Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
hav badtos



ESTABLISHED 1895





a

Australia Loses Ist
Test In 13 Years

From W. J. O'REILLY.

MELBOURNE, Feb. 28.
ENGLAND’S CLEAR CUT VICTORY here
to-day has done much good for cricket. We
were all tired of the one way traffic. The tremendous
ovation for Brown and his team this afternoon was
proof of that.

But England, delighted as she may be about it
all, has like Australia some building up work ahead
to do to maintain the optimism which to-day’s vic-
tory arouses.

Bedser and Hutton have been the outstanding players
| of-the series. Bedser ranks undoubtedly as one of the
greatest bowlers of all time, but he is now a veteran. His

colyssal role in the rehabilitating of English cricket has been
enacted. But his test career is nearly over..

ze So too with Hutton, Not until

this ‘series have the Australian
German Banks





a

public seen the real Hutton.
Review Trade

Now we have seen him at his

best. We are all satisfied to rank

FRANKFURT, Feb. 28,
The central council of west

German banks met here to-day to
continue the exhaustive review of
west Germany's foreign trade
position and credit problems
which have developed to crisis

proportions in the iast two weeks.
A council spokesman told
Reuter to-day that a Communique
would be issued probably to~-
morrow afternobn.

Tne spokesman said the council
was discussing west Germany’s
foreign trade position and the
measures aimed at credit réStric-
tions, One subject under discus-
sion was understood to be the
raising of German bank rates
from six to eight percent or
possibly higher.

The west German Government
last night proclaimed a temporary
embargo on imports of all gpods
from west European cpuntries.

A Government spokesman said
the Government was to re-
vise its import regulations in the
next few days as part of the
coming overhaul of the country’s

whole economic poliesazhich has
hitherto emphasised the principles

of a “free” as against a “planned”
economy.—Reuter,



14-Year-Old Boy
Kills Parents

AUCKLAND, California, Feb. 28,
A 14-year-old boy charged with
shooting both his parents dead
while they watched a television
show was described by psychia-
trists here as sane but ‘obsessed
by simultaneous feelings of love,
hate and jealousy for his parents.”
The boy, Donald Arceo told re-
porters at juvenile detention
quarters that he sent a bullet into
his father’s temple and shot his
mother as she screamed at him.
Donald, an only child, afterwards
gave himself up tp the police. Psy -
chiatrists discovered that the boy
held an intense love for his par-
ents but had come to hate his
father “because he wanted to be
like his dad and could not.”
Donald was also jealous of the
love his parents held for each
pther and felt left out, the psychi-
atrists said. Californian law for-
bids the imposition of_the death
penalty on anyone under 18 but
minors can be jailed for life.
—Reuter.

him “tops.” But it will be opti-
mistic to think he can retain such
form much longer.

It will be hard to replace these
two champions. Tattersall has
clinched a permanent place. He
is a knowledgeable player with
distinct promise.

But what happened to the young
players. Not one added one iota
to his reputation.

We are in the same boat, Hassett,
our oldest player, topped both
average and aggregate in batting

Iverson our “mystery” bowler,
took the stage as a veteran and
now announces his retirement.

Lindwall and Miller have run
their full course as express bowl-
ers.

Attack unwieldy

Our attack has been made ex-
tremely unwieldy by the foolish
policy of our selectors in concen-
trating on off spinners, There
were four of them in this Test.
Off spinners are seldom worth a
cracker in this country.

But we have one silver lining.
Our. two young batsmen Burke
and Hole haye come to stay. Hole,
tall and athletic, hits the ball
powerfully. He will supply plenty
of headaches for England’s bowl-
ers in the future. These two
youngsters give us the edge on
England for the future.

But England’s victory to-day
will surely make a_ challenging
call to English youth, f

The bogey of Australian invinci-
bility has been overcome.

Scores:—



AUSTRALIA—Ist Innings ....-...+> 27
ENGLAND—Ist Innings ........-+.. 320
Australia—2nd Inning:

Burke c Hutton b Bedser ........... 1
Morris 1.b.w, b Bedser ... pant oe
Hassett b Wright... ; 48
Harvey |.b.w. b Wrig . 50
Miller c & b Brown . Be

Hole b Bailey ....





Jan Johnsoh ¢ Brown b Wright .. ©
Lindwall b Bedser .........-..-..... 14
Tallon not out ............. 2
Bill Johnston b Bedser ... 1
Iverson c Compton b Bedser ....... 0
Extras: (2b, 81b.,1w.,inb) 12
197

RK W.

59 6

32 1

32 1

36 3

6 0

Hutton not out .....-...........045. 60
Washbrook ¢ Lindwall b Johnston 7
Simpson run out ............ 15
Compton not out .. sages tarpat sie’) Ae
Extras: (2 leg byes) 2
Total (or 2 wkts.) 95



“Kill The

Chinese:

Save Ourselves”
Ridgway Tells Army Commanders

{ Almost all forces along

TOKYO, Feb. 28,
the 60 miles United Nations

offensive front pushed forward to-day in general probing
attacks to test Communist defences among the wet muddy

hills of central Korea.

Frontline reports indicated patchy resistance on the
= Ee — flanks, ot ee spa and counter-
attacks in the centre around Hoengsong keystone of what is
thought to be the main North Korean line. .

map Sipe ote aee oe Cae Sees

Train Crash Kills 3

RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 28

The engine driver and two other
crewmen lost their lives to-day
when a train crashed into the
water after becoming derailed
while crossing a bridge, About 20
people travelling in the single pas-
senger car in the rear suffered
only slight injury.

The train belonged to the Gov-
ernment operated ida De Fer-
ro Central Do Brazil which also
runs Rio Suburban lines where
another crash occurred last night
killing three and injuring over 70
passengers.—Reuter,



DISAPPOINTED?

WASHINGTON, Feb. 28
John Foster Dulles, President
Truman’s Special Envoy said to-
day he would be greatly disap-
pointed if a peace treaty for Japan
was not near completion by the,
middle of 1951.—Reuter.

Lieutenant-General Matthew B.
Ridgway, 8th Army Commander,
yesterday told his frontline com-
manders: “We have only one ob-
jective—to kill the Chinese and
save ourselves,”

Today he ordered forward his
six-nation attacking force, through
heavy mud, after a day of desult-
ory skirmishing.

Small ibd Communists
had tought ski delaying actions
to cover the Communists with-
drawal to the new line north of
the swollen Han River and across
the difficult hill contours in the
cegion south of the 38th parallel.

An 8th Army spokesman said
tonight that elements of the vet-
eran American ist Calvary Div-
ision advanced 2,000 yards on the
central front today. With only
light enemy |resistance, cavalry-
men took Hill 297, key attack
base, for their drive towards the
eentral rail junction of Yongdu a
few hundred yards to the north.

—Reuter.

nse Nemesis thie maee Sanaa ——

SEVENTY asAND STILL. GOING STRONG















THURSDAY, MAPCH 1,

1951

ARUNDELL WILL FLY BACK TO GRENADA '



Advorat





PRICE, FIYSyCENTS



we :

NN Diminishing raaDlanaplhivstshoiiinigien

PERGUSON who made 84 not ont yesterday is seen here pulling Roy Marshall for four to enter
the seventies. His was a grand knock which helped to put his side in a comfortable position.



‘NO STEPS
Says Griffiths

LONDON, Feb., 28.

Fitzroy MacLean, Conservative,
asked in the Commons to-day who
was now in occupation on Decep-
tion Island in the Antarctic, Colo-
nial Secretary James Griffiths re-
plied there were both British and
Argentine parties established on
Deception Island. British forces
were in charge of a magistrate
and maintained a meteorological
station and post office. MacLean
asked what was being done to
evict “these undesirable aliens
from British territory.” Griffiths
replied that no steps have been
taken. Government hag indicated
that it is quite prepared to let this
matter be decided by the Inter-
national Court.

—Reuter.



day to 488 for 8.

The Price Of
Sugar Is Down

From R. M. MacCOLL.





NEW YORK.
Workers Demand While the price of everything
else creeps steadily up, sugar

Severe Punishment

PRAGUE, Feb. 28.

There was no indication here to-
day when Dr, Vladimer Clementis
and his associates, arrested on|dcwn to 41s. 5d. for 100 lbs.
alleged treachery and conspiracy,| Behind that drop is a healthy
are to appear before the People’s|sign—scare buying and hoarding,
State court. which started after the Korean

The case has been put in the] war began and was fairly acute at

sags. Why? Because there is too
much in America just now.

Last month it would have cost
you 44s. 6d. to buy 100lb. of
sugar in the U.S. To-day it is

hands of the State prosecutor. The|times last year, is pretty well
preparation of the indictment may | dead.

take weeks. Rude Pravye Com-' One up to the American house-
munist Party paper to-day pub-| wife.

lished letters from factory workers Footnote: 100 Ibs. of sugar
in various parts of the country| would cost 41s.°8d. in Britain.
calling for severest punishment] —L.E.S,

for “the disgusting traitors to the
party and all working people.”
—Reuter.

Ban On Red Cross
Emblems Lifted

GENEVA, Feb. 28.

General Mac Arthur has lifted
the ban on Red Cross national
uniforms and emblems in Korea,
the League of Red Cross Societies
announced here to-day. }

General Mac Arthur forbade |
members of Red Cross teams in
Korea to wear their own uniforms,
insignia and protective emblems,
on the ground that they became
members of the United Nations
Command on arriving in Korea.

Danish, Norwegian, British and
Canadian Red Cross teams were
informed on arrival in Tokyo that
they would not be allowed to wear
emblems. They protested to the
International League of Red Cross
Societies which in turn protested
to the United Nations.—Renter.



PILOT BANNED
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28.

The Civil Aeronautics Board to-
day barred Captain Rio Bridoux,
Bolivian pilot, from ever flying
again in this country.

Bridoux, now back in Bolivia,
was blamed. for a plane collision
that killed 55 people here on No-
vember 1, 1949.—-Reuter.

|POCKET CARTOON
| by OSBERT, LANCASTER







RADAR EQUIPMENT
STOLEN FROM R.A.F.

CHELVESTON, Northamp-
tonshire, Feb. 28.

Radar and radio equipment
worth thousands of pounds has
been stoten from an R.A.F. sta-
tion here.

One estimate of its value is
£50,000. The robberies, it is be-
lieved, have been going on for
some months.—Reuter.

ce

* Now
that while
prepared to share blood
donors, use of the oxygen tent

lease don’t forget
we are quite

is to be reserved exc usively
forGovernment supporters!”

ce





FRENCH GOVERNMENT RESIGNS

By HAROLD KING

PARIS, Feb. 28. | price policies are urgently needed

The French coalition Cabinet |owing to the rising cost of living
headed by Rene Pleven, ended to-— |and the growing labour unrest.

day after holding office for 231) The Civil budget for this year

days. The Cabinet resigned at the has also not yet been voted,

end of the long drawn out debate | To-night for the second time in 24) had again tried to reach agree-|tain as many candidates as there|Eeonomic Secretary to the Treas

Stollmeyer Seores Double
Century In Trinidad’s 488
Barbados. Spends Another
Day In The Field

BY O.S.

TRINIDAD kept Barbados for another whole day in the
field yesterday and at close of play had carried their over-
night score of 232 for the loss of 2 wickets on the previous

COPPIN















Jeffrey Stollmeyer turned in
another sterling display of bats-
manship and completed his sec~
-pa'double century on Barb:
‘soil when he added 94 runs. to hi
total of 114 of the previous day
to score 208 runs in 506 minutes,
before his runner was run out
and therefore he as well.

It will be remembered that
Stollmeyer scored 210 against
Barbados for Trinidad at Ken-
sington in 1944.

Stollmeyer gave a_ possible
chance of a stump at 21 on the
previous day but he completed
201 without blemish before he
gave a chance to Denis Atkinson,
fielding at short fine leg to the
bowling of Clyde Walcott,

Yesterday Stollmeyer still used
a runner but his strokes were
characterised by their wonted
fluency. Indeed he brought off
some cover drives that gave the
fieldsmen no chance, and clever
wristwork helped him to make
crisp strokes off the pads between
the gaps in the onside field.

Wilfred Ferguson, number one
crowd pleaser turned in a valu-
able supporting performance and
was 84 not out at close of play.
He has been at the wicket tor
204 minutes and has bit twelve
fours, With Stollmeyer he put
on 100 runs in 102 minutes for
the seventh wicket, and that part-
nership had yielded 111 before
Stollmeyer was runout.

Bowler Weekes

Everton Weekes again took
bowling honours yesterday, He
had already secured the best fig-
ures of one wicket for 6 runs on
the previous day and yesterday
he took two more wickets to make
his bag 3 for 75 in 20 overs.

The Barbados fielding was good
at first but ragged towards the
close of play as the fieldsmen
were evidently feeling the
strain of two dayssin the field,

Two chances went abegging,
Jeffrey Stollmeyer at 201 and
Ferguson at 34. Both of these
should have been taken. Special
mention must be made however
of the first class ground fielding
of Charlie Taylor, Hunte and
Keith Walcott.

Ferguson wili surely be given
his chancé at’ a century to-day
and Trinidad should reach the
500-run mark. This will put
Trinidad in a very strong posi-
tion.

@ On Page &



| Government decisions on wage and | failure to resolve differences in his; there shall be two ballots in the

Cabinet on the system of voting
to be used by the nation in the
General Election this year.

| To-day’s move came when the
| cone hour meeting of the Cabinet
























Gairy Sends ‘Cease
Violence’ Call

FROM CARRIACOU

(By Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 28.
SIR ROBERT ARUNDELL, Governor of the
Windward Islands, is to cut short his leave
in Britain to leave for the West Indies because of
rioting in the island of Grenada, the Colonial Office
said to-day, He leaves England March 6.



Len Hutton
Wins £1,000

MELBOURNE, Feb, 28.
Len Hutton has won the prize
of £1,000 offered by a business
house for the “best player" in the
series of five Test matches which
ended to-day. He was awarded
three points for his second innings
of 60 not out to-day and finished
with 29 points. This was only one
point ahead of his captain Freddie
Brown with 28.

Keith Miller, Australis ll- ‘
rounder was third with 271 pointe. Mr. James Griffiths, Secretary of State for the
Reuter Colonies, told the Commons he was also sending his



Labour Adviser to the island, torn for more than a
week by strikes and incidents.

Sir Robert Arundell, who was not due to return
until the middle of March, will fly back next week.
The Labour Adviser will go within the next few
days to act in an advisory capacity to authorities
there.

Russia Will Not
Start A War
——-SPAAK BELIEVES

BRUSSELS, Feb, 28.
Paul Henri Spaak, Chairman of

the European Consultative Assem-| ~ The bid for political power by

bly said here to-day he did not
believe the Soviet Union would
start a war “because the Russians
must understand that if they fail-
ed to beat the Americans withir
a matter of six months, they would
never beat them.”

Belgium’s former Premier - was
speaking at Brussels airport, afte: HONG KONG, Feb, 28.
@ somewhat rough flight from the British authorities in Formosa
United States where he made a| asked Chinese Nationalist authori
six weeks’ lecture tour ties to delay their threat to

Spaak said: “I am very much{ bomb an unidentified aircraft
impressed by America’s gigantic g*arr-er reported 20 miles off the
effort in the military field and the | west coast of Formosa according
corresponding drive in the econo- | 'O a message received here from
mic and fiscal fields.—Reuter, Taipeh, Formosa.
The British requested the delay

Nationalists Not
To Bomb Carrier



5 until a check had been made
Voluntary Action Te! through British naval headquar-
‘| vers in Hong Kong,

Chinese Nationalists then threw
a security cloak over the whole
incident.

SAYS TRUMAN Earlier reports of the presence
9 the aircraft carrier ,
WASHINGTON, Feb, 28. thrown Chinese military élicles

President Truman declared infin Formosa into confusion, The
a television broadcast from the] carrier was understood not to be
White House to-day that ‘“volun- an American ship.
tary action by people who believe The British aircraft
im a common cause is. still the
far nor force in the world. It ix} this » afternoon

Greatest Weapon

from northern
ar more effective than any form] waters.
tyranny. . A naval

“If we as a nation get together|said earlier
in that spirit of freedom, I am}ship off Formosa
sure that we can overcome the] British ship”.
crisis that faces the free world,
and I believe that we can bring
the world nearer to the peace
which all men desire”.

The President was opening the
1952 appeal for contributions to
the American Red Cross,

General George Marshall, Sec-
retary of Defence and forme
President of the American Rea
Cross, addressed the rally for the
Same cause at Madison Square
Garden, New York.

—Reuter

French Legate

spokesman here had

“could be a
—Reuter.



Action Against
Dock Strikers

In Australie

CANBERRA, Feb, 28.
Australia’s Labour Minister
Harold Holt, announced to-day

he coal crisis will be submitted to
the Australian Parliament which
vi » 4 will Open on March 7,
Declines hivitation Holt also announced that
dockers did not remove their over-
CAIRO, Feb. 28, lime Dan by March 4, action
French Ambassador Couve De] Would be taken the following day
Murville to~day declined the in|‘ proclaim the section of
vitation of Mayptian Foreign Min-] —rimes Act enabling the stevedor-
ister, Salah El Din Bey to cal!
upon him to discuss the situation
in Morocco, The Ambassador sent
an apology for his inability to

the men.
A fuli arbitration court to-day
lismissed charges of contempt

ains » General Secretary of

keep the appointment. against the General Becre as
French official circles said that the Australian Miners . Union|
the Ambassador declined to call} Georse William Grant and the

union’s Vice-President William

on the Foreign Minister because 3
7 . Parkinson.

it is considered that the French :

attitude that “Moroecan and North Miners Union President nie
African affairs are no concern}]Â¥#ams, was dismissed by a fu
of the Egyptian Government.” court on February 20, ae

—Reuter.

RED OPPOSITION TO
CHURCH CONTINUES
In Czechoslovakia

PARIS, Feb. 28.
The Communist fight to elimin-





Labour Party
Takes A Hand

WELLINGTON, New Zealand,

ate the chureh igs going on un Feb, 28.

abated in Czechoslovakia, the New Zealand’s Labour Party
Conservative newspaper. Figare broke silence In the dock strike
reported to-day. “Vice Premier Z.} tonight by offering its help to

reach a settlement

The Party which deprecated the
use of troops to load and unload
ships today suggested a conference
which all parties to the strlixc
should be compelled to attend

Keith J. Holyoake, Minister for
Agriculture, announced today that
next week's wool sales at Auck-
land and Wonganu would be post-
\{ poned because of the dock strike

ive state coal mines with 1,500
workers on South Island were idle
today in sympathy with the dock-

|] ers.

At Canterberg—South Island—
freezing workers decided today
not to handle meat for export.
They will continue to kill but ex-
port meat will remain in store

—Reuter

EMPIRE NEGLECTED |
FOR ARGENTINA

jnext General Election in France |
i Under the single ih

or only one. Under the sing LONDON, Feb. 28
method electors would vote for the The widely read Dally Express
lists of candidates—one list for} sommenting to-day on the’ visit]
{each party—and a list would con-|tg Buenos Aires of the British

Denek Fierlinger ‘recertly said
the Bishop had taken an oath to
the new regime and would confer
Holy Orders on all new priests,
Monsignor Beran, Archbishop
of Prague, though not officially a
prisoner, ig unable to leave his
palace. —Reuter.



TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT









on the Electrical Reform Bill which | hours, Pleven asked the President|ment. The National Assembly | are seats in g department ury, John Edwards, said that it
began last Thursday. | to be relieved of office. had voted by 311 to 295 against Under the double ballot there} was to be hoped that he would be |
Nine successive votes since last | a single ballot system — offered} would be two pools a week apart.|cuccessful in. getting more meat}
Thursday showed that it was im-| Based on a stormy issue the elec-| as alternative 4o the government’s |/The idea is thdt if votes are scat-|for Britain at a “reasonable
possible to get Radical and Catho~ | tora] reform resignation was in no |own complicated proposals. The|tered among a large number of |price.” This paper complained,
lic groups inside g Government | way the result of a vote of confi-/ Assembly recessed while the |candidates in the first poll the |however, that the British Empire
majority to agree on what new | dence. | Cabinet conferred with the MRP | second poll gives them a chance to|had been neglected “to the benefit}
system voting at General Elec-| Last night the President defin— Popular Republicans who have the | regroup themselves round candi-{of the Argentine” and “cheap |
tions was to be. itely refused to accept Pleven’s|majority party in the Cabinet. | dates with the best chance of suc-|meat"’ s the cry, while “no!

It also comes at atime when/’resignation, also following the

Crux of the issue is whether



cess. —Reuter. meat” was the result—Reuter

that the unidentified | workers’

that Special legislation to deal with |Governor Green at

ing industry board to discipline} c¥tive tour

E. M. Gairy, the Grenada labour

British Ask Chinese feader, is believed to underlie the

strikes on the island,

Griffiths said that nothing could
‘ce done to deal with the under-
lying causes of these disorders
until disturbances had ceased and
there had been aq general resump
tion of the work Negotiations
could then be started

Those who have allowed them-
selves to be led into these acts of
violence, are doing great harm to
the island and their own inter-
ests” the Minister added.

Anxiety

Anthony Eden, Leputy Leader

of the Opposition, asked if these
disturbances were purely locat,
There was much anxiety» about

riots which did damage not only
to the island, but to the good name
and trade of the whole of the
West Indies and to the happiness

had] of the people, he said.

Griffiths replied that to the
best of his knowledge the dis
turbances were purely local in
origin, He did not think they had

! carrier} any connection with events out-
Warrier arrived in Hong Kong] side the island,

Our correspondent cabling from
Grenada. states thut 2 delegation
of three of the Manual and Mental
Union Executive by
courtesy of the Government, were
taken by H.M.S. Devonshire last
night to Carriacou, where Gairy
resides in detention, to interview
him and returned this morning.

The party were: C, A. Lowe,
Deputy President General, Allen
Williams and H, A. MeKie who
had a three-hour meeting aboard
the ship with their chief. Also
present were Captain Stokes of
the Devonshire and O. R, Kelsick,
District Officer, Carriacou

Request Granted

Returning, the varty saw Acting
Government
House informing him that they
brought a message from Gairy to
request the workers in his name

if jto desist from violence and intimi-

dation.
The Acting Governor agreed to
the temporary lifting of the ban

the }on public addrésses, accepting the

undertaking that M.M.W.U. Exe-
the country making
this appeal

From noon onwards,
was spread.

iandslides are still untouched
and very little work done in coun-
try districts. Yesterday the water
stoppage ended,

“Soviets Could
Start War”

If They Were Ready

WASHINGTON, Feb, 28.

the news



General Lucius Clay, former
American Military Governor it
Germany said to-day he was
convinced that North Atlanti
Pact nations could have forces
ready within one year to make
Soviet agygression seem “unprofii
able” He was addressing two

Senate Committees in
President Truman's policy of
helping European defence by)
sending more American troops to
Europe. General Clay said he did
net believe west Europe and the

support of

defence build-up would preeipi-
tate Soviet aggression

“Soviet masters would have
precipitated war by now if the
were ready”, he said A weil
trained, well equipped allied
force would be able “to sustain
the slow moving Russian attact
while we mobilise additional
forces. I am _ convinced that

within a year forces will be ready
which will make aggression secm
unprofitable if we pursue at full



steam ahead the course we set”,
General Clay said.

General Clay who spent four
years in Germany, said Western
Germany would have to be re-
eeived into the North Atlantic
Pact on a “reasonable basis” if
real- fighting support- from Ger-
man troops could be expected.

Advocating the use of German
troops in European defence, the
General said it was not fealisti





to expect German contributions
until a proper political atmos-
| phere had been created and West
ern Germany was no longer under
occnnatien

“We should move in that direc-
tion as quickly as possible,” he
added.

—Reuter







PAGE TWO





Carub Calling

APT. W. A. FARMER, Super-

intendent of Police leaves this
afternoon for England on_ the
Golfito. Heé is going to the U.K.
on a six months’ Police Officer’s
course. :

Here Again

ACK to spend another holiday
B in ‘Barbados are Mr. and Mrs.
G: F. Pearson and Mr. and Mrs.
Harley W. Larkin of Toronto who

ived from Canada yesterday
Araening. by T.C.A. r
*°Mr. Pearson is a Banker in
Toronto, Mr. Larkin is in the lum-
ber business. They are here for a
nth, staying at the Windsor
Hotel.

At Seawell to meet them were

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Ross, Cana-
dians also holidaying in Barbadgs.

From Pittsburgh
aR. and Mrs. George Vaughan
arrived from Bermuda yes-
terday by T.C.A. Here for a
month, they are staying at the
Marine Hotel. Mr. Vaughan runs
his own business in Pittsburgh.
He is a fur merchant. They were
in Bermuda for two days awaiting
T.C.A’s mid-week flight to Bar-
bados. ‘
Insurance Manager
M* C. N. MacDONALD, Man-
ager of Travellers Insurance
@o,. in Toronto and Mrs. Mac-
Donald arrived by T.C.A. yester-
day morning to spend two weeks’
holiday in Barbados. They are
spending the first part of their
stay at the Enmore Hotel and the
tter part at the Ocean View
otel, '
From Toronto
R. and Mrs. W. M. Hiller ar-
rived on T.C.A’s mid-week
flight from Canada yesterday to
spend a month or six weeks’ holi-
day at the Marine Hotel. -Mr.
Hiller is a retired businessman of
Toronto.

Arriving on the same plane were
Mr. and Mrs. H. §S. Phillips of
Hamilton, Ontario. They are here
until the-end of March staying at
the Oceah View Hotel. Mr. Phil-
lips is a €ivil Engineer in Hamil-

ton. > ae
First Visit
“@ RRIVENG from the U.S. yes-
l terddy via Canada by T.C.A.
were Mroand Mrs. C. W. Still-
= of Chicago accompanied by
r. Arnold Sagalyn of New York.
They. are staying at the Four
Win Club, St. Peter. This is
eir first visit here.
~ Mr; Stillman is an Economist
at the University of Chicago. Mr.
and Mrs. Stillman expect to be
here for one month. Mr. Sagalyn
who is Edithr of the New York
Sunday Times, plans to spend a
month’s holiday in Barbados.

~ Knitting President
NAR. G. G. BEAMISH, President,
of Chipman Hilton Knitting
Go., Ltd. in Hamilton arrived
from Canada yesterday morning
by T.C.A. accompanied by his
Wife. They are here for one
onth’s holiday staying at the
rbados Aquatic Club.

BY THE WAY

rN the days of my youth it
® was understood that the man
or the team beaten at a game

accepted the fact quietly. There 1

was to be no whining about “bad
luck”.

But to-day a game is half—
science, half commercial racket,

and most of the fun has gone
out of jt. Every day some
individual or some team is

blubbering excuses for a defeat.

It is*done like this: Of course,
nobo would be unsporting
enou to. suggest that our

opponents did not deserve to win
or toygrudge them their victory.
But must be said that they

were ery lucky to win, and that
our defeat was largely owing to

CROSSWORD



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: 5. Delian, 4, Screen: 5, Prairie:

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Breakfast Cloths

coloured Borders from
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REXWEAR SHEETS

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EVANS








ARTIE'S HEADLINE



“An@ now that steei is
nationalised, | tuppose
they'll be saying ‘If only we
had the tin we could give
you tinned food—if only we

had the food’.”

Surprise Visit
R. DENNIS CUMMINGS,
son of the late R. M. Cum-
we and Mrs. Cummings, of
“Mayville,” Codrington Hill, St.
Michael, recently arrived from
New York on a surprise visit to
his mother and sister.

Mr. Cummings is proprietor of
Dennys Quncheonette, New Ro-
chelle, New York, and was last
in: Barbados about twenty-seven
years ago. He notes many im-
provements in the island, civic as
well as social and architectural.

impressed
R. JULIAN GARRETT, Di-
rector of Petroleum and Nat~
ural Gas who was atthe Crane
Hotel for the past few days, is now
staying at the Windsor with Mrs.
Garrett.

He said that this is his first visit
to the island and he was much
impressed with the natural beauty
of the island and had found the
people most friendly and hospi-
table.

Mr. Garrett besides holding
various other posts in Canada, is
Immediate Past President of
Dominion Council of Professional
Engineers.

Civil Engineer
M*: AND MRS. ROBERT
FLEMING of Toronto are
down to spend four or five weeks
in Barbados. They are guests at
the Marine Hotel. Mr. Fleming
is a Civil Engineer in Toronto.

Twelve Years Ago
R. and Mrs. Frank Dixon
w®o visited Barbados twelve
years ago are here again for an-
other holiday. They arrived from
the U.S. via Trinidad on Tuesday
afternoon by B.W.LA. and_ are
guests at the Ocean View Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. Dixon hail from
Chicago.

Back to Trinidad
RS. ALVIN TUCKER and her
son Glenn who spent a short
holiday in Barbados staying at
“West Wego”, St. James, returned
to Trinidad on Tuesday afternoon
by B.W.LA
They were accompanied by Mrs.
Tucker’s brother-in-law and sister
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Maingot.

Here for Two Weeks
M . and Mrs. J. A. Kitchen
and their daughter Sally
Ann were among the passengers
arriving from Canada yesterday
morning by T.C.A. Mr. Kitchen
is a manufacturer of ladies’ hosiery
in Hamilton, They are here for
two months staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.

En-route to Grenada

R. AND MRS. BERNARD

COLLINS are on their way
to Grenada.. Mr. Collins is a
director of T. A. Collins Limited
of England. They arrived from
Canada yesterday morning by
T.C.A. They leave this afternoon
for Trinidad by B.W.I.A, Mean-
while they are guests at the Hotel
Royal.

Speaker's Cousin
Mt. and Mrs. Wilbert E. Hus-

bands who had been holiday-
ing with relatives for the past
couple of months left for the U.S.
on Tu . Mr. Husbands who
is a relative of Mr. K. N. R. Hus-
bands, Speaker of the House of
Assembly has been living in the
U.S. for the past twenty-seven
years, His home is in Boston.

Trinidad Turfite
R. ALEX CHIN, TRINIDAD
turfite arrived from Trini-
dad on Tuesday afternoon by
B.W.LA. He is here for the Bar—
bados Turf Club’s Spring Meet-
ing. He was accompanied by Mrs.
Chin. They are staying at Super
Mare Guest House Worthing.
English Ham
ADIO AMATEURS’ HAMS
in Barbados have probably
spoken on several occasions to
Mr. W. G. C. Wyer over their
amateur “sets”. Yesterday Carib
spoke to him in person, as he
was among the passengers arriv
ing on the T.C.A. "plane yester-
day morning. He came down fron.
England via Canada,

Mr. Wyer, an Electroni<
Engineer in Bournemouth, Hamp-
shire, operates a radio amateui
station in Bournemouth under the
eall sign G2ZB. When he used tc
live in Canada his call sign was
VESBP.

At Seawell to meet him was
Mr. Sidney Lashley local radio
amateur.

Wine Producer

R. and Mrs. E. A. Thomas of
Niagara Falls arrived by
T.C.A. yesterday. Here for a
month, they are staying at the

Barbados Aquatic Club.
Mr. Thomas is President of T. G.
Bright and Co., Wine producers.
—

by Beachcomber é

hing ra wee The dignified A Job for Mimsie
Oe ae aye alt tev yous SUGGESTION has_ beer.
gee? ee eee Fee ee made by the Ministry of

Pep for Beethoven

The film is a documentary of
the Boston Symphony Orchestra
playing Beethoven, livened with
shots of girl students swimming
between classes, :

(News Item.)
J IVENED is the operative word,

i In other words, something
for everybody but not enough to
prevent complaints. A Congress-
man said the bathing dresses were
too scanty. Someone else said
that to try to liven up Beethoven
in this way was all wrong. One
way of pleasing far :nore people
would be to liven up Beethoven
by getting the students in their
bathing costumes to play certain
passages while the musicians did
a bit of swimming. Or else let the
orchestra sit in the water to play
while the girls frolic round them,
splashing them, and_ crying.
“Yippee!”











3 oz. size

1 oz.

BRINGS OUT THE NATURAL
WIGHLIGHTS IN YOUR HAIR

SOLD EVERYWHERE

Food that the exquisite Mimsie
Slopeorner should be sent on 4
tour of the egg-counting stations
to try to shorten the gap between
marking and grading, and to talk
to the packers and loaders. /
high official (called by his col
leagues the High Egg) said
“This won't, of course, get Us any
more eggs. But it should give «
fillip to the egg-workers, and
make them cheerier.” Asked wha’
she would talk about, Mimsic
said. “It will just be heart-to
heart talks about the home fron’
egg-mindedness and getting
together.”
Shop-Shape and
Piccadilly Fashion
The shop sailed majestically up
the Thames.
(News Item.)
PLICE the till, Mr. Salesman.
and see that every tar aboard
the Waring and Gillow has a
double ration of rum.



THE SHAMPOO OF
THE STARS





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BARBADOS ADVOCATE









“Bob And Sally” Junior Short Story Competition |

Produced by Social Guidance
Enterprises of the U.S.A.
This film which opens at the
Plaza Cinema (Bridgetown) on
the 9th of March, 1951, explains
sex on the screen.

It depicts a home in a town
where a Mr. and Mrs. Wright live
with their two young daughtets.
The mother of this family fails Bo
give her daughters the necess@ry
information with regard to sex and
as a result when the older git!
marries her marriage fails and she
returns to her parents, In due
course she has a baby which is
born blind through venereal dis
ease contracted by her husband
during the early days of their
marriage when due to a quarrel
one evening he decided to join
some of his friends on one of their
“down town” activities.

Afraid

The younger sister of this fam-
ily finds that she is going to have
a baby and when her voung lover
suggests that they get married she
refuses because she is afraid-to tell
her mother. At her suggestion ar-
rangements are made by her lover
for her to go to a “quack doctor”
who performs such an unsatisfac-
tory operation that she faints in
the bus the way home and has
to be taken to the family doctor
who has to use all his skill to save
her life.

a

At this juncture the film is in-
terrupted by a talk on “Social Hy-
giene” which is illustrated by dia
grams. These diagrams show the
various organs of a male and fe-
male body and their functions
with regard to reproduction. It
also deals with the various aspects
of venereal disease.

When the film resumes it re-
veals that the younger sister and
her lover have been married and
the family doctor arranges a recon-
ciliation between the elder sister
and her husband who has now
been cured of venereal disease
and his addiction to alcohol ac-
yuired as a result of his unhappy
marriage.

The moral of this film is that it
is the duty of parents to endeavour





The Evening Advocate invites

‘its Junior Short Story Competition.

all children under 12 to enter for;
The best story will be published |

every Monday in The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive |

a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery.

The stories

can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 309

words in length, and must reach The

’s Editor, The Advocate

Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesday every week. |
Send this coupon with your story. |

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Title of Story

BEAUTY AND
CLIMATE

LONDON, Feb.

Davis Factor, son of the late Max
Factor, believes that British women
have made great strides in the
art of make-up.

Factor said:

“I haven’t been in Britain fot
over three years but already 1
see that women are much more
advanced in the use of cosmetics
than they were.

“The English girls do not over-
do their make-up or look artifi-

cial. They have the natural
look.”
Factor said that American

women spend more time on their
appearance and know much more
about the art of eye make-up.

“But the English girls have
learned a tremendous amount
about beauty in the last 15
years,” said Factor.

“They have good skins, too,
clear and delicate. You won't find
any like them except around the
Great Lakes. It’s all a matter of
climate.” —I.N.S.

to educate their children, at the
right age, on the various aspects
of sex.



nn aa

AQUATIC CLUE CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT at 8.30
RK.O. Presents

in

ROBERT MITCHUM—JANE GREER

“QUT OF THE PAST”

with KIRK DOUGLAS—RHONDA FLEMING
—ieaiidenacmmeernenenenpenlilnaham atime

Commencing Friday

2nd

FOREVER AMBER” in Technicolor

Starring: LINDA DARNELL-—CORNEL WILDE—RICHARD GREEN
A 20th Century-Fox Picture



Fb SPOS SOS SSO POPP PS PI PPP PPP OPPP OS

GLOBE THEATRE

TO-DAY

ONLY—5 and 8.30 p.m.

THAT MIDNIGHT

Mario Lanza — Jose Iturbi —Kathryn Grayson.
EXTRA SPORT FLASH TO-DAY,5 & 8.30.
“AUSTRALIA RETAIN THE ASHES.”
SEE THE HIGHLIGHTS in this Film:—

S

Hutton—At 62 bowled by Miller.
Compton—bowled by Miller for nought.

Washbrook—Caught Johnson, bowied Miller.

Lindwall, Iverson and

8 56565656,66 OOOO LAL LEELA LLL.

Jchnston in action.









The CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT

No. 6 MARHILL STREET

be served.

Choiced Chinese Dishes prepared by

Expert Chefs.

Fresh Trinidad SHRIMPS on the MENU.
DIAL 4730 FOR RESERVATIONS.



BLOW: LIL’
e

B’dos 8-year old

POPSOOS

Trumpet Player

: A

s

. Positive
+

: Child
~

x Prodigy
x

x e

%

% Bop &

v

x Calypsoes
%

8 e

>

x

*



MRS. HOUSEWIFE



Master LEROY THOMAS

GLOBE 'THEATRE Friday 2nd 8.30

\
|
)
Announces that Special LUNCHES at 3/-, 4/-, 5/- will
)
4
{
y



MAN:
AND BROTHER HE DOES!

BLOW:

Another
Globe’s

Discovery

e
Guest Star

on
TALENT SHOW
6

FRIDAY 2nd







ENHANCE
THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR HOME WITH

Lancastreum Floor Covering

9 fh x 79% Me cv ee ees . $6.13
BO. 86 st GilG casi he dieciseess $7.36
9 ft. x 10% fo... . eee eeee $8.
9 ft. x 12 fhe oc cece eee GO.BE
CONTINUOUS ROLLS & CUT TO YOUR ORDER
TAB. as geecesivees 53c. yd.
36 Mi cet ees . .100. ¥
TR sss cokvitess $1.40 yd.
ve 108 ins, oseeae $2.10 yd.

Also—ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS TO SELECT FROM
Compare OUR PRICES BEFORE PURCHASING ELSEWHERE



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON



FACTORY LTD.













VOSS



B.B.C. Radio Programme

Y, MARCH 1, 1951
4.30 a.m.—12.00 moon .....-..++ 19.76 m-
6.30 a.m, Football Fixtures, 6.45 a.m

Sporting Record, 7 a.m. The News, 7.10
a.m. News Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the
Editorials, 7.25 a.m. Programme Parade,
7.30 a.m, Generally Speaking, 7.45 a.m

Listeners’ Choice, 8 a.m, Land and Live-
stock, 830 a.m. Natalie Bramley, 8.45
a.m. Plain English, 9 a.m, The News,
9.8) a.m, Home News from Britain, 9.15
a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m. Programme
Parade, 11.25 a.m. Australia vs. England,
11.45 a.m. Special Dispatch, 12 noon The

News, 12.10 pam. News Analysis, 12.15
p.m. Close Down,
4.15—G.00 Pum. occ cc reece teen 25.53 m,

—_——_ $<

4.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 5 p.m

Australia vs. England, 5.15 p.m, Scottish

Magazine, 5.45 p.m. Pipes and Drums,

6 p.m. How to be good oo.
coerce OM

€.00—7.15 p.m. ... & 31.32 m.





cane veriasiapibnteahincne lamepeasielansatbaiieet

6.30 p.m. Light Orchestral Music, 6.45
p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m, The
News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m.
We see Britain.

F.45—11.00 pam. ........ 31.82 & 48.43 m.



7.45 p.m. Generally Speaking, 6 p.m
Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m, Sir John
Magill’s Last Journey, 8.45 p.m. Com-
poser of the week, 9 p.m. Special
Dispatch, 9.15 p.m, Have a go, 9.45 p.m
De you Remember, 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10,15
_m. Take it from here, 10,45 p.m. Life
in Britain, 11 p.m, The Music of Sid
Phillips and his Band.

Phuitpe aia his Banden

Plips_an@_ nig Band___
Ivs HOPE |
AT HIS FASTEST,
FUNNIEST BEST ;

Paramount's Hilarious
Successor To gmc
‘The Paleface”!




\\



Screenplay by Camund Hartmann
and Rabert Bien Based on a Story

by Marry Leon Witsoe
mm

TO-MORROW (Friday).
2.30—4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
and continuing daily at 4.45

and 8.30 p.m.

Extra: (Popeye the Sailor) .
“THE FLY’S LAST FLIGHT’

PLAZA

Bridgetown. (Dial 2310).



Only 3 more Days

TRINIDAD'S
CARNIVAL QUEEN
of 1951

Miss Jeffrey's Beer.
LOVELY

CHRISTINE
GORDON

— appearing —
IN PERSON
with a galaxy of Trinidad’s sing-
ing and dancing stars under the
direction of .
LANDY DE MONTBRUN
on stage at

EMPIRE

SUNDAY, 4th MARCH,
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.



PRICES:
MATINEE:—
Children 50c.; Adults $1.00
NIGHT:—
House and Balcony .... $1.00
Stalls and Boxes ...... $1.50

\
20th Century Fox Double—

3 SHOWS : :



THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1951





ne
——— |

R.K.O

REX BARKER

Mat. TO-DAY 1.30 p.m
MIRACULOUS JOUKNEY
in Cinecolor
Rony CALHOUN and
RAIDERS OF THE BORDER

Johnny Mack BROWN



————

PLAZA

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY

Riding the Sunset Trail






“Midnite Sat. 3rd (Monogram!
CODE OF THE SADDLE
Johnny Mack BROWN and
RIDERS OF THE DAWN

with JIMMY WAKELY

———

Errol Alexis

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown

LAST 2 SHOWS TO
RADIO'S Thrilling Advent

“TARZAN AND THE SLAVE GIRL you

c

plus the

TheatresOISTIN (DIAL 8404)

$ and 6.30 p.m

with Tom KEENE— KEN MAYNAR
Co
Friday & Saturday (only) 5 and 8.30 p.m.

Tom CONWAY—Martha O'DRISCOLL &

Friday, Saturday, Sunday 8.20 p.m.
(Warner's Technicolor Action)

(DIAL 2310)

and 8.30 f

AY 4.4

re

CAN BEAT
Short HE A-BOMB
Fait the Laff-Trall, Partner
Friday (3 Shows) 2.30, 4.45
and 9.30 p.m. and

Continuing Dai

pos HOPE IN “FANCY PANTS”

—--

445 and 3.30 p.m



(Monogram Double)

& Death Valley Rangers

D—HOOT GIBSON—BOB STEELE



Action Double!

R.K.O. Radio's
COURT

CRIMINA!

BACK TO BATAAN
with JOHN WAYNE

aS

GATET Y—(tTHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TONITE (only) 8.30-(Monogram Double)

Leo GORCGEY and the Bowery Boys in
Leon ERROL in “THE KNOCKOUT”

“MR. HEX" and

Matinee Sunday 5 p.m









EMPIRE

Last Two Shows To-day 4.45
and 8.30

United Artists’ Pictures

Presents...

“DONT. TRUST
YOUR HUSBAND”

Starring

Madeline CARROLL
Charles (buddy) ROGERS
and Fred McMURRAY



OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows To-day 4.30
and 8.15

Signe HASSO and Preston
FOSTER in

STRANGE TRIANGLE

— AND —

“A WALKIN THE SUN

with Dana ANDREWS and
Richard CONTE





FLYNN SMITH in “MONTANA” ‘és
Midnitd Sat, 3rd. ‘Monogram Big Action)
JOHNNY MACK BROWN in (Both)
RAIDERS OF THE BORDER and RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH
oa = = ~

ROYAL

To-day Last Two Shows; 5
and 8.30

* Yvonne

: Don ~ “Rod © Helena’
DeCARLO-DURYEA: CAMERON: CARTER

ROXY |

Last Two Shows To-day 4.30
and 8.15

Universal Double Attraction

Lon CHANEY and Claude
RAINES in

“ WOLFMAN”

AND

“ EXILE”

with Douglas Fairbanks Jr.

—



Opening Friday 2nd March

EMPIRE
TMEATRE

iso





* member of
a your family! |

see eee ®

eer Re eer ee eee



Ne A FREE AMERICA...
A FREE WORLD!



A STORY OF THE |
PAST, PRESENT :
AND FUTURF!









Produced
and Directed by :

DOROTHY SILVERSTONE

Story and Narration Written by
MILDRED BARISH VERMONT
Spoken by DENNIS KING
Reroute through Teenieth Century foe



(1LOBE—oPENING TOMORROW 5 & 8.30

OPEN - Sau rT...

it_can_cost your life!



ROBERT CUMMINGS .



© WALTER WANGER PICTURES, INC.
presents

“The BLACK BOOK” jiisii tik



RICHARD BASEHART «+ RICHARD HART with Arnold Moss» Norman Lloyd
Beulah Bondi « Associate Producer EDWARD LASKER « Directed by ANTHONY MANN
Produced by WILLIAM CAMERON MENZIES » Story and Screenpiay by PHILIP YORDAN

and AENEAS MacKENZIE « An Facts | inn Films Release

~ Plus

LOCAL TALENT ON

PARADE





praarts

bieeed oon aeeey

'



THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1951



Courtesy

Of Musical America

Albert Spalding:

By ROBERT SABIN

WHEN Albert Spalding, one oi
America’s most distinguished
violinists, made his debut, in
7905, at the age of 16, in Paris,
the: American musician “rad to
come through the European
door,’ as he puts ii. To-day, he
says, “the generating forces are
in the United States, Not merely
the devastation of world wars
but other factors also have made
ihis nation a musica) center.”

When Albert Spalding was
born in 1888, in Chicago, Ameri-
ea’s midwestern metropolis, the
phonograph, the radio, and the
motion= picture had not vegun
their revolutionary impact on
America, They were to accom-
piish for music what printing did
for literature, by making ii
accessible to a vastly larger pub-
lic. The United States was still
in its musical childhood. To-day
music has become the interest of
the many, instead of the privi-
lege of the few. The American
artist is welcomed in Europe ana
Central and South America as
cordially as artists from other
countries are in the United
States.

Although Mr. Spalding was
born in Chicago, he spe=t most
of his early years in New York
City. His father, a sporting goods
manufacturer, approved of his
son's musical career with the un-
derstanding that Albert should
make his own way in the pro-
fessional world. The young vio-
linist was self supporting almost
as soon as he was launched into
professional life.

To his mother Mr. Spalding
owes hig musical gifts. She was
not only a gifted pianist but also
had a_ beautiful contralto voice
Two events of major importance
occurred in Albert Spalding’:
life when he was seven years
old. His parents decided to spend
the winter in Florence, Italy, 4
venture that subsequently turnec
into an annual custom, and he
asked for a violin for Christmas,
He soon developed a consuming
interest in music. His first teacher
was Ulpiano Chiti, a Florentine
musician,

Albert and his brother Board-
man were educated in a French-
Italian day school in Florence
There he met French, English
German, Russian and Swiss boys
and acquired a mastery of French
and Italian that was to be useful
te him not merely in his artistic
career but in his servite in the
two world wars that were to in-
terrupt his musical life.

In these early years, the young
violinist did not neglect what he
calls the three great essentials of
artistie development — “time
toil and sweat.” The violin, he
explains, is the most personal of
all instruments except the hu-
man’s voice, yet it is not easy to
play, “It has the most awkward
position of any. The violinist
has the daily problem of resolving
this awkwardness into physical
grace.” Not only did he practice,
but he worked hard at his other
musical’! studies: The reward
came in a dramatic form, when
Albert went to Bologna, at the
age of 14, to play for the examin-
ing board of the Bologna Conser-
vatory

To apply for the diploma at
the age of 14 was a daring step.
Only once before in its history
had the Bologna Conservatory
awarded that honour to so young
a candidate, and that was 133
years earlier, to the young Wolf-
gang Amadeus Mozart, who \45-
ited Bologna on his triumpnal
tour of Italy in 1769 and 1770.
The faith of Albert’s teacher was
justified in the results of the exam-
inations. Of the possible 50 points
ae: Albert Spalding scored
48.

Very wisely, Albert’s parents
decided upon two years. of
further study with Lefort, at the
Paris Conservatory, before he
made his debut in the concert
world. When he was 16, he ap-
peared in Paris, with an orchestra
made up mostly of Paris Conser-
vatory students and conducted
by his teacher. This concert led
to a few engagements and the in-
evitable invitations to appear at
benefits, But the road to estab-
lish success was still to be long
and stony.

A stroke of luck was _ the
friendship of Camille Saint-Saéns,
who had heard that the young
Ameriean had given an excellent
performance of his violin con-
certo, Albert was summoned to
the composer’s home and invited
to play for him. Saint-Saéns pro-
posed that they should appear
qogether in a concert in Florence.





ALBERT SPALDING, the famous American violin ist, who announced his retirement from the concert
field at the end of the season 1950-51, in his home,

To the 17-year-old young violinist
this invitation from the world-
famous 71-year-old composer
seemed {Co good to be true. The
concert was a success. Saint-
Saéns wrote to Hans Richter, in
London, urging him to engage his
young protege as soloist with the
London Symphony—in the Saint-
Saéns B minor Cencerto. Richter
complied, and Albert Spalding
was invited to appear with the
erchestra, He also made his con-
cert debut in London that season,

In the summer of 1908, Albert
Spalding was back in the United
States, busily at work, preparing

for his American debut. He was
to appear with the New York
Symphony under Walter Dam-

rosch, in November. In August,
he was invited to visit the Dam-
rosches, He found ‘that Saint-
Saéns had written a cordial letter
to Mr. Damrosch. As a result of
this visit Mr. Spalding won a firm
friend and champion. So highly
did Mr. Damrosch regard his
playing that he wrote letters for
publication, in which he stated
that “Spalding is the first great
instrumentalist the United Siates
has produced.” The debut was a
rmcdest success. Like many artists,
Albert Spalding found that recog-
nition,s for some ironic reason,
comes hardest in one’s own land.
Many of the critics were cordial,
Only one was really hostile. Dur-
ing his first season, Mr. Spalding
played more than 60 engagements,
30 of them with orchestras.



The next six years were filled
with tours of Europe and the
United States, and a series of pro-
grammes in Egypt in 1914. Mr.
Spalding made his first tour of
Russia in 1910, and obtained a
vivid impression of that nation
during his travels. He also visited
Finland, and met the famous com-
poser Jan Sibelius, Rebert Jajanus,
conductor of the Helsingfors Sym-
phony, and other leading musi-
cians. He returned to Russia in
1912-13 and in 1913-14, It was at
this time that he became profes-
sionally associated with his life-
long friend and accompanist,
André Benoist.

in tne three seasons before 1917,
the young violinist gave 60 or 70
concerts a year in the United
States. He was on tour when the
news of America’s entrance into
World War I was flashed across
the nation. Mr. Spalding joined
the U.S. Air Force, at ‘that time a
branch of the Signal Corps. On
his first day there, he was sum-
moned to headquarters for an ex-
amination. His commanding offi-
cer asked him what languages he
spoke, and when he_ replied,
French, Italian, and German, in-
structed another officer to test his
knowledge. This officer was
Fiorello H. LaGuardia, later
Mayor of New York City, who had
given up his office as member of
the House of Representatives in
the U.S. Congress to join the army.

The two young men _ became
close friends. Early in 1918, Mr.
Spalding was transferred to Italy.
When La Guardia became the re-
presentative in Italy of the joint
U.S. Army and Navy Aircraft
Board, he made Mr. Spalding his
assistant.

Upon his return to the United
States, in 1919, Albert Spalding



|THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK

THE

ERE R ON EOUENER OR EDOERER SEEN OOSE DEES EEEEREEERESEFO SESE EEE REST EEEEESESESER OBE TED

TRECSUFPED...........:.cccsesesesesesesisees ee DOCTOLATY.....

activities :





e

\WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,

and Associations to make the compilation of information in
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities;
religious, commercial, cultural, educational, healih, sports,
radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed
below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:

EDITOR,
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 195!,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street.

FORM

Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Ete. ..........sses0

Council or Committee Members.............:ccssssesreessssesssees

Short historical account of the origin, functions and current

APO ENO OE OEE EEE RR ERE R eee RR ORE TERED ERE O®

Ameriean

took another major step in his life
when he married Mary Pyle. The
distinguished French violinist,
Jacques Thibaud, an intimate of
many years’ standing, provided the
music for the wedding

In the early 1920's, when radio
began to rival the phonograph in
popular fayour, Mr. Spalding was
engaged for a series of recitals in
radio broadcasts, both from New
York City and from other Ameri-
ean cities in which he was appear-
ing:on tour. He has none of the
hostility towards the radio phono-
graph, motion picture, and other
modern developments that one
sometimes discovers in musicians.
He accepts the changes in musical
habits and attitudes which they
have brought about. The supreme-
ly important fact, he believes, is
that they have brought music to
an ineomparably larger public
than it has reached before.

In 1925, Mr. Spalding and his
wife secured the house near Great
Barrington, in the eastern State of
Massachusetts, that has been their
home since. In the years between
the two World Wars, Mr. Speld-
ing was busy with concert tours
and orchestral appearances in the
United States and other nations.
He found it an exhilarating ex-

NEW
WAGE





AUCKLAND, N.Z., Feb,
New Zealanders on. bigher wage
levels have been granted the
largest wage increase ever award-
ed at one time, but the rise has
brought many new problems for
the Government,

Labour organisations are threat-
ening protest action on the ground
that the increase is not enough
and the Government is being re-
luctantly forced to return to price
controls and subsidies to keep
down living costs.

The increase granted by the Ar-
bitration Court, which controls
minimum rates of pay in most oc-
cupations throughout the country,
amounted to three shillings in the
pound, or 415 per cent.

The court rejected the principle
of a flat rate increase, It said that
margins for skill had already con-
tracted too much in recent years
and unless the workers on higher
pay got a larger rise the mar:
gin would fall still further.

The court in making its ordet
warned about the dangerous
effects of “vicious world-wide in-
flationary pressures, ” but said it
thought that in justice and equity
all workers should share in the
country’s “interim prosperity.”

Labour Disappointed

Labour organizations—the Fed-
eration of Labour, central trade
and union body, and the Trades
Union Congress, a breakaway left-
much

wing body which made

higher claims—have both ex-
pressed disappointment at the}
amount of the increase and are

considering what action should be
taken. Individual trade unions



seeeeenereneee





ee

ZEALANDERS

BARBADOS

Violinist

perience to observe the enormous
changes in musical life, and at the
same time to take part in then.
He is optimistic about the future
of music in the United States. The
violin may have suffered a tem-
porary eclipse, in eomparison with

its former pre-eminence in the
affections of music studenis, but
he is convinced that “no instru-

ment that has the beauty and great
literature of the violin will die.”

Mr. Spalding is one of the most
modest and charming of artists,
The affection of his fellow musi-
cians was testified at a dinner
given to him by the Bohemians, a
New York club, in December 1949.
Mr. Spalding has a keen sense of
humour and a quiet, penetrating
honesty of viewpoint, The re-
finement and taste that have al-
ways characterized his playing are
mirrored in his attitudes towards
other phases of life. In an age of
superlatives and ,superficial vir-
tuosity he has preserved the
values of his art, as he believed
in them. Spalding’s retirement
from the concert held planned for
the end of the seagon 1950-61, will
only emphasize the high quality
of his musicianship and the dis-
tinction of his musical personality.

GET

BOOST OF 15%
By J.C.

Graham

have also called meetings to con-
Sider protest action

Meanwhile the government has
taken prompt action to check un-
due cost of living increases as a
result of the new wage rates, Re-
tail prices of butter, milk, bread
end flour are being held at present
levels by increased subsidies. The
government had hoped to abolish
subsidies gradually, but pressure
of events has forced it to in-
crease subsidy rates in several
cases recently.

It has also been forced to give
warning that price control, which
was gradually abandoned, may
have to be restored to a wider
ange of goods Some commodi-
ties are still subject to control
and in most cases increases in
prices will be permitted amount-
ing to three-quarters of the add-

ed labour cost. Industry will be
expected to bear the remaining
quarter,

—(C.P.)

FREIGHT
SERVICES

to and from

ADVOCATE



rr







Shifting Deeper
Into U.S. Orbit

OTTAWA, Feb.,

By calculated policy, tradition-
ally-British Canada is moving
deeper into the American military
orbit.

This trend, in one way or an
other, affects all three armed
forces. The changes have come
gradualf¥ and have never been

spelled ‘out in their entirety.

Noteble are these two:

1. The army’s switch from Brit
ish-type to American-type equip-
ment with resulting changes in
organization, a switch now coming
into full stride and expected to
be one of the army’s biggest jobs
for 1951

2. Decision that Canada's sup-
ply of aircraft must be based or
this continent or, in other words,
that the Royal Canadian Air
Force use Canadian or American
type planes—-not British.

he navy has been progressing
gradually from the British to the
American supply system, How-
ever, in planning new ships, it
has designed Canada’s own, using
the best examples both Britain
and the U.S, have to offer,

The American trend has one
main foundation, Defence of Can-
ada hag become of vital concern
and it has been adjudged one
with the defence of North Ameri
ca, a decision that means inte
gration of U.S and Canadian
forces to fight together if needed

Defence Minister Brooke Clax-
ton has defended this integration

as common sense, Linked with
it is the policy of building up
Canada’s facilities for making

planes, ships and arms. Taken to-
gether they mean Canada no long-
er looks to Britain as the source

of military supplies as in two
world wars,
Under U.S. Commands?

The integration steps arise from
North American defence need:
but they go beyond that, They
probably mean that in any new
war Canadian land and air for-
mations will fight largely under
U.S., not British, command.

It is expected, for instance, that
when a Canadian brigade goes to
Europe this year it will serve un-
der U.S. command. It is likely,
too, that when an R.C.A.F. fight-
er wing gets to Europe late this
year it will come under U.S.
command because its three squad-
rons will be flying American-
type F86 Sabre jets made in Can-
ada,

Both formations, in other times,
would serve under British com-
mand The switch to U.S. com-
mand is a logical result of a

logistics or supply problem, They
will be using U.S. equipment.
Parliament's first blast against
this “Americanization trend,” as
he ealled it, came from E, D,. â„¢ul-
ton, a wartime major He pre-
dicted jit will lead to an end of
the regimental army system. Mr
Claxton interrupted to say that is
*nonsense.”’ He has said the army
organizational changes will be
minor. The old regimental names
will stay. —(C.P.)





Russians On
A Visit

LONDON.
A party of Russian boxers re
cently paid their third visit to

Sweden for a tournament.

The result of the meeting, held
at Goteborg on February 3, was
given as follows by Tass, the offl-
cial Soviet news ageney

“Soviet boxers, Bulakov, Khan
ikashvili, Mednov and Romanoy
won by knockouts againgt some of
the best Swedish boxers. Boxers
Aristokisyan, Yegorov and Shot-
sikas defeated their opponents on
points by a large margin. Schcher
bakov lost his fight against Bluem,
one of the leading boxers of
Sweden

“Thus the match ended with a
score of| 7~1 in favour of the
Soviet Boxers.”

The report did not hint at the
possible. fate of beaten Sehcher-
bakov. -—LN.S.





















Regular
Save

Services
Time

From B'dos to | Flying Time [Flights WeeklyjKilo Rates

BERMUDA
LISBON
LONDON

12.15
24.45

Also Connecting Serv:

29.00 hrs.



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$4.84

whole World,

ices to the

ITS’ FASTER BY FAR BY SPEEDBIRD,

Book through your local
B.O.A.C. Forwarding Agent
who makes no charge for
advice, information or book-
ings by “Speedbird” to all
six continents,



BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION

BRITISH WEST INDI

Airways House,

Phone 4585

AN AIRWAYS LIMITED
Bnigstown





Cunadian Forces | Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay |

j
M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Marea Henrietta

< Wonderful Counsellor, Sch. Rainbow
“.. Sch. W. L.. Bunicia, Sch. . Harriet
Whittaker, Sch. Turtle Dove, Sch. Eman-
1el C. Gordon, Sch. Rosarene, Sch, United
Pilgrim S., Seh. Lindsyd II, Sch. Anita
i 5.8, Lady Nelson, Yacht Caribbee,
3ch. Burma D., Sch. Henry D. Wallace,
M.V. Cacique del Caribe, Sch. Lady
Noeleen, Sch. Landalpha
ARRIVALS

Schooner Enterprise S.,

Capt. MeQuilkin, from St

44 tons
Lucia

net,

M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt Par-
ons, from St. Lueia
S.S. Prospector, 3,425 tons net. Capt

.itdechild, from. St. Lucia
DEPARTURES

S.S. Polyerest, 719 tons net, Capt. Sten-
ial, for Dominica.



RATES OF EXCHANGE

FEBRUARY 28, 1951
CANADA
(nelading Newfoundland)
«eee Cheques on

Bankers



2% pr
«4s» Demand
«» Drafts 53.06" pr
+ Sight Drafts 62.9% pr
$5.1% pr Cable
33.6% pr Currency GL.7% pr
sevee Coupons Oe pr

Quebee’s Founder |
iWas Telling Lies
SAYS AUTHOR

QUEBEC, Feb. 26.
Champlain, l7th century ex-
Plorer, who founded Quebec iv
1608, and who through his writ-
ngs is one of the well known
igures in American history, may

lave written about a trip he never
made.

This and other disconcerting
suggestions were presented re-
cently by author Jean Bruchesi to
a handful of historians and archi-
vists who read Les Cahiers Des
Dix, a Quebec historical review,
Historian Bruchesi in a paper en-
ditled Champlain A-T-il Menti
(Did Champlain Lie) comes te
the conclusion that the famed ex-
plorer indulged in boasting if not
worse, when he wrote his brief
discourse, It is the account of an
expedition which Champlain says
he led to the West Indies for the
King of Spain in 1599. Mr. Bru-
chesi's report has come as a shock
to Quebec scholars, who regard
the father of new France as a man
of high moral qualities,

Mr. Bruchesi’s conclusion is that
Elaine and Eleno are the same
person, and it was from him that
Champlain obtained the informa-
tion for his account of the voyage
to the West Indies.—(cPp)



Canada Seeking
New Gas Masks

OTTAWA, Feb. 28

Canada is Studying new types
of gas masks to combat a largely
odourless and invisible poison gar
which the Russians are reported
to have in large quantities.

Officials commenting on reports
that a Danish scientist had started
a Tes@arch programme to find a
remedy for “sneaking: death” gay
said Canada had been studying its
potentialities for some time.

They added that its qualities
{had been over-stressed, but hat

it was very powerful.” It was
described as “much better’* than
mustard gas.—Reuter,

—
ean eee tiation

ee ee



PAGE THREE



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YEAR BOOK 1951 |



The Advocate Co’ Ltd:, will publish a Year Book of Barbados

in 1951,

The Year Book will contain three parts:--

industries,
Barbados

(2)

The compilers

and it is taking
Clubs, Institutions,



| (AN

acct saat 8 artrinenttianiny torino

art, literature and all the things we want to know a

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,

trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,

ut
but have until now not been able to find |

under one cover.

Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
sony butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
c.

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

this information solicited should be sent in immediately or not
jater than March 15th 1951.

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C, Gale
M.L.C., Managing
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice

of the Year Book want to make sure that the

Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados

arenes to invite secretaries of Societies,
business, social and other organisations

of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisa-
tions immediately or not later than March 15th 1951.

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,

34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

| Advertisements close April 30th 1951.

| Advertisers are asked to get in touch with
: Mr, Trevor Gale,

Advertising Manager,
Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)



QUAKER OATS

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*.



