Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
~~ ilhoseteeilee E ss eesntinsnteggeeteer



ESTABLISHED 1895



ARUNDELL MAY FL



Barbados



American Will
Command
British Fleet

LONDON, Feb. 26.

NEW SHOTS WERE FIRED to-day in the new
“Battle of the Atlantic’ started by the ap-
pointment of an American Admiral as supreme
Commander of the Atlantic Pact Naval Forces.
Prime Minister Attlee, after considering a vig-

orous protest told the Commons that the

rit

Government still supported the choice of an

American.

He tried to calm troubled waters stirred up by Mr.
Winston Churchill on this matter last week by announcing
that a British Admiral would be in charge of the eastern
Atlantic and the sea approaches to Britain in time of war.

Red Chairman
Dismissed
FRANKFURT, Feb. 26.

Oskar Mueller, Chairman of the
Qommunist Party in the American
Zone State of Hesse has been dis—
missed from his post after a
speech of self-criticism before a
party congress this week-end. A
Party Communique published in
today’s Frankfurt Communist
newspaper said:

“The Congress decided that
Comrade Mueller (who is also a
member of the West German
Parliament) will in future fulfil
his duties to the party in g differ-
ent party function.

The communige continued; “In-
spired by the spirit of criticism
and self-criticism contained in
speeches of delegates to the
Hessian Communist Party Con-
gress Meeting here on February
24 and 25, it was realized that the
party line must make a marked
turn '% its entire ideological ‘and
organisational policy and structure.

“The Congress therefore unan-
imously elected Klau Weigle as
new Chairman of the Hessian
Party”. Weigle demanded a new
Communist Party policy cam-
paigning for Germany’s national
liberation unleashing a broad
mass movement against
German remilitarisation

Social Democrat and Communist
for the establishment
all-German

workers
of an
assembly.
The Congress appealed to all
comrades, whatever rank of duties
‘they had, to do yy their power
the

constituent

to strengthen Communist
Party.

The German press reports said
that Robert Liebrand, Chairman
of the Communist Party in_ the
American zone of Wuertemberg
Baden had also been dismissed
from his post at a recent Party
Congress.—Reuter.



Italy’s Red Chief
Faces Open Revolt
On Return To Rome

VENICE, Feb. 26.
Italian Communist leader Pal~
niro Togliati arrived here today
after ten weeks convalescence in
Moseow to face an_ anti-Comin-
form revolt in his 2,000,000 mem-
ber rty
He 1 returns to his headquarters
in Rome’s “Street of Dark Shops”
to face an open Anti-Cominform
revolt which broke out in his ab-
sence under the leadership of
Communist deputies Aldo Cuccoi
and Valdo Magnani. —Reuter.

=|
and
preparing united action between

But an American—forecast as
Admiral William Fechteler—would
be in overall command.

Churchill said he would study
the new statement by the Prime
Minister but might find it necess-
ary to force a debate, ;

It looked at this point as if the
battle had been broken off for the
time being. : .

But then Churchill's ef lieu-
tenant Mr. Anthony Eden, raised
the question as to who would de-
cide on movements of warships in
the Atlantic. ’

Attlee said he thought it was
“quite essential” that the Atlantic
Supreme Commander would have

wer to transfer forces from one
Riantie area to another. This
brought Churchill sailing back in-
to the attack.

“Nothing like that ever existed
in the last war and never could
have been accepted. Our life de-
pends upon the maintenance of
our sea approaches, whereas
though the United States may suf-
fer a great deal, her life is in fact
not so affected,” he declared.

Under Supreme Command

Mr. Attlee said that the area
which would be under the Su-

reme Commander would be the
North Atlantic Ocean excluding
the Mediterranean and British-
European coastal waters.

Attlee said the North Atlantic
would be split into Eastern and
Western, areas. The Eastern—
most vital for Britain—would be
under the command of the Brit-
ish C ander-in-Chief of the
Home Fleet.

In time of war he would com-
mand not only British forces but
also those American and other At-
lantic Pact countries stationed in
the area. .

The last war had taught that it
was important to have an overall
Supreme Commander in the North
Atlantic. It was one battle field
in which the mobile threat of the
submarine must be matched by a
flexible defence system. p

There must be quick redisposi-
tioning of forces to meet the shift-
ing threat. : ‘

In considering the nationality of
the Supreme Commander the Gov-
ernment had had to consider the
relative sizes and potential re-
serves of the navies and air forces
of the various Atlantic powers.

Despite Britain's great naval
traditions, she could not alone un-
dertake the defence of the North
Atlantic.

Attlee added: “The Government
are satisfied that in time of war
the proposed arrangements will
ensure both the defence of these
islands and the fullest participa-
tion of all North Atlantic powers
over the whole North Atlantic
Ocean.”

In. peace,

no British ships_ or
planes would

be put under a Su-
preme Commander except for
periods of combined training,
which would be necessary.

Answering questions, Attlee
said the appointment of a Supreme
Commander in the Mediterranean
was still being considered.

Britain. herself would control
the allocation of her mechant fleet.
—Reuter.



U.S. Must Send More
Troops To Europe

WASHINGTON, Feb. 26.

John Sherman Cooper, United States delegate to the United
Nations said today that if the United States failed to send
more troops to Europe it could lead to “the greatest sur-

render in history”.

Testifying before the Congres-

———sional Committee on Troops for

Red China Gets
American Oil

HONG KONG, Feb. 26.
Some oil sent to Chinese Na-

tionalists by the United States! by

has found its way to Communist

China. Usually reliable sources
said here to-day it was. shipped
from Keelung, Formosa, to Portu-

guese Macao, from where it passed
into the hands of Communist
agents.

These sources believe the oii
was then transferred across the
Macao border or sent by junk to
Communist territory. All types of
fuel oil are now commanding high
prices in China owing to the Brit-
ish and American ban on export
to Communist countries:

Communist agents are said to
be trying to buy up quantities
at various points in the Far East
for shipment to China direct or
through Macao.

Important commodities not in-
cluded on Britain’s embargo; list

ere still being sent through Hong| had already

Ke China .—Reuter.



1g into

Europe issue, Cooper Republican
adviser to the State Department
said that American participation
was indispensible to the develop-
ment of adequate Western Euro-
pean Defence against any aggres-
sion.

I,am.certain that an intellectual
and moral decision has been made
the Governments of the United
Kingdom, France and Italy that
their countries must make the full
defence effort and that they will
support fully the defence of West-
ern Europe”, he said.

Casper who attended Atlantic
Pact defence meetings in London
and Brussels said there was full
understanding in Europe of the
aggressive purposes of Soviet
Russia and their threat to Europe.

Cooper said that since Korea,
Britain’s defence budget was in-
creased three times and that pro-
grammes Were underway which
would double military production
in two years and» quadruple pvo-
duction in the third and fourth
years,

Britain had as large a force in
Germany as the United States and
made the decision t

send riore troops.—Reuter

TUESDAY,



Danes Seek
Formula For
“Srieaking Death”

COPENHAGEN, Feb. 26.
Professor Hakon Lund to-day
started seeking a formula for a



yesterday.

deadly poison gas known as
“sneaking death.”
The Danish Government has

given him 175,000 kroner to pro-
duce the gas and then work out
measures to combat it according
to civil defence administration,

Unconfirmed reports here say
Russians -had held 10,000 tons of!
the gas in secret factories in East?
Germany. «

The slightest whiff of it can
blind a man and destroy his nerv-
fous system.

Ry 0. S.

Test ended in a draw.

ON THE
* SPOT

FRATING, Essex, England,
Capt. W. J. Goldsworihy,
tired of goingcut-inenight ©
attire to quieten his dogs,
installed a microphone by
his bed. Now when the dogs
bark he silences them via
loudspeaker in the kennels.

—(C.P)



pes wipe it af taken into the
system either breath or
through the skin. = ine r

Lund who will work in a gas
mask said in an interview, “All
security precautions will be taken.
A special laboratory is being fit-
ted out for research. A protection |
dress made of asbestos is. being}
made for me. {ft is
against all known cases.”

Since we know very little about
this new stuff, I prefer to work
without assistance, But I am keep-
ing a reliable assistant informed
of the progress of my work so that
if necessary, he can continue with
the work.”

When Professor Lund has pro-
duced the gas, Professor Rasmus-
sen of the pharmaceutical institute
of Copenhagen will start work on
finding protection against it.

Professor Rasmussen said _ to-
day that according to information
from France, there was a German
factory near Breslau which at the
end of the war was capable of
producing 10,000 tons of sneaking
Jeaths a year
aken
said.

effective





Argentine Meat For
Britain Via Brazil
“Impracticable”

—British Food Minister

LONDON, Feb., 26.

The Food Minister Maurice
Webb to-day dismissed as “quite
impracticable” the suggestion in
the Commons that Britain might
import Argentine meat from
Brazil.

Bromley Davenport, Conserva-
tive said Argentina was prepared
to sell meat to Brazil at £76 per
ton. He proposed that Britain
should ask Brazil to import all she
could at this price and sell it again
to Britain at a reasonable profit.

Webb replied that if Britain
made arrangements to buy Ar-
gentine Meat from Brazil’ at less
than she was willing to pay the
Argentine for it, Argentine would
either stop selling to Brazil ur put
uprher price.

Earlier Webb had said he stood
by the recent statement that he

@ On Page 3.



This factory was

over by the. Russians, he

—Reuter.

“Superb”’ Sails

For Montevideo

"
BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 26.

Bfitish cruiser Superb, flagship
of Vice Admiral Sir Richard
Symonds - Tayler, Commander-in-
Chief, American anu West Indies
Station which includes the Falk-
land Islands and Antarctic ter-
ritories — sailed for Montevideo
this morning.

The ship which arrived here
last Monday was to be visited by
President Peron at his owti*
quest, but he unexpectedly can-
celled the visit at the last minute
alleging “unforeseen circum-
stances, He never went aboard.
The second British warship leav+
ing Argentine waters today is the
frigate Bigbury Bay, belonging to
the same squadron which since
February 9 has visited Argentine
ports,—Reuter.









OVER CROWDING

BELFAST, Northern Ireland* Feb.
Belfast’s medical officer, Dr. 5.
Barron, in a-report.on oyer-crowd-
ing said that 437 people—32!
adults and 116 children—lived in
26 houses in Lonsdale Street.
Twenty-four of the houses are
used as tenements. Rents vary
from 49 cents to $3.50 per week
for furniSned aapteninceners



“I see that old Dior is
. streamlining the waist this
ceason, Bert.”





(a een en eee
FEBRUARY 27, 1941

wet
t
:

emarsmesamtinaninencadis seetesistieestehililiind

DEFENDING STUBBORNLY

BAC

THIS STROKE is characteristic 6 Wilfred Ferguson, Trinidad’s slow ———-—

bowler who stubborniy defended his end to help stave off defeat

TRINIDAD—BARBADOS
FIRST TEST DRAiWN
Trinidad Dectites Challenge

—tKight Catches Dropped

COPPIN

TRINIDAD to-day, after having lost two key batsmen
Andy Ganteaume and Nyron Asgarali by the run out route,
made no further attempt to accept the challenge to score
253 runs in 225 minutes and so the first Trinidad-Barbados

Altho it was decided to ex-
tend playing time by half an hour
| Trinidad, with two wickets ir
hand were 167 runs and. still 86
runs short of the coveted 253.

\ Barbados missed no fewer thar
| Gight catehes and this militated in
/no spall Way against their chances
of hedges

“dhe wicket was firm yesterday
and played truer than one would
have imagined on the sixth day
It is true that some deliveries kept
j uncomfortably low but these were

j fey and far between,

Barbados yesterday added 4¢
|runs in 65 minutes to their. over-
week score of 122 for 3. Clyde
Walcott was responsible for 39 of
these, so that six wickets fell for 7
runs and this included that of John
Goddard, one of the not out bats-
men who could not resume owing
to his having cut his foot over the
week-end,

Jones and Jackbir were particu.
larly yaccurate and effective yes-
terday and when five additional
wickets had fallen with only 14
runs added to Barbados’ overweek
scote, it seemed ag if Barbado:
would fall even under the 150-r
mark.

‘A. grand duel between Cly:
Walcott and the bowlers Jack!
and Jones ensued from this peri
Walcott was obviously bent
monopolising the bowling, It was
here that he refused to take singles
except at the end of the over and
only ran two runs or hit bound-
aries,

It was a completely differen’
Clyde Walcott yesterday from the
one we saw on Saturday. He was
complete master of the situation,

He batted quietly at the begin-
ning of the day’s play but then he
opened up. He on-drove power-
fully, hooked Jackbir twice to thc
square leg boundary, on-drove
Prior Jones. and then swept him
to the deep square leg boundary in
a veritable flurry of aggression,

While the Barbados batsmen fel!
in rapid succession, Walcott had
remained calm and in complete
control of his role. With Mullins
the last man at the wicket Walcott
relinquished almost all his re-
straint and with one mighty hit
sent one trom Jackbir soaring over
the sight screen straight overhead
for six runs,

As compared with his 58 made
in 137 minutes on Saturday, Wal-
cott had now reached 97 and had
added 39 runs in one hour anc
seven minutes.

But the. ball following .the..hi
for six saw. the end of Clyde Wal-
cott’s innings and the end of th:
Barbados second innings as well.

Another lofty hit off Jackbir by
Walcott did not clear the sight
sereen again’ and Ferguson, who
had taken the precaution of firs!
throwing off his cap, held a well
judged catch to dismiss him.

Walcott had been at the wicket
for 204 minutes for his 97 rung and
this was for almost th? entire time
that the Barbados innings had
lasted,

If he showed signs of having
been baffled for some time by the

@ On Page 3.












Rocket Tests
Completed

WASHINGTON, Feb, 26

The United States Army has
completed high altitude experi-
ments with multi-stage rockets
and is at present concentrating on
the development of rockets as
weapons,

A Military spokesman said here
that the 57th of a series of V-2
tests at White Sands near Mexico
will take place on Thursday night
A single V-2 rocket will be used,
not the “Bimper” style combina-
tion of big and small rocket which
two years ago reached a record
height over 248 miles,

An Army Ordinance spokesman
said that “reséavech in thé bimper
phase” of rocket study had been
concluded. The idea was to learn
some facts in the field of-high alti-
tude flight” he added, ‘This infor-
mation had to be. obteined by
these (multi stage) shoots because
it was the only known way of
getting needed data.’—Reuter,



LIMIT TRUMAN
Taft Urges

WASHINGTON, Feb, 26,
Senator Robert Taft (Republican
Ohio) said today that as many as

18 United States land divisions
might be sent to Europe unles
Congress limited the power ot

President Truman.

He said it would be “foolhardy’
to commit even six divisions t
Western Europe's defence until
the United States obtained definite
ommitments on contributions by
European nations.

Taft was testifying before the
Senate Foreign Relations anc
Armed Services Committees afte:
John Sherman Cooper, Republican
Adviser to the State Department

—Reuter



Britain Will Give Up
Heligoland As Target

BONN, Feb. 26,
The British have agreed to give
up Heligoland as a bombing targe
by 1952, it was officially § statec
here today. Adenauer told Britair
he would co-operate in finding ai
alternative target and in prevent
ing demonstrations on Heligoland

—Reuter

Teams Selected

The second Intercolonial Cricket
Tournament between Barbado
and Trinidad will open to-day at
Kensington Oval, The Barbados
team is:—C. L. Walcott (Capt.)
R. Marshall, C, Hunte, E. Weekes
C. Taylor, K. Walcott, D. Atkin

son, N. Marshall, G. Wooa, E
Millington and & Mullins
Twelfth man is E. Atkinson

Trinidad:—-J Stollmeyer (Capt);
A. Ganteaume, N. Asgarali, R
Tang Choon, R. Legall, C. Skeete,
C. Sampath, W. Ferguson, S
Jackbir, L. Butler and F. King
S. Guillen twelfth man



FIFTH TEST MATCH

Latest score in the fifth
Test match at Melbourne !s
England 303 for nine wick-
ets.





The Sultan Bows To French Demands |

CASABLANCA, French Moroceo, Other tribesmen—foot and horse-

Feb. 26, men of the Berber Bill races-—
march on his| were surrounding Fez the former
sultanate capital of 144,090 citi-~

Faced with a
capital by hostile tribal WREEIOFS) |
the Sultan of Morocco was. to-
night reported to have bowed in



Professor Land who will work
alone, hopes to find the formula’
within three months. |

A civil defence administration!
Official said the “sneaking death”)
paralyses and eventually caused
|



zens, 90 miles inland from Rabat. |

party which had -formed the
\baeckbone of Sultan Side Ben
Youshef’s Cabinet before he dis-
solved it during the week-end
To-night it was generally ex
| pe cted here that the Sultan would
soon make a solemn proclamation



their head as they camped at the | discrediting Istiqulal and possibly | returned to Rabat from Pari

algo the Communist Party

For many months the
has carried out a “strike” against
ignirig a series of administrati
prot ais drafted by the French



a large measure to French de- Chiefs and notables were at
mandé for administrative reforms.
Reports of the 40-year-old | gates of this old city swept by
Sultan’s “climb down” multiplied | breezes from the Sahara desert. |
here to-day as bearded warrior | The tribesmen .rose up over the
horsemen _. of the Zaiag tribes | week-end in growing demonstra
| were marching toward Rabat {tions against the anti-French
j his coastal capital of $4,000 peop extreme Nationalist Istiqulal

Sultan |

administration in
General Alphonse Juin,
France’s leading colonial

r
one of}

|
soldier |

Talks betwéen the two
broke down. Yesterday, Ger
Juin’s deputy, Jacques De Blesson |
vith
the French |
1 and had

}a personal letter from
President, Vincent Aur

an hour’s discussion with the
Sultan after which it be
|Kkgown that negotiations hac
effect been restarted.—Reuter



K TO GREN

a i a 0 ee re



SCHOOL BURNT
IN ST. ANDREW

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 26.

INDWARD ISLANDS Governor Sir Robert

Arundell may break off his leave in Devon in
order to fly to Grenada to deal with the island crisis
following the week-end rioting. He was not due to
return till the middle of March. s
Reports from the Colonial Secretary, who is acting
for the Governor, are being studied by the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies but there is no indica-
tion at the moment of what steps may be taken to

deal with the situation,

U.N. Ships
Blast Port
Of Wonsan

By WARREN WHITE

ABOARD _U.S.S.. COMMAND
SHIP MICHESTER, KOREAN
WATERS, Feb. 26.

American destroyers and fri-
sates fought a duel with Com-
nunist shore batteries near_ the
ortheast Kerean port of Won-
an yesterday.
On Saturday
sunners positioned on a hill near
he port fired through mist at



the Communist

An official spokesman said that
the point in the dispute leading to
the strike action was not yet
known at the Colonial Office,

Our Grenada Correspondent re-
ports that while the tension has
generally seemed less this morn-
ing, last night the Roman Catholic
School at St. Andrew's parish with
an average attendance of 108 was
completely destroyed by fire; and
yesierday evening Police broke up
a disturbance at Beausefour Estate
and arrested nine youths ranging
in ages from 16 to 26 who refused
to move on under orders,

To-day they were fined $15
each. Later to-day clashes devel-
oped between strikers and others
willing to work starting in two
western coast points where the
week-old landslides still eld up
traffic Public Works have again
asked contractors to employ la-
bourers paying 6/- daily for work.

Naval launches took police part-
ies up the coast to deal with the

och Fae, Ee Gaon disturbance. An ugly situation has
pened lite. ani and were }#visen as the town remains un-
juickly spotted. Two destroyers, - since last mid-week The
he Sperry and the Osborne, ana}Press is calling for volunteers,
hree frigates opened fire simul- |Q" Saturday night. the Governor's
aneously.. A few minutes later A.D.C. Colonel Keith Stewart was
. navy “helicopter flew over the wounded in the head when he was

ilent
nents and re
lestroyed,—

Communist gun emplace-
rted ten completely
euter,



New Socialist
Organ To Be
Established

LONDON, Feb. 26

Leaders of all Western Euro-
pean Socialist Parties are expected
in London next week-end to dis-
‘uss the establishment of a new
Socialist International Organisa-
ion, They will be delegates to
1 three-day Conference of the
Committee of the International So-
‘alist Organisation (COMISCO)
‘rom which the new International
would spring. The proposal to
*xtend the scope of COMISCO’s
vork to bring it more into line
with the activities of Socialist
nternationals in the past came
wriginally from the Belgian Social-
st Party. A joint Anglo-Belgian
resolution will come before the
sonference which opens on Friday
it British Socialist Heaquarters at
Cfransport House,. The Conference
vill also discuss a new declara-
ion of the prfneiples of Demo-
vatic Socialism which would be-
ome the Charter of the new’
(nternational.Reuter.

his command ship as she lay at
inchor in Wonsan Harbour.

stoned by a mob in the Calivigny
district. The same night the Water
Works watchman quarters was set
on fire Seventy-one intransit
passengers in the Fert Townshend
to-day confined their activities to
walking around the town but the
180 tons cargo was. discharged.
The Harrison line Mulberry Hill
in since Friday unloading 700 tons,
was similarly handled,

INVADERS PUT OFF
HAMBURG, Feb, 26.
Two British officers and 14 Ger.
man police today removed seven
Communist “invaders” from the
North Sea island of Heligoland
where they had landed on Friday
—Keuter

RUBBER BAN
WASHINGTON, Feb, 26,
The Natienal Production Author-
ity announced today it will reduce
or eliminate the use of natural
rubber in about 40,000 products
on Mareh 1,
These include
tyres, footballs



«





passenger efnar
and tennis balls
—Veuter



TELL THE ADVOCATE

THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT





CC a . .
Summer silks stay bright
as new”

Safest of all for Fine Fabrics

Drelt is safest of all |. You see, Dreft
is absolutely free the harsh in-
gredients which can eventually harm
fine fabrics. [1's

ot

these ingredient

for instance, which @radwally give «
yellow tinge to white woollens or
cause colours to run, Ye Drelt
ia absolutely safe tor all yur fine
thing
When to use Dreft
Dreft is specially made for fine fabrics

so you'll get the best results when
you use it by itsell. Por exrra-
dirty spots, rub in a little dry Di
first,

A regular dip with drets eg

MAKES DAINTY



FABRIC

earnest eentn a stil iene eentennnrencetntntt cana

" YES,”
our silk

mering

rvs Lynne, “all
come up shim-
bright as new
again after one dip in
* Dreft What's more,
Drett keeps them looking
their freshest and gayest a/weys, But
that isn’t all! Our precious woollens
stay as fleecy-solt and colourful as the
day | bought them. It’s amazing,
too, the way Dreft actually ‘rescues
woollens maited by ordinary washing!
And Dreft is wonderfully kind to the
hands—you can actuall
difference! I'm convinced
tite the best ue in






jeel the
Dreft 3
the

qi!
to-day

shor
shops




J costs
f , AME
re 9
(FOR, ORE
\, wanoer tf
Sema aiee aff
& i

LONGER!

S LAST







PAGE TWO







Carib

ADY_ SAVAGE, wife of His
Excellency. the Governor,
their daughter Pat and Mr. and
Mfs. Hopwood attended the fourth
day’s play of the intercolorial
cricket match between Trinidad
and Barbados. They watched the
me from the George Challenor
tand.

Same ’Plane
IR GEORGE SEEL, Head of
7% Development and Welfare
in the West Indies, who went up
to” Antigua on Thursday returned
to Barbados on Sunday afternoon
via Trinidad by B.W.I.A.
Returning by the same p.ane
was Hion. H. A. Cuke.

Lord Lisiowel’s Sister

MONG the passengers arriv-

ing from Jamaica on Sunday
evening by B.W.1I,A. were Mr.
Rory More O’Farrall and his wife
Lady Elizabeth More O’Farrall.
They are here for a week or two
staying at Four Winds Club, St.
Peter. Lady More O’Farrall is a
sister of Lord Listowel, former
Minister of State for Colonial
Affairs who presided over the
Conference of West Indian Gov-
ernors at Barbados in November,

1949.
Mr. More O’Farrall’s brother

Frankie who is a member of the

Anglo-Irish Bloodstock Agency
wrived from South Americ
yesterday afternoon via Venezuela

by B.W.1.A.
Back to Trinidad
RS. O. P. BENNETT and

her two daughters Joan and
‘Barbara who were in Barbados

for a short holiday returned to

Trinidad yesterday afternoon by

B.W.I.A. Joan and Barbara are
on the staff of Barclays Bank ip
San Fernando. They were staying

at the Ocean View Hotel.
Mr. Bennett returned to Trini-

dad on Sunday from the races in
+, and is expected to arrive
here in a-few days for the Barba-

B.G

dos TurfSlub’s Spring Meeting.
the Races

Me". GILBERT YVONET and

4VÂ¥2 Mr.[Â¥rank O'Neil returned

from B.G? via Trinidad on Sun-

day afternoon by B.W.I1.A. to

Tide in the Barbados Turf Clwb’s

‘Spring Meeting.
En Route

IR ROBERT MacKENZIE who
is with the British Embassy

in Washington arrived from Trini-
dad yesterday by B.W.I.A. He
hopes to leave on Thursday for
Puerto Rico en route to Washing-

nm
..Sir Robert has just completed
an official tour of Central Ameri-

ea, Cuba, Martinique and some ©

the other West Indian islands, He
igs in Barbados for a few days
holiday before returning to Wash-

ington.

He is staying at the Colony

Club, St. James,

Morning Flight

ta BRIVING on B.W.I.A’s

morning flight from Trinidad
were Mr. Nestor Baiz and Mr.
Walter Campbell.
ing | at the Ocean View Hotel.

Ir.
Bros, of Canada. Mr. Baiz, Trini-
dad businessman is on the Man-
aging Committee of the Junior
Chamber of Commerce in Port-

of-Spain and Junior Chairman's

Representative to the Road Safety
Assn., and Chairman for organ-
ising future Trade Fairs.

Mr. Baiz is also an active mem-
ber of the Light Aeroplane Club
of Trinidad,

Another Light Aeroplane Club
member who was in Barbados for
a few days was Mr. Dong Moore,
Engineer of S. K. Watson & Co.
of Trinidad who left for Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA.
en route from Antigua,



Mr. NESTOR BAIZ

They .are stay-
Campbell is with Stewart



OFF TO JAMAICA yesterday by B.W.1.A. were, left to right, Sir
John Waddington, Dr. Rita Hinden, Prof. Harlow and Mr. John Hen-

nings.

They formed a Commission to B.G, enquiring into the type of

Government acceptable to the people of that colony.

They are en route to England with their report.

MR, ROLPH GRANT—former W.I.
cricket captain who was in Barbados
on a short visit, returned to Jamaica 560 scientific and technical books

yesterday by B.W.LA.
Former W.,I. Captain

M*

who was in Barbados on a “hor
holiday,

terday by B.W.LA.

Mr. Grant is a former Captain first steam locomotive.
of the West Indian Cricket ‘Team

which toured England in 1939,

Caricature
HE PLAY “1066 And All
That” is the largest pro-
duction yet attempted by the

Harrison College Dramatic Club

an embers of the cast ¢ -
Seer ate Work and Captain of the late 3rd Bat-

performed in the Harrison College talion of the West Yorkshire Regi-
It is a review ment.
or rather a caricature of English

ing hard rehearsing. It is to b
Hall on March 9,

History. Proceeds from this pla;

will help send a Harrison College

sports team to Trinidad,

Petroleum Engineer

R. JOHN MacGOWAN, Pe- tour

troleum Engineer with
U.B.O.T. stationed at Mayaro ar-
rived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.LA. to spend
eleven days’ holiday here staying
at the Ocean View Hotel,
Mr. MacGowan is from the
U.K. and has been jin Trinidad
for eighteen months.

Steying with Relatives
RRIVING from St. Vincent
yesterday morning by B.G
Airways was Mrs, Michael Hans-
chell, She is here for a week

staying with relatives.





BY THE WAY ..

MUCH-TRAVELLED lady has
been saying that the desert
Sheik is not the romantic figure
young people imagine. Miss Vita
Brevis, so long pestered by the
Sheik Spittin el Khuspidor (Cap-
tain Foulenough), would agree.
This curious Sheik was always
inviting her to “fly with me on my
desert steed.”” One day she asked,
“Where is this desert steed?” “At
Moorsom and Calverley’s Livery
Stables,” réplied the dusky beau,
hitching up his burnous like an
Arabian sailor. Foulenough’s little
stratagem was defeated on the day
when the brokers marched in to
W1(a) Palmerston Mews just as the
Sheik was pouring out a glass of
Arebian Hock for his, beautiful
visitor.



”

Dial 4606





Floral designs 92c.

Shame!

At least the Dean has a zip-
fastener under his gaiter-buttons.
(Morning paper.)
HE cheat! His shoe-laces are
probably made of liquorice, and
not at all necessary, except for
eating purposes. I will wager that
the rim of his hat is of detachable
eardboard, and that his button-
holes are blocked up with dried
mud,

Fun all over the place

T has now been decided that a
}ventrilequist’s dummy contra-
venes the Sunday Observance regu-
lations, as being “a wooden prop.”



BEEBE BBB RBRBPRB RRB eeeen
HAIRCORDS

An unrepeatable Vaiue 92c.
PLAIN PALE BLUE HAIRCORD 32” WIDE
WHITE

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Your Shoe Stores

” ” ”

BARBADOS





Really! li’s Not

ADVOCATE



Such A Crime

To Be Single

By MARY -LANG

IF you have decided you want
a husband or wife and
been able to_win one, the fault is
probably within yourself.

That, briefly, is the chilly verdict
of researcher Hilda Holland who,
with a group of medical and other
advisers, has compiled a mock-
Kinsey report* on why men and
women stay single.

Hilda Holland kicked off her
researches with an advertisement
in an American paper which said:
“Why are you single? Write out
your problem—and in doing so you
may solve it.” The first post
brought 267 replies, and convinced
her that the problem was a vital

one.

Using this kind of evidence,
supported by personal
histor.es which seem more than
naive to English eyes, Hilda
Holland sets out to console anid

haven't says: —

case— |

must not be the type who ever

“Pve always been known as
Mary’s sister.”

‘WHY MEN RESIST MARRIAGE

@ THE REPORT calls on
Bernard Shaw and quotes
the evidence of Tanner in
“Man and Superman”, who
asserts it is “a woman’s busi-
ness to get married as soon
as possible and a man's to
keep unmarried as long as
he can.”

Marriage is for this bach-
elor “apostasy, profanation
of the sanctuzy of my soul,
violation of my manhood,
sale of my birthright, shame-

encourage those who still remain , ful surrender, ignominious
single. capitulation, acceptance of
On the assumption that people | defeat.” A married man is to

never stay that way because they
want to, she makes a lengthy in-
vestigation of all the obstacles that
keep men and women from the

him a man with a past, while
a bachelor is a man with a
future. When Anne reminds



ROLPH GRANT, Director.and opened next month.
of T. Geddes Grant Ltd. gogiety is one of the oldest in the
attached to their Jamaica Branch Caribbean,
E ‘ books are some 30 pictures on
staying at the Marine subjects covered by the exhibi-
Hotel, returned to Jamaica yes- tion, including an old print of

him that he need not marry if
he does not want to, he
answers :—

“Does any man want to be
hanged? Yet men let them-
selves be hanged without a
struggle for life, though they
could at least give the chap-
lain a black eye. We do the
world’s will, not our own.”

altar.

Under headings like Are Parent:
to Blame? Why Get Married? Ar
You Emotionally Mature? Love
and Neurosis, Deserters and
Partial Deserters, Momism,.,
and Madonnas, Desertion Tech-
niques—she analyses all the prob-
able and improbable reasons why
people don’t marry.

In a_ survey of
marriages she finds: —

En Route to England

IR JOHN WADDINGTON, Prof.
Vincent Harlow, Dr, Rite
Hinden and Mr. John Hennings
left yesterday for Jamaica by
B.W.LA.

Sir John told Carib that he will
stay one day in Jamaica and then
go to Bermuda for four days be-
fore leaving for England.

Sir John was head of a Com-
mission which went to B.G, to en-
quire what type of constitution
was acceptable to the people of
British Guiana, Prof. Harlow and
Dr. Hinden were members of the
Commission, Mr, Hennings acted
as Secretary,

Americar “When people laughed in my

wresence I ran from the place.”
“T used to cross the street so I
wouldn’t meet people.”
“Nobody cared what I did.”
Any of these remarks, it seems,
prove that you have one of those
tired old psychological twins —
the Inferiority or the Superiority

THAT a greater percentage of
marriages are happy when the
wife is two or three years older
than her husband.

THAT the average woman lives
three years longer than the aver-
age male of the same age.

British Council has

in she When you’ve been to the altar
arranged an exhibition of

and overcome the sin of being
single, Hilda Holland issues a
sharp reminder on how to stay
that way.

To be sure that the marriage
will be a success, she says, you

singles to read, and one that will
astonish the marrieds. After 256
pages of explanation and analysis
of what prevents people marrying
—it seems a wonder that anyone
can bring it off.

for showing in the new premises
of the Royal Agricultural and
Commercial Society in George-
town, which are to be completed

This —LE.S.,







Accompanying the

GLOBE

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M,
“THE TOAST CE. NEW ORLEANS”
Mario LANZA — Kathyrn GRAYSON

Extras — FRANKIE CARL AND ORCHESTRA
Newsreel — WEST INDIAN CRICKET TEAM

TO-MORROW ONLY — 5 & 8.30
John GARFIELD. — Lili PALMER

Stephenson's “Rocket” — Britain’s

Short Visit
IR K, ARTHUR and Lady Lis-

ter-Kaye arrived from Jamai-
ca over the week-end on a short



visit and are queen Oe eee kh een
View Hotel, Sir Arthur is Squad- 4 ‘ , sy
ron Leader (Temp) in the R.A.F “BODY AND SOUL”



See Eee eee
is Meares-

M@ BARBADOS DRAMATIC CLUB
*

Under the Distinguished Patronage of
Excellency the Governor Sir A. W. L. Savage,
K.C.M.G., and Lady Savage

PRESENTS

MURDER ms
ARRANGED

A THRILLER

His home address
Court Mulligan, Eire,

Just So
FF to Antwerp, Holland, last fi
week for a three months’
went Lord Beginner, the
famous Calypsinian. His visit is | | His
exploratory—he wants to discover 4
for himself what (opportunities
there are for calypsonians in
Antwerp. At his “farewell” per-
formance the other evening, he
sang two new calypsves. The first
dealt with the recent Giold Coast A
elections and the second was an
assessment of the art of subtlety
o men and women generally. a aes
Ord Beginner’s verdict is con-
tained in the chorus which goes: BEEN
Men centipede bad bavi,
— centipede more than a

* 15th 16th MARCH, 830 p.m.

MATINEE : Friday, 16th March, 5.00 p.m.
e
Bux Office Opens FRIDAY, March 9th

e
and FRIDAY

by Beacheomber

THURSDAY
And I read that in Brussels, “Any-
one wearing a false nose in the
street is liable to arrest.” What
fun the police will have tweaking
odd-looking noses, to see if they
come off. During the war one of
our secret agents was told to
watch a suspicious character in a
London hotel. The man had in-
curred suspicion by his enormous
nose. Nobody believed it could be
real, So up went the agent and
tweaked it pretty hard. But the
nose was real, and the owner was
a big oil man. With great presence
of mind our agent said, “Excuse,
pleese. Papuan custom, Me Pa-
puan,” “Excuse, please,” replied
the oil man, as he kicked the agent
four times, “English custom. Me
English.”

a
BRBEEBEEBEBEESBEEE S&S
o_o

MRS. HOUSEWIFE

ENHANCE
THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR HOME WITH

Lancastreum Floor Covering





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| COTTON FACTORY LTD.



Dial 4220













wl
@| CARNIVAL QUEEN

B.B.C. Radio|

Programme

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27,
om —I2.15 p.m

1951

6.30 19.76 m



6.30 a.m. Forces Favourites, 7 a.m. The
News, 7.10 a.m, News Analysis, 7.15 a.m.
From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m, Programme
Parade, 7.30 a.m. Generally Speaking
7.45 am, Think on these Things. # a.m
Souvenirs of Music, 8.45 a.m. Letter from
América, 9 a.m. The News, 9.0 a.m
Home News from Britain, 11.15 a m,
Programme Parade, 11.25 a.m, Austraila
va. Englang, 1.45 aym Report from

ritain, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m
News Analysis, 12.15 p.m, Close Down

4.15—6.00 p.m. 3.53 m
4.15 pm. Music from Grand Hotel,

5 p.m. Australia vs. England, 5.15 p.m

Welsh Magazine, 545 p.m. Music Maga-

zine, 6 p.m, New Records

6,00—7.15 p.m, SL32 & 4648 m

6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 7pm
The News, 7.10 p.an. News Anahvsis, 7.15
p.m, West Indian Guest Night
7.45—LL.O? p.m. .... . 31.32 & 4845 m
———

7145 p.m. Generally Speaking, 8 p.m
Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. Meet the
Commonwealth, 8.45 p.m. Composer ot
the Week, 9 p.m. Report from Britain,
9 15 p.m. Queen's Hall Light Orchestra,
16 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. From the
Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Focus on Manners,
10.45‘ p.m. Getting Ready for the
Festival of Britain, 11 p.m. BBC Northern
Orchestra.

CROSSWORD



|

Across
Ever upset by the |ittle + 2
8. Windtiower, (7
about being this,
You can sail it. (5)

yume ?
(7) )
Nothing sharp
(7) 12

It's no waiter








THAT if a girl attends college Complex. Oa ta act Bete ada
‘ her chances of marriage are The report pursues its main Always i) the shoe. (4)

Artist trom Honduras reduced at least one-fourth. If mission — Why do people stay Should pick you up ell right, (5)
“ @& RT is progressing well in the her college is not co-educational single?—with the fervour of 2 Dae i eee

\. West Indies but more should her chances are still less. Don Juan, It produces this gem- 22. Quite natura) to find a hunts-
be done to encourage West THAT the professions you're “Marriage entails a sacrifice for ., Map in th (4) oie sever, (4)
Indians to paint”, This is the Most likely to stay a spinster in a man, while the missing of mar- 34° psn. (3) "95. Uplift. (5)
opinion of 21-year-old Terence are teaching and nursing. riage is the sacrifice for they 6) Almostwee. (5) 27. Statute. (3)
Arthurs, a London commercial THAT where there are more woman.” Down
artist, whose ambition is to visit Men than women, nearly every — Yet not so many pages away| ! What a pati(G), 2. Covering. (8)
British Honduras. Twenty-five Woman will marry. But when @ve find this: Many women are] { Wien you do get it, it may be so
years ago Terence’s father left there are more women than men €urned into partial deserters from little (3)
British Honduras to go to less than 90 per cent. of the men marriage by “a morbid obsession! 5. Weird (5) 6. Biackberry. (7)
Britain and qualify as a tailor, M@™Ty. against household duties, intense] § {02),,2ble to cnauge ature. (7)
Having completed his course he THAT divorced people marry av ‘dislike of housekeeping.” 10, Found In Hutl’s net. (8)
married an English woman and ® more rapid rate than single 13° Sticky game apparently. (6)
they have since made London people. ins qty Re engamed i. Make all over again. (5)

; couples, the report says it was] sf wie brosgm fine
their"home.' And now, naturally ‘Men Lose’ found that more than 35 per cent. rea aes so Piimatenes marian
enough, Terence waite to see for of the women and 24 per cent. of]: Modulate: 6. Abyss: 10 Nave: 11.
himself his father’s homeland. AFTER alr this—what is the 'the men had broken previous] ‘{iibiicn! iy Youn. pen:
He recently sold one of his paint- author's advice to those whv want engagements, and that nearly 13] 2.0%1. 25, Stee Manifesto:
ings to Mr, Norman Manley, to marry? Enhance your strong gor cent. broke their current] ) Py") ‘pear a ‘Site ger:
ta jee latter’s recent’ points, learn to get along witl emgagements. vs )s Osier 17. Snine
Visit to ‘ people, smile occasionally,

“Lege friendly, have something to talk The Riddle a a

Book Exhibition for B.G. about, read one daily newspaper,

HE and look after your appearance. IT is a dismal book for the



Many women are subject to weak,
aching back. Often the kidneys are
to blame, for your kidneys, along
with the liver, must filter out im-
purities from the bloodstream.

So if you fee! tired, worn-out, head-
achy—with the nagging pain of an
aching back—look to both your kid-
neys and liver. That’s why Cana-
dians haye been xezie on Dr.
Chase’s Kidney-Liver for over
half a century.

Give your system a_chance to
work properly. ‘Try Dr. Chase’s
ane ver Pills tomas The name
“Dr. Chase” is your assurance. 3

al ° Dr. Chase's -

KIDNEY-LIVER PILL?



FOR THE FIRST TIME.

TRINIDAD'S
of 1951



Miss Jeffrey’s Beer.
LOVELY

CHRISTINE
GORDON

— appearing —
IN PERSON
with a galaxy of Trinidad’s sing-
ing and dancing stars under the
direction of .
LANDY DE MONTBRUN
on stage at

EMPIRE

SUNDAY, 4th MARCH,
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.





PRICES:
MATINEE:-—
Children 50c.; Adults $1.00
NIGHT:—
House and Balcony .... $1.00
Stalls and Boxes $1.50

27,

1951

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY








—— —————— ” 2

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad St. Phone 2684
Lovely IMPORTED DRESSES from LONDON
TWIN SETS—NYLON LINGERIE—BATHING Sl ITs
{ HOURS: MONDAYS to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30

SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30











| AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE: TO-DAY at 5 p.m.
TO-NIGHT at 8.90
James Hilton's

“SO WELL REMEMBERED”
Statring:. JOHN MILLS—MARTHA SCOTT—PATRICIA ROC

By the brilliant author of “Lost Horizon". ‘Random Harvest”
“Goodbye Mr. Chips”

MATINEE: WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY NIGHT at, 8.30

ROBERT MITCHUM—JANE GREER
in “OUT OF THE PAST”. An R.K.O. Radio Picture.

PLAZA TWheatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TODAY 4.45 and 8,30 p.m. and Continuing Daily

zx.o. racic) TARZAN AND THE SLAVE GIRL

with Lex BARKER—Variessa BROWN—Denise DARCEL & Others — Also

BASU

Distributed by RKO RADIO PICTURES, INC,






Friday—3 Shows: 2.30—4.45—8.30 p.m. Paramount presents—

PLAZA Theatre=O)STIN (DIAL 8404)







LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M, (Warners Action Double)
Humphrey Bogart & Raymond
Massey in

ACTION IN THE =& =©GAMBLING ON THE
NORTH ATLANTIC HIGH SEAS

EDNESDAY & THURSDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. — (Monogram Double)
WpEATH VALLEY RANGERS” & “RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL”
Ken Maynard—Hoot Gibson—Beb Steele Tom Keen



nm




GATET W—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 8.30 p.m. (Monogram Double)

BELOW THE DEADLINE & MR. MUGGS RIDES AGAIN

Warren DOUGLAS Leo Gorcey & East Side Kids





{ TMURSDAY (only) 830 p.m, .. .. (Monogram Double)
‘ JOE PALOOKA in Leo Gorcey and the Bowery Boys in

| “THE KNOCKOUT” & “MR. HEX”
With LEON ERROL
OPENING FRIDAY 2nd MARCH

EMPIRE THEATRE

=



PLUS








Che |

1 ?

| Holy Land,

| astoryor = @@@

| THE PAST, PRESENT

AND FUTURE! | ¥
Story and Narration Written by MILDRED BARISH VERMONT

ee Ternwen Tumi a ereTIaS 08

EMPIRE ROYAL
To-day Last Two Shows

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.30

4.45 and 8.30
Universal Double





United Artists’ Pictures

Presents... Basil RATHBONE in
“TF THIS BE SIN” “BLACK-CAT”
— Starring —

AND

“INSIDE JOB”

with Preston FOSTER

Myrna LOY — Roger
LIVESEY with
Peggy Cummins and Richard
Green.

| OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.15

20th Century Fox Double—

Dick HAYMES and
Vivian BLAINE in

“STATE FAIR”

— AND —

“AND THEN THERE
WERE NONE”

with

Barry FITZGERALD and
Walter HUTSON



|



ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day
4.45 & 8.30



“Yvonne. Dan ="

~ Rod Helena’
DeCARLO- DURYEA: CAMERON: CARTER

%,

eT
9% ee

POO”,



WE CAN SUPPLY...

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OSC CSOO 0800 OS OOet

SLOSS PSS FOSS



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY



fe .
Test Drawn

ES @ From Page 1

Trinidad tactics on Saturday, he
handsomely atoned for this yester-
day when he himself was respon-
Sible for 39 of the 46 runs which
Barbados added to their total to-
day in 65 minutes.

Barbados who had been behind

the clock for the whole innings,
finished well behind the clock and
the innings closed for 168 in 275
minutes.
_ Faced with the prospect of hav-
ing to make 253 runs in 225 min-
utes Trinidad started with Jeffrey
Stollmeyer and Ganteaume. This
pair was unhurried and in the nf-
teen minutes play before lunch
they put up 9 without loss.

They resumed and here was an
exhibition of experienced batting.
Unostentatiously but steadily they
pushed the score along and the
first fifty came in 53 minutes,

Trinidad lost their first wicket—
that of Jeffrey Stollmeyer—to an-
other Roy Marshall special, The
‘Trinidad skipper, who had for

73 minutes at the wicket been
guiding Trinidad in quest of
a win, played for an off break
from Roy Marshall but it was the
one that came through straight as
a top spinner and bowled him for
35. This included five fours.

Clarence Skeete and Andy Gan-
teaume had been dismissed in
similar manner by Roy Marshall
in the Trinidad’s first innings.

Norman Marshall almost had
Ganteaume out at 43. The latter
drove out at a well flighted one
outside the off stump but Roy
Marshall who had been put intc
the slip earlier in place of Mul-
lins, immediately after a similar
stroke had passed near Mullins,
got a hand .o the ball but failed
to hold it.

A cheeky attempt to run a quick
one from a cover drive by Gan-
teaume off Roy Marshal] resulted
in Asgarali being run out. A
clean pick-up, a sizzling return
and a lightning stump by Walcot}
caught Asgarali just out of his
ground and Trinidad had lost a
second wicket for 87 runs. Asgar-
ali’s contribution was only six.

Ganteaume now seemed to lose
his concentration for a moment and
touched one from Norman Mar-
shall behind him on the on-side
very fine but wicketkeeper Wal-
cott did not make the catch and
off the next ball he attempted a
cover drive, did not get well over
it and Denis Atkinson at cover
missed an easy cacch,

Two runs later another run out
gave Barbados the third wicket.
Another attempt to snatch a short
run, in which Tang Choon pushed
to mid-wicket and called,

Ganteaume failed to gain his
ground and a return by Roy Mar-
shall himself and another quick
bit of stumping by Walcott and
Ganteaume was run out,

He had been batting comfort-
ably and well before he gave ni:
three chances, all off Norman
Marshall while he was still at 43,
His innings that lasted just under
two hours included six fours.

Norman Marshall who had been
trundling faithfully for the day
and had three chances missed off
him, was rewarded with Tang
Choon’s wicket. The latter hit out
at a well flighted one and put up
an’ easy catch to Eric Atkinson at
cover.

Tang Choon had not scored and
now Trinidad’s fourth wicket had
fallen at 93.

Legall and Skeete, together now
in a fifth wicket partnership now
carried on their shoulders the re-
sponsibility for any real chance
which Trinidad might have ol
winning the game and even sav-
ing themselves from defeat,

Skeete signalled that he was
aware of this with a cover drive
off one from Roy Marshall for four
runs and a sweep to the square
boundary for another and the cen-
tury was hoisted in 129 minutes,

Legall helped himself to a cover

drive for four runs as well off
Norman and then majestically
swept him to the square leg

boundary for another four.

The tea interval saw Trinidad
with six wickets in hand _ still
needing 143 runs to make fn an
hour and a half.

Only seventeen of those had
been added on resumption before
Legall, in trying to turn one from
Mullins, mistimed, and put up a

olly cateh to Keith Walcott, field-
ing substitute for John Goddard at
mid wicket. F

Skeete left next, without addi-
tion to the score. He played back
to a low straight one from Milling-
ton, was struck on the pad and
Umpire Walcott upheld an appeal
for Ibw. There was a sound as i
the ball had struck the bat as well
and it was suggested that the ball
first struck Skeete’s boot and then
his bat.

Six Trinidad wickets were now
down for 127 and Skeete had been
at the wicket for just over half
an hour for his 23. With four
wickets in hand and 66 minutes
lett for play Trinidad still needed
126 runs to win.

Ferguson and Guillen were now
together in a seventh wicket
partnership and it seemed certain
that they were not going to make

Soeoss

POSS

POPSOOCOGIOSOSS

SO9GS

4,

OOPS

W445
&



f Hoad for a



27, 1951

——





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THEY LL DO IT AGAIN & AGAIN



“ENGLAND’S BATTING
FAILED MISERABLY’’

(From W. J.

If ever England had the

O'REILLY)
MELBOURNE, Feb. 26,
box seat in a Test match it did

to-day. With one wicket down for 141 runs and Hutton
and Simpson in complete control of the situation, with the

Australian bowling done to

Australians had it coming, to them.

a frazzle, it seemed that the
But the old old story.

England's batting failed miserably.

Young Hole, called up from his
fairly busy patrol on the deep leg
fence to give same much needed
support te a jaded attack, bowled
England’s champion batsman Hut-
ton neck and crop, thereby
providing the turning point of the
game.

Not since Leeds 1948 have I seen
the Australian attack so complete-
ly mastered. Lindwall was within
a nace of giving up the ghost and
Iverson apart from keeping the
scoring rate within moderate
bounds failed to make any impres-
sion.

Miller and Johnson had lost so
much interest that each of them
failed to make contact with a
catching chance in the slips from
Len Hutton.

Hassett could not hide the fact
that he was a very worried man.
Hutton and Simpson so dominated
the position that it seemed certain
that England would finish the day
in a winning position.

Going forward into a vigorous
attempt at an off drive Hutton
failed to get to the pitch of a ball
which Hole cleverly “held back”
and the damage was done.

No Bouncers
Inspired by the colt’s baptismal
effort, Lindwall and Miller taking
the second new ball launched a
vigorous assault which brought

about the final collapse.
As English wickets fell regular-
ly to the two fast bowlers there

a bid for the runs for they both
went on the defensive and Walcott
put a string of fieldsmen all
around them, elose to the wicket
on the on-side and off-side
well,

Seven consecutive maidens were
sent down and it was now certain
that nothing short of a miracle
eould have given Trinidad the
runs they needed for victory
within the time left for play and
the batting talent at their disposal

Guillen ended a 89-minute stay
at the wicket without scoring by
being dismissed lbw to Hoad and
Ferguson and Jackbir met in an
eighth wicket partnership,

With half an hour to go and
Trinidad 137 for 7, Walcott called
for the new ball and Millington
bowled first from the pavilion end
to a ring of leg slips.

Jackbir cut one from Mullins
through slip, hard and low but
Denis Atkinson did not make the
catch and the single gave Trinidad
150 in 223 minutes. The extra half
an hour rule was now invoked and
the game was extended for 30
minutes.

Ferguson gave another chance
to Mullins off Norman Marshall
but Mullins got a hand to it and
failed to hold it but he df¢ not
profit much from this life. Next
over he played at a googly from
leg break and was

as

bowled.

He had scored 19 in an hour
and fifteen critical minutes and
with seventeen minutes left for
play and with two wickets in hand
Trinidad with a score of 162 were
still 91 runs behind the Barbados
total. P

Five more. runs were added to
the score and stumps were drawn
for the day with Trinidad 167 for
8, Jones comfortable with 4, not
out and Jackbir who had been at
the wicket for an hour and four
minutes, equally settled with 13.

were some people who spoke of
“direct attack” and “bouncers”.
There was no suggestion of that
whatever. I have always been an
open critic of the consistent use of
the bouncer. I saw nothing today
to eavil at.

It was an inspired session of
bowling and England’s anaemic
batting after Hutton had gone
gave it the highest rates of incen-
tive payment,

With the stage nicely set for his
helated comeback, Compton snick-
ed a good length outswinger.

Brown Out Of Form

Brawn was so badly out of form
that he did not use the middle of
the bat at all.

Simpson who batted splendidly
with Hutton lost all initiative
when his partner went and made
no effort to retain the grip which
he had helped to obtain.

English bowlers have been let
down badly throughout this tour.
They have not failed their team
once. But apart from Hutton who
has been the outstanding batsman
on either side, their batsmen have
failed to rally round.

There is no excuse for the way
this match was wantonly aban-
doned. An ounce or two of back-
bone bolstered up with necessary
determination to do the job well,
would have allowed England to
finish this series in a manner
whieh would have done inestim-
able benefit to the game through-
out the world,

Trinidad Welcomes
Film Stars

From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 23.

Mr. William Nelson, staff mem—
ber of Holiday Magazine and
one of the many journalists wha
are accompanying the Hollywood
stars to Uruguay, to take part in
the Film Festival there, says that
the steelbands will be “terrific”
on television. “I have never seen
such a reception like this any-
where. This is all very exciting,
and what's more it shows great
enthusiasm”, he declared. When
the plane which carried the eight
Hollywood film stars dipped in at
Piarco Airport last night, over
ten thousand fans were there to
receive them, those who arrived
were John Derek, Wendell Corey,
Joan Fontaine, Evelyn Keyes,
June Haver, Lizabeth Scott,
Patricia Neal and Florence Mar—
ley. They were entertained by
the steelband and calypsonians.
After spending a little over an
hour they took off for South
America.

House Collapses

{From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 23.
Joseph Rodriguez; his wife and
seven children had a narrow es—
cape when their Gwn from tapia
house collapsed at 2 o’clock in the
morning. Mr. Rodriguez was
awakened by a cracking sound
just in time to see the large por-
tion of the dirt wall falling apart,
he immediately awoke his wife
and children, and took them to
the neighbour’s house, no sooner
had he vacated when the whole
of the northern portion of the
house collapsed, The family now
have their meals in what remains
of the boxwood kitchen.

OBITUARY.
Miss J. C. Vinter

After an unusually long experi-
ence as Head-Mistress, Miss Jessie
Caroline Vinter died at her. home,
5, St. Helens Park Road on 3rd
February, 1951. The fourth daugh-
ter of the late John Alfred Vinter
(an artist who was the last to hold
the appointment of Royal Litho-
graphic Artist) she was educated
Collegiate
School under Miss Buss, and _

Oo
she
took Honours Degree in Natural

at the North London
Head

Girton

School. Passing
Cambridge,

the
College,

of

Science,

After experience as

Southlands School,

now form the Devon County
Training College for Women
Teachers.

Miss Vinter then offered herself

to the S.P.G. for missionary work

on Bishop Montgomery’s recom-
war

mendation, in the difficult
year of 1918 she went to Barbados

to become the first Head-Mistress

of the Codrington Girls’ High
School which the Church in the
sland was anxious to see started,
there being already Codrington
College in connection with the
Durham University and the Lodge
Hill High School for boys. The
school, partly on account of the
excellent climate attracted pupils
from the other islands, and Miss
Vinter, who had taken on the post
for two years, remained 17} years,
thus completing 33) years as a
Head-Mistress.

There was a large gathering of
parents and friends at Codrington
High School in July 1936 when
reference was made to her cour-
age, perseverance and vision, and
her personal interest in every one

of her pupils. :

Since here retirement, Miss
Vinter took a special interest in
the Gambia Pongas Mission under
Bishop Daly and has addressed
Meetings on the West Indies with
special reference to the work of
the Church.

The funeral service was held on
Wednesday, 7th February, 1951 at
Christ Church Blacklands, Hast-
ings. Canon Morgan officiated and
Mr. Vincent Batts was at the
organ, The interment followed in
the family grave at the Borough
Cemetery.

The mourners present were: —
Dr. Vinter; The Misses Fanny and
Ethel Vinter; Miss Ruth Vinter;
Dr. Jean Vinter; Dr. Noel Vinter;
Mrs. Peter Vinter. There were
a large number of friends present
at the Church.

Flowers were received from the
following: ~The family; Lilian
and Janie; Miss Higginson; Olive;
Miss Blackburn and Miss Watts;
Miss Burrow; Miss Burton; Mr,
and Mrs. Carter; Miss Church;
Miss L. Colyer; Mrs. Day and
family; Nurse Flynn; Mrs. Pastle;
Mrs. Richards; Mrs, Walker and
Miss Crick,

Mobile Bank
On First Trip

The Travelling Office of the
Government Savings Bank lefi
the Public Buildings Yard this
morning at 9 o'clock on its first
visit to the sugar estates this
year.

The Bank has gone to Searles,
Foursquare, Oldbury, Carrington,
Three Houses, Guinea and Bulke-
ley.

It goes out again tomorrow and
Wednesday.

WRONG DECISION.

KIRKCALDY, Scotland.
Two rugger teams decided to
play despite a referee’s decision
to cancel the match because of







frost. Now two players wish
they'd taken his ", advice—they
both broke legs. —C.P.

VORELECEC LOLOL PELL CORP VAL LPP PLLA EL DP PLEO

LKE

SANITARY

neoeepeceqeeosoessoooeseseensenscos STOKES & BYNOE LID Agents. «noc

POISE-—

is largely a matter of the state of mind

If you are uncomfortable or unsure of your sanitary protection it will

be reflected in your lack of self confidence, and will make you ill at ease,

SILKESEPT sanitary tewels ensure peace of mind as well as body.
They give you comfort, convenience, and super absorbency with complete

invisibility. Wear SILKESEPT and you wear a smile.

SEP T

TOWELS

+4

+ A448
PIISFSOO



4,4
P9OOSS

SORE COOtUYH

¢



Assistant
Mistress at Exeter and other High
Schools, she joined her sister Miss
Fanny Vinter as Co-Principal of
Exmouth,
where she spent a very successful
sixteen years in buildings which



SESE SOO CFS SSE FSSSSSS SSS SOSS SS



Driver Fined 40/-

DONVILLE THORNE a chaut-
feur of Bridgetown was yesterday
found guilty of parking the mot
car, M—200 on a
and of refusing to

restricted

give h

ares

name

to a policeman

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
before whom both cases were
heard ordered Thorne to pay a

fine of 20/- for parking and 20/-
for refusing to give his name. Both
cases were brought by the Police.

Set. E. King, prosecuted for the
police from information received
Police Constable 217 Dodson

who Brought the case said that on
December 12 about 7.30 p.m. he
Was on duty on Marhill Street and
saw the motor car M—200 parked
opposite the China Doll Restau-
rant.

The driver came out of the res-
taurant sometime later. He asked
the driver for his name but he re-
fused to give it. After refusing
to give his name the driver then
drove off. He then reported the
matter to the Central Police Sta-
tion,

Thorne

c appealed
decisions,

against beth

STARTED FIGHT
AT CRICKET

THEIR Honours Mr. G. L. Tay-
lor and Mr. H, A. Vaughan, Judges
of the Assistant Court of Appeal
yesterday confirmed a decision o1
His Wership Mr. S. H. Nurse
Police Magistrate of District “E.”

Mr. Nurse had ordered Cecil
Roach of Graveyard, St. Lucy, tc
pay a fine of 20/- and 2/- costs in
seven days or in default one
month's imprisonment with hard
labour for assaulting and beating
McDonald Boyce on December 3
Roach appealed against Mr
Nurse’s decision.

Boyce in giving his evidence yes.
terday said that on December 3
he was playing in a cricket match
Roach came on the pitch and in-
terrupted the play. When he
(Boyce) spoke to Roach he re-
fused to move. Roach then struck
him with an iron rod on his right
shoulder and pulled a dagger in
an attempt to stab him

Roach in making his defence
denied that he ever struck Boyce.

Their Honours in confirming
the decision told Roach that they
had no doubt that he went down
io the cricket match intending te
give trouble, He was spoken to
and instead of leaving, insisted on
staying’and making a nuisance oi
himself. ‘i

Roach was also ordered to pay
7/- appeal costs,





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Argentine Meat

from page 1
believed the British meat ration
would not fail below its present
level

Answering further questions on
the resumption of meat negotia-
tions with the Argentine, Webb
said:

“As announced on Saturday, the
Argentine Government has agreed
to resume discussions on meat
purchases and on other outstand-
ing financial and trade questions.

Discussions will take place in
Buenos Aires. The British dele-
gation which is leaving by air to-
morrow will be led by Economic
Secretary to the Treasury John
Edwards.

Thornton Kemsley, Conserva-
tive, thought it would be better
to give up to £135 a ton for good
quality meat seeing that Britain
was getting none at all from the
Argentine at the moment,

—Reuter.

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

M/V_ Sedgefield, Sch. Marea Henrietta
Seh, Wonderful Counsellor, Sch. Rainbow
M.. Sch. W. L, Runicia, Sch. Harriet
Whittaker, Sch Turtle Dove, Sch,
Emanuel C, Gardon, Sch. Rosarene, Sco
United Pilgrim S., Sch. Lindsyd It,
Sch, Mandalay IL, Sch. Anita H., SS
Lady Nelson, Yacht Ce*ibbee.

ARRIVALS

Schooner Burma D., 59 tons net, Capt
Gooding, from Trinidad via St, Vincent

8.5, Polyerest, 719 tons net, Capt
Stendal, from Port-au-Prince

M.V, Athelbrook, 286 tons net, Capt
Cook, fram Trinidad



_pasanepigni vain a



en = ae

PAGE THREE



ackache Gone

Nelghbour said
** TAKE DOAN’S”

[71S SURPRISING















Schoonr Henry D. Wallace, 59 ton ~ 4.8 . = 14% Ss "
set, Capt. Wallace, from St. Vincent. Mé@@ admire high spiri you feel listléss é
Schooner Oak Hill, 4,229 tons net, Py ty . 4 ‘\) y
Capt. Forsythe, from Liverpool and run-down because you need more A&D' . f
M.V. Cacique del Caribe, 162 tons net, : r i
Capt, Archibald, from St. ‘Lucia , Vieni tke Seon Reon saa n f :
DEPARTURES j ft life ens > 7
M.V. 0. K. Service VIII, 76 tons net, You'lh sgon feel full of iife , , :
Capt, Wolfe, tor Halifax. € \
Schooner Molly N. Jones, 37 tons sa
Capt. Clouden, for St, Lucia ar i” “@ fh
Schooner Franklyn D. R., 8 tons i «more than [ver a UN .
Capt. Sealy, for British Guiana. PO \ MENT.
S.S. Streatham Hl, 4,245 tons net, It's WERFUL NOURISH: ®
Capt. Nelson, for St. Kitts tonlc—it’ ye
Sehooner Timothy A. H. Vansluiytman, Not just aa it's rich

2 tons net, Capt. Stoll, for Trinidad

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Trinidad, Venezuela, Colombia,

Curacao and Jamaica by the 5&5.
Colombie will be closed at the General
Fost Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 3 pm. on the 28th
February 1951, Registered Mail and

Ordinary Mail at 9 a.m, on the ist Mareb
1951,












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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS 4B ADVOGAT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2


































E
mee SK yyy or) |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd, Broad &1., Bridgetown.
——————— er

Tuesday, February 27, 1951
NATURAL GAS

THE announcement of the arrival in
Barbados of Mr. Julian Garrett presages
the proclamation of the Natural Gas Cor-
poration Act. Mr, Garrett has come to
Barbados to take up the duties of Director
of Petroleum and Natural Gas. The people
of. Barbados welcome him to the island
and hope that during his tenure of office
the obstacles to the wider utilisation of
Natural Gas will be removed: and that he
will be able to make Natural Gas available
to the public in ever-increasing quantity.

