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The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Harbados



: 'ABLISHED 1895



Queuille Will Make

Another

Attempt |

To Form Government

PARIS, March 7.

HENRI QUEUILLE—Radical—to-day accepted President
Vincent Auriol’s invitation to make another attempt to
form France's fourteenth post-war Cabinet.

: ‘He had already tried once and had failed. Two other
Politicians, popular Republican leader, Georges Bidaul,
and Socialist Guy Mollet have also failed.

The President’s approach to Queuille was made 12
hours after the National Assembly had rejected Mollet.

Sugar Rationing
Is Unnecessary
Says Lord Lyle

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 7.

Sugar rationing for Britain is
unnecessary, Lord Lyle said today,
Speaking in London at the An-
nual General meeting of Tate
and Lyle he told shareholders
that, there. was two and a_half
million ‘tons of sugar available
for, which no dollars were needed.
Dr. Edith Summerskill had stated
that Britain’s unrationed require-
8g were 2,325,000 tons annual-

y.

“Why does the Food Minister
hesitate?” asked Lord Lyle. “Not
because sugar isn’t available. No‘
uge it is going to cost us

Ss,

IT strongly suspect that it is
largely due to absurd and slumsy
financial manoeuvres with which
the planners attempt to hide the
rising ‘cost of living”.

In. his, speech Lord Lyle .al
referred to the possibilities of the
natidnalisation of the sugar indus-
try in this country. He said that
with! the help of Mr. Cube, Tate
and, Lyle had won the first round
and that the decision to transfer
to public ownership the British
Sugar Corporation could be taken
as an inference that sugar refining
had been dropped from the nation-
alisers’ list.

The proposed nationalisation of
the already publicly owned sugar
beet industry was presumably a
sop to the nationalisers, but Tate
and Lyle would not fear compe-
tition with a state owned industry
as long as competition was “fair
and above board.”

Export sales of Tate and Lyle
last year amounted to 670,000
tons with a total value of 29,000
000 pounds and involved trade
with 55. separate countries.

A report showing a gross profit
of 3,400,000 pounds was adopted.



FIRE ON BROADWAY

- . NEW YORK, March 7

Two hundred firemen fought
seven hours in Broadway today
to control a fire which may have
been started by a. careless .cigar-
ette smoker.

More than 50 firemen were
treated for smoke poisoning and
minor injuries. The blaze broke
out in a sub-basement six storey
building occupied by a paper box
company.—Reuter.

EXCHANGE MISSIONS

NEW DELHI, March 7

The Indian Government and
the Government of Western Ger
many have agreed to exchang
diplomatic missions at legation
level as early as possible, the In-
dian . External Affairs Ministry
announced today.

India ended her state of war
with Germany on January 1 this
year.—Reuter,



—Reuter.

Ships Before

Customs Union
Says Gazette

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 7.

Plans for a-unified West Indies
Customs Union are unreal if con-
sidered apart from the question of
better communications both be-
tween the islands and between
the West Indies and Britain.
This is the view expressed to-day
by the British Export Gazette
which has been campaigning
vigorously in this country during
the past few months for improved
United Kingdom—Caribbean ship-
ping services.

The Gazette declares itself
wholeheartedly in favour of the
creation of stable and less de-
pendent economy in the Britisn
Caribbean which is the ultimate
aim of the preposed Customs
Union. But it points out that
plans for such a Union cannot be
considered without the realisation
of the broader problem of com-
munications.

In this respect, it adds, in con-
trast to the British Government’s
commendable earnestness about
the Customs reform; there has
been delay and every sign of
indifference.

“If only the present bustle of
activity in the cause of Caribbean
Trade were matched by a similar
sense of urgency in regard io
Caribbean communications, then
a more hopeful era could cer-
tainly be said to be beginning for
these potentially resourceful
colonies.”





St. Lucia Appeals
For Assistance

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. LUCIA, March 7.

Up to 6 p.m, on Tuesday, fire
fighters were still engaged in put-
ting out dying blazes which were
likely to prove treacherous later
in the night. Administrator J. M.
Stow to-day issued an appeal for
help, financial and other nature
for sufferers who for the most part
are of the working class and un-
insured.

It has been decided not to ap-
point a Fire Relief Committee as
was done in 1948, instead the local
Red Cxoss Branch under the Chair-
manship of Mrs. J. M. Stow is
delegated to undertake the relief
measure, Two hot meals are being
given daily. The timely gift of
clothing from the London Red
Cross Headquarters is being dis-
tributéd and the Junior Red Cross
link is mdking a house to house
collection of children’s clothing.

It was decided to make accom-
modation for the 1948 victims still
housed in the Vigie barracks in
some.of the unfinished flats in the
reconstruction area and to send
some of the refugees to Vigie.



Woolton Hopes For

Good Negotiations
Between U.K., Argentine

LONDON, March 7,
Biitain’s wartime Food Minister Lord Woolton said io-
day he hoped Anglo-Argentine trade negotiations in Buenos
Aires would be conducted in an amicable manner. Every-
, One in Britain was most anxious, he said, that they would
result not only in agreement but on affording a basis of

-





7

Cuba Produces 6m.
Tons Of Sugar

WASHINGTON, D. C.
Ample world sugar supplies for
1951 are indicateq by current
production figures.

World output of sugar during the
1950—51 crop year is estimated at
almost 42,000,000 tons. This con-
trasts with the 38,000,000 tons
produced during the previous crop
year.

The United States will have a
supply of 12,000,000 tons available
in 1951, according to the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture. Ordin-
‘arily the Nation consumes about
8,000,000 tons annually. This
amount may be increased during
1951 by as much as 500,000 tons
which would be used in the manu-
facture of alcohol for defense pur-
poses,

Comparing the sugar supply
prospects about 10 years ago with
the present situation, The Journal
of ree of New York City
notes that Cuba, one of the largest
producers, now has a peak pro-
duction of 6,000,000 tons. In the
early 1940’s Cuba was producing
half that amount.

, continuous satisfactory trading between the two countries.

Lord Woolton, Conservative,
was speaking in the House of
Lords debate on Britain’s meat
supplies. Recalling that he ha
considerable negotiations with the
Argentine during the war, Lord
Woolton said: “I hope the people
and Government of Argentine,
looking back over the loug and
profitable trade that we had be-
tween two countries, will hasten
to come to an agreement satis-
factory to both of us,

“Trends of trade move up and
down. Sometimes we have a buy-
ers’ market, sometimes a sellers’
market, At present the Argen-
tine are in a strong position. To-
motrow will also be a day and
I am sure it is in the interests
of both our colintries that for very
many tomorrows an easy form o:
trade should flow between us.”

—Reuter.

CHAMPION GETS A

STRIPE FROM EVA
BUENOS AIRES, March 7
Fireman Delfo Cabrerra, win-
rer of the Oiympic marathon in
London in 1948 who yesterday
won the Pan American Marathor
title, was today promoted to firs’
Corporal at Eva Peron’s request
During the ceremony at Police
Headquarters, the Chief of the
Federal Police, Arturo Bertolic
proclaimed a igeneral pardon for
all policemen and firemen guilt:
of petty offences.—Reuter,



iE

THIS SPLENDID PICTURE of schooners in the Inner Basin is a reminder of West Indian communi-

cations to-day, picturesque but







a® &
THURSDAÂ¥, MARCH 8, 1951

OUR SHIPS 4°

sow
oe a

dependent on the weather.



Economic Development

Is First Responsibility.
| Of World ’s Backward Areas

Inspector's House |
Burnt In Grenada !

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, March 7.

New acts of lawlessness coloured
Grenada's strike situation last
night. The worst incident of the
night was the complete destruc-
tion by fire to the two-storey stone
building .residence of Dunstan
Cromwell Price Control Inspector
who since boyhood had ‘ived in
the Woburn district, The house
to-day is worth some £3,000.

Cromwell was awakened from
his sleep around midnight by the
smell of fumes and on rushing to
the upper floor to the bed room
door saw the lower floor aflame
and only had time to rouse the
servant and snatch wildly at a
wardrobe before leaping through
a window to the lower shed roof
which covered the garage. He
landed in safety. The Police ar-
riving from St. George’s shortly af-
ter helped to save the car,

Last night the watchman’
house at Belmont Estate was als
destroyed by fire. Yesterday a
rowdy crowd invaded tie - Dia-
mond Estate and drove off with
the watchman and helped them-
selves to the provisions. Five men
arrested on unlawful assembly
charge on Monday were convicted
and sentenced to terms of impris-
onment ranging from one month
to six months. Gairy yesterday
addressed a gathering of worker:
at Woodlands Estate in tne sugar
belt and asked them to return to-
day but the answer was that they
may resume on Monday. This af-
ternoon a delegation representing
The Chamber of Commerce and
Agricultural Association saw Gov-
ernor Arundell and stressed the
economic plight in the colony as
a result of the strike.

38th Parallel Issue
Still “Academic”

Says U.S. Secretary

WASHINGTON, March 7.

James Webb, Unitea States Act-
ing Secretary of State said to-day
that the question of the United
Nations troops crossing the 38th
parallel in Korea was still “aca-
demic.” United Nations forces
were not in a position to cross the
Parallel and it would be unwise



for him to speculate on their fu- |

ture actions.

Webb was questioned at length
at his Press conference to-day on
MacArthur's statement in Tokyo
that existing limitations would in
time produce theoretical military
stalemate, —Reuter.

THREE KILLED IN
BOMBER CRASH

VIRGINIA, March 7.



A B26 bomber from Lanpiey|him £48

air force base plunged into the

Atlantic late today near an island! told him he had not long to live

off the Virginian shore killing
three men.

It was the second fatal crash
of a bomber from Langley base

in less than 24 hours, The other
crashed last night near Stanton,
Virginia, killing
board.—Reuter

x

SANTIAGO, Chile, March 7,

EUGENE BLACK, President of the International Bank
for Reconstruction and Development, to-day urged that
its internal organisations co-ordinate development of pro-
grammes for the world’s backward areas.

‘in a speech to the United Nations Economie and Social
Council here, he said there was “bewildering multiplicity
channels through which backward areas were being offered

aid.” “Some countries are proceeding
letpntiadasosshenties on purely a national basis” he
added, “Others are acting through
a variety of instruments, both na-
tional and interaational without
‘ae integration among them.

Preniier Of Persia
Assassinated

TEHERAN, March 7.
Persia’s Prime Minister, Gen-

The “very multitude of voices
perhaps urging inconsistent | or
even contradictory policies makes
it difficult to induce developing
eral Ali Razmara, 49, was as-| nations to take some of the pain-
sassinated here today. He was|ful and unpopular decisions that
shot twice this morning at Sol-|are often essential to their fur-
taneh mosque here for a fanatical | ther progress,”
member of the Fedaieh Islam re- International agencies \ beside
ligious congregation and died in | being potentially the most efficient



Sima Hospital, Teheran, an hour | for such work could not be
later. charged with “invading national
Police arrested Razmara’s as- | Sovereignty with economic exploi-

tation or with political diserimina-
tion among different countries”
Black said,

sassin, and two accomplices who
attempted to commit suicide
Their identity was not disclosed. ~

“Finally these agencies seem to

Razmara’s assassination has|me to provide the best and prob-
caused concern among officials in | ably the only way of directing re.
London because it may prejudice sources of national contributors
approval of a new oil agreement | towards the same common pur-
with Britain. poses.”







General Razmara was regarded
as champion of the existing oil
arfangements under which the
British Government owns a big
interest in Persian oil,

Recently he publicly opposed
proposals backed by a. sizable
section in Majlis to nationalise
oil interests. He backed the pre-
sent agreement between the Per-
sian and British Governments
on oil as beneficial to both coun-
tries.

Observers here fear his assass-



Strong Lead Urged

The Bank President suggested
that the United Nat#ons and its
| specialised agencies “take a strong-
er lead in working with member
countries on development and re-
lated problems.”

He said that the world’s back-
ward areas could not escape the
“fundamental fact” that economic
development was primarily their
own responsibility,

“Of all the reforms which we
have s@¢en to be desirable, land

{the most”

both airmen on|

reform is probably the most im-
portant because the whole basis
of development is the land”, Black
said —Reuter.

ination may strengthen forces
pressing for oil nationalisation.
—Reuter.

Will Help In Fight

Against Cancer

NEW YOXK, March 7.
A 36-year-old Brazilian surgeon,
Riven few weeks to live, left here
for home today to raise money to t
fight the disease which is killing | ftalian military authorities.
him. Italian and American official
The surgeon, Dr. Leaureano, is | quarters are observing complete
an expert on cancer, A year ago, | silence on the talks. The Admiral
{he completed plans for setting up
a diagnosis and treatment centre
in his home town.
Then he discovered he had a
malignant form of cancer him
f. Hundreds of his patients and
friends, many of whom he treated
without charge, scraped enough
| money together to send him to the





Sherman Talks
With Italians

ROME, March 7.
Admiral Forrest Sherman, Unit-
ed States Chief of Naval Opera-
ions, conferred here to-day with



It is learned that light British
naval forces will join Italian war-
ships in naval and aerial manoeu-
vres in the Ionian Sea soon, |

Exercises would be under the
overall command of the Italian
Admiral Corso Giraldi. —Reuter.

—$—$$—$-__

CHARLES WINS

Memorial Cancer Research hos
pital in New York—one shoe EZZARD CHARLES, last
maker travelled 75 miles to hand hight defeated Jetyey Joe

Walcott on points in q sched-
uled fifteen-round bout.

‘QUAKE SHOCK FELT
JORHAT, ASSAM, March 7.

An earthguake shock as severe
that which devastated large}

But specialists at the hospital

|“‘few weeks or a month or so at}
Dr. Leaurea‘o said !
| When he gets home to his 25

year-old wife and four-year-old |



as



| daughter, he plans to use himself| areas of Assam last August was;
jas “live propaganda” to rai felt here this morning. It lasted
money for cancer centre and start /two minute but there were no;
‘a training scheme,—Reuter ‘reports of damage ~-Reuter.

' Chinese lay krothers

Advorate

entry

a





PRICE: FIVE CENTS



MacArthur Hints At

“Stalemate” In Korea

ae nennengnnepnaaingenpstatencceelen gel deinen:

Im

Ceilings

OTTAWA, March 7.

Commons gave Government
power last night to impose price
controls. On the heels of the Gov-
ernment reminder that it should
not look for eaily action, Prime
Minister ‘St. Laurent told the
Chamber as it adopted the Em-
ergency Powers Bill that Govern-
ment will not hesitate to use price
ceili when ie can find any os
sonable ground . to. iéve . they
will kK.

He does not want anyone to
get the impression, he said, that

vernment will not impose con-
trols until the country is in some-
thing approaching all out war.

As the debate neared the close
prominent Progressive Conserva-
tive mald leming (Toronto,
Eglington) stepped away. from his
Party's line with the statement
that he is not one of those urging
Government to go rip roaring into
controls on that point. His speech
disagreed with the stand of his
leader vortge Drew who. had
urged the Government a short
time earlier to launch the most
flexible and most effective type of
control as a weapon against infla-
tion.—CP),

Arab Envoy
For Morocco

CAIRO, March 7

The Arab League intends to
send a special envoy to Morocco
to make a first hand study of
conditions there, the League Sec-
retary General Azzam Pasha an-
nounced here today,

The Sultan. of Morocco on
French insistence. . recently. dis-
owned the Istiqual—Nationalist—
movement and the French are also
pressing him to accept adminis-
trative reforms, Anti-French de-
monstrations have been held
among their places in Caito, Alex-
andria, Beirut and Pakistan,

{Adie —Reuter.

ees
. Financial Chief.
Appointed |
PARIS, March: 7

General Dwight D, Eisenhower
today named Guilleaume Le Bigot,
34-year-old French civilian as Fi-
nancial. Chief of the Supreme
Headquarters of the Allied Pow
ers in Europe—S.H.A.P.E.

Le Bigot will have the status
of Assistant Chief-of-Staff in the
S.H.A.P.E.—Major General— on
a level with seven top Staff ap-
pointments announced yesterday,

For the last four years he has
headed the finance section of the
French Defence Ministry serving
as technial adviser to Premier
Rene Pleyen and Defence Minister
Jules Moch,

His appointment completes thu
key staff list in S.H.A.P.E.

—Reuter .





Dissension In
Red Indian Party

BENARES, Northern India,
March 7.
_ A series of differences of opin-
ion “inside the Communist Party
in India” was reported to-day by
Dasgupta, secretary of the Party's
Benares district committee. This
is the first official admission of
dissension in the party.

He made this statement in
denial of a charge by the United
Provinces Minister Lal Bahadur
Shastri that the Communist
Party had decided on a policy for
the ‘armed overthrow of the
government”, He said the allega-
tions were “totally slanderous
and misleading.”

Dasgupta did not indicate what
the differences were about, but
according to unofficial reports,
Indian Communist leadership is
sharply divided om whether to
follow a policy of violence and
sabotage, or of constitutional
methods to achieve the party's
objective: —Reuter,

SIXTY. MORE SHIPS

LONDON, March 7

Sixty ships are to be brought
out of reserve to serve with the
active British Fleet this’ year,
James Callaghan, . Parliamentary
Secretary to the Admiralty said
today.

He told -the Commons - they
would include two destroyers, two



(tents: three submarines, eight

may leave for Athens to-morrow. |

ocean and sea-going and 22 smaller
mine-sweepers, two fast mine lay-
ers and 21 smalicr craft—Reuter.

Prince Rangsit Dies

Of Heart Failure
BANGKOK, March 7.

Prince Rangsit of Chainat, Re-
gent of Thailand, died here today
of heart failure, aged 66.

Prince Rangsit, Chairman of the
Supreme Council of State and of
Council had been in indifferent
health for some months.

—Reuter,



| 5,000 CLERGY IN CHINA

VATICAN CITY, March 7.
Vatican Radio, citing statistics
compiled by a religious institute
said .there are in China, 3,000
foreign and 2,508 Chinese priests:
2,000 foreign and 4,500 Chinese
sisters, and 400 foreign and 682

—Reuter.

_A Step Forward

Canada Gan |
pose Price | U

(By JULIAN BATES).

TOKYO, March 7.

NITED NATIONS troops crossed the Han River
at dawn to-day and after three hours cautious

'advaiice’ rin into heavy small arms and mortar fire
from concealed Communist posts. Under an eight
hundred round a minute gun barrage they had
stormed across east of Seoul as jet planes strafed

and petrol-bombe@ Communist strongpoints

hills.

Koreans Clash
With Tokyo Police

TOKYO, March 7

Four thousand. Koreans shout-
ing anti-American slogans clashed
with 2,000 police in Tokyo today
and injured 27 policemen.

Fifteen Koreans were injured
in the fighting.

The Koreans had crowded into
a school compound for a protest
meeting against the recent police
ban on distribution of anti-
American handbills.

The meeting closed the school
gates on police riot squads, but
eakce called up reinforcements,
broke into the compound and
dispersed Koreans with baton
charges.

The Koreans used sticks and
Stones to hold, off the police
attack.

Koreans involved were sym-

‘pathisers of the North Korean
Communist regime, many being
members of the “Korean Resi-
dents League” broken up by tho
Japanese Government last year
because it was “against occupation
policy”.

It was alleged to have a strong
alliance with the Japanese Com-
munist Party.

Police acted to-day because all
meetings not approved by authori-
ties ate considered illegal.

—Reuter.

Maroceo Is Calm

PARIS, March 7.
General Alphonse Juin, French
Resident General in. Morocco, re-
ferring here to-day to Egyptian
Press reports of disturbances in
Morocco said:, “Never has Maroc-
©o been so chim. If there is any
‘agitation a is pan ae. and at =
ex, oO gy ptian ple.
Never babe preats of Feasn-
ment to France given by the Mos-
lem populations of Morocco been
SO numerous or so moving. It is
these people who have judged and
condemned the methods of vio-
lence used-by a vertain party.
' —Reuter.





BONN, March 7
«West German Chancellor Dr.
Konrad Adenauer, commenting on
the revision of the Allied Occu-
pation Statute announced yester-
day, said this was “indisputably
another step forward.”

Asked what changes in the oc-
cupation statute he thought most
important Adenauer said: “Grant-
ing of freedom to set up our own
Foreign Office and our own For
eign Service are certainly of the
greatest significance’,

—Reuter.

‘















in the

One assault force which crossed
15 miles east of the capital met fire
from self-propelled guns but re-
ported continued advance and

| captured 25 prisoners,

On their right another task force
which crossed at the junction of
the Han and Pukan Rivers met
stiff resistance but took 44 prison-
ers.

Jet planes strafed and_ petrol-
bombed the hills beyond the river.

Over 60 miles to the east on the
extreme right ‘flank of the central
front, Communists threw more
counter-attacks.

Around Changpyong Chinese
troops had hit hard im this area
during the night. An Eighth Army
communique said counter-attacks
were repulsed,

In the centre, United Nations
forces made limited gains up ‘to
1,600 yards against variable resist-
ance, North Koreans attacking in
the east gained about one mile,
forcing South Korean troops to
withdraw to a new defence line
below the road leading from Pang-
nin to the east coast town Kang-
mung.

General MacArthur, United Na-
tions Supreme Commander visited
the front as his forces lunged over
the Han River. He told corre-
spondents that Chinese were ap-
parently preparing a massive
spring offensive. For the first time
he referred to the possibility of a
stalmate.

“Assuming that there is no
dwindling of the enemy's flow
of ground forces and material
to the Korean battle area, con-
tinuation of existing limitations
upon our freedom of counter-
offensive .action and no major
additions to our organisation -
al strength, battle lines cannut
fail in time to reach the point of
a theoretical military stalemate.
“Thereafter our further advance
would militarily benefit the enemy
more than it would ourselves.”
He said.—Reuter.

“NO TIME TO

SPECULATE”

WASHINGTON, March 7.
America believed that a meet-
ing of Big Four Deputies in Paris
afforded an opportunity for a
serious, carefil and deliberate
approach to the examination of
causes and differences between
Russia and the West, Acting Sec-
retary of State Jarmnes Webb said
to-day,

Reporters asked if he was op-
timistic about the prospects of
Deputies agreeing on the agenda
for a proposed meeting of their
Foreign Ministers.

He replied that as the meeting
was still in its very early stages,
it was best not to speculate.
—Reuter.





TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT

ed

: THE

‘STORY OF BOB

AND SALLY .

Sponsored by the National Baby Wel-
fare Council and the British Social Hygiene
Council, is a candid discussion of “an
intimate social problem" dealing chiefly
with the dangers of adolescent ignorance.

While the fictional aspects of this
picture certainly havé their moral, it is the
sheerly documentary aspects which are by
far the more revealing and instructional.

Shown in the United Kingdom under
the title “SHOULD PARENTS TELL”.

Passed by the Barbados Board of Film
Censors for showing to UNMIXED persons

over 16.

wm!
ait

‘Shown

at the

PLAZA THEATRE

BRIDGETOWN



FOR THE GOOD THAT IT CAN DO.





PAGE

7 ck





— Caub Calling

tment of Mr. deL.
jarbadian, awe
Targany ika has just
and will be re-
much satisfac-

Faas ik

FALL INER Y t



Counsel in
Leen announcea
ceived here with
tion,

Mr. Innis vho i
and Mrs . L. Inniss of
ore,” Brittons Hill, was a Barba-
dos Scholar of 1930, After quali-
fying for the Bar he. returned
heme and after a short practice
became Assistant to the Attorney
General ana Magistrate.

He ieft, Barbados cn his appoint-
ment as Legal Draughtsman in
Tanganyika. For some time he
acted as Solicitor General and now

a son of Mr,
“Glen-




has been appointed to the post of &

Crown Counsel. | =
His many friends will join in to \K
congratulations to him and to his e

parents, ae MARC

Interested “The lady's an Mi

RE you interested in having She's been asking for

particulars of your club in- something that wood

look equally chic worn by
@ lady or a gentleman.
London Ervress Servtes.

T.C.A.’s Stores Inspector

R. R. D. TRITT, T.C.A.’s
Stores Inspector for the Ca-
ribbean Region arrived from Can-
“ via Bermuda yesterday by
T.C.A. He is here until Saturday,
when he leaves for Trinidad.
He was in Bermuda for one
week, Mr. Tritt is staying at the
Hastings Hotei.

beng te in the 1951 Year Book? If

please send all such particulars
to the Advocate Company Limited
en or before March 21st.

Publishing Business

R. M. R, CHIPMAN arrived

from Canada yesterday morn-
ing by T.C.A. to join his wife
who is already holidaying in Bar-
bados. Mr, Chipman whose home
is in Montreal is in the publishing
business. He is the Montreal Di-
rector of Maclean-Hunter Pub-
lishing Company. He is here for
about ten days, staying at the
Marine Hotel,

Remaining On

RINIDAL'S Cuarnival Queen,
Miss Christine Gordon, who

Different Directions

R. & MRS. HAROLD DAHL
and their three children

left Barbados yesterday in dif-
was supposed to have returned to + wipe, te agape meet iintiee e
Trinidad yesterday afternoon p'G," Girect, while Mr Dahl
changed her mind at the last jor \esterday afternoon for Tri-
minute and has decided to remain nidad by B. Wy. 1A. He will join
en for a longer holiday. Along pig wife and family shortly in
with Eve Anderson and Lance d€ Ganada, Arriving from Vene-
Montbrun they are staying ON Juela a couple of weeks ago
until Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. they have been holidaying in
Walter Marshall at Aquatic Gar- Barbados staying at the Barbados
dens, Aquatic Club. Mr. Dahl is with
Mr. Landy de Montbrun and “Canam” Agencies in Venezuela.

the remainder of his troupe of
artistes returned to Trinidad yes- Cut Short Holiday
& MRS. H. W. MAC-

terday afternoon by B.W.LA.
Those leaving were Clyde Rivers, MBE;
Dorothy de Montbrun, June Main- KENZIE who arrived from
got, Peter Pitts, Daisy Creque ani Canada February 13th cut short
Clifford Corbin. their holiday to return to Canada
Burma Bridegroom yesterday morning by T.C.A.

Fee's - s. They were ariginally supposed to
NRYZ has just reached me this stay until April 14th.

week of the marriage in the Mr. Mackenzie is a Salesman
Southern Shan States of Burma of with Dominion Textiles in Mon-
Sao Hseng Ong, son of the Presi- trea), They were staying at the
— of the Burmese Union, = Crane Hotel. ’
budians who were at I.C.T,A, an
'Trinidadians may recall that ns
was for a time a student at the
Imperial College of Tropical Agri-

culture.

* ‘ eo8 years ago is now at te London
Married in Trinidad School of Economics preparing 4
MoM". BETTY KEENE of Bar- thesis on “The West Indian Econ-
hedos became the bride of omic Development 1790-—1880,”
Mr, William Woodcock, son of for his M.Sc. degree in Economics,
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Woodcock Graduating at Toronto University,
of Diego Martin, Trinidad at Brown served with the Canadian
Greyfriar’s Church on Saturday Army during the last war, He
March 3. She is the daughter of jis looking forward to returning to

Mrs. Ivy Barrera. Jamaica.

Jamaican Scholar

AMAICAN-B ORK Douglas
Brown who left Jamaica 10



‘Puerto

Dua! Business

RRIVING by T.C.A. yester-

day morning from Canada
were Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Ralph
who are here on two weeks holi-
day, staying at the Marine Hotel.
Mr. Ralph has a dual business,
he is the proprietor of Ralph's
Drug Store and Ralph’s Travel
Service. He ts both a Pharmacist
and a Travel Agent.

Off to U.S.
R. E. D. INNISS of Messrs
T. S. Garraway & Co.,, is
due to leave for the U.S.° via

Rico this morning for
medical attention at the Medical
Centre in New York.

Mr. Inniss is a member of the
Board of Management of the
Barbados Cricket Association.

Romantic Emigration

R. HAROLD MOODY, son of
the late Dr, Harold Moody,
will, I hear, shortly be leaving
Britain for New Zealand to settle
there. A few months ago, Dr.
Moody visited New Zealand to-
gether with MacDonald Bayley
and Arthur Wint to take part in
athletic sports. While there, he
grew to like the country and fell
in love with a New Zealander,
He hopes to get married soon
after his arrival in New Zealand,

On Holiday
OW ON HOLIDAY in London
is Dr. Lionel A. Francis,
member of the Belize City Council,
British Honduras. Last week he
visited many places, including the

Privy Council, the Colonial Office

and the headquarters of the
League of Coloured Peoples. He
hopes to travel in the provinces
soon.

Cultura! Links
ISS BERYL MCBURNIE,

BARBADOS



The Hostess With The B.B.C. Radio|

ADVOCATE



Mostest On The Ball Programme

(By ANNE EDWARDS)

A YEAR in Europe transforms the world’s best-known -
party-giver into a living lesson on how to be very,

diplomatic indeed.

verv

The world’s gayest party giver the world you'll always find me

is a changed ‘Woman. Mrs, Perle
Mesta, once. the most talkative
hostess in America, is now an ex-
pert in the Diplomatic -Art of Say-
ing | Nothing.

Mrs. Mesta is an oil and steel
heiress. She has Pa the social
stock market all her peg he:
played it well. Last year Presi
dent Truman made her U.S. Min-
ister to Luxemburg—the reward,
it was said, of 30 years of politi-
oat cone publicised) party giving.

Mrs. Mesta was
sovge ‘aon to tell about her par-
ties,

“It costs about £4,000 to put on
a buffet,” she once explained.

That duet

And everyone heard the story
of how one of her guests, leading
Senator Tom Connally, once sang
“wy Old Kentucky Home”
close harmony duet with Defence
Secretary Louis Johnson.

But, as a one-year-old diplo—
mat, Mrs. Mesta is not telling any
more—especially not about her
parties,

In London yesterday, “for —
week's holiday and to see ol
friends,” she was a mixture of the.

old professional hostess and a new _

very, very diplomatic diplomat,
Bustling into a large room set
with chairs for 60 people she was
not in the least disconcerted to
find there were only 16. She shook
hands all round briskly, with the
air of a woman dismissing a thou-
sand “Thanks-it-was-wonderful.”
She settled herself in the corner
of a Claridge’s settee, flung one
arm gracefully across the back,
crossed grey-nyloned legs, and
threw us a charming and vital

Director of the “Little Carib” cmile

theatre, Trinidad, was the star of
a lecture-demonstration of West
Indian folklore and dances given
in London last week. The show,
presented by the increasingly
active West Indian Students’
Union was in aid of the “Little
Carib” Theatre.

Miss McBurnie has recently com-
pleted a tour of Spain, France and
North Africa in search of cultural
links with the West Indies.

Food Distributor
R. AND MRS. C. J. McNEELY
of Vancouver arrived from

Cenada yesterday morning by
T.C.A. to spend about ten days
holiday in Barbados, after which ),
they plan to spend another ten
days in Grenada Mr. McNeely is
a Food Distributor in Vancouver.
He runs his own business, C. J
McNeely Company Limited.

Two New Publications
WO NEW WEST INDIAN pub-
lications made their debut
last week, They are “West Indies
Survey and Annual Trade Direc-
tory”, edited by Trinidadian J.
Claude MeNish; and “The British

West Indies’ by W. L. Burn,
Professor of Modern History,
King’s College, Durham,



BY THE WAY! Junior Short Story Competition

By Beachcomber

any edition of any The Evening Advocate invites

N

i paper nowadays you may
read something like this: Also
travelling in the plane were two
armadillo, a giant

almost

antelopes, an
herring, four baboons, and two] words in length, and must reach The Children’s
emus, Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesday every week.

Day and night\animals are on
the move from z00 to zod. But
why should 146,000 ants travel
10,000 miles? Could they not have
been collected nearer home, and
brought by train to London? And
who ‘counted them on arrival?

A Siamese nobleman once sat Name ......++ see ee eeeees
on an anthill in Surrey during a A
picnic, On the way back to Lon- BO cece enccee tee enees
don alone he became aware of a
certain discomfort, so he removed School ..........0050+:
his trousers and shook them out of
the window of his compart- WA sic vets ees vens ne
ment. « . « '

) : Home Address ..... otek
“Not in These Trousers”
He said see e eee eee ee ene eeee
. . ALAS! He lost his grip of Title of Story ......++.+++>

the trousers, and a wanton wind
carried them away into a charm-
ing meadow of buttercups. At
Waterloo the porters said, “’E
orta be locked up, that’s what ’e
orta be.” The stationmaster was
summoned, and he asked the dis-
consolate nobleman what he
thought he was doing, going
rownd like that. Our dusky hero,
hiding his skinny legs with a mac-
intosh, said haughtily, “I am a
Siamese nobleman.” “And_ I,”
roared the stationmaster, “am the
Queen of Syria.’ And so on, until
a secretary of Legation or some-
thing arrived to identify and
rescue the unwilling ee of the
ants,
ine Elusive Charwoman

OT very democratic,” is the

phrase used by political
commentators to describe the new
habit of Cabinet Ministers of
creeping into the House late, and
then trying to hide while they are
being criticised. The next step
will be disguises. “Mr. Speaker,
is it in order for that charwoman
to crouch behind the Member—
nay, the honourable Member for
Catileborough?” (Shouts of “I spy
a stranger!’’). The Speaker then
rose to say, “That is not a char-
woman. That is the Minister of
Bubbleblowing.” (Government
cheers and laughter.)

= MATINEE March

gg FRIDAY 9th
EMPIRE







its Junior Short Story Competition.
every Monday in The Evening Advocate,
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery.
ean be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 306

NOTE: Stories must not be copied.
Send this coupon with your story,

ee ieee a
BARBADOS DRAMATIC CLUB

PRESENTS

Under the Distinguished Patronage of
His Excellency the Governor, Sir Alfred Savage,
K.C.M.G., and Lady Savage

BA MURDER as teen
ARRANGED

THRILLER
M MARCH 15th & 16th 8.30p.m.

eBOX OFFICES OPEN

all children under 12 to enter for

The best story will be published
and the winner will receive
The stories

Editor, The Advocate

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION



16th 530 SHARP

AT 8 A.M.

THEATRE ®

el
BE RRP ERR Ree eee ee ee

we New 36 in. EASTER

aDress Assortment

* Cordrosa’
“Invictaray ”

Lystav,

White

5

Slipper Satin,
MAROCAIN, | in

EVANS &

i MOUG

(at

Tootal Lombia,
Tobralco

fine draping corded crepe

Printed rayon — white grounds
Whitfields}
NEW SHADES.

WHITFIELDS

Robia

Just arrived

Dial 4220



le.
QUESTION.—Are you still in-
terested in giving parties?

“The only kind I'm interested
in are the ones I give for the
G.I.s. No matter where I am in

Jamaica Bound
ORD and LADY BROWNLOW
are at this moment on their

5

“i them American food.

in

* est. on the Continent.



ck on the first of every month s

meet my G.I.s”
.QUESTION.—Do you give them
ch food?

At. the American Embassy I
Ham,

ked beans, apple pie, ice cream,

ilk, and champagne.”

QUESTION. — What do you
think of the play written about
you in New York?

“If I could be as good a diplo-
mat as Ethel Merman is an actress
—I'd be happy.’

QUESTION, — What is your
recive for a successful hostess?

“No rules. I guess I just like
people. I invite the ones who
get on and the ones who don't,
and just put ‘em all together.”

QUESTION. — Do you find Fie
Luxemburg off the beaten track?
“Not at all.

hours frem Paris by car. And,

We're only four

of course, my old friends make

e detour. It’s a beautiful coun-
The people are marvellous.

e legation is one of the loveli-





e and visit me sometime.”

‘London’ Yes, she loved Lon-
‘don, too. ’
Maybe we have underestimated

‘Mirs. Mesta. She is an able wo-
man, a noted charmer even at 68,
and shrewd enough to know when
her technique needs tailoring.

"Tl like my job—it’s
tive,’ she said.

You must

construc-

“I get up at 8 a.m. and work
the same as any other diplomat,

but twice as hard.
the State Department means i

Working for
lot

of notes to Foreign Ministers and

things like that.

“In any
light-hearted job,” said
Mesta, pulling down her skirt.

case, it never was a
Mrs.

“What the world needs now is not

parties but Courage and Sacrifice.
I say so in all my speeches.”
L, E. 8.



Trinidad Priest

OLIN BRYAN, formerly Assis-

tant West

Indian, Liaison

way to Jamaica on board the Officer at the Colonial Office has
ided to become a Roman
tholic priest. Bryan went to
ritain during the Second World
War to join the R.A.F. When the

Jamaica Producers ship North
Star. With them is the wife of
Lt, Col. W. H. Bromley-Daven-
port, Conservative M.P., and Lady
Brownlow’s cousin, They are go-
ing to St. Ann’s Bay on the north
of the Island where, Lord Brown-
low has a house at Roaring River.
He also has considerable house
property in the Bahamas, which
the party will visit later in the
trip.

war

was over he studied Social

Science at the London School of

before joining
Office staff. He
leave England for Rome

Economics
Colonial
shortly

the
will

where his academic course for
the priesthood will begin with a

study of philosophy.

Rupert and the Coughdrop—42_



pals wrt a
s bur BO One appears on the




it
7 Teer sa

Kee,

Rer
wood." Whoever brought it must
hav known that we were all here."

a know what it is,” shouts Rupert.
“ That must have been Santa Claus
who knocke The sack’ $ 100 big
to go down the chimney! | Look,
Mammy, will you open it? Then,
we _shall_know if I'm right 1"

s2v8

the small folk at Nut-




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MARGARET LOCKWOOD -
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“7@_ =O§KACcH.

BEEN WAITING FOR,

THURSDAY, aa 8, 1951
6 30 a m—Ie 15 pm 19.76 M.

The News. 7.10 am. News
7.15 a.m. From the Editorials.

7.0 00 a.m.
Analysis.

7.25 am. Programme Parade, 7.30

What Is Psychology .7 50 a.m Interlude

800 a.m, saotenee Choice. 8 45 a.m

Humour. 9% 00 a. 9 10 a.m.

Home News From, Britain, 915 a.m.
lose Down. 11.15 a.m.

Parade. 11.25 a.m ners Choice. 11.45

Liste
World Affairs.
12,10 p.m News Analysis, 12 15
m Close Down.
fas P.m.—6.00 pm. 19.76 M,

"i 415 pm, Listeners Choice, 5.

a.m.
.



Pp 2.
Cheltenham Gold Cup, 5 15 p.m.
Magazine. 5 45 p.m. Melody on Scien
600 p.m. bee ‘Digest.
600 p m —7 15 p.m, 2% 64 M. & 31.32 M.
6.30 pm Overtutas, | 658 .
gramme Parade. 700 p m
710 pm _ News speees : », p.m,
Britain. 7 45 p -
745 p.m.—11.60 he 34.32 w 43 M.
Radio Newsreel. 8.15) Pp -
sir Sone Mail's past sovaner, 4 8 45 p.m
Composer of the Week, 9 00 Special

Dispatch. 9.15 p.m, tave'k "9 43pm.
Deo You Remember. 10 00 Pp m The
News. 1010 pm. From the Editorials.
it's m Take It From Here, 10 45
ae ing Around Britain. 11 00 p.m.

usic of Sid Ss Phillips ‘a and His Band.

MISSION
LAGOS.

An American girl missionary, of
Seattle, arrived at Lagos last week-
end on her way to Jos in Nigeria.
There she will act as pilot of the

aeroplane used by the Sudan Inte-
rior Mission for flying mission-
aries to their centres. She is the
first woman pilot to engage in such
work in Nigeria.
-_- —

Creer)





Across

Birdlike boxer, (5)

5. Difficult to Kiss on them? (4)
Â¥. You'll neea a true dome to gauge

rain. (8)

Silent for a change. (6)
Bape to do hoiey work. (4)
Good nume for a surgeon? (5)
. Sort of noise t Across would

make, (5)
. Nothing in all three tetters. (3)
» What the pisces delivered. (6)
HG raat feat e iP rt?
. Human feature from Tripoli. 14
Beast o! burden eI

{
Aee of. “ner admiration, (3)
Rum, Ben could count it. (6)
+. Down
- The thunder of a mute final ? (v7)
2 Dialect. (8) 40
3 Homeaic. so we find it sat in
. Is there such a thing as a nigh
one in America? (4)
5 Tt Jargon of tramping tinkers

. Pee) set on top or the Caure:
» AT pores one
popping (6) - (8)
A tow islet. (3) 8. Space. (4)
Solution of gesterdar buzzie
. Loofan 12

Viewles to vei 4a pe.
vi nt; 14, Al 15, G
wh "fs foog. - Era: Bs
Rpa ewan" 2. Impede
g,, Siyosinne

18 Tret’ 20

4
6.
‘ ritece Or being 1Y Across. (3)
3

one

— Across:

s, Onaser:
es: 17 Soap

fight your
HEADACHES

hile they're slight!



When headaches start —
due to worry, overwork, over in-
dulgence—be smart, take Alka-
Seltzer right away. Sparkling
effervescence makes Alka-Seltzer
pleasant-tasting, helps its pain-
killing caalguals go to work

fast. Keep it handy.

Fee

Alka-Seltzer id

yy
DON’T

smear RAZOL pomade on
HAIR. Take it on the comb
and work it thoroughly
|| through the HAIR, forward
| first, then backward, until
miost of it comes back out.
Soft paper can then be used
to wipe away surplus and
to dress the hair to a finish.
The above course, will give
very desirable results.

If your dealer hasn't
a POMADE, phone

BORNN'S BAY RUM Co.








ROT HL Tee

Atay ie










THURSDAY,



MARCH §&, 1951



—_

——— oe MVMOMm
PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 4.45 & 6.0 p.m (Paramount)

Barbara John
STANWYCK LUND

in NO MAN OF HER OWN

A PARAMOUNT THRILLING DRAMA!



accilieamesinctbisbitnintenietninsiagtita
MAT. TO-DAY—1.30 p.m

x" and
“DEATH VALLEY RANGERS”
Ken MAYNARD

(Monogram)
Leo GORCEY & the BOWERY BOYS in}
“MR. HE

— Hoot GIBSON

IDAY 9th 2.30
Ingrid BERGMAN - Bing ‘CROSBY

“BELLS OF ST. MARY'S”

| By Special Request
FRI



Opening Friday 9th Women 4.45 & Men 8.30 p.m.

oom
PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

(RKO-Radio Technicolor Adventure)

TO-DAY

FAIRBANKS, dnr.

(Only) 5 & 4.30 p.m,

cece peepeswn ete liptnsecienneinamentinimmesteesneinarin th
Friday 5 & 8.30 p.m, and Continuing
VA ee ee ie eee

TRON’ SMAN re

Gordon McRAE — Rory CALHOUN



Maureen
O'HARA



“Stery of Bob & Sally”

“SINBAD the SAILOR”

MIDNITE 10th (Monogram)

Leo ee i * Peres BoYs

a,
Roddy

NIGHT”

ck
Lynne Thomas

jowall



GAITET Y—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TO-NITE 8.30 (Monogram Double)

RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL & DEATH VALLEY RANGERS

with Tom KEENE

FRID., SAT., SUN. 8 30 p m
MAT. SUN. 5 P.M. (RKO)
“BACK te BATAAN”
with John WAYNE
Anthony QUINN

FAIRBANKS, nr.



Ken MAYNARD — Hoot GIBSON

by Sey SAT. 10 (RKO)
jouglas Maureen

O'HARA in
“SINBAD the SAILOR”

Color by Technicolor
oo

GLOBE THEATRE

TO-DAY = & 8.30 P.M. LAST SHOWING
. ARTHUR RANK’S

“SLEEPING CAR TO TRIESTE”
Jean KENT and Albert LIEVENT

Fr OPENING TO-MORROW AND CONTINUING

—

“THE GUN AND THE MEN BEHIND IT”

— OO CC ee eee,
The Roaring Story of the Gun that Won the West!

ley WINTERS |

Stay fresh all day long —use Lifebuoy Toilet Soap.
in your daily bath or shower and whenever you
wash. Lifebuoy’s deep-cleansing lather really
frees you of weariness, keeps you looking fresh ,
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FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

Dan DURYEA

with MILLARD MITCHELL » Chades Drake + John Melntire » Will
Screenplay by ROBERT L. RICHARDS and BORDEN CHASE + Dicected by ANTHONY MANN +

PLUS TONITE
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE



CLAYTON THOMPSON Singing

SAM NILES Singing .
FELIX STRAUGHN Singing

Geer « «Jo. loon

Produced by AARON ROSENBERG’

“All The Time”

. “Who Put The Whiskey in The Well”

“Lucky Ole Sun"

EDWARD MARSHALL Singing “Four Winds and Seven Seas”

DORIEN THOMPSON Singing

BYRON ROLLOCK Si’nging

“Wildest Gal in Town”
“Bewitched, Bothered,
and Bewildered”

GUEST STAR:
FITZ HAREWOOD — ist Super Star Winner

PIT 16c; HOUSE 30c;

EMPIRE

Today 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing

Universal ne
Presents .

Yvonne De ‘CARLO
Richard GREENE in

“THE DESERT HAWK”

with Jackie Gleason
and Lois Andrews

Special Saturday Morning
Show at 9.30

“BILL and C00”

AND

“ SHERIFF of WICHITA”

Starring
Allan (Rocky) LANE

ROXY
Today & Tomorrow

4.30 & 8.15 p.m.
Republic Whole Serial

“DAUGHTER of DON Q”

Starring Adrian BOOTH,
Kirk ALYN

with Leroy MASON
and Roy BANCROFT



BALCONY 40c; BOXES 54c.

ROYAL

Today & Tomorrow
4:30 & 8.30 p.m.

Eagle Lion Double

Scott BRADY and
Jeff CAREY in

“CANON CITY”

AND

“MICKY”

Starring Lois BUTLER
and Bill GOODWIN

- OLYMPIC

Today to Saturday
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Republic Smashing Double
Ken Murray's Production

“BILL and €00”

AND

“SANDS of [WO JIMA”

Starring John WAYNE
and Adele MARA





a



a LEVER vnopver





THURSDAY, MARCH 8,

1951



Paper From
Bagasse

LONDON
The use already being made in

various parts of the world of
sugar cane bagasse for paper
manufacture is discussed today

in a letter from a representative
of technical consultants, Middle-
sex.

The writer, Mr. R. Duce, does
not want further time wasted on
“investigations” into whether ba-
gasse is suitable or not for paper
making, He wants “energetic
application of what is already
known to actual production of
paper”. Developments in this
question, he said, are far beyond
the experimental stage. He goes
on—

“Fine papers made from 95 per
cent bagasse have been produced
commerciaily since 1941 in the
Philippines by a company to
whom we are technical consult-
ants. That these papers are sold
in Manila in open unprotected
competition with comparable
grade imported American papers
would seem to prove beyond
doubt the technical and economic
soundness of the process.

‘Further,
sugar producers in Brazil has
placed a contract with us for the
erection of a complete bagasse
pulp and fine paper mill, to be
erected in the state of Sao Paulo;
production is expected to begin
in 1952. We have also specified
and shipped the complete pulp
mill equipment for a bleached
bagasse pulp production of twen-
ty tons per day to Bihar Pro-
vinee, India, and this plant is ex-
pected to go into production very
shortly. Another smaller plant is
being constructed in South India.

“As for the supply of bagasse,
sugar mills generally are so de-
signed as to burn the maximum
quantity of this material to avoid
the embarrassment of stocks ac-
cumulating. Bagasse for paper-
making can be provided partly
by improving the efficiency of the
existing steam-raising boilers,
and also by using alternative fuel,
such as coal ‘or oil. The yield of
high-grade pulp bagasse fully
justifies this substitution of an
alternative fuel, even though the
prices for the latter are relative-
ly high, especially in view of tle
current very high price being
fetched by pulp, and its great
searcity throughout the world.

“The use of bagasse for paper-
making has special significance

for the Commonwealth because
of our comparative dependence
on the already overtaxed wood

supplies of North America and
Scandinavia. The only other
principal source of suitable wood
is Soviet Russia and her satellites,
such as Poland”,



WHAT RUSSIA GOT

In helping the Soviet Union
defeat Hitler, the Uniteq States
delivered to Russia more than
14,700 planes, 7,000 tanks, 52,000
jeeps, 35,000 motorcycles, 375,000
trucks, 186 naval vessels, and vast
quantities of communications
equipment, medical supplies, and
other war materials.

AGE OF MIRACLES?

LISBON.

A 36-year-old housewife has
cured a paralytic by saying “Get
up and walk.” She claims to feel-
ing a “special power within her”
and has cured. also a deaf-mute
and a bling boy, The police are
investigating but the woman is
poor and has not derived any profit
from her cures.

DIAMOND FEVER

CAPETOWN

Diamond fever has gripped the
northwestern section of Cape
Province with the discovery of
diamonds on q farm about 280
miles from here. Interest con-
tinues despite a statement by the
Department of Mines that the
stones are of the industrial type
and not found in large quantities.















KITE . TIM

WE HAVE

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suy now: — Advocate Stationery
























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Trinidad Govt.
Consider Loan
Of $12,000,000

(From Our Own Cerrespendent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 5.

The Trinidaqg Government is
considering the raising of a $12,-
000,000 joan as the first step in car-
rying out the $38,000,000 Five Year
Eccnomic Programme. The Fi-
nancial Secretary, Hon. A. R. W.
Robertson said in Port-of—Spain
the programme was flexible. Gov-
ernment intende@ on the
programme not adhering to it.

The of State for the
Colonies has ai given ap
proval to the 1951 estimates which
showed a surplus of $55,441 rev-
enue. It is proposed to spend
around $15,000,000 on waterworks
schemes which have been given
first priority.

Government is now preparing
legislation to provide for the set-
ting up of a Statutory body to ad-

minister the Railways t
and it is proposed to spend $650,-
000 for the purchase of equipment

and new buses.

SAFE

NEW YORK.

American Robert Dowling,
chairman of Civil Defence, said
that—thanks to the big preponder-
ance of steel and concrete in its
buildings—Manhattan “is the saf-
est city in the world” to be in if
the balloon goes up and the atom
bomb comes down.





False Dream

JOHANNESBURG:

After dreaming that a fortune
was buried in a cemetery near
Pietretief, Transvaal, an African
went there and opened up a
gave. But all he found was the
skeleton of General J. C. Kemp,
Minister of Agriculture in the
first Nationalist Party Cabinet of
1924. The African was s
to four months’ imprisonment for
desecration .

T’DAD. FIRE _DEPT,

MADE SEPARATE UNIT
PORT-OF-SPAIN,
The Trinidad legislature yester-
day approved a bill amending the
Fire Brigade Ordinance divorcing
firefighters from the police force
and setting up a separate unit.
Under the amended legislation,
a bystander refusing to help at
fires when called upon by the Fire
Chief, is liable to imprisonment
or $120 fine,
Policemen now serving in the
Fire Department may choose
which service they prefer.—C.P.

Accident

ROME;

An Italian army Lieutenant,
aged 22, whose arm was cut off
in a car crash in North Italy,
walked into a hospital eras
the arm in his hand. When -





tors told him they could do
nothing about the arm, he
answered, “At least you can

unstrap my gold wrist watch”.

ON THE AIR

BERLIN.

On the air in Berlin this week
for the first time was Nessem
Tiranem Smert—‘The Free Voice
of Russia.” It promised to call
the Ukraine and Red Army men
in Germany twice daily and to
transmit in German to the Soviet
Zone.



Kidnapped

BRUSSELS:
Ukrainian ga
rl was kidna m a
Fists tram months
ago and has since been held in
the Soviet Embassy in Brussels.
The Government has over-ruled
claims from a Catholie refugee
organisation, who brought her
from Germany as a displaced
rson, that she was kidnapped
‘rom their cate. The girl has been
granted .permission to return to

A 13-year-old




PRICES










“ery
“Coane
lee
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Ltd.



Australia Planning
Defence Stockpiles

SYDNEY, Feb.

The National Security Resources
Board is considéring stockpiling
rubber, bauxite and sulphur for
Australian defence.

Rubber is needed chiefly for
aircraft and motor vehicle tires.
Bauxite is used in making alu-
minum, and sulphur for making
explosives.

overnment officials say that
federal ministers have already
made it clear that rubber is in
short supply, and with increased
defence commitments the shortage
will be more pronounced.

American overseas buying has
cut down the amount of rubber
available to other importing coun-
tries.

Bauxite is considered plentiful
at the moment. Deposits at the
reserves of the Australian Alu-
minum Commission are estimated
at about 8,600,000 tons. But in the
event of war consumption would
increase rapidly.

Australia has fairly adequate
stocks of sulphur, but with in-
creased American buying for its
own sek ong. needs, officials
expect that the National Research
Board will Yecommend the estab-
lishment of a reserve.

U.S. Aid To Europe

United States aid to Eurcpean
countries between the end of
World War II and 1947 totalled
$11,000,000,000, In the first three
years of the Marshall Plan,
another $11,500,000,000 was spent
making a total of 24 times the
entire cost of running the U.S.
Government in 1940.

U.S’ HELP FOR KOREA
By 1950 United States economic
assistance to the Republic of Korea,
including food, fertilizers, raw
materials and medical supplies
amounted to more than $500,000,-



SOIT ee
4 4

e@ LINDEN BLOSSOM

LEATHER

“SCRUBS

BARBADOS



“’Moruing, Rockefeller’?
“Morning, Nuffield”

Trinidad Forgers
Face Idleness

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 5.

Hon, A. R, W. Roberston who
recently returned from the United
Kingdom said in an interview that
special precautions gre being taken
over notes printed for use in the
proposed scheme for a uniform
currency in the Eastern Group of
the British Territories. This means
that Trinidad forgers will most
likely go out of “business”. The
notes will be in circulation by
June next.



TRINIDAD APPOINTS
EFFICIENCY EXPERT

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 5.
An “Efficiency Expert”

in’ the ‘Gomes, Minister of Labour.

ADVOCATE

London Express Service



Unique

PARIS:

: A French soldier in Indo-China
this week underwent an operation
for the removal of a live 2.4 in,
mortar bomb from his left thigh
It was successfull and the bomb
was later exploded in a wood.
The operation is believed to be
unique in French Army Medical
Corps history.



300 SUGAR WORKERS
STRIKE AT CARONI

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 5.

Three hundred Caroni workers
have gone on strike in the sugar
areas. Stoppage of work started
on February 20, Mr. Hochoy, Com-
missioner of Labour held talks with
the Hon, Mitra Sinanan, and also
interviewed the Hon.



Albert from St
They

PAGE THREE



Plague

VANCOUVER, March

Russell Davis, 26-year-old sci
ence graduate, ts helping to track
down bubonic plague, one
mankind’s oldest and most
rible enemies.

He catches rats, which with the
fleas that infest them apparently
even today in British Columbia
carry germs of the “black death,”
the disease that once killed a
quarter of Europe’s population

Authorities say they expect there
never will be a recurrence of the
dread disease on the scale of the
great London outbreak in the
17th Century, Twelve years of
research has indicated the plague
reservoir is small,

People now are cleaner thar
those of the Middle Ages and are
Tess likely to be bitten by the
germ, authorities say. New drugs
can combat, the disease and doc-
tors today can recognize the
plague and isolate cases immedi-
ately to forestall an epidemic.

Davis is on a_ scientific team
called the Rodent Plague Survey
For 12 years this group has
combed British Columbia's rat
population in search of the plague
germ,

No Cause for Alarm

They have found the first, but
refuse to say where. They an-
nounced merely that the plague
bacteria had been found in the
flesh of a gopher “trapped some-
where in the interior.”

They said this was not a reason
for alarm, but indicated the need
of caution and continued research,

The provincial government took
over the survey work last year
The research group now is under

the Department of Claude R.
Stonehouse, Chief Sanitary In-
spector.

Russell Davis is the lone field
man, Most of his testing is done
in a Kamloops laboratory

From May to September he
tours the interior, trapping rats
and shooting gophers. He kills
tthe animals with cyanide gas,
thus immobilizing their fleas at the
same time, Then he combs the
rodents’ hair for the fleas and
dissects the body for tissues to be
studied,

He has been inoculated against
the plague germ.

“T guess this is one of the most
peculiar missing-persons hunts
yet,” Davis said, “It often seems
like looking for a needle in a
haystack.”—(C.P.)

Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

Marea Henti-

M.V. Sedgefield, Seh

etta, Sch. Emanuel, C. Gordon, Sch

United Pilgrim §., Sch. Anita H., Yacht

Caribbee, Sch, Burma D., Sch. Henry
Sch. Lady Noeleen, Sch

D. Wallace,
Laidalpha, Sch, Enterprise S., M.V. Lady
Sch, Philip H. Davidson, Seh, May






oO , Sch, Cyclorama O., Sch, Belqueen,
M, V. Dearwood, Sch, Marion Belle Wolfe,
S.S, P. & T. Forester

ARRIVALS

1,235 tons net, Capt,
M.V. Caribbee, 100
from Dominica.

M.V, Inverrosa,
Shaw, from Caripito
tons net, Capt, Gumbs,

Schooner Gloria Henrietta, 55 tons net,
Capt. Glynn, from Dominica Schooner
Adalina, 50 tons net, Capt, Flemming,

Lucia
DEPARTURES
Turtle Dove,

Schooner 82 tons net,

person of Mr. A. C. Briggs of have not yet reachéd any decision. Capt. Ollivierre, for Trinidad

Senior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and schoolgirls
ment of an “expert” would yield between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-

good results in the working of ition, Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words

the United Kingdom has been
appointed to the new post
Organising and Methods Officer
He will receive a salary of $7,200
per annum. Government created
the post hoping that the appoint-

their departments to

of





increase jy Jength and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co,, Ltd.

efficiency and to economise where City not later than Wednesday every week, The best story each week

possible.

16 Million Stockholders

A total of 16,000,000 Americans
own shares of stocks in private
business and industrial corpora-
tions in the United States. One
automobile company, the General
Motors Corporation, has 430,000
stockholders, Some of the Nation’s
largest companies encourage their
employees to become stockholders,
For example, the Bell Telephone
Company, which owns and oper-
ates 82 per cent. of the 42,300,000
telephones in the United States,
has about 190,000 stockholders

among its employees.

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Send this coupon with your story.
SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

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I. A. L.’s Progress In 1950



THE most interesting event of 1950 from the Company's

point of view was probably the formation of our associated

company in the Caribbean

The main reason why this

activity would be chosen ahead of so many others of first
rate importance is because it betokened a major expansion
of 1.A.L.’s activities in the Western Hemisphere

Aeradio stations at the follow-
ing locations have been taken over
end are now being operated by
International Aeradio (Carib-
bean) Limited: Palisadoes Air-
port, Jamaica (aeradio facilities at
Montego Bay, the radio naviga-
tional beacon at South Caicos and
facilities in Grand Cayman will
also be provided under terms of
the LA,L. licence with the Ja-
maican Government); Atkinson
Field, British Guiana; Seawel!
Airport, Barbados; Coolidge Field
Antigua; St. Kitts, Leeward
Islands; Pearls Airport, Grenada
(the station at Pearls Airport and
in the town of St. Georges are in
process of being rebuilt); Bean
Field and Vigie, St. Lucia.

