Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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ESTABLISHED 1895





Reds Abandon
Hoengsong to U.N.

TOKYO, Feb. 24.

(CHINESE REDS abandoned strategic Hoeng-

song, former anchor of their Central Korean
defence line, to pursuing United Nations forces
today. Two tank and infantry patrols pushed into
the bomb-flattened city, ten miles north of Wonju,
on the fourth day of the 8th Army’s new “killer

offensive’’ and found it empty.

One patrol duelled with Chinese rear guards north of
Hoengsong for three hours before returning to Allied lines
south of the City. But a second reported no Red contact
according ‘to an 8th Army communique.

Stndents Plan
Big Strike

PARIS, Feb. 24.
French universities face the
prospect of empty lecture rooms
soon, when the Government pro-
posal for a cut in the subsidies for
the Students’ Social Security come

before the National Assembly.
The students are going on @

strike. The strike is called by
the National Students’ Union
which claims 80,000 members

among France’s 120,000 university
students,

The Students’ Social Security
hailed as the “biggest social ad-
vance” in decades is a post war
innovation in France.

It is financed partly by the stu-
dents but more largely by thc
Government, The Government stb-
sidy for 1951 was to have been
$1,470,000,

But looking around sometime
ago for a way to cut the tradi-
tionally tight French budget
expenses the Government pro-
posed to reduce it to $1,400,000.

Students let out a howl of pro-
test. But the last straw was the
new Government proposal to cu!
the subsidy by half again t:
$570,000, That did it.

The National Students’ Union—
the only students’ representative
body in France—decided “in prin-
ciple’ to call their general strike
when the proposal comes up and
carry it out as long as the Assem-
bly has it under discussion.

—B.U.P.





German Financier

On Way To Bre ?
PARTS 1 =.

Freneh Surete National gs ae
man said that Doctor »H,“imar

Schacht, one time financial wizard
of Nazi Germany had come to
France on two weeks transit visa
obtained on the statement that
he wag en route to Brazil. The
spokesman said since his arrival
here on Thursday night however,
the French police ascertained
that Schacht had made no appli-
cation for a Brazilian visa, and
had not booked a passage by any
shipping or airline for South
America,

“The normal period of validity
for a transit visa is 15 days.” In
Doetor Schacht’s case we may al-
low a little elasticity. But the
Surete has been instructed to
watch his movements closely and
if he overstays the period of his
visa and any legitimate extension
of it he will be conducted back
to the German frontier,

A check with leading South
American consulates here con-
firmed that Schacht had not yet
applied for a visa. All shipping
and airlines linking France with
South America also said they had
no booking for Schacht, Schacht
left his hotel early this morning,
visited the German Consulate and
is scheduled to dine with friends
at one of the French Capital's
most expensive and exclusive
restaurants,



|



Other United States troops with
powerful tank, air and artillery
support smashed a Communist
ambush 25 miles east south-east
of Hoengsong and seized the im-
pertant mountain crossroads town
of Pangnim.

Gains were reported all along
the 60 miles front of the 8th

Army’s four—day-old central
Korean “killer offensive’ But
Chinese and North Korean re-

sistance was stiffening.

The Reds also moved up troops
and tanks to the Han River below
Seoul ion the western front and
attempted two more crossings to
the Allied-held south bank. United
States artillery dispersed loth
crossings last night and probably
knocked out two of five to ten
Red tanks spotted on the north
bank

Warehouse Destroyed

Far up the northeast coast the
45,000-ton United States battle-
ship Missouri turned 16-inch guns
on supply points near Songjin 182
miles above the 38th parallel.
Shells destroyed a warehouse ap-
parently containing ammunition.

Allied air forces flew nearly
500 sorties in support of advan-
eing ground forces hitting targets

j just behind -the front and far t2

the north.

Six railway bridges and one
roaad bridge likewise were de-
stroyed and one of each damaged.
One hundred and nine flying box-
cars dropped a record of 315 tons
of ammunition, medical supplies
and other vital equipment to units
whose ground transport was

@ On Page 13

THE KENSINGTON PAVILION



BARBADOS, FEBh'JARY 25,




ULL HOUSE ;

as here seen was packed tight with

ed the Trinidad-Barbados match yesterday. i



Three Killed
In Moslem Clashes

By HELEN FISHER
BELGRADE, Feb. 24.

At least three people have been
killed during protest demonstra-
tions against the law allowing the
unveiling of Moslem women in
the Yugoslav republic .of Mace-
donia. Deaths occurred in Janu-
ary in clashes with police who
broke up village protest meetings.

The Communist Government
and allied organizations have been
carrying on an active campaign
of education and propaganda in all
Moslem districts in connection
with the new law. Hundreds of
Moslem women have been invited
to enjoy their new-found freedom
in all-expense-paid tours of Bel-—
grade, the Dalmation Coast and
other tourist centres.

Lectures and courses have been
organized for Moslems whose
strict religion had barred them
from schools, and large quantities
of clothes have been distributed
so they can replace their flowing
robes with modern dresses. Re-
ports indicate that younger women
and especially young girls gen-
erally welcomed the unveiling en-
thusiastically. The older genera-
tion, however, has responded with
suspicion or downright rejection.

—B.U.P.



Defence Chiefs Support
U.S. 3-Phase Defence Drive

WASHINGTON, Feb. 24.

Defence officials have put their shoulders behind a triple
phase rearmament drive which they think will guarantee
United States security in either a cold or a hot war.

The three objectives are:

Kirkwood Charges
Under Investigation

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb. 24.

Information on graft crarges
which the Hon R, L. M. Kirk-
wood laid in an address to some
local politicians three weeks ago
is now under Police investigation.
following a transmissions’ state-
ment by Kirkwood to Kingston’s
C.1.D.

If charges which connected
Kirkwood with the be@f racket
eering are proved, the Attorney
General will be called on to insti-
tute Court proceedings against
people connected, Meantime
Kirkwood has called for a special
meeting of the Legislative Coun-
cil on Friday to discuss beef
distributions and racketeering.

Acheson Takes Holiday
WASHINGTON, Feb. 24.
Secretary of State Dean Acheson
and Mrs. Acheson left today
aboard a Pan American Worlc
Airways plane for a fortnight’





—B.U.P, [holiday in Bermuda.—Reuter.



PARTNERS



CLYDE WALCOTT (Jeft) and Skipper John Goddard as they went
out to bat after tea yesterday. They were partners in an unbroken

fourth-wicket
a fighting innings.

stand of 65 when play endva for

the day. It was






























1. Meet the immediate needs of
the Korean war.

2. Build and maintain for an
indefinite period a powerful
3,500,000-man military force.

3. Get ready for an almost in-
stant shift to all-out mobilization
in case of a World War. Nearly
500,000 combat and supporting
forces have been committed to the
Korean war. They included six
army and one marine division and
an undisclosed number of smaller
ground units, nearly 20 air groups
and a strong naval fleet,

Estimates of what the Korean
war will cost for 12 months range
from $3,000,000,000 to $5,000,000,-
000.

Defence authorities consider that
a 3,500,000-man armed force back-
ed by a large manpower pool of
trained reserves as the minimum
needed to safeguard the nation’s
security under present world con-
ditions.

If the world situation worsened,
the United States military pro-
gramme will have been acceler-
ated in proportion.

“Long Range Defence

Long range defence planners
attach as much importance if not
more to the nation’s industrial ca-
pacity “to turn out tanks, planes,
guns and other war items in great
numbers, far in excess of present
needs, Accordingly, war plants
are being geared with stand-by
production capacity.

For instance, the annual produc-
tion capacity of planes is being ex-
panded to 50,000 and of tanks to
35,000—twice the current needs.

Under the present plans, the
United States in a year or two will
have a 24 division army, a 500
warship. navy, two and © half
ground divisions of marines and a
95 group airforce.

>

arn

These strengths are about
double those of pre-Korean days
and roughly one-third to one-half
those at the end of World War II.
A sizeable part of these will be
stationed outside the United States
in Alaska, Japan (after the Korean
war is ended), the Middle East,
Britain, Germany. and elsewhere
in Europe. Military forces in
Alaska are being reinforced with
emphasis on air defences.

General Omar N. Bradley,
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs ‘of
Staff emphasised the long range
aspects of the rearmament pro-
gramme. He said: “Stronger and
more permanent solution of our
defence problem is imperative





P.

TANGIER, Feb., 2

The Moroccan Nationalist leatier
Allal Fasi said that the Sultan
of Morocco had not been consult-
ed on the establishment of United
States air bases in this French
North African protectorate.

But said that a Morocco, inde-
pendent of French rule would be
ready to undertake Atlantic Pact
obligations

Fasi told the press that Moroccan
people would seek United States
or United Nations mediation if all
hope were lost for agreement with
France

Asked if the Nationalist



sup-

Trinidad Pin Down

Batsmen

Loe



BY O.5S.



1951

|

of the 6,000 people who watch-

COPPIN

Negative bowling by the Trinidad trio, Jones, Asgarali and

King, yeste’
some of the dti
sington for some years.

inned the Barbados star batsmen down to
eri that has been witnessed at Ken-
inidad scored 279 in reply to| blockade



PRICE: SIX CENTS



‘Only One Thing Will

Stop World

. Police Patrol
Strike Bound
St. George’s

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, Grenada, Feb 24.

A party of 26 arriveqd from
Trinidad this morning to assist
the local St. Lucia Police, but the
day in the capital was the most
normal of the week save for the
Manual and Mental Workers
Union van in the streets at mid-
day advising strike participants to
desist from violence because of
orders to naval police forces to
take strong action,

Despite the lessened tension,
new vandalism came with the
destruction of the former Grand
Roy Government school now used
as a residence—not to be con-
fused with the nearby extensive
new Colonial Development and
Welfare building,

On the west coast where the
storm damage is now conserva-
tively estimated to be $50,000,
efforts at clearance of parts of the
preventing vehicular

Barbados’ 863 and by close of play Barbados had scored 122] trattic all week, were defeated by

for 3.

‘The wicket yesterday, the fourth day of play in the first

Trinidad-Barbados Test
in hand, Trinidad were stilt 1
innings total. as
E*

ON THE
* SPOT

For overcharging one cent
on one pound two ounces off
plantains, Sanchariah Lal,’
vendor, was fined $50 by
Mr. Fabian J. Camacho, in
the Port - of - Spain Police
court. «



Jamaica Woos
U.S., Canadian
Capital

(From Our Own Correspondenty

KINGSTON, Feb, 20.

A Jamaican sales team is to gc

abroad shortly to sell Canada anc
the United States industrial op-
portunities for investment in the
island.
_ Attempts to interest capital to
invest in Jamaica have met with
encouraging results, Government
officials say, and with the work of
laying out the West Kingston in-
dustrial estate, development offi-
cers of the Government have been
seeking to ensure that there will
be no time lag between the laying
down of roads, water supplies and
power lines and the work of actual
factory building.

It is felt that if on the spot sales-
manship follows the representa-
tions made to U.S. and Canadian
capital so far, a number of big in-
terests keen on overseas oppor-
tunities will come to Jamaica; and
the Government proposes to sera
away a two-man sales team on 4
tour of places already marked
down as favourable to the idea of
investing in Jamaican industries.



Prays Against Rain
(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 21
For a change in the prevailing
adverse weather conditions hamp-
ering rice cultivation, food crops
of all.descriptions and the reaping
of canes by farmers and suga
estates, a prayer will be offered
by Pundit Janki Persad Shaftma
Dharamacharya—of the Sanatana
Dharama Mahasabha of Trinidad
assisted by Mahant Jadgeo Sadhu
and Bhai Chavinath Sadar, at the
Usine Hindu Temple, Trinidad on

Sunday, February 26, at 7 p.m.

acinar een meeps eer areca gee teat cern Diane a



Jca Has Surplus

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Feb. 21.

Jamaica will complete the 1950-
51 financial year’s operations with
a surplus instead of the deficit
budgeted for at the commence-
ment of the year.

When the estimates were settled
there was an estimated deficit of
£135,000; and while there has been
fairly heavy expenditure by way,
of supplementary estimates there
has been a substantial increase in
the collection of import and excise
Guties and: income tax, while large
money-spending departments havc
shown savings with the result that
the estimated deficit has been ‘con-
verted into a surplus,

as still firm and with four wickets

05 runs behind Barbados’ first
oe

Norman Marshall and Carl Mul-
lins curled up the Trinidad” tail
and 21 runs were added for the
other four wickets.

Defensive Field

Jeffrey Stollmeyer set a won-
derfully defensive field and Prior
Jones and Asgarali for the most
part gave the batsmen no balls off
which they could make scoring
strokes.

Asgarali was consistently nega-
tive, bowling fast medium off-
breaks just short of a batsman’s
forward stroke while Jones bowl-
ed inswingers that began on the
leg stump generally. He had a
packetl leg fleld and but two men
on the off-side of the wicket.

Boos

The crowd booed, at times and

called for action but the Barbados

~@tsmen found no real answer to
the problem of pushing on the
score.

Even giant Clyde Walcott took
two hours and nine minutes over
his half century, which proved to
be the best score of the day. He
however took an hour off his first
eight runs.

With a first Innings lead of 84,
Barbados are now 296 runs ahead
and should the wicket start crum-
bling on Monday Barbados should
be in a good position for forcing
a win,

Four Fall For 21

It took the Barbados bowlers
thirty-three minutes to. dispose of
the Trinidad tail and the remain-
ing four wickets added 21 runs.

Guillen defended stubbornly
but only succeeded in adding two
runs to his overnight 10. Hig
dismissal was the result of a great
one-handed effort by Mullins at
first slip. He nibbled at one from
Norman Marshall that went

@ On Page 5

5.0.8.

See Page 10



|



Anti-Red Rebellion

Increases In Chiria

HONG KONG, Feb. 24
The Communist authorities at}

the creation of a new road block
some places where the phone lines
were cut, Theft of estate produce
has hit proprietors hard and there
has been forecast a heavy slump
in export duty.

Business for the week was dull,
Some buses were able to bring in
provision and coals needed in the
capital; they were stopped on
certain roads and their cargoes
filehed, while several people re-
luctantly patronised the well
known suburban woman butcher,
one time leader of a women's

@ On Page 14



Missing Crew
Sighted In Boat

TOKYO, Feb. 24.
The Far East Airforce saiq tat
some of the 12 missing crewmen
of the Norwegian cargo

storm on Tuesday have been
sighted in a lifeboat by a United
States plane, It said that the life~
boat was sighted about 275 miles
southwest of Iw@ Jima, A radio
report said that the crewmem-—
bers could be seen ducking about
in the boat,

The number of men in the
lifeboat could not be determined
but it was reported that 12 crew
members got into the boat wher
the Florentine went down 150
mfles southwest of Iwo Jima,
Those 12 are the only members
of the erew still missing.

Already 20 crew members and
the skipper have been rescued by
United States planes based az the
Anderson Airforce Base on Guam,
and the British ship Silver-
maple.—B.U.P,

4 More Italian Reds
Leave Party Ranks

ROME, Feb, 24.



The breakaway of four more
Italian Communist leaders
brought the number of ‘Titoists

to the 700 mark. A Mantua Com-
munist Federation communique
said that Giovanni Bonevinti, the
former Mantua, Chamber of La-
bour Secretary, Andrea Bertaz-
zoni, the director of one of Man-
tua’s co-operatives, Casmiro
Zanella, an influential provincial
Communist were expelled for
“incompatible behaviour’,

All were old guard Communists,
jonevinti, and Zanella having re-
sided in Russia during Mussolini's
regime, The Milan attorney Pine
Bellone, the’ President of the
Municipal Electric Company was

Canton implementing a new death [¢*Pelled for attending a meeting

penalty for “counter revoluntion
ary activities” shot five alleged
secret agents on Friday, accord-
ing to the leftist Takungpao.
Other Canton reports said that
@ warehouse containing a large
quantity of gasoline exploded and
burned Wednesday, but there was

no. indication - thatthe two in
cidents were connected, The

ineidents highlighted ‘the growing
anti-Red rebellion that was
China-wide and which caused the
Reds to promulgate the new
decree The five were reported-
ly found guilty of “organizing
reactionary armed units”,
espionage and assassination, thé
reports, said.

A Swatow ‘report said that the
Reds had arrested over 200
“reactionaries” who had been put
in a concentration camp.

—B.U.P



FOR BASES IN MOROCCG

ported the Western powers, Fasil
said they would fight alongside
those who supported their inde-
pendence and human rights, and
that they condemned Communism
as contrary to the principles of
Islam. ,
Fasi said that the Sultan and
his people were demanding their
independence, the abolition of the
French protectorate, and the
establishment of elected legisla-
tive assemblies to be followed by
a treaty with France, He said

that he believed the possibility of

2 settlement with France still
exists but not with the French
High Commissioner, General

Alphonse Juin whose “highhanded

actions have stirred up deep
antagonism and forced Franco
Morocean relations into their
present acute crisis”

Juin is expected to relinquish his
Morocean post soon to take up
the deputy command under Gen

eral Eisenhower
Fasi said that Ta

of the moderate Socialists.

Unconfirmed reports said that
the first Italian Anti-Moscow
party meeting will be held near
Milan shortly.—B.U.P.



JAPAN IMPORTERS
GET $13,000,000

WASHINGTON, Feb, 24,

A total of $13,000,000 will be
allocated to Japanese importers
for purchase of 90,000 .tons of
sugar from Cuba and the United
States, aceording to the Interna-
tional Trade and Industry Minis-
try.

The Ministry, also disclosed that
an allocation of $1,700,000 will be
made to traders for import of
steel and iron products, drill steel,
sheet pile and electrodes from the
\nited States. Sweden and West
Germany.—BUP



U.S. HAVE NOT ASKED SULTAN’S PERMISSION

only part of the Sultan’s kingdom
where such conference could still
be held He claimed that in
other parts of Morocco it would be
banned by Juin.
He claimed
October 30,000
been imprisoned
nationalist views He charged
that “illiterate” tribal chiefs had
been summoned by French author-
ities, and “tricked” into affixing
their fingerprints to documents
which were later published as
evidence of the
pport for Juin’

that since last
Moroccans had
for expressing

latest measures.

—BUP.

ship
S. S. Florentine which sank in a

Moroccan bures. |

War HIT’ —

WASHINGTON, Feb. 24.

GOVERNOR DEWEY called on Congress to

speed more United States troops to Europe
“as the only course on earth that will save us from
World War III, and the total destruction of our

civilisation.”

He warned two Senate Committees that to with-
hold American divisions from General Eisenhow-

er’s Atl
capacit
themselves. He said “it

ic Pact army would “paralyze’’ the
of this and other free nations to defend

would certainly invite im-

perialist Communism to move into the vacium we

thus created.’’

“Dewey, titular head of the Republican party and twice
nominee for President, stepped into the middle of a roaring
foreign policy debate with a flat indorsement of administra-
tion plans to send 100,000 more American troops to Europe

to bolster western defences against Communism.

That

placed him squarely at odds with former President Her-

bert Hoover, Senator Robert
can leaders,

BG. Must |

Spend Less |

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 24,

Seeing the need for a substan-
tial saving in Government
expenditure, the Georgetown
Chamber of Commerce President,
Henry George Seaford, O.B.E.,
in his address at the annual meet-
ing of the Chamber urged a
strong committee to be appointed
to probe the efficiency in var-ous
Government Departments to re-
duce colonial expenditure to a
figure more within the colony's
resources . ‘

Giving his address two months
after British Guiana’s Financial
Secretary and Treasurer, Edwin
F. McDavid in his budget state-
ment told the Legislature that
this country needed a more com-
prehensive, economic Develop-
ment programme, but did not
have the resources now nor in the
foreseeable future, Seaford stated
that “business houses cannot but
be greatly concerned over the
general financial position of the
colony. —(CP)



Violate Spirit Of
Wages Settlement

LONDON, Feb, 24,

Britain’s nationalised railway
executive tonight accused railway
men of carrying out week-end
strikes and of not acting in accord.
ance with the spirit of yesterday’:
settlement of the wages dispute,
under which men will receive
wage increases costing £12,000,000,

The executive in an official
statement told strikers that if
they persisted in their action, it
would be compelled to call a meet-
ing with the unions to consider

the situation “which has arisen
from this breach of the settle.
ment”,

This official warning came as
over 2,000 men defied the union’:
appeals to end their token week-
end stoppages which played havoc
with rail services ‘all over the
western region system of British
railways.—B.U.P,

Taft and some other Republi-

In his first appearance before
Congress he warned, “we are
being warred against” already and
an allout conflict can be avoided
only by building up western
strength—and ‘fast.

He ‘said: “We are not maintain-
ing or reinforcing our troops in
Europe as a matter of grace or of
charity. We are doing so as a
matter of hard necessity for our
own. selfpreservation,”

Dewey said the. United States
must face the “iheseapable duty”
to build up an “overwhelming
force to prevent war instead :f
inviting it.’ He warned that to
do otherwise would be “simple
direct notice to Stalin’ that the
United States does not intend to
back up its fighting men already
in Europe and “they and Eurtpe
are his for the asking.”

“I am supporting this course
because it is the only course on
earth that will save us from a
world war and the total destruc—
tion of our civilization,

Dewey said the issue had nar-—
rowed down to a little toe-hold
of isolationism. “But this. is a
powerful toe-hold. It represents
the last gasp of an effort which
speaks for the school of thought
which basically would like to
withdraw from all the world to
our own shores,”

Taft will have the opportunity
to answer Dewey on Monday in
testimony before the same com—
mittees — Foreign Relations and
Armed Service. Taft was not
present as Dewey began his testi-
mony,—B,U.P

U.S. Chiefs And Chinese
Nationalists End Talks

TAIPEH, Formosa, Feb, 24.

United States military and
Chinese Nationalist officials end-
ed conferences to-day on what
kind of Chinese Communist at-
tacks, would bring the United
States ships and planes to For-
mosa’s defence.

The meetings were reported to
have broken up without a clear-
cut answer to the question.

—B.U.P.

——_$—$—$ +}. —$
TELL THE ADVOCATE

THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT





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SUNDAY









TO-NITE GLOBE THEATRE TO-NITE

First with the SPORTS. NEWS
FLASH! FLASH!
See SUGAR RAY ROBINSON the Dynamic Boxer of
And the WEST INDIES TEAM in action
See EVERTON KEEKES Stroke Playing
TONITE and over the Weekend.

the year





PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TODAY 145 and 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily

inx.o.ravio) TARZAN AND THE SLAVE GIRL

wit Lex BARKER—Vanessa BROWN--Benise DARCEL & Others — Also

Pe Chim YOU CAN BEAT THE A-BOMB:

a ‘Produced by EMERSON Fim CO “ne GnvStis Paaoucions ware?

Oistributed by AAO RADIO PICTURES, ne



paienaeisise
WATCH IT
“FANCY PANTS”

YOUR HIT IS... (PARAMOUNT)
(Technicolor) Mr. Robert Hope (the former Bob)







SS



PLAZA Theatre=sO/STIN (DIAL 8404)

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p.m. (Warner's Action)

ERROL FLYNN IN MONTANA resins

“MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 and 6.30 p.m.
Humphrey Bogart & Raymond

ACTION me = & GAMBLING on Tur
HIGH SEA EAS

(Warner's Action Double)

NORTH ATLANTIC

‘GABETY—( ue cz GARDEN) ST. JAMES ¥

LAST 2 SHIOWS TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p.m
BIG ACTION SPECTACLE !
in Colorful Cinecolor

& BAD MEN OF TOMBSTONE
with Rory Calhoun

with Barry Sullivan
Marjorie Reynolds &
Audrey Long, George Cleveland B
MONDAY & TUESDAY 8.30 p.m

rod, Crawford
FALL GUY &
ARMSTRONG

“MIRACULOUS
JOURNEY”

(Monogram Double

John BEAL

eee
SSSSOESOSSSO SPOS SS SPOOF SOS POPP PESOS FG erry “s

THEATRE

LAST SHOW TONIGHT MONDAY —TUESDAY

Ind Part

T BATMAN & ROBIN
BATMAN & ROBIN o Zs

— and —
SOUTH OF DEATH VALLEY

Action Packed Double by Columbia
ist Part

WHIRLWIND RAIDERS
with Charles STAIRETT

EMPIRE |

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30

Monday and Tuesday
4.45 and 8.30

United Artists’ Pictures

ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.30

Universal Big Double .
Douglas FAIRBANKS in

“EXILE”

AND

“WOLFMAN”

with Lon CHANEY

Presents...

“IF THIS BE SIN”

— Starring —

Myrna LOY — Roger
LIVESEY with
Peggy Cummins and Richard
Green.

OLYMPIC

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.30

20th Century For Double—

Tyenoe J nee and Cecjle
RY in —

” BLACK ROSE”

— AND —

“ANY NUMBER CAN
PLAY”

—Starring—
Clarke GABLE and Alexis
SMITH.





4.30 and 8.30
“BLACK=CAT ”
AND
“INSIDE JOB”

ROXY

TO-DAY to TUESDAY
4.45 and 8.15



«UNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL,
es.

presents

MONDAY & “TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.15

“STATE FAIR”

AND Helena










Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler meet once again in the Fox

.
Movietone documentary production, “Farewell to Yesterday.”

ae 4

TURE E FOR |
PH ft PEOPLE! |



|
errr ese OO oeeenceenenenannins

History repeats itself on the screen of the EMPIRE THEATRE |!
beginning Friday, 2nd March together with “THE MAGNETIC

TIDE” The Holy Land, a story of - - - «

| CHRISTIAN SYMBOL
‘THE PAST.

_ PRESENT
and FUTURE

Produced”

und Directed
DOROTHY S sILVERSTON NE

Leland memugh Twentieth Ce







re






ee =











‘ONE THRILLING NIGHT




MONDAY & TUESDAY

tat the St.



Is
‘

aie Sera at the Marine Hotel.

*Then They Were None’ | DeCARLO- DURE. “CAMERON: CARTER

ADVOCATE



SUNDAY,

FEBRUARY

vw

rw
uo

1951



Me F. SISE, Chairman of
A the Board of the Bell Tele-
., of Canada, Mrs. Wm.

ell of Winnipeg and Mrs.
Irving of Victoria B.C.

in Grenada for a few
returned yesterday by
B.W.LA They still have 1
s holiday in Barbados
before returning to Canada

Touring Caribbean
M* EDMUND SHEEDY, Real

Estate agent in Florida and
his attractive wife arrived from


































one Co
{ LUus.
Lennox

who were



Trinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. They are touring the
Caribbean on holiday. Here for

about eight days they are staying
at the Colony Club, St. James.

Marfied Yesterday
ISS CAROL WARD, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Ward
of “Deal” Maxwells was married
yesterday afternoon at Providence
Chureh,. Christ Church to Dr.
Erie Storey, son of Mrs. N. Storey
of George Street, Belleville and
the late Dr. Leonard Storey.

The ceremony performed by
Rev. Broome began shortly after
5 p.m.» The bride, given in
marriage by her father wore an
ex@uisite gown of white slipper
satin cut on very simple lines.
From the skirt, bouffant loops
cascaded in flared fullness at the
back. The headdress was a sim-
ple tiny cap of matching satin
with a waist length veil of cloud
white tulle held in place with

white orchids. Her bouquet was
also of orchids.

Her sole attendant was her
sister Miss Grace Ward who
looked chic in a bronze satin

gown’ cut on the same lines as
the bride’s dress. She wore a
headdress of bronze laurel leaves.

The duties of bestman were
performegi by Dr. Louis Ward
The ushers were Mr. Lisle Harri-
son, Mr. Trevor Talma, Mr.
Clifford Skinner and Mr. Hal
Ward who arrived from Trinidad
yesterday especially for the wed-

ding. ‘

The service was fully choral,
and during the ceremony Mr
George Morris sang the “Nuptia!

Benediction” .
A reception was later held at
the home of the bride’s parents.

Dr. and Mrs. Storey leave for
Trinidad this afternoon where
they will spend a few days before
joining the Colombie on her

aribbean Cruise.

Repeat Performance

MoM": CHARLES ALLMON’S
film of the South Seas was
s0 enjoyed by the audience who
saw it on Friday evening at the
Royal Barbados Yacht Club that
he has been persuaded to repeat
it again tomorrow evening at 6.15
o'clock at the Combermere
School Hall.

This film has also been shown
at the British Council. Mr.
Allmon is at present in Barbados
taking pictures for the National
Geographic Magazine and the
Barbados Publicity Committee.

Proceeds from the show tomor-
row will go to help the Y.W.C.A

From London, Ontario

R. and MRS. J. O. HUGHES

of eee , Ontario, arrived
py TC. yesterday afternoon.
They sae here for three weeks
staying at the Marine Hotel.

Mr. Hughes is Manager of the
London Branch of A, E, Ames
& Co, Ltd., who are in the invest-
ment business,

Mr. Hughes told Carib that
they expect an American couple
Marsh by name to arrive today en
route from the U.S,

Short Visit

M* A. J, FARFAN arrived
from Trinidad yesterday to

spend a few days’ holiday in
Barbados, He returns on Thurs-
day. Mr. Farfan is Governing

Director of Pereira and Co.

Ltd.,
in Port-of-Spain.

He is staying
Lawrence Hotel.

Sisters
RS. ELIZABETH CORISTINE
and her sister Mrs. Mar-
garet Eakin arrived from Canada
yesterday morning by T.C.A. to
spend a_ holiday with their
jparents Mr. and Mrs. H. J.

Mr. Symington is a former presi-
dent of Trans Canada Airlines.



—————————





STRENGTHENING

@
FRESH

RECENTLY



MANNING & CO..







TO THE LAST DROP
Recommended by the Faculty

STOCKS ARRIVED

LTD. = Agents

MURRAY'S
MILK

STOUT

THE STOUTEST OF ALL
STOUTS



Carubh Calling



RETURNING from their honeymoon in Grenada yesterday were Mr.
and Mrs. Michael Lynch.
They are pictured here on their

Back From Honeymoon
R and MRS. MICHAEL
LYNCH, who spent théir

honeymoon in
home yesterday morning
B.W.I.A. Mrs. Lynch is
former Patsy Mitchell.

Here For Two Weeks
RS. JEAN FINNIE and her
two sons Terry and Richard

have come to Barbados for two
weeks’ holiday. They are staying
at Accra Guest House, Rockley.

Mrs. Finnie’s _husband works

with T.C.A. in Montreal.

by
the

Presidents
R. ALEXANDER DENISON,
President «cf the Canadian

Fire Insurance Co., in Winnipeg
arrived from Canada yesterday by
T.C.A. accompanied by Mrs
Denison. They are here for one
month staying at the Hastings
Hotel,

Arriving on the same
were Mr. and Mrs. Walker M.
Taylor. Mr. Taylor is President
of the Dominion Structural Steel
Ltd., in Montreal. They are also
here for a month staying at the
Marine Hotel.

plane

From Montreai
T. COL. and Mrs. W. W.
Ogilvie arrived by T.C.A.
yesterday. Here for three weeks
they are staying at the Colony
Club, St. James. Their home is
in Montreal. Lt. Col. Ogilvie is
Canadian Army retired. They
were in Barbados on a visit last
year.
Alse arriving from Montreal
were Mr. and Mrs. Alex Paterson
who are here for three weeks

staying at the Marine Hotel. Mr.
Paterson. is a _ stockbroker in
Montreal.

Personal Representative
XPECTED to arrive by the
S.S. Colombie on Wednes-
day is Miss Joan McKee the Per-
sonal Representative of the Eliz-
abeth Arden Salons in London,
The purpose of this visit is to
give the same wonderful face
treatments and expert advice on
Skin Care and make-up that one
would receive in the Arden’s
famous Salons in London, New
York and Paris, Miss McKee
will be giving these treatments
and advice at the Phoenix
Branch of Knight’s Ltd., 33
Broad _ Street, from Monday
March 5th where appointments
can be made.



| MARINE HOTEL |

SPECIAL
DANCE

IN OUR BALLROOM
SATURDAY March 3rd

Percy Green’s Orchestra
ALL TOURISTS WELCOME





e
Great Door Prize
Elimination Dance
‘ and Prize

A La Carte —
Kitchen Service

e
9 p.m. to 12 Midnight
Entrance $1.00



Dial 4606

Grenada returned

Floral designs 92c.

way in from the ‘plane,

Leaves To-day

R. ARTHUR M. HUTCHIN-

SON has been appointed a
Liaison Officer in the British West
Indies Central Labour Organisa-
tion in the United States of
America. Mr. Hutchinson leaves
by air for Washington this after-
noon.

Mr. Hutchinson, a resident of
St. Philip, has travelled exten-
sively through the U.S.A. and
Canada. He has done a variety
of fobs at home and in the U.S.
and Canada.

Cooler

R. JIM WILSON, Canadian

Engineer returned from his
visit to Ottawa yesterday by
T.Ci:A e came in wearing
heavy winter clothes. Two hours
later I saw him in a light tropical
suit looking much cooler.

Mr. Wilson is in charge of the
donstruction of the new runway
at Seawell. He is on loan to the
Barbados Government from the
Department {of Transport, Cana-
dian Government. He was away
for one week,

West Indian Play

EMBERS of the West Indian

Rumba Larios (a newly
formed theatrical aOmpany in
London) are busy rehearsing for
their maiden show “Rhythm in
Sepia.” The aim of the play is to
depict life in the West Indies and
JI understand that Jack Hylton,
the impressario, has expressed his
willingness to sponsor it. The
play is written by Jamaican-born
Harold Holness, student of archi-
tecture and newly elected Secre-
tary of W.I.S.U. Hubert Baker,
another Jamaican, is the Director.

Honour For Police Officers
N unusual hpnour was ac-
corded three West Indjan
police officers in England recently.
They were publicly welcomed in
open Court by a Magistrate. The
Iceficers . were Sergeant-Major
Dudley Marshall of British Hon-
duras and Inspectors Cecil Bourne
and Girwood Springer of Barba-
dos. All are spending six months
at the Metropolitan Police College
studying British police methods.
Their “host” was Sir William
Nottidge, Chairman of Tonbridge,
Kent, magistrate, who was after-
wards thanked by them for the
warmth of their welcome.

MRS. HOUSEWIFE

ENHANCE
THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR HOME WITH

Lancastreum Floor Covering

RUGS D ft, KTV Me. woes eee eee - $6.13
OE PH sss ae eines . $7.36
9 ft. x 10% ft. .........,. ‘$8.

9 ft. x 12 ft ........., sees $9.81
CONTINUOUS ROLLS & CUT TO yore ORDER
PE NB iv ccs 06 5 Ga 53c.

PO Mb te vuny caeecis 0c, vd
FRU. 8. oii he oes $1.40 yd,
e+ 108 ins. ..........., $2.10 yd.

Also—ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS TO SELECT FROM
Compare OUR PRICES BEFORE PURCHASING ELSEWHERE



THE BARBADOS
COTTON

‘SSPE EEE ERP BP eee
HAIRCORDS eed GINGHAMS

T Asstd. Checks & Colours
86c. & 87e.

FLORAL LINENE

An unrepeatable Value 92c.
PLAIN PALE BLUE HAIRCORD 32” WIDE
WHITE a

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Your Shoe Stores

36” I
WIDE I
hi tr ad ceed inca

”

FACTORY LTD.

T.C.A.’s Engineering Dept.
R. and Mrs. Hugh A. Reid
arrived from Canada yester-

day by T.CA to spend a week’s

holiday in Barbados.
Mr. Reid is in T.C.A’s Engin-

eering Dept. in Montreal. They
are staying at the Hastings Hotel.
Bookers’ Head

MONG the passengers arriving
from B.G. on Friday morning

Nelson were Mr. and
A. Campbell, their daugh-
ter Mrs. Bayley and son Mr. C. M.
Campbell. Mr. Campbell is Man-
aging Director of Booker Bros. in
B

Mr. and Mrs. Campbell and Mrs,
Bayley will be leaving by the
Gelfito when she returns here on
her way to England. It is under-
stood that Mr. C. M. Campbell
will be returning to B.G.

Meanwhile they are guests at
the Crane Hotel.

Canadian Physicia=
OWN to_spend a_holiday with
Col. Saunders at the Camp,
St. Lawrence is Dr. Fred 5.
Parney who arrived from Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. Dr. Parney
is a physician in Ottawa.

ster
R. and Mrs. C. J. Burchell
were among the passengers
arriving from Canada yesterday
morning, by T.C.A. Here for six
weeks, they are staying at the
Windsor Hotel,
Mr. Burchell is a Barrister in
Halifax.

Investment Dealer

R. A. NESBITT, an invest-

ment dealer with Nesbitt,
Thomson and Co., in Montreal ar-
rived by T.C.A. yesterday to spend
two weeks’ holiday in Barbados.
He was accompanied by his wife.
They are guests at the Colony
Club, St. James.

First Visit

AYING their first visit to Bar-
bados are Mr. and Mrs. W. J.
Henning of Montreal. They plan
to spend two and a half weeks at
the Paradise Beach Club. Mr.
Henning is Assistant General
Manager of Robin Hood Flour

Mills in Montreal.

Persuaded

ERE for maybe three weeks
are Mr. and Mrs, Mark Water-
bury who came in yesterday on
the T.C.A. flight. Mr. and Mrs.
Waterbury are from Utica, New
York, where Mr. Waterbury is
with’H. Waterbury and Sons, Co.
Asked what madg him choose
Barbados for a holiday, Mr. Water-
bury told Carib, that for the past
few years they. generally spent
the Winter months in Bermuda.
This year, however, their good
friends the Hugh Gages, who are
at present here on holiday, per-

suaded them to try Barbados.

Represented

R. EVERTON WEEKES was
at Seawell yesterday morn-
ing to meet Mr. Bede Fletcher
who arrived from Grenada by

B.W.I.A. to spend two weeks’
holiday in Barbados. Mr.
Fletcher represented Grenada

against the Empire Club of Bar-
bados during their recent tour to
Grenada. He is a member of the
“Atoms” Club in Grenada.

Mother And Daughter
RS. ELSIE BORIGHT and her
daughter Mrs. Elizabeth Lind-

say are at present in Barbados for
five weeks, staying at the Hotel
Royal, They arrived from Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. Their home
is in Montreal.

To Join Wife

R. RAY MANBERT, President

of Manbert Paper Pror/icts
Ltd., in Toront, arrived yesterday
by T.C.A. to join his wife who is
already here. She arrived about
three weeks ago. Staying at the
Marine Hotel, they are here for
three weeks.

Cotton

R. and Mrs. James V.. Young,

their son and daughter-in-
law, Mr. and Mrs. David
Young from Hamilton, Ontario,
came in on the T.C.A. flight from
Canada yesterday mo Mr.
James Young is Vice-Presi: lent of
Hamilton Cotton Co., Ltd., his son
is also in the business.

They are here for six weeks,

staying at the Marine Hotel.

CO-OPERATIVE

Uf Pomme



62c.

59c,

Dial 4220



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25,

1951

FOR ONE FLOWER, £125



Orchid bought by

Mr. fioit of Seattle

Even The Emperor

Wants Our Orchids

By GERALD SCHEFF
A’ £125 orchid of rare perfection
is being flown to America this
wéek-end.
It took six years to grow in a

Slough nursery, and has _ just
flowered a single bloom, itself
tco valuable ever to become a

woman’s corsage.

The Orchid, “Aylesbury variety
Suez,” is a new species of cypri—
pedium or “lady’s slipper.’”’ It has
been bought by Mr. Gordon Hoit,
Seattle greetings card manufactur-
er, the only man ever to have
named an orchid, British-raised,
after his mother-in-law.

Exports Rising

He will use it for crossbreeding.
The bloom has a white dorsal with
purple spots, touches of green
and yellow, and a pouch of
lacquered mahogany.

Mr. Hoit does not yet know that
his orchid was given the Royal
Horticultural Society's award
ef merit last week.

Orchids are in the news. Bri-
tain’s biggest orchid show will
be held next month in London.

The other day a Berkshire wo-
man paid £75 for 110 orchids
ranging from white to deep red
for her mother’s funeral.

Exports of high-class orchid
plants are rising, with U.S. and
Australia our best customers.
This year orchid exports are ex-
pected to reach nearly £100,000
aimost double the 1949 figure.

An amateur grower in Australia
hag just ordered 15,000 seedlings
for 17s, 6d. each. A £500 offer
was made recently for a giecn
cymbidium orchid plant

Touring the U.S, to book order's

is’ Mr. Peter Blagk, chairman
of the British Orchid Growers’
Association.

To assist him he has taken
paintings by Miss Nellie Roberts
a grey-haired woman of about 70
who lives in Brixton and is
Britain’s official orchid artist,‘

She has painted them by the
ihousand for more than 50 years
There is no one to replace her
if she dies,

Orchid expert Norman Black,
brother of Peter, told me: ‘Many
American women wear orchid
corsages costing £5 to £20, but in
Britain, where sales have declined,
the average shop price is £1 to 30s.
for this type of orchid.

“Despite Korea there is no
purge of the or¢hid we christen-
ed ‘Stalin’ in 1942.

“Once entered in the stud book
1 name cannot be changed.
Unele Jce’s orchid is soft mauve

with tuby lips and a= golden
throat. i
“Few men in Britain wear

orchid buttonholes today. Growers
never -do.
“Joseph Chamberlain was never





without one, Until the last war
a London _ stockbroker spent
£1,000 a year on orchids. ®

“There is still one man in Lon-
don, the son of a Persian oil
ee who wears a £2 bloom
daily.”

An old customer Emperor
Hirohito of Japan, wants to buy
orchids again.

King’s Collection

Amateur growers range from
royalty—the King has a fine
collection at Windsor and flowers
ere sent to decorate the Queen’s
rooms at Buckingham Palace — to
£8-a-week garage hands paying
10s. 6d. to 25s, for unflowered
plants

ORCHID ODDITIES: Darwin
kept orchids because their struc-
ture resembles the human body
more than any other plant, Baron
Schroder paid £1,800 for a new
species early in the century. John
Dominy, a Briton, bred the first
orchid from seed. There are 15,000
known species. —L.E.S.

Indian Pedlar
Returns Home

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 21.
With tears streaming down his
cheeks, Bhao Singh 55, pedlar of
Princes Town, South Trinidad,
said “goodbye” to his fellow
villagers before leaving to return
to India by the Gascogne, “I am
sorry to leave but I must go back
to my parents, I wish to die in
India.” Singh’s father and
mother, both aged 96, are both
alive in India, °
Singh came to Trinidad at the
age of 16, to work on a sugar
plantation. On completion of his
period of indenture he returned to
peddling spices in which he
acquired a fortune.

TRYING TO SOLVE
U.S. $ PROBLEM

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 21.
The Secretary of State for the
Colonies and _ the American
authorities are at the moment
endeavouring to find a solution to
the problem of allocating U.S.
dollars under the recent trade
Liberalisation Plan. At a meeting
of the Trinidad Chamber of Com-
merce to-day, members heard that
licences are being issued for the
importation of goods from Canada,
but the position with respect te
‘the importation from the United
States was still undecided. It is
understood that applications for
United States dollars involve ten
times the amount of dollars
available.





Ay

errings

FRESH orin

SUNDAY



Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

THE GARDEN im February
CUTHING BACK KING OF

FLOWERS, LAYERING

IT IS difficult to know what to
advise for the garden during this
unpredictable weather we are
having. The unexpected rainfall
has most gardens beaten down
and sodden, and little can be done
except sweep up the leaves, and
clear gutters between flowers.

It would be interesting to know
how the annuals in the various
gardens have stood up to these
rains, as at this time of the year
rain is not reckoned for at all,
nor do most annuals like it,

If any plants such as Exora,
Blue Plumbago, Gesberas or the
Bougainvillaeas show signs of
tur! pale from the extra rains,
a dose of Sulphate of iron will
help to restore their colour. Mix
half a pound in a bucket of water,
and pour a little to each plant.
Repeat in a week, or until a good
green colour has returned.

When the sun does come eut
again (at the time of writing it
shows no sign of doing so!) A
hard white crust is apt to form
on the top of the oe beds.
Do not wait until this happens to
turn the surface of the beds light-
ly with a hand fork when it has
dried sufficiently for this to be
done, and yet has not had time
to form a hard crust.

Where annuals are in the beds
this forking must be done care-
fully so that the delicate roots so
near the surface are not injured.

Cut Back King Of Flowers

One thing that should be done
at this time of the year is the
eutting back of the King of
Flowers.

Opinions differ as to the right
time todo this. The Garden Book
advises cutting it back in April,
but many people consider this too
late, and prefer to do it in Febru-
ary or March, or even earlier. >v,
you can take your choice.

Whenever this job is done how-
ever, the King of Flowers should
be cut back to within two feet of
the ground. After this, fork
around the plants and manure
them generously. From now on,
and all during the flowering
period, keep the King of Flowers
well watered.

To ensure a longer spell of flow-
ers, be sure to cut off the old
flower-heads as they wither. Do
this thoroughly by cutting back
about a foot or two, from the old
flower head, and it will be found
that fresh flowers will quickly
form.

King of Flowers makes a splen-
did and decorative hedge, or it
can be grown singly or in clumps
as a shrub. The pink is the most
common colour and the most
hardy, but it can also be had in
Red, Mauve and White, and the
in between shades.

Layering

To propagate a plant by layer-
ing is a iow business but not a
difficult one.

It simply means bending down
a branch of the desired plant, put-
ting a notch in it where it is to
touch the ground, and then peg-
png the branch firmly down,

eep the branch moist, and when
it has developed plenty of root,
cut it off from the mother plant,
and plant it in a reserved bed, or
a box. When it is well grown

transfer to the desired spot.
“Have you any Gardening questions
you would like answered or any garden
information that would be of interest to
other Gardeners to pass on?
Have you a surplus of seeds or cut-
has yee would like to exchange?
Wr A

to “GARDENING”
C/o The “Advocate”,
and watch this column fer a reply.



G. H. asks:

(1) What do you think is
biting my young Car-
nation leves? The
leaves are left with a
saw - like edge and
some are dropping
off.

(2) The worms are com-
ing on the cabbage.
What shall I do?






ADVOCATE

FARM AND GARDEN |

LIFE IN

THE

SOIL

By Agricola

THERE are two classes of
organisms in the soil—animal and
vegetable. By far the greater
number belong to plant life and
comprise forms of greatest in-
fluence in producing changes in
structure and composition which
eontribute to soil productiveness.
Most are too small to be seen
without the aid of a microscrope.
Simply expressed, we can say that
they fall into two great divisions
—the visible and the invisible.
In the former grouping, the anima}
world is represented by such
forms as rodents, worms, certain
crustaceans and insects; and the
plant world chiefly by large
fungi, algae and plant roots. In
the latter division, members of the
plant world predominate, repre—
sented principally by bacteria; in
addition, there are other micro—
Scopic forms of life — including
such motile groups as protozoa and
species of small worms such as
nematodes which form galls on
plant roots and, indeed, many
others which may use the soil as
a temporary abode, passing only
a part of their life history there.
In this last category are those
which may be parasites not only
of plants but of domestic animals
and even of man himself at some
stage in their existence,

Activity in the soil is so great
that it is impossible for the lay
man to comprehend all that is
taking place in it and in relation
to the crop plants which it sup-
ports. The visible forms of life
are more or less understandable
but, on the other hand, there are
millions of bacteria performing
various complex functions and mil-
lions of microscopic unicellular
animals wriggling their way
through the soil. The effect of all
these operating agencies, both visi-
ble and invisible, is to open up
passages in the soil providing bet~
ter aeration and at the same time
permitting rain and applied water
to percolate to the deeper layers
from which it will return later
for the use of crops. It will be
appreciated that the numbers of all
these organisms fluctuate daily or
even hourly depending on condi-
tions. For example, it has been
established that the beneficial bac—
teria which are so essential for
deeay processes and for the ren—
dering of plant food avarlable are
an easy prey to protozoan forms
and the numbers of the former
diminish greatly under unsuitable
conditions in the sii brorght en by

water-logging, poor drainage, *n~-
adequate tillage and so on. Thus,
the practical farmer and gardenex
must be on the alert to remedy
such deficiencies as may be pre-
judicial to the development and
multiplication of organisms fav-
ourable to successful soil manage—
ment.

Perhaps the most conspicuous
example of a beneficial agency in
the soil is that of the earthworm
which passes tremendous quanti-
ties of earth through its body, ex-
tracting what organic matter it
ean from the material so ingested
and casting out the indigestible
remains on to the land. We are
indebted to Darwin for his method-
ical observations on the value of
earthworms as soil improvers; it
has been estimated that from one-
tenth to two-tenths of an inch of
soil as castings may be deposited
annually on the surface from the

depths below. Advantageously
enough to the cultivator, earth-
worms seek for existence the

heavy, compact soil where their
work is most needed.

Canned Culture

“Highlights of Culture” by H. F.
Boyce, M.A., is the first book of a
general knowledge series which
the author intends to publish. This
book contains 24 ort, simply
written, essays on eminent paint-
ers, musicians, buildings and
operas and should be a useful in-
troductory to the study of these
subjects in schools,

The object of the book, the
author says, is “to give students ¢
eomprehensive acquaintance with
the great men, women and things
of this world from the beginning |
of history.”* “Comprehensive’’ is!
hardly the right word to use, but
by judicious choice of subject and}
careful condensation Mr. Boyce
has managed to get a great deal of |
interesting information into his 39)
pages. |

But, and this must be empha-|
sised, if the book is to be of any}
use, it must be used in conjunction |
with prints of the famous paint-
ings and buildings described and)
records of the music discussed,
Nobody can understand Leonardo
da Vinci without having seen the
“Mona Lisa” or talk intelligently
about “Tristan and Isolde,” with-/|
out at least having heard records}
of that opera,

(‘Highlights of Culture’ will!
soon be on sale at all the leading}
booksellers at 3/6.)



COOKERY CORNER

“My idea of heaven is eating yam,
patés de foie gras to the round of onion and tomato between

hard boiled bacon,

each

eRe,

trumpets,” writes Sydney Smith, layer. Let a layer of yam be on
Well, I cannot run to pates de foie the top, and put a little butter on

gras but here is my idea of a little each Slice.

Pour in the mixture

bit of heaven-—a lunch consisting und bake until the yam is brown.

of flying fish pie, fol-
lowed by caramel pud-
ding. The trumpets are
not really necessary.

FLYING FISH PIE

Fried and seasoned

flying fish

lbs. of boiled yam,

sliced very thin

hard boiled egg

lb. fried bacon

large tomato

yolks of eggs

tablespoonsful salad

oil

2 teaspoonsful butter

1 tablespoonful. Worchester
Sauce,

1 gill Sherry
1 gill Water

1 Onion

Pepper and salt.

Mix well together the
eggs, salad oil, butter,
Sauce, Sherry and water, salt and
pepper. Arrange the fish in a fire-

“
me BS

DON Ree

olks of



ea

swiss



orcester

proof dish in layers with sliced

CARAMEL PUDDING
1 go Milk
3 Eggs
2 oz. granulated
Sugar
Vanilla.
F OMT aay
Put 5 oz of sugar
in a dry metal mould
over the fire to melt
and become slightly
brown, remove and let
it harden. Beat your
eggs then add your
cold milk and a few
jrops of vanilla. When well mixed
pour it into the mould, Put the
mould in a saucepan with water,
but make sure that the water does
not over-flow in your caramel.
Cook in this way for # hr. Place
in the fridge till very cold, then

serve. — MF







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SUNDAY

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‘

Stollmeyer Forces Barbados!) BARBADOS STRUGGLED
Batsmen On The Defensive| FOR RUNS YESTERDAY

363 and (for 3 wkts.) 122

But Barbades Still In Good Position
BY O. S. COPPIN

MUST lead off my comment on the fourth day’s
play in the first Trinidad-Barbados Test which
opened at Kensington on Wednesday, with immedi-
ate reference to yesterday’s play.
The principal topic in West Indian cricket circles
now, for the matches were broadcast, is probably

WW iatete

a

Vee based upon Jeffrey Stollmeyer’s defensive tactics
com}. employed yesterday that so slowed down the pow-

erful tall scoring Barbados run-making machine, spearheaded by
Weekes, Walcott and Roy Marshall, that in an innings lasting for
three hours and a half Barbados was only able to score 122 runs in

210 minutes.
: TIGHT, DEFENSIVE FIELD

REALLY tight defensive field, obviously carefully thought out

and persistent negative bowling by Prior Jones and Asgarali,
were the principal weapons used. ing assisted in the afternoon
when Jones was tiring and he also followed the plan quite well
although he mixed some irritating non-sensical bowling with it.

NO BLAME FOR JEFF

J CANNOT blame Stollmeyer for his tactics as the majority of

Barbadian cricket fans have been doing on the spur of the
noment; nor can I give those who booed the bowlers any credit for
having done so.

One day has already been lost in this scheduled five day game.
There is only one day remaining for play. Trinidad have already
been led on the first innings by 84 runs. With Barbados playing at
home, under conditions better known to them than to the visitors,
and possessing an admittedly inferior batting team_to that of Barba-
dos, well what are the most logical tactics for Trinidad to adopt than
defensive ones and hope for a draw?

ONUS ON BARBADOS

N the other hand, if Barbados, with these conditions in their favour,

are prepared to play safe and make no real attempt to cope

with the problem, I see no reason why Jeffrey Stollmeyer should not
aid and abet them in this.

The onus I contend was upon the Barbadian batsmen to try and
force the pace and not for the Trinidad bowlers to make things easy
for them and.see a huge score piled up ‘and all the fans at Kensing-
ton thrill to lofty sixes and pile driver fours at the expense of the
Trinidadians,

4.

DID WE NOT DO SO TOO?

ID we not commend the West Indies for luring Yorkshire into
defeat when the same Prior Jones and Worrell on the 1950 tour
adopted leg theory tactics and won from Yorkshire although they
were in a really comfortable position for scoring a win from the
West Indies?
Stollmeyer took a chance and it has come off, up to the present.
He gambled on not using Clarence Skeete, so successful with his slow
right arm spinners in the first innings and Ferguson, another tried
and wily slow leg-break bowler.

BARBADOS STILL IN GOOD POSITION

S it stands now Barbados are still 206 runs, ahead and if they

can get some quick runs early on Monday or if the wicket shows

signs of wear over the week-end, well then they are in a good posi-
tion still for forcing a win.

The Trinidad fielding yesterday was excellent. Jeffrey Stoll-
meyer again set his men an excellent example, Skeete failed to hold
a difficult running catch from Walcott and this proved to be the only
real flaw in the excellence of the performance of the team as a whole.

HUNTE PROMISING
UNTE’'S debut as an opening batsman promises great things. It
is true that he was missed on a few occasions but this does not

justify the spate of irresponsible nonsense that has been suggested
about the value of his innings in some sporting circles.
His fielding has been up to a high standard too.
Clyde Walcott’s 77 was made at a time when Barbados needed
someone to stay there and put some stiffening in the batting and it
is to his credit that he did so,
Weekes’ brilliant 75 could scarcely have been possible had not
Clyde stood there after Barbados was one wicket down with only
ten runs on the tins,

CLASS BATSMANSHIP

His strokes all around the wicket were the very epitome of class
batsmanship and he was fittingly dismissed off a cheeky stroke and a
magnificent catch on the deep fine leg boundary by Legall.

I should like to make some record of Goddard's fine effort in
scoring 66 at a crucial period of the innings when it seemed that the
fortunes of the game, which up to a short time before was in the
hands of Barbados, had suddenly swung in favour of Trinidad.

He showed flashes of his old batting form once he had got his
eye in, His setting of the field was excellent in the opinion of compe-
tent judges of the game,

JEFF) AND ANDY COMFORTABLE
Fo Trinidad Jeffrey Stollmeyer and Ganteaume were quite com-
fortable, although Andy had the unnerving experience of having
been served up a snorter by Mullins in the first ball he received,
BETTER START

They..gave-Trinidad a better start than the Barbados opening
pair but Stollmeyer (33) was bowled by a cleverly flighted ball from
Millington when he looked set for big things and Andy after defend-
ing soundly for 56 was bowled by one of the cleverest balls of the
tournament, bowled to him by Roy Marshall, a top spinner that was
delivered almost with the action of an offbreak,

Tangchoon, a sheet anchor for Trinidad for many years now was
not in an unaccustomed role when he shouldered a lot of a big slice
of the batting responsibility after Trinidad had lost some of their
best batsmen, He cut, drove, hooked and gently pushed for singles
to top score with a valuable 69,

LEGALL LOOKED WELL

ALPH LEGALL I have never seen look better. He scored 48
runs in a complacently confident and elegant innings, Impetu-
osity on his part ana persistence (n the part of Mullins brought about
his cismissal when at 48 and going great guns he drove over a stiff
one from Mullins well up and was bowled.

I think that it should now be freely conceded that Mullins on
his bowling performance in this match has justified the confidence
which a few of the local sporting public repose in him and is now
not only a certainty for the next Test but I am sure that he has
engaged the attention of the Selectors.

Clarence Skeete, too I must place in this class.

Ferguson was
we shall see

good on the first day but we must wait and see what
before the tournament is over,













— BECAUSE or
ee Mie
TRAY centre 18
covered wi

AIRY MILK
CHOCOLATE

Ta lacneengeamniee



BARBADOS
TRINIDAD

A struggle for runs was a feature of the day’s play at Ken-
sington yesterday. It was the fourth day of play in the
Barbados-Trinidad cricket match, play not having been pos-
sible on Friday on account of rain.

When stumps were drawn

wickets in their second innings, and with a lead of 84 runs
on the first innings, Trinidad already has 206 runs to make.

In half an hour yesterday Trini-
dad’s remaining 4 batsmen were
back in the pavilion, having added
21 runs to Trinidad’s score of 258
for 6 wickets at the close of play
on Thursday. The 4 wickets went
to Carl Mullins and Norman Mar-
shall, each getting 2.

These bowlers and Roy Marshall
were responsible for the fall of 9
wickets. Each took 3. Roy’s was at
a cost of 25 runs, Norman’s at a
cost of 37 and Mullins’ at a cost
of 68. Errol Millington took the re-
maining wicket for 33 runs.

Barbados’ batsmen found run-
getting a difficult matter in their
second turn at the wicket. Trini-
dad resorted to a negative attack
for the most part and in the first
hour of play only 33 runs were

scored.

With the total at 35 two wickets
fell in quick succession, and later
when it was 55 Everton Weekes
was run out. Clyde Walcott and
Skipper Goddard then played out
time adding 67,

Good Fielding

The Trinidad fielding was good.
No gifts were given the batsmen.
The bowling was steady and
somewhat difficult. Prior Jones
who sent down 11 overs of which
five were maidens got one of the
wickets for 14 rums and Nyron
Asgarali whio sent down 19 overs
including 3 maidens took the
other for 55 runs.

The Start

At 12.15 Guillen 10 and Fer-
guson who had not yet opened his
account, continued Trinidad’s first
innings which stood at 258 for the
loss of 6 wickets. Millington bowl-
ed the first over from the pavilion
end and Guillen took a single—
the only one of the over off the
the third delivery.

Mullins took over from the
screen end and each batsman col-
lected easy singles. Millington’s
next over also yielded a single,
while Mullins yielded two.

With the total at 264, Goddard
brought on Norman Marshall vice
Millington at the pavilion end. He
bowled to Guillen who edged the
first and Mullins at first slip held a
low one-handed catch to dismiss
him for 12.

Sidney Jackbir, Trinidad’s left
hand batsman filled the breach and

ot a single through the slips.

erguson snicked for three and a
leg bye sent the score.to 269.
Jackbir, facing Mullins, was how-
ever lbw with the first he received
and the scoreboard read 269—8—1,

Jones the incoming batsman was
quickly off the mark with a single
to mid-off and was then given an
additional four as the result of an
over throw. Ferguson square cut
one beautifully from Mullins
which was brilliantly stopped by
Hunte at point, He then took a
single to square leg and went
down to face Marshall who sent
down a maiden.

Mullins continued from the
screen end and his first delivery
knocked back Jones’ off stump
and the score read 275—9—5.
King joined Ferguson and hook-
ed one from Mullins to fine leg
for a single to open his account.
Ferguson then played out the re-
mainder. King got a single off
Marshall’s first to cover and an-
other couple as the result of an
overthrow. , .

Ferguson lifted the fourth ball!
from Marshall into the hands of
Millington at mid off and the
innings closed at 12.48 for 279
made in 302 minutes Ferguson
had scored 7 while King carried
his bat for 4,

Barbados Batting
Ph pened their second

s a ‘ P.m,, with Roy
Marshall and Contad Hunte
Sampath took the field for Gan-
teaume. Jackbir started the attack
from the Pavilion End to Roy
Marshall and sent down a maiden
to the batsman.

Frank King then bowled from
the Screen End to Hunte who re-
turned the second delivery to the
bowler. King failed to take an
easy catch, however, and Hunte
cover drove his next bajl to the
boundary. He cut the last ball of
the over uppishly through slips
for another boundary,

Marshall on-drove Jackbir’s
first ball ror a single and Hunte

SY





SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1951

MISSED GALLOPS
All Because Of A Simple Switch Key
BY BOOKIE

LAID my plans carefully. I packed a bag the

I night before so that I would not have to re-

turn home after attending the morning’s gallops.

I also shaved and laid out the clothes which I

would wear to the track. Then I placed my bag

and typewriter at the back dogr so that I would

take off with a swoosh. Next I phoned the Night

Editor and left a message with him to give the

Circulation Manager to phone me at 5.30 sharp. After a bit of read-
ing I retired at about 10 p.m.

I awoke_at 5 a.m, Staggered into the bath, etc., dressed and
by the time ‘my phone call came through I had my hat on. Stop
watch in hand ¥ Ses rearing to go. “No blooming trainer or jockey
is going to put one on me this morning”, I thought to myself. [
opened the Back gate, flung the garage doors wide and gave my
dog a shout of warning to get out of the way. Into the car I jumped.

It was then that I discovered that I had left the engine switched
on from the afternoon before, j ;

That, I put it to you dear reader, is one of the most exasperating
things that can ever happen to a man, and, certainly the worst that
can be so described in my career as a racing journalist,

A above may not, at first glance seem to have much to do with
the forthcoming Spring meeting of the B.T.C., but it explains
why I missed the majority of the most important gallops fast Satur-
day morning. I am therefore still in the dark about several of the
leading candidates entered for our March fixture. :
For instance I wanted specially to see the work of Burns. I am
told that he galloped in company with Sun Queen and that the five
was done in about 1.14, This time figure may be incorrect, but it is
significant. that our friend Gun Site was not called upon to give
the big horse a work out. Evidently something sharper over a sprint
was required and that aught to tell us that Burns is going to show
us his capacity for sprint and middle distance racing. I should think
his chances at both will be equally as good, But I promise that |
will make every effort, or should I say ‘a renewed effort”, to see
him gallop at full speed before next Saturday is upon us
“I have made arrangements to leave the switch keys on the car seat”.
NOTHER interesting gallop { missed was that of Bow Bells and
Best Wishes. I am told they worked a little more than a box



279

Barbados was 122 for three

played . out the over. King con-
tinued to Marshall who hit the
first ball to fine leg for 4 to send
up 10 in 14 minutes, The batsman
played out the remainder of the
over. -

Jackbir bowled to Hunte using
three men short on the leg side
The bowler moved the ball nicely
away from the middle stump tc
leg but the batsman evaded the
trap. This over was another
maiden by Jackbir. King bowlec
to Marshall again from the Screer
End the batsman getting a single
off the seventh ball. The last kept
low outside the wicket and Hunte
played over.

Marshall cover drove Jackbir’s
third delivery for a single and
Hunte played the remaining balls
of the over. Each batsman made
a single off King’s next over.
Marshall drove the second ball of
Jackbir’s next over past the
bowler for a brace but a low re-
turn off the fourth ball ‘taught
the bowler off guard. Marshall
skied the seventh delivery high
on the leg side but none of the
fielders got to the ball, Neither of
the batsmen at this period seemed
quite at ease.

King’s next over yielded four
runs, three going to Marshall, In
Jackbir’s next over Marshall
cover drove the second ball beauti-
fully for two and later cut to
gully for a single. Hunte played
out the over.

Asgarali came on in place of
King from the Screen End with
the score at 29, Marshall pine
the first ball nicely to fine leg for
2. He singled the next and Hunte
played the remaining balls.

Stollmeyer brought on Jones
from the Pavilion End making ¢
double change. He bowled to
Marshall who made a single to
leg off the second delivery. Hunte
played out the over. The first hour
produced 33 runs.

Leg Field

Jones continued from the
Pavilion End to Marshall and
bowled to a leg field, the ball mov-
ing away from the middle stump
to leg. The over, was a maiden,
Asgarali bowled to Hunte and the
sixth ball was edged through slips
for a single. Marshall raised the
next delivery to Jones at mid-on
and the fielder made no mistake.
Marshall’s score was 20 and he
had been at the wicket for 71
minutes. He hit one 4 during his
stay. The total was now 35 for 1
wicket.

Clyde Walcott joined Hunte and
played out the over. Trinidad
“aimed their second victim when
Jones in his next over got the
wicket of Hunte, The batsman hit
low to Skeete fielding at short leg
and was well taken with his score
at 15. Hunte had been at the
wicket for 79 minutes and hit 2
fours Hunte’s downfall) was <:
maiden wicket for Jones. The
total was unchanged.

Everton Weekes joined Walcott
and opened his account with an
edge through slips for 4 off Asga-
rali. He played out the remainder
of the over. Jones’ next over was
a maiden to Walcott, Only a single
was made off Asgarali’s next over
this going to Weekes. The scoring
at this period was very slow as the
bowlers kept a steady length and
the fielders gave nothing away{

Jones continued to bow] from
the Pavilion End and Weekes got
2 tWos on the leg side in the over
In Asgarali’s next over Walcott
and Weekes got 4 runs each to the
long on boundary sending up 50
in 100 minutes.

In Jones’ next over Weekes hit
to mid-on and called for a run.
He-ran down the wicket but
Walcott failed to get off, Stoll-
meyer fielding the ball returned
sharply for wicket-keeper Guillen
to throw down the wicket. Weekes
was 14 when he was run out and
had been at the wicket for 27
minutes. Three wickets had now
fallen for 55 runs and Skipper

to box and that at the beginning Best Wishes looked the easier of the
two, but at the finish Bow Bells was fresher. This sounds very much
like what I expected as it looks to me as if Bow Bells is going to prove
herself an extraordinary good four-year-old creole nlly and any
three—year—old who can go with her for any part-of a distance must
be something good, In addition to that the track was decidedly
heavy and Best Wishes is not noted for stamina yet. For this reason
she cannot be my favourite for the Guineas. At least not unless I see
anything in the next week to cause me to think differently about her
.. « .. “Better still, 1 am going to sleep with the switch keys
under my pillow”. fe : ee Y

ALSO MISSED the British Guiana candidate Vindima who did a
I good gallop with Atomic II. This mare Vindima, it might pay
us to remember, did very well in British Guiana last May when the
track was in a thoroughly wet condition. I have not seen her to best
advantage in Trinidad as the first time she was not yet thoroughly
acclimatised, while on the second occasion, which was last Christmas,
she was still recovering after being off colour at the B.G. October
meeting. It is possible therefore that she may show us good form
up here and naturally her gallop yesterday may have been a pointer
to this, Here then is another important one I must see before race
MAP. 90-3 . . “I thought I would also get a crank handle and a
spare battery just in case”’.

EERHAPS the most impressive gallop I missed, from all reports,
was a box to box, or more, by Usher and Vanguard, The son of
Dunusk and Maid of Honour, Usher, was far too much for Vanguard
and from the start he was bounding along while the latter found it
difficult to keep near him. I am much surprised to hear this and
erhaps pleasantly so, first because only last November it was all that
Usher could do to catch Vanguard at the finish, being nowhere near
him at the start; and secondly, while there is no great surprise about
this, it is pleasing to think that a line as successful in the West Indies
as that tracing back to the mare Maid should still be so active in pro-
ducing good ones.

One only has to mention the name of Footpad and think of what
ne did both in racing and at the stud to realise what Maid did through
her male representatives, Then just to show her dominant influence
think of her daughter Bridesmaid, and her grand daughter Maid of
Honour and remember what they did on the track, Can Usher live
up to such a reputation? It is left to be seen, but I did notice the other
morning that he looked better than the imported filly Arunda in a
fi and it is to be that yesterday Arunda finished much better than

unways in a sprint of five furlongs, Possibly we have in Usher the
horse to make the Guineas more than a match race between Cross
Roads and Best Wishes, He is another I must place on my priority
list for next week. ..+ “I have arranged for a taxi to stand by”.

PEAKING of Cross Roaas he 1s one which I did see yesterday

morning and what I saw makes him remain, in my estimation, a
strong favourite for the Guineas, Since I wrote about him last he has
improved in appearance and that pastiness which he had on returning
from Trinidad has disappeared, He also shows a bit of perspiration
which is a very good sign indeed. His companion yesterday was
Ability and it was evident that he was very easy to her. It is not
every day that we have three-year-old creoles who exercise with
imporieds and make them look like the lesser lights.

©

4s gallop which deserves special mention was one by
Demure and Abberford, For the latter (who is one of those I
must apologise to for a misprint which described him as a “mule”)
things were not really so good, But I would not say that he ran badly
and therein lies the true merit of his companion’s performance for
she simply left him behind. It is therefore very distressing to think
that she may be troubled by some wind ailment as otherwise I would
say we are about to see another like Secret Treasure, Social Gossip
or any of the fastest fillies of the past. that can be brought to mind.
I think the first B class race will be a hack canter for her, providing
she can last long enough,

A FTER apologising to Abberford I cannot do less than the same to

good old Slainte who was also described in like manner. Yes-
terday he went with Miss Panic and this filly once again impressed
me that she will have a lot to do with the finish of the Maiden Stakes.
She is much harder than she was last November and as the majority
of her opponents are just as she was then, I think she will be able
to handle them easily,

There I must let the matter rest. I did see a few other gallops

but I must leave some space for a special ann
am, next Wednesday then sleep tight” eee as

STAR WITNESS ARRIVES TO-DAY

Goddard joined Walcott, He Barbados Turf Club stallion Star Witnes$
i re ness arrives f Eng-
plead out the over which was a land to-day and will be stabled at the paddock for oer dey

before he is sent into the country. By Fair Trial out of s

Solario out of Postmark. by Friar Marcus, this horse saa teed ares
raced in the colours of Miss Dorothy Paget in Engtand. His form I
have already reviewed and now he is only left to be seen with the
naked eye. We shall try and get a picture for to-morrow’s paper
for you between tlie camera man and myself.

Two other maidens were bowled
in succession, one by Asgarali and
the other by Jones, Jones had
now sent down eight overs oi

Page 5

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SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

Trinidad Pin Down BARBADOS STRUGGLED "sland Has 50-50]
FOR RUNS YESTERDAY

Local Batsmen

@ From page 1.
Straight through as a change from
the regular off-break that he was
ewe and Mullins got one of

is big hands to it and held the
@atch.

Mullins Impressive

Mullins was bowling with more
ace and obvious eonfidence than
t any other time during the tour.
t was he that curled up the
rinidad tail beating Jackbir with
the pace off the wicket when he
layed back to a really quick one,
fnissed, and was given out l.b.w.
| Prior Jones he bowled with a
ell pitched up snorter and when
erguson took a swipe at a gdod
ength ball from Norman Mar-
hall, he was caught at mid~off by
illington te end the Trinidad
nings for 279.

Behind The Clock

The innings lasted for 302
inutes. The scoring was behind
e clock for the most part and
nly at one stage of the game did

or

e scoring pass the clock and”

at was for a short time during
e opening partnership between
ffrey Stollmeyer and Andy
anteaume.
The Barbados bowling was
Ways steady and the figures
k. for themselves. Pace
wiler Mullins 3 for 68 in 19
vers, Norman Marshall 3 for 37
just over 17 overs and Roy
Harshau 3 for 25 in seven overs
e creditable in a seore of 27y.

Pinned Down
-The Barbados opening pair,
y Marshall and Hunte were at
ce pinned down by some accu-
te bowling especially by left
m medium fast Jackbir. King
% was steady although he made
ie majority of his deliveries
wing outside the off stump.
‘The first hour's play only saw
8 runs on the tins. To tighten
this brake on the rate of
ring even more, Skipper Stoll-
yer brought on Jones who
wled leg theory from the
avilion end.
e bowled without a slip, with
men on the off side of the
ket and seven on the left side,
luding a tight leg trap.
Accurate Length
sAsgarali was in the plot as
11 and he kept up an accurate
gth from the top end. He too
id the batsmen pinned down.
is rationing of runs had its re-
rd when = Marshall half-
rtedly hooked at a shortish one
‘om Asgarali and put up an easy
eh to Jones at mid-on,
‘Marshall had been at the wicket
an hour and eleven minutes
his 20 runs and Barbados had
iw. lost the first wicket for 35
S.

: Jones Gets One
pence tao met with success, for
out a run having been added
«the score Hunte turned one off
pad, low to Skeete fielding close
the wicket in the leg trap and
latter brought off a smart
ch to dismiss him for 15. He
s at the wicket for an hour and
minutes.

his brought together Walcott
Weekes, but for four overs
great pair were tied down as
ctively as the first pair,
enius told however and
kes stepped about a foot out-
his leg stump and took two
a Jones’ inswinger. This







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proved an open sesame for each
of the batsmen took fours after

this.
50 in 100

Fifty went up in 100 minutes
and five runs later Weekes was
unfortunately run out. He push~
ed one to widish mid-on and
called for a run but Walcott did
not run. I do not know whether
he sent Weekes back, but that was
not apparent from the stands.

In any case it would have been
too late as Weekes had all but
gained the other crease where
Walcott was standing when the
wicket was put down at the other
end. I think they would have
made the run if Clyde could have
got off, but I believe that Weekes’
quick move caught him unawares,

Barbados had now lost the third
wicket for 55 runs.

Goddard Promoted

Skipper Goddard promoted him—
self in the Batting order and went
m next. This was caleulated to
break up the accuracy of the
bowling attack, but still the score
was kept down.

Walcott took an hour over his
first eight runs but when he was
twelve he suddenly loosed a
powerful cover drive off Asgarali
that pierced the ring of fieldsmen
on the off side and went through
to the boundary for four runs.

Later he late cut another of
Asgarali’s deliveries for four runs
and hooked the next to the square
leg boundary for four and some
of the lethargy was driven out of
the game, The crowd stopped
jeering to cheer. Clyde reached
25 with the second boundary off
Asgarali after he had been batting
for an hour and a half.

Persiszence Wins
Asgarali’'s persistence almost
earned him Walcott’s wicket. The
latter lost his control for a moment
and hit out at a good length one.
He skied the ball behind mid-off
and Skeete having run back
several yards got his hand to the
skier but failed to hold it. Wal-

cott was then thirty-three.

In atonement Clyde Walcott
twice hooked short ones from
King to the square leg boundary
to send up the century after three
hours and a quarter.

Walcott later on-drove one
from Asgarali for four runs to
complete his individual half
century in two hours and nine
minutes.

The close of a dull day of play
saw Barbados with 122 runs on
the tins for three wickets,

Asgarali turned in a most useful
spell of bowling and had played
the outstanding part in making
Stolfmeyer’s delaying tactics suc-
vessful. He bowled 19 consecutive
overs and took one wicket for 55
runs,

Footballer Dies

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 21,

Baba Cummings, popular foot—
ball player (Shamrock Club),
died at the Colonial Hospital,
Port-of—Spain, from a fractured
skull sustained in an _ accident
while he was holidaying at the
islands during the weekend.



NW1I0 + ENGLAND
ome

LONDON -

4 efficiency.

Wi Telegraphy and
Tolephosr










@ From Page 4.

which five were maidens and he
had got one wicket at a cost ol
five runs. Asgarali on the other
hand had sent down a_ similar
number of overs of which one was
a maiden and he had captured
one wicket for 21 runs,

When the tea interval arrived
the total had been taken to 58
with Walcott not out 7. Goddard
had not yet opened his account.
Barbados was then at the wicket
for two hours,

After Tea

On resumption after tea, Gan-

teaume took the field. Asgarali
bowled the first over from the
screen end and sent down a

maiden to Goddard. Jones took
over from the screen end, bowl-
ing to a leg field and Walcott got
a single to square leg off the
seventh, while Goddard got three
through the slips off the last and

then faced a maiden from
Asgarali.
Waleott ondrove one from

Jones powerfully for a couple and
then glanced the next to fine leg
for a similar amount to make his
score 12 after being at the wicket
for 66 minutes.

Walcott barely got home when
Goddard played one to square leg
from Asgarali and the batsmen
took a sharp single, the only one
from the over, Goddard turned
the third from Jones nicely to
square leg for a single and Walcott
played out the remainder.

Asgarali who had sent down 11
consecutive. overs, 3 of which
were maidens for 22 runs, and
had taken 1 wicket, continued
from the screen end. Goddard
got a single to cover off the third
while Walcott beat Ferguson at
extra cover with a powerful shot
which went to the boundary off
the sixth delivery.

With the score at 73, Frank King
replaced Jones whose figures were
11 overs, 6 maidens, 14 runs and
1 wicket. He bowled to a leg field
and sent down a maiden to God-
dard.

Walcott on drove the first from
Asgarali’s next over for a single
and Goddard played out the re-
mainder, King bowled a maiden
to Walcott. Ganteaume stopped
what looked like a certain four
from a cut by Goddard off
Asgarali and later the batsman
singled to mid-on to send up Wal-
cott who late cut to the boundary
and then pulled te square leg for
another, to make his score 25 and
the total 85,

King’s next over was a maiden,
hig third in succession. Asgarali
continued his long spell and Stoll-
meyer brought off a brilliant piece
of fielding from a powerful cover
drive from Walcott. The bats-
man, however got a single to the
left of Stollmeyer off the next.

Walcott glanced one from King
to fine leg for a brace and later
got a single to square leg. Facing
Asgarali, he got into his wicket
and turned this bowler beautifully
to square leg for three. King’s
next over yielded a single.

A Chance

Off the second ball of Asgarali’s
next over, Walcott had a mighty
hit, but Skeete fielding at lone-
off, after getting under the ball,
failed to hold the catch. The
batsman eventually got g couple
and later took another single to
make his score 36 in 120 minutes.
Waleott pulled one from King

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to the square leg boundary to send

up 100 on the tins after 195
minutes’ play. Waleott got an-
other boundary wide of Tang

Choon at square leg and later on
drove for three to make his score
47. Goddard whose score was 7
for some time was now at the
wicket for 90 minutes.

An on-drive off Asgarali to the
boundary gave Walcott his 50 In-
cluding 7 boundaries in 129
minutes. He then took a single
wide of mid-—on to send up God-
dard who played out the remain-
der of the over.

King’s next over yielded 4@
single. Walcott cover drove the
second from Asgarali to the

boundary and then repeated the
stroke. but this time he only got
a single. Goddard then played
out the remainder and play ended
for the day with the total at 122
for the loss of 3 wickets. Walcott
is 58 and Goddard 7.

The Scores: —
BARBADOS — Ist Innings — 808
TRINIDAD'S Ist Innings



J. R. Stolimever b Millington a3
A. Ganteaume b R. F Marshal! fy
N. Asgarali ec w.k. (Waleott) b
N. E. Marshail . }
R. Tang Choon b R. E, Marshall eo
Pr. Legall b Mullins . 48
C. Skeeite b -R. EB. Marshall %
$. Guillen ec Mulls b N. Marshall 12
W. Ferguson c Millington b N, Mar-
shall ‘ q
S. Jackbir Lhow. b Mullins T
P. Jones b Mullins 5
F. King not out 4
Extras; lb, 12. nb. 2 15
Total: 219
Fall of wickets: 164, 2—68.
4—199, f-244, 6-—257, 7—264
9-275. .
ROWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M R w
C, Mullins 9 1 eR 8
E. Atkinson iranas 5 0 21 0
E. Millington 16 4 38 1
BR. L. G. Hoad 12 0 o7 - 0
N. E. Marshall 174 8 37 3
TD. Atkinson ” g 22 0
R. E. Marshall see 1 23 3
T, D, Gaddard ‘ 1 0 1 0
BARBADOS—2nd Innings
R. E. Marshall ¢ Jones b Asgarali.. 20
Cc. Hunte c Skeete b Jones 15
Cc. UL. Waleott not out 58
E. D. Weekes run out . M4
4. D, Goddard not out 7
Extras: b.2, 1b. 2, w. 4 8
Total (fer 3 wkts.) 122
Fall of wkts : 1—95. 2—34, 3-—85.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M. RFR w
S, Jackhbir oe 6 2 0 0
Fr. Kine ae wee
P. Jones Ww 6 14 1
N._ Asgarali 19 3 55 1
Umpires: Messrs, H. Waleott and C
Jordan.



*

Jamaica Team

*
Picked

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jca., Feb. 24.

Jamaica’s Eleven to meet Bri-
tish Guiana on March 3 in the
Intercolonial Tournament was
picked this afternoon as the last
trial match found J, K. Holt and
Ken Rickards batting well and
resuming their enthusiasm in the
Jamaican great batting strength.

The team in batting order an-
nounced by the Cricket Board are:

o. J. Cunningham, J. Prescod,
J. K. Holt (Jnr.), Ken Rickards,
Nevel Bonitto, George Mudi, Alfie
Binns, A. R. Bonitto (Capt.), H.
H. Johnson, 8, Goodridge, Alfred
Valentine, with L. B. .Saundera
as twelfth man.

Local opinion is that the best
team could be selected by carry-
ing two fast bowlers in Johnson
and Goodridge, two spin bowlers
in Valentine and Mudi with Binns
as wicketkeeper and a wealth of
batting ability.






KEY TO

HEART.

SOOSOS SOO FROTOF GOCSD COFSF “4 °




















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Chance With

Australia

From HAROLD LARWOOD
MELBOURNE, Feb. 24,
Because the Melbourne weather
s; completely unpredictable it is
impossible to foreeast the result
»? the final Test but without being
biassed I would concede England a
50—50 chance. Indications are that
the pitch rhay dry and roll ow
slow, and easy on Monday and
then it will be up to our batsmen

to consolidate their position
fotiowing Friday’s exeelient bowl-
ing by Bedser and Brown
Looking back it is ridiculous o
think that Australia has already

won four Tests. This in my
opinion should be the glecider and

lot ol
next

Australia will need to‘do a
team building before they
go to Englahd.

As previously reported England
should have won the first and
second Tests. It was only the toss
and Brown's decision to bat and
sending Hutton lower down the list
that lost us the first Test, while the
second was Ipst mainly because
Hutton was out to a frightful ceci-
sion when on top of the bowling
in the first innings.

The Umpire who gave
decision against Hutton has
ince appeared in Test and
does not surprise me

In bith of those games, our bats-
men with one or two exceptions
failed after the bowlers had done
a magnificent job, but whatever
our bowlers did in those matches
was nothing compared ‘to yeSter-
day’s achievements,

In the first and second Tests the
pitch on the opening day was the
seam bowlers’ dream but there
was nothing like that’ yesterday
until very late in the afternoon
when heavy atmosphere enabled
Bedser to move the ball.

No Excuse

There was no excuse for Aus-
tralia’s batting failure other than
England’s magnificent outcricket.
Rrown displayed excellent strat-
egy in setting a slow tempo, and
Morris and Hassett fell into the
trap and played much too safely,
and although they realised after
lunch that they had made a mis-
take, it was then tao late to rec-
tify the position because Brown
then set run saving field placings,
and batsmen could do nothing
about it,

It was through trying to rectify
the position that Morris, Harvey
and Miller all lost their wickets
mm the 15 minutes before the tea
adjournment. From the view-
point of tactics, Australia was
completely outplayed, but I must
give full credit to Brown and
Bedser for the part they played.

Their bowling was excellent,
particularly that of Bedser, who
did all the spade work and never
once let up. The fielding was
also without blemish and Hutton’s
two slip catehes were among the
best I have seen, even though
Len was off-colour but I am glad
to report it was much better to-
day.

Australia's failure was due to
a steady persevering attack, good
English captainey, and bad_bat-
ting. Remembering that, I

the
not
that

very glad when the rain finally
washed out play to-day, as it
would have been a shocking trag-
edy for England to have had con-
ditions. against her after. having
played her way into a winning
position by outplaying Australia.

Just what the weather is going
to do is a complete mystery but
let us hope it plays fair and if it
does, I think Australia will lose
a Test for the first time since 1938,



OIL

Agents



* ESSO STANDARD

FEB. 25 — NO. 160

The Topic
of
Last Week



Last Tuesday in the Assembly
Joe greet Lou with a wink
Just to again remind her
‘It's later than you think.”

. ‘ .

For homes throughout Barbados
Built out of stone or walt
It in themselves divided
Must soon or later fall,
. . .

For when a heavenly party

Is tottering on the brink

Of any great disaster

“Men speak before they think.’
: . ’

Again if any leader

Says everything is right

And some don't feel the same way
It ends ye in @ fight,

Men are just men believe us
Machines men drive all day
If men just turn-in anachines
It's mento have’ the-say. .

,

For if one member feels that
A policy is right
He truly is a great man
if governed by his sight,
. >

But if another feels that

A policy Is wron

But fails to admit frankly,

He is just weak; not strong,
. : ‘

Let opposition rise up
One thing you all can say
However you turn and twist them
They'll argue the same way.

. . *

Se what is good for white man
Is good for black man
What's dood for Joe and vt
Is just as good for Lou,

. .

. . .
You can't just help the King’s man
And then forget the rest
It simply means you're eourting
A big official mess,
.
Act square to everybody
Share workers all alike
Now if you fail, believe us
Your whell must get a spike.
‘ . °

Well Wednesday boys the cricket
Began in bright sunshine
But Lou and comrade Robert
Were all cricket inclined.

. .

We saw Hunte for St. Andrew
His strokes echoed this sound
Well boys you can believe me
“Big cricket come to town,”*

.

Who start him off to “fame-land”
Can any bedy telit *
Twas only Mitchie Hewitt
Who formed the "B.C.L."
. . .

This man had one great vision

To help the country lad

Who now throughout Barbados

For Hunte, they feel quite glad.
o

But take a look at Legall
Speier waren boy a
ho with the Trinidad stalwarts
With Bajan bowlers toy.
.
For his performance Thursday
This is what one man said

You can see that strona boy Legal!
Ate J&R Enriched Bread. '

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SATURDAY, 3RD MARCH, 1951

THURSDAY, 8TH MARCH, 1951
SATURDAY, 10TH MARCH, 1951





TWENTY FOUR EVENTS IN ALL

ret

EIGHT EVENTS EACH DAY



FIRST RACE EACH DAY STARTS AT 1,00 P.M.

The 2/- SWEEPSTAKE will be officially closed on
THURSDAY 1st MARCH, 1951, at 3.00 p.m. and will be
drawn for on FRIDAY 9th MARCH, 1951, at the
GRAND STAND at 4,00 p.m. Tiekets can be purchased
from REGISTERED SELLERS up to 4.00 p.m. on FRI-
DAY 9th MARCH, 1951.

The Plan for admission to the GRAND STAND
will be opened, as follows :-—

To SUBSCRIBERS on Thursday 22nd February,
1951.

To THE GENERAL PUBLIC on Monday 26th Feb-
py 1951 between the hours of 8.15 a.m, and 3.00 p.m,
aily. i

ALL BOOKINGS MUST BE PAID FOR BY
FRIDAY 2nd MARCH, 1951, by 3 P.M.

SUBSCRIBERS :—

Free Admission and Three (3) Ladies or Juniors
* Tickets at $2.16 each.

GENERAL PUBLIC :—

PLEADED LPPLLLSSELEVPEPEEM EAA MLNS

Ladies per Day ........cceeseceeneeee $1.20 ft
Gents per Day ..,,--ecceecseseererene $h-92
Paddock per Day .socccescscsceseseee 91-20
RAGING SUOSON .,scscccnspscesicragacce BeVOe
Gents Beaton .......ccccccesesscscses 96.00...

FIELD STAND:— Per Person per Day — 3/- Each
N.B.—No Passes for re-admittance will be given.

ALL BOOKINGS CLOSED at the Office at 3.00 p.m, on
FRIDAY, 2nd MARCH, 1951.



POSITIVELY NO BOOKINGS WILL BE ACCEPTED

BY TELEPHONE. &

2

G. A, LEWIS, &

Secretary. >

1 PELIICIV OOOO Go 0 FOOL DOP FPSO PUVOC OT FOOD PRY



#

vd







hence sugar production in Barbados, we

PAGE SIX
BARBADOS ADVOGATE are restricted, by acreage of the Island,
Geer SESS SES Paws to improvements in the field of our present



Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd, Broad 6t., Bridgetown.

Sunday, February 25, 1951

SOIL EROSION,

THE unusually heavy ‘and persistent
rains t have been experienced this
month-provide a suitable opportunity for
inviting attention once more to the import-
ant subject of soil erosion. Soil erosion,
expressed in the simplest terms, means the,
uncontrolled movement of water over the
surface of cultivated land, and does not
mean landslides or other forms of geologi-
cal slippage which are commonly seen in
the Scotland District of the island.



The extent of the soil loss caused by
erosion varies with the type of soil; some
soils are more erodible than others and it
is in the black coralline soils on the lower
elevations of the island that the great2st
amount of damage through the washing
away of top soil is effected by erosion.

The main types of erosion which are
active on the coralline seils of Barbados
ate Sheet Erosion—where the whole soil
surface of an undulating area is subjected
to the downward movement of water,
usually excess drainage water, which
carries the soil with it to the bottom of the
slope; Gully Erosion—in this form, the
excess water moving over the soil surface
collects and follows a natural depression
inthe land, forming a small temporary
river, and carrying soil from the sides and
bottom of the depression with it; Soil
(Creep-Erosion—in this case, no water
actually moves over the surface of
the soil, but the particles of soil move
down the slope because of the force
of falling raindrops. This dislodges them,
and they continue their downward move-
mént under the force of gravity, event-
ually coming to rest. It is possible to
control, and to control with advantage,
these types of soil erosion by relatively
simple methods. These methods are known
under the name of contour cultivation. Con-
tour cultivation can be so employed, that it
will-ensure a maximum utilization of rain-
fall to the advantage of crops grown. Fur-
ther any rain that falls either in too great
a concentration for soil absorption or over
and above the requirements of the soil, can
be drained away from the land in a con-
trolled manner. Rainfall under these con-
ditions is responsible for the most serious’
types of erosion-sheet and gully.

It follows, therefore, that more wide-
spread application of measures for the
prevention of Soil érosion and for the con-
servation of soil moisture will-be of great
benefit to the agriculture of the Island.
Moreover, under normal rainfall condi-
tions in Barbados, where often the rate of
precipitation is very great, as much as
three or four inches in one hour, it is’ very
essential that such measures be taken on
all sloping sugar cane soils.

The Department of Agriculture has
placed due emphasis on the fact that soil
consérvation is essentially a commonsense
matter of using land for purposes for
which it is best suited. Technical assist-
ance is available from the Department
whenever it is required, Discussion of
problefhs is welcomed by the officers con-
cerned, But a word of warning is neces-
sary.

The laying down of a sound scheme for
the prevention of-soil erosion is a problem
that must be attacked in a comprehensive
manner. Half-way measures towards con-
trol, sometimes instead of preventing ero-
sion, may in actual fact, exaggerate it.

, It is unfortunate that because of certain
- experiences in a small number of cases,
the practice Of contour cultivation is being
condemned as ineffective in some quarters.

Surface drainage schemes cannct be ex-
pected to do more than prevent for a time
the accumulation of damaging concentra-
tions of water in depressions down, the
slope and*thus check the ultimate develop-
ment of gullies, F e

Drainage schemes alone cannot control
the insidious process of sheet erosion,
which, although less spectacular than gully

erosion, is often more serious.

| A combination of contour drainage with
soil protecting and soil building methods
is; however, of maximum value in reduc-
ing soil and water losses from sloping
cultivated land.

The insistence with which the Depart-
‘ment of Agriculture advoeates contour
cultivation of undulating sugar cane land
on the-coralline soil typef should not be
taken ‘as a condemnation in a negative
manner of the value of the cane-hole sys-
tem. The cane-hole system has proved it-
self a good system for cane cultivation on
undulating soils. The system of contour
cultivation which is merely an extension
of the cane hole system is an improve-
ment of the older system.

The importance of saving the top-soil
cannot be overstressed. In order to im-
‘prove and increase our cane yield, and

“ers ever encountered anywhere in the

acreage, and improvements in the factory.
Good soil management which covers soil
erosion, plays no mean part in any pro-
gramme of production increase.