The repercussions following upon the
government take over of natural gas have
not yet been felt and the shortsightedness
of the government policy which has neces-
sitated this step might not be immediately
apparent.

The taxpayers of Barbados will not be
happy until they know at what price they
have bought out the interest of the British
Union Oil Company. Compensation has to
be paid to that company for their rights
not only in the gas wells but for the pipe
line which the government will be com-
pulsorily acquiring. At the time when
the Natural Gas Corporation Act was be-
fore the Legislature very considerable
sums were mentioned as the probable
amount of compensation and the sooner
that the extent of the liability which the
government has incurred is known the
better it will be.

‘Grave doubts have recently been
expressed in respect of the finances of this
colony and the necessity to have to under-
take a considerable outlay on such a mat-
ter at this time is most unfortunate.’ It is
apparent now that sufficient consideration
was not given to the effects of the policy
which the government was undertaking
and in this field as in so much else of the
government’s policies incompetence and
lack of foresight have been responsible for
the considerable and unnecessary financial
commitments which the island faces.

“The Director of Petroleum and Natural
Gas will have no sinecure, Certain matters
will have to be clarified in his department
such as the relationship between the
Natural Gas Corporation and the Public
Utilities Board. It is also essential that
some agreement be reached without fur-

The Contemporary Seene in English Education V AC ATION JOBS dae este Ulan |
; D. V.

F ROM THE CRADLE By Paul Nugat & CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE

.

TS
Full employment has brought something

i @O k HE GRAVE like a boom to University students in Britain Usually NOW
who welcome vacation jobs. Tins MORTON’S PEA SOUP .......--++*** 18 15

i i In almost every University Vacation Work
dimes ae chipsen describes the By H. L. O. FLECKER the least intelligent in the “Modern| Bureaux: have been formed to bring the jobs 7 a ee
Eighty years ago, when the British ' - No cut and dried sol"! to the students and the students to the jobs.|} Pkes, QUAKER OATS .....-....-----+1"""" 24 2 |

|

n ri tion has been found, although —— :
oars ee a at In a speech at “Wakefield” British thore has been a notable advance.|For Britain’s student population has been | (eee
cerned itself with little more than ©°U"*! Meedauarters. My own view is completely un-| raised since the end of World War II. Where-| ¢* S

the instruction in the three “R's” 11 + was called ‘primary’. The OTthodox, but as it is based on i ea ;

of children between the ages ‘of chief defect cr ine Act _ that 50me experience, I venture to) @S Im a meee pe ae —— “ % FOR YOUR BATHROOM

5 and 12, The 1944 Education it erected an ambitions secondary ©XP?¢ss it. ‘There are some chil- Further Education and Training Scheme for|¢

Act deals with the Nursery School structure without paying _ suffi- dren even as young as 14, wh0) ay servicemen sent the figure up to 105,000;

which can be entéred at the age cient regard to the primary profit enormously by starting ith the decline in the numbers

of 2, with Primary Education ex- foundations. The basic sugges- Patt-time work provided that it}and even with the decline in the nu

aia a to 1 + = tion that it should limit the size ee with ehh edu-|eligible under this Scheme, it is estimated | ¢ Coreen BASINS with Pedestal

on u jon continuing at of the Glasses in the cation. ey are “stuck” becuuse 2 . x 1y ”*%18”

least to 15 and sometimes to 18 schools was actually Pt a they “do not see the use” of what| that the increase in the number of educa-|§ & BASINS with or. without Pedestal

or 19 and with further education. Gebate on February i6th, 1944 in they learn at school, Put them to| tional grants will keep the figure at more :

The limit of this last is pithily the House of Commons, The reply the right sort of work and they] than 80,000

expressed by what an old school- was given that to mention a will come back to their teachers vate hird hei

master of mine used to say when specific figure in an Act of Par- eager to learn the theory of what Of this number, about one-third — their a

ea, aioe oT a oad eae : Bi tg 4 a disservice. they are doing in eee examinations passed — put away their theo- Bakelite Mahogany

v e matter would ealt wi S suggeste ar * : ‘ y

only cure for that!” It has indeed by “regulation” — 5 eee the Biinection ‘Act ine i918, Tt was) retical studies for the long summer vacations Cae roe eat HOLDERS

been said that when education be- Ministry. In the outcome these only carried out in one area, the| and roll up their sleeves ready for work. For HARPIC, Large and Small.

came compulsory, like death, it classes still tend to be much too town of Rugby, where it was @/the provincial students, most of the job P

acquired, like death, a certain large: classes of 40, 50, and ever triumphant success. The Rugby ; ae

vexatiousness. more remain, and this weakness experiment had the advantage of vacancies are of a regional character. There
the primary stage seriously peing backed by a very enlight- | is work in local factories, hospitals, laundries,

at
James Mill wrote in 1825 “An handicaps all subsequent educa- i ; a WILKINSO Co., Ltd.
institution for education, which is tion. Any working schoolmaster ee ag kg ae hotels, holidays camps, theatres, and cinemas. IN & HAYNES

hostile to progression, is the most could have told the politicians ¢¢ cych a scheme on the national Most of these jobs, though socially interest-| § Successors To

preposterous and vicious thing, (and many did so) that an educa- 5 ; i : :
i h fficulties—
which the mind of man can con: tional change of any importance cond mires Fa eeisaaehs ing, are unskilled. So, to ensure good morale,

ceive.” From this charge our myst start at th t the job organisers favour the group employ-|¢
Board of Education (which the work ‘its way up bottom “anc ‘selfish parents who would sené j g group employ-|§ C. S PITCHER & CO.
Act of 1944 converted into a there is dislocation of the educa- 0Ut to work just the children whe | ment of students to prevent students becom-| ¥ 7
Ministry), can be absolved. tion of a generation of children, OUght to stay at school, foolist}ing bored and discontented in their un-|¢ Ph
Thring’s dictum that the waste in Children who want to acquire the | samili di } ones — 4472, 4687,

The progress made since 1870 is g teacher’s workshop is the lives dignity—and the freedom—of iliar surroundings.
striking. It was a great thing in of men holds good whether the W@se-earners before their time: 3 4
1944 to have tidied things up and responsibility for the waste is above all the quite irrefutable} Typical student enterprises were the work | Sessessooooooooooosoees
to have a systematic scheme. jorne by the teacher, the admin- social argument that the condi-} camps started on the sites of two new towns,
There are many excellencies in the jstrator or the politician, The tions in most industries are en-
Act, some glaring defects, some primary teachers mostly. do a tirely unsuitable for such young Stevenage and Harlow, to enable students to

rene See ae oes very fine job: but until their children. Administrators aan work for the Development Corporations on 4 4 |
4 id om - nt to sort things out wi p 1 ; |
lines already laid down in 1902. coon. cd ~ _ pore ae oon ie foreign to human tasks such as social research, surveying, arch-



























ee ene ee Rice aa ead individual attention to the chil- nature, let alone to the nature of ae planning, and heavy manual labour.
i ren, their work cannot properly boys and girls. One is Som ther camps were established to assist in the
— Ser ~ es ger Aa Sma, bear fruit. These large classes tempted to think that. -
Then “fo the first time the child we the existence of the inde- A ne bu)
th tha the official or the tax- ent Preparatory Schools as Satan’s lips twist anticipatory
ae eh ee sie. aa th we vall them, to which the upper smiles
payer" wee | recoguix A erat © classes in England mostly send
Tere ole h naees f teach their sons from the ages of 8 or When education (officers consult
phe ygmegytyenyeie dart linge een a OTR IR ae Bang conn ea or Pac their files.
dentists, officers. of many~ sorts, Seâ„¢mu?" school for the children
director { education with their of all. are socially convincing; I hasten to say that good ad-
levien ee Ales. overnors of but the primary schools will ministrators,— and, thank God,
a hook; illors ald rman, ine, aye to be improved a great deal there are ,)many (of them—are
eirtee sare eas by | the before it will seem reasonable well aware of the danger.
fuhdired, members of partianens “2,20 om toe conclusion. s ; ital
f th ernm re — all of Apart from all questions of The interesting thing is that the

ne hs x ese ates ish Laos. snobbery or of more justifiable 1944 Act makes provision for just
a u thi * t-hill ri aoa fful Objections on social grounds (pri- such a scheme. But it is designed
Poti at A itd tel mm med meaty schools vary a lot in their for erection upon a school-leaving
activity, are ultimately concerned discipline and general care of the age of (eventually) 16. ‘These
oi wron Pail with the y dation children), we have at present not County Colleges, as they are to be
e M Brows's dictation, This the teachers or the buildings or called, are to give part-time
eit we. forget at our peril, the money required for a really cultural and vocational educa-
: worthy primary education. The tion; and attendance up to the

The chief hindrance to nr>gress ates er demand that ele- age of 18 is to be compulsory. |

construction of steel towers in connection
with a hydro-electric scheme in Scotland.
The biggest annual work scheme, however,
are the farm camps, organised by the Nation- COVER THE WORLD |
al Union of Students in co-operation with the
Ministry of Agriculture. Last year, 5,000 of
Britain’s students and 2,000 students from
overseas formed 25 camps to help with the

harvest. your buildings, we can offer you the
NATIONAL PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN following



As a protective covering for the roofs of

To gain national publicity and support for ‘i
its vacation work schemes has been one of RED ROOFING PAINTS
the major tasks of the National Union of “DANBOLINE” ANTI -CORROSIVE PAINT (for galvanized
Students, as there is no tradition in Britain iron)—$7.52 per wine gallon,

to follow for woflking one’s way threugh col: “PROPELLER” READY MIXED OIL PAINT (for wooden

education should be consider this measure the most shingles, asbestos, cement and aluminium)—$7.00 per

ther delay about the price which is to be ea rete te tne Set dears Yom cheap has left a legacy, As things interesting feature of the Act.|lege. About 70 per cent. of the students have wine gallon,
charged for natural gas. While the inter- | }cen the religious question. Partly 226» It wees oe aa to our Unfortunately it has not yet been) State scholarships, supplemental awards, rn
minable wrangle continues the public are owing to the fact that all educa- Sy chon ‘Tole cueniien Under 40 possible to put it into practice. | 444 grants from Local Education Authorities For best results, the following instructions should be carefully
‘ ‘ tion was originally conducted by ; Financial stringency has forbidden , Tt 7 . followed :— 3
denied the full benefit from the existence | {0 church, partly to the great Secure for their children the it, In place of the County | Nevertheless, to live within these incomes in
of natural gas in Barbados, influence of the Sunday School Gin ghee tes Of gral clasees Colleges eae a a oeen et pa |a world of rising prices requires both care- Seerens ye
In securing a price which is fair to the | movement at the end of the 18th’ and also able, to find for all its SAReT ates in quale in Gisteront ful management and a remunerative job to 1, For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least a

Century, our education has always jAniidren as much mone:
_ ke y as the en~
government, the Gas Company and the |had a ‘religious tinge, and th> lightened parent is prepared to

consumer, a great service will-have been | great majority of Englishmen be: pay-for their education, will the gocis! BN re eed aregen
rendered and it will then be possible to | rooted in religion is barren and common school begin to be a jus- Tocadeiry for the state ip inter-
look forward to a development of the gas frustrating. We agree with the ot vier pmeeeny bie Dew © vene: but it would be idle to
poet Wordsworth that the state a niversatly state- ciaim that the Youth Service has

parts of the dountry. If adequate| bridge the extra expenses entailed by the|{} 2. yor previoeiy waited eee poet ot DANBOLINE”.
,

vacations. Sonate rub down, clean, and apply 1 coat of “DANBO-
That Britain's Nation i ee
tional Union of Students 3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor con-

has been successful in its campaign, is large- dition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat





BFF SSS SSS

services and an extension of the areas sup- controlled education appears in L : : sa of “INTERNATIONAL” Ri
ied, P does well when, the recent history of Germany teached the high standard set by ly due to the sympathetic way in which its followed by 1 coat ot “DANBOLINE™ retyiange
pie d Russia, Th itt the voluntary organisations such| aims have been received by such bodi , 3
a en "Binding herself by statute to secure 1026 pay aireia Sa yreartlon = as Boys’ Clubs, Boy Scouts ete.) the Mini y ete ae Wooden Shingle.
ROAD MANNERS For all the chidron whom her soll tare were tu/> 9: arp oer The most interesting experimen: | the Ministry of Labour, the Trades Union ;
.. THE discourtesy of many drivers in this maintains committees which reported in 1938 Ef all is the Cambridgeshire / Congress, and employers’ federations. The 1, For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
commmitipas which reparied in 1398 viuage college. Avound » “Med-| Ministry of Labout through ite local and PRIMER FOR WOOD, followed by 2 coats of “PRO-
island has been remarked upon by strang- The rudiments of letters, ‘and inform tigns may be summarised, as most €rn” school are grouped lecture] |: fat Betcahe AOCRe: at PELLER”.
erg and those who give some consideration iid: mind With TaReaI ARO Ee Bethan either foundie place in the Hooms and common rooms for pho offices, brings to notice of the Union 2. ape eee p elnten work, ¢ the ute ¥ in yee
; : : :. truths.” Education Act of 1944 or else were adults, a hall for concerts and|job vacancies, exempts students from payin 1 wn,, clean, and apply 2coats of “PRO-
to the rights of others. It is no exaggera nur put into force by subsequent ad, Plays, dances and cinema, al jngurance continent co paying 5 Soran ; :
tion to say that the majority of motor The “Excursion” was written in Ministrative regulations of the library, workshop, laboratory, ions, grants free travel : e abies rae. painted work, if the surface is in poor
accidents in this island are the direct result | 1814 and we now expect a little Ministry. | It was proposed that dookery Toor cantoeh and play-| Warrants to and from the farm camps, and of “INTERNATION! L” PRIMER FORK WOOD", followed
A more than “rudiments”, But this the school-leaving age be raised ing fields. The Warden of the/ allows the full ; b : : . AL” PRIMER FOR WOOD”, followed
of bad manners in one way or another, oe 1 “rudiments”, But this +5°5‘and later to. 16 Secondary village college has the duty of full earnings to be retained with- by 2 coats of “PROPELLER”.
The most prevalent today is the refusal {the problem of enoknitattodelions eosin a ge ie at 11 -+. inspiring all these activities and ower from grants or scholarships. Asbestos Cement,
‘ haghraens pe ae and! ever since 1870 _ Alongside of the existing second- then entrusting their leadership e ideal vacation job. i ‘
of many motorists to “dip their lights tary Iiiseittoe has Ale he schoo ary schools, which were re-named to the youths and adults of the] students. i. th J a according to the 1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
When approaching another vehicle. Motors |by the “Dual system”, which sGramaat Sonoote;! rene to be oe, Tam pfoud that one of the} ) é o ie nee es ae the virtues of Seneas AND PLASTER PRIMER, followed by 2 coats of
oda i i R sought to do justice t -estab-. crecte echnical. and ‘modern’? Wardens {s a former pupil oi ing protessiona. useful, socia i ~ OPELLER”.
teday are in nearly every instance fitted I ieee cchturch” whtek Fee tet schools. Arrangements ‘were mine, The ‘first such college was/ing and modestl ma ; ti at manny 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoreughly, clean,
with powerful headlights which blind the | of the school buildings w made for the transfer between opened in’ 1928: the idea was ¥ unerative. In this re- and apply 2 coats of “PROPELLER”. :
: F e gs without , PD n spect, th ete ’ y LER”.
oncoming traffic especially in roads which offending the non-conformists, (or schools at the age of 13 of chil— first mooted by Kay-Shuttleworth pect, the scientific and technological stu- Alumini
lack street lighting Brel, Churchmen,. ds, Wty have oo. a ae in 1840, dents find themselves favoured rete
= ; come called) who ‘dbjecte . bes P y ced. : e 1; " ”
There can be little excuse for not dip- | to the subsidisation by the’ tate The existing examination system The cad s*rondary schools, re- EXCHANGE OF STUDENTS followed ur con oe “PROPELLER —”
ping headlights because cars are fitted of eran eeel Sure teach- (echauition, nee Saal paren Syecenes, ners meet se The 1 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean
: b or eationa ri SS . eate’ ® i Soi y I , :
with switches either near the clutch pedal | made it impossible for the Church was to be established between Sinaien The onan vay had nol r are College of Science and Tech- ot SREY COME, Ot I ee
or on the steering wheel to be manipulated |? finance its schools. A succes- all three forms of secondary made, since the state entered the | "0.O8Y 1n London promoted the first vaca- T
with the greatest ease, The serjousness of in this reapeck the Ack ot LeLe toes ce i field of | secondary education in| on work scheme in industry in 1933, when eee, ee ee
. in § respec’ e Act 0 joes : i i *
the matter will be realised when it is Pact ee girs + PEt eee atubision ane cevioins foe ible educational achievement. Without si eee tan, en tee et re ee ne ee
. x c act man thi : o 'y ira fs se i
pointed out that refusal {o dip one’s lights ee oo 4 coralality — Sotaaree in so highly industrialised a them we could never have found ; ai flourished and last year, 2,000
might. be thé cause. of some vehicle run- tion, which have marked the re, country. as England. Technical ©ough pi to win the Battle} students had offers of holiday-posts from 300
: : lations. between the Church of Schools for boys had existed in Sf Britain. Most unfortunately) concerns in Britain, with furth ffers f DA COSTA & CO LTD — ENTS
ning off the road and causing some fearful | England and the Free Churches some form since 1889. Nor can thé enthusiasts for the new sec-} eon a ee a er, ohers trom me ’ AGEN
accident or the death of the occupants or ree the att 20 ORT ae Te ee ee es ae aliieuarelomeie catabil canta sotvonc oo eek ese khsensigdbrte a yc Fa xmbmgrsice gy?
x : ave justified a bolder approach education beyond the old elemen- abe : ween the three} overseas firms
innocent pedestrians. to the problem, But the on did tary level was desirable for a types, have seen fit to decry and were all members of the



y three- ; a
make two important innovations, mumber of the children who had disparage the Grammar Schools. three-year-old International Association for
In those schools which belonged not hitherto found places in the This danger had been foreseen. the Exchange of Students for Technical Ex-
to the Church but whose dilapi- Grammar schools. Experiments: was present myself on a number] per’erce. Under the auspi f the Associ
dated condition puts eyen half the. in this direction go back as far of occasions when the Grammar t Riss: . pices of the A af
cost of repairs beyond its means, as 1872. But these experiments School Headmasters were assured} “'O"> Britain received and sent overseas
and in. all state-provided schools, had embraced. only the brighter by the Minister, Mr. R. A. Butler| More students than any other country

e _
Our Readers Say: © ———_| 8 those, schools which belonged not hitherto found places in the This danger had been foreseen. 1) the Exchange of Students for Technical Ex-|—
‘ Co-operation
To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I would like to take this opportunity of

FOR YOUR PIE




congratulating you on the fine editorial published |Treligious instruction was to be children: the difficulty was to RED
i . : and by his, lieutenant ‘ APPLES
Leteisurties eo canoe NN ee remruary given according to an agreed syl+ ‘decide Wit what waat® betone Ede “che omer a Conservative [ _, Phose overseas students, together with the

Ttheems th me as a layman, howevell that the | Christian but Son-epctaaiens a tone Wine gta’ vee see vere the astne & Socialist; for those f tUdents in Britain, will have discovered that, ep Tee ret
al nti a Co- . AE were e + .
appoin -oap Sect aera yan vaegedhig This idea goes right back to ®¢hooling) of the least intelligent Bcvatieadins Poke ma ae as a result of a series of conferences attended RHUBARB
acres of Dodds Plantation to peasants on a co-opera- [ate 18th Century and was children. The raising of the > “levelling down” of the }0’ i"dustrial representatives and the staff VELO KRIS

tive basis. At least, the guidance pnd advice of
such an officer would be available, if not to ensure
the success of the venture, at any rate to minimise
its chances of failure.

The importance of co-operative societies in a
community such as ours cannot be over-estimated.
It has often been stated that the average Barbadian
is essentially an individualist and innately suspi-
cious, Mainly for these reasons, there are those
who feel that any efforts to get co-operative ven-
tures started in Barbados are a waste of time.
Possibly, Government hold the same view and con-
scarepty, ‘have not filled the post of Co-operative
Offieer which has been vacant for several months.

If-this is the case, I would like to register my
strong protest, as I am one of the many who feel
that under the leadership of a competent Co-opera-

romoted in the 19th school-leaving agé caught every- Gro : ‘
pre maak eo 10th Century by auahpnitite wrong foc The local aoe dnote that ithe con- and students of the Imperial College, the re- THE HIGHEST
religious “Instruction, divested of Feeuvation as had recive ites and standard ‘of Siiainenaan aoe and employment of the vacation stu- :
all specifically doctrinal clothing, dings nor the equipment ;} den i oud nd
Will prove, too thinly ‘clad 4 Teady. This was-not surprising in cared, “would he wees oe follows certain broad principles. ACHIEVEMENT
weather the storms of to-day, it 1944, When a vast number of Ajas for the Grcateh of pale n arrival at a factory, students are met 17
is an open question. The other eee bape beet, eee bY cians! Even. before the Coalition by one of the firm’s managers, who discusses IN BISCO
innovation, inserted t . le whole man~ ; dis , i ‘
inpaveten, inneriel fe aed the ufacturing energy of the nation wens, Sunscreen B heavy blow was with them a scheme of work, based upon] % MAKING
the statutory enactment that the 28d been diverted to military pur 6)" 4) a iat rammar Schools} their particular interests and length of :
school, day” should Begih with Poses. “There was a — great me plea of integrating the demi tudi gth of aca- CARRS
cobeotive “womans t ante dines shortage! of teachers: we could not teaching profession. The salaries ¢ studies. Students are put to work, s
not “be distinctive of any par- cope cent, the orene mursbers ks: i Pay hitherto been] Spending a week or two in various workshops CREAM CRACKERS
: : : ¥ , let a P 0 ; ‘a a
ticular religious denomination. p yetain 9 neKobatEed wi e Local Educa-| and attending lectures after working hours.]% CHOCOLATE LUNCH

} CHEESE CRiSPS

WATER BISCUITS









“How far legislation of this kina \Y?le year’s intake, Most impor- tion Authorities who paid them
wilk ongute ‘a. relive ieeats tae tant of all, no one had any clear in two panels, one for the sec— In the course of several vacations, the stu-

Tiational BOucaticaeaernaiAe to Cie idea of what to do with the extra ondary (Grammar) Schools, one] dents get a complete picture of every aspect





tive Officer who understands the people and their
e = . year, beyond the entirely negative for the el t 5 : ‘
n ‘a number of Co-operative ventures such as |S¢e?.” Obviously it all depends ; : ementary schopls. We] of indust ithi ir fi ‘AIL UIT BISCUITS
the one proposed for Dodds Plantation could suc- | °” the teachers: if; the thing is > ie hei Hae ‘aS “4 ~~ fully expected ‘that the Grammar eee Sate , — ——
eneetasly te askablished. Another point which Gov- peruneey. and uninspired it ther year would be wrong, At Schools would share the “Upper”} One of the fu a ; .,
seamen should et in mois Rae sucka tong ill do. more Se ; ther year would be wrong. At ponel with the new. secondary fundamental purposes behind Just Arriced For Your Cake
lapee t time ibe ween the return of Mr. Cave to he — - often’ worn a sur- of every sort of teacher in our Schools —.,.the technical and these schemes is to give the students an op- :
ee ee! Ba se aapetn ment of his suc- ane No “e od doubtless, an grea, so that we might hear each modern schools. Instead of this a] portunity to rub shoulders with i dustrial ate om on Pee RAISINS
eo: age oe Teel s-ope e move- Wardvole 4 % ee in his other's views. The elementary single panel was formed for a 1 : industria S in tins CURRANTS |
IE SUT ee ve acaccasdathtaii ites “dase aks ets eek ut +a ea teachers with one voice clamour- P!imary and secondary schools personnel, and to give them a foretaste of the CHASE & SANBORNE
late to agriculture it is right that the post of Co- |should be assed with a a ed for postponing the raising of pogsther. I am afraid that I sus-| type of occupations, which may invol Pr : om
vet Oficen chai ee dae a ae ) om pass wi out a very the school-leaving age until we pect political. skull duggery. The larg j , y 2 ve a LIPTON’S PURE COFFEE ALMOND ICING
tural’Department and that the officer should have mer eee eee had had time to prepare for it. At aataaes Fines primary ot a ac = mar ae WHEAT PUFFS : ee
some*training in agric i th ; a majcrity has called tat On the . . KIN
oe ie anid sabes ane tae Until 1944 elementary educa. that very moment the members s the tune, that ook-out for future graduate per- SLING in tins , ROYAL BAKING POWDER

the person selected for the post should have a good
knowledge of the Barbadian peasant and be Able
to stud his needs and discuss his problems with
him... Above all, he must be in a position to gain
his confidence. Only such an individual can hope
to break down prejudice and suspicion and get co-
operatives organised on a sound basis. I submit
Sir; that it should not be difficult to obtain the ser-
vices of one who meets these requirements.

bss PROGRESS.

tion was provided for children f parliament who were supposea ® Much too high percentage of} sonnel, vacati i

between 5 and 14. An important Specially to’represent these teach money. has gone to the least thei de ee ee
committee which issued-its.report €"s’ views were demanding in qualified teachers so that it has| | ©! performance, to assess personality. As
in 1926 had recommended. a new impassioned language the imme- become difficult—sometimes even] a result, many students return to their Uni
division of age and this was tate raising of the age not to impossible—to find the highly] versities with t
adopted by the recent Act. The 15 but to 16. Education and poli- qualified teachers that the Gram-]. ‘ with an offer of future employment
term ‘elementary’ was abolished tics are uneasy .bed-fellows. mar Schools need for their ad-|i0 their pockets, and with the comforting
and the education of children We are still. working on the Veured wark. thought, that their careers no longer depend

between th
e ages of 5 or 7 and problem.of the best curriculum for (to ke continued “tosmorrow! upon a short nerve-racking interview.



CARROTS 24¢ lb. — CABBAGE 30+ Ib.
GODDARD



i

woe



TUESDAY.~FEBRUARY 27, 1951

BARBADOS



Only Courage Will Give
Barbados A Theatre

By NORMAN DUTHIE
THE Glasgow Citizens Theatre is an independent
experimental theatre or what is loosely called a repertory
theatre. It is part of a movement which began early in
this century with the foundation of the Abbey Theatre in

Dublin, Miss Horniman’s Repertory Theatre in Manchester,

the Vedrenne-Barker Seasons at the Court Theatre in Lon-

don and later the foundation of the Repertory Theatres
notably in Birmingham and Manchester.

About 1909, there was a pin 220 jac hit. We intended to run .his
tory Theatre in Glasgow which|play for 8 weeks, but the public
created an audience for the work | demand was so strong, that when
of the new dramatists in English} we tack it off after 15 weeks, the
like Shaw, Galsworthy, St, John;public grumbled. The house was
Hankin etc. These theatres finished | Sold out for the whole run. On

ADVOCATE



Christian Mission
Case Adjourned

THE CHRISTIAN MISSION case in the Court of
Chancery was begun yesterday and adjourned for an in-
definite period in order that His Honour the Vice-Chancellor
can give a ruling on whether-the plaintiffs were in order to
‘file the suit in their own names and not in the name of the
Christian Mission. Mr. G. H. Adams, Senior Counsel for
the defendants, made that submission yesterday.

Iron Punctures

Lighter

In this suit the plaintiffs are
asking the Court to declare that
Revd. Hoyte and others were not
the properly elected Board of
Management of the Christian Mis-
sion Church for the year 1949-50
according to the provisions of the

PAGE FIVE



| EQUIPMENT HOLDING
| UP ROAD REPAIRS
St. James Vestry Told. |

EQUIPMENT ordered about nine months ago by the
Commissioners of -Highways for St. James has’ not yet
arrived. That is the reason why the St. James tenantry
roads are in a state of disrepair. This explanation was
given to Churchwarden Mr. A, G. Johnson who.asked the
Vestry to appoint a Board of Enquiry to find out why the
tenantry roads were so badly in need of repair.

_Mr. Johnson withdrew his mo- Guardians made the increase and
tion after the matter hag been/ Mr. Johnson withdrew his motion.
discussed. He said that their ten—-| The Vestry agreed to make pro-
antry roads contrasted horribly| visions for dental facilities for
with other roads about the island.| some of the poor people of the

with the outbreak of the 1914-18
war. The Citizens Theatre was”
started in 1943 and the moving
spirit was the Scottish dramatist,
James. Bridie.

It began in a small theatre at-
tached to the Academy of Music
in Glasgow with a seating capa—
city of 500 to 600. Two years
afterwards, it was able to move
to a bigger theatre with about

Saturday night last, I understand

HILE THE S.S. Oakhill was} Christian Mission Act.

The roads were in the condition

parish, This was decided after Mr.

that cur latest Christinas show
finished after a run of about 10
weeks. It also has been'a great
success.
Hard to Please

I was interested in Mr. Lynch’s
letter in the Advocate last week.
He criticises the principle of “ari
for art sake.” We have ficund we must mix cur experimental

being loaded with scrap ircs
on Sunday a piece fell back into
a lighter, owned by Messrs, Plan-
tations Ltd. No one was struck,
but the iron made a hole in the
bottom of the lighter.

Pumps from the Fire Brigade
were used to pump out the water.
The lighter afterwards went on
dock for repairs,

HIRTY-FOUR MOTORISTS

Associated with Mr. Adams is
Mr. D. H. L. Ward. They are be-
ing instructed by Mr. H. L
Thomas of Messrs Carrington &
Sealy. Appeari for the Com-
plainants is Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.,
associated with. Mr. J. S. B. Dear
and instructed by Mr. D. H. Ban-
field of Messrs Hutchinson & Ban-
field. Mr. Reece is holding the

twice that capacity and very much ; work with plays of a wide public
better back stage facilities—ex-, appeal. The ditficulty is to know
cellent scene docks workshops etc. | What the public really wants, and

papers of Mr. E. K. Walcott, IX.c.

they are in now for many years
and it was for that reason that he
had asked members to appoint a
Board of Enquiry.
Mr. Wilkinson

Johnson asked the Vestry to cchn-
sider allowing some people to get
heir teeth extracted when nec +s-
sary, the Vestry paying part of
the cost.

Mr. Crick withdrew a motion
asking ‘Vestry cause’a

, said that the
Highway Commissioners got their
funds from highway ,taxes and
froni Government grants. “In his





,CLARKE’S “BLOOD MIXTURE” r




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impurities; many sufferers from
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
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SL SDR eek



ia LIQUID or TABLET FORM



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COMFORT AT
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LUNCHEON










OPIS COOS

opinion Mr, Johns ~ } Monthly financial’ statement of 8
view the Conmeineleneney amar aod all subsidiary boards to . be >
them how they were getting along placed before them on the 24th

It has also good facilities for the
audience—a restaurant, club room
and bars which have enabled ui
to develop something of a social
centre in the theatre.

We formed a small company
limited by guarantee and not
having a share capital and we
are debarred by our contribution
from paying either dividends or
fees to directors. The board con-
sists of 8 men who are interested
in cultural development, and. one
of our great assets is that all the
directors are firm friends. Accord—
ingly, although there are always
differences of views on questions
of policy, everyone is loyal to the
decisions of the board as a whole.

Citizens Theatre

Scon after the theatre was
started, we formed a_ Citizens
Theatre Society which has now, a;
membership of about 3,000. The
ennual subscription is only 5/-
and the society runs during the
season, about half g dozen lec-
ture’ and discussion meetings. It
has the use of the club room and
all the members get a little mag-
azine with theatre news etc.
which jis issued about six times .a
year. The. society has also an
inner group called the Critics
Circle which meets regularly and
discusses with very great frank—
ness, the plays which have been
produced including the acting
stage setting, production, ete. Last
year the board received consid—
ered criticisms of every play
produced during the season, This
was extraordinary valuable and
enlightening, because it gave us
a quite independent outside view
of the work which the theatre had
done.

Another very interesting de-
velopment was the formation by
a group of school teachers and a
junior society. Twice a year in
the, spring and the autumn we
put on a special production of a
classic—e.g. Shakespeare, Sheri-
dan and Goldsmith. ‘These plays
are given at night to the general
audience, but during the week,
special matinees are given for
schocl children who are charged
only 1/- per head, . This means
that each year, somewhere be-
tween 8,000 and 9,000 school chil—
Gren see a classical play produced
on a high standard. We regard this
work as of first importance and
the young audieritae are so en-
thusiastic, that in many cases
they go home and insist on. their
parents coming to see the play. A
special value which we think this
work has, is that it introduces
the children to the Living
Theatre. It is to be remembered
that in most cases, films make
Uttle if any demand on the imag-
ination, whereas, in the ease of .a
stage play. the audience must
rollaborate with the actors if
suecess is to .be achieved. We
believe also that this work is
building up our future audiences.

Our theatre works “in associa-
tion with the Arts Council of
Great Britain”, They give us a
limited guarantee of half our
loss on any season, and on at
least two occasions we have had
to make calls on this guara.tee.
In addition, the Arts Council
gave us grants for the furnishing
of the club room and the improve-
ment of the stage lighting and
also the non interest bearing
loan for redecoration, heating etc.
of the Princess's Theatre in
which we are now working.

Gift of £10,000

We began with very limited
fnance—about £1,200 mainly in
gifts and before ous first perform-
anee, a good part had had to be
spent on equipment, costumes etc.
On the two years in the Little
Theatre, we just made ends meet.
When we moved to the larger
ome, we had to find a guarantee
for the rent for the ten years
lease, Here we had a stroke of
exceptionally good fortune. — We
approached a number of friends
about this guarantee and one of
them, Sir ea Stewart, a
Glasgow industrialist, gave me 4
ae pleasant shock. He asked
me to see him for half an hour
ene evening and this is what he
said: “I got your letter. This is
just all wrong. You fellows are
giving a lot of time to running
this theatre and are making a
good job’ of it. You ought not to
be wasting your time going round
with the hat like this. I wish I
could give you. some of my time
but I cannot, but I could stop
this waste of your time, I want
to give you a seven year covenant
which will provide the theatre
with £10,000.” I wish more people
who are interested in the theatre
would follow Sir Fred’s fine ex-
ample.

I hope it is clear that our ex-
perience on the financial side of
running a theatre has varied a
great deal. In our 1948-49 season,
we showed a nice surplus at
Easter. Our summer season was
simply disastrous. We had a spell
of fine weather, and there was a
slump in the theatre business
throughout the whole of Britain.
As a result, we began our 1949-50
season with considerable anxiety,
hut we had the great good luck to



1-t frequently, we have offered
what we thought was sure to be a
‘very popular play, and have found
that the public response was
poor. On the (ther hand, plays
apprcaching the “high brow” have
been pronounced successes. We
are very proud of the fact that
we have consistently shown a
surplus on our Shakespearean
plays e.g. Macbeth, the Merchant
of Venice and Midsummer Nights
Dream. All these of course had
Special children’s matinees, but
these do not pay. The credit goes
to the general public and, we
claim, to the gyod productions
and acting.

One of our aims is to encourage
Scottish playwrights and we are
prepared to take risks by putting
on plays by new Scoitish writers.
The majority of our acting com-
pany, can cf course, work in
broad Scots. Bridie gave us one
or two distinctively Scottish
plays and ther promising writers
are Robert Kemp and Robert
MacLéllan.

What we are doing here is
parallel to the fine work done by
the Abbey Theatre in Dublin
which piicduced, not only able
actors and actresses like Sara
Algoecd, . Maire O’Neill, F. J.
McCormick, Arthur Sinclair and
Barry Fitzgerald who also pib-
vided the stage for J. M. Synge,
Sean O’Casey and drew plays
from W. B: Yeats, Lady Gregory
and others. I feel sure that there
are \2cal traditions of a special
outlook in Barbados which de-
serve similar encouragement.
cught to say that our acting
company is purely professional,
Some of nur most valued people
work originally, however, with
the Scottish National players, a
group who were only part time
professionals, but who did most
valuable work especially in the
smaller towns in Scotland. They |
gave only two short seasons in
Glasgow, but their work in the
country - gave rise to the very
vigorous community drama move-
ment in Scotland.

Courage, Enthusiasm

The two things most necessary
for the starting and success of
any venture like jours, are en-
ihusiasm and courage and I
would put a high value on’ the
second of these. Nothing will ever
be done. unless some group of
people take their cowrage in both
hands and make a start. If the
general attitude is that a thing is
difficult and that financial secur-
ity is essential, then nothing will
eyer be done. The second thmught
is that the enthusiasts must be
prepared to work together as a
team to subtrdinate their per-
sonal views to the general de-
cisions of the board. I would
exemplify the point of courage
in this way. Our theatre began in
May 1943 with a little dinner
party at which about 10 pebple
were present. James Bridie was
in the chair, We had a most en-
joyable- and -argumentative talk.
We all expected that the decision
would be that we should begin to
work for a repertory theatre to
start after the war. Bridie summed
up by saying that we were agreed
‘on two things—first, that Glasgow
needed a special theatre and sec-
ond, that there was a _ nucleus
audience justifying a beginning
on a modest scale. He then said:
“Come on then chaps, let’s do
it.” In some extraordinary way,
we had opened our theatre in the
following September.

I understand that one of the
ctifficulties in Barbados is the lack
of a suitable theatre, I_ cannot
even guest what the chances are
of such a theatre being provided,
but I am sure that if the present
amateur movement in Barbados
goes on working with courage
and enthusiasm, such a theatre
will ultimately be provided. I do
not think it should belong to the
acting qompanies, but should be
held as a public asset and rented
out to any group who can offer
.work jof genéral interest to the
community. In the special cir-
cumstances, I hope it would be
suitable also for concerts, and
probably, for the presentation of
non-commercial films. In this
way, it will be a community
centre of the highest value.

Appeal Judges
Confirm Decision

THE decision of His Worship
Mr, E. A. McLeod, Police Magis-
trate of District. “A”—who placec
Marie Waithe of Hindsbury Road
St. Michael on a personal bonc
for one month in the sum. of 15/-
for blackguarding — was yester-
day confirmed by Their Honours
Mr. G. L. Taylor and Mr. H. A.
Vaughan, Judges of the Assistan
Court of Appeal.

Counsel for Waithe was Mr. E. B
Barrow. Waithe gave notice o
appeal at the bar, One witness
for the prosecution said that on
August 12, 1950, she saw Waithe
behaving in an unseemly manne:
an Hindsbury Road. Many peoplc
spoke to her but she still contin-
ued,

Mr. Barrow in his address sub-
mitted that the case be dismissed
Their Honours however were sat-
















and cyclists were reported
over the week-end for tratfic. of-
fences, Of these three motorists
were reported for carrying weight
in €xeess and another three for
not stopping at major roads,
oT broke and entered the
house of Elvina Clarke at
Glendairy Road, St. Michael be-
tween 7.45 a.m. and 10.45 p.m.
on Saturday and stole a quantity
of clothing. The Police are mak-
ing investigations,
LTHOUGH the recent rains
had -hindered many things
yet they were indirectly a great
help to the motorists who drive
through the country districts, At
nearly every plantation canes
were overhanging into the road.
These canes often caused annoy-
ance to motorists,

During the rainy season the
lorries were unable to get into
the cart roads and in cane fields.
To keep the factories going
planters were forced to cut down
the canes that were nearest to
the highways, In the majority of
cases motorists now have a clear

view,
O*N SUNDAY night at 8 o’clock

Professor Raymond G. Jolly,
Executive Trustee of the Layman’s
Home Missionary Movement of
Philadelphia, gave a lecture at
Queen’s Park Shed,

He ended his talk by describing
the Kingdom of God soon to be
established on the earth, To those
present he promised to mail free
of charge further information on
the coming Reign of Peace, the
thousand-year Resurrection Day
and other important Bible studies.



CENTENARIAN

THIS I8 Christian Kellman of Cane
Garden, St. Andrew. The “Advo-
cate” has been following her career
closely from the time she passed the
century mark, She is now 118 years
old and looks good for many more
years. ‘



Lumber Arrives

A shipment of 210,000 feet ot
spruce and pine lumber arrivec
for Barbados yesterday by the
steamship Polycvest from Halifax
The shipment of lumber was con-
signed to Messrs, J. B. Leslie & Co,,

td.
Lighters were bringing the lum-
ber ashore and discharging i‘
along the waterfront in the inner
basin of the Careenage,

This shipment of lumber has
found a large part of the 1% feet

of lumber, which arrived some
days ago by the — steamship
Islandside, still lying on the
waterfront.

It is not expected that the lum-
ber will be cleared off the water-
front until around the end of the
week.

The Polyerest also brought 1,20(
bags of poultry for Messrs. H
Jason Jones & Co,, Ltd. She alsc
began to discharge this cargo yes-
terday and lorries were removing

it from the waterfront to the|$

agents,
Messrs. Plantattons Ltd. are the
Ship’s Agents,



Body Recovered

The body of Clarence Hoyte, a
26-year-old fisherman, who was
drowned at Brooklyn beach,
Paynes Bay, on Sunday morning
was found in the same vicinity
Yesterday” evening by Lionel
Phillips, of St. James.

A post mortem examination was
performed the same eycuing at
the St. James Almshouse by Dr.
A. C. Kirton, P.M.O. of St. Lucy.

An enquiry into the circum-
Sfances surrounding Hoyte’s death
will be held to-day at 11 a.m. at
the Holetown Police Station.

FELL OFF LORRY

Shortly after 2.30 p.m. yes-
terday Bert Gill a 20-year-old
labourer of Parish Land, St.

which was being driven along
Hothersal Turning. P

He was taken to the General
Hospital and was discharged after

put on a Christmas show of a verylisfied that the woman used the} he received treatment for bruises

light hearted type which was 2

language.

on his face and hands.

| SOLIO PACK APPLES
George, fell from the lorry M.1611}



As the case opened this morn-
ing Mr. Reece applied for leave to
amend the Bill of Complaint, and
as soon as this was got over, the
rest of the half day's hearing was
spent on legal argument on the

int raised by Mr. Adams, The

ice-Chancellot in adjourning the
case expressed concern over the
future of the Christian Mission
Church,

Action Maintainable?

Mr. Adams is submitting that
the action is not maintainable in
the manner in which it has been
brought.
ated the Church specifically said

and be sued in all the Courts. If
the plaintiffs were the Christian
Mission, they would have to sue
as the Christian Mission and not
as individuals, unless there was
something in the Act incorporating
them which allowed them to sue
on behalf of the corporate body.

He was submitting for those
reasons that the case be dismissed
with costs to the defendants,

Mr. Reece replying submitted in
the first place that the point Mr,
Adams had raised should have
been made in his pleadings. 1

He was submitting, however,
Mr. Reece said, that the plaintiffs
were properly before the Court.
The Act incorporated the body of
members of the Christian Missior
and not the Board of Management.
The Mission as a Mission could
only sue in its corporate name, but
the Board of Management was not
incorporated,

There were three separate and
distinct bodies: the Mission, a cor-
orate body of all the members,
he Representatives of the Church-
es—one for each of the 28 church-
es in the island or one for every
25 members, and the Board of
Management. The plaintiffs had
never said that they were the
Christian Mission, and he was}
arguing also, that any member
could come to the Court and ask
for a declaration as to who were
the properly constituted Board of
Management.

Taken By. Surprise

After much case law had been
cited on both sides, the Vice- |
Chancellor said that the point}
raised had taken the Court by
some surprise, and it was there-
fore desirable that he should de-
cide that preliminary point after

due care and consideration, The
matter would therefore be ad-
journed.

It was unfortunate that in that
domestic quarrel between. two
sections of the Christian Mission
there should have to be that ad-
journment. Without going into
any merits at that stage, the point
which struck him was with regard
to the future of the Christian Mis-
sion in Barbados and elsewhere.

It seemed to him that there
would have to be another meeting,
and he was wondering why_ it
could not be made possible for that
Court or some other authority to
summon a meeting and have the
future affairs of the Church de-
cided by a proper body.

Much of the facts of the case
related to things that had happen-
ed in the past without much bear-
ing as to what would happen in
the future. That was just by the
way, however. He could not fix
a definite date for the next hearing
of the case, Sessions would begin
next week and there might be fur-
ther delays. The parties would be
notified of the next date of hear-
ing. '

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BARTLETT PEARS

DUTCH STRAWBERRIES IN SYRUP .....

with their work,
About nine months ago he had

of each month and a meeting be]
summoned on the following Mcn-

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The Act which incorpor- | available.

available for th
that it should have the right to sue he yaa tee. ONO: YORI;



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Gay to consicer the report. He
withdrew his motion after he was |
told that Vestry could go to the
Parochial Treasurer and get any
information about the Subsidiary
Boards which he needed,

Mr, Crick said that he did not
feel that the matter was contro-
versial. During the last election
campaign he had heard a member
of the Vestry say that he had
known nothing of what happened
at the various Boards,

The Vestry’s business was done
by means of Boards and if it hap-
pened that one did not get a seat
on a Board one would know noth.
ing of the proceedings of that
Board, Sometimes taxpayers would
ouestion a Vestryman as to cer-
tain goings on ut different Boarr
and the Vestrym’n wuld be un-
able to give him lhe informa-
tion.’ «

been asked to pilot a Bill through
the House on behalf of the High-
way Commissioners for a joan
He got it through and an order
had been sent, but. they had been
tnformed that owing to conditions
in England, there had to be de-
ays.

Mr. Crick said that he had had
complaints from various people
that the roads were bad and he
was wondering whether some-
thing could not be done despite
the fact that rollers were uot
If equipment were ;

asked, would the roads remain
in the same condition without the
Commissioners making any
tempt to get them done?

Mr. Johnson then withdrew his
motion,







bad weather clothing and other
things had to be removed from
it,

Mr, Jordan suggested that they
carry out the normal repairs until
they could get a loan.

The Highway Commissioners
had not been in office, for one
ae or even two years but for a
cng Ume, and the deficiency of! Mr, Wilkinson said that he was
roads Had been in being “all the} surprised that Mr, Crick did not
time, He thought it was their| know the Vestry Act. The Vestry
duty to see that they kept theirj had absolutely’ no control over
implements intaet so that no one |the Sanitary Board. The only peo-
roller would be allowed to got | ple who could control that Board
extremely bad before an. erdet; was the Board of Health. In the
had been sent for another one, case of an epidemic, if the Board
Mr. Walcott said that he would ; of Health did not think they were
suggest to Mr. Johnson that he | Coing their duty, they could check
should telegraph the Secretary of | UP_on that Board.
State for the Colonies and ask him hy ae ee = mectute.
_tly power ary
ae a not allow the roll-| Commissioners... They could not
The tenantry roads were not Se er” om. for any eateries
really | under the control of the The other Boards, too, were
Commissioners, They had grants | emancipated boards and they had
from the Government and they] no right ‘to ask: them for their
were told which roads should be] books either, He had no doubt
repaired first and they could tot} that if a member of the: Vestry
use money given for one road to, wanted, information about the
happenings of any Board and he
asked any of the members, the
information would be given,
Matron’s Salary The idea of a monthly meeting
The Vestry decided to refer to} Was ridiculous, To lay down a
the Board cof Guardians the con- rule for a menthly meeting wa
sideration of revising the sal- | c#rrying things too far and was
ary of the matron at the alms-~ ' Wnnecessary.
house, his was decided after RCO ey
Mr. Johnson asked the Vestry to|@’?°** SpesesoI8ee
ee the revision, and, to look Having a grand time at - -
after better housin or the
nurses, Sin CRICKET!
Mr, ef cmp said that the hous Delict Aiéad Sinslts for
ing for the nurses wags not satis- cious Sweet Bsc
factory. For a long time the LUNCHEON fae a put
building had “been wanting ex-1% Waorted Sweet, Biscuits by
Huntley & Palmer, Peek
Frean, Carr and Jacob.
Prices 10c.—-26¢,—-48¢-—50c,
Per Pck,
Prices $1.20 to $2.14 Per tin.
Jacob’s Cream Crackers 6/-
Per tin,



Mr. Wilkinson said it was a —_—_—

matter for the Poor Law Guar- —Also—

dian, % Luscious Boxes of CONFEC-
Mr. Crick said that seven or|@ TIONERY small and large.






eight years ago the Nurses’ Quar-
ters were in the same condition
they were in then,—deplorable.
When he came to that Vestry that
was the first thing with which
he found fault. An institution like
that in such a condition was a
horrid disgrace to the parish.

He wondered whether the Poor
Law Guardians of St. James real
ised that nursing was carried out
by educated people and that it
was a disgrace to ask any decent
person to go into such quarters.
It was time that that Board made
some arrangement for nurses.

» BLACK MAGIC CHOCO-
f LATES $4.06 per box.
% Peanuts 64c, Per tin,
Butter Scotch 2lc, to 45c.,
% per tin.

% Nougat 34c. and 70c. per tin,
Fry's Hazel Nuts 2/-, 3/9,







y 7/6 Box,
% Cadbury’s Red Rose 98c. &

> i. OX,

x Cadbury's Chocolate Biscuits
K 5/- & 5/3 tin.

» Chewing Gun 2c. & 6c, Pck.
After Dinner Mints 1/- per



> Pek.
y Marr Bars 14c, ea,

® Crest Bars 16c. ea.

% Guava Cheese 18c, 4-02, Pck.
% Cadbury Bars (Asst.) 10c.,
> 17e., 19¢., 34c., 37¢, ea,

? Fry's Bars 7c., 9c., 12c., 15¢,
Carr's Choc, Lunch 12¢, Peck.
Carr's Choc, Tea Cakes 8e,

Increases

Mr. Johnson had a motion to
bring to the Vestry asking for an
increase in allowance to old peo-



i h,

ple from one shilling to three |&% Sacn, Rua

shillings, Since the motion was Carr ene Crisps $1.02
given notice of, the Poor Law Carr’s Club Cheese $1.00 tin,

, Snate’s Toffee 2/6 and 3/3
s n.

% Blue Bird Toffee 1/9, 4/6, &
‘ $1.86 tin,

, —Also—

% Thermos Flask 1-Pint $1.51

Sun Glasses from 38/- to
$15.00,








Get them from ,

BRUCE WEATHERHBAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Street

pe
..per tin $1.17
$1.60

Packets
35c.

”

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at

per Pkt.
CHEESE
Large Tin
50c. Small
62c, Small
Oo. LTD.

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A BEAGTIFUL
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INSIST ON |

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7





TIME TO THINK OF YOUR...

BUTTONS & BOWS

WE HAVE OPENED an Assortmnt of the most Exquisite
and Tasty Variety of BUTTONS for all manner of
‘ Dresses and Ensembles.

This store will be closed at noon on Wednesday 28th
February and Thursday Ist March for the Cricket Tour-
nament.



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET











oO

‘+






































ei

.

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1951

| Bleeding
‘Gums Bleed »:,*::;
Mouth and

Loose Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea.
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
} that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gurn
| bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
| foxy tightens the teeth. Iron clad
| guarantee Amosan must make your
}gmouth well and save your teeth or
money back >cn return of empty pack-
age. Get Amosan from your chemist
today. The guar-

Amosanm :))) °°"

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth




















SS
Christmas is not far and inte the kitchen and, sure enough, “M'm, it’s scrumptious.”’ say
Rupert, as he samples it. *'} mus:

Rupert has been running about he finds Seb ee bay by the tupert,. : its
. . - . tove. ye A } . share this w r n r
playing with his ball in order to SOY) you , ae Nee up with a little hammer. “It smells running out ‘tho the cold Pg

re smiles, "ve cau me_ this *
keep warm, He is just going to time, This was raught ww -be. a bewer and better,” he laughs. crosses a field. “Hello, there's
look for his pals when he pauses by secret. I'm making some toffee Well, now that ie isn't a secret Podgy Pig,’ he murmurs. '‘ He'll
the open door. “ There’s an inter- for you to give to your pals at the fo7,,rene may as well try a enjoy toffee if anybody will! Hi,
esting smell coming from the Christmas party.’’ ‘‘ Oo, do let me fe says Mrs, Bear, as she puts Podgy, you'll never guess wha: my
house,” he thinks. ‘I wonder stay and watch how you do it!" a few scraps into a piece of paper. Mummy's made. Come and see,”






the throat
It nahn —and tastes

what Mummy's cooking ?'’ Heruns begs Rupert, .-
and ches so nice!




























































Rupert and the Coughdrop—3 Rupert and the Coughdrop—4
warn Tay
LLU fi
“ag ae
TE: AA.
ob : eet ei
Podgy stops when R lis Pi 4 %. gi Mrs. Pig looks very doubtful as knows just what to do. A *
him an tebe a ‘coal glen of Mrs. te tc Pen,” he Tsay, is Couldn't Podgy makes his request, but he is it's a nice warm job for this “cold
Bear’s toffee. eee moment he we make some for ourselves? I'm so happy and excited about his eee Now I ple you Vs
Pere Le Sree . re es eel oe lee She bustles off while the little pals
that's lovely,” he says." Did ae ing yin en The dog just indoors to get the things he wants. set to work cheerfully. | Podgy
Maing teally make that?” Ver Pere a er. ‘And they. . " Thave to be out for some time,"” lights a small stove, and Rupert .
and I watched her,” smiles Rupert, of over the grass eo tell Me. Pig she says, “and making toffee may puts the butter and sugar into a . FREE noOoK
"s0 1 know just how to do it,” their new idea. -csesmm ausli? keep you quiet so long as Rupert saucepan and stirs them. which makes
**GOD’S WAY OF %¢
s SALVATION %
Rupert and the Coughdrop—s d the Coughdrop—6 PLAIN”
——— ra ” o
\ he lt | Lane % Please write for one %#
4 iw / . ; Samuel RKoberis, Gospel
6, £4g q std 7 1 ¥, Bcok and Tract Service,
py « {> % . k ( ‘ 30, Central Avenue, Ban-
7 i re Sea g wt, % gor N. Ireland.”
oH es Or ; 1 iN 5 6666999960595966960066"
eS? EM ~~ t€ i)
; j PI H ; Vm ds a, ? ;
= & a , Sy | a RS P © You can’t see the gm, difference ...!
eS : aI | = / . i]
: dj LIAG Co wey & 7 OLD? |
Podgy watches while Rupert stirs chair he opens a cupboard and peers 7 _ {
the good things and he gets more inside. Then he chooses a bottle Podgy has also heard the sound Podgy- What a ms Stee 0s 3
and more interested. ‘ D'you know, and uncorks it. " This should do,’" at the door s0, leaving the toffee, on, let’s open them and see 4 : oS
I should like to make this a special he mutters. “It's a. fine red the little friends run to see who is who they are from. A. ms kd UL § Ta Yee y
kind of toffee,” he says, “different colour and it smells exciting.” And there. “kts the postman,” cries oan a See ink pend J, 0 a OE
in oar ond come, go whee tenis BY BO 8 ieee pean, Reet “ito Wet of Tatars Sir tlcn they look until Podgy turns his / 7 Vita P
There’ Bo ate dee nd your Mummy." ‘With head and sniffs, “*C i , wt |! 37)
toffee, but our very own. | wonder ‘* There's someone at ’ ,an8 your y: = eg Rae ere 0 tee aa : : wi}
what I can put in it?” Getting a he says. get 1, “Sas See eee Le, queer e asks TS Ks
— + = Cia cde SR ! d
— - , ‘ ie: ae ’
wn de, sea erngee and a, eth and carries she stuee oe: Podgy asks Rupert to try the swallows with difficulty, and looks Her child sold fr ock looks new =
wiv a Y othe oe a en'e oe an Don, toffee toffee Gees so the little bear takes up with his eyes watering. ‘' I've be it? lw
stove. "It's the toffee !"’ cries aWaya go. lke this? “he “aes a tiny piece rather gingerly, ‘‘It never tasted anything like it,” he cause it $ alWays
Rupert. “' fquite forgot, we should Anyiously. In the cold air i certainly looks nearly right,” he splutters, “It certainly isn’t ordin- a } ‘. LUX
have kept om utirring. 1 ought to goes Neon that he can ap & oat says, es ee rather a quter sty t0le, ‘a pyanied 4 new was 1ed in
ae ig while Jawan ‘ pit by pie ara siyeey, it a Then he pd he . St aa a re i 0 ra ni e Wash all pretty clothes regularly in gentle
think it's spolled#”” Podgy takea ace’ Gee eet pres gy RA ak = nd calls ‘arger bi in a piece ct paper, he wre Lux flakes and see how much longer
. - By: sn’t it nice?" Rupert races home to Mrs. Bear. ° ; they last! For Lux makes colours stay
The nicesé way of taking lovely, keeps clothes looking like new!
HA ou’ll be thrilled with the long life Lux
LIBUT LIVER OIL gives your dainty clothes. ,
Wade by ALLEM @ HANBURYS LTO, LONDON Keeps all dainty clothes like NEW
ae : AK G46 4 LEVER propuct
We lf > Shy ee |: OOOO PRPC OOOO , : apcies ,
: | 3. x | Yael 80s SEE! TRY |
4 aie : 2 Sis = , - = NaI SZ) res :
ear sniffs at the bit of advise you to eat much of it, It’s As Rupert settles by the fire to he asks. Mrs. Bear puts on her
Ve en Suspebined. feo ae very werk on his party list there is a spectacles. ed is queer," i
anc , Sa piece ight noise in the chim nd murmurs. ‘It says: Santa Claus ; 7
n. she, too, breaks off of paper and ch he subject. ‘ Pt ney ne: 8 ;
pc cinhtgae athe dats cert eee, th reo ed camer Heng Eh ea oa FREIGHT
what Bodgy’s en So why not sit down by the fire down right into the fire, Before it presents will be delayed this year.”’ ;
2 laughs.“ This isn’t toffee at and check the list of friends you can burn he seizes it and stares. ‘* What long words” cries Rupert, SERVICES
all, It’s a cough drop. I shouldn’r will be inviting to your party.” Then he tuns te his mother, ‘but I see what it means, What Ui
Whar [+ all tnac writing on it? can have happened ? Sma ,' =Car value!
Rupert and the eee
Mm I? zert and the
a i, Nl
, s * ° wo.
Regular Services
Save Time
From B'dos to | Flying Time
a BERMUDA aan ss
} : ; tA ‘ Tis IN 24.45
Rupert is very concerned at the his own, So you've had one in a: very: banded oie Pic all fight then. Would ihe Th 1d — IN 29.00 hrs. $4.84
we ‘ rr . ° ‘ou ik 7 et eee Coe or eee eee
woespaced “mesage thar has ane RE eels er “Eade May Pads pein ys serch foe im | afer pal ear with all he en RE Renee Be pelo, Verne.
ay ue Willie, ‘*Do you know what’ e’s gone,"’ she quavers. “'l left“ es, | wish you would,’’ says
rung cut tw tell his friends. On ve vous him wih, you.” Ble wes going 10 Mra. Pig. Meanwhile the lit features of a BIG car. Seats four within :
the Aernnion he finds three of chem Bik” Before ‘Rupert’ can. answer tee Marty Minny. Bobby thal beck’ touting 6S wheelbase. Engine develops 27 horte- ID FASTER BY PAR BY SREEDRIRD.
cradin. 4% a disconolte, Tivle there is an igeeruption. ‘Mis, Pig’ fig make totes” he answers, Ropert and ‘saling exctedly "| gallo. ‘Torsion-bar Independent front BOAC. Forwarding Agent
heading piece of card just like over Ha ree routs eda threes perying hut it turned out cough drops. | wonder what he wants me S do,” gallon, ‘Torsion-bar independent front- who makes no charge Sor
' left him at your house. He was says Rupert wheel suspen-ion smoothes out the rough- advice, information or book-
est road. 7-cubic feet of luggage space. oer Pe seers to ott F l Y« B OAC
: Owing t i ippi MORRIS i ;
: g to delay caused by irregular shipping services the |
; ‘ Easy to park. Easy to steer through traffic
“Ad ” . | e ugh traffic.
: vocate Tegr i s ¢ Easy ‘to garage. Choice of three bod 4
; grets that it has been compelled to curtail its styles, 4 door saloon, 2 door ealgog, and te :
1 convertible, Make a date now for a nett ae: es x ; : 2
: i . : demonstration run in the world’s biggest en oa” a 2
daily cartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all avail- | “““"”
FORT ROYA if BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATIO
' ° , r
\ able strips as they arrive will b ° ° ¢ YAL GARAGE LTD. BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIM!TED
1 e appearing in this space. Phione 2 Pi pigwnys teu a: eaipeoge
one 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 ’ " Phone 4585
{



1 FRSSOOSSOSSGG SS SF OSSSVSSV GO GS GS FOG GG PIPPI OO SOD

a gerne

A eee i te a Ante en



en







TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

27, 1951



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508



charge for announcements of

Ss, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
igments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the

between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.





DIED



HOLDER-—On February 26th 1951, at his
residence “Elvira”, Hastings, Emanuel
Freerhan Holder, His funeral leaves the
above residence at 4.15 o'clock this
evening for the Westbury Cemetery.
Friends are invited.

Iris Holder (daughter), Walter Holder
Ursula Holder. 27.2.51—1n.



THANKS

JONES—The relatives of Retired Sergt.
James N, Jones, late of Roebuck Street,
St. Michael, gratefully acknowledge
with deepest appreciation the various
expressions of sympathy tendered them
in their bereavement. 27.2.51—1n.







FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 172 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a







LORRY—One (1) 5-ton Lorry in perfect
shape, License until June. Apply: F. E. C.
Bethell, Friendship Plantation. Phone
4148, 24.2.51—3n.

PICK-UP—One Dodge Pick-up in work-
ing order. Apply: S. B. Cole & Co., Ltd.
Roebuck Street. 21.2.51—t.f.n.

CAR—Hillman 10 H.P. Mileage 9,000.
Just re-painted. Leather upholstery.
Dial Office 4611, home 8449,





21.2.51—5n.

ELECTRICAL

ONE “COLDRATOR"” Refrigerator in
use only four months. Too small for
present owners, Price $380.00 Call
Central 4640. 27.2.51—I1n.

REFRIGERATOR Gentral Electric
Canadian Model, 6 cub, ft. with 15
months guarantee. Electric Sales and
Service Ltd. 25.2.51—2n.