When the operational require-
ments for the air services to Dom-
inica, St. Vincent and Montserrat
have been determined the Com-
pany will provide appropriate
facilities at these places as well

Pan American and B.W.1. sta-
tions in Trinidad and Tobago were
taken over by I.A.L, last Septem-
ber and negotiations with the
Trinidad Government are now in
process to determine the pattern
of future operations. A signals
plan based on the recommenda-
tions of the 1.C.A.0. Regional con-
ference in Havana has _ been
drawn up and accepted by airlines
operating through the Caribbean,
Much remains to be done to bring
stations up to date. The enthu-
siastic staff of LA,
Ltd., led by their General Man-
ager, Robert Wilspn, have already
made a good start.

(Caribbean)

Considerable progress can be
recorded in the Eastern Hemi-
sphere too, The installation and
maintenance of marine radar
equipment is now being under-
taken in Singapore and Hong
Kong. In view of the anticipated
extension of business in these and
other directions an associated
company will shortly be formed
in Singapore. .

We are happy to announce that
the Italian Civil Aviation authori-
ties have invited L.A.L,. to supply
Air Traffic
Ciampino

Advisers at
Rome — and
Malpensa Airport, Milan, They
will be responsible to the Director
General of Civil Aviation in Italy
for advice on air traffic control
matters. Negotiations are under
way too for the establishment by
LA.L. of an Air Traffic Control
School in Italy to train two hun-
dred controllers,

Control
Airport,

A Telecommunications Adviser
has been appointed to the Hash-
emite Kingdom of Jordan under
the Director of Civil Aviation, Be-
sides acting as adviser he is Man-
ager at Jerusalem Airport, per-
forms air traffic control duties and
trains staff for aeradio and other
appointments, An ILA.L. Tele-
communications and Air Traffic
Control adviser has been appoint-
ed to the Somaliland Protectorate

for duty at Hargeisa Airport,
where he also acts as Airport
Manager.

In East Africa, the Company

has entered into a contract with

the High Commission of East
Africa to install and maintain
all ground aeradio equipment

within the territory, This project
will be undertaken through In-
ternational Aeradio (East Africa)
Limited of which J. MacDonald
is now manager, A total of 28
aerodromes are involved ranging



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MODERN DRESS

trom the International airport at
Eastleigh to airstrips such as
Nachingwea and Kitale. The mag-
litude of this effort can be ap-
preciated by looking at a map and
calculating the distances involved
n administration, We know we
“an rely on our radio engineers
ind radio mechanics to undertake
this project with the same en-
husiasm and skill that they have
shown in other territories.

A few months ago I.A.L. was
invited by the Government of
Pakistan to appoint three special-
sts to the staff of the Director
General of Civil Aviation, Re-
ports to date show that the acti-
vities of the I.A.L,.—nominated
director of Oeperations, Flying
nspector Navigator and Flying
Inspector Pilot have come fully
ip to expectations. In Karachi
nternational Aeradio (Pakistan)
Limited is heavily engaged in pro-
viding training and maintenance
acilities for the Pakistan Air
Services,

A new activity for the Com-
pany was created when we were
asked to take over the responsi-
bility of the Fire Services at
Bahrein Airport. As a result of
his commitment and anticipated
»xtension of this activity, Signals
ind Air Traffic Control staff on
‘eave in U.K. have been attend-
ng the Fire Course provided by
the British Ministry of Civil
Aviation,

In Rangoon I.A.L. is busy with
the expansion of Mingaladon Aif-
sort. The Company has under-
taken the design of re-equipment
ot the air traffic control centre
yd associated communications.
When completed it should be one
of the finest airports in the East,

Qn the aeradio and air traffic
control equipment side it should
be comparable with the best in
the world. Six of the twelve “one-
man” stations supplied to the
Burmese Government for use at
minor airports in the interior
have now been installed, In
March 1950 all the internal ser-
vices operating in Burma went
over to radio telephony, Apart
from international operators’ re-
quirements no W/T air to ground
services exist. In the same month
long range HF R/T was brought
into operation on an experimental
basis and has given first-class ser-
vice,

Experimental long-range HF
R/T has been brought into opera-
tion in Malta. It ig also being
made available at Bahrein, The
importance of developing the use
of long-range HF R/T cannot be
over-emphasised in view of the
world in air route communications
and of the forthcoming operations
of the De Havilland “Comet” by
B.O.A.C.

The 1.A-L. ‘Telecommunica-
tions Adviser in Damascus was
joined by two Air Traffic Con-
trollers and a Meteorologist bring-
ing the total of secondments to
the Syrian Government to four.

The aeradio station in Benina
ig now I.A.L. operated. It is
probable that the complete man-
agement of the airport will even-
tually be entrusted to LA.L. The
Senior Representative of I.A.L.
in Barbados is Mr, George Car-
ter.








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PAGE FOUR







i> Thursday, March 8, 1951



~ CINEMA TAX

THE time has come when serious consid-
eration should be given to the possibility
of adding to the Government’s Revenue by
means of a moderate tax on cinemas.

'

When the suggestion was made between
the two world wars, it was pointed out at
the time that a large proportion of money
was spent on amusements by people who
contributed nothing to the common exche-
quer either by way of taxation or by direct
vontributions to charity. If there was justi-
cation for the remark then,.it is apter now.

; In very recent years the number of cine-
mas in this island has increased rapidly.
Attendance varies with the appeal and
quality of the pictures; but many cinemas
thrive on patrons who become “fans” and
hate to miss a picture.

Some people go to the cinema as many
as five or six times a week.

‘These may be exceptional fans but there
are thousands of regular cinéma goers who
spend a tidy sum on this form of enter-
tainment. It is only just that a proportion
of this “luxury” spending should be ‘“‘chan-
nelled” off to help pay for vital social
services. A comparison of the amount Bar-
bados spends today on social services as
compared to six years ago will illustrate
how urgent is the need for revenue to swell
this desirable pool.

.. The cost of social services, which are still
sadly needed here, could be augmented by
takes on cinema tickets.

__ Seeing that there is already a tax on one
form of entertainment in this island no
serious objection could be advanced against
a cinema tax.

Comparisons have been made between
the imposition of a similar tax in England
“ut it would be asking too much to exact
‘15% of the first cost by way of an enter-
tainment tax in this island,

| If at each cinema a tax of perhaps one
penny in the shilling was collected on
tickets it is estimated that there would be
‘a substantial income for the Government
to spend on much needed social services.

The payment of such tax would not in-
convenience theatre goers and would bring
to them a sense of responsibility when they
realise that in a small but effective way
they too are contributing to the welfare of
the community.

KEEP...?

. FROM time immemorial the law in Bar-



RUSSIA’S PLAN FOR
WORLD CONQUEST

NOW that the Soviet Union has
By JOSEPH STALIN
What is our Youth technique?

become a major power, the world
is severed into two camps. The
vapitalist rid is bei dis- ; It ig the tion oun; °
integreted by internal antagutilns ception, becomes a member of an 4. wad tae ies which are paralyzing it; on the bars eee apa aot spirt of Leninism, strengthening
other hand, our socialist world is for the solidarity of the working their conviction our Workers

steadily growing stronger. State is the base from which the
Lenin told us that once the Com- iclass in its fight against capitalis n.

munist party triumphed in our The support of our a ‘omtion by Svtlen Weta a
own land, the epoch of world ia bate sates of ine: Toy inspired with confidenee in the
seytagen mula ein. noch sw edocs, ari” Heer of the Gyms ery
: . pensable preliminaries withou ro
ree ie oo ay oe which the final triumph of social- ane ail. _ oe eo oa
v ay wr) or chi os ‘pitalistic 48™ cannot be assured. Should 2 cru ctic con ns eee
Ns nth over me chief capitalistic . 1. attack-on Russia materialize; we nae WOFK a= in we
“——s, trategic SHeuld be prepared to use every sect ure, arenes uca—
jod of years or even decades, 20d amy means in order to open 11°08 eevential that the oung folk
Eras Scola Ge Tiod. there the floodgates of revolution made a ne
Oe a aie a a0 "in the throughout the world, rallying the *) oir seven “
must occur’ © id and Hows .in the Workers of capitalist countries and eee be regarded as an en: rd
revolutionary tide. the people of colonial lands to the » but as a means towa

major target for communist in-

The communist revolution does ; the victoi of the proletarian
not develop along a continuous and “4 of the Soviet Union. revolution in all lands,
upward line, but along a zigzag IV. .
path, by means of forward ana [The fact that Communists try _ [The communists encourage

backward marches. Our possibili- to take over American liberal or- both monopolies and co-operatives
ties of success depend upon the ganizations is not an accident; it under capitalism, because they
relative strengths and weaknesses is all part of Stalin’s master plan.] Can be more easily socialized than
of friends and enemies abroad. How will we bring the masses of "dividual enterprises.}

The weaknesses of the capital- a nation into the communist pro- The measures for strengthening
istic world which we can use are gramme? We have fashioned a Socialism are: State monopoly ot
its insuperable antagonisms — number of organizations without foreign trade, agricultural taxes,
antagonisms which dominate the which we could not wage war on State purchase and sale of agri-
whole international situation, capitalism; trade unions, co-opera~ Cultural productioh, and an all-

The first group of antagonisms tives, workshop committees, labour €mbzacing plan fd/nationalization
consists of those between the parties, women’s associations, a Of industry, transport, and credit.
workers and the middle class in labour press, educational leagues, The State and the co-operatives,
the capitalist countries; the second youth societies. as well as the Capitalists, are
consists of those between imperial- traders”, and when they have
ism and the liberation movement , learned how to trade, they will get
in colonies and dependent coun- | the upper hand over private trade
tries; the third consists of those | (they are doing so already!).
between the war victors and the Those who cannot understand this
conquered countries; the fourth | are not Leninists but liberals,
consists of those which have Great banks, as Lenin has said,
arisen among the victorious States; | are the State appartus which we
the fifth consists of those which need for the realization of social-
have developed between the ism, and which we take over
U.S.S.R. and the capitalist coun- ready-made from capitalism, When
tries as a whole. we do so, a unified State Bank ot

The trend of our foreign policy the most comprehensive kind, with
is determined by the conflicts and branches in every district and
antagonisms of these five groups. factory, will control production as
well as distribution of products.

No, we are not liberals. We put
the interest of the Party above the
interests of forma] democracy. For
us communists, formal democracy
is a trifle,

Just like Adolf Hitler, the
Dictator of Soviet Russia has
fe wae world Loo
or suprem-
acy. And just as Hitler did
in his notorious book, “Mein
Kampf”, so has Joseph Stalin
written, in clear and un-
mistakable words, his blue-
print for aggressive con-

communist -

xX

[The Korean War offers con-
vincing proof that Soviet Russia
nas a long-range plan for attack—
ing capitalism through its weak—
est point—the Far East.]

In 1917, the weakest part of the
capitalist world-front was Russia.
Where is the front breakable next?
Again at the weakest point. In

India, there are young and com-
b revolutionaries allied with

people have taken the trouble
to explore Stalin's writings
and weigh their significance
to the citizens of gq free
world. In order that there
be no further unawareness
of his long-range aims for
the forcible spread of com-
muftiism, here is the Russian
Dictator’s nine-point pro-
gramme for world conquest,
taken from his recorded
writings, which are now on
file in the Stalin Archives of
the National War College in
Washington, D.C. Italicized
sentences have been inserted

Vill,

[The performance of the Soviet
delegates at the United Nations is
proof of how Russia likes to talk
about “peace,” while actually
promoting aggression. ]

We communists create slogans
for the masses, Treaties embody-
ing fresh groupings of forces with
an eye to war are termed “peace
treaties.” The signing of them is
always effected to the accom-
paniment of the pipings of “peace-
ful alliances,” | Our preparations
for a war are conducted under

the powerful movement for libera-
tion, The forces of the revolu-
tionary movement in China are
immeasurable. They have not yet
come into anything like fail
operation, but the future will show
how vast they are,

The immediate task confronting
the revolutionary movement in



throughout the article in cover of paeans to peace. The
colonial lands is (1) to win over order to point up Stalin’ opposition will not accept our pro-
the best elements among the work- plan in the light of today’s | posals: that shows how “genuine”
ers to communism and to form crucial events, | is their love of peace,
independent communist parties; The Editors—Coronet | The Peace of, Brest-Litovsk* is
(2) to set up a nationalist and | a model instance of this’ strategy.
revolutionary coalition of work- '—-——-———_________ This “peace” enabled the party to

ers, peasants, and revolutionary As often as not, these are non- t@ke advantage of the discussjons,

intellectuals; and (3) to guarantee . to disintegrate the enemy. forces,
that leadership of the revolution- Pain’ rotertion of ted an dniena and ito €ather strength for an at.
ary coalition shall be in the hands with the party. But under special tack on the White Russians, Even
of the workers, conditions, every one of these the dullest have now. come. to see
It is obvious that each of these organizations is necessary; for, that the Peace of Brest-Litovsk
countries will need separate treat- lacking them, it is impossible to Wa8S a concession which strength-
ment. We must study all the consolidate the class positions of ened us while it wrecked the forces
special characteristics of the the workers in the various spheres f ‘international capitalism,

revolutionary development in these of the struggle. 1X
Seles teste” ieee Seas a 1, phere is a veritable ant heap of {In ‘Stalin’s blueprint, war be-
h tok th i) Bdependent organizations, com- tween Russia and the capitalistic
fei erie i toe igned to Mussions, and committees compris- world is inevitable: the only thing
all the tasks assigned to ing millions of non-party mem- left to chance is the actual date of

I ti io that “at thes npr batons aa ta has said 1
°. ; on that. ese organizations n has said, a terrible

desune ane eee oe take? Where is the central unit clash between Soviet Russia and
the Marsh all Plan Miteea. is con- Of Organization that wields suffi- the capitalist States must in-
vinced that capitalism abroad will Client authority to keep them with- evitably occur. The forces of
inevitably collapse. ] in prescribed lines in order to united capitalism and all their

them,

very extensive ke ;- avoid confusion? power, a very real power. There-
mick sudiglies arene ie The central unit is the Com- fore we must try to take the
has been detached from the â„¢unist party!
oe a. The loss of one- v. > nk vtipd aly dry agp sega
sixth of the world signified for jcommunists are always eager .. “ yo eae
capitalist Europe a restriction of sg ehaneees political “fefo eae dy is ripe for the decisive struggle
production and a profound dis- their real purpose is not reform when, all the class forces arrayed

enemy by surprise, seize a moment
when his forces are dispersed.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





bados compelled the pedestrian “to keep his
person on the left or near side of the road”.
This means that the man walking along
the street must go in the same direction as

turbance. Meanwhile, the Euro- but the .capture of America’s

pean powers are threatened with apparatus of government. ]

the loss of their most important. Among the masses of the people,

hinterland, the colonies, we communists, aS Lenin said, are
Europe has been compelled to but drops in the ocean. We have a

against us are in a’state of confus-
ion; when all are sufficiently em-
broiled with each other and have
been sufficiently weakened in com-
bats; when all the vacillating ele-
ments have exposed themselves






the vehicle which is overtaking him. This
condition affords an easy opportunity to be
run down by the overtaking vehicle.

{. In other parts of the world the law pro-
vides that the pedestrian meet the vehicle
which, especially in the United States
travels on the right.

} The point was raised in 1935 when the
Road Traffic Act was passed and in answer

to the objection it was suggested that the

pedestrian need only walk where the

policeman on duty should direct.

| dn today’s issue a correspondent again
draws attention to the matter and while
adjustments are still being made to traffic
~regulations it would be well. if consider-

ation is given to the difficulty.



Our Readers Say: ~~~

4 Thus, the centre of financial power party leadership.

inerease the burden of taxation, style of work that is peculiar to before the people and paraded
and to make the condition of the the practice of Leninism; it creates their utter bankruptcy. The ruling
workers much worse than before. a special type of worker, a special classes must be in the throes of a
The temporary stabilization of type of party or State official, a major government crisis, so that
capitalism has been mainly effect- special kind of style in public the government is so enfeebled
ed with the aid of U.S. capital. office. the revolutionists can speedily
The European countries, while Our task is to assign party mem- Overthrow it.
continuing to exploit their own bers to the key points in the State _ It is inconceivable, as Lenin has
colonies, have themselyes become apparatus, and to see to it that the ot tte elas nae we
financially dependent upon the U.S. apparatus is thus subjected to side with capitalist States’ Ul.
the imately hy s ~ ore euiat con-
i ng, dq quer, conflict is inevitable.
d ede it stone so The main forces of the revolu-
[The recent history of interne- end, What we are concerned with tion must, at the decisive mément,
cine labor ‘warfare in the U.S. are not the reforms, but the uses be concentrated for an attack on
reveals how cleverly communist they can be put to, A revolutionist the enemy’s most vulnerable spot,
agents use unions to achieve their may sponsor a “reform” because 4t a moment when conditions are
revolutionary aims, } he sees in it a means for linking Tipe. Always we have a clear and
No country can, in these times, yp constitutional action with un- Precise aim towards which we
carry on war without the workers. constitutional ‘action—because ‘he Btrive, for one of the eee merits’
If workers refuse to make war feels he can make use of it as a Of communism is that nothing is
mr — rota then screen behind which he can left ip chehee. lee oie
such war becomes impossible, ( ache Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was signed
Communists must go into the *Tensthen his — work March 3, 1918, between the new. Bol-
[The natural radicalism

Our country, a vast domain with achieve unity of command and to military technique are a mighty

in the capitalist world has been For the

revolutionist,
shifted from Europe to America,
nt

shevik Government and
unions, work in them for five or

Of Tiney, and ‘Solsetle) cr ore

. u ey, ni a .

more years if necessary—see to it America’s younger people, e8- Peinci’ ang Bulgaria) at Brest-Litovak,
that every communist, without ex-

pecially students, makes them @ Russia from World War I.


























Sunday Shopping and
Sabbath Values
'* To che Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—A week or so ago you
published a rather solid letter
' from “Layman” deprecating the

proposal to open stores on Sundays

_ to accommodate tourists, and ap-
»*pealing to the Clergy of the
»-various denominations and their

Staffs to arise and get busy in op-
‘position to the plan and’ for the

nye onan of the Sabbath (or

Lord’s Day) with all its beneficent

‘aims and uses. A very wise line

of action, I cannot but think. And

I would extend the appeal to the

‘political leaders since they also

“are professedly and substantially
_. pledged to promote the well being

of the community, whereas TI

‘notice that the Heads of the
- Workers’ Union’ are running

political and electioneering rallies

‘on Sundays now.

&

But there are worse attacks
upon the inestimab], treasure of a
well spent Sabbath. Last Sunday

for example, one of our crowd of
cinemas offered a regular night-
club. programme imported from
Trinidad, with two performances
——one at, 4.45 for the children—
and announced the day before that
the Box Office would be open for
the sale of tickets on Sunday from
8 to 12 noon, Evidently on regard
at all for the religious character
and duties of the day and its
possible blessings and benefits, but
simply aiming to stir up the
(perhaps jaded appetite of the
public and make money,

Many townships in the Mother
Country refuse to allow cinemas
and other places of amusement to
open On Sundays, but “Little
England” is far from worrying
about a reasonable free chance for
Spiritual affairs.

But returning to the appeal to
the Clergy and their helpers, Are
they not interested and concerned?
I have not heard of any of them
saying or doing anything in regard
to the matter, and yet they are
the primary and natural, guardians

and advocates of “the things that
are God’s”, and responsible for the
souls and morals of the com-
munity. * i ;

Is it that they have nothing to
say on so big and urgent a malter,
but are just satisfied to talk soft
platitudes to their docile (or per-
haps sleepy)‘ congregations? 1
have not heard of any of them
being applauded by the ardent
heroic souls who are eager for the
establishment of the Lord Christ’
Kingdom of | Righteousness and
Love—and there are still a few
of these around, — nor of their
being attacked by the devotees of
“the World, the, Flesh and the
Devil.” We have here perhaps
another reason for regretting that
the Head of 6ne denomination has
sailed qway, for he is famous for
the dictum: “It is the people that
matter”. Anyway, right or wrong,
I think Religion is still of first im-
portance, and Sunday is its main
opportunity to get a living, so I beg
to sign myself.”

“PRO DEO ET PATRIA”
March, 6, 1951,



Race Hatred.

To Tne Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I beg to say race-
hatred in this island is fahned and
kept alive»by the narrow-minded
who do not seek ynity, but mutiny,
and to overthrow the weaker side.
&t is a form of Communism, and
should be punished. Educated or
sensible coloured people should
try to overthrow this backward
thinking among their ace, sand
climb on their own merits. The
Indians, Jews, and other nations
segregate, yet are good mixers, and
do not stir up strife: I must say
I am proud of the East Indians
that are here among us, also the
Jews. Why is this continual
yapping about colour kept up. We
are as white as our Pufity, as
yellow as our insincerity, and as
black as our deéds. ,T ai must
pay tribute to the picture at the
Empire Theatre “Farewell to
Yesterday.” It is the birth of
new thought. “There is one God
—We are all brothers.” Tt is for
us to live it,

A CITIZEN.



THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1951




CLUB FOR SEAMEN

By KATHERINE GLOVER

(From The Christian Science Monitor)

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE

T_ V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.




NOW




Usually





see eae pty $24 $22
MEN who sail the seven seas always Pkgs. LUX FLAKES ...... - -
welcome the day their vessel puts into the Tins COOKING BUTTER (1lb Tins) ...... . -




American port of Mobile, on the Gulf of
Mexico, where they find shelter and welcome
in a completely equipped seamen’s club,
which embodies most of the features of a
modern hotel, a home away from home, a
bank, library, post office, a recreation centre.
It is, in every sense of the word, a seamen’s
paradise and when a sailor crosses the
threshold for the first time he usually thinks
he is dreaming. a

As a matter of fact, the Mobile Seamen’s
Club, in the southern State of Alabama, is
the fulfilled dream of a man of the seas who
understands other seamen. When George E.





82
-32








CARPENTERS’ TOOLS

SAWS—l8ins., 20ins., 22ins., 24ins., 26ins., 28ins., 30ins., 36ins
COMPASS SAWS—12ins., 14ins.

BACK SAWS—12 ins., 14 ins., 16ins.

PLANES, IRON—9ins., 10ins., 15ins., 18ins.

is BLOCK
RATCHET BRACES
CHISELS—\in., %in., %iu., lin.

CHISEL SETS of 4 in., 5% in. 1 in. ins.
OIL STONES—6ins., 8ins.

[ , complete—dins., 6ins.


















Blacktopp, director of the club, was a seaman SN INDING STO Sins., 6ins.
during World War I, conditions were differ- SAW FILES—3ins., 4ins., 4%4ins., 5ins.



CLAW HAMMERS
ENGINEER HAMMERS—llb., 1%lbs., 2lbs.

MASON TROWELS & SQUARES
AT



ent from those of today. Forty men were
crowded into the forecastle in those days;
food often was more to the taste of sharks
than of human beings; hotrs were long,
wages short. When men came into port their
chief concern was in having “fun” and the
type of recreation they chose did not always
please the law or the citizens. Sheer boredom
and loneliness were troublemakers which
too often led the seamen into difficulties.

In many respects life at sea has greatly
changed in the past quarter-century. Today
sailors have good quarters; wages and hours
are good, with higher pay for overtime; food
is the same as that which the officers eat,‘but
loneliness and boredom persist. Blacktopp has
carried his own memory of the seamen’s lot
through the years. Spending most of his civil-
ian life as a welfare worker among seamen,
he realizes how important it always will be
for them to have recreational outlets ashore.
When he went to Mobile to live in its mild
climate, he took over the Seamen’s Bethel, a
century-old institution for serving seamen.
There he put into practice some of the ideas
which have now found full fruition in the
new Seamen’s Club.

Blacktopp believes in treating the seamen
as self-respecting human beings not as poten-
tial lawbreakers. This is a departure from
many services to sailors, which operate on







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sending them on their way to repeat the WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE y
process the next time they come into port. In s



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contrast to this Blacktopp’s theory of serving
seamen is based on the preventive one of pro-| $
viding recreational facilities to engage their| %
leisure time and prevent their getting into
trouble. ; :

The city of Mobile was a good place to carry
out the experiment of the kind of seamen’s
‘service Blacktopp envisioned. During World
War II the Gulf City burgeoned into one of
the most pepor tant ports in the United States,
with large fleets of ships moving in and out of,
its docks, with shipbuilding and ship repairing
of considerable proportions: Also, most. for-
tunately, it had a group of progressive ship-
ping men who were interested in Blacktopp’s
ideas and willing to offer financial help. One
of these, Captain Norman Nicholson, presi-
dent of the Waterman Steamship Company,
whose firm contributed a large sum to the
club, is president of its board of trustees. His
vision and energy in organizing matched
those of Blacktopp. .--

Because of its location on the Gulf of Mex-
ico, Mobile always has had a population of
transient seamen. For more than 100 years
starting in 1834 with a small mission, Mobile
citizens have supported some kind of service
to seamen. On the board of trustees and in
the women’s auxiliary of the present Sea-
men’s Club are grandsons and granddaugh-
ters of citizens interested in the first Seamen’s
Bethel. The money which built the club came
out of the pockets of shipping firms, banks,
business. concerns, and private citizens in
Mobile. Many seamen gave part of their
Savings to the fund,

The Mobile Seamen’s Club operates on a
strictly democratic principle. S ips’ officers}
mingle on the same footing with men who
oil the engines and scrub the decks. Local
hotels sometimes call upon the club’s facili-
ties when they are overcrowded. Recently, |'
two Senators from the midwestern State of
Illinois, while-in Mobile on business, were
temporary overflow guests. They were so
delighted with the club's accommodations
ve oer had no inclination to return to the

otel.

There is no charity or patronage about this
seamen’s club. It operates on a self-sus-
taining basis, although rates are less than
those in a good hotel and services avail:
able include features that cannot be had in
a hotel. For example, a man. who needs a
joan is never turned away. The Seamen’s Club
has one inflexible rule, which is that sailors
who are intoxicated will not be admitted.
They are asked to come back as soon as they
have recovered from their excessive drink-
ing. And they frequently do return, ;

One of the unique features of the club is|$
that it is designed to encourage men to have
their wives and families join them while the
are in port. With ships often in Mobile’s dry
docks for repairs, there is opportunity for
family reunions. 'The Seamen’s Club offers a
variety- of-services to the seamen’s families,
Forexample, it.will provide a qualilled person
to stay with the children whenever a husband
and wife want a few hours together. A play-
ground in the rear of the'b g soon will











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be added to the club's facilities. The sound of 8p ‘FED DUCKS — LAM “a
children’s voices, the sight of women in the a MILK "sg eit pe! 3 aw ge Saar cond
| corridors and lounge of the club.aré things|% | __HAMS —
Sea 7 expected to see in a sailor's ‘ SPECIALS JUST ARRIVED
The club is air-conditioned throughout, fire- LUNCHEON CHEESE —_ IC
| prbdt, and furntahed with wtietetee went )_$121 each BOUILLION -
furniture. A laundry with driers makes it/@ | «. -48 each CANADIAN EGGS
possible for a seaman to wash his clothes and! | HUNTER’S STEAK & KID- ICE CREAM MIX
dry them in a few minutes. There is a re Coes Pane tthe mee FREES SALMON
room and library, writing room, and a recre- 6 cents per tin BRA Ss :
ation a oe apes for bad and other | KOLA Tore 31 80 ais caer
games. The lounge of the club is converted|& | cae
into-a motion picture theatre at times and ag Bt Cones SAUSAGES
good films are shown for the benefit of the BARLEY STICKS—13 each . ONIONS POTATOES
seamen’s guests, In every respect, the club is :
a demonstration of a new approach in service

PHONE GODDARDS WE DELIVER



to seamen,





THURSDAY, MARCH 8,

Rest Essential
For T.B. Patients

DR. O'MAHONY IN
PUBLIC HEALTH TALK

_ At the first Conference of Pub-
lic Health Officers in Barbados
now being held at Queen’s Park
some of the subjects discussed
were: “Tuberculosis”, “The Nu-
trition of the working class moth-
er and child during its pre-school
years” and “The hygiene of food
and of food handling places”

Dr. J. P. O'Mahony, address-
ing the Conference on “Tuber-
culosis” said that it was a subject
they knew a great deal about,
but they did not know all about
it. Tuberculosis was a_ disease
which was caused by a tubercu-
lous germ. That germ or poison
called a tubercle germ or poison
was something that could not be
seen with the naked eye, but by
certain instruments provided in
order to enlarge its size.

It centred into two main parts
of the body and for the purpose
of his talk, he would only deal
chiefly with one. Tuberculosis in
the greater number of cases, was
a disease of the lungs and was
commonly called consumption or
a decline. In other cases, it was
also a_ disease of the intestines,
but the greater number of cases
were in the lungs rather than in
the gut.

The fact that tuberculosis was
got mostly in the lungs should
give an idea as to how the germ
entered the body, because the
body must have contact in some
way or other with the germ so
that the disease was produced. If
there_was no contact between the
body and the cause of the disease,
it was common sense to say that
there would be no disease and
that was a public health fact.

Breaihed In or Eaten

In order to produce the disease
in the lungs, the germ had to get
into the lungs, hence one breath-
ed in the germ. If one had the
Gisease in the gut, one either had
to eat it or drink it.

Dr. O’Mahony said that there
was only one advice to be taken
in a disease of this nature and
that was the advice of the doc-
tors, the people who knew some-
thing about it.

It was absolutely essential for
any case of tuberculosis to have
medical advice because the doc-
tor knew how best he could take
care of himself during the time
he was assisting and would be
able to recommend certain treat-
ments so that if the disease was
in the early stages the patient
would be able to overcome it.

He laid stress on the question
of rest and said that the patient
should be given as much as pos-
sible. The idea behind the rest
was that it gave the best chance
of cure.

He said that a person could get
tuberculosis just as well from
a slum area as in an area of
fresh. air up to two or three
thousand feet. There was no spe-
cial climate for tuberculosis and
that was a fact.

He did not think that direct
sunshine for tuberculosis was
good as in many cases it made the
disease worse. '

The patient he said must eat
nourishing food and a balanced
diet was needed. Foods like milk,
fish and eggs that contained pro-
tein were of the greatest im-
portance to persons suffering
from tuberculosis.

Hie said that Denmark had more
dairy produce than perhaps any
country in the world and it was
known that war had a very bad
effect on the tuberculosis rate of
any country. During the last war.
Denmark was overrun by the
Germans from 1940—45, but in
spite of that, the tuberculosis
rate was low although one would
have expected that it would have
been higher. The reason why it
got better was because there was
no exportation of its dairy pre-
duce to any other country ne

Isolated

Dr. O’Mahony said that a tu-
berculosis patient should have his
own bed, clothing and drinking
utensils and it should be a crim-
inal offence for any infant or
child to go near a tuberculosis
case or for a_ tuberculosis
case to allow a child to come near
him as children did not have the

same resistance as grown ups
and would therefore die more
quickly.

Parents should even send away
their children if there was tu-
berculosis in the home until the
medical authorities said that it
was safe for them to return.

He said that from statistics it
showed that tuberculosis in Bar-
bados was an urban problem and
not a rural one as the rate in the
former area was higher than in
the latter.

Miss A. Estwick whose subject
was “The nutrition of the work-
ing class mother and child during
its pre-school years” said that the
nutrition of that individual would
depend largely on the type of
work she chose to do. Too few
working class persons realised the
importance of eating a balanced
diet which was not only essential
to health, but satisfying to the
appetite.

If Public Health Workers could
drive home that point, a great
portion of the present existing
evils of malnutrition would be
overcome,

It was the duty of the Public
Heaith Workers to suggest cheao
and easily procured local food-
stuffs which would supply a bal-
anced diet like yams, breadfruit,
potatoes, etc., which were widely
grown and were cheap and valu-
able carbohydrate sources.

She said that care should be
taken to ensure that each day’s
menu contained carbohydrates,
proteins, greens, milk, sugar and
fruit.

They considered the responsi-
bility of the working class mother
towards her children, particularly
during pre-school age. The mdst
difficult time was the weaning
stage. The home conditions and
the individuality of each child
were large factors, and while they
simed at an ideal dietary, modifi-
cations must be used to suit the
reauirements and tastes of each
child—discretion being used to dis~
tinguish between pampering and
spoiling and genuine idiosyncra-
sies. There could be no hard and
fast rules, but alterations and in-
troduction of new foods
always be gradual.

@ On Page 8

must



1951
Many letters of support from the Colonial Office, Caribb =~ O S
and congratulation have in which it is stated :
followed the ‘att Gtifiths | [Secre- can 7 =
our December issue of ef State for the
article “Caribbean Colonies) is already UM. Endorsing our compete with the cor-
SOS.” If amy further aware of the urgent and °O™mment oe ss - ny poration’s ships, so much
evidence were required of serious nature of the : S

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



offer adequate passenger
service to their own Col-
onies. The Elders &
Fyffe Line have, how-
ever, helped very con-
siderably with the “Gol-
fite” which is calling

problem to which you « Comment from the regularl Barbados
have—drawm attention, 306 “Worse off today mn Caribbean itself Trinidad, but we are
and he wants me te fore the Boer War.” the must await the uncer- most concerned at the
assure you that it is re- “Guardian” went on to tain mail deliveries, put prospects of the coming
ceiving the active con- say: if readers turn to page season with the antici-
‘sideration of the : 99 of this issue (“Erratic pated increase in the
Government, who are British shipownezs ean Colngied. Mail Disturb umber of visitors for
discussing with the ‘earcely be > they will get the Festival of Britain.
shipping interests con- ‘for regarding West In some further indication

what steps can services as uilat- of opinion on the: We hope that there will

be no repetition of the

proved services to and kind of subsidy... . But our home readers are experiences early in 1950

tra Caribbean. Mr, this does not mean that too various to be quoted when the French Line

Britain and the Caribbean, Griffiths regrets, how- the West Indian Colonies at length, but we ap- “Misr” and other steam-

and are unanimous ever, that he is not yet for which we are re- pend the of ers brought over many

condemnation of the to te sponsible should be left Swe firms wel kmewnin visitors who had the

it precarious state of | when a solution of the to remain dependent on the West Indian Trade: greatest difficulty in get-

dependence on foreign problem will be possible, such shipping services “Gillnenie: Bee. & Ce ting back, and any diver-

- The we as foreigners may care to f ' 3 lasia

of cargo shippers differs Teceived assurances from provide or subsidise. If _Ltd.:” The lack of pas- Seema theoseh the

according to whether they Members of Parliament. the islands and main. SMger accommodation Panama to call for pas-

are concerned with Bar- ‘at the matter is to be jand territories of Gui- between this country t West Indian

bades, Trinidad ,and Ja- Faised inthe Commons as ana and. oc aa ot ye AL Sg gy Re le flac
maica, or with those parts 90n' as : Previous @uras are to lop | ing considerable . y

ports, action,
° JOB FOR THE
Readers will no doubt DEVELOPMENT
be interested to of CORPORATION ?
the initial response to our The “Manchester Guar-
article in official and other dian” gave its weighty



have failed to elicit any-
thing but a non-committal
reply from the Govern-
ment, but it is encourag-
ing to learn that a further
effort is to be made to
emphasise the
nature of the position and

to press for immediate

healthily they must
have adequate sea

. Could not the
Colonial Development
Corporation either build
or charter two or three
vessels and organise a
regular service to the
West Indies itself? It
could reasonably be ar-

serious

the situation has been
relieved by the restora-
tion of the French Line
service and will be im-
Proved even
when their two, buxury
liners are ted,

the position, unless ade-
quate facilities can be
offered for the return.
The outlook is far from
encouraging and we
can see little hope of





Sages, but we agree with
the points brought out in
your article. We are,
however, very much in-
terested in the matter of
freights between — this

of our difficulties in this
direction is that if we

iron stoves, ete, from
Glasgow (which port
serves a considerable
number of manufactur-
ers of these articles), it
is most difficult to obtain
shipping direct to the
Caribbean, and we may
have to wait months for
a direct sailing as tran-
shipment of this break -
able merchandise is not
desirable. However,
there is a rumour that a
Canadian shipping com-
pany may be able to ease
this situation as regards
Jamaica, but at the mo-

Who Steals The
Refuse Box?

The two new refuse collectors
of the Scavenging Department
started to work on Monday last.

Mr. Herbert Best, head driver
at the Scavenging Department,
told the Advocate yesterday that
the trucks cannot hold as much
as the open trucks but the refuse
cannot blow back into the streets.

He said that the Public too
seem to be satisfied but he feels
that people can co-operate more
by putting out their refuse in time
and not waiting until the refuse
collectors have passed.

“Many people complain that
their refuse containers are taken
away by the refuse collectors. but
this is not so,” he said.

He said that the majority of
people put out their stuff in boxes
After the scavengers empty the
stuff they put the boxes back into
the streets but a pedestrian pass-
ing along would see a box which
had contained refuse and take it
up for firewood, On many occa-
sions he has had to stop pedes-
trians from doing this.

He suggested that the people
should get proper containers
Have them painted and also print
their names on them. In this
way the Police would be able to
ascertain that a pedestrian is
stealing a container and he can
take action. Scavengers would
also be able to help if this was

PAGE FIVE
Will Ship Back



Equipment To T’dad

Part of the equipment imported
from Trinidad for work on the
runway at Seawell is being pre-
pared to be shipped back to Trini-~
dad now that the runway is
nearly completed.

The motor vessel Caracas is here
to take back the first set of equip-
ment to Trinidad. The Caracas
brought up from Trinidad with
her, 1,000 drums of colas for
Messrs. Da Costa & Co, Ltd.,
which she is now discharging.

She is expected to finish dis-
charging the colas today and will
then be berthed alongside the
Government crane which will be
used to lift the heavy equipment
aboard her.

The Caracas prought the most ot
the equipment from Trinidad that
was used on the runway. She
is consigned to Messrs, J. N. Har-
riman & Co., Ltd,



PAYING OFFICER
APPOINTED

Mr. L. B. Phillips has been
appointed Old Age Pensions Pay-
ing Officer, St. Michael, with ef-
fect from the 9th of March.



BUSH ROAD

The Constitution flood area is

support to our appeal in
an editorial of 23rd Jan-

sued that this is g form
of capital development
which the

exists to foster, and if,
with the growth of West
Indian trade,
cial companies began to



corporation
to their own

commer- state of affairs

C.J. GIVES Struck With The Waves

7 YEARS

For House breaking
And larceny

Sentence of seven years’ penal
servitude was passed on Eric
Sealy by His Honour the Chiet
Justice Sir Allan Collymore at the
ee of Grand Sessions yester-

ay.

Sealy was found guilty of break-
ing into the house’ of Terrence
Johnson situated at Prince of
Wales Road, Bank Hall on Sept-
ember 21 and stealing money to
the amount of $20 the property
of Johnson.

Miss mm. 2%, sogrme prosecuted
for the Crown. The prosecution
pointed out that Sealy in the ab-
sence of Johnson on September
21 broke into Johnson’s house
using the back door and stealing
$20 which was in the house,

First witness for the prosecu-
tion called was the owner of the
house, Terrence Johnson, He said
that he lives at Prince of Wales
Road, Bank Hall. A woman by
the name of Lilian Taitt _ lives
about 40 feet from his house, On
September 21, at about 8.30 am.
he closed the fromt and back
doors before he left the house.
The back door has two. latches
and on leaving he went through
the front door,

Door Broken

When he returned about 11.20
the same morning to his house.
Taitt told him something. He
saw the back door of the house
was broken and the latch unlock-
ed. One window of the bedroom
was also opened,

Lilian Taitt, a domestic servant
of Bank Hall, said on September
21 at about 9.15 a.m, she was
grazing her sheep and goat a
little way from,Johnson’s house
which is in Prinfe of Wales Road.
While standing there, she saw the
ccused go into Terrence John-
son’s house by opening the side
gate. After the accused stayed
about 15 minutes inside the house,
she asked someone to hold the
sheep for her, and went to John-
son’s house and called for “City”
but the accused told her that
“City” was not there.

She asked the accused who he
was and he said that he was
Louissa_ Rice's grand-son. She
returned for her sheep and about
15 minutes after the accused
came out of the house and went
in the direction of Barracks Road,
About 11.20 am. the same day
she saw Johnson going to his
place and told. him something.
Johnson then went to his house
and she went with him. When
they arrived at the house she
noticed that the back door was
broken,

On September 22 at about 10.30
a.m, she went to the C.I.D. Dept.
and identified the accused in a
line with others,

Accused Identified

Melville Phillips of St, Thomas
said on September 21 at about
9.15 am. he was working at
Prince of Wales Road, and saw
the accused come up the Road
and go to a gate, pull at it, and
go in. Lilian Taitt who was
grazing a sheep went to the same
house and went back and told
him something He saw the
accused come out of the house
and go to Barracks Road. Some-
time later he went to the C.I.D,
and identified the accused among
other men.

Cpl. Kenneth Murphy, now at-
tached to the Bridge Post, said
that on September 22 he was de-
tailed to carry out an identification:
parade ‘on Eric Sea'y who was
accused of house breaking and
larceny. He got eight es of
similar build as Sealy and called
on Lilian Taitt who touched Sealy
on his. hand. Melville Phillips
also picked out the accused, -

The acrused was then formally
charged tad after made a volun-
{ary statement. Cpl, Byer_ ther
gave evidence of going to John-
son's place and investigating about
an alleged house breaking and
larceny, At this stage the case
ior the prosecution was closed.

Sealy then addressed the jury
submitting that he mever stole the
money and placing the theft on
a man name, “City”? who he said
used to stay at Johnson's place
and carried him into Johnson's
house on September 21.

His Honour the Chief Justice
then summed up and after a
short deliberation the Jury re-
turned a verdit of guilty of house
breaking and larceny,

Bottle By

Swept Over

out, preference is given
and it is a deplorable
Britain not to be able to

any improvement for ment it is very indefi-
further some time to come. nite,
Carters (Merchants), Regarding the last point,
Ltd.: The article, of

nationals,

for Great

Took Stolen
Property

, " Jord yester-
nknown Man The Highway ,.0%272.308 90

Oe ee Rupert
. Jordan of Eckstein Village,
Eagle Hall, St. Michael, was taken
to the General Hospital on Tues-
day night and detained with a
swollen neck.

Jordan was picked up by the
Olympic Theatre, He said that a
man, whom he did not know, had
struck Kim with a bottle.

LAIRMONTE CARMICHAEL,

a 16-year-old schoolboy of low.
er Carlton, St. James, was detained
at the General Hospital on Tues-
day night with head injuries.

Carmichael, cyclist, was in-
volved in an aceldent along Queen
Street, St, Peter with motor lorry
S—231, owned by Reginald Pres—
cod of Mount Standfast, St. James,
and driven by Hilton Medford of
Ashton Hall, St, Peter,

The cycle, which is owned by
St. Clair Carmichael, was exten-
sively damaged,

ANY RESIDENTS of Triopath,

St Andrew, are now forced to
drink water from the spring at
Spring Vale Plantation, They
complain that this water is insani-

tary.

Gao told the Advocate that the
pipes in the district have been
locked off since January and they
have to walk miles to get water.

He said that people of the Cane
Garden district haye to travel
to Parks Plantation, three miles
away, to get drinking water. Oc-
casionally the water truck from
the Water Works Department
could be seen in the district but
recently the visits have become
very few.

FINE of 15/- in 14 days with

an alternative of one month's
Imprisonment was imposed by Mr.
G. B. Griffith, Police Magistrate
of District “A” on Prince Henry
Walcott of Rouen Village, St.
Michael,

Walcott was found guilty of
unlawfully assaulting and beating
Beryl Vaughan of Seales Land,
Martinigue, St, Michael, on Janu-
ary 6.

A&A RECOKM CATCH of 2,452

flying fish was brought in
at Oistin Bay, Christ Church yes-
terday afternoon by the fishing
boat Lady Omer owned by Edwin
Fleming of Oistin.

A big crowd of housewives
rushed to the beach to get the
fresh fish and nearly everyone who
was there got their required
amount of fish.

SHAMROCK CREDIT
-UNION, a corporative move-
ment, will hold a meeting at St.
Patrick’s School, Jemmotts Lane,
at 7.30 o'clock tonight. Members
.will receive the Financial Report
and also discuss other affairs of
the Union,

This movement, since its for-
mation, has helped the poor, both
Roman Catholics and those of
other religions, with loans and in
other ways.

R. CORNELIUS ANDERSON,
Superintendent of His Majés-
ty’s Prison in. St. Vincent, who
ds at present on a special visit to
Barbados will be the Guest Speak-
er at the Weekly United Holiness
ig at Reeg Street on Thurs-

day, March 8.

For the past two days, big
waves have been dashing with
fury against the rocks and sand
along the Western coast of the
island. It seemed to be worst
along the St. James Coast, where
at some beaches, a dash of a wave

sent water as high as 30 feet ine

the air.

Along highway No, 1. where the
road was near to the sea and al-
most on a level with the beach,
the waves broke over the street,
leaving layers of bay sand and
small sea rocks behind therm,

Motorists still made use of the
road but they had to take muc
care that their vehicles did not
skid and perhaps topple , over.
Early yesterday, scavengers with
their shovels were at work Tre-
moving the obstacles out of the
road. Occasionally, their work
was intensified by a wave which
threw more sand and stones on
the highway, :

Fishing Fleet Drawn U

Fishing fleets with their moor-
ings along that coast did not ven-
ture out. to make their daily
catches, but the most of them re-
mained at their anchorage to be
‘tossed about by the swelling sea,

Some fishermen said that they
were not running the risk of
losing their boats in that weather
while others were only impeded
from going out because they
thought that the surging of the
sea would make it difficult for
them to catch fish, ;

Over 20 fishing boats from Fitz 8

Village, Paynes Bay and Holetown
took shelter in the inner basin of
the Careenage yesterday. Their
masts were lowered and their
sail neatly put away, |

Fishing boats and moses alike
could be seen drawn up alongside
the road while you pass on youn
way to or from Speightstown,
some of them being made fast to

trees and to the backs of houses
for safety.
Houses near to the beaches

were standing over water and all
the waterways that empty them-
selves into the sea flooded over
their banks while wave after wave
rushed into them,

Under Water

At Hvletown, a large spot of
jJand called the “Swamp” which
is used as a playing fiela was
mostly under water. The “Swamp”
is bounded on the South side by
a river which was swollen by the
sea.

Waves tore away the sand from
the beaches. Along Bay Field, St,
Peter, where casuarina trees are
planted about 20 yards from the
wash of the sea, much of the sand
was swept away, leaving the roots
of the trees exposed to such an ex-

tent that they could be expected to

fall at any moment.

The condition of the sea was not
-at all enc to sea bathers.
Groups of people that can always
be seen at favourite bathing beach-
es, were missed during the two
days.

The sea had lost its blue colour
and turned a dull and ugly colour
caused by the mixing of sand
from the sea’s bed with the waves,

| MOTOR CYCLE MARVEL

VELOCETTE

prisonment with hard labour by
His Honour the Chief Justice, Sir
Allan Collymore, after he pleaded
guilty of receiving stolen property

“between November 28 and 29,
1950. s *

12 Months For Receiving

Kenrick Bennett was ordered to
undergo 12 months’ imprisonment
‘with hard labour. He pleaded
guilty of receiving stolen property
valued $34.70,

* *
Broke House: 9 Months
Sentence of nine months’ impris-
onment was imposed on Marjorie
Edwards after she pleaded guilty
of breaking the house of Cleo-
patra Dash on December 18, and
stealing articles to the value of
$15.99,
* * *
BOUND OVER
Cecil Maloney who entered a
plea of “guilty” of the fraudulent
conversion of $108.08, the money
of Kenrick Small, was bound over

for 18 months.
* * *

On 12 Months’ Probation

Berkley Trotman was put on
probation for 12 months after
pleading guilty of house breaking
and larceny. Date of the offence
was October 27,

me

ON PROBATION

Also put on probation for 18
months was Millicent Layne. She
pleaded guilty of the larceny of
articles valued $46.00 on October

40'- For Bodily
Harm

Ursula Rock of Cats Castle, City,
was yesterday fined 40/- in 14
days with an alternative of one
month's imprisonment by City
Police Magistrate Mr. H. A.
Talma after she was found guilty
of unlawfully and maliciously in-
flicting bodily harm on Marie Ellis
of the same address.

George Rock, who was charged
jointly with Ursula Rock, was
fined 25/- to be paid in 14 days.





4,000 Women Register
For Emigration To U.S.

With the prospect of employ-
ment in the United States, 4,018
women up to yesterday have al-
ready registered at the Employ-
ment Agency in Queen’s Park
the Advocate was told yesterday
Registration began on February
26

In the same period 338 men have
registered and 1,666 have renew-
the'r registration.

ARTICLES STOLEN

THIEVES stole articles valued
$81.20 from the home of Ed-
ward Bowen at Government Hill,
St. Michael, between 5.15 p.m.
and 9,30 p.m. on Monday.
Eugene Blackman reported that
clothing was stolen from his open
yard on Tuesday, °
The Police are
both incidents,



investigating

The New Model L.E. 149 C.C. is different from the conventional type

Motor Cycle—in fact it’s the nearest approach to a motor car.

Water-cooled, Hand-Started. Shaftedriven

and Noiseless.

For SIMPLICITY, ECONOMY and RIDING PLEASURE

Choose a...

VELOCETTE

ROBERT THOM LTD.
White Park Road.

Courtesy Garage

ss SS
— Oo



course deals with the
passenger position and
this affects us only when
personnel connected with
our business in one way
or another require pas-

a monthly cargo service to
T Ba , and
British Guiana from Glas-
gow and Liverpool has
just been initiated by Sag-
uenay Terminals, Ltd, of
Canada,



Westminster
Corner

R, OSBORNE (Conservative,

Lincolnshire, South div.)
has asked the Minister of Fooc
why he increased the price for
Commonwealth sugar by a uni-
form rise of 65s. per ton to £30 10s
a ton, when one country did not
make any claim tor an increase
and another asked for an increase
only of 35s, per ton; and, in view of
this, why the price for Common-
wealth raw sugar in 1951 has now
been fixed at £32 17s, 6d. per ton,

Mr, Webb: A uniform price has
been fixed annually for Common.
wealth sugar for the past 10 years.
When . inereases of price have
been agreed, they have been basec
upon such evidence of increased
cost as was available so as to ar-
vive at a fair average price fot
all the Commonwealth producing
countries, This method has beer
followed in
has resulted in the price increase
referred to by the hon, member

Discussions will take place dur
ing the course of this year witi
representatives of Commonwealtl
Sugar producers to see what car
be done to introduce greater pre:
cision into the method of fixin;
prices under the Commonwealt!
Sugar Agreement. I should adc
however, that this uniform pric
for all the Commonwealth suga
supplies was finally agreed t
after negotiation, at their ow.
united request,

Crude Oil Arrives

A shipment of 878,178 gallons of
crude oil arrived in Barbados yes-
terday byg the oil. tanker Inver-
rosa” from Caripito, Venezuela.
The Inverrosa has anchored off
Shot Hall, St. Michael, to dis-
charge the oil into the tanks of
the British Union Oil Company
Her agents are Messrs, R. M.
Jones & Co., Ltd.





Sale To-morrow
The attention of

of sale of the Central Foundry’s
block. of buildings, Broad Street,
These buildings were originally
advertised to be sold at, the Office
of Messrs Cottle, Catford & Co,
High Strect, at 2 p.m, today, The

buildings will now be put up for

scle by Messrs Cottle, Catford &
Co, at 2 p.m, to-morrow (Friday).






At the first
hint of a

on your handkerchief and pillow
_d, for comfort and protection. Breathe
we the vapour deeply and often, |
i"

THOMAS
K*AIO0F 4 co troy ‘
INGLAN,

GENTLEMEN

GET THESE

NOW.



Each
2

Each

Each





















1950 and 1951 and},

readers is
drawn to the change in the date

ELITE Self colour Shirts... .
trubenised collar
shades of Blue, Tan and Grey,
Sizes 14 te 17—

Athletic Supporters by Johnson &
Johnson, Sizes Medium & Large

ee

Hand Painted Ties — Sceneries of
Barbados —

Striped Pyjamas,
& Large—

oi a



done.

He said that hydraulic tipping
gear in the new trucks comes in
very handy. The old trucks were
fitted with hand pumped tipping
gear. With the new tipping gear
the new trucks can dump the will soon be a large number of
stuff in less time. flies and mosquitoes.

=; PURINA CHOWS
@ FOR POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK
a “See the Difference Purina Makes‘’

mt. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors
SSESEUECEEBUGEEESEEe

EASTER

FALLS ON 25th MARCH

now under bush,

Residents of the area removed
to the Pine and Bay Estate after
the damage by flood water to life
and property in 1949. If this
bush is not cleared away there



We have in Stock - - -

CARD BOARD EGG SHELLS
in 8 sizes. Prices : 32¢., 28¢., and 26c.
These can be used for your Easter Gifts of
Ties, Scarves, Handkerchiefs, Stockings, ete.
or ean be filled with Guava Cheese, Barley
Sugar and other Sweets,

:: ALSO ::

Chocolate Easter Eggs in Plastic Cases and
Marzipan Easter Eggs in Plastic Cups.

KNIGHTS LTD.—ALL BRANCHES

ANIMATED OPINIONS



Says Mr. Leo King:

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BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT!”



MADE IN UK.
The Perfection of Confection

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LONDON. W.3



attached, in

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ENDEAVOUR Striped Cambric
Sizes 38 to 44

$8.30

ee ee ee et fe

Bench cass crenata ia

$4.87

Pyjamas. ins,

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White pure Linen Handkerchiefs,
%4 inch hem—

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Sizes Medium White Cotton Gloves for men

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ised collar attached, Sizes 44 to
Size O.S. Men’s...........94e.



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

Extra Oversize______ DGe. |
|
|
|

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.



PAGE SIX



BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1951



HENRY

MICKEY MOUSE

PCS ANT 4 41 iy ammere 1) f
THE CONFERENCE YS,
IS BREAKING U ) WMBLE I G48

ZL WONDER ...? ae <
a4 MMBLET]
olgiven

= YOU Sé#’ 7
YOU'VE GOT FRI NENDS a ment
ON THE OUTSIDE? 4} yg f

BY LEE

} THAT OLIGAT TO CATCH THEIR H | mp unas ae ol

<=] JATTENTION ONLY AFEW | = | WATER yt

Raa Like} =». | | SECONDS LERT*+AND ONLY

A BLAST FURNACE, |? _
y | THE FLAMING [ ,
PLANE ROARS |

BY CARL, ANDERSON —



FALK







IT PAYS You TO DEAL HERE |

I SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only !

USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
JEFFREYS HEER







Per Carton 480 4.24
Per Bottle 2.50 2.26
Per Case ss rt twC(itC —~=Cié2/.00 FRY’S COCOA i lb. tins 47 42



TOAST TO
YOUR
HEALTH !!
TONIC

LET WINCARNI WINE

)
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ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT

> YOU PULL ¥
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ont a DS.



BUY A BOPTLE TO-DAY.



A FEW
SPANISH BOOKS

BERLITZ
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[aca «7 | || SELECT EARLY FROM
MILK OR SUGAR }
ADVOCATE STATIONERY



Maralyn Milk Plus is creamy milk . . . generously sugared
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New Styles — 20 Shades
and Designs $1.44 yd.



| Regular Services
SPECIAL REMNANTS | Save Time
In JERSEYS, OREPES, ROMAINES and GEORGETTES in _From B'dos to | Flying Time — Wi lo Rates
DRESS, SKIRTS, BLOUSE LENGTHS—at Unbeatable Prices BERMUDA a WI ls $2.16
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A i Bo e of Ladies, Gents and Children’s
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Also Connecting Services to the whole Wale

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THE BARGAIN HOUSE §

30, Swan Street — Ss. ALTMAN, oa 7 $|

7 < oe Ot Oe > Fe. i
LESS FOSS POSES SOS OCS FOSOS FF SSO S FOODS OOO?

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Phone 4585 .



|
|
|
:





THURSDAY, MARCH 8,

4 cents per word on Sundays for each
edditional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is’ $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Netices only after 4 p.m.



THANKS





George uynech (Son), Wife and
Curacao) wife and grand children,
Ciusdsen, Aubrin Liyneh (Son,
Leoni Lynch (daughter, Trinidad),
and children, Clyde and Beril
(grand children) .

6.3.51—In



IN ' MEMORIAM





BIRCH—In loving memory of Elise
Birch, who wes called to rest on
March @th 1949.

“Dear is the grave in which she is
laid

Dear is the memory that never shall
fade

Sweet is the hope that again we

shall meet,
Kneeling together at Jesus’ Feet.”
Inserted by her Dear Friend Elaine
Downes. 8.3.51—-In

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a















CLASSIFIED ADS.



The charge for announcements of FOR RENT —_—- —
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow- |
ee at In ae ee is a nen charge week 72 cents and! Y. M. C. A.
4.50 on week-days an 1,80 on Su ys cents Sundays words —
for any number of words up to 50, and | words 3 cents a were week—4 on ot Tamers FoR ERECTION OF
3 cents per word on week-days and} word Sundays. BUILDING

1951





PUBLIC NOTICES

Tex cents per agate line on week-days
= 3 meee per agate line on Sundeus
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.







The Board of Dirtctors of the ¥.M.C.A.

HOUSES _—_ Application for Tenders for the
erection of a building at Headquarters,
APARTMENT Pinfold Street. ” ’

— Containing 2
reoms upstairs, with W.C.
kitchen and pantry

large The Plans and Specifications ean be
downstairs and yard cus, + AE sees



oe Re Apply “Westmeath” White- Wednesday Tain Marc tate the
Roa 8.3.51—In | hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily except
BUNGALOW: Modern Bungalow, | Sundays.

Belleville, fully furnished. Available
15th March for 3% months, at sable

rent to careful tenants. Ring .
8.3.51—3n



LYNCH: The Lynch family beg through | -———————————______ Tenders submitted will be opened at a
this medium to thank all those who} “AIRY COT"—Brighton Furnished or| 208¢ Meeting to be held at 4.30 p.m. on
sent us wreaths, cards and letters, or ' Unfurnished, for @ month or longer. For the fist March.
in any way expressed their sympathy | further iculars Phone 2452 Miss Park-| _TM® Board does not bind itself to ac-
with us in our recent bereavement | inson, Duneraig, Strathclyde. cept the lowest Tender.
caused by the death of Dorothy 28.2.51—an , HERBERT H. WILLIAMS,
Lynch, St. Matthias Road, Christ | —— aad Secretary.
Church. modern 28.2.51—~8n

: J-bedroom house,
situated Top Rock, unfurnished, Avail-| *

able immediately on 6 months or 12



months lease, For viewing, 4683,
‘or 8569 7.3.$1—3n
WHITE COTTAGE FLAT
St. James.

Furnished or unfurnished,
bething. Private beach.
E. M. Greenidge.
James.”

Good sea-
Appiy Mrs.
White Cottage, St.

ROOM WITH BOARD— In spacious

residence on sea, large double room and| cate) may be obtained from this Office.

bath also one single. Private sandy
beach, extensive grounds, excellent food.
Telephone 2.





PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
oe 12 i Sone eee oste line on Sundays,
â„¢m el . on week~
and $1.80 on Sundays ve

AUCTION
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER





adi
reasonable
883 tary of the YÂ¥.M.C.A.,

25.2.51—4n,} Mot later than Thursday,

6.3.51—3n | Churchwarden’s Office,

Tenders must be submitted Sealed
Celgpes and aBdremed ts: the Store:
Pinfold Street

Inter than Noon 2ist March. =



‘



NOTICE

PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL
ALL persons, Firms and Corporations
having Accounts against the Parish
Saint Michael are requested to send in|
their Vouchers (duly made out in!
Duplicate) to the respective Departmen:s

M h 15th
inst. are 1th

Voucher Forms (Original and Dupli-
FRED J. ASHBY,
Churehwarden’s Clerk.

