Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


—Parbados

LT
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22,



ESTABLISHED 1895

U.N. Troops Need More

Rigorous
—Gen.

Training —
Clark

TOKYO, Feb. 21.

ENERAL MARK CLARK, Chief of the United

States Army Field Forces, said teday American
troops would get more bayonet training in future.
Lessons from the Korean War, he said on a visit
to the central front, would not change the United
States Army’s basic concept of war.

But hardships endured by

United Nations troops had

emphasised the need for more rigorous training.

The bayonet would feature more predominantly in future
training to prepare American soldiers for the exacting con-
ditions for the type of warfare experienced in Korea.



Norway Will
Increase
Forces 30%

OSLO, Feb, 21

Norway will increase her armed
forces about 30 percent within the
next two years aiming at an
armed force of about 270,000 men
by the end of 1952, Defence
Minister Jens Hauge announced
here today. The army would
have four field divisions and the
air force 11 squadrons including
Jet fighter planes.

Army, air force and anti-air-
craft artillery would be double
their present strength.

The navy, in accordance with
Atlantic Pact plans would concen-
trate on coastal defence, The
United States was supplying ten
destroyers.

The Government planned to
spend up to 80 million kroner on
new storehouses, workshops and |
airfields. Another 200 million]
kroner would be spent in piling up |
important industrial raw materi-
als and equipment, Hauge told
Parliament,

The defence plan was based on,
the theory of western experts |
that the main strategic threat to/|
northern Europe and to Norway
would come from the south.

Demonstrators

|
5 the public
interrupted Hauge by



in
gallery
throwing pamphlets attacking
“Americanisation” into the

Assembly hall.

Hauge’s speech was held up for
15 minutes while Police cleared
them out.—Reuter.



Italy Admitted
To U.N. Council

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 21.

The United Nations Trusteeship
Council agreed by 11 votes to none
last night to allow Italy to take
part in its deliberations, but with-
but a vote.

The Soviet Union abstained
from the vote which gave Italy
its first seat in a major United
Nations organ. Italy is alreafiy a
member of the educational, scien-
tific and cultural organisation and
some ‘other agencies.

In extending non-voting rights
to Italy the Council approved the
change in its own rules of proce-
dure to allow Italy to take part,
especially in the discussion on
Somaliland, the African territory
it administers under Uniied
Nations Agreement, and also on
issues concerning the trusteeshiv
system in general.—Reuter.

General Clark said the Ameri-
can field commander in Korea had
learned the importance of:

1. Special emphasis on train-
ing for night fignting.

2. Fighting off roads
tough mountainous terrain.

3. Operating on wide fronts.

4. ‘raining soldiers to stay
in their foxtoles and “hold!
their positions until enemy pen-
etrations have been knocked

(cf,

General Clark said the Army
would conduct training in cold
places in’ the United States and
“try to make it as realistic and
rugged as we can,”

But General Clark said that
while taking remedial action “we
must not change our doctrine of
training”.

The General said: “I only wish
micre people could see the grand
job the United Nations trocps are
doing and the courage and stam-
ina they are displaying.

“It is a real team—all nations,
Army, Navy and Air Force, Their
tails are up and they have fine
morale General Ridgway (Eighth
Army Commander) has got it
buttoned up very nicely.”

—Reuter.

Busta’s B.G. Visit
Not Approved
By P.P.P.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Feb. 21.
The People’s Progressive Party
issued a statement today disasso-

in



ciating the Party with the pro-
posed visit of Bustamante to
British Guiana. “We are not

opposed to Hon’ble W. A. Busta-
mante visiting B.G., but our
party is Socialist and from the
information at our disposal, we
have learned that Bustamante and
his party are far

Socialist.
Consequently our Jamaica
affiliation and sympathies are

towards the Jamaican Party with
a Socialist programme, namely,
the People’s National Party.

“We have no_ personal
pathies toward Bustamante,
on political grounds we
invite him to B.G.”

The statement was signed
Mrs. Janet Jagan,
tary.

anti-
but
cannot

by
Party Secre-

DAKOTA CRASHES

RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 21

A twin engined Dakota cargo
plane crashed and moments later
caught fire after landing on one
wheel in Galeao airport today. |

The crew of four barely had
time to rush out of the aircraft
before it was completely destroy-
ed by flames. —Reuter.









- Britain, U.S. Make

New Kash

mir Plans

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 21.

Britain and the United States made new proposals today for
ending the three-year-old dispute between India, and Pakis-

: tan over Kashmir.

They introduced in the Security Council a resolution pro-
posing the appointment of a new United Nations represent-
ative to effect the demilitarisation of the state and present
plans for a “free” plebiscite on its future.

This representative would ae 5 Miners Trapped



W. Germany Bans
wee .
Atonr Scientist
BERLIN, Feb. 21. j

Professor Frederick Joliot Curie,
French atom scientist and Presi-
dent of the World Peace Council,
was today barred by the West
German Government from attend-
ing the Council’s meeting which
bpened in East Berlin this morn-
ing.

He had been refused permission
to cross to West Germany, it was
said.

Opening the meeting Pietro
Nenni, Italian leftwing Socialist
leader who presided in Joliot’s
place said the West German Gov-
ernment’s withdrawal of the
transit visa for the French Com-
munist atom expert was “a barbar-
ous act to a distinguished scien-
tist” in whom rested one of the
great hopes for world peace.

Nenni said that Joliot Curie
would not arrive in Berlin in time
to preside over the closing stages
of the four day-congress. .. .. ..

—Reuter.

W.I. SERVANTS CAN
ENTER VENEZUELA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 19.

Because of industrialisation
end better pay in factories, Vene-
zuelan domestic servants are re-
ported to be deserting their jobs
It is for this reason that West
Indian servants are in demand.
Any West Indian servaut is given
permission Venezuela,
but she 1 prove







ceed Sir Owen Dixon, Australian
arbitrator who last year reported
the failure ef his mission as Me-
diator in the dispute.

The new representative would
be authorised to take into account
“the possibility that any forces
required for the purpose of facili-
tating demilitarisation and the
holding of the plebiscite might be
provided from member states of
the United Nations or raised local-
ly”.

In the event of failure to reach
full agreement on arrangements,
the Security Council would call
upon parties “to accept arbitra-
tion upon al! outstanding points of
difference” by an arbitrator . or
panel of arbitrators appointed hy
the International Court of Justice

in consultation with the parties! Director

concerned.
Impzrtial Plebiscite

The resciution reminded “Gov-
ernments and authorities con-
cerned” of the principle approved
by the Secur'ty Council that “the
final disposition of the States of
Jammu and ikashmir will be madd
in accerdance with the will of the
people expressed through an im-
nartial plebiscite conducted under
the auspices of the United
Nations”.

The new United Nations repre-
sentative would be instructed to
consult with the Governments of
India arid Pakistan with regard to
their differences. He would then



“effect the demilitarisation of the}

state” and ‘present to India and
Pakistan detailed plans for cari
ing out-a plebiscite in

“The possibility that although
the future. accessi of ‘the stat
should be décic



the state




sion

tiof votes cast in a state





1951

TWENTY FIVE _UP ~



EIGHTEEN-YEAR-OLD B.C.L. player Conrad Hunte yesterday made his initial appearance when he open-
,ed the batting innings for Barbados against Trinidad. He made 63.

the boundary to reach his first 25,

Greek Cabinet

Faces Crisis

ATHENS, Feb, 21

The fate of the Greek Cabinet
will be decided when Parliament
meets tonight, probably on.a vote
of confidence,

Political instability turned into
crisis last night when Panayotis
Canellopoulos announced in Par-
liament that his Populist Unionist
Party would withdraw its support
from the Government, The party
has 87 deputies. The coalition of
Liberals and Democratic Social-
ists which supports the 15-man
cabinet of Prime Ministers Sopho-
cles Venizelos has only 100 of the
250 Parliamentary seats.

The Prime Minister was expect-
ed to cut short his tour of Epirus
and return to Athens today, He
will be received by the King.

The most important Parliament-
ary groups including the Populists
and the Centre Progressive Group
were today believed to be against
the overthrow of the Cabinet.

Some political quarters believed
these two parties would either
give Venizelos a vote of confi-
dence, or abstain, thus allowing
the coalition to obtain a majority
by its own voting strength,

— Reuter,

Split In Italy’s





from beins/Red Parties Widens!

ROME, Feb. 21:
The split in Italy’s extreme left-
wing parties deepened today with
reports of 10 new defections ‘in
The South, a resignation at Siena,

and two expulsions at Rovigno.
At Gravina near Bari in South-
ern Italy, another 10 leftists were
reported to have handed their
membership cards to the local sec-
retary of the Christian Democratic
Party. This followed a wave of
defections at Gravina last week)

The total of Gravina rebels in-
cluded 211 Communists, four mem-
bers of the extreme left-wing
Socialist Party of Pietro Nenni,
and five members of the Commu-
nist dominated National Associa-
tion of Partisans.

_At Siena, south of Florence, Dr.
Luiez Fantocci was said to have
resigned from the Nenni Socialist
Party. He was described as a
prominent intellectual
local politics.

A report from Rovigno said Sil-
vio Baruchello, former local sec-
retary of the Nenni Socialists, and
Bottari of the party’s newspaper
Avanti
party.

Rovigno is the home town of
Deputy Giancarlo Matteotti, who
yesterday expressed views =

figure in

were expelled from the

parallel to those of the Commu-
nist rebel Deputies Valdo Magnani
and Aldo Cucchi.—Reuter,



CHARLEROI, Feb, 21,

Four out of five miners, trapped
by a roof-fall about 700 yards be-
low ground in a coal pit near here
yesterday, were brought out alive
by rescue workers during
the night.

One of the rescued men however
cied this morning in hospital. The
body of the fifth trapped man, an
Italian, was. found today. Forty
four men were working in the
gallery. —Reuter.



New Director

(From Our, Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN,
Captain E, W. Daniel, Deputy
of Education has been
officially appointed D2/rector, In
1927 Capt. Daniel was Principal

when 220 leftists broke with their}
parties.

Gairy



Here he is seen driving Jones to

Leads

Demonstration
IN ST, GEORGE

(From Our on

NOTHING has yet been

dent)
GEORGE'S, Feb. 21.

done to the public road block-

U.N. Warships
Pound North,
South Korea

‘ TORYO, Feb, 21.

United Nations infantry, armour,
aircraft and warships today joined
in to hammer Communists in both
South and North Korea.

The latest campaign reports
were;
SEA—Surface and carrier ait

attacks were intensified on both
coasts. The world’s mightiest bat-
Ueship Missouri hurled shells from
her sixteen—inch guns on rail and
road installations at Tanchon,

AIR—Superforts based on Oki
nhawa ranged far north of the 38th
parallel. Supply and storage cen.
tres at Kamsang, 124 miles north
of the 38th parallel, were also
bombed. No opposition was met
from fighters or anti-aircraft, Bat-
tlefields south of the parallel were
also well covered,

CHIPYONG — Tanks, infantry
and motorized patrols ranged over
a wide area in an are from the
northeast. British Commonwealth
patrols southeast of the old de-
fence box went more than three

ed during the past three days due to week-end rain, despite ; miles ahead without making con
excellent weather, but thousands of all categories of un-

skilled workers ‘and several artisans are idle. Others flock} q
into St. George's from day to day. By 9.30 people w

the market square awaiting.

to march to York House where

meet, in order to protest the
ed yesterday. g

ON THE . ||
*sPOT

DURBAN, South Africa,

_ There was a stir in mag-
istrate’s court when Joe
Stalin was called on a
charge of being drunk, The
magistrate chided the offen-
der with his frivolity only

to get the dignified retort:
‘No, your. Worship, 1 told |!

the police m; +
4 po. —



World War III
Can Be Prevented
—TRUMAN

WASHINGTON, Feb, 21,

President Truman said in a
speech today: “We are gradually
approaching the position in which
a third world war can be preven-
ted if we have the support and
co-operation of all elements of
the population.”

All current attempts to build
up men and material was merely
an effort to prevent such a war,
he told a group of Masonic leaders,

Mr. Truman said\ the moral
forces in America must be
mobilised “to prevent the selfish-
ness of certain groups from
endeavouring to take advantage
of this situation.”

“Everybody, I do not care who
he is or what his conditions or
position is, from the President of
the United States to the labourer
who digs in the trench, must make
some sacrifice in order that the
whole country may be mobiliaey
to meet the serious situation with
which we are faced”, he said,

—Reuter.



Barbara Stanwyck
Gets A Divorce

LOS ANGELES, Feb, 21
Barbara Stanwyck today
obtained a divorce from Robert
Taylor—a divorce which she testi-
fied he requested, She

“shortly after Mr. Taylor returned
from Italy in December where he
had been making films he came to
me and asked for a divorce,

“He said he had enjoyed free-
dom during the month he had been
in Italy and he wanted to continue
to be able to come and go as he
pleased without restrictions of
marriage.”—Reuter.



12 BURMESE M.P.’s

RESIGN

RANGOON, Feb, 21.
Twelve members of the Bur-
mese Parliament have resigned
irom the Government party,
anti-Faseist. People’s

League to form an

block m Parliament.
They claimed that the Leagye
longer

the
Freedom
independent

r.0 represented popular

of Government Training College | opinion and that the Government
and in 1934 he was made rt was suppressing democratic rights. making a total of 8,346 combet}by prior commitments, he added.

Director of Education,





Britain’s Stockpiling Programme Will Cost £140m.—

fFrom Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 21.
Britain’s Stockpiling Programme

for the next financial year be-
ginning in April will cost
£140,000,000. This figure has been

announced by Mr. Hugh Gaitskell,
Chancellor of the Exchequer.

It ineludes approximately
£3,000,000 to be spent on essential
| foodstuffs. But top secrecy sur-
| rounds the identity of goods to be
| purchased
3usines
qua > §



interests and
t that

informed









r are

told
Superior Judge Thurmond Clarke:
j

—Reuter.

K.C.B., former Chairman of the
Advisory Council of the Inter-
national Bank. Writing in the
Financial Times he suggests that
sugar should be high on the list of
priorities.

He points out that stockpiling
only relieves the task of: mer-
cantile marine “under more
hazardous conditions.” It does hot
reduce its importance,

For that reason consideration
should be given to the advisability
cf laying in stocks of goods that
heavy, bulky and cheap.

Storage of Goods

hat that she



At

the deciding factor

Union leader Gairy expecting
the Legislature was due to

state of emergency proclaim-
steel-helmeted police

Srpg!l
tart carrying truncheons eX-| moved into positions level with

as_ the) Seoul. Communists stealing across
around | the icebound river to set up strong.

ere great restraint
erowd started marching
oecasionally following G
whenever he appeared
scene,

ai?
on the

Secondary and primary schools] south
in the capital were closed down] Turks scoured the Kimpo Penin-
aS a precaution soon after open-| sua,

ing, while later in the day be-
cause of the tumult in the vicin-
ity and the possibility of disor-
der, stores bordering the Square
were closed,

Gairy addressing
within 3 stone's throw of the
Roman ee Church® wsked
them to return to the market
where he will address them, be-

cause he said the authorities},

warned them about York House,
Speaking again he said it was

unnecessary to declare a stater Of} to je;

emergency after two days of a
strike in the absence of violence
and he believed the employer
were using their influence on the
acting Governor.

Throughout the day ti.ere were
repeated instances of intimidation
such as stopping and. strik'ng
workers renovating the
House and vendors selling
market, while = simular
came from the coun.ry

After adjournment cf the Leg-
islature the crowd still paraded
the town expecting to hear
Gairy who said he awaited
interview with the Governor.
Vr ith o luck, the crewd broke up,
several certain, trudging some
distance home when the message
reached the roadtlock. During
the interval the de nonstrators
sang songs.

Many members of the
despite no opposition from the
workers, are indignant at tne
leneral paralysis and apparent

sdain of authority.

in the
reports

publis



“,ROZEN WOMAN”
UNBANDAGED

CHICAGO, Feb, 21.

Bandages will be removed
within a few days from Mrs
Dorothy Mae Stevens, 23-year-old
negress, found frozen stiff in an
alley. on February 8, doctors said
here.

When the bandages are taken
cf doctors will decide whether
Mrs. Stevens will need skin en-
praftments. When she was brought

te hospital Mrs. Stevens’ ten
perature was only 64 — the low-
est recorded in medical his-
tory in which the patient sur-

vive.—Reuter.

U.S. CASUALTIES UP.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 21.

American casualties in Korea
rose to 49,132 today, an increase
of 1,097 in a week. Total casualties
reported to next of kin up to ana
including February 17 included
7,408 killed in action, 32,230
wounded and 9,494 missing in
action, The wounded total in-
cluded 853 who later died of thely
wounds, The over-all figure for
missing included 85 known deaa



deaths, —Reuter.

tention should. be paid to the way
goods can be stored without fear
of.-deterioration; also to their
pricés and to their availability.
“Sugar stores are better than
wheat; and we should therefore
store more weeks’ consumption of
sugar. than 6f wheat”, says Sir
Arthur. “Such an extra store ot
sygar is then in effect also a wheat
reserve since the knowledge that
it exists will enable us on the out

break of the war to allocate some

of our limited shipping which

would otherwise have been r«

quired for sugar to carry
Referring to other comr

he states that there is now

tact
South Koreans on the right
ank continued to push north un-

ere in| opposed

HAN RIVER — British patrols
came under heavy fire from the
north as they patrolled the south
bank, eight miles to the north of
Kyongan. Other British units

points in the hills behind the
United Nations forces Were held
up. Americans ranged on its banks
and east of Seoul while

Reuter.

leita einai



Israel Parliament

the crowal Reject Red Motion

JERUSALEM, Feb, 21,

The Israeli Parliament today re-
jected a motion sponsored by
Communist and extreme leftist
nited workers parties charging
the Government with “conspiring
with the Anglo-America bloc
ase Israeli bases to western
powers.” The debate arose out of
‘the visit of General Sr Brian
|Robertson, British land torces
Commander in the Middle East
who is on a three day visit to
Isracl as part of his Middle East
tour,

Another

motion by the right

Town! wing. freedom movement claiming

that the Government should have
got Parliamentary approval before
inviting General Robertson, was
also defeated,
On Foreign

Minister Moshe

from | Sharet’s suggestion, it was agreed
80) To discuss the

who'e matter in the
Foreign Affairs Committee.

“We must realise that Israel
occupies a special political and
military position in this part of the
world”, Sharet said, “We cannot
merely ignore the spotlight from
foreign countries, nor can we re-
ject any request from any quarter
to discuss matters with us.”
—Reuter,



Blockade Russia

NEW YORK, Feb. 21

The New York Times Stock-
holm correspondent reported to-
day that the Swedish Government
was reliably reported to be taking
a “dim view” of any move to
blockade Russia and her satellites
on strategic raw materials and
products,

The Swedes felt there were two
good reasons why they could not
accede to such requests,

Namely :

1. The
neutrality.

2, Its credit and barter agree-
ment with the Soviet Union
plus trade treaties with Soviet
satellites such as Poland.

But some leading Swedish in-
dustries, the correspondent report-
ed, saw eye to eye with Washing-
ton in this matter.

country’s traditional

The major Swedish ball bearing
concern had already cut its ex-
ports of ball bearings to the
Soviet to sizes unusable for mili-
tary purposes,

Producers of electrical equip-

ment and tool machinery would
like to do the same but were tied

—Reuter.



more limited choice than there was

a year ago, For that reason
“availability” has to be a principal
factor Britain must consider

what can be stored in the existing
accommodation or anything extre
that can be quickly improvised
and in some cases-—-for example
oil fuel—specialised shipping will
set certain limits

Sir Arthur concludes by
gesting a list of commodities
stocks of which might be increased
advantage. His list includes

vat and sugar, cocoa

sug

with



vegetable

————$—— $e

CP)

BY O.

S.




FIVE CENTS

WALCOTT 77 WEEKES 75
HUNTE 63,

BAT WELL

COPPIN

CINTILLATING batting by Everton Weekes, a
fine crisis knock by Clyde Walcott and accurate

bowling principally by
googly and

Trinidad’s slow right arm

leg break bowler Clarence Skeete, were

the outstanding features of today’s play when the
first Trinidad-Barbados Test opened at Kensing-

ton. Barbados scored

N. Zealand
Offers Meat
To Britain
Free Of Charge

WELLINGTON, Feb, 21

New Zealand’ Prime Minister
Sidney Holland said today he had
offered Britain the meat cargoes
for four ships to be diverted from
the Argentine free of charge if
necessary. .

Holland said that while he was
in England for the Commonwealth
Prime Ministers’ conference, Brit-
ish Food Minister Maurice Webb
had asked him whether the four
ships which were to have been
loaded with Argentine meat could
get meat from New Zealand.

“T said ves,’ Holland told ‘a
civic reception held in Christ
Church to mark his return home.
Then I said ‘we will load it. If
certain people will not load it, we
will find other people to do it’,.”

“I told him too that if they could
not pay for it they could have it
without payment,”’—Reuter,

Reds Sabotage
Call-up Programme

LONDON, Feb, 21.

Britain's Labour Government,
today threatened to gaol anyone
inciting military reservists to
disobey call up orders.

The move follows the circula~
tion of a chain letter urging
236,000 wartime servicemen to
ae recall for 15 days training
this "summer .



Sir Hartley Shaw-Cross, Attor-
ney General told Parliament last
week he believed the chain letter
was sent out by a Communist-
run organisation,

The new Government Bill sent
to the Commons for approval lays
down penalties up to two years
imprisonment or a £500 fine for
incitement to disaffection.

The penalty would apply to
anyone who had _ possession or
control of any document likely to
incite neglect of duties under the
reserve call up.—Reuter

335 for 9 by close of play.

As I predicted yesterday, the
Kensington wicket proved to be
an easy one and in my opinion,
skipper John Goddard, after hav-
ing won the tass, took a_ wise
decision in going in to bat first

Barbados—although for the first
two hours the scoring was behind
the clock—caught up and passed
the clock and finished up by scor-
ing 335 for the loss of nine wickets
after 300 minutes of playing time.

Jeffrey Stollmeyer deserves the
greatest credit for the astute way
in which he handled the bowling
at his disposal and whenever he
made a distinct bowling change it
bore fruit, :

The fielding of the Trinidad
team was good by all comparative



standards. It is true that on
isolated occasions a few balls
actually p sd through — fields-

men's legs and arms but on the
whole, the. anticipation, picking
up and refurns to the wicket is
far and away above the general
standard obtained in the Trial
games here.

Simpson Guillen is a much im-
proved wicket-keeper and gave a
splendid performance.

Good Bowling

Skeete’s final figures of 4 for 60
in 11 overs are the result of cour-
ageous and clever bowling while
Jackbir’s 3 for 62 in 18 overs and
Ferguson's 2 for 89 in 18 overs
were fine supporting perform-
ances.

And now for the actual play: —

Stollmeyer opened his bowling
attack with King from the sereen
end and Jackbir from the Ken-
sington end. I thought that Jones
would have been given charge
from the screen end,

- Jackbir howled! some aglow
medium inswingers whic e@
varied cleverly and had set four
men in the leg trap. One soon
saw why Stollmeyer tried this
experiment for with the last ball
of his second over Jackbir floated
one of his inswingers a bit and
completely deceived Roy Marshal).
It pierced his defence and took
the middle and leg stumps.

One Down

Barbados in fifteen minutes had
lost the first wicket for 10 runs
and Marshall's contribution was
two,

On Clyde Walcott’s broad shoul-
ders most of the responsibility

@ On Page 7



TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113
DAY OR NIGHT



—_—



“AndI’ve cmuked

Swedes Unwilling To| them ever since! "













“What's the real purpose
of the filter tip? I suppose
you'll tell me that’s the secret
of the exquisite favour.” |




“No, the flavour, strange
to relate, comes from the

There'll never be a better cigarette

Ze
Me
/ 7a

“You're fun to know, Jimmy.
The last time we came here
it was a new cocktail: this
lime it’s my first du Maurier —
and very nice, too.”

“We do our best to
please. i thought you'd
like then. They do
seem to give a cleaner
and a cooler smoke.”

FAS}
( B00!

“ae












“It’s discovery night, David.
Jimmy's just introduced me
to my first du Maurier.””




“You are behind the times,
Nina’s been lyrical about
them for years.”

