Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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|



ESTABLISHED 1895



Har bados

er eeneeteestensnnnnrseneneen

Fire Leaves 300
Without Homes
$1,500,600 Damage

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. LUCIA, March 6.

"THREE HUNDRED families are homeless and over 150

houses destroyed in a raging million and a half dollar
five-hour fire which broke out in the backyard cf the centre
of a densely populated old Castries between St. Louis Street
north, Chaussee Road east, High Street south, and Etchisel
Street west. The alarm was raised at 8.30 Monday night
and Police fire fighting equipment which was officially an-
nounced last week-end up to required strength, arrived

promptly on the scene but

evident from commencement

only the intervention of Providence could avert a second

major catastrophe in three
was available.

| Ivor N evel

Dies Suddenly |

LONDON, March 6.

Ivor Novello world famous Brit-
ish, actor, author and composer,
died early today.

He was 58. He died of a sudden
attack of thrombosis a few hours
etter he had appeared in his
musical show ‘King’s Rhapsody”
at the Palace Theatre here.

*

Ivor Novello rose to the top in
theatre in three roles actor,
author and composer.

When he was only 17, he wrote
aun The Home Fires Burning”
which became the hit song of the
first world war. Born in Cardiff,
Wales, Novello never married, He
began acting in the provinces but
failed to score on the stage until
1924, when he turned to actor-
manager in London with a thriller
called “The Rat’.

He visited Holiywood early in
his career. In 1935 he started at
Drury Lane Theatre, London and
had an extraordinary run of suc-
cessful musical plays. He also
wrote more than 60 songs,

—Reuter.

Malik Denies
U.S. Allegation

LAKE SUCCESS, Mar. 6

Jacob Malik, Soviet delegate to
the United Nations to-day denied
that Russia had prevented adop-
tion of the proposed internation-
al arms census, Addegetion was
made. on Saturday by Frank
Nash, United States representa-
tive. on the United Nations Com-
mission for conventional arma-
ments.

Nash then said that if the Sb-
viet .Government _ really , wanted
the world to know the facts
about the level of armaments it
would withdraw its opposition to
the . programme approve by a
majority of the General Assembly
for exchange of exact and au-
thentic information concerning
armaments and armed forces,
among member states. Nash said
the proposal for such a census
was vetoed in the Security Coun-
cil by Russia.

Today Malik issued a_ state-
ment through the United Nations
which said: “Allegation of Nasn
that the Soviet Union prevented
adoption of a proposal for sub-
mission by the states on infor-
mation of armaments and armed
forces is groundless.

“In reality the United
as well as other countries of the
Anglo-American bloc rejected
the proposal of the USSR for
submission by the States on in-
formation on armed forces which
was introduc@éd by the represen-
tative of the USSR in the Secur-
ity Council on October 13, 1949

—Reuter.

MacDonald In U.K.

LONDON, March 6,



States



Malcolm Mac Donald British
Commissioner General in Scouth-
east Asia arrived here by air
tonight, d ~

He is here for talks on the Far
Eastern situation with Prime

Minister Attlee.

He had flown here from Singa-
pore with General Sir John Hard-
ing Commander-in-Chief of British
Jand forces in the Far East.

z —Reuter,





years as absolutely no water

' The Reservoir chambers regis-
tered nine and three inches re-
spectively and water was already
turned orf during the day

When the brigade arrived water
pressure was ineffective and re-
course was sought to sea water
which fortunately proved to be the
enly available source.

Flames meanwhile fanned by
strong south easterly breeze leapt
uncontrollably across blocks to
pose a triangular problem for fire
fighters. A central blaze raced
unchecked while civilians and po-
lice fought heroically to save
threatened property at two other
burning points and the fire con-
cious populace sped in all direc-
tions to save their belongings.

Hope was practically abandon-
ed when the fire left town limits
Las began climbing Morne Dudon
Hill,

Control was secured at mid-
night after two outer blazes were
checked by demolition of nearby
aouses. The scene was smoulder-
ing till noon on Tuesday with the
brigade working.

Among those affected are ten
families burnt out in the '48 fire,
the St. Isidore Paupers’ Home
and nearly 30 business houses
foreed to squeeze into that section
after the 1948 fire.



U.S. Will Produce
“Canberra” Jets

WASHINGTON, March 6.

Britain’s Canberra jet bomber
is to be put into production in
the United States for the Air
Force, the Defence Department
announced here to-day.

Current plans call for the Glenn
L. Martin Company of Baltimore,
Maryland to build a “Night In-
truder” version of the twin jet
Canberra under licence from an
English company.

The Canberra flew the Atlantic
in the record time of four hours
40 minutes on February 23. She
flew for inspection by American
aviation experts and was yester-
day flown to Martin's factory.

—Reuter,

Britain, U.S. Lift
’Plane Sale Ban

| NEW YORK, March 6.



Britain and, the United States
are ready to lift a two-year-old
ban on the sale of aircraft to
Yugoslavia according to Washing-
ton and London despatches pub-
!lished in the American Press,

The State Department was re-
ported to have agreed in principle
to end the ban, and to be working
out final details with the British
Foreign Office in London.

Yugoslavs are reported badly in
need of additional planes of all
types at present, officials said.
Marshal Tito’s air force numbered
only a few hundred planes, most
of them obsolete Soviet models
acquired before Yugoslavia broke
with Russia three years ago, they
added.



—Reuter.

DISCUSS GREEK
DEFENCE

ATHENS, March 6.
The Greek Government and
n.ilitary leaders headed by Prime
Minister Sophocles Venizelos dis-
cussed Greece’s defence with
British and American military
missons here today to prepare for
the visit by Admiral* Sherman,
American chief of naval opera-
tions who is due on Thursday for

two days. —Reuter.















latches
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1951
GOING BACK





SOME MEMBERS of the Trinidad Cricket Team as they left the

return home

Seven Named
To Top Jobs In
N.A.P. Command

PARIS, March 6.

Supreme Headquarters Atlantic
powers in Europe S.H.A.P.E,
to-day announced the appointment
as’ Deputy Chief of Staff of
Lieutenant General Maurice Car-
pentier, of France

Other appointments announced
were: Deputy Chief of Staff—
Plans — Air Vice Marshal E, C.
Hudleston, R.A.F.; Assistant Chief
of Staff —- Intelligence Major
General Sir Terence Sydney Airey,
British Army; Assistant Chief of
Staff—Organisation and Training
-—-Major General F, W. Festing,
British Army.

Assistant Chief of Staff—Per-
sonnel and Administration-——Rear
Admiral Feorante Capponi, Ital-
ian navy.

Assistant Chief of Staff—Plans,
Policy . and... Operations—Major
General Pierre Bodet, French air
force.

Assistant Chief of Staff—Lo-



gistics—Major General E. H.
Leavy, United States Army.
General Gruenther, General

Eisenhower's Chief of Staff made
these appo!ntments, It was point-
ed out that these officers would
be concerned primarily with
operations and functions within
the staff structure of S.H.A.P.E

They do not include the ap-

pointment of a Deputy Su-
preme Commander or any
other major operational com-

mander which will come under

Eisenhower.

Final selection of these officers

has not yet been made.

All’. appointments within the
Command will follow the princi-
ple of complete integration of
personnel from 12 participating
nations.

The chief of each of the major
staff divisions named today for
example, will be assisted by a

deputy or assistant of another
nationality -

Carpentier was French Com-
mander in Chief in Indo-China

until December, when his com-
mand was taken over by General
De Lattre De Tassigny. Airey has
been Commander in Chief in the
British American zone in Trieste
since 1948.

Hubleston was on the air staff
planning duties in the Middle
East in the war before he helped
to plan the Sicily campaign,

—Reuter.

2 FIND URANIUM

LUGANO, March 6.

Two French engineers claim to
have found traces of uranium in
the mountains in Switzerland,
Lagao reported here.

The presence .of. uranium in
Italian Switzerland has been ru-
moured for two years.

—Reuter.





GIVING HEALTH TALK



MR. W. A. ABRAMS, Chief Sanitary Inspector, General Board of Health, lecturing on the Hygiene
of Food and food handling places at the Health Officers Conference yesterday.





Guest House for Seawell to



ALLIES RESTORE
SELF CONTROL

To West

Germany

BONN, March 6.

THE ALLIED High Commission to-day conferred new
powers on Bonn Government including the right to build
its own Foreign Office and set up diplomatic relations with

foreign countries

At the same time th

e West German Government}

assured the Allies that it would give them free access to
strategic materials in Germany.



ON THE
*SPOT

LONDON, March.

Vitamin pilis sales are
Searing in Britain today pe-
cause of the tiny 91/3 cent
weekly meat ration,

As a result of the buying
rush, prices of vitamin pills
have been reduced

Prices of two of the mosi
popular pills, containing
vitamins B and C, have been
sloshed from 84 cents to 61
cents for 100 pills.—I.N.S,



Barbados Play For
Tennis Trophy

_ Barbados has drawn Jamaica
in the second reund of the tennis
competition for the Brandon Tro-
phy, which openg at Trinidad on
April 12th.

Trinidad present holders of the
Trophy, will play British Guiana
in the first round, when play starts

on the Tranquillity Court, and
Spalding Tennis balls will be
used ‘

The tournament was held in
British Guiana last year,

M.P. WILL ASK. ABOUT
WEST INDIES

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 6

Mr. James Griffith, Secretary of
State for the Colonies,* will be
asked on Wednesday by Mr. Ber-
nard Braine, Conservative, what
Steps he proposes to take to encour-
age the practical application in the
West Indies of the report on the
industrial utilisation of sugar cane
by-products recently issued by the
Caribbean Commission.

COURT SUMMONS
SUFFRAGETTE CHIEF

o CAIRO, March 6.

Egyptian Suffragette Leader,
Doria Shaffik today received a
summons to appear in court for
leading a women’s march on Par-
liament in defiance of a Govern
ment ban.

Madame Shaffik, President of the
Daughters of the Nile Party, are
liable to a heavy fine and one
year’s imprisonment.

Her Party demands the right t
vote; abolition of polygamy; legal
divorce and equal opportunities
for women. Under Islamic law
a man is allowed four wives at a
time,—Reuter,

LOW RELATIONS

NEW YORK, March 6.
Relations between the United
States and Argentina were at
their lowest points in four years
in the opinion of qualified ob-
servers said a Buenos Aires des-
patch published in the New York

Times today. —Reuter.













The West German Government
jis entitled to set up diplomatic
;missions in all countries except
| those in the eastern bloc and
| three westefn capitals.

They may send “official! agents”
to Paris, London and Washington,

Notification of



the increased
; powers Was made in the “Instru
{ment of Revision” which was pub-
lished today and was to become
effective at midnight tonight. The
Instrument
amendments to
| Statute

Here is a
amendments:

consisted of
the

SIX
Occupation

summary of the

1, The Allies give up ccntrol of
legislation to ensure “non-diserim
nation in trade matters”
where Germany's chligations to
G.A.T.T — general agreement on
Tariffs and taxes are concerned,
end then



except

only until Germany
herself has beccme party to
GA.T.T.
2, Allies give up their total
control over Germany's foreign
affairs.

3. In place of total control over

foreign trade and exchange, the
Allies will now only exercise
powers: }

(a) To meet need of security

(b),To ensure observance by
the Federal Republic of the prin-
ciples of G.A.T.T. until Western
Germany becomes a member

(c) To ensure observances by
the Federal Republic of the prin
ciples and practices of the Inter~-
national Monetary Fund Agree
ment and to control its exchange
rate until the Federal Republic has
become a member of the Fund and
assume Satisfactory obligations
with respect to its exchange rate,

—Reuter,



Adenauer Pleased

BONN, March 6
Dr. Herbert Ditmann high
West German Government official
said today that Chancellor Aden-

auer was deeply satisfied over
the revision of the occupation
statute

He said that the revision was

not a result of negotiations with;

Germans,

He said the Gevernment had
full confidence that the Allies
would carry out the new statute!



in the spirit in which it was made,|
—KReuter, |



Seven Jailed

HELIGOLAND, March 6
A British Court here today sen-



tenced seven Communist youths
;to three months in prisen for
having illegoily entered the Nortn
Sea island of He land

Six of the convicted youths,;



iwho were given one year proba-
tion were released immediately
while the leader of the “invasion”
froup, a Hamburg arts student,
) Hans Peter Goettsche will have to
serve his term. |
Str German police forces
ruarced the courthouse during the
trial —Reuter





(arise






Reds Prepare big

Counter Offensive
In Korea

French Legate |

Sees Pasha

CAIRO, March 6.
Ambassador Couve
Murville today asked to
Egyptian Premier Nahas Pasha
His request was
from Egypt's
towards developments in
Morocco,

Abcdel Krim refugee leader of
the Riff rising in 1920—26 called
on the Egyptian Foreign Minister
to-day -and thanked = him’ for
Egypt’s support fcr the Arab
cause in Morocco,

“Egyptian Foreign Minister Mo-
hammed Salah El Din yesterday
announced that Egypt had called
for the formation of an Arab
League Political Comunittee and
said that the Prime
“greatly concerned” over the situ-

French

Frenct

ation in Morocco. A spokesman |
however |

at the Foreign Office
denied press reports that Egypt
was considering breaking diplo
matie relations with France. There

were several other ways of
handling the Moroccan question
he said, —Reuter



Gairy, Blaize
Set Free
Emergency Ended

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Mareh 6,

This morning Gairy and Blaize
were released by the Governor
who later in the day signed a pro-
clamation declaring the state of
emergency ended. Gairy arrived
from Carrigcou by launch and on
landing had an interview with the
Governor while Blaize was let out
of Richmond Hill prison, An offi-
cial statement says that the Gov-

ernor emphasised to Gairy the
grave effect lawlessness of the
kind has on Grenada, and also
stated that emergency powers

were removed by decision of the
Executive Council yesterday in the
belief that sane counsels would
prevail in establishing a peaceful
atmosphere and enabling negotia~

alighting from a car was received
amid scenes of wild excitement by
small groups who were surprised
by the suddenness of the event.
He gave no addre
repeated hand shakes and smiled
happily, looking well-dressed in
light grey tweeds while walking
down the street surrounded by ad-
mirers

The decision of the Administra-
tion was received with mixed
feelings, particularly in view that
yesterday was a veritable reign of
terror in the parishes of St. An-
drews and St, Patricks where mobs
numbering 80 to 150 indulged in
beating persons and looting. Two
small fires also occurred but were
checked without much damage.

The only fatal incident of the
strike also occurred last night
when Policemen fired on a man at
Mount Pleasant Estate, St. An-
drews who was in‘the act of at-
tacking a watchman with a cut-
lass, the attacker dying later on
the way to hospital.

but accepted







SUPREME SOVIET,
OPENS SESSION

MOSCOW, March 6.

The session of the Supreme
Soviet opened here today with a
meeting of
Union.

This Council is one of two
Houses. The other is the Council!
of Nationalities, The
agenda was adopted

Ratification of the State budget
of the U.S.S.R. for 1951,
tion of law on the defence of peace
Election of the Supreme Court of
the U.S.S.R.

Ratification of decrees of the
Praesidium of the Supreme Soviet
of the U.S.S.R

The meeting then closed,

—Reuter

EUROPEANS LEAVE
BURMA MINES

RANGOON, March 6.
The Burma Government evacu-
ated to-day as safety measures all
Europeans and Anglo-Burmans
working in mines in the outskirts
to Tavoy in eastern Tenasserim.
This followed the murder of
two European miners by Com-

munist insurgents last week,
—Reuter.

60,000 MORE NEEDED

WASHINGTON, March 6.
The Army today called for 60,000
conscripts in May, bringing the
total Army requests to 599,000

the Council of the



since conscription began last year,

‘The call for 60,000 in May is

20,000 under the monthly requests

the Army has made since January,
—Reuter.



Italian Police Find Hidden Arms.

GENOA, March 6
Italian police unearthed four
tons of hidden arms and ammuni-

tion at the electric plant of the
giant Ansaldo works here last
nfynt.

This was the second big arsenal
discovered at the works in three



weeks On February 14
seized 14 tons of arms and
munition



The arms found yesterday in-
cluded 50 cases of ammunition for
machine guns, and rifles, three

machine guns and 24 small cases
of ammunition, ix cases of





American mortar bombs, three
German anti-tank guns, two case
and grenades, assorted spare

parts and several gas masks
Three alle arr dump
Vv earthed Oo he

outskirts of Genoa and at Turin}
while a big arsenal was seized in!
Milan on Sunday
|
{

It was reported at Sassuolo near |

Modena that arms and ammuni-
tion were found in the house of
Mario Debbi described as chief of
the local Communist Party He
was arrested, the report added
—Reuter !

following |

Adop- |

De

see

understood to
attitude

1

Minister was!

ions.
Gairy then later made an ap-
pearance at the Market Square
|
|
|
|
\

|

|
|



|





TOKYO, March 6

UNITED NATIONS patrols met heavy resistance

on the Korean central front to-day as General
Mac Arthur warned that Communists were buiid-
ing up for another big counter offensive. American
patrols fought their way across the Han River and
one entered the outskirts of the battered South

Korean capital Seoul.

But all were forced back after heavy machine
gun-fire. Pilots reported North Korean and Chinese
troop concentrations building up at several places

along the front.

|
|
It Is Hotter
|
The heat of the sun, as it
| is measured on the earth, has
increased a fourth of one
per cent during the last 20
years Although seemingly
small, the increase indicates
enough extra heat to affect
the earth's climate to an
observable degree, reports
the Smithsonian Institution
in Washington, D.C,

The finding was made by
scientists at the Institution's
estrophysical laboratory on
the top of Mount Mon-
tezuma, Chile. They made
mere than 16,000 measure-
ments of the solar constant
since the study began ina
1920, The solar constant is
the number of calories of
heat falling during one sex
ona on a black- cube that
measures one cubic centi-
meter. The cube is assumed
to be at the outer edge of
the earth’s atmosphere, and
| @ppropriate mathematical
| corrections were made lo
support this assumption

Between 1920 and 1930 the
average of 5,820 different
measurements of the solar
constant was 1,9431 calories,
Between 1931 and 1940 the
average Of 5,520 measure-
ments was 1,9463, and be-
tween 1941 and 1948 the
average af 5,004 measure,
ments showed that the value
of the solar constant had
increased to 1.0478

The Institution's findings
arree with other evidence of
climatic changes over the
earth, Studies show that
verious locatities have exne-. |
rienced an increase in their
average temperatures, espec
iclly during the recent past





ap aan sgt ‘eperraeiin fee

CANADA WANTS WOOL

OTTAWA, March 6.
A team of seven Canadian wool
experts will soon be~ scouring
world markets buying up sca
wool for Canada’s’ defence
machine, trade officials disclosed
here —RKeuter,



General MacArthur said that
Communists had been fighting a
delaying action since their failure
to break through United Nations
| tines on the central front. The
; action was a screen for the build-
ing up of nine to 12 fresh or re-
habilitated divisions, the United

Nations Commander said in a
personal communique
His warning was echoed by

Lieutenant General Ridgeway 8th
Army Commander, He said he
could hold any offensive “at the
moment” but the position would
be materially altered if Commun-
ists threw in all their foreés and
additional armies,

An Eighth Army
claimed to-night
Nations ground troops had in-
flicted 3,029 casualties on Com-
munists along the front yesterday.
To-day, American troops ad-
vanced about half a mile east of
Hoengsong ‘Pivot of the United
Nations line Pilots reported
Communist tanks moving towards
Hoengsong.

Small groups of Chinese cavalry
were also seen in the area. A few
miles further east American
troops had te fight off Communist
probing attacks at three points.
Other American troops occupied
Pyongehang about 25 miles south
of the 38th parallel.

A Reuter report from Hong
Kong said that the Hong Kong
rightwing vernacular newspaper
Wah Kiu Po said to-day that
Chinese Communists were mobil-
ising more manpower for Korean

fighting, ad

j Srhe report’Which came from a
correspondent in Taipeh, Formosa,
said that Communists had decided
to call up 250,000 able bodied
youths from the Nation’s fac-
tories and schools for military
training,

spokesman
that United

It sail iuac iwnroughout South
and Central China, 500,000 farm-
ers were being drafted into the
armed forces and added that all
available doctors and@ nurses were
being mobilised for service in
Korea,—Reuter.

| |
TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS

in | RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT





“And lP’vesmoked

them ever since!”
















“What's the real purpose
of the filter tip? I suppose /,
you'll tell me that’s the secret 7
of the exquisite flavour.”’ 4

“No, the flavour, strange
to relate, comes from the

tobacco.” ee
e





There'll never be a beficr cigarette

“You're fun to know, Jimmy.
The last time we came here
it was a new cocktail: this
time it’s my first du Maurier —
and very nice, too.””

“We do our best to
please. I thought you'd
like them, They do
seem to give a cleaner
and a cooler smoke.”

“It’s discovery night, David.
Jimmy’s just introduced me
to my first du Maurier.”’

“You are behind the times.
Nina's been lyrical about
them for years.”

$1. for 50

MADE IN
ENGLAND

du MAURIER

THE EXCLUSIVE FIL

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—



PAGE TWO





Caub Calling

Ss GEORGE SEEL, Head ot
Development and Welfare in
the West Indies left for Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.1.A
He leave Trinidad today for
Jamaica, and it is expected that he
will be away for one week

Back To Trinidad

R. PETER KNOWLES, Mana-

ger of Cannings Groceries in
Point Fortin, Trinidad, who had
been holidaying in Barbados with
his relatives, has returned to
Trinidad. He left over the week-
end by B.W.I.A

With Cable & Wireless
R. GORDON LAMBERT has
gone to Trinidad om q week's

holiday. From there he will fly

to Martinique to stay with friends,

He is due to return to Barbados

on March 22.

Mr. Lambert is with Cable and

Wireless here,

Remaining On
RS. HILDA CAMPBELL of
Trinidad whose husband is
at present in England, is in Bar-
bados with their three children,
They are staying at “Rajnauth”
Worthing. Mrs, Campbell likes
Barbados so much that she has put
her three children to school ‘at
the Ursuline Convent, and she is
remaining on for an extended
holiday,
Hair Raiser
HILE out for a stroll on
Sunday morning “Carib”
dropped into the Empire Theatre
to watch the rehearsal for the
Barbados Dramatic Club’s pro-
duction of “A Murder has been
Arranged”. In spite of the fact
that one of the players has been,
away for the last ten days on his
, honeymoon, it was gratifying to
notice that all the players know

their parts. The setting of this
play is one of the most unusual
ever seen in Barbados and I am

sure that when everyone has seen
this play they will think they have
had their money’s worth in thrills,

It is certainly a hair raising thril-

ler.

Rh R. JOHNNIE de FREITAS,
B.G businessman accom-

panied by his wife who had been

spending a short holiday in

Ba rhados has Teturned to B. G,

BY THE WAY

By Beachcomber

GNORANT, loud-voiced,

splenetic critics of this so-
called Government often say that
there is no co-ordination between
the Ministries. Well, here is an
example of perfect co-ordination,

It was evidently the Ministry ot
Agriculture which gave, the Food
Ministry the idea of buying bad
meat to make into fertiliser. It
is called killing no birds with two
stones, Scientists are busy on a
method of reconverting any fer-
tiliser left over into meat, so
that the finished product could
be tinned and sold to the Argen-
tine for resale to America,
whence it could be sent back to
us In the form of férttiliser,

A Saucer of Beer For

Rustiguzsi
MAINTAIN that to give a cat
a walking-on part in an opera
is a dangerous precedent, It is
taking an unfair advantage of an
Englis: audience, who, the
moment a cat appears, lose all
interest in everything and every-
body else. “Oh, the sweet little
thing !” At Sadler’s Wells the
other night no member of the
audience went ag far as to
clamber on. to the stage with a
saucer of milk. But that was
because the novelty stunned
them. And if anyone started
shoving saucers of milk among
the singers, there would be, from
seme of the more robust singers,
shouts for saucers of beer. This
might not be in the best interests
of art, but it would be in the best
interests of drinking,

Don't Stroke the Boa

Constrictor

MR, DANIEL (sic) is reported

as saying the other day, “I
would like to see big-game
hunters showing more kindness
to lions.” Short of not being big
game hunters any more, I don't
see what they can do — unless
they only hunt the lions a little;
in fun, as it were, using popguns;
and crying pop, pop, as_ they
pretend to fire, or shouting
“Boo!” as they spring out from
behind a tree. I knew a woman
who offered a little bag of acid
drops to a crocodile, “It was sc
hungry,” she said afterwards in
hospital, “that it nearly ate me,
too.”

Mr. Kickett Lashes Out
EAR SIR,

The allowance of 4d. a day
for an ape on the Rock of Gib-
raltar is not much of an adver-
tisement for the British Empire
No wonder foreigners say we are
finished. What must a Spaniard
think when he sees these humil-
iated apes trying to exist on a
eum that wouldn't keep a wart-
hog alive? A Commission should
be set up at once to carry out a
fact-finding. investigation on the
®Spot, and to prepare a report. In
nearby Algeciras the local wits
are already talking about “the
fourpenny apes.” Why does our
Gevernment stand for this?

Yours faithfully,
Kickett, P.LJ., F.D.N

B.G. Businessman



Edgar

BESBSEBEBHeE Eee eee eee
BVew 36 in. EASTER Jootal
BDress Assortment

“ Cordrosa”’
“Invictaray ”

Dial 4606

Slipper Satin,
MAROCAIN,

EVANS & WHITFIELDS



CHRISTINE GORDON —Trinidad’s
Carnival Queen leaves this after-
noon after a five-day visit.

High C and All That

oe S man oj fun, Landy
de Montbrun and his troupe of
entertainers staged another suc-
cessful show at the Barbados
Aquatic Club last night. It was
their farewell performance as |
understand the entire party leave
for Trinidad this afternoon,

Clyde Rivers certainly nas a fine
voice, and June Maingot iS uw tal-
ented young singer. Peter Pitts ex-
presses all that is Trinidad with
nis cdlypsos and hé makes a
good dancing partner for Miss
Maingot, Clifford Corbin and hig
banjo are old stagers both in Bar-
bados and Trinidad.

Landy’s (ladies) voice ¢an still
hit “high C” (with a push) and
his playing of a mouth organ with

$s nose must be seen to be
believed,

All this plus the persona) ap-
pearance of Trinidad’s Carnival
Queen—Christine Gordon and her
Lady in Waiting Dorothy has
made this latest show of Landy’s
one of his best.

From Jamaica
RS. ALICE LYN and her
aughter Joyce of Jamaica
are at present in Barbados on
holiday. They arrived over the
week-end by B.W.I.A. and are
staying at the Marine Hotel,
Mining Engineer
R, AND MkKs. RUSSELL
BRYAN and their two chil-
dren arrived from Venezuela
via Trinidad on Monday morning
by B.W.1.A. to spend two weeks’
holiday staying at the Paradise
Beach Club. Mr. Bryan is a
Mining Engineer with the Orinoco
Mining Co., in Cuidad, Bolivar.



Junior Short Story Competition |;

The Evening Advocate invites
its Junior Short Story Competition.

every Monday in The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery,
can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 306
words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate | 24.
Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesday every week,

NOTE: Stories must not be copied,
Send this coupon with your story,

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Going Home
ETURNING to the West In-
dies, after successfully com-
pleting their studies, are Vernon
Lindo and A. L. G. Henriques,
beth from Jamaica. Vernon, who
served in the RAF during the
Second Wofld War, studied meédi-
cine at the London Hospital and
qualified within five years. Hen-
riques, a civil servant who went
to Britain on study leave, is now
a qualified barrister at law. He
hopes io return to the Govern-

ment Service in Jamaica.



Scout Camp
OLONIAL and Daminion
Scouts from ®0 different

territories will be going to London
in August to attend the London
International Patrol Camp. The
camp will consist of a headquar-
ters and seven area subcamps,
each placed in a manner corre—
sponding with their position
in London and featuring a
wilhouette or model symbol-
ising the locality. A high-
light of the camp will be a visit
to Arsenal stadium, After a tour
behind the scenes it is hoped that
the best eleven Senior Scout
footballers will play a game
against an Arsenal eleven. Scout
groups from Jamaica, the Wind-
ward Islands, Cuba "and British
Guiana have already signified
that they will attend the camp.

Gifts For Boys’ Club

NGLISH cricketers, mostly
connected with the Surrey
Club, have contributed funds for
the provision of cricket equip—
ment for dispatch to poor boys’
clubs in British Guiana and Bar-
bados. This is the second year in
succession that boys’ clubs in the
West Indies have benefited by
such gifts. Last year, equipment
was sent to Jamaica and Trini-
dad. The gifts, including bats,
pads, stumps, ete. were dispatch—
ed last week by the Social Ser-
vices Department of the Colonial
Office and are being carried free
of charge by arrangement with
the Harrison Line Company on
board the s.s. Statesman. This
ship is due to arrive in Barbados
on or about March 18th,

Butlin Dea!

"here latest Billy (“Bahamas’’)
Butlin deal was the sale of
his Juxury London mansion in
Bishop’s Avenue, near Hampstead
Heath. It has been sold for
£45,000. That, of course, includes
fixtures and fittings. Several
months ago, Mr Butlin decided
that he no longer needed the
house built with palatial nursery
quarters, as his children were all
away at school. Originally the
firm negotiating the sale asked
£55,000 for it, but it stuck on the
market,

all children under 12 to enter for
The best story will be published

The stories



“THE GUN

A
“THE MEN BEE

Sten MCHALLY

with MILLARD MITCHELL: !

JAMES STEWART





See as

an Belndes Joy CF

MAC’ADAM,

IN A_ 1,000”

ND
1IND THE GUN”



BULL BT DRUNK DAN

UURYEA as WACO JOHNNY THE BANDIT, STEPHEN McNALLY

as DUTCHIE THE RENEGADE, SI
took her man,
OPENING FRIDAY 9TH,

iELLY WINTERS as LOLA. A Gun

and gave her another.
5.00 AND 8.30 and continuing indefinitely

GLOBE THEATRE

Lystav,

fine draping

Printed rayon — white grounds

White
NEW

(at

in’ 5

Lombia,
Tobralco

Whitfields}

SHADES.

Robia

Just arrived

corded crepe

Dial 4220

,j|of their receipts “frozen” by the

:
!
|

{

B

B.B.C. Radiw Aes

WEDN AY, MARCH 1951
6.6 19.06 M

an 12.15 p.m 9.36
6.90 ne Music Goes Round, 7.00
am 3, 7.10 a.m. News Analysis,
7.15 a ‘om the Editorials, 7.25 a.m

Programme Parade, 7.20 ar Red Letter









Day, 7.45 a.m. How to go to the Theatre,
8.25 an Inte rlude, 8.30 a.m. Work and
Wor ship f 2m. Britain and America
9.00 a.m. T Vews, 9.10 a.m. Home News
from Brita 15 a.m. Close Down, 11.5
o.m. Progra © Parade, 11.25 am. Listen.
ers’ Choice, 1145 aim, Statement of
Account, 12.06 ‘noon) The News, 12.3
p.m, News Analysis 12.15 p.m. Clos
Down
4.15-—64.00 p.m, W716 M.

4 13 p.m Souvenirs of “Mus sic, 5.00 p.m.

Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m, Moura
Lluympany, 545 pm. Ronnie Ronalde,
6.00 p.m, Monia_ Liter Quartet.
6.00—7.15 p.m, 26.04 M. & 31.42 M.







6.15 p.m, From the Thifa Programme.
€.35 p.m. Interlude, 6.45 p.m, Programme
Parade, 700 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m
News Aniysis, 7.15 p.m. The Artist and
the Community,

1458.00 pom. SL32 & 4845 M.

6.00 pm, Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m.
Books to Pead, 8.30 p.m. Film Review,
8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week, 9.00
p.m; Statement of Account, 9.15 p.m.
Gerna Gilmour, 9.30 p.m. Tip Top Tunes,
10.00 p.m, The News, 10.10 p.m. From
the Editorials, 10.15 p.m, Fine Goings
On, 10.45 p.m. Mid Week Talk, 11.00 p.m.
From the Third Programme.

New Zealand
Goes Woolly

AUCKLAND, N.Z., Feb.

The amazing spurt in wool
prices this season produced some
remarkable anomalies in New
Zealand farming practice.

Since the wool crop has turned
to gold newspapers are recording
many sidelights. At present there
are more than 15 sheep to every
person in New Zealand, and the
proportion will rise higher if wool
pricés stay at their present level.

Farmers now are getting more
for “crutchings,” the poorer lines
that once could hardly be given
away ,than they got only one or
two seasons ago for the finest
fleece wools.

Small boys





are occasionally

wool trucks.

Sales in Auckland alone this |
year have totalled about £12,000,-
with more to come. Wool
however have one-third

000
farmers



an anti-inflation |

government ‘as
freed at

measuré, to be
future time.

One result of the boom is a de-
cline in receipts of lambs at stock-
yards. Farmers are keeping thém
as long as possible to grow more
wool.

some



+ Any ideas, no! (8)

- Companion of the Bath. (6)

- Copy. (3)

Sor sensed nowadays, at Wembley,

ere you have a ghost. (8)
. Fancy it's in Ba ee ehusn, (4)
Let in here ‘ drinking glasses,
(4) Day of rest. (7)
Inches on the tia (5)
The age of veracity, (3)
sane, & hy, agaiaas poetry.

Enlarge in discourse. (9)

Down

. The little devil leads the Home
Secretary to obstruction. (6)
Obviously no full side, any pupil
will tell you. (5)
The lions are cut up! (5)
Such a cellar is no use under-
Seong, (4)

t that Shah’s pipe into good
order. (9)
- It stops mines working. (8)
Takes @ wild ass to smash an
orange like this. (6)
Must be enthusiastic to become
one. (é
. Sort of country that has recently
seen skating. (3)

you win singles by getting

them? (4)

making £200 or more a week by | ¥
sale of wool scraps, collected from | %
fenees, trees and scrapings of | ¥

serge gaa
oe SPS Bree

(6)

oF SF

e ene

te Cleansing. Material, (4)
f Allowance of sorts, (4)
s UiSseoly Position to be pu. im.
3) 21. Eegs, (3)

Pah of vesterday's
‘ eC

ieztc Nerose: f

- Ibex, O. Rut: 10. &
‘Dance
Aer

TS. Diet ¢



=




AN



THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

COTTON











CROSSWORD 3

ARBADOS ADVOCATE







WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1951

————t

-MPIRE

Last Two Shows Today
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.











———

|
AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only) |
MATINEE : TO-DAY AT 5.00 P.M.
TONIGHT AND TOMORROW NIGHT AT 8.30
“CARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA” in Technicolor

Starring :
» VERA-ELLEN ;«» CESAR ROMERO
CELESTE HOLM





ROYAL

Last Two Shows Today
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.

Eagle Lion Double

Farewell to Yesterday “MEN”

DICK HAYMES

ALONG WITH THE SHORT and



Also : The Technicolor Short “JAMAICA”
The Magnetic: Tide, Tide “THE COBRA STRIKES”
PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) Pe ej lh eR a
TO-DAY & TO-MORROW (Only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. ROXY aia alia
STANWYCK ron NO MAN OF HER OWN % and AAAER
A PARAMOUNT THRILLING DRAMA! Richard F’ E

|
Leo GORCEY & the BOWERY BOYS in





Last Two Shows Todiy
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.









To-Morrow 1.20 p.m. (Monogram)



OLYMPIC

Last Two Shews Today

By Special Request
FRIDAY 9th 2.30 p,
Ingrid penn Bing ‘CROSBY

“BELLS OF ST. MARY'S”

“MR. HEX” and
“DEATH VALLEY RANGERS”
Ken MAYNARD — Hoot GIBSON

PLAZA Theatre=OISTIN (DIAL 8404)

Republic Smashing Double





John Wayne and John Carroll



in 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.
LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. (RKO Radio Double) Republic Whole Serial
tae ea “FLYING TIGERS” aa
NEVADA & THUNDER MOUNTAIN GHOST OF ZORR
Robert Mitchum Tim Holt and starring
TO-MORROW (Only) 5 & 830 (RKO) MIDNITE 10th (Monogram) ss ; it Clayton MOORE
FAIRBANKS, Jnr. Mormana| ““aonts ACLEY" and “FIGHTING SEABEES Pamela BLAKE
“SINBAD the SAILOR” “BLACK MIDNIGHT a
Color by Technicolor Roddy McDowall Lynne Thomas with Roy BARCROFT
John Wayne and Dennis and
O’Keefe George J. LEWIS

GANTET WY—(rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 8.30 pm. (Monogram Double

RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL & DEATH VALLEY RANGERS

with Tom KEENE Ken MAYNARD — Hoot GIBSON





WARNING !II
POSITIVELY NO CHILDREN



Opening FRIDAY 8.30 (RKO) MIDNITE SAT. 19 (RRO) ALLOWED!
‘With Joh WAYNE FAIRBANKS. Jit. RA in Age Limit 16 YEARS and over!
+ and “SINBAD the sArLon
Anthony QUINN Color by Me nalcetee | 2
LOOP OPE LAE POE PLP SF EF EFF SP TOES



To-night



CLUB MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio
with a world-wide reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
Entertainment

throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations

onty $5.76. racu.

ITEM YOU HAVE BEEN WAITING

9. POPP SSSSPPSO POD SOSOD IO OTF GOSS

FACTS/

Sorry...

SHOWN TO
SEPARATE
AUDIENCES
ONLY!

GLOBE THEATRE

TO-NITE = Presents = TO-NITE

LADIES NITE

FEATURING:

The Ist ALL GIRLS Talent Show

“WHO DO YOU KNOW IN HEAVEN”
“TLL GET BY.”










PUTTS Ce NA RA
of hygiene...if parts of
it shock you, remember
it is based on facts!



WOMEN
and girls 16
years & over

Gloria Ashby singing




Anita Small

”










Gloria Bentham %, “IF YOU WERE THE ONLY BOY” , 4.45 P.M.
Lucille Craig =, | “THE TENNESSE WALTZ” Ve Ae making iT
Betty Taylor ,, “MY FOOLISH HEART” : p ae
Leotta Best ,, | “GOODNITE WHEREVER YOU ARE” ae of mae _ a
ULC Cade me
GUEST STAR eile ae hehe WI | yoors& over
TCM CR uCtam | 9.30 P.M.

THE LIL’ MAN WITH THE HORN

LEROY ALLEYNE—8 year old Trumpeter Playing SOCIAL GUIDANCE ENTERPRISES

“THE STORY OF



Bop, Goes My Heart, Our Very Own, Cricket Lovely Cricket,
Chatanooga Shoe Shine

SPECIAL ADMISSION PRICES

Ladies will be admitted to House Section TONITE for 1/- and to
Balcony for 30c. Free lovely balloons from Chase’s store will be
given away to the FIRST 500 LADIES

many young fi

are physically
wrecked by not
dealing with the
Lame LAD a



KN AGREEMENT |
THAT THIS FILM AND ’
SHOULD BE
SHOWN ARE...
B’dos Board of |

USUAL ADMISSION PRICES FOR GENTS

PICTURE 5 & 8.30 P.M. TO-DAY

Film Censors
Director of
Medical Services
Doctors and
others, too
numerous to
mention !

ALL-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST!

PLAYING FROM FRIDAY 9TH



REGULAR Women—4.45 p.m.

PLAZA \Men - 8.30 p.m.

_. PRICES

MURRAY’S
MILK
STOUT

THE STOUTEST OF ALL
STRENGTHENING
TO THE LAST DROP

e
| Recommended by the Faculty

P
i
A
i
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and continuing Daily.













visit







—————$—$—$—$——_——— ee)

©
FRESH STOCKS ARRIVED
RECENTLY






FOR,



MANNING & CO... LTD. = Agents













WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7,

1951



His Excellency Praises
Barbados’ Health Statistics To Late M.C.P.

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor opening the Health
Officers’ Conference at Queen’s Park House yesterday morn-
ing said that part of the task of health officers is to create
in the minds of the community the correct attitude towards

positive health.

The conference has been organ-
ised by the Director of Medical
Services, Dr. J. P. O'Mahony,
in co-operation with the Univer-
sity College of the West Indies
(Extra Mural Department), and
is being attended by health
officers from all over the island,

The Governor was welcomed
by Dr. H. G. Cummins, M.C.P.
DY. O’Mahony made the opening
address on “Attitudes”.

Among thiose present was Mr.
Aubrey Douglas-Smith, Resident
Tutor of the Extra-Mural Depart-
ment of the University College of
the West Indies.

The Governor said:

It gives me great pleasure to
welcome the delegates to this
Conference of Public Health
Officers, particularly as it is the
first to be held in Barbaclos, but
mainly because it gives me an
opp?rtunity to pay a tribute to the
humanitarian work you are doing
in this island.

Your task, whether you be
officers of Government or Vesiry
or members of other professions
is to prevent sickness and disease
rather than to cure it—in fact, to
give us the conditions that we
need for healthy living. I need
hardly stress how much better it
is to prevent than to cure.

Essentials

Clinics and hospitals are essen-
tial institutions, but the neeu for
them would be much moderated
if the major causes of bad health
could be removed. That is your
job—to guide us in the methods of
prevention of disease.

Bad housing is one jof the major
causes of bad health. It leads not
enly to insanitary over-crowding,
but also to family rows, mental
stress and to illness that should
never have occurred,

Concerning the hygiene of food,
the needs of the maternity and
child welfare services, the collec-
tion and disposal of refuse there
is no organisation more qualified
than yours to give a lead to public
opinion.

These, and all the other qount-
less other questions of health and
hygiene in both town and eountry
are the very foundation of civil-
ised life. Science makes its great
discoveries; it is for you to
apply them. Thousands of lives
depend on your work. But in addi-
tion to your scientific and techni-
cal knowledge, you are required to
possess the aptitude of a psychol-
ogist. You must create in the
minds of the community the cor-
rect attitude to positive health. In
fact, “health” must be presented
as something beautiful and desir-
able for its own sake; and when
all is said and done, what can be
more beautiful or more important
both to the individual and to the
community than a healthy mind
in a healthy body,

_ Some of you may feel that pro-
givess towards thi§ goal is top slow,
but do remember that the things
that are worth doing for your
fellow man—in his thinking and
in his living—cannot be achieved
by short cuts. It needs sustained
hard work, but if you study the
health statistics of Barbados of
the past twenty years you can be
proud of your achievements and
inspired to continue your vocation
of service in the prevention of
disease.

Common Objective

Dr. O’Mahony associated him-
self with the Governor in welcom-
ing those present (on what he
called a pioneer occasion. They
had come together—health officers
of every type—to discuss common
problems, arrive at conclusions
and develop attitudes.

They were not to think of what
he was saying as a lecture, They
were met together in a conference



=| - =

in which there was to be free dis-
cussion in which everyone was
invited to express his opinion on
any problem that was being dis-
cussed. That in itself was another
attitude—the attitude of Free Dis-
cussion,

Why were they there. Dr.
O’Mahony asked. That led to
another attitude—the Common
Objective—and the common ob-
jective was the prevention 9;

disease and the promotion
heaith.
Many of them worked for

Parochial Bodies, but if they look-
ed at their work from the limited
parcchial point of view, it would
not be as inspiring as if they con-
sidered it from the point of view
of the common objective. They
should develop the national out-
look, It was only in that way that
the island would get what it
wanted when it was ready for it,
as far as public health was con-
cerned.

He was not belittling parochial
public health, but his point was
that the parochial attitude did not
lead to as high a degree of morale
as the national attitude. So morale
was another of the attitudes with
which he was dealing. Morale was
“an awareness of the common
cbjective, and the energy by
which that common objective
was served,

Store Opened On
Sunday: Fined £2

A fine of £2 with two shillings
costs in 14 days or one month's
imprisonment was imposed on
Radhakishen A. Thani of the firm
of Thani Bros, after he was found
guilty of having the Thani Bros.
store at Prince William Henry
Street opened for i on
Sunday, February 11, the day that
the tourist boat Nieuw Aimster-
dam was in port.

Before imposing the fine, Mr.
G. B. Griffith, “ae
of District “A”, told , “Be-
cause the tourist ship was in you
took a chance, but you have got
caught.” He did not however
impose the maximum fine,

Cpl, Kenneth Murphy, who
made out the charge against
Thani, said that at about 10.30
a.m. on Sunday, February 11, he
was on special duty. He was
detailed to look for anyone com-
mitting a shop offence. He was
instructed that no business prem-
ises had had permission to open
on re day.



entered the premises of
Thani Bros, at Prince William
Henry Street and saw seven
tourists inside. The main door of
the store was open. He was
accompanied by P.C. Hurdle.

Radhakishen Thani was behind
one counter veggies J scarves,
jewellery and other articles to the

wrists. Behind another counter
was a_ second Indian who was
offering another group of tourists
caps and other items,

Murphy asked the tourists to
leave and instructed Thani to
close immediately. He returned
sometime later and found the
main door still open. On in-
structions received he reported
Thani.

P.C. Hurdle corroborated Cpl.
Murphy’s story and added that he
actually saw Radhakishen .Thani
reaching out for jewellery to hand
to the tourists.

In defence Thani said that he
opened the store on holidays and
every Sunday. and Thursday for
the purpose of private business.

His nephews and himself saw
after correspondence at these
periods,

He said that the tourists forced
their way into the store and he
could not push them out,




—~_. TOMA

Wa.



Tribute Paid

The House of Assembly yesterday
recorded its sympathy at the death
of Mr. D. A. Foster, M.C.P.,
late Junior member for St. An-
drew. The resolution which re-
cords the sympathy will be com-
municated to Mr. Foster's family.

Mr, Adams (L) who moved the
passing of the Resolution said
that it was at all times a solemn
duty to refer to the death of
friends or acquaintances. It be-
eame all the more solemn when
as in their case, it was the death
of a political and personal friend,
the death of a member of the
House of Assembly who was on
the Government's side.

It had always been to their
credit in Barbados, that although
their local government was antici-
pating revision, faithful Barba-
dians had always been found in
every parish to take an active,

honest and thorough interest in
the affairs of their particular
parishes.

It had fallen to the lot of few
of them for more than a quarter
of a century, as in Mr. Foster’s
case, to be a member of the Vestry
and thi to have aided in
watching over the interest and
improving the position, as one

might say, to his immediate
n in

Like all human beings he had
had things said against him,
Everything that was said against
him was in the direction of his
energy rather than his lassitude.

Energetic, Loyal

He was not only energetic in
his duties and loyal, but he was
present at the House of Assembly
at 12 o’clock although he had to
pemend from the other end of the

They would miss him, not only
ithe members of his party, but all
the members of the House, as an
interesting figure of a man of good
humour, of sense of his responsi-
bility, a family man, a man of the
community and a man of the House
of Assembly.

It was difficult to get him ruf-
fled. He was a good man, a good
father, a good husband and a
good politician.

Mr, Gill (E) Senior Member for
St. Andrew said that two weeks
ago when he last saw the then Jun-
jor member for St. Andrew, he
was in robust health and he did not
think that he would have passed to
the great beyond so soon, He had
known My. Foster from his (Mr.
Gill’s) childhood and had always
found him a man to be respected.
In him, the parish ang Barbados
had lost a loyal man.

Mr. Smith (L) recalled how Mr.
Foster had always been accused of
‘trying to do too much, but Mr.
Foster was of that noble nature
and he could not help it. He was
responsible for many improve-
ments in his parish and in him
fhe community had lost qa great
man. _

Mr. Wilkinson
although Mr. Foster was not a
member of the party to which he
‘belonged, he was a man respected
by e y in the House of}
Assembly. is death was a preaf
loss not only to the parish of St.

, but to the island as a

(E) said that

whole.

S.P.C.A. Starts
Mobile Clinic

A donation from the Sirming-
ham Branch of the R.S.P.C.A. has
made it possible for the local
§.P.C.A. to start a Mobile Clinic.
Every Tuesday and Thursday
morning between 11 o’clock and
noon the Chief Inspector treats
the eyes of draft animals resting
under the trees at the Pier Head.
The eyes are bathed with boracic
solution and treated with a special
ointment where necessary.

One man remarked that the



§.P.C.A. should also provide oats
for thé mules and donkeys!









BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ii
Sold Adulterated
° ye
Milk: Fined 407-
ORIS PETERS of Fairfiek
Cross Road, Eagle Hall, St
Michael, was yesterday fined 40
in 1¢ days with an aiternative of
one month's imprisonment by Mr.
H. A. Talma, City Police Magis-
trate, when she was found guilty
of selling adulterated milk to L. F.
Harris, Sampling Officer, along
Grazettes Road on January 28.
The milk contained 15.3 per
cent water, ;
"BUS CONDUCTOR, Oswaki
Boyce, was yesterday fined
12/- by Mr. G. B. Griffith after he
was found guilty of carrying pas-
sengers in excess.
FIRE at Carrington’s Village,
St. John, at about 8.30 p.m.
on Monday burnt a quantity of
ripe canes belonging te James
Gittens of the same address. They
were not insured.
INOTYPISTS of the Advocate
met at the Press Club on
Sunday afternoon to say goodbye
to a member of their craft, Mr.
Ralph Headley, who leaves the
island during the week to take up
an appointment with the Veice of
St. Lucia.
‘PRE RIGHT REAR FENDER
of motor car M—1704, owned
by Vernon Thorpe of Britton’s Hill
and driven by Douglas S. Proud-
foot of Flat No. 4, St. Lawrence,
was damaged when the car was
volved in an accident with motor
lorry M—873 along Parry Street,
City, at about 4 o'clock yesterday

The lorry is owned by M. L.
Harrison of Fontabelle and was
being driven by Densil Grecia of
Cambridge, St. Joseph

New Gasoline

Station Opened
In St, Peter

A gasoline and service station at
Road View, St. Peter, owned by
Mr. J. D., Douglas of Country
Road, St. Michael, was opened
officially on Monday evening to
motorists.

Mr, K. N. R. Husbands, Speaker
of the House of Assembly, opened
the function and the Rev. Frank
Lawrence blessed the new station
Mr, Bobby Edghill, Director of
Messrs Hanschell, Larsen & Co.,
Ltd., also spoke.

Miss Sebright of the British
Union Oil Company, cut the blue
end white ribbon which extended
across the door to the office to
complete the official side of the
function. Mr, E, G. Macintyre,
Manager of the British Union Oil
Company, was among the invited
‘guests.

During the Cocktail Party which
followed the opening function, the
service station was making its first
trade after opening. Most of the
motor cars which had brought the
guests to the function, took gaso-
line while attendants with chamois
cloths kept their glasses clean.

Speightstown now has the ser-
vices of two modern stations. The
other is situated at Queen Street
and is the property of the Lone
Star Garage.





3 Years For _ Harbour Log

Larceny | in Carlisle Bay

Adolphus Skeete of Carrington an meee on ees
Village, St. Michael, was yester- Pilgrim S., Sch. Anita B.. Yacht Carthhee,
day sentenced by His Honour the| >“ ~ aoe oo
Chief’ Justice Sir Allan Collymore Saseooes z ry. Leay a aon. Phi p
to three years penal servitude for] H. Davidson, Sch. May Olive, Sch, Cycio-
the larceny of a case of cigarettes |*#â„¢* %- Se> a
and five years preventive treat-
ment for being g habitual crim-
inal at the Court of Grand Ses-
sions.

Miss M. E. Bourne prosecuted
for the Crown. The prosecution
pointed out that on October 23
Skeete stole one case of cigarettes,
the property of British American
Tobacco Co. Ltd, and which is
valued at $104. One witness for
the prosecution Joseph Dyall of

ALS
Oil Tanker Rufina, 1856 tons net
Capt. Bruin, from Trinidad via Grenada
S.S./ Myken, 4399 tons net, Cant
Dolven, from New York via Martiatque
M.V. Deerwood, ® tons net, Capt
Mulzac, from St. Lucia
8.8. P. & T. Forester,
Capt. Bevil Aqua, from
Curacao.
Schooner Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tors
net, Capt. Every, from British Guiana
DEPARTURES
Schooner Rosarene, 60 tons net, Capt
Hazell, for British Guiana
Schooner Turtle Dove

4,749 tons net
Vancouver yie

62 tons ne

Capt. Ollivierre, for Trinidad
Black Rock said he saw when|“‘2S Askyin, 724 tons net, Capt. Kvane
Skeete took the case of cigarettes | for Trinidad

from one of the Trumpeter Tobac-
co Factory wagons. He chased him
and caught him at the junction of
Crichlow Alley and Roebuck St.
Sgt. Phillips of the C.LD. said



Ships In Touch With
Barbados Coast Station

that on February 26 about 3.30

p.m. he received a notice signed Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. advise
; . that they can now commutnicete with

by the Acting Attorney General the following ships through their Barba

saying that a charge of being 4} cos Coast Station

habitual criminal was being] 5.S. Golfito, ss. Bayano, ss. Aleos
; «| Partner, s.s. Duala, ss. Sundial, s¢

brought against Skeete, He knows Toe ted cn “Sips nd eee Polio,

Skeete and has seen him “knock-
ing about town.”

18 Months For
Housebreaking

Sentence of 18 months’ impris-
onment with hard labour was
passeq at the Court of Grand Ses-
sions yesterday on Eustace Thomas
a labourer of St. George, by His
Honour the Chief Justice Sir Al-
lan Collymore. He was found
guilty of housebreaking and lar-
ceny of articles to the value of
$61 and the property of Horace ‘ee

if Z
Rowe on November 1, N |

s.s. Regent Leopard, s.s. Regent Panther
©.8. Mauretania, s.s. Italia, 5.5. Frontenac,
2.8. Rangitata, 5.5, S. Maria, s.s. Rangitote,
ss. Nieuw Amsterdam, Colombie
s.s. S. Clara, 3.5. S. Paula, s.s. Argentin

s.s. Lady Nelson, 5.8. Europa, s.s, Beatrice

Gums Bleed,
Teeth Loose?
£¢ Bere







Anthony Martin of Constitution |
Road, St. Michael, was also sen-
tenced to 18 months’ imprison-

ment with hard labour by His

Honour the Chief Justice Sir Allan

Collymore for shopbreaking and ee”

larceny of articles valued at

$21.54, the property of Allar Stop Pyorrhea and

Franklyn of Roebuck Street on
July 25 at the Court of Grand
Sessions yesterday.

Martin is now serving a term
of imprisonment for uttering coun-
terfeit coins and this sentence for
shopbreaking and larceny is to run
consecutively to the term he is
now serving.