Parochial Buildings,
Bridgetown.
13.51—Ttn



NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. JAMES.
Applications for tht Post of Dispen-
ser at the St. James Dispensary will be
received by the undersigned up to
Thursday 15th, March. From whom all
necessary information may be obtained
Applicants must be qualified









stn neniensl

af | o











BARBADOS ADVOCATE
GOVERNMENT NOTICE
THE BARBADOS POLICE

Tenders for the Supply of Green Fodder

TENDERS are,invited for the supply daily of 360 lbs. of Green
Fodder tor three months beginning from the Ist of April, 1951, for
the Barbados Police at District “A”

2. Further information is obtainable from the Officet in charge
Mounted Branch, District “A”, Police Station.

3. Tenders should be forwarded in sealed envelopes addressed
to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so as to
reach the Colonial Secretany’s Office not later than noon on 17th
March, 1951. n

8.3.51.—In,



TAKE NOTICE

That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, a corporation of the State of
Ghio, United States of America, whose trade or business adaress is The Gwynne
Building, Sixth and Main. Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. hae applied for the
resistration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of shampoo, anc

i be entitled to register the same after one month from the 8th
cay of March 1951 whet some person shall in the meantime give notice in dupli-
ate to me at my office of opposition of such registration. Th
seen on application at my_ office, ee bn

Dated this 7th day of March, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS
Registrar of Trade Marks
8.3.51-—3n



TAKE NOTICE

Risco

That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, a corporation of the State of









LASTING SAFETY



DUNLOP rorr

CAR TYRES

—for
longer
life




DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING

COMPANY LIMITED

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)











i




apcegemmestiaiartnay, senile ittnnenasien-


PAGE SEVEN





Fresh, Lovely

GREEN ESCHALOT

WHOLESALE & RETAIL
Any Quantity
DOMINICA MARKETING
AGENCY,



















Dial 4015.

(a

| wae Nosteat
‘OY CAR, PLANE and SPEED |
BOAT
| in the World
See these amazing Toys
j at
| JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
ee
Enamel — IT
In All Colours
at

JOHNSON'S HARDWARE

Just Received . ..

Tins Red Salmon
Red Salmon %'s
Table Butter 1's
Powdered Milk
Potted Meat
Kardomah Coffee 4's





l's

Pkas

Macaroni
All Bran
Puffed Wheat
Cornflakes

Tins Tono

’ Peanuts

Pkys. Figs

Slabs Bacon

Sliced Bacon

Tins Carrots

‘
STUART & SAMPSON —
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for
BEST BOTTLED RUM

















Jetsam out of H.B, Mare (Ginger), Dam
of Miss Friendship. Can be seen at Eagy
Hall Plantation. Phone 95—263, By kind
permission of the Stewards of the
B.T.C. this Animal will be offered for
scale at the Paddock just after the 3 p,m.
Race on Saturday 10th March, 1951.
4.3.51—Tn

MULE: One (1) large Chestnut Mule,







Mare, Cart and Harness, E, A. Daniel,
Baxters Rd. Dial 2464. 7.3.51—6n
POULTRY



2 White Wyandotte Cockerels bred
fiom imported laying strain. Price $4.00
each or exchange for value in Corn, or
Poultry for eating. Dial 3394.

6.3.51—3n

MISCELLANEOUS

AMERICAN BRASSIERS: Many fam-
ous brands perfect fitting Brass at popu-
jar prices regular brassiers also straples:
in art silk, lace and cotton, white a
tea rose. A. and B. Cups 32—38.
88c to $1.80 Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad
Street 8.3.51—2n

ANTIQUE FURNITURE -—~ Call at Ralph
Beard’'s furnishing showroom, Hardwood
Alley. Phone 4683. 6.3.51—n

ANTIQUES, which include a good
variety of Glass, China etc, Call in at
Ralph Beard’s furnishing showroom
Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.

6.3.51—6n

ANTIQUE CLOCKS At Ralph
Beard’s furnishing showroom, Hardwood
Alley. Phone 4683, 6.3.51—6n

——

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n

a a

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances ana
draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n

COINS—Collection of old silver and
cepper coins, for inspection call 4476.
7.3.51—t.f.n.

CHAIRS—Tubular Chairs $9.17_ each.
With arms $12.00. At Ralph Beard's
Showroom, Hardwood Alley. 6.3.51—in































DIVING MASK & SWIM FINS. Phone

. 6.3.51—3n

——S — -

GOLF CLUBS & BAGS; One set Gents

an@ one set of Ladies. At Ralph Beard's

Showroom, Hardwood Alley. the
8.3.51—

—_—$
LIPTON’S TEA: This brand is used by
discriminating consumers the world over
and a testing sample is yours for the
asking. Save that part of the label indi-
cating weight and return to us as they
are valuable, John F. see a vi
.3.51—2n

eal

MAHOGANY CHEST or DRAWERS:
Modern design , book and magazine stand,
Phone 8477. 8.3.51—1n

furn
DOORS—The distin: | Gove:

MODERNFOLD

guished solution to your special
architectural problem of door closures, |
screens, movab:. partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & )., LTD.

One DOMO CREAM SEPARATOR—
perfect order, very little used, practically
new. Mrs. Peebles, Bayleys, St. Philip

7.3.51—in

POLAR ICE CREAM—In shilling boxes
every day, Noel Roach & Sons, Speixhts-

town. 8.3.51—28n

—_—$—$———————————_—
PRESSURE See —_ Used twice.
Owner leaving. Price $10.00, Phone

3928, 6.3.51—3n

PIANO—Piano upright. Good tone.
$175.00 at Ralph Beard's showroom
Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.

6.3.51—3n

——<$<—_$_—$—$—$——
STAMPS: Two complete sheets of Bar-

bados surcharged One-penny or Two-
pence. Offers P.O. Box 92
7.3.51—t.i.n,

—
STEPLADDERS — 6 tread Steel Step-
li dders $12.94 and 4 tread $9.88. At Ralph

Beard’'s Showroom, Hardwood Alley
6.3.51—610



——————
THREE VENETIAN BLINDS. Size 4 [ft
by 4 i Phone 8497 6.3.51—3n

—_———
TO WHOLESALERS ONLY—Stocks of
Enamel Ware which includes; Pails,
Chambers, Bowls, Pie Dishes, Kettles
ail at Ralph Beard’s Show room. Hard-
wood Alley. 6.3.51—6n





Solicitors. Vestry. Clerk,
St. Andrew.
8,3.5f—6n

{LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICT

Church and is suitable for business prem- The application of O. A. Harris holder
ises, | ot liquor license No, 445 of 1951 granted
Inspection any day on application to the} to him in respect of a board and shingle
tenant. shop attached to a wooden residence at
This property will be set up for sale by ‘ Montrose, Ch. Ch, for permission to vse
Public Competition at our Office No. 14,{ said liquor license at @ wall and wooden

47.3,51—6n

PROPERTY known as No. 24, James
Street standing on 2,181 square feet of
land. This property is situate at Lower
Jemes Street, opposite James Street





James Street at 2 p.m. on Friday ie
March 1951.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE
Solicitors.
7.3.51—9n

OFFERS will be received by the;
undersigned up to the 15th day of
March 1951, for the buildings known
as Calais (land not included) situated







on Dover Coast, Christ Church. The} Police Court, District “A” on Monde the
purchaser to demolish the buildings and} 19th day of Mareh 1951 at 11 o'clock,
clear the land within thirty days from} a.m.
the date of purchase. E. A. McLEOD,
K. BE. McKENZIE, Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”
Neils Plantation, St. Michael. $.3.51—1n
24,2.51—6n.
a ———
ENDLEIGH — crores CP a and
George St., Belleville. welll ous”
on 31, sq. ft, Land — Open an closed LOST
galleries, Drawing and Dining rooms, 3
bedrooms, toilet and bath, tea room,
y and kitchen. Servants’
Wee and “Garage. Space, lawn. GOLD HORSESHOE PIN set with
Dial 2273 for appointment to view. white Pearls, between Worthing Guest

Mrs. E, A. LESLIE.
3.3.51—3n,

WANTED

Minimum charge week %2 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents o
word Sundays.







HELP

tenet pa RENN REESNEpSNSGTSTRETNN
A YOUNG MAN with business expe-
rience, as Sect@tary for a local Company.
Apply by letter only, to—
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.
7.3.51—6n



——

Two experienced Teachers are needed
to fill vacancies on the Staff of the Middle
School of Naparima Girls’ High School
as from April 15th,

Preference will be given to those with
Certificates higher than the Cambridge
School Certificate.

Subjects to include, History, Needle-
work and Physical Training.

Ali applications must be made in writ-
ing to the Principal.

6.3.51—3n

know! of type-

. bly one
with some jous experience in
Commission ice work.

Apply in writing to :—
JAMES A. LYNCH & Co., tte,

“Bridgetown.
28,2.51— T.F.N.

MISCELLANEOUS

WAN’ TO RENT—Furnished or un-
Fiat. Wanted by Head of a
t. From July

e/o Advocate Co.
6.3.51—4n

jewels

——
IMMEDIATE ra for nd

lery, old and late

Phone 4429 or call at GES,

Pi

, ad~
joining Royal Yacht Club.
20.2.51.—T.F.N.

a
IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-



Young Lady wii
writing and





rnment
1951. Apply Box B.



ee ie ee

Antique .

4429.
20.2.51.—t.f.n.





FOR SALE 4

MISCELLANEOUS

VENETIAN
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to}
your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dia) 4476
A. & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n.

YACHT — Yawl “Frapeda” approx.
37% ft, long, with gray marine engine.
Recently painted and in good condition.
Apply: Vincent Burke. Telephone 4569
or 3026.





YACHT; One (1) 12 h.p. Yacht Bost.

in

good condition.
Fernum

Dial 2747, C. O

8.3, 51-6



}
| 33 Running feet Verandah Rail, 3 ft
|
;





high made of 1 in. square bar iron
C. Manning, Newlands, St. Michael

6.3.51

‘



returned to Mrs, McCulloueh, Worthing








27.251—t.f.n. |




shop with ehedroof attached at Uppe
Dayrell's Road, Ch. Ch.. within Dist. “A”.

Dated this 7th day of March 1951.
To: EB. A. McLEOD, Esq

Police Magistrate,

District "A"
Oo. A. HARRIS,
s Applicant
N.B.—This application will be consid-

ered at a Licensing Court to be held at







House, Royal Hotel, Race Track, Bridge-
town or St, John’s Church, Reward if
Guest House 6133. 7.3.51—3n

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET One (1)
B.T.C. Ticket Series N. 2610. Finder ‘to
return same to me at W. A. Medford &



Co. 8.3.51-—2n
One B.T.C. Spring Meeting Ticket
Series U. 1674 with names on back

Finder kindly return same to QO. Smai!
Glebe Land, St. George, 8.3.51—In

Used Postage Stamps

Bought, Sold, Exchanged;

.

Cecil Jemmott
Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy
33 Broad Street, ee, ere
—Iin


















-t oe
“IT HAS IT |
IT has style,
IT has Beauty of Colour,
IT has correct modern lines,
IT has durability,
IT has all you want,





IT’s the modern De Luxe

Table Model Gas Hotplate
Priced to sell
your Gas
Bay St,

at Showroom




BAND CONCERT
By kind permission of the
Commissioner of Police

THE POLICE BAND
will give a

CONCERT

at HASTINGS ROCKS
On Friday, March 9th
at 8 p.m.
In aid of
Lawrence Child Health



















St.




= ee aes SS

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE’
OF THE WEST INDIES
EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT
A COURSE OF TEN LECTURES
on
INTRODUCTION TO
STUDY OF ECONOMICS

AN THE

by
ERROL BARROW, B.Sc. (Econ.)
at the ¥.M.C.A
Beginning Friday March 9tt
at
8 p.m
' Fee for Course $1.00

Members of Ex












American Doctor’s Discovery



rahi RANGE | SAGO SEARERED, a. Gann. IE
' ie on ag oe “. ~e are eat % t
Strengthens Blood, ie forth a ti une | £8. “ALCOA PENNANT” 2.00 ¢, |<. March 2ivd April 3rd
Body, Memory, Brain, Mus- sort Worn-ous _—_———$—
For thstance, Dr. T. A. | NORTHBOUND
cles, and Endurance—Better Ellis, of Canada
cently wrote: “Not S.S. “ALCOA PENNANT” ..

Than Gland O

Thanks to the discov
Doctor, it is now possible for those who
feel prematurely old, Run-down and
‘Worn-out, to experience again the thrill of
Youthful Vigour, Ambition, and Vitality.
This great discovery, which is a simple
home treatment and can be used secretly
by anyone, quickly brings a surplus of vi-
tatty, and an ability to enjoy the pleasures
o fe.

No longer is it necessary for to suffer
from Loss of Vigour and Manhood, Weak
Memory and Body, Nervousness, Impure
Blood, Sickly, Skin, Depression and Poor
Sleep. Instead you merely take this simple
home treatment a few days and you will
find that your vigour is restored. No mat-
ter what your age, you will find that your
gland activity and nerve force is increased
and restored. You will find youthful Baris
cal power in this Glecavery, which builds
rich, pure blood and literally makes your
body tingle with new energy and vita! ity,
This simple home treatment js in pleasant
easy-to-take tablet form and thousands
who have used it ar ae it is far better
than any other met fe

Works in 24 Hours
This new medical discovery,
Vi-Tabs, has been tested by thousands in
America and has achieved results that
seem almost miraculous. It has conquered
obstinate opene thes had Sood a ophey
atment. rescue’ ec ‘0

Sremature old age and deviliy, fe has
made older men as good as new. It has
brought pappiness beyond all price to thou-
sands who believed that they were old,
worn-out, and finished with the joys o!
life, And the beauty of this re-
markable discovery is that
it brings results so
quickly, In 24 hours
you can ind feel
& tremendous = im-
provement and within
eOiy) one week it will literal-
eVigsly make you a new man.

ions.
of an Americen






red corpusele =

likewise acti
gene aren.
‘ollowed by renewed en-

b: " -
rel isha arate
and worsen in middle
ie










it ie
me or older age:
And a wid known Italian Dr.
N. G. Gi . recently wrote: ired-
fl a iB eoeunken 68 80} need
blighes ayn building |
formula, which wor! ndid
b rves and

ater
run-down









gee
to weak, uoervous,

© Guaranteed To Work* -

Vi-Tabs are not an experiment. Thi
simple home treatment, which can be used
with absolute aap we the press

of an Ame: '
new outh, vital-


















joctor
successful and is giving
ca ry eal success, Viet °
use oO
are now distributed by chemist;
wih estionadie® di w
w uestional mi
q iiorthe " ay
and nervous system. Vi-
proved their ster! wo
our own particular case.
the test. See for yourself how much you
feel
Tabs must bri;
tory or you simply return the em
age an cont othing oe The @
ant fou are the sole
ee louble-strength
tle o ittle, and Jasts
eight da uarantee fully protects
your treatment imme-

ity, and energy to m
\~
der @ guarantee of pie
drastic and irritati hich
millions of sufferers, but ar:
ef, stroj
yor ne
ergy, and vitality, and be entirely satistac-
+ a ie ju dr of your own
l. ic!
vi-Tabs corts
As the
u, you should ge
diately 80 that you too will know what it is





SiS Vy Vi-T. to feel 10 to 20
rea sicssoee Iesteo’ Vi-Tabs Xa full of vigo

and vitality. g

pocany other countric:| Restores Manhood and Vitality ,

Jin many other countries



















OCD POOPPDOOPOOOPOOO FH, PELE LESSEE OOOH
5 s

; To ‘et | RECIT AL

7 ers

; Please be informed that we have i International Folk Songs

; just opened the most hygiene ib

Diapers, Face Cloths, Hankies, Bed
Spreads, etc.

We are the only importers of this
class of goods in the island. Cail
early to avoid disappointment.

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.

Dial 9100 where you will find

goods unobtainable at other Stores

and the prices very low.
71,3,51—2n

by
Joke & Eelco Wiebenga

on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14,
at 8 p.m,
“Wakefield,” Whitepark
Tickets obtainable at
“Wakefield”

ADMISSION: 3/- & 2/-

FOR SALE

‘CRANE HOUSE’

One of the most charmingly situated properties of this
nature in the Island. The house has proved its solidity
by withstanding pest hurricanes and contains 5 large
bedrooms (with hot and c.ld water) spacious lounges,
dining reom, large cocktail bar with bamboo décor, wide
shady galleries, garages, ‘turerooms, bathing chalet, }
heavy diese¥ lighting plant and the amenities customary |
with this type of property. There is extensive acreage
including a long stretch of the Crane Beach, large coconut |
grove, gardens planted with dowering shrubs and shade }
| trees, also grazing land. The coastal views could hardly |
| be excelled and the pathing is excellent. |
| Further information may be obtained from the sole agent |

JOHN M. BLADON |

AFS., F.VA |
=~ 6)! Plantations Building ‘|







DEPOTS

at



>










’Phone 4640






SS.



ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE,

an a
SS ————————ee———eeE—_———













February 23rd






Sails for St, John &
Halifax.
Sails for St, John
& Halifax

ee

Due Mareh Sth
s

“AILOA PARTNER" Due March 20th

These vessels have limited passenger aveommodation,

N SERVICE



APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIA

mati atin tarsi ero





PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia , for sail.

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children,

PROTECT THE waa YOUR BELTS
w

“FLEXO” BELT DRESSING

Obtainable at...

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER HEAD LANE.





“GOOD NEWS” for

ASTHMATICS

A New Guaranteed Remedy for the Relief of ASTHMA
This skillfully blended preparation, assures you of
immediate relief in this most distressing disease and
is the result of years of intensive study in Asthmatic
conditions.

Keep a Bottle handy and relieve yourself of the
constant threats of Asthmatic attacks
Retail Price :—12/- Per Bottle

Obtainable at...

BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES

Ltd.—Broad Street
and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings













word Sundays. % gists Drug- pudaiag: Sra and Main Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A., has applied for the — = =
y order of the Com ; gictration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of vegetable shorten- <= SSS
" Health, St. Michael T eer eee te A. W. JOHSON, ne and cooking fat, and will be entitled to register the same after one month from
AUTOMOTIV Merch 9th at the yard of the Scavenging Rector & Chairman, | the 8th day of March 1951 unless some person shall in the meantime
Dept., Church Village, (1) 1945 ms St. shape as Ihio, pease ve: ——s of America, whose trade or business address is The bt
; . 7 e . > 7 ..51—4n. | tive notice in duplicate to me at my office of o sition of such registration ie
eeAR: 1947 Standard Eight. in very Kgod dus ake ce ae ine ce ee mark, can be seen on application ma pe o foe 0 eee ony =
r , 7 : . ated this 7th day of March, 1951 TRA NEW -
2 _j,| Sale at 1 p.m. Terms Cash. NOTICE :
9.3,51—14 H. WILLIAMS
. VINCENT GRIFFITH, et. ide M ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED |
ee See i ere A40, 6.3.51—4n Auctioneer THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW re near an (MANZ Linn) The M.V. “CARIBBER" will ac FOR ENJOYMENT
‘cuntryman—13, miles, condition. a: VESTRY BY-ELECTION eee cept Cargo and Passenger for |
; ————— ; a i 1980) $
Dial 2838. 6.3.51-—~3n x ' I HEREBY give notice that I have M.S. “TONGARIRO” fs scheduled to Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, The Mone Savin Wa
- AUSTIN 5-TONNER TRUCK 1946 MODEL | ®PPOinted the Vestry room near the ‘ii Melbourne February 20th, Sydner Nevis and St. Ktts, Sailing Fridry .
CAR: One Morris Minor in perfect con- We are instructed by the Insurance| Aimshouse at Belleplaine, as the place TAKE NOTICE Februany 28th, Brisbane “March” qth, Ar- Sth inst
dition. Owner driven—done 1,600 miles.| Agents to sell this damaged vehicle by where all persons duly qualified to riving at Barbados early April 1981 NEW and renewed MAHOGANY
Apply: A. Garnes, Erin Ville, Jemmotts| Public Auction at the General Omnibus| Vote at the Election of Vestryman for This vessel has aingle space ‘for Hard ! aad other Wardrobes, Dresem-
Lane, after 4 p.m. 7.3.51,—2n] Garage, Nelson Street, at 2 p.m. on| the said Parish, may meet on Monday . . Frozen and General car The M.V, “DAERWOOD" will robes, — Chests-of-drawers — and
————-?| Friday 9th March, 1951, March 12th 1961, between the hours of Cargo ted oe 1 f accept Cardo and Passengers {for Linen Presses—-Vanaties, Dressing
CAR: One Standard Vanguard in good JOHN M. BLADON 30 and 11 o'clock in the morning to Ladi . mh ait rough ta St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruoa Tables, Stools Screen Frames
condition, mileage 15,000, Apply F. C ‘Auctioneer, | elect a Vestryman in the place of Darry for British GQuiant, Barbados, "Windward and Passengers only for St, Vin- Single and Double Bedsteads,
Hutson, Telephone 3905. edeces 2.3,51—5n,| Atfield Foster (deceased). ‘ and Leeward Islands ‘ ~ cent, Date of sailing to be notified ; Separate Side Rails, Laths.
3.51! Signed C. A. Skinner. i ; ONE: WNE
‘ Dining, Kitchen and Faney
ELECTRICAL By public auction at the Customs on ae nt Bt Andrew PONE, PONY bo Tae: 'asah HL yg, GeO Me TIME: anaes, er apes, et Soa
| Thursday the 8th, at sharp 11 o'clock be- 3.3.51—Bn PROCTERZ &@ GAMBLE " af reer as Tel, 404. caraere: Pinos Colle
= Larders, Waggons, Liquor Cases.
ELECTRIC STOVES & HOT PLATES.| fore the races the following items:— MADE IN U. Da COSTA & CO. LTD., Sonheubhar ;
Piease drop in and see them. John F.| Several Cartons of Cigarettes, One we Trinidad, Barbados, ' Coolerator,
Hutson Ltd. 7.3.51—2n| 11) Haremock, Tins of Margarine, NOTICE B.W.I B.W.I
cee ato ah ae a hoi Baten) and Deal onienet ,THE,PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, a corporation of the State ot — : See ea L Ss
ELECTRIC TOASTERS at John F. Hut-| Planks, Empt: Drums, B: . nio, nited States of merica, whose trade or business address is The wynne ° e
pound. Tabk-an| ahd seveens pA ene aida “ nee OF 8ST, PHILIP Guilding, Sixth and Main Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A., has applied for the
DARCY A. SCOTT. pm ye ae oe ae Philip hereby notifies] registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of soap and will . Trafalgar Street — Dial 4069
S at ; ” a ster ame @ one mor ?
ELECTRIC IRON John F. Hutso: Mov, Austioneer. @ facilities of the King} be entitled to register the same after one month from the 8th day of Mareh
Ltd. 7.3.51—2n 3.3.51—3n George V, Memorial Park can be rented | 1951 unless some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at le - — eee
ceed Sas doable seaiamih ; ae for dances, amusements, etc, my office of opposition of such registration, The trade mark can be seen on appli- “Sou
ELECTRIC KETTLES at John F. REAL ESTATE with” the Ghuschwarden Mr. Denes | 8 Dated this th day of March, 1061 Inc.
Hut da a _ ’ ‘ ates nis th a ren, .
utson ie 7.3.51—2n | Garner M.C.P., Marchfield, St. Philip. H, WALLAMA: te Miki
ELEC * “LASCELL ES. situat t hi P. S. W. SCOTT, Registrar of Trade Marks,
Piesae bios NSA tae teas ae Christ Chureh, standing on eat ‘cae Clerk, to the Vestry, St. Philip. 83M é NEW YORK SERVICE
Hutson Ltd 7.3.51—2| feet of land. The house is built of stone 3.3.51—Tr B.S. “Myken" sails 23rd February, “+: arrives Barbados ¢th March,
and contains, open and closed galleries, 5.8. “Seabreeze” sails 16th March, a, brtives Batheeos te Maren. Building Contractor
LIVESTOCK drawing and dining rooms, three bed- a ee en -i
rooms, breakfast room kitchenette and | NOTICE * NEW ORLEANS SERVICE PORTLAND, GEORGE ST
"HIORSES—2 y.o. Gelding be Gelding “Ladyswan” tery a ae Sante and aca 4 ’ 8.8. “Rung” sails isth February. — arrives Barbados Ist March, BELLEVILLE, Phone 4448
(Sin Gackeriack’ oe Mune S047) Une | Dor ene apmcntraat. PARISH OF 8ST. ANDREW an ‘ a 8.8. "Alcoa Patriot” sails Tth Mareh— arrives Barbados Qird March "
named 2 y.o, gelding (Jim Gackerjack Tha ate 1 f t |. Applications will be received by the —
ex Princess Stella). Apply: J. R.| public Pee ec we ~ ee eee eee undersigned up to Saturday Mareh 24th 5 = CANADIAN SERVICE
Eawards. Telephone 2520, Street, Bridgetown, on Tuesday the 13tn| 1951 for the Post of Sexton of St will undertake the
27.2.51—t.f.n.| March 1981 at 2 p.m. pe cattle glade at a Salary of $15.0 SOUTHBUCND BUILDING & REPAIRING
m0} . ie of ILs iE DO} ¢
HORSE — Cheatant 1 on ola cy CARRINGTON & SEALY C. A. SKINNER, “a Name of Ship SAIL HALIFAX ARRIVES B'DOS of





Charles Mc Enearney & Co.









HOUSES, BUILDINGS,
BRIDGES, ROADS,
ARMACO TUNNELS,
YARDS,

TARAZO. FLOORS

30 Years Experience
Building.

Your Patronage Solicited,










Barbados Amateur
Boxing Association

Under the Patronage of
His Exceliency the Governor
announce

ELIMINATION. BOUTS

in preparation for the West

» Indian Championships to be

held in Trinidad during the
Easter Week-end.

8 THRILLING BOUTS
EACH NIGHT 8

Commencing .









§ p.m, on MONDAY 12th
and THURSDAY 15th a

THE MODERN HIGH
SCHOOL STADIUM

Come and see Cammie Mc:








Clean in action again
Gilbert Goodman, Lau
rence Harper, Torpedo

Browne and members o
the Local Constabulary,

Bookings at

Com Beard,
Hardwood Alley (4683)
or---

Modern High School (2846)



















RINGSIDE i B/=
RING CIRCLE ::: 3/-
BLEACHERS ::: 1/6

4.3.51—4n.



, Ltd.







PAGE £IGHT



B.G. Faces Defeat:\

244 Runs Behind
Bayley Hits 94: Christiani 33

(By 0. S. COPPIN)

KINGSTON, Jamaica, March 7,

B.G. to-day made an impressive start of 149 runs for che
first wicket in quest of the required total of 510 rurs to stave
oif defeat at the hands of Jamaica. They were 244 runs
behind with three wickets intact when play ory the fourth

day of the first Jamaica-B.G. test ended.

It seemed likely that B.G

would give Jamaica a good run
when Bayley and Wight carried
the score to 149 without loss but

careless strokes by Bayley in his
nineties robbed him of his cen-
tury and B.G. made most of the
chances to keep the issue oper

Five more wickets fell for 92 runs

and only a- stubborn effort © by
Robert Christiani gave a little
ray of hope,

Another blow for B.G. came
when Valentine had Christiani

caught off the last ball of the day
and B.G. finished the day’s play
with 266 runs for seven wickets.
Valentine took early punishment
but came back in the second spell
to claim five for 101 in almost
33 overs. There is little doubt that

B.G. will be defeated early to-
morrow

Bayley and Leslie Wight opened
B.G.’s innings faced with the tre-

mendous task of scoring 511 runs
or keeping B.G.’s end up for two
days to uvgid defeat. The wicket
was still firm and the pace
bowlers Goodridge and Johnson
were keeping up a good pace with
the odd ball occasionally flying
but the batsmen were comfortable.
The first half hour's play produced
17 runs including a class cover
drive for four runs by Bayley off
Goodridge. With the score at 40
Bonitto rested Johnson who had
sent down five overs for, five runs
but persisted with Goodridge
(Who had bowled 5 for 31) in an
obvious effort to let the selectors
see more of him.

Bayley punished Valentine lift-

grounds for six runs to enter the
thirties.

Neville Bonitto brought off an-
other brilliant catch close at the
wicket to dismiss MceWatt off Val-
entine. The score was now 214/
6/17. The score reached the 250
mark after 281 minutes of play,
Patoir having joined Christiani.
A pull to the square leg boundary
gave Christiani his fifty after be-
ing at the wicket for 128 minutes,
Christiani added three runs before
being dismissed by Valentine with
what proved to be the last ball of
the day. This was a vicious leg
break which took the edge of the
bat ror Goodridge to take a simple
eatch. The score was 266 runs tor
the loss of seven wickets, Patoir
not out 6.

JAMAICA—ist Innings 273
BRITISH GUIANA—Ist Innings
JAMAICA—Second Innings

BRITISH GUIANA SECOND oe
Wight I.b.w. b Bonitto

Bayley b Valentine

Persaud stpd. b Valentine

Christiani e Goodridge b Valentine
C. H. Thomas c N. Bonitto b Val-

$4

5

53
entine 5
J. lL. Thomas c¢ Mudie b Bonitto 14
McWatt ¢ N, Bonitto b Valentine 17
Patoir not out 6
Extras
Total (for 7 wkts,)

Fall of wiekets : 1
4—191;

-149; 2-157; 3.
5-—216; 6—241; 7-266
BOWLING ANALYSIS
c M R
Johnson : 5 1 5
Goodridge
Valentine
A, R. Bonitto
Mudie

owucct





BARBADOS ADVOCATE





FURRY



S. RAMADHIN

F. WORRELL

WORRELL, RAMADHIN
HEAD THE AVERAGES

LONDON, March 7.

FRANK WORRELL and Sonny. Ramadhin, the two
West Indies-members of the Commonwealth Cricket Team
which sails for home to-morrow, after another successful
tour of India, had the best batting and bowling records
respectively among the men who played throughout the
tour, szys Reuler. :

Worrell, whose aggregate of 1,902 runs was the highest
among the batsmen, played 34 innings (3 not out) for an
averege of 61.354, while Ramadhin who sent down nearly

1,300 overs, took the highest total number of wickets, 82.
for an average of 19.70 runs.

H. W. Stephenson, the Somerset wicketkeeper, who was one
of the players tiown out to reinforce the team later in the tour, had
an average of 71 flor 8 innings in 6 of which he was not out.

Similarly among the. bowlers, Jim Laker (Surrey) who returned
home early in December, had a better average than Ramadhin with
15.83 while taking 37 wickets in over 400 cvers.—Reuter.

Rest Essential For ’7.B. Patients

@ From Page 5





some easily grown vegetables or

















‘lin dealing with children, and in

| eourts:

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1951

COUGHING























‘Delinquency Starts At Home:

| IT IS IN the home that one always practically finds th
cause of any kind of anti-social, behaviour in the juven? ei

the London Juvenile Courts~Magistrate; Mr. Basil H f-
| riques, C.B.E., J.P. told a big audience at the British Council.
| last night. He was giving a talk on “Methods of combatifg)

juvenile delinquency.”
mani she mane, ge

Qne of the things they in -Eng-
fail to do, he said,.. was to an early age.
reform the home at.the same. time ees aes 2 the films






ro reforming the child. imitate 4 o Cs

ig . first on the juvenite| ie

courts, Mr. Henriques cay that Ses wi ep how te at sub-e¢ |
the reason for having a separate !

juvenile court is that a child
should'not be made to feel’he is a
eriminal nor should. a child get
contaminated.

Women can be extremely useful

Then i
America. ‘they
is of ane % rie a
wrong Yidea to get oe a renal f
mind at that early age.

Bnglend there sre women. maste- whole strength of a nation: =

the hoi
trates who assist in the juvenile seg yg a Be

caught on, the heart of aun
would be shaken.

It is essential that the magis- of
The probation officers could do

trate watches the reactions of a
child, but here a magistrate has|@ lot to help vyteny it ge bevler ;
to. be. writing the evidence-all the Aor e, eee 3 Se

while. In land, however, the 7

magistrate has time to concentrate assistants han sénd_ “thier into
on the child, dntitutions:.

There can, be .nothing more
agonising than for a child‘to hear
his parents quarrelling. To find
‘that where there should be con-
‘cord and harmony the hardest
things are said, Just gets the child
‘desperate .

Juvenile courts should not be}:
held in the same court as the adult. But one of the things the West
Visiting the prisons here, he said,|Indies must fight against if they:
it horrified him to see that young |ate.to.survive, Mr, Henriques }
prisoners were nina with the ]is the evil of promiscuous: inter
older ones. It could bring nothing | Course. It was so great a problem |.
but harm. in ae wt mone eee souls }
bg not even’ begin to think of Ways};
To-day the whole trend of the and means of getting-rid of it, but-|:

arguments was to keep people :
under the age of 21 from going en and” education would

It is by the change of expres-
sion, a movement of the hand or
such a thing that one can tell
whether a child approves of the
evidence given.





“ Follow this
Simple Beauty Plan

Avwash your face with Palmolive Soap

Fini sernte woe

» this 3-¢imes a day for 14 d
watt ive’s full
utifying tt

PS. For bath and shower, get the thrifty Bath Size Palmolive
to prison. A sentehoe shoula- bal DOCTORS PROVED evade TR Me Ub

made only as a last resort. eee, eet:
After ee work or H bal, pee ovely on ¥

Cow & GATE! Bod











At the courts, justice must be
done to the child and the child
must feel absolutely at ease. In
England the public is not soreT |
ted though the Press is and the
Press can report the cases so long
as they do not mention the name’
of the child, or describe the case
in such a way that the child can
be identified.

fatigue pon pop and releases |ji|.
new energy. ly

WILLIAM JOHNSON,
, Crumpton Street,

ing a half volley high overhead
into the stand for the second six
of the tournament, following this
up with an extra cover drive for
four runs sending up 50 in 58
minutes. Bayley reached 50 in
83 minutes with an on drive, off
skipper Bonitto for two, The
score was then 177. Bayley’s
seore included three fours and one
six. Lunch time saw the score at
83 Bayley 51 not out, Wight 27 not

Referees Wanted

at hand and there is a grave short-
age of referees. This fact was em-
phasised during the last foot-
ball season when the few referees
volunteering were called upon
to shoulder the arduous task of
sometimes three
















taking matches,

out. times a week.
With the 1951 season approach-
After Lunch ing, the Referees Association are
On resumpizon Bayley twice}â„¢Making a call for those who are

interested in furthering the game
to come to the aid of the Associ-
ation,

So grave is the position that it
is doubtful whether the game can
be carried on under prevailing
conditions. The Referees Associa-
tion would like all those interest-
ed in helping with the games to
communicate with Mr, L, F. Har-
ris, Hon. Secretary Referees As-
sociation c/o Roebuck St, Boys’
School as soon as possible.

foured off Valentine with a hook
to the pull boundary and an on-
drive.

The batsmen took the score to
100 in 107 minutes without loss,

With the score at 117 and
Bayley’s individual score at 70,
Binns failed to stump, Bayley
having stepped out to Mudie and
missed. Later with his score av
92 Bayley drove hard to Valentine
at midon but the latter dropped
the catch.

But Bayley was dismissed be-
fore reaching the coveted century.



. a@ habit, pushing a bottle of spice
tea into a baby’s mouth to keep
THE 1951 Football season is near{!!â„¢ quiet. That carelessness was

It was regrettably too common

chiefly responsible
mortality rate
years of life,
She gave a full explanation with
regard to the weaning of the child.
She said that bush teas were dan
gerous and should be eliminated
from the diet. Care should be
taken about: the child’s habits of
eating from the earliest age and it
should have regular meals, no eac-
ing between meals; fresh whvle-
some food—home-made preter.
ably; variety of diet; water drink.
ing, but not along with the meal;
fruit after meal; no candy as far
as possible; food not too highly
sweetened and within reasonable
limits it should be forced to eut.
She said that it was important
that a working class mother shoula
learn to plan for her family to
ensure economy of labour, econ-
omy of time and economy of purse,
She stressed the use of goat's
jmilke in preference to cow’s milk
lap its fat content was more con-

for
the

the high

in first two

other in the backyard in order to
allow the purse to procure some
other necessary food,

Mothers she said, would be wetl
advised to make themselves ac.
Guainted with:

The right type of food; and
reasons for the use of each article
of diet; the best and most econom-
ical buys; the best, easiest and
quickest method of preparation;
the right method of weaning and
training their children and the
most economical, labour saving
and thriftiest method of manage-
ment,

If those points were observed,
the working class mother would
be able to build for herself, a
healthy and contented life.

Pasteurisation

Mr, W. A. Abranams speaking
on “The Hygiene of Food and Fooc,
handling Places” said that hygiene
ot lood started at its source and
continued during production ana
wuring tne course of preparation
for consumption,

He drew illustrations of such

'tendance is extremely important















Cases come before the court
from say, pranks, to house-break-
ing and larceny. They do not as a
rule bring up cases of swearing.
In the extreme where there is a
case of murder or manslaughter,
such cases must be tried in the
Upper Court.

The regularity of school at-

DANCING SCHOOL — NEW
CLASSES

New classes are being formed
for Ballroom, Tap and Musical
Comedy Dancing and “KEEP
FIT” under the tuition of Miss %&
Joan “Ransori, who holds the
Diploma of the Imperial Society
of Teachers of Dancing and 1s
a Licentiate of the Royal Academy
of Dancing, London, England.

Applications for joining any of
the above or existing classes
should be submitted to iss
Ransom at Greystone Flats, it~
ings, Ch. Ch, (Telephone No, 3390).

Miss Ransom will be taking over
the teaching of the existing class-
es in place of Miss Molly
Radcliffe who has decided to re-
tire from the Madame Bromova
School of Dancing as from the
end of the currert

Madame Bromova and the Hon-
orary Committee thank clients for
their, past patronage. and solicit
their continued support.

fn the life of every child. If he
stayed away from school a chila
would very probably be getting
into some sort of mischief. When
a child plays truant from school
fhere is very likely something
wrong at home, at school or with
the child, He may not be liked at
home, or he may be punished at
school. He may be in.g class in} &
which he does not fit in and he] ¢
may be bored.

Investigations have proved that
films do not affect boys to any
noticeable extent. A boy may go
to the films to get away from home
if he is ill-treated. Going to the
films, however, affects girls. Sub-







How happy Baby is and how healthy — it is a
pleasure to look at him. Buy your Baby, too,
a tin of Health and Happiness — TO-DAY!



At 94 he hit across a straight
ball from Valentine and was
bowled off the pad. Bayley
played a useful confident innings
in 150 minutes. The score -was
then 149/1/94, One hundred and
fifty went up in 152 minutes.

Persaud joined Wight (49) who
gave an easy chance to Rickards
at coyerpoint off Valentine but
reached his individual nfty in 160
minutes, Persaud was never com-
fortable and completely at sea to
Valentine making most ludicrous
strokes and was soon stumped for
5. The score was 157/2/5, Christian!
next man in was shaky to Mudie
and was almost caught § and
bowled, then nearly caugnt in
slips. Binns also failed to stump
him off Valentine at 6.

Skipper Bonitto got Jamaica’s
third wicket when he struck
Wight in front and Umpire Ewart
upheld the appeal for 1.b.w.
Score was 181/3/61. Wight had
prayed a stubborn defensive inn-
ings badly needed by B.G, and
was at the wicket for 200 minutes
hitting six fous. The Radio and
Pressbox housed together consid—
ered that Wight had played the
ball.. Tea was taken with B.G’s.
Score 184/3/61.

After Tea

Seven runs had been added
after the resumption when Thomas
was out to a magnificent one hand
catch at silly mid-off by Neville
Bonitto off Valentine. Lennie
Thomas then partnered Christiani
and with two sweeps to the fine
leg boundary off Bonitto the 200
mark went up after 228 minutes.

But with his score at 14 Thomas
slashed at one outside his off
stump from Bonitto, edged, and
Mudie held a simple catch. The
score was 216/5/14. Robert Chris-
tiani now well set gave the crowd
proof of his first class batsman-
ship, first off driving Valentine for
four runs, then lifting the next
ball high overhead out of the

They'll Do It Every Time ae By Jimmy Hatlo |

Now HE'S THE BOSS: COULD TAKE
ALL AFTERNOON’ BUT THE POOR
SCHMOE ene Caen, HIS ULCER IN TUNE






A cmon! RELAX XZ

FOR ONCE! ALL THE

TIME



A MAN WITH AMBITION, GASTRIC VAN BILK
TOOK FIVE-MINUTE, LUNCHES =:
SANDWICH AND MILK —

Y NOPE (GULP “out

AHEAD «I GOT TOO
MUCH TO 00 (GULP )-

RELAX WHEN IM
HEAD MAN OF
THIS OUTFIT

(GULP)
Ca

Compton Strikes |

Best Form For Tour

AUCKLAND, March 7.

Denis Compton top scorer with |
78 and John Dewes 61 not out?
recaptured their best form to-day!
co put the M.C.C, in a strong posi- |
tion in their match against Auck- |}
land here.

The MCC declared at tea for 298
for seven wickets to lead Auckland
oy 152 runs on first innings, The
home side was still 85 runs in
arrears at the close of play having
lost two second innings wickets for
67 runs,

Compton was in sparkling form
and often advanced boldly down
the pitch before the bowler had
released the ball, He hit eight
fours in his dashing innings,

Dewes too, hammered the bowl-
ing, but was once ‘missed at deep
mid on, Best partnership of the
innings was the fourth wicket
stand of 74 between Compton and

David Sheppard who made 25.
AUCKLAND 1ST INNINGS 116

M.C.C Ist INNINGS
Hutton b, Cleverley 69
Washbrook c. & b, Cammish i
Parkhouse b. Cleverley 19
Compton c. & b. Burke 78
Sheppard c, Kent b. Clark 25
Dewes not “out 61
McIntyre c, Dwyer b. Burke 14 |
Wright c, Cammish b. Cleal ., i
Warr not out 0
Extras « b 41g. 2 nb 4
Total (for 7 wkts. dec.) 298
Fall of wkts; 1—40; 2—01; ~120;
4—194; 5—217; 6—262; 7—286
BOWLING
0 M R
C'ark 22 2 59 4
Cleverly 29 6 79 2
Cammish 19 3 48 1
Cleal 7 o 31 1
Burke 24 4 67 2
AUCKLAND &ND INNINGS
Scott c. Compton b. Wright
Dwyer b, Tattersall
Coleman not out is \
Wallace not out
Extras
_, Total (for 2 wkts.) eT i
ru * frente







PLAYBOYS GO

ENOUGH TO



CS

{stant even in the face of poor

“NO, ALFRED
NOTHING ELSE-
JUST A GLASS OF
SKIM MILK AND
SOME HOT WATER
AND BAKING

foods_as bread, milk, meat ana
home grown vegetables. He puint-
ed out the ditterence between i
clean milk supply and a safe one
and sugyested that pasteurisation
was the only means of making
clean milk safe.

With regard to the question of
food handiing places, he dealt
with the various aspects of site
and methods employed in connec-
tion with the health of the work-
ers in those places,

He said that legislation should
be enacted in order that there
should be compulsory examina-
tions of people dealing with the
sale of food as was done in
Jamaica,

He also pointed out where cases
of infectious diseases would spread
through unhealthy food handlers
and where the question of food
poisoning was likely to arise where
persons were affected with skin
and throat infection.

feeding and as goats had a natural
immunity to pulmonary tubercu
losis,

Thrift should be encouraged es-
pecially in the attempt to produce





What's on To-day

Pclice Courts—10.00 a.m.

Second Day of Barbados
Turf Club Races at Gar-
rison—1,00 p.m,

Mobile Cinema at Mount
Tabor School pasture, St.
John—8.00 p.m.

Inter-Club Division I Table
Tennis match between

Marines and

The Circle Francaise meets

at Combermere Schooi at
8.15 tonight.

The next sitting of the Court
of Grand Sessions will be
on Monday and the Assize
Diary up to Wednesday is
as follows:—

MONDAY
No, 36—Rex vs. Lucius Cools
No, 41—Rex vs. Stanley

HORTICULTURAL
EXHIBITION



COW:s GATE S35
Dhe FOOD of ROYAL BABIES



Lectures To Specialist
Audiences

by




The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 6.15 a.m.
‘Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter) March





























1S Mr. Basil Henriques 7. B. LESLIE & CO. LTD. Agent
Lighting: 6.30 p. in se
High Water: 4. 09 a.m. 4.20 In addition to the public lecture —— ro

‘arch

at 8,30 p.m. on Wednesday,
ting

pm. Methods . of Com!

eee Suventio Delinquency”.

‘Total for Month to Yester- toa taike are specially invited
on



day: .01 in. ° quengy” at 7.30 aren ae
eneenenere _— oe 7 day, March 8th, Excellent
em) e
Youth 1
ve Direction sng: = .m.) sade wane Avra we For
: (3 p.m.) “Youth Work" at 7,15 p.m. on
wind "Velocity: 5 miles per Friday, March 9th,
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.930, All Jectures at’ the British Blouses

Council,

(3 p.m.) 29.876
like
this



FOOTBALL

GRENADA TOUR





Stanton 5
TUESDAY | vat
Nos. 32 & oe = oh % AT ) 2 CHECK
on 8! y mn
: KENSINGTON OVAL ¢
Nes RDNSEDAY WILL NOW BE HELD ON e ee NYLON..PLAIDS
it ; ,
eek awe er eeceaeette SATURDAY APRIL 2h 1x6 ||. in Saxe Blue, Green and re wide
No. 12—Rex vs. Ruby Benn : . s aut> p.m. % Monday 12th Mar. vs. Carlton - ¥ Per Yard . $1.04
No. 16—Rex vs. Albert King m esnear 19 Me ‘s Colts . win} + Steere si NeseFessbeesbedceedare qe
s i . Bae % Thursd vs. Empite %
aguae grarceraat te coe |) WINE Uo The Fecent heavy pains i was Gecieed to AS See eae eee 811 FIGURED RAYON LINGERIE
Pika nantnriewacs ine Man of postpone the Exhibition which was due to be held % Monday rs ee oe

Her Own"—4.45 and 8.30 p.
Plaza—Oistins—“‘Sinbad The ‘Sailor
a. an.



ding the Sunset Trail”
Valley Rangers"—

a

8.40 p.m.

Globe—"Sleeping Car to Trieste”
‘—5.00 and 8.30 p.m,



Haynes Co., Ltd.



EVERY

in Queen’s Park on Saturday,
SATURDAY, APRIL 21ST from 1—6 p.m.

The Exhibition Books are now ready and can be
obtained from the Secretary, C/o Wilkinson &

J & R BAKERIES







A lovely Fabric in a beautiful ane of .

SEASON TICKETS — $1.50
Patterns. 36” wide. Each... sssestsrameane-sssne BEC.

Obtainable from Carlton
members
DAILY

ere CHALLENOR
STAND

March 17th to
















KENSINGTON STAND 2/-
OPEN STANDS 1/-
GROUNDS te +. 1,

PLAY STARTS 5 p.m.





If ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT



awe: of big cities, salt
is ‘used by enginee:
atd public and industrial contractors everywhere.

YOU SHOULD USE IT, TOO

Tough, flexible, yet non-cracking, BOWRANITE is
made in many Suraeis shades. ‘ :
Stocked in .

t _ Permanent Green, Red, Grey, Black and
Super Black’ (Heat Resisting)
in tins of Imperial Measure
ONE GALLON WILL COV. ER 1,000 SQ. FT.
se: eric Pole te pers





"PHONE 4456 e AGENTS
LOAF A PERFECT TREAT WILKINSON & HAYNES Co, Ltd.
SS SSS SSS { Ede = Pat red pa Safad ba nd . Bibiana.