FURNITURE

ee
FURNITURE—Modern Mahogany Chest
of Drawers, Book Magazine Stand, Elec-
trie Iron, Nickel Waiters, Xmas Tree

Decorations Lights, Phone 8477.
27,.2,51—1n













—————

FURNITURE—Ralph Beard offers the
foNowing bargains in Brand New furni-
ture for a limited time : John Brinsmead
Upright Piano $200 00; Mahogany Dining
Chairs $17 00 a pr; Mag. Tub Chairs $34.
a pr ; Mag. Bed-ends 3 ft. 6 ins.
a pr,; Bed-ends 4 ft, 6 ins. $35.00 a pr. ;
Mag Bureaus $75 00 each; Mah
Cocktail Tables from $8 00; Birch Chairs
/15.00 a pr; not forgetting a numerous
variety of high class second hand furni-

Open daily from 8 a.m, to 4 p.m,
Breakfast Time inclusive.
23.2.51.—6n,



LIVESTOCK

GOLDEN RETRIEVER PU?PIES—12
weeks old Reg. Pedigree, both sexes.
Apply: Lady Dos Santos, Box 600. Port-
of-S « 27.2.51—3n,

HORSES—2 y.o. Gelding “Ladyswan"’
(Jim Gackerjack ex Sugar Lady) un-
named 2 y.o, gelding (Jim Gackerjack
ex Princess Stella). Apply: J. R.
Eawards, Telephone 2520,

27,2.51—t.f.n.







in







‘WO HORSES, HARNESS and one (1)
Cart.
& Co., Ltd.





Roebuck Street.
21.2.51—.f.n,

MISCELLANEOUS

—

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete
grade. A. BARNES & Co., _



CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win- ;

dow styling, light control, Valances and

draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n
13.2.51—t.f.n.

enone
DRY CLEANER—For dry cleaning
Suits, Frocks, Hats, Coats ¢tc., try
Scrubb's Dry Cleaner. Price 1/9 bot.
Obtainable at KNIGHT'S LTD.
27.2.51—2n.

————

HARDWARE—Stocks of enamel ware
and galvanise buckets are available to
whole salers only, Stocks consist of
Pails, Saucepans, Bowls, Chambers, Pie
Dishes, Kettles 4 different sizes at landed
costs. At Ralph Beard's Show Room.
Hardwood Alley. 27.2.51—3n.

ee eS
INDIVIDUAL POSTER SIGNS—Improve
your sales by using individual Poster
Signs and Price Tickets made to order
with very attractive colours, C. Pierre-
pointe, Stanway Store, Lucas Street
Dial 490. 27.2.51—2n,
$$$,
MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin.
guished solution to your — special
architectural problem of door closures,
screens, movable partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
Deen eee ee eee eee ean nse UNEP EEmeeme
ONE WINDMILL complete with pump
and tower, Two Lawn mowers, one
mearly new, Call 4124. 27.2.51—3n,

i
RODICIDES--Get rid of the Pests by
using “Rodicide” Insect Powder which

--kills Bugs, Ants, Fleas, House Flies,
Cockroaches, sng pled etc. Price
/- t. KNIGHT'S LTD.

HN 27.2.51—2n.





ean enue ootimnelane ‘

“SCOURINE” Cleanser is quick and
emooth for cleaning Baths, Basins, Pots,
Fans, Ovens ete., etc. Price 2!c. tin.
KNIGHT'S LTD. 27.2.51-—™.

———

VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirseh Sun-aire
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to
vour sites, delivery 3 weeks. Dia! 4476
A. & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n.

_———_—_—_—— LT

WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower-
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.
We cut to your requirements. G. W.-.

Co., Ltd, Dial 4222.
a eae" 15,2.51—10n.



Why not give your floor that new look,
have them fanded hy the Nu Floor
Method. Call Evelyn Roach & Co. Ltd.
2672. 27.2.51—t.f.n.

YACHT — Yaw! “Frapeda” approx.
37% ft, long, with gray marine engine.
Recently painted and in food cone

pr Vi t Burke. ‘elephone 4569
oy ae Bot 27,2.51—t .f.n.

———————————
YACHT “CYCLONE”—Uffa Fox's In-
ternational one-design Tornedo Class.
In first class racing trim. Winner of
the 3. Trial FCG ene ae orien
d JONES & a x

arn mde

MECHANICAL

ET
OFFICE TYPEWRITER—L, C. Smith in

excellent condition su two years old.
leph, Mrs. Gooding 4932.

See oe 25.2.5'+-2n

PERSONAL



———
t y warned against
The public are hereby wa i.

giving credit to my _ wife,

y | Nicholls & Co., Solicitors.



FOR RENT

|



HOUSES

A
Avenue, 2 Ss and all modern
cenveniences. Available from April Ist.
Dial 2259. 25.2.5!—3n.

—
BELLA VISTA: Cattlewash, — Com-
fortably furnished. Three bedrooms,
twin beds.“Large electric refrigerator





Minimum charge week 72 cents and

torte 3 cents a, word wocth—a costes
@ wo; Ke: e

week—4 cents a

BUNGALOW in Bedford



NOTICE
PARISH OF

CHRIST CHURCH
} The Parochial

Treasurer's Office will

j be closed on Tuesday 27th and Wednes- | . a
wo u 8.
| Word Sunday

Cay 28th February 1951, at 12 noon
WOOD GODDARD,
Parochial Treasurer,
27.2.5'r-2a

TAKE NOTICE
KINSEY

KINSEY DISTILLING



That COR

PORATION, a corporation organized and! Antique Shop.
the State of ;

existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is 1420
Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State of
Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of

dials and

light, * Hqueurs and other potable
ted capa running water] gistilted alcoholic beverages, and will be
Stock House, Mrs. Chandler Todds entitled to register the same after onc
95211, : 7 25.2.51--gn,} month from the 27th day of February

_
FLAT—Attractive furnished Flat, Hast-

ings main road. Good verandah facing
sea, Safe bathing. Suitable one person or
couple. Telephone, 2949. 23.2.51—1n

MARINE GARDENS—Newly built Bun-
galow. 3 bedrooms with running water
and all modern conveniences. Apply Mrs.
Friedman, Hotel Royal, Long Lease
prefered. 27.2.5°y—2n
Saleen eee ener cee

ROOMS—Large furnished rooms very
cool, running water, With or without
meals, 10 minutes walk to Clubs or
City. Dial 3356. 27.2.5! —t.f.n.

PUHLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 om Sundays

AUCTION

AUCTION SALE OF HOUSE
Wednesday next the 28th at 2
o’alock on the spot at Water Hall Land,
Eagle Hall, One 16 x 9 house in good
condition, Must be sold. D'Arcy. A,
Scott, Auctioneer.









24.2.51—3n,



REAL ESTATE

Steep

MODERN BUNGALOW — Overlooking
Golf Course, 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining | Rooms, Gallery, Garage and
spacious games room underneath. Apply:





Gordon Nicholls. Telephone 8539,
24.2.51t.f.n.





in good residential districts, All bar-
gains, act now. Ring C. Pierrepointe,
Stanway Store, Lucas Street, Ring 4910,
information given without obligation.
27.2.51—1n,

——
BEMERSYDE, St, Lawrence Gap, Christ

Church, near the Cable Station. The

i dwellinghouse comprises large ‘drawing

and dining rooms, three bedrooms, with
running water in each (one with a private
beth) separate toilet and bath, and
kitchen. Open verandahs to the East
and the North and a closed verandah
to the South on the seaside. Three
servant's rooms, garage and ferneny in
the yard, which also contains several
cocoanut and fruit trees.

The property is situated on the most
popular coast in the Island with perfect

.00 | Sea-bathing.
$30 00 For appointments to view and for

further particulars ring 3925, R. S.
25.2.51—t.f.n.

The parcel of land containing 1,885



For viewing call in Hardwood | square feet with the Buildings thereon,

situate in Lucas Street, Bridgetown, ad-
joining the property of the Barbados
Telephone Company Limited. and at pre-
sent occupied as to part by the Observer
Newspaper and as to part by Miss Cado-
gan.

The property will be set up for sale ac
our offices on Thursday, Ist March 195},
at 2 p.m.

Inspection by application to the ten-
ants,

For further particulars and condition of
sale, apply to:—
COTTLE CATFORD & CO.,

No. 17 High Street,
Bridgetown.
14.2.51—12n.



The undersigned will set up for sale at

Going cheap. Apply: S. E. Cole| their office No 17 High Street, Bridge-

town, on Friday the 2nd day of March,
1951, at 2 p.m.

The dwellinghouse called “Murray
Lodge” with the land thereto containing
by estimation 9,200 sq. feet, situate at
Upper Bay Street, St. Michael, the resi-
dence of the late A. C. Greaves.

Inspection by appointment with Miss

colour suites. Top | Ida Greaves, Telephone No. 3060,

For further particulars and conditions

& CO
1.—10n.

.1.51—t.f.n. | of sale, apply to :—

COTTLE, CATFORD
20.2.5

|ARES--500 Shares Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading Co. Limited. 500 Shares
Barbados Co-operative Cotton Factory
Limited. 120 Shares Barbados Fire
Insurance Co, Limited. 90 Shares Bar-
bados Foundry Limited. 61 Shares
Barbados Ice Co, Limited. 139 Shares
Knights Limited. 122 Shares Barbados
Telephone Co, Limited.

The above shares will be offered to
public competition on Friday next the
2nd March 1951, at 2 p.m. at the office
of the undersigned.

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
Lucas Street.
24.2,51—6n.

—————
OFFERS will be received By the
undersigned up to the 15th day of
March 1951, for the buildings known
as Calais (land not included) situated
on Dover Coast, Christ Church. The
purchaser to demolish the buildings and
clear the land within thirty days from
the date of purchase,
K. E. McKENZIE,
Neils Plantation, St. Michael.
24.2.51—6n.



PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

NOTIC

PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH.
Applications for the Post of Parochial
Treasurer will be received by the un-
dersigned not later than the 28th Feb-
ruary 1951 Applications must be ale-
companied by Baptismal and Medical
Certificates,, and marked on the En-
velope, applications for Post of Paro-
chial Treasurer.
Sed, Rev, L. C. MALLALIEU,
Chairman
St. Joseph's Vestny.
11,2,51—6n.













—

NOTICE
PARISH OF ST, LUCY

All persons owing Parochial and High-
way taxes to this parish are asked to
pay the same without further delay, or
they will be collected according to Law.

O. L. DEANE,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Lucy.
24.2.51—4n.



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE

WEST INDIES



EXTRA-MURAL BOARD
CORRECTION

Mr. Eric James, M.A. will lecture on
“Human Relations and Morale in Ad-
at the British Council,

ministration”
Wakefield, at 8 o'clock on Wednesday,
February. 28th. The lecture

not be held.



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST, PHILIP
VESTRY BYE-ELECTION

.
PROPERTIES—A few small propertie:

formerly
advertised for Thursday March Ist will

I hereby give notice that I have ap-
pointed the Church Boys’ School, near
the Parish Church, as the place where
all Parishioners of the Parish of St.
Philip and other persons duly qualified
to vote at any Election of Vestrymen

KELLMAN (nee Leacock) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or amy-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
sigred by me.

DANIEL KELLMAN,

1951 unless some person shall in the

meantime give notice in duplicate to me

at my office of opposition of such regis

tration. The trade mark can be seen on
#pplication at my office,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951.

HH. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n



TAKE NOTICE

That SIR ROBERT BURNETT & CO.,
LIMITED, a limited liability company
registered under the laws of Great
Britain, Distillers, whose trade on
business address is The Distillery, Sea-
grave Road, Fulham, London, S.W. 3,
England, has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of gin of all descriptions,
end will be entitled to register the same
oe ehaie aa aoe the 27th day
0 ruany 1 unless some person shali
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office,

Dated this 2th day of February, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n





TAKE NOTICE

RED ROSE
That T. H. ESTABROOKS CO.,
LIMITED, a Canadian Corporation,

whose trade or business address is 6201,
Park Avenue, Montreal, Canada, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of tea, coffee, coffee mixtures and spices,
and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day
ot Februany 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
Dated this 24th day of February, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2,51—3n



TAKE NOTICE

That MACLEANS, LIMITED, a British
Company, Manufacturing Chemists,
whose trade or business address is Great
West Road, Brentford, Middlesex, Eng-
Jand, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of medicinal preparations, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 27th day of February
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951,

HH. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.





TAKE NOTICE
PHILADELPHIA

That CONTINENTAL DISTILLING
CORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is No.
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers,
has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alco-
holic cordials and Jiqueurs and other pot-
able distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day of
February 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade merk can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this @th day of February, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n.,

TAKE NOTICE
GAYOIL

That PINCHIN, JOHNSON & ASSO-
CIATES, LIMITED, a British Company,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is 4, Carlton Gardens, London,
S.W., England, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of paints, varnishes
(other than insulating varnish), enamels
(in the nature of paint), painters’ colours,
distempers, japans, lacquers, paint and
varnish driers, wood preservatives, wood
stains, anti-corrosive and anti-fouling
compositions, and anti-corrosive oils, and
will be entitled to register the same
efter one month from the 27th day
February 1951 unless some person shall

Jin the meantime give notice in duplicate

to me at my office of opposition of such

' registration. The trade mark can be
| sten on application at my office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27,2, 51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE
SWIFT'S

t SWIFT & COMPANY, a corpora-
tick organtaed and existing under the
laws of the State of Illinois, United
States of America, whose trade or
business address is Union Stock Yards,
Chicago, State of Ilinois, U.S A., has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of food products end substances used as
ingredients in foods, including fresh, pre-
pared, cooked, salted, dried, cured,
smoked, preserved, frozen, and canned
meat and meat products, especially beef,
pork, lamb, mutton, veal, poultry, fish,
and rabbits and food products derived
therefrom sausage and sausage meat,
eggs, cheese, chile con carne, lard,
shortenings, edible oils, edible tallow,
margarine, oleomargarine, ice cream
butter, buttermilk, gelatin, canned
vegetables, canned baby foods, canned
fruits, dried fruit, pickles and condi-~
ments, vinegar, jams, jellies, marmalade,
pie filler, rice, meal, peanuts, figs, dates,
raisins, cod liver oil, salt, stock feeds,
poultry feeds, fox feeds, dog feeds, bone
meal, and oyster shells.

Soaps and ingredients of soaps, includ-
ing soap bars, soap flakes, liquid soap
and powdered soap, cleansing, polish-
ing, and scouring preparations, and
detergents.

Fertilizers, particularly artificial fer-
tilizers and ingredients thereof, including
chemicals, bone meal, peat moss, ant-
mal urea, hard wood ashes, manure salts,
and horn shavings.

Chemicals especially superphosphate,
sulphuric acid, phosphate rock, and
soda products, nitrate of soda, sulphate
of amonia, ammonium phosphate, cya-
namid. aluminum sulphate, zine sulphate,
manganese sulphate, sulphate of potash,
agricultural limestone. gypsum, muria
of potas, onli ire copper sul-

te, and potassium nitrate.
Trmescctiaides and fungicides, particular-
ly arsenate of lead, calcium arsenate,
nicotine sulphate, and paradichloroben.
zene.

Industrial oils and greases, and in-
edible tallow.

Hides and skins, hair, feathers, wool,
bones, horns, hoofs animal glands, ani-
mal casings and membranes.

Glues and adhesives, including animal,
bone and hide glues, and vegetable ad-
hesives.

Fertilizer spreaders, soil testing
kits, hatchery equipment, baby chicks,
and bags and containers, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 27th day of Febru-
1951, unless some person shall in






























i for the said Parish may assemble on/| 4Ty,
Borin Monday 5th day of March 1931 between| the meantime give notice in Ruationts
"97.2.5!—2n|the hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in the| t@ me at my office of opposition of suc

morning to elect a Vestryman in place
of Ernest Lyte Esq. deceased.
Sed. P. S. W. SCOTT,

A ,



registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
Dated this 2ith day of February, 1951.

1951.
Parochial Treasurer, H. WILLIAMS,
ADVERTISE It Pays St. Philip. Registrar of Trade Marks.
23.2.51—6n, 27.2.51—3n

in respect |
ot whisky, gin, rum, rye, alcoholic cor-|

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents o

MISCELLANEOUS

IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-
| lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.
Phone 4429 or call at GORRINGES, ad-
joining Royal Yacht Club

20.2.51.—T.F.N,

CSU Enea ay
| IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
| lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniature: jade,
Ola BWI Stamps. GORRINGEs,

Dial 4429,
20.2.51.—t.f.n

MAGAZINES—True Detective and True
Story Magazines Picture Comics, Stan-
vay Store, Lucas Street. Dial 4910.

27.2,51—2n

TAKE NOTICE
SINOLETTE
That PINCHIN, JONNSON & ASSOCT-

#TFS. LIMITED, a British Company,
Mrufacturers, whore trade or business











i
|

[cars ’







fddress is 4, Carlton Gardens, London,
S.W., England, has applied for the
iy fon of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of paints, varnishes
‘other than insulating varnish), enamels
‘Un the nature of paint), painters’ colours,
Cist mopers, japans, lacquers, paint and
vernish dricrs, wood preservatives, wood
anti-corrosive and anti-fouling
ccrpositions, and ani-corrosive oils, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 27th day of
February 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—2n.

eS

TAKE NOTICE
SEVILLA RUM

That CONTINENTAL DISTILLING
CORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is No.
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers,
hos applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alco-
holic cordials and liqueurs and other pot-
able distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day of
February 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.













BARBADOS ADVOCATE
——_————
TAKE NOTICE | LOST
DIXIE BELLE RACE TICKET BOOKS--Series
That CONTINENTAL _DISTILLING | 320-19. 1380-29. Series B. 0400-09. Serie
CORPORATION, a corporation organized | H. 8860-6". Series L. 1780-89. | Findes
and existing under the laws of the State | "warded on returning some to Winston
of Delaware, United States of America, | Butler, Chapman Lane F3.5EHiy
area ee or business address is. No.
Valnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A.. Manufacturers, TAKE NOTICE
a “ene for the registration of a
tra mark in Part “A” of Register in ¢ H TEA
respect of wh ky, gin, rum, rye, alco- A U

That THE BORDEN COMPANY, LIM-
ITED, a corporation organized under the
laws of the Dominion of Canada, Manu-
facturers, whose trade or business
address is City Dairy Building, Spadina
Crescent, Toronto, Province of Ontario,
Canada, has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register

holic cordials and liqueurs and other pot-
able distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day of
February 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such



registration. The trade mark can be | jn respect of cheese; butter, cream,
seen on application at my office. milk and milk products; daily pro-
Dated this Mth day of February, 1951. | qucts; substances used as food or
H. WILLIAMS, es ingredients in food, and will

Registrar of Trade Marks. | be entitled to register the same after
27.2.51-—3n Jone month from the 27th day of

February, 1951, unless some person shall

TAKE NOTICE in the meantime give notice in duplicate

to me at my office of opposition of sucn

registration. The trade mark can
seen on application at my office,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,

be
t E BYARD MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMITED, Manufacturers, a



Grit Company, whtes Geae’” ce Registrar of aerate
business address is Castle Boulevard, rf
Nottingham, England, has applied for the

registration of a trade mark in Part

“A” of Register in respect of all kinds WANTED FOR CASH

of hairnets, including hatrnets of silk,
cotton, human hair, rayon, nylon and
other synthetic yarns, bandeaux, sports
nets, slumber nets, hair curlers, hair
@rips, hair pads, hair transformations,
wigs and hairdressers’ wares and sun-
dries, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 27th
day of February 1951 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office.
Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
¥7.2.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
CHARTER OAK

That CONTINENTAL DISTILLING
GORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delawere, United States of America,
whose trade or business address s
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State of
Pennsylvania, U,S.A., Manufacturers, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alcoholic
cordials and liqueurs and other potable
distilled alcoholic beyerages, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 27th day of February
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen

Used Postage Stamps

Of the British West
Tudies, Best Prices paid at the
Caribbean Stamp Society, No, «10
Swan Street.





—————

WHAT'S IN A NAME



When you say

Everton Weekes—

Everyone thinks of Cricket,
& you

Know likewise,

Everyone thinks of Cooking,
as you

Say G. A. Service.









SUN—
GLASSES

For LADIES & GENTS
Amazing Styles & Values!

=











_| SHIPPING

Dated this 24th Prtet wie Npated this Beh day oF Februsey, 1051, THANT’S nigh
Registrar of Trade Marks. Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n, 27,2.51—3n 29S99999599999665999003"
TAKE NoTICE | TAKE NOTICE 1% iagg Any ALL THAT
JANTZEN DODGE



That JANTZEN KNITTING M
INC., a corporation duly organized un
the laws of the State of Nevada, whose
trade or business address is Jantze

That CHRYSLER CORPORATION, a
corporation organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United
States of America, whose trade or business



Center, Portland, State of Oregon, Uni address is 341 Massachusetts Avenue,
States of America, has applied for regis-| Highland Park, Detroit, State of
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of | Michigan, U.S.A., Manufacturers, has



Register in respect of articles of clothing,
and will be entitled to register the
fame after one month from the 27th
day of February 1951 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration, The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1991,

applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of transportation elements of all kinds;
motor driven vehicles, automobiles and
trucks of all kinds and for all purposes;
parts of motor driven vehicles, automo-
hiles and trucks and their accessories of
every description; and will be entitled
engines of all kinds and for ajl purposes,
parts thereof and accessories thereto of




























H. WILLIAMS, every description; internal combustion
Registrar of Trade Marks. to register the same after one month
27.2.51—3n | from the 27th day of Februany 1961,
unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
TAKE NOTICE me at my office of opposition of such
eee aeet The trade mark can be

seen on application at my office.

° TANGO

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951,
H, WILLAAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.

27.2.51-

That THE BYARD MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMIT®D, Manufacturers, a
Britishy Company, whose trade or











business address is astle Boulevard.
Nottingham, England, sa applied for the LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
registration of a trade mark in Part (TRANSFER)

The application of Oscar Beckles of
Endeavour, St. James the purchaser of
Liquor License No, 032 of 1951, granted
to Louise Johnson in respect of a
boarded and shingled shop with shedrzof
attached situated at Endeavour Corner
near Church of God, St, James and to
use it at such last described premises.

Dated this 23rd day of February, 1951,

OSCAR BECKLES,

Applicant.
To:—S, H. NURSB, Exsq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “E’’, Holetown.
N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held on
the 9th March, 1951 at 11 o'clock, a.m,
at Police Court, District “E’', Holetown,
S. H. NURSE,
27.2,51—3n Police Magistrate, Dist. “E’',

GOVERNMENT NOTICE!
TO MERCHANTS AND GOVERNMENT CONTRACTORS

Merchants and Government Contractors and other persons having
accounts against the Government are requested to transmit them to
the several Departments as soon as possible.

2. Accounts should be rendered so that they may be in the
hands of the Auditor General not later than Thursday the 15th of
March, 1951.

3. It is particularly requested that payment of all such accounts
may be claimed on or before the 31st of March, 1951, at the Treasury.

' 27.2.51—2n.,!

INVITATION FOR TENDER
Department of Highways and Transport

SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Colonial Secretary’s
Office up to noon on the 28th February, 1951, for the supply of Bar-
bados Limestone, Marl Filling and Earth Filling to the Department of
Highways and Transport for a period of twelve (12) months from the
Ist April, 1951.

2. A separate tender for each division tendered for should be
submitted in respect of each or any of the following divisions: —

(a) Northern Division—Parishes of St. Lucy and St. Peter.
' (b) Southern Division—-Parishes of Christ Church. St. Philip
and St. John
' (c) Eastern Division—Parishes of St. Andrew and St. Joseph
(d) Western Division—Parishes of St. Michael, St. George,
; St. Thomas and St, James.

3. A tenderer under paragraph 2 may also submit a separate
tender for any combinatiqn of Divisions tendered for under paragraph
2 on the basis of paragraph 6, except that for the final words “on spot
anywhere within the Division” read “on spot anywhere within the
combined Division.” '

4. Samples of limestone of the quality required may be seen, and
particulars of quantity and size likely to be required, may be obtained |
on application at the Department of Highways and Transport.

5. Tenders are to be made on forms which can be obtained at the
Colonial Secretary's Office on payment of a deposit of Five Dollars
($5.00). After a contract has been entered into, those persons who
may have submitted bona fide tenders will have their deposits re-
funded; but no person or persons who may refuse to enter into a con-
tract when so called upon shall have the deposits made by them re-
funded, and these shall be forfeited and paid into the Treasury.

6. The prices tendered must be based on the payment of wages
at current standard rates in the trade, and shall be the flat rates per
cubic yard at which the tenderer would contract to supply materials
on spot anywhere within the Division,

“A” of Register in respect of all kinds
of hairnets, including hairnets of silk,
cotton, human hair, rayon, nylon and
other synthetic warns, bandeaux, sports
nets, slumber nets, hair curlers, hair
grips, hair pads, hair transformations,
wigs and hairdressers’ wares and sun-
dries, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the
day of February 1951 unless some person
Shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
aaee can be seen on application at my
offie.

Dated this 2ith day of February, 1951.

H. WELLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.







7.2.50—2n.



CHANCERY SALE

The undermentioned property will “set up for sale at the Registration Office
Public Buildings, ‘wn, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and on the
date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding Friday

at the same place and during the same hours until sold, Full particulars on appli-
cation to me.

LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL — Plaintiff

°
BA

——_

A Performance will be given in
the Hall of Harrison College at ¢
8.30 p.m. on Friday March 9th,

Tickets at 5/-, 3/- and 2/-, are
on sale either at the Headmaster's
Office or at Johnson's Stationery.

Proceeds
Tow

in aid of Overseas
to Q@.R.C, Trinidad.

:

LOCC LOS PFPEO CEN

[0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

“I LEAP OVER THE WALL”
By Monica Baldwin,
A MORNING AT THE OFFICE
—By Edgar Mittelholzer,

AT
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

Fresh shipment of —

ENAMEL-IT
in all colours

AT
JOHNSON'S HARDWARE

—

HORTICULTURAL
EXHIBITION

e
4

POSTPONED

Owing to the recent heavy
rains it was decided to
postpone the Exhibition
which was due to be held in
Queen’s Park on Saturday

March 17th to SATURDAY,
APRIL 21st from 1—6 p.m,

The Exhibition books are
now ready and can be ob-
tained from the Secretary,
Cfo Wilkinson & Haynes
Co., Ltd.

CARIBBEAN
CLUB

presents

A VARIETY
SHOW

The Police Recreation Room
CENTRAL POLICE
STATION
at 8 p.m.
on
Thursday, Ist March,
Proceeds in aid of Y.W.C.A,
RESERVED SEATS 3/-
UNRESERVED ,, 333 2/=

Music by the Police Band
under the direction of
Capt. Raison.



va.
VIOLET JOHNSON
PROPERTY :

the same may
called “Homestead” and all and singular
and chattel on the said lands erected and
tenances.

UPSET PRICE: £1350 0. 0d.

DATE OF SALE: 2nd March, 1951,

elem

ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Spooners Hil!
in the parish of Saint Michael and Island aforesaid containing by admeasurement
two roods two and two-tenths perches or thereabouts Abutting and bounding on
lands formerly of W. T. E. Richards but now of one Walrond on lands formerly of
G. G, Medford but now of one Farnum on lands formerly of Alfred F. Green but
now of one Pilgrim and on the public road called Spooners Hill or however else
abut and bound Together with

— Defendant

the messuage or dwelling house
the buildings and erections both freehold
built stending and being with the appur-

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery
Sth February, 195}

‘he
‘











ee
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW;
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED |
LINE) |

(MA.N.Z
M.S. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to}
a4 Melbourne February 20th, Sydney
Februan; 28th, Brisbane March 7th, Ar-
riving ot Barbados carly April, 1961 }

This vessel has ample space for Hard

Frozen and General cargo
Cargo accepted on through Bilis of
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad

for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
and Leeward Islands.

For further particulars apply —

FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD, © and
Da COSTA & CO. LTD.,





PAGE SEVEN







_NOTICES



Sense
The M/V ‘CACIQUE Del CARIBE”
will aceept atyo and Passengers

for St. Lucia Vincent
* Aruba. Sailing
» February 2951

The M/V “CARIBBER” wilt
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Novi and St. Kitts. Sailing Priday
St Mareh 1951

The M/V “DAERWOOD” will
wecept Carge and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba, and
Possengers oniy for St. Vincent.
Salling date to be notified.

B.WI. SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION INC,



Grenada
Wednesday —



Tel. 4047,



Trinidad, Barbados,
BW, BW...
-———oivnrnen
NEW YORK
SS. “Myken" sails agra February

S.S. “Seabreeze” sails 16th March,
a nS



S.S. “Runa” sails 15th Februan:

a ny.
S.S. “Alcoa Patriot” sails 7th March
———$—— A sen
—,-

SERVICE

a

rrivés Barbados 6th March.

arrives Barbados 27th March,

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

er

-

arrives Barbados Ist March.

a

rrives Barbados 23rd March

CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship
SS, “ALCOA PARTNER" ae Poy
SS. “ALCOA PEGASUS" .. <
$8. “ALCOA PENNANT” ..

NORTHBOUND
SS, “ALCOA PENNANT" |,
38. “ALCOA PARTNER"

SAILS HALIFAX ARRIVES

B DOS
February 23rd March 6th
Mareh 9th March 20th”
March 23rd April 3rd >

Halifax,
Sails for St,
&

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.

»





>

Due March 8th Sails for $t, John "&
: Due March 20th 3

Halifax
SSeS foeeth_ elie .

These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,

“John
®

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
= SS ——_——$ + |

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia, for sail-

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam, Single tare £70; usual reductions for children.



It will pay you to compa~e our prices for

ELECTRO-PLATED =WARE
before purchasing elsewhere.
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Central Foundry Ltd. — Proprietors.)
Cnr. of Broad & Tudor Streets,

MADE IN ENGLAND BY
(Bata)
~



SMART and DURABLE for

TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS

Sizes:



DEMAND....



eee: meen |



CHARLES MeENEARNEY & CO. LTD.

New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White
6—11

PRICE: $1.60



ONE-O-ONE

CLEANING

POWDER

ONE-O-ONE CLEANSER, the Cleanser in the large
Blue Drum—when you buy 1-0-1 you get 26 ozs. of the
world’s finest Cleanser for only 24e. 1-0-1 cleans with-
out scratching, when you order Cleanser just say 1-0-1.
Obtainable from all Groceries, Druggists and Hard-
ware Stores, in fact obtainable everywhere.



motoring







PAGE .£IGHT



Trinidad Draw Game
With Barbados

TRINIDAD was set the

task yesterday of making 253

ruins for victory in 225 minutes in their match against Bar-
bados at Kensington, but though the time was extended by
half an hour, when stumps were drawn they were still 86
runs short of their goal with only 2 wickets in hand. The

total was 167 for 8.

There. was no real effort by
Trinidad to accomplish the task
set them and the rate of scoring
1 behind the clock all the

rnoon.

Barbados’s bowling was steady
and accurate but the fielding did

not. always give the necessary
4 - No less than seven
catches were missed. Most of

those were off the edge of the

t.

Highlight of the day's play was
a magnificent performance _ by
intercolonial batsman Clyde Wal-—
cott, who with wickets falling
regularly at one end took com—
mand.of the situation. He
punished all loose balls and
managed to keep his. partner
away from the bowling with
some success. There was a typi-
eal example of this in the last
wicket. partnership with Mullins
which _ yielded % runs. Just
before’ Walcott was out he hit a
glorious six to the sight screen off
left-arm medium pacer Sydney
Jackbirs It was the second of the
match. Walcott was the last man

get out and scored 96 runs

luding 13 fours. Skipper John
Goddard unable to play yesterday
owing to a foot injury over the
week-end, Clyde Walcott took
over the captaincy.

Barbados who was 122 for 3 in
their second innings over the
week-end, could only add 46 for
the remaining 6 wickets, bringing
the innings to a close for 168.

Prior Jones and Sydney Jack-
bir took 3 wickets each. Jones
who sent down 18 overs including
9. maidens got his wickets at a
cost of 32 runs. Jackbir who
bowled just over 12 overs includ-
ing 3 maidens took his for 33
runs. N. Asgarali took 1 for 55.

Trinidad opening batsmat
Andy Ganteaume topscored for
his team in the second innings
with 45, but gave three chances.
J..Stollmeyer was next with. 35.

For Barbados E, L. G. Hoad
was the most successful bowler
He took 2 wickets for 2 runs.

Clyde Walcot and Denis Atkin-
sén resumed Barbados’ innings
with the score at 122 for 4, Wal-
cott being 58 not out. Jones opeh-
ed the attack from the Pavilion
End and sent down a maiden to
Walcott.

Jackbir bowled to Atkinson
from the Screen End the batsman
edging the second delivery

through slips for 2, He ondrove
the next for another 2. Next ball
he played defensively to one on
the middle stump, mistimed and
was out l.b.w. Barbados had now
lost five wickets for 126 runs. E,
Atkinson joined Walcott and play-
ed out the over. Jones sent down
another maiden to Walcott and
Jackbir one to Atkinson.

Walcott ondrove the second de-
livery of Jones’ next over for 2
and singled the last to meet Jack-
bir. Four, runs were scored off
this over, 2 going to Walcott and
2 to Atkinson.

In Jones’ next over Atkinson
was bowled with the last ball,
The score board then read 135/6/3
Trinidad got their seventh wicket
when in Jackbir’s next over, Nor-
man Marshall who had joined
Walcott lifted a delivery high
to mid off. S‘ollmeyer cov-
ered a distance of about 10 yards
to take an excellent one hand
catch, Only a single had been
added to the score. Hoad the next
man in was bowled by Jones in
his next over with the score un-
changed. Four wickets had now
fallen for an additional 14 runs
and the score was 136/8/0. The
stay of E, Millington who went
next to the wicket was also short.

A Grive by Walcott to Jackbir in
this bowler’s next over found Mil-
lington out of his crease and on
the run. The ball touched Jack-
bir’s hand and travelled on to the
wicket. Millington was out for
another 0, the third of the innings,
Mullins was the last man in and
Waleott took complete control of
the situation hitting fours off any
loose: balls and singling the last
balls of the overs to meet the
bowling. Jones and Jackbir were
kept.on but Walcott’s tactics were
admirable and the score mounted
steadily. Thirty nine runs were
scored in the first hour of play and
the 150 mark was reached in 260
minutes .

Walcott delighted the crowd
with a powerful hit for 6 to the
sight ‘screen off Jackbir but in
attempting a similar stroke off the
next ball was caught by Ferguson
in the same direction bringing the
total to 168 runs made in 235 min-
utes, Walcott’s score was 97 in-
cluding a 6 and 13 fours and he
was at the wicket for 204 minutes.

Trinidad now had 253 runs to
make in 225 minutes to win the
match,

When the game resumed, Keith
Walcott fielded for Goddard.

Ganteaume and _ Stollmeyer
opened for Trinidad and Mullins
bowled to Ganteaume from the
Sereen End. The batsmen scored
2 runs off the over.

E, Atkinson came on from the
Pavilion End and Stollmeyer on-
drove the second delivery for 4.
Each batsman then scored a single
in the over. Mullins’ next over

yielded a single and Atkinson then ©

bowled a maiden. The lunch in-
terval was taken immediately after
with the score at 9 without loss.
Ganteaume being 3 not out and
Stollmeyer 6.

On resumption Stollmeyer faced
Mullins from the Screen End and
glided the second delivery to leg
for a single. Ganteaume hooked
the last to the long-on boundary.

Millington bowled from the
Pavilion End and Stollmeyer on-
drove the second delivery for a
single. Ganteaume played out the
over.

Each batsman made a single off
Mullins’ next over, and Milling-
ton sent down a maiden to Gan-
teaume. The batsmen now appear-
ed confident and next over from
Mullins, Stollmeyer played a de-
livery nicely to square leg for 4.
D. Atkinson was brought on when
the score had reached 27 and Stoll-
mever made 9 runs off the over
including a cut th~ough slips for
4. Runs now came at a fair rate
and 50 went up on the board by a
beautiful cut through slips off
Atkinson for 4. The fifty was
reached in 53 minutes.

With the score at 52, Roy Mar-
shall was brought on in place of
Atkinson and a single was made
off him . Norman Marshall bowled
from the other end making a
double change. Stollmeyer faced
and placed the fifth ball nicely
through the slips for 4. In Roy
Marshall's second over Stollmeyer
playing defensively, was beaten
and bowled for 35. He had been
at the wicket for 73 minutes and
had hit 5 fours. The total was
now 62 for 1 and Asgarali joined
Ganteaume. In Norman’s next
over Ganteaume edged to first
slip but Mullins fielding in that
position failed to get his hand to
the ball.

Asgarali opened his account in
Roy’s next over cutting the ball
beautifully between second slip
and gully.

The Marshall brothers were
kept on and when the score reach-
ed 87 Asgarali was run out for 6,
Tangchoon joined Ganteaume who
with the score unchanged edged a
delivery from Norman to Roy in
slips but. Roy failed to take the
catch, Ganteaume was then 43
and got two more chances in Nor-
man’s next gyer with his score
unchanged. He was dropped be-
hind the wicket in one case and
in the other, Denis Atkinson drop-
ped an easy catch at cover point.

In Roy’s next over, however, he
was run out in attempting a short
run. He had scored 45 runs in-
cluding 6 fours and was at the
wicket for 115 minutes. The score-
board now read 89/3/45.

Legall joined Tangchoon and
opened his score by a fine cover
drive to the boundary. Barbados
claimed their fourth wicket in
Norman’s next over as Tangchoon
hitting out to the first ball, gave
Bric Atkinson at mid-off an easy
catch, Tangchoon did not score,
Legall who had run down to the
other, wicket meanwhile , played
out the over to give Norman a
maiden wicket.

Skeete, Legall’s next partner,
square cut Roy Marshall in his
next over for 4 and then hooked to
square leg for another 4 to send
up 100 in 129 minutes.

Mullins was given his second
spell from the Screen End with the
score at 106. When the tea inter-
val was taken the score was 110,
Skeete being not out 12 and Legall
9. Trinidad now needed 143 runs
to win with 6 wickets in hand,

Millington bowled the first over
after tea from the Pavilion end
and Skeete cover drove his last
delivery for a couple. Mullins
took over from the Screen end
and Legall cut for a _ couple
and then singled with a similar
shot. A leg bye sent the total to
117 and later Legall glanced to
fine leg for a single and Skeete
despatched the last to the cover
boundary.

Millington’s next over was a
maiden to Legall. Skeete drove
the first from Mullins to the long
on boundary and then got a
single to mid-off when Eric
Atkinson missed. Legall, in
attempting to turn one from
Mullins skied to give Keith Wal-
cott fielding at square leg an easy
catch, The scoreboard then read
127—5—18.

Guillen joined Skeete who was
then 23 and the latter took a
maiden from Millington. Mullins’
next over was a maiden to
Guillen,

Trinidad lost their sixth wicket









apes nine By Jimmy Hatlo

5






when Skeete was given out |.b.w
off the sixth delivery from
Millington’s next over with the
total at 127. He had scored 23
which included four boundaries
in 34 minutes. Ferguson the
incoming. batsman, played out the
remainder.

Millington who was, now bowl-
ing with a silly mid-off and a
silly mid-on, sent down another
maiden, this time to Ferguson.

Roy Marshall replaced Mullins
at the Screen end and sent down
a maiden to Guillen. Ferguson
opened his score with a late cut
to the boundary off the second
from Millington’s next over and
then played out the remainder.
Guillen who had not yet opened
his score, faced another maiden
from Marshall.

Norman Marshall __ relieved
Millington at the Pavilion end
and bowled a maiden to Fergu-

on. ,

With 45 minutes remaining for
play, Hoad was given his first
spell for the day. He bowled
from the Screen end, tossing up
his slows, but Guillen would not
be tempted. The over was a
maiden,

Norman Marshall’s next over
was also a maiden. Guillen who
was at the wicket for 38 minutes,
got his foot in front of one from
Hoad and a decision for 1.b.w-.
was upheld by Umpire Jordan.
The scoreboard then read
131—I—0..

Jackbir joined Ferguson and
on-drove the last ball from Hoad
tor a single and then took a
maiden from Norman Marshall.

Hoad continued from the
Sereen end, and Ferguson cut
past Keith Walcott the only slip
field for a single to send up Jack-
bir who played out the remainder.
Four byes however sent up the
score to 137,

Millington was now brought
back from the Pavilion end. He
bowled to Ferguson who got 4
brace to fine leg off the fourth
and later got a similar amount
with a similar shot off a no ball.

With 20 minutes remaining for
play, Mullins trundled from the
screen end and Jackbir got an
easy single wide of gully. Keith
Walcott at second slip made a
good effort, but failed to hold a
low one from Ferguson off Mul-
lins. The batsmen however ran
a single and Ferguson entered
double figures. He then took an
easy single to point off the second
from Millington to send up Jack..
bir who played out the remainder.

Mullins bowled a maiden to
Ferguson. Denis Atkinson — re-
placed Millington at the screen
end and Jackbir cut through the
slips to the boundary to send the
total to 148. Later an appeal for
l.b.w. against this batsman was
disallowed by Umpire Walcott,

Ferguson got a single to third
man off Mullins and later Denis
Atkinson missed a low one at
second slip from Jackbir off this
same bowler and the batsman got
a single to send up 150 in 223
minutes. Play was now extended
for half an hour,

Jackbir t three through the
slips when Walcott at second slips
missed a low one off Denis
Atkinson. It was the third

delivery and Ferguson who went
up, played out the remainder.

Roy Marshall now bowled from
the screen end and Jackbir got
a brace to fine leg off the third
delivery and then played out the
remainder, Norman Marshall re-
placed Atkinson and Ferguson cut
the fourth to the boundary and
later cut at one which took the
edge of the bat and went high
through the slips but Mullins failed
to hold it. The batsmen eventually
ran two. Ferguson took another
single off Marshall but was bowled
by Hoad who came back on from
the screen end. He had batted 75
minutes for his score of 19 which
included two boundaries.

Jones joined Jackbir and played
out the remainder. Norman Mar-
shaJl bowled a maiden to Jackbir
and Hoad sent down one to Jones,
Mullins was now given the ball
from the pavilion end, He bowled
to Jackbir who took a single to
sguare leg off the third. Jones
played out the remainder. Hoad’s
next over was a maiden to Jackbir.

Jones opened his score with a
cut te the boundary off the first
he received from Mullins’ next
over and played out the remainder
The game then ended with the
total at 167 for the loss of £
wickets. Jackbir who was at the
wicket for 74 minutes was un
defeated for 13 and Jones the othe
not out batsman was 4.

Scores
BARBADOS—:+st Innings .
TRINIDAD—1st Innings ..,...

BARBADOS—tnd Innings
R. Marshall ec Jones b_ Asgarali
Hunte c Skeete b Jones
Walcott c Ferguson b Jackbir
Weekes run out ... . ‘ 4
Goddard retired .......... 7
Atkinson Lb.w, b Jackbir 4
Atkinson b Jones . -. . 3
Marshall ¢ Stollmeyer b J, ckbir 0
L. G. Hoad b Jones 7 ie
Millington run out ....... 0
Mullins not out : 0
2 bs., 2 Lb., 4 w. 8

OnRZRoSman

Extras :
Total . 168

1-35; 2—35; 3—55;
6—135; 7-136; | 8—136;

BOWLING ANALYSIS

°. M R

S$. Jackbir
King

Fall of wickets :
4-122; 5—126;
9—142

28
35
55
32

F.
N. Asgarali
P. Jones

123 3
12

wmowd

————————___ LEE

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| E SHOT+“THERE'S NOTHING TO iT) OF Tuem MES IT 1
ACCORDING TO GOOD OL’ MOM AND POP IT'S A MA
o> cust HOLD STILL, lad
TODINE,DEAR“THIS you won't Se
WON'T HURT A BIT: // eVEN FEEL IT, ‘
THERE'S NOTHING TO DEAR= JUST
BE FRIGHTENED GAL AX- JUST





‘ees

= ABO











YNDICATE, Ine



i EOS
ORLD BIGATS RESERVED

A TICKLE A















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| pane tebe At A A Renn AE ne tne

TRINIDAD—2nd Innings

A. Ganteaume run out 45
J, B, Stoilmeyer b R. Marshall 35
N. Asgarali run out 6

R. Tang Choon c E, Atkinson b
N. Marshall 0
R. Legall c (sub) b Mullins 13
C. Skeete Lb.w. b Millington 23
S, Guilien )b.w. b Hoad 0
W. Ferguson b Hoad 19
S. Jackbir not out 19
P, Jones not out Le
Extras: b. 4; lb. 3; nib. 2 9
Total ffor 8 wkts.) . 167

F genes. did not bat.

‘all of wickets: 1—62; 2—87; 3—B9;
4-93; 5—127)° @—127; 7-101; 8-102,
BOWLING ANALYSIS

0. M R, w.
Cc. Mullins 15 3 al L
E. Atkinson 2 i 6 o
E. Millington 4 5 24 1
D. Atkinson . 5 0 23 0
R. Mars! 4 4 31 1
N. Marshall 16 7 al 1
E. L. G. Hoad....... 6 4 2 2



J .
C’ wealth Lead India,
Pakistan By
114 Runs

COLOMBO, Feb. 26,

A stylish innings of 102 by
Vijay Hazare, failed to prevent
the Commonwealth cricket team
gaining a first innings lead of 114
to-day over the combined India,
Pakistan and Ceylon side.

The combined side scored 236
in reply to the Commonwealth
first innings of 350. The match
ends tomorrow and a draw seems
likely,

Hazare played copybook cricket
during his stay of three and three
quarter hours, He excelled with
euts and drives which earned
him 11 fours, and he was warmly
applauded as he returned to the
pavilion,

Lefthander Gul Mohammed, a
former Indian Test player scored
56 and helped Hazare in a fourth-
wicket partnership of 98. He
batted three hours and hit eight
fours. Shackleton took four for
62 and Ridgway three for 48.

—Reuter.



4 Race Horses Come

The Saguenay Terminal’s Oak
Hill, called at Barbados on Sun-

day from Glasgow with a cargo
race

of sugar machinery, four

horses and other general cargo.
Two of the horses came for Mr.

R. Edwards, one for the Hon. J.|
D. Chandler and the other for the;

Barbados Turf Club.

The Oak Hill ieft port yester-
day afternoon for Port-of-Spain,
Trinidad. Her agents are Messrs.
Plantations Ltd.



What's on Today,

Police Courts - 10 a.m.
Inquiry at Holetown Police
Station into the death of
26-year-old Clarence
Hoyte .......... 11 a.m.
Second Intercolonial Cricket
Tournament between Bar-
bados and Trinidad opens
at Kensington Oval 11.30,
Meeting of Legislative
Council at 2 p.m,
Mobile Cinema gives show
at St. Stephen’s School
Pasture at .... 7.30 p.m.
Police Band plays at Hole—
town Memorial site 4.30

p.m.

House of Assembly Mects
7.00 p.m,

\CINEMAS

Empire; “If This Be Sin”

oes “Black Cat and Inside
ob”

Roxy : “River Lady”

Olympic ; “State Fair” and “Then
They Were None”

Plaza Bridgetown :
the Slave Girl”

Globe:

“Tarzan and



“Toast of New Orleans”












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indigestion and headache caused
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or worry. Analgesic and alkaliz-
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TALCUM
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But new treatment does more than
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A new product; DOLCIN, has been created which not guly. gives

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" BOOKERS DRUG STORES— Bridgetown and Alpha





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CORRECT PUNCTUATION 60c
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eee (simply explained for businessmen and
GeEhvatnee ENGLISH DICTIONARY (Pocket edition) 48c¢
. BODY'S Spanish-English, English-Spanish, DICTIONARY, 84c

ALL, NEW!
SALE of BOOKS at Greatly Reduced prices ask to see
OUR BOOK BARGAIN SECTION

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The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.17 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon tas Quarter) Feb-

ruary
Lighting: 6.36 p.m.
High Water: 7.38 a.m., 8.28

p.m.
YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Cedrington): Nil.
Totai for month to yester-
~ day: 12.24 ins.
eampostuine 2 (Max.) 84.0 °F.
‘Temperature (Min.) 75.5 °F.
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.)

(3 P.M.)
Wind Velocity: 10 miles pe>
hour,
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.921,
(3 p.m.) 29.853.










59339390090



5455

UNIVERSITY COLLEG
OF THE WEST INDIES.
EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT @%
in co-operation with y
THE DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL @
SERVICES
A Conference
Of Public Health Officers
at Queen’s House, Queen's Park
On March 6th, 7th and 98th
Commencing at 9.15 on Tuesday
arch 6th
All Public Health Officers are
welcome. Further details will be
notified. 27.2.51—I1n.

666% OOS! hee
Under the auspices of the
James Branch,
Civie Circle
By kind permission. of
The Commissioner of Police
THE POLICE BAND
will give a Concert
directed by
_Capt., Raison, A.R.C.M.
at



HOLETOWN MONUMENT

on Tuesday, February 27th
at 4.30 p.m.

Democratic Club

We are
AGAIN

there will be a meeting at
6 p.m. sharp!

Here

on Friday next March 2nd
to discuss the problems of the
first day of the Spring Meeting.
This is not a Political meeting.
No after dinner speeches and
there will be no collection for
charity

MENU

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and Ham—J. N. G. and Sons
Home made Sausages-Peach Melba
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owred and trained by S. H. K.
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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1951


















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nesday 28th February and Thursday Ist March for the
Cricket Tournament.

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Full Text
~~ ilhoseteeilee E ss eesntinsnteggeeteer



ESTABLISHED 1895



ARUNDELL MAY FL



Barbados



American Will
Command
British Fleet

LONDON, Feb. 26.

NEW SHOTS WERE FIRED to-day in the new
“Battle of the Atlantic’ started by the ap-
pointment of an American Admiral as supreme
Commander of the Atlantic Pact Naval Forces.
Prime Minister Attlee, after considering a vig-

orous protest told the Commons that the

rit

Government still supported the choice of an

American.

He tried to calm troubled waters stirred up by Mr.
Winston Churchill on this matter last week by announcing
that a British Admiral would be in charge of the eastern
Atlantic and the sea approaches to Britain in time of war.

Red Chairman
Dismissed
FRANKFURT, Feb. 26.

Oskar Mueller, Chairman of the
Qommunist Party in the American
Zone State of Hesse has been dis—
missed from his post after a
speech of self-criticism before a
party congress this week-end. A
Party Communique published in
today’s Frankfurt Communist
newspaper said:

“The Congress decided that
Comrade Mueller (who is also a
member of the West German
Parliament) will in future fulfil
his duties to the party in g differ-
ent party function.

The communige continued; “In-
spired by the spirit of criticism
and self-criticism contained in
speeches of delegates to the
Hessian Communist Party Con-
gress Meeting here on February
24 and 25, it was realized that the
party line must make a marked
turn '% its entire ideological ‘and
organisational policy and structure.

“The Congress therefore unan-
imously elected Klau Weigle as
new Chairman of the Hessian
Party”. Weigle demanded a new
Communist Party policy cam-
paigning for Germany’s national
liberation unleashing a broad
mass movement against
German remilitarisation

Social Democrat and Communist
for the establishment
all-German

workers
of an
assembly.
The Congress appealed to all
comrades, whatever rank of duties
‘they had, to do yy their power
the

constituent

to strengthen Communist
Party.

The German press reports said
that Robert Liebrand, Chairman
of the Communist Party in_ the
American zone of Wuertemberg
Baden had also been dismissed
from his post at a recent Party
Congress.—Reuter.



Italy’s Red Chief
Faces Open Revolt
On Return To Rome

VENICE, Feb. 26.
Italian Communist leader Pal~
niro Togliati arrived here today
after ten weeks convalescence in
Moseow to face an_ anti-Comin-
form revolt in his 2,000,000 mem-
ber rty
He 1 returns to his headquarters
in Rome’s “Street of Dark Shops”
to face an open Anti-Cominform
revolt which broke out in his ab-
sence under the leadership of
Communist deputies Aldo Cuccoi
and Valdo Magnani. —Reuter.

=|
and
preparing united action between

But an American—forecast as
Admiral William Fechteler—would
be in overall command.

Churchill said he would study
the new statement by the Prime
Minister but might find it necess-
ary to force a debate, ;

It looked at this point as if the
battle had been broken off for the
time being. : .

But then Churchill's ef lieu-
tenant Mr. Anthony Eden, raised
the question as to who would de-
cide on movements of warships in
the Atlantic. ’

Attlee said he thought it was
“quite essential” that the Atlantic
Supreme Commander would have

wer to transfer forces from one
Riantie area to another. This
brought Churchill sailing back in-
to the attack.

“Nothing like that ever existed
in the last war and never could
have been accepted. Our life de-
pends upon the maintenance of
our sea approaches, whereas
though the United States may suf-
fer a great deal, her life is in fact
not so affected,” he declared.

Under Supreme Command

Mr. Attlee said that the area
which would be under the Su-

reme Commander would be the
North Atlantic Ocean excluding
the Mediterranean and British-
European coastal waters.

Attlee said the North Atlantic
would be split into Eastern and
Western, areas. The Eastern—
most vital for Britain—would be
under the command of the Brit-
ish C ander-in-Chief of the
Home Fleet.

In time of war he would com-
mand not only British forces but
also those American and other At-
lantic Pact countries stationed in
the area. .

The last war had taught that it
was important to have an overall
Supreme Commander in the North
Atlantic. It was one battle field
in which the mobile threat of the
submarine must be matched by a
flexible defence system. p

There must be quick redisposi-
tioning of forces to meet the shift-
ing threat. : ‘

In considering the nationality of
the Supreme Commander the Gov-
ernment had had to consider the
relative sizes and potential re-
serves of the navies and air forces
of the various Atlantic powers.

Despite Britain's great naval
traditions, she could not alone un-
dertake the defence of the North
Atlantic.

Attlee added: “The Government
are satisfied that in time of war
the proposed arrangements will
ensure both the defence of these
islands and the fullest participa-
tion of all North Atlantic powers
over the whole North Atlantic
Ocean.”

In. peace,

no British ships_ or
planes would

be put under a Su-
preme Commander except for
periods of combined training,
which would be necessary.

Answering questions, Attlee
said the appointment of a Supreme
Commander in the Mediterranean
was still being considered.

Britain. herself would control
the allocation of her mechant fleet.
—Reuter.



U.S. Must Send More
Troops To Europe

WASHINGTON, Feb. 26.

John Sherman Cooper, United States delegate to the United
Nations said today that if the United States failed to send
more troops to Europe it could lead to “the greatest sur-

render in history”.

Testifying before the Congres-

———sional Committee on Troops for

Red China Gets
American Oil

HONG KONG, Feb. 26.
Some oil sent to Chinese Na-

tionalists by the United States! by

has found its way to Communist

China. Usually reliable sources
said here to-day it was. shipped
from Keelung, Formosa, to Portu-

guese Macao, from where it passed
into the hands of Communist
agents.

These sources believe the oii
was then transferred across the
Macao border or sent by junk to
Communist territory. All types of
fuel oil are now commanding high
prices in China owing to the Brit-
ish and American ban on export
to Communist countries:

Communist agents are said to
be trying to buy up quantities
at various points in the Far East
for shipment to China direct or
through Macao.

Important commodities not in-
cluded on Britain’s embargo; list

ere still being sent through Hong| had already

Ke China .—Reuter.



1g into

Europe issue, Cooper Republican
adviser to the State Department
said that American participation
was indispensible to the develop-
ment of adequate Western Euro-
pean Defence against any aggres-
sion.

I,am.certain that an intellectual
and moral decision has been made
the Governments of the United
Kingdom, France and Italy that
their countries must make the full
defence effort and that they will
support fully the defence of West-
ern Europe”, he said.

Casper who attended Atlantic
Pact defence meetings in London
and Brussels said there was full
understanding in Europe of the
aggressive purposes of Soviet
Russia and their threat to Europe.

Cooper said that since Korea,
Britain’s defence budget was in-
creased three times and that pro-
grammes Were underway which
would double military production
in two years and» quadruple pvo-
duction in the third and fourth
years,

Britain had as large a force in
Germany as the United States and
made the decision t

send riore troops.—Reuter

TUESDAY,



Danes Seek
Formula For
“Srieaking Death”

COPENHAGEN, Feb. 26.
Professor Hakon Lund to-day
started seeking a formula for a



yesterday.

deadly poison gas known as
“sneaking death.”
The Danish Government has

given him 175,000 kroner to pro-
duce the gas and then work out
measures to combat it according
to civil defence administration,

Unconfirmed reports here say
Russians -had held 10,000 tons of!
the gas in secret factories in East?
Germany. «

The slightest whiff of it can
blind a man and destroy his nerv-
fous system.

Ry 0. S.

Test ended in a draw.

ON THE
* SPOT

FRATING, Essex, England,
Capt. W. J. Goldsworihy,
tired of goingcut-inenight ©
attire to quieten his dogs,
installed a microphone by
his bed. Now when the dogs
bark he silences them via
loudspeaker in the kennels.

—(C.P)



pes wipe it af taken into the
system either breath or
through the skin. = ine r

Lund who will work in a gas
mask said in an interview, “All
security precautions will be taken.
A special laboratory is being fit-
ted out for research. A protection |
dress made of asbestos is. being}
made for me. {ft is
against all known cases.”

Since we know very little about
this new stuff, I prefer to work
without assistance, But I am keep-
ing a reliable assistant informed
of the progress of my work so that
if necessary, he can continue with
the work.”

When Professor Lund has pro-
duced the gas, Professor Rasmus-
sen of the pharmaceutical institute
of Copenhagen will start work on
finding protection against it.

Professor Rasmussen said _ to-
day that according to information
from France, there was a German
factory near Breslau which at the
end of the war was capable of
producing 10,000 tons of sneaking
Jeaths a year
aken
said.

effective





Argentine Meat For
Britain Via Brazil
“Impracticable”

—British Food Minister

LONDON, Feb., 26.

The Food Minister Maurice
Webb to-day dismissed as “quite
impracticable” the suggestion in
the Commons that Britain might
import Argentine meat from
Brazil.

Bromley Davenport, Conserva-
tive said Argentina was prepared
to sell meat to Brazil at £76 per
ton. He proposed that Britain
should ask Brazil to import all she
could at this price and sell it again
to Britain at a reasonable profit.

Webb replied that if Britain
made arrangements to buy Ar-
gentine Meat from Brazil’ at less
than she was willing to pay the
Argentine for it, Argentine would
either stop selling to Brazil ur put
uprher price.

Earlier Webb had said he stood
by the recent statement that he

@ On Page 3.



This factory was

over by the. Russians, he

—Reuter.

“Superb”’ Sails

For Montevideo

"
BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 26.

Bfitish cruiser Superb, flagship
of Vice Admiral Sir Richard
Symonds - Tayler, Commander-in-
Chief, American anu West Indies
Station which includes the Falk-
land Islands and Antarctic ter-
ritories — sailed for Montevideo
this morning.

The ship which arrived here
last Monday was to be visited by
President Peron at his owti*
quest, but he unexpectedly can-
celled the visit at the last minute
alleging “unforeseen circum-
stances, He never went aboard.
The second British warship leav+
ing Argentine waters today is the
frigate Bigbury Bay, belonging to
the same squadron which since
February 9 has visited Argentine
ports,—Reuter.









OVER CROWDING

BELFAST, Northern Ireland* Feb.
Belfast’s medical officer, Dr. 5.
Barron, in a-report.on oyer-crowd-
ing said that 437 people—32!
adults and 116 children—lived in
26 houses in Lonsdale Street.
Twenty-four of the houses are
used as tenements. Rents vary
from 49 cents to $3.50 per week
for furniSned aapteninceners



“I see that old Dior is
. streamlining the waist this
ceason, Bert.”





(a een en eee
FEBRUARY 27, 1941

wet
t
:

emarsmesamtinaninencadis seetesistieestehililiind

DEFENDING STUBBORNLY

BAC

THIS STROKE is characteristic 6 Wilfred Ferguson, Trinidad’s slow ———-—

bowler who stubborniy defended his end to help stave off defeat

TRINIDAD—BARBADOS
FIRST TEST DRAiWN
Trinidad Dectites Challenge

—tKight Catches Dropped

COPPIN

TRINIDAD to-day, after having lost two key batsmen
Andy Ganteaume and Nyron Asgarali by the run out route,
made no further attempt to accept the challenge to score
253 runs in 225 minutes and so the first Trinidad-Barbados

Altho it was decided to ex-
tend playing time by half an hour
| Trinidad, with two wickets ir
hand were 167 runs and. still 86
runs short of the coveted 253.

\ Barbados missed no fewer thar
| Gight catehes and this militated in
/no spall Way against their chances
of hedges

“dhe wicket was firm yesterday
and played truer than one would
have imagined on the sixth day
It is true that some deliveries kept
j uncomfortably low but these were

j fey and far between,

Barbados yesterday added 4¢
|runs in 65 minutes to their. over-
week score of 122 for 3. Clyde
Walcott was responsible for 39 of
these, so that six wickets fell for 7
runs and this included that of John
Goddard, one of the not out bats-
men who could not resume owing
to his having cut his foot over the
week-end,

Jones and Jackbir were particu.
larly yaccurate and effective yes-
terday and when five additional
wickets had fallen with only 14
runs added to Barbados’ overweek
scote, it seemed ag if Barbado:
would fall even under the 150-r
mark.

‘A. grand duel between Cly:
Walcott and the bowlers Jack!
and Jones ensued from this peri
Walcott was obviously bent
monopolising the bowling, It was
here that he refused to take singles
except at the end of the over and
only ran two runs or hit bound-
aries,

It was a completely differen’
Clyde Walcott yesterday from the
one we saw on Saturday. He was
complete master of the situation,

He batted quietly at the begin-
ning of the day’s play but then he
opened up. He on-drove power-
fully, hooked Jackbir twice to thc
square leg boundary, on-drove
Prior Jones. and then swept him
to the deep square leg boundary in
a veritable flurry of aggression,

While the Barbados batsmen fel!
in rapid succession, Walcott had
remained calm and in complete
control of his role. With Mullins
the last man at the wicket Walcott
relinquished almost all his re-
straint and with one mighty hit
sent one trom Jackbir soaring over
the sight screen straight overhead
for six runs,

As compared with his 58 made
in 137 minutes on Saturday, Wal-
cott had now reached 97 and had
added 39 runs in one hour anc
seven minutes.

But the. ball following .the..hi
for six saw. the end of Clyde Wal-
cott’s innings and the end of th:
Barbados second innings as well.

Another lofty hit off Jackbir by
Walcott did not clear the sight
sereen again’ and Ferguson, who
had taken the precaution of firs!
throwing off his cap, held a well
judged catch to dismiss him.

Walcott had been at the wicket
for 204 minutes for his 97 rung and
this was for almost th? entire time
that the Barbados innings had
lasted,

If he showed signs of having
been baffled for some time by the

@ On Page 3.












