Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Barbados

re eetsteeeeessseensenensnssenesesnsstenseseansenneshnioeenesieenennent

ESTABLISHED 1895





Bidault Invited To

Form New French Govt.

PARIS, MARCH 1. |
PRESIDENT VINCENT AURIOL to-day asked

Ex-Premier Georges Bidault to try to form a.
new French Government.

Bidault, popular Republican leader, told him
he would consult leaders of the political parties and |
give him his reply to-morrow.

If Bidault fails the President

: : \ will then ask a Socialist to try
probably Paul Ramad who!
Ike Flies To was Premier in 1947. “should j

a

London

LONDON, March 1.
General Eisenhower, Atlantic
Pact Supreme Commander, flew
here from Paris to-day for inform-
al talks with British Chiefs of
Staff.
a was flying back to Paris to-
night.
he object of his visit was
understood to be discussions on
the formation of Commands in
northern and southern Europe to
take the place of old regional
groups. The Western Union area
was also being discussed.
British Chiefs of Staff were hav-
ing lunch with Eisenhower.
British Chiefs of Staff discussed
with the Cabinet to-day the
ground they would cover in their
talks with General Eisenhower.
The Cabinet also talked again
about the proposed appointment
of an American Admiral as su-
preme commander of the Atlantic
Pact navies, which caused protests
from Winston Churchill and many
other members of Parliament.
The Government will organise
a full muster of its supporters in
the Commons next Wednesday be-
cause Conservatives decided to
force a vote on this question.
' —Reuter,

U.S. Restrict
Exports To Russia

WASHINGTON, March, 1.

The United States Commerce
Department to-day placed con-
trols on non-strategic American
exports to Russia and Soviet bloc
countries,

Exports of strategic nature to
these countries have been con-
trolled fer some time. To-day’s
order, effective to-morraw, re-
quires exporters to obtain licences
for such npn-strategic goods as
sausage skins and certain types
of machinery.

Books, magazines, processed.
films and ships stores were ex-
empted.

The order formally renewed
controls on the exports of ail
types of goods to Communist
China, Manchuria and North
Korea,

The Commerce Department said
that although the current volume
of exports to these countries was
small, the order would “prevent
or limit any shipment which
might be contrary to national in-

terest.”



LS

The volume and value of United
States exports to Russia and east-
ern Europe have dropped sharply
in the past three years.

—Reuter.

‘dominantly Christian Denwecrat,

he also fail the President would|
no doubt again turn to outgoing:
Premier Rene Pleven,

It is suggested that the new)
Government should get ready to
hold general elections late in May
or early in June.

Pleven to-day refused to attempt
to form a new French Cabinet.

Pleven who looked tired and
ill, told reporters so after a 20
minutes’ interview with President
Auriol.

—Reuter.



Gasperi’s Cabinet
Faces Major Revolt

ROME, March 1.

Premier Alcide De Gasperi’s
sixth post-war Cabinet faced a
crisis tonight with a major revolt
against certain aspects of its
policy by the majority of the
Christian Democratic Party.

After a surprise defeat in the
technical vote in the Chamber of
Deputies last night the Govern-
ment was able to rally a majority
of only 16 votes in a _ parlia-
mentary vote to-day.

Voting on the law to increase
the Government’s economic pow-
ers a large section of 305, Christian
Democratic deputies in a Chamber
of 574 members, voted with Com-
munists and extreme leftwing
Socialists against Government.

It was thought possible that De
Gasperi would resign to-night. |

Immediately after the vote De!
Gasperi called a meeting of Min-{

isters. It was understood that
several ministers favoured im-
mediate resignation in order to

face the revolting Christian
Democrats with their résponsibil-
ities.

They thought that the Demo-
crats were so split among them-
selves that they were unable to
prevent the formation of a new

cabinet on lines similar to the
present one.

De Gasperi. formed his .Goy-
ernment in January 1950. Pre-

also includes some ‘Republicans
and Socialists.—Reuter.

REDS HOLD UP

DANISH TRAWLER

COPENHAGEN, March 1.

A Danish trawler is believed to
have been detained by Soviet
authorties in the Baltic, official
Danish naval sources said here to-
day.

The trawler Capella with a crew
of four was last heard of on Feb-
ruary 25, when another trawler
picked up a message to this effect.

—Reuter.







Big Three Receive Soviet

and
military force in existence in Ger-

Reply To Western Note

MOSCOW, March 1.
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko to-day
handed to Big Three Western Ambassadors, the Soviet reply
to western notes of February 19,
Gromyko received Sir David Kelly, British Ambassador
Admiral Alan Kirk, United States Ambassador and Yves

Chataigneau, French Ambassador at the Soviet Foreigr
Ministry.


































——_——— The British Foreign Office has
W. 4 . received a Soviet reply to West-
atchman’s House

ern notes on Four Power talks and
Burnt In Grenada

was to-day studying it.
Russia has agreed to the pre-
liminary Four Power Talks begin-
From Our Own Correspondent
GRENADA, March 1.
Governor Arundel] leaves Eng-

ning at Paris on March 5, the

Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister

Gromyko told Western Powers’

representatives here to-day.

land to-morrow by air accompanied

by E. W. Barltrop, Labour Adviser

to the Secretary of State for the

Colonies, They are due on Sunday,
The only violence last night was

the burning of the watchman’s

house at Dougaldston Estate by

four masked men while from

country districts came reports of

smallscale picketing and a measure

of intimidation of cocoa pickers

in the St. Andrews area.

Informed sources said Gromyko
had told three western ambassa-
dors that his Government had
appointed a 17-man delegation t
attend the talks. :

State Department officials at
Washington to-day expressed the
hope that Russia’s assent to the
preliminary four power talks in
Paris would lead to a quick agree-
ment on the agenda to be submit-
ted to a formal meeting of Big
Four Foreign Ministers.

Muchael McDermott, a State De-
partment spokesman said the text
of the Russian note had not been
received in Washington. He de-
clined therefore to make any com-
ment.

On the basis of Press reports
however, officials were obviously
pleased that the long period of un-
certainty had been ended and that
Russia had agreed to a meeting
of Foreign Ministers’ Deptities.

President Truman at his weekly
Press Conference this morning
said he would not comment on
Press reports because he had not
been officially informed about
Russia's latest note.

Andrei Gromyko and two other
Soviet Deputy Foreign Ministers
to-day, applied for French visas to
attend_next week's Four Power
Conference in Paris,

It igs now felt certain that inci-
dents of violence may not be at-
tributable to the strikers, The
Manual and Mental Workers’
Union executives yesterday car-
ried out Gairy’s instructions and
advice to desist violence and acts
of intimidation.



Double Conception

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jca. March 1.

A strange double conception
occurred recently at the Kingston
Sanitarium. A woman who had *
baby in August last year and ap-
peared fully recovered found her-
self in labour pains a few days
ago. She delivered another baby
on Friday, six months after the

birth of the first child. Seventeen delegates applied at

The first baby was an eight- " P
months boy, and weighed three Sais ee ener eee to-day for
pounds, the second is a robust Ne P

Named as the first and second
Secretaries of the delegation were
Karp Starkov, previously the first
Secretary at the Paris Embassy,
and Vladmier Lavrov. Two At
taches were named—Serge Doro-
witbjcheev and Viacheslab Popov.

| Reuter.

seven pounds baby girl and the
doctor’s report “everybody doing
weil.”

Local medical opinion is that the
woman had a double uterus and
coneeived while pregnant
the first child.



Britain Rejects
Czech Charges

LONDON, March 1.



3ritain has rejected as. “un-
founded” allegations made in
Czechoslovakia on February 7 that



Britain was reviving German mili-
tarism and aggressiveness.

In a note published today and
handed to the Czech Embassy in
London yesterday, the British
Government expressed hope that
in view. of the Czech government’s
desire for world peace it would
“urge upon the Soviet Govern.
ment the need for a change in
Soviet policy which would make
possible the lessening of interna-
tional tension.”

The British Government “have
no doubt that the Czech people
view with apprehension the. vast
forces which the Soviet Union
maintains both in her own terri-

tory and abroad and the attitude
of hostility which she has adopted

towards the free people of Europe

with which Czechoslovakia form-
erly had such close relations’, the
note added

“The Soviet Government has
been establishing in its zones of

occupation in Germany in viola-
tion of the Potsdam agreement, a
German

military force which is
being trained in the use of tanks
artillery—the only German

ny today.”’—Reuter.



Dockers’ Union
Records Seized

WELLINGTON, March 11.
Government agents today walk-

ed into offices of the striking New

Zealand Waterside Workers’ Union

and seized its records and cash,

books. Agents who were from the
Public Trust, a State Organisation

dealing with estates of deceased
persons, told Union officials -that
similar action was being taken

throughout New Zealand.

Their action came 24 hours after
Labovr Minister Williarn Sulli-
van's order to deregister the union
as part of the Government's eam-
paign to bresk the 11-day-old
strike for six shillings an hour pay
against the employers’ limit of
four shillings and seven pence
Talfpenny

By deregistering the Minister
nvited formation of a new union.

Observers believed Government
ienis would find only a few shil-
lings in the union bank account.
In Auckland a meeting of dock-
ars decided to fight on for in-
creases.—Reuter.



TRUMAN TRUSTS

WILSON

WASHINGTON, March 1.

President Truman said to-day
that Charles E, Wilson, Director
of National Defence Mobilisation,
still had his complete confidence
despite the rift between trade
urions and Wilson’s organisation
yesterday.

Truman at
conference

his weekly

repeatedly refused

however to comment on the de-
Union

cision. yesterday of Trade
leaders to withdraw its representa-
tives from all mobilization and
wage stabilisation Committees
the Government. Asked if
thought Labour would
to meet the country’s
defence, Truman did
directly but reiterated his declara-
tion of national emergency,
—Reuter.

By RONALD PRESTON

BELGRADE, Feb, 28

me that Yugoslavia

lites on her borders,

the fighting c
gary, Rumar

pabilities of
and Bulgaria.












is concerned I repe
already said—that if t
us alone this would no
any special difficulty
Asked t he tt



for ui

he
continue
needs for

Marshal Joseph Tite, in an ex-
clusive interview here today, told
would have
“no special difficulty” in resisting
a combined attack of Soviet satel-

He was replying to a question on
Hun-

The Marshal stressed the im-
pottance of the “political, psycho-
logical and moral.preparations of
a nation,” in this respect, dec
ing: “I do ik they have
and their people do not
war, As far as their f



attacked

represent





FRIDAY, MARCH :

1951

CENTURY STROKE

CLYDE WALCOTT reaches 100 with a cut off Skeete for 4.

U.N. Forward Units

Gain Ground In Korea

*® TOKYO, March 1,

Forward units of Unitéd Nations troops gained ground
in central Korea to-day, airdrops supplying them with food

and ammunition in slushy mo
American “flying boxears” |

in passes.
pped 215 tons so that the

offensive could go on even though all ground transport was

bogged down.

Armoured Division
Will Reinforce Ike’s
German Command
WASHINGTON, March 1,
An armoured division will be

the first of four additional Amer-
ican divisions to reinforce Gen-

eral Eisenhower’s west Europe
command, it was reported here
to-day.

The report gained strength with
the announcement that the First
Armoured Division would be re-

organised at Fort Hood Texas,

The Second Armoured Division
has been training there and indi-
cations were that it would go”
Europe.

The reorganisation of the First
Armcured Division will give the
United States 12 regular divisions

Three are at home, six with the
regiment of the 11th Airborne
Division in Korea, The first
Infantry Divisian has been in
Germany since the war.

The remainder of the
borhe is in the

lith Air-
United States
—Reuter.

Churchill Canicels
Engagements



Winston Churchill, who is
nearly 77, has cancelled his pub-
lic engagemenis.

Quarters close to the Conser-
vative leader say he is suffering
from boils on fis neck.

He is having treatment
resting for
advice of

and is
a few
his

days
doctors,

on

—Keuter.



| Ralph Wins Light

Heavy Crown

KID RALPH smiled broadly
last night when Mr. E. D. Mottley
ouekled on the belt donated by
; Messrs DaCosta & Co. after he
jseored a technical knockout over
Kid Francis at the Yankee Sta-
dium. Francis failed t6 come out
in round nine. This victory has
made Ralph the _ light-heavy
weight champion of Barbados,

About 3,000 boxing fans attend-

Press/ed the fight which was to have

been of ten rounds duration, At
the weigh-in Ralph tipped the
scales at. 161 pounds and Kid

Francis, the shorter, 168 pounds,
In the semi-finals Hal Williams

of | knocked out Sam King in the sixth

‘round of their eight-round fight.
Both boys thrilled the crowd as

they started out from beginning
attacking each other with long

not reply | jefts and rights.
Belfield Kid also scored a

knockout over Victor Lovell in the
preliminary.

|
LONDON, March 1.

the

Lord

Moran and Sir Thomas Dunhill.
He has cancelled engagements
for next Monday and Tuesday.

British Commonwealth troops

advanced one mile and captured

a hill three miles southeast of
Yongduri. South Koreans cap-
tured another hill.

of
vital central route to

Yongduri is 15 miles southwest
ongehon which controls the

the 38th

Parallel,

Ameritan marines fought bit-

ter hand to hand battles with
stubborn North Koreans just
west of the key—mountain pass

town Hoengsong.

On the extreme right flank of

the offensive Americans occupied

Amidong,

11 miles north of
Pyongehang- and about 30 miles

south 6f thé 38th Parallel,

fap retoat ~ynsue
central

desperately to this area,

tion that United Nations men had
come up against main Communist
defence positions,

B. Ridgway, 8th Army Command-
er threw patrols across the Han

River east of -Seoul. All but
ene returned under fire from
Communist defences,

—Reuter,







PRICE: FIVE CENTS



aleott Saves ‘The

Pre, Postwar |
German Debts!

Recognised

BONN, March 1,

Allies and West Germany to-
dey agreed on West Germany's
declaration, recognising pre ane
postwar German debts, a German
spcekesman said here to-night.

The declaration which hud to
be made before the Occupation
Statute could be revised, woul
probably be handed over to the
Allied High Commission on Mon -
day. he said.

West Germaniy is likely to have
a Foreign Ministry atout the
middle of next week, allied offi-
clals said to-night. Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer is expected t
be the first Foreign Minister

The revision of the Occupation
Statute, besides allowing West
Germany to have the Foreigr
Ministry and Ambassadors abroad
will give her greater legislative
and economic powers.

Debate on the agreement which
has been delayed for months, was
reached at a meeting here this
afternoon between High Commis-
sioners, financial advisers and
Dr. Herbert Dittman of the West
German Chancellery

West Germans must also form-
ally pledge themselves to share
equitably, raw materials for de-
fence. Officials say however, that
this document is ready.—Reuter.



Ben Gurion
Refuses To
Form New Govt.

TEL-A-VIV, March 1

: ; Israel's out-going Premiet
Sherl fierve tussles at close/David Ben Gurion has refused to
uarterts went on all day west of form a new Government declar-
oengsong which was the base|ing that a general election is

sul
counter offensive, The
Cloommunists have been clinching

But there was still no indica-

In the west, General Matthew



Bevin Attends
Cabinet Meeting

LONDON, March 1.

Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin,
attended to-day a meeting of the
British Cabinet for the first time
since the middle of January
when he became seriously ill with
pneumonia,

Although the Minister is

have recovered from his ill-
ness, his return to London last
night from the seaside coincided
with the House of Lords debate in
which peers of all parties said he
should give up his job if not in
full health.

Similar opinions have been ex-
pressed by some Government sup-
porters as well as Opposition, mem
bers in the House of Commons

Political quarters were to-day
asking how long Prime Minister

said
to



Attlee can delay making some
decision that will insure contin
uity on the conduct of Foreign

Affairs at top level.—Reuter.



BELGIAN WORKERS
STRIKE OVER PAY

BRUSSELS, March 1
Tram services in Charleroi
mining and industrial centre in
southern Belgium, stopped to-day
when workers struck for more
pay Tramwaymen in_ holiday
resorts along the Belgian North
Sea coast last night decided to
stage a four-day strike if their
wages are not raised parallel to

the official cost'of living index.

—Reuter



AGAINST SOVIET SATELLITES

military capabilities if they were whether in the event of a Soviet

joined by “volunteers” on the
Korean model, the Marshal re-
plied: “That is another thing. This
would mean a direct attack by the
Soviet Union Today regular
armies are given different names
in Cominform propaganda, They
are called volunteers.”

Marshal Tito, looking fit and re-
laxed in a dark suit with a white
shirt and red tie, answered my

- questions for one hour over cups

of coffee and wine
We were seated around a table

at one end of his 60-foot long
workroom in his villa in the fash-
ionable Belgrade suburb of
Dedinje

Superior Forces

supported attack against his coun-
try he would be able to resist as
he did during the Second World
War against vastly superior
forces.

“We hope this will not happen,
but if it did, it would not be our
fault. People here are of course
ready to fight, and will permit no-
body to enslave us.”

Question: “What is
of the strength of
army if it is used for
purposes outside Russia

your opinion
the Soviet
aggressive



Answer: I know that the Soviet
Army fought extraordinarily well
in the liberation war. But I can

that there is a great difference

Chinese|the only solution















to. Israel’s

crisis,

In a letter to President Chaim
Weizmann, he said that if parties
which overthrew the Government
were unable to form another
Government, his out-going four
party Cabinet would continue in
office until the election,

He accused religious parties
which brought the Government
down by voting against its
gious education policy two weeks
ago, of masking “Secular de
mands” under religious

President Weizmann had warn
ed Ben Gurion that an election
‘could cause serious harm to the
stability of the state.”

—Reuter,



U.S. Railwaymen
Get Wage Increase.

WASHINGTON, March, 1.

United States railways to-day
gave a pay increase of 12 and a
half cents an hour to 1,000,000
workers and pledged a cost of
living adjustment every three
months.

The agreement which applies
only to 15 non-operative Unions
(those not actually running
frains) will cost companies about
$280,000,000 per year,

The settlement has no direct
bearing on the big railway wages
dispute with four operating
Workers’ Unions covering shunt-
ers, drivers and firemen who have
staged a number of recent strikes

—Reuter



W. GERMAN TRADE
TALKS END

FRANKFURT, March 1

proportions,
—Reuter.



Yugoslavia Can Defend Herself

pose of enslavement and a wat
which is fought to preserve in-
dependence.”

“Naturally, this would have

rather a strong influence upon the
Soviet army.”

there was
the near

Asked if he thought
any danger of war in
futtire, the Marshal replied: “I
cah only say that it need not be,
but on the other hand the situation
is such today that there exists that
possibility and we must be cau-
tious.

Asked if he would welcome a
fotiial guarantee from the West-
ern powers in addition to verbal





statements already given concern-
in@ Western aid to Yugoslavia in
case, of an attack | the Soviet
bloe, Marshal Tito said he had
nothing nst thi nh principle

t ‘ I need for it at

Reuter

Day For Barbados

Trinidad 494:

B’dos 270/4

By O. S. COPPIN

(CLYDE WALCOTT, the youngest Barbadian ever

to captain a Barbados team, scored 126 not out
yesterday and was associated in an unbroken fifth
wicket partnership of 165 with Denis Atkinson (64

reli-|
| provided

colours. |

not out) in Barbados’ first inni
PWetrinidaa’s 494 at

4 in reply

s total of 270 for
end Of the third

day of play in the second Barbados-Trinidad Test

at Kensington yesterday.

All-German

Polls Wanted |

—ADENAUER

BONN, March 1

West German Chancellor Kon-
rad Adenauer is expected to ask
1 special session of Parliament to
support an apptoach to “Big
Four” powers for all-German elec-
tions

It was announced today that
Parliament will meet next week
to hear the Government declara-
tion on German unity,

Observers think the appeal
would ask the Big Four to spon-
sor such elections at their expect-
ed Foreign Ministers Conference,

The appeal was first proposed
by Opposition leader Kurt Sehu-
macher,

The appeal would, in the opinion
of West German politicians, wrest
the initiative on unity from East
Germany

Political observers here expect-

ed Adenauer would announce
these conditions for all-German
unity.

One, freedom of opinion and re
ligion, and freedom for all poli-
tical parties.

Two, release of all politica)
prisoners and the closing of con-
centration camps

Three, suspension of Bast Ger-
many’'s “law for the protection of
peace”, , Reuter,





France Expects
‘Super’ Airport Soon

PARIS, March 1,

The super airport for Paris,
with hotels, shops and a “city of
the air’ for employees has left
the blueprint stage according to
Marshall Plan authorities here

The realisation of the plan 40
extend Orly airfield will be
finaneed by 500,000,000 francs in
Marshal! Plan counterpart funds
as a Joan to. airport
authorities,

The “greater Orly” project will
involve expxopriation of 550 small
houses in an adjoining village to
double. the airport’s present Area
There will also be an inerease of
maintenance facilities and hangar

The wicket was still firm and
weather conditions ideal when
Trinidad resumed thetr first in-
nings which stood at 488 for 8
They added 6 ruts for the loss of
the two remaining wickets; Fer-
guson who was not out 84 being
responsible for the six additional
runs.

Barbados started
with but 30 runs on the tins,
Hunte, one of the openers was
out and when nineteen runs later
Everton Weekes, one cf the ac-
cepted pillars of strength of Bar-
bados, was also sent back to the
pavilion for four runs,

When Roy Marshall after the
luncheon interval was also dis-
missed for a well played 52, but
with the Barbados’ total at 89 for
3, things looked black for Barba-
dos, Charlie Taylor’s dismissal for
6 left the score at 105 for 4

shakily when

Good Stand

It was here that Clyde Walcott
the best Barbados batsman of the
tournament and one of the most
onsistent to date, became asso-
iated with Denis Atkinson in a
ifth wicket partnership that has
o far added 165 runs to the score

This pair batted with a prim
letermination that was net reflect-
ed in their scoring strokes nor in
he excellence of their batsman-
hip, but fa the great care which
hey took to it for the loose one
ind to ferret out the gaps in the
ield,



The Trinidad fielding was good
or the most part and -although

here ip sapnaaly anyone Worth
articular ition T think that
Sampath, Butler and Andy Gan-

eaume should receive’ specinl
mention,
With Barbados having staged

such a reeovery there is little hope
that the game will not end in a
tame draw. Legall on his first
suting in intereolonial cricket be-
hind the stumps was very impres-
sive, catching the ball neatly and
always on the alert.

With his batting ability, he
should be a strong candidate for
second string wicketkeeper on the
West Indies team to tour Australia
later this year @ On page 8

i

The West German Centra!
Bank Council ended its two-day
jiscussions of the foreign trade
s0sition without raising the West
German bank rate, a West Ger-
man economic news agency re-
ported.

The Council met in a special

session to continue an exhaustive
review of credit problems whieh
have recently developed to crisis

spaee, and there will be perma- || |
nent terminal buildings to replace TELL THE ADVOCATE |
temporary structures | THE NEWS }
The plan will relegate De RING 3112 |
Eaprest airfield to a secondary | DAY OR NIGHT
|

—Reuter. |







we ent of a

gygarette eee

|
vine
weginning of is








i tragedy

Yet it would be idle to calculate the number of

a fires caused by carelessly discarded cigarettes,
because the habit will apparently persist despite
the serious loss of life and property resulting

from these outbreaks.

It is the work ot a few minutes to protec: your-
self from risk of loss through fire, by consulting
at your earliest opportunity the local agents of
Guardian Assurance Co. Ltd. And
tunity does not seém to present irself,

tad

it do so immediately. Fires don

much warning

Local Agents

$. P. MUSSON,

STREET P.¢

Ae o ..
UN oy b0. itd.

Box 227, Phor

oe
BROAD )
5 TN ada a

| eo ABIL BLL ST me: Peed i

ae’ 4

era

e
rn,








GE TWO

ADY HUTSON, widow of the
late Sir John Hutson left for
England vesterday by the Golfito

Changed Plans
M* and MRS LEWARD
C. WYKOFF of Cleveland
returned from Trinidad yesterday
by 5. Pad, in time to connect
with T CA's flight to Canada

to-morrow,. The Wykoffs who
intended ing the greater
part of holiday in Grenada,

changed their plans due to the
labour unrest in that colony and
went on to Trinidad.

S.P.C.A. Tag Day

~DAY is S.P.C.A. tag day.

Helping to collect money for
their fellow animals this morning
will be two Shetland ponies who
will collect» contributions around
the Barbados Mutual Life,
Assurance building.

Coincides

RS. A. A&A. GIBBONS, wife

of Dr. Gibbons, P.M.O..
St. James was among the pas-
sengers leaving for England
yesterday by the Golfito. She is
on a visit-¢o her relatives and
expects to“be away about four
months. Her visit to England
coincides with the Festival of
Britain.

Off To U.K.
’ R. W..E. THOMAS, Direc-
tor of Messrs. Stokes and
Bynoe Ltd., accompanied by his
wife left by the Golfito yesterday
to spend Your or five months in
England.

Canadian Trade

Commissioner
M* T. GRANT MAJOR,
Canadian Trade Commis-
sioner for the Eastern Caribbean
and the Guianas with headquar—
ters in Trinidad, was intransit by
the Colombie yesterday morning

ffom Guadeloupe where he had |

been on ‘ar‘official visit.

Mr. Grant Major who was in
Barbados some weeks ago, also
paid official visits to St. Kitts and
Antigua. He is now returning to
his headquarters.

Back to the Gold Coast
R. H. M. LUCIE-SMITH,
Comptroller of Customs in
the Gold Coast, left for England
by the Golfito yesterday evening
after spending a holiday here
with his brother Mr. D.
Lucie-Smith at Rockley .
Beautician Here
ISS JOAN McREE, personal
representative of the Eliza—
hh Arden Saloons in London,
land, arrived yesterday morn-
Stig by the Colombie.
'*She will be here for three
weeks staying at the Marine
‘Hotel.

* On to Grenada

MONG the passengers arriv-
’ ing here yesterday morning
by. the Colombie intransit for
-Grenada were Mr. T. H. Shill-
‘ingford and his sister Mrs.
Verdun Wallace who were
‘spending # holiday in Dominica.
*-Mr. Shifingford is Manager of
the Grenada Lime Factory and
‘Was proprietor of the Savoy
‘Hotel which was burnt out on
January 4,

‘First Visit to W.L

R. and MRS. WALTER
of TARRY of Rushden, North-
ants, arrived yesterday morning
by the Colombie from England
i their first visit to the West
-Indies. They are spending three
Weeks here and will beestaying
mt the Marine Hotel and Sam
‘Lord's Castle.

Mr. Tarry is a Director of the
Tecnic Shoe Co., Ltd. of Rush-
den, a company with which he
was associated for 30 years,
Prior to that, he was adviser to
William Green and Sons Ltd.
Shoe Manufacturers of England,

~BY THE WAY

By BEACHCOMBER
GUEPORTERS of Manchester's

Hallé Orchestra poured into
the Reyal Albert Hal} last night
swinging rattles and wearing soup-
plate-sized favours of the Hail
colours, '

It was a comparatively orderly
crowd, and the playing of “Bac-
chus and Ariane” was only twice
marred by the fans getting out of
hand.

Barbirolli played magnificently
in the second half, passing across
the strings to the first trombone to
score within the first minute’s
play. His defensive tactics, when
pressed by the first and second
violins during a quiet period in
“Song of Summer,” had the crowd
on their toes, '

There is rumour of an L.P.O.
transfer offer.

Clarifying the Issue

AS for the dummy, is a felt hat
worn during a song “a felt prop”?
Only if it squeaks when pinched,
say the spokesmen in touch with
authoritative Sunday Observance
circles. “Bit a felt hat pressed in-
to a comical shape is obviously
ne ee the mark. You can
sihg “Funiculi, Funicula,” the an-
them of the Tourist Funicular
Society, on a Sunday, but not in
clogs. Mine. Adenibide, the French
coloratura eee soprano, was
once arres! here for coming on
to the platform at a Sunday ioe

: es: umbrella,
a ae

LOCKNIT. 82¢
White & Pastels 90¢

Dial 4606

Carib C

THE “GAMBOLG



“Magnificent

This last Shipment at
old prices saves you 20¢



oliday
I NTRANSIT by the Colombie
from England yesterday

morning for Trinidad, was Dr.
Jesse Grell retired medical
practitioner of that colony.

Dr. Grell who is a brother of

rs. P. A. Lynch and Miss
Louise Grell of St. Lawrence,
spent about five months’ holiday
in the United Kingdom.

First Visit ;
AYING their first visit to Bar-
bados are Dr. and Mrs. Ben
Braun of Chicago. They arrived
yesterday morning by the
Colombie from Martinique where
they had spent six days. They
will now be here for another five
days before leaving for Trinidad.
Dr. and Mrs, Braun are stay-
ing at the Hotel Royal,

“Licked ”’

FTER spending a week in
Tobago and a weck in Trini-
dad, Mr. and Mrs. John M.
Sharpe returned yesterday by
B.W.1.A. in time to connect with
T.C.A’s flight to Canada to-
morrow morning. Prior to the
two weeks in Trinidad and Toba-
go, Mr, and Mrs. Sharpe spent
five weeks in Barbados at the

Paradise Beach Club,
In his Opinion says Mr, Sharpe,

Barbados has California and
Florida “licked,” it is so com-
pletely different,

Mr. Sharpe is President of

Electric Equipment Co,, Ltd., in
Saskatoon, who are in the whole-
sale electrical business,

Drilling Supt.
R. and Mrs. F. M. Crawford
and their son Allan arrived
from Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.1.A. to spend two weeks’

holiday at the Crane Hotel.

Mr. Crawford is a_ Drilling
Superintendent with U.B.O.T.

stationed in Point Fortin.

Here for a Month
I N BARBADOS for a month's

holiday are Mr. and Mrs.
Matthew Craig, who arrived from
Trinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. They are staying at the
Ocean View Hotel. Mr. Craig is
a Director of Walters’ Trinidad
Brewing €o,, in: Port-of-Spain, ~

For Barbados Holiday

M's JOAN LUM accompanied

by Mrs, Gabriel Alves of
Port4of-Spain arrived from Trini
dad yesterday morning by
B.W.LA. Mrs, Alves is here for
two months', Miss Lum is on three
weeks’ holiday. They are staying
with Mrs. D, King in Fontabelle.

From B.G,

M®*: J. DOS RAMOS, salesman

* of Alex Russell and Co, of
British Guiana, arrived by the
Colombie yesterday morning on a
short visit and is Staying at “Ac—
cra”, Rockley,







Automobile Engineering

R.
+ son of Mr. and Mrs. S. B
Bannister of “Thorsby” Pine Hill,
left yesterday for England by the



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

. ° mW |
Empire Girls Tour |
Europe At Tiny Cost
LONDON, Feb

Noreen Sexton of New South!
Wales.and Phoebe Craig of Sas-|

DENNIS BANNISTER, | xatoon, Canada, are preving the| can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 300

strength of commonwealth rela-|
tions. |

Arriving in London from wide- |

Golfite. He is going on a three or} !y-separated parts of the globe

four-year course
Engineering with the Humber Co.,
of Coventry.

With Barclays

in Automobile | withthe same idea in mind, the

22-year-old tourists met at a youth

hostel and decided. to team yp.
Both wanted to see as a
pessible of Britain and Eur on

R. and Mrs. R. G. Burrowes] a limited bank balance.

who have been in Barbados

Already they’ve worked in Lon-!

since December, 1949, left yester- | don, visited Ireland and Scotland

day by the Gelfito for England.

and spent nine weeks touring

Mr. Burrowes who was stationed {| france, Italy, Belgium, Holfafd
with Barclays Bank here has been] Switzerland and Germany ir

re-transferred .to their London
Branch.
Intransit

I NTRANSIT through Barbados

yesterday morning by B.W.1.A
from Trinidad for Antigua was
liis Grace Archbishop Finbar
Ryan, Catholic Archbishop of
Port-of-Spain. His visit to An-
tigua is in connection with the

ucksacks sporting the flags , of
Canada and Australia.

The girls saw the “passion play”
it Oberammergau, were given
eaflets for a proposed communist
strike in Germany and spent a
uight in a dosshouse in Berne.

They arrived in Berne when the
youth hostels had closed for the
season and it was the dosshouse
ar an expensive hotel, They chose

visit of the Statue of Our Lady | the dosshouse and their evening

of Fatima to that colony. The
statue arrived in Antigua a few
days ago.
Retired Civit Servant

l N Barbados for about tw

weeks’ holiday, is th
Hon’ble Austin Winston, retirec
Civil Servant of Dominica. H«

arrived yesterday morning by the},
Canad x

ian © er and is stay-
ing at ‘‘Allworth”, Cheapside.
With Cable and Wireless
ao spending a month’s holi-

day in Dominica, Mr, Cyril
Volney of Messrs. Cable anc
Wireless, returned yesterday
morning by the Colombie. He war
accompanied by his wife and three
children.

To be Married in

St. Kitts
M's HILDA MILNER oi Eng-
land, arrived here yesterday
morning by the Colombie en route
to St. Kitts where she will be
rrarried to Mr, Frank Gaw oi
Barclays Bank (D.C. and 0.)
En-route
R, A. STROUD, of the Gov-
ernment Printery in Grenada,
arrived here yesterday morning
by the Canadian Challenger in-
transit from Dominica where he
had spent a holiday.

Planter from Dominica
RK, VED HONHKYCHUKCH,
planter of Dominica, ar-

rived yesterday morning by tne
Canadian Challenger to spend a
holiday with his relatives, He is
a brotner of Mrs, Frank Colly-
more of Chelsea Road,

Holidaying For Six Months

m. i. K, REVS, son of Lr.

Reeves of Plymouth, Eng-
land, arrived here yesterday by
S.S. Colombie to spend six
months’ holiday with his grand-
mother, Mrs, C. B, Reeves of Bay
Street. Mr. Reeves who spent
four years in the R.A.F., is now
a farmer in South Devonshire.
His grandfather was a well known
shipwright in. Barbados and a
membér.of the. Vestry of St.
Michael.

Barrister Going Home

neal was a cup of cocoa and a
lish of bread-and~butter pudding
with raisins.

Kept Expenses Down ~

For the nine-weeks “a
Noreen and Phoebe allowed them-
elves £22 each and the outlay

ncluded souvenirs and postcards.
Now the girls are back in Bri-
in, working and saving for an-
%ther tour. This will take them

0 Spain, Portugal, Denmark,
3weden and Luxembourg. They
will call at Malta, cross to

Morocco, see Algiers and Tunisia
ind come back through Berlin.
They are allowing themselves
‘our to five months and £50

: On

arrival from _ Canada,
Phoebe had about £200, “and
that’s going pretty fast,” she

said. “When we come back next

‘ime, I'll really have to settle;

jown and save my fare home.”
—(C.P.)



|its Juniof Short Story Competition. The best story will be published



Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for








every Monday in The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The stories

words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate
Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesday every week.
NOTE: Stories must not be copied.
Send this coupon with your story.
JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION







Men’s Socks
Mauve And Purple

MEN’S socks in Victorian pur-
ple, awning red, and garter blue
will be all the rage this year.
Why?—It is Festival year,

The British Colour Council
suggested the new tones.

430 a.m. Take it from here, 7 a.m.
The News. 7.10 a.m. News Analysis,
7.15 a.m. From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m.
Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m. From the
Third Programme, 7.50 a.m. Interlude,
8 a.m. Kathleen Merritt String Orches-
tra, 8.45 a.m. Colonial Questions, 9 a.m.
The News. 9.10 a.m. Home News from
Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m,
Programme Parade, 11.25 a.m. Listenérs
Choice, 11.45 a.m, World Affairs, 12 noon
The News, 12.10 p.m, News Analysis,
22.46 p.m. Close Down,

4150.00 Pom. vee . 26.52 m,
———— ees
Bid m. BBC Northern Orchestra,
5 pee Canbiser of the Week, 5.15 p.m.
Let's Make Music, 6 p.m. Merchant Navy
Newsletter.
€00—7.15 p.m, ....

They decide a year in advance
what colours the fashionable
woman will wear,

. 31.92 & 48.43 m.

Said a council official: “This
Festival commemorates the 1951
Festival of Queen Victoria’s reign.
That suggests Victorian mauves
and purples.”

———$—$_———————————
6.15 p.m. Thinking about London, 6.35
6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m.
News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. West Indian
Diary, 7.37 p.m. Imterlude, 7.45 p.m.
‘on t Things.

bri ae ery a BL82 & 48.43 m.

p.m, Interlude,

Hosiery firms are concentrating
on the home market for men.

One has produced an all-wool
sock with nylon toe and heel
reinforcement, packed in a fancy
gold box with the Festival crest
on the lid,

7.45—11.00 p.m. ...

8 p.m, Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m
English Magazine, 845 p.m. Composer
of the Week, 9 p.m. World Affairs, 9.15
Let’s Make Music, 10 p.m, The
News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials,
10.15 p.m. Communism in Practice,
10.30 p.m. Melody on Strings, 10.45 p,m.
The Debate Continues, 11 p.m. Ring up
the Curtain.

pm.

—L.E.S.



GLOBE
Starting Today 35 & 8.30







PM



Randolph Carrington—*OUR

Malcolm Murray——“STERLA BY STARLIGHT”
Edwin Gilkes—“‘MY OWN DEAR LAND”
Fitz Harewood (Globe’s 1st Super Star)-—“OLE MAN RIVER”

MONG the intransit passen- GUEST STARS:—

wers arriving here on_ the
Colombie yesterday was Mr. Dud-
ley Johnson of Grenada who is
going onto his home island to
practise as a Barrister-at~Law. He
will sail on the Colombie to Trin-
idad, and reach Grenada by
plane. Mr, Johnson who was called
to the Bar in January this year
told Carib he had attended the
Holy Year celebrations in Rome
last August and had then visited
Switzerland.





PLAZA Thestrentridedewn (DIAL 2310)

TO-DAY (3 SHOWS) 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily

THIS...

HOPE

NEVER HAPPENED
to the WEST BEFORE.»

“also “THE FLY'S LAST FLIGHT



at 4.45 and 8,30 p.m.
B

LUCILLE

BALL

“FANCY PANTS”

Color by Technicolor
(Popeye the Sailor)

m





Mat, Saturday 3rd 9.30 a.m, and 1.30 p.m, (Monogram)

BELOW THE DEADLINE
Warren DOUGLAS

BADMEN OF TOMBSTONE

Barry SULLIVAN—Brod CRAWFORD

eee
OOOO aaa











PLAZA Theatre=OISTIN (DIAL 8404)

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW (only) 5
John WAYNE in

BACK 10 BATAAN

“Midnite Sat. ard (Monogram)
CODE OF THE SADDLE
Johnny Mack BROWN and
RIDERS OF THE DAWN

with JIMMY WAKELY






GAITETYW—(THe

FLYNN SMITH

Midnite Sat, 3rd Your Big
JOHNNY MACK

TO-DAY to SUNDAY 8.30 p.m.
Filmdom's Favourite Man of Action!

& 8.30 p.m.

& CRIMINAL COURT

with Tom CONWAY—Martha O'DRISCOLL

———————$—$— — $$ —
SUN, & MON, (only) 5 and 8.30.p.m,

R.K.Q. Radio Musical Hit!

Bing CROSBY—Ingrid BERGMAN in

BELLS OF ST. MARY'S

SSeS



GARDEN) ST. JAMES

Mat, Sun. 5 p.m.

in

“MONTANA”

Color yy Technicolor

Western Nite (Monogram)

BROWN in (Both)

_RAIDERS OF THE BORDER _& RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH



and

yd
Children

EVANS & WHITFIELDS .

Your Shoe Stores
HOURS of BUSINESS, Saturday MARCH 3rd

EVANS & WHITFIELDS will be OPEN ALL DAY (8 a.m.—4 p.m.)
having already closed for the Statutory half day on Thursday Mar. Ist,

Se ERB EB ERR ee ee
HERE Again... tobe “Snapped up”

SAMBA SPUNS
8 7 @ PER 36" YARD

New Range NIGHTIES
35.9 ge 4,95

Panties 3O¢/77¢

Dial 4220

a.

HAL HUNTE—“TENNESSEY WALTZ”

LEROY THOMAS—8 y



gEss

CLUB M

open at

For the entertainment of the passengers from the

S.S. MAURETANIA

and

Dinner

throughout the night
Dial 4000

For Dinner








THE APPEARANCE) OF

Compare OUR PRICES BEFORE

THE BARBADOS
COTTON FAC

Plus TONITE
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

Ernest Mottley, Jnr.—“’LL STRING ALONG WITH YOU”
Leroy Lorde—‘SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY”

ENHANCE

Lancastreum Floor Covering

RUGS 8 2.716 Me ies oe oe $6.13
OS PGR. ss sn pare Pees ed $7.36
9 ft. x 1016 ft, eet. eee ees $8.58
DO. Fhit 0 TAG. iss asa ees $9.81
CONTINUOUS ROLLS & CUT TO YOUR ORDER
3 mse 8 ek nace yd.
nn EE SEE .70c. yd
TREO ci Chaise bee $1.40 yd,
an Le $2.10 3a FRESH

Also—ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS TO SELECT FROM



“HOME COOKING”

HOPE |S HOME
COOKING
LAUGHS.

Paramount's Hilarious
Successor rs

Hag inertness
Newime tor \ "eee

WITH



YouR LIFE!’

WALTER WANGER
ROBERT IG ornsay

CUM
‘ MINGs ,



VERY OWN”

ear old Trumpet Player.
—_——er

f Songs by “BUTTONS
e AND BOWS.”
TUNESMITHS!
To-morrow 3 SHOWS To-day
night and continuing daily at 4.45

and 8.30 p.m.
Extra: (Popeye the Sailor).
“THE FLY’S LAST FLIGHT’

PLAZA

2.30—4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Bridgetown, (Dial 2310).

ORGAN
G6 p.m.

Dancing



—

Reservations



YOUR HOME WITH

PURCHASING ELSEWHERE

CO-OPERATIVE MANNING









FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951



AQUATIC CLUB

MATINEES: TO-DAY

and

TO-NIGHT TO SUNDAY NIGHT
F. Zanuck es ou

vr AMBER” in oh 2

» DARNE: Cornel WILDE—Richard GREENE
@th Century-Fox Picture

Darryl

Starring: Linda DARNELL—
and George SANDERS.

MONDAY and TUESDAY







CENEMA. (Members Only)

TO-MORROW
at 6.20

Technic



NIGHT at 8.30

M NEE: TUESDAY at 5 p.m
on Rex HARRISON— Maureen OHARA
in “FOXES OF HARROW”

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY NIGHT at 6.30
WEDNESD.

MATINEE AY

at 5 p.m

Dick HAYMES—Vera ELLEN—Cesar ROMERO

in “CARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA" in Technicolor.

BEAUTIFUL

CHRISTINE
GORDON

**Miss Jeffrey’s Beer”

TRINIDAD’S
LOVELY 1951

CARNIVAL
QUEEN

Appearing in Person

With a GALAXY OF TALENT

@ JUNE MAINGOT
Singer and Dancer
@ poROTHY
Queen’s Lady in Waiting

@ CLYDE RIVERS
Singer and Humourist
@ PETER PITTS
Singer and Dancer.
@ DAISY CREQUE
Mistress of the Ivories.

And popular LANDY DE MONTBRUN Master of Ceremonies

EMPIRE * SUNDAY, 4th March

THEATRE — 4.45 &

PICTURE:
PRICES:

TICKETS for Sunday can be

“GOODNIGHT SWEETHEART.”

MATINEE—Children 50c., Adults $1.00
NIGHT: Stalls and Box $1.50; House Baicony $1.00

BUY YOUR TICKETS IN

8,30

ADVANCE
bought at Empire Box Office

TO-DAY and TO-MORROW all day and on SUNDAY from

8 a.m. to 12 noon.

@ DOREEN MCKENZIE
Charming Singer



EMPIRE

To-day 2.30 and 8.30 and
Continuing:

Farewell
to

Yesterday

And also extra short.

| The Magnetic

Tide

ROXY

To-day only 4.30 and 8.15.
Universal Double Attrac.
tion.

Preston Foster in . .

INSIDE JOB

— AND —

BLACK CAT

Basil Rathbone and Brod
Crawford.





ROYAL

To-day only, 4.30 and 8.30.
Republic Whole Serial— .

GHOST OF ZORRO

Starring
Clayton Moore — Pamela



To-day to Monday, 4.30 and
i's 8.15.

Republic Smashing Double,

Louis Hayward and Lee
Bowman in

HOUSE BY THE
RIVER

— AND —

DAUGHTER OF THE
JUNGLE

— WITH —
Lois Hall and James Card-
well.





MURRAY'S

MILK
STOUT

THE STOUTEST OF

STOUTS

STRENGTHENING
TO THE LAST DROP

Recommended by the Faculty

STOCKS ARRIVED
- RECENTLY



& CO.,

LTD. = Agents

ALL









{ion eS

Blake, with Roy Bancroft
and George J. Lewis. |
OLYMPIC



FCCCKEC HK FEE POPPE CHTER PESTS te RHE Ys



—

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951





Acress the vast span of
Russia. from the boundaries
of Eastern Europe to the
North Pacific coast, there is
now searcely a break in the
industrial chain.

Stalin said recently that
no nation could achieve such
reogress anti at the same

time prepare for war.
Spekesmen of the Western
Powers asked over the

week-end if Stalin would
give proof of his sincerity.

One of the big questions
is: What is happening in
Northern Siberia, an area
unmapped to the Western
world?



Russia’s Air
Striking
Power Is Weak

WASHINGTON, March 1.

Russia’s air striking power is
weak, though her air defence is
strong, and she builds 8,500 war-
planes per year, according to the
current issue of an American
magazine in an analysis of Soviet
forces.

The article—claimed to be com-
piled from material gathered over
months in the United States and
other countries — said Russia had
threefold protection against air
attacks.

First, she had an Arctic peri-
meter interceptor force to protect
her from attacks across the North
Péle—shortest distance from the
United States and the western
World. This string of fighters
stretched from Latvia to the
northeastern tip of China.

After this she had individual
air defences for major war pro-
duction areas. Then there was a
mobile interceptor force of 100
fast M.1.G. 15 jet fighters ready to
be rushed to vital spots.

But the Soviet attacking power
was far inferior to that of the
United States because the Soviet
force was basically a tactical air-
foree, designed tu~ work with
ground troops, the Magazine said,
and strategic bombing in the Brit~
ish and United States manner had
been subordinated.

Soviet jet fighters, according to
the article, were about equal to
United States planes in perforn-
ance, the M.I.G. 15 being the best.
The Russians were building 3,500
M.LG. 15’s a-year.

Copies of B, 29—

For bombers, the Soviet Union
relied on an almost exact copy of
the American B-29 Superfortress,
three examples of which were in
Russian hands during the last
war, Russian bombers of the class
of the American B-36—giant fast
ten-motor long-range atom bomb-
er—were not expected to fly for
some time.

Russia in all had about 18,000
operation aircraft designed most-
ly to tactical air arms of 1,200
planes each, the Magazine said.

Russia’s annual warplane pro-
duction of 8,500 warplanes, includ-
ed 6,000 fighters—about ‘70% jets
—250 bombers, and other types.

The Russian war potential was
about 60,000 planes a year, com-
pared with the rate of more than
100,000 a year turned out by the
United States in the Second World
War.—Reuter.

Trinidad Will Study
B’dos Fishery Plan

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 27.

Trinidad is likely to follow the
Barbados programme for assisting
the fishermen here who have been
clamouring for more Government
aid to build the industry. With this
in view, the Hon. Victor Bryan of
the Legislative Council, and Min-
ister of Lands and Agriculture ac-
companied by the Hon, Gerald
Wight and Mr. Cecil Farrell, act-
ing Marketing Officer, will leave
Trinidad in the middle of March
for Barbados to study the plan and
see the programme in action.

A delegate of the Fishermen’s
Association visited Barbados re-
cently and reported to the Stand-
ing Advisory Committee on Fish-
ery that the Barbados Government
had a plan of assistance to the
Barbados fishermen, which em-
braces advances by the local Gov-
ernment to fishermen for building
new and modern seaworthy boats
and the purchasing of modern
fishing gear.

Co-operative marketing of the
fishermen’s catches is also provid-
ed for by the plan, and so far the
scheme has proved to be a success.
From the findings of the member
of the Fishermen's Association
outlined to the Standing Advisory
Committee on Fishery, the Com-
mittee felt that the information
brought back by this member had
some merit. The committee then
arrived at the conclusion that the
scheme in Barbados ought to be
investigated on the spot and the
methods _and_procedure studied.







Firestone
TYRES «« TUBES

USE THE TYRES CHAMPIONS USE

a





| Key to Russia
ne

UNITED
KINGDO:

,

ATLANTIC

industrial areas

a



r —

Barents Sea



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Canadian Teacher Danger Swims Meat Buyers Aided

Meets Challenge
Of Arctic School

TUKTOYAKTUK, Northwest
Territories, Feb. |
Teaching “on top of the world”
may have its frigid drawbacks,
but for Dorothy Robinson of
Ottawa it is the opportunity ofa
lifetime.

In the bitter cold of this Arctic
Eskimo village 2,500 miles from
home, the persevering 40-year-old
teacher is finally finding the sense
of freedom and fulfilment she has
been searching for in 14 years of
work in Canada’s northern schools.

Fighting influenza, frost and
ignorance, the gallant lady of the
north has taken charge of the
Federal Resources Department's
most northerly school — a small
one-room affair located at the
reouth of the Mackenzie River,
more than 1,400 miles north of
Edmonton.

“ As Canada’s most northern
teacher, Miss Robinson is faced
with many problems—she is men-
tor, nurse and cook and even Boy
Scout leader to her young Eski-
mo charges.

While teachers across the coun-
try look out their classroom. win-
dows to see city traffie whizzing
by, she sees nothing but the bar-
ren Aretie scene and the distant
Polar ice—nothing lies between
here and the North Pole but the
ice-ridden waters of the Arctic
Ocean.

The youngsters are great stu-
dents, says Miss Robinson, but the
older ones are more difficult. They
can’t seem to understand how
reading, writing and arithmetic
will help them catch more seals
or fish.

Versatile Lender

Miss Robinson is more than a
teacher, When a bout of influ-
enza hits the settlement, she turns
the school into a hospital and pre-
pares hot bowls of soup. She is
ready for anything. She holds a
certificate in wood working, the
bronze medallion of the Royal Life
Saving Society, medallion and bar
of the St. John Ambulance Asso-
ciation, and probably is the only
woman in the world to hold a
Boy Scout medal.

This prize possession was grant-
ed her last year, at an Eskimo
ceremony attended by her little
band of Eskimo Boy Scouts, Girl
Guides, Brownies and Cubs.

What great power has drawn
this woman from civilization to the
barrenness of the Arctic?

“The development of this com-
munity is the fulfilment of my per-
sonal life,” she says. “My desire
is to serve the Canadian Eskimo.

“The task demands the utmost
you have in you—your strength,
your ingenuity, your perseverance,
and then rewards you with a sense
of freedom and accomplishment
found nowhere else.” —(CP).

‘New Style

EISENSTADT, Austria, Feb.
Two Austrians who sought a
Solomon’s judgment from a Rus-
sian Zone court knew today that
the “Soviet style” varies from the
ancient pattern.



The men were parties to a law
suit seeking to determine which
of the two was the legal owner of
a store. The ease had bung for
five years in Austrian courts.

Finally they asked the Soviet
Commander of the Russian Zone
city of Eisenstadt to take the case
out of the Austrian courts and
make his own decision.

The Commander listened to the
arguments of both men. Next day
he handed down the decree:

The store would be confiscated
by the Russians.

It was.

LN.S.

AVAILABLE IN ALL SIZES



Charles Mc Enearney & Co., Ltd. |

ee ees

The Rio

NEW YORK.

Down Mexico way the Ameri-
can immigration men are having
trouble with thousands of Mexi-
cans who try to enter the U.S.
illegally. Many are stopped—but
lots get through.

And because they nearly all
swim across the Rio Grande—
the famous border river — these
illegitimate visitors are known as
wetbacks.

Last year immigration men,
aided by Texas Rangers, turned
back 224,000 wetbacks. In old
days the Mexicans simply
wanted to work on America’s
prosperous farms at America’s
high wages.

But now there is a new head-
ache. Communist agents are
coming ih, too.

AN AUDIENCE of 600 sat lis-
tening for two hours to a fault-
lessly played piano recital in the
Pilgrim State Hospital for Mentai

Patients, on Long Island. The
player was a patient known as
“Miss Jones,” who has been in
the institution since 1946. She
played Debussy, Chepin, and Liszt
with brilliant technique, while
white-coated attendants watched
breathlessly. At the end she
smiled and said: “Did I please
you?”

AS ALWAYS in times of tension

there is a marriage boom in
America. But the men who sell
the things associated with

remance—wedding rings, flowers,
photographs, and linen—are glum,
“They are too young to have any
money,” said a_ big jeweller
sadly, ‘not like the last war.”

OUT IN CALIFORNIA there is
a cotton rush. With cotton selling
at 45 cents a lb.——five times pre-
war—Californians by the thousand
are starting to grow it.

THEY HAVE STARTED a Forty
Plus Club in New York. It helps
the over-forties to find jobs. But
there’s a difference. The club is
only intersted in ‘‘former execu-
tives who used to make at least
$5,000 (£1,785) a year’. Average
(former) salary of applicants:
$10,000 (£3,570) .

CLIVE BROOK, who is a smash
hit on Broadway in the play
“Second Threshold,” will leave
the play in a few months to get
back to his farm in Sussex. “I
haven’t got all that time to spare.’
he says. He is 59.

IDA LUPINO is to make a film
about the “second Dillinger,’
William Cook, who was hunted
down in the desert after killing
six people. Title: “I talked ta
God.”



Practice Bombing
Goes On By R.A.F.

On Heligoland

BONN, Feb. 28.
British practice bombing on the
North Sea Island of Heligoland
has been resumed, a_ British
spokesman said here to-day .
It would have been continued
until an alternative target on the

German North Sea coast had
been selected, he said.
The British announeed last

Monday that the island would be
handed back to Germany by
spring 1952. —Reuter.
bac : vy pe
Britain's Shipbuilding
Lead Decreasing
LONDON, Feb. 28.
3ritain’s post war lead in ship-
building dropped hy 16 per cent
in four years in the face of grow-
ing competition from foreign ship-

yards. .
Lioyd’s annual summary of
newly launched- merchant ships

showed today that the British out-
put of merchant vessels fell to 27.9
per cent of the world total in 1950,
compared with 53 per cent in 1946,
the year after the end of the Sec-
ond World War.--(CP).











By Steamship Cooks

LONDON, Feb.

Meat-starved Britons returning
from continental trips have been
forming long queues outside the
galleys on the cross-channel
steamships. They have been tak-
ing advantage of a new service
provided by the shipping com-
panies,

Before embarking the travellers
have been buying large joints of
meat, legs of lamb, enticing cuts
of sirloin of beef—all easily ob-
tainable in France Steamship
chefs offered to cook the meat free
because raw meat cannot be im-
ported.—(CP).



Thieves Eat Thief

(From Our Own Correspoadant)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 27.
From a_ reliable source comes
the report that three escaped Ven-
ezuelan criminals lost in the
jungle in Venezuela, killed the
fourth and barbecued him like a
pig, eating the roasting flesh. The
three were later captured, and
they are said to have confessed
about the killing. Since then a
special commission has been ap-
pointed by the Cuidad Bolivar
Justice Department to investigate
the matter of thieves roasting
thief.

GPVLIIGS FOOIOIIOVIOIOOIO00SGS DIU 9 FSF FSI IIT”
IT’S THE LIL’ MAN AND THE HORN
This Lad is HOT and SIZZLING!

It’s

7

Leroy Thomas
Barbados 8-year
Trumpeter
Blowing
Hot and Sweet

~ on the
*
g Horn
% .
Extra:
















AUSTRALIA WIN THE ASHES
See Lindwall and Miller working out Compton
and Hutton.

+++ fo feel its fury
"++ 48 free men
Stand together, in
Strength i
COtrage . , .
fight for a tree
tomorrow!

ClatuRr-Fox
presents

Produced by

Edited by LOU.S TETUNIC
Written by JOSEPH KEMAS

Norrated by Sidn.y Bi: c.mer, John Larkir, -

Kermit Murdock and Wiln am Pust, Jt, + A Movistoonws Production

—



Trans-Siber oe railway ane |

East Sit

an



Words

HONGKONG, Feb.

Italy’s Father Giuseppe Minella
arrived in Hongkong from his
Sacred Heart Church in Pengpu,
Anhwei province of China, with
inside informativn on how easy it
is to fall fou! of the Chinese Com-
munists and get expelled.

Father Minella said he was
standing outside his Pengpu
Chureh when a teen-age member
ef the Young Communist Party
asked him where his dog had dis-
appeared to

Without thinking, the priest said
“probably to Korea.”

Next day the local press alleged
that he had insulted the Chinese
“volunteers” in Korea by calling
them “dogs.” A month of student
agitation followed before Father
Minella was finally put under
police guard

“Propagandist”

He said he was never formally

charged bu! the Communist press

alleged that he had called the
“volunteers’} dogs; done propa-
ganda work for the Americans
(actually he read the Nationa!
Geographic Magazine); praised
expatriate Archbishop Paul Yu

pin (now in Formosa) and called
him a “good man;” stopped Ca.h-
olic girls from joining the Young
Communist movement; and spread

alarmist rumours (he said | an

atom bomb could destrey Nan-
king.)
Father Minella denied that

GLOBE
| TO-NITE

e
Guest Star

TALENT SHOW
e

This is Talent!

SESS SOOO FOSS LOOPOPD SELIG SE

SPODOOSS










f0 know its truth







PLUS



EMPIRE






=

Sea

there was any truth in these
allegations but the Communist
authorities refused him a hearing.
They just deported him.

Father Minella is a native of
Milan and has spent 12 years in
China oh mission ld



She Finally Got It

VIENNA, Feb, 28.

A murtderess in Austria, who is
still serving her life sentence, has
inherited the estate of her husband
whom she killed. In 1936 Marie
Fercher was found guilty of mur-
dering her husband in order to
get his farm in Carinthia.

The estate went to Marie’s son,
who was reported missing in Rus-
sia during the war and never re-
turned. The Supreme Court has
cecided that in Austrian law, the
mother jis heir to the property des-
pite her previous crime. The case
is unique in Austrian legal history.
Reuter,



LADIES’ IMITATION LEATHER
HANDBAGS.
White and Assorted Colours.

$1.00 ea.

LADIES’ ART SILK ANKLE
SOCKS.

White and Assorted Colours.

2 prs for $1.00

LADIES’ ART SILK STOCKINGS
Light and Dark Shades.

2 prs for $1.00

|
{



LADIES’ PANTIES 0.8.
White and Pink.
« .Reduced for the $ days.

i pr for $1.00



LADIES’ COTTON VESTS.

2 for $1.00



BRASSIERES.
White and Tea Rose.

2 prs for $].00

LADIES’ NEW BELTS.
Regular Price 69c. and 79c.

Now 2 for $1.00.



SUN—
GLASSES

For LADIES & GENTS
Amazing Styles & Values!

THANTS



DIAL
3466











MEN’S POLO SHIRTS.
White with Zipp.

$1.00

BOYS’

POLO SHIRTS.