Full Text

PAGE 1

THIRSDAY, MARCH 8, 1951 Rest Essential For T.B. Patients DR. O'MAHONY IN PUBLIC HlALTH TALK At the (ir-si Conference of Pubn Officers in Barbados now being held at Queen's Park %  ornt of the subjects discussed were: •'Tuberculosis", -The Nutrition of the working class mother and child during its pre-school years*' and "The hygiene of food and of food handling places" Dr. J. P. O'Mahony, address11. K Ut Conference on "Tuber(UIOSH" *,iirt that it was a subject they knew a great deal about. but ill. > did not ksaOW Ml about it. Tuberculosis was a disease which was caused by a tuberculous germ. That germ or poison railed a tubercle germ or poison was someth.ng that could not be MC* with the naked eye. but by certain instruments provided in order to enlarge its size. It centred inio two main parts of the body and for the purpose of his talk, he would only deal chiefly with one Tuberculosis in the crenter number of cases, was •• disease of the lungs and was commonly called consumption or a decline. In other cases, it mi also a disease Of the intestines, but the greater number of cases were in the lungs rather than in the gut. The fact that tuberculosis was got mostly in the lungs should give an Idea as to how the germ entered the body, because the body must ha\e contact in some way or other with the germ so that the disease was produced. If there was no contact between the body and the cause of the disease. it was common sense to say that there would be no disease and that was a public health fact. Breathed In or Eaten In order to produce the disease in the lungs, the germ had to get into the lungs, hence one breathed in the germ. If one had the disease in the gut. one either hi i to eat it or drink it. Dr. O'Mahony said that there was only one advice to be taken in a disease of this nature and that was the advice of the doctors, the people who knew something about it. It was absolutely faVefstltj fttf any case of tuberculosis to hav medical advice because the doctor knew how best he could take care of himself during the time he was assisting and would be able to recommend certain treatments so that if the disease was in the early stages the patient would be able to overcome it. He laid stress on the question of rest and said that the patient should be given as much as possible. The idea behind the rest was that it gave the best chance of cure. He said that n person could get tuberculosis jus< as well from a slum area as in an ores of freth air up to two or threw thousand feet. There was no special climate for tuberculosis and that was a fact. He did not think that d'rect %  unahlne for tuberculosis was good as in many cases it made th disease worse. The patient he said must eat nourishing food and a balanced diet was needed. Foods liktmilk, fish and eggs that contained protein were of the greatest importance to persons suffering from tuberculosis. He said that Denmark had more dairy produce than perhaps any country in the world and it was known that war had a very bad effect on the tuberculosis rate of any country. During the last war. Denmark was overrun bv the Germans from 1940—45. but in spite of that, the tuberculosis rato was low although one would have expected that it would have been higher. The reason why it got better was because there was no exportation of its dairy produce to any other country. Isolated Dr. O'Mahony said that a tuberculosis patient should have his own bed, clothing and drinking utensils and it should be a criminal offence for any infant or child to go near a tuberculosii case or for a tuberculosis case to allow a child to come near him as children did not have the same resistance as grown ups and would therefore die more quickly. Parents should even send away their children if there was tuberculosis in the home until the medical authorities said that it was safe for them to return. He said that from statistics it showed that tuberculosis in Barbados was an urban problem and not a rural one as the rate in the former area was higher than in the latter. Miss A. EM wick whose subjeel was "The nutrition of the working class mother and child during its pre-school years" .aid that the i.utrtlion of that individual would depend largely on the type of Wafft she chose to do. T.\ etc.. which sflH 11 own and were cheap and valu• lUJiydrate sources. She said that care should be token, to ensure that each day's menu contained carbohydrates, riotein*. greens, milk, sugar and i uit. They con.-idered the responsibility of the working class mother Inwards her children, particularly during pre-school age. The most difficult time stage. The home conditions and the inriividuality of each child vcre large factors, and while they :'imed at an Ideal dietary, modi Amust lie used to suit the reaulrcmcnts and tast*child—discretion being used to distinguish between pampering and rpoilintf and genuine idiosyncrasies. There could be no hard and %  but alteration* and introduction of new foods mus* always be gradual. • Oarage I JUDOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE Many letter* af support and rwirrsiulaUoa have f)l.wed the *blk*U. In Mir Dretsnber bsae *f the article "Caribbean SOS." If any farther evidence were required of the [real aeed to Improve shipping tonneeueos between Ibis country aad Ike British Caribbean Colon!**, and of tae strong feelings of Use busineaa communltj an the sstfsjest, our correspondence that month hat provided It Readers rite nuay in stance* of their own dlflirullles in arraaglng busbies* travel between Hrttaln and ihe Caribbean, and are iinanlmsns to thetr cnndemnnlhw of the present err*arious state of dependence on foreign shipping, rbei experience of cargo shippers differs according to whether they are concerned with Bar bad**. Trlnidnd.and Jamaica, or with those part* of the Caribbean area that ran only be reached by transhipment; the former are fairly satlaned with present cargo services, but those shipping: to British Oiilana or the snuUler Windward and Leeward Islands enptuusise delays suffered at transhipment ports. Readers will no doubt bo Interested to hear of the initial response to our article In official and other authoritative quarters. A letter has been received from the Colonial Office, in which it la stated : Mr. Orunths |oecretary of Stale far the Colonies | as alroady aware of the orient aad serloua oature of the problem u> which > u have drawn atteaUoa. and he want* me h> assure yea that tt at receiving the aetlre eeastaeratioa of the Government, who are Ihtaaahu wha the shipping interests concerned what steps can be taken to provide improved I'M ices to and from the Caribbean. Mr. tirUliUu rrgrru. however, that he h not yet in a posHlon to indicate when a Mlutlon af the problem will be possible In addsttsn, we have received aaoaraatis from Members of I'arl lament that the matter b to be raised In the Commons a* soon ss possible Previous questions In the Mouse have failed to elicit anything, but a non-committal reply from the Government, but it Is encourarbig to learn that a farther effort Is to be made to emphasise the serious nature of the position and to press for immedUl*acuan. JOB M>i: i in DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION ? The "Manchester Guardian" gave Ita weighty support to our sppeal in an editorial of Mrd JsnCaribbean S.O.S. %  ary Eadorstag oar romment that, u far u sl.ips.na i concerned. the Rriii.h West Indie* are -worse off today In some respect* than be fore the Boer War the 'Guardian went on to say: Brttu.h shipowoe. s can %  carcely be Masned for regarding We*l In draa servires as aunsi tractive without sosne kind of subsidy But thai does not mean thai the West Indian Cotonto for which we are responsible should be left to re m ain dependent oa uch shipping services so foreigners may eare to provide or subsidise If the islands and main %  aad territories of Guiana and British Moa daras arc to develop healthily they must have adequate aea transport. Could not the Colonial IHM elopmenl Corporation either build or charter two or three veeseU and organise a regular service le the West linn.-, itself? It could reasonably be arsucd that this ts a form of caplUl development which the corporation r start* to foster, and If. with thr growth of Weil Indian trade, commercial compsnle* began l Kh compete with the cor psrallon's ships, ap the hotter. Cemanent rresn the Brlthh t anal ran Itself mast await the uaorr lain mall gelbrrte*. hut if reader* tara to page *• of this Issue < 'Erratic Colon, 1*1 Malb Dtitorb Traders") the< will get •ome further indication of local opinion on the subject I'oin made by our haane resdera are too vsriams to be quoted at length, but are ap. pend the easune>nts l %  UN) Arm* well known in the Went ls*Uan Trade: GUImpie gats. X Cs. i -id :The hvh ..< puBeaster areemmodalien between this countrt sad the feVW ( fc. cass big consldersbia hardship, quite apart from the financial lea* to these Colonln It U true that the situation haa been lelkvrd by the reatora tion of the Freaeh Unc service and will be Improved even further wbea their two lussr> liners are rampleled. but as the writer of thr article eorreclly points cat. preference la ilvrn to their own national*. sad II 1* S deplorable state of affairs for Great Britain not to be able to offer sdequale passenger service to their own Col onie* The Elders A Fyffe Line have, however, helped very oomsiderabl) with the "Goluto" which icalling regularly a I Kir bad*-. aad Trinidad, hut we ore mast Nhirernei si the prvipects of the coming season with the anaiet paled Increase In the number of vaster* for the Festival of Britain We hope that there will be no repetition of the CKperience* early In 1HJB when the French line M.-.r %  and other steamers brought over man) visitors who had the greatest difficulty la gelling bach, and any diversion of Australasian shipping through the Panama to call for passengers si West Indian peris would only worsen the position, mil" adequate facilities can be offered for the return. The outlooh Is for from encouraging and we con see little hope of any Improvement for skome lime to rome Carters (Merchants). I i.l : The arlklr. of raarse deals with the passenger position and this sffecla us only when personnel connected with war business in ooe way or another require paasaa-rs. but we agree with ihe puinU brought *ul in your article We are. however, very muck Interested In the mailer *f froighu between this, country and the Caribbean. e*pecially Jamaica, and that we find *aaa*bir—but, of .sourse. It could be Improved. One of our dMIculUes h) this direction hi that If we wish to dispatch goads of a breakable nature. such aa sjini..r v earthenware, fire brichs. east iron stove*!, etc. from Glasgow (which port serves a conskirrahlr number of manufactur era of these articles). It Is inost difficult to obuln shipping direct to Ihe Caribbean, aad we mat have to wait aionlhs for a iin.-.i sailing as transhipanent of this breakable merchandtave ••> not desirable. However, there • a rumour that a Canadlsn shipping com pany may he able to ease this "ituation aa regards Jamaica, but at the moment It U very Indefinite Regsrding Ihe l**t point a monthly cargo service to Trinidad. Barbados and British Guiana from Olss gow and i i rriN.ni hss just bern Initiated by Saguenay Terminals. Ltd of CJ. GIVES 7 YEARS For House breaking And Larceny Sentence of seven years' penal servitude was passed on Erie Sealy by His Honour Ihe Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore at tho Court of Grnnd Se-sslons yesterday. Sealy was found guilty of breaking into the house of Terrenrc Johnson situated at Prince of wales Road. Bank Hall on September 21 und stealing money to the amount of 120 the properly of Johnson. Miss (it. r.. nevrne prosecuted for the Crown. The prosecution pointed out that Scaly in the absence of Johnson on September 21 broke Into Johnson's house using the bock door and stealing $20 which was in tho house. First witness for the prosecution called was the owner of the house. Terrence Johnson. He said that he lives al Prince or Wales Road. Bank Hall. A woman by the name of Lilian Taitt lives about 40 feet from his house. On September 21. at about 8.30 a.m. he closed the front and bock doors before he left the house. The bnck door has two Latches mid on leaving ho went through the front door. Door Broken When he relumed about 11.20 the same morning to his house. Taitt told him something-. He saw the bnck door of the house was broken and the latch unlocked. One window of the bedroom was also opened. Lilian Taitt, a domestic servant of Bank Hall, (aid on September 21 at about .15 a.m. she was grazing her sheep and goat a little way from Johnson's house which is in PrinCe of Wale*: Road. While standing ihorc, she saw the accused go Into Terrence Johnson's house by opening the side gate. After the accused stayed about 15 minutes inside the house, she asked someone to hold the sheep for her. and went to Johnson's house and called for "City" tut the accused told her that "City" was not there. She asked the accused who he was and ho said that he was Louissa Rice's grand-son. She icturned for her sheep and about 15 minutes after the accused ame out of the house and went in the direction of Barracks Road. About 11.20 a.m. the same day she saw Johnson going to hit place and told him something. Johnson then went to his house and she went with him. When they arrived at the house she noticed that the back door was broken. On September 22 at about 10.J0 a.m. she went to the C.I.D. Dept. and identified the accused In a line with others. Accused Identified Melville Phillips of St. Thomas %  aid on September 21 at about 9.15 a.m. he was working at Prince of Wales Road, and saw the accused come up the Road and go to a gate, pull at it, and go in. Lilian Taitt who was grazing a sheep went to the same house and went back and told htm something. He saw tho accused come out of the house and go to Barracks Road Sometime later he went to the C.I.D. and identified the accused among id her men. Cpl. Kenneth Murphy, now attached to the Bridge Post, sold that > n September 32 he was detailed to carry out an Identillcation parade on Erie Sea y who was accused of house breaking and larceny. He got eight men of similar build at Scaly and called on Lilian Taitt who touched Sealy on his hand. Melville Phillips also picked out the accused. The acrused was then formally charged ".d after made a voluntary statement. Cpl. Byer. ther gave evidence of going to Johnson's place and investigating aboul nn alleged house breaking and larceny. At this stage the ri for the prosecution was closed Sealy then nddise*sed the Jury • iibmiUing that he never stole the money and placing the theft on a man name. "City" who he said used to stay at Johnson's place and carried him into Johnson's house on September 21. His Honour the Chief Justice then summed up and after short deHberstion the Jury re> turned a verdit of guilty of house breaking snd larceny. Struck With Bottle By Unknown Man I'm iiiif.N vi \i: in ii Rupert *. Jordan of Eckstein Village, Eaglo Hall, St. Michael, was taken to the General Hospital on Tuesday night and detained with a swoUen neck. Jordan was picked up by the Olympic Theatre. He sakl that a man, whom he did not know, had -truck Him with a bottle. C I.MHMilNri: I MIMIIIHII a 16-year-old schoolboy of lower Carlton, St. James, was detained at the General Hospital on Tuesday night with head injuries Carmlchael. cyclist, was involved in an accident along gu..n Street, St. Peter with motor lorrv S—231, owned by Reginald Pres cod of Mount Standfast, St. James, and driven by Hilton Medford of Ashton Hall. St. Peter. The cycle, which is owned by St. Clalr Carmichael, was extensively damaged. M ANY Kt:sil>r.NTS of Triopath, St Andrew, are now forced to drink water from the spring at Spring Vale Plantation. They complain lhat this water is insanitary. One told the Advocate 'hat the pipes In the district have been locked off since January and they have to walk miles to get water He aald that people of the Cane Garden district have to travel to Parks Plantation, three miles away, to get drinking water. Occasionally the water truck from the Water Works Department could be seen in the district but recently (he visits have become very few. A FlNt" of 15/In 14 days with an alternative of one month's Imprisonment was imposed by Mr. G. BGriffith. Police Magistrate of District "A" on Prince H*nrv Wslcott of Rouen Village, Si Michael. Walcott was found guilty of unlawfully assaulting and beating Beryl Vaughan of Seales Lund. Martinique, St, Miehael. on January 6. \ KECOstU CATCH of 2,452 flying fish was brought in at Oislln Bay. Christ Church yesterday afternoon by the fishing boat Lady Osner owned by Edwin Flaming of Olstln. A big crowd of housewives rushed to the beach to get thu fresh fish snd nearly everyone who was there got their required amount of Ash. 1^1 IK SHAMROCK CREDIT .UNION, a corporative movement, will hold a meeting at St. Patrick's School, Jemmotts Lane, at 7.10 o'clock tonight Members will receive the Financial Report and also discuss other affairs of tho Union. This movement, since its formation, has helped the poor, both Roman Catholics and those of other religions, with loans and in other ways. M et COKNFI.irs ANDERSON. Superintendent of His Majesty's Prison in St. Vincent, who is at present on a special visit to Barbados will be the Guest Speaker at the Weekly United Holiness Meeting a t Reed Strce 1 on Thursday. March 8. The Waves Took Stolen Swept Over T/t/e Highway >'or the past two days, big waves have been dashing with fury against the locks and sanrt. along the Western coast of tho Island, it seemed to be worst along the* St. James Coast, where at some beaches, a dash of a wave sent water as high as 30 feet the air. Along highway No. 1. where the road was near to the sea and almost on a level with the beacn. the waves broke over the street, leaving layers of bay sand and small sea rocks behind them. Motorist-, still made use of the road but they had to take much care lhat their vehicles did not skid and perhaps topple over. Early yesterday, scavengers with their shovels were at work removing ihe obstacles out of the road. Occasionally, their work was intensified by a wave which threw more sand and 'tones on the highway. Fishing Fleet l>rawn Up Fishing fleets with their moorings along that coast did not venture out to make their daily catches, but the most of them remained at their anchorage to be tossed about by the swelling sea Some fishermen said nut they were not running the risk of losing their boats in that weathi-r while others were only impeded from going out because they thought that the surging of the sea would make it difficult foi them to catch fish. Over 20 fishing boats from Fltt Village. Paynes Bay and Holetown took shelter In the inner basin of the Careenage yesterday. Their masts were lowered and their sail neatly put away. Fishing boats and moscs alike could be seen drawn up alongside the road while you pass on youc way to or from Speightstown. some of them being made fast to trees and to tho backs of houses for safety. Houses near to the beaches were standing over water and all the waterways that empty them selves Into the sea flooded over their banks while wave after wavi' rushed Into them. Under Water At Holetown, %  large spot ol Und called the "Swamp" whtrn is used as a playing field wat mostly under water. The "Swamp is bounded on the South side by a river which was swollen by the sea. Waves tore away the sand from the beaches. Along Bay Field, St. Peter, where casuarina trees arc planted about 20 yards from th.> wash of the sea, much of the sanJ was swept away, leaving the root* of the trees exposed to such an ex tent that they could be expected lo •all at any moment. The condition of the M-a was not at all encouraging to sea bathe'rs Groups of people that can always be seen a: favourite bathing beurr.es, were missed during Ihe two dan. The sei had lost itblue coloui and turned a dull and ugly coloui caused by the mixing of sand from the sen's bed with the wave* Property Gladstone Jordan was l|*a**f> dmy sentenced lo IB months' imprisonment with hard labour by His Honour the Chief Justice. Sir Allan Collyninrc. after he pleaded guilty of receiving stolen property. between November 28 and 29. 1950 12 Months hor Receiving Kcnrick Bennett was ordered l<> undergo 12 month*' imprisonment with hard labour He pleaded gulltv of receiving stolen propertv valued 34.70. Eroke House: 9 Months Sentence of nine months' imprisonment was Imposed on Marjorir Edwards after she pleaded guiltv of breaking the house of Cleouatra Dash on December 18, and stealing articles to the value of SloM. BOUND OVER Cecil Maloney who entered n pies of "guilty" of the fraudulent conversion of Si OS 08. the money i>r Krnrick Small, was bound over for 18 months. On \2 Months Probation Berkley Trotman was put on probation for 12 months after pleading guilty of house breaking and larceny. Date of the offence was October 27. ON PROBATION Also put on probation for IS months was Milllcenl layne She pleaded guilty of the larceny of articles valued $48 00 on October Westminster Cornei 4 M R OSBORNE (Conservative Lincolnshire. South div i has asked Ihe Minister of FOOT why he increased the price f<>. Common wealth sugar by a uni< form rise of 85s per ton to £30 10s a ton. when one country did not make any claim for an increase and another asked for an increase only of 3Ss. per ton. and. In view of (his. why the price for Cominon•rffdlUl raw sugar in 1061 has now bSjgQ fixed nt £32 17s. fld. per ton. Vi WebbA uniform price l t a ben fixed annually for Common wealth sugar for the past 10 yean. When increases of price have been agreed, they have been base* upon such evidence of iiH-rcusei cost as was available so as to ar nve at a fair averavr price feu all the Commonwealth pioducin* countries This method has beei followed in 1950 and IS51 and has resulted In the price increase referred to by the hon. member Discussions will take place dur ing the course of this year witi representatives of Com mob weal tl sugar producers to sec what cat be done to introduce greater pre cislon into the method of flxin, prices under the Commonwenltl Sugar Agreement. I should ad< however, that this uniform prlc for all the Commonwealth sugi. supplies was finally agreed b .ifter negotiation, at their ow united requ.sL. 40'For Bodily Harm Ursula Rock of CsU Castle, City, was yesterday fined 40/in 14 days wiih an alternative of ont> month's Imprisonment by City Pollc.s Magistrate Mr II A. Tnlma after she was found guilty of unlawfully and maliciously |n< ftictmg bodily harm on Marie Ellis of the rame .mr. % % %  tieorge Bock, who was charged jointly with Ursula Rock, was lined 25 • to be paid in 14 days. Crude Oil Arrives A shipment of 678,178 gallons of crude oil arrived In Barbados yesterday bm the oil tanker taverns**" from Carlpito. Venezuela The Inverroaa has anchored off Shot Hall. St. Michael, lo dischargo the oil Into the tunk'i ol the British Union Oil Company Her agents sre Messrs. R. M. Jones it Co., Ltd. Who Steals The Refuse Box? The two new refuse collector! of the Scavenging Department started to work on Monday last Mr Herbert Beet, head drivei at the Scavenging Department, told KM \*-Y*r*le .rsierday that the trucks cannot hold as mucn as the open trucks but w < cannot blow back into the streets He said that the Public too seem to be satisfied but he feel^ that people can co-operate more l>y putting out their refuse In Umo %  Mid not waiting until the refus" %  II" Usni have passed. 'Many people complain that lacfr Nfuae conUabwrs are taken • %  tors bvu this is not so." he said He said that the majontv ol people put out their stuff in boxeAfu-r the scavengers empty the stuff they put the boxes back into the streets but a pedestrian passng along would see a box which had contained refuse and take it up for firewood On many occasions he has had to stop pedestrians from doing this He suggested that the people should get proper containers Have them painted and idso prim their names on them In lhi> an*) lha Police would be able to ascertain that a pedestrian Is stealing a container and he can take atlion. Scavengers would •Iso be able to help if this was done. HBid that hydraulic lipping gear in the new trucks oOrnas In very handy. The old trucks were dtled with hand pumped tipping gear With the new taping |Ml the new trucks can dump the stuff in less time. Will Ship Hack Equipment To T\lacl Part of the equipment Imported from Trinidad for work on the runway at Seawcll is being prepared to be shipped back to Trinidad now that the runway is nearly completed Tho motor vessel Caracas is here to take back the first set of equipment to Trinidad. The Caracas brought up from Trinidad with her, 1.000 drums of colas for Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd which she is now discharging. She h expected to finish discharging the colas today then lie berthed alongside the Government Crane which WtU be used to lift the heavy equipment aboard her The Carseaa nrought the most ot the equipment from Trinidad th.it was used on the runway She is consigned to Messrs. J N. Harrlman A Co Ltd PAYING OFFICER APPOINTED I H Phillips has been nri*inted Obi Age Pensions Paying Officer, St Michael, with effect from the Pth of March. BUSH ROAD Tho Constitution flood area Is now under bush. R**aassna of the nren removed to the Pine and Bay Eata!nfte • rile ...IT .u.i\,\ It.. I • %  Bg| |0 111"' 1 and property in 1949. If this Lush is not cleared away ther will soon be a large number of flies and mosquitoes. S PURINA CHOWS %  FOR POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK !" "See Ihe Di/forenrv Purina .WnltPi" JH. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-4****s*si MM %  %  %  % % % % % % % % %  %  EASTER FALLS ON 25th MARCH Wr havr Slock • [Mill 111 > Ml! > !(.(• NUM.IS in 3 si/f. Piices : 32c. 28c., and Mc These can b* used for vour Euster (lifts of Ties, Scarves, Handkerchiefs. Sluckini|s, etc. or can be filled with Ciliavu Cheese, Bnrley Sugar and olhrr Sweets, .. ALSO :: Chocolate Kasler KIMS in Plastic Cases and M.M /ip.ni Kasler ggp in Plastic Cuus. KNIGHTS LTD.—ALL BRANCHES 4,000 Women Register For Emifration To U.S. With the prospect of employment in the United States, 4,018 women up to yesterday have already registered at Ihe Employment Agency in Queen's Psrk the Advocate was told yesterdav Registration began on February 26 In the same per:od 338 men have logittered and 1,686 have renewecT the r registration. ARTICLES STOLEN THIEVES stole articles valued 811.20 from the home of Ed ward Bowen at Government Hill. St. Michael, between 5.15 p m. and 9.30 p.m. on Monday. Eugene Blackmail reported that clothing was stolen from hU open yard on Tuesday, The Police are investigating both incidents. Sale To-morrow Tho attention of readers drawn to the change In the date of Bale of the Central Foundry's block .f buildiiigi. Hniiiii Siin' Theie buildings were original!* advertised to I*sold at Ihe Office of Messrs Collie, (jtft.nl Ar (' % %  High Street, nt 2 pm. today. The iiililiMgs will now be put up fur -ili b> Messrs Cottle. 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: 'ABLISHED 1895



Queuille Will Make

Another

Attempt |

To Form Government

PARIS, March 7.

HENRI QUEUILLE—Radical—to-day accepted President
Vincent Auriol’s invitation to make another attempt to
form France's fourteenth post-war Cabinet.

: ‘He had already tried once and had failed. Two other
Politicians, popular Republican leader, Georges Bidaul,
and Socialist Guy Mollet have also failed.

The President’s approach to Queuille was made 12
hours after the National Assembly had rejected Mollet.

Sugar Rationing
Is Unnecessary
Says Lord Lyle

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 7.

Sugar rationing for Britain is
unnecessary, Lord Lyle said today,
Speaking in London at the An-
nual General meeting of Tate
and Lyle he told shareholders
that, there. was two and a_half
million ‘tons of sugar available
for, which no dollars were needed.
Dr. Edith Summerskill had stated
that Britain’s unrationed require-
8g were 2,325,000 tons annual-

y.

“Why does the Food Minister
hesitate?” asked Lord Lyle. “Not
because sugar isn’t available. No‘
uge it is going to cost us

Ss,

IT strongly suspect that it is
largely due to absurd and slumsy
financial manoeuvres with which
the planners attempt to hide the
rising ‘cost of living”.

In. his, speech Lord Lyle .al
referred to the possibilities of the
natidnalisation of the sugar indus-
try in this country. He said that
with! the help of Mr. Cube, Tate
and, Lyle had won the first round
and that the decision to transfer
to public ownership the British
Sugar Corporation could be taken
as an inference that sugar refining
had been dropped from the nation-
alisers’ list.

The proposed nationalisation of
the already publicly owned sugar
beet industry was presumably a
sop to the nationalisers, but Tate
and Lyle would not fear compe-
tition with a state owned industry
as long as competition was “fair
and above board.”

Export sales of Tate and Lyle
last year amounted to 670,000
tons with a total value of 29,000
000 pounds and involved trade
with 55. separate countries.

A report showing a gross profit
of 3,400,000 pounds was adopted.



FIRE ON BROADWAY

- . NEW YORK, March 7

Two hundred firemen fought
seven hours in Broadway today
to control a fire which may have
been started by a. careless .cigar-
ette smoker.

More than 50 firemen were
treated for smoke poisoning and
minor injuries. The blaze broke
out in a sub-basement six storey
building occupied by a paper box
company.—Reuter.

EXCHANGE MISSIONS

NEW DELHI, March 7

The Indian Government and
the Government of Western Ger
many have agreed to exchang
diplomatic missions at legation
level as early as possible, the In-
dian . External Affairs Ministry
announced today.

India ended her state of war
with Germany on January 1 this
year.—Reuter,



—Reuter.

Ships Before

Customs Union
Says Gazette

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 7.

Plans for a-unified West Indies
Customs Union are unreal if con-
sidered apart from the question of
better communications both be-
tween the islands and between
the West Indies and Britain.
This is the view expressed to-day
by the British Export Gazette
which has been campaigning
vigorously in this country during
the past few months for improved
United Kingdom—Caribbean ship-
ping services.

The Gazette declares itself
wholeheartedly in favour of the
creation of stable and less de-
pendent economy in the Britisn
Caribbean which is the ultimate
aim of the preposed Customs
Union. But it points out that
plans for such a Union cannot be
considered without the realisation
of the broader problem of com-
munications.

In this respect, it adds, in con-
trast to the British Government’s
commendable earnestness about
the Customs reform; there has
been delay and every sign of
indifference.

“If only the present bustle of
activity in the cause of Caribbean
Trade were matched by a similar
sense of urgency in regard io
Caribbean communications, then
a more hopeful era could cer-
tainly be said to be beginning for
these potentially resourceful
colonies.”





St. Lucia Appeals
For Assistance

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. LUCIA, March 7.

Up to 6 p.m, on Tuesday, fire
fighters were still engaged in put-
ting out dying blazes which were
likely to prove treacherous later
in the night. Administrator J. M.
Stow to-day issued an appeal for
help, financial and other nature
for sufferers who for the most part
are of the working class and un-
insured.

It has been decided not to ap-
point a Fire Relief Committee as
was done in 1948, instead the local
Red Cxoss Branch under the Chair-
manship of Mrs. J. M. Stow is
delegated to undertake the relief
measure, Two hot meals are being
given daily. The timely gift of
clothing from the London Red
Cross Headquarters is being dis-
tributéd and the Junior Red Cross
link is mdking a house to house
collection of children’s clothing.

It was decided to make accom-
modation for the 1948 victims still
housed in the Vigie barracks in
some.of the unfinished flats in the
reconstruction area and to send
some of the refugees to Vigie.



Woolton Hopes For

Good Negotiations
Between U.K., Argentine

LONDON, March 7,
Biitain’s wartime Food Minister Lord Woolton said io-
day he hoped Anglo-Argentine trade negotiations in Buenos
Aires would be conducted in an amicable manner. Every-
, One in Britain was most anxious, he said, that they would
result not only in agreement but on affording a basis of

-





7

Cuba Produces 6m.
Tons Of Sugar

WASHINGTON, D. C.
Ample world sugar supplies for
1951 are indicateq by current
production figures.

World output of sugar during the
1950—51 crop year is estimated at
almost 42,000,000 tons. This con-
trasts with the 38,000,000 tons
produced during the previous crop
year.

The United States will have a
supply of 12,000,000 tons available
in 1951, according to the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture. Ordin-
‘arily the Nation consumes about
8,000,000 tons annually. This
amount may be increased during
1951 by as much as 500,000 tons
which would be used in the manu-
facture of alcohol for defense pur-
poses,

Comparing the sugar supply
prospects about 10 years ago with
the present situation, The Journal
of ree of New York City
notes that Cuba, one of the largest
producers, now has a peak pro-
duction of 6,000,000 tons. In the
early 1940’s Cuba was producing
half that amount.

, continuous satisfactory trading between the two countries.

Lord Woolton, Conservative,
was speaking in the House of
Lords debate on Britain’s meat
supplies. Recalling that he ha
considerable negotiations with the
Argentine during the war, Lord
Woolton said: “I hope the people
and Government of Argentine,
looking back over the loug and
profitable trade that we had be-
tween two countries, will hasten
to come to an agreement satis-
factory to both of us,

“Trends of trade move up and
down. Sometimes we have a buy-
ers’ market, sometimes a sellers’
market, At present the Argen-
tine are in a strong position. To-
motrow will also be a day and
I am sure it is in the interests
of both our colintries that for very
many tomorrows an easy form o:
trade should flow between us.”

—Reuter.

CHAMPION GETS A

STRIPE FROM EVA
BUENOS AIRES, March 7
Fireman Delfo Cabrerra, win-
rer of the Oiympic marathon in
London in 1948 who yesterday
won the Pan American Marathor
title, was today promoted to firs’
Corporal at Eva Peron’s request
During the ceremony at Police
Headquarters, the Chief of the
Federal Police, Arturo Bertolic
proclaimed a igeneral pardon for
all policemen and firemen guilt:
of petty offences.—Reuter,



iE

THIS SPLENDID PICTURE of schooners in the Inner Basin is a reminder of West Indian communi-

cations to-day, picturesque but







a® &
THURSDAÂ¥, MARCH 8, 1951

OUR SHIPS 4°

sow
oe a

dependent on the weather.



Economic Development

Is First Responsibility.
| Of World ’s Backward Areas

Inspector's House |
Burnt In Grenada !

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, March 7.

New acts of lawlessness coloured
Grenada's strike situation last
night. The worst incident of the
night was the complete destruc-
tion by fire to the two-storey stone
building .residence of Dunstan
Cromwell Price Control Inspector
who since boyhood had ‘ived in
the Woburn district, The house
to-day is worth some £3,000.

Cromwell was awakened from
his sleep around midnight by the
smell of fumes and on rushing to
the upper floor to the bed room
door saw the lower floor aflame
and only had time to rouse the
servant and snatch wildly at a
wardrobe before leaping through
a window to the lower shed roof
which covered the garage. He
landed in safety. The Police ar-
riving from St. George’s shortly af-
ter helped to save the car,

Last night the watchman’
house at Belmont Estate was als
destroyed by fire. Yesterday a
rowdy crowd invaded tie - Dia-
mond Estate and drove off with
the watchman and helped them-
selves to the provisions. Five men
arrested on unlawful assembly
charge on Monday were convicted
and sentenced to terms of impris-
onment ranging from one month
to six months. Gairy yesterday
addressed a gathering of worker:
at Woodlands Estate in tne sugar
belt and asked them to return to-
day but the answer was that they
may resume on Monday. This af-
ternoon a delegation representing
The Chamber of Commerce and
Agricultural Association saw Gov-
ernor Arundell and stressed the
economic plight in the colony as
a result of the strike.

38th Parallel Issue
Still “Academic”

Says U.S. Secretary

WASHINGTON, March 7.

James Webb, Unitea States Act-
ing Secretary of State said to-day
that the question of the United
Nations troops crossing the 38th
parallel in Korea was still “aca-
demic.” United Nations forces
were not in a position to cross the
Parallel and it would be unwise



for him to speculate on their fu- |

ture actions.

Webb was questioned at length
at his Press conference to-day on
MacArthur's statement in Tokyo
that existing limitations would in
time produce theoretical military
stalemate, —Reuter.

THREE KILLED IN
BOMBER CRASH

VIRGINIA, March 7.



A B26 bomber from Lanpiey|him £48

air force base plunged into the

Atlantic late today near an island! told him he had not long to live

off the Virginian shore killing
three men.

It was the second fatal crash
of a bomber from Langley base

in less than 24 hours, The other
crashed last night near Stanton,
Virginia, killing
board.—Reuter

x

SANTIAGO, Chile, March 7,

EUGENE BLACK, President of the International Bank
for Reconstruction and Development, to-day urged that
its internal organisations co-ordinate development of pro-
grammes for the world’s backward areas.

‘in a speech to the United Nations Economie and Social
Council here, he said there was “bewildering multiplicity
channels through which backward areas were being offered

aid.” “Some countries are proceeding
letpntiadasosshenties on purely a national basis” he
added, “Others are acting through
a variety of instruments, both na-
tional and interaational without
‘ae integration among them.

Preniier Of Persia
Assassinated

TEHERAN, March 7.
Persia’s Prime Minister, Gen-

The “very multitude of voices
perhaps urging inconsistent | or
even contradictory policies makes
it difficult to induce developing
eral Ali Razmara, 49, was as-| nations to take some of the pain-
sassinated here today. He was|ful and unpopular decisions that
shot twice this morning at Sol-|are often essential to their fur-
taneh mosque here for a fanatical | ther progress,”
member of the Fedaieh Islam re- International agencies \ beside
ligious congregation and died in | being potentially the most efficient



Sima Hospital, Teheran, an hour | for such work could not be
later. charged with “invading national
Police arrested Razmara’s as- | Sovereignty with economic exploi-

tation or with political diserimina-
tion among different countries”
Black said,

sassin, and two accomplices who
attempted to commit suicide
Their identity was not disclosed. ~

“Finally these agencies seem to

Razmara’s assassination has|me to provide the best and prob-
caused concern among officials in | ably the only way of directing re.
London because it may prejudice sources of national contributors
approval of a new oil agreement | towards the same common pur-
with Britain. poses.”







General Razmara was regarded
as champion of the existing oil
arfangements under which the
British Government owns a big
interest in Persian oil,

Recently he publicly opposed
proposals backed by a. sizable
section in Majlis to nationalise
oil interests. He backed the pre-
sent agreement between the Per-
sian and British Governments
on oil as beneficial to both coun-
tries.

Observers here fear his assass-



Strong Lead Urged

The Bank President suggested
that the United Nat#ons and its
| specialised agencies “take a strong-
er lead in working with member
countries on development and re-
lated problems.”

He said that the world’s back-
ward areas could not escape the
“fundamental fact” that economic
development was primarily their
own responsibility,

“Of all the reforms which we
have s@¢en to be desirable, land

{the most”

both airmen on|

reform is probably the most im-
portant because the whole basis
of development is the land”, Black
said —Reuter.

ination may strengthen forces
pressing for oil nationalisation.
—Reuter.

Will Help In Fight

Against Cancer

NEW YOXK, March 7.
A 36-year-old Brazilian surgeon,
Riven few weeks to live, left here
for home today to raise money to t
fight the disease which is killing | ftalian military authorities.
him. Italian and American official
The surgeon, Dr. Leaureano, is | quarters are observing complete
an expert on cancer, A year ago, | silence on the talks. The Admiral
{he completed plans for setting up
a diagnosis and treatment centre
in his home town.
Then he discovered he had a
malignant form of cancer him
f. Hundreds of his patients and
friends, many of whom he treated
without charge, scraped enough
| money together to send him to the





Sherman Talks
With Italians

ROME, March 7.
Admiral Forrest Sherman, Unit-
ed States Chief of Naval Opera-
ions, conferred here to-day with



It is learned that light British
naval forces will join Italian war-
ships in naval and aerial manoeu-
vres in the Ionian Sea soon, |

Exercises would be under the
overall command of the Italian
Admiral Corso Giraldi. —Reuter.

—$—$$—$-__

CHARLES WINS

Memorial Cancer Research hos
pital in New York—one shoe EZZARD CHARLES, last
maker travelled 75 miles to hand hight defeated Jetyey Joe

Walcott on points in q sched-
uled fifteen-round bout.

‘QUAKE SHOCK FELT
JORHAT, ASSAM, March 7.

An earthguake shock as severe
that which devastated large}

But specialists at the hospital

|“‘few weeks or a month or so at}
Dr. Leaurea‘o said !
| When he gets home to his 25

year-old wife and four-year-old |



as



| daughter, he plans to use himself| areas of Assam last August was;
jas “live propaganda” to rai felt here this morning. It lasted
money for cancer centre and start /two minute but there were no;
‘a training scheme,—Reuter ‘reports of damage ~-Reuter.

' Chinese lay krothers

Advorate

entry

a





PRICE: FIVE CENTS



MacArthur Hints At

“Stalemate” In Korea

ae nennengnnepnaaingenpstatencceelen gel deinen:

Im

Ceilings

OTTAWA, March 7.

Commons gave Government
power last night to impose price
controls. On the heels of the Gov-
ernment reminder that it should
not look for eaily action, Prime
Minister ‘St. Laurent told the
Chamber as it adopted the Em-
ergency Powers Bill that Govern-
ment will not hesitate to use price
ceili when ie can find any os
sonable ground . to. iéve . they
will kK.

He does not want anyone to
get the impression, he said, that

vernment will not impose con-
trols until the country is in some-
thing approaching all out war.

As the debate neared the close
prominent Progressive Conserva-
tive mald leming (Toronto,
Eglington) stepped away. from his
Party's line with the statement
that he is not one of those urging
Government to go rip roaring into
controls on that point. His speech
disagreed with the stand of his
leader vortge Drew who. had
urged the Government a short
time earlier to launch the most
flexible and most effective type of
control as a weapon against infla-
tion.—CP),

Arab Envoy
For Morocco

CAIRO, March 7

The Arab League intends to
send a special envoy to Morocco
to make a first hand study of
conditions there, the League Sec-
retary General Azzam Pasha an-
nounced here today,

The Sultan. of Morocco on
French insistence. . recently. dis-
owned the Istiqual—Nationalist—
movement and the French are also
pressing him to accept adminis-
trative reforms, Anti-French de-
monstrations have been held
among their places in Caito, Alex-
andria, Beirut and Pakistan,

{Adie —Reuter.

ees
. Financial Chief.
Appointed |
PARIS, March: 7

General Dwight D, Eisenhower
today named Guilleaume Le Bigot,
34-year-old French civilian as Fi-
nancial. Chief of the Supreme
Headquarters of the Allied Pow
ers in Europe—S.H.A.P.E.

Le Bigot will have the status
of Assistant Chief-of-Staff in the
S.H.A.P.E.—Major General— on
a level with seven top Staff ap-
pointments announced yesterday,

For the last four years he has
headed the finance section of the
French Defence Ministry serving
as technial adviser to Premier
Rene Pleyen and Defence Minister
Jules Moch,

His appointment completes thu
key staff list in S.H.A.P.E.

—Reuter .





Dissension In
Red Indian Party

BENARES, Northern India,
March 7.
_ A series of differences of opin-
ion “inside the Communist Party
in India” was reported to-day by
Dasgupta, secretary of the Party's
Benares district committee. This
is the first official admission of
dissension in the party.

He made this statement in
denial of a charge by the United
Provinces Minister Lal Bahadur
Shastri that the Communist
Party had decided on a policy for
the ‘armed overthrow of the
government”, He said the allega-
tions were “totally slanderous
and misleading.”

Dasgupta did not indicate what
the differences were about, but
according to unofficial reports,
Indian Communist leadership is
sharply divided om whether to
follow a policy of violence and
sabotage, or of constitutional
methods to achieve the party's
objective: —Reuter,

SIXTY. MORE SHIPS

LONDON, March 7

Sixty ships are to be brought
out of reserve to serve with the
active British Fleet this’ year,
James Callaghan, . Parliamentary
Secretary to the Admiralty said
today.

He told -the Commons - they
would include two destroyers, two



(tents: three submarines, eight

may leave for Athens to-morrow. |

ocean and sea-going and 22 smaller
mine-sweepers, two fast mine lay-
ers and 21 smalicr craft—Reuter.

Prince Rangsit Dies

Of Heart Failure
BANGKOK, March 7.

Prince Rangsit of Chainat, Re-
gent of Thailand, died here today
of heart failure, aged 66.

Prince Rangsit, Chairman of the
Supreme Council of State and of
Council had been in indifferent
health for some months.

—Reuter,



| 5,000 CLERGY IN CHINA

VATICAN CITY, March 7.
Vatican Radio, citing statistics
compiled by a religious institute
said .there are in China, 3,000
foreign and 2,508 Chinese priests:
2,000 foreign and 4,500 Chinese
sisters, and 400 foreign and 682

—Reuter.

_A Step Forward

Canada Gan |
pose Price | U

(By JULIAN BATES).

TOKYO, March 7.

NITED NATIONS troops crossed the Han River
at dawn to-day and after three hours cautious

'advaiice’ rin into heavy small arms and mortar fire
from concealed Communist posts. Under an eight
hundred round a minute gun barrage they had
stormed across east of Seoul as jet planes strafed

and petrol-bombe@ Communist strongpoints

hills.

Koreans Clash
With Tokyo Police

TOKYO, March 7

Four thousand. Koreans shout-
ing anti-American slogans clashed
with 2,000 police in Tokyo today
and injured 27 policemen.

Fifteen Koreans were injured
in the fighting.

The Koreans had crowded into
a school compound for a protest
meeting against the recent police
ban on distribution of anti-
American handbills.

The meeting closed the school
gates on police riot squads, but
eakce called up reinforcements,
broke into the compound and
dispersed Koreans with baton
charges.

The Koreans used sticks and
Stones to hold, off the police
attack.

Koreans involved were sym-

‘pathisers of the North Korean
Communist regime, many being
members of the “Korean Resi-
dents League” broken up by tho
Japanese Government last year
because it was “against occupation
policy”.

It was alleged to have a strong
alliance with the Japanese Com-
munist Party.

Police acted to-day because all
meetings not approved by authori-
ties ate considered illegal.

—Reuter.

Maroceo Is Calm

PARIS, March 7.
General Alphonse Juin, French
Resident General in. Morocco, re-
ferring here to-day to Egyptian
Press reports of disturbances in
Morocco said:, “Never has Maroc-
©o been so chim. If there is any
‘agitation a is pan ae. and at =
ex, oO gy ptian ple.
Never babe preats of Feasn-
ment to France given by the Mos-
lem populations of Morocco been
SO numerous or so moving. It is
these people who have judged and
condemned the methods of vio-
lence used-by a vertain party.
' —Reuter.





BONN, March 7
«West German Chancellor Dr.
Konrad Adenauer, commenting on
the revision of the Allied Occu-
pation Statute announced yester-
day, said this was “indisputably
another step forward.”

Asked what changes in the oc-
cupation statute he thought most
important Adenauer said: “Grant-
ing of freedom to set up our own
Foreign Office and our own For
eign Service are certainly of the
greatest significance’,

—Reuter.

‘















in the

One assault force which crossed
15 miles east of the capital met fire
from self-propelled guns but re-
ported continued advance and

| captured 25 prisoners,

On their right another task force
which crossed at the junction of
the Han and Pukan Rivers met
stiff resistance but took 44 prison-
ers.

Jet planes strafed and_ petrol-
bombed the hills beyond the river.

Over 60 miles to the east on the
extreme right ‘flank of the central
front, Communists threw more
counter-attacks.

Around Changpyong Chinese
troops had hit hard im this area
during the night. An Eighth Army
communique said counter-attacks
were repulsed,

In the centre, United Nations
forces made limited gains up ‘to
1,600 yards against variable resist-
ance, North Koreans attacking in
the east gained about one mile,
forcing South Korean troops to
withdraw to a new defence line
below the road leading from Pang-
nin to the east coast town Kang-
mung.

General MacArthur, United Na-
tions Supreme Commander visited
the front as his forces lunged over
the Han River. He told corre-
spondents that Chinese were ap-
parently preparing a massive
spring offensive. For the first time
he referred to the possibility of a
stalmate.

“Assuming that there is no
dwindling of the enemy's flow
of ground forces and material
to the Korean battle area, con-
tinuation of existing limitations
upon our freedom of counter-
offensive .action and no major
additions to our organisation -
al strength, battle lines cannut
fail in time to reach the point of
a theoretical military stalemate.
“Thereafter our further advance
would militarily benefit the enemy
more than it would ourselves.”
He said.—Reuter.

“NO TIME TO

SPECULATE”

WASHINGTON, March 7.
America believed that a meet-
ing of Big Four Deputies in Paris
afforded an opportunity for a
serious, carefil and deliberate
approach to the examination of
causes and differences between
Russia and the West, Acting Sec-
retary of State Jarmnes Webb said
to-day,

Reporters asked if he was op-
timistic about the prospects of
Deputies agreeing on the agenda
for a proposed meeting of their
Foreign Ministers.

He replied that as the meeting
was still in its very early stages,
it was best not to speculate.
—Reuter.





TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT

ed

: THE

‘STORY OF BOB

AND SALLY .

Sponsored by the National Baby Wel-
fare Council and the British Social Hygiene
Council, is a candid discussion of “an
intimate social problem" dealing chiefly
with the dangers of adolescent ignorance.

While the fictional aspects of this
picture certainly havé their moral, it is the
sheerly documentary aspects which are by
far the more revealing and instructional.

Shown in the United Kingdom under
the title “SHOULD PARENTS TELL”.

Passed by the Barbados Board of Film
Censors for showing to UNMIXED persons

over 16.

wm!
ait

‘Shown

at the

PLAZA THEATRE

BRIDGETOWN



FOR THE GOOD THAT IT CAN DO.


PAGE

7 ck





— Caub Calling

tment of Mr. deL.
jarbadian, awe
Targany ika has just
and will be re-
much satisfac-

Faas ik

FALL INER Y t



Counsel in
Leen announcea
ceived here with
tion,

Mr. Innis vho i
and Mrs . L. Inniss of
ore,” Brittons Hill, was a Barba-
dos Scholar of 1930, After quali-
fying for the Bar he. returned
heme and after a short practice
became Assistant to the Attorney
General ana Magistrate.

He ieft, Barbados cn his appoint-
ment as Legal Draughtsman in
Tanganyika. For some time he
acted as Solicitor General and now

a son of Mr,
“Glen-




has been appointed to the post of &

Crown Counsel. | =
His many friends will join in to \K
congratulations to him and to his e

parents, ae MARC

Interested “The lady's an Mi

RE you interested in having She's been asking for

particulars of your club in- something that wood

look equally chic worn by
@ lady or a gentleman.
London Ervress Servtes.

T.C.A.’s Stores Inspector

R. R. D. TRITT, T.C.A.’s
Stores Inspector for the Ca-
ribbean Region arrived from Can-
“ via Bermuda yesterday by
T.C.A. He is here until Saturday,
when he leaves for Trinidad.
He was in Bermuda for one
week, Mr. Tritt is staying at the
Hastings Hotei.

beng te in the 1951 Year Book? If

please send all such particulars
to the Advocate Company Limited
en or before March 21st.

Publishing Business

R. M. R, CHIPMAN arrived

from Canada yesterday morn-
ing by T.C.A. to join his wife
who is already holidaying in Bar-
bados. Mr, Chipman whose home
is in Montreal is in the publishing
business. He is the Montreal Di-
rector of Maclean-Hunter Pub-
lishing Company. He is here for
about ten days, staying at the
Marine Hotel,

Remaining On

RINIDAL'S Cuarnival Queen,
Miss Christine Gordon, who

Different Directions

R. & MRS. HAROLD DAHL
and their three children

left Barbados yesterday in dif-
was supposed to have returned to + wipe, te agape meet iintiee e
Trinidad yesterday afternoon p'G," Girect, while Mr Dahl
changed her mind at the last jor \esterday afternoon for Tri-
minute and has decided to remain nidad by B. Wy. 1A. He will join
en for a longer holiday. Along pig wife and family shortly in
with Eve Anderson and Lance d€ Ganada, Arriving from Vene-
Montbrun they are staying ON Juela a couple of weeks ago
until Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. they have been holidaying in
Walter Marshall at Aquatic Gar- Barbados staying at the Barbados
dens, Aquatic Club. Mr. Dahl is with
Mr. Landy de Montbrun and “Canam” Agencies in Venezuela.

the remainder of his troupe of
artistes returned to Trinidad yes- Cut Short Holiday
& MRS. H. W. MAC-

terday afternoon by B.W.LA.
Those leaving were Clyde Rivers, MBE;
Dorothy de Montbrun, June Main- KENZIE who arrived from
got, Peter Pitts, Daisy Creque ani Canada February 13th cut short
Clifford Corbin. their holiday to return to Canada
Burma Bridegroom yesterday morning by T.C.A.

Fee's - s. They were ariginally supposed to
NRYZ has just reached me this stay until April 14th.

week of the marriage in the Mr. Mackenzie is a Salesman
Southern Shan States of Burma of with Dominion Textiles in Mon-
Sao Hseng Ong, son of the Presi- trea), They were staying at the
— of the Burmese Union, = Crane Hotel. ’
budians who were at I.C.T,A, an
'Trinidadians may recall that ns
was for a time a student at the
Imperial College of Tropical Agri-

culture.

* ‘ eo8 years ago is now at te London
Married in Trinidad School of Economics preparing 4
MoM". BETTY KEENE of Bar- thesis on “The West Indian Econ-
hedos became the bride of omic Development 1790-—1880,”
Mr, William Woodcock, son of for his M.Sc. degree in Economics,
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Woodcock Graduating at Toronto University,
of Diego Martin, Trinidad at Brown served with the Canadian
Greyfriar’s Church on Saturday Army during the last war, He
March 3. She is the daughter of jis looking forward to returning to

Mrs. Ivy Barrera. Jamaica.

Jamaican Scholar

AMAICAN-B ORK Douglas
Brown who left Jamaica 10



‘Puerto

Dua! Business

RRIVING by T.C.A. yester-

day morning from Canada
were Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Ralph
who are here on two weeks holi-
day, staying at the Marine Hotel.
Mr. Ralph has a dual business,
he is the proprietor of Ralph's
Drug Store and Ralph’s Travel
Service. He ts both a Pharmacist
and a Travel Agent.

Off to U.S.
R. E. D. INNISS of Messrs
T. S. Garraway & Co.,, is
due to leave for the U.S.° via

Rico this morning for
medical attention at the Medical
Centre in New York.

Mr. Inniss is a member of the
Board of Management of the
Barbados Cricket Association.

Romantic Emigration

R. HAROLD MOODY, son of
the late Dr, Harold Moody,
will, I hear, shortly be leaving
Britain for New Zealand to settle
there. A few months ago, Dr.
Moody visited New Zealand to-
gether with MacDonald Bayley
and Arthur Wint to take part in
athletic sports. While there, he
grew to like the country and fell
in love with a New Zealander,
He hopes to get married soon
after his arrival in New Zealand,

On Holiday
OW ON HOLIDAY in London
is Dr. Lionel A. Francis,
member of the Belize City Council,
British Honduras. Last week he
visited many places, including the

Privy Council, the Colonial Office

and the headquarters of the
League of Coloured Peoples. He
hopes to travel in the provinces
soon.

Cultura! Links
ISS BERYL MCBURNIE,

BARBADOS



The Hostess With The B.B.C. Radio|

ADVOCATE



Mostest On The Ball Programme

(By ANNE EDWARDS)

A YEAR in Europe transforms the world’s best-known -
party-giver into a living lesson on how to be very,

diplomatic indeed.

verv

The world’s gayest party giver the world you'll always find me

is a changed ‘Woman. Mrs, Perle
Mesta, once. the most talkative
hostess in America, is now an ex-
pert in the Diplomatic -Art of Say-
ing | Nothing.

Mrs. Mesta is an oil and steel
heiress. She has Pa the social
stock market all her peg he:
played it well. Last year Presi
dent Truman made her U.S. Min-
ister to Luxemburg—the reward,
it was said, of 30 years of politi-
oat cone publicised) party giving.

Mrs. Mesta was
sovge ‘aon to tell about her par-
ties,

“It costs about £4,000 to put on
a buffet,” she once explained.

That duet

And everyone heard the story
of how one of her guests, leading
Senator Tom Connally, once sang
“wy Old Kentucky Home”
close harmony duet with Defence
Secretary Louis Johnson.

But, as a one-year-old diplo—
mat, Mrs. Mesta is not telling any
more—especially not about her
parties,

In London yesterday, “for —
week's holiday and to see ol
friends,” she was a mixture of the.

old professional hostess and a new _

very, very diplomatic diplomat,
Bustling into a large room set
with chairs for 60 people she was
not in the least disconcerted to
find there were only 16. She shook
hands all round briskly, with the
air of a woman dismissing a thou-
sand “Thanks-it-was-wonderful.”
She settled herself in the corner
of a Claridge’s settee, flung one
arm gracefully across the back,
crossed grey-nyloned legs, and
threw us a charming and vital

Director of the “Little Carib” cmile

theatre, Trinidad, was the star of
a lecture-demonstration of West
Indian folklore and dances given
in London last week. The show,
presented by the increasingly
active West Indian Students’
Union was in aid of the “Little
Carib” Theatre.

Miss McBurnie has recently com-
pleted a tour of Spain, France and
North Africa in search of cultural
links with the West Indies.

Food Distributor
R. AND MRS. C. J. McNEELY
of Vancouver arrived from

Cenada yesterday morning by
T.C.A. to spend about ten days
holiday in Barbados, after which ),
they plan to spend another ten
days in Grenada Mr. McNeely is
a Food Distributor in Vancouver.
He runs his own business, C. J
McNeely Company Limited.

Two New Publications
WO NEW WEST INDIAN pub-
lications made their debut
last week, They are “West Indies
Survey and Annual Trade Direc-
tory”, edited by Trinidadian J.
Claude MeNish; and “The British

West Indies’ by W. L. Burn,
Professor of Modern History,
King’s College, Durham,



BY THE WAY! Junior Short Story Competition

By Beachcomber

any edition of any The Evening Advocate invites

N

i paper nowadays you may
read something like this: Also
travelling in the plane were two
armadillo, a giant

almost

antelopes, an
herring, four baboons, and two] words in length, and must reach The Children’s
emus, Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesday every week.

Day and night\animals are on
the move from z00 to zod. But
why should 146,000 ants travel
10,000 miles? Could they not have
been collected nearer home, and
brought by train to London? And
who ‘counted them on arrival?

A Siamese nobleman once sat Name ......++ see ee eeeees
on an anthill in Surrey during a A
picnic, On the way back to Lon- BO cece enccee tee enees
don alone he became aware of a
certain discomfort, so he removed School ..........0050+:
his trousers and shook them out of
the window of his compart- WA sic vets ees vens ne
ment. « . « '

) : Home Address ..... otek
“Not in These Trousers”
He said see e eee eee ee ene eeee
. . ALAS! He lost his grip of Title of Story ......++.+++>

the trousers, and a wanton wind
carried them away into a charm-
ing meadow of buttercups. At
Waterloo the porters said, “’E
orta be locked up, that’s what ’e
orta be.” The stationmaster was
summoned, and he asked the dis-
consolate nobleman what he
thought he was doing, going
rownd like that. Our dusky hero,
hiding his skinny legs with a mac-
intosh, said haughtily, “I am a
Siamese nobleman.” “And_ I,”
roared the stationmaster, “am the
Queen of Syria.’ And so on, until
a secretary of Legation or some-
thing arrived to identify and
rescue the unwilling ee of the
ants,
ine Elusive Charwoman

OT very democratic,” is the

phrase used by political
commentators to describe the new
habit of Cabinet Ministers of
creeping into the House late, and
then trying to hide while they are
being criticised. The next step
will be disguises. “Mr. Speaker,
is it in order for that charwoman
to crouch behind the Member—
nay, the honourable Member for
Catileborough?” (Shouts of “I spy
a stranger!’’). The Speaker then
rose to say, “That is not a char-
woman. That is the Minister of
Bubbleblowing.” (Government
cheers and laughter.)

= MATINEE March

gg FRIDAY 9th
EMPIRE







its Junior Short Story Competition.
every Monday in The Evening Advocate,
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery.
ean be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 306

NOTE: Stories must not be copied.
Send this coupon with your story,

ee ieee a
BARBADOS DRAMATIC CLUB

PRESENTS

Under the Distinguished Patronage of
His Excellency the Governor, Sir Alfred Savage,
K.C.M.G., and Lady Savage

BA MURDER as teen
ARRANGED

THRILLER
M MARCH 15th & 16th 8.30p.m.

eBOX OFFICES OPEN

all children under 12 to enter for

The best story will be published
and the winner will receive
The stories

Editor, The Advocate

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION



16th 530 SHARP

AT 8 A.M.

THEATRE ®

el
BE RRP ERR Ree eee ee ee

we New 36 in. EASTER

aDress Assortment

* Cordrosa’
“Invictaray ”

Lystav,

White

5

Slipper Satin,
MAROCAIN, | in

EVANS &

i MOUG

(at

Tootal Lombia,
Tobralco

fine draping corded crepe

Printed rayon — white grounds
Whitfields}
NEW SHADES.

WHITFIELDS

Robia

Just arrived

Dial 4220



le.
QUESTION.—Are you still in-
terested in giving parties?

“The only kind I'm interested
in are the ones I give for the
G.I.s. No matter where I am in

Jamaica Bound
ORD and LADY BROWNLOW
are at this moment on their

5

“i them American food.

in

* est. on the Continent.



ck on the first of every month s

meet my G.I.s”
.QUESTION.—Do you give them
ch food?

At. the American Embassy I
Ham,

ked beans, apple pie, ice cream,

ilk, and champagne.”

QUESTION. — What do you
think of the play written about
you in New York?

“If I could be as good a diplo-
mat as Ethel Merman is an actress
—I'd be happy.’

QUESTION, — What is your
recive for a successful hostess?

“No rules. I guess I just like
people. I invite the ones who
get on and the ones who don't,
and just put ‘em all together.”

QUESTION. — Do you find Fie
Luxemburg off the beaten track?
“Not at all.

hours frem Paris by car. And,

We're only four

of course, my old friends make

e detour. It’s a beautiful coun-
The people are marvellous.

e legation is one of the loveli-





e and visit me sometime.”

‘London’ Yes, she loved Lon-
‘don, too. ’
Maybe we have underestimated

‘Mirs. Mesta. She is an able wo-
man, a noted charmer even at 68,
and shrewd enough to know when
her technique needs tailoring.

"Tl like my job—it’s
tive,’ she said.

You must

construc-

“I get up at 8 a.m. and work
the same as any other diplomat,

but twice as hard.
the State Department means i

Working for
lot

of notes to Foreign Ministers and

things like that.

“In any
light-hearted job,” said
Mesta, pulling down her skirt.

case, it never was a
Mrs.

“What the world needs now is not

parties but Courage and Sacrifice.
I say so in all my speeches.”
L, E. 8.



Trinidad Priest

OLIN BRYAN, formerly Assis-

tant West

Indian, Liaison

way to Jamaica on board the Officer at the Colonial Office has
ided to become a Roman
tholic priest. Bryan went to
ritain during the Second World
War to join the R.A.F. When the

Jamaica Producers ship North
Star. With them is the wife of
Lt, Col. W. H. Bromley-Daven-
port, Conservative M.P., and Lady
Brownlow’s cousin, They are go-
ing to St. Ann’s Bay on the north
of the Island where, Lord Brown-
low has a house at Roaring River.
He also has considerable house
property in the Bahamas, which
the party will visit later in the
trip.

war

was over he studied Social

Science at the London School of

before joining
Office staff. He
leave England for Rome

Economics
Colonial
shortly

the
will

where his academic course for
the priesthood will begin with a

study of philosophy.

Rupert and the Coughdrop—42_



pals wrt a
s bur BO One appears on the




it
7 Teer sa

Kee,

Rer
wood." Whoever brought it must
hav known that we were all here."

a know what it is,” shouts Rupert.
“ That must have been Santa Claus
who knocke The sack’ $ 100 big
to go down the chimney! | Look,
Mammy, will you open it? Then,
we _shall_know if I'm right 1"

s2v8

the small folk at Nut-




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“7@_ =O§KACcH.

BEEN WAITING FOR,

THURSDAY, aa 8, 1951
6 30 a m—Ie 15 pm 19.76 M.

The News. 7.10 am. News
7.15 a.m. From the Editorials.

7.0 00 a.m.
Analysis.

7.25 am. Programme Parade, 7.30

What Is Psychology .7 50 a.m Interlude

800 a.m, saotenee Choice. 8 45 a.m

Humour. 9% 00 a. 9 10 a.m.

Home News From, Britain, 915 a.m.
lose Down. 11.15 a.m.

Parade. 11.25 a.m ners Choice. 11.45

Liste
World Affairs.
12,10 p.m News Analysis, 12 15
m Close Down.
fas P.m.—6.00 pm. 19.76 M,

"i 415 pm, Listeners Choice, 5.

a.m.
.



Pp 2.
Cheltenham Gold Cup, 5 15 p.m.
Magazine. 5 45 p.m. Melody on Scien
600 p.m. bee ‘Digest.
600 p m —7 15 p.m, 2% 64 M. & 31.32 M.
6.30 pm Overtutas, | 658 .
gramme Parade. 700 p m
710 pm _ News speees : », p.m,
Britain. 7 45 p -
745 p.m.—11.60 he 34.32 w 43 M.
Radio Newsreel. 8.15) Pp -
sir Sone Mail's past sovaner, 4 8 45 p.m
Composer of the Week, 9 00 Special

Dispatch. 9.15 p.m, tave'k "9 43pm.
Deo You Remember. 10 00 Pp m The
News. 1010 pm. From the Editorials.
it's m Take It From Here, 10 45
ae ing Around Britain. 11 00 p.m.

usic of Sid Ss Phillips ‘a and His Band.

MISSION
LAGOS.

An American girl missionary, of
Seattle, arrived at Lagos last week-
end on her way to Jos in Nigeria.
There she will act as pilot of the

aeroplane used by the Sudan Inte-
rior Mission for flying mission-
aries to their centres. She is the
first woman pilot to engage in such
work in Nigeria.
-_- —

Creer)





Across

Birdlike boxer, (5)

5. Difficult to Kiss on them? (4)
Â¥. You'll neea a true dome to gauge

rain. (8)

Silent for a change. (6)
Bape to do hoiey work. (4)
Good nume for a surgeon? (5)
. Sort of noise t Across would

make, (5)
. Nothing in all three tetters. (3)
» What the pisces delivered. (6)
HG raat feat e iP rt?
. Human feature from Tripoli. 14
Beast o! burden eI

{
Aee of. “ner admiration, (3)
Rum, Ben could count it. (6)
+. Down
- The thunder of a mute final ? (v7)
2 Dialect. (8) 40
3 Homeaic. so we find it sat in
. Is there such a thing as a nigh
one in America? (4)
5 Tt Jargon of tramping tinkers

. Pee) set on top or the Caure:
» AT pores one
popping (6) - (8)
A tow islet. (3) 8. Space. (4)
Solution of gesterdar buzzie
. Loofan 12

Viewles to vei 4a pe.
vi nt; 14, Al 15, G
wh "fs foog. - Era: Bs
Rpa ewan" 2. Impede
g,, Siyosinne

18 Tret’ 20

4
6.
‘ ritece Or being 1Y Across. (3)
3

one

— Across:

s, Onaser:
es: 17 Soap

fight your
HEADACHES

hile they're slight!



When headaches start —
due to worry, overwork, over in-
dulgence—be smart, take Alka-
Seltzer right away. Sparkling
effervescence makes Alka-Seltzer
pleasant-tasting, helps its pain-
killing caalguals go to work

fast. Keep it handy.

Fee

Alka-Seltzer id

yy
DON’T

smear RAZOL pomade on
HAIR. Take it on the comb
and work it thoroughly
|| through the HAIR, forward
| first, then backward, until
miost of it comes back out.
Soft paper can then be used
to wipe away surplus and
to dress the hair to a finish.
The above course, will give
very desirable results.

If your dealer hasn't
a POMADE, phone

BORNN'S BAY RUM Co.








ROT HL Tee

Atay ie










THURSDAY,



MARCH §&, 1951



—_

——— oe MVMOMm
PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 4.45 & 6.0 p.m (Paramount)

Barbara John
STANWYCK LUND

in NO MAN OF HER OWN

A PARAMOUNT THRILLING DRAMA!



accilieamesinctbisbitnintenietninsiagtita
MAT. TO-DAY—1.30 p.m

x" and
“DEATH VALLEY RANGERS”
Ken MAYNARD

(Monogram)
Leo GORCEY & the BOWERY BOYS in}
“MR. HE

— Hoot GIBSON

IDAY 9th 2.30
Ingrid BERGMAN - Bing ‘CROSBY

“BELLS OF ST. MARY'S”

| By Special Request
FRI



Opening Friday 9th Women 4.45 & Men 8.30 p.m.

oom
PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

(RKO-Radio Technicolor Adventure)

TO-DAY

FAIRBANKS, dnr.

(Only) 5 & 4.30 p.m,

cece peepeswn ete liptnsecienneinamentinimmesteesneinarin th
Friday 5 & 8.30 p.m, and Continuing
VA ee ee ie eee

TRON’ SMAN re

Gordon McRAE — Rory CALHOUN



Maureen
O'HARA



“Stery of Bob & Sally”

“SINBAD the SAILOR”

MIDNITE 10th (Monogram)

Leo ee i * Peres BoYs

a,
Roddy

NIGHT”

ck
Lynne Thomas

jowall



GAITET Y—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TO-NITE 8.30 (Monogram Double)

RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL & DEATH VALLEY RANGERS

with Tom KEENE

FRID., SAT., SUN. 8 30 p m
MAT. SUN. 5 P.M. (RKO)
“BACK te BATAAN”
with John WAYNE
Anthony QUINN

FAIRBANKS, nr.



Ken MAYNARD — Hoot GIBSON

by Sey SAT. 10 (RKO)
jouglas Maureen

O'HARA in
“SINBAD the SAILOR”

Color by Technicolor
oo

GLOBE THEATRE

TO-DAY = & 8.30 P.M. LAST SHOWING
. ARTHUR RANK’S

“SLEEPING CAR TO TRIESTE”
Jean KENT and Albert LIEVENT

Fr OPENING TO-MORROW AND CONTINUING

—

“THE GUN AND THE MEN BEHIND IT”

— OO CC ee eee,
The Roaring Story of the Gun that Won the West!

ley WINTERS |

Stay fresh all day long —use Lifebuoy Toilet Soap.
in your daily bath or shower and whenever you
wash. Lifebuoy’s deep-cleansing lather really
frees you of weariness, keeps you looking fresh ,
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FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

Dan DURYEA

with MILLARD MITCHELL » Chades Drake + John Melntire » Will
Screenplay by ROBERT L. RICHARDS and BORDEN CHASE + Dicected by ANTHONY MANN +

PLUS TONITE
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE



CLAYTON THOMPSON Singing

SAM NILES Singing .
FELIX STRAUGHN Singing

Geer « «Jo. loon

Produced by AARON ROSENBERG’

“All The Time”

. “Who Put The Whiskey in The Well”

“Lucky Ole Sun"

EDWARD MARSHALL Singing “Four Winds and Seven Seas”

DORIEN THOMPSON Singing

BYRON ROLLOCK Si’nging

“Wildest Gal in Town”
“Bewitched, Bothered,
and Bewildered”

GUEST STAR:
FITZ HAREWOOD — ist Super Star Winner

PIT 16c; HOUSE 30c;

EMPIRE

Today 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing

Universal ne
Presents .

Yvonne De ‘CARLO
Richard GREENE in

“THE DESERT HAWK”

with Jackie Gleason
and Lois Andrews

Special Saturday Morning
Show at 9.30

“BILL and C00”

AND

“ SHERIFF of WICHITA”

Starring
Allan (Rocky) LANE

ROXY
Today & Tomorrow

4.30 & 8.15 p.m.
Republic Whole Serial

“DAUGHTER of DON Q”

Starring Adrian BOOTH,
Kirk ALYN

with Leroy MASON
and Roy BANCROFT



BALCONY 40c; BOXES 54c.

ROYAL

Today & Tomorrow
4:30 & 8.30 p.m.

Eagle Lion Double

Scott BRADY and
Jeff CAREY in

“CANON CITY”

AND

“MICKY”

Starring Lois BUTLER
and Bill GOODWIN

- OLYMPIC

Today to Saturday
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Republic Smashing Double
Ken Murray's Production

“BILL and €00”

AND

“SANDS of [WO JIMA”

Starring John WAYNE
and Adele MARA





a



a LEVER vnopver


THURSDAY, MARCH 8,

1951



Paper From
Bagasse

LONDON
The use already being made in

various parts of the world of
sugar cane bagasse for paper
manufacture is discussed today

in a letter from a representative
of technical consultants, Middle-
sex.