.
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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS sa ADVOGATE

eS ae

ome

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid. Broad St., Bridectown.
Thursday, March 1, 1952

PEASANTS

IN SPITE OF the recent arift to the
town Barbados still possess a large peas-
ant class on whose work depends such
progress as has been achieved of the land.
These peasants are being helped by the
extensive work of the Agricultural
Department and they owe much to the
spread of agricultural stations throughout
the island. But neither co-operative farm-
ing, nor knowledge such as that pessessed
by the large plantation producers, appears
to. have spread among the peasants with
the speed that is commensurate with im-
proved methods of farming.

The Agricultural Society has been func-
tioning for one hundred years and it would
be a fine thing if during its centenary
year it could ‘claim among its members
the majority of the 20,000 peasais in this
island. There is nothing in the rules to
prevent any small holder from becoming

j a member of the society.

- The first step towards this achievement

i seems to be the founding of a» Peasant

Agricultural Society which could be a ~
subsidiary of the Agricultural Society. In .
this way the peasants could discuss the
details of some matter which affected them
and the society ¢ould give expert guid-
‘ance.- lin Jamaica the’ membership of the
Agricultural Society includes the major-
ity of peasants. They have their own
district Associations but are still members
of the parent body. The schemes for
Agricultural improvement in that island
get their impetus from the peasants.

Mr. Rudolph Burke who visited Barba-
dos last year as President of the Agricul-
tural Society of Jamaica is himself of
peasant stock and represents. Jamaica's

agricultural interest.at metropolitan con-
: ferences. A centenary drive by the Agri-
cultural Society of Barbados for an in-
creased membership» among peasants
would help in the education so necessary
if more food is to be grown locally to meet
increased demands. There is nothing in
the rules of the Society to prevent peas-
ants from becoming members and it would
be a step towards improving the economy
of the island based as it is on agricultural

pursuits.



- Not Invincible

ENGLAND'S victory over Australia by
8 wickets in the fifth Test Match at Mel-
bourne yesterday, will delight the whole
cricket-loving world, including} the /Aps-
tralians. English cricket has been gomg
through a difficult period, and the last

meee



as 1938. It speaks well for English sports-
manship that in spite of continuous re-
verses, it has never flagged and efforts
have never been relaxed to build up a
worthy combination to enter the lists
‘against Australia. es oe
_ This long overdue victory will also show,
“that the Australians are not invincible. It
_ig true that the present Australians no
longer can number among their tanks $uch °
outstanding players as Bradman, Pons-
ford, Kippax, McCabe, O'Reilly, and Grim-
met, but they undoubtedly still can put
inté the field men of ability above the
average. 5) vk
“Here in the West Indies England’s vic-
tory will be hailed not only because there
_is‘always sympathy for the underdog, but
‘Hecause it is an indication that our team
which will be touring Australia later this
year has more than an outside sporting
chance of meeting the Australians on even
terms, and probably gaining the honours.
Cricket supremacy moves in cycles. Every-
one will be pleased to see that England,
having weathered her lean times, is once
more making a bid for top honours.

sesame ANTS

—_—_

+i In an article In the Adv es
of July 5th. 1950, entitled “A
Sporting Offer’, I undertook to
_ write on behalf.of the Electric
Supply Co. if they would supply
me with the necessary data. This
offer was made.in good faith and
I am glad to say that it has now
x heen accepted in the same spirit,
fo that this article is an attempt
to give the public some up-to-date
information on the subject,

The officials of the Company in-
vited me to make a detailed in-
spection of the plant and’to ask
any questions I wished, and [

. Should like to place on record my
appreciation of their courtésy and’
the complete frankness’ with
which they gave me all the infor-
mation fur which I asked.

right.

It will be good news for those

who have waited many months

» for electric service, that the com-
' ...pany expects to be ablesto start
“eegiving it to new customers, all
By ing well, in about six weeks, or
. \by the middle of April. There is a
~ Tong list of applications, about 400
‘ jyaltogether, which will of course be
dealt with in order as they were
»* “filed, but it is estimated that about
“hee weeks work by three gangs of

ws

chinery,

~~ -seen set-backs in the meantime.

“The Company regrets the long
“delay, but I am convinced that it
“$s not due to any fault of the staff
. (in Barbados, Delivery of the No,






























suécess against Australia was as far back»



10 generating ‘set was expected
from England last September, but
it has only just arrived sind is in
process of being installed. Some
new parts for No. 7 set have also
errived at last, and the engine
is being carefully run in before be-
ing put on full lead. This-set was
the first to be delivered after the
end of the war, and for one reason
and another, gave a great deal cf
trouble, which the manufacturers
have been at great expense to put

It is interesting to. trace the
growth of the demand for elec-
tricity in Barbados since the Com-
pany began .eperations about 40
years ago. For the first 35-years
“demand seems to have increased
quite slowly, but in the p
years it has approximately trebled,
and is still growing. L
that a sudden ‘spurt in demand
like this makes it difficult for the
Company to’ expand
quickly enough, and the difficulty
is enormously enhanced
very long time taken by manufac-
turers to fill orders for»new ma-

sets have been delivered since the
war ended, and the best delivery

‘~--linemen should take care of the i

. **4ist. Thus by the middle or end of cate the makers can give on
coer all those now waiting should these _machinegs jis 18 _ months
-. have electricity, barring unfore- after placing an order, The ques-

tion of installing. steam turbines
in future is being considered, but
delivery dates on these are longer,
and on boilers about 3 years. I
can only say that I am very glad
I do not have the responsibility

Soil, plants, -animals» dnd; men
are depéndént upoli ofe another
If the human race is to survive,
we must concern ourselves with
seeing to it that the soil is pre-
served and conserved... It.. must
be protected from washing away
or blowing away, and it must’ be
enriched so that it has the pro-
per nutrient qualities for ‘our-

plants.
A rundown soil grows run.
down «food. Every crop takes

away part
from the soil, and every. bank
customer knows only too well the
budget difficulty he gets into
when he withdraws continually
without putting equal amounts or.
more into his account.
What Plants Need

It may be worth while to con-
sider briefly what is needed from
the soil by plants, livestock and
human beings. All are part and
parcel of the same nutrition cy-
cle which governs all living cells,

Plants are living things. They
take in food and convert it into
body tissues and energy. They
seize the energy of the sun’s rays
to build their tissues out of iner‘
material. ;

Set a child and a cow on a,heap
of minerals, surrounded by air.
and with a tub of water: all the
chemical elements required for
their bodies would be present.
They would die of _ starvation,
because neither of them has the,
power to combine the chemical
elements into the food they re-
quire. But plant alfalfa and
grass and micro-organisms in the
soil minerals, water them, and
give them air: the alfalfa and
grass will grow, converting the
chemical elements into plant tis-
sues containing the food com-
pounds needed by the cow, and
the cow in turn will convert the
alfalfa and grass into milk, which
will provide food for the child.

This is a highly simplified ‘il-
lustration of food supply. The
smount of nourishment gathered
into a crop depends upon three
factors: the amount of crop root in
contact with the soil, what goes on
where they touch each other, ‘and
the time they are in contact. In all
this there is activity by the plant
and by the soil. The result is
influenced by sunlight and other
factors as well as by the quality
ofthe material of which the soil
is “composed, but what the plant
has of food value depends in all
but a tiny measure upon. the
fertility of the soil.

Livestock Requirements

Livestock farming has _ been
found to provide the least drain
on soil richness, because less
plant food is exported in animal
products than when crops are
sold off the farm, and a greater
portion of the fertility is retained
in. the form of manures. How-
ever, livestock raise other prob-
lems,‘ - .

Regular and adequate supplies
of. certain minerals in the diet of
animals are necessary if they are
to grow and produce and remain
healthy. Some, such as calcium
and phosphorus, are required in
considerable amounts to provide
for proper ne . development,
Others, such as copper and cobalt,
are equally necessary, though in
mie smaller. quaritities, - -

‘émmon sense tells us that dairy
or. meat products from run-down
pastures,} lacking in; these ’ er
als, -carmot- possi have the
nourishing values of. similar pro-
@ucts from well-bred and healthy
animals reared on. balanced, nu-
tritious forage and pastures.

Sir Robert McCarrison showed
by experiment in India that healtn
and disease are the result of the
quality of the food eaten, He
produced at will almost any di-
sease he desired, simply by
varying the diet of the rats with
which he was experimenting,

There are two interesting ways
of judging the quality of crops
grown for animal feed. A defi-
ciency in soil nutriment may
affect the plant by limiting its
growth, or it may be a deficien¢y
in gome mineral which is not
needed by the plant but should
be passed on by it to the animal,

Pasture for livestock belongs
on good soil, not any old good-
for-nothing-else corner of the
farm. Tt should be seeded tc
productive grasses and legumes,
fertilized to maintain high yields,
and managed so that the herbage
is grazed uniformly. The good

sture should have several types
in its makeup permanent,
rotational and temporary — thus
providing plentiful grazing all
season

Owners of livestock do not like
to be.told that there are starving
their animals, but that is just
what is happening when over-
grazed, under-fertilized land is
seen under the hooves of runty,
scrubby and anaemic cattle. The

—

have
which

urgent
haul,

past 5

It is obvious ..

its plant as the

by the:

Four new Diesel. engine to ord

should
This

with,

of every mineral —



least for’ a time,

months, starting aS soon. as it can
be spared.

; Looking further into the future
the outlook is not clear begause it
aepends on unéertain factors such

for electricity, “and the length of
time taken |to. procure machinery.
after the decision has been made

re-armament
pect in Britain and other cotn-
tries, there is little possibility of
the makers being able to improve
their delivery dates, and in fact
the reverse being the case.

problem for the Company to cope

some steam plant now, and. wait



(From the Newsletter of The Royal
“Banke of Canada,’ February 1951.)

under-nourished grass does not
fatten; it may be a filler, but jt
is not food.

» Human Health

The quality of the food we eat
is the chief factor in our physical
fitness. No health campaign can
succeed unless the materials of
which the body is built are sound.

Professor Ellis said, “To be
healthy is to be well fed. If the
foods produced by farm and gar-
den satisfy all food requirements
so that bodies can be kept in

health, then the works of our
hands are’ good. On the other
hand...if the women develop

goitre, if the babies have rickets,
if the men cannot work because
they ere crippled with arthritis,
if the children have white spots
on their teeth, or if the girls hava
anaemia,.,these disorders are
evidences of malnutrition and
faulty feeding.”

Many of the soils on which food
crops are grown do not supply
the plants with sufficient minerals
te enable them to synthesize
vitamins. in quantities to meet
our demands. Further, and worse,
we are not satisfied to use many
of our plant products in the form
in which nature gives them to
us, but demand that they be pre-
cessed. Unless we know what
nutrients are removed in the pro-
cessing, and make up the quantitv
from other sources, we do not get
enough of them.

Every step in food produc-
tion is important, We have the
right to ask that the nutrition
value of our food shall be safe-
guarded ‘all the way, through cul-



London &xrpress Service.



tivation of the fields, harvesting,
processing, distribution, prepara-
sion and serving.
Managing The Land

To produce food of the highest
quality to feed today’s world
population is far from the sub-
sistence husbandry of other days.
The ownership of iand is a priv-
ilege, but it is also a respons}.
bili

lity.

Soll fertility can result only
from the foresight, labour and
study of generation after genera-
tion. That sort of farming can
make soils naturally poor into
‘farms agriculturally rich, | an
poll naturally fertile into lasting
yielders of still more nutritious
crops.

What we are talking about
now goes far beyond ordinary
soil. conservation practices such
as irrigation, contour ploughing,
planting cover crops to prevent
wind erosion, and all that. Many
farmers who have taken all the
conservation measures written
about in text books have been
disappointed. They have seen
their crops dwindle in quantity
and. quality, but didn’t know
just what to do about remedying
the situation, The secret is to
regulate the quantity and the

‘ouality of organic matter and

plant food available to the grow-

ing crop,
This starts, perhaps, with cul-
tivation. In the United States,

the area in clean cultivation and
row crops approaches one-half of
the cultivated land; in France
and .England, with their longer
agricultural experience, only
about one-fourth of the cultivated
soils are in clean cultivation. Sod
crops have been found to be a
most important factor in holding

‘the soil and maintaining _ its
healthy productivity by their
regular additions of organic
matter.

Maintaining Fertility
Fertilizer, properly chosen and
applied, is an indispensable friend
of the farmer. We shall

The Kilowatts Are Coming

By R. £, SMYTHIES M.E..C.

of trying to guess what will be
the state of affairs 3 years hence,
and provide for it .by ordering
costly machinery that may, or may
not, be delivered within that time.

As things stand at this moment,
the daily peak or maximum de-
mand for electricity is about all
the machinery can carry safely.
Assuming that the No. 7 set can
be worked up to its rated capacity
without further misadventure, this
situation should improve gradual-
ly within the next 3 or 4 weeks,
and w
into use in April, the plant will

pen

lem

hen the No, 10° set comes ing

some reserve capacity, at
The No, 2 set
was deliveréd in 1939 is in
need of a: complete over-

which will-take about 12

the

rate of growth of demand

er it. In view of the vast
rogramme in pros+

did

think, every prospect of
all adds up to a yery tough

If they decided to order

the



that we could not count on it until
it actually arrived here.

There is also of course the prob-

complicated by the tremendous rise
in the cost of such machinery dur

war
investment required to furnish
given plant capacity have gone by

, Sharply upward, and ultimately
reflected in the rates charged, in
addition to the increased cost of
fuel oil, wages and other items.
The Company is to be congratu-
lated on its
public more
these matters, and I feel sure the
new policy will result in better
relations all round, which I am
willing to do
power to promote.
to make it clear that the officials

way, and the conclusions I have
set down above are my own, based
on their answers to my quéstions.
The Company is planning to ex-
pand the plant still further to take
care of growing demand, but the
‘bottle-neck’ is the length of time
needed to obtain machinery trom



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THE SOIL

tertilizerâ„¢always, because every
crop harvested or grazed removes
nutrient elements from the soil.
We “must deposit if we are to
continue to withdraw.

Fertility can only be maintained
in one 6f two ways: either by
supplying large quantities of
crganie gaw materials from which

humus be manufactured in
the soil elf, or else by manu-
facturing humus outside the soil
and applying it to the land as a

finished preduct.

To a person not a farmer the
sensible ®pproach to a solution of
this question would go something
luke tunis: the soil is my capital;
it is not inexhaustible; every crop
I harvest, every beast I graze,
removes some of my capital; that
capital must be maintained. The
best way to maintain it is like
this: 1 will get information from
my agricultural representative o)
the nearest agricultural college
about the mineral requirement:
of all the kinds of crops I mighi
wish to grow; I will have my soi)
tested to “find out what it .con
tains and what it lacks; then i
will sit down and make a budget
Knowing how many pounds oi
each mineral will be removed by
the crop I intend to have, I shal
know the composition of the fer
tilizer and the amount of fer.
tilizer I should apply to meet thai
year’s needs and provide a little
“kitty” for other years.

Natural or Artificial ?

There has been controversy
from time to time about the rela-
tive value of organic fertilizer:
of animal crigin as opposed t
chemical fertilizers produced
commercially. Traditional ideas
tend to linger, but usually join
themselves to newer ideas in a
compromise agreement. That is
so with reference to manure ver-
sus artificial fertilizers.

It is true that continuous inju-
Gicious use of artificial fertilizers
may lead sometimes to a loss of
soil structure, but on the other
hand manure and other natural
fertilizers cannot be said to pro-

vide everything needed for all
sorts of land in the proper bal-
ance. Artificial fertilizer is

usually applied for the current
crop, and the carry-over of bene-
fit to future years is less than
that provided by farmyard
manure. Some soils respond to
manure ahd others respond tec
artificial fertilizer.

Organic Quality

Holding a major place in our
economy (though seldom
thought of by any but agriculturai
scientists) is the organic quality
of our soil. It is an important
natural resource, a major factor
affecting the levels and quality
of crops this year and in the
future, and a vital feature in the
productive life of every farmer

Organic matter, sometimes
loosely called- “humus”, is com-
posed of plant and animal matter
undergoing decay. It includes
such material as dead _ roots
leaves, fruits, and stems of
plants; carcasses of insects
worms and animals; live anc
dead soil micro-onganisms,
and various products of decom
position of dead tissues. It tends
to bind loose soils, open up heavy
soils, and increase the water
holding capacity of all soils. Ir
deccmposing, it liberates nutrients
which are then available to the
plant.

The most common methods of
maintaining the neCessary organic
matter in the soil are by the use
of farm manure, cover crops ana
residues, Our neglected wastes
of straw, corn stalks, and so on
should be put to active work.
No one should minimize the im-
portance of organic matter in the
soil, It is one of the essential or
major factors in successful crop
production,

In addition to turning under
the residues of crops after harvest,
we may grow plants with the
sole purpose of turning them un-
der. The function of a green-
manure crop is to add organic
matter to the soil; the purpose of
a cover crop is to prevent erosion,
to shade the ground, or to protect
the ground from excessive freez-
ing and heaving.

In reckoning the value in dol-
lars and cents of either practice,
the farmer should keep in mind
the investment feature. The in-
crease in the following crop may
or may not be igreat enough to
pay for the ploughed-under crop
or the year of sod, but these
practices may have a marked
effect on’ yields of subsequent
crops for two or more years,
man's objective should be to so
plan his land use that the or-
ganic matter will be maintained
so far as is consistent with a

need reasonable use of the soil,

_—

perhaps 3 years or so to have it
delivered, there is little doubt that
in the
electricity would fall short of the
demand for if, and some people
would have tu go without again.
Even
ordered, so many things may hap-

meantime the supply of

if more Diesel plant is

to prevent it being delivered,

of tinance, which has been

the past twelve years. All pre
ideas on the subject of capitd

board, and must be revised

cision to take the
‘o its confidence in

anything in my
I should like

not try to influence me in any

makers in England.

. of-living bonus part of wages declines, then



THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 195;









—————OOOOeeeee ESS SSS
TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE






















Profit-Sharing Plan
Soives Labour Problems

— ene
An American corporation has found that its

profit-
sharing plan gives employees a personal interest in the

COMpany br Bl =p ape pride in improving production Usually Now

and in "ie DWIGHT G. BAIRD Tins OVALTINE (Large) Pepe Pore oe oP $1.24 $1.12
(From American Business) :

A profit-sharing plan and a sliding wage Tins CORNED BEEF with Cereals 31 28

scale both have been in effect at the Michi- Bottles GROTSCH BEER 24 as

gan Tank and Furnace Corporation at Dear-
born, in the north central State of Michigan,
ior nearly five years. During this time there
nave been periods of increased profits and
increased wages, and there have been weeks
sr months when profits and wages both
declined. Thus, there has been some answer
to the question: What happens under a profit-
sharing plan when earnings and profits
decline? And the answer, according to J. J.
cheviron, company president, is that the
glan is working to the satisfaction of all con-
zerned, :

The combination profit-sharing and cost-
of-living sliding wage scale were introduced
n February 1946. Both were proposed vol-
intarily by the company management to the
abour union and were promptly accepted.

Business was good, and the cost of living}
vas rising during most of the first three|Â¥
years of operation under the plan. But in
-he company’s fiscal year ending June 30,

949, business was not as good as it had been.
(here was a considerable decline in the
water tank and heater industry as a whole,
ind this company was no exception. The
orofits available for sharing, therefore, were
imaller. Furthermore, the cost of living
leclined also, and there was a corresponding
lecrease in wage rates. There was enough] ¥
of a decline both in the profits shared and|¢
n the wage scale, to determine the reaction
vf the employees under such circumstances.

“This reaction has been exactly what we
were confident it would be,’ Mr. Cheviron

said. “Employees realize that if the business
prospers, they prosper correspondingly.
Therefore they do their part to help. But
neither they, nor we, nor anyone else can
guarantee that profits always will be high
and uniform. Production depends upon sales,
and sales necessarily fluctuate. We have
been getting our share of sales in our indus-
try. but sales in the industry as a whole
declined for a short time.

“We did not have as much profit to share
as we had in the two previous years.
employees anticipated this because
knew that production was decreasing.
they knew, at the same time, that they would
fare just as well, correspondingly, as the
company fared. We are happy to have
proved that our employees understand such
economic facts and that they have a sense of
fairness.”

Under the profit-sharing plan, 20 per cent.
of the net operating profits, before taxes, is
distributed annually to employees on the
actory payroll. No employee is eligible to
participate in the profit-sharing plan unless
ne has performed at least 1,000 hours of
labour during the company’s fiscal year, ex-
zept in case of extended illness or death. In
such case, the employee participates in the
profit-sharing plan in the class in which he
would have been placed had he worked the
full year, in the ratio of the number of full
months worked to.12 months.

The method of distributing the share of
orofits apportioned to individuals is based
4pon a point system. In introducing the

olan, it first was presented to the union, and
jetails were worked out amicably. A scale
of credits was agreed upon, and as most of
the employees had five or more years of
seniority at the time, this period was taken
as a basis and the following scale was adopt-
2d: All employees with local union seniority
of five years or more at the end of a period
dated June 30 were assigned a credit of five
units; employees with less than five years
service had fewer units.

The wage scale is based upon the average
rates for the area, plus a variable cost-of-
living bonus. This bonus is based upon the

Bureau of Labour Statistics index of
the cost of living. It was agreed that in case
the cost of living, as measured by this index,
tose, all production employees would receive
an increase. If the cost of living declined
after rising, the bonus would decline. Ad-
justments are made quarterly, up or down,
as the index rises or falls.

The combination of profit sharing and vari-
able wages provides a counter balance to un-
reasonable demands, If wages rise too high,
there will be less profit to share, and individ-
ual earnings for the year will be much the
same as they would have been if wages had
not risen. On the other hand, if the cost-

’ TOOLS

SAWS—1l8ins., 20ins., 22ins., 24ins., 26ins., 28ins., 30ins., 36ins,
COMP. SAWS—12ins., 14ins.

BACK SAWS—12 ins., 14 ins. 16ins. z

PLANES, IRON—9ins., 10ins., 15ins., 18ins.

» BLOCK
RATCHET BRACES

CHISELS—*in., %in., “in., lin.

CHISEL SETS of 3 in., 5s in. 1 in. ins.

OIL STONES—ins., 8ins.

GRINDING STONES, complete—Sins., 6ins.
Spare GRINDING STONES—4ins., 6ins.
SAW FILES—3Wins., 4ins., 4¥%4ins., Sins.
CLAW HAMMERS

ENGINEER HAMMERS—1lb., 1%lbs., 2lbs,

MASON TROWELS & SQUARES
: AT



WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.
4687,

Phones — 4472,




“INTERNATIONAL”
PAINTS

i
COVER THE’ WORLD!
:
As a protective covering for the roofs of
your buildings, we can offer you the
following
RED ROOFING PAINTS |
“DANBOLINE” ANTI -CORROSIVE PAINT (for galvanized {\
For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least a



shingles, asbestos, cement and aluminium)—$7.00 per
wine gallon.
———————,

For best results, the following instructions should be carefully
followed :—

Galvanized Iron.

iron)—$7.52 per wine gallon,
“PROPELLER” READY MIXED OIL PAINT (for wooden
a
year before painting. Then apply 1 coat of “DANBOLINE”. {
For previously painted work, if the surface is in good |

condition, rub down, clean, and apply 1 coat of “DANBO-
LINE.”

For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor con-
dition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat
of “INTERNATIONAL” RED LEAD GRAPHITE PRIMER,
followed by 1 coat of “DANBOLINE”.

Wooden Shingle,

1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
PRIMER FOR WOOD, followed by 2 ‘coats of “PRO-
PELLER”.

For previously painted work, if the surface is in good con-
dition, rub down, clean, and apply 2coats of “PRO-
FELLER”.

For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor
condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat
of “INTERN/AATIONAL” PRIMER FOR WOOD”, followed
by 2 coats of. “PROPELLER”,

Asbestos Cemeat,

1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER, followed by 2 coats of
“PROPELLER”.

For previously painted work, rub down thorcughly, clean,
and apply 2 coats of “PROPELLER”.

2.

Aluminium

1. For ne~w work, apply 1 coat of “YELLOW PRIMOCON”,

followed by 1 coat of “PROPELLER”.

2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean,
ani apply 1 coat of “PROPELLER”,

TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL
PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED.



DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — acenrs

profits increase, other conditions remaining
unchanged, and again the total earnings for
the year remain much the same,

Mr. Cheviron emphasizes the fact that his
corporation’s profit-sharing and bonus plans
are not substitutes for adequate wages.

We were paying the current rates before
we introduced the plan, and we are still
vaying them,” he said. “The profit-sharing
and bonus features were never intended as
i substitute for adequate wages. They were
offered as additions to the prevailing wage
scale for this area, which is one of the highest
in the United States. They were conceived by
‘he management and offered to the employ-
2es without suggestion from the union,

“We would not pretend that we expected
nothing in return for proposing such plans.
It is a fact, though, that there was little
room for improvement. The greatest change} *
among our employees has been in the per-
sonal interest which they take in the
business and the good will which they mani-
test toward the company. We quite literally
are all partners in this business. If the
business prospers, we all prosper according-
ly; if the business fails to prosper, we all
suffer the consequences. Our employees
have something tangible to maintain their Rare Cheeses
interest in their work. If they fail to produce y y ~
if they waste material, if they are absent SPECIALS
frequently without just cause, they are ' For Sau :
penalizing themselves and their co-workers. xg é

Profit-sharing plans that are intended to DAMAGED APPLES .
bolster sublevel wages; that are insufficient its. ber. —_
in amount of profits or are inequitably dis-
tributed, or that fail to cement amicable
labour-employer relations will defeat their
own purpose. Similarly, plans that have to
be won by bargaining are less likely to im-
prove mutual respect and good will.

On the other hand, we are convinced that
profit sharing, properly conducted, is the
answer to many controversies, and that it is
a truly American way of improving our
business and our economy.”





Build Up the
Kellogg’s Corn Flakes
Kellogg’s All Bran
RED APPLES
CARROTS

Children with
Quaker Oats
CABBAGE

For Perfect
SANDWICHES

J. & R, Bread

Pati de Fois Gras

Jellied Chicken

Jellied Turkey $
Sliced Ham
Salami

Sandwich Relish { Rit










THE TOAST of the TOWN
GODDARD'S
GOLD BRAID RUM

ORDER TO-DAY from
, GODDARDS





mee

eH BOOT 4

THURSDAY, MARTH

1, 1951



Right Hand Cut Off

AVID ROACH, a 53-year-old
labourer of Bawden’s Hill, St.
Andrew, had his right hand cut-
off while clearing refuse from
arcund the cane carrier at. Swans

Factory, St. Andrew at about
9.30 o'clock yesterday morning,
He war taken to the General

Hospital in a car by Mr. B.-A.
Goddard, Assistant Manager of
the same Plantation.
“QXHILDREN ON TRIAL”,
the film which was to have
been shown at the British Coun-
cil, ‘Wakefield, on Monday,
March 5, will now be shown on
Saturday, March 3,
THIEF stole a six volt battery,
. valued $32, from the moter
car J-230, which was parked at
Horse Hill between 6.00 a.m; on
Friday and 6,00 a.m. on Saturday.
The battery belongs to Ernest
Thorne cf Horse Hill, St. Joseph,
Clyde Lewis of Brighton Ten -
antry, St. George, reported that
his heuse was broken and ~-en-
tered between 4.05 and 5.30 am.
on Sunday and a wrist watch val-
ued $18, stolen.

HE PIPE

LINE that runs
across Lakes River, which
supplies residents of the Lakes

and Corbins areas, is at present
damaged. People of these districts
are now without water and have
to go to Belleplaine and Haggatts
to get water.

Up to Tuesday. morning no
repairs were being done to. this
pipe line.

IFTEEN MOTORISTS and
conductors were reported by
the Police on Minday for traffic
offences. Six drivers were charged
for failing to stop at major roads
and three conductors for carrying
passengers in excess.
Anoher conductor was report-
ed for allowing more than five
people to ride in a seat,

HREE FIRES took place
earlier this week. At Four
Roads, St. Philip, a house
12 x 11’ 8”, owned by Violet

Holder was completely destroyed
Holder’s two children, Edwin
(3), and Merlyne, 18 months old,
were burnt. Edwin is at present
detained at the General Hospital

while Merlyne is at the St. Philip's .

Almshouse. The house is not in-
sured,

Another fire at Market Hill, St.
George destroyed a boarded and
shingled shop, 20 x 10 feet, with
shedroof attached, property of
Orlando Holder.

The stock, valued $600, clothing
valued $70 and qa bicycle valued
$40, were also destroyed. The
house is insured.

The third fire took place at

Waterman Village. St. James.
Part of a boarded and
shingled house,» with ~ shedroof

attached, the property of Goul-
bourne Moore of Watermans Vill-
age, was damaged. Also destroyed
was a quantity of furniture and
clothing. The damage is-estimated
at $1.44N. The house ic insured,

Neighbours assisted in extin-
guishing the blaze.

NEW ROAD UNDER
CONSTRUCTION

Completion of the road which
is being built near Top Rock,
Christ Church, has been held up
due to the bad weather two weeks’
ago. The Top Rock Road has a
curve at one point and this new
road begins at the curve, cuts
across land and joins the road
where the curve ends. E

It would therefore cut out the
curve and make the road straight
at this point. It is felt that this
will help prevent accidents along
the curve

FESTIVAL GUESTS

THE Government of the United
Kingdom have invited two mem-
bers of the Legislature to attend
the Festival of Britain as their
guests from July 9 to July 30.

His Excellency the Governor has
requested the’ ‘House of Assembly
and Legislative Council to indicate
whether this invitation should be
accepted and if so, whether each
House will nominate one of their
numbers to go,





“Isle Of Spices” Is

Isle Of C



WILL HELP CLEAN (¢

fu



THE THREE modern refuse collectors which have recently arrived for the Scavenging Departme te cf
St. Michael and Christ Church.



Will Consider
Dairy Act

A special meeting of the Board
of Health will be summoned later
this month to aonsider a report
of a sub-committee of the General
Board \of Health and the Com-
missioners vf Health, St. Michael,
who were appointed to visit the
dairies in Bridgetown. The sub-
committee was to consider wheih-
er an amendment should be made
to the Dairy Regulations, 1945,

TWO modern refuse col

February 11, by the S.S. Mul

delivered.
Company.

Director Of
Natural Gas
Opens Office

IN BRIDGETOWN

Mr. JULIAN. GARRETT who is
now in Barbados on a two-year
contract with the Government as
Director of Petroleum and Natur-
al Gas, told the Advocate yester—
cay that he was formerly Vice
President and General Manager
of Northwestern Utilities, Limited

with head office in Edmonton, Al-
berta,

They





The report was laid at a 1-ecting
ot the Board of Health yesterday,
but it was felt that such a report
should be discussed when there
were more members present.

The Board had disallowed Mr
W. A. Hassell from selling 17,368
square feet of land which was
divided and let. The land was
situated behind George Street. At
the time the Board felt that they
eould not perpetuate the bad
Standard of housing by giving
permission to sell small lots.

Mr. Hassell appealed against
the Board’s decision to ihe Gov-
erncr—in-Executive Committee,
The Colonial Secretary informed
the Board that the Governor-in-
Executive _Committee had con-
firmed: its decision and told Mr.

On retirement from this Com-—
pay Ps + in ane Mr.
Hassell that after careful consid- a Matarst Gas one hes office as
ebatitn they were unable’to vary een oo hopead ea cites

ie leaving Canada for Barbados,

The Board was given notice to
quit a building they rent in Dot-
tin’s Alley. The building is occu-

He opened his office in the
Public Buildings yesterday morn—
pied by the Board’s inspectors i"8 and is at present engaged in
and other quarters will have to f@miliarising himself with the
be obtained for the inspectors. historical background of the de—

The Board approved of the velopment of the oil and gas in-
alteration of the appyoved plan Custry in Barbados in_ prepara-
for the division and sale of -land tion for his duties as Director of

in lots at the Navy Gardens, Petroleum and Natural Gas.
Christ Chureh, by Mr. Frank L. ‘
Giblgons. 28 Years In Gas Line

The Board also approved of the
division and sale of 200,206 square _ Mr. Garrett has been, engaged
fect ‘of land in lots at Amity Lodge, in the Natural Gas business for
Christ Church, by Mr. Norman 28 years and has appeared be-
Alleyne. fore many Commissions on Natural

The dividing off from Rose Hill Gas matters.
Plantation, St. Peter, by Mrs, He said that one of the largest
S. Hy Shepherd of the dwelling projects he had been connected
House and 4 acres 202 perches of with in recent years was one to
land for sale was approved of by take gas from the Pincher Creek
the Board. Gas Field in Scuth-western Al-

The Board *postponed the divi- berta through southern Alberta
gyn and sale in lots of 424,610 and Saskatchewan following
square feet of, land at Lodge roughly, the main line to the
Tlantation, by Mr. H. R. Farmer. Canadian Pacific Railway to Win-

i ani i a branch

The division and sale of land in es eee er and Pane
lo.s at Sandy Lane Plantation, St. ajbert
James, by Sandy Lane Co., Ltd., "4

was approved of by the Board. He said that from Winnipeg,

The Board appYoved of the alter- the line would run south to the

ation of the approved plan by Mr. international border and thence

Vernon Smith, owner lof lot No.7 through the State of Minnesota
by laying off a portion and adding to Duluth, Minnesota and Supe-
it to his adjoining land and by rior, Wisconsin, a project involv—
adding to a lot a portion of the ing an estimated capital expendi-
same adjoining land, ture of many millions.

This project may not be pro-
ceeded with until a licence has
been obtained from the Govern
ment of Alberta, authorising the
export of gas from the province
as the Government desires to
make sure that the future supply
cf gas to the people of Alberta
will not be jeopard‘sed.

haos Now.

The proven and probable natu-

MR. ALEXANDER GLEN, accompanied by his wife, 1 gas reserves of the province
left England and went to Grenada last November. They of Alberta have been variously

loved the island so much th
buy a home there.

Mr. Glen arrived in Barbados
yesterday and is staying at Four
Winds Club, St. Peter, where he
and his wife talked with an Advo-
cate Reporter yesterday about
conditions'in Grenada. He_ said
conditions were worse than Press
reports indicated.

Mr. Glen said he found it hard
to understand how the Grenadian
people, whose problems were in
no way as hard as those say of
people in Barbados, have been so
stirred that they are in a state
of mass hysteria. But in spite of
the hysteria, it would appear that
some of the incidents that occur-
red were carefully planned,

Such an incident was the am-
bushing of the Governor's A.D.C.,
as a result of which the A.D.C.
was in hospital with a very serious
skull injury. Another was the
burning of the St, Andrew School
which Mr. Glen thinks was one of
the most beautiful schools in the
West Indies. It cost £40,000 to
erect and was a gift of the British
Government. Those who planned
the burning did not forget to place
road blocks which were effective
in’ preventing the Fire Fighters
from getting near the fire.

Mr. Glen said he could not
understand why the rioters seem-
ed even intent on harming people
like themselves. For example,
they burnt down the medical cen-
tre, a most necessary institution
to the health of the colony. Again,
they attacked an old night watch-
man who was only milking his
own cow.

Also attacked was the mana-
geress of the Santa Maria Hotel,
which hotel is now housing Trini-
dad policemen who have come

at they were even deciding to estimated at from 6 to 7 trillion

But everything was changed in the cubic feet.
twinkling of an eye when disturbances which have sprung
up there recently turned the “Isle of Spices” into an isle
from which tourists are getting out as fast as possible.





‘ r
Legall Plays Table
over to help keep ee ip wig is- 7 ‘ 7 ‘i ht
land. merican tourists have >
been. attacked pas meee, and ennis oe
thi i p thinks ®
that. the TissPbarice in Chessiatin At Aquatic Club
will have a bad effect not only on

that colony’s tourist trade, but the ,.AT 8 o'clock to-night an ex-
tourist trade of the West Indies as hibition of Table Tennis matches

a whole will be played at ante ee
me ., dos Aquatic Club. mong those
ate ack one ~— playing will be Ralph Legall and
due to arrive in Grenada with his team mate Len Butler, Trini-
tourists this week had taken “adian cricketers.
Grenada off of her itinerary, He
recalled that the last time the
Mauretania went there taxi-men

The Barbadians who will meet
these two are: Louis Stoute, lofil
Champ, Campbell Greenidge,
ee ee ee Sake. Now things David Mayers, Charles Humphrey

Mr. Glen said he and his wite 2°4 Ren ~ in 1
thought it was high time to' leave On the last occasion Ralph
Grendda when & bomb wae thrown Legall defeated all who Barbados
at them. Fortunately, said Mrs. 944 to offer.
Glen, it was not a very good bomb.

Mr. Glen said rr up to when /
the disturbance broke out it was %
not very clear what the rioters Hawker Fined 10°-
were demanding. As a matter of 4 ; - i
fact, one estate owner who paid _ HIS Worship Mr. E, A, Mc
his employees three times the Leod, Police Magistrate of Dis-
standard wage was also attacked tTict “A” yesterday fined Seon

is li Cox, a 49-year-old hawker of
a va ern Bie! ee Mangrove, St. Philip, 40/- for the

unlawful possession of a quantity

About 50 per cent of the peo- of wood on February 27.
ple owned land as far as he could
see, and few of them engaged in Cpl. Kenneth Murphy attached
estate. work never worked more to the Bridge Post saw Cox with
than ‘three days a week. They the wood carrying it along the
worked for enough to buy neces- whurf side. He got suspicious and
sary articles in the shops, and after Cox could not give him a
then concentrated on their own reasonable explanation as to how
plots of land. he came by the wood, he took him

Mr. and Mrs. Glen have not yet to the Bridge Post and charged
decided how long they are going him.
to remain in Barbados. Their The fine is to be paid in gne
plans for the future are indefi- month or in default one month’s
nite. imprisonment with hard labour.



EY

-B’dos Gets 3 Modern =
Refuse Collectors

partment of St. Michael and one for the Sanitary Depart-
ment of Christ Church arrived in the island on Sunday

through Messrs. McEnearney & Co., Ltd. and are already
were made

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Py had

gee

Se F or U

United States.



Swimming Pool
At Silver Sands —

WINNER of Monday Evening
Advocate “Your Guess” Compe-

cf Lower Fontabelle. He guessed
correctly that it was the swimming
pool at Silver Sands.

It seemed a very easy competi-
jion, judging by the number of
correct guesses. However, a few
people were completely led astray!

“In the back yard of Dr, Payne's
office” said one guesser; “The
Cable Office, Top Rock” was an-
other guess

One baffling answer was -“This
was taken at the back of St,
James.”

Other wild guesses were, “This
is Alice’s Playing Field,” “Taken
at Kensington”, “Foul Bay, St.
Philip”, “Steps of .the Animal
Flower Cave”, “At Bea¢hyhead,
Philip’, “Garrison Savannah,”
“Wanderers Cricket ground” ete.

The “Your Guess”, Competition
in the Evening Advocate has beer

temporarily discontinued.. Watch,

fcr the Junior Short Story Com-
petition in the Evening Advocate
beginning Monday Mareh 5th.

Lumber Comes In
Large Quantities

Barbados has got one of ‘its best

lectors for the Scavenging De-



Iberry Hill. They were ordered

in England by the Ford
From next week two of these

collectors, with a capacity of seven

cubic yards for refuse, will be shipments of lumber this month.
seen working mainly in the City Around the middle of the month,
area. 1% million feet of fir arrived from

These collectors will replace Vancouver for Messrs T. Geddes

two of the old type. They are Grant Ltd., and only three days
fitted with tipping gear, worked ago, 21,000 feet of spruce and pine
off the engine. The six-volt arrived from Halifax for Messrs.
starter motor is mounted on the J.B. Leslie & Co., Ltd,

right side of the flywheel housing Most of the.144 million feet haye
and its power is transmitted to been cleared off the waterfront but
the flywheel ring gear by an ® large part of the latter ship-
automatic drive. sig basin Of the Careonage ygshertiay.

These modern refuse collectors P&Sin Of Te al ne
were ordered by the Commission- 4,¢°tumber trom the waterfront
a _view to ensuring the most up- Uae eee vicar’ be toad
to-date sanitary arrangements for Speightstown.
the removal of refuse. They will
greatly contribute to the system
of refuse removal and also assist
in bringing about a_ cleaner
Bridgetown.

The collector which was
delivered to the Sanitary Depart
ment of Christ Church is much
larger. It has refuse capacity of
10 cubic yards.



Damages Case
Adjourned

A case brought by Archibald
Welch of Clifton Hall, St. John
oe ane claiming daraae to oh ed o

, £50 from aldston arner 0
THROWN OFF CYCLE Bank Hall and Vincent Lashley of

Forty-six-year-old Albert Belfield Tenantry, St. Michael was
Boyce of Crab Hill, St. Lucy, was yesterday adjourned antil Mareh
treated and detained at the Hos- 29 in the Court of Original Juris-
pital yesterday evening after he diction by Judge G. L. Taylor.
was thrown off his bicycle while ae action = Peer ee, sea
ridi a x as Ss ill. sult of an accident on
oe nae. Road on May 29 between the
motor ears M-501 owned by Gar-

LIP BITTEN OFF ner and driven by Lashley and
J-152 owned by Alonza Mullins

JENETTS FARELL, a 40-year- and in which the plaintiff Welch
old labourer of Yorkshire, Christ was injured thus causing his little
Church, was carried to the Gen- toe on the left foot to be ampu-









eral Hospital yesterday evening ee di” tn. -the’, whee cave “Mr

to be treated for a bitten upper ounse! in. sne : ,

lip. Piece of the lip was bitten a. Bones 390 Weigh and Mr.

out by, anpther, woman. Details of the accident were given

by Policeman Ethelbert pecs

° who is attached to Four Roads

Busta Sits Down Sub-Station. He said that on May

7 N e 29, about 2.30 p.m, in consequence

? of a report he went to the corner

0 egotiate of Church View Road where an

(Prom Our Own Correspondent) accident had occurred between
KINGSTON, two motor cars,

Trade Union history was made _ The cars were M-501, and J-152.
in Jamaica to-day as Hon, W, A, He took measurements, The motor
Bustamante, the Bustamante In- ¢@r J-152 was re rea ae =
dustrial Trade Union head, and the road with the rig ‘a. The * ad
T.U.C. representatives sat down 0 the edge ee © that ie an
tegether with representatives of Wik Sher nan ohaek ie te geben
the Sugar Manufacturers’ Assccia- 4-501 was about four feet
tion to begin joint negotiaticns on from the gutter while the left
behalf of Jamaica's 45,000 sugar front wheel was two feet from the
wtrkers for the current erop. gutter. i

It is. the first time the T.U.C ;
have been concerned in sugar Toe injured
wage negotiations. Opinion has There was a man named Welch
been expressed that the stait of at the spot where the accident oc-
neg@tiations will end this present curred and his left little tee was
spate of strikes and Labour diffi- injured. ,
culties in the industry, Cross-examined by Mr. Dear,

Welch said that on May 29 about

2 p.m. he was walking along Clif-

TAX DEFERRED ton Hall Road going in the direc-
(From Qur Own Correspondent) tion of New Castle Road. He saw

GEORGETOWN, B. G. Feb, 28, two motor cars and went over to

In the face of strong opposition, One side of the road, In jumping
elected and nominated members to the wall the motor car J-152
of the Government to-day de- “caught him” on his left foot and
ferred consideration of the Bil] he then became unconscious. He
which called for a one cent per WS taken to the General Hospital
bottle tax on aerated drinks but ee nied tan ee amputated
placed an additional tax- on â„¢S)â„¢Murec toe. ; shy
whisky, gin, brandy etc, which it He an a the hospital for eight
is estimated will increase thé re- days and stayed at home for nine

’ 4 weeks.
tail price by 24 cents per bottle. To Mr. Dear, Welch said that
New taxation on bauxite was also pe crts canes’ for Clifton Hall

passed. Hants

The Council began to-day con- A gta
sideration of the ‘much debated At this stage Mr. Walcott made
budget and taxation proposals an application for two more de-
before a crowded House. Before fendants in the case. He called on
the business of the House Mrs, Alonza Mullins, and Woodville
J. B. Singh was presented with Mullins the driver of the car
the insignia of O.B.E. J-152.

and works for about

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Over. 1,000 Women Register enjgr Short
S. Emigration In 2 Days

WOMEN from tthe eleven parishes of the ‘s!and with tition.
their slogan “we want work” jammed the U.S. workers
Saving Branch of the Labour Department everyday of the
week to register their namés for possible emigration to the

“Your Guess’’ Was

tition was George Fergusson, Jnr.,’












in PAGE FIVE

Story Competition

The Evoaing Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girls
Letween the ages of 12-18 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe—
Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
in length and must reach the Short Stery Editer, Advocate Co, Ltd.
City not later than Wednesday every week. - The -best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the nner will re

eive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6,





Already, some 1,457 women have
registered. The records show that
500 registered on Monday, €00 on
Tuesaay, and up to 11 a.m. yester
Gav 357 were dispatched,

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

; Name
Most of them, married and ,
singie were domestics and seaim- Ase
tresses while there was a mixture
of general labourers and nurse School
maids,
Some were as young as 18 and Form «2.2... 6c . ee

quite a few were in the 40's, Th.

average age was about 25. Nome Address



Yesterday the Advocate visi.cd Title of Story .........
the department when about 6v
women were queued up for reg - See rer eee — -
is.ration. Surprisingly,
‘slight .murmur’ could be» heard. eee i a oh us



The two policemen on duty were
getting no trouble from the crowd.

e
BRUSH.-. UP... YOUR... SMILE...

just |

One of the registering officers |
said’ that early during the day the
queue was about 75 yards long |

Small Wages

Some ©f the Women were com-
plaining that ‘they could not get
»work while others, who were
Ww rking, - cdmplained of — small
wages. One ‘very énthusiastic wo-
man said. that ‘she’ was idling,
and was willing to do any kind
ef work in the States.



The officers are hoping to do all
registrations of women during the}
eoming week at the Park House. |

At Queen's Park, where the
men are, registering their names
‘for ‘pessible emigration fo ihe
US., large. crowds can be seen
daily renewing their registrations.



k Wisdom's straight-line head reaches
awkward corners easily.




*& Wisdom’s angle in the
handle is the secret of
its comfortable control.

Wisdom’ s widely-spaced
tufts ‘comb’ between teeth
clean where decay begins.

The bureau has been experi-

encing difficulty in filling orders e REGD.
for local employment as both /

male and female workers are say- }

ing that they are only aad)

in emigration

The Labour Commissioner ‘told ADDIS LTD. OF HERTFORD. MAKERS OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN 1780

the Advocate yesterday that many
of the men who had registered
at the Park, had refused work
in the island ‘offered on reason-
able terms. These men, he said,
would not be given first considera-
tion if workers were required for
the United States, }

Barbadian women have been
registered before by the Employ-
ment Agency for local employ-
ment, but this is the first occasion
on which they were registered
for emigration to the U.S.

Dy SOS OOP POO OOOO STO OPO OOOO SOO POO PCPP IOP OSOE

EASTER EGGS

Chocolate Easter Eggs in

Plastic Cases



Marzipan Easter Eggs in

Plastic

‘Golfito’ Calls Today

Messrs, Elders and Fyffes’ “Gol-
fito” is expected to call at Barba-
dos at 3 p.m. to-day to take pas-
sengers for England.

Cups
Marzipan Easter Eggs



e
‘ nr Regweneets must be on board
y 4. pm, The “Golfito” is
consigned to Messrs, Wilkinson & GET YOURS BEFORE THE
Haynes Co., Ltd, RUSH IS ON

PS POS 6 FOSDDOSOGP GOOD ,
% Haviny a grand time at - -

CRICKET!

Delicivuus Sweet Biscuits for
LUNCHEON and TEA put
up ia convenient packages.
Asserted Sweet Biscuits by
Huatley & Palmer, Peek
Frean, Carr and Jacob.
Prices 10¢.—26c.—48c¢.—50c.
Per Pck.
% Prices $1.20 to $2.14 Per tin,
y Jacob's Cream Crackers 6/-
y Per tin,

KNIGHT'S LTD. ate srancues



COSSESSSESSSSESESSS

——$<—
NO FLEAS
ON THIS

~~-Also——
Luscious Boxes of CONFEC-
TIONERY small and large.
BLACK MAGIC CHOCO-
LATES $4.06 per box.
% Peanuts 64c. Per tin.
Butter Scotch 2lc. to 4c,
per tin,
Nougat 34c. and 70c. per tin.
Fry's. Hazel Nuts 2/-, 3/9,
7/6 Box,
Cadbury’s Red Rose 98, &
> $1.80 Box,
% Cadbury’s Chocolate Biscuits
X 5/- & 5/3 tin.
» Chewing Gun 2c, & 6c, Pck,
? After Dinner Mints 1/- per
Peck.
Marr Bars 14e, ea,
Crest Bars 16c, ea.
Guava Cheese 18¢c, 4-02. Pck.
Cadbury Bars (Asst.) 10c.,
17c., 19¢., 34c., 37¢, ea.
Fry’s Bars 7c., 9c., 12c., 15¢.
§ Carr’s Choc. Lunch 12c, Pck.
® Carr's Choc. Tea Cakes 8c.
each,
an Cheese Crisps $1.02
is in,
R Carr’s Club Cheese $1,00 tin.
% Sharp's Toffee 2/6 and 3/3

SLES PGOPSOOS



‘Lorexane’ Dusting Powder, containing pure

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o
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gamma B.H.C., is a potent killer of insect
pests on domestic animals and pouliry. It is
pleasant and non-irritant to animal or user,

Equally effective
against parasites
on poultry,

In convenient sprinkler-stop contaluers of 100 grammes



Also in packings of 500° grammes and 3 kilo

Blue Bi 7 ‘
ue Bird Toffee 1/9, 4/6
$1.86 tin, nt

—Also— nase
Thermos Flask 1-Pint $1.51 4 ER.

Sun Glasses fr -
ee tn

DUSTING POWDER

Get them from ,
IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED

'
BRUCE WEATHERHEAD A sasidary Cornea of tmpetil Chomkal Outatres Loe

WILMSLOW MANCHESTER
ITD. Sole Agents and Distributors

Head of Broad Street A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LIMITED Om

OOOO . 4

»

%





Fastidious Women







For





Creton Shopping Bags

A fetching handmade product with smart wooden tops in
different designs and materials of various patterns. Just the
thing to make you look fashionable and at the same time
very useful.

This store will be closed at noon on Wednesday 28th Febru-
ary and Thursday 1st March for the Cricket Tournament.



Cave Shepherd & Co, Ltd. |





10, 11, 12 & 18 BROAD STREET |

seen







Ne . N
LGC CPF OOOO OOOO OOS POPOL SFO POCVIOE NS |










PAGE SIX



EARLY BIRDS

, Landmark, Notonite and Harroween‘
Return Best Times
By BOOKIE

Everything worked smoothly yesterday morning
and even the weather co-operated to make the
track the best since preparation gallops were started
for the meeting. I arrived at the track when it was
still moonlit but found there were a number of
people who got there before me, Nevertheless we
' - beat the trainers and jockeys by many lengths.
First out was Aberford but he disappointed us because he only did
a breeze on the exercise track. I think that was in preparation for
a gallop today so I will have to miss him out.





~ ae

Couf¥t_O’Law and Cross Roads then obliged us with a 7% furlong
work-out. At first I thought that Cross Roads’ was the easier of the
two, however he was not pushed along at the finish although Court
©’ Law was, and consequently he finished some lengths in front of
the creole. Court O’Law’s time was 1.324 for the box to box and 1.12}
fer the five. I still think Cross Roads should he favourite for the
Guineas as he is a genuine race day horse.

Burns was off again with Pepper Wine, who, incidentally had
pulled him out a lot in a five furlong sprint last Monday morning
This time they started out from the mile and Burns was movin very
impressively @ll the way. Pepper Wine was eased up after a once

--yound at the mile pole and Burns went on to do the mile in 151%,
finishing strong. His box to box was done in 1.284 and the five
in 1,114, Pepper Wine did her lap in 1,278.

Vanguard did a box to box in 1.37% going at a very restrained

pace.

Monsoon did a similar gallop working five in 1.13.

Galiant.Hawk, a half-bred I like very much and one who has
improved in looks in the short space of time he has been here, was
held tightly to do five in 1.17. His chances in G class look good.

Best Wishes has improved since her gallop last Saturday and
yesterday she was out again with Bow Bells, The Jatter looked easier
but I understand that Best Wishes slipped going over the hill, They
both finished very comfortably and considering this, their time of 1.06%
for the five was not at all bad. Bow Bells especially has never looked
fitter and I think it will take something really good to beat her at 54
or 7% furlongs.

Atomie IT was a little too much for Ability to handle although
her saddle was slipping-in the latter stages of their gallop over 742
furlongs, and finally came off soon after she passed the post. Atomic IL
did the once round in 1,262 and the five in 1,09}, Burns and Eliza-
bethan notwithstanding, I think the big creole colt is going to give
us a good race in the B.T.C, stakes.

Arunda did five in 1,143 but as this was a morning of light work
for the Bourne stables she was never really let down.

Miss Friendship could not really make it a {good gallop for her
companion High and Low, an imported chestnut filly. The latter did
the half in .58

Gun Site looked more on his toes yesterday but still had to be
scrubbed at the start to keep up with Waterbelle, They did five in 1.09



re

THE GAMBOLGS

UWAAT A DaY_* POOR GEORGE!
OuT iN THS RAIN — rhe bE

ae

be © be "ALE: -
GURE THERE'S
OF GPR
.
"Scottie, | like the way they still
,
h, \

PSs) Ltt’



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Waterbelie is a good combination of the O.T.C. and Restigo ‘
blood, the latiér being her sire and the former the sire of h la
Before the year is out I think we are going to hear a lot about }
and certainly at this meeting I expect her to de well



Doldrum had Elizabethan for company over five furlongs and
they kept together well, Their time for five was 1.09. Usually. we
see Elizabethan do about a mile as her winding up gallop so this time, I
am a little in the dark about her prospective form. However she likes
the going and will make them run for their money to beat her

Miss Panic is still my favourite for the Maiden. She was
let down yesterday and her time for the five was 1.112.

Cross Bow seems to have retained some of his speed which he
appeared to have lost in Trinidad. He did a five well held in 1,09

no’

Sun Queen did five in 1.07%

Jewel and Vixen appeared to be going fast but
their time for five was only 1.11

Watercress was hardly off the bit at any time
doing a box to box in 1.29% and five in 1.118.

San Tudor did some three quarter pace work
until she reached the half mile pole and then came
back in 59} over the four-furlongs.

Fuss Budget was really impre€ssive over a five
with Infusion. The latter was moved on in the
stretch but Fuss Budget was easy and they finish-
ed in the excellent time of 1.054. After this gallop it
certain that the Maiden would go to Wanderers I was told

Fair Sally was leaving Slainte in the first three furlongs but even-
tually finished very tired behind him. Slainte’s time for the box to box
was 1.26% which I thought was rather good.



seemed

Usher did not let us see what he could do. He therefore leaves
me up in the air about his chances in the Guineas. He did five in 1.19

Tiberian Lady, after a brief return to form last year, looks as
if she is looking for the paddocks again. She did a box to box in
1,31 and the five in 1.128.

Hi-Lo and Clementina had a return match over five, The filly
was not allowed to show her early pace and finished a little behind
Hi-Lo. They did five in 1.102

Harroween and Wotonite did one of the best gallops for the
morning. Both had up light weight jockeys although I do not know
what the saddles weighed. They did a five in 1.05 3/5 which was
the best time for this distance for the morning. Notonite was shaken
up a bit at the finish by Baldwin.

Mopsy did five in 1.11,

Soprano looked too good for the game half-bred Duchess. The;
did five in 1,094.

Landmark, who really went much earlier than she appears in
these ee did a fiye in the same time as Notonite and Harroween,
ie. 1. ,

The last pair I saw was Apollo and April Flowers. certainly looks bigger and stronger than I have ever seen him and
April Flowers had to be pushed at the finish to keep up with him

They did five in 1.09.

On Saturday I will have to pick my winners but up to now
there are quite a few about whicn I am not certain. I am sorry
to hear that the fast filly Demure struck herself and may not run
while I did not netice Lunways yesterday morning. As both of these
were at one time very much up in the betting it makes things dif-
icult to substitute some others in their place. Meanwhile it looks
as if Burns will not be the certainty we had anticipated although
it may well be that he will wait until race day to really show us
his class. Up to the present I cannot say that I have noticed any~-
thing to indicate that he will leave them standing over 5) furlongs
although several people have expressed this view to me. On the
cotatrary it looks to me as he will be much better over a mile, In
that ease the A class milers had better look to their laurels.



AW? WERE HE)
16 AT G

od he ~ ae
: fs yi
rd B | TODAY of
} a3

GEORGE DEA
DON'T LOOK AT ALL WELL

say ‘GOOD merning’ to each other.”
London Express Service







































(ep BS
i ‘| Y Aa

JOHN WHITE

means made just right

—_

Marmalades
& Syrups

Golden Shred Marmalade .47
Silver Shred Marmalade .47

Hartley’s Marmalade ........ 38
5€9. Marmalade (2-th) .... .48
Trin. Marmalade ................ 36

Lyle’s Golden Syrup.... .47 .23
Brechen Castle Golden



PRIMARY. visiavis sp eprassiet pest cccehdosbes 69
Meat Dept.

Prime Aust. Beef in Steak
Roast — Stew Veal — in

Roast — Cutlets — Lamb in

Legs; Shoulders — Chops —
Stew; Mutton — Shoulders —
‘Chops — Kippers — Haddock;
Bacon & Ham — (Sliced);

Salamir Sausage $1.00 per 1b














Biscuits
Peek Frean’s Royal
Scotch Shortbread $1.36

Rose’s Assorted Biscuits — 1.20
Balmoral Choe. Ass’ted
Biscuits oo... 1.60
Orchid Assorted Biscuits 2.08
Peek Frean’s Playbox
Chocolates ........0...0:.00.... 1,20
. Peek Frean’s .Martini
Crackers: ....cicesccccscesccsgeeees 1.75.
| Peek Frean’s Cheeselets 1.24

Ryvita Rye Biscuits......

}

THURSDAY, MARCH 1,’ 1951

OO LLL OL LLL CCC TET

if

f



(THEM good looks tell you they*re just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated .
is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.
Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
tee Shield—the sign which means ‘ just right 7
Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

Juices &
Squashes





Letona Tomato Juice .... $ .34 Liqueurs, Wines, Ete.
Jersy Tomato Juice ...... 38 eR re ee see oe $6.00
Brooks Tomato Juice... .38 COINTREAU osc ssciscucr econ $6.00 3.25
Pineapple Juice ............. 39 ANISETTE... oo cccccce 5.00
Trinidad Orange’ Juice 33 CHABLIS (1947) cccccscccccssssesoerve 3.50
Orange Squash. ............ 96 WIN ROSE (1947) ooccccccccsss eee 3.50
Lemon Squash ................ 93 LUBFRAUMITCH (1946) ........... 4.00
GRAVES (1943) occcccccccssssssseee . 2.88

Canned : :
V bl Ovaltine & Milk Foods

egetabies OVALTING: 0. oecr oes. $ 73
Dutch Garden Peas........ $ .38 TONO $2.21 1.23
Potit:Pols (Tris Tins)... -0 VEER 6h sceechtnstocne tere 13
Batchelor Peas .... 26 BOURN-VITA. ooocscccssccccccccsssssccsevee 70
Dutch Sauerkrant ............ 28 MILO (Tonic Food) ............. $1.07 .62

» Endive wn... . 33 NUTROGEN (Malt Food)... $1.24 .69

» Extra Sliced

Beans................... A5

se MS PPAMPACHD one cece eee

Confectionery
Bots. Liqueur Chocolates $2.54

Fry’s Choc. Scorched
Almonds. .......,........ 1.91
Meltis Favourite Can-
dies 0... $1.85 1.02
” Choc. Mint
‘ Creams. ........0.
Fry’s Hazel Nuts............
Pascall’s Fruit Salad......

Pascall’s Glueose Barley

A MORNING

resh shipment




















0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

I LEAP OVER THE WALL”
By Monica Baldwin.

AT THE OFFICE

By Edgar Mittelholzer.

AT
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY



of —

{
ENAMEL-IT ’
in all colours |

AT
JOHNSON’'S HARDWARE



FAME ' WELL
EARNED

A

by such a Quality Brand as

Sas

°
eo



RUM
Renowned for its Mellow
Flavour and Skilfully

Blended.

STUART & SAMPSON
LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.
Sh led lll

DONT

smear RAZOL pomade on
HAIR. Take it on the comb
and work it thoroughly
through the HAIR, forward
first, then backward, until
most of it comes back out.
Soft paper can then be used
to wipe away surplus and
to dress the hair to a finish.
The above course, will give
very desirable resulis.







Ht your dealer hasn't
RAZOL POMADE, phone
the

BORNN'S BAY RUM Co.

2938.









THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 19



St

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

—_—

The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1,50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 3, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional ward.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for exch
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

— _— ——
IN | MEMORIAM
—
BASCOM—In loving memory of Joseph
Nathaniel Bascom who died on March

Ist 1950.
He is gone but not Forgotten.
Louise White, Elanora Eastmarm
Adolphus Bascom (Grand-
Ethorne Basom (Grand-
children). 13.51—in

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays,

|

Ella
(Daughters),
son), Corine,





AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Style Master, Chevrolet. In veny
good condition, Owner driven. Apply to
L. M. Clarke, Jeweller, No, 12. James
St. Phone 3757. 1,3.51—2n

CAR—One
1950 model,
leaving Colony.





(1) Morris Minor Saloon

under 3,000 miles. Owner

Apply Thirkell 237).
28,2.51—t.f.n.

ee
CAR—One (1) 1950 Model Ford Anglia.

Can be seen at Courtesy Garage.
28.2.51—t.f.n.





PICK-UP—One Dodge Pick-up in work-
ing order. Apply: S. E. Cole & Co., Ltd
Roebuck Street. 21,2.51—t.f.n.



ELECTRICAL
RADIOGRAM—One seven Valve H.M.V.

A-1 condition on show at DaCosta
& Co., Lid, Electrical Department. No
reasonable offer refused.











following bargains in Brand New
ture for a limited time : John Brinsmead
Upright Piano $200 00; Mahogany Dining
Chairs $17 00a pr; Mag. Tub Chairs $34.00
apr ; Mag Bed-ends 3 ft. 6 ins. $30 00
a pr.; Bed-ends 4 ft. 6 ins, $35.00 a pr, ;
Mag Bureaus $75 00 each; Mahogany
Cocktail Tables from $8.00; Birch Chairs
$15.00 a pr., not forgetting a numerousi
variety of high class second hand furni-
ture. For viewing call in Hardwood
Alley. Open daily from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Breakfast Time inclusive.

23.2.51.—6n,

LIVESTOCK

CALF—One. (') Pure Bred Holestine
Bull Calf, out of Prince Albert. Age
ene month old. Dial 3527,





28.2.51—t.f.n,

GOLDEN RETR PUPPIES—12
weeks old Reg. Pedigree, both sexes.
Apply: Lady Dos Santos, Box 600, Port-
of-Spain, 27.2.51—3n.



|



HORSES — Three (3) Riding Horses.
Herbert Dowding, Lower Estate, 7

Michael.
28.2.51—3n.

TWO HORSES, HARNESS and one (i)
Cart. Going cheap. Apply: S. E. Cole
& Co., Lid. Roebuck Street.

21,.2.51—t.f.n.

MISCELLANEOUS

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites, Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t-f.n.