2 for $1.00

BOYS’ PANTS.

Age 5-12 years.

i pr for $1.00

BOYS’ LEATHER BELTS.

2 for $1.00



BABIES’
Blue,

PLASTIC PANTIES
Pink, White.

2 prs for $1.00

CHILDREN’S ART
PANTIES.

SILK

2 prs for $1.00

WHITE COTTON

BLOUSE

Clearing $1.00 ea.



PAGE THREE.

:



sao mo

WHAT'S IN A NAME

When you say
Everton Weexes

Everyone thinks of Cricket,
& you

Know likewise,

Everyone thinks of Cooking,
as you

Say G. A. Service.

—_— oe


















~—with the faithfrl
use of DREAM-— The Soap

of the Beautiful.
Play safe . be preparer,

loveliness

DREAM is available at toilet goods
counters throughout the island. ia

SENSATIONAL VALUES
SENSATIONAL

WHILE THESE BARGAINS LAST

COME EARLY FOR THE BETTER SELECTION

SAVINGS





Ne,

2 LARGE KITCHEN TOWELS + <;

and 1 YELLOW POLISHER

all for $1.00.

YELLOW POLISHERS.

Large Size,

4 for $1.00

PAPER NAPKINS.

200 for $1.00

PLASTIC POWDER BOWL.

2 fer $1.00



1 RUBBER BATH CAP AND
1 PLASTIC SHOWER CAP.

Hoth for $1.00



TOYS
VALUABLE ASSORTED TOYS
3 for $1.00

wig

COLOURFUL = PLASTIO
HANGERS,

3 for $1.00



SENSATIONAL CLEARANCE in COSTUME JEWELLERY and
COMPACTS Many of these Pretty EARRINGS, NECKLACES

to $6.00

Sale Price $1.00 cack 2

| and other JEWELLERY values up
|

LADIES’ PANTIES Reguiar $1.92 Multi filament CREPE

Pink

and White

1 for $5.00

THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE.

:

BROAD STREET







i ie

for your romantic moment...
Get a few cakes of DREAM,,

TOILET SOAP, use it
faithiully in your bath,,
shower and at the wygh
basin for a soft-smeoth-
clear skin, radiant with natgral

~~

a

x

-_—
GR





TIT Pee

= i

FRGE” ERE THURS B,

PAGE FOUR





Primted by the Advocate Co., Ltd, Broad St., Bridgetews.

Friday, March 2, 1951

HELP

PUBLIC support for the Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in this
island has never been indicatve of the vol-
ume or the quality of the work which this
body has been able to do. Flag Days, Con-
certs and public subscriptions have failed
to keep its financial condition near to the
required standard. ‘ 3

Only a week ago it was suggested that a
home be established in order to saye the
number of emaciated dogs from the starva-
tion and illtreatment which they endure
when driven from home during the licens-
ing period. It was officially admitted by
the Society that whilst this has been in-
cluded among other aims it has not been
possible to finance a home from the funds



of the Society.

Today is the Society’s Flag Day and it is
up to those who now recognise the need for
such a Society in a civilised community
and the need for support of its work to
céntribute generously to its funds.

The work of the Society is not spectacu-
lar but that it is necessary and extremely
important can be judged from the recogni-
tion which it has received in communities
more advanced than in Barbados.

“Education in this island has not been
conspicuous in inculcating love for animals
‘by young children, The grown up who
‘keeps his dog for protecting the backyard
does not hesitate to drive him away from
home rather than pay a five shilling tax.
The carter who makes his living with a
draft animal stops at the shop for his glass
of beer or mauby forgetting the animal in
the shafts and in the sun.

As an indication of what proper care
and proper feeding can.do, two ponies will
be exhibited at Beckwith Place today as
a reminder to those who see them, that
animals respond to care and protection as
mutch as any living being. The prevention
of: cruelty is only part of the work of the
Society. Proper methods of handling ani-
mals are as essential as food and the Soci-
ety aims at instructing the average owner
not merely to avoid cruelty but to give
proper care to animals. |

There are very few people who do not
admit a love for animals of some kind and
‘every one who dare profess such love
should not hesitate to contribute to a Soci-
.ety whose sole object is to protect animals
of every kind. It can easily be done by
subscribing to the Flag Day collection,

—ee

GRENADA

WHILST it is difficult, without knowing
all the facts, to comment adequately from
this distance on the Grenada disturbances,
yet the mentality of those who have insti-
gated them and those who have taken part
seems baffling.

Whatever the merits of their case may
be, it is obvious that they are discontented
with wages and conditions of labour. If
they had started these disturbances mere-
ly with the object of bringing the matter
to the attention of the Colonial Office there
might have been some method in their
madness, but if it is considered that these
disturbances have been initiated in an
attempt to better the lot of the worker, it
seems strange that property which had
been erected to improve the workers’ con-
dition, has been the main objects of des-
truction.

One school erected at a cost of £40,000
granted by Colonial Development and
Welfare to further education, and a clinic
also for the improvement of health ser-
vices to combat disease have been wilfully
destroyed,

Mr, Gairy and his followers have been
hoping to conyince the Colonial Office that
adult suffrage. should be .granted to the
people of Grenada. Do they imagine that
this is the way to achieve this end?



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



News From Britain

LONDON, Feb. 23

General Eisenhower has been
made very weleome in Britain as
Supreme Commander of the North
Atlantic Pact forces. An Ameri-
can has been nominated as the
Commanéer of the Air Forces. An
American has been nominated as
Chief of the production effort.

But when the appointment of
Admiral Fechteler of the U.S.
Wavy was known here, the Ad-
miralty Arch was seen to quiver
slightly, and a good deal of turn-

g~ in graves is reported from

minster Abbey. Drake may

indeed be in his hammock and a
thousand miles away—but it’s pre-
sumed he’s not sleeping so well
down below today.
_ In the House of Commons our
enhappy overburdened Prime Min-
ister took the full force on the
chin. Here is how the scene was
deseribed by William Barkley, the
Daily Express parliamentary re-
porter. .

“Consternation struck the Com-
tons, when Mr. Attlee announced
that an American is to command
the Atlantic navies, including
Royal Naval forces. If it was an
outrage to Tory sentiment, it was
also a shock to Socialist feelings.
Never has a statement of their
leader fallen on their ears with
$uch a heavy thud.

“They gaped and the House of
Commons soon witnessed some-
thing quite novel—a degree of
cordiality being shown by Social-
ists to the vivid fervent protests
ef. Mr, Winston Churchill,

“It was not only the substance
but the manner of Mr. Attlee’s
announcement that shocked.

He made it so casually that it
might have been anything to
which M.P.’s are now: accustomed
by every-day experience such as
a rise in the cost of Lging, or a
cut in the meat ration.

“It began with Mr. Churchil)
formally asking if the Prime Min-
ister had a statement to make on
the naval appointment under the
North Atlantic Treaty Organisa-
tion. Mr. Attlee popped up and
read off:—

‘The Defence Committee of the
Organisation has agreed there
should be a Supreme Allied Com-
mander Atlantic,’ “and .in the
same tone, without raising his
head’—-and that should be an
American.’

“Such a buzz of talk resounded
at once that he was hardly heard
adding that an American officer
has already been nominated and
an announcement will be made
soon.



Tito Dilutes Maex....You Could Call Tin
Communism And Splash

BELGRADE.

I noticed the change since my
last visit on the very first station
after the train had crossed the

border into Yugoslavia.

A man with a rakishly angled
high
and enormous
moustaches strutted up and down
the platform behind a youth who
was selling beer and soft, drinks,

The man in the lambskin hat
‘called out all sorts of good things
to eat and drink and smoke as
though he had them for sale. The
For everyone
knew that those things were un-
cbtainable today, but were. part

lambskin hat,

long coat,
leather boots,

crowd loved _ it.

of the station vendors’ ordinary

wares before Socialism came to

Yugoslavia. They joined in with
extravagant suggestions.

The tall, black-coated police-
man at the station
stolidly looked on and took no
notice. Two years ago, when I
was iast here, that scene would
have been impossible.

In the first place the jokester
would never have dared to put
on his act: if he had done, some-
one in a leather coat and a leather
eap would have sprung up from

nowhere and taken him off to the

local headquarters for a_ little
lesson in Socialist culture, '

When I got to my hotel I looked

round for the two leather-coated
plain-clothes men who used to be
on guard in the lobby night and
day. They had been discreetly
withdrawn,
’ Gone is that “voluntary” labour
on the building sites to which
young and old were compelled ta
mareh with pick and | shovel
three times a week on pain ot
forfeiting their rations.

The number of political meet-
ings in factories, offices, and
residential districts have been
arastically cut down, A citizen
who does not attend them is no
longer penalised, nor is a factory
hand who walks out on some
Marxist bore in order to get
on with his work.

In their desire to think out
things afresh and get away from



Our Readers Say:

entrance

By David Temple Roberts

“Mr. Churchill was up at once’
“Was there no British admirai:’

“he inquired in solemn tones.
Tories »roke into cheers aud
numbers of Socialists nodded

gloomy approval while their side
sat siler,t,

“With the same cheers ane
silent gloom the Tory leader put
question after question all in a
string. ‘Was there no. British
admiral capable of discharging
these functions? Does not Great
Britain lie at the very key to all
communications across the Atlan-
tic with Europe?

‘And are not the sea approaches
to our island, in the event of sub-
marine attack, vital to our life?

‘How is it?’ — “with ever more
insistence in his voice’ — ‘that
when our experience is longer
and wider than that of any other
country, particularly of the sub-
marine evil and when we have all
agreed with so much pleasure
that General Eisenhower should
command the Armed Forces on the
land, we might have been thought
to have the command of the
sea on the Atlantic?”

“Mr, Attlee’s reply was short:

‘When there is an organisation
of a number of Powers, the ap-

intment is made by those

owers, and no one Power has
absolute right to dictate its views
as to any appointment.. I under-
stand that the proposition that an
American admiral should be ap-
pointed was generally acceptable.’

“Mr. Attlee had no more ne
wanted to say. He sat back in his
characteristic pose, well down on
his front seaf, .It was only when
a chorus of “Answer, answer” as-
sailed him that he rose again to
say i

‘This matter was naturally
very fully discussed, But I say
ogain it is a matter for agreement.
And the general conclusion was
that this was the best appoint-
ment.’

“Tories were quick to spot, with
shouts of “Oh”, a contradiction
when, having said it was fully
discussed, he added: ‘I cannot at
the moment say whether there
was an elaborate discussion or
not.’

“He seemed taken aback at the
ferment in the House and was
saying again that no one country
could, in such an organisation, in-
sist on its own right, when a
Tory shout smothered his words.”

‘Where is British leadership?’
was the shout.

“Mr, Churchill was on his feet
again with apt figures at hand.

By SEFTON DELMER

the Soviet doctrinaires. Tito’s
Government has even gone so far
as to restore a measure of private
enterprise in some of the smallér
concerns which had been taken
over by the State.

We Can Talk

Most interesting of alk It is
orice more possible for Yugoslavs
to be seen talking to foreigners
like myself without having to fear
the consequences, I have been
made a temporary member of'a
Belgrade. club—unthinkable the
last time I was here.

These men talk freely, frankly.
and even bitterly. And, believe
me — despite the gaiety and
laughing chatter of the young
men and girls taking their even.
ing stroll along the boulevards of
village high streets, despite this
hew policy of liberalisation—there
is a great deal of bitterness, dis-
content and hostility to the
Government everywhere in Yugo-
slavia,

Among the peasants—80 per
cent. of Yugoslavia’s population—
because they resent the Govern-
ment compelling them to sell the
tion’s share of their produce at
very low ccntrolled prices to the
State; because last year’s drought
has hit them badly; and because
they still fear the Government
means to nationalise and collecti-
vise their land,

Among the factory workers
because when the factories were
recently transferred from State
ownership to ownership by the
workers the first result was that
wages were reduced still furthe:,
and more work was demanded,
Because food and clothes are
difficult to buy for the money they
earn,

In the towns because food dis-
tribution, despite American aid,
has broken down, badly, Rations
are not. being honoured, and the
free market prices charged by the
peasants ‘are so high that town



‘It was possible anyhow not very
long ago for one country to sink
525 German U boats, compared
with 174 by the United States.”

The general opinion
House of Commons is that this
is another case of Mr. Attlee
having ‘too much to do. At
present he is Prime Minister,
Foreign Secretary for Common-
wealth. Relations, and has to
take the chair at innumerable
Cabimet Committees. Probably
wha discussions there were
on the appointment did nov
come Mr. Attlee’s attention.
Apparently the United States is
open to representations about
these appointments. “So the Royal
Navy riding high ” was the
slightly emused comment out of a
US. Navy senior Captain in
Washington,

Festival Bandwagon

With understandable eagerness
everybody is using the Festival to
get things polished up and writing
the expense down to good publi-
city. ‘the brewers are thinking up
new names for pubs all over the
country that have neither names
nor signs, Some are modern.
There is the “Jet and Whittle”
near Gloucester — to commemor-
ate the inventor of the jet engine.
And “The Flying Saucer” in Kent
will give some social historian 200
years hence an awful lot of bother
discovering its significance. Per-
naps he will put it down to the
custom of domestic quarrelling.
The brewers claim proudly to
spend £100 apiece on brand new
swinging emblems.

And the British Colour Council
is trying to use the Festival to
make men colour conscious, They
want to see socks in “Victorian
purple, awning red, and garter
blue.” In actual fact a hatter
near Piccadilly did a roaring
trade in green hats, red hats an
orange hats last year, so the,
should have some success at: the
other end of the male body, 1
hear they are also encouraging
hand-painted ties. Mermaids on
ties can already be bought in
Shaftesbury Avenue.

The Churches, too, think th?
Festival of Britain may swell
their re-building funds. The plan
is to sell chunks of pile and stone
frem a dozen historic City church-
es. One Canadian is already in
this ‘game. He manufactures
the bits into book-ends. It will
be remembered that during the
war properly authenticated bits
of the destroyed House of Com-
mons were sold very well to
United States and other visiting
forces,

dwellers have to sell their last
possessions to be able to eat.
Their Profit?

Moscow and the Cominform are
certainly doing their best to profit
irom it all. They devote a total
of 18 hours a day of broadcasting
time to Yugoslavia.

They have’ special training
schools for Yugoslav agents and
agitators in Rumania iid Bul

garia. They send agents across

with leaflets,
rumours,

Their agents have orders to
organise cells in readiness fo:
D-Day, when the Cominform
liberation armies sweep over the
frontier,

But they
progress.

No leaflets or stickers have
been seen by any of my friends,
Long gone are the old days after
the break between Moscow an:|
Belgrade when Mescow still had
a clandestine printing press in
Belgrade on which it could print
an indictment of Tito.

No Column

Now I am not saying that there
are no Cominformists at large
in Yugoslavia. A_ disgruntled
Communist official overruled or
ignored must always be under
temptation to change his alleg-
iance, hoping for reward and
prefenment when the Cominform-
ists invade, if ever they do.

But that is where the secret
police come into the picture. For
with all their new unobtrusive
ness, they are more efficient than
ever.

No, there is nothing of what
one could call a Stalinist pene-
tration of the Yugoslav economic
or administrative machine, There
is no Fifth Column in Yugoslavia
to help a Stalinist invader with
sabotage.

I am convinced that Marshal
Tito could afford to loosen up his
Police State a_ lot. more before
there would ke any inside threat
from Moscow. ,

Eventually I hope he does. For
{ like to hear Serbs sing,

—L.E.S,

slogans, and

are making no





in the | the more convinced I become that the Negro

shoula come first, and that our economic well
peing is of greater
privilege or right to
or to associate with ee on an equal
social basis provided

decisions and pressure legislation

iege and opportunity enjoyed by any other
American, but I am opposed to any type of





Tourist’s Accommodation

_ To the Editor, The Advocate—
: SIR,—There have appeared from
“time to time editorials, and let-
. . ters, published in your paper ac-
vertising the building of another
“hotel on the island, Althous)
Opponents of the idea uve not
- seen fit to appear in print, casual
enquiry disclosed the fact that
residents of the island and many
tourists do not
done which would turn Barba-
los into another Bermuda. ..The
. Writer is in complete ‘sympathy
~ with that thought, but does no¢
“-believe such a_ strange thing
could take place in the foresee-
~ able future for the following
~*=-reasons,
“1, Barbados’ is
_@anada and the Northern U.S,
-- that it is costly to get here, and
although the hotel rates are low,
one has to spend considerable
‘time here to offset the increased
- eost of transportation. On the
other hand, Bermuda and Florida
are only about four hours flight
from New York so that large
numbers of tourists who hae but
“two of three weeks for a winter

holiday, would never go as far
away ag this Island.
2. Although Barbados enjoys

an unsurpassed, climate, it has
little else to offer except a quiet
and leisurely way of life. Even
the bathing here is not comparable
with that-in Florida and Bermuda.
Florida has literally hundreds of
miles of beaches far superior to
the beaches here, The writer has

want anything:

so far frem.

driven his car 30 miles on the
beach in one. direction in the

Daytona and Ormond section of °

Florida where there is not.a trace
of a pebble. Every beach in Barba-
dos where the writer has bathed,
is cluttered with coral rocks
~t various sizes which frequently
scratch the feet. To be sure, in
the early winter in the Daytona
and Ormond area, the water is
not as warm ‘as it is“here, but

by mid-February, it is ideal for

bathing, From Palm Beach south

the water is ‘always!watm | be-

because that part ‘of the coast ”

isu washed by the Gulf Stream, ‘
a ous

At this time of year, mahy of
start training, in various parts of
Florida, and in many cities irr the
state, one may watch good base-
ball several times a week. Fur-
‘thermore, thére are several beau-
tiful tracks jin’ Florida where
there is a long racing season with
most of the Test stables in the
U.S. represented and there-‘is

dog racing and gambling, for.

those whose tastes run in that di-
rection, Every town has real golf
courses, compared with which,
the course here igs a sheep pas-
ture.

Finally, the hotels here are so
primitive and the food so inferior,
that they could not exist in either
Bermuda or Florida. In one hotel
on this island, a guest cannot
even get a drink of water except
at meals or in his room at night
without tipping a bell boy to get
it or go to the bar.

2

«the major league base ball-teams«-

» hotel

Thia is not written in a spirit of
carping eriticism but merely as
an effort to. set forth the facts
showing why, inthe opinion of
the writer, Barbados will never
be a_second Bermuda or Florida.
I like it here and hope to come
other winters if I1.can get a room.
I think there is,ample room for
another hotel, one of about 50
rooms so designed that it can be
enlarged to 100 rooms when con-
ditions justify it; not a de luxs
buts*one built. on ample
grounds “with “a wide gallery,
comfortable rooms ¢ach with bath
and runnifg. hot.and cold water
sand a tel@phope: in every room

he investor iM such an enter-
prise should be:offered every in-
ducement such ‘as. in Jamaica
where the builder can buy
wherever he wishes and the ma-
terials are brought in duty free
and he is not hedged about by
such restrictions as caused the
Blue Waters enterprise to be
abandoned after it was well on
its way.

JUST ANOTHER TOURIST.

A Resident

: mae Editor, The Advocate

R,—Permit me-to-draw- tothe ~~
attention of whom it may concern,
the plight of the residents of the

~Deacons Road Housing Scheme,

Whenever there is a heavy rain-
fall, water settles near a suck well
a distance of about forty (40)
yards long and about eighteen (18)
inches deep, causing much incon-

venience to residents going from

;
or coming to their homes. There
are only about a dozen homes
within the immediate entrances
from Deacons. Road which are not
affected by the water.

Hoping that the authorities will
take action,

WOHN W. WATTS

» Shirts
To the Editor, The, Advocate—
SIR

The Blackshirts and the Brown-
shirts
They had their little day,
The Redshirts still are in the
news
But then, I mean to say,
You've really lost your freedom
The Bill of Rights is dirt
When someone in authority
Selects your bloomin’ shirt!
Imagine tagged “‘Verboten”
And classed with dangerous
drugs
Those coats of many colours
The cheerful jitterbugs:
Designed short-sleeved by com-
monsense,
Worn outside (suits the weather)
A boon to parents’ pocket-
books—
Forbidden altogether!
~ Aderned-by all that's-modern art
Bedecked by Euclid’s figgers
And rampant with all Heraldry
From Jumbo down to jiggers!
a ancestoys were long made
ree
Who knew the shackles’ hurt .. .
No man can seare the pants off
me,
My son shall choose his shirt!
BIMSHIRE.



By DAVIS LEE

(With Acknowledgements to the “Newark Telegram")
THE MORE I travel, listen and observe,

nas been grossly misled in this matter of
integration and civil rights. :
It appears to me that the first things

ce than the
“Gee a white school
Supreme Court

As a Negro, and an American, 1 natufally
want to see my race enjoy every right, privi-

setiow of a righ t
own kind exclusively, if he desires. I would
1ike to reserve such a right for myself and
definitely would not want it encroached
upon by a Supreme Court edict or any other
«ind ot interference.

The right granted to one or two Negroes
in Virginia or some other Southern State
to enter a State graduate school is of no
benefit to the millions of our people who
are in need of the bare necessities of life,
and when the fortunately situated mem-
bers of the race conduct such campaigns
of agitation for selfish gain, the needy
masses suffer.

WHILE THE SOUTH does not provide
ample or adequate modern school facilities
for Negroes everywhere, neither does it
provide completely modern facilities for
white schools, because the money is not
available for such a vast undertaking.
However, rapid progress has been made
and in Montgomery, Ala., and several other
communities the Negro schools far exceed
the white schools in modernization and
physical appearance. Neither do the
majority of Southern Negroes nor the
majority of the whites approve of the pres-
ent programme to disrupt a custom which
has served both races well down through
the years and contributed so much to the
Negro’s economic security.,

Just what would be the future educa-
tional status of the Negro in the South if
the Legislatures of all the Southern States
would enact legislation withdrawing State
financial support from all schools of higher
learning, starting at the high school level?
Not only is this possible, but if it should
come to pass, the Negro would be unable
to finance his own educational programme.
Negro financed educational programmes
have been a failure in the past and nothing
miraculous has happened which would
cause a normal person to assume that the
future holds any better prospect.

NO RACE OR NATIONALITY in this
nation has excelled or equalled the Negro in
educational attainment and achievement,
but this educational opportunity was not
only created by white dollars but has been
financed by white people throughout the
nation. It is an unfortunate fact, that
Negroes contribute very little to their own
community well being and improvement and
this fact should be taken into account by
these agitators before they initiate their pro-
grenime for demands in the field of educa-
ion,

Instead of spending thousands of dollars
to finance unnecessary court fights for
privileges which will cost the race millions
in lost valuable friendships and, racial
goodwill, our leaders should go into the
Negro ghettoes and force the local grocer
to carry prime meats and sell to our people
Grade A products which will make us
healthy.

It is no wonder that the death rate is so
high among Negroes. When one considers the
food situation plus inadequate housing, it is
a wonder that the death rate is not higher.

It is very apparent to me that the Negro
leaders of this nation have a distorted
sense of real values. They appear to be
more interested in breaking down racial
barriers and conducting expensive cam-
paigns of agitation, in spreading hate, than
in directing their efforts, energies and
money towards the attainment of the
tangible essentials of life.

I WAS IN ATLANTA last week and
was greatly impressed by the large number
of outstanding and_ progressive Negro
businesses. Atlanta is strictly a segregated
city. I was in several New England cities
this week where there is not supposed to be
any segregation, and I found not one credi-
table Negro business.

The one owned and operated Negro radio
station is not in New York, but in Atlanta.
Segregation has not only given the Negro
in the South an opportunity to carve out his
industrial and economic destiny, but. it. has
forced him to the fore as the most substantial
and economically secure Negro in the world.

The Negro in New York, Newark and
other supposedly liberal centres may enjoy
the privileges to eat where he pleases or

go to any theatre or public place of amuse-
ment, but a Negro can’t get a license in
Newark to operate a liquor package store,

can’t enter business in other Eastern

Northern cities. But this is not true in ma
South, A Negro can enter any kind of
business he wishes and Southern whites
will even lend the money. Some of the
largest contractors in the South are
Negroes,

NORTHERN NEGRO DOLLARS spent
to force Southern white universities to ad-
mit Negroes will certainly not contribute
anything towards continued good race re-
ations in the South, and race relations
were definitely on the improve until all of
these school suits started.

I find more race prejudice in the East
than I have found in Georgia or Mississippi.
Two weeks ago 10 tourists’ camps refused
to rent me a cabin just outside of Pitts-
burgh, and Pennsylvania is one of the first
States to enact a civil rights law.

The AMERICAN RACE SITUATION has
not only taken on added alarming pro-
portions but has developed into a serious
problem which could explode and create}
a national crisis. Instead of trying to find
peace in Korea and other foreign lands
our leaders, both white and coloured,
should try to find a panacea for these racial
ills and establish peace at home before ad-
vocating it abroad. We are not in a position
to teach the other fellow how to establish
unity in his bailiwick when we don’t have
it in our own.





a a























q :
and there are any number of fields that he

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951

ST

_ RACE RELATION IN U.S.



D. V. SCOTT TO-DAY'S SPECIALS = |
& CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
i aaa iss
| Usually Now
Tins OVALTINE (Large) ......-:-:« $1.24 $1.12
Tins CORNED BEEF with Cereals 31 28
Bottles GROTSCH BEER. ........-..-- 24 18



SAWS—lB8ins., 20ins., 22ins., 24ins., 26ins., 28ins., 30ins., 36ins,
COMPASS SAWS—12ins., 14ins.

BACK SAWS—12 ins., 14 ins. 16ins.

PLANES, IRON—ins., 10ins., 15ins., 18ins.

” BLOCK
RATCHET BRACES
CHISELS—¥in., 54in., %in., lin.

CHISEL SETS of } in., 5s.in, 1 in. ins.
OIL STONES—ins., 8ins.

GRINDING STONES, complete—Sins., 6ins.
Spare GRINDING STO 5ins., 6ins.
SAW Ln are ad 4ins., 4\ins., Sins.

CLAW HAMMERS

ENGINEER HAMMERS—llb., 1 lbs., 2lbs.
MASON TROWELS & SQUARES

AT

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

rua: $3, RITCHER & CO.

"« INTERNATIONAL”
PAINTS

COVER THE WORLD!



As a protective covering for the roofs of
your buildings,
following

RED ROOFING PAINTS

we can offer you the

“DANBOLINE” ANTI -CORROSIVE PAINT (for galvanized
iron)—$7.52 per wine gallon,
“PROPELLER” READY MIXED OIL PAINT (for wooden
shingles, asbestos, cement and aluminium)—$7.00 per
wine gallon.
Tg

For best results, the following instructions should be carefully
followed :—

Galvanized Iron.

1. For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least a
year before painting. Then apply I coat of “DANBOLINE”.
2. For previously painted work, if the surface is in good
ey rub down, clean, and apply 1 coat of “DANBO-

3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor con-

dition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat
of “INTERNATIONAL” RED LEAD GRAPHITE PRIMER,
followed by 1 coat of “DANBOLINE”.

Wooden Shingle,

1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
PRIMER FOR WOOD, followed by 2 coats of “PRO-
PELLER”.
2. For previously painted work, if the surface is in good con-
dition, rub down, clean, and apply 2coats of “PRO-
PELLER”.
3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor
condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat
of “INTERNATIONAL” PRIMER FOR WOOD”, followed
by 2 coats of “PROPELLER”.

Asbestos Cement,

1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER, followed by 2 coats of
“PROPELLER”.

2. For previously painted work, rub down thorcughly, clean,
and apply 2 coats of “PROPELLER”.

Aluminium

1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “YELLOW PRIMOCON”,

followed by 1 coat of “PROPELLER”.

2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean,
ani apply 1 coat of “PROPELLER”,

TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL
PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED.



DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — acents

























ild Up the
Children with

Bu
Kellogg’s Corn Flakes
Kellogg’s All Bran \

Quaker Oats .
RED APPLES + a
CARROTS ¥ fx
CABBAGE *
For Perfect
SANDWICHES

J. & R, Bread

Pati de Fois Gras )
Jellied Chicken

Jellied Turkey

Sliced Ham 1
Salami ‘
Sandwich Relish ({ i
Rare Cheeses er
SPECIALS

For Sauce i

THE TOAST of the TOWN
GODDARD'S
GOLD BRAID RUM

ORDER TO-DAY from
GODDARDS



CARPENTERS’ TOOLS |













/

SS

— loo

=

cheat

a ORE a aN eT

aurnde



FRIDAY, MARCH 2. 1951



Senior Short Story Competition |

The Evening Advocate

tition.

will be- published in the Evening

invites all school-boys
between the ages of 12-18 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-.

Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
in length and must_reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd,,
City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week
Advocate and the winner will Te-

ceive _a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12.6.

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

‘Mauretania

THE CUNARD WHITE

° To Bdos

STAR luxury liner Mauretania

will be making an unexpected visit to Barbados at 10.30 on

Saturday morning with 650

American tourists on board.

Messrs. Hanschell Larsen & Co., Ltd., her local agents,
told the Advocate yesterday that the present disturbances
in Grenada are responsible for the visit of the Mauretania

to Barbados.

- Caribbean |
Club Stages
Good Show

A very successful Variety Show
was given by the Caribbean So-
cial Club at the Police Recreation
Hall, Central Station, last night.
It was in aid of the newly formed
Young Women’s Christian Asso-
ciation at Pinfold Street, The Po-
lice Band was in attendance.

The Caribbean Social Club, a
dramatic group under the capa-
ble direction of Miss Judy
Graham, was formed in March
last year, Its first public per-
formance. was .at the Globe
Theatre where they presented the
successful show “Caribbean
Revelry.”

The Club has as its President
Judy Graham, Secretary Roger
Fields, Treasurer Roosevelt Tudor
and the Committee May Ramain,
Claude Lewis and Reginald Remy.
Mr. Maurice Jones of the Globe
Theatre was the Advertising
Manager who gave his ideas of
attractive advertising of the Club.

The membership is about thirty
and they practise at the hiome
of Miss Judy Graham at Bay
Street. Judy has big ideas. She
intends putting on public per-
formances at least once a year.

She first taught dancing in 1945
at the St. Patrick’s School, Jem-
mot's Lane. Many of the girls
whom she taught then are now
grown up and take part in the
shows. She also taught boys in
the “Musical Band’ at
Patrick's School, Her first con-
cert was in 1946. :

Lancers

The Show last night opened with
a chorus entitled “Welcome -to
Our Musical Show,” produced by
Judy Graham, Twenty took part
in this song. Following this was
the prologue by Quinda Shaw
and then they danced the Lancers.

Cedric Phillips, well known
vcealist-pianist sang “My Heart
and I” to Judy Graham’s accom-
paniment on the piano. A comedy
sketch “The Cricket Match,” the
next item on the programme, de-
lighted the audience, Quinda
Shaw and Elrita Clarke took part
in this. It was the story of two
friends — one wealthy and the
other a pauper. On this occasion,
even the pauper pretended to be
wealthy and to have relatives of
rich origin. After a lengthy argu-
ment they became friendly.

After this a dance, “The Cake
Walk,” arranged by Claude Lewis,
was done. Four boys and the
same number of girls took part
in this, May Ramdin then sang
“I Can Dream, Can't I” and there
was a comedy dance, “The Clown”
by Vera Morris.

The next item was a dance,
“The Cocoanut Dance,” arranged
by Judy Graham and this was
followed by “Ladies” Wit, a
sketch in which May Ramdin,
Rooseyelt Tudor and Cedric
Phillips took part,

“Aint She-Sweet”

Other items on the programme
were: “Aint She Sweet,” a dance
taught by Cedric Phillips, “Miss
Prim'’s Dancing School” and “Mr.
Kinch and Party,” a sketch, This
sketch was of Kinch, a manager
and his friend. Whenever Kinch
invited the friend to his home
he made certain that he would
bé out. In
never home. After a series of dis-
cussions Kinch and his friend
ended up arm in arm and they!
sang “We Want To Be in Dixie,”
‘This sketch was arranged by Mrs.
Graham, Judy’s mother, who wiil |
be remembered as the outstand-
ing Myra Malicious in Caribbean
Revelry.

The show ended with the group
singing “Now Is The Hour” in
parts,. accompanied by Claude
Lewis.

Judy Graham told the Advo~
cate yesterday that she must
thank Gol. R. T. Michelin for
giving them assistance and also
Mr. Maurice Jones for so ably
helping with the advertising.

“SEDGEFIELD'S" HEAVY
EQUIPMENT REMOVED

ENGINEERS are getting ahead
fast in converting the motor ves-
sel Sedgefield into a passenger
ship.

The Sedgefield had her conning
tower and other heavy equipment
removed by the Government
crane on Wednesday.

They were, removed so, as to
provide space for extending the
top deck for passenger accommo-
dation,

The Sedgefield was back at her
berth alongside the dock yester-
day, while repairs were being
continued, After conversion
reaches:a certain stage, she will be
taken on dock for cleaning and
painting.

jeaused the. scheduled

fat -midnight

er words he was|-











The Mauretania, which is now
making its third Caribbean cruise
for this winter, had included
Grenada on this itinerary and
not Barbados. The disturbances
visit to
Grenada to be cancelled.

This call to Barbados will be
the second for the Mauretania
this year. She was here on Febru-
ary 9 with 626 tourists from the
United States. She returned home
from that cruise on Fevruary 22
and left New York two days later
on this cruise.

She will be arriving at Barba-
dos via St. Thomas, Martinique
and Trinidad. She will be leaving
for home via St,
Vincent, Guaira, Curacao
Cristobal, Port-au-Prince = an<
Havana, 4

La



Case Agairist Driver’
Put Off For March 3

Hearing in the case in which
Edgar DaCosta Inniss of Prospect,
St. James, is charged by the Po-
lice of driving the motor car S-188
without due care and consideration
on Fairfield Road, St. Michael,
was yesterday adjourned until
March 3 by His Worship Mr. H. A.
‘Yalma.

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker is appear-
ing on behalf of Inniss and tne
case for the Police is being led by
Sgt. Forde. The case was brought
as a result of an accident on Fair-
field Road between the bicycle
M-4001 and the motor car S-188
which the defendant was said to

be driving.
The offence was alleged to have
been committed sometime on

November 15. George Lowe, the
rider of the bicycle, said that the
car struck the front wheel of the
bicycle damaging it.

Cpl, Watson attached to the
Black Rock Station said that he
went to the scene of the accident
and saw the bicycle and rider. The
car was not there. On returning
to the Station he wrote out a sum-
mons form and on the form was
Colonel R. T. Michelin as com-
plainant in the case. The speed
limit on the Fairfield Road is 30
miles per hour.





FINED 15'- FOR LARCENY

A fine of 15/- to be paid in 14
days or in default one month's im-
prisonment with hard labour was
yesterday imposed on Samuel
Holder of Goodland, St. Michael
by His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”. . :

Samuel Holder was found guilty
of the larceny of a quantity of
cane fodder the property of Edwin
Boyce. The case was brought by
the Police. Sgt. King prosecuted.

Edithe Tull, a witness for the
prosecution, said that she saw
Holder in Boyce’s ground with
about’ 25 pounds of cane fodder
under his arm. She was sure that
it was Holder.

When Boyce saw her he turned
his back to her. He was wearing
a short white pants and a white
shirt,

Barna Defeats
Pelican 5-4:

AT TABLE TENNIS

BARNA defeated Pelican five—
four in an interesting Table Tennis
Inter—Club Division I matcti~at
the Y.M.C.A. on Monday night.

Louis Stoute of Barna gave the
best performarice, He won his
‘three games in convincing style.
Campbell Greenidge also gave a
good performance for Barna but
was defeated by Willoughby in a
good set. Willoughby gave the
best performance for Pelican,

The results were as follows:—

Greenidge (Barna) beat Gibson (Peli-
can) 21—13; 21

aoa (oar ;
CMjoward (Barna) lost to Worrell: (Peli-
can) 12-21; 13—21.

Stoute (Barna) beat Gibson (Pelican)
21—10; 21—18.

Greenidge (Barna) beat Worrell (Peli-
can) 21—14; 26—24

Howard (Barna) lost to Willoughby
(Pelican) 21—18; 8—21; 16-21.

Stoute (Barnes) beat Worrell (Pelican)
1721; 21—18; 21-14.

Howard (Barna) lost to Gibson (Peli-

20—22; 1 _
tRarha) lost to Willoughby
20-—-22; 21—17; 19—21.

REMANDED

Aubrey Harewood of Kensing-
ton New Land, was yesterday re-
manded by His Worship Mr. G. B.
Griffith after he appeared on a
charge brought by the Police of
breaking and entering the house
of Clifford Bowen with intent to
commit a felony. The offence was
alleged ‘to have been committed
sometime on February 28. Police
Constable 81 Llovd of the Central
Station brought Harewood to the
Police Station.
|. Sgt. King is prosecuting on be-
half of the Police. 7



2,
) beat Willoughby (Peli-



and school-girls

|



























By JOHN

In the early hours of the mor-
ring of 2nd March, 1935, the
residents of Hastings were awak-
ened by the bell of the Fire
Brigade, To those who took the
tieuble to get out of their beds
and.look into the eastern sky, it
could be seen that a fire of some
dimension was taking place, All
and sundry were shocked when
they heard that Christ Church
Church was completely gutted,
Nothing could be done to stop this
fire as no water was available.
From the Altar and the exquisite
stained glass window in the East
to the old Font in the West. A
doleful note was heard when the
two bells in the tower crashed tc
the ground and were ruined,

The crowd that gathered to wit-
ness this destruction, seemed to be
spell-bound; those who spoke did
so in whispers, while others were
not ashamed to. be seen wiping
away tears. This Church had been
standing for 99 years and was
loved by the parishioners. It was
re fourth Church of this parisia
vyhich had come to a sudden and

ntimely end.

The first Chureh of Christ
-hurch was built by the early
ettlers in the vicinity of Dover,
nd part of this graveyard can
till be seen, This Church appears
to have suffered heavily in the
floods of 1669, for at a meeting of
he Governor and Council held on
.8th January 1669/70 a report
‘rom the Christ Church. Vestry is
recorded, alleging that “the old
Church and Chapel had fallen to
decay and great inundations lately
upon +ye ‘Chiefest * place’ for
burial at ye, Parish Church had
washed the Earth from off ye
Corps.” The Vestry was seeking
licence to build a new Church,
which was apparently destroyed
in the hurricane of 1580. The
“Barbados Mercury” for Novem-
ber 29th, 1783 records a Petition

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

CRRIST CHURCH CHURCH

*

Grenada Riots Send Do You Remember?

PRIDEAUX

Mrs. Jemina Mascoll. Rev, Hast-
ings. must have died about 1744,
because his will dated 21st Decem—
ber 1743, was proved on the 10th
January, 1744,

Christ Church is famous in the
eyes of strangers as the home of
the “Barbados’ Mystery Vault,”
more commonly known as | the
‘Chase Vault.’ Up to the 22nd of
February i808, when the vault was
opened for the burial of the infant
daughter of the Hon. Thomas
Chase, all was in order, The first
disturbance was noticed when
the vault was opened on 16th
July 1812. The leaden coffins were
again .in disorder when the vault
was opened on the 25th September
1816, again on the 16th November
of the same year. The same dis-
order when the vault was opened
o the. 17th July 1819, for the
burial of Miss Thomasina Clarke.

On every occasion the coffins had jects of study. Priority is given to! Tondon on March 9.

been replaced in their proper
positions,
The Governor, Lord Comber

mere, having heard these stories,
was determined to investigate the
matter for his own satisfaction.
He attended the funeral, and had
the walls and floor sounded, and
after replacing the coffins, the floor
was covered with white sand, The
vault was then cemented up
and the seal of the Governor
affixed in several places; many
others present made their own
marks.

The Hon, N, Lyeas, records,in
his MSS (now in the Public
Library, Bridgetown, Barbados)
that H. E., Mr. Rowland Cotton,
and himself were guests of Mr.
Robert Boucher Clarke at his es-
tate, Elridge’s, Christ Church;
when the coffin mystery was men-
tioned, and the Governor decided
to have it opened that day; thus
the last scene of this drama was

from the Vestry of Christ Church] enacted on the 18th April 1829

to the Commissioners of Parlia-
mentary Bounty for assistance in
rebuilding the Church, They stated
—‘Suffered more from the vio-
lence of the tempest and the in-
undation of the sea than the
interior part of the island,—their
commodious and well constructed
Church was totally demolished
and no proper place left wherein
to call upon the name of the
Lord "The Vestry asked
for a portion of the bounty to
assist with the building of another
Church. There is very little known
about this Church as all the regis-
ters were lost in this hurricane,

The date of the erection of the
third Christ Church Church is
unknown, but it was built to ac-
commodate about 300 persons on
the high land overlooking Oistin’s
Town: then a_ sea-port. This
Church was destroyed by the hur-
ricane of August llth 1831, and
only the Communion Plate, the
Registers, and the Font were
saved,





Hon. Lucas records—

“Every outside appearance
was perfect, not a blade of grass
or stone touched; indeed collu-
sion or deception was impossible;
for neither ourselves nor the
negroes knew anything of the
matter; for the subject was
hardly started in conversation
before we set out for inspection.”
When the vault was opened, it

was founa to be in confusion, The
largest of the coffins which would
have taken at least six men to lift
it, had been set “upon end against
the wall.”

Dr, Lucas contiaues,

“There was no vestize of
water to be discovered in the
vault; no marks where it had

been; and the vault is in a level
churech-yard by no means in a
fall much less in a run of
water;” also “a mason struck
every part of the bottom with
his hammer and all was solid.”
Dr. Lucas offers no explanation,

The parishioners were deter- | 45 he wrote—“All I know is that
mined to build a Church that!it happened, and that I .was an

would withstand the elements, so | eye-witness

of the fact!” The

they entrusted the supervision to vault was abandoned, the widow
Edward Hooper Senhouse Esq.,; of Hon. Thomas Chase, caused the

Churchwarden,

with the result} coffins to be removed and buried

that a substantial building with}in other parts of the graveyard.
thick walls, and its roof hidden by |The ‘Chase Vault’ remains open
a battlement parapet, resembling | for all who care to visit it.

some old castle, was erected and

consecrated on 4th July 1837, The
parishioners of Christ Church
were so pleased with this building,
that they presented Mr. Senhouse
with an address and a solid silver
waiter in which was the following
inseription:—

“Presented to EDWARD H

SENHOUSE ESQUIRE by some] to-day

of the
CHRIST CHURCH PARISH in
the ISLAND ©F BARBADOS as
a sincere testimony of the high

opinion entertained by them of legislation,”

the zealous assiduity he dis-



BAN S, AFRICAN GOODS

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jca., March 1.

On a motion by S. A. Glass
Pole, Opposition Party Secretary,
the House of Representatives

passed a resolution re-

PARISHIONERS OF! questing Government to ban im-

portation.of South African goods
“because of Dr. Malan’s.. recent
passing of colour discrimination
The motion also
#sked Government to contact ana

played in superintending the, request political leaders of other

BUILDING OF _ THEIR! British West

CHURCH.”

After the destruction of the
Church in 1831 and until the new
one was consecrated in 1837, ser-
vice was held in a temporary
Chapel prepared for public wor-
ship at Oistin’s Fort, now Christ
Church Infirmary. This was done
by the kind permission of the
Commissicners of Fortifications.

The name of Warren Hastings
is well known to the people of
the British Empire. His life is
one. that all school children are
familiar with. He started at the
age of seventeen years as a writer
With the East India Co., in Bengal.

Clive, and a year or two after
became a Member cf the Council
at Calcutta. Due to his great
ability, he was advanced from

the first
India.
Warren Hastings’
Pennystone Hastings,

Governor-General

age of 15. His

Gloucester.

ihe famous Warren,
Rev. Hastings soon
again, but his wife also died.

subsequently he volunteered under

post to post, and in 1773. became
of
Few people know that
father, Kev.
was once
rector of Christ Church, Rev.
Hastings was born in England, and
first married there at the early
first wife was
Hester, a daughter of one Warren,
the owner of a small estate in
She died a few days
efter giving birth to their son,

married
He
then came to Barbados and was
appointed Rector of Christ Church,
and in 1787 he married a widow,

Indies Colonies
take similar action,

to



In Bexes and Singly

GIFT BOXES containing many different
styles: Coloured and White, Embroidered



| five

\



Westminster
Corner

English Harbour

R. P, SMITHERS (Conserva-
tive, Hampshire, Winchester
div.) asked the Secretary of State
for the Colonies whether he is

of the historic buildings of Lord
Nelson's dockyard at English Har-
cour, Antigua; and whether he
will open a fund or otherwise take
steps to make their restoration
possible.

Mr. Griffiths: I am already in
consultation with the Governor
about the state of repair of these
buildings.

Public Services

R. P. SMITHERS asked the

Secretary of State for the
Colonies what steps have been
taken by His Majesty's Govern-
ment towards implementing the
recommendations of the Commis-
sion upon the Unifitation "of “Pub-
lic Services in ‘th® British) Carib-'
bean; and what further steps it is
proposed to take.

Mr, Griffiths: The report of the
Commission ‘has been referred to
the Governors of the territories
concerned for consideration by the
Legislatures. Only the Legislative
Council of St. Vincent has yet
completed consideration of the
report and it has approved’ the
Commission's recommendations.
rhe implementation of the report
depends primarily on the decisions
of the Legislatures, and it has been
made clear that His Majesty's
Government have no wish to pre-
judge or influence those decisions,

Colonial Students

N R, P. SMITHERS asked the

Secretary of State for the
Colonies ‘on what’ principle Colo-
nial students are selected for ad-
mission to the Hans Crescent Hos-
tel; and whether any preference is
given to students who are prepar-
ing for Government services.

Mr, Griffiths: The aim is to
produce a balanced student com-
munity, widely representative not
only of the various Colonial terri-
tories but also of the different sub-

new arrivals in the United King-)
dom, for whom up to half the
places are reserved. Thirty-
places are reserved for
15 cadets taking the First Dev-
onshire Course and 20 Eng-
lish students attending Lon-
don University, who in turn re-
lease a corresponding number of
places at their hostels for colonial
Students. This admixture of U.K.
students has been a conspicuous
success. The future career of a
student is only one factor, though
an important one, affecting his
nn to Hans Crescent Hos-
tel.
Sugar Disease

R, R, ROBINSON (Conserva-

tive, Btackpool, South Div.)
asked the Secretary of State for
the Colonies what efforts are being
made to eradicate the leaf scald
disease from the sugar plantations
in British Guiana.

Mr. Braine (Conservative, Essex,
Billericay Div.) asked the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies what
steps are being take~ ‘o check the
spread of the leat ecald disease
threatening the sugar indust., mâ„¢
British Guiana.

Mr. Griffiths: Surveys to de-
termine the extent of the disease
and measures to control it have
been instituted in the Colony, and

steps are being taken urgently to|{$

obtain the services of an experi-
enced plant pathologist to super-
vise research work on the disease.
I am aware of the serious threat
that this disease constitutes to the
sugar industry of British Guiana
and hence to the whole economy
of the country. Vigorous steps are
being taken to combat it.



BUNGALOW BURNT

A bungalow in Station Hill
crugit fire last night about 9.20
o'clock but was put out within ©
minutes by the Fire Brigade which
carned out under Asst. Superin-
tendent Grant. A dairy is run ai
the property. The occupants were
away when it caught fire, Some
of the ceiling floor and clothing
were burnt. +

POSTMISTRESS
OF ST. PHILIP



Miss A. M. B. Hooper has been
appointed to be Postmistress for
the parish of St. Philip with effect
from the lst of March. :






[0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

“I LEAP OVER THE WALL"
By Monica Baldwin,
A MORNING AT THE OFFICE
~By Edgar Mittelholzer,



AT
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY

Fresh shipment of —

ENAMEL. IT
in all colours

AT
JOHNSON’'S HARDWARE

and Lace trimmed. Priced per box from $1.85 to $2.58

WHITE LINEN HANKIES—Each

As the Tourist Ship “Mauretania” will be arriving here
on Saturday next, March 3rd, at 10.30 a.m. this store
will remain open until 4 p.m. on that day.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET



’









‘Dominica Hopes To
Export 1,000,000

Last year, Dorainica exported
about 400,000 stems of bananas
to Ireland and this year they are!
hoping to export a million stems,
the Hon, H D_ Qhillingford,
ML C,, told the Advocate yester-

ay.

He said that their big problem
for the development of the indus-
try was roads which were serious-
ly lacking.

Mr. Shiningford arrived here
yesterday morning by the Colom.
bie for a week's holiday and is
staying at “Abbeville Guest
House,” Worthing.

He, said that before the war,
they had a small trade with gros
miehel bananas, but that was wip-
ead out by the Panama discase.
They were now growing the laca.
tan variety which was highly re
sistant to the Panama disease

They had.expectations of gettin,
tid.of ‘their citrus crop with thé
edvent of Colonial Developmen
Corporation, but that organisation
was very slow in coming int
~peration.

Limes had always been thei
major crop and the prospects fo
this year are fairly good.

BBC Producer Pays





|4-Week Visit To WI

Mr. E. R.. EDMETT, senioi
producer in the West Indies sec.
tion of the Overseas Service a
the B.B..C., is spending a few
days’ in Barbados as part of a
four-week visit to the Caribbean.
In such a short time, Mr, Edmett
told the Advocate, it is impossible
tc make a comprehensive survey,
but he hopes to obtain some idea
of listener response to the pro-
grammes broadcast daily in the
Overseas’: Service. between 7.15
and 7,45 p.m. .

So far Mr Edmett has been to
Jamaica, Trinidad and_ British
Guiana, and will be going on to
St. Lucia. before returning to




By personal contact and infor-
mal, conversations with various
people whom ‘he has been able to
meet, he hopes to build up at least
a few impressions which will be
a useful guide in finding the most
constructive-line to follow — in
future programmes.

“GOLFITO” TAKES
34 TO U.K.

Nineteen passengers came in
from British Guiana, Trinidad
and Venezuela by Messrs, Elders
& Fyffes’ Golfito yesterday cven-

ing,

The Golfito took aboard 34. pas
sengers here for Southampton and
left port a few hours after her

arrival, She is consigned to Messrs.
Wilkinson & Haynes Co,, Ltd

pet ON,

:
|
2

%



intel aa ada
Haviny a grand time at - -

CRICKET!

Deliciuus Sweet Biscuits for
LUNCHEON and TEA put
up ia convenient packages.
Assurted Sweet Biscuits by
Huatley & Palmer, Peek
Frean, Carr and Jacob,
Prices 10c.—26c.—48c.—-50e.
Per Pck.
Prices $1.20 fo $2.14 Per tin.
Jacob's Cream Crackers 6/-
Per tin.

*

-



—Also—
% Luscious Boxes of CONFEC-
% TIONERY small and large.
BLACK MAGIC CHOCO-
LATES $4.06 per box.
$ Peanuts 64c. Per tin,
Butter Scoteh 2l1c.
per tin,
Nougat 34c. and 70c, per tin,
Fry's Hazel Nuts 2/-, 3/9,

to 45c.

y 1/6 Box.
,; Cadbury's Red Rose 98c. &
‘ $1,80 Box,
x Cadbury's Chocolate Biscuits
‘ 5/- & 5/3 tin.
Chewing Gun 2c. & 6c, Pck.
asm, nner Mints 1/- per
c

Marr Bars 14c. ea,
Crest Bars 16c. ea.
Y Guava Cheese 18c, 4-02, Pck.
* Cadbury Bars (Asst.) 10c.,
17c., 19c., 34c., 37¢, ea.
Fry's Bars 7c., 9c., 12¢,, 1c.
Carr’s Choc, Lunch 12c, Pek.
Carr's Choc. Tea Cakes 8c.
each,
iy: Cheese Crisps $1.02
n.
gy Carr’s Club Cheese $1.00 tin.
A es Toffee 2/6 and 3/3
; n.
Y Blue Bird Toffee 1/9, 4/6, &
G $1.86 tin,
4 —Also—
Thermos Flask 1-Pint $1.51
, Sun fpaceer from 3/- to

Get them from, . .

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Street



66%)









X

PAGE. FIVE

acenspeemnsiniiasecuicamninnidnseniitcianaeema nn
SRR U4BKURaEPBESBeaesess

: ae
Stems Of Bananas e

FRESH SUPPLY OF a
i]
e
E |

PURINA HEN CHOW

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

at JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors
SEBS BERBERS REER ESE BEER











}
1



-

PPP VAAL S
%

CHERRY
CREAMS

that’s TO-DAY’S
SPECIAL

Come in an enjoy this delightful






Ice Cream flavour.



KNIGHT'S
PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN

SOLO GOOEY



Lovely and
Comfortable





GIRDLES
BY
‘GOSSARD’

ery —

All Elastic with Reinforced Satin Lastex

Front and Back @ $14.52

Satin Lastex with Boned Front and Zipp @ $10.93

Silk Skin with Satin Front in Roll-on and

Pantie Styles @ 7.20

Also

All Elastic Roll-on CORSELETTES ......... @ $5.76

HARRISON'S

BROAD STREET DIAL 2352

—



FOR THE BEST

Q SeaetiFa
CA8t-Te-cLean © |
FLOOR COVERING |

‘SILVER STAR’ |
CONGOLEUM|

*





INSIST ON

SILVER STAR

SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES |



STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.
fake great
pleasure in
announcing
the opening
TODAY of

their



ae

“ €OCKADE = J
BAR and LOUNGE

on the first floor of their building

/
if in
CS BROAD STREET
Visitors — Residents — Welcome
a MO ee ae OD A a







PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951







Bre WISE...
-. - ADVERTISE

Gums Bleed!

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
Teeth mean that you bave Pyorrhea,
‘Trench Mouth or ao some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amesan stops gum
bleed! the first da:

Rupert and the Coughdrop—25 Rupert and the Coughdrop—226














sore mouth



f yarch he toy soldier fold may well ask,"’ chuckles the clown. , Amecar
A ~ ee ag | a a hee one of Santa Claus’s airships. Very quickly the strange craft looks like another cloud. In a tew tnd auexiy ueitens the teeth. irom clad
up the littie cra st If ever you see a little cloud travel- gathers speed and Rupert finds hum- minutes chey reach it and the toy | guarantee, Amosan must make your
others walling abour Rupert won- j',0° faster than the others you'll self rushing smoothly and steadily soldier works the lever so that they i z Baul wal ano oer aty” pach
dets if he can follow them. Very now that it is one of ? through the starlit sky, leaving all land gently on a mmott yond Leaning iH} = == Foret, Nek we Se trom your chemiâ„¢
gingerly he puts one foot out of the nor a real cloud at all, it will the little clouds behind. Ahead of over a parapet 1s the figure of Sams , Hh , today. Phe usr
basket and, to his surprise, he finds probably have ae of —— wel hip is a re. low — gets rae ae os —" ANT Amosan ant Ce
t oe e i ny ighter an ighter as he draws a } ; | HH
ee et aes Ye eae ee until he pe that it comes he murmurs. ‘‘Why have you er Pyor orrhea—Tre: : ach

; is>"’ 4, ee the starting lever. a e
ever is this?’ he gasps ju 8 fi 2 lovely castle built on what brought him?

Coughdrop—27 Rupert and the Coughdrop—28 THESE 2 CREAMS

AAAAAAAATLAALARALARA:

Rupert and the






Lovely Society women all over the
yet) ; FOLLOW THE BEAUTY
world follow this simple, inexpen- CARE OF Ss
LOVELIEST WOMEN
EVERYWHER

sive beauty care; one that is E





BEPEEEROES.

} See Us for the
} following -—

1 & 2)b. tin C. & E. Morton
Oatmeal

Pkg. Vita Wheat Biscuits

within the reach of everyone of ,
yout: Pe Pam AALAAEALIARERIRARY

This is what you do: every night, at bedtime, smooth Pond’s Cold
Cream over face and throat with your finger-tips. Remove the cream,














When they have all alighted Santa then the clown and the snufflehound Santa Claus leads the way at a resents haven't gone out yet."’ In



Claus gazes blankly at R _ arrived just as | was going to bed surprising speed for such an old nt of him Rupert sees the long, and with it every scrap of dirt and make-up. Then “rinse” with more Pkg. Weetabix Biscuits

rica tact easet” ae) veer bap, e_me come here. And do men, “Flow odd that it should be gloomy faces of the animale, Thets Cold Cream, for extra-cleansing, extra-softening. Very soon, your} Bots, Heinz Sandwich Spread
ae - ’ sents are late." so bright,” thinks Rupert. “ necks are swathed wit nkets, ee

mé?*’ he mutters. ** Do you know ae ~~ 7 py + et. ro Teast teem ihe vahe Line atiall and. thee epee ack “ness ait: skin will be vlearer, smoother, lovelier. Bots. Heinz Salad Cream

anythitg about eindeer?"’ “Reine the old man. And he leads him here.”” At length they turn into a ‘* That's the cause of the trouble,” FOUNDATION AND PROTECTION Tins Heinz Vegetable Salad

deer! No, why should 1?" says aie b a — oy : bridge az spemanent., ' | Taare.” Bes Sain cde oat sare they A By day, use a touch of Pond’s Vanishing Cream as a foundation. This in Mayonnaise

Rupert. “J get your note saying and chen n and down by many +’ these a al ! -greasy ri ts. C. & E. Morton Pickles

pers. 1 aye oe rng Shoat ; on enereen. Sara why the cae wot" ee non-greasy cream will hold your powder matt for hours, and protect ps thee

your complexion from sun and wind.