$1. for 50

MADE IN
ENGLAND

du MAURIER

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

SOLE DISTRIBUTOR: WILKINSON

& HAYNE

cCO,, LTD,, BR ETOWN



98



PAGE TWO





Carub Calling

A*s from yesterday, Trans-
Canada. Airlines have ex-
tended their Canada-Trinidad

flights through Bermuda and Bar-

bados. This eatension will last
throughout the remainder of the
tourist season. These flights will
Saturdays
The first flight

call at. Barbados ‘on
and Wednesdays.
of this extra service operated
through here yesterday, bringing
thirty passengers to Barbados
ahd taking seven passengers back
to Canada.

Successor Named

R. ADAM L. SELLAR of

Huntingdon Gleaner Inc.,
pu Shers of the Canada—West
ndies Magazine has be€n named
the editor and publisher of the
Canada-West Indies Magazine in
succession to the late Mr. H. C.
Collier.

e name Sellar is widely
known in Canada as an able and
suce@ssful family of publishers.
Mr. Adam Sellar’s brother, who
was formerly a partner in the
business, is now Auditor General
of Canada. Carib has been in-
formed that Mr. Frank Napier,
an experienced and favourably
known magazine editor has been

of “magazine and he will be

supported by other members of
the . staff of» the Huntingdon
Gleaner Inc. 2=

Former Student

M* one:

_do the actual editing Christ's Hospital



Mr. H. L. O. FLECKER
Bluecoat Headmaster

ae Oy
Headmaster

School)
yesterday afternoon
accompanied by his
daughter, Mr. Flecker

by B.W.LA.
wife and
is on a

Short Visit
R ARTHUR DeLIMA
Managing Director of Messrs.
Y. de Lima and Co. Ltd., w
in Barbados on a short visit, has
returned to Trinidad, He left by
B.W.LA., on Tuesday afternoon.
First Manager
AJOR and Mrs. Robert

Watson who have been in







AT the George Visuper

hotel
Englishwoma
figure stoac

Paris, an elderly
with a comfortable

up before a company of inter
national lawyers at a banquet
*lattended by Minister of Justicc
René Mayer and proposed the

ho was |health of the French Bar.

Her speech was in French, but

that was no diificulty for joviel
Mrs. Helena Normanton, oreo
Britain’s first two women K.Cs

Mrs. Normanton was on@ a

Barbados since December 9, 1950, student at Dijon University where

returned to Canada

Major and Mrs.

Thirty one years ago,

En Route To Canada
R AND MRS, HAROLD E.

DAHL arrived from Trinidad|mond an d
yesterday morning by T.C.A., to|pearl necklace
FLECKER, spend two weeks in Barbados be-|she wore at
of fore going to Canada for a com-|the banquet.
(The Bluecoat bined business and holiday visit, ,
arrived from Trinidad They are accompanied by their|ing to have it with me,” sh

two sons and daughter,
For the past four years they
have been living

yesterday|shé won a diploma
morning by T.C.A. Their home is} language and literature and learn-
in Montreal.

in French

ed the French trick of washing

Watson have|her hair in red wine.
been holidaying with their son-in-
law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs.
Lionel Williams at “Canbar” St.Jsent the English Bar at the gele-
Joseph,

Now she is in Paris to repre-

prations of the golden jubile# of

Major| French women lewyers.
Watson opened the present branch
of the Canadian Bank of Com- 3
merce in Barbados. Six years later] ton got herself a special licence
he left Barbados and this was his
first visit here since that time.

Before leaving, Mrs. Norman-

from the

Board of
Trade to take
out of the
country the

handsome dia-

“T had a
old
me.

Reason—the necklace was

a@ecial reason, mee

pre-

in Venezuela} sented to her by members of the
three-month tour of the Caribbean where Mr. Dah] used to do some] Old Bailey Bar Mess, of which
for the British Council, meeting fiying before he joined up with the]she was “junior and honorary

7T present holidaying in Bar- ther headmasters and lecturing “Canan” Sales Agency in Caracas.] treasurer” (equivalent to seeretary
bados is Miss Barbara Ann ° 2 Variety of educational sub-

Sheppard of Trinidad.
has just left school and was
formerly a student at the Holy
Name Convent in Port-of—Spain.
She is staying with the Carring-
tons in Cheapside.

Also staying there is Mr.
Lennox Johnston who _ arrived
from Trinidad on Tuesday. after-
noon by B.W.1.A. Mr: Johnston
is with Traders Association in
Port-of-Spain .

U.S. National Holiday

ington is celebrated
U.S.A. and in U.S

in the

Canada

Crane

Barbara Jects. His itinerary includes Vene- got out of V
‘zuela,
Guiana, Antigua and Jamaica.

Trinidad, Grenada, British

Natural Gas Director

R. AND MRS. JULIAN
GARRETT arrived = fror
yesterday morning by
T.C.A. They are staying at the
Hotel. Mr. Garrett has

come to take up the duties of

Director of Petroleum and Natural
Gas.
aoe birthday of George Wash- agreement.

He is here on a two-year

Until 1948, Mr. Garrett told

. possessions Carib, he was Vice-President and

today as a national holiday. It is General Manager of Northwestern
one ofthe biggest holidays in the Utilities Ltd. This gas company

U.S. calendar.
Abraham .Lincoln’s is celebrated

supplies gas to Edmonton, Alberta,
and a dozen other adjacent towns.

Mr. Dahl told Carib that they

the airport was closed due to the
rainy weather.

They are staying at the Barba-
dos Aquatic Club,

Extended

SEE
and Crafts Exhibition
Queen’s Park, has been extended

until March 3rd. Due to the rainy|haq happened in the

in non-legal language) until she

enezuela just before] became a K.C. two years ago.

She Is Proud
They threw a dinner party for
her in the judges’ dining-room at
the “Bailey” to celebrate the
twenty-fifth anniversary of women
being called to the Bar and gave

that the Barbados Arts |her the necklace. She is immense-
at} ly proud of it,

It was the first time such g thing
judges’

weather, attendance has been poor | dining-room and Mrs, Normanton

up to the present,
ended at the end of this month.

With T.C.A., Varicouver

It was to have} was the first woman to be re-

sponsible for the Bar Mess.
But a list of the things she has
done for the first time is so long

ISS MARY WATSON whorthat it becomes a bore, @ven to

works with T.C.A. in Van-
couver has returned to Canada

on February 12th, but it is not a Early in 1948 he retired from the after three weeks’ holiday here

national holiday
only in some of the 48 states.

Chasing Sunshine

M*. AND MRS, HOUGHLAND supply

of Vancouver who were in sota with gas from Alberta.
dos ‘a week ago returned

Barba
yestérday by T.C.A., from Trini-
dad. Due to the rainy weather
here they thought they would try
Trinidad. The weather there
however, is worse so they have
returned. Mr. Houghland is

lumberman in Vancouver. They
are staying at the Crane Hotel,

Leaving. To-morrow
RRIVING from Trinidad on

Tuesday afternoon
aes we Mr, and Mss. Pick
uyter. ey are staying a

Pa Beach Club.

r, Ruyter is Inspector for

Heineken’s Brewery in Central and
leave to-
for |B.G., by morhing by T.C.A. accompanied James who are here for eight days,

Tmorrpw siterncd
B.W.LA.
Back To: Trinidad

R. JOHN KERBEY and Mr.
A. E. F. BARNES, Manager

a Natural Gas Consultant and has
been very busy since especially
in connection with a project to
Saskatchewan and Minne-

the Engineering Institute of
Canada, the American Petroleum
Institute and the American Gas
Association, was at one time Presi-

tion.

When he left Alberta, he told
Carib, there was about eighteen
inches of snow on the ground. It
was the beginning of what they,

by in Canada, called a “Chinook”.

From Ontario
R. GERALD E, GREENE, a

farmer in Agincourt, Ontario,

from Canada yesterday
by his wife to spend about two
months in Barbados staying at the
Marine Hotel.

Arriving on the same plane
were Mr, and Mrs. Fred K, Jas-

and Assistant Manager respective. person of Kingsville, Ontario. Mr.
ly of the Petroleum Marketing Co. Jasperson is a Barrister, They are Barbados Telephone Co., arrived

(W.1.) Ltd. Trinidad who were in
Barbados on a short visit returned
to Trinidad yesterday afternoon
by B.W.LA.,

~> En Route
A(R. KENNETH LOWE who. is

enroute to the U,S.,
8 from Buenos Aires,
a few days in Barbados en
with Mr. Duncan at “Boylston”,

St. James. He left yesterday
afternoon for Trinidad by
B.W,LA. >

and Kingston, Ontario, Mrs, Syrie
spent Pjelsticker and Mrs, Mary Grace
route of Toronto. Mrs. Forman and Mrs,
Crace are here for six weeks stay-

guests at the Enmore Hotel,
Six Weeks

MONG the passengers arriv-
ing by T.C.A, yesterday were
Lorraine D. Forman of
H.

Mrs,

ing at Cacrabank, Mrs. Pielsticker
is Staying at Sam Lords, she too is
down for six weeks,

BY THE WAY....

A WEIGHT-LIFTER who has
been Struggling for eight
months to lift a horse, gave up
yesterday.

_. He said he had tried clasping
it round the body, Then he had
gripped the two hind legs, and
after that the two forelegs. He
got his shoulders under the horse
and heaved. He made the horse
lie down and tried to pick it up
by the head and neck. He placed
it On a trestle table, stood on a
chair and tried to lift it in that
way. Yesterday he said, ‘There
is no future in this country for a
weight-lifter.” So he has gone to
France, to the Ardéche, where the
horses are smaller.

Contempt of Court
Gooseboote: Will you please
tell the jury in your own words
what you painted on your kennel.
le: A — ship. Them’s my

own words,

Cocklecarrot: You will please
leave out the expletives.

Bottle: The what?

Cocklecarrot: These dockyard
oaths.

Bottle: Well, I painted a ship,

just a ship, not a —— ship, but a
ship, only them’s not my words,
.-Cocklecarrot; Please miss out
the adjective.

le: You mean the —— ?

Cock! : Ido.
: Bottle: Then you mean tell
em in your own words, eh? (To

the jury) Gents,'I painted a ship
on my aly pi and why the ——
Cocklecarrot: I fine you £5 for

contempt of court.
tle: Put it down to my

account, cully. I’ve got a *undred
quid's worth of contempt for this
~——- court,

In. Short Supply

The recission of coal through-
put, attributed by experts to an
overall wunder-delivery necessi-
tated by a temporary non-surplus
of stocks available for basic dis-
tribution, is thought by other
spokesmen in touch with authori-
tative circles to be due to a sea-
sonal diminution of man-hours
resulting in a lower potential of
total output operating over a
wide range and accentuating the
target-gap between production
and consumption.
(Issued by Beachcomber News
Service. Copyright in all music-

halls.)

Crammed With
Hyperdobulin

TTEMPTS to make plastic

coal have resulted in the
production at Cromer of an edible
substance which gives off a smell
of seaweed, The Ministries of
Food and Fuel should at once
issue a propaganda leaflet, say-
ing: In the bad old Tory days
only children ate coal, Now we
can all eat it.

All About Tea
OMEONE asked me what actu-

ally occurs when tea _ is
blended. It is fortunate that the
seeker of information hit on

me, as what I don’t know about
tea-blending would fill forty vol-
umes.

second visit to Barbados.

Nephew
RRIVING from

Mrs. Normanton herself.
It began in 1919 when she be—

. It is a holiday company and opened an office as Staying at Cacrabank. This is her|came the first woman ever to be

admitted as a bar student, She
was the first woman barrister to
be briefed at the High Court, the

Bermuda]|Olq Bailey and London Sessions;

yesterday morning by T.C.A.|'the first to appear for the Crown
Mr. Garrett who is a member of 8s Mr. M, V. Redman’s nephew/in a criminal appeal (that was

Mr. Arnold Redman who is here| when Private Robert Slo
for three weeks’ holiday accom-|his case and was hanged fo
They yy. murder in 1948).

panied by his wife.
staying with Mr. and Mrs.M.

adent of the Canadian Gas Associa- Redman at “Beachgate”, Hastings.

From Michigan

lost
wife

Fish—Plus
Sitting at ease by the fire in
the book-cluttered living-room of

M* and MRS. CHARLES F.|her Victorian villa in Beckenham,
WARRICK

arrived
Canada
T

from | Mrs,
yesterday morning by!matters aside to talk of other

Normanton waves these

C.A. to spend three weeks’ | things.

holiday. They are staying at the
Enmore Hotel. Mr. Warrick is

ngs
“I may be a poor barrister,” she
chuckles, “but I can cook.” There

an Electrical Engineer in Detroit, was fish for lunch, but she had

Michigan,
Also arriving yesterday from
Michigan were Dr. and Mrs, Edgar

staying at Sam Lords,
is a dentist.

Maraging Director
R. GEORGE de NOBRIGA,
Managing Director of the

Dr. James

trom Trinidad on Tuesday after-
noon by B.W.I.A. He is a guest
at the Marine Hotel.

Sisters
ISS JOAN BRISLEY and
her sister Donna have been
spending a holiday in Barbados.
They are staying at Cacrabank,
Joan is Secretary in the Canadian
Consulate and Donna is a nurse.
Both are from Winnipeg. They
expect to leave today on their

return journey home.

By Beachcomber

titivated it up with herbs and fried
it in feather—light batter so that
it remained cod only inti strict-
ly legal sense.

She recalled the “noble stuffing”
she had devised for the Christmas
turkey.
American guest that he demanded
a whole plateful of it’).

Reports From French Dress Shops

The elegant woman of 1951 will still be wearing a 1950 suit
Basic lines have not changed. Length’ remains the same
shoulders natural. Waists are in the right place, and small
Newest fashion features are the olive-shaped apron front
skirt, introduced by Desses and the pinafore by Alwynn.

Colours

All. shades of yellow, from
palest yoghourt white to toasted
apricot. Favourites are citron,
canary and mimosa, Navy and
grey for day wear feature Javish
touches of white piqué. For cock-
tails and evening dresses, smoky

However, the main point is pink is first choice,

that it is not a question, as many
seem to think, of smelling and
chewing every single leaf of tea
in.a pile. The blender works to

Materials ;
This is a seagon of deception.
Wools look like silk or linen: silks

an average, smelling handfuls of | 100k like wool, and cottons resem-

the stuff, and putting them down

ble silk. All are crisp-looking and

in smaller heaps. The assistant|light in weight, either plain in
blender smells smaller handfuls, | colour cr very finely striped.

chewing an occasional leaf, and
selects the different kinds, which
he puts in a heap remote from
the others. This heap is then
smelled, scrutinised, and tasted by

Suits
Skirts are slim-fitting, often
with wrap-over backs. Jackets are
held by leather belts instead of

the blender himself, who makes | 0Uttons, have tong, low revers and
the final selection after working | flaring basques, matching or con-

out percentages with a delicate
machine called the Theasinenside-
coctometer.
content, weight and _ scent
parallel columns, by a_ small
needle attached to a ring. If I
can be of any further hindrance,
I shall be overjoyed.

A Passing Thought

j THINK it was Longfellow who | again provide the
said, “If you are going in for|terest. Afternoon dresses

This registers leaf | portant feature
in | with big flaps.

trasting waistcoats or starched
shirt-fronts. Pockets are an im-
jutting forwards

Dresses

The coat dress is smart with a
wrap-over front and white
piqué collars and cuffs. Pockets
detail in-
have

weight-lifting, the first thing is] décolleté square or rectangular
to decide what is worth lifting.” |necklines and full skirts, some-

The words came back to me when | times with

I read about the famous Mr.
Sugrue, of Killorglin, County
Kerry. He picks up with his teeth
a chair containing a fourteen-
stone man playing an accordion,
If I were an impresario I would
gather together a team of lifters
and an orchestra. As far as I
know no orchestra has ever per
ed while held aloft in mid-air by
the teeth of strong men. Many
people who take no notice of
yood music would, by this means,
be attracted to it.

SEE BEES EEE EEBEBEEEHESS

BOOTS *%#

Dress

Dial 4606

John White

Men's Shoes 86-1019

115

4

Ballerinas
Velvet Finish, Rubber Sole

Black,
D225
TAN-SAD Go-Carts
12

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Your Shoe Stores

1 455

Brown

to 234

Dial 4220

a matching or contrast-
ing apron front. A pretty siyle

has side-pleated fullness, Many
dresses are teamed with capes,
Which can also be worn as

reversible apron fronts,





Dries Quicker

DIAL

THE HARRADOS
COTTON



the week

Mrs. K. C.

Can Also Cook

(“It so appealed to an’



SIGMAVAR
‘ Water and Weatherproof
VARNISH

The Ideal all-in-one Varnish for
Yachts, Floors and Household

WHATEVER IT IS—Sigmavar can

Stocked by Our Hardware Department



FACTORY LTD.

20S ADVOCATE

Cee eee cores nana

| couple. Mr. Clark, a chartered
accountant died nearly three years
ago.

For much of her Jegal career,
Mrs. Normanton has had to fight
prejudice against her sex.

But now that she has ceased
to struggle and has become an
laccepted feature of thé lawyer’s
landscape, her feminist claws are
sheathed.

“Let us see that men get fair
treatment,” she advises kindly,

“Married men often get g poorer
deal in the lower courts than
women,”

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
—L.E.8.





CROSSWORD

Diba S. Lal olednked
oe Ee
dd ahead J
£8 £9 Gee ew
lh Metedhcl bs beeieed cd

el dh i le)



From the kitchen «her talk
skipped nimbly to Shakespeare.
Why did Shakespeare put Portia in
Padua when the original woman )
lawyer studied at Bologna? Mrs. ; wave the Humber
Normanton, one-time at Bologna | 10. bub found tn new prefab

towns, and (3)

University herself (“I was the first 12. What the ear may be. (7)
ritish Ya ways. (3)



A
» Wild duck. (9
. Sort of saa

barrister to study there since the] 13. Part of
Reformation”), explained that in is ay oneself fi tety. (7
considerable historical detail. ia. Uariete Oh ti mee Th
From Shakespearean research, | 21 siven ing (7) 22. Sole. (4)
via a recent learned article she ‘ aen é
A + wn quite differently. (4)
wrote about Twelfth Night and} 25. Moods change it seems. (5)
the Temple, to her favourite Down
modern writers. “My pet is Dear 1 Ho¥, Jong, seemingly, for @ sup-
” “ . iter,
Inge,” says she, “I dote on Dr] 4 Photographic halo produced by
reflection. (8)
3. He makes ties go this way. (6)
4. Could produce dated dice. (9)
5. Christmas produced many an
unexpected one (and not in the
milis). (4)



by EVELYN IRONS



$ He ree on be generals, (4)
Inge”. Among the poets she] 9: A Ring mae es det ~
picked on Edith Sitwell as “un- i pone aa knot, Y bin;
f er ’ . cams. o n.
doubtedly the best living.” 19. Appear indistinctly. (4)
20. They oceur in tennis. (4)
Women M.P.s 41. It's Just put on. (3)

“T loathe laborious wit,” she an-

Solution of Saturday's puzzle —Across:
nounced recalling hours of tedium Fait

l pote: 6. Uncanny;
eh 2 tr :



ous; il,

, h Foes ie aan? oR 15 o 3 it

* it- ‘orn; py: 16 re ‘ease; »

in the courts, Who was the wit- rm:' 19 Year: 80, Beare.’ Beww: 4

tiest judge in her experience? Luck: a Antelope Pe :

“ ha . .. * sence; 5, annock; : elery; 8,

Harry EV e. His brilliance was] yitrate: 9.Noematic: 12, Tara: 15, ste’
so easy”. (Sir Harry Eve died 10

years ago.)



Is there a woman lawyer capable
of being a judge? .“Well, why not






rTM mea

Rose Heilbron? Myself? Certainly
not,” Miss Heilbron, 36 now, took |] Bed tt 3
silk at the same time as Mrs Wath 1 of



Normanton, two years ago.

But although she looks forwarc
hopefully to the day when =
woman will be a judge—and ever
Lord Chief Justice—the quality o/
her mercy is somewhat strainec
towards women MPs. After that
titanic fight for the vote what ¢
bunch of nonentities they have
been up to date! she exclaims.

This is q change from the old
feminist days when married as a
law student in 1921, Helena Nor-
manton refused to take the name of
her husband, Mr. Gavin Clark and
was the first married English-
woman to take out a passport in
her own name.

They were a devoted, childless

Treeline lets (oh MES ia al

When headache, fatigue and upset
stomach ruin your morning, you can
“save the day” with Alka-Seltzer.
Take it on arising, again—if needed
—later in the day. Keep a supply of

quick acting Alka-Seltzer
handy — always!

Alka-Seltzer




























wv



OPENING FRIDAY (23)
s=aSHOW S=3
2.30-4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

iP 96

a F a



PARIS, :

PRIZE
FOR AN
EVIL
PRINCE!

Evening Frocks
Evening frocks are either slim
sheath-like, softened with
floating chiffon scarves and huge

or

bows, or crinoline style with The one and only
lavish embroidery. The strapless Tarzan’s greatest
top is still first choice but there adventure — hunt-
are many one-sleeved models. ing down the
Jewellery terror-men
Prettiest fashion was shown by of a wicked
Paquin whose mannequins pin- '
ned diamond brooches one side jungle ruler!

below the waist belt; Earrings in
diamond half loops outline the
contour of the ear.

Jacques Fath models wore a
big jewelled brooch on one shoul-
der, and a diamond stick-pin in
their chignons. Griffe uses jewel-
led bees on eye-veils, sleeves and
high-necks,

Accessories

Hats have forward brims and
higher crowns. Many are mascu-
line in style, and trimmed with
ribbon. Tiny cuffed gloves are
worn in bright yellow with many
outfits. Shoes are unsubstantial
ldcking, with pastel straps or cut-
away sides. Fath shows slim white
umbrellas, which do double duty
for rain or sun.

Hair Styles

Hair styles are new and not too
becoming. They wave softly back
from the face, caught by gilt hair
combs into large flat buns or chig-
nons, For evening, clusters of curls
are worn at the nape of the neck,
tied back with velvet ribbon.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.




Furniture



STAND IT!

Wears Longer




fa evak Matee TOR
Distributed by RKO RADIO PICTURES, te)
KNOW WHAT TO DO, IF
THE FLAMING TERROR
STRIKES !

SEE HOW . . . FRIDAY ..

| PLAZA

,/
| B'TOWN (DIAL 2310)








2039



CO-OPERATIVE







SSS





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22,

| B.B.C. Programme

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 1951

3 am. — 12.55 pm. 19.76 m
6.30 a.m. Football Fixtures; 6.45 a.m.
Sperting Reeord; 7 a.m, The News; 7.10

a.m. News Anatysit; 7.15 a.m. From the
Editorials; 7.25 aim. Programme Parade;
7.30 am. Generally Speaking; 7.45 a.m
Listeners’ Choice; 8 a.m. Land and
Livestock, 8.30 a.m. Susheela Devi; 8.45
em, Plain Baglish; 0 am. The News;
9.10 am, Home News from Britain;
9.15 am, Close Down; 11.15 a.m. Pro-
gramme Parade; 11.25 a.m Listeners’
Choice, 11.45 aan, Special Dispatch; 14
‘noon’ The News; 12.10 pm. News
Analysis, 12.15 p.m, Close Down,
4.15—6,00 p.m. — 25.53 m.

4.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice; 6 p.m.
Composer of the Week; 5.15 p.m. Scot-
tish’ Magazine; 5.45 p.m. Melody on
Strings: 6 p.m. How to argue, 640 p.m
Interlude



6.00715 pm. — 31.32 m. & 4843 m.
645 p.m, Programme Parade; 7 p.m

News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis;

te We see Britain; 7.45 p.m. Gen-
3 aking.

7AG—11.00 — 31.32 m & 48.43 m,

8 p.m, Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Sir

AQUATIC CLUB C
TONIG

ROBERT CUMMINGS



1951





Altention
Children

BEGINNING from next
week and continuing weekly
children not older than 12
years are asked to send to
the Editor, Children’s Cor-
ner, short stories on any
subject they choose. Stories
must not be more than 200
words in length. A prize
will be given for the best
story, which will be publisr-
ed in our Sunday's paper
(children’s corner), Stories
must be sent in not later
than Thursday every week.

J jagili's Last Journey; 845 p.m.
Composer of the week; 9 p.m. Special
Dispatch; 9.15 p.m. Have a go; 9.45 p.m.
Do you remember; 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m, From the Editorials; 10.15
p.m. Take it from here; 10.45 p.m Moray
McLaren talking; 11 p.m, The music of
Sid Phillips and his band.