Rocket Tests
Completed

WASHINGTON, Feb, 26

The United States Army has
completed high altitude experi-
ments with multi-stage rockets
and is at present concentrating on
the development of rockets as
weapons,

A Military spokesman said here
that the 57th of a series of V-2
tests at White Sands near Mexico
will take place on Thursday night
A single V-2 rocket will be used,
not the “Bimper” style combina-
tion of big and small rocket which
two years ago reached a record
height over 248 miles,

An Army Ordinance spokesman
said that “reséavech in thé bimper
phase” of rocket study had been
concluded. The idea was to learn
some facts in the field of-high alti-
tude flight” he added, ‘This infor-
mation had to be. obteined by
these (multi stage) shoots because
it was the only known way of
getting needed data.’—Reuter,



LIMIT TRUMAN
Taft Urges

WASHINGTON, Feb, 26,
Senator Robert Taft (Republican
Ohio) said today that as many as

18 United States land divisions
might be sent to Europe unles
Congress limited the power ot

President Truman.

He said it would be “foolhardy’
to commit even six divisions t
Western Europe's defence until
the United States obtained definite
ommitments on contributions by
European nations.

Taft was testifying before the
Senate Foreign Relations anc
Armed Services Committees afte:
John Sherman Cooper, Republican
Adviser to the State Department

—Reuter



Britain Will Give Up
Heligoland As Target

BONN, Feb. 26,
The British have agreed to give
up Heligoland as a bombing targe
by 1952, it was officially § statec
here today. Adenauer told Britair
he would co-operate in finding ai
alternative target and in prevent
ing demonstrations on Heligoland

—Reuter

Teams Selected

The second Intercolonial Cricket
Tournament between Barbado
and Trinidad will open to-day at
Kensington Oval, The Barbados
team is:—C. L. Walcott (Capt.)
R. Marshall, C, Hunte, E. Weekes
C. Taylor, K. Walcott, D. Atkin

son, N. Marshall, G. Wooa, E
Millington and & Mullins
Twelfth man is E. Atkinson

Trinidad:—-J Stollmeyer (Capt);
A. Ganteaume, N. Asgarali, R
Tang Choon, R. Legall, C. Skeete,
C. Sampath, W. Ferguson, S
Jackbir, L. Butler and F. King
S. Guillen twelfth man



FIFTH TEST MATCH

Latest score in the fifth
Test match at Melbourne !s
England 303 for nine wick-
ets.





The Sultan Bows To French Demands |

CASABLANCA, French Moroceo, Other tribesmen—foot and horse-

Feb. 26, men of the Berber Bill races-—
march on his| were surrounding Fez the former
sultanate capital of 144,090 citi-~

Faced with a
capital by hostile tribal WREEIOFS) |
the Sultan of Morocco was. to-
night reported to have bowed in



Professor Land who will work
alone, hopes to find the formula’
within three months. |

A civil defence administration!
Official said the “sneaking death”)
paralyses and eventually caused
|



zens, 90 miles inland from Rabat. |

party which had -formed the
\baeckbone of Sultan Side Ben
Youshef’s Cabinet before he dis-
solved it during the week-end
To-night it was generally ex
| pe cted here that the Sultan would
soon make a solemn proclamation



their head as they camped at the | discrediting Istiqulal and possibly | returned to Rabat from Pari

algo the Communist Party

For many months the
has carried out a “strike” against
ignirig a series of administrati
prot ais drafted by the French



a large measure to French de- Chiefs and notables were at
mandé for administrative reforms.
Reports of the 40-year-old | gates of this old city swept by
Sultan’s “climb down” multiplied | breezes from the Sahara desert. |
here to-day as bearded warrior | The tribesmen .rose up over the
horsemen _. of the Zaiag tribes | week-end in growing demonstra
| were marching toward Rabat {tions against the anti-French
j his coastal capital of $4,000 peop extreme Nationalist Istiqulal

Sultan |

administration in
General Alphonse Juin,
France’s leading colonial

r
one of}

|
soldier |

Talks betwéen the two
broke down. Yesterday, Ger
Juin’s deputy, Jacques De Blesson |
vith
the French |
1 and had

}a personal letter from
President, Vincent Aur

an hour’s discussion with the
Sultan after which it be
|Kkgown that negotiations hac
effect been restarted.—Reuter



K TO GREN

a i a 0 ee re



SCHOOL BURNT
IN ST. ANDREW

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 26.

INDWARD ISLANDS Governor Sir Robert

Arundell may break off his leave in Devon in
order to fly to Grenada to deal with the island crisis
following the week-end rioting. He was not due to
return till the middle of March. s
Reports from the Colonial Secretary, who is acting
for the Governor, are being studied by the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies but there is no indica-
tion at the moment of what steps may be taken to

deal with the situation,

U.N. Ships
Blast Port
Of Wonsan

By WARREN WHITE

ABOARD _U.S.S.. COMMAND
SHIP MICHESTER, KOREAN
WATERS, Feb. 26.

American destroyers and fri-
sates fought a duel with Com-
nunist shore batteries near_ the
ortheast Kerean port of Won-
an yesterday.
On Saturday
sunners positioned on a hill near
he port fired through mist at



the Communist

An official spokesman said that
the point in the dispute leading to
the strike action was not yet
known at the Colonial Office,

Our Grenada Correspondent re-
ports that while the tension has
generally seemed less this morn-
ing, last night the Roman Catholic
School at St. Andrew's parish with
an average attendance of 108 was
completely destroyed by fire; and
yesierday evening Police broke up
a disturbance at Beausefour Estate
and arrested nine youths ranging
in ages from 16 to 26 who refused
to move on under orders,

To-day they were fined $15
each. Later to-day clashes devel-
oped between strikers and others
willing to work starting in two
western coast points where the
week-old landslides still eld up
traffic Public Works have again
asked contractors to employ la-
bourers paying 6/- daily for work.

Naval launches took police part-
ies up the coast to deal with the

och Fae, Ee Gaon disturbance. An ugly situation has
pened lite. ani and were }#visen as the town remains un-
juickly spotted. Two destroyers, - since last mid-week The
he Sperry and the Osborne, ana}Press is calling for volunteers,
hree frigates opened fire simul- |Q" Saturday night. the Governor's
aneously.. A few minutes later A.D.C. Colonel Keith Stewart was
. navy “helicopter flew over the wounded in the head when he was

ilent
nents and re
lestroyed,—

Communist gun emplace-
rted ten completely
euter,



New Socialist
Organ To Be
Established

LONDON, Feb. 26

Leaders of all Western Euro-
pean Socialist Parties are expected
in London next week-end to dis-
‘uss the establishment of a new
Socialist International Organisa-
ion, They will be delegates to
1 three-day Conference of the
Committee of the International So-
‘alist Organisation (COMISCO)
‘rom which the new International
would spring. The proposal to
*xtend the scope of COMISCO’s
vork to bring it more into line
with the activities of Socialist
nternationals in the past came
wriginally from the Belgian Social-
st Party. A joint Anglo-Belgian
resolution will come before the
sonference which opens on Friday
it British Socialist Heaquarters at
Cfransport House,. The Conference
vill also discuss a new declara-
ion of the prfneiples of Demo-
vatic Socialism which would be-
ome the Charter of the new’
(nternational.Reuter.

his command ship as she lay at
inchor in Wonsan Harbour.

stoned by a mob in the Calivigny
district. The same night the Water
Works watchman quarters was set
on fire Seventy-one intransit
passengers in the Fert Townshend
to-day confined their activities to
walking around the town but the
180 tons cargo was. discharged.
The Harrison line Mulberry Hill
in since Friday unloading 700 tons,
was similarly handled,

INVADERS PUT OFF
HAMBURG, Feb, 26.
Two British officers and 14 Ger.
man police today removed seven
Communist “invaders” from the
North Sea island of Heligoland
where they had landed on Friday
—Keuter

RUBBER BAN
WASHINGTON, Feb, 26,
The Natienal Production Author-
ity announced today it will reduce
or eliminate the use of natural
rubber in about 40,000 products
on Mareh 1,
These include
tyres, footballs



«





passenger efnar
and tennis balls
—Veuter



TELL THE ADVOCATE

THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT





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Drelt is safest of all |. You see, Dreft
is absolutely free the harsh in-
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fine fabrics. [1's

ot

these ingredient

for instance, which @radwally give «
yellow tinge to white woollens or
cause colours to run, Ye Drelt
ia absolutely safe tor all yur fine
thing
When to use Dreft
Dreft is specially made for fine fabrics

so you'll get the best results when
you use it by itsell. Por exrra-
dirty spots, rub in a little dry Di
first,

A regular dip with drets eg

MAKES DAINTY



FABRIC

earnest eentn a stil iene eentennnrencetntntt cana

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mering

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again after one dip in
* Dreft What's more,
Drett keeps them looking
their freshest and gayest a/weys, But
that isn’t all! Our precious woollens
stay as fleecy-solt and colourful as the
day | bought them. It’s amazing,
too, the way Dreft actually ‘rescues
woollens maited by ordinary washing!
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S LAST




PAGE TWO







Carib

ADY_ SAVAGE, wife of His
Excellency. the Governor,
their daughter Pat and Mr. and
Mfs. Hopwood attended the fourth
day’s play of the intercolorial
cricket match between Trinidad
and Barbados. They watched the
me from the George Challenor
tand.

Same ’Plane
IR GEORGE SEEL, Head of
7% Development and Welfare
in the West Indies, who went up
to” Antigua on Thursday returned
to Barbados on Sunday afternoon
via Trinidad by B.W.I.A.
Returning by the same p.ane
was Hion. H. A. Cuke.

Lord Lisiowel’s Sister

MONG the passengers arriv-

ing from Jamaica on Sunday
evening by B.W.1I,A. were Mr.
Rory More O’Farrall and his wife
Lady Elizabeth More O’Farrall.
They are here for a week or two
staying at Four Winds Club, St.
Peter. Lady More O’Farrall is a
sister of Lord Listowel, former
Minister of State for Colonial
Affairs who presided over the
Conference of West Indian Gov-
ernors at Barbados in November,

1949.
Mr. More O’Farrall’s brother

Frankie who is a member of the

Anglo-Irish Bloodstock Agency
wrived from South Americ
yesterday afternoon via Venezuela

by B.W.1.A.
Back to Trinidad
RS. O. P. BENNETT and

her two daughters Joan and
‘Barbara who were in Barbados

for a short holiday returned to

Trinidad yesterday afternoon by

B.W.I.A. Joan and Barbara are
on the staff of Barclays Bank ip
San Fernando. They were staying

at the Ocean View Hotel.
Mr. Bennett returned to Trini-

dad on Sunday from the races in
+, and is expected to arrive
here in a-few days for the Barba-

B.G

dos TurfSlub’s Spring Meeting.
the Races

Me". GILBERT YVONET and

4VÂ¥2 Mr.[Â¥rank O'Neil returned

from B.G? via Trinidad on Sun-

day afternoon by B.W.I1.A. to

Tide in the Barbados Turf Clwb’s

‘Spring Meeting.
En Route

IR ROBERT MacKENZIE who
is with the British Embassy

in Washington arrived from Trini-
dad yesterday by B.W.I.A. He
hopes to leave on Thursday for
Puerto Rico en route to Washing-

nm
..Sir Robert has just completed
an official tour of Central Ameri-

ea, Cuba, Martinique and some ©

the other West Indian islands, He
igs in Barbados for a few days
holiday before returning to Wash-

ington.

He is staying at the Colony

Club, St. James,

Morning Flight

ta BRIVING on B.W.I.A’s

morning flight from Trinidad
were Mr. Nestor Baiz and Mr.
Walter Campbell.
ing | at the Ocean View Hotel.

Ir.
Bros, of Canada. Mr. Baiz, Trini-
dad businessman is on the Man-
aging Committee of the Junior
Chamber of Commerce in Port-

of-Spain and Junior Chairman's

Representative to the Road Safety
Assn., and Chairman for organ-
ising future Trade Fairs.

Mr. Baiz is also an active mem-
ber of the Light Aeroplane Club
of Trinidad,

Another Light Aeroplane Club
member who was in Barbados for
a few days was Mr. Dong Moore,
Engineer of S. K. Watson & Co.
of Trinidad who left for Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA.
en route from Antigua,



Mr. NESTOR BAIZ

They .are stay-
Campbell is with Stewart



OFF TO JAMAICA yesterday by B.W.1.A. were, left to right, Sir
John Waddington, Dr. Rita Hinden, Prof. Harlow and Mr. John Hen-

nings.

They formed a Commission to B.G, enquiring into the type of

Government acceptable to the people of that colony.

They are en route to England with their report.

MR, ROLPH GRANT—former W.I.
cricket captain who was in Barbados
on a short visit, returned to Jamaica 560 scientific and technical books

yesterday by B.W.LA.
Former W.,I. Captain

M*

who was in Barbados on a “hor
holiday,

terday by B.W.LA.

Mr. Grant is a former Captain first steam locomotive.
of the West Indian Cricket ‘Team

which toured England in 1939,

Caricature
HE PLAY “1066 And All
That” is the largest pro-
duction yet attempted by the

Harrison College Dramatic Club

an embers of the cast ¢ -
Seer ate Work and Captain of the late 3rd Bat-

performed in the Harrison College talion of the West Yorkshire Regi-
It is a review ment.
or rather a caricature of English

ing hard rehearsing. It is to b
Hall on March 9,

History. Proceeds from this pla;

will help send a Harrison College

sports team to Trinidad,

Petroleum Engineer

R. JOHN MacGOWAN, Pe- tour

troleum Engineer with
U.B.O.T. stationed at Mayaro ar-
rived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.LA. to spend
eleven days’ holiday here staying
at the Ocean View Hotel,
Mr. MacGowan is from the
U.K. and has been jin Trinidad
for eighteen months.

Steying with Relatives
RRIVING from St. Vincent
yesterday morning by B.G
Airways was Mrs, Michael Hans-
chell, She is here for a week

staying with relatives.





BY THE WAY ..

MUCH-TRAVELLED lady has
been saying that the desert
Sheik is not the romantic figure
young people imagine. Miss Vita
Brevis, so long pestered by the
Sheik Spittin el Khuspidor (Cap-
tain Foulenough), would agree.
This curious Sheik was always
inviting her to “fly with me on my
desert steed.”” One day she asked,
“Where is this desert steed?” “At
Moorsom and Calverley’s Livery
Stables,” réplied the dusky beau,
hitching up his burnous like an
Arabian sailor. Foulenough’s little
stratagem was defeated on the day
when the brokers marched in to
W1(a) Palmerston Mews just as the
Sheik was pouring out a glass of
Arebian Hock for his, beautiful
visitor.



”

Dial 4606





Floral designs 92c.

Shame!

At least the Dean has a zip-
fastener under his gaiter-buttons.
(Morning paper.)
HE cheat! His shoe-laces are
probably made of liquorice, and
not at all necessary, except for
eating purposes. I will wager that
the rim of his hat is of detachable
eardboard, and that his button-
holes are blocked up with dried
mud,

Fun all over the place

T has now been decided that a
}ventrilequist’s dummy contra-
venes the Sunday Observance regu-
lations, as being “a wooden prop.”



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Really! li’s Not

ADVOCATE



Such A Crime

To Be Single

By MARY -LANG

IF you have decided you want
a husband or wife and
been able to_win one, the fault is
probably within yourself.

That, briefly, is the chilly verdict
of researcher Hilda Holland who,
with a group of medical and other
advisers, has compiled a mock-
Kinsey report* on why men and
women stay single.

Hilda Holland kicked off her
researches with an advertisement
in an American paper which said:
“Why are you single? Write out
your problem—and in doing so you
may solve it.” The first post
brought 267 replies, and convinced
her that the problem was a vital

one.

Using this kind of evidence,
supported by personal
histor.es which seem more than
naive to English eyes, Hilda
Holland sets out to console anid

haven't says: —

case— |

must not be the type who ever

“Pve always been known as
Mary’s sister.”

‘WHY MEN RESIST MARRIAGE

@ THE REPORT calls on
Bernard Shaw and quotes
the evidence of Tanner in
“Man and Superman”, who
asserts it is “a woman’s busi-
ness to get married as soon
as possible and a man's to
keep unmarried as long as
he can.”

Marriage is for this bach-
elor “apostasy, profanation
of the sanctuzy of my soul,
violation of my manhood,
sale of my birthright, shame-

encourage those who still remain , ful surrender, ignominious
single. capitulation, acceptance of
On the assumption that people | defeat.” A married man is to

never stay that way because they
want to, she makes a lengthy in-
vestigation of all the obstacles that
keep men and women from the

him a man with a past, while
a bachelor is a man with a
future. When Anne reminds



ROLPH GRANT, Director.and opened next month.
of T. Geddes Grant Ltd. gogiety is one of the oldest in the
attached to their Jamaica Branch Caribbean,
E ‘ books are some 30 pictures on
staying at the Marine subjects covered by the exhibi-
Hotel, returned to Jamaica yes- tion, including an old print of

him that he need not marry if
he does not want to, he
answers :—

“Does any man want to be
hanged? Yet men let them-
selves be hanged without a
struggle for life, though they
could at least give the chap-
lain a black eye. We do the
world’s will, not our own.”

altar.

Under headings like Are Parent:
to Blame? Why Get Married? Ar
You Emotionally Mature? Love
and Neurosis, Deserters and
Partial Deserters, Momism,.,
and Madonnas, Desertion Tech-
niques—she analyses all the prob-
able and improbable reasons why
people don’t marry.

In a_ survey of
marriages she finds: —

En Route to England

IR JOHN WADDINGTON, Prof.
Vincent Harlow, Dr, Rite
Hinden and Mr. John Hennings
left yesterday for Jamaica by
B.W.LA.

Sir John told Carib that he will
stay one day in Jamaica and then
go to Bermuda for four days be-
fore leaving for England.

Sir John was head of a Com-
mission which went to B.G, to en-
quire what type of constitution
was acceptable to the people of
British Guiana, Prof. Harlow and
Dr. Hinden were members of the
Commission, Mr, Hennings acted
as Secretary,

Americar “When people laughed in my

wresence I ran from the place.”
“T used to cross the street so I
wouldn’t meet people.”
“Nobody cared what I did.”
Any of these remarks, it seems,
prove that you have one of those
tired old psychological twins —
the Inferiority or the Superiority

THAT a greater percentage of
marriages are happy when the
wife is two or three years older
than her husband.

THAT the average woman lives
three years longer than the aver-
age male of the same age.

British Council has

in she When you’ve been to the altar
arranged an exhibition of

and overcome the sin of being
single, Hilda Holland issues a
sharp reminder on how to stay
that way.

To be sure that the marriage
will be a success, she says, you

singles to read, and one that will
astonish the marrieds. After 256
pages of explanation and analysis
of what prevents people marrying
—it seems a wonder that anyone
can bring it off.

for showing in the new premises
of the Royal Agricultural and
Commercial Society in George-
town, which are to be completed

This —LE.S.,







Accompanying the

GLOBE

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M,
“THE TOAST CE. NEW ORLEANS”
Mario LANZA — Kathyrn GRAYSON

Extras — FRANKIE CARL AND ORCHESTRA
Newsreel — WEST INDIAN CRICKET TEAM

TO-MORROW ONLY — 5 & 8.30
John GARFIELD. — Lili PALMER

Stephenson's “Rocket” — Britain’s

Short Visit
IR K, ARTHUR and Lady Lis-

ter-Kaye arrived from Jamai-
ca over the week-end on a short



visit and are queen Oe eee kh een
View Hotel, Sir Arthur is Squad- 4 ‘ , sy
ron Leader (Temp) in the R.A.F “BODY AND SOUL”



See Eee eee
is Meares-

M@ BARBADOS DRAMATIC CLUB
*

Under the Distinguished Patronage of
Excellency the Governor Sir A. W. L. Savage,
K.C.M.G., and Lady Savage

PRESENTS

MURDER ms
ARRANGED

A THRILLER

His home address
Court Mulligan, Eire,

Just So
FF to Antwerp, Holland, last fi
week for a three months’
went Lord Beginner, the
famous Calypsinian. His visit is | | His
exploratory—he wants to discover 4
for himself what (opportunities
there are for calypsonians in
Antwerp. At his “farewell” per-
formance the other evening, he
sang two new calypsves. The first
dealt with the recent Giold Coast A
elections and the second was an
assessment of the art of subtlety
o men and women generally. a aes
Ord Beginner’s verdict is con-
tained in the chorus which goes: BEEN
Men centipede bad bavi,
— centipede more than a

* 15th 16th MARCH, 830 p.m.

MATINEE : Friday, 16th March, 5.00 p.m.
e
Bux Office Opens FRIDAY, March 9th

e
and FRIDAY

by Beacheomber

THURSDAY
And I read that in Brussels, “Any-
one wearing a false nose in the
street is liable to arrest.” What
fun the police will have tweaking
odd-looking noses, to see if they
come off. During the war one of
our secret agents was told to
watch a suspicious character in a
London hotel. The man had in-
curred suspicion by his enormous
nose. Nobody believed it could be
real, So up went the agent and
tweaked it pretty hard. But the
nose was real, and the owner was
a big oil man. With great presence
of mind our agent said, “Excuse,
pleese. Papuan custom, Me Pa-
puan,” “Excuse, please,” replied
the oil man, as he kicked the agent
four times, “English custom. Me
English.”

a
BRBEEBEEBEBEESBEEE S&S
o_o

MRS. HOUSEWIFE

ENHANCE
THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR HOME WITH

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wl
@| CARNIVAL QUEEN

B.B.C. Radio|

Programme

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27,
om —I2.15 p.m

1951

6.30 19.76 m



6.30 a.m. Forces Favourites, 7 a.m. The
News, 7.10 a.m, News Analysis, 7.15 a.m.
From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m, Programme
Parade, 7.30 a.m. Generally Speaking
7.45 am, Think on these Things. # a.m
Souvenirs of Music, 8.45 a.m. Letter from
América, 9 a.m. The News, 9.0 a.m
Home News from Britain, 11.15 a m,
Programme Parade, 11.25 a.m, Austraila
va. Englang, 1.45 aym Report from

ritain, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m
News Analysis, 12.15 p.m, Close Down

4.15—6.00 p.m. 3.53 m
4.15 pm. Music from Grand Hotel,

5 p.m. Australia vs. England, 5.15 p.m

Welsh Magazine, 545 p.m. Music Maga-

zine, 6 p.m, New Records

6,00—7.15 p.m, SL32 & 4648 m

6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 7pm
The News, 7.10 p.an. News Anahvsis, 7.15
p.m, West Indian Guest Night
7.45—LL.O? p.m. .... . 31.32 & 4845 m
———

7145 p.m. Generally Speaking, 8 p.m
Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. Meet the
Commonwealth, 8.45 p.m. Composer ot
the Week, 9 p.m. Report from Britain,
9 15 p.m. Queen's Hall Light Orchestra,
16 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. From the
Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Focus on Manners,
10.45‘ p.m. Getting Ready for the
Festival of Britain, 11 p.m. BBC Northern
Orchestra.

CROSSWORD



|

Across
Ever upset by the |ittle + 2
8. Windtiower, (7
about being this,
You can sail it. (5)

yume ?
(7) )
Nothing sharp
(7) 12

It's no waiter








THAT if a girl attends college Complex. Oa ta act Bete ada
‘ her chances of marriage are The report pursues its main Always i) the shoe. (4)

Artist trom Honduras reduced at least one-fourth. If mission — Why do people stay Should pick you up ell right, (5)
“ @& RT is progressing well in the her college is not co-educational single?—with the fervour of 2 Dae i eee

\. West Indies but more should her chances are still less. Don Juan, It produces this gem- 22. Quite natura) to find a hunts-
be done to encourage West THAT the professions you're “Marriage entails a sacrifice for ., Map in th (4) oie sever, (4)
Indians to paint”, This is the Most likely to stay a spinster in a man, while the missing of mar- 34° psn. (3) "95. Uplift. (5)
opinion of 21-year-old Terence are teaching and nursing. riage is the sacrifice for they 6) Almostwee. (5) 27. Statute. (3)
Arthurs, a London commercial THAT where there are more woman.” Down
artist, whose ambition is to visit Men than women, nearly every — Yet not so many pages away| ! What a pati(G), 2. Covering. (8)
British Honduras. Twenty-five Woman will marry. But when @ve find this: Many women are] { Wien you do get it, it may be so
years ago Terence’s father left there are more women than men €urned into partial deserters from little (3)
British Honduras to go to less than 90 per cent. of the men marriage by “a morbid obsession! 5. Weird (5) 6. Biackberry. (7)
Britain and qualify as a tailor, M@™Ty. against household duties, intense] § {02),,2ble to cnauge ature. (7)
Having completed his course he THAT divorced people marry av ‘dislike of housekeeping.” 10, Found In Hutl’s net. (8)
married an English woman and ® more rapid rate than single 13° Sticky game apparently. (6)
they have since made London people. ins qty Re engamed i. Make all over again. (5)

; couples, the report says it was] sf wie brosgm fine
their"home.' And now, naturally ‘Men Lose’ found that more than 35 per cent. rea aes so Piimatenes marian
enough, Terence waite to see for of the women and 24 per cent. of]: Modulate: 6. Abyss: 10 Nave: 11.
himself his father’s homeland. AFTER alr this—what is the 'the men had broken previous] ‘{iibiicn! iy Youn. pen:
He recently sold one of his paint- author's advice to those whv want engagements, and that nearly 13] 2.0%1. 25, Stee Manifesto:
ings to Mr, Norman Manley, to marry? Enhance your strong gor cent. broke their current] ) Py") ‘pear a ‘Site ger:
ta jee latter’s recent’ points, learn to get along witl emgagements. vs )s Osier 17. Snine
Visit to ‘ people, smile occasionally,

“Lege friendly, have something to talk The Riddle a a

Book Exhibition for B.G. about, read one daily newspaper,

HE and look after your appearance. IT is a dismal book for the



Many women are subject to weak,
aching back. Often the kidneys are
to blame, for your kidneys, along
with the liver, must filter out im-
purities from the bloodstream.

So if you fee! tired, worn-out, head-
achy—with the nagging pain of an
aching back—look to both your kid-
neys and liver. That’s why Cana-
dians haye been xezie on Dr.
Chase’s Kidney-Liver for over
half a century.

Give your system a_chance to
work properly. ‘Try Dr. Chase’s
ane ver Pills tomas The name
“Dr. Chase” is your assurance. 3

al ° Dr. Chase's -

KIDNEY-LIVER PILL?



FOR THE FIRST TIME.

TRINIDAD'S
of 1951



Miss Jeffrey’s Beer.
LOVELY

CHRISTINE
GORDON

— appearing —
IN PERSON
with a galaxy of Trinidad’s sing-
ing and dancing stars under the
direction of .
LANDY DE MONTBRUN
on stage at

EMPIRE

SUNDAY, 4th MARCH,
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.





PRICES:
MATINEE:-—
Children 50c.; Adults $1.00
NIGHT:—
House and Balcony .... $1.00
Stalls and Boxes $1.50

27,

1951

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY








—— —————— ” 2

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad St. Phone 2684
Lovely IMPORTED DRESSES from LONDON
TWIN SETS—NYLON LINGERIE—BATHING Sl ITs
{ HOURS: MONDAYS to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30

SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30











| AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

MATINEE: TO-DAY at 5 p.m.
TO-NIGHT at 8.90
James Hilton's

“SO WELL REMEMBERED”
Statring:. JOHN MILLS—MARTHA SCOTT—PATRICIA ROC

By the brilliant author of “Lost Horizon". ‘Random Harvest”
“Goodbye Mr. Chips”

MATINEE: WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY NIGHT at, 8.30

ROBERT MITCHUM—JANE GREER
in “OUT OF THE PAST”. An R.K.O. Radio Picture.

PLAZA TWheatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TODAY 4.45 and 8,30 p.m. and Continuing Daily

zx.o. racic) TARZAN AND THE SLAVE GIRL

with Lex BARKER—Variessa BROWN—Denise DARCEL & Others — Also

BASU

Distributed by RKO RADIO PICTURES, INC,






Friday—3 Shows: 2.30—4.45—8.30 p.m. Paramount presents—

PLAZA Theatre=O)STIN (DIAL 8404)







LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M, (Warners Action Double)
Humphrey Bogart & Raymond
Massey in

ACTION IN THE =& =©GAMBLING ON THE
NORTH ATLANTIC HIGH SEAS

EDNESDAY & THURSDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. — (Monogram Double)
WpEATH VALLEY RANGERS” & “RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL”
Ken Maynard—Hoot Gibson—Beb Steele Tom Keen



nm




GATET W—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 8.30 p.m. (Monogram Double)

BELOW THE DEADLINE & MR. MUGGS RIDES AGAIN

Warren DOUGLAS Leo Gorcey & East Side Kids





{ TMURSDAY (only) 830 p.m, .. .. (Monogram Double)
‘ JOE PALOOKA in Leo Gorcey and the Bowery Boys in

| “THE KNOCKOUT” & “MR. HEX”
With LEON ERROL
OPENING FRIDAY 2nd MARCH

EMPIRE THEATRE

=



PLUS








Che |

1 ?

| Holy Land,

| astoryor = @@@

| THE PAST, PRESENT

AND FUTURE! | ¥
Story and Narration Written by MILDRED BARISH VERMONT

ee Ternwen Tumi a ereTIaS 08

EMPIRE ROYAL
To-day Last Two Shows

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.30

4.45 and 8.30
Universal Double





United Artists’ Pictures

Presents... Basil RATHBONE in
“TF THIS BE SIN” “BLACK-CAT”
— Starring —

AND

“INSIDE JOB”

with Preston FOSTER

Myrna LOY — Roger
LIVESEY with
Peggy Cummins and Richard
Green.

| OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.15

20th Century Fox Double—

Dick HAYMES and
Vivian BLAINE in

“STATE FAIR”

— AND —

“AND THEN THERE
WERE NONE”

with

Barry FITZGERALD and
Walter HUTSON



|



ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day
4.45 & 8.30



“Yvonne. Dan ="

~ Rod Helena’
DeCARLO- DURYEA: CAMERON: CARTER

%,

eT
9% ee

POO”,



WE CAN SUPPLY...

GALVANISED
BARBED WIRE

NOW. AT PRICES
THAT CANNOT

BE REPEATED
@

Plantations Ltd.

SOOO SOSS SOOO SOOOOSS

SOOO POSS PLFEO POPES POOSO SSFP PSSOSSSD



OSC CSOO 0800 OS OOet

SLOSS PSS FOSS
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY



fe .
Test Drawn

ES @ From Page 1

Trinidad tactics on Saturday, he
handsomely atoned for this yester-
day when he himself was respon-
Sible for 39 of the 46 runs which
Barbados added to their total to-
day in 65 minutes.

Barbados who had been behind

the clock for the whole innings,
finished well behind the clock and
the innings closed for 168 in 275
minutes.
_ Faced with the prospect of hav-
ing to make 253 runs in 225 min-
utes Trinidad started with Jeffrey
Stollmeyer and Ganteaume. This
pair was unhurried and in the nf-
teen minutes play before lunch
they put up 9 without loss.

They resumed and here was an
exhibition of experienced batting.
Unostentatiously but steadily they
pushed the score along and the
first fifty came in 53 minutes,

Trinidad lost their first wicket—
that of Jeffrey Stollmeyer—to an-
other Roy Marshall special, The
‘Trinidad skipper, who had for

73 minutes at the wicket been
guiding Trinidad in quest of
a win, played for an off break
from Roy Marshall but it was the
one that came through straight as
a top spinner and bowled him for
35. This included five fours.

Clarence Skeete and Andy Gan-
teaume had been dismissed in
similar manner by Roy Marshall
in the Trinidad’s first innings.

Norman Marshall almost had
Ganteaume out at 43. The latter
drove out at a well flighted one
outside the off stump but Roy
Marshall who had been put intc
the slip earlier in place of Mul-
lins, immediately after a similar
stroke had passed near Mullins,
got a hand .o the ball but failed
to hold it.

A cheeky attempt to run a quick
one from a cover drive by Gan-
teaume off Roy Marshal] resulted
in Asgarali being run out. A
clean pick-up, a sizzling return
and a lightning stump by Walcot}
caught Asgarali just out of his
ground and Trinidad had lost a
second wicket for 87 runs. Asgar-
ali’s contribution was only six.

Ganteaume now seemed to lose
his concentration for a moment and
touched one from Norman Mar-
shall behind him on the on-side
very fine but wicketkeeper Wal-
cott did not make the catch and
off the next ball he attempted a
cover drive, did not get well over
it and Denis Atkinson at cover
missed an easy cacch,

Two runs later another run out
gave Barbados the third wicket.
Another attempt to snatch a short
run, in which Tang Choon pushed
to mid-wicket and called,

Ganteaume failed to gain his
ground and a return by Roy Mar-
shall himself and another quick
bit of stumping by Walcott and
Ganteaume was run out,

He had been batting comfort-
ably and well before he gave ni:
three chances, all off Norman
Marshall while he was still at 43,
His innings that lasted just under
two hours included six fours.

Norman Marshall who had been
trundling faithfully for the day
and had three chances missed off
him, was rewarded with Tang
Choon’s wicket. The latter hit out
at a well flighted one and put up
an’ easy catch to Eric Atkinson at
cover.

Tang Choon had not scored and
now Trinidad’s fourth wicket had
fallen at 93.

Legall and Skeete, together now
in a fifth wicket partnership now
carried on their shoulders the re-
sponsibility for any real chance
which Trinidad might have ol
winning the game and even sav-
ing themselves from defeat,

Skeete signalled that he was
aware of this with a cover drive
off one from Roy Marshall for four
runs and a sweep to the square
boundary for another and the cen-
tury was hoisted in 129 minutes,

Legall helped himself to a cover

drive for four runs as well off
Norman and then majestically
swept him to the square leg

boundary for another four.

The tea interval saw Trinidad
with six wickets in hand _ still
needing 143 runs to make fn an
hour and a half.

Only seventeen of those had
been added on resumption before
Legall, in trying to turn one from
Mullins, mistimed, and put up a

olly cateh to Keith Walcott, field-
ing substitute for John Goddard at
mid wicket. F

Skeete left next, without addi-
tion to the score. He played back
to a low straight one from Milling-
ton, was struck on the pad and
Umpire Walcott upheld an appeal
for Ibw. There was a sound as i
the ball had struck the bat as well
and it was suggested that the ball
first struck Skeete’s boot and then
his bat.

Six Trinidad wickets were now
down for 127 and Skeete had been
at the wicket for just over half
an hour for his 23. With four
wickets in hand and 66 minutes
lett for play Trinidad still needed
126 runs to win.

Ferguson and Guillen were now
together in a seventh wicket
partnership and it seemed certain
that they were not going to make

Soeoss

POSS

POPSOOCOGIOSOSS

SO9GS

4,

OOPS

W445
&



f Hoad for a



27, 1951

——





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THEY LL DO IT AGAIN & AGAIN



“ENGLAND’S BATTING
FAILED MISERABLY’’

(From W. J.

If ever England had the

O'REILLY)
MELBOURNE, Feb. 26,
box seat in a Test match it did

to-day. With one wicket down for 141 runs and Hutton
and Simpson in complete control of the situation, with the

Australian bowling done to

Australians had it coming, to them.

a frazzle, it seemed that the
But the old old story.

England's batting failed miserably.

Young Hole, called up from his
fairly busy patrol on the deep leg
fence to give same much needed
support te a jaded attack, bowled
England’s champion batsman Hut-
ton neck and crop, thereby
providing the turning point of the
game.

Not since Leeds 1948 have I seen
the Australian attack so complete-
ly mastered. Lindwall was within
a nace of giving up the ghost and
Iverson apart from keeping the
scoring rate within moderate
bounds failed to make any impres-
sion.

Miller and Johnson had lost so
much interest that each of them
failed to make contact with a
catching chance in the slips from
Len Hutton.

Hassett could not hide the fact
that he was a very worried man.
Hutton and Simpson so dominated
the position that it seemed certain
that England would finish the day
in a winning position.

Going forward into a vigorous
attempt at an off drive Hutton
failed to get to the pitch of a ball
which Hole cleverly “held back”
and the damage was done.

No Bouncers
Inspired by the colt’s baptismal
effort, Lindwall and Miller taking
the second new ball launched a
vigorous assault which brought

about the final collapse.
As English wickets fell regular-
ly to the two fast bowlers there

a bid for the runs for they both
went on the defensive and Walcott
put a string of fieldsmen all
around them, elose to the wicket
on the on-side and off-side
well,

Seven consecutive maidens were
sent down and it was now certain
that nothing short of a miracle
eould have given Trinidad the
runs they needed for victory
within the time left for play and
the batting talent at their disposal

Guillen ended a 89-minute stay
at the wicket without scoring by
being dismissed lbw to Hoad and
Ferguson and Jackbir met in an
eighth wicket partnership,

With half an hour to go and
Trinidad 137 for 7, Walcott called
for the new ball and Millington
bowled first from the pavilion end
to a ring of leg slips.

Jackbir cut one from Mullins
through slip, hard and low but
Denis Atkinson did not make the
catch and the single gave Trinidad
150 in 223 minutes. The extra half
an hour rule was now invoked and
the game was extended for 30
minutes.

Ferguson gave another chance
to Mullins off Norman Marshall
but Mullins got a hand to it and
failed to hold it but he df¢ not
profit much from this life. Next
over he played at a googly from
leg break and was

as

bowled.

He had scored 19 in an hour
and fifteen critical minutes and
with seventeen minutes left for
play and with two wickets in hand
Trinidad with a score of 162 were
still 91 runs behind the Barbados
total. P

Five more. runs were added to
the score and stumps were drawn
for the day with Trinidad 167 for
8, Jones comfortable with 4, not
out and Jackbir who had been at
the wicket for an hour and four
minutes, equally settled with 13.

were some people who spoke of
“direct attack” and “bouncers”.
There was no suggestion of that
whatever. I have always been an
open critic of the consistent use of
the bouncer. I saw nothing today
to eavil at.

It was an inspired session of
bowling and England’s anaemic
batting after Hutton had gone
gave it the highest rates of incen-
tive payment,

With the stage nicely set for his
helated comeback, Compton snick-
ed a good length outswinger.

Brown Out Of Form

Brawn was so badly out of form
that he did not use the middle of
the bat at all.

Simpson who batted splendidly
with Hutton lost all initiative
when his partner went and made
no effort to retain the grip which
he had helped to obtain.

English bowlers have been let
down badly throughout this tour.
They have not failed their team
once. But apart from Hutton who
has been the outstanding batsman
on either side, their batsmen have
failed to rally round.

There is no excuse for the way
this match was wantonly aban-
doned. An ounce or two of back-
bone bolstered up with necessary
determination to do the job well,
would have allowed England to
finish this series in a manner
whieh would have done inestim-
able benefit to the game through-
out the world,

Trinidad Welcomes
Film Stars

From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 23.

Mr. William Nelson, staff mem—
ber of Holiday Magazine and
one of the many journalists wha
are accompanying the Hollywood
stars to Uruguay, to take part in
the Film Festival there, says that
the steelbands will be “terrific”
on television. “I have never seen
such a reception like this any-
where. This is all very exciting,
and what's more it shows great
enthusiasm”, he declared. When
the plane which carried the eight
Hollywood film stars dipped in at
Piarco Airport last night, over
ten thousand fans were there to
receive them, those who arrived
were John Derek, Wendell Corey,
Joan Fontaine, Evelyn Keyes,
June Haver, Lizabeth Scott,
Patricia Neal and Florence Mar—
ley. They were entertained by
the steelband and calypsonians.
After spending a little over an
hour they took off for South
America.

House Collapses

{From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 23.
Joseph Rodriguez; his wife and
seven children had a narrow es—
cape when their Gwn from tapia
house collapsed at 2 o’clock in the
morning. Mr. Rodriguez was
awakened by a cracking sound
just in time to see the large por-
tion of the dirt wall falling apart,
he immediately awoke his wife
and children, and took them to
the neighbour’s house, no sooner
had he vacated when the whole
of the northern portion of the
house collapsed, The family now
have their meals in what remains
of the boxwood kitchen.

OBITUARY.
Miss J. C. Vinter

After an unusually long experi-
ence as Head-Mistress, Miss Jessie
Caroline Vinter died at her. home,
5, St. Helens Park Road on 3rd
February, 1951. The fourth daugh-
ter of the late John Alfred Vinter
(an artist who was the last to hold
the appointment of Royal Litho-
graphic Artist) she was educated
Collegiate
School under Miss Buss, and _

Oo
she
took Honours Degree in Natural

at the North London
Head

Girton

School. Passing
Cambridge,

the
College,

of

Science,

After experience as

Southlands School,

now form the Devon County
Training College for Women
Teachers.

Miss Vinter then offered herself

to the S.P.G. for missionary work

on Bishop Montgomery’s recom-
war

mendation, in the difficult
year of 1918 she went to Barbados

to become the first Head-Mistress

of the Codrington Girls’ High
School which the Church in the
sland was anxious to see started,
there being already Codrington
College in connection with the
Durham University and the Lodge
Hill High School for boys. The
school, partly on account of the
excellent climate attracted pupils
from the other islands, and Miss
Vinter, who had taken on the post
for two years, remained 17} years,
thus completing 33) years as a
Head-Mistress.

There was a large gathering of
parents and friends at Codrington
High School in July 1936 when
reference was made to her cour-
age, perseverance and vision, and
her personal interest in every one

of her pupils. :

Since here retirement, Miss
Vinter took a special interest in
the Gambia Pongas Mission under
Bishop Daly and has addressed
Meetings on the West Indies with
special reference to the work of
the Church.

The funeral service was held on
Wednesday, 7th February, 1951 at
Christ Church Blacklands, Hast-
ings. Canon Morgan officiated and
Mr. Vincent Batts was at the
organ, The interment followed in
the family grave at the Borough
Cemetery.

The mourners present were: —
Dr. Vinter; The Misses Fanny and
Ethel Vinter; Miss Ruth Vinter;
Dr. Jean Vinter; Dr. Noel Vinter;
Mrs. Peter Vinter. There were
a large number of friends present
at the Church.

Flowers were received from the
following: ~The family; Lilian
and Janie; Miss Higginson; Olive;
Miss Blackburn and Miss Watts;
Miss Burrow; Miss Burton; Mr,
and Mrs. Carter; Miss Church;
Miss L. Colyer; Mrs. Day and
family; Nurse Flynn; Mrs. Pastle;
Mrs. Richards; Mrs, Walker and
Miss Crick,

Mobile Bank
On First Trip

The Travelling Office of the
Government Savings Bank lefi
the Public Buildings Yard this
morning at 9 o'clock on its first
visit to the sugar estates this
year.

The Bank has gone to Searles,
Foursquare, Oldbury, Carrington,
Three Houses, Guinea and Bulke-
ley.

It goes out again tomorrow and
Wednesday.

WRONG DECISION.

KIRKCALDY, Scotland.
Two rugger teams decided to
play despite a referee’s decision
to cancel the match because of







frost. Now two players wish
they'd taken his ", advice—they
both broke legs. —C.P.

VORELECEC LOLOL PELL CORP VAL LPP PLLA EL DP PLEO

LKE

SANITARY

neoeepeceqeeosoessoooeseseensenscos STOKES & BYNOE LID Agents. «noc

POISE-—

is largely a matter of the state of mind

If you are uncomfortable or unsure of your sanitary protection it will

be reflected in your lack of self confidence, and will make you ill at ease,

SILKESEPT sanitary tewels ensure peace of mind as well as body.
They give you comfort, convenience, and super absorbency with complete

invisibility. Wear SILKESEPT and you wear a smile.

SEP T

TOWELS

+4

+ A448
PIISFSOO



4,4
P9OOSS

SORE COOtUYH

¢



Assistant
Mistress at Exeter and other High
Schools, she joined her sister Miss
Fanny Vinter as Co-Principal of
Exmouth,
where she spent a very successful
sixteen years in buildings which



SESE SOO CFS SSE FSSSSSS SSS SOSS SS



Driver Fined 40/-

DONVILLE THORNE a chaut-
feur of Bridgetown was yesterday
found guilty of parking the mot
car, M—200 on a
and of refusing to

restricted

give h

ares

name

to a policeman

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
before whom both cases were
heard ordered Thorne to pay a

fine of 20/- for parking and 20/-
for refusing to give his name. Both
cases were brought by the Police.

Set. E. King, prosecuted for the
police from information received
Police Constable 217 Dodson

who Brought the case said that on
December 12 about 7.30 p.m. he
Was on duty on Marhill Street and
saw the motor car M—200 parked
opposite the China Doll Restau-
rant.

The driver came out of the res-
taurant sometime later. He asked
the driver for his name but he re-
fused to give it. After refusing
to give his name the driver then
drove off. He then reported the
matter to the Central Police Sta-
tion,

Thorne

c appealed
decisions,

against beth

STARTED FIGHT
AT CRICKET

THEIR Honours Mr. G. L. Tay-
lor and Mr. H, A. Vaughan, Judges
of the Assistant Court of Appeal
yesterday confirmed a decision o1
His Wership Mr. S. H. Nurse
Police Magistrate of District “E.”

Mr. Nurse had ordered Cecil
Roach of Graveyard, St. Lucy, tc
pay a fine of 20/- and 2/- costs in
seven days or in default one
month's imprisonment with hard
labour for assaulting and beating
McDonald Boyce on December 3
Roach appealed against Mr
Nurse’s decision.

Boyce in giving his evidence yes.
terday said that on December 3
he was playing in a cricket match
Roach came on the pitch and in-
terrupted the play. When he
(Boyce) spoke to Roach he re-
fused to move. Roach then struck
him with an iron rod on his right
shoulder and pulled a dagger in
an attempt to stab him

Roach in making his defence
denied that he ever struck Boyce.

Their Honours in confirming
the decision told Roach that they
had no doubt that he went down
io the cricket match intending te
give trouble, He was spoken to
and instead of leaving, insisted on
staying’and making a nuisance oi
himself. ‘i

Roach was also ordered to pay
7/- appeal costs,





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ST. CROIX
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ST. JOHNS
ST. LUCIA
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LADIES’ COTTON VESTS.



Argentine Meat

from page 1
believed the British meat ration
would not fail below its present
level

Answering further questions on
the resumption of meat negotia-
tions with the Argentine, Webb
said:

“As announced on Saturday, the
Argentine Government has agreed
to resume discussions on meat
purchases and on other outstand-
ing financial and trade questions.

Discussions will take place in
Buenos Aires. The British dele-
gation which is leaving by air to-
morrow will be led by Economic
Secretary to the Treasury John
Edwards.

Thornton Kemsley, Conserva-
tive, thought it would be better
to give up to £135 a ton for good
quality meat seeing that Britain
was getting none at all from the
Argentine at the moment,

—Reuter.

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

M/V_ Sedgefield, Sch. Marea Henrietta
Seh, Wonderful Counsellor, Sch. Rainbow
M.. Sch. W. L, Runicia, Sch. Harriet
Whittaker, Sch Turtle Dove, Sch,
Emanuel C, Gardon, Sch. Rosarene, Sco
United Pilgrim S., Sch. Lindsyd It,
Sch, Mandalay IL, Sch. Anita H., SS
Lady Nelson, Yacht Ce*ibbee.

ARRIVALS

Schooner Burma D., 59 tons net, Capt
Gooding, from Trinidad via St, Vincent

8.5, Polyerest, 719 tons net, Capt
Stendal, from Port-au-Prince

M.V, Athelbrook, 286 tons net, Capt
Cook, fram Trinidad



_pasanepigni vain a



en = ae

PAGE THREE



ackache Gone

Nelghbour said
** TAKE DOAN’S”

[71S SURPRISING















Schoonr Henry D. Wallace, 59 ton ~ 4.8 . = 14% Ss "
set, Capt. Wallace, from St. Vincent. Mé@@ admire high spiri you feel listléss é
Schooner Oak Hill, 4,229 tons net, Py ty . 4 ‘\) y
Capt. Forsythe, from Liverpool and run-down because you need more A&D' . f
M.V. Cacique del Caribe, 162 tons net, : r i
Capt, Archibald, from St. ‘Lucia , Vieni tke Seon Reon saa n f :
DEPARTURES j ft life ens > 7
M.V. 0. K. Service VIII, 76 tons net, You'lh sgon feel full of iife , , :
Capt, Wolfe, tor Halifax. € \
Schooner Molly N. Jones, 37 tons sa
Capt. Clouden, for St, Lucia ar i” “@ fh
Schooner Franklyn D. R., 8 tons i «more than [ver a UN .
Capt. Sealy, for British Guiana. PO \ MENT.
S.S. Streatham Hl, 4,245 tons net, It's WERFUL NOURISH: ®
Capt. Nelson, for St. Kitts tonlc—it’ ye
Sehooner Timothy A. H. Vansluiytman, Not just aa it's rich

2 tons net, Capt. Stoll, for Trinidad

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Trinidad, Venezuela, Colombia,

Curacao and Jamaica by the 5&5.
Colombie will be closed at the General
Fost Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 3 pm. on the 28th
February 1951, Registered Mail and

Ordinary Mail at 9 a.m, on the ist Mareb
1951,












t tasting, economical too./

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SENSATIONAL VALUES
SENSATIONAL SAVINGS —

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COME EARLY FOR THE BETTER SELECTION





LADIES’ IMITATION LEATHER
HANDBAGS.
White and Assorted Colours.

LADIES’ ART SILK STOCKINGS
White and Assorted Colours.

2 prs for $1.00;

LADIES’ ART SILK STOKINGS
Light and Dark Shades.

2 prs for $1.00





LADIES’ PANTIES 0.8.
White and Pink.
-« Reduced for the $ days.



2 for $1.00



BRASSIERES, _
White and Tea Rose.

2 prs for $1.00

LADIES’ NEW BELTS.
Regular Price 69c, and 79c.

Now 2 for $1.00



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MEN'S POLO SHIRTS
White with Zipp.

$1.00

BoYs'

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2 fer $1.00

BOYS’ PANTS.
Age 5—12 years.

i pr for $1.00

BOYS' LEATHER BELTS.



2 for $1.00



BABIES’ PLASTIC PANTIES
Blue, Pink, White.

2 prs for $1.00

———e

CHILDREN’S ART
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Clearing $1.00 ea.





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PAPER NAPKINS,

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POWDER BOWL.

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BROAD STREET







em,
PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS 4B ADVOGAT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2


































E
mee SK yyy or) |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd, Broad &1., Bridgetown.
——————— er

Tuesday, February 27, 1951
NATURAL GAS

THE announcement of the arrival in
Barbados of Mr. Julian Garrett presages
the proclamation of the Natural Gas Cor-
poration Act. Mr, Garrett has come to
Barbados to take up the duties of Director
of Petroleum and Natural Gas. The people
of. Barbados welcome him to the island
and hope that during his tenure of office
the obstacles to the wider utilisation of
Natural Gas will be removed: and that he
will be able to make Natural Gas available
to the public in ever-increasing quantity.

The repercussions following upon the
government take over of natural gas have
not yet been felt and the shortsightedness
of the government policy which has neces-
sitated this step might not be immediately
apparent.

The taxpayers of Barbados will not be
happy until they know at what price they
have bought out the interest of the British
Union Oil Company. Compensation has to
be paid to that company for their rights
not only in the gas wells but for the pipe
line which the government will be com-
pulsorily acquiring. At the time when
the Natural Gas Corporation Act was be-
fore the Legislature very considerable
sums were mentioned as the probable
amount of compensation and the sooner
that the extent of the liability which the
government has incurred is known the
better it will be.

‘Grave doubts have recently been
expressed in respect of the finances of this
colony and the necessity to have to under-
take a considerable outlay on such a mat-
ter at this time is most unfortunate.’ It is
apparent now that sufficient consideration
was not given to the effects of the policy
which the government was undertaking
and in this field as in so much else of the
government’s policies incompetence and
lack of foresight have been responsible for
the considerable and unnecessary financial
commitments which the island faces.

“The Director of Petroleum and Natural
Gas will have no sinecure, Certain matters
will have to be clarified in his department
such as the relationship between the
Natural Gas Corporation and the Public
Utilities Board. It is also essential that
some agreement be reached without fur-

The Contemporary Seene in English Education V AC ATION JOBS dae este Ulan |
; D. V.

F ROM THE CRADLE By Paul Nugat & CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE

.

TS
Full employment has brought something

i @O k HE GRAVE like a boom to University students in Britain Usually NOW
who welcome vacation jobs. Tins MORTON’S PEA SOUP .......--++*** 18 15

i i In almost every University Vacation Work
dimes ae chipsen describes the By H. L. O. FLECKER the least intelligent in the “Modern| Bureaux: have been formed to bring the jobs 7 a ee
Eighty years ago, when the British ' - No cut and dried sol"! to the students and the students to the jobs.|} Pkes, QUAKER OATS .....-....-----+1"""" 24 2 |

|

n ri tion has been found, although —— :
oars ee a at In a speech at “Wakefield” British thore has been a notable advance.|For Britain’s student population has been | (eee
cerned itself with little more than ©°U"*! Meedauarters. My own view is completely un-| raised since the end of World War II. Where-| ¢* S

the instruction in the three “R's” 11 + was called ‘primary’. The OTthodox, but as it is based on i ea ;

of children between the ages ‘of chief defect cr ine Act _ that 50me experience, I venture to) @S Im a meee pe ae —— “ % FOR YOUR BATHROOM

5 and 12, The 1944 Education it erected an ambitions secondary ©XP?¢ss it. ‘There are some chil- Further Education and Training Scheme for|¢

Act deals with the Nursery School structure without paying _ suffi- dren even as young as 14, wh0) ay servicemen sent the figure up to 105,000;

which can be entéred at the age cient regard to the primary profit enormously by starting ith the decline in the numbers

of 2, with Primary Education ex- foundations. The basic sugges- Patt-time work provided that it}and even with the decline in the nu

aia a to 1 + = tion that it should limit the size ee with ehh edu-|eligible under this Scheme, it is estimated | ¢ Coreen BASINS with Pedestal

on u jon continuing at of the Glasses in the cation. ey are “stuck” becuuse 2 . x 1y ”*%18”

least to 15 and sometimes to 18 schools was actually Pt a they “do not see the use” of what| that the increase in the number of educa-|§ & BASINS with or. without Pedestal

or 19 and with further education. Gebate on February i6th, 1944 in they learn at school, Put them to| tional grants will keep the figure at more :

The limit of this last is pithily the House of Commons, The reply the right sort of work and they] than 80,000

expressed by what an old school- was given that to mention a will come back to their teachers vate hird hei

master of mine used to say when specific figure in an Act of Par- eager to learn the theory of what Of this number, about one-third — their a

ea, aioe oT a oad eae : Bi tg 4 a disservice. they are doing in eee examinations passed — put away their theo- Bakelite Mahogany

v e matter would ealt wi S suggeste ar * : ‘ y

only cure for that!” It has indeed by “regulation” — 5 eee the Biinection ‘Act ine i918, Tt was) retical studies for the long summer vacations Cae roe eat HOLDERS

been said that when education be- Ministry. In the outcome these only carried out in one area, the| and roll up their sleeves ready for work. For HARPIC, Large and Small.

came compulsory, like death, it classes still tend to be much too town of Rugby, where it was @/the provincial students, most of the job P

acquired, like death, a certain large: classes of 40, 50, and ever triumphant success. The Rugby ; ae

vexatiousness. more remain, and this weakness experiment had the advantage of vacancies are of a regional character. There
the primary stage seriously peing backed by a very enlight- | is work in local factories, hospitals, laundries,

at
James Mill wrote in 1825 “An handicaps all subsequent educa- i ; a WILKINSO Co., Ltd.
institution for education, which is tion. Any working schoolmaster ee ag kg ae hotels, holidays camps, theatres, and cinemas. IN & HAYNES

hostile to progression, is the most could have told the politicians ¢¢ cych a scheme on the national Most of these jobs, though socially interest-| § Successors To

preposterous and vicious thing, (and many did so) that an educa- 5 ; i : :
i h fficulties—
which the mind of man can con: tional change of any importance cond mires Fa eeisaaehs ing, are unskilled. So, to ensure good morale,

ceive.” From this charge our myst start at th t the job organisers favour the group employ-|¢
Board of Education (which the work ‘its way up bottom “anc ‘selfish parents who would sené j g group employ-|§ C. S PITCHER & CO.
Act of 1944 converted into a there is dislocation of the educa- 0Ut to work just the children whe | ment of students to prevent students becom-| ¥ 7
Ministry), can be absolved. tion of a generation of children, OUght to stay at school, foolist}ing bored and discontented in their un-|¢ Ph
Thring’s dictum that the waste in Children who want to acquire the | samili di } ones — 4472, 4687,

The progress made since 1870 is g teacher’s workshop is the lives dignity—and the freedom—of iliar surroundings.
striking. It was a great thing in of men holds good whether the W@se-earners before their time: 3 4
1944 to have tidied things up and responsibility for the waste is above all the quite irrefutable} Typical student enterprises were the work | Sessessooooooooooosoees
to have a systematic scheme. jorne by the teacher, the admin- social argument that the condi-} camps started on the sites of two new towns,
There are many excellencies in the jstrator or the politician, The tions in most industries are en-
Act, some glaring defects, some primary teachers mostly. do a tirely unsuitable for such young Stevenage and Harlow, to enable students to

rene See ae oes very fine job: but until their children. Administrators aan work for the Development Corporations on 4 4 |
4 id om - nt to sort things out wi p 1 ; |
lines already laid down in 1902. coon. cd ~ _ pore ae oon ie foreign to human tasks such as social research, surveying, arch-



























ee ene ee Rice aa ead individual attention to the chil- nature, let alone to the nature of ae planning, and heavy manual labour.
i ren, their work cannot properly boys and girls. One is Som ther camps were established to assist in the
— Ser ~ es ger Aa Sma, bear fruit. These large classes tempted to think that. -
Then “fo the first time the child we the existence of the inde- A ne bu)
th tha the official or the tax- ent Preparatory Schools as Satan’s lips twist anticipatory
ae eh ee sie. aa th we vall them, to which the upper smiles
payer" wee | recoguix A erat © classes in England mostly send
Tere ole h naees f teach their sons from the ages of 8 or When education (officers consult
phe ygmegytyenyeie dart linge een a OTR IR ae Bang conn ea or Pac their files.
dentists, officers. of many~ sorts, Seâ„¢mu?" school for the children
director { education with their of all. are socially convincing; I hasten to say that good ad-
levien ee Ales. overnors of but the primary schools will ministrators,— and, thank God,
a hook; illors ald rman, ine, aye to be improved a great deal there are ,)many (of them—are
eirtee sare eas by | the before it will seem reasonable well aware of the danger.
fuhdired, members of partianens “2,20 om toe conclusion. s ; ital
f th ernm re — all of Apart from all questions of The interesting thing is that the

ne hs x ese ates ish Laos. snobbery or of more justifiable 1944 Act makes provision for just
a u thi * t-hill ri aoa fful Objections on social grounds (pri- such a scheme. But it is designed
Poti at A itd tel mm med meaty schools vary a lot in their for erection upon a school-leaving
activity, are ultimately concerned discipline and general care of the age of (eventually) 16. ‘These
oi wron Pail with the y dation children), we have at present not County Colleges, as they are to be
e M Brows's dictation, This the teachers or the buildings or called, are to give part-time
eit we. forget at our peril, the money required for a really cultural and vocational educa-
: worthy primary education. The tion; and attendance up to the

The chief hindrance to nr>gress ates er demand that ele- age of 18 is to be compulsory. |

construction of steel towers in connection
with a hydro-electric scheme in Scotland.
The biggest annual work scheme, however,
are the farm camps, organised by the Nation- COVER THE WORLD |
al Union of Students in co-operation with the
Ministry of Agriculture. Last year, 5,000 of
Britain’s students and 2,000 students from
overseas formed 25 camps to help with the

harvest. your buildings, we can offer you the
NATIONAL PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN following



As a protective covering for the roofs of

To gain national publicity and support for ‘i
its vacation work schemes has been one of RED ROOFING PAINTS
the major tasks of the National Union of “DANBOLINE” ANTI -CORROSIVE PAINT (for galvanized
Students, as there is no tradition in Britain iron)—$7.52 per wine gallon,

to follow for woflking one’s way threugh col: “PROPELLER” READY MIXED OIL PAINT (for wooden

education should be consider this measure the most shingles, asbestos, cement and aluminium)—$7.00 per

ther delay about the price which is to be ea rete te tne Set dears Yom cheap has left a legacy, As things interesting feature of the Act.|lege. About 70 per cent. of the students have wine gallon,
charged for natural gas. While the inter- | }cen the religious question. Partly 226» It wees oe aa to our Unfortunately it has not yet been) State scholarships, supplemental awards, rn
minable wrangle continues the public are owing to the fact that all educa- Sy chon ‘Tole cueniien Under 40 possible to put it into practice. | 444 grants from Local Education Authorities For best results, the following instructions should be carefully
‘ ‘ tion was originally conducted by ; Financial stringency has forbidden , Tt 7 . followed :— 3
denied the full benefit from the existence | {0 church, partly to the great Secure for their children the it, In place of the County | Nevertheless, to live within these incomes in
of natural gas in Barbados, influence of the Sunday School Gin ghee tes Of gral clasees Colleges eae a a oeen et pa |a world of rising prices requires both care- Seerens ye
In securing a price which is fair to the | movement at the end of the 18th’ and also able, to find for all its SAReT ates in quale in Gisteront ful management and a remunerative job to 1, For new work, allow the surface to weather for at least a

Century, our education has always jAniidren as much mone:
_ ke y as the en~
government, the Gas Company and the |had a ‘religious tinge, and th> lightened parent is prepared to

consumer, a great service will-have been | great majority of Englishmen be: pay-for their education, will the gocis! BN re eed aregen
rendered and it will then be possible to | rooted in religion is barren and common school begin to be a jus- Tocadeiry for the state ip inter-
look forward to a development of the gas frustrating. We agree with the ot vier pmeeeny bie Dew © vene: but it would be idle to
poet Wordsworth that the state a niversatly state- ciaim that the Youth Service has

parts of the dountry. If adequate| bridge the extra expenses entailed by the|{} 2. yor previoeiy waited eee poet ot DANBOLINE”.
,

vacations. Sonate rub down, clean, and apply 1 coat of “DANBO-
That Britain's Nation i ee
tional Union of Students 3. For previously painted work, if the surface is in poor con-

has been successful in its campaign, is large- dition, rub down thoroughly, clean, and apply 1 coat





BFF SSS SSS

services and an extension of the areas sup- controlled education appears in L : : sa of “INTERNATIONAL” Ri
ied, P does well when, the recent history of Germany teached the high standard set by ly due to the sympathetic way in which its followed by 1 coat ot “DANBOLINE™ retyiange
pie d Russia, Th itt the voluntary organisations such| aims have been received by such bodi , 3
a en "Binding herself by statute to secure 1026 pay aireia Sa yreartlon = as Boys’ Clubs, Boy Scouts ete.) the Mini y ete ae Wooden Shingle.
ROAD MANNERS For all the chidron whom her soll tare were tu/> 9: arp oer The most interesting experimen: | the Ministry of Labour, the Trades Union ;
.. THE discourtesy of many drivers in this maintains committees which reported in 1938 Ef all is the Cambridgeshire / Congress, and employers’ federations. The 1, For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
commmitipas which reparied in 1398 viuage college. Avound » “Med-| Ministry of Labout through ite local and PRIMER FOR WOOD, followed by 2 coats of “PRO-
island has been remarked upon by strang- The rudiments of letters, ‘and inform tigns may be summarised, as most €rn” school are grouped lecture] |: fat Betcahe AOCRe: at PELLER”.
erg and those who give some consideration iid: mind With TaReaI ARO Ee Bethan either foundie place in the Hooms and common rooms for pho offices, brings to notice of the Union 2. ape eee p elnten work, ¢ the ute ¥ in yee
; : : :. truths.” Education Act of 1944 or else were adults, a hall for concerts and|job vacancies, exempts students from payin 1 wn,, clean, and apply 2coats of “PRO-
to the rights of others. It is no exaggera nur put into force by subsequent ad, Plays, dances and cinema, al jngurance continent co paying 5 Soran ; :
tion to say that the majority of motor The “Excursion” was written in Ministrative regulations of the library, workshop, laboratory, ions, grants free travel : e abies rae. painted work, if the surface is in poor
accidents in this island are the direct result | 1814 and we now expect a little Ministry. | It was proposed that dookery Toor cantoeh and play-| Warrants to and from the farm camps, and of “INTERNATION! L” PRIMER FORK WOOD", followed
A more than “rudiments”, But this the school-leaving age be raised ing fields. The Warden of the/ allows the full ; b : : . AL” PRIMER FOR WOOD”, followed
of bad manners in one way or another, oe 1 “rudiments”, But this +5°5‘and later to. 16 Secondary village college has the duty of full earnings to be retained with- by 2 coats of “PROPELLER”.
The most prevalent today is the refusal {the problem of enoknitattodelions eosin a ge ie at 11 -+. inspiring all these activities and ower from grants or scholarships. Asbestos Cement,
‘ haghraens pe ae and! ever since 1870 _ Alongside of the existing second- then entrusting their leadership e ideal vacation job. i ‘
of many motorists to “dip their lights tary Iiiseittoe has Ale he schoo ary schools, which were re-named to the youths and adults of the] students. i. th J a according to the 1. For new work, apply 1 coat of “INTERNATIONAL”
When approaching another vehicle. Motors |by the “Dual system”, which sGramaat Sonoote;! rene to be oe, Tam pfoud that one of the} ) é o ie nee es ae the virtues of Seneas AND PLASTER PRIMER, followed by 2 coats of
oda i i R sought to do justice t -estab-. crecte echnical. and ‘modern’? Wardens {s a former pupil oi ing protessiona. useful, socia i ~ OPELLER”.
teday are in nearly every instance fitted I ieee cchturch” whtek Fee tet schools. Arrangements ‘were mine, The ‘first such college was/ing and modestl ma ; ti at manny 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoreughly, clean,
with powerful headlights which blind the | of the school buildings w made for the transfer between opened in’ 1928: the idea was ¥ unerative. In this re- and apply 2 coats of “PROPELLER”. :
: F e gs without , PD n spect, th ete ’ y LER”.
oncoming traffic especially in roads which offending the non-conformists, (or schools at the age of 13 of chil— first mooted by Kay-Shuttleworth pect, the scientific and technological stu- Alumini
lack street lighting Brel, Churchmen,. ds, Wty have oo. a ae in 1840, dents find themselves favoured rete
= ; come called) who ‘dbjecte . bes P y ced. : e 1; " ”
There can be little excuse for not dip- | to the subsidisation by the’ tate The existing examination system The cad s*rondary schools, re- EXCHANGE OF STUDENTS followed ur con oe “PROPELLER —”
ping headlights because cars are fitted of eran eeel Sure teach- (echauition, nee Saal paren Syecenes, ners meet se The 1 2. For previously painted work, rub down thoroughly, clean
: b or eationa ri SS . eate’ ® i Soi y I , :
with switches either near the clutch pedal | made it impossible for the Church was to be established between Sinaien The onan vay had nol r are College of Science and Tech- ot SREY COME, Ot I ee
or on the steering wheel to be manipulated |? finance its schools. A succes- all three forms of secondary made, since the state entered the | "0.O8Y 1n London promoted the first vaca- T
with the greatest ease, The serjousness of in this reapeck the Ack ot LeLe toes ce i field of | secondary education in| on work scheme in industry in 1933, when eee, ee ee
. in § respec’ e Act 0 joes : i i *
the matter will be realised when it is Pact ee girs + PEt eee atubision ane cevioins foe ible educational achievement. Without si eee tan, en tee et re ee ne ee
. x c act man thi : o 'y ira fs se i
pointed out that refusal {o dip one’s lights ee oo 4 coralality — Sotaaree in so highly industrialised a them we could never have found ; ai flourished and last year, 2,000
might. be thé cause. of some vehicle run- tion, which have marked the re, country. as England. Technical ©ough pi to win the Battle} students had offers of holiday-posts from 300
: : lations. between the Church of Schools for boys had existed in Sf Britain. Most unfortunately) concerns in Britain, with furth ffers f DA COSTA & CO LTD — ENTS
ning off the road and causing some fearful | England and the Free Churches some form since 1889. Nor can thé enthusiasts for the new sec-} eon a ee a er, ohers trom me ’ AGEN
accident or the death of the occupants or ree the att 20 ORT ae Te ee ee es ae aliieuarelomeie catabil canta sotvonc oo eek ese khsensigdbrte a yc Fa xmbmgrsice gy?
x : ave justified a bolder approach education beyond the old elemen- abe : ween the three} overseas firms
innocent pedestrians. to the problem, But the on did tary level was desirable for a types, have seen fit to decry and were all members of the



y three- ; a
make two important innovations, mumber of the children who had disparage the Grammar Schools. three-year-old International Association for
In those schools which belonged not hitherto found places in the This danger had been foreseen. the Exchange of Students for Technical Ex-
to the Church but whose dilapi- Grammar schools. Experiments: was present myself on a number] per’erce. Under the auspi f the Associ
dated condition puts eyen half the. in this direction go back as far of occasions when the Grammar t Riss: . pices of the A af
cost of repairs beyond its means, as 1872. But these experiments School Headmasters were assured} “'O"> Britain received and sent overseas
and in. all state-provided schools, had embraced. only the brighter by the Minister, Mr. R. A. Butler| More students than any other country

e _
Our Readers Say: © ———_| 8 those, schools which belonged not hitherto found places in the This danger had been foreseen. 1) the Exchange of Students for Technical Ex-|—
‘ Co-operation
To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I would like to take this opportunity of

FOR YOUR PIE




congratulating you on the fine editorial published |Treligious instruction was to be children: the difficulty was to RED
i . : and by his, lieutenant ‘ APPLES
Leteisurties eo canoe NN ee remruary given according to an agreed syl+ ‘decide Wit what waat® betone Ede “che omer a Conservative [ _, Phose overseas students, together with the

Ttheems th me as a layman, howevell that the | Christian but Son-epctaaiens a tone Wine gta’ vee see vere the astne & Socialist; for those f tUdents in Britain, will have discovered that, ep Tee ret
al nti a Co- . AE were e + .
appoin -oap Sect aera yan vaegedhig This idea goes right back to ®¢hooling) of the least intelligent Bcvatieadins Poke ma ae as a result of a series of conferences attended RHUBARB
acres of Dodds Plantation to peasants on a co-opera- [ate 18th Century and was children. The raising of the > “levelling down” of the }0’ i"dustrial representatives and the staff VELO KRIS

tive basis. At least, the guidance pnd advice of
such an officer would be available, if not to ensure
the success of the venture, at any rate to minimise
its chances of failure.