Mr. E. E. Clayton, Soil Corcervatienist,
New South Wales, writes in his latest book
on the subject of soil erosion: —“When
once erosion starts, unless it is arrested, it
will completely devastate cultivation land
and make it unfit for any useful purfr se.
It has been stated that, in its advanced
state, erosion is a gigantic monument to
ignorance. Ignorance of its causes, of its
destructive nature, of its consequences, of
proper remedial measures, and ignorance
of the caution signs of history which sound
their warnings down the corridors of time
giving danger notices of this nation-wreck-
ing menace to all who will listen and
heed.”


















FEDERAL CRICKET

THE announcement that John Goddard
has accepted the captaincy of the West
Indies Cricket team to tour Australia later
this year is a happy augury, not only for
the game itself but for the entire Carib-
bean at a time when federation of the
colonies is a topic of current conversation.
John Goddard has already led the W.I.
team to victory, against England in the
West Indies, in India, and in England. It
would have been most unfortunate if at
the moment of the severest test for West
Indian Cricket, there had to be a change of
leadership.

The team has grown to know and respect
a leader who has knitted it into the power-
ful fighting unit that it now is, and the
captain has learnt the capabilities and tem-
perament of each of the players, in a man-
ner only possible by long association. The
result is that today the West Indies can
place in the field a team that is really a
team in every sense of the word, The pull
is always a long and steady one with every
man in the pull.

If the same could be said for other
spheres of West Indian activity, then the
dream of Federation would become a reali-
ty without much of the fuss and flurry now
attendant on all discussion ‘of the subject.
This sinking of insular ideas, so difficult
of achievement in other aspects of West
Indian life, is a spontaneous action when
cricket is being played. Time was when
any spectator at Kensington stood in physi-
cal danger, if he attempted to cheer any
other but a Barbados player. This has
long given way to West Indian patriotism,
and Trinidadian and. British Guianese
alike receive as hearty an ovation as any
local exponent of the great summer game.
It matters not what .may be his. native
colony, so long as it is West Indian, he is
well applauded, It is these trends which
lead to the hope that the W.I. cricket team
will continue to do well wherever it is call-
ed upon to play.

Regarding the chances of the team in the
forthcoming trial of strength with Aus-
tralia it is good to note that the West
Indian Cricket Board of Control has not
been lulled into any false sense of security,
but is doing everything possible to put the
strongest possible combination into the
field. It is true that the West Indies team
to visit Australia twenty years ago, won
the final test game, but every cricket fol-
lower knows what a deciding factor the
weather was on that occasion and how for-
tune favoured the W.I. This does not in
anyway belittle the great bowling of
Herman Griffith, nor the astute captaincy
of Jack Grant. But this victory was per-
haps the only bright spot in an otherwise
dull series of performances by the W.I.
team.

No other win of note was recorded and
the other tests lost by very comfortable
and wide margins. George Headley stood
out as a batsman of the highest class,
Learie Constantine and Derek Sealey, as
all-rounders, and George Francis and Her-
man Griffith, as among the best fast bowl-

world. But as a team, the achievements
of the 1931 side to Australia were not great.

We repeat, that neither the absence of
names like Woodful, Ponsford, Grimmett,
O'Reilly, Bradman, McCabe and Kippax
from the Australian list nor the recent suc-
cesses of the West Indian team have made
the cricket authorities of these parts care-
less in their efforts at team building, and it
is to be hoped that success will crown the
1951 visit to Australia.

John Goddard, and his men, whoever
they be in the final analysis will face a
stern task which will demand every ounce
of resource, and every grain of determina-
tion if they are to do well. One other
factor can influence the success of the team
to. a great extent, and that is the choice of
a manager. We hope that the same care
will be exercised in this selection, because
“off the field” is as important as “on the
field.” In this way our team can become a
really great fighting force, which can do a
great deal towards welding our several
edlonies into one solid unit.

















































































SUNDAY APVOCATE



OCH WEATHER FaR FEBRUARY |



=

As food has become the
national obsession, it is not
Fp cg that the vicar of
Holy Trinity, Beckenham, in-
vites all present at Sunday
Communion to a free break-
fast in the church hall at
nine o'clock, “Mothers, fath-
ers, and children turn up in
force.”

EFORE you begin I would W
like fo remind you that a
bazaar in aid of... .
Pass the condiments, Mr. B,
Certainly, Mrs. C.
. . . IT would like to remind
you that a bazaar in aid of... . that we can win.
I wonder what these sausages The French excel at Rugger, the
are made of? j © Poles are playing squash,
Reindeer, I should think. At tennis we can never save
We shall be eating Father our face.
Christmas next. But thanks to Mrs. Dix, aged 22,
. . « If you could put your of Olney, Bucks,
knives and forks down for one ‘By gad, sir, we have won the
moment . pancake race.

Marmalade, Mrs. G?

Thank you, Mrs, C.

Oh, do stop it, young Raymond.
There’s other people want toast
as well as you.

Just like my Charlie. “Got any
more, mum?” he’s always saying.
It gets on your nerves.

I'll swear young Raymond eats
his own weight in bread in a
week.

By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

Holding Our Own

Mrs. Isabel Dix, aged 22, of
Olney, Buckinghamshire, beat
the women of Liberal, Kan-
sas, U.S., in the international
pancake race.

E may not shine at cricket,
we may not shine at golf.
Our boxers seem to take it on
the chin. ;
On football fields in foreign parts
the lesser breeds prevail.
In fact, there’s nothing much

{t seems the fate of Englishmen
to give the world at large
The games that we invented

long ago.
Believing that we cannot lose, we
do not stint our help.
Most willingly we teach them
all we know.
We taught them how to use a bat,
and how to kick a goal.
. And how to make a pass and
score a try;
We taught them how to use a left,
and what is our reward?
They use a right and punch us
in the eye,

This lesson should be heeded be-
fore it is too late,
No more should we expose our-
selves to shame.
But keep a few exclusive things,
like croquet, to ourselves
In case we lose an international
are
We still can shove our ha-pennies,
and play our games of darts.
And win them all without a loss
of face,
But if the girls of Kansas start
intensive training now,
Next year, sir, we shall lose the
pancake race.

. Hats Off
_ Answering a man’s ques-
tien: “When should I lift my
hat to women?” a womon col-
umnist replies that he should
lift it when he meets or parts
from a woman, when he is

. . . If you coula be quet for
one moment I would like to tell
you about a bazaar...

I see in the papers we're going
to eat beavers next,

Beavers? What are beavers?

A kind of water rat, I think,
They’re coming from Denmark.

I think it’s a shame we can’t
even eat our own water rats.

» . » Can you hear me? The
bazaar will be open next Tuesday
afternoon in aid of . ..

Had enough, Mrs C?

The first. time I’ve felt full up
for days.

The same _ with me. Come
along, young Raymond. And take
that buttered crumpet out of your
pocket. Where are your man-
ners?

They’re all
morning, Mrs.

Good morning, Mrs. C.

. . « If you could give me one
moment before you go...

Good morning, all.

Good morning, all.
next Sunday.

Nine o'clock sharp.

going now. Good

See you



There is, as Salvador de “First that he should
Madariaga notices in his biblio- and armed a Knight eit eens
graphy, a sea of books about spurs.” And then “that he should
Christopher Columbus. have the right to call himself Don
Yet surprisingly little is known Cristobal Colon and his successors
for certain about him, also.” The Jew, the Converso, the
Most people, including the Knight, the Grand Admiral of the
Genoese, know that at one period sea, the dreamer all these are
of his life Columbus lived in mixeq in Colombus.
Genoa and he has given a name
& ‘aoe and a hotel in that
erranean seaport. her) sees himself carty his -
re fen “ seen mn, cae Kane ourden, He Was thenat te
oO olumbus_ was firs ub- Christiani
lished in 1939 and has now ea ee eens
republished by Hollis and Carter “He put up a big cross at the
(18s.) throws more light on this Mouth of the harbour... on a hill
Genoese connection than most of Where it could be seen’ from
us would normally discover from everywhere, as a sign that Your
other biographies of the Very Highnesses will hold this country
Magnificent Lord Don Cristobal 8S their own and mainly as a sign
Colon, of Jesus Christ Our Lord and in
According to the author Cristo- honour of Christianity.”

foro Colombo was born in a :
family of _, But there is Colon, (the colon-
mily of needy woolweavers and 'i2-7) as well as the Christ-bearer.

tailors, but his school was the sea.
ae eis 1 it, He began well by defending the
early as 14 he would be with tv osts of the natives meeines the

the Corsairs combining trade with “*” ;
war. “The small Sey whe began sailors and shipboys who tried to
sailing at ten and navigating at take advantage of their ignorance
fourteen picked up his astronomi- °f European values. Yet, as he
cal notions while at the ropes.” himself explains, he was not tak-
“And the sea was his university.’ "8 Up their interests as such, but
Cristoforo Colombo was a young i? order to make a good impres-
Genoese whose Italian was not Siom on them “so that the next
resentable- and- whose culture time Your Highnesses send people
language was Spanish, “Now here, they should be well re-
there is only one reasonable way °eived.
of explaining this fact” concludes _It is impossible by quotation to
Senor de Madariaga: “the Co- give more than the sketchiest im-
lomho family were Spenish Jews pression of Senor de Madariaga’s
settled in Genoa, who following portrait of Columbus. The book
the traditions of their race, had has to be. read slowly in its en-
Femained faithful to the language tirety, But it is worth while
of their country of origin.” summarising this short reyiew

x '
Having identified Cristoforo wish the following seTaty
Colombo as a Jew, Salvador de _ “You (Columbus) mattered not.
Madariaga. builds up a picture of What mattered was the Great
Columbus which fits the pattern, Design, the Union of Continent
The Jew in Colon, usually. shy and Continent, the discovery of
and out of the way comes to the the earth by the earth and of man
surface as soon as there is a men< by man. The time had come
tion of gold or gems. The mettallic when mankind, which had lived
and glittering quality of gold—so for centuries with its hands joined
iyplgally Jewish that it has led in upwards in a yearning, vertical
@ English language to the curi- gesture, the shape of its cathedral

ous subconscious pun on Jew and :
Jewellery, + windows, hat to lower its arms,

whereby jewels be- disjoin it
: Ss hands and make them
come the goods typically handled active in horizontal, tumultuous

is naturall i i stat
ant ae - dated ke an acon and creative activities. Worship
having a commercial value, of the unknowable was to be
But Colon is more than a Jew, Superseded by the discovery of
He is a pre-incarnation of Don the Kknowable; the sons of men
Quixote, were to be given at last the full
Colon like Don Quixote feels possession of their planet. At
that he is called to perform a deed era had to begin in which man
to fulfil a mission. was first to seek the surface of the
What_was the price which the planet, then to fathom its depths,
King of Portugal was “to pay? then the depths of infinite space

The Christ-bearer (Christo-

~

TTS THOSE ATOM BOMBS BUT T
BISHOP |!

See

Sitting On The Fence



Christopher Columbus

Reviewed By GEORGE HUNTE :





* “SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1951

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passing a woman he knows,
when he is walking with a
man who speaks to a woman,
when he is walking with a
woman who speaks to another
man, and when he enters a
lift in a private block of flats.

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LTHOUGH this may be a
A useful guide to correct be-
haviour, it still does not answer
the question: “Why should men be
expected to raise their hats to
women. at all? is

Is it supposed to be a tribute
to their beauty, which is often
absent, an acknowledgment that
they are the weaker sex, when
most doctors will tell you they are
as strong as horses, or is it a
mark of respect?

If it is a mark of respect, this
classes women with the national
anthem and funerals, but. still
does not answer another question:
“Respect for what?”

Are they superior beings, and,
if so, where is the evidence? Are
they more intelligent than men,
more courageous, physically and
morally? Are they more truthful,
more honest, more just? If so,
where are the proofs?

* * *

So far as I am concerned, I
don’t mind opening a door for
them, even if they are strong
enough to smash it open with
their fists. I don’t mind lighting
their cigarettes if they wish to
give the impression that they are
too weak to hold a match, I will
even raise my hat in lifts and
stand before them with
bowed head as if they were
corpses, if it makes them any
happier. ;

jBut I warn them that these
acis of humility are not marks
of respect. hey are relics of a

by age when ants tried
to Dlease the ladies of their
choice, for purposes which were
not always respectable,

In other words, the opening of
doors, the lighting of cigarettes,
the raising of hats is nothing but
a leer from the past.

Therefore, if women wish to
keep their respect in this age of
sex equality they should be open-
ing their own doors and lighting
their own cigarettes.

And sometimes, as a gesture
between equals, raising their
ridiculous hats to us.

—L.E.S.





and of that other infinite which
is the microcrosm. Man had to
discover ‘man, the better to know
himself, The cannibals had to
create Caliban in the genius of
Shakespeare; the new world had
to bring forth the Novum Organum
in the genius of Bacon, the naked
Arcadians of Guanahani had to
arouse MRousseau’s imagination
Into chanting of beauties of natura]
man and to usher the French
Revolution, the rights of man and
the gospel of Karl Marx. The
time had come for a world to die
and for another world to be born,
The New World that was to be
discovered was not merely the
American Continent, but the
world which the discovery of the
American Continent was to bring
forth in the minds of men. Some-
one was needed to open the way,
to lead, And the first act would
only be an act of faith—the dis-
covery of a continent by one who
had no reason whatever to believe
in the existence of that continent,
That lost world had to be found
and someone had to find it; but
this was bound to be the greatest
day in human history, and haa
it been-entrusted-to a man-—who

knew what he was doing, he}.

would have been dangerous to
men. This task had to be given
to a man whose vision flew over
the waters of reality like those
birds which you heard pass” over
your tried sails the night before
the discovery; and he had to be
given an illusion so indentical
with reality that he would sai}
towards his dream with’ as much
certainty as if he had been there
before and had locked: it up in his
chest. What.if he led for the
wrong reason, since he led to the
right place? Mankind may know
where it is going even when its
Jeaders do not. You did not
matter at all. Between Europe
and America, you were but a
bridge of aching flesh, You did
not discover America, which is
what mankind was after, you
discovered the Indies, which do
not exist except in your imagina-
tion; ard because you would bend
to yourself that joy, the spirit de-
nied you access to the knowledge
of what you were doing—and the

continent does not bear your
aame, ir
The vision vanished. Colon

died a second time. And he !ives

for evermore.”







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*“** THATS WHY SO MANY PEOPLE ~

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1951 UN , OC :
SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN













By FAN GALE

Our ‘Ladies Of The Lamp’ Work All Night Be guided

i ions ye Buen, rd mayne ¥ en may are “ be - 1 at poor A public subscription was 1838-39 5,000 in-p: i werk

jalic in Jeeamotts Lan a get a fae : are Kept in the atr opened, : and with the money treated, while in the year 1949-5

Wisaiiita) ‘Wan na eee sc raised Carlisle House, standing on the number was 8,500. The nun b
ospital was quiet tnd reacetul an acre and a half of land, was ber of out-patients has increasec y

KRridgetown Never Sleepsmam7





when I visited it cne n’ght last The surgery was being prepared purchased. The House was ¢on- l[remendously-——in 1938 there were

week. The moon was full and 1 for an emergency operator when. verted into wards, apartments for 25,000 -and last year.

walked slowly through the I looked in there, at.d the amass the resident Apothecary and the 75.000, a

grounds, admiring the ‘:ombre of apparatus laid out und@ér the Matron, a_ receiving room for

looking palms and the neatly kept brifiiant circle of lights ‘looked patients and accommodation for Why the increase,

hedges. ratzer frightening There \avere the nece
so many instruments th:t I ceufc. bui

there wer<

: are we be
sary attendants... A new coming more unhealthy as_ th
jing, in which there were six years go by? No, says the Actin












In t-e Maternity Werd all was not help wondering how the syr-)\ ands, was added, Medical Superintendent in his re
not so peaceful however. A few geon ever found the one . ha * port for 1949-& “There is n
of the tiny babies were awake ang Wanted. By 1918 the Hospital could pro: indication that there has been an:

were loudly demanding to be fed vide accommodation: for 232 pa- deterioration in the health of the
I saw two extra-small babies in Lastly I visited the Marie Louise “ents and there were two resident [sland, and the great increase ip
thave, they were a twia and I was Ward. Most of the patients were joie hav To-day the number of the number of patients dealt witl

beds have increased to 326 (314 eg ; ainec ‘ {
tol at at bi 5 sle nine as Se ex < ean only be explained by an in
d that at birth one weigied 3lb., asleep, but the nurse had waxen of which are usually filled) and erease in the Aemnand for Hospita

ok ~ other is They are doing one up to take her pulse, The provision has been made for six attention.” Fortunately, advance
n one cot lay a litte boy of night nurses (there are thirty-five medical officers, although ‘only j ical and surgics shni

ae bite: ea , oe rat hag: mS Le Sy ¥ in medical and surgical techniqu

ec mon is mother had of them) work from 7.30 p.m. to four are in Yesidence at the mo-

died and nobody seemed to want 6.30 a.m., with one hour off for ment. While in 1918 there were

him. I wonder what will ever a meal and rest during the night. 38 nurses, today provision has patients, from 16 to 12 days. How

become of him. been made for 116 qualified nurses ever, the accommodation probler

The riext day the Secretary told (the actual number at the Hos: stil! remains

In the Casualty Ward the doc- me that the Barbados General pital is 61) and there are 78 E

tor, had two patients-to attend, Hespital was founded. as the oul- nurses in training.

The man had a cut on his arm, come ofa public meeting held in

and the woman. had been cut on. 1889 when it was resolved “That Although the staff has been

her head with a “tin tot". Both the altered conditions of Society inc ‘reased in the last few years, it

cuts had to be stitched, The Cas- in this Island render it absolutely is vious that the number of Footnotes Tho. Hospital i

ualty is open.gll night, and the necessary, for the interest of beds have not been inereased in appeal

number of patients varies between’ humanity, to establish and main. rropertion to the number requir- is. ur

three and sixteen a night,.but all tain a general Hospital tor ‘he ing treatment at the Hospita: w- ions, and each

the nurses agree that “Saturday reception and treatment of the sick day For instan¢e, in @he year blood donors receive $5

night is the busiest night of the

week.” :

A wise mother lets baby decide about
the milk for bottle feeds. Lots of energy, steady
gains, contented days, peaceful nights — these tell her what she most
wants to know — baby is doing splendidly on Ostermilk.

Why can mother pin her faith so important additions are made: Iron
firmly on Ostermilk ? Because, where to enrich the blood ~ sugar to: modify
breast feeding is difficult or impossible the food for tiny digestions — Vitamin
it is the perfect substitute for mother’s D to help build strong bones and
milk. Osterzailk is finest grade cow’s teeth. Ostermilk is made by Glaxo
milk, dried under the most hygienic Laboratories Ltd., who, since 1908,
condithwns. The protein, great body- have been pioneers in the develop-
Tee fe made easily digestible ment of the best possible foods for
tee voller drying process. And babies.

a OSTERMILK....

For your free copy of illustrated Baby Book—Phone 4675

and the use of new drugs hav
shortened the average stay of ir

and there is a ver
long list of people waiting fo
admission to the Hespitet









Upstairs in the Matron’s office
the Night Sister, Mrs. Barbara
Judge, was giving out drugs to the

si nurses, The dispenser does not
IN THE MATRON’S OFFICE Sister B ivi 2 / i i 5
Sut “Seugi to the nigte 36 im arbara Judge was giving normally work at night so drugs



ree
0 PPEPLPLA SLL FSPOSS ESE LIF PEGE LIAL ALAA PIP PAAPPEPIS SO,

*

PLEASE NOTE %

+

S

: : . “ 5
Owing to the moving of our Drug Store, which has %
been interrupted by inclement weather, we regret *

the inconvenience caused to our friends and customers
and take this opportunity to inform them that we will
soon be established in new quarters

ONLY A FEW YARDS AWAY
From our Former Place of Business,

The Cosmopolitan Pharmacy —

PEEL LOO ILO LEAL LOLS

Py CTI I CeCe er eg
FRESH SUPPLY OF

enter” a a a a ee

a:

SER ea aa e eka



SPURINA HEN CHOW

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

r | SH. JASON JONES & CO., LTD,—Distributors
A BABY being fed in the Maternity Ward. There are nine cots in this ward but only seven were being used: . is "a0 Sesean ws w a ~ a « a a 5 et a a a



HARRISON'S BROAD STREET
SOLE LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS OF

PIANOS » H.J.RENN | —

THESE PIANOS ARE FITTED WITH—

BRONZED ALL-OVER BACKLESS
IRON FRAME,

HERBURGER-BROOKS ACTION
“AND KEYS,

§ BEST QUALITY HAMMERS

a



e





AND THE CASEWORK IS SOLID MAHOGANY,
HIGHLY POLISHED.

IN ADDITION ALL PIANOS, (WOODWORK, FELTS,
ETC) ARE SPECIALLY TREATED TO RESIST
INSECTS OF ALL KIND



IN THE MARIE LOUISE WARD most of the patients were asleep, but the nurse had woken up one

woman to take her pulse. THE DOCTOR is seen here stitching a cut in a patient’s arm. SUPREME IN TONE QUALITY,
ES ‘ ,





















Pablic Budgetin help the needy around them. ‘ 4 Y © ‘blement, and possibly unemploy- The first thing striking me, is |
ai Tt me 8 Otherwise they eould not possibly O b et e iment. I would not go further, 1 that they all seem to think that AND APPEARANCE
Cae tg thine Soca unig live. But. still I.submit that some- Pigg 7 the British plan goes too tourists boats are to call here regu-
° Budge thing more ‘of a regular and re- i AA ila hc , iar. do not believe in. toe larly on Sundays and also that the : ; i
ae Te niiise and ne Coie, Yiable nature should be officially iii is urgently in need of asa ee 9) tea” soeta’ ae much seeding people with a spoon: stores would be open all day. » Special Introductory Cash Price
> te ra i . a f x . at ‘ ley , . . . : at
tral Government, has come round provided. ‘And so one might go on at of the island, I cannot but feel Rag fo oa inaiv gone peo ships have only a el
once more may I put in a plea Take a couple of sample cases. length. that we can and must make it eae e = d s oe and foresig tain number of hours in port, which ac 1
on behalf of our poor and dis= An. Old Age Pensioner, a re- N I 3 that.the situa- Our business as a humane and o t a abet SeyRemy ; - ps ans pas ssengers cannot give ne ir .
‘ ty spectable lonely woman, tells me . NOW recognise tha Teca hese ising setae. tee was glad to see in the Advo- eatire atte ntion to one particular
abled old people. fli 4 she has to pay 5/— a wees rent, ses the difficult question christian Pe ua ¥ at te ba cate last week that in an inter- item, We will presume the boat it }
The high costs of living, and ° ay Lae 5: ie tice necessaries of life for all our old Yin Mr. Ww eh A OR a item, "Wilk DresinHie Gis Dat
not’ least. the increased charges and cannot get a cheaper place. creased tee joe tbe sot and disabled. badste:mariy ‘bt eae eer. W. A. Crawford recom arviving here at day break and; HARRISON'S Showroom Dept.
2 Now that is her Whole income, ex- that it is complained in the Hous , forked faithfully for , mended this course, and I hope that this is known several days ‘ i , ial 2352
tor rent, are hitting them hard | Ss 1 , Assembly that the pretty big whom worked faithfully for long that he : he litice , nang," sonta he sal 1a
i the authorities should really cept for what charity she can pick ot ssembly tha ie p el S years when they were able. lat he and other political leaders beforehand. The agents here would ;
fs to mite them some. additiona) up. How does. she. live? _She Treasury balarice iB same ai ‘ : will push for it, And the clergy inform the. ship that the Storer)
(a ae: a would be willing; glad, to. share dissipated by ’ Sener eee, oe es B. Let me add here that T am not @%d Church people might well would be open from say 8 to 1€
“ ‘oie to’ 12/2 monthly Parochial -her shelter. with a person of her But ore we oie to advocating giving to able-bodied S*sist_ to publicise and advocate am. of £ " ‘6 pm., winbneent WOM MMe LCP AVP
assistance, (in. St. Michael and own type and quiet way of life,3S already a fh } y Pat there idlers. Far from it. I cordially |. would suit the majority of pas %
aa ther yarishes) and 5/- but that is not easy to find. many of us, On this point ¢ _ agree with the Scripture, “If a | [ venture to hope these sugges~ sengets. This would actually mean $
oa ales old. Age Pension are~~ Again; a Parish Pensioner’ get- 27° then, Res 1 beg man will not work neither. shi! flons will receive the attention and 2 age ny " the wares dity for §
2 2e@kk a bain, & aris . - save _ri— ” “OV > { . . arks. > Ww 2. ge a
really impossible amounts to sup- ting the 12/- per month has to pay ey ee C it re ae eat. ‘ ‘ Seed With th sheen ad oo a eotaae sree tad
ort. anybody in the poorest 60 cents a week for a room, He 1. We as a Community a 2. There is the possibility ot ved, FR ANCIS. GobDso! . ie Ye tell tie tay Gils-woula be %
: hion, Of course there is a great formerly made use of the S.A. still able to spend quite a lot ©! an entertainment Tax. It is levied ANCIS GODSON. _ Don't te me at th wou d > “a ,
oouae of charitable help—on the Shelter, .but craved something money on what must be called jn the Mother Country. It is very Sunday” O ‘ forcing the clerks,, to Bret i. =
streets of Bridgetown and private—. more of a home, He has to depend luxuries —— Entertainments, and jight on the individual ticket, but Sunday Opening Sabbath as how many of them d& With

_ i, |e we re a es i F S aye at home!
ly, and through the Churches. I for most of the neeessaries of life sports, picnics, and gee eta es the total amount is substantial To The Editor, The Advocate— ne WPL ot Sunda ie, ees ae ies
know a good deal about that and on varying and quite inadequate ing and drinking, etc. € The tre and it is easy to collect. : SIR,—I have been following with the advice of "Doing Unto Others”, and
highly appreciate the kind feeling charity. â„¢ believe he has also a are, I believe, ten Cinema atres 3. Finally, the proper course is much interest, the various views then be vexed at your doing something

and generosity that provide it. ticket for the Parochial Food running now, for example, most the long term plan of a National expressed by your correspondents Which you would like someone to do sg

‘FOOD VALUES


























di- 7 | dni tie) . for you if you were a Tourist, r
, h the ten- centre but that is one meal a day; of them twice daily. The expendi-~ Welfare Scheme on the British on the opening of the stores chk Cri: ARES Ss"
Then OL are nelghbourly and what. about morning and night? ture. for this one iten of recrea~ model—but only for Age and dis fiindays.. Mie or eae Yours VJORN. SHANNON. eae ere ees 3 =.
; CRAWFORDS UFILLIT BISCUITS per tin $1.2r
S eS CRAWFORDS Asst, SCOTCH SHORTBREAD ..per tin $1.17
7 .
ORIEN TAL % 3 PEAK FREANS CHOCOLATE %
x % Asst. BISCUITS ............. » $60
q
GIFTS! —. % A Prescription) is b HUNTLEY & PALMERS OSBOURNE BISCUITS}
; sa Bie aag ' McVITIE. PRICK LINCOLN CREAM | } lb. Packets
THANTS - acon % . ° as % | ® ROYAL SCO1 i at 35c. >
; % Simply a Piece % s OSBOURNE ¥ x
== x | JACOBS EXHIBITION | per Pkt. .
SSS % . iT ) s I
: % ve x | JACOBS LINCOLN CREAM . $
% of Paper... So is ¥ | 8
Just Opened % x SLICED HAM SLICED BACON CHEESE §
HISODOL % @t Dollar Biitt. x SOLIO PACK APPLES Oa. aherge Tin <8
TABLETS Fi % 3 TIME TO THINK OF YOUR... SURF MAID GRAPES ..... .Large Tin 50c. Small 29 §
3 ¥ ipl sts denteieel esta iia : A es “a a
HISODOL % «WHILE ONE REPRESENTS WEALTH THE OTHER =. TTONS & BOWS BARTLETT PEARS ..,........Large Tin 6%¢. Small 35 ;
POWDER . SAFEGUARDS HEALTH ; DUTCH STRAWBERRIES IN SYRUP See eS ee
. y - "
BISURATED MAGNESIA : We cannot afford to treat a prescription as an ordinary piece WE HAVE OPENED an Assortmnt of the most Exquisite SOUTH AFRICAN GUAVAS Large Tin — .53 g ,
y' ead nny GD Aé |
Powder & Tablets Sof paper since human Iife and health depends on it, To us it ; - eer eee BUTTONS for all manner of 3 :
LIVONAL $ is a confidential document, Compounded by qualified drug- § | dean albaagrbts den ane COCK ADE Order these from.. x '
earnel >
EPHAZONE TABLETS $ Ste Sul ‘ $| S
EFHAZONE: TABI BS gists and checked for ‘safety. % STANSFELD N
% Send us your next Doctor’s Prescription. % : ‘ ‘1 FINE zt %
perenne Tt OU CAN RUSE U3 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. } jj: oe 3
YEASTVITE TABLET Is YOU CAN TRUST US. 3 a ; r 0. ; x SCOT CT 8
= ie 2 s 2 aa Wi, Livi 3
C. CARLTON BROWNE {i % i Q —Ali Branches. 3 10, 11, 12 & 12 BROAD STREET ; RUM & CO., %
Hl nights ; . & $ | %
so Bateatt ee Sas HS SN iced oinironenienie ae | Broad Street
) SS ye Dur . _ .
i —~'\ ¥ 4, 6366S OOESCSBFO APSO 66% ees = $6565.55 989956550550 95 95990 6650 OOS OOCSOSOS
SSS | V GSS SSO CSS SSFP FOPOOSS LIAL FFE CE OSS





PAGE ZIGHT



Faiths Barbadians “



Live By

By WILLIAM BURKE

THIS is the second in a series
of articles dealing with the
histories of the various religious
denominations that exist in Bar-
bados. Last Sunday I dealt with
the Roman Catholic Church, to-
day the Anglican Chureh takes
the spotlight.

It would perhaps not be amiss
to say that the history of the
Anglican Church in Barbados
began when the first English
settlers landed here, and to quote
from the Diocesan History,
“claimed the island at once and
at the same time alike for the
King of Ingland and the King of
Kings, planting the Cross of
Christ at Holetown,”

The Church has grown with the
island, and has gone a long way
since thé Barly 1620s when many
of the ‘island’s proprietors de-
cided that the Gospel was not to
be preae to the slaves—many
clergymel defied the order—and
when plat®s of worship were jyst
wooden ‘Structures. Today the
shackles of slavery have been
thrown off long ago, the Gospel
is preached to all who want to
listen, and the places of worship
are over four dozen stone build-
ings of varying size and degrees
of beauty.

The Anglican Church today has
21,000 communicant members, and
is the only state supported Church
in the island.

There is very little on record

about the first rectors or about
the authority under which they
were appointed, It seems that in
the 1670s a more or less formal

jurisdiction was exercised by the
Lord Bishop of England, although
his authority was not always
recognised in Barbados and was
even resisted on occasions.

Today the affairs of the Church
in Barbados are not governed by
the Church in*England, but by
the local Diocesan Synod and the
Provincial Synod of which the
Archbishop of the West Indies is
Chairman,

From 1627 to 1875 the whole
West Indies Church was without
a Bishop, and then Revd, William

Coleridge was appointed
Bishop 6f Barbados and of the
Windward and Leeward Islands.
It was no sinecure. Bishop Cole-
ridge had"to administer 13 islands
and British Guiana,

His episcopate saw a big growth
in the Church in Barbados. The
number of Clergymen inereased
from 15 to 31, the number of
places of worship from 14 to 35,
the number of schools from 8 to
383 and the number of children
being educated therein from 500
to 7,000.

But Nature, like God, is no
respecter of persons or of places,
and the hurricane which hit the
island in 1831 played havoe with
all this good work, The Church
under Coleridge triumphed over
the disaster, however, and with
tunds raised locally, and funds
trom the Seciety for the Propoga-
tion of the, Gospel and from the
Society for the Promotion of
Christian Knowledge, almost every
church was rebuilt in five or six
years, vies Z

It was under Bishop Coleridge’s
influence that Friendly Societies,
so popular among the people to-
day, were established. Between
1833 and 1838, 22 of these socie-
ties were established with a total
membership of 2,574.

There have been seven bishops
since Bishop Coleridge’s time.
First there was Thomas Parry and
then Dr. John Mitchinson, during
whose episcopate Codrington Col-
lege was affiliated with the Uni-
versity of Durham. Next was
Herbert Bree in whose time the
Diverce Law was introduced into
the local Legislature for the first
time and thrown out, and the

Cathedral Chapter was established.
William P, Swaby followed. He
after

it was who a_ successful






term of office during which he
grew to love Barbados more than
anywhere else on earth, was elect-
ed Archbishop of the West Indies.
But he died a few days before
taking up his appointment, and
his body wag laid to rest in Bar-
badian soil.

Next was Alfred P. Berkeley
who purchased the building known
as the Church House, During his
term of office was celebrated in
Barbados and Jamaica the centen-
ary of the Consecration of the first
Bishop of the Province, and the
Church in Barbados decided on a
spiritual revival. The Mothers’
Union Movement spread from one
branch in the city to branches: in
many country districts, and the
Clewer Sisterhood sent down four
sisters of the Community of St.
John Baptist. It was during
Berkeley’s term of office, too, that
Codrington College was destroyed
by fire in April 1926.

David Bentley was Berkeley's
successor. From the earliest times
the clergymen in Barbados were
concerned over the people’s pref-
erence for concubinage rather
than matrimony, and over the
high number of illegitimate chil-
dren born. Bishop Bentley with a
view tc improving family relation-
ships started_a purity drive and
founded the Purity League.

He was suceeeded by William J.
Hughes who was appointed a
member of the Legislative Coun-
cil, whose political faith was
Socialism and who resigned re-
cently over the question of the
dis-establishment of the Church.
During his episcopate the Sisters
of St. John Baptist were recalled
and their place was taken by
Sisters of the Good Shepherd.
These sisters have established a
school which is growing rapidly.
It has a roll of over 100 and there
are many others on the waiting
list. Plans are being made to
enlarge the building which is sit-
uated in Lower Collymore Rock,

The Founder of Codrington Col-
lege was Christopher Codrington,
who died in 1710 leaving all his
estates to the S.P.G. A Gram-
mar School was built in 1745, and
the College as we know it to-day
was started in 1830, There are
about 30 under-graduates there
at present, some preparing for
Holy Orders and others reading
for a Classical Degree. But a
change is in the offing, and there
will be sooner or later no scholars
reading for a Classical Degree at
this College. The University of
Durham has decided that as soon
as a Classical Chair is established
at the West Indian University, it
will not compete with the latter in
its own area.

Apart from the Mothers’ Union
which now has 21 Branches with
a membership of over 2,000, there
is the Church Army with a big
membership and the Church
Lads’ and Church Girls’ Brigades.
St. Paul's Church, Bay Street,
is the only Anglican Church
which has a Third Order of St,
Francis,

As I said before, the affairs. of
the Church are administered by
the Synod which has both priests
and laymen as members. The
synod has its annual meeting in
March every year-and then meets
from time to time according to
the business in hand. An import-
ant meeting is planned for May
when members will elect a new
bishop.

The procedure is that as soon
as the See becomes vacant, the
Dean applies to the Archbishop
of the West Indies for his man-
date. The mandate is issued to
the Diocesan Synod and a meet-
ing is summoned within a month.
The Diocesan synod either elects
the bishop then, or delegates the
choice to a committee of which
the Archbishop must be a mem-
ber. The choice of a bishop by
the Synod must be by a majority
of both the clerical and lay mem-
bers, It must then be confirmed

The sooner you take Phensic, the sooner
you'll feel better, for Phensic’s quick, safe
action will bring relief, lift away pain-caused
fatigue, and remove weariness in a matter of
minutes. Phensic neither harms the heart,

nor upsets the stomach.

Be prepared for

pain — keep a supply of Phensic handy.




6

Phensic

for quick, safe relief

FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,
NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS & CHILLS,









SUNDAY ADVOCATE

THE CONSTANTINE TECHNICAL COLLEGE
Middlesbrough, England.

By TONY

WHAT benefits would Barbados
derive from g Technical College,
a Government Training Centre or
perhaps a small Technical School?
They are too numerous to men-
tion. At present the Barba tos
Evening Institute, by keeping
classes at Combermere School, are
catering to q few, but, too few.

On many oeeasions suggestions

have been made regarding the
best possible means by whieh our
population could benefit from

vocational and teehniecal training
but very few, if any, ever ap-
proached the subject of erecting
a Government Training Centre,
Technical College or even a
Technical School,

The cost of erecting the ap-
propriate Tech College may
run into thousands of dollars but
a Start could be made in a rented
building large enough to accom-
modate a school or training centre,

The next question is funds, but
T am certain that any Technical
College, within a short time, could
become self supporting. It must
be remembered that at such an
institution the lighterman would
be able to study art gr drama as
a side line; on certain evenings
the Fisheries Officer would be able
to hold classes for fishermen and
those interested in the fishing
industry; the clerk in the City,
instead of remaining on the lower
scale, would be able to learn about
business management and other
classes which includes woodwork,
commercial courses, printing, aero-
nautics, ete. ete. would be held
The fee would be one suitable for
the poor man’s pocket and I am
sure the instructors would be con-
siderate and not exact a large sum
for their services,

Good examples of what Barba-
dos should look forward to are the
Constantine Technical College at

Middlesbrough or the Goyernment ©

Training Centre at Leeds, both

situated in the county of York—

ettiay England,
e

College, |
throw away from K

_ i a sesere ° ;

rough, on its ro a ee
mately 4,000 last year, Its Prinei-
pal is Mr, D. A. R, Clark
M.Se, (Tech.), M.I, Mech, E.,
M.1.T.A., A.F.R. Ae. S.

by the Governor-in-Executive
Committee and the Bishops of
the West Indies province.

The Anglican Church in Bar-
bados now has 39 priests in the
establishment and there are in
addition retired priests, The
Cathedral Chapter is composed of
six stalls, St Aidan, St, Ambrose,
St. Augustine, St. Basil, St. Cy-
prian and St. Ignatius. Deans of
Chapter include the Archdeacon.
Present Dean of St. Michael is
Revd. G, L. G. Mandeville who
recently succeeded Revd, A. J.
Hutchinson,







When
PAIN

strikes

remember
Phensic!

ust take

Tablets



antine ‘Technical
ich is Only a stone's

VANTERPOOL

This is one of the 157 Techni-
cal Colleges scattered all. over
England while there are six in
Scotland, three in Wales and two

in Northern Ireland. In London
alone there are 19 Technical
Colleges entirely maintained by

the London County Council and 16
Poiytechmics algo aided by the
L.C.C. There are also seven other
educational institutes including
the City and Guilds of London,

All these institutions only form
part of a long chain of Training
centres in the United King smn,

Shortly after the last war the
Constantine College was not only
a help to local folk but also assis.
ted servicemen who were disabled
during the war and not fit to re
turn to their pre-war jobs,

In one class—the commerecial—
in 1947, there was an ex-army lad
who lost both feet in action. He
was always smiling and looked
forward to better days, Though
only able to get along slowly, he
looked quite satisfied with his
artificial legs and finished the
course successfully,

This class was fairly well re-

presented, In it there. were many
Engjishmen, an_ Irishman, two
Barbadians, a Jamaican and a

lad from British Honduras who
had made Newcastle-on-Tyne his
home. elke 1. 4
Quite a number of the students
were pre-war engineers and
mechanics but had become. ner-
vous wrecks because of the war.
They had to be given a suitable
vocation in order to fit back into
civilian life.

There were other classes for

girls and boys. In some they did
sketching and painting while in
one class-room, where a human
skeleton was erected, others did
anatomy. The College is equipped
with a Canteen. Tea and cakes are
served at various intervals.
A “get-together” was held in a
large hall on the ground floor some
Saturday nights. This took the
form of a dance. Soft drinks ‘and
other refreshments. were sold.
‘These functions were always well
attended and the money went.into
the College till.

On certain days those students
who were interested in newspaper

vities could visit Kemsley
ouse where they would see one
of the oldest printing presses in
the world. This press is kept in
the office as an exhibit. They
would also see ne@wspapers going
straight from the press to vans
which immediately took off for
various perts of the country.

To get more funds the College
held a Carnival once a year.
Nearly every class was represented
and the wax figures especially,
which were driven through the
streets on trucks, created much

interest. Other groups of students}:

dressed to represent historic events
and personalities. At a scheduled
time they would hold a procession
through the streets of Middles-
brough and the suburbs.










Before the march begins each
student given a tin in which to
pick up a collection from any
place They invade restaurants,
hotels, homes and also accost

pedestrians, motorists and cyclists.
In -the evening hundreds of
students could be seen flocking
back to the College with weighted
tins. The tins are handed in to
various classrooms and the money
counted. On the following day
the name of the student who
made the best collection would
be announced. This money also
goes into the College till.

On the other hand electrical
welding, . engineering, carpentry,
shoemaking and many other
trades are taught at the Govern-
ment Training Centre at Leeds.
Again servicemen who were dis-
abled during the war benefited
at this Centre. Some men who

had lost their hands could be
seen working with mechanical
hands.

This Centre is also very large
and has a canteen where mid-

day meals are served. The fee
for the meals is paid by the
student.

Perhaps one of the only Tech-
nieal Colleges in the West Indies
is at Puerto Rico. On. many
oceasions students from the Brit-
ish West Indian islands - have
attended this College.

It is time for Barbados to have
such*an institute. This island also
may ibe able to cater to many
others. There is plenty room for
aduit education.



HANDWRITTEN. BIBLE

CALGARY,

Rey. J, M, Watts of the Pente-
costal Tabernacle here is direeting
4 project for a handwritten Bible,
With each parishioner eontribut-
ing a chapter, and well-known
citizens eontribyting a verse or
two, the work is expected to be
finished in three menths.—(CP)

AMBITIOUS BUILDERS

" STRATFORD, Ont,
Forty-seven youngsters in the
Pal Model Aeroplane Club here
build) everything from flying
saucers to model aeroplanes with
a seyen-foot wingspread. Appre-
hensive mothers note the big
models are almost big enough to

carry ‘baby brother away.—CP)



Rx

a His
= :
i
a
a





MATINEE : Friday,
a

Under the Distinguished Patronage of
Excellency the Governor Sir A. W. L. Savage,
K.C.M.G., and Lady Savage

‘ PRESENTS

_A MURDER â„¢s
-wceEN ARRANGED

A PMRIBLER =~
e ‘

THURSDAY and FRIDAY

= 15th 16th MARCH, 830 pa.

e :
‘Box Office Opens FRIDAY, March 9th



HAT ABOUT A TECHNICAL Ming Plate At
COLLEGE?

The Museum

A FAMILLE verte plate of the
late Ming Period, dating from the
end of the sixteenth or early
seventeenth century, is on view at
the Museum for two weeks. It
is described as famille verte
owing to the predominance of fine
green enamel made from oxide of
copper. The plate is 8 inches in
ciameter, and is decorated with
landscape scenes and rushes in
green, purple, yellow, blue and
red. It is marked with a blue
flower symbol on the reverse; and,
was recently presented to the
Museum by Mr. W. Leonard
McKinstry.

Chinese pottery dates bac’x al-
most to fabulous times, The
earliest pottery which appeals to
most European collectors is that
made during the Han dynasty of
206 B.C, te 220 A.D.“This green-
glaze mortuary pottery with its
fine modelling has acquired
beautiful iridescent tints owing
to its long burial. The mortuary
objects include models of houses,
implements, crockery, wine jars,
ineense-burners etc. Other kind:
of pottery were made during the
early centuries, but, during the
fang dynasty 618-906, A.D., great
strides were made jn Chinese art,
and imperial factories were estab-
lished in the Sung Dynasty.
Glazed pottery was also popular
for use as architectural ornaments
such as roof-tiles, mouldings and
dragon gargoyles.

Porcelgin in China is also said
to date back as far as the Han
dynasty, and, although its Chinese
origin has been established, it is
not certain that porcelain was
made as early as the third or sec-
ond century before Christian
ras eds tie eanutetiure - ot
368- ; manufacture — o'
porcelain pri rapidly and
tt became progres, rap delicate
until the so-called ‘“bodiless”
porcelain was juced, thin
and so delicate iless”
poreelain that it “seemed to con-
sist of glaze alone.” A feature of
Ming porcelain wpe the use of col-
oured glazes, Unfortunately, a
great deal of the Ming porcelain
which has survived the centuries
is of the heavier type, much of it
“export ware,” and much of the
so-called “Ming” is really of later

reigns,



BERBER eee
M@ BARBADOS DRAMATIC CLUB &

16th March, 5.00 p.m,





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~~ WE BOIL A BOMB

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The tests which consist of boiling samples under 100 Ib, per
sq. inch oxygen. pressure in ‘bombs”’, are quite safe, We have
never lost.a scientist—or for that matter—a customer because
of a sticky valve, This test is one of many which guarantee the _

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1951



At The Cinema:

FIESTA MOOD
By G. HE.

ONCE AGAIN, the successful director-producer team of
Norman Taurog and Joe Pasternack, who gave us “That
Midnight Kiss” have combined their talents in another
Technicolor musical film THE TOAST OF NEW ORLEANS
now playing at the Globe. The settings of the bayou
country of New Orleans and the French Quarter of the
city itself in 1905 are vivid and spectacular and the whole
film is a galaxy of gorgeous colour and music.

,, starring Katharine Grayson, energy and zest, set off by the
‘Mario Lanza’ and David Niven vivid costumes and native music.
the story is on the flimsy side, but Other opinions to the contrary,
good direction, plenty of humour I enjoyed “THE TOAST OF NEW
and an excellent characterization ORLEANS” and I hope you do
of a Cajun fisherman by J. Caroll too.

Naish all combine to give it plenty





of life. TARZAN AND THE SLAVE.

GIRL (Plaza Bridgetown)

Tarzans may come and Tarzans
may go, but the creator of this
famous ape-man goes on forever.
In all, twenty-six Tarzan films
have been made, and the latest,
under the above title, is showing

‘On a trip to the bayou country,
the impresario of the New Or-
leans Opera House and his fiancée
stop at a Cajun fishing village at
the time of the blessing of the
fleet, when everyone is in holiday
mood and singing and dancing are
the order of day. Amongst the
celebrants, the impresario discov-





laying the jungle king and a
ers a crude young fisherman with -set-

x plgrigus volce snd: realising the eansome; well setup Young man
—— st tie oe ee K. a mysterious tribe of lion-worship-
the help of hi dente wnere Ww’ rs that motivate the plot of this
he help of his fiancée, who is the fim. Vanessa Brown plays Jane,
pading soprano in the Opera, they ang of course, Cheta, the chim-
out to groom the boy for a pro- nanzee, is on hand as Tarzan's
8S ae pie ane — ever loyal friend. Highlights of | the
p * are. Tarzan’s effor o help
OO otenaite to’ peers upset battle a strange epidemic that has
e resa| much, ecima the tribe and to recap-
Tn a film of this xind, it is the ture the women who have been
Inging, dancing and = = en = eae the dimin-
e precedence over the acting, n, ulation.

ho yh the latter fe guda. Petite ee oer

d charming Katharine Grayson Melodrama from start to finish,
s a lovely lyric soprano which it will appeal to people whose
e uses delightfully. Freshness of tastes run along these lines.

one and flexibility are two out- Showing with TARZAN is a

anding features of this

st’s voice, and her range is well timely and instructive short fea-
igh unbelievarle. ede en peenin® BOMB. “The film presents. der
wn at west Anima, 4 tailed demonstrations of how one

light romantic Italian ballad and
‘ rom “ must plan personal defence from
later duet “Brindisi” f La the moment of warning to the in-

Traviata”, sung with Mario Lanza, ont the bomb ex ‘
plodes, High-
eee ee ae favourites (279 lighted is the fact that’ the A-
howed her voice off to perfection. bomb has its limitations, and
; knowing how to take advantage
ewe lane, ie ones seas of these by means of simple pre-
as e Withe Hoest volkes 1° cautions, will considerably in-
br, has one of the finest voic at xrease your chance of survival.
ave heard a a long time. 4 ae Based on scientific knowledge ac-
Globe Theatre wit Serpe, sound Sma oon ert ye
of A-bombs in the Sou as as
wel under contol cunerwse Be well athe Hirashima explosion
e@ purpose o s film is to min-
padioe. = — a ee imize panic and fear, while stress-
Ses u eied a ote th the ing the importance of effective de-
ree H asas' oe nda ~ fence against the dangers of ex-
ars a anowne sere papsion snd radiation,
voice technique. His expression

































s good and his voice full of vital- .?eerrrrrr"™”

ity. aioe the oom ne diame

are “Tina Lina’—a festive bayou e
ong, “The Flower Song” from Attention




‘Carmen” as well as more popular
ypes. Children

On the acting side of the ledger

David Niven plays, with his usual BEGINNING from ne

finish, and delightful humour, the | Week and continuing weekly

suavely _ polished impresario, children not older than 12
hose interest in his fiancee seems | {he Saditor a how agar: ;

a be more paternal than romantic, ner, “short stories on any

Seat eatin ates on are subject they choose. Stories

must not be more than 200
eve in all the fuss and falderals words in length. A prize

rat Zo to make a gentleman, is | win be given for the best
For once, there is plenty of sing- gad Yes ap ee

ing, and the songs have been care- | yaner. Stories must be sent
lly selected to appeal to musical in not later than Thursday

as well as less musical tastes, and every week.

the dancing in the bayou mood, in y ¢

‘the opening of the film is full of




























atthe Plaza. Lex Barker is now .



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

IN SWEDEN
A Man Can’t Sell — Without
His Wife’s Consent
By Joseph Garrity

THERE were female smiles in of divorce, her title to any
Sweden last week at the remark property she brings into the
of London Judge Earengey that marriage.

“fair shares for wives of their
husbands’ wages” was a principle A Safeguard
difficult to enforce in law. : .

From “the land of happy wives,” No bridegroom is shocked to find
Swedish women have written to his bride tour their home after
the Sunday Express pointing out tMe honeymoon labelling the
that economic equality in marriage {Urmiture as a safeguard against
is a right they have enjoyed for future disputes.

30 years. Gone are the days when some
wives had to chase wayward

Bound by Law husbands on Saturday night to
salvage what remained of the

- How does it work? Under the week’s wages. Today under the
Swedish Marriage Act of 1921 pooling system it is a common
husbands and wives are legally sight to see a husband and wife
bound to pool their incomes and opening each other's pay packets.
divide them equally, Women are so well protected

This obligation of equal shares by law that husbands cannot even
applies also to property and to object if wives go and collect the
debts. pay packets, themselves.

Indeed, the Swedish husband

has lost so much ground since the Spiteful Will
days of the Viking buccaneers’ The problem of the spiteful will,
that he cannot buy or sell q thing does not exist in Sweden. For on
without the consent of his wife. aq husband’s death, half the estate
gcees to the widow and the remain-
His Fancy der to the children. This rule
: ° applies in reverse on the death of

Any husband who secretly sells g wife.
his watch for ready cash might What do Swedish men think of
find himself in the same dilemma jt all? Many say that the equality
campaign has swung the balance
too far and that the law has made
the woman the boss.

Because of the equal-pay—fer—
equal—work drive, women’s wages
in many jobs Nave increased, and
in some trades, such as textiles,
men are now demanding equal pay
with women!

‘So Free’

Women are wearing the trousers
so thoroughly now that many
husbands are learning cooking and
baby care at evening classes, Some
men run the home while wives
are out bread-winning, or away
on holiday.

“Bachelor” holidays are now
popular with Swedish wives,





How much money
should a husband
pay his wife?



so “free” that they suffer little,
if any, social stigma by choosing

Eight out of every 100 do.

' Of the 348 children born every
day in Sweden, 29 are illegitimate,
but they enjoy normal passport
and inheritance rights.

Another significant fact revealed
as the spouse of Mrs. Olle Olson, by the Swedish official almanac is
who recently sued her husband for that 660 out of every 1,000 first
pawning his typewriter. children are born in the first six

Mr. Olson, who had paid for the months of marriage.
machine with his own money,

‘Fair. shares is a
principle difficult to
enforce in law,’ says
JUDGE EARENGEY.

[$< — 2





smuggled it out of the house one Not Satisfied
day to raise enough cash to back are Swedish women satisfied ?
his fancy in a horse race. “No,” says Mrs. Svea Svenson.

But, unwittingly, he encounter “We get no alcohol ration from
ed the 1921 marriage law. This the State monopoly until we are
stipulates that the contents of the 25, and if we marry our ration is
home are the joint possessions of put at our husbands’ disposal.
every couple. “Sex prejudice still remains in

Not even the kitchen poker is Sweden, During wartime tobacco

out the consent of the other. léss smokes than men. y
The legal accent on possessions ‘Otherwise we think women’s
is a feature of every~betrothal. -dt»rights are nearly sufficient. We
is customary for a Swedish bride wish our sisters in Britain and
to prepare an inventory of her elsewhere similar luck.”
possessions to ensure, in the event , —.L.ES.



Enjoy yourself in lovely

-

At home or on holiday, working or playing, there’s

nothing to touch Tootal Guaranteed* Fabrics for the

pleasure they give to wearer and beholder alike. With
their wonderful colour range, their variety of beautiful -
textures and their immediate response to styling, you

can be sure of finding the perfect Tootal Fabric for

every fashion need. Tootal Fabrics wash
superbly and are very hardwearing. Many
are marked TEBILIZED for

tested crease-resistance.

vr

mo 4 ED ge eee

DARTWORDS





se

YOU have to arrange the 50 5.
words in the circle so that they ceding word a name of a well-
known person or place in fact or

It may form with the pre-

lead from PIGEON to CLOY in
such a way that the relationship
between any one word and the }
next to it is governed by one of
the six following rules:—

. It may be associated with
the preceding word in the title or
action of a book, play or other

No rule may be invoked more
than twice consecutively.

A typical succession of words
might be: Bush—Brush—Shrub—
Scrub — Curbs — Curds—Whey—
Whet—Stimulate,

anagram of the word that precedes
t.

-. It may be a synonym of the
word that precedes it,
It may be achieved by add-
ing one letter to, subtracting one
letter from, or changing one letter
in, the preceding word.

‘ It may be associated with
the preceding word in a saying,
simile, metaphor or association



PEN PALS

MISS EVAN FORSHAW,
Persaud, age
Miss Yvonne Nelson, age 18, Miss
Oneita Pancito, age 20, Miss Nola

Cire eemecliimenches tenes we

CROSSWORD

Brown, age 16, Miss Camille Le-
Long, age 16, Miss Constance Le-
White, age 20, Lilie Sing, age 17;
and Miss Tenie Cassanova age 19.

Port—of-Spain,
Kenneth Alexis, No, 94 James
Street, Vesta Bella, San Fernando,

tween the ages of 15 and 20.

The women of Sweden are now [2%



Wirdhday Greetings

to have a child out of wedlock. °

- Loud mete! tone it down
et the ass by he won t
m. (5)

Applewhaite,
Bvan returns to church. Ernesta Jessamy and Phillis King.
. What the horse said when

(6)
18. Set up on a permanent bdasis
Long. 5

20. Tar oil for h
1. Such a chant has

q (3)
it’s pullea to push
along, | (3)

(23. Reset the trees.

ange. (6)
an inclination

keeps Wael W Rts
and healthy

pset, (9)
f the colin. (7)
| 3. The line of rulers. (7)
4. Handles,

Temper ‘out of range, (5)
9. Ties one down to a place. (4)
Slate weighed in Chinese ounces.)
ie seems willowy you'll agree
(a7. rine loves to see plenty of
negotiable by one partner with- rationing, women were allotted \



ut of yesterday's puzzle. —Across:
a anaes nd



OY ry ore rey

PAGE NINE









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PAGE TEN

CARIBBEAN SOS...

‘Stranded’

If you are a U.K. businessman
who wants to visit connections in
the British West Indies, or a West
Indian who wants to get home,
you cannot hope for a direct sea
passage before April or May at
tRe earliest—unless you are lucky
enough to step into a cancellation.
If you are taking the family then
do not expect to get away before
the summer, You will probably
travel by a Dutch or French
vessel, paying more than double
the prewar fare. You may pre-
fer, of course, to avoid the queue
by taking the Queen Mary to New
York and then going on to the
West Indies by Canadian National
Steamships or the American Alcoa
or Moore-McCormack ,Lines—but
that_route is expensive, especially
since devaluation. The other
possibility is to go by air, for
which you will have to find £174
to £180 (single fare) plus the
cost of sending extra baggage by
sea. ‘

That is the present state of, the
mother country’s communications
with. one, of her most important
group of Colonies, and there is
little ¥ prospect of any improve-
ment unless some bold and imag-
inative step is taken, Before the
war, these Colonies had regular
and reasonably frequent direct sea
connections with the United King-
dom’ (although, even then, only
one British shipping line was
serving the Eastern Caribbean
group). Today, connections are
precarious and inadequate, de-
pending almost entirely on ser-
vices provided by the French and
Dutch primarily for their own
nationals. The situation is worse
today even than during the war
and immediately afterwards, when
the Ministry of Transport was
able to arrange for special sail-
ings. Now there is no help from
that quarter — in fact, the Min-
istry shrugs its shoulders helpless-
ly in the face of desperate

als, As a result, hardship is
inflicted on West Indians visiting
the mother country, staff move-
ments are hampered, business
contacts are curtailed, and the
tourist trade—so necessary to the
prosperity of these Colonies — is
entirely disregarded.

But these effects, serious as
they are, are only part of the
story. A succession of official and
semi-official reports has borne
witness to the pressing need of
the British Caribbean for better
internal and external communica-
tions. For the past 75 years these
Colonies have been asking for
more adequate shipping. services
and yet they are worse off to-day
in some respects than before the
Boer War. It is therefore not

* merely a matter of making good
a temporary post-war deficiency,
as Government spokesmen hav
implied; it is a far-reaching prob-
lem related to the whole future
economic development and politi-
cal structure of our Caribbean
possessions.

The latest of the series of re-

ports to stress the need for im-

~proved shipping services in this
area was that of the -Common-

wealth Shipping Committee, which
undertook at the Government's
request “to survey the shipping
needs of the British Colonies in

the Caribbean area and Bermuda;
to considér what shipping services
will be required to meet the needs
of the area in future; and to make
tecommendations how these ser-
vices can be provided ....” The
committee's findings, published in
1948, were critically received in
the Colonies since it was felt that
they covered old ground without
offering any concreté remedy, But
at least it was hoped that the com-
mittee’s recommendations — the
most. important of which was for
a fortnightly, or not less than
monthly, passenger service from
the UK to the Eastern Caribbean
would stir someone to action. On
present showing, however, the
committee might as well have
saved itself two years of inquiry
and examination of witnesses,
Nothing has been done to imple-
ment its main proposal and noth-
ing seems likely to be done. In-
quiries on the subject from local
interests have met with stiff reti-
cence from the British Govern-
ment.

What can be done? From the
fuller discussion of the problem
that follows it will be seen that
there is no easy solution, Several
of the shipping lines which served
the Caribbean area before the war
have not been restored; the war
took heavy toll of merchant ship-
ping and new vessels are costly
to build; shipowners Say that to
operate a regular service would
be uneconomic, and apparently no
acceptable form of Government
assistance or subsidy has yet been
offered, But it is hard to believe
that these difficulties are insur-
mountable when so much is at
stake. The time has come for
business interests in this country
and the British Caribbean to unite
their voices in insisting that: the
present attitude of drift, compla-
cency and evasion come to an end.

COLONIZiS CANNOT

PROSPER WITHOUT

BETTER COMMUNI-

CATIONS,

L ET us take a look at the ex-
‘&/tent of Britain’s possessions
in the Caribbean area, They can
be divided eographically’ into
two groups: Western Caribbean,
comprising the Bahamas and
Jamaica, with British Honduras
on the mainland; and Eastern
Caribbean, comprising the Lee-
ward and Windward Islands,
Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago,
with British Guiana on the main-

extent that a British Secretary islands. The Royal Netherlands
of State could hold out no hope Steamship Co., served the area
of improved transport to a West well with one large and
Indies Government except that two largish liners calling fort-
the French Line may be able to nightly. at Barbados, Trinidad
absorb some of the Colony’s and all ports to Cristobal (Pana~
“excess requirements.” ma Canal, and a_ three-weekly

It is the Eastern Caribbean group service with 100-passenger class
of Colonies that is worst hit by vessels to Barbados, Trinidad,
the present dearth of shipping. Ser- Demerara, and. Dutch Guiana,
vices to the Western Caribbean, Of the five “passenger vessels of
although not up to pre-war stan- the Compagnie Generale Trans-
dards, are more or Jess adequate- atlantique (French Line) on the
ly maintained by Elders & Fyffes’ West Indies run, two fast liners,
banana fleet. An exception must be Cuba and Colombie, maintained
noted in the casé of British Hon- a monthly service between the
duras which has no direct pas- U.K. and the Caribbean Colon-
senger or cargo connection with ies. Finally, there were the
the U.K., the Harrison Line’s Harrison Line’s two passenger
pre-war monthly service to Beliz@ ships, accommodating about 100

SUNDAY

caused by transhipment at Trini-
Gad and the steep rise in freight
charges. Vessels calling at
Trinidad used to lay off and dis-
charge from both sides, but now
dock and discharge from one side
only, which means that shipments
destined for Demerara, for instance
take five to six weeks as against
three weeks before the war.

The average rise in freight rates
has been about 130 to 140 per cent.
Here are some comparative
figures for pre-war and present-
day shipments to Trinidad sigp-
plied by a London merchant:—

Pre-1938 =1950

Sanitary earthenware
im crates 40s. 105s.
Plumbers’ brassfoundry 75s. 170s,
Bakelite w.c. seats 60s 140s.

not having been restored. The each, which provided the only Acknow that “rates of
Colony presents an exceptional regular British ‘service to the freight ... present a_ problem,”
problem, since it lies off the main Eastern Caribbean; but it was the Commonwealth Shipping

shipping routes, But there is m0 announced just before the war
such justification for the neglect that this service was to be with-
of the Eastern Cafibbean Colo- Grawn as wneconomic, Apart
nies, which are conveniently from these services
grouped and lie athwart the there were the cargo services
main sea routes, between the UK operated by the French Line
and the Panama Canal, Here Yarrison Line and other com-
we have the anomaly of upwards panies, as well as the fortnightly
100 UK~bound vessels from Aus- service run by the Horn Line
tralia and New Zealand passing (Hamburg) with five boats ac—
through the Canal each year commodating about 40 passen-

while citizens in British Colonies gers each /
queue up to get passages aboard “ fiders & Fyffes’ fleet, which had
wr oa o_ “cannot be earlier served Barbados and Trini-
+4 dad, was in the pre-war period

views ae one poletiel crriscn- running only to Jamaica, That
nomic or for calling only “if suf- Pot was also served | by the
Pacific Steam Navigation Co,

uceme offers.”
the Bettiah camuuet’s 1 which made. about ten calls each
sponsibility to take a less com- ©, homeward and om
mercial and longer-term view of bound, entirely on ——- Bn
a situation affecting the prosperi- regular passenger tra’ r oe
ty of a million or two of its sub- Royal Mail Lines and a Danis
jects. There is a clear duty on Shipping company tran monthly
the part of the mother country Services with limited Somme
to see that shipping services are ®¢commodation, while a
adequate to meet the following calls were also made by ner
requirements:— 4 = ee
i ements e erneen of war came
rr ee See the inevitable announcement ot:
the U.K. and the British Suspended for the duration.
see cyte baa feria see
4 3
eee eee te — the Caribbean area were high. Of
tering UK-Caribbean trade. the French Line's five’ passenger
Tourist traffic, which is po- vessels on the West Indies run, for
tentially much greater than instance, or Oe tea
ene tere Saale ships were both
ii anemia wae ¥ eae lost. Nevertheless, there was. a
i immediately offering, but fencTal, expectation. that, peace,
what could be economically ‘ i t
grown if refrigerated trans- oe ping aay reat rae
port were guaranteed. Coe aren gt bh i ores
Exports of UK manufactur- emphasis laid on this aspect of the
ees which again might West Indies’ development ky such
Ms ot ede, chipping. quthoriensirs surveys as the Royal
. mmission , 1938-9
Unfortunately there is no indi- the Stockdale Report, 1943-4. In

qi)

Giii)

(y)

“ cation that the British Government the 1946 edition of the UK Expat

is facing up to its responsibility Pyomotion Department's Hints to
in this matter—otherwise would Weknaia Men
questioners in the House of Com- West Indies and Bermuda, we find

© mons have been twice fobbed off this sanguine comment on ship-

in recent months with the answer services: “Most of these
that “no practical plan” had yet ar services were suspended or
been submitted for implementing curtailed during the war, when it
the Commonwealth Shipping Com- was difficult, if not
mittee’s recommendations? It is impossible, to make a tour of the
sufficient comment that the con- area by sea. The return to normal
ference of directors of the Incor- conditions will probably see most
porated Chambers of Commerce cf these ‘services resumed... .”
of the British Caribbean, meeting Clearly, “normal conditions” are
in Port of Spain last July—two still a long way off!
vears after the publication of the -
CSC’s findings—should have had In fact, ont
to pass a resolution urging inquir- —just recen’ the French Line
ies to be made of the Secretary of have résumed passenger services
State for the Colonies to find out to the Eastern Caribbean. The
what action was being taken on Royal Netherlands Steamship
that revort, Co,’s Cottiea and Bonaire (ac-
commodating about 100 and 60
passengers respectively) provide
a monthly service to British Gui-
ana with calls at Barbados and
Trinidad, while the Oranjestad
and Willemstad help to ease the
situation in the British Caribbean
Colonies on their, homeward Pe A
growth, Everyone recognises the Pea ee each oaltieah:
need to attract new blood and the Dutch Line now ‘rungs sup-
capital investment into local en— plementary cargo. services to the
terprises if the under-developed West Indies and South Pacific
territories are not to remain for- ports, The Compagnie Generale.
ever dependent on Colonial de- Transatlantique restored their
velopment funds or grants-in-aid, West Indies and Central Ameri-
But what are we to say to the can service as from last October
would — be pioneer or investor — with the completely reconditioned
“Go west, young man, to the Carib- Celombie and a smaller vessel,
bean, but don’t expect the boats Gaseegne, The Colombie, which
to follow you”? That is the kind has accommedation for 584 pas-
of prospect which the British Gov— sengers in three classes, is now
ernment is offering by its failure virtually a new liner after con-
to recognise communications as an Version from her wartime role as
integral part of development in 2 hospital ship and offers a high
this group of Colonies, standard of comfort,
A similar short-sightedness is
shown in regard to cargo capacity.
The constant refrain is: “Cargo
capacity appears to be-adequate to
the demand,” It has been repeated
with slight variations in recent
Colonial Office reports and by Gov-

“Go west, young man”--
and then ?
Expenditure on Colonial weltare
and deyelopment schemes is a lop—
sided policy unless the territories
concerned have the communica-
tions’ necessary for economic

the Colombie tes
ernment spokesmen in the House ree mata = ph gomero}
of Commons. And, with certain gor the French Line by calling at
reservations, it is true — in the Jamaica. é
sense that one can only send to Both the Dutch and French
market what can be transported. Lmes are, naturally enough, run
But have these people never heard primarily for their own nationals
of railroads opening up the back~ ‘They can accept cargo offering
woods or sea connections bringing from the U-K., but passages are
prosperity to isolated islands? It strictly Yimited:) On her maiden
is a lesson of history that commu- voyage, for instance, the Colombie
nications and trade must advance was onlyable to tak& about 100
together. from this country. The
In this context, the example of & available on th
British Honduras is interesting, In ships is quite insufficient
1948, the Commonwealth Shipping to relieve the present congestion
Committee could say: “Because of between the U.K. and the Eastern
its accessibility to North America, Caribbean. The only services on
it is natural that British Honduras Which British travellers have prior
should obtain many of its essential claim are Elders & Fyffes’ Golfito
imports from that source... , ” taking about 100 passengers every
In actual figures, the Colony im- SiX weeks, and the Ha en Shore
ports today about 9 per cent of its and Booker Bros.’ cargo eh
requirements from the UK. But
there was a time when British
Honduras was taking nearly half
its imports from the UK, and a
report on the Colony in 1909 pro-
vides one of the reasons: “Eleven
steamers of the Harrison Line
call evéry year. Dates of sailing

Western. Caribbean-—Elders
Fyffes maintain a fortnightly pas-
senger and freight service with
the Ariguani, Bayano and Cavina,
As previously mentioned, the
Dutch Line now calls at Kingston,
but pre-war services of the Royal
Mail Lines and the Pacific Steam

the Dutch Line and |

Committee had the following to
say: “It is obvious that under the
conditions now obtaining freights
are bound to be high and will re-
main so unless the general level
of prices falls. The shortage of
tonnage, the cost of new

tonnage and the increased
time taken in loading and
discharging are also factors

which have brought a rise im
freight rates. We suggest, how-
ever, that there should be machin-
ery for periodical review of rates
and we record therefore, a pro-
posal made to our committee in
1939 to the effect that an organi-
sation representing shippers and
shipowners be set up to review
freight rates from time to time on
cargoes to and from the West
Indies.”

This recommendation has just
keen put into effect through the
West India Committee, which
nominates representatives of ship-
pers and merchants to confer with
British shipowners.

Refrigerated capacity is
needed

While the Commonwealth Ship-
ping Committee committed itself
to the general view that freight
services between the UK and tha
West Indies were, or would be-
come adequate, the report did
recognise that there would prob-
ably be a need for more refriger-
ated cargo space than yas likely
to be available to cope with the
hoped-for expansion of the banana
and citrus fruit industries and,
moreover, that “expansion of the
West Indies expert trade would
necessitate the purchase of ma-
chinery and materials from out-
side sources for setting up fac-
tories and plants, with a conse-
quent need for additional shipping
tonnage.” But the Trinidad Cham-
ber of Commerce was not satisfied
that the committee had realised
the full freight potentialities,
commenting:

We are of the opinion that a
British line providing a service
such as we previously recom-
mended would obtain a satisfac-
tory volume of the freight offer-
ing between the United King-
dom and the British West Indies,
as it is gbvious that many-ship-
pers and importers would avail
themselves of the opportunity to
have goods shipped by a yessel
arriving from 10 to 12 days after
sailing, instead of the much
longer time now taken by cargo
ships,

The conci:zsion would seem to
he that cargo capacity cannot real—
ly be considered apart from the
improved passenger service that
the British Caribbean so badly
needs, The lack of fast passenger-
and—cargo liners forceg¢ shippers to
rely unduly on slower cargo boats,
which in any case cannot provide
that additional tonnage—including
adequate refrigerated capacity —
which,is essential to the future
development of West Indies agri-
culture and trade.

British West Indian Airways —
now, of course, a subsidiary of
BOAC — have done a great deal
in the past decade to improve local
communications in the Caribbean.
The Barbados Advocate said re-
cently: “Were it not for the ser—
vice of the British West Indian
Airways, the islands of the West
Indies would be denied communi-
cation with each other except when

and Central American areas, there

a fortnightly service from South- is to be a general reorganisation of %7

BWIA and Bahamas Airways on
lines that have proved successful
elsewhere in the corporation's
operations.

But the need remains for q fre—
quent and cheap means of sea
travel between the islands, as wel
as for a more adequate inter—
Caribbean...freight. service. The
official wartime West Indies
Schooner Pool has been superseded

‘bya voluntary co-operative or-

ganisation. BWI Schooner Owners’
Association (Inc.), which» links
Barbados with various parts of the
Windward and Leeward Islands,
and no doubt this means of trans-
port will continue to handle cargo
where time and special protection
are not considerations. Schooner
trips, however, can be rough not
only on passengers, but on cargo

recommendation that “two small
sea—going ships . . . should.be pro-
vided at the cost of Your Majesty's
Government for trade between the
smaller islands.”

The general effects of the ship-
starvation of these Colonies have

schools.

ADVOCATE



W. I. Colonies Need More Ships

Firms with extensive
Caribbean interests are obliged to
“stagger” leave for their estate
managers and other local staff
aceording to available accommo-
dation .

To go by air is beyond the
means of the average West Indian
who wants to travel to the UK
to study or work, or the average

English family coming home 0D fopeign shippin;
leave; and even the businessman There is no of a regu-
must consider seriously whether jg; British p: er service to

his proposed trip will justify the

expense. BOAC fares to typical

Caribbean destinations are:—
Single turn

Trinidad
Jamaica ..
Br, Guiana .

As it is, p
have risen to an
riously embarrasses most travel-
lers between the UK and
Caribbean. Before the war,
ranged from £35 to £41 according
to the class of vessel and type
of accommodation. Today, a pas-

costs £90

£98 to £125. re are no cheap
return fares, as there were
fore the war. To go by one of
the alternative routes eg, via
New York, is even more expéen-
sive—although the whole voyage
can now be paid for in sterling.
In Such conditions, the commer-
cial. and cultural contacts -that
are the life-blood of trade are
reduced to a minimum.

The “blue waters” are
remote

the same conclusion: “we recom~-
mend that on a return to normal

me should consider w
they should not offer a subsidy for
the maintenance of a
the "West. ‘seine, is handicenped
by the competition of subsidised

the
some form of Government’ assist-

fortnightly

and 5,200 passengers.
Pso
would oak cost about three-and-

Line sonable.









regular Brit-
ger service to some of
Colonies, since

asseng
Eastern Caribbean

ance. Supposing, eas a
shipowner to operate a
rini eres with three 100-

17 knots,
cargo capacity—a service
would give an annual capacity of
400,000 to 500,000 tons of

The 88.

a half times as much to build as
before the war and would be un-
likely to pay for ves in
less than 30 years, since operating
costs are high and traffic is sea-
It is true that improved
shipping services would tend to
foster traffic, but nevertheless the
initial outlay would be dispropor-
tionately heavy.

Grented, then, that some kind
of Government assistance is need-
ed, what form should it take? A
direct subsidy to serving
the Caribbean area might
invidious to other ners,
but this a could Z —, by
inviting shipowners er.

lternatively, the building of

hips for the West Indies run

Then what about the West In-,might be assisted either by out-

dies’ tourist. trade—the Col
second most important industry?
“Health, happiness and sunshine
await you in Barbados, all-the-
year round holiday resort. . . °
proclaims a current travel leaf-
let, “The abiding charms of Bar-
bados are the sunshine—tem-
pered by the vigorous North-East
Trade winds—and the sea which
encireles this tropical isle with a
belt of the deepest blue”. Very
nice, too—if you can get there!
But the blue waters of the Carib-
bean are remote nowadays for
the English holidaymaker. One
of the Trinidad Chamber's criti-
cisms of the CSC report was that
the -recommended service would
only barely take past traffic on
the assumption that boats were
full each trip (which they never
were in normal times) and so
would not provide for the vary-
ing seasonal demand. Pre-war
passenger ships offered accom~
modation well in nn Ra actual
vequirements . e glove-
service suggested by the CSC
would, therefore, do nothing ‘to
help the tourist trade. A final
discouragement to the would-be
visitor is the withdrawal of cheap
return fares. Before the war,
there were cheap summer
winter returns, Since the peak
traffic was outward in the au-
tumn and homeward in the spring
the shipping lines had to offer
off-season inducements to make
the boats pay.
“Until the outbreak of war”—
to quote the West Indies Year
Book, 1943—“the British West In-
dies were becoming’ more and
more a favourite holiday resort. . .
Today pleasure travel is negligi-
, but many people scattered
throughout the world, living un-
der vastly changed conditions, in
the quiet moments that come to
us all, still remember with kindly
thoughts those pretty islands and
their happy, friendly inhabitants.”
Today the West Indies are once
more a popular resort with Ameri-
ean and Canadian holidaymakers,
but English tourists still have to
‘live on their memories,

THE SUBSIDY QUESTION

The psychological effects of all
ghar difficulties on the local popu-
ation itself is one of the most seri-
ous ¢ consequences. Archdeacon
Banks’ question: “Does Britain
want her colonies or not?” reflects
the feeling of the majority on this
matter — a feeling that can easily
turn to disillusioned apathy, Indeed
it is pertinent to ask whether the
“lack of initiative’ noted by visit-
ors to some of the more chronically
ship-starved Colonies may not be
precisely due to this sense of isola-
tion.. In any event, frustration is

Although the Canadian ships pass through.” g most unfortunate mood to create
essentially a passenger liner, she It is generally agreed that the jin the important group of Carib-
carries a certain amount of freight local airline has done a good job bean possessions, where a greater
and is now equipped with a mod- at reasonable fares and, following degree of regional responsibility
ern, electrically—controlled loading the recent visit of BOAC chairman,
system. In conjunction with the Sir Miles Thomas, to the North

through federation is the objec-
tive. The impression is gaining
ground in the British West Indies
day that the UK Government
s not merely failing to act on
the recommendations of the Com-
monwealth shipping Committee's
and many previous reports, but is
indifferent to the situation. This
impression is strengthened by the
persistent quiries on the subject. In July,
1949, the Trinidad Chamber wrote
to their local Government to ask
what, had been done. In June,
, the Chamber was advised
that no reply had yet been re-
ceived to the local Government's
inquiry from the Secretary of
State for the Colonies. Now the
Chambers of Commerce of the
British Caribbean have repeated
the inquiry. Is the answer to be
“No practical plan” indefinitely?
What is the solution ?

What form could a_ practical
plan take? The Commonwealth
Shipping Committee quoted in its

To Jamaica—focal point of the too, and there is still a strong ease;report a number of suggested
& for the 1939 Royal Commission’s schemes for improving sh

ipping
services between the UK and the
West Indies and within the Carib-
bean area itself, and urged the
Government as a first step to
“seek proposals from shipowners
who are or might be interested
in the trade along the lines we

‘right

rae or by special credits
« tisk shart basis.
Each of these courses have
its difficulties, but the Government

cannot expect to be presented with

a “practical = until all such’
possibifities been explored
and a basis agreed upon for direct
or indirect assistance to shipown-
It should also be ascertained
how far the West Indies them-
selves would be prepared to con-
tribute and in what ways they
might assist a British shipping
line by concessions in port charges,
et

C.

Another consideration, when
examining the economics of the
question, is that heavy tonnages
have had to be brought from the
area in chartered vessels at Brit-
ain’s expense. It was admitted in
a Parliamentary question that
54,000 tons of sugar had been car-
ried from the Dominican Republic
and Cuba in foreign ships. The
gaving on this kind of charter

tight could be regarded as a contribu-

tion to any subsidy.

Shipping might be diverted
As a stopgap measure to re-
lieve immediate ‘c the
possibility of iaiucing Australa-
sian ships passing through the

and Panama Canal to call more regu-.

larly at Eastern Caribbean ports
should be under constant exam-
ination. It is true that such a
diversion would have its dangers
at the moment, since outgoing
ships from the UK on those routes
are already full and West Indians
might find themselves stranded in
this country. ‘There is no desire».
to repeat the experience of those
who came over earlier this year
by the French Line’s Misr (which
carried a total of some 600 pas-
sengers on three voyages) and
then found that there were no
facilities for getting back. Never-
theless, a regular monthly service
provided by the diversion of Aus-
tralasian shipping—on the basis,
perhaps, of a subsidy on unused
cargo space—would improve
inter-Caribbean communications,
provide refrigerated cargo space
for the transport of West Indies
produce and might at least shorten
the passenger queue by skimming
off one-way travellers,

If no action is taken by the
‘Government either to enable a
British line to operate a regular
‘passenger service or to induce
Commonwealth shipping through
the Panama to divert, then the
only prospect of improvement is
the news that the French Line are’
building two luxury liners 8.8.
Flandre and S.S. Antilles, both
20,000 tons gross, for the West In-
dies run. It is unlikely, however,
that these ships will be in ser-
vice before 1952.

Is the British Government sim-
ply ne things drift in the hope
that foreign shipping lines will
ultimately improve their services
sufficiently to meet the require-
ments of the British Caribbean?
That is how the position appears
at present. If so, it is a sad day
for British maritime prestige and
for the prosperity of the Carib-
bean Colonies.

VIEWS ON CARIBBEAN

SHIPPING
Mr. A. E, V. Barton, Secretary,
West India Committee :—

“The present lack of passenger

shipping between this country
,and the British West Indies is

causing hardship and financial
loss to West I ns, hitting the
tourist trade and putting diffi-
culties in the way of commer-
cial development. It is clear that
no British shipping line is pre-
pared to run a regular service
to the Eastern Caribbean Colo-
nies making reasonable provi-
sion for British passengers un-
less the Government gives some
assistance. This was fore-
shadowed in the Commonwealth

Shi Committee’s report,

which drew attention to the

high cost of operating such a}-

service and the possibility that

special measures of assistance
might be necessary. What is
suspected is that the British

Government is content to let

connections between the UK sna

the Eastern group of the . T

s






























hether Mr. Percy

first duti

SUNDAY,

portion of the many hundreds
of. English people and. West. In-
dians who are waiting for pas-
sages. If it were not for the
six-weekly sailings of the “Gol-
fito’ and the four-weekly ser-
vices of the Booker Line from
Liverpool to Demerara, we
should be in a worse fix than
we are. As it is, the outlook is
very disheartening indeed, and
there seems to be no immediate
of improvement.”

. Donald, Chairman,
Rowson, Drew & Clydesdale,

Ltd :—
“I feel very strongly about this
matter of shipping connections.
As one who in hisvime has visit-
ed ev sh Colony except
the Se lles and Mauritius, I
know hew these territories cdn
be deprived of opportunity and

ed by lack of proper
communications. What right
i “e to oie these Colonies
Z then deny them proper
tra: facilities? Surely the
of the Minister of
‘ransport is to énsure direct and
regular mail, passenger and
cargo services to every Colony?
The merchant venturers regard-

ed transport costs and trade as





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FEBRUARY 25, 1954

one; later, when transport was
segregated, a profit was expect-
ed from both A country can
well afford a loss on transport,
provided it makes up the loss
by trade. That should be the
first consideration in_deciding
what to do about Caribbean
shipping services. The need for
a subsidy is common ground,
but the Commonwealth Shipping
Committee’s report shelved this
question. It seems difficult, tn
jact, to understand why the
Committee’s inquiry was stert-
ed. If to advise the Government
as to equitable subsidy :
tion, it failed in its purpose; éf
delay was the end in view, then
it succeeded. What is needed
are ships, not reports. The

posal made by me for the

uled and regular use of 25 per
cent. of the British

ships venom paasing rough
the Panama a
would supply ships mow, I ad-
vocate this step as an interim
arrangement pending the build-

ing of spe ships
to provide a fortnightly service
to both the Eastern and Western

Caribbean Colonies.”
British Export Gazette December 1950
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you know

about ENO?

DO YOU KNOW thut a gas

ae Pe eee is goer? are fixed before the commence- Navigation Co. have not been re- been sufficiently indicated above, seakis sent ee ae meat oe Senge aera bare
sions Britain has a pespdenatiedilt ment of the year. This certainty stored with ‘the exception of but further mention must be passenger service between the any substantial contribution to
for a population of some 3,090 000 oa yey is a great convenience occasional calls by the PSN’s made of the personal and psy- YK and Eastern Caribbean “with ¢nsure that British. citizens can
occupying 103,000 sq. miles.” and but for it we should not take Keina del Pacifico. The latter chological ‘repercussions. In a ships having accommodation for eS to British Colonies on Brit-

so large a proportion of our pur- vessel, who distributes her favours recent letter to The Times de-§0—75 persons and with a speed ships.”

“Te ae Oger aetna a ok
*





By comparison, tl ae ;
: possessions in the Ghsintnun area nex" 4 in England as we do. . - .” between Kingston and other West scribing his own efforts to get a of not jess than 16—17 knots” Mr. E. Palmer, Director, Bookers
ave some 600,000 inhabitants he seriousness of the British Indies ports, is due to make her passage back to the Eastern which “should if possible give Shipping & Trading Co.,
(36,000 sq. miles), the Dutch Caribbean's present shipping posi- next sailing frdm the UK to Caribbean, the Archdeacon of fortnightly sailings, but not less i—
55,0) i ' tion can be judged by comparing Jamaica “on 12th April. The Trinidad demanded: “Does Bri- frequently than monthly.” “Our e ;
275,000 (55,000 sq. miles) and the : ae ] Sh y xperience is that shipping
American ' 1,900,000 (6,600 sq, Se*vices to-day with what they Jamaica Banana Producers’ ships,"tain want her colonies or net’ Since two years have dragged accommodation available to the
. miles). Yet the shipping lines Were & decade ago. Until the out- Jamaica Producer and North Siar, and went on to say: “I do not by with no sign of action, it must Eastern Caribbean, while cover-
¥ of these other countries serve Preak of war, regular and fast taking 48 and 12 passengers re- wish to engage in politics but I be presumed thaf’no shipping line ing existing staff movements,
E their possessions—and ours, too Passenger services between the spectively, each maintain a six- 4m. very interested in transport can see its way to operate even does not provide for (i). new
. —far more adequately than do $ and the Eastern Caribbean weekly service. ; wt pone, Se pe ee Be pad the ced passenger service re- stay (ii) business people or
5 British lines. The Commonwealth Were maintained by several lines, Cargo shippers’ anxieties pi oe amg oo “* , eae a ed in the report. The (iii) rownd-trippers. Staff holi- Sold in bo 2
° § Shipping Committee’s Report on i? addition to cargo services ac- It will have been seen that Cariimin the Banine) lu et pocamndiins, Seesaw this situation days are dependent on when we ttles for lasting freshness
t West Indian Shipping Services cording to demand. facilities for cargo shipments to oouid not matter lea "tae let- to the, let case te es kanaaten: oer a he Wes Fae te 5
; showed in two striking diagrams Services then and now vnd from the British Caribbean to; supporting the Archdeacon's quired and to the possibilite that ig nth wen aa The 6 s 5
& ‘that, even before the war, foreign The Hambufg-America Lithe are much more satisfactory than forthright comments, an educa- special measure ee TLC! ne’s restored service,
: . ships carried most of the pas- ran a monthly service with’ two passenger services—at least, ac- tigpng) institution pointed out ae x irene of assistance, at together with the Dutch ships, :
; 3 sengers between the U.K. and the fast luxury ships (500-passenger cording to present demand, The i i ed out any rate at the outset, may be help to reléeve the situation,
; = ‘bb Today ane y ships ( passeng . Ay tea ey the difficulty of getting sea pas- necessary to encourage shipown- but these lines give first place The words “ Eno” aud “ Frui
; ; Eastern Caribbean. 4 pday the class), making Barbados in 9 main anxieties confronting cargo sages was” seriously hindering ers to provide the service.” The fo their own nationale ond can m0” and “ Fruit Sale” are registores wade
situation has worsened to such an days and calling around the shippers are the delays now yecruitment of teachers for BWI Royal Commission of 1939 reached not take more than a small pro- .



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY









rump - steak dinner (at
s. 8d. a lb. without sub-
idies) the family could be

posals of marriage.
Britain was far more

Gussie Moran's panties

—and when she once appeared

bare-legged before the abe and

Queen the nation practically
swallowed its Adam's apple,

hen the newspapers an-

nounced that Lenglen had turned

Brave became
‘a general

oe D° you know that a Red Indian
A chief was once made a

Shawnee tribe, and commissioned

him. He fought for us with his

bow-and-arrow braves and was
le

Indiana is famous. And this new





London Express Service

yey

25, 1951

- . .
A CHAMPAGNE SERIAL... No.

\

Last night, in a London flat,
the ‘Russian Lion’ showed off

Suzanne's decision
oppor-

a go
tani for yet
another new kind



of mass

hours before the
first match only 400
tickets had been sold.

It was then that Cochran
showed his mastery as a show-
man, He didn’t cancel the
tournament, He didn’t play to an
empty house.

e took the tickets, in bundles
of a hundred, round to ali



3

the grip
that beat

Sketched at the ringside by Ralph Cleaver

the end—after hitting the canvas
three times in the last round—he
went down for good.

Next morning not only had
Cochran a disastrous fiiancial
record to read, but he
was once more in the
middle of a row almost

-*

e:
wile



SUNDAY ADVOCATE *



«++ by LEONARD MOSLEY

FLASHBACK: First fall to Hackenschmidt in i min. 34 secs.
6 F ; as ae bien, <= 5

description of the final fall.

* adrali got his opponent
by the body and threw him.
Deftly Hackenschmidt slipped on

his hands and knees
+ and there for three lon
minutes Madrali
him_and squeezed him,

“ Before one could quite

erry
ote
=".



i
i
i
i
|
\
;
i
}



QANTAS

EMPIRE AIRWAYS

i cntimeiateiiinaeatl
ait
Racine
amen f
lea SASF
ST oaiteeneemenesl 1 cuniipdioetiniasiamnouial
ST atinpoamadlel Secaeubaeandeensaiintnee
ees nent
. penetra i snaetne eae
Madrali —————
ner) =>=-
ree or | eenionrencennnalll
HACKENSCHMIDT —| —— =
holds up the hands with —— |: —=:
which he. squeezed a -—— el
secon? wrestling victory ——} a) ——
out of Madrali in the ——— mse
Cochran show of 1906. 9 a oF
The réporter’s descrip- P————— 1 & —— :
O you remember professional Bri was con- tion read: “One could aaron] i} —F¥.
Suzanne | Lenglen? GS! Smeg aoe See ocig ko St oi
n agontsin —s =
In a way she typified she ever be recélved in” social © ‘Madrali's Jace force ie
everything about the mad, cireles again ? ” asked a writer in why :— * =| = —
glad, dizzy heights of the ‘Yé,Qaly Express, ae t
Cochran era. It was a worrying, about 4
happy time when over a_ ‘hat. le saw in ro
_
et



1 tel
coal
“Splitbydefending Suzanne's and _ si her wu =
right to be late on the a ‘in ae on
_ Centre Court at Wimbledon. fiuimont Ens | a
_. Suzanne was a hook-nosed tournaments in Ps .
littl Frenchwoman with a London. mae
violent temper. Her figure neo fae vas: 4 3
was scragey, her hair mousy, peers ra” Park teal ;
and her features admirably (capacity 4,500) ‘an — i
fitted her for the part of an n selling tickets — — +
Â¥ ister n anto-
‘3 mine. Yet she was %, -* 2 oe. i =
--iv> always recelving Pro- seemed to ree =

By leaps and bounds

A etallanaedensll
interested in whether . ————
heen se rome ne eae emaenmnel
stockings on .the cow ” |
than it ever was in fennis” and 26

It is a long time — actually millions of years — since the Kangaroo was
anywhere outside Australia. Now, however, as the emblem of Qantas Empire
Airways the Kangaroo has taken wings over the world,

By 1947 (their 25th anniversary) Q.E.A, had routes to the Philippines and
Japan; to Lae, Rabaul, Noumea, Suva; to Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands










PAGE ELEVEN










Os



{
stores and persuaded ine manage- as violent as the realise what was hap- ‘ 5 : y ; : ‘
ments to give them away vo their acruelty vg Ghmpat gn Seem en —and in conjunction with B.O.A.C. to Malaya, India, the Middle East,
customers.

BOXING TOO-

And another row

SUZANNE played ner
usval masterful game

but the public liked it—and liked,

the first flood-lighting
ever to be used for a
sports show.

g e puccees. ba ked a
ie doors,” said one o
Cochran's aides, And then added
that frequent postscript to a
Cochran venture : “ Or course. we
Jost money.”

ochran was not only promot-
ing tennis but had a big box-
ing match on his hands, ‘oo
was the world middle-
championship bout at Oly:
between Scotsman Tommy
Milligan and the holder. America's

to be! For 10 rounds Walker's
iron fists bit their way into
Milligan’s face and body, until by

eo.

Sir Hall Caine led a

Public protest against

what he called “ this
debauch of brutality”

and asked that Cochran should be
“prohibited by law from putting
on such scenes until they had

The man with the fez

rting ventures. At the outset
of his career in the early days ot
the century, he cashed in on the
wrestling boom then sweeping
the country Outstanding
grappler of the _ time—probably
of all time—was Georges Hacken-
schmidt. known as “ The Russian
Lion,”

Cochran seurched Europe unc
America for an opponent ior tim.
and found one at last.

@ full and netive Life. talkee about
it last nevne
Be cemembers the

Express

the body slipped

a Madrali was under-

neath. The battle was won. The

crowd yelled. The victor laughed
and almost danced.”