RATES OF EXCHANGE

Trench Mouth
in 24 Hours

Bleeding gums, sore mouth, o: loose
teeth mean fine ‘ou are & victim of Pyor-
rhea or Trench Moulh, ov some bad uilseas
that will eventually cause you to lose ull
our teeth and have to wear falne teeth
fore your time, Since the great World
War these mouth diseases have spread
throughout the world so that now scien~
tists say that four oul of every five people
are ‘sufferers sooner or later. Be warned in
time and stop these diseases before it is
too late, because they often cause not only
the loss of teeth, but nlso chronic rheuma-




MARCH 6, 195) tism and heart trouble.

Pe Re gy New Discovery Saves Teeth
* = ve B: . 63 1/10% pr Ames . the discovery of an American
Snkare Of PE) cient ae fights these troubles in ® new
Demand aud quick way. It penetrates right to the
Drafts 62.95°% pr. roat of the trouble, stops gums from bleed-
. Sight Drafts 62 6/10°% pr. ing the very first day, quickly takes the
efit be: Same siamese Bis CoukYin Telnet
if rency 8/10% pr ens the teeth. The ow'!h e
ene rte dag oe a) er from Mr. W. W. B. shows the results that
eee ons sen users get: “I suffered from Trench
Sitver Mouth and Pyorrhea for ten yeats. My
bgp Fee pre ums were sore and bleeding and > had
MAIL NOTICE fost four teeth, while several other teeth
were getting looser all the time, £ tried
Mails for St. Lucia bw the M.V. Lady} many things and thon heard of this new
Joy will be closed at the General Post] discovery Amosan, In 2¢ hours uiter using
Office as wider ope my ems had prog od meee
‘ he soreness in my mouth disappeared fn
Parcel Mail at 10.00 a.m. Registered ays and (n two we found that

Mail and Ordinary Mail at 12.15 p.m Fares oa

21 my loose teeth were much bh and that

id ont the hardest of 5

the Sth March, 1951 coul



*- Ask your
Mother to

soothing
give you motions,



.

‘OUR baby’s happiness




breast. Re:

Mother’s milk is[naturall
and to

healthy development.

Wide experience has proved the remarkable value of ‘Ovaltine’
to expectant and nursing mothers. Doctors and nurses str y

recommend that it be taken

comes, to stimulate a rich and amp

In addition, ‘Ovaltine’ helps to maintain the strength and vitality of
the mother during the nursing period. ver

Ovaltine

Helps Mothers to Breast-Feed their Babies

Sold in airtight tin
é
P.C.295



Ashton & Parsons Infants’ Powders are wonderfull;

it
tool the blood and are absolutely safe, Try
them next time baby is fretful through teething.

ASHTON & PARSONS
INFANTS’ POWDERS



di on the care you give him now.
is Co tke every means to ensure that your baby is
that Breast-fed is Best-fed.

The food which Nature supplies is the perfect food for baby.
y constituted to suit his delicate digestion
rovide the nutritive elements for sturdy growth and

by all

a want _

Guarantecd
Amosan works so fast und so cern
see it is guaranteed to stop your gums
rom bleeding, end sore mouth and tighten



your teeth to your complete satisfaction o«
money back on return of empty package.
n't take achance on osing your teeth or
suffering the dangers from rheumatism
and heart trouble. Get Amosan from your
chemist today under this iron-clad gu¢ran-
tec, ¥90 stgk

: u stsk

nothing as th

MIOSAM
tects you

For Pyorrhea-Trcxch Mouth



time. They ensure regalar easy

EYES

Wadia

WIDE

WHICH WILL BE

BEGINNING



well-being in the years to come
he first loners duty
ed

from the

veges before and after y

¢ supply of breast-milk,

Chemists and Stor

Ps ~



AT





|
|

‘

THE LADIES’
WILL
OPEN ..--

BARGAINS



402. TiN



OFFERED
EVERY DEPARTMENT,
ESPECIALLY THE

DRESS GOODS & SHOE DEPT.

AT OUR

EASTER PARADE

ON MONDAY 2th MARCH

PAGE THREE

OBEX
THE FAMILY SOAP

@ Gets skin really clean
© Banishes perspiration odor
© Leaves body sweet and dainty

Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that is
mild and gencle for face, hands and daily
baths. Odex is ideal for family use.
















&



“Axarive

N addition to the regular size, this new,
smaller pack of Andrews Liver Salt has been
introduced to enable you to try the World’s most
popular saline for a very small outlay !
A glass of effervescing Andrews, costing only a
few pence, cleans the mouth, settles the stomach,
tones up the liver, and finally clears the bowels.
Also at any time of the day one teaspoonful in
a glass of cold water makes a cooling, refreshing
drink. You can be sure of Inner Cleanliness
with Andrews.





































THE

IN



AND THE GENTLEMEN
WILL BLUSH
®

and breathe a sigh of relief when the Finest Quality
WORSTED, PARSONS’ GREY, TROPICAL, KHAKI
DRILLS, LINEN and other SUITINGS, also
SHIRTS of all descriptions, including
the Famous SEA ISLAND
COTTON SHIRTS

are offered at such staggeringly low prices.
®
Over $500,000 worth of New and Stylish American,
Canadian, English, French, Dutch, German and
Italian Merchandise is placed at your disposal.
e
HOW LONG CAN IT LAST ? The answer comes on
MONDAY, 12TH MARCH, AT 8.00 A.M.
when all roads lead to...

N. E. WILSON & CO

The Airc Conditioned Store offering MERCHA.NDISE
and SERVICE of the very best.



31, SWAN STREET “ts 1INLAL 3676






BARBADOS i ADVOGATE

B
Grea SSS: — snes,

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid. Broad 8t., Bridgetown.



Wednesday, March 7, 1951

LEADERS NEEDED

EVEN when he praised the enthusiasm
and understanding with which the Bay
Street Boys’ Club was being run, Mr. Basil
Henriques, Vice Chairman of the National
Association of Boys’ Clubs, was forced to
point out that legislation in this island
dealing with children and young people
coming before the Courts was 50 years
behind that in England.

‘Trained as he is to look beyond the sur-

face, Mr. Henriques sees however, some
hope for the future and without giving
offence points out that the example of
Jamaica might well be followed and
modern legislation enacted dealing with
juvenile delinquency.

The Bay Street Boys’ Club was the first
institution of its kind in this island cater-
ing to the needs of children who were not
fortunate enough to have opportunity for
clean sport and home life and who resorted
to playing on the street. It i8 clear that it is
a start in the right direction but it is not
sufficient to give the Barbadian public any
cause for satisfaction. There is much more
to be done.

It is a compliment to the general public
that without any government funds, the
Boys’ Clubs now in existence have been
established and carried on with the enthu-
siasm of which Mr. Henriques speaks with
obvious pleasure. But it is no compliment
to a Government to witness the efforts of
society to reclaim its juveniles and to sit
idly by without doing something to assist
especially in the way in which government
alone can contribute.

Legislation in this island has always
lagged behind the causes which it was in-
tended to help or the social diseases to be
cured. This is doubtless due to the tradi-
tional practice of blaming the faults of
society on individuals, and the consequent
delay in the growth of a collective: social
conscience.

Mr. Henriques makes it clear that we
have started in the right direction by the
establishment of Boys’ Clubs but it is also
clear, and it should not need the comment
of a stranger to tell us that to be satisfied
with a few clubs for juveniles is merely to
tinker with a problem which indicates a
serious condition existing.

The problem of juvenile delinquency
goes farther than life on the street or in the
school. Broken homes, poverty and un-



awareness of parental responsibility con- .

stitute the root cause. Mr. Henriques was
at pains to point out the existence of
Juvenile Courts administering modern
legislation, moral hospitals and other in-
stitutions for correcting the influence of
bad homes and giving children opportun-
ities for living their lives under normal cir-
cumstances and to feel that they are part
and parcel of society,

Beyond this stage, however, there is the
need, which he pointed out for leaders, The
history of the past should be a lesson in
any attempt in the future. Youth leader-
ship is a responsible job of work for which
willingness is not the only qualification
and it is here where the general public
who contribute to organisations in the
interests of young people and children
Should see to it that only those who by
temperament, moral stability and a know-
ledge of the needs of modern society should
be allowed to influence the lives of others.

Mr. Henriques can render this island
further service by way of public lectures
organised by the British Council whose
guest he now is and who have shown a
willingness to bring social and cultural
improvements to the community, In an
island with so many children and adoles-
cents matters affecting youth are of great
magnitude and every opportunity should
be taken to utilise the specialised know-
ledge of Mr. Henriques.

Our Readers Say:

areas. One of the first problems
. Ee in 1942 was the
|





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GOOD NEIGHHOURS

ness to teach Indian women how

(Photograph courtesy of the

In addition to a well-integrated
agricultural p:tgramme, opera-
tions of the Institute of Inter-
American Affairs in Peru include
both education and public health
and sanitation pncjects. All three
are major activities of Point Four
as outlined by U.S. President
Harry S. Truman in his inaugural
address.in January 1949.

In the division of public health
and sanitation, Institute experts
and their Peruvian associates lit-
erally have transformed whole

deadly malaria in the coastal town
of Chimbote. Incidence of this
disease averaged 25 percent the
year around. Despite Chimbbte’s
favourable location as an indus-
trial city, its population was sta-
tionary at about 5,000. Today, a
new drainage and sanitation plan,
embracing 887,000 square metres,
gives mosquitocs small chance to
survive, Health measures are com-
pulsory. Malaria has been reduced
to 2 percent and population has
risen to 12,000, The town is devel-
oping enough electric current to
supply a substantial trade area
and there is promise of continued
expansion in manufacturing and
shipping.

Director of the Institute’s Co-

operative Health Service is Dr.
Frederick J. Wampler, experi-
fenced in public health work in

| Washington, D.C., capital of the
United States, in China, and in his
home State of Virginia. He has on
his staff from the United States
twio sanitary engineers, one medi-
cal officer, one industrial hygiene
expert, two public health nurses,
and two office workers. The other
556 members of the service are
Peruvians, Launches, jeeps, and
airplanes take physicians and
nurses on regular trips into remote
areas. Five hospitals and two
10-bed dispensaries have been
built in jungle towns. Nineteen
sanitary posts are located in
areas so remote that few travel-
lers care to visit them. Seven doc-
tors each operate medical posts in
still other regions.

Many of these Peruvian medi-
eal men have studied public
health and sanitation in the United
States on grants from the Insti-
tute of Inter-American Affairs.
One of them, Dr. Jorge Atkins,
whose father came to Peru as a
young man and married there, is
in charge of the health programme
in Loreto. He has under his direc-
tion three hospitals, four dispens-
aries, a general health centre and
15 jungle sanitary posts. He and

| his staff operate two medical
| launches, Aeroplane service
! brings Lima within three hours of
;an area which a generation ago
‘was almost isolated from the coast
by the Andes Mountains. They
, operate the 120-bed Santa Rosa
‘Hospital in Iquitos, opened by the

has decreased as has the spread of contagious disease.
has proven successful with the co-operation of the two governments of the United States and Peru.

lar programmes are being conducted in 15 other South and Central American countries.
‘Nation’s Business)

When Good Neighbours
Get Together=2

Le



to care for their children.

The Institute of Inter-American Affairs
has proven in Peru that the United
States Point Four Programme can be suc-

cessful with the spirit of co-operation that
has been its hallmark in both countrie

By O.

From

K. ARMSTRONG

“Nation's Business”

service in 1945. Nurses penetrate
to the remotest parts of Peru.
Sometimes their offices are in
trucks or on floating rafts. They
give inoculations, assist the physi-
cian in the treatment of infections,
issue medical supplies. They
assist in teaching expectant moth-
ers and hold classes in child’ care

An example of a programme
Jor improvement of rural health is
Tingo Maria, a community of
5,000 on the eastern watershed.
Here the tropical temperature and
heavy rainfall create ideal coudi-
tions for the cultivation of manioc,
cocoa, tea, rice, yucca, pineapple,
citrus fruits, and rubber. In 1942,
the total health facilities consisted
of a small outpatient clinic, with
one physician working part time.
In 1943 a service survey showed
99 percent of all children infected
with hookworm or ‘other parasites.
A campaign was waged for the
construction of toilets, develop-
ment of a clean drinking .water
supply, use of wholesome facds,
an appreciation of the need for
shoes, and periodical examination
of children, As a result a 40-bed
hiospital was built. A mobile dis-
pensary servicing workmen on the
Tingo Maria-Pucalpa highway
attended 11,692 patients during the
18 months it was in operation,

“Recent examinations show that
the percentage of school children
infected with intestinal parasites
has been cut about in half, while
cther infections haye dropped from
67 to 5 percent and maiaria has
been cut to less than 1 percent,”
Dr. Wampler ‘stated. And the
director added, “It is hard to
measure in dollars the results of
this sort of good-neighbourly
co-operation.”

ant activity of the Institute’s
health services. M. F. Trice, direc-
tor, heads a staff jof two United
States consultants and 20 Peru-
vian technicians, Among the latter
are five physicians, five chemical
engineers, and several laboratory
experts. About 30,000 persons are
employed in the metal mines of
Peru, bringing out zine, silver,
vanadium, and copper ores. Sili-
qosis, the disease resulting from
inhaling dust, has been a constant
and deadly menace to miners, The
service made a systematic study
of dust in the mines. Legislation
Was passed calling for the use of
masks and other preventive meas-
ures. Periodic counts of dust, and
regular checks ©n the health of
miners indicate remaweable pro-
gress in three years,

Industrial hygiene is an import- .underdeveloped

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs penetrate the Peruvian wilder-
As a result of their work the death rate
This is part of the Point Four Programme which

Simi-

The education division, estab-
lished in 1943, came into being
because of increasing recognition
on the part of South American
leaders that industrial and social
progress depends on enlightened
citizenship, In Peru, Lyle B, Plem-
ber is director lof this activity. He
and his ten North American spe-
cialists work in close co-operation
with Qolonel Juan Mendoza Rod-
riguez, Peruvian minister of edu-
cation, and 43 nationals. Rural
elementary education and voca-
tional training are the two prin-
cipal areas of activity in this ser-
vice. An important task in rural
communities has been to construct
modern school buildings. Sixteen
schools have been completed, and
scores more are under construc-
tion,

When the former President of
Peru, José Luis Bustamente
Rivero, was minister to neigh-
bouring Bolivia, some years ago,
he and the Bolivian minister of
education worked out a plan for
educating the Indian children of
the altiplana—the high plateau of
the Andes. The Institute, with
co-operation of the Peruvian and
Belivian ministries of education,
helped put the plan into effect
Now arother neighbour, Ecuador,
has joined. The ministries of edu-
cation exchange information pn
school laws, teaching materials,
anc methods. Increasingly, schools
are becoming community centres
under the work of the Institute.
parents are encouraged to go and
see the work being done, to begin
adult studies, and to participate in
parent-teacher activities. Groups
similar to 4-H clubs (farm youth
organisations) of the United States
are being sponsored.

tute of Inter-American Affairs in
Peru by its activities in 17 other
countries, large and small, in
South and Central America, and
its most_ important feature be-
comes apparent: It is setting the
pattern for sound, profitable de-
velopment lof resources in the
areas of this hem-
isphere. The investment of public
funds is not intended as a perma-
nent programme either for the
Urtited States or for the other
participating countries, but rather
as guiding operations to pave the
way for private investment and
co-operative enterprise.

But there is another result, im-
measurable in its value. The usual
frigid formality of international
relations melts away in the at-
mosphere of close’ personal rela-
tions maintained by all hands
working in the services. Members
of the stafs are no longer “for-
eigners” one to the other, The
effect is a continually deepening
understanding that will strengthen
for all time the structure of’ inter-

American solidarity and peace.



—_
'

Multiply the work wf the :



CREECH JONES ON
COLONIAL AFFAIRS ©

New Words For New Conceptions

By E.B. TIMOTHY

' LONDON.

WNACCURATE words and _ expressions
have created a hindrance towards clear
thinking on Colonial affairs. This opinion is
expressed in an article—‘The Challenge io
‘Colonialism’ ”—by Mr. Creech Jones, (form-
erly Secretary of State for the Colonies) in
the March issue of the New Commonwealth

New words were wanted for new concep-
tions, he writes. The term ‘partnership’, for
example, was inadequate in conveying the
conception behind modern British Colo-
nial policy. The word “Colony” was ambigu-
ous. ‘ :

Although -Malta, for example, was self-
governing except in the fields of defence and
foreign policy, she was grouped in the same
category as other Colonies enjoying less
autonomy. There were variations such as
Protected States, Protectorates, Trust Terri-
tories, etc., to be considered.

Asian independence had led to the replace-

‘lment of the term “British” by that of “Com-

monwealth” while the word “Dominion” had
almast become obsolete. It was now fashion-
able for the meaning of the term “Common-
wealth” to imply “the independent nations
within the Commonwealth and the depend-
ent territories of the United Kingdom, while
the dependent territories of the “dominion”
states were forgotten in this connotation.

Discussing the use of the word “Colonial-
ism” in recent years, notably in America and
Asia, Creech Jones states that it has become
a “word of obloquy to describe the condition
of dependence of non-full self-government”.
Consequently, “Colonialism” was being made
synonymous with alien oppressive rule,

He deplores the wholesale condemnation of
“Colonial status”, particularly in debates at
Lake Success, and points to the dangers of
sudden revocation of Colonial status. He says:

“Everyone will agree that in the unhappy
situation in Malaya the withdrawal of the
British would bring the races into conflict,
break down the public services, create econo-
mic and political anarchy and add another
Communist-ridden territory to the tragic list
of countries so afflicted. In Africa, where the
full co-operation of the African people is
sought as devolution of authority from Lon-
don makes responsibility increasingly real,
it would be a calamity for Britain to break
her treaty and moral obligations to the Afri-
can people and renounce her burden. Our
experience and technical resources, the finan-
cial aid and educational facilities required
are an enormous asset to the Colonial peoples
which cannot be replaced by any interna-
tional authority.”

He continues: “The challenge in Asia
against all forms of Colonialism is a reminder

of the rapidly changing world in which we
live.

“Despite this”, he concludes, “today, how-
ever, Colonies have become almost anachron-
isms. The facts of the world we live in ‘are
seen in a completely different perspective.
The world is more closely knot; nationalism
has transformed Asia and is a strong influ-
ence in Africa; all under-developed regions
are a matter of international concern, and

the imperial Powers are enjoined to advance
self-government”,



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1951











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a

Suggestions

Tourists’ Accommodation
To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—Our thanks a_ million
are due to ‘Just another tourist’
(your issue 2nd inst.) for per-
mitting us ‘to see ourselves as
others see us.’

J.A.T’s chief complaints appear
to be :—

1, Coral rocks on _ bathing
beaches
2. Inferior food

3. Primitive hotels (and last-
ly but not least)
4. Lack of drinking water,
Kindly permit me, Sir, space
for a few constructive suggestions
tor the benefit of our Hotel Pro-

prietors and others,
Taking the complaints in
order:—

1, Tender-foot tourists, should
be supplied with diver’s boots
with fifty pound lead soles, They
could then be carefully lowered
into deep and rockless: water by
means of the crane on the En-
gineer’s Pier at the Yacht Club.
Those of them that made a suit-
able ‘donation’ could doubtless. be
hoisted out again!

2. Gourmands and gastronom-
ical Epicures certainly deserve
something more exciting than the
finny flying-fish. Try them witiy
jug-jug, black pudding and souse,
followed by shark’s oil and sea-
weed salad.

3. Explain to modern tourists



— that Elizabethan Plumbing,
Hanoverian Houses and Queen
Anne furniture are nowadays no¢

to be sheezed at and that tariffs
which include such “olde-worlde
charme,” historical monuments
curios and antique relics ara
cheap at the price even if includ.
ing plain and homely fare,

4. I quote:— “No water, ex.
cept at meals or in his room at
night, without a tip to the bell.
boy or (a trip) to the bar,”

Dear Mr, J. A. T. I’m afraid
the nearest water fountain at
night, is to be found in the
Waiting-room at the Piarco Air-
Port in Trinidad (you mash the
pedal and it squirts in your face!)

But ceme, come, you lazy
Hotel Proprietors you unknow-
ingly have the remedy in your

hands — see! So supply every
tourist with a water-whistle,
(along with the bedroom key)

At the shrill blast of a whistle a
tall and decorative mauby mam-
mey approaches the _ sufferer,
heading her high watercan. on
pretty turbaned head. She opens
the tap and a silvery stream of
delicious ice-cold water trickles,
without glass and straw, plump
into the gasping opened trap,
swilling and irrigating the parch-
ed and tormented abdominal
interstices of the thirsty northern
Tourist. Peace having been re-
stored — mauby mammey, or if
you prefer it, the “Hydraulic
Hostess” retires to refill,
Yours ete:
“LESLIT”,
Thanks

To Tre Editor, The Advocate—

SIR Pl tl

lease grant
space of your

me



wal |
Vaiyabie

to express our gratitude for andPlays staged at St. Martin’s Girls’

appreciation of the notable work
done by Miss Marjorie Blackman
in the parish of St. Philip, For
the eight years she spent among
us she was the soul of kindness,

very sympathetic and always
obliging. These gained her the
love and respect of all who
attended at the post office. Al-

though this is for those in author-
ity to speak, I, from my experi-
ence and association with her
can say she was most prompt,
business-like, and efficient in her
work We regret her loss to us
and hope that her successor will
have the public interest at heart
and will live up to the high stan-
dard she has set manifesting the
qualities necessary for such an
office,

In spite @f the demands of her
work, Miss Blackman found time
for extensive social work, and the
real and energy with which) she
worked has been an inspiration
and example to many, She soon
took over and guided the waning
Guide Troops of St. Philip’s and
St. Martin’s Girls. Shortly after
that she started her own troop at
Four Roads, These troops flourish—
ed and can speak for themselves
The newly born troops at
Four Roads, under her control,
lost no time in gaining first place
in efficiency in St. Philip. With
the troops running well she ven-
tured the development of local
talent and put it to good use. Few
would hardly forget the
staged by the Gi

Bx Schoo

concerts
St Phi ip

ana the Nativity

and St. Philip’s Boys’ School.
Through her indefatigable efforts
these were magnificent successes

and set a pace which would
challenge many to follow.
For these and other services,

too numerous to be mentioned
here, I beg on behalf of the parish
and—may I be personal—on my
own behalf to offer our hearty and
sincere thanks, We shall always be
mindful of her and the work she
has done and wish her every
suecess in her new appointment.
With thanks for the space,
R, S.

Beach Cricket
To che Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I. am- bringing a small
matter to your notice, Do you think
it is fair for anyone to indulge in
a “bat and ball’ match on the
Rockley, or for. matter any
other. beach’ on Sundays when
there are many bathers trying to
utilise it for its proper purpose?
Even if they did so why not use
the section away from the part
that has to be used by bathers.’ Is
it for the purpose of exhibiting
themselves and their — fine
physique? I believe you will agree
with me that it is absolutely un-
fair to the bathers as they have
to keep out of the way as they
might be struck. Can anything be
done to stop it? Many bathers
have to leave their glasses when
they go into the sea and these may
easily get broken, Have they a
hance of getting them replaced?

A STRANGER,

Answers To

Quiz Will

On the night of Sunday, April
8, heads* of 20,000,000 “‘house-
holds” in England, Scotland,
Wales, Northern Ireland, the Isle
of Man and the Channel Isles, will
take part in the biggest “twerity
questions” quiz ever organised iu
this country—the 1951 Census of
Population,

They will have to answer 20
questions — plus one for good
measure — about every individual
staying under their roof that night
and about the arrangements for
water supply, cooking, washing-up
and even bathing in their house-
holds.

To help them do it accurately
20,000 “enumerators” have beet
enrolled in London; 50,000 will
cover the whole country.

Machines Take Over

As in the radio Twenty Ques-
tions, every effort will be made
to ensure secrecy so far as the
“team”—the officials engaged -in
the operation——are concerned.

It is millions to one against anv
official engaged on this operation
dealing with the schedules of any
individuals they may know per-
sonally,

1951 Census
Be Secret

From the moment they have
finished their work machines will
take over and names will cease
to exist.

|
SLE CPLSASSSSPSSOS FS,

-

Every person named on the
original schedules—with the par-
ticulars they have given—will be
just tiny round holes punched in
small cards.

More than 140 _ statistical







atcha tie alle WY; ‘Tee
the ete eee head- - Ls GS
juarters at Sout rt. 5
Fe (8 MILK FED DUCKS — LAMB Leo or Shoulder
It’s All Secret ¢ HAMS —_ 3 Sizes.
y *
Upon the answers they give will s SPECIALS | JUST ‘ARRIVED
depend the siting of new towns, x |
the building of new roads, and the|% LUNCHEON CHEESE — | ASPIC
organisation of transport to deal R (Whole) $1.21 each | BOUILLION
with movements of population % Uae ae ‘ i Pitcairn eas
since the last census 20 years ago. -. .48 eac' | IA §
. % HUNTER’S STEAK & KID- | ICE CREAM MIX
Fears that personal matters may % NEY PUDDING .42 each | FROZEN SALMON
be disclosed to “the wrong people”| ¥ COOK'S PASTE— | CALVES LIVER
are groundless. % 6 cents per tin | ,BRAINS
| KOLA TONIC — SWEET BREADS
Anyone who wishes to keep per-| % Large-—-$1.00 pr btle. | BEEF SUET
sonal detail from the knowledge; $ NESTLE’S CHOCOLATE PORK FAT
of his “head of the house” may! % BARS ....... 15 cents | SAUSAGES
apply for an individual schedule,|% BARLEY STICKS—13 each ONIONS POTATOES
and leave it in a sealed envelope} » i * e :
for the enumerator to collect 1% PHONE GODDARDS - WE DELIVER
—LE.S, Zecoosess SSSSSSOSSSSS9SS SSI OSSSS 555995 SS OESHOSS:

for your
Party !



SANDEMAN’S WINES
RHINE WINES

RED WINES

VIELLE CURE





AND
GODDARD'S

TUBORG BEER







WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1951



Leg. Co. Amend Col.

Treasurer Acts

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL yesterday passed a|
Bill to consolidate and amend the Acts of the island re- |
lating to the Colonial ‘Treasurer, and thereby approve the } worked up.

recommendation for the establishment of the office

“Accountant General” in place of “Colonial Treasurer”
This latter office will be abolished.

Objects and Reasons of the Bill |
State:

Commissioner Adams in_ his!
Report on the re-organization of
the Civil Service recommended
the creation of the post of Ac-
countant General inthe place of
that of Colonial Treasurer, and
advised that certain duties now
performed by the Auditor General
could more properly be performed
by the Accountant General as an
accounting ‘officer,

This Bill therefore seeks to give
effect to those recommendations
without interference with the sys-
tem of pre-audit which has always
existed in this island,

By the repeal of the Colonial
Treasurer’s Act, 1891, the right of
the House of Assembly to nominate
to the office of Colonial Treasurer
(which will be abolished) will no
longer, exist.

The office of Accountant Gen-
eral will be established by an
order under the Civil Establish-
ment Act, 1949, and appointment
to that office will thereafter be
made in the same manner as any
other offiée in the Public Service

Objects of Bill

The Colonial Secretary moved
the second reading of the Bill, He
said;

I should like briefly to elabo-
rate the Objects .and Reasons
which Honourable Members have
before them, It may be remem-
bered that Commissioner Adams
reviewed the Treasury and the
Audit Department together be-
cause, in his own words, “at the
moment their duties overlap to a
greater extent than is either usual
or convenient.”

In the course of his review
Commissioner Adams pointed out
that the work of the Audit De-
partment included the computa-
tion of all pensions and gratuities,
the preparation of pay vouchers
for all expenditure included in the
accounts of the Crown Agents for
the Colonies and the recording of
all reeeipts and expenditure of
schemes under the provisions of
the Colonial Development and
Welfare Act, all of which duties
are normally undertaken by the
Treasury in other territories

He recommended that the Treas-
urer should assume the normal re-
sponsibilities laid on his office by
Colonial Regulations, that the title
of the Office should be changed in
view of the appointment of a
Financial Secretary, and that the
pre-Audit system should be aban—
doned.

The Bill under consideration
does not go as far as this, ‘The
pre-audit system has worked well,
and is generally acceptable, and
there is no intention of modifying
it. There is, moreover, no in-
tention of interfering with the
completely independent position of
the Auditor General, whose main
function, henceforth as in the past,
will be as the “watchdog of the
taxpayer,” and who will continue
to be primarily responsible for
checking revenue and rep.

ture,
Act»

It is, iiowever, proposed to re-
move the limitations of the Colo-
nial Treasurer’s Act, which made
the Colonial Treasurer a sort of
glorified cashier and resulted in
the Auditor General being called
upon to undertake duties and re-
sponsibilities not appropriate to an
Auditor and in some cases created
the anomaly of the Auditor Gen-
eral checking his own figures.

It is visualised that the Account-
ant General should carry the
responsibility for the methods of
Government accountancy for the
custody of cash in his own and
other departments, for the collec-
tion of revenue and for ensuring
that approved expenditure should
not be exceeded. He should also
be the Government’s expert ad-
viser on such non-public accounts
as may be the concern of Govern-
ment, e.g., the accounts of public
utilities, and should be capable
of being an expert witness.

Furthermore it is proposed to
place on the Accountant General
the responsibility of supervising
the compilation of statistics in
Barbados. At present every de-
partment has statistical informa-

Limitations

tion of one kind or another whicn



BRUSH... UP...
A






YOUR...



has never been adequately collated
or interpreted,

Conservation
Pays

Production of food in the
United States has been in-
creased substantially by soil
and water conservation prac-
tices carried out on nearly
3,000,000 American farms
during 1950. These practices:
have helped farmers to
check erosion, restore fer-
tility, and protect and
strengthen the productivity
of their land, the United
States Department of Agri-
culture reports.

Farmers co-operating in
the conservation programme
are encouraged to improve
pastures and rangeland as a
means of building up plant
food reserves in the soil.
The cost of conservation
practices is shared by the
co-operating farmers, The
programme is administered
through locally elected far-
mers committees,

Since the department be-
gan its agricultural conser-
vation programme in 1936,
51,000,000 acres of pasture
have been seeded. About
1,000,000 dams have been
constructed and 260,000,000
tons of lime and 24,000,000
tons superphosphate have
been applied to the soil.

Under the programme,
farmers also have construct-
ed 950,000 miles of terraces
and farmed 130,000,000 acres
of land on the contour. They
have planted 825,000 acres
of trees,



It is
Treasury should be responsible
for the overall supervision of

loans made by Government, and
possibly develop a Loans and
Advances Branch. In these cir-
cumstances it is imperative that
the present Colonial Treasurer's
Act which limits the duties and
responsibilities of the Colonial
Treasi“er should be amended,

Furthermore it is essential that
‘the person appointed as Account-
ant General should be fully
qualified to undertake the duties
and be preferably a qualified
accountant or economist’ with
statistical experience. The salary
of the post may not attract a
professionally qualified and ex-
perienced accountant, but it will
be necessary to seek ‘tha best
candidate that is availdble from
whatever source. It is therefore
more convenient, as well as appro-

priate, that the appointment
should be in the hands of the
Governor.

I now beg to move. that the
Bill be read a second time subject
to a minor amengment which I
will move at the appropriate
time.

_ Faulty Set-Up

Hon. H. A. Cuke seconded the
motion. He said that for very
many years he had ulways felt
that the set-up in the colony was
faulty. He himself had been ap-
pointed by Government some
years ago to reorganise the Trea-
sury, but at that time the ideas
which he had, had to be restrict-
ed because of the fact that the
Colonial Treasurer was operating
under the old Act. 4

The result was that in this
island the Auditor General’s staff
was at present engaged in too
much accounting work. In_ his
opinion the Treasury should be
the central accounting depart-
ment of (overnment and all ac-
counts should be under the con-
trol of the Accountant General.

He believed that the present
Bill for making the Accountant
General an officer of the Govern—
ment under the contol of Goy—
ernment, was a step in the right
direction.

There had been a great deal of
talk from time to time about the
pre-audit system which was not
a system in itself. All that it
would mean was that whereas in
some colonies the head of the de-
partment made out vouchers and
submitted them to the Accountant

SMILE...









ADDIS LIMITED OF
HERTFORD EST. 1780

of | Said the Bill was a

, Sioner Adams to the newly named

proposed too that ihe! in

a Ea





or Propert
surer way
that white

BUCKSKIN
eae
CANVAS



White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use
Propert’s White Renovato
*s Shuwhite. No

of making sure
shoes are white!



PROPERT'S

SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR

in Cartons with Sponge



fe



ahaa
he



out thes vould before,
{to be authorised by the Auditor
| General

The Auditor General Depart-
ment was there to see that the
various



departments were keeping
_ hi s they
find time
were s0

he had already
step in the
right direction and was long over-
due.

obvi-
to do
much

accounts .
could not
they

proper
ously

because
As

Fixed Salary
Ho®, G. D. L. Pile said that from
what the Hon. Colonial Secretary
had said he gathered that they
could not expect the best man for
the job for the salary that would



be paid. If that was the case, it
might simply be a case of “a pen-
ny wise and pound foolish.” He |

considered that it was best to have
the salary fixed which would en-
able them to get the best man or
at any rate would not stand in the
way of their getting the best man.

The Colonial Secretary replied
and said that he was greatly in-
debted to the hon. member for his
observation, because that was a
matter on which he held very

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

House Pass Racial

e oe ,e 7
Discrimination Address /



THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday passed with}

| $1,040 Passed For
_ Silver Jubilee
C. T. A. Delegates

The House of Assembly passed,
With slight amenument, a supple

amendments an Address tabled by Mr. J. E. T. ‘Brancker, | mentary Hesoiution for" $1,080 rot
protesting against the poliey of racial discrimination and

by the South African Go

The address as originally ta
urged in paragraph 3 that instruc-
tions should be given to the Co:

?
n |
|
inhuman treatment met
trol Board to refuse the grant



Import Licenses in respect of
South African goods. Deletion of
this paragraph was one of the
amendments successfully moved
t Mr. E. D. Mottley. Mr. Mott-
ley other amendments were
chiefly changes in phraseology
and were accepted by Mr)
| Brancker. Mr. Brancker did. npt

secept the suggestion for the de-
letion of paragraph 3, and this had
to be put to the vote
The Address as passed reads a8
follows: —
| The House

of Assembly beg to

strong personal views. He did !draw to the attention of His Ex-
not think, however, that the | cellency the Governor the fact
present occasion was the time for) that acute colour and racial dis-
him to voice those views, crimination, the enactment of

As regaris the salary of the

officer, honourable members wo uldj

find on the Order Paper that day
a Bill to amend the Colonial!
Treasurer’s Act 1891, and it was
criginally proposed
salary should apply to the office of
Colonial Treasurer. This office it
Was now proposed to abolish.
In the event of the present Bill
being passed, the next move would
be for an amendment in the Civii
Estabiishment Order giving the
salary recommended by Commis-

cfficer. “I

will prove

best man,”
No Leave Passages

He would take the opportunity

hope the
eiarcagtn

the
to

salary
get the

hat a revised }

segregation laws and the inhuman
treatment of natives not only ex.
j ist in the Union of South Atrica,
but receive official approbation,
and in fact the blessing of the
Union Government.

The Heuse view

. such behaviour
with profound

abhorrence, and
respectfully request that Your
Excellency take cognisance of
their view of the matter,

His Excellency ‘is invited to
take such steps as are requisite to
ensure that the reverent of
the Union of South Africa j fully
reel pg of the sentiment of the

cople cf this island towards the
Rrsen treatment adopted by
that Government; and further His
Excellency is requested to submit
a copy of this Address to His Ma-



to say that cmiditions of service) jesty’s Principal Secretary of!
generally in Barbados were not| State for the Colonies with a re-
competitive with other parts of} Guest that the same be trans nit- |
the world, and he could produce tad to the Government of the;
figures and facts to support that Union of South Africa. |
statement. As honourable mem-}, Mr. J. E. T. Braneker (C) moy

bers might be aware, leave pas-| 8 the passiny of the address,
sages were normally paid to| 5@¢ he was doing so with a full
officers serving in other territories.) S€"Se Of responsibility, and aftr]

|‘That was not the case in this
j colony. It was therefore difficult
these modern days to get the





right type of man.
be possible on the salary offered
to get a really jgood serving officer,
Lut it might be possible to get
good officer who might have re-| }
tired from seme other area and}
who might be prepared to come
here and organise and resi
the department, so that in a period
of about three years he might be |
able té train some local man to
teke his

being passed, said the Colonial
Secretary, His Excellency would
meke the strongest possible effort
to secure a competent qualifted
officer on the terms proposed. If
on the other hand he should fail,
further representations would be
made to the Legislature,

The Bill was then passed and
later the Bill to amend the Colon-
ial Treasurer’s Act 1891, was with-
drawn from the Order Paper,

HIGH SEAS

The sea at Paynes Bay yesterday
resembled the Bathsheba or Crane
coast, Sand three inches deep
covered a road bridge under the
pier by the Highways and Trans-
port Board.

The sea rushed under houses on
the beach and fishing boats were
dragged up and tied to trees near
the roadway.





The sea dashed against the rocks
near Quacobob with such fury
that the spray Yreached to a

height of thirty feet.

One fishing boat near Old Trees
is known to have been dashed to
pieces by the waves. Mate last
night high seas were continuing.



MAHON FOR TRINIDAD

Hon, J. A. Mahon was yesterday
riominated by the Legislative
Council as a representative to
attend the Silver Jubilee Celebra-
tions of the Imperial corees of
Tropical Agriculture. Hon. G. D, L,
Pile was nominated last week but
it is net possible now for him to
attend,

EVELYN FOR FESTIVAL
OF BRITAIN

Hon, G. B. Evelyn was yester
day nominated as a representative
from the Council to attend the
Festival of Britain.




at

It might not 3

}
ay

place after he had gone, | Sanctions on the Union of South
In the event of the present Bill ;Africa, Mr, Brancker said, to show

> eithges.

Pte

Siving the matter full corsider-}
ation, He informed the House that)
since his address had been on the,
Order Paper, the» Legislature of
Jamaica had passed an address of

similar purport,
After reading the expressed
| Views cf Dr. Malan, Prime Minis-

ter of South Africa on the matter
of race and colour, it was im possi-
le to speak too strongly in the
Assembly of Barbados, But he wa:
not dealing with personalities,
They could . impose economic

the deep abhorrence which the
members of one of the most an-
cient Legislatures in the Colonial
Empire felt concerning the racial
policy of South Africa.

That would be the main purpose
of the Address, since they could
not expect the Union of South
Africa to feel the economic effect
of such a sanction as the address!
preposed. But one colony had
already passed a similar address,
and it was quite likely that a
third, fourth or fifth tl would
foliow suit, as weil even as coun-
tries outside of the British Com-
monwealth, a

He moved formally the passing|
of the address. |

Mr. D. D. Garier (C) said that
he had great pleasure in second-|
ing the passing of the Address. |
Like the junior member for St.|
Lucy, he felt very strongly on the
matter which had now become
world wide. p

He said that the Address was not
worded strong enough, because
when they were talking about the
Government of South Africa, they
were talking about Hell let loose,
They were not talking about sane
or cultured men, they were talking
about men who could surely take
their passports and go to the utter-
most partof Hades and live
peace,



the South African Union were
men who detested people looking
like him, but he felt they were np
better than he and in many cases,
they were not as good because they



were not as civilized nor as cul-
tured.
The Government of South

Africa which was part of the
British Empire was still treating

human beings worse than dogs
were being treated.
Even at the U.N.O., where

people went to represent prin-
ciples, they did not talk about
the actions of the South Afri-
can Government,



WITH SPEED
WITH ECONOMY
WITH COMPCRT

\ BWAG |

07M wes) pan anaes

PROPOSES

eu LFA 64 + Oe
SSS SSS SSFP FOP ES



oe




xy pra :



AYS

7
Members of the Government of} 7

a

Out to natives of South Africa

nmment.

He said that they could ask the
Government to boycott those peo-
j ple but there were vicious circles
,2n the world when it came to
| business. Economics ruled the
world to-day and no one had any-
thing to say against principles
So long as his economic status was
not threatened,

It was a very atrocious act in
this twentieth century to find men
who were at the head of a Gov-
ernment such as the South African
Government making such dis-
criminatory laws, preventing
races from having, not only social
intercourse, but business inter-
eourse,

Social intercourse did not move
him, but when they segregated
people that they could not have
business rel itionships together he
would say that was going too far.

The Resolution should be passed
unanimously by the House so that
the Union sovernment would
Know that although they were
tiles apart from those people in

outh Africa their brother folk
were thinking of them = and
“bhorred the treatment meted
veut to them by Dr. Malan end
bis ilk

Dr. Malan was an apology for
a human being. He was insane
nd not normal and a case for a
sathologist. Hé was a madman
at large who perhaps got other

men a little saner than he was
80 along with him

Mr, E. D. Mottley (E) said thas
en address of that sort which was
designed to assist their brothers

to

in the Union of South Africa
should carry some weight, but ‘ne
could not vote for it as it was.

Those of them who had read Dr,
Malan’s statements must come .to
the conclusion that Dr. Malan was
ihe most inhuman being on earth,

They should. still remember
‘hat it was only a few months
aBo it was a section of the people
of Great Britain and some pe ople
in the U.N.O.-who had spoken
against Dr. Malan's treatment of
iegroes in South Africa,

Mr, Mottley after saying he did
| not think the addre was so
worded that it would carry enough -
weight, suggested the amend-
ments already stated. He
not agree at all with the

}

did

para

graph which suggested a boycott
ot South African goods, It was
not logical when they knew that
racial discrimination existed in




America, Canada, Australia,
England, and indeed all over the
world

Mr. E. L. Ward (EB) said that
he did not, agree with the Address
as it stocd. He was therefore
voting for the amendment. What
they were protesting against, was
the policy which the Government
of the Union of South of
had adopted:

At a time like the present when
they were trying to see that people
get equal rights,
unreasonable for the Union of
South Africa to enact such laws
which would create hardship and
depression on the natives of that
particular country.

Africa

he felt it was



Civies In Practice

The Fifth Form of the St.
Michael's Girls’ School paid a visit
to the House of Assembly yester-
day to see the procedure,

The pupils of that Form are
doing Civics which include a study
of central and local governments.

They were at their

seats before

| the House began and were watch-

ing attentively while the House
seetled down to the business of the
day.

The pupils,

+ the Advocate was
informed,

are studying the work
i of local government from the

ine purpose of sending four rep-
resentatives-—two from the Legis
jetive Council and two trom the
House of Assembly—to the Silver
Jubilee of the Imperial College ot
Tropical Agriculture, Trinidad.

Mr. Walcott (L) who took charge
of the Resolution, said that he was
goimg to ask leave of the Commit
tee to make an amendment by in
serting $1,040 in the Resolution in
place of $800,

He said that the money was tc |

cover the cost of passages anc
subsistence allowance for thre«
uays for four representatives and
their wives attending the celebra
tions to mark the Silver Jubilee
of the Royal Charter to the Im-
perial College of Tropical Agri
culture.

He said that some of the em-
ployees of the local Department of
Science and Agriculture had beer

trained at that College. The Res
olution was then passed without
debate.

Mr. Adams (L) had moved the
following Address to the Governor

The House of Assembly beg to
acknowiedge receipt of your Ex
eelency’s message No. 8 of 1951
relating to the invitation from the
Imperial College of Tropical Ag-
riculture, Trinidad, to this island
of Barbados, to be represented at
the Celebration of the Silver
Jubilee of the granting of the
Royal Charter.

The House baz to inform your
Excellency that they are willing
te accept the invitation and beg to
nominate Mr, F, L, Walcott, Sentor
Member for St. Peter, and Mr.
FE. D. Mottley, Senior Member fox
the City, as representatives from
their body to attend the said
celebration.



“Tribesman” Brings
11,186 Bags Cement

A shipment of 11,186 paper bags
of Portland cement arrived for
Barbados on Monday by the
Steamship Tribesman,

The Tribesman also brought
11,999 bags of sulphate of am
monia from Midd'esborough, She
is consigned to Messrg DaCosta
and Company Limited,

TRAVELLING ._ BANK
DOES WELL

The Travelling Office of the
Government Savings Bank has
completed its first week’s visit to
the principal Sugar Factories in
the Island.

Considering weather conditions
during the past two weeks, some
factories worked only part- time—
the result has been very satis-
factory.

The following table is a com-
parison of the results during the
first week for the three years dur-
ing which the office has been in
operation.

New Accounts No. of Amount |
opened deposits deposited
Loan 0 27 siso nat
10 w 158 O8
154 hy ORK RE







Panama Joins World
Health Organization |
NEW YORK,

Panama has become a member |
of the World Health Organization, |
it was announced recently. j

To date, 75 governments have
become full members of WHO and |
one has become an associate mem- |
ber. In the western hemisphere,
all but one of the American re= |
publics are members,

MOUNTS UP

REGINA
A total of $91.54 was contributed
last year by persons placing small
change in the coin box for mb |



blind, handily placed at the stamp
wicket of the Regina Post Office,

PAGE FIVE



SCIENCE’S LATEST







a? S$
~

All who have tried the
arrived “ Lifeguard ” germicide
declare it is an absolute
godsend. In a climate like this the
need for a really powerful germicide
Use “ Lifeguard ”
to prevent cuis, sores, bites, stings,
going septic. Gargle with it when-
ever there’s risk of infection ...

LIFECUARD..

THE SUPREME GERMICIDE AND ANTISEPTIC

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS carsavos) LTD.

AGENTS.

newly -
and

antiseptic

is most vital,









| See us for - - -

BRC FABRIC
EXPANDED METAL
| TEMPERED HARD BOARD
OIL STOVES & OVENS
Phone Phone

| Phone TUPRBERT Ltd. "233

pe] 1& bind Roebuck St., & Magazine Lane.

MT.

id
; PURINA CHOWS
@ FOR POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK

“See the Difference Purina Makes*’
e

gl. JASON JONES & COo., LTD.—Distributors. o
Se BUeuEneenaBenne

EASTER

FALLS ON 25th MARCH

ina serach, snpepeereeeitremecsienienetane oni,







We have in Stock - - -

CARD BOARD EGG SHELLS
in 8 sizes. Prices : 32c,, 28¢., and 26c.
These can be used for your Easter Gifts of
Ties, Searves, Handkerchiefs, Stockings, etc.
or can be filled with Guava Cheese, Barley
Sugar and other Sweets.

: ALSO :;

Chocolate Easter Eggs in Plastic Cases and
Marzipan Easter Eggs in Plastie Cups.

KNIGHTS LTD.—ALL BRANCHES













aude Report. ~(CP)
ne
iieindiadiladiiiiias aah =
ge LPPOCCPELOOOED SOOCOOOO>
% 1 - nat ‘ ‘ ‘
8 % GENTLEMEN ELITE Self colour Shirts FLITE White Shirts with truben-
% % trubenised collar attached, in ised collar attached, Sizes 14 to
g % GET THESE shades of Blue, Tan and Grey. 16% ins. —
% GRENADA TOUR | BOW tt 94.87 Sn Oe
= a ach b
2 Q oh abies Wilh poe
x % 1? ENDEAVOUR Striped Cambric
% AT ~ ) Athletic Supporters by Johnson & Pyjamas. Sizes 38 to 44 ins,
*
% KENSI | Johnson. Sizes Medium & Large _ 88. 30
s *
: NSINGTON OVAL s lich... ShGO Sua i cade cee ake
s on %
Linen Handkerchief»,
% 8 Hand Painted Ties — Scencries of ae ica hee os
$ Monday 12th Mar. vs. Carlton $$ Barbado, —
% Tuesday 13th Mar. vs. Colts %
% Thursday 15th Mar. vs. Empire x Gath i ie 25 POON cic cred bameiacaeed 70e.
S Saturday 17th Mar vs. Spartan
% Monday 19th Mar, vs. Colony M1 Striped Pyjamas, Sizes Mediur White Cotton Gloves for —
~ Admission 3) & Large— Size O.S, Men’s .
$$ SEASON TICKETS — $1.50 % |
x 1 50s | ; 4
% Obtainable from Carlton % UT esa has aL I $5. 72 Extra Oversize_ H6e.
xt members 2 |
% DAILY | |
% GEORGE CHALLENOR 3!
% | STAND a/. & 1 P D Cco., LTD
- 2/- °
% KENSINGTON STAND 2/. %| CAVE SHEPHERD & e
¢ OPEN STANDS 1/- ¥
3 GROUNDS 12, | 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
% PLAY STARTS 5 pm, 3)
2 %)

PMLA LLL AAA LLL LL

LPO AOL LL

CITY G

Sor
eG

LGPL SS LLL SE



hte! PE A EE CYT

GOOD/YEAR TIRES

NOW AVAILABLE
POPULAR

ARAGE

PEELS ASAP IPD

TRADING

LL LLLALL LALO LLAMA ALM MELLON ALAA L ALANS!

ote

' 44,4, 4, yt,
PPPOE PEEP EPEAT LDS P PVP POOP POPES OT POPROF >

MORE PEOPLE THE WORRD”OVER RIDE ON

U



IN
SIZES

ALL

ited Victor St.



Co.. a

5 OG OOOO OOOO

. Sy64
PPLE SSVSF OSSD

$59 3999SO008O

PPPS SOGISS







PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADYOCATE WEDNESDAY, MABCH 7, 1951
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON | gy : cee Dene a AE PAPE ee ae a ea a

A MORE 1 Killed in 7 Minutes

: akin nearly 60 million tiny seams
ae eae gerne hide and cause ter-

and pores

, Boze Peeling,
pile Htching. Crecingworm, Psoriaals,
Blackheads, Pimples, Foot Itch and other

t ve on
L A M U S Berpun Pat ezofe he aS nae
very, -

cause, The ner eaeo ers

w
kills the in
, Gear, attrac-
oe ve pee 2 out. a

on return of

Besa ee
YOU! Niggderm 255

ii) ? *
| 7? Learn from
the hospital.

Society's most beautiful women
the world over rely on Pond’s Face



7 Pewder to enhance their loyeli- Wh

THREE OF THE FACES ARE FRIENDLY 2 . eS ore

es wee. BUT TUAT FOURTH ONE sn! . a ness. Follow their lead and see : f, ction

a OF NATNES ~ fy oo , what a difference the right shade -
WHO_COULP ’ TERY = am threatens
HELP ME! af \< y (6 o \ y of face powder can make to your
: c complexion; how wonderfully soft in your home,
and clear it can look. use â„¢

Sifted through the finest silk,
Pond's Face Powder is as finely
textured as powder can be. So it

=~ | i gces on with extra-special smooth.
ah wr ness and clings for hours.

BY CHIC

‘DETTOL’

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

Deodorant . . . Non-poisonous
Doesn't Pain . . . Doesn't Stain



Pond’s Face Powder is delicately’

perfumed and comes in an ador- Suffe ing from
able Dreamflower Box. You'll find E

( / SL uy om 94) WZ,
it at all the best beauty counters. . acia- cud
5k ZSTOMAC! vy
POND’S FACE PowDER

IN @ LOVELY SHADES






RENNIES
GIVE YOU



THE OF RAILRO;
THIEVES AND THAI HE'S THE ON!
WHO KILLED THE MEN IN THE
TELEGRAPH OFFICE! ry

handbag, i
apres. If they don’t oe

it’s high time you saw your
doctor. All chemists i

sell Rennies-
RE nh J i ES
NO SPOON, NO WATER...
Suck them like sweets




ARE YOU
More_Irritable

These Days?

Has the “‘wear-and-tear”’ of
living

VOTEO HIM 3 T a oe i dane
THE BOY MOST LIKELY . ; ue ~ OFDRIC GEE VOU BULLY
TO BE PRIME Mi R tu ++. VES... P EWE GAYE PF I'VE
D A H 820 MUCH ABOUT You

MT modern ith its daily
SPRL b i struggle to make ends meet
TALL A shake of Vim, a quick | = Gespite shretages eg e

rub with a damp cloth, nerves? Do you feel you're not

2 getting enough rest—and feel so
and surfaces are spot- fr’ ~ oagy i aor wen, ou eat
. . = 10}
lessly clean and bright. Vim cleans - Well, Fire ; ark help the
so thoroughly — smoothly —easily. £° Tr tee ry ag ey
Because thousands of Cana-
dian men and women say they
find they take these worries in









: — 7 Chase's Nerve Food for a while

. , cleans everything . _ This well-known tonic’ which

7 hly and dil ] other “needed minerals-“helps
BRINGING UP FATHER . BY GEORGE MC. MANUS canes smoothly and speedily , cae are Steet rae





ll aan in toning up your whole system.
0. x Get Dr Chase’s Nerve Food
po better, ent better, fost fetter: ‘The

wW/IKIN SEE BY iS: : * your

fae Way THINGS Wzwlecs! COME 3 “Dr. Chase” ia your
ae BAC ie pb OOk® The “economy
“ly ASIF THOSE size” is your best buy. 13





HISODOL
TABLETS
HISODOL

POWDER

BISURATED MAGNESIA
Powder & Tablets










LIVONAL
EPHAZONE TABLETS
HERES THE PITCH... Ki WAITIN’ TIRED, MR. SMITH ? DDS PILLS
we pirne.ee eens. 2 of BEEN PLAYIN’ Bo F
LANDS, WELL SLUG KIRBY AND [x THAT FISH FER TWO YEASTVITE TABLETS
j GRAB THE BOY WITH THE BUCKS! //” eae ! ae 7
IVE GOT A PAST CAR WAITIN’ !
ape ke !





Make KLM Your Airline
in the Caribbean

North and South, East and West, KLM routes over
the Caribbean measure more than six thousand miles. Twenty
different cities are brought within hours of each other by .
fast, luxurious airliners. Make KLM your airline in the
West Indies and enjoy the same fine meals ‘and su-
perb service that have made KLM famous
throughout the world.

For Information Call . .

INSIDE THE DOOMED PLANE,
HTS PAST s =

PHANTOM F/G

it Can Conquer
S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO.LTD. i yours also

Dial 4613

SACROOL is
on sale at
KNIGHT'S LTD.

and all other Drug Stores
SSS SSE

WORLD'S FIRST AIRLINE





























SDAY, MARCH 7,



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.



The charge for announcements of
Birthe, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage of Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash, Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after p.m.

:

THANKS





FOSTE"—The family of Mr. DARRY A.
POSTER. late M.C.P., gratefully return

thanks to all who attended the funeral, | Sh€ba, to approved tenants.