Tins Breakfast Rolls

2%. bots. C. & P. Table Salt

Bots. Cocktail Cherries

1 Ib. tin Asstd. Sweet
Biscuits

oF a
Start now to win the loveliness

POND’S that can be yours’ when you use
Pond’s Creams. You'll find the

‘Rupert and the

Coughdrop—30
1 2.4 J o rid f






































| Vanishing Cream distinctive opal-white jars at all INCE & Co., Ltd.
Cold Cream the best beauty counters. 6, 2, 8 & 9 Roebuck Street,
Oe ; eA yy ae et es (ee , ==
RAPS) PE Soest | |y Faget’ ie | || Fae Uh a * | mM CAN EPILEPSY BE CURED?
\ | {+ } ? I » ;
re : ‘ uv Sae as . = Tod ean ie v7. _ - reant has been found that relieves at-
en tee aa ck as eT A A ae Gane et eae ert ‘ ime began it has attacked rich tacks in most cases. This remarkable
pene ina ree Sanra | been mage. You'd Capua pe home Avan ever. “I can’t send or cea ie Ia realy cclhee $ aie tenes 4 | } Sere hale cee a“ Secular 2 titled Gar +
ai demendendy ona pis @ seni. at a pity.” S murs t . 1 t 2. Pe See a . s ? ; iN yron were vic- ooklet entitied “Can Epilepsy be
parcels. he clown and the wooden into. the corridor and calls a tay = ” a ee, ° certain iaase we ee ee ° athnng : ‘i : . aah ith 9 tims. Epilepsy has always interested Cured?” This booklet is given ames tres
dog are already there, “If you soldier, but at that moment the that you are wanted,” he says. it's coughdrop.”” He takes it 20: : - ‘PATENT: BARLEY Re p i men of science and at last their efforts to epileptics. Anyone suffering from
want to cure your reindeer you snuffle-hound leaps into action and Are you sure that you're not of the paper, and hands «: ; 7 makes milk more digestible for bab ws v4 have been successful because a eet this disease should request a free copy.
wana doctor, you den's want mes’. prances around him again.” There's carrying, something thar could help old man, wha 2:08 « 5, “ ar F THE EDUCATIONAL DIVISION, Dept. A-2a0,” 880 Bergen Ave., Jersey City, NJ,U.S.A.
says Rupert. es, | can't see w something 5 us t once Ruger:’s eyes ligh yhile th ifie-hound ig on rie ted “ t | ee
you were brought,”” sighs the old stand," murters the clown, yp. Tm oniy marics ps ch ng Ga dace ne e2t 5 gett ‘PATE NT’ GROATS fi ' Ce Re ee See ee ee
. us HIME A siicdceedii css sa ciesis beiss ohgtass oapnabmoubedesakess Urvibenas ph banscvsn
é - ot Clean baby=~*, *Z. i me # clarity, pla ; ; !
mys . medher Wenge W PBDRERS 5. ccnch cavcnnedsbahdevitecd atersuecosaensteiatys i





nied . BS hae



y Heiry sbophic aE nnd ii dae sng randy ones ie oh MUIR a casas ae

Steen one oo a of

Coughdrop—31

= oS

Rupert and the

a

“









THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK ~—_—=&®T

e
WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,



the corner with a delighted snuffle- he says, ‘' From here we cat see

For some moments after Rupert





. Racing across a bridge the toy
ne Rnaod ever the views ot seg peed #4 BA DAY a, Seed clown Nesds Rupert to another everything that happens athe and Associations to make the compilation of information in
s silence. ta * in. tower.“ are we going this castle, We shail soon know if-——"’ -
Claus gives a start. ‘Of course, I follo Rupert, “Had we better way ?’” asks little locke breath Then he breaks off, for three dark THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
sec Mel mini” hecciles. “Rty SUPE No Be mon hes pani y,, ‘Santa Claus didn’t come creatures | suddenly appear from possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities;
little di jght sfter all. Hi aL Sie PORES eee ey here.” For answer the toy clown below and leap happily about in "
pies 08 Si wis al. Hate bay 0 ap aca we en: hueries him to a top room and then the sky. ‘*Look, the reindeer, the religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports,
’ a @ busties away mm ihe oper 5 i * .
With a rush he disappears round site direction. ? ae et aoe Suneone” erie all te ath radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed
' Ree a race ce ra below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:

THE EDITOR,
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street.

| FORM :
Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Etc. ...........ssssssessssssesenrsssnnsansees



COP eRO eee Ten eee eeeeeeeeeeeeeet Cet eOe REESE STORET OSES ESE EOESE SEEDS OOOOH ORES E DENT SEDER RES ORS ORTON IS EDELINVOR ENON SET ESS













i warches wah delight mee. chem. “All's well now," Silke Givhs lie Pees bok oe ke eee ee Council or Committee Membets..........scssssessseesvessscsncssnserssennsssssssenneante
‘ re ret deer prante abour ua the old man. “ That coug's the courtyard where he gives a sleigh while a to Senta ‘use
mi i My. 8 2 geod thing i rop cf yours wor! A like magic, shout and in a moment all is bustle everything from his list. Then the
h csoulléhound found you,” ba eas OP e ee ag gave 2 a cena Bring m smaller old gentleman blows a shrill whistle CORSO eS PESO Oe eR DOOR SOROEOOSOPESOD OES OESOOODODOREDSE ESE SER DEERE ERORONT ODER HEROS EOE SOERESERESE REDE D ES OEE EO CS TOO O RODD
cres the chown. ‘* You've dene rhe now th ees fhe rewderr, anc sleigh,’ he orders. ‘*The more and the reindeer tur d glid
' : ey're perfectly acl. Tt distant presents er turn and glide
tock e2 bach and find waoden dog who ha: j sed the first,” Av apecial Compare oben down towards him.“ Now, Rupert, TEOCIBUFOP.....0.ccsseecscessorencerersveoseens SHOCEOUGTY sscccesssssneassesssssvererecsenonedsseoeecece
its, & see how it hap party grins broadly. “ Now some Castle guards ron to dovhis biddings :. ee a, ar eae
penet i neve not gone far on, let's wzite no more time!” sorting and dra + %@ go home with me or on my
Belire they mee: him Ruttpig fe peph Sente Baas ee Oe ing and dragging out parcels and_ cloud aiship,"” he says Short historical account of the origin, functions and current





Coughdrop—35 Rupert and the Coug

Tre on 4 ert ay

hdrop—36

\=4





















C anned SLICED HAM by the Ib $1.56 per Ib

aS S CANNED HAMS 2 ib tins $2.91 each
> qm CANNED HAMS 23 ib tins $3.16 cach




it is high time






rt lat 1 where they can see the airship rest- Very scan the hirtle people have ike," ; yy Me s ; ae’
he went home and he asks to be ing on top of a big totee’ | den le. che light of the castle and are clown cheerfully. ves, fe CANNED HA Ss Bi ib tins $4.60 e hh
ae ee actor. wey po are 7 i starting on sailing Pe, ag night is the faster it goes. Now look at
Then yo ec go by thac their way. **Ign’s agoin. Befare anta Clays and this,"” + tb bs
cloud airship, says Santa coming with us?" a apert his reindeer streak pas: them and speaks Se ned vere es inne 8 s to 10 I tins at $1.21 per tb
It yeu came with me you'd peering over the edge. ‘' No, his disappear ahead. ‘‘I say.’ mur- size and stops. From under a fold
yep gute. work HW mae wo a. a **ten't ies cloud the toy soldier produces the crane
ye to the old gentle- says the clown. “ must have rs very small? Shall and th
sas the clown to a rest.” 5x ae we f § tye can make it rare ier ictal ae wee are







Owing to delay caused by irregular shipping services the | are delicious



er

. {| ———
“Advocate” regrets that it has been compelled to curtail its ALLEYNE ARTHUR

daily cartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all avail- & CO. LTD

able strips as they arrive will be appearing in this space. | “YOUR GROCERS”

oo |
ped CANNED
I DURING LENT FISH
MACKEREL — 1 Ib. tin at ......... 600005. 86e.
PILCHARDS — 1 Ib. tin at .............. 38e.

PILCHARDS — 4 Ib. tin at .............. 2l1c.

BRUNSWICK CANADIAN SARDINES —
per tin 16e.



emer







hal ix
i



FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951



CLASSIFIED ADS.) Aarbour Log





TELEPHONE 2508
The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow- FOR RENT

ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and |
3 cents per word on week-days and



96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a

4 cents per word on Sundays for each word Sundays.
additional word.
For Births, Marriage or Engagement HOUSES

announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for esch
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508

_—_—
BELLA VISTA: Cattlewash, — Com-
fortably furnished. Three bedrooms,
twin beds, Large electric refrigerator













between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death) jignt, power plugs, runn’ water
Notices only after 4 p.m. throughout, Garage. sarvente rooms.
Steck House. Mrs. Chandler. ‘Todds,
DIED 95211. 25.2.51e3n.

ve —_——_—_—————— men
:W_On March Ist 1951 at his resi-] _HOUSE—Modern three bedroom House,
eee enty’s Ville Fontabelle} situated at Top Rock, having large
FREDERICK ADOLFUS CAREW/| Lounge, seperate Dining Room, 2 Pully-

(Merchant). Funeral leaves the above
residence at 4.15 p.m. today for the
Westbury Cemetery. Friends are in-
vited.

tied Toilets and Baths, and all other
conveniences available unfurnished from
March ist on, 3, 6, or 12 months least.
Ring 4683 or 2328. 28,2.51-—4n

Hugh and Gilbert (sons), Maybelle ee
= (sister). MARINE GARDENS—New Bungalow.

3 bedrooms with running water, built in
wardrobes and all modern conveniences.

—
SMALL—On March

1951,



at the

“4 Long Lease preferred. Apply — Mrs.
General Hospital, Mrs. Hilda Small. =
Her funeral leaves Chelsea Road, St. Friedman, Hotel Royal. 1.3.51—4n

Michael at 4.00 p.m. to-day for the

Chapman Street Church of God and

thence to the Westbury Cemetery.
Wilfred Small (widower), McDonald
Morris (brother), Miriam Morris
(aunt), Barbara Breberton ‘adopted
daughter). 2.3.51—In,.

FOR SALE

eee
PLEASANTON — Worthing main Rd.,
Enclosed Gallery, 3 bedrooms, drawing
and dining rooms, servant's room, gar-
ege and ail modern conveniences. Phone
2764. 25.2.51—2n.
—_——

To approved tenant. Furnished Ground
Floor Flat. Hotel area, Within stone's
throw lovely beach. Private telephone.

Gas Cooker. Reception, Dining and
Minimum charge week 172 cents and} 2 Bedrooms. 2 Galleries overlooking
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24/ gardens. Apply Box 250. 2.3.51—2n,

words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—One (1) Morris Minor’ Saloon
1950 model, under 3,000 miles. Owner
leaving Colony. Apply Thirkell 2371.

28.2.51—t.f.n.

WHITE COTTAGE FLAT
St. James.

Furnished or unfurnished. Good sea-
bsthing. Private beach. Appiy Mrs.
E.. M. Greenidge, White Cottage, St.
James.” 25.2.51-—4n.



————
CAR—One (1) 1950 Model Ford Anglia.

Can be seen at Courtesy Garage.
26.2.51—t.f.n.

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 om Sundays

AUCTION

—
AUSTIN 5-TONNER TRUCK 1946 MODEL
We are instructed by the Insurance



OO —_——
PICK-UP—One Dodge Pick-up in work-
ing order. Apply: S. E. Cole & Co., Ltd
Roebuck Street. 21.2.51—t.f.n.

5 VELOCETTE MOTOR CYCLE — in
good order. Price 3480.00. Apply W.
Rogers. Barber over J, N. Goddard, &





Sons, Broad St. 2,3.51—3n | Agents to sell this damaged vehicle by
Public Auction at the General Omnibus
ELECTRICAL Garagé, Nelson Street, at 2 p.m. on

Friday 9th March, 1951.
JOHN M. BLADON,
~ Auctioneer,
2.3.51—5n.

REAL ESTATE

OFFERS will be received by the
undersigned up to the 16th day of
March 1951, for the buildings known
as Calais (land not included) situated
fon Dover Coast, Christ Church. The
purchaser to demolish the buildings and
clear the land within thirty days from
‘the date of purchase,

K. E, McKENZIE,
Neils Plantation, St. Michael.

HORSES — Three (3) Riding Horses. StS l—00,

Herbert Dowding, Lower Estate, St. i

prea NSE ES AL a
Michael.
oo 28.2.51—3n.

MODERN BUNGALOW — Overlooking
———
TWO HORSES, HARNESS and one (1)

RADIOGRAM—One seven Valve H.M.V, j
in A-1 condition on show at DaCosta
& Co., Ltd. Electrical Department. No
reasonable offer refused.

. 1.2.51—4n

LIVESTOCK

CALF—One (1) Pure Bred Holestine
Bull Calf, out of Prince Albert. Age
ene month old, Dial 3527.

28.2.51—t.f.n,

—
GOAT—With, Kid 3 weeks old, giving
eight pints of milk, Phone 4172.
2.3.51—3n,



Golf Course, 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining | Rooms, Gallery, Garage and



: heap. Apply: 8. E. Cole | Spacious games room underneath. Apply:
Shee. Fae Seri direes Gordon Nicholls. ‘Telephone 8539.

21.2.51—t.f.n. 24.2.51t.f.n.

BEMERSYDE, St, Lawrence Gap, Christ

MISCELLANEOUS Church, near the Cable Station. The

dwellinghouse comprises large drawing
and dining rooms, three bedrooms, with
running water in each (one with a private
beth) separate toilet and bath, and
kitchen. Open verandahs to the East
end the North and a closed verandah
to the South on the seaside. Three
servant's rooms, garage and ferneny in
the. yard, which also contains . several
cocoanut and fruit trees.

The property is situated on the most
popular coast in the Island with perfect
sea-bathing.

For appointments to view and for

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1,51—t.f.n.



CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and
draperies. By Kirsch, Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.0
—$—$—$—$—$—— er

DOORS—Several pairs of pitch pine
doors, suitable for Garage or Warehouse

with large hinges. To be seen at) further particulars ring 3925, R. S.
Willdale, Marine Gardens. I. M. G./ Nicholls & Co., Solicitors,
Simpson, 1,3.51—6n, 25,2.51—t.f.n.







GRANT’S SCOTCH WHISKY.—Served
at the Barbados Aquatic Club when
requested, and used by many discrim-
inating consumers. Sold by us per bottle
or per case. Mount Gay Distilleries Ltd,
Agents, 1,3.51-—2n.

————

MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin-
puished solution to your special
architectural problem of door closures,
screens, movable partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD,

The wecepieed will set up for sale at
their offi (9 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 2nd day of “March,
1951, at 2 p.m.

The dwellinghouse called “Murray
Lodge” with the land thereto containing
by estimation 9,200 sq. feet, situate at
Upper Bay Street, St. Michael, the resi-
dence of the late A. C, Greaves.

Inspection by appointment with Miss
Ida Greaves, Telephone No. 3060.

For further particulars and conditions

In Carlisle Bay



M.V. Sedgefield, Sch, Marea Henrietta,

bow M. Sch. W. L. Eunicia,
Harriet Whittaker,
Sch. Emanuel C. Gordon, Sch. Rosaren>,
Sch. United Pilgrim S.. Sch. Anita H.,
Yacht Caribbee, Sch. Burma D., Sch
Henry D. Wallace, MV. "Cacique del
Ccribe, Sch. Lady Noeleen, Sch. Lau-
dalpha, Sch. Enterprise S.. M.V. Lady
Joy.

Sen

ARRIVALS

Oil Tanker Inverrosa, 2,372 tons net
Capt. Shaw, from Caripito.

M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons
net, Capt. Clarke, from Halifax

SS. Golfito, 4,505 tons
Sapsworth, from Trinidad,

S.S. Colombie, 17,554 tons net, Capt.
Kerharo, from Le Havre.

DEPARTURES

Schooner Mary M. » 69 tons net
Capt. Marshall, for British Guiana.

Schooner Lindsyd If, 36 tons net, Capt
Barnes, for Martinique.

Schooner Island Star, 37 tons
Capt. Joseph, from British Guiana.

M.V. Cacique del Caribe, 162 tons net,
Capt. Archibald, for St. Vincent.

S.S. Colombie, 17,554 tons net, Capt.
Kerharo, for Trinidad.

S.S. Golfito, 4,505 tons
Sapsworth, for England.

M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons
ret, Capt. Clarke, for St. Vincent.

Ships In Touch “With

net, Capt.

net,

net, Capt.

Barbados Coast Station | ‘rrooping

CABLE AND WIRELESS (W.1.) Lid.
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
rae Coast Station:—

.S. Imperial Quebec, S.S. Brasil, S.S.
Petter, S.S. Delnorte, M.S. Caribe. SS.
Scatalina, S.S. Thelidomus, S.S. Celijo,
S.S. Colombie, S.S. Geirulv, S.S. Maure-
tenia, S.S. Eika, S.S. Esso France, 8.5.
Winsum, S.S. Tuscanstar, $.S, Esso
Readini, S.S. Ancylus, S.S, Limburg, S.S.
Argentine, S.S. Brazil, SS... Nieuw
Amsterdam, S.S. Frontenac, S.S. Canadian
Challenger. S.S. Kim, 8S.S. Degrasse, S.S,
Loke Kootenam, S.S. Arania, S.S. Queen
of Bermuda, S.S. Ciudad de Sevilla, S.S,
Ines, S.S, Askivinis, S.S. Alcoa Clipper,
8.8. Trocas, S.S. Golfito, S.S. Sunprincs,
S.S. Fufina, S.S. Paraguay, S.S. Hauk-
efjell, S.S. Frontenac, S.S. Washington

LOST







—
A WALLET—Containing one Turf Chub

Sweepstake Ticket, Series A.A. No,
9858, and 2 Receipts. Finder please re-

turn same to Harold Harding C/o B’dos

Advocate. Reward. 2.3.51—1n

_ ee
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET -- Series A.A.
OF14. Finder please return same :o
Eleanor Devonish, Richmond Gap, Hoad
Land. 2.3.51—1n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

TRANSFER & REMOVAL
The application of George Handel Hall



ef Enterprise, Christ Church purchaser
ef Liquor License No. 893 of 1951 grant-
ed to Sylford Scantlebury in respect of
a board and shingled shop at Hindsbury
Road near Eastmond Corner for permis-
sion to remove the said license to the
Ground floor of a two storey wall and
Wooden building
Church within Distriet “B” and to use
the said license at such last described
premises,

at Oistins, Christ

Dated this 28th day of February, 1951.

To:—C. W. RUDDER, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
District “B”,
G, HANDEL HALL,

Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consid-

ered at a Licensing Court to be held
on Wednesday 14th day of March, 1951

fo o'clock a.m. at Police Courts Dist.

'€..W, RUDDER,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “B”
2.3.51—1n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Horatio Greenidge

of Black Rock, St, Michael, for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at a
wall building at Black Rock, St. Michael,

Dated this 28th day of February, 1951.

To:—E, A, McLEOD, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
District “A'.
H. GREENIDGE,
Â¥ _ Applicant
N.B.—This application Will be consi.-

ered at a Licensing Court to be held

at Police Court, District “A” on
Monday the 12th day of March, 1951 at
11 o'clock, a.m,

BE. A, MeLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
2.3.51—1n



a ee

VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirseh Sun-aire
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to
your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD. 13,2.51—t.f.n.

—_——

Why not give your floor that new look.
Have them Sanded by the NU FLOOR
METHOD, Call Evelyn Roach & Co.
Ltd. 4623. 27.2.51—t.f.n.

—————$—$_$_$__$_$_$_$_$_
WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower-
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.
We cut to your requirements. G, W.
HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd. Dial 4222.

(

15.2.51—10n, | 2nd March 1951,

——_

YACHT “CYCLONE"”-—Uffa Fox's In-
ternational one-design ‘Tornado Class.
In first elass racing trim. Winner of
the 3 Trial Races. Price $720.00. H.
JASON JONES & CO,, LTD, PHONE
4279. 27,2.51—6n,

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents ong and $1.80 on Sundays.
— over etic emma
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a | LONDON

96 cents Sundays 24 words
word Sundays.





HELP

Young Lady with knowledge of type-
writing and Shorthand, Preferably one
with some previous experience in
Commission Office work.

Apply in writing to :
JAMES A. LYNCH & Co., Ltd.,

P.O.B. 140.
Bridgetown.
28.2.51— T.F.N,

MISCELLANEOUS

——
A COLLECTOR, Wants to buy Antique
Pistols, Box “C". C/o PAVOT AES 6

.

cee ee ena ah i
IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-

lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.

Phone 4429 nF sul ME ooeeesterers ad-
ini Royal Yac ub.

ee 20.2.51.—T.F.N,

——$—_—————_—$——————

IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-

lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniaturer jade,

Ola B we Dal iso GO. ES,
E a be

ABN Fee 20.2.51.—t.f,n.

nt
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

TRANSFER & REMOVAL

The application of Linley Johnson of | the 2ist March.

Pie Corner, St. Lucy the purchaser of

Liquor License No. 363 of 1951 granted cept the lowest Tender.

in respect of front part of a board and
shingle house at Pie Corner, St. Lucy,
19 remove said License to front part of
a board and shingle house at Pie Corner,
St. Lucy “(about 20 ft. from original)
premises) and to use it at such last de-
scribed premises,

Dated this 26th der of February 1931.
To:—SYDNEY H. NURSE, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
District “E". * Z
LINLEY JOHNSON, *

Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held
on 12th March 1951 at 11 o'clock a.m.

at Police Court, District “E".

SYDNEY H.

Police Magistrate, Dist. “E’,
2.3.51—1n.

sisi ili nedeaeniomcentoae spate
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of James Barrow of
Bush Hall, St. Michael, for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at a
board and shingle shop with shedroof
attached at Alleyne's Tenantny, Bush
Hall, St. Michael,

Dated this 27th day of February 1951.
To:—E. A. MeLEOD, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
JAMES BARROW,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held} February 1951, so far as concerns. the

at Police Court, District “A - un
Friday the 8th day of March, 1951 at
ll o'clock, a.m.

E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.

2.3.51—i1n

of sale, apply to :—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
20.2.51.—10n.

—

SHARES—500 Shares Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading Co. Limited.. 500 Shares
Barbados Co-operative Cotton Factory
Limited. 120 Shares Barbados Fire
Insurance Co, Limited, 90 Shares Bar-
bados Foundry Limited. 61 Shares
Barbados Ice Co. Limited. 139 Shares
Knights Limite¢. 122 Shares Barbados
Telephone Co, Limited.

The above shares will be offered to
public competition on Friday next the
at 2 p.m, at the office
of the undersigned.

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
Lueas Street. |,
24.2.51—6n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days



in 1951.





CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
EXAMINATIONS

Entries for the Summer Examinations, !
1951, of the London Chamber of Com-
merce must reach the Department of
Education, The Garrison, not later than
12 noon on Saturday, the 17th March,
195!.

2. The entry fee will be as follows:—
Single Subjects $1.92 each
Foreign Languages $3.12 each
Full Certificate $10.00

Department of Education.
28.2.51—3n.

(2)

etc.



Y. M. C. A.

TENDER FOR ERECTION OF
BUILDING

The Board of Directors of the Y.M.C.A.
invites Application for Tenders for the
erection of a building at Headquarters,
Pinfold Street.

The Plans and Specifications can be

at. the Secretany’s Office
Y.M.C.A, from Thursday 1st March to
Wednesday Mth March between the
hours of 10 a.m, and 4 p.m. daily except
Sundays.

Tenders must be submitted m Sealed
Envelopes and addressed to the Secre-
tary of the Y.M.C.A., Pinfold Street not
later than Noon 21st March,

Tenders submitted will be opened at a
Board Meeting to be held at 4.30 p.m. on

The Board does not bind itself to ac-
RT H. WILLIAMS,

Secretary.
28,2.51—8n







NOTICE

THE PARISH OF ST. PETER
All persons owing the above parish

ony Parochial Taxes; please pay im- i
mediately.
G. &. CORBIN,
Parochial Treasurer,
1.3.51—4n
—_—_—
NOTICE

GIRLS INDUSTRIAL . UNION
ANNUAL FETE
(Advertisements) at Queen's Park on
Thursday 24th May (Empire Day), 1951,
3 p.m, to # p.m .
Buy a ticket ae lueky number,

(General Secretary), G..U. “}
28. 2.51—2n,









NOTICE is hereby given that the
partnership heretofore subsisting be
tween ARTHUR JAMES DOORLY and
ALFRED ALEXANDER MACKIE carry-
ing on business as Garage Proprietors
at Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, under
the style or firm of Supreme MOTOR
COMPANY, has been dissolved by
mutual consent as from the 28th.day of

seid Alfred Alexander Mackie, who has
retired from the said firm.
Dated the 23rd day of February 1961
A. J. DOORLY.
A. A. MACKIE.
1.3.51—Sn[

| Sen: Wonderful Counsellor, Sch. Rain-

Minimum charge week 72 cents and! Sch. Turtle Dove,

or

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



French Troops Get

American Citation

TOKYO, March 1.

General Ridgway, 8th Army
Commander in Korea, awarded a
United States presidential cita-
ten today to “the French
battalion which made_a_ stand
with American troops in beseigee
Chivyeng a few-weeks ago.

The battalion of fewer than
1,000 men fought at bayonet
point in swirling fog and “helped
ereatly” in putting owt of action
an entire Chinese division.

The citation spoke of the
battalion’s “extraordinary hero-
ism, aggressiveness and esprit de
corps on the central front.

—Reuter.



FILM SHOWS

I.ve_ films. will be shown
it the monthly reunion of the
Cenbermere School Old _ Boys’

Association to-night at 8 o'clock.
‘Yhere are British News, Journey
by a London Bus, Sprinting and
iLurdling, Robinson Charlie and
of the Colour.





Calls For Change
At Foreign Office

LONDON, March 1.

Lord Templewood, added his
voice in the House of Lords to-
day to those calling for a change
at the Foreign Office. As Sir
Samuel Hoare, he was Foreign
Secretary in 1935,

He said there was no post in
the Government where it was
more necessary to have a Minis—
ter sitting day after day, often
night after night in his office.

“It is unfortunate at this
moment of crisis to have a For-
eign Secretary who is a_ sick
man”, he concluded,

—Reuter.

MACK FOR B. AIRES

: LONDON, March 1 ..
Sir Henri Mack, British Ambas-
saqor designate to Argentina, will
seil for Buenos Aires aboard the
Andes on March 10, it was learn-
ed here to-day.

Sir Henri
hopes the new Anglo-Argentine
iegotiations on meat prices about
tc begin in Buenos Aires would
have a satisfactory settlement by
the time he arrived .—Reuter,



THE WHOLE TOWN’

7 CHEMICOâ„¢

S TALKING ABOUT



HOUSEHOLD CLEANSER

“PENNY

TRY IT TODAY— Here's a

prove how easily an
CHEMICO on a dull pen
leams. S-M-O-O-T-H

paintwork, etc., with equal

Distributors
Evelyn Roach & Co., Ltd.

uick way to

efficiently
CHEMICO cleans metal. Dab a little
ny, rub brisk-
ly, and see how brilliantly the coin
ste CHEMI-
O cleans porcelain, tiles, glass, lino,
ease.

TEST”



tHE COUNTY CHEMICAL CO. LTD., SHIRLEY, BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND



LOOK YOUR BEST


































Your hair will be
handsomer by far
when you treat it tu
‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic,
Just use a few drops
@ day.., then see
the difference!

Buy a bottle today!

Vaseline:

TRADE MARK
VASELINE is the registered trade mark
ef the Chesebrough

Mie. Con. Cone'd

- YEAR BOOK 1951



The Advocate Co: Ltd, will publish a Year Book of Barbados

The Year Book will contain three parts:--

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover,

|
Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

this information solicited should be sent in immediately or not
jater than March 15th 1951.

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,

Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Yecr Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisc-
tions immediately or not later than March 15th 1951.

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,

34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951.

Advertisers are asked to get in touch with
Mr. Trevor Gale,

Advertising Manager,

Barbados Advocate, |
34 Broad Street. |

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be |
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

(AN ADVOCATE .PUBLICATION)

ut



said to-day that he

mes





\
4 PLP ESOPPS SSS PSPS SOD “%
x xg
% NOTICE >









Coffee Smugglers

TRIESTE, March !

Police wooped to-day on a)
business community of the free,
port of Trieste, arresting nine well)
known merchants, two policemen
and a civilian
United States on charges of smug-
gling coffee. Police headquarters
said five merchants for whom
arrest warrants had been issued
escaped from the small Adriatic
free territory,

Police alleged the struggling
ring Had earned at least 18 million
lire in the last 12 months by smug-
gling coffee from the free port into
the city of Trieste. They added
that two policemen arrested —
one Austrian and the other Yug.-
slav—were acting as lorry drivers,

—Reuter,



Rates Of Exchange

MARCH 1, 1951



CANADA
oe Cheques on ....... a
* Bankers 63 1/10% pr,
Demand Ws tease ches ahs
Drafts 62.95% pr.

Sight Drafts 62 8/10% pr.
Cable
Currency 61 6/10% pr

60 6/10% Vr,








63
Coupons
Silver







is PURE,
SAFE MILK

\

—

in Proference the World Over

1900 Herden Co, Taternat'l Copr, Reserved

} 1M
‘ret
{ a

PUBLIC MEETING

There will be a Public Meeting
held under the auspices of



THE BARBADOS LABOUR
PARTY
and the
BARBADOS WORKERS’
UNION
at MILE & QUARTER, St, Peter
On FRIDAY, 2ND MARCH,

1951 at 8 P.M.

Speakers:—F. L. Walcott, M.C.P.

K. N. R. Husbands,

M.C.P.
F. E, Miller, M.C.P.
G. H. Adams, M.C.P.

ORIENTAL

GIFTS!
THANTS

RACES
JOCKEY WHIPS

Whalebone Lined.
ges~ Only 3 Remaining.

NEWSAM & Co.

DIAL,
3466

NOTICE

The Women’s Self Help

Association

. Owing to the “MAURE-
TANIA” arriving on SAT-
URDAY, 8rd March, we will
be remaining open until
3.30 p.m.

LPP LLL

SSSs

SOB

~

i}
>
.



NOTICE

Owing to the arrival of
the Tourist ship to-morrow,
SATURDAY, 3rd March
our store will remain open
all day.

COLLINS LTD.



DANCING SCHOOL — NEW
> OLASSES

New classes are being formed
and Musical
and “KEEP
FIT" under the tuition of Miss
Joan Ransom, who hbolds the
Diploma of the Imperial Society
of Teachers of Dancing and 1s
a Licentiate of the Royal Academy
of Dancing, London, England

for Ballroom,
Comedy

Tap
Dancing

Applications for joining any of

the above or existing classes
Q should be submitted to Miss
% Ranvom at Greystone Flats, Hast-
X% ings, Ch. Ch. (Telephone No, 2390), %
% Miss Ransorn will be taking over
% the teaching of the existing class-
$ es in place of Miss Molly ¢
@ Radcliffe who has decided to re- &
* tire from the Madame Bromova
% School of Dancing as from the %
~ end of the current term. 8
) Madame Bromova and the Hon- R
X% orary Committee thank clients for ¥%
% their past patronage and solicit \
% their continued support %
g The School is now in progress 9
g of being re-organised and will in R
x future be known as the Barbados % |
X% = School of Dancing Ltd R
% %
SLO OLE

|
|

employee of the| Madeira



SHIPPING

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO,





Sailing from Afmsterdam, Dover and

ss, “Cottica’ 2nd, 3rd, ot
February, 1951. M.S. “Bonaire” 9th
Wth. 16th Mareh 1951.

Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam—
ims. “Helena” 12th, 15th, February 1951
ms. “Willemstad” 98th, 15th, February
1951, m.s. “Oranjestad” Sth, 15th Marely
1951.

Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and
Georgetown—m.6 “Bonaire™. 27th Janu-
ary 1951; m.s, “Cottica” 20th, Pebruary
1951; ms. “Helena” 3rd Maré 1951.

a ng to Trinidad, La Guisga, Cura-

—m.s. “Oranjestad” ist Pebryary
t

Sailing to Plymouth, Antwern. Amster-
dam=m.s. “Oranjestad” 23rd Feb, 1961,
> PF. MUseUA, BUN & LL. le.
Agents

~





The M’V ‘CACIQUE Del CARIBE’
will accept. Cargo. and Passengers
for St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
anc Aruba, Sailing Wednesday
28th February 1951.

The M/V “CARIBBEE” wilt
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis. and St, Kitts. Sailing Friday
9th March 1951. ;

The M/V “DAERWOOD” will
asecept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba, and ,
Passengers only for St. Vincent

Sailing date to be notified,
BW. SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION INC,
1} Yel, 4047,
'



ee ee



PAGE SEVEN

NOTICES



4



w

FRENCH LINE

~ Mie Gle Transatiantique

SAILINGS TO
ENGLAND & FRANCE
COLOMBIE: March 14th
Via. Martininque and
Guadeloupe

GASCOGNE: Marci 31° || *
via St. Lucia, Martinique,
Guadeloupe, Antigua

SOUTHBOUND —
COLOMBIE: March ist
Trinidad, La Guiara,
Curacao, Cartegena,
Jamaica
Accepting Cargo, Mail
Passengers eek ey

R. M. JONES & Co., Lid.

AGENTS
Phone 3814



a te

Canadian National Steamships

UND
sientreal pon Bost Pardes Rarbac
on! elifax joston jos rbados
SCAN. CHALLENGER" = 21 Feb. _ 1 Mar 1 Mar. â„¢
“LADY RODNBY’ — 3 Mar 5 Mar. 14 Mar. 15 Mar,
LADY NELSON” - 19 Mar. 21 Mar. 30 Mar. 31 Mar.
“CAN. CHALLENGER” - 2 Apr - 12 Apr. 12 Apr,
LADY RODNEY” _ 16 Apr. 18 Apr 2? Apr 27 Apr
NORTHBOUND Arrives Gaile Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax
“LADY NELSON” 23 Feb, 1 Mar, 9 Mar, 10 Mar -
SLADY RODNEY" 27 Mar, 28 Mar, 6 Apr. 7 Apr. a
*LADY NELSON” 12 Apr, 14 Apr. 23 Apr. a 24 Apr.
LADY RODNEY" 10 May. 12 May. 21 May. ae 22 May.

N.B,—Subject to change without notice.
bers.

All vemels fitted with cold storage cham.
Passenger Fares and freight 1ates on application to :— ’



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD.

> ——————— ee

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited; Roseau, Dominia., for sail.

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam, Single fare £170; usual reductions for childrenr




COOPER SPLIT ROLLER BEARINGS



~ homes

|



“Split” Feature enables dismantling and re-assembling to be
effected with ease, speed and economy,

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER

HEAD

LANE,





REAL ESTATE
Ye



Plantation’s Building






Any Part Of

BARBADOS

Our Services are at your Disposal

JOHN M. BLADON

AFS,, F.V.A.

Phone 4640

The Home Furnishing Department

of

i William Fogarty Limited.

Announces its

EASTER PARADE OF VALUES
FOR THE FAMILY

WHITE LACE BEDSPREAD (72 x 90) @ $36.00 each

WHITE LACE TABLE ear
— (54 x

LACE TABLE CLOTHS...
LACE TABLE CLOTHS...
LINEN GLASS. TOWELS @ 79¢. and 95c. each
GLASS TOWELS @ 50c, 63c. and 70c. each

—@ $2.02 and $2.22

54) @ $20.00 each
72) @ $ 6.89 each

50) @ $ 4.35 each

(58 x
(48 x

per.yd,

—@ $3.04 per yd.

48 inch FLORAL TAPESTRY @ $3.66 and $4.01 per yd.
48 ,. STRIPED TAPESTRY @ 2.16 per yd.

31 ,, SANDERSON CRETONNE

cf} On. ' SANDERSON LINEN CRETONNE

46,

FOLKWEAVE CRETONNE @ $1.71 per-y¥d.

WM. FOGARTY LTD.





eee

THE HOUSE OF HOUSEHOLD LINENS







|



PAGE &£IGHT





SIXTY



©

D. ATKINSON driving Butler to the on-boundary to reach 60.

Walcott Shoulders Barbados Batting

@ From Page 1

It took Barbados two overs and
three balls to polish off the tw
remaining Trinidad wickets.

Six runs had been added to the
overnight score of 488 for 8 whe:
Norman Marshall with a we
flighted one outside the off stum >
tempted Butler into playing for
ward straight down the wicket.
The ball took the edge of the bat
and his brother Roy Marshall
took a simple catch at second
slip to dismiss him.

King joined Ferguson who was
now 90 but the latter was out in
making a really wild cross stroke
at a perfectly straight good length
ball from Millington. He had been
at the wicket for 214 minutes and
had hit thirteen fours.

The Trinidad innings had now
closed after lasting 610 minutes
for 494 runs.

B’dos Innings Opens

Roy Marshall and Conrad Hunte
opened the Barbados innings at
11.60--and Lennox Butler, who



CLYDE WALCOTT
—with a classic knock for 126
not out saved the day.

has replaced Prior Jones in the
Trinidad team for the second
Test, opened the bowling to Roy
Marshail.

He bowled some deep inswing—
ers with the first three balls and
straightened the fourth out a bit.
Marshal] got well over it and off
drove it for four runs,

King bowled from the screen
end and Hunte twice cover drove
him with great power but Sam-—
path brought off some excellent
pieces of ground fielding.

He however got off the mark
with a gentle push past point for
a single. But later Marshall got
another boundary, He made the
neatest of glides off an inswinger
from Butler to the fine leg bound-
ary for four runs,

The rate of scoring was steady
but not quick. The first half hour

of play produced 21 runs and
Asgarali replaced King at the
screen end.

He started on the spot at once
and-sent down a maiden over ts

Marshall.
Hunte Out

Stollmeyer still persisted with
Butler from the pavilion end and
the latter nearly claimed Hunte’s
wicket. He beat him with a low
inswinger and struck him on the
pad. Umpire Jordan disallowed
a Stentorian appeal for lbw

Ferguson relieved Asgarali at
the screen end and sent down a
maiden over of impeccable length
to Hunte, but the latter was play—
ing to Ferguson with more con-
fidence than he displayed against
him in the first Test.

Hunte was out however next
over. A single off Butler by Roy
Marshall next over sent up Hunte
to face, He too hit across a well
pitehed ball on his wicket, missed
and was bowled.

Barbados had lost their first
wicket for 30 runs in 55 minutes.
Hunte’s score of 11 included one
four and he had been at the wicket
for 55 minutes as well,

Ferguson Bowls Weekes

_ Weekes, promoted in the bat-
ting order was next man in instead
of Clyde Walcott. He took some—
time having a look at the bowling
before he scored. ;

Marshall got into the twenties
after ha’;ing been an hour at the
wicket Viith a



c powerful cover
drive off Ferguson for 4 runs

He repeated this stroke
off the next ball for another
boundary and _ forced Fer

gusch to remove a silly cover}
poiht and send him back, also

the on-side of the wicket to the

bringing over another man fron
off-side.
}

This did not hamper Marshall]
and= twa balls later he jumped!
into another Ferruson delivery and

that too hit the lor
for four.

That over hz Ferguson
twelve runs in b: We i

ft dary
off da

faced twenty-three balls before
he opened his score with a bound—
ary off Ferguson for four runs.

Ferguson had his revenge,
Weekes soon after droVe hard to
Tang Choon fielding very near the
bat in the off-side trap and Tang
Choon failed to hold the ball in
this almost suicidal position,

Next ball however Weekes got
back on his wicket, apparently
looking for a break from Ferguson
the ball kept straight and took his
wicket.

Barbados had lost the second
wicket, that of Weekes for 4 runs
and the score was 49 made in 70
minutes,

Play was now stopped for lunch.

Marshall Caught

Clyde Walcott who partnered
Roy Marshall ‘©n resumption
pushed Ferguson past mid-on for
a single to send up 50 in 70 min-
utes. King bowled first from the
pavilion end and bowled inswing-
ers to a leg trap.

20y Marshall however pierced
the ring ef fieldsmen on the on-
side and drove out for four. Later
Clyde Walcott hoosked a bumper
to the pull boundary for another
flour.

Walcott got another boundary
with another hopk to deep square
leg for four off another bumper
from King.

King was bowling at increased
pace in the after lunch spell and
he was only being punished when
he bowled bouncers,

Roy Marsall twice late cut Fer-
guson for four to make his score
49 and then off drove for a single
to complete his individual half
century in 105 minutes. He had
now hit nine fours and five of
these off Ferguson.

Three runs later Marshall nib-
bled at an outswinger from King
and Stollmeyer, the only slip on
the off-side held a simple catch
to dismiss him. Marshall had been
at the wicket for 110 minutes and
had played attractive cricket.

Walcott Struck

Charlie Taylhbr now joined
Walcott. The latter with beautiful
wristwork drove one from King
Square of the wicket for four runs,
then neatly turned him off the
pads to deep fine leg for a single
to enter the twenties.

Walcott stepped put of his
erease and took the second de-
livery of Ferguson’s tenth eon-
secutive over at full toss and on-
dijove for another boundary

Charlie Taylor hooked one of
King’s bouncers high to deep
square leg for a single to send up
100 in 125 minutes. The second
fifty had come in 53 minutes as
compared with 72 minutes for the
first fifty.

Soon after this King struck
Walcott on the knee with an in-
swinger and the big fellow fell to
the ground in pain. The rest of
the Trinidad players crowded
around Walcott applying ice
while King squatting several
yards away ate ice himself.

Skipper Stollmeyer took King
off next pver and brought on
Skeete. Walcott took a single to
Square leg off the first ball, and
Taylor faced, He played back to
the fourth ball, missed, was struck
on’ the pad and umpire Jordan
ordered him out Lb.w. ®

Tayler had scored 6 during his
28-minute stay at the wicket.
Barbados had now lost 4 wickets
for 105 runs,

Atkinson In

Denis Atkinson was next man
in and he piayed out the over,

Walcott twice punished Fer-
guson for boundaries to enter the
forties. He back drove a shortish
one to the long-on boundary for
jour runs and then cover drove
for another four runs.

An uppish off drive by Walcott

ERNIE'S

Democratic Club

Here We are
AGAIN

there will be a meeting at
6 p.m, sharp!







THIS EVENING
to discuss the problems of the

‘ first day of the Spring Meeting



This Ys nota political meeting, ~
h after dinner speeches and
there will be a call over
on all races,
MENU
Hors d'oeuvyre—The Usual Turkey
d Ham-—J. N and Sans
Ifome made Sausages*Peach Melba
Purit French Mince Pies
owred and trained by. S. H, K
1 if not, why not? So what
What What

A et e eR EAB SRUET Ro ES REARS

but clear of the fieldsmen, gave
him another boundary in Skeete’s
next over and later, after Butler
had brought pff a brilliant save
off a power drive from Walcott



DENIS ATKINSON
—scored an enterprising 64
not out yesterday.

at extra cover, the latter com-
pleted fifty with another power-
ful one that beat Butler although
he fell, and reached the boundary,

Walcott had ‘now been batting
for an hour and a half and had
hit eight fours.

Denis Atkinson helped himself
to a lovely on drive for four off
Skeete. oe!

Walcott did a most sensible
thing in the circumstances, soor
after, He lifted Jackbir high ove,
the ring of fieldsmen to extra
cover for 4 to make the score 148
and his individual seore 59,

Denis Atkinson sent up 150 runs
in 176 minutes with a pull to the
on boundary off a short one from
Skeete. Next over he executed a
Similar stroke off Jackbir for four
runs and took a single; to com-
plete his individual 20 runs,

Walcott faced and anther
Sizzling cover drive left the six
off-side fieldsmen standing in
helpless admiration while the ball
sped to the boundary,

Tea time found the Barbados
total at 167 for the loss of 4
wickets, Walcott being 66 no
but and Atkinson 21 not out.

Stollmeyer opened his
on resumption with Butler from
the pavilion end and Ferguson
from the screen end. @Valcott off-
Grove the sixth ball of Butler’s
second over for four runs and got
into the seventies.

Atkinson sent up 180 on the
tins with a neat turn to the fing
leg boundary for four off Fer-
guson,

Skipper Stollmeyer requisition-
ed the new ball at 193 and Jackbir
bewled first from the pavilion
end. Each of the batsmen singled
of Jackbir during the over,

Next over from Butler, Atkin
son cover drove for four runs to
send up the double century in 226
minutes,

Atkinson celebrated this with a
drive square of the wicket fo
four runs off Jackbir next over,
Walcott took a four off Jackbir

attack

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

W.I. Rated Second



next over and made his score 96
and Atkinson also ondrive fo:
four.

When the score had reached 205
Atkinson and Walcott had put on
100 for the fifth wicket in 92 min-
utes,

Soon after this Clyde Walcott
at 99 vicious'y square cut a short
leg break from Skeete past back-
ward point to complete his cen-
tury in 178 minutes. He had hit
fourteen fours during his stay at
the wicket

Atkinson completed his individ
ual half century with an off drive
for four off Skeete. He had now
been batting for 114 minutes and
had hit seven fours.

A drive high over midoff for a
couple by Clyde Walcott sent up
250 in 258 minutes.

Six runs later this partnership
had added 150 runs in 118 min-
utes.

Close of play saw the Barbados
tqjal at 270 for the loss of four
wickets, Clyde Walcott being 126
not out and Denis Atkinson 64
not out.

Scores:—
TRINIDAD Ist INNINGS

J. Stolimever run out
A, Ganteaume c Weekes b

R. Marshall O8
N. Asgarali ¢ K. Walcott b Weekes 43
BR, Tang Choon b Mullins
R. Legall ¢ (wkpr.) Wood b

N. Marshall :
C. Skeete Lb,w. Millington
Cc. Sampath stp. (wkpr.) Wood b

Weekes ........ eieid
W. Ferguson b Millington Se . @
S. Jackbir ec R. Marshall b Weekes 26
L. Butler ¢ R, Marshall b

. 208

er

N. Marshall . inte.
F, King not out . +9
Extras: 14 bs., 4 Lbs., 3 n.bs. 21
Total -. 4947

Fall of wickets: 1 for 118, 2 for 231,
3 for 242, 4 for 259, 5 for 268, 6 for 290,
7 for 401, 8 for 456, 9 for 494.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO MOR. OW.
C. Mullins .......45 24 3 101 1
E. Millington 36.3 13 67 2
N. Marshall 35.3 10 89 2
D, Atkinson 16 6 38 0
R. Marshall 27 #1 66 1
E. Weekes oe 3 15 3
Cc. L. Walcott . 7 2 14 0
K. Walcott .... 6 0 23 9
BARBADOS ist INNINGS

R. Marshall ¢ Stollmeyer b King .. 52
C. Hunte b Butler .... nae ees
E, Weekes b Ferguson . teed +
Cc. Walcott not out .... . 126
A. M. Taylor b Skeete +e
D. Atkinson not out . + opted ae
Extras: 2 bs., 4 Lbs. 1 nb, . 7
Total (for 4 wkts.) 270

Fall of wickets: 1 for 30, 2 for 49,
3 for 89, 4 for 105.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M.





aw
L. Butler peso Be 2 44 1
N. Asgarali .....++ 3 2 ; 1 0
Ki BUS css sgcarss, 8 1 3t 1
W. Ferguson 18 3 16 1
Cc. Skeete 11 0 53 1
S. Jackbir 8 0 45 0
Cc Sampath 4 1 13 0
Umpires: Mr, S. C. Foster and Mr,
HH. B, Jordan.
+ “cK
WHAT'S ON
r , 7
ro-DAY
S.P.C.A. Tag Day ;
Art Exhibition Queen’s

Park 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Court of Appeal and Police
Courts 10 a.m.

Fourth Day of Second Game
of Trinidad-Barbados
Cricket Tournament 11.30
a.m,

Sale (Property: Bombay

Cottage) 2 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives Show
at Wiltshire Playfield, St.
Philip 7.30 p.m.

Police Band
Rocks) 8.30 p.m.
CINEMAS

“Farewell to Yesterday”
“The Fly's

-_—_-_oOoOoOoOoO

(Hastings

Empire :
Plaza (Bridgetown) :

Last Night" 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. »
Gaiety (The Garden): “Mr. Rex

and ‘The Knockout” 8.30 p.m.
Aquatic: “Out of the Past” 8.50
p.m,

nd





The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.16 a.m.
Sun sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (New): March 7,
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 10.59 p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington): Nil.
Temperature (Max.) 83.0 °F.
Temperature (Min.) 72.5 °F.
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.)

E.N.E., (3 p.m.) N.E.
Wind Velocity: 9 miles per
hour.
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.937,
(3 p.m.) 29.896,









FLOOR SHOW & DANCE

ee A ee

THE BARBADOS

(Local & Visitin

AQUATIC CLUB

g Members Only)

=— ON «

SATURDAY EVENI

NG, MARCH 3rd.

at 9 o'clock

JEFFREYS

TROUPE of

ARTISTES

Fea uring :

Miss CHRISTINE GORDON
“Miss Jeffrey's Beer 1951”
and
Trinidad’s Carnival Queen,
Mr. LANDY de MONTBRUN,
The “Bob Hope” of Trinidad.

Mr, CLYDE RIVERS,

—Scotch Tenor.
Miss JUNE MAINGOT,

—Pretty Girl

Dancer.

Mr. CLIFFORD CORBIN,
-——Banjo Player.

Mr, PETER PITTS,
—~Calypsonian

Miss DOROTHY de MONTBRUN,

—Lady-in-Wa
Miss DAISY CREQUE,
Mistress of

DANCING after

Admission to Ballroom

2.3.51.—2n.



iting to the Queen.

the Ivories as Accompanist.
FLOOR SHOW.
$1.00

Serre

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951



Only To

Australia

South Africa Challenges

(By PETER DITTON)
AUSTRALIA and the West Indies have both beaten

England at cricket in the past twelve months.
has sustained fairly recent defeats at the hands of England
So if a four-cornered International table
were compiled on the basis of these results Australia would
be on top with the West ladies second and England and
South Africa third and fourth respectively.

and Australia.

The next twelve months will de-
cide whether or not these placings
are justified. The West Indies are
sending a team to Australia later
this year and they will battle for
the unofficial title of “World
Champion”. Similarly England
and South Africa will shortly be
attempting to decide who shall be
the unenviable holders of the
“Wooden Spoon”.

For that reasbn the announce-
ment of the names of the 15 play-
ers who will be representing South
Africa in England this summer as-
sumes an additional importance.
In both previous post-war en-
counters England have emerged
successful and this time South
Africa will be out for revenge,

Only Four

Since their last meeting in this
country in 1947, both teams have
made many changes. In fact, of
the 15 players selected by South
Africa for the forthcoming tour,
only four, Nourse (captain),
Mann, Fullerton and Athol Rowan
were here with Melville’s team of
four years ago. One other pfayer,
Eric Rowan, who missed the last
tour, was here with the 1935 team.

England too have made changes.
Norman Yardley who captained
England in 1947 and George Mann
who led the 1948-49 team to South
Africa have been succeeded by
F. R. Brown, W. J. Edrich, who
with Denis Compton had such a
successful season in 1947 and who
exceeded Hayward's record aggre-
gate of 3,518 runs has been passed
over by the England selectors as
have Laker of Surrey, Watkins of
Glamorgan, Gladwin of Derby-
shire and Young of Middlesex.

And what of Compton himself.
Physically he does not appear to
be suffering from the effects of his
injured knee, But mentally there
can be no doubt that Compton has
suffered ‘greatly, as witness his
Test Match aggregate so far of 31
in six innings. It remains t6 be
seen whether he can play himself
out of this bad patch and regain
the form which has made him one
of England's greatest batsmen.
Remembering his performances in
1947 when he nearly beat the
South Africans on his own, it will
be a great loss to England if he is
not available, for any reason, this
summer.

Weakness
England’s weaknesses in post-
war Tests have usually been
shown up by spin bowlers. This

South Africa

has certainly been the case in all
Tests in this country with the pos-
sible exception of the 1948 seri
against Australia. With the Sou
Africans in 1947 it was_N. F.
‘Tufty’ Mann and Athol Rowan;
with the West Indies it was Ram-
adhin and Valentine and with the
New Zealanders it was Tom Burtt.
And of course the Australians had
Ian Johnson and Bill Johnston to
take over after their pace men had
broken the back of the England
batting.

This South African side contains
both the spinners who did so well
on the previous tour and in addi-
tion it has been reinforced by
Clive Van Ryneveld, a leg-spinner
who promises to rank with the
really great, In the recently con-
cluded South African Test Trial
he captured fifteen wickets—nar-
rowly missing the honour of get-
ting all ten in one innings.

an Ryneveld will of course be
no stranger to this country. Dur-
ing the three years he was here at
Oxford University he was capped
for England at Rugby on a number
of occasions and in 1949 he was
selected to play in the Gentlemen
v. Players annual cricket match at
Lord’s.

An Opportunity

Now he has an outstanding op-
portunity of pulling off a very
rare ‘triple’. For in addition to
the English Rugby cap he already
possesses he is almost certain to
gain a South African Cricket cap
this summer, Then when the tour
is over he will i Feeley be
invited to stay on and participate
in the 1951-1952 Springbok Rugby
tour with the result that he will
most likely gain a Rugby cap
against this country as well.

It has been said that the batting
of this South Africa team is its
weakest point. The bowling is un-
doubtedly strong and the fielding
is reported to be brilliant. Per-
sonally I can see little wrong with
the batting either. In Dudley
Nourse, Eric Rowan, Jack Cheet-
ham and George Fullerton there
are four run-getters well up to
International standard while Me-
Glew and McLean are two young
batsmen from whom great things
are expected.

Throughout the side there is an \
effective blend of youth and ex-{
perience. Altogether it appears to
be by far the strongest South
African team since the war and I
for one would not be surprised
if England suffered her third suc-
cessive defeat in a series of Tests.

JANETTA DRES

UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad St. Phone
Lovely IMPORTED DRESSES from LONDON
TWIN SETS—NYLON LINGERIE—BATHING SUITS

sf

HOURS: MONDAYS to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30

Toenight

visit

CLUB MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night

Club from Miami to Rio

with a world-wide reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
Entertainment

throughout

the night

Dial 4000 for reservations
6

GET READY

FOR THE CRICKET





FLANNEL

P.C.§. MAFFEI & C0. LTD.

“Top Scorers

TOURNAMENT

Let us fit you now

with a

FINE

TROPICAL SUIT

BLAZER

AND

PANTS

in Tailoring”

REGAINS LADIES’
ENNIS TITLE

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 27.
Mrs. Kathleen Lioyd regained |
the Trinidad Ladies Singles Lawn |
Tennis Championships when she |
beat the title-holder, Miss Mildred
Cambridge, in a thrilling three-
Set match at Tranquillity, Port-
of-Spain. Mrs. Lioyd last won |
the Trinidad Title in 1948 when}
she defeated Mrs. Dolly Fisher. |
Mrs. Lloyd’s vietory came as a|
big surprise even to her most ‘ar-
dent supporters: Scores were
<6, 7—5, 6—4.

See us for - - -

——

| ge LUXURY.

ef tuticura Taleum Powder

: ) makes a deligh:fully

ay cooling and refreshing

finish to your beth, even
oa the hottest dey. Kee

the skin 48 soft as




BRC FABRIC
EXPANDED METAL
TEMPERED HARD BOARD
OIL STOVES & OVENS

Phone
4306

T. HERBERD Ltd.

Phone
4267

) & 11 Roebuck St., & Magazine Lane.





Note

Customers

As the TOURIST SHIP “Mauritania”
arriving here on SATURDAY NEXT, March 3rd, at
10.30 a.m., this Store will REMAIN OPEN until 4 p.m.
on that day.

PHONE 4267 FOR

Cupboards,

THESE ARE

THESE ARE

Nylon Chiffon

A lovely new lot of this
pretty material in White

Printed

Ferguson

Fabric

A really first class Fabric

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street

SURINAM PLYWOOD

Treated to resist Termites.

%” thick in sheets 4’ x 8’

4” thick in sheets 3’ x 7’
First class quality, ideal for Flush Doors,
and Panellings
Can be Polished, Varnished or Painted.

STANDARD HARDBOARD

¥” thick in sheets 4’ x 8’, 10’
3/16” thick in sheets 4’ x 8’



WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.

COMFORT.

STYLE.
DURABILITY.

SHOULD DEMAND OF
GOOD CLOTHES.