ENEMA (Members Only)

HT at 8.30

SUSAN HAYWARD

with Agnes MOOREHEAD — Joan LORRING—John ARCHER

in “THE LOST

MOMENT”

A Universal—International Release

Commencing Priday 23rd
D:

ANA ANDREWS—SUSAN HAYWARD
in “MY FOOLISH HEART"
! Distributed by R.K.O, Radio Pictures





TO SEE! JAMES CAGNEY

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

YOUR LAST OPPORTUNITY TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

IN WHITE HEAT



CODE OF THE SADDLE &
Johnny Mack BROWN

Three Shows FRIDAY th 2.30,
daily 4.45 and 8.30 p.m

TARZAN AND THE
lex BARKER—Vanessa BROWN





\= ——

TO-DAY 1.30 p.m. only (A Monogram Action Double)

SLAVE GIRL,






RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL
Jimmy WAKELY

4.45 and 8.30 p.m. and continuing
. R.K.O, Radio Presents

Plus: The Timeiy Short Feature
YOU CAN BEAT THE A-BOMB



PLAZA Theatre=O)STIN (DIAL 8404)

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p.m.

BELOW THE DEADLINE & MR. MUGGS RIDES AGAIN

Warren Douglas

MIDNITE SATURDAY 24th
JOHNNY MACK
RAIDERS OF THE BORDER

. _ FRIDAY, SAT., SUN. 5 and 8.30
Errol FLYNN—Alexis SMITH in ‘



with Leo Goreey and the Bowery Boys

(A. Monogram Double Action)
BROWN in (both)
& RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH

p.m, (Warner's Action Spectacle)
*‘MONTANA”, Color by Technicolor

GATET WY—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE 8.30 (Paramount Double)

RED HOT and BLUE & THIS GUN for HIRE

with Betty Hutton

FRID., SAT,, SUN, 8.30
“MIRACULOUS &

in Colorful Cinecolor

with Rory Calhoun

JOURNEY”
Audrey Long, George Cleveland



with Alan Ladd

p.m. MAT: SUN. 5 p.m,

BAD MEN OF TOMBSTONE

with Barry_ Sullivan
Marjorie Reyn
Brod. Crawf

GLOBE THEATRE

TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. Your Double!

THE MUMMY &

&
Boris KARLOFF
Zita JOHANN

DANGEROUS GAME

&
Richard
Jeanne

LEN
LLY

OPENING TOMORROW 5 & 8.30 P.M.

“A TOAST OF
Mario Lanza and

LOCAL TALENT ON

NEW ORLEANS”
Kathyrn Grayson
PARADE



EMPIRE

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.30

Republic Big Double . .

Dorothy PATRICK &
Arthur FRANZ

“TARNISHED ”
AND
“PRINCE OF THE PLAIN”

with
Monty HALE &
Roy BARCROFT

ROXY

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15

20th Century Fox Double . .

Gregory PECK &
Hugh MARLOWE
n

i
“TWELVE O'CLOCK HIGH





2
e
as



ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.30

Columbia Smashing Double

Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETTB
n

‘WHIRLDWIND RIDERS’
SOUTH of DEATH VALLEY

wit
Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETTE

OLYMPIC

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15

United Artists Double...

Gregory PECK &
Joan BENNET

THE MACOMBER AFFAIR



-~

S——————S_a===Q"==|



AND AND
“DEEP WATERS” “STRANGE GAMBLE”
with Starring
Dana ANDREWS & William BOYD &
L Jean PETERS Andy CLYDE
COCLEPOSSLEOP OPEL LELOLSE SLES VSEPSSS CS SPSSOSSSOS
WE CAN SUpPLy at
GALVANISED
‘ BARBED
%
$ NOW. AT PRICES :
‘ THAT CANNOT | S
: BE REPEATED :
% ° :
Pn i
* Plantations Ltd. a
, SeococeeesesoetoseocoocobossssseooeeeEebeestete 3

‘
«

gy RS





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

Anti-Sub
Helicopters

LONDON, Feb.
Helicopters may be based on
merchant ships to warn convoys
of approaching submarines.
Extensive trials of the plan have
been carried out in the English
Channel.



This means instead of having a
light carrier with every coxivoy,
ene of more merchant ships can
be fitted with a special flight plat-
form for helicopters.

Sea-lanes near the convoy could
then be searched for submarines
which have
range, shore~based aircraft.

Specially strengthened _ stecl
platforms would be fitted above
the deck at the stern of the ship,
clear of all rigging.

For the special tests a specially
strengthened steel platform was
fitted above the deck at the stern
of a 9,000 ton merchant ship.

For take-off the pilot rose off
the platform in the normal way.
During flight the helicopter kept
in touch with the ship by radio.

When landing, the pilot brought
the machine own to within about
20 ft. of the stern of the ship and
hovered above the platform. He
then slowly lowered it to the
platform, directed by a “control-
ler” who used two flags to guide
him in. When not in use, the heli-
copter is “anchored” to the flight
platform.

Naval pilots have mastered the
difficulties of bringing the heli-
copter on a small platform which
rolls and dips in rough seas.

It has proved possible to land a
helicopter when the deck is pitch-
ing and rolling as much as 10
and 20 ft. at a time.

Tests have been made in vary-
ing winds and it has been found
that gusts of wind flex the rotor-—
blades about when they are re-
turning at very low speeds. To
overcome this a canvas screen was
fitted to the forward part of the
platform to protect it against the
wind.—LN.S.

escaped the a

22, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE
INSURANCE DINNER



NORTH AMERICAN LIFE DINNER at Xanadu, Marine Hotel--

In the Picture. Left to Right:

Mrs. Han Edghill, Harley Hughes, Mrs. Robert Challenor,

Harold Kidney, Cecil de Caires, Mrs. Harold Kidney, D'Arcy Galt,

Wm. Anderson,

Vice-President of North

American Life; Mrs.,Harley Hughes, Hon. Robt. Challenor, Mrs. Wm. Anderson, Ken Williams, Miss Hetti

Challenor, Stan Edghill.



Cow Gives Birth To Canada Is Refuge

Calf Of Another

WISCONSIN, Feb. 20.

A calf conceived by one cow
has been born here to another
cow to which a fertilised ovum
had been transferred.

The first cow had had to be
slaughtered immediately — after
fertilisation so that eggs could be
removed the announcement said,
but attempts were being made to
perfect the technique so that both
animals survived. ;

This would make it possible
for a high grade cow to provide
Ova for many calves each year
which could then be bred in low
grade animals.—Reuter.



2 Vietnam Ministers

Resign New Cabinet

Vietnam Premier, Tran

SAIGON, Feb. 21,
Van Huu announced to-night

he had accepted the resignations of Defence Minister,
Nguyen Huu Tri and Education Minister Dr. Phan Hub
Quat from his new Cabinet which met for the first time

yesterday.

The formation of the new
cabinet had resolved the coun-
try’s 30-day crisis. Reliable

sources here said the cabinet was
a “caretaker” Government which
was expected to remain in Office
for about three months.

The two ministers who resigned
within 24 hours of the Cabinet’s









OMPONG _-° AP,
y~ CHAM fe WS
~~ *PREYVENG: ‘
VE SAIGON "et
KAMPOT ‘ >
wt“ eS
CHA-TIEN Sy ARIA Aq
me ~)

beginning; had expresséd dissat-
isfaction the Premier said and he
had decided to carry on without
them,

He said he would himself accept
the defence portfolio in addition
to the portfolio 6f Foreign Affairs
and the Interior,—Reuter.



HRATIE







CANTHO
CLiEU




| British Secretary





Of Trappist Monks
Who Fled Chinese

ST. NORBERT, Man., Feb.,

Ten Trappist monks — nine
Chinese and one Belgian—entered
the Notre Dame De La Prairie
monastery here a year ago after
escaping from the Communists in
China.

Recently granted permission to
speak to a reporter—by religious
vows they are sworn to silence
among themselves—Rev. Simeon
Chang, leader of the Chinese
monks and Rev. Victor Chu said
they ardently desire to return to

ina.

“But” they said, “it may be
two years—it may be 10—before
we can return. It may be never.”

They served in the monastery
of Our Lady of Joy in Cheng-
Tmy, Hopeh Province, before
fleeing after torture and oppres-
sion by the Communists,

One of their number, Rev.
Benedict Joseph, is in good health
now. A Communist bullet, “fired
just for fun,” entered his chest
and came out of his back while
he was standing in the doorway
of the Chinese monastery

The monks here have a self-
contained little world of some 50
fathers, lay brothers and students
for the priesthood. The monastery
is 10 miles south of Winnipeg.

Versatile Monks

The monks pitch into any job.
Father Chu, 40, and Father Chang,
82, for instance, work with electri-
cal equipment in the mechanicai
shop. The monastery’s prize dairy
herd of 300 or more Holstein cai-
tle annually wins top awards in
shows in Canada and the United
States.

Along with other Red River
Valley residents, the monks suf-
fered in last spring’s flood. Tne
water damaged caves which fo
years have been the curing place
for the monastery’s famous Trap-
pist cheese.

The monastery, with its cowled
and silent monks, offers a strange
contrast between medieval life
and the 20th century. Modern
methods are used on the 1,600-
acre farm where 400 galions of
milk is produced daily for the
Winnipeg market.

They are about 75 Trappist
monasteries in the world, mostly
in Europe. In each, the monks re-
tire at 8 p.m.—7 in winter months
—and rise at 2 a.m. to pray until
6 a.m. They spend the remainder
of the day alternately at work,
study and prayer.—(CP)



W. INDIES MAY BE NEXT

DURHAM, South England,
Feb. 21,
The British West Indies, when
federated will probably be the
next to achieve Commonwealth
status Patrick Gordon Walker
of State for
Commonwealth Relations told a
press conference here to-day.
—Reuter.



Don’t let weariness make your day seem long!
Wash regularly with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap

and you'll feel fresh and

Its deep-cleansing lather keeps you fresher
so much longer. So keep a tablet of Lifebuoy
handy — for day-long freshness !

free of weariness.

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS








oo



U.S. Saved West
Europe From
Communism

—REYNAUD

OMAHA, Neb., Feb. 20.

Paul Reynaud, former Premier
of France, said here that the
United States had saved Western
Europe from Communism.

“You already have won a great
victory in Europe through the suc-
cess of the Marshall Plan,” he
said. ;

“You have saved Europe from
Communism,” he continued. “It
remains to make it safe. The
problem is to remove from the
Russians the temptation to lay
their hands upon the Ruhr and
Western Europe.”

That threat could be met, he
said, with sixty divisions backed
by the threat of a large stock of
atom bombs.—Reuter,



U.S. Consider Pact
With Australia
And New Zealand

WASHINGTON, Feb. 24,
The United States is consider-
ing a triangular alliance with
Australia and New Zealand as a
move towards a projected Pacifie
pact similar to the North Atlantic
treaty aceording to usually well

informed sources here to-day.

They said John Foster Dulles,
President Truman’s special envoy
would diseuss the possibility of
such a pact during his visit to the
two countries.

Alternatives being discussed
left a way epen for other nations
to join in the alliance later.

—Reuter.

No More Guards

WASHINGTON, Feb, 20.

The American Army will call
no more National Guard divisions
into service unless the world situa-
tion worsens. Divisions now on
duty will “be released after their
21 months services, it was an-
nounced today, Gen. Maxwell
Taylor, the Army Training Com-
mander, told reporters that 98,000
National Guardsmen were or
active duty.—Reuter.



Boby
Pawela’

Pe Baad

of

SELECT THESE EARLY
Simoniz Wax &

Kleener
Chamois & Polishing Cloths

Back Up Lamps
Spot Lamps
Tractor Lamps

Tituminated Fender Guides
Jeweled Exhaust Pipe Extensions
Steering Wheel Covers

Bumper Jacks
Grease Guns

6 Volt & 12 Volt Horns

Miracle Adhesive

Valve Grinding Compound
Mechanics Bearing Blue
Cylinder Black Heat Resisting Paint

Flake Graphite
Fluxite

Battery Testers
Battery Cables
Brass Shim Metal

Body Solder Plane and Blades

— Also
Decarbonizing Gasket Sets for all popular English
and American Cars and Trucks

CKSTEIN BROTHERS

_
E
4

Bay

i

1
Street

)
)
}?
(pO



_ ARRIVALS














































Life Assurance
Celebrates
70th Anniversary

An Agency meeting of the re—
presentatives in the British West
Indies division of the North Amer-
jean Life Assurance Co.; was held
at the Marine Hotel on the 19th
imstant at 2.30 pm. under the
chairmanship of Mr. W. M. An-
derson C.B.E. F.S.A. Managing }}
Director and Vice-President of |
the Company ",

The Representatives attending
were Mr. D’Arey Galt of Trinidad,
Mr. Ken Williams of Grenada, Mr.
Ceci] F. de Caires of British Gui- }}
ana, Mr. Stanley Edghill, Director |}
of the firm of R. & G. Challenor
Ltd. Local Agents, and Mr. Harold
Kidney, Local Representative,
North American Life, a purely
MUTUAL Company of Toronto
Canada, is this year celebrating
its 70th ANNIVERSARY

This year 1950 has been a record]
year in the history of the Com-
pany, which reflects the outstand-
ing service rendered to policy-
holders by their representatives
throughout the world.

On the occasion of the anniver-
sary, a dinner was held on Monday
Jast at the Ocean View Hotel at
whict# the following were pres-
ent:—

Mr. W. M. Anderson, C.BE.,
F.S.A., and Mrs. Anderson, the
Hon. Robt. Challenor and Mrs
Challenor, Mr. Harley Hughes
K.C. and Mrs. Hughes, Mr.
and Mrs. Stanley Edghill, Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Kidney, Miss H
M. Challenor, Mr. D, A. Galt, Mr
Xen Williams and Mr, Cecil de
Caires.

Suitable speeches and replies
were made proposing the toasts
to the Company, the Vice—Presi-
dent and to the Branch on their
outstanding achievements during
the year. #)



Pope Pius X Will Be
Beatified In May

VATICAN CITY, Feb. 20.
The Vatican’s congregation of
rites to-day completed the last
step before the beatification of
Pope Pius X (1903—1914) ex-
pected sorne time in May.

The congregation gathered in
the Throne Hall of the Vatican
Palace handed to the _ present
Pope their written vote declaring
that us X was “blessed” and
asking him to fix a date for his
“glorification”,

The congregation had earlier
approved two “miracles” attribut-
ed to Pope Pius X as pre
requisite for beatification.

These were the cures of two
nuns suffering from malignant
growth. The first nun died in
1939, The second is still alive and
is expected to attend the beatifi-
cation ceremony.

—Reuter.






$250m. Pipeline

TORONTO, Feb. 19.

A Government scientist predict-
ed Saturday that Canada is enter-
ing an age of pipeline construction
that will bring Alberta natural
gas and oil eastward as far as
Ontario and Quebec. Dr. G. 5S.
Hume, Director General of the
Scientific Services Department of
Mines, Ottawa, told the Royal
Canadian Institute that although,
it would cost $250,000,000 to build
a pipeline serving eastern Canada
the line would be built as soon
as western reserves of oil and gas
exceeded the needs of the prairie
provinces, Next spring many ol
you will be driving cars on gaso~
line refined at Sarnia, Ontario
from Alberta crude oil he said
in referring to the new 1,127 mile
pipeline from Edmonton tc
Superior, Wis.- —(CP)











































Dial 4269 }





} JERSEY REGULAR
} SLIPS

ADVERTISE—It Pays

PAGE THREE

> amie saseee omen ts ena oo YR ANN Me a

Sy
SS

BARGAINS

IN
LINGERIE



en

YOU'RE SURE TO LIKE

Maralyn

MILK PLUS

HOT

JERSEY HALF SLIPS
White, Pink, Black

$1.92 each



Maralyn is a fine bed-time drink
and helps you to sleep soundly.’
And nothing could be nicer...
Maralyn is creamy milk deliciously
flavoured, and enriched with ener-
gising sugar, malt and yeast.

A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT

NO NEED TO ADD
MILK OR SUGAR

MARALYN anc eros







Assorted Colours e ae ‘ 7
$1.92 each t e DOCTORS SAY: e




"QUAKER OATS

is so Nourishing

NIGHT DRESSES
Pink, Blue, White with
elastic waist

$3.36 each

BRASSIERES

Lace Trimmed

$L.31 per pair

BRASSIERES
Nylon

$1.41 per pair

Delicious Quaker Oats gives you
a generous supply of important
food elements in a healthful,
whole-grain cereal.



e Rich in Vitamin B, which turns food into “body-
fuel’’, Quaker Oats aids in building resistance to
fatigue. Because it supplies needed nourishment
with so little tax on the digestive system, this
“natural” food is favored by elderly people as well
as growing youngsters and active adults. Quaker
Oats is the perfect breakfast for a// the family!

PANTY GIRDLES
$1.80 per pair

BRIEF PANTIES

Glove Silk Finish

Poe MORE reason THAN EVER TO BUY QUAKER OATS!

TB¢Y per pair MORE ENERGY............... it's rich in carbohydrates
MORE STRENGTH..................plenty of proteins
it. @ MORE STAMINA. . because of generous Thiamin (Vitamin B;)

MORE ENJOYMENT. . . everybody loves the delicious fever
THE MODERN

‘DRESS SHOPPE









HOW TO PREPARE A TASTY
NOURISHING BREAKFAST

DRESS

Boil 2 cups of . Add sali
BROAD STREET 1 2 cups of water. A ts

When boiling, add 1 cup of
Quaker Oats. Cook it, stirring,
for 2% mioutes. That's all.





YEAR BOOK 1951

The Advocate Co Ltd’, will publish a Year Book of Barbados
in 1951.

The Year Book will contain three parts:--

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know ut
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.
Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
etc.

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about
this information solicited should be sent in immediately or not
later than March 15th 1951.

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd. Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book-is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about:their respective organisa-
tions immediately or not later than March 15th 1951.

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951.

Advertisers are asked to get in touch with
Mr. Trevor Gale,

Advertising Manager,
Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)

(2)




























PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS 49 ADVOGATE

Sy ee Oe eee |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd, Broad 8!., Bridgetown.



Thursday, February 22, 1951



COUNTING

THE House of Assembly on Tuesday
passed a bill to amend and consolidate the
acts relating to the Colonial Treasurer. The
provisions of this bill seek among other
things to change the title to that of Ac-
countant General and to transfer some of
the functions ef the Auditor General to
the officer.

it is at least an initial step along the lines
advocated that the Treasury be attached
to the department of the Financial Secre-
tary and be under the supervision of that
officer leaving the Audit Department as the
final check on the disbursements from the

Treasury.

The introduction of the bill shows that it
was a fallacious belief that the House of
Assembly could control the purse strings
of the Treasury by retaining the appoint-
ment of the Colonial Treasurer. The new
bill now brings the Treasurer within the
ranks of the Civil Establishment and makes
that officer no longer responsible to the
House but to the Governor. The change
was long overdue.

It was not explained however whether
the step now taken was one in a series
which would bring the departments to-
gether. It might be that the wholesale
change of the appointment and control of
the Treasurer by the Governor+and the
amalgamation of the two offices might have
been regarded as too much to be done at
a single stroke of the pen, but the sugges-
tion has already been made and the public
have grown to expect, as Mr. Adams said
during the debate, “that as the administra-
tion of the departments becomes more com-
plex the island should go forward.”

In view of the complexity of which the
Leader of the House spoke, it is worth
noting that there has always been a sys-
tem of pre-audit and it is this which has
saved Barbados on several occasions from
financial difficulties. Under that system the
funds from the Treasury can only be paid
out after the Auditor General has certified
the voucher. It is the duty of the Audit
Department to make sure that the original
sum voted by the House has not been
already expended when demands are made
on the Treasury. The amount on the
voucher can only be paid when the vote
has not been exhausted.

_ Tf as in the other places there was a
post-audit system it might happen that
demands might be made by way of vouch-
er for payment under heads which have
already been exhausted. The result can
easily be imagined.

It has always been the boast of the peo-
ple of this island that we have been able to
pay our own way because of our methods
of handling our financial resources. This
must never be relaxed. Even ‘with the
change advocated that the Financial Secre-
tary be head of the two departments with °
an Accountant General as cashier responsi-
ble for the funds paid and an accountant to
check the payments, it is necessary to
maintain the supervision of the Auditor
General. It is hoped that the changes pro-
vided for in this bill constitute only the
early step in a series which will bring our
system of financial control up to a standard
in keeping with modern administration the ,
world over.

»
rh eee aL

WOMEN

A PUBLIC notice in the Press yesterday
advised women who are unemployed to
register with the Labour Department in
order to be available if opportunity arises
for emigration to the United States.

At the time when it was first stated that
the United States would need a quota of
West Indians for work in field and factory
the hope was, expressed that some oppor-
tunity would be found for women who de-
sire to emigrate.

"It is to be hoped that they will nat be
disappointed and that suitable employment
will be found for Barbadian women in the
States. The Government has at least given
an earnest of its intention to keep good
faith with them. It is well that this is so
inasmuch as the adult suffrage now gives
them the right to vote and it is well known
that they are more exacting in demands
from Government and men in public life
than the men folk.

—



George Washington

General George Washington be-
came a national hero in time of
war, but he did not cease to be the
father of his country when he
laid down his sword, As the first
Chief Executive of the United
States, Washington guarded a new
government in its infancy and
guided its first steps. No other man
did so much to establish the U.S.
Constitution and create the Union,
He was the indispensable Presi~
dent, just as he had been the in-
dispensable General,

In the eight years Washington
held office as the first President of
the United States, he inspired
confidence in the untried govern—
ment and gave it dignity through
his distinguished person and his
famous name. Virtually the creator
of the Executive Branch, he gave
substance and enduring form to
the Presidency. An able adminis-
trator by any standard, he was
superior in judgment to his bril-
liant assistants; and, by means of
his own person and character, he
maintained unity within the gov—
ernment until it was sufficiently
strong to withstand the strains of
internal dissension and political
warfare which are the inevitable
concomitants of democracy.

At the beginning what Washing-— his three assistants. Every day each
made up a package of
what he was. Since he already had letters received, with the drafts
possible respect of of his replies, and submitted this

ton did was less important than

the fullest
everybody, he needed no title
other than “Mr, President,” But
he rightly attached importance to
the dignity of his office, since so

much ridicule had been heaped on comment, thus signifying his ap-

the feeble government. which had
preceded this one, and he went to
great pains to establish good social
forms. The tajl President did not
unbend easily in public. He was
scrupulously fair in his distribu-
tion of social favours and very

conscientious in the performance the hub from which the spokes of

of what he regarded as his social
duties. Although he found such

official occasions as senatorial din— States ever had a President who

ners and formal receptions ex-—
tremely boring, he thought them

formality be observed.
highly

ary human beings. But he had

Hamilton,

Treasury, Washington wanted his
administration to be liked and

extending political
His business was to set a nation

serve it,

viously the Federal Government
had consisted solely of a legislative
body,
supreme, The result had been in-
efficiency and chaos,

Impetuous Hamilton would have

liked to create a centralized nation Continental Army, did not smile

overnight, and if he had had his
way, federal strength would have

been gained at too great sacrifice impression during his Presidency

of personal liberty and local rights,
On the other hand, if Jefferson's
ideas had been followed, individ—
ual and local freedom would
have been safeguarded but
the general government might not
have grown strong enough to en-
dure, The eternal merit of the first
President is that he established a
strong and effective administra—
tion, while guaranteeing by his
own character that there should
be no tyranny“in the United States,



Even the King Feel

King George, iike the majority
of his subjects, is having g tough
time trying to stretch his purse
to meet the spiralling cost of
living.

it came as a shock to most
Britons to hear that their King
could not make ends meet on his
official salary and was being forced
to dip into his own pockets to
keep up the Royal splendour.

To help King George close the
financial gap, the British govern-
ment announced His Majesty
would get an annual $112,000
worth of aid, This would consist
of free telephone and_ telegraph
services and some fuel and light-
ing costs in the Royal palaces,

The government aid would also
pay the salaries of the King’s
official bodyguards known as the
Yeomen of the Guard and Gentle—
men at Arms.

Out of his personal desire to help
meet deficit, King Geor, has
promised to make “personal econ—
omies” in the Royal Household to
the extent of $56,000 annually,

King George is by no means
broke.