The writer, Mr. R. Duce, does
not want further time wasted on
“investigations” into whether ba-
gasse is suitable or not for paper
making, He wants “energetic
application of what is already
known to actual production of
paper”. Developments in this
question, he said, are far beyond
the experimental stage. He goes
on—

“Fine papers made from 95 per
cent bagasse have been produced
commerciaily since 1941 in the
Philippines by a company to
whom we are technical consult-
ants. That these papers are sold
in Manila in open unprotected
competition with comparable
grade imported American papers
would seem to prove beyond
doubt the technical and economic
soundness of the process.

‘Further,
sugar producers in Brazil has
placed a contract with us for the
erection of a complete bagasse
pulp and fine paper mill, to be
erected in the state of Sao Paulo;
production is expected to begin
in 1952. We have also specified
and shipped the complete pulp
mill equipment for a bleached
bagasse pulp production of twen-
ty tons per day to Bihar Pro-
vinee, India, and this plant is ex-
pected to go into production very
shortly. Another smaller plant is
being constructed in South India.

“As for the supply of bagasse,
sugar mills generally are so de-
signed as to burn the maximum
quantity of this material to avoid
the embarrassment of stocks ac-
cumulating. Bagasse for paper-
making can be provided partly
by improving the efficiency of the
existing steam-raising boilers,
and also by using alternative fuel,
such as coal ‘or oil. The yield of
high-grade pulp bagasse fully
justifies this substitution of an
alternative fuel, even though the
prices for the latter are relative-
ly high, especially in view of tle
current very high price being
fetched by pulp, and its great
searcity throughout the world.

“The use of bagasse for paper-
making has special significance

for the Commonwealth because
of our comparative dependence
on the already overtaxed wood

supplies of North America and
Scandinavia. The only other
principal source of suitable wood
is Soviet Russia and her satellites,
such as Poland”,



WHAT RUSSIA GOT

In helping the Soviet Union
defeat Hitler, the Uniteq States
delivered to Russia more than
14,700 planes, 7,000 tanks, 52,000
jeeps, 35,000 motorcycles, 375,000
trucks, 186 naval vessels, and vast
quantities of communications
equipment, medical supplies, and
other war materials.

AGE OF MIRACLES?

LISBON.

A 36-year-old housewife has
cured a paralytic by saying “Get
up and walk.” She claims to feel-
ing a “special power within her”
and has cured. also a deaf-mute
and a bling boy, The police are
investigating but the woman is
poor and has not derived any profit
from her cures.

DIAMOND FEVER

CAPETOWN

Diamond fever has gripped the
northwestern section of Cape
Province with the discovery of
diamonds on q farm about 280
miles from here. Interest con-
tinues despite a statement by the
Department of Mines that the
stones are of the industrial type
and not found in large quantities.















KITE . TIM

WE HAVE

HERRING-BONE TWINE

suy now: — Advocate Stationery
























NOW. AT





Plantations

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THAT CANNOT
BE REPEATED

Trinidad Govt.
Consider Loan
Of $12,000,000

(From Our Own Cerrespendent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 5.

The Trinidaqg Government is
considering the raising of a $12,-
000,000 joan as the first step in car-
rying out the $38,000,000 Five Year
Eccnomic Programme. The Fi-
nancial Secretary, Hon. A. R. W.
Robertson said in Port-of—Spain
the programme was flexible. Gov-
ernment intende@ on the
programme not adhering to it.

The of State for the
Colonies has ai given ap
proval to the 1951 estimates which
showed a surplus of $55,441 rev-
enue. It is proposed to spend
around $15,000,000 on waterworks
schemes which have been given
first priority.

Government is now preparing
legislation to provide for the set-
ting up of a Statutory body to ad-

minister the Railways t
and it is proposed to spend $650,-
000 for the purchase of equipment

and new buses.

SAFE

NEW YORK.

American Robert Dowling,
chairman of Civil Defence, said
that—thanks to the big preponder-
ance of steel and concrete in its
buildings—Manhattan “is the saf-
est city in the world” to be in if
the balloon goes up and the atom
bomb comes down.





False Dream

JOHANNESBURG:

After dreaming that a fortune
was buried in a cemetery near
Pietretief, Transvaal, an African
went there and opened up a
gave. But all he found was the
skeleton of General J. C. Kemp,
Minister of Agriculture in the
first Nationalist Party Cabinet of
1924. The African was s
to four months’ imprisonment for
desecration .

T’DAD. FIRE _DEPT,

MADE SEPARATE UNIT
PORT-OF-SPAIN,
The Trinidad legislature yester-
day approved a bill amending the
Fire Brigade Ordinance divorcing
firefighters from the police force
and setting up a separate unit.
Under the amended legislation,
a bystander refusing to help at
fires when called upon by the Fire
Chief, is liable to imprisonment
or $120 fine,
Policemen now serving in the
Fire Department may choose
which service they prefer.—C.P.

Accident

ROME;

An Italian army Lieutenant,
aged 22, whose arm was cut off
in a car crash in North Italy,
walked into a hospital eras
the arm in his hand. When -





tors told him they could do
nothing about the arm, he
answered, “At least you can

unstrap my gold wrist watch”.

ON THE AIR

BERLIN.

On the air in Berlin this week
for the first time was Nessem
Tiranem Smert—‘The Free Voice
of Russia.” It promised to call
the Ukraine and Red Army men
in Germany twice daily and to
transmit in German to the Soviet
Zone.



Kidnapped

BRUSSELS:
Ukrainian ga
rl was kidna m a
Fists tram months
ago and has since been held in
the Soviet Embassy in Brussels.
The Government has over-ruled
claims from a Catholie refugee
organisation, who brought her
from Germany as a displaced
rson, that she was kidnapped
‘rom their cate. The girl has been
granted .permission to return to

A 13-year-old




PRICES










“ery
“Coane
lee
Pht






Ltd.



Australia Planning
Defence Stockpiles

SYDNEY, Feb.

The National Security Resources
Board is considéring stockpiling
rubber, bauxite and sulphur for
Australian defence.

Rubber is needed chiefly for
aircraft and motor vehicle tires.
Bauxite is used in making alu-
minum, and sulphur for making
explosives.

overnment officials say that
federal ministers have already
made it clear that rubber is in
short supply, and with increased
defence commitments the shortage
will be more pronounced.

American overseas buying has
cut down the amount of rubber
available to other importing coun-
tries.

Bauxite is considered plentiful
at the moment. Deposits at the
reserves of the Australian Alu-
minum Commission are estimated
at about 8,600,000 tons. But in the
event of war consumption would
increase rapidly.

Australia has fairly adequate
stocks of sulphur, but with in-
creased American buying for its
own sek ong. needs, officials
expect that the National Research
Board will Yecommend the estab-
lishment of a reserve.

U.S. Aid To Europe

United States aid to Eurcpean
countries between the end of
World War II and 1947 totalled
$11,000,000,000, In the first three
years of the Marshall Plan,
another $11,500,000,000 was spent
making a total of 24 times the
entire cost of running the U.S.
Government in 1940.

U.S’ HELP FOR KOREA
By 1950 United States economic
assistance to the Republic of Korea,
including food, fertilizers, raw
materials and medical supplies
amounted to more than $500,000,-



SOIT ee
4 4

e@ LINDEN BLOSSOM

LEATHER

“SCRUBS

BARBADOS



“’Moruing, Rockefeller’?
“Morning, Nuffield”

Trinidad Forgers
Face Idleness

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 5.

Hon, A. R, W. Roberston who
recently returned from the United
Kingdom said in an interview that
special precautions gre being taken
over notes printed for use in the
proposed scheme for a uniform
currency in the Eastern Group of
the British Territories. This means
that Trinidad forgers will most
likely go out of “business”. The
notes will be in circulation by
June next.



TRINIDAD APPOINTS
EFFICIENCY EXPERT

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 5.
An “Efficiency Expert”

in’ the ‘Gomes, Minister of Labour.

ADVOCATE

London Express Service



Unique

PARIS:

: A French soldier in Indo-China
this week underwent an operation
for the removal of a live 2.4 in,
mortar bomb from his left thigh
It was successfull and the bomb
was later exploded in a wood.
The operation is believed to be
unique in French Army Medical
Corps history.



300 SUGAR WORKERS
STRIKE AT CARONI

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 5.

Three hundred Caroni workers
have gone on strike in the sugar
areas. Stoppage of work started
on February 20, Mr. Hochoy, Com-
missioner of Labour held talks with
the Hon, Mitra Sinanan, and also
interviewed the Hon.



Albert from St
They

PAGE THREE



Plague

VANCOUVER, March

Russell Davis, 26-year-old sci
ence graduate, ts helping to track
down bubonic plague, one
mankind’s oldest and most
rible enemies.

He catches rats, which with the
fleas that infest them apparently
even today in British Columbia
carry germs of the “black death,”
the disease that once killed a
quarter of Europe’s population

Authorities say they expect there
never will be a recurrence of the
dread disease on the scale of the
great London outbreak in the
17th Century, Twelve years of
research has indicated the plague
reservoir is small,

People now are cleaner thar
those of the Middle Ages and are
Tess likely to be bitten by the
germ, authorities say. New drugs
can combat, the disease and doc-
tors today can recognize the
plague and isolate cases immedi-
ately to forestall an epidemic.

Davis is on a_ scientific team
called the Rodent Plague Survey
For 12 years this group has
combed British Columbia's rat
population in search of the plague
germ,

No Cause for Alarm

They have found the first, but
refuse to say where. They an-
nounced merely that the plague
bacteria had been found in the
flesh of a gopher “trapped some-
where in the interior.”

They said this was not a reason
for alarm, but indicated the need
of caution and continued research,

The provincial government took
over the survey work last year
The research group now is under

the Department of Claude R.
Stonehouse, Chief Sanitary In-
spector.

Russell Davis is the lone field
man, Most of his testing is done
in a Kamloops laboratory

From May to September he
tours the interior, trapping rats
and shooting gophers. He kills
tthe animals with cyanide gas,
thus immobilizing their fleas at the
same time, Then he combs the
rodents’ hair for the fleas and
dissects the body for tissues to be
studied,

He has been inoculated against
the plague germ.

“T guess this is one of the most
peculiar missing-persons hunts
yet,” Davis said, “It often seems
like looking for a needle in a
haystack.”—(C.P.)

Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

Marea Henti-

M.V. Sedgefield, Seh

etta, Sch. Emanuel, C. Gordon, Sch

United Pilgrim §., Sch. Anita H., Yacht

Caribbee, Sch, Burma D., Sch. Henry
Sch. Lady Noeleen, Sch

D. Wallace,
Laidalpha, Sch, Enterprise S., M.V. Lady
Sch, Philip H. Davidson, Seh, May






oO , Sch, Cyclorama O., Sch, Belqueen,
M, V. Dearwood, Sch, Marion Belle Wolfe,
S.S, P. & T. Forester

ARRIVALS

1,235 tons net, Capt,
M.V. Caribbee, 100
from Dominica.

M.V, Inverrosa,
Shaw, from Caripito
tons net, Capt, Gumbs,

Schooner Gloria Henrietta, 55 tons net,
Capt. Glynn, from Dominica Schooner
Adalina, 50 tons net, Capt, Flemming,

Lucia
DEPARTURES
Turtle Dove,

Schooner 82 tons net,

person of Mr. A. C. Briggs of have not yet reachéd any decision. Capt. Ollivierre, for Trinidad

Senior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and schoolgirls
ment of an “expert” would yield between the ages of 12—19 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-

good results in the working of ition, Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words

the United Kingdom has been
appointed to the new post
Organising and Methods Officer
He will receive a salary of $7,200
per annum. Government created
the post hoping that the appoint-

their departments to

of





increase jy Jength and must reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co,, Ltd.

efficiency and to economise where City not later than Wednesday every week, The best story each week

possible.

16 Million Stockholders

A total of 16,000,000 Americans
own shares of stocks in private
business and industrial corpora-
tions in the United States. One
automobile company, the General
Motors Corporation, has 430,000
stockholders, Some of the Nation’s
largest companies encourage their
employees to become stockholders,
For example, the Bell Telephone
Company, which owns and oper-
ates 82 per cent. of the 42,300,000
telephones in the United States,
has about 190,000 stockholders

among its employees.

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Send this coupon with your story.
SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

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of
nor

I. A. L.’s Progress In 1950



THE most interesting event of 1950 from the Company's

point of view was probably the formation of our associated

company in the Caribbean

The main reason why this

activity would be chosen ahead of so many others of first
rate importance is because it betokened a major expansion
of 1.A.L.’s activities in the Western Hemisphere

Aeradio stations at the follow-
ing locations have been taken over
end are now being operated by
International Aeradio (Carib-
bean) Limited: Palisadoes Air-
port, Jamaica (aeradio facilities at
Montego Bay, the radio naviga-
tional beacon at South Caicos and
facilities in Grand Cayman will
also be provided under terms of
the LA,L. licence with the Ja-
maican Government); Atkinson
Field, British Guiana; Seawel!
Airport, Barbados; Coolidge Field
Antigua; St. Kitts, Leeward
Islands; Pearls Airport, Grenada
(the station at Pearls Airport and
in the town of St. Georges are in
process of being rebuilt); Bean
Field and Vigie, St. Lucia.

When the operational require-
ments for the air services to Dom-
inica, St. Vincent and Montserrat
have been determined the Com-
pany will provide appropriate
facilities at these places as well

Pan American and B.W.1. sta-
tions in Trinidad and Tobago were
taken over by I.A.L, last Septem-
ber and negotiations with the
Trinidad Government are now in
process to determine the pattern
of future operations. A signals
plan based on the recommenda-
tions of the 1.C.A.0. Regional con-
ference in Havana has _ been
drawn up and accepted by airlines
operating through the Caribbean,
Much remains to be done to bring
stations up to date. The enthu-
siastic staff of LA,
Ltd., led by their General Man-
ager, Robert Wilspn, have already
made a good start.

(Caribbean)

Considerable progress can be
recorded in the Eastern Hemi-
sphere too, The installation and
maintenance of marine radar
equipment is now being under-
taken in Singapore and Hong
Kong. In view of the anticipated
extension of business in these and
other directions an associated
company will shortly be formed
in Singapore. .

We are happy to announce that
the Italian Civil Aviation authori-
ties have invited L.A.L,. to supply
Air Traffic
Ciampino

Advisers at
Rome — and
Malpensa Airport, Milan, They
will be responsible to the Director
General of Civil Aviation in Italy
for advice on air traffic control
matters. Negotiations are under
way too for the establishment by
LA.L. of an Air Traffic Control
School in Italy to train two hun-
dred controllers,

Control
Airport,

A Telecommunications Adviser
has been appointed to the Hash-
emite Kingdom of Jordan under
the Director of Civil Aviation, Be-
sides acting as adviser he is Man-
ager at Jerusalem Airport, per-
forms air traffic control duties and
trains staff for aeradio and other
appointments, An ILA.L. Tele-
communications and Air Traffic
Control adviser has been appoint-
ed to the Somaliland Protectorate

for duty at Hargeisa Airport,
where he also acts as Airport
Manager.

In East Africa, the Company

has entered into a contract with

the High Commission of East
Africa to install and maintain
all ground aeradio equipment

within the territory, This project
will be undertaken through In-
ternational Aeradio (East Africa)
Limited of which J. MacDonald
is now manager, A total of 28
aerodromes are involved ranging



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e
MODERN DRESS

trom the International airport at
Eastleigh to airstrips such as
Nachingwea and Kitale. The mag-
litude of this effort can be ap-
preciated by looking at a map and
calculating the distances involved
n administration, We know we
“an rely on our radio engineers
ind radio mechanics to undertake
this project with the same en-
husiasm and skill that they have
shown in other territories.

A few months ago I.A.L. was
invited by the Government of
Pakistan to appoint three special-
sts to the staff of the Director
General of Civil Aviation, Re-
ports to date show that the acti-
vities of the I.A.L,.—nominated
director of Oeperations, Flying
nspector Navigator and Flying
Inspector Pilot have come fully
ip to expectations. In Karachi
nternational Aeradio (Pakistan)
Limited is heavily engaged in pro-
viding training and maintenance
acilities for the Pakistan Air
Services,

A new activity for the Com-
pany was created when we were
asked to take over the responsi-
bility of the Fire Services at
Bahrein Airport. As a result of
his commitment and anticipated
»xtension of this activity, Signals
ind Air Traffic Control staff on
‘eave in U.K. have been attend-
ng the Fire Course provided by
the British Ministry of Civil
Aviation,

In Rangoon I.A.L. is busy with
the expansion of Mingaladon Aif-
sort. The Company has under-
taken the design of re-equipment
ot the air traffic control centre
yd associated communications.
When completed it should be one
of the finest airports in the East,

Qn the aeradio and air traffic
control equipment side it should
be comparable with the best in
the world. Six of the twelve “one-
man” stations supplied to the
Burmese Government for use at
minor airports in the interior
have now been installed, In
March 1950 all the internal ser-
vices operating in Burma went
over to radio telephony, Apart
from international operators’ re-
quirements no W/T air to ground
services exist. In the same month
long range HF R/T was brought
into operation on an experimental
basis and has given first-class ser-
vice,

Experimental long-range HF
R/T has been brought into opera-
tion in Malta. It ig also being
made available at Bahrein, The
importance of developing the use
of long-range HF R/T cannot be
over-emphasised in view of the
world in air route communications
and of the forthcoming operations
of the De Havilland “Comet” by
B.O.A.C.

The 1.A-L. ‘Telecommunica-
tions Adviser in Damascus was
joined by two Air Traffic Con-
trollers and a Meteorologist bring-
ing the total of secondments to
the Syrian Government to four.

The aeradio station in Benina
ig now I.A.L. operated. It is
probable that the complete man-
agement of the airport will even-
tually be entrusted to LA.L. The
Senior Representative of I.A.L.
in Barbados is Mr, George Car-
ter.








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Dial 4269


PAGE FOUR







i> Thursday, March 8, 1951



~ CINEMA TAX

THE time has come when serious consid-
eration should be given to the possibility
of adding to the Government’s Revenue by
means of a moderate tax on cinemas.

'

When the suggestion was made between
the two world wars, it was pointed out at
the time that a large proportion of money
was spent on amusements by people who
contributed nothing to the common exche-
quer either by way of taxation or by direct
vontributions to charity. If there was justi-
cation for the remark then,.it is apter now.

; In very recent years the number of cine-
mas in this island has increased rapidly.
Attendance varies with the appeal and
quality of the pictures; but many cinemas
thrive on patrons who become “fans” and
hate to miss a picture.

Some people go to the cinema as many
as five or six times a week.

‘These may be exceptional fans but there
are thousands of regular cinéma goers who
spend a tidy sum on this form of enter-
tainment. It is only just that a proportion
of this “luxury” spending should be ‘“‘chan-
nelled” off to help pay for vital social
services. A comparison of the amount Bar-
bados spends today on social services as
compared to six years ago will illustrate
how urgent is the need for revenue to swell
this desirable pool.

.. The cost of social services, which are still
sadly needed here, could be augmented by
takes on cinema tickets.

__ Seeing that there is already a tax on one
form of entertainment in this island no
serious objection could be advanced against
a cinema tax.

Comparisons have been made between
the imposition of a similar tax in England
“ut it would be asking too much to exact
‘15% of the first cost by way of an enter-
tainment tax in this island,

| If at each cinema a tax of perhaps one
penny in the shilling was collected on
tickets it is estimated that there would be
‘a substantial income for the Government
to spend on much needed social services.

The payment of such tax would not in-
convenience theatre goers and would bring
to them a sense of responsibility when they
realise that in a small but effective way
they too are contributing to the welfare of
the community.

KEEP...?

. FROM time immemorial the law in Bar-



RUSSIA’S PLAN FOR
WORLD CONQUEST

NOW that the Soviet Union has
By JOSEPH STALIN
What is our Youth technique?

become a major power, the world
is severed into two camps. The
vapitalist rid is bei dis- ; It ig the tion oun; °
integreted by internal antagutilns ception, becomes a member of an 4. wad tae ies which are paralyzing it; on the bars eee apa aot spirt of Leninism, strengthening
other hand, our socialist world is for the solidarity of the working their conviction our Workers

steadily growing stronger. State is the base from which the
Lenin told us that once the Com- iclass in its fight against capitalis n.

munist party triumphed in our The support of our a ‘omtion by Svtlen Weta a
own land, the epoch of world ia bate sates of ine: Toy inspired with confidenee in the
seytagen mula ein. noch sw edocs, ari” Heer of the Gyms ery
: . pensable preliminaries withou ro
ree ie oo ay oe which the final triumph of social- ane ail. _ oe eo oa
v ay wr) or chi os ‘pitalistic 48™ cannot be assured. Should 2 cru ctic con ns eee
Ns nth over me chief capitalistic . 1. attack-on Russia materialize; we nae WOFK a= in we
“——s, trategic SHeuld be prepared to use every sect ure, arenes uca—
jod of years or even decades, 20d amy means in order to open 11°08 eevential that the oung folk
Eras Scola Ge Tiod. there the floodgates of revolution made a ne
Oe a aie a a0 "in the throughout the world, rallying the *) oir seven “
must occur’ © id and Hows .in the Workers of capitalist countries and eee be regarded as an en: rd
revolutionary tide. the people of colonial lands to the » but as a means towa

major target for communist in-

The communist revolution does ; the victoi of the proletarian
not develop along a continuous and “4 of the Soviet Union. revolution in all lands,
upward line, but along a zigzag IV. .
path, by means of forward ana [The fact that Communists try _ [The communists encourage

backward marches. Our possibili- to take over American liberal or- both monopolies and co-operatives
ties of success depend upon the ganizations is not an accident; it under capitalism, because they
relative strengths and weaknesses is all part of Stalin’s master plan.] Can be more easily socialized than
of friends and enemies abroad. How will we bring the masses of "dividual enterprises.}

The weaknesses of the capital- a nation into the communist pro- The measures for strengthening
istic world which we can use are gramme? We have fashioned a Socialism are: State monopoly ot
its insuperable antagonisms — number of organizations without foreign trade, agricultural taxes,
antagonisms which dominate the which we could not wage war on State purchase and sale of agri-
whole international situation, capitalism; trade unions, co-opera~ Cultural productioh, and an all-

The first group of antagonisms tives, workshop committees, labour €mbzacing plan fd/nationalization
consists of those between the parties, women’s associations, a Of industry, transport, and credit.
workers and the middle class in labour press, educational leagues, The State and the co-operatives,
the capitalist countries; the second youth societies. as well as the Capitalists, are
consists of those between imperial- traders”, and when they have
ism and the liberation movement , learned how to trade, they will get
in colonies and dependent coun- | the upper hand over private trade
tries; the third consists of those | (they are doing so already!).
between the war victors and the Those who cannot understand this
conquered countries; the fourth | are not Leninists but liberals,
consists of those which have Great banks, as Lenin has said,
arisen among the victorious States; | are the State appartus which we
the fifth consists of those which need for the realization of social-
have developed between the ism, and which we take over
U.S.S.R. and the capitalist coun- ready-made from capitalism, When
tries as a whole. we do so, a unified State Bank ot

The trend of our foreign policy the most comprehensive kind, with
is determined by the conflicts and branches in every district and
antagonisms of these five groups. factory, will control production as
well as distribution of products.

No, we are not liberals. We put
the interest of the Party above the
interests of forma] democracy. For
us communists, formal democracy
is a trifle,

Just like Adolf Hitler, the
Dictator of Soviet Russia has
fe wae world Loo
or suprem-
acy. And just as Hitler did
in his notorious book, “Mein
Kampf”, so has Joseph Stalin
written, in clear and un-
mistakable words, his blue-
print for aggressive con-

communist -

xX

[The Korean War offers con-
vincing proof that Soviet Russia
nas a long-range plan for attack—
ing capitalism through its weak—
est point—the Far East.]

In 1917, the weakest part of the
capitalist world-front was Russia.
Where is the front breakable next?
Again at the weakest point. In

India, there are young and com-
b revolutionaries allied with

people have taken the trouble
to explore Stalin's writings
and weigh their significance
to the citizens of gq free
world. In order that there
be no further unawareness
of his long-range aims for
the forcible spread of com-
muftiism, here is the Russian
Dictator’s nine-point pro-
gramme for world conquest,
taken from his recorded
writings, which are now on
file in the Stalin Archives of
the National War College in
Washington, D.C. Italicized
sentences have been inserted

Vill,

[The performance of the Soviet
delegates at the United Nations is
proof of how Russia likes to talk
about “peace,” while actually
promoting aggression. ]

We communists create slogans
for the masses, Treaties embody-
ing fresh groupings of forces with
an eye to war are termed “peace
treaties.” The signing of them is
always effected to the accom-
paniment of the pipings of “peace-
ful alliances,” | Our preparations
for a war are conducted under

the powerful movement for libera-
tion, The forces of the revolu-
tionary movement in China are
immeasurable. They have not yet
come into anything like fail
operation, but the future will show
how vast they are,

The immediate task confronting
the revolutionary movement in



throughout the article in cover of paeans to peace. The
colonial lands is (1) to win over order to point up Stalin’ opposition will not accept our pro-
the best elements among the work- plan in the light of today’s | posals: that shows how “genuine”
ers to communism and to form crucial events, | is their love of peace,
independent communist parties; The Editors—Coronet | The Peace of, Brest-Litovsk* is
(2) to set up a nationalist and | a model instance of this’ strategy.
revolutionary coalition of work- '—-——-———_________ This “peace” enabled the party to

ers, peasants, and revolutionary As often as not, these are non- t@ke advantage of the discussjons,

intellectuals; and (3) to guarantee . to disintegrate the enemy. forces,
that leadership of the revolution- Pain’ rotertion of ted an dniena and ito €ather strength for an at.
ary coalition shall be in the hands with the party. But under special tack on the White Russians, Even
of the workers, conditions, every one of these the dullest have now. come. to see
It is obvious that each of these organizations is necessary; for, that the Peace of Brest-Litovsk
countries will need separate treat- lacking them, it is impossible to Wa8S a concession which strength-
ment. We must study all the consolidate the class positions of ened us while it wrecked the forces
special characteristics of the the workers in the various spheres f ‘international capitalism,

revolutionary development in these of the struggle. 1X
Seles teste” ieee Seas a 1, phere is a veritable ant heap of {In ‘Stalin’s blueprint, war be-
h tok th i) Bdependent organizations, com- tween Russia and the capitalistic
fei erie i toe igned to Mussions, and committees compris- world is inevitable: the only thing
all the tasks assigned to ing millions of non-party mem- left to chance is the actual date of

I ti io that “at thes npr batons aa ta has said 1
°. ; on that. ese organizations n has said, a terrible

desune ane eee oe take? Where is the central unit clash between Soviet Russia and
the Marsh all Plan Miteea. is con- Of Organization that wields suffi- the capitalist States must in-
vinced that capitalism abroad will Client authority to keep them with- evitably occur. The forces of
inevitably collapse. ] in prescribed lines in order to united capitalism and all their

them,

very extensive ke ;- avoid confusion? power, a very real power. There-
mick sudiglies arene ie The central unit is the Com- fore we must try to take the
has been detached from the â„¢unist party!
oe a. The loss of one- v. > nk vtipd aly dry agp sega
sixth of the world signified for jcommunists are always eager .. “ yo eae
capitalist Europe a restriction of sg ehaneees political “fefo eae dy is ripe for the decisive struggle
production and a profound dis- their real purpose is not reform when, all the class forces arrayed

enemy by surprise, seize a moment
when his forces are dispersed.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





bados compelled the pedestrian “to keep his
person on the left or near side of the road”.
This means that the man walking along
the street must go in the same direction as

turbance. Meanwhile, the Euro- but the .capture of America’s

pean powers are threatened with apparatus of government. ]

the loss of their most important. Among the masses of the people,

hinterland, the colonies, we communists, aS Lenin said, are
Europe has been compelled to but drops in the ocean. We have a

against us are in a’state of confus-
ion; when all are sufficiently em-
broiled with each other and have
been sufficiently weakened in com-
bats; when all the vacillating ele-
ments have exposed themselves






the vehicle which is overtaking him. This
condition affords an easy opportunity to be
run down by the overtaking vehicle.

{. In other parts of the world the law pro-
vides that the pedestrian meet the vehicle
which, especially in the United States
travels on the right.

} The point was raised in 1935 when the
Road Traffic Act was passed and in answer

to the objection it was suggested that the

pedestrian need only walk where the

policeman on duty should direct.

| dn today’s issue a correspondent again
draws attention to the matter and while
adjustments are still being made to traffic
~regulations it would be well. if consider-

ation is given to the difficulty.



Our Readers Say: ~~~

4 Thus, the centre of financial power party leadership.

inerease the burden of taxation, style of work that is peculiar to before the people and paraded
and to make the condition of the the practice of Leninism; it creates their utter bankruptcy. The ruling
workers much worse than before. a special type of worker, a special classes must be in the throes of a
The temporary stabilization of type of party or State official, a major government crisis, so that
capitalism has been mainly effect- special kind of style in public the government is so enfeebled
ed with the aid of U.S. capital. office. the revolutionists can speedily
The European countries, while Our task is to assign party mem- Overthrow it.
continuing to exploit their own bers to the key points in the State _ It is inconceivable, as Lenin has
colonies, have themselyes become apparatus, and to see to it that the ot tte elas nae we
financially dependent upon the U.S. apparatus is thus subjected to side with capitalist States’ Ul.
the imately hy s ~ ore euiat con-
i ng, dq quer, conflict is inevitable.
d ede it stone so The main forces of the revolu-
[The recent history of interne- end, What we are concerned with tion must, at the decisive mément,
cine labor ‘warfare in the U.S. are not the reforms, but the uses be concentrated for an attack on
reveals how cleverly communist they can be put to, A revolutionist the enemy’s most vulnerable spot,
agents use unions to achieve their may sponsor a “reform” because 4t a moment when conditions are
revolutionary aims, } he sees in it a means for linking Tipe. Always we have a clear and
No country can, in these times, yp constitutional action with un- Precise aim towards which we
carry on war without the workers. constitutional ‘action—because ‘he Btrive, for one of the eee merits’
If workers refuse to make war feels he can make use of it as a Of communism is that nothing is
mr — rota then screen behind which he can left ip chehee. lee oie
such war becomes impossible, ( ache Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was signed
Communists must go into the *Tensthen his — work March 3, 1918, between the new. Bol-
[The natural radicalism

Our country, a vast domain with achieve unity of command and to military technique are a mighty

in the capitalist world has been For the

revolutionist,
shifted from Europe to America,
nt

shevik Government and
unions, work in them for five or

Of Tiney, and ‘Solsetle) cr ore

. u ey, ni a .

more years if necessary—see to it America’s younger people, e8- Peinci’ ang Bulgaria) at Brest-Litovak,
that every communist, without ex-

pecially students, makes them @ Russia from World War I.


























Sunday Shopping and
Sabbath Values
'* To che Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—A week or so ago you
published a rather solid letter
' from “Layman” deprecating the

proposal to open stores on Sundays

_ to accommodate tourists, and ap-
»*pealing to the Clergy of the
»-various denominations and their

Staffs to arise and get busy in op-
‘position to the plan and’ for the

nye onan of the Sabbath (or

Lord’s Day) with all its beneficent

‘aims and uses. A very wise line

of action, I cannot but think. And

I would extend the appeal to the

‘political leaders since they also

“are professedly and substantially
_. pledged to promote the well being

of the community, whereas TI

‘notice that the Heads of the
- Workers’ Union’ are running

political and electioneering rallies

‘on Sundays now.

&

But there are worse attacks
upon the inestimab], treasure of a
well spent Sabbath. Last Sunday

for example, one of our crowd of
cinemas offered a regular night-
club. programme imported from
Trinidad, with two performances
——one at, 4.45 for the children—
and announced the day before that
the Box Office would be open for
the sale of tickets on Sunday from
8 to 12 noon, Evidently on regard
at all for the religious character
and duties of the day and its
possible blessings and benefits, but
simply aiming to stir up the
(perhaps jaded appetite of the
public and make money,

Many townships in the Mother
Country refuse to allow cinemas
and other places of amusement to
open On Sundays, but “Little
England” is far from worrying
about a reasonable free chance for
Spiritual affairs.

But returning to the appeal to
the Clergy and their helpers, Are
they not interested and concerned?
I have not heard of any of them
saying or doing anything in regard
to the matter, and yet they are
the primary and natural, guardians

and advocates of “the things that
are God’s”, and responsible for the
souls and morals of the com-
munity. * i ;

Is it that they have nothing to
say on so big and urgent a malter,
but are just satisfied to talk soft
platitudes to their docile (or per-
haps sleepy)‘ congregations? 1
have not heard of any of them
being applauded by the ardent
heroic souls who are eager for the
establishment of the Lord Christ’
Kingdom of | Righteousness and
Love—and there are still a few
of these around, — nor of their
being attacked by the devotees of
“the World, the, Flesh and the
Devil.” We have here perhaps
another reason for regretting that
the Head of 6ne denomination has
sailed qway, for he is famous for
the dictum: “It is the people that
matter”. Anyway, right or wrong,
I think Religion is still of first im-
portance, and Sunday is its main
opportunity to get a living, so I beg
to sign myself.”

“PRO DEO ET PATRIA”
March, 6, 1951,



Race Hatred.

To Tne Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I beg to say race-
hatred in this island is fahned and
kept alive»by the narrow-minded
who do not seek ynity, but mutiny,
and to overthrow the weaker side.
&t is a form of Communism, and
should be punished. Educated or
sensible coloured people should
try to overthrow this backward
thinking among their ace, sand
climb on their own merits. The
Indians, Jews, and other nations
segregate, yet are good mixers, and
do not stir up strife: I must say
I am proud of the East Indians
that are here among us, also the
Jews. Why is this continual
yapping about colour kept up. We
are as white as our Pufity, as
yellow as our insincerity, and as
black as our deéds. ,T ai must
pay tribute to the picture at the
Empire Theatre “Farewell to
Yesterday.” It is the birth of
new thought. “There is one God
—We are all brothers.” Tt is for
us to live it,

A CITIZEN.



THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1951




CLUB FOR SEAMEN

By KATHERINE GLOVER

(From The Christian Science Monitor)

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE

T_ V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.




NOW




Usually





see eae pty $24 $22
MEN who sail the seven seas always Pkgs. LUX FLAKES ...... - -
welcome the day their vessel puts into the Tins COOKING BUTTER (1lb Tins) ...... . -




American port of Mobile, on the Gulf of
Mexico, where they find shelter and welcome
in a completely equipped seamen’s club,
which embodies most of the features of a
modern hotel, a home away from home, a
bank, library, post office, a recreation centre.
It is, in every sense of the word, a seamen’s
paradise and when a sailor crosses the
threshold for the first time he usually thinks
he is dreaming. a

As a matter of fact, the Mobile Seamen’s
Club, in the southern State of Alabama, is
the fulfilled dream of a man of the seas who
understands other seamen. When George E.





82
-32








CARPENTERS’ TOOLS

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COMPASS SAWS—12ins., 14ins.

BACK SAWS—12 ins., 14 ins., 16ins.

PLANES, IRON—9ins., 10ins., 15ins., 18ins.

is BLOCK
RATCHET BRACES
CHISELS—\in., %in., %iu., lin.

CHISEL SETS of 4 in., 5% in. 1 in. ins.
OIL STONES—6ins., 8ins.

[ , complete—dins., 6ins.


















Blacktopp, director of the club, was a seaman SN INDING STO Sins., 6ins.
during World War I, conditions were differ- SAW FILES—3ins., 4ins., 4%4ins., 5ins.



CLAW HAMMERS
ENGINEER HAMMERS—llb., 1%lbs., 2lbs.

MASON TROWELS & SQUARES
AT



ent from those of today. Forty men were
crowded into the forecastle in those days;
food often was more to the taste of sharks
than of human beings; hotrs were long,
wages short. When men came into port their
chief concern was in having “fun” and the
type of recreation they chose did not always
please the law or the citizens. Sheer boredom
and loneliness were troublemakers which
too often led the seamen into difficulties.

In many respects life at sea has greatly
changed in the past quarter-century. Today
sailors have good quarters; wages and hours
are good, with higher pay for overtime; food
is the same as that which the officers eat,‘but
loneliness and boredom persist. Blacktopp has
carried his own memory of the seamen’s lot
through the years. Spending most of his civil-
ian life as a welfare worker among seamen,
he realizes how important it always will be
for them to have recreational outlets ashore.
When he went to Mobile to live in its mild
climate, he took over the Seamen’s Bethel, a
century-old institution for serving seamen.
There he put into practice some of the ideas
which have now found full fruition in the
new Seamen’s Club.

Blacktopp believes in treating the seamen
as self-respecting human beings not as poten-
tial lawbreakers. This is a departure from
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contrast to this Blacktopp’s theory of serving
seamen is based on the preventive one of pro-| $
viding recreational facilities to engage their| %
leisure time and prevent their getting into
trouble. ; :

The city of Mobile was a good place to carry
out the experiment of the kind of seamen’s
‘service Blacktopp envisioned. During World
War II the Gulf City burgeoned into one of
the most pepor tant ports in the United States,
with large fleets of ships moving in and out of,
its docks, with shipbuilding and ship repairing
of considerable proportions: Also, most. for-
tunately, it had a group of progressive ship-
ping men who were interested in Blacktopp’s
ideas and willing to offer financial help. One
of these, Captain Norman Nicholson, presi-
dent of the Waterman Steamship Company,
whose firm contributed a large sum to the
club, is president of its board of trustees. His
vision and energy in organizing matched
those of Blacktopp. .--

Because of its location on the Gulf of Mex-
ico, Mobile always has had a population of
transient seamen. For more than 100 years
starting in 1834 with a small mission, Mobile
citizens have supported some kind of service
to seamen. On the board of trustees and in
the women’s auxiliary of the present Sea-
men’s Club are grandsons and granddaugh-
ters of citizens interested in the first Seamen’s
Bethel. The money which built the club came
out of the pockets of shipping firms, banks,
business. concerns, and private citizens in
Mobile. Many seamen gave part of their
Savings to the fund,

The Mobile Seamen’s Club operates on a
strictly democratic principle. S ips’ officers}
mingle on the same footing with men who
oil the engines and scrub the decks. Local
hotels sometimes call upon the club’s facili-
ties when they are overcrowded. Recently, |'
two Senators from the midwestern State of
Illinois, while-in Mobile on business, were
temporary overflow guests. They were so
delighted with the club's accommodations
ve oer had no inclination to return to the

otel.

There is no charity or patronage about this
seamen’s club. It operates on a self-sus-
taining basis, although rates are less than
those in a good hotel and services avail:
able include features that cannot be had in
a hotel. For example, a man. who needs a
joan is never turned away. The Seamen’s Club
has one inflexible rule, which is that sailors
who are intoxicated will not be admitted.
They are asked to come back as soon as they
have recovered from their excessive drink-
ing. And they frequently do return, ;

One of the unique features of the club is|$
that it is designed to encourage men to have
their wives and families join them while the
are in port. With ships often in Mobile’s dry
docks for repairs, there is opportunity for
family reunions. 'The Seamen’s Club offers a
variety- of-services to the seamen’s families,
Forexample, it.will provide a qualilled person
to stay with the children whenever a husband
and wife want a few hours together. A play-
ground in the rear of the'b g soon will











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be added to the club's facilities. The sound of 8p ‘FED DUCKS — LAM “a
children’s voices, the sight of women in the a MILK "sg eit pe! 3 aw ge Saar cond
| corridors and lounge of the club.aré things|% | __HAMS —
Sea 7 expected to see in a sailor's ‘ SPECIALS JUST ARRIVED
The club is air-conditioned throughout, fire- LUNCHEON CHEESE —_ IC
| prbdt, and furntahed with wtietetee went )_$121 each BOUILLION -
furniture. A laundry with driers makes it/@ | «. -48 each CANADIAN EGGS
possible for a seaman to wash his clothes and! | HUNTER’S STEAK & KID- ICE CREAM MIX
dry them in a few minutes. There is a re Coes Pane tthe mee FREES SALMON
room and library, writing room, and a recre- 6 cents per tin BRA Ss :
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games. The lounge of the club is converted|& | cae
into-a motion picture theatre at times and ag Bt Cones SAUSAGES
good films are shown for the benefit of the BARLEY STICKS—13 each . ONIONS POTATOES
seamen’s guests, In every respect, the club is :
a demonstration of a new approach in service

PHONE GODDARDS WE DELIVER



to seamen,


THURSDAY, MARCH 8,

Rest Essential
For T.B. Patients

DR. O'MAHONY IN
PUBLIC HEALTH TALK

_ At the first Conference of Pub-
lic Health Officers in Barbados
now being held at Queen’s Park
some of the subjects discussed
were: “Tuberculosis”, “The Nu-
trition of the working class moth-
er and child during its pre-school
years” and “The hygiene of food
and of food handling places”

Dr. J. P. O'Mahony, address-
ing the Conference on “Tuber-
culosis” said that it was a subject
they knew a great deal about,
but they did not know all about
it. Tuberculosis was a_ disease
which was caused by a tubercu-
lous germ. That germ or poison
called a tubercle germ or poison
was something that could not be
seen with the naked eye, but by
certain instruments provided in
order to enlarge its size.

It centred into two main parts
of the body and for the purpose
of his talk, he would only deal
chiefly with one. Tuberculosis in
the greater number of cases, was
a disease of the lungs and was
commonly called consumption or
a decline. In other cases, it was
also a_ disease of the intestines,
but the greater number of cases
were in the lungs rather than in
the gut.

The fact that tuberculosis was
got mostly in the lungs should
give an idea as to how the germ
entered the body, because the
body must have contact in some
way or other with the germ so
that the disease was produced. If
there_was no contact between the
body and the cause of the disease,
it was common sense to say that
there would be no disease and
that was a public health fact.

Breaihed In or Eaten

In order to produce the disease
in the lungs, the germ had to get
into the lungs, hence one breath-
ed in the germ. If one had the
Gisease in the gut, one either had
to eat it or drink it.

Dr. O’Mahony said that there
was only one advice to be taken
in a disease of this nature and
that was the advice of the doc-
tors, the people who knew some-
thing about it.

It was absolutely essential for
any case of tuberculosis to have
medical advice because the doc-
tor knew how best he could take
care of himself during the time
he was assisting and would be
able to recommend certain treat-
ments so that if the disease was
in the early stages the patient
would be able to overcome it.

He laid stress on the question
of rest and said that the patient
should be given as much as pos-
sible. The idea behind the rest
was that it gave the best chance
of cure.

He said that a person could get
tuberculosis just as well from
a slum area as in an area of
fresh. air up to two or three
thousand feet. There was no spe-
cial climate for tuberculosis and
that was a fact.

He did not think that direct
sunshine for tuberculosis was
good as in many cases it made the
disease worse. '

The patient he said must eat
nourishing food and a balanced
diet was needed. Foods like milk,
fish and eggs that contained pro-
tein were of the greatest im-
portance to persons suffering
from tuberculosis.

Hie said that Denmark had more
dairy produce than perhaps any
country in the world and it was
known that war had a very bad
effect on the tuberculosis rate of
any country. During the last war.
Denmark was overrun by the
Germans from 1940—45, but in
spite of that, the tuberculosis
rate was low although one would
have expected that it would have
been higher. The reason why it
got better was because there was
no exportation of its dairy pre-
duce to any other country ne

Isolated

Dr. O’Mahony said that a tu-
berculosis patient should have his
own bed, clothing and drinking
utensils and it should be a crim-
inal offence for any infant or
child to go near a tuberculosis
case or for a_ tuberculosis
case to allow a child to come near
him as children did not have the

same resistance as grown ups
and would therefore die more
quickly.

Parents should even send away
their children if there was tu-
berculosis in the home until the
medical authorities said that it
was safe for them to return.

He said that from statistics it
showed that tuberculosis in Bar-
bados was an urban problem and
not a rural one as the rate in the
former area was higher than in
the latter.

Miss A. Estwick whose subject
was “The nutrition of the work-
ing class mother and child during
its pre-school years” said that the
nutrition of that individual would
depend largely on the type of
work she chose to do. Too few
working class persons realised the
importance of eating a balanced
diet which was not only essential
to health, but satisfying to the
appetite.

If Public Health Workers could
drive home that point, a great
portion of the present existing
evils of malnutrition would be
overcome,

It was the duty of the Public
Heaith Workers to suggest cheao
and easily procured local food-
stuffs which would supply a bal-
anced diet like yams, breadfruit,
potatoes, etc., which were widely
grown and were cheap and valu-
able carbohydrate sources.

She said that care should be
taken to ensure that each day’s
menu contained carbohydrates,
proteins, greens, milk, sugar and
fruit.

They considered the responsi-
bility of the working class mother
towards her children, particularly
during pre-school age. The mdst
difficult time was the weaning
stage. The home conditions and
the individuality of each child
were large factors, and while they
simed at an ideal dietary, modifi-
cations must be used to suit the
reauirements and tastes of each
child—discretion being used to dis~
tinguish between pampering and
spoiling and genuine idiosyncra-
sies. There could be no hard and
fast rules, but alterations and in-
troduction of new foods
always be gradual.

@ On Page 8

must



1951
Many letters of support from the Colonial Office, Caribb =~ O S
and congratulation have in which it is stated :
followed the ‘att Gtifiths | [Secre- can 7 =
our December issue of ef State for the
article “Caribbean Colonies) is already UM. Endorsing our compete with the cor-
SOS.” If amy further aware of the urgent and °O™mment oe ss - ny poration’s ships, so much
evidence were required of serious nature of the : S

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



offer adequate passenger
service to their own Col-
onies. The Elders &
Fyffe Line have, how-
ever, helped very con-
siderably with the “Gol-
fite” which is calling

problem to which you « Comment from the regularl Barbados
have—drawm attention, 306 “Worse off today mn Caribbean itself Trinidad, but we are
and he wants me te fore the Boer War.” the must await the uncer- most concerned at the
assure you that it is re- “Guardian” went on to tain mail deliveries, put prospects of the coming
ceiving the active con- say: if readers turn to page season with the antici-
‘sideration of the : 99 of this issue (“Erratic pated increase in the
Government, who are British shipownezs ean Colngied. Mail Disturb umber of visitors for
discussing with the ‘earcely be > they will get the Festival of Britain.
shipping interests con- ‘for regarding West In some further indication

what steps can services as uilat- of opinion on the: We hope that there will

be no repetition of the

proved services to and kind of subsidy... . But our home readers are experiences early in 1950

tra Caribbean. Mr, this does not mean that too various to be quoted when the French Line

Britain and the Caribbean, Griffiths regrets, how- the West Indian Colonies at length, but we ap- “Misr” and other steam-

and are unanimous ever, that he is not yet for which we are re- pend the of ers brought over many

condemnation of the to te sponsible should be left Swe firms wel kmewnin visitors who had the

it precarious state of | when a solution of the to remain dependent on the West Indian Trade: greatest difficulty in get-

dependence on foreign problem will be possible, such shipping services “Gillnenie: Bee. & Ce ting back, and any diver-

- The we as foreigners may care to f ' 3 lasia

of cargo shippers differs Teceived assurances from provide or subsidise. If _Ltd.:” The lack of pas- Seema theoseh the

according to whether they Members of Parliament. the islands and main. SMger accommodation Panama to call for pas-

are concerned with Bar- ‘at the matter is to be jand territories of Gui- between this country t West Indian

bades, Trinidad ,and Ja- Faised inthe Commons as ana and. oc aa ot ye AL Sg gy Re le flac
maica, or with those parts 90n' as : Previous @uras are to lop | ing considerable . y

ports, action,
° JOB FOR THE
Readers will no doubt DEVELOPMENT
be interested to of CORPORATION ?
the initial response to our The “Manchester Guar-
article in official and other dian” gave its weighty



have failed to elicit any-
thing but a non-committal
reply from the Govern-
ment, but it is encourag-
ing to learn that a further
effort is to be made to
emphasise the
nature of the position and

to press for immediate

healthily they must
have adequate sea

. Could not the
Colonial Development
Corporation either build
or charter two or three
vessels and organise a
regular service to the
West Indies itself? It
could reasonably be ar-

serious

the situation has been
relieved by the restora-
tion of the French Line
service and will be im-
Proved even
when their two, buxury
liners are ted,

the position, unless ade-
quate facilities can be
offered for the return.
The outlook is far from
encouraging and we
can see little hope of





Sages, but we agree with
the points brought out in
your article. We are,
however, very much in-
terested in the matter of
freights between — this

of our difficulties in this
direction is that if we

iron stoves, ete, from
Glasgow (which port
serves a considerable
number of manufactur-
ers of these articles), it
is most difficult to obtain
shipping direct to the
Caribbean, and we may
have to wait months for
a direct sailing as tran-
shipment of this break -
able merchandise is not
desirable. However,
there is a rumour that a
Canadian shipping com-
pany may be able to ease
this situation as regards
Jamaica, but at the mo-

Who Steals The
Refuse Box?

The two new refuse collectors
of the Scavenging Department
started to work on Monday last.

Mr. Herbert Best, head driver
at the Scavenging Department,
told the Advocate yesterday that
the trucks cannot hold as much
as the open trucks but the refuse
cannot blow back into the streets.

He said that the Public too
seem to be satisfied but he feels
that people can co-operate more
by putting out their refuse in time
and not waiting until the refuse
collectors have passed.

“Many people complain that
their refuse containers are taken
away by the refuse collectors. but
this is not so,” he said.

He said that the majority of
people put out their stuff in boxes
After the scavengers empty the
stuff they put the boxes back into
the streets but a pedestrian pass-
ing along would see a box which
had contained refuse and take it
up for firewood, On many occa-
sions he has had to stop pedes-
trians from doing this.

He suggested that the people
should get proper containers
Have them painted and also print
their names on them. In this
way the Police would be able to
ascertain that a pedestrian is
stealing a container and he can
take action. Scavengers would
also be able to help if this was

PAGE FIVE
Will Ship Back



Equipment To T’dad

Part of the equipment imported
from Trinidad for work on the
runway at Seawell is being pre-
pared to be shipped back to Trini-~
dad now that the runway is
nearly completed.

The motor vessel Caracas is here
to take back the first set of equip-
ment to Trinidad. The Caracas
brought up from Trinidad with
her, 1,000 drums of colas for
Messrs. Da Costa & Co, Ltd.,
which she is now discharging.

She is expected to finish dis-
charging the colas today and will
then be berthed alongside the
Government crane which will be
used to lift the heavy equipment
aboard her.

The Caracas prought the most ot
the equipment from Trinidad that
was used on the runway. She
is consigned to Messrs, J. N. Har-
riman & Co., Ltd,



PAYING OFFICER
APPOINTED

Mr. L. B. Phillips has been
appointed Old Age Pensions Pay-
ing Officer, St. Michael, with ef-
fect from the 9th of March.



BUSH ROAD

The Constitution flood area is

support to our appeal in
an editorial of 23rd Jan-

sued that this is g form
of capital development
which the

exists to foster, and if,
with the growth of West
Indian trade,
cial companies began to



corporation
to their own

commer- state of affairs

C.J. GIVES Struck With The Waves

7 YEARS

For House breaking
And larceny

Sentence of seven years’ penal
servitude was passed on Eric
Sealy by His Honour the Chiet
Justice Sir Allan Collymore at the
ee of Grand Sessions yester-

ay.

Sealy was found guilty of break-
ing into the house’ of Terrence
Johnson situated at Prince of
Wales Road, Bank Hall on Sept-
ember 21 and stealing money to
the amount of $20 the property
of Johnson.

Miss mm. 2%, sogrme prosecuted
for the Crown. The prosecution
pointed out that Sealy in the ab-
sence of Johnson on September
21 broke into Johnson’s house
using the back door and stealing
$20 which was in the house,

First witness for the prosecu-
tion called was the owner of the
house, Terrence Johnson, He said
that he lives at Prince of Wales
Road, Bank Hall. A woman by
the name of Lilian Taitt _ lives
about 40 feet from his house, On
September 21, at about 8.30 am.
he closed the fromt and back
doors before he left the house.
The back door has two. latches
and on leaving he went through
the front door,

Door Broken

When he returned about 11.20
the same morning to his house.
Taitt told him something. He
saw the back door of the house
was broken and the latch unlock-
ed. One window of the bedroom
was also opened,

Lilian Taitt, a domestic servant
of Bank Hall, said on September
21 at about 9.15 a.m, she was
grazing her sheep and goat a
little way from,Johnson’s house
which is in Prinfe of Wales Road.
While standing there, she saw the
ccused go into Terrence John-
son’s house by opening the side
gate. After the accused stayed
about 15 minutes inside the house,
she asked someone to hold the
sheep for her, and went to John-
son’s house and called for “City”
but the accused told her that
“City” was not there.

She asked the accused who he
was and he said that he was
Louissa_ Rice's grand-son. She
returned for her sheep and about
15 minutes after the accused
came out of the house and went
in the direction of Barracks Road,
About 11.20 am. the same day
she saw Johnson going to his
place and told. him something.
Johnson then went to his house
and she went with him. When
they arrived at the house she
noticed that the back door was
broken,

On September 22 at about 10.30
a.m, she went to the C.I.D. Dept.
and identified the accused in a
line with others,

Accused Identified

Melville Phillips of St, Thomas
said on September 21 at about
9.15 am. he was working at
Prince of Wales Road, and saw
the accused come up the Road
and go to a gate, pull at it, and
go in. Lilian Taitt who was
grazing a sheep went to the same
house and went back and told
him something He saw the
accused come out of the house
and go to Barracks Road. Some-
time later he went to the C.I.D,
and identified the accused among
other men.

Cpl. Kenneth Murphy, now at-
tached to the Bridge Post, said
that on September 22 he was de-
tailed to carry out an identification:
parade ‘on Eric Sea'y who was
accused of house breaking and
larceny. He got eight es of
similar build as Sealy and called
on Lilian Taitt who touched Sealy
on his. hand. Melville Phillips
also picked out the accused, -

The acrused was then formally
charged tad after made a volun-
{ary statement. Cpl, Byer_ ther
gave evidence of going to John-
son's place and investigating about
an alleged house breaking and
larceny, At this stage the case
ior the prosecution was closed.

Sealy then addressed the jury
submitting that he mever stole the
money and placing the theft on
a man name, “City”? who he said
used to stay at Johnson's place
and carried him into Johnson's
house on September 21.

His Honour the Chief Justice
then summed up and after a
short deliberation the Jury re-
turned a verdit of guilty of house
breaking and larceny,

Bottle By

Swept Over

out, preference is given
and it is a deplorable
Britain not to be able to

any improvement for ment it is very indefi-
further some time to come. nite,
Carters (Merchants), Regarding the last point,
Ltd.: The article, of

nationals,

for Great

Took Stolen
Property

, " Jord yester-
nknown Man The Highway ,.0%272.308 90

Oe ee Rupert
. Jordan of Eckstein Village,
Eagle Hall, St. Michael, was taken
to the General Hospital on Tues-
day night and detained with a
swollen neck.

Jordan was picked up by the
Olympic Theatre, He said that a
man, whom he did not know, had
struck Kim with a bottle.

LAIRMONTE CARMICHAEL,

a 16-year-old schoolboy of low.
er Carlton, St. James, was detained
at the General Hospital on Tues-
day night with head injuries.

Carmichael, cyclist, was in-
volved in an aceldent along Queen
Street, St, Peter with motor lorry
S—231, owned by Reginald Pres—
cod of Mount Standfast, St. James,
and driven by Hilton Medford of
Ashton Hall, St, Peter,

The cycle, which is owned by
St. Clair Carmichael, was exten-
sively damaged,

ANY RESIDENTS of Triopath,

St Andrew, are now forced to
drink water from the spring at
Spring Vale Plantation, They
complain that this water is insani-

tary.

Gao told the Advocate that the
pipes in the district have been
locked off since January and they
have to walk miles to get water.

He said that people of the Cane
Garden district haye to travel
to Parks Plantation, three miles
away, to get drinking water. Oc-
casionally the water truck from
the Water Works Department
could be seen in the district but
recently the visits have become
very few.

FINE of 15/- in 14 days with

an alternative of one month's
Imprisonment was imposed by Mr.
G. B. Griffith, Police Magistrate
of District “A” on Prince Henry
Walcott of Rouen Village, St.
Michael,

Walcott was found guilty of
unlawfully assaulting and beating
Beryl Vaughan of Seales Land,
Martinigue, St, Michael, on Janu-
ary 6.

A&A RECOKM CATCH of 2,452

flying fish was brought in
at Oistin Bay, Christ Church yes-
terday afternoon by the fishing
boat Lady Omer owned by Edwin
Fleming of Oistin.

A big crowd of housewives
rushed to the beach to get the
fresh fish and nearly everyone who
was there got their required
amount of fish.

SHAMROCK CREDIT
-UNION, a corporative move-
ment, will hold a meeting at St.
Patrick’s School, Jemmotts Lane,
at 7.30 o'clock tonight. Members
.will receive the Financial Report
and also discuss other affairs of
the Union,

This movement, since its for-
mation, has helped the poor, both
Roman Catholics and those of
other religions, with loans and in
other ways.

R. CORNELIUS ANDERSON,
Superintendent of His Majés-
ty’s Prison in. St. Vincent, who
ds at present on a special visit to
Barbados will be the Guest Speak-
er at the Weekly United Holiness
ig at Reeg Street on Thurs-

day, March 8.

For the past two days, big
waves have been dashing with
fury against the rocks and sand
along the Western coast of the
island. It seemed to be worst
along the St. James Coast, where
at some beaches, a dash of a wave

sent water as high as 30 feet ine

the air.

Along highway No, 1. where the
road was near to the sea and al-
most on a level with the beach,
the waves broke over the street,
leaving layers of bay sand and
small sea rocks behind therm,

Motorists still made use of the
road but they had to take muc
care that their vehicles did not
skid and perhaps topple , over.
Early yesterday, scavengers with
their shovels were at work Tre-
moving the obstacles out of the
road. Occasionally, their work
was intensified by a wave which
threw more sand and stones on
the highway, :

Fishing Fleet Drawn U

Fishing fleets with their moor-
ings along that coast did not ven-
ture out. to make their daily
catches, but the most of them re-
mained at their anchorage to be
‘tossed about by the swelling sea,

Some fishermen said that they
were not running the risk of
losing their boats in that weather
while others were only impeded
from going out because they
thought that the surging of the
sea would make it difficult for
them to catch fish, ;

Over 20 fishing boats from Fitz 8

Village, Paynes Bay and Holetown
took shelter in the inner basin of
the Careenage yesterday. Their
masts were lowered and their
sail neatly put away, |

Fishing boats and moses alike
could be seen drawn up alongside
the road while you pass on youn
way to or from Speightstown,
some of them being made fast to

trees and to the backs of houses
for safety.
Houses near to the beaches

were standing over water and all
the waterways that empty them-
selves into the sea flooded over
their banks while wave after wave
rushed into them,

Under Water

At Hvletown, a large spot of
jJand called the “Swamp” which
is used as a playing fiela was
mostly under water. The “Swamp”
is bounded on the South side by
a river which was swollen by the
sea.

Waves tore away the sand from
the beaches. Along Bay Field, St,
Peter, where casuarina trees are
planted about 20 yards from the
wash of the sea, much of the sand
was swept away, leaving the roots
of the trees exposed to such an ex-

tent that they could be expected to

fall at any moment.

The condition of the sea was not
-at all enc to sea bathers.
Groups of people that can always
be seen at favourite bathing beach-
es, were missed during the two
days.