GET IN CLOTHES MADE BY

C. B. RICE & CO.

BOLTON LANE






Peach and Blue 36 ins.

wide





Per yard

$2.70





















36 ins. wide

Per yard

$1.65

will be

'

of all kinds,

WHAT YOU

WHAT YOU



Full Text

PAGE 1

I KlflAV. MARCH 2. IMI II.\RII\IM> ADVOCAT.. I'\(.l HVB Senior Short Story Competition The Evening Aarvorale invite* all school-boys and school-girls between the ages ol 11-18 to enter for its Sealer Short Story l—ipe l.tiati. Stories can be on any .object, but should not exceed MO word* in length and must reach the Blurt Story taator. Adveraar ** Ltd.. City nol later than Wednesday every week. The best story I will be published In the Kveaiaw Adverate and the winr.er will rei*re* 3 prize of books or Stationery to (he value uf 1? fi •hi* coupon with your story. SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION HIBUM III IM II III III II I %  .. r %  \ \.U. | Title of Slory Grenada Riots Send 'Mauretania' To B'dos THE CUNARD WHITE STAR luxury liner Maurclania will bo making an unexpected visit lo Barbados at 10.3U on Saturday morning with 650 American tourists on board. Messrs. Hanschell Larsen & Co.. Ltd.. her local agents. tuld the Advocate yesterday that the present disturbances ill 'irmuda aro responsible for the visit ol the Maurclania :o Barbados. I The Mauritania, which Is now j making its third Caribbean cruise for this winter, had included Grenada on this itinerary and not Barbados. The disturbances caused the scheduled visit lo Grenada to bo cancelled. This call to Barbados will be the second lor tinMauretanij this year. She was here on February S with 62(1 tourist* from the I .i RtttM Sinreturned homo from that cruise on Feoruary 2"-. and left New York two days later on this cruise. She will bo arriving at Barbados via St. Thomas. Martinique and Trinidad. Sho will bo leaving M midnight dor home via St. Vinc*nt, I-a Oiuirn. Curacao Crialobai Port-au-rriB*g in Caribbean Club Stages Good Show A very successful Variety Show was given by the Caribbean Social Club at the Police Recreation Hall. Central Station, last night It was in aid of the newly formed Young Women's Christian Association at Pinfold Street. The Polio* Band was in attendance The Caribbean Social Club, a dramatic group under the capable direction of Miss Judy Graham, was formed in March last year. Its first public performance was at the Globe Hi atre whore they presented tho %  \ cccsful show "C aribbcin Revelry." The Club has a s its President Judy Graham, Secretary Roger Fields, Treasurer Roosevelt Tudor im<\ the Committee May Ramam, Claude 1-cwis and Reginald Remy. Mr. Maurice Jones of the Globe ThMtn was the Advertising i i who gave his ideas of Bttractfvt advertising uf the Club. The membership is about thirty -ind Ihey practise at the heme of Miss Judy Graham at Bay Street. Judy has big Ideas. She intend-* putting on public perFortlianeM at least once n year. She llr-! (aught dancing in 1945 nt the St Patrick's School, Jemmot s Lane. Many of the girls whom sho taught then are now grown un and take part in the shows. She also taught boys in the "Musical Band" at St. Palrick's School. Her first concert was In 1946. LBBBMM Tho Show last night opened with n chorus entitled "Welcome to Our Musical Show." produced by Judy Graham Twenty took part ,n tinsung Following this was the prologue by Quinda Shaw and then they danced the Lancers. Cedric Phillips, well known vrcalist-i ianist sang "My Heart and r* to Judy Graham's accompni.imoni on the piano. A comedy ••ketch "The Cricket Match." the next item on the programme, delighted the audience. Quind Shaw and F.lrita Clarke took part |p this. It was the story of two friends — one W estininster Doadeass H..-.. > T, Do You Remember? By JOHN 9RIDSAUX Case Against Driver Put Off For March 3 Hearing in tho case in which Edgar OaCosta lnniss of Prospect. St. James. Is charged by the Police nf driving the motor car S-188 without due care and consideration on Fairfleld Road, St Michael, was yesterday adjourned until March 3 by Ills Worship Mr. H. A. Talma. Mr. J. E. T Brancker is appearing on behalf of Inniss and the case for the Police is being led by Sgt. Ford* 1 The case was brought as n result of an accident on Fairfield Road between the bicycle M-4001 and tho motor car S-188 which the defendant was said to bo driving. The offence was alleged to have been committed sometime on November 15. George Lowe, the rider of the bicycle, said that the car struck tho front wheel of the bicycle damaging it. Cpl. Watson attached lo the Black Rock Station said that he went to tl*c scene of tho accident and saw tho bicvclo and rider. The car was not there. On returning to the Station ho wrote out a summons form and on the form was Colonel 11. T. Michelin as complainant in the case. The speed limit on the Fairfleld Road is 30 miles per hour. other a pauper. On this i IINED1S 1 -FOR LARCENY ._„, A fine of 15/lo r* pild In 14 Hhv and Ihe days or In default one monm im. o IKWuer. On thl occasion. I prlaonm.nl wllh hard labour was $^>EStt£%\%^ Si S iSSSS hy and to have relative, of !" £ Wors np Mr c „ { ; rimth> Acting Police Magistrate of District "A". Samuel Holder was found guilty of the larceny of a quantity of cane fodder the property of Edwin HumThe cose was brought by the Police. Sgt. King prosecuted Fdithe Tull, a witness for the B rosccution, said that she saw older in Boyce's ground with about 25 pounds of cane fodder under his arm. She was sure that it was Holder. When Boyce saw her he turned his back to her. He was wearing a short white pants and a white shirt. umh.iv and to have relati' rich origin. After a lengthy argu mem thev became friendly. After this a dance, "The Cake Walk." arranged by Claude I W'"" ''*>> %  Hi It II: U l ftioutP iKamabnl GilMon lrli*sn OMOMB* end look into tho eastern sk.. \i could bo oatH thai a fire of some dimension was taking place. All and sundry were shocked when >ey heard that Christ Church Church was completely gutted. Nothing could be done to stop this Are as no water was available From the Altar and the exquisite stained glass window in the East tl the old Font In tho Wesi A doleful note was heard when the two bolls in the tower crashed tc the ground and were ruined. The crowd that gathered to witness this destruction, seemed to be spell-bound; those who spoke did so in whispers, while others not ashamed to. be seen wiping away tears This Church had been rtandii-K for M years and was lOM i by tho parishioner* It was ie fourth Church of tinparlsu /hioh had como to a iwddfi. am) ntimely end. The first Church of Christ 'hurch was built by the early tttlcrs in the vicinity of Dover, nd part of this graveyard can till bo seen. This Church appear* to have suffered htavily in the ikods of 1600. for at a meeting of ne Governor and Council held on .8th January lfMM'70 a report rom tho Christ Church Vestry i i i'ii.nii'ii. alleging that "the old Church and Chapel hod fallen Ic Jecay and great inundations lately upon ye Chlefest %  place for burial at ye. Parish Church had v-ashed the Earth from Corps." The Vestry was seeking licence lo build a new Church, which was apparently destroyed in tho hurricane of 1*80 The %  urbados Mercury" for November 29th. 1783 record*, a Petition from the Vestry of Christ Church to the Commissioners of Purl mentary Bounty for assistance rebuilding the Church They stated —"Suffered more from the lence of the tempest and tho undation of the sea than tho interior part of the island,—their commodious and well constructed Jhurch was totally demolished ind no Ffopar place left wherein to call upon tho name of th Lord '* The Vestry asked for a portion of the bounty to Mate) with the building of another Church. There is very little known about this Church as all tho realtors were lost in this hurnconc The date cf the erection of the third Christ Church Church Is unknown, but it was built to accommodate about 300 persons on the high land overlooking Oistin't Town, then a sea-port. Thir. Church was destroyed by tho hurricane of August llth 1831. and only the Communion Plate, the Registers, and tho Font wor-? saved. The parishioners were determined to build a Church that would withstand the elements, so ihev entrusted tho supervision f. Edward Hooper Henhouse K*<|. Churchwarden, with the result that a substantial building with thick walls, and Its roof hidden bj. a battlement parapet, resembling some old castle, was erected and consecrated on 4th July 1837. The oarinhicmor., of Christ Church wero so pleased with this building. that thev presented Mr. Senhouse with an address and a solid silver waiter in which was the roUOwUlg inscription:— %  Presented lo EDWARD It SKNHOUSE ESQUIRE bj <.f the PARISHIONERS OF CHRIST CHURCH PARISH u the ISI-AND OF BARBADOS aa sincere testimony of the higl' opinion entertained by Ihem of the zealous assiduity he displayed in superintending the BUILDING OF THEIR cmmcB.*After the dr*lruclion of tho Church in 1831 and until the new one was consecrated in 1837. ervice was held in a temporary Chapel prepared for public worship at Oistin's Fort, now Chrisl Church Infirmary. This was done by the kind permission of th Commissioners of Fortifications. Mrs. Jomina Mascoll ings must have died Furt li. %  ibout 1744. because his will dated 21st Devomber 1743. was proved on the IQlh January. 1744 Christ Church is tamoui In the Hanger" as Ihe BOnM %  the "Barbados' Mystery Vault." more commonly known as the Chase Vault.' Up to the 22nd of February .808, when the vault as ipened for the burial of the infant daughter of the Hon. Thorn.. Chase, all was in crder The Ural disturbance was noticed when the vault was opened on Ittli July 1812. The leaden OOAng wei %  again .in disorder when ih"c vault was opened on the 2.Mti Sepieinb'i 1818. again on the 16th November of the same year. The same dis irder when the vault was opened • tho 17th July 1810. for the burial of Miss Thomasina CUirko On every occasion tho coflttM had been i-plat'oil in then |ii",n %  The Qovemnri Lord i mere, having heaui then iMVgea> tlsjatc ihe tter for his own satisfaction. He attended the funeral, and had the walls and floor minded, an I after replacing tho coffins, the floor is covered with white sand. The ult was then cemented up and the seal of the Governor ifftxed in several places; manv others present made their own in.li l,' Tho Hon. N. Lpcaa, records.iii Eda tin (now in DM I Library, Bridgetown. Barbadcr-1 that II. F. Mr. Rowland Cotton. and himself were guests of Mr Robert Boucher Clarke B t his e^ late. Klrulgo's, Christ Church, when the eollln iiwstery was mer. tioned, and tho Governor decider tt. nave II ope n ed that do>; thir. the last scene of this drama wal enacted on the 18th April I82'i Hon. Lucas records— "Every OUttkat appearance VM perfect, not %  bla.le of gi-•* %  or siono touched; indeed coUu i n.i, 11 n< cent* i wa Impoaafbl*; for neither omselvos nor the negrtos knew anything of ihe for Ihe -abject was hardly itnrtod In eonvi i ii on before we sol ./ut for mi When tne vault was opened, it was found to be in confusion. The largest of ihe oofllns which would have loken .a least six men to lift it. had been set "upon end against the wall." Dr Lucas OOtttl "There was no VOttJ %  Ol water to be discovered In Ihe null; no marks where il had been; and tho vault is in , level church-yard by no nweaa fail much less in a run of wnter.' also "a mason struck Oven part of the bottom with his hammer and all was si did Dr. Lucas offers no explanation. as he wrote—"All I know is that it happened, and thai I was an eye-witness of the fact'"* Tho vault was abandoned, the widow of Hon Thomas Chase, caused the coffins to be removed and burled in other parts of the .'i The 'Chase Vault 1 i-mams open for all who care to visit it. Corner I n-leli Harbour M R P. sMITIIF.Rs (ConservaHompshire, Winchester div asked the Secretary of State for t"ie Colonies whether he is aware of the bad state of repair of the historic buildings of Lord Nelson's dockyard at English Harooui. Antigua; and whether he A ill open a fund or otherwise take steps to make their ITS toration possible Mr Griffiths : I am already in Consultation with the Governor about ihe state of repair of these buildings. Ptihln Service* M R. I' SMITHERH asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies what steps have been taken by His Majesty's Government towards implementing the recomaiendations of the Commission upon* the Wnttleatioft of Public Services in the" British Carlbbean; and what further steps it is proposed to take Mr. Griffiths %  The report of the Commission has been referred to tho Governors of the territories concerned lor consideration by the LettalatUreB. Only the Legislative Council of Si. Vincent has yet completed consideration of the report and it has approved Commission'* recominrmlatl Export LJMMMMMi Moms Of liainanas "i.dnica •Kportej f'bout 400.000 stems of banana. to Ireland and this year they iLII 1 oping lo export a nnlli. the Hon. II D BhUltngforO, Ml C, told Ihe Advwato veslei day He said that their big problem for ihe development of tne %  iutry was roods which were tcHou** l> lacking Mr Shi.lingfjfd arrived here yosterdav morning by the ('olesn bte for o week's holiday and t suying at "Abbeville Guest House," Worthing. Id lh-t before the wai they had .i small trade with gee %  tleaeJ bananas, but that was .up ed out by the Penanu .11 i i I liiey -ere now growing tho laea la > variety which was high' re aistant to the Puna in i disease Un". had aayactattoaa at ,|n i in ol 'heir citrus crop with the tdvant of Colonial Dew CorponUon but that organis.tioi was very slow in coming int pt ration Limes had always been ;hel ivojor crop and the prospect' fo i i %  fairly good BBC Producer Paja l*he implementation of the report -]-" ('('^ Vlftll I O W I lepemis primarily on the decisions I ol the I-egislalures, and it ha*been made rlear that His Majesty's Government have no wish to prejudge or influence those decisions Colonial Students M R. P. SMITHERK asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies on what principle Colonial students are selected for admission to the Hans Crescent Hostel; and whether any preference is given to students who arr piopoiUUJ for Government •••rvic-s Mi C.iifftths: The aim is to produce a balanced student community, widely representative not oiil*. M the various Colonial territories but also of the different subst Luciabefe.ro Joel* o( study. Priority is given lo' Igmdofl 00 Morch 9. now arrivals m the United King-, | tv personal contact and infor dom. for whom up to half the 1l( (l ,„ nV orsations with vart i . ne reserved. ThirtyMr E R EDMETT, tei producer m the West Indie* i tion of the Overseas Service tie H H C u spending a few days in Barbados as part of a hMU weak visit to the Caribbean In such a short time. Mr. Edmett told the Advaeale.' it is impossible lo moke a comprehensive survey, but ne hopes to obtain some idea of listener response to the proci.Miur.es lu.nlcast doily in the Overseas Service between 1 I* and I 4* p.m. So lar Mr Edmett has been to Jamaici. Trinidad and British Guiana, and will lie going on to r.\c i I .ii %  • %  ..iii.'i rved for IS Cadetl lakniK the First Devon.hue Course and 20 English students ottending l-on %  i ii turn ie. questing Qove ban importation of So ilh African goods becau %  • of Dr. Malan'a. receiil. passing of colour dlaertnilnatlofl Tho motion also .' %  sked Government to contact an I request political leidoi. of other Hriti-h W. I Inn take similar action. M io Win--. is -n W.rrll P*l loat tc OlMon P.II Wllk, .Khl,' REMANDED Aubrey Hare wood of Kensington New I-ond was yesterday n manded bv Rll Warship Mr G ] Griffith after ho apDcared on -harge brought by tho Police i breaking and entering Ihe hou of Clifford fl->wen with Intent to commit a felony. The ofTence was alleged to have been committed sometime on February 28. Police Constable 81 Uovd of Ihe Central •Station brought Harewood to tho Police Station Sgt. King is prosecuting on behalf of the Police BUNGALOW BURNT A bungalow in S'a tion Hill c .ug'il fire last night ofcoul 11 2' o'clock but was put out within %  nlnutea by the Fire Brigade whirl <-it under Asst. Superin Qrent. A dairy is run the property. Tho occupsnts were uway when it caught lire Sonic i.l lot eaiUnffJ tloor and clolhtn-i \. ii I Hint. FRESH SUPPLY Or IPURINA HEN CHOW I (SCRATCH GRAIN) !H. JASOM JONES & CO, LTD.-Duixibutor. CHERRY CREAMS — St that's TO-DAY'S ffi SPECIAL \d Otana in u onj> thu eWscMN Ice I'IMIII fUvaar KNIGHTS PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN people whom be In. been meet, he i-.opo* to build up at leeat o few impression* which will in* ., UM fui guide in -hiding ihe BM>at conitructlva line to follow in future proarammes •COLF1TO" TAKES 34 TO U.K. Nineteen passengers came ii from British Guiana. Trinidad and Venezuela by Mcssr> ndo & FylTos' Oelnle vesierduy evening. The f.oltlU took nlHtonl M pea •lengers hero for Southampton um left port a few hours after he arrival She is consigned to Maaan Wilkinson A Huvnes Co.. Ltd Hni'i'i,* a prnrid MaW of CRICKET! Delicious Sweet Biscuits for LUNCHEON and TEA put Up iff convenient |iuckogeii. Assorted Swee* Binrulti by Ifu.itley It Palmer. Peek Freon. Corr and Jacob. Prices 10c.—20c 48c.—50c. Per IV k Prices f 1.20 fo 12 1* Per Un. Jacob's Cream Crackers •/Per tin. —AlsoLuscious Boxes of CONFECTIONERY small and large. BLACK MAGIC CHOCOLATES *4.0fl per box. Peanuts 04c Per tin. Butter Scotch 2lc. to 45c. POSTMISTRESS OF ST. PHILIP Miss A M B Hooper has appointed to be Poslmislren tho parish of St. Philip with from the 1st of March. It-Mrs MWS FLASH I I TAP OVBjl TH* WALLIIM-.r.iu BsMoln. A UORNINC AT Tlir OFFIcr Hy r-Jr MiiWIhol/M. AT IOHNXOS' aTAtfOirBari ii.il-.-iivaAlDIIABg I I tin Nougat 34c. and 7Qe. per tin. Fry's Hazel Nuts 2/-, 3/9, 7/0 Box Cadbury's Rod Rose Mk. ft $1.80 Box. Cadbury's Chocolate Blsrults 5/* 5/3 tin. Chewing Gun 2c. ft 8c. Pck. After Dinner Mints I/par Pck. Marr Bars 14c. en. Crest Bars lac. ea. Guavn Cheese ISc. 4-oz. Pck. Cadbury Bars (Asst | 10c., 17c, lth-, 34c, 37c. ea. Fry's Bars 7c, e. 12c, IfSc. Carr'sChoc. Lunch 12c. Pck. Carr'i Choc. Tea Cokes 8c. each. Carr's Cheese Crisps (I 02 tin Carr's Club Cheese II 00 tin. Shaip's Toffee 2/0 and 3/3 tin. Blue Bird Toffee 1/9, 4/6, ft 81 BO Un, —Alao— Thermos Flask 1-1'mt || II Sun Glasses from 3/to 115 00. MI 1 1 1 niiimiiun LTD. Heart of Broad Street WZ/WrVW.-WAW \'0-VThe name of Warren Ha*tings is well known lo the people of the Britb>h Empire His life one that all school children are famili-ir with. Ho starte.1 ;.t the age of seventeen years as a write! with the East India Co.. in Bengal subsequently he volunteered undei Clive, and a year or two after became a Member cf the Council at Calcutta. Due to his %  enability, he was advanced from post to post, and in 1773 became the first Governor-General of India. Few people know thor 1 Warren Hastings' father. Pennyitone Hastings, was onc* rector of Christ Church. Rev Hastings was born in England, and first married there at the early age of 15. His Ant wife wa., Hester, a daughter of one Warren, the owner of a small estate Gloucester. She died a few days ;ftor fffftng birth to their son, .he famous Warren Rev. Hastings soon married again, but his wife also died lf< then came to Barbados and was appointed Rector of Christ Church and in 1737 he mnrried a widow. ^UwJydk"^ In Boxes and Singly (ilKT lt(i\ls rontaininu many diffcrenl styles: Coloured and White, Kmhroidered and Lace trimmed. Priced per box from S1.K5 to $2.58 WlllTr: L1NFN HANKIKS—Kach 2fe. As the Tourist Ship "Maurelmiia" will be arriving here on Saturday next. March 3rd, at 10.30 a.m. this store will remain open until 4 p.m. on that day. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET /*#*/ and i O III/OWM/./.^ GIRDLES BY GOSSARD' All Klastic iih Keiiii.irceil Satin l.ustev Front and Hack ,< 814.52 Sulin Laslex with Iluiird Fnntl und Zipp M $1(1.93 Silk Skin with Satin Front in Roll mi and Panlie Style-* , Cd 7.29 All Flattie Itell-nn COMELETTBS -ii $5.7 HARRISON • BROAD STREET — DIAL 2352 FOR THE BEST I lEllTIFIL IUT II-CLUI e rLOOB OOVUUNC 'SILVER STAR' CONGOLEUM INSIST ON SILVER STAR SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES 8TAJVSFEIM. SiOli A 10. I.TU. lahv art-lit lllfiism-f iii lllliiiilliliinil th. TOn. tht'ir npi-iiini, m.v COCKADE BAR and LOUNGE / on ihr fir.l floor ol Unit balMlBf / in / BROAD STUKF.T Visitors — Kcsiilt'llU — W.'ltooi.'


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ET4AYAT0M_U9CZJP INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T14:44:20Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02522
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

PAGE CIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE %  -KIIIAY. MARCH 2. 151 sivrv 11 MSI nvci and i | and Atkinson also ondrivc !• I. a boundhim Jimlher boundary in Skeete':. ary off Kerguson ior four runs. next over and later, after Butler ..I his revenge, had brought if! :i hullinut save lOfl after drov c hard to off ,i powej drive fiom Walcott Tang Choon lioldinit vci y Dear Lhe ti.it In the off-tide trap and Tang — ChOOB failed to hold the ball In this almost suicidal position. Next ball however freakae got back on bis wicket, apparently Ferguson the ball kept straight and look his %  Barbados had lost the second Wicket, that of Weekes for 4 runs %  ml the score was 49 mode in 70 minutes. Play was now stop-iod for lunch. I Marshall KiD '-I .' Cairo 14 Mim.udi.i. t b MllHngtOn • B. M*r.hll b Wafc*< Manhall b b. 4 !. %  . 1 •>. %  . .Marshall Cauifht Clyde Walcott who partnered Roy Marshall on resumption -.inutes pushed Ferguson past mid-un for Ingle to send up SO In 70 mln B'dus Innings Opens utM King bowled Hrst from the Roy Marshall and Conrad Hunt* pavilion end and bowled inswlngopened the Bnrbados innings at era to a leg trap. •-.II of .c*U I for IIS. 3 for 1 lor Ml, lor *S 9 lor Stt. a lo! Mr 4*1. S for 4H. S lor AM nOWUMO ANALYSIS I MlHihRlo" N Maul-mi) II AlhiH>n u Marsl sU r. Wwkn C L Wnlcoll BARBADOS 1.1 DfMINOa Marahall c StoUmeyrr b Klnt Hurtle t> Duller ... Wcrkfi b Ft-rfuton Wnlcoll not oul . M Taylor b *k.-nAUIninn nol oul 1 b. 4 Ibo. I "b ToUl ifot 4 *!• • nOWl-INO ANALYSIS 'fKNIft ATKINSON —scored an enferprtsing 64 col out yesterday. <.. ... 1 Hoy Marshnll however pierced Tin ring (.1 in Msmen on the onMOV and drove out for four. Later Clyde Walcott hocked u bumper to the putl boundary for another l HI Wak-oil got another boundary with another hulk to deep square leg lor four off another bumpei •'•' tra cover, the latter comKing. pletcd fifty With another powerKing was bowling at increased ul <••' 'hut beat Butler although ibe after lunch spell and rif / cl '. n<1 'tached the boundary he was onlv being punished when Walcott had now been battiiut he bowledbouncers. tnr " hour and a half and had R v Muraall twice late nil Per"" "a*! 'eurs guon for four to make his score I*ems Atkinson helped himself 49 and then off drove for ;i single ' lovely rn drive (off four off lo complete his individual half Skeete -. century in I0S minutes. He bad Walcott did a most sensible now hit nine fpurs and five or thing in the circumstances, soor these off Ferguson. after. He lifted Jackbir high ove. Three rum later Marshall nibthe ring of fieldsmen to extrrt bled at an outs winner from King cover for 4 In make the score MS and Stollmeyer. Ihe only slip on and ha Individual SOOTP SB. the off-side held a simple i.ttch Denis Atkinson sent up 150 runto dismiss him. Marshall bad been i" IM minutes with %  pull to the ut the wicket for 110 mlnules and on boundary off a short on* fn had played attractive cricket. "s. C rir, ..nil Mr. CLVDE WALCOTT —U'ilh a classic knock I not oat saved the day. Walrull Struck TnyJTjr now joined Walcott. The latter u.th beniitifui k drove one from King wiuare of Iho wicket f V four rum. has i-placed Prior Jones in the then neatly turned him off the Trinidad team lor Uv ,,„ ,, Ml ,,. Test, opened the bowling to Key to enter the twenties. Marshall. Walcolt stepped put of hiHe bowled some deep Inst inj rease and looi Itae saoimd deen with the tlrst thriL bJils and livery of Firguaon's tenth con-straightened the fourth oul a bit. ^eculive over at full tose and onMarshall got well over it and off drive for another boumlarv drove It for four runs. Charlie Taylor King bowled from the screen King's bouncers end and Hunte twice *M I drove square leg lor %  him with great power hut Sam100 in 123 minutes. The second path brought off some excellent nfty had rome in 53 minutes as pieces of ground fielding. lagged wiUi %?. minutes lor the He however got off the murk first fifty. e no doubt that Compton has suffered greatly, as witness his Test Match aggregate so far of 31 in six innings. It remains to be seen whether he can play himself nut of this bad patch and regain the form which has made him one of England's greatest batsmen. Remembering his performances In 1947 when he nearly beat the South Africans on his own, it will n great loss to England if he is not available, for any reason, this Weakneas England's weaknesses in poster Test> have usuallv been lown up by spin bowlers This up on lie 0 single. Hut later Marshall got another boundary, ti* neatest of glides off an InawlngaV irom Butler to the fine leg bound nry for foui The rate of scoring wi.. Steady d J^ %  *£ Somi after III.Kins struck JSTZEUZ '""," '".'" ffateett on th, kaee wttta an Inlcit boundl ">' *r four swinger and the big fellow fell lo the ground In pain. The rest ul the Trinidad player* crowded but not quick. The Brat hall bOU of play produced 21 runs and Aagarali iepl i %  I Kinu ut the ncreen and. He started on the spot at once and sent down a maiden over t.' Marshall %  rail yard Skipper Kins —ERNIES Democratic Club Ilimlc Out Stollmeyer still persJated With Butler from the pavilion end end thelatter nearly claimed Hunte's wicket. He beat him with ;i low inswinger end struck him on the pad. Umpire Jordan disallowed „ stentorian appeal for low Ferguson rellevi the screen end ,md pen! down ; %  maiden over ol impeccable length """ '^ boundaries to to Hunte, but the latter was playing to Ferguson with more confidence than he dleplayi him in the first Test. Hunte was out however next over. A single off Butler by Roy Marshall next over HunM to face. He too hit across a welT pitched ball on his wicket, missed and was bowled. Barbados had lost their first wicket for 30 runs in 55 minutes. Hunte's score of II in : four and lie had been <,t the wuket 'or 55 Adnutei %  well Ferguson Hauls Weekes Weekes, promoted in the batling order was next man in Instead of Clyde Walcott. H e took sometime having a look at the bowling before he scored. Marshall got into Un after ha-.* i E been an hour at the wkgfiH ;th ., powerful cover drive off Ferguson fi Ho rep. iroki off the next u^ll n boundary and f. i gusen to remove a silly poinl and send hun back, bringing over anothci the on-aide of the wicket to the off-side This did ni ro bulb itei I Into another Fei that too hit •• %  for four. That over I. Ferguson twelve runs In b It !>(|IUttint scvcr.il lee himself. neyei took King on next i-ver and brought on Skcte. Walcott took a single to lag i>if Ihe first hall, and Taylor fao. n. played back to drive square of the wtekel toi the fourth ball, irue sed. wa s struck olir ^ orf Jnckblr lvy> TUv, off Fe.guapn, Skipper Stollmeyer requisition. ed the new ball at 193 and Jackbi, 1 Ural from the pavllior 11 0, Back of the WiUimn singled off Jackbir during the ov.i N-.-xt over from Uutlor. Atkii: m a covei drove for four rum l • send uo ihe di.ubi" century in 2_t( nttnutae, Atkinson celebrated (his with : the pad and umpire Jordan ordered him out l.b w. < I iv 1.1 had scored during his 23-mmute stay at the wuket. Barbados had now lost 4 wickets for 105 run Atkinson In Dems Atkinson was next man in and he played out the v i WaU -tt twice punlelK nler the 1 k drove i thortiah one lo the long-on boundary fnr i over drove for another four runs An uppish off drive by Walcott Walcott took a four off Jackbir The Weather TO-DAY Sun Rises: 6.1g a.m. Han sets: fl ie p.m Moon I * >' assssaj %  •* rvfiMNuf S I.I a to >•>••' bia. Wi valWbelMaiday K*i Uw taft anil aa %3k so.p aad uMlutuTl (uticura V* TALCUM S u* for • BRC FABRIC EXPANDED METAL TEMPERED HARD BOARD on, STOVES a OVENS Phone UN T.HERBERT Ltd. Phone 4267 II 11 Roebuck St., & Magazine Lane. JANETTA DRESS SHOP I I'M \IK> ovii; NEWSAM'S. Lower Broad M Phone 2614 Lovelr IMPORTED nni"ls from LONDON TWIN SETS—NYLON LINGERIE—BATHING SUITS HOl'RS : MONDAYS to FRIDAYS 9.30 to 3 30 SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30 /fere AGAW there *UI be a mwtini m S pjti. tharp' rent trmmtma %  • dlitua.'lf* ptoblemi of ihe wr %  %  %  on all racei. MENU H l)Bual TUrkd > J NO and San* ow.*a and jrasasg bv i and II not. What Whatr H. K. %  FLOOR SHOW & DANCE — AT — THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB (Local d; \ i-iti is Member. Onl>> — ON — .SATURDAY EVENING, MARCH 3rd. JEFFREY'S nun IT ARTISTES Tea uring: Miss CHRISTINE GORDON "Miss JelTre>'s Beer 19M" ar.d Trinidad's C irnival Queen. Mr. LANDY de MONTBRUN. The "Bob Hoiw" of Trinidad Mr CLYDE RIVERS. -Scotch Tenor. Mlas JUNE MAINCOT. —Pretty Girl Dancer. Mr. CLIFFORD CORBIN, ll..n)o Flayei Mr. PETER PITTS. —Ca ly pson 1 a n. Miss DOROTHY de MONTRRUN. —Lady-in-Waiting lo the Queen. Miss DAISY CHEQUE. —Mist res* of the Ivc of M\\< IN(i alter FLOOR Admission to Ballroom as Accompanist. SHOW SI 00 To-night visit CLUB MORGAN The most Bcauli/ul JViaht Club from Miami to Rio trtfh a ti-orid-urlds reputation JOT good food Music, Dancing Entertainment throughout the night Dial 4000 for rriervoiions GET READY FOR THE CRICKET TOURNAMENT Let us fit you now with a FINE TROPICAL SUIT BLAZER AND FLANNEL PANTS • P.C.S. MAFFEI & CO. LTD. Top Sco;er( in Tailoring." Nybn Chiffon A lovely new lot of this prelly material in White Peach nnd Blue 36 ins. wide Per yard $2.70 • Printed Ferguson Fabric A really first class Fabric 36 ins. wide Per yard $1.65 Customers Note As tho TOURIST SHIP "Mauritania" will be arriving here on SATURDAY NEXT, March 3rd. at 10.30 a.m.. this Store will REMAIN OPEN until 4 p.m. on that day. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street PHONE 4267 FOR SURINAM PLYWOOD Treated to resist Termites. Vt" thick in sheets (' X f Vi" thick in sheets 3' X V First class quality, ideal for Flush Doors, Cupboards, and Panellings ot all kinds. Can be Polished, Varnished or Painled, STANDARD HARDBOARD W thick in sheets 4' X 8', 10' 3/l" thick in sheets 4' X 8' WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd COMFORT. STYLE. DURABILITY. THESE ARE WHAT YOU SHOULD DEMAND OF GOOD CLOTHES. THESE ARE WHAT YOU GET IN CLOTHES MADE B* C. B. RICE & CO. OF BOLTON LANE



PAGE 1

PACE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRII1AV. MAKM -'. II i BARBADOS AmttftTE Friday. Mrch 2, 1951 Wens From Ift liiaiii uam ^ I OMM.S. iiKi.r PUBLIC support for the Society (or the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in this island has never been indicatve f the volume or the quality of the work which this body has been able to do. Flag Days. Concerts and public subscriptions have failed to keep its financial condition near to the required standard. Only a week ago it was suggested that a home be established in order tu save the number >f emaciated dogs from the starvation and illtreatment which they endure when driven from home during the licensing period. It was officially admitted by the Society that whilst this has been included among other aims it has not been possible to finance a home from the funds o[ the Society. Today is the Society's Flag Day and it is up to those who now recognise the need for such a Society in a civilised community and the need for support of its work to contribute generously to its funds. The work of the Society is not spectacular but that it is necessary and extremely important can be judged from the recognition which it has received in communities more advanced than in Barbados. Education in this island has not been conspicuous in inculcating love for animals "by young children. The grown up who keeps his dog for protecting the backyard does not hesitate to drive him away from home rather than pay a live shilling tax. The carter who makes his living with a draft animal stops at the shop for his glass of beer or mauby forgetting the animal in the shafts and in the sun. As an indication of what proper care and proper feeding can do. two points will be exhibited at Beckwith Place today as a reminder to those who see them, that animals respond to care and protection as much as any living being. The prevention of cruelty is only part of the work of the Society. Proper methods of handling animals are as essential as food and the Society aims at instructing the average owner not merely to avoid cruelty but to give proper care to animals. There are very few people who do not admit a love for animals of some kind and every one who dare profess such love should not hesitate to contribute to a Society whose sole object is to protect animals of every kind. It can easily be done by subscribing to the Flag Day collection. WHILST it is difficult, without knowing all the facts, to comment adequately from this distance on the Grenada disturbances, yet the mentality of those who have instigated them and those who have taken part seems baffling. Whatever the merits of their case may be. .it is obvious that they are discontented with wages and conditions of labour. If they had started these disturbances merely with the object of bringing the matter to the attention of the Colonial Office there might have been some method in their madness, but if it is considered that these disturbances have been initiated in an attempt to better the lot of th,e worker, it seems strange that property which had been erected to improve the workers' condition, has been the main objects of destruction. One school erected at a coal of £40.000 granted by Colonial Development and Welfare to further education, and n clinic also for the improvement of health services to combat disease have been wilfully destroyed. Mr. (..airy and his followers have been hoping to convince the Colonial Office that adult suiTrage should be granted to the people of Grenada. Do they Imagine that tliia is the way to achieve this end? LONDON. Feb 23 Eisenhower has been mnd<* very welcome in Britain •> .Supreme Commander of the North Atlantic Pact force* An American has been nominated as the ri nf II"' Ait Forces. An American has been nominated as Chief of the production effort. Hut when the appointment of Admiral Fcchleler of the U S, Navy was known here, the Ad B/ Divd Tempi* Roberts 'Mi Churchill was up at or-** %  dmtoi i %  i icii in solt'n-t. tone*. nodded i loomy approval while their tide %  With the same cheers and .dent (loom Uta 1> 11 leader put .waves 2E SJFssEz It was possible anyhow not \m long ago for one country to sink 525 German U boaU, compared with 174 by the United States The general opinion in the House of Commons Is that thi< Is anothei e*M of Mr. Attlee havbu i'-o much to do. At present ha b Prime Minister. Foreign Secretary for CommonruttaUons, and has to liike the chair at i" r Cab ia* %  < mmiiteea. Probab.lv i ii-m discussions then wen thia appointment did noi thousand, miles away—but it's pre sumed he's not sleeping so well down below today. In the House of Commons our unhappy overbuulensl l*rime Minbier took the full force on the chin Here Is how the scene was described by William Barkley, the Pally Express parliamentary re porter. cross the Allaniheat gapolntment*. So the Royal Navy Is riding high was tho -iightlv mntent out of a is Niv> Knlor Captain n Washington. Festival Bandwagon With understandable eagerness everybody is using the Festival to get things polished up nnd writing the expense down tu good publlitty. 'ir.r brewers are thinking w r new names for pubs all over the country lhat hove neither names nor signs. Some are modern There is the -Jet and Whittle 1 Mar Oh ucester — to commemori t %  tic with Europe? 'And are not the sea approach! lo our island. In the event of Mil marine attack, vital to nil Ufl 'Hew is if — with ever moi insistence in his voice" — 'th when our experience is longer and wider thin that of any other country, particularly of the sub marine evil and when we have all "Consternation struck the Comngreed with so much ploar r..ons when Mr Attlee announced that General Elsenhower shoulJ trat an American is to command command the Aimed Forces on th< the Atlantic navies. Including land, we might have been thc.ugn Royal Naval forces. If it was an tt have the command Of. (M outrage to Tory sentiment, It was ea on the Atlantw "' also a shock to Socialist feeling*. "Mr. AUIee's reply was short Never ha* a statement ol their When there is an organisation a te the inventor of the jet engine leader fallen on their ears with cf a number of Powers, the apAnd 'Tin' FIMNK Saucer" in Keni Such a heavy thud. pointment is made by those will rive %  ORM -orial historian 20" "They gaped and the House o! Powers, and no one Power has years hence an awful lot of bother Commons soon witnessed someAbsolute right to dictate iu. view* d ta covarlag lU : minllcance. Perthing quite novel—a decree of %  to any -ippolntment. I under. i^ps he will put it down to the cordiality being shown by Socialstand that the proposition lhat an eustom of domestic quarrelling 1st* lo 'he vivid fervent'protests American admiral should be ayThe brewer: claim proudly ti of Mr. Win-ton Churchill. pointed was generally acceptable." spend i! 100 apiece on brand new "It was not only the substance "Mr. Attlee hud no more ne swinginK emblems. bul |bt manner of Mr. Alllee's wanted to say. He sat back in hu And the British Colour Council announcement that shocked. character is lie pose, well down o-i is trying to use the Festival to his front sent. It was only when make men colour conscious. They He made it so casually that It a chorui of "Answer, answer" aswant to see socks in "Victorian ght have been anything to sailed him that he rose again to purple, awning red. and garter which M.P.'s are now accustomed ray— blue." In actual fait a hattci bv every-day experience such a* 'This rrntter was naturally Gear Piccadilly did a roaring rlgg In the cost of li/lng. or a very fuliy discussed. Hut 1 soy trade in green hats, red hats am t in the meat ration. .-gain It is a matter for agreement, orange hBts last year, so the. "It began with Mr. Churchill And the general conclusion was should have some success at th formally asking If the Prime Min|hal th;< was the best appointother end of the male body, liter had a statement to make on ment.' hear they are also encouraging the naval appointment under the •Tories were quick to spot, with hand-painted ties. Mermaids on North Atlantic Treaty Organise shouts of "Oh", a contradiction ties can already be bought It lion. Mr. Attlee popped up and when, having said it was fully Sraftcsbury Avenue read off:— discussed, he added: 'I cannot at The Churches, too. think th 'The Defence Committee of the the moment soy whether Ihere Festiv.il of Britain may swe'l Organisation has agreed there wns an elaborate discussion or their re building funds. The plan should be a Supreme Allied Comnot.' Is tn sell chunks of pile nnd ston" mander Atlnnlio.' "and in th "He seemed taken aback ;t the in m I d BM historic City chinch. same lone, without raising his ferment in the House and wa i % %  innadlan is already in and thut should be an .nying again lhat no one country this game. He nwiufaetufl I American.' could, in such an organisation, inthe bil-into honk-ends. It will "Such a buzz of talk resounded t,it on it* own right, when I be renn'mbered that during the i.l once that he was hardly heard Tory shout smothered his words." war OfOpgffty authenticated bits adding 'hat an American officer Where Is British leadership?' of the destroyed House of Com has already been nominated and was the shout. mons were sold very well t" an announcement will be made "Mr. Churchill was on his feet United States and other vislttn? room again with apt figures at hand, forces. By DAVIS LEE IM viii>. %  >. when the Cominform liberation armies sweep over th frontier. But Ihey are makmu n BELGRADE. I noticed Ihe change since my last visit on the very Urn station lhe 5^;,, doctrinaires. Tit*' SB,,";,^" "ad crossed the Government „„ even gone so fa border into Yugoslavia. . us lo restore a men A wT n "L ". rdk,shly %  %  *S enterprise in nome of the lambakm hat. long coat, high „„„„„ whlth ha „ b0 ,. ; leather boots, ill d enormous ^er bv the State BMUgweaag itniCMa up and down the platform behind a youth who \\, | m Talk was selling beer and soft drinks The man in Ihe lambskin hat Most interesting of all: It is called oul all norta of good things ,n< more JIO.-MI.IC f..r Yugoslav.* to eat and drink and smoke aa lo be seen talkin* lo foreigners though he had them for sale The like myself without having to fenr crowd loved It. For everyone the consequence!, j have been knew that those things were unmtidc a temporary member of a rblainable today, but were part l*lgrade club— unthinkable the cf the station vendors' ordinary last time 1 was here. wares before Socialism came to These men talk freely, frnnklv. Yugoslavia. They Joined in wit'i nnd even bitterly. And. believe progress. extravagant suggestions. pw — despite the gaiety mid Ho leaflets or stickers haw The tall, black-coated policelaughing clwlter of the young been Bean by any of my friendv man at the station entrance m er nnd girls taking their even. i,o, 1|( B „ne are the 0 'd days aftei stolidly looked on and took no ing stroll along the boulevard* of ihr brVat between Moscow anDOttee. Two years Bgo. when 1 villuge high streets, despite this Belgrade when Moscow still ha v.as last here, that scene would IKW policy of liberalisation—ther.. ., c | nn dcstine printing |< have been impossible. is 11 great deal of bitterness, dlsBelgrade on which it could prin i„ ihe nrsi ..luce ih.,iNo Column on his act: if he had done, some* Now I am not saying that ther. one in a leather coat and a leather Among the peasants—80 per r r " Corn In form is ts at larg< cap would have sprung up from cent, cf Yugoslavia's population— '" ugu*iavla. A disgruntle nowhrie end taken him off to the beeeUM they resent the Governt'nnimunist ofllciai overruled 0 local headquarters for a liltl • ,,„.,,! oampellinst them to sell ihe K>torcd nuist always be unde lerMn In Socialist cultuie. lion's share of their produce at temptation to change his allegWhen 1 K"! 'o my hotel I looked very low controlled prices lo tho iartce. i> ping for reward aru 1 round for tne two leathercoatca Slnte; because last year's drcughl prpiciment when lhe cominform plain-clothes men who used to be has hit them badly; and because l s invade, il ever they do. on guard in the lobby night and they sun fear tne Government But ihaX w wl cre the secre day. They had been discreetly menus to nationalise and colleenPoliee come into ihe picture. For withdrawn, vise their land Wl,n a lncir ncw unobtrusive Dene is that "voluntary" labour i" 1 ". Ihey are more efficient thnr on the building sites to which Among the factory workers eve. young and old weie compelled ta because when the factories were No. there is nothing of what march with pick and shovel recently transferred from State one could call a Stalinist pene three limes a week on pain cl ownership to ownership by the tmttotl of the Yugoslav econoeaic forfeiting their rations. workers the llrsl result was thai or administrative machine. There The number of political meetwages were reduced still furthe %  i* no Fifth Column in Yugoslavia %  ngs in factories, offices, and and more work was demanded, to help a Stalinist invader will' icsidontial districts have been Because food and clothes ere *aboi.,gr urnshcnllv cut down. A cltl/cn difficult lo buy for Ihe money thev I ;,m convinced that Marshal who does not attend them is no earn. Tito could afford to loosen up hi longer penalised, nor Is a factory In lhe towns because food dlsPOIIcv Stnte %  lot more befor hand who walks out on some tribution, despite American nid. there would be any inside threat Mi\ii pen In order to get has broken licwn badly. Ration* iron, Moscow, on with his work. nr*) not Mnj honoured, nnd the Eventually I hope he does. F01 In their desire to think out free market prtcei tharfad by the I like to hear S'rbs sing, things afresh and get away from peasant-; are so high lhat town —1..F. S. Our Hril4 is Sav : fennel %  Wruninimltil'um To llie Kdllor. The Advocate — silt. -There hive appeared from Una l" time editorial'.. an: le'.ters. published in your paper !• '• vertlsiiiK lhe budding of anolhci hotel on the island. Althnui£. opponents ot the idea v .*vc not seen lit tu appear in print, casual enquiry disclosed the fuct thiit ol lhe island and manv tourists do not want aiiylliliic done which would lurn Harbacios ini another Bermuu.i The writer is m complete tympafh] with lhal I'lought, bul does np| believe Mich a strange IhtAj could take \ lace in Ihi r.ble future lot the following reason*. 1. Barbados I-. so far nytona and Onmmd seclion nf Florida where there is not a tract' of u pebble. Every beuch in Barbados where the writer has be.th.rd, i* cluttered with coral tockfc X various sizes which frequently scratch the feet. To be sure, in the early winter in the Daytomi and Ormond area, the water is r.nt, as warm as it is" here, out by mid-February, it Is ideal for bathing From I'.ilm Beach south ;!:, %  water is always warm be because thai part of the coast washed by the tlujf Stream. At this time of year, many ol Ihe major league base ball team* .start training In various parts ol Florida, and in many cities m the state, one may watch good baseball several times a week. Furthermore, there are several beautilul tracks in Florida where there is a long raring season with most of the beet stables In lhe US represented and there Is dog racing and gambling for thine whose tastes run In lhat direction. Every town has reel golf course*, compared with which. the course here is a sheep pasture Finally, the hotels here are so primitive ond the food so inferior. that they could not exist in either Bermuda or Florida. In one hotel on this island, a guest cannot even get a drink of water except at meals or in his room at night without tipping a bell boy lo get it or go to the bar. This u not written In a Atri1 nf carping criticism but merely as an effort tn set forth the fact* 'howing why. in the opinion of the *mter, BarbdQOs will never be a second Bermuda or Florida. I like it here and hope to come other winters if 1 can get a room. I think there is ample room for another hotel, one of about 50 looms so designed that il can be enlarged to 100 rooms when conditions justify It; not a de hW hotel btlt one built on ample ground*,* ^vlth a wide gallery. comfortable rooms each with bath and running hot and cold water and a telephone iu every room Investo* in such an enterprise should beoffered every inducement such at in Jamaiei where the builder can buy wherever he wishes ""d the materials are brought In duty free and he is not hedged about by iuch restrictions a$ caused the Blue Waters enterprise to be abandoned after It was well on Us way JUST ANOTHER TOURIST. \ Rrniilvnl To The Utter, The Adi-ocnic Sll* Permit me TO draw to me attention of whom It may concern, the plight of the residents of the Daacons Road Hpusing Beta Whenever there is a heavy rainfall, water settles near a suck well a distance of about fortj yards long and about eighteen (181 inches deep, causing much incon\enience to residents going from m coming lo their homes. Thore are only about a dor.en homes within, the immediate entrances fiom Deacons Koad which are not affected b> the water Hoping :rnl the %  UtbortttOI will lake action. dOHN W WATTS Shirt* To Ihe Fdifor. The Advocate— SIR. The IC.ukshliis and the Brownshirts Thev bad their little dav. The Red hsrti still are In Ihe news But then I mean lo say. You've realb lost your freedosn The Rill .f Rights is dirt When son cone in authority Selects youi bloomln' shirt' Imagine tagged "Verbolen" And classed with dangerous drugs Those coats of many colours The cheerful litlerbugs: Designed short-sleeved by cornWorn outvde (suits the weather* A boon lo parents' pocketbook*Forbidden altogether! Adorned by all that's modern art B eda e fcad by Euclid's flggcrs And ram^mt vrlth all Heraldry From Jumbo down to jiggers' My ancestor* were long made fre^ Who knew the shackles' hurl . No man cm scare the pants off Mv son ihill choose his shirt! I (IRE. WHILE THE SOUTH does not provide ample or adequate modern school facilities for Negroes everywhere, neither does it provjde completely modern facilities for white schools, because the money is not available for such a vast undertaking. However, rapid progress has been made and in Montgomery, Ala., and several other communities the Negro schools far exceed the white schools in modernization and physical appearance. Neither do the majority ot Southern Negroes nor the majority of the whites approve of the present programme to disrupt a custom which has served both races well down through Ihe years and contributed so much to the Negro's economic security.. Just what would be the future educational status of the Negro in the South if the Legislatures of all the Southern States would enact legislation withdrawing State linancial support from all schools of higher learning, starting at the high school level? Not only is this possible, but if it should come to pass, the Negro would be unable to finance his own educational programme. Negro financed educational programmes have been a failure in the past and nothing miraculous has happened which would cause a normal person to assume that the future holds any better prospect. NO RACE OR NATIONALITY in this nation has excelled or equalled the Negro in educational attainment and achievement, but this educational opportunity was not only created by white dollars but has been Hnanced by white people throughout the nation, It is an unfortunate lact, that Negroes contribute very little to their own community well being and improvement and this fact should be taken into account by these agitators before they initiate their programme for demands in "the field of education. Instead of spending thousands of dollars to finance unnecessary court tights for privileges which will cost the race millions in lost valuable friendships and, racial goodwill, our leaders should go into the Negro ghettoes and force the local grocer to carry prime meats and sell to our people Grade A products which will make us healthy. It is no wonder that the death rate is so high amonp, Negroes. When one considers the food situation plus inadequate housing, it is a wonder that the death rate is not higher. It is very apparent to me that the Negro leaders of this nation have a distorted sense of real values. They appear to be more interested in breaking down racial barriers and conducting expensive campaigns of agitation, in spreading hate, than in directing their efforts, energies and money towards the attainment of the tangible essentials of life. I WAS IN ATLANTA last week and was greatly impressed by the large number of outstanding and progressive Negro businesses. Atlanta is strictly a segregated city. I was in several New England cities this week where there is not supposed to be any segregation, and I found not one creditable Negro business. The one owned and operated Negro radio station is not in New York, but in Atlanta at'Kregation has not only given the Negro in the South an opportunity to carve out his industrial and economic destiny, but it has forced him to the fore as the most substantial nd economically secure Negro in the world The Negro in New York. Newark and other supposedly liberal centres may enjoy the privileges to eat where he pleases nr go to any theatre or public place of amusement, but a Negro can't get o license in Newark to operate a liquor package store and there are any number of fields that he can t enter business in other Eastern and Northern cities. But this is not true in the South. A Negro can enter any kind of business he wishes and Southern whites will even lend the money. Some of the largest contractors in the South arc Negroes. NORTHERN NEGRO DOLLARS spent to force Southern white universities to admit Negroes will certainly not contribute anything towards continued good race relations in the South, and race relations were definitely on the improve until all of these school suits started. I find more race prejudice In the East than I have found in Georgia or Mississippi. Two weeks ago 10 tourists' camps refused to rent me a cabin just outside of Pittsburgh, and Pennsylvania is one of the first Slates to enact a civil rights law. The AMERICAN RACE SITUATION has not only taken on added alarming proportions but has developed into a serious problem which could explode and create a national crisis. Instead of trying to And peace in Korea and other foreign lands our leaders, both white and coloured. %  Aould try to find a panacea for these racial ills and establish peace at home before advocating it abroad. We are not in a position to teach the other fellow how to establish unity in his bailiwick when we don't have it in our own. WILKINSON 4 BATNES Co-, Ltd. Successors Ta GS. PITCHER & CO. Phone — 4472. 41*1. I* "INTERNATIONAL" PAINTS COVER THE WORLD! A a protective covering for the roofi of your buildings, we can offer you the following RED IIOOI 1X4. I'AIVIS "DANBOLINE" ANTI -CORROSIVE PAINT (for galvanized iron)—$7.52 per wine gallon. "PROPELLER" READY MIXED OIL PAINT (for wooden shingles, asbestos, cement and aluminium)—$7.00 per wine gallon. For best results, Ihe following Instructions should be carefully followed ;— Galvanised Iran. 1. For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least a year before painting. Then apply I coat of "DANBOLINE". 2. For previously painted work, it the surface Is in good condition, rub down, clean, and apply 1 coat of "DANBOLINE." 3. For previously painted work, if the surface Is In poor condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat of "INTERNATIONAL" RED LEAD GRAPHITE PRIMER, followed by 1 coat of "DANBOLINE-*. Wooden Shingle. 1. For new work, apply 1 coat of "INTERNATIONAL" PRIMER FOR WOOD, followed by 2 coats of "PROPELLER". 2. For previously painted work, if the surface Is in good condition, rub down, clean, nnd apply 2 coats o( "PROPELLER". 3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat of "INTERNATIONAL" PRIMER FOR HOOD", followed by 2 coat* of "PROPELLER". Asbestos Cement. 1 For new work, apply I coat of "INTERNATIONAL" CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER, followed by 2 coats of "PROPELLER". 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean. and apply 2 coals of "PROPELLER". Aluminium 1. For new work, apply 1 coat of "YELLOW PRIMOCON". followed by 1 coat of "PROPELLER". 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean, an i apply 1 coat of "PROPELLER". TRY THERE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. AGENTS II niiii i /i tin*/../


PAGE 1

fr\GT. TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. MARlH 2. I51 CaJiib Ceding L ADY HlTSON. widow of the late Sir 3>Y.< England vmwday bv the GarfflU Changed Plant M R and MRS LEWAKD C WYKOfT of Cleveland iriurnrd from Trinidad yesterday by I) W i A i, •vith T C-*' fllghl to Canad:. to-morrow. Tlic Wykoffs who intended spending the greater part of ihasr holiday in Grenada, changed their plan* due to the labour unrast In that colony ami went on to Trinidad S.P.C.A. Tag Day r i-DAV USP C A. tag da* Hfluinir 1*' roUaff money for their fellow anlmaU this mornln.t will be two Shetland ponies who will collarl opntiibutiona around trie Barbados Mutual Ufa., Assurance building Coincide* M RS A A GIBBONS sj O of Dr Gibbons. P M.O Si James was among the passengers leaving for England yasterday by the GafataShe Is on a visit -to her relatives an1 expects to"Te away about four months Her vim lo England coincides with the Festival of Britain OH To U.K. M R WE THOMAS. D rector of Messrs Stokes and Bynoe Ltd accompanied by hit wife left by the GeMta yesterday to spend Four or five months in England Canadian Trade Com mission er M R. T GRANT MAJOR. Canadian Trade Commissioner for the Eastern Caribbean and the Guianas with headquar ten In Trlaidad. was Intransit bv the (asasnbte yesterday morning from Guadeloupe where he had baan on an official visit. Mr Grant Major who was la Barbados some weeks ago. also paid official visits to 3t. Kit', and Antigua He la now returning to his headquarters Back to the Gold Coast M R. H M LUC1E-SMIT1I. Comptroller of Customs in the Gold Coast, left for England by the GaMta yesterday fVaDlai after -spending a holiday here with his brother Mr. D A Lucie-Smith lit Hneklev Beautician Here M ISS JOAN McREE. personal representative of the EllziiDtth Arden Saloons In London. Jungi.md. arrived yesterday morning by the Colembte She will be here for three weeks staying at the Marine Hotel On to Grenadn A MONG the passengers arriving here yestenlay morning by the t'olambie intransit fo. Grenada were Mr T H. Shlllinfford nnd his sister Mrs. Vardun Wallace who were •pending a-holiday In Dominica. • Mr Shirtingford Is Manager of the Grenada Lime Factory and Was proprietor of the Savoy %  Hotel which was burnt out U'eks hennnd will l* staving %  at the Marine Hotel a n d Sam Lord's Castle. Mr. Tarry is a Director of the Tecnlc Shoe Co.. Ltd. of Rushdan, a company with which he waa associated for 30 vcur*, Prior to that, he was adviser lo William Green and Sons Ltd Shoe Manufacturers of England. THEGA. Lid in Baaatal on, who aie in HM WllUla) Mile electrical business. Drilling Supt. AM** and Mrs F. M. Crawford -l" and their son Allan arrived trom Trinidad yesterday bv B.W.I.A. to spend two weeks' holiday at the Crone Il-tel Mr. Crawford Is a Drilling Superintendent with U.B O T. stationed in Point Kortin. Hare for a Month T N BARUADOS for a month's %  a. holiday arc Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Craig, wl._ ; i rived from Trinidad vesterday morning by B.W I A. They are staying at 1he Ocean View Hotel. Mr. Cralg la a Director of Walter-, Trinidad Drawing Co.. in Port f For Barbados Holiday M ISS JOAN LUM accompanied by Mrs Gabriel Ahes of PortJof-Spain m-ived from Trim dad yesterday morning b\ BWI.A. Mr*. AJvss i.< here for two months'. Miss Lum is on three weeks' holiday. They are staying •with Mr> D King In Fontabelle. From B.C. A/i n •> %  DOS RAMOS, salesman %  *• of Alex Russell and Co. of Brillalj Guiana, arrived by the ( Kiamble yesterday mornltiR on a short visit and is staying at Acera", Rocklry Automobile Engineering M R DENNIS BANNISTER. ton of Mr. and Mrs. S B Bannister of Thorsby" Pine Hill, left yesterday for England by the (Matte. He is going on a three or four-year course in Automobile Engineering with the 1 lumber Co af Coventry With Barclays M R. and Mrs. R C. Burrowes who have been in Barbados •ince December. 1049, left yesterday by the GeMU for England Mr llurrowei who was stationed with Barclay! Bank here has bean re-transferred to their London Branch Intransit I NTRANSIT through Barbados yesterday morning by B W I A from Trinidad for Antigua wai His Oracc Archbishop Finbar Kvan. Catholic Archbishop of Sj-aln. His visit to Antigua is in connection with the visit Of the Statue of Our I*d> of Falima to that colony. Th* statue arrived in Antigua a fev, days ago Retired Civil Servant I N Barbados for about twt. weeks' holiday. la th< Hon'ble Austin Winston, retireCivil Servant of Dominica. Hi arrived yesterday morning by the Canadian Challenger and is stay ing at %  Allworth", Chcapside With Cable and Wireless A FTER spending ,, month's holl~ day in Dominica, Mr. Cyril Volney of Messrs Cable anr Wireless. returned yesterday morning by the Colessble He wa accompanied bv his wife and thret children. To be Married in St. Kitt. *ISS HILDA MILNEJt oi Eng%  *•" land, arrived here yesterdaj morning by the Cefstabtc en routt to SI. Kltts where she will I* n irrled to Mr. Frank Gsw ol Barclays Bank (DC. and O.) En-routc M R. A. STROUD. of the Government PTintery in Crenadi, iirnve.1 here yesterday morning by the CaaadLaa Challenger intransit from Dominica where he had spent a holiday. Planter from Dominica M K. iED MONfcKCHUHCH, planter of Dominica, arrived yesterday morning by lot) t' sn adian Challenger to spend a holiday with his relatives. He i a brotner of Mrs. Frank Collymore of Chelsea Road. Holidaying For Six Months M il. s* h. Kt-E-Vto, son ot ur. Reeves of Plymouth. EngI.IM:. arrived here yesterday by SS. Colomble to spend six months' holiday with his grandmother, Mri. C. B. Reeves of Bay Street. Mr. Reeves who spent four years in the R.A.F.. Is now a farmer la South Devonshire His grandfather was a well known shipwright in Barbados and a member of Ihe Vestry of St. Michael Barrister Going Home \ MONG the intransit passengers arriving here on the Catombie yesterday wa* Mr. Dudley Johnson of Grenada who Is going on lo his home island to practise as a Barrister-at-Law. He will sail on the Calamhk to Trtn idad, and reach Grenada by plane Mr. Johnson who was called lo the Bar In January this year told Carib he had attended the Holy Year celebrations In Rome last August and had then visited Switzerland. r-ci aat •}! %  s # nd KurofKt Empin(sirls Tour Europe At Tin\ CdflS LONDON, | HOgaasI Seton of New Soyth Wales and Phoebe Cralg of Saataloon, Canada, are proving ihe .u-ength of commonwealth rvU-1 Uons .. in London from wide' ly-cparated pans of the globe I *ilh_ the same idea in mind, thr aotlel and deci'led to t> Both war.; ptssible of Britain and Eu. a limited bank balance. Already they've worked m London, visited Ireland and ScotlBn" and spent nine week., tourin; France. Italy. Belgium. H'gsar. iwitcerland and Germany—-afseli ucksacks sporting the flags ol Canada and Australia. The girls saw the "passion plsy il Oberammergau, were given eaflcts for a proposed rommunti: ttrkke in Germany and spent s light in a doashouse In Berne. They arrived in Berne when the routh hostels had closed for the %  eason and it was the dos.ihouM> >r an expensive hotel. They those the dosshouse and their evesnng neal was a cup of cocoa and a iish of bread-and-butter puddu..; *lth raisins. Kepi Expenses Down For the nine-weeks tour. Moreen and Phoebe allowed i< n elves £22 each and the outlay ncluded souvenirs and postcards. Now the girls are back m Hi i Jin. working and saving fcr snither tour. This will take them o Spain, Portugal, I Sweden and Luxembourg. They will call at Malta, cross to Morocco, see Algiers and TUBists md come back through Berlin. ~hey are allowing themselves 'our to five months and £50 •ach. On arrival from Canada, .'hoebe had about £200, "ana 'hat's going pretty fast." she .aid "When we come baa atxl ime. I'll really have to settle lown and save my fare horm —(C.P.) Junior Short Story Competition The Eveaaag Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for its Junior Short Story Competition The best ttory will be published i.day in The Beeaaag Adrsaale. and the winner will receive a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The stories can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than MM words In length, and must reach The C WJarass'a Unsr. The Adveeate f '• Ltd.. CMy not later than Wednesday every week. NOTE : Storiei must not be copied Send this coupon with your story. Jl AOt -Hl.gr 8TOKY COMPTTTTION Naeae BY THE WAY By BSACttCQMBE* S UPPORTERS of Manchester's Halle Orchestra poured Into MM K< rsl Alien Hall last nigh', swinging rattles and wearing soup. plUcsucd favours of the limit colours. It was a comparatively orderly crowd, and the playing of "Bacchus and Arlanc" was Only twtot marred by the fans get'.ing out of hand Barbirolli played maginiu.ntlv in the second half, passing across ihe strings to the find lioinbone to score within the rlrst minute'* pia>. tits defanslvs lacUcs, when pressed by the first nnd second violins during a quiet period in Song cif Summer," had the crowd on their toes. There is rumour of an L.P.Q transfer offer. Clarifying thr htur AS for Ihe dummy, is a felt hat "' durlm a song "a felt prop". Only If It squeaks when pinched, say the spokesmen in touch with authoritative Sunday Observance circles. Bui a f e u hat pressed Into a comical shape is obvlousK over.tepaliig the mark. Yn u cai. slog "Funicull. Funicula." the anthem of the Tourist Funicular .Society on a Sunday, but not „, dogs. Mine,. Adcimidr. the Preaeta eoluiuturslladdy soprano, was once arrejtad here for coming on lo the platform at a Sunday con§ 1 carrying an umbrella. | %  %  %  %  %  i PLAZA Tbeatre-firidgetown (DIAL 2310) TO-DAY %  fatowm s n. s a %  %  > m mi conunums DCIW THIN '""" LUCTU* HOPE BALL •• ,h WEST BIFORC! 'FANCY PANTS >d 1 90 pin iMor-x-.-i.i< HAUMIS OS TOVSHTOM SU1J.1VAN llrml imwniKii Vi.X'I.iX Thealre-O/ST/W (DIAL 8404) TCl-IlAV A TOMOKHnW rSSj*l ^ A *0 I BKO RsdlO D*uMl BlftTftlmiN & tRIMINAL COURT Drtvn IV Drtlrtrt.! _,„, Tooi ,\ ( NWAY-Mjrlh ODIUSK.-01.I. Mldnilr Sul 3rd iMonofumi I SUN a MOW ionly> %  and %  J Ot llll -MUM I f K K O K.-.H,. M-.i, Johnny Mack BROWN *nd j Blnl iMOHBY -Ingild BEKOMAN i BIDSBS Of THE PAWN Wllh JIMMY WAKCI.Y BELLS OF ST. MARY'S GAIETY — {THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES FLYNN SMITH ilar hv Tectuitc RAIDERS OF THE BORDER ft RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH "WTTBI %  %  %  %  %  ~k M %  I %  HERE Again ... w be "Snapped up" I I Magnificent SAMBA SPUNSJ Thi las; Sliipment at old prices saves you 20? MM KM I 820 and White c Pastels 90 yd 87t PF.R 36" YARD New Range NlGHflES :t. 91. ,95 Children Panties .10/77? EVANS Dial 4606 fi WHITFIELDS Your Shoe Stores Dial 4220 HOURS of BUSINESS. Saturday MARCH 3rd l \\\s A WIIITFIFLDS will b.tlPEN ALL DAV (I s-m.—4 p.m > having jln .nl> rlosrd fur thr Statutr> half da) on Thursday Mar. 1st, Aga School Farsa IIMBT AMrNi TKIc mi fttsry New Ltxtk For 3fen 9 8 Socks Mauve And Purple MEN'S socks in Victorian purpic. awning red, and garter blma will be all the rage this year Why?—It Is Festival year. The British Colour Council sugiic-sted the new tones. They decide a year in advance what colours the fashionable 111 wear. B.B.C. Radio Programme s>SS %  mMAJU-1I I. 1SSI *•*•. Said a council official: "This Festival commemorates the 1BS1 Festival of Queen Victoria's reign That suggests Victorian mauves and purples." II :•': > C.i'ii.,1c t<-!iciT:l|-.itil!ii on the home market for men. One has produced an all-wool sock wiih nylon loe and heel rcinf'irrcment. packed In a fancy gold box with ihe Festival crest "ii the lid —L E.S. GLOBE Stnrlinfi l<;t,i,, J V /I. II) TaK* 11 'torn !>•*• %  ? • m T IS am Mm Anly*i. IIS am. From the gsHwrtslt. 7-Ss am. P-og*IIOIM FWSda. 7 J %  rn From th* Thlid Itoarat-u.,*. 7 M a n. lntcl-a*. I iiti KaihU*n Sf*rrlH Sirins Oich-*ira. B4* am Colonl-I OttMSIina. Sam Th* N*wa. t IS m Htc Nrw. 'm" Britain. Illiir C\o~ Down. 11 IS a m PTan>mm* Par*d*. IDS BJB. UW-ri Cholc*. lle am. Worl4 ASaira. IS r*r Th* K*w. DID pm. N AnlW %  • %  a pin Clin* Down. isasa BM*. M SS ai a U p m BBC N..rlh*rn Orch*M' S p.m Compor of th* W'*H. SIS pn L#T.. Makr Mtiilc. S p.m Mnchant Nav t fm sla tt ar 'sviii p.m si.ss a 4a.u KMITIMIJK C'laVCMA [MambanOnryl SSATDfgKB TO-DAV and TO-MOSSmOW -t P %  TO-KIOMT TO SUNDAY NIOKT at S SB Darryi P Ttnurfc mn'iu intivrs AJCBSBin T-rhnleomT Sttrrmc Unda D*SWBX4>-C*n*l WILDSV_P J rhd GFCTMs; -4 OMff SUJiTSSSta. SSU. C*n'-'>-*HOKTMY *ns* TUtSSDAV NIOtfTat B SB MATLVSX TVKSSMY at • P m Stm HAMUSJN *i'ir*i O-HABA in rO OS BASJUlliJ SrBTJMSBBDAT •"! TMtTtBJDAV N1UKT sllS SCATTMSat WaTJrrSMDAV al 5 p m _.^ i>.. HAVurs Vara il I ss" Cassi B TSBiari B 19 n m Thlnhlntr about Lamdon. BJ o.cn. lnt*rliMM. B * pm Pror"v Parad*. 7 pm Th* N* 7 10 p n N**>a Analtila. 7 IS p m W"l Iixt" Dlaty. TJ1 pm. fcnWrlnS*. 7 p Thing-on that* Thtna lis lit* P" sis* UU i MM TWI CHRISTINE GORDON H SSjl Jeffrey'* Heer' : TRIWD.WS I.OVU.V 1931 CARNIVAL QUEEN Appearing in Pvrmn %  pm. Radio Ne*w**l. S.1S pm Engtlah M-W. S.4* Pm Compoaai ol th* Wt*h S pm World AAalri. •.SI BH I*,Wah* M.iuc. 11 P"' Th. N*w. 10 10 pm. FVom tl- Fd.ioiuU IS.IS P-m. Communlam In **rsrl* 10 SO pm Melody on SlrlrB-. 10 48 p.m Th* D*b*te Contlnu*a. II p m. "I"* "I Ih* Curtain ( ..fTCArJC05T YOOXUf*! "" %  wwiH "•-o.. SSSSr %  PluTONTTFLOCAL TA1.KVT ON PARADE Erne DAISY (REQL'E <|uern's Lady In Waltlns MiBlresks of the Ivories And popular LANDY DE MONTBRTN Master of i rrmuniri EMPIRE SUNDAY, 4th March THEATRE — 4.45 & 8.30 PICTIRE: "GOODNIGHT SWEETHEART" PRICES: MATINEE—Children .lie.. Adults S1.00 NK.1IT : Stalls and Box SI.50: House Balcony SI.OS BUY YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE TICKETS for Sunday ean be bousht at Empire Box OITire TO-DAY and TOMORROW all day and on SUNDAY from 8 am. to l noon. Songs by "BUTTONS AND BOWS." TUNESMITIIS! :i SHOWS r-s-dav I 2 30—4.45 and I 30 p m. Jin] continuing dally at 4 45 and 8 30 p.m. Extra: (Popeye the Sailor). "THE FLY'S LAST FLIGHT | JPLAZA Bridgetown (Dial 2310). EMPIRE To-day 2 30 and 8 30 and Continuing: I' tufiii-lt to 1 1't'.slt'rtltii/ And also extra .hurl !/•• Mtifiiii'tir Tide BOXY To-day only 4 30 and 8 15. Unlvrrsal Doable Attraction. Pre*ton Foster in . INSIDE JOB — AND — BLACK CAT Basil Rathbone and Brod Crawford ROYAL To-day only. 4 30 and 8.30 Republic Whole Serial— GHOST OF ZORRO Starring Clayton Moore — Pamela Blake, with Roy Bancroft and George J i < %  :< ,, OLYMPIC To day to Monday. I 30 and S 15 Republic Smashing Double. Louis Hayu-ard and Lee Bowman In HOI'SE BY THE RIVER — AND — DAUGHTER OF THE JUNGLE — WITH — Loin Hall and James (ardMRS. HOUSEWIFE ENHANCE THE APPEARANCE. OF YOUR HOME WITH Lanrastrenm Floor Covering RUGS I II i !'j B, Mil %  n. I n 17 ss a rt. x ii' ft is ss • ft X I! tt. Oil f'ONTINCOI'* ROLLS CI'T TO TOCR ORDER illm. 51c. yj. !"•. 7r. .J ln II 40 yd lSSI.s. ft.lt ,*. ASM—ATTRACTIVE IIESIONS TO SELECT FROM Compxrr OCR TRICES BEFORE PURCHASING ELSEWHERE Tin: II Aim iiios i o-ori II \ 11\ i

Barbados

re eetsteeeeessseensenensnssenesesnsstenseseansenneshnioeenesieenennent

ESTABLISHED 1895





Bidault Invited To

Form New French Govt.