King George has estates and
heirlooms estimated to be worth
at least $6,000,000 but these can-
not be turned into ready cash for
they must be pssed on to his suc-
cessor. ‘

Draws $1,148,000

The King, whose income is
voted to him by Parliament, draws
$1,148,000, But he is probably less



Our Readers Say:



—

Commendation

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly allow me through
your columns, to highly commend
the Authorities, who placed a
Harbour Police Boat in the Con-
stitution Road district, so as to
save people, who might have been
marooned in their houses during
the heavy rains which fell during
the last few days.

If a thought like this were
given on the last occasion, when
so many people lost their lives,
and: -houses~-brokedown,;

t

stooks-

(The first President of the United States
was born on February 22, 1732)

By DUMAS MALONE

(From The New York Times Magazine)

In the beginning Washington
was the Executive grancn, tor it
took the newly organized Congress
some time to create the Executive
departments. Congress, after heat-
ed debates, eventualiy made the
heads of tnese executive depart—
ments responsible to the Fresi-
dent and removable by him. Thus
Washington became ‘the master of
his own household and began to
realize on the potentialities of
what was to become perhaps the
greatest office in the world.

The first President personally
directed his administration in a
way which no modern successor
could hope to do, Besides Hamilton
and Jefferson he had only one
other department, head, the Secre-
tary of War, General Henry Knox,
There were no Cabinet meetings at
first, and the three Secretaries
were supposed to be assistants to
the President. Jefferson has left an
interesting description of the way
official correspondence was
handled by the first President and

Secretary

to Washington. The President kept
his eye on everything, but he was
not dictatorial in spirit. Generally
he returned the letters. without

proval; sometimes he attached
comments and suggestions in little
notes, Sometimes he held matters
up until he could confer with a

Secretary. Thus he J ge lr unity

of action among the departments
through his own person, He was

the wheel radiated.
It was doubtful if the United

was Washington’s ‘superior as an
administrator. He was

mediary and spokesman

L’Enfant drew the famous plan.

George Washington’s capacity
supported by the great body of for wrath was well-known, But
citizens, but he did not conceive ordinarily he vented his anger only
his immediate task to be that of in private and against men whom
democracy. he regarded as disrespectful, un-
He kept
going, and his idea of the way to his naturally strong passions under
gain popular support was to de- stern control and in his dealings
with trusted subordinates he was

At this initial stage of its de- the soul of patience. Those who
velopment it was evident that the were most intimately associated
Government of the. United States, with him in his late fifties and
and especially the executive part early sixties saw in him just what
of it, must be strengthened. Pre— his officers had seen in their young

patriotic, or dishonest.

colonel a quarter-century before:
“steady adherence to impartial

and the States had been justice,” and ‘quick discernment

and invariable regard to merit.”
It has been said that General
Washington, as commander of the

once during the entire American
Revolution, and the prevailing

was that he had no sense of
humour, At his official dinners he
occasionally might tell a story but
he gained no more fame as a ra-
eonteur than a public speaker, His
state papers are generally heavy,
but hig personality is better re-
vealed in the private letters which
he wrote in his clear, round band,
In these, there is evidence of a
quiet humour, along with a vast
amount of sympathetic under-
standing.

By FRED SMITH

well off than any British Sover-
eign since Queen Victoria for
despite the hiked cost of living
his income has remained unchang-
ed since his Coronation in 1937,

The King’s income is made up
of two main parts. His salary—
the Privy Purse — amounts to
$308,000; from this the King pays
his own and the Queen’s personal
expenses—like clothes and private
entertainment. It is known that
the King also gives financial aid
to some members of the Royal
family who do not draw State
salaries ’

It is the Privy Purse expendi-
ture that King George hopes te cut
by $56,000 a year,

Of the rest of the income,
$375,200 goes in salaries and pen—
sions for the Royal household,
$427,840 in the living expenses of
the _ household and $36,960 -in
Royal gifts and alms.

Contrary to popular belief, King
George has to pay for everything
he needs for he can accept noth-
ing gratis, The only transportation
which does not cost him anything
is a naval vessel or a plane of the
official King’s Flight;

From his household allowance,
King George has to pay for all
decorating, plumbing, furnishing
and interior repairs for those parts
of the nine Royal Palaces reserv—
ed exclusively for Royal use. At
Buckingham Palace the King pays

lost, so much damage would not
have been done. .

It is a splendid idea, and de-
serves credit. Hoping sir, to see
Steps taken in other ways ‘so as
2 help our poor unfortunate peo-
ple.

L. B, CLARKE.

Sunday Opening
To ‘he Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—In answer to the letter re
opening of stores, on Sunday for
the—aecdmmodation of visitors

prompt,
necessary and insisted that strict judicious but decisive, exceedingly
exacting of his subordinates, and
Unlike Thomas Jefferson, his probably too exacting of himself.
intellectual Secretary of He did not succeed in avoiding
State, Washington was relatively petty details, though he tried to,
uninterested in ideas as such; as hence his business was generally
a practical man he had less faith onerous and often vexatious. This
than the author of the Declaration was true even of the planning of
of Independence: in the natural the new federal city, which bears
integrity and diseretion of ordin- his name. Jefferson was his inter-
in this
none of the cynicism of Alexander complicated matter of designing
the young genius of a capital city and made notable
finance and administration whom contributions of his own, though
he appointed Secretary of the the French engineer Major Pierre

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

National unity was President
Washington's political ideal, and
he did far more than anybody else
to maintain it during the critical
early years in the life of the new
American nation, Probably this
was his greatest service 10 his
cou » and .unquestionably it
was the one that was most expect-—
ed of him. Organized political par-
ties in the modern sense appear—
ed in rudimentary form during
his administration, but he did not
like them, He had been elected
unanimously, and he always
thought of himself as the Presi-
dent of all the States and all the
people. He realized that clashes
of interest would be inevitable;
that no State or region or class
would ever get all it wanted. But
he reasoned that just as the Con-
stitution had been based on the
spirit of mutual accommodation,
so must the government be, and
the people must realize that the
gains of Union far exceeded any
likely loss.

Within his official family Wash-|\'

ington expected unity of spirit
amid diversity of talents and dif-
fering points of view, though he
did not realize how great the diT-
ferences w, turn out to be
when he inVited both Alexander
Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson tc
join it. The feud which arose be-
tween these two was inevitable.
One man loved power while the
other feared it; one distrusted the
common people while the other
distrusted rulers; the Secretary of
the Treasury was predominantly
concerned with economic progress
while the Secretary of State was
supremely interested in the rights
of men, Washington felt that he
could spare neither Secretary and
he did not wholly agree with
either. War was imminent in
Europe, threatening the commerce
and security of the United States
before the young republic had
gained for itself standing among
the nations. It was no time for
internal dissension, and the wise
and patient Washington made
peace between his warring Secre-
taries. Resolutely, he steered the
ship of state, seeking the middle
way, maintaining unity in policy
despite dissension within the ranks
until the most crucial years were
past and the néw government was
a recognized success.

Giving himself so unstintingly
to the task of bringing unity ana
strength to the new nation,
Washington's own physical
strength began to wane. Toward
the end of hig first term as Presi-
dent he was reported to have said
that he would rather go to his
farm, take his spade in hand, and
work for his bread than remain
in his present situation. But the
leaders who were in his confidence
protested with one voice that he
could not yet be spared, Hamil-
ton said that his retirement would
be the greatest evil that could
possibly befall the young country;
and Jefferson wrote him: “North
and South will hang together, if
they have you to hang on.” Uné
able to escape, Washington. reiuc—
tantly yielded to their persuasions
and was unanimously re-elected,
He was still obligated to no group
or party, still President of the
entire United States in a sense
that no successor of his ever has
been, >

Thomas Jefferson, who became
the third President of the United
States (1801-1809), in his own old
age looked back upon George
Washington, the man who had
been his leader and his friend,
and made this appraisal of him:
“On the whole his ‘character was
in its mass perfect, in nothing bad,
in few points indifferent; and it
may truly be said that never did
nature and fortune combine more
perfectly to make a man great.”
‘This judgment commands respect
at the bar of history.



s the Rise

for all electricity, gas and water

except that used for lighting and

washing down the courtyards,
Less Dinners

Another major hole in the royal
pocket is made by salaries paid
to his domestic staff. Buckingham
Palace alone has a domestic staff
of 260 people.

Although Salaries of the Royal
Household are not listed many
employees at Buckingham Palace
have joined trade unions thereby
receiving higher pay.

It is not expected that King
George will cut any of his Palace
staff for they already have been
pared to the bone. The $56,000 he
has promised to make in “person—
al economics” will be saved from
domestic expénses.

Private dinner parties at Buck-
ingham Palace are expected to
become fewer and more austere
while house parties at Windsor
will be smaller,

Such things as Christmas and
Birthday presents will be less ex-
pensive.

Although King George pays_no
income tax, other members of the
Royal family are not so lucky.
Their State salaries are listed as
follows: '

Queen Mary, $196,000 q year;
Princess Elizabeth, $112,000,
Prince Philip, _ $28,000; Duke of
Gloucester, $98,000, and the Prin-
cess Royal $16,800. , i

Princess Margaret will receivé
$16,800 when she reaches her 21st
birthday in August.—LN.S.

from cruise sHips—I am also a
teurist on your beautiful Island—
however, I agree most whole-
heartedly with the letter written
by “Layman” in Wednesday's
Advocate,

Surely one need not desecrate
the Sabbath. It would be a crime
if any further thowght be given
to the opening of shops on the
Lord’s Day, for the convenience of |
us tourists or anyone else.

Sincerely, |

JOYCE MANBERT. |

Marine Hotel |
Feb. 14, 1951.

.
.



GEORGE WASHINGTON

By JOHN PRIDEAUX

BARBADOS has had many distinguished
visitors to its shores, but few were destined
to be greater than a nineteen-year-old lad who
visited it in 1751. George Washington (1732-
1799) came to Barbados as companion to his
invalid brother Major Lawrence Washington,
the Proprietor of Mount Vernon on the Pota-
mac in Virginia, Lawrence Washington was
suffering from consumption, and they had
been advised to try the West, Indies as the
change of climate might have been a remedy
for his complaint.

George Washington, in his daily journal,
published by Joel Munsell, Albany, N.Y., 1892,
records—

“We were greatly alarm’d with the cry of
Land at 4 A.M.: we quitted our beds with
surprise and found ye land plainly appear-
ing at 3 Leagues distance when by our
reckonings we shou’d have been near 150
Leagues to the Windward we to Leeward
abt ye distance above mention’d and had we
been but 3 or 4 Leagues more we shou’d
have been out of sight of the Island run
down the Latitude and probably not have
discover’d our Error in time to have gain’d
the land for 3 Weeks or More.”

On the 4th of November, the day after
their arrival, Washington states that they
received a card from Major Clarke welcoming
them to Barbados, with an invitation to
breakfast and dine with him. He records
that he went with some reluctance as the
smallpox was in the Clarke family. He also
records that ‘after drinking tea they were
invited to Mr. Carter’s, and desired to make
his house ours till we could provide lodgings
agreeable to our wishes,
accepted,’

After several trips into the country-side,
of which he states—‘were perfectly enraptur-
ed with the beautiful prospects which on
every side presented to our view. The fields
of Cain, Corn, Fruit Trees &c. in a delightful
Green.’ They accepted the house of Captain
Crofton, the commandant of Fort James, al-
though they considered it extravagantly dear
his brother was obliged'to give £15 per
month exclusive of liquors and washing,
which they had to find. He records that this
house was pretty near the sea and about a
mile from town, the prospect is extensive by
land and pleasant by sea as it commanded
the prospect of Carlisle Bay and all the
shipping in such a manner that none could
go in or out without been seen by them.

Washington relates how he was entertain-
ed by the ‘Beefsteak and Tripe Club.’ This
simple Virginian appears to have been
astounded by the elaborate spread at these
dinners, for he reports—‘We were entertain’d
by the Company, they have a meeting every
Saturday, this being Colo. Maynards. After
Dinner was the greatest Collection of Fruits
I have ever seen set on the Table. We re-
ceived invitations from every Gentleman
there. Mr. Warren desired Majr. Clarke to
shew us the way to his house; Mr. Hackt. in-
sisted on our coming Saturday next. to his,
being his Day to treat with Beef Stake and
ee but above all the invitation of Mr.

a
desir’d and even insisted as well as his Lady
with him and promis’d nothing should be
wanting to render our stay agreeable my
Br. promis’d he wou’d as soon as he was a
Little disengag’d from the Drs.”

While here, George Washington visited a
theatre for the first time. The play was the
tragedy of ‘George Barnwell.’ This drama
was supposed to be of a very improving na-
ture, and suited to young men. As was
usual of plays in those days, it pointed a
boisterous moral. George Barnwell was an
idle apprehtice who, after robbing his mas-
ter, passed thorugh the various Hogarthian
states of vice, and finally committed murder,
for which crime he was hanged. His last
moments were peculiarly embittered by the
reflection that his sweetheart was to be hang-
ed at the same time, he having led her
astray.

Washington's foreboding came to pass;
fourteen days after their arrival he devel-
oped smallpox. The attack was not severe,
but he bore the marks of this disease upon

his face to the day of his death. On Satur-| ¢

day, 17th November, Washington records—
‘Was strongly attacked with the small Pox
sent for Dr.\Lanahan whose attendence was
very constant till my recovery, and. going
out which was not till Thursday the 12th of
December.” He records how kind Major
Clarke’s family was to him during his ill-
ness.

On the 22nd of December, 1751, George
Washington took leave of his brother and all
the friends he had made in Barbados and sail-
ed on the Industry, Captain John Saunders,
for Virginia. Soon after this his brother
Lawrence went to Bermuda in search of bet-
ter health, but did not succeed in regaining
strength. He died soon after and George
inherited Mount Vernon,

In 1759, George Washington married the
beautiful young widow, Martha Curtes. In
1774 when the dispute between the British
home government and the colonists broke
out, he became one of the leaders of the local
opposition, and later was elected to the first

ongress at Philadelphia. In the following
year 1775, he was made Commander-in-Chief
of the American army, and from that time
to the end of the struggle in 1783 he was
trusted and adored by the people.

Deeply dejected, he left Mount Vernon on
April 16th, 1789, as he expressed in a letter to

\| General Knox, “with feelings not unlike those

of a culprit going to his place of execution,
- «+» Integrity and firmness are all I can
promise.” On April 30th, from the portico
of the Federal Building in New York, in the
resence of a ‘vast concourse,’ he took the
"residential oath, and then went to the
Senate Chamber where he delivered his in-
augural address. Senator Maclay of Penn-
sylvania recorded in his journal that ‘this
great man was agitated and embarassed more
than ever he was by levelled cannon or point-
ed musket. He trembled and several times
could scarce make out to read.’ He was not
accompanied by Mrs. Washington, as she had
not been able to leave Mount Vernon in time
for the event.

Washington served a second term of office
from’1793 onwards, and refused election for
a third time. He was one of the noblest
characters in history, good, simple, honest.
brave, and efficient. t

ard was the most kind and friendly, he] $



D. V. SCOTT TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
& CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
ey
Usually NOW
Pkgs: A.P. MACARONI .........---.+++° $ 35
Tins SPAGHETTI with Tomato Sauce i
and Cheese ...........-- es 4 Nes sete 28
Bottles ALLSOPP’S BEER ........-.----+ 26 20

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1951





FOR YOUR BATHROOM

Corner BASINS with Pedestal
BASINS with or without Pedestal
-up SUITES
wc. PANS, S & P TRAPS
W.C. SEATS {Plastic White and
Bakelite Mahogany
Cast Iron CISTERNS

Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS
HARPIC, Large and Small.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,



which offer wel 46696699666966699996

MAZAWATTEE



TEA

PREFERRED FOR ITS
DISTINCTIVE FLAVOUR
e

DaCOSTA & Co.. Ltd.

DIAL 4689

$ 31

oo

|



pings ve ; Wines That
ea rea
sedate divine: Gladden The









Salami Sausage

Corned Beef

Keep up . Your

GOLD BRAID










\ ( oa
Cold Cuts £1
Cooked Hams, 3 sizes
Ox
$
x
gz

Now in Stock in our Clothing Dept.

RAINCOATS

by Chas. McIntosh |

TOOTALS
AND JAYBRA

in Men’s and Boys’ Sizes

— Also —

MEN'S OVERCOATS

in Harris and Manx Tweeds

DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

S96

Amontillado
Partners Port
Ruby Port

Carr’s Cream Crackers
Gouda Cheese

‘Edam Cheese

tongues ¢

Spirit

with our famous

RU MM

FRPSPPPSP PDI FFP” §

COSCSOSY

SSCSSSESOSOSOS
PPOOOPO PPPS POPP OCPD PPPOE,

Meart ...«
Pale Dry Nutty Sherry

New Arrivals





cM CRN EINER TUNES



—

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

Sugar Yield May

22, 1951

300 New Books

Exceed 175,000 Tons | On Preview

According to reports received the yields of cane per acre
are much above the estimates says the Director of Agricul-
ture in his notes for January. Some plantations in the in-
termediate rainfall areas have reported average yields of

Fishermen Ask
For Lights

HEN THE ADVOCATE visit-

ed the Public Market on
Tuesday night the fish department
was in darkness. Shortly after-
wards over 17 improvised lamps—
bottles of oil with paper stuffed
into them—lighted up the market.
This cccurred after the word went
around that two boats were on
their way to the Careenage.

Kenneth Connell, a fish seller,
also had a lighted bottle. He said
that the market is wired and
equipped with fluorescent lighting.
‘These lights are switched off when
the fish is sold out but no con-
sideration is given to the boats
which are still out to sea.

Sometimes the counters are
crowded with people awaiting
boats to come in and it becomes
miserable to wait in darkness.
Owing to the darkness it takes the
fishermen and vendors more time
to distribute and count their fish.

Connell said that in another
section which is occupied by “fish
boners” electric lamps burn all
the time. it is not as necessary
for lights to be in this section as
it is for. them to be in the fish
department, he said.

Connell, feels that the lights
could be allowed to burn for a
longer period and the watchman
could switch them off. He is
hoping that this will soon be done.
He said, “We have to pay six-
pence per day to sell fish in the
market place and still buy kero-
sene oil for bottle lamps.”

: - L. O. FLECHER,

M.A., Headmaster of Christ’s
Hospital, will lecture at the
British Council at 8.30 p.m, on
Thursday, February 22nd. His
lecture, “From the Cradle to the
Grave,” constitutes g survey of
education in Britain today.

Mr, Flecher is spending a week
in Barbados as guest lecturer for
the British Council. With Mrs.
and Miss Flecker, he will be a
guest at Government House for
three days and of Mr. and Mrs.
Risely Tucker for the remainder
of his stay. In addition to this
public lecture he will be having
talks with Sir George Seel who
is a governor of Christ’s Hospital,
and with Barbados educationalists,
visiting the principal secondary
schools and renewing aquaintance
with old ‘bluecoats’. Among these
may be mentioned the Director
of Education, Major Reed, Mr.
Frampton, Mr, Haskell, Mr.
Smithies and, in Antigua, the
Governor and the Colonial Secre-
tary.

HIEVES REMOVED three six—

volt batteries, valued $90,
from three lorries at Seawell Air-
port between Monday and Tues—
day. The batteries are the|
property of Messrs. J. N. Harri-
man & Co., and their foreman,|
Lenville Jacob,
cident.

The home of Horace Farrell at
Fairfield, Black Rock, was broken
and entered between 11.15 p.m.
Monday and 5.30 a.m. on Tues—
day and a quantity of ‘silvers and
clothing valued $40.15 were stolen.

Gordon Young, an employee of
Hill’s Dairy, Fontabelle, reported
that his watch, a pen and a
quantity of clothing, total value
of $27.96, were stolen from a room
at the same dairy between Feb-
ruary 11 and Monday,

A thief stole a ladder from the
enclosed yard of Arthur C. Bailey
at Vauxhall Road, Christ Church
during the month.

EVENTEEN MOTORISTS were

reported for traffic offences on
Tuesday including two for ex-
ceeding the speed limit. Other
motorists were reported for carry-
ing weight in excess,
woe IFILL of Queen

Street, St. Peter, was taken
to the General Hospital on Tues—
day and detained with injuries to
his head.

7All was involved in an accident
with the motor lorry E-99, owned
by Allendale Plantation, St. Peter
and driven by Lisle Hendy of Rose
Hill, St. Peter,

Gaoled On Three
Charges Of Larceny

LIONEL BEST a labourer of
Church Village, St. Michael was
found guilty on three charges of
larceny brought by the Police yes-
terday .His Worship Mr. E, A.
McLeod before whom Best appear-
ed sentenced him to 12 months’
imprisonment with hard labour
for each charge,

On the first charge Bes: was
found guilty of the larceny of a
pair of glasses, the property of St.
Clair Burkett of Chapman Lane,
on January 22. On the second
charge Best stole articles to the
value of £3 5s. 1d. from the house
of Sydney Reece on January 12.

On the third charge he stole
articles valued at $19.26 from the

reported the in-



and the property of Kathleen
Maitland on January 25. Best was
arrested by Police Constable
Devonish attached to the CLD,
Department. 4

Best had three previous convic-
tions for larceny.



What Do You
Think?

Mr. E. R. Edmett, Senior Pro-
ducer of the West Indies Section
of the B.B.C. arrived in Trini-
dad from Jamaica on Saturday
last.

Mr. Edmett is on a 28-day tour
of the Caribbean-Jamaica, Trini-
dad, British Guiana, Barbados
and St. Lucia.

He is making a survey of the
listening interest of West Indians
in the “Calling the West Indies”
programme He wants to know
the uecess the programme has
had, how many. people are listen-

what improvements



house of T. K. Davis of Hastings |

over 42 tons of cane per acre for plant canes and ratoons.

During the month the sucrose
content of the juice was low, and
the juice quality varied from dis-
trict to district. A poor juice
quality was to be expected in the
early part of the season, as reap-
ing was started before the canes
were mature; the quality should
greatly improve as the season
progresses. Taking the above
factors into account the crop
should exceed 175,000 toms sugar.

The young plant cane crop has

a healthy appearance and ‘sup-|-

plies’ planted during December
are germinating well.

The main yam crop was har-
vesied and stored during the
month. Sweet potatoes and eddoes
were also harvested and the
market supply was satisfactory.
Some “market garden’’ crops
were easily obtainable, particu-
larly tomatoes, carrots, French
beans and cabbage.

Peasant Agriculture

Light intermittent showers
which fell during the latter half
of the month, however, favoured
the growth of garden vegetables.
As a result, these were in better
supply than they had been for
some weeks past. Towards the
end of the month, tomatoes,
cabbages, carrots and lettuce
could be obtained at more reason-

able prices. Of the main food
crops, yams and eddqs ‘were
easily available, but sweet

potatoes were in short supply,
especially in parts of Christ
Church and some districts along
the leeward coast.

The yields of groundnuts reaped
during the month were again dis-
appointing. Experienced growers
of the crop are nevertheless
satisfied that, given suitable con-
ditions, the “local” and the
Virginia Bunch varieties can be
very heavy producers.

Coconuts and pananas were in
good supply in the market. Other
tree crops which were available
during the month included paw-
paws, guavas and limes. _

The principal plant pests re-
ported in January were the cab-
bage white butterfly, scale insects
and slugs. Suitablej control
measures are being advocated.

Several inquiries and applica-
tions for assistance under the
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare Irrigation Scheme continue
to be received. During the month
work was completed on the
erection of a 12’ windmill unit
with overhead spray lines on a
holding in St. Philip. Other
peasants were given assistance
with equipment and fittings for
overhead spraying. ;

Livestock at the six Stations
at the end of January, including
stud animals, cattle, goats, sheep,
pigs and equines, numbered 124.
Four hundred and _ sixty-five
gallons of milk were produced .
Fourteen head of stock, including
12 young pigs for rearing, were
sold.

Stud services paid for at the
Stations were as follows: bulls
145, bucks 48, rams 33 and boars
81, making a total of 307 for the
month.



“Your Guess” ;
Was St. John’s
Church

About sixty percent of thel
guessers in the Evening Advocate’s
“Your Guess” competition guessed
correctly that the picture was
“The roof of St. John’s Church”.
Sybil Browne of Eagle Hall, St.
Michael was the winner. Hers
was the first correct answer to be
pulled out of the box. Thirty per-
cent guessed it was taken in the
Westbury Cemetery. Other guesses
were “This is at Graves End
‘Cemetery,” “The roof of St.
Patrick’s R.C, Church”, “St, Jos-
eph Church Yard,” “Belmont
Chapel”, St. Paul’s Church,” and
at least two dozen other churches
in the island.