FOR RENT

Minimum charge weék 72 cents and
'
96 cents s 24 _
- "Sunday, words over 24
word Sundays.



i

HOUSES

Sen Sie el a
HOUSES; Gibb's Béach, St. Peter fully



furnished, “IN-an-OUT’,’ suitable for
couple, from May “RESTAWHILE” 3
bedrooms, June, October. November,
December. Apply: Wesley Bayley, High
Street. 7.3.51—I1n

HOUSE; 3-vedroom modern house,

situated Top Rock, unfurnished. Avail-
able immediately on 6 months or 1%
months lease. For viewing, Ring 4683,
or 8569. 7.3.51—3n
ee

“KEN-ERME”, seaside residence, Bath-
Available

sent wreaths, cards, or letters of sym-|APril and onward. Linen and cutlery

pathy in their sudden bereavement.
Elizabeth Foster, (Wife), David,
John, Wesley, Hubert (Sons); Ermie
Clarissa, Eleen, Gloria (Daughters). ;
7.3.51—I1n

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 12 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.





AUTOMOTIVE

CAR: One 1948 Model Austin Ado,
Countryman—13,000 miles. Al condition.
Dial 2838. 6.3.51—3n



CAR: One Morris Minor in perfect con-
dition, Owner driven—done 1,600 miles.



Apply: A. Garnes, Brin Ville, Jemmotts
Lane, after 4 p.m 7.3.51.—a
ELECTRICAL

—————————

ELECTRIC STOVES & HOT. PLATES.
Piease drop in and see them. John F
Hutson Ltd 7.3.51—2n

tint etter eetnen tanita lanpirinnaltotatimiuie
ELECTRIC TOASTERS at John F. Hut-
son Lid. 7.3.51—2n

LL
PLECTRIC IRONS at John F. Hutson
Ltd 1.3. 51-21

ELECTRIC VACUUM CLEANERS.
Please drop in and see them John F
Hutson Ltd 7.3. 51—2y

ELECTRIC KETTLES
Hutson Ltd









John

7

at F

3.51—2n



LIVESTOCK

a
HORSES—2 y.o. Gelding “Ladyswan"
(Jim Gackerjack ex Sugar Lady) un-
named 2 y.o. gelding (Jim Gackerjack
ex Princess Stella). Apply: J. R.

Eawards. Telephone 2520.
27.2,51—t.f.n,

HORSE Chestnut yr. old by
Jetsam out of H.B, Mare (Ginger) Dam
o* Miss Friendship, Can be seen at Easy
Hall Plantation. Phone 95—263. By kind
permission of the Stewards of the
B.T.C. this Animal will be offered for
sale at the Paddock just after the 3 p.m.
Race on Saturday 10th March, 1951.

4.3.51—To

1

———————

MULE: One (1) large Chestnut Mule,
Marte, Cort and Harness, E. A. Daniel,
Baxters Rd. Dial 2464 7.3.51—6n



POULTRY

2 White Wyandotte Cockerels bred
from imported laying strain. Price $4.00
each or exchange for value in Corn, or
Poultry for eating. Dial 3394.

6.3.51—3n



MISCELLANEOUS
ANTIQUE FURNITURE — Call at Ralph
Beards. furnishing showroom, ood
Alley. Phone 4683, 6.3.51—6n

ANTIQUES, which include a good
variety of Glass, China etc, Call in at
Ralph Beard’s furnishing showroom
Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.





6.3.51—6n

ANTIQUE CLOCKS At Ralph
Beard’s furnishing showroom, Hardwood
Alley. Phone 4683, 6.3.51—6n

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrese with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.£.n.





COINS—Collection of old silver and
ecpper coins, for inspection call 4476,
1.3,51—t.f.n.

CHATRS—Tubular Chairs $9.17 each.
With arms $12.00. At Ralph Beard’s
Showroom, Hardwood Alley, 6.3.51—6n

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and
draperies. By_ Kirsch. Dial 4476 A,
BARNES & CO., LTD, 13.2.51-—t.f.n

DIVING MASK & SWIM FINS. Phone
S497. 6.3.51—3n











DOORS—Several pairs of pitch pine
doors, suitable for Garage or Warehouse

with large hinges. To be seen at
Willdale, Marine Gardens. I. M, G.
Simpson. 1,3,51—6n,



LIPTON’S TEA; This brand is used by
discriminating consumers the world over
and a testing sample is yours @or the
asking. Save that part of the label indi-
csting weight and return to us as the
are valuable. John F. Hutson Ltd

7,3.51—2n

a
MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin.
guished solution to your special
erchitectural problem of door closures,
ecreens. movab-. partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & UO,, LTD.

Nee ee et
One DOMO CREAM SEPARATOR—
perfect order, very little used, practically









new. Mrs. Peebles, Ba'yleys, St. Philip
7.3.51—an
PIANO (Upright) Monington & Wes-
ton, Dial 4196 7.3.51—-1n
PIANO—Piano upright. Good tone
$175.00 at Ralph Beard'’s showroom
Hardwood Alley, Phone 4683.
6.3.51—3n

a STAMPS: Two complete sheets of Bar-

bedos surcharged One-penny or Two-
pence, Offers P.O. Box 92.
7.3,51—t.f-n.

STEPLADDERS — 6 tread Steel Step-
lidders $12.94 and 4 tread $9.88, At Ralph
Beard’s Showroom, Hardwood Alley.

6.3.51—61

-
THREE VENETIAN BLINDS. Size 4 ft
by 4 ft. Phone 8497. 6.3.51—3n

————

TO WHOLESALERS ONLY—Stocks of
Enamel Ware which includes; Pails,
Chambers, Bowls, Pie Dishes, Kettles,
Call at Ralph Beard's Show room, Hard-
wood Alley. 6.3.51—6n

VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirseh Sun-aire
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to
your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO,, LTD. 13.2,51—t.f.n,

YACHT,— Yawl “Frapeda” approx.
37% ft. long, with gray marine engine
Recently painted and in good condition









Apply: Vincent Burke. Telephone 4560
or 2026. 27.2.51--t.{£.n.

2% Running fect Verandah Rail. 3 ft
high made of 1 in. square bar iron

H. C. Manning, Newlands, St. Michael,
6.3.51—3n







LOST



On the
Filling
return

One (1) Gold
Between Fairview
Péter. Finder please
Douglas, Country Rd
6,.3.51—I1n
—_——- +
GOLD HORSESHOE PIN set with
white Pearls, between, Worthing Guest
«. Royal Hotel, Race Track, Bridge-
St. John’s Church
turned to Mrs. McCulloueh
Guest House #133

EARRING
Sth inst
Station, St.
to J. D.



ii
te or

Worthing
7.3.51—



¢ Rn”
Se

TICKET
DD. 0770

re<

Reward if



optional. Dial 2550 for particulars.
6.3.51—2n

Oe eS

ROOM WITH BOARD— In spacious
residence on sea, large double room and
bath also one single. Private sandy
beach, extensive grounds, excellent food.
Telephone 8372. 6.3.51—3n



ISDON, Maxwells Coast. Fully
furnished, 3 bedrooms, Dial 8417 or 4559,

7.3.51—3n

PUHLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,

minimum charge $1.50 on eek:
and $1.80 on Sundays bs ea.

AUCTION
UNDER *HE IVORY HAMMER

By order of the Commissi
sean on Michael 1 on Fr
c at the yard of the Scav
Dept.. Church Village, (1) 1945 ‘Dodge
Truck (Army Type) complete with plat-
form and in running order. Must be sold
Sale at 1 p.m. - Terms Cash.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer





‘ ot
will sell on Friday

6 3.51—4n
__———

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

WALL BOARD
By recommendation of Lloyds Agents,
will sell on WEDNESDAY the 7th;
sheets Wallboard at Messrs. Wilkinson
& Haynes Co., Ltd. Prince Alfred St.
Sale 1.30 o'clock. Terms Cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
Auctioneers.

w



6.3.51—2n



REAL ESTATE

“LASCELLES”, situate at Worthing
Christ Church, standing on 14,411 square
feet of land. The house is built of stone
and contains, open and closed galleries,
drawing and dining rooms, three bed-
rooms, breakfast room kitchenette and
usual out offices Garage and Servants
room in yard, Inspection by appointment.
Dial 8394 4

The above will be set up for sale at,
Public Competition at our office in Lucas |
Street, Bridgetown, on Tuesday the 13tn
March 1951 at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors,
7.3.51—6n,

Se ey

PROPERTY known as No. 24, James
Street standing on 2,181 square feet of
land. This property is situate at Lower
Jemes Street, opposite James Street
Church and {§ suitable for business prem-
ises.

Inspection any day on application to the
tenant.

This property will be set up for sale by
Public Competition at our Office No. 14,
James Street at 2 p.m. on Friday 16th
March 1951.

YEARWOOD & ROYCE
Solicitors
7.3.51-—9n |
be received by the}
up to the 15th day of
March 1951, for the buildings known
as Calais (land not included) situated
on Dover Coast, Christ Church. The *
purchaser to demolish the buildings and
clear the land within thirty days from
the daté of purchase,
K. E. McKENZIE,
Neils Plantation, St. Michael.
24.2.51—6n.







OFFERS will
undersigned







The substantial block of commercial
buildings standing on 13,704 sq. ft. of
land with frontage on Broad Street,
Prince Alfred St., and Chapel St., the
property of Central Foundry Limited and
tenanted by British Bata Shoe Co,, M.
Altman & Sons Ltd., K. R. Hunte & Co.,,
Ltd., and others

The undersigned will offer the same
premises by public competition at their
office, 17 High St., Bridgetown, on Friday
Sth March, 1951 at 2 p.m.

Further lars from—
Cc » CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
23 2 51.—7n.



PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.



NOTICE

THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW
VESTRY BY-ELECTION
I HEREBY give notice that I have
appointed the Yestry room near the
Almshouse at Belleplaine, as the place
where all persons duly qualified to
vote at the Election of Vestryman for
the said Parish, may meet on Monday
March 12th 1951, between the hours of
10 ahd 11 o'clock in the morning to
elect a Vestryman in the place of Darry
Atfield Foster (deceased),
Signed C. A. Skinner,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Andrew.
3.3.51—8n.





NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
The Vestry of St. Philip hereby notifies
the public that the facilities of the King
George V. Memorial Park can be rented
for dances, amusements, etc.
Applications for hire can be arranged
with the Churchwarden Mr. D. D.
Garner M.C.P., Marchfield, St. Philip.
P. 8. W. SCOTT,
Clerk, to the Vestry, St. Philip.
3.3.51—Tn



NOTICE

The Parochial Treasurer's Office, St
Michael will be closed at 12 o'clock noon
on Thursday 8th March 1951.

PERCY H. BURTON,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Michael.
6.3.51—2n



TAKE NOTICE



That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE
COMPANY, © corporation of the State
of OHIO, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is The
Gwynne Building,. Sixth and Main
Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A., has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in re-
spect of vegetable shortening and
cooking fat, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 2nd day of March 1951 unless some
person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office
of opposition of such registration. The



trede mark can be seen on application
at my office
ting} Dated this Ist day of March, 1951
H, WILLIAM
Registrar of Trade



@ word weeky4 Cents a) tenes, wa See


















BARBADOS ADVOCATE
GOVERNMENT NOTICES

—_———————

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words -~ over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.











Articles to be Sold at Auction at Customs on
the 8th March, 1951, at 11.00 am.

WANT OF ENTRY GOODS UNDER TRADE ACT 1910—4
SECTION (48) 3&4

Marks & Numbers





'
|,.A YOUNG

HELP

MAN with busines expe
tetaty for a local Company
Apply by letter onjy, to

COTTLE, CATFORD & Cx



1-6 Deseription of Qoods



———
A LADY for general office work with





Pee re re ee e ;
knowledge of typing. A Junior for gen- K R. Hunts 2 Co., Ltd 4 pte (3) Pkg. sonD,
¢ral_ office work. Apply by letter oniy| Harrison & Co., Ltd. ?.7One (1) Pkg. Drugs.
to R. M. Jones & Company Liniaga d. Ni H, & Ge. ‘ «+ }One (1) Carton Squashes.
2i— an, . *. ¢ .
To La TT dtislbitorn tie fe CS: és és $.] Three (3) Odd Shoes.
ex: ene ‘eachers are needed Aj rhe ~ciei
to fill vacancies on the Staff of the Middle | 2 Medina vies ..|One (1) Pkg. Medic ine.
Schoot of Naparima Girls’ High Schoo! | Y. D. L. 4662 One (1) Case Xmas Decora-
ay from April Agen. tions
erence will be given to those with | __ j me
Schoo! Certiteste” thon the Cambridge} K, R. H. 62112 .. | One ; ») Carton Carboard Car-
ubjects to include, History, Needle- Ons.
work and Physical Training. Nmptage, 2 Yne ‘ase rertisi Si
, Oe ae ee — be made in writ- N uM ers F z ; On oO ‘Bal — ons
ny ncipal. jwN/d us es =. ee : ea :
6.3.51—n | Manning & Co., Ltd. .. e-}One (1) Parcel Samples
WANTED FOR BRITISH GUIANA rG.G 1% Two (2) Cases Dried Fruit.
OPPORTUNITY for experienced senior! J), [hberson Va os «. | One (1) Hammock.

male Assistant in country General Store.













five hours river steamers from Port}/ Manning & Co., Ltd. One (1) Carton Calendars.
ae eee All - cone FOL Of
ge essential. Free house UN LAIM UN TRA lad
Hours— 8—12 and 2.30—6.30. Wednesday | c ED BAGGAGE DER DE ACT 1910-4
half-holiday, Salary £450 per annum |} SECTION 119.
ond upward according to experience. |
Seete hiae oat Onty men wita | N/m ; r; A ..]/One (1) Carton Cigarettes.
Apply in writing with copies of recent | Capt. Eide v's ee +» {One (1) Carton Cigarettes
references to Box 139, C/o this Paper Torville , ko T ne
stating age, experience, marital status, M. Norvill ‘ i One (I) Pkg. Tobacco.
ond if married, state number of children. |-). Christiansen aa «| Two (2) Cartons Cigarettes,
4.3.51—Sn | N /M et IF One (1) 5-lb. Tin Margarine.
HOUSEKEEPER — With Hotei or] ~ wan - FOL HUTY TNHheES THDANP any
Boarding House experience. Write stat- GOODS ABANDONED FO DUTY UNDER TRADE ACT

























ing all qualifications to Box X.M.G. 1910-4 SECTION 80
4.3.51—3n. et: eh P dtehidnitn Kinin nasil ncietheti itll’
Young Lady with knowledge of type- Whom Abandoned Deseription of Goods.
writing and Shorthand. Freferably one _—_
with some previous experience in Dosis . pe 1 . lace 'P uw Imitea op
Commission Office work. Bradshaw & Co, ; oe One (1) ( ase Pypew riter Parts
Apply in writing to :— dos Import & Export Co. [One (1) Case Liquor Samples
pen A. LENCE oP on iio Robert Thom Ltd, One (1) Case — Potassium
a4 Pudactown: Cyanide,
pibieteciobntiendes Five (5) Empty Drums.
One (1) Carton Canned Meat.
MISCELLANEOUS

One (1) Carton Merchandise.

Seventy-five (75) Ctns. Para-
fin Wax.

One (1) Piece Galv. Tron Pipe

———
GOODS SEIZED AND FORFEITED UNDER TRADE ACT
1910-4 SECTION 135 (1)





PAYING GUEST—Male or Female, or
Married couple in Belleville District, in
a very quiet home, Box C.W,
Advocate Co. 3.3.51

IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-
lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.
Phone 4429 or call at GORRINGES, ad-
joining Royal Yacht Club

20.2.51.—T.F.N.

aaa
IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniaturer jade,
ola BWt Stamps. GORRINGES,

Antique Shop. Dial 4429,
20.2.51,—t.f.n.

PERSONAL

By Whom Forfeited Deseription of Goods





One (1) Bateau Contg.
Six (6) Deal Planks

—

“GOODS SEIZED AND FORFEITED UNDER TRADE ACT
1910-4 SECTION 135 (1)
Attempted Exportation Without xport Licence.

Una Rice on





: _— ——— -_———-

Seized on Board Daerwood

SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

" ¢ +
The publie are hereby warned against Two-(2) Bars Soa p.
giving credit to my wife WINEFRED
LYNCH (nee Boucher) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me
NEBERT LYNCH,
Prout Hill,
St. Thomas.





6,3.51—2n

Sailing from Amsterdam, Dover and
Madeira—s.s. ‘‘Cottica’ 2nd, 3rd, 9th
TAKE NOTICE February, 1951, M.S. “Bonaire” 9th,
10th. 16th Marci 1863, Cie Gle Transatlantique

Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam—-
m.s. “Helena” 12th, 15th, February 1951,
m.s. “Willemstad” §th, 15th, February
1951, m.s. “Oranjestad” 9th, 15th Mareh
1951.

Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and
Georgetown—m.s, “Bonaire” 27th Janu-
ary 1951; m.s, “Cottica’”’ 20th, February
1951; ms. “Helena” 3rd March 1951.

Sailing to Trinidad, La Gutara, Cura-
cao ete—m.s, “Oranjestad” Ist February
1951.

Sailing to Plymouth, Antw â„¢ ster-
dam—m.s. “Oranjestad” a

SAILINGS TO
ENGLAND & FRANCE

COLOMBIE: March 12th
via Martininque and
Guadeloupe

=: March 31
via St. Lueia, Martinique,

DETTOL

GASCOGNE :





& CO., LTD.,
| ee ee * ‘Agents Guadeloupe, Antigua
SOUTHBOUND
The M/V “CARIBBEE” will

COLOMBIE: March Ist

aceept Cargo and Passéngers for

Dow.iniea, Antigua, : en Te Trinidad, Lid Guiara,
ma oy on i me ea a Curacao, Cartegena,
day 9 st.

Jamaica
Accepting Cargo, Mail
Passengers



M/¥Y “DAERWOOD will

The
That RECKITT & COLMAN LIMITED, | accept Cargo and Passengers for



|
|
\

Lucia, Grenada and Aruba and




|
|
|
|



British Limited Liability Company, St soeay 2
Manufacturers, of Kingston Works, Passengers only ag Nl ~

Dansom Lane, Mull, England, has! Sad ling Thursday oat net. R M JONES & Co Ltd
applied for the registration of a trade, ; e a
thark in Part “A” of Register in re-|j| 8.W.1. Sonne weer o Me Ke ’

spect of pharmaceutical preparations | pe ASSOCIA ’ AGENTS

for human use and for veterinary use, | Yel, 4047,

sanitary substances, disinfectants, Phone 3814
germicides and insecticides, and will }

be entitled to register the same after |



S—_—_—_—_—=

one month from the 2nd day of March
1951, unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
déen on application at my office.

‘Canadian National Steamships



Dated this Ist day of March, 1951, SOUTHBOUND deus satio CD aS athe
eo eet Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbador
Registrar of Trade Marts. “LADY RODNEY" 3 Mar. 5 Mar. 14 Mar. iS Mar
“LADY NELSON” o 19 Mar, 21 Mar, 30 Mar. 31 Mar
“CAN. CHALLENGER" - 2 Apr -- 12 Apr. 12 Apr
TAKE NOTICE “LADY RODNEY” - 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 27 Apr = 27 Apr
HBOUN Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
— fe Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax
“LADY RODNEY" 27 Mar 28 Mar. 6 Apr. 7 Apr --
| “LADY NELSON” 12 Apr. 14 Apr. 23 Apr. -- 24 Apr
‘ “LADY RODNEY” 10 May. 12 May, 21 May. - 22 May

N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All veswels fitted with cold storage cham.
bers. Passenger Fares and freight 1ates on application to :-~



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD. — Agents.

HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM





That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE
COMPANY, a corporation of the State
of Ohio, United States of America,



|

Whose trade or business address is The
Gwynne Building, Sixth and main |
Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, VER eas Due

jL fe th gistration of a trade
Pent th “Part oR ee oe xB. Vessel from Leaves Barbados

toilet d bath soap, and wi 7 5

Re eniitied to vegister the same. alter $8. “PACIFIC STAR” .. Liverpool 28th Feb. 15th Mar.
one month from the 2nd dey i awe Be STATESMAN” .. London 3rd Mar. 18th Mar.
1951, unless some person shall in the .S. “SUCCESSOR” rt : Mar. r ar.
rneantime ive ngtice in iupticate to ss oaneneee Glade e Tth

t office of opposition of 5 =e * oe sgo
registration, The trade mark can be South Wales» 10th Mar. 25th Mar,
seon oh epplication at mz omMes. 3.8, “SPECIALIST” London Qist Mar, ‘4th April

ted this Ist day of March, 1951.
ree H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
3.3.51—3n.

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

‘Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S.S. “PLANTER” London 10th March

For further information apply to - - -
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, tor sail-

ing to Europe, The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.



nee

TAKE NOTICE

Wy

sr =










‘JOHN M. BLADON

wa

That RECKITT & COLMAN LIMITED,









British Limited Liability Company,
Manufacturers, of Kingston Work
Dansom Lane Hull, England has
applied for the registration of o« trade AFS., F.V.A,
mark in Part “A of Register in re- |
spect of pigments and colo not fos |
leundry or toilet purpose md will FOR
be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 2nd day of March |
1951, unless sore person shall in the |
méantime give notice in duplicate to]
mé at my office of oppositio such |
trade mark |
or . ff i > ~ . *
jay of Marci i REAL ESTATE AGENT — AUCTIONEER -—- SURVEYOR
H, WIld1JAM | ’Phone 4640 Plantations’ Building
Registrar of Trade a
!







TAKE NOTICE
DOLSA

Theat RECKITT & COLMAN LIMITED,
British Limited Liability Company
Manufacturers, of Kingston Works,
Dansom Lane, Mull, England has
applied for the registration of trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in re
spect of medicmal and pharmaceut cal
preparations for the relief of internal
disorders, but not including prepara-
tions for the relief of rhewmatiam or
arthritis or goods of ao like kind to
these exchided goods, and witl be
entitled to register the savie after ane
month from the 2nd da? of Murch
951, uniess some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
ne at my office of opposition of such
egistration. The trade mark can be
seen On application at my office.
Dated this Ist day of March, 1951
H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Mark:
3.3.52.-—-3n





SCIENTIFIC MASSAGE
Massage is indispensable to
Boxers and other Athletes. Why

not to CRICKETERS? It relieve
conjestion, pain stiffness and
eliminates fatigue poisons. “GIV
IT A TRIAL.
WILLIAM JOHNSON,
Crumpton Street,
Bridgetown,













FOR YOUR INSURANCE

NEEDS _- CONSULT
ANDREW D. SHEPPARD |
Representing



WANTED FOR CASH

Used & Mint Stamps

of Barbados and the other Islands
of the British West Indies, GOOD

PRICES PAID at CARIBBEAN
STAMP SOCIETY, No. 10 Swan
Street, 3.3.51—4n,



lO

“IT HAS Ir
| #

has stile,

has Beauty of Colour,
has correct modetn tines
has durability,

has all you want,

the modern De Luxe
Table Model Gas Hotplate
Priced to sell
at your Gas
Bay St

See it Showroom

Don't forget friends

The Bee-Bop Dance
TO-NIGHT

At QUEEN'S PARK
from 9 p.m
ADMISSION 2/
Music by C. B. Browne's
Orchestra
BAR SOLID
Promoter: Charles Lynton

To All Expectant



Mothers
Please be informed that we have
just opened the most hygiene

Diapers, Fave Cloths, Hankies, Bed
Spreads, etc, wae
We are the only importers of thix
class of goo@s in the island. Cat
early to avoid disnppuintment

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.

Dial 4100 where you will find

dods unobtainable at other Stores

and the prices very low
7A51—2n



“T LEAP OVER THE WALL”
By Monica Baldwin,
A MORNING AT THE OFFICE
~By Edgar Mittelholzer,






AT
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
a Ree oe eS
Fresh shipment of —
ENAMEL. IT
in alt coloure

JOHNSON'S fianowate















A very attractive
MODERN HOUSE

having every convenience,
3 Bed-rooms, Blectric
lights & water 11% miles
from Bridgetown on main
bus route, 5 minutes wali
from the sed, standing on
12,000 sq. feet of land,

BED-ROOM COTTAGE
with one acre of good land
within 2 miles of Bridge.
town. Electric lights ‘anc
yater

See .

CECIL JEMMOTT
Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy
33 Broad St. ::: Phone 4563

“2






ONLY NI

View by

PRICE with ONI





\W HOUSE FOR SALE ON THIS COAST
ALL MAIN SERVICES
Appointment Only Telephone 9172 }

ACRI



PAGE SEVEN





OFFICIAL NOTICE

BARBADOS IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

In pursuane notice all persons
” claim incurmbrance in or
the pr y of the Defendant) to
itnesses, documents and

1906, 1 heret to
any
pron

their

hancery Act dc
te, ritht or interest
inafter mentioned (the
their ms with

len

or



ha
effecting
bring bef



an
erty
Mm account of























voucher éxamined by me, o Tuesday or Friday between the hours
12 ne at the Registration Office, Public Build-
ings, Brid day of May, 1951 in order that
such claim ed aceording to the nature and priority
thereof respec ei? will be precladed from the benefits
any decree and be deprived of ’ t t again uid property
PLAINTIFF JAMES ARTHUR TUDOR
DEFENDANT MERTON CLEMENT HURDLE
PROPERTY. ALI. THAT certain piece parcel lar situate at Welchman Hal
in the parish of Saint Thomas a lotand aforesaid contaiming by ad-
veasurement 3. roeods 17 perches or thereabouts (of which area.4
perches are in the public ad hereinafter mentioned) abutting and
: bounding on lands formerly of McD. Chandler but now of Joe Cave
on lands of the Estate of William Small, deceased on lands now or
late of one Mayers on lands of Hizhland Plantation and on the Pub;
lic Read or however else the same may abut and bound TOGETHER
with the messuage or dwellinghouse and ali and singular other the
buildings and erections thereon
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.
Bill fled 19th January, 195) .
Dated 6th Match, 1951 $








































PROTECT THE LIFE OF YOUR BELTS

with
“FLEXO” BELT DRESSING
Obdtainable at

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER HEAD LANE.



Tak: this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :~—
GALVANISED. & STEAM PIPE

Ranging from 14 In. upwards

MILD STEEL
Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes

BOLTS & NUTS—AIll Sizes

FILTER CLOTH~—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.

The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid.

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST, MICHAEL

FOGARTY'S
SPRING
COLLECTION

SILK STRIPES, Exquisitely
coloured

CRISP LINENS & RAYONS
FLORAL CREPES

LOVELY. EMBROIDERED
NETS

Admirably «appropriate for

Bridesmaids’ Dresses
‘BRIDAL VEILS and WREATHS
SILVER TINSEL BROCADE

and other
White materials

ORDERED ESPECIALLY FOR
BRIDES’ DRESSES

Wm. FOGARTY LTD.


























several Gorgeous












FOR SALE

“Manzanilla”
ST. JAMES
(Next to Colony Club)

147 Beach Frontage
Perfect Bathing

ca tas
FSS SSS

\

Looe se
SSS Sa

£ 16,500;

FREEHOLD

eee
Pa

with

)

ACRES £13,500









PAGE £IGHT

B.G. Must























































Seore 510 GO





















BARBADOS ADVOCATE



































VERNOR PRESENTS Golfers Qualify for Island Title



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1951





FOR A SMOOTH, COOL SKIN



















}
}
. Yr" 3
K c ‘hristie’s score of eoffrey Manning 89
. CRICKET PRIZES Ly, K, K. Christie's scare of Gtytres baming s | the beauty cream
* a> j 2 79 led the field of qualifiers fc Sehis Garecs ae | s ‘ 3
i Ose if Ss a "hE the Open Amateur Championship DA COSTA CUP 92 | that is a treatment
THE GOVERNOR presented prizes to various mem- at the Rockley Golf and Country FA. Bemtanain 112) 92 |
, Moet : . ani ny s ° , an Niblock (1) 92 |
bers of the Barbados and Trinidad cricket teams for out- _ nag mage 1, Bp warwesng NE BL. Rhodes (14) 7
° * : . ‘ . sixteer oO ste ers playe < PF ‘won'n (75) | .
(By O. S. COPPIN) standing performances at the conclusion of the Intercolonial {f4j; way to place in the select K. R Saiseatestth-<5 cc civcconsexe 16 *MAZELINE SNOW" =—e
KINGSTON, Jamaica, March 5 Tournament at Kensington on Monday afternoon. circle which will compete for the }Â¥ Nurse (16) 6 rotects the skin from dust
* z oear Ue = ts A Mr, J. M. Kidney, Junior Vice 7 Téland honours. Two strokes back V King :23) 93 | : P 7
IN A SPATE of run-getting to-day Jamaica added: 304 president of the Barbados Cricket Co. Ltd.. for the best bowling averagim CP, leader was James O'Neal . Vanneck (20) 2 | : and dirt . .. guards against sun
to the overnight total of 94, in 294 minutes, putting A Ny bet ssking the 10 prese py Messrs. G. W. Hutchin- and in third place was Bryan Wl Grannum (2iy rots cools the skin immediately
; : : - fi ‘ rt ‘ R. Innis 22 } » :
94 runs in the second innings at the ena af the Gow @ pres the prizes Oo Ne es Mee wae es Pr casting Oe = = it is applied .. . so refreshing
Y uns e iis Py he Ave » on Barbados side— s a ay sete w ° a 3 . .'
day's play in the first Jamaica British Guiana a : 2 * ait af Letter cae : “ a af ve ceeman haa Be owen aotatoner (a8) 105 softens and perfumes the
’ a > ea a ‘nian © aAVING COM 11 Presented “by _ Messrs Alexander failure, . 0 “nne * Colin Bellamy (24) Mt skin. its that shiny look
b Led by a flawless 121 by Neville Bonitto, .ne Soy 4, Hayley & Co., for attractive batting ‘member of the Barbados team : peavemy y
maican batsmen could not be heid. They scored behind yy the Governor had 2}4., und Weeping —B, Beaall “Which fecently played in Trini- " cleanses thoroughly, gently
sh “y evene t sw 2 nm 2M in« been t gton most days to 12. Presented by Messrs. C arrie t alify for *hampion- r eo . :
clock until they evened m atters Vv ith 200 in } min bee ’ on oe io = Presented b ena Ee Bere oy a Oey te ee aa C wealth Draw > *Haseline Saow’ dees so much fer o> — matt
te 1 ihat all other times before the clock. With £& i oud Pesan ados side—E. Weekes--Hat Sera tanen ae places in the your skin. Manes ta weee wee feundation for powder
on the fir ings, Jamaicé , compellec . mg 13 ed by Mestrs. Y. de Lima & Island a aoe M trust it as they do no other beaut
i ym the first nnings, J Maica now SOR e eG keen interest in Co., Ltd.. for ; verage on st flight, ut Hunte had gn off Last atch Of Tour Stee te oeheehy cates oak
Britis na to score 510 runs or be defeated outright. : » the isiand Trinidat side--J. St er—Pen & Gay and missed by three shots seasons, so good for treating little
— Se SERA anS eae REREAD Trim wes the most-eccurate of During the early part of the ,, enn by Messrs. Knights Ltda, when he took a 94 over the 18- BOMBAY, March 6. blemishes, oo greasy, ‘ Hazeline
° yn B.G. bowlvurs. maintaining 4 good teurnamen: they had to postpone for best batting average on Barbados Hole test. The Commonwealth ericket Snow’ should be your daily choice,
Cricket i OUP tensth and pace and capturing 4 ft owing to rain and were doubly ,, side—C. L. Walcott~Shaving Sst. Tt wes necessary to do 91 or team drew their last match of the
e ‘or 83 ia Wy overs. Tne wicke* grateful to Col. Michelin for Sone Lid.. for good fihting innings etter .to.get in for the inaten tour against the Prime Minister’s ’ ’
: _- - was q bit dusty but not playing lending them the Fire Brigade’s = —D. Atkinson—Pads. play struggles, that will decide XI here today, HAZELINE SNOW
Cost $5,500 wricks while the crowd is stilt Sigmund pump to clear’ the !6. Presented bs Bape fae Bevan the title, currently held by J. R Set to get 213 to win in their a oe
7 large. Today's gate was 8.000 ae ares or —_ occasions, N. Marshall—Gloves Rodger; whe automatically quali- second innings in just undey two
Oficial receipts show that 25,500 — Jamaica lost their first wicket If that id not happen, they 17 Presented by Messrs. Manning & Co. fied. John Grace was the last hours the Commonwealth had
persons paid $11,718.18 to witness after cleven minutes of play to- would mot have had . any ar oa on Trinidad side Pan under the wire, while lan scored 130 for four wickets by the A_ BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. PRODUCT
1 two Intercolonial Cricket gay. Trim bowling at increase! .ournament. 18 Presented by Messrs. Modern Dress Niblock and E. A Benjamin close. Bala Anonts for Barbados : Collins’ Lid. 28 Uroad Stren
Tourné t Matches which began pace with the wicket giving more He also thanked Mr. Bruce Shoppe, for beat Relding an Barbados just missed by one stroke. The combined XI, who had
on Feb. 2ist and ended on March jife had Presced Ne when tac nae ee aninee % Maseriag 19 Presented by Messrs. Plantations Ltd oe who a es = — only oo = reply to — ————————_—_=_—— essa
5 latter attempted to ook 2 good who Pp allantiy m cleari for most promising performance on e@ championship wi Sommonwea s rst innings o
‘The Tour was the most'eXpen- jengtn ball on the leg stump and the grounds. f gg Prinidad side--L. Butler—Bat. —¢ Match play for the Da Costa Cup, 505 for 5 declared, followed on and
intercolonial —— ot saab, missed, The score was then 59—1 He said that they had gag ~ Challenor for most promising per- Which .will be pred under made 544 for 7 before Merchant
cost was likely to reach $9,000.00, 97. enjoyable tournament and = no formance on either side-—C. Hunte handicap, This trophy was WOM declared their second innings.
n cial of the Barbados Cricket Holt joiniag Cunningham seem. doubt, everyone was glad to see * ean Si i elo es eRe YORT by Geoffrey Manning, Imtiaz Ahmed the Pakistan
A tion said yesterday. ed comfortable at once pulling Jeffrey Stollmeyer bat and make Co., Lid.. two cases beer to the two Who this year moved up tO A wicketkeeper carried his bat for Excellent
main items of this amoun Rollox to the square leg boun- Tums in his own characteristic teams—-one Barbados side; one Trim- place in the championship ot 300, the highest individual score
= rle ida s 5 a ri vi i “or - 2 . :
! dary, then executing an elegant Style. : Fae | ae Settentad tot. Miners: oibtn! Cos ees Uae ne with a score against the Commonwealth team
ia -petresh cover drive for four, sending up _He also thanked the three & Co., Ltd., two cases rum to the two 89. _ ef the tour—Reuter, For
and refresnh- 100 in 114 minutes, Jamaica, in Umpires tor their services anc teams—Trinided and Barbados s'des The draw for the match play
5 i es lay add See ee caid that a high compliment had 23 Presented by Messrs. J. B. Leslie & meetings will be seeded according ay
balls during practice 54 minutes teday added the neces Pies aid t ye whe: the Co., for consistent batting on Trinidad si vhich the play-
poke Sete sary 46 runs for the century becn =paid to- nem when i side—A. Ganteaume—Bat te the position in v i p i Th Blouses
eaplpiert ied iar haan! A Meanwhile Cunningham . who Captain of the Trinidad team told 24 Presented by Messrs DaCosta & Co., ers qualified and according to the e eather
Professional fees $480; : od the innings eit batting bim that he had never witnessed itd... for highest aggregate runs on Humerical table prescribed for ;
ee ea ae seoncilly and from. dle aches ‘of te better umpiring in intercolonial ,, Srgerkten 6 Gaaie he ke deuce & that purpose. TODAY like
$200: adily ¢ Ss 5 3 4 : . : : ' ace
oe} zo ; * 7 PS espae a la am pala ,; tournaments. Co., for highest aggregate runs on The scores: Su> Rises: 6.15 a.m.
Printing ar d a ivert 1g $240; not Out, yesterday ne ec mpiaras After the distribution of the Rarbados side—C, L. Walcot!—Bat _ CHAMPIONSHIP FLIGHT Sun Sets: 6.11 nm
Groundsmen from January to his individual half-century in 12! prizes by the Governor Mr. 26 Presented by Messrs, Stokes & Bynoe J, K. K. Christie : ze Moo (Ne ; Ma h 1 thi
ee “7 ni tes : B . . or good bowling performance—N James O'Neal . p n ew) Mare
aa caite aie and police Potoir held Holt in check for Jeffrey Stollmeyer, Captain of ee ee M : rs an Wybrew Lighting: 6.30 p.m. 1S
7 three overs with good length leg the Trinidad team said that he \â„¢ Crt most wickets In series S, fernard Role High Water: 3.34 a.m,, 3.36
re 5 , ce arbados 7 ; porns
quarter share 6f pas- breaks. The latter became impa. “OUld not like to leave Rarb Jackbir—Cigarette Case David Inniss p.m.
¢ 5200 tient, hit t and put g cue, Without saying a word of thanks 28 Presented by Messrs. A. de Lima & Will Atkinson YESTERDAY
atten “Glutdnia Lent) 2O Britisn Gutana team catch to Trim at deep mid-off. bers of the Barbados Cricket Waleott—Watch Michael Timpson Rainfall (Codrington) nil
s the Barbados Crick- jyo)t patted soundly for 37 in 72 MEMPErS 0 the Barbados Cr: ‘|29 Presented by Messrs. Wm. Fosarty R. P. Gooding Total for Month to Yeste
tion $1,445 being the |. ; 3 y : 44“ Association and the many friends Ltd., for good bowling performance-- _P. D. McDermott ; CL o Yester-
‘passages rags. Minutes hitting four fours. Neville whom they had met on the visit. C Skeete—Bat D. Lugie-Smith day: .01 in.
are of passages. It was pp, S : ry ;
seessary to effect certain repairs Bonitte partnered Cunningham He was very sorry that they aici Temperature (Max.) 82.0°F
necess ea ; »y Playing out the over giving Patoir hag overstayed their leave, but// ~~ S—S—S etn Yemperature (Min.) 73.0°F
to the Kensington Stand and other a maiden wicket over when. play d : ae 5 featnon West Wind Direction (9 a.m.) N.W NYL N PL
indry repairs amounted to $400. ©. . “1 SY as one o eir learnec 2 4 yoy NETN, TOTAL ; pe m. s
7 sae Ladies’ room attached to “topped for lunch. Cunningham Indian Selectors had said, they ARE YOU THINKING OF BUYING A STOVE: (3 p.m.) W.N.W.

the George Challenor Stand was
erected at a cost of $820.

Another amount of $480 is due
the solicitors for a year’s interest
and in eptember a_ Barbados
team goes to British Guiana and
the quarter share of passages will
be in the region of $500.

When all these expenses are
paid the Cricket Association's bal-
ance from the tour will be around
$2,500. Their total liabilities of the
st Association are approxi-
$43,000.

the

Tew







ately
Not a regi
Barbados Cricket Association as a

people regard
wealthy concern. Many repairs
are still necessary at the Oval;
also a pavilion between Pickwick’s
and the Kensington Stand. It
should be abundantly clear that
other Associations having the uses
ef the facilities at the Oval should
earmark part of their funds for
the purpose of erecting additional
Stands

New Zealand Spun
Out For 146 Runs

AUCKLAND, March 6.
The M.C.C,. made an impres-
sive start today to their short
New Zealand tour, They spun
out New Zealand for 146 runs
and by the close of play had re-
plied with 86 for one wicket,



The match ends on Thursday.
Tattersall anc Douglas Wright

exploiting the scarred pitch shared
the wickets. Tattersall put up his
best performance. since he flew
out to bolster the injury hit team

The Lancashire offspin bowler
claimed four wickets for 38 runs,



Wright bowled his leg breaks
with consistent accuracy taking 5



wickets for 54 runr
AUCKLAND 18ST INNINGS












Vv. J. Seott b Tatteroan 25
K Dwyer b Tattersall 9
K Deas Lb.w b Wright 6
W. M. Wallace b Tattersall 36
D D Coleman b Tattersall 21
0. C, Cleal run out i4
L. Kent c Warr b Wright 6
Cc. Burke not out 8
D Clark c Compton b Wright 1
J. Cammish b Wright 4
D. Cleverley b Wriaht 8
Extras (7 b., 4 1b., 1 nb) 12
Total ‘ i
Fall of wickets: 1— 2-3 3-5
4-85; 5-~109; 6—113; 125 8-128
o—-138
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M. R. W
Warr a
Statham 0
Wright 5
‘Tattersall 4
Compton 2 24 0
MCC IST INNINGS
Hutton not out . 56
Washbrook o. & b. Cammish . Ml
Parkhouse not out 13
Extras 0
Total (for 1 wkt.) 5 80
—Reuter,
KING WON
Sam King, boxer, knocked out Hal
Williams in the sixth round of their

eight round contest at the Yankee
Stadium on Thureday night March 1

will s did not win the fight
Was rlously reported.

|

as





| The







bf

TH#TOP THe :

TRAIN!!
I FOLDED uP THE
URHZ NG WASHBASIN

AND PUSHED MY
TEETH DOWN THE
DKAIN!!





‘ll Do iG Every

CANT OO NOTHIN’

was 59 not out. could do well to grow rice in this
On resumption Rickards who country.

had not epened his scoring before He then made a shurt reference
the interval was ducked when to the cricket which had been
playing defensively to Trim and played during the tournament
missed. The score was 136/3/9. and said that he was sure every-
Neville Bonitto now artnered one had enjoyed it,

Cunningham who soon fell victim He had noted that they were
to a vicious one cut back from some who did not appreciate the
the off by Trim that knocked back tactics put into effect during the
his middle and leg stumps. Cun- first game. To all those young
ningham batting for 158 minutes cricketers he said that those
gave Jamaica a good start scoring tactics should be significant. The
62 in 162 minutes. The secre West Indies were soon to go to
was 1474/62. Mudie next man Australia and he assurred them
in helped to boost the score past that the “Aussies” did not play
the 150 mark in 167 minutes. They cricket easy, they. played it hard
now attacked the bowling hitting and if’ they were to win in
the ball to all parts of the fiela Australia, they had to play hard.
and the fourth 50 took but 33 He congratulated Clyde Walevtt
minutes to complete two hundred on his magnificent innings and or

coming in 200 minutes. his splendid captaincy and alse
Both batsmen were level on Fyerton Weekes on his bowling

scores in the forties but Mudie performance.

reached 50 first in 59 minutes. He On behalf of the Trinidac

added two runs before he was team, he expressed thanks for the
caught in the long field by a well very excellent manner in whick
judged catch by Peter Wight. the games were umpired. first
The score 239/5/52. Binns joined ¢jass cricket could only be playec
Bonitto who completed this indi- py good umpiring he said, anc
vidual half century in an even the umpiring in the present game«
two hours. The rate of scoring had been of the highest standard
increased Jamaica getting in front He said that they had enjoyec
of the clock by scoring 250 in themselves immensely on this
245 minutes, Still the batsmen jjttle ‘island and thanked every-
flogged the tiring bowling and one for their hospitality.

800 went up in 269 minutes the ~hree cheers were then called
fifth 50 coming in 24 minutes, Tea jo. by the Captains of the re-
interval saw Jamaica 301 for five, spective teams and the gathering
‘Bonitto 78 not out, Binns 32 not separated,
cut,

PRIZES
After Tex BAKBADOS—TRINIDAD
Jamaica added 34 runs after 1 Presented by Messrs. Cave, Shepherd

& Co., Ltd., for the highest score in
the first match-—C, L, Walcott-—Bat.
Presented by Messrs, Jas, A. Lynct
& Co., Ltd. for the highest score in
the first match on Trinidad side—
R, Tanz Choon—Bat

tea Binns helping himself to some
lusty hitting which gave him six 2
fours while Bonitto approached
his. century with careful purpose-

{ul batting. Trim pierced Binns’ 4 Ppresenied by Messrs, Central Foundry
defence bowling him for 49 Ltd., for the highest score in the sec

ond match on Barbados side—C. L
Walcot*—Bat.

Presented by Messre. British Ameri-
ean Co,, for the highest seore in_ the
second match on Trinidad side-—Jeff
Stolimeyer—Bat,

Presented by Messvs, HM. Jason Jones
& Co. for bowler taking most wickets

making Jamaica's score now 335/
6/49. Neville Bonitto who was
now joined by skipper A. R.
Benitto completed his individual
century with a lofty cover drive
for four off Gaskin, He had been

=



batting with effortless progress 4 jycwnted ig Meare bane fot. the
for 147 minutes. Taree hundred highest score in series—C, L, Walcot



and filty went up in 307 minutes. . “Ve ce
7” ' ) = © . ‘ resente 1” Me
Thirteen runs later A. R. Bonitto Co. for the bes: rounder on ‘Tri:
cut a leg spinner from Patoir into idud side—W. Ferguson—Bat,
Christiani’s waiting mitts behind 4%





J, B. Lestie &



Presented by Messty F B Arm-

vinle ~ ~ tre Ltd.. tor the best all roundei

the wicket. Goodridge next man aH awbahed ‘sido Mheahalh
in was run out off the first ball Gloves

Presented by Messrs, A. Barnes &

he received, Christiani got B.G’s. ®
eighth wicket with a brilliant bit
of stumping. N e ville Bonitte
played forward to a leg spinner
trom Patoir missed and Christiani
whipped off the bails before he
could regain his balance, Bonitto
played a tlawless innings for 121
in 182 minutes hitting 11 fours,







N. L, Bonitto stpd wkpr
b- Patotr ’
Mudie ¢ Sub, b Thomas 52
Binns b Trim a9
A. R. Bonitto c wkpr. (Christiani)
b Patoir ‘
Goodridge run out ’ 0

(Christiani)

: . Johnson not out + 22
Johnson and Valentine the num- Valentine b Rollox |. meee
bers ten and eleven batsmen Extras... “ne .
carried the score to 399 before

. Total
Va-entine was bowled by Rollox =



for seven while Johnson carried | Fall of wickets 136,
out his bat for 22. With only six hate ee ae.
"

minutes left play ended, BOWLING ANALYSIS

JAMAICA FIRST INNINGS 273 oO M R Ww
5.G. FIRST INNINGS 162. Trim 19 1 83 4
JAMAICA SECOND INNINGS Gaskin + 21 4 87
Cunningham b Trim 62 ~Patoir o> ae 1 oO 3
Preseod Lb.w, Trim 37 = Pollox ; 17.6 2 88 1
Holt ¢ Trim, b Patoir .,..... 3st) 6C. H, Thomas ,,,.. 7 33 1
Rickard tb.w, Trim . . 0 fersaud .. 2 1S *





Jimmy Hatlo





‘Time

Prelvered US Pernt Mee





















THAT'S THE Li
LADIES CLUB TOMORROW

HELL HAVE TO WIGWAG
HiS SPEECH»:

S\S7__ HE'S GOT TWo
TUXEDOS WITH HIM,
{| BUT HIS SPARE CHOPPERS
“\ ARE HOME IN THE
BUREAU DRAWER”

7” HORSE TEETH DON'T
LAND ON THE TRACK =
ITD DERAIL THE



SORRY, MISTER





ABOUT IT UNTIL





tDieaiins THE WARNING
SIGNS, THERE'S AT

LEAST ONE ON

EVERY TRIP —



















»

SeSSeerenne
SSSSESLRES
--- eee

SOPOSOOOOOOOP SOF)





AT

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Wind Velocity: 6 miles per

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Barometer (9 am.) 29.939,
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FIT”

Joan. Ransom,
Diploma of the
of Teachers of

a Licentiate of the Royal Academy
of Dancing, London, England.