FOR RENT

Mintmum charge week 12 cents
96 cents Sundays 24 words = toa

words 3 cents
caer i, @ word week—4 Cents a

HOUSES

Ler nee
A FURNISHED BUNGALOW in Bedford

Avenue. 2 ms and all modern
cenveniences. Available from April ist.
Dial 2259. 25.2.5!—3n,

HOUSE—Modern three bedroom
situates at Top Rock, - havi

unge, seperate Dining Room, 2 Fully-
titled Toilets and Baths, and all other
conveniences available unfurnished from
March ist on, 3, 6, or 12 months least.
Ring 4683 or 2328. 28.2.51-—4n

“MODERN HOUSE2 Bedrooms WIC,
and Bath, Electric and Water, Gazette's
Ra., “St. Michael. Apply Dalton Gaskin.
Thomas Gap. * 1.2.51—2n

OO
MARINE GARDENS—New Bungalow.
3 bedrooms with running water, built in
wardrobes and all modern conveniences.
Long Lease preferred. Apply Mrs,
Friedman, Hotel Royal, 1.3.51—4n

CESS pe a a
ROOMS—Large furnished rooms very

cool, running water. With or without
‘ey 10 minutes walk to Clubs or
ity, Dial 3356. 27.2.51—t.f.n.

sen liellicaeieges

WHITE me tere FLAT
: * », PaMes.. ‘

Furnished or un entered Good sea-
bsthing. Private beach. Appiy Mrs.
E. M. Greenidge, White Cottage, St.
James.” 25.2.5°+—4n,

House,
large



PUHLIC SALES

Ten cénts per agate tine on week-d:
ane ee worn line on Sundays,
rge . 1
and $1.80 on Sundays aS ere

AUCTION

AUCTION SALE OF PROPERTY
AT KING'S STREET

On Thursday next the Ist March at
2 o'clock at my office, Magazine Lane,
one property at King’s Street called
Bombay Cottage. It consists of a Wali
Verandah, Drawing and Dining Rooms,
2 Bedrooms, Bath, Kitchen, Water and
Light, and the land on which it stands.
Inspection on application to the tenant.
For particulars sée D'Arcy A, ° Scott,
Magazine Lane. 24.2.51—3n.
——————

REAL ESTATE
meee,

OFFERS will be received by the
unde up to the ‘Sth day of
March 1951, for the buildings kn
“@s Calais (land not included) situated
on Dover Coast, Christ Church. The
eae be ere the buildings and
cJear the land within thirty days fr
the date~of purchase, Rae

K. E. McKENZIE,
Neils Plantation, St. Michael.
24.2.51—6n.
i

——
MODERN BUNGALOW — Overlooking
Golf Course, 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining | Rooms, Gallery, Garage and
spacious games room underneath, Apply:

Gordon Nicholls, Telephone 8539.
A.2.51t.f.n.

aa hse mee

E, St. Lawrence Gap, Christ
Church, near the Cable Station. The
dwellinghouse comprises large drawing
and dining rooms, three bedrooms, with
running water in each (one with a private
beth) separate toilet and bath, and
kitchen, Open verandahs to the East
and the North and a closed verandah
to the South on the seaside. Three
servant's rooms, garage and ferneny in
the yard, which also contains several
cocoanut and fruit trees.

The property is situated on the most
popular coast in the Island with perfect
sea-bathing.

For appointments to view. and for
further particulars ring 2925, R. S.
Nicholis & Co., Solicitors.







CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and
draperies. By Kirsch, Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.0

DOORS—Several pairs of pitch pine
doors, syitable for Garage or Warehouse



with large hinges. To be seen at
Willdale, Marine Gardens. I. M. G.
Simpson, 1.3.51—6n.



inating consumers,
or per case, Mount Gay Distilleries Ltd.
Agents. 1.3,51—2n



salers only.
Pails, Saucepans, Bowls, Chambers, Pie
Dishes, Kettles 4 different sizes at landed
costs. At Ralph Beard's Show Room.
Hardwood Alley. 27.2.51—3n.

MODERNFOLD DOORS-—The distin.
solution

ARNES & CO., LTD.

——————

ONE WINDMILL complete with pump
and tower. Two Lawn mowers, one
nearly new, Call 4124, 27.2.51—3n.

VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirsch Sun-aire

your sizes, delivery 3 weeks.
A. BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n.

———$$

Why not give your floor that new look.
Have them Sanded by the NU FLOOR
METHOD. Call Evelyn Roach & Co.
Ltd. 4623. 27.2.51—t.f.n.

WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower-
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.
We cut to your requirements. G. W.

HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd. Dial 4222,
15.2.51—10n.

———————

YACHT “CYCLONE”--Uffa Fex's In-
one-design Tornedo Class.
In first class racing trim, Winner of

the 3 Trial Races. Price $720.10. H.
JASON JONES & CO., LTD, PHONE
4279. 27.2.51—6n.





PERSONAL



CHARLES WEEKES,
Marchfield
St. Philip.
‘ > 28.2.51—2n.



word Sundays.



HELP

Young Lady with knowledge of type-
writing and Shorthand. Preferably one
with some previous experience in
Commission Office work,

Apply in writing to :
JAMES A, LYNCH & Co., Ltd.,

P.O.B. 140.
Bridgetown.
28.2.51— T.F.N.

MISCELLANEOUS

A COLLECTOR, Wants to buy Antique
Pistols, Box “C". C/o Advocate ye ae
1,3,.51—

IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-
lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.
Phone 4429 or call at GORRINGBS, ad-
joining Royal Yacht Club.

20,2.51.—T.F.N.

————_
IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniature? jade,
Old BWI Stamps. GORRINGES,

Antique Shop. Dial 4429.
20.2.51.—t.£.n.

LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series V. 4387.
Finder please return to Leonard Byer.
Tweedside Rd. 1.4.51—in

















their

Upper Bay Street, St. Michael,
dence of the late A. C. Greaves.

25.2,51—t.f.n.
The lersigned will set up for sale at
omce ne 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 2nd day of March,
1951, at 2 p.m.
The dwellinghouse called “Murray
Lodge” with the land thereto containing
by estimation 9,200 sq. feet, situate at

the resi-

Inspection by appointment with Miss
Ida Greaves, Telephone No. 3060.
For further particulars and conditions
of sale, apply to :—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
20,2.51,—10n,

SHARES—500 Shares Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading Co, Limited. 500 Shares
Barbados Co-operative Cotton Factory
Limited. 120 Shares Barbados Fire
Insurance Co, Limited. 90 Shares Bar-
bados Foundry Limited. 61 Shares
Barbados Ice Co, Limited. 139 Shares
Knights Limitec. 122, Shares Barbados
Telephone Co. Limited. A

The above shares will be offered to
public competition on Friday next the
2nd March 1951, at 2 p.m, at the office
of the undersigned.

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
Lucas Street.
24.2.51—6n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

LONDON









CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
EXAMINATIONS

Entries for the Summer Examinations, !
1951, of the London Chamber of Com-
merce must reach the Department of
Education, The Garrison, not later than
12 noon on Saturday, the 17th March,
1958.

2, The entry fee will be as follows:—
Single Subjects $1.92 each
Foreign Languages $3.12 each
Full Certificate $10,00

Department of Education.



28.2.51—3n.

PARISH OF ST, PHILIP
VESTRY BYE-ELECTION

I hereby give notice that IT have ap-
pointed the Church Boys’ School, near
the Parish Church, as the place where
all Parishioners of the Parish of St.
Philip and other persons duly qualified
to vote at any Election of Vestrymen
for the said Parish may assemble on
Monday 5th day of March 1951 between
the hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in the
morning to elect a Vestryman in place
of Ernest Lyte Esq. deceased.

Sed. P. S. W.. SCOTT,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip.
22.2.51—6n.



Y. M. C. A.

TENDER FOR ERECTION OF
BUILDING

The Board of Directors of the ¥.M.C.A.
invites Application for Tenders for the
erection of a building at Headquarters,
Pinfold Street.

The Plans and Specifications can be
inspected at the Secretary's Office
Y.M.C.A, from Thursday 1st March to
Wednesday ith Mareh between the
hours of 10 a.m, and 4 p.m. daily except
Sundays.

Tenders must be submitted ti Sealed
Envelopes and addressed to the Secre-
tary of the Y.M.C.A., Pinfold Street not
later than Noon 2ist March.

Tenders submitted will be opened at a
Board Meeting to be held at 4.30 p.m. on
the 2ist March.

The Board does not bind itself to ac~-
cept the lowest Tender.

HERBERT H. WILLIAMS,
Secretary.
28.2.51—8n



NOTICE

PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL
ALL persons, Firms and Corporations
having Accounts against the Parish of
Saint Michael are requested to send in
their Vouchers (duly made out in
Duplicate) to the respective Departments
mot later than Thursday, March 15th

inst.
Voucher
cate) may

Forms (Original and Dupli-
be obtained from this Office.
FRED J. ASHBY,
Churchwarden’s Clerk.
Churchwarden’s Office,
Parochial Buildings,
Bridgetown.









NOTICE
THE PARISH OF 8ST. PETER
Ali pérsens owing the above parish
eny Parochial Taxes please pay im-
mediate!
! G. § CORBIN,
| Parochial Treasurer
; 13.51—4n
i - —
NOTICE is heréhiy given that the
partnership: heretofore subsisting be
tween ARTHUR JAMES Y and

ALPRED ALEXANDER MACKIE. carry -
ing on business as Garage Proprietor:
®t Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, under
the style or firm of Supreme MOTOR
COMPANY, has been dissolv: by
routual consent as from the 28th day o(
February 1951, so far as concerns. the
said Alfred Ale: Mackie, who ha
retired from the firm,
Dated the 23rd dey of February 1961.
A. J, DOORLY.
A. A. MACKIE,
1.3.51—3n



——- -—

TAKE NOTICE
CHATEAU

ee
rgan: ©
the Dominion of Canada, Manu
facturers, whose trade or busines
address is City Dairy Building, Spadin:
Crescent, Toronto, Province of Ontaric
Canada, has applied for the registratior
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Registe’
in respect of cheese; butter, cream
milk and milk products; daily pro
ducts; substances used as food. or
a ingredients in food, and wil!
be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 27th day of
February, 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
+ Dated this 24th day of February, 1951
WILLIAMS,



H. 5
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
DIXIE BELLE

That CONTINENTAL OISTILLING
CORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is No.
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers,
has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A" of Register in
respect of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alco-
holic cordials and liqueurs and other pot-
able distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day of
February 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of sueb
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951.

TLLIAMS,





TAKE NOTICE _

HALO

That THE BYARD MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMITED, Manufacturers, 2
British Company, whose trade or
business address is Castle Boulevard,
Nottingham, England, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part
“A" of Register in respect of all kinds
of hairnets, including hairnets of silk,
cotton, human hair, rayon, nylon and
other synthetic yarns, bandeaux, sports
nets, slumber nets, hair curlers, hair
grips, hair pads, hair transformations
wigs and hairdressers'. wares and sun-
dries, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 27th
day of February 1951 unless some person
Shall in the meantime give’ notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n





TAKE NOTICE
PHILADELPHIA ©

That CONTINENTAL DISTILLING
CORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is No.
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers,
has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A’ of Register in
respect of whisky, gin, rum, rye, aleo-
holic cordials and liqueurs and other pot-
able distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day of
February 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office,

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS.

Registrar of Trade Marks.
27,2.51—3n.

TAKE NOTICE
GAYOIL

That PINCHIN, JOHNSON & ASSO-
CIATES, LIMITED, @ British Company,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is 4, Carlton Gardens, London,
S.W., England, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of paints, varnishes
{other than insulating varnish), enamels
(in the nature of pafnt), painters’ colours,
distempers, japans, lacquers, paint and
varnish driers, wood preservatives, wood
stains, anti-corrosive and anti-fouling
compositions, and anti-corrosive oils, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day
February 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
sten on application at my office,

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n



TAKE NOTICE
CHARTER OAK

That CONTINENTAL DISTTLLING
GORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State of
Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A of Register in respect
of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alcoholic
cordials and liqueurs and other potable
distilled alcoholic beverages, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 27th day of February
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office.

Dated this 2ith day of February, 1951.

H. WILAAAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
27.2.$1—3n.

TAKE NOTICE
DODGE

That CHRYSLER CORPORATION, a
corporation organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United
States of America, whose trade or business
address is 341 Massachusetts Avenue,
Highland Park, Detroit, State of
Michigan, U.S.A., Manufacturers, has
applied for the refistration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of transportation elements of all kinds;
motor driven vehicles, automobiles and
trucks of all kinds and for all purposes;
parts of motor driven vehicles, automo-
biles and trucks and their accessories of
every. description; and will be entitled
engines of all kinds and for aj] purposes,
parts thereof and accessories thereto of
every description; internal combustion
to register the same after one month
from the 27th day of Februany 1951,
unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 2th day of February, 1951.

H. WILAAAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27,2.51—3n





BARBADOS



SEVILLA RUM

That CONTINENTAL DISTILLING
CORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the Stato
of Delaware. United States. of America
whose trade or business address is No
14.9 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A,, Manufacturers,
hes applied for the fegistration of a
trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alco-
nolic cordials and liqueurs and other pot-
able’ distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
ifter one month from the 27th day of
February 1931, unless some person shall
1 the meantime give notice in duplicate
4 me at my office of opposition of such
agistration. The trade mark can be
een on application at my office.

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE
SWIFT'S

Tha: SWIFT & COMPANY, a corpora-
vo organized and existing under the
aws of the State of Miinois, United
states. of America, whose trade or
yusiness address is Union Stock Yards,
A.cueo, Stace of Mhinos, US A., has
ppued for the registration of a trade
wax. in Hart "A" of. Register in. respect
a luod “products d substances used as



neredients in foods, inc:uding fresh, pre-
awed, cooked, salted, dried, cured,
} .wOacd, Preserved, fiozen, and canned

meat and meat products, especially beet,
sork, lamb, mutton, veal, poultry, fish,
ind fabbits and food products derived
and sausage meat,
ile con carne, lJard,
oils, edible tallow,
» Qleomargarine, ice cream
butter, buttermilk, gelatin, canned
vegetables, canned baby foods, canned
‘ruits, dried fruit, pickles and condi-
ments, vinegar, jams, jellies, marmalade,
pie filler, rice, meal, peanuts, figs, dates,
raisins, cod liver gil, salt, stock feeds,
poultry feeds, fox feeds, dog feeds, bone

Meal, and oyster shells,
» inelud-

marger!

Soaps and ingredients of soa)

ng soap bars, soap flakes, liquid soap
and powdered soap, cleansing, polish-
ng, and scourt preparations, and
detergents.

Fertilizers, particularly artificial fer-
tilizers and ingredients: thereof, including
chemicals, bone meal, peat moss, ani-
mal urea, hard wood ashes, manure salts,
and horn shavings.

Chemicals especially superphosphate,
sulphurie acid, phosphate rock, soda and
soda products, nitrate of soda, sulphate
of amonia, ammonium phosphate, cya-
aamid, aluminum sulphate, zine sulphate,
manganese sulphate, sulphate of potash,
wricultural limestone, gypsum, muriate
of potash, calcium nitrate, copper sul-
phate, and potassium nitrate.

: Insecticides and fungicides, particular-

\y arsenate of lead, calcium arsenate,

anne sulphate, and paradichloroben-
ne.

Industrial oils and greases, °
edible tallow, e i

Hides and skins, hair, feathers, wool,
bones, horns, hoofs animal glands, ani-
nal casings and membranes,

Glues and adhesives, including animal,
vone and hide glues, and vegetable ad-
Yesives.

Fertilizer spreaders,
sits, hatchery equipment, baby chicks,
.and bags and containers, and will be
ontitled to register the same after one
month from the 27th day of Febru-
ary, 1951, unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate

o me at my office of opposition of such

egistration, The trade mark can be
‘een on application at my office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951,

soil testing

‘951.
Registrar’ of wat Marks,
27,2.51—3n,
_—
TAKE NOTICE
TANGO

That THE BYARD MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMITED, Manufacturers,
British Company, whose trade or
business address is Castle Boulevard,
Nottingham, England, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of all kinds
of hairnets, including hairnets of silk,
cotton, human hair, rayon, nylon ‘and
other synthetic :yarns, bandeaux, sports
nets, slumber nets, hair curlers, hair
Srips, hair pads, hair transformations,
wigs and hairdressers’ wares and sun-
dries, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the
day of FeDruary 1951 unless some person
Shall in the meantime give notice in
dupli¢ate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
wae can be seen on application at my
offie,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
27,2.51—3n



-

TAKE NOTICE
KINSEY

That KINSEY DISTILLING COR-
PORATION, a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is 1429
Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State of
Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part "A" of Register in respect
ot whisky, gin, rum, rye, alcoholic cor-
dials and liqueurs and other potable
distilled alcoholic beverages, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 27th day of February
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27,.2.51—3n





‘TAKE NOTICE

That SIR ROBERT BURNETT & CO.,
LIMITED, a limited liability company
registered under the laws of Great
Britain, Distillers, whose trade ot
business address is The Distillery, Sea-
grave Road, Fulham, London, SW. 4
Englond, has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of gin of all descriptions,
and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day
of Februany 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be seer
on application at my office,

Dated this 2th day of February, 1951;

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n
— ee

TAKE NOTICE

That MACLEANS, LIMITED, a British
Company, Manufacturing Chemists
whose trade or business address is Great
West Road, Brentford, Middlesex, Eng-
land, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of medicinal preparations, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 27th day of February
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at-my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this @th day of February, 195!

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
27.2,51—2n
















ADVOCATE



Rout In London

From GEORGE WHITING
SOUTHAMPTON
Dave Sands, Empire middle
weight champion from Aus-

tralia, will defend his title against
Britain’s Randolph Turpin in
London in May or June.

An attempt will then be made
to match the winner’ with
America’s Ray Robinson for the
world tithe he won from Jake
LaMotta in Chicago this week.

Promoter Jack Solomons,
home,from South Africa loade?
with trophies of the chase —
ineluding £500 won in this ship’s

The undermentioned property will be
Public Buildings, Bridgetown between 12
date specified below. If not then sold, it

application to me.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain pie

admeasurement one acre, fifteen and a



UPSET PRICE: £2,000. Os. 0A.

DATE OF SALE: 9th March, 1951.
TAKE NOTICE
RED ROSE
That T. 4H. ESTABROOKS CO.,
LIMITED, a Canadian Corporation,

whose trade or business address is 6201
Park Avenue, Montreal, Canada, has
applied for the registration of a trade
merk in Part “A” of Register in respect
of tea, coffee, coffee mixtures and spices,
and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day
of Februany 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark oan be
seen on application at my office,
Dated this 2th day of February, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE -
JANTZEN

That JANTZEN KNITTING MILLS
INC,, a corporation duly organized under
the laws of the State of Nevada, whose
trade or business address is Jantzen
Center, Portland, State of Oregon, United
States of America, has applied for regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of articles of clothing,
and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 27th
day of February 1951 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
27,2.51—3n

TAKE NOTIC
SINOLETTE

That PINCHIN, JOHNSON & ASSOCI-
ATES, LIMITED, a British Company,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is 4, Carlton Gardens, London,
S.W,, England, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of paints, varnishes
(other than insulating varnish), enamels
(inethe nature of paint), painters’ colours,
distempers, japans, lacquers, paint and
varnish driers, wood preservatives, wood
stains, anti-corrosive and anti-fouling
compositions, and anti-corrosive oils, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 27th day of
February 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade merk can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,

PRVOSDSS9S G99 D99 OOOO FOF
Scientific Massage

After strenuous work or
play MASSAGE

fatigue poisons and releases










removes

new energy.
W. JOHNSON, D.M.T.

Crumpton St.

1.3.53.—In.




GRAND MARCH

FURNITURE

AT MONEY-SAVING PRICES

FULL-PANELLED Mahogany sin-
gle & Double Bedsteads; some in
Outstanding Designs—Vanities witn

















Various Mirrors-—Wardrobes and
Dresser-robes,
MAHOGANY, Birch and Deal

Tables for Dining, Cocktail, Radio,
Sewing, Kitchen in several shapes
and sizes—Sideboards, Cabinets
for China, Kitchen and Bedrooin.
SUITES and Separate Drawing
Room pieces in Morris, Tub,
Bergere and Rush, and Many
other Nice Things, NEW AND
RENEWED.

L.S. WILSON

Trafalgar Street—Dial 4969











COOPER SPLIT ROLLER BEARINGS

“Split’’ Feature enables dismantling and re-assembling to be

effected with ease,

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER

AGENTS.

os?

at the same place and during the same hours until sold,

















| LE

TAKE. NOTICE § | Turpin-Sands Title *

run—
I mes

epstake on the daily
ve me this news when
him. here to-day.





‘Only the financial details and
the exact date for Turpin v Sands
remain to be _ settled,’ said
Solomons *Â¥You can forget all
those reports about Sands not]

wanting to fight outside Australia
He will be here when the weather
warms up a bit. I shall be settling
the details with Sands’s manager,
Tom Maguire over the week-end”

“I have travelled half-way
round the world in the last few
months”, added Solomons. But
I have yet to see any better
prospects than our own three
champions Randolph Turpin,
Jack Gardner and Don Cockell

—L.E.S,





CHANCERY SALE

set up for sale at the Registrd un Office,
noon and 2 p.m, for the sum and on the
will be set up on each succeeding Friday
Full particulars on

REYNOLD ST, CLAIR HUTCHINSON — Plaintiff
ve
OLIVER ST. CLAIR DOTTIN -

Defendant

ce or parcel of land situate at Codrington

Hill in the parish of St. Michael and Island of Barbados aforesaid containing by

half perches Abutting and bounding on

lands of the Estate of Sarah Brewster, on !ands late of S. E, Small but now of
one Headley, on the Public Road and on a road in common 16 feet wide or however
else the same may abut and bound Together with the messuase or dwelling house
and all and singular other the buildings and erections thereon erected and built
standing and being with the appurtenances the property of the Defendant,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery,
19 February, 1951.
20,2.51--3n

PUBLIC. MEETING

There will be a Public Meeting
held under the auspices of

THE BARBADOS LABOUR
PARTY

and the

BARBADOS WORKERS’
UNION

at MILE & QUARTER, St. Peter

On FRIDAY, 2ND MARCH,
1951 at 8 P.M.

Speakers:—F. L. Walcott, M.C.P.
K. N. R. Husbands,

M.C.P.

F. E. Miller, M.C.P.

G, H, Adams, M.C.P.

ORIENTAL
GIFTS!
THANTS = ux"

3466









ad
Ce tee

WHAT'S IN A NAME

When you say

Everton Weekes—

Everyone thinks of Cricket,
& you

Know likewise,

Everyone thinks of Cooking,
as you

Say G, A. Service.





GLASSES

For LADIES & GENTS
Amazing Styles & Values!

THANTS = ir

8466







NOTICE



The Health Conference

at Queen’s Park on
Tuesday, March 6th
will be opened by

HIS EXCELLENCY THE
GOVERNOR

at 9.30 a.m. and not at 9.15
as previously advertised



WANTED

PROPERTY in easily
manageable form up to
£25,000. Wanted for over-
seas investor,

















John M. Biadon

REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
"Phone 4640

REAL ESTATE


















speed and economy.

HEAD LANE,





































SHIPPING





MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW

















ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED || |The M/V (CACIQUE Del CARIBE
i argo and Passeng
(M.A.N.Z. LINE) | for St, Laila, St. Vincent. Gre
: “ | ‘Aruba
M.S TONGARIRO"” is schedured to} 2kth February
vil Melbourne Febru 20th, Syde : : A
Februan’ 28th, Brisbane March 7th, he aes ana" hee =
ne Siewit are tance Fe aks Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Sama’ Ge Smee | Nevir and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
‘Cargo accepted on through Bills of | | 2% March 1961 |
Lading with transhipment at_ Trinidad | ||, 7°, a ee |
ond Leeward Islands Passengers only for St. Mincent, |?
For further particulars apply Svlling Gate to Be notified
VURNESS, wiry & co! trp, ana| || >W , SCHOONER OWNERS.
N INC,
Da COSTA & CO, LTD., | Yel. 4047,
Trinidad, Barbados, }
BW. B.W.L, Sa = _ ,





Se









BO” 2 ihe
o1

CANADIAN SERVICE

From Halifax, N.S., St. John, N.B.
To Barbados, Trinidad, Demerara, B.G.

porns “LOADING DATES

.
| Expected Arrival
Halifax









st. Joha Dates Bridgetown,
ss. “SUNDIAL” Barbados
ae eae Eley 03 | 1” Feb. } 4 March,
print “POLYCREST” } 38 feb. 24 Feb 18 March.
8. “SUNDIAL” , 12 Mareh. | 28 March
26 March | 23 March 11 April.
U.K. SERVICE Toe ee
From Glasgow, Liverpool, Newport, London.
| Newport Expected Arri
| Glassow | Liverpool | Swansea Dates riaectotn:
8.8, “SUNRELL" 26 Feb. | 22 Feb a re
ee ne a 2. eb, Feb. 1S
s.s. “SUNWHIT ” March. | 22 Mar. ‘® March 2. April,
terre pe ene ret te ena ;
From Rotterdam, Antwerp, London : "Expected Arrival.
fs Rotterdam Antwerp London Dates idget
ss, “SUNAVIS" 15 Mar, 17 Mar. 27 Mar, 12 me by
Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED,
Phone 4703 ~
.
Co.
ae.
: NEW YORK SERVICE
8S _"“Myken™ sails 23rd February arrives Barbados 6th Mareh,
5.S. “Seabreeze”

Is 16th



8

M





ch, arrives Barbados 27th March,

etnies





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE





SS. Runa" sails 15th February. arrives Barbados Ist March.
S.8. “Alcoa Patriot’ sails 7th March arrives Barbados 23rd March
_—
. _: enn Enemas D





CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHROUND

Name of Ship SAILS HALIFAX ARRIVES B'DOS



S. “ALCOA PARTNER” + + February 23rd March 6th
“ALCOA PEGASUS" .. March 9th March 20th
» “ALCOA PENNANT" ., Mareh 28rd April 3rd

eaaaaE ERR ERREnnEEEEEneemeeneeeeee Enel
NORTHBOUND :

SS, “ALCOA PENNANT” ,, +s +» Due March Sth Sails for St, John &
Halifax.
2.8 “ALCOA PARTNER” os a Due March 20th Sails for St. Jon
& Halifax .



ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE :

These vessels have Nmited passenger secommodation,





=. J

PASSAGES TO EUROPE i |

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Domini, for sail.

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Rotterdam, Single fare £170; usual reductions for childrens -






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WE CAN SUPPLY. ...

+
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PAGE ZIGHT ~

Barbados Spends Another Day
In The Field ey, ting ook

@ From

When Jeffrey Stolimeyer (114)
and Tangchoon (0) resumed Trin-
idad’s first innings at their over-
night score of 232 for 2, Norman
| Marshall and Mullins opened the
a attack.

Marshall sent down a maiden
over to Jeffrey who was still using
a runner and Mullins also bowled
@ maiden to Tangchoon from the
pavilion end.

In Mullins’ second over Stoll-
meyer turned him nicely off the
pad to the square leg boundary
for four runs and took another
single with a similar stroke which
Was smartly cut off by Roy
Marshall, «

With ten runs added to th
score Mullins got the third wicket
for Barbados. He beat Tangchoon
with a fast low one that was cut
back fram the off and took his off
stump.

Al gh Tangchoon had been |

at the wicket for over half an
hour—36 minutes to be exact—he
had not vet opened his scoring.

‘me

The score now xead 242—3--0.

Ralph Legall partnered his skip- |
per who sent up 250 with a cover |

drive off Norman Marshall for
four and an on-drive off Mullins
for another boundary.

Trinidad was now farther be-
hind the clock. The fifth fifty hed
taken 84 minutes to complete, 2!
being made in 334 minutes as
compared with 200 in 250 minutes.

Nine runs laier Legall fell vi:
tim. to Norman Marshall. 1s
reached forward and edged the
ball into Wood’s pads behind the
wicket. Umpire Foster had no
hesitation in upholding an appeal
for caught at the wicket.

Legall had scored 2 runs during
his thirteen minute stay at the
wicket and Trinidad had lost four
wickets for 259 and Stollmeyer
‘was responsible for 139 of these.

Skeete swept one on the pad
from Marshall to the square leg
boundary for four runs but he was
out soon after.

He played back to a change
pacer from Millington, mistimed
the ball and was struck on the
pad. Up went Umpire Jorden’s
index finger in response to an
appeal for 1.b.w.

Skeete had scored 9 during his
twenty-five minute stay at the
wicket,

Trinidad up to this time had
lost three wickets in the day’s
play for an additional 36 runs.
Skeete, who seemed more cramp-
@d and cautious than the condi-
tions demanded, might have got
‘quite a few more runs if he had

own some of his wonted enter-
prise.

The score was now 268 for 5 and
Chicki Sampath partnered Stoll-
meyer, The latter, although still
using a runner, did not seem to
alter his excellent stroke-play to
any appreciable extent.

He approached his 150 with a
cover drive off Roy Mar-
shall for 4 and a late cut off the
same bowler, later in the over
for three, brilliantly saved on the
boundary by Charlie Taylor.
Mullins replated Roy Marshall
at the screen end and _ Jeffrey
Stollmeyer tickled a full toss to
the fineé“leg boundary for four
runs to compiete his 150 in 387
minutes.

Jeffrey. Stollmeyer had been
playing beautifully attractive cric-
ket and had hit ‘twenty fours and
a five during his stay at the wicket
up to that time.

When play stopped for lunch
Stollmeyer was 151 not out and
Sampath 9 not out and the Trini-
dad score 290 for 5.

Trinidad lost another wicket on
resumption without any addition
to their pre-lunch score of 290.
Weekes claimed his second wicket
of the innings when he lured Sam-
path out of his crease with a well
ne seers and en

Fs made no mistake in
whipping off the bails.

Sampath had batted for 28 min-
utes for his score of 9. Ferguson,
the stalwart defender of the second
innings of the first Test, was the
next man in.

Ferguson dispelled any doubts as
to the possibility of punishing
Weekes by cover driving a full
one to the boundary for four runs
to send up 298 runs on the tins.

A confident on-drive by Stoll-
meyer for three runs, that was
only saved from being a boundary
by another of Charlie Taylor's
magnificent saves, sent up 300 for
Trinidad in 410 minutes.

Ferguson entered double figures
with another cover drive off
Weekes for four runs.

New Ball at 308

With the score at 308 Walcott
requisitioned the new ball and
brought on Norman Marshall, The
first ball was wide of the leg

{ They'll Do It Every
















FOR ONE WHOLE )-»))/

Page 1
stump but Stollmeyer turned the
next one, almost similar to deep

square leg for a couple.

Mullins bowled from the pavil-
fon end.and Stolimeyer steered
him cleverly through the slip for
four runs.

Ferguson, batting more freely
now than at any other time dur-
ing the series, cover-drove one
from Norman Marshall for another
boundary.

Jeffrey Stollmeyer entered the
180’s with a late cut off Roy Mar-
shall as neat as if his bat was a
rapier and it raced to the bound-
ary unchallenged.

Stollmeyer sent up 350 runs
with another cover drive to the
boundary off Roy Marshall. This
had taken 460 minutes to compile.

WILFRED FERGUSON
—made a gallant 84 not out
yesterday.

The rate of the Trinidad scoring
had now caught up with the clock
as far as the last fifty runs were
concerned. The seventh fifty was
scored in 50 minutes.

Boundaries

Stollmeyer with a wonderfully
controlled stroke, tickled an in-
swinger on his pad from Atkinson
to the fine leg boundary for four
and then turned him hard to the
deep square leg boundary for an-
other four to make his individual
total 196.

Next over from Weekes, Fer-
guson kept up the boundary tempo
and swept Weekes to the square
leg boundary for four and then
gently guided him to the deep fine
leg for three,

Jeffrey Stollmeyer off drove for
3 and made his total 199. Walcott
bowled himself to Stollmeyer, now
more upright than ever in his
stance and watchful. He turned
one off his pad past short square
leg for a single and completed his
200 runs in 470 minutes. He had
now hit twenty-five 4’s and a 5.

Chances

Barbados now missed both bats-
men in rapid succession, Ferguson
with his score at 34 edged a sharp
one from Weekes to Millington in
the slips but the latter put it on
the carpet.

Next over from Walcott, Stoll-
meyer with his score at 201 turned
one to short fine leg. Denis Atkin-
son got the ball into his hands but
fell and failed to hold it,

Ferguson pushed one from Wal-
cott to mid-wicket for au single
taking the score to 390. This
meant that with Stollmeyer, Fer-
guson put on 100 in 102 minutes
for the seventh wicket partner-
ship, unbroken up to then.

tollmeyer welcomed a full toss
from. Walcott and smashed it to
the long on boundary for four
runs. our byes sent up 400 on
the tins in 504 minutes.

With a single added to the score,
Ferguson pushed wide of the slip
and Tang Choon, acting as runner
for Stollmeyer came running down
the pitch. erguson declined the
run and rane Choon scampered
back towards his wicket. A smart
return by Clyde Walcott to his
brother Keith and the wicket was
put down with Tang Choon out of
his ground.

Stollmeyer Run Out

Stollmeyer was therefore run
out for 208. He had been at the
wicket for 506 minutes and had
hit 26 fours. His innings was
worthy of a first class batsman.
He might have been stumped off
Norman Marshall at 21 but after
that he only gave a chance to

Denis Atkinson when he had
reached and passed his double
century. ‘

_He received a tremendous ova-
tion on his return to the pavilion,

Jackbir joined Ferguson who
cut one from Keith Walcott
through the slip to complete his
individual half century in 110
minutes. This included eight 4’s.

The Tea interval was now taken
with Trinidad’s total at 401, Fer~









‘time








MONTE =

guson being 52 not out while
Jackbir had not yet opened his
his score
After Tea
When play resumed, Jackbir,

after a spell of steady poking un-
leashed a full-klooded late cut
past gully off Millington for four
runs.

Another neat late cut gave Jack-
bir another four off Millington. A
cover drive soon after gave Jack-
bir a third four at Millington’s ex-
pense.

Ferguson, now quite settled, en-
tered the sixties with an off drive
off Weekes for four and a late cut
that beat Millington's boot for
four.

After a very quiet spell Fer-
guson swept one off his pad to the
square leg boundary for four runs
to send up 450 runs in 564 minutes.

Jackbir celebrated this with a
square cut off Weekes for 4 but
later Weekes deceived him with a
leg spinner and he put up an easy

catch to Roy Marshall in the slip.
Jackbir had been at the wicket for
54 minutes and had hit four 4’s.

Trinidad had now put up 456
for the loss of eight wickets.

Lennox Butler joined Ferguson
and with the straightest of bats he
helped Ferguson to advance Trini-
dad’s total, and when play ended

for the day, Trinidad had scored
488 for the loss of eight wickets,
Ferguson being 84 not out and
Butler 13 not out.

Seores:—

TRINIDAD ist INNINGS
J. Stolimeyer run out ,..,,.......
A. Ganteaume c Weekes b
R, Marshal) ...,:......, 68
N. Asgarali e K. Walcott b Weekes 48
R. Tang Choon b Mullins . ot.
It. Legall ec (wkpr.) Wood b

N. Marshall cede oe ne syaer ed
C. Skeete |I.b.w, Millington 9
C. Sampath stpd. (wkpr.) Wood b

Weekes . se ‘

W, Ferguson not out .. 84
8S. Jackbir ¢ R. Marshall b Weekes 26
L. Butler not out : .
Extras: 14 bs., 4 Lbs, 3 n.bs, .. 21
Total (for 8 wkts.) 488

Fall of wickets: 1 for 118, 2 for
3 for 242, 4 for 259, 5 for 268, 6 for
for 401, & for 456,

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M.

231,
290,

a
Cc. Mullins . wee Ss WI 1
i. Millington .. 35° 13 66 1
N. Marshall .. “ #10 a 1
D. Atkinson .. 16 6 38 9
R. Marshall ... a 66 1
E.. Weekes ...+--.+ 20 3 15 3
Cc. L. Walcott ..... 7 2 4 0
K. Walcott . fen 6 0 23 0
Umpire: Messrs. S. C. Foster and

H. B. Jordan,

Golf Entries
Close To-day

ENTRIES will close today for
the Qpen Amateur Golf Cham-
pionship with a strong field al-
ready assured for the title event
which will occupy the attention
of local enthusiasts through the
month of March, Because the
event always attracts the largest
field of the year, an ecighteen-
hole qualifying round will be
necessary to reduce the match-
play starters to sixteen and this
will take place on Sunday after.
moon at the Rockley Golf and
Country Club.

The first sixteen in Sunday's
field will qualify for the Cham-
pionship proper, the first round of
which will be played a week from
Sunday. The second sixteen to
qualify will enter the match play
rounds for the DaCosta Cup, which
will be played off hardicap, The
second round of both competitions
is scheduled for Saturday, March
17, with the semi-finals the next
day, Sunday, March 18. The finals,
which will be played over a 36-.
hole stretch, will be played on
Saturday, March 24 and Sunday,
March 25, eighteen holes each day

Actually only the first fifteen in
Sunday's round will qualify for
the title play as John R. Rodger
the current holder of the crown
is automatically listed. The drav
will be seeded, with Rodger at No
1, and the others according t
their place after Sunday's test,

Ralph—Francis
Fight To-night

TO-NIGHT at the Yanke
Stadium Kid Ralph fights a re-
turn bout with Kid Francis whom
he defeated on a technical knock:
eut on the last occasion, Bott
fighters have undergone seriou:
training for this contest whicl
will decide the championship in
their division and for which ;
belt has been offered, so to-nigh
there will be no quarter asked o
given, Each man is in the pink o.
condition and all attending ean
be assured of all out fighting
from start to finish,

Francis with his ring craft anc
experience, will be opposed to <
rugged younger fighter, and the
struggle for a win is bound to bc
hectic and interesting.







Senne ane nene em

By Jimmy Hailo |











woe PaaS SS
Os i VY4e NURSE — \
(ices cuts, YA/my SPLEEN! \ (city Poo
FEVER AND CHILLS) \ HEY,NURSE!) = \SheRoi act




‘5
0p.)



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1951



M.C.C. DRAW GAME
WITH VICTORIA

LONDON, Feb. 19.

The M.C, retained their re-
cord of being unbeaten by a State
team on this present tour when
they drew with Victoria at Mel-
bourne last week in the last First
Class fixture in Australia, apart
from the fifth Test. They owed
the preservation of this reeord ta
Hutton and Bailey’ who came to-
gether after five wickets had
tallen cheaply and were con-
cerned in a stand which’ realised
196 runs. Both batsmen com-
pleted centuries, Hutton’s, being
the fifth of the tour and 96th of
his career and Bailey's the first
of the tour.

Another batsman in a_ high-
scoring mood was Lindsay Has-
sett, Australian and Victorian
Captain who seized the oppor-
tunity to put together his highest
score in first class cricket. He
batted six and ‘a half hours, hit-
ting 20 fours, and scored more
than half the Victoria’s total from
his own bat.

Brown Abseni

In the absence of Brown, trou-
bled by a groin injury, Compton
again captained the M.C.C. side
and again he lost the toss. Victoria
given first innings on an easy
wicket did not take advantage of
this piece of fortune as they
might and had it not been for

Hassett’s undefeated 173 at the
close of play, they might have
been in trouble.

Young Brian Statham had

Meuleman caught by Hutton with
only four runs on the board and
although Hassett then remained
master of the situation he could
not find anyone to stay with him
for any length of time.

Neil Harvey although scoring
only 25 batted in his brightest

style and produced one magnifi-.

cent square cut in which there
appeared to be no time at all be-
tween the bat hitting the ball and
the ball hitting the fence.

But all in all it was Hassett’s
day and apart from one chance at
73 when he was dropped by the
unfortunate Close off Bailey, he
never looked like getting out.

His partnership on the second
day with Ring produced 166 in
two and three-quarter hours and
established a new record for the
seventh wicket for any Australian
State against the M.C.C, side,

Stiff Task

When the M.C.C. bega,. their
stiff task of scoring 442 for first
innings lead Compton elected to
open the batting with Washbrook
in an endeavour to play himself
back into form after his failure
in the Tests. The experiment did
not however come off. After he
had made only 20 he was clean
bowled by Ian Johnson,

Dewes, the Middlesex ieft-
hander, than assisteti Washbrook
in a partnership which added an-
other 59 but after the score had
been taken to. 107, Washbrook
was drawn out by one of Ring's
spinners and stumped. After
that two more wickets fel] quickly
and at 124 for 4 the M.C.C.’s
hopes were pinned on Hutton
when stumps were drawn at the
close of the second day’s play.



PERC
All Tourists Welcome

9 P.M,

y GREEN'S ORCHESTRA

GREAT DOOR PRIZE

ELIMINATION

ENTRANCE $1.00

was that trust mis-
placed. Hutton played another
grand innings, perhaps a little
more subdued than usual but not
unnaturally so in the circum-—
stances, and in partnership with
Trevor Bailey he put on 196 for
the sixth wicket and gave the
M.C.C. a great chance of secur—
ing first innings lead.

He eventually fell via a mag-—
nificent catch on the boundary
by Loxton to Ring who had
claimed five of the six wickets
which had fallen at that stage for
134 runs,

Bailey went on to his highest
score of the tour. At the close
he was undefeated with 107 and
in partnership with Close had put
on 44, leaving the M.C.C. only

Neither

50 runs behind with four wickets ®

in hand.

No Lead

The looked-for M.C.C. lead
did not materialise on the fourth
and final day and after Hassett
had turned down a Compton
offer to try and arrange a finish
the match ended farcically with
Washbrook bowling—and taking
wickets—and Statham and Berry
opening the M.C.C.’s innings.

Bailey, last man out in the
M.C.C’s first innings, gave his
best display with the bat since
leaving England.

The afternoon was devoted to
a carefree exhibition of batting
by the Victorians, notably Harvey
who smacked and smacked and
smacked again at Berry in
attempts to bash the ball through
the offride field. {lima

After Tea

After tea the proceedings grew
even more and more light-hearted.
Even as a comedian likes to star in
Shakespearean tragedy, so do
batsmen like to try and bowl.
Washbrook was put on for the
first time in two tours of Aus—
tralia and his straight up-and-
downers promptly took twa
wickets for eight runs in two
overs,

The final act was a reversal of
the bowler-batsman effort. In-
stead, this time it was the turn
of the bowlers to show just how
simple the business is of opening
an_ innings.

The M.C.C. had been set 262
for victory in a quarter of an
hour and although Berry and
Statham swished enthusiastically
and energetically at everything
sent down by the bowlers the
M.C.C. were still 228 runs short
of the necessary total with nine
wickets remaining when stumps
were drawn!

The following are the score:—

VICTORIA 1st INNINGS,
(Hassett 282, Ring 74)
SECON

seeds egegit e+ 441

D INNINGS
C. McDonald c Hollies b Berry .. 26
N. Harvey ¢ Hutton b Berry ...... 56
5. Loxton c Compton b Berry .... 15

K. Meulemen run out ...,........ 30
H. Turner ec Hutton b Compton .. 40
A. L. Hassett e Close b Washbrook 36
D. Ring ec MeIntyre b Washbrook 15
I, McDonald 1.b.w. b Close ........
J. Hill not out
W. Johnston stpd, McIntyre b
Mutton ois vese
i. Johnson absen
Extras .......

Potal oie. scseses



Fall of wickets; 1 for 56, 2 for 101,
3 for 104, 4 for 174, 5 for 193, 6 for 220,
7 for 227, 8 for 227, 9 for 234,






DANCE AND PRIZE

A La Carte — Kitchen Service

TO 12 MIDNIGHT

BOWLING ANALYSIS
o.

M R w.
Berry . vam ‘s
Washbrook 2 0 8 2
Hutton 1 ° 4 1
Compten 9 1 43 1
ose. 15 2 70 1
Briley + 6 12 «60
Hollies 6 2 22 ®
Statham 6 1 25 9%
B.C.C.
D, Compton b I. Johnson .......... 20
C. Washbrook stpd. 1. McDonald b
Es ottaws dbl der 38

. G. Dewes ¢ and b Ring
W. G, A. ‘khouse

L. Hutton
A. Me





Fall of wickets; 1
3 for 107, 4 for 120, 5 for
7 for 388, 8 for 404, 9 for 414.

BOWLING neee-yess

for 48, 2 for 107,
apes 6 for M7,



R. W.
134 5
68 2
99 2
10 1
2 0
an)
67 0

SECOND INNINGS
B. Statham c Hill b Turner .... 16
B. Wy. SG CUE nica ce cnyerees- B
W, E. Hollies not out ............ 1
SEL, (kas be 505020 a ‘i 6
Tota) (for 1 wkt.) ... ..



The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 6.16 a.m.

Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m.

Moon (New) March 7.

Lighting: 6:30 p.m.

High Water: 9.31 a.m., 11.31
p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington): Nil.
Total for month to yester-

day: 12.24 ins.
Temperature (Max.) 83.0 °F.
Temperature (Min.) 76.0 °F.
Wind Direction: 9 a.m.
E.N.E., (3 p.m.) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour.
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.910,
(3 p.m.) 29.847,



FLOOR SHOW AND
DANCE

at
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
{ on
SATURDAY EVENING,
MARCH 3RD
at 9 o'clock

JEFFREY’S TROUPE
OF ARTISTES
Featuring : . .

Miss CHRISTINE GORDON
Miss Jeffrey’s Beer 1951

and
Carnival Queen
with
Mr. LANDY de MONTBRUN
Mr. CLYDE RIVERS,
—Seotch Tenor,
Miss JUNE MAINGOT,
—Pretty Girl Dancer.
Mi. CLIFFORD CORBIN,
—Banjo Player.
Mr, PETER PITTS,
—Calypsonian.
Miss DOROTHY de MONT-
BRUN

Trinidad’s

' —lLady-in-Waiting to the

| Queen.

Miss DAISY CREQUE,

| Mistress of the Ivories
as accompanist.

| DANCING after FLOOR

i SHOW

Admission to Ballroom $1.00

(Local & Visiting Members

—— ERNIES

Democratic Club

He We are
" AGAIN

there will be a meeting at
6 p.m. sharp!



on Friday next March 2nd
to discuss the problems of the
wftst day of the Spring Meeting.
‘Mis s ‘a pélitical meeting.
No after dinner speeches and
there will be a call over
on all races,

MENU

Hors d'oeuvre—The Usual Turkey
and Ham—J. N. G. and Sons
Kome made Sausages-Peach Melba
~Purity French Mince Pies
owred and trained by Ss. H, K,

-

and it “not,” why not? "So what?
What What!

|

U.S. NAVY RUSH FOOD

TO KOREAN REFUGEES

TOKYO, Feb. 28.

United Nations naval authori-
ties to-day were rushing food and
medical supplies to two small is-
lands off the Korean west coast
port of Inchon to relieve the plight
of 30,000 famine stricken South
Korean refugees.

Refugees fled from the Inchon
and Seou! areas ahead of Chinese
troops who occupied the South

Korean capital in their new year
offensive,

It was said that for many days
people had eaten nothing but the
roots they have been able to dig
from the frozen ground.—Reuter.



What's on Today

Art Exhibition, Queen’s
Park ......9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Police Courts and Court of
Original J




jurisdiction
++++.-10 a.m.

WE ss es ebast
St. Lucy Vestry Meet-
Fed es Uren 2 p.m.
Mobile Cinema gives Show
at Foundation School pas-

ture, Christ Church
Sains > Piles chs 7.30 p.m.



ban vies. 445 & 8.30 p.m,
Olympic—“Strange Triangle” and
“A Walk In The Sun”
secceeeess ee 4.30 & 8.15 p.m,
Roxy—"Wolfman” and
“Exile” 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.
Royal—River Lady” 5 & 8.80 p.m.
Plaza (Bridgetown) “Tarzan and
The Slave Girl” 4.45 & 8.30 p.m,
Plaza (Oistin) “Riding the Sunset
Trail” and “Death Valley
Rangers" ' . 5 & 8.30 p.m.



rere nnn mreosanneigeremyenentnpeinany,



Boby

Powder



NEW- RELIEF FOR

BOXING

at the
YANKEE STADIUM
Brittons Hill
e

TO-NIGHT

e
KID RALPH
(163 Ibs.)
vs.
KID FRANCIS
(162 Ibs.)

o
In return match for the
Light-Heavy weight
Championship of
BARBADOS

10 Rounds

Lt

@ €\ At the first ;
4
{







bh \
“em your handkerchief and pillow
‘ for comfort and protection. Breathe

i. the vapour deeply and often.

ARTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than
ease these terrible agonies.

A new product, te, bas been created which not only gives

rheumatism, but
% IN has
"t . it
Get DOLCIN y.
BY:

lue to the symptoms of arthritis and
the metabolic processes which constitute

of the rheumatic state’s background.
thoroughly tested
is being used now with
x Spormal li Pe ult of taking D

ag a result o mj

Don’t dela: Piok by the ex aonoe of fellow-victims of these
A bottle of 100 precious tablets costs

in medical institutions,

eae success. DOLCIN

nd many sufferers have already
OLCIN,

BOOKERS DRUG STORES— Bridgetown and Alpha
Pharmacy.
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lengths of 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12,
14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24
inches,

Priced from 29c. to 98c,
Coloured in lengths of 6,
7, 8, 9, 10 and 12 inches.
Priced from 24¢c., to 44c.

FASTENERS

This store will be closed to business at 12 noon on Wed-
nesday 28th February and Thursday Ist March for the

Cricket Tournament.







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} PHONE 4267 FOR

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street







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SHE DRAW? AH :
CHONDRIAC week
THREE -HOUR CASE
HISTORyâ„¢.












Full Text

PAGE 1

FRICEfi FIV ARUNDELL WILL FLY BACK TO GRENADA Australia Loses 1st Test In 13 Years From W. J. O'REILLY. MELBOURNE, Feb 28 £NGLAND'S CLEAR CUT VICTORY here to-day has done much good for cricket. We were all tired of the one way traffic. The tremendous ovation for Brown and his team this afternoon was proof of that. But England, delighted as she may be about it all, has like Australia some building up work ahead to do to maintain the optimism which today's victory arouses Bvlser and Hutton have been the outstanding players of the scries. Bedser ranks undoubtedly as one of the greatest bowlers of all time, but he is now a veteran. His colossal role in the rehabilitating of English cricket has been enacted. But his test career is nearly over. So too with Hutton. Not until this'series have the Australian public teen the real Hutton. Now we have seen him at hi* best. We are all satisfied to rank htm "topt." But it will be optimistic to think he can retain such form much longer. It will be hard to replace those two champions. Tattersall hat hed a permanent place. He knowledgeable player v distinct promise. But what happened to the young players. Not one added one iota to his reputation. We are in the same boat, Hasoctt cur oldest player, topped both average and aggregate in battti Iverton our "mystery" bowl took the stage as a veteran and now announces bis retirement Lindwall and Miller have run their full course as express bowlGerman Banks Review Trade FRANKFURT, Feb. 28, The central council of west German banks met here to-daj continue the exhaustive review of west Germany's foreign trade position and credit problems which have developed to crisis proportions in the last two weeks A council spokesman told Keuler to-day that a Communique would be issued probably tomorrow afternoon Tne spokesman said the council was discussing west Germany'? forelan trade position and the measures aimed at credit restrictions. One subject under discussion was understood to be the raising of German bank rstes from six to eight percent ur possibly higher. The west German Governmen: last night proclaimed a temporary embargo on imports of all apod* from west European cpuntnes. A Government spokesman sold the Government was to revtn Its Import regulation* in the next few days as part of the coming overhaul of the country's whole economic policy M'hlch has hitherto emphasised the principle* of a ''free" as against a "planned' economy.—Beater. 14-Year-Old Boy Kills Parents AUCKLAND, California. Feb. 28, A Myear-old boy merged with shooting both his parents dead while they watched a television show was described by psychiatrist* here as sane but "obsessed by simultaneous feelings of low. hate and Jealousy for his parents The boy, Donald Arceo told reporters HI juvenile detention quarter* that he sent j bullet into his father's temple and shot hi* mother as she screamed ot him. Donald, an only child, afterwards nave himself up tt) the police. Pay etalatrlstS discovered that the boy held an intense love for his parents but had come tu hate his father "because he wanted to be iik,. his dad and could not." Donald was also Jealous of the love his parents held for each I ther and felt left out, the psychiatrists said. Californian law furbids the imposition of the death penalty on anyone under 18 but minors can be jailed for life. —Reuter. SKVIXTVailMI Mill I.OIM. MllOM. %  rs Attack unwieldy Our attack has been mada ex-tremely unwieldy by the foolish policy of our selectors in concentrating on off spinners. There were four of them in this Test Off spinners are seldom worth l cracker in this country. But we hsve one silver lining. Our two young batsmen Burke and Hole have come to stay. Hole, tell and athletic, hits the ball powerfully. He will supply plenty of headaches for England's bowlin the future. These two ngstera give us the ede on England for the future. But England's victory to-day 111 surely make a challenging call to English youth. The bogey of Australian Invinci bility has been overcome. Scores:— l sTKMH— lit I"-.ill. 1>1 Ndl.AND—III lltmnl**• •W.tr.ll — % % %  id I....I..Iurk* r Hullon b Brttwr 1 MorrW I b.w. b medtet ti b Wrlfbi OJ y lb.w. b Wright SO Milter e b Blown • Holt b Vailey •' %  John.c Brown b Wilitil Jwall b Brdter 14 l*iluii nol out S Mil John-Ion b B-dwr ... 1 BOWLING ANALYSIS ,. %  T-d Ini BXIfccr BaiWv Blown WiHjnl -nail IMsa Million nol owl ilibrook < %  Ui-lwj.11 b Jonntt-n BlmtMon run out Cnmpton nol out Extra | il i r> feTMi Tola I ior J wkti i FERGUSON who mads S4 oat out yenterdsy In leen hers pulling Key Marshall for four to enUr tho neveaUea. His was a grand knock which helped to put 111* *.dr In a comfortable poalUon. Gairy Sends 'Cease Violence 9 Call Len Hutton Wins £1,000 MFLROURNr. Feb. 28 Len Hutton has won the price of f 1.000 offered by a busir house for the "bent player" In series of live Test match" which ended to-day. He was awarded three point* for his second inmng* nf 80 not out to-day and hnishrd with 29 points. This was only one point ahead of his captain Freddie Brown with 28 Keith Miller. Australian allrounder was third with 271 points Healer NO STEPS Says Griffiths LONDON, Feb. 28. Fitzroy Mat-Lean. Conservative, asked in the Commons to-day who was now in occupation on Decep tion Island in the Antarctic. Colo mal Secretary James Griffiths replied there were both British and Argentine parties established on Deception Island. British force* wore in charge of a magistrate and maintained a meteorological station and post office. MacLei asked what was being done to evict "these undesirable aliens from British territory" Griffiths replied that no steps have been taken Government hn^ indicated that It Is quite prepared to let this matter be decided by The International Court. Workers Demand Seven* Punishment PRAGUE. Feb. 28. There was no Indication here today when Dr. Vladimer dementis and his associates, arrested on ellcged treachery and conspiracy, are to appear before the People'* State court. The case has been put in thq hands of the State prosecutor. The preparation of the indictment may take week:. ftue> Crave Communisi Party paper to-day published letter* from factory workers in various parts of the country calling for severest punishment for 'the disgusting traitors to the parly and all working people." —Reuter. Stollmeyer Scores Double Century In Trinidad's 488 Barbados Spends Another Day In The Field BY O. S. COPPItf TRINIDAD k*pt Barbados for another whole dav In the field yesterday and at close of play had carried their overnight score of 232 for the low of 2 wickets on the previous day to fillfor 8. — I Jeffrey Stollmeyer turned in another uterllng diiplay of l..il numihlp and completed hi, aac' r* double century on Hurtndos' /- f T-v so 11 **eii fie adds,] 04 run. 10 hie nllPfll* IS I lOWn ,oljl "' m "' " prsviuui day L -" p al 3 1 "" TU to ..-ore 208 run. In MM minute., before his runner win run out and therefore he DS well "Kill The Chinese: Save Ourselves" Ridgway Tells Army Commanders TOKYO. Feb. 28. Almost all forces along the 60 miles United Nations offensive front pushed forward to-day in general probing attacks to test Communist defences among the wet muddy hllls of central Korea. Frontline reports indicated patchy resistance on the east and west hanks, but stubborn defence and counterattacks in the centre around Hoengsong keystone of what is thought to be the main North Korean line. Lieu tenant-General Matthew B Ridgway. 8th Army Commander. yesterday told his frontline commanders: "We have only one objective—to kill the Chinese and save ourselves." Today he ordered forward his six-nation attacking force, through heavy mud, after a day of desultory skirmishing. Small groups of Communist*; had fought skilful delaying actions to cover th Communists withdrawal to the new line north of •he swollen Han River and acrosthe difficult hill contours In the %  egton south of the 38th parallel An 8rh Army spokesman said tonight that elements of the veteran American 1st Calvary Division advanced 2.000 varda on the central front today. With only light enemy resistance, cavalrymen took Hill 297, key attack base, for their drive towards the -entral rail junction of Yongdu :i few hundred yards to the north Train Crash Kills 3 RIO DC JANEIRO, Feb. 28 The engine driver and two other crewmen lost their lives to-day when a train crashed into the water after becoming derailed while crossing a bridge. About 20 people travelling in the single passenger car in the rear suffered only slight injury. The train belonged to the Government operated Estrada De Ferro Central Do Brazil which also runs Rio Suburban lines where another crash occurred last night killing three and injuring over 70 passengers —Beater. DISAPPOINTED? WASHINGTON. Feb. 28 John Foster Dulles. President Truman'" Special Envoy said today he would be greatly dlsap* pointed i( a peace treatv for Japan wa not near completion by the m.ddle of 1951 —Renter Bait On Red Cross Emblems Lifted GENEVA, Feb. 28. OfJIgftJ Mac Arthur has lifted the ban on Red Cross national uniforms and emblems in Korea, the League of Red Cross Societies announced here to-day. General Mac Arthur forbade members of Red Cross teams In Korea to wear their own uniforms insignia and protective emblems, on the ground that they became members of the United Nations Command on arriving in Korea Danish, Norwegian, British and Canadian Red Cross teams were informed on arrival in Tokyo that they would not be allowed to wear i-mblems. They protested to the International League of Red Cross Societies which in turn protested to the United Nations.—Reuter. From K M MacCOLL NEW YORK While the price of everything • %  I: 'u %  lendil. up. >ugar sags WhyBecause there is too :h in America Just now. list month it would have cost you 44s. tkl to buy 1001b. of sugar in the U.S. To-day it is dewn to 41s. 5d. fur 100 lbs. Behind that drop Is g baatth" sign—scanbuying and hoarding. 'nlch started after the Korea war began and was fairly acute t times last year, Is prettv M Sfl dead. One up to the American house wife Foouaeie: too lbs. of sugar would cost 41s. Bd in Britain PILOT BANNED WASHINGTON. Feb 28 TinCivil Aeronautics Board to day barred Captain Itio Itridoux. Bolivian pilot, from ever flying again in this country Bridoux, now back in Bolivia, was blamed fur u plane collision that killed 55 people here on No. vembcr 1. 1949. Renter. POCKET CARTOON by OSBI Rl LANCASTER RADAR EQUIPMENT STOLEN FROM R.A.F. CHELVESTON, Northamptonshire. Feb. 28. Radar and radio equipment worth thousands nf pounds has been stoh-n from an R A.F. stn tion henOne estimate of Its value; is £50.000. The robberies, it is believed, have been going on fot acme months.—Reuter "Now tUaie deii'i forger tnat while . r are quue prepare-*' m .hare K I donors, utt 0 f ,i, r oxygen tent it re be rctervea executively for Government supporter t .'" It will be remembered that Stollmeyer scored 210 agaimt 3arba took two more wickets to make his bag 3 for 75 in 20 overs. The Barbados fielding was good at first but ragged towards the of play as the tlcldsmci, gvldl 'i'ly feeling the strMn of two day* in the Held. Two chances went abcgging, Jeffrey Stollmeyei at 201 Ferguson at 34. Both of these should have l>een Uken. Special nSion must I* made however of tho first claas ground fielding of Charlie Tuvlor, Huntc and Keith Walcott Ferguson will luraly be given 1> chance at a century to-day _nd Trinidad should reach the 500-run mark. This will put Tr.nidad in a very strong posiion. • Oafso* Russia Will \ol Start A War —SPAAK BtUEVES BRUSSEI.S, Feb 28 l'.ml Henri Spaak, Chairman oi the European Consuhati\ bly said here to-day he dnl oat believe the Soviet Union would start a war "because the Kuaslam %  t understand that if they failed to beat the Americans withir a mattei of six months, they would never beat them Belgium's, formei Piemier was speakinit at RrusaeU mrpoii, all, i a SOIT-.CAIUII rough fllKht fiom the United Stater, whcie he mada a six weeks' lecture tour Spaak said "I am very much impress ad by America's gigantli •iTort in the milita.y field and tin corrct-ponding drive in the economic ai.d fiscal ilcM — Reuter. Voluntary Action \f GfOttOtt Weapon SAYS TRUMAN WASHINGTON. Feb. 28. 1'iesident Truman declared in a television broadcast frum the White limi.* to-day thai voluntaiv %  etten by ptsOplc wlio lx'lie\ In a common cause is still Mi C ealesl force In the world. It r more err. v. dl" tyranny. if wc as a nation get lAftthe Ui that spirit of freedom. I an ai.re that we BSM overcome th. cr.sls that face* tiie free world, and I belle\*e that we can bring the world nearer to thu iwacwhlrh all man desire" The Pn-sident was opening the 1952 appeal for contribution* ; i the American Red Crosa General George Marshall. Secretary or Defence anil formei President of the American Rec Cross, addressed the rally for th. anme cause at Madi-on S'lunn Garden. New York. —Reuter French Legate DccIincH bivitation CAIRO. Feb 28 French Ambassador Couve Dr MurvilV to-day declined the invrtalion ,f ".typtian Foreign Rfin Utr. SMl.ih El Din Key to ml upon him to dlscu the situation in Morocco. The Ambassador sent an apology for his inability to kerp the MDQ ln Unggtl French ofliciul circle. akl that the Ambassador declined to call on the Foreign Minister because It is considered that the French attitude that "Moroccan and North African affairs are no concern of 'he Egyptian Government -—Reuter FROM CARRIACOU SIR RED OPPOSITION TO CHURCH CONTINUES In Czechoslovakia PARIS. Feb. 2B. The (-rimmunltt fight 10 ellmlll utc the church is going on un (• f:Techo-l'iv.ikls. the ( %  r strt I'.ive ncwspa|X'i Hi in i eported to-da) "Vice Premier 7. Dcnek Plartlnast recsflttl* said the B is h op had taken an oath to the new regime and would confer Holy Orders on all new priests Monsignor Reran. Archblshou of Prague, though no) ollV iallj %  par I sonar, is unable to leave his palace. —Renter TELL T1IF. ADVOCATE THE NEW* RING IIII DAY OR NIGHT FRENCH GOVERNMENT RESIGNS — Beuler By HAROLD KING PAIU.*;. Feb. 2fl The French coalition Cabinet headed by Rene Pleven, ended today after holding office for 231 days. The Cabinet resigned at the end of the long drawn out debate on the Electrical Reform Bill which began last Thursday. Nine successive vote* mnce last Thursday showed that it was Impossible to get Radical and Catholic groups Inside a Government majority to agree on what new system voting at General Elections was to be. It also comes at a time when Government decisions or wage ami price policies are urgently needed owing to the rising cost of livmj, and the growing labour unreal The Civil budget for tins vaai has also not yet been voted. To-night for the second time in 24 hours. Pleven asked the President to be relieved of office Based on a stormy Issue the dec toral reform resignation was in no way the result of a vote of confldenoLast night the President definitely refused to accept Pleven's resignation, also following the failure to resolve gntgCBSI Cabinet on the gegtatn of voting to be used by the nattOl Ifl Ibt General Election this year. To-day'n move came %  ono hour meeting of the Cabinet i had again tried to reach agreeIment. The National Assembly [had verted by 111 to 25 against 1 a single ballot system — offered as alternative lo the government's own complicated proposals The Assembly recessed while the Cabinet conferred with the MRP Popular Republicans who have the majority party in tne Cabinet Crux of the usue Is whefier there shall be two ballots in th' neat General Election In Franc or only one Under On method electors would \<>\v for Ulg Hats of candidates-one list each party—and a list v. tain as many candidates as there are seat* in a department Under the double ballot 'hue would be two pools a week apart The kieu i that if votr tered among a large number of candidates in the lirst p>*ll tl %  econd poll Hive* them a chance io regroup themselves round candi dates with the oast chance of sue eess —Reuter uu-.. :l.. of tin re ol tne Manual and Meimd Workers' UnltM Kxccuiivc b) courtesy of Ihe Govetnmenl. nm taken D) II M P Devonshire Inst night to Carriacou, where Gain ietention. to interview lum mid resigned this mernlni The pOftg were C, A l.i. Deput. I'lemdent General. Allen Williami and II A McKie who had a three-hour meeting aboard tho <.inp with that! shstt Also present weie Captain Stnkes of the Devonshire and O It Kalskk. District onicer. Carrlaoou Ke|ursl (irnnU-rl Returning, the partv saw Aclm British Ask ChlaasBM NutionuIils Not To Bomb Carrier HUNG KONG. Feb. 20 British i.uthniilic" in run"" 'i %  Skod Chinese Nationalist suthonuea to delay their Uintal iioioit .n> linldantiBad .in ei racrartod 10 mUea ofl lbs A'est coast of Foimosn urrnnUn, (O a message recelvisl here frtun raipeh. Formosa. •Pno iintM' raouaotod Uw dataj until a OAOeh through Untish naval headgii.n jen in Hong Kong. %  .ilisls then llii.'W i saourtt) ilimk over tho whole .1!, L.lrl.t Earlier reportii of Hie presence U the alrcran carrlei had thrown Chinese militar> iinlein Koimona into eagojll HK9 Th' mi ilei tvgj ujsJgTStQOd an Anu-iu'an ship. The Brifeisa slri rait i vrii %  VaSrrSi Brrived in Hoog Kon this -at lei noon from iioitlHin A naval spokesman said oarliei thai tin' unldentiAod ship off Ponnoag "could be a BmUh r*hlp". .Reuter Action Against Dock Strikers In Australia CANREHKA, Feb. 28. Australia's Labour Minister Mar*.id Holt, ghnounood to dgj .hat special legislation to deal with ha ooal srtsla w0] he subgatttad %  - he Australian Parliament which sill o,ic,i on March 7. Holt also announced that if lockers did not remove their overIme bun by March 4. action would be taken llic following day to proclaim the %  eciion or the timeAd enabling the stevedorng mdulry lioanl to di-< ipliruhe men A tuli iiriiilrntioii COUrf hS dsTT I ism used charges of contempt igalnst the General Bet %  %  Ihe Australian Minors Unlo.i loorgo William Grant and the minn's Vice -President Will, n Parkinson Mirer. Union President Wil ^ -_ d by. run "Soviets Could Qovornos Creen at Oovonimtnl Hi.H-. %  iniurmlng him thai thc.v brought ii message from Gairy to request the workers in hi* name to desist from vtOssOCa .md mlini.... %  The Aitini! Governor aitreCd to i'. lifting oi tho ban on public adclressr.-. BCCOptinfl the undertaking thai M M.w.u. Executive tout the country making this appeal From noun unwind*, the neus KM .. i till imlouclnd and verv little wink done in country district*. Yesterday the water : %  irt on February '10. Labour Parly Takes A I hi ml Newbroke tonight WELLINGTON. New Zealand, Feb. 2fl Zealand'* Labour Party lencc In the dock stnkr b] offering its help to racn a Settk ni Tbt Partj vhli N % %  ( 'i %  op i< load and unload ships todav suggested s eontorenci i sjaiwg Io Uw mkt should bo oompi lit Keith J Holyeaka, WnMet fot Agriciiltme, announced toda> th.it next week's wool sales at Au'knd and Wongdini would U' pi>htBOBOd be> ause of tho iio.k -tnkr Five state coal mlltOS with 1.501. vari %  i on South Island today In symputhv with I %  era. At CaiiUrberg—South Island free/ini; worker* decided totloy not to handle moat rot They will continue to kilt but export meat will remain in Store, —Reuter EMPIRE NEGLECTED FOR ARGENTINA LONDON. Feb. 28. Ii.il> Fxprri. Htmentlnj to-daj on the \, \ to Buenu. Aires Of the Briti:.h Feonomn SeeieUrv t.i i ury. John Edwards, said th.it it rg |g I*hoped that he wouhl l>c in gottlag 'nore meat I tin at a 'Ygasonabte price." This paper cai newoosr, thjtn%  the A i meat" w*s the meat" was the result.—Reaier Start War" If Tafty Were Ready WASHINGTON'. F.b. 2B. I I.-niei., Ifllltai i • %  Germany said to*day he was convinced that Nonh Allanli Pact nations could have fore i •o moki 1 %  able" M( 11 .sing two Senate Committees in sud Pnnldent Trim ., holptng tu r opsai •ensUni moro r\merleaa (mops m Kurnpe Ceiiei.il I'l.r. sgJd he o (j i . defence build-up would precipitata Bogrlot aggression. "Soviet maitrri would haw proelpltatod war by now if th<' were read>", he said. A m •raiiieil well equipped aUlog force woul i sustain the slow moving ffitsai. %  • while we mohiii.e sddiuonai forces. I am convinced thai within n year forOtS will lie rrad^ i make nggie.M' unprodtublo if we |nit*u t fni! steam nh. i we '• General Clnv pent tbui rears In Gi I Western r,erm:mv '.. be received lot Atlantic Pact iyn | baasaT* if real figbttn man tronn* could bs ag|gst llll Advocatii i %  %  troops in European 'h' General said it m nc %  Oerrnan %  <>ntrlbuUnn intll .. %  rhere tod been i i %  %  Uon as qul added. —Heater