‘Athelbrook’ Comes
For Molasses

THE 286-ton molasses tanker
Athelbrook began her yearly
series of visits to Barbados yes-
terday to take vacuum pan
molasses for Trinidad.

The Athelbrook arrived shortly
after daybreak and later took her
berth in the inner basin of the
Careenage from where she was
supplied with her load of molasses.

She came out of the inner basin
of the Careenage yesterday even-
ing ready to start on her voyage
to Trinidad.

The Athelbrook is expected to
return within a week or so for
another load. Her local agents are
Messrs, Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.



CONTRACT FOR
UNIFORMS GRANTED

AT a meeting of the Hospital
Advisory Board yesterda m-
bers dealt with the aw of ten-
ders for the making of uniforms.
The contract has been awarded to

the six lowest tenders on the un- | peo

derstanding that each will submit
the first portion of work done,
to the Medical Superintendent.
If the work of each of them is
satisfactory, the contract will be
awarded to all six at the price
quoted by the highest tender.

Names of the six are, Violet
Waldron, Katie Phillips, Ellen
Crawford, Grace Forde, Beryl
Mason and Eleanor Byer.



Fined For Dangerous
Driving

A FINE of £2 to be paid in 28
days or one month's i i
ment was imposed on
Wiggins of Bank Hall for driving
the motor car M—521 in a danger-
Ous manner on December 5, by
His Worship Mr. A, J. H, Han-
schell yesterday.

















AT PUBLIC LIBRARY

Over 300 new books will be
put into circulation at the Bar-
bados Public Library next Mon-
day morning. They will be on pre-
view from today.

The majority of the new works
are non-fiction, and some of

po. a none th a British

unc on, rar, in
Trinidad. .

Three new books on cricket
are among the selection—“Gone
with the Cricketers” by John
Arlott, “A Wisden Century—1850-
19 * by John Hadfield, and
“Cricket” by Archer Sandham.
There are also works on Football
and Lawn Tennis.

For politicians and those inter-
ested in politics there is “History
of Trade Unionism” by Sidney
and Beatrice Webb. Those who
want some informative facts
about weather forecasting will be
interested in “Here is the Weather
Forecaster” by E. G. Bilham,
Chief of the E.T.A., the Centrai
Forecasting Station of the Air
os at Dunstable, Bedford-
shire,

‘Bungalow By The Beach”
A travel book that deals with

Grenada is “Bungalow by the
Beach”, and another in_ this
section is “Appointment in the

Sun” by Rosita Forbes. An out-
Standing book that has been
already requested by 30 people is
the auto-biography of Dr. Barbara
Lloyd-Still, wife of the Medical’
Superintendent of the local Mental
Hospital.
“Dr. Barbara’,

Books dealing with the negro
are represented by “Rules of
Prejudice against the Negro” by
Hines, and “The Negro in the
U.S.” by Goldstein.

Other good works are, ‘Dollar
Crisis, its Causes and Cures”; “A
West Indian Fortune”; “Flood
Estimation and Control”; “A
Thousand Garden Questions
Answered”; and in the Famous
British Trial Series, “The Trial
of Peter Griffiths”. Griffiths was
the defendant in the Blackburn
Baby Murder of 1948.

I Remember

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

‘Skeete Takes Four
Wkts. In Ist. Mate

About 4,000 og witnessed the first day

match between
terday.

PAGE FIVE



of play in the

inidad and Barbados at Kensington yes-

Barbados occupied the wicket for the day and at the draw-

ing of stumps had made 335

for the loss of 9 wickets.

It was a keen contest throughout, highlighted by the cus-
tomary fine display of batting by international batsmen
Clyde Walcott and Everton Weekes, the former making 77

runs and the latter 75.

Youthful Conrad Hunte new-
comer to intercolonial cricket and
one of the island’s opening bats-
men, scored a valuable 63, He
started off confidently and was
giving a good display, but just be-
fore the luncheon period he
seemed to lose concentration and
played shakily to the spinners. It
was at this stage that he was given
a “life.” He was 34 when he
cover drove a delivery from Wil-
fred Ferguson to Clarence Skeete
at cover point and was dropped.
He- gave another before his
innings closed. He was then 44,

John Goddare played a skip-
per’s innings. Going in at number
8 he batted well and scored with
some measure of freeness. At the
close of play he was undefeated
with 43 to his credit,

The Triridad bowling was
steady throughout the day and
Captain Jeffrey Stollmeyer
handled it admirably, The field-
ing, however, left much.to be de-
sired and quite a few catches
went abegging.

Slow right arm spinner Clar-

Title of the book is}ence Skeete and left-arm medium :

pacer Sydney Jackbir gained aj
great measure of respect. The first
ended with a bowling analysis of
4 wickets for 60 runs and the
other 3 for 62, Ferguson captured

2 for 89.
Play

John Goddard won the toss and
decided to bat on an easy-paced
wicket. Roy Marshall and Con-
rad Hunte opened the innings and
left arm medium pacer Jackbir|
bowled to Marshall from the
northern end. Marshall played the
seventh ball to square leg for two
runs and played out the over,

*

When The Chief Scout
) Visited Barbados

BY W. B. MILLAR ~
TO-DAY, February 22nd is an important day for Scouts and

Guides all over the world. It is

“Thinking Day”, for them,

and as the birthday of the founder of the Scout movement,

the late Lord Baden-Powell, as

well as the birthday of his

widow Lady Baden-Powell, Chief Guide, it is of more than

pasting interest to both
he Chief Guide, at present on
a tour of the West Indies was in
Barbados some days ago, and
hopes to return before leaving
the Caribbean. She is a dynamic
personality, and seems to have lost
nothing in her keenness and drive
since that Wednesday morning in
January twenty-one years ago
when I saw her for the first time.

I was one of the scouts at the
Baggage Warehouse who welcom-
ed B.P. the Chief Scout of alt
the world and his wife, when they
paid a visit to this colony. How
well do I remember how anxious
we scouts were to catch a glimpse
of one of the world’s greatest men,
in the flesh. The lucky fellows
who had gone to the World Jam-
borees in 1924 and 1929 at Arrowe
Park had told us of him, but we
were all very eager to see him
for ourselves.

“The Chief”

And at last he came, in full
Scout uniform, with a light cloak
hanging loosely over his square
shoulder, Long well past the mid-
dle of his life, the soldier still
carried himself as erect as we an-
ticipated, and there was a twinkle
in his eye as he walked between
the boys shaking left hands with
those whom he had met before, as
well as those he was greeting for
the first time.

He remembered faces easily,
and called names correctly in
many cases.

There was an amusing incident
which well illustrates the sense
of humour which never deserted
“B.P.” all through his life.

Rover Scout Charles Morris,
now a Rover Leader was stand-
ing next tome as “B.P.” came
down the line’. I got my firm
hand-shake and then “B.P.” paus-
ed and looked at Charles with a
emile on his face.

“All those service stars” he said
pointing to the twelve years’ ser-
vice stars on Charles’ shirt. “This
chap seems to have been a Scout
before me,” he chuckled.

This was characteristic cf the



Tickets Overworked
At Kensington

THE Advocate was in receipt of
complaints yesterday that the
majority of ticket-holderg in the
Kensington Stand were unable to
claim their seats as these were
occupied by people who did not
have the tickets with the numbers
corresponding and in some cases
those occupying the seats did not
have tickets at all.

It was suggested that some
“after they had gained

outside and others had entered
with the same tickets.

In an interview with the cricket
authorities it was learnt that
precautions will be taken today to
ensure that every one in the
Stands wear their tickets and that
they sit in seats that correspond
with their tickets,

—

Inquiry Adjourned

THE inquiry into the death of
50-year-old Donald Gittens of
Chatterton Road, St. Michael, was
further adjourned by Mr. A. J. H.
Hanschell, Coroner of District “A”
yesterday until February 23

Gittens suddenly took ill at his
home on January 1, bui died be-
fore he could reach General
Hospital.



the

boys and girls.










LADY BADEN-POWELL

And
same

founder of the movement.
his wife was cast im the
mould,

Big Rally

Later that day there was a
giant joint rally at Queen's Park
where Lord and Lady Baden-
Powell addressed the Scouts and
.Guides of Barbados.

The Governor Sir William
Robertson, the Island Commis-
‘sioner, the late Sir Frederick

larke, Mrs. Heidenstam wife of
the Police’ Commissioner and
Miss Daisy Yearwood Girl Guide
leaders were among the huge at-
tendance and it was an historic
occasion.

Both Chiefs expregsed apprecia-
tion of the welcome accorded
them, appreciation of the work
cone for both branches of the
movement, and urged one and all
to greater efforts.

It was gratifying to hear the
Chief Guide say on her visit 21
years after that those appeals
had not fallen on barren ground,
much has been done, but there is
yet opportunity for much more to
be done,

May “Thinking Day” help one
and all to think more about
Seouting and Guiding.

TH

Oo
°

z continued to bowl from

me

FRESH SUPPLY OF

PURINA HEN CHOW

(SCRATCH GRAIN)
SH. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distsibutore Mi
BEBUERE SEER

Frank King bowled to Hunte
from the southern end, He played
the first delivery and square cut
the second for two runs, He drove
the fourth delivery to long off
and ran 4, Ganteaume having to
run from cover point to the
boundary. He was beaten by the
next delivery the ball just missing
the stumps. The next ball he
on-drove for 2 and played out the
remainder of the over.

Jackbir continued from the
northern end and with the last
ball of the over beat Marshall
with the pace of the ball and
bowled him for 2 with the score
at 10. It was a maiden over.
Marshall was at the wicket for 15
minutes, Clyde Walcott was the
next man in and Hunte faced
King from the other end. The
batsman edged the third delivery
dangerously to Skeete at second
slip but cover drove the fifth
beautifully to the boundary, He
singled the seventh to the leg side
and Walcott repeated the stroke
off the next ball for another single,

Facing Jackbir, Walcott on-
drove the second ball for 4 and
played out the remainder of the
over,

Jones Bowls

Next over Prior Jones relieved
King with the score at 20, and
bowled to Hunte. The batsman
hit the sixth ball nicely to square
leg for 2 and singled the next to
cover, , Walcott played out the
over, Jackbir continued from the
northern end and Hunte cover
drove the fourth ball powerfully
for 4 to bring his score to 20. He
played out the over. Jones con-
tinued to Walcott and had the
ball, moving nicely away from the
wicket. Clyde hit the seventh de—
livery to square leg for 2 and
played the next.

Hunte then faced Jackbir and
after playing seven balls hit the
last high but safe to the square
leg boundary. Each batsman made
a single off Jones’ next over.
Hunte faced Jackbir and turned
the fourth ball neatly to the fine
leg boundary. He cover drove
the next and beat Ganteaume at
cover point for the ball to go te
the boundary. He played out the
over.

The score was now 41 and
Ferguson came on in place of
Jones from the Screen End. He
sent down a maiden to Walcott.

the other end and each batsman
made a single in the over, The
bowler was mixing his deliveries
well and the batsmen were takin:
no chances. In Ferguson's nex
over Walcott on-drove the fourth
ball to the boundary to bring the
score to 47. He _ then cover
drove the sixth to Legall, The
fielder failed to stop the ball and
the batsman got 2 runs, The
batsman played out the remainder
of the over. Hunte made a single
off Jackbir’s first delivery tc
bring the score to 50 in 66
minutes. Walcott off-drove the
fifth ball for 4 and on-drove the
next for a single. Hunte played
out the over. Ferguson conceded
one run in his next over and this
was made by Walcott. Jones now
came on from the Pavilion End
and bowled to Walcott with the

score at 57.
A Boundary
The batsman on-drove the

second ball to the boundary, but
the next delivery was a “beauty’
which Walcott just managed to
dig out of his wicket. No more
runs were scored off the over,
A single went to each batsman
off, Ferguson’s next over, but
Hunte cover-drove the last ball
high to Skeete who failed to
take the catch. Hunte was now
34 runs. A single went to Wal-
cott in Jones’ next over.
Ferguson's next yielded 3 more.
Jones’ first delivery in his next
over was to Walcott who hit the
ball to the fine leg boundary.
He singled the third ball. Hunte
hit the fifth ball neatly to square
leg for a brace and played out
the remainder of the over. The
luncheon interval was now taken
with the score at 74 for 1, made
in 90 minutes, Hunte being 37
not out and Walcott 34 not out,

After Lunch

On resumption after lunch,
Ferguson bowled the first over
from the screen end to Walcott
who took a single to fine leg off
the fourth to send up Hunte who
off drove beautifully to the

boundary and then played out the
remainder,

Frank King bowled from the
pavilion end to Walcott who
furned the second beautifully ‘to

On page 8



E FAMILY SOAP

Gets skin really clean
Banishes perspiration odor

© Leaves body sweet and dainty

Ode: kes a deep
mild: and sootia for face,
baths, Odex

“fece Maods and. daily

is ideal for family use.

4



CAREENAGE
CONGESTED

FOR the past two days, the!
Careenage was very congested
Schooners and motor vessels have
been steadily arriving with car-
go from other West Indian is-
isnds since Sunday, but have
been finding no berths available
fer: them to discharge their
cargoes.

From the latter days of last
week, the Careenage was already
getting crowded, having litfle
veom for subsequent arrivals. it
hes now come to the pitch where
some eight vessels laden with car-
go were lying in Carlisle Bay
because there were no berths for
them in the Careenage or inner
basin,

Some of the vessels brought
supplies of fruit, chiefly bananas,
plantains and oranges. In order
to avoid their spoiling, the crews
of the vessels had to bring them
fsom Carlisle Bay into the Careen-
age by row boats.

Port authorities had the head-
ache of arranging the shipping
activities in such a way that all
the pogsible space in the Careen-
age was filled in with vessels. At
sume points, vesels were lying
two abreast,

Britain, U.S. Make

New Kashmir Plans

From Page 1
provided that due account is taken
of geographical and economic con-
siderations—subsequent boundary
adjustments in areas contiguous to
the frontier of India or Pakistan
in which the vote is overwhelm-
ingly in favour of the party with
the minority of votes in the state-
wide plebiscite.”

He would also take into account
the possibility that different de-
grees of supervision of the func-
tions of Government might be
appropriate for different areas of
the state,

The representative would be
linstructed to report back to the

ecurity Council when arrange-
ments for the plebiscite might be
put into effect, or im any case
within three months,—Reuter.



Holiday In U.S.A.

TODAY the birthday of George
Washington, one of the most
famous figures in Americar
History is celebrated all over the
United States and in all American
territories as a National Holiday
February 12 is the birth day of
another famous American,
Abraham Lincoln, His birth day is
not a national holiday. It is kept
as a holiday in some of the 48
States,



HOTEL DAMAGED
BY FIRE

The roof of Enmore Hotel, Col-
lymore Rock, caught fire last night
about 7.50 p.m, and was slightly
damaged. The hotel is the pro-
perty of G. C. Hards, The Fire
Brigade under Capt. Grant went to
the scene and put out the fire.

The people of the hotel had al-
ready begun to use a garden hose to
help put out the fire and the Fire
Brigade did not have much diffi-
culty. The damage is covered by
insurance,



In The Court For Divorce
And Matrimonial Causes

IN the suit of Neville Seymour
Sainsbury, Petitioner, and Estre-
lita Anne Sainsbury, Respondent,
Mr, G. B, Niles holding the papers
of Mr. E, K. Walcott, K.C,, in-
structed by G. L. W. Clarke and
Co,, Solicitors, appeared for the
Petitioner,

Mr. W. O,.

Haynes, Solicitor,

appeared for the Respondent.

His Honour, Sir Allan Colly-
more, pronounced the decree nisi,
and made no order as to costs.

of a cold 4

fdeal for use during the day.
Easily recharged from Vapex pvecle.

’
vim co 110: exer

«aroot *
wt ee



















COUGHING

IS DANGEROUS

Every time you cough
your lungs are strained,
and your heart is over-
worked. Stop YOUR
cough by taking VENO’s
COUGH MIXTURE! ‘This
world-famous remedy
stops coughing, makes
breathing easy, soothes
away soreness,

and protects the lungs.



























































The IDEAL
FAMILY REMEDY for
: aes * BRONCHT

MISS ARDEN’S Personal Representative is coming

FOR THE FIRST TIME

to give you the same wonderful
TREATMENTS AND CONSULTATIONS '

as in her famous London Salon, A Treatment makes
you look much prettier, feel so much younger. We

know you'll want to book an appointment at once |

Commencing Monday, March 5th,

for three weeks, at:

KNIGHTS LTD.

33, BROAD STREET
BRIDGETOWN

FOR THE BEST |





A BEASTIFUL
@ASY-TO-CLEAN >
) FLOOR COVERING

‘SILVER STAR’
CONGOLEUM

INSIST ON

SILVER STAR

SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES





sos cs fOr Brides



WHITE STAMPED
SATIN
36” wide. Per Yd. ........ $2.63

OYSTER STAMPED
SATIN
36” wide. Per ¥d. ....... $2.93

PLAIN CREPE SATIN
in heavy quality for
Brides
Wear.

36” wide. Per Yd. ....... $2.45

or Evening

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.,LTD.

112 &

13 BROAD STREET



renner neni



PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1951
™ eee rears A “Have you heard about
f
upert on and the Blue wank Ps i and Bs — ind







:
an
tr
bd
ps)
O
CG
a
ae)
tri
Dp



Dow’? Miss Our on a long-planned
guting or party .. . when Paradol
quickly helps to relieve periodic





ES IT

clung | if floating upwards, and a muffled vowe tells him tuat inn he has his breath back waves him off. “ No fear, Pee a
Poe ft oe aveiel ‘ z any- his pal sale in anqiec tt<, so he ft turns ee pal and grins. enough,’ he declares. _ *? might | Pains, ee bong vn Abe
Sispg waril he touches the branches begins to clamber dowim very care- ‘Well, that really was a weird fyapoen again. I'm going home.” down orjafter-effects entifically
cia tall sree, There he cluches a fully. The hetle pee reaches the eka happen,'’ he says, ‘‘ but we . So Rupert starts his search alone. compounded from 4 ingredients
snc bough to prevent humselt from ground before him and looks up don’t seem to be any the worse For a long time he Paradol is exceilent for headaches,
going any higher, Gradually the — shakily. “| cold you queer chizigs for it, I’m dying to know what through the weod without too. Get Dr. Chase's - Paradol
‘iting ceases, «md he finds he is able were happening in this wood,” says caused the warm wind that sent any hing. He does not notice a y—the “Dr. Chase” is
to wm ameng the branches. He Pong-Ping. “Now you se whae us up into the air. Come on, let's strange figure is watching him A toda name 3 a
calig ug anxiously to Pong-Ping. I mieaat. ea try to find out.” But Pong-Ping on ind a tree. your assurance.
DR. CHASE’S
isiisiin e ° PARADOL

ager! and the — Pirin ops ane the Blue Firemans ——— ex Quick Relief from Pain me

Be ~ " aR



LES
( 187s: good

a oe

YOU DESIRE THE
BEST TEA — SO USE



SMALL USER | ADVERTISE



True old saying, “YOU cant



" STOPPING THE TIDE

: a : = = stop the tide,” however good

_ Rupert wolee on in the deonien } om. top. With great excitement “And what wee a little bear help ae was happening’ your intention. WE find that
fy warm wind came. that a number of little Hoe be doing here prying into my ot what the blue fireworks ie as much as we would like to
Tully, wy on 8 someching queer on 9 Zowecks are scattered neat it. affairs?" asks the stranger Dut Fil go away if you like. keep our prices stableti, the

ver the " he Te “No,” says the man m |

the: gone, ‘ oe oe # = a aha os plan ag me J severely. “* Please, F didn't meanany ++] have other plans spe eqnatant peecin. ie prices

discovers a tind of blackened _ Suddenly a voice from behind makes harm,” says Rupert in a nervous Picking up the round obj "Tren Of CUP TEW matsniate sores He

grass. In the middle isa curious him curn sharply. The strange man voice. “* We saw qenebedy Teng the ground, he returns to where a ‘ | to revise some of our prices,

round object pierced with many meer phat come forward and is frowning ing oe cough balloon = 5 nt s = vn lying, picks it up too ; rd a s i ¢

i and with a a _very_unfriendly .wa t in a sort of whithwi and marches Rupest firmly ~ way pr. bay Rum still .. ic.

eal eclee knob _on him in y_ y Ways ond Tve fgund this, Eoouldn's . through the thick wood, « ax } No, 3 bay Rum still .. 30c.
ow Limolene Highergrade 60c.

” Mentholated 72c.

IT IS GOOD TEA. | tee
|
|



Rupert a and the Blue F ‘rework —I 0 Rupert and the Blue Firework—I1








Mentholated 30c.

Floralene 6 oz, ...... 30c.

3 oz, ;

Cologne BOB ii cd nen 24c.

In spite of the increases our

products are still best value
to-day.

On sale at all good stores.



Seen PE TF







nn





aes not like being there is my house. [| built it pote re than ever. “ They'll

Ru
marched off so suddenly. “* Where cially for what I'm doing.” In



The strange man takes Rapert to

be here soon. I've no rime to lose."
are w taking me?" he asks e hollow of the forest Rupert can an irom table and gives him some !
shaki “I'm not going to hurt pa a curious ane building — sandwiches and a glass of milky man “a ' Foas more the

fou, ite bear,"’ says the man, all its windows igh - Ina few “You will need to be stroma tor geher grimly. "simply can'r stand
e

‘but you've seen too much already minutes he is insi house is ‘ 7 do,"’ he b
and if you want me to explain what filled with a low buzaing sound and Ses ey Sere “ 6 9 ioe gonewee)

t what am | going to do?” ie called a FPoglifter,



rth on,
is happening you'll have to come machines of differene shapes and pu a ;

sks the litle bear, And what I'l) show you everything.” And

\ and help me finish my work. Look, sizes are in every room. ne Whbse reitaad for?" “I's he leads him away (o some steps

Javember," says the man more and an underground workshop,

Household
mune e ec 2 Bln Ft irewon rk—12 isupert and the Blue Firework- -13 Requisites ney MEAT DEPARTMENT
ee am! | PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF: In Roast,

Dip: (Permanent





Starcher) ............. $ 06 FOO as ccsisiescath incase. A7
’ Drift Soap Flakes Quaker Oats ............ 52 Steak, Stew.
$50 .24 bain” i
Allson‘s R. Oats ...... A8 VEAL: in Legs, Roast, Stew.
Rinso Soap —— 58 23 Water Corn Flakes 24 nf
aie MUTTON: in Shoulders, and Chops.
Premier Soap Flakes .o0................. ‘ fhie
wey te 23 "6 jon 35 LAMB: in Legs, Shoulders, Chops.
Switching —- : 5 Di Ss OO Seiidsinesnniaae
points to a hted at tall seus hie Wye ie var" wy he 4 The inventor comes back fo ane | oke that strong wind Flakes 28 Quak Stew.
head. ‘That's the first of my Ae and hurt yous afterwards.” fears. one, otal ae we m; he ho fs ‘ vere ageeadls, ag bakoientdioteass f er Oats ....... ss. 22
rename he: mays. * Tha's-2 " Look here,"” he says. wa Tice oon wonlin ‘age for, They're the key to it. dew come te the tap of che Lux T. Soap (per OX TAILS . TRIPE e KIPPERS - BACON
most powerful new lifting gas in some nore round s like the the whole idea,"” he says. “There's txerse vid ht finish exsfa.ting Cake) once 16 :
there. it will litt fog or leaves or one I saw on the gtound, and there some of my new lifting &i pressed = Sings." He leads the frie bear and HAM (Sliced)
“ne't ea oo pa bike aa not Sas oa Sale Be aca ing ind v7 Na th ree tee in Mane as wary ~ you tat ome > Palmolive T. Soap
cries Rupert, Ge eth, if you is oe >, BS pe che wh “hey Tiss: Mee ate very powerful, much?” Y ashe Rupert. S| (per Cake) .............. .16 SALAMI SAUSAGE, Per Ilb..._—$.1.00

Bouquet T.
Soap (per Cake)... 23
mepert and ae ao Firework—14 Rupert and the Be Firework—15 cin” ate

Soap (per Cake)... 92

e Extracts &
Pickles and Sauces Sanenenty.