POPPE OPEOSOSOFS

NOTICE

DANCING SCHOOL — NEW
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New classes are being formed
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under the tuition of Miss





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Vice-Chairman of the National Association of I My husband was dreaming {ost night. He tossed &
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; The thief, in his hurry, had also run down a neighbour.
oe Under the chairmanship of WEDNESDAY
"Silly.” I told Brad, “Even if all that and more had
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THE HONOURABLE, THE COLONIAL SECRETARY 5.30 Sharp % really happened, your LLOYD'S “HP.” MOTOR CAR %
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Full Text

PAGE 1

l'AC.F. MGOT n.\RR.\nfls ADVOCATI: WEDNESDAY. M \l!( II 7. 1951 B.G. Must SCO!** 1 510 GO VERNOR PRESE MS Golfers Qualify for Island Title Or Lose First Match atMXET maES (B) "> S. i OPPIN i iPATl %  tne .. .. ,! i the HIM .' ed by i %  J K K TV Urn for THE JOVERNI >l: i ol UM Barbadoi and Tnntda i crlckel % % %  ,. | %  .: IH 32 starters played 10 (ila-r HI the select Ttmi'iamrni ioon. itnd honours Two atrokeji back %  Icr wu Jam** O'Neal i in third place wa %  I *'•** voned mall had Crickel lour Cos! $54500 U iUl the-. ... past oover ore ->M) runs hi %  > %  rum % %  irl of the 11 C, bowli-r*. maintaining A u %  jxntptne lenitth and pace and < %  < ll dusty but not pij'. h muod pump to i %  largeTodav"* talc > atnd OB true, oi foui Jamaica \e*\ their Hi I % % %  %  ]*"• U*J lid not have had any %  wling ii iBcrea < al Matches which laeuan p, lv w ilh the wicket aiviet mi' le hd Pranca M K A v Williams bad to hook a goo: who helped jjailanlly R mar was the most cxpen| (ngl h ^u on lr ,c leg stump and the ifr.unds. ual Tour and the .^.^i Theses r amM lhal lhe >' ,,ait "" _j 7 onto] nicnt and no nioil Cunningham ecm *0Jj -* glad to see M.m. G 1 T.I 1 tterke* nt-a r M— .i V d* I | Ik.it nil a' 1 : .do* Cricket %  the few upsets was th" Kenneth Hunte. u :he Barbadd. 1 wfatch recently played In Tnnicfakd t< QuaUIj %  '<•'' ehampionof the Mtm earned places in the t rttght. ut Hunte hurl an off bv three shots when hr took *M ovei the 1RMlUns uriif "•> tWbavi..< Holt te*st -. n ** necss o 91 or for the loatco bia> struRKles thai will rleeide Ue titlecurrant)] held bv J H Wt automatically quailfled John Grace was the last man under the wire, while Ian ..nd E A Benjamin i lake. Those who failed to gjtl thi< hnmpi.onJ.hip will meet I j H %  r M c ssts ri F A IVniarnm tltl %  ill> a' i. sB K II Hunt. BJ i %  -a %  i P.WHIM bv M.r* A <* : %  Ma %  .. (. OMI ItoWms c* Trinidad * %  C Sampa-h-rut I t Mrur. M.-lert. Dre— ftavopp*. fur bi rt-kl IK <-n — r taaa fci a Iw I'IHWII flu* BattW fii mai.h play for .he Da Coala Cup wwaas PIT which will be played aa. Ii i'.— iii h, Mr> r Ihla mi-mint ,it it !*( % %  LIU1IUI* II %  mount I;o | U(V u u„. ..,„,.,„. |_ BOOB nms %  4 manul ,hc ** IVI ' .n.hjd lllll %  '. .1)1 thH ,--. ;:.,>. In MM championship division, qualifving with a score of |M M.O0I I 1 %  I I '.: $24ii; i. :i'.tary to md police %  %  I S200. ..... tne Barbados Cnckiti]l drive y -id i iin la ol i Inm that he them when the S2!LVw?L2 n 2£; L'SSiiS \ .'i SI.445 being the M| quarter dnre of passageI | H ; %  %  %  .if $-Will r due Inrs .'or a >ear's Interest pencd (he mnli.n was battln k %  >"" "> "^^ .leadily and from his .<'" '' n P n B "' ' Lrco, ,n, • I ,e S te,day he c-npletod ^""X distribution of the ld.l half-centi %  ,;,„,.,..„, Mr im without Baying i. i LTeh In SuTi 11 .*? SuS rbX,, of his team to all the ratrh to Trim at deep mld-ell mrmbors 0 f lhc Barbados Cueket ttod soundly for 37 m .2 AfcMM iall< under This trophy was won Geoffrey Manning. year moved up to utiu onr BMrtMdoa UO. •1...1 .1.1"H-kfflt| i. ^ T£" The draw for the n n^-ii %  %  MeUnn will N* seeded according %  %  ;: r T ih. .-..l.onmwhich.theplayPlokvplrd bt M*ui> D •<-...! %  4 Co. (rs <|U.'lilted and (;il lable that purpose The %  antTM Cwtallh Draw LuA MahhOf Tour BOMBAY. March 6 i.veulth crlckc; team drcv.their last match of the tour a*un1 'he MRM H XI here today. -ot 213 to win in their second innings In just under two h 1 OX* the Coinoionwealth had erre r fmu wirkets by the close. The comhincd XI, who hail scored only 173 In reply to the Commonwealth's first Innings ol MO for 5 declared, followed on anil Meiehan-. declared their second innings' ImtUU Ahmed the Pakistan v.kketki i ; %  ibat f,, T 800, Hie Blf h wl iiuhnduul scoru against the t:>mnioiiwealth team cf the tour.—Renter. I A SMOOTH. COOL 9 K1 the beauty rream that is a 'trealmeut' UAUUVt SHOW aa>ralacla UM ilm fiom J ua ">t. %  (*idi % % %  UIM too cmoU UM akia laBoiLa>il r H k apailW .. ta cifrnfadf so/teae aaa peifi %  km. ptarvaii dial afeJaay look eieoitaaa iLmmigbly. icatly . fi'H %  p-r-.t ma f—JaU— fw pi,-iJ.j Sioiiim cording to the prescribed mllrutei hitting four fours. Neville U"iio'm""t"h< %  llM vigil partnered Cunningham |(c wai V e*-y sorry that they playing out the ovei giving r.n ir h:.d i.vcrst.iverii made g ghuTl tt _. the interval was dm Ked ,K'i whieh Bd neen ,%  September a Barbados playing %  I Trim Mid playad durnnj the tournament ed. The that h was sure everyuuc* will Neville Bonltto now partnered 0 nc had eni" Cuiininuham WDO tOOD Bit victim IV had n'>'ed th1 I • i:.es are to a vlcioua one cut back frrm sonM who did I tll lthe eff by Trim that knocked back tact. ffaet during %  ance from the tour will ba around his midJlc and leg slumps. Cun nrst game. To %  !! thow voung it the ningham batting for 158 minutes crlckttafl he Hid fiat those ncn a good start rcorlng tactics should lie significant The 62 In 112 minutes The 'cero Wet Indies were soon rajond the was 147 4-02. Mudie next man Australia and he .. on • in % %  : :' %  : to ..' %  % %  i t thai %  A i i lid nol pla) crn. Man) repairs the 150 mark in 167 minute-. TinN herd alary at the Oval; now aftackod ihe bowling hitiitiK god ll Ihea '.tie to Bin bi also a pavilion h risk*! the ball to all parti of the lulu Australia, they had to pl'.v bait! tuid thi Stand It gad trie fourth oO took but 33 He congratulated Clvde W %  Bd on his magnificent iruUtUtl and or ng the uses reming in 200 minutes. his BJatowfad '1 •* %  cf thi I I Both baUmen were level r.n Everton Weeke< on hiIxn-lini irrnark part of their funds for *rore* in i ( Mudie performance. icached 50 ilmt in 3o minutes He On behalf of the IVtokaW ndded t ... | thanks for thi CaWfbl i" the long field l.y g well very excellent manner in whicl judged catch by I'eter Wight, the games were umpired, rlrst r 23 5 52 Bines joined c i aM cricket could only be pasyw iKlli,v food umpMng he sold, tm vidual hall century in un e\en nc umpiring in thi T ''e rale of rearing had bSHB of the highest standard i Jamaica getting in front j| C u ,a that they had enjoyct of the clock by scorinj 250 In thanutlvoa immensely on thii 245 minutes. Still the botnnon nttic 'island and thanked every. Co. lot hiahnt nrrra<> "i.li^o. ->do l Pf —aamal (or aood buwlitia p*K. Marshall--Bat aTaaa n a fil b> Mr>.rj Bm>krr. nroil>m u,t mu.t MtkMi in Jar-kMr Ctmair't* Taw PmanUd bi ataaan \ dp l^rna Ji I i,ii w I % %  I b) Ma^-v Wm rmiilv I Brmd lm:ni( i>r i ('inan MBNTI Cay*. Slwuh [or 54 runr I, Wr ll" • %  %  i. iih \NALYSIS ii c 'sr nntmoa %  %  ... ,i.-.. Total lot l nkt J KING WON rifhl %  %  I making Jamaica's sore now 335/ i ii N'CVH! Bonltto who was no* o^ppti A. R. I. .1 I -i rat iirivi ll for tour off G.iskin He had been np with effort I* %  i J ;or 147 mlnul Tnfta hundred (t) wanl IIJI m 307 minutes. later A R. Bonltto %  cut slif spinner IrOm Patolr Into Chiist.ani's walttnf mitts liehlnd UM wiekel Condrldge next man *J In Wl he rascoivad. Christian] | % %  n < ; %  ughth wieJorl wiih a brilUanl bit nf gtumplno. N o villa B II i.nsllani whipiwd off the balls befi could ragaln his balance B p H plajn %  !!. %  %  i.M IB) [' in 182 inmulelulling 11 fours. i> fobjnoon and Valentino the num%  ten and e'even balsmen rrttd the tc ire to :i!''i befora ..I ^.is howled by Rollox ior rcven whllo Jehus m earried ul his h.it f r U With only six mbnitaa lelt play ended J/.UAI i 'll T INNINGS m i.i, I iie%T I ||j .'AM-\'CA sncoND nntiHoa luiiniisham b Trim | b Trim i li. .1 Ti.i i> IVl..,. J Trim — WE OFFER — FALKS KEROSENE COOKER 2-lll'KNKIt TABLE MODK1.S (Grrrn anil ( r. un) 2-BIIKNKK I I inn: MODELS :i-Bl!RNKR II ; M.ilil l.s ALL AT RFASONABLE PRICES. PBONB 21119. Illlli. or Mill whrrr your Orders will be promptly executed. Barbados Hardware Co.. Ltd. The Woathcr TODAV Su i Rk>es: 1.15 am. Sun Sets: Ml im Moon (New) March 7 Mgbllii'.. 6 30 p.m High otaaan 3 34 am. 3.3 pm YESTKRUAV %  : %  iiit.li ifodrlngton) nil ToUl for Mil, to Yester day: .01 In li mperaturr (Max) 0*2.0* P imill i ..tm. iMIn ) 73 0"P Wind Hir. %  [,,. %  o a ml N U 13 p.m.) H N.w Hlnd Velority: 6 miles per hour Barometer <9 am > 79.939, (3 p.m ) 29.068 • RaMkn. Saow BM M -.da fa. mm akia. Wosaaa tlaa woiU e>a> iruil il a* ih.* Jo no oltarr baaoi. %  naa So a.i r .U T c—Hag .1 all %  —aaas. ae food foe UMlaag liili* lilrBialf*, n<* gioaay. -HasfUaM SBOW tfaoakl bo row daily ..V i in pUrv .,f Me. Mollv S < KadvlirT* who ban dm -, u %  futur* be known % %  Ih* Ilaibadoa Scnoui of Dancing Lid. Excellent For V* Blouses like this CHECK NYLON PLAIDS In Saxe Blue, QrevB and Purple. 36" wide Per Yard $1.01 FIGURED RAYON LINGERIE A lovely Fahrle in i. Iieaiitifiil assortment ol Pa I terns. 3fi" wide. ICach Hie. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. to, ll, 12, A. IS, iii;*.WV>**V**#'.V ,'.'.',',',••• My husband was dreaming last night. Ho tossed and turned so. I couldn I sloop a wink. To-day ha told me about his nightmare : Our car was stolon, and had been found gutted by Hames, cfler crashing into a tree. The thief. In his hurry, had also run down a neighbour. "Silly." 1 told Brad. "Even ii all that and more had really happonod. your LLOYD'S "HJ>." MOTOR CAB POLICY would fully insure you against loss Tonight we bolh can sleep. Have you this complete carefree Protection ior your driving ? Wrile. 'phone, or call I WAITING FOR Mk ' an B.**^.. YOU | A Fine K..n..c of . EXCLUSIVE TWF.KDS. WORSTEDS and TROPICAL SITTINGS When TAU.OUKI) h US will give you thai lock ..I PERFECTION I %  • %  yVasW/'l yar* Bai Ihe PatlarM now on Show '. m P. ('. S. InarTII & < (>.. LTD" lB BaaBaaBaa*^r^a))aVoflaBaV c^baV "TOP SIOI'IIIS l\ HIIORIMi" 1 PHONE 4267 FOR SURINAM PLYWOOD Treated to resist Termites. W thick in itatBtO A' X 8" %" tin. 1. in shorts 3' X V First class quality, ideal for Flush Doors, Cupboards, and Pencil ir.<;r. of all kinds. Can be Polished, Varnished nr Painted. STANDARD HARDBOARD W thick in sheets 4' ;< 8'. la" 3/18" thick in sheets 4' X 8' WILKINSON & HAYr-iES Co., Lid.



PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY. MARCH 1 H51 ll.VUIt Mills \r>\ IK Ml PACE sF.vrs CLASSIFIED ADS.(_ W ^ !" MHIIIMIIM XOTIMS TatLfPMOnl 2S0 Ml-lnh-, rbempc wart -,, &,„ mnlt "•• Sander*, H -Hi •— %  3 mil ironl tree-: J 1 M an aunda). ltd* up to M. Md That rt-atf* t Birth.. Uinlin t. and li HMO u %  - %  > for *n number of %  %  1 re-nl. per word on week-day a 4 eir.U pet word on ak ap aa ) f. tar eaeh additional word. Tor R.rth.. StarrKaTr or Ertgegcrt.ent •noouMBupiU in Carib Calling the ehaigr .. un for ary r.umbn c*f word. up to M and S cent* per word for e.eh additional word. Term* eaah. Pronr BM N.lle. I 9 90 I FOR III V I HHiin.BOM-f, IM* T9 rnri %  • M c.n gwgiap* M iwdi — errr 1 III! I' HOUSES r itill.v i Beei-h inWBBle 'RXTTAWMIIX October WoVetriOer. v We.lCY n-W. Ill 1 9 91FC TBE— The family of Mr HARRY I 1X99TTEP late M C P gratefully retui -* all thy In thetr •udden bereavement UUebelh Forler. .Wife Dpvid. Join WHI H.bm,' raanei; Ermillirliu. deer., fllwu >D.iuiihirMHOUSE j-taadto-m .tuated Top Hock „,,„ ibn.".mediately on terriha Ira" Tor vie-. KEN-BRAiE MOO. Matdenel. aheba. to approved tenant. Av April and onward Linen and L BpUaeanl Dial 99M for particular. J 91 ?-, FOR SALE Minimum chore-* u-eek T) ^nii M mil Sundaw M tcordr — oMf M %  roretg 3 real* a turd tceek—4 'nil word Mfday: AITOMOTIVE CAH: CouMry n.ai SK i* Minor hi perfect to" l*r. .lone IMP mllri k Jeenmo't ELECTRICAL ra.Ec*rni< T'IASTEHM UCTRI ELECTRIC VACUUM CUANEM Pleear dr.* m a.-d anthan rtulau.. Ltd T 3 !-. EUDCTRIC KETTLES a) John F~ LIVESTOCK HORREfc—1 v n Clewing 'Ledvewari "Jim tTnckrijack e. Hni.r 1*1 >i ui ramod 1 v.o gelding Uim Oeckerjac •' Prlnceee Stella i. Apply: J. 1 '"•mi' Telephone ISM rrj.st—i.t %  HORSE rhaaim.t 1 vr. old by JrWam out of HI Mare >Oinger> Dam 0' Mara r'nrrnlcrtip. Can be arm at Fan I.all Plantation Phone U-WJ By kind pcnrnaaion of the Stewards of tha ETC inu Anttral will be offered lor .-!• at the Paddock Jtt.t after th.1 Bar), Pace gag Saturday 1Mb March. I*l. Oil f MULE: Ware, CM H.xten t (.. i l.i lane Cncatnnt Mulr I tfarnaa* E A Daniel. Dial ;M 3 M-*i POULTRY 1 While Wy.nuotte Coekaraal b*M f-om imported ktylnc abaln Prk-e 94 M each or axchange (or vihr in Corn, or Poultry for eattiiB Dial 3MM 4.JSI—an MISCELLANEOUS wriQt-r rt-nNtTt'itr. cau at M.iipo Dcaid'a faorUahlac ahowraara. Har-woa.1 Altoy. Frame an s t n ANTIQUES, which Inrlude a load variety of Ola. China etc. Call In at P..lph Heard' %  fumlahlnE ihowroom Hardwood Alley. Phone P GJSI~4ki ANTIQUE CIACKft Baard %  rorn|dkta| nm Alley. Phone 4f>n — At • • n BATTIA — fn Porcelain Enamel. White. Green. Prlmraie with matrhtnf. uniti to completa colour nHtrf, TOP ffrade. A. BARNES Co., Ltd. MIS1—(f %  and <1I A res—Tubular Chalta r.I7 aar With mmt |l?oa> At Ralph Bear* Showroom. Hordwotd Alley. 6.3.11 ROOM WITM BOARDI„ epaeiou. rrrldrncr on ara. larar double room and bath alao one alnsW Private aandy beech, eatenaive (roimdi. eacellent food rnepnone Err? a s 91—fc I ,,;, IM III H Tea reala per ooalr SALES and 12 •enif u-eeb-da,, : k^aakaji UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER ...,!,, Health. Si Michael I will irl March tth Dep. Truck form i flair at 1 „ „, Term. Caah vp.-, rvT ( Chi,,.I. Vular. m IMJ r,Hi |P IAn.,> T.pe. ...inpiete with plaUNDER THE SILVER HAMMER WALL BU> En m recommendation of l.loid. Acmu, %  • will Til en WEDNESDAV the Tth jr. iheeta Wall board at Mearr*. Wllbuiunn A llaynea Co. Ltd Pilme AH red S' sale l arloeb TaWo3 l'\: \\h l i; TROTMAN CO.. AVJeii4rnrert REAL ESTATE A >"! %  r*ar*r ,, AppU ba letter A LADY for genrral k-o.led.co( • %  piruj A rral office work Apol l<> R M jonrt Cam Junior lor aT 1 'i hv ette. %  %  Articles to be Sold at Auction at Customs on the 8th March, 1951 at 11.00 a.m. WANT OF ENTRY O00D8 UNDER TRADE ACT 1910-4 SECTION (48) 3 A 4 Two capeHenced Teacher* arr I — on the Staff al the *.hool of Nap-rim I .... will be men la thee a. CcrttSratehgrher thin the Carrbiul Vhnol Certificate Subject* U> include lliKni SVrdl w.k and Phvairal I Ail at'Dliraltoier muat bo made In wrl i"E to the Pnnripal R R rhnt, | • I.:.i %  V Co I. i.i. J. N. H. A C B. 8. A M rJtni v r> L MM .. K R H 12111 WANTED FOE % % % %  OPPOfrTl-NITv tar rule Aaa:*tant In ...,„ five hour, river -i. (-or|rto.n. All re Cry fooda aaaantla nri ... ivv "pelienced MBtl < %  i;..i iad IM ar...-le,lac i, PM4 %  %  ncure— a—11 and I JB— • 3B Wednaanan lalf-hollda a;*:* par BJHHM et.d upward accordmi in cxparlrcce Ae betwean a* — 40. Or.' c need apply. Apply in writing with copi*. a l recrn' reference, to Box l. C era! tl married. lUte number ,.( children •JUI v Rmptag J M .liiMiiui' ft Co, i.id. r Q i; I). Lbbpri-n .MnniMiiir ft Co I.t.! It ')•'" ..t. %  0n 1 Pkg DniiT" ODP 1 Carton Rqnaohw 1 : It Odd I Ow l Pkg Mi i n.Otip \,\\ BHI XoiE-i D Hoii*. i IM i Oftrtea Cftrboarrd 'r Ion I'll. 1 t.'ilsr AiiVt'TlisiliK Sigii OBI Bate Mat Oin1 I'sr.-..) Banplrr-o .i-.'s Hn-.l l-'nii! I' 1 llauiin.nk 1 I'EfloO r.iiVii.iiii-* HUt'vLKKtl 1 %  Wit IT %  aawdjaa a*RkM aaparkr %  Wrllt ai Ltd 140 MISCELLANEOUS Co 3*1 4n IMMEDIATE CASH lot .tlamond Jewellerr. old China, •liver an.l Sheffield PU'e. Phone 443* or call at fWRRiNaBS. adlalninl Royal Yacht Cluh ?f1*.l -Tr.N IMMEDIATE CMH I. lid' B W I Stamp* brnken Jewelinlalurer Jad*. OORRIreOES. PERSONAL l-ASc-ELIXS ". artuate at Chrtat Oitrrch. atandlnM on 14. act of land Tha hbuae % %  but nd contain., open and cloaed galleiiei. nawln and dimns roama. three bed%  in. breakfait room kitchenette and rual out orncea Carafe and Servant! ard Inteection by appointment in., it The thine !" P'-n'tc are nemii aroi akanl LYNCH (rate Boucher, a* 1 mvarlf ie*ponalble f,x hak rontrartina an, debt or debli li> m nat ""kii by a written order tl MalJ •> I NTBEItT LYNCH. Prout Hill. -., %  item ill be art up for Competition al oar office In Tttteet. Bridgetown, on Tueidav ih March IMi at p rn CAHRfNGTON A SEA[.Y •*.. .it.. I*R'>PEI1TY known S'.reet .Uiiduia a.. I. Itnd ThU properlv it rituate ,'rmea Street, oppoalle Jan.. Church and It on table for buUn 94. Jame> re reel of at lower In.pectl-i tpalfc %  •! %  Thla pToparay will bo aat up for aali Public Competition at our Office No Jamea Street at 1pm on Frtda> March IS9I YKARWOODat ROYC* Solicitor. TIM til TAKE NOTICE OFTESW will be rarrlvaa a imderaimed tip to the 19th dav of I March IMI. for the bulldinf* known* a. Calala Hand not Included, alttiaiad I on Dover Coaat. Chrlat Church Tha J purehaacT to drmoUih the buiidinia and I clear tha land within thirty dayi from I the date of purchase K E. McKXN/.li:. Nail* Plantation. St. Michael. 94911Ct-RTAIN FTTTrNTJS—For amart window atvllnE. Ilrht control. Valance* and draperiea. By Klrerh. Dial 441 A. BAfLNFA St CO, LTD. 11?'1 -tin DOORS Several paira n deora. an liable for Garage With large lungri To vTilldale. Marine Garden., aimpaon. I 3 II en L1ITN-S TEA: Thl. brand li uaed by ditrrlinliuitii> ronaumrni • SI Philip PIANO-Pvano upright. Good tona MT1.W at Ralph Beard! .howrootr Hardwood Alle> Phone 44S3 • 3.61—Jn STAMPS Two complete iheeta of Batfaedoa mrcharaed One-penny or Two. pence Onera P O Boa M 1 3 91 tin The atibaunual block building, rtandlrul on 13.104 -q. ft. 9* land with frontage on Broad Street. Prince Alfred Et and Chapel SI, the pi.ipeitv nf Crntr.il P'"lnllr Lln.itod and lenanted by Brltlth Bala Shoe Co.. M Altman Son" Ltd K H Hnnte £ Co.. The undersigned will offer the unr premiae^ by public rompetltisn at their (, 11 High St fludgil I.I, m, Futljv %  tii March. IMI at 9 p m irlhar partlctilan frum COTTI.E. CATFORD A CO., Soltcltnri 33 3 HI -Tit. PUBLIC Minus Tn c--'.ti par apafe line end 19 rent* par opaie hi minimum rheroe 11 50 and .1*0 oa Simdovi l ipeck-dayi on ^unddkl. u-erfc-dnul NOTICE THE PAEISM Of Ri ANDREW VESTRY BY-EIJETTION I HEREBY give noure that I have appointed Ihe Vanry mom near the Almahouw at Brllrplalne. ai the plarwhere all peraon* dnlv qtiallfird tc vote at the Election of Vertrytnen for the Bald Pariah, may meet on Monday March 13th IMI. between the hour, o* 10 and II oclock in the morning to elect a Vettryman In Ihe place of Darry Atfleld P—ter ideceai-^lr. Signed C. A. Skinner. Parochial Treasurer, flt Andrew NOTICE UNCLAIMED BAOQAOE UNDER TRADE ACT 19104 SECTION 119. \ Ml G-pl Bdi M KorviUc I In jvijnii-<>ti \ H o,„. iirl.ni CiiiJiri-lt Carton C*iffartt*i One .1 l-kir T.ilm.r.. Tv % %  Ji CitriOH CigaUvlti %  I Ml, I B H> Till Mill-.it ut. GOODS ABANDONED FOE DUTY UNDER TRADE ACT 19104 SECTION 80. r.rmlsimu ft B'dosi Imporl Robfrl T 'i I Bxpotl Co l-t*4 Dr'scriplii.ii ol '." 11 till I 1 COJkf Ti DPWritPr RarU o,„ 1 l.ls. 1 niK.r RannlM in. 11 Cue Pitiiisvitini 1 \ mini.1 IV %  i Eni|i1\ Drums IhM 11. Carton NIL 1 Mi t' lit Cnrton Un handisf s. vi-ntv li\. 1 ins I'HTHtin Wax On 1 Plef, < all Iron Pip. GOODS SEIZEI. AND FORFEITED UNDER TRADE ACT 19104 SECTION 138 (1) Drwnpliun ol (! I'M Ri. 1 i Itnl.'MU Contg (HI IVnl Plan' 0O0DS SEIZED AND EORFEITED UNDER TRADE ACT 10104 SECTION 13 (1) Attempted Exportation Without Export Lit.-, <• S,I/.,I .MI Board Damrood Two |9 Ban Soap SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Mkdeai IflTU %  "Ih I 1151. i IP.-1 and -•.a. "Coitlca" and. 3rd. tth IMI. MS. "Bonaire" rlh. i Match IMI .. from Antwerp and Am.terdam Helena'' ITth, 19th. February IMl. WtHamatad" Blh. 19th. rabruory 11 . "Oraniratad" 9th. 19th March ._ Ttlntdad. Paramaribo %  Ge"tgi"*"i" %  "Bonaire" 91th Jar ary IMI. ma. "Coitlca" 10th. Febru, 1191: m. "HHena" 9rrt March IMI Railing U) Trinidad. La auek. Dial 44TC A RARNES CO LTD. 133.9l--l.fr YACHT.Yav.1 Fiapeda" apptn • i> aT with gray marine eng.r Recaeitlv painted and In good rr.ndlii; Appl-. Vlrrer.t E.trke Trlaphon49 OF 3030 97 3 SIt ( ^ anna i IB "eil. 9 li l,lgh made of I In •otj.o.' It C MannlnK. Ncwlandv St. M-rhael. A 3 91—'-n LOST a*—iiia OM I Oau :.th In.t IVtwecii Pairview StaUnr.. ai peter Flndahpleat, tO J D IVlMgl." < The Paiocliial Treaitirera OrTice. St Michael will be cloaed at II o'clock nnoi ct. Thiradav nh Marrh IMI. ."EllCY II BURTON. Parochial Trea.ure, SI Mlcharl TAKE NOTICE U ^i % %  itoaaeaHoa PIN art wim ihite Pearl., between Worlhing Cu" llouar. Ru^al Hotel, Hare Track. Ifalelf-tmvn or v Hrwaid il .Hurnad to Mra McCulioueh. Worthlm M 4133 One R T i.g Mealiiut DO 61tt Finder p*aaae re%  l:iM Dep' T 1 91—in Thai THE PROCTER OAMRI-E COMPANY. .< imporation of the Slut* oi OHIO. United State, of Arnertca whnae trade or hucmre* addrea. la Thi RaiUdieal Bitlll and Main Stiaeta Cincinnati. Ohio, t* A I-. applied for Ihe reglrtration of a trade mirk m Part 'A" of Regiater In %  peet ol vegajtable ihnrtening cooking Hi and will be entitled eg >ame lifter hall an the i Klvr notice in duplicate W ,v office of nupmil,.... rrgMIratlon The trade mark can be %  en on application at my orAce Daied thl1.1 day of March. IMI II WIU.IAMS Regirtrar ol Trade Mark.. I'M I'-. TAKE NOTICE M Vrwu-I SS PAOBC STAII" SS "STATESMAN" SS 'SUiCESSOR' s s STUDENT" ; S SPECIALIST" from L trrpuOl Lonrlnn Uverpool rii a E..w a Soiatn WHIM leMetfOfl 28lh Fell 3rd Mar 7lh Mai. 10th Mar Gist Mar TAKE NOTICE DOLSA Th-M R93TKITT COLM-'V I aartttah Unified 1 , Mann (art trrera. ol Kinf.tP aneaea lane. h>iii, EitaUM). hea applied tor the ret.rtratl.m of u ti mark In parA el it., • •pert of nved.en.al and pharmaceut (> l peepatat-w* I-.tie relief el hi pre*. %  Meai for the telkef cat rheumataan arthiit.. or panel* of a I... I led good-. -ml urn Ue %  . • iteaMk rgive n te al mi office rgi.tratlor The ,t pj M....( II Mil rr an.l other ml to CRICKETERSIt re ceajeatton. pain M9TMM eliminate, fatic.e polaot'> IT A TRlAi -IIJ.1AM J.aHNS*>N. I'. K.mget.FOB TOUR IviiltMi NEEDa — CONSULT ANDREW D Slir.PPAEIl Rerreientlng ranfaderall-a Lafe Aaaeetalaaa C/o P. B. AR9aTnoNa LTD riHHKlETOWN. HAMBADOI TeL MM MAS Till TOR llsrd & Mint Ma> c. n.rbado. and Ihe MB4 I ol the RrltNIi \\ • I %  !< BR PAID i I IHIRIIEAN STAfttP StH'IFTY. Mo, 10 Swan .'.irert II HAS IT" 1 ha. Be i ha. correct modern line" i... gMral 1 na. all van -rant. I the modern De I -. Table M.ilrl O... Hotplate IVIced |a ell i at ymrr Oa. Showroom The Bee-Bop Dance TO-MGHT Al OIHN '1 PMIK fiom B p.m ADMISSION /• Mu-i, in c n BrowW ci.t.. HAB BOUD Promolrr: Charlr* l.yiiinn | To Alt Expectant Me... Moth -li • Informrd that lit. .„ %  %  %  n I . ,. | S Spread, elt. f V We are the Oaklt ,,,,,.. ... ,, %  -.. ol gaaMtt i' I,, tftm BBBEMJ % %  A E. TAVMIR LTD fO-DAYS NEWS lUfl A MOHNtNO AT THE OFFlf E -By Edgar Mitiehiolier I\MUMKV JOHNriON* MARnWAllE Mi ll SA IV A varj %  ttiwfjva M 0BI1N BO IISI having every rumcnieiu'e. S lied loom... Mctfll liKl.ts AV water I i, rfillt from hildtieUiwn on iti;.ni bus roiitn. 5. mlnuU" *..l, ( frorn the mi, slondinii on 12.000 M ( feet ,,r land r RED-ROOM COTTAGE wilh one ncre nl aMd Ian I will,m 2 mile,.f BVid| %  i"-n Elfetric lifihtnd wnier V.rr CECIL IIMMOTT u*patairi Ptioenia iniarmaey 81. ::: Pkotie 4Stb OFFICIAL NOTICE IN TE .IA?;-'• a. J Bilerlty tnerrof t> i. raided from tha HiilEli %  DEFENDANT -I I THAT re Heeri aHM Kali I -aa*a )a iligeRi awellenadi abutting aad h-itirxiing n. land .1.-, out aow of J.* < ape %  e-aa-ecl on lanria now or ilMaver. i.n In I.rialmn and .n UtRjfMK lie R^ad or however el-Ih-ame may eawit and ho.md TOT.ET>IER rae-a aar <. d-'ll.nghoaie and all and %  mevlar o-het the bulMino and erection thereon N WIIttAMR. Rg;.trar-in-Ch4f>rer>i:. •nmxm* # % %  #.# %  I*HB-;SSIXH OMllMla. Of CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. igat aaia uun ATTEXnONU FACTOIIV >I \\ \f.l IIS T.fc. IM. opporlnHr r oM.inini ,nr r.alrrma* h. :— GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE Kanitnc rr*m |4 % %  ..warap MILD STEEL rUh Kminda. Hguirf. hi all Skw. BOLTS & NUTS—All Slie. FILTER CLOTH -White Cotton Twill At n;lll. UII.1 cannpl ta Th* ii tun n/os roiMticr na. 1MIITF FARK 111.All 8T. Mil IIAC1. ... u un Klifihlifjhts o/. . FOVAHTVS SPttMXG CQLLECTtOH SILK STMI'ES. F.x.|tiisitelv .'oltmrril 0RI9P LINENS c* HAYONS I LORAL CREPES LOVELY EMBROIDERED NETS Admirably appropriate for Bridesmaid*' Dresses BRIDAL VEILS ami WREATHS SILVER TINSEL BROCADE and several other Gorgeous White materials ORDERED ESPECIALLY FOR BRIDES' DRESSES Wm. FOGARTY LTD. Due H.uh.il.. IMh Mar i8Ui Mai 23 rd Mar, 25th Mai. 4th April HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED UM0D0M Vfnael For Cloaea In BarbadoH SS I'l.AMTER London 101 h March For farther inlormation apply to • • DA COSTA A CO.. LTD.-Agent. %  : 1. nut RaVRrrr a COLSAAN I IMITTTI RritHii !... tompan) %  ippliiel for the regl mark In Ittspeti • pert ot pigment, and coin Mindrs or toilet p-irpoe*.. and win |o regl-ter the ri* month from Ihe 9nd d. IMl. unleaa aome> peraon .hall In the ireantlrne gVa DOOM in duplicate to me at r..v office of oppoaitleri of waeh i ;iltcatkn at m Deled thi. I.t day of March. IMI H. WIU Ref.i'.rai of Trade Mark.. 9.911 -3n PASSAGES TO EUROPE tonlar-t Antilles Products, Limited. Ro*eau. Domini*,, for sailing to Europe. The usual port* of call are Dublin, London, or Rotterdam. Single fare £70. usual reduction* for children. JOHN M. BLADON A F S. F V.A. FOR REAL ESTATE RIAL ESTATE AGENT — AUCTIONEER ~ SlfRVFYOR 'Phone 4840 — Plantations' Building. WM. FOR SALE "Manzanilla*' SI. JAMES (Naaj I.. C a b as Club) I4 Bporh FrunliiK>. Parian B.HI....-.: ONL1 M V." IIOIM; IOU BALE ON THIS COAST ALL MAIN SESVICI S \'itw |.\ Ap a ol a liaaal i.nl. — T<-l<'iihi.f '.IT.' PBfCE with ONI um CII.SIHI: uiih %  •' 1CBBS (1UM r 1:1 I noil) I





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Ml HM SI)\Y, MARCH T, 1951 n.XRBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE His Excellency Praises Tribute Paid Barbados'Health Statistic* To Late M.GP. HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor opening the Health The House of Anemoly yterdjt Office' Conference at Queen's Park House ywterday morn. £"££•" J? 'X"*!*.*' M* c*p ing said that part of the task of health officers is to create ute Junior member for st Sold Ululiertiteil Milk: Fined 40'3 Years For Larceny i Road. Eagle Hall S: Au.ilp.iu> Skeeu,>i Camnaton Michael, nijpvl 41) Village, Si Michael, was yMttr14 day* Miih im ..iterrwivr vt day sentenced by His Honour the ona month'* imprisonment by Mr Cbiat Justice Sir Allan Collymore _. — AnH. A. Talma. City Polic* Magi* to three years penal servitude tot in Ihe minds of, the community the' CGirecl attitude towards drew. The resolution which reirate, when she wax found jnuity the larceny of a case of dianrUr< positive health. cords the sympathy will be comof telling adulterated milk to L T and five years preventive irealThe conference has been organin which there was to be free dismunicated. to Mr Foster* family Harn* Sampling Officer, along ment for being a habitual c runlsed by ihe Director al Medical cuulon in which evervooe was •*** %  Adaaaa . invited to express his opinion on Passing of the Resolution *aid The milk contained 15 3 per alotu. in co-operation with Ihe Univera ny problem that was being disthat It was at all times a solemn cent water. \hs. || | ft pi l BflVSjaarti ihe West Indies cussed. That in itself w as another duty to refer to th* death of A *U s IOMHCTOR. Otwak. f,, r ih r Crown The proeeculioi; (Extra Mural Department). and attitude—the attitude of Free Disfriends or acquaintances. It be•* Bvycc. was yesterday fined pointed out that on October 23 is being attended by health cuulon. cam*, all the more solemn when 12 • by Mr. G B Griffith after he Skeete stole one case of cigarette** officer*from all over the island. Why were they there. Dr. as in their ease, it was the death %  round guilt> of carrying pai lna property of British American The Governor was welcomed O'Mahony aikcd That led to of a potitical and personal friend. M n c 1 r 2. m •**f p * m mmtmm Tobacco Co. Ltd. and which Dr. II. G. Cummin-.. M C P. another attitude thr Common the death of a member of the O'MBhony made tfM opening Objective—and the common obHouse of Assembly who arSa on address on "Altai ,, Governor said: par.ch.al point of view, it would every parish to take an active. """*> It gives me great pleasure to net be as inspiring as if they conhonest and thorough interest 1 welcome the delegates Lo this nidcred it from the point of view the affairs of their partimU .' A niE at Camngton's Villa*' St. John, at about 890 p i Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay M.V SNftfl'H. Wt> Mart-a ItowMtU BS* aSj.H M. iaal C Oa*V. SrH Uu-rU* paSaWaS Vh Ami. H v.M <.'....w•cm. Bunt* D. Belt Mr-n, D Walla*. Seh. !-•> NuMm. fch l-a>aa>l|M>a Bra BUT*rUr a. at v i**> J Bra Phu i> H lki^-f< Srh M..i Olnr. BCti C>rfc>IHM O Srt aWaaura*AMMVALS OU T-iiker Ruan. IJH San* MM, Caa* rttuin. from TriiU4*S vM armaSi S.S Myhati • ** %  t.n. nH Cap* Duivfti. (i..it, Ha* Tort Ma Martiaaiw M.V IVrrwood. a* to. nat. Capt Muii.H flW m la... as r. a T. rwH *.ta ton. „i aHswai rta Srhooorr Manor Brlir Woli. 74 M< I iWI. Cpl gvw>. Iio-n mil • I psTARTvay— ODEX THE FAMILY SOAP O Gets skin ready clean O Banishes pefspiration odor O Leaves body sweet and dainty slued at ei04. One witness for the prosecution Joseph Dyall 0 Monday burnt a quantity ul B | ack Rock M j d h e saw whei ,... np' canes belonging to Jam** skeete took the case of cigarette.[ that although C'Hrns of the same address. They f lom Q,,,, O( t \ u Trumpeter Tobac'' .' %  '.' '' co Factory wagon* h INOTYMSTS of me A*raaaar and cautfhl him -t lhl mat at the Press Club on cru-hlow Alley and Roebuck si fteinoon to say goodby Sfl pniihp, of the C I D said i m mb ?, r f h ,"""' *? %  mat oa Frbruary M about 3 JO Ralph Headley. who leaves la„ m h< ^celved a notice signc* %  iWll. ( %  .-! %  ehootirr TurtW Oave Uthtim*. tor Til. A.k i( .. TV. MB 1...i. nM. Cl .,.. island during the nn appointment i St Uicia T*HK atUiHT Hi-Alt I i Mi; I ^eek to take u^ hv ,|. ni ihr Vaiee •' of motor car M Conference of Public Health of the common objective. The* parishes. OnVara, particularly as il is the should develop the national outIt had fallen to the lot of few first to be held in Barbaci.ts, but Irok. It was only in that way that of them for more than a quJiter mainly ba oB UM it atvag me an Ihe inland would get what it of a century, as in Mr. Foster's cpry rtunlty to pny a tribute lo the wanted when it was ready for il. case, to be a member of the Vestry humanitarian work you are doing ns. far as public health was conand thereby to have aided in bv rnon Thorpe .>t nntton s Hill '" '' 'land. ccrncd. watching oCcr the interest and und !" f" b y Douglas S ProudYour task, whether you be He was not belittling parochial improving the position as one foot FlBl No 4 Si *wrence. cfficeis nf Government or Veatry public health, but his point was might say. to hij immediate was damaged when the car was or members of olher professions that the parochial attitude did no" neighbours Involved In an accident with moioi is to prevent sickness and disease lead lo as high a degree of moral.Uka all human beings he had lo T ry M ~"* 7 along Parry Street, rather than o cure it—in fad. to as the national attitude So morale had things said against him. Clty ',"* • boul 4 c!ock v rtwt, F the conditions that we. was arTHher of the attitudes with ajverything that was *aki against •••nhlf. -him was In the direction of his Acting Attorney General VIDK ch.it a charge at habitual iriminal was being brought against Skeete He know !"":_" wn .*ff Skeete and has seen ban knock ing about town ** give need for healthy living 1 need hanliy stress how much betlejr It is to prevent than to cure Essentials Clinics and hospitals are essential institutions, but the nee*, for them would be much moderated if the major causes of bad health could be removed. Thai is your 18 Months For Houaebreaking hi'.h he was dealing MoraU an awareness of the common bjeetive. and the energy by Lliich thai common objective served. Store Opened On % % %  I'i.i inI.-T:,. • %  •rii. 1 n;i. i| your r, t, „ Job—to guide us in the methods of dUfldaV T HH*d £2 prevention of disease. * energy rather than bis lassitude. Energetic, Loyal He was not only energetic in his duties and loyal, but he was present at the House of Assembly at 12 o'clock although he h.-.d to romp from the other end of the island. They would miss him. not only the members of his party, but all The lorry is owned by M. ilnrrison of FonUl>eUe mid being driven by Densil Greci, Cambridge. St. Joseph L. prevent!... Bad housing is one &f the major A "" r U with two shillings % %  members of the House, as an A causes of bad health. It leads not co u in 1* <**y* or one months interesting ilgure of a man of good "* Hi: Ships In Touch With Barbados Coast Station n...t " %  > eta -> i (hr lulluv > ae **< %  •' -n." as Gvisio. M a i'all i HI /.ivaft tr, >• M>hn• iii-M.ni Last 1 l %  MuUi>l* • !< %  R.na;l..l.. a. M ..Airatarti .. a cur. ii a ts.Hi... AI.-I-I i !-, Nl.i. %  • BuroiM. %  %  B*M M Juii,1 dalilhri I Gums Bleed. Teeth Loose. %*** r 2*#& "Btr u rv nd white ribbon which emended consecutively to the term lie %  rving. RATES OF EXCHANGE but also to family rows, mental Radhuklsht-n A. Thani of the firm toilily, a fsmlly man, a man of the K ( oad, 11 stress and to illness that should '^ni Bros aftar he was found community and a man of the House "^J "' ' ——• ——a coiiymorc for uiuphreaking ami never have occurred. u,ll y f having the Thani Bros, of Assembly. Mr K N It HusbandSneaker Isrceny of article* valued at Concerning the hygiene of food. *? n "Lf^!!" a* 1 "^ Henry U *^ dMBcuU to W h,m ru 'of The House of AsS v ^uid ' ^ *• &*** * AlUr the needs of the maternity and g"* 1 ^"* a "* business on d. He was a good man. ,. good gj g"Sg l "J m ^£" ?>' &_*J Frankly., of RosOUck V Slid -Adfaie service*, the col lee*"** %  f* D !" ur .>' %  ,he d > ,hal f"her. a good husband and a r !" w j^i ?S !" JJ1 'L iVlu* J-W 25 at the Court of Grand Uon and disposal of refuse there i he lou,Ut b0 1 "* Aaastergood poliUelan fe Bo4v Mehil SEertoVof Sessions yesterday, la no organisation more oualifled *.*" m P, v „ „ Mr. GUI Senior Member for tEiun^mSS lM^i£ Co Mart... u now servln. a tern. tha-^yuistognealeadtopublic r ^f r, m^'rl 8 *s, fl ^, Mr St An nw said ,nMl lw *** 1 LW^alio spokT ol %  mprisonmenl fo. ouer.ng ,-ounopmion G DiaincT^V' £u ^"S 15 ^ when he last ,. w the then Jun^^ s£rt&* "l the BMUeh rfa*t coin, and thla awtance tr These, and all Ihe other ounlI "^V„ „'. J. Thaal Beior member for St Andrew, he lass other quaationi Of health and ^.^.^'L.? 1 ? "V '" y !" * s n robust health and he did not hygiene in both lewn and country c -iuaht ** He did not hV*^: think that he would have passed to across the deer lo UM offl. are the very foundation of civil, mpoae hc maitimum fine the !" 1 b vond * • oon Htf hBd complete the oflicisl side of the IKII life Science makes its great ,._. Kenneth Murnh'v who known Mr. Foster from In, i Mr function Mr. E. G. MaehUyi. discoverlcsi it Is for you to m ~fc £* 5u> charge agamst G1U S) cmWno d nd had always Manage, of the Brits* Union Oil apply them. Thousands of lives Thani said that at about inao tound rom m *" to ^ respei-led lompan.v. was among the Invited depend on your work. But in addiam on Sunday February U he *" hlm lhe P ar,lin ""d Barbamis -guest.s l islion to your scientific and lechmWM Q,, apeciat dutv He was ***** lo "' loyal man. During the Cocktail Party which eel knowledge, you are required to detailed to look for anyone comMr. Sasstts (LI recalled how Mr followed the openinc. function, Ihr posses*, the aptitude of a psycliolmilling a shop offence. He was Foster had always been accused of service station was making its llrst cfjlst. You must create in the instructed that no business premtry in*" to do too much, but Mr tiade after opening Moat of tho ';'•'•• minds of the community the cor,<** had had permission to open Foster was of mat noble nature motor cars which had brought the "*" "*" rart attitude to positive health. In „n that day. and he could not help it. He was guests to the function, took gaso. fact, "health" must be presented He entered the premises of responsible for many Improveline while attendants with chamoi' as something beautiful and desitThanl Bros, at Prince William merits in his parish and in him able for its own sake; and when Henry Street and saw seven the community had lost „ great all Is said and done, what can be tourists inside. The main door of man, more beautiful or more important the store waa open. He was Mr. Wilkinson (E) said that both to the individual and to the accompanied by P.C. Hurdle. although Mr. Foster was not a community than a healthy mind Rodhakishen Thani was behind member of the party to which he in a healthy body. one counter offering scarves, belonged, he was a man respected Some of you may feel that prt>Jewellery and olher articles to the tw avarvbodv in the House of gress towards ihfs goal is ton slow. 4 '— "1 "~ J tourists. Itehlnd another counter but do remember that ihe thing* was a second Indian who was that are worth doing for vour offering another group of tourists fellow man—m his thinking and C P ann othar Hems, in his living—cannot be achieved Murphy asked tnr tourists lo by short cuts It needs sustained lrnve ana Instructed Thani to hard work, but If jam Study the dose immediately. He returned health .statistics of Hnrrw*doa of sometime Inter and found Ihe Cm inreported Assembly. His death w;>.i rreel loss not only to the parish of SI Andrew, but to the Island as a whole the pas! twenty years you < proud of your achievements inspired to continue your vocation of service in the prevention of disease. Common Objective Dr. O'Mahony associated himself with the Governor In welcoming those present on what he called a pioneer occasion. They had come together—health officer''. S.P.C.A. Mobile Starts Clinic sometime Inter nnd found i^ main door still open. .,,,, structions received he a Thani. P.C. Hurdle corroborated Cpl A donation from the HirmtngMurphy story and added that he ham Branch of the K.S.P.C.A. has actually saw Radhakishen Than! mad* it possible for the local hing out for jewellery to hand 6.P.C.A. to atari a Mobile Clinic. lo the tourists. Every Tuesday and Thursday In defence Thank said that he morning between 11 o'clock and iponed the store on holidays and noon the Chief Inspector treat" every Sunday and Thursday for the eyes of draft animals resting the purpose of private business, under the trees at the Pier Head. of every type—to discuss common His nephews and himself saw The eyes are bathed with boracu problems. am>v a| conclusions after correspondence at these solution and treated with a special and develop altitude.-. m-riods. ointment where necessary They were not lo think of whal He said that the tourists forced One man remarked that the he was saying as a lecture. They their way into the store and ho S.P.C.A. should also provide oats were mot together in a conference could not push them oul. for the mules and donkeys loth.i kept Ihcir glasses clem Speightsiown now has the ser• Icai Of hwo modern t..tions. Th" other is situated at Queen Street end Is tho property of the Lone Star Garage MARCH B. IWt C'ANAMA I Ch.q.1.. ea Banker. UI : Dwiiawl IV.it. • SHghi Drafts Utl MAIL NOTICE I. (..i si I...HIUi HV (.iiitiil br clourt al m. < ... .,.,*•> Ml Mali al 1*00 am. IWaiiwra %  lid Ordinary Mall %  > %  If IS p m II. Marrh. 1WI AAto. l'..~.. Ut.nl.I"-J— •" .....l..l... KtUn( .1 twlliui. Itni. Tl.> '""" W.11U1 ... %  Mm wol llv. W'1 ^ 1 1 %  %  u %  ''> ihno nat unr b.by i. Ireful iKfNi.h ir.il. u/. • %  Aikyur Iflig fl givyu ASHTON ft PARSONS INT ANTS' POWDERS ^ tmm ^ ^ i Stop Pyorrhea and Trench Mouth in 24 Hours l-Mh nr Oial win nf r t.,MVI T?'.%  M. : 11..1 -111 .1. |i. mi.i< int UM *ar flns v. q-i'Hi ' %  • "' •ui ol rout aaDuin, ad aoea Iha tlh n.fnll lit W W B ihnam Ihr taaialu trial jMUHtia.1 I aftiuth ar.d Pmttli Ti>r wn yt" My E Bi> *(!%  tit* antl ^Imdliij Bad 'i"il lour i-.iti, v A ,. %  !.. ,.. u...' Am-mi. 1 • % %  II* a0iK€i'at In ni *" %  %  "VI" *t*f '"J IM .*> •' 1 -. •; m* laoa* f %  Mid tlial OauU Bi UV tialdri. 1 M Ouar.*nlJ Amour WSTki -' '' •i" fAi rbaakit lodaj III -t . Amoisn rr Pyorr %  H -III I N sddilion to the regular sj/c. tin. new. *malkr pack of AnJrcws l.ivcr Sail has been introduced 10 enable you to try the Vd'orMS mo $ popular s-lnio for a very small outlay A glut, ol elTcrvcscing Andrews, cottmg only a few prncr, cleans the mouih, settles the stomach. tones up the liver, and hnally clears the bowels. Also at any nine of the day one ica.poonful in a glass of cold water makes a cooling, rcfrcshmg drink. You can be sure of Inm* Clianlint^ with Aodrcus. Y OUR habv'a happineM aad wall'being in iha yeara 10 roasa depend on id* cara you give him now. Th* am ianporuoi duty la to taka every atieana 10 ensure lhai vour babi la fed from ihe breast. Remember that Braajt-faaf i Hrat-frd. The food which Nature Blips*!** 1* thr perfect food for baby. Mother*! milk la,naturally comtiiutrd to ault hta drlkate digrailun -nil to provide tinnutritive rlrtnent* for sturdy growth and braltbv dcvHopaarnt. W'idr rxprrlrnce haa proved thr remarkable value of 'Ovaltlad' to expectant and nuriing modicr*. Doctors and nuraet Birooaly rKomaifnd chat it he takrn regularly hrforr and after baby comra. to atimulate a rich and ample tupply of breast'mllk. In addition. 'OvaltinaV help* to maintain the itrength and vitality of %  he mother during the nnraifav period. Ovaltine Helps Mothers to BreuH-Rtd theirBatia ioU m miiligUti*. I>y a I <.tumi!, and Stan,. THE LADiES" EVES WILL OPEJ\ r WIDI: AT THE ll\IUa\l\S WHICH WILL BP. OFFERED IN EVERY DEPARTMENT. ESPECIALLY THE ^ f lll!i;SS I.IHHIS \ SHOE DII'l. AT OUR 4* EASTER PARADE llr.4.l\M\4. Onl .rIOXDiaY %  •!• MAIM II Aim run WBJL GENTLEMEN HI.ISH and brxflha a .Iqh ol r.11.1 wan tha FinMl QuoUly WORSTED, PARSONS GREY, TROPICAL, KHAKI DRILLS, LINEN and other SUITINGS, aUo SHIRTS ol all d~cripMon., includlna ihiFOTBUI SEA 1.SLAND COTTON SHIFTS aro oH*r.d al uch stagqarlnqly low prlco., e Ovr $500,000 worth ol N.w and Sylih Anurtcan, Canadian. Engllah, French. Dulih, Gwmaii and Italian M.rchandto. i. placwi at TB> di.poMl. e HOW LONG CAN IT LAST ? Th. anarw*r eaBBM on MONDAY, 12TH MARCH, AT 8.00 A.M. wh.n all road. lKid lo . TV. E. WILSON & CO Th. Air Conditioned Store oBerlng MERCHANDISE and SERVICE ol th. very best. Hi SWAN STREET •:• DIAL 367S


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PAGE FOIR BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. MARCH 7. 1SSI BARBADOS : W_A1A0GCTE Wrdnrsday M.rch 7. 1931 I I MM Its Ml III II EVEN when he praised the enthusiasm and understanding with which the Bay S!i..-i Boys' Club w.is being run, Mr. Basil Henriques. Vice Chairman of the National Association of Boys' Clubs, was forced to point out that legislation in this island dealing with children and young people coming before the Courts was 50 years behind that in England. Trained as he is to look beyond the surface. Mr. Henriques sees however, some hope for the future and without giving offence points out that the example of Jamaica might well be followed and modern legislation enacted dealing with juvenile delinquency. The Bay Street Boys' Club was the first institution of its kind in this island catering to the needs of children who were not fortunate enough to have opportunity for clean sport and home life and who resorted to playing on the street. It is clear that it is a start in the right direction but it is not sufficient to give the Barbadian public any cause for satisfaction. There is much more to be done. It is ;i compliment to the general public that without any government funds, the Boys* Clubs now in existence have been established and carried on with the enthusiasm of which Mr. Henriques speaks with obvious pleasure. But ii is M>Compliment to a GovernnMfit t<> witness the efforts of society to reclaim its juveniles and to ril idly by without doing something to assist especially in the way in which government alone can contribute. Legislation in this island has always lagtred behind the causes which it was intended to help or the social diseases to be cured. This is doubtless due to the traditional practice of blaming the faults of society on individuals, and the consequent delay in the growth of a collective social conscience. Mr. Henriques makes it clear that we have started in the right direction by thl establishment of Boys' Clubs but it is also clear, and it should not need the comment of a stranger to tell us that to be satisfied with a few clubs for juveniles is merely to tinker with a problem which indicates a serious condition existing. The problem of juvenile delinquency goes farther than life on the street or in the school. Broken homes, poverty and unawareness of parental responsibility constitute the root cause. Mr. Henriques was at pains to point out the existence of Juvenile Courts administering modern legislation, moral hospitals and other institutions for correcting the influence of bad homes and giving children opportunities for living their lives under normal circumstances and to feel that they are part and parcel of society. Beyond this stage, however, there is the need, which he pointed out for leaders. The history of the past should be a lesson in any attempt in the future. Youth leadership is a responsible job of work for which willingness is not the only qualification and it is here where the general public who contribute to organisations in the interests of young people and children should see to it that only those who by temperament, moral stability and a knowledge of the needs of modern society should be allowed to influence the lives of others. Mr. Henriques can render this island further service by way of public lectures organised by the British Council whose guest he now is and who have shown u willingness to bring social and cultural improvements to the community. In an island with so many children and adolescents matters affecting youth are of gn ft! magnitude and every opportunity should be taken to utilise the specialised knowledge of Mr. Henriques. <.OOI MK.IIINM KS PUBLIC HEALTH NUKSEH of the lo-uttW -f Inter-American Aff.ir* penetrate the Peruvian wilder ne* to teach Indian women how to care r-r ikeir children. An a remit of tasir work the death rate hai decreased is has the spread of contagion* discs** Thin l* part of the Point Fonr Programme which has proven nacceaafol with the co-operation of the two Kovomment* of the United State* and pu Similar pros r mm s ..re heing conducted m If. other South and Central American counttlts. .Ph*WT"ph .aniw.y ol me ".Nation i fiuaineaai When f POIMI Neighbours Get Together-2 In addition to n well-integrated agricultural i> <. lions of In Peru Include, both edw %  %  nd ttnlterteOO pwVjact*. All three nre major Mtivitot at Point Pour as outlined by U.S Pn ktvOI Harry S TrumAii in his inaugural tfddroMi*it January 1949. In the division of pUbllc In lltfa and sanitation, Institute UtpBftl and their Peruvian aaaoclBtSf literally have transformed whole %  I deadly malaria in liic coas!..l town of Chimbote IncidWKC of this disease averaged 25 percent the %  i .i i D p M I %  favourable location .' nn Industrial city, its population was stationary at about 5,000 1 new drainage and sanitation plan. cmbracinK 887,000 square metres, Rivi-. mosquitoes small chance to sin vivc. H pulsory. MaUri.i I |0 2 paVOMM %  id population has risen to I2,0o0 The mm i^ developing enough cleclrlc current to supply %  iubManUl trjde area and tlii'nr continued expansion in manufacturing and shipping. Director of Ihe IntUtUtfi Coll I %  b l>i Frederick J Wampler. experienced in public health work in Washington. DC. capital of the United States, in China, and in his in n. Mat* 11 Virginia. He has on his slaff from lh,. United States tiM\i sanitary onfUwars, i niadli liynien %  expert, two public baaltn nurses, and two office workers. The other .i -li II n n : :\i>%  > i vii .,iv . ; airplanes take pi... % %  ni.uiand i regular trips Into remote i Fiva hospitals and two io-hed id j. va boon I ml 1 D |U sanitary pom an i"cted in areas so remote th.ii (• IKIM'Ilers cure to visit them. Seven doctor* en I, ( pel .'i ill other regions. Many of DotM Peruvian medical man have studied public health and sumption in the United Sl.it. • n I;I.H,' ftin the Intitule of Inter-American Aff.iirs. OM 4 them. Dr. Jorge Atkins, whose father came to Peru as a young man and minted tharo. Ii a of tha baaltn pi in Loreto. He It. s undei i lion thraa hospitals, four dlapansanaral b< altn eantri and J.I Mi .ii. tail oparata two medical launches. AeroplaiM i n in brings Lima within thraa an area which a gem inl was almost laolated from the mast h>* tha Andes M untalns. They I .nta Rosa Hospital In lquitos. openel by |ha By O. K ARMSTRONG iyg ** %  *' The educati-n division, eatab.,"^ lC lished in IMS. came Into blfnfl t increasing recognition boji countrM.. c „ lne pari of South AnW lenders that Industrial and social progress depends en enUghtaaad rrom tfattiwa Biaaiiin" dtuwnanip, in Paru, l.yle u. piwnber is director of this activity. II. in 1945. Nurses penetrate n"d his ten North American speto the rem (est parts of IVru. cialisls work In close co-operation Som-Umcs their office* are in with Oolonel Juan Mendoza Hodion floating rafts They rigue?. Peruvian minister of edualV* InOCUUtkms. assist the physl. CJtlon, and 43 nationals. Rur clan in the i.'atru.ni 1; f infecliiTi-. elementary education and voci Issue medical supplies. They tional training arc the twt of good-neighbourl\ comes apparent: It is MIIHHJ the co-operation" pattern for sound, profitable devclopmcnt f resources In ,h Industrial hygiene Is an import-vunderdeveloped areas of this he m ant nctiv.ty of the Institute's (sphere. The investment of publ c health senu,. M P nice, direrfunds is not Intended as a normals a surf *f two United nent programme either fir the States consultant* and 20 IVruumted States or for the other !" n n t ^ hn C ,,,!, • Am0 "* l, \ e taUe ^ ^"^'P-"ng countries, but rather Physicians, five chemical as guiding operations to pave the engineers, and Mvaral laboraB^ry way for private Investment and About 30.000 persons are co-operative enterprise id HI the metal mines cf ( %  lit /inc. tthrer, But there is another result, imvanadium. and ooppat ores. SUlmeasurable in its value. The usual I idisease resulting from frigid formality of international Inhaling dual, has btn %  constant relations melt* away m the at%  l iiy menace to miners. The mospherc of close personal rclainada a systematic *tud> 11 M maintained bv all hand) Of dust in the mlw I U glalatkn working in the *ervices. Member.* wa* paaaad caUIni %  i tha use of of the stalls are no longer "form a afc* and othar prwvanUva man*•taa*f*" une BO the other The uro* Peiiodic counts of dust, and effect is u continually iHapanlni regular checks on the health of understanding that wdl strengthen miners indicate remaaioble profor all tune the structure of'intergress m three years. American *olidarlty and peace. CREECH JONES ON COLONIAL AFFAIRS Hew Words For New Conceptions By E. B. TIMOTHY LONDON. FNACCURATE words and expressions BWI seated a hindrance towards clear '.hinkinu on Colonial affairs. This opinion is expressed in an article—"The Challenge .o Colonialism' -by Mr. Creech Jones, (formerly Secretary nf State for the ColumeM In the March issue oi the New Common v. eulth New words were wanted for new conceptions, he writes. The term 'partnership', for example, was inadequate in conveying the conception behind modern British Colonial policy. The word "Colony" was ambiguous. • Although -Malta, for example, was selfgoverning except in the fields of defence and foreign policy, she was grouped in the same category as other Colonies enjoying less autonomy. There were variations such as Protected States. Protectorates, Trust Territories, etc., to be considered. Asian independence had led to the replacement of the term "British" by that of "Commonwealth" while the word "Dominion" had almost become obsolete. It was now fashionable for the meaning of the term "Commonwealth" to imply "the independent nations within the Commonwealth and the dependent territories of the United Kingdom, while the dependent territories of the "dominion" states were forgotten in this connotation. Discussing the use of the word "Colonialism" in recent years, notably in America and Asia, Creech Jones states that it has become a "word of obloquy to describe the condition of dependence of non-full self-government". Consequently, "Colonialism" was being made synonymous v/ith alien oppressive rule. He deplores the wholesale condemnation of "Colonial status", particularly in debates at Lake Success, and points to the dangers of sudden revocation of Colonial status. He says "Everyone will agree that in the unhappy situation in Malaya the withdrawal of the British would bring the races into conflict, break down the public services, create economic and political anarchy and add another Communist-ridden territory to the tragic list of countries so afflicted. In Africa, where the full co-operation of the African people is sought as devolution of authority from London makes responsibility increasingly real, it would be a calamity for Britain to break her treaty and moral obligations to the African people and renounce her burden. Our experience and technical resources, the financial aid and educational facilities required are an enormous asset lo the Colonial peoples which cannot be replaced by any international authority." He continues: "The challenge in Asia against all forms of Colonialism is a reminder of the rapidly changing world in which we live. "Despite this", he concludes, "today, however, Colonies have become almost anachronisms. The facts of the world we live in are seen in a completely different perspective. The world is more closely knot; nationalism has transformed Asia and is a strong influence in Africa; all under-developed regions are a matter of international concern, and Ihe imperial Powers arc enjoined to advance self-government". Our It* iug-)ug. black pudding and *ou*e, followed by shark's oil and o. weed salad. 3. Kxplain to modern tourist* :— Uiat Elizabethan Plumbta* Hanoverian Houses and Queen Anne furniture are nowaday* not to be ancczod at and that tariffs which include we* "Ide-worldo charme." historical iMnumtnti curio* and antique raU cheap at the price even If including plain and homely fare. 4. I quote:— "No water, except at meals or In his room at night, without a tip to the bellboy or (a trip! to the bar" Dear Mr. J A T. I'm afraid r. '"'Mil water fountain a' night. i to be found in the Wailing room at the Piarco AirPOri in Trinidad (you mash HM> pedal and it squirts in your face') But erne, come, you lag* Hotel Proprietors you unknowingly have the remedy in vour hands — see! So supply cverv tourist with %  water.whistle. WOOl with the bedroom kev) At the shrill blast of i whistle %  tall and decorative maubv inammey approaches the *uflerer, heading her high waters;an on rrcHy turlianed head. She open-; the Up and a silvery stream of delicious ice-cold water trickles. Without glass and straw, plump int.i the gasping opened trap, swilling and irrigatnm n w parched and, tormented abdominal of the thirsty northern Peace having been re stored — mauby mam' 1 VOU prefer it. Hostess" retires to refill. I. KSI.IT ffiaafa Mater, The Advocate— space uf. your valuable column* ; *pwi our gratitude foi andl Laced ,.t st Martin's Girls' %  ppraeuiuon ..i the notabto work and si Philip** novs* School. 1,1,1111 h] >'. nan Through her indefatigable effort* In UM parish ol Si Philip Pot these were magnificent successes tna atgni yean she spent imoni and set a puce which would VH the soul ol kindness cfuUhmM many lo follow. very sympathetic and alwayi for ihese ;md other services. '-bhj-infi. These gained her tha too numerous to be mentioned love and reapeel of ..II uh,> licre. I beg on behalf of the parish attended at tha post oOce Aland may i be personal—.n cay tlmugh this is for those in authni own behalf to offer our hearty nn'd ity to speak. 1. from my rxperisincere thanks. We shall always be anea nod %  MOCUYUMI with rtei nundfu] i>e her and the work she can *ay she was most prompt has done and wish her every business like, and efflelenl In her success in her new appointment. WOtrl W regie! her loss to us With thanks for the space, and hope that her successor will U S have thr public interest at heart nd will live up to the nigh lU'iivh Cricket M manifesting the r 0 ..v Edifor, Tha Adrocflfe— S1H.-I am bringing ., sm.,11 — „ matter to your notice. Do you Hunk ln %  P < ''' h a is fair ft M.dulfe in work, Mis* BUickmnn fi II I ball*' match on the islve social woi T (pi that matter any i beach <-n Sundnvs when worked ha* been -,,u i. bethert trying to and example lo many She soon utilise it for Its proper purpose? took over and guided the waning Even if they did so why not use Cuide Troops ..f s: phi] section away from the part Ft. Martins Gnl* She I ha* to be used by bathers It rn troop at it for ihe purpose of axhlbltlnc 1 %  %  %  %  % % % % %  'i th< solves and t b 111 b*M D. V SCOTT & CO., LTD. Tins K1.IM POWDICKKD MILK (5 nw> I'KINIS (P Pr lh) ANCIIOK TABLK BL'TTER (1th) TO-DArS SPECIALS al THE COLONNADE Usually Now |MI SC.50 .50 .42 .88 .82 CARPENTERS' TOOLS SAWS— ISins., 20ins.. 22in,.. 24ins.. 26ins-, 2ains, 30irm., 36im C-OMI'ASS SAWS Uini Hlns. BACK SAWS—12 in.. 14 Int., ItHni. PL_\NES. 1KON-9U1... 10ms.. 15ins.. 18in,. BLOCK RATCHET BRACES CHISELS— ',111. *.in„ '.ill. Ua. CHISEL SETS of I in S in. 1 in. Ins. mi. STO.NES-eim., 8m... GRINDING STONES, complete—Sins Bins. Spare GKINDINCi STONES—51ns.. IIITI.. SAW FILES—JVtlns., 4in, tWam., 5im. CLAW HAMMERS ENGINEER HAMMERS-lib. llilbs., 21bs. MASON TROWELS . SQUARES AT WILKINSON & HAI MS Co., LW. Successor* To C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phono — 4472. 4187, STERNETTE * FIRST IN 4 & 9.G m. B. of HBO f.Hid space ;| EFFICIENCY iforn.oti.-atI> scaled unit ;* BEAUTY Finccr lip cold control •i CAPACITY I DESIGN I ECONOMY Il m '"" 1 'B„,in 5 WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE DaCOSTA & CO., LTD. ELECTRICAL DEPT. .t-yt-ars ^ti:irnnlci? Ideal Deep Freeze lor When selecting your .. FOOTBALL OR TABLE TENNIS GEAR VMSMT DACOSTA 9 S where you will find a full RANGE lo select from. DaCOSTA A COI A'II. Dry <.


PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY. MARCH 7, l51 II Mill \l idADVOt ATI: PACK FIVE Leg. Co. Amend Col. Treasurer Acts THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL yesterday passed a Bill to consolidate and amend the Acts nf the island relatmK to the Colonial Treasurer, and thereby approve iho rfsmnmer.dation Tor the establishment ol the oftice of "Accountant General" in place of "Colonial Treasurer" This latter office will be abolished. Objects and Reasons of the BIN state Commissioner Adams in his! Jleport on the re-organizatlon of i the Civil Service recommended the creation of Ihe post of Accountant General in the place of that of Colonial Treasurer and advised that certain duties' now performed by the Auditor Goner:. I could more properly be perform**-! by the Accountant General as an accounting officer. This Bill therefore seeks to give effect to those recommendation* without interference wit'i the system of pre audit which h.v always. existed in this island. By the repeal of the Colonial Treasurer's Act, 1891. the right o the Home of Assembly to nominate to the office of Colonial Treasure' (which will he ..bolished) will no tenser exist. The office of Accountant General will be established bv ar order under the Civil Fsiablfrhment Act. 1949. and appointment to that office will thereafter be made in the same manner as any other office in the puM Objects Si Bill The Colonial Secretary moved Ihe second leading of the Bill He said: I should like briefly to elaborate the Objects .and Reasons which Honourable Members have before them. It may be remembered, that Commissioner Adams reviewed the Treasury and the Audit Department tOBWthSi baeause, in his own word., .it th-moment their duties ovarian t.i :i greater extent than is cither usual or convenient." In the course of his n-view Commissioner Adams pointed out that the work of the Audit Department included the computation of til' pensions and gratuities, the preparation of pay vouchers for all expenditure Included in the accounts of the Crown Agents for the Colonies and the recording of all receipts and WpSSsdltUTS of schemes under the provisions of the Colonial Development and v., ii ir Act, all of which duties are normally undertaken by th? Treasury In other territories He recommended th;it the Treasurer should assume the normal responsibilities laid on his office hv Colonial Regulations, that the title of the Office should be changed In view of the appointment of a Financial Secretary, and that the pre-Audit system should be abandoned. The Bill Master con does not go as far as this. Tho pre-audli system has worked well. and is generally acceptable, and there is no intention of it. There if. moreyvi -, tentlon of interfering with the (ompiiM.'iy lndsf>endenl position of the Auditor General, whose ma n (unction, henceforth as In the past, will M at ihe %  v.mhdog of the taxpayer." and who will continue to be primarily responsible lor (hecking revenue and expend) tnre. A. |V Limitations It is. iiowcver, proposed to remove the limitations i i ni-.l Treasurer's Act, which, made the Colonial Treasurer a sort of glorified cashier and rat iltnd •>' the Auditor General being called upon 10 undertake dulio Mid responsibilities not appropriate to an Auditor and in some case., created the anomaly of the Auditor General checking his own B| It is visualised that the Accountant General should carry th responsibility for the methods of Government accountancy (or the custody of cash in his own and other departments, for the collection of revenue and for SMurhli that approved expenditure should not be exceeded. He should also be tho Government's expert adn such non-public accounts as may be the concern of Government, e.g.. the accounts of public utilities, mid should be capab' of being an expert witness. Furthermore it is proposed to place on the Accountant General the resoonslbillty of HlMrVl Ihe compilation of statistics Barbados At present ever Conservation Pays Production of food in the United States has been increased substantially by soil and %  itai i i an %  BOM pi at .irncd out on Marty 3.000.0(H) American farms during 1850. These practices helped farmers to M k erosion, restore fertility, and protect and strengthen the productivity of their land, the United Deportment of Agriculture reports. Farmers co-operating in ihe conservation programme are encouraged to improve pastures and rangeland as a means of building up plant food reserves in the soil. The cost of conservation practices is shared by the tu-cijcriiting farmers. The I irogramme is administered Urough locally elected farmers committees. Since the department !*>gan Its agricultural conservation programme In 1936. 51.000.000 acres of pasture have been seeded. About 1.000,000 dams haw constructed and 260.000.000 tons of Una and IHOOO.OOO tons superphosphate have hern applied to the soil. Under the programme, farmers also have constructed 950,000 mile-: of terrace and farmed 130.000.000 acres of land on the contour. They h.ive planted 825,000 acres of trees. has never been adequately collate! or interpreted. It Is proposed too that the Treasury should be n for the overall supervision of loans mnde by Government, and possibly develop a Loans and I iii.iiuh In i cumstances it is imperative thai ant Cokmlal Treasurer's Act which limits the duties and responsibilities of the Colonial Treasi*er should be amended Furtnermore it is essential that the person appointed as Accountant General should be fully qualified to undertake the dutie: and be preferably n qualified accountant or economist with Motlstical experience. TtH of the post may not attract a professionally qualified pel icriced accountant, but it will be necessary to seek the, bast candidate that is available from whatever source. It is therefore n;..! % %  i i.venient, as well as appropriate, that the appoinlmcr., Sh> uld b in the hands of the I now beg to movethat the Bill be read a second lime subject to a minor amendment which I >ve at the appropriate will time Faulty Set-t'p Hon. II A Onae seconded the motion. He said that for very many years he had always felt that the set-up in the colony was faulty He himself had been appointed by Government some vears ago to reorganise the Treasury, but at that time the ideas which he had. had to be restricted because of the fact that the Colonial Treasurer was operating under the old Act. The result was that in this Island the Auditor General's staff was at present engaged in too much accounting work. In his opinion the Treasury should be Ihe central accounting depart ment of Government and all accounts should be under the COB trol of the Accountant General. He l>elieved that the present Bill for making the Accountant General an officer of the Government under the control of Government, was a step In Cic right direction. There had been a great deal of talk from time to lime about the pre-audit system wh n system in itself. All that it would mean was that whereas colonies the head of the department has statistical Inform,!pariment made out vouchers and lion of ON kind or another whl. n submitted them to 'he Accountant Kountant i before. %  Auditor General. ihe Audft i General Departthat the various v.< re keeping proper accounts ously could not find t. < %  because they were so much worked up A' I tep in th.light din HI Fixed Balm Ha". G D L Pile said that from wh.it (tic Hpn Colonial Secretary had said he gathered that the' could not expect the best man for the job for the salary 11 be paid. If that might simply be a rase of "a penny wise and pound foolish." He td that it was best to have the salary fixed which able them to get the baa %  way of their getting the best man Tfce Colonial SeerrUi and said that he was gp %  r for his observation, because that was a matter on which he strong personal viewi Ha dM not ihmk, however, that fee cession was the time for h.m to voice those As regards the sab: lourable members would find on the Order PapSI I a Dill to ame Treasurer's Act 1891. and it WM originally propoi ed 1 •uld apply to tha Colonial Tree urer. Th. was now proposed to %  % % %  Ii* the event .>f tha pTSS) I a re would i" tl m amendment U aaJjarj n'tonimended by Corn mi *i a'mg to tie newly named 1 %  l will pruv.sdequata to get the heat man." No Leave Passage* llr wot) A", not competitive with other parts of 1 I .-< %  u %  i : %  • 11 thai statement. As bonourel %  ban mid t i a p %  officers serving in other I That was not the • colony it ,.< ii,i refore difficull modern dayi I %  Tight typ* Of num. It be possible on tth to get a ri ll g officer. !i*ht he possible to get .i good officer who n haw tiled from some other i who might be prepared t.i eagle here and organise nod reshuffla thedepaitu : a period %  night b able to train some local man to ti kc In ; % % %  imd none. In tlie event of the pp boinc passed •aid has I i HI* Kxcellenrv WOUld make tba strongest poi. i 1 to secure a competent qualified n the terms proposed If on the other hand he sroulri fad. fin tin i representation* would be made to the Leg! ll The Bill was then passed atu: •! g Mill to amend ner's Act IB91 Ordei Pap i HIGH SEAS • Paan i B i resembled the Bathsheba or Crane ,i i %  and UUM bv i ii11 .. road bridge | n pier by the Highways and Transport Board Tha i i rushed undaa I the beach and fishing boats were dragged up and tied to I n the roadway. These i dashed against the rocks aaaa Quacobob with wch fury tii.it tha BDray ram bed to a height of thirty feet. One tlshing boat near Old Trees is known to have i %  pieces bv Ihe night hlfl House Pass Racial I *'0 m "> '"* w For Silwr Jnlii/ir I. C. T. A. DelegaOs Discrimination Address THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY an Address tabled b) Mr J K T Brucker, P0 iin and inhuman ti. ui tnei i mclea South All t< %  by the Soul>i Atncun Government. bul there wcie vICWua circle* lrl hu.il t.. r.... ti_ ——JJ." lie norlrf when it i busiress. Economics ruled the world to-day and no one had any thins to soy against ptilaclptea so long as his economic I It wa> us act In eth century to Bad mi .., who were at tli, Mich a the Boutl •nt making Dr) laws, i aces from having, not onl Hitanouias, but awsttM aourse. Social mtercoiiT Um, but wnn thf M-gregat*d %  %  %  %  %  that was going too far. lUUon -hould be passed unanimously by the House so thai i nt would .1 although %  ( dies apart from thoe paspk In %  were thlnkirur .i hbhflrrad th,. tieatment nieted to then Import Licenses In respect of South African goods I> amendment ||, move< % %  rents and were .... %  %  M : :, %  -.crept the SUCfastlon PM ihe dSH letlon of paragraph 3. and this had The Addreaa as passed rends aaJ 1 use of Assembly beg to draw to the attention of Hi F\' %  ellency |h Qovernor the fact %  crimination, the enactment of segregation laws ID I the inhuman trealnietr | ,, n i v cx 1st in the Union of South Africa, but receive official %  [.probation. and In I Union Government The Hi .. nee, and rmectfujij .. ,,u, ( ii,., : y r.xcelten, %  ii ahbeailssw %  %  %  ol South An: , fulb apprised of the lenUnieni of tha %  %  and further Hi* %  la submit Id-; M.i%  quest th %  %  ud la the Gov< rnmenl .f ine Union ol S Mr J. i: T nrmnrkrr i %  mi II full \ ind .'It i%  "' %  "" %  He Informed Ihe H i Nk l>r Malan was an upa human being He w.i* insane nd not normal and :i l madman pM other %  along with luni Mi | l> M^tthv mi ol thai -oi i %  %  designed %  beousft s ui the Union of Sou: ; \;i i lould e IITJ '.,. but 'no could ii..1 vole fat It %  them who bad n Lh >' %  tab enl to P4O the coneiu-i.,.1 thai i >i llahui anaa ihe most Inhuman baa na on earth They should .'till remember hat it was only a few niunth; it was u section of ihe peoDl since hiaddreti had bean on i". '' I %  %  ,. Laajfctfaluft i m ""' N •*• h; ' JLinalca had passed an addi-es. nr' ''*! -l ,, i ,r Malan hreahnent of I the express,. ? .. M, ''"' % ''"'' **"* "" "" d think the add.e.!er of South Africa < i the matter ce and clour, it wan imposii num. a upple "•1.11*0 1." UM i HI i'Ii : v ( ii.i aa tow rap House of Assenu I the Imperial College ot : Agriculture. Trl Mr Halcwt (|.) who took charge said thai he wa, I Commit MB to make ail .iniemirnent h> in srituig |1,040 in the Resolution II place of 18U1 %  V was t cover tin %  aayi for four represent.'' their wive* attending th. tlona to mark the BUvar JubUai of the It %  . the Imperial Collece of Tiopiral Agn i rturi He said lhat some of the em the local Depot t that College. Tn. Rat ahaUon was then passed lYtthoui tie b-te. Mr Adam tl.t h.ul moved UK toUowlng Address tn Die < | in, House of Assembly heg to seknowiadgn receipt ,f roui fta I of 1051 relating to the invitation from the Imperial CoUt.es of Trnploal Ai riculture. Trinidad, to U I of Itarbadivt. to | %  the Celebration if tho S\tvei JubUi •' of UM -i utlng of th< Royal Charter Tlie House I til to inform vmn Fxcellency that they are willinj: QVttafcV I] and tH'g • nate Mr r L walcott, Senlfl Member fbi St ivicr and ^l. F. D. Mottl. Sri.,.., KatnlVM foi lUves from their body to nttced 'lebration. SCIENCE'S LATEST All who have tried 1 the newlyarrived Lifefuard antiaipiic JcUrc it i* an ll I. l:i J CBBBsia like this ih: need lor J rcallv powvrlul pen is mi; vital. l'-c LtfcguarJ" M ptnttal cut-, -ores, bucai (iarglc ith u waMB ever ihcrc's risk of infection . ffiU OAkJvottfou done tort'be -trit&otcG LIFEGUARD IftGV** THE SUaRIMtCtRMiClDI AND A NTI'f'TlC MAHON FOR TRIMDAD Hon. J. A. Mah<..n was ye btrdajl homlnnted by 'he U Council as a representative to attend the Silver Jubilee (V.rbri lions of the InKM Tropical Ayrlrulturc HOB 0 l> I Pile was lominated last week but It is net possible now for him to j.ttend. EVELYN FOR FESTIVAL OF BRITAIN Hon c; ll Kvelyn v. day nominated as a repn from tho council to %  ttend tha il Of Hrituin. %  uld cat i %  enough weight. KugKsted the amendmenta alrwady stated Hg did not agree at ail with the para. g'aph which siiggesUti | ol South African goods, it was tl Wtien ihey kucv. th.it racial diserirninauan CM I .II,... i... Australia, England, and indeed all OVei the M I he dnl i Hard ill I %  frith the Address i He wasthen t i %  the amendment What ting again t, wag which the Government < f the Union of South U pled. At a tlnw like the | i i %  %  ll rights, he felt it :, ibis f"i tha Dnlon of South Africa I I i rdahlp and depressicn on the natives if lhat pai t II MI. ii couidi > Ci\ics In Practice peak too stronviv u, th not dealing with They eould ; %  ker said, to show [the deep sbirrece which the e ..i i fempire leit c sicen policy of South Afrli %  That would be the in.. %  of the Addiev.. .,,,, ,. %  I sxpeet roe Union ..r South 0 al the aoononue effen "' -"i 1 %  and %  prr.poscd. But one oil i h already passed a limflai Uld It ^.t:. Quito likev ||i..t ., ilord. fourin or fifth colon %  i a iitit iate un out do of Ihe f' ll %  nil. He mov* ,. passinc .i %  i %  Mr l. || (larr^r ,< %  na bad graal plaaaatra in .•...,, itng (ha passing of the Addrasi Uhe Ihe Junior meml.,1 for St Lucy, be fait very strongly on the matter which had now become '" '" ' '"" of world wide Oirls School paid a v He said that the Address was rioi | V 0 "'' M ( '' '' A-s, N i,l, , wer r talking about Hell let loose They lt ere not talking about sane or culturerl men. they were talhin; 1 about men who could surely take their passports and go to the utter. most part cf Hades and live in Memlters of the Government of the South AMcan Union were men who detested people looking tike him. but he tali the. baths thin he and bi mi %  they were not as good be, I were not as civilized n< tured. The Government of South Africa which was part of the British Empire was fUU human beings worse than dogs were being treated. Even H t the U.N.O whenpeople went to represent prlni iples. they did not the actions of the South African Government. "Tribesman" Brings UalttfBap Cental %  cm of ti.iHts papi i bag* i I I' i Uand cen.ent imv ,t |,n on Monday I | the Bteamahip Trlbeama.i Tlie TrOasBaaaii '1.999 bags of sulphate -t .,i laonla iron ugh Sh< sd tl M d Comp ai] L %  TRAVELLING BANK DOES WELL The Travelling Office of the ;.>wi tuneiit Savings Hank has completed Its first nook's visit to i r principal Sugai Pai u i I Consideiltig weatl,. Idltlot 'luring ti. soka, some %  %  the result has Ijeen v i %  owing table Is ., cmunison of the results during the Hist week for the three years duri | win. Ii the office hai l> in operation Na* \...ur,u Na. ,..ll..l BRUSH... UP... YOUR... SMILE... w aj^BBB WITH fHE CORRECT-SHAPE TOOTHBRUSH Wtsdom For all irhite shoe* White shoes, to pass muster in company, musi be spotless, Immaculate. Use ,r>/p Propert's White Rcnovato fes5i-,| or Properts Shuwhite. NsJ i surer way of making MM M that white shoes are -*i/r / risitji^ I'tiOI'llll s SHimilTE & aiUTE REyOVATOR The pupils o"f that Form are eiuoV of central and lo ai tiovcrrimcnts ra at their scats before began and wan mi! attentively while th. I settled down to the business of the day. Tha pupils, I).. Advocate .v i are studying ihe wot K IIIK of local Kovernment from Iho iUpOn FOOTBALL 1 I GRENADA TOUR >: I I A.S. BRYDEi\ & SONS .BARBADOS) LTD. AGENTS S*e us for • • BRC FABRIC EXPANIIKD MITAI. rSMPSSB) 1IAHII ROARO OIL STOVa & OVENS Plum, T.HFRKEKTLul. I i \ 11 Roebuck SI.. & Mnsjailne I..mi-. Phone 4267 %  %  at %  MB mwmm a te %  % %  %  I PURINA CHOWS I | FOR POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK | "8m Ihv IHffvrvnw Purina aMaMM** %  • c: ,H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-Di^ibuior.. Panama Joins World Health Organization NF.w YORK nn-liil ei I 'I.. World Health Organisation, it was announce,! lu date. 75 governn out i boeome full members of WHO n I one has become an (inocinte DM n '" %  r. In the western hem i %  "f the Amarli ui re> %  MOUNTS UP tsniiui A tolol ol ui J4 „, „,iiiriLule,| -I 1.-..T %  .!,.. <*ano In ihe coin to* ,,., u„ bUM, II.IIIIII, ,,,.„,. ( | .,, ||,e l.i.ii,. wtckfl ol Ihr ll..,:in., p •CPi EASTER FALLS ON 25th MARCH We have in Slock CARD HOAKli WQQ •HELLS ti, :i i PriO H*% 2Hc„ and 2tr. These can lv uaajrj for voui Bwter (iifis nf Tics. Scarves. Iliniilkerchirls, SloikiiiL;^. ate, <>i i .in be flllexl with OttlVl CttM-MS BsnrUrj Sugar mid other SwgeUU :: A1£0 :: ; liuful.le l'.:ishr I'^g. in l'luv:ic fuses unit Mur/iiun IfMrilt l.ggs In I'lnstir Cups. illTS LTD.—All. BRANCHES AT KRNSINGTON OVAL ^ Monday 12th Mar -. Osrlton V Tti.-.dy 13th Mar. v-. Colts , TlmtMlay lf>Ui Mar. vs. Empire •• S.ilnrday 17th Msr vs. Hpsrtsn ^ Monday loth Mar. vs. Colony \ AdmlWon S HFA80N TICKETB -. SI.WJ ^ ; OhUlnsble from Ciirlton \ >* mr-iuoiT* x *, DAILY 1 '; OEOBOR CIIAI.LENOR ** ' HTAND 2/ \ ;* KEKBINOTON STAND J/ S { Ol-EN STANDS w. , ; <> R0UHD8 |g, G I; PLAY STARTS r. p.n. o '*.• •.•.:'*.*.".:'.:;>.•,•. %  ,;>,;'..,*,". f.EMI.IMK.S GET THESr xow. Il.lli: Mil rnlour Slilrl. Itiihinh.., oils. Si/... ,4 |c ,7 S4.87 Ueh. Alhlrlir Suppuilrr. ,,. .1 I John .*< I..'.:. Hand Harl [ath_ Sl.liO I'alnled In %  II.Ill White hirU It! l.ir attached. Si/ 11 Eh BJJS ENDaUVOUM sirlp*d f-mbric r laasH wag 38 to 4.* ins. sun S.:M IVbilr in..I.lnrn lljndkrrrtUrl hem— stripr.l I'.JJII a Laa. Suit _%2;2.-> ag.73 Uch 7r. HI He tolton OlaTSS . Me, Extra Ovorn'e_ !li. CAVE SHEPHERD a CO., LTD. 10, II. 12 & 13 Brosd Slice,. ZttJ*' .-;; !m* % % % % % % %  % % % % % %  % %  -.^ %  %  %  %  %  %  %  .^ %  %  %  %  %  ,v.%-,',',v,%-,-,-,w^^ MORE PEOPtS-THE WORliD OVER RIDE ON GOOD/VEAR TIRES THAN ON ANY OTHER MAKE TMUm AIRWAYS VO\% AVAILABLE l\ ALL POPILAII SHIS I II V i. All Mi ITKAIII.M; to.. I.dl Vi.„.,... s, I i



PAGE 1

dRf* xwwjiy///,, ESTABLISHED 1395 Fire Leaves 300 Without Homes $1,500,000 Damage (From Our Own Correspondent) j_-u_ ST. LL'CIA. March 6. 'THRr.K III MHO I> families are homeless and over 150 houses destroyed in %  raging million and a half dollar five-hour lire which broke out in the backyard of the centre of a densely populated old Castries between St. UmLs Street north. ( haussee Knari east. High Street south, and Ktchisel, Street west. The alarm was raised ut &30 Monday night \ and Policelire fighting equipment which was officially an-' noiinced lust week-end up to required strength, arrived promptly on the scene but evident from commencement only the intervention of Providence could avert a second major catastrophe in three years as absolutely no water was available. Th. WEDNESDAY; .1ARCH 7. 19M Ivor Novello Dies Suddenly LONDON. March 6 Ivor N, VlUo world fiimous Rril i*h\ actor, author and composer, died early todiy. He was 58. He died ; attack of thrombosis a tew hours t ;tcr h hud appenred in hi.' musical show "King'*; Rhapsody" ul the Palace Thc.itrc here. Ivor Novello nme to the top in theatre in three roles — actor. ; lUffoor a.nd composer. Vhcn he was only 17. he wrote Keep The Home Plies Burning" which became the hit song of the • %  'rsX world war. Born In Cardjtf, Wales. Novello never nuu hegen acting m the provinces but filled to score on the stage until 1924. when he turned to actormanager in London with %  thriller called -The Hat". He vis,ted Hollywood early in his career. In IMS he started r. Irury Lane Theatre. London and had an extriordinary run of s ceasful musical plays. He also wrote more than 60 songs. — %  > utrr Malik Denies U.S. Allegation LAKE SUCCESS. Mar. 6 Jacob Malik, Soviet delegate |g the United Nations to-day denied that Russia had prevented adoption of the pi'mewed Iatemat'.oti; %  arms census. AUaaakwti mada oft Saturday by Prank Nash. United States reprexentative on the United Nations Commission for conventional armaments. Nash then smd that if the Soviet Government really wanted the world to Know the facts about the levaj of armaments it would Withdraw Its opposition to the programme approved by a of the General Assembly for exchange of exact and identic information concerning i.rmamcnts and armed forces, among member states Nash said the proposal for such a census was vetoed in the Security Council by Itussla. Today Malik issued a stat ment Ihrough the United Nation*which said: "Allegation rf N.tsn thai the Soviet Union prevented adoption of a proposal for submission bv the states on information of armaments and armed forces is groundless, "In reality the United State' ns well as other countries, of the Anglo-American Hoc rejected IDpOflaJ of the USSIt submission by the States on formation on armed forces \\ I was introduced by the representative of the USSR in i B* U Ity Council on October 13. 194rf —Rrutrr. MacDonaldln U.K. IJONDON. March 6, Malcolm Mac Dot I Bah*] Commissioner General in Southeast Asia nrrived here by tonight, He is here lor talks on the Fir Eastern situation with Prime Minister Attlee He had flown here from Singa. pore with General Sir John Ha;d mg Commander-in-Chief of Hnlv> land forces in the Far East. —Keuter. and pochawl i : i rag] tered nine and three inches rep.-lively tod w.iter was already turned off during the day When the brigade arrived water pressure was ineffective and recourse was sought to sea water which fortunately proved to be the ily available source. Flames meanwhile fanned l>. strong south easterly breeze leapt trollably across blockt. pose a triangular problem for lire fighters. A central blaze raced necked while civilians lice fought heroically threatened property at two other burning points and the (lie ODDpopulace sped in all directions to save their belongings. Hope was practically abandoned when the nre left town limits and began climbing Morne Dudon Hill. Control was secured night after two outer blase* cheeked .louses. ing till noon on Tuesday with Ihe brigade working. Among those affected are Mm families burnt out in the '48 lire. the St. Isidore Paupers' Home and nearly 30 business houses forced to squeeze Into that section after the 1048 lire. Reds Prepare Big Counter Offensive In Korea French Legal* Sees Pasha SOME MEMBFRS of the i Ii 1 Cricket Team rrlurn home Seven Named To Top Jobs In %  d by demolition of nearby'. XT A D ** — %  The scene was smoulde. i 1 A.i4./% tjOmmailtt %  .id-' U.S. Will Produce* "Canberra" Jots WASHINGTON. March 6 Britain's Canberra jet bomber is to be put Into production In the United States for the Air Force, the Defence Department announced here to-day. Current plans call for the Glenn I, Martin Company of Baltlmon Maryland io build a "Night InIruder" version of the twin )et Canberra under licence from an English company. The Canberrn flew the Atlantic in the record time of four hours 10 minutes on February 23. She (lew for inspection by American aviation experts and was yesterday llown to Martin's facton —MNag Britain. U.S. Lift 'Plane Sale Ban NEW YORK. March 8. Britain and. the United State: are ready to lift a two-year-old ban on the sale of aircraft t.i Yugoslavia according to Washington and London despatches published In the American Press. The Slate Department was reported to have agreed In principle to erd the ban. and to be (forking: out final details with the British Foreign Office in London. Yugoslavs are reported badly In need of additional planes of all types at present, officials said Marshal Tito's air force numbered only a lew hundred planes, most of "them obsolete Soviet models acquired before Yugoslavia broke with Russia three years ago. they added —Reuter DISCUSS GREEK DEFENCE ATHENS. March 6. The Greek Government and military leaders headed by Prim Sophocles Ven:.' cutsed Greece's defence with British and American military mlsaons here today to prepare lo* I he visit by Admiral' Sherman, American chief of naval operalions who is due on Thursday for two days. PARIS, March 8 Supremo Hcidguai Icr* All.ml I towers in Europe — SIIAl'K to-day announced the appointment Deputy Chief ot Slaff ol Lteutenant General Maurice Car leniicr. of France Other appointments announced were Deputy Chief of StaffPlans — Air Vice Marshal E. C Hudlcslon. RAF.; Aaaunant Chief of Staff — Intelligence M.imi British Army; Assistant Chief . Staff—Organisation and Tr.uninj —Major General F. W. Festing, British Army. Assistant Chief of Staff—Personnel and Administration—Ri Admiral Feoianto Cnpponi, Italian navy ml Chief of Staff—Plan POl ley and Operations—II.m (ftnar a l Pierre Bodet. French at force Assistant Chief of Staff—Logistics—Major General E Leavy, United Stales Ar.ny. General Gnienlh< i. General BaanhOwar'l Chief of Staff made 0 ntments. It was pointid out that thee otneers would bi concanwd primarily will nitrations and functions within Ihe staff structure of SHAPE They do not include the appointment of a Deputy Supreme Commander or any other major operational commander which will com* unde. i i i howar, Final selection of thee oflaMM has not yet been made Air appointments within the Command will follow the principle of complete integration of personnel from 12 partlcipatlni nations. The chief of -aeh <>f the majo' staff divisions named today foi example, will be assisted by t deputy or assistant of annthr nationality rWlCh Commander m Chief In Indo-Chi until Decenilx-r. when his en mand was taken over l Gam :•'' Da I ittre De Tav.igm. Airey been Commander in Chief in the British American zone in Tncst, since 1948. Hubleston was on the air M.iff planning duties In the Middle Baat In the war before he helped 'o plan the Sicily campaign —Reuter. 2 KIND URANIUM LUGANO. March 6 Two French engineers claim to have found traces of uranium the mountains In Switzerland. Lacao reported ban The presenca ol uranium io Italian Switzerland has been r mourcd for two years. —Reulrr <.IVI.\. Ill Allll 111 K MR_ WA. ASSAMS. Chuf BanlUry Iiwpsctor, Oeneral Board of Health, lecturing I •f Feed and faed handling places at the XssKh OaVtrs Cwiferene* yesterday. ALLIES RESTORE SELF CONTROL To West Germany BONN. March b\ THF AI.I.IFf) High Commission to-tiay coftfarred new %  Avt'i;. on Bonn Uovtinment including the rinht to bultd its own foreign Offlcp and gel up dlploqutic tiutiofu Ith cotinti IM AI the same time the Wist German fioveronwnt .issuie-l the AIUM thai II mid givt lht free strategic materiaJs in Germunv. Tiie v., %  (;.; %  ,. „. Qovarnmeot Is entltlod to wt up diplonutUc missions in all cowntrlei cxeept rnoaa In the eavtern hloc and inn %  wn ^tcrn eapitals 1 %  id official stofita' .to r.irls. London and W ion i i id,increased (powers Ml madr in the "Inttru inent of Hcvi-ion' 1 which was pub' lyfftad today and was to become %  t rnldBlghl tonight. The rnatrumtnl ooMaMed of six amendmenti to the Occupation It Hen i. mi rm > \ ol the rp i.h An CAIRO. Miirrh B. ,Ml0l Da %  lodi N u paak . -• MI und* oise nrem Bag p4*i attitude .inwards d" In French 11 %  Krlm refugee leader of the Riff using m 1930 M called in the Egyptian Foretgn Minister n,l tlmnked him f. %  i I i upport tet thi vi i .m>. .i\| i, .. B | ptuw PoraUn M oj MM M '. : d lhat Kgypt bad called %  IT the formation ol an Arab Committee and he Pi low M i Kroatb concei neo ovar the H i stum iii Morocco A aj ihe rorotan OfBce hawevt i denied press reports thai Egypt ii e inridarini breoklni dlplomatle raUUoru erltb Prance Thar were sevenii oOMr M —ReHlrr TOKYO. March C IJNITED NATIONS fwurols met heavy resistance on the Korean central front to day as General Mac Arthur warned that Communists were build ing up for another big counter offensive. American patrols fought their way across the Han RiTer and one entered the outskirts of the battered South Korean capital Seoul. But all were forced back after heavy machine gun-fire. Pilots reported North Korean and Chinesr troop concentrations building up at several places along the front. ox nit: • SPOT LONE vu •oaring in bnurin today e. cause nf t)„ tirr) 0 i :i cent weakly meat ration. As a result of the binim. lush, prlcej of vitamin pills have been reduced PTlcai i f t*o of the meal i opulat pflle, v itaniiin. ,i IN ci ( h.ive levi il-shed finn. B4 ..id. u> til cents f 0 r I (io plU | \ s Itarhailos Play For Tennis Trophy Barbados has drawn Jamaica In the second rcund of the tennis competition for the llrandon Trophy, which o|>ens .il Ti %  : April 12th Trinidad present hold, i ol Trophy, will play British Guiana in the first round, when pluy starts on the Tranquillity Court, and Spalding Tennis balls will be uead Ihe tournament Wtl held in BrtUah Citlana last year. M.P. WILL ASK ABOUT WEST INDIES IXJNDON. March ti -State for the Colonies, will be asked on Wednesday by Mr. Bernard; Braine, Conservative, whiit steps he propose! t' t -k Rail 3. In plate of total control over : oigc, the Allies will triw only exercise t (in To meet need of aamrlty ib• i '> ensure ol i %  %  .,1 Bepublh ol the pi clples of G.A.T T until Germany becomes a mctnl^i (Cj I" anaw the Federal Republic of the i rln i practical of the International II Bet u I r .i Aniea' ment and ti eontrcl it* exchange rate until the Federal Itcpuolu li.i. mamber of the I assume Mrl obUgationa arfth ie]" —Rrutrr \;rla ShaMlk today received a summons lo appear in court for leadJhl i women's march on Paihiiment in defiance of a Govern ment han Madame Shafflk, President ol Ihe IJiiufchter* of the Nile Party, arc liable to a heavy fine and one year's imprisonment. Her Party demands the right to vote; abolition of polygamy; lenal rinorce and equal opportunities for women. Under Islamic latt a man is allowed four wives at ; i lime -Keulrr LOW RELATIONS Marli (v Harberl ...ii Oovsnun I nancellor Adenauer was deeply satisfied nvei %  %  i' omi patttw %  %  l i'the i"\iBion was not a result of tie got uit ions with' Germans. He said the Coven lull confidence that the Allies) would e;irry OUt the new stutite in the spirit in which Ii i < —Reuter Gairy, Blaize Sel Free Emergency Fniletl QRCNADA, Mart h I This murniiiK Galry and Blaiic wen releeaad bar the Oovernoi who Liter in the day signed n pmdamatkm declaring the stale of emerfsnej ended Gairy arriveit the Market Sipiiin aliKhtlnn from a car was received %  mid enanei "f wild aadtenienl by small sroups S/ho nan surprised by the suddenness of the event %  I %  i %  copied repeatad hand shakes and aniuad happily, looking a/ell-dn id p.-teds while waUtlni tr.vl -urround! | 1 The decision of Ihe Adminl-traraci lYSd with mixed feelings, particularly In view that yesterday was a veritable icign of larrat In Ihe parishes of -St AnI St I'.itm ks v. I %  nuaibarini BO io iso induigc wttti %  meeting ..t log COUncU of the Unlot This Council la one of two Houses. The other is the Council ol NaUonalltlar The foiiowniH 1 .1natilWation ol the Slate hudgc' of Ihe U B s it tot i!i:i Adoption of law pn the dafanea of peace Dactlon Of the Supreme Cunt o' s it Ratification of decrees of the PraoMdium of the Supreme Soviet •i. USSR •.mi* then closed. —Ranter tt Is Hotter The heal of the am ith. has %  %  ... • during the yaai Mthougn eemlngl) %  affect Iha e a III .limate lo an ohaarvable d> %  union M D.C i he Biidlni %  i %  the top ..t Mount Mnnle/nni. I'lni Vn.v mada mi ic th.m li %  ( iht Mtai constant i to ituds i agnn la 1920. T Unl : i the numbei <>i cali i B %  | Ml -, i on i black cube Rial %  ubic cantt t,. i %  BI ihe outai edge of ten, and i late math* n ,. i %  imptlon Ueiwecu ll2u .md IM0 the vcragc of 6,Ri0 different u menta of the solar constant was I !U.11 i il en 1U3I and Ibid tha ..\ erage of 5.S2U measurewas 1 94(13. and be tween HHI and 1U4H the % % %  of ft,i)u4 mea in menls showed thai Hie value of Ihe Milar ctmstunl nid • d lo : M7I TinInstitiil i Umalk i han m ovi i tha cailh RtUdHM ^ll"v^ that %  %  %  l an M s in then .1 1 I i: Ily during ihe recent |>a*1. CANADA WANTS WOOL OTTAWA. Mar h I A Ic in <,f M-vcn < an.idi.in wo. i *1 i Will oon IM %  nkels buying up scarce wool f..i Ca n ada*! dafaiv %  mai ii : • trade ol l< lal %  disclosed h.rc Kent, i MacArthur said lh.it U ha' the moment" hut the position would U) %  llSgad if Coinmimksta threa In all their to • ,nl.litmii.il An Kighth Armv spokesman lo-nlahl tha'. I Rauon unund troppa I %  long the fronl %  i ro-day, American troops ad. oui ball .i mil. llnengmiiig Pivot "' the t'niteil tw PUota Communist tanks n Hoanaaong amall groups nl Chfnaaa cavalry tha area, A few miles fiirthe, eaal American trnniii had te light nil Communist probing afneks al three point". >thci An i~iu|iinl %  %  Of the 38th parallel. A Hmlrr report from Hong id that the Hong Kong itghlwing vernacular newspaper Wah Klu p said to-daj thai Chinese Commuuibts were inolillising more manpower foi Korean lighting. The reporf which came from a correspondent in ffalpah, Ponnoaa, ssid tnat Communist!, har OaSBH Iiil woa new in. Mail %  lliit -m* lit.) .In Marnier — 11V dn our bi$t lo pirate. I tlumghl MaY il Ukt Mum, They /o In give a elraner and n inotrr imot-r." Seven Jailed NEW YORK, Ma i %  nd Argentina i their lowest twin' i the opinion of Qjuallflei irvcrs said a iluenos Airei itch published In the New Yorl haaa U —Ri-iler HFIJfiOLANI). Man h I t-xiey sentetieed seven Commun, to i sreu the Nor^ii of i nvlcted youtht. i yaar prchi Th 6. Hoi .mediately i rnvas'cn" %  ere .'itf u p .i KaRlbui I II lerslll.ir.s l"eter Ooefl 001 conscription began last year. j Thg cell for 90.000 In May is des-l BI D pnliM f>r The hum,.i Oovanunagd ev* uated to-day as safety measures all Anglo-llurinaii' working In mines in thf outikirtto Tavoy in eastern Tenas*rrlm i fo lowed the piurdar of' two t m ropean miners by Com-| mtmiit Insurgents last week. —Reuler. ?\ .1 •l,.c'. i.l Ihr I'll! >.III 'II I'll ..llbr ,.„( Ihr r.nl r. Ilp irlhul'. i-ilr II., %  "Pr— • hr^. rrl w& ^ 60,00) MORE NEEDED WASHINGTON. March . TI | Aimy leday called for 60,001, conscripts In May, bringing the total Army requests lo 590,000 "No, Ihe flavour, tl range lo relate, comet from Ihe lohaeco." ^^ rthouM durlnl Rtalthe Army has made since January —Renter I —Renter Italian Police Find Midden Arms outskirts while a big arsenal Milan on Sunday GENOA. March 1 The iimsi found Italian poUea unearthed foui c! %  k Itioci for St three %  %  giant Ansalrto works her'' lasi of ammunition, six cases of American mortar bomb*. vaa the second Mg at 0 "nan anti-tank guns, two rases lion were found in the hi I discovered nl the work* In ti irenades. assorted spare Man weeks On Tebruary 14. pollci parlv :md se-eral gas masks. the local Communist Part dumps wa-> munition. Q the — Rcaur "Il's discover* night. In Jii j '• jn-1 latngaaaal n, sq in-i da Mai "You are behind the limes. Sina'i been lyieal about them for years." $1. (or SO MSDI IN ING1SNO II I Modcn that arms and There'll never be a belli. cigaretfe du MAURIER THE EXCLUSIVE FiLTER TIP CIGARETTE I




|



ESTABLISHED 1895



Har bados

er eeneeteestensnnnnrseneneen

Fire Leaves 300
Without Homes
$1,500,600 Damage

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. LUCIA, March 6.

"THREE HUNDRED families are homeless and over 150

houses destroyed in a raging million and a half dollar
five-hour fire which broke out in the backyard cf the centre
of a densely populated old Castries between St. Louis Street
north, Chaussee Road east, High Street south, and Etchisel
Street west. The alarm was raised at 8.30 Monday night
and Police fire fighting equipment which was officially an-
nounced last week-end up to required strength, arrived

promptly on the scene but

evident from commencement

only the intervention of Providence could avert a second

major catastrophe in three
was available.

| Ivor N evel

Dies Suddenly |

LONDON, March 6.

Ivor Novello world famous Brit-
ish, actor, author and composer,
died early today.

He was 58. He died of a sudden
attack of thrombosis a few hours
etter he had appeared in his
musical show ‘King’s Rhapsody”
at the Palace Theatre here.

*

Ivor Novello rose to the top in
theatre in three roles actor,
author and composer.

When he was only 17, he wrote
aun The Home Fires Burning”
which became the hit song of the
first world war. Born in Cardiff,
Wales, Novello never married, He
began acting in the provinces but
failed to score on the stage until
1924, when he turned to actor-
manager in London with a thriller
called “The Rat’.

He visited Holiywood early in
his career. In 1935 he started at
Drury Lane Theatre, London and
had an extraordinary run of suc-
cessful musical plays. He also
wrote more than 60 songs,

—Reuter.

Malik Denies
U.S. Allegation

LAKE SUCCESS, Mar. 6

Jacob Malik, Soviet delegate to
the United Nations to-day denied
that Russia had prevented adop-
tion of the proposed internation-
al arms census, Addegetion was
made. on Saturday by Frank
Nash, United States representa-
tive. on the United Nations Com-
mission for conventional arma-
ments.

Nash then said that if the Sb-
viet .Government _ really , wanted
the world to know the facts
about the level of armaments it
would withdraw its opposition to
the . programme approve by a
majority of the General Assembly
for exchange of exact and au-
thentic information concerning
armaments and armed forces,
among member states. Nash said
the proposal for such a census
was vetoed in the Security Coun-
cil by Russia.

Today Malik issued a_ state-
ment through the United Nations
which said: “Allegation of Nasn
that the Soviet Union prevented
adoption of a proposal for sub-
mission by the states on infor-
mation of armaments and armed
forces is groundless.

“In reality the United
as well as other countries of the
Anglo-American bloc rejected
the proposal of the USSR for
submission by the States on in-
formation on armed forces which
was introduc@éd by the represen-
tative of the USSR in the Secur-
ity Council on October 13, 1949

—Reuter.

MacDonald In U.K.

LONDON, March 6,



States



Malcolm Mac Donald British
Commissioner General in Scouth-
east Asia arrived here by air
tonight, d ~

He is here for talks on the Far
Eastern situation with Prime

Minister Attlee.

He had flown here from Singa-
pore with General Sir John Hard-
ing Commander-in-Chief of British
Jand forces in the Far East.

z —Reuter,





years as absolutely no water

' The Reservoir chambers regis-
tered nine and three inches re-
spectively and water was already
turned orf during the day

When the brigade arrived water
pressure was ineffective and re-
course was sought to sea water
which fortunately proved to be the
enly available source.

Flames meanwhile fanned by
strong south easterly breeze leapt
uncontrollably across blocks to
pose a triangular problem for fire
fighters. A central blaze raced
unchecked while civilians and po-
lice fought heroically to save
threatened property at two other
burning points and the fire con-
cious populace sped in all direc-
tions to save their belongings.

Hope was practically abandon-
ed when the fire left town limits
Las began climbing Morne Dudon
Hill,

Control was secured at mid-
night after two outer blazes were
checked by demolition of nearby
aouses. The scene was smoulder-
ing till noon on Tuesday with the
brigade working.

Among those affected are ten
families burnt out in the '48 fire,
the St. Isidore Paupers’ Home
and nearly 30 business houses
foreed to squeeze into that section
after the 1948 fire.



U.S. Will Produce
“Canberra” Jets

WASHINGTON, March 6.

Britain’s Canberra jet bomber
is to be put into production in
the United States for the Air
Force, the Defence Department
announced here to-day.

Current plans call for the Glenn
L. Martin Company of Baltimore,
Maryland to build a “Night In-
truder” version of the twin jet
Canberra under licence from an
English company.

The Canberra flew the Atlantic
in the record time of four hours
40 minutes on February 23. She
flew for inspection by American
aviation experts and was yester-
day flown to Martin's factory.

—Reuter,

Britain, U.S. Lift
’Plane Sale Ban

| NEW YORK, March 6.



Britain and, the United States
are ready to lift a two-year-old
ban on the sale of aircraft to
Yugoslavia according to Washing-
ton and London despatches pub-
!lished in the American Press,

The State Department was re-
ported to have agreed in principle
to end the ban, and to be working
out final details with the British
Foreign Office in London.

Yugoslavs are reported badly in
need of additional planes of all
types at present, officials said.
Marshal Tito’s air force numbered
only a few hundred planes, most
of them obsolete Soviet models
acquired before Yugoslavia broke
with Russia three years ago, they
added.



—Reuter.

DISCUSS GREEK
DEFENCE

ATHENS, March 6.
The Greek Government and
n.ilitary leaders headed by Prime
Minister Sophocles Venizelos dis-
cussed Greece’s defence with
British and American military
missons here today to prepare for
the visit by Admiral* Sherman,
American chief of naval opera-
tions who is due on Thursday for

two days. —Reuter.















latches
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1951
GOING BACK





SOME MEMBERS of the Trinidad Cricket Team as they left the

return home

Seven Named
To Top Jobs In
N.A.P. Command

PARIS, March 6.

Supreme Headquarters Atlantic
powers in Europe S.H.A.P.E,
to-day announced the appointment
as’ Deputy Chief of Staff of
Lieutenant General Maurice Car-
pentier, of France

Other appointments announced
were: Deputy Chief of Staff—
Plans — Air Vice Marshal E, C.
Hudleston, R.A.F.; Assistant Chief
of Staff —- Intelligence Major
General Sir Terence Sydney Airey,
British Army; Assistant Chief of
Staff—Organisation and Training
-—-Major General F, W. Festing,
British Army.

Assistant Chief of Staff—Per-
sonnel and Administration-——Rear
Admiral Feorante Capponi, Ital-
ian navy.

Assistant Chief of Staff—Plans,
Policy . and... Operations—Major
General Pierre Bodet, French air
force.

Assistant Chief of Staff—Lo-



gistics—Major General E. H.
Leavy, United States Army.
General Gruenther, General

Eisenhower's Chief of Staff made
these appo!ntments, It was point-
ed out that these officers would
be concerned primarily with
operations and functions within
the staff structure of S.H.A.P.E

They do not include the ap-

pointment of a Deputy Su-
preme Commander or any
other major operational com-

mander which will come under

Eisenhower.

Final selection of these officers

has not yet been made.

All’. appointments within the
Command will follow the princi-
ple of complete integration of
personnel from 12 participating
nations.

The chief of each of the major
staff divisions named today for
example, will be assisted by a

deputy or assistant of another
nationality -

Carpentier was French Com-
mander in Chief in Indo-China

until December, when his com-
mand was taken over by General
De Lattre De Tassigny. Airey has
been Commander in Chief in the
British American zone in Trieste
since 1948.

Hubleston was on the air staff
planning duties in the Middle
East in the war before he helped
to plan the Sicily campaign,

—Reuter.

2 FIND URANIUM

LUGANO, March 6.

Two French engineers claim to
have found traces of uranium in
the mountains in Switzerland,
Lagao reported here.

The presence .of. uranium in
Italian Switzerland has been ru-
moured for two years.

—Reuter.





GIVING HEALTH TALK



MR. W. A. ABRAMS, Chief Sanitary Inspector, General Board of Health, lecturing on the Hygiene
of Food and food handling places at the Health Officers Conference yesterday.





Guest House for Seawell to



ALLIES RESTORE
SELF CONTROL

To West

Germany

BONN, March 6.