PARIS, MARCH 1. |
PRESIDENT VINCENT AURIOL to-day asked

Ex-Premier Georges Bidault to try to form a.
new French Government.

Bidault, popular Republican leader, told him
he would consult leaders of the political parties and |
give him his reply to-morrow.

If Bidault fails the President

: : \ will then ask a Socialist to try
probably Paul Ramad who!
Ike Flies To was Premier in 1947. “should j

a

London

LONDON, March 1.
General Eisenhower, Atlantic
Pact Supreme Commander, flew
here from Paris to-day for inform-
al talks with British Chiefs of
Staff.
a was flying back to Paris to-
night.
he object of his visit was
understood to be discussions on
the formation of Commands in
northern and southern Europe to
take the place of old regional
groups. The Western Union area
was also being discussed.
British Chiefs of Staff were hav-
ing lunch with Eisenhower.
British Chiefs of Staff discussed
with the Cabinet to-day the
ground they would cover in their
talks with General Eisenhower.
The Cabinet also talked again
about the proposed appointment
of an American Admiral as su-
preme commander of the Atlantic
Pact navies, which caused protests
from Winston Churchill and many
other members of Parliament.
The Government will organise
a full muster of its supporters in
the Commons next Wednesday be-
cause Conservatives decided to
force a vote on this question.
' —Reuter,

U.S. Restrict
Exports To Russia

WASHINGTON, March, 1.

The United States Commerce
Department to-day placed con-
trols on non-strategic American
exports to Russia and Soviet bloc
countries,

Exports of strategic nature to
these countries have been con-
trolled fer some time. To-day’s
order, effective to-morraw, re-
quires exporters to obtain licences
for such npn-strategic goods as
sausage skins and certain types
of machinery.

Books, magazines, processed.
films and ships stores were ex-
empted.

The order formally renewed
controls on the exports of ail
types of goods to Communist
China, Manchuria and North
Korea,

The Commerce Department said
that although the current volume
of exports to these countries was
small, the order would “prevent
or limit any shipment which
might be contrary to national in-

terest.”



LS

The volume and value of United
States exports to Russia and east-
ern Europe have dropped sharply
in the past three years.

—Reuter.

‘dominantly Christian Denwecrat,

he also fail the President would|
no doubt again turn to outgoing:
Premier Rene Pleven,

It is suggested that the new)
Government should get ready to
hold general elections late in May
or early in June.

Pleven to-day refused to attempt
to form a new French Cabinet.

Pleven who looked tired and
ill, told reporters so after a 20
minutes’ interview with President
Auriol.

—Reuter.



Gasperi’s Cabinet
Faces Major Revolt

ROME, March 1.

Premier Alcide De Gasperi’s
sixth post-war Cabinet faced a
crisis tonight with a major revolt
against certain aspects of its
policy by the majority of the
Christian Democratic Party.

After a surprise defeat in the
technical vote in the Chamber of
Deputies last night the Govern-
ment was able to rally a majority
of only 16 votes in a _ parlia-
mentary vote to-day.

Voting on the law to increase
the Government’s economic pow-
ers a large section of 305, Christian
Democratic deputies in a Chamber
of 574 members, voted with Com-
munists and extreme leftwing
Socialists against Government.

It was thought possible that De
Gasperi would resign to-night. |

Immediately after the vote De!
Gasperi called a meeting of Min-{

isters. It was understood that
several ministers favoured im-
mediate resignation in order to

face the revolting Christian
Democrats with their résponsibil-
ities.

They thought that the Demo-
crats were so split among them-
selves that they were unable to
prevent the formation of a new

cabinet on lines similar to the
present one.

De Gasperi. formed his .Goy-
ernment in January 1950. Pre-

also includes some ‘Republicans
and Socialists.—Reuter.

REDS HOLD UP

DANISH TRAWLER

COPENHAGEN, March 1.

A Danish trawler is believed to
have been detained by Soviet
authorties in the Baltic, official
Danish naval sources said here to-
day.

The trawler Capella with a crew
of four was last heard of on Feb-
ruary 25, when another trawler
picked up a message to this effect.

—Reuter.







Big Three Receive Soviet

and
military force in existence in Ger-

Reply To Western Note

MOSCOW, March 1.
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko to-day
handed to Big Three Western Ambassadors, the Soviet reply
to western notes of February 19,
Gromyko received Sir David Kelly, British Ambassador
Admiral Alan Kirk, United States Ambassador and Yves

Chataigneau, French Ambassador at the Soviet Foreigr
Ministry.


































——_——— The British Foreign Office has
W. 4 . received a Soviet reply to West-
atchman’s House

ern notes on Four Power talks and
Burnt In Grenada

was to-day studying it.
Russia has agreed to the pre-
liminary Four Power Talks begin-
From Our Own Correspondent
GRENADA, March 1.
Governor Arundel] leaves Eng-

ning at Paris on March 5, the

Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister

Gromyko told Western Powers’

representatives here to-day.

land to-morrow by air accompanied

by E. W. Barltrop, Labour Adviser

to the Secretary of State for the

Colonies, They are due on Sunday,
The only violence last night was

the burning of the watchman’s

house at Dougaldston Estate by

four masked men while from

country districts came reports of

smallscale picketing and a measure

of intimidation of cocoa pickers

in the St. Andrews area.

Informed sources said Gromyko
had told three western ambassa-
dors that his Government had
appointed a 17-man delegation t
attend the talks. :

State Department officials at
Washington to-day expressed the
hope that Russia’s assent to the
preliminary four power talks in
Paris would lead to a quick agree-
ment on the agenda to be submit-
ted to a formal meeting of Big
Four Foreign Ministers.

Muchael McDermott, a State De-
partment spokesman said the text
of the Russian note had not been
received in Washington. He de-
clined therefore to make any com-
ment.

On the basis of Press reports
however, officials were obviously
pleased that the long period of un-
certainty had been ended and that
Russia had agreed to a meeting
of Foreign Ministers’ Deptities.

President Truman at his weekly
Press Conference this morning
said he would not comment on
Press reports because he had not
been officially informed about
Russia's latest note.

Andrei Gromyko and two other
Soviet Deputy Foreign Ministers
to-day, applied for French visas to
attend_next week's Four Power
Conference in Paris,

It igs now felt certain that inci-
dents of violence may not be at-
tributable to the strikers, The
Manual and Mental Workers’
Union executives yesterday car-
ried out Gairy’s instructions and
advice to desist violence and acts
of intimidation.



Double Conception

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jca. March 1.

A strange double conception
occurred recently at the Kingston
Sanitarium. A woman who had *
baby in August last year and ap-
peared fully recovered found her-
self in labour pains a few days
ago. She delivered another baby
on Friday, six months after the

birth of the first child. Seventeen delegates applied at

The first baby was an eight- " P
months boy, and weighed three Sais ee ener eee to-day for
pounds, the second is a robust Ne P

Named as the first and second
Secretaries of the delegation were
Karp Starkov, previously the first
Secretary at the Paris Embassy,
and Vladmier Lavrov. Two At
taches were named—Serge Doro-
witbjcheev and Viacheslab Popov.

| Reuter.

seven pounds baby girl and the
doctor’s report “everybody doing
weil.”

Local medical opinion is that the
woman had a double uterus and
coneeived while pregnant
the first child.



Britain Rejects
Czech Charges

LONDON, March 1.



3ritain has rejected as. “un-
founded” allegations made in
Czechoslovakia on February 7 that



Britain was reviving German mili-
tarism and aggressiveness.

In a note published today and
handed to the Czech Embassy in
London yesterday, the British
Government expressed hope that
in view. of the Czech government’s
desire for world peace it would
“urge upon the Soviet Govern.
ment the need for a change in
Soviet policy which would make
possible the lessening of interna-
tional tension.”

The British Government “have
no doubt that the Czech people
view with apprehension the. vast
forces which the Soviet Union
maintains both in her own terri-

tory and abroad and the attitude
of hostility which she has adopted

towards the free people of Europe

with which Czechoslovakia form-
erly had such close relations’, the
note added

“The Soviet Government has
been establishing in its zones of

occupation in Germany in viola-
tion of the Potsdam agreement, a
German

military force which is
being trained in the use of tanks
artillery—the only German

ny today.”’—Reuter.



Dockers’ Union
Records Seized

WELLINGTON, March 11.
Government agents today walk-

ed into offices of the striking New

Zealand Waterside Workers’ Union

and seized its records and cash,

books. Agents who were from the
Public Trust, a State Organisation

dealing with estates of deceased
persons, told Union officials -that
similar action was being taken

throughout New Zealand.

Their action came 24 hours after
Labovr Minister Williarn Sulli-
van's order to deregister the union
as part of the Government's eam-
paign to bresk the 11-day-old
strike for six shillings an hour pay
against the employers’ limit of
four shillings and seven pence
Talfpenny

By deregistering the Minister
nvited formation of a new union.

Observers believed Government
ienis would find only a few shil-
lings in the union bank account.
In Auckland a meeting of dock-
ars decided to fight on for in-
creases.—Reuter.



TRUMAN TRUSTS

WILSON

WASHINGTON, March 1.

President Truman said to-day
that Charles E, Wilson, Director
of National Defence Mobilisation,
still had his complete confidence
despite the rift between trade
urions and Wilson’s organisation
yesterday.

Truman at
conference

his weekly

repeatedly refused

however to comment on the de-
Union

cision. yesterday of Trade
leaders to withdraw its representa-
tives from all mobilization and
wage stabilisation Committees
the Government. Asked if
thought Labour would
to meet the country’s
defence, Truman did
directly but reiterated his declara-
tion of national emergency,
—Reuter.

By RONALD PRESTON

BELGRADE, Feb, 28

me that Yugoslavia

lites on her borders,

the fighting c
gary, Rumar

pabilities of
and Bulgaria.












is concerned I repe
already said—that if t
us alone this would no
any special difficulty
Asked t he tt



for ui

he
continue
needs for

Marshal Joseph Tite, in an ex-
clusive interview here today, told
would have
“no special difficulty” in resisting
a combined attack of Soviet satel-

He was replying to a question on
Hun-

The Marshal stressed the im-
pottance of the “political, psycho-
logical and moral.preparations of
a nation,” in this respect, dec
ing: “I do ik they have
and their people do not
war, As far as their f



attacked

represent





FRIDAY, MARCH :

1951

CENTURY STROKE

CLYDE WALCOTT reaches 100 with a cut off Skeete for 4.

U.N. Forward Units

Gain Ground In Korea

*® TOKYO, March 1,

Forward units of Unitéd Nations troops gained ground
in central Korea to-day, airdrops supplying them with food

and ammunition in slushy mo
American “flying boxears” |

in passes.
pped 215 tons so that the

offensive could go on even though all ground transport was

bogged down.

Armoured Division
Will Reinforce Ike’s
German Command
WASHINGTON, March 1,
An armoured division will be

the first of four additional Amer-
ican divisions to reinforce Gen-

eral Eisenhower’s west Europe
command, it was reported here
to-day.

The report gained strength with
the announcement that the First
Armoured Division would be re-

organised at Fort Hood Texas,

The Second Armoured Division
has been training there and indi-
cations were that it would go”
Europe.

The reorganisation of the First
Armcured Division will give the
United States 12 regular divisions

Three are at home, six with the
regiment of the 11th Airborne
Division in Korea, The first
Infantry Divisian has been in
Germany since the war.

The remainder of the
borhe is in the

lith Air-
United States
—Reuter.

Churchill Canicels
Engagements



Winston Churchill, who is
nearly 77, has cancelled his pub-
lic engagemenis.

Quarters close to the Conser-
vative leader say he is suffering
from boils on fis neck.

He is having treatment
resting for
advice of

and is
a few
his

days
doctors,

on

—Keuter.



| Ralph Wins Light

Heavy Crown

KID RALPH smiled broadly
last night when Mr. E. D. Mottley
ouekled on the belt donated by
; Messrs DaCosta & Co. after he
jseored a technical knockout over
Kid Francis at the Yankee Sta-
dium. Francis failed t6 come out
in round nine. This victory has
made Ralph the _ light-heavy
weight champion of Barbados,

About 3,000 boxing fans attend-

Press/ed the fight which was to have

been of ten rounds duration, At
the weigh-in Ralph tipped the
scales at. 161 pounds and Kid

Francis, the shorter, 168 pounds,
In the semi-finals Hal Williams

of | knocked out Sam King in the sixth

‘round of their eight-round fight.
Both boys thrilled the crowd as

they started out from beginning
attacking each other with long

not reply | jefts and rights.
Belfield Kid also scored a

knockout over Victor Lovell in the
preliminary.

|
LONDON, March 1.

the

Lord

Moran and Sir Thomas Dunhill.
He has cancelled engagements
for next Monday and Tuesday.

British Commonwealth troops

advanced one mile and captured

a hill three miles southeast of
Yongduri. South Koreans cap-
tured another hill.

of
vital central route to

Yongduri is 15 miles southwest
ongehon which controls the

the 38th

Parallel,

Ameritan marines fought bit-

ter hand to hand battles with
stubborn North Koreans just
west of the key—mountain pass

town Hoengsong.

On the extreme right flank of

the offensive Americans occupied

Amidong,

11 miles north of
Pyongehang- and about 30 miles

south 6f thé 38th Parallel,

fap retoat ~ynsue
central

desperately to this area,

tion that United Nations men had
come up against main Communist
defence positions,

B. Ridgway, 8th Army Command-
er threw patrols across the Han

River east of -Seoul. All but
ene returned under fire from
Communist defences,

—Reuter,







PRICE: FIVE CENTS



aleott Saves ‘The

Pre, Postwar |
German Debts!

Recognised

BONN, March 1,

Allies and West Germany to-
dey agreed on West Germany's
declaration, recognising pre ane
postwar German debts, a German
spcekesman said here to-night.

The declaration which hud to
be made before the Occupation
Statute could be revised, woul
probably be handed over to the
Allied High Commission on Mon -
day. he said.

West Germaniy is likely to have
a Foreign Ministry atout the
middle of next week, allied offi-
clals said to-night. Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer is expected t
be the first Foreign Minister

The revision of the Occupation
Statute, besides allowing West
Germany to have the Foreigr
Ministry and Ambassadors abroad
will give her greater legislative
and economic powers.

Debate on the agreement which
has been delayed for months, was
reached at a meeting here this
afternoon between High Commis-
sioners, financial advisers and
Dr. Herbert Dittman of the West
German Chancellery

West Germans must also form-
ally pledge themselves to share
equitably, raw materials for de-
fence. Officials say however, that
this document is ready.—Reuter.



Ben Gurion
Refuses To
Form New Govt.

TEL-A-VIV, March 1

: ; Israel's out-going Premiet
Sherl fierve tussles at close/David Ben Gurion has refused to
uarterts went on all day west of form a new Government declar-
oengsong which was the base|ing that a general election is

sul
counter offensive, The
Cloommunists have been clinching

But there was still no indica-

In the west, General Matthew



Bevin Attends
Cabinet Meeting

LONDON, March 1.

Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin,
attended to-day a meeting of the
British Cabinet for the first time
since the middle of January
when he became seriously ill with
pneumonia,

Although the Minister is

have recovered from his ill-
ness, his return to London last
night from the seaside coincided
with the House of Lords debate in
which peers of all parties said he
should give up his job if not in
full health.

Similar opinions have been ex-
pressed by some Government sup-
porters as well as Opposition, mem
bers in the House of Commons

Political quarters were to-day
asking how long Prime Minister

said
to



Attlee can delay making some
decision that will insure contin
uity on the conduct of Foreign

Affairs at top level.—Reuter.



BELGIAN WORKERS
STRIKE OVER PAY

BRUSSELS, March 1
Tram services in Charleroi
mining and industrial centre in
southern Belgium, stopped to-day
when workers struck for more
pay Tramwaymen in_ holiday
resorts along the Belgian North
Sea coast last night decided to
stage a four-day strike if their
wages are not raised parallel to

the official cost'of living index.

—Reuter



AGAINST SOVIET SATELLITES

military capabilities if they were whether in the event of a Soviet

joined by “volunteers” on the
Korean model, the Marshal re-
plied: “That is another thing. This
would mean a direct attack by the
Soviet Union Today regular
armies are given different names
in Cominform propaganda, They
are called volunteers.”

Marshal Tito, looking fit and re-
laxed in a dark suit with a white
shirt and red tie, answered my

- questions for one hour over cups

of coffee and wine
We were seated around a table

at one end of his 60-foot long
workroom in his villa in the fash-
ionable Belgrade suburb of
Dedinje

Superior Forces

supported attack against his coun-
try he would be able to resist as
he did during the Second World
War against vastly superior
forces.

“We hope this will not happen,
but if it did, it would not be our
fault. People here are of course
ready to fight, and will permit no-
body to enslave us.”

Question: “What is
of the strength of
army if it is used for
purposes outside Russia

your opinion
the Soviet
aggressive



Answer: I know that the Soviet
Army fought extraordinarily well
in the liberation war. But I can

that there is a great difference

Chinese|the only solution















to. Israel’s

crisis,

In a letter to President Chaim
Weizmann, he said that if parties
which overthrew the Government
were unable to form another
Government, his out-going four
party Cabinet would continue in
office until the election,

He accused religious parties
which brought the Government
down by voting against its
gious education policy two weeks
ago, of masking “Secular de
mands” under religious

President Weizmann had warn
ed Ben Gurion that an election
‘could cause serious harm to the
stability of the state.”

—Reuter,



U.S. Railwaymen
Get Wage Increase.

WASHINGTON, March, 1.

United States railways to-day
gave a pay increase of 12 and a
half cents an hour to 1,000,000
workers and pledged a cost of
living adjustment every three
months.

The agreement which applies
only to 15 non-operative Unions
(those not actually running
frains) will cost companies about
$280,000,000 per year,

The settlement has no direct
bearing on the big railway wages
dispute with four operating
Workers’ Unions covering shunt-
ers, drivers and firemen who have
staged a number of recent strikes

—Reuter



W. GERMAN TRADE
TALKS END

FRANKFURT, March 1

proportions,
—Reuter.



Yugoslavia Can Defend Herself

pose of enslavement and a wat
which is fought to preserve in-
dependence.”

“Naturally, this would have

rather a strong influence upon the
Soviet army.”

there was
the near

Asked if he thought
any danger of war in
futtire, the Marshal replied: “I
cah only say that it need not be,
but on the other hand the situation
is such today that there exists that
possibility and we must be cau-
tious.

Asked if he would welcome a
fotiial guarantee from the West-
ern powers in addition to verbal





statements already given concern-
in@ Western aid to Yugoslavia in
case, of an attack | the Soviet
bloe, Marshal Tito said he had
nothing nst thi nh principle

t ‘ I need for it at

Reuter

Day For Barbados

Trinidad 494:

B’dos 270/4

By O. S. COPPIN

(CLYDE WALCOTT, the youngest Barbadian ever

to captain a Barbados team, scored 126 not out
yesterday and was associated in an unbroken fifth
wicket partnership of 165 with Denis Atkinson (64

reli-|
| provided

colours. |

not out) in Barbados’ first inni
PWetrinidaa’s 494 at

4 in reply

s total of 270 for
end Of the third

day of play in the second Barbados-Trinidad Test

at Kensington yesterday.

All-German

Polls Wanted |

—ADENAUER

BONN, March 1

West German Chancellor Kon-
rad Adenauer is expected to ask
1 special session of Parliament to
support an apptoach to “Big
Four” powers for all-German elec-
tions

It was announced today that
Parliament will meet next week
to hear the Government declara-
tion on German unity,

Observers think the appeal
would ask the Big Four to spon-
sor such elections at their expect-
ed Foreign Ministers Conference,

The appeal was first proposed
by Opposition leader Kurt Sehu-
macher,

The appeal would, in the opinion
of West German politicians, wrest
the initiative on unity from East
Germany

Political observers here expect-

ed Adenauer would announce
these conditions for all-German
unity.

One, freedom of opinion and re
ligion, and freedom for all poli-
tical parties.

Two, release of all politica)
prisoners and the closing of con-
centration camps

Three, suspension of Bast Ger-
many’'s “law for the protection of
peace”, , Reuter,





France Expects
‘Super’ Airport Soon

PARIS, March 1,

The super airport for Paris,
with hotels, shops and a “city of
the air’ for employees has left
the blueprint stage according to
Marshall Plan authorities here

The realisation of the plan 40
extend Orly airfield will be
finaneed by 500,000,000 francs in
Marshal! Plan counterpart funds
as a Joan to. airport
authorities,

The “greater Orly” project will
involve expxopriation of 550 small
houses in an adjoining village to
double. the airport’s present Area
There will also be an inerease of
maintenance facilities and hangar

The wicket was still firm and
weather conditions ideal when
Trinidad resumed thetr first in-
nings which stood at 488 for 8
They added 6 ruts for the loss of
the two remaining wickets; Fer-
guson who was not out 84 being
responsible for the six additional
runs.

Barbados started
with but 30 runs on the tins,
Hunte, one of the openers was
out and when nineteen runs later
Everton Weekes, one cf the ac-
cepted pillars of strength of Bar-
bados, was also sent back to the
pavilion for four runs,

When Roy Marshall after the
luncheon interval was also dis-
missed for a well played 52, but
with the Barbados’ total at 89 for
3, things looked black for Barba-
dos, Charlie Taylor’s dismissal for
6 left the score at 105 for 4

shakily when

Good Stand

It was here that Clyde Walcott
the best Barbados batsman of the
tournament and one of the most
onsistent to date, became asso-
iated with Denis Atkinson in a
ifth wicket partnership that has
o far added 165 runs to the score

This pair batted with a prim
letermination that was net reflect-
ed in their scoring strokes nor in
he excellence of their batsman-
hip, but fa the great care which
hey took to it for the loose one
ind to ferret out the gaps in the
ield,



The Trinidad fielding was good
or the most part and -although

here ip sapnaaly anyone Worth
articular ition T think that
Sampath, Butler and Andy Gan-

eaume should receive’ specinl
mention,
With Barbados having staged

such a reeovery there is little hope
that the game will not end in a
tame draw. Legall on his first
suting in intereolonial cricket be-
hind the stumps was very impres-
sive, catching the ball neatly and
always on the alert.

With his batting ability, he
should be a strong candidate for
second string wicketkeeper on the
West Indies team to tour Australia
later this year @ On page 8

i

The West German Centra!
Bank Council ended its two-day
jiscussions of the foreign trade
s0sition without raising the West
German bank rate, a West Ger-
man economic news agency re-
ported.

The Council met in a special

session to continue an exhaustive
review of credit problems whieh
have recently developed to crisis

spaee, and there will be perma- || |
nent terminal buildings to replace TELL THE ADVOCATE |
temporary structures | THE NEWS }
The plan will relegate De RING 3112 |
Eaprest airfield to a secondary | DAY OR NIGHT
|

—Reuter. |







we ent of a

gygarette eee

|
vine
weginning of is








i tragedy

Yet it would be idle to calculate the number of

a fires caused by carelessly discarded cigarettes,
because the habit will apparently persist despite
the serious loss of life and property resulting

from these outbreaks.

It is the work ot a few minutes to protec: your-
self from risk of loss through fire, by consulting
at your earliest opportunity the local agents of
Guardian Assurance Co. Ltd. And
tunity does not seém to present irself,

tad

it do so immediately. Fires don

much warning

Local Agents

$. P. MUSSON,

STREET P.¢

Ae o ..
UN oy b0. itd.

Box 227, Phor

oe
BROAD )
5 TN ada a

| eo ABIL BLL ST me: Peed i

ae’ 4

era

e
rn,





GE TWO

ADY HUTSON, widow of the
late Sir John Hutson left for
England vesterday by the Golfito

Changed Plans
M* and MRS LEWARD
C. WYKOFF of Cleveland
returned from Trinidad yesterday
by 5. Pad, in time to connect
with T CA's flight to Canada

to-morrow,. The Wykoffs who
intended ing the greater
part of holiday in Grenada,

changed their plans due to the
labour unrest in that colony and
went on to Trinidad.

S.P.C.A. Tag Day

~DAY is S.P.C.A. tag day.

Helping to collect money for
their fellow animals this morning
will be two Shetland ponies who
will collect» contributions around
the Barbados Mutual Life,
Assurance building.

Coincides

RS. A. A&A. GIBBONS, wife

of Dr. Gibbons, P.M.O..
St. James was among the pas-
sengers leaving for England
yesterday by the Golfito. She is
on a visit-¢o her relatives and
expects to“be away about four
months. Her visit to England
coincides with the Festival of
Britain.

Off To U.K.
’ R. W..E. THOMAS, Direc-
tor of Messrs. Stokes and
Bynoe Ltd., accompanied by his
wife left by the Golfito yesterday
to spend Your or five months in
England.

Canadian Trade

Commissioner
M* T. GRANT MAJOR,
Canadian Trade Commis-
sioner for the Eastern Caribbean
and the Guianas with headquar—
ters in Trinidad, was intransit by
the Colombie yesterday morning

ffom Guadeloupe where he had |

been on ‘ar‘official visit.

Mr. Grant Major who was in
Barbados some weeks ago, also
paid official visits to St. Kitts and
Antigua. He is now returning to
his headquarters.

Back to the Gold Coast
R. H. M. LUCIE-SMITH,
Comptroller of Customs in
the Gold Coast, left for England
by the Golfito yesterday evening
after spending a holiday here
with his brother Mr. D.
Lucie-Smith at Rockley .
Beautician Here
ISS JOAN McREE, personal
representative of the Eliza—
hh Arden Saloons in London,
land, arrived yesterday morn-
Stig by the Colombie.
'*She will be here for three
weeks staying at the Marine
‘Hotel.

* On to Grenada

MONG the passengers arriv-
’ ing here yesterday morning
by. the Colombie intransit for
-Grenada were Mr. T. H. Shill-
‘ingford and his sister Mrs.
Verdun Wallace who were
‘spending # holiday in Dominica.
*-Mr. Shifingford is Manager of
the Grenada Lime Factory and
‘Was proprietor of the Savoy
‘Hotel which was burnt out on
January 4,

‘First Visit to W.L

R. and MRS. WALTER
of TARRY of Rushden, North-
ants, arrived yesterday morning
by the Colombie from England
i their first visit to the West
-Indies. They are spending three
Weeks here and will beestaying
mt the Marine Hotel and Sam
‘Lord's Castle.

Mr. Tarry is a Director of the
Tecnic Shoe Co., Ltd. of Rush-
den, a company with which he
was associated for 30 years,
Prior to that, he was adviser to
William Green and Sons Ltd.
Shoe Manufacturers of England,

~BY THE WAY

By BEACHCOMBER
GUEPORTERS of Manchester's

Hallé Orchestra poured into
the Reyal Albert Hal} last night
swinging rattles and wearing soup-
plate-sized favours of the Hail
colours, '

It was a comparatively orderly
crowd, and the playing of “Bac-
chus and Ariane” was only twice
marred by the fans getting out of
hand.

Barbirolli played magnificently
in the second half, passing across
the strings to the first trombone to
score within the first minute’s
play. His defensive tactics, when
pressed by the first and second
violins during a quiet period in
“Song of Summer,” had the crowd
on their toes, '

There is rumour of an L.P.O.
transfer offer.

Clarifying the Issue

AS for the dummy, is a felt hat
worn during a song “a felt prop”?
Only if it squeaks when pinched,
say the spokesmen in touch with
authoritative Sunday Observance
circles. “Bit a felt hat pressed in-
to a comical shape is obviously
ne ee the mark. You can
sihg “Funiculi, Funicula,” the an-
them of the Tourist Funicular
Society, on a Sunday, but not in
clogs. Mine. Adenibide, the French
coloratura eee soprano, was
once arres! here for coming on
to the platform at a Sunday ioe

: es: umbrella,
a ae

LOCKNIT. 82¢
White & Pastels 90¢

Dial 4606

Carib C

THE “GAMBOLG



“Magnificent

This last Shipment at
old prices saves you 20¢



oliday
I NTRANSIT by the Colombie
from England yesterday

morning for Trinidad, was Dr.
Jesse Grell retired medical
practitioner of that colony.

Dr. Grell who is a brother of

rs. P. A. Lynch and Miss
Louise Grell of St. Lawrence,
spent about five months’ holiday
in the United Kingdom.

First Visit ;
AYING their first visit to Bar-
bados are Dr. and Mrs. Ben
Braun of Chicago. They arrived
yesterday morning by the
Colombie from Martinique where
they had spent six days. They
will now be here for another five
days before leaving for Trinidad.
Dr. and Mrs, Braun are stay-
ing at the Hotel Royal,

“Licked ”’

FTER spending a week in
Tobago and a weck in Trini-
dad, Mr. and Mrs. John M.
Sharpe returned yesterday by
B.W.1.A. in time to connect with
T.C.A’s flight to Canada to-
morrow morning. Prior to the
two weeks in Trinidad and Toba-
go, Mr, and Mrs. Sharpe spent
five weeks in Barbados at the

Paradise Beach Club,
In his Opinion says Mr, Sharpe,

Barbados has California and
Florida “licked,” it is so com-
pletely different,

Mr. Sharpe is President of

Electric Equipment Co,, Ltd., in
Saskatoon, who are in the whole-
sale electrical business,

Drilling Supt.
R. and Mrs. F. M. Crawford
and their son Allan arrived
from Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.1.A. to spend two weeks’

holiday at the Crane Hotel.

Mr. Crawford is a_ Drilling
Superintendent with U.B.O.T.

stationed in Point Fortin.

Here for a Month
I N BARBADOS for a month's

holiday are Mr. and Mrs.
Matthew Craig, who arrived from
Trinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. They are staying at the
Ocean View Hotel. Mr. Craig is
a Director of Walters’ Trinidad
Brewing €o,, in: Port-of-Spain, ~

For Barbados Holiday

M's JOAN LUM accompanied

by Mrs, Gabriel Alves of
Port4of-Spain arrived from Trini
dad yesterday morning by
B.W.LA. Mrs, Alves is here for
two months', Miss Lum is on three
weeks’ holiday. They are staying
with Mrs. D, King in Fontabelle.

From B.G,

M®*: J. DOS RAMOS, salesman

* of Alex Russell and Co, of
British Guiana, arrived by the
Colombie yesterday morning on a
short visit and is Staying at “Ac—
cra”, Rockley,







Automobile Engineering

R.
+ son of Mr. and Mrs. S. B
Bannister of “Thorsby” Pine Hill,
left yesterday for England by the



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

. ° mW |
Empire Girls Tour |
Europe At Tiny Cost
LONDON, Feb

Noreen Sexton of New South!
Wales.and Phoebe Craig of Sas-|

DENNIS BANNISTER, | xatoon, Canada, are preving the| can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 300

strength of commonwealth rela-|
tions. |

Arriving in London from wide- |

Golfite. He is going on a three or} !y-separated parts of the globe

four-year course
Engineering with the Humber Co.,
of Coventry.

With Barclays

in Automobile | withthe same idea in mind, the

22-year-old tourists met at a youth

hostel and decided. to team yp.
Both wanted to see as a
pessible of Britain and Eur on

R. and Mrs. R. G. Burrowes] a limited bank balance.

who have been in Barbados

Already they’ve worked in Lon-!

since December, 1949, left yester- | don, visited Ireland and Scotland

day by the Gelfito for England.

and spent nine weeks touring

Mr. Burrowes who was stationed {| france, Italy, Belgium, Holfafd
with Barclays Bank here has been] Switzerland and Germany ir

re-transferred .to their London
Branch.
Intransit

I NTRANSIT through Barbados

yesterday morning by B.W.1.A
from Trinidad for Antigua was
liis Grace Archbishop Finbar
Ryan, Catholic Archbishop of
Port-of-Spain. His visit to An-
tigua is in connection with the

ucksacks sporting the flags , of
Canada and Australia.

The girls saw the “passion play”
it Oberammergau, were given
eaflets for a proposed communist
strike in Germany and spent a
uight in a dosshouse in Berne.

They arrived in Berne when the
youth hostels had closed for the
season and it was the dosshouse
ar an expensive hotel, They chose

visit of the Statue of Our Lady | the dosshouse and their evening

of Fatima to that colony. The
statue arrived in Antigua a few
days ago.
Retired Civit Servant

l N Barbados for about tw

weeks’ holiday, is th
Hon’ble Austin Winston, retirec
Civil Servant of Dominica. H«

arrived yesterday morning by the},
Canad x

ian © er and is stay-
ing at ‘‘Allworth”, Cheapside.
With Cable and Wireless
ao spending a month’s holi-

day in Dominica, Mr, Cyril
Volney of Messrs. Cable anc
Wireless, returned yesterday
morning by the Colombie. He war
accompanied by his wife and three
children.

To be Married in

St. Kitts
M's HILDA MILNER oi Eng-
land, arrived here yesterday
morning by the Colombie en route
to St. Kitts where she will be
rrarried to Mr, Frank Gaw oi
Barclays Bank (D.C. and 0.)
En-route
R, A. STROUD, of the Gov-
ernment Printery in Grenada,
arrived here yesterday morning
by the Canadian Challenger in-
transit from Dominica where he
had spent a holiday.

Planter from Dominica
RK, VED HONHKYCHUKCH,
planter of Dominica, ar-

rived yesterday morning by tne
Canadian Challenger to spend a
holiday with his relatives, He is
a brotner of Mrs, Frank Colly-
more of Chelsea Road,

Holidaying For Six Months

m. i. K, REVS, son of Lr.

Reeves of Plymouth, Eng-
land, arrived here yesterday by
S.S. Colombie to spend six
months’ holiday with his grand-
mother, Mrs, C. B, Reeves of Bay
Street. Mr. Reeves who spent
four years in the R.A.F., is now
a farmer in South Devonshire.
His grandfather was a well known
shipwright in. Barbados and a
membér.of the. Vestry of St.
Michael.

Barrister Going Home

neal was a cup of cocoa and a
lish of bread-and~butter pudding
with raisins.

Kept Expenses Down ~

For the nine-weeks “a
Noreen and Phoebe allowed them-
elves £22 each and the outlay

ncluded souvenirs and postcards.
Now the girls are back in Bri-
in, working and saving for an-
%ther tour. This will take them

0 Spain, Portugal, Denmark,
3weden and Luxembourg. They
will call at Malta, cross to

Morocco, see Algiers and Tunisia
ind come back through Berlin.
They are allowing themselves
‘our to five months and £50

: On

arrival from _ Canada,
Phoebe had about £200, “and
that’s going pretty fast,” she

said. “When we come back next

‘ime, I'll really have to settle;

jown and save my fare home.”
—(C.P.)



|its Juniof Short Story Competition. The best story will be published



Junior Short Story Competition

The Evening Advocate invites all children under 12 to enter for








every Monday in The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive
a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery. The stories

words in length, and must reach The Children’s Editor, The Advocate
Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesday every week.
NOTE: Stories must not be copied.
Send this coupon with your story.
JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION







Men’s Socks
Mauve And Purple

MEN’S socks in Victorian pur-
ple, awning red, and garter blue
will be all the rage this year.
Why?—It is Festival year,

The British Colour Council
suggested the new tones.

430 a.m. Take it from here, 7 a.m.
The News. 7.10 a.m. News Analysis,
7.15 a.m. From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m.
Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m. From the
Third Programme, 7.50 a.m. Interlude,
8 a.m. Kathleen Merritt String Orches-
tra, 8.45 a.m. Colonial Questions, 9 a.m.
The News. 9.10 a.m. Home News from
Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m,
Programme Parade, 11.25 a.m. Listenérs
Choice, 11.45 a.m, World Affairs, 12 noon
The News, 12.10 p.m, News Analysis,
22.46 p.m. Close Down,

4150.00 Pom. vee . 26.52 m,
———— ees
Bid m. BBC Northern Orchestra,
5 pee Canbiser of the Week, 5.15 p.m.
Let's Make Music, 6 p.m. Merchant Navy
Newsletter.
€00—7.15 p.m, ....

They decide a year in advance
what colours the fashionable
woman will wear,

. 31.92 & 48.43 m.

Said a council official: “This
Festival commemorates the 1951
Festival of Queen Victoria’s reign.
That suggests Victorian mauves
and purples.”

———$—$_———————————
6.15 p.m. Thinking about London, 6.35
6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m.
News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. West Indian
Diary, 7.37 p.m. Imterlude, 7.45 p.m.
‘on t Things.

bri ae ery a BL82 & 48.43 m.

p.m, Interlude,

Hosiery firms are concentrating
on the home market for men.

One has produced an all-wool
sock with nylon toe and heel
reinforcement, packed in a fancy
gold box with the Festival crest
on the lid,

7.45—11.00 p.m. ...

8 p.m, Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m
English Magazine, 845 p.m. Composer
of the Week, 9 p.m. World Affairs, 9.15
Let’s Make Music, 10 p.m, The
News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials,
10.15 p.m. Communism in Practice,
10.30 p.m. Melody on Strings, 10.45 p,m.
The Debate Continues, 11 p.m. Ring up
the Curtain.

pm.

—L.E.S.



GLOBE
Starting Today 35 & 8.30







PM



Randolph Carrington—*OUR

Malcolm Murray——“STERLA BY STARLIGHT”
Edwin Gilkes—“‘MY OWN DEAR LAND”
Fitz Harewood (Globe’s 1st Super Star)-—“OLE MAN RIVER”

MONG the intransit passen- GUEST STARS:—

wers arriving here on_ the
Colombie yesterday was Mr. Dud-
ley Johnson of Grenada who is
going onto his home island to
practise as a Barrister-at~Law. He
will sail on the Colombie to Trin-
idad, and reach Grenada by
plane. Mr, Johnson who was called
to the Bar in January this year
told Carib he had attended the
Holy Year celebrations in Rome
last August and had then visited
Switzerland.





PLAZA Thestrentridedewn (DIAL 2310)

TO-DAY (3 SHOWS) 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily

THIS...

HOPE

NEVER HAPPENED
to the WEST BEFORE.»

“also “THE FLY'S LAST FLIGHT



at 4.45 and 8,30 p.m.
B

LUCILLE

BALL

“FANCY PANTS”

Color by Technicolor
(Popeye the Sailor)

m





Mat, Saturday 3rd 9.30 a.m, and 1.30 p.m, (Monogram)

BELOW THE DEADLINE
Warren DOUGLAS

BADMEN OF TOMBSTONE

Barry SULLIVAN—Brod CRAWFORD

eee
OOOO aaa











PLAZA Theatre=OISTIN (DIAL 8404)

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW (only) 5
John WAYNE in

BACK 10 BATAAN

“Midnite Sat. ard (Monogram)
CODE OF THE SADDLE
Johnny Mack BROWN and
RIDERS OF THE DAWN

with JIMMY WAKELY






GAITETYW—(THe

FLYNN SMITH

Midnite Sat, 3rd Your Big
JOHNNY MACK

TO-DAY to SUNDAY 8.30 p.m.
Filmdom's Favourite Man of Action!

& 8.30 p.m.

& CRIMINAL COURT

with Tom CONWAY—Martha O'DRISCOLL

———————$—$— — $$ —
SUN, & MON, (only) 5 and 8.30.p.m,

R.K.Q. Radio Musical Hit!

Bing CROSBY—Ingrid BERGMAN in

BELLS OF ST. MARY'S

SSeS



GARDEN) ST. JAMES

Mat, Sun. 5 p.m.

in

“MONTANA”

Color yy Technicolor

Western Nite (Monogram)

BROWN in (Both)

_RAIDERS OF THE BORDER _& RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH



and

yd
Children

EVANS & WHITFIELDS .

Your Shoe Stores
HOURS of BUSINESS, Saturday MARCH 3rd

EVANS & WHITFIELDS will be OPEN ALL DAY (8 a.m.—4 p.m.)
having already closed for the Statutory half day on Thursday Mar. Ist,

Se ERB EB ERR ee ee
HERE Again... tobe “Snapped up”

SAMBA SPUNS
8 7 @ PER 36" YARD

New Range NIGHTIES
35.9 ge 4,95

Panties 3O¢/77¢

Dial 4220

a.

HAL HUNTE—“TENNESSEY WALTZ”

LEROY THOMAS—8 y



gEss

CLUB M

open at

For the entertainment of the passengers from the

S.S. MAURETANIA

and

Dinner

throughout the night
Dial 4000

For Dinner








THE APPEARANCE) OF

Compare OUR PRICES BEFORE

THE BARBADOS
COTTON FAC

Plus TONITE
LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

Ernest Mottley, Jnr.—“’LL STRING ALONG WITH YOU”
Leroy Lorde—‘SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY”

ENHANCE

Lancastreum Floor Covering

RUGS 8 2.716 Me ies oe oe $6.13
OS PGR. ss sn pare Pees ed $7.36
9 ft. x 1016 ft, eet. eee ees $8.58
DO. Fhit 0 TAG. iss asa ees $9.81
CONTINUOUS ROLLS & CUT TO YOUR ORDER
3 mse 8 ek nace yd.
nn EE SEE .70c. yd
TREO ci Chaise bee $1.40 yd,
an Le $2.10 3a FRESH

Also—ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS TO SELECT FROM



“HOME COOKING”

HOPE |S HOME
COOKING
LAUGHS.

Paramount's Hilarious
Successor rs

Hag inertness
Newime tor \ "eee

WITH



YouR LIFE!’

WALTER WANGER
ROBERT IG ornsay

CUM
‘ MINGs ,



VERY OWN”

ear old Trumpet Player.
—_——er

f Songs by “BUTTONS
e AND BOWS.”
TUNESMITHS!
To-morrow 3 SHOWS To-day
night and continuing daily at 4.45

and 8.30 p.m.
Extra: (Popeye the Sailor).
“THE FLY’S LAST FLIGHT’

PLAZA

2.30—4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Bridgetown, (Dial 2310).

ORGAN
G6 p.m.

Dancing



—

Reservations



YOUR HOME WITH

PURCHASING ELSEWHERE

CO-OPERATIVE MANNING









FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951



AQUATIC CLUB

MATINEES: TO-DAY

and

TO-NIGHT TO SUNDAY NIGHT
F. Zanuck es ou

vr AMBER” in oh 2

» DARNE: Cornel WILDE—Richard GREENE
@th Century-Fox Picture

Darryl

Starring: Linda DARNELL—
and George SANDERS.

MONDAY and TUESDAY







CENEMA. (Members Only)

TO-MORROW
at 6.20

Technic



NIGHT at 8.30

M NEE: TUESDAY at 5 p.m
on Rex HARRISON— Maureen OHARA
in “FOXES OF HARROW”

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY NIGHT at 6.30
WEDNESD.

MATINEE AY

at 5 p.m

Dick HAYMES—Vera ELLEN—Cesar ROMERO

in “CARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA" in Technicolor.

BEAUTIFUL

CHRISTINE
GORDON

**Miss Jeffrey’s Beer”

TRINIDAD’S
LOVELY 1951

CARNIVAL
QUEEN

Appearing in Person

With a GALAXY OF TALENT

@ JUNE MAINGOT
Singer and Dancer
@ poROTHY
Queen’s Lady in Waiting

@ CLYDE RIVERS
Singer and Humourist
@ PETER PITTS
Singer and Dancer.
@ DAISY CREQUE
Mistress of the Ivories.

And popular LANDY DE MONTBRUN Master of Ceremonies

EMPIRE * SUNDAY, 4th March

THEATRE — 4.45 &

PICTURE:
PRICES:

TICKETS for Sunday can be

“GOODNIGHT SWEETHEART.”

MATINEE—Children 50c., Adults $1.00
NIGHT: Stalls and Box $1.50; House Baicony $1.00

BUY YOUR TICKETS IN

8,30

ADVANCE
bought at Empire Box Office

TO-DAY and TO-MORROW all day and on SUNDAY from

8 a.m. to 12 noon.

@ DOREEN MCKENZIE
Charming Singer



EMPIRE

To-day 2.30 and 8.30 and
Continuing:

Farewell
to

Yesterday

And also extra short.

| The Magnetic

Tide

ROXY

To-day only 4.30 and 8.15.
Universal Double Attrac.
tion.

Preston Foster in . .

INSIDE JOB

— AND —

BLACK CAT

Basil Rathbone and Brod
Crawford.





ROYAL

To-day only, 4.30 and 8.30.
Republic Whole Serial— .

GHOST OF ZORRO

Starring
Clayton Moore — Pamela



To-day to Monday, 4.30 and
i's 8.15.

Republic Smashing Double,

Louis Hayward and Lee
Bowman in

HOUSE BY THE
RIVER

— AND —

DAUGHTER OF THE
JUNGLE

— WITH —
Lois Hall and James Card-
well.





MURRAY'S

MILK
STOUT

THE STOUTEST OF

STOUTS

STRENGTHENING
TO THE LAST DROP

Recommended by the Faculty

STOCKS ARRIVED
- RECENTLY



& CO.,

LTD. = Agents

ALL









{ion eS

Blake, with Roy Bancroft
and George J. Lewis. |
OLYMPIC



FCCCKEC HK FEE POPPE CHTER PESTS te RHE Ys
—

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951





Acress the vast span of
Russia. from the boundaries
of Eastern Europe to the
North Pacific coast, there is
now searcely a break in the
industrial chain.

Stalin said recently that
no nation could achieve such
reogress anti at the same

time prepare for war.
Spekesmen of the Western
Powers asked over the

week-end if Stalin would
give proof of his sincerity.

One of the big questions
is: What is happening in
Northern Siberia, an area
unmapped to the Western
world?



Russia’s Air
Striking
Power Is Weak

WASHINGTON, March 1.

Russia’s air striking power is
weak, though her air defence is
strong, and she builds 8,500 war-
planes per year, according to the
current issue of an American
magazine in an analysis of Soviet
forces.

The article—claimed to be com-
piled from material gathered over
months in the United States and
other countries — said Russia had
threefold protection against air
attacks.

First, she had an Arctic peri-
meter interceptor force to protect
her from attacks across the North
Péle—shortest distance from the
United States and the western
World. This string of fighters
stretched from Latvia to the
northeastern tip of China.

After this she had individual
air defences for major war pro-
duction areas. Then there was a
mobile interceptor force of 100
fast M.1.G. 15 jet fighters ready to
be rushed to vital spots.

But the Soviet attacking power
was far inferior to that of the
United States because the Soviet
force was basically a tactical air-
foree, designed tu~ work with
ground troops, the Magazine said,
and strategic bombing in the Brit~
ish and United States manner had
been subordinated.

Soviet jet fighters, according to
the article, were about equal to
United States planes in perforn-
ance, the M.I.G. 15 being the best.
The Russians were building 3,500
M.LG. 15’s a-year.

Copies of B, 29—

For bombers, the Soviet Union
relied on an almost exact copy of
the American B-29 Superfortress,
three examples of which were in
Russian hands during the last
war, Russian bombers of the class
of the American B-36—giant fast
ten-motor long-range atom bomb-
er—were not expected to fly for
some time.

Russia in all had about 18,000
operation aircraft designed most-
ly to tactical air arms of 1,200
planes each, the Magazine said.

Russia’s annual warplane pro-
duction of 8,500 warplanes, includ-
ed 6,000 fighters—about ‘70% jets
—250 bombers, and other types.

The Russian war potential was
about 60,000 planes a year, com-
pared with the rate of more than
100,000 a year turned out by the
United States in the Second World
War.—Reuter.

Trinidad Will Study
B’dos Fishery Plan

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 27.

Trinidad is likely to follow the
Barbados programme for assisting
the fishermen here who have been
clamouring for more Government
aid to build the industry. With this
in view, the Hon. Victor Bryan of
the Legislative Council, and Min-
ister of Lands and Agriculture ac-
companied by the Hon, Gerald
Wight and Mr. Cecil Farrell, act-
ing Marketing Officer, will leave
Trinidad in the middle of March
for Barbados to study the plan and
see the programme in action.

A delegate of the Fishermen’s
Association visited Barbados re-
cently and reported to the Stand-
ing Advisory Committee on Fish-
ery that the Barbados Government
had a plan of assistance to the
Barbados fishermen, which em-
braces advances by the local Gov-
ernment to fishermen for building
new and modern seaworthy boats
and the purchasing of modern
fishing gear.

Co-operative marketing of the
fishermen’s catches is also provid-
ed for by the plan, and so far the
scheme has proved to be a success.
From the findings of the member
of the Fishermen's Association
outlined to the Standing Advisory
Committee on Fishery, the Com-
mittee felt that the information
brought back by this member had
some merit. The committee then
arrived at the conclusion that the
scheme in Barbados ought to be
investigated on the spot and the
methods _and_procedure studied.







Firestone
TYRES «« TUBES

USE THE TYRES CHAMPIONS USE

a





| Key to Russia
ne

UNITED
KINGDO:

,

ATLANTIC

industrial areas

a



r —

Barents Sea



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Canadian Teacher Danger Swims Meat Buyers Aided

Meets Challenge
Of Arctic School

TUKTOYAKTUK, Northwest
Territories, Feb. |
Teaching “on top of the world”
may have its frigid drawbacks,
but for Dorothy Robinson of
Ottawa it is the opportunity ofa
lifetime.

In the bitter cold of this Arctic
Eskimo village 2,500 miles from
home, the persevering 40-year-old
teacher is finally finding the sense
of freedom and fulfilment she has
been searching for in 14 years of
work in Canada’s northern schools.

Fighting influenza, frost and
ignorance, the gallant lady of the
north has taken charge of the
Federal Resources Department's
most northerly school — a small
one-room affair located at the
reouth of the Mackenzie River,
more than 1,400 miles north of
Edmonton.

“ As Canada’s most northern
teacher, Miss Robinson is faced
with many problems—she is men-
tor, nurse and cook and even Boy
Scout leader to her young Eski-
mo charges.

While teachers across the coun-
try look out their classroom. win-
dows to see city traffie whizzing
by, she sees nothing but the bar-
ren Aretie scene and the distant
Polar ice—nothing lies between
here and the North Pole but the
ice-ridden waters of the Arctic
Ocean.

The youngsters are great stu-
dents, says Miss Robinson, but the
older ones are more difficult. They
can’t seem to understand how
reading, writing and arithmetic
will help them catch more seals
or fish.

Versatile Lender

Miss Robinson is more than a
teacher, When a bout of influ-
enza hits the settlement, she turns
the school into a hospital and pre-
pares hot bowls of soup. She is
ready for anything. She holds a
certificate in wood working, the
bronze medallion of the Royal Life
Saving Society, medallion and bar
of the St. John Ambulance Asso-
ciation, and probably is the only
woman in the world to hold a
Boy Scout medal.

This prize possession was grant-
ed her last year, at an Eskimo
ceremony attended by her little
band of Eskimo Boy Scouts, Girl
Guides, Brownies and Cubs.

What great power has drawn
this woman from civilization to the
barrenness of the Arctic?

“The development of this com-
munity is the fulfilment of my per-
sonal life,” she says. “My desire
is to serve the Canadian Eskimo.

“The task demands the utmost
you have in you—your strength,
your ingenuity, your perseverance,
and then rewards you with a sense
of freedom and accomplishment
found nowhere else.” —(CP).

‘New Style

EISENSTADT, Austria, Feb.
Two Austrians who sought a
Solomon’s judgment from a Rus-
sian Zone court knew today that
the “Soviet style” varies from the
ancient pattern.



The men were parties to a law
suit seeking to determine which
of the two was the legal owner of
a store. The ease had bung for
five years in Austrian courts.