SPINELLI- |

‘ea rm beer js ed of thi speakable
"Brigadier-General in the British girl named Dore ‘Boeing barbarity." : oe ae Temperamental dancer
, ATM: 5 7 ocliran’s repiy was sharp.
The British were fighting the Tt was a wolf devouring a lamb,

WN cocnes 14 years later

British ReRyS Vay champion,
Carpentier got £5, as his end
of tne purse, and Beckett £3,000.

tine high) Cochran was able to
araw a gate of over £30,000.

This bout, too, was over in less
than a round—with a knock-out
over Beckett.
Cochran did well out of that
figat. And he made money out
of others. But then, suddenly
disgusted with boxing politics, he
quit, and decided to concentrate
on the theatre,

By 1930 Cochran had five
shows Bong, well, and p

ee A on to sell tickets on the morning proved in be. ‘The cold breatn of depression
wace Phi tat on _ aad.) | of the fight. Sales dried up. . In his Hampstead flat Hacken- hadn't yet touched Britaln
ps ra 44-3 7% ly > Price, But what a fight it Gernant Yait sehimict. now 74 and sill living

and.
in any case, it was still bright and
warm and exciting imside a
Cochran theatre.

N. Africa, Italy, France and England,
For their Australian and international services Shell supply Qantas
Empire Airways with their major requirements of aviation fuel and engine oils,

SUGLL AVIATION SERVICE

. r lways yt PF | retlls or
_ killed. “ After that the tennis BENE Dittuordioore By charging 25 guineas for i istribut
_ . This is one of the battle stories tournaments were a Some extraordinary ringside seats (still a world's all- i pist yp
for which America’s State of touch to Cochran's { G

SHELL













ae

Americans, and ‘thi ing ME eter. se dapper, dane ine FOR AIRLINES THE WORLD OVER He ptr
_ Americans, an ngs were said. ’ apper, ancing : aplde rego?

badly for us. We made friends a. Coan Of cect as Frencnman Georges Carpentier Goide® in “ao!

with Chief Tecumseh, of the “272 played at night under MADRALI.~ to London to box Joe ket,

piatignu gentot
soum * soint +*
plate! pe

pl ugeum

i ita

pall



, for,
Mickey Walker, He was a giant who first at least more—wi stars
ones xe, the oelp of seats gee wearing a long Far cont fanging all ihe wey Ro the:
i ou. ve been soa , Jimmy and_a fez. and he was introduce emperainental renc jancer
Seek ‘iret faniine both the White. the millionaire financier, as Madrali the Terrible Turk. Spinelli to Noél Coward and
William ‘Herrisee. ne Caren, committed suicide. This sensa- Huckenschmidt wrestled hira Gertrude Lawrence,
us, and the 150th en of tion robbed Cochran of the Front twice. in 1904 and 1906. What a Over in America bread-lines
Indiana as wee territocy, Page publicity be always banked fantastic struggle the isv6 bour Were beginning to form.

iwndon Express Service





ee













Owing to delay caused by irregular shipping services the

| “Advocate” regrets that it has been compelled to curtail its:

: daily cartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all avail-

able strips as they arrive will be appearing in this space.







——
















——=

Cows that Feed on Sunny
Pastures Produce
THIS

Creamy Flavoured
Milk
Oak has a lovely, rich, creamy

flavour because the cows that pro-
duce OAK Milk feed on luscious

Innoxa





Che Loveliness that lasts a
: Lifetime eore













THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK







Now Offers You the means of ensuring this.





BROAD STREET or ALPHA PHARMACY (HASTINGS)

Noel Roach & Co

L, J. WILLIAMS MARKETING CO., LTD.,—Sole Agents. activities :

green grass all the year round— rs
e
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MISS ANN THOMAS of INNOXA’S BOND STREET SALON, jh ii) tL" h.esn ‘smile in arid oz) tin - ‘THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
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Now offers the following Treatments by Appointments :— 12 He EDITOR
oz____ 79. THE ’
(1) FULL FACIAL TREATMENT (1 Hour) ........ $5.00 THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 195!,
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* (3) CLEANSE & MAKE UP (20 Minutes)......... . 1.80
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i » bs B. M. Fergusson : Nelson Pharmacy if SP rrIIIITTi Tee Tiiiii ty i i iad, oecees senesereressacces
Booker's 0s) Drug Stores Ltd. jj) : "rei eee | a
: : Harold Proverbs 11d * Cosmopolitan Pharmacy Short historical account of the origin, functions and current
* St. Ann's armaqy





PAGE TWELVE



CLASSIFIED ADS.





—_—_——— _
PAYNE—In ever loving memory of our

















Main Rd., near Plaza, Oistins, three Bed-

(Two large), and Din-



PUBLIC |









PARISH OF ST. PHILAP



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



WANTED





















Coastal Station







Harbour Log SHIPPING NOTICES



Bailing to Plymouth, Antwerp, Amster-

FEBRUARY 25, 1054



INDAY,











GASCOGNE: March 31

a)

\ Le 7 Thm c
Téa cents per agate line on week _ | } BAND CONCERT (
and 12 cents per agate line on gph Tininwen change soeak a cents and L 4 if
» 5 okedays | 96 cents Sundays words — over . ega a Be
TELEPHONE 2508 and 1 Te St” om = wesk-Oays |: omg 5 cents a word week—4 cents a In Carlisle Bay a ete beeen etry” Under the auspices of th« i
——— - eas eubieetie thes eatin ae | word Sundays. | ROYAL NETHERLANDS } St. James Branch, {
; i M/V Sedgefield, Sch, Marea Henrietta, | : Civie Cirele
} oO : ; ;
Bisine, “Marieges ‘Beate, Acsnow-| | FOR RENT ee HELP Ain Yan Sewtman’ sen” Wandertal| gay TEAMSHIP CO. | By kind permission ot ff
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is| Mimimum charge week 72 cents end PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH. " FeetieenE ate addi ao, Coeraaien Sch Rainbow M., Sch. W.| ,>silime from Amsterdam, Dover and | ss aan ae of Police
$1.50 on Week-day's and $1.80 on Sundays | 06 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24| Applications for the Post of Parochiai] 1 NGIISHWOMAN desires onlay ment 1” wunicia, an, Whittaker, Sch.| Médeire—s.s. “Cottica” and, 3rd, 9th The Commissi .
fox any number of words up to 50, and | words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents @| Treasurer will be received by the un. | Pt ferably hotel work, Fluent Spanish Turtle Dove, Sch. Molly N. Jones, Sch.| february, 1951. M.S. “Bonaire” 9th, THE POLICE BAND
3 cents per word on week-days ana| word Sundays. Gersigned not later than the 28th Feb- | #is> copable of dealing with English or Zurtle Dove Gordon, Sch. Rosarene, Sch.| ‘th. 16th March 1951. a Cie Gle Transatlantique will give a Concert {
4 cents per on Sundays for each ruary 1951 Applications must be aic- | SPonish correspondence. Write Box ““D’ ’ - ‘ S,. Sch. Lindsyd 11 Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam g fs
— companied by Baptismal and Medical | Co. Advocate as ieee : “Sch. Ania #| MS. “Helena” 12th, 15th, February 1951, 8 directed by
Por Births, \ Engagement ES Certificates, and marked on the En-}| ———-—-—- ——- § -~ “MY. ice | @S- “Willemstad” Oth, 15th, February ws ae dictn: ARO:
inteaaenis pe eae Calling the HOUS velope, applications for Post of Pare.4 STENOGRAPHER—An excellent oppor- Sar ag y so cpa Pe: SHEne 1951, mo. “Oranjestad” §th, 15th March Capt. Rai: As ARO
charge is $3.00 for any number of words chial Treasurer {tunity awaits a § grapher desirous of ** DEPARTURES 1961. : se F SAILINGS TO Se es Ro ale NT
up to $@ and 6 cents per word for exch Sed. Rey. L. C. MALLALIEU, St actlve eexmanent employment with sin pelqueen, 4 tens net, Capt. King,| Selling to Trinidad, Peramariho | ang ENGLAND & FRANCE HOLETOWN MONUME?
fdditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2503] APARTMENT — Upstairs - apartment Chedemnan attractive remuneration, Apply to Brad- oi. Vise, . Georgetown—m.s. “Bonaire” 27th Janu- ie F - oF
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 83113 for Death | Large coo! Bedrooms, Dining Sitting St. Joseph's Vestry. | *©w & Company, P.O, Box 228. . : ary 1961; ons. “Cottica” 20th, February COLOMBIE; March 12th on Tuesday, February 27
Notices only after 4 p.m. Teorn and Kitchenette, All modern ¢ 11.2.51—6n. 22.6.51.—6n. 1951; ms. “Helens” 3rd March 1951. via Martininque and at 4.30 p.m.
veniences, Dial4506. 25.2.51- fn To With Barbados | «°"2,° Se vie Guadeloupe
rT uch éa0 ete—m.s. “Oran P : {
IN MEMORIAM A Large Cottage at Thornbury Hill, NOTICE MISCELLANEOUS 1951. st

rooms Drawing AQUARIAMS.—AN glass or concrete dam—m.s. “Oranjestad” 23rd Feb. 1951. via St. Lueia, Martinique,
ae Gere who died on Feby. 8th. ling Rooms, Open Gallery, Modern Con- VESTRY BYE-ELECTION with glass front, Large medium or small, Cable an@ Wireless (W.1.) 14d advise} § P. MUSSON, SON & CO., i. Guadeloupe. Antigua

. r z veniences, Spacious Yard Enclosed, Va- ¥ , Alo glass bowls and battery glass jars. that they can now communicate with the i
Sad and sudden was the call cant. Dial 3141, 25.2.61—in. I hereby give notice that I have ap- H F. Shearn, Phone 2318 23.2.51.——3 Bs Se
of that dear one loved by aii —| Pointed the Church Boys’ School, near > 3 <0l.—Sn. following ships through their Barbados =:

Deepest of sorrow no word can tell



mpty JEFFREYS REER 4 . a SOUTHBOUND
Of the Jost one we loved so well. 7 avenue. 2 bedrooms and all. modern| all Parishioners of the Parish of St, compiles with “kisier paritions Lens, jet Sinn eee Sete. — The M/V CARIBBEE will accept Bek tet
Guy Payne ee ert te | eenveniences. Available from April Ist. ip and other persons duly qualified | each—delivered to the Warehouse of S. ). tor, Oakhill, Alcoa t, Gan Salvador, Cargo and Passengers for Dominica — COLOMBIE: Marc s
Father) Audrey, Gwen (Sisters) Annette 1 Bi aaey 25.28!—8n, | t0 vote at any eection of Vestrymen| Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. Pierhend. Fort: Townshend ;, Exapress of BP ae vaio ce Mokch Trinidad, La Guiara,
. —_—_—_— Tish 9 7 Atte ing a)
BLUE HOUSE—Lucas Street. A fine} Monday Sth day of March 1961 between 018.251 —On eae: ona Ce eee 1961. Curacao, Cartegena,
business stand. Immediate possession, the hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in the Hill, Folke . 5 .



























7—_—_—————
A FURNISHED BUNGALOW in Bedford



Apply: THANI BROS, Pr. Wn. Hry St.{ morning to elect a Vestryman in place le


















the Parish Church, as the place where









Const StitiGhi—

r

IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel- ‘Ancon, Usodimere 7
ry, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate, ©/#t2, S. Rosa, . ;



















ne ae er mame









The M/V DAERWOOD will























Jamaica

















































































x “‘larkes Wharf, ibesman, Lady accept nd Passengers for
FOR SALE ; Dial 3466. 25.2.51—In. | of Ernest Lyte Esq. deceased. Phone 4420 or ‘call at GORRINGES, ad- yyjctet) Clarkes Wharf, ri ; Reade stead, End henna: Accepting Cargo, Mail deans
: Sed. P. S. W. SCOTT, joining Royal Yacht Club Tureville. Siwtesesk, Spehonen ' and Passengers only for St. Vin- Passengers
Minimum charge week 72 cents and] a FURNISHED BUNGALOW in Bedford Parochial Treasurer, 20.2.51—T.F.N, Libreville. _ : Gia, Wake of eailitias to be notified. ng
96 cents Sundays 24 words — aver 241 avenue, 2 bedrooms and all modern con- St. Philip. |] — Districts, Ban@alend, + The M/V CACIQUE will accept te
words 3 cents a word waek—4 Cents OI veniences. Available from April Ist, 22.2.51—6n.| | UMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel- ‘and Peasengers for St STIFF NECK
word Sundays. Dial 2259. 25.2.51—3n. Lag sold nuggets, coins, miniature? Jade, — “Mrenadé- end Aribe, and 0 t 7
id dhicishenbestotbusininsmtareerone ribs: Siete, Grenade end Arne, | and R. M. JONES & €
AUTOMOTIVE BELLA VISTA: Cattlewash, — Com- oT Antique Shop. Dial 4429, see Salhe Sika we a Sina. ere RHEUMATISM,
N CE 20.2.51.—t.f. a $s Sailing Tuesday 27th in
fortably furnished. Three bedrooms, —wie-SSB. . AGENTS PAINS IN THE
hone beds. cates see oe PARISH OF 8ST, LUCY BWA, SCHOONER OWNERS ae 3914
CAR — 1938 Dodge. Excellent condi- + power plugs, running water All fi P, ASSOCIATION INC, 0. ttt
J persons hial and High- JOINTS
tion, Suitable for taxi, Apply C. A. FE. | throughout. Garage. Servants’ rooms. owing Paroe Tel. 4047.
Beckles, Perry's Gap, Roebuck Street,| tock House. Mrs. Chandler. Todds. bt 3 ag Ard gue peri hee acter He SOVERNMENT NOTICES !
or Department of Be eee 05211. 25.2.51—3n. they will be collerted entpedisnr te hae You can et speedy re-
r CLL, — , O, L, DEANE, : : . i i
GAR aaiinnds 10 DLP. Mileage or000.| Gamer Neciy ooh wmode ees wit Parochial Treasurer, Attention is drawn to the Control of Lumber Prices (Defence) ‘ " « lief by rubbing in
Just re-painted. Leather upholstery. jfront and back porches: Three. bed- Py sige: | (Amendment) Order, 1951, No. 2 which will be published in the Off- National Steamshi Ss
Dial Office 4611, home 9449. Bete a rooms, wanch with running wales, ining 24.2.51—4n, cial Gazette of Monday 26th February, 1951 .
2. + |rcom, Large sitting room. Garage, Ser- , ¥ ‘
KK nnn | vant’s room and all modern convenien- 2. Under this Order the maximum retail sell ice of “Mer-| SOUTHBOUND Soils
LORRY—One (1) 5-ton Lorry in perfect | ces, Electricity. Ready for occupancy NOTICE ie ee _ ing pr Sails Sails Salle Arrives Selle,
-FEC chantable Douglas Fir” is as follows :-— Montreal Holifax nm
shape. License until June. Apply: F. E.C.) from ist March 1951. Phone 2985. Mra. - ¢ “CAN. CHALLENGER” — 2) Feb. on 1 Mar, 1 Mar. This great
Rema, Peieodekip Pantene. pihone | C. C. Clarke. 14.2.51—4n, PARISH OF ST. PETER COLUMN ONE COLUMN TWO “LADY RODNEY” = 3 Mar. 5 Mar. 14 Mar, 15 Mar
a -|“CLEVELAND'—Fully furnished, and DEHS will be received by the Ordinary Retail Price : NELSON" a oe ee. eS oe Pain-Killer on Sale at
yey Suen ' undersigned for the following up to Article (mot more than) " . CHALLENGER” ‘his 2 Apr ~~ 12 Apr. 12 Apr
PICK-UP—One Dodge Pick-up in work- | Avenue, Belleville. Ring 2017. March 3rd (Saturday) ‘ RODNEY” le 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 27 Apr 27 Apr i
ing order. Apply: 8. E. Cole & Co., Ld. 25.2.51—n«| (1) ‘The supply of Fresh Milk in bulk for ‘Asrives Arrives Azrives Knights Drug Stores
TaD co aeacious, Unturnished Flat. | 9) ‘The ‘suppiy wt Fresh Meat tor the| (2) Merchantable Douglas Fir $260.00 per 1,000 board feet MORTEROUND Goruclts Maskates ‘fosten Bi dom | Helen
FURNITURE Miapione Mrs. Gooding, 4092. 4 Imahotuse ;
%2-5\—-18.1 (3) The supply of Medicine and Drugs| 54in February, 1951 25251.in, | TADY NELSON” 23 Feo = 4 Feb. 8 Mar. © peed =
PURNITURE—Ralph Beard offers the |"“mr OwER DEW” at Maxwell Coast for’ the Almshouse and outdoor sh Ribate si were * | “LADY RODNEY a yon 4 oe 23 bi —" 26 Apr oe ie rida. scala
following ‘bargains in Brand New furni- | poad, Right of Way to Sea, Good Bathing, patients eS. ee ; 22 May
ture 206 @ Seniten time ; John Brinamead S Phinianishie "steerer Cottage. ati | (4 The conveyance of paupers PART ONE ORDERS “LADY RODNEY” 10 May 12 May. 21 May. -
Upright Piano $200 00; jahogany ning (a) To and from the Almshouse to
Chairs $17 00.4 pr; Mag, Tub Chairs 634.00 woseve ant Gules st sence ie and from any part of the Parish N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vesvels fitted with cold storage cham.
a pr.; Mag Bed-ends 3 ft. 6 ins. $30 00 fiigerator, Radio, Telephone, Vacant (b) To and from the Almshouse or By bers. Passenger Fares and freight yates on application to :—
a pr.; Bed-ends 4 ft. 6 ins. $35.00 a pr. ; Di , ‘m0 tt ne ® @. ¥. 6c Aarau, any part of the Parish to and Lieut.-Col. J. Connell, OBE, ED,
Mag Bureaus $75 00 each; Mahogany Wusiicraets er 9 aam., D. ae, from the General Hospital, ‘Commanding,
Cookin Sete foes. 06 204 yds : na “| (5) ane Burial of Paupers to the The Barbados Regiment. si he
¥ ° is tery from the Almshouse or any Issue No. & 23 Feb. 51.
variety of high class second hand furni-| FLAT—Attractive furnished Flat, Hast emetery is
ture. For viewing ols in Geriweed sae Saeed TOMA, Good veranda facing part of me be Saseiiee s ereas GARDINER AUSTIN & Cow LTD. emis Agenis.
Alley. Open daily from 8 a.m. P.M. | sea. le ng. Suitable one person or . 5. :
Breakfast Time inclusive. couple, Telephone, 2429, Clerk of the Poor Law Guardians, All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 bours on Thursday Jj 0 Hi Re
23.2.51.—6n. 25.2.52—1n. phair an: 1 Mar. 51.
-2.01—4an. HQ Coy will continue their specialist training. The m range is also available
ELECTRICAL FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast. Furnigh- to HQ Coy under arranzements to be made by the O«, CRICKETERS THE BARBADOS ARTS &
TEsais waarocmly pete ae supply, LI UOR LI s TIC aan Soy wil gD gigtiar, Chapter 3, loading, lying and firing. a de CRICKETER CRAFTS SOCIETY
aa siete ng ant. uble carport, “B" Coy wi io L.M.G, ssson 4, aiming and holding: th t of this lesson reet our comrade 3 th »4
REFRIGERATOR — General Electric servants’ rooms. From February 15th. Q CEN E NO E being to teach each man how to hold and aim the isen Goh neces in order in BLAZERS and FLANNEL Eeeeens - eye e
Canadian Model. € cub. ft. with 25 Dial 4476 28.1.51—t.f.0, to obtain good results on the range PANTS send them to~ to ] Exh bit |
months guarantee. Electric Sales and . ae 4 The application of Gilbert Jones, holder Bana . ; RAYMOND JORDAN nna I 1 10n |
Service Ltd. 25 .2.61—2n. HOUSE-—2-Storey full furnished. Avail-| Of Liquor Licence No, 953 of 1951, granted Band practice parades will be held on Monday 26, Wednesday 28 and Thurs- s QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE | |
able from March 16th on 3 monthe to] t® him in respect of bottom floor of a day 1 Mar, 51. in Bay Street, opposite Tussiay, Sebramiy 18th. ..t0 |
LIVESTOCK 6 or 12, Situated near the Aquatic Club} fvo Storey wooden ‘building in Baxters! 9 yoLUNTARY NIGHT Combermere Street. MAS Aide haa ard 1981 BLADON
and Yacht Club. For viewing, a ae a Cane teks War eas see i, There will be a voluntary parade for WOs and NCOs at 1700 hours on Tuesday Pe eet ate : |
“ Be 25.2.51—3n. > * + . 27 Feb. 51. WOs & NCOs of “A” tar 3. Ss s ej y
Gok eee ee ee on ee iri ERI: | a anne itn org attached at Kings of “B" Coy will do LMG, soathe sath he aa pepe Bayo Fr per Pe ea m. }
& Co., Ltd. Roebuck Street. NEWHAVEN, Crane Coast. Furnished; pi St, Michael, expected to attend. fr WANTED FOR CASH Adteammaas ye Children Half A.F.S., F.V.A
21.2.51--t.f.n, | ¢ bedrooms, wernt gupply, Lighting}, 7 rd gr te AS February 1061, |» ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING sed Posta Stam 5 "Price * eh ee
E Ser ta . ant, Double Garage, ‘a . . A. , * 5 R. 5
a = Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”. : U ; ge p Parties of School Children ac
FURNITURE Dial we” et 4 st piten. rr Signed GILBERT JONES, Orderly Officer Lieut. E. R. Goddard companied by their’ Teachers Formerly Dixon & Bladon



















Orderly Serjeant
Next for duty

Applicant.
application will




235 L/S Quintyne, K, will be admitted at Special Rates.

Of the British West
5 Members of the BA.S.C, will

Best Prices paid at the



tr ninsingyetininaanaperiiomnnam
PRIVATE sale of household furniture PLEASANTON — Worthing main Rd.,

N.B.—This



be con- Indies.





























































































































ete, At 19 Pavilion Court, Hastings, | Enclose@ Gallery, 3 bedrooms, drawing | sidered at a Licensing Court to be held Orderly Officer Lieut. S. G. Lashley Caribbean Stamp Society, No. 10 be admitted at ree PS ee
from 9 a.m. to 12 Mid-day on Tuesday Jand dining rooms, servant's room, gar-| at Police Court, District “A” on Monday Orderly Serjeant 233 L/S Blackman, A. L, O. Swan Street. ware. the Cuan year , :
E h i March 2nd i D iL i 8. Phone | the 5th day of March 1, at 11 o'clock, aras : t
oe 27th to Friday Te agian, ceo all modern conven eat tee oe ay oO} ms M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major. ms FOR S. Al E
E. A, McLEOD, S.O4L.F. & Adjutant, SSS pirat om
PREMISES—-No, 6 Swan Street, Up- Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”. The Barbados Regiment, | a am A446 “MEDMENHAM” — Pine Hill, A
MECHANICAL Stairs Premises, very spacious and cool 26,2.51—I1n, PART Il ORDER . . POPP F PICS SPS OPED aie | very fine two-storey property
suitable ior Factory, Agents Ofiice, 8 [ | N a pleasantly situated in approx, 1%
OFFICE TYPEWRITER—L, C. Smith 10 | Dentists, Solicitors, or Society. Apply: ie Tae REGIMENT SERIAL NO, 7 P roiessiona olice 1 ALL TH AT % acres near Government House.
excellent aendition asund two years old. tani Bros. or Dial 3466. 25.2.51—In PUBLIC § ALES 8 ex tre ‘ SHEET NO. 1 GOOD HEALTH AWAITS YOU 1066 AND % ee a en aa =
lephone | Goodl 4932. . 1. TRANSFER AT POREY SPRING, ag
25.2.5%~2n.1 ROOM--On ground floor of Mayfair caaiie ¥ prising 3 reception, dining and
——— | Gift Shop, suitable for Flower Shop or i il eee See 852 Pte Outram, J. D. BY Coy Transferred to MT. HQ Coy are eae Q{fh| breakfast rooms, 4 ‘bedrooms, (1
MISCELLANEOUS Greens Counter. Apply in writing to] BEMERSYDE, St. Lawrence Gap, Christ | 9 LEAVE—Privilege di are Madam E, E. Skeete, G.C.S.M. A Performance will be given in ¥ with large dressing room) but-
the Secretary, Mayfair Gift Shop, Chureh, near the Cable Station. The 384 L/S Laurie, G. “Ay Granted 6 months P/Leave wef Craduate Masseuse and Hydro- é Hall of Harrison College at ler’s pantry, kitchen, servant's
ANTIOS 28 — Of every description 22.2.51—3n. Sypsheuse comprises large Srawing ¥ 1 Mar, 51. ¥ Therapist, Specializes in Scientific zt ae i, ae rooms, garage, fernery, poultny
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver }- —~—-———-—-———— —— | an ning rooms, three bedrooms, with 306 Pte Barnett, P, HQ a Granted 4 weeks P/Leave wef 1 Swedish Massage, Medical Gym- 8.30 p.m. On Friday “Mare . ee houses ete. There is a two-way
Watercolours. » Maps. Auto-{, SPACIOUS, UNFURNISHED FLAT—| running water in each (one with a private Mar, 61. nastics, High blood pressure, ; 1H) entrance drive and the grounds |
graphs etc. at Gorrin Antique Shop | Telephone Mrs. Gooding 4932. beth) separate toilet and bath, and 421 Pte Yearwood, H. M. vs Granted 6 months P/Leave wef Diabetes, Rheumatism, Asthma, Tickets at 5/-, 3/- and 2/- are %& | are well laid out with lawns, flow-
e Royal Yacht Club. * 25.2.51—In.| Isitchen, Open verandahs to the Bast ve : 1 Mar. 51 Piles, Pneumonia, Russian-Baths, on sale either at the Headmaster's ering shrubs and flower gardens.
3.9.50—t.f.n. Wiaen OOTeAGn PLAT ae ae and ine eh re 499 Pte Yearwood, C. N, Re, Granted Medicated Baths, etc, Treatments cin + ee: danpabeee aivathbeaeny The whole property has a plea-
oO u ‘ hree r. 6 v Y y 2 * ice or ins ‘s 2 . sa 7
BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in ax St. James, paswant’s rooms, pce ae aieweny in} ° Pe Baca a Sareea Sent. ie Your nent Pa aBP aes othe Mites eau oe
White, Green, Primrose with matching | Furnished or unfurnished. Good sea-] the yard, which also contains several e Prescod, B. T. Bn HQ Granted 4 days’ Sick Leave wef Offline. Mouse: nesdnen | an Proceeds in aid of Overseas this exclusive aren,
units to complete colour suites. Top |bething. Private beach. Appiy Mrs.| cocoanut and fruit trees, 23—26 incl. Grarsdays 10, cdas to he a Tour to Q@.R.C. Trinidad.
grade, A. BARNES & Co., Ltd. E Greenidge, White Cottage, St. The property is situated on the most P Ze or “MALTA” — St. Peter. A mo-
26.1.51—t.f.n. | James.” 25.2.5!+—4n, | popular coast in the Island with perfect M. L. D, SKEWES-COX, Major, dern and very solid stone-built
ciathnhlipipebapre-cnaspentenemtasintentmrenninganisinganas sea-bathing, The Bee ¢ SSS O CCS OSB VSO OSSSOON bungalow raised above ground
CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win- . For appointments to view and for e Barbados Regiment. a Nal OT level allowing ample storage and
dow styling, light control, Valances and PURLIC SALES further particulars ring 3925, R. S., j garage space below. There are 3
draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A. ; Nicholls & Co,, Solicitors, ee | " bedrooms, large living room,
B. & CO, LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n Ten cents per agate tine on week-days 25.2,51—t.f.n. WHAT § IN A NAME - kitchen, pantny, 2 garages, ser.
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, vant's quarters for 2. The pro-
DIVING MASKS ~— 10/- each obtain- | ™inimum charge $1.50 on week-days GRANDVIEW-—Bathsheba. Three (3)

and $1.80 on Sundays



perty of approx, 4 acres is locat-
ed in the landward sidé of the
coast road but a right of way to
an excellent bathing beach is
opposite, This house was built by

able in the Toy Dept. at Cave Shepherd

When you say
& Co. Ltd. 28.1.51—t.f.n.

Everton Weekes— :
Everyone thinks of Cricket,
& you

Bedroomed Bungalow, standing on 14,919
square feet of land, Offer in writing for
the same, will be received by E. C,
FIELD, C/o James A. Lynch & Co., Lid.
up to 4 p.m. 28th February 1951.











DESCHIENS SYRUP OF HEMOGLO-
BINE: Especially valuable after an

AUCTION



For LADIES & GENTS



attack of influenza or whooping cough.

Give it to your children: Nothing better.

Fresh supply to hand at all Druggists,
4,.2.51—4n

i ene nee
MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin-
guished solution to your special
architectural problem of door closures,







screens, movable partitions. Dial 4476
A. BA & CO., LTD,

13,2.51—t..n.

PIANO — In good condition, Apply

to Mrs. Parris, Culloden Ra,

25.2.51—1n,
ra
VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirsch Sun-aire
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to
your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2,51—t.f.n,
——
WE buy and sell household equip-

ment of all description. Owen TT,
Allder, Roebuck Street. Dial 3200,
24.2.51—4n.

SS
WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower-
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.
We cut to your requirements. G. W.

HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd. Dial 4222.
15.2.51—10n.

PERSONAL







The public are hereby warned against
Piving credit to my wife, Winifred Skeete
inee Allman) as 1 do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone else con-
tracting aixy debt or debts in my name
unless by a writterr order signed by me.

Signed CHARLES SKHETE,
Westbury, Road, Pickwick Gap,
St. Michael,
24.2.51—2n.



LOsT



GOLD CHAIN — A 3 Strand Gold
Chain necklace, during week-end of 10th
February, Anyone giving information
towards recovery of same will be well

rewarded. Apply in person to Marie's
Beauty Parlour over Alexander Bay-
ley, Broad St.

2A,2.51—2n.



BE WISE...
-. - ADVERTISE

—_—_

lich Germs

ei 7 M ute
lled in 7 Minutes
* ‘Your has nearly 50 million tiny seams
mrabere germs hide and cause ter-
ri Htohing.. Cracking, Eozema, Peeling,
B ing, ne, Ringworm, Psoriasis,
Pimples, Foot Itch and other

rdinary treatments give
temporary he gles eso ae, ete
germ cause. new discovery, \«
oan kills the ae in 7 minutes and ts
ie

eee to ou a soft, dear, attrac-
guaran



8 one week, or
on return of

cause of

im Troubles trouble.

—_— es
AUCTION SALE OF PROPERTY

one property at King's Street called









AT KING'S STREET
On Thursday next the Ipt March at
2 o’clock at my office, Magazine Lane,

mbay Cottage. It consists of a Wall
Verandah, Drawing and Dining Rooms,
2 Bedrooms, Bath, Kitehen, Water and
Light, and the land on which it stands,
Inspection on application to the tenant.
For partitulars see D'Arcy A. Scott,
Magazine Lane. 24.2.51—3n,

AUCTION SALE OF HOUSE
On Wednesday next the 28th at 2
o'clock on the spot at Water Hall Land,
Eagle Hall, One 16 x 9 house in good
condition. Must be sold. D'Arey. A,
Scott, Auctioneer,
24.2.51—3n,.

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

SALES IN MAROH

TUESDAY 6th—Sale by order of Lioyds,
/gents, 17 High Street.

TUESDAY 13th—Mrs, Chaffee (Mac-
Adam). Sale: “The Rhonda” Worthing.

THURSDAY—Miss M, Massiah’s Sale
“Stewart Ville”, Rockley,

TUESDAY 20th—Sale at the Mahattan
Club, Pr, Wm, Henry Street.

THURSDAY 29th—Mrs. Gerald Skeete’s
Sale, Geneva", Garrisan.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
25.2.5)—1n,

REAL ESTATE

Set metetie
ON THE SEA
at Garden, St. James
Modern Bungalow, 3 bedrooms, two
baths. Overlooking Sea, own private







bathing beach, Good Yacht Anchorage.
Phone 91-50, 25.2.51—t.f.n,
BE HEEDFUL—War, Inflation and

Semi-Starvation based on Diplomacy
vnother word for Hypocriay Bargains
sre still on My List and I am almost off
the Sick List. Grasp These:—Almost
New 3 Bedroom Reinforced Concrete
Pungalow Near City, Good Location,
Going for under £2,100, A large 3
bedroom cottage at Thornbury ill,
Main Rd., near Plaza, Oistins, Modern
Conveniences, Ver; Good Condition,
Spacious Yard BPnclosed, Vacant, Going
for Under £900, A Large Stonewall
Pusiness Residence in Tudor St., Going
for under £2,300, A Small Property
mear Country ‘Rd., Yields $21.09 p.m.,
Going for Under $1,900. Almost New
3 Bedroom Stonewall Bungalow Type
| at Fontabelle, Going for Under £2,500.
A 2 Bedroom Cottage (not old) by
Fontabelie, Going for Under £1,300. A
3 Bedroom, (possible 4) at Hastings,
Main Rd., Going for Under £2,200, A
3 Bedroom at Rocklay, Main Rd., near
Blue Water Terrace, Going for Under
£3,100. Almost New 3 Bedroom and a
New 2 Bedroom Stonewall Bungalows
near Navy Gardens, Going for Under
£2,300 and £4,700. A Desirable ana
Almost New Bun,
Going for Under
Substantial 2 Storey
Gardens, Suitable for Flats, Guest House
or a Medico, about 2 Acres, Going for
Under £4,500. C Me for New Stonewall
Bungalows (Seaside and near the Sea)
ond Building Sites, Re-Sale Values
Assured. Mortgages Arranged, Dial 3111
D. F. de Abreu, a Real (Not Sham) Estate
























Broker, Auctioneer & Valuer, Call at
“Olive Bough", Hastings,
BUNGALOW—Gregg Farm, St. Andrew
all usual conveniences, standing on
epproximately 1 acre with well estab-
lished fruit tre Ideal situation 960
feet above sea level. For further par-
ticulars Telephone 4677 or 4739,
95.2.51-—1n,

their office No 17 High Street, Bridge-

21.2.51—5n.
—<——_________
The undersigned will set up for sale at



town, on Friday the 2nd day of March,
1951, at 2 p.m,

The dwellinghouse called “Murray
Lodge’’ with the land thereto containing
by estimation 9,200 |. feet, situate at
Upper Bay Street, St. Michael, the resi-
dence of the late A, C. Greaves,

Inspection by a intment with Miss
Ida Greaves, Tele Eine No. 3060,

For further pa jars and conditions
of sale, apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
20.2.51.—10n,

—_———
The substantial block of commercial
buildings standing on 13,704 sq, ft. of
land with frontage on Broad Street,
Prinee Alfred St, and Chapel St., the
property of Central Foundry Limited and
tenanted by British Bata Shoe Co,, M
Altman & Sons Ltd, K, R, Hunte £ Co.,
Ltd, and others
The undersigned will offer the same
premises by public competition at their
office, 17 High St , Bridgetown, on Thurs-
day, 8 March, 1951 at 2 p m.
Further particulars from—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
23 2 51. —Tn,

The parcel of land containing 1,885
Square feet with the Buildings thereon,
situate in Lucas Street, Bridgetown, ad-
joining the property of the Barbados
Telephone Company Limited. and at pre-
sent occupied as to part by the Observer
Newspaper and as to part by Miss Cado-
gan,

The property will be set up for sale at
our offices on Thursday, Ist March 1951,
at 2 p.m,

uspeeton, by application to the .ten-
ants.

For further particulars and condition of
sale, apply to:—

COTTLE CATFORD & CO.,
No, 17 High Street,
Bridgetown.
14.2,51—12n.

————_—_—
MODERN BUNGALOW — Overlooking
Golf Course, 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining . Rooms, Gallery, Garage and
spacious games room underneath, Apply;

Gordon Nicholls, Telephone 8539.
24.2.51t.f.n.

SHARES-500 Shares Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading Co, Limited. 500 Shares
Barbados Co-operative Cotton Factory
Limited. 120 Shares Barbados Fire
Insurance Co, Limited. 90 Shares Bar-

dos Foundry Limited. 61
Barbados Ice Co, Limited, 139 Shares
Knights Limited. 122 Shares Barbados
Telephone Co. Limited.

The above shares will be offered to
public competition on Friday next the
2nd March 1951, at 2 p.m. at the office
of the undersigned.

CARRINGTON & SBALY.
Lucas Street.
24,2.51—6n.

CS en

OFFERS will be received by the un-
Cersigned up to the 15th day of March
1951 for the building known as Calais
{land not Ineluded) situated at Dover
Coast Ch. Ch. The Purchaser to demo-

lish the buildings afd clear the land

within thirty days from the date of
purchase.

K. BE. Me KENZIE,

Meets,

St Michael

24.2.51—6n

WALL BUILDING—(Reasonable offer)

A two storey solid wall building, suit-

able for business or private residence

on approximately 3 acres of land, eélee-
tricity, government water, dairy stalls,
spacious yard (enclosed) fruit trees,
vegetable garden with modern irrigation
unit, fan mill and double garage. Apply
“Williams Court”, opposite “Sayes Court
Farm", Ch. Ch,, Silver-Sands, Bus stop
in front, 25.2.51— a



Shares

PARLEY HILL

ST. PETER

FOR £15,000

Built by Sir Graham Briggs,
of Prince Albert and
Who visited there in

,

Bart., for the entertainment
Prince George (later George V)
1879. Containing vast Reception
Rooms — Ball-room, Dining Room, Library and Sitting
Room—also fourteen Bed-rooms, Bath Rooms, etc.
Standing on some thirteen acres principally covered with

valuable mahogany timber.. Also Orchard, Paddock,
Stables, Garages, Etc.

BRADSHAW & COMPANY

BRC FABRIC
EXPANDED METAL
TEMPERED -HARD BOARD
OIL STOVES. & OVENS

r

4306 T. HERBERT Ltd.

1 & 11 Roebuck

Phone
4267

St. & Magazine Lane.

“Po <7 .
Beautiful Selection of ...

PRAYER & HYMN BOOKS—Small, Medium and Large

wint available in the following qualities :
Cheap Edit: Prices ranging from 84c. to $1.32
Med. Quality: Prices ranging from $1.80 to 3.00
Leather Binding: Prices wanging from $3.12 to 16.00

Including White Back Books

f ALSO ——.
HYMNS A. & M. with MUSIC from $3.50 to $4.32

ROBERTS & Co. Dial

3301

Sooceu,

3 months P/Leave
Pah,

SSO ESOC S G99
















































Amazing Styles & Values!
DIAL

THANI’ Ss 3466

At DECORATION
HOUSE

make and sell. upholstered
Forniture Hand Blocks Fabrics |
aug attractive Gifts. COAST
ROAD GARDEN, ST. JAMES.









we








FREE BIBLE LECTURES
b

y
Prof. R. G. JOLLY

of Pa, U.S.A,

Sunday, 25th, 8 p.m.
“CHRIST'S SECOND COM.
ING”.—Why? How? When?

Wednesday, 28th, 8 p.m.
“THE JUDGMENT DAY”
How long will it be? Is it
to be feared? Is there any
hope wand Wie grave?

A

THE STEEL SHED
QUEEN'S PARK
Auspices of
The Laymen’s Home
Missionary Movement
on Free.
No Collection,

AT THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Cnr, of Broad & Tudor Streets)

you will find a fine assortment o:

CARPENTERS & MECHANICS TOOLS

Buy TO-DAY or pay more Tomorrow,



Wo ea”



Senentens ma reception rooms, 3
@ PINS & CHAINS | information an application.
@ SASH PIVOTS
@ SASH FASTENERS lg obi
@ RIM KNOB LOCKS || REAL ESTATE AGENT |
If so We have reeeived the Above. } |
| AUCTIONEER
NB. HOWELL if) Peararions sumone
LUMBER & HARDWARE 5 |
Dial 3306 a Bay Street | Phone 4640
SaaS SSS |







We have the following...




a Master Builder for his own oc-
cupation and will stand critical
inspection.

Know likewise,

Everyone thinks of Cooking,
as you

Say G. A. Service. }





ESTATE HOUSE near
some #2 miles from town, Ma



ast |
et









construction and fine state of
repair, 4 bedrooms, 2 dressing
avooms, large and airy reception
roums, verandahs ete. Stone out-
buildings with double garage.
Barns, cowpen, milking shed.





Large ..courtyard,
lend with several fertile acres
excellent for ground provision [
cultivation, Property very suitabie )

for mixed farming. !
;

Over 17 acres





CARIBBEAN
CLUB





TWO NEW BUNGALOWS—In |







pleasant new development area.

presents Both well built of stone with

3 bedrooms, living reom, kitchen,

r Sarage and = servant’s quarters.

A VARIETY All main services. £3,500 each.
Freehold.

SHOW




“WINSLOW” — Bathsheba, St.
Joseph. A comfortable holiday
bungalow constructed of timber
situated in one of the most popular
holiday resorts in Barbados.
Splendid sea-bathing and delight-
ful sceneny, Verandah on 3 sides,
3 bedrooms, kitchen ete., Stand-
ing on over 1 acre of land, ° Very
reasonable price,






The Police Recreation Room
CENTRAL POLICE
STATION
at 8 p.m.
on
Thursday, Ist March,
Proceeds in aid of Y.W.C.A.
RESERVED SEATS 3/-
UNRESERVED ,, 2/-

Music by the Police Band
under the direction of
Capt. Raison.






NEA DENDRA—Pine Hill Estate.
Recently built coral stone bunga-
low in select residential area.





Well designed and constructed by
@ reputable firm of Contractors, 3
wardrobes)

tiled





becrooms (built-in








a

COASTAL LAND—St, James, 2
acres of excellent building land
with sea frontage which may be i

sold in half acre lots if required.





BUILDING LAND — Nearly 2
acres of land on edge of escarp-
ment near the Club Morgan, Ideal
Position for good class property.

PINE ROAD—Good building plot
of 12618 sq. ft. in select and
eentral position,

“SHLVERTON"—Cheapside. Com-
modious 2-storey stone house
standing in approx, 1% acres
Planted with fruit trees. 2 large
reception rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2
Salleries, kitchen, 2 bathrooms,
etc. Centrally located and suitable
for conversion into flats or board-
ing house,

“ROCK DUNDO"—Cave Hill. A
well maintained and productive
Estate of some 32 acres in a very
lovely position 2 miles from City.
The house is worthy of speciai
notice and possesses great charm
Its general condition is excellent
a there is spacious accommoda-
ion.



























“ELSWICK"—#th Avenue, Belie-
ville. A stone and timber house
On approx. 3,600 sq. ft. Enclosed
























SUNDAY,

B.B.C. Radio Notes:

Students In Britain

Situation for West Indies
In the ‘Ten-Minute’ talk to be
broadcast in the West Indies’ half-
hour on Wednesday next, 28th.
February the situation for stu-
dents from overseas, who came to
Britain seeking entry into higher
education centres particularly the
university and medical schools,
will be reviewed by G. E, Mills
of the Welfare Department of the
Colonial Office. As a Jamaican
Mills has a particular understand-
of the factors affecting West
Indians. He will speak at the be-
ginning of the West Indies’ pro-
gramme from London, that is, at
7.15 p.m. he rest of the pro-
gramme will be taken up with the
second programme in the new
series, ‘From the Regions’ in which
listeners. hear about the U.K.
through the eyes of West Indians
in various parts of the country
and not just confined to London.
The broadcast on the 28th, comes
from Wiser.

Other W.I. Programmes

The only other W.I. programme
from London in the coming week
of which we have particular in-
formation is ‘Caribbean Voices’ on
the 25th. February. That broad-
cast opens with a short story from
Grenada by Eula Redhead who
has contributed many folklore
tales of Compere Czien to the
series and now writes of life with-
in prison, The programme con-
cludes with a short story from
Trinidad by Louis Dummett who
tells of ‘whe whe’ players — the
Jamaican version of which is ‘drop
pan’ — and does it very well too.
Like all West Indies programmes
from the B.B.C. broadcast begins
at 7.15 p.m,

Fifth Test
We remind our. readers that
arrangements for broadcasting

comments on the Fifth Test from
the B.B.C., are the same as usual
— daily illustrated reports at 5.00
pm. anda cable from E. W.
Swanton in the West Indies’ Sat-
urday evening programme ‘Behind
the News.’ One would say that
the daily broadcasts will be on
for the six days of the match until
Thursday,1st. March, but in view
of previous experiences we’ll say
that these reports will be given as
long as the match lasts but no
matter how short it is E, W. Swan-
ton will still send his cable re-
viewing it in the light of the forth-
coming visit of theWest Indies to
Australia. ‘Behind the News’ is on
the air at the usual time for W.I,
+ programmes 7.15 p.m,

How To Be Good At Games

The next programme in the cur-
rent ‘How’ series now being
broadcast by the BBC on Thurs-
days is ‘How to be Good at
Games’ written and produced by








Appearing in
TRINIDAD'S






Dorothy Queen’s Lady in Waiting

@ CLYDE RIVERS
Humourist & Singer
@ PETER PITTS
Calypso King—Singer & Dancer
@ DAISY CREQUE
Mistress of the Ivories
@ LANDY DE MONTBRUN—

FEBRUARY

— with —
DOREEN MC KENZIE
Lovely Singer—

JUNE MAINGOT
Charming Singer & Dancer

9°

B.B.C. Radio
Programmes

SUNDAY, February 25, 1952
6.30—12.15 19.76M

1951



6.20 am. Weekend Sports Repart, 6.45
“an. Sandy Macpherson at the Theatre
Organ, 7.00 am. The News, 7.10 a.m
News Analysis,
Editorials, 7
rade, 730 am -

am. Calling All The
a s =" a.m, Home News from Brit-
. / am.

The News, 82.10 p.m. News A $
12.15 p.m. Close Down, cy ae
+.15—6.00 25.53M



415 p.m, Music Magazine, 4.30 7m.
Sunday Halfhour, 5.00 ris, Composter of
the Week, 5.15 p.m. Listeners* Choice,
6.00 p.m. Kathleen Merritt String Or-
chestra,

6.00—7.15 81.99 M 48.49M

—-

ones Brgremme Pirade, 7.00
.m. e ews, im, v
7:18 p.m. Short Stories: * Analysis,

Ties.
7AS—11.00 31.52M & 4843M

A Whole Armour of God,
bs ta a a Newsreel, 8.15 p.m.
jay rvice, 8.45 p.m. pose
the Week, 9.00 i a 9
P.m. Interlude, 10.00 Pm.
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, * .
The Cathedral Organs, 10,30 p.m, London
Forum, 11.00 p.m. Nina Milkina.

BOSTON

WRUL 15.29 Mc WRUW 11.75 17.75 M.
MONDAY, February 26, 1951
6, 30—12.15 196 M



7 onantinveimnestastniwpasidiioeneed see

6.30 a.m. Billy Cotton Band Show, 7.00
am. The News, 7.10 a.m. News Analy-
sis, 7.15 p.m. From the Editorials, 7.25
a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m. Pros-
becting for Gold, 7.45 a.m. Singing is
£0 Good a Thing, 8.00 a.m. Let's Make
Music, 8.45 p.m. The Debate Continues,
9.00 a.m. The News, 9.10 a.m. Home
News from Britain, 9.45 a.m. Close

Down, 11.15 a.m. Programme Parade,
11.25 a.m. Australia vs, England, 71.45
am Commonwealth Survey, |) iz_(
(noon) The News, 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down.
4.156 .60. 0. oes eee 25.55 M



The Stonyteller, 5.45 p.m_
Ivor Moreton and Dave Kaye, 6.00 Pm.
ra





6,00—7.15........40., ‘31,82 M, 48.49M
6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m
The News, 7.10 P.m. News Analysis,

7.15 p.m. Our Mutual Friend.

7 45—-11.00........91.92 M, & 48.43

7.45 p.m Prospecting for Gold, 9.00
p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. Com-
monwealth Survey, 8.30 p.m. Singing is
So Good a Thing, 8.45 p.m. Composer
of the Week, 9.00 p.m. BBC Concert
Hall, 40.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m,
From the Editoria!s, 10.15 p.m. Ray's
A Laugh, 10.45 pm. Science Review,
11.00 p.m How to be Good at Games,

Stephen Potter and with inser-
tions by Joyce Grenfell. An im-
Portant section of this alleged
major work is devoted to ‘How to
Win at Games’ without actually
Cheating. The listener is advised
to note the three Basic Attacks
devised to undermine the three
Basic Types of Opponent, the
nervous, the hard-headed and the
cbnfident. You'll have lots of fun
in listening to this broadcast at
6.00 p.m. on Thursday, Ist
March,

a So

Firestone |
TYRES «41 TUBES

AVAILABLE IN ALL SIZES

USE THE TYRES CHAMPIONS USE

PERSON

BEAUTIFUL CARN. T VAL QUEEN
w THE SHOW OF THE YEAR

Master of Ceremonies

Prices:—Mat. Children 50¢ Adults $1.00
Night:Stalls & Boxes $1.50 House & Balcony $1.00

¢

EMPIRE

| SUNDAY 4th MARCH



am ON STAGE



LT ea eSsesensensnnteeee

Church Services

ANGLICAN

ST. PAUL'S-7 a.m. Holy Communion.
$.15 a.m. Litany in Procession Mothers
Union taking part
Mass and Sermon.
SUBJECT: —

3 pm. Sunday School 330 pom
Children’s Service. 7 p.m. Sol Evensong
and Sermon and Procession, Preacher
The Rev. B. C. Ullyett,

ST. LEONARD'S: & a.m. Holy Com-
munion; 9 a.m. Choral Eucharist and
Address; 11 a.m, Matins and Sermon; 3
p.m. Sunday School; 7 p.m. Evensong
erd Sermon

Holy Communion celebrated daily
throughout Lent:— Mondays, Tuesdays,
Wednesdays, and Saturdays at 7.30 a.m.

Thursdays at 5 a.m. hymns)
Fridays at 6 a.m.

Open Air Service Monday 26th. 7.30

m. Waterhall Land (Amplified),

v. W. C. Woode, Vicar.

MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK s8T.
9 a.m. Rev, D. C. Moore, 7 p.m
A. C. Pilgrim

$30 a.m Solemn

«with

Rev

GRACE a
11 am. Mr, O. Lewis, 7 P.m. Mr. D
Culpepper.
FULNECK

ll a.m. Rev. D. C. Moore, 12.15 P.m
v. D. C. Moore (Holy Communion)
7 p.m. Mr, W. Swire.
MONTGOMERY
7 p.m. Mr. U. Reid.
SHOP HILI,
7 p.m. Mr. F. G. Smith.
UNSCOMBE

D
a.m. Rev. A. C. Pilgrim (Holy Com-
munion) 7 p.m. Mr. G. Francis.

METHODISY

JAMES STREET
1l_a.m. Rev. B. Griffin, 7 p.m. Rev
H. C. Payne.
PAYNES BAY
9.30 a.m. Harvest Festival, Mr. F
Moore, 3 p.m. Harvest Programme by
Sunday School Scholars, 7 p.m. Harvest
Festival, Rev. R. McCullough.
WHITEHALL
9.36 a.m. Mr. J. Payne, 7 p.m. Mr.
G, Harper.

GILL MEMORIAL

ll a.m. Rev. R. McCullough, 7 p.m

Mr. W. St, Hill.
HOLETOWN

8.30 a.m, Mrs, Morris, 7 p.m. Rev

EB. Griffin, Holy Communion.
BANK HALL

930 am. Mr. G. MeAllister, 7 Pm

Mr. J, A. Griffith.
SPEIGHTSTOWN

l4 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrence, 7 p.m

F. Lawrence, 7.00 p.m,
SELAH .

9.30 a.m, Harvest Festival, Mr. D.
Scott, ®% p.m. Harvest Programme, Rev.
F. Lawrence. 7.00 pra

BETHESDA
11 am. Mr. D Scott, 7 p.m,
BETHEL—11 a.m. Mr, H. Grant, 7 Pm

Rev. B. Crosty, “The Life of Jesus’’.
(3) The great confession.
DAI —ll a.m, Rev. H. C, Payne,
7 p.m. Mr. G. Bascombe,
BELMONT—1) a.m. Mr.
H.

7 p.m. Mr, E, Gilkes.

SOUTH DISTRICT—9 a.m, Mr. W. w, promote a_ better

Alleyne, 7 p.m. Mr. P. Deane.
PROVIDENCE—11 a.m. Rev, B. Crosby,
7 p.m. Mr. G. Jones.
VAUXHALL—9 a.m, Rev. B. Crosby,
7 p.m. Mr. TI. Blackman,

SALVATION ARMY
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL

P. Bruce, :

SUNDAY

PIE CORNER

il a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting

PREACHER: Sr. Major Hoeliingswort}

CARLTON

‘Il a.m, Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting

PREACHER: Captain Bourne

CHECKER HALL

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting.

PREACHER: Lieutenant Reid.
COLLYMORE ROCK A.M.E. CHURCH

HARVEST SUNDAY

Bible Exposition, 2330 p.m
The Hand of God. 7.15 pm
At the 3.30 pm
Stevenson will be |

l? am
Cantata
Evangelistic Service
Service Mr. W. G
the Chairmen.

A cordial invitation is extended to all. |

Minister: Rev. E, A. Gilkes. ;
THE ST. 1OHN'S LUTHERAN CHURCH [
FAIRFIELD ROAD, BLACK |

ll a.m. Songs and Seynon by the
Rev. Dr. Herm A. Mayers, Ph.D., Assist
Executive Sec., for the Lutheran |
Churches in the North and South |
America, Subj. The biessedness of the |
Peliévers.The Rev. W. F. O'Donohue, |
Founder. Tune in for Bringing Christ
to the Nations at 6 p.m. Sunday evening. i

THE ST. WALTER LUTHERAN HOUR
The Lutheran Church will hold their |
service at the Steel Shed, at Queen's |
Park, on Monday night the 26th, the |
service beginning at 7 pm. The Rev |
Dr. H. A. Mayers, Ph.D., assist. Execu- |
tive Sec., from the U.S.A. will be the |
speaker, for the evening. The Rev, |
W. F. O'Donohue, assisting, |
The public are to attend, this |
rervice of Bringing Christ to the Nations
ST. MATTHEW'S ORTHODOX CHURCH
DEIGHTON ROAD j
9 a.m, Mass’ Preacher and Celebrant,
Rev. Fr, E. F. Neblett, 7 p.m, Vespers
2 p.m Hhrvest Festival under the
Chairmanship of Mr, E. D. Mottle:, |
M,.C.P., an invitation is extended to
the public.
THE NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH
OF GoD

ST. MICHABL—11 am. Piver Road,
Rev. E. W. Weekes. 11 a.m. Brittons
ill Evangelist, T. A. Griffith. 3 p.m.
Britten's < Sunday School, Rev
R. Brome, 7 p.m. Brittan’s Hill
Gospel Meeting, Rev .
CHRIST CHURCH—7 p.m
Gospel Meeting, Rev. E.
ST. JOHN—1ls a.m
J. B. Winter,





Venture,
Bowmanstone,

a.m, Sion Hill, for |
dedication of infants, Rev. A. R. Brome. |

Anglican Synod |
Appreciates Efforts |

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Feb. 21.

The Anglican Synod, meeting in
Kingston last week, passed a reso-
lution in appreciation of “the |
efforts of the Lord Bishop of
Jamaica, the Vicar Apostolic. of
the Roman Catholic Church in
amaica and the Chairman of th
Methodist Church in Jamaica, to
understanding
in the industrial Jife of the coun- |
ry.” |
‘This is in connection with’ the
current industrial dispute in the
sugar industry, on which agree- |
ment was reached last week-end

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m, Com- between the sugar manufacturers,
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. the Bustamante Industrial Trade |

Smith,

: Major
WELLINGTON STREET

Union and the Trades Union|

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com- Congress for polls to be taken on)

pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
PREACHED: Sr. Major Gibbs
18’

41 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting.
PREACHER: Lieutenant Gibbons
DIAMOND CORNER
11 a.m, Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting.
PREACHER: Lieutenant Moore,





OF
1951




DOREEN McKENZIE














16 estates in the industry to,
determine union affiliation, In|
the meantime it was agreed that |
there should be joint bargaining)
between the unions and the man- |
ufacturers in respect to wage rates |
for the 1951 crop season.



. i |
Reds Abandon |

Hoerigsong

@ From Page i.
, slowed by foot-deep mud
| thaw swollen rivers. :
| British and Canadian forces are
reported to be fighting an esti-|
mated Red battalion of up to 1,000,
men in another sector northesst
of Chipyong. The western front,
|on the south and on both sideg
of Seoul was giving way in recent |
weeks. |
In the pre-dawn darkness, how- |
ever, the United States artillery
broke up two Communists at-|
tempts to cross the Han River, |
east of Seoul, and probably peck-
ed two out of five to ten Commu-
nist tanks spotted on the north
bank,

United Nations forces on the
central front launched patrol stabs
into Hoengsong after capturing
hills in the southeast in advances
of up to four miles yesterday.

—B.U.P.

CLOSE LOSE,

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.
OF THE WEST INDIES, ©
Extra-Mural Departmet

TWO LECTURES

| on

PUBLIC ADMINISTRA-
TION

|
|
|
and |
|

(The Technique of
Supervision)
by
ERIC G. JAMES, M.A.,
Staff Tutor, Extra - Mural
Board, University College of
the West Indies.



on
Wednesday, February 28th
at 8 p.m.

at the
British Council, Wakefield
and on
Thursday, March Ist
at the Y.M.C.A.

FEE FOR ADMISSION :
12¢. for each Lecture



& DANCE
at the
i B'DOS sora CLUB

(Local & Visiting Members
Only)

Saturday Evening March 3rd

tee
nt

Jeffrey’s Troupe of Artistes
| featuring:

Miss CHRISTINE GOR-
N (“Miss Jeffrey’s Beer

DO

1951,” and Trinidad’s Carni-

val Queen) with Mr. LANDY
{

de MONTBRUN, Mr. Clyde
Pivers, (The Seotch Tenor)
Miss~ Doreen McKenzie,
(Beautiful young Singer),
Mr. Peter Pitts, (Calypso-
nian), June Maingot (Pretty
Girl Dancer),
Mentbrun, (Lady-in-waiting
tc the Queen), and Miss
Daisy Creque, (Mistress of
the Ivories as accompanist),

Dorothy do

DANCING after Floor Show

Admission to Ballroom $1.00



ii
i}
)






ADVOCATE

a

NOTICE

The Telephone Company invites attention to the
inconvenience and annoyance which is caused by the
ringing of a “wrong number.”

Broadly speaking Wrong Numbers in an automatic
telephone exchange system can be attributed to three
distinct causes :

(a) Failure of the exchange switching appar-
atus.

(b) Incorrect dialling by the caller.

(c) Faulty dial in the calling telephone.

An elaborate routine maintenance procedure en-
sures a high standard of mechanical operation inside
the exchange, but incorrect dialling or a faulty dial is
something which the Telephone Company has great
difficulty in controlling or locating.

Subscribers are therefore requested to (i) make
certain that they dial the correct number in a methodi-
cal and precise manner and (ii) call 09 and report to
the exchange all cases in which a wrong number is
obtained. Your telephone company will follow np the
complaint in the interests of all concerned.

Alarm
Mantle
Bureau
Wall and
Chiming

CLOCKS

from Your Jewellers





—-

Y. De Lima & Co. Ltd. ;

Broad Street

< =



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A FIRE INSURANCE POLICY :
that will afford you adequate protection and peace of
mind,

For information and rates, apply to the Agents:

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.



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PAGE THIRTEE

THE PETER RABBIT BOGKS written and
illustrated by the late Beatrix Potter, are to-
day among 1%! Peter
Rabbit and all the other quaint characters are
known and loved by both children and adults
all over the world.

1e world’s best ller

PETER RABBIT is now glad to let everyone
know that he as well as Jemima Puddleduck. ”
Benjamin Bunny, Timrey Tiptoes, Tom Kitten,
The Tailor of Gloucester, and many other ot
his pals of the story book>, are now in town.

PROUDLY PRESENTED

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

BOLTON LANE

Sole Representative Polex Watch Co., Switzerland

ROYAL STORE

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OME ONE, COME ALL !!
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PAGE FOURTEEN

Who Is





Gairy ?

(By Our Own Correspondent

GRENADA.

To-day Grenada is in a State of Emergency. St. Lucia

pohce are coming to the as

policemen. What is it all about

a new leader

Lightning Strikes
House In St. Andrew
BOARDED and _ shingled

house owned by James Dow-—
ney of 'Turner’s Hall, St. An-—



arey as struck by lightning on
Friday afternoon. Some shingles
na beards were torn away from
the eastern side of the house
Downey was hit by one of the

boarc and slightly injured,

many St. Andrew districts
rain fell for a five-hour period
ut a break The showers
-ompanied by thunder and





light

T! is were flooded and ve-
hieles were held up for long
pericds, Residents had to assist
in clearing debris from the high—
ways.





“THE CARIBBEAN CLUB, with
Judy Graham and her group,
will give a show at the Police
Recreation Hall, Central Station,
on Wednesday night at 8 o’clock,
The show is in aid of the Y.W.C.A,
The Police Band, under Capt.!
C. E., Raison, will be in attend-
ance,

HE POLICE HAVE started a
campaign against motorists”
who park vehicles a distance frome
the side of the street, Colonel”
R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of#
Police, told the Advecate yester-
day morning. A
Special Police patrols have
been posted to look out for these’
offenders, When motorists stop

i
|
,
f





ible to the side of the road.=
Eight motorists were. recently:
reported for not having their;
registration ecards affixed. They,
were warned by the Police. f

A’ THE LOCAL TALENT
Show at the Globe Theatre*
on Friday night, first prize went!*
to Hal Hunte who sang “Home
On The Range.” The second
prize was awarded to
Small with “I Should Care.”
Guest Star was Percy Welch»
and ‘he sang “‘Doctor, Lawyer.”

EV. H. A. MAYER, D.D.,

represented the Lutheran
Chureh, Missouri Synod, arrived
in the island yesterday by
B.W.I1.A He is on a tour of
the West Indies.

The Lutheran Church has been
broadcasting the popular pro~
gramme “Bringing Christ To The
Nations” for the past 20 years.
There are 1,100 broadcasting
stations in 51 countries, The pro—
gramme is broadcasted in 36
different languages.

He has already toured South
America and is now here.to see
how the programme is received
locally, He expects to leave on
Wednesday for Puerto Rico. This
is his first visit to Barbados.





Seouts And Guides
Own To-day

The Annual Scouts and Guides

- Own will take place at Comber-

mere School to-day, Sunday 25
at 430 p.m. and NOT AT ST.
MICHAEL’S GIRLS’ SCHOOL as
was previously arranged.

All Ranks—Cubs, Scouts, Rov-
ers and Scouters will assemble at
Combermere at 3.30 p.m.

Please make a note of the
chanre of place, and inform any
member of the Movement with
whom you may come in contact.

All sections are reminded to be
punctual and to leave nothing to
be desired in their smartness and
general appearance, :

BADGERS’ CORNER

Congratulations to the following
scouts who have ,ained the under-
-mentioned badges,

Ambulance: O. St. C, Worrell
(8rd Sea Scouts),

Despatch Rider : Malcolm Tay-
lor, (Y.M.C.A,) i

Electrician : O, St. C. Worrell,
(3rd Sea Scouts).

.. Handicraft : LeRoy Davis
(Y.M.C.A.)
Interpreter ; Leyland Clarke,
(Y.M.C.A ) pe
Mechanic O. St. C. Worrell,

(3rd Sea Secxut>)

Public health ; ik. uv. Scantle-
bury, E. Thompson, C, P. Thomp-
son, E. L. Thompson, (3rd Sea
Scouts). e

Owing to the inclemency of the
weather the Scouts and Guides
Own which was to be held at
St. Michael’s Girls’ School today,
will now take place at the Hall
of Combermere School at 4.15
p.m. Seouts and Guides will fall
in at the Combermere School at
3.30 p.m.

poo












>







TO
THAN Tapvey,
MRS.CEO NLEY.

\arig it ;
Case
“©)-1Z

COPR. 1950. KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, Inc, WORLD BR






must draw up as close ash

ernest *

sistance of the mere 156 local
? The people have found

Twenty-nine years old last
Sunday, a spare-bodied Grenadian

ex-pupil—teacher by nome of Gairy
with only three years teaching t&
his credit and six years in Aruba
as a clerk in the Lago Oil Com-

pany’s ,Instruments Departmen,
returned home and founded a
Manual and Mental Worxets’
Union just 14 months ¢.o0

Eric Matthew Gairy gave up his
teaching job at the St. Mary’s
R. C. School, St. Andrew's, in
1941 and left for Aruba. He had
been a Boy Scout and, as is inevita-
ble in the life of the young Roman
Catholic, had done hs bit. as
acolyte and Sodality member. In
Aruba, from all accounts, he began
to make good, resuminy his connec-
tion with the Holy Name Society
there and as an attestation to his
popularity among fellow West
Indian workers he was for thre
years on the clerical side of the
Lago Employees, Council. How
ever, he grew in disfavour with the
Company authorities and was laid
off in 1949,
































E. M. GAIRY with white gloves
and Mike.

Gairy was not even in the lime-
light at the time Hon, T. A.
Marryshow answered a call to
assist an incipient West Indian
workers’ movement in Aruba.
Marryshow was forbidden to
address public meetings and was
given summary notice by the
authorities to leave the island.
Leader of that movement was
another young Grenadian, Gas-
ccigne Blaize, whose Aruba career
eventually ended in expulsion,
after which he went to Trinidad.
Just a week ago he arrived here
to assume General-Secretaryship
of the M.M.W.U. and participate
in its present strike action.

The short history of Gairy’s local
rise is now fairly well known in
Barbados—his Emancipation Day
demonstration last year in St.
David's parish, his sugar workers’
strike and resultant wage increase
by arbitration which bolstered his
stock with the masses and his
November 11 demonstration in a
speech at which he suggestively
acclaimed himself the greater
leader than Marryshow.

Dapper and a ringer of changes
of wear from planters’ togs through
zoots to evening tails, he must be
seen in demonstration garb to be
believed. Leading a march around
St. George in sweltering forenoon
heat last November 11, his rig was
evening tail coat, bowler, cravat,
white cane slung over one arm and
Bible and “documents” under the
other, Similarly, he led thousands
singing to steel band aceompani-
ment over a seven-mile route up
hill and down dale in St. David's
last August 1,

Gairy is undoubtedly lionised by
the labouring masses. Where his
power will lead him is yet un-
predictable, The voice of authority
has issued its veto against his
present general strike which has
turned the Spice Island into an
island of strife. What next?

U.C.W.I. CELEBRATES

From Our Own Correspondent



KINGSTON, Feb., 21.
-Founder’s Day at the Universi-
ty College of the West Indies last
Friday—anniversary of the re-
ceiving of the Charter from
Princess Alice—was celebrated
with a cricket match between a
u.C.W.1. team and a Jamaica
Crieket Board eleven, other
special functions as well as the
issue of special postage stamps.

The match was drawn,



| They'll Do Ic Every Time ss1mm By Jimmy Hatlo |






UGHTS Rk



Police Patrol
St. George’s

@ From Page 1

cricket touring team to Trinidad.

The Cinema in the capital has
been closed and the townfolk are
indoors early in the evening.
Special reserve police are now
also on duty This afternoon a
Regulation was issued by the
Acting Gevernor under § his
emergency power, ordering ‘the
Ccuneil to forbid loitering in high-
ways or bypaths. After the re-
quest of a member of the: Police
Force or reserve to remove, people
must give their names = and
addresses. Public meetings and
processions haye been banned;
also the carrying on of any
assembly with torches, sticks,
stones and other offensive
weapons.

Arrest Without Warrant

The Police have been given
power to arrest without warrant
and with reasonable cause anyone
suspected of breaking these regu-
lations. The penalty’ on convic-
ticn will be a fine not exceeding
$500 or six months or both,

OUR Trinidad correspondent
cables that the Butler Union today
arranged financial aid ip response
to Gairy’s appeal to the Trinidad
Union, Butlerites made a des-
patch delegation to Grenada to
help the strikers. Other Trinidad
Unions are reticent regarding the
aid quest) â„¢.

According to our Jamaica
correspondent, Honourable W. A.
Bustamante who is_ celebrating
his 67th birthday, called on the
Secretary of State for the Colonies
asking that justice be done on be-
half of the Grenada workers in
connection with the current strikes.
In a letter to the Windward
Islands’ Governor, Jamaica's
Prime Minister expressed concern
over the situation adding: “It
seems to me of interest that the
working man is not considered to
have his due to what is right.”

Bustamante said here there
should be total West Indian action
on the Grenada situation. Busta-
mante said ‘‘Here’s a chance for
us to show that we really are
interested in federation. Let us
support the workers, not only by
representations, but financially,
including provision for legal
assistance for those who have
been charged. Let the workers of
Grenada maintain their fine re-
cords of good behaviour and let
the Empire of the British West
Indies come forward to back their
cases.”

Black Eagle Wins
Stewards Handicap
As D.T.C. Meet Ends

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, British Guiana, Feb. 24,
The D.T.C. New Year Meeting ended
today with a record crowd including the
Governor, Sir Charles Woolley. emia
follow :— ‘
VLISSENGEN HANDICAP
& Furlongs, Class H
Genno (Lutchman) 104 Ibs, ..........
Just By Chance (Yvonet) 135 Ibs, ..
Surprise Packet (Gobin) 133 Ibs. ....
Shy Fox (Lutchman) 110 Ibs.
Time: 1 min, 61/5 sees.
BOURDA HANDICAP
7 Furlongs, Class G
Montgomery (Lutehman) 110 Ibs. ....
Sagga Boy (Joseph) 114 Ibs.
Ormondes Battery (O'Neil) 130 Ibs,
Flying Step (Beckles) 118 Ibs,
Time: 1 min, 34 secs.
GARDEN HANDICAP
1 Mile, 100 Yards, Class D
Sunwateh (Lutehman) 115 Ibs,
Just Reward (Joseph) 116 Ibs.
Anna Tasman (Aphan) 120 Ibs,
Millionaire (Singh) 120 Ibs.
Time: 1 min, 55 secs.
STABROEK HANDICAP
7 Furlongs, Class A
Miss Shirley (O'Neil) 119 Ibs,
Double Link (Forshaw) 140 Ibs. ......
Sunny Game (Yvonet) 128 Ibs, .
Sunhurst (Joseph) 145 Ibs,
Time: 1 min, 30 secs,
KINGSTON HANDICAP
7 Furlongs, Class H
Sly Fox (Lutehman) 110 Ibs. ......,.
Sagga Boy (Sunnich) 118 Ibs, ...
Flying Step (Joseph) 116 Ibs. Ses
Surprise Packet (Gobin) 132 Ibs,
Time: 1 min, 33 sees.
STEWARDS HANDICAP
7 Furlongs, Class F
Black Eagle (Naidoo) 112 Ibs. ..,....,
Goblin (O'Neil) 116 Ibs, ........,
Ormondes Battery (Yvonet) 116 Ibs,
Black Shadow (Persaud) 108 Ibs,
Time: 1 min, 32 secs,
FINAL HANDICAP
7 Furlongs, Class C
Anna Tasman (Aphan) 110 Ibs, .....
Etoile Defleurf (Sunnich) 126 Ibs.
Dancing Master (Singh) 116 Ibs.
Tuckers Kitty (Lutchman) 123 Ibs,
Time: Imin. 31 sees,



aus awe mote to bom Beste sone

Bowie



SERIES AA

Horse racing enthusiasts were
looking skyward yesterday and
asking themselves whether the
present bad spells of weather will
hold off and give a chance to have
a bright March meet,

The Turf Club are selling
Series AA at present and there
are indications that before the
selling period is closed for the
coming meet, Series DD will be
sold,

The sand track which was built
not long ago at the Garrison has
come in very useful for training
during this rainy interval which
has caused the ground to become
heavy.



BUT THEY ALWAYS
PICK A SWELL SPOT
TO PUT UP THOSE

WELCOME SIGNS ++













SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Louis Wins
By T.K.O.

FANS BOO

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 24. |
Joe Louis scored a dull 10th
round technical knock-out victory
over Andy Walker, California’s
heavyweight chamyron, before
18,000 booing fans who paid
approximately $90,000 |

Louis who outweighed Walker—
207 pounds to 194—-said afterwards
that he’ was ready to fight the!
champion Ezzard Charles again for
the crown he once wore.

Louis and manager Marshali
Miles will leave for Chicago today
to negotiate the return match with
Charles probably in Chicago or
San Francisco this spring.

The once fearsome Louis, show-
ing little of the punch that made
him the killer in bygone days did
little to add to his prestige for as
the referee raised Louis’ hand in
victory in the tenth and final
round, the ex-champion was greet—
ed by a chorus of boos.

Louis had chased the frightened
Walker all over the ring for nine
rounds during which he knocked
him down twice. The referee
stopped the bout at one minute,
49 seconds of the tenth with
Walker still on his feet but obvi-
ously willing to quit. In the fourth
round Walker took a five count
after being hit with a stiff left to
head and falling partly through
the ropes.

The referee waved Walker back
into action. Walker took a seven
count in the seventh round while
standing up and leaning against
the ropes. Again the referee
ordered him to resume fighting
The California rules call for a
knock down when the fighter
hangs on to the ropes.

The referee, Frankie Brown, said
that he had stopped the uneven
contest because Walker was obvi-
ously helpless from punishing
rights and lefts he took to the
head.

—B.U P.

CARONI TEAM
TO TOUR JAMAICA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 21.
A cricket team from Caroni,
Trinidad, will tour Jamaica in
November to play a series of
three matches against leading
Sugar eStates teams there,







The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.17 a.m.
‘Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (Last Quarter): Feb-
ruary 28
Lighting: 6.30 p.m,
High Water: 6.26 a.m,
6.46 p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington):
.06 in.
Total for month to yester-
day: 12.24 ins.
‘Temperature (Min.): 76.0° F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E.,
ll a.m. E.S.E.
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29,920,
(11 a.m.) 29.910

)

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Be bright... fight your

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—be smart, take Alka-Seltzer at
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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1951



















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{ ~
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s.
§ A DANCE es
&
¢ . we will be given by %
a Miss ELISE. HARRIS %
Bren a At ST. CATHERINE’S SOCIAL ¥
Mr. & Mrs. CLUB BALL, WILTSHIRES %



KENNETH HOPE
At their residence Dash Gap,
2nd. Ave, Bank Hall,
On Wednesday Night
28th February, 1951
Music by Percy Green’s Ork.
ADMISSION - - 2/-
Refreshments On Sale

SOOO SO

(St. Philip)
(Kindly lent by the Management)
On SUNDAY NIGHT 25th
February, 1951 %
Admission GENTS 2/- LADIES 1/6
Mr. Percy Greene's Orchestra in
Attendance

Refreshments on Sale — Please
invite your friends 25,2.51—1n

CLOSSCCSOIOPOE GFF

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Full Text

PAGE 1

LI St'VDAV II r.til \Y a, 1K1 -IMIW ADVOCATE PAGE THREE ONI I I OH III. t\ti Gardening Hints For Amateurs THE GARDEN la Fearuar> CU111NG BACK KING Of FLOWERS. LAYERING IT IS difficult to know what to advise for the garden during this unpredictable weather we are llnhiit hmi/ihl liy Mr. Even The Emperor Wants Our Orchids fly GF.RAIJl SCHEFF A i.is orchid (if ran nffbetton i* being flown to America this ueek-end. i ;IIN to pow in a Slough nursery. nd na* .1 single bloom, too valuable ever to become a An old customer Emperor woman's corsage. Hlrohlto of Japan, wants to buy The Orchid, "Aylesbury variety orrhids again. Suae," I a new specie!, of cypriKing's Collection |:.him or' %  indy's slipper." 'than Amateur growers range from been bought by Mr. Gordon Hon. royalty—the King hM a line Seattle greetings card manufaeturcollection .it Windsor and flower* •f, the only man ever to have „^ sm lo decorate the Queen rimed nn orchid, British-raised. after his mother-in law. FARM AND GARDEN I II I IN i in son H> Agrirola THERE are two classes of wator-loggtng. poor di.ii lam • • organ urns In the soil—animal and adequate tillage and aj CD, Tin*. vegetable, by lar the greater the practical farmer and n am bar belong to plant Uaa aud must be on the alert to remedy comprise forms of greatest Insuch denoenctet as may be preI The iwestaected rainfall fluemw i n prw |uclng change, m judicial to the development and HI "Si "^i Ji!! structure and conpo.il,>. which multiplication of organism,, fav „.H1 aouden. and little cube done ^.^o^^ to .^ productions oumble to successful soil manag. XTlSE between Sower. Mo* are too ,m.lTu> be sscn 13 It would be Interesting to know without the aid of a mlcioscrope. Perhaps the most conspicuous how the annuals In the various Simply expressed, we can gay that example of a beneficial agency garden* have stood up to these they fall into two great divisions the soil la that of the earthworm rains, aa at this tune of the year —the visible and the invisible which passes tremendous nuanti rain is not reckoned tor at all. In the former grouping, the animal tie* of earth through its body, exnor do most annuals like (4. world is repre s e n ted by such trading what organic matter it If any plants such as BKora. forms as rodents, worms, certain can from the material so Ingeatac Blue Plumbago, Geeberas or tne crustaceans and Insects; and the sad casting out the indigestibk Bougainvillaeas show signs of pl| int WorId vhMty bv ai ^ remains an to tjie land We art .urnin* P*"! rrc '" 1 "' *. "H *"?*; fungi, algae and plant roots In indebted to Darwin for his mcihodhal.?ta rltun^Sh coh uT Mix *" '"'" <" v ' m ".ember, ef the leal obsereation, on the value ot half a pound in bucket of water, l ,1 nl wor, << predominate, repreearthworms as soil improvers; it and pour a little to each plant. en td principally by bacteria; |n has been estimate-! thiit from oneRepeat in a week, or until a good 'Addition, there are other micro— tenth to two-tenths of an Inch o> green colour has returned scopic forms of life — Including soil as castings may be deposited When the sun doea coma aut such motile groups ai protozoa and annually on the surface (roan th< again (at the time of writing it species ot small worms such aJ depths below. Advantageously shows no sign of doing so!) A nematodes which form gall* on enough lo the cultivator, earthhard white crust is apt to form plant roots and. indeed, many worms seek for existence the on the top of the garden beds, others which may use the ..oil as heavy, compact soil utm itaH SrnX.^r.r'if'.t Kill. £?5Z*l3£ £X2?£S! ~* ^ ""* without one Until the l..t war done, and yet ha. not had time J "J-v be }****> '••; ***• "- to 5.\SS.,7S in ,h, bed, ZfSZ S^SSS .TZie -'"•"''.'•--"•• w thU forking must be done carestage in their cxi-itenre. rtayec. M A is the llrst book of a fully so that the delicate roots so Activity in the soil is so great s"cner.,l knowledge Barns whul is impossible for the lay J h *? ,,lhor Intends t publish. Ttitf book contains 24 arum. *implj taking place in it and In relation W ,,W mi ^*' " JS5E pBlnt : SJZ ^ VVTS.5 •, gaaa^VK £*ss raw: rO-IAVS MEWS FLASH I LXAP OVER TR WALL" By Monm Baldwin A MQHXWG AT TlaX USTICf R. td' Mmafltobrr AT JOII'ON RATawrasii SttitlhBRUSH... UP... YOUR... SMILE... [aceCanned Culture (1 000 a year on orchid. "There is still one man in Ldn don, the son of a Persian oil Just magnate. iiM-lf daily e-. i-i^ !" Ir >" ,h e surface arc nut Injured, that ho v.e.rs a £2 bloom ^ g^^ KinB m tltmm man lo ^^^ ^ lhal One thing that should be d this time of the year is rutting back of the King -MU..I..... to the studv <>f these Flowers. "l mor J' * !^ ^undexatandule , % ,,„,, ,„ whoolf Opinions differ as to the right bL I " f ^l \ ^" "^ '""* **>*<"* r " %  -*. < hf tipic lo do this. The Garden Book miUlo,a * bacu?rla perlormuig author says, is "to advises cutting it back in April, various complex functions and milcomi>rcheiiMvi< ucquainUinop with but many people consider this too lions of microscopic unicellular the gn.it men. women ,md thing! 18-a-week garage hands Lxporls Ivi-in^ 0s ad to Z5s. for untlowered He will use it for crossbreeding, r'ents 1 he bloom ha, a while dorsal with ORC, D ODDITIBS: Darwin purpLa spots, touches of green kr n orchids because their strue, f lure resembhss the human body lacquered mahogany. ,no !" h n o'ber plant. Baron Mr H .now that S^broder paid tl.8i lor a new ooms at Buckingham Palace — to lMc and prefer to do it in Fcbruanimals wriggling their of ihu irld from |h U-gmning [ WITH THE CORRECT-SHAPE TOOTHBRUSH iiry or March, or even earlier, ao, through the soil, the eaTivt of ill "f hisur>-'" Vonipeehanftlve'' ii pau wm lake your choice thaee oj>erating agencies, both vidhardly the righl word tome, but Whenever this Job is done howbio and invisible, is to open up by tlsdlasBaal aftkoKa ..f Mbjael and ever, the King of Flowers should p.,*tasHr th< usr ,,( <* It will U Hurticultural Society's award ^ om ny ^._"_ ?frl ,0 i^ b __ ._ *.*!£ well watered. approciated thai the number* of all cf merit last week. Orchids arc in the Bri tain's biggest orchid show will l>e held next month m London. The other day a Berk nan paid £75 Tor 110 orchids i..nging from white to deep red lor her mother's funeral. Exports of high-class orchid plants arc rising, with US. and Australia our best i This yar orchid exports are lotted to l £100.000 almost double the 1949 figure. An amateur grower in Australia nr.hld from seed. There are 16.000 known species. —L.E S. Indian Pedlar Returns Home To ensure a longer spell of flow*rs, be sure to cut off the old dower-heads as they wither. Do „_, ,i,i,. i-,,„i f i, u i which It will return later ""A ; ,, i '"" """ %  '"' ''i.i p .lu.%  laed. ir the book U lo ba <>t uu vam. it must be lined m c. nium tun ftM organisms fluctuate daily c£? HTHJ* J ma hourly dapsjodbu m. condi'"* lions. For <-xam|.le. it has beau .fl. -.M-I.ll I.M nUal for .lil be found ^f>'"^r^." 1 ^ ,or 1 ln /' 1 r n wlll quickly %  "Httg cf plant 'ool .nailablc are nls of the music discuaaed Ki>bndy can unfierstmid l>ron(ird' da \ inii without haviln' Mnna Lisa 1 or talk inlcllLernth oliout Ti-istnn and Isolde." wlth1 having heard nMQrdl can be grown singly or in clumps us a shrub. The pink is the most saasasit common colour and the mcn.t hardy, but it can also be had In Red. Mauve and White, and the in between shades. Layerlnti To propagate a plant by layetbuslncss but not a alive in India. Singh came to Trinidad at thi i Prom Out iWni I'urmpomM-nl %  PORT-OF-SPAIN. Fab. SI With tears streaming down hi heeks. Bhao Singh ii, pedlar c Princes Town, South Tnnidad. said "goodbye" to his villagers before leaving to return ha. Ju.t ordered 1.V0U. '"".'•' '"' <-~ !" "I •"' lor 17. Bd each A 15110 oiler "" rv '" '" %  > ""' back Tr: ,.k ordo, 5-H-i. aS •%  . i 1 :,, is Mr. Peter Black, chau-man JMJJJ Clraw^ ^ To assist h ga by Miss Nellie Hubert* ^ HrttainV ofhetad arehld ortlat. She li MI MI by the thousand for more than SO years no one lo replace her if she dies. Orchid expert NniMon Black, brother of Peter, told m: Many .imeriian women wear oichiri Colonies and corsages costing CS to K0, but in authorities are flower head, uud It that fresh flowers ... form. n <5 S F P n y * profcoaosin forma 0 f that o| King of Flowers makes a splen"'d the numbs*. >f th>f a-n <-r < |,uhlit.u t rmlWtwill did and decorative hedge, or It diminish grertlv andat unsuitable soon bo on laJfl at all theIcnrttnj; nditions In the ?-ui br right fote pros to the round of onion and 1 trumpets.' writes Sydney Smith, layer Let i\ Well, 1 cannot run to pdtei de /oie the tup, and but here Is my Idea of a little boiled ega. bacon. aiiKitn between assen layer of yam be on put a little butter on the It simply means bending down a branch of the desired plant, put*• jftff** *On *tt **MOtt > %  !ouch\K l ou n nd! a W n-" %  ".' f ait) lalani illwr (liH.imi U> fin % %  : ii.. ... %  i.teiM mi w4... satTRYING TO SOLVE U.S.$ PROBLEM Qn Our Own Cnrtr.pood>nl l-ORT-OF-SPAIN. Feb. SI. The Secretary of State for the the American tinaVr*. the moment "'i* • Britain, where sales have declined, endeavouring to And a soluti the overage shop price is £1 to 30*. \h* problem of allocating U.S. fur this type of orchid dollars under the recent trade :e Korea there is no Liberalisation Plan. At a meeting purge ff the orchid we christenof the Trinidad Chamber ot Cornid 'Stalin' In IMS. merce to-day, members heard that "Once rntererl In U • slud book licences are being Issued for the name cannot U> changed. Importation of good* from Canada. ne! .1 it the position with respect tr Wlft tub) stff Bad a golden the importation from the United throat. States was still undecided. It Is "Few men in Britain wear understood that applications for orchid btr.tonholes today. Orowan Unitcl States dollars involve ten i v. I it times the amount of dollar* "Joseph Cnamberlain was never available. ... %  ••ill 1*1. ratal*, far %  rralf. O H asks: (1) What do you think is biting my young Carnation Utfljras? The leaves arc left with n saw like edge and some are dropping off (2) The worms are coming on the cabbage. What shall I do* want by caramel pudduui. The trumpet*, are %  cesaary. I I WM, I ISM ]'1|. 13 Flied ami seasoned Byiasj 11 lbs. of boiled yam. slieea verv thin 1 hard boiled egg | lb. fried bacon 1 large tomato 2 yolfcs of eggs 2 tablespoonsfiil aalad oil 2 teaspoonsful butter 1 tablespoonful Worchester 1 gill Sherry ] Kill Wat. r I Onion i 1 pptT and salt. Mix well together the yolki ear., salad ml. butter, Worcester Sauce. Sheriy and water, salt and pepper. Arrange the fish In a fl rein UVCffl with sliced 1 pint Milk 1 llJD 2 or. granulaU'd Sugar Vanilla. Put 5 uz~ of hugar in a dry melal mould over the fire to melt and become slighlly brown. remove and let it harden. Heat your •ifji then U ii*l your cold milk and a few Irops of vanilla When well mixed pour it Into the mould Put the mould in a saucepan with water, -ure that the water does not • rag -float In vow nrungl Cook In this *&y for I hr. Place in the Magsl Oil '• erv ">ld. then aU 1 IINASSIIHfS Choose from 12 dilTerenl .lylrs in Tea Roue, While and Black. Sim 32 lo 44. Price* from KKi. in -J % %  : %  %  AUT gtaTS With Klasin U.ii-i I %  Iriinined. White and Tea Sine II.SZ. ait* >•. %  ** I'A.VTIKS. VIS IS. Ml. II 1%  llll SSI S antl eVJAMAS ill fact everylhinx thai is LINGERIE. We have the liiMjesi noaortnienl of colours. Sixes nnd Si vies. i in Moiiinix DRESS SHOPPE BROAD STREET Wisdom ADDIS LTD. Of MISTFOHD. MAKIS* Of THI SSBflSJ TOOTHBRUSH IN rTSO The FINEST ^fMjflLD 1 rvrr b wUhowt aeml-O* fTniaS] •nenta "h. /...„* houMhoM rwip £ 'i"i-llml.o.il Ui* wurl>> in. psisari wiw-ion !" USMI SM %  •< IMS. Ii.nl.nins boS* Mtottfm. arul lleulany imiaoiiUn* i„ th. h.ih .ft.r aauusaa umamiv nwri win and .Una. an a UF. %  i l laji iaii t„ tii honnthcia BBssa, II ii.iiatn in* ho .4 all aaiirat. •nas, llna>tH> and nykmi SCRUBB'S. CLOUDY AMMONI'2-r t. B. ARMSTRONG 1.T11 Brlrtirloxn Barbadca. .W.l. Hole tiui-alf tor Uarbmdot, Leeu'ilrd and Wlnduiard l.Iand.. HIIMWI. . ONE-O-ONE 0 LBL 1 SMAW 110 II 'MM 0NB-O-0NB ci.l A.\M K. tbt CWfVBf In the Urue in no Drum when you bu) 1-4V1 rou "xx 2*5 zs. of tne WOTld'l Oltly BB. 1-#1 cleans without MI at* Inn a/hfjn you of In Cleanser just say 1-0*1. ObCainabU Irom all Crocenn, I>ruXRlsui and Hardware St nes. in hni iibumuhle everywhere. The refrigerating unit of the G.B.C refrigerator u co hnely made that it is hermcticaUy sealed after manufjctJix and never ncedi servicing. This rel'figeraior will stand up to any esireme of clirnaic — and it's lovely to look at, too I THE OTY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. BRIDGETOWN. BARBADOS s£rwc me CCNLKM a£crc co. tro. oc ENCUNO Women everywhera will And Ihol DKLAM ii a beauty soap bey or 4 comparison. Its faithful use in tha balh. shower and at the *ah I 1 mn will yield a new Skin Be.uty nrcausa Dreamn*<,ut y lather seeps deep down Into the pores flushing nut i perspiration adds that eaura abnornuil skin condiUons. Pity safe . ure DREAM fpastJ I and see for yourself the improvement it brings to your sk.n. • I'REAM Is available at your tavourita Toilet Goods counter. LONG UtSTINd RICH IEAUTT LAtHEtt FRAORANTLT PERFUMED f &f *"" \ L L^"^ FRAGRAHTLT PgRF TOILST SOAP