Rovril .... $1.60, $ .60 $ .49





Morton’s Mixed
Pickles .......00.......... $ .56 Marmite .97, .60 .30
| ‘ "= pagans Chow UE ass ii ficasibiiccss, 1.62 .85
Rupert is impatient to hear how clear it.” He bustles about, puts When he has fastened his fur "You had one like that when you er ang repo a Ground Ginger ........ 68
the’ ‘inventor lets off his done * a mules and a woolly cap, aud jacket the mam goes down from me found me in the wood." ‘“ No time Morton’s Pennie... . SB
ut when they reach the top room an ae wa one. to explain more new,'” says the adros Curry .......... .
b hen th h th 2 =o fur naar 4 4 don't and of the plai th M dros Curry 76
the man gives a start, and stares at tens ee fog,’ +e plait ony id objects, mans sure that it wh gruff. sak by be e Morton’s Silverskin.
the windows in the ceiling. ‘Look where Pm . f°" it's very cold fll a diectisns. ‘Then T Then he pk beet eee, i The fog ownte inte Onion ........ceesesseee 71 Bisto (for Gravies), 33
up there,”’ he cries. ‘“‘It's fog, indeed." t id bi
real fog. It must have come since seca says Ruy a ‘May fapeens to his se * aie ~ — ar a Holbrook’s Cocktail Heinz Browning (for
bes on ident et tcnte a = = i and watch how you what is that thing?” asks follow him. _. . Onions oc 59 Gravies) ................ 44

Anchovy Sauce$.55 45 PEARS, ach WE CO D9?

» Lea & Perrin’s Sauce

Rupert and the Blue Firework—16 Rupert and the Blue Firework —17 nag . PEACHES, tx_____—_—«99¢



| Custards & Desserts ee Wines APRICOTS, 16 & 3/1 ¢ |
J} came omeg Dom mam GRAPES, ta____ 334,



Ice Cream Powder... 1.23 Grand Mariner ........ 7.50 7 ‘
Se aa ;
Chivers’ T. Jellies... .22 Nolly Prat : GAUY AS, ti 5] ¢



‘The inventor marches quickly bear waits and listens, For a — - - ~—
‘forward, and Rupert wonders if he time nothing happens, and_ the nae waits and trembles, come quite clear so that he can
wonderin,



aught to go too. ‘May | .come world seems quite. still. Then vg if he is to be carried see right into the wood. He Hartley's T. Jellies... .20 ti 43
once more he hears the fizzing up into the air as before, and he watches the mist as it rises higher R 1 a
with rate i ete re has nearly preared in the fog Gradually it swells to a roar, and relief he is ee only A few jn among the trees. ‘* That Powder 16 Bols Genever Gin 3.00
his tin comes back faintly. again it is followed by ‘a mighty and then drops back, ‘| say, invention has worked waedesiole. 3 va

you mi; ee Jost if things \ wind, Leaves and twigs are flying look what's happening to the to he thinks, “but he himself hi ¢g

ta right. u’d better stay round the little bear, and next It's going up,” he mowers. And. disappeared. Where can he ha
use, So the little moment he is blown right over. sure enough, the air below as’ be» gone so quickly?"

ee









- Owing to delay caused by irregular shipping services the |
Advocate regrets that it has been' compelled to curtail its daily |

-eartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all available strips |
as they arrive will be appearing in this space.







ee









THURSDAY, FEBRUARY



LASSIFIED ADS.

22, 1951

TELEPHONE 2508



ape charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of werds up to 50,

3 cents per word on week-days 3a
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.










FOR RENT
Minimum cherge week 72 cents and

96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 2
Words 2 cents © word week—4 cents &
vs.









HOUSES ;
WHITEHALL — on February 21, at her} Gift Shop, suitable tox Flower on a
residence, Bridge Cot, St. George.| Greens Counter, Apply in writing to
Mrs. Samuel Whitehall. Her funeral] the Secretary, Mavfair Gift
i D the ~~ Tee at 4 . gn
Dm. today ‘or : ugustine
ay T Whit hall id )
mue e| (widower
nian chao Uline, Lioyd, Suel PURLIC SALES
Whit : ¢ r) Ten cents per agote line on us
n Alleyne (Nephew) and 12 cents per agate line on 3,

Marjorie Arthur (Niece),



IN MEMORIAM

WALCOTT—In loving memory of our
dear Gertrude Ophelia Waicott who
fell asleep Februany 2ist, 1946.

ys and moments quickly flying
Blend the living with the dead;
Soon will you and I be lying
Each within our. narrow bed
The Walcott Family, Orange Hill,
James.





FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 vents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.



AUTOMOTIVE

Sallie hnreniaisnittmiaccioemanshtie

AUTO CYCLE — One Norman Auto
Cycle. Good condition. Owner leaving
shortly, Dial 3939,



17.2.51—6n.



minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

AUCTION



921 BAGS D.C. SUGAR

By recommendations of Lioyds Agents
Wwe will sell on FRIDAY the 23rd at 12.30
o'clock 921 bags Dark Crystal Sugar at
the following places.

S. P. Musson Son & Co, Ltd., Bridge
Street, Jones & Swan, Fairchild St.
H. Jason Jones & Co., Hincks Street,
General Traders Ltd Roebuck St. Plan-
tations Ltd. Bay St.

Sale start 12.30 o'clock
Warehouse, Bridge St.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers.
21,2.51—2n,

at

I_ will sell at

Me
GARAGE on FRIDAY, 23rd at

2 pt,

Musson s | estate are requested to settle their ac-
counts without delay.

ne | Qualified executors of the will of Samuel
ENEARNEY’S | Henry Howard Streat, deceased.



PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea cents per agate line on weel-days
12 cents per

and agate line on ve,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.



is hereby given that the undersigned
Laan, La oy ys has this
HAT" carried on by us at Dottin’s Alley,
wh, and that the said wil

be continued to be carried on by the
——- SAMUEL VICTOR ASHBY
Dated this 17th day of February, 1951.

s 7 cox,

335 For

@ From Pagel .
now rested for g Barbadb:
in a more ible positi
Hunte assisted considerably with
a drive off King between
open mid-—off and extra cover
for and next over a misfield
with foot by Prior Jones ga
Walcott a welcome four past mi
on.

" A hovel cares Siva off Speer

or ave

2 ame cove SU

a e

wicketeger cute and
n

cone a

‘ort to catch the
Choon & his hand
but to hold i

ASHBY.
21.2.51—3n.



Howard Streat, late of Bloomsbury
plantatiun in the parish of Saint Thomas,
who died in this Island

of January 1951 are required to
send in particulars of their claims, duly
attested, to the undersigned Gordon

Oswald Hamilton Harding,

ard Streat and Hilton Seale, the quali-

fied executors of the will of the deceas-

ed in care of Cottle Catford & Co., No.
, Bridgetown, on or before

the 28th day of March 1951, after

date we shall pyceed to distribute the

assets of the said estate among the par-

ties entitled thereto, having

have had and
that we shall not be liable for assets so
distributed to any person of whose debt
or claim we shall not have had notice
at the time of such distribution.
And all persons indebted to the

Tang
eg ball

to
t. Hands flew
into the air and there was much
speculation as to whether it w
a catch. A checkup with U:
Cortez Jordan who was ‘ at
the time revealed that if J
Choon had held the ball, Hun
would not have been given out
since in his opinion the ball struck
the pad and not the bat.

Hunte whose cricket and crowd
pleasi powers increased at a
tremendous rate as the inni
got older, hooked a full toss from
Jackbir to the deep square }
boundary for four and got into the
thirties with a oe dri
oo sone Ned ‘toe tel ume =

joni e throug
the first half contins: came in
an hour’s time and Walcott who
had been restrained for most of
his forty-five minutes ‘stay at the

Dated the: 23rd day of January 1951.
Gordon Oswald Hamilton Harding,
Oswald Howard Streat,

Hilton Seale

24.1.51—3n,





_ Tet peteat eee teria SALCom aa wicket took four runs off Fer-
baci For Od PE ae moe eo RCH foe Beat execute brine Ove
as . r vate or use,

condition, 22,000 miles, Apply: Manager, * se tei. NOTICE drive off Jackbir for aaa
Marine Hotel. 23.2.51—3n . 18.2.51—4n, PARISH OF ST. PETER





CAR—One 1947 Mercury Sedan, done
22,000 miles, in perfect order (S.52)
Apply: Howard King, Taitts Plantation,
St. James. Ring 91-30. 20.2,.51—2n,





CAR—Singer 10 H.P. good condition,



TENDERS will be received by the | POUNdary.

undersigned for the following up to

Ferguson troubled Hunte with

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Barbados Score

9 Wkis

He had two chances, one at
{34 and another at 44 but his
jinnings as a whole was one of
the most promising entries into
Intercolonial cricket as an open-
ing batsman that I have seen in
Barbados for many years.

Hunte had been at the wicket
for two and three quarter hours
and had hit nine fours.

Nine Sizzling Fours

Weekes hit nine fours all around
the wicket to help hoist the
double century in 182 minutes
and two balls after executed a
powerful ondrive off Skeete to
complete his individual half
century in 38 minutes. Weekes
had now hit ten fours in 51.

Seven runs later Denis Atkin-
son, who had partnered Weekes
was out to a fine return catch to
Skeete. He came down the wicket
and drove a well flighted delivery
back to Skeete whv readily
aceepted the catch.

Another wicket fell before tea,
that of Eric Atkinson. He played
over one well up from Skeete and
was bowled for 13. The score was



ngsjnow 231 for 5 and Weekes was

65 not out when the game stopped

eS ifor tea.

Brilliant Dismissal

A pull stroke .by Weekes in
which the brilliance of its execu-
tion was overshadowed only by
the magnificence of the effor
that made it a catch, brought
about Weekes’ dismissal.

He got into his wicket and lifted
an inswin with the new ball
from Jackbir to deep square leg
Legall anticipated well , dived
and held the catch but had to
leave the field as he fell heavily

|
\
|
| M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Marea Henriet-

stmerererenoeisesianpinsicie-aumppeninatniidindsiedes
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the
Insurance Company I will sell on Friday
February 23rd at Fort Royal Garag2,

5 good tyres, new battery. Price $500.00.| St. Michael's Row (1) 146 Austin 10
A. G. Seale, Central Livestock Station,| H.P., (1) 1937 V-8 Ford Sedan. Both
Pine. Phone 3495. 22.2.51—2n.| demaged in accident. Sale at 2 p.m.

—_——

CAR—One 12 H.P. Vauxhall in good
condition. vy be seen at Straughn’'s
Garage, Roebuck Street. 20.2,.51,—4n.

CAR—One (1) Rennault 8 H.P. Apply
R. M. Farmer, Fairy Valley, Ch. Ch.
.2.51.—3n,

FURNI E

FURNITURE — (1) Mahogany Vanity
dresser, (1) Wardrobe, (1) China Cabinet,
()) Ice box, (1) Simmons double bed.
Dial 3939, 17.2,51—6n.





MECHANICAL

SINGER TREADLE MACHINE—206K10
for plain sewing, buttonholes embroidery.
Fractically new. Owner leaving. $250
for quick sale which hundred below
current price. Dial 8266. 22.2.51—1n.

MISCELLANEOUS

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel,
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n.

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and
draj es. By Kirsch, Dial 4476 A.
& CO., LTD. 13.2.51—tf.n

GALVANISED SHEETS. A_ limited
juantity 11 ft. 0 in. x 2 ft. 6 ins; 24 gauge
Ivanized plain sheets at $5 74 per sheet.
pply Eckstein Bros. 17 2 51.—3n,

Sees cele aeiegee oer ade egesiegetdaaees
MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin:
guished solution







:



>oe



movable partitions. Dial 4476
& CO., LTD.
13.2.51—t.f.n.

TWO HORSES, HARNESS and one (1)
Cart. Going cheap. Apply: S. FB. Cole
& Co., Ltd. Roebuck Street.

21.2.51—t.f.n.

VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirsch Sun-aire
ail metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to
your sizes, delivery 3 weeks, Dial 4476
A, BARNES & CO.,LTD, —13.2.51--t.f.n.

WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower-
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.
a cut to your requirements. G, W.

'UTCHINSON & Co., Ltd. Dial 4222.

15.2.51—10n.

WALL PLAQUES — With figures 'n
relief of specially beautiful design. $3.08
wards. Y. De LIMA & Co., Ltd., 20
ad Street. 17.2.51—Tn,

WANTED

Minimum charge week 2 cents and

96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24

is 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays,









HELP

EXPERIENCED ACCOUNTANT capable
assuming Office Management. Apply
letter only not later than February
26th stating age and giving references.
Electric Sales & Service Ltd., Tweedside
Road, St. Michael.

|



Fg



A COOK OR MAID nobody without
réferences need apply. Mrs, Massiah,
Merton Lodge, Collymore Rock.

22.2.51—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

Empty JEFFREYS BEER
complete with inner rtitions at 24c.
each—delivered to the Warehouse of S. 1’.
Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. Pierhead.

18.2.51—9n





cartons—



BOTTLES — 50,000 empty, white, plain
three-gill bottles packed in bales of 1b

13.2.51—10n.

IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-

, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.

cre —, et ee en ten ad-
oyal Yac u

em * 20,2.51.—T.F.N.

IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniatures, jade,
Old BWI Stamps. GORRINGES,
Antique Shop. Dial 4429.

20.2.61.—t.i.n,

WANTED TO RENT
HOUSE, BUNGALOW OR FLAT—

Pasa, Nese ht AB Pe

TAKE NOTICE

~%



i









Terms cash.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
18.2.51—4n,

I will offer for sale by public com-
petition at my office VICTORIA STREET,
on THURSDAY 22nd at 2 p.m. ALL
THAT certain piece or parcel of land by
estimation 2,000 square feet at PINFOLD
ora wore cr eee and wooden

uu thereon, House con-
eine enone tae room, kitchen
downstairs, 2 bedrooms upstairs with
running water, W.C. and Bath, electric
light, large enclosed yard. For inspec-
tion and conditions of sale apply to

R, ARCHER McKENZIE,
Dial 2947. 18.2.51—4n,





pointed the Church Boys’ School, near
the Parish Church, as the place where
all Parishioners of the Parish of
Philip and other persons duly qualified
to vote at an:
for the said

REAL ESTATE



“DUNSINANE”

COUNTRY, ROAD, ST, MICHAEL.
The residence lately occupied by Mrs.
W. ©. Collymore.

The house stands in well kept gardens | °f Prnest an Gecepsed.

and grounds (2 acres 3% perches).

The whole comprises verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 5 bedrooms, one
with marble bath, 2 showers, 2 lava-
tories, convenient kitchen and pantry,
reoms for 5 servants, garage for 2 cars,
and stables.

Water supply for m and grounds
from a well with mill; water service in
house and also servants rooms (shower
and lavatory).

The residence completely wired and
furnished with electric iighting from
the company’s ins,

House convertible into flats and out-
buildings convertible into a cottage

The land is suitable for develop-

March 8rd (Saturday)

11) The supply of Fresh Milk in bulk for

his spinners. He did not seem to
get them on the volley. In an
effort to relieve himself he lashed

in doing so.
Weekes took 80 minutes over

@





ing will be held on Wednesday,
Feb. 1951 at 4.30 p.m.

the Almshouse
12) The supply of Fresh Meat for the
Almshouse
The supply of Medicine and Drypes
for the Almshouse and outdoor
patients
The conveyance of paupers
(a) To and from the Almshouse to
and from any part of the Parish
(b) To and from the Almshouse or
any part of the Parish to and
from the General Hospital.

out at a well flighted one on the
off-stump and raised the ball.
Skeete at cover got one hand tu
it but failed to hold what would
have been a very smart catch.
Mid-Wicket Conference

A word of advice from Clyde
Walcott after a short mid-wicket

(4)

(5) The puna % Pauvers to thebeonference helped things and
emetery om ie imshouse oF any
pare of ti tone Hunte gradually settled down
G. S. CORBIN, once more.

Signed
Clerk of the Poor Law Guardians,
St, Peter.
22.2.61—4n.

When play stopped for luneh
Barbados had scored 74 for the
loss of one wicket in ninety
minutes. Hunte was 37 not out
and Clyde Walcott 34 not out.

The batsmen were in a happy
mood after resumption and both
Walcott and Hunte took bound-
aries off Frank King and Fer-
guson. Walcott scored a boundary
with a powerful backdrive off
Ferguson for four and completed
his individual half century in 83

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST, PHILIP
VESTRY BYE-ELECTION

I hereby give notice that I have ap-
St,

Election of Vestryrmea
arish may assemble on

Monday Sth day of March 1951 between|Minutes. This included eight
the hours of 10 and 11 o'clock im the} fours.
morning to elect a Vestryman in place First Century

P. S. W. SCOTT The first century was hoisted

Parochial Treasurer, |soon after this in 104 minutes.

es oe Hunte made his second mistake

t .|when he edged one from King to

Jones in the slip and got a life.

NOTICE aor oe me =, to his in-

lividua a century with a

ee EAR «boundary to extra. cover off
Owing to there not being @ quorum at oe. He thad now been
of ve ation. i

x Wednesday, rob. ‘Mist, 1951. The meet- atting for 127 minutes and his

scoring strokes had reached the

th
rs boundary no fewer than seven

ment or kitchen gardens.

The un will offer the
premises for sale % public auction at
their office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the
February 1951 at 2 p.m.

Inspection on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days only between 3 and 5 p.m.



23rd day Of! phat it is the intention of the Vestry
of the parish of Saint Michael to cause
x be introduced into the oye“
‘is Island a Bill to amend the Parochial

FOr OTTLE, CATFORD Bab, .° | Employees Pension Act 1944 (1944-14), as
COTTLE, a ae A amended by the Parochial Employees
4.2 Bi dore Pension (Amendment) Act, 1947 (1947-5),
“| end by the Parochial Employees Pension



at} (Amendment) Act, 1948 (1948-19), and
oo Smee Wiersma elas| "se" arate "Pence

(Amendment) Act 1949 (1949-20) and the

isi ar’ oe ee ae Parochial Employees Pension (Amend-
The dwellinghouse called ‘“Murray] ment) Act 1950, (1950-13) authorising the

Lodge” with the land thereto containi Vestry for each of the several parishes
Be eediesalls 9,200 . feet, Sint of this Island, (if they consider it ex-
Upper Bay Street, St. Michael, the resi-] pedient so to do) to continue to pay “|
dence of the late A, C. Greaves. the parochial employees who have retired
Inspection by appointment with Miss] or may hereafter retire from the service

Ida Greaves, Telephone No. 3060.
For further particulars and conditions| and on the terms and conditions set out
of sale, apply to :— in the Parochial Employees Pension Act
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO} i944 (1944-14) as amended by the

20.2.51.—10n.{ Parochial Employers Pension (Armend-

The parcel of land containing 1,685) ™°"" A er Var be SEALY
squmry fen tm ne Bus, tereo|souitors forthe Venn of he Bara of
si . . ? in ic b
joining the property of the Barbador
Telephone Company Limited. and at pre-
sent occupied as to part by the Observer
Newspaper and as to part by Miss Cado-



\the

Sgd. C. W. CUMBERBATCH, times.
Asst. Secretary. Jeffrey Stollmeyer made a
Sole phan ond Fives | on Skeete
or the first time, Ss proved
TAKE NOTICE immediately successful. He

tempted Walcott into crossing a
shortish leg-break and captured
fg valuable wicket for Trinidad.

alcott mistimed and put up a
catch to Tang Choon, fielding at
widish midon, who had to run
about ten yards to make the

catch,
Crisis Knock
Walcott played part in retrieving the fortunes of
game for Barbados, He
scored a much needed 77 and with
Hunte had put on 125 for the

of such Vestry an allowance at the rate second wicket.

Weekes received a great

ovation as he went in to partner}

Hunte and obliged with a late
cut for four, a cover drive for
andther four and an on-drive
for a third four to send up 150

20,2.51—2n. |iN_as many minutes.

Hunte pulled one from Jackbir
to the square leg boundary for



his scintillating 75 that included
thirteen fours.

Goddard and Norman Marshall
aut on 29 for the next wicket
sefore another successful bowl-
ng change by Stollmeyer saw
Ferguson beat and bowl Marshall
with a well pitched leg break
for a plucky 23. Marshall had
hit the only six of the day.

Some characteristic batting by
mark reached in 265 minutes with

his own contribution being 30.
A useful effort by Hoad that
earned him 24 before he was
bowled off the pad playing back
to a googly from Skeete saw the
score reach 322 for 8.
Millington’s arrival at ‘the
wicket made it easier for the
Trinidad fieldsmen with Skipper
Goddard now at the wicket as
well, as they were two left-hand-
ers, Millington only made a couple
before he crossed a perfectly good
length ball from
was bowled.
Mullins scored a single off the
first ball he received and skipper
Goddard too. Mullins played
out the over, the last of the day.
Barbados, at close of play on
the first day had scored 335 for
9 wickets. Goddard had carried
out his bat for 43 and Mullins 1
not out,
rf ~

Ferguson and



Victoria Win
Cricket Shield

MELBOURNE, Feb. 20.

Victoria won the Sheffield shield,
Australia’s championship cricket
trophy, by beating West Australia
by eight wickets today,

Earlier in the day, New South
Wales, the holders, beat South
Australia by 10 wickets in Sydney,
and Victoria had to win outright
to regain the shield,

Scores:—West Australia 126 and
103, Victoria 182 for 8 declared
and 49 for 2 wickets.

South Australia 207 and 233.
New South Wales 398 and 44 for
no wicket,—Reuter,

a

Welcome To Visitors

G oddard

And
S tollmeyer

sale, apply to:—
COTTLE

consisting of a centre room
feet square,

gan.

The property will be set up for sale at
our offices on Thursday, 1st March 1951,
at 2 p.m.

Tspection by application to the ten-

ants.

For further particulars and condition of

CATFORD & CO.,
No. 17 High Street,
Bridgetown
* 14,2,51—12n.

One Wooden Buildii
about 1
with windows and doors,



BUILDING —

surrounded by a verandah of Pine about
22 ft square, the entire building cover-
ed by a shingled roof. Further particu-
lars Dial 6105.

17.2.51—4n,



BELT—Sunday afternoon at Central

Police Station during parade, Brown Vel-} seen on application at
vet Belt with ornate Silver Buckle.

Re-
turned to Advocate Office.
ward if return o $09.51 Sn,

—
TINTED GLASSES--Pink-rims. Between
Goddards and Ocean View Hotel. Call:
Sam Lords. Reward. 22,2.51—2n.

PERSONAL

ving eredit to my wite DULCINA TAY-
Vv; credit to wil ao
Eo ines Harrow) tt toon not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
cise contracting any debt or debts in





my name uniess by a written order
signed by me. ‘
Sed. JOSEPH TAYLOR,
Parris Hill,
Joseph.
2.51—2n.



That SCHENLEY

Inc,
a corporation and existing

rganized
That STAVERT, ZIGOMALA & CO.| under the laws of the State of Delaware,

LIMITED, a Company registered under
the Compamies Act of England, whos?
trade or business address is 6, Minshull
Street, Manchester 1, England, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of cotton piece yoods,
rayon piece goods ami woollen and
wool amd cotton piece goods, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 20th day of
February, 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be

seen on application at my office

Dated this 19th day of Februat
H WILLIAMS

Registrar of Trade Marks
20.2.51—3n-

1951

United States of Aanerica, lace
turers, whose trade or business address
is 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, State
ot New. York, U.S.A., has applied for
the registration of a trade mark it
Part “A” of Register in respect
of all potabie alcoholic bever-
ages including whisky, gin, brandy,
alcoholic cordials and rum, and will
be entitled to register the same alter
one month from the 20th day of
February, 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office

Dated this 19th day of February, 195!
H WILLIAMS
Registrar of Trade Marks
20.2.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
BULOVA

mpany,|Off a shortish one outside the
gr poe ‘pametnes woes the/stump and pulled the ball on to
few York, United) his wicket.