Finally they asked the Soviet
Commander of the Russian Zone
city of Eisenstadt to take the case
out of the Austrian courts and
make his own decision.

The Commander listened to the
arguments of both men. Next day
he handed down the decree:

The store would be confiscated
by the Russians.

It was.

LN.S.

AVAILABLE IN ALL SIZES



Charles Mc Enearney & Co., Ltd. |

ee ees

The Rio

NEW YORK.

Down Mexico way the Ameri-
can immigration men are having
trouble with thousands of Mexi-
cans who try to enter the U.S.
illegally. Many are stopped—but
lots get through.

And because they nearly all
swim across the Rio Grande—
the famous border river — these
illegitimate visitors are known as
wetbacks.

Last year immigration men,
aided by Texas Rangers, turned
back 224,000 wetbacks. In old
days the Mexicans simply
wanted to work on America’s
prosperous farms at America’s
high wages.

But now there is a new head-
ache. Communist agents are
coming ih, too.

AN AUDIENCE of 600 sat lis-
tening for two hours to a fault-
lessly played piano recital in the
Pilgrim State Hospital for Mentai

Patients, on Long Island. The
player was a patient known as
“Miss Jones,” who has been in
the institution since 1946. She
played Debussy, Chepin, and Liszt
with brilliant technique, while
white-coated attendants watched
breathlessly. At the end she
smiled and said: “Did I please
you?”

AS ALWAYS in times of tension

there is a marriage boom in
America. But the men who sell
the things associated with

remance—wedding rings, flowers,
photographs, and linen—are glum,
“They are too young to have any
money,” said a_ big jeweller
sadly, ‘not like the last war.”

OUT IN CALIFORNIA there is
a cotton rush. With cotton selling
at 45 cents a lb.——five times pre-
war—Californians by the thousand
are starting to grow it.

THEY HAVE STARTED a Forty
Plus Club in New York. It helps
the over-forties to find jobs. But
there’s a difference. The club is
only intersted in ‘‘former execu-
tives who used to make at least
$5,000 (£1,785) a year’. Average
(former) salary of applicants:
$10,000 (£3,570) .

CLIVE BROOK, who is a smash
hit on Broadway in the play
“Second Threshold,” will leave
the play in a few months to get
back to his farm in Sussex. “I
haven’t got all that time to spare.’
he says. He is 59.

IDA LUPINO is to make a film
about the “second Dillinger,’
William Cook, who was hunted
down in the desert after killing
six people. Title: “I talked ta
God.”



Practice Bombing
Goes On By R.A.F.

On Heligoland

BONN, Feb. 28.
British practice bombing on the
North Sea Island of Heligoland
has been resumed, a_ British
spokesman said here to-day .
It would have been continued
until an alternative target on the

German North Sea coast had
been selected, he said.
The British announeed last

Monday that the island would be
handed back to Germany by
spring 1952. —Reuter.
bac : vy pe
Britain's Shipbuilding
Lead Decreasing
LONDON, Feb. 28.
3ritain’s post war lead in ship-
building dropped hy 16 per cent
in four years in the face of grow-
ing competition from foreign ship-

yards. .
Lioyd’s annual summary of
newly launched- merchant ships

showed today that the British out-
put of merchant vessels fell to 27.9
per cent of the world total in 1950,
compared with 53 per cent in 1946,
the year after the end of the Sec-
ond World War.--(CP).











By Steamship Cooks

LONDON, Feb.

Meat-starved Britons returning
from continental trips have been
forming long queues outside the
galleys on the cross-channel
steamships. They have been tak-
ing advantage of a new service
provided by the shipping com-
panies,

Before embarking the travellers
have been buying large joints of
meat, legs of lamb, enticing cuts
of sirloin of beef—all easily ob-
tainable in France Steamship
chefs offered to cook the meat free
because raw meat cannot be im-
ported.—(CP).



Thieves Eat Thief

(From Our Own Correspoadant)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 27.
From a_ reliable source comes
the report that three escaped Ven-
ezuelan criminals lost in the
jungle in Venezuela, killed the
fourth and barbecued him like a
pig, eating the roasting flesh. The
three were later captured, and
they are said to have confessed
about the killing. Since then a
special commission has been ap-
pointed by the Cuidad Bolivar
Justice Department to investigate
the matter of thieves roasting
thief.

GPVLIIGS FOOIOIIOVIOIOOIO00SGS DIU 9 FSF FSI IIT”
IT’S THE LIL’ MAN AND THE HORN
This Lad is HOT and SIZZLING!

It’s

7

Leroy Thomas
Barbados 8-year
Trumpeter
Blowing
Hot and Sweet

~ on the
*
g Horn
% .
Extra:
















AUSTRALIA WIN THE ASHES
See Lindwall and Miller working out Compton
and Hutton.

+++ fo feel its fury
"++ 48 free men
Stand together, in
Strength i
COtrage . , .
fight for a tree
tomorrow!

ClatuRr-Fox
presents

Produced by

Edited by LOU.S TETUNIC
Written by JOSEPH KEMAS

Norrated by Sidn.y Bi: c.mer, John Larkir, -

Kermit Murdock and Wiln am Pust, Jt, + A Movistoonws Production

—



Trans-Siber oe railway ane |

East Sit

an



Words

HONGKONG, Feb.

Italy’s Father Giuseppe Minella
arrived in Hongkong from his
Sacred Heart Church in Pengpu,
Anhwei province of China, with
inside informativn on how easy it
is to fall fou! of the Chinese Com-
munists and get expelled.

Father Minella said he was
standing outside his Pengpu
Chureh when a teen-age member
ef the Young Communist Party
asked him where his dog had dis-
appeared to

Without thinking, the priest said
“probably to Korea.”

Next day the local press alleged
that he had insulted the Chinese
“volunteers” in Korea by calling
them “dogs.” A month of student
agitation followed before Father
Minella was finally put under
police guard

“Propagandist”

He said he was never formally

charged bu! the Communist press

alleged that he had called the
“volunteers’} dogs; done propa-
ganda work for the Americans
(actually he read the Nationa!
Geographic Magazine); praised
expatriate Archbishop Paul Yu

pin (now in Formosa) and called
him a “good man;” stopped Ca.h-
olic girls from joining the Young
Communist movement; and spread

alarmist rumours (he said | an

atom bomb could destrey Nan-
king.)
Father Minella denied that

GLOBE
| TO-NITE

e
Guest Star

TALENT SHOW
e

This is Talent!

SESS SOOO FOSS LOOPOPD SELIG SE

SPODOOSS










f0 know its truth







PLUS



EMPIRE






=

Sea

there was any truth in these
allegations but the Communist
authorities refused him a hearing.
They just deported him.

Father Minella is a native of
Milan and has spent 12 years in
China oh mission ld



She Finally Got It

VIENNA, Feb, 28.

A murtderess in Austria, who is
still serving her life sentence, has
inherited the estate of her husband
whom she killed. In 1936 Marie
Fercher was found guilty of mur-
dering her husband in order to
get his farm in Carinthia.

The estate went to Marie’s son,
who was reported missing in Rus-
sia during the war and never re-
turned. The Supreme Court has
cecided that in Austrian law, the
mother jis heir to the property des-
pite her previous crime. The case
is unique in Austrian legal history.
Reuter,



LADIES’ IMITATION LEATHER
HANDBAGS.
White and Assorted Colours.

$1.00 ea.

LADIES’ ART SILK ANKLE
SOCKS.

White and Assorted Colours.

2 prs for $1.00

LADIES’ ART SILK STOCKINGS
Light and Dark Shades.

2 prs for $1.00

|
{



LADIES’ PANTIES 0.8.
White and Pink.
« .Reduced for the $ days.

i pr for $1.00



LADIES’ COTTON VESTS.

2 for $1.00



BRASSIERES.
White and Tea Rose.

2 prs for $].00

LADIES’ NEW BELTS.
Regular Price 69c. and 79c.

Now 2 for $1.00.



SUN—
GLASSES

For LADIES & GENTS
Amazing Styles & Values!

THANTS



DIAL
3466











MEN’S POLO SHIRTS.
White with Zipp.

$1.00

BOYS’

POLO SHIRTS.

2 for $1.00

BOYS’ PANTS.

Age 5-12 years.

i pr for $1.00

BOYS’ LEATHER BELTS.

2 for $1.00



BABIES’
Blue,

PLASTIC PANTIES
Pink, White.

2 prs for $1.00

CHILDREN’S ART
PANTIES.

SILK

2 prs for $1.00

WHITE COTTON

BLOUSE

Clearing $1.00 ea.



PAGE THREE.

:



sao mo

WHAT'S IN A NAME

When you say
Everton Weexes

Everyone thinks of Cricket,
& you

Know likewise,

Everyone thinks of Cooking,
as you

Say G. A. Service.

—_— oe


















~—with the faithfrl
use of DREAM-— The Soap

of the Beautiful.
Play safe . be preparer,

loveliness

DREAM is available at toilet goods
counters throughout the island. ia

SENSATIONAL VALUES
SENSATIONAL

WHILE THESE BARGAINS LAST

COME EARLY FOR THE BETTER SELECTION

SAVINGS





Ne,

2 LARGE KITCHEN TOWELS + <;

and 1 YELLOW POLISHER

all for $1.00.

YELLOW POLISHERS.

Large Size,

4 for $1.00

PAPER NAPKINS.

200 for $1.00

PLASTIC POWDER BOWL.

2 fer $1.00



1 RUBBER BATH CAP AND
1 PLASTIC SHOWER CAP.

Hoth for $1.00



TOYS
VALUABLE ASSORTED TOYS
3 for $1.00

wig

COLOURFUL = PLASTIO
HANGERS,

3 for $1.00



SENSATIONAL CLEARANCE in COSTUME JEWELLERY and
COMPACTS Many of these Pretty EARRINGS, NECKLACES

to $6.00

Sale Price $1.00 cack 2

| and other JEWELLERY values up
|

LADIES’ PANTIES Reguiar $1.92 Multi filament CREPE

Pink

and White

1 for $5.00

THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE.

:

BROAD STREET







i ie

for your romantic moment...
Get a few cakes of DREAM,,

TOILET SOAP, use it
faithiully in your bath,,
shower and at the wygh
basin for a soft-smeoth-
clear skin, radiant with natgral

~~

a

x

-_—
GR


TIT Pee

= i

FRGE” ERE THURS B,

PAGE FOUR





Primted by the Advocate Co., Ltd, Broad St., Bridgetews.

Friday, March 2, 1951

HELP

PUBLIC support for the Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in this
island has never been indicatve of the vol-
ume or the quality of the work which this
body has been able to do. Flag Days, Con-
certs and public subscriptions have failed
to keep its financial condition near to the
required standard. ‘ 3

Only a week ago it was suggested that a
home be established in order to saye the
number of emaciated dogs from the starva-
tion and illtreatment which they endure
when driven from home during the licens-
ing period. It was officially admitted by
the Society that whilst this has been in-
cluded among other aims it has not been
possible to finance a home from the funds



of the Society.

Today is the Society’s Flag Day and it is
up to those who now recognise the need for
such a Society in a civilised community
and the need for support of its work to
céntribute generously to its funds.

The work of the Society is not spectacu-
lar but that it is necessary and extremely
important can be judged from the recogni-
tion which it has received in communities
more advanced than in Barbados.

“Education in this island has not been
conspicuous in inculcating love for animals
‘by young children, The grown up who
‘keeps his dog for protecting the backyard
does not hesitate to drive him away from
home rather than pay a five shilling tax.
The carter who makes his living with a
draft animal stops at the shop for his glass
of beer or mauby forgetting the animal in
the shafts and in the sun.

As an indication of what proper care
and proper feeding can.do, two ponies will
be exhibited at Beckwith Place today as
a reminder to those who see them, that
animals respond to care and protection as
mutch as any living being. The prevention
of: cruelty is only part of the work of the
Society. Proper methods of handling ani-
mals are as essential as food and the Soci-
ety aims at instructing the average owner
not merely to avoid cruelty but to give
proper care to animals. |

There are very few people who do not
admit a love for animals of some kind and
‘every one who dare profess such love
should not hesitate to contribute to a Soci-
.ety whose sole object is to protect animals
of every kind. It can easily be done by
subscribing to the Flag Day collection,

—ee

GRENADA

WHILST it is difficult, without knowing
all the facts, to comment adequately from
this distance on the Grenada disturbances,
yet the mentality of those who have insti-
gated them and those who have taken part
seems baffling.

Whatever the merits of their case may
be, it is obvious that they are discontented
with wages and conditions of labour. If
they had started these disturbances mere-
ly with the object of bringing the matter
to the attention of the Colonial Office there
might have been some method in their
madness, but if it is considered that these
disturbances have been initiated in an
attempt to better the lot of the worker, it
seems strange that property which had
been erected to improve the workers’ con-
dition, has been the main objects of des-
truction.

One school erected at a cost of £40,000
granted by Colonial Development and
Welfare to further education, and a clinic
also for the improvement of health ser-
vices to combat disease have been wilfully
destroyed,

Mr, Gairy and his followers have been
hoping to conyince the Colonial Office that
adult suffrage. should be .granted to the
people of Grenada. Do they imagine that
this is the way to achieve this end?



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



News From Britain

LONDON, Feb. 23

General Eisenhower has been
made very weleome in Britain as
Supreme Commander of the North
Atlantic Pact forces. An Ameri-
can has been nominated as the
Commanéer of the Air Forces. An
American has been nominated as
Chief of the production effort.

But when the appointment of
Admiral Fechteler of the U.S.
Wavy was known here, the Ad-
miralty Arch was seen to quiver
slightly, and a good deal of turn-

g~ in graves is reported from

minster Abbey. Drake may

indeed be in his hammock and a
thousand miles away—but it’s pre-
sumed he’s not sleeping so well
down below today.
_ In the House of Commons our
enhappy overburdened Prime Min-
ister took the full force on the
chin. Here is how the scene was
deseribed by William Barkley, the
Daily Express parliamentary re-
porter. .

“Consternation struck the Com-
tons, when Mr. Attlee announced
that an American is to command
the Atlantic navies, including
Royal Naval forces. If it was an
outrage to Tory sentiment, it was
also a shock to Socialist feelings.
Never has a statement of their
leader fallen on their ears with
$uch a heavy thud.

“They gaped and the House of
Commons soon witnessed some-
thing quite novel—a degree of
cordiality being shown by Social-
ists to the vivid fervent protests
ef. Mr, Winston Churchill,

“It was not only the substance
but the manner of Mr. Attlee’s
announcement that shocked.

He made it so casually that it
might have been anything to
which M.P.’s are now: accustomed
by every-day experience such as
a rise in the cost of Lging, or a
cut in the meat ration.

“It began with Mr. Churchil)
formally asking if the Prime Min-
ister had a statement to make on
the naval appointment under the
North Atlantic Treaty Organisa-
tion. Mr. Attlee popped up and
read off:—

‘The Defence Committee of the
Organisation has agreed there
should be a Supreme Allied Com-
mander Atlantic,’ “and .in the
same tone, without raising his
head’—-and that should be an
American.’

“Such a buzz of talk resounded
at once that he was hardly heard
adding that an American officer
has already been nominated and
an announcement will be made
soon.



Tito Dilutes Maex....You Could Call Tin
Communism And Splash

BELGRADE.

I noticed the change since my
last visit on the very first station
after the train had crossed the

border into Yugoslavia.

A man with a rakishly angled
high
and enormous
moustaches strutted up and down
the platform behind a youth who
was selling beer and soft, drinks,

The man in the lambskin hat
‘called out all sorts of good things
to eat and drink and smoke as
though he had them for sale. The
For everyone
knew that those things were un-
cbtainable today, but were. part

lambskin hat,

long coat,
leather boots,

crowd loved _ it.

of the station vendors’ ordinary

wares before Socialism came to

Yugoslavia. They joined in with
extravagant suggestions.

The tall, black-coated police-
man at the station
stolidly looked on and took no
notice. Two years ago, when I
was iast here, that scene would
have been impossible.

In the first place the jokester
would never have dared to put
on his act: if he had done, some-
one in a leather coat and a leather
eap would have sprung up from

nowhere and taken him off to the

local headquarters for a_ little
lesson in Socialist culture, '

When I got to my hotel I looked

round for the two leather-coated
plain-clothes men who used to be
on guard in the lobby night and
day. They had been discreetly
withdrawn,
’ Gone is that “voluntary” labour
on the building sites to which
young and old were compelled ta
mareh with pick and | shovel
three times a week on pain ot
forfeiting their rations.

The number of political meet-
ings in factories, offices, and
residential districts have been
arastically cut down, A citizen
who does not attend them is no
longer penalised, nor is a factory
hand who walks out on some
Marxist bore in order to get
on with his work.

In their desire to think out
things afresh and get away from



Our Readers Say:

entrance

By David Temple Roberts

“Mr. Churchill was up at once’
“Was there no British admirai:’

“he inquired in solemn tones.
Tories »roke into cheers aud
numbers of Socialists nodded

gloomy approval while their side
sat siler,t,

“With the same cheers ane
silent gloom the Tory leader put
question after question all in a
string. ‘Was there no. British
admiral capable of discharging
these functions? Does not Great
Britain lie at the very key to all
communications across the Atlan-
tic with Europe?

‘And are not the sea approaches
to our island, in the event of sub-
marine attack, vital to our life?

‘How is it?’ — “with ever more
insistence in his voice’ — ‘that
when our experience is longer
and wider than that of any other
country, particularly of the sub-
marine evil and when we have all
agreed with so much pleasure
that General Eisenhower should
command the Armed Forces on the
land, we might have been thought
to have the command of the
sea on the Atlantic?”

“Mr, Attlee’s reply was short:

‘When there is an organisation
of a number of Powers, the ap-

intment is made by those

owers, and no one Power has
absolute right to dictate its views
as to any appointment.. I under-
stand that the proposition that an
American admiral should be ap-
pointed was generally acceptable.’

“Mr. Attlee had no more ne
wanted to say. He sat back in his
characteristic pose, well down on
his front seaf, .It was only when
a chorus of “Answer, answer” as-
sailed him that he rose again to
say i

‘This matter was naturally
very fully discussed, But I say
ogain it is a matter for agreement.
And the general conclusion was
that this was the best appoint-
ment.’

“Tories were quick to spot, with
shouts of “Oh”, a contradiction
when, having said it was fully
discussed, he added: ‘I cannot at
the moment say whether there
was an elaborate discussion or
not.’

“He seemed taken aback at the
ferment in the House and was
saying again that no one country
could, in such an organisation, in-
sist on its own right, when a
Tory shout smothered his words.”

‘Where is British leadership?’
was the shout.

“Mr, Churchill was on his feet
again with apt figures at hand.

By SEFTON DELMER

the Soviet doctrinaires. Tito’s
Government has even gone so far
as to restore a measure of private
enterprise in some of the smallér
concerns which had been taken
over by the State.

We Can Talk

Most interesting of alk It is
orice more possible for Yugoslavs
to be seen talking to foreigners
like myself without having to fear
the consequences, I have been
made a temporary member of'a
Belgrade. club—unthinkable the
last time I was here.

These men talk freely, frankly.
and even bitterly. And, believe
me — despite the gaiety and
laughing chatter of the young
men and girls taking their even.
ing stroll along the boulevards of
village high streets, despite this
hew policy of liberalisation—there
is a great deal of bitterness, dis-
content and hostility to the
Government everywhere in Yugo-
slavia,

Among the peasants—80 per
cent. of Yugoslavia’s population—
because they resent the Govern-
ment compelling them to sell the
tion’s share of their produce at
very low ccntrolled prices to the
State; because last year’s drought
has hit them badly; and because
they still fear the Government
means to nationalise and collecti-
vise their land,

Among the factory workers
because when the factories were
recently transferred from State
ownership to ownership by the
workers the first result was that
wages were reduced still furthe:,
and more work was demanded,
Because food and clothes are
difficult to buy for the money they
earn,

In the towns because food dis-
tribution, despite American aid,
has broken down, badly, Rations
are not. being honoured, and the
free market prices charged by the
peasants ‘are so high that town



‘It was possible anyhow not very
long ago for one country to sink
525 German U boats, compared
with 174 by the United States.”

The general opinion
House of Commons is that this
is another case of Mr. Attlee
having ‘too much to do. At
present he is Prime Minister,
Foreign Secretary for Common-
wealth. Relations, and has to
take the chair at innumerable
Cabimet Committees. Probably
wha discussions there were
on the appointment did nov
come Mr. Attlee’s attention.
Apparently the United States is
open to representations about
these appointments. “So the Royal
Navy riding high ” was the
slightly emused comment out of a
US. Navy senior Captain in
Washington,

Festival Bandwagon

With understandable eagerness
everybody is using the Festival to
get things polished up and writing
the expense down to good publi-
city. ‘the brewers are thinking up
new names for pubs all over the
country that have neither names
nor signs, Some are modern.
There is the “Jet and Whittle”
near Gloucester — to commemor-
ate the inventor of the jet engine.
And “The Flying Saucer” in Kent
will give some social historian 200
years hence an awful lot of bother
discovering its significance. Per-
naps he will put it down to the
custom of domestic quarrelling.
The brewers claim proudly to
spend £100 apiece on brand new
swinging emblems.

And the British Colour Council
is trying to use the Festival to
make men colour conscious, They
want to see socks in “Victorian
purple, awning red, and garter
blue.” In actual fact a hatter
near Piccadilly did a roaring
trade in green hats, red hats an
orange hats last year, so the,
should have some success at: the
other end of the male body, 1
hear they are also encouraging
hand-painted ties. Mermaids on
ties can already be bought in
Shaftesbury Avenue.

The Churches, too, think th?
Festival of Britain may swell
their re-building funds. The plan
is to sell chunks of pile and stone
frem a dozen historic City church-
es. One Canadian is already in
this ‘game. He manufactures
the bits into book-ends. It will
be remembered that during the
war properly authenticated bits
of the destroyed House of Com-
mons were sold very well to
United States and other visiting
forces,

dwellers have to sell their last
possessions to be able to eat.
Their Profit?

Moscow and the Cominform are
certainly doing their best to profit
irom it all. They devote a total
of 18 hours a day of broadcasting
time to Yugoslavia.

They have’ special training
schools for Yugoslav agents and
agitators in Rumania iid Bul

garia. They send agents across

with leaflets,
rumours,

Their agents have orders to
organise cells in readiness fo:
D-Day, when the Cominform
liberation armies sweep over the
frontier,

But they
progress.

No leaflets or stickers have
been seen by any of my friends,
Long gone are the old days after
the break between Moscow an:|
Belgrade when Mescow still had
a clandestine printing press in
Belgrade on which it could print
an indictment of Tito.

No Column

Now I am not saying that there
are no Cominformists at large
in Yugoslavia. A_ disgruntled
Communist official overruled or
ignored must always be under
temptation to change his alleg-
iance, hoping for reward and
prefenment when the Cominform-
ists invade, if ever they do.

But that is where the secret
police come into the picture. For
with all their new unobtrusive
ness, they are more efficient than
ever.

No, there is nothing of what
one could call a Stalinist pene-
tration of the Yugoslav economic
or administrative machine, There
is no Fifth Column in Yugoslavia
to help a Stalinist invader with
sabotage.

I am convinced that Marshal
Tito could afford to loosen up his
Police State a_ lot. more before
there would ke any inside threat
from Moscow. ,

Eventually I hope he does. For
{ like to hear Serbs sing,

—L.E.S,

slogans, and

are making no





in the | the more convinced I become that the Negro

shoula come first, and that our economic well
peing is of greater
privilege or right to
or to associate with ee on an equal
social basis provided

decisions and pressure legislation

iege and opportunity enjoyed by any other
American, but I am opposed to any type of





Tourist’s Accommodation

_ To the Editor, The Advocate—
: SIR,—There have appeared from
“time to time editorials, and let-
. . ters, published in your paper ac-
vertising the building of another
“hotel on the island, Althous)
Opponents of the idea uve not
- seen fit to appear in print, casual
enquiry disclosed the fact that
residents of the island and many
tourists do not
done which would turn Barba-
los into another Bermuda. ..The
. Writer is in complete ‘sympathy
~ with that thought, but does no¢
“-believe such a_ strange thing
could take place in the foresee-
~ able future for the following
~*=-reasons,
“1, Barbados’ is
_@anada and the Northern U.S,
-- that it is costly to get here, and
although the hotel rates are low,
one has to spend considerable
‘time here to offset the increased
- eost of transportation. On the
other hand, Bermuda and Florida
are only about four hours flight
from New York so that large
numbers of tourists who hae but
“two of three weeks for a winter

holiday, would never go as far
away ag this Island.
2. Although Barbados enjoys

an unsurpassed, climate, it has
little else to offer except a quiet
and leisurely way of life. Even
the bathing here is not comparable
with that-in Florida and Bermuda.
Florida has literally hundreds of
miles of beaches far superior to
the beaches here, The writer has

want anything:

so far frem.

driven his car 30 miles on the
beach in one. direction in the

Daytona and Ormond section of °

Florida where there is not.a trace
of a pebble. Every beach in Barba-
dos where the writer has bathed,
is cluttered with coral rocks
~t various sizes which frequently
scratch the feet. To be sure, in
the early winter in the Daytona
and Ormond area, the water is
not as warm ‘as it is“here, but

by mid-February, it is ideal for

bathing, From Palm Beach south

the water is ‘always!watm | be-

because that part ‘of the coast ”

isu washed by the Gulf Stream, ‘
a ous

At this time of year, mahy of
start training, in various parts of
Florida, and in many cities irr the
state, one may watch good base-
ball several times a week. Fur-
‘thermore, thére are several beau-
tiful tracks jin’ Florida where
there is a long racing season with
most of the Test stables in the
U.S. represented and there-‘is

dog racing and gambling, for.

those whose tastes run in that di-
rection, Every town has real golf
courses, compared with which,
the course here igs a sheep pas-
ture.

Finally, the hotels here are so
primitive and the food so inferior,
that they could not exist in either
Bermuda or Florida. In one hotel
on this island, a guest cannot
even get a drink of water except
at meals or in his room at night
without tipping a bell boy to get
it or go to the bar.

2

«the major league base ball-teams«-

» hotel

Thia is not written in a spirit of
carping eriticism but merely as
an effort to. set forth the facts
showing why, inthe opinion of
the writer, Barbados will never
be a_second Bermuda or Florida.
I like it here and hope to come
other winters if I1.can get a room.
I think there is,ample room for
another hotel, one of about 50
rooms so designed that it can be
enlarged to 100 rooms when con-
ditions justify it; not a de luxs
buts*one built. on ample
grounds “with “a wide gallery,
comfortable rooms ¢ach with bath
and runnifg. hot.and cold water
sand a tel@phope: in every room

he investor iM such an enter-
prise should be:offered every in-
ducement such ‘as. in Jamaica
where the builder can buy
wherever he wishes and the ma-
terials are brought in duty free
and he is not hedged about by
such restrictions as caused the
Blue Waters enterprise to be
abandoned after it was well on
its way.

JUST ANOTHER TOURIST.

A Resident

: mae Editor, The Advocate

R,—Permit me-to-draw- tothe ~~
attention of whom it may concern,
the plight of the residents of the

~Deacons Road Housing Scheme,

Whenever there is a heavy rain-
fall, water settles near a suck well
a distance of about forty (40)
yards long and about eighteen (18)
inches deep, causing much incon-

venience to residents going from

;
or coming to their homes. There
are only about a dozen homes
within the immediate entrances
from Deacons. Road which are not
affected by the water.

Hoping that the authorities will
take action,

WOHN W. WATTS

» Shirts
To the Editor, The, Advocate—
SIR

The Blackshirts and the Brown-
shirts
They had their little day,
The Redshirts still are in the
news
But then, I mean to say,
You've really lost your freedom
The Bill of Rights is dirt
When someone in authority
Selects your bloomin’ shirt!
Imagine tagged “‘Verboten”
And classed with dangerous
drugs
Those coats of many colours
The cheerful jitterbugs:
Designed short-sleeved by com-
monsense,
Worn outside (suits the weather)
A boon to parents’ pocket-
books—
Forbidden altogether!
~ Aderned-by all that's-modern art
Bedecked by Euclid’s figgers
And rampant with all Heraldry
From Jumbo down to jiggers!
a ancestoys were long made
ree
Who knew the shackles’ hurt .. .
No man can seare the pants off
me,
My son shall choose his shirt!
BIMSHIRE.



By DAVIS LEE

(With Acknowledgements to the “Newark Telegram")
THE MORE I travel, listen and observe,

nas been grossly misled in this matter of
integration and civil rights. :
It appears to me that the first things

ce than the
“Gee a white school
Supreme Court

As a Negro, and an American, 1 natufally
want to see my race enjoy every right, privi-

setiow of a righ t
own kind exclusively, if he desires. I would
1ike to reserve such a right for myself and
definitely would not want it encroached
upon by a Supreme Court edict or any other
«ind ot interference.

The right granted to one or two Negroes
in Virginia or some other Southern State
to enter a State graduate school is of no
benefit to the millions of our people who
are in need of the bare necessities of life,
and when the fortunately situated mem-
bers of the race conduct such campaigns
of agitation for selfish gain, the needy
masses suffer.

WHILE THE SOUTH does not provide
ample or adequate modern school facilities
for Negroes everywhere, neither does it
provide completely modern facilities for
white schools, because the money is not
available for such a vast undertaking.
However, rapid progress has been made
and in Montgomery, Ala., and several other
communities the Negro schools far exceed
the white schools in modernization and
physical appearance. Neither do the
majority of Southern Negroes nor the
majority of the whites approve of the pres-
ent programme to disrupt a custom which
has served both races well down through
the years and contributed so much to the
Negro’s economic security.,

Just what would be the future educa-
tional status of the Negro in the South if
the Legislatures of all the Southern States
would enact legislation withdrawing State
financial support from all schools of higher
learning, starting at the high school level?
Not only is this possible, but if it should
come to pass, the Negro would be unable
to finance his own educational programme.
Negro financed educational programmes
have been a failure in the past and nothing
miraculous has happened which would
cause a normal person to assume that the
future holds any better prospect.

NO RACE OR NATIONALITY in this
nation has excelled or equalled the Negro in
educational attainment and achievement,
but this educational opportunity was not
only created by white dollars but has been
financed by white people throughout the
nation. It is an unfortunate fact, that
Negroes contribute very little to their own
community well being and improvement and
this fact should be taken into account by
these agitators before they initiate their pro-
grenime for demands in the field of educa-
ion,

Instead of spending thousands of dollars
to finance unnecessary court fights for
privileges which will cost the race millions
in lost valuable friendships and, racial
goodwill, our leaders should go into the
Negro ghettoes and force the local grocer
to carry prime meats and sell to our people
Grade A products which will make us
healthy.

It is no wonder that the death rate is so
high among Negroes. When one considers the
food situation plus inadequate housing, it is
a wonder that the death rate is not higher.

It is very apparent to me that the Negro
leaders of this nation have a distorted
sense of real values. They appear to be
more interested in breaking down racial
barriers and conducting expensive cam-
paigns of agitation, in spreading hate, than
in directing their efforts, energies and
money towards the attainment of the
tangible essentials of life.

I WAS IN ATLANTA last week and
was greatly impressed by the large number
of outstanding and_ progressive Negro
businesses. Atlanta is strictly a segregated
city. I was in several New England cities
this week where there is not supposed to be
any segregation, and I found not one credi-
table Negro business.

The one owned and operated Negro radio
station is not in New York, but in Atlanta.
Segregation has not only given the Negro
in the South an opportunity to carve out his
industrial and economic destiny, but. it. has
forced him to the fore as the most substantial
and economically secure Negro in the world.

The Negro in New York, Newark and
other supposedly liberal centres may enjoy
the privileges to eat where he pleases or

go to any theatre or public place of amuse-
ment, but a Negro can’t get a license in
Newark to operate a liquor package store,

can’t enter business in other Eastern

Northern cities. But this is not true in ma
South, A Negro can enter any kind of
business he wishes and Southern whites
will even lend the money. Some of the
largest contractors in the South are
Negroes,

NORTHERN NEGRO DOLLARS spent
to force Southern white universities to ad-
mit Negroes will certainly not contribute
anything towards continued good race re-
ations in the South, and race relations
were definitely on the improve until all of
these school suits started.

I find more race prejudice in the East
than I have found in Georgia or Mississippi.
Two weeks ago 10 tourists’ camps refused
to rent me a cabin just outside of Pitts-
burgh, and Pennsylvania is one of the first
States to enact a civil rights law.

The AMERICAN RACE SITUATION has
not only taken on added alarming pro-
portions but has developed into a serious
problem which could explode and create}
a national crisis. Instead of trying to find
peace in Korea and other foreign lands
our leaders, both white and coloured,
should try to find a panacea for these racial
ills and establish peace at home before ad-
vocating it abroad. We are not in a position
to teach the other fellow how to establish
unity in his bailiwick when we don’t have
it in our own.





a a























q :
and there are any number of fields that he

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951

ST

_ RACE RELATION IN U.S.



D. V. SCOTT TO-DAY'S SPECIALS = |
& CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
i aaa iss
| Usually Now
Tins OVALTINE (Large) ......-:-:« $1.24 $1.12
Tins CORNED BEEF with Cereals 31 28
Bottles GROTSCH BEER. ........-..-- 24 18



SAWS—lB8ins., 20ins., 22ins., 24ins., 26ins., 28ins., 30ins., 36ins,
COMPASS SAWS—12ins., 14ins.

BACK SAWS—12 ins., 14 ins. 16ins.

PLANES, IRON—ins., 10ins., 15ins., 18ins.

” BLOCK
RATCHET BRACES
CHISELS—¥in., 54in., %in., lin.

CHISEL SETS of } in., 5s.in, 1 in. ins.
OIL STONES—ins., 8ins.

GRINDING STONES, complete—Sins., 6ins.
Spare GRINDING STO 5ins., 6ins.
SAW Ln are ad 4ins., 4\ins., Sins.

CLAW HAMMERS

ENGINEER HAMMERS—llb., 1 lbs., 2lbs.
MASON TROWELS & SQUARES

AT

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

rua: $3, RITCHER & CO.

"« INTERNATIONAL”
PAINTS

COVER THE WORLD!



As a protective covering for the roofs of
your buildings,
following

RED ROOFING PAINTS

we can offer you the

“DANBOLINE” ANTI -CORROSIVE PAINT (for galvanized
iron)—$7.52 per wine gallon,
“PROPELLER” READY MIXED OIL PAINT (for wooden
shingles, asbestos, cement and aluminium)—$7.00 per
wine gallon.
Tg

For best results, the following instructions should be carefully
followed :—

Galvanized Iron.

1. For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least a
year before painting. Then apply I coat of “DANBOLINE”.
2. For previously painted work, if the surface is in good
ey rub down, clean, and apply 1 coat of “DANBO-

3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor con-

dition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat
of “INTERNATIONAL” RED LEAD GRAPHITE PRIMER,
followed by 1 coat of “DANBOLINE”.

Wooden Shingle,

1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
PRIMER FOR WOOD, followed by 2 coats of “PRO-
PELLER”.
2. For previously painted work, if the surface is in good con-
dition, rub down, clean, and apply 2coats of “PRO-
PELLER”.
3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor
condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat
of “INTERNATIONAL” PRIMER FOR WOOD”, followed
by 2 coats of “PROPELLER”.

Asbestos Cement,

1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER, followed by 2 coats of
“PROPELLER”.

2. For previously painted work, rub down thorcughly, clean,
and apply 2 coats of “PROPELLER”.

Aluminium

1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “YELLOW PRIMOCON”,

followed by 1 coat of “PROPELLER”.

2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean,
ani apply 1 coat of “PROPELLER”,

TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL
PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED.



DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — acents

























ild Up the
Children with

Bu
Kellogg’s Corn Flakes
Kellogg’s All Bran \

Quaker Oats .
RED APPLES + a
CARROTS ¥ fx
CABBAGE *
For Perfect
SANDWICHES

J. & R, Bread

Pati de Fois Gras )
Jellied Chicken

Jellied Turkey

Sliced Ham 1
Salami ‘
Sandwich Relish ({ i
Rare Cheeses er
SPECIALS

For Sauce i

THE TOAST of the TOWN
GODDARD'S
GOLD BRAID RUM

ORDER TO-DAY from
GODDARDS



CARPENTERS’ TOOLS |













/

SS

— loo

=

cheat

a ORE a aN eT

aurnde
FRIDAY, MARCH 2. 1951



Senior Short Story Competition |

The Evening Advocate

tition.

will be- published in the Evening

invites all school-boys
between the ages of 12-18 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe-.

Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
in length and must_reach the Short Story Editor, Advocate Co., Ltd,,
City not later than Wednesday every week. The best story each week
Advocate and the winner will Te-

ceive _a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12.6.

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

‘Mauretania

THE CUNARD WHITE

° To Bdos

STAR luxury liner Mauretania

will be making an unexpected visit to Barbados at 10.30 on

Saturday morning with 650

American tourists on board.

Messrs. Hanschell Larsen & Co., Ltd., her local agents,
told the Advocate yesterday that the present disturbances
in Grenada are responsible for the visit of the Mauretania

to Barbados.

- Caribbean |
Club Stages
Good Show

A very successful Variety Show
was given by the Caribbean So-
cial Club at the Police Recreation
Hall, Central Station, last night.
It was in aid of the newly formed
Young Women’s Christian Asso-
ciation at Pinfold Street, The Po-
lice Band was in attendance.

The Caribbean Social Club, a
dramatic group under the capa-
ble direction of Miss Judy
Graham, was formed in March
last year, Its first public per-
formance. was .at the Globe
Theatre where they presented the
successful show “Caribbean
Revelry.”

The Club has as its President
Judy Graham, Secretary Roger
Fields, Treasurer Roosevelt Tudor
and the Committee May Ramain,
Claude Lewis and Reginald Remy.
Mr. Maurice Jones of the Globe
Theatre was the Advertising
Manager who gave his ideas of
attractive advertising of the Club.

The membership is about thirty
and they practise at the hiome
of Miss Judy Graham at Bay
Street. Judy has big ideas. She
intends putting on public per-
formances at least once a year.

She first taught dancing in 1945
at the St. Patrick’s School, Jem-
mot's Lane. Many of the girls
whom she taught then are now
grown up and take part in the
shows. She also taught boys in
the “Musical Band’ at
Patrick's School, Her first con-
cert was in 1946. :

Lancers

The Show last night opened with
a chorus entitled “Welcome -to
Our Musical Show,” produced by
Judy Graham, Twenty took part
in this song. Following this was
the prologue by Quinda Shaw
and then they danced the Lancers.

Cedric Phillips, well known
vcealist-pianist sang “My Heart
and I” to Judy Graham’s accom-
paniment on the piano. A comedy
sketch “The Cricket Match,” the
next item on the programme, de-
lighted the audience, Quinda
Shaw and Elrita Clarke took part
in this. It was the story of two
friends — one wealthy and the
other a pauper. On this occasion,
even the pauper pretended to be
wealthy and to have relatives of
rich origin. After a lengthy argu-
ment they became friendly.

After this a dance, “The Cake
Walk,” arranged by Claude Lewis,
was done. Four boys and the
same number of girls took part
in this, May Ramdin then sang
“I Can Dream, Can't I” and there
was a comedy dance, “The Clown”
by Vera Morris.

The next item was a dance,
“The Cocoanut Dance,” arranged
by Judy Graham and this was
followed by “Ladies” Wit, a
sketch in which May Ramdin,
Rooseyelt Tudor and Cedric
Phillips took part,

“Aint She-Sweet”

Other items on the programme
were: “Aint She Sweet,” a dance
taught by Cedric Phillips, “Miss
Prim'’s Dancing School” and “Mr.
Kinch and Party,” a sketch, This
sketch was of Kinch, a manager
and his friend. Whenever Kinch
invited the friend to his home
he made certain that he would
bé out. In
never home. After a series of dis-
cussions Kinch and his friend
ended up arm in arm and they!
sang “We Want To Be in Dixie,”
‘This sketch was arranged by Mrs.
Graham, Judy’s mother, who wiil |
be remembered as the outstand-
ing Myra Malicious in Caribbean
Revelry.

The show ended with the group
singing “Now Is The Hour” in
parts,. accompanied by Claude
Lewis.

Judy Graham told the Advo~
cate yesterday that she must
thank Gol. R. T. Michelin for
giving them assistance and also
Mr. Maurice Jones for so ably
helping with the advertising.

“SEDGEFIELD'S" HEAVY
EQUIPMENT REMOVED

ENGINEERS are getting ahead
fast in converting the motor ves-
sel Sedgefield into a passenger
ship.

The Sedgefield had her conning
tower and other heavy equipment
removed by the Government
crane on Wednesday.

They were, removed so, as to
provide space for extending the
top deck for passenger accommo-
dation,

The Sedgefield was back at her
berth alongside the dock yester-
day, while repairs were being
continued, After conversion
reaches:a certain stage, she will be
taken on dock for cleaning and
painting.

jeaused the. scheduled

fat -midnight

er words he was|-











The Mauretania, which is now
making its third Caribbean cruise
for this winter, had included
Grenada on this itinerary and
not Barbados. The disturbances
visit to
Grenada to be cancelled.

This call to Barbados will be
the second for the Mauretania
this year. She was here on Febru-
ary 9 with 626 tourists from the
United States. She returned home
from that cruise on Fevruary 22
and left New York two days later
on this cruise.

She will be arriving at Barba-
dos via St. Thomas, Martinique
and Trinidad. She will be leaving
for home via St,
Vincent, Guaira, Curacao
Cristobal, Port-au-Prince = an<
Havana, 4

La



Case Agairist Driver’
Put Off For March 3

Hearing in the case in which
Edgar DaCosta Inniss of Prospect,
St. James, is charged by the Po-
lice of driving the motor car S-188
without due care and consideration
on Fairfield Road, St. Michael,
was yesterday adjourned until
March 3 by His Worship Mr. H. A.
‘Yalma.

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker is appear-
ing on behalf of Inniss and tne
case for the Police is being led by
Sgt. Forde. The case was brought
as a result of an accident on Fair-
field Road between the bicycle
M-4001 and the motor car S-188
which the defendant was said to

be driving.
The offence was alleged to have
been committed sometime on

November 15. George Lowe, the
rider of the bicycle, said that the
car struck the front wheel of the
bicycle damaging it.

Cpl, Watson attached to the
Black Rock Station said that he
went to the scene of the accident
and saw the bicycle and rider. The
car was not there. On returning
to the Station he wrote out a sum-
mons form and on the form was
Colonel R. T. Michelin as com-
plainant in the case. The speed
limit on the Fairfield Road is 30
miles per hour.





FINED 15'- FOR LARCENY

A fine of 15/- to be paid in 14
days or in default one month's im-
prisonment with hard labour was
yesterday imposed on Samuel
Holder of Goodland, St. Michael
by His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”. . :

Samuel Holder was found guilty
of the larceny of a quantity of
cane fodder the property of Edwin
Boyce. The case was brought by
the Police. Sgt. King prosecuted.

Edithe Tull, a witness for the
prosecution, said that she saw
Holder in Boyce’s ground with
about’ 25 pounds of cane fodder
under his arm. She was sure that
it was Holder.

When Boyce saw her he turned
his back to her. He was wearing
a short white pants and a white
shirt,

Barna Defeats
Pelican 5-4:

AT TABLE TENNIS

BARNA defeated Pelican five—
four in an interesting Table Tennis
Inter—Club Division I matcti~at
the Y.M.C.A. on Monday night.

Louis Stoute of Barna gave the
best performarice, He won his
‘three games in convincing style.
Campbell Greenidge also gave a
good performance for Barna but
was defeated by Willoughby in a
good set. Willoughby gave the
best performance for Pelican,

The results were as follows:—

Greenidge (Barna) beat Gibson (Peli-
can) 21—13; 21

aoa (oar ;
CMjoward (Barna) lost to Worrell: (Peli-
can) 12-21; 13—21.

Stoute (Barna) beat Gibson (Pelican)
21—10; 21—18.

Greenidge (Barna) beat Worrell (Peli-
can) 21—14; 26—24

Howard (Barna) lost to Willoughby
(Pelican) 21—18; 8—21; 16-21.

Stoute (Barnes) beat Worrell (Pelican)
1721; 21—18; 21-14.

Howard (Barna) lost to Gibson (Peli-

20—22; 1 _
tRarha) lost to Willoughby
20-—-22; 21—17; 19—21.

REMANDED

Aubrey Harewood of Kensing-
ton New Land, was yesterday re-
manded by His Worship Mr. G. B.
Griffith after he appeared on a
charge brought by the Police of
breaking and entering the house
of Clifford Bowen with intent to
commit a felony. The offence was
alleged ‘to have been committed
sometime on February 28. Police
Constable 81 Llovd of the Central
Station brought Harewood to the
Police Station.
|. Sgt. King is prosecuting on be-
half of the Police. 7



2,
) beat Willoughby (Peli-



and school-girls

|



























By JOHN

In the early hours of the mor-
ring of 2nd March, 1935, the
residents of Hastings were awak-
ened by the bell of the Fire
Brigade, To those who took the
tieuble to get out of their beds
and.look into the eastern sky, it
could be seen that a fire of some
dimension was taking place, All
and sundry were shocked when
they heard that Christ Church
Church was completely gutted,
Nothing could be done to stop this
fire as no water was available.
From the Altar and the exquisite
stained glass window in the East
to the old Font in the West. A
doleful note was heard when the
two bells in the tower crashed tc
the ground and were ruined,

The crowd that gathered to wit-
ness this destruction, seemed to be
spell-bound; those who spoke did
so in whispers, while others were
not ashamed to. be seen wiping
away tears. This Church had been
standing for 99 years and was
loved by the parishioners. It was
re fourth Church of this parisia
vyhich had come to a sudden and

ntimely end.

The first Chureh of Christ
-hurch was built by the early
ettlers in the vicinity of Dover,
nd part of this graveyard can
till be seen, This Church appears
to have suffered heavily in the
floods of 1669, for at a meeting of
he Governor and Council held on
.8th January 1669/70 a report
‘rom the Christ Church. Vestry is
recorded, alleging that “the old
Church and Chapel had fallen to
decay and great inundations lately
upon +ye ‘Chiefest * place’ for
burial at ye, Parish Church had
washed the Earth from off ye
Corps.” The Vestry was seeking
licence to build a new Church,
which was apparently destroyed
in the hurricane of 1580. The
“Barbados Mercury” for Novem-
ber 29th, 1783 records a Petition

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

CRRIST CHURCH CHURCH

*

Grenada Riots Send Do You Remember?

PRIDEAUX

Mrs. Jemina Mascoll. Rev, Hast-
ings. must have died about 1744,
because his will dated 21st Decem—
ber 1743, was proved on the 10th
January, 1744,

Christ Church is famous in the
eyes of strangers as the home of
the “Barbados’ Mystery Vault,”
more commonly known as | the
‘Chase Vault.’ Up to the 22nd of
February i808, when the vault was
opened for the burial of the infant
daughter of the Hon. Thomas
Chase, all was in order, The first
disturbance was noticed when
the vault was opened on 16th
July 1812. The leaden coffins were
again .in disorder when the vault
was opened on the 25th September
1816, again on the 16th November
of the same year. The same dis-
order when the vault was opened
o the. 17th July 1819, for the
burial of Miss Thomasina Clarke.

On every occasion the coffins had jects of study. Priority is given to! Tondon on March 9.

been replaced in their proper
positions,
The Governor, Lord Comber

mere, having heard these stories,
was determined to investigate the
matter for his own satisfaction.
He attended the funeral, and had
the walls and floor sounded, and
after replacing the coffins, the floor
was covered with white sand, The
vault was then cemented up
and the seal of the Governor
affixed in several places; many
others present made their own
marks.

The Hon, N, Lyeas, records,in
his MSS (now in the Public
Library, Bridgetown, Barbados)
that H. E., Mr. Rowland Cotton,
and himself were guests of Mr.
Robert Boucher Clarke at his es-
tate, Elridge’s, Christ Church;
when the coffin mystery was men-
tioned, and the Governor decided
to have it opened that day; thus
the last scene of this drama was

from the Vestry of Christ Church] enacted on the 18th April 1829

to the Commissioners of Parlia-
mentary Bounty for assistance in
rebuilding the Church, They stated
—‘Suffered more from the vio-
lence of the tempest and the in-
undation of the sea than the
interior part of the island,—their
commodious and well constructed
Church was totally demolished
and no proper place left wherein
to call upon the name of the
Lord "The Vestry asked
for a portion of the bounty to
assist with the building of another
Church. There is very little known
about this Church as all the regis-
ters were lost in this hurricane,

The date of the erection of the
third Christ Church Church is
unknown, but it was built to ac-
commodate about 300 persons on
the high land overlooking Oistin’s
Town: then a_ sea-port. This
Church was destroyed by the hur-
ricane of August llth 1831, and
only the Communion Plate, the
Registers, and the Font were
saved,





Hon. Lucas records—

“Every outside appearance
was perfect, not a blade of grass
or stone touched; indeed collu-
sion or deception was impossible;
for neither ourselves nor the
negroes knew anything of the
matter; for the subject was
hardly started in conversation
before we set out for inspection.”
When the vault was opened, it

was founa to be in confusion, The
largest of the coffins which would
have taken at least six men to lift
it, had been set “upon end against
the wall.”

Dr, Lucas contiaues,

“There was no vestize of
water to be discovered in the
vault; no marks where it had

been; and the vault is in a level
churech-yard by no means in a
fall much less in a run of
water;” also “a mason struck
every part of the bottom with
his hammer and all was solid.”
Dr. Lucas offers no explanation,

The parishioners were deter- | 45 he wrote—“All I know is that
mined to build a Church that!it happened, and that I .was an

would withstand the elements, so | eye-witness

of the fact!” The

they entrusted the supervision to vault was abandoned, the widow
Edward Hooper Senhouse Esq.,; of Hon. Thomas Chase, caused the

Churchwarden,

with the result} coffins to be removed and buried

that a substantial building with}in other parts of the graveyard.
thick walls, and its roof hidden by |The ‘Chase Vault’ remains open
a battlement parapet, resembling | for all who care to visit it.

some old castle, was erected and

consecrated on 4th July 1837, The
parishioners of Christ Church
were so pleased with this building,
that they presented Mr. Senhouse
with an address and a solid silver
waiter in which was the following
inseription:—

“Presented to EDWARD H

SENHOUSE ESQUIRE by some] to-day

of the
CHRIST CHURCH PARISH in
the ISLAND ©F BARBADOS as
a sincere testimony of the high

opinion entertained by them of legislation,”

the zealous assiduity he dis-



BAN S, AFRICAN GOODS

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jca., March 1.

On a motion by S. A. Glass
Pole, Opposition Party Secretary,
the House of Representatives

passed a resolution re-

PARISHIONERS OF! questing Government to ban im-

portation.of South African goods
“because of Dr. Malan’s.. recent
passing of colour discrimination
The motion also
#sked Government to contact ana

played in superintending the, request political leaders of other

BUILDING OF _ THEIR! British West

CHURCH.”

After the destruction of the
Church in 1831 and until the new
one was consecrated in 1837, ser-
vice was held in a temporary
Chapel prepared for public wor-
ship at Oistin’s Fort, now Christ
Church Infirmary. This was done
by the kind permission of the
Commissicners of Fortifications.

The name of Warren Hastings
is well known to the people of
the British Empire. His life is
one. that all school children are
familiar with. He started at the
age of seventeen years as a writer
With the East India Co., in Bengal.

Clive, and a year or two after
became a Member cf the Council
at Calcutta. Due to his great
ability, he was advanced from

the first
India.
Warren Hastings’
Pennystone Hastings,

Governor-General

age of 15. His

Gloucester.

ihe famous Warren,
Rev. Hastings soon
again, but his wife also died.

subsequently he volunteered under

post to post, and in 1773. became
of
Few people know that
father, Kev.
was once
rector of Christ Church, Rev.
Hastings was born in England, and
first married there at the early
first wife was
Hester, a daughter of one Warren,
the owner of a small estate in
She died a few days
efter giving birth to their son,

married
He
then came to Barbados and was
appointed Rector of Christ Church,
and in 1787 he married a widow,

Indies Colonies
take similar action,

to



In Bexes and Singly

GIFT BOXES containing many different
styles: Coloured and White, Embroidered



| five

\



Westminster
Corner

English Harbour

R. P, SMITHERS (Conserva-
tive, Hampshire, Winchester
div.) asked the Secretary of State
for the Colonies whether he is

of the historic buildings of Lord
Nelson's dockyard at English Har-
cour, Antigua; and whether he
will open a fund or otherwise take
steps to make their restoration
possible.

Mr. Griffiths: I am already in
consultation with the Governor
about the state of repair of these
buildings.

Public Services

R. P. SMITHERS asked the

Secretary of State for the
Colonies what steps have been
taken by His Majesty's Govern-
ment towards implementing the
recommendations of the Commis-
sion upon the Unifitation "of “Pub-
lic Services in ‘th® British) Carib-'
bean; and what further steps it is
proposed to take.

Mr, Griffiths: The report of the
Commission ‘has been referred to
the Governors of the territories
concerned for consideration by the
Legislatures. Only the Legislative
Council of St. Vincent has yet
completed consideration of the
report and it has approved’ the
Commission's recommendations.
rhe implementation of the report
depends primarily on the decisions
of the Legislatures, and it has been
made clear that His Majesty's
Government have no wish to pre-
judge or influence those decisions,

Colonial Students

N R, P. SMITHERS asked the

Secretary of State for the
Colonies ‘on what’ principle Colo-
nial students are selected for ad-
mission to the Hans Crescent Hos-
tel; and whether any preference is
given to students who are prepar-
ing for Government services.

Mr, Griffiths: The aim is to
produce a balanced student com-
munity, widely representative not
only of the various Colonial terri-
tories but also of the different sub-

new arrivals in the United King-)
dom, for whom up to half the
places are reserved. Thirty-
places are reserved for
15 cadets taking the First Dev-
onshire Course and 20 Eng-
lish students attending Lon-
don University, who in turn re-
lease a corresponding number of
places at their hostels for colonial
Students. This admixture of U.K.
students has been a conspicuous
success. The future career of a
student is only one factor, though
an important one, affecting his
nn to Hans Crescent Hos-
tel.
Sugar Disease

R, R, ROBINSON (Conserva-

tive, Btackpool, South Div.)
asked the Secretary of State for
the Colonies what efforts are being
made to eradicate the leaf scald
disease from the sugar plantations
in British Guiana.

Mr. Braine (Conservative, Essex,
Billericay Div.) asked the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies what
steps are being take~ ‘o check the
spread of the leat ecald disease
threatening the sugar indust., mâ„¢
British Guiana.

Mr. Griffiths: Surveys to de-
termine the extent of the disease
and measures to control it have
been instituted in the Colony, and

steps are being taken urgently to|{$

obtain the services of an experi-
enced plant pathologist to super-
vise research work on the disease.
I am aware of the serious threat
that this disease constitutes to the
sugar industry of British Guiana
and hence to the whole economy
of the country. Vigorous steps are
being taken to combat it.



BUNGALOW BURNT

A bungalow in Station Hill
crugit fire last night about 9.20
o'clock but was put out within ©
minutes by the Fire Brigade which
carned out under Asst. Superin-
tendent Grant. A dairy is run ai
the property. The occupants were
away when it caught fire, Some
of the ceiling floor and clothing
were burnt. +

POSTMISTRESS
OF ST. PHILIP



Miss A. M. B. Hooper has been
appointed to be Postmistress for
the parish of St. Philip with effect
from the lst of March. :






[0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

“I LEAP OVER THE WALL"
By Monica Baldwin,
A MORNING AT THE OFFICE
~By Edgar Mittelholzer,



AT
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY

Fresh shipment of —

ENAMEL. IT
in all colours

AT
JOHNSON’'S HARDWARE

and Lace trimmed. Priced per box from $1.85 to $2.58

WHITE LINEN HANKIES—Each

As the Tourist Ship “Mauretania” will be arriving here
on Saturday next, March 3rd, at 10.30 a.m. this store
will remain open until 4 p.m. on that day.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET



’









‘Dominica Hopes To
Export 1,000,000

Last year, Dorainica exported
about 400,000 stems of bananas
to Ireland and this year they are!
hoping to export a million stems,
the Hon, H D_ Qhillingford,
ML C,, told the Advocate yester-

ay.

He said that their big problem
for the development of the indus-
try was roads which were serious-
ly lacking.

Mr. Shiningford arrived here
yesterday morning by the Colom.
bie for a week's holiday and is
staying at “Abbeville Guest
House,” Worthing.

He, said that before the war,
they had a small trade with gros
miehel bananas, but that was wip-
ead out by the Panama discase.
They were now growing the laca.
tan variety which was highly re
sistant to the Panama disease

They had.expectations of gettin,
tid.of ‘their citrus crop with thé
edvent of Colonial Developmen
Corporation, but that organisation
was very slow in coming int
~peration.

Limes had always been thei
major crop and the prospects fo
this year are fairly good.

BBC Producer Pays





|4-Week Visit To WI

Mr. E. R.. EDMETT, senioi
producer in the West Indies sec.
tion of the Overseas Service a
the B.B..C., is spending a few
days’ in Barbados as part of a
four-week visit to the Caribbean.
In such a short time, Mr, Edmett
told the Advocate, it is impossible
tc make a comprehensive survey,
but he hopes to obtain some idea
of listener response to the pro-
grammes broadcast daily in the
Overseas’: Service. between 7.15
and 7,45 p.m. .

So far Mr Edmett has been to
Jamaica, Trinidad and_ British
Guiana, and will be going on to
St. Lucia. before returning to




By personal contact and infor-
mal, conversations with various
people whom ‘he has been able to
meet, he hopes to build up at least
a few impressions which will be
a useful guide in finding the most
constructive-line to follow — in
future programmes.

“GOLFITO” TAKES
34 TO U.K.

Nineteen passengers came in
from British Guiana, Trinidad
and Venezuela by Messrs, Elders
& Fyffes’ Golfito yesterday cven-

ing,

The Golfito took aboard 34. pas
sengers here for Southampton and
left port a few hours after her

arrival, She is consigned to Messrs.
Wilkinson & Haynes Co,, Ltd

pet ON,

:
|
2

%



intel aa ada
Haviny a grand time at - -

CRICKET!

Deliciuus Sweet Biscuits for
LUNCHEON and TEA put
up ia convenient packages.
Assurted Sweet Biscuits by
Huatley & Palmer, Peek
Frean, Carr and Jacob,
Prices 10c.—26c.—48c.—-50e.
Per Pck.
Prices $1.20 fo $2.14 Per tin.
Jacob's Cream Crackers 6/-
Per tin.