PAGE 1

Reds Abandon Hoengsong to U.N. TOKYO, Feb. 24. CHINESE BEDS abandoned strategic Hoeng song, former anchor of their Central Korean defence line, to pursuing United Nations forces today. Two tank and infantry patrols pushed into the bomb flattened city, ten miles north of Wonju, on the fourth day of the 8th Army's new "killer offensive" and found it empty. On." patrol duelled with Chinese rear guards north of Hoenjjioni; for three hours before returning to Allied lines south nf the City. But a second reported no Red contact according to an 8th Armv communique. oth.r United State* trsopi with I powerful tank, air and artillery I support smashed a Communlat ambuah -• 'inb east south-i Students Plan Big Strike Bv JAt K S< Hi-Mill I'ABIS. Feb. 24 French universities face the prospect of empty lecture room* MX>n. when the Government proposal for a cut in the subsidies BM the Students' Social Security conn.' before the National Assembly The students are going on IhC strike i> culled by the Nalion.il Students' Union which claniw 80.000 member* amonz France's 120.000 university %  ita. The Students' Social Security hailed u the -biggest social adn decade* Is a post war innovation in France. It is financed partly by the students but more Inrgcly by ir,. %  nl. The Government subsidy for 1851 was to b $1,470,000. Hut h-king around sometime ngo for n way to cut Uli tnd< tionally 1iKht French budget %  -. < tinQoMmnMDt i"" posed to reduce it to $1,400,000 Students let out %  howl nl pro v was th< new Government proposal to cu' the subsidy by half .mum t 1570.000. That did It. The National Students' Union— the only students' representative l>od\ in Frame—decided "In pnni|>le" to rail their general strike when the proposal comes up and out as long as the Assemblv has it under discussion. — nv.r. German Finuiioirr On Way T* Br' ? pAitia, .-, ^Fretwsi Sur.-te National ..peke.man said that Doctor H. In ai Schacht. one time financial wizard of NJ^I Germany had come to France on two weeks v. obtained on the statement thati he wa s en route to Brazil. Thc| spokesman *aid since his arrival | hero on Thursday night bOWVfer, the French police ascertained that Schuchi had made no application for a Brazilian visa, and had not booked a passage by any yhippinj; or airline for South %  %  The normal pasted of validity for a transit visa Is 15 days." In I m may allow ., utOa elasticity. But Ltaa Lit l>ecn instructed to watch his movement^ closely and if he overstays the period of his visa and nny legitimate extension of it he will be conducted back I to the German frontier. A check with lending South American consulate* here C0Bt BcJ adit had not yet applied for a visa. All shipping MS linking France with South America also said they had no booking for Schacht. Schacht left his hotel early this morning. |h % %  German Consulate ano l scheduled to dine with friend-at one <>f the French Capitals must expensive and exclusive Testaii' -BI.P. I 'of Hoeng'm: and seized the lmii uintaln crossroads town of Fangnim. Gains were reported all along the 60 miles front of the Hth Army's four-day-old central Korean Killer offensive" But Chinese and North Korean resistance was stiffening The Ratal alao moved up troops md tnnks to the Han River Itelow Seoul %  it the western front and attempted two more crossings to the Allied-held south bank United States artillery dispersed hnth crossings last night and probably knocked out two of five to ten Red tanks spotted on the north bank Warehouse Destroyed Far up the northeast coast the 45,000-ton United States battle %  Up Missouri turned 10-uuh gun: on supply points near Song} in 182 miles above the 38th parallel Shells destroyed a warehouse apparently containing ammunition Allied air fviees flew nearh" 500 sorties in support of advancing ground forces hitting targets just behind the front and for fc; the north Six railway bridges and one road bridge likewise w Is -tiiiyed ind une of each damaged. One hundred and nine flying boxcars dropped a record of 315 tons of ammunition, medical supplies and other vital equipment to unit* whose ground transport was s> On Page 13 I I I I HOI SI THE KEK81NQT0N PAVILION as hara seen was pucks*. Ught wits | OS the Tnmdsd Barbados match yesterday. of ths ftnoo peonl* who watchThree Killed In Moslem Clashes By HELEN FISHER BELGRADE. Feb. 24. At least three people have been killed during protest demonslraUons against the law allowing the unveiling of Moslem women in the Yugoslav republic of Macedonia Deall.! ix-ctirred in January In clashes with police who broke up village* protest meetings. The Communist Government and allied organizations have been an an active campaign of education and propaganda in all Moslem districts In connection with the new law Hundreds of Moslem women have been invited to enjov their new-found freedom in all-expenae-paid tours of Belgrade, the Uiilmatinn Coast and 0th** tourist centres lectures and courses have been organized for Moslems whose strict religion had barred them from schools, and large quantities of clothes have lieen distributed so they can replace their flowing robes with modern dm R B l>orts indicate that younger srOOsCT and especially young girls generallv welcomed the unveiling enthusiastically. The older genera'.ion. howwver, has responded with suspicion or downright rejection. —Bl'.P Trinidad Pin Down Local Batsmen BY O. S. COPPIN Negative bowling by the Trinidad trio, Jt.iu.-s. Asparali and Kins. yeMerdur pinned the Barbados star batsmen i some *f thr (hllleat cricke|thjt hus been witnessed at Kensington for some years. Trinidad scored 279 in reply u> Barbados' 363 and by close of ulav Barbados had scored 122 for 3. The wicket yesterday, the fourth day of play in the first I stiUflrro and with foar wickets I 106 runs behind Barbados' first Trinidad-Barbados Test in hand, Trinidad were si Innings total. o.\ mi; • SPOT For overcharging one cent on one pound two ounces of plantains, Sanchanah Lai, vendor, was fined S50 by Mr. Fabian J. Camacho. in the Port of Spain Police court. Defence Chiefs Support U.S. 3-Phase Defence Drive WASHINGTON, Feb. 24. Deience oflicials have put their shoulders behind a triple phase rearmament drive which they think will uarantee United Stales security in either a cold or a hoi war. The three objectives are: et the Immediate needs of Kirk wood Charges Under Investigation irr-wM Our Own CorrMpondciii %  KINGSTON. Jamaica. K< N Information on graft crarges which the Hun K. L. M. KirKwood laid in an address to some local politicians three weeks ago is now under Police investigation. following a transmissions' stalei' lit by Kukwood to Kingston's C.I.D. if charges which connected Kirk wood with the be** racket are proved, tho Attorney General will be called on it. in tutc Court proceedings against! people connected. Meantime Kirkwood has called for a speciil meeting of the Legislative Council on Friday to discuss beef distributions and racketeering. Acheson Takes Holiday WASHINGTON, Feb. 24. Secretary of State Dean Acheson and Mrs. Acheson left today aboard a Pan American Work Airways plane for a fortnight holiday in Bermuda.—Rcuter I'AIMM IIS Ku Huilii and maintain for an detlnite period a powerful 3.500.000-man military force. Get ready for an almost inttant shift to sll—out mobilization in case o( a W.itld W;ir. Nearly 500.000 combat and supporting forces have been committed to the Korc.m war. Thev included six army and one marine division and % %  disclosed number of smaller ground units, nearly 20 air groups and a strong naval fleet. Estimates of what the KOBWU war will cost for 12 months range from $3,000,000,000 to $5,000,000,000. Defence authorises consider that I 3.500.000-man armed force back:l by a large manpower pool of aiuepoeidfntr KINGSTON. Feb. 30 A Jamaican sales team is ta gbroad shortly to sell Canada am the United States industrial opportunities for Investment in Uiad Attempts to interest capital to vest In Jamaica have met with encouraging results. Government officials soy. and with the work of laying out the West Kingston industrial estate, development oAeers of the Government have been seeking to ensure that there will be no lime lag between the taping. down of roods, water supplies and iiower lines and the work of oclual factory building. "t is felt that if on the spot saledcnt> IOHT-OF-SPAIN. Feb. 21 For a change In the pivvalUai adverse weather conditions hamp. ig rice cultivation, food crop* of all. descriptions and Ihe roaplni of canes by farmers ami sugai estates, a prayer will be offered by Pundit Janki Persad Sharma Dharamacharya—of the San a Una Dharama Mahasabha of Tri;nd.d assisted by Mahant Jadgeo Sadhu and Bhai Chavlnath Sadar, at the Uslne Hindu Temple, Trinidad 6n Sunday. February 25, at 7 p m. lake scoring Norman Marshall and Carl Mullins curled up the Trinidad tail and 21 runs were added for Ihe other four wickets Defensive Field Jeffrey Stullmeyer pel I Wonderfull) defensive field and Prior Jonas and Asgorali for the moat part gave Ihe batsmen no balls off wblch they could strokes. Asgarali was consistently negative, bowling fast medium offbreaks just short of a batsman's forward stroke while Jones bowled inswingers ihat btgan on iha leg stump generally. He had a packed leg field ami but two man on the off-side of the wickef. Boos Tha crowd IHC.1 at tin cdlsd for action hut the Barbados %  stamen found no real answer to the problem of pushing on the .%  core. Even giant Clyde Walcott took two hours and nine minutes over his half century, which proved lo !>c the l>est score of the day Ha however took an hour off his first eight ram With a first Innings It Barbados are now 206 rUM ahc.l and should the tvirkel start crumbling on Mom:..Barbados should be In a fai for forcing %  win, Four Fall For 21 it took the Bat llaity-llnr. | the Tlinldai remaining four wickets added 2\ runs. Guillen d %  *< stubbornly but only succeeded in adding two urns to hi' ovarnight 10. His dismissal was tha Itsult of a great one-ha if I" I effort bv Mulling nt Irst slip. He nibbled at one from Norman Mai ..hail ih.,i MOl #> On Page 5 s.o.s. See Page JO 'Only One Thing Will Stop World War IIP J'ca Has Surplus iFItMn Our Own CurrnpondrM < KINGSTON. Feb. 21 Jamaica will complete the 185051 financial year's operations with a surplus instead of tha deflnbudgeted for at the commencement of the year. When the estimates were settled there was an estimated deficit o' tl35,000; and while there has bee, "airly heavy expenditure by wa^ of supplementary estimates then has been a substantial increase In the collection of Import and tftcis) uutles and income tax, while larrj money-spending departments havt d-.own savings with the result thai the estimated deficit has been converted into a surplus. AntiKed Rebellion Inereaseg In China HOKG KO\. i The Communist BUtha Canton implementing; a D< penalty for "counter revohmti ary activities" shot Bvt secret agents on Friday, according to the leftist Takungpao. Other Canton report:: said that a warehouse containing a large quantity of gaSOuM exploded and bumed Wednesday, but there wai no indication th-t the two in rtdents were connecte<|. Tho incidents highlighted thi anti-Rerl rebtlllon that wai China-wide and which caused the Rtds lo promulgate doerss The five were reportedly found guilty of "organizing reactionary armed espionage and assassination, the reports said. A Swatow report said that the Reds had arrest "reactionaries" who had l>ccii pu' In a concentration camp. — Ill I' Police Patrol Strike Bound St. George's %  rtnni Our Own CanMpondvni > QKHIOaTS, Grenada, Feb 24 A party of 26 arrived from Trinidad this morning to assist tho local St. Lucia Police, but the day in the capital was tha moat normal of the week *nve fur the Manual and Mental Woikcn vassal van In the ssJtaat day advising strike participants to desist from violence because ol orders to naval police forces ID lake strong action. I the lessened tension, new vandalism came with the destruction of the former Grand Hoy Government school now used ,i i. -ni.-i. c not so i..' assj fused with the nearby extensive Dsftv Colonial Development and Welfare bttUdtasE. on tho west coast where the storm damage i* now conservatively estimated to be $50,000, fforts t clearance of parts of the blockade preventing vehicular Nik, u.ie defeated by 00) of a new road block some places where Ihe phone lines were cut. Theft of estate produce has hit proprietors hard and there has been forecast a heavy slump duty. Busmen f„r Ihe week was dull. Some hoses were able to bring in Ud coals needed in the %  apital; they were stopped on ertam roads and their cargoes ilche.1. while several people reluctantly patronised the well known suburban woman butcher, one time tender of | women's at On Page II Missing Crew Sighted In Boat TOKYO, Feb. 24. I'lii Fa i Ka-1 All four :aid tm.t some or the 12 missing tfevonsti of the Norwegian cargo ship L Florentine which sank m a %  torn on Tuesday have bean sighted aa a HfeboNt by a United States plane. It said Ihat the lifeboat was sighted about 275 miles southwest of Iwd Jims. A radio report said that the rrewmembers could be seen ducking about boat Saanbar of men in the Dsjll not ba dctcnnine,! but II was reported that 12 crew members got Into the boat wliei: the Florentine went down 150 1< southwest of |wo Jima. 1 an the only members of the crew still missing. Already 20 crew member.; .eel e skipper have lieen rescued by United States planes based a; tha Anderson Airfare* Base on Guam. and Ihe British ship Wfes> nuple — II il F. I More Italian Itedh' Leave Party R'anktf ROME, Feb. 24. The breakaway of four more Italian Communist leader' brought the number of Titolsts to the 700 mark A Mantua Commist Federation cmmuuiqii" I that Giovanni Boiievintl. Hit mer Mantua, Chamber of I.o%  Baejejtary, Andrea Bertaz i! the dlrectar of one of Man I'S cooperatives. Ca'smlrc /..men.., un mlluenliiil piovinciil CommunJal were expelled (or Incompatible behaviour". All were old guard Communist*, and Zancllu having relad '' llussia during Mussolini'' regime. The Milan attorney Pin' Itellone the President of the Municipal Electric Company was rxpelled for attending i of the moderate Socialists Unconfirmed reports aaid thai lha tlrst Italian Anti-Moscow party meeting will be held near Milan shortly.—B,U.r. WASHINGTON, Feb 24 GOVERNOR DEWEY called on Congress to speed more United States troops to Europe "aa the only course on earth that will save us from World War III, and the total destruction of our civilisation." He warned two Senate Committees that to withhold American divisions from General Eisenhower's Atlantic Pact army would "paralyze" the capacity of this and other free nations to defend themselves. He said "it would certainly invite im perialist Communism to move into the vacuum we thus created." I Vw.'v. titular head ol ti" 1 ElwpiiisUoan party and twice nominee fur President, stepped into the middle of a roaring foreign policy debate with a flat indorsement of administration plans to send 100.000 more American troops to Europe to bolster western defences against Communism, That placed him squarely at odds with former President Herbert Hoover. Senator Robert Taft and some other Republican leaders. B.G. Must Spend Less GEORGETOWN, B.O, Feb. 24. Seeing the need foi ,i fiuhstaiilial saving in Government expenditure), the Oeorfetewn Chamber of Commerce I'M II.I Henry George Seaford. O.B.E In lus address at the annual nioctIng of the Chamber urged a strong committee lo !• ippotntM to probe the efflriencs in \ iGovemment Uepuitmeiits to reduce colonial expenditure to i figure more wilhin the DOsQOyl resources. Giving his address two m.xiili after British Guiana's Financial Secretary and Treasurer. Edwin F. MeUavid in his budget state nt told the Issglllalilie thai s count cy needed a me pn'hensive. economic Iiciinpment programme, bul did DO) hSffl th.' lesourrc. now nor In Ihr for es eeable future, Seeford staled that "business houses cannot bui be greatly concerned over the general tlnandal position of the olony. .—4CH Violate Spirit Of W ug-s ScttJrmml LONDON, Feb 24. B.-iUiin's nationallsetl railway pxecutive tonight accused railway men of carrying out i airues and of not acting in jiceord anee with ih. spirit of v. MMleiueiii of the wages dispute %  inder which men will receive age increases costing CI2,000.(HHI The executive in an onici.il .tatement told strikers that 11 ""y persisted In their action, it would he compelled lo call u meeting with the unions to consider the situation "which has arisen from this breach of the settlemi i '" This onVial warning eaaaa ai over 2,000 men delicti the union'. appeaU to end their token week %  nil stoppage! which played huvix vith rail services all over the vestvrn n-glon svstem of British raUways—.u P. JAPAN IMPORTERS GET $13,000,000 WASHINGTON, Feb. 24. A total of SI3.OOB.0O0 will l-e %  THi III porter fm purchase of oo.ooo tons of sugar from Culm and the United *' d' 1 I'd" % %  Mi.[nteriirtUonal Trade and Industry Muiintry. The Ministry also disclosed that an allocation of Sl.70O.O0O will he traders for Import of ran products, drill rtisT %  and electrodes Front thr %  ;.. Sweden and West BIT U.S. HAVE NOT ASKED SULTANS PERMISSION TANGIER. Feb 24^ I list I. %  ..fie i FOR BASES IN MOROCCO f*T.VD? WAI t i It • %  a Lgfaunt COTT (1-fti and Skipper John Goddard a* tbsy wsot ut t*s yesterday. They wars partners In an unbroken -und of 05 wbtn plsy ebu; foi the day. It wai The Moroccan National... All*] Fast said that the Sultan of Morocco had not been umaUft j ,,ud the Western powers. Fast thai he believed the possibility of cd on the establishment of United Mlf i %hey would fight aJOsJgalde e settlement with Frsnce still wi!? %  i r ba cs ,n t" 1 •"eiidi those who supported their Inde exists but not with the French HOrUi African protectorate. pendence and human rights, and High Commissioner. But sajd Uuit a Morocco, ndethat they condemned Communism Alphonsa Juln whose "highhynded pendent of French rule would be as contrary to the principle* of action* have -.tirred up deep to undertake Atlantic Pact islam, antagonism and forced Francooblit^tions Fasl said that the Sultan and Moroccan relations |nl Fas; told the press that Moroccan his people were demanding their present acute crisis" people would seek United States Independence, the abolition of Ihe Juln b expected to relinquish hU Unlu i Nations mediation if all French protectorate, and the Moroccan post soon t" UsW up hope were lost for agreement with establishment of elected legiMnthe deputy command under Gen* n £*'i L tive assemblies to be followed by ei Asked if the NaUonalisu supa treaty with France. He said Fasi said that Tangier 0t the Sultan's kingdom where such conference could still IM> held II-* claimed that in tther parts of Morocco it would be banned by Juin. that since last October 30,000 Moroccans had been imprisoned for expressing He charged tribal chiefs had rnoned by French authorHies, and tricked" into affixing %  gSsrpnnta to documents > %  Liter published ae evidence of the Moroccan public t'lpport for Juin'j latest measures. — %  UP. .ippe.ii.ti ii' lief ore Congress he warned. "Wi an being warred against" already and an uloul eorallel can ba avoided only by building up Strength—and fast He said. "We are not maintain |n| or reinforcing our troops in Europe as a matter Of trace or of snartta Wa .ire doing so aa a matter of hard necessity for our i*n selfprcservatlon." Dewey said the United Statci Mir "Iswacap^budull ti> build up an "overwhelming force to prevent war instead A Inviting it He warned that to do otherwise would be "mmple direct notice to Stalin" that the United States docs not intend to hack up its fighting men already in Europe and "they and EurPpo are his for the asking." "I am supporting this course because it is the only course on earth ihat will save us from n world War .md the total destruction of our rivilliatlon Dewey said the issue had nar rm.-.i down to J little of Isolationism. "But this is a powerful BM hold 11 represents the last gasp of an effort which speaks for the school of thought whlrh basically would like to withdraw from all the world to our own shores." Taft will have the opportunity to answer Dewey on Monday in testimony before the same committees Foreign Ttchittons and Armed Service Taft was iwt present .is Dewey began his testimony.—n\r P U.S. Chiefs And Chinese Nationalists End Talks TAII'EH. Formosa. Feb 24 United State* military and Chinese Nationalist officials endlo day on what kind of Chinese Communist attacks, would bring the United Stales ships and planes to ForIT"" defence The meetings were reported to luive broken up without a cleai cut answer tn the question —BU.P TELL THE ADVOCATE THE NEW* RING Sill DAY OR NIGHT RALEIGH THE ALL-STSE L BIC VC L B ALWAYS AT YQUR SERVICE A varily of models constantly in slock and ready assembled (or you to choose (rom


= peeganinmeanennenniee

:
i



omen ere



ESTABLISHED 1895





Reds Abandon
Hoengsong to U.N.

TOKYO, Feb. 24.

(CHINESE REDS abandoned strategic Hoeng-

song, former anchor of their Central Korean
defence line, to pursuing United Nations forces
today. Two tank and infantry patrols pushed into
the bomb-flattened city, ten miles north of Wonju,
on the fourth day of the 8th Army’s new “killer

offensive’’ and found it empty.

One patrol duelled with Chinese rear guards north of
Hoengsong for three hours before returning to Allied lines
south of the City. But a second reported no Red contact
according ‘to an 8th Army communique.

Stndents Plan
Big Strike

PARIS, Feb. 24.
French universities face the
prospect of empty lecture rooms
soon, when the Government pro-
posal for a cut in the subsidies for
the Students’ Social Security come

before the National Assembly.
The students are going on @

strike. The strike is called by
the National Students’ Union
which claims 80,000 members

among France’s 120,000 university
students,

The Students’ Social Security
hailed as the “biggest social ad-
vance” in decades is a post war
innovation in France.

It is financed partly by the stu-
dents but more largely by thc
Government, The Government stb-
sidy for 1951 was to have been
$1,470,000,

But looking around sometime
ago for a way to cut the tradi-
tionally tight French budget
expenses the Government pro-
posed to reduce it to $1,400,000.

Students let out a howl of pro-
test. But the last straw was the
new Government proposal to cu!
the subsidy by half again t:
$570,000, That did it.

The National Students’ Union—
the only students’ representative
body in France—decided “in prin-
ciple’ to call their general strike
when the proposal comes up and
carry it out as long as the Assem-
bly has it under discussion.

—B.U.P.





German Financier

On Way To Bre ?
PARTS 1 =.

Freneh Surete National gs ae
man said that Doctor »H,“imar

Schacht, one time financial wizard
of Nazi Germany had come to
France on two weeks transit visa
obtained on the statement that
he wag en route to Brazil. The
spokesman said since his arrival
here on Thursday night however,
the French police ascertained
that Schacht had made no appli-
cation for a Brazilian visa, and
had not booked a passage by any
shipping or airline for South
America,

“The normal period of validity
for a transit visa is 15 days.” In
Doetor Schacht’s case we may al-
low a little elasticity. But the
Surete has been instructed to
watch his movements closely and
if he overstays the period of his
visa and any legitimate extension
of it he will be conducted back
to the German frontier,

A check with leading South
American consulates here con-
firmed that Schacht had not yet
applied for a visa. All shipping
and airlines linking France with
South America also said they had
no booking for Schacht, Schacht
left his hotel early this morning,
visited the German Consulate and
is scheduled to dine with friends
at one of the French Capital's
most expensive and exclusive
restaurants,



|



Other United States troops with
powerful tank, air and artillery
support smashed a Communist
ambush 25 miles east south-east
of Hoengsong and seized the im-
pertant mountain crossroads town
of Pangnim.

Gains were reported all along
the 60 miles front of the 8th

Army’s four—day-old central
Korean “killer offensive’ But
Chinese and North Korean re-

sistance was stiffening.

The Reds also moved up troops
and tanks to the Han River below
Seoul ion the western front and
attempted two more crossings to
the Allied-held south bank. United
States artillery dispersed loth
crossings last night and probably
knocked out two of five to ten
Red tanks spotted on the north
bank

Warehouse Destroyed

Far up the northeast coast the
45,000-ton United States battle-
ship Missouri turned 16-inch guns
on supply points near Songjin 182
miles above the 38th parallel.
Shells destroyed a warehouse ap-
parently containing ammunition.

Allied air forces flew nearly
500 sorties in support of advan-
eing ground forces hitting targets

j just behind -the front and far t2

the north.

Six railway bridges and one
roaad bridge likewise were de-
stroyed and one of each damaged.
One hundred and nine flying box-
cars dropped a record of 315 tons
of ammunition, medical supplies
and other vital equipment to units
whose ground transport was

@ On Page 13

THE KENSINGTON PAVILION



BARBADOS, FEBh'JARY 25,




ULL HOUSE ;

as here seen was packed tight with

ed the Trinidad-Barbados match yesterday. i



Three Killed
In Moslem Clashes

By HELEN FISHER
BELGRADE, Feb. 24.

At least three people have been
killed during protest demonstra-
tions against the law allowing the
unveiling of Moslem women in
the Yugoslav republic .of Mace-
donia. Deaths occurred in Janu-
ary in clashes with police who
broke up village protest meetings.

The Communist Government
and allied organizations have been
carrying on an active campaign
of education and propaganda in all
Moslem districts in connection
with the new law. Hundreds of
Moslem women have been invited
to enjoy their new-found freedom
in all-expense-paid tours of Bel-—
grade, the Dalmation Coast and
other tourist centres.

Lectures and courses have been
organized for Moslems whose
strict religion had barred them
from schools, and large quantities
of clothes have been distributed
so they can replace their flowing
robes with modern dresses. Re-
ports indicate that younger women
and especially young girls gen-
erally welcomed the unveiling en-
thusiastically. The older genera-
tion, however, has responded with
suspicion or downright rejection.

—B.U.P.



Defence Chiefs Support
U.S. 3-Phase Defence Drive

WASHINGTON, Feb. 24.

Defence officials have put their shoulders behind a triple
phase rearmament drive which they think will guarantee
United States security in either a cold or a hot war.

The three objectives are:

Kirkwood Charges
Under Investigation

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb. 24.

Information on graft crarges
which the Hon R, L. M. Kirk-
wood laid in an address to some
local politicians three weeks ago
is now under Police investigation.
following a transmissions’ state-
ment by Kirkwood to Kingston’s
C.1.D.

If charges which connected
Kirkwood with the be@f racket
eering are proved, the Attorney
General will be called on to insti-
tute Court proceedings against
people connected, Meantime
Kirkwood has called for a special
meeting of the Legislative Coun-
cil on Friday to discuss beef
distributions and racketeering.

Acheson Takes Holiday
WASHINGTON, Feb. 24.
Secretary of State Dean Acheson
and Mrs. Acheson left today
aboard a Pan American Worlc
Airways plane for a fortnight’





—B.U.P, [holiday in Bermuda.—Reuter.



PARTNERS



CLYDE WALCOTT (Jeft) and Skipper John Goddard as they went
out to bat after tea yesterday. They were partners in an unbroken

fourth-wicket
a fighting innings.

stand of 65 when play endva for

the day. It was






























1. Meet the immediate needs of
the Korean war.

2. Build and maintain for an
indefinite period a powerful
3,500,000-man military force.

3. Get ready for an almost in-
stant shift to all-out mobilization
in case of a World War. Nearly
500,000 combat and supporting
forces have been committed to the
Korean war. They included six
army and one marine division and
an undisclosed number of smaller
ground units, nearly 20 air groups
and a strong naval fleet,

Estimates of what the Korean
war will cost for 12 months range
from $3,000,000,000 to $5,000,000,-
000.

Defence authorities consider that
a 3,500,000-man armed force back-
ed by a large manpower pool of
trained reserves as the minimum
needed to safeguard the nation’s
security under present world con-
ditions.

If the world situation worsened,
the United States military pro-
gramme will have been acceler-
ated in proportion.

“Long Range Defence

Long range defence planners
attach as much importance if not
more to the nation’s industrial ca-
pacity “to turn out tanks, planes,
guns and other war items in great
numbers, far in excess of present
needs, Accordingly, war plants
are being geared with stand-by
production capacity.

For instance, the annual produc-
tion capacity of planes is being ex-
panded to 50,000 and of tanks to
35,000—twice the current needs.

Under the present plans, the
United States in a year or two will
have a 24 division army, a 500
warship. navy, two and © half
ground divisions of marines and a
95 group airforce.

>

arn

These strengths are about
double those of pre-Korean days
and roughly one-third to one-half
those at the end of World War II.
A sizeable part of these will be
stationed outside the United States
in Alaska, Japan (after the Korean
war is ended), the Middle East,
Britain, Germany. and elsewhere
in Europe. Military forces in
Alaska are being reinforced with
emphasis on air defences.

General Omar N. Bradley,
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs ‘of
Staff emphasised the long range
aspects of the rearmament pro-
gramme. He said: “Stronger and
more permanent solution of our
defence problem is imperative





P.

TANGIER, Feb., 2

The Moroccan Nationalist leatier
Allal Fasi said that the Sultan
of Morocco had not been consult-
ed on the establishment of United
States air bases in this French
North African protectorate.

But said that a Morocco, inde-
pendent of French rule would be
ready to undertake Atlantic Pact
obligations

Fasi told the press that Moroccan
people would seek United States
or United Nations mediation if all
hope were lost for agreement with
France

Asked if the Nationalist



sup-

Trinidad Pin Down

Batsmen

Loe



BY O.5S.



1951

|

of the 6,000 people who watch-

COPPIN

Negative bowling by the Trinidad trio, Jones, Asgarali and

King, yeste’
some of the dti
sington for some years.

inned the Barbados star batsmen down to
eri that has been witnessed at Ken-
inidad scored 279 in reply to| blockade



PRICE: SIX CENTS



‘Only One Thing Will

Stop World

. Police Patrol
Strike Bound
St. George’s

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, Grenada, Feb 24.

A party of 26 arriveqd from
Trinidad this morning to assist
the local St. Lucia Police, but the
day in the capital was the most
normal of the week save for the
Manual and Mental Workers
Union van in the streets at mid-
day advising strike participants to
desist from violence because of
orders to naval police forces to
take strong action,

Despite the lessened tension,
new vandalism came with the
destruction of the former Grand
Roy Government school now used
as a residence—not to be con-
fused with the nearby extensive
new Colonial Development and
Welfare building,

On the west coast where the
storm damage is now conserva-
tively estimated to be $50,000,
efforts at clearance of parts of the
preventing vehicular

Barbados’ 863 and by close of play Barbados had scored 122] trattic all week, were defeated by

for 3.

‘The wicket yesterday, the fourth day of play in the first

Trinidad-Barbados Test
in hand, Trinidad were stilt 1
innings total. as
E*

ON THE
* SPOT

For overcharging one cent
on one pound two ounces off
plantains, Sanchariah Lal,’
vendor, was fined $50 by
Mr. Fabian J. Camacho, in
the Port - of - Spain Police
court. «



Jamaica Woos
U.S., Canadian
Capital

(From Our Own Correspondenty

KINGSTON, Feb, 20.

A Jamaican sales team is to gc

abroad shortly to sell Canada anc
the United States industrial op-
portunities for investment in the
island.
_ Attempts to interest capital to
invest in Jamaica have met with
encouraging results, Government
officials say, and with the work of
laying out the West Kingston in-
dustrial estate, development offi-
cers of the Government have been
seeking to ensure that there will
be no time lag between the laying
down of roads, water supplies and
power lines and the work of actual
factory building.

It is felt that if on the spot sales-
manship follows the representa-
tions made to U.S. and Canadian
capital so far, a number of big in-
terests keen on overseas oppor-
tunities will come to Jamaica; and
the Government proposes to sera
away a two-man sales team on 4
tour of places already marked
down as favourable to the idea of
investing in Jamaican industries.



Prays Against Rain
(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 21
For a change in the prevailing
adverse weather conditions hamp-
ering rice cultivation, food crops
of all.descriptions and the reaping
of canes by farmers and suga
estates, a prayer will be offered
by Pundit Janki Persad Shaftma
Dharamacharya—of the Sanatana
Dharama Mahasabha of Trinidad
assisted by Mahant Jadgeo Sadhu
and Bhai Chavinath Sadar, at the
Usine Hindu Temple, Trinidad on

Sunday, February 26, at 7 p.m.

acinar een meeps eer areca gee teat cern Diane a



Jca Has Surplus

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Feb. 21.

Jamaica will complete the 1950-
51 financial year’s operations with
a surplus instead of the deficit
budgeted for at the commence-
ment of the year.

When the estimates were settled
there was an estimated deficit of
£135,000; and while there has been
fairly heavy expenditure by way,
of supplementary estimates there
has been a substantial increase in
the collection of import and excise
Guties and: income tax, while large
money-spending departments havc
shown savings with the result that
the estimated deficit has been ‘con-
verted into a surplus,

as still firm and with four wickets

05 runs behind Barbados’ first
oe

Norman Marshall and Carl Mul-
lins curled up the Trinidad” tail
and 21 runs were added for the
other four wickets.

Defensive Field

Jeffrey Stollmeyer set a won-
derfully defensive field and Prior
Jones and Asgarali for the most
part gave the batsmen no balls off
which they could make scoring
strokes.

Asgarali was consistently nega-
tive, bowling fast medium off-
breaks just short of a batsman’s
forward stroke while Jones bowl-
ed inswingers that began on the
leg stump generally. He had a
packetl leg fleld and but two men
on the off-side of the wicket.

Boos

The crowd booed, at times and

called for action but the Barbados

~@tsmen found no real answer to
the problem of pushing on the
score.

Even giant Clyde Walcott took
two hours and nine minutes over
his half century, which proved to
be the best score of the day. He
however took an hour off his first
eight runs.

With a first Innings lead of 84,
Barbados are now 296 runs ahead
and should the wicket start crum-
bling on Monday Barbados should
be in a good position for forcing
a win,

Four Fall For 21

It took the Barbados bowlers
thirty-three minutes to. dispose of
the Trinidad tail and the remain-
ing four wickets added 21 runs.

Guillen defended stubbornly
but only succeeded in adding two
runs to his overnight 10. Hig
dismissal was the result of a great
one-handed effort by Mullins at
first slip. He nibbled at one from
Norman Marshall that went

@ On Page 5

5.0.8.

See Page 10



|



Anti-Red Rebellion

Increases In Chiria

HONG KONG, Feb. 24
The Communist authorities at}

the creation of a new road block
some places where the phone lines
were cut, Theft of estate produce
has hit proprietors hard and there
has been forecast a heavy slump
in export duty.

Business for the week was dull,
Some buses were able to bring in
provision and coals needed in the
capital; they were stopped on
certain roads and their cargoes
filehed, while several people re-
luctantly patronised the well
known suburban woman butcher,
one time leader of a women's

@ On Page 14



Missing Crew
Sighted In Boat

TOKYO, Feb. 24.
The Far East Airforce saiq tat
some of the 12 missing crewmen
of the Norwegian cargo

storm on Tuesday have been
sighted in a lifeboat by a United
States plane, It said that the life~
boat was sighted about 275 miles
southwest of Iw@ Jima, A radio
report said that the crewmem-—
bers could be seen ducking about
in the boat,

The number of men in the
lifeboat could not be determined
but it was reported that 12 crew
members got into the boat wher
the Florentine went down 150
mfles southwest of Iwo Jima,
Those 12 are the only members
of the erew still missing.

Already 20 crew members and
the skipper have been rescued by
United States planes based az the
Anderson Airforce Base on Guam,
and the British ship Silver-
maple.—B.U.P,

4 More Italian Reds
Leave Party Ranks

ROME, Feb, 24.



The breakaway of four more
Italian Communist leaders
brought the number of ‘Titoists

to the 700 mark. A Mantua Com-
munist Federation communique
said that Giovanni Bonevinti, the
former Mantua, Chamber of La-
bour Secretary, Andrea Bertaz-
zoni, the director of one of Man-
tua’s co-operatives, Casmiro
Zanella, an influential provincial
Communist were expelled for
“incompatible behaviour’,

All were old guard Communists,
jonevinti, and Zanella having re-
sided in Russia during Mussolini's
regime, The Milan attorney Pine
Bellone, the’ President of the
Municipal Electric Company was

Canton implementing a new death [¢*Pelled for attending a meeting

penalty for “counter revoluntion
ary activities” shot five alleged
secret agents on Friday, accord-
ing to the leftist Takungpao.
Other Canton reports said that
@ warehouse containing a large
quantity of gasoline exploded and
burned Wednesday, but there was

no. indication - thatthe two in
cidents were connected, The

ineidents highlighted ‘the growing
anti-Red rebellion that was
China-wide and which caused the
Reds to promulgate the new
decree The five were reported-
ly found guilty of “organizing
reactionary armed units”,
espionage and assassination, thé
reports, said.

A Swatow ‘report said that the
Reds had arrested over 200
“reactionaries” who had been put
in a concentration camp.

—B.U.P



FOR BASES IN MOROCCG

ported the Western powers, Fasil
said they would fight alongside
those who supported their inde-
pendence and human rights, and
that they condemned Communism
as contrary to the principles of
Islam. ,
Fasi said that the Sultan and
his people were demanding their
independence, the abolition of the
French protectorate, and the
establishment of elected legisla-
tive assemblies to be followed by
a treaty with France, He said

that he believed the possibility of

2 settlement with France still
exists but not with the French
High Commissioner, General

Alphonse Juin whose “highhanded

actions have stirred up deep
antagonism and forced Franco
Morocean relations into their
present acute crisis”

Juin is expected to relinquish his
Morocean post soon to take up
the deputy command under Gen

eral Eisenhower
Fasi said that Ta

of the moderate Socialists.

Unconfirmed reports said that
the first Italian Anti-Moscow
party meeting will be held near
Milan shortly.—B.U.P.



JAPAN IMPORTERS
GET $13,000,000

WASHINGTON, Feb, 24,

A total of $13,000,000 will be
allocated to Japanese importers
for purchase of 90,000 .tons of
sugar from Cuba and the United
States, aceording to the Interna-
tional Trade and Industry Minis-
try.

The Ministry, also disclosed that
an allocation of $1,700,000 will be
made to traders for import of
steel and iron products, drill steel,
sheet pile and electrodes from the
\nited States. Sweden and West
Germany.—BUP



U.S. HAVE NOT ASKED SULTAN’S PERMISSION

only part of the Sultan’s kingdom
where such conference could still
be held He claimed that in
other parts of Morocco it would be
banned by Juin.
He claimed
October 30,000
been imprisoned
nationalist views He charged
that “illiterate” tribal chiefs had
been summoned by French author-
ities, and “tricked” into affixing
their fingerprints to documents
which were later published as
evidence of the
pport for Juin’

that since last
Moroccans had
for expressing

latest measures.

—BUP.

ship
S. S. Florentine which sank in a

Moroccan bures. |

War HIT’ —

WASHINGTON, Feb. 24.

GOVERNOR DEWEY called on Congress to

speed more United States troops to Europe
“as the only course on earth that will save us from
World War III, and the total destruction of our

civilisation.”

He warned two Senate Committees that to with-
hold American divisions from General Eisenhow-

er’s Atl
capacit
themselves. He said “it

ic Pact army would “paralyze’’ the
of this and other free nations to defend

would certainly invite im-

perialist Communism to move into the vacium we

thus created.’’

“Dewey, titular head of the Republican party and twice
nominee for President, stepped into the middle of a roaring
foreign policy debate with a flat indorsement of administra-
tion plans to send 100,000 more American troops to Europe

to bolster western defences against Communism.

That

placed him squarely at odds with former President Her-

bert Hoover, Senator Robert
can leaders,

BG. Must |

Spend Less |

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 24,

Seeing the need for a substan-
tial saving in Government
expenditure, the Georgetown
Chamber of Commerce President,
Henry George Seaford, O.B.E.,
in his address at the annual meet-
ing of the Chamber urged a
strong committee to be appointed
to probe the efficiency in var-ous
Government Departments to re-
duce colonial expenditure to a
figure more within the colony's
resources . ‘

Giving his address two months
after British Guiana’s Financial
Secretary and Treasurer, Edwin
F. McDavid in his budget state-
ment told the Legislature that
this country needed a more com-
prehensive, economic Develop-
ment programme, but did not
have the resources now nor in the
foreseeable future, Seaford stated
that “business houses cannot but
be greatly concerned over the
general financial position of the
colony. —(CP)



Violate Spirit Of
Wages Settlement

LONDON, Feb, 24,

Britain’s nationalised railway
executive tonight accused railway
men of carrying out week-end
strikes and of not acting in accord.
ance with the spirit of yesterday’:
settlement of the wages dispute,
under which men will receive
wage increases costing £12,000,000,

The executive in an official
statement told strikers that if
they persisted in their action, it
would be compelled to call a meet-
ing with the unions to consider

the situation “which has arisen
from this breach of the settle.
ment”,

This official warning came as
over 2,000 men defied the union’:
appeals to end their token week-
end stoppages which played havoc
with rail services ‘all over the
western region system of British
railways.—B.U.P,

Taft and some other Republi-

In his first appearance before
Congress he warned, “we are
being warred against” already and
an allout conflict can be avoided
only by building up western
strength—and ‘fast.

He ‘said: “We are not maintain-
ing or reinforcing our troops in
Europe as a matter of grace or of
charity. We are doing so as a
matter of hard necessity for our
own. selfpreservation,”

Dewey said the. United States
must face the “iheseapable duty”
to build up an “overwhelming
force to prevent war instead :f
inviting it.’ He warned that to
do otherwise would be “simple
direct notice to Stalin’ that the
United States does not intend to
back up its fighting men already
in Europe and “they and Eurtpe
are his for the asking.”

“I am supporting this course
because it is the only course on
earth that will save us from a
world war and the total destruc—
tion of our civilization,

Dewey said the issue had nar-—
rowed down to a little toe-hold
of isolationism. “But this. is a
powerful toe-hold. It represents
the last gasp of an effort which
speaks for the school of thought
which basically would like to
withdraw from all the world to
our own shores,”

Taft will have the opportunity
to answer Dewey on Monday in
testimony before the same com—
mittees — Foreign Relations and
Armed Service. Taft was not
present as Dewey began his testi-
mony,—B,U.P

U.S. Chiefs And Chinese
Nationalists End Talks

TAIPEH, Formosa, Feb, 24.

United States military and
Chinese Nationalist officials end-
ed conferences to-day on what
kind of Chinese Communist at-
tacks, would bring the United
States ships and planes to For-
mosa’s defence.

The meetings were reported to
have broken up without a clear-
cut answer to the question.

—B.U.P.

——_$—$—$ +}. —$
TELL THE ADVOCATE

THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT





THE ere ey

«

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE

A variety of models constantly in stock
and ready assembled for you to
choose from






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display at

& Co., Ltd.

10 - 13 Broad Street
Sole Distributors

CAVE SHEPHERD





|
|
PAGE TWO





XQTATIC CLUB CINEMA. (Members Only)





TO-NIGHT at
amael Goldwyn Presents |
DANA ANDREWS SUSAN HAYWARD |
IN “MY FOOLISH HEART”





MONDAY & TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.50
MATINER TUESDAY at 5 pm
James Hilton's

“SO WELL REMEMBERED”
Starring JOHN MILLS—MARTHA SCOTT—PATRICIA
Byr the brilliant author of “Lost Horkon Random

“Goodbye Mr. Chips”

ROC
Harvest”

ool
SSO
_ GLOBE THEATRE

e
Presents The Voice of MARIA LANZO
N



THE TOAST OF NEW ORLEANS
— WITH —
Kathryn GRAYSON and David NIVEN
TO-NITE 8.30 — MON. & TUES. 5.00 & 8.30 P.M.



°
TALENT AUDITION
All Are Invited

LOCAL
=

THIS MORNING
9.30 A.M.

a
EMPIRE THEATRE
Opening Friday 2nd March



‘Farewell To

Yesterday’ |
..
Living History

Of Our Time

‘THE VICTORS’







SUNDAY









TO-NITE GLOBE THEATRE TO-NITE

First with the SPORTS. NEWS
FLASH! FLASH!
See SUGAR RAY ROBINSON the Dynamic Boxer of
And the WEST INDIES TEAM in action
See EVERTON KEEKES Stroke Playing
TONITE and over the Weekend.

the year





PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TODAY 145 and 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily

inx.o.ravio) TARZAN AND THE SLAVE GIRL

wit Lex BARKER—Vanessa BROWN--Benise DARCEL & Others — Also

Pe Chim YOU CAN BEAT THE A-BOMB:

a ‘Produced by EMERSON Fim CO “ne GnvStis Paaoucions ware?

Oistributed by AAO RADIO PICTURES, ne



paienaeisise
WATCH IT
“FANCY PANTS”

YOUR HIT IS... (PARAMOUNT)
(Technicolor) Mr. Robert Hope (the former Bob)







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PLAZA Theatre=sO/STIN (DIAL 8404)

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p.m. (Warner's Action)

ERROL FLYNN IN MONTANA resins

“MONDAY & TUESDAY 5 and 6.30 p.m.
Humphrey Bogart & Raymond

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NORTH ATLANTIC

‘GABETY—( ue cz GARDEN) ST. JAMES ¥

LAST 2 SHIOWS TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p.m
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LAST SHOW TONIGHT MONDAY —TUESDAY

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— and —
SOUTH OF DEATH VALLEY

Action Packed Double by Columbia
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WHIRLWIND RAIDERS
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EMPIRE |

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30

Monday and Tuesday
4.45 and 8.30

United Artists’ Pictures

ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.30

Universal Big Double .
Douglas FAIRBANKS in

“EXILE”

AND

“WOLFMAN”

with Lon CHANEY

Presents...

“IF THIS BE SIN”

— Starring —

Myrna LOY — Roger
LIVESEY with
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OLYMPIC

LAST TWO SHOWS
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20th Century For Double—

Tyenoe J nee and Cecjle
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4.30 and 8.30
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History repeats itself on the screen of the EMPIRE THEATRE |!
beginning Friday, 2nd March together with “THE MAGNETIC

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| CHRISTIAN SYMBOL
‘THE PAST.

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DOROTHY S sILVERSTON NE

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Is
‘

aie Sera at the Marine Hotel.

*Then They Were None’ | DeCARLO- DURE. “CAMERON: CARTER

ADVOCATE



SUNDAY,

FEBRUARY

vw

rw
uo

1951



Me F. SISE, Chairman of
A the Board of the Bell Tele-
., of Canada, Mrs. Wm.

ell of Winnipeg and Mrs.
Irving of Victoria B.C.

in Grenada for a few
returned yesterday by
B.W.LA They still have 1
s holiday in Barbados
before returning to Canada

Touring Caribbean
M* EDMUND SHEEDY, Real

Estate agent in Florida and
his attractive wife arrived from


































one Co
{ LUus.
Lennox

who were



Trinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. They are touring the
Caribbean on holiday. Here for

about eight days they are staying
at the Colony Club, St. James.

Marfied Yesterday
ISS CAROL WARD, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Ward
of “Deal” Maxwells was married
yesterday afternoon at Providence
Chureh,. Christ Church to Dr.
Erie Storey, son of Mrs. N. Storey
of George Street, Belleville and
the late Dr. Leonard Storey.

The ceremony performed by
Rev. Broome began shortly after
5 p.m.» The bride, given in
marriage by her father wore an
ex@uisite gown of white slipper
satin cut on very simple lines.
From the skirt, bouffant loops
cascaded in flared fullness at the
back. The headdress was a sim-
ple tiny cap of matching satin
with a waist length veil of cloud
white tulle held in place with

white orchids. Her bouquet was
also of orchids.

Her sole attendant was her
sister Miss Grace Ward who
looked chic in a bronze satin

gown’ cut on the same lines as
the bride’s dress. She wore a
headdress of bronze laurel leaves.

The duties of bestman were
performegi by Dr. Louis Ward
The ushers were Mr. Lisle Harri-
son, Mr. Trevor Talma, Mr.
Clifford Skinner and Mr. Hal
Ward who arrived from Trinidad
yesterday especially for the wed-

ding. ‘

The service was fully choral,
and during the ceremony Mr
George Morris sang the “Nuptia!

Benediction” .
A reception was later held at
the home of the bride’s parents.

Dr. and Mrs. Storey leave for
Trinidad this afternoon where
they will spend a few days before
joining the Colombie on her

aribbean Cruise.

Repeat Performance

MoM": CHARLES ALLMON’S
film of the South Seas was
s0 enjoyed by the audience who
saw it on Friday evening at the
Royal Barbados Yacht Club that
he has been persuaded to repeat
it again tomorrow evening at 6.15
o'clock at the Combermere
School Hall.

This film has also been shown
at the British Council. Mr.
Allmon is at present in Barbados
taking pictures for the National
Geographic Magazine and the
Barbados Publicity Committee.

Proceeds from the show tomor-
row will go to help the Y.W.C.A

From London, Ontario

R. and MRS. J. O. HUGHES

of eee , Ontario, arrived
py TC. yesterday afternoon.
They sae here for three weeks
staying at the Marine Hotel.

Mr. Hughes is Manager of the
London Branch of A, E, Ames
& Co, Ltd., who are in the invest-
ment business,

Mr. Hughes told Carib that
they expect an American couple
Marsh by name to arrive today en
route from the U.S,

Short Visit

M* A. J, FARFAN arrived
from Trinidad yesterday to

spend a few days’ holiday in
Barbados, He returns on Thurs-
day. Mr. Farfan is Governing

Director of Pereira and Co.

Ltd.,
in Port-of-Spain.

He is staying
Lawrence Hotel.

Sisters
RS. ELIZABETH CORISTINE
and her sister Mrs. Mar-
garet Eakin arrived from Canada
yesterday morning by T.C.A. to
spend a_ holiday with their
jparents Mr. and Mrs. H. J.

Mr. Symington is a former presi-
dent of Trans Canada Airlines.



—————————





STRENGTHENING

@
FRESH

RECENTLY



MANNING & CO..







TO THE LAST DROP
Recommended by the Faculty

STOCKS ARRIVED

LTD. = Agents

MURRAY'S
MILK

STOUT

THE STOUTEST OF ALL
STOUTS



Carubh Calling



RETURNING from their honeymoon in Grenada yesterday were Mr.
and Mrs. Michael Lynch.
They are pictured here on their

Back From Honeymoon
R and MRS. MICHAEL
LYNCH, who spent théir

honeymoon in
home yesterday morning
B.W.I.A. Mrs. Lynch is
former Patsy Mitchell.

Here For Two Weeks
RS. JEAN FINNIE and her
two sons Terry and Richard

have come to Barbados for two
weeks’ holiday. They are staying
at Accra Guest House, Rockley.

Mrs. Finnie’s _husband works

with T.C.A. in Montreal.

by
the

Presidents
R. ALEXANDER DENISON,
President «cf the Canadian

Fire Insurance Co., in Winnipeg
arrived from Canada yesterday by
T.C.A. accompanied by Mrs
Denison. They are here for one
month staying at the Hastings
Hotel,

Arriving on the same
were Mr. and Mrs. Walker M.
Taylor. Mr. Taylor is President
of the Dominion Structural Steel
Ltd., in Montreal. They are also
here for a month staying at the
Marine Hotel.

plane

From Montreai
T. COL. and Mrs. W. W.
Ogilvie arrived by T.C.A.
yesterday. Here for three weeks
they are staying at the Colony
Club, St. James. Their home is
in Montreal. Lt. Col. Ogilvie is
Canadian Army retired. They
were in Barbados on a visit last
year.
Alse arriving from Montreal
were Mr. and Mrs. Alex Paterson
who are here for three weeks

staying at the Marine Hotel. Mr.
Paterson. is a _ stockbroker in
Montreal.

Personal Representative
XPECTED to arrive by the
S.S. Colombie on Wednes-
day is Miss Joan McKee the Per-
sonal Representative of the Eliz-
abeth Arden Salons in London,
The purpose of this visit is to
give the same wonderful face
treatments and expert advice on
Skin Care and make-up that one
would receive in the Arden’s
famous Salons in London, New
York and Paris, Miss McKee
will be giving these treatments
and advice at the Phoenix
Branch of Knight’s Ltd., 33
Broad _ Street, from Monday
March 5th where appointments
can be made.



| MARINE HOTEL |

SPECIAL
DANCE

IN OUR BALLROOM
SATURDAY March 3rd

Percy Green’s Orchestra
ALL TOURISTS WELCOME





e
Great Door Prize
Elimination Dance
‘ and Prize

A La Carte —
Kitchen Service

e
9 p.m. to 12 Midnight
Entrance $1.00



Dial 4606

Grenada returned

Floral designs 92c.

way in from the ‘plane,

Leaves To-day

R. ARTHUR M. HUTCHIN-

SON has been appointed a
Liaison Officer in the British West
Indies Central Labour Organisa-
tion in the United States of
America. Mr. Hutchinson leaves
by air for Washington this after-
noon.

Mr. Hutchinson, a resident of
St. Philip, has travelled exten-
sively through the U.S.A. and
Canada. He has done a variety
of fobs at home and in the U.S.
and Canada.

Cooler

R. JIM WILSON, Canadian

Engineer returned from his
visit to Ottawa yesterday by
T.Ci:A e came in wearing
heavy winter clothes. Two hours
later I saw him in a light tropical
suit looking much cooler.

Mr. Wilson is in charge of the
donstruction of the new runway
at Seawell. He is on loan to the
Barbados Government from the
Department {of Transport, Cana-
dian Government. He was away
for one week,

West Indian Play

EMBERS of the West Indian

Rumba Larios (a newly
formed theatrical aOmpany in
London) are busy rehearsing for
their maiden show “Rhythm in
Sepia.” The aim of the play is to
depict life in the West Indies and
JI understand that Jack Hylton,
the impressario, has expressed his
willingness to sponsor it. The
play is written by Jamaican-born
Harold Holness, student of archi-
tecture and newly elected Secre-
tary of W.I.S.U. Hubert Baker,
another Jamaican, is the Director.

Honour For Police Officers
N unusual hpnour was ac-
corded three West Indjan
police officers in England recently.
They were publicly welcomed in
open Court by a Magistrate. The
Iceficers . were Sergeant-Major
Dudley Marshall of British Hon-
duras and Inspectors Cecil Bourne
and Girwood Springer of Barba-
dos. All are spending six months
at the Metropolitan Police College
studying British police methods.
Their “host” was Sir William
Nottidge, Chairman of Tonbridge,
Kent, magistrate, who was after-
wards thanked by them for the
warmth of their welcome.

MRS. HOUSEWIFE

ENHANCE
THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR HOME WITH

Lancastreum Floor Covering

RUGS D ft, KTV Me. woes eee eee - $6.13
OE PH sss ae eines . $7.36
9 ft. x 10% ft. .........,. ‘$8.

9 ft. x 12 ft ........., sees $9.81
CONTINUOUS ROLLS & CUT TO yore ORDER
PE NB iv ccs 06 5 Ga 53c.

PO Mb te vuny caeecis 0c, vd
FRU. 8. oii he oes $1.40 yd,
e+ 108 ins. ..........., $2.10 yd.

Also—ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS TO SELECT FROM
Compare OUR PRICES BEFORE PURCHASING ELSEWHERE



THE BARBADOS
COTTON

‘SSPE EEE ERP BP eee
HAIRCORDS eed GINGHAMS

T Asstd. Checks & Colours
86c. & 87e.

FLORAL LINENE

An unrepeatable Value 92c.
PLAIN PALE BLUE HAIRCORD 32” WIDE
WHITE a

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Your Shoe Stores

36” I
WIDE I
hi tr ad ceed inca

”

FACTORY LTD.

T.C.A.’s Engineering Dept.
R. and Mrs. Hugh A. Reid
arrived from Canada yester-

day by T.CA to spend a week’s

holiday in Barbados.
Mr. Reid is in T.C.A’s Engin-

eering Dept. in Montreal. They
are staying at the Hastings Hotel.
Bookers’ Head

MONG the passengers arriving
from B.G. on Friday morning

Nelson were Mr. and
A. Campbell, their daugh-
ter Mrs. Bayley and son Mr. C. M.
Campbell. Mr. Campbell is Man-
aging Director of Booker Bros. in
B

Mr. and Mrs. Campbell and Mrs,
Bayley will be leaving by the
Gelfito when she returns here on
her way to England. It is under-
stood that Mr. C. M. Campbell
will be returning to B.G.

Meanwhile they are guests at
the Crane Hotel.

Canadian Physicia=
OWN to_spend a_holiday with
Col. Saunders at the Camp,
St. Lawrence is Dr. Fred 5.
Parney who arrived from Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. Dr. Parney
is a physician in Ottawa.

ster
R. and Mrs. C. J. Burchell
were among the passengers
arriving from Canada yesterday
morning, by T.C.A. Here for six
weeks, they are staying at the
Windsor Hotel,
Mr. Burchell is a Barrister in
Halifax.

Investment Dealer

R. A. NESBITT, an invest-

ment dealer with Nesbitt,
Thomson and Co., in Montreal ar-
rived by T.C.A. yesterday to spend
two weeks’ holiday in Barbados.
He was accompanied by his wife.
They are guests at the Colony
Club, St. James.

First Visit

AYING their first visit to Bar-
bados are Mr. and Mrs. W. J.
Henning of Montreal. They plan
to spend two and a half weeks at
the Paradise Beach Club. Mr.
Henning is Assistant General
Manager of Robin Hood Flour

Mills in Montreal.

Persuaded

ERE for maybe three weeks
are Mr. and Mrs, Mark Water-
bury who came in yesterday on
the T.C.A. flight. Mr. and Mrs.
Waterbury are from Utica, New
York, where Mr. Waterbury is
with’H. Waterbury and Sons, Co.
Asked what madg him choose
Barbados for a holiday, Mr. Water-
bury told Carib, that for the past
few years they. generally spent
the Winter months in Bermuda.
This year, however, their good
friends the Hugh Gages, who are
at present here on holiday, per-

suaded them to try Barbados.

Represented

R. EVERTON WEEKES was
at Seawell yesterday morn-
ing to meet Mr. Bede Fletcher
who arrived from Grenada by

B.W.I.A. to spend two weeks’
holiday in Barbados. Mr.
Fletcher represented Grenada

against the Empire Club of Bar-
bados during their recent tour to
Grenada. He is a member of the
“Atoms” Club in Grenada.

Mother And Daughter
RS. ELSIE BORIGHT and her
daughter Mrs. Elizabeth Lind-

say are at present in Barbados for
five weeks, staying at the Hotel
Royal, They arrived from Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. Their home
is in Montreal.

To Join Wife

R. RAY MANBERT, President

of Manbert Paper Pror/icts
Ltd., in Toront, arrived yesterday
by T.C.A. to join his wife who is
already here. She arrived about
three weeks ago. Staying at the
Marine Hotel, they are here for
three weeks.

Cotton

R. and Mrs. James V.. Young,

their son and daughter-in-
law, Mr. and Mrs. David
Young from Hamilton, Ontario,
came in on the T.C.A. flight from
Canada yesterday mo Mr.
James Young is Vice-Presi: lent of
Hamilton Cotton Co., Ltd., his son
is also in the business.

They are here for six weeks,

staying at the Marine Hotel.

CO-OPERATIVE

Uf Pomme



62c.

59c,

Dial 4220
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25,

1951

FOR ONE FLOWER, £125



Orchid bought by

Mr. fioit of Seattle

Even The Emperor

Wants Our Orchids

By GERALD SCHEFF
A’ £125 orchid of rare perfection
is being flown to America this
wéek-end.
It took six years to grow in a

Slough nursery, and has _ just
flowered a single bloom, itself
tco valuable ever to become a

woman’s corsage.

The Orchid, “Aylesbury variety
Suez,” is a new species of cypri—
pedium or “lady’s slipper.’”’ It has
been bought by Mr. Gordon Hoit,
Seattle greetings card manufactur-
er, the only man ever to have
named an orchid, British-raised,
after his mother-in-law.

Exports Rising

He will use it for crossbreeding.
The bloom has a white dorsal with
purple spots, touches of green
and yellow, and a pouch of
lacquered mahogany.

Mr. Hoit does not yet know that
his orchid was given the Royal
Horticultural Society's award
ef merit last week.

Orchids are in the news. Bri-
tain’s biggest orchid show will
be held next month in London.

The other day a Berkshire wo-
man paid £75 for 110 orchids
ranging from white to deep red
for her mother’s funeral.

Exports of high-class orchid
plants are rising, with U.S. and
Australia our best customers.
This year orchid exports are ex-
pected to reach nearly £100,000
aimost double the 1949 figure.

An amateur grower in Australia
hag just ordered 15,000 seedlings
for 17s, 6d. each. A £500 offer
was made recently for a giecn
cymbidium orchid plant

Touring the U.S, to book order's

is’ Mr. Peter Blagk, chairman
of the British Orchid Growers’
Association.

To assist him he has taken
paintings by Miss Nellie Roberts
a grey-haired woman of about 70
who lives in Brixton and is
Britain’s official orchid artist,‘

She has painted them by the
ihousand for more than 50 years
There is no one to replace her
if she dies,

Orchid expert Norman Black,
brother of Peter, told me: ‘Many
American women wear orchid
corsages costing £5 to £20, but in
Britain, where sales have declined,
the average shop price is £1 to 30s.
for this type of orchid.

“Despite Korea there is no
purge of the or¢hid we christen-
ed ‘Stalin’ in 1942.

“Once entered in the stud book
1 name cannot be changed.
Unele Jce’s orchid is soft mauve

with tuby lips and a= golden
throat. i
“Few men in Britain wear

orchid buttonholes today. Growers
never -do.
“Joseph Chamberlain was never





without one, Until the last war
a London _ stockbroker spent
£1,000 a year on orchids. ®

“There is still one man in Lon-
don, the son of a Persian oil
ee who wears a £2 bloom
daily.”

An old customer Emperor
Hirohito of Japan, wants to buy
orchids again.

King’s Collection

Amateur growers range from
royalty—the King has a fine
collection at Windsor and flowers
ere sent to decorate the Queen’s
rooms at Buckingham Palace — to
£8-a-week garage hands paying
10s. 6d. to 25s, for unflowered
plants

ORCHID ODDITIES: Darwin
kept orchids because their struc-
ture resembles the human body
more than any other plant, Baron
Schroder paid £1,800 for a new
species early in the century. John
Dominy, a Briton, bred the first
orchid from seed. There are 15,000
known species. —L.E.S.

Indian Pedlar
Returns Home

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 21.
With tears streaming down his
cheeks, Bhao Singh 55, pedlar of
Princes Town, South Trinidad,
said “goodbye” to his fellow
villagers before leaving to return
to India by the Gascogne, “I am
sorry to leave but I must go back
to my parents, I wish to die in
India.” Singh’s father and
mother, both aged 96, are both
alive in India, °
Singh came to Trinidad at the
age of 16, to work on a sugar
plantation. On completion of his
period of indenture he returned to
peddling spices in which he
acquired a fortune.

TRYING TO SOLVE
U.S. $ PROBLEM

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 21.
The Secretary of State for the
Colonies and _ the American
authorities are at the moment
endeavouring to find a solution to
the problem of allocating U.S.
dollars under the recent trade
Liberalisation Plan. At a meeting
of the Trinidad Chamber of Com-
merce to-day, members heard that
licences are being issued for the
importation of goods from Canada,
but the position with respect te
‘the importation from the United
States was still undecided. It is
understood that applications for
United States dollars involve ten
times the amount of dollars
available.





Ay

errings

FRESH orin

SUNDAY



Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

THE GARDEN im February
CUTHING BACK KING OF

FLOWERS, LAYERING

IT IS difficult to know what to
advise for the garden during this
unpredictable weather we are
having. The unexpected rainfall
has most gardens beaten down
and sodden, and little can be done
except sweep up the leaves, and
clear gutters between flowers.

It would be interesting to know
how the annuals in the various
gardens have stood up to these
rains, as at this time of the year
rain is not reckoned for at all,
nor do most annuals like it,

If any plants such as Exora,
Blue Plumbago, Gesberas or the
Bougainvillaeas show signs of
tur! pale from the extra rains,
a dose of Sulphate of iron will
help to restore their colour. Mix
half a pound in a bucket of water,
and pour a little to each plant.
Repeat in a week, or until a good
green colour has returned.

When the sun does come eut
again (at the time of writing it
shows no sign of doing so!) A
hard white crust is apt to form
on the top of the oe beds.
Do not wait until this happens to
turn the surface of the beds light-
ly with a hand fork when it has
dried sufficiently for this to be
done, and yet has not had time
to form a hard crust.

Where annuals are in the beds
this forking must be done care-
fully so that the delicate roots so
near the surface are not injured.

Cut Back King Of Flowers

One thing that should be done
at this time of the year is the
eutting back of the King of
Flowers.

Opinions differ as to the right
time todo this. The Garden Book
advises cutting it back in April,
but many people consider this too
late, and prefer to do it in Febru-
ary or March, or even earlier. >v,
you can take your choice.

Whenever this job is done how-
ever, the King of Flowers should
be cut back to within two feet of
the ground. After this, fork
around the plants and manure
them generously. From now on,
and all during the flowering
period, keep the King of Flowers
well watered.

To ensure a longer spell of flow-
ers, be sure to cut off the old
flower-heads as they wither. Do
this thoroughly by cutting back
about a foot or two, from the old
flower head, and it will be found
that fresh flowers will quickly
form.

King of Flowers makes a splen-
did and decorative hedge, or it
can be grown singly or in clumps
as a shrub. The pink is the most
common colour and the most
hardy, but it can also be had in
Red, Mauve and White, and the
in between shades.

Layering

To propagate a plant by layer-
ing is a iow business but not a
difficult one.

It simply means bending down
a branch of the desired plant, put-
ting a notch in it where it is to
touch the ground, and then peg-
png the branch firmly down,

eep the branch moist, and when
it has developed plenty of root,
cut it off from the mother plant,
and plant it in a reserved bed, or
a box. When it is well grown

transfer to the desired spot.
“Have you any Gardening questions
you would like answered or any garden
information that would be of interest to
other Gardeners to pass on?
Have you a surplus of seeds or cut-
has yee would like to exchange?
Wr A

to “GARDENING”
C/o The “Advocate”,
and watch this column fer a reply.



G. H. asks:

(1) What do you think is
biting my young Car-
nation leves? The
leaves are left with a
saw - like edge and
some are dropping
off.

(2) The worms are com-
ing on the cabbage.
What shall I do?






ADVOCATE

FARM AND GARDEN |

LIFE IN

THE

SOIL

By Agricola

THERE are two classes of
organisms in the soil—animal and
vegetable. By far the greater
number belong to plant life and
comprise forms of greatest in-
fluence in producing changes in
structure and composition which
eontribute to soil productiveness.
Most are too small to be seen
without the aid of a microscrope.
Simply expressed, we can say that
they fall into two great divisions
—the visible and the invisible.
In the former grouping, the anima}
world is represented by such
forms as rodents, worms, certain
crustaceans and insects; and the
plant world chiefly by large
fungi, algae and plant roots. In
the latter division, members of the
plant world predominate, repre—
sented principally by bacteria; in
addition, there are other micro—
Scopic forms of life — including
such motile groups as protozoa and
species of small worms such as
nematodes which form galls on
plant roots and, indeed, many
others which may use the soil as
a temporary abode, passing only
a part of their life history there.
In this last category are those
which may be parasites not only
of plants but of domestic animals
and even of man himself at some
stage in their existence,

Activity in the soil is so great
that it is impossible for the lay
man to comprehend all that is
taking place in it and in relation
to the crop plants which it sup-
ports. The visible forms of life
are more or less understandable
but, on the other hand, there are
millions of bacteria performing
various complex functions and mil-
lions of microscopic unicellular
animals wriggling their way
through the soil. The effect of all
these operating agencies, both visi-
ble and invisible, is to open up
passages in the soil providing bet~
ter aeration and at the same time
permitting rain and applied water
to percolate to the deeper layers
from which it will return later
for the use of crops. It will be
appreciated that the numbers of all
these organisms fluctuate daily or
even hourly depending on condi-
tions. For example, it has been
established that the beneficial bac—
teria which are so essential for
deeay processes and for the ren—
dering of plant food avarlable are
an easy prey to protozoan forms
and the numbers of the former
diminish greatly under unsuitable
conditions in the sii brorght en by

water-logging, poor drainage, *n~-
adequate tillage and so on. Thus,
the practical farmer and gardenex
must be on the alert to remedy
such deficiencies as may be pre-
judicial to the development and
multiplication of organisms fav-
ourable to successful soil manage—
ment.

Perhaps the most conspicuous
example of a beneficial agency in
the soil is that of the earthworm
which passes tremendous quanti-
ties of earth through its body, ex-
tracting what organic matter it
ean from the material so ingested
and casting out the indigestible
remains on to the land. We are
indebted to Darwin for his method-
ical observations on the value of
earthworms as soil improvers; it
has been estimated that from one-
tenth to two-tenths of an inch of
soil as castings may be deposited
annually on the surface from the

depths below. Advantageously
enough to the cultivator, earth-
worms seek for existence the

heavy, compact soil where their
work is most needed.

Canned Culture

“Highlights of Culture” by H. F.
Boyce, M.A., is the first book of a
general knowledge series which
the author intends to publish. This
book contains 24 ort, simply
written, essays on eminent paint-
ers, musicians, buildings and
operas and should be a useful in-
troductory to the study of these
subjects in schools,

The object of the book, the
author says, is “to give students ¢
eomprehensive acquaintance with
the great men, women and things
of this world from the beginning |
of history.”* “Comprehensive’’ is!
hardly the right word to use, but
by judicious choice of subject and}
careful condensation Mr. Boyce
has managed to get a great deal of |
interesting information into his 39)
pages. |

But, and this must be empha-|
sised, if the book is to be of any}
use, it must be used in conjunction |
with prints of the famous paint-
ings and buildings described and)
records of the music discussed,
Nobody can understand Leonardo
da Vinci without having seen the
“Mona Lisa” or talk intelligently
about “Tristan and Isolde,” with-/|
out at least having heard records}
of that opera,

(‘Highlights of Culture’ will!
soon be on sale at all the leading}
booksellers at 3/6.)



COOKERY CORNER

“My idea of heaven is eating yam,
patés de foie gras to the round of onion and tomato between

hard boiled bacon,

each

eRe,

trumpets,” writes Sydney Smith, layer. Let a layer of yam be on
Well, I cannot run to pates de foie the top, and put a little butter on

gras but here is my idea of a little each Slice.

Pour in the mixture

bit of heaven-—a lunch consisting und bake until the yam is brown.

of flying fish pie, fol-
lowed by caramel pud-
ding. The trumpets are
not really necessary.

FLYING FISH PIE

Fried and seasoned

flying fish

lbs. of boiled yam,

sliced very thin

hard boiled egg

lb. fried bacon

large tomato

yolks of eggs

tablespoonsful salad

oil

2 teaspoonsful butter

1 tablespoonful. Worchester
Sauce,

1 gill Sherry
1 gill Water

1 Onion

Pepper and salt.

Mix well together the
eggs, salad oil, butter,
Sauce, Sherry and water, salt and
pepper. Arrange the fish in a fire-

“
me BS

DON Ree

olks of



ea

swiss



orcester

proof dish in layers with sliced

CARAMEL PUDDING
1 go Milk
3 Eggs
2 oz. granulated
Sugar
Vanilla.
F OMT aay
Put 5 oz of sugar
in a dry metal mould
over the fire to melt
and become slightly
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cold milk and a few
jrops of vanilla. When well mixed
pour it into the mould, Put the
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but make sure that the water does
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Cook in this way for # hr. Place
in the fridge till very cold, then

serve. — MF







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PAGE FOUR

SUNDAY

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‘

Stollmeyer Forces Barbados!) BARBADOS STRUGGLED
Batsmen On The Defensive| FOR RUNS YESTERDAY

363 and (for 3 wkts.) 122

But Barbades Still In Good Position
BY O. S. COPPIN

MUST lead off my comment on the fourth day’s
play in the first Trinidad-Barbados Test which
opened at Kensington on Wednesday, with immedi-
ate reference to yesterday’s play.
The principal topic in West Indian cricket circles
now, for the matches were broadcast, is probably

WW iatete

a

Vee based upon Jeffrey Stollmeyer’s defensive tactics
com}. employed yesterday that so slowed down the pow-

erful tall scoring Barbados run-making machine, spearheaded by
Weekes, Walcott and Roy Marshall, that in an innings lasting for
three hours and a half Barbados was only able to score 122 runs in

210 minutes.
: TIGHT, DEFENSIVE FIELD

REALLY tight defensive field, obviously carefully thought out

and persistent negative bowling by Prior Jones and Asgarali,
were the principal weapons used. ing assisted in the afternoon
when Jones was tiring and he also followed the plan quite well
although he mixed some irritating non-sensical bowling with it.

NO BLAME FOR JEFF

J CANNOT blame Stollmeyer for his tactics as the majority of

Barbadian cricket fans have been doing on the spur of the
noment; nor can I give those who booed the bowlers any credit for
having done so.

One day has already been lost in this scheduled five day game.
There is only one day remaining for play. Trinidad have already
been led on the first innings by 84 runs. With Barbados playing at
home, under conditions better known to them than to the visitors,
and possessing an admittedly inferior batting team_to that of Barba-
dos, well what are the most logical tactics for Trinidad to adopt than
defensive ones and hope for a draw?

ONUS ON BARBADOS

N the other hand, if Barbados, with these conditions in their favour,

are prepared to play safe and make no real attempt to cope

with the problem, I see no reason why Jeffrey Stollmeyer should not
aid and abet them in this.

The onus I contend was upon the Barbadian batsmen to try and
force the pace and not for the Trinidad bowlers to make things easy
for them and.see a huge score piled up ‘and all the fans at Kensing-
ton thrill to lofty sixes and pile driver fours at the expense of the
Trinidadians,

4.

DID WE NOT DO SO TOO?

ID we not commend the West Indies for luring Yorkshire into
defeat when the same Prior Jones and Worrell on the 1950 tour
adopted leg theory tactics and won from Yorkshire although they
were in a really comfortable position for scoring a win from the
West Indies?
Stollmeyer took a chance and it has come off, up to the present.
He gambled on not using Clarence Skeete, so successful with his slow
right arm spinners in the first innings and Ferguson, another tried
and wily slow leg-break bowler.

BARBADOS STILL IN GOOD POSITION

S it stands now Barbados are still 206 runs, ahead and if they

can get some quick runs early on Monday or if the wicket shows

signs of wear over the week-end, well then they are in a good posi-
tion still for forcing a win.

The Trinidad fielding yesterday was excellent. Jeffrey Stoll-
meyer again set his men an excellent example, Skeete failed to hold
a difficult running catch from Walcott and this proved to be the only
real flaw in the excellence of the performance of the team as a whole.

HUNTE PROMISING
UNTE’'S debut as an opening batsman promises great things. It
is true that he was missed on a few occasions but this does not

justify the spate of irresponsible nonsense that has been suggested
about the value of his innings in some sporting circles.
His fielding has been up to a high standard too.
Clyde Walcott’s 77 was made at a time when Barbados needed
someone to stay there and put some stiffening in the batting and it
is to his credit that he did so,
Weekes’ brilliant 75 could scarcely have been possible had not
Clyde stood there after Barbados was one wicket down with only
ten runs on the tins,

CLASS BATSMANSHIP

His strokes all around the wicket were the very epitome of class
batsmanship and he was fittingly dismissed off a cheeky stroke and a
magnificent catch on the deep fine leg boundary by Legall.

I should like to make some record of Goddard's fine effort in
scoring 66 at a crucial period of the innings when it seemed that the
fortunes of the game, which up to a short time before was in the
hands of Barbados, had suddenly swung in favour of Trinidad.

He showed flashes of his old batting form once he had got his
eye in, His setting of the field was excellent in the opinion of compe-
tent judges of the game,

JEFF) AND ANDY COMFORTABLE
Fo Trinidad Jeffrey Stollmeyer and Ganteaume were quite com-
fortable, although Andy had the unnerving experience of having
been served up a snorter by Mullins in the first ball he received,
BETTER START

They..gave-Trinidad a better start than the Barbados opening
pair but Stollmeyer (33) was bowled by a cleverly flighted ball from
Millington when he looked set for big things and Andy after defend-
ing soundly for 56 was bowled by one of the cleverest balls of the
tournament, bowled to him by Roy Marshall, a top spinner that was
delivered almost with the action of an offbreak,

Tangchoon, a sheet anchor for Trinidad for many years now was
not in an unaccustomed role when he shouldered a lot of a big slice
of the batting responsibility after Trinidad had lost some of their
best batsmen, He cut, drove, hooked and gently pushed for singles
to top score with a valuable 69,

LEGALL LOOKED WELL

ALPH LEGALL I have never seen look better. He scored 48
runs in a complacently confident and elegant innings, Impetu-
osity on his part ana persistence (n the part of Mullins brought about
his cismissal when at 48 and going great guns he drove over a stiff
one from Mullins well up and was bowled.

I think that it should now be freely conceded that Mullins on
his bowling performance in this match has justified the confidence
which a few of the local sporting public repose in him and is now
not only a certainty for the next Test but I am sure that he has
engaged the attention of the Selectors.

Clarence Skeete, too I must place in this class.

Ferguson was
we shall see

good on the first day but we must wait and see what
before the tournament is over,













— BECAUSE or
ee Mie
TRAY centre 18
covered wi

AIRY MILK
CHOCOLATE

Ta lacneengeamniee



BARBADOS
TRINIDAD

A struggle for runs was a feature of the day’s play at Ken-
sington yesterday. It was the fourth day of play in the
Barbados-Trinidad cricket match, play not having been pos-
sible on Friday on account of rain.

When stumps were drawn

wickets in their second innings, and with a lead of 84 runs
on the first innings, Trinidad already has 206 runs to make.

In half an hour yesterday Trini-
dad’s remaining 4 batsmen were
back in the pavilion, having added
21 runs to Trinidad’s score of 258
for 6 wickets at the close of play
on Thursday. The 4 wickets went
to Carl Mullins and Norman Mar-
shall, each getting 2.

These bowlers and Roy Marshall
were responsible for the fall of 9
wickets. Each took 3. Roy’s was at
a cost of 25 runs, Norman’s at a
cost of 37 and Mullins’ at a cost
of 68. Errol Millington took the re-
maining wicket for 33 runs.

Barbados’ batsmen found run-
getting a difficult matter in their
second turn at the wicket. Trini-
dad resorted to a negative attack
for the most part and in the first
hour of play only 33 runs were

scored.

With the total at 35 two wickets
fell in quick succession, and later
when it was 55 Everton Weekes
was run out. Clyde Walcott and
Skipper Goddard then played out
time adding 67,

Good Fielding

The Trinidad fielding was good.
No gifts were given the batsmen.
The bowling was steady and
somewhat difficult. Prior Jones
who sent down 11 overs of which
five were maidens got one of the
wickets for 14 rums and Nyron
Asgarali whio sent down 19 overs
including 3 maidens took the
other for 55 runs.

The Start

At 12.15 Guillen 10 and Fer-
guson who had not yet opened his
account, continued Trinidad’s first
innings which stood at 258 for the
loss of 6 wickets. Millington bowl-
ed the first over from the pavilion
end and Guillen took a single—
the only one of the over off the
the third delivery.

Mullins took over from the
screen end and each batsman col-
lected easy singles. Millington’s
next over also yielded a single,
while Mullins yielded two.

With the total at 264, Goddard
brought on Norman Marshall vice
Millington at the pavilion end. He
bowled to Guillen who edged the
first and Mullins at first slip held a
low one-handed catch to dismiss
him for 12.

Sidney Jackbir, Trinidad’s left
hand batsman filled the breach and

ot a single through the slips.

erguson snicked for three and a
leg bye sent the score.to 269.
Jackbir, facing Mullins, was how-
ever lbw with the first he received
and the scoreboard read 269—8—1,

Jones the incoming batsman was
quickly off the mark with a single
to mid-off and was then given an
additional four as the result of an
over throw. Ferguson square cut
one beautifully from Mullins
which was brilliantly stopped by
Hunte at point, He then took a
single to square leg and went
down to face Marshall who sent
down a maiden.

Mullins continued from the
screen end and his first delivery
knocked back Jones’ off stump
and the score read 275—9—5.
King joined Ferguson and hook-
ed one from Mullins to fine leg
for a single to open his account.
Ferguson then played out the re-
mainder. King got a single off
Marshall’s first to cover and an-
other couple as the result of an
overthrow. , .

Ferguson lifted the fourth ball!
from Marshall into the hands of
Millington at mid off and the
innings closed at 12.48 for 279
made in 302 minutes Ferguson
had scored 7 while King carried
his bat for 4,

Barbados Batting
Ph pened their second

s a ‘ P.m,, with Roy
Marshall and Contad Hunte
Sampath took the field for Gan-
teaume. Jackbir started the attack
from the Pavilion End to Roy
Marshall and sent down a maiden
to the batsman.

Frank King then bowled from
the Screen End to Hunte who re-
turned the second delivery to the
bowler. King failed to take an
easy catch, however, and Hunte
cover drove his next bajl to the
boundary. He cut the last ball of
the over uppishly through slips
for another boundary,

Marshall on-drove Jackbir’s
first ball ror a single and Hunte

SY





SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1951

MISSED GALLOPS
All Because Of A Simple Switch Key
BY BOOKIE

LAID my plans carefully. I packed a bag the

I night before so that I would not have to re-

turn home after attending the morning’s gallops.

I also shaved and laid out the clothes which I

would wear to the track. Then I placed my bag

and typewriter at the back dogr so that I would

take off with a swoosh. Next I phoned the Night

Editor and left a message with him to give the

Circulation Manager to phone me at 5.30 sharp. After a bit of read-
ing I retired at about 10 p.m.

I awoke_at 5 a.m, Staggered into the bath, etc., dressed and
by the time ‘my phone call came through I had my hat on. Stop
watch in hand ¥ Ses rearing to go. “No blooming trainer or jockey
is going to put one on me this morning”, I thought to myself. [
opened the Back gate, flung the garage doors wide and gave my
dog a shout of warning to get out of the way. Into the car I jumped.

It was then that I discovered that I had left the engine switched
on from the afternoon before, j ;

That, I put it to you dear reader, is one of the most exasperating
things that can ever happen to a man, and, certainly the worst that
can be so described in my career as a racing journalist,

A above may not, at first glance seem to have much to do with
the forthcoming Spring meeting of the B.T.C., but it explains
why I missed the majority of the most important gallops fast Satur-
day morning. I am therefore still in the dark about several of the
leading candidates entered for our March fixture. :
For instance I wanted specially to see the work of Burns. I am
told that he galloped in company with Sun Queen and that the five
was done in about 1.14, This time figure may be incorrect, but it is
significant. that our friend Gun Site was not called upon to give
the big horse a work out. Evidently something sharper over a sprint
was required and that aught to tell us that Burns is going to show
us his capacity for sprint and middle distance racing. I should think
his chances at both will be equally as good, But I promise that |
will make every effort, or should I say ‘a renewed effort”, to see
him gallop at full speed before next Saturday is upon us
“I have made arrangements to leave the switch keys on the car seat”.
NOTHER interesting gallop { missed was that of Bow Bells and
Best Wishes. I am told they worked a little more than a box



279

Barbados was 122 for three

played . out the over. King con-
tinued to Marshall who hit the
first ball to fine leg for 4 to send
up 10 in 14 minutes, The batsman
played out the remainder of the
over. -

Jackbir bowled to Hunte using
three men short on the leg side
The bowler moved the ball nicely
away from the middle stump tc
leg but the batsman evaded the
trap. This over was another
maiden by Jackbir. King bowlec
to Marshall again from the Screer
End the batsman getting a single
off the seventh ball. The last kept
low outside the wicket and Hunte
played over.

Marshall cover drove Jackbir’s
third delivery for a single and
Hunte played the remaining balls
of the over. Each batsman made
a single off King’s next over.
Marshall drove the second ball of
Jackbir’s next over past the
bowler for a brace but a low re-
turn off the fourth ball ‘taught
the bowler off guard. Marshall
skied the seventh delivery high
on the leg side but none of the
fielders got to the ball, Neither of
the batsmen at this period seemed
quite at ease.

King’s next over yielded four
runs, three going to Marshall, In
Jackbir’s next over Marshall
cover drove the second ball beauti-
fully for two and later cut to
gully for a single. Hunte played
out the over.

Asgarali came on in place of
King from the Screen End with
the score at 29, Marshall pine
the first ball nicely to fine leg for
2. He singled the next and Hunte
played the remaining balls.

Stollmeyer brought on Jones
from the Pavilion End making ¢
double change. He bowled to
Marshall who made a single to
leg off the second delivery. Hunte
played out the over. The first hour
produced 33 runs.

Leg Field

Jones continued from the
Pavilion End to Marshall and
bowled to a leg field, the ball mov-
ing away from the middle stump
to leg. The over, was a maiden,
Asgarali bowled to Hunte and the
sixth ball was edged through slips
for a single. Marshall raised the
next delivery to Jones at mid-on
and the fielder made no mistake.
Marshall’s score was 20 and he
had been at the wicket for 71
minutes. He hit one 4 during his
stay. The total was now 35 for 1
wicket.

Clyde Walcott joined Hunte and
played out the over. Trinidad
“aimed their second victim when
Jones in his next over got the
wicket of Hunte, The batsman hit
low to Skeete fielding at short leg
and was well taken with his score
at 15. Hunte had been at the
wicket for 79 minutes and hit 2
fours Hunte’s downfall) was <:
maiden wicket for Jones. The
total was unchanged.

Everton Weekes joined Walcott
and opened his account with an
edge through slips for 4 off Asga-
rali. He played out the remainder
of the over. Jones’ next over was
a maiden to Walcott, Only a single
was made off Asgarali’s next over
this going to Weekes. The scoring
at this period was very slow as the
bowlers kept a steady length and
the fielders gave nothing away{

Jones continued to bow] from
the Pavilion End and Weekes got
2 tWos on the leg side in the over
In Asgarali’s next over Walcott
and Weekes got 4 runs each to the
long on boundary sending up 50
in 100 minutes.

In Jones’ next over Weekes hit
to mid-on and called for a run.
He-ran down the wicket but
Walcott failed to get off, Stoll-
meyer fielding the ball returned
sharply for wicket-keeper Guillen
to throw down the wicket. Weekes
was 14 when he was run out and
had been at the wicket for 27
minutes. Three wickets had now
fallen for 55 runs and Skipper

to box and that at the beginning Best Wishes looked the easier of the
two, but at the finish Bow Bells was fresher. This sounds very much
like what I expected as it looks to me as if Bow Bells is going to prove
herself an extraordinary good four-year-old creole nlly and any
three—year—old who can go with her for any part-of a distance must
be something good, In addition to that the track was decidedly
heavy and Best Wishes is not noted for stamina yet. For this reason
she cannot be my favourite for the Guineas. At least not unless I see
anything in the next week to cause me to think differently about her
.. « .. “Better still, 1 am going to sleep with the switch keys
under my pillow”. fe : ee Y

ALSO MISSED the British Guiana candidate Vindima who did a
I good gallop with Atomic II. This mare Vindima, it might pay
us to remember, did very well in British Guiana last May when the
track was in a thoroughly wet condition. I have not seen her to best
advantage in Trinidad as the first time she was not yet thoroughly
acclimatised, while on the second occasion, which was last Christmas,
she was still recovering after being off colour at the B.G. October
meeting. It is possible therefore that she may show us good form
up here and naturally her gallop yesterday may have been a pointer
to this, Here then is another important one I must see before race
MAP. 90-3 . . “I thought I would also get a crank handle and a
spare battery just in case”’.

EERHAPS the most impressive gallop I missed, from all reports,
was a box to box, or more, by Usher and Vanguard, The son of
Dunusk and Maid of Honour, Usher, was far too much for Vanguard
and from the start he was bounding along while the latter found it
difficult to keep near him. I am much surprised to hear this and
erhaps pleasantly so, first because only last November it was all that
Usher could do to catch Vanguard at the finish, being nowhere near
him at the start; and secondly, while there is no great surprise about
this, it is pleasing to think that a line as successful in the West Indies
as that tracing back to the mare Maid should still be so active in pro-
ducing good ones.

One only has to mention the name of Footpad and think of what
ne did both in racing and at the stud to realise what Maid did through
her male representatives, Then just to show her dominant influence
think of her daughter Bridesmaid, and her grand daughter Maid of
Honour and remember what they did on the track, Can Usher live
up to such a reputation? It is left to be seen, but I did notice the other
morning that he looked better than the imported filly Arunda in a
fi and it is to be that yesterday Arunda finished much better than

unways in a sprint of five furlongs, Possibly we have in Usher the
horse to make the Guineas more than a match race between Cross
Roads and Best Wishes, He is another I must place on my priority
list for next week. ..+ “I have arranged for a taxi to stand by”.

PEAKING of Cross Roaas he 1s one which I did see yesterday

morning and what I saw makes him remain, in my estimation, a
strong favourite for the Guineas, Since I wrote about him last he has
improved in appearance and that pastiness which he had on returning
from Trinidad has disappeared, He also shows a bit of perspiration
which is a very good sign indeed. His companion yesterday was
Ability and it was evident that he was very easy to her. It is not
every day that we have three-year-old creoles who exercise with
imporieds and make them look like the lesser lights.

©

4s gallop which deserves special mention was one by
Demure and Abberford, For the latter (who is one of those I
must apologise to for a misprint which described him as a “mule”)
things were not really so good, But I would not say that he ran badly
and therein lies the true merit of his companion’s performance for
she simply left him behind. It is therefore very distressing to think
that she may be troubled by some wind ailment as otherwise I would
say we are about to see another like Secret Treasure, Social Gossip
or any of the fastest fillies of the past. that can be brought to mind.
I think the first B class race will be a hack canter for her, providing
she can last long enough,

A FTER apologising to Abberford I cannot do less than the same to

good old Slainte who was also described in like manner. Yes-
terday he went with Miss Panic and this filly once again impressed
me that she will have a lot to do with the finish of the Maiden Stakes.
She is much harder than she was last November and as the majority
of her opponents are just as she was then, I think she will be able
to handle them easily,

There I must let the matter rest. I did see a few other gallops

but I must leave some space for a special ann
am, next Wednesday then sleep tight” eee as

STAR WITNESS ARRIVES TO-DAY

Goddard joined Walcott, He Barbados Turf Club stallion Star Witnes$
i re ness arrives f Eng-
plead out the over which was a land to-day and will be stabled at the paddock for oer dey

before he is sent into the country. By Fair Trial out of s

Solario out of Postmark. by Friar Marcus, this horse saa teed ares
raced in the colours of Miss Dorothy Paget in Engtand. His form I
have already reviewed and now he is only left to be seen with the
naked eye. We shall try and get a picture for to-morrow’s paper
for you between tlie camera man and myself.

Two other maidens were bowled
in succession, one by Asgarali and
the other by Jones, Jones had
now sent down eight overs oi

Page 5

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SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

Trinidad Pin Down BARBADOS STRUGGLED "sland Has 50-50]
FOR RUNS YESTERDAY

Local Batsmen

@ From page 1.
Straight through as a change from
the regular off-break that he was
ewe and Mullins got one of

is big hands to it and held the
@atch.

Mullins Impressive

Mullins was bowling with more
ace and obvious eonfidence than
t any other time during the tour.
t was he that curled up the
rinidad tail beating Jackbir with
the pace off the wicket when he
layed back to a really quick one,
fnissed, and was given out l.b.w.
| Prior Jones he bowled with a
ell pitched up snorter and when
erguson took a swipe at a gdod
ength ball from Norman Mar-
hall, he was caught at mid~off by
illington te end the Trinidad
nings for 279.

Behind The Clock

The innings lasted for 302
inutes. The scoring was behind
e clock for the most part and
nly at one stage of the game did

or

e scoring pass the clock and”

at was for a short time during
e opening partnership between
ffrey Stollmeyer and Andy
anteaume.
The Barbados bowling was
Ways steady and the figures
k. for themselves. Pace
wiler Mullins 3 for 68 in 19
vers, Norman Marshall 3 for 37
just over 17 overs and Roy
Harshau 3 for 25 in seven overs
e creditable in a seore of 27y.

Pinned Down
-The Barbados opening pair,
y Marshall and Hunte were at
ce pinned down by some accu-
te bowling especially by left
m medium fast Jackbir. King
% was steady although he made
ie majority of his deliveries
wing outside the off stump.
‘The first hour's play only saw
8 runs on the tins. To tighten
this brake on the rate of
ring even more, Skipper Stoll-
yer brought on Jones who
wled leg theory from the
avilion end.
e bowled without a slip, with
men on the off side of the
ket and seven on the left side,
luding a tight leg trap.
Accurate Length
sAsgarali was in the plot as
11 and he kept up an accurate
gth from the top end. He too
id the batsmen pinned down.
is rationing of runs had its re-
rd when = Marshall half-
rtedly hooked at a shortish one
‘om Asgarali and put up an easy
eh to Jones at mid-on,
‘Marshall had been at the wicket
an hour and eleven minutes
his 20 runs and Barbados had
iw. lost the first wicket for 35
S.

: Jones Gets One
pence tao met with success, for
out a run having been added
«the score Hunte turned one off
pad, low to Skeete fielding close
the wicket in the leg trap and
latter brought off a smart
ch to dismiss him for 15. He
s at the wicket for an hour and
minutes.

his brought together Walcott
Weekes, but for four overs
great pair were tied down as
ctively as the first pair,
enius told however and
kes stepped about a foot out-
his leg stump and took two
a Jones’ inswinger. This







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proved an open sesame for each
of the batsmen took fours after

this.
50 in 100

Fifty went up in 100 minutes
and five runs later Weekes was
unfortunately run out. He push~
ed one to widish mid-on and
called for a run but Walcott did
not run. I do not know whether
he sent Weekes back, but that was
not apparent from the stands.

In any case it would have been
too late as Weekes had all but
gained the other crease where
Walcott was standing when the
wicket was put down at the other
end. I think they would have
made the run if Clyde could have
got off, but I believe that Weekes’
quick move caught him unawares,

Barbados had now lost the third
wicket for 55 runs.

Goddard Promoted

Skipper Goddard promoted him—
self in the Batting order and went
m next. This was caleulated to
break up the accuracy of the
bowling attack, but still the score
was kept down.

Walcott took an hour over his
first eight runs but when he was
twelve he suddenly loosed a
powerful cover drive off Asgarali
that pierced the ring of fieldsmen
on the off side and went through
to the boundary for four runs.

Later he late cut another of
Asgarali’s deliveries for four runs
and hooked the next to the square
leg boundary for four and some
of the lethargy was driven out of
the game, The crowd stopped
jeering to cheer. Clyde reached
25 with the second boundary off
Asgarali after he had been batting
for an hour and a half.

Persiszence Wins
Asgarali’'s persistence almost
earned him Walcott’s wicket. The
latter lost his control for a moment
and hit out at a good length one.
He skied the ball behind mid-off
and Skeete having run back
several yards got his hand to the
skier but failed to hold it. Wal-

cott was then thirty-three.

In atonement Clyde Walcott
twice hooked short ones from
King to the square leg boundary
to send up the century after three
hours and a quarter.

Walcott later on-drove one
from Asgarali for four runs to
complete his individual half
century in two hours and nine
minutes.