The importance of co-operative societies in a
community such as ours cannot be over-estimated.
It has often been stated that the average Barbadian
is essentially an individualist and innately suspi-
cious, Mainly for these reasons, there are those
who feel that any efforts to get co-operative ven-
tures started in Barbados are a waste of time.
Possibly, Government hold the same view and con-
scarepty, ‘have not filled the post of Co-operative
Offieer which has been vacant for several months.

If-this is the case, I would like to register my
strong protest, as I am one of the many who feel
that under the leadership of a competent Co-opera-

romoted in the 19th school-leaving agé caught every- Gro : ‘
pre maak eo 10th Century by auahpnitite wrong foc The local aoe dnote that ithe con- and students of the Imperial College, the re- THE HIGHEST
religious “Instruction, divested of Feeuvation as had recive ites and standard ‘of Siiainenaan aoe and employment of the vacation stu- :
all specifically doctrinal clothing, dings nor the equipment ;} den i oud nd
Will prove, too thinly ‘clad 4 Teady. This was-not surprising in cared, “would he wees oe follows certain broad principles. ACHIEVEMENT
weather the storms of to-day, it 1944, When a vast number of Ajas for the Grcateh of pale n arrival at a factory, students are met 17
is an open question. The other eee bape beet, eee bY cians! Even. before the Coalition by one of the firm’s managers, who discusses IN BISCO
innovation, inserted t . le whole man~ ; dis , i ‘
inpaveten, inneriel fe aed the ufacturing energy of the nation wens, Sunscreen B heavy blow was with them a scheme of work, based upon] % MAKING
the statutory enactment that the 28d been diverted to military pur 6)" 4) a iat rammar Schools} their particular interests and length of :
school, day” should Begih with Poses. “There was a — great me plea of integrating the demi tudi gth of aca- CARRS
cobeotive “womans t ante dines shortage! of teachers: we could not teaching profession. The salaries ¢ studies. Students are put to work, s
not “be distinctive of any par- cope cent, the orene mursbers ks: i Pay hitherto been] Spending a week or two in various workshops CREAM CRACKERS
: : : ¥ , let a P 0 ; ‘a a
ticular religious denomination. p yetain 9 neKobatEed wi e Local Educa-| and attending lectures after working hours.]% CHOCOLATE LUNCH

} CHEESE CRiSPS

WATER BISCUITS









“How far legislation of this kina \Y?le year’s intake, Most impor- tion Authorities who paid them
wilk ongute ‘a. relive ieeats tae tant of all, no one had any clear in two panels, one for the sec— In the course of several vacations, the stu-

Tiational BOucaticaeaernaiAe to Cie idea of what to do with the extra ondary (Grammar) Schools, one] dents get a complete picture of every aspect





tive Officer who understands the people and their
e = . year, beyond the entirely negative for the el t 5 : ‘
n ‘a number of Co-operative ventures such as |S¢e?.” Obviously it all depends ; : ementary schopls. We] of indust ithi ir fi ‘AIL UIT BISCUITS
the one proposed for Dodds Plantation could suc- | °” the teachers: if; the thing is > ie hei Hae ‘aS “4 ~~ fully expected ‘that the Grammar eee Sate , — ——
eneetasly te askablished. Another point which Gov- peruneey. and uninspired it ther year would be wrong, At Schools would share the “Upper”} One of the fu a ; .,
seamen should et in mois Rae sucka tong ill do. more Se ; ther year would be wrong. At ponel with the new. secondary fundamental purposes behind Just Arriced For Your Cake
lapee t time ibe ween the return of Mr. Cave to he — - often’ worn a sur- of every sort of teacher in our Schools —.,.the technical and these schemes is to give the students an op- :
ee ee! Ba se aapetn ment of his suc- ane No “e od doubtless, an grea, so that we might hear each modern schools. Instead of this a] portunity to rub shoulders with i dustrial ate om on Pee RAISINS
eo: age oe Teel s-ope e move- Wardvole 4 % ee in his other's views. The elementary single panel was formed for a 1 : industria S in tins CURRANTS |
IE SUT ee ve acaccasdathtaii ites “dase aks ets eek ut +a ea teachers with one voice clamour- P!imary and secondary schools personnel, and to give them a foretaste of the CHASE & SANBORNE
late to agriculture it is right that the post of Co- |should be assed with a a ed for postponing the raising of pogsther. I am afraid that I sus-| type of occupations, which may invol Pr : om
vet Oficen chai ee dae a ae ) om pass wi out a very the school-leaving age until we pect political. skull duggery. The larg j , y 2 ve a LIPTON’S PURE COFFEE ALMOND ICING
tural’Department and that the officer should have mer eee eee had had time to prepare for it. At aataaes Fines primary ot a ac = mar ae WHEAT PUFFS : ee
some*training in agric i th ; a majcrity has called tat On the . . KIN
oe ie anid sabes ane tae Until 1944 elementary educa. that very moment the members s the tune, that ook-out for future graduate per- SLING in tins , ROYAL BAKING POWDER

the person selected for the post should have a good
knowledge of the Barbadian peasant and be Able
to stud his needs and discuss his problems with
him... Above all, he must be in a position to gain
his confidence. Only such an individual can hope
to break down prejudice and suspicion and get co-
operatives organised on a sound basis. I submit
Sir; that it should not be difficult to obtain the ser-
vices of one who meets these requirements.

bss PROGRESS.

tion was provided for children f parliament who were supposea ® Much too high percentage of} sonnel, vacati i

between 5 and 14. An important Specially to’represent these teach money. has gone to the least thei de ee ee
committee which issued-its.report €"s’ views were demanding in qualified teachers so that it has| | ©! performance, to assess personality. As
in 1926 had recommended. a new impassioned language the imme- become difficult—sometimes even] a result, many students return to their Uni
division of age and this was tate raising of the age not to impossible—to find the highly] versities with t
adopted by the recent Act. The 15 but to 16. Education and poli- qualified teachers that the Gram-]. ‘ with an offer of future employment
term ‘elementary’ was abolished tics are uneasy .bed-fellows. mar Schools need for their ad-|i0 their pockets, and with the comforting
and the education of children We are still. working on the Veured wark. thought, that their careers no longer depend

between th
e ages of 5 or 7 and problem.of the best curriculum for (to ke continued “tosmorrow! upon a short nerve-racking interview.



CARROTS 24¢ lb. — CABBAGE 30+ Ib.
GODDARD



i

woe
TUESDAY.~FEBRUARY 27, 1951

BARBADOS



Only Courage Will Give
Barbados A Theatre

By NORMAN DUTHIE
THE Glasgow Citizens Theatre is an independent
experimental theatre or what is loosely called a repertory
theatre. It is part of a movement which began early in
this century with the foundation of the Abbey Theatre in

Dublin, Miss Horniman’s Repertory Theatre in Manchester,

the Vedrenne-Barker Seasons at the Court Theatre in Lon-

don and later the foundation of the Repertory Theatres
notably in Birmingham and Manchester.

About 1909, there was a pin 220 jac hit. We intended to run .his
tory Theatre in Glasgow which|play for 8 weeks, but the public
created an audience for the work | demand was so strong, that when
of the new dramatists in English} we tack it off after 15 weeks, the
like Shaw, Galsworthy, St, John;public grumbled. The house was
Hankin etc. These theatres finished | Sold out for the whole run. On

ADVOCATE



Christian Mission
Case Adjourned

THE CHRISTIAN MISSION case in the Court of
Chancery was begun yesterday and adjourned for an in-
definite period in order that His Honour the Vice-Chancellor
can give a ruling on whether-the plaintiffs were in order to
‘file the suit in their own names and not in the name of the
Christian Mission. Mr. G. H. Adams, Senior Counsel for
the defendants, made that submission yesterday.

Iron Punctures

Lighter

In this suit the plaintiffs are
asking the Court to declare that
Revd. Hoyte and others were not
the properly elected Board of
Management of the Christian Mis-
sion Church for the year 1949-50
according to the provisions of the

PAGE FIVE



| EQUIPMENT HOLDING
| UP ROAD REPAIRS
St. James Vestry Told. |

EQUIPMENT ordered about nine months ago by the
Commissioners of -Highways for St. James has’ not yet
arrived. That is the reason why the St. James tenantry
roads are in a state of disrepair. This explanation was
given to Churchwarden Mr. A, G. Johnson who.asked the
Vestry to appoint a Board of Enquiry to find out why the
tenantry roads were so badly in need of repair.

_Mr. Johnson withdrew his mo- Guardians made the increase and
tion after the matter hag been/ Mr. Johnson withdrew his motion.
discussed. He said that their ten—-| The Vestry agreed to make pro-
antry roads contrasted horribly| visions for dental facilities for
with other roads about the island.| some of the poor people of the

with the outbreak of the 1914-18
war. The Citizens Theatre was”
started in 1943 and the moving
spirit was the Scottish dramatist,
James. Bridie.

It began in a small theatre at-
tached to the Academy of Music
in Glasgow with a seating capa—
city of 500 to 600. Two years
afterwards, it was able to move
to a bigger theatre with about

Saturday night last, I understand

HILE THE S.S. Oakhill was} Christian Mission Act.

The roads were in the condition

parish, This was decided after Mr.

that cur latest Christinas show
finished after a run of about 10
weeks. It also has been'a great
success.
Hard to Please

I was interested in Mr. Lynch’s
letter in the Advocate last week.
He criticises the principle of “ari
for art sake.” We have ficund we must mix cur experimental

being loaded with scrap ircs
on Sunday a piece fell back into
a lighter, owned by Messrs, Plan-
tations Ltd. No one was struck,
but the iron made a hole in the
bottom of the lighter.

Pumps from the Fire Brigade
were used to pump out the water.
The lighter afterwards went on
dock for repairs,

HIRTY-FOUR MOTORISTS

Associated with Mr. Adams is
Mr. D. H. L. Ward. They are be-
ing instructed by Mr. H. L
Thomas of Messrs Carrington &
Sealy. Appeari for the Com-
plainants is Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.,
associated with. Mr. J. S. B. Dear
and instructed by Mr. D. H. Ban-
field of Messrs Hutchinson & Ban-
field. Mr. Reece is holding the

twice that capacity and very much ; work with plays of a wide public
better back stage facilities—ex-, appeal. The ditficulty is to know
cellent scene docks workshops etc. | What the public really wants, and

papers of Mr. E. K. Walcott, IX.c.

they are in now for many years
and it was for that reason that he
had asked members to appoint a
Board of Enquiry.
Mr. Wilkinson

Johnson asked the Vestry to cchn-
sider allowing some people to get
heir teeth extracted when nec +s-
sary, the Vestry paying part of
the cost.

Mr. Crick withdrew a motion
asking ‘Vestry cause’a

, said that the
Highway Commissioners got their
funds from highway ,taxes and
froni Government grants. “In his





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OPIS COOS

opinion Mr, Johns ~ } Monthly financial’ statement of 8
view the Conmeineleneney amar aod all subsidiary boards to . be >
them how they were getting along placed before them on the 24th

It has also good facilities for the
audience—a restaurant, club room
and bars which have enabled ui
to develop something of a social
centre in the theatre.

We formed a small company
limited by guarantee and not
having a share capital and we
are debarred by our contribution
from paying either dividends or
fees to directors. The board con-
sists of 8 men who are interested
in cultural development, and. one
of our great assets is that all the
directors are firm friends. Accord—
ingly, although there are always
differences of views on questions
of policy, everyone is loyal to the
decisions of the board as a whole.

Citizens Theatre

Scon after the theatre was
started, we formed a_ Citizens
Theatre Society which has now, a;
membership of about 3,000. The
ennual subscription is only 5/-
and the society runs during the
season, about half g dozen lec-
ture’ and discussion meetings. It
has the use of the club room and
all the members get a little mag-
azine with theatre news etc.
which jis issued about six times .a
year. The. society has also an
inner group called the Critics
Circle which meets regularly and
discusses with very great frank—
ness, the plays which have been
produced including the acting
stage setting, production, ete. Last
year the board received consid—
ered criticisms of every play
produced during the season, This
was extraordinary valuable and
enlightening, because it gave us
a quite independent outside view
of the work which the theatre had
done.

Another very interesting de-
velopment was the formation by
a group of school teachers and a
junior society. Twice a year in
the, spring and the autumn we
put on a special production of a
classic—e.g. Shakespeare, Sheri-
dan and Goldsmith. ‘These plays
are given at night to the general
audience, but during the week,
special matinees are given for
schocl children who are charged
only 1/- per head, . This means
that each year, somewhere be-
tween 8,000 and 9,000 school chil—
Gren see a classical play produced
on a high standard. We regard this
work as of first importance and
the young audieritae are so en-
thusiastic, that in many cases
they go home and insist on. their
parents coming to see the play. A
special value which we think this
work has, is that it introduces
the children to the Living
Theatre. It is to be remembered
that in most cases, films make
Uttle if any demand on the imag-
ination, whereas, in the ease of .a
stage play. the audience must
rollaborate with the actors if
suecess is to .be achieved. We
believe also that this work is
building up our future audiences.

Our theatre works “in associa-
tion with the Arts Council of
Great Britain”, They give us a
limited guarantee of half our
loss on any season, and on at
least two occasions we have had
to make calls on this guara.tee.
In addition, the Arts Council
gave us grants for the furnishing
of the club room and the improve-
ment of the stage lighting and
also the non interest bearing
loan for redecoration, heating etc.
of the Princess's Theatre in
which we are now working.

Gift of £10,000

We began with very limited
fnance—about £1,200 mainly in
gifts and before ous first perform-
anee, a good part had had to be
spent on equipment, costumes etc.
On the two years in the Little
Theatre, we just made ends meet.
When we moved to the larger
ome, we had to find a guarantee
for the rent for the ten years
lease, Here we had a stroke of
exceptionally good fortune. — We
approached a number of friends
about this guarantee and one of
them, Sir ea Stewart, a
Glasgow industrialist, gave me 4
ae pleasant shock. He asked
me to see him for half an hour
ene evening and this is what he
said: “I got your letter. This is
just all wrong. You fellows are
giving a lot of time to running
this theatre and are making a
good job’ of it. You ought not to
be wasting your time going round
with the hat like this. I wish I
could give you. some of my time
but I cannot, but I could stop
this waste of your time, I want
to give you a seven year covenant
which will provide the theatre
with £10,000.” I wish more people
who are interested in the theatre
would follow Sir Fred’s fine ex-
ample.

I hope it is clear that our ex-
perience on the financial side of
running a theatre has varied a
great deal. In our 1948-49 season,
we showed a nice surplus at
Easter. Our summer season was
simply disastrous. We had a spell
of fine weather, and there was a
slump in the theatre business
throughout the whole of Britain.
As a result, we began our 1949-50
season with considerable anxiety,
hut we had the great good luck to



1-t frequently, we have offered
what we thought was sure to be a
‘very popular play, and have found
that the public response was
poor. On the (ther hand, plays
apprcaching the “high brow” have
been pronounced successes. We
are very proud of the fact that
we have consistently shown a
surplus on our Shakespearean
plays e.g. Macbeth, the Merchant
of Venice and Midsummer Nights
Dream. All these of course had
Special children’s matinees, but
these do not pay. The credit goes
to the general public and, we
claim, to the gyod productions
and acting.

One of our aims is to encourage
Scottish playwrights and we are
prepared to take risks by putting
on plays by new Scoitish writers.
The majority of our acting com-
pany, can cf course, work in
broad Scots. Bridie gave us one
or two distinctively Scottish
plays and ther promising writers
are Robert Kemp and Robert
MacLéllan.

What we are doing here is
parallel to the fine work done by
the Abbey Theatre in Dublin
which piicduced, not only able
actors and actresses like Sara
Algoecd, . Maire O’Neill, F. J.
McCormick, Arthur Sinclair and
Barry Fitzgerald who also pib-
vided the stage for J. M. Synge,
Sean O’Casey and drew plays
from W. B: Yeats, Lady Gregory
and others. I feel sure that there
are \2cal traditions of a special
outlook in Barbados which de-
serve similar encouragement.
cught to say that our acting
company is purely professional,
Some of nur most valued people
work originally, however, with
the Scottish National players, a
group who were only part time
professionals, but who did most
valuable work especially in the
smaller towns in Scotland. They |
gave only two short seasons in
Glasgow, but their work in the
country - gave rise to the very
vigorous community drama move-
ment in Scotland.

Courage, Enthusiasm

The two things most necessary
for the starting and success of
any venture like jours, are en-
ihusiasm and courage and I
would put a high value on’ the
second of these. Nothing will ever
be done. unless some group of
people take their cowrage in both
hands and make a start. If the
general attitude is that a thing is
difficult and that financial secur-
ity is essential, then nothing will
eyer be done. The second thmught
is that the enthusiasts must be
prepared to work together as a
team to subtrdinate their per-
sonal views to the general de-
cisions of the board. I would
exemplify the point of courage
in this way. Our theatre began in
May 1943 with a little dinner
party at which about 10 pebple
were present. James Bridie was
in the chair, We had a most en-
joyable- and -argumentative talk.
We all expected that the decision
would be that we should begin to
work for a repertory theatre to
start after the war. Bridie summed
up by saying that we were agreed
‘on two things—first, that Glasgow
needed a special theatre and sec-
ond, that there was a _ nucleus
audience justifying a beginning
on a modest scale. He then said:
“Come on then chaps, let’s do
it.” In some extraordinary way,
we had opened our theatre in the
following September.

I understand that one of the
ctifficulties in Barbados is the lack
of a suitable theatre, I_ cannot
even guest what the chances are
of such a theatre being provided,
but I am sure that if the present
amateur movement in Barbados
goes on working with courage
and enthusiasm, such a theatre
will ultimately be provided. I do
not think it should belong to the
acting qompanies, but should be
held as a public asset and rented
out to any group who can offer
.work jof genéral interest to the
community. In the special cir-
cumstances, I hope it would be
suitable also for concerts, and
probably, for the presentation of
non-commercial films. In this
way, it will be a community
centre of the highest value.

Appeal Judges
Confirm Decision

THE decision of His Worship
Mr, E. A. McLeod, Police Magis-
trate of District. “A”—who placec
Marie Waithe of Hindsbury Road
St. Michael on a personal bonc
for one month in the sum. of 15/-
for blackguarding — was yester-
day confirmed by Their Honours
Mr. G. L. Taylor and Mr. H. A.
Vaughan, Judges of the Assistan
Court of Appeal.

Counsel for Waithe was Mr. E. B
Barrow. Waithe gave notice o
appeal at the bar, One witness
for the prosecution said that on
August 12, 1950, she saw Waithe
behaving in an unseemly manne:
an Hindsbury Road. Many peoplc
spoke to her but she still contin-
ued,

Mr. Barrow in his address sub-
mitted that the case be dismissed
Their Honours however were sat-
















and cyclists were reported
over the week-end for tratfic. of-
fences, Of these three motorists
were reported for carrying weight
in €xeess and another three for
not stopping at major roads,
oT broke and entered the
house of Elvina Clarke at
Glendairy Road, St. Michael be-
tween 7.45 a.m. and 10.45 p.m.
on Saturday and stole a quantity
of clothing. The Police are mak-
ing investigations,
LTHOUGH the recent rains
had -hindered many things
yet they were indirectly a great
help to the motorists who drive
through the country districts, At
nearly every plantation canes
were overhanging into the road.
These canes often caused annoy-
ance to motorists,

During the rainy season the
lorries were unable to get into
the cart roads and in cane fields.
To keep the factories going
planters were forced to cut down
the canes that were nearest to
the highways, In the majority of
cases motorists now have a clear

view,
O*N SUNDAY night at 8 o’clock

Professor Raymond G. Jolly,
Executive Trustee of the Layman’s
Home Missionary Movement of
Philadelphia, gave a lecture at
Queen’s Park Shed,

He ended his talk by describing
the Kingdom of God soon to be
established on the earth, To those
present he promised to mail free
of charge further information on
the coming Reign of Peace, the
thousand-year Resurrection Day
and other important Bible studies.



CENTENARIAN

THIS I8 Christian Kellman of Cane
Garden, St. Andrew. The “Advo-
cate” has been following her career
closely from the time she passed the
century mark, She is now 118 years
old and looks good for many more
years. ‘



Lumber Arrives

A shipment of 210,000 feet ot
spruce and pine lumber arrivec
for Barbados yesterday by the
steamship Polycvest from Halifax
The shipment of lumber was con-
signed to Messrs, J. B. Leslie & Co,,

td.
Lighters were bringing the lum-
ber ashore and discharging i‘
along the waterfront in the inner
basin of the Careenage,

This shipment of lumber has
found a large part of the 1% feet

of lumber, which arrived some
days ago by the — steamship
Islandside, still lying on the
waterfront.

It is not expected that the lum-
ber will be cleared off the water-
front until around the end of the
week.

The Polyerest also brought 1,20(
bags of poultry for Messrs. H
Jason Jones & Co,, Ltd. She alsc
began to discharge this cargo yes-
terday and lorries were removing

it from the waterfront to the|$

agents,
Messrs. Plantattons Ltd. are the
Ship’s Agents,



Body Recovered

The body of Clarence Hoyte, a
26-year-old fisherman, who was
drowned at Brooklyn beach,
Paynes Bay, on Sunday morning
was found in the same vicinity
Yesterday” evening by Lionel
Phillips, of St. James.

A post mortem examination was
performed the same eycuing at
the St. James Almshouse by Dr.
A. C. Kirton, P.M.O. of St. Lucy.

An enquiry into the circum-
Sfances surrounding Hoyte’s death
will be held to-day at 11 a.m. at
the Holetown Police Station.

FELL OFF LORRY

Shortly after 2.30 p.m. yes-
terday Bert Gill a 20-year-old
labourer of Parish Land, St.

which was being driven along
Hothersal Turning. P

He was taken to the General
Hospital and was discharged after

put on a Christmas show of a verylisfied that the woman used the} he received treatment for bruises

light hearted type which was 2

language.

on his face and hands.

| SOLIO PACK APPLES
George, fell from the lorry M.1611}



As the case opened this morn-
ing Mr. Reece applied for leave to
amend the Bill of Complaint, and
as soon as this was got over, the
rest of the half day's hearing was
spent on legal argument on the

int raised by Mr. Adams, The

ice-Chancellot in adjourning the
case expressed concern over the
future of the Christian Mission
Church,

Action Maintainable?

Mr. Adams is submitting that
the action is not maintainable in
the manner in which it has been
brought.
ated the Church specifically said

and be sued in all the Courts. If
the plaintiffs were the Christian
Mission, they would have to sue
as the Christian Mission and not
as individuals, unless there was
something in the Act incorporating
them which allowed them to sue
on behalf of the corporate body.

He was submitting for those
reasons that the case be dismissed
with costs to the defendants,

Mr. Reece replying submitted in
the first place that the point Mr,
Adams had raised should have
been made in his pleadings. 1

He was submitting, however,
Mr. Reece said, that the plaintiffs
were properly before the Court.
The Act incorporated the body of
members of the Christian Missior
and not the Board of Management.
The Mission as a Mission could
only sue in its corporate name, but
the Board of Management was not
incorporated,

There were three separate and
distinct bodies: the Mission, a cor-
orate body of all the members,
he Representatives of the Church-
es—one for each of the 28 church-
es in the island or one for every
25 members, and the Board of
Management. The plaintiffs had
never said that they were the
Christian Mission, and he was}
arguing also, that any member
could come to the Court and ask
for a declaration as to who were
the properly constituted Board of
Management.

Taken By. Surprise

After much case law had been
cited on both sides, the Vice- |
Chancellor said that the point}
raised had taken the Court by
some surprise, and it was there-
fore desirable that he should de-
cide that preliminary point after

due care and consideration, The
matter would therefore be ad-
journed.

It was unfortunate that in that
domestic quarrel between. two
sections of the Christian Mission
there should have to be that ad-
journment. Without going into
any merits at that stage, the point
which struck him was with regard
to the future of the Christian Mis-
sion in Barbados and elsewhere.

It seemed to him that there
would have to be another meeting,
and he was wondering why_ it
could not be made possible for that
Court or some other authority to
summon a meeting and have the
future affairs of the Church de-
cided by a proper body.

Much of the facts of the case
related to things that had happen-
ed in the past without much bear-
ing as to what would happen in
the future. That was just by the
way, however. He could not fix
a definite date for the next hearing
of the case, Sessions would begin
next week and there might be fur-
ther delays. The parties would be
notified of the next date of hear-
ing. '

SER UZREEERSEREREE SS
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Asst, BISCUITS

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JACOBS LINCOLN CREAM
SLICED HAM
SURF MAID GRAPES ........
BARTLETT PEARS

DUTCH STRAWBERRIES IN SYRUP .....

with their work,
About nine months ago he had

of each month and a meeting be]
summoned on the following Mcn-

*

oe
_

The Act which incorpor- | available.

available for th
that it should have the right to sue he yaa tee. ONO: YORI;



repair another,’

| tensive repairs and during the las:

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Gay to consicer the report. He
withdrew his motion after he was |
told that Vestry could go to the
Parochial Treasurer and get any
information about the Subsidiary
Boards which he needed,

Mr, Crick said that he did not
feel that the matter was contro-
versial. During the last election
campaign he had heard a member
of the Vestry say that he had
known nothing of what happened
at the various Boards,

The Vestry’s business was done
by means of Boards and if it hap-
pened that one did not get a seat
on a Board one would know noth.
ing of the proceedings of that
Board, Sometimes taxpayers would
ouestion a Vestryman as to cer-
tain goings on ut different Boarr
and the Vestrym’n wuld be un-
able to give him lhe informa-
tion.’ «

been asked to pilot a Bill through
the House on behalf of the High-
way Commissioners for a joan
He got it through and an order
had been sent, but. they had been
tnformed that owing to conditions
in England, there had to be de-
ays.

Mr. Crick said that he had had
complaints from various people
that the roads were bad and he
was wondering whether some-
thing could not be done despite
the fact that rollers were uot
If equipment were ;

asked, would the roads remain
in the same condition without the
Commissioners making any
tempt to get them done?

Mr. Johnson then withdrew his
motion,







bad weather clothing and other
things had to be removed from
it,

Mr, Jordan suggested that they
carry out the normal repairs until
they could get a loan.

The Highway Commissioners
had not been in office, for one
ae or even two years but for a
cng Ume, and the deficiency of! Mr, Wilkinson said that he was
roads Had been in being “all the} surprised that Mr, Crick did not
time, He thought it was their| know the Vestry Act. The Vestry
duty to see that they kept theirj had absolutely’ no control over
implements intaet so that no one |the Sanitary Board. The only peo-
roller would be allowed to got | ple who could control that Board
extremely bad before an. erdet; was the Board of Health. In the
had been sent for another one, case of an epidemic, if the Board
Mr. Walcott said that he would ; of Health did not think they were
suggest to Mr. Johnson that he | Coing their duty, they could check
should telegraph the Secretary of | UP_on that Board.
State for the Colonies and ask him hy ae ee = mectute.
_tly power ary
ae a not allow the roll-| Commissioners... They could not
The tenantry roads were not Se er” om. for any eateries
really | under the control of the The other Boards, too, were
Commissioners, They had grants | emancipated boards and they had
from the Government and they] no right ‘to ask: them for their
were told which roads should be] books either, He had no doubt
repaired first and they could tot} that if a member of the: Vestry
use money given for one road to, wanted, information about the
happenings of any Board and he
asked any of the members, the
information would be given,
Matron’s Salary The idea of a monthly meeting
The Vestry decided to refer to} Was ridiculous, To lay down a
the Board cof Guardians the con- rule for a menthly meeting wa
sideration of revising the sal- | c#rrying things too far and was
ary of the matron at the alms-~ ' Wnnecessary.
house, his was decided after RCO ey
Mr. Johnson asked the Vestry to|@’?°** SpesesoI8ee
ee the revision, and, to look Having a grand time at - -
after better housin or the
nurses, Sin CRICKET!
Mr, ef cmp said that the hous Delict Aiéad Sinslts for
ing for the nurses wags not satis- cious Sweet Bsc
factory. For a long time the LUNCHEON fae a put
building had “been wanting ex-1% Waorted Sweet, Biscuits by
Huntley & Palmer, Peek
Frean, Carr and Jacob.
Prices 10c.—-26¢,—-48¢-—50c,
Per Pck,
Prices $1.20 to $2.14 Per tin.
Jacob’s Cream Crackers 6/-
Per tin,



Mr. Wilkinson said it was a —_—_—

matter for the Poor Law Guar- —Also—

dian, % Luscious Boxes of CONFEC-
Mr. Crick said that seven or|@ TIONERY small and large.






eight years ago the Nurses’ Quar-
ters were in the same condition
they were in then,—deplorable.
When he came to that Vestry that
was the first thing with which
he found fault. An institution like
that in such a condition was a
horrid disgrace to the parish.

He wondered whether the Poor
Law Guardians of St. James real
ised that nursing was carried out
by educated people and that it
was a disgrace to ask any decent
person to go into such quarters.
It was time that that Board made
some arrangement for nurses.

» BLACK MAGIC CHOCO-
f LATES $4.06 per box.
% Peanuts 64c, Per tin,
Butter Scotch 2lc, to 45c.,
% per tin.

% Nougat 34c. and 70c. per tin,
Fry's Hazel Nuts 2/-, 3/9,







y 7/6 Box,
% Cadbury’s Red Rose 98c. &

> i. OX,

x Cadbury's Chocolate Biscuits
K 5/- & 5/3 tin.

» Chewing Gun 2c. & 6c, Pck.
After Dinner Mints 1/- per



> Pek.
y Marr Bars 14c, ea,

® Crest Bars 16c. ea.

% Guava Cheese 18c, 4-02, Pck.
% Cadbury Bars (Asst.) 10c.,
> 17e., 19¢., 34c., 37¢, ea,

? Fry's Bars 7c., 9c., 12c., 15¢,
Carr's Choc, Lunch 12¢, Peck.
Carr's Choc, Tea Cakes 8e,

Increases

Mr. Johnson had a motion to
bring to the Vestry asking for an
increase in allowance to old peo-



i h,

ple from one shilling to three |&% Sacn, Rua

shillings, Since the motion was Carr ene Crisps $1.02
given notice of, the Poor Law Carr’s Club Cheese $1.00 tin,

, Snate’s Toffee 2/6 and 3/3
s n.

% Blue Bird Toffee 1/9, 4/6, &
‘ $1.86 tin,

, —Also—

% Thermos Flask 1-Pint $1.51

Sun Glasses from 38/- to
$15.00,








Get them from ,

BRUCE WEATHERHBAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Street

pe
..per tin $1.17
$1.60

Packets
35c.

”

4 lb.
at

per Pkt.
CHEESE
Large Tin
50c. Small
62c, Small
Oo. LTD.

— S

Rael

Large Tin












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A BEAGTIFUL
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7





TIME TO THINK OF YOUR...

BUTTONS & BOWS

WE HAVE OPENED an Assortmnt of the most Exquisite
and Tasty Variety of BUTTONS for all manner of
‘ Dresses and Ensembles.

This store will be closed at noon on Wednesday 28th
February and Thursday Ist March for the Cricket Tour-
nament.



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET











oO

‘+



































ei

.

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1951

| Bleeding
‘Gums Bleed »:,*::;
Mouth and

Loose Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea.
Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad disease
} that will sooner or later cause your teeth
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gurn
| bleeding the first day, ends sore mouth
| foxy tightens the teeth. Iron clad
| guarantee Amosan must make your
}gmouth well and save your teeth or
money back >cn return of empty pack-
age. Get Amosan from your chemist
today. The guar-

Amosanm :))) °°"

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth




















SS
Christmas is not far and inte the kitchen and, sure enough, “M'm, it’s scrumptious.”’ say
Rupert, as he samples it. *'} mus:

Rupert has been running about he finds Seb ee bay by the tupert,. : its
. . - . tove. ye A } . share this w r n r
playing with his ball in order to SOY) you , ae Nee up with a little hammer. “It smells running out ‘tho the cold Pg

re smiles, "ve cau me_ this *
keep warm, He is just going to time, This was raught ww -be. a bewer and better,” he laughs. crosses a field. “Hello, there's
look for his pals when he pauses by secret. I'm making some toffee Well, now that ie isn't a secret Podgy Pig,’ he murmurs. '‘ He'll
the open door. “ There’s an inter- for you to give to your pals at the fo7,,rene may as well try a enjoy toffee if anybody will! Hi,
esting smell coming from the Christmas party.’’ ‘‘ Oo, do let me fe says Mrs, Bear, as she puts Podgy, you'll never guess wha: my
house,” he thinks. ‘I wonder stay and watch how you do it!" a few scraps into a piece of paper. Mummy's made. Come and see,”






the throat
It nahn —and tastes

what Mummy's cooking ?'’ Heruns begs Rupert, .-
and ches so nice!




























































Rupert and the Coughdrop—3 Rupert and the Coughdrop—4
warn Tay
LLU fi
“ag ae
TE: AA.
ob : eet ei
Podgy stops when R lis Pi 4 %. gi Mrs. Pig looks very doubtful as knows just what to do. A *
him an tebe a ‘coal glen of Mrs. te tc Pen,” he Tsay, is Couldn't Podgy makes his request, but he is it's a nice warm job for this “cold
Bear’s toffee. eee moment he we make some for ourselves? I'm so happy and excited about his eee Now I ple you Vs
Pere Le Sree . re es eel oe lee She bustles off while the little pals
that's lovely,” he says." Did ae ing yin en The dog just indoors to get the things he wants. set to work cheerfully. | Podgy
Maing teally make that?” Ver Pere a er. ‘And they. . " Thave to be out for some time,"” lights a small stove, and Rupert .
and I watched her,” smiles Rupert, of over the grass eo tell Me. Pig she says, “and making toffee may puts the butter and sugar into a . FREE noOoK
"s0 1 know just how to do it,” their new idea. -csesmm ausli? keep you quiet so long as Rupert saucepan and stirs them. which makes
**GOD’S WAY OF %¢
s SALVATION %
Rupert and the Coughdrop—s d the Coughdrop—6 PLAIN”
——— ra ” o
\ he lt | Lane % Please write for one %#
4 iw / . ; Samuel RKoberis, Gospel
6, £4g q std 7 1 ¥, Bcok and Tract Service,
py « {> % . k ( ‘ 30, Central Avenue, Ban-
7 i re Sea g wt, % gor N. Ireland.”
oH es Or ; 1 iN 5 6666999960595966960066"
eS? EM ~~ t€ i)
; j PI H ; Vm ds a, ? ;
= & a , Sy | a RS P © You can’t see the gm, difference ...!
eS : aI | = / . i]
: dj LIAG Co wey & 7 OLD? |
Podgy watches while Rupert stirs chair he opens a cupboard and peers 7 _ {
the good things and he gets more inside. Then he chooses a bottle Podgy has also heard the sound Podgy- What a ms Stee 0s 3
and more interested. ‘ D'you know, and uncorks it. " This should do,’" at the door s0, leaving the toffee, on, let’s open them and see 4 : oS
I should like to make this a special he mutters. “It's a. fine red the little friends run to see who is who they are from. A. ms kd UL § Ta Yee y
kind of toffee,” he says, “different colour and it smells exciting.” And there. “kts the postman,” cries oan a See ink pend J, 0 a OE
in oar ond come, go whee tenis BY BO 8 ieee pean, Reet “ito Wet of Tatars Sir tlcn they look until Podgy turns his / 7 Vita P
There’ Bo ate dee nd your Mummy." ‘With head and sniffs, “*C i , wt |! 37)
toffee, but our very own. | wonder ‘* There's someone at ’ ,an8 your y: = eg Rae ere 0 tee aa : : wi}
what I can put in it?” Getting a he says. get 1, “Sas See eee Le, queer e asks TS Ks
— + = Cia cde SR ! d
— - , ‘ ie: ae ’
wn de, sea erngee and a, eth and carries she stuee oe: Podgy asks Rupert to try the swallows with difficulty, and looks Her child sold fr ock looks new =
wiv a Y othe oe a en'e oe an Don, toffee toffee Gees so the little bear takes up with his eyes watering. ‘' I've be it? lw
stove. "It's the toffee !"’ cries aWaya go. lke this? “he “aes a tiny piece rather gingerly, ‘‘It never tasted anything like it,” he cause it $ alWays
Rupert. “' fquite forgot, we should Anyiously. In the cold air i certainly looks nearly right,” he splutters, “It certainly isn’t ordin- a } ‘. LUX
have kept om utirring. 1 ought to goes Neon that he can ap & oat says, es ee rather a quter sty t0le, ‘a pyanied 4 new was 1ed in
ae ig while Jawan ‘ pit by pie ara siyeey, it a Then he pd he . St aa a re i 0 ra ni e Wash all pretty clothes regularly in gentle
think it's spolled#”” Podgy takea ace’ Gee eet pres gy RA ak = nd calls ‘arger bi in a piece ct paper, he wre Lux flakes and see how much longer
. - By: sn’t it nice?" Rupert races home to Mrs. Bear. ° ; they last! For Lux makes colours stay
The nicesé way of taking lovely, keeps clothes looking like new!
HA ou’ll be thrilled with the long life Lux
LIBUT LIVER OIL gives your dainty clothes. ,
Wade by ALLEM @ HANBURYS LTO, LONDON Keeps all dainty clothes like NEW
ae : AK G46 4 LEVER propuct
We lf > Shy ee |: OOOO PRPC OOOO , : apcies ,
: | 3. x | Yael 80s SEE! TRY |
4 aie : 2 Sis = , - = NaI SZ) res :
ear sniffs at the bit of advise you to eat much of it, It’s As Rupert settles by the fire to he asks. Mrs. Bear puts on her
Ve en Suspebined. feo ae very werk on his party list there is a spectacles. ed is queer," i
anc , Sa piece ight noise in the chim nd murmurs. ‘It says: Santa Claus ; 7
n. she, too, breaks off of paper and ch he subject. ‘ Pt ney ne: 8 ;
pc cinhtgae athe dats cert eee, th reo ed camer Heng Eh ea oa FREIGHT
what Bodgy’s en So why not sit down by the fire down right into the fire, Before it presents will be delayed this year.”’ ;
2 laughs.“ This isn’t toffee at and check the list of friends you can burn he seizes it and stares. ‘* What long words” cries Rupert, SERVICES
all, It’s a cough drop. I shouldn’r will be inviting to your party.” Then he tuns te his mother, ‘but I see what it means, What Ui
Whar [+ all tnac writing on it? can have happened ? Sma ,' =Car value!
Rupert and the eee
Mm I? zert and the
a i, Nl
, s * ° wo.
Regular Services
Save Time
From B'dos to | Flying Time
a BERMUDA aan ss
} : ; tA ‘ Tis IN 24.45
Rupert is very concerned at the his own, So you've had one in a: very: banded oie Pic all fight then. Would ihe Th 1d — IN 29.00 hrs. $4.84
we ‘ rr . ° ‘ou ik 7 et eee Coe or eee eee
woespaced “mesage thar has ane RE eels er “Eade May Pads pein ys serch foe im | afer pal ear with all he en RE Renee Be pelo, Verne.
ay ue Willie, ‘*Do you know what’ e’s gone,"’ she quavers. “'l left“ es, | wish you would,’’ says
rung cut tw tell his friends. On ve vous him wih, you.” Ble wes going 10 Mra. Pig. Meanwhile the lit features of a BIG car. Seats four within :
the Aernnion he finds three of chem Bik” Before ‘Rupert’ can. answer tee Marty Minny. Bobby thal beck’ touting 6S wheelbase. Engine develops 27 horte- ID FASTER BY PAR BY SREEDRIRD.
cradin. 4% a disconolte, Tivle there is an igeeruption. ‘Mis, Pig’ fig make totes” he answers, Ropert and ‘saling exctedly "| gallo. ‘Torsion-bar Independent front BOAC. Forwarding Agent
heading piece of card just like over Ha ree routs eda threes perying hut it turned out cough drops. | wonder what he wants me S do,” gallon, ‘Torsion-bar independent front- who makes no charge Sor
' left him at your house. He was says Rupert wheel suspen-ion smoothes out the rough- advice, information or book-
est road. 7-cubic feet of luggage space. oer Pe seers to ott F l Y« B OAC
: Owing t i ippi MORRIS i ;
: g to delay caused by irregular shipping services the |
; ‘ Easy to park. Easy to steer through traffic
“Ad ” . | e ugh traffic.
: vocate Tegr i s ¢ Easy ‘to garage. Choice of three bod 4
; grets that it has been compelled to curtail its styles, 4 door saloon, 2 door ealgog, and te :
1 convertible, Make a date now for a nett ae: es x ; : 2
: i . : demonstration run in the world’s biggest en oa” a 2
daily cartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all avail- | “““"”
FORT ROYA if BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATIO
' ° , r
\ able strips as they arrive will b ° ° ¢ YAL GARAGE LTD. BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIM!TED
1 e appearing in this space. Phione 2 Pi pigwnys teu a: eaipeoge
one 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 ’ " Phone 4585
{



1 FRSSOOSSOSSGG SS SF OSSSVSSV GO GS GS FOG GG PIPPI OO SOD

a gerne

A eee i te a Ante en



en




TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

27, 1951



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508



charge for announcements of

Ss, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
igments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the

between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.





DIED



HOLDER-—On February 26th 1951, at his
residence “Elvira”, Hastings, Emanuel
Freerhan Holder, His funeral leaves the
above residence at 4.15 o'clock this
evening for the Westbury Cemetery.
Friends are invited.

Iris Holder (daughter), Walter Holder
Ursula Holder. 27.2.51—1n.



THANKS

JONES—The relatives of Retired Sergt.
James N, Jones, late of Roebuck Street,
St. Michael, gratefully acknowledge
with deepest appreciation the various
expressions of sympathy tendered them
in their bereavement. 27.2.51—1n.







FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 172 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a







LORRY—One (1) 5-ton Lorry in perfect
shape, License until June. Apply: F. E. C.
Bethell, Friendship Plantation. Phone
4148, 24.2.51—3n.

PICK-UP—One Dodge Pick-up in work-
ing order. Apply: S. B. Cole & Co., Ltd.
Roebuck Street. 21.2.51—t.f.n.

CAR—Hillman 10 H.P. Mileage 9,000.
Just re-painted. Leather upholstery.
Dial Office 4611, home 8449,





21.2.51—5n.

ELECTRICAL

ONE “COLDRATOR"” Refrigerator in
use only four months. Too small for
present owners, Price $380.00 Call
Central 4640. 27.2.51—I1n.

REFRIGERATOR Gentral Electric
Canadian Model, 6 cub, ft. with 15
months guarantee. Electric Sales and
Service Ltd. 25.2.51—2n.

FURNITURE

ee
FURNITURE—Modern Mahogany Chest
of Drawers, Book Magazine Stand, Elec-
trie Iron, Nickel Waiters, Xmas Tree

Decorations Lights, Phone 8477.
27,.2,51—1n













—————

FURNITURE—Ralph Beard offers the
foNowing bargains in Brand New furni-
ture for a limited time : John Brinsmead
Upright Piano $200 00; Mahogany Dining
Chairs $17 00 a pr; Mag. Tub Chairs $34.
a pr ; Mag. Bed-ends 3 ft. 6 ins.
a pr,; Bed-ends 4 ft, 6 ins. $35.00 a pr. ;
Mag Bureaus $75 00 each; Mah
Cocktail Tables from $8 00; Birch Chairs
/15.00 a pr; not forgetting a numerous
variety of high class second hand furni-

Open daily from 8 a.m, to 4 p.m,
Breakfast Time inclusive.
23.2.51.—6n,



LIVESTOCK

GOLDEN RETRIEVER PU?PIES—12
weeks old Reg. Pedigree, both sexes.
Apply: Lady Dos Santos, Box 600. Port-
of-S « 27.2.51—3n,

HORSES—2 y.o. Gelding “Ladyswan"’
(Jim Gackerjack ex Sugar Lady) un-
named 2 y.o, gelding (Jim Gackerjack
ex Princess Stella). Apply: J. R.
Eawards, Telephone 2520,

27,2.51—t.f.n.







in







‘WO HORSES, HARNESS and one (1)
Cart.
& Co., Ltd.





Roebuck Street.
21.2.51—.f.n,

MISCELLANEOUS

—

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete
grade. A. BARNES & Co., _



CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win- ;

dow styling, light control, Valances and

draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n
13.2.51—t.f.n.

enone
DRY CLEANER—For dry cleaning
Suits, Frocks, Hats, Coats ¢tc., try
Scrubb's Dry Cleaner. Price 1/9 bot.
Obtainable at KNIGHT'S LTD.
27.2.51—2n.

————

HARDWARE—Stocks of enamel ware
and galvanise buckets are available to
whole salers only, Stocks consist of
Pails, Saucepans, Bowls, Chambers, Pie
Dishes, Kettles 4 different sizes at landed
costs. At Ralph Beard's Show Room.
Hardwood Alley. 27.2.51—3n.

ee eS
INDIVIDUAL POSTER SIGNS—Improve
your sales by using individual Poster
Signs and Price Tickets made to order
with very attractive colours, C. Pierre-
pointe, Stanway Store, Lucas Street
Dial 490. 27.2.51—2n,
$$$,
MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin.
guished solution to your — special
architectural problem of door closures,
screens, movable partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
Deen eee ee eee eee ean nse UNEP EEmeeme
ONE WINDMILL complete with pump
and tower, Two Lawn mowers, one
mearly new, Call 4124. 27.2.51—3n,

i
RODICIDES--Get rid of the Pests by
using “Rodicide” Insect Powder which

--kills Bugs, Ants, Fleas, House Flies,
Cockroaches, sng pled etc. Price
/- t. KNIGHT'S LTD.

HN 27.2.51—2n.





ean enue ootimnelane ‘

“SCOURINE” Cleanser is quick and
emooth for cleaning Baths, Basins, Pots,
Fans, Ovens ete., etc. Price 2!c. tin.
KNIGHT'S LTD. 27.2.51-—™.

———

VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirseh Sun-aire
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to
vour sites, delivery 3 weeks. Dia! 4476
A. & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n.

_———_—_—_—— LT

WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower-
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.
We cut to your requirements. G. W.-.

Co., Ltd, Dial 4222.
a eae" 15,2.51—10n.



Why not give your floor that new look,
have them fanded hy the Nu Floor
Method. Call Evelyn Roach & Co. Ltd.
2672. 27.2.51—t.f.n.

YACHT — Yaw! “Frapeda” approx.
37% ft, long, with gray marine engine.
Recently painted and in food cone

pr Vi t Burke. ‘elephone 4569
oy ae Bot 27,2.51—t .f.n.

———————————
YACHT “CYCLONE”—Uffa Fox's In-
ternational one-design Tornedo Class.
In first class racing trim. Winner of
the 3. Trial FCG ene ae orien
d JONES & a x

arn mde

MECHANICAL

ET
OFFICE TYPEWRITER—L, C. Smith in

excellent condition su two years old.
leph, Mrs. Gooding 4932.

See oe 25.2.5'+-2n

PERSONAL



———
t y warned against
The public are hereby wa i.

giving credit to my _ wife,

y | Nicholls & Co., Solicitors.



FOR RENT

|



HOUSES

A
Avenue, 2 Ss and all modern
cenveniences. Available from April Ist.
Dial 2259. 25.2.5!—3n.

—
BELLA VISTA: Cattlewash, — Com-
fortably furnished. Three bedrooms,
twin beds.“Large electric refrigerator





Minimum charge week 72 cents and

torte 3 cents a, word wocth—a costes
@ wo; Ke: e

week—4 cents a

BUNGALOW in Bedford



NOTICE
PARISH OF

CHRIST CHURCH
} The Parochial

Treasurer's Office will

j be closed on Tuesday 27th and Wednes- | . a
wo u 8.
| Word Sunday

Cay 28th February 1951, at 12 noon
WOOD GODDARD,
Parochial Treasurer,
27.2.5'r-2a

TAKE NOTICE
KINSEY

KINSEY DISTILLING



That COR

PORATION, a corporation organized and! Antique Shop.
the State of ;

existing under the laws of
Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is 1420
Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State of
Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of

dials and

light, * Hqueurs and other potable
ted capa running water] gistilted alcoholic beverages, and will be
Stock House, Mrs. Chandler Todds entitled to register the same after onc
95211, : 7 25.2.51--gn,} month from the 27th day of February

_
FLAT—Attractive furnished Flat, Hast-

ings main road. Good verandah facing
sea, Safe bathing. Suitable one person or
couple. Telephone, 2949. 23.2.51—1n

MARINE GARDENS—Newly built Bun-
galow. 3 bedrooms with running water
and all modern conveniences. Apply Mrs.
Friedman, Hotel Royal, Long Lease
prefered. 27.2.5°y—2n
Saleen eee ener cee

ROOMS—Large furnished rooms very
cool, running water, With or without
meals, 10 minutes walk to Clubs or
City. Dial 3356. 27.2.5! —t.f.n.

PUHLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 om Sundays

AUCTION

AUCTION SALE OF HOUSE
Wednesday next the 28th at 2
o’alock on the spot at Water Hall Land,
Eagle Hall, One 16 x 9 house in good
condition, Must be sold. D'Arcy. A,
Scott, Auctioneer.









24.2.51—3n,



REAL ESTATE

Steep

MODERN BUNGALOW — Overlooking
Golf Course, 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining | Rooms, Gallery, Garage and
spacious games room underneath. Apply:





Gordon Nicholls. Telephone 8539,
24.2.51t.f.n.





in good residential districts, All bar-
gains, act now. Ring C. Pierrepointe,
Stanway Store, Lucas Street, Ring 4910,
information given without obligation.
27.2.51—1n,

——
BEMERSYDE, St, Lawrence Gap, Christ

Church, near the Cable Station. The

i dwellinghouse comprises large ‘drawing

and dining rooms, three bedrooms, with
running water in each (one with a private
beth) separate toilet and bath, and
kitchen. Open verandahs to the East
and the North and a closed verandah
to the South on the seaside. Three
servant's rooms, garage and ferneny in
the yard, which also contains several
cocoanut and fruit trees.

The property is situated on the most
popular coast in the Island with perfect

.00 | Sea-bathing.
$30 00 For appointments to view and for

further particulars ring 3925, R. S.
25.2.51—t.f.n.

The parcel of land containing 1,885



For viewing call in Hardwood | square feet with the Buildings thereon,

situate in Lucas Street, Bridgetown, ad-
joining the property of the Barbados
Telephone Company Limited. and at pre-
sent occupied as to part by the Observer
Newspaper and as to part by Miss Cado-
gan.

The property will be set up for sale ac
our offices on Thursday, Ist March 195},
at 2 p.m.

Inspection by application to the ten-
ants,

For further particulars and condition of
sale, apply to:—
COTTLE CATFORD & CO.,

No. 17 High Street,
Bridgetown.
14.2.51—12n.



The undersigned will set up for sale at

Going cheap. Apply: S. E. Cole| their office No 17 High Street, Bridge-

town, on Friday the 2nd day of March,
1951, at 2 p.m.

The dwellinghouse called “Murray
Lodge” with the land thereto containing
by estimation 9,200 sq. feet, situate at
Upper Bay Street, St. Michael, the resi-
dence of the late A. C. Greaves.

Inspection by appointment with Miss

colour suites. Top | Ida Greaves, Telephone No. 3060,

For further particulars and conditions

& CO
1.—10n.

.1.51—t.f.n. | of sale, apply to :—

COTTLE, CATFORD
20.2.5

|ARES--500 Shares Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading Co. Limited. 500 Shares
Barbados Co-operative Cotton Factory
Limited. 120 Shares Barbados Fire
Insurance Co, Limited. 90 Shares Bar-
bados Foundry Limited. 61 Shares
Barbados Ice Co, Limited. 139 Shares
Knights Limited. 122 Shares Barbados
Telephone Co, Limited.

The above shares will be offered to
public competition on Friday next the
2nd March 1951, at 2 p.m. at the office
of the undersigned.

CARRINGTON & SEALY.
Lucas Street.
24.2,51—6n.

—————
OFFERS will be received By the
undersigned up to the 15th day of
March 1951, for the buildings known
as Calais (land not included) situated
on Dover Coast, Christ Church. The
purchaser to demolish the buildings and
clear the land within thirty days from
the date of purchase,
K. E. McKENZIE,
Neils Plantation, St. Michael.
24.2.51—6n.



PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

NOTIC

PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH.
Applications for the Post of Parochial
Treasurer will be received by the un-
dersigned not later than the 28th Feb-
ruary 1951 Applications must be ale-
companied by Baptismal and Medical
Certificates,, and marked on the En-
velope, applications for Post of Paro-
chial Treasurer.
Sed, Rev, L. C. MALLALIEU,
Chairman
St. Joseph's Vestny.
11,2,51—6n.













—

NOTICE
PARISH OF ST, LUCY

All persons owing Parochial and High-
way taxes to this parish are asked to
pay the same without further delay, or
they will be collected according to Law.

O. L. DEANE,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Lucy.
24.2.51—4n.



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE

WEST INDIES



EXTRA-MURAL BOARD
CORRECTION

Mr. Eric James, M.A. will lecture on
“Human Relations and Morale in Ad-
at the British Council,

ministration”
Wakefield, at 8 o'clock on Wednesday,
February. 28th. The lecture

not be held.



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST, PHILIP
VESTRY BYE-ELECTION

.
PROPERTIES—A few small propertie:

formerly
advertised for Thursday March Ist will

I hereby give notice that I have ap-
pointed the Church Boys’ School, near
the Parish Church, as the place where
all Parishioners of the Parish of St.
Philip and other persons duly qualified
to vote at any Election of Vestrymen

KELLMAN (nee Leacock) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or amy-
one else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
sigred by me.

DANIEL KELLMAN,

1951 unless some person shall in the

meantime give notice in duplicate to me

at my office of opposition of such regis

tration. The trade mark can be seen on
#pplication at my office,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951.

HH. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n



TAKE NOTICE

That SIR ROBERT BURNETT & CO.,
LIMITED, a limited liability company
registered under the laws of Great
Britain, Distillers, whose trade on
business address is The Distillery, Sea-
grave Road, Fulham, London, S.W. 3,
England, has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of gin of all descriptions,
end will be entitled to register the same
oe ehaie aa aoe the 27th day
0 ruany 1 unless some person shali
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office,

Dated this 2th day of February, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n





TAKE NOTICE

RED ROSE
That T. H. ESTABROOKS CO.,
LIMITED, a Canadian Corporation,

whose trade or business address is 6201,
Park Avenue, Montreal, Canada, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of tea, coffee, coffee mixtures and spices,
and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day
ot Februany 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
Dated this 24th day of February, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2,51—3n



TAKE NOTICE

That MACLEANS, LIMITED, a British
Company, Manufacturing Chemists,
whose trade or business address is Great
West Road, Brentford, Middlesex, Eng-
Jand, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of medicinal preparations, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 27th day of February
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951,

HH. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.