THE ALLIED High Commission to-day conferred new
powers on Bonn Government including the right to build
its own Foreign Office and set up diplomatic relations with

foreign countries

At the same time th

e West German Government}

assured the Allies that it would give them free access to
strategic materials in Germany.



ON THE
*SPOT

LONDON, March.

Vitamin pilis sales are
Searing in Britain today pe-
cause of the tiny 91/3 cent
weekly meat ration,

As a result of the buying
rush, prices of vitamin pills
have been reduced

Prices of two of the mosi
popular pills, containing
vitamins B and C, have been
sloshed from 84 cents to 61
cents for 100 pills.—I.N.S,



Barbados Play For
Tennis Trophy

_ Barbados has drawn Jamaica
in the second reund of the tennis
competition for the Brandon Tro-
phy, which openg at Trinidad on
April 12th.

Trinidad present holders of the
Trophy, will play British Guiana
in the first round, when play starts

on the Tranquillity Court, and
Spalding Tennis balls will be
used ‘

The tournament was held in
British Guiana last year,

M.P. WILL ASK. ABOUT
WEST INDIES

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 6

Mr. James Griffith, Secretary of
State for the Colonies,* will be
asked on Wednesday by Mr. Ber-
nard Braine, Conservative, what
Steps he proposes to take to encour-
age the practical application in the
West Indies of the report on the
industrial utilisation of sugar cane
by-products recently issued by the
Caribbean Commission.

COURT SUMMONS
SUFFRAGETTE CHIEF

o CAIRO, March 6.

Egyptian Suffragette Leader,
Doria Shaffik today received a
summons to appear in court for
leading a women’s march on Par-
liament in defiance of a Govern
ment ban.

Madame Shaffik, President of the
Daughters of the Nile Party, are
liable to a heavy fine and one
year’s imprisonment.

Her Party demands the right t
vote; abolition of polygamy; legal
divorce and equal opportunities
for women. Under Islamic law
a man is allowed four wives at a
time,—Reuter,

LOW RELATIONS

NEW YORK, March 6.
Relations between the United
States and Argentina were at
their lowest points in four years
in the opinion of qualified ob-
servers said a Buenos Aires des-
patch published in the New York

Times today. —Reuter.













The West German Government
jis entitled to set up diplomatic
;missions in all countries except
| those in the eastern bloc and
| three westefn capitals.

They may send “official! agents”
to Paris, London and Washington,

Notification of



the increased
; powers Was made in the “Instru
{ment of Revision” which was pub-
lished today and was to become
effective at midnight tonight. The
Instrument
amendments to
| Statute

Here is a
amendments:

consisted of
the

SIX
Occupation

summary of the

1, The Allies give up ccntrol of
legislation to ensure “non-diserim
nation in trade matters”
where Germany's chligations to
G.A.T.T — general agreement on
Tariffs and taxes are concerned,
end then



except

only until Germany
herself has beccme party to
GA.T.T.
2, Allies give up their total
control over Germany's foreign
affairs.

3. In place of total control over

foreign trade and exchange, the
Allies will now only exercise
powers: }

(a) To meet need of security

(b),To ensure observance by
the Federal Republic of the prin-
ciples of G.A.T.T. until Western
Germany becomes a member

(c) To ensure observances by
the Federal Republic of the prin
ciples and practices of the Inter~-
national Monetary Fund Agree
ment and to control its exchange
rate until the Federal Republic has
become a member of the Fund and
assume Satisfactory obligations
with respect to its exchange rate,

—Reuter,



Adenauer Pleased

BONN, March 6
Dr. Herbert Ditmann high
West German Government official
said today that Chancellor Aden-

auer was deeply satisfied over
the revision of the occupation
statute

He said that the revision was

not a result of negotiations with;

Germans,

He said the Gevernment had
full confidence that the Allies
would carry out the new statute!



in the spirit in which it was made,|
—KReuter, |



Seven Jailed

HELIGOLAND, March 6
A British Court here today sen-



tenced seven Communist youths
;to three months in prisen for
having illegoily entered the Nortn
Sea island of He land

Six of the convicted youths,;



iwho were given one year proba-
tion were released immediately
while the leader of the “invasion”
froup, a Hamburg arts student,
) Hans Peter Goettsche will have to
serve his term. |
Str German police forces
ruarced the courthouse during the
trial —Reuter





(arise






Reds Prepare big

Counter Offensive
In Korea

French Legate |

Sees Pasha

CAIRO, March 6.
Ambassador Couve
Murville today asked to
Egyptian Premier Nahas Pasha
His request was
from Egypt's
towards developments in
Morocco,

Abcdel Krim refugee leader of
the Riff rising in 1920—26 called
on the Egyptian Foreign Minister
to-day -and thanked = him’ for
Egypt’s support fcr the Arab
cause in Morocco,

“Egyptian Foreign Minister Mo-
hammed Salah El Din yesterday
announced that Egypt had called
for the formation of an Arab
League Political Comunittee and
said that the Prime
“greatly concerned” over the situ-

French

Frenct

ation in Morocco. A spokesman |
however |

at the Foreign Office
denied press reports that Egypt
was considering breaking diplo
matie relations with France. There

were several other ways of
handling the Moroccan question
he said, —Reuter



Gairy, Blaize
Set Free
Emergency Ended

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Mareh 6,

This morning Gairy and Blaize
were released by the Governor
who later in the day signed a pro-
clamation declaring the state of
emergency ended. Gairy arrived
from Carrigcou by launch and on
landing had an interview with the
Governor while Blaize was let out
of Richmond Hill prison, An offi-
cial statement says that the Gov-

ernor emphasised to Gairy the
grave effect lawlessness of the
kind has on Grenada, and also
stated that emergency powers

were removed by decision of the
Executive Council yesterday in the
belief that sane counsels would
prevail in establishing a peaceful
atmosphere and enabling negotia~

alighting from a car was received
amid scenes of wild excitement by
small groups who were surprised
by the suddenness of the event.
He gave no addre
repeated hand shakes and smiled
happily, looking well-dressed in
light grey tweeds while walking
down the street surrounded by ad-
mirers

The decision of the Administra-
tion was received with mixed
feelings, particularly in view that
yesterday was a veritable reign of
terror in the parishes of St. An-
drews and St, Patricks where mobs
numbering 80 to 150 indulged in
beating persons and looting. Two
small fires also occurred but were
checked without much damage.

The only fatal incident of the
strike also occurred last night
when Policemen fired on a man at
Mount Pleasant Estate, St. An-
drews who was in‘the act of at-
tacking a watchman with a cut-
lass, the attacker dying later on
the way to hospital.

but accepted







SUPREME SOVIET,
OPENS SESSION

MOSCOW, March 6.

The session of the Supreme
Soviet opened here today with a
meeting of
Union.

This Council is one of two
Houses. The other is the Council!
of Nationalities, The
agenda was adopted

Ratification of the State budget
of the U.S.S.R. for 1951,
tion of law on the defence of peace
Election of the Supreme Court of
the U.S.S.R.

Ratification of decrees of the
Praesidium of the Supreme Soviet
of the U.S.S.R

The meeting then closed,

—Reuter

EUROPEANS LEAVE
BURMA MINES

RANGOON, March 6.
The Burma Government evacu-
ated to-day as safety measures all
Europeans and Anglo-Burmans
working in mines in the outskirts
to Tavoy in eastern Tenasserim.
This followed the murder of
two European miners by Com-

munist insurgents last week,
—Reuter.

60,000 MORE NEEDED

WASHINGTON, March 6.
The Army today called for 60,000
conscripts in May, bringing the
total Army requests to 599,000

the Council of the



since conscription began last year,

‘The call for 60,000 in May is

20,000 under the monthly requests

the Army has made since January,
—Reuter.



Italian Police Find Hidden Arms.

GENOA, March 6
Italian police unearthed four
tons of hidden arms and ammuni-

tion at the electric plant of the
giant Ansaldo works here last
nfynt.

This was the second big arsenal
discovered at the works in three



weeks On February 14
seized 14 tons of arms and
munition



The arms found yesterday in-
cluded 50 cases of ammunition for
machine guns, and rifles, three

machine guns and 24 small cases
of ammunition, ix cases of





American mortar bombs, three
German anti-tank guns, two case
and grenades, assorted spare

parts and several gas masks
Three alle arr dump
Vv earthed Oo he

outskirts of Genoa and at Turin}
while a big arsenal was seized in!
Milan on Sunday
|
{

It was reported at Sassuolo near |

Modena that arms and ammuni-
tion were found in the house of
Mario Debbi described as chief of
the local Communist Party He
was arrested, the report added
—Reuter !

following |

Adop- |

De

see

understood to
attitude

1

Minister was!

ions.
Gairy then later made an ap-
pearance at the Market Square
|
|
|
|
\

|

|
|



|





TOKYO, March 6

UNITED NATIONS patrols met heavy resistance

on the Korean central front to-day as General
Mac Arthur warned that Communists were buiid-
ing up for another big counter offensive. American
patrols fought their way across the Han River and
one entered the outskirts of the battered South

Korean capital Seoul.

But all were forced back after heavy machine
gun-fire. Pilots reported North Korean and Chinese
troop concentrations building up at several places

along the front.

|
|
It Is Hotter
|
The heat of the sun, as it
| is measured on the earth, has
increased a fourth of one
per cent during the last 20
years Although seemingly
small, the increase indicates
enough extra heat to affect
the earth's climate to an
observable degree, reports
the Smithsonian Institution
in Washington, D.C,

The finding was made by
scientists at the Institution's
estrophysical laboratory on
the top of Mount Mon-
tezuma, Chile. They made
mere than 16,000 measure-
ments of the solar constant
since the study began ina
1920, The solar constant is
the number of calories of
heat falling during one sex
ona on a black- cube that
measures one cubic centi-
meter. The cube is assumed
to be at the outer edge of
the earth’s atmosphere, and
| @ppropriate mathematical
| corrections were made lo
support this assumption

Between 1920 and 1930 the
average of 5,820 different
measurements of the solar
constant was 1,9431 calories,
Between 1931 and 1940 the
average Of 5,520 measure-
ments was 1,9463, and be-
tween 1941 and 1948 the
average af 5,004 measure,
ments showed that the value
of the solar constant had
increased to 1.0478

The Institution's findings
arree with other evidence of
climatic changes over the
earth, Studies show that
verious locatities have exne-. |
rienced an increase in their
average temperatures, espec
iclly during the recent past





ap aan sgt ‘eperraeiin fee

CANADA WANTS WOOL

OTTAWA, March 6.
A team of seven Canadian wool
experts will soon be~ scouring
world markets buying up sca
wool for Canada’s’ defence
machine, trade officials disclosed
here —RKeuter,



General MacArthur said that
Communists had been fighting a
delaying action since their failure
to break through United Nations
| tines on the central front. The
; action was a screen for the build-
ing up of nine to 12 fresh or re-
habilitated divisions, the United

Nations Commander said in a
personal communique
His warning was echoed by

Lieutenant General Ridgeway 8th
Army Commander, He said he
could hold any offensive “at the
moment” but the position would
be materially altered if Commun-
ists threw in all their foreés and
additional armies,

An Eighth Army
claimed to-night
Nations ground troops had in-
flicted 3,029 casualties on Com-
munists along the front yesterday.
To-day, American troops ad-
vanced about half a mile east of
Hoengsong ‘Pivot of the United
Nations line Pilots reported
Communist tanks moving towards
Hoengsong.

Small groups of Chinese cavalry
were also seen in the area. A few
miles further east American
troops had te fight off Communist
probing attacks at three points.
Other American troops occupied
Pyongehang about 25 miles south
of the 38th parallel.

A Reuter report from Hong
Kong said that the Hong Kong
rightwing vernacular newspaper
Wah Kiu Po said to-day that
Chinese Communists were mobil-
ising more manpower for Korean

fighting, ad

j Srhe report’Which came from a
correspondent in Taipeh, Formosa,
said that Communists had decided
to call up 250,000 able bodied
youths from the Nation’s fac-
tories and schools for military
training,

spokesman
that United

It sail iuac iwnroughout South
and Central China, 500,000 farm-
ers were being drafted into the
armed forces and added that all
available doctors and@ nurses were
being mobilised for service in
Korea,—Reuter.

| |
TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS

in | RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT





“And lP’vesmoked

them ever since!”
















“What's the real purpose
of the filter tip? I suppose /,
you'll tell me that’s the secret 7
of the exquisite flavour.”’ 4

“No, the flavour, strange
to relate, comes from the

tobacco.” ee
e





There'll never be a beficr cigarette

“You're fun to know, Jimmy.
The last time we came here
it was a new cocktail: this
time it’s my first du Maurier —
and very nice, too.””

“We do our best to
please. I thought you'd
like them, They do
seem to give a cleaner
and a cooler smoke.”

“It’s discovery night, David.
Jimmy’s just introduced me
to my first du Maurier.”’

“You are behind the times.
Nina's been lyrical about
them for years.”

$1. for 50

MADE IN
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du MAURIER

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—
PAGE TWO





Caub Calling

Ss GEORGE SEEL, Head ot
Development and Welfare in
the West Indies left for Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.1.A
He leave Trinidad today for
Jamaica, and it is expected that he
will be away for one week

Back To Trinidad

R. PETER KNOWLES, Mana-

ger of Cannings Groceries in
Point Fortin, Trinidad, who had
been holidaying in Barbados with
his relatives, has returned to
Trinidad. He left over the week-
end by B.W.I.A

With Cable & Wireless
R. GORDON LAMBERT has
gone to Trinidad om q week's

holiday. From there he will fly

to Martinique to stay with friends,

He is due to return to Barbados

on March 22.

Mr. Lambert is with Cable and

Wireless here,

Remaining On
RS. HILDA CAMPBELL of
Trinidad whose husband is
at present in England, is in Bar-
bados with their three children,
They are staying at “Rajnauth”
Worthing. Mrs, Campbell likes
Barbados so much that she has put
her three children to school ‘at
the Ursuline Convent, and she is
remaining on for an extended
holiday,
Hair Raiser
HILE out for a stroll on
Sunday morning “Carib”
dropped into the Empire Theatre
to watch the rehearsal for the
Barbados Dramatic Club’s pro-
duction of “A Murder has been
Arranged”. In spite of the fact
that one of the players has been,
away for the last ten days on his
, honeymoon, it was gratifying to
notice that all the players know

their parts. The setting of this
play is one of the most unusual
ever seen in Barbados and I am

sure that when everyone has seen
this play they will think they have
had their money’s worth in thrills,

It is certainly a hair raising thril-

ler.

Rh R. JOHNNIE de FREITAS,
B.G businessman accom-

panied by his wife who had been

spending a short holiday in

Ba rhados has Teturned to B. G,

BY THE WAY

By Beachcomber

GNORANT, loud-voiced,

splenetic critics of this so-
called Government often say that
there is no co-ordination between
the Ministries. Well, here is an
example of perfect co-ordination,

It was evidently the Ministry ot
Agriculture which gave, the Food
Ministry the idea of buying bad
meat to make into fertiliser. It
is called killing no birds with two
stones, Scientists are busy on a
method of reconverting any fer-
tiliser left over into meat, so
that the finished product could
be tinned and sold to the Argen-
tine for resale to America,
whence it could be sent back to
us In the form of férttiliser,

A Saucer of Beer For

Rustiguzsi
MAINTAIN that to give a cat
a walking-on part in an opera
is a dangerous precedent, It is
taking an unfair advantage of an
Englis: audience, who, the
moment a cat appears, lose all
interest in everything and every-
body else. “Oh, the sweet little
thing !” At Sadler’s Wells the
other night no member of the
audience went ag far as to
clamber on. to the stage with a
saucer of milk. But that was
because the novelty stunned
them. And if anyone started
shoving saucers of milk among
the singers, there would be, from
seme of the more robust singers,
shouts for saucers of beer. This
might not be in the best interests
of art, but it would be in the best
interests of drinking,

Don't Stroke the Boa

Constrictor

MR, DANIEL (sic) is reported

as saying the other day, “I
would like to see big-game
hunters showing more kindness
to lions.” Short of not being big
game hunters any more, I don't
see what they can do — unless
they only hunt the lions a little;
in fun, as it were, using popguns;
and crying pop, pop, as_ they
pretend to fire, or shouting
“Boo!” as they spring out from
behind a tree. I knew a woman
who offered a little bag of acid
drops to a crocodile, “It was sc
hungry,” she said afterwards in
hospital, “that it nearly ate me,
too.”

Mr. Kickett Lashes Out
EAR SIR,

The allowance of 4d. a day
for an ape on the Rock of Gib-
raltar is not much of an adver-
tisement for the British Empire
No wonder foreigners say we are
finished. What must a Spaniard
think when he sees these humil-
iated apes trying to exist on a
eum that wouldn't keep a wart-
hog alive? A Commission should
be set up at once to carry out a
fact-finding. investigation on the
®Spot, and to prepare a report. In
nearby Algeciras the local wits
are already talking about “the
fourpenny apes.” Why does our
Gevernment stand for this?

Yours faithfully,
Kickett, P.LJ., F.D.N

B.G. Businessman



Edgar

BESBSEBEBHeE Eee eee eee
BVew 36 in. EASTER Jootal
BDress Assortment

“ Cordrosa”’
“Invictaray ”

Dial 4606

Slipper Satin,
MAROCAIN,

EVANS & WHITFIELDS



CHRISTINE GORDON —Trinidad’s
Carnival Queen leaves this after-
noon after a five-day visit.

High C and All That

oe S man oj fun, Landy
de Montbrun and his troupe of
entertainers staged another suc-
cessful show at the Barbados
Aquatic Club last night. It was
their farewell performance as |
understand the entire party leave
for Trinidad this afternoon,

Clyde Rivers certainly nas a fine
voice, and June Maingot iS uw tal-
ented young singer. Peter Pitts ex-
presses all that is Trinidad with
nis cdlypsos and hé makes a
good dancing partner for Miss
Maingot, Clifford Corbin and hig
banjo are old stagers both in Bar-
bados and Trinidad.

Landy’s (ladies) voice ¢an still
hit “high C” (with a push) and
his playing of a mouth organ with

$s nose must be seen to be
believed,

All this plus the persona) ap-
pearance of Trinidad’s Carnival
Queen—Christine Gordon and her
Lady in Waiting Dorothy has
made this latest show of Landy’s
one of his best.

From Jamaica
RS. ALICE LYN and her
aughter Joyce of Jamaica
are at present in Barbados on
holiday. They arrived over the
week-end by B.W.I.A. and are
staying at the Marine Hotel,
Mining Engineer
R, AND MkKs. RUSSELL
BRYAN and their two chil-
dren arrived from Venezuela
via Trinidad on Monday morning
by B.W.1.A. to spend two weeks’
holiday staying at the Paradise
Beach Club. Mr. Bryan is a
Mining Engineer with the Orinoco
Mining Co., in Cuidad, Bolivar.



Junior Short Story Competition |;

The Evening Advocate invites
its Junior Short Story Competition.

every Monday in The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery,
can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 306
words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate | 24.
Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesday every week,

NOTE: Stories must not be copied,
Send this coupon with your story,

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Going Home
ETURNING to the West In-
dies, after successfully com-
pleting their studies, are Vernon
Lindo and A. L. G. Henriques,
beth from Jamaica. Vernon, who
served in the RAF during the
Second Wofld War, studied meédi-
cine at the London Hospital and
qualified within five years. Hen-
riques, a civil servant who went
to Britain on study leave, is now
a qualified barrister at law. He
hopes io return to the Govern-

ment Service in Jamaica.



Scout Camp
OLONIAL and Daminion
Scouts from ®0 different

territories will be going to London
in August to attend the London
International Patrol Camp. The
camp will consist of a headquar-
ters and seven area subcamps,
each placed in a manner corre—
sponding with their position
in London and featuring a
wilhouette or model symbol-
ising the locality. A high-
light of the camp will be a visit
to Arsenal stadium, After a tour
behind the scenes it is hoped that
the best eleven Senior Scout
footballers will play a game
against an Arsenal eleven. Scout
groups from Jamaica, the Wind-
ward Islands, Cuba "and British
Guiana have already signified
that they will attend the camp.

Gifts For Boys’ Club

NGLISH cricketers, mostly
connected with the Surrey
Club, have contributed funds for
the provision of cricket equip—
ment for dispatch to poor boys’
clubs in British Guiana and Bar-
bados. This is the second year in
succession that boys’ clubs in the
West Indies have benefited by
such gifts. Last year, equipment
was sent to Jamaica and Trini-
dad. The gifts, including bats,
pads, stumps, ete. were dispatch—
ed last week by the Social Ser-
vices Department of the Colonial
Office and are being carried free
of charge by arrangement with
the Harrison Line Company on
board the s.s. Statesman. This
ship is due to arrive in Barbados
on or about March 18th,

Butlin Dea!

"here latest Billy (“Bahamas’’)
Butlin deal was the sale of
his Juxury London mansion in
Bishop’s Avenue, near Hampstead
Heath. It has been sold for
£45,000. That, of course, includes
fixtures and fittings. Several
months ago, Mr Butlin decided
that he no longer needed the
house built with palatial nursery
quarters, as his children were all
away at school. Originally the
firm negotiating the sale asked
£55,000 for it, but it stuck on the
market,

all children under 12 to enter for
The best story will be published

The stories



“THE GUN

A
“THE MEN BEE

Sten MCHALLY

with MILLARD MITCHELL: !

JAMES STEWART





See as

an Belndes Joy CF

MAC’ADAM,

IN A_ 1,000”

ND
1IND THE GUN”



BULL BT DRUNK DAN

UURYEA as WACO JOHNNY THE BANDIT, STEPHEN McNALLY

as DUTCHIE THE RENEGADE, SI
took her man,
OPENING FRIDAY 9TH,

iELLY WINTERS as LOLA. A Gun

and gave her another.
5.00 AND 8.30 and continuing indefinitely

GLOBE THEATRE

Lystav,

fine draping

Printed rayon — white grounds

White
NEW

(at

in’ 5

Lombia,
Tobralco

Whitfields}

SHADES.

Robia

Just arrived

corded crepe

Dial 4220

,j|of their receipts “frozen” by the

:
!
|

{

B

B.B.C. Radiw Aes

WEDN AY, MARCH 1951
6.6 19.06 M

an 12.15 p.m 9.36
6.90 ne Music Goes Round, 7.00
am 3, 7.10 a.m. News Analysis,
7.15 a ‘om the Editorials, 7.25 a.m

Programme Parade, 7.20 ar Red Letter









Day, 7.45 a.m. How to go to the Theatre,
8.25 an Inte rlude, 8.30 a.m. Work and
Wor ship f 2m. Britain and America
9.00 a.m. T Vews, 9.10 a.m. Home News
from Brita 15 a.m. Close Down, 11.5
o.m. Progra © Parade, 11.25 am. Listen.
ers’ Choice, 1145 aim, Statement of
Account, 12.06 ‘noon) The News, 12.3
p.m, News Analysis 12.15 p.m. Clos
Down
4.15-—64.00 p.m, W716 M.

4 13 p.m Souvenirs of “Mus sic, 5.00 p.m.

Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m, Moura
Lluympany, 545 pm. Ronnie Ronalde,
6.00 p.m, Monia_ Liter Quartet.
6.00—7.15 p.m, 26.04 M. & 31.42 M.







6.15 p.m, From the Thifa Programme.
€.35 p.m. Interlude, 6.45 p.m, Programme
Parade, 700 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m
News Aniysis, 7.15 p.m. The Artist and
the Community,

1458.00 pom. SL32 & 4845 M.

6.00 pm, Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m.
Books to Pead, 8.30 p.m. Film Review,
8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week, 9.00
p.m; Statement of Account, 9.15 p.m.
Gerna Gilmour, 9.30 p.m. Tip Top Tunes,
10.00 p.m, The News, 10.10 p.m. From
the Editorials, 10.15 p.m, Fine Goings
On, 10.45 p.m. Mid Week Talk, 11.00 p.m.
From the Third Programme.

New Zealand
Goes Woolly

AUCKLAND, N.Z., Feb.

The amazing spurt in wool
prices this season produced some
remarkable anomalies in New
Zealand farming practice.

Since the wool crop has turned
to gold newspapers are recording
many sidelights. At present there
are more than 15 sheep to every
person in New Zealand, and the
proportion will rise higher if wool
pricés stay at their present level.

Farmers now are getting more
for “crutchings,” the poorer lines
that once could hardly be given
away ,than they got only one or
two seasons ago for the finest
fleece wools.

Small boys





are occasionally

wool trucks.

Sales in Auckland alone this |
year have totalled about £12,000,-
with more to come. Wool
however have one-third

000
farmers



an anti-inflation |

government ‘as
freed at

measuré, to be
future time.

One result of the boom is a de-
cline in receipts of lambs at stock-
yards. Farmers are keeping thém
as long as possible to grow more
wool.

some



+ Any ideas, no! (8)

- Companion of the Bath. (6)

- Copy. (3)

Sor sensed nowadays, at Wembley,

ere you have a ghost. (8)
. Fancy it's in Ba ee ehusn, (4)
Let in here ‘ drinking glasses,
(4) Day of rest. (7)
Inches on the tia (5)
The age of veracity, (3)
sane, & hy, agaiaas poetry.

Enlarge in discourse. (9)

Down

. The little devil leads the Home
Secretary to obstruction. (6)
Obviously no full side, any pupil
will tell you. (5)
The lions are cut up! (5)
Such a cellar is no use under-
Seong, (4)

t that Shah’s pipe into good
order. (9)
- It stops mines working. (8)
Takes @ wild ass to smash an
orange like this. (6)
Must be enthusiastic to become
one. (é
. Sort of country that has recently
seen skating. (3)

you win singles by getting

them? (4)

making £200 or more a week by | ¥
sale of wool scraps, collected from | %
fenees, trees and scrapings of | ¥

serge gaa
oe SPS Bree

(6)

oF SF

e ene

te Cleansing. Material, (4)
f Allowance of sorts, (4)
s UiSseoly Position to be pu. im.
3) 21. Eegs, (3)

Pah of vesterday's
‘ eC

ieztc Nerose: f

- Ibex, O. Rut: 10. &
‘Dance
Aer

TS. Diet ¢



=




AN



THE HARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY LTD.

COTTON











CROSSWORD 3

ARBADOS ADVOCATE







WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1951

————t

-MPIRE

Last Two Shows Today
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.











———

|
AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only) |
MATINEE : TO-DAY AT 5.00 P.M.
TONIGHT AND TOMORROW NIGHT AT 8.30
“CARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA” in Technicolor

Starring :
» VERA-ELLEN ;«» CESAR ROMERO
CELESTE HOLM





ROYAL

Last Two Shows Today
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.

Eagle Lion Double

Farewell to Yesterday “MEN”

DICK HAYMES

ALONG WITH THE SHORT and



Also : The Technicolor Short “JAMAICA”
The Magnetic: Tide, Tide “THE COBRA STRIKES”
PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) Pe ej lh eR a
TO-DAY & TO-MORROW (Only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. ROXY aia alia
STANWYCK ron NO MAN OF HER OWN % and AAAER
A PARAMOUNT THRILLING DRAMA! Richard F’ E

|
Leo GORCEY & the BOWERY BOYS in





Last Two Shows Todiy
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.









To-Morrow 1.20 p.m. (Monogram)



OLYMPIC

Last Two Shews Today

By Special Request
FRIDAY 9th 2.30 p,
Ingrid penn Bing ‘CROSBY

“BELLS OF ST. MARY'S”

“MR. HEX” and
“DEATH VALLEY RANGERS”
Ken MAYNARD — Hoot GIBSON

PLAZA Theatre=OISTIN (DIAL 8404)

Republic Smashing Double





John Wayne and John Carroll



in 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.
LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. (RKO Radio Double) Republic Whole Serial
tae ea “FLYING TIGERS” aa
NEVADA & THUNDER MOUNTAIN GHOST OF ZORR
Robert Mitchum Tim Holt and starring
TO-MORROW (Only) 5 & 830 (RKO) MIDNITE 10th (Monogram) ss ; it Clayton MOORE
FAIRBANKS, Jnr. Mormana| ““aonts ACLEY" and “FIGHTING SEABEES Pamela BLAKE
“SINBAD the SAILOR” “BLACK MIDNIGHT a
Color by Technicolor Roddy McDowall Lynne Thomas with Roy BARCROFT
John Wayne and Dennis and
O’Keefe George J. LEWIS

GANTET WY—(rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 8.30 pm. (Monogram Double

RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL & DEATH VALLEY RANGERS

with Tom KEENE Ken MAYNARD — Hoot GIBSON





WARNING !II
POSITIVELY NO CHILDREN



Opening FRIDAY 8.30 (RKO) MIDNITE SAT. 19 (RRO) ALLOWED!
‘With Joh WAYNE FAIRBANKS. Jit. RA in Age Limit 16 YEARS and over!
+ and “SINBAD the sArLon
Anthony QUINN Color by Me nalcetee | 2
LOOP OPE LAE POE PLP SF EF EFF SP TOES



To-night



CLUB MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio
with a world-wide reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
Entertainment

throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations

onty $5.76. racu.

ITEM YOU HAVE BEEN WAITING

9. POPP SSSSPPSO POD SOSOD IO OTF GOSS

FACTS/

Sorry...

SHOWN TO
SEPARATE
AUDIENCES
ONLY!

GLOBE THEATRE

TO-NITE = Presents = TO-NITE

LADIES NITE

FEATURING:

The Ist ALL GIRLS Talent Show

“WHO DO YOU KNOW IN HEAVEN”
“TLL GET BY.”










PUTTS Ce NA RA
of hygiene...if parts of
it shock you, remember
it is based on facts!



WOMEN
and girls 16
years & over

Gloria Ashby singing




Anita Small

”










Gloria Bentham %, “IF YOU WERE THE ONLY BOY” , 4.45 P.M.
Lucille Craig =, | “THE TENNESSE WALTZ” Ve Ae making iT
Betty Taylor ,, “MY FOOLISH HEART” : p ae
Leotta Best ,, | “GOODNITE WHEREVER YOU ARE” ae of mae _ a
ULC Cade me
GUEST STAR eile ae hehe WI | yoors& over
TCM CR uCtam | 9.30 P.M.

THE LIL’ MAN WITH THE HORN

LEROY ALLEYNE—8 year old Trumpeter Playing SOCIAL GUIDANCE ENTERPRISES

“THE STORY OF



Bop, Goes My Heart, Our Very Own, Cricket Lovely Cricket,
Chatanooga Shoe Shine

SPECIAL ADMISSION PRICES

Ladies will be admitted to House Section TONITE for 1/- and to
Balcony for 30c. Free lovely balloons from Chase’s store will be
given away to the FIRST 500 LADIES

many young fi

are physically
wrecked by not
dealing with the
Lame LAD a



KN AGREEMENT |
THAT THIS FILM AND ’
SHOULD BE
SHOWN ARE...
B’dos Board of |

USUAL ADMISSION PRICES FOR GENTS

PICTURE 5 & 8.30 P.M. TO-DAY

Film Censors
Director of
Medical Services
Doctors and
others, too
numerous to
mention !

ALL-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST!

PLAYING FROM FRIDAY 9TH



REGULAR Women—4.45 p.m.

PLAZA \Men - 8.30 p.m.

_. PRICES

MURRAY’S
MILK
STOUT

THE STOUTEST OF ALL
STRENGTHENING
TO THE LAST DROP

e
| Recommended by the Faculty

P
i
A
i
A

and continuing Daily.













visit







—————$—$—$—$——_——— ee)

©
FRESH STOCKS ARRIVED
RECENTLY






FOR,



MANNING & CO... LTD. = Agents










WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7,

1951



His Excellency Praises
Barbados’ Health Statistics To Late M.C.P.

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor opening the Health
Officers’ Conference at Queen’s Park House yesterday morn-
ing said that part of the task of health officers is to create
in the minds of the community the correct attitude towards

positive health.

The conference has been organ-
ised by the Director of Medical
Services, Dr. J. P. O'Mahony,
in co-operation with the Univer-
sity College of the West Indies
(Extra Mural Department), and
is being attended by health
officers from all over the island,

The Governor was welcomed
by Dr. H. G. Cummins, M.C.P.
DY. O’Mahony made the opening
address on “Attitudes”.

Among thiose present was Mr.
Aubrey Douglas-Smith, Resident
Tutor of the Extra-Mural Depart-
ment of the University College of
the West Indies.

The Governor said:

It gives me great pleasure to
welcome the delegates to this
Conference of Public Health
Officers, particularly as it is the
first to be held in Barbaclos, but
mainly because it gives me an
opp?rtunity to pay a tribute to the
humanitarian work you are doing
in this island.

Your task, whether you be
officers of Government or Vesiry
or members of other professions
is to prevent sickness and disease
rather than to cure it—in fact, to
give us the conditions that we
need for healthy living. I need
hardly stress how much better it
is to prevent than to cure.

Essentials

Clinics and hospitals are essen-
tial institutions, but the neeu for
them would be much moderated
if the major causes of bad health
could be removed. That is your
job—to guide us in the methods of
prevention of disease.

Bad housing is one jof the major
causes of bad health. It leads not
enly to insanitary over-crowding,
but also to family rows, mental
stress and to illness that should
never have occurred,

Concerning the hygiene of food,
the needs of the maternity and
child welfare services, the collec-
tion and disposal of refuse there
is no organisation more qualified
than yours to give a lead to public
opinion.

These, and all the other qount-
less other questions of health and
hygiene in both town and eountry
are the very foundation of civil-
ised life. Science makes its great
discoveries; it is for you to
apply them. Thousands of lives
depend on your work. But in addi-
tion to your scientific and techni-
cal knowledge, you are required to
possess the aptitude of a psychol-
ogist. You must create in the
minds of the community the cor-
rect attitude to positive health. In
fact, “health” must be presented
as something beautiful and desir-
able for its own sake; and when
all is said and done, what can be
more beautiful or more important
both to the individual and to the
community than a healthy mind
in a healthy body,

_ Some of you may feel that pro-
givess towards thi§ goal is top slow,
but do remember that the things
that are worth doing for your
fellow man—in his thinking and
in his living—cannot be achieved
by short cuts. It needs sustained
hard work, but if you study the
health statistics of Barbados of
the past twenty years you can be
proud of your achievements and
inspired to continue your vocation
of service in the prevention of
disease.

Common Objective

Dr. O’Mahony associated him-
self with the Governor in welcom-
ing those present (on what he
called a pioneer occasion. They
had come together—health officers
of every type—to discuss common
problems, arrive at conclusions
and develop attitudes.

They were not to think of what
he was saying as a lecture, They
were met together in a conference



=| - =

in which there was to be free dis-
cussion in which everyone was
invited to express his opinion on
any problem that was being dis-
cussed. That in itself was another
attitude—the attitude of Free Dis-
cussion,

Why were they there. Dr.
O’Mahony asked. That led to
another attitude—the Common
Objective—and the common ob-
jective was the prevention 9;

disease and the promotion
heaith.
Many of them worked for

Parochial Bodies, but if they look-
ed at their work from the limited
parcchial point of view, it would
not be as inspiring as if they con-
sidered it from the point of view
of the common objective. They
should develop the national out-
look, It was only in that way that
the island would get what it
wanted when it was ready for it,
as far as public health was con-
cerned.

He was not belittling parochial
public health, but his point was
that the parochial attitude did not
lead to as high a degree of morale
as the national attitude. So morale
was another of the attitudes with
which he was dealing. Morale was
“an awareness of the common
cbjective, and the energy by
which that common objective
was served,

Store Opened On
Sunday: Fined £2

A fine of £2 with two shillings
costs in 14 days or one month's
imprisonment was imposed on
Radhakishen A. Thani of the firm
of Thani Bros, after he was found
guilty of having the Thani Bros.
store at Prince William Henry
Street opened for i on
Sunday, February 11, the day that
the tourist boat Nieuw Aimster-
dam was in port.

Before imposing the fine, Mr.
G. B. Griffith, “ae
of District “A”, told , “Be-
cause the tourist ship was in you
took a chance, but you have got
caught.” He did not however
impose the maximum fine,

Cpl, Kenneth Murphy, who
made out the charge against
Thani, said that at about 10.30
a.m. on Sunday, February 11, he
was on special duty. He was
detailed to look for anyone com-
mitting a shop offence. He was
instructed that no business prem-
ises had had permission to open
on re day.



entered the premises of
Thani Bros, at Prince William
Henry Street and saw seven
tourists inside. The main door of
the store was open. He was
accompanied by P.C. Hurdle.

Radhakishen Thani was behind
one counter veggies J scarves,
jewellery and other articles to the

wrists. Behind another counter
was a_ second Indian who was
offering another group of tourists
caps and other items,

Murphy asked the tourists to
leave and instructed Thani to
close immediately. He returned
sometime later and found the
main door still open. On in-
structions received he reported
Thani.

P.C. Hurdle corroborated Cpl.
Murphy’s story and added that he
actually saw Radhakishen .Thani
reaching out for jewellery to hand
to the tourists.

In defence Thani said that he
opened the store on holidays and
every Sunday. and Thursday for
the purpose of private business.

His nephews and himself saw
after correspondence at these
periods,

He said that the tourists forced
their way into the store and he
could not push them out,




—~_. TOMA

Wa.



Tribute Paid

The House of Assembly yesterday
recorded its sympathy at the death
of Mr. D. A. Foster, M.C.P.,
late Junior member for St. An-
drew. The resolution which re-
cords the sympathy will be com-
municated to Mr. Foster's family.

Mr, Adams (L) who moved the
passing of the Resolution said
that it was at all times a solemn
duty to refer to the death of
friends or acquaintances. It be-
eame all the more solemn when
as in their case, it was the death
of a political and personal friend,
the death of a member of the
House of Assembly who was on
the Government's side.

It had always been to their
credit in Barbados, that although
their local government was antici-
pating revision, faithful Barba-
dians had always been found in
every parish to take an active,

honest and thorough interest in
the affairs of their particular
parishes.

It had fallen to the lot of few
of them for more than a quarter
of a century, as in Mr. Foster’s
case, to be a member of the Vestry
and thi to have aided in
watching over the interest and
improving the position, as one

might say, to his immediate
n in

Like all human beings he had
had things said against him,
Everything that was said against
him was in the direction of his
energy rather than his lassitude.

Energetic, Loyal

He was not only energetic in
his duties and loyal, but he was
present at the House of Assembly
at 12 o’clock although he had to
pemend from the other end of the

They would miss him, not only
ithe members of his party, but all
the members of the House, as an
interesting figure of a man of good
humour, of sense of his responsi-
bility, a family man, a man of the
community and a man of the House
of Assembly.

It was difficult to get him ruf-
fled. He was a good man, a good
father, a good husband and a
good politician.

Mr, Gill (E) Senior Member for
St. Andrew said that two weeks
ago when he last saw the then Jun-
jor member for St. Andrew, he
was in robust health and he did not
think that he would have passed to
the great beyond so soon, He had
known My. Foster from his (Mr.
Gill’s) childhood and had always
found him a man to be respected.
In him, the parish ang Barbados
had lost a loyal man.

Mr. Smith (L) recalled how Mr.
Foster had always been accused of
‘trying to do too much, but Mr.
Foster was of that noble nature
and he could not help it. He was
responsible for many improve-
ments in his parish and in him
fhe community had lost qa great
man. _

Mr. Wilkinson
although Mr. Foster was not a
member of the party to which he
‘belonged, he was a man respected
by e y in the House of}
Assembly. is death was a preaf
loss not only to the parish of St.

, but to the island as a

(E) said that

whole.

S.P.C.A. Starts
Mobile Clinic

A donation from the Sirming-
ham Branch of the R.S.P.C.A. has
made it possible for the local
§.P.C.A. to start a Mobile Clinic.
Every Tuesday and Thursday
morning between 11 o’clock and
noon the Chief Inspector treats
the eyes of draft animals resting
under the trees at the Pier Head.
The eyes are bathed with boracic
solution and treated with a special
ointment where necessary.

One man remarked that the



§.P.C.A. should also provide oats
for thé mules and donkeys!









BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ii
Sold Adulterated
° ye
Milk: Fined 407-
ORIS PETERS of Fairfiek
Cross Road, Eagle Hall, St
Michael, was yesterday fined 40
in 1¢ days with an aiternative of
one month's imprisonment by Mr.
H. A. Talma, City Police Magis-
trate, when she was found guilty
of selling adulterated milk to L. F.
Harris, Sampling Officer, along
Grazettes Road on January 28.
The milk contained 15.3 per
cent water, ;
"BUS CONDUCTOR, Oswaki
Boyce, was yesterday fined
12/- by Mr. G. B. Griffith after he
was found guilty of carrying pas-
sengers in excess.
FIRE at Carrington’s Village,
St. John, at about 8.30 p.m.
on Monday burnt a quantity of
ripe canes belonging te James
Gittens of the same address. They
were not insured.
INOTYPISTS of the Advocate
met at the Press Club on
Sunday afternoon to say goodbye
to a member of their craft, Mr.
Ralph Headley, who leaves the
island during the week to take up
an appointment with the Veice of
St. Lucia.
‘PRE RIGHT REAR FENDER
of motor car M—1704, owned
by Vernon Thorpe of Britton’s Hill
and driven by Douglas S. Proud-
foot of Flat No. 4, St. Lawrence,
was damaged when the car was
volved in an accident with motor
lorry M—873 along Parry Street,
City, at about 4 o'clock yesterday

The lorry is owned by M. L.
Harrison of Fontabelle and was
being driven by Densil Grecia of
Cambridge, St. Joseph

New Gasoline

Station Opened
In St, Peter

A gasoline and service station at
Road View, St. Peter, owned by
Mr. J. D., Douglas of Country
Road, St. Michael, was opened
officially on Monday evening to
motorists.

Mr, K. N. R. Husbands, Speaker
of the House of Assembly, opened
the function and the Rev. Frank
Lawrence blessed the new station
Mr, Bobby Edghill, Director of
Messrs Hanschell, Larsen & Co.,
Ltd., also spoke.

Miss Sebright of the British
Union Oil Company, cut the blue
end white ribbon which extended
across the door to the office to
complete the official side of the
function. Mr, E, G. Macintyre,
Manager of the British Union Oil
Company, was among the invited
‘guests.

During the Cocktail Party which
followed the opening function, the
service station was making its first
trade after opening. Most of the
motor cars which had brought the
guests to the function, took gaso-
line while attendants with chamois
cloths kept their glasses clean.

Speightstown now has the ser-
vices of two modern stations. The
other is situated at Queen Street
and is the property of the Lone
Star Garage.





3 Years For _ Harbour Log

Larceny | in Carlisle Bay

Adolphus Skeete of Carrington an meee on ees
Village, St. Michael, was yester- Pilgrim S., Sch. Anita B.. Yacht Carthhee,
day sentenced by His Honour the| >“ ~ aoe oo
Chief’ Justice Sir Allan Collymore Saseooes z ry. Leay a aon. Phi p
to three years penal servitude for] H. Davidson, Sch. May Olive, Sch, Cycio-
the larceny of a case of cigarettes |*#â„¢* %- Se> a
and five years preventive treat-
ment for being g habitual crim-
inal at the Court of Grand Ses-
sions.

Miss M. E. Bourne prosecuted
for the Crown. The prosecution
pointed out that on October 23
Skeete stole one case of cigarettes,
the property of British American
Tobacco Co. Ltd, and which is
valued at $104. One witness for
the prosecution Joseph Dyall of

ALS
Oil Tanker Rufina, 1856 tons net
Capt. Bruin, from Trinidad via Grenada
S.S./ Myken, 4399 tons net, Cant
Dolven, from New York via Martiatque
M.V. Deerwood, ® tons net, Capt
Mulzac, from St. Lucia
8.8. P. & T. Forester,
Capt. Bevil Aqua, from
Curacao.
Schooner Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tors
net, Capt. Every, from British Guiana
DEPARTURES
Schooner Rosarene, 60 tons net, Capt
Hazell, for British Guiana
Schooner Turtle Dove

4,749 tons net
Vancouver yie

62 tons ne

Capt. Ollivierre, for Trinidad
Black Rock said he saw when|“‘2S Askyin, 724 tons net, Capt. Kvane
Skeete took the case of cigarettes | for Trinidad

from one of the Trumpeter Tobac-
co Factory wagons. He chased him
and caught him at the junction of
Crichlow Alley and Roebuck St.
Sgt. Phillips of the C.LD. said



Ships In Touch With
Barbados Coast Station

that on February 26 about 3.30

p.m. he received a notice signed Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. advise
; . that they can now commutnicete with

by the Acting Attorney General the following ships through their Barba

saying that a charge of being 4} cos Coast Station

habitual criminal was being] 5.S. Golfito, ss. Bayano, ss. Aleos
; «| Partner, s.s. Duala, ss. Sundial, s¢

brought against Skeete, He knows Toe ted cn “Sips nd eee Polio,

Skeete and has seen him “knock-
ing about town.”

18 Months For
Housebreaking

Sentence of 18 months’ impris-
onment with hard labour was
passeq at the Court of Grand Ses-
sions yesterday on Eustace Thomas
a labourer of St. George, by His
Honour the Chief Justice Sir Al-
lan Collymore. He was found
guilty of housebreaking and lar-
ceny of articles to the value of
$61 and the property of Horace ‘ee

if Z
Rowe on November 1, N |

s.s. Regent Leopard, s.s. Regent Panther
©.8. Mauretania, s.s. Italia, 5.5. Frontenac,
2.8. Rangitata, 5.5, S. Maria, s.s. Rangitote,
ss. Nieuw Amsterdam, Colombie
s.s. S. Clara, 3.5. S. Paula, s.s. Argentin

s.s. Lady Nelson, 5.8. Europa, s.s, Beatrice

Gums Bleed,
Teeth Loose?
£¢ Bere







Anthony Martin of Constitution |
Road, St. Michael, was also sen-
tenced to 18 months’ imprison-

ment with hard labour by His

Honour the Chief Justice Sir Allan

Collymore for shopbreaking and ee”

larceny of articles valued at

$21.54, the property of Allar Stop Pyorrhea and

Franklyn of Roebuck Street on
July 25 at the Court of Grand
Sessions yesterday.

Martin is now serving a term
of imprisonment for uttering coun-
terfeit coins and this sentence for
shopbreaking and larceny is to run
consecutively to the term he is
now serving.

RATES OF EXCHANGE

Trench Mouth
in 24 Hours

Bleeding gums, sore mouth, o: loose
teeth mean fine ‘ou are & victim of Pyor-
rhea or Trench Moulh, ov some bad uilseas
that will eventually cause you to lose ull
our teeth and have to wear falne teeth
fore your time, Since the great World
War these mouth diseases have spread
throughout the world so that now scien~
tists say that four oul of every five people
are ‘sufferers sooner or later. Be warned in
time and stop these diseases before it is
too late, because they often cause not only
the loss of teeth, but nlso chronic rheuma-




MARCH 6, 195) tism and heart trouble.

Pe Re gy New Discovery Saves Teeth
* = ve B: . 63 1/10% pr Ames . the discovery of an American
Snkare Of PE) cient ae fights these troubles in ® new
Demand aud quick way. It penetrates right to the
Drafts 62.95°% pr. roat of the trouble, stops gums from bleed-
. Sight Drafts 62 6/10°% pr. ing the very first day, quickly takes the
efit be: Same siamese Bis CoukYin Telnet
if rency 8/10% pr ens the teeth. The ow'!h e
ene rte dag oe a) er from Mr. W. W. B. shows the results that
eee ons sen users get: “I suffered from Trench
Sitver Mouth and Pyorrhea for ten yeats. My
bgp Fee pre ums were sore and bleeding and > had
MAIL NOTICE fost four teeth, while several other teeth
were getting looser all the time, £ tried
Mails for St. Lucia bw the M.V. Lady} many things and thon heard of this new
Joy will be closed at the General Post] discovery Amosan, In 2¢ hours uiter using
Office as wider ope my ems had prog od meee
‘ he soreness in my mouth disappeared fn
Parcel Mail at 10.00 a.m. Registered ays and (n two we found that

Mail and Ordinary Mail at 12.15 p.m Fares oa

21 my loose teeth were much bh and that

id ont the hardest of 5

the Sth March, 1951 coul



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INFANTS’ POWDERS



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PAGE THREE

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A glass of effervescing Andrews, costing only a
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BARBADOS i ADVOGATE

B
Grea SSS: — snes,

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid. Broad 8t., Bridgetown.



Wednesday, March 7, 1951

LEADERS NEEDED

EVEN when he praised the enthusiasm
and understanding with which the Bay
Street Boys’ Club was being run, Mr. Basil
Henriques, Vice Chairman of the National
Association of Boys’ Clubs, was forced to
point out that legislation in this island
dealing with children and young people
coming before the Courts was 50 years
behind that in England.

‘Trained as he is to look beyond the sur-

face, Mr. Henriques sees however, some
hope for the future and without giving
offence points out that the example of
Jamaica might well be followed and
modern legislation enacted dealing with
juvenile delinquency.

The Bay Street Boys’ Club was the first
institution of its kind in this island cater-
ing to the needs of children who were not
fortunate enough to have opportunity for
clean sport and home life and who resorted
to playing on the street. It i8 clear that it is
a start in the right direction but it is not
sufficient to give the Barbadian public any
cause for satisfaction. There is much more
to be done.

It is a compliment to the general public
that without any government funds, the
Boys’ Clubs now in existence have been
established and carried on with the enthu-
siasm of which Mr. Henriques speaks with
obvious pleasure. But it is no compliment
to a Government to witness the efforts of
society to reclaim its juveniles and to sit
idly by without doing something to assist
especially in the way in which government
alone can contribute.

Legislation in this island has always
lagged behind the causes which it was in-
tended to help or the social diseases to be
cured. This is doubtless due to the tradi-
tional practice of blaming the faults of
society on individuals, and the consequent
delay in the growth of a collective: social
conscience.

Mr. Henriques makes it clear that we
have started in the right direction by the
establishment of Boys’ Clubs but it is also
clear, and it should not need the comment
of a stranger to tell us that to be satisfied
with a few clubs for juveniles is merely to
tinker with a problem which indicates a
serious condition existing.

The problem of juvenile delinquency
goes farther than life on the street or in the
school. Broken homes, poverty and un-



awareness of parental responsibility con- .

stitute the root cause. Mr. Henriques was
at pains to point out the existence of
Juvenile Courts administering modern
legislation, moral hospitals and other in-
stitutions for correcting the influence of
bad homes and giving children opportun-
ities for living their lives under normal cir-
cumstances and to feel that they are part
and parcel of society,

Beyond this stage, however, there is the
need, which he pointed out for leaders, The
history of the past should be a lesson in
any attempt in the future. Youth leader-
ship is a responsible job of work for which
willingness is not the only qualification
and it is here where the general public
who contribute to organisations in the
interests of young people and children
Should see to it that only those who by
temperament, moral stability and a know-
ledge of the needs of modern society should
be allowed to influence the lives of others.

Mr. Henriques can render this island
further service by way of public lectures
organised by the British Council whose
guest he now is and who have shown a
willingness to bring social and cultural
improvements to the community, In an
island with so many children and adoles-
cents matters affecting youth are of great
magnitude and every opportunity should
be taken to utilise the specialised know-
ledge of Mr. Henriques.

Our Readers Say:

areas. One of the first problems
. Ee in 1942 was the
|





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GOOD NEIGHHOURS

ness to teach Indian women how

(Photograph courtesy of the

In addition to a well-integrated
agricultural p:tgramme, opera-
tions of the Institute of Inter-
American Affairs in Peru include
both education and public health
and sanitation pncjects. All three
are major activities of Point Four
as outlined by U.S. President
Harry S. Truman in his inaugural
address.in January 1949.

In the division of public health
and sanitation, Institute experts
and their Peruvian associates lit-
erally have transformed whole

deadly malaria in the coastal town
of Chimbote. Incidence of this
disease averaged 25 percent the
year around. Despite Chimbbte’s
favourable location as an indus-
trial city, its population was sta-
tionary at about 5,000. Today, a
new drainage and sanitation plan,
embracing 887,000 square metres,
gives mosquitocs small chance to
survive, Health measures are com-
pulsory. Malaria has been reduced
to 2 percent and population has
risen to 12,000, The town is devel-
oping enough electric current to
supply a substantial trade area
and there is promise of continued
expansion in manufacturing and
shipping.

Director of the Institute’s Co-

operative Health Service is Dr.
Frederick J. Wampler, experi-
fenced in public health work in

| Washington, D.C., capital of the
United States, in China, and in his
home State of Virginia. He has on
his staff from the United States
twio sanitary engineers, one medi-
cal officer, one industrial hygiene
expert, two public health nurses,
and two office workers. The other
556 members of the service are
Peruvians, Launches, jeeps, and
airplanes take physicians and
nurses on regular trips into remote
areas. Five hospitals and two
10-bed dispensaries have been
built in jungle towns. Nineteen
sanitary posts are located in
areas so remote that few travel-
lers care to visit them. Seven doc-
tors each operate medical posts in
still other regions.

Many of these Peruvian medi-
eal men have studied public
health and sanitation in the United
States on grants from the Insti-
tute of Inter-American Affairs.
One of them, Dr. Jorge Atkins,
whose father came to Peru as a
young man and married there, is
in charge of the health programme
in Loreto. He has under his direc-
tion three hospitals, four dispens-
aries, a general health centre and
15 jungle sanitary posts. He and

| his staff operate two medical
| launches, Aeroplane service
! brings Lima within three hours of
;an area which a generation ago
‘was almost isolated from the coast
by the Andes Mountains. They
, operate the 120-bed Santa Rosa
‘Hospital in Iquitos, opened by the

has decreased as has the spread of contagious disease.
has proven successful with the co-operation of the two governments of the United States and Peru.

lar programmes are being conducted in 15 other South and Central American countries.
‘Nation’s Business)

When Good Neighbours
Get Together=2

Le



to care for their children.

The Institute of Inter-American Affairs
has proven in Peru that the United
States Point Four Programme can be suc-

cessful with the spirit of co-operation that
has been its hallmark in both countrie

By O.