*

-



—Also—
% Luscious Boxes of CONFEC-
% TIONERY small and large.
BLACK MAGIC CHOCO-
LATES $4.06 per box.
$ Peanuts 64c. Per tin,
Butter Scoteh 2l1c.
per tin,
Nougat 34c. and 70c, per tin,
Fry's Hazel Nuts 2/-, 3/9,

to 45c.

y 1/6 Box.
,; Cadbury's Red Rose 98c. &
‘ $1,80 Box,
x Cadbury's Chocolate Biscuits
‘ 5/- & 5/3 tin.
Chewing Gun 2c. & 6c, Pck.
asm, nner Mints 1/- per
c

Marr Bars 14c. ea,
Crest Bars 16c. ea.
Y Guava Cheese 18c, 4-02, Pck.
* Cadbury Bars (Asst.) 10c.,
17c., 19c., 34c., 37¢, ea.
Fry's Bars 7c., 9c., 12¢,, 1c.
Carr’s Choc, Lunch 12c, Pek.
Carr's Choc. Tea Cakes 8c.
each,
iy: Cheese Crisps $1.02
n.
gy Carr’s Club Cheese $1.00 tin.
A es Toffee 2/6 and 3/3
; n.
Y Blue Bird Toffee 1/9, 4/6, &
G $1.86 tin,
4 —Also—
Thermos Flask 1-Pint $1.51
, Sun fpaceer from 3/- to

Get them from, . .

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Street



66%)









X

PAGE. FIVE

acenspeemnsiniiasecuicamninnidnseniitcianaeema nn
SRR U4BKURaEPBESBeaesess

: ae
Stems Of Bananas e

FRESH SUPPLY OF a
i]
e
E |

PURINA HEN CHOW

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

at JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributors
SEBS BERBERS REER ESE BEER











}
1



-

PPP VAAL S
%

CHERRY
CREAMS

that’s TO-DAY’S
SPECIAL

Come in an enjoy this delightful






Ice Cream flavour.



KNIGHT'S
PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN

SOLO GOOEY



Lovely and
Comfortable





GIRDLES
BY
‘GOSSARD’

ery —

All Elastic with Reinforced Satin Lastex

Front and Back @ $14.52

Satin Lastex with Boned Front and Zipp @ $10.93

Silk Skin with Satin Front in Roll-on and

Pantie Styles @ 7.20

Also

All Elastic Roll-on CORSELETTES ......... @ $5.76

HARRISON'S

BROAD STREET DIAL 2352

—



FOR THE BEST

Q SeaetiFa
CA8t-Te-cLean © |
FLOOR COVERING |

‘SILVER STAR’ |
CONGOLEUM|

*





INSIST ON

SILVER STAR

SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES |



STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.
fake great
pleasure in
announcing
the opening
TODAY of

their



ae

“ €OCKADE = J
BAR and LOUNGE

on the first floor of their building

/
if in
CS BROAD STREET
Visitors — Residents — Welcome
a MO ee ae OD A a




PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951







Bre WISE...
-. - ADVERTISE

Gums Bleed!

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
Teeth mean that you bave Pyorrhea,
‘Trench Mouth or ao some bad disease
that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amesan stops gum
bleed! the first da:

Rupert and the Coughdrop—25 Rupert and the Coughdrop—226














sore mouth



f yarch he toy soldier fold may well ask,"’ chuckles the clown. , Amecar
A ~ ee ag | a a hee one of Santa Claus’s airships. Very quickly the strange craft looks like another cloud. In a tew tnd auexiy ueitens the teeth. irom clad
up the littie cra st If ever you see a little cloud travel- gathers speed and Rupert finds hum- minutes chey reach it and the toy | guarantee, Amosan must make your
others walling abour Rupert won- j',0° faster than the others you'll self rushing smoothly and steadily soldier works the lever so that they i z Baul wal ano oer aty” pach
dets if he can follow them. Very now that it is one of ? through the starlit sky, leaving all land gently on a mmott yond Leaning iH} = == Foret, Nek we Se trom your chemiâ„¢
gingerly he puts one foot out of the nor a real cloud at all, it will the little clouds behind. Ahead of over a parapet 1s the figure of Sams , Hh , today. Phe usr
basket and, to his surprise, he finds probably have ae of —— wel hip is a re. low — gets rae ae os —" ANT Amosan ant Ce
t oe e i ny ighter an ighter as he draws a } ; | HH
ee et aes Ye eae ee until he pe that it comes he murmurs. ‘‘Why have you er Pyor orrhea—Tre: : ach

; is>"’ 4, ee the starting lever. a e
ever is this?’ he gasps ju 8 fi 2 lovely castle built on what brought him?

Coughdrop—27 Rupert and the Coughdrop—28 THESE 2 CREAMS

AAAAAAAATLAALARALARA:

Rupert and the






Lovely Society women all over the
yet) ; FOLLOW THE BEAUTY
world follow this simple, inexpen- CARE OF Ss
LOVELIEST WOMEN
EVERYWHER

sive beauty care; one that is E





BEPEEEROES.

} See Us for the
} following -—

1 & 2)b. tin C. & E. Morton
Oatmeal

Pkg. Vita Wheat Biscuits

within the reach of everyone of ,
yout: Pe Pam AALAAEALIARERIRARY

This is what you do: every night, at bedtime, smooth Pond’s Cold
Cream over face and throat with your finger-tips. Remove the cream,














When they have all alighted Santa then the clown and the snufflehound Santa Claus leads the way at a resents haven't gone out yet."’ In



Claus gazes blankly at R _ arrived just as | was going to bed surprising speed for such an old nt of him Rupert sees the long, and with it every scrap of dirt and make-up. Then “rinse” with more Pkg. Weetabix Biscuits

rica tact easet” ae) veer bap, e_me come here. And do men, “Flow odd that it should be gloomy faces of the animale, Thets Cold Cream, for extra-cleansing, extra-softening. Very soon, your} Bots, Heinz Sandwich Spread
ae - ’ sents are late." so bright,” thinks Rupert. “ necks are swathed wit nkets, ee

mé?*’ he mutters. ** Do you know ae ~~ 7 py + et. ro Teast teem ihe vahe Line atiall and. thee epee ack “ness ait: skin will be vlearer, smoother, lovelier. Bots. Heinz Salad Cream

anythitg about eindeer?"’ “Reine the old man. And he leads him here.”” At length they turn into a ‘* That's the cause of the trouble,” FOUNDATION AND PROTECTION Tins Heinz Vegetable Salad

deer! No, why should 1?" says aie b a — oy : bridge az spemanent., ' | Taare.” Bes Sain cde oat sare they A By day, use a touch of Pond’s Vanishing Cream as a foundation. This in Mayonnaise

Rupert. “J get your note saying and chen n and down by many +’ these a al ! -greasy ri ts. C. & E. Morton Pickles

pers. 1 aye oe rng Shoat ; on enereen. Sara why the cae wot" ee non-greasy cream will hold your powder matt for hours, and protect ps thee

your complexion from sun and wind.

Tins Breakfast Rolls

2%. bots. C. & P. Table Salt

Bots. Cocktail Cherries

1 Ib. tin Asstd. Sweet
Biscuits

oF a
Start now to win the loveliness

POND’S that can be yours’ when you use
Pond’s Creams. You'll find the

‘Rupert and the

Coughdrop—30
1 2.4 J o rid f






































| Vanishing Cream distinctive opal-white jars at all INCE & Co., Ltd.
Cold Cream the best beauty counters. 6, 2, 8 & 9 Roebuck Street,
Oe ; eA yy ae et es (ee , ==
RAPS) PE Soest | |y Faget’ ie | || Fae Uh a * | mM CAN EPILEPSY BE CURED?
\ | {+ } ? I » ;
re : ‘ uv Sae as . = Tod ean ie v7. _ - reant has been found that relieves at-
en tee aa ck as eT A A ae Gane et eae ert ‘ ime began it has attacked rich tacks in most cases. This remarkable
pene ina ree Sanra | been mage. You'd Capua pe home Avan ever. “I can’t send or cea ie Ia realy cclhee $ aie tenes 4 | } Sere hale cee a“ Secular 2 titled Gar +
ai demendendy ona pis @ seni. at a pity.” S murs t . 1 t 2. Pe See a . s ? ; iN yron were vic- ooklet entitied “Can Epilepsy be
parcels. he clown and the wooden into. the corridor and calls a tay = ” a ee, ° certain iaase we ee ee ° athnng : ‘i : . aah ith 9 tims. Epilepsy has always interested Cured?” This booklet is given ames tres
dog are already there, “If you soldier, but at that moment the that you are wanted,” he says. it's coughdrop.”” He takes it 20: : - ‘PATENT: BARLEY Re p i men of science and at last their efforts to epileptics. Anyone suffering from
want to cure your reindeer you snuffle-hound leaps into action and Are you sure that you're not of the paper, and hands «: ; 7 makes milk more digestible for bab ws v4 have been successful because a eet this disease should request a free copy.
wana doctor, you den's want mes’. prances around him again.” There's carrying, something thar could help old man, wha 2:08 « 5, “ ar F THE EDUCATIONAL DIVISION, Dept. A-2a0,” 880 Bergen Ave., Jersey City, NJ,U.S.A.
says Rupert. es, | can't see w something 5 us t once Ruger:’s eyes ligh yhile th ifie-hound ig on rie ted “ t | ee
you were brought,”” sighs the old stand," murters the clown, yp. Tm oniy marics ps ch ng Ga dace ne e2t 5 gett ‘PATE NT’ GROATS fi ' Ce Re ee See ee ee
. us HIME A siicdceedii css sa ciesis beiss ohgtass oapnabmoubedesakess Urvibenas ph banscvsn
é - ot Clean baby=~*, *Z. i me # clarity, pla ; ; !
mys . medher Wenge W PBDRERS 5. ccnch cavcnnedsbahdevitecd atersuecosaensteiatys i





nied . BS hae



y Heiry sbophic aE nnd ii dae sng randy ones ie oh MUIR a casas ae

Steen one oo a of

Coughdrop—31

= oS

Rupert and the

a

“









THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK ~—_—=&®T

e
WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,



the corner with a delighted snuffle- he says, ‘' From here we cat see

For some moments after Rupert





. Racing across a bridge the toy
ne Rnaod ever the views ot seg peed #4 BA DAY a, Seed clown Nesds Rupert to another everything that happens athe and Associations to make the compilation of information in
s silence. ta * in. tower.“ are we going this castle, We shail soon know if-——"’ -
Claus gives a start. ‘Of course, I follo Rupert, “Had we better way ?’” asks little locke breath Then he breaks off, for three dark THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
sec Mel mini” hecciles. “Rty SUPE No Be mon hes pani y,, ‘Santa Claus didn’t come creatures | suddenly appear from possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities;
little di jght sfter all. Hi aL Sie PORES eee ey here.” For answer the toy clown below and leap happily about in "
pies 08 Si wis al. Hate bay 0 ap aca we en: hueries him to a top room and then the sky. ‘*Look, the reindeer, the religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports,
’ a @ busties away mm ihe oper 5 i * .
With a rush he disappears round site direction. ? ae et aoe Suneone” erie all te ath radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed
' Ree a race ce ra below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:

THE EDITOR,
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street.

| FORM :
Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Etc. ...........ssssssessssssesenrsssnnsansees



COP eRO eee Ten eee eeeeeeeeeeeeeet Cet eOe REESE STORET OSES ESE EOESE SEEDS OOOOH ORES E DENT SEDER RES ORS ORTON IS EDELINVOR ENON SET ESS













i warches wah delight mee. chem. “All's well now," Silke Givhs lie Pees bok oe ke eee ee Council or Committee Membets..........scssssessseesvessscsncssnserssennsssssssenneante
‘ re ret deer prante abour ua the old man. “ That coug's the courtyard where he gives a sleigh while a to Senta ‘use
mi i My. 8 2 geod thing i rop cf yours wor! A like magic, shout and in a moment all is bustle everything from his list. Then the
h csoulléhound found you,” ba eas OP e ee ag gave 2 a cena Bring m smaller old gentleman blows a shrill whistle CORSO eS PESO Oe eR DOOR SOROEOOSOPESOD OES OESOOODODOREDSE ESE SER DEERE ERORONT ODER HEROS EOE SOERESERESE REDE D ES OEE EO CS TOO O RODD
cres the chown. ‘* You've dene rhe now th ees fhe rewderr, anc sleigh,’ he orders. ‘*The more and the reindeer tur d glid
' : ey're perfectly acl. Tt distant presents er turn and glide
tock e2 bach and find waoden dog who ha: j sed the first,” Av apecial Compare oben down towards him.“ Now, Rupert, TEOCIBUFOP.....0.ccsseecscessorencerersveoseens SHOCEOUGTY sscccesssssneassesssssvererecsenonedsseoeecece
its, & see how it hap party grins broadly. “ Now some Castle guards ron to dovhis biddings :. ee a, ar eae
penet i neve not gone far on, let's wzite no more time!” sorting and dra + %@ go home with me or on my
Belire they mee: him Ruttpig fe peph Sente Baas ee Oe ing and dragging out parcels and_ cloud aiship,"” he says Short historical account of the origin, functions and current





Coughdrop—35 Rupert and the Coug

Tre on 4 ert ay

hdrop—36

\=4





















C anned SLICED HAM by the Ib $1.56 per Ib

aS S CANNED HAMS 2 ib tins $2.91 each
> qm CANNED HAMS 23 ib tins $3.16 cach




it is high time






rt lat 1 where they can see the airship rest- Very scan the hirtle people have ike," ; yy Me s ; ae’
he went home and he asks to be ing on top of a big totee’ | den le. che light of the castle and are clown cheerfully. ves, fe CANNED HA Ss Bi ib tins $4.60 e hh
ae ee actor. wey po are 7 i starting on sailing Pe, ag night is the faster it goes. Now look at
Then yo ec go by thac their way. **Ign’s agoin. Befare anta Clays and this,"” + tb bs
cloud airship, says Santa coming with us?" a apert his reindeer streak pas: them and speaks Se ned vere es inne 8 s to 10 I tins at $1.21 per tb
It yeu came with me you'd peering over the edge. ‘' No, his disappear ahead. ‘‘I say.’ mur- size and stops. From under a fold
yep gute. work HW mae wo a. a **ten't ies cloud the toy soldier produces the crane
ye to the old gentle- says the clown. “ must have rs very small? Shall and th
sas the clown to a rest.” 5x ae we f § tye can make it rare ier ictal ae wee are







Owing to delay caused by irregular shipping services the | are delicious



er

. {| ———
“Advocate” regrets that it has been compelled to curtail its ALLEYNE ARTHUR

daily cartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all avail- & CO. LTD

able strips as they arrive will be appearing in this space. | “YOUR GROCERS”

oo |
ped CANNED
I DURING LENT FISH
MACKEREL — 1 Ib. tin at ......... 600005. 86e.
PILCHARDS — 1 Ib. tin at .............. 38e.

PILCHARDS — 4 Ib. tin at .............. 2l1c.

BRUNSWICK CANADIAN SARDINES —
per tin 16e.



emer







hal ix
i
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951



CLASSIFIED ADS.) Aarbour Log





TELEPHONE 2508
The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow- FOR RENT

ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and |
3 cents per word on week-days and



96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a

4 cents per word on Sundays for each word Sundays.
additional word.
For Births, Marriage or Engagement HOUSES

announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for esch
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508

_—_—
BELLA VISTA: Cattlewash, — Com-
fortably furnished. Three bedrooms,
twin beds, Large electric refrigerator













between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death) jignt, power plugs, runn’ water
Notices only after 4 p.m. throughout, Garage. sarvente rooms.
Steck House. Mrs. Chandler. ‘Todds,
DIED 95211. 25.2.51e3n.

ve —_——_—_—————— men
:W_On March Ist 1951 at his resi-] _HOUSE—Modern three bedroom House,
eee enty’s Ville Fontabelle} situated at Top Rock, having large
FREDERICK ADOLFUS CAREW/| Lounge, seperate Dining Room, 2 Pully-

(Merchant). Funeral leaves the above
residence at 4.15 p.m. today for the
Westbury Cemetery. Friends are in-
vited.

tied Toilets and Baths, and all other
conveniences available unfurnished from
March ist on, 3, 6, or 12 months least.
Ring 4683 or 2328. 28,2.51-—4n

Hugh and Gilbert (sons), Maybelle ee
= (sister). MARINE GARDENS—New Bungalow.

3 bedrooms with running water, built in
wardrobes and all modern conveniences.

—
SMALL—On March

1951,



at the

“4 Long Lease preferred. Apply — Mrs.
General Hospital, Mrs. Hilda Small. =
Her funeral leaves Chelsea Road, St. Friedman, Hotel Royal. 1.3.51—4n

Michael at 4.00 p.m. to-day for the

Chapman Street Church of God and

thence to the Westbury Cemetery.
Wilfred Small (widower), McDonald
Morris (brother), Miriam Morris
(aunt), Barbara Breberton ‘adopted
daughter). 2.3.51—In,.

FOR SALE

eee
PLEASANTON — Worthing main Rd.,
Enclosed Gallery, 3 bedrooms, drawing
and dining rooms, servant's room, gar-
ege and ail modern conveniences. Phone
2764. 25.2.51—2n.
—_——

To approved tenant. Furnished Ground
Floor Flat. Hotel area, Within stone's
throw lovely beach. Private telephone.

Gas Cooker. Reception, Dining and
Minimum charge week 172 cents and} 2 Bedrooms. 2 Galleries overlooking
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24/ gardens. Apply Box 250. 2.3.51—2n,

words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—One (1) Morris Minor’ Saloon
1950 model, under 3,000 miles. Owner
leaving Colony. Apply Thirkell 2371.

28.2.51—t.f.n.

WHITE COTTAGE FLAT
St. James.

Furnished or unfurnished. Good sea-
bsthing. Private beach. Appiy Mrs.
E.. M. Greenidge, White Cottage, St.
James.” 25.2.51-—4n.



————
CAR—One (1) 1950 Model Ford Anglia.

Can be seen at Courtesy Garage.
26.2.51—t.f.n.

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 om Sundays

AUCTION

—
AUSTIN 5-TONNER TRUCK 1946 MODEL
We are instructed by the Insurance



OO —_——
PICK-UP—One Dodge Pick-up in work-
ing order. Apply: S. E. Cole & Co., Ltd
Roebuck Street. 21.2.51—t.f.n.

5 VELOCETTE MOTOR CYCLE — in
good order. Price 3480.00. Apply W.
Rogers. Barber over J, N. Goddard, &





Sons, Broad St. 2,3.51—3n | Agents to sell this damaged vehicle by
Public Auction at the General Omnibus
ELECTRICAL Garagé, Nelson Street, at 2 p.m. on

Friday 9th March, 1951.
JOHN M. BLADON,
~ Auctioneer,
2.3.51—5n.

REAL ESTATE

OFFERS will be received by the
undersigned up to the 16th day of
March 1951, for the buildings known
as Calais (land not included) situated
fon Dover Coast, Christ Church. The
purchaser to demolish the buildings and
clear the land within thirty days from
‘the date of purchase,

K. E, McKENZIE,
Neils Plantation, St. Michael.

HORSES — Three (3) Riding Horses. StS l—00,

Herbert Dowding, Lower Estate, St. i

prea NSE ES AL a
Michael.
oo 28.2.51—3n.

MODERN BUNGALOW — Overlooking
———
TWO HORSES, HARNESS and one (1)

RADIOGRAM—One seven Valve H.M.V, j
in A-1 condition on show at DaCosta
& Co., Ltd. Electrical Department. No
reasonable offer refused.

. 1.2.51—4n

LIVESTOCK

CALF—One (1) Pure Bred Holestine
Bull Calf, out of Prince Albert. Age
ene month old, Dial 3527.

28.2.51—t.f.n,

—
GOAT—With, Kid 3 weeks old, giving
eight pints of milk, Phone 4172.
2.3.51—3n,



Golf Course, 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining | Rooms, Gallery, Garage and



: heap. Apply: 8. E. Cole | Spacious games room underneath. Apply:
Shee. Fae Seri direes Gordon Nicholls. ‘Telephone 8539.

21.2.51—t.f.n. 24.2.51t.f.n.

BEMERSYDE, St, Lawrence Gap, Christ

MISCELLANEOUS Church, near the Cable Station. The

dwellinghouse comprises large drawing
and dining rooms, three bedrooms, with
running water in each (one with a private
beth) separate toilet and bath, and
kitchen. Open verandahs to the East
end the North and a closed verandah
to the South on the seaside. Three
servant's rooms, garage and ferneny in
the. yard, which also contains . several
cocoanut and fruit trees.

The property is situated on the most
popular coast in the Island with perfect
sea-bathing.

For appointments to view and for

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1,51—t.f.n.



CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and
draperies. By Kirsch, Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.0
—$—$—$—$—$—— er

DOORS—Several pairs of pitch pine
doors, suitable for Garage or Warehouse

with large hinges. To be seen at) further particulars ring 3925, R. S.
Willdale, Marine Gardens. I. M. G./ Nicholls & Co., Solicitors,
Simpson, 1,3.51—6n, 25,2.51—t.f.n.







GRANT’S SCOTCH WHISKY.—Served
at the Barbados Aquatic Club when
requested, and used by many discrim-
inating consumers. Sold by us per bottle
or per case. Mount Gay Distilleries Ltd,
Agents, 1,3.51-—2n.

————

MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin-
puished solution to your special
architectural problem of door closures,
screens, movable partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD,

The wecepieed will set up for sale at
their offi (9 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 2nd day of “March,
1951, at 2 p.m.

The dwellinghouse called “Murray
Lodge” with the land thereto containing
by estimation 9,200 sq. feet, situate at
Upper Bay Street, St. Michael, the resi-
dence of the late A. C, Greaves.

Inspection by appointment with Miss
Ida Greaves, Telephone No. 3060.

For further particulars and conditions

In Carlisle Bay



M.V. Sedgefield, Sch, Marea Henrietta,

bow M. Sch. W. L. Eunicia,
Harriet Whittaker,
Sch. Emanuel C. Gordon, Sch. Rosaren>,
Sch. United Pilgrim S.. Sch. Anita H.,
Yacht Caribbee, Sch. Burma D., Sch
Henry D. Wallace, MV. "Cacique del
Ccribe, Sch. Lady Noeleen, Sch. Lau-
dalpha, Sch. Enterprise S.. M.V. Lady
Joy.

Sen

ARRIVALS

Oil Tanker Inverrosa, 2,372 tons net
Capt. Shaw, from Caripito.

M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons
net, Capt. Clarke, from Halifax

SS. Golfito, 4,505 tons
Sapsworth, from Trinidad,

S.S. Colombie, 17,554 tons net, Capt.
Kerharo, from Le Havre.

DEPARTURES

Schooner Mary M. » 69 tons net
Capt. Marshall, for British Guiana.

Schooner Lindsyd If, 36 tons net, Capt
Barnes, for Martinique.

Schooner Island Star, 37 tons
Capt. Joseph, from British Guiana.

M.V. Cacique del Caribe, 162 tons net,
Capt. Archibald, for St. Vincent.

S.S. Colombie, 17,554 tons net, Capt.
Kerharo, for Trinidad.

S.S. Golfito, 4,505 tons
Sapsworth, for England.

M.V. Canadian Challenger, 3,935 tons
ret, Capt. Clarke, for St. Vincent.

Ships In Touch “With

net, Capt.

net,

net, Capt.

Barbados Coast Station | ‘rrooping

CABLE AND WIRELESS (W.1.) Lid.
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
rae Coast Station:—

.S. Imperial Quebec, S.S. Brasil, S.S.
Petter, S.S. Delnorte, M.S. Caribe. SS.
Scatalina, S.S. Thelidomus, S.S. Celijo,
S.S. Colombie, S.S. Geirulv, S.S. Maure-
tenia, S.S. Eika, S.S. Esso France, 8.5.
Winsum, S.S. Tuscanstar, $.S, Esso
Readini, S.S. Ancylus, S.S, Limburg, S.S.
Argentine, S.S. Brazil, SS... Nieuw
Amsterdam, S.S. Frontenac, S.S. Canadian
Challenger. S.S. Kim, 8S.S. Degrasse, S.S,
Loke Kootenam, S.S. Arania, S.S. Queen
of Bermuda, S.S. Ciudad de Sevilla, S.S,
Ines, S.S, Askivinis, S.S. Alcoa Clipper,
8.8. Trocas, S.S. Golfito, S.S. Sunprincs,
S.S. Fufina, S.S. Paraguay, S.S. Hauk-
efjell, S.S. Frontenac, S.S. Washington

LOST







—
A WALLET—Containing one Turf Chub

Sweepstake Ticket, Series A.A. No,
9858, and 2 Receipts. Finder please re-

turn same to Harold Harding C/o B’dos

Advocate. Reward. 2.3.51—1n

_ ee
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET -- Series A.A.
OF14. Finder please return same :o
Eleanor Devonish, Richmond Gap, Hoad
Land. 2.3.51—1n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

TRANSFER & REMOVAL
The application of George Handel Hall



ef Enterprise, Christ Church purchaser
ef Liquor License No. 893 of 1951 grant-
ed to Sylford Scantlebury in respect of
a board and shingled shop at Hindsbury
Road near Eastmond Corner for permis-
sion to remove the said license to the
Ground floor of a two storey wall and
Wooden building
Church within Distriet “B” and to use
the said license at such last described
premises,

at Oistins, Christ

Dated this 28th day of February, 1951.

To:—C. W. RUDDER, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
District “B”,
G, HANDEL HALL,

Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consid-

ered at a Licensing Court to be held
on Wednesday 14th day of March, 1951

fo o'clock a.m. at Police Courts Dist.

'€..W, RUDDER,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “B”
2.3.51—1n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Horatio Greenidge

of Black Rock, St, Michael, for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at a
wall building at Black Rock, St. Michael,

Dated this 28th day of February, 1951.

To:—E, A, McLEOD, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
District “A'.
H. GREENIDGE,
Â¥ _ Applicant
N.B.—This application Will be consi.-

ered at a Licensing Court to be held

at Police Court, District “A” on
Monday the 12th day of March, 1951 at
11 o'clock, a.m,

BE. A, MeLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
2.3.51—1n



a ee

VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirseh Sun-aire
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to
your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD. 13,2.51—t.f.n.

—_——

Why not give your floor that new look.
Have them Sanded by the NU FLOOR
METHOD, Call Evelyn Roach & Co.
Ltd. 4623. 27.2.51—t.f.n.

—————$—$_$_$__$_$_$_$_$_
WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower-
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.
We cut to your requirements. G, W.
HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd. Dial 4222.

(

15.2.51—10n, | 2nd March 1951,

——_

YACHT “CYCLONE"”-—Uffa Fox's In-
ternational one-design ‘Tornado Class.
In first elass racing trim. Winner of
the 3 Trial Races. Price $720.00. H.
JASON JONES & CO,, LTD, PHONE
4279. 27,2.51—6n,

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents ong and $1.80 on Sundays.
— over etic emma
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a | LONDON

96 cents Sundays 24 words
word Sundays.





HELP

Young Lady with knowledge of type-
writing and Shorthand, Preferably one
with some previous experience in
Commission Office work.

Apply in writing to :
JAMES A. LYNCH & Co., Ltd.,

P.O.B. 140.
Bridgetown.
28.2.51— T.F.N,

MISCELLANEOUS

——
A COLLECTOR, Wants to buy Antique
Pistols, Box “C". C/o PAVOT AES 6

.

cee ee ena ah i
IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-

lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.

Phone 4429 nF sul ME ooeeesterers ad-
ini Royal Yac ub.

ee 20.2.51.—T.F.N,

——$—_—————_—$——————

IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-

lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniaturer jade,

Ola B we Dal iso GO. ES,
E a be

ABN Fee 20.2.51.—t.f,n.

nt
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

TRANSFER & REMOVAL

The application of Linley Johnson of | the 2ist March.

Pie Corner, St. Lucy the purchaser of

Liquor License No. 363 of 1951 granted cept the lowest Tender.

in respect of front part of a board and
shingle house at Pie Corner, St. Lucy,
19 remove said License to front part of
a board and shingle house at Pie Corner,
St. Lucy “(about 20 ft. from original)
premises) and to use it at such last de-
scribed premises,

Dated this 26th der of February 1931.
To:—SYDNEY H. NURSE, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
District “E". * Z
LINLEY JOHNSON, *

Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held
on 12th March 1951 at 11 o'clock a.m.

at Police Court, District “E".

SYDNEY H.

Police Magistrate, Dist. “E’,
2.3.51—1n.

sisi ili nedeaeniomcentoae spate
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of James Barrow of
Bush Hall, St. Michael, for permission
to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at a
board and shingle shop with shedroof
attached at Alleyne's Tenantny, Bush
Hall, St. Michael,

Dated this 27th day of February 1951.
To:—E. A. MeLEOD, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
JAMES BARROW,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held} February 1951, so far as concerns. the

at Police Court, District “A - un
Friday the 8th day of March, 1951 at
ll o'clock, a.m.

E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.

2.3.51—i1n

of sale, apply to :—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
20.2.51.—10n.

—

SHARES—500 Shares Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading Co. Limited.. 500 Shares
Barbados Co-operative Cotton Factory
Limited. 120 Shares Barbados Fire
Insurance Co, Limited, 90 Shares Bar-
bados Foundry Limited. 61 Shares
Barbados Ice Co. Limited. 139 Shares
Knights Limite¢. 122 Shares Barbados
Telephone Co, Limited.

The above shares will be offered to
public competition on Friday next the
at 2 p.m, at the office
of the undersigned.

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
Lueas Street. |,
24.2.51—6n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days



in 1951.





CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
EXAMINATIONS

Entries for the Summer Examinations, !
1951, of the London Chamber of Com-
merce must reach the Department of
Education, The Garrison, not later than
12 noon on Saturday, the 17th March,
195!.

2. The entry fee will be as follows:—
Single Subjects $1.92 each
Foreign Languages $3.12 each
Full Certificate $10.00

Department of Education.
28.2.51—3n.

(2)

etc.



Y. M. C. A.

TENDER FOR ERECTION OF
BUILDING

The Board of Directors of the Y.M.C.A.
invites Application for Tenders for the
erection of a building at Headquarters,
Pinfold Street.

The Plans and Specifications can be

at. the Secretany’s Office
Y.M.C.A, from Thursday 1st March to
Wednesday Mth March between the
hours of 10 a.m, and 4 p.m. daily except
Sundays.

Tenders must be submitted m Sealed
Envelopes and addressed to the Secre-
tary of the Y.M.C.A., Pinfold Street not
later than Noon 21st March,

Tenders submitted will be opened at a
Board Meeting to be held at 4.30 p.m. on

The Board does not bind itself to ac-
RT H. WILLIAMS,

Secretary.
28,2.51—8n







NOTICE

THE PARISH OF ST. PETER
All persons owing the above parish

ony Parochial Taxes; please pay im- i
mediately.
G. &. CORBIN,
Parochial Treasurer,
1.3.51—4n
—_—_—
NOTICE

GIRLS INDUSTRIAL . UNION
ANNUAL FETE
(Advertisements) at Queen's Park on
Thursday 24th May (Empire Day), 1951,
3 p.m, to # p.m .
Buy a ticket ae lueky number,

(General Secretary), G..U. “}
28. 2.51—2n,









NOTICE is hereby given that the
partnership heretofore subsisting be
tween ARTHUR JAMES DOORLY and
ALFRED ALEXANDER MACKIE carry-
ing on business as Garage Proprietors
at Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, under
the style or firm of Supreme MOTOR
COMPANY, has been dissolved by
mutual consent as from the 28th.day of

seid Alfred Alexander Mackie, who has
retired from the said firm.
Dated the 23rd day of February 1961
A. J. DOORLY.
A. A. MACKIE.
1.3.51—Sn[

| Sen: Wonderful Counsellor, Sch. Rain-

Minimum charge week 72 cents and! Sch. Turtle Dove,

or

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



French Troops Get

American Citation

TOKYO, March 1.

General Ridgway, 8th Army
Commander in Korea, awarded a
United States presidential cita-
ten today to “the French
battalion which made_a_ stand
with American troops in beseigee
Chivyeng a few-weeks ago.

The battalion of fewer than
1,000 men fought at bayonet
point in swirling fog and “helped
ereatly” in putting owt of action
an entire Chinese division.

The citation spoke of the
battalion’s “extraordinary hero-
ism, aggressiveness and esprit de
corps on the central front.

—Reuter.



FILM SHOWS

I.ve_ films. will be shown
it the monthly reunion of the
Cenbermere School Old _ Boys’

Association to-night at 8 o'clock.
‘Yhere are British News, Journey
by a London Bus, Sprinting and
iLurdling, Robinson Charlie and
of the Colour.





Calls For Change
At Foreign Office

LONDON, March 1.

Lord Templewood, added his
voice in the House of Lords to-
day to those calling for a change
at the Foreign Office. As Sir
Samuel Hoare, he was Foreign
Secretary in 1935,

He said there was no post in
the Government where it was
more necessary to have a Minis—
ter sitting day after day, often
night after night in his office.

“It is unfortunate at this
moment of crisis to have a For-
eign Secretary who is a_ sick
man”, he concluded,

—Reuter.

MACK FOR B. AIRES

: LONDON, March 1 ..
Sir Henri Mack, British Ambas-
saqor designate to Argentina, will
seil for Buenos Aires aboard the
Andes on March 10, it was learn-
ed here to-day.

Sir Henri
hopes the new Anglo-Argentine
iegotiations on meat prices about
tc begin in Buenos Aires would
have a satisfactory settlement by
the time he arrived .—Reuter,



THE WHOLE TOWN’

7 CHEMICOâ„¢

S TALKING ABOUT



HOUSEHOLD CLEANSER

“PENNY

TRY IT TODAY— Here's a

prove how easily an
CHEMICO on a dull pen
leams. S-M-O-O-T-H

paintwork, etc., with equal

Distributors
Evelyn Roach & Co., Ltd.

uick way to

efficiently
CHEMICO cleans metal. Dab a little
ny, rub brisk-
ly, and see how brilliantly the coin
ste CHEMI-
O cleans porcelain, tiles, glass, lino,
ease.

TEST”



tHE COUNTY CHEMICAL CO. LTD., SHIRLEY, BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND



LOOK YOUR BEST


































Your hair will be
handsomer by far
when you treat it tu
‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic,
Just use a few drops
@ day.., then see
the difference!

Buy a bottle today!

Vaseline:

TRADE MARK
VASELINE is the registered trade mark
ef the Chesebrough

Mie. Con. Cone'd

- YEAR BOOK 1951



The Advocate Co: Ltd, will publish a Year Book of Barbados

The Year Book will contain three parts:--

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover,

|
Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

this information solicited should be sent in immediately or not
jater than March 15th 1951.

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,

Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Yecr Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisc-
tions immediately or not later than March 15th 1951.

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,

34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951.

Advertisers are asked to get in touch with
Mr. Trevor Gale,

Advertising Manager,

Barbados Advocate, |
34 Broad Street. |

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be |
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

(AN ADVOCATE .PUBLICATION)

ut



said to-day that he

mes





\
4 PLP ESOPPS SSS PSPS SOD “%
x xg
% NOTICE >









Coffee Smugglers

TRIESTE, March !

Police wooped to-day on a)
business community of the free,
port of Trieste, arresting nine well)
known merchants, two policemen
and a civilian
United States on charges of smug-
gling coffee. Police headquarters
said five merchants for whom
arrest warrants had been issued
escaped from the small Adriatic
free territory,

Police alleged the struggling
ring Had earned at least 18 million
lire in the last 12 months by smug-
gling coffee from the free port into
the city of Trieste. They added
that two policemen arrested —
one Austrian and the other Yug.-
slav—were acting as lorry drivers,

—Reuter,



Rates Of Exchange

MARCH 1, 1951



CANADA
oe Cheques on ....... a
* Bankers 63 1/10% pr,
Demand Ws tease ches ahs
Drafts 62.95% pr.

Sight Drafts 62 8/10% pr.
Cable
Currency 61 6/10% pr

60 6/10% Vr,








63
Coupons
Silver







is PURE,
SAFE MILK

\

—

in Proference the World Over

1900 Herden Co, Taternat'l Copr, Reserved

} 1M
‘ret
{ a

PUBLIC MEETING

There will be a Public Meeting
held under the auspices of



THE BARBADOS LABOUR
PARTY
and the
BARBADOS WORKERS’
UNION
at MILE & QUARTER, St, Peter
On FRIDAY, 2ND MARCH,

1951 at 8 P.M.

Speakers:—F. L. Walcott, M.C.P.

K. N. R. Husbands,

M.C.P.
F. E, Miller, M.C.P.
G. H. Adams, M.C.P.

ORIENTAL

GIFTS!
THANTS

RACES
JOCKEY WHIPS

Whalebone Lined.
ges~ Only 3 Remaining.

NEWSAM & Co.

DIAL,
3466

NOTICE

The Women’s Self Help

Association

. Owing to the “MAURE-
TANIA” arriving on SAT-
URDAY, 8rd March, we will
be remaining open until
3.30 p.m.

LPP LLL

SSSs

SOB

~

i}
>
.



NOTICE

Owing to the arrival of
the Tourist ship to-morrow,
SATURDAY, 3rd March
our store will remain open
all day.

COLLINS LTD.



DANCING SCHOOL — NEW
> OLASSES

New classes are being formed
and Musical
and “KEEP
FIT" under the tuition of Miss
Joan Ransom, who hbolds the
Diploma of the Imperial Society
of Teachers of Dancing and 1s
a Licentiate of the Royal Academy
of Dancing, London, England

for Ballroom,
Comedy

Tap
Dancing

Applications for joining any of

the above or existing classes
Q should be submitted to Miss
% Ranvom at Greystone Flats, Hast-
X% ings, Ch. Ch. (Telephone No, 2390), %
% Miss Ransorn will be taking over
% the teaching of the existing class-
$ es in place of Miss Molly ¢
@ Radcliffe who has decided to re- &
* tire from the Madame Bromova
% School of Dancing as from the %
~ end of the current term. 8
) Madame Bromova and the Hon- R
X% orary Committee thank clients for ¥%
% their past patronage and solicit \
% their continued support %
g The School is now in progress 9
g of being re-organised and will in R
x future be known as the Barbados % |
X% = School of Dancing Ltd R
% %
SLO OLE

|
|

employee of the| Madeira



SHIPPING

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO,





Sailing from Afmsterdam, Dover and

ss, “Cottica’ 2nd, 3rd, ot
February, 1951. M.S. “Bonaire” 9th
Wth. 16th Mareh 1951.

Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam—
ims. “Helena” 12th, 15th, February 1951
ms. “Willemstad” 98th, 15th, February
1951, m.s. “Oranjestad” Sth, 15th Marely
1951.

Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and
Georgetown—m.6 “Bonaire™. 27th Janu-
ary 1951; m.s, “Cottica” 20th, Pebruary
1951; ms. “Helena” 3rd Maré 1951.

a ng to Trinidad, La Guisga, Cura-

—m.s. “Oranjestad” ist Pebryary
t

Sailing to Plymouth, Antwern. Amster-
dam=m.s. “Oranjestad” 23rd Feb, 1961,
> PF. MUseUA, BUN & LL. le.
Agents

~





The M’V ‘CACIQUE Del CARIBE’
will accept. Cargo. and Passengers
for St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
anc Aruba, Sailing Wednesday
28th February 1951.

The M/V “CARIBBEE” wilt
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis. and St, Kitts. Sailing Friday
9th March 1951. ;

The M/V “DAERWOOD” will
asecept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba, and ,
Passengers only for St. Vincent

Sailing date to be notified,
BW. SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION INC,
1} Yel, 4047,
'



ee ee



PAGE SEVEN

NOTICES



4



w

FRENCH LINE

~ Mie Gle Transatiantique

SAILINGS TO
ENGLAND & FRANCE
COLOMBIE: March 14th
Via. Martininque and
Guadeloupe

GASCOGNE: Marci 31° || *
via St. Lucia, Martinique,
Guadeloupe, Antigua

SOUTHBOUND —
COLOMBIE: March ist
Trinidad, La Guiara,
Curacao, Cartegena,
Jamaica
Accepting Cargo, Mail
Passengers eek ey

R. M. JONES & Co., Lid.

AGENTS
Phone 3814



a te

Canadian National Steamships

UND
sientreal pon Bost Pardes Rarbac
on! elifax joston jos rbados
SCAN. CHALLENGER" = 21 Feb. _ 1 Mar 1 Mar. â„¢
“LADY RODNBY’ — 3 Mar 5 Mar. 14 Mar. 15 Mar,
LADY NELSON” - 19 Mar. 21 Mar. 30 Mar. 31 Mar.
“CAN. CHALLENGER” - 2 Apr - 12 Apr. 12 Apr,
LADY RODNEY” _ 16 Apr. 18 Apr 2? Apr 27 Apr
NORTHBOUND Arrives Gaile Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax
“LADY NELSON” 23 Feb, 1 Mar, 9 Mar, 10 Mar -
SLADY RODNEY" 27 Mar, 28 Mar, 6 Apr. 7 Apr. a
*LADY NELSON” 12 Apr, 14 Apr. 23 Apr. a 24 Apr.
LADY RODNEY" 10 May. 12 May. 21 May. ae 22 May.

N.B,—Subject to change without notice.
bers.

All vemels fitted with cold storage cham.
Passenger Fares and freight 1ates on application to :— ’



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD.

> ——————— ee

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited; Roseau, Dominia., for sail.

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam, Single fare £170; usual reductions for childrenr




COOPER SPLIT ROLLER BEARINGS



~ homes

|



“Split” Feature enables dismantling and re-assembling to be
effected with ease, speed and economy,

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER

HEAD

LANE,





REAL ESTATE
Ye



Plantation’s Building






Any Part Of

BARBADOS

Our Services are at your Disposal

JOHN M. BLADON

AFS,, F.V.A.

Phone 4640

The Home Furnishing Department

of

i William Fogarty Limited.

Announces its

EASTER PARADE OF VALUES
FOR THE FAMILY

WHITE LACE BEDSPREAD (72 x 90) @ $36.00 each

WHITE LACE TABLE ear
— (54 x

LACE TABLE CLOTHS...
LACE TABLE CLOTHS...
LINEN GLASS. TOWELS @ 79¢. and 95c. each
GLASS TOWELS @ 50c, 63c. and 70c. each

—@ $2.02 and $2.22

54) @ $20.00 each
72) @ $ 6.89 each

50) @ $ 4.35 each

(58 x
(48 x

per.yd,

—@ $3.04 per yd.

48 inch FLORAL TAPESTRY @ $3.66 and $4.01 per yd.
48 ,. STRIPED TAPESTRY @ 2.16 per yd.

31 ,, SANDERSON CRETONNE

cf} On. ' SANDERSON LINEN CRETONNE

46,

FOLKWEAVE CRETONNE @ $1.71 per-y¥d.

WM. FOGARTY LTD.





eee

THE HOUSE OF HOUSEHOLD LINENS




|



PAGE &£IGHT





SIXTY



©

D. ATKINSON driving Butler to the on-boundary to reach 60.

Walcott Shoulders Barbados Batting

@ From Page 1

It took Barbados two overs and
three balls to polish off the tw
remaining Trinidad wickets.

Six runs had been added to the
overnight score of 488 for 8 whe:
Norman Marshall with a we
flighted one outside the off stum >
tempted Butler into playing for
ward straight down the wicket.
The ball took the edge of the bat
and his brother Roy Marshall
took a simple catch at second
slip to dismiss him.

King joined Ferguson who was
now 90 but the latter was out in
making a really wild cross stroke
at a perfectly straight good length
ball from Millington. He had been
at the wicket for 214 minutes and
had hit thirteen fours.

The Trinidad innings had now
closed after lasting 610 minutes
for 494 runs.

B’dos Innings Opens

Roy Marshall and Conrad Hunte
opened the Barbados innings at
11.60--and Lennox Butler, who



CLYDE WALCOTT
—with a classic knock for 126
not out saved the day.

has replaced Prior Jones in the
Trinidad team for the second
Test, opened the bowling to Roy
Marshail.

He bowled some deep inswing—
ers with the first three balls and
straightened the fourth out a bit.
Marshal] got well over it and off
drove it for four runs,

King bowled from the screen
end and Hunte twice cover drove
him with great power but Sam-—
path brought off some excellent
pieces of ground fielding.

He however got off the mark
with a gentle push past point for
a single. But later Marshall got
another boundary, He made the
neatest of glides off an inswinger
from Butler to the fine leg bound-
ary for four runs,

The rate of scoring was steady
but not quick. The first half hour

of play produced 21 runs and
Asgarali replaced King at the
screen end.

He started on the spot at once
and-sent down a maiden over ts

Marshall.
Hunte Out

Stollmeyer still persisted with
Butler from the pavilion end and
the latter nearly claimed Hunte’s
wicket. He beat him with a low
inswinger and struck him on the
pad. Umpire Jordan disallowed
a Stentorian appeal for lbw

Ferguson relieved Asgarali at
the screen end and sent down a
maiden over of impeccable length
to Hunte, but the latter was play—
ing to Ferguson with more con-
fidence than he displayed against
him in the first Test.

Hunte was out however next
over. A single off Butler by Roy
Marshall next over sent up Hunte
to face, He too hit across a well
pitehed ball on his wicket, missed
and was bowled.

Barbados had lost their first
wicket for 30 runs in 55 minutes.
Hunte’s score of 11 included one
four and he had been at the wicket
for 55 minutes as well,

Ferguson Bowls Weekes

_ Weekes, promoted in the bat-
ting order was next man in instead
of Clyde Walcott. He took some—
time having a look at the bowling
before he scored. ;

Marshall got into the twenties
after ha’;ing been an hour at the
wicket Viith a



c powerful cover
drive off Ferguson for 4 runs

He repeated this stroke
off the next ball for another
boundary and _ forced Fer

gusch to remove a silly cover}
poiht and send him back, also

the on-side of the wicket to the

bringing over another man fron
off-side.
}

This did not hamper Marshall]
and= twa balls later he jumped!
into another Ferruson delivery and

that too hit the lor
for four.

That over hz Ferguson
twelve runs in b: We i

ft dary
off da

faced twenty-three balls before
he opened his score with a bound—
ary off Ferguson for four runs.

Ferguson had his revenge,
Weekes soon after droVe hard to
Tang Choon fielding very near the
bat in the off-side trap and Tang
Choon failed to hold the ball in
this almost suicidal position,

Next ball however Weekes got
back on his wicket, apparently
looking for a break from Ferguson
the ball kept straight and took his
wicket.

Barbados had lost the second
wicket, that of Weekes for 4 runs
and the score was 49 made in 70
minutes,

Play was now stopped for lunch.

Marshall Caught

Clyde Walcott who partnered
Roy Marshall ‘©n resumption
pushed Ferguson past mid-on for
a single to send up 50 in 70 min-
utes. King bowled first from the
pavilion end and bowled inswing-
ers to a leg trap.

20y Marshall however pierced
the ring ef fieldsmen on the on-
side and drove out for four. Later
Clyde Walcott hoosked a bumper
to the pull boundary for another
flour.

Walcott got another boundary
with another hopk to deep square
leg for four off another bumper
from King.

King was bowling at increased
pace in the after lunch spell and
he was only being punished when
he bowled bouncers,

Roy Marsall twice late cut Fer-
guson for four to make his score
49 and then off drove for a single
to complete his individual half
century in 105 minutes. He had
now hit nine fours and five of
these off Ferguson.

Three runs later Marshall nib-
bled at an outswinger from King
and Stollmeyer, the only slip on
the off-side held a simple catch
to dismiss him. Marshall had been
at the wicket for 110 minutes and
had played attractive cricket.

Walcott Struck

Charlie Taylhbr now joined
Walcott. The latter with beautiful
wristwork drove one from King
Square of the wicket for four runs,
then neatly turned him off the
pads to deep fine leg for a single
to enter the twenties.

Walcott stepped put of his
erease and took the second de-
livery of Ferguson’s tenth eon-
secutive over at full toss and on-
dijove for another boundary

Charlie Taylor hooked one of
King’s bouncers high to deep
square leg for a single to send up
100 in 125 minutes. The second
fifty had come in 53 minutes as
compared with 72 minutes for the
first fifty.

Soon after this King struck
Walcott on the knee with an in-
swinger and the big fellow fell to
the ground in pain. The rest of
the Trinidad players crowded
around Walcott applying ice
while King squatting several
yards away ate ice himself.

Skipper Stollmeyer took King
off next pver and brought on
Skeete. Walcott took a single to
Square leg off the first ball, and
Taylor faced, He played back to
the fourth ball, missed, was struck
on’ the pad and umpire Jordan
ordered him out Lb.w. ®

Tayler had scored 6 during his
28-minute stay at the wicket.
Barbados had now lost 4 wickets
for 105 runs,

Atkinson In

Denis Atkinson was next man
in and he piayed out the over,

Walcott twice punished Fer-
guson for boundaries to enter the
forties. He back drove a shortish
one to the long-on boundary for
jour runs and then cover drove
for another four runs.

An uppish off drive by Walcott

ERNIE'S

Democratic Club

Here We are
AGAIN

there will be a meeting at
6 p.m, sharp!







THIS EVENING
to discuss the problems of the

‘ first day of the Spring Meeting



This Ys nota political meeting, ~
h after dinner speeches and
there will be a call over
on all races,
MENU
Hors d'oeuvyre—The Usual Turkey
d Ham-—J. N and Sans
Ifome made Sausages*Peach Melba
Purit French Mince Pies
owred and trained by. S. H, K
1 if not, why not? So what
What What

A et e eR EAB SRUET Ro ES REARS

but clear of the fieldsmen, gave
him another boundary in Skeete’s
next over and later, after Butler
had brought pff a brilliant save
off a power drive from Walcott



DENIS ATKINSON
—scored an enterprising 64
not out yesterday.

at extra cover, the latter com-
pleted fifty with another power-
ful one that beat Butler although
he fell, and reached the boundary,

Walcott had ‘now been batting
for an hour and a half and had
hit eight fours.

Denis Atkinson helped himself
to a lovely on drive for four off
Skeete. oe!

Walcott did a most sensible
thing in the circumstances, soor
after, He lifted Jackbir high ove,
the ring of fieldsmen to extra
cover for 4 to make the score 148
and his individual seore 59,

Denis Atkinson sent up 150 runs
in 176 minutes with a pull to the
on boundary off a short one from
Skeete. Next over he executed a
Similar stroke off Jackbir for four
runs and took a single; to com-
plete his individual 20 runs,

Walcott faced and anther
Sizzling cover drive left the six
off-side fieldsmen standing in
helpless admiration while the ball
sped to the boundary,

Tea time found the Barbados
total at 167 for the loss of 4
wickets, Walcott being 66 no
but and Atkinson 21 not out.

Stollmeyer opened his
on resumption with Butler from
the pavilion end and Ferguson
from the screen end. @Valcott off-
Grove the sixth ball of Butler’s
second over for four runs and got
into the seventies.

Atkinson sent up 180 on the
tins with a neat turn to the fing
leg boundary for four off Fer-
guson,

Skipper Stollmeyer requisition-
ed the new ball at 193 and Jackbir
bewled first from the pavilion
end. Each of the batsmen singled
of Jackbir during the over,

Next over from Butler, Atkin
son cover drove for four runs to
send up the double century in 226
minutes,

Atkinson celebrated this with a
drive square of the wicket fo
four runs off Jackbir next over,
Walcott took a four off Jackbir

attack

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

W.I. Rated Second



next over and made his score 96
and Atkinson also ondrive fo:
four.

When the score had reached 205
Atkinson and Walcott had put on
100 for the fifth wicket in 92 min-
utes,

Soon after this Clyde Walcott
at 99 vicious'y square cut a short
leg break from Skeete past back-
ward point to complete his cen-
tury in 178 minutes. He had hit
fourteen fours during his stay at
the wicket

Atkinson completed his individ
ual half century with an off drive
for four off Skeete. He had now
been batting for 114 minutes and
had hit seven fours.

A drive high over midoff for a
couple by Clyde Walcott sent up
250 in 258 minutes.

Six runs later this partnership
had added 150 runs in 118 min-
utes.

Close of play saw the Barbados
tqjal at 270 for the loss of four
wickets, Clyde Walcott being 126
not out and Denis Atkinson 64
not out.

Scores:—
TRINIDAD Ist INNINGS

J. Stolimever run out
A, Ganteaume c Weekes b

R. Marshall O8
N. Asgarali ¢ K. Walcott b Weekes 43
BR, Tang Choon b Mullins
R. Legall ¢ (wkpr.) Wood b

N. Marshall :
C. Skeete Lb,w. Millington
Cc. Sampath stp. (wkpr.) Wood b

Weekes ........ eieid
W. Ferguson b Millington Se . @
S. Jackbir ec R. Marshall b Weekes 26
L. Butler ¢ R, Marshall b

. 208

er

N. Marshall . inte.
F, King not out . +9
Extras: 14 bs., 4 Lbs., 3 n.bs. 21
Total -. 4947

Fall of wickets: 1 for 118, 2 for 231,
3 for 242, 4 for 259, 5 for 268, 6 for 290,
7 for 401, 8 for 456, 9 for 494.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO MOR. OW.
C. Mullins .......45 24 3 101 1
E. Millington 36.3 13 67 2
N. Marshall 35.3 10 89 2
D, Atkinson 16 6 38 0
R. Marshall 27 #1 66 1
E. Weekes oe 3 15 3
Cc. L. Walcott . 7 2 14 0
K. Walcott .... 6 0 23 9
BARBADOS ist INNINGS

R. Marshall ¢ Stollmeyer b King .. 52
C. Hunte b Butler .... nae ees
E, Weekes b Ferguson . teed +
Cc. Walcott not out .... . 126
A. M. Taylor b Skeete +e
D. Atkinson not out . + opted ae
Extras: 2 bs., 4 Lbs. 1 nb, . 7
Total (for 4 wkts.) 270

Fall of wickets: 1 for 30, 2 for 49,
3 for 89, 4 for 105.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M.





aw
L. Butler peso Be 2 44 1
N. Asgarali .....++ 3 2 ; 1 0
Ki BUS css sgcarss, 8 1 3t 1
W. Ferguson 18 3 16 1
Cc. Skeete 11 0 53 1
S. Jackbir 8 0 45 0
Cc Sampath 4 1 13 0
Umpires: Mr, S. C. Foster and Mr,
HH. B, Jordan.
+ “cK
WHAT'S ON
r , 7
ro-DAY
S.P.C.A. Tag Day ;
Art Exhibition Queen’s

Park 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Court of Appeal and Police
Courts 10 a.m.

Fourth Day of Second Game
of Trinidad-Barbados
Cricket Tournament 11.30
a.m,

Sale (Property: Bombay

Cottage) 2 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives Show
at Wiltshire Playfield, St.
Philip 7.30 p.m.

Police Band
Rocks) 8.30 p.m.
CINEMAS

“Farewell to Yesterday”
“The Fly's

-_—_-_oOoOoOoOoO

(Hastings

Empire :
Plaza (Bridgetown) :

Last Night" 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. »
Gaiety (The Garden): “Mr. Rex

and ‘The Knockout” 8.30 p.m.
Aquatic: “Out of the Past” 8.50
p.m,

nd





The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.16 a.m.
Sun sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (New): March 7,
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 10.59 p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington): Nil.
Temperature (Max.) 83.0 °F.
Temperature (Min.) 72.5 °F.
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.)

E.N.E., (3 p.m.) N.E.
Wind Velocity: 9 miles per
hour.
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.937,
(3 p.m.) 29.896,









FLOOR SHOW & DANCE

ee A ee

THE BARBADOS

(Local & Visitin

AQUATIC CLUB

g Members Only)

=— ON «

SATURDAY EVENI

NG, MARCH 3rd.

at 9 o'clock

JEFFREYS

TROUPE of

ARTISTES

Fea uring :

Miss CHRISTINE GORDON
“Miss Jeffrey's Beer 1951”
and
Trinidad’s Carnival Queen,
Mr. LANDY de MONTBRUN,
The “Bob Hope” of Trinidad.

Mr, CLYDE RIVERS,

—Scotch Tenor.
Miss JUNE MAINGOT,

—Pretty Girl

Dancer.

Mr. CLIFFORD CORBIN,
-——Banjo Player.

Mr, PETER PITTS,
—~Calypsonian

Miss DOROTHY de MONTBRUN,

—Lady-in-Wa
Miss DAISY CREQUE,
Mistress of

DANCING after

Admission to Ballroom

2.3.51.—2n.



iting to the Queen.

the Ivories as Accompanist.
FLOOR SHOW.
$1.00

Serre

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1951



Only To

Australia

South Africa Challenges

(By PETER DITTON)
AUSTRALIA and the West Indies have both beaten

England at cricket in the past twelve months.
has sustained fairly recent defeats at the hands of England
So if a four-cornered International table
were compiled on the basis of these results Australia would
be on top with the West ladies second and England and
South Africa third and fourth respectively.

and Australia.

The next twelve months will de-
cide whether or not these placings
are justified. The West Indies are
sending a team to Australia later
this year and they will battle for
the unofficial title of “World
Champion”. Similarly England
and South Africa will shortly be
attempting to decide who shall be
the unenviable holders of the
“Wooden Spoon”.

For that reasbn the announce-
ment of the names of the 15 play-
ers who will be representing South
Africa in England this summer as-
sumes an additional importance.
In both previous post-war en-
counters England have emerged
successful and this time South
Africa will be out for revenge,

Only Four

Since their last meeting in this
country in 1947, both teams have
made many changes. In fact, of
the 15 players selected by South
Africa for the forthcoming tour,
only four, Nourse (captain),
Mann, Fullerton and Athol Rowan
were here with Melville’s team of
four years ago. One other pfayer,
Eric Rowan, who missed the last
tour, was here with the 1935 team.

England too have made changes.
Norman Yardley who captained
England in 1947 and George Mann
who led the 1948-49 team to South
Africa have been succeeded by
F. R. Brown, W. J. Edrich, who
with Denis Compton had such a
successful season in 1947 and who
exceeded Hayward's record aggre-
gate of 3,518 runs has been passed
over by the England selectors as
have Laker of Surrey, Watkins of
Glamorgan, Gladwin of Derby-
shire and Young of Middlesex.

And what of Compton himself.
Physically he does not appear to
be suffering from the effects of his
injured knee, But mentally there
can be no doubt that Compton has
suffered ‘greatly, as witness his
Test Match aggregate so far of 31
in six innings. It remains t6 be
seen whether he can play himself
out of this bad patch and regain
the form which has made him one
of England's greatest batsmen.
Remembering his performances in
1947 when he nearly beat the
South Africans on his own, it will
be a great loss to England if he is
not available, for any reason, this
summer.

Weakness
England’s weaknesses in post-
war Tests have usually been
shown up by spin bowlers. This

South Africa

has certainly been the case in all
Tests in this country with the pos-
sible exception of the 1948 seri
against Australia. With the Sou
Africans in 1947 it was_N. F.
‘Tufty’ Mann and Athol Rowan;
with the West Indies it was Ram-
adhin and Valentine and with the
New Zealanders it was Tom Burtt.
And of course the Australians had
Ian Johnson and Bill Johnston to
take over after their pace men had
broken the back of the England
batting.

This South African side contains
both the spinners who did so well
on the previous tour and in addi-
tion it has been reinforced by
Clive Van Ryneveld, a leg-spinner
who promises to rank with the
really great, In the recently con-
cluded South African Test Trial
he captured fifteen wickets—nar-
rowly missing the honour of get-
ting all ten in one innings.

an Ryneveld will of course be
no stranger to this country. Dur-
ing the three years he was here at
Oxford University he was capped
for England at Rugby on a number
of occasions and in 1949 he was
selected to play in the Gentlemen
v. Players annual cricket match at
Lord’s.