PAGE 1

1 llinsnAV MARCH I. 1931 lliRBADOS ADVOCATE PACK FIVE : Right 1 Hand Cul Off wn i HI I r CUBAN ITV rXAVID ROACH. U iboun 53-year-old *den\ Hill. Si Andrew, had his right hand .utoft while clearing refuse from arcund the cane carrier at Swan* Factory. St Andrew .S0 O'clock yesterday morning. taken iu ihe Oeneral "i F A Goudard. ASSIM. %  %  %  r-Htl IIKI ON TRIAL*. VJ the film winch was to have wn al the British Coun ril. wakefitld.'' on Monday. \/lll now he rhown on Sntiirrtay. March 3 A THIEF si, U %  MX volt battery, valued 832. from the mclcr car .1 'J30. which wM i*arkr I .,i Horse Hill between 6 DO ; m on Fndtig and O.oo a.m. on Saturday, The batterv i..lon--. lo Ernoipe line. Over 1,000 Women Register For L.S. Emigration In 2 Days WOMEN from tho eleven parishes oi tb • I their staff*, "we want work" jammed the I'.S. workers Sa\ IIIX Branch of the Labour Department ev.*ryda\ vrajffe 10 register their names for possible emiKration to the Un'Ud State* — %  Already, tome 1.451 women hive t .-. --, ,, n registered. The records show tb it I Olir OttPSa Wa8 S00 registered on Monday. CM on -, . ra f Tueauay. and up to 11 a.m. yesler Swimming Pool At Silver Sands Senior Short Story Competition The Eroding Advocate invites all school ..>Lgirle •he ages of 12-18 lo enter for lU Senior ShM Star* (snipe iltian. Stone* can be on any subject, bul should not %  n length and mttM reach Ihe Asters Hlory Fdllar. Mvaoafc (. lid i uv nol later than Wednesday ever? week The '. leeadag Mveeete u %  : will reprise of book.* or Stationery < Ihe value of !. 157 were dispatched. Moat of them, married and MDgic were domestic* and seamtresses while there was a MtHtUrv el general labourers and nu. %  maid*. Boodi 11.. WINNFH of Monday Kerning Advocate "Your Guess' CompeItUon WWB George Fergusson, Jnr., I I yjrei Kuidala-lle He guessed eiieell> that it was ihe Swimming quite a few wer pool at Sdvei Sands average age as* %  lit 'V5HJ kT y t£*Z.!£l£**l Yesterday the Advaeate vW completely led astray. !" !" ? l wcr O 0 *"* 1 U P for r "In the back yard of Dr. Payne's were as young as II ^ in Ihe 40V i about 25. conductors were reported by the Police on M.noay for traffic. ofTenctJ. Six drivers were charged for falling to stop at major roads and three conductors for carrying passengers in excess. Another conductor THE THREE modern refuse Bt. Michael and Christ Church Board of Health Witt Consider Da in' Act Scavenging Drpanir A special meeting of the Board of Health will be summoned Inter thla mouth to (insider a report of a sub-commlWee of the General ''**. "^P 0 ."" Board f Health and the ComplacN ed for allowing more than live missiomr. of Health. St M.chael. people to ride in a sear. wno wcr c appointed to visit the dairies in nrldgel^wn The subcommittee was to consider whe,her an amendment should be made '.o the Dairy Regulations, 194*1. The report was laid at a f-teUng of the Board of Health yesterday B'dos Gets 3 Modern Refuse Collectors TWO modern refuse collectors for the ScavenKin* Department of it. Michael and one for the Sanitary Department of Christ Church arrive*! in the island on Sunday February 11. by the SS Mullberry Hill. They weir ordered through Messrs. McEnearney & Co., Ltd. and are already delivered. They were made in England by the Ford Company, d one guesaer: "The Office, Top Rock" was anguess One baffling answer wan -"This ...-. taken at Ihe back of St Other wild guesses wrre. "This PUyng Field." "Taken at Ken-niigton". -Foul lV.-\. Si Philip", "Steps of the Animal 1 i \ ( v. Ai Beaehyhead, st Philip" "Garrtaon Bae a ng ia h," "Wanderer* Cricket ground" etc The "YouiGuess". Compel ration. Surprisingly, just rbghi murmur could be heard The two pphcemen on duty wan i.< uing no trouble from the ciwd One of the registering officers %  atd that early during the day the tueue was about 75 yards Ion; Small Wages Seme 4 f 'he Women were com plammg that they could not t.< %  w*tc whik* others, who were complained of Send this coupon with your story. SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPHHION hhtfM Age School Farm Hume Mcnai TKIe uf Stary •RUSH... UP... YOUR... SMILE... /, jn the Evening Advocate hjs been wage* One very enthusiastic wfl I idliiu my km. lempcranly discontinued Watch UT the Junior Short Story Competition in the Evening %dvaeale leginniug Monday Mai eh 5th %  an George destroyed .•hingled shop. 20 rhedroof attached Orlando Holder. The slock, valued $600. clolhlny valued S70 and 0 bicycle valued $40. were also destroyed. Tho house is insured. The third lire took pine at Walerman Village St. James. Part of a boarded and ahlnrtad house, with shedroof attached, the property of GouliMiuine Moore of WatermanVill. was boarded an;. s i luilte ,, behind George Street. Al 10 feet. w:Ui y,, property oge, was damaged. Also destroyed fc^ v ,ia quantity of furniture and time lha Board felt thai they i i,ld not perpetuate the had standard f housing by giving permission lo sell small lats. Mr Hjs.scll appealed against the iionrd'x decision to ihe Govnnor-in-Excculive Committee The Colonial Btcretary informed the Board that the Governor-mExecutive Committee had connrn %  Its decislcn and told Mr. Haaaell that after careful conald* ble to vary Director Of Natural Gas Opens Office IN BRIDGETOWN Mr. JUUAN GAHRETT who is now In Barbados on a two-year contract with the Government as Director of petroleum and Natur„ al G.is, udd Ihe Advoeate yesterto-dale sanitarv arranaem<-ntlot " !" l he was formerly Vice the removal of refuse Thev President and General Manager gientiv eoBflunite lo the ayst of Northweslern Utilities. Limited of refuse removal and also a*' v,illi head office in Edmonton. Alin bringing nbout a cleans herta. Bridgetown. The collector which On retirement from this Comdel.vcred to ihe Sanitary Dei-art Barbados has gol one of 11s best From next week two <>f these ci llech ra, adth a capactta of seven cubic yards for refuse, will bo shipments of lumbei this month, seen working mainlj In the City Around the middle of the mouth, urea 1 "j million feet of fir arrived from ._,.!„_ -.,m,-,i t Tneat eolleclors will replace VgncOUVei for Messrs T .=eddes ^'"_ ,m ^| _> two of the old type They are Grant Ltd., and only three days lilted wilh l-|>nin ked ago. 21.000 feet of; spruce and pine of! the engmr fha -ivolt The officers are hoping to do all regtstraiions of women during th • ecmlng week at the Park House At Queen's Park, where the men are. registering their namefor |l-"*sible emigration lo'liic US, large crowds can be seen dailv renewing their registrations. ub i.iti driv These modern rafuao rOUaeter were orderod by the Cofnanatsioa ers of Health of St Michael willi view to ensuring Ihe most up MI; red from Halifax for M< j it Leslie Co.. Ltd. Moat "i the IVi million teal have h in i leered off the waterfiont bill j large part %  ( the latter shipi -in ;!-. still around Usl IttBei basin of the Careenage yesterday Lorries and carts are removing the lumber from the waterfront. The Spcightslown schooners hav< bureau has IK en expertrilling orders for local employment as both male and female workers are saying that Ihey anonly Interested In emigration take qua Hpeightstown. lite a numlter of loads to lion if workci The Labour OonynJartonai fold the Advocate ycsierday that many Of the men who had registeied ai Ihe Park, had refused wink in the Island offered on raaaott* abl> terms Thes> meti. he said. wiuld noi be given first consideiowere required i clcthing. The damage la estimated Di t 4*n The hou !>• insured. Neiehbo'irs assisted in extincuishing the blaze. party, after 25 years In )94B M Gan-ett opened his own office as a Natural Gas Consultant and has been so engaged up to the tim> of leaving Canada for Barbados Hit of Christ Church Is inner larger It has refuse < ., 10 cubic >ards. Damages Case Adjourned tho United Stati Barbadian wfomen have been registered before, by the Employ, menl Agency for local ampin} mem. but tins IN the lirst ocean.' n on which they were registered for emigration to the U S. NEW ROAD UNDER CONSTRUCTION opened his office in ihe Public Buildings yesterday morning and is at present enfJBCOd in familiarising himself with the historical background of the dewa thrown off his bicycle wi vclopment of the oil and gas inriding along Musehouse Hill. c^uslry in Barbados In THROWN OFF CYCLE Forty-six %  yaw Old Albci Bcyce f Crab Hill. St Lucy, an treated and dctaiwd at the Ho* pital yesterday evening uftn ti prai an The Beard was given notice lo quit a building they rent in T>iXUnl Alley. The building is occupied by the Board's UMHSjgtOIl and other quarters will have ti be obtained t^r the inapectorti. Tho Beard approved of th alteration of (he app-r.ved plai. for ths a > S"**? >-aiie Plantation. St. Albert the Festival of Brilain as their James, by Sandy I.ane Co., Lid gUeftS from July 9 to July 30. was approved of by the Board. He said that from Winnipeg. His Excellency the Governor has The Board app-j:ved of the alterthe line would run south to the requested the 'House of Assembly ation of the approved plan by Mr. internal ion a I border and thence nnd legislative Council to indicate Vernon Smith, owner lof lot No. 7 through the State of Minnesota whether this invitation should be by laying oft a portion and adding to Duluth, Minnesota and Bupg accepted and if so. whelher each it to his adjoining land and by rior. Wisconsin, a projeel involvhave been House will nominate one of their adding to a lot a portion of the ir.g an estimated capital cxpenrtinumbers lo go. same adjoining land. ture of many millions. trgcthcr with rcpresenia' al the Sugar Maniifariaieis" A K tfSj lion to begin joint negotiant tis on behalf of Jamaica's 4.1.00U sugar \' r \"x\\ w'hi 'f A case brought by Archibald Welch "f CUfton Hall, st Jonn claiming ilamages to the amount of MJ from Galdston Garner of Bank Hall and Vincenl Lashlcy of t BHfleld Tenantry, St. Michael was %  \eslerday adjourned *intil March 29 in the Court of Original Jurls%  diction by Judge G. L. Taylor. The action was brought as a result of an arcident on Cllfion Hull Road on May 21) between the motor cars M-501 owned by GarMB and driven by l.ashliy and J-I52 owned bv Alonrn Mulllns and in which Ihe plaintiff Welch Christ was injured thus causing his little G,.nlea on the left foot to be amputated, a Counsel in the ease are Mr ,i s it. peai foi Welch and Mr B K Walcott, K.C. for Garner. Details of the accident were given by Policeman Ethelberl Bynoe who is attached lo Four Road* Rub-SUUon He said thai on May L'l. about 2 30 p.m. In consequence ..' i report he went lo the corner of Church View Road where an nceldenl had occurred between two motor cars. II were M-501, and J-152. He look measurements. The motor car J-152 was on the left side of DM road With the light rear wheel On Iha edge of the road The road was 16 feet wide at thai point The left rear wheel of the motor ar M-501 was about four feet from the gutter while the left was two feet from the Golfilo'CulIa Today Messrs. Elders and Fyftes' "Oelflle" is expected lo call at Barbados at 3 p.m to-day to take passengers for England. AM passengers must be on board by 4 30 p.m The "ttolflto" is consigned to Messrs. Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd. "Isle Of Spices" Is Isle Of Chaos Now tnre __ This projeel may nol be pro cccdcd with until a licence ha been obtained from the Q wai inent of Alberta, authorising the export of gas from the ptovln as the Government desires to make sure that the future supply lO the paoola Of Albcrtr will not be Jeopard'sed. ... ,, The proven and probable natuMR. ALEXANDER GLEN, accompanied by his wife, rill Bas serves of the province lcrt England and went to Grenada last November. They of Alberta have been variously loved Hie island so much that they were even deciding to estimated at from 6 to i trillion buy a home there. But everything was changed In Ihe *" '"*" 1 twinkling of an eye when disturbances which hove sprung — up there recently turned the "Isle of Spices" into an isle from which tourists are getting nut as fast as possible. Mr. Glen arrived in Barbados -— %  —; %  ;—— yesterday and_ %  Staying at Four ?ver to help keep order in the isrkers for the rurrent crop. gutl'r, It is the first Umc the T U C cerieerned in sugar Toe injured negotiations. Opinion has There was a man named Welch been expressed thai the stait of nt the spot where the accident oenegftlallons will end this pi.-.em i-urred and his left little tee was pate of strikes and Labour dlffiinjured. cullies in the i TAX DEFERRED 1 .. %  ' .. GEDKGKTOWN. It l. I i. 2*1 In the face of strong opposition, alec lad apd nominated members Of the Government to-dav de. l '*V£ hl i"" 1 fene err, I. (..lion r,| the Bill L ""'" * Cross-examined by Mr. Dear, Welch S.IMI that i n M., 29 :d-ul 2 pm. he was walking along Clifton Hall Itoad going in the direction of New Castle Road He saw Iwo motor cars and went over to one side of the road. In Jumping to the wall the motor car J-152 Ins left fool and unconsciouti. He tl Hospital %  nji.it at rd Lt gall Plays Table Tennis Tonight At Aqualic Club ken to Ihe Gem where Doctor i.eacock his Injured loe. He was in the hospital for eight days and stayed al home for nine %  ...-..To Mr. Dear. Welch said that Wind.* Club. St. Peler. whsrc he Und. American lourliu hav ond his wile talkod wilh on Adv.heon attacked and robbed and r.U Reporter yeMerrl.y about there is where Mr Qlen think. coDdlUWl in Orinada He .aid that the disturbance In Grenada condition, were worse than Pros, will have a bod eflecl not only on „vlock tn.nial eport.: indicated. £SSue TCw^iSL ^ hib^Ln o,T~bleTennl, etches the In.!*.!. Mr. Olen said he found it hard tourist trade ol the West Indies as !" jj ^ M 1|w Rarba to understand how the Grenodion a "''"I 0 „ _, dos Aquatic Club Among those gy L ^ H feuS ' £ tlv^Sr^ Bra-s^sfflw sSTeS'-hat'tn-erare 8 ?7uS £Trt£ '^^JJ^C — cr,cke W r.. of mass hvsteria. But in spite of Grenada off of her itinerary. He Ihe hvsteria. 11 would appear that recalled that the last time the some of the incidents thai occurManrettiiia went there taxi-men .ed were carefully planned. had been on strike Now things Such an incident was Ihe am**" %  ven worse hushing of ihe Governors A.D.C.. !" r C ,e n "> > and his wife %¡ s a result of which the A.DC Which Called for a one cent per bottle lax on aerated drinks but placed an additional tax on i h indy etc. which it tad ami irtcrea e the*i Uil prka by 2* ..His per botllr New taxnilon on bauxite wa., also hf Cl ., s cnnM for CI(fU)M „„„ IMissed. planlallon and works for about The Council be) on $20 a week %  (deration of the much deoated A t this stage Mr. Walcott made budget and taxation yropusala -,„ application for two more deBafori %  crowded House Before fendanls in the case. He called on Ihe business of the House Mrs Alon/n Mulllns. and Woodville I. B. Singh was presented with Mullins the driver of th f O B E J-1S2. The Barbadians who will meet these two are : Louis Stoute, lof tl Champ. Campbell Greenidge. David Mayers. Charles Humphre.. nd Ben Herbert was in hospital with a very serious c !" od ".ffifJlES w ".? r E r ? skull injury Another was the • ,hom Fortunately, said Mrs burning of the St Andrew School Oft. £ ?$*£? F? ^JT" which Mr Glen thinks was one ol >fc38£ SS*!?Xt mr. own sam ne ano nis ne n ,, i_ <( „..„,. Rnhd, had to offer. disturbance broki •cry clear SITU demanding. SSI r'iotTr. HuukerFinetl 10'the matter of ^DUnned act ,ale owner wh P 3 1 5? ^v^'t M '. E i_ MiniRVM. thr times ihe UHKI PO1,CC Magistrate r\. Mc f Disyesterday lined Seon 49-year-old hawker of Mangrove. St. Philip. 40/for the unlawful possession of a quantity f wood on February 27. which mi. uini IIIIIIJ "aa u..t . the most beautiful schools in the "* West Indies It cost £40.000 lo !" erect and was a gift of the British Government. Those who planned the burning did not forget to place f> employees three road block; which were effect.ve ; nd l !' r 2 w "* f *Z ^u^^i Cox in preventing the F.re Fighters and had lo defend his life wilh £? from getting near the fire. n gun Mr Glen said he could not About 50 per cent of Ihe peounderstand why the rioters seemp i e owned land as far as he could ed even intent on harming people sec, and few of them engaged in Cpl Kenneth Murphy attached tike themselves. For example, estate work never worked morc to the Bridge Post saw Cox with they burnt down the medical centhan 'three days a week. They ihe wood carrying 11 along ihe tre. a most necessary institution worked for enough lo buy neceswharf side. He got suspicious end to Ihe health of ihe colony. Again, sary articles in the shops, an 1 after Cox could not give him a ihey attacked an old night watchthen concentrated on their own reasonable explanation as to how n,an who was only milking his plots of land. he came by the wood, he took him own cow. Mr and Mrs. Glen have nol yet lo Ihe Bridge Post and charged Also attacked was the manadecided how long they are going him geraai of ihe Santa Maria Hotel, to remain in Barbados. Theii The Tine is to be paid in one wUcta hotel 15 now housing Trimplans for the future are indeflmonth or in default one month's dad policemen who have come nite. imprisonment with hard labour. New Loveliness For You PALIHOLIVE SOAP \ I v Follow this Simple Bmty Plan Svitth your tier >lih C , Having a orand fiwie ar CRICKET! Delict .HI* Sweet Biscuits for LUNCHEON and TEA put up I.i convenient packages. Assorted Swee' Biscuits by Hu.uiey fr Palmer. Peek Frean, Carr and Jacob. Prices I0e—2oc.—48c. -50c. Per Pck. Prices 11.20 lo 2 14 Prr tin. Jacob's Cream Crackers ,Per tin. -Also— Luscious Boxes of CONFECHONKItY small and large. BLACK MAGIC CHOCOLATES $4 nt, per box. PcinuU 04c. per tin. Butter Scotch 2lc. to 45c. per tin. Nougat 34c and 70c. per tin. Fry's Hare) Nuts 21-, 3/0, 7/8 Box. Cadhury'.i Bed Hose 08c. i. 81.80 Box. Cadbury's Chocolate Biscuits 5/& 5/3 tin. Chewing Gun 2c 8e. pck. After Dinner Mints \l. per Pck. Marr Bars 14c. ea. Crest Ban ] (i ,,, Guava Cheese 18c. 4-or. Pck. Cadbury Bars (Asst.) 10c., 17c, 19c. 34c.. 37c. ea. Fry, Bars 7c, Be. 12c. 15e, Carr s Choc. Lunch 12c Pck. Carrs Choc. Tea Cakes 8c. each. Carr's Cheese Crisps 81.02 Un. Carr's Club Cheew 81.00 tin Shaips Toffee 2/6 and 3/3 U. tin. 'Bird Toffee 1/0, 4/8, k SI Hfl tin. —Also— Thermos Flask 1-pinl $1.51 """,%"*' ""'" "" ' BRUCE WEATHEKHEAD ITD. Head of Broad Street ADDIS LTD. Ol HIRTfOSD. MAkfS. O' Till flS.T TOOIHISUtH IN InM M£usti>r SMMVN is * ##*##/ EASTER COOS Chocolate caster Fggs in Plastic Cases Marzipan faster fgas in Platttc Cups Marzipan latter eggs CtT VOUKS BEFOM THE RUSH IS ON KNIGHTS LTD.-Ait BRANCHES NO FLEAS ON THIS DOG.. 'Lorcsane' Uusting Powder, containfflf pure gamin:! llll C'.. is a rxytcm killer of %  pgafi on domcMic animali nad pouhry. It is pleasant and non-irntinl to animal Or BtflT. /.r ...ti. fie i'"I !/•< (>'..'.'< I. ,-.. % % %  MTie/IOQ %  Ah* in trnktntt 'LOREXANE DUSTING POWDER IMPmtM (I.LMHM il'H\k\l*( II IU Ms I IMtll l> "II MMOW MAM iiistm Salt *t*'" —af rnnrUMH*< K. S. HIM in \ A st)Ns iiisHIl W>ns> MMiin %  % %  ! %  %  % % % % % % % % % % %  %  %  a FRESH SUPPLY Or ZPURINA HEN CHOW: (SCRATCH GRAIN) %  IH. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD. --Di.i,ibutor. %  Fr • ' I aslidioiis Women C bhoppinc Or reton Ohopping ags A fetching handmade product wilh smart wooden lop-, in different designs and materials of various patterns. Just the ihini* lo make you look fashionahle nnd at ihe same lime very useful. Ihis store will be closed at noon on Wednesday 2Sth Felimary and Thursday 1st March far the Cricket Tournament. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II, 12 13 BROAD STBEET



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PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATr TIHI1MHT MAHCII I. l3l EARLY BIRDS Landmark, ISoionite and Harraween' Return Best Times By BOOKIE Everything wor-teii -.mocthly yesterday momma: and iv. ad to mike the track the beet ilnc preparation gallop* were started I meeting. I arrived at the track when it was Mill moonlit bin found there were a number of pU who got there before me. Nevertheless we beat the trainer* and jockeys by many lengths. First out was Aberford but he disappointed us because he only did B Itreew on the cxrrrise track 1 think that WM in preparation for a gallop today so 1 will have to miss him out. Court O'Law and Cross RoadJ then obliged us wUh a ~>j furUsng workout. At firm I thought that Crosn Roads was the easier of the two. however he was not pushed along ;it the flniiili although Court O' Law was, and consequent!* he nnwhed some lengths in front of a. Court O Law time was 1.32* for the box to box and l lZi fcr the five I still think Cross Roads should be favourite for the as he is a genuine race day horse. Hums wa* off again with Pepper Wine, who, incidentally had pulled him out a lot in a live furlong sprint last Monday morning Tin, time thev Martvd o U l frtm the mile and Burns wa* moving verv imprautvelv oil Hi. way I'fpper Wine was ***** up after a fjua round at the mile pole and Burns went on to do the mile in l III, iinishlng strong His box to box was done m 1 2*i and the five in 1.1 if Pepper Wine did her lap in 1.I7J. Vanguard did a U-x to box in 1 87* going at a v.i. D % %  tmm-u pace. Monsoon did a llaUUl gallop working five ui MS. Gallant Hawk, a half-bred I like veiy much and one who ha* improved In looks in the short space of ume he ha been here, was held tightly to do five In 1.17 His chance* in G class look good Best VVishts has improved since her gallop last Saturday and vesierda) "he was out again with Bow Bells. The Jatier looked rii but I understand that Best Wishes slipped going over the hill. Toav both finished very comfortably and considering this, their time of 1.06'; for the five was not at all bad. Bow Bells especially has never lookt-t fitter and I think it will take something really good to beat her at 5 or 74 %  urlongs Atomic II wai a little too much fur Ability to handle although her saddle WO dipping; Mi the latter stages of their gallop over 7 7 furlongs, and firnilU came off soon afler she passed the post Atomic 11 did the once round m |JM and the five in 1.091. Burns and Elizabethan notwithstanding. I think the big creole colt is going to give d race In the T.C rtpl • Arunrl.i did live in 1,141 bin aj lhi.s WJS ;< morning" or light work lor lh' Bo ur n* atadalt tVtr really U-i down III Pi i> I OMU noi it-ally make It a Igood gallop for her companion High and Low, an imported chestnut filly. The latter did the ha!? U Gun Silo looked more on his toes yesterday but still hod to be I keep up with Waterbell.-. They did five In 1 09 I good combination .f thr O T C Mood. UM lauer benig h*r sire and %  %  <• I think we are going M xpect her U. gj Ihildrum had Elizabethan for company over five furlongs and !: Then tune for live ami 1 OH l ttethando about a mile as her winding up gallop so n am a little in the dark ahout ha* n e like* the going and "ill make them run for their money to beet her M'M Panic is still my favourite for the Maiden She was no* let down yesterday and her time for the live was 1.111Clots Bow aeema to have retained some % %  hich hr i.ppaared to have lost in Trinidad. He did a five well haU Sun Queen did five in 1.071. god Vixen appeared I faM but the r time for rive was only 1 II, Watercress waa hardly off the bit at any time doing a box to box in 1 291 and five in 1 lid San Tudor did %  oimthree quarter pace work until she reached Ihe half mile pole and then cam* back in 59i over the lour furlongs. fuss Budget was ieally impressive over a Bv* with Infusion The latter was moved on in the stretch but Fuss Budget was easy and they nn'shed in the excellent time of 1 0M After this gallop U seemed certain that the Maiden would go to Wanderers 1 was told Fair Sally wa* leading Slainle in the first three furlongs but eventually flnishi-d vci v Urwd behind Kim Kluinte's ttme for the box to box WHS l MJ which I thought WM rather good. l-hir §14 MJl M gf see what he could do He ihi-n .... me up In the air about hU chances in the Guineas. He did %  *• U) 1 18 Tlbenan Lady, afler a brief return to form last year, looks a.il she If locking for the paddocks ag#n. She old a box to box in 1 31 and the five tn I 121 lli-Lo and Clementina had a return match ovtf (. %%  The ally was not allowed to shnw her earlv pace and llnished a little behind Hi-I-. They did Bvc In 1 101. Hi ween MM Biota % %  "" U •" morning Both had up buhl weight lookers although 1 do • hat the saddles weighed. They did a five in 1.04 3 5 which wa tinnu-t tune lui this distance for the morning. Notonite was shaken up a bit at the finish by Baldwin. Mpsy did five in ill. Soprano looked too good for the game half-bred Duche* Thej did five in 1.091. Landmark, who really went much earlier than she appears In these notes, did a five In the same time us Notonitiand Hal I.e. 1 051 The last pair 1 saw was Apollo and April Flowers Apollo certainly looks bigger and stronger than I have ever seen him and April Floweis had m be pushed at the finish to keep up with him They did Bvc in 1 09. On Saturday I will have to pick my winner! but up to nov there are quite a few about whicn I am not certain I am sorry to hear that the fast fitly Demure struck herself and pnu while I did not notice Lunways yesterday morning. As both of the** were at one Ume very' much up in the betting it makes things dirIcult to hubstitute some others in their place. Meanwhileit l<">* as if hums will not oc the certainly wa had antiotpated nithnugh t may well be thai he will wait until race da> to u-Mi. his clan. Up to Ihe present I cannot say that I have noticed any. ih'ng to indicate that he will leave them standing over B| furlongs although several people have expressed Ihis view to me, On In (-(titrary It look,s to me as he will be much better over a rnUt. In that eaaj the A class miler* h:id ix-ttoi 1>OK to the 10-DAVS NEWS FLASH I LEAP OVFH THE WALLS' Monica lUldwin. A MORNING AT TIC y Kd4i Mif*lriol.f" AT IOB.MMN • HTATinxrRT llrh hlpment of — %  MAam ii Is all raUiirt AT JOHNSON S UAHUH Mil! / f <#§>rpHEIR good looks tell yon they're: fust right. Yon know, too, when you look at Ihe price tag. that you rnn't pet finer value. Illustrated i a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths. Tied to every pair is the John tt hite Guarantee Shield—the sign whi. h means • glut right 7 Look for it in leadiug: stores in Barbados. made by JOHN WHITE means made just right A PANE WELL EARNED l>> n*-h A Qullt> Brand ;i 1 A S RIM Itrnnwnrd Ml ii-* Mellow rUvonr and Skilfully Blended. SHAM & SAMPSON ITD. Ileadguarlrrs for Bert Bum. IIOIVT %  matt RAZOL pomade on IIAIK. Take H on th< I and work it thorougb'y thiough the HAIR, forward Brat, than backward, until moat of it romis hack out. Soft paper con then be used to wipe awn) MII i'K to drew Ihe hair to a Rnhth. The atMVTC CSNaT 9, ill gjlrc n.iblf ii-'.M-. If >our dealer liasn't r ,/.i l-OMADK. phw WIRN.VS BAY RIM Co. TP.frGAM60LS like thm way ttuty still lay to aach other London Eaprtas Service Golden Shred Marmalade .47 Silver Shred Marmalade .47 Hartley's Marmalade J| '> Murmalade (2-tn) .48 Tnn. Marmalade .36 Lyle\ Golden Syrup .47 .23 Brerhen Castle Golden Syrup 69 Meat Dept. Prime Ausl. Beef in Steak Koast — Slevt Veal — in Roust — Cutlets — l..inil. in bCflstl Shoulders — Chops — Stew; Mutton — Shoulders — Chops — Kippers — Haddock: Baron & Ham — (Sliced); Salumii' Sausiifce Sl.Ofl per lb I i inn.i Tomato Juice . $ .34 Jersy Tomato Juire .38 Brooks Tomato Juice M Pineapple Juiee 3* Trinidad Orange Juice .33 Orange Squash M Lemon Squash 93 Canned Vegetables Dutch ('..inlc-n %  % %  Pflil Pow Tim) Balchrlnr Teat Dutch Sauerkraut „ Endive Extra Sliced Beans... Spinach s ,::s .SO .26 .2tt .311 41 .2a Liqueurs, Wines, Etc. DKAMBl'l S6.IWI COINTRfAL' MM> X25 ANISETTK 5.00 CHABLIS (IH47) 3.50 VIN ROSE (1917) 3M I.I'BFKAVMITCH (1!IIC) 4.0* CRAVES (IMS) 2.S* Ovaltine & Milk Foods OVALTINK $ .7:1 TONO J2.21 I.M VITACUP 73 BUL'KN-VITA 70 MILO (Tonic Food) SLOT .02 M TIKiC I \ (Mult FtK.d) 1 21 .09 Biscuits Peek Frean's Royal Scotch Shortbread $1.30 Rose's Assorted Biscuits 1.20 Bulinornl Choc. Ass'ted Biscuits 1.60 Orchid Assorted Biscuits 2.08 Peek Frean's Playbox Chocolates 1.20 Peek Frean's Martini Crackers 1.73 Peek Frean's <'heeselets 1.24 Rvvila R\e Biscuits 90 Confectionery Bots. Liqueur Chocolates $2.51 Fry's Choc. Scorched Almonds l.tl Meltis Favourite Can* dies $1.85 1.02 Choc. Mint Creams 1.32 Fry's Haul Nuls 2.02 Pascall's Fruit Salad .. 1*1 Pascall's C.lucose Barley Sugar .98 m 1! SI !IIS III — •



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FAGB TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIIIRsDAV. M.IMII I. 1-"H QaJiib Callhiq Bob And Saliv" Junior Short Story Competition C APT W A FARMER, Superintendenl of Police leaves Ihis afternoon for England on the Got flu Ho i* going lo Ihe U.K. on a six months* Police Officer's course Here Afc.un B ACK to spend another attltdaj in Barbados are Mr and Mrs O. F. Pearson and Mr. and Mrs. Harley W. "Larkln of Toronto who arrived from Canada yesterday momma by TCA Mr Pearson Is a Banker in Toronto. Mr. Larkln is in the lumn. They are h*V f'>r :i n.tnth, staying at tlw Windsor %  Mel At Seawell to meet them were Mr and Mrs. Kenneth Ross. Canadians also holidaying in Barbados. From Piltiourah M R. and Mrs. George Vaughan arrived from Bermuda yesterday by TCA. Here for a month, they are slaying at the Marine Hotel Mr. Vaughan run* his own business in Pittsburgh. He is a fur merchant They were in Bermuda for two days awaiting T.C.A's mid-week flight to BarMOM Insurance Manager M R. C. N MacDONALD, Manager of Travellers Insurance Co.. in Toronto and Mrs. MacDonald arrived by TCA yesterdav morning to spend two weeks hoi ida* in Barbados. They are spending the first part of their stay a*, the Enmore Hotel and the S tler part at the Ocean View atel. From Toronto M R and Mrs. W. M Hiller arrived on TCAs mid-week flight from Canada yesterday to apend a month or ux weeks' holiday at the Marine Hotel Mr. Hlllcr is a retired businessman or Toronto. Arriving on the same plane were Mr and Mrs H S Phillips of Hamilton. Ontario They are here until the end of March staying at the Oeeaft View Hotel. Mr. Phillips Is a C>vil Engineer In Hamilton .Ml First Visit A RRIVING from the U S yesterday via Canada by T.C.A were Mr. and Mn C W Stillman of Chicago accompanied by Mr. Arnold Sagalyn of New York They are staying at the Four Winds Club, St Peter This is rat visit here Mr. St ill man is an Economist at the Univr-rsttv of Chlcaap. Mr. %  nd Mrs Stillman expect lo be here for one month Mr. Sagalyn who %  F.iiitr r of the New York fttuiday Times, plans to spend a month's holiday in Barbados Knitting President M R. G. G. BEAMISH. President of Chipman II-linn KnlUing Co. Ltd., in Hamilton arrived from Canada yesterday morning by T.C.A accompanied by his wife They are here for one month's holiday staying at the Barbados Aqualic Club. ARTIE'S HEADLINE 11**1 uppo they'll he laying 'If only had the fin wr could %  %  you tinned food—if only %  had the food'." Surprii Us Visit M R DENNIS CUMMING5. son of the Iste R. M Cummings and Mrs. Cummings, of "Mayvillo." Codrington Hill. St. Michael, recently arrived from New Yerk on a surprise visit io his mother and sister Mr Cummings is proprietor of Dcnnys Quncheoneltc. New Ro• helle. New York, and was last ii. Barbados about twenty-seven years ago. He notes many improvements in the island, civic a> well as social and architectural. Impressed M R. JULIAN GARRETT. Director of Petroleum and Natural Gas who was at the Crane Hotel for the past few days, is now staying at the Windsor with Mrs. Garret t. He said that this is his first visit to the island and he was much impressed with the natural beauty of the island and had found the people most friendly and hospitable Mr. Garrett besides holding various other posts in Canada, is Immediate Past President o' Dominion Council of Professional Engineers. Civil Engineer M R. AND MRS ROBERT FLEMING of Toronto are down to spend four or five weeks in Barbados They are guests at the Marine Hotel Mr Fleming is a Civil Engineer In Toronto Twelve Years Agio M R. and Mrs. Frank Dlxon w*o visited Barbados twelve years ago are here again lor another holiday. They arrived from the U.S. via Trinidad on Tuesday afternoon bv BW.I.A and are guests at the Ocean View Hotel. Mr. and Mrs Dlxon hall from Chicago. Back to Trinidad M HS ALVIN TUCKER and her son Glenn who spent a short holiday In Barbados staying at "West Wego". St. James, returned to Trinidad on Tuesday afternoon b) BW.I.A. They were accompanied by Mrs Tucker's brother-in-law and slater Mr and Mrs Vincent Maingot. Here for Two Weekt M R. and Mrs J A Kitchen and their daughter Sally Ann were among the passengers arriving fr.m Canada yesterday morning by TCA. Mr Kl t dHSI i* a manufacturer of ladles' hosierv in Hamilton. They are here for two months staying at the Ocean View Hotel. En-route to Grenada M R AND MRS BERNARD COLLINS are on their way to Grenada. Mr. Colling is a director of T. A. Collins United of England. They arrived from Canada yesterday morning by T.C A They leave this afternoon fet Trinidad by B W I A. Mean while they are guests at the Hotel Royal. Speaker's Cousin M R. and Mrs. Wilbert E, Husbands who had been holidaying with relatives lor the past couple of months left for the US. on Tuesday. Mr. Husbands who ia a relative of Mr K N. R. Husbands, Speaker of the House of Assembly has been living In the U.S for the past twenty-seven years. His home ia In Boston Trinidad Turfite M R. ALEX CHIN, TRINIDAD turfite arrived from Trinidad on Tuesday afternoon by B.W.I.A. He is here for the Barbados Turf Club's Spring Meeting. He was accompanied by Mrs Chin. They are staying at Super Mare Guest House Worthing tng-lish Hun R ADIO AMATEURS' HAMS in Barbados have probably spoken on several occasions to Mr. W G. C. Wyer over thei amateur "sets". Yesterday Carib spoke to him In person, as he was among ihe passe n gers arriv Ing on Ihe T.C.A. 'plane yesterday morning He came down tron England via Canada. Mr. Wyer. an Electronic Engineer in Bournemouth. Hamt>shlre, operates a radio amateui station in Bournemouth under the call sign GtZB. When he used tr live in Canada his call sign wa< \E3B1*. At Seawell to meet him was Mr. Sidney Lashley local radio The Evening Advocate invitee all children under 12 to enter for I Short Slory Competition. The bc-i itorj In Tiie Events* Advocate, md th*" %  rlimsr Brill re ceive a prUB lo the value of 7 in either books or BtaUofM I i The storie* can be on any subject under the sun but should not l>c mere than 303 length, and must reach The CMMrM's MKer. The Advocate < ,. I id CHy not later than Wednesday every week. Send this coupon with your story. jrviOR SHOBT STORY coMFfrrmoN Name .... Age Keheel Home Addreaa TiUr of Stacy ; -j Produced by Social Guadanrr Knterpriae* of the I > V This film which opens at tne Plaza Cinema (Bridgetowni on Ihe 9th of March, 1951, explain* sex on the screen. It depicts a home In a town where a Mr. and Mrs. Wright live with their two young daughters The mother of this family falls!" laughters the nec ess jyy information with regard to sex and as a result when the older gitl marries her marriage fails and aho returns to her parents. In duo course she has a baby which IS born blind through venereal dit> ease contracted by her husband during the early day* of themarriage when due to a quarrel one ivi'tilng he decided to Join some of his friends on onr of then "down town" activities. Afraid The younger sister of this family finds that she is itoing to have a baby and when her young lover LONDON. Fob suggests thai they get t tarried she Davis Factor, son of the late Max refuses because she is afraid to tell Factor, believes that British wome.; her mother. At her suggestion ar haw made great strides In the rangements are made by her lover .trt of make-up. fur tin to go to a "quack doctor Factor said: who performs such an un*atisfai "1 haven't been in Britain foi tory operation that she faints in over three years but already 1 pd*. the bus bn the way home and has see that women are much more M |*I..\ZA TUemtre-BridgetownlDiAL 2310) R K O RADIO ThMllin. I •TAR/W AM IHI M WI Bill" HEX AKKER PIS alal TO-PAY I M P %  MIX II I llll %  lOCUSt 1 n, en assa • Roa. CAIJUMJN < HAiesaa or T* aoaara Johnr.* Mack DROWN Oantrnxing • %  BOB HOPE IN. YOU CAN BFAT %  HI MOMB Ml nigii*i. • • m Th* !(•*. %  •> am Ham* Nrwa from Britain. W is — Ctea* Down. 11 1J %  m Frogianw..> AuiUOlU vt. England DltiMtrh. II noon Tlw til* ... N. AnalTMi. 11 Ca*M Daws At ihis juncture the (ilm Is in icrrupied by a talk on "Social Hy giene" which is illustrated by dia lco jf grams These diagrams show the Factor sard w xanous organs of a male and fe women spend more time on their male body and their function!) appearance and ki with regard to reproduction. It about the art of eye make-up. also deals with the various aspect of venereal disease. MMrleBBB le on their much more 111 am Uilrii*"* ChoHf. P "> Auatr.lU vi England. IS P m Sfoltl.h M'gMint. * pm P'Pe -nd Drumv t p in Ho. lo br good al % %  < f as— us aas. v.u a II t; m M Wine Producer R and Mrs. E A. Thomai .gara Falls arrived T.C.A. yesterday. Here for a month, they are staying at the Barbados Aquatic Club. Mr Thomas is President of T. G. Bright and Co. Wine producers. BY THE WAY I N the days of my youth it was understood that the man or the team beaten at a game accepted the fact quietly. There Was to be no whining about "bad luckBut to-dav a game ia halfsrtence, half commercial racket, and moat of the fun has gone out of jt. Every day some individual or some team Is blubbering excuses for a defeat. It ii done like this; Of course, xobodf' would be unsporfinp; mono* to juoopst that our opponents did not deserve fo win tm f.i urudpr Ihem rhrir victory. But U mtisl br sold (hot they were Tcfy lucky to u'in, and (hot our defeat u-qs laryclu owing io UOiSWOhD 1. ACerrist can -upon ngni. (V> 7. RNumol a mcui-iiBiBiiimil. Ill li wan a noicn ooicli it Is. (i \1 Hamt in Lap.and. Ill ii Tfkt %  nini noc*er irsn. I4I is A jnitter ot incnn. I4I 18 Sat 2 Down. IB. Procure. (3> 21 Pwi uf a mn pin |3j %  ii Alum. )u lirro a anil clOV*. (<.-4i J. uviome oi a iood matrn. (S) 4. Wlitp ih mi no doubt. ii 0. Onr a day, II . Kiilin oi M*uiuw.an. (61 5. SU* awlille. 141 a. He mar do ine curing in 4 Down, isi io coia. I4i 14. Wool int.. IS) 15. Balow l.rnm >Sl 18. steady. i4i 11. Uni* a bail. cJi II Item!. .4 i J'). Mi-: nut Uiat. (4 :.. Trip can), oi 33. Peaated tS< •flK i BBBSj —A" traai: 19 Rm. in Qarnt: si, QB; tl S'aV 2-> SimBwaa I. | m ..< %  • %  K> V H. Ci-irn. II ftuW U •unsirfi !' %  Ben i S PLICE the till. Mr Salesman and see that everv tar aboard the Waring and Giliow has double ration of rum. drene CM a.m. UgM Orchntral Muut. 64S pm. ftogmmm* Paiad*. 1 pm. Tn~ Newt. T U P-m. Nawa AnV..t 3 l> P.m. tfcSSS ...... -a •Bui the BiglUli !'!• %  > %  icmd > iremcndous .moun. ''i*'*T. '!; When the film resumes it reabout beauty in the last is j|*gin'' %  * Jc*araB ( s veals that the younger sister and years" said Factor. poaar ot iha weak. her lover have been married and %  Tney have good skins, too ^ %  h B !" 1 D j m ",Vo the family doctor arranges a recon c | e ar and delicate. You won't find JJ'.J"* r „ (n ,,,. idttortala. IO.IS •f>he II from nere. 10 U %  aasi i I4S im The Hi illation between the elder sister j.p'y'ukc them except around the and her husband who has now QMS i^kcs It's all a matter ol been cured of venereal discas.t „ mfttc '• _i.N S. and his addiction to alcohol ar ^ —•uired as a result of his unhapp> %  -..— _, h marriage. •" •*"• % %  ,h r children at tt The moral of this fll ducat t Is that il r-*ht age, Is Ihe duty of parents to endeavour of sex their child on the various aspect* Tha fclei nd. of Sid AOIATIC rUH CUfBHA (*aafcarOaV) i. H(*WT \nrcHt'M JANT C.IU3ER •OUT Of THE PAST" KIRK DOUC1I-ABHONIIA rtJXING Comnrncinf f"Mv >r >t lOKIMS AMI"* •. Tchitl*olor UNPA DAIUVBU^C-OHKn. WUJW BBTiARD OH1XN A JWh On.rv-ro Plfll %  S6VV'a'y>V!r l VVVAV>*^^^ GLOBE THEATRE TO-DAY ONLY—5 and 8 30 p.m. THAT MIDNIGHT KISS Mario Lansa — Jose Ilurbi — Kathryn Crsysoa EXTRA SPORT FLASH TO DAY. 5 % . AIf.TH.ALIA RETAIN THE ASHES ." SEF. THE HIGHLIGHTS in tnls Film:— MSM Million —At 6? bowled b> Millrr Complon—bowled by Miller for nought Waslihrook—Caught Johnson, bowled Miller I imtu'H iwr-i.n and .l< hnoton in action ','.'.','^',' r '^,' r *,'.'.'*'^^^*^^^''^^^^^^^^^^^ The CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT No. 6 M Mlllll.l STREET Announce lhal Special LUNCHES al 3/-, 4/-. 5/will be served. Chniced Chinese Dishes prepared by Expert Chefs. Fresh Trinidad SIIKIMPS on Ihe MENU. DIAL 4730 FOR RESERVATIONS. It'a IIOI'i: AT HIS FASTEST. FI'NNIEST BEST : Ptnmovnt's Hilarious Successor To ThePslehce: PLAZA Thealrc-OISr/N [DIAL 84041 RidiB^the Subset frail *' ath Valley Rangers KEN 1AVNAJtI> HOOT orBBOH-Oe BTBSax Mbdnltr Sal <> too* oi isr .Monoai.-i" HABB1.E rrMlay BaturtUy .>lv S and 8 n i asio %  *•%  "* **" Do b .l-IMl IOIBT Tom rONWAY GAIETY— [THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES TON1TE only 1*., COTtrsSY a..d the I* !" E1WOI. In Tlir SMHROII tiUlat. S*UdJ%. Bund-' S JS p in. Matlna* *intla> Crrol AlexU iWarnep 1 Tnhuriolor AeUeni H.V.SN BMITH in MONTANA p m ragmn Ma ArUor.i .ii.ll'.N'i MACK BIM>WN HI -H-ilri BAIUIB" OI IHI IHHIHI 11 rtd K1IHIKOI llll -i %  Hi s=rr== %  I AII'IICI I .-I Two Shown To-4ay 4 *5 and 8 M United Arfirtf' Piefurcs Presents . "DON'T TRUST YOIR HUSBAND •' SUrring Madeline CARROLL Charles illdy) ROCEHS and Fred McMURRAY OLYMPIC Last TA*o Shows To-day 4-30 and 8 IS 20th Cenfwru Fox Double— Sigm 11ASSO and Preston FOSTER in STRANGE TRIANGLE — AND — "AWAIRIX rnisiis with Dana ANDREWS and Richard CONTF ROYAL To-daj last Two Sho and 8 39 UhlMM. HnSMIKMW RIVER LAJJV coion tr ': I TECHNICOLOR' <<• % % %  Du lid H.IIM DcUHO OURYEA CAMERON %  CARIB HOW Last Two Show* To-day 4..10 and 8 15 Universal Ilouble AHrartio,, Lon CHANEY and Claude RAINES in WOLEMAN" AND "EXILE" wnii Pouilaa PUrbanki Jr. snows TOMORROW (Friday). t SO—4 45 and 8 30 p m. and continuing dally at 4 45 and 8 30 p m Extra: (Popeye the Sailor) THK FLY'S LAST FLIGHT PJLAZA IWllHI (Dial 23101 ft/n'iiiiif/ I i-iiltifi 2nd .\luri'h K M I' I It I r u m i r n i: RI.OW: Ml,' MAN: BLOW I AMI BKIITIIKK UK DOES: Another Globe's Discovery TALENT SHOW FRIDAY 2nd Only .1 uuii-f lliti/* TRINIDAD'S CARNIVAL QUEEN of 1951 SOLD EVERYWHERE 3 oz. size 1 oz. „ _78c. 30c. DAMASK Breakfast Cloths cotouied Border, from >.83 6.24 I 70" x 90" : Curtain Nets RE2CWEAB) _5; 53 '• Available SIIKKTK 80"_x 100" TABLE TEACLOTHS 52" x 52" Border Designs 2-35 each Coloured Towels 44 x 22 147 7.07 While i Half-Nets from 49c. yd. ;ii !" ..L5' 0U f L from 39c. yd. EVANS & WHITFIELDS bial 4606 Your Shoe Stores Dial 4220 GLOBE Master I i ROY THOMAS THEATRE Friday 2nd 8.30 MRS. HOUSEWIFE F.N rIANCE THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR HOME WITH Lancastreum Floor Covering • a x 7', IL il II. v II 9 fl. x 10', fl. 9 II. s 12 fL .....11 n ..Mil CONTTSrorS l:m I a CUT TO YOl'R ORDFR r) Ins. Sir >d. :icuw. ... ?er. yd. Jln 1.4 Id. ltllns. IS.10 yd. Abo— \TTRACTIVr. D11SIGNS TO SELECT FBOM Compir. OCR PRICES HKIORE Pl'RCHARING ELSEWHERE Tin: II \iin urns HKii-nmiM COTTOX I VI Hill. LTD. PICTURE FOR k" ( PEOPLE... FREE AMERICA..." FREE WORLD! 2o The Landl; A STORY OF THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURH -OPENING TOMORROW 5 & 8.30 it can cost your life! .The Had Mbs lo-ii... Beer. LOVKLV CHRISTINE GORDON — appearing — IN I'Ht SON wilh a Kslaxy of %  riluiii.nl tine Ini and danrlnK stars under tindirection of i. \\l>\ DE MONTBRl'N on staie at EMPIRE — ON — SI'NOAY. 4th MARCH, 4 45 and 8 10 pm MATINEE:— Children 50c : Adu NIGHT:— House and Bslronr Stalls and Boxea fl 00 $1 5 ROBERT MINGS ..-TM, BUCK lOWt'&Iiit PICHARD BASIHAfit. SICHAS0 MABT -*. ArssH Mcai. IHfnan Ltofd Bsuakfe lead) • anaoaia iNBiaoai IOW/UTD UWI• • BtraciaJ H urMOHr w.si FraogcM ft "-in*" CAHIfOK MfSIIES • Sbar*a**SssskHH W ntBir 'OkTIH a* U-HAI MatatUit %  > '—' — *-* MMM Plus LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE I


hav badtos



ESTABLISHED 1895





a

Australia Loses Ist
Test In 13 Years

From W. J. O'REILLY.

MELBOURNE, Feb. 28.
ENGLAND’S CLEAR CUT VICTORY here
to-day has done much good for cricket. We
were all tired of the one way traffic. The tremendous
ovation for Brown and his team this afternoon was
proof of that.

But England, delighted as she may be about it
all, has like Australia some building up work ahead
to do to maintain the optimism which to-day’s vic-
tory arouses.

Bedser and Hutton have been the outstanding players
| of-the series. Bedser ranks undoubtedly as one of the
greatest bowlers of all time, but he is now a veteran. His

colyssal role in the rehabilitating of English cricket has been
enacted. But his test career is nearly over..

ze So too with Hutton, Not until

this ‘series have the Australian
German Banks





a

public seen the real Hutton.
Review Trade

Now we have seen him at his

best. We are all satisfied to rank

FRANKFURT, Feb. 28,
The central council of west

German banks met here to-day to
continue the exhaustive review of
west Germany's foreign trade
position and credit problems
which have developed to crisis

proportions in the iast two weeks.
A council spokesman told
Reuter to-day that a Communique
would be issued probably to~-
morrow afternobn.

Tne spokesman said the council
was discussing west Germany’s
foreign trade position and the
measures aimed at credit réStric-
tions, One subject under discus-
sion was understood to be the
raising of German bank rates
from six to eight percent or
possibly higher.

The west German Government
last night proclaimed a temporary
embargo on imports of all gpods
from west European cpuntries.

A Government spokesman said
the Government was to re-
vise its import regulations in the
next few days as part of the
coming overhaul of the country’s

whole economic poliesazhich has
hitherto emphasised the principles

of a “free” as against a “planned”
economy.—Reuter,



14-Year-Old Boy
Kills Parents

AUCKLAND, California, Feb. 28,
A 14-year-old boy charged with
shooting both his parents dead
while they watched a television
show was described by psychia-
trists here as sane but ‘obsessed
by simultaneous feelings of love,
hate and jealousy for his parents.”
The boy, Donald Arceo told re-
porters at juvenile detention
quarters that he sent a bullet into
his father’s temple and shot his
mother as she screamed at him.
Donald, an only child, afterwards
gave himself up tp the police. Psy -
chiatrists discovered that the boy
held an intense love for his par-
ents but had come to hate his
father “because he wanted to be
like his dad and could not.”
Donald was also jealous of the
love his parents held for each
pther and felt left out, the psychi-
atrists said. Californian law for-
bids the imposition of_the death
penalty on anyone under 18 but
minors can be jailed for life.
—Reuter.

him “tops.” But it will be opti-
mistic to think he can retain such
form much longer.

It will be hard to replace these
two champions. Tattersall has
clinched a permanent place. He
is a knowledgeable player with
distinct promise.

But what happened to the young
players. Not one added one iota
to his reputation.

We are in the same boat, Hassett,
our oldest player, topped both
average and aggregate in batting

Iverson our “mystery” bowler,
took the stage as a veteran and
now announces his retirement.

Lindwall and Miller have run
their full course as express bowl-
ers.

Attack unwieldy

Our attack has been made ex-
tremely unwieldy by the foolish
policy of our selectors in concen-
trating on off spinners, There
were four of them in this Test.
Off spinners are seldom worth a
cracker in this country.

But we have one silver lining.
Our. two young batsmen Burke
and Hole haye come to stay. Hole,
tall and athletic, hits the ball
powerfully. He will supply plenty
of headaches for England’s bowl-
ers in the future. These two
youngsters give us the edge on
England for the future.

But England’s victory to-day
will surely make a_ challenging
call to English youth, f

The bogey of Australian invinci-
bility has been overcome.

Scores:—



AUSTRALIA—Ist Innings ....-...+> 27
ENGLAND—Ist Innings ........-+.. 320
Australia—2nd Inning:

Burke c Hutton b Bedser ........... 1
Morris 1.b.w, b Bedser ... pant oe
Hassett b Wright... ; 48
Harvey |.b.w. b Wrig . 50
Miller c & b Brown . Be

Hole b Bailey ....





Jan Johnsoh ¢ Brown b Wright .. ©
Lindwall b Bedser .........-..-..... 14
Tallon not out ............. 2
Bill Johnston b Bedser ... 1
Iverson c Compton b Bedser ....... 0
Extras: (2b, 81b.,1w.,inb) 12
197

RK W.

59 6

32 1

32 1

36 3

6 0

Hutton not out .....-...........045. 60
Washbrook ¢ Lindwall b Johnston 7
Simpson run out ............ 15
Compton not out .. sages tarpat sie’) Ae
Extras: (2 leg byes) 2
Total (or 2 wkts.) 95



“Kill The

Chinese:

Save Ourselves”
Ridgway Tells Army Commanders

{ Almost all forces along

TOKYO, Feb. 28,
the 60 miles United Nations

offensive front pushed forward to-day in general probing
attacks to test Communist defences among the wet muddy

hills of central Korea.

Frontline reports indicated patchy resistance on the
= Ee — flanks, ot ee spa and counter-
attacks in the centre around Hoengsong keystone of what is
thought to be the main North Korean line. .

map Sipe ote aee oe Cae Sees

Train Crash Kills 3

RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 28

The engine driver and two other
crewmen lost their lives to-day
when a train crashed into the
water after becoming derailed
while crossing a bridge, About 20
people travelling in the single pas-
senger car in the rear suffered
only slight injury.

The train belonged to the Gov-
ernment operated ida De Fer-
ro Central Do Brazil which also
runs Rio Suburban lines where
another crash occurred last night
killing three and injuring over 70
passengers.—Reuter,



DISAPPOINTED?

WASHINGTON, Feb. 28
John Foster Dulles, President
Truman’s Special Envoy said to-
day he would be greatly disap-
pointed if a peace treaty for Japan
was not near completion by the,
middle of 1951.—Reuter.

Lieutenant-General Matthew B.
Ridgway, 8th Army Commander,
yesterday told his frontline com-
manders: “We have only one ob-
jective—to kill the Chinese and
save ourselves,”

Today he ordered forward his
six-nation attacking force, through
heavy mud, after a day of desult-
ory skirmishing.

Small ibd Communists
had tought ski delaying actions
to cover the Communists with-
drawal to the new line north of
the swollen Han River and across
the difficult hill contours in the
cegion south of the 38th parallel.

An 8th Army spokesman said
tonight that elements of the vet-
eran American ist Calvary Div-
ision advanced 2,000 yards on the
central front today. With only
light enemy |resistance, cavalry-
men took Hill 297, key attack
base, for their drive towards the
eentral rail junction of Yongdu a
few hundred yards to the north.

—Reuter.

nse Nemesis thie maee Sanaa ——

SEVENTY asAND STILL. GOING STRONG















THURSDAY, MAPCH 1,

1951

ARUNDELL WILL FLY BACK TO GRENADA '



Advorat





PRICE, FIYSyCENTS



we :

NN Diminishing raaDlanaplhivstshoiiinigien

PERGUSON who made 84 not ont yesterday is seen here pulling Roy Marshall for four to enter
the seventies. His was a grand knock which helped to put his side in a comfortable position.



‘NO STEPS
Says Griffiths

LONDON, Feb., 28.

Fitzroy MacLean, Conservative,
asked in the Commons to-day who
was now in occupation on Decep-
tion Island in the Antarctic, Colo-
nial Secretary James Griffiths re-
plied there were both British and
Argentine parties established on
Deception Island. British forces
were in charge of a magistrate
and maintained a meteorological
station and post office. MacLean
asked what was being done to
evict “these undesirable aliens
from British territory.” Griffiths
replied that no steps have been
taken. Government hag indicated
that it is quite prepared to let this
matter be decided by the Inter-
national Court.

—Reuter.



day to 488 for 8.

The Price Of
Sugar Is Down

From R. M. MacCOLL.





NEW YORK.
Workers Demand While the price of everything
else creeps steadily up, sugar

Severe Punishment

PRAGUE, Feb. 28.