INC., a corporation or;
Jaws of the State of

States of America, whose
business address is 630 Fifth Avenue,
City of New York, State of New York,
U.S.A., has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A" of Register
in respect of watches, watch move-
ments, and parts thereof and watch

trade or

cases, bracelets and chains for
watches, and fastenings therefor made
wholly, in part of, or plated with

precious metals, with or without jewels,
precious and semi-precious stones, par-
ticularly used for the parts of watches,
wrist bands, bracelets, straps for
watches made of leather, imitation
leather, fabric and fabric cord, and will
be ertitled to register the same adter
one month from the 2Ist day ot
February, 1951, unless some persom shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade fees can be
my office.

ated this 19th day of February, 1951,
- wi of rade Mark

istrar of a arks.

foe 21.2.51—in,

TAKE NOTICE
ESQUIRE

That ESQUIRE, INC., a corporation
organized under the Jaws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is 65
East South Water Street, City of
Chicago, State of Miinois, US.A., has
applied for the registration of a ‘trade
in Part “A” of Register

of publications, magazines,

particularly maga-
zines issued monthly, and will ba
entitled to register the same after
one month from the 2ist day of



February, 1951, unless some person shall | |

in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
Dated this 19th day of February, 1951.
resis of Hn Ma
istrar of irks.
~ 21,2.5%—3n,



VACANCY
@

in],

four but was out in the same

over, He attempted a square cut names as popular in cricket

as GAS for Cooking.
Se,

GOVERNMENT NOTICE







ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence)
(Amendment) Order, 1951, No. 2 which will be published in the
Official Gazette of Thursday, 22nd February, 1951.

21st February, 1951. 22.2.51—I1n










NOTICE

The Public is hereby noti-
fied that

Canadian ‘Catelli’’
Macaroni

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

" POSITION
OFFERED

LADY with some knowledge
of Cash and Accounts want-
ed for our Office.

SALARY $40.00 per month.

Johnson's Stationery

ee "

IF YOU WANT
A house paint, a roofing paint, a wall paint,
















is again obtainable
at all grocers.
' 21.2.51—3n





EIS Ss



@ boat paint, a dull paint, a bright paint,
a paint, ‘an expensive paint, m

THE CE EMPORIUM

Cnr. of Broad Street & Tudor Streets
CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors



Real Estate Agents—Auctioneers—Surveyors

JOHN M. BLADON

An excellent opportunity AF.S., P.V.A.
awaits stenographer desirous
of obtaining permanent em- (Formerly Dixon & Bladon)
ployment with attractive Connections in ‘
remuneration.
Kaus tos U.K.—CANADA—U.S. A. —VENEZUELA
Bradshaw & Company, Before buying examine our extensive lists of high class
© P.O. Box 228 % Property and Land located in all areas
& 22,2.51—6n % "Phone 4640 —! : Plantations Building
% x sea
| 6662S SOOO STUS







1

Harbour Log
IN CARLISLE BAY

ta; Sch, Mary E. Caroline, M.V. Vaga-
bend Prince, Sch, Emeline, Sch
Franklyn D. R.. Sch. Timothy A. H
Vanstuytman, Sch. Wonderful Counse!-
lor, Sch. Rainbow M, Sch. W. L. Puni-
cla, M.V. Daerwood; Sch. Harriet Whit-
taker; Seh, Turtle Dove; Sch. Moll N
Jones, Sch. Emanuel C. Gordon, Sch
Belqueen, ss. Factor; Sch. Rosarene
Sch. United Pilgrim §., Sch, Lindsyd I



PAGE SEVEN
'
i r . “From 6 s 0 rs) st i-
Newcastle United | ,o0°°% oir, Supporters | stand

good but we shall show Newcastle
that we have justified our place in
the last fights”, said Tann.

Favoured To Win
| English F.A, Cup

Stan Seymour, Newcastle direc-
tor, was just as optimistic. Only

LONDON, Feb. 19. | one club, he said, had beaten New-
In the First Division Newcastle} castle on their own heme ground
United at odds of 5—2 have re-|this season. That was harm

placed Blackpool as favourites to] who turned the trick on Novem-
win the English football Associa-| ber 12

tion Cup. They got the nod from
bookies after drawing the home | Sunderland has continued its

S ; ° -draw-luck, gaining
Sch. Mandalay IL. game for the sixth round on/ Tun of cup: w .
ARRIVALS February 24 against -the only | ground advajtage for the fourth
Sch. Island Star, 37 tons net, Capt.lremaining third division club, | Successive time. They meet the
Joseph, from Trinidad.

M.V. Athelbrook, 286 tons net,
Cook, from Trinidad
M.V, Caribbee, 100 tons

Gumbs, from Dominicia.

‘n Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Capt

net, Capt

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd advise
that thay can now communicate with
the following ships through their Bar-
hados Coast Station: —

ss. Clarkes Wharf;
ss. Alcoa Pennant;
Atlantic Seaman;
ss. Kansi; 5,5.

88. Mormacland;
ss. Cottica; s.s.
ss. Imperial Toronto;
Fordsdale; s.6. Tampan;
8, Tamapoa; s.s. Ciudad de Maracaibo
8. Exso Hartford; 4.6. Paula; s.8.
Nieuw Amsterdam;
8.8. Jean Lykes;

s.8 Ioanian Pioneer
ss, Golfito; ss. Gas-
cogne; ss. Thebon!; 5.5, San Virgilio:
s Libreville; ss. Labraule; ss. Mu!-
berry Mill; s.s, Aleoa Patriot; ».s. Chesa-
peake; s.s. Vulfrano; s.s. Myriam,
Byfjord; s.», Bonite; «8. Sun Prince;
$6. Pioneer Isle; 8s. Lampania; s

Bewoll; s.s. Bulkoceanic; 6.8, Esso Arubs
8.5, Telamon.

Benn 8 p.m.

RATES OF EXCHANGE

PEBRUARY 21, 1951.

8.8



highly fancied Wolves, the only
team from the first divisicen they

Other cup survivors were quoted ; have had to battle in five rounds.
as follows: Blackpool 7—2, Sun-

Bristol Rovers.

derland §—1, Manchester United) In winning the cup in 1987,
6—1, Wolverhampton Wanderers | Sunderland by a_co-incidence,
7—1, Birmingham 10—1, Fulham /defeated Wolves in the sixth

| round.
In the other sixth cound ties
Although Bristol nas been hard | Manchester United visit Birming-
hit by injuries, Manager Bert Tano' ham while Blackpool take on Ful-

12—1, and Bristol Rovers 100—1



said his club is not dismayed ham.—C.P
ee ee





MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, |

ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
{(M.A.N.Z. LINE)

M.S, “TONGARINO” is scheduled to
sail Adelaide January 24th, Melbourne
February $th, Sydney February 17th,
Brisbane February 23rd, Arriving at eee
eee end of Mareh, 195), oat

ig vessel has ample space for Hard
SAILINGS TO

Prozen and General cargo.
ENGLAND & FRANCE

FRENCH LINE

Cie Gle Transatlantique

Cargo accepted on through Bills of



- yith vent ”
G4 9/10% pr Cheques on | for British ‘Guianc, Barbados, Windward | {| COLOMBIE: March 11
Seman Tee ee pr, | 2d Leeward stands. via Martininque and
ad ta iad Sight Drafts @2 6/10% pr For further particulars apply — Guadeloupe
64 S/i0% ‘pr. Cable FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. and $3
63 4/10% pr, Currency 61 4/10% pr Da COSTA & CO. LTD, GASCOGNE: March 31
50% pr. ae ae er sw via St, Lucia, Martinique,

Tanrier Outpointed



Guadeloupe, Antigua
[Se SE, 4

The M’‘V “DAERWOOD"
eccept Cargo and Passengers for

will

SOUTHBOUND

St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba, | COLOMBIE : Feb. 28
and P ger only = for St " ‘ -
LONDON, Feb. 20. Vincent, Siting Wednesday 21st Trinidad, La Guiara,
inst Curacao, Cartegena,
was outpointed over eight ree The ae ig eel wo | Jamaica
. - peept rgo and amengers for
by Joe Lucy, the London: light Denviniion, Antigua, Montserrat, Accepting Cargo, Mail
weight, at Streathamace Rink, Nevis and St. Kitts. Salling,
London, tonight. Friday 23rd inst, Passengers
From the outset Lucy was on athe. fh. “MARY & CANO. th
the retreat, but he scored con- : ce eee we eee
. : : . P.orrengers for Dominica, Sailing
tinually with right jabs, Tanner Medtneday fist. inet. R. M. JONES & (0., Lid.
having difficulty in overcoming his -
“southpaw” stance. Bw, FA feat one AGENTS
Tanner tried to land a knock- Tel, 4047. 7 ; Phone 3814
out in later rounds, but Lucy,
though flustered, was able take) Ee

out of treuble and _ retaliated
strongly in the last round to gain
the decision,-—Reuter.




Keep your lavatory spotlessly clean, It's
simple, Shake some ‘ Harpic’ into the bowl,
leave overnight, then flush. ‘Harpic’ will
clean and deodorise the whole pan —even
where no brush can reach.

HARPIC

RGD.

THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER

GRASS MAT
FOR BEDROOM
$1.01 EACH

THANT'S




DIAL
mo6








The above equip-

ment is available for

early delivery from

the U. K.

COURTESY
GARAGE

| ROBERT THOM Ltd.

Allan Tanner of British z












Alcoa *teamahip Co.

NEW YORK SERVICE







SS, “Myken” sails 3rd February arrives Barbados 6th March
5.5, “Seabreeze” sails 16th May arrives Barbados 27th March
an a a a panne ee ‘
NEW ORLEANS . SERVICE
S.S. “Runa” sails 15th Februan arrives Barbados Ist March
S.S. “Alcoa Patriot” sails 7th Mareh

arrives Barbados 23rd Mareh
SS





CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship





SAILS HALIFAX ARRIVES BDOS
“ALCOA PENNANT” February 9th February 20th
8. “ALCOA PARTNER” February 23rd March 6th
“ALCOA PEGASUS” Mareh Sth March 20th
. “ALCOA PENNANT" March 23rd April ard
NORTHBOUND
§.S. “ALCOA PENNANT” ., Due March 5th Sails for St. John &

Halifax,
ee



These vesseis have limited passenger acoommodation,

ROBERT THOM LTD.—Now Yorw and Guif Bervice.
Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Canadian Service.



PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, for satl-

ing to Europe, Tae usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.







ne ra



ALCO A OCEOCOOS

MASSEY-HARRIS
EQUIPMENT

the

cordially invited for

the

Enquiries

of following—

supply

42 B.0.P. 6 cyl. DIESEL WHEEL
TRACTORS

(Steel Wheels also available for
Ploughing)

GRASS CUTTERS =— 5 & Git
MANERE SPREADERS

SIDE DELIVERY RAKES
FEER MILLS

FERTILIZING



DRILLS

2





PAGE EIGHT

Skeete Takes Four
Wkts. In Ist. Match

gle, while Skeete’s yielded 14 in-
cluding three boundaries in suc-
cession by Weekes, an on drive,





@ From Page 5
fine leg for a brace and then got

a boundary wide of mid-off. 4 pull to square leg and an off
Walcott took another boundary drive.
this time to the left of Skeete at Jackbir continued from the
square leg and then took a single screen end to Weekes wite was
to mid-on to make his score 46 now 44 and the batsman gat en
and the total 90 easy singie-to muitc-on off the
Wailcttt powerfully on drove seventh. Weekes off drove Skeete
one from Ferguson and the ball jo- a Gdup'e to send up 2CO0 on
vas beautifully stopped by the tins in 182 minutes. He later
aralli. The batsman however back drove one from this bowler
Hot ingle. Hunte got a single powerfully to\the boundary to get
off the next and later Walcott his 50.including 10 boundaries in
cover drove one which Skeete 38 minutes, Weekes got a couple
missed and the ball went to the wide of Tang Choon to send up
boundary to give hm 50 includ- Atkinson who drove back the
ne 8 boundaries in 83 minutes.,, mext to the bowler who took a



The fourth ball from King was hard low return to dismiss him
wide on the leg side and the for,4. ‘ -
wicket-keeper failed to hold. it, The total was 207 and Eric
the ball going to the boundary to Atkinson joined Weekes and was
send up 100 aiter 104 minutes’ Quickly off the mark with a pull
pay. Walcott on crove King to tO Square leg off the last for a
the boundary and later Legall on Shee ee then faced a maiden
the fine leg boundary fielded ee pis oe athe ae
brilliantly to cut off another boun~ _ id ae att Sey ease Wicd
dary from Walcott. The batsman at mid-wicket off Skeete and
eventually got. a singie Atkinson got one to fine leg.

‘Weekes then took another one to
mid-off, Atkinson took a short one
to mid-on and Weekes got another
single with a similar shot.
A Chop

Weekes chopped one down to
gully off Ferguson for a single
and Atkinson got an easy single

Ferguson continued to bowl
from the sereen end and Hunte
pulled his second to square leg
10° a brace to make his score 44
end then played out the remainder,

Walcott took a single to fine leg
a short one from King to send



cn i i
re “s foana’? , to mid-on. Atkinson narrowly
P _ : wee Mt arene oe missed being run out when taking
s by ‘ee # te co aaa single to square leg off Skeete
clivery, The batsman tam 6°' Weekes got a single to long on

a singe wide of mid—wicket and
iater Walcott got an easy singie
to mid-off. The total was now 112
with Walcott 60 and Hunte 45.
Walcott tickled .one from
Ferguson to fine leg for a single
and Hunte got another to back-

off this same bowler to make his
score 59 and later Atkinson got
a brace to square leg.

A_crisp square cut by Weekes
off Jackbir was nicely stopped by
Tang Choon, but the next ball, a
lovely off drive found its way to

ward point. Ferguson’s next the boundary. Weekes then sin- ‘ . ; Q
delivery resulted in a single, a gled to mid-on and later Atkinson the boundary to make the total
powerful off drive by Walcott. cover drove for another. 293. He toek a sharp single to
Hunte then playel out the re- Atkinson beat Jackbir with a Mâ„¢id-off off the seventh to send up
mainder hard cut off Skeete which went Hoad who survived the last,
Walcott singled King’s fourth to the boundary to enter double Goddard pulled one _ from
delivery to mid-on and Hunte figures and then got a single to Ferguson to long on for a single
acain played out the remainder. mid-off. Weekes got a long single and later Hoad back drove this
Ferguson continued from the to mid-on, but from the last ball bowler to the boundary and then

sereen cnd and bowled to Walcott before tea, Atkinson was bowled took a couple with a late cut to

who got a single wide of square om ee oe he missed one senq up 300 in 265 minutes.
leg. Hunte then cover crow. oo yell + UD. one had Goddard took a single to mid-off
Ferguson beautifully to : ve wickets were of King and Hoad ot another,

now down for 231, with Weekes 65

C 2 is 50 including
boundary to get his re

7 bouncaries 1n 127 minutes,

A lovely off drive off the first
ball from King’s next over, gave
Walcott his ninth boundary out of
his score of 68. He then got a
couple pasi point. An uppish but
safe stroke by Walcott gave him
another couple and later he edged
this bowler to the boundary to
make his score 76 and the total

this time to mid-on and Goddard
did likewise. In Ferguson's next
over, Goddard got a single through
the slips to send up Hoad who
lifted this bowler to the off
boundary to enter double figures
and then singled to square leg.
A Life

King’s next over yielded a

single which was scored by Hoad

On resumption, Norman Mar-
shall went out to the wicket with
Weekes, Prior Jones bowled from
the screen end to Weekes who
took a single to mid-wicket off the
first and later Marshall pulled a
short one to the on boundary for
the first six of the day to open
his account, and later got an easy

aa single to si

Ferguson’s next over Was a *' 8! square leg. p
aiden the third for the day— | With the total at 239 Jackbir i d
to Hunte. took the new ball from the screen nical t

end and sent down a maiden to an urs
Walcott Out
vi e total at 133, Skeete from Jones beautifully to the UW b 4 t ah
Fe aac on from the pavilion boundary and then glanced this n ?a en
end. He bowled to Walcott who bowler for another boundary.

Marshall took a single to cover to
send up 250 in 225 minutes, but
later Weekes hooked one from this
bowler and Legall fielding on the
boundary ‘after covering some
good ground brought off a magnifi-
cent catch to end his innings of
75 including 18 boundaries in 80

singled to long on. The batsmen
then ran a leg bye and later Wal-
cott pulled at one from this
bowler and Tang Choon who was
fietding at mid—wicket, took a
good running catch to dismiss this
batsman with his score at 77 in-
cluding 11 boundaries in 127 min-

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G.
Feb, 21

the second day’s D.T.C. New
Year meeting concluded at Dur-



utes. This partnership had yield- minutes, race unbeaten. for the meeting.
ed 125. Sa ae of ae at

The total was 135 and Everton Goddard In cating on iden abet ee pred
Weekes the incoming batsman, ! the lead tor the D.C ane
played out the remainder of | Skipper Goddard filled the A big surprise came when S -
Skeete’s over. breach and saw Marshall pull one |... Back : r ae he ms nth

Hunte took a single off the first from Jackbir to the long on Soni fe ee ome wi Nn
from Ferguson and Weekes boundary and then got an easy ontgomery second. Combinc

paid $615.00 on a $1.00 forecast

square cut to the boundary and ,
: ‘ ‘ ticket,

later on drove for another, Each
batsman then singled and Weekes
again reached the boundary with
a cover drive which beat Legall
(fielding in that position, 150 then
went up on the tins in exactly 150
minutes.

Weekes

come to mid-off to make his score

Marshall got into his wicket and
pulled @ short one from Jones
to the fine leg boundary and then
took an easy single to mid-on.
Goddard broke his duck with a
nicely placed shot past gully for a
single and went up to face Jackbir,

PEBRUARY STAKES

(6 Furlongs) Class B
Ist. SANDHURST (Joseph) 136 ibs.
2nd. SUNNY GAME (Sunich) 126 Ibs,
3rd, MISS SHIRLEY (O'Neil) ‘@1 Ibs.
4th, GALLANT MAN (Gobin) 124 Ibs

Time 1 min, 17 2/5 secs.
JUVENILE STAKES

on drove the second he (6 Furlongs) Class H

; 5 i i. Jus P P 1) 19
received from Skeete for a single He cover drove the third delivery ws) | DY CHANCE (ivonnet) 124
and later Hunte got a single with for a couple and later got a simi- , 294. SURPRISE PACKET (Gobin) !24
a similar shot. : Ibs.

lar amount with a well

shot to square leg,
Marshall took an easy single to

mid-off and Goddard square cut

placed “gra. FLYING STEP (Beckles) 124 Ibs
4th. SLY FOX (Lutchman) 129 Ibs.
Time 1 min. 20 secs,
NEW YEAR HANDICAP
(Mile and Hundred Yards) Class F

Jackbir was now brought back
from the screen end and Weekes
greeted his first delivery with a
powerful cover drive to the boun-

; the next to the boundary and then Sunic
ha aan, ane, cent a hee t ya Ist. JOLLY MILLER (Sunich) 128 Ibs.
9 A gene ma Le ond got a single to fine leg to enter 2nd. BLACK SHADOW (Gobin) 126
misoft | 3 ne oe to Sthe double figures, Marshall off drove 3". ORMONDES BATTERY (Naidoo)
up Hun who play : 116 ibs
famainder: ~ a single and Goddard off drove 4th. BIG BOY (Lutehman) 108 Ibs.
Weckes on drove the first from Pe ine the er ae aes Time: 1 min, 56 secs,
Skeete to the boundary and then ith the score at 275, King was , d
took a single wid> of mid-on, breught on vice Jackbir from the ‘e Purlense Cleo
Hunte drove past the bowler to Pavilion end. He howled to Mar- 1st. BTOILE DE FLEURS (Sunich)
the boundary and got a brace to Shall who got a single to mid- | 114 Ibs,
fine leg off the next. wicket off the second delivery. 2nd yen KITTY (Lutchman)
Weekes who was now 24 with Goddard stopped one in front of 3:4, GALLANT MAN (Joseph) 112 Ibs,

him and the batsmen ran a quick
single. Marshall also got a single
off the last, a short one from

4 boundaries, added another one
to his list when he pulled the first
he received from Jackbir’s next
He got a

4th. SWISS ROLL (Lutehman) 118 Ibs
Time: 1 min. 19 secs,
DIRECTORS HANDICAP

(6 Furlongs) Class G

over to the square leg. King, to fine leg, Ist, SURPRISE PACKET (Gobin) 122
single to point to send up Hunte * Ibs.
who pulled the next to the square Marshall Bowled and, MONTGOMERY : (Hutphaien) "106
leg boundary. Ferguson replaced Jones at the — arq MOR? ELIER (O'nei!) 112 Ibs.
screen end with the total at 279 4th. ORMONDES BATTERY (James)
Hunte Out He bowled to Marshall and beat 126 Ibs

Time: 1 min, 20 secs,

Trinidad got their third success
when Hunie played on the fourth
from Jackbir with his score at 63

including 9 boundaries in 165

and bowled this batsman with his
first delivery. He had scored 23
including 1 six and 2 fours in 40
minutes.

PRESIDENT HANDICAP
(6 Furlones) Class E

C } and, JUST REWARD (Joseph) 134 Ibs

minutes. 7 Hoad the next man in got a 3rd. GOBLIN (Lutechman) 116 Ibs.
The total was 178 and the bats- single to fine leg off the first, ball | 4th. ANNA TASMAN (Yvonnet) 124

men had put on 43 in 21 minutes. he received. Goddard got q couple Ibs. y.

Denis Atkinson filled the breach a Time 1 min, 19 4/5 secs

through the slips and then took
a single wide of mid—on,
Facing King, he off drove the

THE GUIANA HANDICAP

(1 Mile and 100 Yards) Class A
Ist. SANDHURST (Joseph) 138 Ibs.
2nd, DOUBLE LINK (Forshaw) 136 lbs

and played out the remainder.
Weekes took an easy single off
Skeete and later Atkinson pulled

this bowler to the square leg first to the boundary to make his oa. MA SOR ee ae ibs
this s a 3 ‘TER is
boundary to open his account, Score 24 and‘ then placed one be- jy.

Jackbir’s next over yielded a sin- tween second slip and guily to Time 1 min, (51 sees.

By Jimmy Hatlo |





| ‘They'll Do It Every Time
ete TT



Registered U 5 Patent Offtee













































CH “Y
Arete, YOU CAN SAY BOSWELL THERE WON'T YY wilo DIGS UP THE

| (1M THE JERKIMER BLOWFISH“ARTIST, \/ BE TIME FOR A 7 GUESTS FOR THIS

| ANNOUNCER ON WORLD TRAVELER,BIG-GAME }) PROGRAM=JUST |/ PROGRAM SOME

| THIS FORUM HUNTER, AND RACONTEUR=» (\ THE COMMERCIAL [ MEAT PACKER ?




AND HIS INTRO-
DUCTION’

PROGRAM, MR.
BLOWFISH - WHAT
i WOULD YOU LIKE
ME TO SAY ABOUT
y YOU IN MY
INTRODUCTION?

AUTHOR OF’RED CHILBLAINS? WHAT HAMS 1!
“OUTSIDE TIMBUCTOO™: AND
"MAGENTA MIDNIGHT-MEMBER
OF THE TYPHOON CLUB,

FOUNDER OF -**s









8105

HE WON'T
OPEN HIS YAP
WHEN HE'S ON








Ame | iN

; Listenine TO THE

FREE GUEST BLOW HIS |
OWN HORN»

THANX to ED BILL,
386 474 AVENUE,
NEW YORK

9-8):







Sandhurst scored a “double”, as

‘st, BLACK SADDLE (Gobin) 134 lbs

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



HES OUT

THIS is the stroke Clyde Walcott made to end his innings at 77 yesterday. H
by Tang Choon off Skeete. ” . moor

to fine leg. Facing Ferguson,
Hoad, lifted one overhead for a
single and Goddard pulled to
square leg for another. Moad got
a boundary with ag pull to.the mid+

wicket boundary and later on
drove for another. Hoad had a
“life’ when Asgaralli dropped

him near the long on
with his score at 23.

Skeete replaced King at the
pavilion end and bowled Hoad off
his pads with the total at 332.
Hoad who was at the wicket for
31 minutes, scored 24 including 3
boundaries.

boundary

Millington the incoming batsman
got a single to square leg and
Goddard singled past gully.

Ferguson continued to bowl
from the screen end and Goddard



Footballer Fined
LONDON
Bobby Flavell, “ace”. Scottish

footballer who went to Bogota las:
year, has been fined $420 by the
Scottish Football Association and
informed that he cannot play
again in Scotland until next sea-
son.