An Opportunity

Now he has an outstanding op-
portunity of pulling off a very
rare ‘triple’. For in addition to
the English Rugby cap he already
possesses he is almost certain to
gain a South African Cricket cap
this summer, Then when the tour
is over he will i Feeley be
invited to stay on and participate
in the 1951-1952 Springbok Rugby
tour with the result that he will
most likely gain a Rugby cap
against this country as well.

It has been said that the batting
of this South Africa team is its
weakest point. The bowling is un-
doubtedly strong and the fielding
is reported to be brilliant. Per-
sonally I can see little wrong with
the batting either. In Dudley
Nourse, Eric Rowan, Jack Cheet-
ham and George Fullerton there
are four run-getters well up to
International standard while Me-
Glew and McLean are two young
batsmen from whom great things
are expected.

Throughout the side there is an \
effective blend of youth and ex-{
perience. Altogether it appears to
be by far the strongest South
African team since the war and I
for one would not be surprised
if England suffered her third suc-
cessive defeat in a series of Tests.

JANETTA DRES

UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad St. Phone
Lovely IMPORTED DRESSES from LONDON
TWIN SETS—NYLON LINGERIE—BATHING SUITS

sf

HOURS: MONDAYS to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30

Toenight

visit

CLUB MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night

Club from Miami to Rio

with a world-wide reputation for good food

Music, Dancing
Entertainment

throughout

the night

Dial 4000 for reservations
6

GET READY

FOR THE CRICKET





FLANNEL

P.C.§. MAFFEI & C0. LTD.

“Top Scorers

TOURNAMENT

Let us fit you now

with a

FINE

TROPICAL SUIT

BLAZER

AND

PANTS

in Tailoring”

REGAINS LADIES’
ENNIS TITLE

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 27.
Mrs. Kathleen Lioyd regained |
the Trinidad Ladies Singles Lawn |
Tennis Championships when she |
beat the title-holder, Miss Mildred
Cambridge, in a thrilling three-
Set match at Tranquillity, Port-
of-Spain. Mrs. Lioyd last won |
the Trinidad Title in 1948 when}
she defeated Mrs. Dolly Fisher. |
Mrs. Lloyd’s vietory came as a|
big surprise even to her most ‘ar-
dent supporters: Scores were
<6, 7—5, 6—4.

See us for - - -

——

| ge LUXURY.

ef tuticura Taleum Powder

: ) makes a deligh:fully

ay cooling and refreshing

finish to your beth, even
oa the hottest dey. Kee

the skin 48 soft as




BRC FABRIC
EXPANDED METAL
TEMPERED HARD BOARD
OIL STOVES & OVENS

Phone
4306

T. HERBERD Ltd.

Phone
4267

) & 11 Roebuck St., & Magazine Lane.





Note

Customers

As the TOURIST SHIP “Mauritania”
arriving here on SATURDAY NEXT, March 3rd, at
10.30 a.m., this Store will REMAIN OPEN until 4 p.m.
on that day.

PHONE 4267 FOR

Cupboards,

THESE ARE

THESE ARE

Nylon Chiffon

A lovely new lot of this
pretty material in White

Printed

Ferguson

Fabric

A really first class Fabric

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street

SURINAM PLYWOOD

Treated to resist Termites.

%” thick in sheets 4’ x 8’

4” thick in sheets 3’ x 7’
First class quality, ideal for Flush Doors,
and Panellings
Can be Polished, Varnished or Painted.

STANDARD HARDBOARD

¥” thick in sheets 4’ x 8’, 10’
3/16” thick in sheets 4’ x 8’



WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.

COMFORT.

STYLE.
DURABILITY.

SHOULD DEMAND OF
GOOD CLOTHES.

GET IN CLOTHES MADE BY

C. B. RICE & CO.

BOLTON LANE






Peach and Blue 36 ins.

wide





Per yard

$2.70





















36 ins. wide

Per yard

$1.65

will be

'

of all kinds,

WHAT YOU

WHAT YOU




PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1395 KillKAY MAKCF %  Bidault Invited To Form New French Govt. PARIS. MARCH 1 PRESIDENT VINCENT AURIOL to day asked Ex Premier G-eorgea Bidault to try to form a new Trench Government Bidault, popular Republican leader, told him he would consult leaders of the political parties and give him his reply to-morrow. If Bidault fails the President will then auk a Socialist to trv probably Paul Ramadier who \vai Premier in 1947. Should he also fail the Preside no doubt again turn to outgoing Premier Hene Pleven. It Is suggested that the nev. Government should gel ready to hold general eleetlona laie In M3> or early in June Pleven to-day refused lo attempt to form a new French Cabinet Pleven who looked tired nnd ill. told reporters so afler n 20 minutes' Interview with President Aunol, —Keuter. 4 I Ml ItY MHOKI Ike Flies To London LONDON. March I. General Eisenhower, Atlantic Pact Supreme Commander, flew here (ram Pans to-dny for Informal talk* with British Chiefs ol Stair He was living back to Paris tonight. The object of his visit m understood to be discussions on th formation of Commands tn northern and southern Europe to tab* the place of old regional gitsups. The Western Union area was also being discussed. British Chiefs of Staff were having lunch with Eisenhower. trftlah Chiefs of Stan* discussed with the Cabinet to-day the ground they would cover in their tulks with Gcncrnl Klaenhower. The Cabinet also talked again nbout the proposed appointment of an American Admiral as sui.rerno commander of the Atlantic Pact navies, which caused protests from Winston Churchill and many other members of Parliament. The Government will organise a full muster of its supporters in the Commons next Wednesday because Conservatives decided to force o vote on this question. —Dealer. U.S. Restrict Exports To Russia WASHINGTON. March. 1 The United States Commerce Department to-day placed control* on non-strategic American exports to Russia and Soviet bloc countries. Exports of strategic nature to these countries have been controlled fir ome time. To-day's order, effective to-morrow, requires exporters to obtain licences for such non-strateglc goods as sausage skins and certain type-. of machineryBooks, magazines, proc e ssed films and ships stores were exempted. Tin* order formally renewed controls on the exports of all types of goods to Communist China. Manchuria and North Korea. Gasperi's Cabinet Faces Major Revolt HOME. March I. Premier Alcide Da 0 sixth post-war Cabinet | erialg tonight with a major revnll against certain aspects of iti policy by the majority of tht Christian Democratic Party After a surprise defeat In the technical vote in the Chamber of Deputies last night the Q ment was able lo rally a majorit> of only 18 votes in a parliamentary vote to-day. Voting on the law to increase the Government's economic poor* era a large section of 305 Christian Democratic deputies in n Chamber of 574 members, voted with Communists and extreme MtWlnf Socialists against Government It was thought possible that De Oasperi would resign to-night, mmedlately after the vof lie Oasperi called a meeting of Ministers, it was understood 'ha: several ministers favoured immediate resignation in order to face the revolting Christian Democrat'; with their frit ics. They thought that the Democrats were so split among them%  Ives that they were unable to prevent the formation of ;i Mm cabinet on lines similar to the present one. IV Gasperi formed Ins Government In January 19SO Predominantly Christian Democrat, also Includes some Republicans and Socialists—keuler Walcott Saves The Day For Barbados Trinidad 494: B'dos 270/4 The Commerce Department i that although the current volume of exports to these countries mu small, the order would "prevent or limit any shipment which might be contrary to national interest The volume and value of United States exports to Russia and eastern Europe have dropped sharply in the past three vears. —Reuter. CLYDE WALCOTT readies 100 with a cut oil Bkeete for 4. Rritain Rejects Czech Charges LONDON. Mitch I. %  as "un%  llegations made In nary 7 thai N j man miiitinlay and lxmdon .yesterday, the British Government expressed hope thai In vie* ol %  i rnmenl's desire for world peace It would "urge upon the Soviet Governmem the need for a change In Soviet policy which would make the lessening ol InMfgsltfonal tension." The Briiish Government "have no doubt that the Czech people view with apprehension the vast %  bleb tiic Soviet union maintains both In her own territory and abroad and the attitude • % %  which she has adopted towards the tree people of Europe with which Creehoslovakin formerly had such close relations", the note Gilded Th* Soviet Government has been establishing in ils rones of tcciipntinn in Germanv In viol.. Ion of the Potsdam agreement. .* German military force which | being trained In the use of tankand artillery—the onlv German mllitarv force In existence In Oerloday."—Renter REDS HOLD UP DANISH TRAWLER COPENHAGEN, March I, A Danish trawler i* believed to have been detained by Soviet authortics m the Bailie, official Danish naval sources said here today. The trawler Capella with a crew of four was last heard of on February 25. when another trawler picked up a message to this effect. —Reuler. Big Three Receive Soviei Reply To Western Note MOSCOW. March ] Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko to-rla> handed lo Big Three Western Ambassadors, the Sovwi rojpij to western notes of February 19, Gromyko received Sir David Kelly. British Ambassador Admiral Alan Kirk. United States Ambassador and Yves Chataigneau, French Ambassador at the Soviet Foreigl Ministry. ~ ~ '' %  %  — The British Foreign Oflice has Xtr a • m received u Soviet reply to West\\ ul rhm;iii H House Burnt In Grenada From Our Own CarrMBondrff GRENADA. March I. Governor Arundel) leaves England to-morrow by alf accompanied by E. W. Barltrop, Labour Adviser to the Secretary of State for the Colonies. They are due on Sunday. The only violence last night was the burning of the watchman's house at Dougaldston Estate by four masked men while from country district* came reports of smallscale picketing and %  of intimidation of cocoa pickers in the St. Andrews area. It is now fell certain that incidents of violence may not be attributable lo the strikers. The Manual and Mental Worker.;' Union executives yesterday carried out Gairys Instructions and .clviio to desist violence and act? of Intimidation. U.N. Forward Units Gain Ground In Korea TOKYO. March I, Forward uniUi of UmWd Nations troops gair.nl Krimmi in central Korea to-day, airdropisupplyinc thorn with food and ammunition in slushy m>uin*jiin paste* American "ltyln boxcara" dropped 119 tons so that the otlenslve could Co on rven though ail ({round tramport wan hogged down. llrMi'Ji Commonwealth troojw 'd one mile Bad captured Dockers' Union Records Seized WELLINGTON. March 1. Oovernmenl agents today walked mio offices of tha striking New Waterside Worki I nd seised its records and cash. BO were from Ihe Public Trust, a State Organisation .'lies of ueceased 'V--iaU thai .•imilJr action was being taken throughout New Zealand Then action came 24 hours after Minister William Sullivan's order to dercgistcr the union %  rnr' of the Govern"" I paign to breax the I .•day-old (Unas an heir pi limit By din UJM Minister nvited formation of a new un Relieved CM" p %  nuld And onlv i Ings m the union bank account, n Auckland a n.eeting of dockr* decided to light on for re.-c —Rraler. Armoured Division Will Keinforce Ike's German Command WASHINGTON, March 1. An armoured division • i four additional American divisions lo reinlor.i (,cn oral Elsenhower'*, west Europe OD mrn nnd. it was report lo d.iv The report gained strength with the announcement that the Firs! Armoured Division would be reorganised at Fort Hood Texas. The Second Armoured Division has been training there and indl cations were that it would art' rr Europe. The reorganisation of the First Armoured Division will give tin regular divisions Three are at home, six With the i I the nth Airborne in Km'. I Infantry Division has been Jr Germany since the war. mnder of the Ilth AirHI the United Stales —Renter Churchill Caned* Engagements LONDON. March I. Chmrh.ll. near.y 77. has cancelled lie ciitf^ucmenls. S close to tha re lead) r My he t trom bolls on ms neck Ha ,' having treatinaW ragBng lor a few days on ih* advice of hi* doctors. Lord Morati and Sir Thorn albhas <]iic-cili-d engagements for next Monday ana Keutrr. i In three miles -oiitheast Yonaojrl South Km. %  .ui<-d another hill. Yongdun is 15 miles southof H iigchon hlch controls vital cenlral route to the : Parallel. American marines [ought hitler hi rtd to hand battfoi with stubborn North Koreans Jus! was -if the key-mount town Hocngsong. On the extreme right Monk the offensive Americans occupleo Amldng, II miles north ig .n..i about 3d i south M the 38th Parallel. Sn*rt fterce tussles at S iarta s wenl on all oa oengsong which was %  centri counter offensive The t... i an I'linchlniF to this arat Uul tli'-i Ml indication Hull United Nations men had ome up against main CoonminiIn ihe wesl. (leneiid Matthew ... 8th Army c unman* er threw patrols mi-s tinII.m % %  Of Seoul AH but • irned under tire Iron. Communist dtfancM —Renter. Pre. Postwar German Debts Recognised BONN. March 1. Allies and WeM Oerninny to%  is. nnv.1 ,,•! VVCM Germany's lid Lit .Hun, recognising pre mi.' postwar Oarman dabts. i Oarmar p kesman said here |o-n The declaration which had l<> r* made beftue the Occupation Statute could be HWlagU. WOtl) Df I .d h M i; I'rl.'i over to the Allied High Commls'lon on MOD dm. he said. West Qt i l) tu have %  Fi reign Ministry afoul ih. MM week, alh.o I Hi i.i to-niKht CauneaUoi Ailenauer is twpwrnl i i th. |rat Foreign Ml i ....... %  ilowmg West Oermanv to have the Forciar and Ambassiidci il will mv. |„ grMbst and ecnnnmle poMTIs. OH the agreement which has been ttelajssd ft i tDQBlha, wreached at a mecltng I afUrnocn bvtsnMn l| lt >h Coninifcv financial ad* i D' Herbert Utlhnan ol German ChaUteaUarj W. !(..,,,, ally pledge Uassn a tlvaa to share equitably, raw n m fence. Ofncialu %  this document is naadj —Renter Ren Curion Refuses To Form New Govt. as Double Coneeption 'From Out Own Corr*i>ofl4n! %  KINGSTON. Sea. March 1. A strange double conception occurred recently at tha K Sanitarium. A woman who had i baby In August last year and appeared fullv recovered found herself in labour pains a few days ago. She delivered another baby on Friday, six months after the birth of the first child. Thr fir* baby was an eightmonths boy. and weighed three pounds, the second is a robust seven pounds baby girl and the ndy doing Local medical opinion is that the woman had a double uterus and conceived while pregnant with the first child. notes on Four Power talks and was to-day studying it Russia has agreed to Ihe preliminary Four Power Talks beginning at Paris on March 5. the Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Gromyko told Western P< representatives here to-day. Informed sources said Gromyko had told three western ambassadors ".hat his Govorniw ippouiled a 17 miln ddi • I Itend the talks. State Department otlcial Washington to-day expi, hope that ItusMa's assent to the preliminary four power talks would lead lo a qio. ment on the agenda to be submitted to a formal meeting of Big Four Foreign Ministers. Michael McDcrmott. a State Department spokesman said the text •t the Russian note had not been received m Washington. He declined therefore to make any comment On the basis of Press report! hoM-rviT. officials were obvious!* pleased that the long period of uncertainty had been ended and that Russia had agreed lo a meeting of Foreign Minister*. 1 uepuncs President Truman at his weekly Press Conference this morning said he would not comment Press reports because ha hod not been officially informed about Russia'], latest note. Andrei Gromvko r.nd two other Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister, to-day. applieu foi French visas to ottend__ncxt week's Four Pow Confererre m P Seventeen delegates applied at the French Embassy to-day foi visas to enter France Named as the first and second Secretaries of the delegation Karp Starkov, previously the first ..t the Paris Embatsy -.vrov. Two Attaches were named—Serge Dorocheev snd Viachealab Popov. Renter. TRUMAN TRUSTS WILSON WASHINGTON. March l Truman said to-day I W'iDir-. b %  of National Difomc Mobilisation still had his complete confidence the lift between U. a new Oovornroani that a aeneri.! election only solution to Uiaei'* crisis. letter to ftm\ %  Weumann. he said that if partial WhlCtl overthrew the ( ;, ,\ ei mnil:l were un.dile %  at, his out-going four mrtv ('nlonet sfOUld COtrtlAUa in Rice until UMI %  He a e au a ad rallghsui iwri which bmught the Govanunatll by voting againut its roll* ginus education policy two araOkJ ago, of masking "Seculnt IU mands" nndgj rwlfloug coloun Prsin\''. lav. 'oi the prataotlon o| —Rcutcr. U.S. Railwaymen Get Wage increase. WASHINGTON. Manh. I United Staterailway g*\i. ,i i in Increase of | hnif canl i.nnn.ofK) I'' :nid pledged a cost of Uvlng adjuatmenl avarj Ihra* i ignana m whici onlv to 15 nonoperiili' %  %  ..t actually 'rains) will cost com pa i *2R0.noo'MM) par year. DO duc-el bearing on Ihe big railway wage-* dispute with four ring shuntait, drlvai i | stage*I i numhe. f rtwanl strike i —Ri-cler France Expeoti M r M*r' Airport Smui PARIS. March I .ii ampl ... hai U I t i In. i %  i "idlng I. Marshall I'l in attthotith Tha rfoii atlon lha plan • extend Urh airfield will be nnanced I %  I 0 D rri I 1 ;IH ,i loan to BlTpl rl %  The "greitler Otly" project will |n*i Ive asipg pn it., r -f rsr>n small hotasw in an adjoining i esenl area i %  %  %  i Ihera will hi | ..I nt t..n .1 .1 Mil ti mpoi irj I The plan will relegabDo tVmrgcl '.i role —Reuler. TUX TIIF. ADVOCATK Till*. NIWI lll\V -volunteers" on the "no special dlfflruliy" in resisting Korean model, the Marshal re. v.csateti>l"-u Thai is another-rilng. Thl-. lltes on her bank would mean n direct attack by the Soviet I.'nion Tortav regular .: to a question on armies are ent name. of HunIn Comlnform propagand;. Thev %  nd Bulgaria volunteers'' The Marshal stressed the imMarshal Tito. looking t;i oi the "politic) *"d in a dark suit with a white % %  i r.nd nd tie, uaan n a nation," in this respect, declarquestions for one hour over cup* Vuesti-.r. W\ il ,r.g:"Id-iTee and wme gth ol the H ...rai.te,. fron We were Ml Dd for aggressive "1 I*"**" '" "ddttlon lo verbal Asked if he thought II UlC "e.n ,* [| need not I,. hut on the other hand tha is su era i gists that • We hope tl,. %  did. d would not l>e ou • here are of ... but the ueginning of a tragedy Atki %  (#ople A-ant war As : -ed I repeat what I have workroom in his villa In the fashnrh of us alone rhii would n any special difl.. Superior Farm Asked what he thought of U 'tnrshsl would not i outsldP Russia lan I know that th< Soi let CMi Ina Btmal Army fouirh' •xtraordlnarlly well l.loe. Mar hal Tito In Hie liberation war But I enn i.< say oetween a war which has the pu:Reuter Yet it would be idle f calculate tlvc number of y.rcttes. becauxe the habii will apparagstly pgnaaJ Jtpnc th' TKUIS toss of life and propeftv resulting from these ouibrcj* .. It h the work oi a fen mfawtcatctpntt KtTfipoa through flre by obswddBg at vour cirli." ; i 1 turutv J.ws noi teem t| MAKf %  much a i Local Ai^mit S.P.MUSSON,SON&Co.l!!l. %  !' %  • -U6J VE n •9-1 %  it raa itoll drm and weather conditions ideal when i thatr tirst toll uo,l at 488 for 8 %  wickets, FcrI.I ouIM l>einp %  artth but so rui nan was an nlnotoan runlatar m %  ton Wei %  < MM I %  ptcd pUlai ol n u %  Kh to Ina .1 Win n I! %  i 32, but :h ti %  Barbados' tntal at I 3, things looked M .. Chat II Good Stand it was tare I %  of the %  Ifth wlckal parl I i 16i nms to I Thl(tan batted with g mgj i it araa noi irtlect(I In their MO! lOg slrok. . batsman* dp, l nt m die %  %  %  *l>. in the anhougii i'i. J. i.riagMilt xu ooe wortn %  in-ticniai TnentUi i fW I tat %  i Home nention With | I staged 1 %  %  | i ting In Intei 1 %  ive, catching On ball nontb ond With hi-. btttbUj ability, he hauM i" second string wicketkee:Australia f) On pur





PAGE 1

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE" IRIDAV. MARCH I. IMI Rupert and the Coughdrop—25 Rupert and the C oughdrop—26 ttbm watching ihe toy w H .t f Md up (he htiie crane and tee -,th .xher* walking item Rupe Jen gingerl bedm p 1 itl.." chuckle, ihe clown. N ol Santa Clmi'i airship*. ill* cloud IMV4 than thf other* you 1 F ,. .-,!" — !" ,, rvft ^ 4 ..,, ck)ja l(JV ; xher* walking about Rupert -or, (r( >hjn rhf ^j^, yo^II am if he caa kite* them. Vr., ,,„*. ,,,„ „ „ ,( ih>n iri guigerly h ami* on* foot owl of ihe nor j real doorl ( all. %  • talk* and. ^ bu. .rpnat. jiMi P~*-Wv **• •*•* !" • "%. In can trand gui-e aaauy. Wha*. A. Ha .peak* the t. tower pn* rver • *H; he g**P> "You :h* ratting >•"'• look, 'ike 4iwiHfr ctouc*. In 4 Itminute* they reach ,• and ihe toy soldier work* tht lr ao thai (hay land gently 01 a courtyard UlM| 0*er a parapet 11 'he figure of Stami ' 1 fjee hi. a purjltd brighter and bf*nt.. a. h draw. took. "WTt *g^f >1 nearer o-.nl h* •*. thai coma* he murmur*. Why have yog rw lovely etirle built < %  *" hrohl him ? V.*r> CJ l > 'he mange nail gather* apecd and Rupert find, huni.lf rushing smoothly and .lead ly rhrough rht uarlit aky. Ie*v:n all %  *l.trlc cloud* behind. Ahead at %  'ami towhich (Ha Clan* Mat and tangnter aa he draw. took. Rupert and the Coughdrop—27 Rupert and the Coughdrop—28 Every normal skin needs THESE 2 CREAMS mi: 11 #>/•;. .. .. \n* ntiisi Gums Bleed! Meeting Ouno. •" Mouth and too— T.-ih .•* %  tl4 >a baa /!'•" %  ; %  ; Trawr*. Man*ee wirhaay* —tn* 'S.fSrfc Heam Ti-uMAi ^*;^'^;~ "/S^^S today Ti aoAraoian FOLLOW THK BCAl'Tl' ^ (ARE OF SOCIETY'S \ LOVELIEST WOMEN ETERTWHERE i-i. > 1'j nl V upftt. "Hn on -"h c %  w halp 1 ..„ r> M kro* ndr> ahoulH l> Ram%  -. 1 aavi Ku;t't m • a, kan ra %  han iha clown and rha anuffahstind in.ved JUII a* I waa foirif 10 bed and made m. coma hue. And do KII mt % %  (ht pntienit ara bia. Com, and I'll Ac* you." .ay. tha oke ruRht lima at all bam." Ai knfih tbiy mm jnw a hm apatuwam. " %  •.'" am tha M aanUanan. iheia a<* my ihiea in3eer. and rarfl I while rha • .* %  M tnd dj-: I taJ < Rupert and the Coughdrop—31 Rupert and the For aome moment* liter Rupert h* handed over the piece cri cough' drop there 11 ulrnce. Then Santa Claiu give. nut. "Of coufM, I *ee it all now." he enei. "My HUM dog wai right after all. Han it ihe secret, here in my hand !" With a rain he d.inoeari round %  re) I.. And he t me d tecm-r with a delighred tnuffleat hi* heeTi. "CocJ It, what a huny he's in." tupen. "Had we bet let No. he gtM v." ti* >n p 13 our v er POND'S Vanishing Cteam Cold Cream Start now In win the loveliness that can be ymirt when you use Pond's Creams. You'll find the distinctive opal-white Jars at all ihe best beauty rounters. See Us fox the following : — 1 A 2 lb. tin C & E. Mcrrlr,!! Oatmeal Pkg. Vita Wheat Biscuits Pkg. Wevtabix Biscuits Bots Heinz Sandwich Spread Bots. Heinz Salad Cream Tta* Heinz Vegetable Salad Ui Mayonnaise BoU. C. At E. Morton Pickle Tim Lamb Tongues *""* Tins Breakfast Rolls 2 lb. bots. C. It P. Table Sail Bots. Cocktail Cherries 1 lb. tin Asstd. Sweet Biscuit* INCK & Co.. Ltd. 6, 1, I %  I Roebuck. Street. Dial HM ROBINSONS 'PATENT' BARLEY makes milk more digestible •PATENT' CROATS makai w,ir ;-g a happy rtm. fcr fc aby I r ** ml-ir i CAN EPILEPSY BE CURED? What is cii'fi.'f' A gtii. kin* (Hal meot hai barn found that raig Caesar Napoleon and Byion wee .. booklet entitled Can Epiltpiv ba tins. Epilepsy b*s always mttra* 1K1 L. mit ew-m he .ayi. From here we can <,e everything that happen, m "t cattle. We .hall aoon kiw* il Then he break, off, for ihie* dark creature* auddenly appear from below and leap happily, about in the *ky. l-ook, the reindeer, ihe in* up a rope laoon 10 <* iw leindeer I" hoot the ,wn. There, this i* our *.*'Po.ni."^ ," They're all right aga' Ripert and the Coughdrop—33 -34 :S delixhi laea puree aboui My. Ha a need ihmg ^und ggai." \> chwr. You've dene 'he U'*a g) oark nd Snd drop tl JOWT. •. i Thai cwuj,'. I like, amamr, "id gave 1 Ut gj oark and %  %  BH ^. %  UW| regone (a a. hattying -e I broka hil to each of h. now they're p.-le^r ," ft woovten no* who Si id tht hag. party grmi braadh. gwae on. let* wjirt ne .Tvta t-wa I" •in Santa Cbus. Rupert and the CoughdropBo ••) M %  wdaa _nd (lacking the deigh while a roy iroren eeerythmg ftooa hi* lUt. Thei old gctitrfman blow, a .hell whiule and the reindeer turn and glide down toward, him. Now. Rupe>:, you mu-t decile whether you want to go liotna^with me ot on my he. **yt. t back Santa Cl.u, u he, R, !he coutiyatd where he givea a .hoet and in a moment all u buitle and eicitament. Bung my (mailer •leigh," he ordtta. ''The more di*tant pteaenii muii be taken nt.:.' A >pecial company of ihe (JMle guatd* *un to do hi. bidding. aaenag and dragging out pareeli and_ check. Rupsti and the Coughdrop 35 ftnpert and the Coughdrop—36 ii .. high time hi ... • home and he aik. to be ide q.j..k..> (My, vw'd baiter go by thai .( -thp." ,„ Same N ..'h me jou'd -,. round." i the old gentlewhere they can ace the airahip real' mg on op ol a big a>wei kaBKi they are aboatd and aurung un theie w*y. Igg'i iha aiuifaa-aowKi lomiiig with ui*" asks Rupari peering over the edge. No, nil -ork <* nnithed hihe aaaaaaa. %  '• the clown. Ha must have THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK WITH A VIEW lo collating tha SecrclariM ot Societies, Club*, and Associations lo make the compilation oi Information in THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities: religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports, radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed below filled in and sent In as soon as possible to: THE EDITOR. THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 191!, C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street. FORM Title of Society. Club, Organisation, Etc President or Chairman Council or Committee Members.. Treasurer Secretary Short historical account of the origin, functions and current activities! Wr Ban ih, luHa p*?l' t"v, !, ilM t;ih' ol tb, ...Ik ,..! in %  J'l'H :Sfo,|S ih. ilitft niahi Man lani &ra CL„ ,nd ht i. nda,: iit.jk p,i; ih,m and : ahead. I .' %  m.ir MR. ** Im'i I'I (loud ,c, ? tail ? Shall t atf] ma on-" -v. •Hai i,i. -n Urn." down chnrtulli. "Tha tmalkt n it th. baiat il pota. Now look at IMP,'' And. ,ui. anouili, aa he •prikt Iha cloud iv,,IU 10 a gran %  an and Kopa. prom under a fold ih, IO, toldiaa product, the eraoc and the baikvi nj rtupcrt tf.pt Owing to delay caused by irregular shipping services the "Advocate" regrets that it has been compelled to curtail its daily cartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all available strips as they arrive will be appearing in this space. Canned SLICED HAM by Ihelb Sl.JO per lb CANNED HAMS 2 lb linn 2.l *aeh CANNED HAMS 2i lb linS3.10 eeh CANNED HAMS fee lb line .** Mill %  .. % %  • R Ibts lo III lls linn, al S1.2I per lb are delicious ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., LTD. "YOUR GROCERS' SERVE MvRE MUHN* UIHT CANNED FISH MACKEREL — 1 lb. lin st •*• PILCHARDS — 1 lb, lin al Mr. PILCHARDS — 1 lb. lin al 21'BRl'NSWICK CANADIAN SARDINES — per lin IB*.



PAGE 1

FRIDAY, MARCH i, 1931 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SI.VI N CLASSIFIED PilDS.\ Harbour Log French Troops Grt TKLEPHONI ZMt ICarliile Bav V I1HTM lilt Cltat.Olf T>. Birth*. Marrta***. Daath*. Aafcrtowl*0*mii. and In afmortam nouen u f: 50 on w*rk-4a\* and 1110 on Sunday* %  Of any kivbn 0* worda up la W. and J rant* par waul on *>**k-da*a and 4 nnii par word on Sunday* fa* •** %  additional word). For Birth*. Mwriai' or Eat*tnent anftOUn**m*f-t* i" Canto tailing in. thmif la 13 00 for any nurobw of word. up to M and a canta par •oral (or |M idOllwn*! •** %  * TPIHI cal. MOM IMS b*t.*an ISO and 4 pm. 3113 for ONaUaaa only after 4 p in. DIED trw On Mart-ti 1st INI al hla tajl,t.r..r II" r, Vill* FonUballr FREDERICK ADOI.FUR CAREW M*i<-hanl' F.inrial •*>*• Ihr aanvr rr.Mlrnt*' al 4 15 P in today f.-r lha r-tbun tXnatar* Frarnd' ant In Mlr.1 H .. a Htarin u I3l GiltvM Mavbrllr MIALL -On March 1*1, 1H) al tha Onoral Hoapiial. Mrs Hilda Small, liar luncrnl Iravn Chrlaaa Road. atMlrharl al 4M p.m. lo-day lor Iht"hap>>uiii Strati Crmrch ol Clod an 1 0MBkM lit lh* Wratburv Crmrtaiy. Wilfred Small laidowrri. McDonald Mnrrla tbrolhari. Mutant Mum .laughtrri. U.st-in FOR SALE Minimum rhnrff* ***: TI Mil d"d M caat* Sunduw. 34 uorda — aMf M u oiO, j cent* a uwrd u'#r—4 imli a u*v M u*>r*ia S mil a uo-d isaafc—4, <(f word ~ HOUSES HtU_* VISTA Ottlcwa*h. — Comfortably turiiuhvd Ihirf bcdroon.i twin bed* Laisr alaclric rafli*>~t ll*hl. pawn plus*, run nine *l-r lhrou,hoL.i Gitm Servant** raam*. Stora Hni-r Mn Chandler Ta-lda. II ill'SK-Modem thrr* 1-adroom Ho.i•Una 1*4 M Top Rock. having larar L^ Lon I*a* preferred Apply Friedman Holrl %  <,>*! l -"IJ-ASAVTON Worlhln. n. Enrloaed Oallery. 3 bedroonm. i.nd dining room*. %  %  * and ail modern i nei ItJ r .>pnroiid tr..nt Furnlrheil Grmin Within HUMU-'B throw btwlv benrh Prtk He trlrphone Hat Cooker. Racapllon. Dtnine and 1 Be-drooma. 3 Oollerie* overloukiii)* rarden. AppV Box 130. J.3 81-ln. WNIT1 tUTTAGR FLAT Si. Jame. Furnithcd or iinfurniehcd. Good aaahtlhlnc. private beach. Applv Mi. K. M Oeeenldie. White Cnltaae. St. (AH One III I MO Model Fotd A Ci>n b* aeen at Cow tray Garaar Kill 1'ICK-UP. One Dodge Pick-up In working order Apply: S C Cola •) Co. Ltd. P-l>,.ck •Street ll.l.ll-tln. Vn/ UK TTI! MOTOH CYCLE — > kood order Pi ire Maoon Apol* w. Ri-gars. Qirber ,i\cr J K. Coddard. *V %  OfM. Broiui St 1SSI—3n ELECTRICAL ItADlOGRAM-Oii ll.M V. ahow at DftCoata I Declrir-l Departinani No offer refuaed UvhSTOCK t*J Pure Bred HoU-luw ol Prince Albert. Ago Dial 3531 Mill—tf.n. TWO IIORSF-S. HARNESS and on* Ml Cart. Going; cheap. Apply: S. E. Colo Co.. Ltd. Roebuck Street tl 1 Sl-I.r.n. MISCELLANEOUS BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel. In White. Green. Prlmroae with matching iinlta to complete colour aultaa. Top grade A. BARNES at Co.. Ltd. CURTAIN FITTINGS— For amart window atyhnf. light control. Valance, and draper***. By Klrach, Dial 441 A. IiAHNES A CO.. LTD. 13111 -tin DOORS—Several pa Ira ol pilch pine i-oori. niltable for Garage or Wnrehoun with large hinge*. To be. een Jt Wllldalc, Marine Gardena. I. M OSunptton IA*I-*. ( ;ir aft 9 SI'OTCII WIILSKY '.. T-.--I at the BartJBtdoa Aqualic Club whan rrqite-ited. and u*ed by many dlacrlnviimllng roniiinier* Sold by tia per bottle nr per •**. Mount GajDiUllleriri IW Agema. 1 331 -to MODERNFOLD eiiWhed aolntlon to TO (.rchllectural problem ot do •ireen. movable partition*. A. BARNES & CO, LTD. DOORS -The dl.tlnto vour apeclal rlooirea. li..l 4476 VENETIAN BUNDS.—Klrach Stin-alr* all matal Da Lue VeneUin blind*, to \our Ue*. delivery 3 weeka. DUI 4*M A BARNES \ CO. LTD. I13S1—t.f.n. IM Hill SALES Ten ivnti per noolr 1 and It -m(i per apale miiUr coaat in the Iiland with perfect aeo-balhlng For appointmenta lo vi and for further particular* ring 3PU, K. S. Nlcholl* < Co., Solicitor*. tVt.fti-t f n Ti.c urflraitaaa-l will aat up for agle at th*U. office No IT limb Street. Bridgeln*n. c.n Friday the 3nd day of March, IMI, at 1 pm Tha dwallinghouaa call**! "Murray Lodge" with the land thereto containing by eatimaUon f.MO aq feel, altuale at Upper Bay Street, SI Michael, the realdet... of the Ute A. C. OrMvae. In.peition by appointment with MU* Ida Greave*. Telephone No. SOW. For further particular* and condition. of alr. apply to :— COTTLE. CATTORD ft CO M 1.31— Ion. lUve Ihem Sanded hv i METHOD Call Evelyn I t.i 4t3 Uval new look lie NU FIOOR Roach & Co. ti.1.51-1 In. WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flowrl ed Sheet and Plate GUa* lor all nac in. Cap! Clark*, fiocn Halifax GolAto 4.M0 Ion* net, Cafl S*p.-..rtn trnm Trinidad. SS r,.lo.nb*. TU4 ton. in CaM Kerharo. trnen Le llavie "iftt'i %  !*> %  aThooner Mart M I*-*K M to* net C-pt. Marahall. for Brrti*h t;..i..-. Schooner 1-lnd.vd II. M ton* net. Capi Barne*. for Martlnlaiue Schooner laland Star. 37 ton* IH". C.pl Joaeph. (rom Brltl-h r.uiaia M V Cacique del Caribe. 1*3 ton* net. Capl. Archibald, for SB Vinrent SS. Colombia. T5*4 Ion* net, 0>pt Kerharo. for Tru-.tdad S.S Oointo. .m Inn* net. Capt Sapawnrth. for England. M.V Canadian Challenger. 3*16 Ion. let. Capt Clarke, for St Vincent Ships In Touch With Barbados Coast Station CARLE AND WIREI£SS Wli ltd fattaag th*l the. ,.,„ „„• communlcata .tn tne following diip. through their B-UKXI,., Coaat Sution %  t ^S rl ^ ***>* %  %  %  • Driaui. as. Patter, gg Del.uai*. K.I Caribe. S.S ScaUllna. SB Thelktom.u. SS. CalUo. SB. Colombia. SS. Oetrulv. SS Uaupctanla. 8.S. bk.. SS Ka rrancc. SS Winun. SS Tuacanatar. SS K*-. ReadUu. SS. Ancyhu. 88. Llmburg. SS Argentine. SS Rearll. R| N|ela Amaterdam. SS Fronteiuc SS Canadian Ct.allenger. 8 8. Klnv 8 8 Degralae S >*. L.ke K.le"m. SS Arania. SS t*uec. M Batmuda. S.S. Ctudad de SevilU. SS. Ine.. ill. Aaklvini*. SS Alcoa Clipper Teoca., SS Golfllo. IS SunprmcSS FuRna. SS. Paraguay, SS Hauk•fjell. SS. Frontmar. SS Wa nh American troops in beseifec* a few weeks aajo The luttalion of fewer than 1.000 men fought at bay one'. I Mint in RWirltrif fog and "helpeil iiv-Uvm pi.tiing 01A of action an •ntlr* Chinese division The citation *poke> of the battsUoaa %  'oxiraordirvary heroism, aggreisiveness and rgprV d" ii thv central iraol —Reuter Calls For Change At Foreign Of/ice LONDON, March 1. Lord Templcwood. added hi* vote* in the House of I day to those calling for a change at the Toreign Office. . As Sir s.imuei IlMfa he wag Foreign SocreUn, in 1B35. He said there was no post in i! tiovfrnnifi.i u.lu-ic H %  %  nvte nece*isary to have a MinisI day after day. often nlant afu-r night in his office. "It Is unfortunate at this moment of crisis to have ,i Fi" eign Secretary who is a sick m^n", he concluded. Coffee Sinu^l.rSHIPPING NOTICES FILM SHOWS I LOST A WAUJCT-ConUliiing %  wrepatake Ticket. si| ••M. and | Receipt* Fun i aame to Harold Hard te Turf Cluti A A N„ r pleaar rein* w>ll be shown i ih monthly reunion ol ttw i't nburrer." School Old Boys' tu-nighl t* 8 o'clock. ''hero air British New*. Journey oy a I.ojidon Bus, Sprinting and Iii'linsun Charlie ;m:l Trooping nf the Colour. MACK FOR B. AIRES LONDON. March 1 Sir Henri Mack. Briti-ih Amba* aaaor designate to Argentina, will stil for Buenos Aires aboard Iha Andes on March 10, It was lean.. ed here today. Sir Henri said to-day that he hc|es the new Anglo-Argentine i J K.iiiations on meat prices about tt begin in Buenos Aires wout.l have j satisfactory settlement by the time he in rived — Kewter TlilKSTK. Mi on a business community of the free port of Trieste, arresting nine well blown mcrehanl v iUaa employee of the Umte.l Slates on charges of smuggling coffee. Police headquarter. I merchants for whom arrest warrants had DCH-I escaped from the small Adnntic uTM leiritory. Police alleged the %  niggling ring Had es '"* null im lire in the last IS months by smuggling cotter frtim the (rea port Into the city of lYiMttj, They adde.) that two ilicemen arresiej one Austrian and the other Yug. rs ailing as lorrv drive —Keuler. Rates Of Exchange MAMCit 1, IHI *NADA Cne-oueaoii %  ••• Vanker* M i Demand ..... DtafU %  pr .... Sight llrafl* Ul !•%  V Cable 01 |0 pr, Currencr i Coupon. OBI IS-. .. SWETJ-iTAKE TICK FT OfU Finder plea** ret. K.ra>nor D-vonl*h, Klchmor Land. Serie. A A il aame o %  rjaa B % %  1 LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE TBAVKFFR a UMOVAI. The application ol George Handel M.ill rr nuerprlae. Chritt Church purrhaarr Cl IJquor Ijrenar No ISO of 1H1 grunted to Sylford Scanlleburv In re a pect of a board and ihlnglad ahop at Hu>d*b Vaseline' Hair Tonic.i Just use a lew drops day...then see the dilference! Buy a bottle today! fdbeil [!riDNic THE HAKH.AIIOS I'AKTY KAKIIAIMIS WORK! Its I NION at MILE ft QIARTEK. SI I'rlrr On FRIDAY. DID MARCH. 1951 at B P.M. Speakers:— V L. Walrolt. M.l'P K N. R. Husbands, M.C F. E. Miller. M.C.P i. H. Adama. M V OIIIIMM 4.TFTS! THANI'S Si-" GARDINER AUSTIN A CO. LTD. — Agent*. PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Products. Umilod, ituseau, Dominla, for lallIng to Europe. The usual ports of call ate Dublin, Londun. oi Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reduction! lor childrear C00PER SPLIT ROLLER BEARINGS "Split" Feature rnaMes dismantling and reassembling lo he effected with ease, apeed and economy. CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. TIER HEAD LANE AGENTS. YEAR BOOK 1951 Y. M. C. A. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE TBANSFEB A BBMOVAL The application of Ltnlay Johnaon of Pie Cnrnar. St. Lucy the puiehau-r of Liquor liranae No 1S3 of 1W1 granted in re*pecl of front part ot a board and -ringle house at Pie Comer. SI. 1*. t i remove aakd LMonar lo finnt part of ., boanl and ihingle hotiaa at Pie Comer, i obout ft from originalpremiae.1 and to uae it 31 t*h lau •• >i rived premlaaa. Q^ted on* *t" d. nf rebruiry tSJI f fl %  YDKfSY H NURSE. Cat). H atrtrale. Di*tflct "E-. LfNLEY JOHNSON. AMBI H Nn-Thi* apphcation %  ill be con*iderad al a Llcenaing Court to be held on 1Mb March IMI at II oclock am. at Police Court, District "B". SYDNEY H NUaSE. Police MagUtrate. Diet. "EV I a il In. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Tne application of Jame* Barrow ot Duati Hall, 8t Michael, for pern\lao*i i .ell fiplrit*. Malt laqiwri Ac at a board and ahtngle shop aith anedroof Mlached al Allejne'* Tenanta/, Bu*h 11.11 st Michael. Dated til. TTth day of February 1*91. To--E. A. MrLEOD. Eaq. police Magi lira tc. Di-triCt "A-. JAMES nAFUlOVV Appl leant MB—Thl. applWallon will be con.ldered al a Llcen.ing Couii at Police Court. Dtetrtct Friday the tlh day of March, issi a: II n-ckvk. a.m. S. A. McLEOD. Fol-re Magblrate, Dl. %  A" I Ail—in TENDER FOR ERECTION OF BULKING The Board of Dlr-ctor. of the Y M.C A. Invite. Application for Tender* for the erection of a building at lleadqiiraler.. Pinfold Street Tha Plan* and Specification* can be Inapaclcd al the Secretar.'a Otnce v Mf v from ThB(*day i.t M.r.h Meataeaday Nth Mar.h between t hour* ol 10 a.m. and 4 pm. daily nn Sundaya Tender* ntu.t be mbmltled Si Seal Envelope* and addreaaed lo Ihe *ci i:,---of Ihe YMC.A. Pinfold Street not luer than Naaa 'i-i Match. Tender, mbmltted will be npencd ( Board Meeting to be held at 11 pat. tha Slat March. The Board doe* not bind Itaelf to accept the loweat Tacider. UKRIItRT IL WILLIAMS. Secret a ry fB.15i-gn NOTICE TBE PABI*B Ol All pcraon* owing nv Par.titial Taxet ST. PETFR NOTICE GIRLS INDCSTRIAL t'NIOS ANNI'AL FETR Ulveet tar menial at Queer, 1 Park On Thureday Mth Mar tBmpira Dad IMI. p.m. to M p to. Bjy -i ticket win a lucky 1 number. C WIIJJAWS. General SarreUrvl, Q IB as.! ai :•> NOTICE i* hereugiven tr.al Ihe t-rt"er*hip heretofore aubalittng b*^tween ARTHUR JAMES DOORI.V and AIPRED AlXXANDEn MACKIE carrvii.g on buaineaa a* Garage Proprietor* S| Roeti'irk Street. Bridgetown, under trie atylr or Arm ol Supreme MOTOR COMPANY, ha* been diaaolved b' mutual conaartt a* from the nth.day o February IMI. ao far a. concern, th. HTKI Alfred Aleaander Mackie. who ha retired from the aald firm. Diled the I^rd dav of Trbniary ISSI A. J DOUHLY A A MACKIE 13 91—Si The Advocate Co Ltd. wiU publish a Year Book oi Barbados in 1951. The Year Book will contain three parts:— (1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, iinancc. industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport. art. literature and all the things we want to know about Barbados but have until now not been able lo find under on* cover. (2) Special supplement on Barbados' industries: e.g. sugar, soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels etc. (3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about this information solicited should be sent in immediately or not later than March 15th 1951. A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Galo M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate. Mr. Neville Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale. Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be responsible for the publication. The compilers of the Yea Book want to make sure that the Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados! and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies, Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisation.) of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisations immediately or not later than March 15th 1951. Year Book. Co Editor, Barbados Advocate. 34 Broad Street. Names and addresses of all those to be considered lot inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed. Advertisements close April 30th 1951. Advertisers are asked to get in touch with Mr. Trevor Gale, Advertising Manager, Barbados Advocate. 34 Broad Street. This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to bo without Ihe Year Book of Barbados 1951. (AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION) PlaiiUllotr. RIIIKIIII REAL ESTATE If You Intend To Buy PROPERTY Any Part Of BARBADOS Our Services are at your Disposal JOHN M. BLADON AFS, F V A. The Home Furnishing Department William Fogarly Limited. Amimmci"* Hi EASIER PARADE OF VALUES FOR THE FAMILY WHITE I.AC f. BEDSPREAD (72 x !W) @ JM.OO each WHITE I.ACE TABLE CLOTHS —(M x 04. S SliO.OO rach LACK TABLE CLOTHS (58 x 72) (u $ fi 11 LACE TABLE CLOTHS (48 x 50) LINEN GLASS TOWELS ... It) I I M GLASS TOWELS 50c. (tic. and 70c. eacli 48 Inch FLORAL TAPBSTRY • M.Ofi and $4.01 per yd. 48 .. STRIPED TAPESTRY < 2 16 per yd. SANDERSON CRETONNE —@ $2.02 and $2 22 per yd. SANDERSON LINEN CRETONNE —@ $3.04 per yd. FOLKWEAVE CRETONNE (if SI "I pal yl WM. FOGARTY LTD. THE HOUSE OF HOUSEHOLD LINENS I



PAGE 1

1 FRIDAY, MARCH t, 19SI BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE VE \rrst Ihr vast ID ol KUI-LJ. from the lwund.irir> •f Eastern Europe I* the North Pacific coast, there a. now -liu'li A break in ihe lndu-.tr in I •ruin Stalin -.mi .e..nll. thi. no natioi. could llMm *urli l.uicv aott at the urnr 11 PIiprepare for war S|„ kt-.ir.fo i 1 liir rt'-lrrn Power* asked over the n-rk-r-,1 If si., hi, would i" iiroof o| hJa sims.it) tin.ot the blf qurslhink la: VYhal b happening in Northern Siberia, an area unmapped to the Western world? Russia's Air Striking Power Is Weak SUNGLASSES Per LADIES A GENTS M> Ir-. A Value* THANIS WHAT'S IN A NAMl I : IDthinks ul Cm llhra Everyone thinks of Cookii as you Say G. A. Service. WASHINGTON. March I. Russia's air striking power weak, though her air defence strong, and she build* 8.500 wi planes ix-r yaor. according to the current issue of an American raajaitiM in an analysis of Soviet force: Thc article—claimed to be compiled from material gathered over months in the United State* and other countries — said Russia had threefold protection against air attacks. S Canadian Teacher Danger Stilus Meat Buyers Aided Meets Challenge The Rio R v Slramwhip Cooks W otds Of Arctic School TUKTOYAKTUK. Northwest Territories, Feb. ( Teaching "on top of the woritf may have its frigid drawback! but for Dorothy NEW YOUK LONDON. Fell pawn Mexico way the Amcrl. Meat-starved Unions returning can immigration men are havinf %  <">' CO BlP I Ba Hai 'rips have been trouble with thousand. of Mexiforming long ^ueiK-s outside the cans who irv to enter the U.S. I? 11 *" nn ""' eross-channel idegally. Man?are stopped —but F* Kubmson of lots get through. ; the opportunity of I And been' thev ,i l> ..II swim across ihe Rio Grande — First, she had nn Arctic perlOttawa It ruetiT interceptor force to protect lifetime her (rom attacks across the North the famous border river — these Pole—shortest distance from the )n .j,,, i^uer cold of tbi-i Arctic illegitimate vlatton are known as United States and the western r^mo village 2.500 miles from wetback' World. This string of fighter* home, the persevering 40-w.>-"-' -m-Mn-'i from Latvia to the* ^achcr is finally finding the sense northeastern tip of China _# freedom and fulfilment she hus After this -he had individual ^ m searching for in 14 years of "'•* defences for major war proW ork taCeaaWla'ft northern schools. Fightini; Influenza, frost and ignorance, the gallant lady of the north ha* taken charge of the than was any truth in the*! allegations but the ComsMUUal HONGKONG, r* •" %  : "* ,um '• '" •" ll, Italy's F-lhc. 0 .< '''•> jusl deputed h.m arrived In Fl. ngkiing from hts Kithcr Minellu la J nt Sacred Hrarl Church In lVngpu. M ''* " d hn PWj 12 >*'" Ul Annwn am -.ft htoia, with China on mission work—1 N.n i • i or it ito Bill foti! of the Chii i el expelled. i.itiu. M %  II.. -i.i ti. waa provided bv the sh.ppuig com%  utndlng] aul Ida nil Panapii panics. Churca wh. i .i teen-age fit tho Young Communist Part) Before embarking the I reveller* asked him whan bu dog had dishave iicen buying large joints of appeared to They idjrsjMsjjasj have been takShe Fiuulh Got It VIENNA. Feb 28. auction areas. Then there wi mobile Interceptor force of 100 fast M.I.G. IS jet lighter 1 ; redd) to be rushed to vital spots. :mx. legs of lantb, enticing CUtl last yasjl i-nm.nr-tion men. of fc llutn of httt ;ill Cilslh „,,. aided by I.*.Hangers, turned talnahlr* In Frant. St. back 224.000 wetbacks. In Old rhefs offered to cook -he meat free days ihe Maa rk a ai a simply because raw meat cannot i>e imuanted la work on America's ported— 0>. prosperous farms at Americas Federal Kesuurces Department's actw headBut the Soviet attacking |>"*et was far inferior to that of the United Btatoa because the Soviet ||y i tactical airforce, designed U." work j'round troops, the Magazine said. -. it,.ii.i,in H "' the Brit* Ishand United Sttatci manner nan ( ", been subordinated. Bovlet |el Bairtara, aeeorCHna t* the article, '-ere about equal to United States nlanes in ierfor-nmce. the M.I.G. IS being the brut. The Russia MIC. 15s a-year. mml northerly school — ina-room affali rcouth of the Mackenzie m.ire than 1.400 miles nortl ^^ Edmonton. ...11 _•:.!-. Canada's most northe.i. .,._-,, Miss Itobinsun is raced [Sj %  th many problems -she is rncnlor, nurse and cook and rvenjtov Scout leader to her -"O charges. While teachers across t %  HFUHg ih. too. L %  AN At im.Mfc of 60U sat h>,''"_'; tening for TWO hours to B I litlasslj played pi,-in<> ris-ital in the Pilgrim Suite HoxpiUil (or Meula. Pawnia, on I^HIBT Niand. The uatient ki.oun ..who hj:. been In the institution •lrtee 1940. She lyad l H'bussy, Chopin, and Lint pij(. eating th Thieves Eut Thief i Ci.i i. sMsea The brilliant icrhliniur. whll" iliree were later epturel. anil he counwhite-eoalod alteiuiants watclwd ihoy are saidlo have confessed agitation |pllowed balora FaUv i .Mineila INU finally put undrr pajftaa guam "PropoBimdisI" !(• *id |e wns never formally rharKed bul tin* Conununl I PORT-OF-SI'AIN. Feti. 37. alleged mi %  In bad i .lUsi tin From a reliable source conies 'volunteers'^ ttogj done piopathe report that three escaped Venscandal work for the Amerteam eauelan criminal* lost in the (actually he re.ni ihe jungle in Venezuela, killed the cicouruphfe Maga; fourth and barlwcued him like a mpatrlaal irellbWl p Pi l roasting flesh. The |)|ri ( III1W ,, a^raioaa) and eaiiee him a "K.'ii • % %  piped C hA murder still serving her life scnlci.i %  i ia inlieided ihe estate of her husband whom she killed. In 1936 Mane bar was found guilty of inurWithoul thinking, thi i i mg her husband in order u "probabls k> Korea" get his htm ui Carinthia. Next day ihe local pram alleged The estate went to Marie's son, bad moulted the Chilian who waa raoortad mutsing m Btat"volunteers" In Kor In| '•' dmingthe war and never rethem "dojpi" A month al student l )"ed %  "• Su )l, nu Court the end ncrs ;ic"s * —*>•hr*nthle*slv = aft £ § r arsA ss"ss -,.„, p, !" by. .ho • nothlnibu^lho^M^^ ALWAVS n „ m0 ,„, loml0 „ j u U cc Dr"p.rlmcnl lo Copirs ,if II. 29— F,„ homben, Ua tort" Ui*c M !" i"jL'*l"?;' h ,jli"•' ron Arctic ccnc nn %  at a about the killing. Since then a ; i.,i i i D laston has iwi-n appointed by trnCuidnd Bolivar ' Deportment to investigate '"> bomb in the matter of thieves roasting king > II thief joining the Yoimi' overnrnt; and spre.nl ours (he aatil ai cfniid di>tio> NarlOCtdad thai in Austrian low. the mother is heir to the properly despite her praVWOa crime. The ease unique In Austrian legal history Keuter. W. i, Vr f.othf-ll toi IlRKAM -TneSoap ( the i Plav safe be nrepareu. f.* vour rom nilic nv-imjit .;.i %  lew cakai Ol DKE.VH nn>T sfAP. use II v in your bJlhbasin for a sofl-sjaafahghan. radiant with nalu-i' mtKAM hi available at toilet gpddi nters throughout the island. i.i£ icwtlli— cr—were not expected to fly for •ome time. Russia in all had about 18.000 oeratinn aircraft designed mostly lo tactical ail arms of 1.200 planes each, the Magazine said. Russia's annual warplane proiclud, ;u ,l laatn to understand how reading, writing and arlthmeti. ivdl help them catch more scali or fish. Versatile t>ndrr lUCtK i of 8.500 warolanes. Miss Rcsblnaon teacher When said sadlv." not IIK,the 1 Ol'T IN ('ALU-UKNlA there U a cotton rush With cotton selling at 45 cents a lb.--live times prewar—Califomians by the thousand are starting to grow it THEY IIAVEHTARTF.D a Forty Plus Club in New York. It helps the over-forties to find job*. But diflrrvnco The club SENSATMOXAMJ VALUES SEJVSATMOJVAM. SAVINGS II •####.# %  : 1101 si HAHI.IIXS I..I.SI COME EARLY FOR THE BETTER SELECTION is more than bout of infUi,| lfl .•d'6.000 flintora^OOU* 19% iafa e"*a hlta the ~" { !" e !" \^J K ""* OOty mterstrd m f BXO .'E? •"Sh?'.; 9BmwSS a>-ea."' (former) salary of applicant." SIU.UOO ?> ' ?2^£SS Skltt* pared with the rate of more Ihmn rerliricale Ii • "' %  '>^ .' 100.000 a year lurne.1 out bv the br.,n mcdallton of th United States In the Second World W.r—Rrutcr Trinidad Will Study B'doa Fishery Plan 0*n CorrMpondf Saving Societv, medallion and bar of the St. John Ambulance Association, and probably is the only woman in the world to hold a Boy Scout medal This prize possession was granted her last year, at an Eskimo teremonv attended by her little about band of Eskimo Boy fewta. Oirl William Cook, who Guides. Brownies and Cubs (LIVE BROOK, who i> a smash hit on Broadway In the play "Second Threshold," will leave H i few months to get back lo hu larm in Sussex '-| haven't got all that time to spare.' he says He is 59 IIA H'PlNO La to mike a film lb.•-, (Mad Dillinger.' as luinlel down in the desert after killin nides. Brownies ano v.uu • What great power has drown six people. Ti this woman from civilization to Ihe Cod." -rennesa of the Arctic? PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 27. Trinidad is likely to follow the Barbados programme for assisting bwreraeta for Itarhadoi lo study the plan and Pruetke Bdmbiiig Goes On By R.A.F. On Heligoland. New Style EISENSTADT. Austria. Feb. see the programme in action. A delegate of the Fisherman's Association visited Barbados recently and reported to the Standing Advisory Committee on Fishj wn Austrlans who sought a cry that the Barbados Government Solomon's judgment from a Bushad a plan of assistance to the Man Zone court knew todny that Barbados fishermen, which emm( "Soviet style" varies from Ihe braces advances by the local Gov„iieicnl pattern, ernment to fishermen for building new and modern seaworthy boats The men were parlies to a law ond the purchasing of modern Milt seeking to determine which fishing gear. of the two u the legal owner or Co-operative marketing of the a store. The case had hung for ilso providlive years in Aiistmn %  eil for by the plan, and So far the aeheVne has proved to be a success Finally th. From Ihe findings of the inembei the Fishermen's Asso, nut lined to the Standing Advisory out of the Austrian courts t nii.ii itt<'%  !, Ftabery, the Commake his own derialoi BONN, Feb. 18. British practice bombing on the North Sea Island of Hi has been resumed, a British spokesman said hare to-day. It asauad have been rontinuen until an alternative target on the German North Sea coast had been selected, lie said. The British anr.nuncexl last i Monday thai the Island would ha handed back to Germany by i Bpgfcsfl 1&52. — Keuler Britain's Shipbuilding Lead Decreasing LONDON. Feu. 28. Britain's i>ost asked the Soviet buildinK dropped by 10 per cant jder ul the Ruaatan Zone hi four vean in the face f growof Elsensladt to take the eae Ing competition fiom foreign shlp.,„'! it;* It-It that the Information brought back by this member had •ome merit. The committee then n.veil nt the conclusion that the scheme in Barbados ought to be Investigated on the spot and the i net hods and procedure studied The Commander listened to the arguments of both men Next day he handed down the decreeThe store would l>c confiscated by the itUaatani It was I.N.S. yards. Lloyd'J jnnu;.l summary t id newly launtlMil rnercsuaill ihipa showed lodaj that the British outi.i. t of Tiierchant vessels fell to 27 (I per cent ol Ihe world total In UM0. i ^ Ith ">.t per cent In 1946. %  fter the end of the SecOnd World War.--ll l IO.\S USE Charles Mc Enearney & Co... Ltd. 2