The close of a dull day of play
saw Barbados with 122 runs on
the tins for three wickets,

Asgarali turned in a most useful
spell of bowling and had played
the outstanding part in making
Stolfmeyer’s delaying tactics suc-
vessful. He bowled 19 consecutive
overs and took one wicket for 55
runs,

Footballer Dies

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 21,

Baba Cummings, popular foot—
ball player (Shamrock Club),
died at the Colonial Hospital,
Port-of—Spain, from a fractured
skull sustained in an _ accident
while he was holidaying at the
islands during the weekend.



NW1I0 + ENGLAND
ome

LONDON -

4 efficiency.

Wi Telegraphy and
Tolephosr










@ From Page 4.

which five were maidens and he
had got one wicket at a cost ol
five runs. Asgarali on the other
hand had sent down a_ similar
number of overs of which one was
a maiden and he had captured
one wicket for 21 runs,

When the tea interval arrived
the total had been taken to 58
with Walcott not out 7. Goddard
had not yet opened his account.
Barbados was then at the wicket
for two hours,

After Tea

On resumption after tea, Gan-

teaume took the field. Asgarali
bowled the first over from the
screen end and sent down a

maiden to Goddard. Jones took
over from the screen end, bowl-
ing to a leg field and Walcott got
a single to square leg off the
seventh, while Goddard got three
through the slips off the last and

then faced a maiden from
Asgarali.
Waleott ondrove one from

Jones powerfully for a couple and
then glanced the next to fine leg
for a similar amount to make his
score 12 after being at the wicket
for 66 minutes.

Walcott barely got home when
Goddard played one to square leg
from Asgarali and the batsmen
took a sharp single, the only one
from the over, Goddard turned
the third from Jones nicely to
square leg for a single and Walcott
played out the remainder.

Asgarali who had sent down 11
consecutive. overs, 3 of which
were maidens for 22 runs, and
had taken 1 wicket, continued
from the screen end. Goddard
got a single to cover off the third
while Walcott beat Ferguson at
extra cover with a powerful shot
which went to the boundary off
the sixth delivery.

With the score at 73, Frank King
replaced Jones whose figures were
11 overs, 6 maidens, 14 runs and
1 wicket. He bowled to a leg field
and sent down a maiden to God-
dard.

Walcott on drove the first from
Asgarali’s next over for a single
and Goddard played out the re-
mainder, King bowled a maiden
to Walcott. Ganteaume stopped
what looked like a certain four
from a cut by Goddard off
Asgarali and later the batsman
singled to mid-on to send up Wal-
cott who late cut to the boundary
and then pulled te square leg for
another, to make his score 25 and
the total 85,

King’s next over was a maiden,
hig third in succession. Asgarali
continued his long spell and Stoll-
meyer brought off a brilliant piece
of fielding from a powerful cover
drive from Walcott. The bats-
man, however got a single to the
left of Stollmeyer off the next.

Walcott glanced one from King
to fine leg for a brace and later
got a single to square leg. Facing
Asgarali, he got into his wicket
and turned this bowler beautifully
to square leg for three. King’s
next over yielded a single.

A Chance

Off the second ball of Asgarali’s
next over, Walcott had a mighty
hit, but Skeete fielding at lone-
off, after getting under the ball,
failed to hold the catch. The
batsman eventually got g couple
and later took another single to
make his score 36 in 120 minutes.
Waleott pulled one from King

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to the square leg boundary to send

up 100 on the tins after 195
minutes’ play. Waleott got an-
other boundary wide of Tang

Choon at square leg and later on
drove for three to make his score
47. Goddard whose score was 7
for some time was now at the
wicket for 90 minutes.

An on-drive off Asgarali to the
boundary gave Walcott his 50 In-
cluding 7 boundaries in 129
minutes. He then took a single
wide of mid-—on to send up God-
dard who played out the remain-
der of the over.

King’s next over yielded 4@
single. Walcott cover drove the
second from Asgarali to the

boundary and then repeated the
stroke. but this time he only got
a single. Goddard then played
out the remainder and play ended
for the day with the total at 122
for the loss of 3 wickets. Walcott
is 58 and Goddard 7.

The Scores: —
BARBADOS — Ist Innings — 808
TRINIDAD'S Ist Innings



J. R. Stolimever b Millington a3
A. Ganteaume b R. F Marshal! fy
N. Asgarali ec w.k. (Waleott) b
N. E. Marshail . }
R. Tang Choon b R. E, Marshall eo
Pr. Legall b Mullins . 48
C. Skeeite b -R. EB. Marshall %
$. Guillen ec Mulls b N. Marshall 12
W. Ferguson c Millington b N, Mar-
shall ‘ q
S. Jackbir Lhow. b Mullins T
P. Jones b Mullins 5
F. King not out 4
Extras; lb, 12. nb. 2 15
Total: 219
Fall of wickets: 164, 2—68.
4—199, f-244, 6-—257, 7—264
9-275. .
ROWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M R w
C, Mullins 9 1 eR 8
E. Atkinson iranas 5 0 21 0
E. Millington 16 4 38 1
BR. L. G. Hoad 12 0 o7 - 0
N. E. Marshall 174 8 37 3
TD. Atkinson ” g 22 0
R. E. Marshall see 1 23 3
T, D, Gaddard ‘ 1 0 1 0
BARBADOS—2nd Innings
R. E. Marshall ¢ Jones b Asgarali.. 20
Cc. Hunte c Skeete b Jones 15
Cc. UL. Waleott not out 58
E. D. Weekes run out . M4
4. D, Goddard not out 7
Extras: b.2, 1b. 2, w. 4 8
Total (fer 3 wkts.) 122
Fall of wkts : 1—95. 2—34, 3-—85.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M. RFR w
S, Jackhbir oe 6 2 0 0
Fr. Kine ae wee
P. Jones Ww 6 14 1
N._ Asgarali 19 3 55 1
Umpires: Messrs, H. Waleott and C
Jordan.



*

Jamaica Team

*
Picked

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jca., Feb. 24.

Jamaica’s Eleven to meet Bri-
tish Guiana on March 3 in the
Intercolonial Tournament was
picked this afternoon as the last
trial match found J, K. Holt and
Ken Rickards batting well and
resuming their enthusiasm in the
Jamaican great batting strength.

The team in batting order an-
nounced by the Cricket Board are:

o. J. Cunningham, J. Prescod,
J. K. Holt (Jnr.), Ken Rickards,
Nevel Bonitto, George Mudi, Alfie
Binns, A. R. Bonitto (Capt.), H.
H. Johnson, 8, Goodridge, Alfred
Valentine, with L. B. .Saundera
as twelfth man.

Local opinion is that the best
team could be selected by carry-
ing two fast bowlers in Johnson
and Goodridge, two spin bowlers
in Valentine and Mudi with Binns
as wicketkeeper and a wealth of
batting ability.






KEY TO

HEART.

SOOSOS SOO FROTOF GOCSD COFSF “4 °




















OCLC LL

JONES & CO. LTD. -

Chance With

Australia

From HAROLD LARWOOD
MELBOURNE, Feb. 24,
Because the Melbourne weather
s; completely unpredictable it is
impossible to foreeast the result
»? the final Test but without being
biassed I would concede England a
50—50 chance. Indications are that
the pitch rhay dry and roll ow
slow, and easy on Monday and
then it will be up to our batsmen

to consolidate their position
fotiowing Friday’s exeelient bowl-
ing by Bedser and Brown
Looking back it is ridiculous o
think that Australia has already

won four Tests. This in my
opinion should be the glecider and

lot ol
next

Australia will need to‘do a
team building before they
go to Englahd.

As previously reported England
should have won the first and
second Tests. It was only the toss
and Brown's decision to bat and
sending Hutton lower down the list
that lost us the first Test, while the
second was Ipst mainly because
Hutton was out to a frightful ceci-
sion when on top of the bowling
in the first innings.

The Umpire who gave
decision against Hutton has
ince appeared in Test and
does not surprise me

In bith of those games, our bats-
men with one or two exceptions
failed after the bowlers had done
a magnificent job, but whatever
our bowlers did in those matches
was nothing compared ‘to yeSter-
day’s achievements,

In the first and second Tests the
pitch on the opening day was the
seam bowlers’ dream but there
was nothing like that’ yesterday
until very late in the afternoon
when heavy atmosphere enabled
Bedser to move the ball.

No Excuse

There was no excuse for Aus-
tralia’s batting failure other than
England’s magnificent outcricket.
Rrown displayed excellent strat-
egy in setting a slow tempo, and
Morris and Hassett fell into the
trap and played much too safely,
and although they realised after
lunch that they had made a mis-
take, it was then tao late to rec-
tify the position because Brown
then set run saving field placings,
and batsmen could do nothing
about it,

It was through trying to rectify
the position that Morris, Harvey
and Miller all lost their wickets
mm the 15 minutes before the tea
adjournment. From the view-
point of tactics, Australia was
completely outplayed, but I must
give full credit to Brown and
Bedser for the part they played.

Their bowling was excellent,
particularly that of Bedser, who
did all the spade work and never
once let up. The fielding was
also without blemish and Hutton’s
two slip catehes were among the
best I have seen, even though
Len was off-colour but I am glad
to report it was much better to-
day.

Australia's failure was due to
a steady persevering attack, good
English captainey, and bad_bat-
ting. Remembering that, I

the
not
that

very glad when the rain finally
washed out play to-day, as it
would have been a shocking trag-
edy for England to have had con-
ditions. against her after. having
played her way into a winning
position by outplaying Australia.

Just what the weather is going
to do is a complete mystery but
let us hope it plays fair and if it
does, I think Australia will lose
a Test for the first time since 1938,



OIL

Agents



* ESSO STANDARD

FEB. 25 — NO. 160

The Topic
of
Last Week



Last Tuesday in the Assembly
Joe greet Lou with a wink
Just to again remind her
‘It's later than you think.”

. ‘ .

For homes throughout Barbados
Built out of stone or walt
It in themselves divided
Must soon or later fall,
. . .

For when a heavenly party

Is tottering on the brink

Of any great disaster

“Men speak before they think.’
: . ’

Again if any leader

Says everything is right

And some don't feel the same way
It ends ye in @ fight,

Men are just men believe us
Machines men drive all day
If men just turn-in anachines
It's mento have’ the-say. .

,

For if one member feels that
A policy is right
He truly is a great man
if governed by his sight,
. >

But if another feels that

A policy Is wron

But fails to admit frankly,

He is just weak; not strong,
. : ‘

Let opposition rise up
One thing you all can say
However you turn and twist them
They'll argue the same way.

. . *

Se what is good for white man
Is good for black man
What's dood for Joe and vt
Is just as good for Lou,

. .

. . .
You can't just help the King’s man
And then forget the rest
It simply means you're eourting
A big official mess,
.
Act square to everybody
Share workers all alike
Now if you fail, believe us
Your whell must get a spike.
‘ . °

Well Wednesday boys the cricket
Began in bright sunshine
But Lou and comrade Robert
Were all cricket inclined.

. .

We saw Hunte for St. Andrew
His strokes echoed this sound
Well boys you can believe me
“Big cricket come to town,”*

.

Who start him off to “fame-land”
Can any bedy telit *
Twas only Mitchie Hewitt
Who formed the "B.C.L."
. . .

This man had one great vision

To help the country lad

Who now throughout Barbados

For Hunte, they feel quite glad.
o

But take a look at Legall
Speier waren boy a
ho with the Trinidad stalwarts
With Bajan bowlers toy.
.
For his performance Thursday
This is what one man said

You can see that strona boy Legal!
Ate J&R Enriched Bread. '

sponsored by
J&R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of









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SATURDAY, 3RD MARCH, 1951

THURSDAY, 8TH MARCH, 1951
SATURDAY, 10TH MARCH, 1951





TWENTY FOUR EVENTS IN ALL

ret

EIGHT EVENTS EACH DAY



FIRST RACE EACH DAY STARTS AT 1,00 P.M.

The 2/- SWEEPSTAKE will be officially closed on
THURSDAY 1st MARCH, 1951, at 3.00 p.m. and will be
drawn for on FRIDAY 9th MARCH, 1951, at the
GRAND STAND at 4,00 p.m. Tiekets can be purchased
from REGISTERED SELLERS up to 4.00 p.m. on FRI-
DAY 9th MARCH, 1951.

The Plan for admission to the GRAND STAND
will be opened, as follows :-—

To SUBSCRIBERS on Thursday 22nd February,
1951.

To THE GENERAL PUBLIC on Monday 26th Feb-
py 1951 between the hours of 8.15 a.m, and 3.00 p.m,
aily. i

ALL BOOKINGS MUST BE PAID FOR BY
FRIDAY 2nd MARCH, 1951, by 3 P.M.

SUBSCRIBERS :—

Free Admission and Three (3) Ladies or Juniors
* Tickets at $2.16 each.

GENERAL PUBLIC :—

PLEADED LPPLLLSSELEVPEPEEM EAA MLNS

Ladies per Day ........cceeseceeneeee $1.20 ft
Gents per Day ..,,--ecceecseseererene $h-92
Paddock per Day .socccescscsceseseee 91-20
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Gents Beaton .......ccccccesesscscses 96.00...

FIELD STAND:— Per Person per Day — 3/- Each
N.B.—No Passes for re-admittance will be given.

ALL BOOKINGS CLOSED at the Office at 3.00 p.m, on
FRIDAY, 2nd MARCH, 1951.



POSITIVELY NO BOOKINGS WILL BE ACCEPTED

BY TELEPHONE. &

2

G. A, LEWIS, &

Secretary. >

1 PELIICIV OOOO Go 0 FOOL DOP FPSO PUVOC OT FOOD PRY



#

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hence sugar production in Barbados, we

PAGE SIX
BARBADOS ADVOGATE are restricted, by acreage of the Island,
Geer SESS SES Paws to improvements in the field of our present



Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd, Broad 6t., Bridgetown.

Sunday, February 25, 1951

SOIL EROSION,

THE unusually heavy ‘and persistent
rains t have been experienced this
month-provide a suitable opportunity for
inviting attention once more to the import-
ant subject of soil erosion. Soil erosion,
expressed in the simplest terms, means the,
uncontrolled movement of water over the
surface of cultivated land, and does not
mean landslides or other forms of geologi-
cal slippage which are commonly seen in
the Scotland District of the island.



The extent of the soil loss caused by
erosion varies with the type of soil; some
soils are more erodible than others and it
is in the black coralline soils on the lower
elevations of the island that the great2st
amount of damage through the washing
away of top soil is effected by erosion.

The main types of erosion which are
active on the coralline seils of Barbados
ate Sheet Erosion—where the whole soil
surface of an undulating area is subjected
to the downward movement of water,
usually excess drainage water, which
carries the soil with it to the bottom of the
slope; Gully Erosion—in this form, the
excess water moving over the soil surface
collects and follows a natural depression
inthe land, forming a small temporary
river, and carrying soil from the sides and
bottom of the depression with it; Soil
(Creep-Erosion—in this case, no water
actually moves over the surface of
the soil, but the particles of soil move
down the slope because of the force
of falling raindrops. This dislodges them,
and they continue their downward move-
mént under the force of gravity, event-
ually coming to rest. It is possible to
control, and to control with advantage,
these types of soil erosion by relatively
simple methods. These methods are known
under the name of contour cultivation. Con-
tour cultivation can be so employed, that it
will-ensure a maximum utilization of rain-
fall to the advantage of crops grown. Fur-
ther any rain that falls either in too great
a concentration for soil absorption or over
and above the requirements of the soil, can
be drained away from the land in a con-
trolled manner. Rainfall under these con-
ditions is responsible for the most serious’
types of erosion-sheet and gully.

It follows, therefore, that more wide-
spread application of measures for the
prevention of Soil érosion and for the con-
servation of soil moisture will-be of great
benefit to the agriculture of the Island.
Moreover, under normal rainfall condi-
tions in Barbados, where often the rate of
precipitation is very great, as much as
three or four inches in one hour, it is’ very
essential that such measures be taken on
all sloping sugar cane soils.

The Department of Agriculture has
placed due emphasis on the fact that soil
consérvation is essentially a commonsense
matter of using land for purposes for
which it is best suited. Technical assist-
ance is available from the Department
whenever it is required, Discussion of
problefhs is welcomed by the officers con-
cerned, But a word of warning is neces-
sary.

The laying down of a sound scheme for
the prevention of-soil erosion is a problem
that must be attacked in a comprehensive
manner. Half-way measures towards con-
trol, sometimes instead of preventing ero-
sion, may in actual fact, exaggerate it.

, It is unfortunate that because of certain
- experiences in a small number of cases,
the practice Of contour cultivation is being
condemned as ineffective in some quarters.

Surface drainage schemes cannct be ex-
pected to do more than prevent for a time
the accumulation of damaging concentra-
tions of water in depressions down, the
slope and*thus check the ultimate develop-
ment of gullies, F e

Drainage schemes alone cannot control
the insidious process of sheet erosion,
which, although less spectacular than gully

erosion, is often more serious.

| A combination of contour drainage with
soil protecting and soil building methods
is; however, of maximum value in reduc-
ing soil and water losses from sloping
cultivated land.

The insistence with which the Depart-
‘ment of Agriculture advoeates contour
cultivation of undulating sugar cane land
on the-coralline soil typef should not be
taken ‘as a condemnation in a negative
manner of the value of the cane-hole sys-
tem. The cane-hole system has proved it-
self a good system for cane cultivation on
undulating soils. The system of contour
cultivation which is merely an extension
of the cane hole system is an improve-
ment of the older system.

The importance of saving the top-soil
cannot be overstressed. In order to im-
‘prove and increase our cane yield, and

“ers ever encountered anywhere in the

acreage, and improvements in the factory.
Good soil management which covers soil
erosion, plays no mean part in any pro-
gramme of production increase.

Mr. E. E. Clayton, Soil Corcervatienist,
New South Wales, writes in his latest book
on the subject of soil erosion: —“When
once erosion starts, unless it is arrested, it
will completely devastate cultivation land
and make it unfit for any useful purfr se.
It has been stated that, in its advanced
state, erosion is a gigantic monument to
ignorance. Ignorance of its causes, of its
destructive nature, of its consequences, of
proper remedial measures, and ignorance
of the caution signs of history which sound
their warnings down the corridors of time
giving danger notices of this nation-wreck-
ing menace to all who will listen and
heed.”


















FEDERAL CRICKET

THE announcement that John Goddard
has accepted the captaincy of the West
Indies Cricket team to tour Australia later
this year is a happy augury, not only for
the game itself but for the entire Carib-
bean at a time when federation of the
colonies is a topic of current conversation.
John Goddard has already led the W.I.
team to victory, against England in the
West Indies, in India, and in England. It
would have been most unfortunate if at
the moment of the severest test for West
Indian Cricket, there had to be a change of
leadership.

The team has grown to know and respect
a leader who has knitted it into the power-
ful fighting unit that it now is, and the
captain has learnt the capabilities and tem-
perament of each of the players, in a man-
ner only possible by long association. The
result is that today the West Indies can
place in the field a team that is really a
team in every sense of the word, The pull
is always a long and steady one with every
man in the pull.

If the same could be said for other
spheres of West Indian activity, then the
dream of Federation would become a reali-
ty without much of the fuss and flurry now
attendant on all discussion ‘of the subject.
This sinking of insular ideas, so difficult
of achievement in other aspects of West
Indian life, is a spontaneous action when
cricket is being played. Time was when
any spectator at Kensington stood in physi-
cal danger, if he attempted to cheer any
other but a Barbados player. This has
long given way to West Indian patriotism,
and Trinidadian and. British Guianese
alike receive as hearty an ovation as any
local exponent of the great summer game.
It matters not what .may be his. native
colony, so long as it is West Indian, he is
well applauded, It is these trends which
lead to the hope that the W.I. cricket team
will continue to do well wherever it is call-
ed upon to play.

Regarding the chances of the team in the
forthcoming trial of strength with Aus-
tralia it is good to note that the West
Indian Cricket Board of Control has not
been lulled into any false sense of security,
but is doing everything possible to put the
strongest possible combination into the
field. It is true that the West Indies team
to visit Australia twenty years ago, won
the final test game, but every cricket fol-
lower knows what a deciding factor the
weather was on that occasion and how for-
tune favoured the W.I. This does not in
anyway belittle the great bowling of
Herman Griffith, nor the astute captaincy
of Jack Grant. But this victory was per-
haps the only bright spot in an otherwise
dull series of performances by the W.I.
team.

No other win of note was recorded and
the other tests lost by very comfortable
and wide margins. George Headley stood
out as a batsman of the highest class,
Learie Constantine and Derek Sealey, as
all-rounders, and George Francis and Her-
man Griffith, as among the best fast bowl-

world. But as a team, the achievements
of the 1931 side to Australia were not great.

We repeat, that neither the absence of
names like Woodful, Ponsford, Grimmett,
O'Reilly, Bradman, McCabe and Kippax
from the Australian list nor the recent suc-
cesses of the West Indian team have made
the cricket authorities of these parts care-
less in their efforts at team building, and it
is to be hoped that success will crown the
1951 visit to Australia.

John Goddard, and his men, whoever
they be in the final analysis will face a
stern task which will demand every ounce
of resource, and every grain of determina-
tion if they are to do well. One other
factor can influence the success of the team
to. a great extent, and that is the choice of
a manager. We hope that the same care
will be exercised in this selection, because
“off the field” is as important as “on the
field.” In this way our team can become a
really great fighting force, which can do a
great deal towards welding our several
edlonies into one solid unit.

















































































SUNDAY APVOCATE



OCH WEATHER FaR FEBRUARY |



=

As food has become the
national obsession, it is not
Fp cg that the vicar of
Holy Trinity, Beckenham, in-
vites all present at Sunday
Communion to a free break-
fast in the church hall at
nine o'clock, “Mothers, fath-
ers, and children turn up in
force.”

EFORE you begin I would W
like fo remind you that a
bazaar in aid of... .
Pass the condiments, Mr. B,
Certainly, Mrs. C.
. . . IT would like to remind
you that a bazaar in aid of... . that we can win.
I wonder what these sausages The French excel at Rugger, the
are made of? j © Poles are playing squash,
Reindeer, I should think. At tennis we can never save
We shall be eating Father our face.
Christmas next. But thanks to Mrs. Dix, aged 22,
. . « If you could put your of Olney, Bucks,
knives and forks down for one ‘By gad, sir, we have won the
moment . pancake race.

Marmalade, Mrs. G?

Thank you, Mrs, C.

Oh, do stop it, young Raymond.
There’s other people want toast
as well as you.

Just like my Charlie. “Got any
more, mum?” he’s always saying.
It gets on your nerves.

I'll swear young Raymond eats
his own weight in bread in a
week.

By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

Holding Our Own

Mrs. Isabel Dix, aged 22, of
Olney, Buckinghamshire, beat
the women of Liberal, Kan-
sas, U.S., in the international
pancake race.

E may not shine at cricket,
we may not shine at golf.
Our boxers seem to take it on
the chin. ;
On football fields in foreign parts
the lesser breeds prevail.
In fact, there’s nothing much

{t seems the fate of Englishmen
to give the world at large
The games that we invented

long ago.
Believing that we cannot lose, we
do not stint our help.
Most willingly we teach them
all we know.
We taught them how to use a bat,
and how to kick a goal.
. And how to make a pass and
score a try;
We taught them how to use a left,
and what is our reward?
They use a right and punch us
in the eye,

This lesson should be heeded be-
fore it is too late,
No more should we expose our-
selves to shame.
But keep a few exclusive things,
like croquet, to ourselves
In case we lose an international
are
We still can shove our ha-pennies,
and play our games of darts.
And win them all without a loss
of face,
But if the girls of Kansas start
intensive training now,
Next year, sir, we shall lose the
pancake race.

. Hats Off
_ Answering a man’s ques-
tien: “When should I lift my
hat to women?” a womon col-
umnist replies that he should
lift it when he meets or parts
from a woman, when he is

. . . If you coula be quet for
one moment I would like to tell
you about a bazaar...

I see in the papers we're going
to eat beavers next,

Beavers? What are beavers?

A kind of water rat, I think,
They’re coming from Denmark.

I think it’s a shame we can’t
even eat our own water rats.

» . » Can you hear me? The
bazaar will be open next Tuesday
afternoon in aid of . ..

Had enough, Mrs C?

The first. time I’ve felt full up
for days.

The same _ with me. Come
along, young Raymond. And take
that buttered crumpet out of your
pocket. Where are your man-
ners?

They’re all
morning, Mrs.

Good morning, Mrs. C.

. . « If you could give me one
moment before you go...

Good morning, all.

Good morning, all.
next Sunday.

Nine o'clock sharp.

going now. Good

See you



There is, as Salvador de “First that he should
Madariaga notices in his biblio- and armed a Knight eit eens
graphy, a sea of books about spurs.” And then “that he should
Christopher Columbus. have the right to call himself Don
Yet surprisingly little is known Cristobal Colon and his successors
for certain about him, also.” The Jew, the Converso, the
Most people, including the Knight, the Grand Admiral of the
Genoese, know that at one period sea, the dreamer all these are
of his life Columbus lived in mixeq in Colombus.
Genoa and he has given a name
& ‘aoe and a hotel in that
erranean seaport. her) sees himself carty his -
re fen “ seen mn, cae Kane ourden, He Was thenat te
oO olumbus_ was firs ub- Christiani
lished in 1939 and has now ea ee eens
republished by Hollis and Carter “He put up a big cross at the
(18s.) throws more light on this Mouth of the harbour... on a hill
Genoese connection than most of Where it could be seen’ from
us would normally discover from everywhere, as a sign that Your
other biographies of the Very Highnesses will hold this country
Magnificent Lord Don Cristobal 8S their own and mainly as a sign
Colon, of Jesus Christ Our Lord and in
According to the author Cristo- honour of Christianity.”

foro Colombo was born in a :
family of _, But there is Colon, (the colon-
mily of needy woolweavers and 'i2-7) as well as the Christ-bearer.

tailors, but his school was the sea.
ae eis 1 it, He began well by defending the
early as 14 he would be with tv osts of the natives meeines the

the Corsairs combining trade with “*” ;
war. “The small Sey whe began sailors and shipboys who tried to
sailing at ten and navigating at take advantage of their ignorance
fourteen picked up his astronomi- °f European values. Yet, as he
cal notions while at the ropes.” himself explains, he was not tak-
“And the sea was his university.’ "8 Up their interests as such, but
Cristoforo Colombo was a young i? order to make a good impres-
Genoese whose Italian was not Siom on them “so that the next
resentable- and- whose culture time Your Highnesses send people
language was Spanish, “Now here, they should be well re-
there is only one reasonable way °eived.
of explaining this fact” concludes _It is impossible by quotation to
Senor de Madariaga: “the Co- give more than the sketchiest im-
lomho family were Spenish Jews pression of Senor de Madariaga’s
settled in Genoa, who following portrait of Columbus. The book
the traditions of their race, had has to be. read slowly in its en-
Femained faithful to the language tirety, But it is worth while
of their country of origin.” summarising this short reyiew

x '
Having identified Cristoforo wish the following seTaty
Colombo as a Jew, Salvador de _ “You (Columbus) mattered not.
Madariaga. builds up a picture of What mattered was the Great
Columbus which fits the pattern, Design, the Union of Continent
The Jew in Colon, usually. shy and Continent, the discovery of
and out of the way comes to the the earth by the earth and of man
surface as soon as there is a men< by man. The time had come
tion of gold or gems. The mettallic when mankind, which had lived
and glittering quality of gold—so for centuries with its hands joined
iyplgally Jewish that it has led in upwards in a yearning, vertical
@ English language to the curi- gesture, the shape of its cathedral

ous subconscious pun on Jew and :
Jewellery, + windows, hat to lower its arms,

whereby jewels be- disjoin it
: Ss hands and make them
come the goods typically handled active in horizontal, tumultuous

is naturall i i stat
ant ae - dated ke an acon and creative activities. Worship
having a commercial value, of the unknowable was to be
But Colon is more than a Jew, Superseded by the discovery of
He is a pre-incarnation of Don the Kknowable; the sons of men
Quixote, were to be given at last the full
Colon like Don Quixote feels possession of their planet. At
that he is called to perform a deed era had to begin in which man
to fulfil a mission. was first to seek the surface of the
What_was the price which the planet, then to fathom its depths,
King of Portugal was “to pay? then the depths of infinite space

The Christ-bearer (Christo-

~

TTS THOSE ATOM BOMBS BUT T
BISHOP |!

See

Sitting On The Fence



Christopher Columbus

Reviewed By GEORGE HUNTE :





* “SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1951

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passing a woman he knows,
when he is walking with a
man who speaks to a woman,
when he is walking with a
woman who speaks to another
man, and when he enters a
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LTHOUGH this may be a
A useful guide to correct be-
haviour, it still does not answer
the question: “Why should men be
expected to raise their hats to
women. at all? is

Is it supposed to be a tribute
to their beauty, which is often
absent, an acknowledgment that
they are the weaker sex, when
most doctors will tell you they are
as strong as horses, or is it a
mark of respect?

If it is a mark of respect, this
classes women with the national
anthem and funerals, but. still
does not answer another question:
“Respect for what?”

Are they superior beings, and,
if so, where is the evidence? Are
they more intelligent than men,
more courageous, physically and
morally? Are they more truthful,
more honest, more just? If so,
where are the proofs?

* * *

So far as I am concerned, I
don’t mind opening a door for
them, even if they are strong
enough to smash it open with
their fists. I don’t mind lighting
their cigarettes if they wish to
give the impression that they are
too weak to hold a match, I will
even raise my hat in lifts and
stand before them with
bowed head as if they were
corpses, if it makes them any
happier. ;

jBut I warn them that these
acis of humility are not marks
of respect. hey are relics of a

by age when ants tried
to Dlease the ladies of their
choice, for purposes which were
not always respectable,

In other words, the opening of
doors, the lighting of cigarettes,
the raising of hats is nothing but
a leer from the past.

Therefore, if women wish to
keep their respect in this age of
sex equality they should be open-
ing their own doors and lighting
their own cigarettes.

And sometimes, as a gesture
between equals, raising their
ridiculous hats to us.

—L.E.S.





and of that other infinite which
is the microcrosm. Man had to
discover ‘man, the better to know
himself, The cannibals had to
create Caliban in the genius of
Shakespeare; the new world had
to bring forth the Novum Organum
in the genius of Bacon, the naked
Arcadians of Guanahani had to
arouse MRousseau’s imagination
Into chanting of beauties of natura]
man and to usher the French
Revolution, the rights of man and
the gospel of Karl Marx. The
time had come for a world to die
and for another world to be born,
The New World that was to be
discovered was not merely the
American Continent, but the
world which the discovery of the
American Continent was to bring
forth in the minds of men. Some-
one was needed to open the way,
to lead, And the first act would
only be an act of faith—the dis-
covery of a continent by one who
had no reason whatever to believe
in the existence of that continent,
That lost world had to be found
and someone had to find it; but
this was bound to be the greatest
day in human history, and haa
it been-entrusted-to a man-—who

knew what he was doing, he}.

would have been dangerous to
men. This task had to be given
to a man whose vision flew over
the waters of reality like those
birds which you heard pass” over
your tried sails the night before
the discovery; and he had to be
given an illusion so indentical
with reality that he would sai}
towards his dream with’ as much
certainty as if he had been there
before and had locked: it up in his
chest. What.if he led for the
wrong reason, since he led to the
right place? Mankind may know
where it is going even when its
Jeaders do not. You did not
matter at all. Between Europe
and America, you were but a
bridge of aching flesh, You did
not discover America, which is
what mankind was after, you
discovered the Indies, which do
not exist except in your imagina-
tion; ard because you would bend
to yourself that joy, the spirit de-
nied you access to the knowledge
of what you were doing—and the

continent does not bear your
aame, ir
The vision vanished. Colon

died a second time. And he !ives

for evermore.”







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FAMOUS THROUGH OUR BLENDING
*“** THATS WHY SO MANY PEOPLE ~

AT HOME AND ABROAD PREFER...

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nt TE ET TL LL TT TT aL RITE SR RRR Hrdamanesersttat amis. -_
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1951 UN , OC :
SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN













By FAN GALE

Our ‘Ladies Of The Lamp’ Work All Night Be guided

i ions ye Buen, rd mayne ¥ en may are “ be - 1 at poor A public subscription was 1838-39 5,000 in-p: i werk

jalic in Jeeamotts Lan a get a fae : are Kept in the atr opened, : and with the money treated, while in the year 1949-5

Wisaiiita) ‘Wan na eee sc raised Carlisle House, standing on the number was 8,500. The nun b
ospital was quiet tnd reacetul an acre and a half of land, was ber of out-patients has increasec y

KRridgetown Never Sleepsmam7





when I visited it cne n’ght last The surgery was being prepared purchased. The House was ¢on- l[remendously-——in 1938 there were

week. The moon was full and 1 for an emergency operator when. verted into wards, apartments for 25,000 -and last year.

walked slowly through the I looked in there, at.d the amass the resident Apothecary and the 75.000, a

grounds, admiring the ‘:ombre of apparatus laid out und@ér the Matron, a_ receiving room for

looking palms and the neatly kept brifiiant circle of lights ‘looked patients and accommodation for Why the increase,

hedges. ratzer frightening There \avere the nece
so many instruments th:t I ceufc. bui

there wer<

: are we be
sary attendants... A new coming more unhealthy as_ th
jing, in which there were six years go by? No, says the Actin












In t-e Maternity Werd all was not help wondering how the syr-)\ ands, was added, Medical Superintendent in his re
not so peaceful however. A few geon ever found the one . ha * port for 1949-& “There is n
of the tiny babies were awake ang Wanted. By 1918 the Hospital could pro: indication that there has been an:

were loudly demanding to be fed vide accommodation: for 232 pa- deterioration in the health of the
I saw two extra-small babies in Lastly I visited the Marie Louise “ents and there were two resident [sland, and the great increase ip
thave, they were a twia and I was Ward. Most of the patients were joie hav To-day the number of the number of patients dealt witl

beds have increased to 326 (314 eg ; ainec ‘ {
tol at at bi 5 sle nine as Se ex < ean only be explained by an in
d that at birth one weigied 3lb., asleep, but the nurse had waxen of which are usually filled) and erease in the Aemnand for Hospita

ok ~ other is They are doing one up to take her pulse, The provision has been made for six attention.” Fortunately, advance
n one cot lay a litte boy of night nurses (there are thirty-five medical officers, although ‘only j ical and surgics shni

ae bite: ea , oe rat hag: mS Le Sy ¥ in medical and surgical techniqu

ec mon is mother had of them) work from 7.30 p.m. to four are in Yesidence at the mo-

died and nobody seemed to want 6.30 a.m., with one hour off for ment. While in 1918 there were

him. I wonder what will ever a meal and rest during the night. 38 nurses, today provision has patients, from 16 to 12 days. How

become of him. been made for 116 qualified nurses ever, the accommodation probler

The riext day the Secretary told (the actual number at the Hos: stil! remains

In the Casualty Ward the doc- me that the Barbados General pital is 61) and there are 78 E

tor, had two patients-to attend, Hespital was founded. as the oul- nurses in training.

The man had a cut on his arm, come ofa public meeting held in

and the woman. had been cut on. 1889 when it was resolved “That Although the staff has been

her head with a “tin tot". Both the altered conditions of Society inc ‘reased in the last few years, it

cuts had to be stitched, The Cas- in this Island render it absolutely is vious that the number of Footnotes Tho. Hospital i

ualty is open.gll night, and the necessary, for the interest of beds have not been inereased in appeal

number of patients varies between’ humanity, to establish and main. rropertion to the number requir- is. ur

three and sixteen a night,.but all tain a general Hospital tor ‘he ing treatment at the Hospita: w- ions, and each

the nurses agree that “Saturday reception and treatment of the sick day For instan¢e, in @he year blood donors receive $5

night is the busiest night of the

week.” :

A wise mother lets baby decide about
the milk for bottle feeds. Lots of energy, steady
gains, contented days, peaceful nights — these tell her what she most
wants to know — baby is doing splendidly on Ostermilk.

Why can mother pin her faith so important additions are made: Iron
firmly on Ostermilk ? Because, where to enrich the blood ~ sugar to: modify
breast feeding is difficult or impossible the food for tiny digestions — Vitamin
it is the perfect substitute for mother’s D to help build strong bones and
milk. Osterzailk is finest grade cow’s teeth. Ostermilk is made by Glaxo
milk, dried under the most hygienic Laboratories Ltd., who, since 1908,
condithwns. The protein, great body- have been pioneers in the develop-
Tee fe made easily digestible ment of the best possible foods for
tee voller drying process. And babies.

a OSTERMILK....

For your free copy of illustrated Baby Book—Phone 4675

and the use of new drugs hav
shortened the average stay of ir

and there is a ver
long list of people waiting fo
admission to the Hespitet









Upstairs in the Matron’s office
the Night Sister, Mrs. Barbara
Judge, was giving out drugs to the

si nurses, The dispenser does not
IN THE MATRON’S OFFICE Sister B ivi 2 / i i 5
Sut “Seugi to the nigte 36 im arbara Judge was giving normally work at night so drugs



ree
0 PPEPLPLA SLL FSPOSS ESE LIF PEGE LIAL ALAA PIP PAAPPEPIS SO,

*

PLEASE NOTE %

+

S

: : . “ 5
Owing to the moving of our Drug Store, which has %
been interrupted by inclement weather, we regret *

the inconvenience caused to our friends and customers
and take this opportunity to inform them that we will
soon be established in new quarters

ONLY A FEW YARDS AWAY
From our Former Place of Business,

The Cosmopolitan Pharmacy —

PEEL LOO ILO LEAL LOLS

Py CTI I CeCe er eg
FRESH SUPPLY OF

enter” a a a a ee

a:

SER ea aa e eka



SPURINA HEN CHOW

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

r | SH. JASON JONES & CO., LTD,—Distributors
A BABY being fed in the Maternity Ward. There are nine cots in this ward but only seven were being used: . is "a0 Sesean ws w a ~ a « a a 5 et a a a



HARRISON'S BROAD STREET
SOLE LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS OF

PIANOS » H.J.RENN | —

THESE PIANOS ARE FITTED WITH—

BRONZED ALL-OVER BACKLESS
IRON FRAME,

HERBURGER-BROOKS ACTION
“AND KEYS,

§ BEST QUALITY HAMMERS

a



e





AND THE CASEWORK IS SOLID MAHOGANY,
HIGHLY POLISHED.

IN ADDITION ALL PIANOS, (WOODWORK, FELTS,
ETC) ARE SPECIALLY TREATED TO RESIST
INSECTS OF ALL KIND



IN THE MARIE LOUISE WARD most of the patients were asleep, but the nurse had woken up one

woman to take her pulse. THE DOCTOR is seen here stitching a cut in a patient’s arm. SUPREME IN TONE QUALITY,
ES ‘ ,





















Pablic Budgetin help the needy around them. ‘ 4 Y © ‘blement, and possibly unemploy- The first thing striking me, is |
ai Tt me 8 Otherwise they eould not possibly O b et e iment. I would not go further, 1 that they all seem to think that AND APPEARANCE
Cae tg thine Soca unig live. But. still I.submit that some- Pigg 7 the British plan goes too tourists boats are to call here regu-
° Budge thing more ‘of a regular and re- i AA ila hc , iar. do not believe in. toe larly on Sundays and also that the : ; i
ae Te niiise and ne Coie, Yiable nature should be officially iii is urgently in need of asa ee 9) tea” soeta’ ae much seeding people with a spoon: stores would be open all day. » Special Introductory Cash Price
> te ra i . a f x . at ‘ ley , . . . : at
tral Government, has come round provided. ‘And so one might go on at of the island, I cannot but feel Rag fo oa inaiv gone peo ships have only a el
once more may I put in a plea Take a couple of sample cases. length. that we can and must make it eae e = d s oe and foresig tain number of hours in port, which ac 1
on behalf of our poor and dis= An. Old Age Pensioner, a re- N I 3 that.the situa- Our business as a humane and o t a abet SeyRemy ; - ps ans pas ssengers cannot give ne ir .
‘ ty spectable lonely woman, tells me . NOW recognise tha Teca hese ising setae. tee was glad to see in the Advo- eatire atte ntion to one particular
abled old people. fli 4 she has to pay 5/— a wees rent, ses the difficult question christian Pe ua ¥ at te ba cate last week that in an inter- item, We will presume the boat it }
The high costs of living, and ° ay Lae 5: ie tice necessaries of life for all our old Yin Mr. Ww eh A OR a item, "Wilk DresinHie Gis Dat
not’ least. the increased charges and cannot get a cheaper place. creased tee joe tbe sot and disabled. badste:mariy ‘bt eae eer. W. A. Crawford recom arviving here at day break and; HARRISON'S Showroom Dept.
2 Now that is her Whole income, ex- that it is complained in the Hous , forked faithfully for , mended this course, and I hope that this is known several days ‘ i , ial 2352
tor rent, are hitting them hard | Ss 1 , Assembly that the pretty big whom worked faithfully for long that he : he litice , nang," sonta he sal 1a
i the authorities should really cept for what charity she can pick ot ssembly tha ie p el S years when they were able. lat he and other political leaders beforehand. The agents here would ;
fs to mite them some. additiona) up. How does. she. live? _She Treasury balarice iB same ai ‘ : will push for it, And the clergy inform the. ship that the Storer)
(a ae: a would be willing; glad, to. share dissipated by ’ Sener eee, oe es B. Let me add here that T am not @%d Church people might well would be open from say 8 to 1€
“ ‘oie to’ 12/2 monthly Parochial -her shelter. with a person of her But ore we oie to advocating giving to able-bodied S*sist_ to publicise and advocate am. of £ " ‘6 pm., winbneent WOM MMe LCP AVP
assistance, (in. St. Michael and own type and quiet way of life,3S already a fh } y Pat there idlers. Far from it. I cordially |. would suit the majority of pas %
aa ther yarishes) and 5/- but that is not easy to find. many of us, On this point ¢ _ agree with the Scripture, “If a | [ venture to hope these sugges~ sengets. This would actually mean $
oa ales old. Age Pension are~~ Again; a Parish Pensioner’ get- 27° then, Res 1 beg man will not work neither. shi! flons will receive the attention and 2 age ny " the wares dity for §
2 2e@kk a bain, & aris . - save _ri— ” “OV > { . . arks. > Ww 2. ge a
really impossible amounts to sup- ting the 12/- per month has to pay ey ee C it re ae eat. ‘ ‘ Seed With th sheen ad oo a eotaae sree tad
ort. anybody in the poorest 60 cents a week for a room, He 1. We as a Community a 2. There is the possibility ot ved, FR ANCIS. GobDso! . ie Ye tell tie tay Gils-woula be %
: hion, Of course there is a great formerly made use of the S.A. still able to spend quite a lot ©! an entertainment Tax. It is levied ANCIS GODSON. _ Don't te me at th wou d > “a ,
oouae of charitable help—on the Shelter, .but craved something money on what must be called jn the Mother Country. It is very Sunday” O ‘ forcing the clerks,, to Bret i. =
streets of Bridgetown and private—. more of a home, He has to depend luxuries —— Entertainments, and jight on the individual ticket, but Sunday Opening Sabbath as how many of them d& With

_ i, |e we re a es i F S aye at home!
ly, and through the Churches. I for most of the neeessaries of life sports, picnics, and gee eta es the total amount is substantial To The Editor, The Advocate— ne WPL ot Sunda ie, ees ae ies
know a good deal about that and on varying and quite inadequate ing and drinking, etc. € The tre and it is easy to collect. : SIR,—I have been following with the advice of "Doing Unto Others”, and
highly appreciate the kind feeling charity. â„¢ believe he has also a are, I believe, ten Cinema atres 3. Finally, the proper course is much interest, the various views then be vexed at your doing something

and generosity that provide it. ticket for the Parochial Food running now, for example, most the long term plan of a National expressed by your correspondents Which you would like someone to do sg

‘FOOD VALUES


























di- 7 | dni tie) . for you if you were a Tourist, r
, h the ten- centre but that is one meal a day; of them twice daily. The expendi-~ Welfare Scheme on the British on the opening of the stores chk Cri: ARES Ss"
Then OL are nelghbourly and what. about morning and night? ture. for this one iten of recrea~ model—but only for Age and dis fiindays.. Mie or eae Yours VJORN. SHANNON. eae ere ees 3 =.
; CRAWFORDS UFILLIT BISCUITS per tin $1.2r
S eS CRAWFORDS Asst, SCOTCH SHORTBREAD ..per tin $1.17
7 .
ORIEN TAL % 3 PEAK FREANS CHOCOLATE %
x % Asst. BISCUITS ............. » $60
q
GIFTS! —. % A Prescription) is b HUNTLEY & PALMERS OSBOURNE BISCUITS}
; sa Bie aag ' McVITIE. PRICK LINCOLN CREAM | } lb. Packets
THANTS - acon % . ° as % | ® ROYAL SCO1 i at 35c. >
; % Simply a Piece % s OSBOURNE ¥ x
== x | JACOBS EXHIBITION | per Pkt. .
SSS % . iT ) s I
: % ve x | JACOBS LINCOLN CREAM . $
% of Paper... So is ¥ | 8
Just Opened % x SLICED HAM SLICED BACON CHEESE §
HISODOL % @t Dollar Biitt. x SOLIO PACK APPLES Oa. aherge Tin <8
TABLETS Fi % 3 TIME TO THINK OF YOUR... SURF MAID GRAPES ..... .Large Tin 50c. Small 29 §
3 ¥ ipl sts denteieel esta iia : A es “a a
HISODOL % «WHILE ONE REPRESENTS WEALTH THE OTHER =. TTONS & BOWS BARTLETT PEARS ..,........Large Tin 6%¢. Small 35 ;
POWDER . SAFEGUARDS HEALTH ; DUTCH STRAWBERRIES IN SYRUP See eS ee
. y - "
BISURATED MAGNESIA : We cannot afford to treat a prescription as an ordinary piece WE HAVE OPENED an Assortmnt of the most Exquisite SOUTH AFRICAN GUAVAS Large Tin — .53 g ,
y' ead nny GD Aé |
Powder & Tablets Sof paper since human Iife and health depends on it, To us it ; - eer eee BUTTONS for all manner of 3 :
LIVONAL $ is a confidential document, Compounded by qualified drug- § | dean albaagrbts den ane COCK ADE Order these from.. x '
earnel >
EPHAZONE TABLETS $ Ste Sul ‘ $| S
EFHAZONE: TABI BS gists and checked for ‘safety. % STANSFELD N
% Send us your next Doctor’s Prescription. % : ‘ ‘1 FINE zt %
perenne Tt OU CAN RUSE U3 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. } jj: oe 3
YEASTVITE TABLET Is YOU CAN TRUST US. 3 a ; r 0. ; x SCOT CT 8
= ie 2 s 2 aa Wi, Livi 3
C. CARLTON BROWNE {i % i Q —Ali Branches. 3 10, 11, 12 & 12 BROAD STREET ; RUM & CO., %
Hl nights ; . & $ | %
so Bateatt ee Sas HS SN iced oinironenienie ae | Broad Street
) SS ye Dur . _ .
i —~'\ ¥ 4, 6366S OOESCSBFO APSO 66% ees = $6565.55 989956550550 95 95990 6650 OOS OOCSOSOS
SSS | V GSS SSO CSS SSFP FOPOOSS LIAL FFE CE OSS


PAGE ZIGHT



Faiths Barbadians “



Live By

By WILLIAM BURKE

THIS is the second in a series
of articles dealing with the
histories of the various religious
denominations that exist in Bar-
bados. Last Sunday I dealt with
the Roman Catholic Church, to-
day the Anglican Chureh takes
the spotlight.

It would perhaps not be amiss
to say that the history of the
Anglican Church in Barbados
began when the first English
settlers landed here, and to quote
from the Diocesan History,
“claimed the island at once and
at the same time alike for the
King of Ingland and the King of
Kings, planting the Cross of
Christ at Holetown,”

The Church has grown with the
island, and has gone a long way
since thé Barly 1620s when many
of the ‘island’s proprietors de-
cided that the Gospel was not to
be preae to the slaves—many
clergymel defied the order—and
when plat®s of worship were jyst
wooden ‘Structures. Today the
shackles of slavery have been
thrown off long ago, the Gospel
is preached to all who want to
listen, and the places of worship
are over four dozen stone build-
ings of varying size and degrees
of beauty.

The Anglican Church today has
21,000 communicant members, and
is the only state supported Church
in the island.

There is very little on record

about the first rectors or about
the authority under which they
were appointed, It seems that in
the 1670s a more or less formal

jurisdiction was exercised by the
Lord Bishop of England, although
his authority was not always
recognised in Barbados and was
even resisted on occasions.

Today the affairs of the Church
in Barbados are not governed by
the Church in*England, but by
the local Diocesan Synod and the
Provincial Synod of which the
Archbishop of the West Indies is
Chairman,

From 1627 to 1875 the whole
West Indies Church was without
a Bishop, and then Revd, William

Coleridge was appointed
Bishop 6f Barbados and of the
Windward and Leeward Islands.
It was no sinecure. Bishop Cole-
ridge had"to administer 13 islands
and British Guiana,

His episcopate saw a big growth
in the Church in Barbados. The
number of Clergymen inereased
from 15 to 31, the number of
places of worship from 14 to 35,
the number of schools from 8 to
383 and the number of children
being educated therein from 500
to 7,000.

But Nature, like God, is no
respecter of persons or of places,
and the hurricane which hit the
island in 1831 played havoe with
all this good work, The Church
under Coleridge triumphed over
the disaster, however, and with
tunds raised locally, and funds
trom the Seciety for the Propoga-
tion of the, Gospel and from the
Society for the Promotion of
Christian Knowledge, almost every
church was rebuilt in five or six
years, vies Z

It was under Bishop Coleridge’s
influence that Friendly Societies,
so popular among the people to-
day, were established. Between
1833 and 1838, 22 of these socie-
ties were established with a total
membership of 2,574.

There have been seven bishops
since Bishop Coleridge’s time.
First there was Thomas Parry and
then Dr. John Mitchinson, during
whose episcopate Codrington Col-
lege was affiliated with the Uni-
versity of Durham. Next was
Herbert Bree in whose time the
Diverce Law was introduced into
the local Legislature for the first
time and thrown out, and the

Cathedral Chapter was established.
William P, Swaby followed. He
after

it was who a_ successful






term of office during which he
grew to love Barbados more than
anywhere else on earth, was elect-
ed Archbishop of the West Indies.
But he died a few days before
taking up his appointment, and
his body wag laid to rest in Bar-
badian soil.

Next was Alfred P. Berkeley
who purchased the building known
as the Church House, During his
term of office was celebrated in
Barbados and Jamaica the centen-
ary of the Consecration of the first
Bishop of the Province, and the
Church in Barbados decided on a
spiritual revival. The Mothers’
Union Movement spread from one
branch in the city to branches: in
many country districts, and the
Clewer Sisterhood sent down four
sisters of the Community of St.
John Baptist. It was during
Berkeley’s term of office, too, that
Codrington College was destroyed
by fire in April 1926.

David Bentley was Berkeley's
successor. From the earliest times
the clergymen in Barbados were
concerned over the people’s pref-
erence for concubinage rather
than matrimony, and over the
high number of illegitimate chil-
dren born. Bishop Bentley with a
view tc improving family relation-
ships started_a purity drive and
founded the Purity League.

He was suceeeded by William J.
Hughes who was appointed a
member of the Legislative Coun-
cil, whose political faith was
Socialism and who resigned re-
cently over the question of the
dis-establishment of the Church.
During his episcopate the Sisters
of St. John Baptist were recalled
and their place was taken by
Sisters of the Good Shepherd.
These sisters have established a
school which is growing rapidly.
It has a roll of over 100 and there
are many others on the waiting
list. Plans are being made to
enlarge the building which is sit-
uated in Lower Collymore Rock,

The Founder of Codrington Col-
lege was Christopher Codrington,
who died in 1710 leaving all his
estates to the S.P.G. A Gram-
mar School was built in 1745, and
the College as we know it to-day
was started in 1830, There are
about 30 under-graduates there
at present, some preparing for
Holy Orders and others reading
for a Classical Degree. But a
change is in the offing, and there
will be sooner or later no scholars
reading for a Classical Degree at
this College. The University of
Durham has decided that as soon
as a Classical Chair is established
at the West Indian University, it
will not compete with the latter in
its own area.

Apart from the Mothers’ Union
which now has 21 Branches with
a membership of over 2,000, there
is the Church Army with a big
membership and the Church
Lads’ and Church Girls’ Brigades.
St. Paul's Church, Bay Street,
is the only Anglican Church
which has a Third Order of St,
Francis,

As I said before, the affairs. of
the Church are administered by
the Synod which has both priests
and laymen as members. The
synod has its annual meeting in
March every year-and then meets
from time to time according to
the business in hand. An import-
ant meeting is planned for May
when members will elect a new
bishop.

The procedure is that as soon
as the See becomes vacant, the
Dean applies to the Archbishop
of the West Indies for his man-
date. The mandate is issued to
the Diocesan Synod and a meet-
ing is summoned within a month.
The Diocesan synod either elects
the bishop then, or delegates the
choice to a committee of which
the Archbishop must be a mem-
ber. The choice of a bishop by
the Synod must be by a majority
of both the clerical and lay mem-
bers, It must then be confirmed

The sooner you take Phensic, the sooner
you'll feel better, for Phensic’s quick, safe
action will bring relief, lift away pain-caused
fatigue, and remove weariness in a matter of
minutes. Phensic neither harms the heart,

nor upsets the stomach.

Be prepared for

pain — keep a supply of Phensic handy.




6

Phensic

for quick, safe relief

FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,
NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS & CHILLS,









SUNDAY ADVOCATE

THE CONSTANTINE TECHNICAL COLLEGE
Middlesbrough, England.

By TONY

WHAT benefits would Barbados
derive from g Technical College,
a Government Training Centre or
perhaps a small Technical School?
They are too numerous to men-
tion. At present the Barba tos
Evening Institute, by keeping
classes at Combermere School, are
catering to q few, but, too few.

On many oeeasions suggestions

have been made regarding the
best possible means by whieh our
population could benefit from

vocational and teehniecal training
but very few, if any, ever ap-
proached the subject of erecting
a Government Training Centre,
Technical College or even a
Technical School,

The cost of erecting the ap-
propriate Tech College may
run into thousands of dollars but
a Start could be made in a rented
building large enough to accom-
modate a school or training centre,

The next question is funds, but
T am certain that any Technical
College, within a short time, could
become self supporting. It must
be remembered that at such an
institution the lighterman would
be able to study art gr drama as
a side line; on certain evenings
the Fisheries Officer would be able
to hold classes for fishermen and
those interested in the fishing
industry; the clerk in the City,
instead of remaining on the lower
scale, would be able to learn about
business management and other
classes which includes woodwork,
commercial courses, printing, aero-
nautics, ete. ete. would be held
The fee would be one suitable for
the poor man’s pocket and I am
sure the instructors would be con-
siderate and not exact a large sum
for their services,

Good examples of what Barba-
dos should look forward to are the
Constantine Technical College at

Middlesbrough or the Goyernment ©

Training Centre at Leeds, both

situated in the county of York—

ettiay England,
e

College, |
throw away from K

_ i a sesere ° ;

rough, on its ro a ee
mately 4,000 last year, Its Prinei-
pal is Mr, D. A. R, Clark
M.Se, (Tech.), M.I, Mech, E.,
M.1.T.A., A.F.R. Ae. S.

by the Governor-in-Executive
Committee and the Bishops of
the West Indies province.

The Anglican Church in Bar-
bados now has 39 priests in the
establishment and there are in
addition retired priests, The
Cathedral Chapter is composed of
six stalls, St Aidan, St, Ambrose,
St. Augustine, St. Basil, St. Cy-
prian and St. Ignatius. Deans of
Chapter include the Archdeacon.
Present Dean of St. Michael is
Revd. G, L. G. Mandeville who
recently succeeded Revd, A. J.
Hutchinson,







When
PAIN

strikes

remember
Phensic!

ust take

Tablets



antine ‘Technical
ich is Only a stone's

VANTERPOOL

This is one of the 157 Techni-
cal Colleges scattered all. over
England while there are six in
Scotland, three in Wales and two

in Northern Ireland. In London
alone there are 19 Technical
Colleges entirely maintained by

the London County Council and 16
Poiytechmics algo aided by the
L.C.C. There are also seven other
educational institutes including
the City and Guilds of London,

All these institutions only form
part of a long chain of Training
centres in the United King smn,

Shortly after the last war the
Constantine College was not only
a help to local folk but also assis.
ted servicemen who were disabled
during the war and not fit to re
turn to their pre-war jobs,

In one class—the commerecial—
in 1947, there was an ex-army lad
who lost both feet in action. He
was always smiling and looked
forward to better days, Though
only able to get along slowly, he
looked quite satisfied with his
artificial legs and finished the
course successfully,

This class was fairly well re-

presented, In it there. were many
Engjishmen, an_ Irishman, two
Barbadians, a Jamaican and a

lad from British Honduras who
had made Newcastle-on-Tyne his
home. elke 1. 4
Quite a number of the students
were pre-war engineers and
mechanics but had become. ner-
vous wrecks because of the war.
They had to be given a suitable
vocation in order to fit back into
civilian life.

There were other classes for

girls and boys. In some they did
sketching and painting while in
one class-room, where a human
skeleton was erected, others did
anatomy. The College is equipped
with a Canteen. Tea and cakes are
served at various intervals.
A “get-together” was held in a
large hall on the ground floor some
Saturday nights. This took the
form of a dance. Soft drinks ‘and
other refreshments. were sold.
‘These functions were always well
attended and the money went.into
the College till.

On certain days those students
who were interested in newspaper

vities could visit Kemsley
ouse where they would see one
of the oldest printing presses in
the world. This press is kept in
the office as an exhibit. They
would also see ne@wspapers going
straight from the press to vans
which immediately took off for
various perts of the country.

To get more funds the College
held a Carnival once a year.
Nearly every class was represented
and the wax figures especially,
which were driven through the
streets on trucks, created much

interest. Other groups of students}:

dressed to represent historic events
and personalities. At a scheduled
time they would hold a procession
through the streets of Middles-
brough and the suburbs.










Before the march begins each
student given a tin in which to
pick up a collection from any
place They invade restaurants,
hotels, homes and also accost

pedestrians, motorists and cyclists.
In -the evening hundreds of
students could be seen flocking
back to the College with weighted
tins. The tins are handed in to
various classrooms and the money
counted. On the following day
the name of the student who
made the best collection would
be announced. This money also
goes into the College till.

On the other hand electrical
welding, . engineering, carpentry,
shoemaking and many other
trades are taught at the Govern-
ment Training Centre at Leeds.
Again servicemen who were dis-
abled during the war benefited
at this Centre. Some men who

had lost their hands could be
seen working with mechanical
hands.

This Centre is also very large
and has a canteen where mid-

day meals are served. The fee
for the meals is paid by the
student.

Perhaps one of the only Tech-
nieal Colleges in the West Indies
is at Puerto Rico. On. many
oceasions students from the Brit-
ish West Indian islands - have
attended this College.

It is time for Barbados to have
such*an institute. This island also
may ibe able to cater to many
others. There is plenty room for
aduit education.



HANDWRITTEN. BIBLE

CALGARY,

Rey. J, M, Watts of the Pente-
costal Tabernacle here is direeting
4 project for a handwritten Bible,
With each parishioner eontribut-
ing a chapter, and well-known
citizens eontribyting a verse or
two, the work is expected to be
finished in three menths.—(CP)

AMBITIOUS BUILDERS

" STRATFORD, Ont,
Forty-seven youngsters in the
Pal Model Aeroplane Club here
build) everything from flying
saucers to model aeroplanes with
a seyen-foot wingspread. Appre-
hensive mothers note the big
models are almost big enough to

carry ‘baby brother away.—CP)



Rx

a His
= :
i
a
a





MATINEE : Friday,
a

Under the Distinguished Patronage of
Excellency the Governor Sir A. W. L. Savage,
K.C.M.G., and Lady Savage

‘ PRESENTS

_A MURDER â„¢s
-wceEN ARRANGED

A PMRIBLER =~
e ‘

THURSDAY and FRIDAY

= 15th 16th MARCH, 830 pa.

e :
‘Box Office Opens FRIDAY, March 9th



HAT ABOUT A TECHNICAL Ming Plate At
COLLEGE?

The Museum

A FAMILLE verte plate of the
late Ming Period, dating from the
end of the sixteenth or early
seventeenth century, is on view at
the Museum for two weeks. It
is described as famille verte
owing to the predominance of fine
green enamel made from oxide of
copper. The plate is 8 inches in
ciameter, and is decorated with
landscape scenes and rushes in
green, purple, yellow, blue and
red. It is marked with a blue
flower symbol on the reverse; and,
was recently presented to the
Museum by Mr. W. Leonard
McKinstry.

Chinese pottery dates bac’x al-
most to fabulous times, The
earliest pottery which appeals to
most European collectors is that
made during the Han dynasty of
206 B.C, te 220 A.D.“This green-
glaze mortuary pottery with its
fine modelling has acquired
beautiful iridescent tints owing
to its long burial. The mortuary
objects include models of houses,
implements, crockery, wine jars,
ineense-burners etc. Other kind:
of pottery were made during the
early centuries, but, during the
fang dynasty 618-906, A.D., great
strides were made jn Chinese art,
and imperial factories were estab-
lished in the Sung Dynasty.
Glazed pottery was also popular
for use as architectural ornaments
such as roof-tiles, mouldings and
dragon gargoyles.

Porcelgin in China is also said
to date back as far as the Han
dynasty, and, although its Chinese
origin has been established, it is
not certain that porcelain was
made as early as the third or sec-
ond century before Christian
ras eds tie eanutetiure - ot
368- ; manufacture — o'
porcelain pri rapidly and
tt became progres, rap delicate
until the so-called ‘“bodiless”
porcelain was juced, thin
and so delicate iless”
poreelain that it “seemed to con-
sist of glaze alone.” A feature of
Ming porcelain wpe the use of col-
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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1951



At The Cinema:

FIESTA MOOD
By G. HE.

ONCE AGAIN, the successful director-producer team of
Norman Taurog and Joe Pasternack, who gave us “That
Midnight Kiss” have combined their talents in another
Technicolor musical film THE TOAST OF NEW ORLEANS
now playing at the Globe. The settings of the bayou
country of New Orleans and the French Quarter of the
city itself in 1905 are vivid and spectacular and the whole
film is a galaxy of gorgeous colour and music.

,, starring Katharine Grayson, energy and zest, set off by the
‘Mario Lanza’ and David Niven vivid costumes and native music.
the story is on the flimsy side, but Other opinions to the contrary,
good direction, plenty of humour I enjoyed “THE TOAST OF NEW
and an excellent characterization ORLEANS” and I hope you do
of a Cajun fisherman by J. Caroll too.

Naish all combine to give it plenty





of life. TARZAN AND THE SLAVE.

GIRL (Plaza Bridgetown)

Tarzans may come and Tarzans
may go, but the creator of this
famous ape-man goes on forever.
In all, twenty-six Tarzan films
have been made, and the latest,
under the above title, is showing

‘On a trip to the bayou country,
the impresario of the New Or-
leans Opera House and his fiancée
stop at a Cajun fishing village at
the time of the blessing of the
fleet, when everyone is in holiday
mood and singing and dancing are
the order of day. Amongst the
celebrants, the impresario discov-





laying the jungle king and a
ers a crude young fisherman with -set-

x plgrigus volce snd: realising the eansome; well setup Young man
—— st tie oe ee K. a mysterious tribe of lion-worship-
the help of hi dente wnere Ww’ rs that motivate the plot of this
he help of his fiancée, who is the fim. Vanessa Brown plays Jane,
pading soprano in the Opera, they ang of course, Cheta, the chim-
out to groom the boy for a pro- nanzee, is on hand as Tarzan's
8S ae pie ane — ever loyal friend. Highlights of | the
p * are. Tarzan’s effor o help
OO otenaite to’ peers upset battle a strange epidemic that has
e resa| much, ecima the tribe and to recap-
Tn a film of this xind, it is the ture the women who have been
Inging, dancing and = = en = eae the dimin-
e precedence over the acting, n, ulation.

ho yh the latter fe guda. Petite ee oer

d charming Katharine Grayson Melodrama from start to finish,
s a lovely lyric soprano which it will appeal to people whose
e uses delightfully. Freshness of tastes run along these lines.

one and flexibility are two out- Showing with TARZAN is a

anding features of this

st’s voice, and her range is well timely and instructive short fea-
igh unbelievarle. ede en peenin® BOMB. “The film presents. der
wn at west Anima, 4 tailed demonstrations of how one

light romantic Italian ballad and
‘ rom “ must plan personal defence from
later duet “Brindisi” f La the moment of warning to the in-

Traviata”, sung with Mario Lanza, ont the bomb ex ‘
plodes, High-
eee ee ae favourites (279 lighted is the fact that’ the A-
howed her voice off to perfection. bomb has its limitations, and
; knowing how to take advantage
ewe lane, ie ones seas of these by means of simple pre-
as e Withe Hoest volkes 1° cautions, will considerably in-
br, has one of the finest voic at xrease your chance of survival.
ave heard a a long time. 4 ae Based on scientific knowledge ac-
Globe Theatre wit Serpe, sound Sma oon ert ye
of A-bombs in the Sou as as
wel under contol cunerwse Be well athe Hirashima explosion
e@ purpose o s film is to min-
padioe. = — a ee imize panic and fear, while stress-
Ses u eied a ote th the ing the importance of effective de-
ree H asas' oe nda ~ fence against the dangers of ex-
ars a anowne sere papsion snd radiation,
voice technique. His expression

































s good and his voice full of vital- .?eerrrrrr"™”

ity. aioe the oom ne diame

are “Tina Lina’—a festive bayou e
ong, “The Flower Song” from Attention




‘Carmen” as well as more popular
ypes. Children

On the acting side of the ledger

David Niven plays, with his usual BEGINNING from ne

finish, and delightful humour, the | Week and continuing weekly

suavely _ polished impresario, children not older than 12
hose interest in his fiancee seems | {he Saditor a how agar: ;

a be more paternal than romantic, ner, “short stories on any

Seat eatin ates on are subject they choose. Stories

must not be more than 200
eve in all the fuss and falderals words in length. A prize

rat Zo to make a gentleman, is | win be given for the best
For once, there is plenty of sing- gad Yes ap ee

ing, and the songs have been care- | yaner. Stories must be sent
lly selected to appeal to musical in not later than Thursday

as well as less musical tastes, and every week.

the dancing in the bayou mood, in y ¢

‘the opening of the film is full of




























atthe Plaza. Lex Barker is now .



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

IN SWEDEN
A Man Can’t Sell — Without
His Wife’s Consent
By Joseph Garrity

THERE were female smiles in of divorce, her title to any
Sweden last week at the remark property she brings into the
of London Judge Earengey that marriage.

“fair shares for wives of their
husbands’ wages” was a principle A Safeguard
difficult to enforce in law. : .

From “the land of happy wives,” No bridegroom is shocked to find
Swedish women have written to his bride tour their home after
the Sunday Express pointing out tMe honeymoon labelling the
that economic equality in marriage {Urmiture as a safeguard against
is a right they have enjoyed for future disputes.

30 years. Gone are the days when some
wives had to chase wayward

Bound by Law husbands on Saturday night to
salvage what remained of the

- How does it work? Under the week’s wages. Today under the
Swedish Marriage Act of 1921 pooling system it is a common
husbands and wives are legally sight to see a husband and wife
bound to pool their incomes and opening each other's pay packets.
divide them equally, Women are so well protected

This obligation of equal shares by law that husbands cannot even
applies also to property and to object if wives go and collect the
debts. pay packets, themselves.

Indeed, the Swedish husband

has lost so much ground since the Spiteful Will
days of the Viking buccaneers’ The problem of the spiteful will,
that he cannot buy or sell q thing does not exist in Sweden. For on
without the consent of his wife. aq husband’s death, half the estate
gcees to the widow and the remain-
His Fancy der to the children. This rule
: ° applies in reverse on the death of

Any husband who secretly sells g wife.
his watch for ready cash might What do Swedish men think of
find himself in the same dilemma jt all? Many say that the equality
campaign has swung the balance
too far and that the law has made
the woman the boss.

Because of the equal-pay—fer—
equal—work drive, women’s wages
in many jobs Nave increased, and
in some trades, such as textiles,
men are now demanding equal pay
with women!

‘So Free’

Women are wearing the trousers
so thoroughly now that many
husbands are learning cooking and
baby care at evening classes, Some
men run the home while wives
are out bread-winning, or away
on holiday.

“Bachelor” holidays are now
popular with Swedish wives,





How much money
should a husband
pay his wife?



so “free” that they suffer little,
if any, social stigma by choosing

Eight out of every 100 do.

' Of the 348 children born every
day in Sweden, 29 are illegitimate,
but they enjoy normal passport
and inheritance rights.

Another significant fact revealed
as the spouse of Mrs. Olle Olson, by the Swedish official almanac is
who recently sued her husband for that 660 out of every 1,000 first
pawning his typewriter. children are born in the first six

Mr. Olson, who had paid for the months of marriage.
machine with his own money,

‘Fair. shares is a
principle difficult to
enforce in law,’ says
JUDGE EARENGEY.

[$< — 2





smuggled it out of the house one Not Satisfied
day to raise enough cash to back are Swedish women satisfied ?
his fancy in a horse race. “No,” says Mrs. Svea Svenson.

But, unwittingly, he encounter “We get no alcohol ration from
ed the 1921 marriage law. This the State monopoly until we are
stipulates that the contents of the 25, and if we marry our ration is
home are the joint possessions of put at our husbands’ disposal.
every couple. “Sex prejudice still remains in

Not even the kitchen poker is Sweden, During wartime tobacco

out the consent of the other. léss smokes than men. y
The legal accent on possessions ‘Otherwise we think women’s
is a feature of every~betrothal. -dt»rights are nearly sufficient. We
is customary for a Swedish bride wish our sisters in Britain and
to prepare an inventory of her elsewhere similar luck.”
possessions to ensure, in the event , —.L.ES.



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DARTWORDS





se

YOU have to arrange the 50 5.
words in the circle so that they ceding word a name of a well-
known person or place in fact or

It may form with the pre-

lead from PIGEON to CLOY in
such a way that the relationship
between any one word and the }
next to it is governed by one of
the six following rules:—

. It may be associated with
the preceding word in the title or
action of a book, play or other

No rule may be invoked more
than twice consecutively.

A typical succession of words
might be: Bush—Brush—Shrub—
Scrub — Curbs — Curds—Whey—
Whet—Stimulate,

anagram of the word that precedes
t.

-. It may be a synonym of the
word that precedes it,
It may be achieved by add-
ing one letter to, subtracting one
letter from, or changing one letter
in, the preceding word.

‘ It may be associated with
the preceding word in a saying,
simile, metaphor or association



PEN PALS

MISS EVAN FORSHAW,
Persaud, age
Miss Yvonne Nelson, age 18, Miss
Oneita Pancito, age 20, Miss Nola

Cire eemecliimenches tenes we

CROSSWORD

Brown, age 16, Miss Camille Le-
Long, age 16, Miss Constance Le-
White, age 20, Lilie Sing, age 17;
and Miss Tenie Cassanova age 19.

Port—of-Spain,
Kenneth Alexis, No, 94 James
Street, Vesta Bella, San Fernando,

tween the ages of 15 and 20.

The women of Sweden are now [2%



Wirdhday Greetings

to have a child out of wedlock. °

- Loud mete! tone it down
et the ass by he won t
m. (5)

Applewhaite,
Bvan returns to church. Ernesta Jessamy and Phillis King.
. What the horse said when

(6)
18. Set up on a permanent bdasis
Long. 5

20. Tar oil for h
1. Such a chant has

q (3)
it’s pullea to push
along, | (3)

(23. Reset the trees.

ange. (6)
an inclination

keeps Wael W Rts
and healthy

pset, (9)
f the colin. (7)
| 3. The line of rulers. (7)
4. Handles,

Temper ‘out of range, (5)
9. Ties one down to a place. (4)
Slate weighed in Chinese ounces.)
ie seems willowy you'll agree
(a7. rine loves to see plenty of
negotiable by one partner with- rationing, women were allotted \



ut of yesterday's puzzle. —Across:
a anaes nd



OY ry ore rey

PAGE NINE









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PAGE TEN

CARIBBEAN SOS...

‘Stranded’

If you are a U.K. businessman
who wants to visit connections in
the British West Indies, or a West
Indian who wants to get home,
you cannot hope for a direct sea
passage before April or May at
tRe earliest—unless you are lucky
enough to step into a cancellation.
If you are taking the family then
do not expect to get away before
the summer, You will probably
travel by a Dutch or French
vessel, paying more than double
the prewar fare. You may pre-
fer, of course, to avoid the queue
by taking the Queen Mary to New
York and then going on to the
West Indies by Canadian National
Steamships or the American Alcoa
or Moore-McCormack ,Lines—but
that_route is expensive, especially
since devaluation. The other
possibility is to go by air, for
which you will have to find £174
to £180 (single fare) plus the
cost of sending extra baggage by
sea. ‘

That is the present state of, the
mother country’s communications
with. one, of her most important
group of Colonies, and there is
little ¥ prospect of any improve-
ment unless some bold and imag-
inative step is taken, Before the
war, these Colonies had regular
and reasonably frequent direct sea
connections with the United King-
dom’ (although, even then, only
one British shipping line was
serving the Eastern Caribbean
group). Today, connections are
precarious and inadequate, de-
pending almost entirely on ser-
vices provided by the French and
Dutch primarily for their own
nationals. The situation is worse
today even than during the war
and immediately afterwards, when
the Ministry of Transport was
able to arrange for special sail-
ings. Now there is no help from
that quarter — in fact, the Min-
istry shrugs its shoulders helpless-
ly in the face of desperate

als, As a result, hardship is
inflicted on West Indians visiting
the mother country, staff move-
ments are hampered, business
contacts are curtailed, and the
tourist trade—so necessary to the
prosperity of these Colonies — is
entirely disregarded.

But these effects, serious as
they are, are only part of the
story. A succession of official and
semi-official reports has borne
witness to the pressing need of
the British Caribbean for better
internal and external communica-
tions. For the past 75 years these
Colonies have been asking for
more adequate shipping. services
and yet they are worse off to-day
in some respects than before the
Boer War. It is therefore not

* merely a matter of making good
a temporary post-war deficiency,
as Government spokesmen hav
implied; it is a far-reaching prob-
lem related to the whole future
economic development and politi-
cal structure of our Caribbean
possessions.

The latest of the series of re-

ports to stress the need for im-

~proved shipping services in this
area was that of the -Common-

wealth Shipping Committee, which
undertook at the Government's
request “to survey the shipping
needs of the British Colonies in

the Caribbean area and Bermuda;
to considér what shipping services
will be required to meet the needs
of the area in future; and to make
tecommendations how these ser-
vices can be provided ....” The
committee's findings, published in
1948, were critically received in
the Colonies since it was felt that
they covered old ground without
offering any concreté remedy, But
at least it was hoped that the com-
mittee’s recommendations — the
most. important of which was for
a fortnightly, or not less than
monthly, passenger service from
the UK to the Eastern Caribbean
would stir someone to action. On
present showing, however, the
committee might as well have
saved itself two years of inquiry
and examination of witnesses,
Nothing has been done to imple-
ment its main proposal and noth-
ing seems likely to be done. In-
quiries on the subject from local
interests have met with stiff reti-
cence from the British Govern-
ment.

What can be done? From the
fuller discussion of the problem
that follows it will be seen that
there is no easy solution, Several
of the shipping lines which served
the Caribbean area before the war
have not been restored; the war
took heavy toll of merchant ship-
ping and new vessels are costly
to build; shipowners Say that to
operate a regular service would
be uneconomic, and apparently no
acceptable form of Government
assistance or subsidy has yet been
offered, But it is hard to believe
that these difficulties are insur-
mountable when so much is at
stake. The time has come for
business interests in this country
and the British Caribbean to unite
their voices in insisting that: the
present attitude of drift, compla-
cency and evasion come to an end.

COLONIZiS CANNOT

PROSPER WITHOUT

BETTER COMMUNI-

CATIONS,

L ET us take a look at the ex-
‘&/tent of Britain’s possessions
in the Caribbean area, They can
be divided eographically’ into
two groups: Western Caribbean,
comprising the Bahamas and
Jamaica, with British Honduras
on the mainland; and Eastern
Caribbean, comprising the Lee-
ward and Windward Islands,
Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago,
with British Guiana on the main-

extent that a British Secretary islands. The Royal Netherlands
of State could hold out no hope Steamship Co., served the area
of improved transport to a West well with one large and
Indies Government except that two largish liners calling fort-
the French Line may be able to nightly. at Barbados, Trinidad
absorb some of the Colony’s and all ports to Cristobal (Pana~
“excess requirements.” ma Canal, and a_ three-weekly

It is the Eastern Caribbean group service with 100-passenger class
of Colonies that is worst hit by vessels to Barbados, Trinidad,
the present dearth of shipping. Ser- Demerara, and. Dutch Guiana,
vices to the Western Caribbean, Of the five “passenger vessels of
although not up to pre-war stan- the Compagnie Generale Trans-
dards, are more or Jess adequate- atlantique (French Line) on the
ly maintained by Elders & Fyffes’ West Indies run, two fast liners,
banana fleet. An exception must be Cuba and Colombie, maintained
noted in the casé of British Hon- a monthly service between the
duras which has no direct pas- U.K. and the Caribbean Colon-
senger or cargo connection with ies. Finally, there were the
the U.K., the Harrison Line’s Harrison Line’s two passenger
pre-war monthly service to Beliz@ ships, accommodating about 100

SUNDAY

caused by transhipment at Trini-
Gad and the steep rise in freight
charges. Vessels calling at
Trinidad used to lay off and dis-
charge from both sides, but now
dock and discharge from one side
only, which means that shipments
destined for Demerara, for instance
take five to six weeks as against
three weeks before the war.

The average rise in freight rates
has been about 130 to 140 per cent.
Here are some comparative
figures for pre-war and present-
day shipments to Trinidad sigp-
plied by a London merchant:—

Pre-1938 =1950

Sanitary earthenware
im crates 40s. 105s.
Plumbers’ brassfoundry 75s. 170s,
Bakelite w.c. seats 60s 140s.

not having been restored. The each, which provided the only Acknow that “rates of
Colony presents an exceptional regular British ‘service to the freight ... present a_ problem,”
problem, since it lies off the main Eastern Caribbean; but it was the Commonwealth Shipping

shipping routes, But there is m0 announced just before the war
such justification for the neglect that this service was to be with-
of the Eastern Cafibbean Colo- Grawn as wneconomic, Apart
nies, which are conveniently from these services
grouped and lie athwart the there were the cargo services
main sea routes, between the UK operated by the French Line
and the Panama Canal, Here Yarrison Line and other com-
we have the anomaly of upwards panies, as well as the fortnightly
100 UK~bound vessels from Aus- service run by the Horn Line
tralia and New Zealand passing (Hamburg) with five boats ac—
through the Canal each year commodating about 40 passen-

while citizens in British Colonies gers each /
queue up to get passages aboard “ fiders & Fyffes’ fleet, which had
wr oa o_ “cannot be earlier served Barbados and Trini-
+4 dad, was in the pre-war period

views ae one poletiel crriscn- running only to Jamaica, That
nomic or for calling only “if suf- Pot was also served | by the
Pacific Steam Navigation Co,

uceme offers.”
the Bettiah camuuet’s 1 which made. about ten calls each
sponsibility to take a less com- ©, homeward and om
mercial and longer-term view of bound, entirely on ——- Bn
a situation affecting the prosperi- regular passenger tra’ r oe
ty of a million or two of its sub- Royal Mail Lines and a Danis
jects. There is a clear duty on Shipping company tran monthly
the part of the mother country Services with limited Somme
to see that shipping services are ®¢commodation, while a
adequate to meet the following calls were also made by ner
requirements:— 4 = ee
i ements e erneen of war came
rr ee See the inevitable announcement ot:
the U.K. and the British Suspended for the duration.
see cyte baa feria see
4 3
eee eee te — the Caribbean area were high. Of
tering UK-Caribbean trade. the French Line's five’ passenger
Tourist traffic, which is po- vessels on the West Indies run, for
tentially much greater than instance, or Oe tea
ene tere Saale ships were both
ii anemia wae ¥ eae lost. Nevertheless, there was. a
i immediately offering, but fencTal, expectation. that, peace,
what could be economically ‘ i t
grown if refrigerated trans- oe ping aay reat rae
port were guaranteed. Coe aren gt bh i ores
Exports of UK manufactur- emphasis laid on this aspect of the
ees which again might West Indies’ development ky such
Ms ot ede, chipping. quthoriensirs surveys as the Royal
. mmission , 1938-9
Unfortunately there is no indi- the Stockdale Report, 1943-4. In

qi)

Giii)

(y)

“ cation that the British Government the 1946 edition of the UK Expat

is facing up to its responsibility Pyomotion Department's Hints to
in this matter—otherwise would Weknaia Men
questioners in the House of Com- West Indies and Bermuda, we find

© mons have been twice fobbed off this sanguine comment on ship-

in recent months with the answer services: “Most of these
that “no practical plan” had yet ar services were suspended or
been submitted for implementing curtailed during the war, when it
the Commonwealth Shipping Com- was difficult, if not
mittee’s recommendations? It is impossible, to make a tour of the
sufficient comment that the con- area by sea. The return to normal
ference of directors of the Incor- conditions will probably see most
porated Chambers of Commerce cf these ‘services resumed... .”
of the British Caribbean, meeting Clearly, “normal conditions” are
in Port of Spain last July—two still a long way off!
vears after the publication of the -
CSC’s findings—should have had In fact, ont
to pass a resolution urging inquir- —just recen’ the French Line
ies to be made of the Secretary of have résumed passenger services
State for the Colonies to find out to the Eastern Caribbean. The
what action was being taken on Royal Netherlands Steamship
that revort, Co,’s Cottiea and Bonaire (ac-
commodating about 100 and 60
passengers respectively) provide
a monthly service to British Gui-
ana with calls at Barbados and
Trinidad, while the Oranjestad
and Willemstad help to ease the
situation in the British Caribbean
Colonies on their, homeward Pe A
growth, Everyone recognises the Pea ee each oaltieah:
need to attract new blood and the Dutch Line now ‘rungs sup-
capital investment into local en— plementary cargo. services to the
terprises if the under-developed West Indies and South Pacific
territories are not to remain for- ports, The Compagnie Generale.
ever dependent on Colonial de- Transatlantique restored their
velopment funds or grants-in-aid, West Indies and Central Ameri-
But what are we to say to the can service as from last October
would — be pioneer or investor — with the completely reconditioned
“Go west, young man, to the Carib- Celombie and a smaller vessel,
bean, but don’t expect the boats Gaseegne, The Colombie, which
to follow you”? That is the kind has accommedation for 584 pas-
of prospect which the British Gov— sengers in three classes, is now
ernment is offering by its failure virtually a new liner after con-
to recognise communications as an Version from her wartime role as
integral part of development in 2 hospital ship and offers a high
this group of Colonies, standard of comfort,
A similar short-sightedness is
shown in regard to cargo capacity.
The constant refrain is: “Cargo
capacity appears to be-adequate to
the demand,” It has been repeated
with slight variations in recent
Colonial Office reports and by Gov-

“Go west, young man”--
and then ?
Expenditure on Colonial weltare
and deyelopment schemes is a lop—
sided policy unless the territories
concerned have the communica-
tions’ necessary for economic

the Colombie tes
ernment spokesmen in the House ree mata = ph gomero}
of Commons. And, with certain gor the French Line by calling at
reservations, it is true — in the Jamaica. é
sense that one can only send to Both the Dutch and French
market what can be transported. Lmes are, naturally enough, run
But have these people never heard primarily for their own nationals
of railroads opening up the back~ ‘They can accept cargo offering
woods or sea connections bringing from the U-K., but passages are
prosperity to isolated islands? It strictly Yimited:) On her maiden
is a lesson of history that commu- voyage, for instance, the Colombie
nications and trade must advance was onlyable to tak& about 100
together. from this country. The
In this context, the example of & available on th
British Honduras is interesting, In ships is quite insufficient
1948, the Commonwealth Shipping to relieve the present congestion
Committee could say: “Because of between the U.K. and the Eastern
its accessibility to North America, Caribbean. The only services on
it is natural that British Honduras Which British travellers have prior
should obtain many of its essential claim are Elders & Fyffes’ Golfito
imports from that source... , ” taking about 100 passengers every
In actual figures, the Colony im- SiX weeks, and the Ha en Shore
ports today about 9 per cent of its and Booker Bros.’ cargo eh
requirements from the UK. But
there was a time when British
Honduras was taking nearly half
its imports from the UK, and a
report on the Colony in 1909 pro-
vides one of the reasons: “Eleven
steamers of the Harrison Line
call evéry year. Dates of sailing

Western. Caribbean-—Elders
Fyffes maintain a fortnightly pas-
senger and freight service with
the Ariguani, Bayano and Cavina,
As previously mentioned, the
Dutch Line now calls at Kingston,
but pre-war services of the Royal
Mail Lines and the Pacific Steam

the Dutch Line and |

Committee had the following to
say: “It is obvious that under the
conditions now obtaining freights
are bound to be high and will re-
main so unless the general level
of prices falls. The shortage of
tonnage, the cost of new

tonnage and the increased
time taken in loading and
discharging are also factors

which have brought a rise im
freight rates. We suggest, how-
ever, that there should be machin-
ery for periodical review of rates
and we record therefore, a pro-
posal made to our committee in
1939 to the effect that an organi-
sation representing shippers and
shipowners be set up to review
freight rates from time to time on
cargoes to and from the West
Indies.”

This recommendation has just
keen put into effect through the
West India Committee, which
nominates representatives of ship-
pers and merchants to confer with
British shipowners.

Refrigerated capacity is
needed

While the Commonwealth Ship-
ping Committee committed itself
to the general view that freight
services between the UK and tha
West Indies were, or would be-
come adequate, the report did
recognise that there would prob-
ably be a need for more refriger-
ated cargo space than yas likely
to be available to cope with the
hoped-for expansion of the banana
and citrus fruit industries and,
moreover, that “expansion of the
West Indies expert trade would
necessitate the purchase of ma-
chinery and materials from out-
side sources for setting up fac-
tories and plants, with a conse-
quent need for additional shipping
tonnage.” But the Trinidad Cham-
ber of Commerce was not satisfied
that the committee had realised
the full freight potentialities,
commenting:

We are of the opinion that a
British line providing a service
such as we previously recom-
mended would obtain a satisfac-
tory volume of the freight offer-
ing between the United King-
dom and the British West Indies,
as it is gbvious that many-ship-
pers and importers would avail
themselves of the opportunity to
have goods shipped by a yessel
arriving from 10 to 12 days after
sailing, instead of the much
longer time now taken by cargo
ships,

The conci:zsion would seem to
he that cargo capacity cannot real—
ly be considered apart from the
improved passenger service that
the British Caribbean so badly
needs, The lack of fast passenger-
and—cargo liners forceg¢ shippers to
rely unduly on slower cargo boats,
which in any case cannot provide
that additional tonnage—including
adequate refrigerated capacity —
which,is essential to the future
development of West Indies agri-
culture and trade.

British West Indian Airways —
now, of course, a subsidiary of
BOAC — have done a great deal
in the past decade to improve local
communications in the Caribbean.
The Barbados Advocate said re-
cently: “Were it not for the ser—
vice of the British West Indian
Airways, the islands of the West
Indies would be denied communi-
cation with each other except when

and Central American areas, there

a fortnightly service from South- is to be a general reorganisation of %7

BWIA and Bahamas Airways on
lines that have proved successful
elsewhere in the corporation's
operations.

But the need remains for q fre—
quent and cheap means of sea
travel between the islands, as wel
as for a more adequate inter—
Caribbean...freight. service. The
official wartime West Indies
Schooner Pool has been superseded

‘bya voluntary co-operative or-

ganisation. BWI Schooner Owners’
Association (Inc.), which» links
Barbados with various parts of the
Windward and Leeward Islands,
and no doubt this means of trans-
port will continue to handle cargo
where time and special protection
are not considerations. Schooner
trips, however, can be rough not
only on passengers, but on cargo

recommendation that “two small
sea—going ships . . . should.be pro-
vided at the cost of Your Majesty's
Government for trade between the
smaller islands.”

The general effects of the ship-
starvation of these Colonies have

schools.

ADVOCATE



W. I. Colonies Need More Ships

Firms with extensive
Caribbean interests are obliged to
“stagger” leave for their estate
managers and other local staff
aceording to available accommo-
dation .

To go by air is beyond the
means of the average West Indian
who wants to travel to the UK
to study or work, or the average

English family coming home 0D fopeign shippin;
leave; and even the businessman There is no of a regu-
must consider seriously whether jg; British p: er service to

his proposed trip will justify the

expense. BOAC fares to typical

Caribbean destinations are:—
Single turn

Trinidad
Jamaica ..
Br, Guiana .

As it is, p
have risen to an
riously embarrasses most travel-
lers between the UK and
Caribbean. Before the war,
ranged from £35 to £41 according
to the class of vessel and type
of accommodation. Today, a pas-

costs £90

£98 to £125. re are no cheap
return fares, as there were
fore the war. To go by one of
the alternative routes eg, via
New York, is even more expéen-
sive—although the whole voyage
can now be paid for in sterling.
In Such conditions, the commer-
cial. and cultural contacts -that
are the life-blood of trade are
reduced to a minimum.

The “blue waters” are
remote

the same conclusion: “we recom~-
mend that on a return to normal

me should consider w
they should not offer a subsidy for
the maintenance of a
the "West. ‘seine, is handicenped
by the competition of subsidised

the
some form of Government’ assist-

fortnightly

and 5,200 passengers.
Pso
would oak cost about three-and-

Line sonable.









regular Brit-
ger service to some of
Colonies, since

asseng
Eastern Caribbean

ance. Supposing, eas a
shipowner to operate a
rini eres with three 100-

17 knots,
cargo capacity—a service
would give an annual capacity of
400,000 to 500,000 tons of

The 88.

a half times as much to build as
before the war and would be un-
likely to pay for ves in
less than 30 years, since operating
costs are high and traffic is sea-
It is true that improved
shipping services would tend to
foster traffic, but nevertheless the
initial outlay would be dispropor-
tionately heavy.

Grented, then, that some kind
of Government assistance is need-
ed, what form should it take? A
direct subsidy to serving
the Caribbean area might
invidious to other ners,
but this a could Z —, by
inviting shipowners er.

lternatively, the building of

hips for the West Indies run

Then what about the West In-,might be assisted either by out-

dies’ tourist. trade—the Col
second most important industry?
“Health, happiness and sunshine
await you in Barbados, all-the-
year round holiday resort. . . °
proclaims a current travel leaf-
let, “The abiding charms of Bar-
bados are the sunshine—tem-
pered by the vigorous North-East
Trade winds—and the sea which
encireles this tropical isle with a
belt of the deepest blue”. Very
nice, too—if you can get there!
But the blue waters of the Carib-
bean are remote nowadays for
the English holidaymaker. One
of the Trinidad Chamber's criti-
cisms of the CSC report was that
the -recommended service would
only barely take past traffic on
the assumption that boats were
full each trip (which they never
were in normal times) and so
would not provide for the vary-
ing seasonal demand. Pre-war
passenger ships offered accom~
modation well in nn Ra actual
vequirements . e glove-
service suggested by the CSC
would, therefore, do nothing ‘to
help the tourist trade. A final
discouragement to the would-be
visitor is the withdrawal of cheap
return fares. Before the war,
there were cheap summer
winter returns, Since the peak
traffic was outward in the au-
tumn and homeward in the spring
the shipping lines had to offer
off-season inducements to make
the boats pay.
“Until the outbreak of war”—
to quote the West Indies Year
Book, 1943—“the British West In-
dies were becoming’ more and
more a favourite holiday resort. . .
Today pleasure travel is negligi-
, but many people scattered
throughout the world, living un-
der vastly changed conditions, in
the quiet moments that come to
us all, still remember with kindly
thoughts those pretty islands and
their happy, friendly inhabitants.”
Today the West Indies are once
more a popular resort with Ameri-
ean and Canadian holidaymakers,
but English tourists still have to
‘live on their memories,

THE SUBSIDY QUESTION

The psychological effects of all
ghar difficulties on the local popu-
ation itself is one of the most seri-
ous ¢ consequences. Archdeacon
Banks’ question: “Does Britain
want her colonies or not?” reflects
the feeling of the majority on this
matter — a feeling that can easily
turn to disillusioned apathy, Indeed
it is pertinent to ask whether the
“lack of initiative’ noted by visit-
ors to some of the more chronically
ship-starved Colonies may not be
precisely due to this sense of isola-
tion.. In any event, frustration is

Although the Canadian ships pass through.” g most unfortunate mood to create
essentially a passenger liner, she It is generally agreed that the jin the important group of Carib-
carries a certain amount of freight local airline has done a good job bean possessions, where a greater
and is now equipped with a mod- at reasonable fares and, following degree of regional responsibility
ern, electrically—controlled loading the recent visit of BOAC chairman,
system. In conjunction with the Sir Miles Thomas, to the North

through federation is the objec-
tive. The impression is gaining
ground in the British West Indies
day that the UK Government
s not merely failing to act on
the recommendations of the Com-
monwealth shipping Committee's
and many previous reports, but is
indifferent to the situation. This
impression is strengthened by the
persistent quiries on the subject. In July,
1949, the Trinidad Chamber wrote
to their local Government to ask
what, had been done. In June,
, the Chamber was advised
that no reply had yet been re-
ceived to the local Government's
inquiry from the Secretary of
State for the Colonies. Now the
Chambers of Commerce of the
British Caribbean have repeated
the inquiry. Is the answer to be
“No practical plan” indefinitely?
What is the solution ?