There was no indication here to-
day when Dr, Vladimer Clementis
and his associates, arrested on|dcwn to 41s. 5d. for 100 lbs.
alleged treachery and conspiracy,| Behind that drop is a healthy
are to appear before the People’s|sign—scare buying and hoarding,
State court. which started after the Korean

The case has been put in the] war began and was fairly acute at

sags. Why? Because there is too
much in America just now.

Last month it would have cost
you 44s. 6d. to buy 100lb. of
sugar in the U.S. To-day it is

hands of the State prosecutor. The|times last year, is pretty well
preparation of the indictment may | dead.

take weeks. Rude Pravye Com-' One up to the American house-
munist Party paper to-day pub-| wife.

lished letters from factory workers Footnote: 100 Ibs. of sugar
in various parts of the country| would cost 41s.°8d. in Britain.
calling for severest punishment] —L.E.S,

for “the disgusting traitors to the
party and all working people.”
—Reuter.

Ban On Red Cross
Emblems Lifted

GENEVA, Feb. 28.

General Mac Arthur has lifted
the ban on Red Cross national
uniforms and emblems in Korea,
the League of Red Cross Societies
announced here to-day. }

General Mac Arthur forbade |
members of Red Cross teams in
Korea to wear their own uniforms,
insignia and protective emblems,
on the ground that they became
members of the United Nations
Command on arriving in Korea.

Danish, Norwegian, British and
Canadian Red Cross teams were
informed on arrival in Tokyo that
they would not be allowed to wear
emblems. They protested to the
International League of Red Cross
Societies which in turn protested
to the United Nations.—Renter.



PILOT BANNED
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28.

The Civil Aeronautics Board to-
day barred Captain Rio Bridoux,
Bolivian pilot, from ever flying
again in this country.

Bridoux, now back in Bolivia,
was blamed. for a plane collision
that killed 55 people here on No-
vember 1, 1949.—-Reuter.

|POCKET CARTOON
| by OSBERT, LANCASTER







RADAR EQUIPMENT
STOLEN FROM R.A.F.

CHELVESTON, Northamp-
tonshire, Feb. 28.

Radar and radio equipment
worth thousands of pounds has
been stoten from an R.A.F. sta-
tion here.

One estimate of its value is
£50,000. The robberies, it is be-
lieved, have been going on for
some months.—Reuter.

ce

* Now
that while
prepared to share blood
donors, use of the oxygen tent

lease don’t forget
we are quite

is to be reserved exc usively
forGovernment supporters!”

ce





FRENCH GOVERNMENT RESIGNS

By HAROLD KING

PARIS, Feb. 28. | price policies are urgently needed

The French coalition Cabinet |owing to the rising cost of living
headed by Rene Pleven, ended to-— |and the growing labour unrest.

day after holding office for 231) The Civil budget for this year

days. The Cabinet resigned at the has also not yet been voted,

end of the long drawn out debate | To-night for the second time in 24) had again tried to reach agree-|tain as many candidates as there|Eeonomic Secretary to the Treas

Stollmeyer Seores Double
Century In Trinidad’s 488
Barbados. Spends Another
Day In The Field

BY O.S.

TRINIDAD kept Barbados for another whole day in the
field yesterday and at close of play had carried their over-
night score of 232 for the loss of 2 wickets on the previous

COPPIN















Jeffrey Stollmeyer turned in
another sterling display of bats-
manship and completed his sec~
-pa'double century on Barb:
‘soil when he added 94 runs. to hi
total of 114 of the previous day
to score 208 runs in 506 minutes,
before his runner was run out
and therefore he as well.

It will be remembered that
Stollmeyer scored 210 against
Barbados for Trinidad at Ken-
sington in 1944.

Stollmeyer gave a_ possible
chance of a stump at 21 on the
previous day but he completed
201 without blemish before he
gave a chance to Denis Atkinson,
fielding at short fine leg to the
bowling of Clyde Walcott,

Yesterday Stollmeyer still used
a runner but his strokes were
characterised by their wonted
fluency. Indeed he brought off
some cover drives that gave the
fieldsmen no chance, and clever
wristwork helped him to make
crisp strokes off the pads between
the gaps in the onside field.

Wilfred Ferguson, number one
crowd pleaser turned in a valu-
able supporting performance and
was 84 not out at close of play.
He has been at the wicket tor
204 minutes and has bit twelve
fours, With Stollmeyer he put
on 100 runs in 102 minutes for
the seventh wicket, and that part-
nership had yielded 111 before
Stollmeyer was runout.

Bowler Weekes

Everton Weekes again took
bowling honours yesterday, He
had already secured the best fig-
ures of one wicket for 6 runs on
the previous day and yesterday
he took two more wickets to make
his bag 3 for 75 in 20 overs.

The Barbados fielding was good
at first but ragged towards the
close of play as the fieldsmen
were evidently feeling the
strain of two dayssin the field,

Two chances went abegging,
Jeffrey Stollmeyer at 201 and
Ferguson at 34. Both of these
should have been taken. Special
mention must be made however
of the first class ground fielding
of Charlie Taylor, Hunte and
Keith Walcott.

Ferguson wili surely be given
his chancé at’ a century to-day
and Trinidad should reach the
500-run mark. This will put
Trinidad in a very strong posi-
tion.

@ On Page &



| Government decisions on wage and | failure to resolve differences in his; there shall be two ballots in the

Cabinet on the system of voting
to be used by the nation in the
General Election this year.

| To-day’s move came when the
| cone hour meeting of the Cabinet
























Gairy Sends ‘Cease
Violence’ Call

FROM CARRIACOU

(By Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 28.
SIR ROBERT ARUNDELL, Governor of the
Windward Islands, is to cut short his leave
in Britain to leave for the West Indies because of
rioting in the island of Grenada, the Colonial Office
said to-day, He leaves England March 6.



Len Hutton
Wins £1,000

MELBOURNE, Feb, 28.
Len Hutton has won the prize
of £1,000 offered by a business
house for the “best player" in the
series of five Test matches which
ended to-day. He was awarded
three points for his second innings
of 60 not out to-day and finished
with 29 points. This was only one
point ahead of his captain Freddie
Brown with 28.

Keith Miller, Australis ll- ‘
rounder was third with 271 pointe. Mr. James Griffiths, Secretary of State for the
Reuter Colonies, told the Commons he was also sending his



Labour Adviser to the island, torn for more than a
week by strikes and incidents.

Sir Robert Arundell, who was not due to return
until the middle of March, will fly back next week.
The Labour Adviser will go within the next few
days to act in an advisory capacity to authorities
there.

Russia Will Not
Start A War
——-SPAAK BELIEVES

BRUSSELS, Feb, 28.
Paul Henri Spaak, Chairman of

the European Consultative Assem-| ~ The bid for political power by

bly said here to-day he did not
believe the Soviet Union would
start a war “because the Russians
must understand that if they fail-
ed to beat the Americans withir
a matter of six months, they would
never beat them.”

Belgium’s former Premier - was
speaking at Brussels airport, afte: HONG KONG, Feb, 28.
@ somewhat rough flight from the British authorities in Formosa
United States where he made a| asked Chinese Nationalist authori
six weeks’ lecture tour ties to delay their threat to

Spaak said: “I am very much{ bomb an unidentified aircraft
impressed by America’s gigantic g*arr-er reported 20 miles off the
effort in the military field and the | west coast of Formosa according
corresponding drive in the econo- | 'O a message received here from
mic and fiscal fields.—Reuter, Taipeh, Formosa.
The British requested the delay

Nationalists Not
To Bomb Carrier



5 until a check had been made
Voluntary Action Te! through British naval headquar-
‘| vers in Hong Kong,

Chinese Nationalists then threw
a security cloak over the whole
incident.

SAYS TRUMAN Earlier reports of the presence
9 the aircraft carrier ,
WASHINGTON, Feb, 28. thrown Chinese military élicles

President Truman declared infin Formosa into confusion, The
a television broadcast from the] carrier was understood not to be
White House to-day that ‘“volun- an American ship.
tary action by people who believe The British aircraft
im a common cause is. still the
far nor force in the world. It ix} this » afternoon

Greatest Weapon

from northern
ar more effective than any form] waters.
tyranny. . A naval

“If we as a nation get together|said earlier
in that spirit of freedom, I am}ship off Formosa
sure that we can overcome the] British ship”.
crisis that faces the free world,
and I believe that we can bring
the world nearer to the peace
which all men desire”.

The President was opening the
1952 appeal for contributions to
the American Red Cross,

General George Marshall, Sec-
retary of Defence and forme
President of the American Rea
Cross, addressed the rally for the
Same cause at Madison Square
Garden, New York.

—Reuter

French Legate

spokesman here had

“could be a
—Reuter.



Action Against
Dock Strikers

In Australie

CANBERRA, Feb, 28.
Australia’s Labour Minister
Harold Holt, announced to-day

he coal crisis will be submitted to
the Australian Parliament which
vi » 4 will Open on March 7,
Declines hivitation Holt also announced that
dockers did not remove their over-
CAIRO, Feb. 28, lime Dan by March 4, action
French Ambassador Couve De] Would be taken the following day
Murville to~day declined the in|‘ proclaim the section of
vitation of Mayptian Foreign Min-] —rimes Act enabling the stevedor-
ister, Salah El Din Bey to cal!
upon him to discuss the situation
in Morocco, The Ambassador sent
an apology for his inability to

the men.
A fuli arbitration court to-day
lismissed charges of contempt

ains » General Secretary of

keep the appointment. against the General Becre as
French official circles said that the Australian Miners . Union|
the Ambassador declined to call} Georse William Grant and the

union’s Vice-President William

on the Foreign Minister because 3
7 . Parkinson.

it is considered that the French :

attitude that “Moroecan and North Miners Union President nie
African affairs are no concern}]Â¥#ams, was dismissed by a fu
of the Egyptian Government.” court on February 20, ae

—Reuter.

RED OPPOSITION TO
CHURCH CONTINUES
In Czechoslovakia

PARIS, Feb. 28.
The Communist fight to elimin-





Labour Party
Takes A Hand

WELLINGTON, New Zealand,

ate the chureh igs going on un Feb, 28.

abated in Czechoslovakia, the New Zealand’s Labour Party
Conservative newspaper. Figare broke silence In the dock strike
reported to-day. “Vice Premier Z.} tonight by offering its help to

reach a settlement

The Party which deprecated the
use of troops to load and unload
ships today suggested a conference
which all parties to the strlixc
should be compelled to attend

Keith J. Holyoake, Minister for
Agriculture, announced today that
next week's wool sales at Auck-
land and Wonganu would be post-
\{ poned because of the dock strike

ive state coal mines with 1,500
workers on South Island were idle
today in sympathy with the dock-

|] ers.

At Canterberg—South Island—
freezing workers decided today
not to handle meat for export.
They will continue to kill but ex-
port meat will remain in store

—Reuter

EMPIRE NEGLECTED |
FOR ARGENTINA

jnext General Election in France |
i Under the single ih

or only one. Under the sing LONDON, Feb. 28
method electors would vote for the The widely read Dally Express
lists of candidates—one list for} sommenting to-day on the’ visit]
{each party—and a list would con-|tg Buenos Aires of the British

Denek Fierlinger ‘recertly said
the Bishop had taken an oath to
the new regime and would confer
Holy Orders on all new priests,
Monsignor Beran, Archbishop
of Prague, though not officially a
prisoner, ig unable to leave his
palace. —Reuter.



TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT









on the Electrical Reform Bill which | hours, Pleven asked the President|ment. The National Assembly | are seats in g department ury, John Edwards, said that it
began last Thursday. | to be relieved of office. had voted by 311 to 295 against Under the double ballot there} was to be hoped that he would be |
Nine successive votes since last | a single ballot system — offered} would be two pools a week apart.|cuccessful in. getting more meat}
Thursday showed that it was im-| Based on a stormy issue the elec-| as alternative 4o the government’s |/The idea is thdt if votes are scat-|for Britain at a “reasonable
possible to get Radical and Catho~ | tora] reform resignation was in no |own complicated proposals. The|tered among a large number of |price.” This paper complained,
lic groups inside g Government | way the result of a vote of confi-/ Assembly recessed while the |candidates in the first poll the |however, that the British Empire
majority to agree on what new | dence. | Cabinet conferred with the MRP | second poll gives them a chance to|had been neglected “to the benefit}
system voting at General Elec-| Last night the President defin— Popular Republicans who have the | regroup themselves round candi-{of the Argentine” and “cheap |
tions was to be. itely refused to accept Pleven’s|majority party in the Cabinet. | dates with the best chance of suc-|meat"’ s the cry, while “no!

It also comes at atime when/’resignation, also following the

Crux of the issue is whether



cess. —Reuter. meat” was the result—Reuter

that the unidentified | workers’

that Special legislation to deal with |Governor Green at

ing industry board to discipline} c¥tive tour

E. M. Gairy, the Grenada labour

British Ask Chinese feader, is believed to underlie the

strikes on the island,

Griffiths said that nothing could
‘ce done to deal with the under-
lying causes of these disorders
until disturbances had ceased and
there had been aq general resump
tion of the work Negotiations
could then be started

Those who have allowed them-
selves to be led into these acts of
violence, are doing great harm to
the island and their own inter-
ests” the Minister added.

Anxiety

Anthony Eden, Leputy Leader

of the Opposition, asked if these
disturbances were purely locat,
There was much anxiety» about

riots which did damage not only
to the island, but to the good name
and trade of the whole of the
West Indies and to the happiness

had] of the people, he said.

Griffiths replied that to the
best of his knowledge the dis
turbances were purely local in
origin, He did not think they had

! carrier} any connection with events out-
Warrier arrived in Hong Kong] side the island,

Our correspondent cabling from
Grenada. states thut 2 delegation
of three of the Manual and Mental
Union Executive by
courtesy of the Government, were
taken by H.M.S. Devonshire last
night to Carriacou, where Gairy
resides in detention, to interview
him and returned this morning.

The party were: C, A. Lowe,
Deputy President General, Allen
Williams and H, A. MeKie who
had a three-hour meeting aboard
the ship with their chief. Also
present were Captain Stokes of
the Devonshire and O. R, Kelsick,
District Officer, Carriacou

Request Granted

Returning, the varty saw Acting
Government
House informing him that they
brought a message from Gairy to
request the workers in his name

if jto desist from violence and intimi-

dation.
The Acting Governor agreed to
the temporary lifting of the ban

the }on public addrésses, accepting the

undertaking that M.M.W.U. Exe-
the country making
this appeal

From noon onwards,
was spread.

iandslides are still untouched
and very little work done in coun-
try districts. Yesterday the water
stoppage ended,

“Soviets Could
Start War”

If They Were Ready

WASHINGTON, Feb, 28.

the news



General Lucius Clay, former
American Military Governor it
Germany said to-day he was
convinced that North Atlanti
Pact nations could have forces
ready within one year to make
Soviet agygression seem “unprofii
able” He was addressing two

Senate Committees in
President Truman's policy of
helping European defence by)
sending more American troops to
Europe. General Clay said he did
net believe west Europe and the

support of

defence build-up would preeipi-
tate Soviet aggression

“Soviet masters would have
precipitated war by now if the
were ready”, he said A weil
trained, well equipped allied
force would be able “to sustain
the slow moving Russian attact
while we mobilise additional
forces. I am _ convinced that

within a year forces will be ready
which will make aggression secm
unprofitable if we pursue at full



steam ahead the course we set”,
General Clay said.

General Clay who spent four
years in Germany, said Western
Germany would have to be re-
eeived into the North Atlantic
Pact on a “reasonable basis” if
real- fighting support- from Ger-
man troops could be expected.

Advocating the use of German
troops in European defence, the
General said it was not fealisti





to expect German contributions
until a proper political atmos-
| phere had been created and West
ern Germany was no longer under
occnnatien

“We should move in that direc-
tion as quickly as possible,” he
added.

—Reuter




PAGE TWO





Carub Calling

APT. W. A. FARMER, Super-

intendent of Police leaves this
afternoon for England on_ the
Golfito. Heé is going to the U.K.
on a six months’ Police Officer’s
course. :

Here Again

ACK to spend another holiday
B in ‘Barbados are Mr. and Mrs.
G: F. Pearson and Mr. and Mrs.
Harley W. Larkin of Toronto who

ived from Canada yesterday
Araening. by T.C.A. r
*°Mr. Pearson is a Banker in
Toronto, Mr. Larkin is in the lum-
ber business. They are here for a
nth, staying at the Windsor
Hotel.

At Seawell to meet them were

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Ross, Cana-
dians also holidaying in Barbadgs.

From Pittsburgh
aR. and Mrs. George Vaughan
arrived from Bermuda yes-
terday by T.C.A. Here for a
month, they are staying at the
Marine Hotel. Mr. Vaughan runs
his own business in Pittsburgh.
He is a fur merchant. They were
in Bermuda for two days awaiting
T.C.A’s mid-week flight to Bar-
bados. ‘
Insurance Manager
M* C. N. MacDONALD, Man-
ager of Travellers Insurance
@o,. in Toronto and Mrs. Mac-
Donald arrived by T.C.A. yester-
day morning to spend two weeks’
holiday in Barbados. They are
spending the first part of their
stay at the Enmore Hotel and the
tter part at the Ocean View
otel, '
From Toronto
R. and Mrs. W. M. Hiller ar-
rived on T.C.A’s mid-week
flight from Canada yesterday to
spend a month or six weeks’ holi-
day at the Marine Hotel. -Mr.
Hiller is a retired businessman of
Toronto.

Arriving on the same plane were
Mr. and Mrs. H. §S. Phillips of
Hamilton, Ontario. They are here
until the-end of March staying at
the Oceah View Hotel. Mr. Phil-
lips is a €ivil Engineer in Hamil-

ton. > ae
First Visit
“@ RRIVENG from the U.S. yes-
l terddy via Canada by T.C.A.
were Mroand Mrs. C. W. Still-
= of Chicago accompanied by
r. Arnold Sagalyn of New York.
They. are staying at the Four
Win Club, St. Peter. This is
eir first visit here.
~ Mr; Stillman is an Economist
at the University of Chicago. Mr.
and Mrs. Stillman expect to be
here for one month. Mr. Sagalyn
who is Edithr of the New York
Sunday Times, plans to spend a
month’s holiday in Barbados.

~ Knitting President
NAR. G. G. BEAMISH, President,
of Chipman Hilton Knitting
Go., Ltd. in Hamilton arrived
from Canada yesterday morning
by T.C.A. accompanied by his
Wife. They are here for one
onth’s holiday staying at the
rbados Aquatic Club.

BY THE WAY

rN the days of my youth it
® was understood that the man
or the team beaten at a game

accepted the fact quietly. There 1

was to be no whining about “bad
luck”.

But to-day a game is half—
science, half commercial racket,

and most of the fun has gone
out of jt. Every day some
individual or some team is

blubbering excuses for a defeat.

It is*done like this: Of course,
nobo would be unsporting
enou to. suggest that our

opponents did not deserve to win
or toygrudge them their victory.
But must be said that they

were ery lucky to win, and that
our defeat was largely owing to

CROSSWORD



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° urn of a nocturnal animal. (3)
h Ny is, (4)

a

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‘i ; . Procure. (3)
Part of a nair pin, (3
sa
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a@ good tu
An alluring woman, (9)
” Down
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16 Across. For Seuting this
Jelly you need a soft clove, (6-4)
)

. teome of a good match, (5
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. One a day, (4)
ot Methuselah, (5)

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: Dual; 17,
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: 1, Limpid:
: 5. Delian, 4, Screen: 5, Prairie:

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Dial 4606

BEEBE ESBS EE BE B::

BEBBeeeeg
DAMASK
Breakfast Cloths

coloured Borders from
ee
REXWEAR SHEETS

00" w100" 97

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EVANS








ARTIE'S HEADLINE



“An@ now that steei is
nationalised, | tuppose
they'll be saying ‘If only we
had the tin we could give
you tinned food—if only we

had the food’.”

Surprise Visit
R. DENNIS CUMMINGS,
son of the late R. M. Cum-
we and Mrs. Cummings, of
“Mayville,” Codrington Hill, St.
Michael, recently arrived from
New York on a surprise visit to
his mother and sister.

Mr. Cummings is proprietor of
Dennys Quncheonette, New Ro-
chelle, New York, and was last
in: Barbados about twenty-seven
years ago. He notes many im-
provements in the island, civic as
well as social and architectural.

impressed
R. JULIAN GARRETT, Di-
rector of Petroleum and Nat~
ural Gas who was atthe Crane
Hotel for the past few days, is now
staying at the Windsor with Mrs.
Garrett.

He said that this is his first visit
to the island and he was much
impressed with the natural beauty
of the island and had found the
people most friendly and hospi-
table.

Mr. Garrett besides holding
various other posts in Canada, is
Immediate Past President of
Dominion Council of Professional
Engineers.

Civil Engineer
M*: AND MRS. ROBERT
FLEMING of Toronto are
down to spend four or five weeks
in Barbados. They are guests at
the Marine Hotel. Mr. Fleming
is a Civil Engineer in Toronto.

Twelve Years Ago
R. and Mrs. Frank Dixon
w®o visited Barbados twelve
years ago are here again for an-
other holiday. They arrived from
the U.S. via Trinidad on Tuesday
afternoon by B.W.LA. and_ are
guests at the Ocean View Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. Dixon hail from
Chicago.

Back to Trinidad
RS. ALVIN TUCKER and her
son Glenn who spent a short
holiday in Barbados staying at
“West Wego”, St. James, returned
to Trinidad on Tuesday afternoon
by B.W.LA
They were accompanied by Mrs.
Tucker’s brother-in-law and sister
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Maingot.

Here for Two Weeks
M . and Mrs. J. A. Kitchen
and their daughter Sally
Ann were among the passengers
arriving from Canada yesterday
morning by T.C.A. Mr. Kitchen
is a manufacturer of ladies’ hosiery
in Hamilton, They are here for
two months staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.

En-route to Grenada

R. AND MRS. BERNARD

COLLINS are on their way
to Grenada.. Mr. Collins is a
director of T. A. Collins Limited
of England. They arrived from
Canada yesterday morning by
T.C.A. They leave this afternoon
for Trinidad by B.W.I.A, Mean-
while they are guests at the Hotel
Royal.

Speaker's Cousin
Mt. and Mrs. Wilbert E. Hus-

bands who had been holiday-
ing with relatives for the past
couple of months left for the U.S.
on Tu . Mr. Husbands who
is a relative of Mr. K. N. R. Hus-
bands, Speaker of the House of
Assembly has been living in the
U.S. for the past twenty-seven
years, His home is in Boston.

Trinidad Turfite
R. ALEX CHIN, TRINIDAD
turfite arrived from Trini-
dad on Tuesday afternoon by
B.W.LA. He is here for the Bar—
bados Turf Club’s Spring Meet-
ing. He was accompanied by Mrs.
Chin. They are staying at Super
Mare Guest House Worthing.
English Ham
ADIO AMATEURS’ HAMS
in Barbados have probably
spoken on several occasions to
Mr. W. G. C. Wyer over their
amateur “sets”. Yesterday Carib
spoke to him in person, as he
was among the passengers arriv
ing on the T.C.A. "plane yester-
day morning. He came down fron.
England via Canada,

Mr. Wyer, an Electroni<
Engineer in Bournemouth, Hamp-
shire, operates a radio amateui
station in Bournemouth under the
eall sign G2ZB. When he used tc
live in Canada his call sign was
VESBP.

At Seawell to meet him was
Mr. Sidney Lashley local radio
amateur.

Wine Producer

R. and Mrs. E. A. Thomas of
Niagara Falls arrived by
T.C.A. yesterday. Here for a
month, they are staying at the

Barbados Aquatic Club.
Mr. Thomas is President of T. G.
Bright and Co., Wine producers.
—

by Beachcomber é

hing ra wee The dignified A Job for Mimsie
Oe ae aye alt tev yous SUGGESTION has_ beer.
gee? ee eee Fee ee made by the Ministry of

Pep for Beethoven

The film is a documentary of
the Boston Symphony Orchestra
playing Beethoven, livened with
shots of girl students swimming
between classes, :

(News Item.)
J IVENED is the operative word,

i In other words, something
for everybody but not enough to
prevent complaints. A Congress-
man said the bathing dresses were
too scanty. Someone else said
that to try to liven up Beethoven
in this way was all wrong. One
way of pleasing far :nore people
would be to liven up Beethoven
by getting the students in their
bathing costumes to play certain
passages while the musicians did
a bit of swimming. Or else let the
orchestra sit in the water to play
while the girls frolic round them,
splashing them, and_ crying.
“Yippee!”











3 oz. size

1 oz.

BRINGS OUT THE NATURAL
WIGHLIGHTS IN YOUR HAIR

SOLD EVERYWHERE

Food that the exquisite Mimsie
Slopeorner should be sent on 4
tour of the egg-counting stations
to try to shorten the gap between
marking and grading, and to talk
to the packers and loaders. /
high official (called by his col
leagues the High Egg) said
“This won't, of course, get Us any
more eggs. But it should give «
fillip to the egg-workers, and
make them cheerier.” Asked wha’
she would talk about, Mimsic
said. “It will just be heart-to
heart talks about the home fron’
egg-mindedness and getting
together.”
Shop-Shape and
Piccadilly Fashion
The shop sailed majestically up
the Thames.
(News Item.)
PLICE the till, Mr. Salesman.
and see that every tar aboard
the Waring and Gillow has a
double ration of rum.



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BARBADOS ADVOCATE









“Bob And Sally” Junior Short Story Competition |

Produced by Social Guidance
Enterprises of the U.S.A.
This film which opens at the
Plaza Cinema (Bridgetown) on
the 9th of March, 1951, explains
sex on the screen.

It depicts a home in a town
where a Mr. and Mrs. Wright live
with their two young daughtets.
The mother of this family fails Bo
give her daughters the necess@ry
information with regard to sex and
as a result when the older git!
marries her marriage fails and she
returns to her parents, In due
course she has a baby which is
born blind through venereal dis
ease contracted by her husband
during the early days of their
marriage when due to a quarrel
one evening he decided to join
some of his friends on one of their
“down town” activities.

Afraid

The younger sister of this fam-
ily finds that she is going to have
a baby and when her voung lover
suggests that they get married she
refuses because she is afraid-to tell
her mother. At her suggestion ar-
rangements are made by her lover
for her to go to a “quack doctor”
who performs such an unsatisfac-
tory operation that she faints in
the bus the way home and has
to be taken to the family doctor
who has to use all his skill to save
her life.

a

At this juncture the film is in-
terrupted by a talk on “Social Hy-
giene” which is illustrated by dia
grams. These diagrams show the
various organs of a male and fe-
male body and their functions
with regard to reproduction. It
also deals with the various aspects
of venereal disease.

When the film resumes it re-
veals that the younger sister and
her lover have been married and
the family doctor arranges a recon-
ciliation between the elder sister
and her husband who has now
been cured of venereal disease
and his addiction to alcohol ac-
yuired as a result of his unhappy
marriage.

The moral of this film is that it
is the duty of parents to endeavour





The Evening Advocate invites

‘its Junior Short Story Competition.

all children under 12 to enter for;
The best story will be published |

every Monday in The Evening Advocate, and the winner will receive |

a prize to the value of 7/6 in either books or stationery.

The stories

can be on any subject under the sun but should not be more than 309

words in length, and must reach The

’s Editor, The Advocate

Co. Ltd., City not later than Wednesday every week. |
Send this coupon with your story. |

JUNIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Title of Story

BEAUTY AND
CLIMATE

LONDON, Feb.

Davis Factor, son of the late Max
Factor, believes that British women
have made great strides in the
art of make-up.

Factor said:

“I haven’t been in Britain fot
over three years but already 1
see that women are much more
advanced in the use of cosmetics
than they were.

“The English girls do not over-
do their make-up or look artifi-

cial. They have the natural
look.”
Factor said that American

women spend more time on their
appearance and know much more
about the art of eye make-up.

“But the English girls have
learned a tremendous amount
about beauty in the last 15
years,” said Factor.

“They have good skins, too,
clear and delicate. You won't find
any like them except around the
Great Lakes. It’s all a matter of
climate.” —I.N.S.

to educate their children, at the
right age, on the various aspects
of sex.



nn aa

AQUATIC CLUE CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT at 8.30
RK.O. Presents

in

ROBERT MITCHUM—JANE GREER

“QUT OF THE PAST”

with KIRK DOUGLAS—RHONDA FLEMING
—ieaiidenacmmeernenenenpenlilnaham atime

Commencing Friday

2nd

FOREVER AMBER” in Technicolor

Starring: LINDA DARNELL-—CORNEL WILDE—RICHARD GREEN
A 20th Century-Fox Picture



Fb SPOS SOS SSO POPP PS PI PPP PPP OPPP OS

GLOBE THEATRE

TO-DAY

ONLY—5 and 8.30 p.m.

THAT MIDNIGHT

Mario Lanza — Jose Iturbi —Kathryn Grayson.
EXTRA SPORT FLASH TO-DAY,5 & 8.30.
“AUSTRALIA RETAIN THE ASHES.”
SEE THE HIGHLIGHTS in this Film:—

S

Hutton—At 62 bowled by Miller.
Compton—bowled by Miller for nought.

Washbrook—Caught Johnson, bowied Miller.

Lindwall, Iverson and

8 56565656,66 OOOO LAL LEELA LLL.

Jchnston in action.









The CHINA DOLL RESTAURANT

No. 6 MARHILL STREET

be served.

Choiced Chinese Dishes prepared by

Expert Chefs.

Fresh Trinidad SHRIMPS on the MENU.
DIAL 4730 FOR RESERVATIONS.



BLOW: LIL’
e

B’dos 8-year old

POPSOOS

Trumpet Player

: A

s

. Positive
+

: Child
~

x Prodigy
x

x e

%

% Bop &

v

x Calypsoes
%

8 e

>

x

*



MRS. HOUSEWIFE



Master LEROY THOMAS

GLOBE 'THEATRE Friday 2nd 8.30

\
|
)
Announces that Special LUNCHES at 3/-, 4/-, 5/- will
)
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B.B.C. Radio Programme

Y, MARCH 1, 1951
4.30 a.m.—12.00 moon .....-..++ 19.76 m-
6.30 a.m, Football Fixtures, 6.45 a.m

Sporting Record, 7 a.m. The News, 7.10
a.m. News Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the
Editorials, 7.25 a.m. Programme Parade,
7.30 a.m, Generally Speaking, 7.45 a.m

Listeners’ Choice, 8 a.m, Land and Live-
stock, 830 a.m. Natalie Bramley, 8.45
a.m. Plain English, 9 a.m, The News,
9.8) a.m, Home News from Britain, 9.15
a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m. Programme
Parade, 11.25 a.m. Australia vs. England,
11.45 a.m. Special Dispatch, 12 noon The

News, 12.10 pam. News Analysis, 12.15
p.m. Close Down,
4.15—G.00 Pum. occ cc reece teen 25.53 m,

—_——_ $<

4.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 5 p.m

Australia vs. England, 5.15 p.m, Scottish

Magazine, 5.45 p.m. Pipes and Drums,

6 p.m. How to be good oo.
coerce OM

€.00—7.15 p.m. ... & 31.32 m.





cane veriasiapibnteahincne lamepeasielansatbaiieet

6.30 p.m. Light Orchestral Music, 6.45
p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m, The
News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m.
We see Britain.

F.45—11.00 pam. ........ 31.82 & 48.43 m.



7.45 p.m. Generally Speaking, 6 p.m
Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m, Sir John
Magill’s Last Journey, 8.45 p.m. Com-
poser of the week, 9 p.m. Special
Dispatch, 9.15 p.m, Have a go, 9.45 p.m
De you Remember, 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10,15
_m. Take it from here, 10,45 p.m. Life
in Britain, 11 p.m, The Music of Sid
Phillips and his Band.

Phuitpe aia his Banden

Plips_an@_ nig Band___
Ivs HOPE |
AT HIS FASTEST,
FUNNIEST BEST ;

Paramount's Hilarious
Successor To gmc
‘The Paleface”!




\\



Screenplay by Camund Hartmann
and Rabert Bien Based on a Story

by Marry Leon Witsoe
mm

TO-MORROW (Friday).
2.30—4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
and continuing daily at 4.45

and 8.30 p.m.

Extra: (Popeye the Sailor) .
“THE FLY’S LAST FLIGHT’

PLAZA

Bridgetown. (Dial 2310).



Only 3 more Days

TRINIDAD'S
CARNIVAL QUEEN
of 1951

Miss Jeffrey's Beer.
LOVELY

CHRISTINE
GORDON

— appearing —
IN PERSON
with a galaxy of Trinidad’s sing-
ing and dancing stars under the
direction of .
LANDY DE MONTBRUN
on stage at

EMPIRE

SUNDAY, 4th MARCH,
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.



PRICES:
MATINEE:—
Children 50c.; Adults $1.00
NIGHT:—
House and Balcony .... $1.00
Stalls and Boxes ...... $1.50

\
20th Century Fox Double—

3 SHOWS : :



THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1951





ne
——— |

R.K.O

REX BARKER

Mat. TO-DAY 1.30 p.m
MIRACULOUS JOUKNEY
in Cinecolor
Rony CALHOUN and
RAIDERS OF THE BORDER

Johnny Mack BROWN



————

PLAZA

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY

Riding the Sunset Trail






“Midnite Sat. 3rd (Monogram!
CODE OF THE SADDLE
Johnny Mack BROWN and
RIDERS OF THE DAWN

with JIMMY WAKELY

———

Errol Alexis

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown

LAST 2 SHOWS TO
RADIO'S Thrilling Advent

“TARZAN AND THE SLAVE GIRL you

c

plus the

TheatresOISTIN (DIAL 8404)

$ and 6.30 p.m

with Tom KEENE— KEN MAYNAR
Co
Friday & Saturday (only) 5 and 8.30 p.m.

Tom CONWAY—Martha O'DRISCOLL &

Friday, Saturday, Sunday 8.20 p.m.
(Warner's Technicolor Action)

(DIAL 2310)

and 8.30 f

AY 4.4

re

CAN BEAT
Short HE A-BOMB
Fait the Laff-Trall, Partner
Friday (3 Shows) 2.30, 4.45
and 9.30 p.m. and

Continuing Dai

pos HOPE IN “FANCY PANTS”

—--

445 and 3.30 p.m



(Monogram Double)

& Death Valley Rangers

D—HOOT GIBSON—BOB STEELE



Action Double!

R.K.O. Radio's
COURT

CRIMINA!

BACK TO BATAAN
with JOHN WAYNE

aS

GATET Y—(tTHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TONITE (only) 8.30-(Monogram Double)

Leo GORCGEY and the Bowery Boys in
Leon ERROL in “THE KNOCKOUT”

“MR. HEX" and

Matinee Sunday 5 p.m









EMPIRE

Last Two Shows To-day 4.45
and 8.30

United Artists’ Pictures

Presents...

“DONT. TRUST
YOUR HUSBAND”

Starring

Madeline CARROLL
Charles (buddy) ROGERS
and Fred McMURRAY



OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows To-day 4.30
and 8.15

Signe HASSO and Preston
FOSTER in

STRANGE TRIANGLE

— AND —

“A WALKIN THE SUN

with Dana ANDREWS and
Richard CONTE





FLYNN SMITH in “MONTANA” ‘és
Midnitd Sat, 3rd. ‘Monogram Big Action)
JOHNNY MACK BROWN in (Both)
RAIDERS OF THE BORDER and RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH
oa = = ~

ROYAL

To-day Last Two Shows; 5
and 8.30

* Yvonne

: Don ~ “Rod © Helena’
DeCARLO-DURYEA: CAMERON: CARTER

ROXY |

Last Two Shows To-day 4.30
and 8.15

Universal Double Attraction

Lon CHANEY and Claude
RAINES in

“ WOLFMAN”

AND

“ EXILE”

with Douglas Fairbanks Jr.

—



Opening Friday 2nd March

EMPIRE
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Ne A FREE AMERICA...
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A STORY OF THE |
PAST, PRESENT :
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DOROTHY SILVERSTONE

Story and Narration Written by
MILDRED BARISH VERMONT
Spoken by DENNIS KING
Reroute through Teenieth Century foe



(1LOBE—oPENING TOMORROW 5 & 8.30

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'
THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1951



Courtesy

Of Musical America

Albert Spalding:

By ROBERT SABIN

WHEN Albert Spalding, one oi
America’s most distinguished
violinists, made his debut, in
7905, at the age of 16, in Paris,
the: American musician “rad to
come through the European
door,’ as he puts ii. To-day, he
says, “the generating forces are
in the United States, Not merely
the devastation of world wars
but other factors also have made
ihis nation a musica) center.”

When Albert Spalding was
born in 1888, in Chicago, Ameri-
ea’s midwestern metropolis, the
phonograph, the radio, and the
motion= picture had not vegun
their revolutionary impact on
America, They were to accom-
piish for music what printing did
for literature, by making ii
accessible to a vastly larger pub-
lic. The United States was still
in its musical childhood. To-day
music has become the interest of
the many, instead of the privi-
lege of the few. The American
artist is welcomed in Europe ana
Central and South America as
cordially as artists from other
countries are in the United
States.

Although Mr. Spalding was
born in Chicago, he spe=t most
of his early years in New York
City. His father, a sporting goods
manufacturer, approved of his
son's musical career with the un-
derstanding that Albert should
make his own way in the pro-
fessional world. The young vio-
linist was self supporting almost
as soon as he was launched into
professional life.

To his mother Mr. Spalding
owes hig musical gifts. She was
not only a gifted pianist but also
had a_ beautiful contralto voice
Two events of major importance
occurred in Albert Spalding’:
life when he was seven years
old. His parents decided to spend
the winter in Florence, Italy, 4
venture that subsequently turnec
into an annual custom, and he
asked for a violin for Christmas,
He soon developed a consuming
interest in music. His first teacher
was Ulpiano Chiti, a Florentine
musician,

Albert and his brother Board-
man were educated in a French-
Italian day school in Florence
There he met French, English
German, Russian and Swiss boys
and acquired a mastery of French
and Italian that was to be useful
te him not merely in his artistic
career but in his servite in the
two world wars that were to in-
terrupt his musical life.

In these early years, the young
violinist did not neglect what he
calls the three great essentials of
artistie development — “time
toil and sweat.” The violin, he
explains, is the most personal of
all instruments except the hu-
man’s voice, yet it is not easy to
play, “It has the most awkward
position of any. The violinist
has the daily problem of resolving
this awkwardness into physical
grace.” Not only did he practice,
but he worked hard at his other
musical’! studies: The reward
came in a dramatic form, when
Albert went to Bologna, at the
age of 14, to play for the examin-
ing board of the Bologna Conser-
vatory

To apply for the diploma at
the age of 14 was a daring step.
Only once before in its history
had the Bologna Conservatory
awarded that honour to so young
a candidate, and that was 133
years earlier, to the young Wolf-
gang Amadeus Mozart, who \45-
ited Bologna on his triumpnal
tour of Italy in 1769 and 1770.
The faith of Albert’s teacher was
justified in the results of the exam-
inations. Of the possible 50 points
ae: Albert Spalding scored
48.

Very wisely, Albert’s parents
decided upon two years. of
further study with Lefort, at the
Paris Conservatory, before he
made his debut in the concert
world. When he was 16, he ap-
peared in Paris, with an orchestra
made up mostly of Paris Conser-
vatory students and conducted
by his teacher. This concert led
to a few engagements and the in-
evitable invitations to appear at
benefits, But the road to estab-
lish success was still to be long
and stony.

A stroke of luck was _ the
friendship of Camille Saint-Saéns,
who had heard that the young
Ameriean had given an excellent
performance of his violin con-
certo, Albert was summoned to
the composer’s home and invited
to play for him. Saint-Saéns pro-
posed that they should appear
qogether in a concert in Florence.





ALBERT SPALDING, the famous American violin ist, who announced his retirement from the concert
field at the end of the season 1950-51, in his home,

To the 17-year-old young violinist
this invitation from the world-
famous 71-year-old composer
seemed {Co good to be true. The
concert was a success. Saint-
Saéns wrote to Hans Richter, in
London, urging him to engage his
young protege as soloist with the
London Symphony—in the Saint-
Saéns B minor Cencerto. Richter
complied, and Albert Spalding
was invited to appear with the
erchestra, He also made his con-
cert debut in London that season,

In the summer of 1908, Albert
Spalding was back in the United
States, busily at work, preparing

for his American debut. He was
to appear with the New York
Symphony under Walter Dam-

rosch, in November. In August,
he was invited to visit the Dam-
rosches, He found ‘that Saint-
Saéns had written a cordial letter
to Mr. Damrosch. As a result of
this visit Mr. Spalding won a firm
friend and champion. So highly
did Mr. Damrosch regard his
playing that he wrote letters for
publication, in which he stated
that “Spalding is the first great
instrumentalist the United Siates
has produced.” The debut was a
rmcdest success. Like many artists,
Albert Spalding found that recog-
nition,s for some ironic reason,
comes hardest in one’s own land.
Many of the critics were cordial,
Only one was really hostile. Dur-
ing his first season, Mr. Spalding
played more than 60 engagements,
30 of them with orchestras.



The next six years were filled
with tours of Europe and the
United States, and a series of pro-
grammes in Egypt in 1914. Mr.
Spalding made his first tour of
Russia in 1910, and obtained a
vivid impression of that nation
during his travels. He also visited
Finland, and met the famous com-
poser Jan Sibelius, Rebert Jajanus,
conductor of the Helsingfors Sym-
phony, and other leading musi-
cians. He returned to Russia in
1912-13 and in 1913-14, It was at
this time that he became profes-
sionally associated with his life-
long friend and accompanist,
André Benoist.

in tne three seasons before 1917,
the young violinist gave 60 or 70
concerts a year in the United
States. He was on tour when the
news of America’s entrance into
World War I was flashed across
the nation. Mr. Spalding joined
the U.S. Air Force, at ‘that time a
branch of the Signal Corps. On
his first day there, he was sum-
moned to headquarters for an ex-
amination. His commanding offi-
cer asked him what languages he
spoke, and when he_ replied,
French, Italian, and German, in-
structed another officer to test his
knowledge. This officer was
Fiorello H. LaGuardia, later
Mayor of New York City, who had
given up his office as member of
the House of Representatives in
the U.S. Congress to join the army.

The two young men _ became
close friends. Early in 1918, Mr.
Spalding was transferred to Italy.
When La Guardia became the re-
presentative in Italy of the joint
U.S. Army and Navy Aircraft
Board, he made Mr. Spalding his
assistant.

Upon his return to the United
States, in 1919, Albert Spalding



|THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK

THE

ERE R ON EOUENER OR EDOERER SEEN OOSE DEES EEEEREEERESEFO SESE EEE REST EEEEESESESER OBE TED

TRECSUFPED...........:.cccsesesesesesesisees ee DOCTOLATY.....

activities :





e

\WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,

and Associations to make the compilation of information in
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities;
religious, commercial, cultural, educational, healih, sports,
radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed
below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:

EDITOR,
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 195!,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street.

FORM

Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Ete. ..........sses0

Council or Committee Members.............:ccssssesreessssesssees

Short historical account of the origin, functions and current

APO ENO OE OEE EEE RR ERE R eee RR ORE TERED ERE O®

Ameriean

took another major step in his life
when he married Mary Pyle. The
distinguished French violinist,
Jacques Thibaud, an intimate of
many years’ standing, provided the
music for the wedding

In the early 1920's, when radio
began to rival the phonograph in
popular fayour, Mr. Spalding was
engaged for a series of recitals in
radio broadcasts, both from New
York City and from other Ameri-
ean cities in which he was appear-
ing:on tour. He has none of the
hostility towards the radio phono-
graph, motion picture, and other
modern developments that one
sometimes discovers in musicians.
He accepts the changes in musical
habits and attitudes which they
have brought about. The supreme-
ly important fact, he believes, is
that they have brought music to
an ineomparably larger public
than it has reached before.

In 1925, Mr. Spalding and his
wife secured the house near Great
Barrington, in the eastern State of
Massachusetts, that has been their
home since. In the years between
the two World Wars, Mr. Speld-
ing was busy with concert tours
and orchestral appearances in the
United States and other nations.
He found it an exhilarating ex-

NEW
WAGE





AUCKLAND, N.Z., Feb,
New Zealanders on. bigher wage
levels have been granted the
largest wage increase ever award-
ed at one time, but the rise has
brought many new problems for
the Government,

Labour organisations are threat-
ening protest action on the ground
that the increase is not enough
and the Government is being re-
luctantly forced to return to price
controls and subsidies to keep
down living costs.

The increase granted by the Ar-
bitration Court, which controls
minimum rates of pay in most oc-
cupations throughout the country,
amounted to three shillings in the
pound, or 415 per cent.

The court rejected the principle
of a flat rate increase, It said that
margins for skill had already con-
tracted too much in recent years
and unless the workers on higher
pay got a larger rise the mar:
gin would fall still further.

The court in making its ordet
warned about the dangerous
effects of “vicious world-wide in-
flationary pressures, ” but said it
thought that in justice and equity
all workers should share in the
country’s “interim prosperity.”

Labour Disappointed

Labour organizations—the Fed-
eration of Labour, central trade
and union body, and the Trades
Union Congress, a breakaway left-
much

wing body which made

higher claims—have both ex-
pressed disappointment at the}
amount of the increase and are

considering what action should be
taken. Individual trade unions



seeeeenereneee





ee

ZEALANDERS

BARBADOS

Violinist

perience to observe the enormous
changes in musical life, and at the
same time to take part in then.
He is optimistic about the future
of music in the United States. The
violin may have suffered a tem-
porary eclipse, in eomparison with

its former pre-eminence in the
affections of music studenis, but
he is convinced that “no instru-

ment that has the beauty and great
literature of the violin will die.”

Mr. Spalding is one of the most
modest and charming of artists,
The affection of his fellow musi-
cians was testified at a dinner
given to him by the Bohemians, a
New York club, in December 1949.
Mr. Spalding has a keen sense of
humour and a quiet, penetrating
honesty of viewpoint, The re-
finement and taste that have al-
ways characterized his playing are
mirrored in his attitudes towards
other phases of life. In an age of
superlatives and ,superficial vir-
tuosity he has preserved the
values of his art, as he believed
in them. Spalding’s retirement
from the concert held planned for
the end of the seagon 1950-61, will
only emphasize the high quality
of his musicianship and the dis-
tinction of his musical personality.

GET

BOOST OF 15%
By J.C.

Graham

have also called meetings to con-
Sider protest action

Meanwhile the government has
taken prompt action to check un-
due cost of living increases as a
result of the new wage rates, Re-
tail prices of butter, milk, bread
end flour are being held at present
levels by increased subsidies. The
government had hoped to abolish
subsidies gradually, but pressure
of events has forced it to in-
crease subsidy rates in several
cases recently.

It has also been forced to give
warning that price control, which
was gradually abandoned, may
have to be restored to a wider
ange of goods Some commodi-
ties are still subject to control
and in most cases increases in
prices will be permitted amount-
ing to three-quarters of the add-

ed labour cost. Industry will be
expected to bear the remaining
quarter,

—(C.P.)

FREIGHT
SERVICES

to and from

ADVOCATE



rr







Shifting Deeper
Into U.S. Orbit

OTTAWA, Feb.,

By calculated policy, tradition-
ally-British Canada is moving
deeper into the American military
orbit.

This trend, in one way or an
other, affects all three armed
forces. The changes have come
gradualf¥ and have never been

spelled ‘out in their entirety.

Noteble are these two:

1. The army’s switch from Brit
ish-type to American-type equip-
ment with resulting changes in
organization, a switch now coming
into full stride and expected to
be one of the army’s biggest jobs
for 1951

2. Decision that Canada's sup-
ply of aircraft must be based or
this continent or, in other words,
that the Royal Canadian Air
Force use Canadian or American
type planes—-not British.

he navy has been progressing
gradually from the British to the
American supply system, How-
ever, in planning new ships, it
has designed Canada’s own, using
the best examples both Britain
and the U.S, have to offer,

The American trend has one
main foundation, Defence of Can-
ada hag become of vital concern
and it has been adjudged one
with the defence of North Ameri
ca, a decision that means inte
gration of U.S and Canadian
forces to fight together if needed

Defence Minister Brooke Clax-
ton has defended this integration

as common sense, Linked with
it is the policy of building up
Canada’s facilities for making

planes, ships and arms. Taken to-
gether they mean Canada no long-
er looks to Britain as the source

of military supplies as in two
world wars,
Under U.S. Commands?

The integration steps arise from
North American defence need:
but they go beyond that, They
probably mean that in any new
war Canadian land and air for-
mations will fight largely under
U.S., not British, command.

It is expected, for instance, that
when a Canadian brigade goes to
Europe this year it will serve un-
der U.S. command. It is likely,
too, that when an R.C.A.F. fight-
er wing gets to Europe late this
year it will come under U.S.
command because its three squad-
rons will be flying American-
type F86 Sabre jets made in Can-
ada,

Both formations, in other times,
would serve under British com-
mand The switch to U.S. com-
mand is a logical result of a

logistics or supply problem, They
will be using U.S. equipment.
Parliament's first blast against
this “Americanization trend,” as
he ealled it, came from E, D,. â„¢ul-
ton, a wartime major He pre-
dicted jit will lead to an end of
the regimental army system. Mr
Claxton interrupted to say that is
*nonsense.”’ He has said the army
organizational changes will be
minor. The old regimental names
will stay. —(C.P.)





Russians On
A Visit

LONDON.
A party of Russian boxers re
cently paid their third visit to

Sweden for a tournament.

The result of the meeting, held
at Goteborg on February 3, was
given as follows by Tass, the offl-
cial Soviet news ageney

“Soviet boxers, Bulakov, Khan
ikashvili, Mednov and Romanoy
won by knockouts againgt some of
the best Swedish boxers. Boxers
Aristokisyan, Yegorov and Shot-
sikas defeated their opponents on
points by a large margin. Schcher
bakov lost his fight against Bluem,
one of the leading boxers of
Sweden

“Thus the match ended with a
score of| 7~1 in favour of the
Soviet Boxers.”

The report did not hint at the
possible. fate of beaten Sehcher-
bakov. -—LN.S.





















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whole World,

ices to the

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Cunadian Forces | Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay |

j
M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Marea Henrietta

< Wonderful Counsellor, Sch. Rainbow
“.. Sch. W. L.. Bunicia, Sch. . Harriet
Whittaker, Sch. Turtle Dove, Sch. Eman-
1el C. Gordon, Sch. Rosarene, Sch, United
Pilgrim S., Seh. Lindsyd II, Sch. Anita
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3ch. Burma D., Sch. Henry D. Wallace,
M.V. Cacique del Caribe, Sch. Lady
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Schooner Enterprise S.,

Capt. MeQuilkin, from St

44 tons
Lucia

net,

M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt Par-
ons, from St. Lueia
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.itdechild, from. St. Lucia
DEPARTURES

S.S. Polyerest, 719 tons net, Capt. Sten-
ial, for Dominica.



RATES OF EXCHANGE

FEBRUARY 28, 1951
CANADA
(nelading Newfoundland)
«eee Cheques on

Bankers



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+ Sight Drafts 62.9% pr
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33.6% pr Currency GL.7% pr
sevee Coupons Oe pr

Quebee’s Founder |
iWas Telling Lies
SAYS AUTHOR

QUEBEC, Feb. 26.
Champlain, l7th century ex-
Plorer, who founded Quebec iv
1608, and who through his writ-
ngs is one of the well known
igures in American history, may

lave written about a trip he never
made.

This and other disconcerting
suggestions were presented re-
cently by author Jean Bruchesi to
a handful of historians and archi-
vists who read Les Cahiers Des
Dix, a Quebec historical review,
Historian Bruchesi in a paper en-
ditled Champlain A-T-il Menti
(Did Champlain Lie) comes te
the conclusion that the famed ex-
plorer indulged in boasting if not
worse, when he wrote his brief
discourse, It is the account of an
expedition which Champlain says
he led to the West Indies for the
King of Spain in 1599. Mr. Bru-
chesi's report has come as a shock
to Quebec scholars, who regard
the father of new France as a man
of high moral qualities,

Mr. Bruchesi’s conclusion is that
Elaine and Eleno are the same
person, and it was from him that
Champlain obtained the informa-
tion for his account of the voyage
to the West Indies.—(cPp)



Canada Seeking
New Gas Masks

OTTAWA, Feb. 28

Canada is Studying new types
of gas masks to combat a largely
odourless and invisible poison gar
which the Russians are reported
to have in large quantities.

Officials commenting on reports
that a Danish scientist had started
a Tes@arch programme to find a
remedy for “sneaking: death” gay
said Canada had been studying its
potentialities for some time.

They added that its qualities
{had been over-stressed, but hat

it was very powerful.” It was
described as “much better’* than
mustard gas.—Reuter,

—
ean eee tiation

ee ee



PAGE THREE



——

*Harpic’
for
Hygiene



It’s as easy as ABC to keep the

lavatory spotless. Just sprinkle some

'E

*Harpic’ into the bow! and leave over-

night—then flush, ‘Harpic’s’ cleans= ....

ing action disinfects and deodorises the S-bend where no

brush can reach.

HARPIC

REGD

-~~4

“os Se

THE: SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER

Agents: A. 8S. BRYDEN & CO. B town

e . . a ye






breakfasts

QUICK HEALTH BREAKFAST!
Boil 2 cups of water, Add salt. When
boiling, add 1 cup of Quaker Oats.
Cook it, stirring, for 2% minutes,
That's all.





During or After an
attack of

The tempting Flavour of BOVRIL, its ease of assimilas

tion and its remarkable reviving and strengthening

properties make it an invaluable ally.

Huild up your strength on

BOVERIL|

Tey

YEAR BOOK 1951 |



The Advocate Co’ Ltd:, will publish a Year Book of Barbados

in 1951,

The Year Book will contain three parts:--

industries,
Barbados

(2)

The compilers

and it is taking
Clubs, Institutions,



| (AN

acct saat 8 artrinenttianiny torino

art, literature and all the things we want to know a

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,

trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,

ut
but have until now not been able to find |

under one cover.

Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
sony butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
c.

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

this information solicited should be sent in immediately or not
jater than March 15th 1951.

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C, Gale
M.L.C., Managing
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice

of the Year Book want to make sure that the

Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados

arenes to invite secretaries of Societies,
business, social and other organisations

of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisa-
tions immediately or not later than March 15th 1951.

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,

34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

| Advertisements close April 30th 1951.

| Advertisers are asked to get in touch with
: Mr, Trevor Gale,

Advertising Manager,
Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)



QUAKER OATS

> ia
* |

| give more nourishment
to help children grow!



*.



.
‘
os
b
\*
i ;
mee |
eile >
ele «
7 Be ee
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walle
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ae
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non




PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS sa ADVOGATE

eS ae

ome

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid. Broad St., Bridectown.
Thursday, March 1, 1952

PEASANTS

IN SPITE OF the recent arift to the
town Barbados still possess a large peas-
ant class on whose work depends such
progress as has been achieved of the land.
These peasants are being helped by the
extensive work of the Agricultural
Department and they owe much to the
spread of agricultural stations throughout
the island. But neither co-operative farm-
ing, nor knowledge such as that pessessed
by the large plantation producers, appears
to. have spread among the peasants with
the speed that is commensurate with im-
proved methods of farming.

The Agricultural Society has been func-
tioning for one hundred years and it would
be a fine thing if during its centenary
year it could ‘claim among its members
the majority of the 20,000 peasais in this
island. There is nothing in the rules to
prevent any small holder from becoming

j a member of the society.

- The first step towards this achievement

i seems to be the founding of a» Peasant

Agricultural Society which could be a ~
subsidiary of the Agricultural Society. In .
this way the peasants could discuss the
details of some matter which affected them
and the society ¢ould give expert guid-
‘ance.- lin Jamaica the’ membership of the
Agricultural Society includes the major-
ity of peasants. They have their own
district Associations but are still members
of the parent body. The schemes for
Agricultural improvement in that island
get their impetus from the peasants.

Mr. Rudolph Burke who visited Barba-
dos last year as President of the Agricul-
tural Society of Jamaica is himself of
peasant stock and represents. Jamaica's

agricultural interest.at metropolitan con-
: ferences. A centenary drive by the Agri-
cultural Society of Barbados for an in-
creased membership» among peasants
would help in the education so necessary
if more food is to be grown locally to meet
increased demands. There is nothing in
the rules of the Society to prevent peas-
ants from becoming members and it would
be a step towards improving the economy
of the island based as it is on agricultural

pursuits.



- Not Invincible

ENGLAND'S victory over Australia by
8 wickets in the fifth Test Match at Mel-
bourne yesterday, will delight the whole
cricket-loving world, including} the /Aps-
tralians. English cricket has been gomg
through a difficult period, and the last

meee



as 1938. It speaks well for English sports-
manship that in spite of continuous re-
verses, it has never flagged and efforts
have never been relaxed to build up a
worthy combination to enter the lists
‘against Australia. es oe
_ This long overdue victory will also show,
“that the Australians are not invincible. It
_ig true that the present Australians no
longer can number among their tanks $uch °
outstanding players as Bradman, Pons-
ford, Kippax, McCabe, O'Reilly, and Grim-
met, but they undoubtedly still can put
inté the field men of ability above the
average. 5) vk
“Here in the West Indies England’s vic-
tory will be hailed not only because there
_is‘always sympathy for the underdog, but
‘Hecause it is an indication that our team
which will be touring Australia later this
year has more than an outside sporting
chance of meeting the Australians on even
terms, and probably gaining the honours.
Cricket supremacy moves in cycles. Every-
one will be pleased to see that England,
having weathered her lean times, is once
more making a bid for top honours.

sesame ANTS

—_—_

+i In an article In the Adv es
of July 5th. 1950, entitled “A
Sporting Offer’, I undertook to
_ write on behalf.of the Electric
Supply Co. if they would supply
me with the necessary data. This
offer was made.in good faith and
I am glad to say that it has now
x heen accepted in the same spirit,
fo that this article is an attempt
to give the public some up-to-date
information on the subject,

The officials of the Company in-
vited me to make a detailed in-
spection of the plant and’to ask
any questions I wished, and [

. Should like to place on record my
appreciation of their courtésy and’
the complete frankness’ with
which they gave me all the infor-
mation fur which I asked.

right.

It will be good news for those

who have waited many months

» for electric service, that the com-
' ...pany expects to be ablesto start
“eegiving it to new customers, all
By ing well, in about six weeks, or
. \by the middle of April. There is a
~ Tong list of applications, about 400
‘ jyaltogether, which will of course be
dealt with in order as they were
»* “filed, but it is estimated that about
“hee weeks work by three gangs of

ws

chinery,

~~ -seen set-backs in the meantime.

“The Company regrets the long
“delay, but I am convinced that it
“$s not due to any fault of the staff
. (in Barbados, Delivery of the No,






























suécess against Australia was as far back»



10 generating ‘set was expected
from England last September, but
it has only just arrived sind is in
process of being installed. Some
new parts for No. 7 set have also
errived at last, and the engine
is being carefully run in before be-
ing put on full lead. This-set was
the first to be delivered after the
end of the war, and for one reason
and another, gave a great deal cf
trouble, which the manufacturers
have been at great expense to put

It is interesting to. trace the
growth of the demand for elec-
tricity in Barbados since the Com-
pany began .eperations about 40
years ago. For the first 35-years
“demand seems to have increased
quite slowly, but in the p
years it has approximately trebled,
and is still growing. L
that a sudden ‘spurt in demand
like this makes it difficult for the
Company to’ expand
quickly enough, and the difficulty
is enormously enhanced
very long time taken by manufac-
turers to fill orders for»new ma-

sets have been delivered since the
war ended, and the best delivery

‘~--linemen should take care of the i

. **4ist. Thus by the middle or end of cate the makers can give on
coer all those now waiting should these _machinegs jis 18 _ months
-. have electricity, barring unfore- after placing an order, The ques-

tion of installing. steam turbines
in future is being considered, but
delivery dates on these are longer,
and on boilers about 3 years. I
can only say that I am very glad
I do not have the responsibility

Soil, plants, -animals» dnd; men
are depéndént upoli ofe another
If the human race is to survive,
we must concern ourselves with
seeing to it that the soil is pre-
served and conserved... It.. must
be protected from washing away
or blowing away, and it must’ be
enriched so that it has the pro-
per nutrient qualities for ‘our-

plants.
A rundown soil grows run.
down «food. Every crop takes

away part
from the soil, and every. bank
customer knows only too well the
budget difficulty he gets into
when he withdraws continually
without putting equal amounts or.
more into his account.
What Plants Need

It may be worth while to con-
sider briefly what is needed from
the soil by plants, livestock and
human beings. All are part and
parcel of the same nutrition cy-
cle which governs all living cells,

Plants are living things. They
take in food and convert it into
body tissues and energy. They
seize the energy of the sun’s rays
to build their tissues out of iner‘
material. ;

Set a child and a cow on a,heap
of minerals, surrounded by air.
and with a tub of water: all the
chemical elements required for
their bodies would be present.
They would die of _ starvation,
because neither of them has the,
power to combine the chemical
elements into the food they re-
quire. But plant alfalfa and
grass and micro-organisms in the
soil minerals, water them, and
give them air: the alfalfa and
grass will grow, converting the
chemical elements into plant tis-
sues containing the food com-
pounds needed by the cow, and
the cow in turn will convert the
alfalfa and grass into milk, which
will provide food for the child.

This is a highly simplified ‘il-
lustration of food supply. The
smount of nourishment gathered
into a crop depends upon three
factors: the amount of crop root in
contact with the soil, what goes on
where they touch each other, ‘and
the time they are in contact. In all
this there is activity by the plant
and by the soil. The result is
influenced by sunlight and other
factors as well as by the quality
ofthe material of which the soil
is “composed, but what the plant
has of food value depends in all
but a tiny measure upon. the
fertility of the soil.

Livestock Requirements

Livestock farming has _ been
found to provide the least drain
on soil richness, because less
plant food is exported in animal
products than when crops are
sold off the farm, and a greater
portion of the fertility is retained
in. the form of manures. How-
ever, livestock raise other prob-
lems,‘ - .

Regular and adequate supplies
of. certain minerals in the diet of
animals are necessary if they are
to grow and produce and remain
healthy. Some, such as calcium
and phosphorus, are required in
considerable amounts to provide
for proper ne . development,
Others, such as copper and cobalt,
are equally necessary, though in
mie smaller. quaritities, - -

‘émmon sense tells us that dairy
or. meat products from run-down
pastures,} lacking in; these ’ er
als, -carmot- possi have the
nourishing values of. similar pro-
@ucts from well-bred and healthy
animals reared on. balanced, nu-
tritious forage and pastures.

Sir Robert McCarrison showed
by experiment in India that healtn
and disease are the result of the
quality of the food eaten, He
produced at will almost any di-
sease he desired, simply by
varying the diet of the rats with
which he was experimenting,

There are two interesting ways
of judging the quality of crops
grown for animal feed. A defi-
ciency in soil nutriment may
affect the plant by limiting its
growth, or it may be a deficien¢y
in gome mineral which is not
needed by the plant but should
be passed on by it to the animal,

Pasture for livestock belongs
on good soil, not any old good-
for-nothing-else corner of the
farm. Tt should be seeded tc
productive grasses and legumes,
fertilized to maintain high yields,
and managed so that the herbage
is grazed uniformly. The good

sture should have several types
in its makeup permanent,
rotational and temporary — thus
providing plentiful grazing all
season

Owners of livestock do not like
to be.told that there are starving
their animals, but that is just
what is happening when over-
grazed, under-fertilized land is
seen under the hooves of runty,
scrubby and anaemic cattle. The

—

have
which

urgent
haul,

past 5

It is obvious ..

its plant as the

by the:

Four new Diesel. engine to ord

should
This

with,

of every mineral —



least for’ a time,

months, starting aS soon. as it can
be spared.