The sea had lost its blue colour
and turned a dull and ugly colour
caused by the mixing of sand
from the sea’s bed with the waves,

| MOTOR CYCLE MARVEL

VELOCETTE

prisonment with hard labour by
His Honour the Chief Justice, Sir
Allan Collymore, after he pleaded
guilty of receiving stolen property

“between November 28 and 29,
1950. s *

12 Months For Receiving

Kenrick Bennett was ordered to
undergo 12 months’ imprisonment
‘with hard labour. He pleaded
guilty of receiving stolen property
valued $34.70,

* *
Broke House: 9 Months
Sentence of nine months’ impris-
onment was imposed on Marjorie
Edwards after she pleaded guilty
of breaking the house of Cleo-
patra Dash on December 18, and
stealing articles to the value of
$15.99,
* * *
BOUND OVER
Cecil Maloney who entered a
plea of “guilty” of the fraudulent
conversion of $108.08, the money
of Kenrick Small, was bound over

for 18 months.
* * *

On 12 Months’ Probation

Berkley Trotman was put on
probation for 12 months after
pleading guilty of house breaking
and larceny. Date of the offence
was October 27,

me

ON PROBATION

Also put on probation for 18
months was Millicent Layne. She
pleaded guilty of the larceny of
articles valued $46.00 on October

40'- For Bodily
Harm

Ursula Rock of Cats Castle, City,
was yesterday fined 40/- in 14
days with an alternative of one
month's imprisonment by City
Police Magistrate Mr. H. A.
Talma after she was found guilty
of unlawfully and maliciously in-
flicting bodily harm on Marie Ellis
of the same address.

George Rock, who was charged
jointly with Ursula Rock, was
fined 25/- to be paid in 14 days.





4,000 Women Register
For Emigration To U.S.

With the prospect of employ-
ment in the United States, 4,018
women up to yesterday have al-
ready registered at the Employ-
ment Agency in Queen’s Park
the Advocate was told yesterday
Registration began on February
26

In the same period 338 men have
registered and 1,666 have renew-
the'r registration.

ARTICLES STOLEN

THIEVES stole articles valued
$81.20 from the home of Ed-
ward Bowen at Government Hill,
St. Michael, between 5.15 p.m.
and 9,30 p.m. on Monday.
Eugene Blackman reported that
clothing was stolen from his open
yard on Tuesday, °
The Police are
both incidents,



investigating

The New Model L.E. 149 C.C. is different from the conventional type

Motor Cycle—in fact it’s the nearest approach to a motor car.

Water-cooled, Hand-Started. Shaftedriven

and Noiseless.

For SIMPLICITY, ECONOMY and RIDING PLEASURE

Choose a...

VELOCETTE

ROBERT THOM LTD.
White Park Road.

Courtesy Garage

ss SS
— Oo



course deals with the
passenger position and
this affects us only when
personnel connected with
our business in one way
or another require pas-

a monthly cargo service to
T Ba , and
British Guiana from Glas-
gow and Liverpool has
just been initiated by Sag-
uenay Terminals, Ltd, of
Canada,



Westminster
Corner

R, OSBORNE (Conservative,

Lincolnshire, South div.)
has asked the Minister of Fooc
why he increased the price for
Commonwealth sugar by a uni-
form rise of 65s. per ton to £30 10s
a ton, when one country did not
make any claim tor an increase
and another asked for an increase
only of 35s, per ton; and, in view of
this, why the price for Common-
wealth raw sugar in 1951 has now
been fixed at £32 17s, 6d. per ton,

Mr, Webb: A uniform price has
been fixed annually for Common.
wealth sugar for the past 10 years.
When . inereases of price have
been agreed, they have been basec
upon such evidence of increased
cost as was available so as to ar-
vive at a fair average price fot
all the Commonwealth producing
countries, This method has beer
followed in
has resulted in the price increase
referred to by the hon, member

Discussions will take place dur
ing the course of this year witi
representatives of Commonwealtl
Sugar producers to see what car
be done to introduce greater pre:
cision into the method of fixin;
prices under the Commonwealt!
Sugar Agreement. I should adc
however, that this uniform pric
for all the Commonwealth suga
supplies was finally agreed t
after negotiation, at their ow.
united request,

Crude Oil Arrives

A shipment of 878,178 gallons of
crude oil arrived in Barbados yes-
terday byg the oil. tanker Inver-
rosa” from Caripito, Venezuela.
The Inverrosa has anchored off
Shot Hall, St. Michael, to dis-
charge the oil into the tanks of
the British Union Oil Company
Her agents are Messrs, R. M.
Jones & Co., Ltd.





Sale To-morrow
The attention of

of sale of the Central Foundry’s
block. of buildings, Broad Street,
These buildings were originally
advertised to be sold at, the Office
of Messrs Cottle, Catford & Co,
High Strect, at 2 p.m, today, The

buildings will now be put up for

scle by Messrs Cottle, Catford &
Co, at 2 p.m, to-morrow (Friday).






At the first
hint of a

on your handkerchief and pillow
_d, for comfort and protection. Breathe
we the vapour deeply and often, |
i"

THOMAS
K*AIO0F 4 co troy ‘
INGLAN,

GENTLEMEN

GET THESE

NOW.



Each
2

Each

Each





















1950 and 1951 and},

readers is
drawn to the change in the date

ELITE Self colour Shirts... .
trubenised collar
shades of Blue, Tan and Grey,
Sizes 14 te 17—

Athletic Supporters by Johnson &
Johnson, Sizes Medium & Large

ee

Hand Painted Ties — Sceneries of
Barbados —

Striped Pyjamas,
& Large—

oi a



done.

He said that hydraulic tipping
gear in the new trucks comes in
very handy. The old trucks were
fitted with hand pumped tipping
gear. With the new tipping gear
the new trucks can dump the will soon be a large number of
stuff in less time. flies and mosquitoes.

=; PURINA CHOWS
@ FOR POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK
a “See the Difference Purina Makes‘’

mt. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors
SSESEUECEEBUGEEESEEe

EASTER

FALLS ON 25th MARCH

now under bush,

Residents of the area removed
to the Pine and Bay Estate after
the damage by flood water to life
and property in 1949. If this
bush is not cleared away there



We have in Stock - - -

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in 8 sizes. Prices : 32¢., 28¢., and 26c.
These can be used for your Easter Gifts of
Ties, Scarves, Handkerchiefs, Stockings, ete.
or ean be filled with Guava Cheese, Barley
Sugar and other Sweets,

:: ALSO ::

Chocolate Easter Eggs in Plastic Cases and
Marzipan Easter Eggs in Plastic Cups.

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Extra Oversize______ DGe. |
|
|
|

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
PAGE SIX



BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1951



HENRY

MICKEY MOUSE

PCS ANT 4 41 iy ammere 1) f
THE CONFERENCE YS,
IS BREAKING U ) WMBLE I G48

ZL WONDER ...? ae <
a4 MMBLET]
olgiven

= YOU Sé#’ 7
YOU'VE GOT FRI NENDS a ment
ON THE OUTSIDE? 4} yg f

BY LEE

} THAT OLIGAT TO CATCH THEIR H | mp unas ae ol

<=] JATTENTION ONLY AFEW | = | WATER yt

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A BLAST FURNACE, |? _
y | THE FLAMING [ ,
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BY CARL, ANDERSON —



FALK







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I SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only !

USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
JEFFREYS HEER







Per Carton 480 4.24
Per Bottle 2.50 2.26
Per Case ss rt twC(itC —~=Cié2/.00 FRY’S COCOA i lb. tins 47 42



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BUY A BOPTLE TO-DAY.



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A i Bo e of Ladies, Gents and Children’s
WEAR at Unbeatable Prices



Also Connecting Services to the whole Wale

san FASTER BY FAR BY SPEEDBIRD.
BO OAC, ac. Porwarding Avent

i Seer SFLy- BOM





MILL SECONDS.
BOYS' SHIRTS
2 for $1.00

& RAY “MOORES

MEN’S VESTS
2 for $1.00



CHILDREN’S VESTS
LADIES VESTS

3 for $1.00
ww bihichdinindenbsicbthaekislpoanteidinhiiy
# ote $0 CHILDREN’S PANTIES
CF cae Pie
GENTS SOCKS 2 for $1.00
and
3 for $1.00 8 for $1.00

BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION
BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED



THE BARGAIN HOUSE §

30, Swan Street — Ss. ALTMAN, oa 7 $|

7 < oe Ot Oe > Fe. i
LESS FOSS POSES SOS OCS FOSOS FF SSO S FOODS OOO?

Airways House, Brnigetown
Phone 4585 .



|
|
|
:


THURSDAY, MARCH 8,

4 cents per word on Sundays for each
edditional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is’ $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Netices only after 4 p.m.



THANKS





George uynech (Son), Wife and
Curacao) wife and grand children,
Ciusdsen, Aubrin Liyneh (Son,
Leoni Lynch (daughter, Trinidad),
and children, Clyde and Beril
(grand children) .

6.3.51—In



IN ' MEMORIAM





BIRCH—In loving memory of Elise
Birch, who wes called to rest on
March @th 1949.

“Dear is the grave in which she is
laid

Dear is the memory that never shall
fade

Sweet is the hope that again we

shall meet,
Kneeling together at Jesus’ Feet.”
Inserted by her Dear Friend Elaine
Downes. 8.3.51—-In

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a















CLASSIFIED ADS.



The charge for announcements of FOR RENT —_—- —
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow- |
ee at In ae ee is a nen charge week 72 cents and! Y. M. C. A.
4.50 on week-days an 1,80 on Su ys cents Sundays words —
for any number of words up to 50, and | words 3 cents a were week—4 on ot Tamers FoR ERECTION OF
3 cents per word on week-days and} word Sundays. BUILDING

1951





PUBLIC NOTICES

Tex cents per agate line on week-days
= 3 meee per agate line on Sundeus
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.







The Board of Dirtctors of the ¥.M.C.A.

HOUSES _—_ Application for Tenders for the
erection of a building at Headquarters,
APARTMENT Pinfold Street. ” ’

— Containing 2
reoms upstairs, with W.C.
kitchen and pantry

large The Plans and Specifications ean be
downstairs and yard cus, + AE sees



oe Re Apply “Westmeath” White- Wednesday Tain Marc tate the
Roa 8.3.51—In | hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily except
BUNGALOW: Modern Bungalow, | Sundays.

Belleville, fully furnished. Available
15th March for 3% months, at sable

rent to careful tenants. Ring .
8.3.51—3n



LYNCH: The Lynch family beg through | -———————————______ Tenders submitted will be opened at a
this medium to thank all those who} “AIRY COT"—Brighton Furnished or| 208¢ Meeting to be held at 4.30 p.m. on
sent us wreaths, cards and letters, or ' Unfurnished, for @ month or longer. For the fist March.
in any way expressed their sympathy | further iculars Phone 2452 Miss Park-| _TM® Board does not bind itself to ac-
with us in our recent bereavement | inson, Duneraig, Strathclyde. cept the lowest Tender.
caused by the death of Dorothy 28.2.51—an , HERBERT H. WILLIAMS,
Lynch, St. Matthias Road, Christ | —— aad Secretary.
Church. modern 28.2.51—~8n

: J-bedroom house,
situated Top Rock, unfurnished, Avail-| *

able immediately on 6 months or 12



months lease, For viewing, 4683,
‘or 8569 7.3.$1—3n
WHITE COTTAGE FLAT
St. James.

Furnished or unfurnished,
bething. Private beach.
E. M. Greenidge.
James.”

Good sea-
Appiy Mrs.
White Cottage, St.

ROOM WITH BOARD— In spacious

residence on sea, large double room and| cate) may be obtained from this Office.

bath also one single. Private sandy
beach, extensive grounds, excellent food.
Telephone 2.





PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
oe 12 i Sone eee oste line on Sundays,
â„¢m el . on week~
and $1.80 on Sundays ve

AUCTION
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER





adi
reasonable
883 tary of the YÂ¥.M.C.A.,

25.2.51—4n,} Mot later than Thursday,

6.3.51—3n | Churchwarden’s Office,

Tenders must be submitted Sealed
Celgpes and aBdremed ts: the Store:
Pinfold Street

Inter than Noon 2ist March. =



‘



NOTICE

PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL
ALL persons, Firms and Corporations
having Accounts against the Parish
Saint Michael are requested to send in|
their Vouchers (duly made out in!
Duplicate) to the respective Departmen:s

M h 15th
inst. are 1th

Voucher Forms (Original and Dupli-
FRED J. ASHBY,
Churehwarden’s Clerk.

Parochial Buildings,
Bridgetown.
13.51—Ttn



NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. JAMES.
Applications for tht Post of Dispen-
ser at the St. James Dispensary will be
received by the undersigned up to
Thursday 15th, March. From whom all
necessary information may be obtained
Applicants must be qualified









stn neniensl

af | o











BARBADOS ADVOCATE
GOVERNMENT NOTICE
THE BARBADOS POLICE

Tenders for the Supply of Green Fodder

TENDERS are,invited for the supply daily of 360 lbs. of Green
Fodder tor three months beginning from the Ist of April, 1951, for
the Barbados Police at District “A”

2. Further information is obtainable from the Officet in charge
Mounted Branch, District “A”, Police Station.

3. Tenders should be forwarded in sealed envelopes addressed
to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so as to
reach the Colonial Secretany’s Office not later than noon on 17th
March, 1951. n

8.3.51.—In,



TAKE NOTICE

That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, a corporation of the State of
Ghio, United States of America, whose trade or business adaress is The Gwynne
Building, Sixth and Main. Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. hae applied for the
resistration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of shampoo, anc

i be entitled to register the same after one month from the 8th
cay of March 1951 whet some person shall in the meantime give notice in dupli-
ate to me at my office of opposition of such registration. Th
seen on application at my_ office, ee bn

Dated this 7th day of March, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS
Registrar of Trade Marks
8.3.51-—3n



TAKE NOTICE

Risco

That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, a corporation of the State of









LASTING SAFETY



DUNLOP rorr

CAR TYRES

—for
longer
life




DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING

COMPANY LIMITED

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)











i




apcegemmestiaiartnay, senile ittnnenasien-


PAGE SEVEN





Fresh, Lovely

GREEN ESCHALOT

WHOLESALE & RETAIL
Any Quantity
DOMINICA MARKETING
AGENCY,



















Dial 4015.

(a

| wae Nosteat
‘OY CAR, PLANE and SPEED |
BOAT
| in the World
See these amazing Toys
j at
| JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
ee
Enamel — IT
In All Colours
at

JOHNSON'S HARDWARE

Just Received . ..

Tins Red Salmon
Red Salmon %'s
Table Butter 1's
Powdered Milk
Potted Meat
Kardomah Coffee 4's





l's

Pkas

Macaroni
All Bran
Puffed Wheat
Cornflakes

Tins Tono

’ Peanuts

Pkys. Figs

Slabs Bacon

Sliced Bacon

Tins Carrots

‘
STUART & SAMPSON —
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for
BEST BOTTLED RUM

















Jetsam out of H.B, Mare (Ginger), Dam
of Miss Friendship. Can be seen at Eagy
Hall Plantation. Phone 95—263, By kind
permission of the Stewards of the
B.T.C. this Animal will be offered for
scale at the Paddock just after the 3 p,m.
Race on Saturday 10th March, 1951.
4.3.51—Tn

MULE: One (1) large Chestnut Mule,







Mare, Cart and Harness, E, A. Daniel,
Baxters Rd. Dial 2464. 7.3.51—6n
POULTRY



2 White Wyandotte Cockerels bred
fiom imported laying strain. Price $4.00
each or exchange for value in Corn, or
Poultry for eating. Dial 3394.

6.3.51—3n

MISCELLANEOUS

AMERICAN BRASSIERS: Many fam-
ous brands perfect fitting Brass at popu-
jar prices regular brassiers also straples:
in art silk, lace and cotton, white a
tea rose. A. and B. Cups 32—38.
88c to $1.80 Modern Dress Shoppe, Broad
Street 8.3.51—2n

ANTIQUE FURNITURE -—~ Call at Ralph
Beard’'s furnishing showroom, Hardwood
Alley. Phone 4683. 6.3.51—n

ANTIQUES, which include a good
variety of Glass, China etc, Call in at
Ralph Beard’s furnishing showroom
Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.

6.3.51—6n

ANTIQUE CLOCKS At Ralph
Beard’s furnishing showroom, Hardwood
Alley. Phone 4683, 6.3.51—6n

——

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n

a a

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances ana
draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n

COINS—Collection of old silver and
cepper coins, for inspection call 4476.
7.3.51—t.f.n.

CHAIRS—Tubular Chairs $9.17_ each.
With arms $12.00. At Ralph Beard's
Showroom, Hardwood Alley. 6.3.51—in































DIVING MASK & SWIM FINS. Phone

. 6.3.51—3n

——S — -

GOLF CLUBS & BAGS; One set Gents

an@ one set of Ladies. At Ralph Beard's

Showroom, Hardwood Alley. the
8.3.51—

—_—$
LIPTON’S TEA: This brand is used by
discriminating consumers the world over
and a testing sample is yours for the
asking. Save that part of the label indi-
cating weight and return to us as they
are valuable, John F. see a vi
.3.51—2n

eal

MAHOGANY CHEST or DRAWERS:
Modern design , book and magazine stand,
Phone 8477. 8.3.51—1n

furn
DOORS—The distin: | Gove:

MODERNFOLD

guished solution to your special
architectural problem of door closures, |
screens, movab:. partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & )., LTD.

One DOMO CREAM SEPARATOR—
perfect order, very little used, practically
new. Mrs. Peebles, Bayleys, St. Philip

7.3.51—in

POLAR ICE CREAM—In shilling boxes
every day, Noel Roach & Sons, Speixhts-

town. 8.3.51—28n

—_—$—$———————————_—
PRESSURE See —_ Used twice.
Owner leaving. Price $10.00, Phone

3928, 6.3.51—3n

PIANO—Piano upright. Good tone.
$175.00 at Ralph Beard's showroom
Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.

6.3.51—3n

——<$<—_$_—$—$—$——
STAMPS: Two complete sheets of Bar-

bados surcharged One-penny or Two-
pence. Offers P.O. Box 92
7.3.51—t.i.n,

—
STEPLADDERS — 6 tread Steel Step-
li dders $12.94 and 4 tread $9.88. At Ralph

Beard’'s Showroom, Hardwood Alley
6.3.51—610



——————
THREE VENETIAN BLINDS. Size 4 [ft
by 4 i Phone 8497 6.3.51—3n

—_———
TO WHOLESALERS ONLY—Stocks of
Enamel Ware which includes; Pails,
Chambers, Bowls, Pie Dishes, Kettles
ail at Ralph Beard’s Show room. Hard-
wood Alley. 6.3.51—6n





Solicitors. Vestry. Clerk,
St. Andrew.
8,3.5f—6n

{LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICT

Church and is suitable for business prem- The application of O. A. Harris holder
ises, | ot liquor license No, 445 of 1951 granted
Inspection any day on application to the} to him in respect of a board and shingle
tenant. shop attached to a wooden residence at
This property will be set up for sale by ‘ Montrose, Ch. Ch, for permission to vse
Public Competition at our Office No. 14,{ said liquor license at @ wall and wooden

47.3,51—6n

PROPERTY known as No. 24, James
Street standing on 2,181 square feet of
land. This property is situate at Lower
Jemes Street, opposite James Street





James Street at 2 p.m. on Friday ie
March 1951.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE
Solicitors.
7.3.51—9n

OFFERS will be received by the;
undersigned up to the 15th day of
March 1951, for the buildings known
as Calais (land not included) situated







on Dover Coast, Christ Church. The} Police Court, District “A” on Monde the
purchaser to demolish the buildings and} 19th day of Mareh 1951 at 11 o'clock,
clear the land within thirty days from} a.m.
the date of purchase. E. A. McLEOD,
K. BE. McKENZIE, Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”
Neils Plantation, St. Michael. $.3.51—1n
24,2.51—6n.
a ———
ENDLEIGH — crores CP a and
George St., Belleville. welll ous”
on 31, sq. ft, Land — Open an closed LOST
galleries, Drawing and Dining rooms, 3
bedrooms, toilet and bath, tea room,
y and kitchen. Servants’
Wee and “Garage. Space, lawn. GOLD HORSESHOE PIN set with
Dial 2273 for appointment to view. white Pearls, between Worthing Guest

Mrs. E, A. LESLIE.
3.3.51—3n,

WANTED

Minimum charge week %2 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents o
word Sundays.







HELP

tenet pa RENN REESNEpSNSGTSTRETNN
A YOUNG MAN with business expe-
rience, as Sect@tary for a local Company.
Apply by letter only, to—
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.
7.3.51—6n



——

Two experienced Teachers are needed
to fill vacancies on the Staff of the Middle
School of Naparima Girls’ High School
as from April 15th,

Preference will be given to those with
Certificates higher than the Cambridge
School Certificate.

Subjects to include, History, Needle-
work and Physical Training.

Ali applications must be made in writ-
ing to the Principal.

6.3.51—3n

know! of type-

. bly one
with some jous experience in
Commission ice work.

Apply in writing to :—
JAMES A. LYNCH & Co., tte,

“Bridgetown.
28,2.51— T.F.N.

MISCELLANEOUS

WAN’ TO RENT—Furnished or un-
Fiat. Wanted by Head of a
t. From July

e/o Advocate Co.
6.3.51—4n

jewels

——
IMMEDIATE ra for nd

lery, old and late

Phone 4429 or call at GES,

Pi

, ad~
joining Royal Yacht Club.
20.2.51.—T.F.N.

a
IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-



Young Lady wii
writing and





rnment
1951. Apply Box B.



ee ie ee

Antique .

4429.
20.2.51.—t.f.n.





FOR SALE 4

MISCELLANEOUS

VENETIAN
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to}
your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dia) 4476
A. & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n.

YACHT — Yawl “Frapeda” approx.
37% ft, long, with gray marine engine.
Recently painted and in good condition.
Apply: Vincent Burke. Telephone 4569
or 3026.





YACHT; One (1) 12 h.p. Yacht Bost.

in

good condition.
Fernum

Dial 2747, C. O

8.3, 51-6



}
| 33 Running feet Verandah Rail, 3 ft
|
;





high made of 1 in. square bar iron
C. Manning, Newlands, St. Michael

6.3.51

‘



returned to Mrs, McCulloueh, Worthing








27.251—t.f.n. |




shop with ehedroof attached at Uppe
Dayrell's Road, Ch. Ch.. within Dist. “A”.

Dated this 7th day of March 1951.
To: EB. A. McLEOD, Esq

Police Magistrate,

District "A"
Oo. A. HARRIS,
s Applicant
N.B.—This application will be consid-

ered at a Licensing Court to be held at







House, Royal Hotel, Race Track, Bridge-
town or St, John’s Church, Reward if
Guest House 6133. 7.3.51—3n

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET One (1)
B.T.C. Ticket Series N. 2610. Finder ‘to
return same to me at W. A. Medford &



Co. 8.3.51-—2n
One B.T.C. Spring Meeting Ticket
Series U. 1674 with names on back

Finder kindly return same to QO. Smai!
Glebe Land, St. George, 8.3.51—In

Used Postage Stamps

Bought, Sold, Exchanged;

.

Cecil Jemmott
Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy
33 Broad Street, ee, ere
—Iin


















-t oe
“IT HAS IT |
IT has style,
IT has Beauty of Colour,
IT has correct modern lines,
IT has durability,
IT has all you want,





IT’s the modern De Luxe

Table Model Gas Hotplate
Priced to sell
your Gas
Bay St,

at Showroom




BAND CONCERT
By kind permission of the
Commissioner of Police

THE POLICE BAND
will give a

CONCERT

at HASTINGS ROCKS
On Friday, March 9th
at 8 p.m.
In aid of
Lawrence Child Health



















St.




= ee aes SS

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE’
OF THE WEST INDIES
EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT
A COURSE OF TEN LECTURES
on
INTRODUCTION TO
STUDY OF ECONOMICS

AN THE

by
ERROL BARROW, B.Sc. (Econ.)
at the ¥.M.C.A
Beginning Friday March 9tt
at
8 p.m
' Fee for Course $1.00

Members of Ex












American Doctor’s Discovery



rahi RANGE | SAGO SEARERED, a. Gann. IE
' ie on ag oe “. ~e are eat % t
Strengthens Blood, ie forth a ti une | £8. “ALCOA PENNANT” 2.00 ¢, |<. March 2ivd April 3rd
Body, Memory, Brain, Mus- sort Worn-ous _—_———$—
For thstance, Dr. T. A. | NORTHBOUND
cles, and Endurance—Better Ellis, of Canada
cently wrote: “Not S.S. “ALCOA PENNANT” ..

Than Gland O

Thanks to the discov
Doctor, it is now possible for those who
feel prematurely old, Run-down and
‘Worn-out, to experience again the thrill of
Youthful Vigour, Ambition, and Vitality.
This great discovery, which is a simple
home treatment and can be used secretly
by anyone, quickly brings a surplus of vi-
tatty, and an ability to enjoy the pleasures
o fe.

No longer is it necessary for to suffer
from Loss of Vigour and Manhood, Weak
Memory and Body, Nervousness, Impure
Blood, Sickly, Skin, Depression and Poor
Sleep. Instead you merely take this simple
home treatment a few days and you will
find that your vigour is restored. No mat-
ter what your age, you will find that your
gland activity and nerve force is increased
and restored. You will find youthful Baris
cal power in this Glecavery, which builds
rich, pure blood and literally makes your
body tingle with new energy and vita! ity,
This simple home treatment js in pleasant
easy-to-take tablet form and thousands
who have used it ar ae it is far better
than any other met fe

Works in 24 Hours
This new medical discovery,
Vi-Tabs, has been tested by thousands in
America and has achieved results that
seem almost miraculous. It has conquered
obstinate opene thes had Sood a ophey
atment. rescue’ ec ‘0

Sremature old age and deviliy, fe has
made older men as good as new. It has
brought pappiness beyond all price to thou-
sands who believed that they were old,
worn-out, and finished with the joys o!
life, And the beauty of this re-
markable discovery is that
it brings results so
quickly, In 24 hours
you can ind feel
& tremendous = im-
provement and within
eOiy) one week it will literal-
eVigsly make you a new man.

ions.
of an Americen






red corpusele =

likewise acti
gene aren.
‘ollowed by renewed en-

b: " -
rel isha arate
and worsen in middle
ie










it ie
me or older age:
And a wid known Italian Dr.
N. G. Gi . recently wrote: ired-
fl a iB eoeunken 68 80} need
blighes ayn building |
formula, which wor! ndid
b rves and

ater
run-down









gee
to weak, uoervous,

© Guaranteed To Work* -

Vi-Tabs are not an experiment. Thi
simple home treatment, which can be used
with absolute aap we the press

of an Ame: '
new outh, vital-


















joctor
successful and is giving
ca ry eal success, Viet °
use oO
are now distributed by chemist;
wih estionadie® di w
w uestional mi
q iiorthe " ay
and nervous system. Vi-
proved their ster! wo
our own particular case.
the test. See for yourself how much you
feel
Tabs must bri;
tory or you simply return the em
age an cont othing oe The @
ant fou are the sole
ee louble-strength
tle o ittle, and Jasts
eight da uarantee fully protects
your treatment imme-

ity, and energy to m
\~
der @ guarantee of pie
drastic and irritati hich
millions of sufferers, but ar:
ef, stroj
yor ne
ergy, and vitality, and be entirely satistac-
+ a ie ju dr of your own
l. ic!
vi-Tabs corts
As the
u, you should ge
diately 80 that you too will know what it is





SiS Vy Vi-T. to feel 10 to 20
rea sicssoee Iesteo’ Vi-Tabs Xa full of vigo

and vitality. g

pocany other countric:| Restores Manhood and Vitality ,

Jin many other countries



















OCD POOPPDOOPOOOPOOO FH, PELE LESSEE OOOH
5 s

; To ‘et | RECIT AL

7 ers

; Please be informed that we have i International Folk Songs

; just opened the most hygiene ib

Diapers, Face Cloths, Hankies, Bed
Spreads, etc.

We are the only importers of this
class of goods in the island. Cail
early to avoid disappointment.

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.

Dial 9100 where you will find

goods unobtainable at other Stores

and the prices very low.
71,3,51—2n

by
Joke & Eelco Wiebenga

on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14,
at 8 p.m,
“Wakefield,” Whitepark
Tickets obtainable at
“Wakefield”

ADMISSION: 3/- & 2/-

FOR SALE

‘CRANE HOUSE’

One of the most charmingly situated properties of this
nature in the Island. The house has proved its solidity
by withstanding pest hurricanes and contains 5 large
bedrooms (with hot and c.ld water) spacious lounges,
dining reom, large cocktail bar with bamboo décor, wide
shady galleries, garages, ‘turerooms, bathing chalet, }
heavy diese¥ lighting plant and the amenities customary |
with this type of property. There is extensive acreage
including a long stretch of the Crane Beach, large coconut |
grove, gardens planted with dowering shrubs and shade }
| trees, also grazing land. The coastal views could hardly |
| be excelled and the pathing is excellent. |
| Further information may be obtained from the sole agent |

JOHN M. BLADON |

AFS., F.VA |
=~ 6)! Plantations Building ‘|







DEPOTS

at



>










’Phone 4640






SS.



ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE,

an a
SS ————————ee———eeE—_———













February 23rd






Sails for St, John &
Halifax.
Sails for St, John
& Halifax

ee

Due Mareh Sth
s

“AILOA PARTNER" Due March 20th

These vessels have limited passenger aveommodation,

N SERVICE



APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIA

mati atin tarsi ero





PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia , for sail.

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children,

PROTECT THE waa YOUR BELTS
w

“FLEXO” BELT DRESSING

Obtainable at...

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER HEAD LANE.





“GOOD NEWS” for

ASTHMATICS

A New Guaranteed Remedy for the Relief of ASTHMA
This skillfully blended preparation, assures you of
immediate relief in this most distressing disease and
is the result of years of intensive study in Asthmatic
conditions.

Keep a Bottle handy and relieve yourself of the
constant threats of Asthmatic attacks
Retail Price :—12/- Per Bottle

Obtainable at...

BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES

Ltd.—Broad Street
and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings













word Sundays. % gists Drug- pudaiag: Sra and Main Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A., has applied for the — = =
y order of the Com ; gictration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of vegetable shorten- <= SSS
" Health, St. Michael T eer eee te A. W. JOHSON, ne and cooking fat, and will be entitled to register the same after one month from
AUTOMOTIV Merch 9th at the yard of the Scavenging Rector & Chairman, | the 8th day of March 1951 unless some person shall in the meantime
Dept., Church Village, (1) 1945 ms St. shape as Ihio, pease ve: ——s of America, whose trade or business address is The bt
; . 7 e . > 7 ..51—4n. | tive notice in duplicate to me at my office of o sition of such registration ie
eeAR: 1947 Standard Eight. in very Kgod dus ake ce ae ine ce ee mark, can be seen on application ma pe o foe 0 eee ony =
r , 7 : . ated this 7th day of March, 1951 TRA NEW -
2 _j,| Sale at 1 p.m. Terms Cash. NOTICE :
9.3,51—14 H. WILLIAMS
. VINCENT GRIFFITH, et. ide M ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED |
ee See i ere A40, 6.3.51—4n Auctioneer THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW re near an (MANZ Linn) The M.V. “CARIBBER" will ac FOR ENJOYMENT
‘cuntryman—13, miles, condition. a: VESTRY BY-ELECTION eee cept Cargo and Passenger for |
; ————— ; a i 1980) $
Dial 2838. 6.3.51-—~3n x ' I HEREBY give notice that I have M.S. “TONGARIRO” fs scheduled to Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, The Mone Savin Wa
- AUSTIN 5-TONNER TRUCK 1946 MODEL | ®PPOinted the Vestry room near the ‘ii Melbourne February 20th, Sydner Nevis and St. Ktts, Sailing Fridry .
CAR: One Morris Minor in perfect con- We are instructed by the Insurance| Aimshouse at Belleplaine, as the place TAKE NOTICE Februany 28th, Brisbane “March” qth, Ar- Sth inst
dition. Owner driven—done 1,600 miles.| Agents to sell this damaged vehicle by where all persons duly qualified to riving at Barbados early April 1981 NEW and renewed MAHOGANY
Apply: A. Garnes, Erin Ville, Jemmotts| Public Auction at the General Omnibus| Vote at the Election of Vestryman for This vessel has aingle space ‘for Hard ! aad other Wardrobes, Dresem-
Lane, after 4 p.m. 7.3.51,—2n] Garage, Nelson Street, at 2 p.m. on| the said Parish, may meet on Monday . . Frozen and General car The M.V, “DAERWOOD" will robes, — Chests-of-drawers — and
————-?| Friday 9th March, 1951, March 12th 1961, between the hours of Cargo ted oe 1 f accept Cardo and Passengers {for Linen Presses—-Vanaties, Dressing
CAR: One Standard Vanguard in good JOHN M. BLADON 30 and 11 o'clock in the morning to Ladi . mh ait rough ta St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruoa Tables, Stools Screen Frames
condition, mileage 15,000, Apply F. C ‘Auctioneer, | elect a Vestryman in the place of Darry for British GQuiant, Barbados, "Windward and Passengers only for St, Vin- Single and Double Bedsteads,
Hutson, Telephone 3905. edeces 2.3,51—5n,| Atfield Foster (deceased). ‘ and Leeward Islands ‘ ~ cent, Date of sailing to be notified ; Separate Side Rails, Laths.
3.51! Signed C. A. Skinner. i ; ONE: WNE
‘ Dining, Kitchen and Faney
ELECTRICAL By public auction at the Customs on ae nt Bt Andrew PONE, PONY bo Tae: 'asah HL yg, GeO Me TIME: anaes, er apes, et Soa
| Thursday the 8th, at sharp 11 o'clock be- 3.3.51—Bn PROCTERZ &@ GAMBLE " af reer as Tel, 404. caraere: Pinos Colle
= Larders, Waggons, Liquor Cases.
ELECTRIC STOVES & HOT PLATES.| fore the races the following items:— MADE IN U. Da COSTA & CO. LTD., Sonheubhar ;
Piease drop in and see them. John F.| Several Cartons of Cigarettes, One we Trinidad, Barbados, ' Coolerator,
Hutson Ltd. 7.3.51—2n| 11) Haremock, Tins of Margarine, NOTICE B.W.I B.W.I
cee ato ah ae a hoi Baten) and Deal onienet ,THE,PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, a corporation of the State ot — : See ea L Ss
ELECTRIC TOASTERS at John F. Hut-| Planks, Empt: Drums, B: . nio, nited States of merica, whose trade or business address is The wynne ° e
pound. Tabk-an| ahd seveens pA ene aida “ nee OF 8ST, PHILIP Guilding, Sixth and Main Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A., has applied for the
DARCY A. SCOTT. pm ye ae oe ae Philip hereby notifies] registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of soap and will . Trafalgar Street — Dial 4069
S at ; ” a ster ame @ one mor ?
ELECTRIC IRON John F. Hutso: Mov, Austioneer. @ facilities of the King} be entitled to register the same after one month from the 8th day of Mareh
Ltd. 7.3.51—2n 3.3.51—3n George V, Memorial Park can be rented | 1951 unless some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at le - — eee
ceed Sas doable seaiamih ; ae for dances, amusements, etc, my office of opposition of such registration, The trade mark can be seen on appli- “Sou
ELECTRIC KETTLES at John F. REAL ESTATE with” the Ghuschwarden Mr. Denes | 8 Dated this th day of March, 1061 Inc.
Hut da a _ ’ ‘ ates nis th a ren, .
utson ie 7.3.51—2n | Garner M.C.P., Marchfield, St. Philip. H, WALLAMA: te Miki
ELEC * “LASCELL ES. situat t hi P. S. W. SCOTT, Registrar of Trade Marks,
Piesae bios NSA tae teas ae Christ Chureh, standing on eat ‘cae Clerk, to the Vestry, St. Philip. 83M é NEW YORK SERVICE
Hutson Ltd 7.3.51—2| feet of land. The house is built of stone 3.3.51—Tr B.S. “Myken" sails 23rd February, “+: arrives Barbados ¢th March,
and contains, open and closed galleries, 5.8. “Seabreeze” sails 16th March, a, brtives Batheeos te Maren. Building Contractor
LIVESTOCK drawing and dining rooms, three bed- a ee en -i
rooms, breakfast room kitchenette and | NOTICE * NEW ORLEANS SERVICE PORTLAND, GEORGE ST
"HIORSES—2 y.o. Gelding be Gelding “Ladyswan” tery a ae Sante and aca 4 ’ 8.8. “Rung” sails isth February. — arrives Barbados Ist March, BELLEVILLE, Phone 4448
(Sin Gackeriack’ oe Mune S047) Une | Dor ene apmcntraat. PARISH OF 8ST. ANDREW an ‘ a 8.8. "Alcoa Patriot” sails Tth Mareh— arrives Barbados Qird March "
named 2 y.o, gelding (Jim Gackerjack Tha ate 1 f t |. Applications will be received by the —
ex Princess Stella). Apply: J. R.| public Pee ec we ~ ee eee eee undersigned up to Saturday Mareh 24th 5 = CANADIAN SERVICE
Eawards. Telephone 2520, Street, Bridgetown, on Tuesday the 13tn| 1951 for the Post of Sexton of St will undertake the
27.2.51—t.f.n.| March 1981 at 2 p.m. pe cattle glade at a Salary of $15.0 SOUTHBUCND BUILDING & REPAIRING
m0} . ie of ILs iE DO} ¢
HORSE — Cheatant 1 on ola cy CARRINGTON & SEALY C. A. SKINNER, “a Name of Ship SAIL HALIFAX ARRIVES B'DOS of





Charles Mc Enearney & Co.









HOUSES, BUILDINGS,
BRIDGES, ROADS,
ARMACO TUNNELS,
YARDS,

TARAZO. FLOORS

30 Years Experience
Building.

Your Patronage Solicited,










Barbados Amateur
Boxing Association

Under the Patronage of
His Exceliency the Governor
announce

ELIMINATION. BOUTS

in preparation for the West

» Indian Championships to be

held in Trinidad during the
Easter Week-end.

8 THRILLING BOUTS
EACH NIGHT 8

Commencing .









§ p.m, on MONDAY 12th
and THURSDAY 15th a

THE MODERN HIGH
SCHOOL STADIUM

Come and see Cammie Mc:








Clean in action again
Gilbert Goodman, Lau
rence Harper, Torpedo

Browne and members o
the Local Constabulary,

Bookings at

Com Beard,
Hardwood Alley (4683)
or---

Modern High School (2846)



















RINGSIDE i B/=
RING CIRCLE ::: 3/-
BLEACHERS ::: 1/6

4.3.51—4n.



, Ltd.




PAGE £IGHT



B.G. Faces Defeat:\

244 Runs Behind
Bayley Hits 94: Christiani 33

(By 0. S. COPPIN)

KINGSTON, Jamaica, March 7,

B.G. to-day made an impressive start of 149 runs for che
first wicket in quest of the required total of 510 rurs to stave
oif defeat at the hands of Jamaica. They were 244 runs
behind with three wickets intact when play ory the fourth

day of the first Jamaica-B.G. test ended.

It seemed likely that B.G

would give Jamaica a good run
when Bayley and Wight carried
the score to 149 without loss but

careless strokes by Bayley in his
nineties robbed him of his cen-
tury and B.G. made most of the
chances to keep the issue oper

Five more wickets fell for 92 runs

and only a- stubborn effort © by
Robert Christiani gave a little
ray of hope,

Another blow for B.G. came
when Valentine had Christiani

caught off the last ball of the day
and B.G. finished the day’s play
with 266 runs for seven wickets.
Valentine took early punishment
but came back in the second spell
to claim five for 101 in almost
33 overs. There is little doubt that

B.G. will be defeated early to-
morrow

Bayley and Leslie Wight opened
B.G.’s innings faced with the tre-

mendous task of scoring 511 runs
or keeping B.G.’s end up for two
days to uvgid defeat. The wicket
was still firm and the pace
bowlers Goodridge and Johnson
were keeping up a good pace with
the odd ball occasionally flying
but the batsmen were comfortable.
The first half hour's play produced
17 runs including a class cover
drive for four runs by Bayley off
Goodridge. With the score at 40
Bonitto rested Johnson who had
sent down five overs for, five runs
but persisted with Goodridge
(Who had bowled 5 for 31) in an
obvious effort to let the selectors
see more of him.

Bayley punished Valentine lift-

grounds for six runs to enter the
thirties.

Neville Bonitto brought off an-
other brilliant catch close at the
wicket to dismiss MceWatt off Val-
entine. The score was now 214/
6/17. The score reached the 250
mark after 281 minutes of play,
Patoir having joined Christiani.
A pull to the square leg boundary
gave Christiani his fifty after be-
ing at the wicket for 128 minutes,
Christiani added three runs before
being dismissed by Valentine with
what proved to be the last ball of
the day. This was a vicious leg
break which took the edge of the
bat ror Goodridge to take a simple
eatch. The score was 266 runs tor
the loss of seven wickets, Patoir
not out 6.

JAMAICA—ist Innings 273
BRITISH GUIANA—Ist Innings
JAMAICA—Second Innings

BRITISH GUIANA SECOND oe
Wight I.b.w. b Bonitto

Bayley b Valentine

Persaud stpd. b Valentine

Christiani e Goodridge b Valentine
C. H. Thomas c N. Bonitto b Val-

$4

5

53
entine 5
J. lL. Thomas c¢ Mudie b Bonitto 14
McWatt ¢ N, Bonitto b Valentine 17
Patoir not out 6
Extras
Total (for 7 wkts,)

Fall of wiekets : 1
4—191;

-149; 2-157; 3.
5-—216; 6—241; 7-266
BOWLING ANALYSIS
c M R
Johnson : 5 1 5
Goodridge
Valentine
A, R. Bonitto
Mudie

owucct





BARBADOS ADVOCATE





FURRY



S. RAMADHIN

F. WORRELL

WORRELL, RAMADHIN
HEAD THE AVERAGES

LONDON, March 7.

FRANK WORRELL and Sonny. Ramadhin, the two
West Indies-members of the Commonwealth Cricket Team
which sails for home to-morrow, after another successful
tour of India, had the best batting and bowling records
respectively among the men who played throughout the
tour, szys Reuler. :

Worrell, whose aggregate of 1,902 runs was the highest
among the batsmen, played 34 innings (3 not out) for an
averege of 61.354, while Ramadhin who sent down nearly

1,300 overs, took the highest total number of wickets, 82.
for an average of 19.70 runs.

H. W. Stephenson, the Somerset wicketkeeper, who was one
of the players tiown out to reinforce the team later in the tour, had
an average of 71 flor 8 innings in 6 of which he was not out.

Similarly among the. bowlers, Jim Laker (Surrey) who returned
home early in December, had a better average than Ramadhin with
15.83 while taking 37 wickets in over 400 cvers.—Reuter.

Rest Essential For ’7.B. Patients

@ From Page 5





some easily grown vegetables or

















‘lin dealing with children, and in

| eourts:

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1951

COUGHING























‘Delinquency Starts At Home:

| IT IS IN the home that one always practically finds th
cause of any kind of anti-social, behaviour in the juven? ei

the London Juvenile Courts~Magistrate; Mr. Basil H f-
| riques, C.B.E., J.P. told a big audience at the British Council.
| last night. He was giving a talk on “Methods of combatifg)

juvenile delinquency.”
mani she mane, ge

Qne of the things they in -Eng-
fail to do, he said,.. was to an early age.
reform the home at.the same. time ees aes 2 the films






ro reforming the child. imitate 4 o Cs

ig . first on the juvenite| ie

courts, Mr. Henriques cay that Ses wi ep how te at sub-e¢ |
the reason for having a separate !

juvenile court is that a child
should'not be made to feel’he is a
eriminal nor should. a child get
contaminated.

Women can be extremely useful

Then i
America. ‘they
is of ane % rie a
wrong Yidea to get oe a renal f
mind at that early age.

Bnglend there sre women. maste- whole strength of a nation: =

the hoi
trates who assist in the juvenile seg yg a Be

caught on, the heart of aun
would be shaken.

It is essential that the magis- of
The probation officers could do

trate watches the reactions of a
child, but here a magistrate has|@ lot to help vyteny it ge bevler ;
to. be. writing the evidence-all the Aor e, eee 3 Se

while. In land, however, the 7

magistrate has time to concentrate assistants han sénd_ “thier into
on the child, dntitutions:.

There can, be .nothing more
agonising than for a child‘to hear
his parents quarrelling. To find
‘that where there should be con-
‘cord and harmony the hardest
things are said, Just gets the child
‘desperate .

Juvenile courts should not be}:
held in the same court as the adult. But one of the things the West
Visiting the prisons here, he said,|Indies must fight against if they:
it horrified him to see that young |ate.to.survive, Mr, Henriques }
prisoners were nina with the ]is the evil of promiscuous: inter
older ones. It could bring nothing | Course. It was so great a problem |.
but harm. in ae wt mone eee souls }
bg not even’ begin to think of Ways};
To-day the whole trend of the and means of getting-rid of it, but-|:

arguments was to keep people :
under the age of 21 from going en and” education would

It is by the change of expres-
sion, a movement of the hand or
such a thing that one can tell
whether a child approves of the
evidence given.





“ Follow this
Simple Beauty Plan

Avwash your face with Palmolive Soap

Fini sernte woe

» this 3-¢imes a day for 14 d
watt ive’s full
utifying tt

PS. For bath and shower, get the thrifty Bath Size Palmolive
to prison. A sentehoe shoula- bal DOCTORS PROVED evade TR Me Ub

made only as a last resort. eee, eet:
After ee work or H bal, pee ovely on ¥

Cow & GATE! Bod











At the courts, justice must be
done to the child and the child
must feel absolutely at ease. In
England the public is not soreT |
ted though the Press is and the
Press can report the cases so long
as they do not mention the name’
of the child, or describe the case
in such a way that the child can
be identified.

fatigue pon pop and releases |ji|.
new energy. ly

WILLIAM JOHNSON,
, Crumpton Street,

ing a half volley high overhead
into the stand for the second six
of the tournament, following this
up with an extra cover drive for
four runs sending up 50 in 58
minutes. Bayley reached 50 in
83 minutes with an on drive, off
skipper Bonitto for two, The
score was then 177. Bayley’s
seore included three fours and one
six. Lunch time saw the score at
83 Bayley 51 not out, Wight 27 not

Referees Wanted

at hand and there is a grave short-
age of referees. This fact was em-
phasised during the last foot-
ball season when the few referees
volunteering were called upon
to shoulder the arduous task of
sometimes three
















taking matches,

out. times a week.
With the 1951 season approach-
After Lunch ing, the Referees Association are
On resumpizon Bayley twice}â„¢Making a call for those who are

interested in furthering the game
to come to the aid of the Associ-
ation,

So grave is the position that it
is doubtful whether the game can
be carried on under prevailing
conditions. The Referees Associa-
tion would like all those interest-
ed in helping with the games to
communicate with Mr, L, F. Har-
ris, Hon. Secretary Referees As-
sociation c/o Roebuck St, Boys’
School as soon as possible.

foured off Valentine with a hook
to the pull boundary and an on-
drive.

The batsmen took the score to
100 in 107 minutes without loss,

With the score at 117 and
Bayley’s individual score at 70,
Binns failed to stump, Bayley
having stepped out to Mudie and
missed. Later with his score av
92 Bayley drove hard to Valentine
at midon but the latter dropped
the catch.

But Bayley was dismissed be-
fore reaching the coveted century.



. a@ habit, pushing a bottle of spice
tea into a baby’s mouth to keep
THE 1951 Football season is near{!!â„¢ quiet. That carelessness was

It was regrettably too common

chiefly responsible
mortality rate
years of life,
She gave a full explanation with
regard to the weaning of the child.
She said that bush teas were dan
gerous and should be eliminated
from the diet. Care should be
taken about: the child’s habits of
eating from the earliest age and it
should have regular meals, no eac-
ing between meals; fresh whvle-
some food—home-made preter.
ably; variety of diet; water drink.
ing, but not along with the meal;
fruit after meal; no candy as far
as possible; food not too highly
sweetened and within reasonable
limits it should be forced to eut.
She said that it was important
that a working class mother shoula
learn to plan for her family to
ensure economy of labour, econ-
omy of time and economy of purse,
She stressed the use of goat's
jmilke in preference to cow’s milk
lap its fat content was more con-

for
the

the high

in first two

other in the backyard in order to
allow the purse to procure some
other necessary food,

Mothers she said, would be wetl
advised to make themselves ac.
Guainted with:

The right type of food; and
reasons for the use of each article
of diet; the best and most econom-
ical buys; the best, easiest and
quickest method of preparation;
the right method of weaning and
training their children and the
most economical, labour saving
and thriftiest method of manage-
ment,

If those points were observed,
the working class mother would
be able to build for herself, a
healthy and contented life.

Pasteurisation

Mr, W. A. Abranams speaking
on “The Hygiene of Food and Fooc,
handling Places” said that hygiene
ot lood started at its source and
continued during production ana
wuring tne course of preparation
for consumption,

He drew illustrations of such

'tendance is extremely important















Cases come before the court
from say, pranks, to house-break-
ing and larceny. They do not as a
rule bring up cases of swearing.
In the extreme where there is a
case of murder or manslaughter,
such cases must be tried in the
Upper Court.

The regularity of school at-

DANCING SCHOOL — NEW
CLASSES

New classes are being formed
for Ballroom, Tap and Musical
Comedy Dancing and “KEEP
FIT” under the tuition of Miss %&
Joan “Ransori, who holds the
Diploma of the Imperial Society
of Teachers of Dancing and 1s
a Licentiate of the Royal Academy
of Dancing, London, England.

Applications for joining any of
the above or existing classes
should be submitted to iss
Ransom at Greystone Flats, it~
ings, Ch. Ch, (Telephone No, 3390).

Miss Ransom will be taking over
the teaching of the existing class-
es in place of Miss Molly
Radcliffe who has decided to re-
tire from the Madame Bromova
School of Dancing as from the
end of the currert

Madame Bromova and the Hon-
orary Committee thank clients for
their, past patronage. and solicit
their continued support.

fn the life of every child. If he
stayed away from school a chila
would very probably be getting
into some sort of mischief. When
a child plays truant from school
fhere is very likely something
wrong at home, at school or with
the child, He may not be liked at
home, or he may be punished at
school. He may be in.g class in} &
which he does not fit in and he] ¢
may be bored.

Investigations have proved that
films do not affect boys to any
noticeable extent. A boy may go
to the films to get away from home
if he is ill-treated. Going to the
films, however, affects girls. Sub-







How happy Baby is and how healthy — it is a
pleasure to look at him. Buy your Baby, too,
a tin of Health and Happiness — TO-DAY!



At 94 he hit across a straight
ball from Valentine and was
bowled off the pad. Bayley
played a useful confident innings
in 150 minutes. The score -was
then 149/1/94, One hundred and
fifty went up in 152 minutes.

Persaud joined Wight (49) who
gave an easy chance to Rickards
at coyerpoint off Valentine but
reached his individual nfty in 160
minutes, Persaud was never com-
fortable and completely at sea to
Valentine making most ludicrous
strokes and was soon stumped for
5. The score was 157/2/5, Christian!
next man in was shaky to Mudie
and was almost caught § and
bowled, then nearly caugnt in
slips. Binns also failed to stump
him off Valentine at 6.

Skipper Bonitto got Jamaica’s
third wicket when he struck
Wight in front and Umpire Ewart
upheld the appeal for 1.b.w.
Score was 181/3/61. Wight had
prayed a stubborn defensive inn-
ings badly needed by B.G, and
was at the wicket for 200 minutes
hitting six fous. The Radio and
Pressbox housed together consid—
ered that Wight had played the
ball.. Tea was taken with B.G’s.
Score 184/3/61.

After Tea

Seven runs had been added
after the resumption when Thomas
was out to a magnificent one hand
catch at silly mid-off by Neville
Bonitto off Valentine. Lennie
Thomas then partnered Christiani
and with two sweeps to the fine
leg boundary off Bonitto the 200
mark went up after 228 minutes.

But with his score at 14 Thomas
slashed at one outside his off
stump from Bonitto, edged, and
Mudie held a simple catch. The
score was 216/5/14. Robert Chris-
tiani now well set gave the crowd
proof of his first class batsman-
ship, first off driving Valentine for
four runs, then lifting the next
ball high overhead out of the

They'll Do It Every Time ae By Jimmy Hatlo |

Now HE'S THE BOSS: COULD TAKE
ALL AFTERNOON’ BUT THE POOR
SCHMOE ene Caen, HIS ULCER IN TUNE






A cmon! RELAX XZ

FOR ONCE! ALL THE

TIME



A MAN WITH AMBITION, GASTRIC VAN BILK
TOOK FIVE-MINUTE, LUNCHES =:
SANDWICH AND MILK —

Y NOPE (GULP “out

AHEAD «I GOT TOO
MUCH TO 00 (GULP )-

RELAX WHEN IM
HEAD MAN OF
THIS OUTFIT

(GULP)
Ca

Compton Strikes |

Best Form For Tour

AUCKLAND, March 7.

Denis Compton top scorer with |
78 and John Dewes 61 not out?
recaptured their best form to-day!
co put the M.C.C, in a strong posi- |
tion in their match against Auck- |}
land here.

The MCC declared at tea for 298
for seven wickets to lead Auckland
oy 152 runs on first innings, The
home side was still 85 runs in
arrears at the close of play having
lost two second innings wickets for
67 runs,

Compton was in sparkling form
and often advanced boldly down
the pitch before the bowler had
released the ball, He hit eight
fours in his dashing innings,

Dewes too, hammered the bowl-
ing, but was once ‘missed at deep
mid on, Best partnership of the
innings was the fourth wicket
stand of 74 between Compton and

David Sheppard who made 25.
AUCKLAND 1ST INNINGS 116

M.C.C Ist INNINGS
Hutton b, Cleverley 69
Washbrook c. & b, Cammish i
Parkhouse b. Cleverley 19
Compton c. & b. Burke 78
Sheppard c, Kent b. Clark 25
Dewes not “out 61
McIntyre c, Dwyer b. Burke 14 |
Wright c, Cammish b. Cleal ., i
Warr not out 0
Extras « b 41g. 2 nb 4
Total (for 7 wkts. dec.) 298
Fall of wkts; 1—40; 2—01; ~120;
4—194; 5—217; 6—262; 7—286
BOWLING
0 M R
C'ark 22 2 59 4
Cleverly 29 6 79 2
Cammish 19 3 48 1
Cleal 7 o 31 1
Burke 24 4 67 2
AUCKLAND &ND INNINGS
Scott c. Compton b. Wright
Dwyer b, Tattersall
Coleman not out is \
Wallace not out
Extras
_, Total (for 2 wkts.) eT i
ru * frente







PLAYBOYS GO

ENOUGH TO



CS

{stant even in the face of poor

“NO, ALFRED
NOTHING ELSE-
JUST A GLASS OF
SKIM MILK AND
SOME HOT WATER
AND BAKING

foods_as bread, milk, meat ana
home grown vegetables. He puint-
ed out the ditterence between i
clean milk supply and a safe one
and sugyested that pasteurisation
was the only means of making
clean milk safe.

With regard to the question of
food handiing places, he dealt
with the various aspects of site
and methods employed in connec-
tion with the health of the work-
ers in those places,

He said that legislation should
be enacted in order that there
should be compulsory examina-
tions of people dealing with the
sale of food as was done in
Jamaica,

He also pointed out where cases
of infectious diseases would spread
through unhealthy food handlers
and where the question of food
poisoning was likely to arise where
persons were affected with skin
and throat infection.

feeding and as goats had a natural
immunity to pulmonary tubercu
losis,

Thrift should be encouraged es-
pecially in the attempt to produce





What's on To-day

Pclice Courts—10.00 a.m.

Second Day of Barbados
Turf Club Races at Gar-
rison—1,00 p.m,

Mobile Cinema at Mount
Tabor School pasture, St.
John—8.00 p.m.

Inter-Club Division I Table
Tennis match between

Marines and

The Circle Francaise meets

at Combermere Schooi at
8.15 tonight.

The next sitting of the Court
of Grand Sessions will be
on Monday and the Assize
Diary up to Wednesday is
as follows:—

MONDAY
No, 36—Rex vs. Lucius Cools
No, 41—Rex vs. Stanley

HORTICULTURAL
EXHIBITION



COW:s GATE S35
Dhe FOOD of ROYAL BABIES



Lectures To Specialist
Audiences

by




The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rises: 6.15 a.m.
‘Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter) March





























1S Mr. Basil Henriques 7. B. LESLIE & CO. LTD. Agent
Lighting: 6.30 p. in se
High Water: 4. 09 a.m. 4.20 In addition to the public lecture —— ro

‘arch

at 8,30 p.m. on Wednesday,
ting

pm. Methods . of Com!

eee Suventio Delinquency”.

‘Total for Month to Yester- toa taike are specially invited
on



day: .01 in. ° quengy” at 7.30 aren ae
eneenenere _— oe 7 day, March 8th, Excellent
em) e
Youth 1
ve Direction sng: = .m.) sade wane Avra we For
: (3 p.m.) “Youth Work" at 7,15 p.m. on
wind "Velocity: 5 miles per Friday, March 9th,
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.930, All Jectures at’ the British Blouses

Council,

(3 p.m.) 29.876
like
this



FOOTBALL

GRENADA TOUR





Stanton 5
TUESDAY | vat
Nos. 32 & oe = oh % AT ) 2 CHECK
on 8! y mn
: KENSINGTON OVAL ¢
Nes RDNSEDAY WILL NOW BE HELD ON e ee NYLON..PLAIDS
it ; ,
eek awe er eeceaeette SATURDAY APRIL 2h 1x6 ||. in Saxe Blue, Green and re wide
No. 12—Rex vs. Ruby Benn : . s aut> p.m. % Monday 12th Mar. vs. Carlton - ¥ Per Yard . $1.04
No. 16—Rex vs. Albert King m esnear 19 Me ‘s Colts . win} + Steere si NeseFessbeesbedceedare qe
s i . Bae % Thursd vs. Empite %
aguae grarceraat te coe |) WINE Uo The Fecent heavy pains i was Gecieed to AS See eae eee 811 FIGURED RAYON LINGERIE
Pika nantnriewacs ine Man of postpone the Exhibition which was due to be held % Monday rs ee oe

Her Own"—4.45 and 8.30 p.
Plaza—Oistins—“‘Sinbad The ‘Sailor
a. an.



ding the Sunset Trail”
Valley Rangers"—

a

8.40 p.m.

Globe—"Sleeping Car to Trieste”
‘—5.00 and 8.30 p.m,



Haynes Co., Ltd.



EVERY

in Queen’s Park on Saturday,
SATURDAY, APRIL 21ST from 1—6 p.m.

The Exhibition Books are now ready and can be
obtained from the Secretary, C/o Wilkinson &

J & R BAKERIES







A lovely Fabric in a beautiful ane of .

SEASON TICKETS — $1.50
Patterns. 36” wide. Each... sssestsrameane-sssne BEC.