What form could a_ practical
plan take? The Commonwealth
Shipping Committee quoted in its

To Jamaica—focal point of the too, and there is still a strong ease;report a number of suggested
& for the 1939 Royal Commission’s schemes for improving sh

ipping
services between the UK and the
West Indies and within the Carib-
bean area itself, and urged the
Government as a first step to
“seek proposals from shipowners
who are or might be interested
in the trade along the lines we

‘right

rae or by special credits
« tisk shart basis.
Each of these courses have
its difficulties, but the Government

cannot expect to be presented with

a “practical = until all such’
possibifities been explored
and a basis agreed upon for direct
or indirect assistance to shipown-
It should also be ascertained
how far the West Indies them-
selves would be prepared to con-
tribute and in what ways they
might assist a British shipping
line by concessions in port charges,
et

C.

Another consideration, when
examining the economics of the
question, is that heavy tonnages
have had to be brought from the
area in chartered vessels at Brit-
ain’s expense. It was admitted in
a Parliamentary question that
54,000 tons of sugar had been car-
ried from the Dominican Republic
and Cuba in foreign ships. The
gaving on this kind of charter

tight could be regarded as a contribu-

tion to any subsidy.

Shipping might be diverted
As a stopgap measure to re-
lieve immediate ‘c the
possibility of iaiucing Australa-
sian ships passing through the

and Panama Canal to call more regu-.

larly at Eastern Caribbean ports
should be under constant exam-
ination. It is true that such a
diversion would have its dangers
at the moment, since outgoing
ships from the UK on those routes
are already full and West Indians
might find themselves stranded in
this country. ‘There is no desire».
to repeat the experience of those
who came over earlier this year
by the French Line’s Misr (which
carried a total of some 600 pas-
sengers on three voyages) and
then found that there were no
facilities for getting back. Never-
theless, a regular monthly service
provided by the diversion of Aus-
tralasian shipping—on the basis,
perhaps, of a subsidy on unused
cargo space—would improve
inter-Caribbean communications,
provide refrigerated cargo space
for the transport of West Indies
produce and might at least shorten
the passenger queue by skimming
off one-way travellers,

If no action is taken by the
‘Government either to enable a
British line to operate a regular
‘passenger service or to induce
Commonwealth shipping through
the Panama to divert, then the
only prospect of improvement is
the news that the French Line are’
building two luxury liners 8.8.
Flandre and S.S. Antilles, both
20,000 tons gross, for the West In-
dies run. It is unlikely, however,
that these ships will be in ser-
vice before 1952.

Is the British Government sim-
ply ne things drift in the hope
that foreign shipping lines will
ultimately improve their services
sufficiently to meet the require-
ments of the British Caribbean?
That is how the position appears
at present. If so, it is a sad day
for British maritime prestige and
for the prosperity of the Carib-
bean Colonies.

VIEWS ON CARIBBEAN

SHIPPING
Mr. A. E, V. Barton, Secretary,
West India Committee :—

“The present lack of passenger

shipping between this country
,and the British West Indies is

causing hardship and financial
loss to West I ns, hitting the
tourist trade and putting diffi-
culties in the way of commer-
cial development. It is clear that
no British shipping line is pre-
pared to run a regular service
to the Eastern Caribbean Colo-
nies making reasonable provi-
sion for British passengers un-
less the Government gives some
assistance. This was fore-
shadowed in the Commonwealth

Shi Committee’s report,

which drew attention to the

high cost of operating such a}-

service and the possibility that

special measures of assistance
might be necessary. What is
suspected is that the British

Government is content to let

connections between the UK sna

the Eastern group of the . T

s






























hether Mr. Percy

first duti

SUNDAY,

portion of the many hundreds
of. English people and. West. In-
dians who are waiting for pas-
sages. If it were not for the
six-weekly sailings of the “Gol-
fito’ and the four-weekly ser-
vices of the Booker Line from
Liverpool to Demerara, we
should be in a worse fix than
we are. As it is, the outlook is
very disheartening indeed, and
there seems to be no immediate
of improvement.”

. Donald, Chairman,
Rowson, Drew & Clydesdale,

Ltd :—
“I feel very strongly about this
matter of shipping connections.
As one who in hisvime has visit-
ed ev sh Colony except
the Se lles and Mauritius, I
know hew these territories cdn
be deprived of opportunity and

ed by lack of proper
communications. What right
i “e to oie these Colonies
Z then deny them proper
tra: facilities? Surely the
of the Minister of
‘ransport is to énsure direct and
regular mail, passenger and
cargo services to every Colony?
The merchant venturers regard-

ed transport costs and trade as





| Good mornings

Now shave off their

with the greatest of ease ;-
You also should share the
_ improvement they’ve made _
By using the wonderful
Blue Gillette Blade



Blue Gill

TRADE ENQUIRIES TO:

‘What do



The Basques who reside
in the High Pyrenees

Sharpest ever made, Blue

FEBRUARY 25, 1954

one; later, when transport was
segregated, a profit was expect-
ed from both A country can
well afford a loss on transport,
provided it makes up the loss
by trade. That should be the
first consideration in_deciding
what to do about Caribbean
shipping services. The need for
a subsidy is common ground,
but the Commonwealth Shipping
Committee’s report shelved this
question. It seems difficult, tn
jact, to understand why the
Committee’s inquiry was stert-
ed. If to advise the Government
as to equitable subsidy :
tion, it failed in its purpose; éf
delay was the end in view, then
it succeeded. What is needed
are ships, not reports. The

posal made by me for the

uled and regular use of 25 per
cent. of the British

ships venom paasing rough
the Panama a
would supply ships mow, I ad-
vocate this step as an interim
arrangement pending the build-

ing of spe ships
to provide a fortnightly service
to both the Eastern and Western

Caribbean Colonies.”
British Export Gazette December 1950
whcrueseersh-sanehadleeieidegi ine -oontntiatiaah

so ~FOR
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Gillette Blades are also the most {
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—t..

ad

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T. GEDDES GRANT LIMITED



you know

about ENO?

DO YOU KNOW thut a gas

ae Pe eee is goer? are fixed before the commence- Navigation Co. have not been re- been sufficiently indicated above, seakis sent ee ae meat oe Senge aera bare
sions Britain has a pespdenatiedilt ment of the year. This certainty stored with ‘the exception of but further mention must be passenger service between the any substantial contribution to
for a population of some 3,090 000 oa yey is a great convenience occasional calls by the PSN’s made of the personal and psy- YK and Eastern Caribbean “with ¢nsure that British. citizens can
occupying 103,000 sq. miles.” and but for it we should not take Keina del Pacifico. The latter chological ‘repercussions. In a ships having accommodation for eS to British Colonies on Brit-

so large a proportion of our pur- vessel, who distributes her favours recent letter to The Times de-§0—75 persons and with a speed ships.”

“Te ae Oger aetna a ok
*





By comparison, tl ae ;
: possessions in the Ghsintnun area nex" 4 in England as we do. . - .” between Kingston and other West scribing his own efforts to get a of not jess than 16—17 knots” Mr. E. Palmer, Director, Bookers
ave some 600,000 inhabitants he seriousness of the British Indies ports, is due to make her passage back to the Eastern which “should if possible give Shipping & Trading Co.,
(36,000 sq. miles), the Dutch Caribbean's present shipping posi- next sailing frdm the UK to Caribbean, the Archdeacon of fortnightly sailings, but not less i—
55,0) i ' tion can be judged by comparing Jamaica “on 12th April. The Trinidad demanded: “Does Bri- frequently than monthly.” “Our e ;
275,000 (55,000 sq. miles) and the : ae ] Sh y xperience is that shipping
American ' 1,900,000 (6,600 sq, Se*vices to-day with what they Jamaica Banana Producers’ ships,"tain want her colonies or net’ Since two years have dragged accommodation available to the
. miles). Yet the shipping lines Were & decade ago. Until the out- Jamaica Producer and North Siar, and went on to say: “I do not by with no sign of action, it must Eastern Caribbean, while cover-
¥ of these other countries serve Preak of war, regular and fast taking 48 and 12 passengers re- wish to engage in politics but I be presumed thaf’no shipping line ing existing staff movements,
E their possessions—and ours, too Passenger services between the spectively, each maintain a six- 4m. very interested in transport can see its way to operate even does not provide for (i). new
. —far more adequately than do $ and the Eastern Caribbean weekly service. ; wt pone, Se pe ee Be pad the ced passenger service re- stay (ii) business people or
5 British lines. The Commonwealth Were maintained by several lines, Cargo shippers’ anxieties pi oe amg oo “* , eae a ed in the report. The (iii) rownd-trippers. Staff holi- Sold in bo 2
° § Shipping Committee’s Report on i? addition to cargo services ac- It will have been seen that Cariimin the Banine) lu et pocamndiins, Seesaw this situation days are dependent on when we ttles for lasting freshness
t West Indian Shipping Services cording to demand. facilities for cargo shipments to oouid not matter lea "tae let- to the, let case te es kanaaten: oer a he Wes Fae te 5
; showed in two striking diagrams Services then and now vnd from the British Caribbean to; supporting the Archdeacon's quired and to the possibilite that ig nth wen aa The 6 s 5
& ‘that, even before the war, foreign The Hambufg-America Lithe are much more satisfactory than forthright comments, an educa- special measure ee TLC! ne’s restored service,
: . ships carried most of the pas- ran a monthly service with’ two passenger services—at least, ac- tigpng) institution pointed out ae x irene of assistance, at together with the Dutch ships, :
; 3 sengers between the U.K. and the fast luxury ships (500-passenger cording to present demand, The i i ed out any rate at the outset, may be help to reléeve the situation,
; = ‘bb Today ane y ships ( passeng . Ay tea ey the difficulty of getting sea pas- necessary to encourage shipown- but these lines give first place The words “ Eno” aud “ Frui
; ; Eastern Caribbean. 4 pday the class), making Barbados in 9 main anxieties confronting cargo sages was” seriously hindering ers to provide the service.” The fo their own nationale ond can m0” and “ Fruit Sale” are registores wade
situation has worsened to such an days and calling around the shippers are the delays now yecruitment of teachers for BWI Royal Commission of 1939 reached not take more than a small pro- .
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY









rump - steak dinner (at
s. 8d. a lb. without sub-
idies) the family could be

posals of marriage.
Britain was far more

Gussie Moran's panties

—and when she once appeared

bare-legged before the abe and

Queen the nation practically
swallowed its Adam's apple,

hen the newspapers an-

nounced that Lenglen had turned

Brave became
‘a general

oe D° you know that a Red Indian
A chief was once made a

Shawnee tribe, and commissioned

him. He fought for us with his

bow-and-arrow braves and was
le

Indiana is famous. And this new





London Express Service

yey

25, 1951

- . .
A CHAMPAGNE SERIAL... No.

\

Last night, in a London flat,
the ‘Russian Lion’ showed off

Suzanne's decision
oppor-

a go
tani for yet
another new kind



of mass

hours before the
first match only 400
tickets had been sold.

It was then that Cochran
showed his mastery as a show-
man, He didn’t cancel the
tournament, He didn’t play to an
empty house.

e took the tickets, in bundles
of a hundred, round to ali



3

the grip
that beat

Sketched at the ringside by Ralph Cleaver

the end—after hitting the canvas
three times in the last round—he
went down for good.

Next morning not only had
Cochran a disastrous fiiancial
record to read, but he
was once more in the
middle of a row almost

-*

e:
wile



SUNDAY ADVOCATE *



«++ by LEONARD MOSLEY

FLASHBACK: First fall to Hackenschmidt in i min. 34 secs.
6 F ; as ae bien, <= 5

description of the final fall.

* adrali got his opponent
by the body and threw him.
Deftly Hackenschmidt slipped on

his hands and knees
+ and there for three lon
minutes Madrali
him_and squeezed him,

“ Before one could quite

erry
ote
=".



i
i
i
i
|
\
;
i
}



QANTAS

EMPIRE AIRWAYS

i cntimeiateiiinaeatl
ait
Racine
amen f
lea SASF
ST oaiteeneemenesl 1 cuniipdioetiniasiamnouial
ST atinpoamadlel Secaeubaeandeensaiintnee
ees nent
. penetra i snaetne eae
Madrali —————
ner) =>=-
ree or | eenionrencennnalll
HACKENSCHMIDT —| —— =
holds up the hands with —— |: —=:
which he. squeezed a -—— el
secon? wrestling victory ——} a) ——
out of Madrali in the ——— mse
Cochran show of 1906. 9 a oF
The réporter’s descrip- P————— 1 & —— :
O you remember professional Bri was con- tion read: “One could aaron] i} —F¥.
Suzanne | Lenglen? GS! Smeg aoe See ocig ko St oi
n agontsin —s =
In a way she typified she ever be recélved in” social © ‘Madrali's Jace force ie
everything about the mad, cireles again ? ” asked a writer in why :— * =| = —
glad, dizzy heights of the ‘Yé,Qaly Express, ae t
Cochran era. It was a worrying, about 4
happy time when over a_ ‘hat. le saw in ro
_
et



1 tel
coal
“Splitbydefending Suzanne's and _ si her wu =
right to be late on the a ‘in ae on
_ Centre Court at Wimbledon. fiuimont Ens | a
_. Suzanne was a hook-nosed tournaments in Ps .
littl Frenchwoman with a London. mae
violent temper. Her figure neo fae vas: 4 3
was scragey, her hair mousy, peers ra” Park teal ;
and her features admirably (capacity 4,500) ‘an — i
fitted her for the part of an n selling tickets — — +
Â¥ ister n anto-
‘3 mine. Yet she was %, -* 2 oe. i =
--iv> always recelving Pro- seemed to ree =

By leaps and bounds

A etallanaedensll
interested in whether . ————
heen se rome ne eae emaenmnel
stockings on .the cow ” |
than it ever was in fennis” and 26

It is a long time — actually millions of years — since the Kangaroo was
anywhere outside Australia. Now, however, as the emblem of Qantas Empire
Airways the Kangaroo has taken wings over the world,

By 1947 (their 25th anniversary) Q.E.A, had routes to the Philippines and
Japan; to Lae, Rabaul, Noumea, Suva; to Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands










PAGE ELEVEN










Os



{
stores and persuaded ine manage- as violent as the realise what was hap- ‘ 5 : y ; : ‘
ments to give them away vo their acruelty vg Ghmpat gn Seem en —and in conjunction with B.O.A.C. to Malaya, India, the Middle East,
customers.

BOXING TOO-

And another row

SUZANNE played ner
usval masterful game

but the public liked it—and liked,

the first flood-lighting
ever to be used for a
sports show.

g e puccees. ba ked a
ie doors,” said one o
Cochran's aides, And then added
that frequent postscript to a
Cochran venture : “ Or course. we
Jost money.”

ochran was not only promot-
ing tennis but had a big box-
ing match on his hands, ‘oo
was the world middle-
championship bout at Oly:
between Scotsman Tommy
Milligan and the holder. America's

to be! For 10 rounds Walker's
iron fists bit their way into
Milligan’s face and body, until by

eo.

Sir Hall Caine led a

Public protest against

what he called “ this
debauch of brutality”

and asked that Cochran should be
“prohibited by law from putting
on such scenes until they had

The man with the fez

rting ventures. At the outset
of his career in the early days ot
the century, he cashed in on the
wrestling boom then sweeping
the country Outstanding
grappler of the _ time—probably
of all time—was Georges Hacken-
schmidt. known as “ The Russian
Lion,”

Cochran seurched Europe unc
America for an opponent ior tim.
and found one at last.

@ full and netive Life. talkee about
it last nevne
Be cemembers the

Express

the body slipped

a Madrali was under-

neath. The battle was won. The

crowd yelled. The victor laughed
and almost danced.”

SPINELLI- |

‘ea rm beer js ed of thi speakable
"Brigadier-General in the British girl named Dore ‘Boeing barbarity." : oe ae Temperamental dancer
, ATM: 5 7 ocliran’s repiy was sharp.
The British were fighting the Tt was a wolf devouring a lamb,

WN cocnes 14 years later

British ReRyS Vay champion,
Carpentier got £5, as his end
of tne purse, and Beckett £3,000.

tine high) Cochran was able to
araw a gate of over £30,000.

This bout, too, was over in less
than a round—with a knock-out
over Beckett.
Cochran did well out of that
figat. And he made money out
of others. But then, suddenly
disgusted with boxing politics, he
quit, and decided to concentrate
on the theatre,

By 1930 Cochran had five
shows Bong, well, and p

ee A on to sell tickets on the morning proved in be. ‘The cold breatn of depression
wace Phi tat on _ aad.) | of the fight. Sales dried up. . In his Hampstead flat Hacken- hadn't yet touched Britaln
ps ra 44-3 7% ly > Price, But what a fight it Gernant Yait sehimict. now 74 and sill living

and.
in any case, it was still bright and
warm and exciting imside a
Cochran theatre.

N. Africa, Italy, France and England,
For their Australian and international services Shell supply Qantas
Empire Airways with their major requirements of aviation fuel and engine oils,

SUGLL AVIATION SERVICE

. r lways yt PF | retlls or
_ killed. “ After that the tennis BENE Dittuordioore By charging 25 guineas for i istribut
_ . This is one of the battle stories tournaments were a Some extraordinary ringside seats (still a world's all- i pist yp
for which America’s State of touch to Cochran's { G

SHELL













ae

Americans, and ‘thi ing ME eter. se dapper, dane ine FOR AIRLINES THE WORLD OVER He ptr
_ Americans, an ngs were said. ’ apper, ancing : aplde rego?

badly for us. We made friends a. Coan Of cect as Frencnman Georges Carpentier Goide® in “ao!

with Chief Tecumseh, of the “272 played at night under MADRALI.~ to London to box Joe ket,

piatignu gentot
soum * soint +*
plate! pe

pl ugeum

i ita

pall



, for,
Mickey Walker, He was a giant who first at least more—wi stars
ones xe, the oelp of seats gee wearing a long Far cont fanging all ihe wey Ro the:
i ou. ve been soa , Jimmy and_a fez. and he was introduce emperainental renc jancer
Seek ‘iret faniine both the White. the millionaire financier, as Madrali the Terrible Turk. Spinelli to Noél Coward and
William ‘Herrisee. ne Caren, committed suicide. This sensa- Huckenschmidt wrestled hira Gertrude Lawrence,
us, and the 150th en of tion robbed Cochran of the Front twice. in 1904 and 1906. What a Over in America bread-lines
Indiana as wee territocy, Page publicity be always banked fantastic struggle the isv6 bour Were beginning to form.

iwndon Express Service





ee













Owing to delay caused by irregular shipping services the

| “Advocate” regrets that it has been compelled to curtail its:

: daily cartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all avail-

able strips as they arrive will be appearing in this space.







——
















——=

Cows that Feed on Sunny
Pastures Produce
THIS

Creamy Flavoured
Milk
Oak has a lovely, rich, creamy

flavour because the cows that pro-
duce OAK Milk feed on luscious

Innoxa





Che Loveliness that lasts a
: Lifetime eore













THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK







Now Offers You the means of ensuring this.





BROAD STREET or ALPHA PHARMACY (HASTINGS)

Noel Roach & Co

L, J. WILLIAMS MARKETING CO., LTD.,—Sole Agents. activities :

green grass all the year round— rs
e
oe eee ITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,
-UP THE “INNOXA WAY” th ilk in the world W g aes
ae ee eee eae te et and Associations to make the compilation of information in
MISS ANN THOMAS of INNOXA’S BOND STREET SALON, jh ii) tL" h.esn ‘smile in arid oz) tin - ‘THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
. ) for only 79¢. and more if you wish possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities;
; TY PE TALIST Co religious, commercial, cultural, educational, healih, sports,
retdio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed
PRICES | below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:
Now offers the following Treatments by Appointments :— 12 He EDITOR
oz____ 79. THE ’
(1) FULL FACIAL TREATMENT (1 Hour) ........ $5.00 THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 195!,
(2) CLEANSE, MASK & MAKE UP (14 Hour) ...... 2.52 3 lb___. $2.50 ie C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street. .
* (3) CLEANSE & MAKE UP (20 Minutes)......... . 1.80
‘ FULL CREAM Mil kh FORM
A COURSE OF SIX FULL FACIAL TREATMENTS for $25.00 POWDERED Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Etc. .........:cccce ceeeeseees epee |
| e
DAYS : TUESDAY WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY OEE EE RENEE EERE EEE He HOT EE TREE EE EERE EE HE EE EEE EERE EEE E ETHER E EERE TEETER EERE E TEER EEE EEE eee HEE EEE R EEE Ee | j
TIME: 9toliam. 1to3 p.m. 9 to 11.30 a.m. OBTAINABLE AT ae /
« ¢ A, aikes
2S Consultation and Advice Included ORR een Gio. ae bev + Bruce’ Weatherhead President or Chotirman..........cssccsccesessessseesssessessssssessecsscsessnsesessesessesnvers dy
ee oe 2 3, paar asi + Bookers Brug perree ten Council or Committee Member............cscccsssssssvessssssssesesrssvessvsnsvesnne ita
e § John D, Taylor e Gittens rte |
For Appointments and further information, Dial 4584 or c ane thik a Co tee. N.S. Sainsbury i a. Dam SiN, aes ae
PEO * Knights Ltd., Clty Pharmacy & John g,,, Suecessor Cussaresdbeanimhansadsineannenachicdgteaaessunesods chabtaorsueess |
Side ; x Kohls Lia. Phoente Pharmacy} & Hing” Treasurer MIO NINY Sasi siacscccsississssessibcciosesincntiee
i » bs B. M. Fergusson : Nelson Pharmacy if SP rrIIIITTi Tee Tiiiii ty i i iad, oecees senesereressacces
Booker's 0s) Drug Stores Ltd. jj) : "rei eee | a
: : Harold Proverbs 11d * Cosmopolitan Pharmacy Short historical account of the origin, functions and current
* St. Ann's armaqy


PAGE TWELVE



CLASSIFIED ADS.





—_—_——— _
PAYNE—In ever loving memory of our

















Main Rd., near Plaza, Oistins, three Bed-

(Two large), and Din-



PUBLIC |









PARISH OF ST. PHILAP



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



WANTED





















Coastal Station







Harbour Log SHIPPING NOTICES



Bailing to Plymouth, Antwerp, Amster-

FEBRUARY 25, 1054



INDAY,











GASCOGNE: March 31

a)

\ Le 7 Thm c
Téa cents per agate line on week _ | } BAND CONCERT (
and 12 cents per agate line on gph Tininwen change soeak a cents and L 4 if
» 5 okedays | 96 cents Sundays words — over . ega a Be
TELEPHONE 2508 and 1 Te St” om = wesk-Oays |: omg 5 cents a word week—4 cents a In Carlisle Bay a ete beeen etry” Under the auspices of th« i
——— - eas eubieetie thes eatin ae | word Sundays. | ROYAL NETHERLANDS } St. James Branch, {
; i M/V Sedgefield, Sch, Marea Henrietta, | : Civie Cirele
} oO : ; ;
Bisine, “Marieges ‘Beate, Acsnow-| | FOR RENT ee HELP Ain Yan Sewtman’ sen” Wandertal| gay TEAMSHIP CO. | By kind permission ot ff
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is| Mimimum charge week 72 cents end PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH. " FeetieenE ate addi ao, Coeraaien Sch Rainbow M., Sch. W.| ,>silime from Amsterdam, Dover and | ss aan ae of Police
$1.50 on Week-day's and $1.80 on Sundays | 06 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24| Applications for the Post of Parochiai] 1 NGIISHWOMAN desires onlay ment 1” wunicia, an, Whittaker, Sch.| Médeire—s.s. “Cottica” and, 3rd, 9th The Commissi .
fox any number of words up to 50, and | words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents @| Treasurer will be received by the un. | Pt ferably hotel work, Fluent Spanish Turtle Dove, Sch. Molly N. Jones, Sch.| february, 1951. M.S. “Bonaire” 9th, THE POLICE BAND
3 cents per word on week-days ana| word Sundays. Gersigned not later than the 28th Feb- | #is> copable of dealing with English or Zurtle Dove Gordon, Sch. Rosarene, Sch.| ‘th. 16th March 1951. a Cie Gle Transatlantique will give a Concert {
4 cents per on Sundays for each ruary 1951 Applications must be aic- | SPonish correspondence. Write Box ““D’ ’ - ‘ S,. Sch. Lindsyd 11 Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam g fs
— companied by Baptismal and Medical | Co. Advocate as ieee : “Sch. Ania #| MS. “Helena” 12th, 15th, February 1951, 8 directed by
Por Births, \ Engagement ES Certificates, and marked on the En-}| ———-—-—- ——- § -~ “MY. ice | @S- “Willemstad” Oth, 15th, February ws ae dictn: ARO:
inteaaenis pe eae Calling the HOUS velope, applications for Post of Pare.4 STENOGRAPHER—An excellent oppor- Sar ag y so cpa Pe: SHEne 1951, mo. “Oranjestad” §th, 15th March Capt. Rai: As ARO
charge is $3.00 for any number of words chial Treasurer {tunity awaits a § grapher desirous of ** DEPARTURES 1961. : se F SAILINGS TO Se es Ro ale NT
up to $@ and 6 cents per word for exch Sed. Rey. L. C. MALLALIEU, St actlve eexmanent employment with sin pelqueen, 4 tens net, Capt. King,| Selling to Trinidad, Peramariho | ang ENGLAND & FRANCE HOLETOWN MONUME?
fdditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2503] APARTMENT — Upstairs - apartment Chedemnan attractive remuneration, Apply to Brad- oi. Vise, . Georgetown—m.s. “Bonaire” 27th Janu- ie F - oF
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 83113 for Death | Large coo! Bedrooms, Dining Sitting St. Joseph's Vestry. | *©w & Company, P.O, Box 228. . : ary 1961; ons. “Cottica” 20th, February COLOMBIE; March 12th on Tuesday, February 27
Notices only after 4 p.m. Teorn and Kitchenette, All modern ¢ 11.2.51—6n. 22.6.51.—6n. 1951; ms. “Helens” 3rd March 1951. via Martininque and at 4.30 p.m.
veniences, Dial4506. 25.2.51- fn To With Barbados | «°"2,° Se vie Guadeloupe
rT uch éa0 ete—m.s. “Oran P : {
IN MEMORIAM A Large Cottage at Thornbury Hill, NOTICE MISCELLANEOUS 1951. st

rooms Drawing AQUARIAMS.—AN glass or concrete dam—m.s. “Oranjestad” 23rd Feb. 1951. via St. Lueia, Martinique,
ae Gere who died on Feby. 8th. ling Rooms, Open Gallery, Modern Con- VESTRY BYE-ELECTION with glass front, Large medium or small, Cable an@ Wireless (W.1.) 14d advise} § P. MUSSON, SON & CO., i. Guadeloupe. Antigua

. r z veniences, Spacious Yard Enclosed, Va- ¥ , Alo glass bowls and battery glass jars. that they can now communicate with the i
Sad and sudden was the call cant. Dial 3141, 25.2.61—in. I hereby give notice that I have ap- H F. Shearn, Phone 2318 23.2.51.——3 Bs Se
of that dear one loved by aii —| Pointed the Church Boys’ School, near > 3 <0l.—Sn. following ships through their Barbados =:

Deepest of sorrow no word can tell



mpty JEFFREYS REER 4 . a SOUTHBOUND
Of the Jost one we loved so well. 7 avenue. 2 bedrooms and all. modern| all Parishioners of the Parish of St, compiles with “kisier paritions Lens, jet Sinn eee Sete. — The M/V CARIBBEE will accept Bek tet
Guy Payne ee ert te | eenveniences. Available from April Ist. ip and other persons duly qualified | each—delivered to the Warehouse of S. ). tor, Oakhill, Alcoa t, Gan Salvador, Cargo and Passengers for Dominica — COLOMBIE: Marc s
Father) Audrey, Gwen (Sisters) Annette 1 Bi aaey 25.28!—8n, | t0 vote at any eection of Vestrymen| Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. Pierhend. Fort: Townshend ;, Exapress of BP ae vaio ce Mokch Trinidad, La Guiara,
. —_—_—_— Tish 9 7 Atte ing a)
BLUE HOUSE—Lucas Street. A fine} Monday Sth day of March 1961 between 018.251 —On eae: ona Ce eee 1961. Curacao, Cartegena,
business stand. Immediate possession, the hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in the Hill, Folke . 5 .



























7—_—_—————
A FURNISHED BUNGALOW in Bedford



Apply: THANI BROS, Pr. Wn. Hry St.{ morning to elect a Vestryman in place le


















the Parish Church, as the place where









Const StitiGhi—

r

IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel- ‘Ancon, Usodimere 7
ry, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate, ©/#t2, S. Rosa, . ;



















ne ae er mame









The M/V DAERWOOD will























Jamaica

















































































x “‘larkes Wharf, ibesman, Lady accept nd Passengers for
FOR SALE ; Dial 3466. 25.2.51—In. | of Ernest Lyte Esq. deceased. Phone 4420 or ‘call at GORRINGES, ad- yyjctet) Clarkes Wharf, ri ; Reade stead, End henna: Accepting Cargo, Mail deans
: Sed. P. S. W. SCOTT, joining Royal Yacht Club Tureville. Siwtesesk, Spehonen ' and Passengers only for St. Vin- Passengers
Minimum charge week 72 cents and] a FURNISHED BUNGALOW in Bedford Parochial Treasurer, 20.2.51—T.F.N, Libreville. _ : Gia, Wake of eailitias to be notified. ng
96 cents Sundays 24 words — aver 241 avenue, 2 bedrooms and all modern con- St. Philip. |] — Districts, Ban@alend, + The M/V CACIQUE will accept te
words 3 cents a word waek—4 Cents OI veniences. Available from April Ist, 22.2.51—6n.| | UMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel- ‘and Peasengers for St STIFF NECK
word Sundays. Dial 2259. 25.2.51—3n. Lag sold nuggets, coins, miniature? Jade, — “Mrenadé- end Aribe, and 0 t 7
id dhicishenbestotbusininsmtareerone ribs: Siete, Grenade end Arne, | and R. M. JONES & €
AUTOMOTIVE BELLA VISTA: Cattlewash, — Com- oT Antique Shop. Dial 4429, see Salhe Sika we a Sina. ere RHEUMATISM,
N CE 20.2.51.—t.f. a $s Sailing Tuesday 27th in
fortably furnished. Three bedrooms, —wie-SSB. . AGENTS PAINS IN THE
hone beds. cates see oe PARISH OF 8ST, LUCY BWA, SCHOONER OWNERS ae 3914
CAR — 1938 Dodge. Excellent condi- + power plugs, running water All fi P, ASSOCIATION INC, 0. ttt
J persons hial and High- JOINTS
tion, Suitable for taxi, Apply C. A. FE. | throughout. Garage. Servants’ rooms. owing Paroe Tel. 4047.
Beckles, Perry's Gap, Roebuck Street,| tock House. Mrs. Chandler. Todds. bt 3 ag Ard gue peri hee acter He SOVERNMENT NOTICES !
or Department of Be eee 05211. 25.2.51—3n. they will be collerted entpedisnr te hae You can et speedy re-
r CLL, — , O, L, DEANE, : : . i i
GAR aaiinnds 10 DLP. Mileage or000.| Gamer Neciy ooh wmode ees wit Parochial Treasurer, Attention is drawn to the Control of Lumber Prices (Defence) ‘ " « lief by rubbing in
Just re-painted. Leather upholstery. jfront and back porches: Three. bed- Py sige: | (Amendment) Order, 1951, No. 2 which will be published in the Off- National Steamshi Ss
Dial Office 4611, home 9449. Bete a rooms, wanch with running wales, ining 24.2.51—4n, cial Gazette of Monday 26th February, 1951 .
2. + |rcom, Large sitting room. Garage, Ser- , ¥ ‘
KK nnn | vant’s room and all modern convenien- 2. Under this Order the maximum retail sell ice of “Mer-| SOUTHBOUND Soils
LORRY—One (1) 5-ton Lorry in perfect | ces, Electricity. Ready for occupancy NOTICE ie ee _ ing pr Sails Sails Salle Arrives Selle,
-FEC chantable Douglas Fir” is as follows :-— Montreal Holifax nm
shape. License until June. Apply: F. E.C.) from ist March 1951. Phone 2985. Mra. - ¢ “CAN. CHALLENGER” — 2) Feb. on 1 Mar, 1 Mar. This great
Rema, Peieodekip Pantene. pihone | C. C. Clarke. 14.2.51—4n, PARISH OF ST. PETER COLUMN ONE COLUMN TWO “LADY RODNEY” = 3 Mar. 5 Mar. 14 Mar, 15 Mar
a -|“CLEVELAND'—Fully furnished, and DEHS will be received by the Ordinary Retail Price : NELSON" a oe ee. eS oe Pain-Killer on Sale at
yey Suen ' undersigned for the following up to Article (mot more than) " . CHALLENGER” ‘his 2 Apr ~~ 12 Apr. 12 Apr
PICK-UP—One Dodge Pick-up in work- | Avenue, Belleville. Ring 2017. March 3rd (Saturday) ‘ RODNEY” le 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 27 Apr 27 Apr i
ing order. Apply: 8. E. Cole & Co., Ld. 25.2.51—n«| (1) ‘The supply of Fresh Milk in bulk for ‘Asrives Arrives Azrives Knights Drug Stores
TaD co aeacious, Unturnished Flat. | 9) ‘The ‘suppiy wt Fresh Meat tor the| (2) Merchantable Douglas Fir $260.00 per 1,000 board feet MORTEROUND Goruclts Maskates ‘fosten Bi dom | Helen
FURNITURE Miapione Mrs. Gooding, 4092. 4 Imahotuse ;
%2-5\—-18.1 (3) The supply of Medicine and Drugs| 54in February, 1951 25251.in, | TADY NELSON” 23 Feo = 4 Feb. 8 Mar. © peed =
PURNITURE—Ralph Beard offers the |"“mr OwER DEW” at Maxwell Coast for’ the Almshouse and outdoor sh Ribate si were * | “LADY RODNEY a yon 4 oe 23 bi —" 26 Apr oe ie rida. scala
following ‘bargains in Brand New furni- | poad, Right of Way to Sea, Good Bathing, patients eS. ee ; 22 May
ture 206 @ Seniten time ; John Brinamead S Phinianishie "steerer Cottage. ati | (4 The conveyance of paupers PART ONE ORDERS “LADY RODNEY” 10 May 12 May. 21 May. -
Upright Piano $200 00; jahogany ning (a) To and from the Almshouse to
Chairs $17 00.4 pr; Mag, Tub Chairs 634.00 woseve ant Gules st sence ie and from any part of the Parish N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vesvels fitted with cold storage cham.
a pr.; Mag Bed-ends 3 ft. 6 ins. $30 00 fiigerator, Radio, Telephone, Vacant (b) To and from the Almshouse or By bers. Passenger Fares and freight yates on application to :—
a pr.; Bed-ends 4 ft. 6 ins. $35.00 a pr. ; Di , ‘m0 tt ne ® @. ¥. 6c Aarau, any part of the Parish to and Lieut.-Col. J. Connell, OBE, ED,
Mag Bureaus $75 00 each; Mahogany Wusiicraets er 9 aam., D. ae, from the General Hospital, ‘Commanding,
Cookin Sete foes. 06 204 yds : na “| (5) ane Burial of Paupers to the The Barbados Regiment. si he
¥ ° is tery from the Almshouse or any Issue No. & 23 Feb. 51.
variety of high class second hand furni-| FLAT—Attractive furnished Flat, Hast emetery is
ture. For viewing ols in Geriweed sae Saeed TOMA, Good veranda facing part of me be Saseiiee s ereas GARDINER AUSTIN & Cow LTD. emis Agenis.
Alley. Open daily from 8 a.m. P.M. | sea. le ng. Suitable one person or . 5. :
Breakfast Time inclusive. couple, Telephone, 2429, Clerk of the Poor Law Guardians, All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 bours on Thursday Jj 0 Hi Re
23.2.51.—6n. 25.2.52—1n. phair an: 1 Mar. 51.
-2.01—4an. HQ Coy will continue their specialist training. The m range is also available
ELECTRICAL FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast. Furnigh- to HQ Coy under arranzements to be made by the O«, CRICKETERS THE BARBADOS ARTS &
TEsais waarocmly pete ae supply, LI UOR LI s TIC aan Soy wil gD gigtiar, Chapter 3, loading, lying and firing. a de CRICKETER CRAFTS SOCIETY
aa siete ng ant. uble carport, “B" Coy wi io L.M.G, ssson 4, aiming and holding: th t of this lesson reet our comrade 3 th »4
REFRIGERATOR — General Electric servants’ rooms. From February 15th. Q CEN E NO E being to teach each man how to hold and aim the isen Goh neces in order in BLAZERS and FLANNEL Eeeeens - eye e
Canadian Model. € cub. ft. with 25 Dial 4476 28.1.51—t.f.0, to obtain good results on the range PANTS send them to~ to ] Exh bit |
months guarantee. Electric Sales and . ae 4 The application of Gilbert Jones, holder Bana . ; RAYMOND JORDAN nna I 1 10n |
Service Ltd. 25 .2.61—2n. HOUSE-—2-Storey full furnished. Avail-| Of Liquor Licence No, 953 of 1951, granted Band practice parades will be held on Monday 26, Wednesday 28 and Thurs- s QUEEN’S PARK HOUSE | |
able from March 16th on 3 monthe to] t® him in respect of bottom floor of a day 1 Mar, 51. in Bay Street, opposite Tussiay, Sebramiy 18th. ..t0 |
LIVESTOCK 6 or 12, Situated near the Aquatic Club} fvo Storey wooden ‘building in Baxters! 9 yoLUNTARY NIGHT Combermere Street. MAS Aide haa ard 1981 BLADON
and Yacht Club. For viewing, a ae a Cane teks War eas see i, There will be a voluntary parade for WOs and NCOs at 1700 hours on Tuesday Pe eet ate : |
“ Be 25.2.51—3n. > * + . 27 Feb. 51. WOs & NCOs of “A” tar 3. Ss s ej y
Gok eee ee ee on ee iri ERI: | a anne itn org attached at Kings of “B" Coy will do LMG, soathe sath he aa pepe Bayo Fr per Pe ea m. }
& Co., Ltd. Roebuck Street. NEWHAVEN, Crane Coast. Furnished; pi St, Michael, expected to attend. fr WANTED FOR CASH Adteammaas ye Children Half A.F.S., F.V.A
21.2.51--t.f.n, | ¢ bedrooms, wernt gupply, Lighting}, 7 rd gr te AS February 1061, |» ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING sed Posta Stam 5 "Price * eh ee
E Ser ta . ant, Double Garage, ‘a . . A. , * 5 R. 5
a = Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”. : U ; ge p Parties of School Children ac
FURNITURE Dial we” et 4 st piten. rr Signed GILBERT JONES, Orderly Officer Lieut. E. R. Goddard companied by their’ Teachers Formerly Dixon & Bladon



















Orderly Serjeant
Next for duty

Applicant.
application will




235 L/S Quintyne, K, will be admitted at Special Rates.

Of the British West
5 Members of the BA.S.C, will

Best Prices paid at the



tr ninsingyetininaanaperiiomnnam
PRIVATE sale of household furniture PLEASANTON — Worthing main Rd.,

N.B.—This



be con- Indies.





























































































































ete, At 19 Pavilion Court, Hastings, | Enclose@ Gallery, 3 bedrooms, drawing | sidered at a Licensing Court to be held Orderly Officer Lieut. S. G. Lashley Caribbean Stamp Society, No. 10 be admitted at ree PS ee
from 9 a.m. to 12 Mid-day on Tuesday Jand dining rooms, servant's room, gar-| at Police Court, District “A” on Monday Orderly Serjeant 233 L/S Blackman, A. L, O. Swan Street. ware. the Cuan year , :
E h i March 2nd i D iL i 8. Phone | the 5th day of March 1, at 11 o'clock, aras : t
oe 27th to Friday Te agian, ceo all modern conven eat tee oe ay oO} ms M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major. ms FOR S. Al E
E. A, McLEOD, S.O4L.F. & Adjutant, SSS pirat om
PREMISES—-No, 6 Swan Street, Up- Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”. The Barbados Regiment, | a am A446 “MEDMENHAM” — Pine Hill, A
MECHANICAL Stairs Premises, very spacious and cool 26,2.51—I1n, PART Il ORDER . . POPP F PICS SPS OPED aie | very fine two-storey property
suitable ior Factory, Agents Ofiice, 8 [ | N a pleasantly situated in approx, 1%
OFFICE TYPEWRITER—L, C. Smith 10 | Dentists, Solicitors, or Society. Apply: ie Tae REGIMENT SERIAL NO, 7 P roiessiona olice 1 ALL TH AT % acres near Government House.
excellent aendition asund two years old. tani Bros. or Dial 3466. 25.2.51—In PUBLIC § ALES 8 ex tre ‘ SHEET NO. 1 GOOD HEALTH AWAITS YOU 1066 AND % ee a en aa =
lephone | Goodl 4932. . 1. TRANSFER AT POREY SPRING, ag
25.2.5%~2n.1 ROOM--On ground floor of Mayfair caaiie ¥ prising 3 reception, dining and
——— | Gift Shop, suitable for Flower Shop or i il eee See 852 Pte Outram, J. D. BY Coy Transferred to MT. HQ Coy are eae Q{fh| breakfast rooms, 4 ‘bedrooms, (1
MISCELLANEOUS Greens Counter. Apply in writing to] BEMERSYDE, St. Lawrence Gap, Christ | 9 LEAVE—Privilege di are Madam E, E. Skeete, G.C.S.M. A Performance will be given in ¥ with large dressing room) but-
the Secretary, Mayfair Gift Shop, Chureh, near the Cable Station. The 384 L/S Laurie, G. “Ay Granted 6 months P/Leave wef Craduate Masseuse and Hydro- é Hall of Harrison College at ler’s pantry, kitchen, servant's
ANTIOS 28 — Of every description 22.2.51—3n. Sypsheuse comprises large Srawing ¥ 1 Mar, 51. ¥ Therapist, Specializes in Scientific zt ae i, ae rooms, garage, fernery, poultny
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver }- —~—-———-—-———— —— | an ning rooms, three bedrooms, with 306 Pte Barnett, P, HQ a Granted 4 weeks P/Leave wef 1 Swedish Massage, Medical Gym- 8.30 p.m. On Friday “Mare . ee houses ete. There is a two-way
Watercolours. » Maps. Auto-{, SPACIOUS, UNFURNISHED FLAT—| running water in each (one with a private Mar, 61. nastics, High blood pressure, ; 1H) entrance drive and the grounds |
graphs etc. at Gorrin Antique Shop | Telephone Mrs. Gooding 4932. beth) separate toilet and bath, and 421 Pte Yearwood, H. M. vs Granted 6 months P/Leave wef Diabetes, Rheumatism, Asthma, Tickets at 5/-, 3/- and 2/- are %& | are well laid out with lawns, flow-
e Royal Yacht Club. * 25.2.51—In.| Isitchen, Open verandahs to the Bast ve : 1 Mar. 51 Piles, Pneumonia, Russian-Baths, on sale either at the Headmaster's ering shrubs and flower gardens.
3.9.50—t.f.n. Wiaen OOTeAGn PLAT ae ae and ine eh re 499 Pte Yearwood, C. N, Re, Granted Medicated Baths, etc, Treatments cin + ee: danpabeee aivathbeaeny The whole property has a plea-
oO u ‘ hree r. 6 v Y y 2 * ice or ins ‘s 2 . sa 7
BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in ax St. James, paswant’s rooms, pce ae aieweny in} ° Pe Baca a Sareea Sent. ie Your nent Pa aBP aes othe Mites eau oe
White, Green, Primrose with matching | Furnished or unfurnished. Good sea-] the yard, which also contains several e Prescod, B. T. Bn HQ Granted 4 days’ Sick Leave wef Offline. Mouse: nesdnen | an Proceeds in aid of Overseas this exclusive aren,
units to complete colour suites. Top |bething. Private beach. Appiy Mrs.| cocoanut and fruit trees, 23—26 incl. Grarsdays 10, cdas to he a Tour to Q@.R.C. Trinidad.
grade, A. BARNES & Co., Ltd. E Greenidge, White Cottage, St. The property is situated on the most P Ze or “MALTA” — St. Peter. A mo-
26.1.51—t.f.n. | James.” 25.2.5!+—4n, | popular coast in the Island with perfect M. L. D, SKEWES-COX, Major, dern and very solid stone-built
ciathnhlipipebapre-cnaspentenemtasintentmrenninganisinganas sea-bathing, The Bee ¢ SSS O CCS OSB VSO OSSSOON bungalow raised above ground
CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win- . For appointments to view and for e Barbados Regiment. a Nal OT level allowing ample storage and
dow styling, light control, Valances and PURLIC SALES further particulars ring 3925, R. S., j garage space below. There are 3
draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A. ; Nicholls & Co,, Solicitors, ee | " bedrooms, large living room,
B. & CO, LTD. 13.2.51—t.f.n Ten cents per agate tine on week-days 25.2,51—t.f.n. WHAT § IN A NAME - kitchen, pantny, 2 garages, ser.
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, vant's quarters for 2. The pro-
DIVING MASKS ~— 10/- each obtain- | ™inimum charge $1.50 on week-days GRANDVIEW-—Bathsheba. Three (3)

and $1.80 on Sundays



perty of approx, 4 acres is locat-
ed in the landward sidé of the
coast road but a right of way to
an excellent bathing beach is
opposite, This house was built by

able in the Toy Dept. at Cave Shepherd

When you say
& Co. Ltd. 28.1.51—t.f.n.

Everton Weekes— :
Everyone thinks of Cricket,
& you

Bedroomed Bungalow, standing on 14,919
square feet of land, Offer in writing for
the same, will be received by E. C,
FIELD, C/o James A. Lynch & Co., Lid.
up to 4 p.m. 28th February 1951.











DESCHIENS SYRUP OF HEMOGLO-
BINE: Especially valuable after an

AUCTION



For LADIES & GENTS



attack of influenza or whooping cough.

Give it to your children: Nothing better.

Fresh supply to hand at all Druggists,
4,.2.51—4n

i ene nee
MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin-
guished solution to your special
architectural problem of door closures,







screens, movable partitions. Dial 4476
A. BA & CO., LTD,

13,2.51—t..n.

PIANO — In good condition, Apply

to Mrs. Parris, Culloden Ra,

25.2.51—1n,
ra
VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirsch Sun-aire
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to
your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2,51—t.f.n,
——
WE buy and sell household equip-

ment of all description. Owen TT,
Allder, Roebuck Street. Dial 3200,
24.2.51—4n.

SS
WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower-
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.
We cut to your requirements. G. W.

HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd. Dial 4222.
15.2.51—10n.

PERSONAL







The public are hereby warned against
Piving credit to my wife, Winifred Skeete
inee Allman) as 1 do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone else con-
tracting aixy debt or debts in my name
unless by a writterr order signed by me.

Signed CHARLES SKHETE,
Westbury, Road, Pickwick Gap,
St. Michael,
24.2.51—2n.



LOsT



GOLD CHAIN — A 3 Strand Gold
Chain necklace, during week-end of 10th
February, Anyone giving information
towards recovery of same will be well

rewarded. Apply in person to Marie's
Beauty Parlour over Alexander Bay-
ley, Broad St.

2A,2.51—2n.



BE WISE...
-. - ADVERTISE

—_—_

lich Germs

ei 7 M ute
lled in 7 Minutes
* ‘Your has nearly 50 million tiny seams
mrabere germs hide and cause ter-
ri Htohing.. Cracking, Eozema, Peeling,
B ing, ne, Ringworm, Psoriasis,
Pimples, Foot Itch and other

rdinary treatments give
temporary he gles eso ae, ete
germ cause. new discovery, \«
oan kills the ae in 7 minutes and ts
ie

eee to ou a soft, dear, attrac-
guaran



8 one week, or
on return of

cause of

im Troubles trouble.

—_— es
AUCTION SALE OF PROPERTY

one property at King's Street called









AT KING'S STREET
On Thursday next the Ipt March at
2 o’clock at my office, Magazine Lane,

mbay Cottage. It consists of a Wall
Verandah, Drawing and Dining Rooms,
2 Bedrooms, Bath, Kitehen, Water and
Light, and the land on which it stands,
Inspection on application to the tenant.
For partitulars see D'Arcy A. Scott,
Magazine Lane. 24.2.51—3n,

AUCTION SALE OF HOUSE
On Wednesday next the 28th at 2
o'clock on the spot at Water Hall Land,
Eagle Hall, One 16 x 9 house in good
condition. Must be sold. D'Arey. A,
Scott, Auctioneer,
24.2.51—3n,.

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

SALES IN MAROH

TUESDAY 6th—Sale by order of Lioyds,
/gents, 17 High Street.

TUESDAY 13th—Mrs, Chaffee (Mac-
Adam). Sale: “The Rhonda” Worthing.

THURSDAY—Miss M, Massiah’s Sale
“Stewart Ville”, Rockley,

TUESDAY 20th—Sale at the Mahattan
Club, Pr, Wm, Henry Street.

THURSDAY 29th—Mrs. Gerald Skeete’s
Sale, Geneva", Garrisan.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
25.2.5)—1n,

REAL ESTATE

Set metetie
ON THE SEA
at Garden, St. James
Modern Bungalow, 3 bedrooms, two
baths. Overlooking Sea, own private







bathing beach, Good Yacht Anchorage.
Phone 91-50, 25.2.51—t.f.n,
BE HEEDFUL—War, Inflation and

Semi-Starvation based on Diplomacy
vnother word for Hypocriay Bargains
sre still on My List and I am almost off
the Sick List. Grasp These:—Almost
New 3 Bedroom Reinforced Concrete
Pungalow Near City, Good Location,
Going for under £2,100, A large 3
bedroom cottage at Thornbury ill,
Main Rd., near Plaza, Oistins, Modern
Conveniences, Ver; Good Condition,
Spacious Yard BPnclosed, Vacant, Going
for Under £900, A Large Stonewall
Pusiness Residence in Tudor St., Going
for under £2,300, A Small Property
mear Country ‘Rd., Yields $21.09 p.m.,
Going for Under $1,900. Almost New
3 Bedroom Stonewall Bungalow Type
| at Fontabelle, Going for Under £2,500.
A 2 Bedroom Cottage (not old) by
Fontabelie, Going for Under £1,300. A
3 Bedroom, (possible 4) at Hastings,
Main Rd., Going for Under £2,200, A
3 Bedroom at Rocklay, Main Rd., near
Blue Water Terrace, Going for Under
£3,100. Almost New 3 Bedroom and a
New 2 Bedroom Stonewall Bungalows
near Navy Gardens, Going for Under
£2,300 and £4,700. A Desirable ana
Almost New Bun,
Going for Under
Substantial 2 Storey
Gardens, Suitable for Flats, Guest House
or a Medico, about 2 Acres, Going for
Under £4,500. C Me for New Stonewall
Bungalows (Seaside and near the Sea)
ond Building Sites, Re-Sale Values
Assured. Mortgages Arranged, Dial 3111
D. F. de Abreu, a Real (Not Sham) Estate
























Broker, Auctioneer & Valuer, Call at
“Olive Bough", Hastings,
BUNGALOW—Gregg Farm, St. Andrew
all usual conveniences, standing on
epproximately 1 acre with well estab-
lished fruit tre Ideal situation 960
feet above sea level. For further par-
ticulars Telephone 4677 or 4739,
95.2.51-—1n,

their office No 17 High Street, Bridge-

21.2.51—5n.
—<——_________
The undersigned will set up for sale at



town, on Friday the 2nd day of March,
1951, at 2 p.m,

The dwellinghouse called “Murray
Lodge’’ with the land thereto containing
by estimation 9,200 |. feet, situate at
Upper Bay Street, St. Michael, the resi-
dence of the late A, C. Greaves,

Inspection by a intment with Miss
Ida Greaves, Tele Eine No. 3060,

For further pa jars and conditions
of sale, apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
20.2.51.—10n,

—_———
The substantial block of commercial
buildings standing on 13,704 sq, ft. of
land with frontage on Broad Street,
Prinee Alfred St, and Chapel St., the
property of Central Foundry Limited and
tenanted by British Bata Shoe Co,, M
Altman & Sons Ltd, K, R, Hunte £ Co.,
Ltd, and others
The undersigned will offer the same
premises by public competition at their
office, 17 High St , Bridgetown, on Thurs-
day, 8 March, 1951 at 2 p m.
Further particulars from—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
23 2 51. —Tn,

The parcel of land containing 1,885
Square feet with the Buildings thereon,
situate in Lucas Street, Bridgetown, ad-
joining the property of the Barbados
Telephone Company Limited. and at pre-
sent occupied as to part by the Observer
Newspaper and as to part by Miss Cado-
gan,

The property will be set up for sale at
our offices on Thursday, Ist March 1951,
at 2 p.m,

uspeeton, by application to the .ten-
ants.

For further particulars and condition of
sale, apply to:—

COTTLE CATFORD & CO.,
No, 17 High Street,
Bridgetown.
14.2,51—12n.

————_—_—
MODERN BUNGALOW — Overlooking
Golf Course, 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and
Dining . Rooms, Gallery, Garage and
spacious games room underneath, Apply;

Gordon Nicholls, Telephone 8539.
24.2.51t.f.n.

SHARES-500 Shares Barbados Ship-
ping & Trading Co, Limited. 500 Shares
Barbados Co-operative Cotton Factory
Limited. 120 Shares Barbados Fire
Insurance Co, Limited. 90 Shares Bar-

dos Foundry Limited. 61
Barbados Ice Co, Limited, 139 Shares
Knights Limited. 122 Shares Barbados
Telephone Co. Limited.

The above shares will be offered to
public competition on Friday next the
2nd March 1951, at 2 p.m. at the office
of the undersigned.

CARRINGTON & SBALY.
Lucas Street.
24,2.51—6n.

CS en

OFFERS will be received by the un-
Cersigned up to the 15th day of March
1951 for the building known as Calais
{land not Ineluded) situated at Dover
Coast Ch. Ch. The Purchaser to demo-

lish the buildings afd clear the land

within thirty days from the date of
purchase.

K. BE. Me KENZIE,

Meets,

St Michael

24.2.51—6n

WALL BUILDING—(Reasonable offer)

A two storey solid wall building, suit-

able for business or private residence

on approximately 3 acres of land, eélee-
tricity, government water, dairy stalls,
spacious yard (enclosed) fruit trees,
vegetable garden with modern irrigation
unit, fan mill and double garage. Apply
“Williams Court”, opposite “Sayes Court
Farm", Ch. Ch,, Silver-Sands, Bus stop
in front, 25.2.51— a



Shares

PARLEY HILL

ST. PETER

FOR £15,000

Built by Sir Graham Briggs,
of Prince Albert and
Who visited there in

,

Bart., for the entertainment
Prince George (later George V)
1879. Containing vast Reception
Rooms — Ball-room, Dining Room, Library and Sitting
Room—also fourteen Bed-rooms, Bath Rooms, etc.
Standing on some thirteen acres principally covered with

valuable mahogany timber.. Also Orchard, Paddock,
Stables, Garages, Etc.

BRADSHAW & COMPANY

BRC FABRIC
EXPANDED METAL
TEMPERED -HARD BOARD
OIL STOVES. & OVENS

r

4306 T. HERBERT Ltd.

1 & 11 Roebuck

Phone
4267

St. & Magazine Lane.

“Po <7 .
Beautiful Selection of ...

PRAYER & HYMN BOOKS—Small, Medium and Large

wint available in the following qualities :
Cheap Edit: Prices ranging from 84c. to $1.32
Med. Quality: Prices ranging from $1.80 to 3.00
Leather Binding: Prices wanging from $3.12 to 16.00

Including White Back Books

f ALSO ——.
HYMNS A. & M. with MUSIC from $3.50 to $4.32

ROBERTS & Co. Dial

3301

Sooceu,

3 months P/Leave
Pah,

SSO ESOC S G99
















































Amazing Styles & Values!
DIAL

THANI’ Ss 3466

At DECORATION
HOUSE

make and sell. upholstered
Forniture Hand Blocks Fabrics |
aug attractive Gifts. COAST
ROAD GARDEN, ST. JAMES.









we








FREE BIBLE LECTURES
b

y
Prof. R. G. JOLLY

of Pa, U.S.A,

Sunday, 25th, 8 p.m.
“CHRIST'S SECOND COM.
ING”.—Why? How? When?

Wednesday, 28th, 8 p.m.
“THE JUDGMENT DAY”
How long will it be? Is it
to be feared? Is there any
hope wand Wie grave?

A

THE STEEL SHED
QUEEN'S PARK
Auspices of
The Laymen’s Home
Missionary Movement
on Free.
No Collection,

AT THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Cnr, of Broad & Tudor Streets)

you will find a fine assortment o:

CARPENTERS & MECHANICS TOOLS

Buy TO-DAY or pay more Tomorrow,



Wo ea”



Senentens ma reception rooms, 3
@ PINS & CHAINS | information an application.
@ SASH PIVOTS
@ SASH FASTENERS lg obi
@ RIM KNOB LOCKS || REAL ESTATE AGENT |
If so We have reeeived the Above. } |
| AUCTIONEER
NB. HOWELL if) Peararions sumone
LUMBER & HARDWARE 5 |
Dial 3306 a Bay Street | Phone 4640
SaaS SSS |







We have the following...




a Master Builder for his own oc-
cupation and will stand critical
inspection.

Know likewise,

Everyone thinks of Cooking,
as you

Say G. A. Service. }





ESTATE HOUSE near
some #2 miles from town, Ma



ast |
et









construction and fine state of
repair, 4 bedrooms, 2 dressing
avooms, large and airy reception
roums, verandahs ete. Stone out-
buildings with double garage.
Barns, cowpen, milking shed.





Large ..courtyard,
lend with several fertile acres
excellent for ground provision [
cultivation, Property very suitabie )

for mixed farming. !
;

Over 17 acres





CARIBBEAN
CLUB





TWO NEW BUNGALOWS—In |







pleasant new development area.

presents Both well built of stone with

3 bedrooms, living reom, kitchen,

r Sarage and = servant’s quarters.

A VARIETY All main services. £3,500 each.
Freehold.

SHOW




“WINSLOW” — Bathsheba, St.
Joseph. A comfortable holiday
bungalow constructed of timber
situated in one of the most popular
holiday resorts in Barbados.
Splendid sea-bathing and delight-
ful sceneny, Verandah on 3 sides,
3 bedrooms, kitchen ete., Stand-
ing on over 1 acre of land, ° Very
reasonable price,






The Police Recreation Room
CENTRAL POLICE
STATION
at 8 p.m.
on
Thursday, Ist March,
Proceeds in aid of Y.W.C.A.
RESERVED SEATS 3/-
UNRESERVED ,, 2/-

Music by the Police Band
under the direction of
Capt. Raison.






NEA DENDRA—Pine Hill Estate.
Recently built coral stone bunga-
low in select residential area.





Well designed and constructed by
@ reputable firm of Contractors, 3
wardrobes)

tiled





becrooms (built-in








a

COASTAL LAND—St, James, 2
acres of excellent building land
with sea frontage which may be i

sold in half acre lots if required.





BUILDING LAND — Nearly 2
acres of land on edge of escarp-
ment near the Club Morgan, Ideal
Position for good class property.

PINE ROAD—Good building plot
of 12618 sq. ft. in select and
eentral position,

“SHLVERTON"—Cheapside. Com-
modious 2-storey stone house
standing in approx, 1% acres
Planted with fruit trees. 2 large
reception rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2
Salleries, kitchen, 2 bathrooms,
etc. Centrally located and suitable
for conversion into flats or board-
ing house,

“ROCK DUNDO"—Cave Hill. A
well maintained and productive
Estate of some 32 acres in a very
lovely position 2 miles from City.
The house is worthy of speciai
notice and possesses great charm
Its general condition is excellent
a there is spacious accommoda-
ion.



























“ELSWICK"—#th Avenue, Belie-
ville. A stone and timber house
On approx. 3,600 sq. ft. Enclosed





















SUNDAY,

B.B.C. Radio Notes:

Students In Britain

Situation for West Indies
In the ‘Ten-Minute’ talk to be
broadcast in the West Indies’ half-
hour on Wednesday next, 28th.
February the situation for stu-
dents from overseas, who came to
Britain seeking entry into higher
education centres particularly the
university and medical schools,
will be reviewed by G. E, Mills
of the Welfare Department of the
Colonial Office. As a Jamaican
Mills has a particular understand-
of the factors affecting West
Indians. He will speak at the be-
ginning of the West Indies’ pro-
gramme from London, that is, at
7.15 p.m. he rest of the pro-
gramme will be taken up with the
second programme in the new
series, ‘From the Regions’ in which
listeners. hear about the U.K.
through the eyes of West Indians
in various parts of the country
and not just confined to London.
The broadcast on the 28th, comes
from Wiser.

Other W.I. Programmes

The only other W.I. programme
from London in the coming week
of which we have particular in-
formation is ‘Caribbean Voices’ on
the 25th. February. That broad-
cast opens with a short story from
Grenada by Eula Redhead who
has contributed many folklore
tales of Compere Czien to the
series and now writes of life with-
in prison, The programme con-
cludes with a short story from
Trinidad by Louis Dummett who
tells of ‘whe whe’ players — the
Jamaican version of which is ‘drop
pan’ — and does it very well too.
Like all West Indies programmes
from the B.B.C. broadcast begins
at 7.15 p.m,

Fifth Test
We remind our. readers that
arrangements for broadcasting

comments on the Fifth Test from
the B.B.C., are the same as usual
— daily illustrated reports at 5.00
pm. anda cable from E. W.
Swanton in the West Indies’ Sat-
urday evening programme ‘Behind
the News.’ One would say that
the daily broadcasts will be on
for the six days of the match until
Thursday,1st. March, but in view
of previous experiences we’ll say
that these reports will be given as
long as the match lasts but no
matter how short it is E, W. Swan-
ton will still send his cable re-
viewing it in the light of the forth-
coming visit of theWest Indies to
Australia. ‘Behind the News’ is on
the air at the usual time for W.I,
+ programmes 7.15 p.m,

How To Be Good At Games

The next programme in the cur-
rent ‘How’ series now being
broadcast by the BBC on Thurs-
days is ‘How to be Good at
Games’ written and produced by








Appearing in
TRINIDAD'S






Dorothy Queen’s Lady in Waiting

@ CLYDE RIVERS
Humourist & Singer
@ PETER PITTS
Calypso King—Singer & Dancer
@ DAISY CREQUE
Mistress of the Ivories
@ LANDY DE MONTBRUN—

FEBRUARY

— with —
DOREEN MC KENZIE
Lovely Singer—

JUNE MAINGOT
Charming Singer & Dancer

9°

B.B.C. Radio
Programmes

SUNDAY, February 25, 1952
6.30—12.15 19.76M

1951



6.20 am. Weekend Sports Repart, 6.45
“an. Sandy Macpherson at the Theatre
Organ, 7.00 am. The News, 7.10 a.m
News Analysis,
Editorials, 7
rade, 730 am -

am. Calling All The
a s =" a.m, Home News from Brit-
. / am.

The News, 82.10 p.m. News A $
12.15 p.m. Close Down, cy ae
+.15—6.00 25.53M



415 p.m, Music Magazine, 4.30 7m.
Sunday Halfhour, 5.00 ris, Composter of
the Week, 5.15 p.m. Listeners* Choice,
6.00 p.m. Kathleen Merritt String Or-
chestra,

6.00—7.15 81.99 M 48.49M

—-

ones Brgremme Pirade, 7.00
.m. e ews, im, v
7:18 p.m. Short Stories: * Analysis,

Ties.
7AS—11.00 31.52M & 4843M

A Whole Armour of God,
bs ta a a Newsreel, 8.15 p.m.
jay rvice, 8.45 p.m. pose
the Week, 9.00 i a 9
P.m. Interlude, 10.00 Pm.
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, * .
The Cathedral Organs, 10,30 p.m, London
Forum, 11.00 p.m. Nina Milkina.

BOSTON

WRUL 15.29 Mc WRUW 11.75 17.75 M.
MONDAY, February 26, 1951
6, 30—12.15 196 M



7 onantinveimnestastniwpasidiioeneed see

6.30 a.m. Billy Cotton Band Show, 7.00
am. The News, 7.10 a.m. News Analy-
sis, 7.15 p.m. From the Editorials, 7.25
a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m. Pros-
becting for Gold, 7.45 a.m. Singing is
£0 Good a Thing, 8.00 a.m. Let's Make
Music, 8.45 p.m. The Debate Continues,
9.00 a.m. The News, 9.10 a.m. Home
News from Britain, 9.45 a.m. Close

Down, 11.15 a.m. Programme Parade,
11.25 a.m. Australia vs, England, 71.45
am Commonwealth Survey, |) iz_(
(noon) The News, 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down.
4.156 .60. 0. oes eee 25.55 M



The Stonyteller, 5.45 p.m_
Ivor Moreton and Dave Kaye, 6.00 Pm.
ra





6,00—7.15........40., ‘31,82 M, 48.49M
6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m
The News, 7.10 P.m. News Analysis,

7.15 p.m. Our Mutual Friend.

7 45—-11.00........91.92 M, & 48.43

7.45 p.m Prospecting for Gold, 9.00
p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. Com-
monwealth Survey, 8.30 p.m. Singing is
So Good a Thing, 8.45 p.m. Composer
of the Week, 9.00 p.m. BBC Concert
Hall, 40.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m,
From the Editoria!s, 10.15 p.m. Ray's
A Laugh, 10.45 pm. Science Review,
11.00 p.m How to be Good at Games,

Stephen Potter and with inser-
tions by Joyce Grenfell. An im-
Portant section of this alleged
major work is devoted to ‘How to
Win at Games’ without actually
Cheating. The listener is advised
to note the three Basic Attacks
devised to undermine the three
Basic Types of Opponent, the
nervous, the hard-headed and the
cbnfident. You'll have lots of fun
in listening to this broadcast at
6.00 p.m. on Thursday, Ist
March,

a So

Firestone |
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USE THE TYRES CHAMPIONS USE

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Prices:—Mat. Children 50¢ Adults $1.00
Night:Stalls & Boxes $1.50 House & Balcony $1.00

¢

EMPIRE

| SUNDAY 4th MARCH



am ON STAGE



LT ea eSsesensensnnteeee

Church Services

ANGLICAN

ST. PAUL'S-7 a.m. Holy Communion.
$.15 a.m. Litany in Procession Mothers
Union taking part
Mass and Sermon.
SUBJECT: —

3 pm. Sunday School 330 pom
Children’s Service. 7 p.m. Sol Evensong
and Sermon and Procession, Preacher
The Rev. B. C. Ullyett,

ST. LEONARD'S: & a.m. Holy Com-
munion; 9 a.m. Choral Eucharist and
Address; 11 a.m, Matins and Sermon; 3
p.m. Sunday School; 7 p.m. Evensong
erd Sermon

Holy Communion celebrated daily
throughout Lent:— Mondays, Tuesdays,
Wednesdays, and Saturdays at 7.30 a.m.

Thursdays at 5 a.m. hymns)
Fridays at 6 a.m.

Open Air Service Monday 26th. 7.30

m. Waterhall Land (Amplified),

v. W. C. Woode, Vicar.

MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK s8T.
9 a.m. Rev, D. C. Moore, 7 p.m
A. C. Pilgrim

$30 a.m Solemn

«with

Rev

GRACE a
11 am. Mr, O. Lewis, 7 P.m. Mr. D
Culpepper.
FULNECK

ll a.m. Rev. D. C. Moore, 12.15 P.m
v. D. C. Moore (Holy Communion)
7 p.m. Mr, W. Swire.
MONTGOMERY
7 p.m. Mr. U. Reid.
SHOP HILI,
7 p.m. Mr. F. G. Smith.
UNSCOMBE

D
a.m. Rev. A. C. Pilgrim (Holy Com-
munion) 7 p.m. Mr. G. Francis.

METHODISY

JAMES STREET
1l_a.m. Rev. B. Griffin, 7 p.m. Rev
H. C. Payne.
PAYNES BAY
9.30 a.m. Harvest Festival, Mr. F
Moore, 3 p.m. Harvest Programme by
Sunday School Scholars, 7 p.m. Harvest
Festival, Rev. R. McCullough.
WHITEHALL
9.36 a.m. Mr. J. Payne, 7 p.m. Mr.
G, Harper.

GILL MEMORIAL

ll a.m. Rev. R. McCullough, 7 p.m

Mr. W. St, Hill.
HOLETOWN

8.30 a.m, Mrs, Morris, 7 p.m. Rev

EB. Griffin, Holy Communion.
BANK HALL

930 am. Mr. G. MeAllister, 7 Pm

Mr. J, A. Griffith.
SPEIGHTSTOWN

l4 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrence, 7 p.m

F. Lawrence, 7.00 p.m,
SELAH .

9.30 a.m, Harvest Festival, Mr. D.
Scott, ®% p.m. Harvest Programme, Rev.
F. Lawrence. 7.00 pra

BETHESDA
11 am. Mr. D Scott, 7 p.m,
BETHEL—11 a.m. Mr, H. Grant, 7 Pm

Rev. B. Crosty, “The Life of Jesus’’.
(3) The great confession.
DAI —ll a.m, Rev. H. C, Payne,
7 p.m. Mr. G. Bascombe,
BELMONT—1) a.m. Mr.
H.

7 p.m. Mr, E, Gilkes.

SOUTH DISTRICT—9 a.m, Mr. W. w, promote a_ better

Alleyne, 7 p.m. Mr. P. Deane.
PROVIDENCE—11 a.m. Rev, B. Crosby,
7 p.m. Mr. G. Jones.
VAUXHALL—9 a.m, Rev. B. Crosby,
7 p.m. Mr. TI. Blackman,

SALVATION ARMY
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL

P. Bruce, :

SUNDAY

PIE CORNER

il a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting

PREACHER: Sr. Major Hoeliingswort}

CARLTON

‘Il a.m, Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting

PREACHER: Captain Bourne

CHECKER HALL

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting.

PREACHER: Lieutenant Reid.
COLLYMORE ROCK A.M.E. CHURCH

HARVEST SUNDAY

Bible Exposition, 2330 p.m
The Hand of God. 7.15 pm
At the 3.30 pm
Stevenson will be |

l? am
Cantata
Evangelistic Service
Service Mr. W. G
the Chairmen.

A cordial invitation is extended to all. |

Minister: Rev. E, A. Gilkes. ;
THE ST. 1OHN'S LUTHERAN CHURCH [
FAIRFIELD ROAD, BLACK |

ll a.m. Songs and Seynon by the
Rev. Dr. Herm A. Mayers, Ph.D., Assist
Executive Sec., for the Lutheran |
Churches in the North and South |
America, Subj. The biessedness of the |
Peliévers.The Rev. W. F. O'Donohue, |
Founder. Tune in for Bringing Christ
to the Nations at 6 p.m. Sunday evening. i

THE ST. WALTER LUTHERAN HOUR
The Lutheran Church will hold their |
service at the Steel Shed, at Queen's |
Park, on Monday night the 26th, the |
service beginning at 7 pm. The Rev |
Dr. H. A. Mayers, Ph.D., assist. Execu- |
tive Sec., from the U.S.A. will be the |
speaker, for the evening. The Rev, |
W. F. O'Donohue, assisting, |
The public are to attend, this |
rervice of Bringing Christ to the Nations
ST. MATTHEW'S ORTHODOX CHURCH
DEIGHTON ROAD j
9 a.m, Mass’ Preacher and Celebrant,
Rev. Fr, E. F. Neblett, 7 p.m, Vespers
2 p.m Hhrvest Festival under the
Chairmanship of Mr, E. D. Mottle:, |
M,.C.P., an invitation is extended to
the public.
THE NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH
OF GoD

ST. MICHABL—11 am. Piver Road,
Rev. E. W. Weekes. 11 a.m. Brittons
ill Evangelist, T. A. Griffith. 3 p.m.
Britten's < Sunday School, Rev
R. Brome, 7 p.m. Brittan’s Hill
Gospel Meeting, Rev .
CHRIST CHURCH—7 p.m
Gospel Meeting, Rev. E.
ST. JOHN—1ls a.m
J. B. Winter,





Venture,
Bowmanstone,

a.m, Sion Hill, for |
dedication of infants, Rev. A. R. Brome. |

Anglican Synod |
Appreciates Efforts |

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Feb. 21.

The Anglican Synod, meeting in
Kingston last week, passed a reso-
lution in appreciation of “the |
efforts of the Lord Bishop of
Jamaica, the Vicar Apostolic. of
the Roman Catholic Church in
amaica and the Chairman of th
Methodist Church in Jamaica, to
understanding
in the industrial Jife of the coun- |
ry.” |
‘This is in connection with’ the
current industrial dispute in the
sugar industry, on which agree- |
ment was reached last week-end

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m, Com- between the sugar manufacturers,
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. the Bustamante Industrial Trade |

Smith,

: Major
WELLINGTON STREET

Union and the Trades Union|

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com- Congress for polls to be taken on)

pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
PREACHED: Sr. Major Gibbs
18’

41 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting.
PREACHER: Lieutenant Gibbons
DIAMOND CORNER
11 a.m, Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting.
PREACHER: Lieutenant Moore,





OF
1951




DOREEN McKENZIE














16 estates in the industry to,
determine union affiliation, In|
the meantime it was agreed that |
there should be joint bargaining)
between the unions and the man- |
ufacturers in respect to wage rates |
for the 1951 crop season.



. i |
Reds Abandon |

Hoerigsong

@ From Page i.
, slowed by foot-deep mud
| thaw swollen rivers. :
| British and Canadian forces are
reported to be fighting an esti-|
mated Red battalion of up to 1,000,
men in another sector northesst
of Chipyong. The western front,
|on the south and on both sideg
of Seoul was giving way in recent |
weeks. |
In the pre-dawn darkness, how- |
ever, the United States artillery
broke up two Communists at-|
tempts to cross the Han River, |
east of Seoul, and probably peck-
ed two out of five to ten Commu-
nist tanks spotted on the north
bank,

United Nations forces on the
central front launched patrol stabs
into Hoengsong after capturing
hills in the southeast in advances
of up to four miles yesterday.

—B.U.P.

CLOSE LOSE,

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.
OF THE WEST INDIES, ©
Extra-Mural Departmet

TWO LECTURES

| on

PUBLIC ADMINISTRA-
TION

|
|
|
and |
|

(The Technique of
Supervision)
by
ERIC G. JAMES, M.A.,
Staff Tutor, Extra - Mural
Board, University College of
the West Indies.



on
Wednesday, February 28th
at 8 p.m.

at the
British Council, Wakefield
and on
Thursday, March Ist
at the Y.M.C.A.

FEE FOR ADMISSION :
12¢. for each Lecture



& DANCE
at the
i B'DOS sora CLUB

(Local & Visiting Members
Only)

Saturday Evening March 3rd

tee
nt

Jeffrey’s Troupe of Artistes
| featuring:

Miss CHRISTINE GOR-
N (“Miss Jeffrey’s Beer

DO

1951,” and Trinidad’s Carni-

val Queen) with Mr. LANDY
{

de MONTBRUN, Mr. Clyde
Pivers, (The Seotch Tenor)
Miss~ Doreen McKenzie,
(Beautiful young Singer),
Mr. Peter Pitts, (Calypso-
nian), June Maingot (Pretty
Girl Dancer),
Mentbrun, (Lady-in-waiting
tc the Queen), and Miss
Daisy Creque, (Mistress of
the Ivories as accompanist),

Dorothy do

DANCING after Floor Show

Admission to Ballroom $1.00



ii
i}
)






ADVOCATE

a

NOTICE

The Telephone Company invites attention to the
inconvenience and annoyance which is caused by the
ringing of a “wrong number.”

Broadly speaking Wrong Numbers in an automatic
telephone exchange system can be attributed to three
distinct causes :

(a) Failure of the exchange switching appar-
atus.

(b) Incorrect dialling by the caller.

(c) Faulty dial in the calling telephone.

An elaborate routine maintenance procedure en-
sures a high standard of mechanical operation inside
the exchange, but incorrect dialling or a faulty dial is
something which the Telephone Company has great
difficulty in controlling or locating.

Subscribers are therefore requested to (i) make
certain that they dial the correct number in a methodi-
cal and precise manner and (ii) call 09 and report to
the exchange all cases in which a wrong number is
obtained. Your telephone company will follow np the
complaint in the interests of all concerned.

Alarm
Mantle
Bureau
Wall and
Chiming

CLOCKS

from Your Jewellers





—-

Y. De Lima & Co. Ltd. ;

Broad Street

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that will afford you adequate protection and peace of
mind,

For information and rates, apply to the Agents:

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.



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PAGE THIRTEE

THE PETER RABBIT BOGKS written and
illustrated by the late Beatrix Potter, are to-
day among 1%! Peter
Rabbit and all the other quaint characters are
known and loved by both children and adults
all over the world.

1e world’s best ller

PETER RABBIT is now glad to let everyone
know that he as well as Jemima Puddleduck. ”
Benjamin Bunny, Timrey Tiptoes, Tom Kitten,
The Tailor of Gloucester, and many other ot
his pals of the story book>, are now in town.

PROUDLY PRESENTED

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

BOLTON LANE

Sole Representative Polex Watch Co., Switzerland

ROYAL STORE

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PAGE FOURTEEN

Who Is





Gairy ?

(By Our Own Correspondent

GRENADA.

To-day Grenada is in a State of Emergency. St. Lucia

pohce are coming to the as

policemen. What is it all about

a new leader

Lightning Strikes
House In St. Andrew
BOARDED and _ shingled

house owned by James Dow-—
ney of 'Turner’s Hall, St. An-—



arey as struck by lightning on
Friday afternoon. Some shingles
na beards were torn away from
the eastern side of the house
Downey was hit by one of the

boarc and slightly injured,

many St. Andrew districts
rain fell for a five-hour period
ut a break The showers
-ompanied by thunder and





light

T! is were flooded and ve-
hieles were held up for long
pericds, Residents had to assist
in clearing debris from the high—
ways.





“THE CARIBBEAN CLUB, with
Judy Graham and her group,
will give a show at the Police
Recreation Hall, Central Station,
on Wednesday night at 8 o’clock,
The show is in aid of the Y.W.C.A,
The Police Band, under Capt.!
C. E., Raison, will be in attend-
ance,

HE POLICE HAVE started a
campaign against motorists”
who park vehicles a distance frome
the side of the street, Colonel”
R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of#
Police, told the Advecate yester-
day morning. A
Special Police patrols have
been posted to look out for these’
offenders, When motorists stop

i
|
,
f





ible to the side of the road.=
Eight motorists were. recently:
reported for not having their;
registration ecards affixed. They,
were warned by the Police. f

A’ THE LOCAL TALENT
Show at the Globe Theatre*
on Friday night, first prize went!*
to Hal Hunte who sang “Home
On The Range.” The second
prize was awarded to
Small with “I Should Care.”
Guest Star was Percy Welch»
and ‘he sang “‘Doctor, Lawyer.”

EV. H. A. MAYER, D.D.,

represented the Lutheran
Chureh, Missouri Synod, arrived
in the island yesterday by
B.W.I1.A He is on a tour of
the West Indies.

The Lutheran Church has been
broadcasting the popular pro~
gramme “Bringing Christ To The
Nations” for the past 20 years.
There are 1,100 broadcasting
stations in 51 countries, The pro—
gramme is broadcasted in 36
different languages.

He has already toured South
America and is now here.to see
how the programme is received
locally, He expects to leave on
Wednesday for Puerto Rico. This
is his first visit to Barbados.





Seouts And Guides
Own To-day

The Annual Scouts and Guides

- Own will take place at Comber-

mere School to-day, Sunday 25
at 430 p.m. and NOT AT ST.
MICHAEL’S GIRLS’ SCHOOL as
was previously arranged.

All Ranks—Cubs, Scouts, Rov-
ers and Scouters will assemble at
Combermere at 3.30 p.m.

Please make a note of the
chanre of place, and inform any
member of the Movement with
whom you may come in contact.

All sections are reminded to be
punctual and to leave nothing to
be desired in their smartness and
general appearance, :

BADGERS’ CORNER

Congratulations to the following
scouts who have ,ained the under-
-mentioned badges,

Ambulance: O. St. C, Worrell
(8rd Sea Scouts),

Despatch Rider : Malcolm Tay-
lor, (Y.M.C.A,) i

Electrician : O, St. C. Worrell,
(3rd Sea Scouts).

.. Handicraft : LeRoy Davis
(Y.M.C.A.)
Interpreter ; Leyland Clarke,
(Y.M.C.A ) pe
Mechanic O. St. C. Worrell,

(3rd Sea Secxut>)

Public health ; ik. uv. Scantle-
bury, E. Thompson, C, P. Thomp-
son, E. L. Thompson, (3rd Sea
Scouts). e

Owing to the inclemency of the
weather the Scouts and Guides
Own which was to be held at
St. Michael’s Girls’ School today,
will now take place at the Hall
of Combermere School at 4.15
p.m. Seouts and Guides will fall
in at the Combermere School at
3.30 p.m.

poo












>







TO
THAN Tapvey,
MRS.CEO NLEY.

\arig it ;
Case
“©)-1Z

COPR. 1950. KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, Inc, WORLD BR






must draw up as close ash

ernest *

sistance of the mere 156 local
? The people have found

Twenty-nine years old last
Sunday, a spare-bodied Grenadian

ex-pupil—teacher by nome of Gairy
with only three years teaching t&
his credit and six years in Aruba
as a clerk in the Lago Oil Com-

pany’s ,Instruments Departmen,
returned home and founded a
Manual and Mental Worxets’
Union just 14 months ¢.o0

Eric Matthew Gairy gave up his
teaching job at the St. Mary’s
R. C. School, St. Andrew's, in
1941 and left for Aruba. He had
been a Boy Scout and, as is inevita-
ble in the life of the young Roman
Catholic, had done hs bit. as
acolyte and Sodality member. In
Aruba, from all accounts, he began
to make good, resuminy his connec-
tion with the Holy Name Society
there and as an attestation to his
popularity among fellow West
Indian workers he was for thre
years on the clerical side of the
Lago Employees, Council. How
ever, he grew in disfavour with the
Company authorities and was laid
off in 1949,
































E. M. GAIRY with white gloves
and Mike.

Gairy was not even in the lime-
light at the time Hon, T. A.
Marryshow answered a call to
assist an incipient West Indian
workers’ movement in Aruba.
Marryshow was forbidden to
address public meetings and was
given summary notice by the
authorities to leave the island.
Leader of that movement was
another young Grenadian, Gas-
ccigne Blaize, whose Aruba career
eventually ended in expulsion,
after which he went to Trinidad.
Just a week ago he arrived here
to assume General-Secretaryship
of the M.M.W.U. and participate
in its present strike action.

The short history of Gairy’s local
rise is now fairly well known in
Barbados—his Emancipation Day
demonstration last year in St.
David's parish, his sugar workers’
strike and resultant wage increase
by arbitration which bolstered his
stock with the masses and his
November 11 demonstration in a
speech at which he suggestively
acclaimed himself the greater
leader than Marryshow.

Dapper and a ringer of changes
of wear from planters’ togs through
zoots to evening tails, he must be
seen in demonstration garb to be
believed. Leading a march around
St. George in sweltering forenoon
heat last November 11, his rig was
evening tail coat, bowler, cravat,
white cane slung over one arm and
Bible and “documents” under the
other, Similarly, he led thousands
singing to steel band aceompani-
ment over a seven-mile route up
hill and down dale in St. David's
last August 1,

Gairy is undoubtedly lionised by
the labouring masses. Where his
power will lead him is yet un-
predictable, The voice of authority
has issued its veto against his
present general strike which has
turned the Spice Island into an
island of strife. What next?

U.C.W.I. CELEBRATES

From Our Own Correspondent



KINGSTON, Feb., 21.
-Founder’s Day at the Universi-
ty College of the West Indies last
Friday—anniversary of the re-
ceiving of the Charter from
Princess Alice—was celebrated
with a cricket match between a
u.C.W.1. team and a Jamaica
Crieket Board eleven, other
special functions as well as the
issue of special postage stamps.

The match was drawn,



| They'll Do Ic Every Time ss1mm By Jimmy Hatlo |






UGHTS Rk



Police Patrol
St. George’s

@ From Page 1

cricket touring team to Trinidad.

The Cinema in the capital has
been closed and the townfolk are
indoors early in the evening.
Special reserve police are now
also on duty This afternoon a
Regulation was issued by the
Acting Gevernor under § his
emergency power, ordering ‘the
Ccuneil to forbid loitering in high-
ways or bypaths. After the re-
quest of a member of the: Police
Force or reserve to remove, people
must give their names = and
addresses. Public meetings and
processions haye been banned;
also the carrying on of any
assembly with torches, sticks,
stones and other offensive
weapons.

Arrest Without Warrant

The Police have been given
power to arrest without warrant
and with reasonable cause anyone
suspected of breaking these regu-
lations. The penalty’ on convic-
ticn will be a fine not exceeding
$500 or six months or both,

OUR Trinidad correspondent
cables that the Butler Union today
arranged financial aid ip response
to Gairy’s appeal to the Trinidad
Union, Butlerites made a des-
patch delegation to Grenada to
help the strikers. Other Trinidad
Unions are reticent regarding the
aid quest) â„¢.

According to our Jamaica
correspondent, Honourable W. A.
Bustamante who is_ celebrating
his 67th birthday, called on the
Secretary of State for the Colonies
asking that justice be done on be-
half of the Grenada workers in
connection with the current strikes.
In a letter to the Windward
Islands’ Governor, Jamaica's
Prime Minister expressed concern
over the situation adding: “It
seems to me of interest that the
working man is not considered to
have his due to what is right.”

Bustamante said here there
should be total West Indian action
on the Grenada situation. Busta-
mante said ‘‘Here’s a chance for
us to show that we really are
interested in federation. Let us
support the workers, not only by
representations, but financially,
including provision for legal
assistance for those who have
been charged. Let the workers of
Grenada maintain their fine re-
cords of good behaviour and let
the Empire of the British West
Indies come forward to back their
cases.”

Black Eagle Wins
Stewards Handicap
As D.T.C. Meet Ends

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, British Guiana, Feb. 24,
The D.T.C. New Year Meeting ended
today with a record crowd including the
Governor, Sir Charles Woolley. emia
follow :— ‘
VLISSENGEN HANDICAP
& Furlongs, Class H
Genno (Lutchman) 104 Ibs, ..........
Just By Chance (Yvonet) 135 Ibs, ..
Surprise Packet (Gobin) 133 Ibs. ....
Shy Fox (Lutchman) 110 Ibs.
Time: 1 min, 61/5 sees.
BOURDA HANDICAP
7 Furlongs, Class G
Montgomery (Lutehman) 110 Ibs. ....
Sagga Boy (Joseph) 114 Ibs.
Ormondes Battery (O'Neil) 130 Ibs,
Flying Step (Beckles) 118 Ibs,
Time: 1 min, 34 secs.
GARDEN HANDICAP
1 Mile, 100 Yards, Class D
Sunwateh (Lutehman) 115 Ibs,
Just Reward (Joseph) 116 Ibs.
Anna Tasman (Aphan) 120 Ibs,
Millionaire (Singh) 120 Ibs.
Time: 1 min, 55 secs.
STABROEK HANDICAP
7 Furlongs, Class A
Miss Shirley (O'Neil) 119 Ibs,
Double Link (Forshaw) 140 Ibs. ......
Sunny Game (Yvonet) 128 Ibs, .
Sunhurst (Joseph) 145 Ibs,
Time: 1 min, 30 secs,
KINGSTON HANDICAP
7 Furlongs, Class H
Sly Fox (Lutehman) 110 Ibs. ......,.
Sagga Boy (Sunnich) 118 Ibs, ...
Flying Step (Joseph) 116 Ibs. Ses
Surprise Packet (Gobin) 132 Ibs,
Time: 1 min, 33 sees.
STEWARDS HANDICAP
7 Furlongs, Class F
Black Eagle (Naidoo) 112 Ibs. ..,....,
Goblin (O'Neil) 116 Ibs, ........,
Ormondes Battery (Yvonet) 116 Ibs,
Black Shadow (Persaud) 108 Ibs,
Time: 1 min, 32 secs,
FINAL HANDICAP
7 Furlongs, Class C
Anna Tasman (Aphan) 110 Ibs, .....
Etoile Defleurf (Sunnich) 126 Ibs.
Dancing Master (Singh) 116 Ibs.
Tuckers Kitty (Lutchman) 123 Ibs,
Time: Imin. 31 sees,



aus awe mote to bom Beste sone

Bowie



SERIES AA

Horse racing enthusiasts were
looking skyward yesterday and
asking themselves whether the
present bad spells of weather will
hold off and give a chance to have
a bright March meet,

The Turf Club are selling
Series AA at present and there
are indications that before the
selling period is closed for the
coming meet, Series DD will be
sold,

The sand track which was built
not long ago at the Garrison has
come in very useful for training
during this rainy interval which
has caused the ground to become
heavy.



BUT THEY ALWAYS
PICK A SWELL SPOT
TO PUT UP THOSE

WELCOME SIGNS ++













SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Louis Wins
By T.K.O.

FANS BOO

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 24. |
Joe Louis scored a dull 10th
round technical knock-out victory
over Andy Walker, California’s
heavyweight chamyron, before
18,000 booing fans who paid
approximately $90,000 |

Louis who outweighed Walker—
207 pounds to 194—-said afterwards
that he’ was ready to fight the!
champion Ezzard Charles again for
the crown he once wore.

Louis and manager Marshali
Miles will leave for Chicago today
to negotiate the return match with
Charles probably in Chicago or
San Francisco this spring.

The once fearsome Louis, show-
ing little of the punch that made
him the killer in bygone days did
little to add to his prestige for as
the referee raised Louis’ hand in
victory in the tenth and final
round, the ex-champion was greet—
ed by a chorus of boos.

Louis had chased the frightened
Walker all over the ring for nine
rounds during which he knocked
him down twice. The referee
stopped the bout at one minute,
49 seconds of the tenth with
Walker still on his feet but obvi-
ously willing to quit. In the fourth
round Walker took a five count
after being hit with a stiff left to
head and falling partly through
the ropes.

The referee waved Walker back
into action. Walker took a seven
count in the seventh round while
standing up and leaning against
the ropes. Again the referee
ordered him to resume fighting
The California rules call for a
knock down when the fighter
hangs on to the ropes.

The referee, Frankie Brown, said
that he had stopped the uneven
contest because Walker was obvi-
ously helpless from punishing
rights and lefts he took to the
head.

—B.U P.