TAKE NOTICE
PHILADELPHIA

That CONTINENTAL DISTILLING
CORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is No.
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers,
has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part "A" of Register in
respect of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alco-
holic cordials and Jiqueurs and other pot-
able distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day of
February 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade merk can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this @th day of February, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n.,

TAKE NOTICE
GAYOIL

That PINCHIN, JOHNSON & ASSO-
CIATES, LIMITED, a British Company,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is 4, Carlton Gardens, London,
S.W., England, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of paints, varnishes
(other than insulating varnish), enamels
(in the nature of paint), painters’ colours,
distempers, japans, lacquers, paint and
varnish driers, wood preservatives, wood
stains, anti-corrosive and anti-fouling
compositions, and anti-corrosive oils, and
will be entitled to register the same
efter one month from the 27th day
February 1951 unless some person shall

Jin the meantime give notice in duplicate

to me at my office of opposition of such

' registration. The trade mark can be
| sten on application at my office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27,2, 51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE
SWIFT'S

t SWIFT & COMPANY, a corpora-
tick organtaed and existing under the
laws of the State of Illinois, United
States of America, whose trade or
business address is Union Stock Yards,
Chicago, State of Ilinois, U.S A., has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of food products end substances used as
ingredients in foods, including fresh, pre-
pared, cooked, salted, dried, cured,
smoked, preserved, frozen, and canned
meat and meat products, especially beef,
pork, lamb, mutton, veal, poultry, fish,
and rabbits and food products derived
therefrom sausage and sausage meat,
eggs, cheese, chile con carne, lard,
shortenings, edible oils, edible tallow,
margarine, oleomargarine, ice cream
butter, buttermilk, gelatin, canned
vegetables, canned baby foods, canned
fruits, dried fruit, pickles and condi-~
ments, vinegar, jams, jellies, marmalade,
pie filler, rice, meal, peanuts, figs, dates,
raisins, cod liver oil, salt, stock feeds,
poultry feeds, fox feeds, dog feeds, bone
meal, and oyster shells.

Soaps and ingredients of soaps, includ-
ing soap bars, soap flakes, liquid soap
and powdered soap, cleansing, polish-
ing, and scouring preparations, and
detergents.

Fertilizers, particularly artificial fer-
tilizers and ingredients thereof, including
chemicals, bone meal, peat moss, ant-
mal urea, hard wood ashes, manure salts,
and horn shavings.

Chemicals especially superphosphate,
sulphuric acid, phosphate rock, and
soda products, nitrate of soda, sulphate
of amonia, ammonium phosphate, cya-
namid. aluminum sulphate, zine sulphate,
manganese sulphate, sulphate of potash,
agricultural limestone. gypsum, muria
of potas, onli ire copper sul-

te, and potassium nitrate.
Trmescctiaides and fungicides, particular-
ly arsenate of lead, calcium arsenate,
nicotine sulphate, and paradichloroben.
zene.

Industrial oils and greases, and in-
edible tallow.

Hides and skins, hair, feathers, wool,
bones, horns, hoofs animal glands, ani-
mal casings and membranes.

Glues and adhesives, including animal,
bone and hide glues, and vegetable ad-
hesives.

Fertilizer spreaders, soil testing
kits, hatchery equipment, baby chicks,
and bags and containers, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 27th day of Febru-
1951, unless some person shall in






























i for the said Parish may assemble on/| 4Ty,
Borin Monday 5th day of March 1931 between| the meantime give notice in Ruationts
"97.2.5!—2n|the hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in the| t@ me at my office of opposition of suc

morning to elect a Vestryman in place
of Ernest Lyte Esq. deceased.
Sed. P. S. W. SCOTT,

A ,



registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
Dated this 2ith day of February, 1951.

1951.
Parochial Treasurer, H. WILLIAMS,
ADVERTISE It Pays St. Philip. Registrar of Trade Marks.
23.2.51—6n, 27.2.51—3n

in respect |
ot whisky, gin, rum, rye, alcoholic cor-|

WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents o

MISCELLANEOUS

IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-
| lery, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.
Phone 4429 or call at GORRINGES, ad-
joining Royal Yacht Club

20.2.51.—T.F.N,

CSU Enea ay
| IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
| lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniature: jade,
Ola BWI Stamps. GORRINGEs,

Dial 4429,
20.2.51.—t.f.n

MAGAZINES—True Detective and True
Story Magazines Picture Comics, Stan-
vay Store, Lucas Street. Dial 4910.

27.2,51—2n

TAKE NOTICE
SINOLETTE
That PINCHIN, JONNSON & ASSOCT-

#TFS. LIMITED, a British Company,
Mrufacturers, whore trade or business











i
|

[cars ’







fddress is 4, Carlton Gardens, London,
S.W., England, has applied for the
iy fon of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of paints, varnishes
‘other than insulating varnish), enamels
‘Un the nature of paint), painters’ colours,
Cist mopers, japans, lacquers, paint and
vernish dricrs, wood preservatives, wood
anti-corrosive and anti-fouling
ccrpositions, and ani-corrosive oils, and
will be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 27th day of
February 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—2n.

eS

TAKE NOTICE
SEVILLA RUM

That CONTINENTAL DISTILLING
CORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is No.
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., Manufacturers,
hos applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alco-
holic cordials and liqueurs and other pot-
able distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day of
February 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.













BARBADOS ADVOCATE
——_————
TAKE NOTICE | LOST
DIXIE BELLE RACE TICKET BOOKS--Series
That CONTINENTAL _DISTILLING | 320-19. 1380-29. Series B. 0400-09. Serie
CORPORATION, a corporation organized | H. 8860-6". Series L. 1780-89. | Findes
and existing under the laws of the State | "warded on returning some to Winston
of Delaware, United States of America, | Butler, Chapman Lane F3.5EHiy
area ee or business address is. No.
Valnut Street, Philadelphia, State
of Pennsylvania, U.S.A.. Manufacturers, TAKE NOTICE
a “ene for the registration of a
tra mark in Part “A” of Register in ¢ H TEA
respect of wh ky, gin, rum, rye, alco- A U

That THE BORDEN COMPANY, LIM-
ITED, a corporation organized under the
laws of the Dominion of Canada, Manu-
facturers, whose trade or business
address is City Dairy Building, Spadina
Crescent, Toronto, Province of Ontario,
Canada, has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register

holic cordials and liqueurs and other pot-
able distilled alcoholic beverages, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 27th day of
February 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such



registration. The trade mark can be | jn respect of cheese; butter, cream,
seen on application at my office. milk and milk products; daily pro-
Dated this Mth day of February, 1951. | qucts; substances used as food or
H. WILLIAMS, es ingredients in food, and will

Registrar of Trade Marks. | be entitled to register the same after
27.2.51-—3n Jone month from the 27th day of

February, 1951, unless some person shall

TAKE NOTICE in the meantime give notice in duplicate

to me at my office of opposition of sucn

registration. The trade mark can
seen on application at my office,

Dated this Mth day of February, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,

be
t E BYARD MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMITED, Manufacturers, a



Grit Company, whtes Geae’” ce Registrar of aerate
business address is Castle Boulevard, rf
Nottingham, England, has applied for the

registration of a trade mark in Part

“A” of Register in respect of all kinds WANTED FOR CASH

of hairnets, including hatrnets of silk,
cotton, human hair, rayon, nylon and
other synthetic yarns, bandeaux, sports
nets, slumber nets, hair curlers, hair
@rips, hair pads, hair transformations,
wigs and hairdressers’ wares and sun-
dries, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the 27th
day of February 1951 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office.
Dated this 24th day of February, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
¥7.2.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
CHARTER OAK

That CONTINENTAL DISTILLING
GORPORATION, a corporation organized
and existing under the laws of the State
of Delawere, United States of America,
whose trade or business address s
1429 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, State of
Pennsylvania, U,S.A., Manufacturers, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of whisky, gin, rum, rye, alcoholic
cordials and liqueurs and other potable
distilled alcoholic beyerages, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 27th day of February
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen

Used Postage Stamps

Of the British West
Tudies, Best Prices paid at the
Caribbean Stamp Society, No, «10
Swan Street.





—————

WHAT'S IN A NAME



When you say

Everton Weekes—

Everyone thinks of Cricket,
& you

Know likewise,

Everyone thinks of Cooking,
as you

Say G. A. Service.









SUN—
GLASSES

For LADIES & GENTS
Amazing Styles & Values!

=











_| SHIPPING

Dated this 24th Prtet wie Npated this Beh day oF Februsey, 1051, THANT’S nigh
Registrar of Trade Marks. Registrar of Trade Marks.
27.2.51—3n, 27,2.51—3n 29S99999599999665999003"
TAKE NoTICE | TAKE NOTICE 1% iagg Any ALL THAT
JANTZEN DODGE



That JANTZEN KNITTING M
INC., a corporation duly organized un
the laws of the State of Nevada, whose
trade or business address is Jantze

That CHRYSLER CORPORATION, a
corporation organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United
States of America, whose trade or business



Center, Portland, State of Oregon, Uni address is 341 Massachusetts Avenue,
States of America, has applied for regis-| Highland Park, Detroit, State of
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” of | Michigan, U.S.A., Manufacturers, has



Register in respect of articles of clothing,
and will be entitled to register the
fame after one month from the 27th
day of February 1951 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration, The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office.

Dated this 24th day of February, 1991,

applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of transportation elements of all kinds;
motor driven vehicles, automobiles and
trucks of all kinds and for all purposes;
parts of motor driven vehicles, automo-
hiles and trucks and their accessories of
every description; and will be entitled
engines of all kinds and for ajl purposes,
parts thereof and accessories thereto of




























H. WILLIAMS, every description; internal combustion
Registrar of Trade Marks. to register the same after one month
27.2.51—3n | from the 27th day of Februany 1961,
unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to
TAKE NOTICE me at my office of opposition of such
eee aeet The trade mark can be

seen on application at my office.

° TANGO

Dated this 24th day of February, 1951,
H, WILLAAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.

27.2.51-

That THE BYARD MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMIT®D, Manufacturers, a
Britishy Company, whose trade or











business address is astle Boulevard.
Nottingham, England, sa applied for the LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
registration of a trade mark in Part (TRANSFER)

The application of Oscar Beckles of
Endeavour, St. James the purchaser of
Liquor License No, 032 of 1951, granted
to Louise Johnson in respect of a
boarded and shingled shop with shedrzof
attached situated at Endeavour Corner
near Church of God, St, James and to
use it at such last described premises.

Dated this 23rd day of February, 1951,

OSCAR BECKLES,

Applicant.
To:—S, H. NURSB, Exsq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “E’’, Holetown.
N.B.—This application will be consid-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held on
the 9th March, 1951 at 11 o'clock, a.m,
at Police Court, District “E’', Holetown,
S. H. NURSE,
27.2,51—3n Police Magistrate, Dist. “E’',

GOVERNMENT NOTICE!
TO MERCHANTS AND GOVERNMENT CONTRACTORS

Merchants and Government Contractors and other persons having
accounts against the Government are requested to transmit them to
the several Departments as soon as possible.

2. Accounts should be rendered so that they may be in the
hands of the Auditor General not later than Thursday the 15th of
March, 1951.

3. It is particularly requested that payment of all such accounts
may be claimed on or before the 31st of March, 1951, at the Treasury.

' 27.2.51—2n.,!

INVITATION FOR TENDER
Department of Highways and Transport

SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Colonial Secretary’s
Office up to noon on the 28th February, 1951, for the supply of Bar-
bados Limestone, Marl Filling and Earth Filling to the Department of
Highways and Transport for a period of twelve (12) months from the
Ist April, 1951.

2. A separate tender for each division tendered for should be
submitted in respect of each or any of the following divisions: —

(a) Northern Division—Parishes of St. Lucy and St. Peter.
' (b) Southern Division—-Parishes of Christ Church. St. Philip
and St. John
' (c) Eastern Division—Parishes of St. Andrew and St. Joseph
(d) Western Division—Parishes of St. Michael, St. George,
; St. Thomas and St, James.

3. A tenderer under paragraph 2 may also submit a separate
tender for any combinatiqn of Divisions tendered for under paragraph
2 on the basis of paragraph 6, except that for the final words “on spot
anywhere within the Division” read “on spot anywhere within the
combined Division.” '

4. Samples of limestone of the quality required may be seen, and
particulars of quantity and size likely to be required, may be obtained |
on application at the Department of Highways and Transport.

5. Tenders are to be made on forms which can be obtained at the
Colonial Secretary's Office on payment of a deposit of Five Dollars
($5.00). After a contract has been entered into, those persons who
may have submitted bona fide tenders will have their deposits re-
funded; but no person or persons who may refuse to enter into a con-
tract when so called upon shall have the deposits made by them re-
funded, and these shall be forfeited and paid into the Treasury.

6. The prices tendered must be based on the payment of wages
at current standard rates in the trade, and shall be the flat rates per
cubic yard at which the tenderer would contract to supply materials
on spot anywhere within the Division,

“A” of Register in respect of all kinds
of hairnets, including hairnets of silk,
cotton, human hair, rayon, nylon and
other synthetic warns, bandeaux, sports
nets, slumber nets, hair curlers, hair
grips, hair pads, hair transformations,
wigs and hairdressers’ wares and sun-
dries, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from the
day of February 1951 unless some person
Shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
aaee can be seen on application at my
offie.

Dated this 2ith day of February, 1951.

H. WELLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.







7.2.50—2n.



CHANCERY SALE

The undermentioned property will “set up for sale at the Registration Office
Public Buildings, ‘wn, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and on the
date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding Friday

at the same place and during the same hours until sold, Full particulars on appli-
cation to me.

LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL — Plaintiff

°
BA

——_

A Performance will be given in
the Hall of Harrison College at ¢
8.30 p.m. on Friday March 9th,

Tickets at 5/-, 3/- and 2/-, are
on sale either at the Headmaster's
Office or at Johnson's Stationery.

Proceeds
Tow

in aid of Overseas
to Q@.R.C, Trinidad.

:

LOCC LOS PFPEO CEN

[0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

“I LEAP OVER THE WALL”
By Monica Baldwin,
A MORNING AT THE OFFICE
—By Edgar Mittelholzer,

AT
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

Fresh shipment of —

ENAMEL-IT
in all colours

AT
JOHNSON'S HARDWARE

—

HORTICULTURAL
EXHIBITION

e
4

POSTPONED

Owing to the recent heavy
rains it was decided to
postpone the Exhibition
which was due to be held in
Queen’s Park on Saturday

March 17th to SATURDAY,
APRIL 21st from 1—6 p.m,

The Exhibition books are
now ready and can be ob-
tained from the Secretary,
Cfo Wilkinson & Haynes
Co., Ltd.

CARIBBEAN
CLUB

presents

A VARIETY
SHOW

The Police Recreation Room
CENTRAL POLICE
STATION
at 8 p.m.
on
Thursday, Ist March,
Proceeds in aid of Y.W.C.A,
RESERVED SEATS 3/-
UNRESERVED ,, 333 2/=

Music by the Police Band
under the direction of
Capt. Raison.



va.
VIOLET JOHNSON
PROPERTY :

the same may
called “Homestead” and all and singular
and chattel on the said lands erected and
tenances.

UPSET PRICE: £1350 0. 0d.

DATE OF SALE: 2nd March, 1951,

elem

ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Spooners Hil!
in the parish of Saint Michael and Island aforesaid containing by admeasurement
two roods two and two-tenths perches or thereabouts Abutting and bounding on
lands formerly of W. T. E. Richards but now of one Walrond on lands formerly of
G. G, Medford but now of one Farnum on lands formerly of Alfred F. Green but
now of one Pilgrim and on the public road called Spooners Hill or however else
abut and bound Together with

— Defendant

the messuage or dwelling house
the buildings and erections both freehold
built stending and being with the appur-

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery
Sth February, 195}

‘he
‘











ee
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW;
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED |
LINE) |

(MA.N.Z
M.S. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to}
a4 Melbourne February 20th, Sydney
Februan; 28th, Brisbane March 7th, Ar-
riving ot Barbados carly April, 1961 }

This vessel has ample space for Hard

Frozen and General cargo
Cargo accepted on through Bilis of
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad

for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
and Leeward Islands.

For further particulars apply —

FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD, © and
Da COSTA & CO. LTD.,





PAGE SEVEN







_NOTICES



Sense
The M/V ‘CACIQUE Del CARIBE”
will aceept atyo and Passengers

for St. Lucia Vincent
* Aruba. Sailing
» February 2951

The M/V “CARIBBER” wilt
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Novi and St. Kitts. Sailing Priday
St Mareh 1951

The M/V “DAERWOOD” will
wecept Carge and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba, and
Possengers oniy for St. Vincent.
Salling date to be notified.

B.WI. SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION INC,



Grenada
Wednesday —



Tel. 4047,



Trinidad, Barbados,
BW, BW...
-———oivnrnen
NEW YORK
SS. “Myken" sails agra February

S.S. “Seabreeze” sails 16th March,
a nS



S.S. “Runa” sails 15th Februan:

a ny.
S.S. “Alcoa Patriot” sails 7th March
———$—— A sen
—,-

SERVICE

a

rrivés Barbados 6th March.

arrives Barbados 27th March,

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

er

-

arrives Barbados Ist March.

a

rrives Barbados 23rd March

CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship
SS, “ALCOA PARTNER" ae Poy
SS. “ALCOA PEGASUS" .. <
$8. “ALCOA PENNANT” ..

NORTHBOUND
SS, “ALCOA PENNANT" |,
38. “ALCOA PARTNER"

SAILS HALIFAX ARRIVES

B DOS
February 23rd March 6th
Mareh 9th March 20th”
March 23rd April 3rd >

Halifax,
Sails for St,
&

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.

»





>

Due March 8th Sails for $t, John "&
: Due March 20th 3

Halifax
SSeS foeeth_ elie .

These vessels have limited passenger accommodation,

“John
®

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
= SS ——_——$ + |

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia, for sail-

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam, Single tare £70; usual reductions for children.



It will pay you to compa~e our prices for

ELECTRO-PLATED =WARE
before purchasing elsewhere.
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Central Foundry Ltd. — Proprietors.)
Cnr. of Broad & Tudor Streets,

MADE IN ENGLAND BY
(Bata)
~



SMART and DURABLE for

TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS

Sizes:



DEMAND....



eee: meen |



CHARLES MeENEARNEY & CO. LTD.

New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White
6—11

PRICE: $1.60



ONE-O-ONE

CLEANING

POWDER

ONE-O-ONE CLEANSER, the Cleanser in the large
Blue Drum—when you buy 1-0-1 you get 26 ozs. of the
world’s finest Cleanser for only 24e. 1-0-1 cleans with-
out scratching, when you order Cleanser just say 1-0-1.
Obtainable from all Groceries, Druggists and Hard-
ware Stores, in fact obtainable everywhere.



motoring




PAGE .£IGHT



Trinidad Draw Game
With Barbados

TRINIDAD was set the

task yesterday of making 253

ruins for victory in 225 minutes in their match against Bar-
bados at Kensington, but though the time was extended by
half an hour, when stumps were drawn they were still 86
runs short of their goal with only 2 wickets in hand. The

total was 167 for 8.

There. was no real effort by
Trinidad to accomplish the task
set them and the rate of scoring
1 behind the clock all the

rnoon.

Barbados’s bowling was steady
and accurate but the fielding did

not. always give the necessary
4 - No less than seven
catches were missed. Most of

those were off the edge of the

t.

Highlight of the day's play was
a magnificent performance _ by
intercolonial batsman Clyde Wal-—
cott, who with wickets falling
regularly at one end took com—
mand.of the situation. He
punished all loose balls and
managed to keep his. partner
away from the bowling with
some success. There was a typi-
eal example of this in the last
wicket. partnership with Mullins
which _ yielded % runs. Just
before’ Walcott was out he hit a
glorious six to the sight screen off
left-arm medium pacer Sydney
Jackbirs It was the second of the
match. Walcott was the last man

get out and scored 96 runs

luding 13 fours. Skipper John
Goddard unable to play yesterday
owing to a foot injury over the
week-end, Clyde Walcott took
over the captaincy.

Barbados who was 122 for 3 in
their second innings over the
week-end, could only add 46 for
the remaining 6 wickets, bringing
the innings to a close for 168.

Prior Jones and Sydney Jack-
bir took 3 wickets each. Jones
who sent down 18 overs including
9. maidens got his wickets at a
cost of 32 runs. Jackbir who
bowled just over 12 overs includ-
ing 3 maidens took his for 33
runs. N. Asgarali took 1 for 55.

Trinidad opening batsmat
Andy Ganteaume topscored for
his team in the second innings
with 45, but gave three chances.
J..Stollmeyer was next with. 35.

For Barbados E, L. G. Hoad
was the most successful bowler
He took 2 wickets for 2 runs.

Clyde Walcot and Denis Atkin-
sén resumed Barbados’ innings
with the score at 122 for 4, Wal-
cott being 58 not out. Jones opeh-
ed the attack from the Pavilion
End and sent down a maiden to
Walcott.

Jackbir bowled to Atkinson
from the Screen End the batsman
edging the second delivery

through slips for 2, He ondrove
the next for another 2. Next ball
he played defensively to one on
the middle stump, mistimed and
was out l.b.w. Barbados had now
lost five wickets for 126 runs. E,
Atkinson joined Walcott and play-
ed out the over. Jones sent down
another maiden to Walcott and
Jackbir one to Atkinson.

Walcott ondrove the second de-
livery of Jones’ next over for 2
and singled the last to meet Jack-
bir. Four, runs were scored off
this over, 2 going to Walcott and
2 to Atkinson.

In Jones’ next over Atkinson
was bowled with the last ball,
The score board then read 135/6/3
Trinidad got their seventh wicket
when in Jackbir’s next over, Nor-
man Marshall who had joined
Walcott lifted a delivery high
to mid off. S‘ollmeyer cov-
ered a distance of about 10 yards
to take an excellent one hand
catch, Only a single had been
added to the score. Hoad the next
man in was bowled by Jones in
his next over with the score un-
changed. Four wickets had now
fallen for an additional 14 runs
and the score was 136/8/0. The
stay of E, Millington who went
next to the wicket was also short.

A Grive by Walcott to Jackbir in
this bowler’s next over found Mil-
lington out of his crease and on
the run. The ball touched Jack-
bir’s hand and travelled on to the
wicket. Millington was out for
another 0, the third of the innings,
Mullins was the last man in and
Waleott took complete control of
the situation hitting fours off any
loose: balls and singling the last
balls of the overs to meet the
bowling. Jones and Jackbir were
kept.on but Walcott’s tactics were
admirable and the score mounted
steadily. Thirty nine runs were
scored in the first hour of play and
the 150 mark was reached in 260
minutes .

Walcott delighted the crowd
with a powerful hit for 6 to the
sight ‘screen off Jackbir but in
attempting a similar stroke off the
next ball was caught by Ferguson
in the same direction bringing the
total to 168 runs made in 235 min-
utes, Walcott’s score was 97 in-
cluding a 6 and 13 fours and he
was at the wicket for 204 minutes.

Trinidad now had 253 runs to
make in 225 minutes to win the
match,

When the game resumed, Keith
Walcott fielded for Goddard.

Ganteaume and _ Stollmeyer
opened for Trinidad and Mullins
bowled to Ganteaume from the
Sereen End. The batsmen scored
2 runs off the over.

E, Atkinson came on from the
Pavilion End and Stollmeyer on-
drove the second delivery for 4.
Each batsman then scored a single
in the over. Mullins’ next over

yielded a single and Atkinson then ©

bowled a maiden. The lunch in-
terval was taken immediately after
with the score at 9 without loss.
Ganteaume being 3 not out and
Stollmeyer 6.

On resumption Stollmeyer faced
Mullins from the Screen End and
glided the second delivery to leg
for a single. Ganteaume hooked
the last to the long-on boundary.

Millington bowled from the
Pavilion End and Stollmeyer on-
drove the second delivery for a
single. Ganteaume played out the
over.

Each batsman made a single off
Mullins’ next over, and Milling-
ton sent down a maiden to Gan-
teaume. The batsmen now appear-
ed confident and next over from
Mullins, Stollmeyer played a de-
livery nicely to square leg for 4.
D. Atkinson was brought on when
the score had reached 27 and Stoll-
mever made 9 runs off the over
including a cut th~ough slips for
4. Runs now came at a fair rate
and 50 went up on the board by a
beautiful cut through slips off
Atkinson for 4. The fifty was
reached in 53 minutes.

With the score at 52, Roy Mar-
shall was brought on in place of
Atkinson and a single was made
off him . Norman Marshall bowled
from the other end making a
double change. Stollmeyer faced
and placed the fifth ball nicely
through the slips for 4. In Roy
Marshall's second over Stollmeyer
playing defensively, was beaten
and bowled for 35. He had been
at the wicket for 73 minutes and
had hit 5 fours. The total was
now 62 for 1 and Asgarali joined
Ganteaume. In Norman’s next
over Ganteaume edged to first
slip but Mullins fielding in that
position failed to get his hand to
the ball.

Asgarali opened his account in
Roy’s next over cutting the ball
beautifully between second slip
and gully.

The Marshall brothers were
kept on and when the score reach-
ed 87 Asgarali was run out for 6,
Tangchoon joined Ganteaume who
with the score unchanged edged a
delivery from Norman to Roy in
slips but. Roy failed to take the
catch, Ganteaume was then 43
and got two more chances in Nor-
man’s next gyer with his score
unchanged. He was dropped be-
hind the wicket in one case and
in the other, Denis Atkinson drop-
ped an easy catch at cover point.

In Roy’s next over, however, he
was run out in attempting a short
run. He had scored 45 runs in-
cluding 6 fours and was at the
wicket for 115 minutes. The score-
board now read 89/3/45.

Legall joined Tangchoon and
opened his score by a fine cover
drive to the boundary. Barbados
claimed their fourth wicket in
Norman’s next over as Tangchoon
hitting out to the first ball, gave
Bric Atkinson at mid-off an easy
catch, Tangchoon did not score,
Legall who had run down to the
other, wicket meanwhile , played
out the over to give Norman a
maiden wicket.

Skeete, Legall’s next partner,
square cut Roy Marshall in his
next over for 4 and then hooked to
square leg for another 4 to send
up 100 in 129 minutes.

Mullins was given his second
spell from the Screen End with the
score at 106. When the tea inter-
val was taken the score was 110,
Skeete being not out 12 and Legall
9. Trinidad now needed 143 runs
to win with 6 wickets in hand,

Millington bowled the first over
after tea from the Pavilion end
and Skeete cover drove his last
delivery for a couple. Mullins
took over from the Screen end
and Legall cut for a _ couple
and then singled with a similar
shot. A leg bye sent the total to
117 and later Legall glanced to
fine leg for a single and Skeete
despatched the last to the cover
boundary.

Millington’s next over was a
maiden to Legall. Skeete drove
the first from Mullins to the long
on boundary and then got a
single to mid-off when Eric
Atkinson missed. Legall, in
attempting to turn one from
Mullins skied to give Keith Wal-
cott fielding at square leg an easy
catch, The scoreboard then read
127—5—18.

Guillen joined Skeete who was
then 23 and the latter took a
maiden from Millington. Mullins’
next over was a maiden to
Guillen,

Trinidad lost their sixth wicket









apes nine By Jimmy Hatlo

5






when Skeete was given out |.b.w
off the sixth delivery from
Millington’s next over with the
total at 127. He had scored 23
which included four boundaries
in 34 minutes. Ferguson the
incoming. batsman, played out the
remainder.

Millington who was, now bowl-
ing with a silly mid-off and a
silly mid-on, sent down another
maiden, this time to Ferguson.

Roy Marshall replaced Mullins
at the Screen end and sent down
a maiden to Guillen. Ferguson
opened his score with a late cut
to the boundary off the second
from Millington’s next over and
then played out the remainder.
Guillen who had not yet opened
his score, faced another maiden
from Marshall.

Norman Marshall __ relieved
Millington at the Pavilion end
and bowled a maiden to Fergu-

on. ,

With 45 minutes remaining for
play, Hoad was given his first
spell for the day. He bowled
from the Screen end, tossing up
his slows, but Guillen would not
be tempted. The over was a
maiden,

Norman Marshall’s next over
was also a maiden. Guillen who
was at the wicket for 38 minutes,
got his foot in front of one from
Hoad and a decision for 1.b.w-.
was upheld by Umpire Jordan.
The scoreboard then read
131—I—0..

Jackbir joined Ferguson and
on-drove the last ball from Hoad
tor a single and then took a
maiden from Norman Marshall.

Hoad continued from the
Sereen end, and Ferguson cut
past Keith Walcott the only slip
field for a single to send up Jack-
bir who played out the remainder.
Four byes however sent up the
score to 137,

Millington was now brought
back from the Pavilion end. He
bowled to Ferguson who got 4
brace to fine leg off the fourth
and later got a similar amount
with a similar shot off a no ball.

With 20 minutes remaining for
play, Mullins trundled from the
screen end and Jackbir got an
easy single wide of gully. Keith
Walcott at second slip made a
good effort, but failed to hold a
low one from Ferguson off Mul-
lins. The batsmen however ran
a single and Ferguson entered
double figures. He then took an
easy single to point off the second
from Millington to send up Jack..
bir who played out the remainder.

Mullins bowled a maiden to
Ferguson. Denis Atkinson — re-
placed Millington at the screen
end and Jackbir cut through the
slips to the boundary to send the
total to 148. Later an appeal for
l.b.w. against this batsman was
disallowed by Umpire Walcott,

Ferguson got a single to third
man off Mullins and later Denis
Atkinson missed a low one at
second slip from Jackbir off this
same bowler and the batsman got
a single to send up 150 in 223
minutes. Play was now extended
for half an hour,

Jackbir t three through the
slips when Walcott at second slips
missed a low one off Denis
Atkinson. It was the third

delivery and Ferguson who went
up, played out the remainder.

Roy Marshall now bowled from
the screen end and Jackbir got
a brace to fine leg off the third
delivery and then played out the
remainder, Norman Marshall re-
placed Atkinson and Ferguson cut
the fourth to the boundary and
later cut at one which took the
edge of the bat and went high
through the slips but Mullins failed
to hold it. The batsmen eventually
ran two. Ferguson took another
single off Marshall but was bowled
by Hoad who came back on from
the screen end. He had batted 75
minutes for his score of 19 which
included two boundaries.

Jones joined Jackbir and played
out the remainder. Norman Mar-
shaJl bowled a maiden to Jackbir
and Hoad sent down one to Jones,
Mullins was now given the ball
from the pavilion end, He bowled
to Jackbir who took a single to
sguare leg off the third. Jones
played out the remainder. Hoad’s
next over was a maiden to Jackbir.

Jones opened his score with a
cut te the boundary off the first
he received from Mullins’ next
over and played out the remainder
The game then ended with the
total at 167 for the loss of £
wickets. Jackbir who was at the
wicket for 74 minutes was un
defeated for 13 and Jones the othe
not out batsman was 4.

Scores
BARBADOS—:+st Innings .
TRINIDAD—1st Innings ..,...

BARBADOS—tnd Innings
R. Marshall ec Jones b_ Asgarali
Hunte c Skeete b Jones
Walcott c Ferguson b Jackbir
Weekes run out ... . ‘ 4
Goddard retired .......... 7
Atkinson Lb.w, b Jackbir 4
Atkinson b Jones . -. . 3
Marshall ¢ Stollmeyer b J, ckbir 0
L. G. Hoad b Jones 7 ie
Millington run out ....... 0
Mullins not out : 0
2 bs., 2 Lb., 4 w. 8

OnRZRoSman

Extras :
Total . 168

1-35; 2—35; 3—55;
6—135; 7-136; | 8—136;

BOWLING ANALYSIS

°. M R

S$. Jackbir
King

Fall of wickets :
4-122; 5—126;
9—142

28
35
55
32

F.
N. Asgarali
P. Jones

123 3
12

wmowd

————————___ LEE

wu

19
1

f
Gey : ; NG Bu
HEN IT’S THE KID WHO'S GET ‘ rT CO
| E SHOT+“THERE'S NOTHING TO iT) OF Tuem MES IT 1
ACCORDING TO GOOD OL’ MOM AND POP IT'S A MA
o> cust HOLD STILL, lad
TODINE,DEAR“THIS you won't Se
WON'T HURT A BIT: // eVEN FEEL IT, ‘
THERE'S NOTHING TO DEAR= JUST
BE FRIGHTENED GAL AX- JUST





‘ees

= ABO











YNDICATE, Ine



i EOS
ORLD BIGATS RESERVED

A TICKLE A















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| pane tebe At A A Renn AE ne tne

TRINIDAD—2nd Innings

A. Ganteaume run out 45
J, B, Stoilmeyer b R. Marshall 35
N. Asgarali run out 6

R. Tang Choon c E, Atkinson b
N. Marshall 0
R. Legall c (sub) b Mullins 13
C. Skeete Lb.w. b Millington 23
S, Guilien )b.w. b Hoad 0
W. Ferguson b Hoad 19
S. Jackbir not out 19
P, Jones not out Le
Extras: b. 4; lb. 3; nib. 2 9
Total ffor 8 wkts.) . 167

F genes. did not bat.

‘all of wickets: 1—62; 2—87; 3—B9;
4-93; 5—127)° @—127; 7-101; 8-102,
BOWLING ANALYSIS

0. M R, w.
Cc. Mullins 15 3 al L
E. Atkinson 2 i 6 o
E. Millington 4 5 24 1
D. Atkinson . 5 0 23 0
R. Mars! 4 4 31 1
N. Marshall 16 7 al 1
E. L. G. Hoad....... 6 4 2 2



J .
C’ wealth Lead India,
Pakistan By
114 Runs

COLOMBO, Feb. 26,

A stylish innings of 102 by
Vijay Hazare, failed to prevent
the Commonwealth cricket team
gaining a first innings lead of 114
to-day over the combined India,
Pakistan and Ceylon side.

The combined side scored 236
in reply to the Commonwealth
first innings of 350. The match
ends tomorrow and a draw seems
likely,

Hazare played copybook cricket
during his stay of three and three
quarter hours, He excelled with
euts and drives which earned
him 11 fours, and he was warmly
applauded as he returned to the
pavilion,

Lefthander Gul Mohammed, a
former Indian Test player scored
56 and helped Hazare in a fourth-
wicket partnership of 98. He
batted three hours and hit eight
fours. Shackleton took four for
62 and Ridgway three for 48.

—Reuter.



4 Race Horses Come

The Saguenay Terminal’s Oak
Hill, called at Barbados on Sun-

day from Glasgow with a cargo
race

of sugar machinery, four

horses and other general cargo.
Two of the horses came for Mr.

R. Edwards, one for the Hon. J.|
D. Chandler and the other for the;

Barbados Turf Club.

The Oak Hill ieft port yester-
day afternoon for Port-of-Spain,
Trinidad. Her agents are Messrs.
Plantations Ltd.



What's on Today,

Police Courts - 10 a.m.
Inquiry at Holetown Police
Station into the death of
26-year-old Clarence
Hoyte .......... 11 a.m.
Second Intercolonial Cricket
Tournament between Bar-
bados and Trinidad opens
at Kensington Oval 11.30,
Meeting of Legislative
Council at 2 p.m,
Mobile Cinema gives show
at St. Stephen’s School
Pasture at .... 7.30 p.m.
Police Band plays at Hole—
town Memorial site 4.30

p.m.

House of Assembly Mects
7.00 p.m,

\CINEMAS

Empire; “If This Be Sin”

oes “Black Cat and Inside
ob”

Roxy : “River Lady”

Olympic ; “State Fair” and “Then
They Were None”

Plaza Bridgetown :
the Slave Girl”

Globe:

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The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.17 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon tas Quarter) Feb-

ruary
Lighting: 6.36 p.m.
High Water: 7.38 a.m., 8.28

p.m.
YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Cedrington): Nil.
Totai for month to yester-
~ day: 12.24 ins.
eampostuine 2 (Max.) 84.0 °F.
‘Temperature (Min.) 75.5 °F.
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.)

(3 P.M.)
Wind Velocity: 10 miles pe>
hour,
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.921,
(3 p.m.) 29.853.










59339390090



5455

UNIVERSITY COLLEG
OF THE WEST INDIES.
EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT @%
in co-operation with y
THE DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL @
SERVICES
A Conference
Of Public Health Officers
at Queen’s House, Queen's Park
On March 6th, 7th and 98th
Commencing at 9.15 on Tuesday
arch 6th
All Public Health Officers are
welcome. Further details will be
notified. 27.2.51—I1n.

666% OOS! hee
Under the auspices of the
James Branch,
Civie Circle
By kind permission. of
The Commissioner of Police
THE POLICE BAND
will give a Concert
directed by
_Capt., Raison, A.R.C.M.
at



HOLETOWN MONUMENT

on Tuesday, February 27th
at 4.30 p.m.

Democratic Club

We are
AGAIN

there will be a meeting at
6 p.m. sharp!

Here

on Friday next March 2nd
to discuss the problems of the
first day of the Spring Meeting.
This is not a Political meeting.
No after dinner speeches and
there will be no collection for
charity

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PAGE 1

TAGF: rocs I! WIIUIMi-. ADVIK \ll BARBADOS & A0Vt)GttE t -—-— ?—-i llMl Bl. BtMi-i-WB. Tm-sd.iv. Krhniar. 1951 wrinvi u\s THE announcement of the arrival in Barbados of Mr. Julian Carrett presages the proclamation of the Natural Gas Corporation Act. Mr. Garrelt has come to Barbados to take up the duties of Director of Petroleum and Natural Gas. The people of Barbados welcome him to the island and hope thai during his tenure of office t.iclcs |0 UM wider utilisation of Natural Gas will be removed and that he will be able to make Natural Gas available to the public in ever-increasing quantity. The repercussions following upon the government take over of natural gas have not yet been felt and the shortsightedness of the government policy which has necessitated this step might not be immediately apparent. The taxpayers of BaibauVk will not be happy until they know at what price they have bought out the interest of the British Union Oil Company. Compensation has to be paid to that company fur their rights not only in the gas wells but for the pipe line which the government will be compulsorily acquiring. At the time when the Natural Gas Corporation Act was before the Legislature very considerable sums were mentioned as the probable amount of compensation and the sooner that the extent of the liability which the government has incurred is known the better it will be. Grave doubts have recently been expressed in respect of the finances of this colony and the necessity to have to undertake a considerable outlay on such a matter at thin time is most unfortunate. It is apparent now that sufficient consideration was not given to the effects of the policy which the government was undertaking and in this tield as in so much else of the Covernment's policies incompetence and lack of foresight have been responsible for the considerable and unnecessary financial commitments which the island faces. The Director of Petroleum and Natural Gas will have no sinecure. Certain matters will have to be clarified in his department such as the relationship between the Natural Gas Corporation and the Public Utilities Board. It is also essential that some agreement be reached without further delay about the price which is to be charged for natural gas. While the interminable wrangle continues the public are denied the full benefit from the existence of natural gas in Barbados. In securing a price which is fair to the government, the Gas Company and the consumer, a great service will have been rendered and it will then be possible to look forward to a development of the as services and an extension of the areas supplied. ROAM MAWXKHK T)JE discourtesy of many drivers in this island has been remarked upon by strangers and those who give some consideration to the rights of others. It is no exaggeration to say that the majority of motor accidents in this island are the direct result of bad manners in one way or another. The most prevalent today is the refusal of many motorists to "dip" their lights when approaching another vehicle. Motors today are in nearly every instance titled with powerful headlights which blind the oncoming traffic Mpgtftolly in roads which Ifltfc street lighting. There can be lillle excuse for not dipping headlights because curs are fitted with switches either near the clutch pedal or on the slcerini; wheel to be manipulated with the grt-atesi ease. The seriousness of the matter will be realised when it is pointed out that refusal to dip one's lights might be the cause of some vehicle running off the road and causing some fearful accident or the death of the occupants or innocent pedestrians. The ("ontenipornry Seene in I nylisli I.,1 % %  < %  lion FROM THE CRADLE TO THE GRAVE Tho title chosen describes the difficulty of the task in hand. Eighty years ago, when H Slate first undertook the education of the people, Parliament concerned itself with little more than •ion in the three "K/T of children between Ihe ages of 5 and 1 Aft -U:,\ which can be entered at the age By H. L. 0. FLECKER Wa.rlWld C*unril HNdqtiirttn II + was railed 'primary'. The mmm tlatti defect UMJ Act was that ome The 1W4 Education it erected an ambitions secondary "press ith the Nursery School .-tructure without paying; suffl**"[". W rejrard to the primary P !" 11 the least intelligent In the Modern schools". No rut and dried solution has been found, although there has Men a notable advance. My own view I* completely unorthodox, bur a.i It is based on vrnture to are some chilM 1*. who enormously ;>> of 2. with Primary Education eiifoundations. The basic 'sugge*'>"" hmt Undine from 5 to 11 r. with erlion that it Should limit the slro '* combined with oart-time mi ondary education continuing at of the classes In the primary cation. They .ire "stuck I least to IS and -lomotlmes to IB school* was actually made In they "do not see Ihe use of what or IS and with further education, ucbatc on February i8th. 1044 in thev ienrn at school Put them to The limit of this last is pithily the House erf Commons. The reply the right sort of work and they expressed by what an old schoolwas given that to mention a will come bach to their teachermaster of mine used to say when specific figure In an Act of Pareager to leain Ihe theory of what we commiserated with him on his Uamini would be a disservice, they are doing in practice. This physical admenl* 'Death's the The matter would be dealt with procedure was suggested by ut Onq mre for that'" it has indeed \,y "regulation" — i.e. of Us* 1In cut ion Acl in 1818. It wo been said that when education beMinistry. In the outecme these onh carried out In one arc. th< came compulsory, like death, it classes still tend to be much too town of Rugly. where it was ; 'quired, like death, n certain large: classes of 40, 50. and even triumphant success The Rugby cxatiousness. more remain, and this weakness experiment had Ihe advantage of ol the primary stage seriously \ w ; uli backed bv %  very cnllghlJames Mill wrote in 182ft "An handicaps all subsequent educacnw | group of two or three bi, institution for edacatton, which is lu n Any working schoolmaster nr | u ttrlal concerns. The adoplior lioslllo to progression, is the most cou i d hove lold the politician* ,, a .^heme on the natt ale bristles with dim Our He'iitlVr* Sy z ('u-.i/uTiilion To Ihe Editor. The dlgiugfi SIR.—I would like to take this opportunity of congratulating you on the fine editorial published in the Barbados Advocate on Wednesday, February Uth, under the coptlon "Good News It seems to me as ,i layman, however, that the appointment i>( ;i Co-operative Officer should come before Ihe proODMd (ioverimii'iil scheme lu lease SO acres of Dotlds Plantation to peasants on a co-operative basis. At least the guidance find advice of such an officer would be available, if not to ensum the success of the venture, at any rale to minimise its chances of failure. The importance <>f co-operative societies in a community such as ours cannot be over-estimated. It has often been stated that the average Bnrbadinn Is essentially an Individualist and) innately suspicious. Mainly for these reasons, there are those who feel that any efforts to get co-operative ventures started in Barbados art a waste of time. Possibly. Government hold Ihe same view and consequently have not Riled the post of Co-operative Officer which bus bven vacant for several months. If lhis Is the case, I would like to register my strong protest, as I am one of the many who feel that under the leadership, of a competent Co-operative Officer who understands the people and their need*, n number of Co-operative ventures sueh as the one proposed for Dodds Plantation could successfully be established. Another point which Government should bear in mind Is that such a long la pee of time between the return of Mr. Cave to British Honduras and the anooinjjncnt of his successor will only do harm to the *r-operative movement In the colony Since most of our '"-operative activities must relate to agriculture it is right that the post or Cooperative Officer should remain under the Agricultural Ocpnrlment and that the officer should have some-training in agriculture, More important shll. Ihe person selected for the post should have a good knowledge ol Hi Barbadian peasant and be able In study his need and discuss his problems with him. Above all. he must be in n position to gam his confidence Oi such on individual can hope to break down prej dire and suspicion and • operatives organised ., ..,. lrt beuJj | BU h m tt, Sir. that it should n obtain the >ervlces of one who meet these requirements. PROGRESS. preposterous and vicious thing. which the mind of man can conceive From this charge our Board of Education (which ib>Act of 1944 converted Into a Ministry!, can be absolved (and many did so) thai on educational change of any importam must start at the bottom ami work its way up. Otherwise there is dislocation of Ihe education of n generation of childn iltlee— small and retrograde businesses selfish parents who would senout lo work Just the children wh< ought to stay at school, foolist Thnng-.-dfctum that the waste in Jildren who want:tO tgutoj H The progress made since 1870 hi „ teachers workshop Is the live* ignity~and }-\* Izzll ,\ m(1 sinking, .1 was a. great thing in of meB hoJda B00 7whether the *£*****£ *ft*g 1044 to have tidied things up and responsibility for the waste is bovc have a systematic scheme. There are many excellencies in the borne by the teacher, the administrator or the politician. Th social argument "that the condi tions in most industries are en mere are many eAi-einriK-i !" in mi| s t ra ,of or the politician. Tne • — "- ,V~T~~~\r Mima Art. some glaring defects, some pr)marv teachers mostly do a tlrelv unaultab e tor such jwmi children. Admin istrators always clauses of doubtful wisdom. But its outstanding advance is along lines already hid down In 1902. The Board of Education then began to abandon "the old crudi very fine job; but until the.. classes are reduced to such num. want to sort things out bers that they can give some tir'.incss that ll foreign lo hum., individual altention to the chil nature, let alone to the n !" "**"* fren, their work cannot properly boys and girls. One is sometime) idea thjil its functions were merely j^,,. f ru i l> These Urge classe* tempted to think that. financial and administrative, justify the existence of the indeThen "for the first time the child, pendent Preparatory Schools as rather thon the official or the taxwe vui \ them, to which the upper payer" was recognized as Ihe cluMtt in England mostly send most Important consideration. Inplr son (mm thc Bifs trf ..r 9 to 13. The arguments for tha common school for the ahttdrtel of all are socially convincing; but the primary schools will .... have to be improved a great deil there are .many of thi before It will seem reasonable well aware of Ihe danger, to press them to a conclusion. Apart from all questions of The intermtlng thing Is that tt snobbery or of more justifiable 1944 Act makes provision for just For the whole hierarchy of teuchcrs, nurses, matrons, doctors. dentists, officers of many sorts, directors of education with their tlcrks and flies, governors of schools, councillors, aldermen, inspectors, civil servants by the hundred, members of parliament and of the government — all of with Satan's lips IwW anlicipntoi v smiles When education officers consult their flies. I hasten to say thnt good adlinlstrators — and. thank God arc busy and distinguished peoobjections on sociai"grounds"'(~pr*awli a scheme But it Is designed pie. all this ant-hill of punwaefu" mary Khooh vary a lot in th ej cctlvity. are ultimately "concerned !" rin!i ith the sums that Willy Smith children) „ gets wrong and with the mistakes lne t rac h' ers In Mary Brown's dictation, fact we forget at our peril. The chief hindrance lo In elementary education in hngfor erection upun a school-lcavin; riu general care of tho a gc of (eventually) 1". Thcs. at present not County Colleges, as they are to be the buildings or called, are t> give part-time the money required for a really cultural and vocational cuuca worthy primary education. The i,on; and attendance i"P * tiie 19th century demand that eleUKtf „f m is t lie oompuli menuiry education should be consider this measure the most cheap has left a legacy. As things interesting feature of Ihe Act. "'i^ri 8 ,.'. 1 ;'' a *'„S i r''£Sw ""• ".! ."W?!" '"' Unforl,m,cly II h %  > b~. been the religious QUsWUon Partly owing to Uie fnct that all education was originally conducted by the church, partly to the great Influence of the Sunday Sch Century, our education has alw had a religious tinge, and tb" great majorfe el Englishmen,believe that education which is no' rooted in religion Is barren and .... frustrating. We agree with the "' %  inrtt. lH-it Hie eln!* *'". "nindlns "rr-.lf by stnttiW t. rr %  tl" ihlMrnai whom senie of Juslice to forbid parent". p (jiS ,|,i ( to put it into practice spend their moneyln order to Financial stringency has forbidden tno it. In place of the Ctounty Colleges there has been a big expansion of Uie Youth Servi. which varies in riuullty in different parts of the country. H adequate secure for their ehildie \ supreme benefit of small cli 1 iibii. ttr^ifn ihi. Only when Ihe allon is readv much money as the en. „, ^ ^ Kl ri-.i! t *fl P ",u?.iS wctaJ and recreational facilities were to lie provided, It w* necessary for the state te Inter vene: but it would be idle t* %  laim that the Youth Servii nt Irlt.ri and likliwm i moral and rrllfloi inovement at the Cd ?* tP*JM^ a „d absr. able, to find for all it children lightene pay for their education, will tin common school begin tn be a justiiiable project. Moreover tho poM Wordwonh U.nl tho IUt ^K,^ 1 i,m !" ,"n"o!>cnn"'.n ''""" •"" "" Yuu,h Scrvl h : KrtJSTS sts ?S%SLS committees which reporle.1 in 1938 ' '* the CambridfWrtir. and in 1943. Their recommend avillage college. Around a Moday be summarised, as most *rn" school are grouped lectu of them cither found a place in the *nw and common rooms for Education Art of 1944 or else were adults, a hall for concerts and put Into force bv subsequent ad. play?, dances and cinema. : iinni-trative regulations of tho library. workshop, laboratory Ministry. It was proposed tho* ls. which were renamed to the youtnl and adults of the "Grammar Schools," were to be rrea. I am pf>>ud that one of the imt.d tecliiilcnl and "modern" Wardens Is a former pupil i hc-il Arrangements were mine. The first such college ode (or the transfer l>etween opened in 192B: the idea was nj-c of IS <.f chil ilrst rrnxded by Kay-Shuttle worth dren whom .-xperieiiie slmweil ,n I84fl. to have ben wrongly placed. Tin* existing examinaiion system The .d s viiirl as England iatlons between the Church of schools for boys had existed in England and the Free Churches ome ,or n h,we l8B N 1 %  %  %  during '1"' lJl 30 years, would ll ** disputed that some sort of have Justified g bolder approach education beyond the.old elemenestablish P*^*"""** hl to ihe problem. But the Act did tary level was desirable for %  *• have seen nt to decry and make two important Innovations number of the children who had dispar.-Re Ihe Grammar Schools In those achooll which belonged not hitherto found places in the This danger had been foreseen. I U> Ihe Church but whose dilaplGrammar schools. Experiments was present myself on a number tinted condition puts even half the in this direction go back as far of occasion* when the Grammar %  ost of repairs beyond Its means, as 1872. Bui theM rxpt rbnmta Sohool lleadmnslers were assure lhf ex,ra > ei,r ' schooling the latter a Socialist; f, r those Christian but non-seclarlan (and late, on lh extra Wromr? we.e the days of the c ,.,litior This idea goes right back to ^chMiUng) Of Ihe least tnlelligent Government) that there would be late 18th Century and was children. The raising of the rn 'levelling down" of the promoted in the 19th Century by schoolleoving age caught every(irammar Schools; that the conllie great Dr. Arnold. Whether on the ronii foot. The local iU lerable independence and amen religioos instruction, diverted of *^ lU( :' ,ll )n Authorities had neilher ltl „ nnri SUndanl oI etiuipment %  D specifically doctrinal clothing. he buildings nor the equipment will prove too thinly clad to ready This was not surprising in weather the siorms of today, it ,944 -. wh *" a va 1 " b *r f ll an open question The other ******* h <* I eon dertioyci by innovation. Inserted to calm the •"'"•'"y action and the whole man apprehensions of Churchmen, is ur f5 urlnr ,, on t v ( ^ '^ naUon the Statutory enactment that the 1^* !" "^"'*''' ,oml la PW school da> should begin with *? collective worship whtfltl mu' ;'* called the tune, that of parliament who were supposed B mu,,n ,po hl h Percentage of penally to represent these te;n-h mot \ n \ has gone to the least rs' views were demanding in Q" 1 "" 1 ^ teachers so that it has mpatsloned language the imme. %  *•" difllcult— someiidkstc raising of the age not to impossible—to find the highly lull lo 16 Education and poll*li<}cd teachers thai the Gram llgalfleant that such legislation should be pasted without a verygreat deal of adverse comment. Until IB44 elementary' cilur.t tion was provided for chUdran I and 14. An mipomnt committee which issued Its report in 1928 had recommended a new division of age and this adopted by the recant Act. The term 'elementary' was abolished ,1CS nrc uneaiy bcd-fellows and the education of children We are iiill working on the between the ages of 5 or 7 and problem oX the beM curriculum lor mar Sehoo vanced w need £.