; Looking further into the future
the outlook is not clear begause it
aepends on unéertain factors such

for electricity, “and the length of
time taken |to. procure machinery.
after the decision has been made

re-armament
pect in Britain and other cotn-
tries, there is little possibility of
the makers being able to improve
their delivery dates, and in fact
the reverse being the case.

problem for the Company to cope

some steam plant now, and. wait



(From the Newsletter of The Royal
“Banke of Canada,’ February 1951.)

under-nourished grass does not
fatten; it may be a filler, but jt
is not food.

» Human Health

The quality of the food we eat
is the chief factor in our physical
fitness. No health campaign can
succeed unless the materials of
which the body is built are sound.

Professor Ellis said, “To be
healthy is to be well fed. If the
foods produced by farm and gar-
den satisfy all food requirements
so that bodies can be kept in

health, then the works of our
hands are’ good. On the other
hand...if the women develop

goitre, if the babies have rickets,
if the men cannot work because
they ere crippled with arthritis,
if the children have white spots
on their teeth, or if the girls hava
anaemia,.,these disorders are
evidences of malnutrition and
faulty feeding.”

Many of the soils on which food
crops are grown do not supply
the plants with sufficient minerals
te enable them to synthesize
vitamins. in quantities to meet
our demands. Further, and worse,
we are not satisfied to use many
of our plant products in the form
in which nature gives them to
us, but demand that they be pre-
cessed. Unless we know what
nutrients are removed in the pro-
cessing, and make up the quantitv
from other sources, we do not get
enough of them.

Every step in food produc-
tion is important, We have the
right to ask that the nutrition
value of our food shall be safe-
guarded ‘all the way, through cul-



London &xrpress Service.



tivation of the fields, harvesting,
processing, distribution, prepara-
sion and serving.
Managing The Land

To produce food of the highest
quality to feed today’s world
population is far from the sub-
sistence husbandry of other days.
The ownership of iand is a priv-
ilege, but it is also a respons}.
bili

lity.

Soll fertility can result only
from the foresight, labour and
study of generation after genera-
tion. That sort of farming can
make soils naturally poor into
‘farms agriculturally rich, | an
poll naturally fertile into lasting
yielders of still more nutritious
crops.

What we are talking about
now goes far beyond ordinary
soil. conservation practices such
as irrigation, contour ploughing,
planting cover crops to prevent
wind erosion, and all that. Many
farmers who have taken all the
conservation measures written
about in text books have been
disappointed. They have seen
their crops dwindle in quantity
and. quality, but didn’t know
just what to do about remedying
the situation, The secret is to
regulate the quantity and the

‘ouality of organic matter and

plant food available to the grow-

ing crop,
This starts, perhaps, with cul-
tivation. In the United States,

the area in clean cultivation and
row crops approaches one-half of
the cultivated land; in France
and .England, with their longer
agricultural experience, only
about one-fourth of the cultivated
soils are in clean cultivation. Sod
crops have been found to be a
most important factor in holding

‘the soil and maintaining _ its
healthy productivity by their
regular additions of organic
matter.

Maintaining Fertility
Fertilizer, properly chosen and
applied, is an indispensable friend
of the farmer. We shall

The Kilowatts Are Coming

By R. £, SMYTHIES M.E..C.

of trying to guess what will be
the state of affairs 3 years hence,
and provide for it .by ordering
costly machinery that may, or may
not, be delivered within that time.

As things stand at this moment,
the daily peak or maximum de-
mand for electricity is about all
the machinery can carry safely.
Assuming that the No. 7 set can
be worked up to its rated capacity
without further misadventure, this
situation should improve gradual-
ly within the next 3 or 4 weeks,
and w
into use in April, the plant will

pen

lem

hen the No, 10° set comes ing

some reserve capacity, at
The No, 2 set
was deliveréd in 1939 is in
need of a: complete over-

which will-take about 12

the

rate of growth of demand

er it. In view of the vast
rogramme in pros+

did

think, every prospect of
all adds up to a yery tough

If they decided to order

the



that we could not count on it until
it actually arrived here.

There is also of course the prob-

complicated by the tremendous rise
in the cost of such machinery dur

war
investment required to furnish
given plant capacity have gone by

, Sharply upward, and ultimately
reflected in the rates charged, in
addition to the increased cost of
fuel oil, wages and other items.
The Company is to be congratu-
lated on its
public more
these matters, and I feel sure the
new policy will result in better
relations all round, which I am
willing to do
power to promote.
to make it clear that the officials

way, and the conclusions I have
set down above are my own, based
on their answers to my quéstions.
The Company is planning to ex-
pand the plant still further to take
care of growing demand, but the
‘bottle-neck’ is the length of time
needed to obtain machinery trom



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THE SOIL

tertilizerâ„¢always, because every
crop harvested or grazed removes
nutrient elements from the soil.
We “must deposit if we are to
continue to withdraw.

Fertility can only be maintained
in one 6f two ways: either by
supplying large quantities of
crganie gaw materials from which

humus be manufactured in
the soil elf, or else by manu-
facturing humus outside the soil
and applying it to the land as a

finished preduct.

To a person not a farmer the
sensible ®pproach to a solution of
this question would go something
luke tunis: the soil is my capital;
it is not inexhaustible; every crop
I harvest, every beast I graze,
removes some of my capital; that
capital must be maintained. The
best way to maintain it is like
this: 1 will get information from
my agricultural representative o)
the nearest agricultural college
about the mineral requirement:
of all the kinds of crops I mighi
wish to grow; I will have my soi)
tested to “find out what it .con
tains and what it lacks; then i
will sit down and make a budget
Knowing how many pounds oi
each mineral will be removed by
the crop I intend to have, I shal
know the composition of the fer
tilizer and the amount of fer.
tilizer I should apply to meet thai
year’s needs and provide a little
“kitty” for other years.

Natural or Artificial ?

There has been controversy
from time to time about the rela-
tive value of organic fertilizer:
of animal crigin as opposed t
chemical fertilizers produced
commercially. Traditional ideas
tend to linger, but usually join
themselves to newer ideas in a
compromise agreement. That is
so with reference to manure ver-
sus artificial fertilizers.

It is true that continuous inju-
Gicious use of artificial fertilizers
may lead sometimes to a loss of
soil structure, but on the other
hand manure and other natural
fertilizers cannot be said to pro-

vide everything needed for all
sorts of land in the proper bal-
ance. Artificial fertilizer is

usually applied for the current
crop, and the carry-over of bene-
fit to future years is less than
that provided by farmyard
manure. Some soils respond to
manure ahd others respond tec
artificial fertilizer.

Organic Quality

Holding a major place in our
economy (though seldom
thought of by any but agriculturai
scientists) is the organic quality
of our soil. It is an important
natural resource, a major factor
affecting the levels and quality
of crops this year and in the
future, and a vital feature in the
productive life of every farmer

Organic matter, sometimes
loosely called- “humus”, is com-
posed of plant and animal matter
undergoing decay. It includes
such material as dead _ roots
leaves, fruits, and stems of
plants; carcasses of insects
worms and animals; live anc
dead soil micro-onganisms,
and various products of decom
position of dead tissues. It tends
to bind loose soils, open up heavy
soils, and increase the water
holding capacity of all soils. Ir
deccmposing, it liberates nutrients
which are then available to the
plant.

The most common methods of
maintaining the neCessary organic
matter in the soil are by the use
of farm manure, cover crops ana
residues, Our neglected wastes
of straw, corn stalks, and so on
should be put to active work.
No one should minimize the im-
portance of organic matter in the
soil, It is one of the essential or
major factors in successful crop
production,

In addition to turning under
the residues of crops after harvest,
we may grow plants with the
sole purpose of turning them un-
der. The function of a green-
manure crop is to add organic
matter to the soil; the purpose of
a cover crop is to prevent erosion,
to shade the ground, or to protect
the ground from excessive freez-
ing and heaving.

In reckoning the value in dol-
lars and cents of either practice,
the farmer should keep in mind
the investment feature. The in-
crease in the following crop may
or may not be igreat enough to
pay for the ploughed-under crop
or the year of sod, but these
practices may have a marked
effect on’ yields of subsequent
crops for two or more years,
man's objective should be to so
plan his land use that the or-
ganic matter will be maintained
so far as is consistent with a

need reasonable use of the soil,

_—

perhaps 3 years or so to have it
delivered, there is little doubt that
in the
electricity would fall short of the
demand for if, and some people
would have tu go without again.
Even
ordered, so many things may hap-

meantime the supply of

if more Diesel plant is

to prevent it being delivered,

of tinance, which has been

the past twelve years. All pre
ideas on the subject of capitd

board, and must be revised

cision to take the
‘o its confidence in

anything in my
I should like

not try to influence me in any

makers in England.

. of-living bonus part of wages declines, then



THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 195;









—————OOOOeeeee ESS SSS
TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE






















Profit-Sharing Plan
Soives Labour Problems

— ene
An American corporation has found that its

profit-
sharing plan gives employees a personal interest in the

COMpany br Bl =p ape pride in improving production Usually Now

and in "ie DWIGHT G. BAIRD Tins OVALTINE (Large) Pepe Pore oe oP $1.24 $1.12
(From American Business) :

A profit-sharing plan and a sliding wage Tins CORNED BEEF with Cereals 31 28

scale both have been in effect at the Michi- Bottles GROTSCH BEER 24 as

gan Tank and Furnace Corporation at Dear-
born, in the north central State of Michigan,
ior nearly five years. During this time there
nave been periods of increased profits and
increased wages, and there have been weeks
sr months when profits and wages both
declined. Thus, there has been some answer
to the question: What happens under a profit-
sharing plan when earnings and profits
decline? And the answer, according to J. J.
cheviron, company president, is that the
glan is working to the satisfaction of all con-
zerned, :

The combination profit-sharing and cost-
of-living sliding wage scale were introduced
n February 1946. Both were proposed vol-
intarily by the company management to the
abour union and were promptly accepted.

Business was good, and the cost of living}
vas rising during most of the first three|Â¥
years of operation under the plan. But in
-he company’s fiscal year ending June 30,

949, business was not as good as it had been.
(here was a considerable decline in the
water tank and heater industry as a whole,
ind this company was no exception. The
orofits available for sharing, therefore, were
imaller. Furthermore, the cost of living
leclined also, and there was a corresponding
lecrease in wage rates. There was enough] ¥
of a decline both in the profits shared and|¢
n the wage scale, to determine the reaction
vf the employees under such circumstances.

“This reaction has been exactly what we
were confident it would be,’ Mr. Cheviron

said. “Employees realize that if the business
prospers, they prosper correspondingly.
Therefore they do their part to help. But
neither they, nor we, nor anyone else can
guarantee that profits always will be high
and uniform. Production depends upon sales,
and sales necessarily fluctuate. We have
been getting our share of sales in our indus-
try. but sales in the industry as a whole
declined for a short time.

“We did not have as much profit to share
as we had in the two previous years.
employees anticipated this because
knew that production was decreasing.
they knew, at the same time, that they would
fare just as well, correspondingly, as the
company fared. We are happy to have
proved that our employees understand such
economic facts and that they have a sense of
fairness.”

Under the profit-sharing plan, 20 per cent.
of the net operating profits, before taxes, is
distributed annually to employees on the
actory payroll. No employee is eligible to
participate in the profit-sharing plan unless
ne has performed at least 1,000 hours of
labour during the company’s fiscal year, ex-
zept in case of extended illness or death. In
such case, the employee participates in the
profit-sharing plan in the class in which he
would have been placed had he worked the
full year, in the ratio of the number of full
months worked to.12 months.

The method of distributing the share of
orofits apportioned to individuals is based
4pon a point system. In introducing the

olan, it first was presented to the union, and
jetails were worked out amicably. A scale
of credits was agreed upon, and as most of
the employees had five or more years of
seniority at the time, this period was taken
as a basis and the following scale was adopt-
2d: All employees with local union seniority
of five years or more at the end of a period
dated June 30 were assigned a credit of five
units; employees with less than five years
service had fewer units.

The wage scale is based upon the average
rates for the area, plus a variable cost-of-
living bonus. This bonus is based upon the

Bureau of Labour Statistics index of
the cost of living. It was agreed that in case
the cost of living, as measured by this index,
tose, all production employees would receive
an increase. If the cost of living declined
after rising, the bonus would decline. Ad-
justments are made quarterly, up or down,
as the index rises or falls.

The combination of profit sharing and vari-
able wages provides a counter balance to un-
reasonable demands, If wages rise too high,
there will be less profit to share, and individ-
ual earnings for the year will be much the
same as they would have been if wages had
not risen. On the other hand, if the cost-

’ TOOLS

SAWS—1l8ins., 20ins., 22ins., 24ins., 26ins., 28ins., 30ins., 36ins,
COMP. SAWS—12ins., 14ins.

BACK SAWS—12 ins., 14 ins. 16ins. z

PLANES, IRON—9ins., 10ins., 15ins., 18ins.

» BLOCK
RATCHET BRACES

CHISELS—*in., %in., “in., lin.

CHISEL SETS of 3 in., 5s in. 1 in. ins.

OIL STONES—ins., 8ins.

GRINDING STONES, complete—Sins., 6ins.
Spare GRINDING STONES—4ins., 6ins.
SAW FILES—3Wins., 4ins., 4¥%4ins., Sins.
CLAW HAMMERS

ENGINEER HAMMERS—1lb., 1%lbs., 2lbs,

MASON TROWELS & SQUARES
: AT



WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.
4687,

Phones — 4472,




“INTERNATIONAL”
PAINTS

i
COVER THE’ WORLD!
:
As a protective covering for the roofs of
your buildings, we can offer you the
following
RED ROOFING PAINTS |
“DANBOLINE” ANTI -CORROSIVE PAINT (for galvanized {\
For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least a



shingles, asbestos, cement and aluminium)—$7.00 per
wine gallon.
———————,

For best results, the following instructions should be carefully
followed :—

Galvanized Iron.

iron)—$7.52 per wine gallon,
“PROPELLER” READY MIXED OIL PAINT (for wooden
a
year before painting. Then apply 1 coat of “DANBOLINE”. {
For previously painted work, if the surface is in good |

condition, rub down, clean, and apply 1 coat of “DANBO-
LINE.”

For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor con-
dition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat
of “INTERNATIONAL” RED LEAD GRAPHITE PRIMER,
followed by 1 coat of “DANBOLINE”.

Wooden Shingle,

1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
PRIMER FOR WOOD, followed by 2 ‘coats of “PRO-
PELLER”.

For previously painted work, if the surface is in good con-
dition, rub down, clean, and apply 2coats of “PRO-
FELLER”.

For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor
condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat
of “INTERN/AATIONAL” PRIMER FOR WOOD”, followed
by 2 coats of. “PROPELLER”,

Asbestos Cemeat,

1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER, followed by 2 coats of
“PROPELLER”.

For previously painted work, rub down thorcughly, clean,
and apply 2 coats of “PROPELLER”.

2.

Aluminium

1. For ne~w work, apply 1 coat of “YELLOW PRIMOCON”,

followed by 1 coat of “PROPELLER”.

2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean,
ani apply 1 coat of “PROPELLER”,

TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL
PAINTS, LTD., AND BE CONVINCED.



DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — acenrs

profits increase, other conditions remaining
unchanged, and again the total earnings for
the year remain much the same,

Mr. Cheviron emphasizes the fact that his
corporation’s profit-sharing and bonus plans
are not substitutes for adequate wages.

We were paying the current rates before
we introduced the plan, and we are still
vaying them,” he said. “The profit-sharing
and bonus features were never intended as
i substitute for adequate wages. They were
offered as additions to the prevailing wage
scale for this area, which is one of the highest
in the United States. They were conceived by
‘he management and offered to the employ-
2es without suggestion from the union,

“We would not pretend that we expected
nothing in return for proposing such plans.
It is a fact, though, that there was little
room for improvement. The greatest change} *
among our employees has been in the per-
sonal interest which they take in the
business and the good will which they mani-
test toward the company. We quite literally
are all partners in this business. If the
business prospers, we all prosper according-
ly; if the business fails to prosper, we all
suffer the consequences. Our employees
have something tangible to maintain their Rare Cheeses
interest in their work. If they fail to produce y y ~
if they waste material, if they are absent SPECIALS
frequently without just cause, they are ' For Sau :
penalizing themselves and their co-workers. xg é

Profit-sharing plans that are intended to DAMAGED APPLES .
bolster sublevel wages; that are insufficient its. ber. —_
in amount of profits or are inequitably dis-
tributed, or that fail to cement amicable
labour-employer relations will defeat their
own purpose. Similarly, plans that have to
be won by bargaining are less likely to im-
prove mutual respect and good will.

On the other hand, we are convinced that
profit sharing, properly conducted, is the
answer to many controversies, and that it is
a truly American way of improving our
business and our economy.”





Build Up the
Kellogg’s Corn Flakes
Kellogg’s All Bran
RED APPLES
CARROTS

Children with
Quaker Oats
CABBAGE

For Perfect
SANDWICHES

J. & R, Bread

Pati de Fois Gras

Jellied Chicken

Jellied Turkey $
Sliced Ham
Salami

Sandwich Relish { Rit










THE TOAST of the TOWN
GODDARD'S
GOLD BRAID RUM

ORDER TO-DAY from
, GODDARDS


mee

eH BOOT 4

THURSDAY, MARTH

1, 1951



Right Hand Cut Off

AVID ROACH, a 53-year-old
labourer of Bawden’s Hill, St.
Andrew, had his right hand cut-
off while clearing refuse from
arcund the cane carrier at. Swans

Factory, St. Andrew at about
9.30 o'clock yesterday morning,
He war taken to the General

Hospital in a car by Mr. B.-A.
Goddard, Assistant Manager of
the same Plantation.
“QXHILDREN ON TRIAL”,
the film which was to have
been shown at the British Coun-
cil, ‘Wakefield, on Monday,
March 5, will now be shown on
Saturday, March 3,
THIEF stole a six volt battery,
. valued $32, from the moter
car J-230, which was parked at
Horse Hill between 6.00 a.m; on
Friday and 6,00 a.m. on Saturday.
The battery belongs to Ernest
Thorne cf Horse Hill, St. Joseph,
Clyde Lewis of Brighton Ten -
antry, St. George, reported that
his heuse was broken and ~-en-
tered between 4.05 and 5.30 am.
on Sunday and a wrist watch val-
ued $18, stolen.

HE PIPE

LINE that runs
across Lakes River, which
supplies residents of the Lakes

and Corbins areas, is at present
damaged. People of these districts
are now without water and have
to go to Belleplaine and Haggatts
to get water.

Up to Tuesday. morning no
repairs were being done to. this
pipe line.

IFTEEN MOTORISTS and
conductors were reported by
the Police on Minday for traffic
offences. Six drivers were charged
for failing to stop at major roads
and three conductors for carrying
passengers in excess.
Anoher conductor was report-
ed for allowing more than five
people to ride in a seat,

HREE FIRES took place
earlier this week. At Four
Roads, St. Philip, a house
12 x 11’ 8”, owned by Violet

Holder was completely destroyed
Holder’s two children, Edwin
(3), and Merlyne, 18 months old,
were burnt. Edwin is at present
detained at the General Hospital

while Merlyne is at the St. Philip's .

Almshouse. The house is not in-
sured,

Another fire at Market Hill, St.
George destroyed a boarded and
shingled shop, 20 x 10 feet, with
shedroof attached, property of
Orlando Holder.

The stock, valued $600, clothing
valued $70 and qa bicycle valued
$40, were also destroyed. The
house is insured.

The third fire took place at

Waterman Village. St. James.
Part of a boarded and
shingled house,» with ~ shedroof

attached, the property of Goul-
bourne Moore of Watermans Vill-
age, was damaged. Also destroyed
was a quantity of furniture and
clothing. The damage is-estimated
at $1.44N. The house ic insured,

Neighbours assisted in extin-
guishing the blaze.

NEW ROAD UNDER
CONSTRUCTION

Completion of the road which
is being built near Top Rock,
Christ Church, has been held up
due to the bad weather two weeks’
ago. The Top Rock Road has a
curve at one point and this new
road begins at the curve, cuts
across land and joins the road
where the curve ends. E

It would therefore cut out the
curve and make the road straight
at this point. It is felt that this
will help prevent accidents along
the curve

FESTIVAL GUESTS

THE Government of the United
Kingdom have invited two mem-
bers of the Legislature to attend
the Festival of Britain as their
guests from July 9 to July 30.

His Excellency the Governor has
requested the’ ‘House of Assembly
and Legislative Council to indicate
whether this invitation should be
accepted and if so, whether each
House will nominate one of their
numbers to go,





“Isle Of Spices” Is

Isle Of C



WILL HELP CLEAN (¢

fu



THE THREE modern refuse collectors which have recently arrived for the Scavenging Departme te cf
St. Michael and Christ Church.



Will Consider
Dairy Act

A special meeting of the Board
of Health will be summoned later
this month to aonsider a report
of a sub-committee of the General
Board \of Health and the Com-
missioners vf Health, St. Michael,
who were appointed to visit the
dairies in Bridgetown. The sub-
committee was to consider wheih-
er an amendment should be made
to the Dairy Regulations, 1945,

TWO modern refuse col

February 11, by the S.S. Mul

delivered.
Company.

Director Of
Natural Gas
Opens Office

IN BRIDGETOWN

Mr. JULIAN. GARRETT who is
now in Barbados on a two-year
contract with the Government as
Director of Petroleum and Natur-
al Gas, told the Advocate yester—
cay that he was formerly Vice
President and General Manager
of Northwestern Utilities, Limited

with head office in Edmonton, Al-
berta,

They





The report was laid at a 1-ecting
ot the Board of Health yesterday,
but it was felt that such a report
should be discussed when there
were more members present.

The Board had disallowed Mr
W. A. Hassell from selling 17,368
square feet of land which was
divided and let. The land was
situated behind George Street. At
the time the Board felt that they
eould not perpetuate the bad
Standard of housing by giving
permission to sell small lots.

Mr. Hassell appealed against
the Board’s decision to ihe Gov-
erncr—in-Executive Committee,
The Colonial Secretary informed
the Board that the Governor-in-
Executive _Committee had con-
firmed: its decision and told Mr.

On retirement from this Com-—
pay Ps + in ane Mr.
Hassell that after careful consid- a Matarst Gas one hes office as
ebatitn they were unable’to vary een oo hopead ea cites

ie leaving Canada for Barbados,

The Board was given notice to
quit a building they rent in Dot-
tin’s Alley. The building is occu-

He opened his office in the
Public Buildings yesterday morn—
pied by the Board’s inspectors i"8 and is at present engaged in
and other quarters will have to f@miliarising himself with the
be obtained for the inspectors. historical background of the de—

The Board approved of the velopment of the oil and gas in-
alteration of the appyoved plan Custry in Barbados in_ prepara-
for the division and sale of -land tion for his duties as Director of

in lots at the Navy Gardens, Petroleum and Natural Gas.
Christ Chureh, by Mr. Frank L. ‘
Giblgons. 28 Years In Gas Line

The Board also approved of the
division and sale of 200,206 square _ Mr. Garrett has been, engaged
fect ‘of land in lots at Amity Lodge, in the Natural Gas business for
Christ Church, by Mr. Norman 28 years and has appeared be-
Alleyne. fore many Commissions on Natural

The dividing off from Rose Hill Gas matters.
Plantation, St. Peter, by Mrs, He said that one of the largest
S. Hy Shepherd of the dwelling projects he had been connected
House and 4 acres 202 perches of with in recent years was one to
land for sale was approved of by take gas from the Pincher Creek
the Board. Gas Field in Scuth-western Al-

The Board *postponed the divi- berta through southern Alberta
gyn and sale in lots of 424,610 and Saskatchewan following
square feet of, land at Lodge roughly, the main line to the
Tlantation, by Mr. H. R. Farmer. Canadian Pacific Railway to Win-

i ani i a branch

The division and sale of land in es eee er and Pane
lo.s at Sandy Lane Plantation, St. ajbert
James, by Sandy Lane Co., Ltd., "4

was approved of by the Board. He said that from Winnipeg,

The Board appYoved of the alter- the line would run south to the

ation of the approved plan by Mr. international border and thence

Vernon Smith, owner lof lot No.7 through the State of Minnesota
by laying off a portion and adding to Duluth, Minnesota and Supe-
it to his adjoining land and by rior, Wisconsin, a project involv—
adding to a lot a portion of the ing an estimated capital expendi-
same adjoining land, ture of many millions.

This project may not be pro-
ceeded with until a licence has
been obtained from the Govern
ment of Alberta, authorising the
export of gas from the province
as the Government desires to
make sure that the future supply
cf gas to the people of Alberta
will not be jeopard‘sed.

haos Now.

The proven and probable natu-

MR. ALEXANDER GLEN, accompanied by his wife, 1 gas reserves of the province
left England and went to Grenada last November. They of Alberta have been variously

loved the island so much th
buy a home there.

Mr. Glen arrived in Barbados
yesterday and is staying at Four
Winds Club, St. Peter, where he
and his wife talked with an Advo-
cate Reporter yesterday about
conditions'in Grenada. He_ said
conditions were worse than Press
reports indicated.

Mr. Glen said he found it hard
to understand how the Grenadian
people, whose problems were in
no way as hard as those say of
people in Barbados, have been so
stirred that they are in a state
of mass hysteria. But in spite of
the hysteria, it would appear that
some of the incidents that occur-
red were carefully planned,

Such an incident was the am-
bushing of the Governor's A.D.C.,
as a result of which the A.D.C.
was in hospital with a very serious
skull injury. Another was the
burning of the St, Andrew School
which Mr. Glen thinks was one of
the most beautiful schools in the
West Indies. It cost £40,000 to
erect and was a gift of the British
Government. Those who planned
the burning did not forget to place
road blocks which were effective
in’ preventing the Fire Fighters
from getting near the fire.

Mr. Glen said he could not
understand why the rioters seem-
ed even intent on harming people
like themselves. For example,
they burnt down the medical cen-
tre, a most necessary institution
to the health of the colony. Again,
they attacked an old night watch-
man who was only milking his
own cow.

Also attacked was the mana-
geress of the Santa Maria Hotel,
which hotel is now housing Trini-
dad policemen who have come

at they were even deciding to estimated at from 6 to 7 trillion

But everything was changed in the cubic feet.
twinkling of an eye when disturbances which have sprung
up there recently turned the “Isle of Spices” into an isle
from which tourists are getting out as fast as possible.





‘ r
Legall Plays Table
over to help keep ee ip wig is- 7 ‘ 7 ‘i ht
land. merican tourists have >
been. attacked pas meee, and ennis oe
thi i p thinks ®
that. the TissPbarice in Chessiatin At Aquatic Club
will have a bad effect not only on

that colony’s tourist trade, but the ,.AT 8 o'clock to-night an ex-
tourist trade of the West Indies as hibition of Table Tennis matches

a whole will be played at ante ee
me ., dos Aquatic Club. mong those
ate ack one ~— playing will be Ralph Legall and
due to arrive in Grenada with his team mate Len Butler, Trini-
tourists this week had taken “adian cricketers.
Grenada off of her itinerary, He
recalled that the last time the
Mauretania went there taxi-men

The Barbadians who will meet
these two are: Louis Stoute, lofil
Champ, Campbell Greenidge,
ee ee ee Sake. Now things David Mayers, Charles Humphrey

Mr. Glen said he and his wite 2°4 Ren ~ in 1
thought it was high time to' leave On the last occasion Ralph
Grendda when & bomb wae thrown Legall defeated all who Barbados
at them. Fortunately, said Mrs. 944 to offer.
Glen, it was not a very good bomb.

Mr. Glen said rr up to when /
the disturbance broke out it was %
not very clear what the rioters Hawker Fined 10°-
were demanding. As a matter of 4 ; - i
fact, one estate owner who paid _ HIS Worship Mr. E, A, Mc
his employees three times the Leod, Police Magistrate of Dis-
standard wage was also attacked tTict “A” yesterday fined Seon

is li Cox, a 49-year-old hawker of
a va ern Bie! ee Mangrove, St. Philip, 40/- for the

unlawful possession of a quantity

About 50 per cent of the peo- of wood on February 27.
ple owned land as far as he could
see, and few of them engaged in Cpl. Kenneth Murphy attached
estate. work never worked more to the Bridge Post saw Cox with
than ‘three days a week. They the wood carrying it along the
worked for enough to buy neces- whurf side. He got suspicious and
sary articles in the shops, and after Cox could not give him a
then concentrated on their own reasonable explanation as to how
plots of land. he came by the wood, he took him

Mr. and Mrs. Glen have not yet to the Bridge Post and charged
decided how long they are going him.
to remain in Barbados. Their The fine is to be paid in gne
plans for the future are indefi- month or in default one month’s
nite. imprisonment with hard labour.



EY

-B’dos Gets 3 Modern =
Refuse Collectors

partment of St. Michael and one for the Sanitary Depart-
ment of Christ Church arrived in the island on Sunday

through Messrs. McEnearney & Co., Ltd. and are already
were made

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Py had

gee

Se F or U

United States.



Swimming Pool
At Silver Sands —

WINNER of Monday Evening
Advocate “Your Guess” Compe-

cf Lower Fontabelle. He guessed
correctly that it was the swimming
pool at Silver Sands.

It seemed a very easy competi-
jion, judging by the number of
correct guesses. However, a few
people were completely led astray!

“In the back yard of Dr, Payne's
office” said one guesser; “The
Cable Office, Top Rock” was an-
other guess

One baffling answer was -“This
was taken at the back of St,
James.”

Other wild guesses were, “This
is Alice’s Playing Field,” “Taken
at Kensington”, “Foul Bay, St.
Philip”, “Steps of .the Animal
Flower Cave”, “At Bea¢hyhead,
Philip’, “Garrison Savannah,”
“Wanderers Cricket ground” ete.

The “Your Guess”, Competition
in the Evening Advocate has beer

temporarily discontinued.. Watch,

fcr the Junior Short Story Com-
petition in the Evening Advocate
beginning Monday Mareh 5th.

Lumber Comes In
Large Quantities

Barbados has got one of ‘its best

lectors for the Scavenging De-



Iberry Hill. They were ordered

in England by the Ford
From next week two of these

collectors, with a capacity of seven

cubic yards for refuse, will be shipments of lumber this month.
seen working mainly in the City Around the middle of the month,
area. 1% million feet of fir arrived from

These collectors will replace Vancouver for Messrs T. Geddes

two of the old type. They are Grant Ltd., and only three days
fitted with tipping gear, worked ago, 21,000 feet of spruce and pine
off the engine. The six-volt arrived from Halifax for Messrs.
starter motor is mounted on the J.B. Leslie & Co., Ltd,

right side of the flywheel housing Most of the.144 million feet haye
and its power is transmitted to been cleared off the waterfront but
the flywheel ring gear by an ® large part of the latter ship-
automatic drive. sig basin Of the Careonage ygshertiay.

These modern refuse collectors P&Sin Of Te al ne
were ordered by the Commission- 4,¢°tumber trom the waterfront
a _view to ensuring the most up- Uae eee vicar’ be toad
to-date sanitary arrangements for Speightstown.
the removal of refuse. They will
greatly contribute to the system
of refuse removal and also assist
in bringing about a_ cleaner
Bridgetown.

The collector which was
delivered to the Sanitary Depart
ment of Christ Church is much
larger. It has refuse capacity of
10 cubic yards.



Damages Case
Adjourned

A case brought by Archibald
Welch of Clifton Hall, St. John
oe ane claiming daraae to oh ed o

, £50 from aldston arner 0
THROWN OFF CYCLE Bank Hall and Vincent Lashley of

Forty-six-year-old Albert Belfield Tenantry, St. Michael was
Boyce of Crab Hill, St. Lucy, was yesterday adjourned antil Mareh
treated and detained at the Hos- 29 in the Court of Original Juris-
pital yesterday evening after he diction by Judge G. L. Taylor.
was thrown off his bicycle while ae action = Peer ee, sea
ridi a x as Ss ill. sult of an accident on
oe nae. Road on May 29 between the
motor ears M-501 owned by Gar-

LIP BITTEN OFF ner and driven by Lashley and
J-152 owned by Alonza Mullins

JENETTS FARELL, a 40-year- and in which the plaintiff Welch
old labourer of Yorkshire, Christ was injured thus causing his little
Church, was carried to the Gen- toe on the left foot to be ampu-









eral Hospital yesterday evening ee di” tn. -the’, whee cave “Mr

to be treated for a bitten upper ounse! in. sne : ,

lip. Piece of the lip was bitten a. Bones 390 Weigh and Mr.

out by, anpther, woman. Details of the accident were given

by Policeman Ethelbert pecs

° who is attached to Four Roads

Busta Sits Down Sub-Station. He said that on May

7 N e 29, about 2.30 p.m, in consequence

? of a report he went to the corner

0 egotiate of Church View Road where an

(Prom Our Own Correspondent) accident had occurred between
KINGSTON, two motor cars,

Trade Union history was made _ The cars were M-501, and J-152.
in Jamaica to-day as Hon, W, A, He took measurements, The motor
Bustamante, the Bustamante In- ¢@r J-152 was re rea ae =
dustrial Trade Union head, and the road with the rig ‘a. The * ad
T.U.C. representatives sat down 0 the edge ee © that ie an
tegether with representatives of Wik Sher nan ohaek ie te geben
the Sugar Manufacturers’ Assccia- 4-501 was about four feet
tion to begin joint negotiaticns on from the gutter while the left
behalf of Jamaica's 45,000 sugar front wheel was two feet from the
wtrkers for the current erop. gutter. i

It is. the first time the T.U.C ;
have been concerned in sugar Toe injured
wage negotiations. Opinion has There was a man named Welch
been expressed that the stait of at the spot where the accident oc-
neg@tiations will end this present curred and his left little tee was
spate of strikes and Labour diffi- injured. ,
culties in the industry, Cross-examined by Mr. Dear,

Welch said that on May 29 about

2 p.m. he was walking along Clif-

TAX DEFERRED ton Hall Road going in the direc-
(From Qur Own Correspondent) tion of New Castle Road. He saw

GEORGETOWN, B. G. Feb, 28, two motor cars and went over to

In the face of strong opposition, One side of the road, In jumping
elected and nominated members to the wall the motor car J-152
of the Government to-day de- “caught him” on his left foot and
ferred consideration of the Bil] he then became unconscious. He
which called for a one cent per WS taken to the General Hospital
bottle tax on aerated drinks but ee nied tan ee amputated
placed an additional tax- on â„¢S)â„¢Murec toe. ; shy
whisky, gin, brandy etc, which it He an a the hospital for eight
is estimated will increase thé re- days and stayed at home for nine

’ 4 weeks.
tail price by 24 cents per bottle. To Mr. Dear, Welch said that
New taxation on bauxite was also pe crts canes’ for Clifton Hall

passed. Hants

The Council began to-day con- A gta
sideration of the ‘much debated At this stage Mr. Walcott made
budget and taxation proposals an application for two more de-
before a crowded House. Before fendants in the case. He called on
the business of the House Mrs, Alonza Mullins, and Woodville
J. B. Singh was presented with Mullins the driver of the car
the insignia of O.B.E. J-152.

and works for about

Simple Beauty Plan

Avash your face with Palmolive Soap

Brhen, for 60 seconds, massage with
Palmolive's soft, lovely lather. Rinse!

CDo this 3 times a day for 14 days.
This cleansing massage brings
your skin Palmviive's full
beautifying effect!

- ae
Tiriritiititiit
FRESH SUPPLY OF .

SPURINA HEN CHOW §

= (SCRATCH GRAIN) ®
gi JASON JONES & CO,, LTD.—Disteibutors &
SESS EEEREER ERE





Over. 1,000 Women Register enjgr Short
S. Emigration In 2 Days

WOMEN from tthe eleven parishes of the ‘s!and with tition.
their slogan “we want work” jammed the U.S. workers
Saving Branch of the Labour Department everyday of the
week to register their namés for possible emigration to the

“Your Guess’’ Was

tition was George Fergusson, Jnr.,’












in PAGE FIVE

Story Competition

The Evoaing Advocate invites all school-boys and school-girls
Letween the ages of 12-18 to enter for its Senior Short Story Compe—
Stories can be on any subject, but should not exceed 500 words
in length and must reach the Short Stery Editer, Advocate Co, Ltd.
City not later than Wednesday every week. - The -best story each week
will be published in the Evening Advocate and the nner will re

eive a prize of books or Stationery to the value of 12/6,





Already, some 1,457 women have
registered. The records show that
500 registered on Monday, €00 on
Tuesaay, and up to 11 a.m. yester
Gav 357 were dispatched,

Send this coupon with your story.

SENIOR SHORT STORY COMPETITION

; Name
Most of them, married and ,
singie were domestics and seaim- Ase
tresses while there was a mixture
of general labourers and nurse School
maids,
Some were as young as 18 and Form «2.2... 6c . ee

quite a few were in the 40's, Th.

average age was about 25. Nome Address



Yesterday the Advocate visi.cd Title of Story .........
the department when about 6v
women were queued up for reg - See rer eee — -
is.ration. Surprisingly,
‘slight .murmur’ could be» heard. eee i a oh us



The two policemen on duty were
getting no trouble from the crowd.

e
BRUSH.-. UP... YOUR... SMILE...

just |

One of the registering officers |
said’ that early during the day the
queue was about 75 yards long |

Small Wages

Some ©f the Women were com-
plaining that ‘they could not get
»work while others, who were
Ww rking, - cdmplained of — small
wages. One ‘very énthusiastic wo-
man said. that ‘she’ was idling,
and was willing to do any kind
ef work in the States.



The officers are hoping to do all
registrations of women during the}
eoming week at the Park House. |

At Queen's Park, where the
men are, registering their names
‘for ‘pessible emigration fo ihe
US., large. crowds can be seen
daily renewing their registrations.



k Wisdom's straight-line head reaches
awkward corners easily.




*& Wisdom’s angle in the
handle is the secret of
its comfortable control.

Wisdom’ s widely-spaced
tufts ‘comb’ between teeth
clean where decay begins.

The bureau has been experi-

encing difficulty in filling orders e REGD.
for local employment as both /

male and female workers are say- }

ing that they are only aad)

in emigration

The Labour Commissioner ‘told ADDIS LTD. OF HERTFORD. MAKERS OF THE FIRST TOOTHBRUSH IN 1780

the Advocate yesterday that many
of the men who had registered
at the Park, had refused work
in the island ‘offered on reason-
able terms. These men, he said,
would not be given first considera-
tion if workers were required for
the United States, }

Barbadian women have been
registered before by the Employ-
ment Agency for local employ-
ment, but this is the first occasion
on which they were registered
for emigration to the U.S.

Dy SOS OOP POO OOOO STO OPO OOOO SOO POO PCPP IOP OSOE

EASTER EGGS

Chocolate Easter Eggs in

Plastic Cases



Marzipan Easter Eggs in

Plastic

‘Golfito’ Calls Today

Messrs, Elders and Fyffes’ “Gol-
fito” is expected to call at Barba-
dos at 3 p.m. to-day to take pas-
sengers for England.

Cups
Marzipan Easter Eggs



e
‘ nr Regweneets must be on board
y 4. pm, The “Golfito” is
consigned to Messrs, Wilkinson & GET YOURS BEFORE THE
Haynes Co., Ltd, RUSH IS ON

PS POS 6 FOSDDOSOGP GOOD ,
% Haviny a grand time at - -

CRICKET!

Delicivuus Sweet Biscuits for
LUNCHEON and TEA put
up ia convenient packages.
Asserted Sweet Biscuits by
Huatley & Palmer, Peek
Frean, Carr and Jacob.
Prices 10¢.—26c.—48c¢.—50c.
Per Pck.
% Prices $1.20 to $2.14 Per tin,
y Jacob's Cream Crackers 6/-
y Per tin,

KNIGHT'S LTD. ate srancues



COSSESSSESSSSESESSS

——$<—
NO FLEAS
ON THIS

~~-Also——
Luscious Boxes of CONFEC-
TIONERY small and large.
BLACK MAGIC CHOCO-
LATES $4.06 per box.
% Peanuts 64c. Per tin.
Butter Scotch 2lc. to 4c,
per tin,
Nougat 34c. and 70c. per tin.
Fry's. Hazel Nuts 2/-, 3/9,
7/6 Box,
Cadbury’s Red Rose 98, &
> $1.80 Box,
% Cadbury’s Chocolate Biscuits
X 5/- & 5/3 tin.
» Chewing Gun 2c, & 6c, Pck,
? After Dinner Mints 1/- per
Peck.
Marr Bars 14e, ea,
Crest Bars 16c, ea.
Guava Cheese 18¢c, 4-02. Pck.
Cadbury Bars (Asst.) 10c.,
17c., 19¢., 34c., 37¢, ea.
Fry’s Bars 7c., 9c., 12c., 15¢.
§ Carr’s Choc. Lunch 12c, Pck.
® Carr's Choc. Tea Cakes 8c.
each,
an Cheese Crisps $1.02
is in,
R Carr’s Club Cheese $1,00 tin.
% Sharp's Toffee 2/6 and 3/3

SLES PGOPSOOS



‘Lorexane’ Dusting Powder, containing pure

LLCS POPS SSS SEOGOOSSES
o
=
=r)
a
s

gamma B.H.C., is a potent killer of insect
pests on domestic animals and pouliry. It is
pleasant and non-irritant to animal or user,

Equally effective
against parasites
on poultry,

In convenient sprinkler-stop contaluers of 100 grammes



Also in packings of 500° grammes and 3 kilo

Blue Bi 7 ‘
ue Bird Toffee 1/9, 4/6
$1.86 tin, nt

—Also— nase
Thermos Flask 1-Pint $1.51 4 ER.

Sun Glasses fr -
ee tn

DUSTING POWDER

Get them from ,
IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED

'
BRUCE WEATHERHEAD A sasidary Cornea of tmpetil Chomkal Outatres Loe

WILMSLOW MANCHESTER
ITD. Sole Agents and Distributors

Head of Broad Street A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LIMITED Om

OOOO . 4

»

%





Fastidious Women







For





Creton Shopping Bags

A fetching handmade product with smart wooden tops in
different designs and materials of various patterns. Just the
thing to make you look fashionable and at the same time
very useful.

This store will be closed at noon on Wednesday 28th Febru-
ary and Thursday 1st March for the Cricket Tournament.



Cave Shepherd & Co, Ltd. |





10, 11, 12 & 18 BROAD STREET |

seen







Ne . N
LGC CPF OOOO OOOO OOS POPOL SFO POCVIOE NS |







PAGE SIX



EARLY BIRDS

, Landmark, Notonite and Harroween‘
Return Best Times
By BOOKIE

Everything worked smoothly yesterday morning
and even the weather co-operated to make the
track the best since preparation gallops were started
for the meeting. I arrived at the track when it was
still moonlit but found there were a number of
people who got there before me, Nevertheless we
' - beat the trainers and jockeys by many lengths.
First out was Aberford but he disappointed us because he only did
a breeze on the exercise track. I think that was in preparation for
a gallop today so I will have to miss him out.





~ ae

Couf¥t_O’Law and Cross Roads then obliged us with a 7% furlong
work-out. At first I thought that Cross Roads’ was the easier of the
two, however he was not pushed along at the finish although Court
©’ Law was, and consequently he finished some lengths in front of
the creole. Court O’Law’s time was 1.324 for the box to box and 1.12}
fer the five. I still think Cross Roads should he favourite for the
Guineas as he is a genuine race day horse.

Burns was off again with Pepper Wine, who, incidentally had
pulled him out a lot in a five furlong sprint last Monday morning
This time they started out from the mile and Burns was movin very
impressively @ll the way. Pepper Wine was eased up after a once

--yound at the mile pole and Burns went on to do the mile in 151%,
finishing strong. His box to box was done in 1.284 and the five
in 1,114, Pepper Wine did her lap in 1,278.

Vanguard did a box to box in 1.37% going at a very restrained

pace.

Monsoon did a similar gallop working five in 1.13.

Galiant.Hawk, a half-bred I like very much and one who has
improved in looks in the short space of time he has been here, was
held tightly to do five in 1.17. His chances in G class look good.

Best Wishes has improved since her gallop last Saturday and
yesterday she was out again with Bow Bells, The Jatter looked easier
but I understand that Best Wishes slipped going over the hill, They
both finished very comfortably and considering this, their time of 1.06%
for the five was not at all bad. Bow Bells especially has never looked
fitter and I think it will take something really good to beat her at 54
or 7% furlongs.

Atomie IT was a little too much for Ability to handle although
her saddle was slipping-in the latter stages of their gallop over 742
furlongs, and finally came off soon after she passed the post. Atomic IL
did the once round in 1,262 and the five in 1,09}, Burns and Eliza-
bethan notwithstanding, I think the big creole colt is going to give
us a good race in the B.T.C, stakes.

Arunda did five in 1,143 but as this was a morning of light work
for the Bourne stables she was never really let down.

Miss Friendship could not really make it a {good gallop for her
companion High and Low, an imported chestnut filly. The latter did
the half in .58

Gun Site looked more on his toes yesterday but still had to be
scrubbed at the start to keep up with Waterbelle, They did five in 1.09



re

THE GAMBOLGS

UWAAT A DaY_* POOR GEORGE!
OuT iN THS RAIN — rhe bE

ae

be © be "ALE: -
GURE THERE'S
OF GPR
.
"Scottie, | like the way they still
,
h, \

PSs) Ltt’



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Waterbelie is a good combination of the O.T.C. and Restigo ‘
blood, the latiér being her sire and the former the sire of h la
Before the year is out I think we are going to hear a lot about }
and certainly at this meeting I expect her to de well



Doldrum had Elizabethan for company over five furlongs and
they kept together well, Their time for five was 1.09. Usually. we
see Elizabethan do about a mile as her winding up gallop so this time, I
am a little in the dark about her prospective form. However she likes
the going and will make them run for their money to beat her

Miss Panic is still my favourite for the Maiden. She was
let down yesterday and her time for the five was 1.112.

Cross Bow seems to have retained some of his speed which he
appeared to have lost in Trinidad. He did a five well held in 1,09

no’

Sun Queen did five in 1.07%

Jewel and Vixen appeared to be going fast but
their time for five was only 1.11

Watercress was hardly off the bit at any time
doing a box to box in 1.29% and five in 1.118.

San Tudor did some three quarter pace work
until she reached the half mile pole and then came
back in 59} over the four-furlongs.

Fuss Budget was really impre€ssive over a five
with Infusion. The latter was moved on in the
stretch but Fuss Budget was easy and they finish-
ed in the excellent time of 1.054. After this gallop it
certain that the Maiden would go to Wanderers I was told

Fair Sally was leaving Slainte in the first three furlongs but even-
tually finished very tired behind him. Slainte’s time for the box to box
was 1.26% which I thought was rather good.



seemed

Usher did not let us see what he could do. He therefore leaves
me up in the air about his chances in the Guineas. He did five in 1.19

Tiberian Lady, after a brief return to form last year, looks as
if she is looking for the paddocks again. She did a box to box in
1,31 and the five in 1.128.

Hi-Lo and Clementina had a return match over five, The filly
was not allowed to show her early pace and finished a little behind
Hi-Lo. They did five in 1.102

Harroween and Wotonite did one of the best gallops for the
morning. Both had up light weight jockeys although I do not know
what the saddles weighed. They did a five in 1.05 3/5 which was
the best time for this distance for the morning. Notonite was shaken
up a bit at the finish by Baldwin.

Mopsy did five in 1.11,

Soprano looked too good for the game half-bred Duchess. The;
did five in 1,094.

Landmark, who really went much earlier than she appears in
these ee did a fiye in the same time as Notonite and Harroween,
ie. 1. ,

The last pair I saw was Apollo and April Flowers. certainly looks bigger and stronger than I have ever seen him and
April Flowers had to be pushed at the finish to keep up with him

They did five in 1.09.

On Saturday I will have to pick my winners but up to now
there are quite a few about whicn I am not certain. I am sorry
to hear that the fast filly Demure struck herself and may not run
while I did not netice Lunways yesterday morning. As both of these
were at one time very much up in the betting it makes things dif-
icult to substitute some others in their place. Meanwhile it looks
as if Burns will not be the certainty we had anticipated although
it may well be that he will wait until race day to really show us
his class. Up to the present I cannot say that I have noticed any~-
thing to indicate that he will leave them standing over 5) furlongs
although several people have expressed this view to me. On the
cotatrary it looks to me as he will be much better over a mile, In
that ease the A class milers had better look to their laurels.



AW? WERE HE)
16 AT G

od he ~ ae
: fs yi
rd B | TODAY of
} a3

GEORGE DEA
DON'T LOOK AT ALL WELL

say ‘GOOD merning’ to each other.”
London Express Service







































(ep BS
i ‘| Y Aa

JOHN WHITE

means made just right

—_

Marmalades
& Syrups

Golden Shred Marmalade .47
Silver Shred Marmalade .47

Hartley’s Marmalade ........ 38
5€9. Marmalade (2-th) .... .48
Trin. Marmalade ................ 36

Lyle’s Golden Syrup.... .47 .23
Brechen Castle Golden



PRIMARY. visiavis sp eprassiet pest cccehdosbes 69
Meat Dept.

Prime Aust. Beef in Steak
Roast — Stew Veal — in

Roast — Cutlets — Lamb in

Legs; Shoulders — Chops —
Stew; Mutton — Shoulders —
‘Chops — Kippers — Haddock;
Bacon & Ham — (Sliced);

Salamir Sausage $1.00 per 1b














Biscuits
Peek Frean’s Royal
Scotch Shortbread $1.36

Rose’s Assorted Biscuits — 1.20
Balmoral Choe. Ass’ted
Biscuits oo... 1.60
Orchid Assorted Biscuits 2.08
Peek Frean’s Playbox
Chocolates ........0...0:.00.... 1,20
. Peek Frean’s .Martini
Crackers: ....cicesccccscesccsgeeees 1.75.
| Peek Frean’s Cheeselets 1.24

Ryvita Rye Biscuits......

}

THURSDAY, MARCH 1,’ 1951

OO LLL OL LLL CCC TET

if

f



(THEM good looks tell you they*re just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated .
is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.
Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
tee Shield—the sign which means ‘ just right 7
Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

Juices &
Squashes





Letona Tomato Juice .... $ .34 Liqueurs, Wines, Ete.
Jersy Tomato Juice ...... 38 eR re ee see oe $6.00
Brooks Tomato Juice... .38 COINTREAU osc ssciscucr econ $6.00 3.25
Pineapple Juice ............. 39 ANISETTE... oo cccccce 5.00
Trinidad Orange’ Juice 33 CHABLIS (1947) cccccscccccssssesoerve 3.50
Orange Squash. ............ 96 WIN ROSE (1947) ooccccccccsss eee 3.50
Lemon Squash ................ 93 LUBFRAUMITCH (1946) ........... 4.00
GRAVES (1943) occcccccccssssssseee . 2.88

Canned : :
V bl Ovaltine & Milk Foods

egetabies OVALTING: 0. oecr oes. $ 73
Dutch Garden Peas........ $ .38 TONO $2.21 1.23
Potit:Pols (Tris Tins)... -0 VEER 6h sceechtnstocne tere 13
Batchelor Peas .... 26 BOURN-VITA. ooocscccssccccccccsssssccsevee 70
Dutch Sauerkrant ............ 28 MILO (Tonic Food) ............. $1.07 .62

» Endive wn... . 33 NUTROGEN (Malt Food)... $1.24 .69

» Extra Sliced

Beans................... A5

se MS PPAMPACHD one cece eee

Confectionery
Bots. Liqueur Chocolates $2.54

Fry’s Choc. Scorched
Almonds. .......,........ 1.91
Meltis Favourite Can-
dies 0... $1.85 1.02
” Choc. Mint
‘ Creams. ........0.
Fry’s Hazel Nuts............
Pascall’s Fruit Salad......

Pascall’s Glueose Barley

A MORNING

resh shipment




















0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

I LEAP OVER THE WALL”
By Monica Baldwin.

AT THE OFFICE

By Edgar Mittelholzer.

AT
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY



of —

{
ENAMEL-IT ’
in all colours |

AT
JOHNSON’'S HARDWARE



FAME ' WELL
EARNED

A

by such a Quality Brand as

Sas

°
eo



RUM
Renowned for its Mellow
Flavour and Skilfully

Blended.

STUART & SAMPSON
LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.
Sh led lll

DONT

smear RAZOL pomade on
HAIR. Take it on the comb
and work it thoroughly
through the HAIR, forward
first, then backward, until
most of it comes back out.
Soft paper can then be used
to wipe away surplus and
to dress the hair to a finish.
The above course, will give
very desirable resulis.







Ht your dealer hasn't
RAZOL POMADE, phone
the

BORNN'S BAY RUM Co.

2938.






THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 19



St

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508

—_—

The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1,50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 3, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional ward.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for exch
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

— _— ——
IN | MEMORIAM
—
BASCOM—In loving memory of Joseph
Nathaniel Bascom who died on March

Ist 1950.
He is gone but not Forgotten.
Louise White, Elanora Eastmarm
Adolphus Bascom (Grand-
Ethorne Basom (Grand-
children). 13.51—in

FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays,

|

Ella
(Daughters),
son), Corine,





AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Style Master, Chevrolet. In veny
good condition, Owner driven. Apply to
L. M. Clarke, Jeweller, No, 12. James
St. Phone 3757. 1,3.51—2n

CAR—One
1950 model,
leaving Colony.





(1) Morris Minor Saloon

under 3,000 miles. Owner

Apply Thirkell 237).
28,2.51—t.f.n.

ee
CAR—One (1) 1950 Model Ford Anglia.

Can be seen at Courtesy Garage.
28.2.51—t.f.n.





PICK-UP—One Dodge Pick-up in work-
ing order. Apply: S. E. Cole & Co., Ltd
Roebuck Street. 21,2.51—t.f.n.



ELECTRICAL
RADIOGRAM—One seven Valve H.M.V.

A-1 condition on show at DaCosta
& Co., Lid, Electrical Department. No
reasonable offer refused.











following bargains in Brand New
ture for a limited time : John Brinsmead
Upright Piano $200 00; Mahogany Dining
Chairs $17 00a pr; Mag. Tub Chairs $34.00
apr ; Mag Bed-ends 3 ft. 6 ins. $30 00
a pr.; Bed-ends 4 ft. 6 ins, $35.00 a pr, ;
Mag Bureaus $75 00 each; Mahogany
Cocktail Tables from $8.00; Birch Chairs
$15.00 a pr., not forgetting a numerousi
variety of high class second hand furni-
ture. For viewing call in Hardwood
Alley. Open daily from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Breakfast Time inclusive.

23.2.51.—6n,

LIVESTOCK

CALF—One. (') Pure Bred Holestine
Bull Calf, out of Prince Albert. Age
ene month old. Dial 3527,





28.2.51—t.f.n,

GOLDEN RETR PUPPIES—12
weeks old Reg. Pedigree, both sexes.
Apply: Lady Dos Santos, Box 600, Port-
of-Spain, 27.2.51—3n.



|



HORSES — Three (3) Riding Horses.
Herbert Dowding, Lower Estate, 7

Michael.
28.2.51—3n.

TWO HORSES, HARNESS and one (i)
Cart. Going cheap. Apply: S. E. Cole
& Co., Lid. Roebuck Street.

21,.2.51—t.f.n.

MISCELLANEOUS

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites, Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t-f.n.









FOR RENT

Mintmum charge week 12 cents
96 cents Sundays 24 words = toa

words 3 cents
caer i, @ word week—4 Cents a

HOUSES

Ler nee
A FURNISHED BUNGALOW in Bedford

Avenue. 2 ms and all modern
cenveniences. Available from April ist.
Dial 2259. 25.2.5!—3n,

HOUSE—Modern three bedroom
situates at Top Rock, - havi

unge, seperate Dining Room, 2 Fully-
titled Toilets and Baths, and all other
conveniences available unfurnished from
March ist on, 3, 6, or 12 months least.
Ring 4683 or 2328. 28.2.51-—4n

“MODERN HOUSE2 Bedrooms WIC,
and Bath, Electric and Water, Gazette's
Ra., “St. Michael. Apply Dalton Gaskin.
Thomas Gap. * 1.2.51—2n

OO
MARINE GARDENS—New Bungalow.
3 bedrooms with running water, built in
wardrobes and all modern conveniences.
Long Lease preferred. Apply Mrs,
Friedman, Hotel Royal, 1.3.51—4n

CESS pe a a
ROOMS—Large furnished rooms very

cool, running water. With or without
‘ey 10 minutes walk to Clubs or
ity, Dial 3356. 27.2.51—t.f.n.

sen liellicaeieges

WHITE me tere FLAT
: * », PaMes.. ‘

Furnished or un entered Good sea-
bsthing. Private beach. Appiy Mrs.
E. M. Greenidge, White Cottage, St.
James.” 25.2.5°+—4n,

House,
large



PUHLIC SALES

Ten cénts per agate tine on week-d:
ane ee worn line on Sundays,
rge . 1
and $1.80 on Sundays aS ere

AUCTION

AUCTION SALE OF PROPERTY
AT KING'S STREET

On Thursday next the Ist March at
2 o'clock at my office, Magazine Lane,
one property at King’s Street called
Bombay Cottage. It consists of a Wali
Verandah, Drawing and Dining Rooms,
2 Bedrooms, Bath, Kitchen, Water and
Light, and the land on which it stands.
Inspection on application to the tenant.
For particulars sée D'Arcy A, ° Scott,
Magazine Lane. 24.2.51—3n.
——————

REAL ESTATE
meee,

OFFERS will be received by the
unde up to the ‘Sth day of
March 1951, for the buildings kn
“@s Calais (land not included) situated
on Dover Coast, Christ Church. The
eae be ere the buildings and
cJear the land within thirty days fr
the date~of purchase, Rae

K. E. McKENZIE,
Neils Plantation, St. Michael.
24.2.51—6n.
i

——
MODERN BUNGALOW — Overlooking
Golf Course, 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining | Rooms, Gallery, Garage and
spacious games room underneath, Apply:

Gordon Nicholls, Telephone 8539.
A.2.51t.f.n.

aa hse mee

E, St. Lawrence Gap, Christ
Church, near the Cable Station. The
dwellinghouse comprises large drawing
and dining rooms, three bedrooms, with
running water in each (one with a private
beth) separate toilet and bath, and
kitchen, Open verandahs to the East
and the North and a closed verandah
to the South on the seaside. Three
servant's rooms, garage and ferneny in
the yard, which also contains several
cocoanut and fruit trees.

The property is situated on the most
popular coast in the Island with perfect
sea-bathing.

For appointments to view. and for
further particulars ring 2925, R. S.
Nicholis & Co., Solicitors.







CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and
draperies. By Kirsch, Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.0

DOORS—Several pairs of pitch pine
doors, syitable for Garage or Warehouse



with large hinges. To be seen at
Willdale, Marine Gardens. I. M. G.
Simpson, 1.3.51—6n.



inating consumers,
or per case, Mount Gay Distilleries Ltd.
Agents. 1.3,51—2n



salers only.
Pails, Saucepans, Bowls, Chambers, Pie
Dishes, Kettles 4 different sizes at landed
costs. At Ralph Beard's Show Room.
Hardwood Alley. 27.2.51—3n.

MODERNFOLD DOORS-—The distin.
solution

ARNES & CO., LTD.

——————

ONE WINDMILL complete with pump
and tower. Two Lawn mowers, one
nearly new, Call 4124, 27.2.51—3n.

VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirsch Sun-aire

your sizes, delivery 3 weeks.
A. BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n.

———$$

Why not give your floor that new look.
Have them Sanded by the NU FLOOR
METHOD. Call Evelyn Roach & Co.
Ltd. 4623. 27.2.51—t.f.n.

WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower-
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.
We cut to your requirements. G. W.

HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd. Dial 4222,
15.2.51—10n.

———————

YACHT “CYCLONE”--Uffa Fex's In-
one-design Tornedo Class.
In first class racing trim, Winner of

the 3 Trial Races. Price $720.10. H.
JASON JONES & CO., LTD, PHONE
4279. 27.2.51—6n.





PERSONAL



CHARLES WEEKES,
Marchfield
St. Philip.
‘ > 28.2.51—2n.



word Sundays.



HELP

Young Lady with knowledge of type-
writing and Shorthand. Preferably one
with some previous experience in
Commission Office work,

Apply in writing to :
JAMES A, LYNCH & Co., Ltd.,

P.O.B. 140.
Bridgetown.
28.2.51— T.F.N.

MISCELLANEOUS

A COLLECTOR, Wants to buy Antique
Pistols, Box “C". C/o Advocate ye ae
1,3,.51—

IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-
lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.
Phone 4429 or call at GORRINGBS, ad-
joining Royal Yacht Club.

20,2.51.—T.F.N.

————_
IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniature? jade,
Old BWI Stamps. GORRINGES,

Antique Shop. Dial 4429.
20.2.51.—t.£.n.

LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series V. 4387.
Finder please return to Leonard Byer.
Tweedside Rd. 1.4.51—in

















their

Upper Bay Street, St. Michael,
dence of the late A. C. Greaves.

25.2,51—t.f.n.
The lersigned will set up for sale at
omce ne 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 2nd day of March,
1951, at 2 p.m.
The dwellinghouse called “Murray
Lodge” with the land thereto containing
by estimation 9,200 sq. feet, situate at

the resi-

Inspection by appointment with Miss
Ida Greaves, Telephone No. 3060.
For further particulars and conditions
of sale, apply to :—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
20,2.51,—10n,

SHARES—500 Shares Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading Co, Limited. 500 Shares
Barbados Co-operative Cotton Factory
Limited. 120 Shares Barbados Fire
Insurance Co, Limited. 90 Shares Bar-
bados Foundry Limited. 61 Shares
Barbados Ice Co, Limited. 139 Shares
Knights Limitec. 122, Shares Barbados
Telephone Co. Limited. A

The above shares will be offered to
public competition on Friday next the
2nd March 1951, at 2 p.m, at the office
of the undersigned.

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
Lucas Street.
24.2.51—6n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

LONDON









CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
EXAMINATIONS

Entries for the Summer Examinations, !
1951, of the London Chamber of Com-
merce must reach the Department of
Education, The Garrison, not later than
12 noon on Saturday, the 17th March,
1958.

2, The entry fee will be as follows:—
Single Subjects $1.92 each
Foreign Languages $3.12 each
Full Certificate $10,00

Department of Education.



28.2.51—3n.

PARISH OF ST, PHILIP
VESTRY BYE-ELECTION

I hereby give notice that IT have ap-
pointed the Church Boys’ School, near
the Parish Church, as the place where
all Parishioners of the Parish of St.
Philip and other persons duly qualified
to vote at any Election of Vestrymen
for the said Parish may assemble on
Monday 5th day of March 1951 between
the hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in the
morning to elect a Vestryman in place
of Ernest Lyte Esq. deceased.

Sed. P. S. W.. SCOTT,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip.
22.2.51—6n.



Y. M. C. A.

TENDER FOR ERECTION OF
BUILDING

The Board of Directors of the ¥.M.C.A.
invites Application for Tenders for the
erection of a building at Headquarters,
Pinfold Street.

The Plans and Specifications can be
inspected at the Secretary's Office
Y.M.C.A, from Thursday 1st March to
Wednesday ith Mareh between the
hours of 10 a.m, and 4 p.m. daily except
Sundays.