CARONI TEAM
TO TOUR JAMAICA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 21.
A cricket team from Caroni,
Trinidad, will tour Jamaica in
November to play a series of
three matches against leading
Sugar eStates teams there,







The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.17 a.m.
‘Sun Sets: 6.10 p.m.
Moon (Last Quarter): Feb-
ruary 28
Lighting: 6.30 p.m,
High Water: 6.26 a.m,
6.46 p.m.
YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington):
.06 in.
Total for month to yester-
day: 12.24 ins.
‘Temperature (Min.): 76.0° F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E.,
ll a.m. E.S.E.
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29,920,
(11 a.m.) 29.910

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Mr. & Mrs. CLUB BALL, WILTSHIRES %



KENNETH HOPE
At their residence Dash Gap,
2nd. Ave, Bank Hall,
On Wednesday Night
28th February, 1951
Music by Percy Green’s Ork.
ADMISSION - - 2/-
Refreshments On Sale

SOOO SO

(St. Philip)
(Kindly lent by the Management)
On SUNDAY NIGHT 25th
February, 1951 %
Admission GENTS 2/- LADIES 1/6
Mr. Percy Greene's Orchestra in
Attendance

Refreshments on Sale — Please
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PAGE 1

? SUNDAY. FKBkTAKY M, 1*41 %  SI NDAY ADVOCATE I'M.I II I VI \ A CHtMPACVE SUSHI . .; No. 3 .... h, IKOVAHI> MOM KV Last night, in a London flat, the 'Russian Lion' showed off the grip that beat \ Madrali COClU* STQH' U O you remember Suzanne Lenglen ? In .. way she typified ovjrythlnR about the mad. glad, dizzy heights of the Cochran era. It was a happy time when over a rump steak dinner (at is 8d. a lb without subsidies) the family could be fell! by defending Suzanne's Hunt to be late on the C-t.trc Court at Wimbledon. Susanne was a hooK-nosed little Frenchwoman with a violent temper Her figure was scragey. her nalr mousy. and her features admirably ntted her for ihe part of an Ugly S.itei In panio. • mime. Yet she was •••.• aiwavs receiving pro ? :I.J*1A of mart. age. Britain >u far more m a .r.*,*d ;n whether Suzanne would wear *iock.n* on ihe courts than it ever %  ,*, in 'Hi"' Moron's pannes -and when sue once appeared baieieggtxl belore the Kng and Quvii the nation praci.callv iwallowrd Its Adams apple. When iJnnewtpapeTi innotiaced %  hat Lenglen had tunx-d professional Britain aas COO* vulsed with horror. "Will thi* alTect Subotie'i status ? Can %  he ever oe received in social c.tries again ? %  asktd a writer in IJ1S Daily Expreis Cochran wasn't •orry.ng about that. Ha saw In Sutanae's decision a golden Opportunity for ret another new kind of mats spectacle and signed her up match HACKESSCHMIDT Holds up the hands with whtc/i he squeezed saccxfl irrriliWio escfort oaf o/ Madrali m fi, t-ocft'.i ifcoie ol IMS. Yhe reporter'! description read ; "One could i.*f the grouiig look o/ n()iJtiUmp hopelessneu on MaitralCi ystY." Here's whf -— FUSHBACK: First fall to HackenschmWt ii 1 nil. 34 sees. a s:gnei £400 Brave became a general D O you Know thai a Red Indian chief was once made a %  Bngndier-Oeneral In the ISntlsh snarl Tbe British were nghtlng the Americans, and things were going badly lor m. Wo made friends with enter Tecumseh. of the Mhawnee tribe, and commissioned him. He fought lor us with his bowand -arrow bravea and waj killed. This is one of the battle stories lor which America's Stale of Indiana U famous. And this i stamp commemorates both the Slate's Unit fighting Oovcmor, William Harrison who defeated tu. and the 150th anniversary of Indiana as American territory. rye* value: 3 cents Old.) : perforation: 10, by II; ,.,.,-. unused 4d.-J.A.A. London Express Service for a series of pro fesslonal tennis tournamenta m i-ondon. H hired Ule vas' snating rink a' Holland Park •capacity 4.MO1 an.l •>egsn s-lling ticket. •'.Us. to a time. The nat.on vetned to agree with the pompom leader writer ho consi dered his show "a bad thing fot tennis." and -t hours before the llrst match onlv 400 ncketa hjd been sold. It was then that Cochran showed In* mastery as a NIUWn.an. He dldnl cancel the tournament He didn't plat town empty house He took ihs tickets in bundles of a hundred, round to ali the big *torw and pefituaded me Managements to give UMUI away .0 toeir customers IIO\l\. TOOAnd (inother row S UZiNNB played ner •ural masterful game to dereat a Oerman girl named Dora Koerlng It win a wolf devouring a iamb out the public liked if and bHad Rantcuiarly. the exclie, • meni of seeing tennis '•:•: Pl>ed at night under ^ %  jagk ihe first flood-lih %  m* ^ %  jjr -ver to be uvd tor 11 ^•w^ snorts show. After that the tennis J loumaments were a %  zV great success packed 10 the doors." said one of Coclirans aides. And then sddrn Uiat frequent postscript to a Cocnran venture ; "Ot course, we Hat money." Cochran was not only promoting tennis but had a Dig box ing match on his hands. 00. .1 was the world middle weight championship bout at nivrnp between Scotsman Tbrnrnv MUligan and Iheh-'der *"i— -ca'a Mickey Walker. Just when the sale o* seats %  uuuild ne been soaring. Jirnrnv White the millionaire financier, committed suicide. This sensation robbed Cochran of the Trent Page puMlclty he always banked on to setl tickeU 00 the morning of the fight. Sales dried up. But what a fight It turned out to be > for 10 rounds Walker's iron lists bit their way into Milligans face and body, until by Cochn !<•• at saivA CIMMT ihe end—after hUttna the canvas three ume> in the last round-he went down lor good. Next morning not only had a disastrous financial record 10 read but he ,.was once more in the •.• %  • middle of a row almost sfHfjk M violent as the VB* cruelty runpiiun % a*-nint nis Rodeo Sir Hall Caine led a I public protest against eats* whai tie called ** this debauch of brutalltv anu asked thtt Cochran should be prohibited bv law from putting on uch scenes until ihev had beer purged of iheir Linip-akuLi. barbsrity." Cociiron's reply was eharp "Ea.iv Victorian .iMpdoodle lie .said >l\OII \t IThe man uith the /r; 1 ^ HERE was always SOatg .'xtraorJinarv touch 10 Cochran's spor'.ing ventures. Al the outaci of h^s career in the early Jays ol the century, he cashed in on me wreMIIng boom then sweeping Ihe country Outstanding grappicr ol the t inie pmbablv ill time— was Oeorjes H..-:. as '"The rtussiun dewcnptLon o! the final fall. "... Madrali got his opponent oy the body and threw him, Deftly Hackenschmldt slipped on his hands and knees sehmldi k.v > 11 Lion." Cochran seurched Europ.' asU America for an opponen* I'UI 1 and found one at last. He was s giani *Iio Hrg| appeared wear.ne a long fu. coal and a rez anil he was .nroduced as Madrali ihe Terrible Turk Harkenschnndt wrestled him twice in l-gH an.1 IO0C What %  laniasiie si niggle ihe l r -JC U.u> pro veil w be In his lUmuMeui! tut H 1 k.i. aciiriutiL now T3 atii! (till living a lull sr t r| H uv# i.i,. ., fc c -lBia II lti • %  •yltf. He nmennVn u.,tu, i:am and aqued him. '' Befure one could quite t.'.iiisr what was riapPi-mng. Hackenschmklt'4 gnat shoulders heaved the body slipped round and Madrali was undi-ri"ath. The buttle was won. The crowd yelled. The victor laughed and almost danced." snirau*Tei 11 peramental dancer mj EARLY 14 years later l cochran brought that dapper. dancing Frencnman Oeorgea Curpentier ;. London to box Joe Becked British heav. -weight champion t ariM-ntier got aa.000 as hietui 01 tne puise. and Beckett 4:3.000. B> ci.arging 35 guineas lot r.tiKside scats ist.ll a world'.* allgni Uochisn WHS able to craw a gate ol ovr £30.000. This bour too. was over in less : ^a" round—with a knock-out Coatran djd well out of that baiit. And he mtidc money out of outers But then suddenly disgusted uith beting politics he uuit. and decided 10 concentrate uii the ih g| Hv 1930 Cochran mm Hve Knows going well, and pWus (or at least JO mnre—wriUi atara 1 uif.in.! all the way from the tem pern,..eiilal French dancer r-.pinelli to N.iei Coward and Uertrude lawrence. Over m America bread-Ultes were begiunins; 10 form. 1 he cola OieaUi of depression hadn't yet Uiuohed RrlUUn—and m any case, a was still bright and *!%im and azoiUDg inside a %  %  1.1.UieaLra talOdOO Elp: Q A N T A 9 EMPIRE k I R W A T B L. By Ivans and bounds li k • KMH lime aclmll) millions of years — sini-e Ihe Kangaroo was niiyuherc auttkk \\iMralia. Now. however, as Ihe emblem of y.mi.i, 1 nipire -\ir..i>s tinKannjnio has laken wings over ihe world. By 1*17 (their IStb anniversary) 0.l-'.A. had ronlcs 10 Ihe Philippines and Japan: lo l.ac. Rabaul. Noumea. Sava ; lo Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands —and in conjunction vviih B.O.A.C. to Malaya. India, the Middle Easl. N. Africa. Italy. Prance and England For their Australian and international wrviees shell supply Oantas empire Airways with their major requirements of av iMtoo fuel and engine oils. FOB IIK/./.VKS THE WOHI.lt OVER QSjaniia^aaiisjsDCj Qaa^as'a % kmv^ i S.-rvlos Owing to delay caused by irregular shipping services the "Advocate" regrets that it has been compelled to curtail its daily cartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all available strips as they arrive will be appearing in this space. vi 9nn oxa Til* Im,,limri% Ikml Imtlt m smmmm*... N.w Offers Tou tbe tneuia or I '.EARN TBE ABT OF MAKE-l'r TBK "INNOXA WAV MISS ANN THOMAS ol INNOXA'S BOND STKEFT SALON. INNOXAS BEAUTY SPECIALIST Now offers the Mlowutc TnttmeMo by AnoinUnenU :— II) FILL FACIAL TREATMENT tl Hour) S I M ( CLEANSE. MA8R MAKE UP IV, HMr) >.H (1) CLEANSE MAKE If • MU.iile.) I 10 A COl'RSE OF SIX FILL FACIAL TREATMENTS fr 185 M OATS : TUESDAY WEDNESDAY A THURSDAY TIME: • to 11a.m. 1 to S p.m. IbllNiii ulUtton I Advice Imludrd APPOINTMENTS AS FROM TLESDAY. FEBRUARY JTPH For Appointments snd rurther Information, Dial 4584 or Apply . Booker's (B-DOS) Drug Stores Ltd. BROAD STREET or ALPHA PHARMACY tHABTTNOS) OBDMUUM •a r vi k „ .. ,. TI Gordons THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK W/ITH A VIEW lo assailing Ihe Secretaries ol Societies. Clubs. and Associations to make the compilation oi iniormation in THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as possible, all organisations embracing all forms ol activities; religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports, radio, agricultural, etc.. are asked lo have the form printed below lilled In and sent In as soon as possible to : THE EDITOR. THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 19b!. Co Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street. FORM Title ol Society. Club. Organisation. Etc President or Chairman Council or Committee Members Treasurer Secretary.. Short historical account ol Ihe origin, (unctions and current activities:



PAGE 1

SUNDAY. IIHRI \RY H, !.-.! B.B.C. Radio Programmes ,• town,, *ho cam. lo £:r A.SriT -^ m teit. Proraf B.B.C. Radio Note.: Sludents In Britain Situation for West hfa In the -Ten-Minute' talk to be broaelrast in the West Indies' halfhour on Wednesday next. 2tth. February the situation for students from overseas. Britain seeking entry into higher U^rJiT education centre* particularly the '-• )Nin ii_ r !y and medical schools, £ m <" %  " %  All ram-, tea will be reviewed bv G. E Mills !" ".!.V" % %  %  •>•*• n of th. Welfare Department of the rVoa^JU^^AV;, 'aBa-iaa. Colonial Office. As a Jamaican %  • " *4>*ay a.-**., iias^a-a?.' MUM ha* a particular understandfif. "!?%.? ,,, ,. D '" ***' * %  *•. ID* of the factors affecting West i.|i-in -i.il ^"" Indians, lie ,u 4 pe.ik at the be^ ginning of the West Indies* pro*. 4 J, L p i n .^* uMc ***mu gramme from Indon. that 7.15 p.m. The real of the gramme will be taken up with thi second programme in the new series. 'From the Region*' in which listeners hear about the UK through the eyes of West Indians in various parts of the country and not just confined to London. The broadens! on the 28th comes from *7-Mn. Othtr W.I. Prnummmes M Sl\\ \!>\Ot \i ) Churrh Services sr Mm fUCAM m li !" Convnonion, i eYoc uW on M.rfiH-r. Balsa i %  M BM IMM tiwjrcT •*• aJ>? m *^' *' %  Vho l P- am * Sermon an* Precoauor, IT^hc, U The Bay M < a.* ar. uaoNARD-a SSO BMatBB, • am Choral abirMrl* a*Kl The AMt. il u MiUn. and tWtnon. i %  *"P.M. Sunday SrHool. T P ,„. %  \cnaon.t %  rrd fafmon '**•. Italy Comn.unlo-i raWBr.ia. *,!/ tro U fhoni li,i Mor.diM. TIIHU'WaaiMilBky.. .no IHUIUM n|a a m a>liTO.V ~ h !" "' ,--_— Opar^Alr *r.le> Mondar JStK. T SI Amuaa<. I* n*n_ ,s P"" atuilc MiBaiinr av> ._ * %  > mr WIIH No I 'I *l M II I M MOBAVIAV KotlU I k St. D C Moorr. T p • Fl* IOKMI IMa M..llr*. .1 | < t i> m Sarva' ( IH! MM WM Martin, 1 %  canv Uretlnl. T pm BaJvaUttti H -, -fJ-U'lia ravUii Bnurar < Nl. kll MM I 1 An M**(irt>. i p m. Com. r-n; Mi". T pm Balval^n Maa'inn. rTT-ArHFB lan.wnanl R„. mi it MUNI XIM *. )i raracti HAW VIST VcnAV RaM aa* >M r-nlala The Hand of ftod IS t> m Serve* At the Sift p %  Barvtc* Mr WO Stavraaon will bo lh Ctialrman A rordiai tnvllilM-i I* ailrndMI I* .11 %  aaar ru< r. A Oanai nu • j iNM-i icnnuN rn c* rAar?iaj> BOAD BT^A.K aOCTK 11 ant Sena, and Ration %  Uia %  ri Dr liana A Mafar*. Pt> D. AuHl Kac,iu. S*e lor UM niuiehr* in IK* North Amerkra. uhl The blaaaedne.. ol ifca ; Rr, W F Tone IB (or lliinamk* Oiul NOTICE I • pn Mr. LM M 9tM a 4C4IM T p.m. Th. Whola Armour' %  D "i Radio Nfrnrtl I rCwU^VSrT n "S m Cioa^oaS-'ai I. W J-^T^ 10 OS p n, Thr N,,. Odd. a>, D c Cotton Band •*.. 1H 'Warn. New, Analman thr Bdllorlali. T.H The only other W I. programme from tendon In the coming week BOSTON of which we have particular information is Caribbean Voices' on *V m ,„, the 25th. February. That broad-,,?^ DA% cast opens with a short itory from — (-renada by Cula Redhead who ,J5 "T" ~" Y has contributed many folklor* ih is n "i tales of Compere Czien to the %  • ^NH.^ r ., series and now writes of life wilh**""" *"r Gold. 7 u a m si ll(1 „. ,,' in prison. The programme conM,,^ 10 J 1 Thlnr • W • m "- %  * %  eludes with a short story from mSt C ^^"'N^,' Yt? 1 .-\ 0,1, i. n —' Trinidad by Louis Dummett who "•• %  '"•". Bnui* t i Vm £Z-" telU of 'whe whe' players — the P"*" %  "• rroaramtiw p..,3Jamaican version of which is 'drop i\,7 'romm-T^.J'' ta "*. ''•• (* %  "-:•"? do ' vary waU too. r W TTK^",, ,?""„ %  i.-~ Like all West Indies programmes **''-* i* u p m OOH Do n from the BBC. broadcast begins at 7.13 p.m. a.as*dj.aa... ; HM rl'l.VKCK l> C Moor* Hit pm toot* iHoly ComimuikHti W. Swir*. MosTt.oHrav 4r U Rrkd aaror nu i Ir r. G Smith iHN<*" of this alleged Australia. Behind the News' is on ^ OT w ** k to d voted to 'How to the air at the usual time for W I Wln -1 Game without actually programmes 7.15 p.m Cheating". The listener is advised _, i note the three Basic Attacks How To Be Good Al Games < lr ^'**'l to undermine the three -_.„_ BA'IC Type* of Opponent. th.> me next programme in the curnervous, ihe hard-headed and the !t£.H.„?*k.. ^I ^ n ow belng tbn fl dent You'll have lots of fun to this broadcast at on Thursday. 1st I School Brholai '. Bat K M,-CulMuh V. IN i II M I W. Si Hill v,v • m Mr. Morn* J p r nriflln. Holy Communion. BANK HALL JO • m Mr G MeAiii^rr. J. A. arlfflUi HP1IUHTSTOWN a in IWv I*. LdwraMW. 1 INI -.T MMIIR I I THI MAN HIM • UMaaa ("hinth wH aMN al Ihe SHal Ww*l. at Qiirvn Mxivdav nici.i (hr Kill tr.< : p..i The H |i> II A Mayrr*. *'t. n live R*e from the U H A •ill be ih, •prafcer lor the nfmni The K<, VI F OT*ar>ohii. a-wMtna The wwDllr are *! % %  — lo attand. th > remain*/ CHrrt to the Kalio,, -T MAtTHI W IIKTHDIMIX I Nl Kt II tMnOHTON ROAI> • a.m. Mai. Praarher and Crlrbrmi. Rev. FT. B r NebW>lt T pm. VMM'* P m H.,.,e-t PMUval Chairmanship t Mr t I) Motl* MCP. an Invnalloci It e.trnded '. II* pi*** rar srn Ti*T.ii.r IMIWII •i> ...ii. *!T Ml, i v i p„ I:, v B W Waomr* tliui Hill Braaipalia.. T A Uiimih nnitaat Kill. Sunday School The Tclcphnnc Company bavilaj attpntion to the caused bv the rinKinR of a "wronjnumber." Broadly speakm %  >tiers in an automatic telr phone exchange system can be attributed to three distinct ea I %  Uura r>f UM exehUaga iwlMldnf appar(b) I tin ealaai ii I Ua .n the t\illii< btMftti An elaborate rautilM miiintriutiur proredurc ensures a hiifh standard of itrawhaWacal npcration liisi.lf the exchaiiK.\ but Incorrccl dUllng or a faulty dial is something which the Telephone Company has great difficulty in controlling or locating. Subscribers are therefore requested to (i) make J :hc correct number in a methodical and precise nujuvn: and (MI rail (ti and rapoii i^ arhich i wMtng number is obtairatd xoui Mephone eomptny will follow i\p the po m pla tn t In the intereats >i all i f Wrekeiture. H' %  m4m rtj,"TWu? -"""*" <*"amw 1 *v ilual rrwnd of the Week, t p m BBC" Com*Vi •> 00 p m The Nem, 10 to p.m the EditoriaV II 15 p ,aa, a 4Sh. 10.44 p m Selence Review. p m How |o be Good al Oamra nC)Hi.a.iA % %  'HaTLe-ll am Mr. H Orant. I p ... **V B Crn.lv. "The l.lle nl J r ^, <*' The ffrat contaaaion. DALKErrM^-1, an. Rev II C Payne Ii %  um:,'* I p.m. Mr H B. Qllkef. SOUTH OlSTlUtT S ln Mr W W Alleyne. 7 p m Mr p De.ne l-ROVIDKNCX 11 ... h. H .,. „ 1 P m Mr a Jon*. VAI'XHAIJ,* am Rdv a cnat T p m H< I Blackman. SALVATION ASMV NKIIM.CTOUN taNTBAL ii ii m Holinem Mrrllna 3 pm. Cm P *2L2£2£S& •** Sdlvati'm Me.-.-., HiLUNoroN niirti II • m Holme* Meet ACIIKT. M.. Salv.uo broadcast by the BBC on Thursr ys i How to be Good at 6.00 i Games' written and produced by March. BMM OI-IINs 'lam. Hoi idea. Mcelina. 3 pm ComPHF-ACHER Lieutenant Gil*..,.. DIAMOND .. ii--., %  Tl am Holineai Meetlnf. J p.m. Companjr al eetma T pm 8alvatn Meet in, PBEAOtBjt laculenwii Moore ie. T l....pel Meet inf. Rev CKR1ST .lU'NCH 7 C. nl Meelim He. BT JOHN It i II. J B Winter. T p t Rev J B Winter ST JAMM-ll a m BMM Hill. Idedication ol Inlant.. Rev. A H. Bron.r Anglican Synod Ap|>rM'ial**s Efforts (From Our Own Corteap KtNOaTTtMl, la* 21 The Anglican Synod, n i Klnaston last waek. paaaed a reaolution In appreciation of "the effort* of the L*>rd Bishop of Jamaica, the Vicar Apostolic !l i'om Your Jewelttrs rACKTIIIHTH \ llll ITTIR RXRKIT BOOBS ITflttOI and led by the late Beairr Potter, are today am Rabbit and al! UM other Qua'nl chiracter* are and loved by both children nnd adults rrrra MBBR knoo tail ho as well as Jnaa natMaalili." Iteni.min Buini>. Tin.r > Tiptoes. Tom Kitten. The Tailor nl Gloueesier, and many other ol lb ol the story bookare now in town. MKM in \ I'IIIM.MIII By LOUS L BAYLEY IIOI.TON LANS %  all %  iflllaaaalllt .".,|,v Watch Co.. |nl|in|ial 12 HIGH ST. 12 HIGH ST. ROYAL STORE Headquarter* for Shirts V. lie lima A 4 ... Lid. Broad Slreef TYRES ^ TUBES AVAILABLE J2V ALL Sir IS USE THE TYRES C II \>ll>IO\S USE Charles Mc Eneamey & Co., Ltd. I//'' ri.i,, in I'UIISOV TKIMDADS _. „,. BKAVTIFVL CARNIVAL QUEEN IV THE SHOW OF THE YEAR 1951 — with — PORF.EN MC K I \/II Lovely Singer— JUNE MAINGOT Charminc Singer A Dancer CLYDE RIVERS Humourist & Singer PETER PITTS Calypao King—Singer & Dancer DAISY CHEQUE Mistress of the Ivories Dorothy Queen's Lady in Wailing LANDY DE MONTBRUNMasler ol Ceremonies IKIKIIN McKEN7IF Prices.—Mat. ChUdien 50 1 Adults $1.00 Night—Stalls 8. Boxes $1.50 House & Balcony $1.00 — OX SI if,I mm EMPIRE KrtN Abandon Ho4 k itgsong • From I'm 1 slowed by root-deep mud and thaw nwollen rivers. Brttj Ii and Canadian forcen nro reported to be righting ajl aStl' i mated Hed battalion ot up to 1.000 men in another sector northe,.st of Chipyong. TTie wesicrn Iinnt on the south and on both Man of Seoul was juvinu WB> In hacanl i-eeks. In the pre-duwn darkn ever. Ih United States artillery broke up two Communist* attempt.. i„ cnN the Han Hiver. ca-.t of Seoul, and probably pedk* ad taro out ot flva t< ten rit tankn K,W.-IIIM on the north bank ITniinl \ %  M ranlrai Urom launi hed p it into n<" naaona aflei i lullin tin nl .„i. ,| U V of up lo lmimill M I IUNIVERSITY COI.I OF THE WEST IN Fvtr.i-Murr.1 Department TWO i.KCTIIRRS PMIHC ADMINISTRATION (The Techniqae of Supervision) hy ERIC G JAMES, MA. Staff Tutor, Extra Mural Board. University College <.f the West Indie* on Wednesday. February 2th at 8 p.m at the Brilfah CeMiell Wakelleld and on Thuraday. Marrh 1*1 at Ihe Y M V A FEE FOR ADMISSION I2r l9t each laWvaTa COm aim, com: All a POSITIVELY FOR YOUR BENEFIT iWmm On*.*.* /*//nM,/s fur Eiistvr in a Ini ji varlatgr "•A HI K m all ih.de,. Crepe Sntlm. Crepo do Chine*. Romain Crap, cheekH Tad.u.., s t rnnletl, 8lrlpe.l and Checked .s.. AnitlaUe. YOLK SHOES? WFI.I. SEE OUR ASSORTMENT We Lenl\\ \l.l ItS .: i... a .. -• Tak. Uili opponoollr or ..ll.lnl-u T .ur raqalreaiaaa Bl I— GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE RaoilDc f'um U l aaararda MILD STEEL flats, ':. mi.lv vjntr. In all siin BOLTS & NUTS—All Size* FILTER CLOTH-While Cotton Twill At PRICES Ikal r.iiniil ba rrp..U 1 Thf It IIIII llllts Hi I Alllti i.ttl. M III! I I\KI. ROAD, BT. Mil IIAH. DIAL 4 '. .'.V.'.V,'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'-',*,V*.-,'.-,-.-,'.',',•, %  .-.-,•.','. *.-.-.-.*.-,'.'.-.-,'.-. ii #. von on i it HAMS (Cooked) UACON (Slirf'dl CHEESE CHICKEN HADOIES ICE CREAM MIX APPLE SAUCE ASPAKAGUS DATE PUDDINO DAI.TON FLAKES Tina lb. lb. Tini |.kK. OUVIS BOU COCKTAIL ONIONS MANGO CHUTNEY COD ROE T ,n. OB cunnANT JEI.I.V „ DRIED ONIONS COCKTAIL BISCUITS ,. "LIVE OIL CAKE MIX | k.< I.OLDIN lli-oll RIM WE CAN SUPPLY .... GALVANISED BARBED WIRE NOW AT PRICES THAT CANNOT BE REPEATED • Plantations Ltd. ..—1 J34 Ji'i --V-, %  -'y '"(f"T 6\A%£S We i NOW MS l in TIME TO SELECT YOUR ENAMELWARE' pply you with the followlnn:— V//AV/W//.V.V,V^MA'.V,V,V//V'//.VAV. ',: %  %  .-'. • SAUCE PANS (All Slzenlaj PLATES a CUPS .. a BOWLS (am 0 JUGS .. m PIE DISHES (All SUM) a l.lrKAKI \ An.1 Many Others '" Mention Pay u. n VU.lt Before IfakinR Your Purcha.^ El."Where. Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd. (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) jr. SWAN STP.FFT PHONE -MOD. 4400. -n l y %  '' %  : s I



PAGE 1

IAC.I .'.ir.iiT SUNDAY ADViH'in MJNDA. MIIHl AI1V %  IS1 Faiths Barbadians WHAT ABOUT A TECHNICAL Ming Plate At Live By COLLEGE? Bar ptck n themarch brgiiu given a Hn in wrueh io collaction iron, env invade The Museum By WILLIAM BURKE THIS it the second in a series term of office during which ho %  I articles dealing with Ihe giew to lova Barbados mare than mslorlee of ttw vinous reliiuus •">**•" J W "" ""J: *f'JffV culmination, that exist m Bar*d Archbishop oMhe Wast IpdJ bado* Last Sunday I dealt with ""'''' the Homan Catholic Church, loI" k 4l! J up M AugUcan Church take* r'fnspotlight dtad few days before appointment, and bodv wa* laid to rest in Barbadian soil. Next was Alfred P. Berkeley uld perhaps not bo amiss w ho purchased iha building known io say that the history of the ts lnr church House. During his Anglican Church in Barbados (erm „r office was celebrated in began when the Ilrst English Barbados and Jamaica the centeni.iaded here, and to quote ary of the Consecration of the first from the Diocesan History. Bishop of the Province, and the %  claimed the island nt once and Church in Barbadosdccidad on a ma .dike for the spiritual revival. The HMiai King of lOnglaiul and the King ol V B,0n u ?£""}, "T^i t %£SL2 u, KltZ* iJammw Ihr Crvms l branch in tin t" br..n< hfs in S5S" JXSELm* mi,nv counu v •*• mnd Ihr li? 1 Si ... ... Clewcr Sisterhood sent down four The Charch has grown with the ^ tn ot the Commiiruty „f St ,viand. —I bM BM a long way Jonn Baptist. It was during *ince the early lti2iM when many Berkeley's term of office, too. that .if the l*1and' proprietor deCodrington College was destroyed ided that Die tiosiwl was not to by fire in April iWfl be pieavMd to the slaves—inait> ..na^defied the order—and David Benlley was Berkeley H tip ware jyst succeiaor. From Ihe earliest times A FAMILLE verte plate of the end the sixteenth weld i i THE CONSTANTIKE TECHKICAL COLI.Edl. Middled rough. England. By TONY VArJTERPOOL WHAT I I nafltl would Barbados Thi motorists and cyclists art Ers^ srssir?r?;\anuus claaarooms and the money owing to the predominance of fine On the following day %  *••" enamel made from oxide of the name of the student who copper Tha plate is • inches in .. beat collection would diameter, and is 4eorated with Duncad. Th's money also landscape scene* and rushes in goes into the College till green, purple, yellow, blue and . .. . red, H is marked with | blue fc.„T*2ET m.S *252; • !" nti, pnmud io <>* Ikmg and many other .•? „ %  -*<. .. %  *..ugh. M th/o.wn."j""", Mr W 1 *"" d innl Traming Centre al Ixeds McKlnatry. Again scrvlMtmn who were dlachltMM pottery I toy meal, anrved The fee 1 !" modrtlliw ha. acquired iiirala la pal.1 hy the beautiful Irldeacent tlnu owlnj •.tutleiit to iu long burial. The mortuary I-.-I UM DH of the onl> Tech"-hieeU include models of houan .ical Cullegn in the Weal Indie. Implement., crockery wine Jar., Rleo. On many Incenie-bumen etc Other Kind. .. _. Puerto .__. —, le of Ihe 157 Tcchnioecmona rtudenta from the Britof pottery were made during the wooden-rtrmlu.es Tod.., the 'he clergymen In Barbado. were ,,., „. nieal College. ,ul College-, scattered all. ovr h "f >•">!?•}, i 1 """ n,v ~' "" y c *" ,U !". .. b 2i A^Ji. ahKkln ot .lave.v Wi U-en enncernia over the people s prefQ „„„„„„.„, T ,.,„, „, f,,,.,,. ,., Ki.gbi.,1 while UM* a.e " """led th.. Crjlege (T an, dyna.ty •'•- M '*."- '"' SarmJSme;; I.!-." -. ; Sa^'a -don gSSftWEfettB g2 Stt ferg others. There is plenty room for elated pottery was also popular for use as architectural ornaments It as roof-tiles, mouldings and of slavery Gospel gg". is preached lo all who want to h n ; (lUm bar of'.Hegit.mat.. ehll listen. B nd the places of worship dlta bi/Tn ^ BUhop i % %  . v tc improving family relationV-IIW pi itartad .-i purity drive and "'' of beauty. founded thi Purity U'ngue. Tha Anglican C iiuuh today has sj e was ouceccded by William J. :> 1,000 i I T i %  ited ;< ihe QOb stala nuppoited Chuu-h member -A th-U-gi^lt.tive Coun.n tha island ell. whose political faith i l i* very little on record Socialism and who resigned nthMlftWrity under w hich they d.s-eslaoUshme.d of the CTjUTch %  Mgc %  ppotBtad. ii ri'ns that In perhaps a small Technical School*' Scotland, th Tni'v .nv tuti DUmaToUS t man l,L N'.ithern Ireland hi Lond' Hon. At present the Barba.los aUme lhei>art InsUliitc in koaplni mlUs jaa antirely mainl.ined by lasses at Comba n ne r a School, pre ""' I-ondon Counly Council and in catering to a few. but. too few. Poiytecnnic-a also aided by the — On man> occasions augmtlutis c t Th lB *'• ••*• * ve " Ul,,r have been made ligarJing the *duratlonal Institutes nuiudin K %  .. in ore or less formal During his episcopate the Sistei Of St. John Baptist were recalled beat possible means by popuifUflsi luuld btnailt from .ocatlonal and technical training (ml very few, if sny, aver approached the subject of erecting %  '.nviiiimciit Training Centra I Cullegv oi ivi-n .i Technical School The cost of erecting tinappropriate Tech College may run Into thou.aiKl* of dollars but %  start could be made in u rented oinlding large anoupn to a.-comwho lost bot^i leet m action He modate u school or training centra, was always smiling and looked Th P next question is funds, but forward to Utter days Though the local Diocesan Synod and the The Founder of Codrington ColI am certain that any Technical only able to get along slowly, he Psovteetal Svnod of which the lege was Christopher Codrington. Collage, within a short time, could looked quite satisfied with his hi WasttoSaa II who died in 171& icving all hf. become self supporting. It must artificial leg. and finished Ibf estates to the S.P.G. A Grambe remembered that at such an course successfully, mar School was built in 1745, and institution the lighterman would This class was fairly well and their place was tflktjuiisdlrlli.n was exercised by (JM Sl .. (: „, thr ( ; 1MX | Sh.pliiii Lcrd Bblu.p or England, although These sisters have established %  h.s authority was not always w hool which Is growing rapidly recognised in Barbados and was it has a roll of over 100 and there even resisted on occasions. are many others on the waiting Today the affairs of the Church list. Plans are being mode to •n Barbados are not governed by enlarge the building which is gitthe Church in-England, but by "ted >" Lower Collymore Rock. (ho city mid Guilds of I ondoB. All thesv ins'Ilutioiih uiilv fuini pan of a long chain of Training .eutres in tne United Kii>.:.aBn. Shortly alter the lat gftf UM Conatantine College was not onl> \un\> a help to local folk but also oasisted servicemen who were disabled during the war and not fit t u re lorn to their pre-war Jobe. In MM classlha i in 11147. there was an ex-army lad HANDWRITTEN BIBLE dragon gargoyles. Porcellln in China is also said CALOARY ,u ••* back as far as th* Han Waits of the Portiadynoatjr. and. although Its Chinese -ie here is directing origin has been established, it ihandwritten Bible, not certain that porcelain was .ft parishioner contributmade as early as the third or seeg i chapter, and well-known ond century before the Chrlstia• %  itiieii tintnbutlng a verso or era. During work is expected lo be 1368-lo4J. thi •lnished In three months— Rav .1, M. Ofjtol Tiibenm proai"t for i AMBITIOUS BUILOIUS Archbishop of Chairman. Prom 1827 to 1875 thr whole West Indies Church was without the College : vas started It to-day be able to study art qr drama as E"-*"** 1 ,n ll there were many hensivL Xi hen Jr\SSSSi ^^3—undU:^duates ere ihere tf&SS. Sneer'woul^'abf: BafbaaiTn.: ." JgSS^^ ?£? ^af^^P-^ S£ British Honduras who Windward and U-eward Islands. fo ^' a CUuJica i DeBrec. But a lire Bishop Colechinw ls ln lnt offlng in( lheir ulge_ha<_rTo_a,lminister IS islands wl „ ^ sooner or uu f no ,. noll ,, s and British Guinna. those Interested industry; the clerk instead of remaining reading for a Classical Degree at scale, would 6c able lo learn and -a l,< "' 1 the fishing haa muap NewcBstlo-on-Tyno nil the* lower **" ,e number of IhVSu £ nig the Ming Period manufacture of Iircelsln progressed rapidly and i'. became more and more delicate until the so-called "bodilessporcelain was produced. So thin and >o dallcita was this "bodiless" porcelain that It 'seemed to conSTRATFORD, Ont. bls i 0 f glare alono." A feature of Forty-seven youngators in tn* Ming porcelsin was ahe use of colI il Mi tel Aeroplane Club here oured glases. Unfortunately, a build everything from flying groat deal of the Ming porcelain t,> model aeroplanes with which has survived the centuries a seven foot wingspread. Appro\ t f lha heavier type, much of It mothers note the big "export ware," and much of the ira nlmost big enough to so-called "Ming" Is reslly of later by brother away.—(CW reigns. were Hi in ...!.,(. %  "< *" >"• um one rla-room. where ,, human But Nature, like God. I, no a rn.mber.hlp of ow 1.000. there <*"""• "'vice, .heleton waj erecte.1. otn.rs M re.pe.ter ,.t persons or of place.. U -.he Church Army with • Dig Good example, ol what Barba ...atomy The College . oou.pped and the hurricane which hit the member.hlp and the Chun* do. .houW look forward to are the wlU. a eanlee^a Tea .ndc.gM are island in 1831 played havoc with Lad.' and Church Girl.' Brigade. Con.tantlne Technical College at served al varlou. Interval, all this good work. The Church St. Paul'. Church. Bay street. Middleabrough or the Government A "gel-together wa. held in a under Coleridge triumphed over l. the only Anglican Churm Training Centre at I,c.d.. both large hall on ihe ground Bcwr:earn. Ihe disaster, however and with which hu a Third Order ot St situated In the county ol YorkSaturday night.. inn too* i.ie had! raliM locally, and fund, rrgncli. -hire, Kn form of a dance Soft drink. O0 trom theielety for the PropogaA. 1 Mid before, the .flair, ot The Conalanlme Technical WMr .el.,iilunenu wi^euild lion of the Go.pel and from the he Church ore admlnntered by Colleie. which I. only a atotM'1 The., 'unction, were aim JBI Soriei, fir the Promotion of lr ,e Synod which ha. both priols throw away f.o.n Kenuley Hour* •!'•""• %  *" d .'. n nlcn • CaaigUgB Unowledge. almoat every nn d laymen a. member.. %  hurrh was rebuilt In live or aix synod ha. Its annual meeting >ears. Marth every vear and then meet, "an ..wu > % %  > / %  •.. •.• %  • %  •-•% %  — It wa. under Bishop Coleridge'. ,„„„ llm 'u Urn. according lo pal la Mr. DAB Clark • !" v ' h !" u d v vl influenc that Friendly Soc.etic. lhe b „.inea. in hand An importM.Se. ITMh.). M.I. Meeti. E.. "* w to popular among the people to„,„ meeting la planned for May M I I n A F R. A*. .I.-Lnrf lla iilill .... rleal. t"row away fiuin Kenuley Hotiw atteuaea ana in. mo...-, !" The tBV new.p.ner cent-, of Mlddlthe College till. , in br, u.h. r..cTon It. roll .pprox.On certain day. lho .tud,U neet I ."auly 4,000 la.t J.ar It. Princlwho were inWreated In newjPWr _. ..... LiBi-tur* %  d !Ji w, ;'.IJ." b i. ,, "! d t D w "" when member, will elect 1813 and 1838. 22 of thee, socieDlsll0p lie. were ctablUhed with a total The procedure U. that el oon membership of 2,374. ,..__. athe See become, vacant, the have bc.nj.ven buhon. „.,„ u „ ,„ „„ Ar( hb „ ho „ hy the Committee Lha West Ind The Anglic lados now has 39 priest. establishment and liieumeeladdition retired priests month. Cathedral Chapter is com elects six stalls, St Aldan. St. A ould see one of the oldest printing presses in i tha world. This press is kept in the office as an exhibit The> (governor.in-Executive woul( j m \ K ee newspapors going rd the Bishops of ttr> |ght from the press to vans es province which Immediately took off foil Church In Barvarious pr.rts of the country ***• To get more funds the College > n held a Carnival once a year. The Neorly every class was repie>enled posed of an d the wax figures especially. ibrose, which were driven through the BUfga&WeS 85 S ^n?on 8 ed n w i ithTn d : ISrsitv of DuTnam Nei was The Diocesan synod eith Herbert Brce In whose time the ,h o bishop then, or delegates tho St. Augustine. St. Basil, Si. Cystreets on trucks, created much Divorce Law was Introduced into choice lo a committee of which prian and St. Ignatius. Deans of interest. Other groups of students tho local Legislature for lhe first the Archbishop must be a momChapter include the Archdeacon, dressed to represent historic events time and thrown out, and the her. The choice of a bishop by Present Dean of St. Michael Is nd personslitiea. Al a scheduled (. jtl.cdral Chapter wai established, the Synod must be by a majority Revd O. L O Msndeville who time they would hold a procession w %  ', .mi i' Swabv lollnwrd H" of both the clerical and lay memrecently succeeded Revd. R. J. through the streets of MldilesWho after a successful iters. It must then be confirmed Hulchinson. trough ond the suburb. %  %  %  IIAIIIIAIIOS IUIAMATH (I.IB Undsr the Distinguish.*. S.trongg. of His Excellency lhe Governor Sir A. W. LSavage, KCMC. and Lady Savage PRESENTS n.\s A MURDER "^ ARRANGED A THRILLER Till IISIIAV nnd FRIDAY 15th 16th MARCH, 830 pm. MATINEE I rrlity, inth March, 00 p.m. Box Olrle. OtSSS. TRIDAY, Mtrch Ih When PAIN strikes Every day remember Phensicl lhe sooner you take Phensic, the sooner you'll feel better, for Phensic's quick, safe action will bring relief, lift away pain-caused fatigue, and remove weariness in a matter of minutes. Phensic neither harms the heart, nor upsets the stomach. Be prepared for pain — keep a supply of Phensic handy. fust take* ULablets. WE BOIL A BOMB Phensic for quick, safe relief FROM HEADACHES,RHEUMATIC PAINS,LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS & CHILLS You may well iuk. why we permit our •ctoniiMs to do MyThiM so foolhardy. Bui the plain answer it that we have to do it to satisfy ourselves that even after prolonged storage, REGENT will not form gum to stick valves and clog; fuel systems. The tests which consist of boning samples under 100 lb. per sq. inch ox\pcn pressure in "bombi", gre quite safe. We have never losi a scientist—or for thai mailer—a customer because of a sticky \j\\e. This test is one of many which guarantee tho t quality anj performance of REGENT petroL HEGEBMT stirilii|Quliti9 DISTRIBUTORS — DA COSTA & CO., LTD. AND JAMES A. LYNCH & CO,, LTD. Fox Quick Relief from Haad and Chest Colds, Catarrh, Bronchitis, Influenza, Sor* Throat. Neuritis, Neuralgia, Toothache, Rheumatism, Lumbago. Sdgtka, Muscular Pains and Strains. Bruises, Insect Bites, and other Aches and Pains, rub In Tharmogene Medicated Rub — so soothing, healing and relieving Try it You wrU say K is a real blessing MEDICATED RUB In Jars and Tim coissn ownts sciumnc IVUMHCI THAT ttUSMM TUTM RiSNT Aim tftTOM Wltg COLGATE DENTAL CREAM HELPS STOP TOOTH DECAY1 Heii Year CUUTM AWM TeeriiDateyl fnsiit that your children always brush their t-st-tli right after meals tWl Oat* gate Dental (ream. They'll love Colgate's delirious doubte-minty flavour, to It's easy tn get tliern to use Colgate* correctly. The Colgate way is the./nost efferMve way yet known to help reduce decay. Eihasstlva leSMrtli ly EmlftMi Dental AerWritles Prtves Hew Using Celgote's Helps Staf TMA Deto, lefert it Sian.l v 2 years' rescan-li at ."> g'eat univeraities -rase hii-turi uf hundreds of people who used Colgate 11, Mill Cream right after eating —shows the Colgate way helps prevent ne* oaviius, greatly reduce tooth decay! I mi.in lo Rarfki BarbiiliHi nrrv Tii-*la. a\ r.SUp.m. il.t\iiilrrw. "Ruggv R!de"PrograMiiiie prnvlaes renf nil. tl;iiiiinr:il. Cm I N addition to the regular size, this new, %  mall.-r psck of Andrew* Liver Salt has been introduced to enable you to try ihe World's most popular saline for a very unit I outlay I A glass of effervccing Andrews, eating only a fm gftgntv. cleans the mouth, settles the stomach, tones up the liver, and finally clears the bowels. Abo at any lime of the day one tcaspoonful in a glass of cold water makes s cooling, refreshing drink. Yon can be sure of Immr Cmtmhntsi with Andrews, (



PAGE 1

PAfiK FEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY t-KMl'AHV ii, IIH CARIBBEAN SOS... 'Stranded 9 W. I. Colonies Need More Ships .schools. Caribbean slagge Firji.s with cxleiuivt he Mme ronduuon: -we recominterests are obliged to m, !" ) uat on a return to normal leave for their eetate conditions. Your Ma)eit>' GovJSS J C m %, .1 .. Trinidad uaed to lay ofl and d. aoafm and other local a>UT 1 !" ^ ,' h ould ronOder whet THSTv ,J} ,a *•••* from both aides, but mm assorting lo available nceommo,.,, .hould not ^fler a subsidy a to Cr.su.6al (Pan.dork and diecharie from one side datum, th, maintenance of a rtgular 11 11 y..u ore a L.K bull an enunt that a British BaetwUlT islands The Royal Netherlands rauard bv trariahlnmrrr who wants to visit .-..maKtaam an of Stale could hold out no hope Steamship Co., served the art* did .rid the mill I III the British West Indies, or a Wat! of improved transport to a Waat well with one large and charges Veaswls call Indian who wants lo get home, indiea Government except that two largish liners calling fortTrinidad used Is lav off you canno! hope lor • direct as to, s„nc h Unc may be able lo nightly at — -—puaage before April or May al absorb seme of the Colony's and all porta to Cristobal (Pane, dock and discharge from one side jaUon ss^ssaasaaaassaasaaai a regular l, .l,e.l-,mlcs >,, are luck, % %  e.ceo requltwwiu." m. Canal, and a three-weekly „!,. which meanVthat ahipinents To go by air I. beyond the X Ei3SS^L?JiMM. enough to step into a cancellauon. Iv a the Ij.-lcrn ambbran group MTVIC. with 100-passenge. class destined for Demerara, for insti.n, %  ,„eans of the average West Indian "5,,.. Indie. Colonleal since U youi are taking Ihe family then of Colonies that la worat hit by vessels lo Barbed !" Trinidad. ,„ k nvc lu „ x W eeks as against „.,„ „a„i, to Iravel to the OK !,',„,„ ^pptng is hamkIJPl do not expec t lo get •"•rj*''* the preaeni dasirlh of shipping SerDemerara and Dutch Guiana rh>e weeks before Ihe war. i„ .1Klr or work, or the average y ,„, corJpeUuon ol subVClasd J!"S" li"^.!? ^tZHi 2S !£ esternjLaribbean. Of the five -passenger vessels "I The average ran MI freight rats Kngush family tomlng home on ,£,„,, slapping, travel by a witch c* 'rencn alti.ougn not up to pre-war sunThe Compagnl. Gencrale Transhas bsran about ISO to HO pci ce.il >av; and even the bulineasman There is no likelihood of a reguvessel. paying more than double -lards, are mm, %  or leas adequnlc,.Uaiillque (French Une) on the llrn irc sat. comparative must conalder aarloualy whether i ar RnU^ passenger service to the prewar fare. You may prei, maintained by tlders J. t>fles aaagi i nd ies run. two faat liner. 1|um (or gn-wa, an ,i presentlua proposed trip will justify the .„„ Eastern Caribbean without I*f1if1 In* stllfMla*Wa.aaa alasassaV ess i %  iiissBigsiiBti saai.si^sl **a ays. 1 -a sfa_ %  ss-11-lsLajs -1 a a a r aa-t at s a J 1 M *sa a lial Ot, of cou '|W. toavoirt the queue banana Heel An exception mini be Cab* and (tUnMr. maintained iuly" ^ipmnt*T to" Trinidad **&• cxpen&e. BOAC'fare* "to typical ^nir form" of Government assist by taking the Queen Han u> New noted in the tane of British Hona monthly service between the phed by a London merchanl— ("aribbeen destinations are:— anee. Supposing, for instance; a shipowner proposed to operate a fortnightly service with three 1U0paaaenger steamers of 7500 tony 17 knots, each with refrigerated Caribbean Colonthere were the i Mrlhg.iv II*.. rr is • Ml !• • void (he queue banana fleet An exception must be Cab* and a Mar* to .New no ied .n the rasa of British Hona monthly York and then going on to the duras which ha* no direct paaU.K. and th> Weal India* by Canadian National aenger or cargo cwiriectron with 1PS Finally, Steamship* or the American Alcoa the UK the Harrison Line's Harrison Line's two passenger t .,,,^, 1 _,I"".^..^r. ui .Mao r a MrC o rm a r l r f .i n aa N il ,.„.-. Wi(r monthly aervite to BeUa* shins, accommodating about 100 ahiiu> wc -*ii i that route Is expensiveT especially n(jl having been reatored. Taa cacti, which provided the only Acknowledging that 'rate* sine* ttevaluatiO) Tlie other colony presents an axceptional regular British service to the ireigtit ... present a problem, ,Ki.bility is to go by air. for problem, since it lies off the main Eaatern Ca rib bean; but it was the Commonwealth Shipping which MU will have to :.iu1 C1TH shipping route*. But there is no announced just before the war Committee had the following to j to £1*0 (single fare) plus the M j C h justification fox the neglec. ha this aervice was to be withn*: It Is obvious that under the coat of sending extra baggage by ot the Eastern Caribbean Colodrawn a* uiwoaoorak, Apart conditions now obtaining freights l im a > a yJi l ZJl2%^Zmm32m wyuld each coat about thrce-andme., which anconveniently from lhew passenger aarvices ..re bound to be high and will reran £? ^"2 £ ^ 5 *? **1 ST"S3 a half times as much to build as of iir otiiaaa is. sa mm aai •• rAoacltv—a aervice that K havi rli^^'^ilJirirS S 3SR g'Tan annual cpacty of ,lng hava riaen to an extent IMfr 4M i>oo to 500.000 tons of cargo *< moid travel*^.^> *9 500,000 tons of cargo tinwar, larra ; -—^r. „>-,.. ihr,.,.-andeisly embari Bvfbi That is the present state of the grouped and lie athwart the there were the cargo services moUatr country's conimuntcations nmin •• route* between the UK operated by the Freni wian one of her most important and the Panama Canal. Here Harrison Line and othej. group of Colonies, and there is we have the anomaly of upward* panics as well a* the fortnightly tonnage and littleprospect of any improve100 UK-bound vessels -from Auaservice run by the Hom Line time taken in loading ment unless some bold and imagtraha and New Zealand passing (Hamburg) with five boats aedischarging are also %  native step i* taken. Before the through the Canal each year commodattng about 40 pasaenwhich have brought a rise aa war. these Colonies had regular while citliens in British Colonies t „ s e^ freight rate*. We suggest, howMid rea*onahl> frequent direct sea queue up to gal passages aboard pi,,., rvfleV lWt which had ever, that there should be macblnconncct.ons with the t'-..ted KingFrench or Dutch .nip*. Jllae^isSXrbaaS and Trmiety for periodical review of rate* dom (although, even then, only T he shipping line, cannot be *" d ll a ''.^.hf Drc -w period nd * '* cord therefore, a proone British shipping line was blamed for refusing to run serf"' *J *,,'?' t„,J,ca That I"** 1 m dc to our committee in serving the Eastern Caribbean vkMJ that they consider uncco*""' "''• '* _*, u-rv-d bv the 1* to the eflecl that an organigroup). Today, connections are nomic or for calling only "if sufJ~"_ o,-,,-, N.v.ealion Co nlion representing shippers and precarious and inadequate, deBeen. Inducement offers." But it *'',"" _~. 'L,,,,'.J, ciu each shipowners be set up to review pending almost entirely on serIs the British (Jovemments rewhhf h "^M^gJlr? JS .aitward ficight rates from lime to time on vices provided b> the French and possibility to take a leas com>*• hon ?*ZJ^n icount nTthe cargoes to and from the West Dutch pnnw.ly for their own mcrcial and longer-term view of S !" ^.l" r S '£ Indie." nationals. The stluation is worae a situation affecting the prosper!Jf*"" r .,jTT?^r _." !" banish This recommendation has just monthly n*** pat into effect through the services with limited passenger Wc** >ccommodaUon. while occasional < the war and would be ua service* mam so unless the general leva! w ^LJzZu^.^T^im, li naVb 1oiv At vmr and would b ch Line of prices falls. The shortage of '^^^S^^'tSSioluSo llkel > *** for lhem elv t 4T comtonnage, the cost of ne w %  ..% ^[Jj* Fr Sc? LiS £W le l ^ n y u \* !" J!?Tl ortnightly tonnage and the increased \" "_ > %  * lb !" Suich Line 00-8 mT hi h and l r mc lorn Une ttme taken m loading and '_'' 140 ^. d St**'^TJ£l sonablc It is true that impro £140 and by the Dutch Line JJJJJ far-or. £W to £125 Th r are n **?* iftum fares, as there were before the war. To go by one of the alternative routes eg. via New York, is even more exp*ns VfF _although the whole voyage be paid for in sterling today even than during the wa and immediately afterwards, when the Ministry of Transport was able to arrange for speti.il sailings. Now theie is no help from that quarter m fart, the Ministry shrugs Its shoulders helplessly in the face of desperate appeals. As a result, hardship is Inflicted on Wast Indians visiting the mother country, staff movements are hampered, business contacts are curtailed, and (he tourist trade^—so necessary to the prosperity of these Colonies — u entirely disregarded. But these effects, serious as they are. are only part of the story. A succession of official and semi-official reports has borne witness to the pressing need of the British Canbbean for better internal and external communications. For the past 75 years these Colonies have been asking for more adequate shipping services and yet they are worse off to-day ifferting the prosper!L**" 1 ? r ., p IB I* nier ..iilllon or two of ft* sub>*<>*•' a1 Lines Jccts. There Is a clear duty on rhipping co i m Vl |>; the part of the mother country to see that shipping services arc adequate to meet the following lequirements:— |ij Movement* of official and commercial staff between the U.K. and the British Caribbean (ii) Journeys of merchants and India Committee, which tcs representatives of shipcall* were also made bv other POT* ui..l merchants to confer with Eriliah and foreign Hnas. %  British shipowners. With the outbreak oi war came Refrigerated capacity is the inevitable announcement of' needed 'Suspended for the duration.'' %  • ientrue that improved shipping service* would tend to foster traffic, but nevertheless the initial outlay would be dwproportinnately heavy. Granted, then, that some Kind of Government assistance 1* Deeded, what form should it take"' A •.urn conditions, the rornmerd iMc t mbsidy to stopping serving iial and cultural contact* that tnc Caribbean area might seem are the Ufe-blood ot trade arc mvldloliS to other shipowners. reduced to a minimum. but this objection could be met bv remote f*shi P s for the West Indie* run Then what about the West In-,might be assisted either by outdies' tourist trade—the Colonies* rtg bt grants or by special credits second most important industry? „, a mutual risk-sharing basis • He.nlth. happiness and sunshine E ae h of these courses would hffl await you in Barbados, all-theIT,iif11eullics. but the Government vear round holiday resort. . cannot expect to be presented v.ill. j.rocla.m* a current travel leafB "praefical plan M unUI all such let "The abiding charms of Barpossibilities have been explored the sunshine—ternand a baais agreed upon for OT" portion of Ihe many h of tnuiu'. pcaplff UIIU I dians u'lio arr icoitum for pasicgei It U ssere not for Ins siz-teeelcli/ saillnps ot III* ami fli. rices of the Bvukcr U Liverpool lo Demerara, u-e should be in a WCJTM fix lhan we *** %  AM ii Is, Use outlook % %  MTf dulled':, r.r J l,,iii..'d. Uliii rhere seem* to be NO IWMsdWgfg prospect of smproeeir Mr. rarer G. Den*Id. Chairman. aum-sea. Drew X ( l<*Y-*ljle Ltd:— "f ferl very iirougly about this tnarier of s'lippmir coaaectsons. At one U'hn aa hlf time has risited tvtrry Brtti* '' the Sewehelle* and Afoaritius. / fcnoie asnr fhSSS feratones can be deprived o( uppurtanilv and n sssp f riiied bf larkof propecenimMiuretiond ItThM hoee IM COSPSHCJ and (hen den* fhent gro pe r trsHiporr far-Ufies? Surely file flrst dul|, < %  ) 0uMinister of Traaspifrr i* to ensure direct and. regular moiJ. poasttioi r a>id carpo sernicei fe vrery Cofotip? The rrieri'iarir %  rrlurers repardrd transport costs and trade ci ^VnpriMM lor the uwn. Wh)k ^ Commonwealth Ship..eppd b y the vigorous North-East or indirect assistance to shipownS fJ' Sg ?Z?e£2£ria2!& P" Committee committed .Uelf V.ade w.nd_Jnd the sea which ers. It Should .Uo be ascertained naanaan %  -,,,,. ,na j£VlS!ii? -l^ i^J^i^. rw '" '"*-• """ inl v w "•* t "'^ t encircles this tropical hue with a how far the West Indies themothers concerned with fos* !" Jl,,*?t !" \ iT* !" „Ii n ,?r 'orviccs between the UK and the .„. of the deepest blue*' trring UK-Car.lAsam t. ; ..|e !**. *"" h v.l* T*< ,"Z** !" L West Indies were, or would ben iee. too-if you c*n_ gel Ircles this lropic_. Very selves would be prepared to !" %  vou can get there! tribute and in what ways th< JS*"*'**W'Ll^lai, n .ur r £55 a^uate the report did Sirib-TS waters of the Cribmight £• Britiah ttbipping tentially much greater than ^' L ^JtJftl .Lf *aS recognise that there would prnhb**H are remote nowaday* for line by conee*atons in port charge: ^UJ shirks vvre LTt. Wy be a need for mom rSfrtgM the English holiday maker One etc two pawenger ships v.re both ^ w-B BM( ^ (h-n WM |kfK thc ^^dmA Chamber's critlAnother consideraUon. tering in Tourist traffic, which at present. vi Shipments of West produce—not only i in nub. rhn what could be economically grown If refrigerated transport were guaranteed (vi lTxports of UK manufactured goods, which again might well expand under the itim ulus of improved shipping. Unfortunately there la no lost. Nevertheless. peneral evpectatio both there wasa that peace AiOTi of fenne; %  .( ,i to bo available to cope with tts* i of il^ CSC report was that examining the economics of thc ><.ommended service would question, is that heavy tonnage* citrus fruit industries and. only barely take past traffic on have had W^^ht '~" "| e moreover, that "expansion of the -.he assumption that boats werarea to chaa^ggsjj **-+ ajt.aWtJ West ImlK-. ex,rt trade would fall each trip (which they^ never am Pensc was adm^trd n and shipping services to strength—and, prrhnps. Kreater strength in yiew of the Went Indies export ernphasi. laid on this kspect of the necessitate the purchase West Indies' development l;v authoritative survey-, gg the I. Commission Report, llM-fl, and the StockdnU Report. 1M*-4. In Qtlggtl need for adddional -.luppmg ... normal times) and so a ParlJamentary uuestlon that ov.de for the_vary^J^^Sg^SXgsSi t i.v inch ch ncry and materials from outwou.u % y,^-^ . %  "='—',. -.^ ft „ m „,, i*,. U.'.-Vo'i'.l ^urre. f„ MM up lac-^^""1^.^ ^SZ -S cSgta E.I* Ml-S. aiM I-'" %  "••. plants, wllh a_ eonse'•"" „.,""* ,.„.,_. „, „„,,, gsrtng on thla merit u*&s no. sa nafl eu ommltlee had reallaefl full freight potentlalltie! anting: iue.-War It 1 ihnrefor. „„• n '""' ,h; lh "' Br "" h Ooveninwm ,e 1M6 edition of the UX Exprrt loi.n.ge." uut t „M,',K mJ*J^SSH J.Zi ' %  •""* "J '" ''• -—a....t..l.: -ProtaastM DtMIWaat'l lllnta M • •>* ComOWB SZSLLSr^Lij^SSJS! '" V>." ".tter-^therw,*, .-ould Boalne* VhHI.. %  rWar, that the comn. ..'nX rn'm.K 0l .''r^eLrSI, C '1!i?; %  *•<""• the Hou of ComWeal ladle, and Bermuda. e Ond „f^H V 'iT'?. !" ,.', P .^S^. i^! %  •>" %  J" "" %  '-S'.'" 1 *" " "•' """"••" *£< !" 5h| pin recent months with the answer pn>g services: "Most of thsc that "no practical plan" had yet regular services were suspended or been submitted for implementing curtailed during the war. when it the Commonwealth Shipping Com was extremely difficult, tf no*, mittee's recommendations? It is impossible, to make %  tour of the pofta"to"*tress"the" need "for" faD*^ !" l J^!!^^\^ t !" %  **• .T Ma H"" "^"^ t0 """^ proved sh.ppmg services in this fwenc of directors of the lneoreondttions will probably see moat purated Chambers of Commerce t( these services resumed... of the British Caribbean, meeting Clearly, "normal conditions" are in Pan ,,f Spain last July—two still a long way off! Mir the publication of the CSCa nitdlnaV should have bad In fact, only the Dutch Une and implied; it is a far-reaching prob lem related to Ihe whole futur. economic development and politi cal structure of our Caribbeai possessions. The latest of the series of re proved shipping services in this area was that of the -Commonwealth ShippinnCununitti-e. which undertook at the Government's request "to survey the shipping needs ol the Briuab Colonies In tm(.'.inLvix'dii jicii and llerinuda* P<" nwolution urging inquir—Just reeeiitlw—the French Lino ......, ..-. ^. .. ...... ~to cons.dr what sh.ppmg M.IV.C !" "" to be made of the Secretary of have resumed passenger services Ion*,, lime now taken bv cargo Today pleasure trave Is negllgiby the French Line %  W^Whirh w.UU..equ.nHlto .melthgTSS SUte fo. the Colonies to find out to the EaSter^r Caribbean The ships ble. hut '^"^^JJ^,*^" 6 '^ 2J* *J*g* "S-S S ;ec^rni.^\ UU 'r ;an rt h ,0mak0 W^SSS *" ^ "^ ^C^^S^S The concl-aiOn would .cern to £^cKl|^^ ZSTtoS* ^ iZZ^L^ vSTcTtTovK. ""^Thc fornmodttlng a'K.t'So^nd*'-. f that cargo capacity canm : ^."ESLS&flsXsll ^il.t.es for getting back. Neve •1-Jo Wt, >oung imin"passengers respectively) pro_v.de ly be considered lirt from Ihe us ..11. We are of the opinion thut a British line providing a service such as we previously recom mended would obtain a satisfactory volume of the freight ofKrinn between the United Kingdom sod thc British West Indies. as it l< obvious that many shippers and importers would avail ihernst'lves of the opportunity Ui have goods shipped by a vessel arriving from 10 to 12 days after sailing, instead of the much loiigir lime ships ,ean eommunicati at least it was heped that the com%  *. ..,sg,r.,*a>i (.„,> ,,,„ ,.-!-,. *ituation in the British C %  mber with kindly thclcss, a regular monthly service improved passenger service that thoughts those pretty islands and provided by the diversion of Austhe llnii-li Car can so badly the* 1 toj&J& ^ Jnto UHm tralaslan shipping—on the basis noeds The ink ,,( f.si i iisjai Today the West Indies are once perhaps, of a subsidy 5S£ !" hilt! ', w ;. .^ .. %  y^^K.**> lh tcargo space-would pgtn %  l was hoped that the com mittee's recommendations — the %  ncerned have the nunlca•-—,--" %  —, — T~, —", —-—--*—• ~ mn ami Laiiatiisn nouaaymaaers, Inter-Ctrlbbean communications, i Caribbean rely unduly on slower cargo boats, but Eni!lisn tourists still have to provide refrigerated cargo apace iniltee's recommendations — the nonV" !" reM.,7., "V\. r"V.^ !" "i.. Colonies on their homeward voywhich in any case cannot provide Mve on th ei r memories. For the transport of West Indies most Important of which was for vm/a tovrv^ reZto)!Z!^£ lf SM In v CW *• "J 1 "*** 1 that additional tonnage—including v .-. produce and might at least shorten a fortnightly, or not less than W fj,/ 5 ? f"'*? !" Z fr l"" ,cv "' pa*n*r "'nga, adequale refrigerated capacity — THE SI RSIDY QUESTION the passenger queue b skimming inonthlv. passenger service from 'Zl7, ,, Jl, , , an the Dutch Une now run* supwhich^ij essential to the future The psychological effects of all off one-way travellers, the UK to the Eastern Caribbean ,,!,',,!" ". J "^ P^mentary cargo services to the development of West Indies „ K n these difficulties on the local popuIf no action is taken by the —would stir someone to action. On ir i' 6 "the under-developed v/est Indies and South Pacdlc (U i Uir e and trade. fation itself is one of the most serlGovernment either to enable a present showing, however, thc •"• _•" not to remain lorports. The Compngnle Gencrale Bi iti-h West Indian Airways — ous > consequences. Archdeacon British line lo operate a regul. QUMttOBi "Does Britain passenger induce ; teiritones are no' committee might as well have cvor dependent on Colonial deTransallantlque restored their no uf ctmrS g. a .subsidiary of Bank saved Itself two years ol inquiry ^"'"Pmcnl funds or grants-in-atd. West Indies and Central Ameri^y^C have done a great deal unnl h colonies or not?" reflects Commonwealth shipping through and examination ol witnesses. Hul what ore we to say to the can service as from last October m l)ie jg^-gria 0 m prove local the feeling of the majority on this the Panama to divert, then the Nothing has been done to implewould — be plota ur or investor — with the completely reconditioned TO iruiiuiiic.itiQii.. In the Canbut in m;i tter — a feeling that can easily only prospect of improvement ment its main proposal and i ing seems likely to be done. vessel The Barbados Advaeate said oth"Go west, young man, lo the CaribCeiombte and a smalle _. Inbean, but don't expect the boats (.aweaenr. The Celamblr. which qulrie* on the subject from local to follow you" J That Is the kind has accommodation for 5*4 pJJjTrf thV Hr ish West ln.hai" of prospect which the British Govsurrrs tn three classes, U now !" r lsnMJgs.li havi mel %  %  i iff ret i"f prospect v.ni.li IIHIII.*L-I, (,.. RgfiMrj ut ttkTM CUM*, cence from the British Governeminent l s offering by its failure virtually a new liner afte. !" .. '""!' to recognise communications s an version from her wartime role a* What can be done? From the integral part of development m hospllal ship and offers a high 5 kUO /,* w1 fuller, discussion of the problem this group ctf Colonies. standard of comfort _A.th.mgh the Canadian ships pa. turn to disillusioned apathy. Indeed the news that the French Line nre l is pertinent to ask whether the building two luxury liners U.S. lack of initiative" noted by visitFlandre and 8.8. Antilles, both ors to some of the more chronically 20,000 tons gross, for the West Inays. the islands of the West lh ,p-starved Colonies may not be dies run. It Is unlikely, howev it, ..-_.* 3.1 l... ..IIIIS-I nao.iilVi ... Ass. ..1 —%  %  . .... „ ,„„ ,„„, A similar shorl-lgniedne.s Is "^"^ 5 —. m.-r ---w.. SL^m^torl.'a !" ..,^ ern. ,l.clr,c.U^om„,lied Hading Ihe rocenlvi.il of BOAC chairman, through federation ., the objecSSSFS'JS SS&J*S. ur .ii^S, ^ ^! ^ ^ system. In cun|uiu-lie>i with thc Sir Mile, Thorn; !" Ihe demand11 has been repealed ,;.„_,. ....%  SJ___>„. .„H n b. B a regular service would crnn !" spokesmen In the House ^J^^ |lll4U| the operate be uneconomic, and apparently no of Commons. And, sltll ilombte operate* and Central American are* tin i fortnightly service, from Southis to be a general reorganisation o rbados .md Trlnldnd BWIA and Bahamas Airways oi and has uuiugufated a new route lines that have proved succcsafu corporation': M.l I-.^I.II nil s-iilvllrs._. s. M be denie*wn national* travel between Ihe islands, as wl mountable when so much is at f railroads opening up the back They can accept cargo offering M foi „ nion adequate inter The lime has conw for woods or sea connection.bringing from the U.K., hut passages arc canbbc-.ii freight &f oaviee The lo ihen local Government to ask interests in this country prosperity lo isolated Islands? It strictly limited. On her maiden o/n,.';,! wartime West Indies what had l-een done. In June, Is a lesson of history that commu voyage, for instance, the Ceiembte Schooner I*o*il has been suiiersedcd 19S6. the Chamber was advised t advance was only able to take* about 0 b ., vo i, m tarv eo-oper..t^ M-MM-*a*aM? S5E *JS2Z \Z2SZS ^"^ with'vanouM^ oVffi to wUeve the .tan conaesuot. W|nc|wan| „ nd !„ ward j8|nmi which British travellers have p. lor ^ t claim are Elders Ai FyfleV CallUo stake busin and the British Caribbean to unite their voices In insisting that the present altitude of drift, complacency and evasion come to an end. COLONIES CANNOT PKOSPKR WITHOUT BUTTER COMMUNICATIONS 1 ET us take a look at thc ex' lent of Britain's possession* In the Caribbean area. Tiu-v cam be divided geographically into two groups: Western Caribbean, comprising the Bahamas arid Jamaica, with British Honduras on the mainland: and Eastern Caribbean^ comprising the Leeward ond Windward Islands, Barbados. Trinidad and Tobago, with British Guiana on the mainland. In addition, there Is Bermuda Through these crouml in the British West Indies That is how the position appc; in-u\, that the UK Government at present. If so, it is a sad day Is not merely falling to act on 'or British maritime prestige ami the recommendations of the Com'or the prosperity of the Caribmonwealth shipping Committee's bean^ Colonies. and many previous reports, but is VIEWS ON CARIBBEAN indifferent to the situation. This SHIPPING impression Is strengthened by thc Mr. A. E. V. Barton, Serrettrr, persistent cold-shouldering of inWest India Committee:— miiries on the subject. In July. 'The present lack of passenger 1949. the Trinidad Chamber wrote jhippfng between this nications and trade' tonether. In this context, the example of British Honduras Is Interesting, In IIM8, the Commonwealth Shipping t'onuoittee could say: "Because of its accessibility lo North America. It is natural that British Horn.mas should obtain many of Its essential where till ntinue to handle %  and special prote.-tui iMdeT.*tior\*. Schorr, that no reply had yet been teclvcd to the local Government's r ,uir\ from the Secretary of State for thc Colonies. Now the Cham tiers of Commerce of the British Caribbean have repeated the Inquiry Is the answer to be %  "No practical plan" indefinitely? Whai i* ihe solution ? there was Honduras its imports from the UK report on the Colony in 1909 pi ides one of the reasons: "Bkfva imimrta from ""thai V<,,",i^ taking tibo.it IW> passenger* e\rv\ '•' % %  "' •M.-.. u ,iniw . oo.ui:,,. y/hat form rould a practical n actual Zr h <, %  i,n * weeks, and the Harrison Une', trips, h-.wever. can be rougl no! pUn take? The Commonwealth "* *** ***• h ^ 1 "'''•> f nn and Booker Bros' cargo vesseit. on >y "*' P * iM sj g| g, but on oargc Shipping Committee quoted In its EZSaSS^K ^ f W "-ft To Jamaica-focal point of ho too. and there Is still a strong case report a number of suggested requirement* from the UK. But '",-,* cJrlbbc.ti lilder* h mr the I93H Royal CosniiiJssaMi'a schemes for improving shipping ime when British !" "' ( uh a [of Sh iccommendntioii that "two small services between the UK and the Uking nearly half J Hll" d Ked bv comparing Jamaica on 12th April. Thc Trinidad demanded: 'Does Brifrequently than montWy." American 'iQOOOnn lasnn t wrvices lo-dav with what thev Jamaica Banana Producers' ^hlps. tmn want her colonies or net Since two year* lave dragged XrYf the sh., m,.r IttaS. wcl u <> V ""til th, Lit J.m.ka rr^ueer and North Stsar. nd wen, on to aaj "I do not by w.th no sign of action. It must nf Masa .rthri %  wainirlJ. v '..' Il 1 1 of war regular and lasl taking 48 and 12 passengers rebvh lo engage in politics but I be presumed thaTnn shipping line Selr MeeMio^l*-3nd ours ton Ppn8er services between the speetlvely. each maintain %  six %  "> yer> interested in transport can *ee ku way to operate even -fir rnore^ad^telV Tan do UK %  ' <• S"tern Caribbean weekly service which is looked upon by the the limited passenger service reBritish |,n. T.^Comm.mwcalVr, •• rn^ntained by several lines C.re shippen" anxieties 92^1 !" !?* .fV "SL •^5^ ^^f"^.. 1 lh JB-* The Shipping Cominlttce's Report on ln addition t„ cargo services acu will have been seen tha West IndUn Khlpelnr. Services C !" 'K t" demand. facilities for cargo shipments ti showed In two ttnkii.g diagrams Service*, then and novi' ind from thc British Caribbe.-ui Xfr supporting the Artrideacon' that, even before the i r< reign The H.unlni|'g^America Ijfie nre much more satisfactory than f or ninght eomments. nn educ; chip* carried moat of the .pa*ran u monthlv service with two passenger service*—at least, act |oiial Instituiion noiuted 0" sengers between the UJC. and the fast luxury ships_ (500-passenger cording to present demand. The -i,,, dinV-ulty of getting sea pasNavigation Co. have not been rebCL .^.f!?: menl pf the year. This certaintv stored with t*"" exception of but further mention must o foVl !^to\i!!*\*JZ^^£n "' "•"*" ta **** ronveniencoccasional calls by the ISSN's made of tfjic personal and pay SBSa^^moM^ZAf^'^ ; d ,,u, for wv %  houkl noi t^"" ***** •>' •*•'"" %  • %  The latter rholoarkal ^rcpercuasion*. In Bv comiSSon thT i?V*. P h * ,ar ** Proportion of our pui vessel, who dlstnbutev hss fgMMI rOCMrt teller to The Time-. IN MMSSionT m the C.i blM-an 7re ,;,i '^ l F n lun a W <" t^* w Kingston and other West scribing his own efforta to get * somt60u!l0 InShllanta !" ? "riousness of the British Indies ports, is due to make her passage back to the Eastern within thc V K but outside (within the Fmplre) anparenlU could not matter less" In a tat. ittee foresaw this sltuatic. and added; "We draw attention to the high cost of the tonnage required and to the possibilitv that special measures oi assistance, al %  1 the outset, may be necessary to encourage shipownEastern Caribbean. Today the class), making Barbados In 9 main anxieties confronting cargo M w „ seriously hindering ers to provide the service." The situation has worsened to tuch an daya and calling around the fhlppen are the delay* now recruitment of teachers for BWI Royal Commission of 1930 reac.ied mat; asser, #*-* ti^aaport uaw seprcpaled, a projU ioa* expected from both A couitry CSWI u*HI aDard a loss on tmissport, I it makes up the lose bi/ irooV. Thai iftoutd 6* the firm eonsideratUm in drcia*i.tf u-Jinl to do about Caribbean shiupiriu len-icri The need for m MaetaV is roams* „s *Ma*uf but the Comiisoeieealth r ill.Wg.lii t, e'a report sheloed sMs Queitiofi. It seeiai di#cs*. • forr, lo underamnd u*v <*>e -.fl iaoirir was aMsrl ed. It to advise Ihe Cooemnseisi as lo equitable rubsidp sppsieelion. It failed tn Us parso*e; if d€-lou U'ns the cad tn iHeu'. then eded. What is needed or# snipe, nol reports. The prr>Isal inside bv me for the scsMwiil.d end rrowler use of 2& per Hn:v. r<<1-\Qrratetl ships retfuiorly pasriti,; itirouoh Hie Panama Canal, if adopted, u-ould supplp ahip* ssaar. 1 galMl step a* on inrerim arranorment pending Ihe bufldinp of sprcta. refnperatfd *hp* fo (/rorioV a tortiHghlly seTTlce to botd ihe ISaateri md WeMem Caribbean Colonies." i Cvporl Qaat-llff TSeeenOur IM nd'ihr Bririih West Indies is rausi'iu hardship and financial lots lo Writ Indians, httllnp the tourist Irode and puitinp diffcullies in Ihe u>ay of commercial denelopmenf. If is clear .hoT no British shipplnp line is prepared lo nin a regular service lo Ihe Eastern Caribbean Colonies making reasonable prolusion for British, passengers unless Ihe Government gives some asrislance. This was forrshadou-rd In the Commonu>eoIih .S'hjppinp Commit tee'* report, which, dreu* altenlion to Ihe high coil of oprrafinp such a aervice and the possibility thai •pecial measures of assistance nUflhl be neceisary. What I* ruspecfed is that the British Government is rosilenf to let connections belteeen Ine UK and Ihe Easrrrn oroup of the BVI be catered for by foreign linen and is nol ready to face up to any substantial contribution to ensure that British citizens cai pel lo Brifiah Colonies on British ships" Mr. %  Palmer. Director. Beakers %  -MslvhH! A T.-adlng €>.. Lt*.:"Our experience is that shippiu., accommodation available fo (he Fanem Caribbean, while cover. inp existinp staff tnofemem.*. does not provide for fi) aeir ttaff (ii) business people or fill) run rid-[rippers. Staff holidaps are dependent on when ice can get passapet to this country from the West Indies. The French Line's restored service .lopether n-trh Ihe Duich th-.ps, help lo relieve the ritualion. Mil fhese line* gew Irst place lo their oirn nationals and cannot lake more than a mail proALL OVKR THE WORLD Good mornings begin with Gillette The Basques who roidc in the High Pyrenees Now shave off Ihcir beards with Ihe {reatest of e You also should share the improvement they've By using the wonderful Blue Gillette Blade 4 Shgrpesl ever made. Blue Gillette Blades arc also the most economical because ihey last M> long. Naturally ihey are chosen by the Bl fl tsr1 rneo of every country in the worM. Blue Gillette Blades RADL INOUIKILS TO: T. (.(DDES CHANT LIMITED What do you know about ENO? DO YOU KNOWum.4. of cooling, .refreshing ENO, will correct the effccti of jbmeating and dhoking? DO YOU KNOW that ENO, with in gcnllcklalivtactioa, will freshen jou up mentallg god physically? Slid m but lies /or lotting SmSMtM Eno's Fruit Salt'


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u HAT SUNDAV AWVOl'ATK CLASSIFIED ADS SUNDAY, HJUItABV 23, 1*U TFLEPHOWf act Tha rto rgi for mnnniiH> Ic>gmente. and In Uimoi I• *• en w4i/. end SIN oa Bund •Oi any uuwba ef arW up to Hi. I rwrti par w.ird i.ti weck-aaa* 4 nnM per wurd on Sund.v. for e %  !*'">-! -" Berth*. Mamarr af Engag-m %  Car to i ailing FOII HIM i i %  ; I for i I uallinaial Word Tarmac between t 34 and 4 p m... Netleee onry aim4 pn .,' lmi by ail City Payne iMaevbeivl1 %  Father. Audrey. 0<> JUl 7*i in A FVRB1MM.I) KQKIAeArW to. Bed'acd Awni* 1 bedroom* and I arnvttiMnt'i Available ttom April Dm SSM IS 25'.FOB SVIJ Wial-mm champ* IIM Tl cenu mn M cH * % % %  %  M tooede — matr 1 i, ittdi a cwali a ton-d u-(c 4 ceaia tcard LUauAl'TOMUTIVi: CAR IBM Dodge Ewallont conahiMt lot u*l. Apply C. A. E. Barklaa. Pfitd Gap. Ruabuck Straw*. t.r De**artmee.i el Agriculture BELLA VISTA Ciltle.a.h Corn%  ortabL. (iM.uhrd Three bedroom*. •arm badi Ijnje electttc tef () g.-i.Vor light. po.rt plug*, runnlnr -aler lhrmaglo.it Garage neTvant*' room*. %  •* Mouee. Mr*. Chandler Todd*. %  I. J)V-*i CAP -Jhllm.n 10 M P Mileage *.•• JuK to-painted t.aaWanw tapholalT). ntal 0"W 441) home M4P 11 Sat-an. I-OltHYOne .li Vto. Lorr* In perron %  hap* Ucenar untd Jianc Apply: r. E. C. Beth* II. ntand.Mii Plantation. Phono 4iu. M i %  ] n PK'KIP Out Dodge Rato-up m wearing order Apply: ft E Cola (k Co. Ltd IkMfeock Strart II I fll-t f n. Fl'KMTlRK I i KMii Pli-li-4-n Daard orra lha (!...*i.w taraain. U> Tiand Naw liMnll.irr for a llmllad tlnu> Jnha B ill—laa d l'l>Tnd > 1 ft a in. U0 00 a pr ; Bad-end* ft am*. HaJP a pr | Maa Buraaw B7S 00 *arh. MahosaiO' C'-cklall Tabln from M 00; niith Clialm IS 00 a pi. nol foraittirm a nutnaraua vartrty of hlah rlaaa w.nd hand fumliur. For viawlnp call in Mardwaad Allry Opjn daily fr..m • a m to 4 p.m. MK HOUSK-lwaa fttraa-t A lb* inaaa "and ImmadiaU paaaaaMon. Applv Tl'ANI BH(M. Pr W-i, Hf* SL OUI MM Ml 51—• IM IH M \OIH IS T. <*i p#r n *n. MM ,H, u-ark-devi a-d U cn.u par opoia llaa on Jaadavf, m.-(m U m .ho-p, II M aa iaaa*^ayi and II 00 oa Sunday* NO'HCE r\ni-n or T m.nii Appt K .tn far UM Poat of Pararid-.! aai*r win Pa racMvad bv the unaar.i*"rd not laiar than ina Mil, p.-bnawp IM1 Appllcatlona mu.t be taanpaniad by Baptiamil and Madlcal "nd markrd on tha Envelope, application^ Sad llr; I C M \ l %  n-RNI^MR) Kl'N'CAUtW In Bedloid Avenue 2 bedroom* and all modem ronvanktnea* Available from April Ut. Dtol IMP Mill ML %  LAI* ATHOIX. AppUby. M laanaa Nrwlv-btillt modem houta with Did bark porrne* Thro* liedI. aarh with runninp water Dtnmf lanpa illlln*. loom G-rape. farrElaclncity. Kendy for oceupanr* Id March mi. Phone MS. Mn C. Clarke. n i M *„ In nt fr..i •'CT-BVriAWD*'—Pully lurnlahod. artd Avaeiua Ballavllle Rlns 1 IT in MI. FLaXT %  Opaclo.i.. Unfumlahaa] Plat Mr floodtnp. 4PK. S3 M -In IntiMI !' % %  Inclii*lve JJIHEI.KCTKK AL ft with II le ftalei an* 1 al-ln. UVESTOCX TWO IIORHM. IM C>rl Ooli>| rheap A Co Ltd ItuebmFl RMTl RE Tlowrjl DBW" at Mnawrll CoaM Raad. Rlihl of Way to Baa. Oond Bathmi. 0 CaaMfprtobla ] Bedroom Cottaie. all Modern Con yen lenaaa, Pully Pumlahed D MM lit < .'!.-.. if aaaj i ir • il li. I.latarator. K.idu> Telrpajona. Vaapnl. Dtol MM after •> in p. da Abrau. A uctlor.aer. *. j i i \,, rt^TAttractive furnlihed Tat. KaitInaa main toad Good varandaJi facing aaa. Bale bathing Rullable ona paraon or rouple. Telephone. Mtf. aoiii in PARAU'AV. St Philip Caaat rurnlahafl; 3 bed room n, Water-mill aupply. IJflMlnp PIMM, Double carpoH. ] •artamatoom*. From February 1Mb. Dtol PtlC .l.&l-t.f.a. IIOUrtR IdMom full fi.,l^.. Gift Shoo, auitable for Plowar Shop or '•" ' l' i nit. Aopl) M -riluiK the Secretary. Mavfali Oifl Miop. NOTICK PABJPB OF T. ..Mi'. VEsmtY BVR-CLRCTION T herebv give notice that I have appointed tha Church Bovr School, nan tha Pariah Church, aa tiie place where all Parlthlonar* of tha Pariah of m HUUp and other pereom duly pualMad to vww at any rjectlon of Ve.t.,man for tha MM Pariah may aaaembie on Monday Mb day of March MM betwr.n the hour* of It and 11 o'clock m tha) morning to elect a Veatrvrran M place "* %  DrnaM Lyte Eaa. dacaaaad. Bid. P. s. w ftcoTT Parochial Treaaurer. M. Phi KINU AMI II 'haea* u-ee* It cenla a-d M .en. >'"yi M uoeda — pppp M taorar, ] fCBl ^^.g ajgMl | cia %  RHdJ Xaadap*. Harbour Log SHIPPING NOTICES In Carlisle Bay HELP preferably hotel work Fl-ierff hpaoiah MM capable M doi lh — itr. Encllah or *p nlah (orraapondance Write Bo* D" .ate li KOGaTA 1"TIFR An eaeellenl oppor%  >l-"**ra*l>ri .1. -trnii. >.l it active raanunerat ion Apply to BradMl 51.—n. M.V a>dto.ftat4. ftch Mare* Hanrlatla. •ch Flunklyn D R Brh TtmaOhy A H. Van Mia-tman, rich Wonderful oninieiior. Mr* Ral n ba w M Bah W :le D..i'e. I .lairim I Brh %  lay li. Bah %  _B I. Keleeo. MV OR \ HI.. Var-it Cariahae nRPARTVRIJI t. h Belojuawn. 44 tana nat Cap'. MISCELLANEOUS NOTICE l\i l-ll OF HT. lilt Ing Paiochial and Hlghwa* taaaa to thla pail* are Baked, li pay tha aamo without further deUyoi they wul be raUarled aceordlng to l*w O I. DF.ANE. Bpj IT.., NOIICE Wl '*" OF T PPTXR TF_--inLMS will be received by the 111 The aupply of Fre.h Milk In bulk for %  ha AlauhouM <*' Tha mtpp.. of Me-llelne and Drilll for ma Almahouat and outdoni BMMhM III The conveyance of paupers (ai To and |t„ m thr Almabouaa U and from any pail of the P-ttdi loi To and from the Almahoui* or any part of the Pariah to and from tha (inur.il lluaullul Hi Tha Burial of Pauper a to the Omrtcr, fn-n the Almahouat or any part of the pen-t. %  Jgnad O *x COHniN. Clark of the Poor Lew Guardlam. Peter BtSI—4n LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The appliealion of Okaaerl Jonaa. holder M U KB Licence No Ml of 1M61. granted to him In reaprct ^f bolloin Boor of e two Btorev waiKlen totMinf In R.i.t,-.. Road. St Michael, for pennlaaton to u*e "aid Liquor Ureiiae ut board and 'hiitglr •i.i.n wiili aited altached ut Klngi ftraal. alt. Michael Ihtted thla Mrd bay al February IM) TO %  A MrijBfjp, E-q. Police Magiktratr. Iti-( "A" Slgnad GIIJIERT JONTB. ., .. a. .. Applicjnl N.B—Tin* appllcalton will be ( niMered nt a Llcenalng Court to be held at Police Court. Dlatrwt "A" on Monda.' the lih d.v ..f March M*1. al II o'clock. E A M.IXOD Police Mai'U-rata. DUt MI ITIII. ir SAl.i;s RATH*. — In Porcelain Enamel. WitBa. Gracn. Prtmoii> with mjtchlna urdM to complete rilour tultia. Tan iradc. A. BAHNES & Co, Ltd M.ISI-ff. mart wit CURTAIN FITTINGS— For i dow (tiling. IIB.-.I control. Valance* am • Iraperle*. By Klrach. Dial 44T8 A PARKER At CO.. LTD. 111.51-1 fi HIVING MASKS -ID rach obUlnfhla tn the Toy Dept. al Cave Shepherd -1-5? "* MISI-t.fn. DCSCHIRNS SYRUP Albnani I do not hold .. -*elf %  ••poi..llile loi tier ... ., . tnctuig r>, ,i.i,i .^ debt* In my name il-law by a written order l agratd bv me Signed CHARIX.1 fUCWTTT, UVub.uv. |(o.„| PVhwtok Gap. %  -•. M.h.,.1 34 HI 3n LOST GOLD CHAD.' ~ A .1 Strnnd Gold • ham necklace, down* week-end of IMh 1'idjruai.v. Anv.-ir givlnc tiiwro> rdtovpn of MI* HI be well i.-* j..1. to nropeity at King'* rHieel called ombay (nttage it conatata ol u Wall Verandah. Dialing and Dining Boon %  ., > Badrooent, Bath. Ktlchan. Water and l4pm Uth February 1MI. AltriON PAUL OF BOl'SB on Wedncday next the Mth I a clock on the *pol at Wnter Hall L Eagle Hall. One 10 x 1 houta In good condition. Mint be aold. D'Arcp. A. Scott. Auctioneer. :u si—an Tha iinderaUtned will act up for aalc I their office No U High Strap!. Bildgi %  own. on Ftiday the Snd day of Maid 1H1. at 1 pm. Tha dwelltoBhouw called 'Mum. ••dge'* wiih the land thereto containing by aatlinaili>n 9HI -a, leet. Utuale al Upper Bay Street. Pi. Michael, the real •nra ol the late A. C. flreevr* Inipectinn by appointment with Ml** Ida Greave-. Telephone No. BM0. For further particular" and condition. 1 -ale. apply to :— COTTLI, CATFORD TO lOlSl-lOn. UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER HALE* IN MAUN TUaVDAY Slh Rale by older of IJi gaeiia. II High Itrvct nlaTSSDAV Dth-Mra Chafre* i d.imi Sale "The Rhonda' 1 Worthing THURSDAY Mia* M. Matalah* •tewart VI lie". Rock ley TDTBOAY lh-S.le at the Mahal urn Hem Oa .. h.ar, • Geneva ". O* RKANKrlt. TROTHAN CO.. REAL ESTATE ON THE SEA al Oardan, BL Jamaa Modern Bung.low. i bedroom*, two batna. Overlooking Bea. own private nothing beach. Good Yacht SrWhofaga J-hone Ul-M ISIil||n PR HRRDFUI, -War. InBallon am aienu-Btaivalton baaed oa Diplomac cnolher word far Hvpocrl*,Bargain • re aim on My LIH .,„ | „„, B :moal ol tha Blrk Ll.t C.ra^ Tl hew 3 Bedroom Beml..t,-ed ('..iwrat. BUWI IB P N.-.r Clly. &d location Going lo. „nder 11.1 to A torpe 3 bedroom cottage al Thoiiibniv Hill, Main Rd neat Plai.i. Otallna. Modeli lur Under EM0. A l-nBli. Rurineoa Residence m Tudor St.. Goto. lor under a: !.: %  . A Small I To pert v near Country Kd. Yield* Ml.P> pin. Going for Under SI.MXi A.moat New 1 Bed loom Stonewall Buigaiow Tvpe at Fonuballe. (to,,* f OI Ull# >, tijgp A Z Bedroom Cottage inot oldi by FonUbelle Going for Under £1.100. A 3 Bedroom. Ipoaatbl* 4' at ll.ialinn. Main Rd.. Going for Under (IM). A i Bedroom al B.wkin.. Main Kd near Blue Water Tarrace. Going for Under fS 100. Almoat New 3 lledroom and a New 1 Bedroom Stonewall Bung.low* Garden*. Going lor Under ClRM and £a.W A Deniable „nd J>bnoat New Bui.gr.iov, in Navy Garden*, Going for Undei £iow. An Ideal antf .-ibf-nl ..I / Btorai S roall ne... V%  • Garden*. Suitable tor Plata. Gueal Itonw Of a Medico, aboul 1 Acre*. Going lor Under £4 V0 C Me for New Stonewall galow* iScasidr and near the Sea' Building bn... Re-Bale Value* Brad IM '. %  .%  Mi ., i DMI III de Abrwi. a Baal iNol Shaani EatoU' let. Auctioneer Si Vulurr re Bough Halting*. BEMERSYDE. SI Lawrence Gap. Chrtat • ".I.I ear tha Cabta Stalion. The d elllnghouae compel*** large drawing and dining room*, ihrre he running water In each .on* with a prlvat. betm ae|rale toilet and bath, am kitchen Open verandah* to tha laend the North and a cloned vernndah lo the Honih on (ha aeaHdeThrag -rvant %  room*, auap aid fei no yard, which algo cortUine oeoonul and rrnlt tree. The property i. ritiaaled on c opular coaat In lite filrind with pcrfecl ra-bathing For appointment* lo view and for furthor particular! ring MSB, B. 8 Nlcholla A Co Solicitor* 2ft 3 31 I I | The %  ufe.untai block of commai building, .tundlftg on 13.14H -q. ft land with frontage on Broad Sti Prince Alfred Si. and Chapa) St. property ol Central Foundry Limited and tenanted bv Brituh Hat. Shoo Co M Altnuin A Son. Ud K II llunte t Co Ltd and other* Tha undenlgnad will offer the i preinlae* hv public ranipellUan at offlca. 17 High St Bridgetown, on Thur.. day. g March. 1MI |pn Further jiartlmlar* fromCOTTI* CATFORD CO,. S,.llcu,.,. 11 a II —Tn Tha parcel of land containing in luare feel with the Rulldlnga theteon tuate In l^ica. "Itreel. Bridgetown, adfining the propeilv of the BarbadoTelephone Company Limited nnd ad pre-ei I aaHpM %  • to part hv the Obaereer N.watiaprr and aa lo part by Ua> faeton The nroperiv Will be fl up for aale al our off.-, on Thunday. lal March 1MI. 'napoction bp appucaBea to the tenFor further particular* and condltli Uto. apply to — COTTlJt CATFORD A CO., No. 17 High Street. Baldgrtowii 14JII-lln VinrnN prNr.AI.OW Overlooking Coll cMmar 1 Bedroom. Drawing and Dining Room* Gal let v. Oarage and Gordon NlcholU Telephone SUP Ml Ml f. SHAKES V Rliarra Barbado* Ship ping A, Trading CO Umlted MB Share* lurb-doa Co-operative Cotton Factory limited IM Share. Barbado. Fire Intiiranee Co. Umlted M Bharei B*-hndo. Foundry Llmlled. 61 Boar Bnrbadoa Ice Co Untiled IIP Shan Ki.ighla Umlted IIS Sh.re* Barbado* Telephone Co UmlUd Tha abovo ahatea will be offered pvibltr competition on Friday nr>l Bid March null, at 1 pm. at the oAce of the uniter*l|fneil. CAPH1NGTOK A tr.AI V 1 II..,* Slr^rl tlfal f> UN ARIAMB.All glaaa 'I'h glaaa front Large medi.-.. v %  •• „,... jrd '.,1'PcrN atopj ,.,. Sa-iin, Phone Oil aej^ZsrV W JEFFREYS RFFR complete wllh Inner peart) tloni at Mc each delivered to the Warahooaa of S |*. Muaaon. Bon m Co Ltd. ptorhead la 1 >l-Pn W Touch With Bavrbsdo* Coastal Stntion ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Sal'tog from Am-terdam. Dov-r am lahruary. 1PM MS, <44h. 1Mb Btoicli 1ML Balkng from Ank 'Mawaa'llto. 1Mb. Februau-y IMI. % %  a. "WBtomal.Migt„. |Mh F.t.ru-ry IMI. to-a. -OrwijaataW' Mh. IM.', Match IMI •aBiaag to Trinidad. Par.maribo and i. .. %  ar> IMI in.*. CoMitU.' Atk. tebruary IMI; ma. %  MMlSrd March IMI Balling to Trinidad. La GWara. Curacao ate—an* -OraniMUtTlat FoMawT IMMFIHATE CASH for diamond 1-wal•1 Oilna. .ilver and BhadMeH Plate. MM or call at GORRtNots, ma Royal Ya.ht Club ^ SB-f.SI-~T.r-N. JatMfDlATE CASH for btoke n Jw. Ilet". i.ikl nuggela. coin*, miniaturejade Old B W I Stamp* GORRINaEsi Antlqie Shop. Dl.il 44ft. FRENCH LINE %  afJUNQi TO I Sf.l AM. | K\M I < IX)AIBIEi Marrh 12lh via Martininque anrl Guadclot.pt KIND (0.MIII I/MBT 'I.' J.I-^I r*t MM net* Brar.rb. i f-ll-4* Tt-c Cortm .1 K BAVU dtract in. ARC M. %  • %  ai TritiBdsr Frbrasrj 210 ut 430 p.m. Allention is drawn to the Control o( Lumber Price* (Defence) 'Amendment) Order. 1951. No. 2 which iil be publigrhtd in the Oman! Gazette of Monday 26lh February. 1951. will be received b Arraigned up to lha IMh d.iv o Ml tor the building HI." n g bind not Included. HOMMd I CoaM Ch. Ch. Tha Purchiiarr I. IM the building* a,W Gre(, Fonn S\ Andrew all UOUal conicrurn.en. (landing on ) .uoru.lmat.u i c.e with well eelab } llahed irult lieea Ideal altualton too lact abovo era level For further t"rI tlculnra Teleph. .e 40T1 or 4TM. I'MI lUMintNG Iftoag two .torey Mild wall building, ault a ..dnroa or private reudrnc* .alely 3 ucipa of land. tl*. rhrny, government waier. dairy totl. l-cioii. yard 'enclo*edi fruit im>. egnabla garden with modern inigaUon ntt fan mill and double range Ajiplv Wllllama Conn", opi front j lioaiitiful Selection of... I'RWIK A IIVMN BOOKR-Km-ll. Medium and Large MM available t„ tnr r.illowinr >iBalltle I < J'? P ..* V t Priw> rw i< fn. •* Med. t.iiility : |> rirW Leather liu iin, 1IVMNS \ ROBERTS SI 32 from II 90 to 1 04) 1'rleea ranging from $3 It to IS AS Including While Bark Book* — ALSO M. with Ml'Slr from 9.1 JO to 94.W wjsi-'p r |0 lb Md>#4> V. II. 11 o \\ I I I I.I Mhl I! & HARI)Y\ Ut| *^U*t*<*<*%', > IU Street %  MM M \ luMiRA-puie Hill Eatate Sm ra BMr bwUt coral afito Mmgaiclect icWdentlal area, haal dMlgiieU and ennatructed bv a reputable llmi of Contractor*. 1 'built-in wardrobe*' dining room, tiled .-.,1 i,,... BI-liniNtl LAND — Nr.il.v dge of cacarp .. -.--> Morgan. Ideal tor goad etna a property. planted with fruit lieu*. 1 targe reception rooma. 4 bedrooma. 1 galletiea. kitchen. 1 bathroom*, etc. Centrally located and luitab'.e •rdon into ftaU or board"BOCK IIIMIO' ..., Hill A well maintained and productive Eataia ol aome 3f acre. M a v-i, lovely po*iuoti 3 mile, from City. The houee la worthy ol asocial Holloa aad pa .a*i. gra*vt charm It. g.i.tjl condition la BaaMaWM aoaclou* accommoda;",i, h ,, h A ,. JtaA itone and limber houar, ippro*. !.*) M R, Eiii-ioaol UAL ESTATE AGENT AlCTKIM I It PLANTATIONS Rl II IIIM. I'll.im;i.iii