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PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOl 111 TUESDAY. FEBRUABV 27, ltSI Rupert and the Coughdrop—1 Tfirxr Rupert and the Coughdrop—2 CViiciui it not (•[ off end Rupert he* been rMun| about playing wfh hue bail in order to keep wan*. Hi it juK going to took far hit pelt when hi pautet by ih* open door. "There'i an interetimg emetl coming from the houee." he think*. I wonder —, -— ^JrMuB1mv'looo^un^? %  Hi nina begt Rupert %  nto ihi kitchen and. aurc enough, hi find* MM. tear buiy br * itovi. "Hullo. RaptR.*' i- em.lei. you'vu caught me ih • mm. Thu wit IMUK be a aecrtt. I'm nuking MM loftee lor you to give to your pah at the Chriatma. pi:y." OQ. do lee me tay and watch how vou do M 1 Rupert watcher h.. moth*! %  ho ann ihi toftte, poura it I flu pin ra cool and ihin breakt R up with a Wile hanunir. h aimlli bewt* and bettor," ho Uughi. Wolf, now that %  i.n't a aeeret any tongor you may %  • will try a bit." aaya Hra. tear, aa ah| putt a few atrapo into j picor ot won. Mm. .:'. IOwgffg4 !•*•*• *' i Rupert, aa he uvpln ii. I % %  ahari th. with aomtbody." .' running OUT n:o 'he ,-oM ., 1 (ro**e* a tattf "ttelk*. th. Podgy Pj. hf murmuri. "W *Tiny toffee jt anybody will t Podgy, you'll never gum aigti Murnmv't mute. Com* irtrt I. Ii Rupert and the Coughdrop — 3 Rupert and the Coughdrop — 4 Podgy atop* wh*n Rupert call* Podgy pauaci. I aay, that'i |J '• him and takea a amall pier ot M'. n an idea." hi trui. CoJdn Bcar't tedte-r. Tot a moment he w make aome for ou**he ? I'm aamplea it. and then a beaming aute my Mummy would give ua the 'Ti.tr tpreadt over hit lace. "M>. thing*. See, there ahe ia, n<* :-* wjth our In lie dog Fktpp) her.'' And they acaanpai jrota ta> toll MM. Pig new idia. Thai** lovely." he aaya. Did your going out with our bttk dog Flippy Mummy really make tha: ? " Ye,. Ufa tik hir." A and I watched her." imilei Rupert, ad over the gnu "to I know i'jw how do ty* thei r 'Mn. Pig looki very doubtful a* Podgy make* hi* requeR, but he i* to happy and canted about hi* idea that the give* way. and goci indoor* ra git rhi thing* he wanti. I have ro be out for aome time," %  he ayi. "and making toUee may beep you qnet ae long ai Rupert weather, delayed She bun eet ro ;,!„. a put* the taucepan II what TO do. Anyway. e warm |ob lor ihi. cold Now I mutt go: you've me loo much al.eW" ei off while the little pall rork cheerfully. Podgy mull wove, and Rupert butter and augar into a arid itiri them. Rupert and the Coughdrop—5 rr Rupert and the Coughdrop — € Podgy watche* while Rupert wire the good thing, and ho gelt more and more intrrewed. D'you know. 1 thould like ro make thu a JP**" 1 kind ot torlee," he tayt. different m aolour and taate. *o that people v.wvJd know that it watn't ordinary %  offae. but our vary own. I wonder .hat I can put ,t ? Getting a chair he open* a cupboard and peet* ir.dde. Thin he chootet a bottle and uncork* it. Thi* %  not.M do." he mutter*. ** It'i a toe red cotoue and K imell* emoting." And he pout* a few drop* into the mixture. Suddenly Rupt't ruin*. % %  rhete't aoraieone at the door." he *ayiPodgy hu alto heard the aound at tho door to, leaving tho toffee, the little Iriendi run ra aeo who %  then. "W'i the pottman." erica Rupert, with a kit of Idler* for you and your MummT." With Chr.tmiu to Mir 1 upeet they've %  il tot t**W tarda 3 them,' *_ Podgy. What a lot there are. Come on, let'a open them and tee who they ate from." So foe The Mt few minute* they buuly arrange the card* and think how n*e they took until Podgy turn* hi* head and amfl*. "Can you i r?" In aoythiif mrvouily. ry queer? k. Rupert and the Coughdrop —7 Ruoert and the Coughdrop—8* TrM gffwH i;e: itronger and the two paU nigh t-'ck to the little atove. "II'I the toffte I" err* Rupert. %  ,Uklc forgot, we thould have k*r* "tt i uvto hi* moutkk "Good gracMMit!" he U l. "Whu'l up'" call. %  y. "I.n'i ii r*ke>" Rupen %  wallow* with difficulty, and look* up with hit eye* watering. I've never taatttd tnything like it." he tploncrt. "It centinly itrTt ordiniry toffee. You've invented a new bind. May 1 take a bit to ho my Mummy?" And. .erewing up a 'jtger bit in a piece of paper, ho race, home to Mr.. Beat. Rupert and the Coughdrop — 9 Rupert and the Coughdrop-10 • %  1 toffee .-• -.h.r I' %  %  t y r .1' yo.• the !.L%  Br.it miff* at ihi bit of tcaa o ihe .tmy ol iprrt tnd Podgy have been too. bretk. off ;*.-.tnd lauet it. "Whew. what Podgy'* done?" Thu itn't toffee it cough drop. I *hou)dn't adviM you to eat much of it. It'i terribly ttrong." Rupert took* very d tapporitrd, to the fetchei a prtcc of paper and change, the t.ibiect. Chriti na* it vtry near," .he tayt. "So -:i> not lit down by the fin jnd check the Hat of friendt you will be inviting to your ptrty. A. Rupcn tetilet by the t.te TO •tgcfe on lit party I -T there ia t iiifht tioi'r in the chimney and a th>n r '*e oi card come* fluttering do an ISI into ihe fiie. Before it can butn he acitll H and turn ffici he run* u hi* mothtt. "V. ui %  .Ii tna. wilting on it ? he aikt. Mi.. V" P UM on ipeotacle* Ihi* il queer." ittHrrnurt. k ay* : Santa Cl regrett thit owing to ciirum.iincr. I ovet which he hat no control, ptetent. will be delayed ihi* yett" r What lone wor>!." ctiet Rupert, "but I *ec what it metnt, vVhai | can hive happrntd ? Rupert and the Coughdrop—11 liifnt and the Coughdrop-!:! I voey cone Knekpcited mettage deopped down hit chimney u tell hit i'.ful' %  Andl thiee c •h, ; ha* id he On them mtolite little 1 IH ee. th.t och one piece of card |utr like In. o.n. So you've had one too." tayt Edward heavily. 1 call it a bit thick!" hiueak* Willie. "Do you know what'* happrned to Santa Caau.?" aalu Rill. Before Rupert can antwethete i* an interruption. Mn. Pig and her dog Flopoy come hurry n| o>-rr the gnu toward. th*n*. he i very ,,,:%  way Mt.. Pig Rupett eiide. "My Podgy gone." the ouaveti. "1 let Ighi then. Would you ... you. fig ike tofteo. Wh i going TO m.HC mure. nntu it he i Rupert %  -aHonithed. We did try to rrk toffee." he antweri, but it turned OUT oough drop.. I Utt hi-n at your houte. He wat ._ help you "Oh ye.. I wiah Mn. Pig. Mear. Floppy hai bee very odd way. Rupert tnd imrl wonder what hr. Hvt Rupert rdi n?" hu vou would." tayt iiile the little dog heh.vng in a jumping up at ig excitedly. "I tjnt* me • do." Owing to delay caused by irregular shipping services the Advocate" regrets that it has been compelled to curtail its j daily cartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all avail' able strips as they arrive will be appearing in this space. FOR QUALITY & FLAVOUR Teeth Loose Gums Blood u... T..I>. "•ijfl • "• *RT?Ji !o*fU"ou.a*m.r. l r:.'u'; %  i* lt*or Trycdjli Ama %  lonei J u.r.iM-i tho i.t.i 4-1, rj* • %  m qiilcvty iigtiuna m t muuit ron %  ta Ha >our your tealB or of empty packln iay T e-arAmosar. Tmr l-r.rrk.. Tr.-. M..H ZWRH \^ ^ .>0€l t < %  '< STANDS SUPREME I'h'J-r ii ; ,> foT ODO iO sjmurl KoberU. Gonprl Bcok Jtid Tt. 1 Scrviic, 30. Central Avenue. BanCOr N. Ir.-I.tri ,1 mm HEALTH BENEFITS L> • CONTAINS VITAMIN A & D IN A DELICIOUS FORM • INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS • ENSURES STRONG LIMBS AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN Haliborange The nicoBi way of taking HALIBUT LIVgR OIL i... t> mil t IIIIIITI in., IIIDII difference ... '•'.'.•.•.•.•.'.'.•SSS.'.'.'SSSfSSS, SEE! TRY! THE WORLDS mtest Hmalheiir vatue! The worM'i moit tougke tirter small car with aH the featutea of a DIG cr. Seat, four within wheclbtue. Engine develope 27 honepower. Petrol crntumptlon 15-40 milet per gUi. Tor-ion-bor Independent frontwhei-l tutptii ion tmoothri out the roughctt TOJ. 7-cubic feet of luggage ipecc. MINOR Her child's old frock looks newbecausc it's ahcays washed in LUX WJ.II all pretty clothes regularly in gentle dainty Lux Hakes and sec how much longer they lant I For Lux mukn colours stay lovely, keeps clothes looking !•*..ne I Vou'll be thrilled with the long life Lux gives your dainty clothes. Keeps all dainty clothes like NEW AIR FREIGHT SERVICES to and from Regular Services Save Time Frwn B'dM U BERMUDA LISBON LONDON 11.11 B.fl 2 00 hn Fllibu Wnkl T llo Ram *!. %  > MM Atao t'onnrrllnt Snir. to Uir uholr World !>Mk. I a.y 10 r through IraflK-. I I-t (nr|r Choice ol Ihrer body uykt. 4 door uloon. 2 door ujoon uj tMft Make a date oow lor a dMDODBtratlon run to tbr wotld'i btajtit unall car buy. FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Dlttribulon Pb 4504 ... 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T1'F.SD*V FERRI'ARV 27. 1S5I i:\llli \IMI~. \DVIK ATE ru.i: FIVE Only Courage Will Give Barbados A Theatre By NORMAN DL'THIE THE Glasgow Citizens Theatre is an independent < xpenmentul theatre or what is loosely called a i. theatre. It is part of a movement which began Mi iy In oentury with the foundation of the Abbey Tht Dublin. Miss Horn-man's Repertory Theatre in Mjmhv>i.r, the Vedrenne-Barlcer Seasons at the Court Theatre in London and later the foundation of the Repertory Theatres notably in Birmingham and Manchester. About l"W9, there was a reper / smash hit. We intended to run hu lory Theatre in Glasgow which'play for 8 week*, but the public created an audience for the work demi.d was so strong, thai of the new dramatists in Knilteli like Shaw. (ialsw.-rthy. Si Jeha lijiikiu etc These theatres finished wittl the outbreak (.1 the 11*14 18 war. The Clllzeiu Theatre *as %  tasted in IM3 and the movinn (j-iril was the Scottish dramatist. James Bridie It began in a small theatre attached to the Academy of Music in Glasgow with a seating capacity of 500 to 600. Two years kftenranh) W was able to move to a bigger theatre with about twice ilial capacity and very Uark stage fucilit .. hen W* tuvk it oft after 15 weeks, the puLln iciiimbled. The house wa> -;.lil otf for 'he whole run On 8sAsrdai alibi last, i unuVrsiand that cur laic t Cbrtttmaf "how •niished after a run of about 10 week* It also has been a great success. II .id to Please I was interested in Mr. Lynch'* letter in the Advocate last week He criticise* the principle of "arl for art sake." We have fund .ha', t WO must mix PUT < \J-I mii-n.jl ,uch work with plays uf a wide public appeal The duticult. i know %  llent scene dock, workshops etc. ] what the public read) wants, and It has also good facilities for the 'It frequently. wa hav* oifered audience—a restaurant, club room i *'"' ' inought was sure to bt a and ban which have enabled .it [very popular play, and have found to develop somethina of a social | that the public response was Btttri in the theatre. We fcrmei a smsll company limited by guarantee and not having a share capital and we nro debarred by our contribution from paying either dividends or tees to directors. The board conFists of 8 men who are interested ii> cultural development, and one of our great assets is that alt the director* are firm friends. Accordingly, although there are alwsys differences of views on questions of policy, everyone is loyal to the of the board as a whole Citixens Theatre Scon after the theatre ix.or On the ether band, play approaching the "high brow" have been pronounced sue. • W. are very prvud of the fact tin.*. we have eoiiM<.leNtl> shown a surplus on our Shakespearean plays eg. Macbeth, the Mercnant of Venn.' and Midsummer Nights Dream. All these of course had special children's malinees. but these do not pay. The credit goes to the general public and, we claim, to the shod productions and acting. One of our aims is to encourage Scotlish playwright-, and we are prepared L> take risks by putting in play* by new Scottish writers started, we formed a Citizen* .j^ maJw Uy of our Bctlng mm Theatre Society which hasnow.a j pany. can cf course, work in membership of about 3.000. The broad Sects .Bridie gave us one annual subscription is only 5 and the society runs during the season, about half a dWen leei ,iist Dj|Ot to the general audiauea, but during the wcea, special malinees are given fir ttchocl children who are charged only I/per head. This mcais that each year, somtvhere between 8,000 and 9.000 school children see a classical play produced or, a high standard. We regard this work as of first importance and the young audience* are so enthusiastic, that in many cases U •% gjo horrU* nitd insist on their parents coming to see the play. A %  pedal value which we think this work has. is that it introduces the children to the Living Theatre. It is to be remembered lhat in most cases, films make little If any demand on tl motion, whereas, in the ease of a stage play, the audience must rollabcrale with Ihe actors is to be achieved, we believe also that this work is building up our future nudlei Our theatre works in association with the Arls Council of Great Britain". They give limited guarantee of half our loss on any season, and on at least two occasion* we have had lo make calls on this guara .te-\ In addition, the Arls Council ave us grants for the furnlshm? of the flub room and Ihe Improve ment of the slage lighting and nlso the non interest bearing loan Tor redecoration. heating etc. of the Princess's Theatre in which we are now working. Gift of £ 1.0M We began with very limited ('nance—about £1,200 mainly in Ulrta and before ouf Hrst performi i -,MX1 part had had to be spent on equipment, costume* Bte. On the iwo years in the Little Theatre, we just made ends meet. When we moved lo the larger one. we had to find a guarantee for the rent for the ten years lease. Here we had a stroke or exceptionally good fortune W approached a number of friends about this guarantee and one of ihem. Sir Frederick Stewart Glasgow industrialist, gave me a most pleasant shock. He asked me to see him for half an bou one evening and this is what he %  .aid: I got your letter. This is just all wrong. You fellows are giving a lot of time to running this theatre and are makinn a Kood )ob of It. You ought not to be wasting yo" r time *i n 8 round with the hat like this. I wish I could five you some of my time tout I cannot, but I could stop this waste of your time. I wan'. to give vou a seven year covenant which will provide the theatre with CIO.000." I wish more people who are interested in the theatre would follow Sir rred's fine example. I hope it Is clear that our experience on the financial side of running a theatre has varied n great deal In our IM8-49 season. we showed a nice surplus al Easter Our summer season was "Imply disastrous. We had a spell of fine weather, and there was a %  lump In the theatre business throughout the whole of Britain Aa a result, we began our 1849-50 aeeson with oftnsideroble anxiet u' as* had the great good luck to put on a Christmas show of a very Christian Mission Case Adjourned THE CHRISTIAN MISSION case in llll Clianctry was begun yesterday and adjourned for an inOjgflnitt petted it. older that His Honour the Vice-Chaiic. iU Ihe Abbey Theatre in Dublin whim piLduced. not only able actors and actresses like Sara Algocd. Maire O'Neill, F. J. MeCormick, Arthur Sinclair and Barry Fitzgerald who nlso pil>vided the stage for J. M. Syngc Sean OVasey and drew plays from W. B. Yeats. Lady Gregory and others. I feel sure that there are Izcal traditions of a special outlook in Barbados which deer ve similar encouragement. I "' I thai our acting %  empany is purely professional. Some of cur most valued people work originally, however, wuh the Scottish National players, a group who were only part time professionals, but whw did most valuable work especially in the smaller towns in Scotland. They gave only two short seasons in Glasgow, but their work in Ihe c< untry gave rie to the very igi'BtMu community drama movement in Scotland. Courage, Enthusiasm The two things most necessary for the starting and success of any venture like ours, are enihuslasm and courage and I would put a high vlue on the second of these Nothing will ?ver be dpne unless some group of people take their coarage in both hands and make a start. If the general attitude is that a thing b difficult and that financial security is essential, then nothing will ever be done. The second thftught is that the enthusiasts must be prepared to work together is u team to subordinate their personal views to the general derisions of the board. 1 would exemplify the point of courage in this way. Our theatre began in May 1W3 with a little dinner party at which aboul 10 people were present. James Bridie was in ihe chair. We had a most enjoyable and argumentative talk. We all expected that the decision would be that we should begin to work for a repertory theatre to start after the war. Bridie summed up by saying that we were agreed £n two things—first, that Glasgow needed a special theatre and seethat there was a nucleus audience justifying a beginning in a modest scale. He then said Come on then chap*, let's do it" In some extraordinary way. had opened our theatre in the following September. I understand that one of the Hfflculties in Barbados Is the lack %  >f .i -tillable theatre. I cannot even guest what the chances arc of such a theatre being provided, but I am sure lhal if the present -amateur movement in Barbados gees on working with courage and enthusiasm, such a theatre will ultimately be provided. I do not think II should belong to the acting tt-mpames, but should be held as a public asset and rented out to any group who can ofli work |of general Interest to the community. In the special cums'ances. I hope it would be suitable also for concerts, and probably, for the presentation of non-ff mmcrnal films. In this way. H will be a community centre of the highest value. Appeal Judges Confirm Decision THE decision of His Worshu Mr. E A. McLeod. Police Magisrate of District "A"—who placet' Marie Wjithe of Hindnbury Road St. Michael on a personal bone for one month in the sum of 15. • for blackguarding — was yesterday confirmed by Thsir Honour Mr. G. L. Taylor and Mr 11 A Vaughan. Judges of the AssisUn Court of Appeal. Counsel for Walthe was Mr. E. B Barrow. Walthe gave notice appeal at the bar. One witrev for the prosecution said that o>~ August 12. 1050. she saw Waithi behaving in an unseemly mannei on Hindsbury Road. M..: spoke to her but she still continued. Mr. Barrow in his address submlt:ed that the case be dismissed %  ours however were iat.srted lhat the woman used ihi W HILE THE S S Oakhlll wabelnr, loaded with scrap Irr-s on Sunday a piece fell back Into a lighter, owned by Messrs Plantations Ltd No one was atruck, but the iron made a holt m oS* bottom of the hunter Pumps from the Fire Brigade were used lo pump out the water. The lighter afterwards went on doc k for repairs. *THIRTV-FOirg MOTORISTS •*.-nd cyclists were reported over the week-end for traffic offences Of these threemotorists were reported for carrying weight IP excess and another three for not :,toipiug at major roads. T^HIhVEH broke and enter, d UM house of Elvlna Clark.ai Glendairy Road. St. Michael between 7.43 a m. and 10.45 p.m. en Saturday and stole a quantity of clothing. The Police are making investigations A LTHOUGH the recent rains had hindered many things yet they were indirectly a great help to the motorists who drive through the country districLs. At nearly every plantation cane: were overhanging into the road. These canes often caused annoyance to motorists. During the rainy season the lorries were unable to get into the cart roads and in cane Ik-Ids To keep the factories going planters were forced to cut down the canes that were nearest to the highways. In the majority of caseg motorists now have a clear view. O N SUNDAY night at 8 o'clock Profet-soi Raymond Q. Jolly. Executive Truatec of the I-aymanN Home Mi MHUJI y Movcnieii! of Philadelphia, gave a lecture at Quean 1 Park Shed. He ended hi* talk by describing (he Kingdom of God soon to be established on the earih. To those PfCgenl he promised to mall free of charge further information on the coming Reign of Peace, the thousand-year Resurrection Day and other important Bible studies. crarrrgNARiAN in this suit the plaintiffs are the Court to declare that oyle and others were not Ihe proper l> elected Bonnl of Management of the Christian Misdou Church for the >cr ]b*y-5n according to the provisions uf the Christian Mission Act Associated with Mr Adams is Mr. D. H. I Ward They are being instructed by Mr. II U Thomas of Messrs Carrington Sealy. Appearing for the Complainants U Mr. W W Reece. KC, associated wtth Mr. J. S. B. Dear and instructed by Mr. D H BanHeld of Messrs Hutchiuson it BanHeld Mr Reece i-. holding th.papers ..f Mi F K Wall As the case openad this morning Mr. Reeee applied for l> m to amend Ihe Rill of Complaint, and as soon as this -..., ....: ovei thi rest of ihe half day's healing Vnsl spent on legal argument on tinpoint raised by Mr Adams The Viee-Chancellor in adjourning ihe case expres*ed cpnearu oyej "> %  'uturr of the Chiistl.ui Ml:inn Church. Action Maintainable? Mr. Adams is submitting lhat the action Is not maintainable in the manner in which ll has been lion after the matter had been discussed. He said that their tenantry roads contrasted horribly with other roads about the island. The roads were in th* condition they are in now for many years %  nd it was for that reason that he had asked members lo appoint a DOinj "' Enquiry Mr H'llklaasm said that the Highway Commissioners got their rur 0 '* from highway taxes and from Government grants. In his opinion Mr. Johnson could interview the Commissioners and ask tw hMw they were getting along with their work. About nine months ago he had been asked to pilot a Bill through t.ie House on behalf of the limit way Commissioners for a loan He got || through and an oidei had been cnt. but they had been I I'.at owing to wndttiow iii England, there had to be delays Mr. Crlrk said that he had had complaints from various pcrole that the roads were bad and he was wondering whether so nl thing could not be done dc ;iti the fact that rollers were no! brought. The Act which Incorpoi-available If equipment were not aled Ihe Church specificall> said I available for Ihe next five vears that it should have the right to sue %  and be sued In all the Courts, If the plaintiffs were the Christian Mission, they would h.-\ as the Christian Mission and not as individuals, unless there was something in the Act incorporating Ihem which allowed them to sue behalf of the corporate body. > was submitting for uSoa* reasons that the case be dismissed With costs to the ilefiiiil.tutMr Reece replying submitted In the first place that the point Mr. Adams had raised should have been made In hispleadings EQUIPMENT HOLDING UP ROAD REPAIRS St. James Vestry Told EQUIPMENT inisfjMil about nine months ago by the l'..MimisMimerN of Highways Cpr St James has not yet arrived. That is the reason why the St. James ienantr\ roads are in a state of disrepair. This explanation was ti> Churchwarden Mr. A_ G. Johnson wh<> asked. \h> Vestry to appoint a Board of Enquiry to find out why the tenantry roads were so badly in need of repair. Mr. Jehaaan withdrew his moGuardians made the increase and Mr. Johnson withdrew his motion The Vestry agreed to make provisions for dental facilities for some of the poor people of the parish. This was decided after Fir Johnson aaked ihe Vestrv to skier allowing lome people lo set [Ihfftr teeth extracted when ne **sary, the Vestrv paying part of the cost. Mr. Crick withdrew a mol. asking that the Vestry cau< monthly financial statement all subsidiary boards lo be placed before them on the taW of each month and a meeting isummoncd oil the lollowlng M< u cay lo consider the report. He Withdrew his SWUon h>Vestry say lhat he had known nothing of what happened al the various Boards. The Vestry's business was done by mean* of Boards and If it happened that one did not get a seat en s Board one would know DjOtbi Ing of the proceedings of that Board Sometimes taxpayers would OUgeUon a Vestryman as to certain goings on at different Boat %  ad OnVeslryii'-m -uld be un. Ml lo give hitu i Information CLARKE'S "BLOOD MIXTURE Cleanse the system from blood Impurities ; many sufferers from rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago, neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and minor skin aliments, can derive great benefit from this well-known medicine. la 1IQUID eg TABLir fOXM '*-*•* %  *'*•+'+'**.'.: %  ,'.•*'* %  %  .w./.v/.vv.'/AV/rf Kxjor raw to til on i AT fHHKET duly to see that the v kept their implement* intact so "lhat no one roller would be allowed to gat "* 'or the Colonies and ask him members of the Christian Missions, why ho would no! allow the rollhe asked, would the roads remain in ihe same rendition without the Coriinn -M, ,-imaking an\ .it tempt to get them done* The Highway Commissioner* had not been in office for one year or even two years but for a kllg Umr anl the deficiency of" M tuikin-.n 1..1 l., r*ls had been in being all the | „ ur| nH)H tnat Mr Crkk did not Hi UtOaghl n m their know the VCMIV Act The Ve and not Ihe Board of Management The Mission as a Mission could only sue In Its corporate name, but the Board of Management was not incorporated. There were three separate and distinct booM %  thi Ml porate body nf ail the members, the Representatives of the Churches—one for each of the 28 churches in the island or one for every 25 members, and the Board of Management. The plaintiffs had ii'Vn | nd Hut IbtV were the Christian Mission, and he was arguing also, that any member Id come h> the Court and for a declaration as to who were h J ,u "*v Thi* ers to come The tenantry roads were not really under the control of the Commissioners. They had grants I mm the Government ahd they were told which roads ateuld bt repaired Hrst and Ihey could riot use money given for one road to repair another. Mr. Jehason then wlthd-Vw his motion. Matron's Salary The Vestry derided lo refer to the Board cf Guardians Ihe consideration of revising the salary of the matron al Ihe almsthe prnperl.*. MhiiaRcinent was decided after asked the Vestry Taken By Surpri*.* Ision, ad to look housing for the enstttutad Board of 'Mr Jotu consider the I after belter i.urses. Mi Jahi-ion said that the housing for the nurses was not satis factory. For a long time the building had lieen wanting rttensive repairs a nd during the las'. bad weather clothing and other things hud to be removed from THIS IB Christian Kellmsn of Oane Garden, St. Andrew. The "Advocsta" has bsan following her caroar closely from the time she passed tha century mark. She Is now 118 years old and look* good for many more years Lumber Arrives shipment of 210.000 feel ot spruce and pine lumber arrive* for Hnrbados yesterday bv th' steamship l'o|y ( >e-t fr ,m llalilax The shipment of lumber %  ** %  i"'isigncd to Messrs, J. B. I,cil Ltd. Lighter* were bringing the lumber ashore und discharging i UOng the waterfront in the innei basin of the Careenage. Tin-; hipmeni i>r liunl/ currying things loo far and w unnecessary. .'.',*,', ',-,',V'--WV, ,*>*V *V£ llst'ino. a orand time at CRICKET! Delicious Sweet Biscuits for LUNCHEON and TEA put up In convenient packages. Assorted Sweet Bisculls by Huntley 4 Palmer, Peek Frean, Carr and Jacob. Prices I0c.-26c.--48c^-60c. Per Pck Prices 91.20 lo 12 II Per tin. Jacob's Cream Crackers 6/Per tin —AlsoLuscious Boxes of CONFF.CTIONKRY small and large. UI.ACK MAGIC CHOCO1.ATES 94 Do per box. IV units 64r Per tin. Butter Scotch 21c. to 45c per tin. Nougat 34c and •Oc per tin. Fry's Haiel Nuts 2/-, S/9, 7/6 Box. Cadbury's Red Hose 98c. 4 $1.80 Box Cadbury's Chocolate Biscuits 5/& 3/3 tin. Chewing Gun 2c. 4 Be. Pck. After Dinner Mints I/per Pck Marr Bars 14c ea. Crest Bars 18c ea. Ouova Cheese 18c 4-Og, Pck Cadbury Bars (Asst ) 10c. 17c, 19c. 34c. 37c. ea. Fry's Bars 7c, 9c.. 12c 15*. Carr's Choc. I-unch 12c Pck Carr'a Choc. Tea Cakes B.\ each. Carr's Cheese Crisps $1.02 tin. Carr's Club Cheese $1.00 tin. Shaip's Toffee 2/0 and 3/3 tin. Blue Bird Toffee 1/9. 4/8, 4 Si 88 tin —Alan— Tfaertrw FlMk i-Pint si.M Sun Glasses from a/lo IIS 00. Bill IF. WEATHF.KHEAD LTD. Head of Broad Street S XD ^ LUNCHEON | SETS 2. 3 and 4-pieeo Sots .VOH OFFKHEU AT HI on I n RHHFS. KNKiHTS_LTP.-au UAHCHB IIABHISOX'* BROAD STREET SOLE LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS OF PIANOS BV H. J. RENN THESE PIANOS I ARE FITTED WITHI lilcns/H) AI.I.(i\KU BACKLESS IRON FRAMK, III HllUil. I i: ItKC )l IK •• ACTION AND KEYS, I III M QUALITY IIAMMKKS AND I III CASEWORK IS SOLID MAHOGANY, HIGHLY I'm Ism 11 IN ADDITION ALL PIANOS. (WOODWORK, FELTS. ETC) ARE SPECIALLY TREATED TO RESIST INSECTS OP ALL KINDS. SUPREME IN TONE, QUALITY, AND APPEARANCE fat""*Special Introductory Cash Price $675.00 Each -a. IIAItltlSOVS Showroom Dept. Dial 2352 FELL OFF LORRY Shonly after 2.30 p.m. yesterday Bert Gill a 20-ywr.old labourer of Parish Land, St Ml from the lorry M 1611 •srhich was belriB driven aloas Hothersal Turning He was taken to the General Hospital and was discharged after he received treatment for bruiser on his fsce and hsnds. Food ilkSpecials IKIku uiilNKINC STI1AWS (HAWFOriUS LFII.LIT BISCUITS CRAWFOHDS Aiut SCOTCH SIIORTBHF.AI> i-EAK FREANS CHOCOLATE AMI BISCUITS HUNTI.EY & PALMERS OSBOURNE BISCUITS McVITIF. PRICE LINCOLN CREAM .. ROYAL SCOT .. OSBOURNE JACOBS EXHIBITION „ JACOBS LINCOLN CREAM SLICED HAM SLICED BACON SOLIO PACK APPLES SURF MAID CRAPES .. Large Tin BARTLOT PEARS IJrr Till DUTCH STRAWBERRIES IN SYRUP ... per Un II 21 per tin SI 17 | lb Paclcell ) al 3k. I per Plcl CHEESE .Large Tin 75 SOr. Small 21 62c. Small SS a srAjvsnoLm. scmrr* to. LTD. Bar. — FOR THE BEST INSIST ON SILVER STAR SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES TIME TO THINK OF YOUR . BUTTONS & BOWS WE HAVE OPENED an Assortmnt oi the most Exquisite and Tasty Variety ol BUTTONS lor all manner of Dresaee and Ensembles. This store will be closed at noon OT Wedneeday 28th rsbruary and Thursday 1st March lor the Cnckat Tournament. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, II. 12 13 BROAD STREET



PAGE 1

Tl I I>\Y I UIIU \Hv 27, lSI ii.rtn.nos ADVOCATE PACE THREE Test Drawn • From Pice I Trinidad UcUei on Saturday he Handsomely atoned for |J. OUT when he himself was responsible (or 39 of Ihe 46 run Barbados added to their lolai toll mlnuies Barbados who had been behind the clock for the whole innings. Crushed well behind the clock and the Innings closed for 168 in 2~*< minutes. Faced with the prospect of havBJW 233 runs in 22S min1 Trinidad <.l-rted with Jeffre> Stollmeyer and Oanteaume This pair was unhurried and in the iifleen minutes play before lur.i-h iney put up 9 without loss rney resumed and here was an OXhfbUMm of experienced batting Uiiosleritatiuusly but steadily they pushed the score along and the eama in 33 minutes. Trinidad lost their flrsl uk.-t that of Jeffrey Stollmeyer—to another Roy Marshall special. Tnc Jruiidad skipper, who had for >3 minutes at the wicket been guiding Trinidad in quest Of a win. played for an off break from Roy Marshall but it was the one that came through straight a•i top spinner and bowled him for 35. This included five fours. Clarence Skeete and Andy GantaaiBM had been dismissed In nmllar manner by Roy Marshall HI Ihe Trinidad's Unit Innings. Norman Marshall almost had OantMuiM out at 43. The lattei drove out at a well flighted one outside the off slump but Roy Marshall who had been put int. the slip earlier in place of Mulling, Immediately after a similar stroke had passed near Mullins. yot a hand .o the ball but failed bold 11. A cheeky attempt to run a quick ana from l cover drive bv Oanleaume off Roy Marshall resulted ui Asgarali being run out. A Mean pick-up. a mailing relu IIII.VI I. HO II \l.\l\ A \.\l\ Driver Unvtl Ui'Xr^rniinr \IHI DONY1LU. Tilt found guUtj of p-irking and or refuing w glvt hi* rum' 1 His Woialiip M %  i.m both calk igflra heard ordrrtv TTMH ne I 11 f..r parking and 20 i..r ICflWing to give '.-.name. Doth case* arorc t>r..ught by the Police, sgt. I King, proatwulad for the police in mfurn Ma 317 Dodaon who IVoughl I e case said that on Decemr< |Q p m< he was on duty on Mnrhi!. Street and •aw th-' motor car M—200 parked oppoalte the China Doll Restaurant. The %  .,' ,(,,, peg). taurant Bometim the driver for hi. name l>ut he refused to give it After refusing to give his name the driver then drove off lie then ran matter to the Central Hon. Thorns appealed against gt Irani page 1 %  l HtUfl would not fail below its preaani levu Answering further questions on the resumption of meat negotiaI. the Arge*itim\ Webb As announced on Saturday, the Argentine Government has agreed to resume discussions on meat purchases and on other outstanding ltnaiici.il and trade questions. M"iii will take place in Buenos Aires. The British deleration which is leaving by air tomorrow will ba Ie~> by Economi. Secretary to the Treasury John Edwards. Thornton Kemsley. Conservative, thought it would be better io give up to ti35 u urn (or no*" >iuahty meat seeing that Britain was getting none at all from Argentine at the moment. —Renter bclh "ENGLAND'S BATTING FAILED MISERABLY" OBITUARY Miss J. C. V inletSTARTED FIGHT AT CRICKIT THEIU Honour, Mr <: i. TV. lor and Mr H. A. VauKhnn. JudvcuaBf Ions ",Prtot mc Anlatanl Court ol Appral nttafda) lonlinnrd a decision ot Wynhlp Mr. S H. Nurse Police Magistrate of District %  :" If rvor England had the box waUna'Tni'mnlchVt did u-1 ",Vc'"t!,. rred Vinljr _"'• *"£'' J"' 1 ^'"i?''?....?*" to-day. With one wicket down for 141 ran. and Hull.... ,"> ££.££:J","^ WSJ !T .me or X r-Lod 1 < (From W. J. O'REIi.l.V) MELBOURNE. Feh Mi. After an u. aoca as Head-Mistress. Miss Jessie V inter died at her home, S, Si Helcus Pal February. IBM Thr fourth duiflh•v~..j. • %  • * ""i' vnsniri uun .ui HI ::un. UIIII iiiiut'u --, %  , p..,.„i i .(.._ para ni and Simpson in complete control of tin ^\£ JJ "edited "••. Australian bowling done to a frazzle, it seemed that tho it (hi Nortfi London CoUagiarkC ["I"" 1 "*. costs in days or in default OtM iiniiiisniinu'iit with hard Au.lr.lln. had ,i coming. ,„ Bjy, But the old old rtory. ^'^ ISSJt^S&T" ^ SgSfA England, batting failed miserably. '(.ilieie C.mbrid.c, she K !" e" Pl-led iisain.i Mr \OUIIK Hole, called up from hi were some people who spoke of .afc Honour" Degree in Natural Nurae'a declilon. fJii lv liuy patrol on the deep leg "direct attack" and "bouneert". s,ionrc Boyce in KIVIIU hn evidence vc-. inn lmm to lve Mm ln,lth needed Then, ,.ce an Assistant teraay s ^id that on December 3 and a llBhtnliig -tutno bv Waliotl s ''PP0rt to a jaded attack, bowlel whatever. I have always been an JJ other High "• waa playin. In a erlcfcM matcti r.iuaht Asoiirali lust out of hit Xna'thd's champion patsmnn Hutopen crllir of the ron-,stem u When hi second wicket lor 8" run* AsxarprovidlnK the turning point of the to cavil at. v. lin ds School. Exmouth. iBoyce) .'poke to Roach he rc_i* enmc I' w.is an inspired session of where she spent a very successful fused l.. nova ftoach then siimh howling and England's anaemic daaaen Man In buUcUnn which him with an iron riHl on hin riant nlribulion was onlv six. game Qanta wme now seemed i„ los" Not since l*cxls 1948 have I wan n ,l Ihe Australian attack so completebutting allir -Mull. %  :: lull IM: pox f,,'r m the 1). von County shoulder and pulled a dagn touched one from Noma^nMiu" bmastered Undwall was within •"" "" h l l "• 1 """ "' lnwn Training College for Women „„ atlei.pt 10 Itab inn, shall behind him on llu, on-side nace of giving up the ghost and "£,.fi! > ', m ?"V I"*t „ . ..„ Hooch in making his aaMH very line but w ickclkieT.r W'.' l !" ln apart Irom keepins the With Ihe stage nicely set for litMiss Vlntcr Ikon offered hrrso.r j,, „,.„ ,„. ,. v ,., t „ ,„. k B oyee w ' scoring rate within Soderate •*••* tmtMt, Ootnptoti mirkla th. SPA. Cor nusshsnary work Thl .|, Honours in i Iiounas failed t.i make an> iiopres,,"';'[''"' to oecoi ,., ,„„ Me „,. u ,,,,,, t. failed to make contact with it, li ,, ,| ? h ,' „t"L'"lll "rS i, %  ' '""I ' te ,,.hm,. chance in the shps ,r,. m h |X ",/",,.. b.,,,.,i H : itii Button Ion ;id initlaUvf ; oiroad-y Codi l.i-n llulton. Hassett cnuld nnl hide the f;ict that h Mutton roll did nm make the catch and off the next ball he attempted .1 cover drive, did not get well over it and Denis Atkinson at covet missed an easy catch. Two runs later another run out gave Barbados the thlid wicket, Another nttempt to snatch :i short run. 111 which Tang Choon pushed in mM-wicket and callad, . "^ K IllO lAlatu'Ti Kim a\ rt^i'iiivil ill itii.i K ound and a relurn by Buy Mu,h„ e„g| nnd would nnish the .1. hall liimsclf and another quick ,,. v .,, n i n „ noslUoi. It Of stumping by Walcott and Goll SUSS Into a Ciantouumc was run mil. Me had iiecn batting comfort Ij and well bef(..e he gave ni *hree chance*., all off Norman Mauhall while he was still at 43. Mis innings that lasted just mulct Uu botjrg uKlude.1 six four,. Num.:m Marshall who had beer i unitlini, faithfully for the da. Harbour Log In Crli.le Bay M V adSw.k1. Sttv Maira HvnrlrllS A, %  %  % %  'ui t ,-.,.-.11. %  S. |, |l I-.M *'h W I. nUnXto. *-•. Iliiriai Whlius*. S.H Tutus Dov. sk-h. Rn.si.i.el r Osartt.ii. -kr. o-mi. .-.i %  riSS B fch I S.H Ma.iu.al.ir II.. aVh Ai>ila H. • l*.1i N.ln. V-.-rH C.'lbk-**i-UUIVM afcthO U thwl 1 BIIHIV. D M l CoMMi. from TKnUtart via as ivivri.rt. lit icna IMI Capi MM 1,1.1;. fi,.m r*>n--n-nifn. M.V. All>*tlB.H>aV. SSS Ion* nl. Capl Tr-iiidad rVheor, M.-' .i* D Wallace. S U-< il. Cap* Watl*M. Iron Si Vincsnt fcihot-1-.r oak Hill, in* Una Mi Capl PUrth*. iron, inam.ii H.V OsnaiM .W CSTOM ISJ UDJ IM (apl. Ai.tnlMld. (rum *l i %  : i %  %  i !:• MV O K Mllct VIII, l.,ii. en IVipi W.Wfr. I..i Haliro a a w SiM ktallv N. Jonas. ST ion. ne I'ai>i lk>.i. lur BrllUI. Umaiia SW fHfalnam Hill. ,M Ion, ne .•-pt N.i... lor SI KUta rVhinnrr IliiuilM. A II Vaniltolinai 1 ion* net, Capl Htoli. lor Timid.il MAIL NOTICE I I. mi.lad. VSttMlaStt, i uloiubu ruracao and Jarnaka by I ha SI rndamblr mil br iloard al Ihr ri fUlsl Mall al 1 %  m. mi Ih. Ml rrlgruary IH1 Htgitlrrcd Mail an Mil al 9 am on Ihr I.I Man 1*11 Backache Gone Neighbour told TAK£ DQAN'S IT IS SURfRISINO how qnkkry bs^taebe, '..iml'afo, ibcumsrx pssss, %  nff, *jdBikg mn sd ks oc Mints sod cnm i n oB nrlnaUT die i r Jen Jus u Uiktjguh kidney •^i i^i can often be-wavofs*. Strong, sorer ksioeyi .ifgusrd rour hasltb be ttsBssdaf ncsas uric S>dkl auj bsrfnlJ 4 **aM out of the trstem. Then < Jner scoon Is inatic qu tfe askd ra.l) IP Bber use blood properly, paio and divotanlart B oucoitr result. Dosn'i steosacbe Kidney Pins brir| happy relief by I irdping to ,lnas s ihe kidney tjiet and so iijmiihtaM i heir scncsL You can rely upon ihls well known .ikureoc sad urinary sniiepuc. Many Utousaiids of C ieful men and sromen have tenined io the Kb Ibcr bar* regained by tasting Dean's 1 n : , i AJ* your Oaalar ft =^= Um aaWra kslgsi .pirn,. If ou hd Ui'dsss and run-down btcauM you ased a>ort A*D \' lumiai. lake Scoil'l ErouliKni ii; %  WU tooa 1W full •f < lif mere tfkin |u*t a fah!\ IfsrOWIRRIL NOUtlSHMINt Not jun ao ordifMiy tonlc-n saiursl A*D* Viiassioi. Good istdng, ssonosaical loo.' r** scons EMULSION H/GH EN£RGY FOOD TONIC himself. Roach r !" "m'I„, ''„„; whe, ,... ,,„ r wen, mad. £olh rtlh^fi .^L^X n and Suni"o„ ", l.min %  i."t "" I'"'.","." '?"" ' H "" '".'' P '.illonl, u l,t.,,,,,"l "• i. "",,"•" "'!"' HIU % %  T "" %  e nnd !" .1 i.r. M ,,'h. div Bn.li'h la.v.le,. .luw.bcni let Khcol parti, on account of Uv> I .as ulsn ordered to l>a> ituwii t adly throughout tl They have not failed List iland*. and Mis* attempt TmJ%UVS T C \ Bul a|,; '" "" m Hut iV who S *G on .he .K*.. fa W. tu ui to the Iiuif ,1 hi Tr" lh ? ft, in,, 1 5 batatnan for 1u „ „ IT| yattra, which Hole cleverly 'held bark jnd the darpafc was doni No Bniinrers 01)4 had Ihree chances missed off nbou , hp fl [0 „ npsc hlra, was reworded, with Tnnj As English ^..ki 1 ly to Ihe thoon's wicket. The hitler hit ou' at n well (lighted one nnd put UP n eaiy catch to Eric Atkinson at cossgr "'" or the runs for they Ixith Tang Choon bad ,l 1 i """ =' "l"-ing r>r tteldfmen nil fallen at 93. arouiul tliem. close Io Uw Li .II and Skaat*. tactthar now on ihe on-aida and oil in a tlftb wicket pai'tnerslilp now well. n their shmilderri the reSe\-en coiueculivo maidens were ,i!y for any real chance wit down and it aru HOW certain which Trinidad might have ul '""I nothing short ol a mlraok winning the game and even savcould have given Trinidad the nig themselves from defeat. m* 'hey needed for victory Skeete signalled that he wa. within the time left for play and .•ware of this with a cover drive the batting talent al their disposal i.IT one from Boy Marshall for four Guillen ended a 39-mm runs and a sweep to the square at the wicket without scoring by bnunclarv lur another and the conbeing dismissed Ibw to lload and tury was hoisted In 120 minutes. Fergusov. and Jackbir met in an Lagan helped himself to a cover eighth wicket partnership. for lour runs sj well oil Norman and then majestically witu swept him to the square boundary for another four. The tea Interval sn --thus completing 331 > failed lo rally rciuii Hc.nl-Mistress. There !•> n.. eTrnse for tle way T. . ga K.ithi run: i>f Ihis match w.is wjiilotily abjntarants and fnends at l_!odr.flSJtOI. doned An ounce or two of backHigh School in Jidv 1336 when Inspired by the colt's baptismal iione boistcn-i up with necessary irfcrince waa mada to her courftTurt. Undwall and Miller taking delermination to d i i llowed England to her personal intarcs. In every one brought ilnlsli this series in a manner of her pupils. which would have done incslimSim-' here retirement. Miss tC-kata fell regularable benoiil to Ihe gama thnmehVintei ii-.V, .. -i.i..l interest In fast bowlers there out the world. .,„ %  Gambia Ponfll Mi-siin under Daly and has addressed Ihe second new i go rou -i assault 11 launched whic world *— Bishop rn ^ t aw %  Meetingnn ine nesi ma I IMIHI.HI \\ < I.'OIIH S l! "" the Church Film Stars frum Our Own Co maa omiriii I'OlfT-Or SPAIN. Feh. 23. Air William Nalson, stall mem bar >.t Holiday Msasiine and one of the many Journalists wh. >rk ol The funeral ervlce was held on ... 7th February. 1351 at Christ Chinch lulicklands, Hastings. Canon MOIK.HI ullicialed and Mr. Vincent H.'twai at the organ The interment followed in the family gravs ;il the Borough present watfC! any Ethel Vlnler; Mist Ruth Vintei; : Dr. Noel Vlnter; In There were • of frlend present mpanylni the Hoilywood Cemetery such n reception like mis inv" ime umlif This is all very encllln,. „,'SJ Church ana wliat s more n slums great (lowan were rt.eiveil bam the enihumann lie dee I a red When following:—The family UIIU nulf an hour Io go anil lie plane which earned the eight „,„| jaroV Miss Hlgglnson; Ollvc; I,.:. Trinidad .37 lor 7. Walcott called J stars dipptni In al Miss lllacklmrn snd Miss Waif, for the new ball and Millington Plarco Airport last niaht. over Miss Burrow; Miss Burlen: Mr. TrinKlad bowled first from the pavilion and ,on thousand fana were there to and Mrs. Carter; Miss Church; wirkrts in hand still to a ring of leg slips receive them, those who arrived Miss 1.. Culver; Mrs. Day and neSlna 1 rau to make In in Jackbir cut one from MulllU " %  J"h" lm,k Wendell fcores Iwhlb NuiM Kmn; Mr. Pastlc: hour "..la ha !" through .lip. hard and low but"" Ponlaine. Evclvn Karaa, H Wcha, Mrs Walker nnd Onlv seventeen ot thow had Denis Atkinson did not make the June Haver, l-i'-jocll, Scott. Mis. Click; led on resumption before catch and the single gave Trinidad !" nc S !" d •"* %  • %  >? " r l.egall in trying Io turn one from 150 in 223 minutes. The eatro half eyThe)were an v'llins. mistimed, and put up a an hour rule wa, now invoked and the sterlh.mrl and ,l„il catch to Keith Walcott. Held, the game was aatended I. W *" ,^ v ndi n ." <£ n m '" Ine substitute for John Goddard at minutes. YS y r Soulh mid wicket. Ferguson gave another chance America. Skeete left next, without addiIo Mullins off Norman Marshall Mobitf HankOn First Trip House Collupsi-s .„ the score. He ployed back but Mullins got a hand to it and Ui a low straight one from Millingfailed lo hold It but he dM nol ion, was struck on Ihe pad and profit much from thi* life Next Umpire Walcott uphold an appeal over he played at a googly from fur Ibw. There was a sound as if Hoad for a leg break and the ball had struck Ihe bet as well bowled^ capr wh( n t helr~r^v7i "froiii "taiHw Foursquare. Oldbiry. Csrnngdon, lit nao. scoria IP in an nvui .„.„„ pnl — %  %  _<-— —%  %  >.., %  .POHT-OF-SI'AIN. Fel. Joseph Rocirlguer seven children had The Travel!,ii* OfflW <>f Oovernment Savings Hank ic(. the Public Buildings Yard thi.< mornina; at 9 o'clock on its first vn.it to the augar estates thw his wife and year narrow asThe Bank has gone to aeajiei NOW.. PAA offers CUPPFR CV-240 .md it was suggested that the boll first struck Skeete's boot and then and fifteen critical minute hm bat. wlln seventeen minuter left for Six Trinidad wickets were now play and with two wickets in hand down for 127 and Skeele had been Trinidad with a score of HS2 were %  1 the wicket for just over hall still 91 runs behind the Barbados iin hour for hi 23. With four total. wickets in hand and 66 minutes Five more runs %  left for play Trinidad still needed V\e score and stum. house collapsed at 2 o'clock In the Three Houses. Gulnen and Bulkeiiiorning. Mi. Hodnguez gsag awakened by M cracking sound Jusi in time to see ihe large portion of the dirt wall falling apart, he immediately awoke hi* wuv added lo "id children, and took ihem to drawn the neighbour's house, no sooner ity. It goes out again tomorrow and 1 Wcdneaiday. WRONG DECISION KIRKCALDY. Scotland. Two rugger teams derided to 126 runs to win. for the day wilh Tnnidud 17 for had he vacated when the whole p i av Respite a referee's decision Ferguson and Guillen were now 8. Jones eof^ortabl* with 4, not cf ihe northern portion of the to v „ ncv \ ,he match because ol together in a seventh wicket out and Jackbir Who had been al house collapsed. The family now frost. Now two olayers wish partnership and it seemed certain the wicket for an hour and four have their meals In what remains they'd taken his 'advice-—they thai they were not going to make minutes, equally settled with 13. of the boxwood kitchen, both broke legs —C.P. <&W*WW9*9***o*99*99** ^v/,v///^,^v//.v.v,v/,^v/,v/////,^y,^v,',-,',',^^',^v,-,'/, %  /.'.*,y,w, v.wss,'*w ; POISE l^ai is largely a matter of the state of mind If you pre uncomfortable or uniure nf your sanitary protection it will be reflected in your lack of self confidence, and will make you III at ease. 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PAGE KIGIIT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27. 1S51 Trinidad Draw Game With Barbados when Skeete was given out 1 b w off the sixth delivery from Mlllington's next ovci with the total at 127. He had scored 23 .luded (our boundaries in 34 minute*. Ferguson the M ula mMl, played out the TRINIDAD was Ml the IJ uf making 253 ^"i"*^,, who WM now ^iruns for victory In S5 minute In their match against BarillK wlUl p tii [y ml d-off and a bados at Kensington, but thouuh the lime was extended by .lib mM-on, sent down another half an hour, when Humpwere dnwn they were still 86 -^'.. thu MVS£*U$\IM run, short of their goal with only 2 wickets in hand. The ^"jr JJ^^^X^ lotal was 167 for 8. a maiden lo Gulllwi. Ferjuon There wa. no real clton b, r.amc.un,. .nd Stollmeyer opened hto !" "" • '"^J TnnU.d lo accompli* the u* op^d lot Tr,n.dad .nd Mullins J^^SSSSP. next emTSnd ihem .nd In. rale ol ..-..,i„: bowled 10 Ganteaume Iron, the '[""' ,^'!S"v£l lhc reffaMar. n 5t ^l^"""" ~'~ SullUn ito Kd not > opened Irom Ihe his cor *' '*<'* d • no,h t %  n ,a > n "' Iron, Mai shall Norman Marshall iclleved Mlllinglon at the Pavilion end and bowled a maiden lo Frrsii on • ... With 45 minulcs remaining lor ,,„, plav. Hod waa given hla nrst Sgl !" "pr" lor Ihe day. He bowled TR|MI\li--„d II out J H U,Ui %  run uui B Tans Choon c E Atkiniuii N M.r.hali ff Larval! %  'MIIII b Multlri* c an*-*in* b v Oi.ll.rn lb b florl W r WlUM l b HixM %  Jarhbn nol <>,,' I S.t. b |, lb I etb 1 T.,lal l %  will* l afternoon. Barbad.*\ I A III SnU -'••., (fa ins off the over. AUtui ion i ama r Ki.is did rv.i bat. rail •* wackrU t-atr 1 -St. B>-ea. a—in. •> 117 ? m. a 102 INT. ANALYSIS Mullir.. II I AIIMI...M. 1 I Mlllmai >II 14 > i< 9 Aikimen * B it Mjir.tulJ 11 4 11 1 Martha" u: -, n • I r. HoM 4 1 nnd accurate but the fielding did Pavilion End and Stollmever onmit always five the necessary drove ihe second delivery for 4. support. No lew than seven Each betsmnn then scored a single catches were missed. Mo* of in the over. Mullins' next over those were off the edge of the vielded a single and Atkinson then bat. I,.,] d maiden The lunch inHighlight of the day's play wan lerral wan taki a magnificent jwrformanee by wlIh thr ,,„ Bt 9 without loss J£< '£ i"* „ Vnd toss m^nu be tempted. The over off th. cut th-migh slips for score to 137 Huns now came at a fair rate Milimgton was now brought and 50 went up on the board by a bM y frorn lhe p flV ilion end. He L* lutifUl cut through slips off bowled to Ferguson who got a Atkinson for 4 The fifty was bnK .p to fl no ] c( o/f the fourth • %  ached In 53 minutes. and nUir ol a iimilar amount With the .cure at 52, Roy Mar*** %  similar shot off a no ball. cott, who with wickets fniiin.t stollmeyer 6. regularly at one end took comQ,, resumption Stollmeyer faced mand of the situation He Mullins f rom the Screen Knd and "|!~L_ M .r,h.ir, ne^i over punished all loose balU anUllrrl lhc „ cnnft d ,.| lV erv to leg wfl N '"£"millw fii^i wrS managed lo keep his pa.tnu (>r ., Mni | P ( ia „iea„ m e ho.,ke3 was also J !" ^\?J U £'* !" away from the bowling with h „ lnill lo the long-on boundary was al '•*^ kel J or J 8 !" "!^ seme su* There was a l>p. Millington bowled from the *t J'*' 001 "'/f,^' L?*T l !" cal example Of this m the last Pavilion F-nd and Stollmeyer <-nHond and a declon ror rr, w WlgkM p*ltt>l Up WlUl Mullins drove th^ second delivery for a *a* opheUl by Umpire Jordan^ which yielded ft runs. Just tingle Gantesumc played out the The scoreboard then read before Walcott was out he hit a ovj %  l3 \,ZT 1 J ~A glorioos six to the sight screen off Each batsman made a sintle off Jackblr Joined ^"n ana left-arm medium pacer Sydney Mullins' next over, and Millingon-drove the last ball from liond Jackblr. H was the second of the ton sent down a maiden to Ganlor a single and then too* .1 match. Walcott was the last mar. leaume The batsmen now appearmaiden from Norman MarshuM. t get out and scored S6 runs • I confident arid next over from Hoad continued from the ludlnf 13 tour*. Skippei J..hn Mullins. Stollmeyer played a deScreen end, and Ffcrguson cut Goddard unable to ol-,-. vefteni.. iverj nicely to square leg for 4. past Keith Walcott the only slip owing to a loot Injury *ei th D AUlnson was brought on when field for a single to send up Jackweek-end. Cl>'de Walcott tooi the acore had naotwd 2. igtd Stoll|,, r Wrto played out the remainder, over the captaincy. Ifl,,c 9 runs off thc V Fo [ bv * however sent up the Bi-ibado* who was 122 f'-r 3 in Including their second innings over th week-end. could only :-dd 46 fo the remaining 6 wickets, brlnglnR %  he innings to a close for IRS. Prior Jones and Sydney Jack hir took 3 wickets each. Jone who aant down 18 overs includlnR RhaU H ,. ()i brought on in place of With 20 minutes remaining for 9 maidona got his wickets at a Atkinson and a single wns made play. Mullins trundled from the cost of 32 runs Jackbir who off him Norman Marshall bowled screen end and Jackblr got an bowled just over 12 overs includf r om the other end making a may single wide of gully. Keith ing 3 maidens look his 'or 31 double change. Stollmeyer faced Walci.tt at second slip made a runs. N. AsgBrali look I for 55 and placed the fifth ball nicely food effort, but failed lo hold a Trinidad opening batsman through the slips for 4. In Hoy low one from Ferguson off Mul Andv Gantcaumc topsc-orcd, for Mai %  h:.ll ,s MCUIKI over Stollmeyer lins. The batsmen however ran his team In the second innings playing defensively, was beaten a single and Ferguson entered with 45. but gave three chances, and bowled for 35 He had been double figures. He then took nn J Stollmever was next with 35 at Ihe wicket for 73 minute-; and ^Q^ single to point off the si-cuim For Barbados E, L. G Hoad had hit 5 fours. The total was 1l0 m Mllllngton to send up Jack waa the most successful bowler now M lor 1 and £ %  "*'! Joined ^ r who played out the remainder He took 2 wickets for 2 runs Gantcaume In ^nnj" %  ""' Mullins bowled a maiden to over Ganteaume edged to first s^ rfuloni Deni* Atkinson rcClyde Wslcoit and Denis Alkin,up but Mullins fielding 111 that plocvti Mllllngton at the screen son resumed Barbados' innings position failed lo get his hand to Wld and Jlc |, mr cut through the with the score at 122 for 4. Wallhbail. alips lo the boundsry to send the cott being 58 not out. Jones openAsgarsli opened his account in ( t 48 t appeal for ed the attack from the Pavilion Roy's next End and sent down a maiden to Iwnutifuily waiooU Jackbir bowled to Atkinson The —_-.. from the Screen End the bataman kept on, and when the score rearhe-lging the second del.vcy rf M A'^arali w^as run -nut for throuih .t.ps for 2. He ondrove Tar^hoon joined Oantewine the next for another 2 Next ball he played defensively lo one the middle stump, mistimed and ^^/"banteaume'Vas then 43 for half an hour wasoutl.bw. Barbados had now nfi „ n lW(l mriM (hll nces In NorJSckbir got three through the lost five wickets for 128 runs. E. .* wUh Wf srore Up|l when Walcott at second slips Atkinson Joined Walcott and playunc hanged. He was dropped bemissed u low one off Denis ed oui the over. Jones sem down ninfl the ttic i. et | n one case and Atkinson. It was the Ihird another maiden 10 Walcott and hl 1hft oI her. Denis Atkinson dropdelivery und Ferguson who went Jackbir one lo Atkinson. pet j >n C0R y ca tch at cover point, up. played out the remainder Hoy Marshall now bowled from the screen end and Jackblr got bl.nilo liinU-ii oil Ihe Mu. 1 C'wealtli L-ad India, Pakistan By 114 Runs COLOMBO, Feb. 28. A stylish Innings of 102 by Vijay Hazare, tailed to prevent the Commonwealth cricket team gaining a first innings lead of 114 to-day over the combined Indii Pakistan and Ceylon side. The combined side scored 238 in reply to the Commonwealth first innings of 350. Thc match ends tomorrow and a draw see likely. Hazare played copybook cricket during his stay of three and three quarter hours. He excelled with cuts and drives which earned him II fours, and he was warm I y applauded as he returned to thc pavilion. lefthander Gul Mohammed. a former Indian Test player scored 56 and helped Hazare in a fourthwickct partnership of 98. He baited three hours and hit eight fours. Shacklcton took four fc 62 nn'" Rldgway three for 48. —Reuler 4 Race Horncri Come The Saguenay Terminal's Oak Hill, called nl Barbados on Sunlay from Glasgow with >t : ugar machinery, four 1 .... h „ i in l| •'"• " %  >. w*"--r un appvui ii ami gully. Marshall brothers ivera 1 the score res %  run nut fo. .h( lilichanged edged a delivery from Norman to Roy In slips but Roy fniled to lake Ur disallowed by Umpire Walcott Ferguson got a single to third man off Mullins and later Denis Atkinson missed a low one aecond slip from Jackblr off this same bowler and thc batsman got a single to send up 150 in 223 ilnutea. Play was now extended Walcott ondrove thc second delivery of Jones' next over for 2 In Roys next over, however, he and singled the last to meet Jackwaa run out in attempting a short this over. 2 going lo Walcott and — 2 to Atkinson wicket for 115 minutes Tin In Jones' next over Atkinson board now read189/3/45 was bowled with the last ball. Legall Joined Tungchoon The score board then read 135 6 3 opencl his score by a fine Trinidad got their seventh wicket dr-ve to the boundary when In Jackbir's next over. Nor a,mcd '["'' ,^i iv.n delivery and then played oui the ludlng.6 fours .and was al the ^^^ Normo j; Marshall and Norman's next placed Atkinson and Ferguson cut the fourth to the boundary and later cut at one which took the Barbados odge of the bat and went hich fourth wicket In through the slips but Mullins faileo r as Tangchoon ' hold it. The batsmen eventually ~ two. Ferguson took another wi-riBw rW*5lS S'X,SnJ„ LVmldif.'n e„^ -Sfc^ I .aWh. Tangchoon t, !" !" ,, .„.,,. 1 the maiden from Millington. MutUns' "OWLINQ A next over was a maiden lo J.cki Jackbir who was at Uu wicket for 74 minutes was un 1 dssreated for 13 and Jones the othei nol nut batsman was 4. Sfore* '.AKBAnOl Ini. NIMH Mi HI Is* "I'l-i %  nd l... : M*t.t,-n 1. AM WalbDii %  1 n J HI an out %  ill I, make in 225 minutes to match. When the game resumed. Keith Gtl Walcott fielded foi Goddard. 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Ill Ml W II HKI \R\ 27, 1S1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SI \ I \i CLASSIFIED ADS. TILKPHONI IMS The charge for %  nnwui UB i — f Both*. Marriage*. Death*. Aekao Hl H nnU, and In Mernonem nolle** II M on *>e*-day* and II at on Sunday* lor any number of word* u lo H. Mid 3 Mia per word on WM*>day* aad nnu par word on Sundays tor each •ddli tonal "oid For Birth.. Manias* or Engagement auiouneernenU in Carib Calling Iha chaige K'HOO (or any number o( word. up lo Ml and %  NMi per word lor e eft additional word Term, cart Fhon* Ml between l)l*M<>m. 1111 for Death Notice* only after pJR. % % %  —> % %  H....I., t I'fbmuv Mm Mi. -i h%  *", Hasting* Fan-tnuel li. I"~ul leave, thir-Knitr -I 4 11 oclOCK thll ev.ning fur lhe Wdburv C.meters Fr.-nde ere inv ited Ma Holder idaufhiee', Walter HoidcUr.ula HoHltr. IT SSI-In THANKS ft Retired SargV Jajv.r* N Jo.ie.. lair of Hoebuek Slraat. Mi. '..nl. gratefully acknowledge • PMl apprcclatloii H eamf***kpM pf %  yinpat'i'. tendered Ihfm in the" Wia-vama.il FI 1 SI— In FOR NAI.K wit SUnddy*. FOR HIM Hialnuia, cherpc u-eelr. tj real* am Pa cent* SmWan M word* — over 1 r*^d'liTuhiii'' *"*** •* %  *•*—* ***** HOUSES A FVRNISHEI) BCNGAIJJW n BadforJ Atenue I bedroom* and all modm •njrnwf Avaua W a tram April tat •' %  *" MS*', hi nuwUapaw Slock M-*. •Ail I Oarage Servant.' loomi I MT Chandler Todd* IS 111-*, t'l .AT MtmllPt furnlahad rial. Hart lng mam road Good verandah facini Me Safe bathing Suitable paw paroon ot couple Telephone. JP4P 13111—1. kVARtNE ClABDENS—N*wlv built Bungalow 1 badrooma with running walar %  M .ill MMMMPP BPKVPPHajpffi flpgU. Mi, madman. Hotel F lyal. I.ng (**<. prefered tIS 5 .-In %  n la had WMS Un, f U ri Pool, running walar. With or Witho "-"' l minute* walk lo Club. Citv ul S36C HIV If l'l III H SALES nd 11 SO on Cuadavr : I un .s u-„1.1. J OW uri.-d^i AUCTION AUTOMOTIVE I.OKRV -One .11 MM Lurry in perfect %  I.-or Llrenw until June. Appl> : t\ E C. Il.thell. Frtend.hip Plantation Phone 4111. WHI td PIOX-UP OM li.-liir Pi.. ip In working ordrr. Apply: S B Cola ft Co. Lid. It-chnck Street 11 I M I f r, CAR lllllm-ii 10 HP. Mileage 9.PC0 JuR re-painted Irathcr iiphoUtcry. l)i.il Office 4011. homa S44* II > SI—So. ELECTRICAL AUCTION -lie or mil -i on Wednesday next the lath at 3 %  ."iS*".,'"* Ul ,(rol M w t*' Hall laand Eagle Hall. On* II I hou— in food rendition Muat ba told P'Arc. A Scotl. Aiittionrrr. M ssi—an REAL ESTATE Nome rAanM m MIISI MI HI %  Tfta Parochial Trra*ora> %  iHnra prlU %  • rtoaad on TUapdav JTlh and Wtdnra<"-y s*h Pthuvy laai ,i u npon WOOD OOODAJUl %  nttv i.i TAKE NOTICE KINSEY WAVI'MI MISCELl AXEOL'S .. ... China. aiKar and SnaflUtd Plata % i ..I* (Ul of call at aoKNlNGFS. loinMUl Royal Varhl Club S01S1 --TFN IMUEDIATE CASH i DI-TIIJ.INC. COH oTJ % W W 1" -rt li t SS iratton orpaniud aad An tiv.c Shop Dial 41 Thai KLs.*TY PORATIUH. > aw ritrtlnc u.idrr Ih. Delaware. United SU*ta t Amenra whoro trade or baunaaa add n ai la I4t Walnut street. Phlladalphia. Stale ot Panmylvanla U^A. Manufacturer!. ha< applied lor the rrpMtratMn of a Irpfle "-..(. i n p.i.t -Aof Ralater Hi reaper' i.i w-nMky. ii". in" •>*. alrohour cor dlali Uallon The trade mark can be aren oi ippiu-aiM>n at m, nffMw Dated lh Mth day of February. IM1 l( mi'i.Mnaauirar of Tre M-.k. I) S .1 J %  | hM IMM minUture' lad. QOBJUNOI MAGAZINES True Drier live and True Finn Uaraii-vea Pteiure Comlri. 9 a Mot*. LtKa* Street Dn.i 4P1< TAKE NOTICE SINOLETTE lOpaUOH A Associ%  I i 'Mrrrii • Pntun rnmp— ) ...... who* Lade or MilwPPi J._ F.-pU. d. ha. -ppiLed for the P — %  k ... r.-t -A f.p.*t of pai -t. varnlahea .naulatin.* varnih> enamel. ( P Ifttl pai.iu,,, colourp ;patu. lacquer., paint and TAKE NOTICE lloullr • 111 be %  recuiered under Ihe lawa of BMtoin. Dulllkrra, whoae trad W1M W PPI addrea The Di.tllWr* %  rave Road. FMlham. London. %  England, hai applied for Iha rrff.Mtratlor\ -— nark In Frt —" In reapect and will be after on* mo. of Fk-bruaa' IPS I ntttled to ma al my ofJk recu.Ua ti on The on application at my Dated Ihl. Mih day refiner Ihe aan.e from Ihe tttb da% ileai aome per^nn ahali .•e notice In doplu-alr of oppciaitiun of turb .ft !" Pabni r^. mi H WIIJJAMS. KepMtrar of Trade Mark, 11 t SI Jn TAKE NOTICE OnTE -COIJMIATOR" Pfrkt*rotq uie only four rnonthn Too amal imaent owner.. Price UPU on Central M4P. JtJ.Sl C-ll iKFRIGEBATOR fJemral Ek C.nadlan Model %  rub. ft wit munthn fuaranlee Elect,.. Service Ud 1 Bl Mai m. FIRNITURE FCI'-NITURE Modem Mahoaany Cheat of Drawer.. Book Maffailne Stand. Eaefl-KIron. Nickel Waiter*. Xmaa Tree l>ccQrnllon Urtili Phone MTJ W.2 SI IS n MNIII RC — Ralph Braid offer" Ue inlWini bargalm in Brand New furniture for a limited time | John Brmamead 1'prnht PUno tlOO 00. Mahoaany Dinina ChairSIT PO a pr; Mad Tub Chair. 134.00 a pr Man Bed-rndu 3 (t. 8 ln 30 00 a pr ; Bed-end. 4 ft. 6 inOS 00 a pr | Ma> Bureau. $1S 00 each: Mahogany I'.-ktail Table, frum U 00. Birch Cnalin .IS00 a pr : nal lometllnd a numerou* '.ail.i. <>f hlfih Ha., teeoiu! hand furnl'.nr Por vlewlni CPU in Hardwood AlUy Open dally from B am to 4 p.m. Hreakfu'l Time inclusive 23 I SI -fin. LIVESTOCK IT %  |-fF.s\ |? Re iv.i ,-. both larse*. Apptl LM %  Do* Samoa. lox 6U0. Port. f s f .,, al.1 M -In HORSES-1 y o. Oeldmg ''Ladvawan %  Jim Gackeriack ex Sugar Udy un i -mod 1 yn. gelding 'Jim Oackerjaeli n P-lncr.. StrlU*. Apply: J H Koward*. Telephone IS30. 9T1.SI—If n TWO HORSES, HARNF.SS und on-? (11 Curt. Going cheap Apply S. E. Cole A Co ltd Roebuck Street MISCELLANEOUS BATHS — In Porcc-Uln Enamel. In While. Green. Prunioae wllh matching ii...u In complalo colour rullt*. Top trade. A BARNES ft Co.. Ltd. :., 1.91—If.n. CITITAIN FITTINGS—For rmart window ttviuig. light control. Valanrt* and draperie-. By KUarh. Dial 447S A. BARNES ft CO, LTD. I3IS1 -t.ln 1U.SI—Lf.n. DRV C^RAMRR—Por dry cleaning Suit*. Frock*. Hat*. Coat* etc.. try Snubb'a Dr. Clejner. Prke I bol. ObUlnablr i.l KNIOHT'S LTD. IT 2.SI—9n. MODERN BUNGALOW Overlooking Oolf Courie. S Bedroom*. Drawing and Dining Room*. Gallery. Garage Mid ipacioui game* room underneath Apply Gordon Nlcholl. Telephone PUP MUM f n nu)"ERTDQ-A few .mall propertlei in good reiadential dlatrirU All torgain*, ad now Ming C "irn. point-. sianwav Store, tuca* Street. Ring 4UI0. information |iv !" without vbllgitioi BEMERSYDE. St LawfCPda Gap, Chrlrt Church, near Ihe Cable Station The dwelllnghouae romprlaei large drawing and dining room*, thre, badrooma. wllb running water In each tone with a private bathi aaparate toiler and bath, and kitchen. Open verandah* to the Eaat "nd the Norlh and a rloard verandah to the South on the iwaialde Three yard, which i and fruit The priperly la na-bothing For appolntmenla to 1i further particular* ring Nirholl. ft CO., Solicitor. %  ISI—t I The parcel of land containing 1.811 •q lare feel Wllh the Building* thorron %  ituato in Lucaa Street, Bridgetown, adJoining the property of Ihe Bacbado' Telephone Company Limited, and at pre %  ent occupied aa to part by the Obaervet Nrwepaper and a* lo part by Miea Cado ?"*pet tion by application to the lenanU. For further particulara and condition of •ale. applyt — COTTIJ: CATPOBD co. No. II High Street. Bnd<:cU*n That 1 LIMITED. %  TlaMja m I'.,-. RED ROSE H ESTABROOKS a Canadian Corporation. I .lilted to regiater Ihe aame aftei one month from the nth da oi Feftniar*IMI unlea* *nnve peraon dial In the meantime give notice in dupUral* lo me at my office of opposition of aurh regiitralwn. The trade maek ran b. aeen on application at my ofSxe. Dated Ihl* Mth day of Pebruarv. IPS I H WIII.I,MRPgutrfu ot Trade Mark* IT 1 11 3n Mm i... applied mMk In Part "A" of Reginer in re-pert ol tea. coffee coffee muture* -nd *plce*. l-nd will be entitled to regiater Ihe aame • %  (tar one month from the Xlth day ol Frbruai.1P9I unleaa aome peraon "hall In the meantime give notice m duplicate to me al my office of opposition of aiuh reglatrallon T^e trade mark can be teen on application at my office Dated thia 34th day ol F.br.iaey, IPS! H wn i.i AMS Rcgi-trar nl Trade Mark* TAKE NOTICE SEVILLA RUM That CONTINENTAL DISTI1J.1NG CORPORATION. > corporation org.ni.ed .i"(l emeting under the law* of Ihi nf Delaware. Unltod ghttpa who*e trade or buu.eaa addrea* IIJP Walnut Street. Philadelphia. State Of Penneyivanlp. UJA, Menu far >-. applied for the rrgirtralkin irada m*rk n, Part A" of Hegiite. I. reapect of whitky. gin. rum. ryp. Pic*) node rordial* and liqueur* and other potable di.tillcd alcoholic beveiage*, and entitled lo regiater the *mi after one month from the 2Tlh day of MNirj 1PSI. unleaa anme prraui *hall In ihe meantime give nolle* in dupllcat. I my office of oppoMllon of lurl reginratntn The trade mark can L> %  en on appllrallon at my office. Dated Ihl* Mth day of Febtuary. 11*1 II WILLIAMS Rrgt.trar of Trade Mmki till! H TAKE NOTICE 4. LIMITED. lln ...I.L. Weal Road. Brr nt ford. Mldd land, i ... applied for the rrgLrration a Iradmark in Part "A* of ItrglMer re.pe.-t of mcdk.-lnal preparation., a will be entitled to regi.ter the Mime al ith from the 2Tlh day of Frbrui |gp| .LT.lv duplic, %  ofnre of optButtii.ii of i unileriiBned will wt t office No 11 High St on Fridpy Ihe 3nd d. ip for *ale al I eel. Bridge y of March Upper Bai den. ellinahouae called "Murray h Ihe land thereto containing ion P.10P aq feet, altuate at Street. St Michael, the real'" i Ilia* ...meet ion hv appoi.. Ida Greave*. Trlephone Hi. For further particular* and condition' of -ale. apptv b COTTI.E. CATFORD ft CO Mill-ion HARDWARE---Storko( enamel ware and >.>l>*hlM> bucketa are iivailnbte to %  Ikpla -....i. only Sto.li conal.t of "all.. Saucepan*. Bowl-. Chamber*. Pi* k.Hle* 4 dllterent *irea at landed co.t.. Al Ralph Beard'. Show Boom Hardwood Alley. Tl.ai~3n. INDIVIDUAL POSTER SIGNS— Improve your aalea be. uung individual Porter Sign, and Price Ticket* mid? to orde-Ith very attractive colour*. C. Pieriepolnte, SUnwn. Store. Luco. Street rial 4P'/> JT J M in. M'H>ERNFOUJ DOORS—The dlrtlnriu.hed anlutlon to your -pecUl .inhitecliiial problem of door clonire*. ^reena, movable partltlona. DU1 44IL A. BARNES ft CO. LTD. SHAKES MB Share* Barb ado. Shlpplng A Tr.idlng Co Limited 500 Share* narbado* Co-operative Cotton Factory Limited. 110 Share* Barbadoa Fire Inaurance Co. Limited. P0 Share" Barhado* Foundrv IJmited. 01 Share* Barbadoi Ice Co. Limited IIP Shnre. Knight* Umlted 111 Shore* Barbado* Telephone Co Li ile.l The above aha re* will be offe red to public competition on Friday net the 2nd March IMI. at I pm nl Ihe office of the under-limed. CARRINGTON ft SF-ALV. Luc** Street be received By the Ihe 'Mh da' of Calal* Mdj build) -wluded Church The i building* and md within thirty day" from Chrl lolll purr ha err clear the the date of pmrhaac K E McKENZtC Neil* Plantation. St. Mlch*el Dated Ihl. Mth day of Fein II WIIJJAMS. Begirtrar ol Trade Mark* TI i si :t, ~~TAKE NOTICE PHILADELPHIA That CONTINENTAL DISTUJ.INO CUHItJRATION, a corporation onfanlted and cutting under the lawa of the State of Delaware. United State* of America, whoae trade or buiinee* adder** i* No I43P Walnut Street. Philadelphia. States of Pennsylvania. US*.. Manufacturer*, ha* applied for Ihe reglatrallon of a Irade mark In Part "A" of Reglrter In reaped of whlaky. gin. rum. rye, alcoholic cordial, and liqueur* and other potable dirt Hied alcoholic beverage., and will be entitled lo reglrter the Mm* alter one month from the Tlth day of February IMI. unwaa *ome peraon n>ll In the meantime give notice tn duplicate to me al my office of nppoaition ol such Kgi-iiaiion The Irade mark ran be ...plication nt niv ochre. Dated thi. Kth day of February. IPftl. II WIIJJAMS. Kegittrar of Trade Mark*. 17 3 II—*i TAKE NOTICE GAY0IL That PINCHM. JOHNSON ft ASSOCIATES. IJMITED BriU.h Company Manufacturer., whoae trade or bualneai addreM I* 4. Carlton Garden., london S.W England, haa applied for Ihe reglatrallon of a trade mk In Part "A" ol Reflater in reaped .other Hi,, n the -,i. M i nil, patnl enamel, pcoloura -.11.1 .T.. ONE WINDMILL nd tower. Two laiw BMttM P Call 4114 n.3.M-*i. IfuDUIDRS—Ort rid of IK* Pert* by u.mg -Bodkrlde" Irvaed Powder wrden kill* Bug*. Anla. Flea*. Ilr>u*e File*, foi-k.oachc*. Beeileetc. CM. Price 1 %  bol KNIC.irrs LTD PMl-In STOl'RINIV IlMliHT'S LTD. ick and VENETIAN BUNDS.Kir*eh Sun-air; • II metal Dc l.u.e Venetaln blind*, to • our *l*e*. delivery 1 week* Dial 44TI A BARNES ft CO LTD. IllSl-tfn. WINDOW GIASS Sparkle Tlower ed Sheet and Plale Glo** *or all need* We cut lo >our requirementa. U. W HITCHDISOH Co. Ltd. Dial 4JM. t new look. N" Floor ft Co Ltd YACHT Yawl "Frapedaappro*: T,'i II long, with gray marine engine Hec-ntljpunted and in good condition Appl) V Tr ***? or 30*1 17.3 Mt YACHT ternaHonal o"e-de*Ign In flrM CUM racing t Iha i Trtai RPPM P JARON' JONTS CO 4171 InI7MM) ll TD. PHONE r 2Sl-n. PI'111.14' Ml I II I 'S dlrtemper-. eapanl. lacque vamlah tfriera. wo %  tain*, antl-corroelve and antl-foullrv compu.ilIon*, and anti-corro-lvc oil*, an will be entitled lo reglrter the aim liter one month from the TTth da >• biliary IMI unleaa aome penmi *ha in the meanlime give notice in duplical to me at my office of opposition of *ur regkWnatloii. The Uade mark can I Men on application at my office Dated Ihl. 34th day of Febr.LW) 1M H. WILLIAMS. RegUtrar of Trade Mark*. 17.1 ll—l*i ill per spate l ti per apefr I charpe |1 SO on Su-idnvt I ..il li %  •' -lli.V le on Ay-d'i.i on week-dow NOTICE PARKH OF ST. lo.l I'll AppHratlon. for Ihe Po*t of Parochial Treaat.rer wUI he received bv the unUrriigned not later lliati the Mih February IMI Application* mu-l be accompanied bv Baptiimal and Medical Certlfkatea. and marked on the En. %  rlope. application* for Poet ol Paro KM Treaaurrr. Sgd. Rev |. C MAIJALIE1T. Chairman St. Ji.wi.ii'. VeeUV. II 1S1 flti NOTICE FARIAS OF ST. 1.1 CT All peraon* owing Pi irl*h pay Ihe urn* without they will be collected O L DEANE. Parochial Treaau .1 ggpl Ii'.ire a*Med t< ier delay, o 34 IS MECHANICAL "FFU IT TYPEWRITER L C. Smll -.,-eile.,l condit.on around two year" lelephore MM. Gooding 4P31 TAKE NOTICE SWIFTS tat SW1IT ft COMPANY, a corpora peSMt&Ml and ruining under thn i of Ihe State ol llllnoi*. Unite. M of America. wbo*e Uade .. ne*i pddTPM la Union Stock Yard* Chicago, stale of Illlnoia. U S A hft applle.1 for the .eguuatlon of a trad, mark in Pan A of Pegi-ter In re**>ec ,.l food prmtuct. md mhalanre* u—d n gredietii. in f..ud-, including fie*h. pre TAKE NOTICE JANTZEN Thai JANTZEN KNITTING MUXtil NC a corporation duly organlied unnVf rie lawa of Ihe Stale of Nevada, whoae rude or bualneM eddreae la Jantaap finei ".rlland. Stale of Oiegoit. U'llhH l~lel nl America, haa applied lor ri %  r MB trndo mark in Part "A 1 Krgi.ter in rr-r>ecl nf article* of clothing, and will be ...titled lo rrgl.tci the i after one month from Ihe JTIh nf Febru.r. IMI ,.,,le*. aome perioi. In the meantime n..ir. i duplicate to n.e at my office of oppoai lion of uich reglilratwn. The treat. nark >~J,H be >em on appllrallon at n Daled It l. Mih day of February. IMI II WH.UAMS. Rrpi.trar of Trade Mark*. 17 1 II -In TAKE NOTICE TANGO That THE BYARD MANUFACTURING. COMPANY LIMITED. Manufacturer.. Brlll-lr Company. whoaa trad* it new addle** I* Ca.tle H...il.a.il Nottingham. Fj.fi.nil ra>. applied for the egi.t.atiun of a trade mark In Part A of Regialer in reapect of all kindt if hairnet*, including hairnet* of *Hk. ottoii. human hair, rayon, nylon and ilher .ynthetlr i.arn*. bnndeaui. iporti %  Mi .lumber net*, halt curler*, hai* grip*, hair pad*, hair transformation*, *W* and halrdre**eriware, and iiiti. Irle*. and will be entitled lo regi.ter lh am* after one month from the lay of Febnoary IMI UNICM aome pen hall In the meanlime give noUce duplicate lo me al my office of opp. lion of .„h regl.t,at-.,i The In nark .an be urn on application al i Dated thi* 14th day of FebruMy. II H. WILLIAMS Reglilrac of Trad* Marki TAKE NOTICE DIXIE BELLE l3P Walnut Street. Phi lade.. M*a applied fo. the reglatrMI Uade mark la, Pan A' of Regirtei In reepect of wh fkv. gin. rum r>e. alcoholic cMdiaU and liqueur* and other potable dtoLlled alcolwuic beveie**and will ftp entitled to refMer the law after one month from Iha ITth day of IMruMr 'Ml. unleaa aome perm .hall m the meantime give notice in duplicate IP me al gay office a*7 np—Rlun f >uch igieti..ti, ta-lle Boulevard. Nottingham. England, ha* applied for tlie Wfr-affg 1 *" <* %  <" M* ti P.t A of Regi.ter in reaper! of all kind* hairnet* of allk. n. hum ... .i hair. net*. Number neu, hair culler*, hair grip", hah pad*, hair tran.iortnallon*, wig* and h-lrdreaeer*' ware, and auudrte*. and will be entitled lo reglrter the gMMj alter one monlh frm Ihe 17th day of Pebru.r, mi urn,*, „„,, p^n.^. plicate lo me al my office of oppoaiin of auch regl.tr J" -in The trade irk can be aeen on application at my Dated. •>.* Mth day of reb.ua*v. tMI H WIIJJAMS. : leg I. trai ol Trade MarkTAKE NOTICE CHARTER OAK That CONTINENTAL DLSTIU.IN<; OOKI'OltATION. a corporation organued and eNlrting under Ihr law. of the it it. of Delaware. United State, pf An,.., a. whoae Ir.ide or buaineia addre ., l. walnut Street. Philadelphia. Male of Peiiiuylvaiua. U.S.A. M-nufartUF-rp, hPa applied for the rpglatraUon of a trade Mk in Part A of Regi.ter in re.pect WhUfcy. gin, ip irdial* and liqueur* and other potable dlrtillcd aknholw lie\iiage^ ..nd will b> Hilled tn -c.gl.lcr tiuum aftpf .ne onth from the ITth day of February Ol unleta mm* peraon aheii in the eantlme give notice In duplicate to me my office of oppoaltion of inch regl— nlloii Thw trade mark gpx i application at my office Dated thi* Mth day of February. "Ml H WIUJAMS LOVT RACE TICKET BOOK*ScTl** A I PPhTh Tio I 17P0-M Findei warded on retumeag aame I* WHI-4O< (..tier. Chapman lame If 1 SI ITAKE NOTICE CHATEAU HOHDF.N inMI'ANY 1JM ITED. a eorporaIMn oiganiaad under the law. of the Dominion of Canada. Menu faiturer.. whoae trad* or buainc— addreM la Clly Dairy Building. Spadina 1'irmnl Toronto. Pro. inc* of Onlarlw, Canada, haa applied lor the rcgi.ire.tton f a trade mark in Part -A" of Bepiater m reaped ol criceac; butter, rroam. milk and milk product*, daily pro. duct*, aubetancee uaed a* food or %  v. ingredient. m food. and will be entitled to regiater the aame after one month from the |7lh day of Pebruarv IMI. unteaaoene peraon .hall to me al mv oSIre of upgioaltlim of ancii fegl-tralion. The trade mark ran be Been M ept-lu ati..n at mv Kmer Daled thi. Mih day of February. IMI H WIIJJAMS. Reai.liar ,.f Trade Mart. IT I SI jn I sril I'osiaiif Slanps Of the Rrltlah Weal li.dteBeat Price* paid al the i ..IIUI--.I. si..,,,. %  pptl t v.M Swan Slr-t W1AT8 IN A NAME When you aay %  Vwfton W*x'krs— fcveryonp thinks ..f Crickel. & you Know likewise, Everyone thinks of Cooking. .!• %  you Say G. A. Servic*. SUNGLASSES For LADIES & GENTS Arruuiiu; Styles A Value*! THANKS n /0. TAKE NOTICE DODGE That CHRYSLER CORPORATION, a orporaltou orgmuted and rilitmg undo h* law* of Ihe Bute of Delaware. Unlled itaie* nl Amrrica. who** trade or buainro iddreaa I* 341 M,.*jHlu<>etl. Avenue. Hghland Park. Drtmtt. Stale uf •Dchlgan. V 1 A M.., ut.icturer*. ha* applied for the reglMraiion of a trade mark In J*arl "A" of llcgi.fr in reaped of tran-purtalton element* ol all kind*: motor driven vehicle*, automobile* and truck, of all kind* and fo. all piirpoae.. part, of motor driven vehicle-, aiitomohaPhl and truck, and their aceeaorie* of every deacrlptlon. and will he entitled %  •riginea of all kind* and for all puipoae*. pan. thereof Mid arremorle. UkMPM .,f every rte.crlplii.ri. internal ..niliu-lion t i.gi.trr the tame after ,. lioin Ihe 17lh djpg of Feliiuiin IMI. meantime give notice In dm>h. ,u i,. me at mv offl.e of oppontion ot auch legirtration. The Irade mark ran be •ecu on application al my office Dated thi* Mih day of February. IMI. H WIIJJAMS, Raglalrar ot Trade Mark. 17 I SI In iniii; AND ALL THAT LIQtOK LICENSE NOTICE I II \V I I I, The application of Otcar Deckle* of Endeavour. St Jam*. Ihe purchaarr ul 1 i.i I n.e No ami of IMI. granted IP I—..!.Johnaon In reape-t of a boarded and %  hingled ahop with >he<;of attached ailualed al Endeavnoe Corner rear Chinch of Oi>d. St Jamr. ami *.. Doled 1 I... To S If NURSE, raq. IN li. M.igi.lr.te Di.t L". llnl N II Tin. ..ppli.alion will be rred at a IJ-eiiwng Court lo be h fhp Plh March. IMI at II o'clock %  ollce Court. Polio Haa >', (.OVIIIMIIM Minus TO MEHCHANTS AND OOVBENMENT CONTRACTORS Merchants nnd Government Contractors and other persons having counts against the Government are requested to transmit them to the several Deportments as goon as possible. 2. Accounts should be r*rh*rTeplarapaag mam butler, biitteimttk. arlalln. v*MUl>|r*, canned baby foodi fruit. dried Jruii. pickle* and condiment. >ineaar. lam*. Jallle*. martnalad*. pie filler, rice. meal, peanut-, fig., date*, tsialn*. rod liver oil. *alt. *loek feeda. poultry feed*, fo* feed*, dog fr*d.. bone meal, and oyiler .hell* noap* and ingredient, of aoapa. Including toap bar*, .oap Sake., liquid *oap and powdered •oap. t learning, polishing, and won ring preparation., and Ffrtilir.r., particularly artificial fettlllier. and maiedientthereof, inrludu rhenucaU bone ma I horn .having. ertibla tallow. canned ::T PF.RSOXAL The publk are hereby warned againrt nving credit to my wife. RTTA nap layacorki aa I do not hold m>*e:f rerponalbl* lor her or anytracUng any debt or debU in my name unleaa by %  wrltlrn order • rred by me. DAND3. KELLMAN. Sen rig tie id Al Joaeph 77H' -in ADVERTISE—It Pays NOTICE PARISH OF BT. I nil. 11 VESTBV BTE-ELECTION I herebv give notice that I have %  pointed the Church Boyi' School, rn the Pariah Church, aa Ih* place where all Parlehlonera of Ibe Pariah of Philip and other peraon* duly qual lo vote at any Election of Vaatry for the Mid Pariah may aaaaenbl* Monday Mh day of March 1111 bet* the hour* of 10 and 11 o'clock In mprning to elect a Vestryman In place Ol trnnt Lye Eaq. decraaed. Sgd P S. W. SCOTT. Parochial Treasurer. St Philip jaiSI-dn Chtm .ulpliu.'c a. namid al eipeciallv .uperphoapliafr. id. phephate rock. *oda and ..f ..-la. luiphate %  mnvonium phoaphale. cvaMagpt .it. %  . l|.hat. ilphate. ...Iphaie of pntaui. agricultural limeitone gypaum. muriate ol polaah. calcium nitral*. c-pper .ulphaie. and pntai.ium r.nat' Inaedlcldea and fungicide", particular, ly areenaie of lead, calcium araenatr nicotine aulphate. and paradiehlorobentnduilnal ol edir.1. 'all.— ll,.!.-.....l and areM and Ir. feather., wool. hoof* anunal aland*. an|. mal caainga and membrane* Olue* and ad-,e.iv.. including animal bone and hide glue*, and vegetable ad hMivea Pertillirr iprrader*. mil te-ling kite, hatcherv equipment, baby chirk*, and bag* and container*, and will be entitled In reglrter the ume alter one n-anth from the Tlth dav of Fe*wuarv. IMI. unlaa* m.me person *hall in •he meantime give notice In duplicate lo me at my nance of oppoaltion of eucti The trada mark can be wen Ml aoDlication at mv office Dated thli Mih day of Februarv. IMI 1*11. M WILLIAMS. Regl.trar of Trad* Mark. 17 t ftl—ln A Performance will be given in UN Hall uf HariUon College al 130 pin. on Friday March Ptli Tn-kcta at S -. S and 3/Ma %  Mir either at Ihe Headmaileri Office or al John km'* Bl a I loner. Proceed* In ran to UK' .ml nf ilvn. Trinidad. V//MVaWa'AVyaV/AV/rV. ,X fO-DAl'S NEWS FLASH "I IJ*AP OVEH THE WALI in UMta Baldwin. A MORN1NO AT THE OFFICE -By Edgar MltlelhuUer. ''HI S -..', Ull.iMlll JOItNaON 4 IMkl.lM.r INVITATION FOR TENDER Department of Highways and Transport SEALED TENDERS will be received al the Colonial Secretary"i Office up to noon on the 28th February, 1931, for the supply of Barbados Limestone. Marl Filling and Earth Filling to the Department of Highways and Transport for a period of twelve (12) months from the 1st April. 1951. 2. A separate tender for each division tendered for should be submitted in respect of each or any of the following divisions: — (a) Northern Division—Parishes of St. Lucy and St. Peter (b) Southern Division—Parishes of Christ Church. St. Philip and St. John (r) Eastern Division—Parishes of St. Andrew and St. Jose pi' (dj Western Division—Parishes of St. Michael, St. George, St. Thomas and St. James. 3. A tenderer under paragraph 2 may also submit n separate tender for ony combination of Divisions tendered for under paragraph 2 on the basis of paragraph 6. except that for the Anal word* "on spot anywhere within the Division" read "on spot anywhere within the combined Division." 4. Samples of limestone of the quality required may be seen, and particulars of quantity and size likely to be required, may be obtained. application at the Department of Highways and Transport. 5. Tenders are to be made on forms which can be obtained at the Colonial Secretary's Office on payment of a deposit of Five Dollars ($3.00). After s contract has been entered into, those persons who may have submitted bona fide lenders will have their deposits refunded; but no person or persons who may refuse to enter Into a contract when so called upon shall have the deposits made by them rrfunded, ond these shall be forfeited and paid Into the Treasury. 6. The prices tendered must be based on Ihe payment of wagei at current standard rates in the trade, and shall be the flat rales per cubic yard at which Ihe tenderer would contract lo supply material* on spot anywhere within the Division. 7.J-50—2n. I'OMI-OM l Owing lo the recent heavy rains it was decided ID postpone the Exhibition which was due tu be held In Queen'* Park on Saturday March ITth In SAII ItlCV. AI'KIL lift, ii..„, |_ p.ni. The Exhibition books aro V now ready and can be obS lalned from the Secretary, <'#> Wilkinson & Havuta \ Co u.i. ;• .Till .f CHANCERY SALE %  ARSUU3CM The undermentioned property will be Mt up Public Building*. Bridgetown, between I* noon data •perilled below If not then told, it Will b* at the aame place and during Ihe umi hour* un LINDSAY KRCIL RVEBl'RN OII.L Pla at tl.e Registration Offlc. m. for Ihe mm and on th on each succeeding (nilFull particular* on appli ,1:17 VIOLET JOHNSON PBOPriTT ALL THAT certain piece in the pan*h of Burnt Michael and Ma two rood* two and two-tenth* percho land, former I v of W T E li O a Medford but now of one Famum if one Pilgrim and on the pi Ihe aame may abut and bound Together will called "HomMiead* and all and alngular the In.ildin an.1 chattel on the Mid land* erected and built itrnd Defendant or parcel of land niuafe at ".poonera | d afore-aid containing by edmea-iirem. •I thereabout. Abutting and bounding now of .me Walrond on land MI land* formerly of Alfred F Green I oad .ailed Spooney* Hill i ...,.) rpHU win IAMS. Regnlrar In-CI-ancery tth February. IMI The CARIBBEAN CLUB presents A VARIETY SHOW at The Police Recreation Honm CENTRAL POLICE STATION at I %  m. Thursday, lot Mareh Pr ...ds In aid of Y W.C.A. I RESERVED SEATS :il 3/| I NltrsrRVED .. Music by Ihe Follre undrr the direction trf \ (apt Rabaon SHIPPING NOTICES MUMIil VI UMKUli M U ZEALAND LINK. LIMITED %  MAN/ Us -rOMOAffUaaO I* atbeduiad • %  ne Feb.,..,, >, '". Briiban* March Tin. A ly April. IMI -paee foe KM Thi. i.*ael haa ac.ap t .g on t Mourn BUU o llth IHn.ip.M %  ih Oulan. latiMa Wmdwar. r further particular, apply rtnureas. wrmv a co iw .. Da COSTA A CO LTD Trinidad. Berhadr-. It m l ,.,• %  1 Mln February a*SI Th* M V %  AH mm. | riidar Mh u*< h IMI 3tWOOD' will SI Lucia Ore, ada .i_t Aruba. and -•- •ail.aar ill V 1 'a to be nottaad. W.f. SCHOONER OMNKRS ASSOCIATl | T.i SC NEW YOI l>ken uiu 13rd February "Heabreere aalt* ln ItarpR. SERVICE smpPa Barbado* th March. wn\ei Barbado. r.NsTW ORLXANS SERVICE B Februanr ariivca Barbadoa let l ma PPUIOI„„. T ,„ Mwh anl ^:£^T^ ) < V.NADIAN SERVICE MM IHItllt ND Na*M af ablp SS. "AU-MA I'AHTNFR SS ,| ' AiaroA PEKNANT -in: 1 11 11. .1 SI. .S "ALCOA PEfrtNAST • a. "ALCOA PAHTNFR -UlNtllM. APRIVI1 P February Sard March Plh •fareh tuti v, n > tptai Dur lurch Slh .OBKIIT THOM 1.T11. NEH 1ORK AND Ol'l.r Mllllll arei.v:— HA COSWA a c o. LTD —CANADIAN SERVICE PASSAGES TO EUROPE Comae! Anllllci Products. Limili'd. RoHau. Domini*., for Milta lo Europt. The usual ports of call an Dublin. London, oi Rotterdam. Single fare £70; uiual reductions for children. SMART and DURABLE for TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White Siiea: 6—1 1 PRICE: $1.60 ( -*^VCr*aOv**V>>^,Ver,VeO Wf'.Wl.WI .... ONE-0-ONE ONK-O-ONK CLEANSER, thi CUan.tr Ul the lare Blue Drum—when you buy l--l you girt -*i (| />"1 th*> world's airiest Clcansi'i' Col only -4c. 1-0-1 CiaffJU withitchlng, when you order CteVkMT just say 1-0-1. Obtjinablc from all Groceries. Druggists and Hardware Stores, In (act obtainable everywhere. I (1) > • CHARLES McENEARNEY & CO. LTD. to a "C 3 o S w.'ss.'s',:;'.:*. W. ',0.W,(-WX-VtrtV'/.'a