Obtainable from Carlton
members
DAILY

ere CHALLENOR
STAND

March 17th to
















KENSINGTON STAND 2/-
OPEN STANDS 1/-
GROUNDS te +. 1,

PLAY STARTS 5 p.m.





If ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT



awe: of big cities, salt
is ‘used by enginee:
atd public and industrial contractors everywhere.

YOU SHOULD USE IT, TOO

Tough, flexible, yet non-cracking, BOWRANITE is
made in many Suraeis shades. ‘ :
Stocked in .

t _ Permanent Green, Red, Grey, Black and
Super Black’ (Heat Resisting)
in tins of Imperial Measure
ONE GALLON WILL COV. ER 1,000 SQ. FT.
se: eric Pole te pers





"PHONE 4456 e AGENTS
LOAF A PERFECT TREAT WILKINSON & HAYNES Co, Ltd.
SS SSS SSS { Ede = Pat red pa Safad ba nd . Bibiana.





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PAGE 1

iwr.i: .wo IIUSIIUMiS ADVOCATE im RSDAY, MARCH K rsi Quhib CaUinq T i tssjtn) ika has Just will oe rei, MiMCaeHon. or "C1c and after H short practice i(came* AI*i.innt lo the Attorney 1 .IIKI Magistrate. ; Barbados an his appoint mm! ai Legal Draughtsman m Taafanylkn ror some time be ji-ied as Solicitor General and now has been appointed to the post of Crown Counael. H;s many friends will join In longratulaUons to him and lo hi-: %  Interntod A RE you interested In havinj particulars of your club Ina.B*af in the 1951 Year Book? If BO, please send all such particular* to tV Advix-Jite Compnnv Umilfd rnn' ?l*t. Pubiishir.K Business The Hostess With The B.B.C. Radio Mostest On The Ball Programme The tattys oi fje- bten cUmo for •omelAino "'" %  loo* equally eftlfl won %  • lad*/ or a oenUeman.' *>••• !*" % %  W-rt T.C.A.'. Store Impector M B. M. R CHIPMAN arrived M R L R D T R'TT. I i 3 mOTtl *** 81 " '"speetor I flnnMn BIMIIM a*.t*aaa.aa^-i Inf try T C.A |Oj in Barbados. Mr i i Ipmu whose homo is in Montreal is in the publishing •. %  '.' %  n-Huntcf PubDunl Business A RJUVma by T C.A iTiuininx from Canada weie Mr. and Mrs. E C. Ralph who are here on two weeks holiday, slaying at the Mm too has a dual business, he is tbW proprietor of Ralph' Drug Store and Ralph's Travel Sen. e H b both a PhamiBd.t and a Travel Agent. Off lo U.S. E. a. INNISS of Messrs T. S Garraway a, C-*. Is rtue to leave, for tiro US. via Puerto lUco this meriting for medu .il attention at tin* Medical York Mr. Inniss is a member of the Board of Management of the ....rbadoa Cricket Associat'on. Romantic Emigration ,n HAROLU MOODY, son of the late Dr. Harold Moody, will, I hear, shortly r K leaving Britain for New Zealand to settle theie A few months ago. Dr Moody visited New Zealand togettier with Mae Don JI Id Bay ley and Arthur Wlnt to take part in .ilhletic uports.^ While there, he grew tii like the country Mkd fell tn love with a New Zcalander. m.irried soon Nays) /.igsaad M" D n (B) ANNr: EHWAKDM A YEAR m Europe u^nglrjrms the world's betrt-known Irsson on how to be V ] diplomatic r The world's gayest parl> giver the world you'll alwayr Batd '"' %  i. (.'hanged Woman. Mis Perk jp,ck at the tirst of every month Mesta, once the most talkative fc nw.-t mj %  < I I %  .. i. a, is now an axkoyf.STXO.V.—Do pou on B the nplomati %  -d7 INK Nothing. -At the American Embassy 1 Mrs. Mesta Is an oil and steel Mv, them American food. Ham. heiress. She ha* played the social bake-l beans, apple pie. Ice cream, i.irket all her lite, and toll'*, and champagne." played it well. Last year PreslQVF.STION. — What do you d> i,t Truman made her U S Mmthxnk of the plow u>>holnsc 1 M an SO* a.m. UMrttara Ou.t .... Kiinwwr • so a Th HrwS M am. Mow Nw rram BriUl S II %  > Cloar Dour. 11 IS am ProsKaxtmr Parade IISS a..1 U.i*r. Chni. II* %  n. World Again 11 SB Moon Th. N- I11S pai N AnaJyilm IS I 0 m Cloao Down. LM %  .aa.-4o at It IS SS. lies. 'It coits about £4.000 to put on 11 buffet." she once explained That duet And everyone heard the story of hew one of her guests, leading .._ /or a successful hostess' "No rules. 1 guess I just like people. 1 invite the ones who get on nnd the ones who don't. ajul lust put "em all together." QIF.STIOH. — Do vou find He is here for "•"'" %  * T.C.A.'i for 11.. 1 Iboean Region arrived from CanHe hopes to get l*da via Bermuda yesterday bv after his arrival T c.A He is bar* until Saturdf • %  %  • %  v.hen he leaver for Trinidad. On Holiday He was in Bermuda for onr lVTOW ON IfflMDAY in LoDdOD eek Mr. Trltl i* staying at tl, l^i 1^ Dr. Lionel A. Francis. %  >i ni/ biic in IIII i-v-i. ii-aiimn ^" %  • —• %  ., Senator Tom Connally, once song Liw"iou'O "0 ""* beaien 1 !" *-*:. ..1> Old Kenturkv HomeIn "Not it iff We're only four close harmony duet with Defence hours from Pans by ear. And. of couree. my old friends make But. as a one-year-old dlplothe detour Its a beauUful emusX ... Th. rsnnla • morvellOUI 4 1} p m Li.tn#n CKoIro S St p Chcllanham Gold Cup 115 pm. Best tun Masa-mr S p.m Mrlody on *lrif %  SB p m U*lonon Diavtl -•--. 1 IS p.m M M M a SIJS M 5 SO p m Ovfrturoi • 49 p m Pro%  T*-nnLr Paiailr ; ot p m The PJvW tiopiHaw< Anab'io IS p.m Ss- H: ..n I *' i> 111 0n#tlly loeaklnf • I.' ••-11 as • ii-" 4 M.lit "4 l*P" Rodio Na*.rool I II p as Sir John MaOIII tail Journal B B p*i CompoMr nl tho Wr.li B BO p m flporla DupalrK IS p.m Have 1 On I U p n Do Vou Rotnomtxr ION pm Th< Hrw, |A 10 p m Ftorn lh# Editorial' II II p Take II Prom Mart is 45 p m Taai-litC Around BrlUin II Bt pan Tho Mu.Si Std Phillipand Hi. Band niit, Mrs Mesta Is not telling any_5P'her*"" 1 legation i. one of the lovellHon-i. %  member of the Beli/e ( .' British Honduras. Lust week In visited many places, including the Privy Council, the Colonial Office L MRS. HAROLD DAHL and the headquarters of the ind their three children U-ague of Coloured Peoples. He left Barbados yesterday In dlfhopes to travel in the province.fercnt directions. Mrs. Dahl and soon. the children left for Canada •" Different Directions T.C.A. direct, while Mr Dahl left yesterday afternoon for TnCultural Links M I S S BERYL MCBURNIE. Director of the "Little Carib" thoatre, Trinidad, was the star of a lecture'demonstration of We'. ,.'f pk!l %  •* Indian folklore and dances given hd.iii Mrs. Ivy Barrera. Jamaica. King'* College. Durham Cut Short Holiday M R k MRS. H KESZIE who arrived from vt Canada February 13th cut short their holiday to return lu Canada yesterday morning by T.C.A. ,(,,, They were originally supposed to L Z %  %  u nl A P ril 14lh the increasingly Indian Students' Union was in iiid of the "Little Carib" Theatre. Hiss McBurnle has recently comMACP' c led a tour of Spain. France and North Africa in search of cultural links with the West Indies. Food Distributor M R. AND MRS C J. KelfBI V of Vancouver arrived from Crnada yei.terday morning b; The people are ore—especially not about herWh* 1 legation 1. one n parties jBat on the Continent. You must In London yesterday, 'for :, ,c.'e and visit me sometime^ week's holiday and to see otd-tLondon" Yes. she loved Lon*he was a mixture of th-* don. too old ui^agfagial liustjsai utdanel M 1 %  %  fcrn tidereatiniatad very, very diplomatic diplomat, *** M i < She is an able woHustling into a large room act man. a noted charmer even at 68. with chairs for 60 people she ws* nnd shrewd enough to know when not in the least disconcerted to her technique needs tailoring. tind there were only 16. She-hook "I like my Job— it's construehands all round briskly, with the live.' she said. air of a woman dismissing a thou"1 get up at 8 a.m. nnd work Band "Thanks-it-was-wonderful." the same as any other diplomat. she settled herself In the corner but twice as hard. Working for of a Clartdges settee, flunk* one 1 . %  Slate Deoartment means L lot arm gracefully across the back, of notes to Foreign Ministers and crossed grey-nyloned legs, and things like that. threw us a charming and vital "In anv case, it never was a smile. light-hearted Job." said Mrs. QUESTION— Arc i/ou still inMesta. pulling down her skirl, r. rested in prrinp panic?? 'What the world needs now is not "The only kind I'm interested parlies but Courage and Sacrifice. in are the ones I give for the I say so In all rm speeches." Gil No matter where I am In L E. S. MISSION LAGOS An American girl missionary, ot Seattle, arrived at Lagos last weekend on her way to Jos in Niger! There she will act a s pilot of the aeroplane used by the Sudan Interior Mission for flying missionaries to their centres. She Is the first woman pilot to engage in such work in Nigeria. Jamaica Bound L ORD and LADY BROWNLOW are at this moment on their way to Jamaica on board the J.unalca Producers ship Nertfa Star. With them is the wife of Lt. Col. W. H. Bromley-Davenport. Conservative M.P, and Lady fiiownlow's cousin. Thev are goIng to St. Anns Bay on the north of the Island where. I-ord Hrownlow has a house at Roaring River. He also has considerable house property in the Baham..'. which the party will visit later in the trip. Trinidad Priest C OLIN BRYAN, formerly Assistant West Indian. Liaison Officer at the Colonial Office ha* dhctded to become a Roman Oatholie priest Bryan went lo Britain during trie Second World %  Far f join the H.A F When the war was over he studied Soc Science at the London School of Cconomlcs before ioming the Colonial Office Staff. He will I m England for Rome, where his academic course f the priesthood will begin with study of philosophy. M R Rupert and the Coughdrop—42 History, BY THE WAY By Beachvomher I N aJatQ I any eiliUon of brj ml may tnethlng like this: Also Travelling, in ihr plfltoantelopes, in nrmadilln. a giant foar baboons, end two %  mil. Day and night',anlmals are the move from roo to soo. But why should 146.000 ants travel 10.000 miles' Could thev not iu\ C been collected nearer home, and brought bv train tn London 4 And .•ited them on arrival? A Siamese nobleman once sat on an anthill in Surrey during a picnic. On the way back to Wmdon alone he became aware of I fort, so he removed his trousers ami shook them out of the window of his compartment. . • ••W Im Thff TI-OUIHTM'' He MI ill . AIJ\S: He lost his grip of the trousers, nnd a wanton wind %  11 awBU Into a charming Bieedo* of tmtlercups. At Waterloo the porters said. 'E orta be locked up, that's what orta be." The Maiionmaster was %  uaunonedi and he anked the disi-onsolate nobleman what he thought he was doing, going round like that. Our dusky hero, hiding. Ins skinny leu* w'" macintosh, said haughtily. "I am nobleman." "And /." roared the stationmaster, "am the Queen of Syria And so on. until a secretary of Legation or somete identify nnd rescue the unwilling friend of the ants. • Thiftfeais* fhrmrommi '"VTOT very democratic," *s the l'l phrase used by political commentators lo deal ribs H" 1 la""", habll of Cabinet Ministers of treeping uito the House late, and then living to hidi while they are .Urlsed. The next step will be disguises "Mr. Speaker. is It in order for that charwoman to crouch behind the Member— honourable Member for oraughf M (Shouts of "I spy a stranger' ) The Speaker then rose to say. "That is not a charwoman That Is the Minister of Bubbb-ulowing." iCorerinnent cheers and lauphfer.) Junior Short Story Competition every Monday In The Evenlnj Advocate, and Ihc winner will revive a prUe to U.e value ol 7 %  In either book, or stationery. The. itorle. can be on anv subject under the .un but should not I* more thar 500 •olds in Inulh. and must reach The rhlldrea's rdltoc. The Aflracale Co Ltd.. City not later than Wednesday every week. NOTE : Stories must not be copied. Send this coupon with your story. irNIO* SHORT STORY COSsniiilON Na A RehoM rs*i Home AddreTlUe of Slery BARBADOS DRAMATIC CLUB PRESENTS Under the DistmRUished Patronage of His Excellency the Governor. Sir Alfred Savage. K.C.M G.. and Lady Savage %  A HI HIM It uxsuur.% THRILLER MARCH 15th & 16th 8.30 p.m. MATINEE March 16th 5.30 SHARP BOX OH It IS ll*l \ F1I1DAY lh AT 8 V.M IMI'llll THE A THE %  %  • %  %  : %  >€ ttisll folk *t No-I r-OJjhl ,! SkBM tuvr lvnofn th*; wt • BM been Sinn Cllu, •ho krwekci. TS uck'* too bg M sja ttowti th* cH-mnry l^o*. ll fou open II >"*Tr,tr>j Bhi AQl-ATir rilHMMMl >UrnUr. Onfy) CARNIVAL IN COSTA Hit \" in Technicolor DSCK HA-nr. VlA-gLXgl CttSAR HOUEHO '• Ti JLM Am TW lxk.M.1 PHkort JAMAK urxsis PRICE tNew 36 in. EASTER J ootal T 0 ^ bi a Robia _, ... Lystav, Tobralco iDress Assortment luU a „ iVKl I "Cordrosa" I "Invictaray" I Slipper Satin, I MAROCA1N, fine draping corded crepe Printed rayon — white grounds White (•! Whirfieldl) Q 5 NEW SHADES. CV/UWi & WHITFIELDS •^I'JC Dial 4220 CLUB >IOIM.A.V The most Beoml/ul .VioM Oufc from Miami lo Rio icilh a trorld-u'lde reputation tor oood looi Music, Dancing En terla in men I throughout the night Oia/ 4000 /of reservations HARDWOOD CHAIRS S.S.TIs KA'H. (IM AN ITtM YOU HAVl BUN WAITING f0 CROSSW ODD 1 1 A 1 %  6 !' Id t % % %  PLAZA Theatre-Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) No" MAN 0. HER OWN %  ••( ? Bk**i ton I I SI. A PASIAMOIN-T TMRlll *r niim--1 B "• •* % %  "• %  "" %  L#o OOHCtV !•> ISOWtRY BOY' i •%  SS**" • %  • i.i UN l.Mlli BAKOISI" Kvn MAYNAHD II—t OIRSoN y Spw'WI RS*^< l,n M 'SSSSy^ P !" >. -BBUJI OW s'r. MABT'SPLAZA Themtre-OISTIN {DIAL 84041 imM) the SAILOR in % %  -. iOnli I.MRBANKS. Jar. I1"M FrMaf S B BJS %  m. % %  ( % %  Ulnuli-f AHNfcRS Nrw AC-TIO?. TltRIl.LTR TBB'lHrn • %  tk* i H.N iim-M t3i %  ort ol nDit* I Aro-> wou'.n rnAke. I'I M.t.'iuiK In all turnit>i:-i lS> W:IAI ui* iiiacti d-llvarra Bea n or oumsn. (Si Agr of -lir*iatimlv.iilnn, (3) mim. D couifl count it. IOI MSI IM uiunqet oi > mini nnai m. llomaticK. ac we nnu it sat in n i tdrio nucn a itims as s nisi ont in Ao.rics (41 i. Die Ismon DI iinrnpiaa tinsci* Outcome oi OfiDM m Acnn> u :< James STEWART %  • sybyWINTERS f DanOURYEA .SupbMcNALLY n> ... MlllB0 WI1CHEU Mil Drslt Mai MclaM. IM ka • tn CFlstM w— >,wiiiia—I— M %  *mm*m*m M ^^^mmmmm' PLUS TONITIO LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE CLAYTON THOMPSON -mm,: -AU The Time" SAM mm s.nrii.t "Who Put The Whiskey In The H>ll FELIX STRAl'GHN Slnclnr "Lucky Ole Han EDWARD MARSHALL Slmlm Toor Winds and Seven Sr.j" DORIF.N THOMPSON smalm 'Wlldeat Gal In Te-n" BYRON BOLLOCK Sl'nf Use "Bowltf hed. Bothered. .IIHI Bewildered" GUEST STAR : FITZ IIAREH'OOD — 1st Super Star Wlaner PIT lie: Mi il -ii jar; BALCONY 4oe: BOXES 54e. light you, HEADACHIS ulr tlt vr re ihfhl Whan hssftlaches sUrtdiss to worry, os^rw-orst, ovsr indulc*nco be tman. laha AlkSaltsor rihl • %  ray. Sparkling oBBrvesseopc* makss AlkB-Saltsai plcatant-(ailing halps its painkilling analt*elc fto to work fast. Kt-p it Ikindy. Alka Seltzer '£ DON'T RAZOL pomade on HAIR. Take il on the rOmr. and work, il IhoroujTrtly through the HAIR, forward flr*t, tht-n backward, until most of It comes bark out. Soft paper can then be used to wipe away surplus and to dress the hair to a flr.lsh. The above course, will give very desirable results. THE IIAIIIIAIMPS CO-OPERATIVE 1'OTTOX I AI IOII. LTD. Use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP Stay fresh all day long use Lifebuoy Toilet Soap in your daily bath or shower and whenever you wash. Lifebuoy'i deep-cleaming lather really rreea you of weariness, keeps you looking fresh so much longer. Buy a tablet aoday and discover for Totmelf the difference it nakes I FOR PERSONAL FRESHSESS ALWAYS



PAGE 1

PACE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. MARCH ft, 151 BARBADOS filADVOSrrE ff%M kr ifc MIHUI r. in BnaJ ' IHMHHL Thursday. March 8. 1951 I\I;M A TAX THE time has come when serious consideration should be given to the possibility of adding to the Government's Revenue by means of a moderate lax on cinemas. When the suggestion was made between the two world wars, it was pointed out at the lime that a large proportion of money was spent on amusements by people who contributed nothing to the common exchequer cither by way of taxation or by direct contributions to charity. If there was justicalion for the remark then, it is apter now. In very recent years the number of cinemas in this island has increased rapidly. Attendance varies with the appeal and quality of the pictures; but many cinemas thrive on patrons who become "fans" and hate to miss a picture. Some people go to the cinema as many as five or six times a week. These may be exceptional fans but there are thousands of regular cinema goers who spend a tidy sum on this form of entertainment. It is only just that a proportion of this "luxury" spending should be "channelled" off to help pay for vital social services A comparison of the amount Barbados spends today on social services as compared to six years ago will illustrate how urgent is the nerd for revenue to swell this desirable pool. The cost of social services, which are still sadly needed here, could be augmented by taxes on cinema tickets. Seeing that there is already a tax on one form of entertainment in this island no serious objection could be advanced against a cinema tax. Comparisons have been made between the imposition of a similar tax in England but it would be asking too much to exact 75% of the first cost by way of an entertainment tax in this island. 1 Jf at each cinema a lax of perhaps one penny in the shilling was collected on tickets it is estimated that there would be a substantial income for the Government to spend on much needed social services. The payment of such tax would not inconvenience theatre goers ana would bring to them a sense of responsibility when they realise that in a small but effective way they too are contributing to the welfare of the community. KEEP...? FROM time immemorial the law in Barbados compelled the pedestrian "to keep his person on the left or near side of the road". This means that the man walking along the street must go in the same direction as the vehicle which fs overtaking him. This condition affords an easy opportunity to be run down by the overtaking vehicle. : In other parts of the world the law provides that the pedestrian meet the vehicle which, especially in the United States travels on the right. 1 The point was raised in 1935 when the Hoad Traffic Act was passed and in answer to the objection it was suggested that the pedestrian need only walk where the policeman on duty should direct. In today's Issue a correspondent again draws attention to the matter and while adjustments are still being made to traffic regulations it would be well if consideration is given to the difficulty. RUSSIA'S PLAN FOR WORLD CONQUEST NOW ft %  Dados has become a major power, the world U severed into two camps The %  ttftUat world I* being disBy JOSEPH STALIN ceptton. becomes a member of i work patiently and lyitemaUcallj *£'? of Leninism, u*nnhenln| for tr.r*ol.d.m y ol the work.ni £"/ ^IcUon **> Worker. cUm in iU fljjht ajauui capitalU !" : J" >•>€ baae from which UM i fiaht against capitalU The support of our revojuUcn by major target for oniiuimt In drx-rrifiaiiofi and mar.tpulario*.) What is our Voutt. technique £ hlnd.'Z'ochfj'wor.,,, """ • -n—U-11, *2 ' t-SU, reng.henin steadily growing stronger Lanln told us mat once the Communist party triumphed in our own land, the epoch of world revolution would begin, an epoch full of conflicts a:.d wan. of victories and defects an epoch p ^ i T 1 ^T. which would. In Une end, lead lo whkh "•> rt m Pf of %  ortalvletory over the chief capitalistic ^.""r 01 -f '" ur d ahouU eouatvtai epoch coven a strategic period of years or even decades „,. %  revolution our revolution ded • an end not develop along a continuous and *' d OI '"* %  *" %  union revolution l n .11 landupward line, but along a zigzag |y >II path, by means of forward anu [The fact that 'commumi$ta fry I The communua encourage backward marches. Our ponlbUI. ro lake over American liberal orboth monopolies and ro-operatti les of success depend upon the ganizations Is no* an accident; ir under capitalism, because they relative strengths .nd weaknesses U all pan of Stalin's master plan.) can be more easily socialned than of friends and enemies abroad. How will we bring the masses of individual enferpnWs.l The weaknesses of the capitala nation Into the communist proThe measures for strengthening iatic world which we can use are gramme? We have fashioned a %  ociajism are: State monopoly oi its Insuperable antagonism* — number of organizations without foreign trade, agricultural taxea. antagonisms which dominate the which we could not wage war on State purchase and sale of agriwhole International situation. capitalism: trade unions, co-operacultural production, and an %  11Th,, first group of antagonisms lives, workshop committees, labour *mt.-aclng plan for nationalization consists of those between the parties, women's associations, a ' Industry, transport, and credit. workers and the middle class in labour press, educational leagues. The State and the co-operatives, the capitalist countries; the second youth societies. consists of those between imperial. u, £ !" ,uUon v m •" wntrie. *£ the workers of all lands, and. even ***',?£ Y un "*** muat * more, by the victory of worker, in 1 in '?' rc ^ wl h ~"rker s ism and the liberation movement In colonies and dependent countries; the third consists of those between the war victors a nd the conquered countries; the fourth consists of those which have arisen among the victorious States; the fifth consists of those which have developed between the U.S.S.R. and the capitalist countries as a whole. The trend of our foreign policy is determined by the conflicts and antagonisms of theae live groups. I The Korean War offers convincing proof that Sovtet Russia not a long-range plan for attacking capitalism through Us teeakrsr point— the Far Cast.] In 1917, the weakest part of the capitalist world-front was Russia. Where |g the front breakable next? Again at the weakest point. In India, there arc young and combative revolutionaries allied with the powerful movement for liberation. The forces of the revolutionary movement in China a re immeasurable. They have not yet come into anything like full operation, but the future will show how vast they nre. The Immediate task confronting the revolutionary movement In colonial lands is (1) to win over the best elemenU among the workers to communism and to form independent communist parties; (2) to set up a nationalist and revolutionary coalition of workpeasant's, and revolutionary Jus* like Adolf Hitler, the Dictator of Soviet Russia lua a caRSTUlIf prepared plan for winning world supremacy. And just a* Hitler dad In hat notorious book. "Mein Kama*". *o haa Joseph SUlln written. In clear and unmistakable words, his bluepriau for aggressive conqurtt—the 'ommum-.l blueprint that kt being followed, dawn to the amallcal detail, in the Par Eaal and elsewhere around UV globe. Ironically, however, few people have taken the trouble la explore sunn writing* and weigh their significance to thr eltlseiu of a tree world. In order that there be no further nnawarenesw of has long-range alms for the forcible spread of eontmunlim. here la the Ruaalan Dictator'* nine-point profjrammr for world conquest, taken from hht recorded writings, which ore now on file In the Stalin Archives of the National War College ln Washington, D IV ii-.hr h.r I sentences have been Inserted Uirou about the article In order to point up tttalin plan In Ihe llghl of today's crucial events The I die n--.—Coronet as well as the capitalists, are traders", and when they hav learned how to trade, they will get the upper hand over private trade (they are doing so already?) Those who cannot understand this are not Leninists but liberals Great banks, as Lenin has said, are the State appartus which we need for the realization of socialIsm, and which we take over ready-made from capitalism. Wh we do so. a unified Slate Bank oi the most comprehensive kind, with branches in every district a factory, will control production well as distribution of products No. we are not liberals. We put the interest of the Party above the Interests of formal democracy. For us communists, formal democracy Is a trifle. vm. |Th.per/orinanc i,\ the Sec dWepam nf the tltulrd Natums is proof of how Russia UktB to talk about "peace, !" n-M/,. actually prornotinp aaarfisivn.. We communists create "logai.. for the masses. Treaties embodying fresh groupings of forces with an eye to war are termed "peace treaties." The signing of thei always effected to the accompaniment of the pipings of "peaceful alliances." Our preparations for a war are conducted undo cover of paeans to peace. Thi opposition will not accept our propoaali: that shows how "genuine" is their love of peace. The Peace of Brest-Li to vsk* ii n model Instance of this' strategy. This "peace" enabled the party to As often as not, these ar e nonJake advantage of the discussions. ftfflSlaftli^rli riufifinum? par1y or 8n'"<>" a"d only a carto ^integrate th* enemy forces. n tain proportion of tnem aro linked %  " to gather strength for an atwith the party. But under special tack on lh e White Russians. Even hands ary coalition shall be in th of the workers. It Is obvious that each of tin cotmtrles'wrirnc^se'pirate'treM: ^'"Vhem H u" ment. We must study all the lj< special characteristics of the revolutionary development In these lands, and must educate the students from these countries in such a way as lo be sure they will fulfill all the tasks assigned to them. IL [AMU though America is inj billions in Europe under conditions, every one of these ,nc dullest have now come to see necessary; for. ,httt lne Peace of Brest-Utovsk impossible to was a concession which strengthconsolidate the class positions of enod us wn "c It wrecked the fo,*ces the workers l n the various spheres ot International capitalism, of the struggle. _jThere la a veritable ant heap of 1 1„ v,„n--, KI„'-_-I_. .,.„, iniU-pcndent organizations. c-Sm^ %%• 2?^,$^ misaiona and committees compriswurld U inci-lfable the only thing ing millions of non-party memleft to chance is the actual date beri. Who decides upon the direchostilities.) tlon that all these organization). As Lenin has said, terrible take? Where is the central unit clash between Soviet Russia and ihr Marshall Plan. Russia is con* organization that wields sulhthe capitalist States must flnci'd iliat rapttalis"! abroad will rlenl authority to keep them withevltably occur. The forces md'irablu collapse] 'n prescribed lines in order to united capitalism and ail their Our country, a vast domain with achieve unity of command and to military technique are a mighty very extensive markets and enoiuvo 'd confusion? power, a very real power. Thercmous supplies of raw materials, Ttie central unit is the Comfor e we muat try to take the has been detached from the munlst party! enemy by surprise, seize a moment capitalist system The loss of onev when his forces ate dispersed, sixth of the world signified for inw—ia. -1n i,,. n „. nnM We ml y consider that the time capitalist Europe restriction of J^" r^^1 "rc^ut'bZ b ri P e for U, dwU production and u profound dis,hc.r r'edl Jirpose is noi reforin wh ** • • ***** '" arrayed turbance. Meanwhile, the Eurobul the capture of AmericaMalnat us arc In attate of eonfuipcan powers arc threatened wiih apparatus of poDcrament.l the loss of their most Important Among the masses of the peopb hinterland, the colonies. we communists, a Lenin said, are Europe has been compelled to but drops in the ocean. We have increase the burden of taxation, atyle of work that Is peculiar to M. and to make the condition of the the practice of Leninism; It creates their utt^'banVruptey The rulin workers much worse than before, a special type of worker. special classes must be m the throes of J temporary stabilization of type of party or Slate official, a major government crisis so that capitalism has been mainly effectspecial kind of style in public the government is so enfeebled ed with the aid of U.S. capital, office. the ^revolutionists can speedily struggle ne class torcc arc In a *tatc a ion; when all aro sufficiently embroiled with each other and have been sufficiently Weakened in combats; when all the vacillating elements have exposed themselves the people and paraded HM Buroptao countries, whlh continuing to exploit their own %  olonies. have themselves become financially dependent upon the U.S. Thus, the centre of financial power In the capitalist world has been shifted from Europe to America III Th* rrccMt history of inrcrrnend cine labor warfare in the V S. _. I'calt note rJepcrlu communist they can be agents use unions to achieve their may sp o nao Nn"'^Ti? fl '"" I .iu he sees in a meVi^'forllnkrng 'P* Always we have a clear and No country can. in these tlmea. u congtitutional action with unPrecise aim towards which we _rry on war without the workers, constitutional action—because he strive, for one of the great merits u\r S *?"? m 1^ ^' nr fPeU h0 Mn %  ** use of It as a of communism is that nothing against our Soviet Republic, then S( recn 1*,,^ wnlch h<1 con left to chance rn^r .^T n !" lmpOMl V^' strengthen his secret work MX^U' ttifl'tt "2 '*?? Communists must go into tho VI h*-£ r "*<*'•'" KATHHINC aovil rtMti ra* i imwa SM Our Header.* S ? : Sunday Shopping anil Sabbath Valum To .he Editor, Thr Advocate— SIR.—A week or so ago you published a rather solid letter from "Layman" deprecating the proposal to open stores on Sundays to accommodate tourists, and appealing to the Clergy of the various denominations and their staffs to arise and gel busy In opposition to the plan and for the Creservation of the Sabbath (or Drd's Day) with all it* beneficent alms and uses. A very wise line of action. I cannot but Ihink. And I would extend the appeal to the political leaders since they also are professedly and substantially pledged to promote the well beinc of the community, whereat T notice that the Head', of the Workers' Union are running political and electioneering; rallies on Sundays now. But there are worse .ittacks upon the Inestimabl .• treasure of a wU spent Sabbath. Last Sunday, for example, one of our crowd of cinemas offered a regular nightclub programme imported from Trinidad, with two performances —one at 4 4ft for Ihe children— and announced the day before that the Rox Office would be open for the sale of tickets on Sundav from fl to 12 noon. Evidently on regard at all for the religious character and duties of the clay and its possible blessings and benefits, but simply aiming to stir uo the (perhaps jaded appetite of the public and make money. Many townships in the Mother Country refuse to allow cinemas and other places of amusement to open on Sundays, but "Little England" is f iir from worrying about a reasonable free chance for spiritual affairs But returning to the appeal to the Clergy and their helpers. Are they not interested and concerned" I have not heard of any of thorn saying or doing anything in regard to the matter, and yet they are the primary and natural guardians and advocates of "the things that nre Cod's", and responsible for Iht souls and morals of the community. Is It that they have nothing lo aay on so big and urgent a maltc*. but are just satisfied to talk soft platitudes to their docile (or perhaps aleepy) congregations? I have not heard of any of them being applauded by the ardent heroic souls who a *e eager for the establishment of the Lord Christ' Kingdom of Righteousness and Love—and there are still a few of these around. — nor of their being attacked bv the devotees of the World, tho Flesh and the Devil." We have here perhaps another reason for regretting that the Head of one denomination has sailed away, for he Is famous for the dictum: "It is the people lhal matter". Anyway, ritfit or wrong I think Religion is still of first Importance, and Sunday Is its main Opportunity to get a living, so I bcto Sign my,elf -PMO DEO ET pATRIA" March, 6, 1811. Raro //a/red* To Tne Editor. The Adrocafc— SIR.—I beg to say that racehatred in thi.* island is fanned and kept alive by the narrow-minded who do not seek unity, but mutiny, and to overthrow the weaker side It Is a form of Communism, and should be punished. Educated or sensible coloured people should try to overthrow this backward thinking among their race, and climb on their own merits. The Indians, Jews, and other nations segregate, yet are good mixers, and do not stir up strife: 1 must say I am proud of the East Indians that are here among us. also the Jews. Why Is this continual yapping about colour kept up W' are as white as our Parity, as yellow as our insincerity, and as black as our deeds. I also must pay tribute to the picture at the fanplre Theatre "Farewell to Yealeroay." It is the birth of new thought. "There u one Cod —We are all brothers." it u foi us to live it. A CITIZEN. MEN who sail the seven seas always welcome the day their vessel puts into the American port of Mobile, on the Gulf of Mexico, where they find shelter and welcome •n a completely equipped seamen's club, which embodies most of the features of a modern hotel, a home away from home, a bank, library, post office, a recreation centre. It is. in every sense of the word, a seamen's paradise and when a sailor crosses the threshold for the first time he usually think-; he is dreaming. As a matter of fact, the Mobile Seamen's Club, in the southern State of Alabama, is the fulfilled dream of a man ol the seas who understands other seamen. When George E. Blacktopp, director of the club, was a seaman during World War I, conditions were different from those of today. Forty men were crowded into the forecastle in those days; food often was more to the taste of sharks than of human beings; hoars were long. wajjes short. When men came into port their chief concern was in having "fun" and the type of recreation they chose did not always please the la'v or the citizens. Sheer boredom and loneliness were troublemakers which too often led the seamen into difficulties. In many respects lifo at sea has greatly changed in the past quarter-century. Today sailors have good quarters; wages and hours are good, with higher pay for overtime; food is the same as that which the officers eat.'but loneliness and boredom persist. Blacktopp has carried his own memoiy of the seamen's lot through the years. Spending most of his civilian life as a welfare worker among seamen he realizes how important it always will be for them to have recreational outlets ashore. When he went to Mobile to live in its mild climate, he took over the Seamen's Bethel, a century-old institution for serving seamen. There he put into practice some of the ideas which have now found full fruition in the now Seamen's Club. Blacktopp believes in treating the seamen as self-respecting human beings not as potential lawbreakers. This is a departure from many services to sailors, which operate ... the principle of helping them temporarily and sending them on their way to repeat the process the next time they come into port. In contrast to this Blacktopp's theory of serving seamen is based on the preventive one of providing recreational facilities to engage their leisure time and prevent their getting into trouble. The city of Mobile was a good place to carry out the experiment of the kind of seamen's service Blacktopp envisioned. During World War II the Gulf City burgeoned into one of the most important ports in the United Stales, with large fleets of ships moving in and out of its docks, with shipbuilding and ship repairing of considerable proportions. Also, most fortunuUly, it had a group of progressive shipping men who were interested in Blacktopp's ideas and willing to offer financial help. One of these, Captain Norman Nicholson, president of the Waterman Steamship Company, whose firm contributed a large sum to the club, is president of its board of trustees. His vision and energy in organizing matched those of Blacktopp. Because of its location on the Gulf of Mexico, Mobile always has had a population of transient seamen. For more than 100 years starting in 1834 with a small mission, Mobile citizens have supported some kind of service to seamen. On the board of trustees and in the women's auxiliary of the present Seamen s Club are grandsons and granddaughters of citizens interested in the first Seamen's Bethel. The money which built the club came out of the pockets of shipping firms, banks, business concerns, and private citizens Mobile. Many seamen gave part of their savings to the fund. The Mobile Seamen's Club operates on strictly democratic principle. Ships' officers mingle on the same fooling with men who ml the engines and scrub the decks. Local hotels sometimes call upon the club's facilities when they are overcrowded. Recontly, two Senators from the midwestern State of Illinois, while in Mobile on business, were temporary overflow guests. They were so delighted with the club's accommodations thai they had no inclination to return to the hotel. There is no charity or patronage about this seamen's club. It operates on a self-sustaining basis, although rates are less than those in a good hotel and services available include features that cannot be had in a hotel. For example, a man who needs a loan is never turned away. The Seamen's Club has one inflexible rule, which is that sailors who are intoxicated will not be admitted They are asked to come back as soon as they have recovered from their excessive drinking. And they frequently do return. One of the unique features of the club is thai it is designed to encourage men to have their wives and families join them while they are In port. With ships often in Mobile's dry docks for repairs, there is opportunity for family reunions. The Seamen's Club offers a variety of services to the seamen's families. Forexample. it,will provide a qualified person to stay with the children whenever a husband and wife want a few hours together A playground in the rear of the building soon will be added to the club's facilities. The sound of children's voices, the sight of women in the corridors and lounge of the club are things seamen never expected to see in a sailor's hostel. The club is air-conditioned throughout fljp. proof, and furnished with attractive, modern furniture. A laundry with driers makes it possible for a seaman to wash his clothes and dry them in a few minutes. There is a reading room and library, writing room, and a recreation room with tables for billiards and other names The lounge of the club is converted into a motion picture theatre at times and good films are shown for the benefit of the ssjamcn'fl guests In every respect, the club is a demonstration of a new approach in service to seamen. r V.SCOTT CO, LTD. TO-DAY'S SPECIALS at TUE COLONNADE t ...u. sow S .34 S fti*. LVX FLAKES Tins COOKING BCTTCR •!!• Tina) I'kts. Sl'LTANAS Ttaw NESCAFE Pas*. MACARONI CARPENTERS 9 TOOLS SAWS—181ns. 201ns. 221ns. 241n>., 26ins.. 28ins., 30ins., 36lna fOMl'ASS SAWS— 12in, Mini. BACK SAWS— It Ins.. 14 Ins., ISins. PLANES. IRON—0n. 101ns, 151ns., 181ns. BLOCK RATCHET BRACES CHISELS— feln., *ln.. ^iu„ lln. CHISEL SETS of i in., in. 1 In. ins. OIL STONES—61ns.. Bins. GRINDING STONES, complete—Sins., Gins. Spare GRINDING STONES—51ns.. 6ins. SAW FILES—3 4ins, 41ns., 4U,lns., 51ns. CLAW HAMMERS ENGINEER HAMMERS—lib, lHlbs, 21bs. MASON TROWELS & SQUARES AT WILKINSON Jk HATNES Co., Ltd. Successors To C.S. PITCHER & CO. Phones — M72. 487. STERNETTE 8 FIRST IN i & 9 tu. fl. of ZERO food space jl EFFICIENCY n ermrl i ca n y scaled unit J BEAUTY Finger lip cold control I $ CAPACITY .'• %  y.-nrs' guarantee Ideal Deep Freeie for Home. Hotel or Business. DESIGN ECONOMY WF. SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE DaCOSTA & CO., LTD. F.LFXTRICAL DEPT. When selecting your .. FOOTBALL OR TABLE TENNIS GEAR VISIT DACOSTA'S where you will find a full RANGE to select from. DaCOSTA & CO., LTD. Dry tioodn llt-pl. Suggestions for your Party! AND GODDABD'S 601 D BRAID RUN XWB0 """ BANDSMAN'S WINES RHINE WINES RED WINES VIEL.LE CURE QUALITY MEAT MILK FED DUCKS HAMS LAMB i9 o. should., 3 Siz.i SPECIALS LUNCHEON CHEESE —




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PACF. six BARBADOS ADVOCATR THl'KSDAV, MAIM H S, >KI USUALLY NOW MIIIIIVS III I II Per Bottle .26 .18 Per Carton 4.80 4.24 cm 2.50 226 — 26.00 IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW HEINZ vi:.i:i\m.i: soi i> 30 27 WHOLE TOMATOES in tins 35 30 I'll VS COCOA i lb. tins .47 .42 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street A TOAST TO YOUR HEALTH!! TONIC WINE WINCAHNIS ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT. BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY THIS HEW FAMILY DRINK Manlni Milk Plui ii cfcirar milk . ftnrrouity tugtrtd ... IDd iptoally coiicbtd. Ii'i rJaUcfcm. And It'i till woily dignirtj nounihmcflt,. .a cup of Mara)vn tend* you to bed contented. You dip into tie cp and deep e.'/. It •oothc* sway the ICMICMOTU you get bom or anxiety — v.-u te-1 rrally ftnk neat day. NO NEED TO ADO MILK Oil SU0AR Maralyn %  in Plea A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT BARGAINS BORDERED SPUNS New Sfy/es 20 Shades and Designs $1.44 yd. • SPECIAL REMNANTS In JERSEYS, CREPES, ROMAINEfl and OEOROBTTES In DRESS. SKIRTS, BLOUSE LENGTHS—at Unbeatable Pricei A FEW SPANISH BOOKS • BERLITZ EDITIONS • SELECT EARLY FROM ADVOCATE STATIONERY A Full Range of Ladies. Gent* and Children's UNDERWEAR at Unbeatable Prices tffxx si:io\iPs. BOYS' SHIRTS 2 for 11.00 LADIES VESTS 2 for SI 00 QENTS SOCKS 9 for II 00 MEN'S VESTS 2 for 1100 CHILDREN'S VESTS 3 fOf $1.00 CHILDREN'S PANTIES 2 fr SI 00 and S for SI.00 I THE BARGAIN HOUSE | SO. Swan Street — S. ALTMAN. Proprietor ^ AIR FREIGHT SERVICES to and from Regular Services Save Time From B'dos u BIHMl'IH LISBON LONDON Hln It 15 14.U 1><* In. Fll.ht, w Alaa OeaaacltM gerrlee. U lh bol, v ^f ale^ I! It 1411 •444 ITS'FASTER BY FAR BY SPF.EDBlltD. Book Iftrouoh m>r loeal B.O.A.C. Forwarding Agent who makes no charge for BBBBBBUBBI advice, information or bookT I XI A A I l> &j£5E~* • u rLY'BuAC BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED Airways lluaae.



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TlimsDAV MNIMII H, I'.M II\I:I:\IMIS MINIM MI PACK *l • I N CLASSIFIED ADS. The 'iJifr for ar Birthi. Marriage*. DMUII. Acknowledgmrru, and In M i M fWn noUfM M • %  M wi nH4iji and tl JO o Sunday* Mr any number at wart* up to M. and 3 fee.lt par ward an week-day* and 4 nit in par word oft SundJji (or eaah %  .ddn.c-ial word To. Dlrtka. Marriage or Engagement annriii i-r-itaiiti In C'arib Calling the cnaia* la $310 la* an> numbtr of oi4> up to 3d and t rant* per word for e.efc additional word Term* ca-h Rhone SMI IMKIK VIIIIIIS "-"" charge •) at aa t**e*t-ii V i aad UNN Sb*d b t 1 tog : ..id THANKS FOR HIM "i" 1 """" rha'c* toes* Tl real* *-d' M real* itviiii M taaod a — ova* Ml too-a. a CM, u,^^ wa-n— cw vrord — "lifapl HOUSES AFAKTMKNT CM reraai upetam \.ith *.llcheei and panlty down tut i>undr> Apply -Wei park rte.,1 I VMCM Tl* Lynch family %  > through ) thi* medi..m to than* all thoee who | arnt ui wreath*, card* and letter*, or *a> "P'- Ihcir •vttipalht with na tn ot.r recent bereavement ca.iaed by In* draih of Dorothy Si Matilda* Bo*d. Chun "-a ^vn*h iSoni. Wife and Curacaoi wifa .ind grand childrei Leoiu Lynch idaughtn i grand chi U'noh %  tm. Trinidad • BITKOALOW. Modern aK>4-l0Belaeetiie. fully r.irruahed AvatlabLr rfOP tsan Marco for IS mom hi. at reeannabi rent ,, careful tenant* Ring alas • S 41 -+ "AIRY COT--HrlMon Furnl.hed o iinfurniahed. for a month or longer. For further particular*. Phone MM Mi.. pa.. mean, Dui>crai'g. stratheivd* BLI.91-3n "llOUf* Jaadtaa m %  a.aarT~houaa %  miauej Top Rock, gnfuriuahad. Available unmedialelv on • iaaar.Ua* or 11 month* irjw Koi viewing. Ring apU IN MEMORIAM llaUH—I. win Bm-n. who we* Mi'rrth mt. 'Daar i. the i laid Dear la fade Sweet la lha hop* in which i that never FOR SALE Mialmuwi rho-ee toe** Tl ggaM ad Id mill Amdauf 34 laorda — ot'ar M IIOI*I 1 rrali n m.rd ii*•* — 4 ""atli a word Saadau*. Al TOMOTIVi: CAR Ota C'runtrvnian lli-.l ?J* CAR One Mom* Minor m perfect conulltou ON. •I em mllaa. Apply: A Gnrnr*. r>ln Ville, Jeenmotta Lana. altar 4pm 7 1 M In ic Sl.tn.Uid Vni.g.iard lit goo.1 nlraga 1S.0M Apply F C ,,.! %  %  ,MM CJ1I—3n ELECTRICAL rucT'tu %  UtaDii l.lrt STOVI34 at HOT PI ATI"" in and at* tham. John v T 1.11—dn rxTHir TOASTUIB a ZCTHRIRON'S ELIX-THir UVES TOCK HOUSES 1 v o. OaMtng "Ladvawan iJIm Oackarjack as Sugar Udyi un ramad 7 < %  goldlng iJlm (1krr) %  <" at Princraa Sta!la> Apply: J rowarda. Talaphona . r SSt—t.f n HOrtar <-ha*tiu.i i IT. old by J.t.u, ,.„i .,f n n. Mai* >G|iu;rrp Dim uMia. PriaodaAlp Can ba aarn at Ea. hall ptantatMn. Plurnt HV Ml. By kind pcrmi-aiiofi of th* Strwarda ol tha ETC thla Animal will ba offarcd for %  aha at tha Paddock juit after the J p.m. Race on Saturday 10th March. IPM MULE It J.I K.I in... *.| POt'LTRV 7 While Wyandotte Cockcrrla 1 f*om Importad laying -train Price MM each or avchangc lor value In Corn IVt.ltiN tot eating. Dial 3>M. MISCELLANEOUS WNITt COTTAOr. fXAT rurnlUied or unf hathtng Private E. U. Caanidga. irntahed. Oood ara >aarh. Appiv M' White Cottage. s\ ]. 4,ROOM WITH BOA-I) In If III 111 rendanca on ar* Urge double room and bath alao one ainglr Private aandi baach. r.tentivr ground*, rxcelln.t load Talapnone B3TI n j it in PIIHII Tea real a par apaia SALES Y. M. C. A. TftMR FOB Ulilluv ftr "III .lll\, Tha Board a** Dirarlor. af tha V M C A inNltra Application for Taitvlf The Planand Kprciflratiorai ran h* inapartad .t tit.. Se, I .| J r- Ornr-, VMCA from Tharadar 1.4 Mai.h t.t %  •' %  "• I4ih Marah between th* houra or 10 am and 4 p m dall* aicavt Bundava. Tandara muat ba aubmitted m Baaled Env-alopaa and addraaaed to th* Sacralary of tha Y M C A Plnfotd Straet not l.ter than Moao Mat Mareh. Tendar* aiibmitlad win be Roan! Mealing to be h*!d It The Board do** not bind Ittaff to accept tha hvwaat Tender laMaaff H WlUJAVt. ^ ai, NOHCE PABIBB Or -\i'i %  !... AU. paraona, rirma and Corr-ar.t.o.h-vliNf Arraunu againal tha Pariah .f *? M lch ** 1 %  "*l"ct*d | UMr than %  char Form* lOriflnal ard DupiiI %  bo obtained from Ihl. OrHn nun J AmRV. Churcharardrn'a Clark, rrhwardrn'a Office. rochlal Build Inc., %  rtdgetown I I.O\l IIMM VI \OIIM THE RAKIMIHiS PQLKI Tenders for Irre Stipfily of Green Fudrler | %  ;.lv dail) of 30 lb* of (ireen FotMtc 'om the lprn ad.lrr;aC Port t la rrarutar tha th IM j..-. BM I I M.IMV IPfll. "OMPANV. a corpacati.'.n l the Itair W or buaineaa oddnaaa >. The Gavnn Olih. l'A. Ufa aa>pl>ad for (hi ftaaKter in re^aae.t ai ahamawo BIT. me month rroni Bag f n Mir Miraitlime gtv* raataMI .n diiplr raglaaraoaai The trad* mark ran IK II W1IUAMS AUCTION UNDER n.E IVORY HAMMER By order of lha CnmmlaMoncra of Health. St Michael I will aell on Prida* Murch Pth at the yard of Ihe Vaveiiim* Dapt Church Village. ,|< iu no,!*, Tnirk .Army Typai compietc with pla< fornand In running order Mutt or ao|d Sala illpm TermCaah VINCENT (IKinini Auctioneer At'HIlS l>TONNKR TRICK ll'K MOIII 1 We •rtad by the Im a*U Ihlt Public Auction at tha Generil Ommb.u Oarag*. Halaon Street, al J p M on Friday Mh March. 1M|. JOHN M. HI.AIH1N-. AucUoneer. 13 51—Sn. NOTICE PABI. or .TT JAMIS Applicaoona for thl Poat of Dlaner.%  ar at tha St j m *. nirpe.i. leeaitrd bv the underaigned up i.< Thuradav llth. March From uham all i.tee-..ry information m.iN b, Apyina'.t. mii.t be quallAad Drug. A. w. jonsoy. Rector t Chairman Si Jamea Ve.tr. *J H NOTICE TBE FBI4B OF *T AKDRFW VBBTBV BV-K-BCTION I HEREBY give nolle* thai I hi appointed the Verlrv roo— —— Aimenouae at Belltplainc. where all perron, dut' qiiallfVu ,.... the II,. CI'ITOMg -MI By public auction at the Cuatomn in Thuradav the Mh. al aharp 11 o'clock bribe racea tha following llama veral Carton, of ClgaretMi. On* Haiamock. Tina of Margarine. T.ipawrllcr Parla. One Bateau and D*J' Planka. Emptv Dnuiu, Bara of Soap %  -I -cviral other llama of Intereat. D'ARCY A SCOTT. OONI Auctioneer 13-BI—*t ild Pariah. Mar meet on Monda March mh IWI between ihe hour, c 10 and 11 o'clock m th. elect n Vanrnmn In tha place nf Pair AtAeld Fmter ideceaaedi. Signed C A. Skmnar. Parochial Trea.urer. St AndicN. NOTICE REAL ESTATE U'CtLlri ailu.it...I V Chrlat Ch.u >et of land The horn >d contalna. open ai lawlng and dining breakfaat Dial l. built ot afcMM cloaed lallenea, .omi. throe bad. kitchenette and PARiaB or T. ran ir The VrMry of St Philip hareb. not.r*. tho public thai the facihtle. of the Klur Oeorga V. Memorial Rark can be •entft for dance, amiitrfnenta. etc Applirationa for hire can be arrange" with Ihe Churchwarden Mr f> it Carnrr MCR. Marchfleid. Si Philip P S W BCOTT. Clerk, to thr Ve.trv. St Philip 33*1 The above will be art up for aala a Public Competition at our office In Luca Street. Bridgetown, on Tueaday the llti March 1M1 al 1 p m CARRrNGTON or SEAI.Y Bollrllon 7.3 il S NOTICE PABIBB OF IT. ANDREW Apttllcaimna will be received bv th< iitderaigTied up ti> Saturday March l*t1HI for ihe Poa! of Be-lon of St Simon-t Chirrch M a Salary of It IK PM .„M. C. A. SKINNFJ' \. h %  i l-ROPERTY known aa No. M. Ja reel .landing on LIU aquare feat me. T w'.e,T*' I ^^'te j'.roe. 1 V.Tcei 1 LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICI (lurch and btUeSaf '"r b.nlneia ptem, The appllc*-' In.pec11or any day on application t> I tenant Thlproper*, will be act up for aale Public Coanaad ii l nn at our Ofhc* .So Jumea Street at 1 p m on Friday V March IBM. YTARWOOO K nOYCfc Solicitor. T 1 11an be recelvi toy lha darr ol AMERICAN IlKASaHERS: Mam/ fam om hrai.d. perfed flttlng Bnaa at pop-.Ihe di lar price, regular aa-aaakpra alao etraplea., in arl .ilk. Iaca> and rotlon. white and. tea roar A. and B. Cup* 11 M aVoaw Mr to |1 10 Modem Dr. a. Shoppe. Broad Street I 1 II In OFFCRR will under.tgnrd up March sM for the building* A Calaia .land not Included. ailtiMM on Dover Coatl. Chrlrl Church .he purrhaaer M demoll.h the building* and clear the land within thirty daya from f purchaaa. K E. McKENElE. > Flnnlatlon. St. Michael. jtl'tl fa ANTIUCK FUltNITURE • Call al Ralph Dearda furnlahlng ahowroont. Hardwood Alk-y. Pho ANTIul'ES. which include a variety of Otan, China etc. Cnll | lialph Heard'. Hardwood Allay. AN'llgt'l. CUX'KS At Ralph Beard'* furnlahlng ah.it.room. Hardwooel Alley 1-l.one MR3 SJ.B1—dr. liquor licanae No 440 ol IS01 lo him in reaperi of a board ami • hop atlmhed to Matttmw. Ch Ch for pcrmt r.-Id liqi. Dayrrll II..nil Vl I T Mar MdM I).' To' E A Mil KOp. r*q Bailee HHI.IIII. platrtrt \ O A II MIT',*. N D T. PfJ ereal at a Licn-mi: I Police Court HI-t'iH A on Mood. lha lath day of March IBM ..t II orlock. TAKE NOTICE disco Thai Till: MIOcTI :t %  CAMBLE t OMPAHY. a corporation ,.l BM IliiiMine.tath and Mam Slreet. Cu unall Ohio t'DA liaai>pl>e.t Hf Ihv %  .t a trade n at • in Part "A M Raai'ter in reaped of veretable .Ivorten. ^nd cooklna i.i and will lie entitle, lo regi.ier the .ante after one month from Mh day ol Match 1M1 unleaa wm# peraon ah a II In the meanttmrB. tolled Sta-e. .( A marl. a. .hi* i -de or bualnea. addre.I. The Ow.nne aotloa m nupl.cate 'o me ai m. efTlre of oapoaition ol luch rMBMrattMt The le 'nark am %  a] ijn.-e Dated ihi. :th d.i> nf Mar.h 1101 II WILLIAMS. Heariat.ar of Trade Maika TAKE NOTICE IVORY DUNLOP DOWDING mm & TRADINfi COMPANY LIMITED (CCKTCIN MOS.J SHIPPING NOTICES STUARI & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. FROCTlB/ft •AHI1I IF PIIOCTER A GAMBLE t oMI'ANY. a corporation of the Slat* "I lo. United State, of America, whoae nade or buaineaa -ddiei. The Oa.nit, iMing. Slath and Main Street*. Cine.muni Ohio. U.S.A.. ha. applied for the tatralion of a trade mark to Part -\ el Hr (1 ater m re.pe. %  ol ap and win l>e eiiiitle.1 to reglater the aaitte nflar one month from Ihe Mb oa> n< Mareti IMI unreal aome pera-.n .riBtl in lha meantime give notice in dupli The trade mark can be •i regt.trai < cation at mi office Doled (hi. Tlh da. ol March. 1W1 appllII WILLIAMS. Itegletr.r "< Tra LINK. LIMITED MAN? IINEl M S TONCAHIKii la achadiiled t.. .11 MelWxirtMP February lath. TebruaaBlth. Ihiahane March 7th. living at Barbado* early April. IMI. ha. ample apace for Hard l or en ,int General cargo Cargo accepted on through Bill* .1 I .-.lint mih iiar.iupmant at Tin.-Ufor But -h Guiana Baibndo* Wirdwan t al Leeward lalartda. For further parik.ileM apply — VURNEAS, WITHY A CO LTD.. an. Da COSTA A CO LTD. Tilmilad. Darbadoa, 11 W I B.W.I. cent Date of nailing lo be notified B W I SCH0ONTR OWNTRS ASROCIATIOH WC. Tel 4MI. NEW YOB*. SKBVICt BB "Myken" aaikt tied Fabruary. '• airtvea lUrbadn. Mh March. B.S Saabreeie' Mil. IMh March airivea Berbado. ITIh March NatW OBLFANel RRRVfCC "Nuna" .all. IMh Februat airivea Paibadoa I.i March 'Alcoa Patriot *aili 1th March arrive* Barbados tlrd Match Americon Doctor's DlacovBry StrongtfiBns Blood, Nervn, Body, Memory, Brain, Mucles, and Endoroncp Bettar Than Gland Operotion-. Than to Ihe dlarorar* of an Am-rlrri Doctor. II U now poaalPla for thoae ono feel prematurely Old. Run-down a-d Worn it. m eiprrlence a.aln the thrill nf Toothful Vigour. Ambition, and viiatit. H aniotia. qutrkly bung* a ampin, of tltallti and an aoility to tnjoy to* l"*-• % %  '" Bo lotirrr 1 I* neeeaaary fir r !" to .-if 11 Irom Lou of Vig !" r and Mannood, Weal Memory and Body, Reryouinru. ""f'"' Blood. BleUr Bktn. Dapreaaloii and !• %  .r Sleep. Itialrad you avreiy tak* thia aim;.!' MaM treatment a leday. and you a ill find that TO"' vigoir 1* *;'" %  % % %  ? %  ',: i-r a hat yoar ag'. loo will and that m %  .land artfviiy and*aarra lo... it Shllid Ind reatoird You will find youthful BhT..l..I power in thia diarorerr. whirhji %  tab! pure blood and LleraUy oijkea body flnfl* • • ho II*N* jaed it aar lha Al other in.thod Works In 24 Hours aaaaa aliou-l miraculona It haa cunqui abaUnale caaaa that had denrd nil ol t„.tm-nt 11 t.aa r-ea l^ rora| f pramatur. old age and debility. Il Made older a>*n a* good aa new It SKS 5ro -K,"^;.". 1. kahle diaenrrry I* t •t bringi ir*ul1a unl'kly In 14 ha ,., can .-. ar* %  k tremendoui (01 Ihoal who are aid Ifor. I heir lime. Rundoan, and Warn-oat For tnHanre. Dr T. A Mill, of Canada, rcenlly arote: 'Hot anlr doea thia formula *B< H..-I-. aetltatea tl.a aland %  • %  Un. Thli 1* fnllowrd by renee'der• rgr and ambitieit. n.i tic-jlirit %  ratifying to H..-I-. aetltatea Ha t land -r.lem Thl* I (illowrd by reneeed e If and ambitie rjl.Tl. %  ratify n tn middle or older Bgta %  la known Italian doclor Ir .. O Olannlnl. recently wrote 'T1reg : oul. Frail and Shrunken l,odi- aon 1 ..'.hli.h'd ayataai Buildino li Ihla formula, which aorka Hi 1 CANADIAN srRVK F -IM I MUM I Mi Nara* -f Ship S S All'OA PARTNER' US AIIYIA PEGASUS" P B. "ALCOA PEKNANT" BAUTAJI ABB1M I lan 13rd Maicli u '. Mh March li 1 Urd April 3rd men and om. And_a a.idrlr ''" eSecta upon tha'bliandTdanS. .. Iirer—lmpro*a appetll*. brlagi alrength lo oeak. trium. peoplg.• Guoranio.d To Work* Vl-Tak. are not an aaprrlaMnt. Thl* %  Imiilhoma treatment. •Inch can b# iited aim abiolut* arcrery, la tha preatrUMUm of an Amenaan doetor. 11 la aa.-"-%  ucieaafut and I* |lrln| n.o youtli IK, and en.rgy te mlUlatU la AjBrMI cauae of n. remarkable aorceaa. Vi.Tfaja ara now di.tnbuted by rhemlati hen under a guarantee af taaapk-le aaliifactMn For thr* r-aabii you aliodld not eanenrarnt inabla >i %  .• a hi-h may D* 'adaliea'* 1 •••-, __. atatotog nlt.d 11 To*, to NOHTBROI NO S B. All'OA ItWNANT i. "AirOA PARTNER'' nue March Mh II.0March Blth ajBlbj tot , j„hn 4 llalilna Sail, lo* St Julia A Halifaa Thaa* v*>*el> have limlled pa"*ng< .I ROBCBT THOM LTD. — NEW APPLY:-DA CO8TA CO., YORK AND C.m.F HERVIC'K LTD— < %  ANADIW BBBTKaV r.oved lh*ir aUrllng aorlh by mmioraiaf aoffrrer*. Sot arrguarai l.if oan particular caae Pm Vl. ;i,-:-TV„r.' lur yuuraelf how D and Mara *aet*rou. you 1 feal aith ml. doctar-a praarriptkm. VIToaa murt tr.ng you a new feellna nf eg. tfgy, and Vital It. and be entlr.lv aatliUrlory or yo-i aimply return Ihe empty pada|* aiiaT II GES ROADS, A KM A C O TIINNEIA VAHDS. . TAIIAZO FLOORS I* Vesri I MIC n in i c RulldlRg ii I-.I'I | s.imii hi 1'ROTF.CT THF. 1.1FF OF YOUR BELTS with "FLEXO" BELT IHIESSIX1. Obtalnablr af . CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. rill: HEAD LANE Karbidos Amalrur |{o\iii lvsrtr.al.on UnA x I'I Hh Extf )>i Patronage of i \ thl fliivernor V//AV.V>*/V/V//V////rr RECITAL liiirriiitiiuiiall-filkSiHiiis by Joke A Krlro Wlebenga WEDNESDAY. MARCH 14. illpm. al "WakefleloV" Whllruark Tickets obtainable at "WnkeAeld" ADMISSION A %  FOR SALE CRANE FOUSE' One of the most i-harmingly lituated propertie* of tin* riiinir' in 11. I lai The house haa provad Its ablidHv b) wUlkotandLni pcsl humcanai and contain* 5 largo mi fwlth hot nnr' i !d watei | OUngM, dlBln. room, lame cocktail bv Aith bamboo decor, wlrir hady gnlleriea. gurauo %  crerocms, bnthlng chalet. heavy diewr hghiine -i with Ui There is exlemive iicrcpgp iricludinR a long stn*t< %  U <*clli largo coconut grove, garden-. Bring ihrubs and shadr !^o gracing land. The coaaul views could haidly ic %  — %  Old ..nd tho DBthing is excellent Furi'ici InfonriBl 'he U' agent JOHN M. BLADON A I H.. ( Y A H 4o40 aa> %V "GOOB 1VMWS" tor ASTHMATICS A Now GuoxanlBod Ramedy for lha Rallel ol ASTHMA Thia skilliully blended praparaiion, aaaures you ol immedlala rolial in thia moil diairaaainq diaaoae and IB Iho iwBult oi yoaiB ol inianalvo giudy in Aalhmatic condlhona. Keep a Bottle handy and teliovo youiaoli of the conatant thxaata of Aathmalic aiiacks Retail Prico:—Is/Per Bottle Obtainablo at . BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES Ltd-Broad Street and ALPHA PHARMACY. Hoilina. ELIMINATION BOMS in preparation for Ihe Weat Indian t'lumBlon^hiDa lo b* held iii Trinidad during Ihe l .i-i.-r Week end H fllltll I IM. Hill |~ EACH Mi .lii g Commencing I p IB on MONDAY IZth and TIII'RSDAY ISIh | THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM Come and w Cammie McClenn in action a tain Gilbert Goodman. Lau lenrclltJMr, Torperto Browne and members o ihe Locnl Constabulary. llotittin.il at f ""III ltf.nl Hardwood Alley I4M1J Modern High School (IStt, RINGSIDE f/RING CIRCLE I %  : 3/BLEACHERS i ., 1f 111 aB. % > Ud * Charles Mc Enearney & Co., Ltd