Tenders must be submitted ti Sealed
Envelopes and addressed to the Secre-
tary of the Y.M.C.A., Pinfold Street not
later than Noon 2ist March.

Tenders submitted will be opened at a
Board Meeting to be held at 4.30 p.m. on
the 2ist March.

The Board does not bind itself to ac~-
cept the lowest Tender.

HERBERT H. WILLIAMS,
Secretary.
28.2.51—8n



NOTICE

PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL
ALL persons, Firms and Corporations
having Accounts against the Parish of
Saint Michael are requested to send in
their Vouchers (duly made out in
Duplicate) to the respective Departments
mot later than Thursday, March 15th

inst.
Voucher
cate) may

Forms (Original and Dupli-
be obtained from this Office.
FRED J. ASHBY,
Churchwarden’s Clerk.
Churchwarden’s Office,
Parochial Buildings,
Bridgetown.









NOTICE
THE PARISH OF 8ST. PETER
Ali pérsens owing the above parish
eny Parochial Taxes please pay im-
mediate!
! G. § CORBIN,
| Parochial Treasurer
; 13.51—4n
i - —
NOTICE is heréhiy given that the
partnership: heretofore subsisting be
tween ARTHUR JAMES Y and

ALPRED ALEXANDER MACKIE. carry -
ing on business as Garage Proprietor:
®t Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, under
the style or firm of Supreme MOTOR
COMPANY, has been dissolv: by
routual consent as from the 28th day o(
February 1951, so far as concerns. the
said Alfred Ale: Mackie, who ha
retired from the firm,
Dated the 23rd dey of February 1961.
A. J, DOORLY.
A. A. MACKIE,
1.3.51—3n



——- -—

TAKE NOTICE
CHATEAU

ee
rgan: ©
the Dominion of Canada, Manu
facturers, whose trade or busines
address is City Dairy Building, Spadin:
Crescent, Toronto, Province of Ontaric
Canada, has applied for the registratior
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Registe’
in respect of cheese; butter, cream
milk and milk products; daily pro
ducts; substances used as food. or
a ingredients in food, and wil!
be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 27th day of
February, 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
+ Dated this 24th day of February, 1951
WILLIAMS,



H. 5
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
DIXIE BELLE

That CONTINENTAL OISTILLING
CORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is No.
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers,
has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A" of Register in
respect of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alco-
holic cordials and liqueurs and other pot-
able distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day of
February 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of sueb
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951.

TLLIAMS,





TAKE NOTICE _

HALO

That THE BYARD MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMITED, Manufacturers, 2
British Company, whose trade or
business address is Castle Boulevard,
Nottingham, England, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part
“A" of Register in respect of all kinds
of hairnets, including hairnets of silk,
cotton, human hair, rayon, nylon and
other synthetic yarns, bandeaux, sports
nets, slumber nets, hair curlers, hair
grips, hair pads, hair transformations
wigs and hairdressers'. wares and sun-
dries, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 27th
day of February 1951 unless some person
Shall in the meantime give’ notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n





TAKE NOTICE
PHILADELPHIA ©

That CONTINENTAL DISTILLING
CORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is No.
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers,
has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A’ of Register in
respect of whisky, gin, rum, rye, aleo-
holic cordials and liqueurs and other pot-
able distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day of
February 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office,

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS.

Registrar of Trade Marks.
27,2.51—3n.

TAKE NOTICE
GAYOIL

That PINCHIN, JOHNSON & ASSO-
CIATES, LIMITED, @ British Company,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is 4, Carlton Gardens, London,
S.W., England, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of paints, varnishes
{other than insulating varnish), enamels
(in the nature of pafnt), painters’ colours,
distempers, japans, lacquers, paint and
varnish driers, wood preservatives, wood
stains, anti-corrosive and anti-fouling
compositions, and anti-corrosive oils, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day
February 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
sten on application at my office,

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n



TAKE NOTICE
CHARTER OAK

That CONTINENTAL DISTTLLING
GORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State of
Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A of Register in respect
of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alcoholic
cordials and liqueurs and other potable
distilled alcoholic beverages, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 27th day of February
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office.

Dated this 2ith day of February, 1951.

H. WILAAAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
27.2.$1—3n.

TAKE NOTICE
DODGE

That CHRYSLER CORPORATION, a
corporation organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United
States of America, whose trade or business
address is 341 Massachusetts Avenue,
Highland Park, Detroit, State of
Michigan, U.S.A., Manufacturers, has
applied for the refistration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of transportation elements of all kinds;
motor driven vehicles, automobiles and
trucks of all kinds and for all purposes;
parts of motor driven vehicles, automo-
biles and trucks and their accessories of
every. description; and will be entitled
engines of all kinds and for aj] purposes,
parts thereof and accessories thereto of
every description; internal combustion
to register the same after one month
from the 27th day of Februany 1951,
unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 2th day of February, 1951.

H. WILAAAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27,2.51—3n





BARBADOS



SEVILLA RUM

That CONTINENTAL DISTILLING
CORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the Stato
of Delaware. United States. of America
whose trade or business address is No
14.9 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A,, Manufacturers,
hes applied for the fegistration of a
trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alco-
nolic cordials and liqueurs and other pot-
able’ distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
ifter one month from the 27th day of
February 1931, unless some person shall
1 the meantime give notice in duplicate
4 me at my office of opposition of such
agistration. The trade mark can be
een on application at my office.

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE
SWIFT'S

Tha: SWIFT & COMPANY, a corpora-
vo organized and existing under the
aws of the State of Miinois, United
states. of America, whose trade or
yusiness address is Union Stock Yards,
A.cueo, Stace of Mhinos, US A., has
ppued for the registration of a trade
wax. in Hart "A" of. Register in. respect
a luod “products d substances used as



neredients in foods, inc:uding fresh, pre-
awed, cooked, salted, dried, cured,
} .wOacd, Preserved, fiozen, and canned

meat and meat products, especially beet,
sork, lamb, mutton, veal, poultry, fish,
ind fabbits and food products derived
and sausage meat,
ile con carne, lJard,
oils, edible tallow,
» Qleomargarine, ice cream
butter, buttermilk, gelatin, canned
vegetables, canned baby foods, canned
‘ruits, dried fruit, pickles and condi-
ments, vinegar, jams, jellies, marmalade,
pie filler, rice, meal, peanuts, figs, dates,
raisins, cod liver gil, salt, stock feeds,
poultry feeds, fox feeds, dog feeds, bone

Meal, and oyster shells,
» inelud-

marger!

Soaps and ingredients of soa)

ng soap bars, soap flakes, liquid soap
and powdered soap, cleansing, polish-
ng, and scourt preparations, and
detergents.

Fertilizers, particularly artificial fer-
tilizers and ingredients: thereof, including
chemicals, bone meal, peat moss, ani-
mal urea, hard wood ashes, manure salts,
and horn shavings.

Chemicals especially superphosphate,
sulphurie acid, phosphate rock, soda and
soda products, nitrate of soda, sulphate
of amonia, ammonium phosphate, cya-
aamid, aluminum sulphate, zine sulphate,
manganese sulphate, sulphate of potash,
wricultural limestone, gypsum, muriate
of potash, calcium nitrate, copper sul-
phate, and potassium nitrate.

: Insecticides and fungicides, particular-

\y arsenate of lead, calcium arsenate,

anne sulphate, and paradichloroben-
ne.

Industrial oils and greases, °
edible tallow, e i

Hides and skins, hair, feathers, wool,
bones, horns, hoofs animal glands, ani-
nal casings and membranes,

Glues and adhesives, including animal,
vone and hide glues, and vegetable ad-
Yesives.

Fertilizer spreaders,
sits, hatchery equipment, baby chicks,
.and bags and containers, and will be
ontitled to register the same after one
month from the 27th day of Febru-
ary, 1951, unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate

o me at my office of opposition of such

egistration, The trade mark can be
‘een on application at my office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951,

soil testing

‘951.
Registrar’ of wat Marks,
27,2.51—3n,
_—
TAKE NOTICE
TANGO

That THE BYARD MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMITED, Manufacturers,
British Company, whose trade or
business address is Castle Boulevard,
Nottingham, England, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of all kinds
of hairnets, including hairnets of silk,
cotton, human hair, rayon, nylon ‘and
other synthetic :yarns, bandeaux, sports
nets, slumber nets, hair curlers, hair
Srips, hair pads, hair transformations,
wigs and hairdressers’ wares and sun-
dries, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the
day of FeDruary 1951 unless some person
Shall in the meantime give notice in
dupli¢ate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
wae can be seen on application at my
offie,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
27,2.51—3n



-

TAKE NOTICE
KINSEY

That KINSEY DISTILLING COR-
PORATION, a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is 1429
Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State of
Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part "A" of Register in respect
ot whisky, gin, rum, rye, alcoholic cor-
dials and liqueurs and other potable
distilled alcoholic beverages, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 27th day of February
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27,.2.51—3n





‘TAKE NOTICE

That SIR ROBERT BURNETT & CO.,
LIMITED, a limited liability company
registered under the laws of Great
Britain, Distillers, whose trade ot
business address is The Distillery, Sea-
grave Road, Fulham, London, SW. 4
Englond, has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of gin of all descriptions,
and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day
of Februany 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be seer
on application at my office,

Dated this 2th day of February, 1951;

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n
— ee

TAKE NOTICE

That MACLEANS, LIMITED, a British
Company, Manufacturing Chemists
whose trade or business address is Great
West Road, Brentford, Middlesex, Eng-
land, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of medicinal preparations, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 27th day of February
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at-my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this @th day of February, 195!

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
27.2,51—2n
















ADVOCATE



Rout In London

From GEORGE WHITING
SOUTHAMPTON
Dave Sands, Empire middle
weight champion from Aus-

tralia, will defend his title against
Britain’s Randolph Turpin in
London in May or June.

An attempt will then be made
to match the winner’ with
America’s Ray Robinson for the
world tithe he won from Jake
LaMotta in Chicago this week.

Promoter Jack Solomons,
home,from South Africa loade?
with trophies of the chase —
ineluding £500 won in this ship’s

The undermentioned property will be
Public Buildings, Bridgetown between 12
date specified below. If not then sold, it

application to me.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain pie

admeasurement one acre, fifteen and a



UPSET PRICE: £2,000. Os. 0A.

DATE OF SALE: 9th March, 1951.
TAKE NOTICE
RED ROSE
That T. 4H. ESTABROOKS CO.,
LIMITED, a Canadian Corporation,

whose trade or business address is 6201
Park Avenue, Montreal, Canada, has
applied for the registration of a trade
merk in Part “A” of Register in respect
of tea, coffee, coffee mixtures and spices,
and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day
of Februany 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark oan be
seen on application at my office,
Dated this 2th day of February, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE -
JANTZEN

That JANTZEN KNITTING MILLS
INC,, a corporation duly organized under
the laws of the State of Nevada, whose
trade or business address is Jantzen
Center, Portland, State of Oregon, United
States of America, has applied for regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of articles of clothing,
and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 27th
day of February 1951 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
27,2.51—3n

TAKE NOTIC
SINOLETTE

That PINCHIN, JOHNSON & ASSOCI-
ATES, LIMITED, a British Company,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is 4, Carlton Gardens, London,
S.W,, England, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of paints, varnishes
(other than insulating varnish), enamels
(inethe nature of paint), painters’ colours,
distempers, japans, lacquers, paint and
varnish driers, wood preservatives, wood
stains, anti-corrosive and anti-fouling
compositions, and anti-corrosive oils, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 27th day of
February 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade merk can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,

PRVOSDSS9S G99 D99 OOOO FOF
Scientific Massage

After strenuous work or
play MASSAGE

fatigue poisons and releases










removes

new energy.
W. JOHNSON, D.M.T.

Crumpton St.

1.3.53.—In.




GRAND MARCH

FURNITURE

AT MONEY-SAVING PRICES

FULL-PANELLED Mahogany sin-
gle & Double Bedsteads; some in
Outstanding Designs—Vanities witn

















Various Mirrors-—Wardrobes and
Dresser-robes,
MAHOGANY, Birch and Deal

Tables for Dining, Cocktail, Radio,
Sewing, Kitchen in several shapes
and sizes—Sideboards, Cabinets
for China, Kitchen and Bedrooin.
SUITES and Separate Drawing
Room pieces in Morris, Tub,
Bergere and Rush, and Many
other Nice Things, NEW AND
RENEWED.

L.S. WILSON

Trafalgar Street—Dial 4969











COOPER SPLIT ROLLER BEARINGS

“Split’’ Feature enables dismantling and re-assembling to be

effected with ease,

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER

AGENTS.

os?

at the same place and during the same hours until sold,

















| LE

TAKE. NOTICE § | Turpin-Sands Title *

run—
I mes

epstake on the daily
ve me this news when
him. here to-day.





‘Only the financial details and
the exact date for Turpin v Sands
remain to be _ settled,’ said
Solomons *Â¥You can forget all
those reports about Sands not]

wanting to fight outside Australia
He will be here when the weather
warms up a bit. I shall be settling
the details with Sands’s manager,
Tom Maguire over the week-end”

“I have travelled half-way
round the world in the last few
months”, added Solomons. But
I have yet to see any better
prospects than our own three
champions Randolph Turpin,
Jack Gardner and Don Cockell

—L.E.S,





CHANCERY SALE

set up for sale at the Registrd un Office,
noon and 2 p.m, for the sum and on the
will be set up on each succeeding Friday
Full particulars on

REYNOLD ST, CLAIR HUTCHINSON — Plaintiff
ve
OLIVER ST. CLAIR DOTTIN -

Defendant

ce or parcel of land situate at Codrington

Hill in the parish of St. Michael and Island of Barbados aforesaid containing by

half perches Abutting and bounding on

lands of the Estate of Sarah Brewster, on !ands late of S. E, Small but now of
one Headley, on the Public Road and on a road in common 16 feet wide or however
else the same may abut and bound Together with the messuase or dwelling house
and all and singular other the buildings and erections thereon erected and built
standing and being with the appurtenances the property of the Defendant,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery,
19 February, 1951.
20,2.51--3n

PUBLIC. MEETING

There will be a Public Meeting
held under the auspices of

THE BARBADOS LABOUR
PARTY

and the

BARBADOS WORKERS’
UNION

at MILE & QUARTER, St. Peter

On FRIDAY, 2ND MARCH,
1951 at 8 P.M.

Speakers:—F. L. Walcott, M.C.P.
K. N. R. Husbands,

M.C.P.

F. E. Miller, M.C.P.

G, H, Adams, M.C.P.

ORIENTAL
GIFTS!
THANTS = ux"

3466









ad
Ce tee

WHAT'S IN A NAME

When you say

Everton Weekes—

Everyone thinks of Cricket,
& you

Know likewise,

Everyone thinks of Cooking,
as you

Say G, A. Service.





GLASSES

For LADIES & GENTS
Amazing Styles & Values!

THANTS = ir

8466







NOTICE



The Health Conference

at Queen’s Park on
Tuesday, March 6th
will be opened by

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GOVERNOR

at 9.30 a.m. and not at 9.15
as previously advertised



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manageable form up to
£25,000. Wanted for over-
seas investor,

















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AUCTIONEER

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
"Phone 4640

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i argo and Passeng
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BW. B.W.L, Sa = _ ,





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porns “LOADING DATES

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PAGE ZIGHT ~

Barbados Spends Another Day
In The Field ey, ting ook

@ From

When Jeffrey Stolimeyer (114)
and Tangchoon (0) resumed Trin-
idad’s first innings at their over-
night score of 232 for 2, Norman
| Marshall and Mullins opened the
a attack.

Marshall sent down a maiden
over to Jeffrey who was still using
a runner and Mullins also bowled
@ maiden to Tangchoon from the
pavilion end.

In Mullins’ second over Stoll-
meyer turned him nicely off the
pad to the square leg boundary
for four runs and took another
single with a similar stroke which
Was smartly cut off by Roy
Marshall, «

With ten runs added to th
score Mullins got the third wicket
for Barbados. He beat Tangchoon
with a fast low one that was cut
back fram the off and took his off
stump.

Al gh Tangchoon had been |

at the wicket for over half an
hour—36 minutes to be exact—he
had not vet opened his scoring.

‘me

The score now xead 242—3--0.

Ralph Legall partnered his skip- |
per who sent up 250 with a cover |

drive off Norman Marshall for
four and an on-drive off Mullins
for another boundary.

Trinidad was now farther be-
hind the clock. The fifth fifty hed
taken 84 minutes to complete, 2!
being made in 334 minutes as
compared with 200 in 250 minutes.

Nine runs laier Legall fell vi:
tim. to Norman Marshall. 1s
reached forward and edged the
ball into Wood’s pads behind the
wicket. Umpire Foster had no
hesitation in upholding an appeal
for caught at the wicket.

Legall had scored 2 runs during
his thirteen minute stay at the
wicket and Trinidad had lost four
wickets for 259 and Stollmeyer
‘was responsible for 139 of these.

Skeete swept one on the pad
from Marshall to the square leg
boundary for four runs but he was
out soon after.

He played back to a change
pacer from Millington, mistimed
the ball and was struck on the
pad. Up went Umpire Jorden’s
index finger in response to an
appeal for 1.b.w.

Skeete had scored 9 during his
twenty-five minute stay at the
wicket,

Trinidad up to this time had
lost three wickets in the day’s
play for an additional 36 runs.
Skeete, who seemed more cramp-
@d and cautious than the condi-
tions demanded, might have got
‘quite a few more runs if he had

own some of his wonted enter-
prise.

The score was now 268 for 5 and
Chicki Sampath partnered Stoll-
meyer, The latter, although still
using a runner, did not seem to
alter his excellent stroke-play to
any appreciable extent.

He approached his 150 with a
cover drive off Roy Mar-
shall for 4 and a late cut off the
same bowler, later in the over
for three, brilliantly saved on the
boundary by Charlie Taylor.
Mullins replated Roy Marshall
at the screen end and _ Jeffrey
Stollmeyer tickled a full toss to
the fineé“leg boundary for four
runs to compiete his 150 in 387
minutes.

Jeffrey. Stollmeyer had been
playing beautifully attractive cric-
ket and had hit ‘twenty fours and
a five during his stay at the wicket
up to that time.

When play stopped for lunch
Stollmeyer was 151 not out and
Sampath 9 not out and the Trini-
dad score 290 for 5.

Trinidad lost another wicket on
resumption without any addition
to their pre-lunch score of 290.
Weekes claimed his second wicket
of the innings when he lured Sam-
path out of his crease with a well
ne seers and en

Fs made no mistake in
whipping off the bails.

Sampath had batted for 28 min-
utes for his score of 9. Ferguson,
the stalwart defender of the second
innings of the first Test, was the
next man in.

Ferguson dispelled any doubts as
to the possibility of punishing
Weekes by cover driving a full
one to the boundary for four runs
to send up 298 runs on the tins.

A confident on-drive by Stoll-
meyer for three runs, that was
only saved from being a boundary
by another of Charlie Taylor's
magnificent saves, sent up 300 for
Trinidad in 410 minutes.

Ferguson entered double figures
with another cover drive off
Weekes for four runs.

New Ball at 308

With the score at 308 Walcott
requisitioned the new ball and
brought on Norman Marshall, The
first ball was wide of the leg

{ They'll Do It Every
















FOR ONE WHOLE )-»))/

Page 1
stump but Stollmeyer turned the
next one, almost similar to deep

square leg for a couple.

Mullins bowled from the pavil-
fon end.and Stolimeyer steered
him cleverly through the slip for
four runs.

Ferguson, batting more freely
now than at any other time dur-
ing the series, cover-drove one
from Norman Marshall for another
boundary.

Jeffrey Stollmeyer entered the
180’s with a late cut off Roy Mar-
shall as neat as if his bat was a
rapier and it raced to the bound-
ary unchallenged.

Stollmeyer sent up 350 runs
with another cover drive to the
boundary off Roy Marshall. This
had taken 460 minutes to compile.

WILFRED FERGUSON
—made a gallant 84 not out
yesterday.

The rate of the Trinidad scoring
had now caught up with the clock
as far as the last fifty runs were
concerned. The seventh fifty was
scored in 50 minutes.

Boundaries

Stollmeyer with a wonderfully
controlled stroke, tickled an in-
swinger on his pad from Atkinson
to the fine leg boundary for four
and then turned him hard to the
deep square leg boundary for an-
other four to make his individual
total 196.

Next over from Weekes, Fer-
guson kept up the boundary tempo
and swept Weekes to the square
leg boundary for four and then
gently guided him to the deep fine
leg for three,

Jeffrey Stollmeyer off drove for
3 and made his total 199. Walcott
bowled himself to Stollmeyer, now
more upright than ever in his
stance and watchful. He turned
one off his pad past short square
leg for a single and completed his
200 runs in 470 minutes. He had
now hit twenty-five 4’s and a 5.

Chances

Barbados now missed both bats-
men in rapid succession, Ferguson
with his score at 34 edged a sharp
one from Weekes to Millington in
the slips but the latter put it on
the carpet.

Next over from Walcott, Stoll-
meyer with his score at 201 turned
one to short fine leg. Denis Atkin-
son got the ball into his hands but
fell and failed to hold it,

Ferguson pushed one from Wal-
cott to mid-wicket for au single
taking the score to 390. This
meant that with Stollmeyer, Fer-
guson put on 100 in 102 minutes
for the seventh wicket partner-
ship, unbroken up to then.

tollmeyer welcomed a full toss
from. Walcott and smashed it to
the long on boundary for four
runs. our byes sent up 400 on
the tins in 504 minutes.

With a single added to the score,
Ferguson pushed wide of the slip
and Tang Choon, acting as runner
for Stollmeyer came running down
the pitch. erguson declined the
run and rane Choon scampered
back towards his wicket. A smart
return by Clyde Walcott to his
brother Keith and the wicket was
put down with Tang Choon out of
his ground.

Stollmeyer Run Out

Stollmeyer was therefore run
out for 208. He had been at the
wicket for 506 minutes and had
hit 26 fours. His innings was
worthy of a first class batsman.
He might have been stumped off
Norman Marshall at 21 but after
that he only gave a chance to

Denis Atkinson when he had
reached and passed his double
century. ‘

_He received a tremendous ova-
tion on his return to the pavilion,

Jackbir joined Ferguson who
cut one from Keith Walcott
through the slip to complete his
individual half century in 110
minutes. This included eight 4’s.

The Tea interval was now taken
with Trinidad’s total at 401, Fer~









‘time








MONTE =

guson being 52 not out while
Jackbir had not yet opened his
his score
After Tea
When play resumed, Jackbir,

after a spell of steady poking un-
leashed a full-klooded late cut
past gully off Millington for four
runs.

Another neat late cut gave Jack-
bir another four off Millington. A
cover drive soon after gave Jack-
bir a third four at Millington’s ex-
pense.

Ferguson, now quite settled, en-
tered the sixties with an off drive
off Weekes for four and a late cut
that beat Millington's boot for
four.

After a very quiet spell Fer-
guson swept one off his pad to the
square leg boundary for four runs
to send up 450 runs in 564 minutes.

Jackbir celebrated this with a
square cut off Weekes for 4 but
later Weekes deceived him with a
leg spinner and he put up an easy

catch to Roy Marshall in the slip.
Jackbir had been at the wicket for
54 minutes and had hit four 4’s.

Trinidad had now put up 456
for the loss of eight wickets.

Lennox Butler joined Ferguson
and with the straightest of bats he
helped Ferguson to advance Trini-
dad’s total, and when play ended

for the day, Trinidad had scored
488 for the loss of eight wickets,
Ferguson being 84 not out and
Butler 13 not out.

Seores:—

TRINIDAD ist INNINGS
J. Stolimeyer run out ,..,,.......
A. Ganteaume c Weekes b
R, Marshal) ...,:......, 68
N. Asgarali e K. Walcott b Weekes 48
R. Tang Choon b Mullins . ot.
It. Legall ec (wkpr.) Wood b

N. Marshall cede oe ne syaer ed
C. Skeete |I.b.w, Millington 9
C. Sampath stpd. (wkpr.) Wood b

Weekes . se ‘

W, Ferguson not out .. 84
8S. Jackbir ¢ R. Marshall b Weekes 26
L. Butler not out : .
Extras: 14 bs., 4 Lbs, 3 n.bs, .. 21
Total (for 8 wkts.) 488

Fall of wickets: 1 for 118, 2 for
3 for 242, 4 for 259, 5 for 268, 6 for
for 401, & for 456,

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M.

231,
290,

a
Cc. Mullins . wee Ss WI 1
i. Millington .. 35° 13 66 1
N. Marshall .. “ #10 a 1
D. Atkinson .. 16 6 38 9
R. Marshall ... a 66 1
E.. Weekes ...+--.+ 20 3 15 3
Cc. L. Walcott ..... 7 2 4 0
K. Walcott . fen 6 0 23 0
Umpire: Messrs. S. C. Foster and

H. B. Jordan,

Golf Entries
Close To-day

ENTRIES will close today for
the Qpen Amateur Golf Cham-
pionship with a strong field al-
ready assured for the title event
which will occupy the attention
of local enthusiasts through the
month of March, Because the
event always attracts the largest
field of the year, an ecighteen-
hole qualifying round will be
necessary to reduce the match-
play starters to sixteen and this
will take place on Sunday after.
moon at the Rockley Golf and
Country Club.

The first sixteen in Sunday's
field will qualify for the Cham-
pionship proper, the first round of
which will be played a week from
Sunday. The second sixteen to
qualify will enter the match play
rounds for the DaCosta Cup, which
will be played off hardicap, The
second round of both competitions
is scheduled for Saturday, March
17, with the semi-finals the next
day, Sunday, March 18. The finals,
which will be played over a 36-.
hole stretch, will be played on
Saturday, March 24 and Sunday,
March 25, eighteen holes each day

Actually only the first fifteen in
Sunday's round will qualify for
the title play as John R. Rodger
the current holder of the crown
is automatically listed. The drav
will be seeded, with Rodger at No
1, and the others according t
their place after Sunday's test,

Ralph—Francis
Fight To-night

TO-NIGHT at the Yanke
Stadium Kid Ralph fights a re-
turn bout with Kid Francis whom
he defeated on a technical knock:
eut on the last occasion, Bott
fighters have undergone seriou:
training for this contest whicl
will decide the championship in
their division and for which ;
belt has been offered, so to-nigh
there will be no quarter asked o
given, Each man is in the pink o.
condition and all attending ean
be assured of all out fighting
from start to finish,

Francis with his ring craft anc
experience, will be opposed to <
rugged younger fighter, and the
struggle for a win is bound to bc
hectic and interesting.







Senne ane nene em

By Jimmy Hailo |











woe PaaS SS
Os i VY4e NURSE — \
(ices cuts, YA/my SPLEEN! \ (city Poo
FEVER AND CHILLS) \ HEY,NURSE!) = \SheRoi act




‘5
0p.)



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1951



M.C.C. DRAW GAME
WITH VICTORIA

LONDON, Feb. 19.

The M.C, retained their re-
cord of being unbeaten by a State
team on this present tour when
they drew with Victoria at Mel-
bourne last week in the last First
Class fixture in Australia, apart
from the fifth Test. They owed
the preservation of this reeord ta
Hutton and Bailey’ who came to-
gether after five wickets had
tallen cheaply and were con-
cerned in a stand which’ realised
196 runs. Both batsmen com-
pleted centuries, Hutton’s, being
the fifth of the tour and 96th of
his career and Bailey's the first
of the tour.

Another batsman in a_ high-
scoring mood was Lindsay Has-
sett, Australian and Victorian
Captain who seized the oppor-
tunity to put together his highest
score in first class cricket. He
batted six and ‘a half hours, hit-
ting 20 fours, and scored more
than half the Victoria’s total from
his own bat.

Brown Abseni

In the absence of Brown, trou-
bled by a groin injury, Compton
again captained the M.C.C. side
and again he lost the toss. Victoria
given first innings on an easy
wicket did not take advantage of
this piece of fortune as they
might and had it not been for

Hassett’s undefeated 173 at the
close of play, they might have
been in trouble.

Young Brian Statham had

Meuleman caught by Hutton with
only four runs on the board and
although Hassett then remained
master of the situation he could
not find anyone to stay with him
for any length of time.

Neil Harvey although scoring
only 25 batted in his brightest

style and produced one magnifi-.

cent square cut in which there
appeared to be no time at all be-
tween the bat hitting the ball and
the ball hitting the fence.

But all in all it was Hassett’s
day and apart from one chance at
73 when he was dropped by the
unfortunate Close off Bailey, he
never looked like getting out.

His partnership on the second
day with Ring produced 166 in
two and three-quarter hours and
established a new record for the
seventh wicket for any Australian
State against the M.C.C, side,

Stiff Task

When the M.C.C. bega,. their
stiff task of scoring 442 for first
innings lead Compton elected to
open the batting with Washbrook
in an endeavour to play himself
back into form after his failure
in the Tests. The experiment did
not however come off. After he
had made only 20 he was clean
bowled by Ian Johnson,

Dewes, the Middlesex ieft-
hander, than assisteti Washbrook
in a partnership which added an-
other 59 but after the score had
been taken to. 107, Washbrook
was drawn out by one of Ring's
spinners and stumped. After
that two more wickets fel] quickly
and at 124 for 4 the M.C.C.’s
hopes were pinned on Hutton
when stumps were drawn at the
close of the second day’s play.



PERC
All Tourists Welcome

9 P.M,

y GREEN'S ORCHESTRA

GREAT DOOR PRIZE

ELIMINATION

ENTRANCE $1.00

was that trust mis-
placed. Hutton played another
grand innings, perhaps a little
more subdued than usual but not
unnaturally so in the circum-—
stances, and in partnership with
Trevor Bailey he put on 196 for
the sixth wicket and gave the
M.C.C. a great chance of secur—
ing first innings lead.

He eventually fell via a mag-—
nificent catch on the boundary
by Loxton to Ring who had
claimed five of the six wickets
which had fallen at that stage for
134 runs,

Bailey went on to his highest
score of the tour. At the close
he was undefeated with 107 and
in partnership with Close had put
on 44, leaving the M.C.C. only

Neither

50 runs behind with four wickets ®

in hand.

No Lead

The looked-for M.C.C. lead
did not materialise on the fourth
and final day and after Hassett
had turned down a Compton
offer to try and arrange a finish
the match ended farcically with
Washbrook bowling—and taking
wickets—and Statham and Berry
opening the M.C.C.’s innings.

Bailey, last man out in the
M.C.C’s first innings, gave his
best display with the bat since
leaving England.

The afternoon was devoted to
a carefree exhibition of batting
by the Victorians, notably Harvey
who smacked and smacked and
smacked again at Berry in
attempts to bash the ball through
the offride field. {lima

After Tea

After tea the proceedings grew
even more and more light-hearted.
Even as a comedian likes to star in
Shakespearean tragedy, so do
batsmen like to try and bowl.
Washbrook was put on for the
first time in two tours of Aus—
tralia and his straight up-and-
downers promptly took twa
wickets for eight runs in two
overs,

The final act was a reversal of
the bowler-batsman effort. In-
stead, this time it was the turn
of the bowlers to show just how
simple the business is of opening
an_ innings.

The M.C.C. had been set 262
for victory in a quarter of an
hour and although Berry and
Statham swished enthusiastically
and energetically at everything
sent down by the bowlers the
M.C.C. were still 228 runs short
of the necessary total with nine
wickets remaining when stumps
were drawn!

The following are the score:—

VICTORIA 1st INNINGS,
(Hassett 282, Ring 74)
SECON

seeds egegit e+ 441

D INNINGS
C. McDonald c Hollies b Berry .. 26
N. Harvey ¢ Hutton b Berry ...... 56
5. Loxton c Compton b Berry .... 15

K. Meulemen run out ...,........ 30
H. Turner ec Hutton b Compton .. 40
A. L. Hassett e Close b Washbrook 36
D. Ring ec MeIntyre b Washbrook 15
I, McDonald 1.b.w. b Close ........
J. Hill not out
W. Johnston stpd, McIntyre b
Mutton ois vese
i. Johnson absen
Extras .......

Potal oie. scseses



Fall of wickets; 1 for 56, 2 for 101,
3 for 104, 4 for 174, 5 for 193, 6 for 220,
7 for 227, 8 for 227, 9 for 234,






DANCE AND PRIZE

A La Carte — Kitchen Service

TO 12 MIDNIGHT

BOWLING ANALYSIS
o.

M R w.
Berry . vam ‘s
Washbrook 2 0 8 2
Hutton 1 ° 4 1
Compten 9 1 43 1
ose. 15 2 70 1
Briley + 6 12 «60
Hollies 6 2 22 ®
Statham 6 1 25 9%
B.C.C.
D, Compton b I. Johnson .......... 20
C. Washbrook stpd. 1. McDonald b
Es ottaws dbl der 38

. G. Dewes ¢ and b Ring
W. G, A. ‘khouse

L. Hutton
A. Me





Fall of wickets; 1
3 for 107, 4 for 120, 5 for
7 for 388, 8 for 404, 9 for 414.

BOWLING neee-yess

for 48, 2 for 107,
apes 6 for M7,



R. W.
134 5
68 2
99 2
10 1
2 0
an)
67 0

SECOND INNINGS
B. Statham c Hill b Turner .... 16
B. Wy. SG CUE nica ce cnyerees- B
W, E. Hollies not out ............ 1
SEL, (kas be 505020 a ‘i 6
Tota) (for 1 wkt.) ... ..



The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 6.16 a.m.

Sun Sets: 6.11 p.m.

Moon (New) March 7.

Lighting: 6:30 p.m.

High Water: 9.31 a.m., 11.31
p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington): Nil.
Total for month to yester-

day: 12.24 ins.
Temperature (Max.) 83.0 °F.
Temperature (Min.) 76.0 °F.
Wind Direction: 9 a.m.
E.N.E., (3 p.m.) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour.
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.910,
(3 p.m.) 29.847,



FLOOR SHOW AND
DANCE

at
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
{ on
SATURDAY EVENING,
MARCH 3RD
at 9 o'clock

JEFFREY’S TROUPE
OF ARTISTES
Featuring : . .

Miss CHRISTINE GORDON
Miss Jeffrey’s Beer 1951

and
Carnival Queen
with
Mr. LANDY de MONTBRUN
Mr. CLYDE RIVERS,
—Seotch Tenor,
Miss JUNE MAINGOT,
—Pretty Girl Dancer.
Mi. CLIFFORD CORBIN,
—Banjo Player.
Mr, PETER PITTS,
—Calypsonian.
Miss DOROTHY de MONT-
BRUN

Trinidad’s

' —lLady-in-Waiting to the

| Queen.

Miss DAISY CREQUE,

| Mistress of the Ivories
as accompanist.

| DANCING after FLOOR

i SHOW

Admission to Ballroom $1.00

(Local & Visiting Members

—— ERNIES

Democratic Club

He We are
" AGAIN

there will be a meeting at
6 p.m. sharp!



on Friday next March 2nd
to discuss the problems of the
wftst day of the Spring Meeting.
‘Mis s ‘a pélitical meeting.
No after dinner speeches and
there will be a call over
on all races,

MENU

Hors d'oeuvre—The Usual Turkey
and Ham—J. N. G. and Sons
Kome made Sausages-Peach Melba
~Purity French Mince Pies
owred and trained by Ss. H, K,

-

and it “not,” why not? "So what?
What What!

|

U.S. NAVY RUSH FOOD

TO KOREAN REFUGEES

TOKYO, Feb. 28.

United Nations naval authori-
ties to-day were rushing food and
medical supplies to two small is-
lands off the Korean west coast
port of Inchon to relieve the plight
of 30,000 famine stricken South
Korean refugees.

Refugees fled from the Inchon
and Seou! areas ahead of Chinese
troops who occupied the South

Korean capital in their new year
offensive,

It was said that for many days
people had eaten nothing but the
roots they have been able to dig
from the frozen ground.—Reuter.



What's on Today

Art Exhibition, Queen’s
Park ......9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Police Courts and Court of
Original J




jurisdiction
++++.-10 a.m.

WE ss es ebast
St. Lucy Vestry Meet-
Fed es Uren 2 p.m.
Mobile Cinema gives Show
at Foundation School pas-

ture, Christ Church
Sains > Piles chs 7.30 p.m.



ban vies. 445 & 8.30 p.m,
Olympic—“Strange Triangle” and
“A Walk In The Sun”
secceeeess ee 4.30 & 8.15 p.m,
Roxy—"Wolfman” and
“Exile” 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.
Royal—River Lady” 5 & 8.80 p.m.
Plaza (Bridgetown) “Tarzan and
The Slave Girl” 4.45 & 8.30 p.m,
Plaza (Oistin) “Riding the Sunset
Trail” and “Death Valley
Rangers" ' . 5 & 8.30 p.m.



rere nnn mreosanneigeremyenentnpeinany,



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Powder



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BOXING

at the
YANKEE STADIUM
Brittons Hill
e

TO-NIGHT

e
KID RALPH
(163 Ibs.)
vs.
KID FRANCIS
(162 Ibs.)

o
In return match for the
Light-Heavy weight
Championship of
BARBADOS

10 Rounds

Lt

@ €\ At the first ;
4
{







bh \
“em your handkerchief and pillow
‘ for comfort and protection. Breathe

i. the vapour deeply and often.

ARTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than
ease these terrible agonies.

A new product, te, bas been created which not only gives

rheumatism, but
% IN has
"t . it
Get DOLCIN y.
BY:

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the metabolic processes which constitute

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thoroughly tested
is being used now with
x Spormal li Pe ult of taking D

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Don’t dela: Piok by the ex aonoe of fellow-victims of these
A bottle of 100 precious tablets costs

in medical institutions,

eae success. DOLCIN

nd many sufferers have already
OLCIN,

BOOKERS DRUG STORES— Bridgetown and Alpha
Pharmacy.
eee seeesieeeeneenrees



ZIP








White Zips fasteners in
lengths of 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12,
14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24
inches,

Priced from 29c. to 98c,
Coloured in lengths of 6,
7, 8, 9, 10 and 12 inches.
Priced from 24¢c., to 44c.

FASTENERS

This store will be closed to business at 12 noon on Wed-
nesday 28th February and Thursday Ist March for the

Cricket Tournament.







eee

} PHONE 4267 FOR

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street







|

SURINAM PLYWOOD

Treated to resist Termites.
; iy” thick in sheets 4’ < 8 |
; %4” thick in sheets 3’ x 7




vi









EN
So on HER Fist AND THE SPOTS : F ity, ideal for Flush D
f RS ( > BEFORE \% irst class quality, ideal for Flush Doors,
DATE, WHAT DOES MY EVES~ THEYRE SQUARE.

Cupboards, and Panellings of all kinds.

Can be Polished, Varnished or Painted.

STANDARD HARDBOARD
1” thick in sheets 4’ « 8’, 10’. ‘i.
3/16” thick in sheets 4’ x 8’



AND MY TEMPERATURE |S
USUALLY 106-1 THAT OK?
I CUT My ToE«AND-
BLABBITY BLAH»

SHE DRAW? AH :
CHONDRIAC week
THREE -HOUR CASE
HISTORyâ„¢.













PAGE 1

1 TIU'RSDAV. MARCH I. 1*51 BAKBAIMis \|>\<>< \u PACK TIIKF.K Courtesy Of Muiical America Albert Spalding: American \ ioiinisl By ROBERT SABIN WHEN Albert Spaldinit. on* KI America'i moil dUtlnguixhec viobniats. made hi* debut, in 7905. at the age of i, in Pan* tne American musician "iad f come through the Bbrnpeea door." a* he put* i.. To-day. :. uya. "the generating force* are .ted Stairs. Ni>I merely irte devastation of world wars but other factors also hove man. in a musical center." When Albert Spalding waborn in 18&8. in Chicago. America's mid western metropolis, the phonograph, the radio, and the motion picture had not oegun their revolutionary impact on America. They were to accomplish for music what printing dio iui I terature. by making i> accessible to a vastly larger r>ul>)ic. The t'nited State* was stilt in its musical childhood. To-day music has become the interest of the many, instead of the privilege nf the few. The American artist is welecftnad 111 Europe ana Central and South America a* cordially aa t.rti not only a nifted pianist mil isfl had a beautiful contralto voice TWO event! of major importance n rnd in Albert l y*Ht? ft f life wn.n M .1 In pgrentS decided lo MM-nd the Winttff in Florence. Italy, venture that subsequently turnet irn .,n annual custom, and he asked for a violin for CvrlellUM Mr MMD (lev*toped a consuming In music. His first leuchci was UlphUM Chiti. a Florentine mufciciun. Albert and his brother BpfJdman were educated in a Frenchllalian day school in Florence There he met French. Knglisn Qerman, Russian and Swiss boys fin acquired a mastery of French und Italian tliut was In lie useful to him not merely in hi.artistic career bul in his aerviVIn the tWO WOrld WatS that weic to interrupt his musical life. In tin : the younj v,olmiM d|d not neglect Whal In i ..]! %  the ihive gnat essentials of artistic development tune toil and iwaat." The violin, he esplalna, is the most personal ol li instrun.' :iitxoapl lie human's voice, yet it is not easy lo pipy. "II has the met awkward position of any. The violinist has ihe daily problem of resolving tinawkwardness into physical B*tt." Not only did he practice, hut he worked hard ot his other musical studU'i The reward came in a dramatic form, when Albert went lo Bologna, at the age of 14, to play for the examining board of the Bologna Conservatory To apply for the diplOB |g %  < the age of 14 was a daring step. Only once before in its history had the Bologna Conservatory awarded t';'i honour to so young a candidate, and thut was 133 "iier, to the young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who •**•led Bologna on his Inumpnsl tour of Italy in I76U and t"T0 The faith of Albert s InafBCr WOI justified in the results of the examinaUons Of the possible 50 point* obtainable. Albert Spalding scored 48. Very wisely. Albert's parent* decided upon two years of further study with Lefori. at the Paris Conservatory, before he made his debut in the concert world. When he was 18, he appeared in Paris, with an orchestra made up mostly of Paris Conservatory students and conducted by his learner. This concert led to a few engagements and the inrvitable Invitations to appear at hem-tits. But the road to establish success was still to be long and stony. A stroke of luck was the friendship of Camllle Saint-Saens. who had heard that the youna American had given an excellent performance of his violin concerto. Albert was summoned lo the romp ser's home and invitee, to play for him. Salnt-Sa.ns proposed that they should appear 1-gether in u concert in Florence ALBERT SPALDING. tii* famou* American violin wt, who announced, til retirement from toe concert field si the end of the season 1960-S1, la hu home To the 17-year-old young violinist this mviiation from the aprid famous 71-year-old composer aaaanasj )fio good to be true. Tim concert wag .. worse I rote u> Hans Riehtor, bi London, urging bin I > engage his y| ung protege as aolut*' L> ndon S:>mpii >.I nr. ItO. Klehtei C3mplied. and Albcr. was invited li> appeal Wltll 0M i ivneatra He auto madi • eit debul in Luniloii u In the summer ol W8. Albert Spalding was hack m the United Stales, busily at work, preparing %  debut, lie was to appear with the Nul was a %  % %  • aiding found u nition,for acarw Ironh earn cornea hardest In one's own land. Many ol the u ilics wen . .: >nlv one was ieall> hostile. During his first season. Mr Spalding Slayed more than f>0 engagement^ [I of them with otduV.i | The next six years were tilled with tours of Europe and the Dd a series of programmes in Egypt In IBM. Mr. Spaldinc n t tour nr Russia in 11*10. and ph| vivid impression of that nation during his travels. He also visited Finland, and met the famous, composer Jan SlbaUua, Robert tajanus, conductor of the Heudngfon S; % %  phony, and other leading musicians. He returned to Ru ll in 1912-13 and ir. 1913-14. It was at this time that he became prOBBS" sionally aswKlaled with his llta. long friend und accompanist. An an Baa ask lo tne three seasons before 1917, Ihe young violinist gave 60 or 7o concerts a year in the Untied States. He was on tour when the news of America's entrance into World War I was flashed across the nation. Mr. Spalding joined the U.S. Air Force. t that lime a branch of the Signal Corps. On his first day there, he was summoned to headquarters for an examination. His commanding officer asked him what languages he %  poke, and when he replied, French, Italian, and German, instructed another officer to test his knowledge This on %  tlOfeUo H. I.aGuardia ( later Mayor of New York < ity, who had %  Ivan up hi.s oflke as n Ihe Hou&e of Raneaeentatlvai In the U.S. Congreaa to join the army The two vomit: men became cloae friends. Early in 1918. Mr. Spalding was transferred lo Italy. When I.. Guaetna became the reC resentative in Italy of the Joint .S. Army and Navy Aircraft Board, he made Mr. Spaldinx his Upon hi* return lo the United States, in 1919, Albert Spalding look another major step in his life when he n I Pylt The iistiim. oshed French vtottnlat, I %  .i standing, pn the weddinp In UV %  IH-USII to rival tht pooular favour, Mr, BpakUng was engaged foj a laiiei ol recitaJs In radio t. dcasts, both fi r-n iHies ,n Whlott he .v.. nit; on lour lie bai none of Urn |iostiln> towards the lauio phonograph, motion picture, and other modern developments that one %  onaatunea %  Mn'iff^'i In oiaatelaBS. In maiacal %  Mch they have brought about. The l, trnnortanl fact, he Ex i ., %  . .. %  .,11 aiiMiopaiwbly larger public lli.m il has re,rhi I m f .,, In 1U25, Mr Spaldtng and hlfl %  %  atu, thai baa %  . .: IPorl Wei H log was bn -.iili concert %  %  till appeararu aa In Ihe i %  > exhilarating i ii i U I pai He U optuniMic about i ID ihe I'gited Si Ian < %  In the i nis, bul I i men! thai 1 • .md great Mr Baal !i the most iui oharaiUii i : nis fellow mukla dinner alvi n i" Mai bj the Bob) New YorK club. In December 1949. Mi Bpel< %  a keen %  enaa "f htimoui and ,i Qttlet, penetrating po i '. The roll have alwayt ebarai b n/i-d hli playlni are mirrored In hli sea of life. In a preserved tie %  believes] fi tin Concert ftvld planned for the end of the *eaon !9Mi-fti. will phaStlC ihe high quality i .. the dl i ) lus Hindi al |> NEW ZEALANDKRS GET WAGE BOOST OF i:> 11^ J. i lai-alium AUCKLAND. NZ, Feb. %  %  ;.. .. %  %  rt have been granted me largest wage bwra • % %  t one 'line but Aa brought many new pre • tinCI.MIIIIIIII.;. Labour organisations art cr.hik pixitesl action on the ground that the increase li not enoufh li'tvernment Is being relui lantl) t reed I oCrttrota and Bubsldles to Keen down living costs. %  'ease granted by ihe Arbitration Court, which oootroui minimum rales of pay In most octhrouanout the country, amounted to three shillings In the [K-unii. or iS per cent The court rejected the (.1 a Bat rate increaNe. II said that margins for skill had already contracted too much in recent years and unless the workers on higher pay got a larger rise (he mar ild fail still hither. The court in making its ordei warned about the dangerou %  effects of "vicious world-wide inflationary picssurcv. bul said it thought thai in justice and equity al] workers should ahari i . '-interim prosperily." l II.. II Disappointed Labour organizations—the FedI Labour, ("iitiai trade i on body, and the Tradrj Union Congress a breakaway leftwing body which made BWCO higher claims—have bolh exprt ated daMppointnai nl at "> r and are UK what action should be Individual trade unions meetings to con* ainei protest action %  ile the govern taken prompt action to cheek un due coat of living im iruet as a i renal Heitler. milk, bread and Mniii are U-n j. ( %  %  | an subsidies. The goveiriincnl had hoped lo abolish pressure nf avafHa has foiled it to Ini It has also iteen forc-d to ). -nl. which <t>[H*r Into U.S. Orbit OTTAWA. Feb. By calculated policy. %  i military orbit. i md, In one way or an other, affects all three armed nges have come graduwiry and have never been .(M-lled "id ,n the! Notable die these two: 1 The ara\y*i iwttcfa from Bn'. UUMypV to American.type equiiv Itb resulting changes u> on, a switch now coming \ peeled to I %  ,.:.at th> armi bbjpsai bib for IBM UMI that Canada's tup ply of airriafl must be based Of Ihls continent or, in olhei WOfda that the Hoyal Canadian Ab \ m or Ana not linti-h The navy has been progressing gradually ftom the British to the r IIOWr. m pla nn i n g new has designed Canada's own. using h Britain and baa U S have to offer. The American trend has one a of Canada has become of vital concern adiced urn wnn gaa delence of North Amen thai aaeane m'et U.S. and i forces to light together if needed Hu i lei Daooha Claa> lon has .lelended this integration a f common aanaa. Linked wilh b H tl.ii .u. of building up facilities fur making planes, ships and araM Tahssa together they mean Canada no longr looh.s U> Britain as the %  OUTOl .if mililaiy supplies as m t i world am InHer VS. Commands" :i itepa an-e fmm North aims ban deBanei aat I but thev go beyond that, Itaaj mean thai m any w a .-I and utr forarlll light laigei L %  iimeh cornmand. I; ; .ni-e. dUI anadlaa brigade goes i Kurope tins year .1 will serve un der U.S. cornmand. li bj Ufcl toe. that when an B C A r iig'uH -in. getl 10 BUBOpe lair this year ii will Dome undei U S ceeaaaand because ita thruaoiaad mn anil <>•• flying ( lypc FM Bl |etl made in CaniioUi [ormationt, in othei times, would aerve an* r British command. The switch to U I eon i ai i logn.i reauli ol lonisliev ,.i lUpaly pii.l^lein I'he)will be USIIIK u.s aqulprnant Parllameni nrat bla I inA w in utlon trend." as It, rame frorn I u tTub .i i ai time mayor He are* ,ia ted It aOI Uad to a Id pi M rrupted lo 'ay thai is He has said the i m> organbuilional changes will be minor. The old regimental names will stay. — tC.P t Russians On A Visit LONDON. A party of Russian bOKOI cently paid their third vtall to i for ,i tournament. TIL. reeuU Of the meelin,! laid %  Qotahori on P^ebruary l. was given as follows by Tacw. the offldfal S>viet news agency i oaai Bulaaov, Khan i\ and Knnianov won by knockouts againet somr of Swadlah Iwxers Boxers AllatOkuyan, Vcgorov and Shotsikas defeated their opponents on point by a large margin Benches bakm lost his fight against Bluem. one of the leading boxers of Bwedoft. "Thus the match ended with a M ore of "1 in favour of the Soviet Boxers." The leport did not hint at the pM io.Eab %  beaten Schcherbakov. — I.N.H Ilarbaur Log In Carliale Bay SI V Sja—ltoM. Si-M Mii-.> i %  -O.I 1,-iduMW. S(l< HII>I>.I I. IO II 1 lunwii 4.1Karxri • .n..r Sea. TunH D.v s*h Enuijl c oarswi. Be* SMMM I PilBiim S. a*ti Liuod II. Sch Ar.lU %  %  CarlbbH. Ilrnt. II W*Jlw*. UV reia>>* 'i*i cm-. --h U| 1 % %  * %  . Srh lAnaalpha %  !> \l B chno— r bUNMiM S. 44 loa> M, from St l.uris H V L*d% JT. 4S (<. Ml. Cap! rr..... t!" .. St. Lon> ss ri.-i^.'in ISM Wfi iwi Capt (rain Si U-M. HI'IHI Rl> %  S Pal*n*M. Tl ion. net. Opt *1 (4SASA idUiM i nfesn '<• % %  i Draft< %  4' Sum Dralt. iff nut i>< CatOa ' 1 Quebec's Founder Was Telling Lies SAYS AUTHOR gUEBEC, Feb. 26 Champlain, 17lh century explores, who founded Quebec tu .606. und who ihrough his writ%  ngl is one of the well known IgUrtl ba Ami'inan history, may lave wrltaan about a ir.p he nevai made. This and other d isconcertirg iuggcstions were presented re%  cnlly by author Jean Uiucliesi to -i hatnlfiil of historians and archivists who read Lea Cahiera Det Dix. a Quohee ruaaarioal fwe l a* Historian Ilruchesi in a paper enili I (h.miplain A-T-d Menh (Did Champlain lael eoines I.. [he eoneliiMon that the famed explorat bsfMlgad la boaa'mg if not worse, when he wrote his brief liscoursc. It is the account of an 'xpcdlbon which Champlain sa> he led to the Weal Indus for the Spain in 159tV Mi. Hruchesi's report has come as a shock "• Quebec scholars, who regard "' ''"he irw France us a mar I high moral qualities. Mr. Bruciiesi'B conclusion is thai D i %  and Eleno are the sanuperaon. a,l it was feom him thai hamptaln uiiUiuod the bnforasa* lion for bai account of tl b> Ihe West Indies.—(CM Ha r pie for I/f/fytViif? It's as easy as ABC to keep the lavatory Ipofkss. Just sprinkle some 'Harpic' into the bowl and leave overnight--then flush. 'Harp:.\ 'clejrav ing action disinjecw and deodorises ihe S-bend where no brush can reach. HARPIC mo ss THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER *t'-'< A s aaviHN .-. i .i QUAKER OATS treat/a** five more nourishment to help children growl :: Canaclu S-e-kiii^ Now Gas Musks OTTAWA, Feb. 21 Canada is studying new lypc* or SO* masks lo combat a largely odourle^s and invisible poiaon gar which ihe Husslans sre reported to have in large quanlltles. OfArlals commenting on reports thai I Danish scientist had started a rosaaiih programme |„ flnd a lemedy for "sneaking death" ga,, %  '•'I .'U.i,i., had i ..I, ittudying ii. potentialities for some lime They ad.led that il* ,„uil,ll.^ lu.d ln-en over-stressed, bul thai It was very powerful" |t wa „ described us "much hrtter" than mustard gns.—Reoter THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK W'lTH A VIEW lo assisting Ihe Secretaries oi Societies, Clubs, and Associations to make the compilation oi information in THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities; religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports. radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed below filled In and sent in as soon as possible to: THE EDITOR. THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 19S!. C o Advocate Co. Ltd.. 34 Broad Street. FORM Title of Society. Club. Organisation, Etc President or Chairman Council or Committee Members AIR FREIGHT SERVICES lo and from Regular Services Save Time from Kilipv lo 1 %  Kin Tim, Itlliliu >rltl>|Kllo (Uln. Kl UMI I.A 1 1 -. 15 1 „ ,," LISBON HU ^ ,,•.„ LONDON | M hr | i \ "IM Abo f'onnrcllni Korvim t,. ti.r wholr IVorld M0SC MINUAll MORE mnm MO&E CUIOMTMAIU M0R£ VIIAMIMf (I, Mat,| During* or Alder MII afiuek ol INFLUENZA The templing Fluvmir nf HOVHII,, its (MM of ii-siuiili. tiun and its reinarkiihle reviviitu imrl strciiLithcniiiK pro|RTties make il nn invaluable ally. Iliiilil up ^Olir sill ll'^lli OH BOVItlL YEAR BOOK 1951 Treaaurer Secretary Short historical account oi the origin. Junctions and current activities: ITS' PASTER Ili r'ARill SPMJtBIRI). Hook Ihrtniah ynur local HO AC fi.rtcarduu; Aatv' who rnokci no charge for advice, Informallof. or booktnpt by •jpeedMrd" to all rlz confln.-nti. FLY-BO AC The Advocate Co Ltd, will publish a Year Book of Barbados in 1961. The Year Book will contain three parts:— (1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance, industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport, art, literature and all the things we want to know about Barbados but have until now not been able to find under one cover. (2) Special supplement on Barbados' industries: e.g. sugar, soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, oloctricity, hotels etc. (3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you Bhould know about ihis information solicited should be sent in immediately or not iater than March 15th 1951. A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Galo M.L.C.. Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mi. Trevor Gale. Advertising Manager olthe Barbados Advocate will be responsible for the publication. The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that tho Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries ol Societies. Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisation-* of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisations immediately or not later than March 15th 1951. Year Book, Co Editor. Barbados Advocate. 34 Broad Street. Names and addresses of all those to be considered for inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed. Advertisements close April 30th 1951. Advertisers are asked to get in touch with Mr. Trevor Gale. Advertising Manager, Barbados Advocate. 34 Broad Street. This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to bu without the Year Book of Barbados 1951. (AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION) y:.