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PACK TWO n\UIIAIK)S ADV04 \H TUODAI reaai at tr. mi Qahib QaUinq L ADY SAVAGE, wife of His Excellencv the G< th#it (.laufhter Pal and Mr. add Mrs Hopwood attended the fourth daw'* play o( the Info cricket match between Trimdai' and Baiim-ios Thi-v vrntctu-d thi Sftir from thf tieorce Challenoi Stand Same 'Plane S IR GtOROE SEEU Head of Development and Welfare in thf Wt-st Indies, who went u,. .. in Thursday returned to Barbados on Sunday •ftarooon via Trinidad by H.W I A Ri'turnlug by the fcime piano m >in H A Cute Lord LisiowH's Sitter A MONG the pawengeis arriving from Jamaica on Sunday evening by B.W.I.A. were Mr Rorv More O'Farrail and his wifa Lady Elizabeth More O'FarraU. Tney are here for a week r two Staying at Pour Winds Club. St Fetcr. Lady More O'Farr.dl is a sister of Lord Li si owe!. Oirmcr Minister of State for Cifcnuil Affairs who presided ever thiConference cf West Indian Governors at Barbados In November, 1849 Mr More O'Farrall** brother Frankle who is a member of the Anglo-Irish Bloodstock Agency trrived from South Americy— t arday afternoon via Venezuela by B.W.I.A. Back to Trinidad M RS OP BENNETT and her two daughters Joan and Barbara who were in Barbados for a short holiday returned to Trinidad yesterday afternoon by B W I.A. Joan and Barbara are on Ihe staff of Barclays Bank IU San Fernando They were staying nt the Ocean View Hotel. Mr Bennett returned to Trinidad on Sunday from the races in B.G and is expected tl arrive here in a*w days for the Barba dos TurfXluh's Spring Meeting F* the Race* GILBERT YVONET and 4i 3Vank O'Neil returned from B GT via Trinidad on Sunday afternoon by B W.I.A. to ride m thi Barbados Turf CttaVl Spring Meeting. En Route S IR ROBERT MarKENZIE whn Is with the British Embassy In Washington nrrived from Trim* dad yesterday b> B W.I A. Hi hopes to leave on Thursday foi Puerto Rico en route to WashingWn Sir Robert has just complete" an official tour of Central America, Cuba, Martinique and some 0 the other West Indian islands. He is In Barbados for a few day: holiday before returning to Washington. He is staying ot the Colony Club. St. James. Really! It's Not Such A Crime To Be Single By MARY LANG IF you have decided you want must not be the type who ever a husband M wife and haven't aavbeen able to win one, the fault is *Tve always been known a-, probably within you That, brieflv. n UstehlUy *i of researcher Hilda Holland who. with a group of medical and othct advisers, has compiled a mockKinsey report* on why men and women slay single. Hilda Holland kicked off her raassfcrcbai with an advertisement In an American paper w/l "Why are you single'.' Will, out your problem-and in doing so you may solve it The first post brought 261 replies, and convinced her that the problem was a vital B.B.C. Radio Programme OFF TO JAMAICA yesterday by BWU. were, left to right. Sir John Waddlnpton. Dr Rita HIndcn, Prof. Harlow and Mr. John Baanlnga. They formed a Commission to BO. enquiring Into the type of Government acceptable to the people of that colony. They are en route to England with their report. M", En Route to England IK JOHN WADDINGTON, Prof. t'smg this kind of evidence, by personal case— "hlch seem more than naive to English eves. Hilda Holland sets out to console an'l entourage those who still remain single. On the assumption that people i never slay that way because they want to, she makes a lengthy investigation of all the obstacles thai keep men and women from the attar. Under headings like Are Parent* to Blame* Why Get Married* ArA You Emotionally Mature' LOW and Neurosis. Deserters and • Till: REPORT rails on Bernard Shaw and quotes the evidence of Tanner In "Man nd Superman", kffJko a**erta it b> "a woman's basd%  % %  -i %  set married aa ao*>n ah puwtble and a man's %m keep unmarried aa lei as he can." Marriage H for this bachelor "apostasy, profanation of the s.tniiu. .> of my soul, violation of my manhaod, sale of my birthright, *hsmeful lurrendcr. Icnomlnloua rapltulallon. acceptance ef defeat.*' A married man la to him a man with a past, while a bachelor la a man with a future When Anne reminds him that he nerd not marry If he does not want to. he ... T %  • a m Nf Arul*." am Iria Ml to. la I. T a m PNfnniM rM>. TJt am OammlU Spvaaintf an. Think W IKcar Thlnf "am in-—In el atuMc. S U am I. %  >mKm. t am nil*.< %  -• • *> %  ,nw Mr., tram BriUln. ll li -m agramma "**••. ii.as a r>< Enananf 'I U .m lUpocl from NH f>ng*T—. Hit P"> Claee Do.'. IV.T-H -" i P m N. A..-. Indian Ouari t 1I.S* MIS a Marl t pm OaiwnUjr BpeaklN Radio NowanWi. I I Common WM IIh. %  4S p m. BIWI %  Ulf W***.. • P m R>pnrl < lllpm Qiatan'i Hall Ushl t*rrmrj 1<. p m THa Naw*. 10 ID %  d i roci \1., in &f ' p m Oalllna Rradv l u r reatival of Britain. II p m BBC Von Orchvalra H W I A. Sir John told Crib that he will donVmarry stay one day in Jamaica and then *^,; „,..„ niques—she analyses all the prob, able and Improbable reasons why In a survey of Americai Bermuda for four d.yi bemn1wl ,„, g fc fore leaving for England. "Does say man want le be hanged ? Yet men let tbemselvea be hanged without a struggle for life, though they could at leaat give the chaplain a black eye. We da the world's will, nol eur awn." -When people laughed in my resence 1 ran from the place." "I used to cross the street so I wouldn't meet people." "Nobody cared what I did." Any of these remarks, it seems John was head of a ComTHAT a greater percentage of hich wenl to B.G. to enmarriages are happy when the uire what lype of constitution wife is two or three years older nag .uieplablc to the people oi lnon ncr husband. Milan Guiana, Prof. Harlow and THAT the average woman lives prove thai you have one of those ir Hmden were members of the three years longer than the avertired old psychological twins — 'on mission, Mr. Hcnnings acted a ge male of the same age. tha Inferiority or the Superiori" %  Secretary. THAT If a girl attends college Complex. %  j hr r rhances of marriage are The report pursues Its main Arttlt trom Hondurat reduced at least one-fourth. If mission — Why do people sta> A RT Is progressing well in the her college is not co-educational single*—-with the fervour of i West Indies bul more should her_chartces are stijl less. J),,,, Juan. It produces this genv "Marriage entails a sacrifice for a man. while the missina of CROSSWORD F 1 j J T' i P i Y 1 i 1 / I i i i r JANETTA DRESS SHOP IPSIMKS OVR MM~\MI."" Bro.il l Photir .•• Lovrl. IMTORTKI) DKI ssfs Ir.m LONIMtN rl\ itKTt—NYLON LINGEBIE—BATHING Sills HOIKS MONDAYS to FRIDAYS .J0 lo 3 SI SATI'RDAYS I.M W ll.M AQI ATIC CUn CIXE.HA :Memb.rsOnly) MATTNfS: TO-DAV al • p.mTO-NIGHT i.l 111 Jama* Hilton'i "SO WELL REMEMBERED" Surtrinv: 1AV -.id THU1UIDAY NIOIIT *l Ki.pr.HT WrTCIIfM.PA-NT. CBtSK iilim mi 1^1 ,n ll K i PLAZA TU**tr*—BridgetownJDiAL 2310) IR K.O. R^DTOI ta TARZAN AND "THE" SLAVE GIRL Wita lam nAIIKEII Vancaaa BROWN Dnl* DAHtlt a o*i>cr A,-I 8. Viliicl^u*" til tna •liarp ab..ut b.-i IS thkS. j v eaq sail i 5> %  llw JOUII n:l. Ml ?r chances are still less be done lo encourage West THAT the professions you 1 Indians to paint". This is the most likely to stay a spinster of 21-year-old Terence arp teaching and nursing. riage Is the sacrift Arthurs, a London commercial THAT where there are motwoman Hrtist, whose ambition is *o visit men xhun omen nca l l y cverv Vet not BrTufh Honduras Twenty-five woman will marry But when fre fi.Kl this frs ago Terence's father left abould p.c rou in. all r-gh .0 ru* iiliirieciitn is the loinr.i aid..* s rival, •*• naiiiiiii w nna man in it. nt „ is. Odd-oD ciiance till* u .. "" M, Kata i3i fl W for Ihe I Itrltisti Honduras Itritaln and qualify Having completed hi married an English vm<-u %  •<• they have since made London *^" ** iheir home. And now, naturally enough, Terence wants to see for himself his father's homeland. o #> to a a tailoi course he and fcrnod into partial deserters froi marriage by "a morbid obsession many pages away Many women there arc more women than less than 90 per cent, of the airy. against household duties. THAT divorced people many at dislike of housekeeping." %  "" !" rapid rate than sinnle In a study o( 1.000 engaged couple*, the report says it was 'Men Lose* found that more than 35 per cent. of the women and 24 per cent, of AFTER all this—what is the \hv men had broken previous .recently sold %  cent broke their current K C upon the latters recent points, learn to get along witli efcgagemcnts. visit to London. people, smile occasionally, be n i %  taM r n C friendly, have somrth'ng lo tajk The Riddle Book Exhibition for B.U. about, read one daily newspaper, . .__ __ -_ „ x t „ „ and look afler vour appearance. IT is a dismal book for the MR. R0LPH 0RANT former W.I. rpiib DnUsh Council has Whpi( yo „. ve t>c0n lo thp a)Ur rfngles to rend, and one that will cricket captain who wan in Barbados J. nrranged an exhibition of an( | overcome Ihe sin of being astonish the marrieds. After 256 on a short viMt, returned to Jamaica 560 scientific and technical books s i ng i,. ( Hilda Holland Issues a pages of explanation and analysli yesterday by B.W.I.A. j or -mowing In the now premise* s harp lemlndei on how to stay of what prevents people marrying c uv 1 %  *• %  • ' "^ Ry* Agricultural and tnBt Wffl y. —it seems a wonder that anyone rormfr W.I. Captain Commercial Society in GeorgeTo be sure that the marriage can bring it off „ %  a ,-.,--, „, tow", which are to be completed w \\\ ^e a success, she says, you M -PH ^ RAN J "I":'!"' •"* o^"* 1 %  *?*. mo n ,h Morning Flight (ARRIVING on B.W I A*i atmcrmng flight from Trinidad were Mr. Nestor Bin/, and Mi Walter Campbell. They are stayingat Ihe Ocean Vkrw-Hotel. iT j. „ f T 0efJdci G anl Ud ^ |a fme Qf ^ O16M |n |hc Mr. Campbell U wi!^ Stewart i( t 1;)C hed to their Jamaica Rrnneh Calbbe*n. Accompanying the BBJ or Canada Mr. ban, Trimwho was ,„ Harbednj, on a hor books are some 30 pictures on dad businessman is on ihe Manholiday, staying at the Marine auo jects covered bv the exhlblrelurned to Jamaica yesHon. including an'old print of Stephenson's "Rocket" — Britain's ailing Committee of the Junior Hotel Chamber of commerce in P'riterday by B W.I A of-Spain and Junior ChalrmanV. Mr. Gro.it is a former Captain "flitTsteam Focomotlvc. Represcniative to the Road Safety of the West Indian Cricket Tean Assn.. and Chairman f'-r organwhich loured England In 1939 ising future Trade Fi Mr. Baiz Is also an active member of the Light Aeroplane Club of Trinidad. Another Light Aeroplane Club member who was in Barbados for a few days was Mr Dong Moore, Engineer of S. K. Watson & Co. of Trinidad who left for Tiinidad yesterday afternoon by B.WI.A. en route from Antigua. Caricature T HE PLAY "108(1 And All That" is the larjMl production yet attempted by the Harrison College Dramatic Club and members ol the cast are working hard rehearsing It 11 to b performed in the Ham: Court ML.1IU.UI. Eire. Just So Mr:. %  ".Mr. NESTOR BAIZ Short Visit S IR K. ARTHUR and Lady Lu> ti'i-Kayc arrived from Jamaica over the week-end on a shori visit and arc guests at tbe Ocean View Hotel. Sir Arthur is Squndron Leader (Temp.) in the H.A.F and Captain of the late 3rd Bat.. College ,8l| on of the West Yorkshire RcgiHall on March 9. It la 0 review merit. or rather a caricature of English History. Proceeds from this plaj will help send a Harrison College iixms team to Trinidad. O FF to Antwerp. Holland, last week for a threaj months' MR JOHN MacGOWAN. IVtour went Lord Beginner. Ihe troleum Engineer with famous Calyprtnian. His visit is U.B.O.T. stationed at Mayaro arexploratory—he wants to discover rived from Trinidad yesterday for himself what opportunities morning l>> It W.I.A t„ spend there are for calypsonians in eleven days' holiday here staying Antwerp. At his "farewell" perut the Ocean View HOtttl formanee the other evening, he Mr. MacGowan is from the sang Iwo new calypsces. The first 0 K and bai bean Jn Trinidad dealt with the recent Gold Coast lor (igtitecn months. %  IWUotnl and the second was an e , -_ assessment of tha> art of subtlety Staying with Kelativei f men and women generally A RRIVING irum St. Vincent Lord Beginner's verdict is conyesterday morning by BO tained in the chorus which goes: Airways was Mrs. Michael HansMen centipede bad bai. vhell. She is here for a week Woman centipede more than staying with IT: bad GLOBE BY THE WAY A MUCH TRAVELLED lady has been saying that the desert Sheik is not the romantic ftgur? young people imagine Miss Vita Hrcvis. so long pestered by the Sheik Spitlln el Khuspidor (Captain Foulenought. would agree. This curious Sheik was always inviting her to "fly with me on my desert steed." One day she asked. "Where is this desert sleed?" "At Moorsom and Calvcrley's Livery Stables." replied the dusky beau, hitching up his burnous like an Arabian sailor. Foulcnough's little stratagem was defeated on the day when Ihe brokers marched in to 71(a) Palmcrston Mews lust as the Sheik was pouring out a glass of Arabian Hock for his beautiful visitor Ola At lesit '!,,• liean has a :iffasfencT undrr his oaifrr-buUmi.i. < Morning paper) T HE cheat! His shoe-laces are probably made of liquorice, and no) %  ) al %  seep*, for eating purposes 1 will wager that the rim of his hat is of detachabla cardboard, and that his buttonholes are blocked up with dried mud. AM all oivr Ihr placv I T has now been decided lhal a ventriUqulst's dummy contrav nil tha Sunday Observance regulations, as being "a wooden prop by Bvachpombet And I read that in Brussels. "Anyone wearing a false nose in the street Is liable to arrest." What fun the police will have tweaking odd-looking noses, to see it Ihcy come off. During Ihe war one ot our secret agents was told watch a suspicion* character in a Ixmdon hotel. The man had Incurred suspicion by hts enormous noae. Nobody believed It could be real. So up went the agent and tweaked it pretty hard. But the nose was real, and the owner was a big oil man. With great presence of mind our agent said, "Excuse, pteese. Papuan custom, Me Papuan." "Excuse, please." replied the oil man, as he kicked the agent finir times. "English custom. Me English." LAST TWO SHOWS TO-1IAV :. .1 8.30 P.M. H Tin: TO \ST (r v;w OKI.I: \ V8 H Mario 1.AN7.A — Kathyrn GRAYSON Extras — FRANK1E CARL AND ORCHESTRA Nctrsrccl WEST INDIAN CRICKET TEAM TO-MORROW ONLY -5 1 B.3U John GARFIELD — I.ill PALMER — In — "BOD] tv> sot rIIAICHAUOS IM. \>1 ATM Mill Under the Distinguished PotronaKe of His Excellency the Governor Sir A. W. L. Savage, K.C.M.U., and Lady Savage PLAZA Theatre— O/Sr/N {DIAL 8404) Action Doublal ACTION is THE & GAMBLING ON THE NORTH ATLANTIC HIGH SEAS GAHETY— {THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES BELOW THE DEADLINES MR. MtiGGS RIDES AGAIN HAW HAIR CORDS Floral designs 92c. I ALL 36" WIDE GINGHAMS Asld. Checks & Colours PRESENTS A MURDER m ARRANGED A THRILLER Till IIKII.ll nd FIIIOAY 15th 16th MARCH, 830 p-m. MATINKi: : Friduy, 16th March, 5.00 p.m. Bux OHice Onvns FRIDAY, March 9th Many woman ur* fubjccl lo waJi. %  •-Iiini back. Often ilukidnayi an lo I tin ma, fur your kirlnaya. ilimj wilh il," ll.-r. inn-; lili.-r out IIIIpuritiaa from the bUmdatrrain. So if you f.-l find. *-orn-oul,ha*dachy—wilh lb* naKiiiiig uitin of aa milieu back—look lo baa your kidneys and liver. That'* why Cim.idiana have been reiving on Dr. I'haae'a Ktdnay-Ijver I'iU for ovnr half a ivnturv. %  yatem a chanoe to work pniixTlv. Trv l)i. Cli.m'i Kidney Uverfilla today. The nomo "Dr. Chaaa" ) %  your aMuranoa. 1 Dr. Chase's • KIDNEY-LIVER PILLf FOR THE FIRST TIME TRINIDAD'S CARNIVAL QUEEN ol 1951 •IF THIS BE SIN' — Starring — Myrna LOY — Roger LIVESEY with Peggy Cummins and Richard Green. OLYMPIC l.a-i Two Shows To-day 4 30 aid I IS 20lh Century Fox Double— Dick HAYMES and Vivian liLMNE in "STATE FAIR" — AND — AND THEN THERE WERE NONE" To-djy Last Two Shows 4.3 and 830 t*r.lveral Double BajD UATimONE In "BLACK-CAT" AND "INSIDE JOB" with Preston FOSTER HOW Last Two Shows To-day 46 ft 8 30 FLORAL I J 86c. & 87c-. LINENE An nun praluMr Value 92r. PLAIN PALE BLUE HAIRCORD 32" WIDE 62e. WHITE ,. „ „ 59C EVANS & WHITFIELDS Dial a06 Your Shoe Stores Dial 4270 MRS. HOUSEWIFE THE APrEARANCF OF YOl'R HOME WITH lancaslrciiiii Floor Covering RiT.s e ii x 71, n. MIS %  ii. n n.M 9 n. X lt'i >L M BI Mt \ r n 19.11 CONTINl'ors ROLLS a CUf TO YOl'R ORDER Zt Inn Mf. Jd. .16 Inn. 19c. yd. :.' %  %  11.49 .j 199 int. St. 19 yd. AIM—ATTRACTIVr DESIONS TO SELECT FROM Daaaan OIR PRICES KEFORE PIRC HASINC. ELSEWHERE TIII: n MIIS \iMis < O-OI>I IIATIVI: xorrox i \i HUM LTD. RIVER LADY coiot ir TECHNICOLOR" !,.-. Cin til Filing utURLO DURYEA CAMERON CARIEK .'.*.'.'^,-^'*-.'.'.'.'.'.-,-.*.-.' MM JflTrfy'* Beer. LOVELV CHRISTINE GORDON — appearing — IN PERSON wilh a falaxy r Trlnidid* *in lagand danrlm *Un under Ihe I direction of LANDV DE MONTBRIN on ataie at EMPIRE — ON — SCNDAY. 4th MARCH. 4 4S ml 8 39 p m WE CAN SUPPLY .... GALVANISED BARBED WIRE I'RK l>: [MATINEE: Chtldrrn "."' 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Quorate ESTABLISHED 1895 11 RSI>A\ KESftl *HV ARUNDELL MAY FLY BACK TO GRENA American Will Command British Fleet LONDON, Feb. 26. MEW SHOTS WERE FIRED to day in the new "Battle of the Atlantic" started by the ap pointment of an American Admiral as supreme Commander of the Atlantic Pact Naval Forces Prime Minister Attlee, after considering a vigorous protest told the Commons that the British Government still supported the choice of an American. Ho tried to cairn troubled waters stirred up by Mr. Winston Churchill on this matter last week by announcing that a British Admiral would be in charge of the eastern Atlantic and the sea approaches to Britain in time of war. But an American— forecast as Admiral William Fcchteler—would Red Chairman Dismissed ItEFENDIlH. sriKHiHi.M.i FRANKFURT. Fcb 26. Oskar Mueller, Chairman of the 0>mmunist Party In the American Zone State of Hwr has been dismissed front his poit after a speech of self-criticism before a party congress this week-end. A Party Communique published In today's Frankfurt Communist newspaper said: •The Congress decided that Comrade Mueller (who is also a member of the West German Parliament) will In future fulfil his duties to the party in n different party function. The cominuniqe continued: "Inspired by the spirit of criticism and self-criticism contained In speeches of delegates to the Hessian Communist Party Con gress Meeting here on February 24 and 25, It wax realized that impart y line must make a marked turn fn its entire ideological and organisational policy and structure "The Congress therefore unanimously elected Klau Weigle as new Chairman of the Hessian Party". Weigle demanded a new Communist Party policy campaigning lot Germany**national liberation unleashing u broad mass movement against West German remilitarisation and preparing united action between Social Democrat and Communist workers for the establishment of an all-German constituent assembly. The Congress appealed to all roinrades. whatever rank of duties They had. to do all In their power to strengthen the Communist Party. The German press reports said that Robert Liebrand. Chairman of the Communist Party in the American zone of Wuertemborg Baden had also been dismissed from his post at a recent Party Congress —Realer. Italy's Red Chief Faces Open Revolt 0U Return To Rome VENICE. Feb. 26. Italian Communist leadei Pal ii iro Tcgllati arrived here today ofter ten weeks convalescence in Moacow to fate an anti-Cominform revolt in Ills 2.000.000 memlier party He returns to his headquarters ii, Rome'.-Street of Dnik Simp-'' to face an open Anti-Comlnfomi revolt which broke out In his absence under the leadership of Communist deputies Aldo Cuceoi and Valdo Magnani —Heater. be In overall command Churchill said he would study the new statement by the Prime Minister but might find it necessarv to force a debate. It looked at this point as If the battle had been broken off for the time being. But then Churchill's chief lieutenant Mr. Anthony Eden, raised the question as to who would de : clde on movements of warships In ihc Atlantic. Attlee said he thought it was "quite essential" that the Atlantic Supreme Commander would have S mrer to transfer forces from one llantic area to another. This brought Churchill sailing back Into the attack. "Nothing like that ever existed in the last war and never could have been accepted Our life depends upon the maintenance of our sea approaches, whereas though the United States may suffer a great deal, her life is in fact not so affected." he declared Under Supreme Command Mr. Attlee said that the area which would be under the SuS reme Commander would lie the orth Atlantic Ocean excluding the Mediterranean and BritishEuropean coastal waters. Attlee said the North Atlantic would be split into Eastern and Western areas. The Eastern most vital for Britain—would be under the command of the British Commander-in-chief of the Home Fleet. In time of war he would command not only British forces but also those American and other Atlantic Pact countries stationed in the area. The last war had taught that it was Important to have an overall Supreme Commander in Ihe North Atlantic It was one battle field in which the mobile threat of the submarine must be matched by a flexible defence system. There must be quick redisposltioning of forces to meet the shifting threat. In considering the nationality of the Supreme Commander the Government had had 'o consider Ihe relative siies and potential reserves of the navies and nir forces of the various Atlantic powers. Despite Britain's groat naval traditions, she could not alone undertake the defence of the North Atlantic. Attlee added: "The Government are satisfied that In time of war the proposed arrangements will ensure both the defence of these Islands and the fullest participation of all North Atlantic powers ever the whole North Atlantic Ocean." In peace, no British ships or planes would be put under a Supreme Commander except for periods of combined tralnmg. which would l>e necessary. Answering questions. Attlee Bald the appointment of a Supreme Commander in the Mediterranean was still being considered. Britain herself would control the allocation of her mechant fleet. —Reuter Darferi Seek Formula For ''Sneaking Death" COPENHAGEN. Fcb |fc Professor Hakon Lund to-day stalled seeking a formula for a deadly poison gas known as "sneaking death." The Danish Government has given him 175.000 kroner to proth* gas and then work out measures to combat it according civil defence administration. Unconfirmed reports here say Russians had held 10,000 tons of the gas in secret factories in East Germany. • The slightest whiff of It can blind a man and destroy his nervlous syrtem. ProfMt%r l.und wh. will work ikMM hopes to firm the formula within three mor A civil defence adtninr U anon official said the "sneaking death" paralyses and eventually caused leath uhen It is taken into the system either by breathing >i through the ^m l.und who will work in a gas mask said in an interview, 'All security precautions will be taken. A special laboratory i.s being fitted out for research. A protection iress made of asbestos is being made for me If is effective against all known eats." Since we know very little about (his new stuff. I prefer to work without assistance. But I am keeping a reliable essistnnt informed >f the progress of my work so that If necessary, he can continue with the work. %  When Professor Lund has produced the gas. Professor Rasmussen of the pharmaceutical institute pf Copenhagen will atari won HI Inding nrotoction against it. Professor Rasmussen said tolay that aocord.ng to information 'rom France, there was | "actory near Breslau which at the nd of the war was capable of producing m.ooo tons of snenking leaths n year Thx f.. akert over bv the Rill I i iald. —Reater U.S. Must Send More Troops To Europe WASHINGTON. Feb. 20. John Sherman Cooper, United Slates delegate to the United Nations said today that if the United States failed to send more troops to Europe it could lead to "the greatest surrender in history". Testifying before the Congressional Committee on Troops for Europe issue. Cooper Republican adviser to the State Department said that American participation was indispensible to the development of adequate Western European Defence against any aggresI. 1 am certain that an intellectual and moral decision has been made by the Governments of the United King*-m. France and Italy thai their countries must make the full defence effort and that they will pport fully the defence of WtRed China Gets American Oil HONG KONG. Feb. 26 Some oil sent to Chinese Nationalists by the United State* has found its way to Communist China. Usually reliable source. Mild here to-day It wit shipped from Keelurur. Formosa, to Portuguese Macao, from where it passed into the hands of Communist .II • %  HI These sources believe the oil Mas then transferred arrow the Macao border or sent b> junk *.J Communist territory. All types of fuel oil are now commanding high prices In China owing to the British and American ban on export to Communist rourtneCommuntst agents are said to be trying to buy up quantities %  1 various points in the Far East for shipment to China direct or ihrough i Important commwlit.es not eluded on Britain's embargo Its! ire still being sent through Hong Kong into China— Renter. em Europe", he said. CoDper who attended Atlantic Parr d.'fence meetings in Lor,don and Brussels said there was full understanding in Europe of the aggressive purposes of Soviet Russia and their threat to Europe Cooper said that since Korea. Britain's defence budget was Increased three rimes ami I grammes Were underway which would double military prodih'um in two years and quadruple pa ductlon In the third and fourth years. Britain had as large a force in Germany M Ihe United Slates and bad already made the decision t: -re troops—Realer "Su/terb" Sail* For Montevideo BUENOS AIRES, Fob 2(1. British cruiser Superb, of Vic Admiral Sir Richard SymMida %  1'ayler, Comn: Chief. American Station which includes the Falk land Islands nnd Antarctic tersalled for Montevideo this morning. The ship which arrived here last Monday was lobor President Peron at his vn request, but he unexpected relied the visit at the Isst minute alleging "unforeseen eircuni stances. He never went aboard The second British warship leaving Argentine waters today Is the frigate flic bury Bay. belonging tn the same squadron which since Fclmiarv 9 has visited Argentine ports.—Reuter. OVER CROWDING BELFAST. Northern hgtM(g Fcb Belfast*! Mcucal officer, Dr. S Barrou. in a report on overcrowding said that 437 people—321 adults nnd 116 children—lived In 26 houses in Lonsdalo Street. Twenty-four of the ha used as tenements. Rents vary from 49 cents to S3.SU per week for furnished accommodation -IN.1 THIS STROKE K characteristic of Wilfred Ferguson. Trinidad's slow UcwUr who ktuuboruiy defended his end to help •uv> off drfcat tastaflay, TRINIDAD—BARBADOS FIRST TEST DRAWN Trinidful Declines Challenge — Eight Catches Dropped ll> O. V IOIlIX TRINIDAD to-day. jifter having lost two key batsmen Andy Ganleaume and Nyron Aagarali by the run out route, madr no further attempt to arcept the challenge in score 253 runs in 22j minutes and an Ihe first Trinidad-Barbados Test ended in a draw. | Although It was decided to extend playing time by half an horn I Trinidad, wild two wickets u harm were 167 runs and Mill 86 it or the coveted 253 Barbados missed no fewer that i th;militate.i ,r nu nail way against their chances ox Tin: • SPOT FHATlNr,. Kswx. England. Capt, W. J. GoldsworJiy. tlten of going ot „i uiajy. attire to quieten his dogs. installed a microphone b. P* w when the dop bark he Mlenccs them via loudspeaker in the kennels —(OF) Argenttm MVal For Britain Via Brazil "Iinprarticablc" —British Food Minister LONDON. Feb.. 2C. The Food Minister Maurice Webb to-day dismissed as "quite %  Dl the BUgg. the Commons that B-riUi import Argentine meat from Brazil Bromley Davenport. Conservative said Argentina Was to *eil meat i<> Brasil at ti6 par l< i lie proposed thai Brital Hra/il to import all she tould m this price ami noil it aguiu to Britain HI a reasonable profit. Webb replied that if Britain made .iimngemciits to buy Argentine Men! from Hni/il ;it kW than sho was willing to pav the %  i 10* r %  ->i• setting to llr.ir.ll jr put up-her price. Earlier Webb had said he stood by the Meant statement that he • On l'age I. "1 see that old Dior i I itrtamiinmK the uaiit (rn> lease*, Bert." %  rie vftcket was firm yesterday 'and played truer than one would have imagined on the sixth day %  It is true tha' same deliveries kept uncomiortably low but fhete few and far between. Rnrhadov yesterday added %  run* In 65 minutes to their overweek score of 122 for 3 Clyde Kalcott was responsible for 39 of these, so thai six wickets fell rdi 7 %  uns and this included that of John ('roddaid. one of the not out batsni'n Who HKlld not i "'Mime owinp o his having cut hi* foot aVOI UV veekend. Jones and Jackbir won larly ^accurate and eflVi I ierd.iv and when five additional Urloktti hnd fallen with only 14 runs added to Barbados' over week arore. ,\ seemed as If Barbadi ould fall even under the 150' ili.uk A rand duel between VI WatcOM and the l>owler. Jae -nd Jonts ensued from this |>ei WUcotl m ubvlously bent n onopoUslng the bowling. It l.ere that he refused to take singl except at the end of the OVOl ajM only ran two runs or hit boundaries. It was l completaly dlfferen Clad* Walrott yeaterdaj from thi I ft %  • 00 Sntut la) Mr I 11 mplete master of ti tual on He batted quietly at the beglnng of the day's pla> bul iijiened up. He on-drove, powti fully, hooked Jackbir twice to th square leg boundary, nn-ni-iv. Prior Junes and then swept him to the deep square leg boundary ir ,i veritable flurry of aggression. While the Barbados batsmen l*'l II rapid auoDeasion. Walcott had 'iin.uii"tt had now rescind 87 and iian added 39 runs in wing the hi lor six saw the end of Clyde W*:eclt's innings nnd the end ot thBarbados second innings as well Another lofty hit off Jiiekhu b) Waleotl did not clear the *JRIII screen again and Ferguson, who had taken the precaution of (Irsl in* '.(T hla cap. held a well fudpad eateh to dismiss him Waleotl had been a', the wickjt for 204 minutes for his H7 runs and this was for almost th I entir,. tinn ti; d the Barbados innings had '. % %  : If he nhowed signs of LuvkU len baffled lor some time by thel • On Fsge 3 I Rocket Tests Completed WASHINGTON. Feb 26 The United BtafeM Anny has completed high alutudv vxpvrimeuts with multistage nnkct and is at present conctfltntblg on the development o< to weappoa, A Mllilary spokesman said here thai the 17th <•' I Miles of V-I lest* at While Sands near Mexico will take place on Thumdav night \ roeket mil be used, not the "aUrmMr* rtylt eombsna tlon of big and %  %  height over 24K mil.An Army Ordinance sp Hid thai "roe.mJi M tv phase" of rocket Much had been conclude*!. The Ida* was t.i learn some facts in the Held of high slti tude Might' he added. "This information had to be obtained bv these The British have BgTOOd t" ftVi tend a. a bomlung large tU| state. here today Adenauer tol ne wiiuid coHajMrato In I aiteinalive target nnd In ing deinMii-lt.iti.in-, on M —Bruler SCHOOL BURNT IN ST. ANDREW W tKroni t>ur Own Correspondent > LONDON, Feb. 26. INDWARD ISLANDS Governor Sir Robert Arundell may break off his leav* in Devon in order to fly to Grenada to deal with tbe island crisis following the week end rioting. He was not due to return till the middle of March. Reports from the Colonial Secretary, who is acting for the Governor, are being studied by the Secre tary of State for the Colonies but there is no indict tion at the moment of what steps may be taken to deal with the situation. An ofllcwl spokesman said thai the point In the dispute leading to the itrike %  the tad*) i Oui Orei ndenl reiHirtm that while the tension ho* i. H morn'tunms Selected The second Ii %  < i %  Tom iiaiiicnt bet* Ben and Trinidad will open to-day at Kensington Oval. The Ball team Is.-C. L. Walw.tt (I r R. Marshall. (' HuMc I C. Ttivlr^r. K WaloOtt, D. Atk n %  ,n. N aaanhaU 0 Millinglon and C Mullms Twelfth mini i:. K Aikinson Trinidad .1 W A. Canleaume, N A>garali, It Tang Choon. H l^-gall. I C. Sampaih. w I Inekbir. 1, Ilutler and F King S (Milan tw.-lflh man. FIFTH TEST MATCH Latest srure In Ihe flftn Test mslrh at Melbourne Is Kncland 33 for nine wickets. The Sultan Bows To French Demands CASABLANCA. French Morocco. Feb 26. Faced with a march on hicapital by ho^lle tribal warrior*, the Sultan of Morocco was tonight reported to have bowed In a latgo measure to French demand* for administrative reform*. Repriii of the 40-vear-o|d her to-day .;* bearded warrior horsemen of the Zaiaic tribes I were marching towards Rgbet | his coastal capital of U4.O00 people. Other tribesmen—foot snd horse'her Hill race*— war* rurrourattal Fo^ the lfcrmer For manv months tbe Sultan has carried out a "strike" again~>l signing a series of administrative proposals drafted by the French .idmlnbdratM.n ll General Alphonie Jinn France's leading colonial between the two sides irok doam. v< Juin's depul returned to Kab.ii ;i peraon il ii il and had an hour's discussion with the Sultan .iftei arhleh it became known that negotiate •• effect been restarted —Reuter U.N. Ships Blast Port Of Wonsaii By HARIUN WIIITt VHOAP1 I SHIP MII'HKHTCR. KOHKAN WATERS, Feb 2fl. and fri;,ites fought a duel with Comnunist shore batteries near tlie and Ihe OMIMI M I I hree frigates opened, fire slmulnneoualy A few mlnul ilrnl Communist gun emplaeeu-portcd Ion Reutri. Orgu New Socialist gan To Be Establish*'*! LONDOK. Fei. 2d leaders lit nil Weatern Buro> %  %  n liondni. uss the establishment of a new Socialist Intarnatl i Organlsakw. The% \-ii; i i throo-i' Con anoa <>t tbe 'ommiitee i>f the International Solallsl OrganlsaUon (COMISC< %  'rom which the new International #ould spring Tinpro] (lend ihe m ope of CO vorfc to bring it more into line .vith the i % %  L\. t Sr> lall I nternatldind In th' poat enme irigkuiill' from the Relgl Part] A joint Anglo-Belglnn reaoluUon will coi %  baton N i I %  it nrltlsh Soetaliht Henquarters at i rangporl Houaa The i i vtll also dlseuaa a new declaraIon of Ihe principles of Desnoratu BoriaUam wnlen wouM be> oma toe Chgrlej of Ihe new Cruler i CatholL' •i ..' i ragi iu was %  n |>ii lei (Ire: and limke up disturbance at Heausefour Esute ai"l arrested nine youths ranging %  n ages from 16 to 26 who refused to move on unde wan lined (15 l..ri i oped between -tnkii .md others willing to work starting in two •vestrrn coast points where the week i id land llde; rtlll 'old up traffic Public W I asked coni i nsploj laNaval launches look poatea parties up ihe canal to deal with the disturbance. An ni> Munition haa arisen as the luwn remains tini • eeh Tba l"resa is calling for \ s ; i Ilu ••overnor's AD.C. Coloiu I K-'ith Stewart was an he was stoned bi a mob in 'lie Calivtgn) i nght the Water %  k on BM loveniy-ona mtraaati paaaWafari In tho Fart Tawnshenil to-day confined their activilirt to Ii ound Ihe town hm ihe ISO Ions eaigu wnj dlschaig.sii. %  attarrj inn daj unlondlni TOO tons, adled INVADERS PUT OFF BAMBURO, Feb 26. i 14 Oern ,m police today itmoi Ci niniuni-' % %  from the i ind %  f Heligoland %  %  %  %  —Renter RUBBER~BAN WARHTKOTON Ftb M The Niitional Producttor K.uth r. todi id reduce 1 r natural rubber in about moon produeti i March I. tiger r n' re*, footballs and teruiM bail—Veuter TFXL T1IF ADVOCATE Tnr. Nrw* R1NO Sill DAY OR NIOHT Summer silks stay bright as new" Ka. Safest of all for I me Fabric Drrd b alni ..i all I Yen —. I).wr gredienu I nd %  .ii'v-rmull. harm for miisnrr. wfm M riwto'h tafi lor ail i When to i \ Jggggaga> r^Rpr^ .... ..ii" .idip III tTi HI. M Ihrll b ilrfir frcsl iiti. But ibai i>* ( AII inn %  l*V.stl. .. d.i. I bought il Irs Jiihvlag. i %  \."l Drefl 1 %  tbs ibuoi I Hrctt i 'f.talh m.M fnr ft Ijltt lirn C aw II by Its %  .. I lirsi. A revuhir dip rwf/j dreft MAKRS f> MMV F\RRICS \s I LONOER1