PAGE 1

IfotMft ESTABLISHED 1395 Queuille Will Makej Another Attempt To Form Government PARIS. March ?. I JjENRI <(rKt]IIJ.E—Radic.l—to-day accepted President Viiin-tit Aurinl's Invitation to make another attempt to form France*! fourteenth post-war Cabinet. He had already tried once and had failed. Two other politicians, popular Republican leader. George* Bidaul:,! and Socialist Guy Mollct have also failed. The Presidents approach to Queuille wan made 12 i hours after the National Assembly had rejected Mollet. THURSDAY. MARCH S, 1951 PftlCE : FIVE CENTS Ol It \IIII>S Sugar Rationing Is Unnecessary Says Lord Lyle ttnm Oar Ova t'*nM*d*aii LONDON. March 7 Sugar rationing for Britain it unnecessary. Lord Lyle said today Spiking in London at the Annual General meeting of Tatc and Lyle he told shareholder. thal> there wag two and a half million tons of sugar available for which no dollars were needed Dr. Kdlth Summerskill had stated that Britain's unraliuned requirements were 2.325.000 tons annually. 'Why does the Food Minister hesitate?" asked Lord Lyle. Not because sugar Isnt available. No because it is going to cost us dollars. I strongly suspect that it u largely due to absurd and slumsy financial manoeuvre* with which the planners attempt to hide the rising cost of living". Tn his speech Lord Lyle aJsc referred to the possibilities of the nationalisation of the sugar industry in this country. He said thai with the help of Mr Cube, Tatc and. Lyle had won the first rounc and that the decision to transfer to pubUc ownership the British Sugar Corporation could be taker as an inference that sugar refining had been drop|K>d from the national users' list. The proposed nationalisation ol the already publicly owned suga beet industry was presumably ; sop to the nationalise!*, but Tat arid Lyle would not fear competition with a Stale owned Industry as long as competition was "fair and above board." Export sales of Tate and Lyle last year amounted to 670.000 tons with a total value or 30.000 000 pounds and Involved trade with 55 separate countries. A report showing a gross profit of 3.400.000 pounds was adopted —Reuter. Ships Before j Customs Union! Says Gazette I..., i Cn LONDON. March 7 Plans for a unified West Indies Customs Union are unreal If con vidercd apart from the question of better -ommuDicatiom both between the islands and between the West Indie* and Britain This is the view expressed to-day by the British Expwt GaseUe which has been campaigning vigorously tn this country during the past few months (or improved United Kingdom—Caribbea-i shipping services. The Osaette declares itself wholehearte.il> m favour of the creation of stable and less dependent economy tn the llritisa Caribbean which is the ultimate arm of the proposed Custcm* Union. But it points out that plans for such a Union cannot be considered without the realisation of the broader problem of com mu meat ions. In this respect, it adds. In contrast to the British Government'.* commendable earnestness about the Customs reform; there has been delay and every sign of indifference. %  If rnly the present bustle of activity in the cause of Caribbean Trade were matched by a similar sense of urgency in regard ;o Caribbean communications, then a more hopeful era could certainly be said to be beginning for these potentially resourceful colonies.' FIRE ON BROADWAY NEW YORK, March 7 Two hundred bremen fought seven hour:; in Broadway today to control a tire which may have been started by a careless cigarette smoker. More than 50 firemen were treated for smoke poisoning and minor injuries. The blaze broke out In a sub-basement six storey building occupied by a paper I company.—Eeutcr. EXCHANGE MISSIONS NEW DELHI. March 7 The Indian Government and the Government of Western Ger many have agreed to exchang-.' diplomatic missions at legation level as early as possible, the Indian External Affairs Ministry announced today. India ended her slate of war with Germany on January 1 this > ear.—.tester. St. Lucia Appeals For Assistance I mat Oar Owa fiaMKSaajSMU ST. LUCIA. March 7 Up to 6 p.m. on Tuesday, fire fighters were still rngaged in putting out dying blazes which were likely to prove treacherous later in the night. Administrator J. M. Stow to-day issued an appeal for help, financial and other nature for sufferers who for the most part are of the working class and uninsured It has been decided not to appoint a Fire Relief Committee as was done in 1948, instead the local Red C0os* Branch under the Chairmanship of Mrs. J. M. Stow ll delegated to undertake the relief measure. Two hot meals are being given daily. The timely gift of clothing from the London Red Cross Headquarters is being distributed and the Junior Red Cross link is mailing a house to house collection of children's clothing It was decided to make accommodation for the 1948 victims still housed in the Vigie barracks in some of the unfinished flats in the reconstruction area and to send some of the refugees to Vigte Woolton Hopes For Good Negotiations Between U.K., Argentine LONDON, March 7, Bi Ham's wartime Food Minister Lord Woolton said today he hoped Anglo-Argentine trade negotiations in Buenos Aires would be conducted in an amicable manner. Everyone in Britain was most anxious, he said, that they would result not only in agreement but on affording a basts of continuous satisfactory trading between the two countries. I^ord Woolton, Conservative, _vas speaking In the House of Cuba Produces 6m. Tons Of Sugar THII SPLENDID PICTURE of schooner* in thf Inner Basin U i cauons to-day. picturesque but dependent on the weather minder of West Indian communl Economic Development Is First Responsibility Inspector's House Burnt In Grenada From Our Own CotrpoedFM' riRKNADA. March 7. New acts of lawlessness coloured GienndiiN %  tnke situation last night. The worst Incident of the night was the complete destruction by fire to tne two slo-ey stone building .residence ot D-instai. Cromwell Price Control Inspecto: who since boyhood had lived in the Wohiirn district. The hous: to-day is worth some £3.000. Cromwell was awakened from his sleep around midnight hy the smell of fumes and on rushing to the upper floor to the bed room door saw the lower floor Aflame and only had time to rouse the servant and snatch wildly at .. wardrobe before leaping through a window to the lower shed roof which covered the garage, Hr landed in safety. The Police arriving from St. George'> shortly after helped to save the car. Lost night the watchman*' house at Bclmont Estate was alst destroyed by fire. Yesterday %  rowdy crowd invaded toe Diamond Estate and drove off will the watchman and helped themselves to the provisions. Five mei arrested on unlawful assembly charge on Monday were convicted and sentenced to terms of imprisonment ranging from one month to six months. Gairy yesterday nddressed a gathering of worker at Woodlands Estate in tsM sugar belt and asked them to return today but the answer was that the* may resume on Monday. This afternoon a delegation represent inn [he Chamber of Commerce and Agricultural Association saw Governor Arundell and st ress ed the conomlc plight in the colony as i result of the strike | Of World's Backward Areas SANTIAGO, Chile, March 7. EUGENE BLACK, President of the International Bank for Reconstruction find D< vcioprnvnt. to-day urgfjd that its Internal OlffUiaUUOfal co-ordinate development ol pruL'I jinnies for the worlds b.tekwurd ureas. '\n a speech to the United Nations Economic and Social Council here, he said there was "bewildering multiplicity channels through which backward areas were h.-inj; offered Stum countries are broceadtnsj on purely national basis" he added. "Other* arc acting through variety of Instruments, both naWASHINGTON, D. C. Ample world sugar supplies for 1951 are indicated by current production figures. World output of sugar during the I960—51 crop year is estimated at almost 42.000,000 tons. This contrasts with the 38.000.000 tons produced during the previous crop year The United States will have a supply of 12,000,000 tons available In 1931. according to the I'S Department of Agriculture. Ordinarily the Nation consumes about 8.000.000 torn annually. This amount may be increased during 1961 by as much as 500.000 tons which would be used in the manufacture of alcohol for defense purposes. Comparing the sugar supply prospects about 10 years aeo with the present situation. The Journal sf Oaasssstree of New York City notes that Cuba, one of the largest producers, now has a peak pro•lection of 8.000.000 tons In the early 1940's Cuba was producing half that amount. Lords debate on BriUi supplies. Recalling that he ha conslder-iblr negotiations with the Argentine during the war, Lord Woolton s-ild: "I hope the people and Government of Argentine, looking back over the loi.g and profitable trade that we had between two countries, will hasten to come to an agreement satis. factory to both of us. %  'Trend* of trade move up and down BsirsSfc lmas we have a buyers' market, MjncUmea a sellers market At present the Argentine are in a strong potlUon. Tomorrow will also be a day and I am sure it u in the interesU of both our countries that tor very many tomorrows OB easy form o trade should flow between us." —Heater CHAMPION GETS A STRIPE FROM EVA BUENOS AIRES, March 7 Fireman Delfo Cabrerra. winrer of the Olympic marathon in I^>ndon in 1948 who yesterday won the Pan American Marathoi title, was today promoted to firs Corporal at Eva Peron's request During the ceremony at Police Headquarters, the Chief of the Federal Police. Arturo Bertollc proclaimed a -general pardon foall policemen and firemen guilt; of petty offences — Beater. 38th Parallel tame Still "AcadVmic" Says U.S. Secretary WASHINGTON. March 7. James Webb, L'nitCa States Acting Secretary of State said to-day that the question of the United Nations troop crossing the 38th parallel in Korea was still "metdemic." United Nations forces were not in a position to croN.i the Parallel and it would be unwise 'or him to speculate on their future actions Webb was questioned at length at his Press conference toHtsa on MacArthur 1 statement in Tokvo that existing limitations would in time produce theoretical military stalemate — Reuter. aid." Pmnier Of IVrsia Assassinated TEHERAN, March 7. Persia's Prime Minister. General All Razmara. 49, was assassinated here today. He was shot twice this morning at Soltaneh mosque here for a fanatical member of the Fedaieti Islam religious congregation and died In SI ma Hospital, Teheran, an hour later. Police arrested Ruzmara's assassin, and two accomplices who attempted to commit suicide Their identity was not disclosed. Razmara's assassination ha> caused concern among officials in Uonal and International withou much integration among (hem. The 'very mi.'lllude of voices perhaps urging Inconsistent or inn i-onli .I.IK t bt desirable, land reform Is probably the mOal important because the whole basis of development is the |ai raid—Renter. THREE KILLED IN BOMBER CRASH VIRGINIA. March 7 A B28 bomber from Langiey air force base plunged into the Atlantic late today near an lslani off the Virginian shore killing three men. It was the second fatal cra-h if a bomber from Langley base in less than 24 hours. The other crashed last night near Stanton. Virginia, killing both airmen on board—Heater. Will Help In Fight Against Cancer NEW XOMK March T A 38-year-old Brazilian surgeon Riven few weeks to live. 1. ft hen for home today to raise money to fight the disease which ( % Uuuu him. The surgeon. Dr. Leaureano, i:an expert on cancer A year aaV. (ho completed plans for setting up a diagnosis a nd treatment centre In his home town. Then he discovered he had S malignant form f i.,... self. Hundreds of his patients and friends, many of whom In tr. it him t4fl But specialists at the hospita' told him he had not long to live "few weeks or a month or so at the most" Dr. Leaurea IO said When he avts home to hu 2.'i year-old wife and foui daughter, he plans to use himvel/ as "live propaganda" to rsis-' money for cancer a training tcherre—Keuter Sherman Talks With Italians ROME. March 7. Admiral Forrest Sherman, Unlt| ed Stat-a Chief of Naval Operanferrsd rurc to-day with Italian military Muthorilnand American official S iiarters arc observing complete the talks The Admiral may leave for Athem to-morrow It is learned thai light British naval forces will join Italian warshits in naval and aerial manoeuvres in the Ionian Sea soon. would I*' under the Btmand of the Italian < TTSO Giraldl MacArthur Hints At "Stalemate" In Korea Camilla Clan Impose Price CA'iling* OTTAWA. March ?. Commons gave Government power last night tu impose prks controls. On the heels of the Government reminder that it should not look (or early action. Prune Minister St l-mr.-nt told the Chamber as It adopted the Emergency Powers Bill that Government will not hesllale to use price .eilings Ahen it i-an .litui any ieasonauie ground to believe thev will work He does not want anyone to get the impression, he said, that Government will not Impose controls until the country Is In something approaching all out war. As the debate neared the close prominent Progressive Conservi. tive Donald Fleming (Toronto. Egllngton' stepped away from his Party s line with the statement that he m not one of those urging Government to go rip roatiiiR into controls on that point. His speech disagreed *ith the stand or his leader George Drew who had urged the Government a short time earlier to launch the moat flexible and most eflecUve type of control as a weapon jgiuiul inflation >. Arab Envoy For Morocco CAIRO, March 7 The Arab League intends u> send a special envoy to Morocco to make a Urst hand study o| tondtlions there, the League .Secretary General Assam Pasha announced here today. Tne Sultan of Morocco on 1 French insistence recent) t ill owned the Istlqual Nationalist movement and the French are ah I resslng him to accept admlnl Irative reforms. Anti-French d ministrations have been held • tnong their places tn Cairo. Aletcrndrla. Beirut and Pakistan I*J —Hraler. Fiiianeiul Chief Appointed PARIS, March 7 Uenvral Dwlght D. Eisenhower today nsmed Gullleaume Le Bigot, 34-year old French civilian as Fi%  anclal Chief of the Supremo Headquarters of the Allied Po ers in Europe—SHARK. La Bigot will have the itatui ol Ai-slst an i Chief-of-Starr in the SHAPE -Major Oeneralon -. level with se/en top Staff ap pojntrnenti announced yesterday For the last four years he has Uuded the llnance section of the French Defence Ministry serving as technial adviser to Prcmlei Rene Pleven and Defence Minister Jules Moch. Ills appointment complete* th.i key staff list hi S.H.A.P.E. —Ranter Dissension In Red Indian Party I.ENARES, Northern India. March ?. A series of differences of opinion "inside the Communist Party in India" was reported to-day by Dasgupta. secretary of the Party's Benares district committee. Tolais the first official admission of dissension in the party. He made this statement in denial of a charge by the United Provinces Minister Lai Bahadur Shastrl that t h e Communist Party had decided on a policy (or the 'armed overthrow of the government". He ssld the allegations were "totally slanderous and misleading." Dasgupta did not indicate what the differences were about, but BgsjordifM to unofficial reoorts, Indian Communist leadership is sharply divided on whether to follow a policy of violence and sabotage, or of constitutional methods to achieve the party's WrtCttffSJ —.Tester. (By JULIAN BATES). TOKYO, March 7. UNITED NATIONS troops crossed the Han River at dawn to-day and after three hours cautious advance ran into heavy small arms and mortar Are from concealed Communist posts. Under an eight hundred round a minute gun barrage thoy had stormed across east of Seoul as jet planes strafed and petrol-bombe| Communist strongpoints in the killOne aisault force which crossed **** % %  1 5 miles east ol the capital met fire from self -propel led guns but re ported continued advance and %  aptured 25 prisoners. On their right another task force which crossed at the junction of the Han and Pukan Rivers met stiff resistance but took 44 prisonKoreans Clash With Tokyo Police TOKYO, March 7 Kour thousand Koreans shouting -nli-Ameitcan slogans clashed with 2.000 police In Tokyo today and injured 27 policemen. fifteen Koreans were lniure.1 in the fighting. The Koreans had crowded IBM a school compound for a protest meeting against the recent potter.' ban on distribution of antiAmerican handbills. The meeting closed the school gates on police riot squads, but police called up reinforcement', broke into the compouiul and dispersed Korean* with baton rharges The Kuraans used sticks and stones to hold off the police Muck Koreans involved were lympathbMTs of the North Korean Communist regime, many being members of the "Korean Residents League" broken up by thn Japanese Government last year because It was "against occupuUoi poUay". It was alleged to have a strong alliance with the Japanese C munirt Party Police acted to-day because all meeting* not approved by authorities are considered Illegal —Beater. Morocco Is Calm PARIS, March 7. General Alphonse Juin. French Hrsldcnt General In Morocco, referring here to-day to Egyptian Press reports of disturbances In Morocco said: "Never has Morocco been so calm. If there Is any agitation It in In Cairo and at tho •VMM f the Egyptian people Never have proof* of attachment |o Prance given by the Moslem podtilatloiiB of Murocco been ao numerous or so moving. It La these people who have Judged and condemned the methods of vlore used hr a certain party. —Reuter SIXTY MORE SHIPS LONDON. March 7 Sixty ships are to be brought out of reserve u> serve with the active llntish Fleet this y James Callaghan, Parliamentary .Secretary to the Admiralty said today. He told the Commons they would includetwo destroyer., two frigates, three submarines, eight ocean and sea-going and 22 smaller mine-sweepers, two fast mine layers and •! smsbir craft.—Kealer. CHARLES WINS EZZAatD CHARLES, last i.lht defeated fUSSg Jw IV.Ic.t l on points bl a scheduled fifteen-round bout Prince Rangsit Dies Of Heart Failure BANGKOK. March 7. Prince Rangslt of Chain*t. Regent of Thailand, died here today of heart failure, aged 66. Prince Rangsit, Chairman of the Supreme Council of State and of Council had been In indifferent health for some months. — %  eater QUAKE SHOCK FELT lORHAT. ASSAM. March 7. An earthquake shock as severe as that which devastated large area* of Assam ;J*I August was felt here this morning. It lasted two minute;*, hut there were no reports of damag* — Reater. 5,000 CLERGY IN CHINA VATICAN CITY. March 7. Vatican Radio, eltlrg statistics compiled by a nthglOUS Institute raid there are in China. 3.000 foreign and 2,508 Chinese priests: 2.000 foreign and 4.500 Chinese sisters, and 400 foreign snd 68^ Chinese lay brothers. A Step Forward BONN. March 7 „ We.it German Chancellor Dr Konrad Adenauer, commenting on the revision of the Allied Occupation Statute announced yesterday, said this was "Indisputably another step forward." Asked what changes In the occupation statute he thought most important Adenauer said; "Granting of freedom to set up our own Foreign Offlro and our own Foreign Scrvire are certainly of the aTeatcsl significance", ers Jet planes strafed and petrolbombed the hills beyond the river. Over 80 mile* to the east on the > gtrtnu right flank of Ilk trait, Communists threw more counter-alt ;n kAround Changpyong Chinese troops had hit hard in this, .nu during the night An Eighth Army f rountct offensive action and no major iddilions to our organisation at strength, battle lines cannot fall in lime to reach the point of thi-otetical military stalemate Thereafter oui further advance vould militartl} benefit the enemy more than It would ourselves" He said—Reater. "NO TIME TO SPECULATE" WASHINGTON. March 7 erica believed that a meeting of Big Four Deputies in Paris nffnrditl an opportunity for a erious. cartful BEkd deliberate pproach to the examination or causes and differences betwi-cn Russia nnd the Wr*t, Arling Secretary of State James Webb said to-day. Reporters asked If he was optimistic about the prospects of Deputies agreeing on the agenda for a proposed meeting of their ireign Ministers He rcDlied that as the meeting was still In Its very early stages, It was best not to speculate. —Reuter I TELL TUB ADVOCATE THF NEWC RIND HIS DAT OB NIOUT THE STORY OF BOB AND SALLY Sponsored by the National Baby Welfare Council and the British Social Hygiene Council, is a candid discussion of "an intimate social problem" dealing chiefly with the dangers of adolescent ignorance. While the fictional aspects of this picture certainly have their moral, it is the sheerly documentary aspects which are by far the more revealing and instructional. Shown in the United Kingdom under the title "SHOULD PARENTS TELL". Passed by the Barbados Board of Film Censors for snowing to UNMIXED persons over 16. u Shown at the PLAZA THEATRE BRIDGETOWN FOR THE GOOD THAT IT CAN DO.



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PAGE RIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MARCH 8, Ul B.G. Faces Defeat: 244 Runs Behind BayleyHUs 94: Chritiani 53\ (By O. S COFFIN ) KINGSTON. Jamaica. Hi •3 G. to-day made an unpraMlva start ui 149 runt (oi ,t.t, Qrsl wickcl in ouaal uf tinrequired total of 510 run t the hands of Jamaica. They m 241 rum behind witli thrM taicketi intact when play on Irw < %  trip B.G teal andt i TOPS n i I i:ood nn .' %  19 without loss but tn ... i LsSyiay in hu hlio o( his ten %  B C. made inotl of the chance' t.i keep the Issue open. Free inori wicketa fell foi 13 nan ubborn cilon by Rjl I .1 i.ristiwii gave A littli 'uipc. Another blew for B.G came tlontine hud GhrtattULfl fl the las: hall of thif dbv and B <:, %  • .lay's play with 2M, runs for M\rn wickets. Valentine took aari* piml^iwnl but came back in the second spell to Ctelm nvc for 101 m hlrrmsi M vrr% Theea is little doubt tbatl n n win i>r A %  Ad I-eslte Wight ..prne.l .:n the intajik of 'coring Si I nin or Imping Hi; 'i and up tor mi ..vpid defeat. The wicket wan mill frm iind the pace 'Joodridge and Johnson mng up n good pace with the odd ball occasionally flying %  it&men were comfortable The Brst half hour'n play produced 1? runs Including a clan cover drfW 'or four runs by Bay lev off 'ioo.lri.lcWith the score at 40 Bonitto rested Johnson who had MM down live overs lot but persisted with Good ridge (Who hid bowled S (or 31) in an fibvimis %  (Ion to lot the selectors see more of him. punished Valentine lift tng a half volley liign overhead into the atand for the -.crond six of the tournament, following; tin* up with an extra cover drive for lour rim* sending up 50 In 98 minutes Bayley reached 50 tn 83 minute* with nn on .^kipper Bonitto for two. The xcore wns then 77 Bayley'* .'cor* in-tufted three (ours and one six. Lunch time .saw the score at 83 Ray ley 51 not out, Wight 27 not out. Afler Lunch On re.ump."ori Bayley tun." foured oft! ValanUni with a hook TO the p.ill boundary and an ondrtve Tlie batsmen took the score to 100 In l7 minutes without loss With Mi.score at 117 and Bayley'! individual score at 70, •iled to stump, I'-.ivU -. having 'epped out to Mudle and mls-ed Latei with his score .it 2 Bay lev drove hard i at midon but the latter dropped the catch. But Bayley was dismissed before reaching the coveted century. At 94 he hit aeroM ;i %  tralfnl l>all from Valentine and was bowlod off the pad. Bavley played n useful confident mumps HI iro nunutea. The score Mien HB I 94 One hundred and ..II. want up in 152 minutes. Ptrsaud Joined Wight (411) who ggVC "it easy thancc to Rickards j-otnt off Valentine but leached his individual lifty in 160 minutes. Persaud was never comfortable and completely ;d na l<> Valentine making most ludicrous strokes and was soon stumped for j. The score was 157. 2 5. Christian next man in was shaky to Mudu .md was almost CtUjllt and bowled, then nearly caugnt %  Up Binns also failed to stump him off Valentine at 6. Skipper Bonitto got Jamaica's thahl wicliet when he struck Wight in front and I'mpire Ewari upheld the appeal for 1 h at Score was 181'3/81. Wight hud pTayed a stubborn defrn.-.' innings badly needed by B.C. and ivaa at the wicket for 200 %  ti .. -ix fou s The Radio and Pressbox housed together consld. red that Wight had i ball Tea was taken with BXJ'l score 184'3/61. After i.i Seven inns had been added .ifter the resumption when Thomas via* out to a magnificent one hand catch at stilly mid-mi by Neville Bonitto off Valentine. l*nnie Thomas then partnered Christian! and with two sweeps to the fine leg boundary off Bonitto the 200 mark went up after 228 minutes. But with his score at 14 Thomas slashed at one outside his off stump from Bonitto, edged, and Mudle held a simple rntch The score was 218/5 14. Robert Christian! now well set gave the crowd proof of hi* lU'it class batsmani off drivtnr. Valentine for four runs, then lifting the next hall high overhead out of the xr.iundv fr.i six run-, in ruler ihe %  Neville It.nitlo bfOUgM <>7 L.mi eaten close M the wicket to dismiss nfcWait off Valnow 214/ 8 17 The icore raaebfd 'he 150 mark after 381 minutes of play. Patoii having joined I A pull to the >.,uare leg boundary ^ave Chrisli.n his fl'iy after bemfl ^t the aickal for 128 minutes c'hristlani added three run before Uelng dtanUatatd by Valentine With \< hal proved t.I h V. 1 Crimllani >• (J—irirl* b V*lvniin 9] C II triont.. N li>nilt BOWLING ANAI.VhlS Referees Wantocf THE 1951 Football apanan H near at hand and there b> u grave short age of referees. This fact was emphasised during the last football season when the few referees volunteering were called upon to shoulder the arduous task of taking matches, sometimes three times a week With the 1951 season approachg. the Referees Association are aking a call for those who are Interested in furthering the game to come to the aid of the Association. So grave is the position that It Is doubtful whether the BUM < "d he carried on under prevailing conditions The Referees Association would like all those interested in helpinc with the games tc communicate with Mr. 1, V 11.nris. Hon. Secretary Referees Association c'o Roehuck St Boys' School as soon as possible. F WORRFLL s. KAMADHIN WORRELL, RAMADHIN HEAD THE AVERAGES LONDON. March 7. IRANK YVOKKK1.L and Sonny rUmadhln. the two Wl Indies members of the Commonwealth Cricket Team which sails (or home to-morrow, after another successful lour uf India, had the best hnttint; and howling record-. respectively amonrz Ihe men who played throughout the lour, ltyi It' "it' Worrell, whose aggregate "f 1.902 runs whfl thv highest among the bat&men, played 34 innings (3 not nut) for an average of 61 354, while Ramadhin who senl down nearly 1.300 overs, took the highest total number of wickets, 82 for an average of 19.70 runs. Il W Stephenson. the Somerset wicket keeper, who was one of the players Hown out ti reinforce the team later In the tour, had Ml average of 71 jr 8 innings in 6 of which he was not out. Similarly among the bowlers, Jim Laker (Surrey! who returned home early m December, had a better average than Ramadhin with 15.83 while taking 37 wickets in over 400icvcrs.—Renter. Delinquency Starts At Home IT IS IN the home that one always practically finds the cause of any kind of anti-social behaviour in the Juvenile. the Iaondon Juvenile Courts Magistrate, Mr Basil HeTiC.B.E.. J.P told a big audience at the British Council last night. He was giving a talk on "Methods of combating. juvenile delinquency.' 1 coiiseiously a girl la looking fur a husband from an early agrWheh she goes to the 81ms and, sees the latest "tars, she' cannot help but imitate thalr walk nftd dnria to help her in trnu sub-con scious mnUve Then in some of the filmr. frojn America they tee that (*imU> life is of little value arHt'.lfal* i4* wrong idea to get in a fematftV mind at that early age Tju whole strength of a, nation wan-In the hmnf and it such ideas wore caught on, the heart of nation would be shaken. The probation officers could do a lot to help juvenile delinquent* and he though that tt was better to get more probation offlews or assistants than 'send cnlldrfn into Intltutions. Rest Essential For T.ll. Patient* • From Page S %  *bly too coi h..bil. pushing a bottle of spice %  into a baby's mouth to keep That carelessness war. tucfty resixm*ible for the hiah nortality rate in the fust twe years of life Baa vave a full axplnnaUoo nitfe regard to Die weaning of the child. She sAid that bush teas were dan yerous and should be eliminated from the diet Care should be taken about Ihe child's habits o' eating from the earliest age and It should have regular meals, no eating between meals; fresh whcle;onie food—home-made preler f.Wy; variety of diet; water dr.ok ii L. but not along with the meal, fruit after tnaal; no candy as far as possible; food not too highly swccicmil and within reasonable limits it should be forced to cut. She Mini thai it was unporlan'. that a working class mother gnouln Icam to plan for her family to ensure economy of labour, economy of lime and economy of purse. She stressed the use of goat's milk in preference to cow's milk ts fat content was more con< om|>lon Strikes Best Form For Tour AUCKLAND. March '. ix-ms t -ompion top scorer with 78 and John ltewes 61 not out •ccaplureJ thalr twst form to-day | M C.C in a strong post-| .Ion ui their mutch against Auckland here The MCC onclartd at tea for 298 'oi Bavan Wlekatl t" lead Auckland oy 153 runs on llrsl innings The %  tome side was still 8f runs in arrears at the elo •• <>t ila* ba\ mg Lost two second innings wickets for 67 runs. Compton WU tn sparkling form md olien advanced boldly down the pilch before the bowler had released the ball. He hit eight fours in his dashing innings. Dewes too, hammered the bowling, but was once'munted at deep mid on. Best partnership Of the Innings was the fourth wicket stand of 74 between Compton and David Sheppard who made 35. MIKI ASIl 1ST ISNINOS IK M I I IB1 INMINns I" some easily grown vegetables oi other in the backyard in order to allow the purse to procure some other necessary food. Mothers she said, would be well i rivised to make themselves aci.ualnlcd with: The right type of food; and reasons for the use of each article MI diet, the best and most economical buys; the best, easiest and, quickest method of preparation; the right method of weaning and n hc training their children and the most economical, labour saving %  ftd thriftiest method of manage men*. If those points were observed, Ihe working class mother woule? be able to build for herself, %  healthy and contented life. | One of the things they m Kng. I laqd fail to do. he said, was to reform the home at the same time l^bta ware reforming the child. ^•eskinj; tir-t on 'he luvnniM curu. Mr Henrique* said that the reason for having 4 separate ,-w Ik court is that a child shimld not be made to fed he 1., criminal nor should a chDd get contaminated. Women caji be extremely useful In dealing with children, a nd In England there are women magistrates who assist in the juvenile courts. It is essential that the magistrate watches th r reactions of a child, but here a magistrate has to be writing the evidence all the while In England however, the magistrate has time to concentrate on the child. It is by the change of expresslon, a movement of the hand or such a thing that one can WU whether a child approves of the evidence given. Juvenile courts should not be hold in the same court as the adult. Visiting the prisons here, he said. It horrified him to see that young prisoners wore mixing with the okler ones, it could bring nothing but harm. To-day the whole trend of the arguments was to keep people under the age of 31 from going to prison. A sentence should he made only as a last resort. At the courts. Justice must ba done to the child and the child must feel absolutely at ease. In England the public is not admitted though the Press is and the Press can report the cases so long as they do not mention the name oi* the child or describe the case in such a way that the child can be identified. Pasteurisation Mr. W. A. Aoranams spenkint on "The Hygiene of Food and Foot handling Places" said that hygient %  lood started at its source and continued during production a no uunnfl tne course ot preparation for consumption. He drew illustrations of such foods as bread, milk, meat ano Cases come before the court from say, pranks, to house-breaking and larceny. They do not as a rule bring up cases of swearing. In the extreme where there is a cuse of murder or manslaughter. such cases must be tried in the Upper Court. The regularity of school attendance is extremely important life of every child. If he stayed away from school a chlkt would very probably be getting Into some sort of mischief. When child plays truant from school there is very likely something wrong at home, u t school or with the child. He may not be liked at home or he may be punished at school He may be in D class in which he does not lit in and he may be bored. investigations heve proved that films do not nfTect boys to any noticeable extent. A boy may go the films to get away from home if he it ill-Ueated. Going to the ttlms. however, affects girls. SubThere can be nothing more agonising than for a child to henr his parents quarrelling. To And that where there should be concord and harmony the hardest things are said. Just gets the child desperate But one of the things the West Indies must light against if they are to survive. Mi. Henriques said, is the evil of promiscuous intercourse. It was ao great a problem in the West Indies that one could not even begin to think ot ways and means of getting rid of it, bu* religion and education would help. Srirmifit Massage After strenuous work or play MASSAGE removes fatigue poisons and releases new energy. .Vll.ll W JOHNSON. Mant even in the face of poor home grown vegetables. He p.int feeding and as goats had a natural Immunity to pulmonary tubercu losis. Thrift should be encouraged especially in Ihe attempt to product W.Jil.l *.k .a 1 Csaanuft 1'nkh.. 1. cwi Ha) Can B* n e S> b B rhi Shrwpjnl 1 K*nt D. Clark pews fckiim re c. Dwjw Baraa Wr,M %  Ota) Wti Ut OHl rri H b 4 IS I nb T..UI lor I wku der 1 t.ii %  >| wkU: I—M' l-fli 1-liTs-sar 7-is* new LING O M r art 11 1 n • C 1 IS 1 1 . 1 • M A III MUli Ml INMM. C t<-' 1 Wrlht H.vcr U Tntlr.nl What's on To-day l'. he. f'ourts—in no am Second Day of Barbados Turf Club l!.'i at Oar rlson—I tt pm Mobile Cinema at Mount Tabor School | ulurc. St. .loll 1 Mill p 111 Inter Club Olvli Ion I Table TennU match between Abbey Marines and Y H.P.C—80S pm The Circle Francaiae meeia at Combermere ftrnooi ai 8 15 tonight. The next sitting of the Coarl of Grand Hesalona will be on Monday and the Asahn' Diary na to Wedw*da> I" a follows:— MONDAY No. 36—Rex vs. Lucius Cools No 41—Rex vs. Stanley Hlanlon TUESDAY Nee 32 & S3 Rex vs. Edmond Ash No 38—Rex v>. Alex Davis VMDNrSDW Ne. It)—Rex vs. lesmoiid WoodrofTe No. 12—Rex vs. Ruby Benn No. 16 Rex vs Albert Kl is CINEMAS ed out the dinvrence batweoa clean milk supply and a safe one nd 111,-1 1. -1 that pasteurisation th. Mil I tani uf making clean unlk sale. With regard to the question of ml handling places, he dealt 1h the various aspects of _. .d methods employed bl eorohteUoo with the health of the worfcs in those places. He -aid that legislation should b. enacted In onlftr inai then hould be c<>mpulsory examinn. Ions of people dealing with the ale of food as was done in Jatnaka. He also pointed out where cases of infectious disuses, wuuld BptSKh] through unhealthy food handle and where the question of food I oisoiimg was likely to arise wherpersons were affected with sk and throat infection. Sitaallr %  I I %  .'.1. w D OlatM -l,.l". Ill U lnr.l' —aoa aaa S.SO • The Weather TODAY Sun Rises: 6 16 a.m Hun Hets: 6 11 em. Moon (First Quarter) March 18 Lighting: 6.30 pm High Water: 4 08 am, 4 20 p.m YESTERDAY %  alnfall (Codrlngton) nil Total for Month to Yrster. day: .01 In. Temperature (Max) 81 .••* Temperature (MJn.) 6.5"F Wlad Dlreetlo.i (9 *m.) NE. (3 pm 1 N.NVV. Wind Velocity: 5 mile* aer kenr Barometer t a.m.) .*a. (3 pm) 29.816 NOTICE iiwcivi; acaooL — xsw cLASSta New CUMM ar brlna farmed fnr n*iK.-K>ni. Tap and Mn Rinwm al Oeeyatone rtat. Haalina.. Ch Cl> .Telephone No. XSMl. MIM Rannm will be taking ovor Ihc teaching of the elallng clae. In place ol Ml Molly Badcllffe who ha decided to retire from tha Madam* Hro-no** Hchool of Dancing aa from Ihe end of the ruirenl term. Madame Bromova and the Honorarr Commltteo thank clienu lor their paat patronage and aoUCIt their rontliuied oppoTt. The School It now In progreii of beioa re-organlaad and will It future bo known, aa thai Barbadoa School of Dancing Ltd. LfrlirfsTe Socialist Andtfiefs N Mr. Basil Henriques In addlUon lo Ihe public lertura :. %  : % %  pm on Wedneadny. March 1th. on "Melhoan irf CoiTibating Juvenile Dellnquenty". %  i1. Leadtra a WMt'l %  perlally Imitad U a UI "Youth Work" nl MS pi rrlday. March lih. HORTICULTURAI. EXHIBITION %  f £^^W^. !" o>>> They'll Go It Every Time %  ~-^. By Jimmy Hatlo A MM WITH AMBlTlOJ, GASTRIC VAH &L< TO0< FWE-MINUTE LURCHES • % %  SAMSWiCM MO MiLH %  — (OR ONCE ALL. THE BRASS iS AWAYVKCRE OOIMQ OJtK TO THE DUTCW'-'^S'S ANO PIN ON A REAL FEED>eo Pi>y8oys GO AHEAD ~-Z GOT TOO MUCH TO D0(6ULP> TIME ENOUGH TO REL4X *HeN 1*1 HCAO MAN OP THIS OUTFIT. Wll.l. NOW BE HF.LD ON N.VITItllA*, AIMIII. 2ISI %  —. p.m. Owint; to the recent heavy rains it v.as decided to postpone the Exhibition which was dua to be held in Queen's Park on Saturday, March 17th lo SATURDAY. APRIL 21ST from 1— p.m. The Exhibition Books are now ready and can be obtained from the Secretary, C'o Wilkinson tt Haynes Co., Ltd. FOOTBALL GRENADA TOUR AT KENSINGTON OVAL Monday 13th alar. vs. Carlton Tutsday 13th Mar. , Oolta Tbursday 16th Mar. rs. Eaatrs aaturday 17th Mar vs. Bparun Monday 19th Mar. vs. Colony Admlaaloa SEASON TICKETS — II M Obtainable from Carlton manbors DAILY OEOROE CRALLENOR STAND .. 2/KENSINOTON STAND VOPEN STANDS 1/O ROUNDS ..18. COUGHING [^ UGH MIXTURE New Loveliness For Yon < !" NLIILIH SUP Follmv this Simple Beauty Plan %  SVaah yaM face with rslmolita Soap nrhen.bMaftaeconda. nvauagr wlih rsJmall.a'a aof r, h>*ac) lather. Rlnaei / %  !>• rhkl Mama da> lor II Jayi bf*u>:fimt aaTait' PS. For bath and sho\vr. i.,-t the thrifty Bath Sir.* Palmoliv-e DOCTORS PROVED PALMOLIVE S BEAUTY RESULTS oCitWy and oCoryr on COW & GATE! How happy Baby Is and how healthy —It Is a pleasure to look at him. Buy your Baby, too. a tin of Health and Happiness — TO-DAY! COW&GATESoViS Okn FOOD of ROYAL BABIES CHECK NYLON PLAIDS in Saxe Blue, Orcen and Purple. 3" wide Per Yard $1-M FIGURED RAYON LINGERIE A lovely Fabric In a beautiful assortment of Pattern!.. 36" wide. Each _, 81c. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II, 12. & 13, BROAD STREET BOWRANITE ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT Iran and Steelwork cannad Mrradr beneath a eoai rf IU>V\KANITK Proof acinM heat a>r cold, the rorroalve a'.' albig clllrs, aallspraand sea-water. BOWKANITE tm used by engineers, thinning lines. dVefc authorities, and subtle and Industrial contractors everywhere. YOl MUM III SI IT. TOO Tough. neslWe. yet non-rraeklng. BOWRANITr h made In nunv at*i~artlve thadrs. Stoehad In . Permarenl Green. Red. flrey. B4aek and Super Black (Heat RetUUng) is Un of Imperial Measure. aar 0 Nt GALLON WILL C*OVKR i.aaa SQ. FT "'••"•' • %  %  •'rimPHONE 4.-.i, AGENTS Vi ILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.



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Till RSDAY. MARCH 8, 1*51 BARBADOS ADVOCATE TACE THREE Paper From Bugu&*iLOMDQM The uif already being made In various pail.* of the world of sugar cane bagasse for paper manufacture I* discussed today in a letter from a representative of technical consultants. Middlesex. The writer. Mr. R Ducc, doc* • further time watted on %  invrtiigatlons" into whether bagasse is suitable or not for paper making. He wants "energetic application of what Is already known to actual production of paper". Developments in this S iestion. he said, are far beyond le experimental stage. He goea on— "Fine papers made from 95 per cent bagasse have been produced commercially since 1941 in the Pmuppnes by a company to whom wo are technical consultants That these papers are sold in Manila in OM unprotacted competition with comparablegrade imported American papers would seem to prove beyond doubt the technical and economic soundness of the process. "Further, one of the biggest sugar producers in Brazil has placed a contract with us for the erection of a complete bagasse pulp and fine paper mill, to be the state of Sao Paulo. production if: expected to begin in 1852. We have also specified and shipped the complete pulp mill equipment for a blanched bagasse pulp production of twenty tons per day to Bihar Province, India, and this plant is expected to go Into production very shortly. Another smaller plant is being constructed in South India. "As for the supply of bagasse, sugar mills generally are so designed as to burn the maximum quantity of this material to avoid the embarrassment of stocks accumulating. Bagasse for papermaking can be provided partly by improving the efficiency of the existing steam-raising boilers, and also by using alternative fuel, such as coal "or oil. The yield of high-grade pulp bagasse fully justifies this substitution of an alicrnmive fuel, even though the prices for the latter are relatlvel\ high, especially in view of tie current very high price being fetched by pulp, and Its great scarcity throughout the world. "The use of bagasse for papermaking has special significance for the Cpmmonwealth because of our comparative dependence on the already overtaxed wood supplies of North America and Scandinavia. The only other principal source of suitable wood is Soviet Russia and her satellite*, such as Poland". Trinidad Cor/. Consider Loan Of $12,000,000 i %  <> %  or On I iii>fi''ii PORT-OF-SPAIN. March 5 The Trinidad Government i* considering the raising of a $11.* 000.000 loan as the first step in carrying out the $38,000,000 Five Year Bcoaonk Programme The Financial Secretary, Hon. A R W Robertson said in Port -of -Spa i. the programme was flexible. Government intended working on the programme not adhering to It. The Secretary of State for the Colonies has already given approval to the 1951 estimates which showed a surplus of $65,441 revenue. It is propose d to spend around $15,000,000 on waterworks schemes which have been given first priority. Government is now preparing legislation to provide for the setting up of a Statutory body to administer the Railways Department and it is proposed to spend $850,000 for the purchase of equipment and new buses. SAFE NKW YORK. American Robert Dow ling, chairman of Civil Defence, said that—thanks to the big preponderance of steel and concrete In its buildings—Manhattan "is the safest city in the world" to be in if the balloon goe, up and the atom bomb conies down. False Dream JOHANNESBURG: After dreaming that a fortune was buried in a cemetery near Pietretief. Transvaal, an African went there and opened up a S ave But all he found was the fleton of General J C Kemp. Minister of Agriculture in the first Nationalist Party Cabinet of 1924. The African was Msntenced to four month-.* Imprisonment for desecration. T'DAD. FIRE DEPT. MADE SEPARATE UNIT PORT-OF-SPAIN. The Trinidad legislature yesterday approved a bill amending the Fire Brigade Ordinance divorcing firelighters from the police force and setting up a separate unit. Under the amended legislation. a bystander refusing to help at tires when called upon by Ola Fire Chief, is liable to imprisonment or $120 fine. Policemen now serving in the Fire Department may choose which service they prefer.—C.P. Plague WHAT RUSSIA GOT In helping the Soviet Union defeat Hitler, the United States delivered to Russia moie than 14,700 planes, 7,000 tanks, 52.000 Jeeps. 35.000 motorcycles, 373.000 trucks, 188 naval vessels, and vast quantities of communications equipment, medical supplies, and other war materials. Accident ROME: An Italian army Lieutenant, aged 22. whose arm was cut off In a isr crash in North Italy. walked into a hospital carrying the arm In his hand. When doctors told him they could do nothing about the arm. he answered. "At least you can unstrap my gold wrist watch". ON THE AIR AGE OF MIRACLES? LISBON. A 36-year-old housewife has cured a paralytic by saying 'Get up and walk." She claims to feeling a "special power within her" and has cured also a deaf-mute and a blind boy. The police are Investigating but the woman II poor and has not derived any profit from her cures. DIAMOND FEVER CAPETOWN Diamond fever has gripped the northwestern section of Cape Province with the discovery of diamonds on a farm about $0 miles from here. Interest continues despite a statement by the Department of Mines that the stones are of the industrial type and not found in large quantities. Australia Planning Defence Stockpiled SYDNEY. Fcb The National Security Resources Board is considering stockpiling rubber, bauxite and sulphur fur Australian defence. Rubber is needed chiefly for aircraft and motor vehicle tires. Bauxite is used in making aluminum, and sulphur for making explosives Covernment officials say that federal ministers have already made It clear that rubber is in short supply, and with increased defence commitments the shortage will be more pronounced. American overseas buying has cut down the umount of rubber available to other Importing countries. Bauxite is considered plentiful at the moment. Deposits at the reserves of the Australian Aluminum Commission are estimated at about 8.8O0.000 tons But in (he event of war consumption would increase rapidly. Australia has fairly adequate stocks of sulphur, but with Increased American buying for its own stockpiling needs, officials expect that the National Research Board will Yecommend the establishment of a reserve. Trinidad Forgers Face Idleness eek underwent .HI operat-oi for ihc removal of a live 2 4 in. ]. !" I H W Lm v ho ,nar b mb fr m his XC(1 lhl *" h Hon. A. K. W. Roberstoi who h ^ ,, recently returned from the Units* w „ Wfr „„,,„,,„, ,„ „ wood Kingdom said in an interview that TN opcjaUo,, ts believed to be -pecial precautions a re neing taken mH uc tn Trench Aimy Medical YANO RUSMU l>avis. i*>-year-*d 8*1. s-nee gradu.i'.c %  nrlpmg to track down bubonic plague, one of oldest and most horrible enemies. with the fleas that infest them apparent! even today as British Columbia carry germs of the "black death.* the disease that one* kJBed ., quarter of Europe's population lpSMt there never will be a recurrence of the dread disease on the scale of the great London outbreak in the 17th OawtUf*. Twelve years of research has indicated the plague reservoir u small. People now are cleaner thai those of the Middle Ages and arc less likely to be bitten by UM germ, authorities say. New drugs can combat the disease and doetors today can recognize th-> plague and Isolate cawM ininuxitately to forestall an gpl I %  i tv -llcl the Rodent Plague Survey to II years this group has combed British Columbia's 1*1 population in search of the plague germ No Cause for Alarm They have found thi> first, but refuse to say where Ti | nounead merely that the plague bacteria had been found in the flesh of %  gopher "trapped SC where in the int.'in'i They said this was not a reason for alarm, but indicated the need of caution n nd continued research. The provincial government tOOg over the survey work last year The research group now hi undtf th e Department of Claude R Stonchousc. Chief Sanitary Inspector Ttussell Davis Is th,i man. Most of his testing Is done lit a Kamloopa laboratory i From May to BaptesnbaV bg ItMnl the Interior, trapping rats and shooting gophers He kith the animals with t-v ankle gas. thus Immobiliring then fleas .it the um* time Then he combs the rodents' hair for hno fleas and dissects the body for tissues to bi studied. He has been inoculated ainsl the plague germ "I guess this l one of lasl """' A F,o„c h **, in l*0ffifc-ffl 1 Y like looking for ., iteedta In I haystack."—(C.P.) I. A. L.s Progress In 1950 THK most interesting evt nt of 1950 trom the Company | pngtf ai view was probably th* formation of our associated cempany in the Caribbean The main reason why thai activity" would be chosen ahead of so many others i I ratta :mportance is because II betokened a ma; uf I A Li activities in the Western Hemisphere t/nvion Express Service Unique Aeradio stations at the following locationx have been taken ovei are now being operated by International Aeradio (Caribbean) Limited Palisadoes AirK.rt, Jamaica (aeradio facilities at DSstSsH Hay. the radio navtga•nal beacon at South Calcoa and %  band Cayman will At be provided under terms of l A1. licence with iiu Ja%  luiicm GovOrnfMnt). Atkinwn Field, British Guiana. Seawall Airport. Barbados: CoolldgO Field Antigua; St Kltts. Leeward (Varls Airport. Grenada (the station at Pearls Airport and the town of St. Georges are In process of Wing rebuilt); Bean Field and Vlgie. St Lucia. When the operational reoulrecnts for iht i vices to DomVlneent and Montwrra* have been determined the Company will provide uppropriaU B&Ube id these places as well Pan American ami B.WJ stations in Trinidad and Tobago were tauten oreby LAX lael September and negotiations with tin rtlnlil.iit Government are now n process to determine the patten Bl Mare operations A signal plan based on the recommendations of Ihe It" A.O Regional cotifeiemv in Havana has been drawn up .nd .H operating through the Carlbb Much remains to be done M btini stations up t<> dale. The enlhulaB of I A. (Caribbean) Ltd., led by their General Manager. Ilohert Wilson, have already ade a good start. CiHuidcruMe progress can be recorded in the Eastern Hemisphere too The Installation and maintenance of marine radat qulpnient Is now being undertaken in Singapore and Hong Kong. In view of the anticipated tension of business in these snd other directions an associated .-ompany will shortly be formed n Singapore. over notes printed for use In the proposed scheme for a uniform currency In the Eastern Group of the British Territories. Thin means that Trinidad forgers will most likely go out of "business" Thnotes will be in circulation by June next. us history. TRINIDAD APPOINTS EFFICIENCY EXPERT 300 SUGAR WORKERS STRIKE AT CARONI %  i r.m oaf oOaaraBfegeaatl PORT-OF-SPAIN. March 5 Three hundred Cartinl workers 3.8.' have gone on strike in the sugai —v Stoppage of work started ,,,„. ,,., m caiiptM i February 20. Mr. Horhoy, Comissioner of Labour held talks with *-** !" n ,7. Harbour Log In C-rli>lBay M V SXlt**-M. •*' M...11. in. CIU. S*h CmttiUMl C OUrton J*'" i -niu-e eiisim a. ach A-HI. H y^hi i anbbM. Sch. a...l> *< Hjnrr U WalUcr. 8h. l*dy Nufl-jn. S.ll^idalpiM, S*h HnWrprl-a 8 M V l-e p, c. %  ,,. II DavMS-on, Sth Mat niivf. %"\ CioiaiT.". % %  • IWIqurrn. V IW.f-.m-l, SM-li M.. ... II. .' %  a T. ropMi*! ABJMVAMI • i .,' Ibl-* r~ Cpl Ols it. i iniii. ikiiiiium IrMB. St, PORT-OF-SPAIN. March 5 BERLIN On the air In Berlin this w for the first time was N Tlrmnesa Smert— 'The Free Voice of Hussia." It promised to call the Ukraine u*-d Red Army men ————__ in Germany twice dally ami to __ . _ transmit In German to the Soviet C/aO. HtU JOMirOjM' Zonc __^^—— United States aid to European countries between the end of World War II and 1M7 totalled $11,000,000,000. In the nrst three years of the Marshall Plan. another $11,500,000,000 was spent making a total of 2 1 .times the entire cost of running the U S. Government in 1940 interviewed the Hon. Albert i'""' An "Efficiency Expertin th* <"-" %  MAifter of UbOUT. JJ person of Mr A C Rngfcs of h*e not yet isa*M any decision, cast the United Kingdom has I , %  appointed to the new post of Organising and Methods Ofllcei He will receive a salary of $7,200 per annum. Government i-renlr i the post hoping that the appointment of an "expert" would yield good results in the working nf their departments t" %  l efficiency and to economise where possible. in i\>ii id TurinDov*. %  Tiiii-darl Kidnapped BRUSSELS: A 13-year-old Ukrainian schoolS ri wai kldnappad "">," rurt< tram *r- %  % %  • %  KO and has innee been held in the Soviet Embany In BruaaeU. The Government has over-ruled clalnu. Irom a Catholic refuge.organisation, who brought he. Irom Germany as a displace. S rson, that she was kidnapped >m their care. The rl has been granted permission to return to Russia. U.SHELP FOK KOREA By 1950 United States economic assistance to the Republic of Korea, Including food, fertilisers, raw materials and medical supplies amounted to more than $500,000,0*0. 16 Million Stockholders A total of 16,000,000 Americans own shares of stocks in private business and Industrial corporations In the United States. One automobile company, the General Motors Conn-ration, has 430,000 stockholders. Some uf the Nation's largest companies encourage their employees to become stockholders. Fop example, the Ball Tclr-phi-mCompany, which owns and oi>oratcs 82 per cent, of the 42,3011.000 telephones in the United States, has about 190.000 stockholders among Its employees. Senior Short Story Competition The Evening Advocate invites all school-boys and school girls between the agajj of 12-19 to enter for Us Sealer Short Sterv omaelllloo Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 word* In length and must reach the Short KUry Editor. Advocate n the aeradio and air traffic rontrol equipment side H IKcomparable with the beet In the world. Six of the twelve "oneman" stations supplied to the Hurmese (.ov.-num-nt tor use at. minor airports in the interior 'tavc now been installed. In March 1930 all the Intcni-l *er vices operating in Dunna went over to radio telephony. Apart irom International operators' reinin-ments no W'T air to ground services exist. In the same month long range HF R T was brought into operation on an experimental bag given first-class service. Experimental long-range HF H/T has been brought Into operation in Malta. It Is also being made available at Bahrein The importance of developing the ue Of long-range iff It f -annol be vcr-emphaslsed in view of tho world In air route communications and of the forthcoming operations •r in iv Havtlland "Comet" by B O AC Todromes are Involved ranging uw. The I A I. Telecommunications Adviser In Damascus was joined by two Air Traffic Controllers and a Meteorologist bringing the total of secondments t %  the Syrian Government to four. The aeradio station in Benina Is now I.A.L operated. It It prtbable that the complete management of the airport will eventually be entrusted to I.A.L. The S-oiuiItepresentatlve of I.A L. in Barbados Is Mr. George CarTitle ef Story KITE TIMES APPROACHING WE HAVE HERRING-BONE TWINE BUY N ow!! — Advocate Stationery 4WW)!*>*"" w CAN SUPPLY .... GALVANISED BARBED WIRE NOW AT PRICES THAT CANNOT BE REPEATED • Plantations Ltd. The. FINEST RINSO washes WHITERquicker f AMERICAN BRASSIERES M.IM famous brand* perfnl At1h.it Brass at popular prlrea. Kimil./ Br a ssi e r*, also strapless, Ui art silk, larc and retlon. White and Tra Rese A and K (IPS Zl-'S* Ironi HHc. MOM it \ IHU:SS .%#####; Broad Street Navar be willuiut 8rrubbi Cloydv Ainnvmlathr fanmna hHHarhold helpi m "'illiom wf hqmM Uirouabnul Uw worlfl' It la t*v* p*rf--t -alir-t-ill-i.-r idaal In "ulart ua. baMilahiBS hod) .iiiM In -r hath aft.' riarcoo IVrii)a|>. An.ma4.la InaUrit.r i>-l.ra nrt bllra aiMl *llnii and 1H>. I" •*"* %  ""it of tl-iiD-li<(-naaltip lot aU ho-jM.hi.ld wann" all da-llcsia SCRUB8 S CLOUDY AMMONIA F. B. ARMSTRONG LTD. RHrt-M'town, Barbados. Bill Sol* agents /or Barbadoi. Lecicard ana* Vfiidiro'd Itlenda. For whittr white*—and brighter eoloureds too— use Rinso. You'll be thrilled with the way Rinso'* rich suds make everything ao clean and smart—-so thoroughly—eo gently. For quicker, easier washing UK Rinso every time. RINSO for all your wash! Uttti/OT Mt 1.1 MsWt|