From

K. ARMSTRONG

“Nation's Business”

service in 1945. Nurses penetrate
to the remotest parts of Peru.
Sometimes their offices are in
trucks or on floating rafts. They
give inoculations, assist the physi-
cian in the treatment of infections,
issue medical supplies. They
assist in teaching expectant moth-
ers and hold classes in child’ care

An example of a programme
Jor improvement of rural health is
Tingo Maria, a community of
5,000 on the eastern watershed.
Here the tropical temperature and
heavy rainfall create ideal coudi-
tions for the cultivation of manioc,
cocoa, tea, rice, yucca, pineapple,
citrus fruits, and rubber. In 1942,
the total health facilities consisted
of a small outpatient clinic, with
one physician working part time.
In 1943 a service survey showed
99 percent of all children infected
with hookworm or ‘other parasites.
A campaign was waged for the
construction of toilets, develop-
ment of a clean drinking .water
supply, use of wholesome facds,
an appreciation of the need for
shoes, and periodical examination
of children, As a result a 40-bed
hiospital was built. A mobile dis-
pensary servicing workmen on the
Tingo Maria-Pucalpa highway
attended 11,692 patients during the
18 months it was in operation,

“Recent examinations show that
the percentage of school children
infected with intestinal parasites
has been cut about in half, while
cther infections haye dropped from
67 to 5 percent and maiaria has
been cut to less than 1 percent,”
Dr. Wampler ‘stated. And the
director added, “It is hard to
measure in dollars the results of
this sort of good-neighbourly
co-operation.”

ant activity of the Institute’s
health services. M. F. Trice, direc-
tor, heads a staff jof two United
States consultants and 20 Peru-
vian technicians, Among the latter
are five physicians, five chemical
engineers, and several laboratory
experts. About 30,000 persons are
employed in the metal mines of
Peru, bringing out zine, silver,
vanadium, and copper ores. Sili-
qosis, the disease resulting from
inhaling dust, has been a constant
and deadly menace to miners, The
service made a systematic study
of dust in the mines. Legislation
Was passed calling for the use of
masks and other preventive meas-
ures. Periodic counts of dust, and
regular checks ©n the health of
miners indicate remaweable pro-
gress in three years,

Industrial hygiene is an import- .underdeveloped

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs penetrate the Peruvian wilder-
As a result of their work the death rate
This is part of the Point Four Programme which

Simi-

The education division, estab-
lished in 1943, came into being
because of increasing recognition
on the part of South American
leaders that industrial and social
progress depends on enlightened
citizenship, In Peru, Lyle B, Plem-
ber is director lof this activity. He
and his ten North American spe-
cialists work in close co-operation
with Qolonel Juan Mendoza Rod-
riguez, Peruvian minister of edu-
cation, and 43 nationals. Rural
elementary education and voca-
tional training are the two prin-
cipal areas of activity in this ser-
vice. An important task in rural
communities has been to construct
modern school buildings. Sixteen
schools have been completed, and
scores more are under construc-
tion,

When the former President of
Peru, José Luis Bustamente
Rivero, was minister to neigh-
bouring Bolivia, some years ago,
he and the Bolivian minister of
education worked out a plan for
educating the Indian children of
the altiplana—the high plateau of
the Andes. The Institute, with
co-operation of the Peruvian and
Belivian ministries of education,
helped put the plan into effect
Now arother neighbour, Ecuador,
has joined. The ministries of edu-
cation exchange information pn
school laws, teaching materials,
anc methods. Increasingly, schools
are becoming community centres
under the work of the Institute.
parents are encouraged to go and
see the work being done, to begin
adult studies, and to participate in
parent-teacher activities. Groups
similar to 4-H clubs (farm youth
organisations) of the United States
are being sponsored.

tute of Inter-American Affairs in
Peru by its activities in 17 other
countries, large and small, in
South and Central America, and
its most_ important feature be-
comes apparent: It is setting the
pattern for sound, profitable de-
velopment lof resources in the
areas of this hem-
isphere. The investment of public
funds is not intended as a perma-
nent programme either for the
Urtited States or for the other
participating countries, but rather
as guiding operations to pave the
way for private investment and
co-operative enterprise.

But there is another result, im-
measurable in its value. The usual
frigid formality of international
relations melts away in the at-
mosphere of close’ personal rela-
tions maintained by all hands
working in the services. Members
of the stafs are no longer “for-
eigners” one to the other, The
effect is a continually deepening
understanding that will strengthen
for all time the structure of’ inter-

American solidarity and peace.



—_
'

Multiply the work wf the :



CREECH JONES ON
COLONIAL AFFAIRS ©

New Words For New Conceptions

By E.B. TIMOTHY

' LONDON.

WNACCURATE words and _ expressions
have created a hindrance towards clear
thinking on Colonial affairs. This opinion is
expressed in an article—‘The Challenge io
‘Colonialism’ ”—by Mr. Creech Jones, (form-
erly Secretary of State for the Colonies) in
the March issue of the New Commonwealth

New words were wanted for new concep-
tions, he writes. The term ‘partnership’, for
example, was inadequate in conveying the
conception behind modern British Colo-
nial policy. The word “Colony” was ambigu-
ous. ‘ :

Although -Malta, for example, was self-
governing except in the fields of defence and
foreign policy, she was grouped in the same
category as other Colonies enjoying less
autonomy. There were variations such as
Protected States, Protectorates, Trust Terri-
tories, etc., to be considered.

Asian independence had led to the replace-

‘lment of the term “British” by that of “Com-

monwealth” while the word “Dominion” had
almast become obsolete. It was now fashion-
able for the meaning of the term “Common-
wealth” to imply “the independent nations
within the Commonwealth and the depend-
ent territories of the United Kingdom, while
the dependent territories of the “dominion”
states were forgotten in this connotation.

Discussing the use of the word “Colonial-
ism” in recent years, notably in America and
Asia, Creech Jones states that it has become
a “word of obloquy to describe the condition
of dependence of non-full self-government”.
Consequently, “Colonialism” was being made
synonymous with alien oppressive rule,

He deplores the wholesale condemnation of
“Colonial status”, particularly in debates at
Lake Success, and points to the dangers of
sudden revocation of Colonial status. He says:

“Everyone will agree that in the unhappy
situation in Malaya the withdrawal of the
British would bring the races into conflict,
break down the public services, create econo-
mic and political anarchy and add another
Communist-ridden territory to the tragic list
of countries so afflicted. In Africa, where the
full co-operation of the African people is
sought as devolution of authority from Lon-
don makes responsibility increasingly real,
it would be a calamity for Britain to break
her treaty and moral obligations to the Afri-
can people and renounce her burden. Our
experience and technical resources, the finan-
cial aid and educational facilities required
are an enormous asset to the Colonial peoples
which cannot be replaced by any interna-
tional authority.”

He continues: “The challenge in Asia
against all forms of Colonialism is a reminder

of the rapidly changing world in which we
live.

“Despite this”, he concludes, “today, how-
ever, Colonies have become almost anachron-
isms. The facts of the world we live in ‘are
seen in a completely different perspective.
The world is more closely knot; nationalism
has transformed Asia and is a strong influ-
ence in Africa; all under-developed regions
are a matter of international concern, and

the imperial Powers are enjoined to advance
self-government”,



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1951











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GEAR

visir DA COSTA‘S
where you will find a full

RANGE to select from.

DaCOSTA & CO.. LTD.
Dry Goods

Dept.





=





a

Suggestions

Tourists’ Accommodation
To The Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—Our thanks a_ million
are due to ‘Just another tourist’
(your issue 2nd inst.) for per-
mitting us ‘to see ourselves as
others see us.’

J.A.T’s chief complaints appear
to be :—

1, Coral rocks on _ bathing
beaches
2. Inferior food

3. Primitive hotels (and last-
ly but not least)
4. Lack of drinking water,
Kindly permit me, Sir, space
for a few constructive suggestions
tor the benefit of our Hotel Pro-

prietors and others,
Taking the complaints in
order:—

1, Tender-foot tourists, should
be supplied with diver’s boots
with fifty pound lead soles, They
could then be carefully lowered
into deep and rockless: water by
means of the crane on the En-
gineer’s Pier at the Yacht Club.
Those of them that made a suit-
able ‘donation’ could doubtless. be
hoisted out again!

2. Gourmands and gastronom-
ical Epicures certainly deserve
something more exciting than the
finny flying-fish. Try them witiy
jug-jug, black pudding and souse,
followed by shark’s oil and sea-
weed salad.

3. Explain to modern tourists



— that Elizabethan Plumbing,
Hanoverian Houses and Queen
Anne furniture are nowadays no¢

to be sheezed at and that tariffs
which include such “olde-worlde
charme,” historical monuments
curios and antique relics ara
cheap at the price even if includ.
ing plain and homely fare,

4. I quote:— “No water, ex.
cept at meals or in his room at
night, without a tip to the bell.
boy or (a trip) to the bar,”

Dear Mr, J. A. T. I’m afraid
the nearest water fountain at
night, is to be found in the
Waiting-room at the Piarco Air-
Port in Trinidad (you mash the
pedal and it squirts in your face!)

But ceme, come, you lazy
Hotel Proprietors you unknow-
ingly have the remedy in your

hands — see! So supply every
tourist with a water-whistle,
(along with the bedroom key)

At the shrill blast of a whistle a
tall and decorative mauby mam-
mey approaches the _ sufferer,
heading her high watercan. on
pretty turbaned head. She opens
the tap and a silvery stream of
delicious ice-cold water trickles,
without glass and straw, plump
into the gasping opened trap,
swilling and irrigating the parch-
ed and tormented abdominal
interstices of the thirsty northern
Tourist. Peace having been re-
stored — mauby mammey, or if
you prefer it, the “Hydraulic
Hostess” retires to refill,
Yours ete:
“LESLIT”,
Thanks

To Tre Editor, The Advocate—

SIR Pl tl

lease grant
space of your

me



wal |
Vaiyabie

to express our gratitude for andPlays staged at St. Martin’s Girls’

appreciation of the notable work
done by Miss Marjorie Blackman
in the parish of St. Philip, For
the eight years she spent among
us she was the soul of kindness,

very sympathetic and always
obliging. These gained her the
love and respect of all who
attended at the post office. Al-

though this is for those in author-
ity to speak, I, from my experi-
ence and association with her
can say she was most prompt,
business-like, and efficient in her
work We regret her loss to us
and hope that her successor will
have the public interest at heart
and will live up to the high stan-
dard she has set manifesting the
qualities necessary for such an
office,

In spite @f the demands of her
work, Miss Blackman found time
for extensive social work, and the
real and energy with which) she
worked has been an inspiration
and example to many, She soon
took over and guided the waning
Guide Troops of St. Philip’s and
St. Martin’s Girls. Shortly after
that she started her own troop at
Four Roads, These troops flourish—
ed and can speak for themselves
The newly born troops at
Four Roads, under her control,
lost no time in gaining first place
in efficiency in St. Philip. With
the troops running well she ven-
tured the development of local
talent and put it to good use. Few
would hardly forget the
staged by the Gi

Bx Schoo

concerts
St Phi ip

ana the Nativity

and St. Philip’s Boys’ School.
Through her indefatigable efforts
these were magnificent successes

and set a pace which would
challenge many to follow.
For these and other services,

too numerous to be mentioned
here, I beg on behalf of the parish
and—may I be personal—on my
own behalf to offer our hearty and
sincere thanks, We shall always be
mindful of her and the work she
has done and wish her every
suecess in her new appointment.
With thanks for the space,
R, S.

Beach Cricket
To che Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I. am- bringing a small
matter to your notice, Do you think
it is fair for anyone to indulge in
a “bat and ball’ match on the
Rockley, or for. matter any
other. beach’ on Sundays when
there are many bathers trying to
utilise it for its proper purpose?
Even if they did so why not use
the section away from the part
that has to be used by bathers.’ Is
it for the purpose of exhibiting
themselves and their — fine
physique? I believe you will agree
with me that it is absolutely un-
fair to the bathers as they have
to keep out of the way as they
might be struck. Can anything be
done to stop it? Many bathers
have to leave their glasses when
they go into the sea and these may
easily get broken, Have they a
hance of getting them replaced?

A STRANGER,

Answers To

Quiz Will

On the night of Sunday, April
8, heads* of 20,000,000 “‘house-
holds” in England, Scotland,
Wales, Northern Ireland, the Isle
of Man and the Channel Isles, will
take part in the biggest “twerity
questions” quiz ever organised iu
this country—the 1951 Census of
Population,

They will have to answer 20
questions — plus one for good
measure — about every individual
staying under their roof that night
and about the arrangements for
water supply, cooking, washing-up
and even bathing in their house-
holds.

To help them do it accurately
20,000 “enumerators” have beet
enrolled in London; 50,000 will
cover the whole country.

Machines Take Over

As in the radio Twenty Ques-
tions, every effort will be made
to ensure secrecy so far as the
“team”—the officials engaged -in
the operation——are concerned.

It is millions to one against anv
official engaged on this operation
dealing with the schedules of any
individuals they may know per-
sonally,

1951 Census
Be Secret

From the moment they have
finished their work machines will
take over and names will cease
to exist.

|
SLE CPLSASSSSPSSOS FS,

-

Every person named on the
original schedules—with the par-
ticulars they have given—will be
just tiny round holes punched in
small cards.

More than 140 _ statistical







atcha tie alle WY; ‘Tee
the ete eee head- - Ls GS
juarters at Sout rt. 5
Fe (8 MILK FED DUCKS — LAMB Leo or Shoulder
It’s All Secret ¢ HAMS —_ 3 Sizes.
y *
Upon the answers they give will s SPECIALS | JUST ‘ARRIVED
depend the siting of new towns, x |
the building of new roads, and the|% LUNCHEON CHEESE — | ASPIC
organisation of transport to deal R (Whole) $1.21 each | BOUILLION
with movements of population % Uae ae ‘ i Pitcairn eas
since the last census 20 years ago. -. .48 eac' | IA §
. % HUNTER’S STEAK & KID- | ICE CREAM MIX
Fears that personal matters may % NEY PUDDING .42 each | FROZEN SALMON
be disclosed to “the wrong people”| ¥ COOK'S PASTE— | CALVES LIVER
are groundless. % 6 cents per tin | ,BRAINS
| KOLA TONIC — SWEET BREADS
Anyone who wishes to keep per-| % Large-—-$1.00 pr btle. | BEEF SUET
sonal detail from the knowledge; $ NESTLE’S CHOCOLATE PORK FAT
of his “head of the house” may! % BARS ....... 15 cents | SAUSAGES
apply for an individual schedule,|% BARLEY STICKS—13 each ONIONS POTATOES
and leave it in a sealed envelope} » i * e :
for the enumerator to collect 1% PHONE GODDARDS - WE DELIVER
—LE.S, Zecoosess SSSSSSOSSSSS9SS SSI OSSSS 555995 SS OESHOSS:

for your
Party !



SANDEMAN’S WINES
RHINE WINES

RED WINES

VIELLE CURE





AND
GODDARD'S

TUBORG BEER




WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1951



Leg. Co. Amend Col.

Treasurer Acts

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL yesterday passed a|
Bill to consolidate and amend the Acts of the island re- |
lating to the Colonial ‘Treasurer, and thereby approve the } worked up.

recommendation for the establishment of the office

“Accountant General” in place of “Colonial Treasurer”
This latter office will be abolished.

Objects and Reasons of the Bill |
State:

Commissioner Adams in_ his!
Report on the re-organization of
the Civil Service recommended
the creation of the post of Ac-
countant General inthe place of
that of Colonial Treasurer, and
advised that certain duties now
performed by the Auditor General
could more properly be performed
by the Accountant General as an
accounting ‘officer,

This Bill therefore seeks to give
effect to those recommendations
without interference with the sys-
tem of pre-audit which has always
existed in this island,

By the repeal of the Colonial
Treasurer’s Act, 1891, the right of
the House of Assembly to nominate
to the office of Colonial Treasurer
(which will be abolished) will no
longer, exist.

The office of Accountant Gen-
eral will be established by an
order under the Civil Establish-
ment Act, 1949, and appointment
to that office will thereafter be
made in the same manner as any
other offiée in the Public Service

Objects of Bill

The Colonial Secretary moved
the second reading of the Bill, He
said;

I should like briefly to elabo-
rate the Objects .and Reasons
which Honourable Members have
before them, It may be remem-
bered that Commissioner Adams
reviewed the Treasury and the
Audit Department together be-
cause, in his own words, “at the
moment their duties overlap to a
greater extent than is either usual
or convenient.”

In the course of his review
Commissioner Adams pointed out
that the work of the Audit De-
partment included the computa-
tion of all pensions and gratuities,
the preparation of pay vouchers
for all expenditure included in the
accounts of the Crown Agents for
the Colonies and the recording of
all reeeipts and expenditure of
schemes under the provisions of
the Colonial Development and
Welfare Act, all of which duties
are normally undertaken by the
Treasury in other territories

He recommended that the Treas-
urer should assume the normal re-
sponsibilities laid on his office by
Colonial Regulations, that the title
of the Office should be changed in
view of the appointment of a
Financial Secretary, and that the
pre-Audit system should be aban—
doned.

The Bill under consideration
does not go as far as this, ‘The
pre-audit system has worked well,
and is generally acceptable, and
there is no intention of modifying
it. There is, moreover, no in-
tention of interfering with the
completely independent position of
the Auditor General, whose main
function, henceforth as in the past,
will be as the “watchdog of the
taxpayer,” and who will continue
to be primarily responsible for
checking revenue and rep.

ture,
Act»

It is, iiowever, proposed to re-
move the limitations of the Colo-
nial Treasurer’s Act, which made
the Colonial Treasurer a sort of
glorified cashier and resulted in
the Auditor General being called
upon to undertake duties and re-
sponsibilities not appropriate to an
Auditor and in some cases created
the anomaly of the Auditor Gen-
eral checking his own figures.

It is visualised that the Account-
ant General should carry the
responsibility for the methods of
Government accountancy for the
custody of cash in his own and
other departments, for the collec-
tion of revenue and for ensuring
that approved expenditure should
not be exceeded. He should also
be the Government’s expert ad-
viser on such non-public accounts
as may be the concern of Govern-
ment, e.g., the accounts of public
utilities, and should be capable
of being an expert witness.

Furthermore it is proposed to
place on the Accountant General
the responsibility of supervising
the compilation of statistics in
Barbados. At present every de-
partment has statistical informa-

Limitations

tion of one kind or another whicn



BRUSH... UP...
A






YOUR...



has never been adequately collated
or interpreted,

Conservation
Pays

Production of food in the
United States has been in-
creased substantially by soil
and water conservation prac-
tices carried out on nearly
3,000,000 American farms
during 1950. These practices:
have helped farmers to
check erosion, restore fer-
tility, and protect and
strengthen the productivity
of their land, the United
States Department of Agri-
culture reports.

Farmers co-operating in
the conservation programme
are encouraged to improve
pastures and rangeland as a
means of building up plant
food reserves in the soil.
The cost of conservation
practices is shared by the
co-operating farmers, The
programme is administered
through locally elected far-
mers committees,

Since the department be-
gan its agricultural conser-
vation programme in 1936,
51,000,000 acres of pasture
have been seeded. About
1,000,000 dams have been
constructed and 260,000,000
tons of lime and 24,000,000
tons superphosphate have
been applied to the soil.

Under the programme,
farmers also have construct-
ed 950,000 miles of terraces
and farmed 130,000,000 acres
of land on the contour. They
have planted 825,000 acres
of trees,



It is
Treasury should be responsible
for the overall supervision of

loans made by Government, and
possibly develop a Loans and
Advances Branch. In these cir-
cumstances it is imperative that
the present Colonial Treasurer's
Act which limits the duties and
responsibilities of the Colonial
Treasi“er should be amended,

Furthermore it is essential that
‘the person appointed as Account-
ant General should be fully
qualified to undertake the duties
and be preferably a qualified
accountant or economist’ with
statistical experience. The salary
of the post may not attract a
professionally qualified and ex-
perienced accountant, but it will
be necessary to seek ‘tha best
candidate that is availdble from
whatever source. It is therefore
more convenient, as well as appro-

priate, that the appointment
should be in the hands of the
Governor.

I now beg to move. that the
Bill be read a second time subject
to a minor amengment which I
will move at the appropriate
time.

_ Faulty Set-Up

Hon. H. A. Cuke seconded the
motion. He said that for very
many years he had ulways felt
that the set-up in the colony was
faulty. He himself had been ap-
pointed by Government some
years ago to reorganise the Trea-
sury, but at that time the ideas
which he had, had to be restrict-
ed because of the fact that the
Colonial Treasurer was operating
under the old Act. 4

The result was that in this
island the Auditor General’s staff
was at present engaged in too
much accounting work. In_ his
opinion the Treasury should be
the central accounting depart-
ment of (overnment and all ac-
counts should be under the con-
trol of the Accountant General.

He believed that the present
Bill for making the Accountant
General an officer of the Govern—
ment under the contol of Goy—
ernment, was a step in the right
direction.

There had been a great deal of
talk from time to time about the
pre-audit system which was not
a system in itself. All that it
would mean was that whereas in
some colonies the head of the de-
partment made out vouchers and
submitted them to the Accountant

SMILE...









ADDIS LIMITED OF
HERTFORD EST. 1780

of | Said the Bill was a

, Sioner Adams to the newly named

proposed too that ihe! in

a Ea





or Propert
surer way
that white

BUCKSKIN
eae
CANVAS



White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use
Propert’s White Renovato
*s Shuwhite. No

of making sure
shoes are white!



PROPERT'S

SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR

in Cartons with Sponge



fe



ahaa
he



out thes vould before,
{to be authorised by the Auditor
| General

The Auditor General Depart-
ment was there to see that the
various



departments were keeping
_ hi s they
find time
were s0

he had already
step in the
right direction and was long over-
due.

obvi-
to do
much

accounts .
could not
they

proper
ously

because
As

Fixed Salary
Ho®, G. D. L. Pile said that from
what the Hon. Colonial Secretary
had said he gathered that they
could not expect the best man for
the job for the salary that would



be paid. If that was the case, it
might simply be a case of “a pen-
ny wise and pound foolish.” He |

considered that it was best to have
the salary fixed which would en-
able them to get the best man or
at any rate would not stand in the
way of their getting the best man.

The Colonial Secretary replied
and said that he was greatly in-
debted to the hon. member for his
observation, because that was a
matter on which he held very

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

House Pass Racial

e oe ,e 7
Discrimination Address /



THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday passed with}

| $1,040 Passed For
_ Silver Jubilee
C. T. A. Delegates

The House of Assembly passed,
With slight amenument, a supple

amendments an Address tabled by Mr. J. E. T. ‘Brancker, | mentary Hesoiution for" $1,080 rot
protesting against the poliey of racial discrimination and

by the South African Go

The address as originally ta
urged in paragraph 3 that instruc-
tions should be given to the Co:

?
n |
|
inhuman treatment met
trol Board to refuse the grant



Import Licenses in respect of
South African goods. Deletion of
this paragraph was one of the
amendments successfully moved
t Mr. E. D. Mottley. Mr. Mott-
ley other amendments were
chiefly changes in phraseology
and were accepted by Mr)
| Brancker. Mr. Brancker did. npt

secept the suggestion for the de-
letion of paragraph 3, and this had
to be put to the vote
The Address as passed reads a8
follows: —
| The House

of Assembly beg to

strong personal views. He did !draw to the attention of His Ex-
not think, however, that the | cellency the Governor the fact
present occasion was the time for) that acute colour and racial dis-
him to voice those views, crimination, the enactment of

As regaris the salary of the

officer, honourable members wo uldj

find on the Order Paper that day
a Bill to amend the Colonial!
Treasurer’s Act 1891, and it was
criginally proposed
salary should apply to the office of
Colonial Treasurer. This office it
Was now proposed to abolish.
In the event of the present Bill
being passed, the next move would
be for an amendment in the Civii
Estabiishment Order giving the
salary recommended by Commis-

cfficer. “I

will prove

best man,”
No Leave Passages

He would take the opportunity

hope the
eiarcagtn

the
to

salary
get the

hat a revised }

segregation laws and the inhuman
treatment of natives not only ex.
j ist in the Union of South Atrica,
but receive official approbation,
and in fact the blessing of the
Union Government.

The Heuse view

. such behaviour
with profound

abhorrence, and
respectfully request that Your
Excellency take cognisance of
their view of the matter,

His Excellency ‘is invited to
take such steps as are requisite to
ensure that the reverent of
the Union of South Africa j fully
reel pg of the sentiment of the

cople cf this island towards the
Rrsen treatment adopted by
that Government; and further His
Excellency is requested to submit
a copy of this Address to His Ma-



to say that cmiditions of service) jesty’s Principal Secretary of!
generally in Barbados were not| State for the Colonies with a re-
competitive with other parts of} Guest that the same be trans nit- |
the world, and he could produce tad to the Government of the;
figures and facts to support that Union of South Africa. |
statement. As honourable mem-}, Mr. J. E. T. Braneker (C) moy

bers might be aware, leave pas-| 8 the passiny of the address,
sages were normally paid to| 5@¢ he was doing so with a full
officers serving in other territories.) S€"Se Of responsibility, and aftr]

|‘That was not the case in this
j colony. It was therefore difficult
these modern days to get the





right type of man.
be possible on the salary offered
to get a really jgood serving officer,
Lut it might be possible to get
good officer who might have re-| }
tired from seme other area and}
who might be prepared to come
here and organise and resi
the department, so that in a period
of about three years he might be |
able té train some local man to
teke his

being passed, said the Colonial
Secretary, His Excellency would
meke the strongest possible effort
to secure a competent qualifted
officer on the terms proposed. If
on the other hand he should fail,
further representations would be
made to the Legislature,

The Bill was then passed and
later the Bill to amend the Colon-
ial Treasurer’s Act 1891, was with-
drawn from the Order Paper,

HIGH SEAS

The sea at Paynes Bay yesterday
resembled the Bathsheba or Crane
coast, Sand three inches deep
covered a road bridge under the
pier by the Highways and Trans-
port Board.

The sea rushed under houses on
the beach and fishing boats were
dragged up and tied to trees near
the roadway.





The sea dashed against the rocks
near Quacobob with such fury
that the spray Yreached to a

height of thirty feet.

One fishing boat near Old Trees
is known to have been dashed to
pieces by the waves. Mate last
night high seas were continuing.



MAHON FOR TRINIDAD

Hon, J. A. Mahon was yesterday
riominated by the Legislative
Council as a representative to
attend the Silver Jubilee Celebra-
tions of the Imperial corees of
Tropical Agriculture. Hon. G. D, L,
Pile was nominated last week but
it is net possible now for him to
attend,

EVELYN FOR FESTIVAL
OF BRITAIN

Hon, G. B. Evelyn was yester
day nominated as a representative
from the Council to attend the
Festival of Britain.




at

It might not 3

}
ay

place after he had gone, | Sanctions on the Union of South
In the event of the present Bill ;Africa, Mr, Brancker said, to show

> eithges.

Pte

Siving the matter full corsider-}
ation, He informed the House that)
since his address had been on the,
Order Paper, the» Legislature of
Jamaica had passed an address of

similar purport,
After reading the expressed
| Views cf Dr. Malan, Prime Minis-

ter of South Africa on the matter
of race and colour, it was im possi-
le to speak too strongly in the
Assembly of Barbados, But he wa:
not dealing with personalities,
They could . impose economic

the deep abhorrence which the
members of one of the most an-
cient Legislatures in the Colonial
Empire felt concerning the racial
policy of South Africa.

That would be the main purpose
of the Address, since they could
not expect the Union of South
Africa to feel the economic effect
of such a sanction as the address!
preposed. But one colony had
already passed a similar address,
and it was quite likely that a
third, fourth or fifth tl would
foliow suit, as weil even as coun-
tries outside of the British Com-
monwealth, a

He moved formally the passing|
of the address. |

Mr. D. D. Garier (C) said that
he had great pleasure in second-|
ing the passing of the Address. |
Like the junior member for St.|
Lucy, he felt very strongly on the
matter which had now become
world wide. p

He said that the Address was not
worded strong enough, because
when they were talking about the
Government of South Africa, they
were talking about Hell let loose,
They were not talking about sane
or cultured men, they were talking
about men who could surely take
their passports and go to the utter-
most partof Hades and live
peace,



the South African Union were
men who detested people looking
like him, but he felt they were np
better than he and in many cases,
they were not as good because they



were not as civilized nor as cul-
tured.
The Government of South

Africa which was part of the
British Empire was still treating

human beings worse than dogs
were being treated.
Even at the U.N.O., where

people went to represent prin-
ciples, they did not talk about
the actions of the South Afri-
can Government,



WITH SPEED
WITH ECONOMY
WITH COMPCRT

\ BWAG |

07M wes) pan anaes

PROPOSES

eu LFA 64 + Oe
SSS SSS SSFP FOP ES



oe




xy pra :



AYS

7
Members of the Government of} 7

a

Out to natives of South Africa

nmment.

He said that they could ask the
Government to boycott those peo-
j ple but there were vicious circles
,2n the world when it came to
| business. Economics ruled the
world to-day and no one had any-
thing to say against principles
So long as his economic status was
not threatened,

It was a very atrocious act in
this twentieth century to find men
who were at the head of a Gov-
ernment such as the South African
Government making such dis-
criminatory laws, preventing
races from having, not only social
intercourse, but business inter-
eourse,

Social intercourse did not move
him, but when they segregated
people that they could not have
business rel itionships together he
would say that was going too far.

The Resolution should be passed
unanimously by the House so that
the Union sovernment would
Know that although they were
tiles apart from those people in

outh Africa their brother folk
were thinking of them = and
“bhorred the treatment meted
veut to them by Dr. Malan end
bis ilk

Dr. Malan was an apology for
a human being. He was insane
nd not normal and a case for a
sathologist. Hé was a madman
at large who perhaps got other

men a little saner than he was
80 along with him

Mr, E. D. Mottley (E) said thas
en address of that sort which was
designed to assist their brothers

to

in the Union of South Africa
should carry some weight, but ‘ne
could not vote for it as it was.

Those of them who had read Dr,
Malan’s statements must come .to
the conclusion that Dr. Malan was
ihe most inhuman being on earth,

They should. still remember
‘hat it was only a few months
aBo it was a section of the people
of Great Britain and some pe ople
in the U.N.O.-who had spoken
against Dr. Malan's treatment of
iegroes in South Africa,

Mr, Mottley after saying he did
| not think the addre was so
worded that it would carry enough -
weight, suggested the amend-
ments already stated. He
not agree at all with the

}

did

para

graph which suggested a boycott
ot South African goods, It was
not logical when they knew that
racial discrimination existed in




America, Canada, Australia,
England, and indeed all over the
world

Mr. E. L. Ward (EB) said that
he did not, agree with the Address
as it stocd. He was therefore
voting for the amendment. What
they were protesting against, was
the policy which the Government
of the Union of South of
had adopted:

At a time like the present when
they were trying to see that people
get equal rights,
unreasonable for the Union of
South Africa to enact such laws
which would create hardship and
depression on the natives of that
particular country.

Africa

he felt it was



Civies In Practice

The Fifth Form of the St.
Michael's Girls’ School paid a visit
to the House of Assembly yester-
day to see the procedure,

The pupils of that Form are
doing Civics which include a study
of central and local governments.

They were at their

seats before

| the House began and were watch-

ing attentively while the House
seetled down to the business of the
day.

The pupils,

+ the Advocate was
informed,

are studying the work
i of local government from the

ine purpose of sending four rep-
resentatives-—two from the Legis
jetive Council and two trom the
House of Assembly—to the Silver
Jubilee of the Imperial College ot
Tropical Agriculture, Trinidad.

Mr. Walcott (L) who took charge
of the Resolution, said that he was
goimg to ask leave of the Commit
tee to make an amendment by in
serting $1,040 in the Resolution in
place of $800,

He said that the money was tc |

cover the cost of passages anc
subsistence allowance for thre«
uays for four representatives and
their wives attending the celebra
tions to mark the Silver Jubilee
of the Royal Charter to the Im-
perial College of Tropical Agri
culture.

He said that some of the em-
ployees of the local Department of
Science and Agriculture had beer

trained at that College. The Res
olution was then passed without
debate.

Mr. Adams (L) had moved the
following Address to the Governor

The House of Assembly beg to
acknowiedge receipt of your Ex
eelency’s message No. 8 of 1951
relating to the invitation from the
Imperial College of Tropical Ag-
riculture, Trinidad, to this island
of Barbados, to be represented at
the Celebration of the Silver
Jubilee of the granting of the
Royal Charter.

The House baz to inform your
Excellency that they are willing
te accept the invitation and beg to
nominate Mr, F, L, Walcott, Sentor
Member for St. Peter, and Mr.
FE. D. Mottley, Senior Member fox
the City, as representatives from
their body to attend the said
celebration.



“Tribesman” Brings
11,186 Bags Cement

A shipment of 11,186 paper bags
of Portland cement arrived for
Barbados on Monday by the
Steamship Tribesman,

The Tribesman also brought
11,999 bags of sulphate of am
monia from Midd'esborough, She
is consigned to Messrg DaCosta
and Company Limited,

TRAVELLING ._ BANK
DOES WELL

The Travelling Office of the
Government Savings Bank has
completed its first week’s visit to
the principal Sugar Factories in
the Island.

Considering weather conditions
during the past two weeks, some
factories worked only part- time—
the result has been very satis-
factory.

The following table is a com-
parison of the results during the
first week for the three years dur-
ing which the office has been in
operation.

New Accounts No. of Amount |
opened deposits deposited
Loan 0 27 siso nat
10 w 158 O8
154 hy ORK RE







Panama Joins World
Health Organization |
NEW YORK,

Panama has become a member |
of the World Health Organization, |
it was announced recently. j

To date, 75 governments have
become full members of WHO and |
one has become an associate mem- |
ber. In the western hemisphere,
all but one of the American re= |
publics are members,

MOUNTS UP

REGINA
A total of $91.54 was contributed
last year by persons placing small
change in the coin box for mb |



blind, handily placed at the stamp
wicket of the Regina Post Office,

PAGE FIVE



SCIENCE’S LATEST







a? S$
~

All who have tried the
arrived “ Lifeguard ” germicide
declare it is an absolute
godsend. In a climate like this the
need for a really powerful germicide
Use “ Lifeguard ”
to prevent cuis, sores, bites, stings,
going septic. Gargle with it when-
ever there’s risk of infection ...

LIFECUARD..

THE SUPREME GERMICIDE AND ANTISEPTIC

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS carsavos) LTD.

AGENTS.

newly -
and

antiseptic

is most vital,









| See us for - - -

BRC FABRIC
EXPANDED METAL
| TEMPERED HARD BOARD
OIL STOVES & OVENS
Phone Phone

| Phone TUPRBERT Ltd. "233

pe] 1& bind Roebuck St., & Magazine Lane.

MT.

id
; PURINA CHOWS
@ FOR POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK

“See the Difference Purina Makes*’
e

gl. JASON JONES & COo., LTD.—Distributors. o
Se BUeuEneenaBenne

EASTER

FALLS ON 25th MARCH

ina serach, snpepeereeeitremecsienienetane oni,







We have in Stock - - -

CARD BOARD EGG SHELLS
in 8 sizes. Prices : 32c,, 28¢., and 26c.
These can be used for your Easter Gifts of
Ties, Searves, Handkerchiefs, Stockings, etc.
or can be filled with Guava Cheese, Barley
Sugar and other Sweets.

: ALSO :;

Chocolate Easter Eggs in Plastic Cases and
Marzipan Easter Eggs in Plastie Cups.

KNIGHTS LTD.—ALL BRANCHES













aude Report. ~(CP)
ne
iieindiadiladiiiiias aah =
ge LPPOCCPELOOOED SOOCOOOO>
% 1 - nat ‘ ‘ ‘
8 % GENTLEMEN ELITE Self colour Shirts FLITE White Shirts with truben-
% % trubenised collar attached, in ised collar attached, Sizes 14 to
g % GET THESE shades of Blue, Tan and Grey. 16% ins. —
% GRENADA TOUR | BOW tt 94.87 Sn Oe
= a ach b
2 Q oh abies Wilh poe
x % 1? ENDEAVOUR Striped Cambric
% AT ~ ) Athletic Supporters by Johnson & Pyjamas. Sizes 38 to 44 ins,
*
% KENSI | Johnson. Sizes Medium & Large _ 88. 30
s *
: NSINGTON OVAL s lich... ShGO Sua i cade cee ake
s on %
Linen Handkerchief»,
% 8 Hand Painted Ties — Scencries of ae ica hee os
$ Monday 12th Mar. vs. Carlton $$ Barbado, —
% Tuesday 13th Mar. vs. Colts %
% Thursday 15th Mar. vs. Empire x Gath i ie 25 POON cic cred bameiacaeed 70e.
S Saturday 17th Mar vs. Spartan
% Monday 19th Mar, vs. Colony M1 Striped Pyjamas, Sizes Mediur White Cotton Gloves for —
~ Admission 3) & Large— Size O.S, Men’s .
$$ SEASON TICKETS — $1.50 % |
x 1 50s | ; 4
% Obtainable from Carlton % UT esa has aL I $5. 72 Extra Oversize_ H6e.
xt members 2 |
% DAILY | |
% GEORGE CHALLENOR 3!
% | STAND a/. & 1 P D Cco., LTD
- 2/- °
% KENSINGTON STAND 2/. %| CAVE SHEPHERD & e
¢ OPEN STANDS 1/- ¥
3 GROUNDS 12, | 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
% PLAY STARTS 5 pm, 3)
2 %)

PMLA LLL AAA LLL LL

LPO AOL LL

CITY G

Sor
eG

LGPL SS LLL SE



hte! PE A EE CYT

GOOD/YEAR TIRES

NOW AVAILABLE
POPULAR

ARAGE

PEELS ASAP IPD

TRADING

LL LLLALL LALO LLAMA ALM MELLON ALAA L ALANS!

ote

' 44,4, 4, yt,
PPPOE PEEP EPEAT LDS P PVP POOP POPES OT POPROF >

MORE PEOPLE THE WORRD”OVER RIDE ON

U



IN
SIZES

ALL

ited Victor St.



Co.. a

5 OG OOOO OOOO

. Sy64
PPLE SSVSF OSSD

$59 3999SO008O

PPPS SOGISS




PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADYOCATE WEDNESDAY, MABCH 7, 1951
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON | gy : cee Dene a AE PAPE ee ae a ea a

A MORE 1 Killed in 7 Minutes

: akin nearly 60 million tiny seams
ae eae gerne hide and cause ter-

and pores

, Boze Peeling,
pile Htching. Crecingworm, Psoriaals,
Blackheads, Pimples, Foot Itch and other

t ve on
L A M U S Berpun Pat ezofe he aS nae
very, -

cause, The ner eaeo ers

w
kills the in
, Gear, attrac-
oe ve pee 2 out. a

on return of

Besa ee
YOU! Niggderm 255

ii) ? *
| 7? Learn from
the hospital.

Society's most beautiful women
the world over rely on Pond’s Face



7 Pewder to enhance their loyeli- Wh

THREE OF THE FACES ARE FRIENDLY 2 . eS ore

es wee. BUT TUAT FOURTH ONE sn! . a ness. Follow their lead and see : f, ction

a OF NATNES ~ fy oo , what a difference the right shade -
WHO_COULP ’ TERY = am threatens
HELP ME! af \< y (6 o \ y of face powder can make to your
: c complexion; how wonderfully soft in your home,
and clear it can look. use â„¢

Sifted through the finest silk,
Pond's Face Powder is as finely
textured as powder can be. So it

=~ | i gces on with extra-special smooth.
ah wr ness and clings for hours.

BY CHIC

‘DETTOL’

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

Deodorant . . . Non-poisonous
Doesn't Pain . . . Doesn't Stain



Pond’s Face Powder is delicately’

perfumed and comes in an ador- Suffe ing from
able Dreamflower Box. You'll find E

( / SL uy om 94) WZ,
it at all the best beauty counters. . acia- cud
5k ZSTOMAC! vy
POND’S FACE PowDER

IN @ LOVELY SHADES






RENNIES
GIVE YOU



THE OF RAILRO;
THIEVES AND THAI HE'S THE ON!
WHO KILLED THE MEN IN THE
TELEGRAPH OFFICE! ry

handbag, i
apres. If they don’t oe

it’s high time you saw your
doctor. All chemists i

sell Rennies-
RE nh J i ES
NO SPOON, NO WATER...
Suck them like sweets




ARE YOU
More_Irritable

These Days?

Has the “‘wear-and-tear”’ of
living

VOTEO HIM 3 T a oe i dane
THE BOY MOST LIKELY . ; ue ~ OFDRIC GEE VOU BULLY
TO BE PRIME Mi R tu ++. VES... P EWE GAYE PF I'VE
D A H 820 MUCH ABOUT You

MT modern ith its daily
SPRL b i struggle to make ends meet
TALL A shake of Vim, a quick | = Gespite shretages eg e

rub with a damp cloth, nerves? Do you feel you're not

2 getting enough rest—and feel so
and surfaces are spot- fr’ ~ oagy i aor wen, ou eat
. . = 10}
lessly clean and bright. Vim cleans - Well, Fire ; ark help the
so thoroughly — smoothly —easily. £° Tr tee ry ag ey
Because thousands of Cana-
dian men and women say they
find they take these worries in









: — 7 Chase's Nerve Food for a while

. , cleans everything . _ This well-known tonic’ which

7 hly and dil ] other “needed minerals-“helps
BRINGING UP FATHER . BY GEORGE MC. MANUS canes smoothly and speedily , cae are Steet rae





ll aan in toning up your whole system.
0. x Get Dr Chase’s Nerve Food
po better, ent better, fost fetter: ‘The

wW/IKIN SEE BY iS: : * your

fae Way THINGS Wzwlecs! COME 3 “Dr. Chase” ia your
ae BAC ie pb OOk® The “economy
“ly ASIF THOSE size” is your best buy. 13





HISODOL
TABLETS
HISODOL

POWDER

BISURATED MAGNESIA
Powder & Tablets










LIVONAL
EPHAZONE TABLETS
HERES THE PITCH... Ki WAITIN’ TIRED, MR. SMITH ? DDS PILLS
we pirne.ee eens. 2 of BEEN PLAYIN’ Bo F
LANDS, WELL SLUG KIRBY AND [x THAT FISH FER TWO YEASTVITE TABLETS
j GRAB THE BOY WITH THE BUCKS! //” eae ! ae 7
IVE GOT A PAST CAR WAITIN’ !
ape ke !





Make KLM Your Airline
in the Caribbean

North and South, East and West, KLM routes over
the Caribbean measure more than six thousand miles. Twenty
different cities are brought within hours of each other by .
fast, luxurious airliners. Make KLM your airline in the
West Indies and enjoy the same fine meals ‘and su-
perb service that have made KLM famous
throughout the world.

For Information Call . .

INSIDE THE DOOMED PLANE,
HTS PAST s =

PHANTOM F/G

it Can Conquer
S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO.LTD. i yours also

Dial 4613

SACROOL is
on sale at
KNIGHT'S LTD.

and all other Drug Stores
SSS SSE

WORLD'S FIRST AIRLINE


























SDAY, MARCH 7,



1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.



The charge for announcements of
Birthe, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage of Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash, Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after p.m.

:

THANKS





FOSTE"—The family of Mr. DARRY A.
POSTER. late M.C.P., gratefully return

thanks to all who attended the funeral, | Sh€ba, to approved tenants.

FOR RENT

Minimum charge weék 72 cents and
'
96 cents s 24 _
- "Sunday, words over 24
word Sundays.



i

HOUSES

Sen Sie el a
HOUSES; Gibb's Béach, St. Peter fully



furnished, “IN-an-OUT’,’ suitable for
couple, from May “RESTAWHILE” 3
bedrooms, June, October. November,
December. Apply: Wesley Bayley, High
Street. 7.3.51—I1n

HOUSE; 3-vedroom modern house,

situated Top Rock, unfurnished. Avail-
able immediately on 6 months or 1%
months lease. For viewing, Ring 4683,
or 8569. 7.3.51—3n
ee

“KEN-ERME”, seaside residence, Bath-
Available

sent wreaths, cards, or letters of sym-|APril and onward. Linen and cutlery

pathy in their sudden bereavement.
Elizabeth Foster, (Wife), David,
John, Wesley, Hubert (Sons); Ermie
Clarissa, Eleen, Gloria (Daughters). ;
7.3.51—I1n

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 12 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.





AUTOMOTIVE

CAR: One 1948 Model Austin Ado,
Countryman—13,000 miles. Al condition.
Dial 2838. 6.3.51—3n



CAR: One Morris Minor in perfect con-
dition, Owner driven—done 1,600 miles.



Apply: A. Garnes, Brin Ville, Jemmotts
Lane, after 4 p.m 7.3.51.—a
ELECTRICAL

—————————

ELECTRIC STOVES & HOT. PLATES.
Piease drop in and see them. John F
Hutson Ltd 7.3.51—2n

tint etter eetnen tanita lanpirinnaltotatimiuie
ELECTRIC TOASTERS at John F. Hut-
son Lid. 7.3.51—2n

LL
PLECTRIC IRONS at John F. Hutson
Ltd 1.3. 51-21

ELECTRIC VACUUM CLEANERS.
Please drop in and see them John F
Hutson Ltd 7.3. 51—2y

ELECTRIC KETTLES
Hutson Ltd









John

7

at F

3.51—2n



LIVESTOCK

a
HORSES—2 y.o. Gelding “Ladyswan"
(Jim Gackerjack ex Sugar Lady) un-
named 2 y.o. gelding (Jim Gackerjack
ex Princess Stella). Apply: J. R.

Eawards. Telephone 2520.
27.2,51—t.f.n,

HORSE Chestnut yr. old by
Jetsam out of H.B, Mare (Ginger) Dam
o* Miss Friendship, Can be seen at Easy
Hall Plantation. Phone 95—263. By kind
permission of the Stewards of the
B.T.C. this Animal will be offered for
sale at the Paddock just after the 3 p.m.
Race on Saturday 10th March, 1951.

4.3.51—To

1

———————

MULE: One (1) large Chestnut Mule,
Marte, Cort and Harness, E. A. Daniel,
Baxters Rd. Dial 2464 7.3.51—6n



POULTRY

2 White Wyandotte Cockerels bred
from imported laying strain. Price $4.00
each or exchange for value in Corn, or
Poultry for eating. Dial 3394.

6.3.51—3n



MISCELLANEOUS
ANTIQUE FURNITURE — Call at Ralph
Beards. furnishing showroom, ood
Alley. Phone 4683, 6.3.51—6n

ANTIQUES, which include a good
variety of Glass, China etc, Call in at
Ralph Beard’s furnishing showroom
Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.





6.3.51—6n

ANTIQUE CLOCKS At Ralph
Beard’s furnishing showroom, Hardwood
Alley. Phone 4683, 6.3.51—6n

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrese with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.£.n.





COINS—Collection of old silver and
ecpper coins, for inspection call 4476,
1.3,51—t.f.n.

CHATRS—Tubular Chairs $9.17 each.
With arms $12.00. At Ralph Beard’s
Showroom, Hardwood Alley, 6.3.51—6n

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and
draperies. By_ Kirsch. Dial 4476 A,
BARNES & CO., LTD, 13.2.51-—t.f.n

DIVING MASK & SWIM FINS. Phone
S497. 6.3.51—3n











DOORS—Several pairs of pitch pine
doors, suitable for Garage or Warehouse

with large hinges. To be seen at
Willdale, Marine Gardens. I. M, G.
Simpson. 1,3,51—6n,



LIPTON’S TEA; This brand is used by
discriminating consumers the world over
and a testing sample is yours @or the
asking. Save that part of the label indi-
csting weight and return to us as the
are valuable. John F. Hutson Ltd

7,3.51—2n

a
MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin.
guished solution to your special
erchitectural problem of door closures,
ecreens. movab-. partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & UO,, LTD.

Nee ee et
One DOMO CREAM SEPARATOR—
perfect order, very little used, practically









new. Mrs. Peebles, Ba'yleys, St. Philip
7.3.51—an
PIANO (Upright) Monington & Wes-
ton, Dial 4196 7.3.51—-1n
PIANO—Piano upright. Good tone
$175.00 at Ralph Beard'’s showroom
Hardwood Alley, Phone 4683.
6.3.51—3n

a STAMPS: Two complete sheets of Bar-

bedos surcharged One-penny or Two-
pence, Offers P.O. Box 92.
7.3,51—t.f-n.

STEPLADDERS — 6 tread Steel Step-
lidders $12.94 and 4 tread $9.88, At Ralph
Beard’s Showroom, Hardwood Alley.

6.3.51—61

-
THREE VENETIAN BLINDS. Size 4 ft
by 4 ft. Phone 8497. 6.3.51—3n

————

TO WHOLESALERS ONLY—Stocks of
Enamel Ware which includes; Pails,
Chambers, Bowls, Pie Dishes, Kettles,
Call at Ralph Beard's Show room, Hard-
wood Alley. 6.3.51—6n

VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirseh Sun-aire
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to
your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO,, LTD. 13.2,51—t.f.n,

YACHT,— Yawl “Frapeda” approx.
37% ft. long, with gray marine engine
Recently painted and in good condition









Apply: Vincent Burke. Telephone 4560
or 2026. 27.2.51--t.{£.n.

2% Running fect Verandah Rail. 3 ft
high made of 1 in. square bar iron

H. C. Manning, Newlands, St. Michael,
6.3.51—3n







LOST



On the
Filling
return

One (1) Gold
Between Fairview
Péter. Finder please
Douglas, Country Rd
6,.3.51—I1n
—_——- +
GOLD HORSESHOE PIN set with
white Pearls, between, Worthing Guest
«. Royal Hotel, Race Track, Bridge-
St. John’s Church
turned to Mrs. McCulloueh
Guest House #133

EARRING
Sth inst
Station, St.
to J. D.



ii
te or

Worthing
7.3.51—



¢ Rn”
Se

TICKET
DD. 0770

re<

Reward if



optional. Dial 2550 for particulars.
6.3.51—2n

Oe eS

ROOM WITH BOARD— In spacious
residence on sea, large double room and
bath also one single. Private sandy
beach, extensive grounds, excellent food.
Telephone 8372. 6.3.51—3n



ISDON, Maxwells Coast. Fully
furnished, 3 bedrooms, Dial 8417 or 4559,

7.3.51—3n

PUHLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,

minimum charge $1.50 on eek:
and $1.80 on Sundays bs ea.

AUCTION
UNDER *HE IVORY HAMMER

By order of the Commissi
sean on Michael 1 on Fr
c at the yard of the Scav
Dept.. Church Village, (1) 1945 ‘Dodge
Truck (Army Type) complete with plat-
form and in running order. Must be sold
Sale at 1 p.m. - Terms Cash.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer





‘ ot
will sell on Friday

6 3.51—4n
__———

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

WALL BOARD
By recommendation of Lloyds Agents,
will sell on WEDNESDAY the 7th;
sheets Wallboard at Messrs. Wilkinson
& Haynes Co., Ltd. Prince Alfred St.
Sale 1.30 o'clock. Terms Cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
Auctioneers.

w



6.3.51—2n



REAL ESTATE

“LASCELLES”, situate at Worthing
Christ Church, standing on 14,411 square
feet of land. The house is built of stone
and contains, open and closed galleries,
drawing and dining rooms, three bed-
rooms, breakfast room kitchenette and
usual out offices Garage and Servants
room in yard, Inspection by appointment.
Dial 8394 4

The above will be set up for sale at,
Public Competition at our office in Lucas |
Street, Bridgetown, on Tuesday the 13tn
March 1951 at 2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors,
7.3.51—6n,

Se ey

PROPERTY known as No. 24, James
Street standing on 2,181 square feet of
land. This property is situate at Lower
Jemes Street, opposite James Street
Church and {§ suitable for business prem-
ises.

Inspection any day on application to the
tenant.

This property will be set up for sale by
Public Competition at our Office No. 14,
James Street at 2 p.m. on Friday 16th
March 1951.

YEARWOOD & ROYCE
Solicitors
7.3.51-—9n |
be received by the}
up to the 15th day of
March 1951, for the buildings known
as Calais (land not included) situated
on Dover Coast, Christ Church. The *
purchaser to demolish the buildings and
clear the land within thirty days from
the daté of purchase,
K. E. McKENZIE,
Neils Plantation, St. Michael.
24.2.51—6n.







OFFERS will
undersigned







The substantial block of commercial
buildings standing on 13,704 sq. ft. of
land with frontage on Broad Street,
Prince Alfred St., and Chapel St., the
property of Central Foundry Limited and
tenanted by British Bata Shoe Co,, M.
Altman & Sons Ltd., K. R. Hunte & Co.,,
Ltd., and others

The undersigned will offer the same
premises by public competition at their
office, 17 High St., Bridgetown, on Friday
Sth March, 1951 at 2 p.m.

Further lars from—
Cc » CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
23 2 51.—7n.



PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.



NOTICE

THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW
VESTRY BY-ELECTION
I HEREBY give notice that I have
appointed the Yestry room near the
Almshouse at Belleplaine, as the place
where all persons duly qualified to
vote at the Election of Vestryman for
the said Parish, may meet on Monday
March 12th 1951, between the hours of
10 ahd 11 o'clock in the morning to
elect a Vestryman in the place of Darry
Atfield Foster (deceased),
Signed C. A. Skinner,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Andrew.
3.3.51—8n.





NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
The Vestry of St. Philip hereby notifies
the public that the facilities of the King
George V. Memorial Park can be rented
for dances, amusements, etc.
Applications for hire can be arranged
with the Churchwarden Mr. D. D.
Garner M.C.P., Marchfield, St. Philip.
P. 8. W. SCOTT,
Clerk, to the Vestry, St. Philip.
3.3.51—Tn



NOTICE

The Parochial Treasurer's Office, St
Michael will be closed at 12 o'clock noon
on Thursday 8th March 1951.

PERCY H. BURTON,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Michael.
6.3.51—2n



TAKE NOTICE



That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE
COMPANY, © corporation of the State
of OHIO, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is The
Gwynne Building,. Sixth and Main
Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A., has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in re-
spect of vegetable shortening and
cooking fat, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 2nd day of March 1951 unless some
person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office
of opposition of such registration. The



trede mark can be seen on application
at my office
ting} Dated this Ist day of March, 1951
H, WILLIAM
Registrar of Trade



@ word weeky4 Cents a) tenes, wa See


















BARBADOS ADVOCATE
GOVERNMENT NOTICES

—_———————

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words -~ over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.











Articles to be Sold at Auction at Customs on
the 8th March, 1951, at 11.00 am.