PAGE 1

PACK FOUR IMUBAhOS IDVOI Ml THURSDAY, MARCH I, IK) BARR\WSA0V r O^E Thur-doi. Vlarrh 1. 1952 PEASANT* IN SPITE OR the r*Ol ll drift i" the town Barbados still possess a lar^r peasant class on whoso work depends such progress as has been achieve i n ih,land. These peftStnta are being hel[Mil by the extensive work of the Agricultural Department and they < ,0 ?*" .HE foort produced bv farm and gar rntlbteturMCh 10 I solution ol S2r* JftSSt^^JSSLJSt -en satisfy a., food requiremP> -meinin. so that bodies can be kept in lia* UUSX Int .oil is my capital, health, llirn the works of our il %  not inexhaustible; every crop hands ore good On the other I harvest, every beast I graze. hind if the wocnea dere l ov rei .i my capital; tha; goitre, if the I allies have rlcket SynHWllge Knowbu now many pounds i. vitamins in quantities lo meet each mineral will be removed i 011C demands Further, and worse, the eroa I Inland to have. 1 shal we are not satisfied to use many know the composition of the fer chemical elements required for 0 f our plant products in the form '.ili7er and the amount of fer their bodies would be present. j n which nature gives them to tilizer I should apply to meet tha* They would die of starvation, us, but demand that they be proyear's need* and provide :i IittU beeau.se neither of them has the cessed. Unless %  • know whal kitt <-an. power to combine the chemical nutrients are removed in the proelements into the food they rer e$stiia; and make up die quantitv Natural ur Artificial 7 Quire But plant alfalfa and rom olrMT sources, we do not gel _. treat snd n,iei..0 rgn.sms in the .,. .,,,,. „f UMtfl *. Thl 7* ."". ^"^ T£ VVT £ soil minerals, water them, and Every step In food produc ,r0m l,rne lo lime about me reiathem air the alfalfa and tlon ( s important. We have the l,ve v ' u "t organic fertiluen grass will grow, converting the r igtit to ask that the nutrition * animal irtgtn as opposed -hcmjc-al elements into plant Usvalue of our food shall be safe BUCS containing the food comkua rded all ihe wav. through cul pounds needed by the cow. and when he wiUidri without putting equal more into his account What Plants Need It may be worth while to conthe energy of the sun's rays Ui build their tissues out of nui* material. Set a child and a cow on a Jheap of minerals, -urrounded by air. and with a tub of water: all the he cow in turn will convert the alfalfa and grass into milk, which will provide food for the ch'ld. This is a highly simplified illustration of food supply The tmouni of nourishment gathered into* a crop depends upon three factors. Ihe amount of crop root in pontad w-ith the soil, what goes on where they touch each other, and the lime they are in contact. In all this there is activity by the plant and by the soil. The result is rfluenced by sunlight and other factors as well as by the quality of the material of which the soil s composed, but what the plant -as of food value depends in all but a tiny measure upon the fertility of the soil. Livestock Requirements Livestock farming has been found to provide the least drain m soil richness, because less plant food Is exported in animal products than when crops arc sold oft ihe farm, and a greater portion of the fertility is retained l| the form of manures. However, livestock raise other prob—^——"-"~~ "Regular and adequate supplies Nation of the field of certain minerals hi the diet or P"****"* d.str.butloi aoimals are necessary if they arc to grow and produce and rerm healthy. Some, such as calcium chemical fertilizers produced commercially Traditional ideas tend to linger, but usually Join themselves to newer ideas in s compromise agreement That a so with reference to manure ver-i tus artificial fertilisers. It || true that continuous in)u dicious use of artificial fertilizers may lead sometimes to a loss of si il structure, but on the other rand manure aod other natural fertilizers JIIIIOI be said to provide everything needed for all torts of land in the proper balance Artificial fertilizer is usually applied for Ihe .urrent crop, and the carry-over of benefit to future years is less than Uiat provided by farmyard manure Some soils respond tr manure ai.d others respond t< artificial fertlizer Organic Quality Holding a major place m our economy ithough seldom thought of by any but agricultural tg) is the organic quality of our soil. It is an important natural resource, a major factc* affecting the levels and quality of crops this year and in the future, and a vital feature in the pioductive life of every farmer Organic matter, sometime. loosely called "humus", is com' paged of pi.ni end mleaal matter undergoing decay. It includes material as dead rooU fnnt>', and stems arcasses of insects harvest Inir. preparaand serving. Managinc The Land To produce food of the bifbaal Ml ,.|, I "phosphorus. aTe'rcquired'm Quality to feed today's world |,.,.,. roriRiderable amounts lo provide population is far rrom the subp i an t 5; for proper bone development, •'ustenee husbandry of other days. worm s and animals; live am Others, such as copper and cobalt. Thc ownership of land is a pnvdead sol micro-onganisins & equally necessary, though in I'***, but it Is also a rcsponsi and various products of decom mjirh smaller quantities.bl lli. y ,_^,,,. position of dead tissues. It tend:Cdmmon sense tells us thai dairy So / cn "" v .*? "?"" ""'>' to bind lor~e soils, open up heavy or meat products from run-down f,om lh / <*'**" t labour and sons> nnd increase Uie water pastures, larking, m these "miner*f ud > r of KeneraUon after generah oldinK capacity of all soils. Ii al, caimot po.-i>>'> hate the '" : Tn !" ,on nf rmlng can ,ie t( mp^mg, it liberates nutrient! nourishing values of similar pro? alw *" 5 %  l"Hy poor into whIt n ;(t ,. ,h,. n available lo th* fluets rrom well-bred and healthy farm ^ricultur My rich, and plant animals reared on balanced, nu so, s naturally fertile Into lasting trttloW forage and past Sir Robert MiC.n Ito by cxperimenl in India tnai nealin R -S !" S^"**.-"rW^I"" ZmM^i ' n rm maBUre, cover crops and disease are the result of the BC 'SS^t&J^SSSaSrS r WuM ur negleeted wH quaUty of the foo %  ** %  ^'" k sease he desired, simply by tffi !" ,^ aod MS thai Many N m "* lliniUI %  %  ** "'" '" %  '"'' £•" -* rarmers^X Ke 'ken all the g* !" ^.-anic ntatte, n, Uv wliich he was ex^rimenting. wns< rvaUo „ measure written 'l ' OM of the essenl.al or There are two interesting ways pnoul n |cx( booK hflW L30Cn major factors in successful crop production. In addition to turning under the residues of crops after harvest The most common methods of ...aintaining the necessary organic showed "^Jfru n Q „ 1 n in „ nlmt manar in the soil are by Ihe usi ithalhealtn na i *r "L.l "*u.,, of fr.rm manui. %  ._, .. ... — 1IIIUL1L III tl .* IKI"h of judging the quality of crops dl appolnU .,| Th ,. v have seen grown for Dn.mal feed. A detllhc lr ( | w lndle in quantity ciency in soil nutriment may .,„,, h ,, nl „,„„-, kn ow affect the plant by limiting lu Ju(l ^ ax to liu bout remedying mowth. or it may be a deficiency Uie situation. The secret is lo In some mineral which not %  ol the may grow plants with the purpose of turning them unThl fum-lion of a green regulate the quantity needed by the plain but should oualily of organic mailer and manure crop is u, add organ., be passed on by It lo the animal. p | ant food available to the growmatter to the soil; the purpose ol Paature for livestock belongs im j crop> a cover .rop is to prevent erosion. lun is working to the satisfaction of all con:erned. The combination profit-sharing and costif-living sliding wage scale were introduced n February 1946. Both were proposed volintarily by the company management to the abour union and were promptly accepted. Business was good, and the cost of living vfls rising during most of the first three /ears of operation under ihe plan. But in he company's fiscal year ending June 30, 949. business was not as good as it had been. There was a considerable decline In the vater tank and heater industry as a whole, ind this company was no exception. The irofltg available for sharing, iherefore. were smaller. Furthermore, the cost of living Ieclined also, and there was a corresponding lecrease in wage rates. There was enough if a decline both in the profits shared and n the wage scale, to determine the reaction A the employees under such cinut "This --eaction has been exactly what we A'TC confident it would be," Mr. Cheviron %  add "Employee* realize that if the business prospers, they prosper correspondingly. Therefore they do their part to help. But neither they, nor we, nor anyone else can guarantee that pfofltg always will be high and uniform. Production depends upon sales, and sales necessarily fluctuate, we have been getting our share of sales in our industry, but sales in the industry as a whole declined for a short time. "We did not have as much profit to share as we had in the two previous years. Our employees anticipated this because they knew that production was decreasing. But they knew, at the same time, that they would fare just as well, correspondingly, as the company fared. We are happy to have proved that our employees understand such economic facts and that they have a sense of fairness." Under the profit-sharing plan. 20 per cent if the net operating profits, before taxes, is listributed annually to employees on the actory payroll. No employee is eligible to >articipate in the profit-sharing plan unless le has performed at least 1,000 hours of abour during the company's fiscal year, except in case of extended illness or death. In ;uch case, the employee participates in the orotit-sharing plan in the class in which he A'ould have been placed had he worked the full year, in the ratio of the number of full nonths worked to 12 months. The method of distributing the share of M-ofits apportioned to individuals is based ipon a point system. In introducing the )tan. it first was presented to the union, and letails were worked out amicably. A scale if credits was agreed upon, and as most of he employees had five or more years of seniority at the time, this period was taken is a basis and the following scale was adoptld: All employees with local union seniority if tivc years or more at the end of a period iated June 30 were assigned a credit of live units; employ "es with less than five years service had fewer units. The wage scale is based upon the .average rates for the area, plus a variable cost-ofdving bonus. This bonus is based upon the U.S. Bureau of Labour Statistics index of -he cost of living. It was agreed that in case ;he cost of living, as measured by this index rose, all production employees would receive tn increase. If the cost of living declined ifter rising, the bonus would decline. Adjustments are made quarterly, up or down is the index rises or falls. The combination of profit sharing and variable wages provides a counter balance to unreasonable demands. If wages rise too high, there will be less profit to share, and individual earnings for the year will be much the lame as they would have been if wages had not risen. On the other hand, if the costof-living bonus part of wages declines, then profits increase, other conditions remaining unchanged, and again the total earnings for the year remain much the same. Mr. Cheviron emphasizes the fact that his corporation s profit-sharing and bonus plans ire not substitutes for adequate wages. "We were paying the current rates before we introduced the plan, and we are still •jaymg them." he said. "The profit-sharing ind bonus features were never intended as I substitute for adequate wages They were jfTered as additions to the prevailing wage wale for this area, which is one of the highest %  n the United States. They were conceived bv he management and offered to the emplov^es without suggestion from the union. "We would not pretend that we expected nothing in return for proposing such plans. It is a fact, though, that there was little room for improvement. The greatest change imong our employees has been in the personal interest which they take in the business and the good will which they manifest toward the company. We quite fiteralh are all partners in this business. U the business prospers, we all prosper accord.ng•V L busmess fa ''s to prosper, we all puffer the consequences. Our employees have something tangible to maintain their interest in their work. If they fail to produce if they waste material, if they are absent frequently without just cause, they are penalizing themselves and their co-workers. Profit-sharing plans that are intended to bolster sublevel wages; that are insufficient in amount of profits or are inequitablv distributed, or that fail to cement amicable labour-employer relations will defeat their own purpose. Similarly, plans that have to be won by bargaining are less likely to impr X C mutual respect and good will.' On the other hand, we are convinced that profit sharing, properly conducted, is the answer to many controversies, and that it is a truly American way of improving our business and our economy." D. V. SCOTT & CO, LTD. TO-DAY'S SPECIALS al THE COLONNADE Tins OVALTINE (Urge) Tins CORNED BEEF with Cereals Bottles GROTSCH BEER l/sually SI.24 .31 .24 Now SI.12 .28 .18 CARPENTERS' TOOLS SAWS—18ln.. 20ins., 22ins.. 24ins., 2flm 28in, 30ins., 36in COMPASS SAWS—121ns.. 141ns. BACK SAWS—12 in*. 14 in<, lin*. PLANES, IRON—oins.. lOins 15ins IBins. ., BLOCK RATCHET BRACES CHISELS— Hln.. Sin., ",; %  lln. CHISEL SETS of | In., 5* in. 1 in. ins. OIL STONES—Bins.. Sins. GRINDING STONES, eomplete—5ins., 6ins. Spare GRINDING STONES— Sin*. Gins. SAW FILES—3Sins.. 41n*., 4'tins.. Sinn. CLAW HAMMERS ENGINEER HAMMERS—lib., 1 'jibs 21bs. MASON TROWELS 1 SQUARES AT WILKINSON ft HAYNES Co., Ltd. Successors To C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phonet — 447*. 4W7. l*w*l "INTERNATIONAL" PAINTS COVER THE WORLD! As a protective covering for the roofs of your buildings, we can offer you the following RED IIOOI l\(. IMIMS ii win II IM ANTI -CORROSIVE PAINT (for galvanized iron)—$7.52 per wine nallon. "PROPELLER" READY MIXED OIL PAINT (for wooden shingles, asbestos, eement and aluminium)—$7.00 per wine gallon. t instruction* should be carefully For best results, the folio followed :— Galvanlied Iron. 1. For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least a year before painting. Then apply 1 coat o( "DANBOLINE". 2. For previously painted work, if the surface is in good condilion, rub down, clean, and npply l coot ol "DANBO3. For previously pointed work, if the surface is in poor condition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat Of "INTERNATIONAL" RED LEAD GRAPHITE PRIMKK, followed by 1 coat of "DANBOLINE". Wooden Sblnle. 1. For new work, applv 1 coal of "INTERNATIONALPRIMER FOR WOOD, followed by 2 coals of "PROPELLER". 2. For previously painted work, if the surface is in Rood condition, ruh down, clean, and applv 2 coats ol "PROPELLER". 3. Fer previously painted work, if the surface is in poor condition^ rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coal of "INTERN 1TIONAL" PRIMER FOR WOOD", followed by 2 coats ot "PROPELLER". AibesUM Cement, 1. For new work, apply I coat of "INTERNATIONAL" CEMENT AND PLASTER PRIMER, followed by 2 coats of "PROPELLER". 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clear., and apply 2 coats of "PROPELLER". For nt/w work, apply I coat of "YELLOW PRIMOCON". followed by 1 coat of "PROPELLER". For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean, an i annly 1 coat of "PROPELLER". TRY THESE FINE PRODUCTS OF INTERNATIONAL PAINTS, LTD.. AND BE CONVINCED. DA COSTA & CO., LTD. AGENTS Build I i* tin1'hihlrt'ii tilth Kelloss's Corn Flake* Kellosi's All Bran Quaker OaU RED APPLES CARROTS CABBAGE For J'twr/e^re* A1 xn II u m s J. ft R. Bread Patl de FotGras Jellied Chicken Jellied Turkey Sliced Ham Salami Stndwleh RelUh \ Rare Cheeur* SPKViALS For Sauce THETOASToftheTOVJU G0DDARD S GOLD BRAID RUM ORDF.R TO-DAY from GODDARDS '-.'.*'//( *<*'* '. *''-*.


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PAGE f.IO.HT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MARCH I. 151 Barbados Spends Another Day In The Field • Frem When Jeffrey Stollt. • and Taugihoon (U) resumed Trinidad's first Inningfl at their overnifhl score ..f 03 tOf ?. Newman Marshall and Mulling opened the Barbados attark Marshall sent down a maiden over to Jeffrey who was still using a runner and Mulliii* aim bowled a maiden t> Tangrhoi.v pavilion end In Mulhii'. NNH %  .1 rted hini nicelj fiit thu pad to the square leg boundary for four run* ami took another single with a similar stroke which was smartly cut off by Roy Marshall. With ten runs addd to the score Mullins got the third wicket for Barbados. He beat Tangchoon with a fas', low one that was cut back iram the off ami took hi* off %  .uinp Although Tangchonn had been ai the wicket tot over half an hour—SB minute* to be exact—he had nut vet oftwd his scoring • The score now read 242—3—0. Ralph Legal! partnered his skipper who sent up 250 with a cover drive oft Norman Marshall for lour and an on drive off Mulllntt tor another boundary. Trinidad was now farther behind the Clock, The fifth fifty bad itken M minutes to complete, 2V> being made in 334 minutes | s compared with 200 In 250 minute.. Nino runs la.er Legall fell v, Um to Norman Marshall. i: reached forward and edged lhi boll into Wood's pads behind tinwicket. Umpire Foster had no hesitation in upholding an appeal for caught ai the wicket Legal) had scored 2 runs during his thirteen minute stay at the wicket and Trinidad had lost four wickets for 258 and Stollmeyer was responsible for 139 of these. Skeete swept one on the pad from Marshall to the square U\; boundary for four run* but he was otit soon after. He played back to a chan K e pacer from Millington. mistimed the bull and was struck on the pad. Up went Umpire Jordan's index linger in response to an appeal for I b.w. Skeete had scored 0 during his twenty.five minute stay at the wicket. Trinidad up to this time had lost three wicket* In the day's play for an additional 36 run* Skeete, who seemed more cramp ed and cautious than the conditions demanded, might hove got quite a few more runs if he had shown some of his wonted enter. prise. The wore was now 288 for 5 and Chicki Sampath partnered Stollmeyer. The latter, although still I'sing a runner, did not seem tn alter his excellent stroke, play to any appreciable extent. He approached his 130 with a sluling cover drive off Roy Mar. shall for 4 and a Inte cut off the same bowler, later in the over for three, brilliantly saved on the boundary bv Charlie Taylor. Mullins replaced Roy Marshall at the screen end and Jeffrey Stollmeyer tickled a full toss to the IIinleg boundary for four runs to complete his ISO in 18? minutes. JeiTiev Stollmeyer hod been playing beautifully attractive cricket aim had hit twenty fours and a live during his stay at the u Ichet up tu that time. When play stopped for lunch Stollmeyer was 131 not out and Sampath 9 not out and the Trim dad score 290 for 3. Trinidad lost another wicket on resumption without any addition to their pre-lunch score of 290. Weekes claimed his second wicket of the Inninas when he lured Sampeth out of his crease with a well flighted off-break and wicketkeeper Wood made no mistake In whipping off the bails. Sampath had batted for 28 minutes for his score of 9. Ferguson, the stalwart defender of the second innings of the Aral Test, WHS the next man In. Ferguson dispelled any doubts ns to the possibility of punishing Weekes by cover driving a full one to the boundary for four runs lo send ut> 298 runs on the tins. A confident on-drive by Stollmeyer for three runs, that was only saved from being u boundary by another of Charlie Taylor's magnificent saves, sent up 300 for Trinidad in 410 minutes. Ferguson entered double figure* with another cover drive off Weekes for four runs. New Ball at 308 With the score at 308 Walcolt requisitioned the new ball and brought on Norman Marshall. The first ball .•... wide of the leg rase 1 %  tump but StoUmeyei turned the .i to deep %  %  on and and Stollmeyer steered him cleverl> through the slip for four runs. , batting more freely DM tbn al any other time during thtpd wkpr I Wood W, rVrffilMii nol out St s JaekMr %  K Marahall b WMn M I Ri>U*r M* out U Exiraa14 b. lb* 1 nix. ?1 M.C.C. DRAW GAME WITH VICTORIA' it Boundaries Stollmeyer with a wonderfultv controUed stroke, tickled an iuswinger on his pad from Atkinson to the line leg boundary for four and then turned him hard to the deep square leg boundary for another four to make his individual total 196. Next over from Weekes, Ferguson kept up the boundary tempo und swept Weekes to the square leg boundary for four and then gently guided nun to the deep fine leg for Hirer. Jeffrey Stollmeyer off drove for 8 and made his total 199. Walcolt bowled himself to Stullmeyer. now more upright than ever in his stance and watchful. He turned one off his pad past short square leg for a single and completed hi* 200 runs in 470 minute. Me had now hit twenty-five 4's and a 5. n Aiunton a Marahall JT n m K Wrrke* St 3 C L. Wnkwli tan K Walrotl S 0 Umpire: MM.. %. C. FosUi H U J-tf. LONDON. Feb. 19 The M.C.C. retained their record of being unbeaten I team on this present tour when they drew with Victoria at Melbourne last week in in,, h..i First Class fixture In Australia, apart from the fifth Test. They owed the preservation of this record u> Hutton and Bailey wh< gether after five wtrkets haa lallen cheaply and were concerned In a stand which realised 196 runs. Both batsmen completed centuries. |lutlon\ being Hie fifth of the tour and 98th of his career and Bailey* Ike ilrsi ..r the tour Another bau>inan in a highscoring mood was Lindsay Hassan. Australian and Victorian Captain who seized the opportunity to put together his highest score in first class cricket He betted six and a half hours, hitting 20 fours, and scored more than half the Victoria's total from his own bet. Brown Absent In the absence of Brown, troubled by a groin injury, C>mpton again captained the M.C C. side and again he lost the toss Virton.t given first innings on an easy wicket did not take advantage of this piece of fortune as they might und had it not been for Hassett's undefeated 173 al the close of play, they might huve l*en in trouble. Young Brian Stalham had Meulcman caught by Hutton with only four runs on the board and although Hassett then remained master of the situation he could not find anyone to stay with him for any length of time. Neil Harvey although iCQflnsj only 25 baited in his brightest style and produced one magnificent square cut in which there appeared to be no time at all between the bat hitting the bull and the ball hitting the fence. But all in all it was Hassett's day and apart from one chance at 73 when he was dropped by the unfortunate Close off Bailey, he never looked like gelling out Hi.s partnership on the second day with Ring produced 168 in two and three-quarter hours and established a new record for the seventh wicket for any Australian State ngainst the M-C.C. side. Chances Barbados now missed both batsmen In rapid succession. Ferguson with his More at 34 edged a sharp one from Weekes to Millington in the slips but the latter put it on the (, mld-wicket for .. single taking the score to 390. This meant that with Stullmevn. Ferguson put on 100 In 102 minutes for log seventh wicket partner.shiu. unbroken up to then Stollmeyer welcomed a full loss from Walcott and smashed il lo the long on bouiularv for four runs Four byes tent up 400 un the tins in 304 minutes With a single added to the score, Ferguson pushed wide of the slip and Tang Choon. acting as runner for stoiini...i came rutuung down UM pitch. Ferguson declined the run and Tang Choon scampered hack towards his wicket. A .smart return by Clyde Wakotl to his brother Keith and the wicket was S ul down with Tang Choon out of is ground. Stollmeyer Run Out Stollmeyer was therefore run out for 208 He had been at the wicket for 306 minutes and had hit 26 fours. His innings was worthy of a first class batsman. Me might have been slumped off Norman Marshall at 21 but after that he only gave a chance to Denis Atkinson when he had leached and passed Ins double century. He received a tremendous ovation on his return to the pavilion. Jackbir joined Ferguson who cut one from Keith Walcott through the slip to complete his individual half century in I in minutes This included eight 4's The Tea Interval was now taken with Trinidad's total at 401. PerGolf Entries Close To-day ENTRIES will close today for the Open Amateur Golf Championship with a strong field already assured for the title event which will occupy the attention of local enthusiasts through the month of March. Because the event always attracts the largest Held of the year, an cighteenhole qualifying round will be necessary to reduce the matchplay starters to sixteen and 'his will lake plnce on Sunday afternoon at the Kockley Golf and Country Club. The first sixteen in Sunday's field will qualify for the Championship proper, the first round of whuh will be played a week from Sunday. The second sixteen to qualify will enter the match play rounds for the DaCosla Cup. which will bo plnyed off hardlcap. The second round ol both competitions Is M'hcdulcd t|ir Saturday, March 17. with the semi-finals the next day. Sunday, March 18 The finals. whuh will be played over a M hole stretch, will be played on Saturday, March 24 and Sunday. March 25. eighteen holes each da: Actually only the first fifteen III Sunday's round will qualify lot the title play as John B Rodger the current holder of the crown |> automatically listed. The drav will be seeded, with Rodger al No I. and the others according t< their place ofter Sundays teal. Stiff Task When the M.C.C. begn.. their stiff task of scoring 442 for first innings lead Compton clecti-d to open the batting with Washbrook in an endeavour to play himself back into form after his failure In the Tests. The experiment did not however come off. Afler he had made only 20 he was clean howled by Ian Johnson. Dewes. the Middlesex lefthander than assisted Wasbbrook In a partnership which added another 58 but after the score hao been taken to 107. Washltrook was drawn out by one of Ring's spinners and stumped. After that two more wickets fell QUICK ly and at 124 for 4 the M.C.C hopes were pinned on Hutton when stumps were druwn at the close of the second days play. Ne,ther was that trust misplaced Hutton played another grand innings, perhaps a little more subdued than usual but no' unnaturally so in the circumstance*, and in partnership with Trevor Bailey he put on 196 for the sixth wicket and gave the M.C.C. a great chance of securing first innings lead. Me eventually fell via a magnificent catch on the boundary by Loxton to Ring who had claimed five of the six wicket* which had fallen ut that stage for 134 runs. ISailey went on to his highes'. I M the tour. At the close he was undefeated with 107 and in partnership with Close had put on 44. leaving the M C.C. only 50 runs Sehind with four wickets in hand. No Lead The looked-for M.C.C. lead did not materialise on the fourth and final day and after Hassett had turned down a Compton offer lo try and arrange a finish the match ended farcically with Washl.rook bowling—and taking wickets—and Stalham and Berr. opening the M C.C.'s innings. Bailev. last man out In the M.C.C's first Innings, gave his best display with the bat since leaving England. The i.fteinoon was devoted to a carefree exhibition of betting by the Victorians, notably Harvey who smacked and smacked and smacked again at Berry In attempts to bash the ball through Ihe otT'lde field. -. After Teg After tea the proceedings grew even more and mor light-hearted. Even as a comedian likes to star In Shakespearean tragedy, so do batsmen like to try and bowl. Washbrook was put on for the first time in two lours of Australia and his straight up-anddowners promptly took two wickets for eight runs In two The final act was a reversal of the bowler-batsman effort. InI t eed, this time It was the turn of the bowlers to show Just how Mm pie the business '.s of opening an innings. The M.C C had been set 262 fee victory in a quarter of an nouf and although Berry and Statham swished enthusiastically and energeucally at everything seni down by the bowlers the M.C.C were still 228 runs short of the necessary total with nine wickets remaining when stumps were drawn! The following are the score:— VICTORIA Id INNINGS iHaasaM m. Rint ii „: Stri)M> INNING* C McDonald c Holllas b Benrv M Harvey r Hutton b Barry is B l-nt'ni c Compton b Barry is K Maalettun run will SO H. Tui .PI t Hutton b COmptou 40 A I DanMtl r Clow b Wadibm.K X n Him. c Mrlmyre b Waib(ooK IS I M Oonald Ibw. b Cloa* 0 J Hill n.,1 n.it J tv JOnnaton -1pd Mclntna i, BOWUKO ANALYSIS HvSMa ConuHM t Clan ib B*tfy HSBJM a Btatham .., S %  Ac b 1 Jotinaao RIB* J O Dwi c and b RHig W. O. A rar* • Bin* . T B Baltry "M I M*Ds-M Hill | D B Cloat • W Janntta* W E MoJUaa.lbk W Johnston B SjHMham no* ..a n Bar** k Mill 1 tar 1ST. t tor ISS. 3 lt>SM S lor M. > KM 1 tit BOWLING ANALYSIS Bin* St 8 1 W. Jolt—ton St T Hill SI 1 li I Johflaon S 1 il.-.-wn 1 • lUrvc. • Loilon %  St 1 BBTOND IMHtNGS B StMham c Hill b Ti.rsoi II B-ir EN t Wind Velocity: 12 miles per Bear. Baiometer: It a m > 29.91*. <3 p m i 2*,g47. FLOOR SHOW AN* DANCE Fbll of wlrbata; I In M. I for 101, 1 f.-r lot. t fur 1T4. 5 for Its. S lot IB), fur an. I for . %  for SSt. Ralph — Francis Fight To-night TO-NIOHT nl the Yanke. Stadium Kid Ralph fights a return bout with Kid rrnncls whon he defeated on a technical knockout on the Last occasion. Botr Hghter* have undergone serioui training for this contest whid will decide the championship u their division and for which ; Ul: has i>pcn offered, so lo-nlgh llieie will be no quarter nsked o given. Each man is In the pink o condition and all attending can be assured of all out flghtini from start to finish. Francis with his ring craft am •gperkmea, will be opposed t> rugged younger lighter. ,md ihi struggle mr a win i. bound \ a) hectic and interesting MtfW SPECIAL DANCE Dl OUR BALLROOM S\T\ HAV *lh. rl. PERCY GREENS ORCHESTRA AU Tourists Welcome >z I nnc -— By Jimmy Hstlo |ujlNA'tt*u^rriAJffiJ SpONHEeF/SST BATE, WHAT DOES SHEW?AW?AHyPO. CHONDRiAC WITH A THREE-HOUR CASE HlSTDRy... GREAT DOOR PRIZE ELIMINATION DANCE AND PRIZE A I -i Carle — Kilchen Service 9 P.M. TO 12 MIDNIGHT ENTRANCE $1.00 THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB oil SATURDAY EVENING. MARCH JKIi al 9 a'rlork JEFFREY'S TROUPE OF ARTISTES Featuring . Mies CHBIBT1NE GOBDON Miss Jeffrey's Beer 1951 and 1 Trinidad's Csrnlval Queen with Mr. I.ANDY de MONTBRt N Mr. CLYDE IIIMHscotch Tenor. Mies JUNE MA1NOOT. —Pretty Olri Dancer. v. CLIFFOKD CORBIN. —Banjo Player Mr. PETER PITTS, -< .ilv|iMini.in Miss DOROTHY de MONTBRllN —Lady-in-Waltuig to the Queen Miss DAIRY CREQUE. —M ist ress of Use Ivories as aeeempanlst. DANCING after FLOOR SHOW Admission lo Ballroem $1.00 (Local Ac Visiting Member* Only) 1.1.91.—In. —ERNIE'S Democratic Club Here We tfjf AGAIJS IKfta will ba • mealing ai • P.w. sharp' on Friday nail Match Jnd la diarusa tht problami of the *•£? ia. "' lh Sp,,n Msessag. TKuTiTioT'a' Mhlirji tr>a*llnf. No aflat dlniiar aaearhaa nnd %  her* will he a call over MENU Bar* d'eemi* The Umal Toth'y MB Mem-J K. O and Son. Kerne made Bauaatta-Peach Melba Pur.i> PVatKii Mince Plea •wi-e< and trained by s. , K J & R ENRICHED BREAD is the LOAF thai mattes A CHAMPION. W hat's oa Today Art Eshlbltlan. Queen's Park f s-m. to 6 gun. Police Courts and Ceart of Original Jniiselktlon It ..in Third day's alar af B eaaad OBBse -t Trtnldad-Barbeeloa Cricket Tournament ll.lt .i m -i Lmr VeatTT Meeting .... I P m Mobile Cinema gives Show at Foundation Hchool pasture. Christ Church 7 J0 |> m Boslng at Yankee Stadium (KM Ralph v*. Kid Francis) • p m. i INSWA Aeaall* (lab— %  CM al Ua l-.n %  p.m Braalra "Daal Traal Taar M..fea-a if B BBS a %  in.mal. lUiili Trlaailr ..J > Walk la IK, • %  ' I ut A %  1 -. f.BB. Ba ar _"Waltaaan" .4 "BaUa" ISS a S.IS —. a...i— Si... Ledv" s a a.M a %  n... iBtldaalewa) T.,....,a BOXING at the YANKEE STADIUM Brillons Hill TO-.XH.HT o KID RALPH ill..! II.. > V. KID FRANCIS i H.2 lba.) O In return match for the Light-Heavy weigh: Championship of BARBADOS 10 Rounds At the first V'-*") hint of a COLD VAPIX I NHALANT NEW RELIEF FOR ARTHRITIC PAINS But IMW trMtment does more than i these terrible agonies. A new prodnct, DOLTIN, has been created which not only gives prompt relief from the pains due to the symptoms of arthritis and iJaiaxoataSSD, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute a veey important part of the rheumatic state's background. IXJLCIN haa been thoroughly tested in medical inatifutlons. DOLCXN Is being used note with unprecedented success. IHJM'IN Is besBgr presc ri bed by doctors now. And many sufferers have already rsensaed normal living as a result of taking DOI.CIN. Don't delay. Profit by the eiperlence of fellow-vicliins of these pains. Get DOLCIN today. A bottle of 100 precious tablets coats Stt II: BOOKERS DRUG STORESBridodoion and Alpha __^___^__ Pharmacy. Z#J White Zips fastener* in lenKlhtotS. 7.8, , 10. 12. 14, Hi. 18, 2, 22. and 24 inches. Priced Irom 29c. to 98c. Coloured in lengths of 6. 7, 8, 9,10 and 12 Inches. Priced from 24c. to 44c. FASTENERS This store will be closed to business ut 12 noon on Wednesday 28th February and Thursday 1st March for the Cricket Tournament. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street PHONE 4267 FOR SURINAM PLYWOOD Treated lo resist Termites. %  H" thick in sheet* 4' X *' UT thick in sheets 3' X V First class quality, ideal for Flush Doors. Cupboards, and Panellings of all kinds. Can be Polished, Varnished or Painted. STANDARD HARDBOARD W thick in sheet! 4' X 8', !•' 3/16" thick in sheets 4' X I* WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid.



PAGE 1

TIIIRsllAY. MARCH I. lftSI BARBADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. TKLCPHONE 2301 The chart* lor announrepienu Of Birth*. UvtUin. Death.. Ark now*r0franaaitc. and In Memnnam not trie ia •1.30 en • %  % %  iU)i and IIHon Vuaalar* for any number of words up to 90. and 3 NnU per word on week-day* and 4 rmu ptt word on Sunday* lor each additional word. Pi" Birth.. Marriage or Engagement announcement* in Cartb Calling lb* cnaige nBMfof any number of worda up to M and fl cents par word for e>ch IdoiUona) word Ttrma ca.h. Phono (Odd between IM and • p.m. SII3 for Death Katie*, only aficr 4 pm IN ME MORI AM it\N*ii in loving mrmory of Jiaep h Nathaniel B* acorn who died on Msrrh l-l ItSO He L> gone but not Forgotten. nia latutie WTilte. Banort IMmui • Daughter... Adolph... % %  acem Grand ni.'. Conor. Eihorne B-aom %  Grand.1 ildrem J J M lit FOn KALE Minimum rhnrce %  < eak TI mil and M emit SMnddv* 1* uiorda — oca* 34 u-oKti 3 (mi a mnl nee*;—4 c*wi a uixd Sandau*. AUTOMOTIVE I AM KTa) Master Chevi .. L-H-I condition. Oavnei driven Apply 1 1. M Clarke. Jeweller. No II Jama Si Phot..' 3til. 1111) CAP Ow O i Morn. Minor Saloo !• model, under 3.000 miir. Own* lvinii Colony. Applv ThlrVell ZJTI MlJl-tli i IMO Mode) Ford Anglil I Cnurircy Oarage. Kill -t.f.n PICK-l'l" -One Dodge Pick-up In working order. Apply: S. E. Coir ft Co. Ltd. Foebucli Itreel 31 3 31-1 I n ELECTRICAL r-AmoOBAS*—Onr .even Valva H M.V. In A-l rondltlon on ahow al DnCoata ACo.. Ud. Beclrical Department. Noreasonable offer" irluwd 1 1 Sl-4*l I OH HIM MBtaOJM rhorpr toaoat tl cmi* and word Shadova. NOTICE IE PARISH OF BT ra.1a.al All Drama owlnd tnr dbove MaWakt O C P'Tucnial Ti ciaini MOUSES A rvrtNUHED BUNGALOW in Bedford i V HI!* bartrootra and aU modem %  StaTsES**" Av ltaW ** AprU 1st HOI-HEMode !" ihre* hed.oom || ailualed at Top Rork, having 1 1.Nt*an -eprraie Dining Room. 3 rullitiled Toilet, and Bail... and all other ram-enience* available ..nfurniahed from a?." „.i.* *"• • •• *>' 1* numth. lea.t Rin g SS3 oc K Bi SSISIAn MODFRN HOUSE I Brdroo"i~W~C a.* Baih-''" •" %  Water. Gn.ettr JW *l h^K-rl Apply Daltot, Qa.k.n. HAUNE QAEDENi-Nru Bung.lo1 % %  daymai with running staler, built ti -ardiube* and all modam ronv-iier.ee. gg L *"*„ PWrrwdi. Apply Mri. rlrdman. Hotrl Royal. la.M-dd MOOMSU.rfurmahod • %  ) WMITt rOTTAUR KLAT ft /irn ir unfumia. Purnlitvrd or unfurniahrd Oood *Hbalhlnr FMvat* boarh App, M. E. M (i-*nkl, Whltr Cotlafr. St I'lHIK M14K8 9— oootr lint oai Sumiiaut TmSL '• on '**-*"i'* AUCTION FLRNITl'RE ',.ii..iT. bai iiro for a III I'prlaht Plan CI.all. 117 00 a pr J Mat a pr. | Bcd-er Ma Buraam Cocktail Tabli llMfj I M vnriPlv r.f hih Rt—Hilpli Braid iiflrn thr %  aim In Brand Nrw fuml• tir.l linir : John BriMiwid • K0 M. Mahixany Dlnlnc a pr; Mad Tub Chaira (34 00 Tlia WO* 3 ft In. IX 00 Ida 4 ft. Ina. 133 00 a pr. ; i ITS 00 •a.-h: Mahoiany h> from M 00: Birch Chain h rlaaa •rrond hand furnl%  rwinf roll In Hardwood daily from %  am. to p.m. -.m RaktH a 3 31.—an. AUCTION RALE ni rori Rtl AT KIM., ,,,:,, On Thursday nm the at March at orlock at my ofrko. Maiatinr Lane. -M woprrty at Klrut'. Strwi c *lld Bomtuy Cottac* It conatat* of a Wall yar,dah. Drawmi and Olnlnf Rooma. J Brdroorna. Bath. Kilrhrn. Water a nd Lifht. and thr land on which It lUmda Inaprctlon on application to ihr trnant ror particular, are D'Arry A. Scolt, MMailnr I-ai.o. 34fll-3n. REAL ESTATE LIVESTOCK CAi.r-n.i* t-j •>,!,, Tin.i HointiiK Bull Cult out of Ptlncr Albrrl. ARa i. month old. Dial 3011. ami.ll-Lf.il, f.OMHJi RETBIEVER PU.PP1IS II kl old R*g\ Prdliprr both Jin. Apply Ijidv Doa Sanloa. BOM too. Portnl Spam :: 3 il Sn ItORSFI Three %  :!> Rldir Korxr* Herbert OowdlnR. Lowrr Eatate, St. M i i id m 7 51--Jn. TWO II0R51EH. HARNESn and ono ill Carl. Oolnc cheap. Apply: S. I.. Cole A Co l.l.l Rnoamck Slr'et -I 1 H—t f n. MISCELLANEOUS BATHS — In Porcolaln Enamel. In While. Orrrn. rnmrote with malcblni unlit to complete colour an it it. Top pade. A. BARNES Co., Lid. M.I Sl-lf.n. CURTAIN FITTINGS— For amarl window Btyllnf, light control, Valanceanil %  iranrrirBe Klrach. Dial 4474 A. DAnNXA CO. LTD. lJ15l-t.f.r> OHANTS SCOTCH WHISKY Served at the Hartaadoa Aquatic Club when ,..(ii, .i..i .i„l ....,! l>\ man) tnCltear 1 mniiM cnTLMineri. Sold bv u. per botlloc per cue. Mount G Dl.lilleiieLtd. •.rent-. ISM-3.1 OFFTJta will be received hv if,.unner.inrd up to the 'Bh dn' of March INI (or „* building, known . CaUla tUrtd not Included. a| lu .i,d on Dover Cooat. Chrlrt Church The puirha-er to demol.ah the buiUHnaa iu| clear the land within thirty day* frorr ihe da** of purchase K. E McKEN7.IE, Nella Plantation. St Michael. 24 I 11 tlMODERN BUNGALOW 0-\-erlonKl:m (io Courae, 3 Brdroorna, Drawing 4"d Dining Rooma. (l.llery. Oarafe aitd 'I'.ick'ti. tame* room urtderneath Appi< Gordon Ntcholli. Telephone fas*. Hl.t L ff.ii DE. St Lawrence Gap. Chr.Bt Church, near the Cable Station The dwelHnihouae comprUea Urge drawing and dining ioom< ihre* bedroom., with running water I" each lone with private ii-ihi srparale luilet and bath, and kitchen. Open verandah* to Ihe Eaat .-nd the North and rloaed verandah lo the South on the aeatlde. Three aa-rvant'* rooma. garage and frrnenIn the yard, which alao i..ni.ln. *\rrjl rocoanut and fruit treeThe priperly la aituated on ihe moat popular coaat In, the Maud with perfect Ha-bothlnaT For appoint men la lo view and for further partk-ulara rtruj 9EV. p. B. Nlrholla & Co. Solicitor*. 381.11-t f n T'u IM underaigned will aet up for aale at ornco No IT KIRh .% %  e-i. Brlddv Pilday the tnd day of March. lost, at The dwelt! nohouae called "Mini ay Lodge" with the land thereto containing by estimation •JOB aq feet, aituat* at Upper Bar Street. 81. Michael, the mlI the ite A. C. GrMvet. Irwpetiion bv appointment with Mlaa Ida Cn-avea. Telephone No. 30U. For further partlcula: and condition" nf >alr. apply to : — COTTIE. CATTORD A CO H.1.II. MB. HARDWARE Stock, of enamel war* and lalvanlae buckets are available lo whole aalera only. Stork, coneiat Of Pail.. Saucepan.. Bow la. Chamber.. Pie fir.hea. Kettle, 4 different .i.e. at landed roil* At Rilph Beard'a Show Room. rdwood Alley. 1 .3.31 3n. flODERNFOIJJ DOOPS -The dtallri v %  hed aolulion apeclal eena. movable ..rl.m UI 4416 A BARNES a. CO LTD i SHARES -M0 Sham Barbadoa hhlpplnf A Trading Co. Limited. 300 Share. narbaooa Co-operative Cotton Pactory Umited. 1 Share. Barbadoa Ptre ranee Co. Limited. 00 Sharea Bart Foundry Limited 1 Sharea BorDadoa lee Co. Umited. 1* Share. Knighta Umitec. 131, Share* Barbadoa Telephone Co. Umited The above ahare* will be offered lo public competition on Friday nexl the tnd March I Ml. at 3 pm. at the office of the uitdrruftird CAKRLSGTON A REALY. Lucaa Street. ONE. WINDMIIJ. complete with pump rnd tower. Two lawn mower., one nearly new. Call 4134. 3T.1.31—3n. VENETIAN BLINDS.-Klrach Sun-air. all metal De l.i.f Venetain blind., to vour aea. delivery 3 week* n ji 4478 A BAJINES A CO.. LTD. IS 3 31—t f n. Wli i %  X'FTHOD ltd. 4039 give you Sanded Call Et floor thai new look by the NU FIOOR elyn Roach A Co. zriai— if n. WINDOW GI.ASS Sparkle Eloarered Sheet and Plate Glass for all need.. W* nit la vour requirement* O. W. HCTCHINSON A Co. Lid. Dial 4313 lil.M tin YACHT "CYCIANE ,, -llffi. Fc %  • Inlernallnnal one-dcaign Toriudo Claa*. In flr-t ctaM racing trim. Wtnr-r of the 3 Trial Bare*. Prlca n;0'0 If. JAIVV* JONXfl A CO.. LTD. PHONE 4tn iTtsi-dn. II;IISO\AI living credit i ee Buikn. .-pon.ible f< CHARLES WFEKES M ,r,hf,.'l.l St Philip 3 SI 3 WANTED Mlalnun rharp* week 73 real* and M rewli .Vuedov* 34 irordi — oaar M >•>-" 3 ceatr a U'ord \ttrk a cnu a u-ord 5aada v r. HELP Young Lady with knowledge of type. .riling avd Shorthand Preferably one with aoane previou. e*peilei ce In CommlHion Office work. Appli in writing to — JAMES A LYNCH A Co Ltd POD 140 Bridgetown SIS 31— TFK MISCELLANEOUS inta lo buy Antique i Advocate Co. I 111-3-1 I\fMFDIATE CASH for diamond jewel. ler*. old China, allver and Sheffield Plata Phone 44 or call al OnRRlNGaai. adjoining Royal Yacht Club aM.ll.--T.F-N IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewellerv. gold nugget*, com., miniaturelade Old B W I Stamp. OORRINGES Antique Shop. Dial 4*3f>. %  MaHe Hn LOST SWEETSTAKF TICKET -Serle. V 4J4T! Tinder ple.-e rM^rn to Leonard Bjer T.veadt,de Rd. I E t li'MI PUBLIC NOTICES Ti) rent* per aonte line oa leeek-dovi ind II cewa per apote line oi .^uadni/B, minimum cruirae 1130 on week-dow* and Ii in on Sunday IUMIIIS C'HAMBIB Or' I'.IM'IIILCI IXAMINATIONR Eh trie, for the Summer Elamlnalloni. 1011. of Ih* London Chamber of Com^e mut reach the Department of Education. The QarrUoit. not later than oon on Saturday. Ihe 17th March. IMI. I The entry fee will be aa followa: — Single Subjecla II WJ c.i, Foreign Language. S3 13 each Full CertuVale *wi. Department of Education Mill %  NOTICE PARIRH Or RT. PHII-IF TttTET BTE-ELECTION pointrd thr Church Ilov. 1 School, near Pariah Church, ai Ihe place where P*rl.hloner* of the Pariah of SI. I hilip iiiul other peraon. duly qualified of VeatrATnei vmfale for the aald Pati.li n Monday Mh day of Mi the haura of 10 and 11 o'clock in irning to elect a Vestryman in u Ernet) Lyle Eaq. deceaaed. Sgd P. 8. W. SCOTT. Parochial Treaaun Y. M. C. A. TF.VBEB FOR IMOIWI OP Bt'lLDIhU The Board of Direclora of the Y.M.C A. in Ml*. Application for Tender, for the erection of a building al Headquarter!. pinfold Street The Plana and Specincaliona can be inaperted at the Secretary* OrnC" Y M < %  A from Tharaday lit March IV M..-'.*. Nth March between the hour. Of 10 a.m and 4 p m daily except flundava Ta a algri tnuat be submitted i. Sealed Envelope, and addressed lo the Hecrelary of Ihe Y.MCA.. Pinfold Street not liter than Neea 7lat Maiah. Trnder. %  ubmilted will be opened at a Board Meeting to be held al I* pa aa %  h* II.I Mareb. The Board doe* not bind ilaetf to accept the lowest Tender HT-ltnERT II WILUAM7*. Secretary 34.131—dn NOTICE PAIIRH OP ITS i vi i. II vi i ALL peraoata. Firm, and Corporal I A lag Airoiint. against Ihr Pari.r Salt.i Michael are raquened to .em their Vouchers iduly nuuae out Duplicate' to the respective Departmen.a rot later than Thursday. March 134h Voucher Form. •Orutinai and Dupll ratemay be obtained from thia OBVe FRED J ASHBY Churchwarden*. Clerk Churchwarden'. Office. Parochial Building*. Bridgetown 1 3 317„ HOTKBB W her* I. i-.rtner.rup heretofore aubaMtin. tween ARTHUR JAMBS DOOfU Y ALFRED A1XXAND4TR MACKLE I Ing on bualnaa* aa Gar. at K-eh .el. Street Bdgetown under the style er Ba-m of Supreme MOTiil; COMPANY. ha. been dUaolved r.' Pataruaii IBgl. ao far a. og arid Alfrel Aieiaaaavr Machar, who ha retired (m the *>ld fb-av Dated the 33rd aV. of FeAruarv IMI A J DOUBLY A A MACKIE TAKE NOTICE CHATEAU laws of the Dominion of Canada. farturen. whose trade or buatneaddrasa I. cily Dairy Building. Spadii i Cretceni. Toronto. Province of Ontari< Canada, na. applied for the reoiatratioi of a trad* mam in Part -A" nf Rect-te In laaatrt of rhtea. butter, craam milk and milk products, daily pro duct.; substance* used a* food or ai. ingredlenu In food. and wll' be entitled to redlatet the same aflat one month from the 37U1 day of Februa.v. IMI. unlea. some person shall in me meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of sucn regi.tration The trade mark can be •een on application al my ofBce. Dated tut. 341h dav of February. IMI 11 Wll I 1AMS. Regl.trar of Trade Mark tl j UTAKE NOTICE SEVILLA RUM That CONTINtNTAL DISTIUJNi CORPORATION, .i corporaiton organlaoo a-.d f.iHing u-der Ihe law. of the taat. of Del .-.are. United Bute, of Aaaaarara -loi-ade .., L.> taaaa -ddreaa i. No 14 0 W.lt., I Si.e.t PtiiUdelphia. *sTU.i, of PvnaaylvanM, V S.A-. Manufacturer. -i for ihe raariatration of .i Lde mark n Part "A of Regi.ler m apart of whl.k>. gin. rum, rve. ak-o .he cordiaU and liqoaur. and other pot aDlr duitilled aJcanolar baveragaa, %  >.> win be entitled to register leal ift. r one month from ihr rfth da) February Ifll. unleea nr person I n Ihe aaeantlme give notice in dupll v office of oppeaitlen of i The trade r-rk can be een on applk-atum al my office Dated tin. S4th day of Pebruaav. I: II WILIJAMS. Regatrar of Trade Mark 31 1 IITAKE NOTICE DIXIE BELLE That CONTlNENlAi. OlSTnjJNG CORPORATION, a corporation organised ar.d canting under the law* of the 84, of Del.iware. United Stale, of Amerl whose trade or business adttreaa la 1 1420 Walnut Street. Philadelphia, State of Pennaylvama. U.S.A.. Manufacturer. has applied for Ihe regutratlon of I trade mark in Part "A" of Reglater H respect of whisky, gin. rum. rro. alcohol, e.idtal. and liqueur, and other pot able Q i. tilled aicohulic beverage*, am will be -nillied to reglater the aanu after one month from the Ilth day O February 1031. unless* —me person shall In Ihe meiiillme give notice In duplicate lo me al my office or opposition of aocr regtatration The trade mark cart bo aeen on application al my office. Dated thl. 34th day of February IJJfll H WIUJAMS. Regutrar ol Trade Mark* 37 3.11-an TAKE NOTICE HALO Trail THF ilVAIlD MANUFACTURING OMPANY LIMITED. Manufartureti, rituh Company. whose trade or JOl n oag addreas la Ca.tle Boulevard Nottingham. England, has applied for ih. itration of a trade mark in Port of Reglater In respect of all kind, of hairnet*, including hairnet* of attk in. human hair, rayon, nylon and r •ynlhetir -urm. bandeaux, aporta grip* hair i. and will be entitled to regi.ler thr earne afl'i one month from the llth lay of February 1031 miles, -.me person ihall In the maafataaM give iiotlre In duplicate to me at my office of oppnu. lion of urh registration. The trade C can be aeen on epplirallon at my Dated o-.lt 34lh day of February, mi II. WIUJAMS. ricgWtrar of Trade M-i 3T 1 51 Jn TAKE NOTICE PHILADELPHIA That CONTINENTAL D1ST1IJ.INO CiiRpouATlON. a corporation organlied the law* of the State ol Delaware. United Slate, nf America, whose trade or buetneaa addre** I. No. 14W Walnut Street. Philadelphia. Slate of Pennavivania, USA. Manufacturers, polled for tho regi.lrntMn of a trade mark In Part A of Regi.ler in respect of whl*ky. gin. rum. rve. alcoand liqueur* and other poii alcoholic beveraae.. and win be entitled lo reglater the same ith from the 37th ggrjl "I IVh, hag lL ..-l.rr. n II : • hall I my office. Ha itth day of February. 1*31 M WIUJAMS, Bcglitrar ol Trade Mark. 37 1 II 3ll TAKE NOTICE GAYOIL |M PINCH IN, JOHNSON A AfWOTES LIMITED. • Briti.h Company. i ran, whose trade or buHnesa addreaa It 4. Carlton Garden*. London. gland, has applied for Ihe regltI a trade mark In Part "A" of Register In respect of palnta, varnishes, her than Insulating varnl.hi. enamel. the nature of palr.ti. painter*' colours, distempers, Japan*, lacquer*, paint and varnish driers, wood preservative*, wood •Ulna, nntl-corrosive and anti-fouling composition*, and aiitl-corro*lve oil*, and will be entitled to reglater the aame .'fter one month from the 37th day Ftbruary INI unless tome peraon .hall In the meantime give notice In duplicate ll my office of opposition of auch TAKE NOTICE SWIFTS ft Win t.i>MPANV. a corpora| under the ,. ol tno State ol Htinola. United uaineee addrew I* Vmoi, gto<'k Yards. LOaaO SsaM o UUnois. USA, hat aabuad lor me rcgurtration ol a trade aJ auD>u>iurt uarn aa (rea.eut, in fooda. inc udlng lieah. premaal and meat products. eapeiUlly beel. vra. lamb, mutton, veal, poultry. n*h, ,nd i.biuu and food product, derived herefrom tautage and sausage m*mt. .* %  •. cheese, chile con came, lard, .B Br ti gBB h gr edible tttfa. edible tallow, maigwrlne. oleoniargai Ine ice cream Dtitter. bultarrnalk, gelatin, canned %  aaetablea, canned baby food*, canned ruit* dried fruit pick lea and condlnents, vinegar, jam*. Jrllle*. marmalade. le Hllei. rice. meal. |ieanu|., tig-, uatea, -auin.. cod liver oil. .all. .lock feed.. .KHiHiy feed., IOK feed., dog feed-, bone neal. and oyster ahelkf. Sttap. and ingredienu of toap.. inch id ng viap bar.. huu> flake., liquid uap ind powdered aoap. dramlng. poluh ng. and aroun ig prrparaliona, and leleraenta. Feiiilirer.. partlcularLy artifleial fer'liner, and Ingredient, thereof, including tM peat hard wood ashes, aaaa mm shaving* Chemical, eapeclallv .uperphotphate, utphurlc acid, phoaphale rock, aoda and -jda producU. nitrate of soda, .ulphate X amonia, ammonium phosphate, cyalamld, aluminum aurphate. rimsulphate, %  narauutaao .ulphate. tulphatr of putaidt. igncullural linvestone. gypsum, muriate >f potash, calcium nitrate, copper tulahate. and potaaslum nitrate insecticide, and fungicide., parttcularv arsenate of lead, calcium arsenatr. nlcoiinc -ulphate. and paradu hlorobened I baa Urtr |?' "*'* "** %  W * M> %  nd ta Hide, and .kin., hair, feather*, wool. *>ne-. horn*, hoofa animal g1a>.d>, anlnal eating* and membrane* Ohw. and adhesive*, including anlmgl. ^one^and hide glue*, and vegetable adFartlllrer .preadera. aotl testing "I., hatchery equipment, baby chick.. _?.i* *. !" 1 rn,l, l !" and will b•ntltled to leai.ter the umr after one ironih fiom the llth dav of Eebru>-y. ML ks aonte par-on shaFln he meantime give notice In duiilmle -.I".* ^! m> 'iS!** Pf PfPo'H'on of auch eai.nallon The trade mark ran he %  eeri on application al my office. JJated thl. Mth day of February, IMI. M H. WILLIAMS, RegUtrar of Tiade Mark* r I Si -in TAKE NOTICE TANGO eJOKLtSF "VARD MANUFACTURINC (OUPANY UMI-PBD. Mftmifaelurrr.. Britith Compaiiv. whoa* trade a, bualne.* ndd-c.* It Castle Boulevard riottmgham. bigiand, haa applied for th. reii.1,,1,,.,, (ll ,. trade mark In parl of Reg, MI, ,„ reapert of all klnd> alrneta. including hairnet, of .ilk. *i. humnn hair, rayon, nylon and other synthetic varna. bandeau., aporil *lumber nets, hair curlera, hair grip., hair pad*, hair tranalormattoix and bairdrearer s ware* and aun .. and will be entitled to register thi same after one month from tht day of FVfrtuary IMI unleea aome p*r*n> %  hall In the meantime give notice In duplicate to me at mv office of opposlion of *uch ragnatratlon The tradi "ink ran be aeen on application at in) Dated thl* llth day of February, mil II. WILLIAMS. Regl.trar of Trade Mark.. 31 1 Sl-ln Tiir/tin-Sunt/s iHtle Rout In London From <,i:otH.t. WHITING SOUTHAMPTON it.it.' SBadc, Kmi Ire nttddle %  in Australia, will dcfwid hLt litlr agdinsl Brttain's Randolph Turpln in laonrloo IB M.v or June An attempt will then bf made to mgU-h the winner with America's Ray Robinson for the world liile he won from Jake I^Mott* in Chicano thi* week. Promoler Jack Solomons. home from South Africa loade-.' wilh trophies ol the chase — incliidinn C500 won in this ship's PAGE ^1 V I S :he daily run— ii this news u. him here to-djiy. Onlv lb* linaneial details and LBU In Tuipin v Sand. i.-ir.a TI u> be aeUled.' said Solomons *'You can '. %  wanting 10 fight i H i ...... w.rms up a Int. I %  hall the oWtetlM wilh Sands's manager. Tom Maguire over ihe week-end" "I have travelled half-way round the win Id in the last few nu nth*", added Solomons Rut %  prospects than our own three champions Randolph Tuipin Jack Owdirtr and Don CeckeU —L.r.s CHANCERY SALK The undrrmeniioned property will be set up for aak> at the Regiatrf n Office. Public Buildin-* Rmlgetown between 11 noon and 1pm. for the -urn and on the date .penned below If not then aoM, it will be aet up oa each .ureceding: Fnday at Ihe same place and during the same houia until Mid Full particular, on application to me. RFYNOID ST Ct All! BflCaalMOM I'lalntiff Of ivrn sr Cl.MR IHVTT1N Defendant r or par.-cl of laitd tiluatat Codrlngt" ind of Barbado. aforesaid i all perrhc. Abultina and hounding o i 'ami. late of S g Small 1 I |g feel wide or howeve lelluir him. rtOI'IWTT ALL THAT certain p Hill in the pan.it of Si Michael and 1 land. Of Ihe E.late of Sarah In r w . i nrw Hcarilev. on the IN.blic Road and on a road el.e the *ame may abv.l and bound Toaeihi i woo % %  % % %  %  %  % % % %  and all and ungular ..iher the buildirut. and erection, iheieoi .la.O.na and bailal arlth Hie aptn.rlrnan.*. the piope.tv of the DeferMtanl. i rair rim eiooo o* on B A,. or .... ., .„,,,, Regiatrar-ln-Chancery. II Fehruaiv. 1*01 3"3 31 3n TAKE NOTICE RED ROSE That T II RSTABROOKH CO. LIMITED. a Canadian Corporation, whose trade or buMneae addrra. la gaol Park Avenue. Montiaal. Canada, haapplied for the reglatral.i of a trade n-ark in Part "A" of Reg late, in respect of lea. coffee, coffee lol.Hne. and apices. .nd will be enlllled to reglater Ihe aame -Her on n.onth Irom the 37th day ol Februar.. IMI milee* .tnte persiui U..II In Trie meantime give notice m duplicate to me at my office of opposition ol aurh regtilratMn. The trade mark ran be seen on application al my office. Dated thi. 14th day ol February. IMI. II WIUJAMS Regl.trar of Trade Mark. 11 1 .'I in TAKE NOTICE JANTZEN Thai JANT7.CN KNITTING MILLS DfC .. i iporatton duly organized under tho law. of Ihe State of Nevada, whoa* trade or buslnesa address I* J.nitirn Center, J*orlland. State of Uiego". Un.led Ktatea of America, hat applied for regie Kerutei in rtaaFact od arilrlea of clothing. and will be ONlitaMl M legialer tin .-me aHer one month from Ihe 1711 das of Fetiruarj IBM unlr.. some peravi •hall In the meantime give notice In duplicate to ma at my office of oppoai lion ol auch registration The Iratl* aeen on application al my sffice. 11 '.-.I : i 34th i |>hC..tl.l ,. %  • %  ,,. Dated thl. Mth day of February. IMI. II. WILLIAMS. Regittrar of Trade Marks 31 3 M-Sn TAKE NOTICE CHARTER OAK That CONTHMFNTAI. DlflTTl LINO OUill>t)ItATIt>N. a corporation organised I'd ell'tlng under Ihe law. of Ihe State >f Delaware. United State* of America, ahoae irade or bnalne.a addresa it 143* Walnut Wrert. Philadelphia. Stale of Pennsylvania. U.S.A.. Manufacturer*, haa ipplled for ihe regl.tr a I ion of a trade r.irk In Parl "A" of IteaiateT in rcpect if whisky, gin. rum. rye. alcoholic ordlala and liqueur, and other potable listilled alcoholic bevtrogea. and will mtitled lo reglater the aame after < ith from the 31th day ol Febru, IPI Llll give notice In duplic. t my office of opposition of aueti rrgtaralton The trade mark ran be .een n application at my office Dated thi. Mth day of February, ItSI I! WnjJAMS. Regntrnr of Trade .Mai. 37 3 91-jn. TAKE NOTICE DODGE That CHPYSLKR CORPORATION, a corporation organiied and estatlng under Ihe law* of the Stale of Delaware. United Male* of America, whose trade or buat aafatra Mai Highland Park. Detroit. State Michigan. USA Manufacture... ha* applied for the reffaatralion of a ti mark in Part "A" of Reglater m respect Of transportation eWmenta of all kind*. maior driven vehicle*, automobile* and truck* of all kind* and for all purpc parte of motor driven vehicle*, auto l-ik. and truck* and their accveaorie v*Tr description, and will be entitled engine* of all kind* and lor all purpose* parts thereof and aroroasilii thereto of every dear rip t lo n. Internal combustion to rtguter Ihe tame after one month from Ihe 37th day of Fabruaay IK) unl*-** aome person snail In thi rnoantlma give nature In duplicate to aw at my office of opposition of auch registration The trade mark ran b* teen on application at my office. Dated Urn Mth day of February. 1*31 H WILIJAMS, Reftrtrar of Trade Mark. IT iii-m TAKE NOTICE KINSEY That KaNSRY D!rriLHNO CORPORATION, a corporation organised and exlrting under Ihe lawa of the Rtale of Delaware. United State, of America whoar trade oi hu.inea. addreg* la MfU Walnut Straet. Philadelphia. State ol Pannaylvanla, USA, Manulaetui.r*. "• applied for the regl.tr.lion of a trade "ark in Parl "A" of Reglater in reaper! i whiaky, gin. rum. rye, alcoholic eorliala and liqueur* and other potablr fiitnied alcoholic beverage*, and will lie I lo reglater the aame after one from the llth day i.f Febru.i^ nlea* tome person anaII in Ihe me give nolle* In duplicate to me office of opposition of such regla%  n-.(,.de i rk t tan aiy office Dated thl* 34th dav of FebruaaM. WILLIAMS. :t-yi-Tir of Trade Mark. 17 1 31^.1 TAKE NOTICE Th atSI R ROBERT BURNETT A CO LHHTtD. a limited liability compant rrglatered under the law* ol Oreai Britain. DUiiller*, whose trade 01 Imame.* addreaa t. The Dl.tllkry. Seagfa-Fg Had. Pulham. I.o.do.t SW ,i England, ha* applied for the reglalratior of a Irade mark In Part "A" of Regl.tei In respect of gin of all description. and will be aril Hied lo reglater Ihe .atru after one month from ihe ITth dai Of FrbniBB/ 1H1 unless some person .hall i the meantime give notice tn duplicate i m* at my office Of oppo.it ion of auch tl.tratlon Th* trade mark can be seen i application at my office Dated thl" 34th day of February. H WIUJAMS Rrgi.trnr of Trade Mail I 1 '" | TAKE NOTICE SIN0LETTE Thtl PINCHIN. JOHNSON al ASftOCL /TES. LIMITED, a Urtli.li Company. Manufacturer a. whoae Irade or bualneas nddreaa I. 4. Carlton Garden*. London, S W England, ha. applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part 'A" of Reglater in reaper! of paints, mrm.hu tnthrr than Iniulaling varnlaln. enamel. 1 1 m the natuie of paUili. palutaas' caluurw. dlatempeni, )apan*. lacquers, paint and nrah drrrra. wood pieae ,..ti .,-1 (t ilu compoaitiont. and antl-roriome t.i will be entitled to reglater the tame after one month from Die ilth da> ol fafcuaig 1901 unleea tomo peraon ahall in thr meantime give notice in duplicatr to me al my office of opp>i.itinn of -ueh regutratlon. The trade mark can be aeen on application at my office. p.W thi. Mlh day of Februarv. IBM It WILLIAMS, Regutrar of Trade Mark. If I 31 in Sfifiilifir Mawa^c After strenuous work or play MASHAOt: removes fidigue poisons .ind p new energy. W JOHNSON, II.MT C'rumptun si I 3 'ii —la '///////AVeV////// TAKE NOTICE Thai MACLEANS. UMITED. a RrlUsri nm pa n y. Manufacturing Chemlit hose trade or lauainesa addres. I. flreat Wtat Road. Brentford. Mlddleaea;. Ing land, has applied fur the legi.tiMion of a trade mark in Part ~A" of Regi.ler in retpeet of medicinal preparatlona. an-l Will be entitled lo register th* aame after rne month from the 31lh day of February 1441 unleia aome per*on aha 11 in Ihe meantime give nolk-e In duplicate to me M my office of opposition of auch regu trallen Th* trad* mark ran be aeen on ggfaaWr l lon at mv office Daled thi. Mth day of February IMI H. WIUJAMS. Iteg'itrsi of Trade Mark* V 1 II—In PUBLIC MMTINi. Thr.r will be a Tubltr Meeting %  trial ut.drr Ihr auspices f fill: BAKRAIMIS I.AHOl R I'M! I i I'. \\:\: iniiv WOKKERS' I NION tl lllll A CJIAKTI.H. SI Tclrr On FRIDAY. 2NII M \K< II 1051 at 8 I'M. Speakers:—F I.. tValrolt, M V r K N H lluabanda II.0P F. E. Miller, M C.P (i II. Adanu, M F P OIIIIM Al LIFTS! THANFS D JT WIIATS IN A NAME When you *ny B vert on Weekes— l-vii.n thinks <>[ Crickel, -V Mi Know likewise. BVwTJhMMj thinks of Cooking, .. yiiu Say C. A. Service. SUNGLASSES For LADIFH CENTS Amailng Slrles & Values! THANTS Vt MIIIII: I ii I Ihe Health (onlfroiiri' J; v al Ifurrna Park on Jv •1 Tuesday. March tilh \ * will l>e opened by i \ HI4 KXCEI.LENCY THE C fi (JOVFRNOR C at 9 30 a fn Utd not .it | |fl \ | a. pi.vii.u.ii ...ivt.-i -.! ;>*> %  > %  >> %  > \* J ^t^^^e^V>'XaVOO0' REAL ESTATE PROPERTY in easily maiiaKcable form up to 125.800 Wanted for ovcrscoinvestor. REAL ESTATE AOENT AUCTIONEER PLANTATIONS Bl'ILDINO Phone 4640 COOPER SPLIT ROLLER BEARINGS "Spill" Feature enablr* dismantling and rr^inaemhllng lo lir effrrled uilh raae. ipeed and economy CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. rir.r. HEAD LAsr ,\<.I:MS I * • CHARLES McENEARNEY & CO. LTD. '.••-; v ; looa a attae.. n t W/AMK SHIPPING NOTICES MONTBBAL, Al STRAI.l M .\ ZEALAND LINE. LIMITED . n ihrLia*i B.n. .. lading wtU %  Trinidad %  %  i I 0 leeward Islands For turthrr patiarular* aupl) PtJWfXSS. WITHV 1 CO LTD. art] Da COSTA CO LTD. The M V 'CACKll'g '. 1 for St laaal. atn February -am 11M V %  CARIBBW Will %  e-ngei. lor Vnllgvi-. Montwrral. N.vl sod St Kilt. v. •th Murrh 1051 The M V -DArjIWOOD-' uill %  Ortnaaal and Ariiba. and P-atengers .. %  WI SCHCONFR OWNCR* ASBOlVIATION l.v'C V.. I *i; SACUENAY TERMINALS ( \NAIII\S MMVK I From Halifax. N.S.. St. John, N.B Tn Barbados. Trinidad. Demerara. B.C. %  "Hi It l|l| • POI VCREST SUNDIAL LOADINCI DATES N Hart* .' %  l-h %  M.I. i 11 April I K SKRVK I Fr-a. Ulasaaa.. Li.erpasi N,„ rl L-ad.a. Ne-tp-it "SUNRRI.t %  stmwHrr Glaa**N li.-ip—i aaaa From Rotteidam. a. "SUNAVW Anlwerp. Loaadon Rallerdam l Ma. i ..r.i,.i Arrival A-era l.ad.a line. nroJtet***) II Mar II Apr Anenls: PLANTATIONS LIMITED. IMmiitITtl.'t NEW YORK SEKVM.E I. 11..I Fehruarv arrives Barb NEW ORLEANS SERVICE i w u.iw MRVK I: Naaa* sf Ohlg M.' OA l-AllTNKM. ' AIAXiA l-EOASUS'' "ALCOA ItOtNANT" \OMtHntH Ml M "AKTtlA PRNNANT a "ALCOA PAMTNSJe Dm March Mh S.il. f.ti SI .1 ^hn A, lrt Mar.h loth ..'... Joftu •nm* v !" t. h.v. Ilmilpd p.,.,.i^,r %  mounoSltloa. j HOBIRI THOM LTD. — NK VORK ANII LTD.—CANADIAN SIRVI1 K PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Product*, Limited. Roseau. Domini*., for sailing to Europe, The uiual ports of call are Dublin, London, or Rotterdam. Single fare £70. usual reductions for children. ( § WE CAN SUPPLY .... GALVANISED BARBED WIRE NOW AT PRICES THAT CANNOT BE REPEATED Plantations Ltd. %  y.:::::::::;; :::::::;:::'.-,y^.-.-.::::::::::::::::' RECENT ARRIVALS of SELECT THESE EARL > . Klmonts Wax A Klernrr h .nun. A Polishing Cloths Hack %  .' Lamps Spot Lamps Trartor Lamps Illuminated l ruder Ciuldes Jeu'rlrd I vi.tu-i ripe Egtenstons Hlrering uiii Covers Bumper in*. flreaae Uuns 6 Volt A 12 Volt Haras Mir.i I.Adhesive VsJve Grinding Ce-mpound M" li niif s Bearing Blue A Under Black Heal Roslstln| Palal Flake f.mphllr Flux Ite r. ni. n Tester* r. 'i, OtMM Brass Shim Mela) Body Solder Plane ....l Blsdrs — Also) — nersrbonlslng )...k.i Sets Tor all popular Eiiclbb and American Can and Trucks ECKSTEIN BROTHERS Biy Slr.fl