PAGE 1

PACE FOUR SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2S, 1S1 askjbr Cussons TALCUM POWDER Stollmeyer Forces Barbados BARBADOS STRUGGLED FOR RUNS YESTERDAY Batsmen On The Defensive Hut Itarbados Still In Good Position BY O. S. COPPIN • It* I MUST lead oft my comment on the fourth days play in the first Trinidad-Barbados Test which A %  pencd at Kensington on Wednesday, with immediate reference to yesterday's play. The prim ipa] topic in We*l Indian crlcHel circles now. for the matches were broadcast, n probably %  BatV* tactics employed yesterday that so slowed down the powerful tall scoring Barbados run-making machine, spearheaded hy Weekes, Walcott and Roy Marshall, that in an innings lasting for three beurs and a half Barbados was only able lo score 122 runs in 210 minute • TIGHT. MKNSIVI F1KLD A REALLY tight defensive Held, nhTflnualj carefully thought out and persistent negative bowling by Prior Jones and Asgarali. were the principal weapons used. King assisted in the afternoon when Jones was tiring and he also followed the plan quite well nlthough he mixed some irritating non-scnslcal bowling with it. u sHcmrvz VACATION IN GRENADA $105.80 INCLVBE$ 8WIA round tnp fo'C f n>ohl oi Iht lu. NO Ante Beach. : .: %  Grand Itl.XMI. FOR JEFF eyer for hh> Uetlra a*> the malerUy the spur ml Uw BARBADOS TRINIDAD — 363 and (for 3 wkts.) 122 279 f CANNOT i.i.n,.,Ntoll Barbadian ciiekel fan* have been doing ... %  ••snent; nor HD I give those who booed the bowlers *y credit for 8 e,Un 8 hsvin, done •• One day has already been lost in this scheduled five day game. There is only one day remaining for play. Trinidad have already been led on the first innings by 84 runs. With Barbados playing at I home, under conditions better known to them than to the visitors. I and possessing an admittedly Inferior batting learn to that of Barbados, well what me the most logical tactics for Trinidad to adopt than %  lines and hope for a draw? A struggle for rung was a feature of the day's play at Kensington yesterday. It was the fourth day of play in the Barbados-Trinidad cricket match, play not having been possible on Friday on account of rain. When stumps were drawn Barbados was 122 for three wickets in their second innings, and with a lead of 84 runs on the first innings, Trinidad already has 206 runs to make. In half an hour yesterday Trinldad's remaining 4 batsmen were played out the over. King conback in the pavilion, having added if !" *? l . Marshall who hit the 21 runs to Trinidad's score of 258 !" Iball to One leg for 4 to send for wickets si the close of play "P n in 14 minutes. The batsman on Thursday. The 4 wickets went played out the remainder of the to Carl Mullins and Norman Marover. .shall, each getting 2. Jackblr bowled to Hunt* using These bowlers and Roy Marshall three men short on the leg side were responsible for the fall of 9 The bowler moved the boll nicely wickets. Each took 3. Roy's was at away from the middle stump t< a cost of 25 runs, Norman's at a leg but the batsman evaded the cost of 37 and Mullins' at a coat trap. This over was another of 68. Errol Milllngton took the remaiden by Jackblr. King bowlec %  naming wicket for 33 runs. to Marshall again from the Screer Barbados' batsmen found runEnd the batsman getting a single ' ,n he r of the seventh ball. The last kept cket. Trail) ow outside the wicket and Hunte dad resorted to a negative attack played over for the most part and in the first Marshall cover drove Jackblr'* hour_of play only 33 run* were mrd dflUvery tor „ lng|c aIld scored. Coll IWIA lo* detail* ol ^psool rotei for chikf'tn cud even cheaper oil tnclwtivc teu* to the fond Hard. BWIA BRITISH WEST MIAN AIRWAYS O 10WER MOM) STREET BRICOHOWN I he Home Furnishing Depart menl of William Fogarly Limited. AnnmiiH *•> Ml EASTER PARADE OF VALUES lor Ihc Family. • M\I)i:lRV KAMI KMBHOIDF.RKD IIEDSPREADS (flu 108) ..ml two I'll.LOW CASKS @ (55.68 per Sri MAIM 1R\ II.WI) I Mlll!(lllli;Ki:i> DINNER SET (13 Pieces) — T.AHI.K CLOTH 72 SO Colour : Ben '< % %  SI24.HO per Sel MADURA HANI) I MIIRUIUKKED DINNER SET (9 Pfea) — T.MII.K CLOTH 54 X M Colour : While @ $53.00 per Sel MADEIRA HAND I MI.IKIIDI 1111) TEA SET (7 PIMM) II A CLOTH 31 X 54. fulmir : Eeru @ 518.48 per Sel MADEIRA HAND EMRSOIDESED TEA SET (7 Pieces) — TEA CLOTH 45 .-• 45 j SI8.16 per Sel NADEUU HAM) I.MIIKOIDKKED LUNCHEON BET (1.1 Pieces) — fl 516.211 per Sel MADURA HAM) 1.MBKOIDKRLD COCKTAIL S;:T (H Pieces) — @ 87.55 per Sel MADURA HAND LMBKOIDKKED TKAV CLOTHS !,i< J2.ll. S2.77. & $3.10 Each Those Ni'l> :ire of Pure Linen and milv one Sel of rath is ill Slock. ONUS ON BARBADOS ,N the other hand. If Barbados, with these conditions In their favour, repared to play safe and make no real attempt to cope with the problem, I see no reason why Jeffrey Stollmeyer should not aid and abet them In this. The onus I contend was upon the Barbadian batsmen to try and force the pace and nol for Ihc Tnniilad bowlers to make thing's easy for them and see a huKC score piled up and all the fans at Kensington thrill to lofty slices and pile driver fours at the expense of the Trinkladlans. DID WE NOT DO SO TOO? D ID we nol commend the West Indies for luring Yorkshire Into defeat when the same Prior Jones and Worrell on the 1B50 lour adopted leg theory tacUcs and won from Yorkshire although they .'.in. in a really comfortable position for scoring a win from the West Indies? Stollmeyer took a chance and It has eome nff. up to the present. He gambled on not using Clarence Skecte. so successful with his slow right arm spinners in the Itrst innings and Ferguson, another tried and witv slow leg-break bowlei. BARBADOS STII I. IN QOOD POSITION AS it stands now Barbadof are still 206 runs.'ahead and if they il can get some quick runs early on Monday or If the wicket shows signs of wear over the week-end, well then they jire In a good position still for forcing a win. The Trinidad fielding yesterday was excellent. Jeffrey Stollmeyer again set his men nn excellent example. Skecte failed to hold .i difficult running catch from Walcott and thin proved to be the unly real flaw In the excellence of the performance of the team as a whole. HUNTE PROMISING H UNTE'S debut as an opening batsman promises great things. It Is true that he was missed on a few occasions but this does not Justify the spate of irresponsible nonsense that has been suggested %  bOUl the value of his Innings in some sporting circles. Rig fielding has been up to a high standard too. Clyde Walcolt's 77 was made at u time when Barbados needed someone to stay there and put some stiffening in the batting and It is to his credit that he did so Weekes' brilliant 75 could scarcely have been possible had not Clyde stood there after Barbados was one wicket down with only ten runs on the tins. fell in quick succession, and later when It waa 55 Everton Weekes nun out. Clyde Walcott and Good Fielding the bowler oft" guard. Marshall The Trinidad fielding was good, skied the seventh delivery high No gifts were given the batsmen. „n the leg side but none of the The bowling was steady and nelders got to the ball. Neither of lomewhat difficult. Prior Jones th e stamen at this period seemed vho sent down 11 oven of which quite at ease. live were maidens got one of the King's next over yielded four ickets for 14 runs and Nyron runs, three going to Marshall. In Asgarali whlo sent down 19 overs Jackbir's next over Marshall ruluding 3 maidens took tho cover drove the second ball beaut Iither for 55 runs. fully for two and later cut _. gully for n single. Huntc played The Start out the over. At 12.15 Guillen 10 and FerAsgarali came on In place of guaon who had not yet opened his Klna from the screen End with account, continued Trinidad's first uie score at 28, Marshall placing ngs whieh stood at 258 for the. the nrst ball nicely to fine leg for of 6 wickets Mlllington bowl2. He singled the next and Huntc CLASS BATSMANSIUP His strokes all around the wicket were the very epitome of class batsmanship and he was fittingly dismissed off a cheeky stroke and a magnificent catch on the dettp line leg boundary by Legall. I should like to make some record of Goddurd's fine effort In scoring 6(1 at a crucial period of the innings when it seemed that the fortunes of the game, winch up to a short time before was In the hands of Barbados, had suddenly swung in favour of Trinidad. He showed flashes of his old batting form once he had got his in. His setting of the Held was excellent in the opinion of competent judges of the game. JEFF AND ANDY COMFORTABLE F OR Trinidad Jeffrey Stollmeyer and Ganteaume were quite ci fortablc, although Andy had the unnerving experience of having been served up a snorter by Mullins in the first ball he received. BETTER START Thay gave Trinidad a better start than the Barbados opening 1*11 but Stollmeyer <33) was bowled by a cleverly flighted ball from Mlllington when he looked set for big things and Andy after defendg soundly for 56 was bowled by one of the cleverest balls of the tournament, bowled to him by Hoy Marshall, a top spinner that was delivered almost with the action of an offbreak. Tangchoon. a sheet anchor .(m Trinidad] for many years now not In un unaccustomed role when he shouldered a lot of a big slice of the batting responsibility idler Trinidad had lost some of their best batsmen. He cut. drove, hooked and gently pushed for slngli to top score with a valuable 69. WM. FOGARTY LTD IIIiAMNG I-INKN-DRAPERS. SELECT THESE I \Rl.Y .... SlmoiiiHU A Klrener Chami.i* A Poli.liiin. ( lot ITS Bark I'D .Lamps Spot Lamps Trie lor Lamps llluminalrd Fender Guide* Jrwrli-i! ( \luu-t Pipe Extension* M line Wheel Covers Damper Jacks Ore*. C Volt & II Vail Horns Mlr-.de Adhesive Tart**) (irlndlnr Compound Mr.h.nirs, Hearing Mile Cylinder Black lies! Rckhdlni I'alal I-Uke Graphite riuxite Battery Troten Isaltel KblM Brass Shim Natal Body Solder Plane and Blades — ASM — Dccarhonirlnc tiasket Srta for all popula; and American Cars and Trucks ECKSTEIN BROTHERS l.r.GALI, LOOM II WELL R ALPH LEGALL I have never seen look bcllcr. He runs In a complacently confident ind elegant innings, persistence %  n the part of M rored 48 ImpcUibrought about he drove over a still :>&ity on his part liia c..smlssal when at 48 and going great gu 0M from Mullins well up mid was twwled. I think that it should now be freely conceded that Mullins on hi* bowling performanrc in this match has justified the confident. which a few of the local sporting public repose in him and Is now not only a certainty for the next Teat but 1 am sure that he has engaged the attention of the Selectors. Clarence Skeete, too 1 must place In this class. Ferguson wa. good on the first day but we must wait and see what we shall see before the tournament is over. •i single off King's next over. Marshall drove the second ball of Jackbir's next MISSED GALLOPS All Because Of A Simple Switch Key t£ BY BOOKIE T LAID my pla arefully. I packed a bag the night before so that 1 would not have to return home after attending the mornings gallops also shaved and laid out the clothes which I %  ould wear to the track. Then I placed my bag and typewriter at the back door so that I would take off with a swooshNext I phoned the Night Editor and left a message with him to give the Circulation Manager to phone me at 5 30 sharp. After a bit of reading I retired at about 10 p.m. 1 awoke at 5 a.m. Staggered Into the bath. etc.. dressed and Dy the time Yny phone call came through I had my hat on. Stop watch In hand I was rearing to go. "No blooming trainer or Jockey •j going to put one on me this morning". I thought to myself. I opened the back gate, flung the garage doors wide and gave my dog a shout of warning to get out of the way. Into the car 1 jumped It was then that I discovered that I had left the engine switches on from the afternoon before. That, I put It to you dear reader, is one of the most exasperating things that can ever happen to a man. and, certainly the worst that can be so described In my career as a racing Journalist. %  "[MIE above may not, at ilrst glan 1 tl Skipper Goddard then played out KSr'for a'&rThut flow £? Mm aUo ol ,u *** t b Umcaddina 87 powicr for a brace but a low re.., h Inad arrone ,. m enIs ^'-" ^ r n L ^!.,i he J. our 1 __5 ,,, L*l U A h A NOTHER interesting ga seem to have much to do with the forthcoming Spring meeting of the B.T.C.. but it explains why I missed the majority of the most important gallops last day morning. I am therefore still in the dark about several of the leading candidates entered for our March fixture. For Instance 1 wanted specially to see the work of Burns. I am told tha; he galloped in company with Sun Queen and Wat th live was done in about 1.14 This time figure may be Incorrect but it I significant that our friend Gun Site was not called upon to give die big horse a work out. Evidently something sharper over a spnn. was required and that aught lo tell us that Burns is going to show us his capacity for sprint and middle distance racing. I should tiuin. his chances at both will be equally as flood. But I promise that i ,. will make every effort, or should I say "a renewed effort", to <• P 851 tno him gallop ut full speed before next Saturday Is upon us ,>e made crranaemenls to Wave the switch kcya on the car scat". A NOTHER interesting gallop i missed was that of Bow Bells and Best Wishes. 1 am told they worked a little more than a box ed the first over from the povilic end and Guillen took a single— the only one of the over off the the third delivery. Mullins took over from the played the remaining balls. Stollmeyer brought on Jonet from the Pavilion End making r double change. He bowled to Marshall who made a single to f T!? T d .. and i -, Ch l 1?!*'L CO !~ *'* <"* <"< %  Mcond del lected easy singles. Millingtoi next over also yielded a single, w 'die Mullins yielded Iwo. With the total at 264, Goddard brought on Norman Marshall I played out the over. The first hou produced 33 runs. I .<•:: Field Jones continued from tiv Mlllington at the paviuon end. HP*vlllon End to Marshall am bowled to Guillen who edged the bowled to a leg Held, the bull niovflrst and Mullins at first slip held a in away from the middle stump low one-handed catch to dismiss •* %  •*• The over, was a maide him for 12. Asgarali bowled to Hunte and the Sidney Jackblr, Trinidad's left s '*ih ball was edged through slips hand batsman filled the breach and 'or a single. Marshall raised the got a single through the slips, next delivery to Jones at mid-on Ferguson snicked for three and a and the fielder made no mistake. leg bye sent the score to 268. Marshall's score was 20 and he Jackblr, facing Mullins. was howhad been at the wicket for 71 r Ibw with the first he received minutes. He hit one 4 during his and the scoreboard read 269—8—1. stay. The total was now 35 for 1 Junes the incoming batsman was wicket quickly off the mark with a single Clyde Walcott Joined Hunte and to mid-off and was then given an played out the over. Trinidad additional four as the result of an palmed their second victim when over throw. Ferguson square cut Jones In his next over got the one beautifully from Mullins wicket of Hunte. The batsman hit which was brilliantly stopped by low to Skeete fielding nt short leg Hunte at point. He then took a and was well taken with his score single to square leg and went at 15. Hunte had been at the down to face Marshall who sent wicket for 79 minutes and hit 2 down „ a ma 'den. fours Hunte's downfall was : Mullins continued from the maiden wicket for Joneg. The screen end and his first delivery total was unchanged, knocked back Jones' off stump Everton Weekes Joined Walcott and the score read 275—9—5. and opened his account with nn King Joined Ferguson and hookedge through slips for 4 off Asgaed one from Mullins to fine leg rail. He played out the remainder for a single to open his account. of the over. Jones' next over war Ferguson then played out the rea maiden to Walcott. Only n single mainder. King got a single off was made off A*gnralis next over Marshall's first lo cover and anthis going to Weekes. The scoring other couple as the result of an at this period was very slow as the overthrow. bowlers kept a steady length and Ferguson lifted the fourth bal! Oic fielders gave nothing awuVf from Marshall into the hands of Jones continued to bowl tronMillmgton at mid off and the "ie Pavilion End and Weekes got Innings closed at 12.48 for 279 2 twos on file leg side in the over made m 302 minutes Ferguson In AsgaraU's next over Walcott had scored 7 while King carried and Weekes got 4 runs each to the his bat for 4. long on boundary sending up 50 Barbados Ratting; '" 100 minutes. Barbados opened their seconci n Jones' next over Weekes hit innings at 1.40 p.m. with Roy lu mld-on and called for a run. Marshall and Conrad Hunte r ran down the wicket but Sampath look the field for GanWalcott failed to set off. Stollteaume. Jackblr started the attack meyer fielding the ball returned from the Pavilion End to Rov sharply 'or wicket-keeper Guiller Marshall and sent down a maiden to throw down the wicket. Weekc: to the batsman. was 14 when he was run out an< Frank King then bowled from had been at the wicket for 27 the Screen End to Hunte who reminutes. Three wickets had now turned the second delivery to the fallen for 55 runs and Skippei bowler. King failed lo take an Goddard Joined Walcott. 1* easy catch, however, and Huntc played out the over which was o cover drove his next ball to the maiden. boundary. He cut the last ball ol Two other maidens were bowled the over uppishly through slipi in succession, one by Asgarali for another boundary. the other by Jones. Jones had Marshall on-drove Jackbir> now sent down eight overs first ball rur a single and Hunte m On Page 5 to box and that at the beginning Best Wishes looked the easier of the two, but at the finish Bow Bells was fresher. This sounds very much like what I expected as it looks to me as If Bow Bells is going to prow herself an extraordinary good four-year-old creolo nlly and any three-year-old who can go with her for any part-of a distance mus-. be something good. In addition to that the track was decKUdly heavy and Best Wishes is not noted for stamina yet. For this reason she cannot be my favourite for the Guineas. At least not unlesa I see anything In the next week to cause me to think differently about her • %  Belter still, / am pot no to sleep u-ith Ihe sicifch keys under mu pillou'". I ALSO MISSED the British Guiana candidate Vlndima who did a good gallop with Atomic II. This mare Vlndima, it might pay us to remember, did very well in British Guiana last May when the track was in a thoroughly wet condition. I have not seen her t<> bag) idvantage in Trinidad, as the first time she was not yet thoroughly acclimatised, whlio on the second occasion, which was last Christmas, she was still recovering after being off colour at the B.G. October meeting. It is possible therefore that she may show us good i up here and naturally her gallop yesterday may have been a pointer to this. Here then Is another Important on) I must see before race day. . . "1 thought 1 would also per a crank handle and a spare battery lust in case". P ERHAPS the most impressive gallop I missed, from all reports, was a box to box, or more, by Usher and Vanguard. The son of Dunusk and Maid of Honour. Usher, was far loo much for Vanguard and from the start he was bounding along while the latter found il difficult to keep near him. I am much surprised to henr this and perhaps pleasantly so, first because only last November it was all that usher could do lo catch Vanguard at the finish, being nowbtra MM him at the start; and secondly, while there is no great surprise about this, it is pleasing to think that a line as successful in the West Indies cs that tracing back to the mare Maid should still be so nctlve in producing good ones. One only has to mention the name of Footpad and think of what r.e did both in racing and at the stud to realise what Maid did through her male representatives. Then Just to show her dominant Influence think of her daughter Bridesmaid, and her grand daughter Maid of Honour and remember what they did on the track, Can Usher live up to such a reputation? It is left to be seen, but I did notice the other morning that he looked better than the .imported lllly Arunda in a lollop and it Is to be that yesterday Arunda finished much better than Lunways in a sprint at five furlongs. Possibly we have in Usher the horse to make the Guineas more thnn a match race between Cross Roads and Best Wishes. He is another I must place on my priority list for next week f hare arnrnped for a tail to stand bu". S PEAKING of Cross Roaas U it one which I did see yesterday morning and what I saw makes him remain, in my estimation, n strong favour,te for the Guineas. Since I wrote about him last he has improved in appearance and that pastiness which he had on returning from Trinidad has disappeared. He also shows n bit of perspiration which is a very good sign indeed. Ills companion yesterday was Ability and it was evident that he was very easv to her. If la not every day that we have three-ye>ir-old Creoles "who exercise with imporieds and make them look like ihe lesser lights. A NOTHER gallop which deserves special mention was one by a. Demure and Abberford. For the latter (who is one of those I must apologise lo for a misprint which described him as a "mule") IhingH were not really so good. But I would not say that he ran badly and therein lies the Irue merit of his companion's performance for she simply left him behind. It is therefore very distressing to think that she may lie troubled by some wind ailment as otherwise I would ray we are about to see another like Secret Treasure, Social Gossip or any of the fastest fillies of the past that can be brought to mind. 1 think the first B class race will be a hack canter for her, providing frhc can last long enough. A FTER apologising to Abberford I cannot do less than the same to good old Slainte who was also described in like manner. Yesterday he went with Miss Panic nnd this fillv once again impressed me that ahe will have a lot to do with Ihe finish of the Maiden Stakes. She is much harder than she was last November and as the majority of her opponents are Just as she was then, I think (he will be able to handle them easily. There I must let the matter rest. 1 did see a few other eallnp but I must leave some space for a special announcement. Until 0 0_m. next Wednesday ihen s leep tiphi". STAR WITNESS ARRIVES TO-DAY *X*HE Barbados Turf Club stallion Star Witness' arrives from EngA land to-day and will be stabled at the pnddock for a few days before he is sen! into the country. By Fair Trial out of Speckle, bv Solario out of Postmark, by Friar Marcus. Ihis horse was bred and raced in the colours of Miss Dorothy Page! In England H, s fOrm I naked eve We shall try and get n picture for to-morrow', for you between the camera man and myself. paper PH0SFERINE for a quick convalescence w*hen the body's reserves are brought low by influenza or other debiutaung illness, and convalescence threatens to be a slow business. PHOSFERINE can do much lo replace energy and strength. PHOSFERINE exercises its fine tonic powers by coaxing ihe appetite, providing the gentle stimulus to get things going "g^i", So rc-.-p.'nsivc is the body to the help of PHOSFERINE tiiat improvement may be looked for almost immediately— and every day will bring signs of returning s tTengrh. In liquid or tablet form, ii drops of PHOSFERINE equal 2 tablets. THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS for Oterss/on. Dbillt r Inrfifsstion •p lnfi..o Slnpl.ima. *



PAGE 1

' ^ M M>\V riI!Rr\RV 23. 1931 SI Sliw ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN Hi i .AI.I. Our 'Ladies Of The Lamp' Work All Night IN THE MATRON'S OFFICE Bister out drug* to the night Nurses. Barbara Judge was girtng RXCRPT fur the sound of some and sixteen a night, tu: ail the nurses agree that "Saturday : night Ig the busies, night of the week." in the Matron's offlce the NLghl Sister. Wrs. Burbnru Judge, was g.v.ng out orus to the nurses. Tee dispenser does noi normally work at night so drugs -v.. which may have to t night are kepi in the Mali i ofnee The surgtiy *j. bcin. for an emergen< v I looked In Were, ai d the mm** of apparatus laid out ;.nd r the brflllant circle if llgh'i looked rat: er Mghtening Thi ao manv inatrunwatg in t i caufc not help wondering hov thi geon over found tha irie l.oUi*e asleep, but thr nurso had wakt-n one up to take her pulse. The night nurses (there are tl work from T.30 p.in to fi 3d a in with one hour off for a meal and rest during the night The next o.t\ the Secretary told me that tl*.Barbados Qetu l Hospital WHS (iWIHU.i .1111*' oul come of o public meattnf hald in 18SK whan It ... %  %  icJ the attar d < ot Soclr'.*.' in tin'. Island :' %  let m'cessarv, for idnit* humanity, to establish an tabs a general Hunpitni for-nho i.m treatment %  opened, and uith thi raised Carl) I .mting on 'ui %  | t .ilf of land, was 1 was eon to wards, apartments for %  %  Matron, a roi-civiiiR room for .nd aecornniodaUon for %  ttatxjaAt*. A new there were six i.ard*. was added. Bv 1918 tha Hupital could pro %  %  imodallon i. %  tients and thena To daj Ibe beds hax-e Increased to 326 (31* of which are usually filled) and hag been mad.rank -i otAcei although only four are in residence at the mo •nent White in .HIS there were 38 nurse%  • %  ( 'i' i in iivi.iiiiicd nuraee I % %  ..t the Hoi 111 and than ire TH ..i ItgdJUBg, i thg :.iiT i I In lha last ( a thai tha i %  %  badi have not been inereaa d In >ti,uwi'tibii to ih.' miinuer louuir%  id jt M-. tltatai the year %  treeaed, arhtla ID %  i itl has increases iremendously m mil" then 25,000 and last 15.000. Wh' tinIneraaaa, are we be coming mote unhealthy ai th< years go by*' No. tajr*. Superintendent in his rt 1949 50 "Th* i indication that there hat been on; deterioration In Ihe health of th' Island, and thf great Ii the number of patient': dealt witi in* explauuvJ crease in the demand '<>.Hoaplta attention advance in medical and surgical techniqu ami the ugfl of new drugs hav sh.rtenol thr i\ paUanti froan IS to ever, the -mi rent ill long list of people waiting fo %  F;*tc4r T %  I i A wise mother lets baby decide ibout the milk for bottle feeds. Lota of energy, iteadj tains, contented days, peaceful nights — these tell her what she most wanu to know — baby ii doing ipleodi Jly on CHtermilk. Why can soother pin bar fahh M finely %  OsMnnllk t Because, where breast RMdlng U difficult or Impossible it Is the parhct substitute for mother's milk. Ostenauk Is finest grade cow's milk, dried tinder the moat hygienic i-ondhfcna. Tha protein, greet bodybuudse* (• toads easily duteiiible by lha eaDar drylag process. And important sdditions trt made: Iron io*n::,h the blood sugar to modify ihe food for tiny digciiions --Vitamin D to help build strong bones and lecth. Osiermilk is made by Glaxo Laboratories Ltd., who, since 1908, have been pioneers in ihe development of the best possible foods lot babies. Steesfv pros, SOSTERMILK or your (roe copy of illustrated Baby Book-Phon 4675 PLEASE NenTE Owtng to the movbig of our Dmv Store), arhlcfa hag been IntaXniplM iiv uulrincnt weather, we regret Ihe iiuonvcniift %  itf trial dl gtl ami lake thai opportunity t>' inforni I will soon be atrtabsaihed In new quarters ONLY A l*BW YAKMS AWAY i rtasii Had of Bystnaaa. Tho Cosmopolitan Pharmacy A BABY being fed la tho Matamlty Ward. There are nine cota In this ward but only sevtn wars being i THE SURGERY wan bslng prepared for an operation. IN THE MARIE LOUISE WARD woman to take her pulse. had woken up one THE DOCTOR Is seen hers stitching a cut in a patient's arm. Public llti g anie^ rent, nnd cannot get n cheaper place Now that Is her Whole Ihcorne, except for what charity she can pick up. Mow doe* she-live.? She would !" %  wlHjng, k'l.id. tu share lin shclttfl' \ l!h .1 I •" %  .11 "if He; g and quiet way of lile but that is not easy tu find. %  Again; a" Parish Pensioner got ting the 12'per month M BO cents a week" for a room. He formerly made use of the S.A. Shelter, but craved something more of a home. He has to depend for most of the necessaries of life on varying and quite inadequate charity. believe he has also a ticket for the Parochial Food centre but that is one meal a day; what about morning and night? OUR READERS KAY: and he Is urgently in need n{ clothing. And so one might go on at length. Now 1 recognise that the situ;i twin raises the difficult question of increased taxation, lor 1 notice that it is complained in the House of Assembly that the pretty big Treasury balance is fust being dissipated by generous s(endinn Rut taxation jn Its varioufi forms is already a heavy burde.i W> many Of u On tin p->int there BN three provide th lea of hfe for all our eld and disabled people, many of whom worked faithfully for long % %  .lillc. l#t me add here s 11 -t i .m noi ad* >i Ming giving to abk idlers, nr rtom i'I !i the St in.tin. n man will I Mil I he eat.'" 2. There Is the possibility ol an enteTtalninent Tux. n t s levied in the Mother Country. It is very light Ot) the individual I the total amount Is substant'itl and it is easy to collect. 3. Finally, the proper course Is the long term plan of a National Welfare Scheme on the British model—but only for Age and dls ablement, and possibly unemployment. I would not go further. 1 think tne British plan goes too far. I do not lielieve HI ti..: ti urli reeding people with a spoon: it tends to destroy indiv i itiative and effort, and foresight and reasonable econi my I was glad to see In the Adveeata leaf week that In view Mr. W. A. Crawfi i mended this courae, and i hope thai he and other poUtlen] leader) %  fill pui b for M And the i lerjgj and Church people nUfhl erefl %  %  p ii i mture to hope the %  . approval of the guttooHUi %  con cerned. With thanks foi FRANCIS OOOoON. Suiutny Itjwiiiiin re ra EaVBar, rhe Adi-ocot^— SIR.—I have len following with much tatevtat, the various viewexpressed by your correspondents on one opening of the stores on Sur. das The first thing itrlkJBg me. i that they all seem in think lhat tourists bonts are to call here regu. i.ois en Bundayi and %  stores would bo open all day Tour.st ships have only %  cartain number'if hours in 001' vv^i it means passengers cannot give their e lire attention to one i item. We will presume the boat ii ar.iving here ;it day break and ikno*n revert 1 days: ,. aroul i Inform the ih p th ,t U arould be i I to ir i in | |i in. whlchevei %  the in ijorlty of peasengtrs. I %  % %  .t.,. rot who teauM t* gettinDon't tell me thnt this would he the clerks to break OM Sabbath as how many of them d no work on Sunday* at home! TW Ood. 1 b-llrv. In, wouU iw.I Slvc %  i %  .( "Duiri Unli 'nher". and I'm h vrxtd %  in" iJ"t"l nn*lliins •OM tl 4o (or )ou If yav wm • T'j'inrt. HA . %  FRESH SUPPLY Or IPURINA HEN CHOW (SCRATCH GRAIN) IH. IAS0M JONES & CO., LTD.-Di.iributo,. SOLE LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS OF PIANOS %  H.J.RcNN THESE PIANOS ARE FITTED WITHI BRON7.KI) AI.I.-OVKIt BACKLESS I IKON I Ii \ ill I IIKIIIU UliU! IIHOIIKS ACTION "AND KKVS. I UKST QVALIR HAMMK.RS AND TIIK CASEWOBK IS SOLID MAHOGANY, HIGHLY POLISHED. IN ADDITION ALL PIANOS, (WOODWORK, KELTS. I'.TC) ARK SPECIALLY TREATED TO KI.SIST INSKtTS OK ALL KINDS. SUPREME IN TONE, QUALITY, AND APPEARANCE faj*" Special Introductory Cash Price $675.00 Each -ee IIAIIIIISOVS *SIS 5: %  %  .:: %  %  %  %  %  %  .: %  .• OHIEXTAL GIFTS! THA.MS •££ %  .lift Open**! IIISUIIOI. TABLETS IIIMMIOL POWDER r.l~l r \ll I) MAGNESIA Powder Tablets MVOXAI. 1 I'll \/<>NE TABLETS DODDS PILLS \\ A-I'VITE TABLETS C. CARLTON BROWNE V,V/.V///-*-W//)W/! I I IH-vsrriptinn is Si,,i t ,l,i a I'iift;I ot i'ui„T .. .So IM %  a n„ii„. Hill. § .il.lll ONE REPBESENTS WEALTH THE OTHER BArEGVARDS HEALTH | We e.nnol .Bord to lre.1 • prewrlllon u u> ordlnar. pl"e ft ol paper ilnte human life and hrallh depends on II. To Bi It $ la • eonRdentlal doeumrpl. Componnded by aiulMed drf. X claU and cheeked roraafet*. Pfai us .out next llorlor'a Prevrlpllon. fOV i AN SUM i. Knights Ltd.-All Branches. %  ,::::;'X •'. •• • •: %  %  TIME TO THINK OF YOUn . BUTTONS & BOWS WE HAVE OPENED an Aaaortmnl of the moat ExtrulaUo and Taety Variety ol BUTTONS for all ma.iner ol Dresses and Ensembles. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II. 12 A 13 BROAD STREET W/414MCVMI'/AV/M*M* FOOD VALUES hOXKS DHINKINC: STRAWS .72 CRAWFOHDS UFILLIT IIISCU1TS p4T llll 51 II CRAWFOUDS AM BCOTCH SHORTBREAD m lm|LI7 TEAK FIIEANS t IKK'CjI.A'I'l. Bin in is II no III'N'II.EY A I'Al.MF.IfS 0SBOURNE BISCUfTSI M.-VITIE rilll-K LINCOLN CHI IM I'M ., ROYAI. .. OSHOUI'NK I.XIIIP.ITKIN .. | p.T Pkl. JACOIIS LINCOLN CREAM BUCED HAM BUCEO BACOM CHEESE SOI.IO PACK APPLES LdRV Tin Tfl SCKF MAI1> (IHAPF.S Liu-Jc T.n .'rfkv Small M 11ARTI.ETT PEARS '.... Uirjc Till 03cSmall 35 DUTCH STRAWBE-.IRIES IN SYR1P 3 SOUTH AFRICAN CUAVAS I.arce Tin 51 COCKADE FIM; HUM Older these from ... STANSFELD SCOTT & CO., LTD. Broad Street ^.•••.•^.^ %  %  %  %  • % %  ^.^ %  .•. %  %  % % %  %  % % % % % % %  %  %  %  % % % %  • %  • % % % % % % % % % % %  • %  • %  %  %  ''' %  %  ''' % 



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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY U, 15! SUNDAY \I>VIK \l I PAGE FIVE \ U Trinidad Pin Down Local Batsmen BARBADOS STRUGGLED FOR RUNS YESTERDAY • Fra** %  * | Motta %  > i tad Andy anieaumr. .The Barbados bowling was ways steady and Ihe figure? ik for themselves. Pace >wler Mullins 3 IJT 68 in 19 •era, Norman Marshall 3 for 37 %  Just over 17 overs and Boy %  arshall 3 for 25 in seven overs te creditable In a score of 27V. Pinned Down Tfie Barbadu-i opening pair, by Marshall and Hunt* MM M •be* pinned down by some aeeu*te bowling especially by left *m medium fast Jackbir King au was steady although he made fee majority of his deliveries Wing outside the off stomp. Tinilrst hour's play only saw 1 runs on the tins. To tighten %  > this brake on the rate of gprniK even more. Skipper Stoll yer brought on Jones who wled leg theory from the evil ion end. le bowled without a slip, with B men on the off side • f the eket and seven on the left side. rluding n tight leg trap. Accurate Length Atjrarali was in the plot aa II and he kepi up an accurate igth from the top end. He too d the batsmen pinned down ia rationing of tuns had its rerd when Marshall half%  ricrlly hooked at a %  Hortish no f>m Asgarali and put up an easj ch to Jones at mid-on Marshall had been at the (ticket %  an hour and eleven minutes 1 his20 run* and Barbados had w lo<.t the first wicket for 35 is. Jones Get* One Jones to\> met with success, for thout a run having been added the score Hunte turned one off pad. low to Skeete fielding cloae the wicket in the leg trap and latter brought off a smart ch to dismiss him for 15. He a at the wicket for an hour and minutes. This Brought together Walcolt U Wceke*. but for four overs %  groat pair were tied down as %  rtivsly as the first pair. %  eniu* told however and ekes stepped about a foot out%  his leg stump and took two m a Jones' inswlnger. This proved an open sesame for each of the batsmen took four* after this. M in 1*0 Fifty went up in 100 minute* and flve runs later Weekes was unfortunately run out. He pushed one to widish mtd-on and called for a run but Walcott did not run. 1 do not know whether he sent Weekes back, but thai was not apparent from the stands. In jny case it would have been too late a* Weekes had all but gained the other crease where Walcott was standing when the wicket was put down at the other end. I think they would have made the run if Clyde could have got off. but I believe that Weekes' quick move caught him unaware*. Barbados had now lost the third wicket for 55 run*. Goddard 1 Promoted Skipper Goddard promoted himself in the batting order and went in next This was calculated to break up the accuracy ol the bowling attack, but still the score was kept down. Walcott took an hour over hi* first eight run* but when he ml twelve he suddenly loagad R powerful cover drive off Asgarali that pierced the ring of fieldsmen on the off skle and went through to the boundary for four runs. Later he late cut another of Asgarali's deliveries fur (our runs and hooked the next to the square leg boundary for four and some Of the lethargy was driven out of the game. The crowd stopped Jeering tn cheer Clyde reached 35 with ihe second boundary off Asgarali after he had been batting for an hour and a half. Peroiiienre Win* Asgarali's persistence almost earned him Walcott'* wicket The latter lost his control for a moment and hit out at a good length one. He skied the nail behind mkl-off and Skeete having run back several yards got his hnnd to the skier but failed to hold It. Walcott was then thirty-throe. In atonement Clyde Walco'.t twice hooked short one* from King to the square leg boundary to send up the century alter three hours and a quarter Walcott later on-drove one from Asgarali for four runs to complete his individual half century in Iwo hours and nine minutes. Tho close of a dull day of play saw Barbados with 122 runs on Ihe tins for three wickets. Asgarali turned in a most useful spell of bowling and had played the outstanding part In making St ol [meyer*.* delaying tactics inojessful. He bowled 19 consecutive overs u nd took one wicket for 55 runs. Footballer Dies PORT-OF SPAIN, Feb. .'I Baba Cummlngs, popular football player (Shamrock Club), died at the Colonial Hospital. I'ort-of -Spam, from a fractured skull sustained in an accident while he was holidaying at the islands during the weekcil • Frew Page 4 which tlve were maiden* and h* had got one wicket at a cost ol five runs. Asgarali on the other hand had sent down a simitar number of overs of which MM wag a maiden and he had captured one wicket for II When the tea interv.il arrived tho total had been t" with Walcott not out 7 Goddard had not yet opened his tecount. %  rag then Mt (be wicket for two hour*. After Tea On resumption after lea. Ganteaumc look the held. Asgarali bowled the first over from the %  JM ud and sent down .i maiden to Goddard. Jones took over from the screen end. bowl big to a leg Held and Walcott got a single to square leg off the seventh, while Goddard not three Through the slips off t*M then faced a m;iileii from Asgarali. WilCotl ondrovfj one from Junes DowvrfuUy for .i couple said then glam < t to fine leg tiler amount fa IxoTg [• jfter being at H for 66 minutes. Walcott barely got hi Goddard played one to square \<;\ from Aiggmll •imi u*a bettwen lock .i -h-irp Blnjpe, the only OfW from the over. Goddard turned the third from Jones nm-ly to square leg for a single a nd Walcott played out the remainder. Asgarali who had sent down 11 consecutive overs. 3 of whith were maidens for 22 runs, and had taken 1 wicket. cOWtuMatd from the screen end. got a single lo lover off ihe third while Walcott beat Ferguson at extra cover with a powerful shot which went to the boundary "IT the sixth delivery With the score at 73, Frank King replaced Jones whose figures were II overs, 6 maidens. 14 runs and 1 wicket H bowled to %  and sent down a maiden lo Goddard. ti an drove the fir*t from Asgarali's next over for n single and Goddard played out the remainder. King bowled a maiden to Walcott. Ganieuume stopped what looked like a certain four fiom .. cut by Goddard off Asgarali and later the batsman singled to mid-on to send up Walcott who late cut to the boundsi v and then pulled to square lug for another, to make his score 25 and the total 85. King's next over was a maiden, his third in succession. Asgernh continued hi* long spell and Stoll meyer brought off a brilliant piece of fielding from a powerful cover drive from W-lcoll The batsman, however got a single to the left of Stoll meyer off the next Walcott glanced one from King to fine leg for a brace and later got a single to square teg. Facing Asgarali. he got Into his wicket and turned this bowler beautifully to square leg for throe. King's next over* yielded a single. A Chance Off the second ball of Aagarah'a next over. Walcott had a mighty hit. but Skeete fielding at lon*off. after getting under the hall. failed to hold the catch The batsman eventually got u couple and later look another single to make his score 36 in 120 minutes. Walcott pulled one from King to the square leg bound.u up 100 on the tins minutes* p |*y Wsjcc: other boundary wide of Tang Choon at square leg and later on drove tor throe lo make his score 4T. Goddard whose score was 7 for some time was now at the wicket for 00 minutes. An on-drive off Asgai boundary give Walcott hi* 50 Including 7 boundaries ha Ml :i took n single i up Qotldgwd *•' pfasye i out l der of th. King's nevt %  JnsjU Waricott i. .ver drove tho second from A boundary stroke, but this time h* oulv u-rt' •i played out the r (or Hi day with the total t >H %  i Goddard 7. 1 he S H \*n Vims I.I %  % %  • % %  — 1" TWMirtAfV* 1.1 li'iiiusa i r> *"•" %  %,. i. MHUM*M ,.. aa r W..-W as N. Aagarail e w a. iW..ktii b "WBS %  lull F Kins %  %  art*** i <> i: ii h > riii ot art-***" i u a*, si IP, • ROWl RH AHA1 Y1H II ia r i i; H<*H it N lManhall IT I ..,i, 1" fl V Var.h.11 T ....( 1 IIAIIIIADOB—Ind I %  r M.mla c B..i.. I> Jon* II ,..>< .ml R n W-k. i.in out ... 1 P (inddanl "•• "' i. . %  T..'. isjaj .i wH i r Ki n 11 * *, HUM N A-arali IS S H Mrn II Wal*ott and Jomaicft Team Picked Because the Melbourne weathci .mpossibte to foreeaat the r**ut' thout being %  i 1 u. uld concede England a nee Indications are thai %  ut | oui Kondn ant* then n will be u to consolidate thcit eieeUe.il twlbau-k it I* rti %  I Aii-tr.ili.i Ii won f our TOftt, This In mv hould be the decider and Australia will need loVto •> kM ol %  I nglaftd. A> p*viousl> lepoilcd England on the first and second Ti It* It -as only the toss snip bi' i the li-l thai I0M h| got, Kfhlki llM m.niih beau-e tUm when on U>i> BJ UM towltM in the lit^t mi.. The Umpire who i % %  %  %  I.' .mil Out' >lo*t nol surprise me In U>th if thoae games. < g Pf* • * BBgfl t^ late to lectifv the | going to do is a complete mystery but let u* hope it plays fair and if it does, I think Australia will lost a Test for the lirst time since 11130. You can't keep dandruff g Mcrct — but you can get rid of it Dandruff means that your hair if under-nourished and thai bodily supplies of natural vital hair foods arc running low. Replenish the supply with Sllvikrin and dandruff diiappcars. Fed by iu natural foods, the hgir regains it* youthful vigour and slays in your head not in your comb. 1% lsraa1aft*toalSBBMaSBBfa/*sgaSBf I aaaJ laiaMar *aV. At a datfi aWu.af mw #;*To** ( %  .>'./"u/oV V Mrf>. DOES CROW HAIR • Ir.im all ihrmhit, hairjrf SIIVIK*IN lAtOKATOIllfS LTD • LONDON s*xf... To Mathers II FEED YOUR BABY ON NUTRINE The Wonderful Baby Food!! ON SALE AT LEADING DRUG STORES Buy a tin o( NUTRINE and :"j get with it a Booklel lull •; of valuable inlormalion about the care and nurture ol Children. FEB. 25 — NO. 160 The Topic of Last Week !,-• lint Um oilli a *mh I i.i td Main irnnixl li iv. lairt iiail<>> %  .ill UU ( *l MOM w wad I II i„ ia~-u.ii.. ilaWi'ii a in*..i.ly MV rin* II tn i.(ink CM in* airal ilt^.t.-t ktoh .|ioah ln*in llwt llmiH." A||in If n IraHrr Wi .v.rnhi.1* m imi.i Aivd IUIM dun I (r*l ih Mm. *aj Ii M>*a up la a **hi. Man ar l.iil >iaa> WWvr u. Machine man dnvtall day II nan iiwl lum u> aaaaSifta* ll'. in lo K*,. liBt ptnbvr f*>h lhal A palicy ict*ht Mr IKily H %  UHl man II >vamad In hia *i*hi Bui II anolHi A pli.-> i. H ( .i I.i a -.il" BM***, .. not •inms. i.t i*BH*ttasa MM I S.. uitat la Mul I.i whiM man i*a* lor liiiil man UMA WI..C. irf to JW aaar*W>< I (end to* Lrtu Von rani lux H*lp lha Kin* ma Anil IIKII T.irn-I lha i*-l It urtiplv inaan* y*u'r* •oiirtlnd A ina oTIcial mat-. iir |* •vM-ybodv ..i"r. all atik. %  all. ballava Write Direct or Airmail lor fatherly Advke-rtct THE STEPPING STONES TO SUCCESS Don 'thtiftatc about your fulura ( Go forward. confident that The Btnnttt Colltfe will see you through to a sound p*tltin In *ny career you chooM. Tha tnneu Col**f method* are Individual. Thara'i %  friendly. personal touch that encourttft -ulck pro*reis and maks r early •fficlcney %  .i M fan Wllava „Vo.,r h.ll m,„J m %  %  *** WrIT Wrdrvcdav boy. th. MfSbal Maan m ariafci k un>hut. Hi>( l^u and mmradr RDIH-M W.r. all irirdrl ln.lin.-rt W. u. Hunla Inr Kl. Andraw - achoad ihli •ound Wfll boyi wu can baliav* at* Bi| irirkat n-m. in 1MB," WIM .t,| him f.|T Id -'fma-land" lan an)body l.il, T*annly Mitthip ll.wlll Who inrxwl lha JIC U ThU man had an* iaai vlalon T.i (alwarl< With Bala* bowlan toy F..r hi, parlonnanr* Thi,r>.l.v Th,. i. *h>t una mart ku id TOV tail %  •< Ihat >tion* boy l*f>ll Air JhH Enrirhrd Brrad ipomored by J & R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD in and will be drawn for H II IHHII > WII I II II I I U I HI i i tniiiiimiiinw



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r TAGE TWO M'Miw M)\iK \ II SUNDAY, PESttUARY 23. 1*51 TtTTviKdllKIVKMA IMambarsOnly) DANA vvntirw. OHAN HAVWAItn IN MY FOOLISH HEART" SO WELL REMEMBERED" .-OOTT PATHICIA ROC "fkantty.. Mr < GLOBE THEATRE • I'rfwnlthe V4aa* of MAKIA I.AN/o IN THE TOAST OF NEW ORLEANS — WITH — Kulhr>n GHAVSON and David NIVEN TO-NITE 111MS 4 TI ES IN 1 I II r M • I.OC.U. TALI.M Al ItlTION THIS MORNING aw All AIT Intilril 9 31 A SI. i >IIMISI i in: \i HI: Opvninf/ Fritluy 2nd Miinh 'Farewell To Yesterday' Is Living History Of Our Time THE VICTORS* I TO-NTTE (.LORE Till Al HI TO-NITE run with tkt STOBTS NI:WK FLASH FLASH B..' SUGAR RAT ROBINSON the Dynaauc Box. r sj And th*> WEST INDIES TCAM in selion 8 EVRBTON KBBKBB SUeka Playing TONITE And over the Weeks-id. I'l A/A Then! MvAl (R K O RADIO! Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) TAIZAN AND THE SLAVE f.llil YOU CAH BEAT7HE A BOMB IL AZA_.TIJMM*— p/SJ/rV (DMl 8404,) '.."".'•VIM **T 1 Mluws TO-DAY : %  ERROL FLYNN IN 'Wonw' Anmr Double ACTION IN IB & GAMBLING ON THE NORTH ATLAMIC IIH.II SKAS IJAIETY — {THE GARDEN) ST. JAMBS % %  MMACXXOl'S JOURNEY" In Colorful CtlMCOlw ttiin ttory Calhoitn Audrr. Lorn.. O^-rfi & BAD MEN OF TOMBSTONE ith B.tij Ballliaa Marjorl* Oa> noUli Hi-I QflM MONDAY fc TUBBDAY •> p m •Munomm Double FALL GUY & ONE THRILLING NIGHT Hobr-it AHMSTHONQ John REAL ~~ THEATRE I LAST AHOW TONIGHT c MONDAY TlfBBD, Action ParRit Doubt* by Columbia '• r-arl BATMAN & ROBIN o R BATMAN & ROBIN WHIRLWIND RAIDERS wllh Charlri OTAIRrTT THE VAJVQUMSMMEMr Benitw Mmyi llm ;tucl Adnll Hitler meet unce again in (lie Fx Movietone rii>cummtjir> production. "Farewell (o Yesterday." 111 -1 %  1 > repeats il-.-ll on the screen uC the KM I'll! I I III \ I 111 hcrimiine. Friday, 2nd Match llgHBRff with -THE MAGNETIC TIDF." The Holy Land, a story of CHRISTIAN SYMBOL •Till: PAST. PHESE.XT #/ I I SI III EMPIRE TO DAY 4 45 and 8 St Mnmlj) \\\iX Turntj> 4 45 and I SB DBUti Artirfs* Picture! Presents . II THIS BE SIN" Starring — Myrna LOY — Roaer I.IVESEY with Peggy Cummins and Richard Cram. OLYMPIC LAST TWO HIIOWS TODAY 4 %  : ind 8 SO 20th Century Fox DoubleTyrone POWER and Cccilc AUURY in — •BLACK ROSE" — AND — "ANY NUMBER CAN PLAY —Starring— Clarke CABLE and Alcxll SMITH. MONDAY TUESDAY 4.3a and l.ll sr\it: niKANI1 "7'Aen They Her.KM*' ROYAL LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY 4 St and I 3t Universal Big Double . Douglas FAIRBANKS in "EXILE" AND "WMINAN" with Lon CHANEY MONDAY £ TI'KSIIAY 4.SO and 8.SO BLACK-CAT" AND %  l \SIDE JOB" HOW TO DAY to TI I Ml \ 4.45 and 8 15 CCHOB SV •/! %  I TECHNICOLOR ."• Baa lei Mtlinc DeCARLO OURYfA-CAMERON CARTER M n c r. iiai the Board of the B*-ll Tele.v.'.rilprE and Mm. rta B.C.. %  VMUMBI for a few iiirnt-ri rastei B W A They .till in Barbadoa %  lurning to Canada Touring Caribbean M M LliaViUND sHEEDY. Real Estate iiuriit in Floritta ana %  THnwlad ycaterday mornlni by 1 W I A They are touring the Caribbean on holiday. Here for •i out eight d.iyi they are itaylntt at the Colony Club. St Jamea. Married Yesterday M .ROL WARD daughter of Mr and Mm E L Ward Of %  Dost* 1 Maxwells was married esterday afternoon at Providence Church. Christ Church to Dr. Erie Storey, son of Mrs. N. Storc> it fieors.lie late Dr Leonard Storey. The ceremony performed by Rev Brooms began shortly after l> m The bride given in .i-iriage bv her father wore an xtfulaiW gown of white slipper satin cut on very simple line* From the skirt, bouffant loops aded in flared fullness at the buck. The headdress was a simple tiny cup of matehlng satin with a waist length veil of eloud wli.u uille held in place with i-iurt was also of orchids. H< bit %  llMBltnl was her ilster Miss Grace Ward who a bronze satin it t>n the same lines as tht lindo's dress. She MBn I ha.idflress of bronze laurel leaves The duties of bestman were E rmoc b Lou Ward ushers were Mr Lisle lliirtiSon, Mr. Trevor Talma. Mr. ChlTord Skinner and Mr. Hal 1 vfstcnlay csprcinlly for the wedtPBJ. The tarrlet oral fully choral. id during the ceremon> Mr sorrii ooni the "Nupiu: %  i Uon". A rteaptton W08 later held ,•! %  he home of the bride's parents. TV and Mrs Storey leave for '.ins afternoon where •hev will spend a few days l>efore Jfjimng HM Celn-mhle on her Caribbean Cruise Repeat Performance M R. CHARLES ALLMOPTS lllm of the South Seas was mjoyed by the .tudience who it on Friday % % %  Bins tl ttii al Barbados Yacht Club that has been persuaded to rootsM mernrn tvoBdag at 6.15 'clock at the Combermerp Si hoot Hall. This lllm has also been shown %  inBritish Council. Mr. Allmon is at present in Harbadotaking pictures fur the National Geographic Magazine and the Hnrbados Publicity Committee. ProetBdi fmrii the ;how tomorrow will goto help the Y.W.C.A From London, Ontario M R. and MRS. J. O. HUGHES of London Ontario, arrived by T.C.A yesterday afternoon They arc here for three weeks %  1 the Marine Hotel. Mr. Hughes is Manager of the London Branch of A. E. Ames & Co. Ud., who arc in the Investment business. Ml Hughes told Carib that they expect an American couple h by name to arrive today en QaJub CaULnq RETURNING from tliair honeymoon in Orenad.. ysaterday i and Mrs. Michael Lynch They ars pictured htrs on thelx way in from the 'plans. M %  frt tinI' s Short Visit M R A. J FARFAN arrived from Trinidad yesterday to spend a few days' holiday in He returns on Thursrla> Mr. Farfan Is Governing %  1 Pcrelra and Co. Ltd.. in l'oit-of IsBtn ILttaB m at the St Uiwren.e Hotel Siert M RS. ELI/.AHF.TH CORISTINE Ud her sister Mm. Mar> .II arrived from Canada morning b\ T.C.A. to holiday with their parents Mr and Mrs. H. J. Svinli.tfon ;it the Marine Hotel Mr Symington is a former presidcit of Trans Canada Airlines. MURRAY'S MILK STOUT %  THE STOUTEST OF ALL STOUTS STRENGTHENING TO THE LAST DROP It<< UMIIKIMIIII hfi tin* iin nit,i • FRESH STOCKS ARRIVED RECENTLY M\\M\. A 441.. I 1 l>. rlgMrtM Back From Honeymoon M R and MRS MICHAEL LYNCH, who spent then honeymoon in Grenada returned home yesterday morning by B.W I A Mrs Lynch is the former Patsy Mitchell Here For Two Weeks M RS. JEAN FINN1F. and her two sons Terry and Richard have come to Barbados for two weeks' holiday. They are staying at Accra Guest House. Rockley. Mrs Finnle's ,husband works with T.C.A. in Montreal Presidents M R ALEXANDER DENISON. President :t the Canadian Fire insurance Co., in Winnipeg arrived from Canada yesterday by TC.A accompanied by Mrs Denlson. They are here fur one month staying at the Hastings Hotel Arriving on the same plane were Mr and Mrs Walker M Taylor. Mr. Taylor is President Of the Dominion Structural Steel Ltd., in Montreal. They are also here for a month staying at the Marine Hotel. From Montreal L T. COL. and Mrs. W W Ogllvic arrived by T.C.A. yssterday. Here for three weeks they are staying at the Colony Club. St James. Their home is in Montreal. Lt. Col. Ogilvie is Canadian Army retired The. were in Barbados on a visit lost year. Also arriving from Montreal were Mr. and Mrs. Alex Paterson who are here for three weeks staying at the Marine Hotel. Mr. Paterson is a stockbroker in Montreal. Personal Representative E XPECTED to BffHVB l,y lluS.S. Colomhir ... ,i, day is Mis. J n Hi K. the Personal Representative Of tht Bttgab. th Ai'Un Salons u. The purpo.se of thai VW give Ihe same wonderful fate treatments and expert I i skm Cart ami moJta-iga inat one OBtva m i he Arden's famous Salons In London, New York and Paris. Miss McKee will be giving these treatments and advice at the Phoenix Branch of Knight's Ltd .13 Broad Street. from Monday March 5th where appointment., can be made. Leaves To-day M R ARTHUR M. HUTCHINSON has been appointed I Liaison Officer in the Britrn WtM iVntral Labour Organisation in the United States of America. Mr HuichinftHi leaves by air for Washington this afternoon. Mr Hutchlnson, a resident of St. Philip, has travelled extensively through the U.S.A. and Canada. He has done a variety of Jobs at home and in the U S. and Canada. Cooler M R. JIM WILSON. Canadian Engineer returned from his vlsi*. to Ottawa yesterday by T.C.A. He came in wearing heavy winter clothes. Twe hours later 1 saw him in a light tropical suit looking much cooler. Mr. Wilson Is in charge of the destruction of the new runway at Sea well. He is on loan to the Barbados Government from the Department of Transport. Canadian Government He was away for one week. West Indian Play M KMBERS of the West Indian Rumba Larlos (a newly formed theatrical oPmpany in London) are busy rehearsing for their mamen show "Rhythm In Sepia." The aim of the play Is to depict iff in the West Indies and I understand that Jack Hylion. .hr .ir.pr.-Ksario, has expressed his wltllng-nttB to sponsor tl Th.* play is written by Jamaican-born Kg* U ilolncs*. student of architecture and newly elected Secietarj Of W I.S.U. Hubert Baker. another Jamaican, is the Director. Honour For Police Officers A N uiuitual honour was accorded three West Indian police officers in England recently. They were pttbUely welcomed in open Court by a Magistrate. The hfflcers were Sergeant-Major 'i rttfsh Honduras and i OtcU Bourne and Otrwood Springer f Boibadoi All are spending six months nt the Metropolitan P-Jlkv College British police methods. Their "host" was Sir William Notlidge. Chairman cf Tonbndge. Kent, magistrate, who was aftsj wards thanked by them for the warmth of their welcome. T.CA.'s Earineering Dept. M R. and Mrs. Hugh A Reid arrived from Canada yestardav by T.C A to spend s week'* holiday in Barbados Mr. Reid ti in T.CA's Engineering Dept., In Montreal. Thev are staying the Hastings Hotel Bookers' Head A MONG the passengers arriving from B.G. on Friday morning by the l-ady Netaea were Mr ana Mrs. C A. Campbell, their daughter Mrs Buyley and son Mr CM Campbell. Mr. Campbell is Managing Director of Booker Bros, in BC Mr. and Mrs. Campbell and Mrs. Bajley will be leaving by the Gclflto when she returns here on her way to England. It Is understood that Mr CM Campbell will be returning to B.G. Meanwhile they are guests it the Crane Hotel. Canadian Physician D OWN to, spend a holiday with Col. Saundcrs at the Camp. M Lawrence Is L>r. Fred b Parney who arrived from Caiuda yr-sicrday by T.C.A. Dr. Parne> is a physician in Ottawa. Barrittor M R and Mrs. C. J. Burchcll were among the passengers ,ti uving from Canada yesterday morning, by T.C.A. Here for six weeks, they are staying at the Windsor Hotel. Mr. Burchcll Is a Barrister in Halifax. Investment Dealer It. A. NESBITT. an Investment dealer with Nesbilt. Thomson and Co., in Montreal arrived by T.C.A. yesterday to speiKl two weeks' holiday ji Barbados He was accompanied by hbt w.fe. They are guests af the Colonv Club, St. James. First Visit P AYING their first virit to Bar. bados are Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Hcnn.ng of Montreal. They plan to spend two and a half week* at the Paradise Beach Club. Mr. Henning is Assistant General Manager of Robin Hood Flour Mills in Montreal. Persuaded H ERE for maybe three weeks are Mr. and Mrs. Mark Waterbury who came in yesterday on the TC.A. flight. Mr. and Mrs. Waterbury arc from UUca, New York, where Mr. Waterbury is with H. Waterbury and Sons, Co. Asked what mado, him choose Barbados for a holiday, Mr. Waterbury told Carib. that for the past lew years they generally spent the Winter months in Bermuda. This year, however, their good friends the Hugh Gages, who are St present here on holiday, persuaded them to try Barbados. Represented Grenada M R. EVERTON WEEKES was at Seawell yesterday morning to meet Mr. Bede Fletchei who arrived from Grenada l>> B.W.LA. to spend two weeks' holiday in Barbados. Mr. Fletcher represented Grenada against the Empire Club of Barbadoa during their recent tour u Grenada He Is a member of the "Atoms" Club in Grenada. Mother And Daughter M RS ELSIE BORIGHT and her daughter Mrs. Elizabeth Lindsay are at present in Barbados for five weeks, staying at the Hotel Royal. They arrived from Canada yesterday by T.C A. Their home Is In Montreal. To Join Wife M R RAY MANBERT, President of Manbert Paper Prc/icts Ltd., In Toronto, arrived yesterdav by T.C A. to join his wife who is niieady here. She arrived about three weeks ago. Staying at the Marine Hotel, they are here for three weeks. Cotton M R. and Mrs. James V. Young, their son and daughter-inlaw. Mr. and Mrs David M Young from Hamilton. Ontario, came In on the T.C.A. flight from Canada yesterday morning. Mr. James Young is Vice-President of Hamilton Cotton Co.. Ltd.. his son Is also In the business. They are here for six weeks, staying at the Marine Hotel. MARINE HOTEL SPECIAL DANCE • IN OUR BALLROOM SATURDAY March 3rd Percy Green's Orchestra ALL TOURISTS WELCOME Great Door Prize Elimination Dance and Prize A La Carte — Kitchen Service • 9 p.m. to 12 Midnight Entrance EMM ^^S MRS. HOUSEWIFE ENHANCE THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR HOME WITH Lancastreum Floor Covering RI'GS IR.I 71, It. 1 IL I t It I ft. MM It. 9 IL x 11 ft M 11 •7.M SI M C'ONTINI'OIS ROLLS CUT TO TOCR ORDER ln M. y* J Ina. 7e. r* 72 1m. II 44 yd. Mia. II 11 rd. Aba—ATTRACTIVE DEKIGNK TO SELECT FROM Compare OCR PRICES BEFORE PURCHASINO ELSEWHERE THE IIAltllADOS 4 O-OI'I IIAIIVI


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SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 25. II.U SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE NINE .It The OMMI FIESTA By .. is. ONCE AGAIN. Ihe successful director-producer learn of Norman Taurog and Joe Paste-mack, who gave us "That Midnight Kiss" have combined their talents in another Technicolor musical film THE TOAST OF NEW ORLEANS now playing at the Globe. The settings of the bayou country of New Orleans and the French Quarter of the city itself in 1905 are vivid and spectacular and the whole film is a galaxy of gorgeous colour and music Starring Katharine Orayson. enemy and ant, set off by the %  10 Lanza and David Nlvcn vivid costumes and native muilr. story is on the flimsy aide, but Other opinion* to the contrary, good direction, plenty of humous I enjoyed "THE TOAST OF NFW and an excellent characterization ORLEANS" and I hope you do o* a Cajun fisherman by J. Caroll loo. Haish all combine to Rive it plenty or life. 9 TAKZAN AND THE SLAVE On a trip to the bayou country. GIRL < PU Brid B etown> the Impresario of the New Or. leans Opera House and his fiancee IX SMI III \ MOOD A Man Cant Sell — Without His Wife's Consent DAKTWOIIDS II? los.pl. I. slop at a Caju. flahlng villa,, at .^"^.^man%£, the Um. of th. blesn s of the '""W Tom? %  "** '." Tanans may con.e and Tarzans may go. but the creator of this >es on forever. | fleet, when everyone-iFYn holiday & !" i^£Z£*jF$? laUsT mood and singing and dancing are under^eatove title is his adventures with .ISSL n *" uw,M h lm a myaterioui tribe of Ilon-worahlpI ? TL i"?L Wh K r 1 W ,'i h l*" that motivate the plot of this %  h elp of his fiancee, who Is the n|m> vaneasa Brown plays Jane, JS dan , W) P" no In the Opera, they an)i of ^^ Chrtn thr chim set out to groom the boy for a pro. panH>< is oll hand s Taiwan's kasionai career. Of course, the „.„ lnyB i f r icnd. Highlight of UM m*> young people fall in love. 1Um arf/ Tarzans efforts to help •Jtiicri. fortunately, docsn t upset oaltle a strange epidemictli-t hathe impresario too much decimated the tribe and to recapIn a film of thlfc Kind, It is the t U re the women who have been aanging, dancing: and music that kidnapped to replenish the dimlntake precedence over the acting, ishing population, though the latter is good. PeUta „ , fjnd charming Katharine Gravson Melodrama from starj to finish. has a lovely lyric soprano which ' ** appeal to people whose Bhe uses delightfully Freshness of tastes run alon these lines, %  one and flexibility are two out-.,..„, ... Tiq7 M ,, „ %  landing features of this young .. Sh ." wi l Z'SlJ,** „w, ?. ft voice, and her range 1, well m % n d CATRFA> TH/T high unbelievable. Her opening \g* £ %h? Aim 7%L2S de~ BS "TUSSAfSSfUS^:^ t^od B demLMra?lons P oThow oZ 42I !" ^ -nVlSh WJ021 -I must plan personal defence from LfW Z f, UK „rTn-h the moment of warning to the inrnvlata ungwllh Mario Lanzn h ^ mb e)tDlodeiii „,„,,. ivere two of ray favourites and ,,,, Mtvi ,. ,„„ tai .f hn Ih(1 %_ THERE were female smiles in Sweden last week at the remark of London Judge Earengey that "fair shares for wives of their husbands' wages" was a principle difficult to enforce in law From "the land of happy wives." Swedish women have written to the Sun*ta>< Express, pointing out that economic equality in marriage is a right they have enjoyed for 30 years. Bound by LawHow does It work? Under the Swedish Marriage Act of 1921 husbands and wives arc legally bound to pool their incomes and divide them equally. This obligation of equal shares applies also to property and to debts. Indeed, the Swedish husband has lost so much ground since the days of the Viking buccaneers that he cannot buy or sell a thing without the consent of his wife. His Fancy Any husband who secretly sells his watch for ready cash might find himself in the same dilemma I i How iMck MMey should a husband pay his wife? K JV or S „ ,, liJhl"! ! ""• f" lhat Ihe Ahowed her voice oft lo perfection b J mb ha „, „ mllaUo „. and knowing how lo lake advaulage Mario Lanaa who once ayaln o( lnBe b „„„ o( rimplc prr %  ploys Ihe role of an unknown tenl lon „.,,, r „„,ide Ia blv Infer, has one of the finest voices V re „ e j,,,, ch nc o[ u Jlval. Ihavc heard In a long time. I only Uiaca on Klcn ,| ni knowledge ac%  BK it*' SPf 0U "S. *' 5 quired from experimental blasts %¡ lobe Theatre wil keep the sound „, A.bombs In the South Seas a. veil under control, otherwise the wc || „ hc Hiroshima explosion, dience will be blasted out of the hc purp< ,„ „, lhis fl | m |, u, mi „. Imire panic and frar, while stremsing tie importance of effective debuilding. He has a tremendously owerful voice of superb quality ange, and it is obvious that ko loves to sing. He does not indulg. it the well-known sob-in-theNroice technique. His expression "i good and his voice full of vitality. Amongst the songs he sings e "Tina Lina"—a festive bayou ng. "The Flower Song" from Carmen" as well as more popular Hypes. On the acting side of the ledger David Nlven plays, with his usual nish, and delightful humour, the %  suavely polished impresario, whose interest in his fiancee seems i be more paternal than romantic. J. Caroll Naish as Lansa's Isherman uncle, who doesn't believe in all the fuss and falderals hat go lo make a gentleman, is priceless. For once, there is plenty of singling, and the songs have been careIfully selected to appeal to musical i well as less musical tastes, and Ithe dancing in the bayou mood, in the opening of the film Is full of fence against the dangers of explosion and radiation." •Pair ah are a is a principle difficult to enforce f'< %  au\' tayt JVDOC EAREHGEY. Attention Children BEGINNING from next week and continuing weekly children not older than 12 veers are asked to send to the Editor. Children's Corner, short stories on any subject they choose. Stories must not be more than 200 words in length. A prize will be given for the best story, which will be published In Monday Evening's paper. Stories must be sent in not later than Thursday every week. as the spouse ot Mrs. Olle Olson, who recently Bued her husband for pawning his typewriter. Mr Olson, who had paid for the machine with his own money, •"nuggled it out of the house one day to raise enough cash to back his fancy in a horse race. But. unwittingly, he encountered the 1921 marriage law. This stipulates lhat the contents of the home are the Joint possessions of every couple. Not even the kitchen poker is negotiable by one partner without the consent of the other The legal accent on possessions Is a feature of every betrethei. J. is customary for a Swedish bride to prepare an inventory of her possessions to eniure, in the event of divorce, her title to any property she brings into the marriage A Safeguard No bridegroom is shocked to find his bride tour their home after the honeymoon labelling the luinilure aa a safeguard against future disputes Gone are the days when some wives had to chase wayward husbands on Saturday night to salvage what remained of the week's wages. Today under (he pooling system it is common light to ee a husband and wife opening each other's pay packetsWcmcn are so well protected by law that husbands cannot eveo object if wives go and collect the pay packets, themselves. Spiteful Will The problem of the spiteful will, does not exist in Sweden For on a husband's death, half the estate gees to the widow and the remainder to the children. This rule applies in reverse on the death o* a wife. What do Swedish men think of it a"? Many say that the equality campaign has swung the balance too far and that the law has made the woman the boss. Because of the equal-pay-fcrequal-work drive, women's wages in many Jobs have Increased, and in some trades, such as textiles. men are now demanding equal pay with women! 'So Free' Women are wearing the trousers so thoroughly now that many husbands are learning cooking and baby care at evening classes. Some men run the home while wives are out bread-winning, or away on holiday. "Bachelor" holidays are now popular with Swedish wives. The women of Sweden are now so "free" that they suffer little. If any, social stigma by choosing to have a child out of wedlock Eight out of every 100 do. Of the 34J children born every day in Sweden, 29 are illegitimate, but they enjoy normal passport and inheritance rights. Anothei significant fact revealed by the Swedish official almanac Is I that 600 out of every 1.000 first children are born in the first six months of marriage. YOU have to arrange the 50 words in the circle so that they lead from PIGEON to CLOY In such a my thai the relationship between any one word and the next to It is governed by one of the six following rules — I. The word may be an anagram of the word that precedes It. 2 It may be a synonym of the word that precedes it. 3. It may be achieved ba addr Ing one letter to. subtracting one l.-ltcr from, or changing one letter ui. the preceding word. 4. It may be associated with (he preceding word in a saying. simile, .metaphor or association of ideas. 3. It may form with the preceding word a name of u wellknown person or place in fact or fiction • 6. It may be associated will the preceding word in the title u action of a book, play or othe composition. No rule may be mvoke.1 g*0C than twice consecwtiw-U A typical succession of word : Scrub — Curbs — Cur. Whet-Stimulate. —L E . CROSS v/oau M t IB |_i 1. r *T ~ ^T ^ CTl %  ^1 :^ r r |_ -^ JL Hi f i aceagi Loud mate I tone it down ir$ %  11* )ou gel tlia ** %  i>i i i (ail in. IS i i Rva.it rriiirn* lo rhuicli i> What the lioi-e •mil whr i i i-i-IiK-M lu lump ISI AWr Inim tin -I ill Such bait u •-.: ft otnt(\.im m a^t up to %  pi-iiiiBiiL-iit iij, 1*1 in Lona i> i Tar oil Tor a change. iS> Hum a ciiaiil naa an inr nuiti >l: i"l.Vrj!"is. Mciuir' .16 Traceiai til. UHIAIM ui. cm:., t.y g at!.! *._>'* %  ; ** Doom* n... i I. a !" **, > %  HilaUen: A. KaMit a. Urdt.• %  •a 9. HteU 6. Aide: 7,jtD*ad' %. Rufi, MACLEANS keeps TOSirii and healthy i?isia(E)^a)i: TOOTH PASTJ For white teeth, use the PF.ROXIDB tooth paste —use Macleans every djy. Enjoy yourself in lovely TOOTAL fabrics At homo or on hnliilay. working or playing, tlitre's illiinR to touch Tootul Cuaranlivd* Fabrir* for tlif plaatara ibey give to aeant and bahelatr alike With thiir woueeiful nlooi ranRc. thirir varirty of I., .uitiful texturr" anil their iniTn.cli.it.rraponitr to styling, you can be sure of fimling the perfeel Tootal Fabric for every fanhion need. Tootal Fabric, waih superbly and are very hardwearing. Many are marked TEBII.IZED for tested creae-resiitance. TOOTAL • . ^€U^t€^^/ee^ _.* '.atf-Zl-. 7TZ Some ftmooi TOOTAL rTonrlte LYftl 1\ %  fpua r .1*1.11 hbrlr, xjiha.^rllms. int. ii lik.Mfrtfaer vwry Mtae4a riii ailaiii%  We. I -) I I M.fil% .1.......I i rlean rut ii|..ml -tyla-a. In many ricli (CIIIWIIILprlatfl iii'l l-ar plain -liail.-. Wn.li.,1!..in.| esirhed nniii/iu l-.r ir.fil THH U> O IB -'-|*| il>' patiatl waa* cotton. II. M.irl.l-v.i.1.rr|iiil..lM.ii r-.laaj H.-n.|.. leslor* aad |s) >U>IIIthat >! %  > %  Iirtli ihlWgfc yeagl "' i*|lar trBr ami r. |..K.I ".i-Innj I IiIminraiiii* of daann. in< In.I.-, aaaajj %  ("•'" %  ••v SStaM for brsrh ttjflm and liiMr.M wear. TIMHI14. \„ HUSetfvS .Irr.. fjhrir of-pun """• .h-i.,., in.-1,1. II,,atwaa Ii %  "" II-IKI.I.IIilr asssaal •>! aaaki ihaslei aa*] tmU-*otnuf4 sfiata. Similar is I.V9TA1 HI wsaght, r00l IN* *> %  ju-i a. .rraatiir. iatl..rii>K nr .li-inaK v. % %  Ii sjasal •iircea*, ap*aramr. 1 (nn.-r from %  iluiii jd.l fancy wWSa "-It ...lour, and ii'itiimitf .il.mrumm .^1.-. I", •asaaa. I.... Lav in ir.t.-ii ic i %  wasktaaa i ABtHT)Jtl-l-.HK-l-r\Nnrr lhaTil oill ii i ..ml irt-wver from rrra>ui)t mm It a* I.....I 'ho-. iialiimlK. HM uui-ru.halilr. but errut' ifi'luii >II-|I lilitn. w.i-d iH-rr-tlK %  I ii.ii avoid Innlum jii.l -ir.uiK -oj|i HiluiiuiM. THE TOOTAL GLARAYTKr: Ml R no*l. -M li> lb* CUasg n> anal seariaf Ihr rrt-iii-rnl Iradr in.ifk nn.Hl -.r U ,r,l. A rrt.rl I Mill.i < I .r. IStraatSSd l> tbr < ompall* aad ass w g essstieal!.. % %  ....n-f... Htm. Baarwk' ti.itc BTM* llirnimli .i". ilrf.i t ulul ..M\ri in ill.%  gStSftal li-.lrfl wfli r.|.la. %  .1 nr r-f I tiiprice and |ia> lln. %  >( incurrrd in asahaaa %  •> fW *a TOvt 4t mt a*>> tw. •- %  .* 4



PAGE 1

FAGF. SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 2S, IWI BARBADOS to*,--—T" %  "" MS tt CA Alurtli A0\ r 0fflTE t Mr... SI fclU'l!" Sunday, February 25. 15I SOIL iuosiox THE unusually heavy and persistent rains that have been experienced this month -provide a suitable opportunity for inviting attention once more to the important subject of soil erosion. Soil erosion, expressed in the simplest terms, means the^ uncontrolled movement of water over the surface of cultivated land, and does not mean landslides or other forms of geological slippage which are commonly seen in the Scotland District of the island. The cxleni of the soil IOSF caused by erosion varies with the type of soil; some soils are more erodiblc than others and it is In the black coralline soils on the lower elevations of the island that the great.st amount of damage through the washing away of top soil is effected by erosion. The main types of erosion which are act've on the coralline suils n( Barbados are Sheet UrnMon — where the whole soil snrface of an undulating area is subjected to the downward movement of water, usually excess drainage water, which r.TTiies the soil with it to the bottom of the slope; Gully Erosion—in this form, the excess water moving over the soil surface collects and follows a natural depression in lie land, forming a small temporary river, and carrying soil from the sides and bottom of the depression with it; Soil i'reep-Bfoalon—in this case, no water actually moves over the surface of the soil, hut the particles of soil move down the slope because of the force of falling raindrops. This dislodges them, and they continue their downward movement under the force of gravity, eventually coming to rest. It is possible to control, and to control with advantage, these types of soil erosion by relatively simple methods. These methods are known under the name of contour cultivation. Contour cultivation can be so employed, that it will ensure a maximum utilization of rainfall to the advantage of crops grown. Further any rain that falls either in too great a concentration for soil absorption or over and above the requirements of the soil, can be drained away from the land in a controlled manner. Rainfall under these conditions is responsible for the most serious types of erosion-sheet and gully. It follows, therefore, that more widespread application of measures for the prevention of soil erosion and for the conservation of soil moisture will be of great benefit to the agriculture of the Island. Moreover, under normal rainfall condition in Barbados, where often the rate of precipitation is very great, as much as three or four inches in one hour, it Is very essential that such measures be taken on all sloping sugar cane soils. The Department of Agriculture has placed due emphasis on the fact that soil conservation is essentially a communsense matter of using land for purposes for which.it is best suited. Technical assistance is available from the Department whenever it is required. Discussion of problems is welcomed by the officers concerned. Bui a word of warning is necessary. The laying down of a sound scheme for the prevention of soil erosion is a problem that must be attacked in a comprehensive manner. Half-way measures towards control, sometimes instead ot preventing erosion, may in actual fact, exaggerate it. It is unfortunate that because of certain experiences in a small number of cases, Die practice of contour cultivation is being condemned as ineffective in some quartors. Surface drainage schemes cannct be expected to do more than prevent for a time the accumulation of damaging concentrations of water in depressions down the slop* end thus check the ultimate development of gullies. Drainage schemes alone cannot control the insidious process of sheet erosion, which, although less spectacular than gully erwtion, i. often more serious. A combination of contour drainage with soil protecting and soil building methods is. however, of maximum value in reducing soil and water losses from sloping cultivated land. The Insistence with which the Department of Agriculture advocates contour cultivation of undulating sugar cane land on the coralline soil type,' should not be taken as a condemnation in a negative manner of the value of the cane-holc system. The cane-hole system has proved itself A good system for cane cultivation on undulating soils. The system of contour cultivation which is merely an extension of the cane hole system is an improvement of the older system. The importance of saving the top-soil cannot be overstressed. In order to improve and increase our cane yield, and agar production in Barbados, we are restricted, by acreage of the Island, to improvements in the field of our present acreage, and improvements in the factory. Good soil management which ciA'ers soil erosion, plays no mean part in any programm.* of production token Mr. E. E. Clayton, Soil Cor.:?-vati*-nist, New South Wales, writes in his latest book on the subject of soil erosion: —"When once erosion starts, unless it is arrested, it will completely devastate cultivation land and make it unfit for any useful purr/ se. It has been stated that, in its advanced state, erosion is a gigantic monument to ignorance. Ignorance of its causes, of its destructive nature, of its consequences, of proper remedial measures, and ignorance of the caution signs of history which sound their warnings down the corridors of time giving danger notices of this nation-wrecking menace to all who will listen and heed." (Sue* \AJCrvrdei*. f a ft fefcftOrUw 1 e^ni-ie \J -f* FEDERAL CRICKET THE announcement that John Goddard has accepted the captaincy of the West Indies Cricket team to tour Australia later this year is a happy augury, not only for the game itself but for the entire Caribbean at a time when federation of the colonies is a topic of current conversation. John Goddard has already led the W.I. team to victory, against England in the West Indies, in India, and in England. It would have been most unfortunate if at the moment of the severest test for West Indian Cricket, there had to be a change of leadership. The team has grown to know and respect a leader who has knitted it into the powerful lighting unit that it now is, and the captain has learnt the capabilities and temperament of each of the players, in a manner only possible by long association. The result is that today the West Indies can place in the field a team that is really a team in every sense of the word. The pull is always a long and steady one with every man in the pull. If the same could be said for other spheres of West Indian activity, then the dream of Federation would become a reality without much of the fuss and flurry now attendant on all discussion of the subject. This sinking of insular ideas, so difficult of achievement in other aspects of West Indian life, is a spontaneous action when cricket is being played. Time was when any spectator at Kensington stood in physical danger, if he attempted to cheer any other but a Barbados player. This has long given way to West Indian patriotism, and Trinidadian and British Guianene alike receive as hearty an ovation as any local exponent of the great summer game. It matters not what may be his native colony, so long as it is West Indian, he is well applauded. It is these trends which lend to the hope that the W.I. cricket team will continue to do well wherever it is called upon to play. Regarding the chances of the team in the forthcoming trial of strength with Australia it is good to note that the West Indian Cricket Board of Control has not been lulled into any false sense of security, but is doing everything possible to put the strongest possible combination into the field. It is true that the West Indies team to visit Australia twenty years ago, won the final test game, but every cricket follower knows what a deciding factor the weather was on that occasion and how fortune favoured the W.I. This does not in anyway belittle the great bowling of Herman Griffith, nor the astute captaincy of Jack Grant But this victory was perhaps the only bright spot in an otherwise dull series of performances by the W.I. team. No other win of note was recorded and the other tests lost by very comfortable and wide margins. George Headley stood out as a batsman of the highest class. Learie Constantine and Derek Sealey, as all-rounders, and George Francis and Herman Griffith, as among the best fast bowlers ever encountered anywhere in the world. But as a team, the achievements of the 1931 side to Australia were not great. We repeat, that neither the absence of names like Woodful. Ponsford, Grimmett, O'Reilly. Bradman, McCabe and Kippax from the Australian list nor the recent successes of the West Indian team have made the cricket authorities of these parts careless in their efforts at team building, and it is to be hoped that success will crown the 1951 visit to Australia. John Goddard, and his men f whoever they be in the final analysis will face a stern task which will demand every ounce of resource, and every grain of determination if they are to do well. One other factor can influence the success of the team to A great extent, and that is the choice of a manager. We hope that the same care will be exercised in this selection, because "off the field" is as important as "on the field." In this way our team can become a really great fighting force, which can do a great deal towards welding our several colonies into one solid unit. Sitting On The Fence As food has becoma the national obsession, 11 is not surprising that Ihe vicar of Holy Trinity, Beckenham. invites all present at Sunday Communion to a free breakfast In the church hall at nine o'clock. "Mothers, fathers, and children turn up in force." B EFORE you begin I would like U> remind you that a bazaar In aid of ... Pass the condiments, Mr. B. Certainly, Mrs. t\ . J would like m remind you that a baraar in aid of . I wonder what these sausages arc made of? Reindeer, I should think. We shall be eating Father Christmas next. %  %  '/ i/ou could put your knifes and forks tfotrn /or one By NATHANIEL GUBBINS Holding Our Own Mrs. Isabel Dix. aged 22. of Olney, Buckinghamshire, beat the women of Liberal. KanMi. U.S., in the international pancakf race passing a woman he knows, when he is walking with a man who speaks to a woman. when he is walking with a woman who speaks to another man. and when he enters a lift In a private block of flats. be to correct bcA 1-1 /V u ineful guld< 7E may not shine at cricket, havlour. it still does not answer W t\ mav noi amiss ui nni\->. imviuui, •• -'• % %  —,', z:__ , m may no. .hip. ... rtf. •gfffg Tg. -'" %  „ women at all? Is It supposed to be a tribute to their beauty, which is often absent, an acknowledgment that they are the weaker sex. when most doctors will tell you they are as strong as horses, or is it never save mark of respect? If It is a mark of respect, this ButTnankVto Mrs. Dix, aged 22, classes women with the national Of Olncv BuckB, anthem and funerals, but still By gad. sir. we have won the does not answer another q we may not ibiM at golf. Our boxers scetn to lake It on the chin. On football fields In foreign parts the lesser breeds prevail. In fact, there's nothing much that we can win. The French excel at Rugger, the %  Poles are playing squash. Al tennis 1 face. D. V. SCOTT & CO., LTD. TO-DAY'S SPECIALS at THE COLONNADE f.iA.P. MACAEONI Tins SPAGHETTI with Tssnate Satvreand Cheese Bottles ALLSOPFS BEER TJnuuly NOW | .55 9 .31 FOR YOUR BATHROOM Corner BASINS with Pedtitil 25"xl8" 1 I I BASINS with or without Pedestal 22"xlI Low-down SUITES Hllh-up SUITES W.C. PANS, S P TRAPS W.C, SEATS (Plastic White and (Bikellte Mahogany Cart Iron CISTERNS Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS IIARPIC, Large and Small. WILKINSON A HATNES Co., I.lrl. To C.S. PITCHER & CO. Phono — uit, tun. pancake race. %  Respect for what? Marmalade. Mrs. O? Thank you. Mrs. C. Oh, do stop it, young Raymond. There's other people want toast well as you. Just like my Charlie. "Got any more, mum?" he's always saying. It gets on your nerves. I'll swear young Raymond eats his own weight In bread in a week. . 1/ you ciiiim be quiet for moment I would Uk$ to Ml you about a bazaar . I see in the papers we're going to eat beavers next. Beavers? What are beavers? A kind of water rat. I think. They're coming from Denmark. I think it's ., sh.mie we can't ven eat our own water rats. . Can you hear me? The bataar will be open next Tuesday afternoon IT) aid of Had enough. Mrs C? The first time I've felt full up for days. The same with me. Come along, young Raymond. And take that buttered < pocket. Wher ners? They're all morning, Mrs. Good morning, Mrs. C . If you could uin omenl be/ore you oo Good morning, all. Good morning, all. next Sunday. Nine o'clock sharp. Are they superior beings, and. It seems the fate of Englishmen if so, where is the evidence' %  Id af large they more intelligent than men. The games that .we Invented more courageous, physically and long ago. morally? Are they more^truthful, Believing that we cannot lose, we more honest, more ju do not stint our help. where are the proofs. Most willingly we teach them , If so, all we know. pass and score a try; We taught them how to use a left, and what is our reward? They use a right So far as 1 am An'rh„ h r,o ro ^ k e-. g pUs and J-f. -fTO -„-- their fists. I don't mind lighting their cigarettes if they wish that they are I will i the eye. nunr-h ua B* ve lhe Impress' 0 nd pun