WANT OF ENTRY GOODS UNDER TRADE ACT 1910—4
SECTION (48) 3&4

Marks & Numbers





'
|,.A YOUNG

HELP

MAN with busines expe
tetaty for a local Company
Apply by letter onjy, to

COTTLE, CATFORD & Cx



1-6 Deseription of Qoods



———
A LADY for general office work with





Pee re re ee e ;
knowledge of typing. A Junior for gen- K R. Hunts 2 Co., Ltd 4 pte (3) Pkg. sonD,
¢ral_ office work. Apply by letter oniy| Harrison & Co., Ltd. ?.7One (1) Pkg. Drugs.
to R. M. Jones & Company Liniaga d. Ni H, & Ge. ‘ «+ }One (1) Carton Squashes.
2i— an, . *. ¢ .
To La TT dtislbitorn tie fe CS: és és $.] Three (3) Odd Shoes.
ex: ene ‘eachers are needed Aj rhe ~ciei
to fill vacancies on the Staff of the Middle | 2 Medina vies ..|One (1) Pkg. Medic ine.
Schoot of Naparima Girls’ High Schoo! | Y. D. L. 4662 One (1) Case Xmas Decora-
ay from April Agen. tions
erence will be given to those with | __ j me
Schoo! Certiteste” thon the Cambridge} K, R. H. 62112 .. | One ; ») Carton Carboard Car-
ubjects to include, History, Needle- Ons.
work and Physical Training. Nmptage, 2 Yne ‘ase rertisi Si
, Oe ae ee — be made in writ- N uM ers F z ; On oO ‘Bal — ons
ny ncipal. jwN/d us es =. ee : ea :
6.3.51—n | Manning & Co., Ltd. .. e-}One (1) Parcel Samples
WANTED FOR BRITISH GUIANA rG.G 1% Two (2) Cases Dried Fruit.
OPPORTUNITY for experienced senior! J), [hberson Va os «. | One (1) Hammock.

male Assistant in country General Store.













five hours river steamers from Port}/ Manning & Co., Ltd. One (1) Carton Calendars.
ae eee All - cone FOL Of
ge essential. Free house UN LAIM UN TRA lad
Hours— 8—12 and 2.30—6.30. Wednesday | c ED BAGGAGE DER DE ACT 1910-4
half-holiday, Salary £450 per annum |} SECTION 119.
ond upward according to experience. |
Seete hiae oat Onty men wita | N/m ; r; A ..]/One (1) Carton Cigarettes.
Apply in writing with copies of recent | Capt. Eide v's ee +» {One (1) Carton Cigarettes
references to Box 139, C/o this Paper Torville , ko T ne
stating age, experience, marital status, M. Norvill ‘ i One (I) Pkg. Tobacco.
ond if married, state number of children. |-). Christiansen aa «| Two (2) Cartons Cigarettes,
4.3.51—Sn | N /M et IF One (1) 5-lb. Tin Margarine.
HOUSEKEEPER — With Hotei or] ~ wan - FOL HUTY TNHheES THDANP any
Boarding House experience. Write stat- GOODS ABANDONED FO DUTY UNDER TRADE ACT

























ing all qualifications to Box X.M.G. 1910-4 SECTION 80
4.3.51—3n. et: eh P dtehidnitn Kinin nasil ncietheti itll’
Young Lady with knowledge of type- Whom Abandoned Deseription of Goods.
writing and Shorthand. Freferably one _—_
with some previous experience in Dosis . pe 1 . lace 'P uw Imitea op
Commission Office work. Bradshaw & Co, ; oe One (1) ( ase Pypew riter Parts
Apply in writing to :— dos Import & Export Co. [One (1) Case Liquor Samples
pen A. LENCE oP on iio Robert Thom Ltd, One (1) Case — Potassium
a4 Pudactown: Cyanide,
pibieteciobntiendes Five (5) Empty Drums.
One (1) Carton Canned Meat.
MISCELLANEOUS

One (1) Carton Merchandise.

Seventy-five (75) Ctns. Para-
fin Wax.

One (1) Piece Galv. Tron Pipe

———
GOODS SEIZED AND FORFEITED UNDER TRADE ACT
1910-4 SECTION 135 (1)





PAYING GUEST—Male or Female, or
Married couple in Belleville District, in
a very quiet home, Box C.W,
Advocate Co. 3.3.51

IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-
lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.
Phone 4429 or call at GORRINGES, ad-
joining Royal Yacht Club

20.2.51.—T.F.N.

aaa
IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniaturer jade,
ola BWt Stamps. GORRINGES,

Antique Shop. Dial 4429,
20.2.51,—t.f.n.

PERSONAL

By Whom Forfeited Deseription of Goods





One (1) Bateau Contg.
Six (6) Deal Planks

—

“GOODS SEIZED AND FORFEITED UNDER TRADE ACT
1910-4 SECTION 135 (1)
Attempted Exportation Without xport Licence.

Una Rice on





: _— ——— -_———-

Seized on Board Daerwood

SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

" ¢ +
The publie are hereby warned against Two-(2) Bars Soa p.
giving credit to my wife WINEFRED
LYNCH (nee Boucher) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me
NEBERT LYNCH,
Prout Hill,
St. Thomas.





6,3.51—2n

Sailing from Amsterdam, Dover and
Madeira—s.s. ‘‘Cottica’ 2nd, 3rd, 9th
TAKE NOTICE February, 1951, M.S. “Bonaire” 9th,
10th. 16th Marci 1863, Cie Gle Transatlantique

Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam—-
m.s. “Helena” 12th, 15th, February 1951,
m.s. “Willemstad” §th, 15th, February
1951, m.s. “Oranjestad” 9th, 15th Mareh
1951.

Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and
Georgetown—m.s, “Bonaire” 27th Janu-
ary 1951; m.s, “Cottica’”’ 20th, February
1951; ms. “Helena” 3rd March 1951.

Sailing to Trinidad, La Gutara, Cura-
cao ete—m.s, “Oranjestad” Ist February
1951.

Sailing to Plymouth, Antw â„¢ ster-
dam—m.s. “Oranjestad” a

SAILINGS TO
ENGLAND & FRANCE

COLOMBIE: March 12th
via Martininque and
Guadeloupe

=: March 31
via St. Lueia, Martinique,

DETTOL

GASCOGNE :





& CO., LTD.,
| ee ee * ‘Agents Guadeloupe, Antigua
SOUTHBOUND
The M/V “CARIBBEE” will

COLOMBIE: March Ist

aceept Cargo and Passéngers for

Dow.iniea, Antigua, : en Te Trinidad, Lid Guiara,
ma oy on i me ea a Curacao, Cartegena,
day 9 st.

Jamaica
Accepting Cargo, Mail
Passengers



M/¥Y “DAERWOOD will

The
That RECKITT & COLMAN LIMITED, | accept Cargo and Passengers for



|
|
\

Lucia, Grenada and Aruba and




|
|
|
|



British Limited Liability Company, St soeay 2
Manufacturers, of Kingston Works, Passengers only ag Nl ~

Dansom Lane, Mull, England, has! Sad ling Thursday oat net. R M JONES & Co Ltd
applied for the registration of a trade, ; e a
thark in Part “A” of Register in re-|j| 8.W.1. Sonne weer o Me Ke ’

spect of pharmaceutical preparations | pe ASSOCIA ’ AGENTS

for human use and for veterinary use, | Yel, 4047,

sanitary substances, disinfectants, Phone 3814
germicides and insecticides, and will }

be entitled to register the same after |



S—_—_—_—_—=

one month from the 2nd day of March
1951, unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
déen on application at my office.

‘Canadian National Steamships



Dated this Ist day of March, 1951, SOUTHBOUND deus satio CD aS athe
eo eet Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbador
Registrar of Trade Marts. “LADY RODNEY" 3 Mar. 5 Mar. 14 Mar. iS Mar
“LADY NELSON” o 19 Mar, 21 Mar, 30 Mar. 31 Mar
“CAN. CHALLENGER" - 2 Apr -- 12 Apr. 12 Apr
TAKE NOTICE “LADY RODNEY” - 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 27 Apr = 27 Apr
HBOUN Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
— fe Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax
“LADY RODNEY" 27 Mar 28 Mar. 6 Apr. 7 Apr --
| “LADY NELSON” 12 Apr. 14 Apr. 23 Apr. -- 24 Apr
‘ “LADY RODNEY” 10 May. 12 May, 21 May. - 22 May

N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All veswels fitted with cold storage cham.
bers. Passenger Fares and freight 1ates on application to :-~



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD. — Agents.

HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM





That THE PROCTER & GAMBLE
COMPANY, a corporation of the State
of Ohio, United States of America,



|

Whose trade or business address is The
Gwynne Building, Sixth and main |
Streets, Cincinnati, Ohio, VER eas Due

jL fe th gistration of a trade
Pent th “Part oR ee oe xB. Vessel from Leaves Barbados

toilet d bath soap, and wi 7 5

Re eniitied to vegister the same. alter $8. “PACIFIC STAR” .. Liverpool 28th Feb. 15th Mar.
one month from the 2nd dey i awe Be STATESMAN” .. London 3rd Mar. 18th Mar.
1951, unless some person shall in the .S. “SUCCESSOR” rt : Mar. r ar.
rneantime ive ngtice in iupticate to ss oaneneee Glade e Tth

t office of opposition of 5 =e * oe sgo
registration, The trade mark can be South Wales» 10th Mar. 25th Mar,
seon oh epplication at mz omMes. 3.8, “SPECIALIST” London Qist Mar, ‘4th April

ted this Ist day of March, 1951.
ree H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
3.3.51—3n.

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

‘Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S.S. “PLANTER” London 10th March

For further information apply to - - -
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, tor sail-

ing to Europe, The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.



nee

TAKE NOTICE

Wy

sr =










‘JOHN M. BLADON

wa

That RECKITT & COLMAN LIMITED,









British Limited Liability Company,
Manufacturers, of Kingston Work
Dansom Lane Hull, England has
applied for the registration of o« trade AFS., F.V.A,
mark in Part “A of Register in re- |
spect of pigments and colo not fos |
leundry or toilet purpose md will FOR
be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 2nd day of March |
1951, unless sore person shall in the |
méantime give notice in duplicate to]
mé at my office of oppositio such |
trade mark |
or . ff i > ~ . *
jay of Marci i REAL ESTATE AGENT — AUCTIONEER -—- SURVEYOR
H, WIld1JAM | ’Phone 4640 Plantations’ Building
Registrar of Trade a
!







TAKE NOTICE
DOLSA

Theat RECKITT & COLMAN LIMITED,
British Limited Liability Company
Manufacturers, of Kingston Works,
Dansom Lane, Mull, England has
applied for the registration of trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in re
spect of medicmal and pharmaceut cal
preparations for the relief of internal
disorders, but not including prepara-
tions for the relief of rhewmatiam or
arthritis or goods of ao like kind to
these exchided goods, and witl be
entitled to register the savie after ane
month from the 2nd da? of Murch
951, uniess some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
ne at my office of opposition of such
egistration. The trade mark can be
seen On application at my office.
Dated this Ist day of March, 1951
H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Mark:
3.3.52.-—-3n





SCIENTIFIC MASSAGE
Massage is indispensable to
Boxers and other Athletes. Why

not to CRICKETERS? It relieve
conjestion, pain stiffness and
eliminates fatigue poisons. “GIV
IT A TRIAL.
WILLIAM JOHNSON,
Crumpton Street,
Bridgetown,













FOR YOUR INSURANCE

NEEDS _- CONSULT
ANDREW D. SHEPPARD |
Representing



WANTED FOR CASH

Used & Mint Stamps

of Barbados and the other Islands
of the British West Indies, GOOD

PRICES PAID at CARIBBEAN
STAMP SOCIETY, No. 10 Swan
Street, 3.3.51—4n,



lO

“IT HAS Ir
| #

has stile,

has Beauty of Colour,
has correct modetn tines
has durability,

has all you want,

the modern De Luxe
Table Model Gas Hotplate
Priced to sell
at your Gas
Bay St

See it Showroom

Don't forget friends

The Bee-Bop Dance
TO-NIGHT

At QUEEN'S PARK
from 9 p.m
ADMISSION 2/
Music by C. B. Browne's
Orchestra
BAR SOLID
Promoter: Charles Lynton

To All Expectant



Mothers
Please be informed that we have
just opened the most hygiene

Diapers, Fave Cloths, Hankies, Bed
Spreads, etc, wae
We are the only importers of thix
class of goo@s in the island. Cat
early to avoid disnppuintment

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.

Dial 4100 where you will find

dods unobtainable at other Stores

and the prices very low
7A51—2n



“T LEAP OVER THE WALL”
By Monica Baldwin,
A MORNING AT THE OFFICE
~By Edgar Mittelholzer,






AT
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
a Ree oe eS
Fresh shipment of —
ENAMEL. IT
in alt coloure

JOHNSON'S fianowate















A very attractive
MODERN HOUSE

having every convenience,
3 Bed-rooms, Blectric
lights & water 11% miles
from Bridgetown on main
bus route, 5 minutes wali
from the sed, standing on
12,000 sq. feet of land,

BED-ROOM COTTAGE
with one acre of good land
within 2 miles of Bridge.
town. Electric lights ‘anc
yater

See .

CECIL JEMMOTT
Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy
33 Broad St. ::: Phone 4563

“2






ONLY NI

View by

PRICE with ONI





\W HOUSE FOR SALE ON THIS COAST
ALL MAIN SERVICES
Appointment Only Telephone 9172 }

ACRI



PAGE SEVEN





OFFICIAL NOTICE

BARBADOS IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

In pursuane notice all persons
” claim incurmbrance in or
the pr y of the Defendant) to
itnesses, documents and

1906, 1 heret to
any
pron

their

hancery Act dc
te, ritht or interest
inafter mentioned (the
their ms with

len

or



ha
effecting
bring bef



an
erty
Mm account of























voucher éxamined by me, o Tuesday or Friday between the hours
12 ne at the Registration Office, Public Build-
ings, Brid day of May, 1951 in order that
such claim ed aceording to the nature and priority
thereof respec ei? will be precladed from the benefits
any decree and be deprived of ’ t t again uid property
PLAINTIFF JAMES ARTHUR TUDOR
DEFENDANT MERTON CLEMENT HURDLE
PROPERTY. ALI. THAT certain piece parcel lar situate at Welchman Hal
in the parish of Saint Thomas a lotand aforesaid contaiming by ad-
veasurement 3. roeods 17 perches or thereabouts (of which area.4
perches are in the public ad hereinafter mentioned) abutting and
: bounding on lands formerly of McD. Chandler but now of Joe Cave
on lands of the Estate of William Small, deceased on lands now or
late of one Mayers on lands of Hizhland Plantation and on the Pub;
lic Read or however else the same may abut and bound TOGETHER
with the messuage or dwellinghouse and ali and singular other the
buildings and erections thereon
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.
Bill fled 19th January, 195) .
Dated 6th Match, 1951 $








































PROTECT THE LIFE OF YOUR BELTS

with
“FLEXO” BELT DRESSING
Obdtainable at

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER HEAD LANE.



Tak: this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :~—
GALVANISED. & STEAM PIPE

Ranging from 14 In. upwards

MILD STEEL
Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes

BOLTS & NUTS—AIll Sizes

FILTER CLOTH~—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.

The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid.

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST, MICHAEL

FOGARTY'S
SPRING
COLLECTION

SILK STRIPES, Exquisitely
coloured

CRISP LINENS & RAYONS
FLORAL CREPES

LOVELY. EMBROIDERED
NETS

Admirably «appropriate for

Bridesmaids’ Dresses
‘BRIDAL VEILS and WREATHS
SILVER TINSEL BROCADE

and other
White materials

ORDERED ESPECIALLY FOR
BRIDES’ DRESSES

Wm. FOGARTY LTD.


























several Gorgeous












FOR SALE

“Manzanilla”
ST. JAMES
(Next to Colony Club)

147 Beach Frontage
Perfect Bathing

ca tas
FSS SSS

\

Looe se
SSS Sa

£ 16,500;

FREEHOLD

eee
Pa

with

)

ACRES £13,500






PAGE £IGHT

B.G. Must























































Seore 510 GO





















BARBADOS ADVOCATE



































VERNOR PRESENTS Golfers Qualify for Island Title



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1951





FOR A SMOOTH, COOL SKIN



















}
}
. Yr" 3
K c ‘hristie’s score of eoffrey Manning 89
. CRICKET PRIZES Ly, K, K. Christie's scare of Gtytres baming s | the beauty cream
* a> j 2 79 led the field of qualifiers fc Sehis Garecs ae | s ‘ 3
i Ose if Ss a "hE the Open Amateur Championship DA COSTA CUP 92 | that is a treatment
THE GOVERNOR presented prizes to various mem- at the Rockley Golf and Country FA. Bemtanain 112) 92 |
, Moet : . ani ny s ° , an Niblock (1) 92 |
bers of the Barbados and Trinidad cricket teams for out- _ nag mage 1, Bp warwesng NE BL. Rhodes (14) 7
° * : . ‘ . sixteer oO ste ers playe < PF ‘won'n (75) | .
(By O. S. COPPIN) standing performances at the conclusion of the Intercolonial {f4j; way to place in the select K. R Saiseatestth-<5 cc civcconsexe 16 *MAZELINE SNOW" =—e
KINGSTON, Jamaica, March 5 Tournament at Kensington on Monday afternoon. circle which will compete for the }Â¥ Nurse (16) 6 rotects the skin from dust
* z oear Ue = ts A Mr, J. M. Kidney, Junior Vice 7 Téland honours. Two strokes back V King :23) 93 | : P 7
IN A SPATE of run-getting to-day Jamaica added: 304 president of the Barbados Cricket Co. Ltd.. for the best bowling averagim CP, leader was James O'Neal . Vanneck (20) 2 | : and dirt . .. guards against sun
to the overnight total of 94, in 294 minutes, putting A Ny bet ssking the 10 prese py Messrs. G. W. Hutchin- and in third place was Bryan Wl Grannum (2iy rots cools the skin immediately
; : : - fi ‘ rt ‘ R. Innis 22 } » :
94 runs in the second innings at the ena af the Gow @ pres the prizes Oo Ne es Mee wae es Pr casting Oe = = it is applied .. . so refreshing
Y uns e iis Py he Ave » on Barbados side— s a ay sete w ° a 3 . .'
day's play in the first Jamaica British Guiana a : 2 * ait af Letter cae : “ a af ve ceeman haa Be owen aotatoner (a8) 105 softens and perfumes the
’ a > ea a ‘nian © aAVING COM 11 Presented “by _ Messrs Alexander failure, . 0 “nne * Colin Bellamy (24) Mt skin. its that shiny look
b Led by a flawless 121 by Neville Bonitto, .ne Soy 4, Hayley & Co., for attractive batting ‘member of the Barbados team : peavemy y
maican batsmen could not be heid. They scored behind yy the Governor had 2}4., und Weeping —B, Beaall “Which fecently played in Trini- " cleanses thoroughly, gently
sh “y evene t sw 2 nm 2M in« been t gton most days to 12. Presented by Messrs. C arrie t alify for *hampion- r eo . :
clock until they evened m atters Vv ith 200 in } min bee ’ on oe io = Presented b ena Ee Bere oy a Oey te ee aa C wealth Draw > *Haseline Saow’ dees so much fer o> — matt
te 1 ihat all other times before the clock. With £& i oud Pesan ados side—E. Weekes--Hat Sera tanen ae places in the your skin. Manes ta weee wee feundation for powder
on the fir ings, Jamaicé , compellec . mg 13 ed by Mestrs. Y. de Lima & Island a aoe M trust it as they do no other beaut
i ym the first nnings, J Maica now SOR e eG keen interest in Co., Ltd.. for ; verage on st flight, ut Hunte had gn off Last atch Of Tour Stee te oeheehy cates oak
Britis na to score 510 runs or be defeated outright. : » the isiand Trinidat side--J. St er—Pen & Gay and missed by three shots seasons, so good for treating little
— Se SERA anS eae REREAD Trim wes the most-eccurate of During the early part of the ,, enn by Messrs. Knights Ltda, when he took a 94 over the 18- BOMBAY, March 6. blemishes, oo greasy, ‘ Hazeline
° yn B.G. bowlvurs. maintaining 4 good teurnamen: they had to postpone for best batting average on Barbados Hole test. The Commonwealth ericket Snow’ should be your daily choice,
Cricket i OUP tensth and pace and capturing 4 ft owing to rain and were doubly ,, side—C. L. Walcott~Shaving Sst. Tt wes necessary to do 91 or team drew their last match of the
e ‘or 83 ia Wy overs. Tne wicke* grateful to Col. Michelin for Sone Lid.. for good fihting innings etter .to.get in for the inaten tour against the Prime Minister’s ’ ’
: _- - was q bit dusty but not playing lending them the Fire Brigade’s = —D. Atkinson—Pads. play struggles, that will decide XI here today, HAZELINE SNOW
Cost $5,500 wricks while the crowd is stilt Sigmund pump to clear’ the !6. Presented bs Bape fae Bevan the title, currently held by J. R Set to get 213 to win in their a oe
7 large. Today's gate was 8.000 ae ares or —_ occasions, N. Marshall—Gloves Rodger; whe automatically quali- second innings in just undey two
Oficial receipts show that 25,500 — Jamaica lost their first wicket If that id not happen, they 17 Presented by Messrs. Manning & Co. fied. John Grace was the last hours the Commonwealth had
persons paid $11,718.18 to witness after cleven minutes of play to- would mot have had . any ar oa on Trinidad side Pan under the wire, while lan scored 130 for four wickets by the A_ BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. PRODUCT
1 two Intercolonial Cricket gay. Trim bowling at increase! .ournament. 18 Presented by Messrs. Modern Dress Niblock and E. A Benjamin close. Bala Anonts for Barbados : Collins’ Lid. 28 Uroad Stren
Tourné t Matches which began pace with the wicket giving more He also thanked Mr. Bruce Shoppe, for beat Relding an Barbados just missed by one stroke. The combined XI, who had
on Feb. 2ist and ended on March jife had Presced Ne when tac nae ee aninee % Maseriag 19 Presented by Messrs. Plantations Ltd oe who a es = — only oo = reply to — ————————_—_=_—— essa
5 latter attempted to ook 2 good who Pp allantiy m cleari for most promising performance on e@ championship wi Sommonwea s rst innings o
‘The Tour was the most'eXpen- jengtn ball on the leg stump and the grounds. f gg Prinidad side--L. Butler—Bat. —¢ Match play for the Da Costa Cup, 505 for 5 declared, followed on and
intercolonial —— ot saab, missed, The score was then 59—1 He said that they had gag ~ Challenor for most promising per- Which .will be pred under made 544 for 7 before Merchant
cost was likely to reach $9,000.00, 97. enjoyable tournament and = no formance on either side-—C. Hunte handicap, This trophy was WOM declared their second innings.
n cial of the Barbados Cricket Holt joiniag Cunningham seem. doubt, everyone was glad to see * ean Si i elo es eRe YORT by Geoffrey Manning, Imtiaz Ahmed the Pakistan
A tion said yesterday. ed comfortable at once pulling Jeffrey Stollmeyer bat and make Co., Lid.. two cases beer to the two Who this year moved up tO A wicketkeeper carried his bat for Excellent
main items of this amoun Rollox to the square leg boun- Tums in his own characteristic teams—-one Barbados side; one Trim- place in the championship ot 300, the highest individual score
= rle ida s 5 a ri vi i “or - 2 . :
! dary, then executing an elegant Style. : Fae | ae Settentad tot. Miners: oibtn! Cos ees Uae ne with a score against the Commonwealth team
ia -petresh cover drive for four, sending up _He also thanked the three & Co., Ltd., two cases rum to the two 89. _ ef the tour—Reuter, For
and refresnh- 100 in 114 minutes, Jamaica, in Umpires tor their services anc teams—Trinided and Barbados s'des The draw for the match play
5 i es lay add See ee caid that a high compliment had 23 Presented by Messrs. J. B. Leslie & meetings will be seeded according ay
balls during practice 54 minutes teday added the neces Pies aid t ye whe: the Co., for consistent batting on Trinidad si vhich the play-
poke Sete sary 46 runs for the century becn =paid to- nem when i side—A. Ganteaume—Bat te the position in v i p i Th Blouses
eaplpiert ied iar haan! A Meanwhile Cunningham . who Captain of the Trinidad team told 24 Presented by Messrs DaCosta & Co., ers qualified and according to the e eather
Professional fees $480; : od the innings eit batting bim that he had never witnessed itd... for highest aggregate runs on Humerical table prescribed for ;
ee ea ae seoncilly and from. dle aches ‘of te better umpiring in intercolonial ,, Srgerkten 6 Gaaie he ke deuce & that purpose. TODAY like
$200: adily ¢ Ss 5 3 4 : . : : ' ace
oe} zo ; * 7 PS espae a la am pala ,; tournaments. Co., for highest aggregate runs on The scores: Su> Rises: 6.15 a.m.
Printing ar d a ivert 1g $240; not Out, yesterday ne ec mpiaras After the distribution of the Rarbados side—C, L. Walcot!—Bat _ CHAMPIONSHIP FLIGHT Sun Sets: 6.11 nm
Groundsmen from January to his individual half-century in 12! prizes by the Governor Mr. 26 Presented by Messrs, Stokes & Bynoe J, K. K. Christie : ze Moo (Ne ; Ma h 1 thi
ee “7 ni tes : B . . or good bowling performance—N James O'Neal . p n ew) Mare
aa caite aie and police Potoir held Holt in check for Jeffrey Stollmeyer, Captain of ee ee M : rs an Wybrew Lighting: 6.30 p.m. 1S
7 three overs with good length leg the Trinidad team said that he \â„¢ Crt most wickets In series S, fernard Role High Water: 3.34 a.m,, 3.36
re 5 , ce arbados 7 ; porns
quarter share 6f pas- breaks. The latter became impa. “OUld not like to leave Rarb Jackbir—Cigarette Case David Inniss p.m.
¢ 5200 tient, hit t and put g cue, Without saying a word of thanks 28 Presented by Messrs. A. de Lima & Will Atkinson YESTERDAY
atten “Glutdnia Lent) 2O Britisn Gutana team catch to Trim at deep mid-off. bers of the Barbados Cricket Waleott—Watch Michael Timpson Rainfall (Codrington) nil
s the Barbados Crick- jyo)t patted soundly for 37 in 72 MEMPErS 0 the Barbados Cr: ‘|29 Presented by Messrs. Wm. Fosarty R. P. Gooding Total for Month to Yeste
tion $1,445 being the |. ; 3 y : 44“ Association and the many friends Ltd., for good bowling performance-- _P. D. McDermott ; CL o Yester-
‘passages rags. Minutes hitting four fours. Neville whom they had met on the visit. C Skeete—Bat D. Lugie-Smith day: .01 in.
are of passages. It was pp, S : ry ;
seessary to effect certain repairs Bonitte partnered Cunningham He was very sorry that they aici Temperature (Max.) 82.0°F
necess ea ; »y Playing out the over giving Patoir hag overstayed their leave, but// ~~ S—S—S etn Yemperature (Min.) 73.0°F
to the Kensington Stand and other a maiden wicket over when. play d : ae 5 featnon West Wind Direction (9 a.m.) N.W NYL N PL
indry repairs amounted to $400. ©. . “1 SY as one o eir learnec 2 4 yoy NETN, TOTAL ; pe m. s
7 sae Ladies’ room attached to “topped for lunch. Cunningham Indian Selectors had said, they ARE YOU THINKING OF BUYING A STOVE: (3 p.m.) W.N.W.

the George Challenor Stand was
erected at a cost of $820.

Another amount of $480 is due
the solicitors for a year’s interest
and in eptember a_ Barbados
team goes to British Guiana and
the quarter share of passages will
be in the region of $500.

When all these expenses are
paid the Cricket Association's bal-
ance from the tour will be around
$2,500. Their total liabilities of the
st Association are approxi-
$43,000.

the

Tew







ately
Not a regi
Barbados Cricket Association as a

people regard
wealthy concern. Many repairs
are still necessary at the Oval;
also a pavilion between Pickwick’s
and the Kensington Stand. It
should be abundantly clear that
other Associations having the uses
ef the facilities at the Oval should
earmark part of their funds for
the purpose of erecting additional
Stands

New Zealand Spun
Out For 146 Runs

AUCKLAND, March 6.
The M.C.C,. made an impres-
sive start today to their short
New Zealand tour, They spun
out New Zealand for 146 runs
and by the close of play had re-
plied with 86 for one wicket,



The match ends on Thursday.
Tattersall anc Douglas Wright

exploiting the scarred pitch shared
the wickets. Tattersall put up his
best performance. since he flew
out to bolster the injury hit team

The Lancashire offspin bowler
claimed four wickets for 38 runs,



Wright bowled his leg breaks
with consistent accuracy taking 5



wickets for 54 runr
AUCKLAND 18ST INNINGS












Vv. J. Seott b Tatteroan 25
K Dwyer b Tattersall 9
K Deas Lb.w b Wright 6
W. M. Wallace b Tattersall 36
D D Coleman b Tattersall 21
0. C, Cleal run out i4
L. Kent c Warr b Wright 6
Cc. Burke not out 8
D Clark c Compton b Wright 1
J. Cammish b Wright 4
D. Cleverley b Wriaht 8
Extras (7 b., 4 1b., 1 nb) 12
Total ‘ i
Fall of wickets: 1— 2-3 3-5
4-85; 5-~109; 6—113; 125 8-128
o—-138
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M. R. W
Warr a
Statham 0
Wright 5
‘Tattersall 4
Compton 2 24 0
MCC IST INNINGS
Hutton not out . 56
Washbrook o. & b. Cammish . Ml
Parkhouse not out 13
Extras 0
Total (for 1 wkt.) 5 80
—Reuter,
KING WON
Sam King, boxer, knocked out Hal
Williams in the sixth round of their

eight round contest at the Yankee
Stadium on Thureday night March 1

will s did not win the fight
Was rlously reported.

|

as





| The







bf

TH#TOP THe :

TRAIN!!
I FOLDED uP THE
URHZ NG WASHBASIN

AND PUSHED MY
TEETH DOWN THE
DKAIN!!





‘ll Do iG Every

CANT OO NOTHIN’

was 59 not out. could do well to grow rice in this
On resumption Rickards who country.

had not epened his scoring before He then made a shurt reference
the interval was ducked when to the cricket which had been
playing defensively to Trim and played during the tournament
missed. The score was 136/3/9. and said that he was sure every-
Neville Bonitto now artnered one had enjoyed it,

Cunningham who soon fell victim He had noted that they were
to a vicious one cut back from some who did not appreciate the
the off by Trim that knocked back tactics put into effect during the
his middle and leg stumps. Cun- first game. To all those young
ningham batting for 158 minutes cricketers he said that those
gave Jamaica a good start scoring tactics should be significant. The
62 in 162 minutes. The secre West Indies were soon to go to
was 1474/62. Mudie next man Australia and he assurred them
in helped to boost the score past that the “Aussies” did not play
the 150 mark in 167 minutes. They cricket easy, they. played it hard
now attacked the bowling hitting and if’ they were to win in
the ball to all parts of the fiela Australia, they had to play hard.
and the fourth 50 took but 33 He congratulated Clyde Walevtt
minutes to complete two hundred on his magnificent innings and or

coming in 200 minutes. his splendid captaincy and alse
Both batsmen were level on Fyerton Weekes on his bowling

scores in the forties but Mudie performance.

reached 50 first in 59 minutes. He On behalf of the Trinidac

added two runs before he was team, he expressed thanks for the
caught in the long field by a well very excellent manner in whick
judged catch by Peter Wight. the games were umpired. first
The score 239/5/52. Binns joined ¢jass cricket could only be playec
Bonitto who completed this indi- py good umpiring he said, anc
vidual half century in an even the umpiring in the present game«
two hours. The rate of scoring had been of the highest standard
increased Jamaica getting in front He said that they had enjoyec
of the clock by scoring 250 in themselves immensely on this
245 minutes, Still the batsmen jjttle ‘island and thanked every-
flogged the tiring bowling and one for their hospitality.

800 went up in 269 minutes the ~hree cheers were then called
fifth 50 coming in 24 minutes, Tea jo. by the Captains of the re-
interval saw Jamaica 301 for five, spective teams and the gathering
‘Bonitto 78 not out, Binns 32 not separated,
cut,

PRIZES
After Tex BAKBADOS—TRINIDAD
Jamaica added 34 runs after 1 Presented by Messrs. Cave, Shepherd

& Co., Ltd., for the highest score in
the first match-—C, L, Walcott-—Bat.
Presented by Messrs, Jas, A. Lynct
& Co., Ltd. for the highest score in
the first match on Trinidad side—
R, Tanz Choon—Bat

tea Binns helping himself to some
lusty hitting which gave him six 2
fours while Bonitto approached
his. century with careful purpose-

{ul batting. Trim pierced Binns’ 4 Ppresenied by Messrs, Central Foundry
defence bowling him for 49 Ltd., for the highest score in the sec

ond match on Barbados side—C. L
Walcot*—Bat.

Presented by Messre. British Ameri-
ean Co,, for the highest seore in_ the
second match on Trinidad side-—Jeff
Stolimeyer—Bat,

Presented by Messvs, HM. Jason Jones
& Co. for bowler taking most wickets

making Jamaica's score now 335/
6/49. Neville Bonitto who was
now joined by skipper A. R.
Benitto completed his individual
century with a lofty cover drive
for four off Gaskin, He had been

=



batting with effortless progress 4 jycwnted ig Meare bane fot. the
for 147 minutes. Taree hundred highest score in series—C, L, Walcot



and filty went up in 307 minutes. . “Ve ce
7” ' ) = © . ‘ resente 1” Me
Thirteen runs later A. R. Bonitto Co. for the bes: rounder on ‘Tri:
cut a leg spinner from Patoir into idud side—W. Ferguson—Bat,
Christiani’s waiting mitts behind 4%





J, B. Lestie &



Presented by Messty F B Arm-

vinle ~ ~ tre Ltd.. tor the best all roundei

the wicket. Goodridge next man aH awbahed ‘sido Mheahalh
in was run out off the first ball Gloves

Presented by Messrs, A. Barnes &

he received, Christiani got B.G’s. ®
eighth wicket with a brilliant bit
of stumping. N e ville Bonitte
played forward to a leg spinner
trom Patoir missed and Christiani
whipped off the bails before he
could regain his balance, Bonitto
played a tlawless innings for 121
in 182 minutes hitting 11 fours,







N. L, Bonitto stpd wkpr
b- Patotr ’
Mudie ¢ Sub, b Thomas 52
Binns b Trim a9
A. R. Bonitto c wkpr. (Christiani)
b Patoir ‘
Goodridge run out ’ 0

(Christiani)

: . Johnson not out + 22
Johnson and Valentine the num- Valentine b Rollox |. meee
bers ten and eleven batsmen Extras... “ne .
carried the score to 399 before

. Total
Va-entine was bowled by Rollox =



for seven while Johnson carried | Fall of wickets 136,
out his bat for 22. With only six hate ee ae.
"

minutes left play ended, BOWLING ANALYSIS

JAMAICA FIRST INNINGS 273 oO M R Ww
5.G. FIRST INNINGS 162. Trim 19 1 83 4
JAMAICA SECOND INNINGS Gaskin + 21 4 87
Cunningham b Trim 62 ~Patoir o> ae 1 oO 3
Preseod Lb.w, Trim 37 = Pollox ; 17.6 2 88 1
Holt ¢ Trim, b Patoir .,..... 3st) 6C. H, Thomas ,,,.. 7 33 1
Rickard tb.w, Trim . . 0 fersaud .. 2 1S *





Jimmy Hatlo





‘Time

Prelvered US Pernt Mee





















THAT'S THE Li
LADIES CLUB TOMORROW

HELL HAVE TO WIGWAG
HiS SPEECH»:

S\S7__ HE'S GOT TWo
TUXEDOS WITH HIM,
{| BUT HIS SPARE CHOPPERS
“\ ARE HOME IN THE
BUREAU DRAWER”

7” HORSE TEETH DON'T
LAND ON THE TRACK =
ITD DERAIL THE



SORRY, MISTER





ABOUT IT UNTIL





tDieaiins THE WARNING
SIGNS, THERE'S AT

LEAST ONE ON

EVERY TRIP —



















»

SeSSeerenne
SSSSESLRES
--- eee

SOPOSOOOOOOOP SOF)





AT

%
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>
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Wind Velocity: 6 miles per

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Barometer (9 am.) 29.939,
(3 p.m.) 29.868

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for Ballroom,
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FIT”

Joan. Ransom,
Diploma of the
of Teachers of

a Licentiate of the Royal Academy
of Dancing, London, England.



POPPE OPEOSOSOFS

NOTICE

DANCING SCHOOL — NEW
CLASSES

New classes are being formed
Tap and Musical

under the tuition of Miss





SSO

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Tn addition to the public: lectur? $
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Vice-Chairman of the National Association of I My husband was dreaming {ost night. He tossed &
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PAGE 1

PACK TWO IIARRADOS ADVOCATE Wl.IIM.M)AY. M XRt'll I, l31 fyudb Callinq S IR GEORGE D*vciopiiipiit and Wi I %  will b< Back To Trinidad V4 ,'FTEK n %  *** a of Cannings '.: boo. holidaying in Barb his relatives, ha* rrturnrd M Trinidad. He left ove) tiid by II W.I A With Cable £ Wirrlrss M R. t.ORDON LAMBERT ha* gone to Trinidad on | wamk holiday. From thcto hr will flv lo Martinique to stay wiih Inrnoa He is due to return to Barbados on Mai, Mr. Lambert Is with CAle ud Wirele*ban Rrm.-.ininr On M RS. HILDA CAMPUEU. .,( Trinidad wbOaa husband is it present In Enirtand. n Bel bados with their three children. They are staying at "Rainaiith" Worth in*. Mrs. Campbell like.Barbados o murr> that *he has put her three children to srkoel at the Ursi.' god she U remaining on for an holiday. Hair Raiser W HILE o.U fur a : lay inorninK Carlo" Oto the Empire Theatre to watch tho rehearsal (or uV Barbados Dramatic Club's production of -A Murder has been Arranged'. In spite of the fact that one of the players has been away tar the last ten days on his eras gnitifvinn u, notice that ;i)l the player* know their parts The setting of this play Is one of the most unusual < in Barbados and I an: sure that when everyone has seen this play they will think they have ry*i w.rth in thrill-; It l| certainly 41 hair raising thrtlh, B.C. Businessman TLMB lOII.WIE prmg out from Inhind a tree. 1 knew | woman who offered a little bag of add drops to n crocodile. It wal hungry." she said afterwards In he* pi la I, 'th.it it nearly ate me, too." Vr. hi, ktii gaaftei Out D EAR SIR. The gUowanos Ol 4d %  day for an ape on the Hock of Gibraltar is not much of an advertisement for the British Empire No wonderfun tirmhect What IHUM g Spaniard Hunk when he sees lh<-.,humilpes trying to exist as. %  nm that wouldn't keep a warttt A Commission should tp at onte to earry out a fact-finding Investigation on the *pot. and to prepare a report. In local wl -•' already talking about '"the f'urpenny apes" Why does our Government stand fog (I Youis faithfully. Edgar Kickett, P.LJ.. F D N Clf RIflTTNE OORDON Trinidad I Carnival Queen leaves this afternoon after a nve day visit High C and All Thai 'TMMNIDAD'S man 01 (un. Land> Ado Montbrun and hi. troupr ol entaiMiners staged another successful show at the isarbaoos Aquatic Club hist night. It was tiieir farewell performance as I understand the entire party leave for Trinidad this afternoon. Clyde Rivers certainly naa a fine • %  one, and June Malng'-0 JAMES STEWART us MACADAM. M'l.l.KT IIRI'NK HAN UURYEA . WACO JOHNNY THE BANDIT, STEPHEN McNALLV as DUTCHIE THE RENEGADE, SHF.IXY WINTERS n"> 1X)1.A. A GUI. look her man. untl gave her another .)!'! MM. FRIDAY MM .1.00 AND 8.30 -in.l rnniinuini indefinitely GLOBE THEATRE 0.B.C. Radit 'Programmes a-SavmaBMl M\*.H : mi Dai ? i Ha* i.i aa %  M l^lle, r Thvau*. ft j 1r.tr r I mtr. %  3t nir New.. 10 ... tf*nm N— f i staaam, : %  i %  m tmr n.ti*. 11 • Fiugiammrr PimN. IIS • mm 'i*m p m Nr. Aiulj.iv IMS, I 4 II pin Snuvmir* at MuMr. Id pm CWnewr of UM Wwk. S.l pm htaura I'tnaw. wm. Ili JWmjIO*. -0 piMontB l.ilr euortcl n p -.. la.** is a M.m at. S IS p.m. Fram tinThS*S rinfrimn,3* pm InlcrluMi IS pin PloSrantnw itwlr, T0 pn Ttir Ne-i. 7 IS m Sni Aniiydi. Ill p Thr Aroit and i* Ccimtnunlt* •a—••• aaa. at-at a su M SOS pat. Radio N*vrarrl. Hi p m %  I JO p m mm Bview. ttw Wrrk. S Tha Mw. 10 10 pi fvaai • fcHlnrl-V" 10 IS pm. Fir* OMn* a. lo.at pm. Mid WH. Tula. II * a.m. Fiom lha Third ."ror'Tranf. New ZoaUiwI Goes Woolly AUCKLAND. N.Z Feb. The amazing spurt in wool season produced some remarkable anomalies In NewZealand farming practice. Si nrithe wool crop has turned f ftld newspapers are rernrdlng V sidelights At presenl there are more than 15 sheep to every l>erson in New Zealand, and the proportion will rise higher if wool prices stay at their present level. Farmers now are getting more (or "crotehlngs." the pnorer lines that once could hardly he given away .than they got only one or two seasons ago for the flne-st fla y s aroota Small boys are occasionally making £200 or more a week by ..ile nf sranl scraps, collected from fences, trees and scrapings of wool trucks. Sales in Auckland alone this year have totalled about L 12,000.000 with more to come Wool formers however hitvc one-third of their receipts ''froatn' 1 l the government as an anti-Inflation measure, to be freed at some iture tuna One result of the boom Is a decline in receipts of lamhs at tr--kyards. Farmers are keeping them as long as possible to grow more ool. GROS'VORO \OI \ I ir II I R < INml lAAamoarsOnry) M \TIN:F. TO-DAV AT s.aa r.M TONICillT AM) lOMOHOU MGHT AT I 18 CARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA" m Technicolor Starring DICK IIAVMES . VERA-EIXEN CESAR ROMERO CELESTE HOLM Also I hiIrtlinii'olur Short J%.*MH'A' l*LAZi\ Thenirr-Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) i M ro-Moaaon .oi Ma I I Mi A PABAMOt-MT TMRILLING t>PAM NO MAN 01 HER OWN rHatiaI •" I* IHOMINBI •' *Pril P'*a'"* HrROMAN %  Bins CMOSBV nraTH VALIFV BtNacBt" Kn. M.M %  \r-;, %  <,ili-.QN Btl t OF ST <* %  %  PLAZA Tan—ri QHTlH [DIAL 8404) i *••!• Daaklri Zana d*. %  THUNDER MOUNTAIN Tim Holt .UIONirt: lh oinmi L*> UOBIFI a Bowra* BOYS NOFI H ALLST" aad ..Ui; I V— [THE OAgOfrfJ ST. JAMS lODtr m TO-SJOBBOfT • at Si iri> RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL A DEATH VALLEY RANGERS %  Ilk i-n, "F.i KrM4TN4BD — RMI OnMON '. % % %  I I III' M %  *> .1 KM K IBATAAN vlia I-hB SUM -IT mm Mii'Mir n..fi.. \lflA\KInr O HABA -rvn Mi H.. SAn.OBI it.. bT lrfn><" >>i rim: Last Two Shows Today 4 45 A t.St pat. Farfwrll lo Vrstrrdiy AU'NG WITH THE .->HORT The Magnetic TMr HO AY Last Two Show* Todi* IMA IlSpm. Republic Smashing Double John Wayne and John Carroll In "MING TIGERS and • FIGHTING SEAFEES with ROYAL Last Two Shown' Taday Ltt at S.3S p m Esgls Lien Double T-MEN and "THE COBRA STRIKES Wiih Sncila PYAN and Rlch.ird FRAZER OLYMPIC Last Two Shew* Today 4 30 & 8 15 pm. Rrpublit TrThole Sarial GHOST OF /ORRO" Starring Clayton MOORE Pansaia BLAKE >uh Roy BARCROFT and George J LFW1S II IflVfYf. // f 1 ~ i I 1"'*' 1 H .. 1. Anidaaa. ool iSt M Companion ot ttie Bath<*> 11 Cupf. IS) IJ WltDaaaed. oowadaia. at WcmDiay. 13. Her* you Dava a gnoat. ifl) M. Fancy Us in Dadrn-Railni. (4| IS 1*^ in Here Xo: drliiKini |"i-f (41 17 IM. Dt tit'l. i7) in. Incbra on th* mov* tftl 12. TUr ua" ot vrrarliv. (SI 111. MrmilnBlV BSiilnat por(i!r. IS) •%• KuiargB in ducoune. IUI iaara 1. The iltlla doiu leaOi ih* Homaacrvtars io oo-uu-tiim. mi B. Ubvioualv nu full -idr ani uiull -in t*n rov. 5i 4. Tha liona arn nil up I (6) ii. snen a criiiir U no u* underK JUIlU. (4) t that Hlisaii'n plpr Into unorl order. a>.ilng matariai. m IS. Allowance o( aorta. I4i JC. DirOrult ponlimo t,i n.pu m. IS) 3t. SStaa. fl) AalUtmn of *>l"rtT r % %  %  GLOBE THEATRE I MI-.MII. — Vrt*eatH IO-MI1 :• LADIES NITE J I-EATORINO Thhi AIL 1.IM s inhni atlas* s inglng Oloria Aihby Anita Small Olona Bentham -„ Lucille CrSlg Batty Taylor Laotta Bast WHO DO yOU KNOW IN HEAVEN*' "I'LL OET BY •IT YOU WERE THE ONLY BOY" "THE TENNES8E WALTZ*' MY FOOLISH HFART "OOODNITE WHEREVER YOU ARE"' GUEST STAR THE LIL* MAN WITH THE HORN LEROY ALLBYNE—8 year old Trnmpetfr Playing Bop. Ooe* My Heart, Our Vary Own. Criekst Lovsly Orickat, Chaunooga Shoe Shine SPECIAL AO.MISSIOX I'HICICS Ladiev will be admitted to Houae Section TONITE for 1/and to Balcony far 30e. Free lovely balloon* from Ohaae'a ittoTe will be given away to flic FIRST 500 LADIES USUAL ADMISSION PRICES FOR GENTS PICTURE f, a 8 30 P.M. TO-DAY .'.'.%'^^',%WM^^^^'^^'^^^VJ^t^sVi '.VV/,WAW. rosiri\>;i.v .\o many youi, ... %  ii ,-,,.,i;u I'd b, ail wiih Ik. IS AGREEMENT THAT THIS FILM BHOL'LD BE SHOWN ARE . H'dos Board ol Film Onsora Dirtc-tor ..I M'dlral vivnf, Doctors and olhrrv lao Tiumi-rniis lo nolit ion %  social cwostta mnwiitw' prrunM THE STORY OP SU1Y ALL-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST! IIM.I I PLAYING FROM I mini 9TII II miifilI. I.'t p.m. PLAZA Mas H.:IO P .„,. '"' d ronlinuinc Dally. II IJVeiV 36 in. EASTER Tootal LomHa. Robia iDress Assortment ystav , miMd I Cordrosa" fii:e drapinci corded crepe lnvictaray Slipper Satin, MAROCA1N, ii EVA1VS & Dial 4606 Printed rayon — white grounds White [M vvhuii.idi) i 5 NEW SHADES. WHITFIELDS Dial 4220 I ti-itif/hl visit MORGAN The most Bri wtth a tn nfiful Night Club from 'ld-irlde r(?paiatton foi Miami to Rio flood food Music, Dancing Entertainment throughout the night Dial 4000 for reservationi THE MURRAY'S MILK STOUT STOUTEST OF ALL STOUTS HARDWOOD CHAIRS oxi.v .S.s.70 KAIH. AN ITIM YOU HAVC UtN WAITING f0 STRENGTHENING TO THE LAST DROP lli>vii,l,;l by tinFaculty FRESH STOCKS ARRIVED RECENTLY %  III IIAUII \IIOS CO-OPERATIVE IOTTOX I 1IIIMI1 LTD. MAWIMi A CO.. LTD. %a-nl



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATr. WEDNESDAY. MABCU J, 1951 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON v MICKEY MOUSE WALT DISNEY -vCU ME ... : \\-\9 SYTTEN B-U T-S PSACT.V T:J-TZM r_V.. 4N9 I MEAIK? T-EST, vve A -re u HE.P MB '. -^ ^ BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG *fcfc-.?-. "*i If THE LONE RANGER FRANK STRIKER Im 5 NO LONGER XY NEED TO*-J WEAR TONTO'5 CLOTHES. GOOD T*N I HAD A 3BARE OUTFIT NOW TORTtC JAILBREAK 1 COME ON.SILVIR! THE GAMBOLS ftf-OK? 4JAP f> 1 ftOV Wt iBLS "" "KTut 0T I MANOSOrVlfc eCiCOL Msweteprj *<&> 0 VOTf-0 Ul*> MOT UKrLY TO-OAV OAVIyouo OlO H-AJntr vM I'Vf Ai-0 MlM TO *Qt TQ OiWtJf-BL RAtMM. A *. •* t •H* 9 Attf> SO*** O BY BARRY APPLEBY ..v wLAOTI Irfr '•~>~ 9U-.Y AflfrN'T 6A 't I'V*ril-AffOJ ft) AAUCM Aftout voiir-^ "^=r~v—rTri %  • %  ~i BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS AATI I.H 6EE Bv TUB WAV TMlM$t> AWGON'-THSH ^ nXoH HO£l TCMT-THI6 PQDCWAM EM3S N A CO*LCOFM,*JTE4' I WUtfT MOLP '-*-" Mtfc'T** j AT TVJffOCElCe IVSPp6TFOD rTMBy Q*v O-^Ci >v GUT 'TLNA*ON 9 f A BACKT LOOK* At> IP I'taJGC a y ErRIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND / Heff5TM£plrcM...KMy%l*mN ) —1 KX tirTTK..B ittrexxamtr' %  ,aRAl0MTHlfcjTO! /^ JCCWVSN! rvf u .^ no CA! rvsar AKTTfM 1** &t7TAiyTCA4^l l -HT)N'! THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES IJEV.-JM^.TMATI. * %  > faEN TikESWEB THE OWBOt' fcs^=q d erm BLA2IW PLANE' FlAMESiRE4PBEAWH6F*STTHE PlAME'll lOT0t>E,4NV MOMENT/V ^4 MOVci' GLAMOROUS YOU! Society \ meat beautiful women the world over rely on Pond'*, Fere P'.wdcr te i-nluiicr Ihnr level! new Follow their IM4 and mr "i at a dirlrrriKi1I11nsiil hadr ol fare pw^drr ran make U. yr < ..I.M-I'M" haw wondrrfullv ..n and drar It can look s.K-.l throwh th.1. nf-1 -.Ik I'c.ii.i Firf Powdrr fat a* flnrly l< klurrd aa powder ean be J* It ice* • %  with evlra special %  moMh nem and rlln(i ftw houn Panda Fare Powder is drlicateU i'. r i ui.i.-ii and romei tn an adorable OreamBower Box Voull find •1 at all the beat beauty counter* POND'S Itch Germs Killed in 7 Minutes Yearahta % %  aaarly to mllUon liny Mrn* and ooraa wtwr> frnm N* *d cu—irtkla liaMwf. Crachla*. %  "•"•? !" ***' Botelaa. Am*. RlnawKf" PooHaaia, %  Bafe*Bam, Pim*A '•<>* "' h •"* *' tnMiii Ordlaary uatTn*ni* aiv> ml* if^S >ni. S-~ 1. > a im' --f' %  r* Mhfm TrpaklPS irtakU. .' l 0^> MCaT POWDER l\ () LOVELY SHADES j 1 u^ # smooth, ^^ : / •NT / A shake of Vim, a quick rub with a damp cloth, and surface* arc spotlessly clean and bright. Vim cleans so thoroughly —smoothly—easily. %#||U| cleans everything, W I Ivl smoothly and speedily 1 Learn from the hospital. Whenever infection threatens in your home, use DETTOL' pM+nmt . Xm-pmitmrnt />*•/ Pam . Dttim'l Java Suffering from \l the tint %  !( %¡ of discomfort artaf meal*, tuck rwo ROUUM, one after he other. Their faM-atung blend of inucid ingredient* speedily concert •tidily and remove* the rauie of pain. Never be wrihoui Reruues if yuu're Ttooe 10 arid a rorn a ch It'i to eaty :o carry a few in your pocket or nandbag, for each one ii separately %  rapped. If they don't help you, lien it's high time you uw your doctor. All chemists sell Renniea•^ DIGESTIF PENNIES HO SPOOX. NO All.H .. Sot* Aaw Uaawaal. ARE YOU More Irritable These Days? H11 the "wear•and-tear" of a aoda tu living—with ita daily struggle to make enda meet deopite ahnrtagea and "high pricoa"—lnjgun to wear on your sanaa? Do you feel you're not getting enough reat—and fe*l ao edgy half too time, you can't emuy life any more? Wall, you can't help the unhappy coodition of the world —but you can htip yournrtl'. Bacauee tbouanndii of Canadian man and women any they find they take thee* worriea in Ihdr itride -after taking Dr Chaaw'a Nerve Food for a while Thie wall-known tonic which contains Vitamin Hi, iron anil other needed rmn< r.il-helpa build up your vitahly and atda In toning up your wholaayalain. Get Dr Chese'a Naree Food today! See if you don't rear fceffer. eat oettrr, frt orUVr. The name "Dr. Chaae" ia your aaaurance. The large "eoonurny aiaa" ia your beat buy, 11 J Mi fit fP/nni'il KISOIMM TABLETS atlSOUOL POWDER HI--1 H \i 1 n MAGNESIA Powder dr TaMfta IIVOVAI EFHAZONE TABLETS DODDS PILLS TEASTVITE TABLETS C CARLTON BROWNE SACROOL Mi 1'an Congutr tfimrs mist SAVHOOL in on .*/• 11I kMt.lllS LTD. and all other Drug Storss