Flavell, an inside forward or
left winger, played for the Million-
aires Club in Bogota after sud-

ban Park, to be the only horse to denly leaving the Hearts F.C.
—I.N.S.

re

|

Washing-up
ts done in .
half the time

with Rinso!



And Rinso is
Perfect for use
' in washing
machines !

|
;

JA

i
VARESE SS

START THEM OFF





brilliantly, caught



Zot a single to the right of Skeete

at mid-wicket. Millington got

a

single to fine leg to send up God-

dard who drove the next to the
long on boundary to make his
score 40.

Skeete’s next over yielded
single.

a

The total was now 333 and

Ferguson bowled Millington with

his fourth delivery.

the mar

Mullins’ the
incoming! batsman was quickly off
‘ with an easy single to
mid—on, Goddard also got a single

off Ferguson and the game ended
with the total at 335 for the loss

of 9 wickets.
Mullins 1,

Following are the scores:—
BARBADOS Ist Innings

Goddard is 43 and

R. E. Marshall b Jackbir ........ 2
C. Hunte b Jackbir o20 sopves0. Oe
Cc. L. Walcott ¢ Tang Choon b Skeete 77
E. D. Weekes c Legall b Jackbir .. 75
D. Atkinson c & b Skeete 4
EK, Atkinson b Skeete .. 13
'N. Marshall b Ferguson .. 23
J. Goddard not out . . 43
rE. L. G. Hoad b Skeete . pad
FE.. Millington b Ferguson ... 2
C, Mullins not out ............50.. 1

Extras b. 5, lb, 1, W. 1, n.b1 8

Total (for 9 wkts. .... 335

Fall of wickets: 1 for 10; 2 for 135; 3] \PSSGISSSSSSS9999999999%

for 178; 4 for 207; 5 for 281; 6 for.250;

7 for 279; 8 for 322; 9 fér 333.
BOWLING ANALYSIS

Oo M R
S. Jackbir 18 3 62
By WING «6.00. eee ul : 62
P. TOnes .. 6.50.5 .44+ 10 - 4
W. Ferguson 18 2 89
C. Skeete il - 60

You get whiter whites, brighter
coloureds when you use Rinso!
Rinso’s rich hard-working suds
work through and through every
article, cleaning out all the dirt,
so thoroughly—yet so gently.
Results are always so much better
when you use Rinso in the wash.

RINSO for all
your wash /

X-R 245 800

ew

SSS

aw oes
























DAILY

NRICHED BREAD
The Vitamin Loaf





THURSDAY,
Olympic Flame Is A,
ARTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than
ease these terrible agonies.

FEBRUARY 22, 1951





% ROME, Feb. 20.

The eternal flame from Mount
Olympus, universal symbol of
Sportsmanship reached Rome the
“Eternal City” today on its way
to Buenos Aires for the opening
of the Pan-American games on
February 25.

The torch, lighted yesterday at

A new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives

the Olympiad flame, started its| prompt relief from the pains due to the symptoms of arthritis and
6,000 mallee journey this morning ae , but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
when it was taken on to an Italian| @

airliner which brought it to Rome. |
{t was to be transferred to another
plane for Buenos Aires.

Accompanying the symbolic
flame were two Greek athletes, the
Greek Olympi¢e Committee Secre-
tary and two journalists.

—Reuter.

‘tism, > D
of the rheumatic state’s background. =—__
has oa thoroughly tested in, medical institutions.
DO! is used now with unprecedented success. DOI,CIN
is Babee | by doctors now. And many sufferers have already
cao normal living as a result of taking

LCIN.
Don’t delay. Profit by the serene of fellow-victims of these
pains. Get LCIN t 0

ay. A bottle of 100 precious tablets costs
ony
sy

.BOOKERS DRUG STORES— Bridgetown and Alpha
Pharmacy.















ienebiln caste tociia aaietiiliaieaiaaineiads

What's on To-day FREE BIBLE LECTURES

Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion — 10 a.m.

MAKE YOUR SELECTIONS FRO!
THESE; — ir

Tins Cocktail Peanuts
Bots Cocktail Cherrics

Tins Cocktail Sausages by
ond day of first Trinidad » M
SeeBarkades cricket tour- Prof. R. G. JOLLY
nament .. continues .. at Sandwich Spread of Pa. U.S.A.

Ox tail Soup
Vegetable Soup,
Asparagus Soup
Chicken Soup
Tomato Soup

Kensington Oval — 11.30 Sunday, 25th, 8 p.m.
“CHRIST'S SECOND COM-

a.m.
Christ Church Vestry meet- ING”’.—Why? How? When?

ing — 2 p.m. Carrots, (ait Wednesday, 28th, 8 p.m.
Sale: (land at Pinfold Sirert aes yay ced and whole) “THE JUDGMENT DAY”

with wall and wooden +» Tomatoes | How long will it be? Is it

building) — 2 p.m. Pkgs saueigecge ||] to be feared? Is there any
Mobile Cinema gives show Bete ‘Relat Crdan | hope beyond the grave?

at the “Home” Agr. Stn. At

» Prepared Mustard
Scouts) Welches School, STUART & SAMPSON Auspices of

LTD.

|
1
Headquarters for Best Rum. |



St. Thomas — 8 p.m.
CINEMAS

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA: “The
Lost Moment — 5 & 8.30 p.m.

The Laymen’s Home
Missionary Movement
Admission Free,














































PLAZA (Bridgetown): ‘White No Collection.
Heat" — 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

EMPIRE: “Tarnished” & ‘Prince
of the Plain” — 4.30 & 8.30 p.m.

ROXY: “Twelve O'clock High
and “Deep Waters” — 4.30 &

8.15 p.m,

OLYMPIC: “The Macomber

Affair” and “Strange Gamble”
—4.30 & 8.15 p.m.





The Weather

TO-DAY
‘Sun Rises: 6.18 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.09 p.m.
Moon (Full): February 23
Lighting: 6.30 p.m,
High Water: 4.43 a.m,
4.31 p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington): Nil
Total for month to yester-

day: 11.06 ins.
Temperature (Max.): 81.5° F
Temperature (Min.): 74.5° F
wre Gb mn) NINE. A variety of these
“Sear re pretty Fashionable
| a 29.853". aren and useful items

made in Jamaica





g and guaranteed to
=, - * ~ :
BARBADOS 3 make you 100k
x

MUSEUM ee

K. R. BROODHAGEN
Sculpture and Paintings
MARJORIE BROOD-
HAGEN
Paintings and
colours

1! Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street










8

Water-



WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT OUR
NEW PREMISES IN PINFOLD STREET ARE
NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS.













JOHN HARRISON
Watercolours of Barba-
dos and West Indies
Daily 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

.







Sundays 2.30 p.m.
to 6 p.m.
until 5th March.










We can supply you with...
GASOLINE, LUBRICATING OILS, SPARE PARTS
and ACCESSORIES, also BICYCLES, PARTS
and ACCESSORIES
e
WE HAVE THE FACILITIES to do the SERVICING

and REPAIRS ‘necessary for the upkeep of your car

Paper, @

SUST RECEIVED
A NEW SHIPMENT OF STANDARD VANGUARDS
AND TRIUMPH MAYFLOWERS







FLANNEL DANCE

Under the patronage of
Hon, V. C. Gale, M.L.C,
to be given by
BARBADOS PRESS CLUB

in honour of the members
of the visiting Trinidad
Cricket Team



























at
QUEEN’S PARK
Saturday night, Feb, 24

Music by Percy Green’s
full Orchestra

ADMISSION ::: $1.00
Strictly by invitation only

Qe For further Information call at...






CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LID.

PINFOLD STREET



FOR ALL PURPOSES
“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT

in Cream and Green.
For interior decoration of Walls,
Ceilings ‘atid Woodwork.
“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT
in White
HARD GLOSS TULIP GREEN
PAINT
HARD GLOSS PERMANENT
GREEN PAINT
For exterior or interior use.
| “SPECIAL” HOUSE PAINTS
In Grey, Tropical White, Oak
Brown, Barbados Light and Dark
Stone.
For exterior or interior usc.
CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS
In Grey, Bright Red, Mid Green.
RED ROOF PAINT
” For Galvanise or Shingles,
— PAINT REMOVER

| m For the easy removal of old paint.

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.

AGENTS,














wir






The Sign ot
QUALITY



4456
4267





)
PSS urenteanennmnll lL



2ALO000 00068 LOODL AP ABA NODOOOOOONHNOGOHSOO0OOG Sia,

|



Full Text

PAGE 1

TIII'RSDAV. FEBRUARY tt. 1S1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. "5555555 TfLEPMONE UOI Ta* rrujraw far ar. lidJ Death.. Aelnew I -nd In W error i am noun* v llMon WNk-<< Mid tin on Sunday W.en> m*Mr of wernl M N. M 3 real* pn word n •.* da 4 nii Mr word Ml Sunday* fi USMlDml word MED '.r BJS HNIIIM VII F,i : %  Mr* Rimurl Whitehall NOT flaO*WS "••• th* above residence at J £;;„-,:—• %  *—""' Sam.iel Whitehall .widov*Ti Clotelle. De.mond Ullne. Lloyd Sue it;iion ichirdran. I*on wnnujker < brother Clarendon Allern* iRepheu. • Ri*e*i. Marion* Arthur IN MF.MCRIAM WALCOTT—ln loving manor* ol o dear Oertrude Ophelia Walcott w 1 rail aaleep Februan.' Slat. 1S4S Dj.y and moment. Quick I* Eying %  wad In* hying with toe de.d I be lyin FM REXT NOTICE rbo*ee apeak tl '*• %  <••* I'miSSfcL-"*'** ,hM "^ R4*>t>Bniad; u-dflj.. 24 ward. ere> K) £a*7HWP.RF MCDONALD COX K a ih„ • nor* w*e> -4 r,ia • *L'> '"eo " !" Pin* "hone MM a EM UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER Ml BAOH DC. SUGAR By -ecommendaUons ol Lloyd* Agent* .clock SSI U|i Dark CryaUl Bug*! following place* Mueeon Son A Co. Ltd Brldf* a Swain. PairrhiM "'•"" !" Co. HlnckSt I Tr.id*ia bid llorbork 5l h WAT r nriM on by .i. at (JoM-kftHlxw*.. aad ihM rhaaaM flrtn br*nilnud to be tarried on b' |.rderned AMVD. VK'TOri ASMBV D-%d .h inh day o( Pebruarv. ill L. MtD COX. • V AftMV II I 31--' NOTICE Ra aWTATT. Or SAMUEL HnntY HOWARD RTRT-AT •ireet, Jonea l M .,-. Warehouar. Brldde St. %  BANKER. TROTMAN COAuriloneer.. n t si 5*1*0 '•" lBTCT ''OK" SAUHIN CAR^ 1„ perfect r-nnm. o.„. Hfl It AIU1ir.lt McKEKzrX. Au.ll..r--| 111 31-41. UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER CAROne IJ II I' VI condition. Mar be eei (.*]• dreaaer. %  Wirdrobe. U> China Cabinet. (Ii Ice bo. i|. Iimmom double bed RM Ml i;sii-fl-i. MECIIAMCAI. Obri St Mich, HP. tli | .,r.l lOTn ..i from the Company | will aell on Prldav Drd at port Royal Catai'rl R000 aqoare STRURT llh the w Iniilcl.nfi >taouin( then tain, drawing, dining ._ downatalra. 1 bedroomupatatr witn running aater. W.C. and Bath, electric iighi. large encloaad /ard. For kupecuon and candltiana or aal applv ta R ARCHER. McKUtZIl trial W47. DIM | n b> public iomVICTORIA *TRFPT. ? i>-. ALL tt al land by at PINFOLD and woodei RgHBM M %  REAL ESTATE MISCEELANEOl'S BATHS — in Porcelain Enamel in White. Oraan, Primroaa with matching %  nm to complete colour tultet. TOP r A BARNES & CO.. Lid. %  in tf CITITAD* FITTINQS—Eor amart wi dow ilyling. light control. Velancaa a: aVaMtlaa. By Klrich. Dial WTf. BARNER A CO. tTD. HIM I OAI.VANISKD SHEET* A limited S iantlty II It 0 In 2 ft fl i nl 34 I4> alvaniird plain theeli at U 14 per %  heel. Apply Eckiiem Bro. IT t 31 -3n HOOE3ANPOLD DOOHS-Th dlltlnnilahed solution to your apecul aechitaclural problem o* door rloaurea. acreen*. movable partitiocx. Dial 4476 A BARNES A CO, LTD. lllal-tf n. TWO HOHSRS. llARNKSti and on %  |jl Cart Onlng cheap Apply S B Cole A Co.. Ltd Roetiiirk Strrel 2! ISI-Un. VENETIAN RI.INIX4 -Kirarh Stm-alrall laelal Da Luxe Venetam biird. u. your Rlwa. delivery 3 week. Dial 44-N A. BARNES J. CO. LTD. 13 I 31I f n WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flowet%  d Sheet and Plate Ola for all needa. W cut to yotrr requirement!. G W Rl'TCIirNSOM Ai Co, Ltd. Dial 4331. li 181-ion WANTED Wlmlnum tli^-o* irara; it <**!. and H cent* Sumdaw M ipordi — oi-er U word, g re-t. „ „rd u-eefc—4 'eall • word Sundaui. HELP KXPERDTNCED AOCOIJNTANT rapuhl. Of aaaumlng OfBee Managemaivl. Appl< aW letter only not later thai. Februar) tfflh auting age and giving relerencea Eln-ti.c Sain a> Service Lid. TweedBKIi Road. St. Michael. J2 1 M -! % %  A GOOK OR MAID nobody witlwi '•""•" need apply Mr. Maollah Merlon lodge. Coll.tnore Rack DVNUDIAWECOUNTBY. ROAD. ST. MICHAI1 The reiidence lately occupied by MM V O. Col 11 mo re Tha i on-, atanda In wall kept f.rde-i ird ground, if ace* 91 perchc. Tha whole rompmn verandah, dr.w. hg and dining rooma. ft bedrooma. ona v-ith marble bath. I ahowata, 3 lavatorlea. ron van lent kitchen and pantrv, -tma for 3 •orvanU, garage lor 3 eara, ia atablei Water rupplr for garden and ground) from a well with mill: I mi • %  •'OW i flat. ind outcotuga devrWptho and li II..lasMaaaM untahed with i* companya mama. it... p %  BajfOjMI -i building* convertible Tha land la HI I table man I or k lichen gardana. TTi undaralgned will o(r>r prernlaaa lor eala by public aurtln their ofnee, No IT, High Street. D"dgeFriday Ihr 33rd dBr *t Pebruary 1*31 at 3 p.m. Inspection on Tueaalaya and Tlulr* tya only between 1 and 3 pm. For lurthar panic ulara apply to COTTLR, CATTORD A CO-. Solicitor.. 4-1.11—ion. Tha underalgned will m up for aala at their offica No IT lligti Street. Bridgetown, on Friday the 2nd day of March. 1RSI. al 3 p.m. Tha dwetllnaThouaa called "Uu lodga" with the land thereto containing by cBtlmation J00 aq. feel, altuati Upper Bat Htreel SI Michael, the reai• of i Irupautlon l> appoint IIJ Orrave>. Telephone For funber parUcula. f .ale. apply 1o :— COTTLE, CATTORD A CO SO 3 31 -10#_ nanl with MbHi 3oao. and comliti.ii MISCELLANEOUS Sly JEFFREYS DEER carton*— lete with inner parlltlona al 34c -delivered to tha Warehouae of S |TTie parrel of land containing Iraa Street. Brtdgetn joining the proparli of Ihe Barbado* Trleptwne Company limited ent occupied aa to part by the tibarrvn Ncwapaper and ai to part by Mlaa Cadn%  an n-t up for i i lit March IHI. it 1p.m. laaap m iB li by application to the trn< mb For f'irthrr partKulara and condition d %  M, apply la:— COTTlJ: CATTORD CO.. No 17 High Stretl. Bridge to wr 141.81 -13 BOTTLER SO.OQO empir, w three-gill bottle, lacked In bn down each — al It par bottle r klng. Pleaie apply to S. •' Mi Co., Ltd. Broad Street. Dm) : IMMEDIATE CASH lor diamond Jewellory, old China, .liver and ShafRald Plata Phone 441* or call at GORRINGES, adlalnhc Royal Yacht Club 30151 TIN IMMllHAIk (.ASM i any. %  "kt miK'i' ."in" Old II W 1 Btampa An-.,! „ %  Shop Dial 4" >r broken Jrwrl%  tlOllltlMlCS. WANTED TO BFNT HOUSE. DUNG ALOW OR FIAT Fuiniahed Fui Marih and ApiU. Teirl Sone 1 Mr* Boa 9181 -Sn TAKE NOTICE lara Dial 1105 With window, and dm By a verandah ol Pine abc tha entire building cove Ingled roof. Further parlic ERST TINTEl* Ol^WSaR. -Ptiik-rimt. ( %  ndrtarrt. and tice-n View Ho" Sam 1—rd. lt.aed | PERSONAL NOTTCT. %  hereb> g.ven that all per- having an* deb I or claim uBOn M -nectir.g the eata-a af Samuel R*e.n Howard Rtreat. late of Bloom.bun plantati.,n In the pariah of Smi.t Thoi-n. who died In thi. laland Lin Ihe at" da. of Jgnuarv 1M1 are M ^tuTed fc aer.d in particular* ol their claima. dull atteated. to Ihe urtdanlgned Gordon oawald Hamilton Harding OtwaLR ,^. *T,I Mreai and Hitto-Seal* the quaillied nterutoi* of Ihe will of Ih* dn'nlro in rare ol ColUa Caifard at Co Ho IT High Stierl BrldaTatOwn, on or B*(ct the .ati: day of March ltd), altar whili d^ie we ahall pVKeed to dlrtrlrnite the lied there i Kti.l .-.in. %  laMd to di.lrtkmted lo any peraon of .home r claim we .hall not hair had notKO : the Um* ol nach dlatrtbution. And all peraon* indvtrted lo the -( itat* aa* requaated to WW U*a>tr e'mnt* anthout delay. Doled iha-Urd day ol January ltdl tlotdon fald Hamilton Harrllne Oawald Howard Slrtat. Hilton Scale .'aliUrd excciilora of the will of Bmi:cl rnr> Howard Stte.it drceaaed MIAl-ln, Barbados Score [Harbour Log 335 For 9 Wkts """"^ •gt Frosn a^tJrp 1 1 ivirbM for pi acinf Bsrt>o>> Tiforl He had two chsnees. one si and another si 44 but hi I ...nirtct oi • whole was one of more com!*)*table pomtiop he mMl promlRini; mirirfoE.lBur snd nexiover m.^e^ ^^wJS tS?.,7h. wkR.1 NOllCK IX SI -M OF ST. I-I1.lt • Ttie aiiopl) of Preah MUR %  hulk fo> Ihe AlmahouM • The atipply of Preah Meal for Ihe Almahouar 1 The .uppk. of Medicine aod rtrun lor the Almahouae and outdoor I The conveyance ol pauper. la. To and from the Abruhoiiar m and from any part ol Ihe Pumh tbi To and from the Alra*hau>r or any part ol the ParHh to and from Ihe General Hoapital ,, Thr BurUI of Pauper, to Ihe Cemeterv from the Almthoua* or any part of th* pariah Snad a. s CORBIN. Clerk ol Ihr Poor Law Uuardian•t pet-r NOTICE l' \I:I-H OF ST PHIUP VESTRY BYE-ELECTION I tierebv give nolle* thai I have appointed Ihe Church Rova' Srhool. fie.r the Pariah Ch.irch. u tha place where all Puniriloner* ol Ihe Pariah of St Philip and other peraon* duly qualified me al any Election ol W.ti. mri he Mid Parrth may aaarmlila no Monday 91h day of March IHI betwe*. the elect J NOTICE TBf II V Hll Mills I1VII. "HIM ARKOI IATION •wing to there not being a quorum al i meeting of Ihe above A—iati .i Wednaaday. fob. r ISSt The meet will be held on Wedneedav. Mil P*b IBS) at 4 10 p.m. Sgd C W Cl'MBERDATCII. Aaat Sac ratal y mn so TAKE NOTICE f the p..n.h a to be UUiodajM thi I-:.,, .i .. %  Ernployee* Pein omended by I rnd bv Ihe P-e < Amendment • by th I Ui A. i rhlal Empkryeea Penalon lAtt I' Act ISSO. tlMS-IBi auihorl*lm rv for each ol th* aavetal pariahea M< Idand lf pedienl ao to doi t the parochial emploveea who hire rotirrd nay hereafter retire from Ihe -rrvki wh Ve.try an alk>wanre at the rate on Ih* term* and condition! art out de Parochial Employeee Pension Art HI44-14. a* amended bv lh Khial Bmployrrr Pennon "Amendt< Ait. ista -itas-iaCAflRINQTON A SCALY. Snlirilora lor Ihe Vr.ir, of Ih* pariah ol S-lnl Mlthael nssi-ie. with the foot by Prior Jones gm\* Wslcott s welcome four past ml|A lovely ewer drive off Jarkbii for fcnir soon after tavs Mnr.t. JO The nexi gMlvery \wm fc awur sharply to the log and icket-keepei Culllen ami Tsraf Choon, fielding tn the leg trap made sn effort to catch the ball Tans Choon rot his hand to It but failed to hold It. Hands new he air and (here was much simulation as to whet he-. _. > catrh A checkup with Umpire Cortes Jordan who was "on al the time revealed that if Tans Choon had held the ball. Hunt* would not have been given out since in his opinion the hall struck thr pad and not the bat. Hunte whose cricket and crowd pleasing powers Increased at a ui'inendous rate as the innings cot older, hooked a full toss from Jackblr to the deep square leg boundary for four and got into thfl thirUes with a sliding cover drlvt for four which Oanteaume must be pardoned for letting through. The find half century came in an hour's time snd Walcott uho had been restrained for most of his forty-nvo minutes stav at the wuket took four runs off Ferguson to the long on boundatv and next executed n hrt liant cover drive off Jackhir for another boundary. Ferguson troubled Hunte wilii his spinners. He did not seem to g?t them on the volley. In nn effort to relieve himself he lasher out at a well tlinhte.1 one on ttr off-stump and raised the ball Skeete st cover got one hand ti it but failed to hold what woul-. have been a very smart catch. Mid-Wicket Conference A word of advice from Clydf Walcott after a short m.d-wicket conference helped things and Hunte gradually settled down once more. When plav Mopped for lunch Barbados had scored 74 for th loss of one wicket in ninety minutes Hunte was 37 not out .nut Clyde Walcott 34 not out. The batsmen were in a happy mood after resumption and both Walcott and Hunte took boundaries off Frank King and Ferguson Walcott scored a boundary with a powerful backdnve off Ferguson for four and completed his individual half century in 83 minutes This included eight fours First Century The first century was hoisted soon after this In 104 minutes. Hunte made his secoiwi mistake when lie edged one from King to Jones in the slip and got a life. After this he raced to his Individual half century with a boundary to extra cover off Ferguson Ha had now been batting for 127 minutes and h •coring strokes had reached the boundary no fewer than seven lime*. Jeffrey Stollmeyer made a cluing* and brought op fTttliall for the first time. This proved immediately successful. He tempted Walcott into crossing ,i •Imitish leg-hrrak .ind raptured u valusble wicket for Trinidad Walcott mistimed and put up ;i catch lo Tana; Choon, fielding al widish iriidon. who had to run about ten yards to mak catch. Crisis Knock Walcott plnvrd the pn...., part In retrieving the fortunes of coraider tt e.-liho game for Barbados. He "-";;.,'!I'' %  ""'' %  rm h tMeatWd '•'. Had vHI, Hunte had put on 125 for tho !..... Sgd P It W SCOTT I Ih* Ve.l ivd Ihe Parochial .044 ilSM-141, M arochinl Fmplovte* li Act. INT <1M7-SI, i Ra Baa BM Iv-Hi-ii 1S4S HSU-lSt. ami Eroplavet Hn Ipai TAKE NOTICE BULOVA Thai BULOVA WATCH COMPANY. INC a corporation organ Had under Ih* Uwa of tha Rial* of Hew Yk. Uniled Stataa of America, w-hoar tiada or bu.ire.. addrea* U SS* Plllh Aven.e. City of New York. State of NewYwfc. USA. ha* applied lor the regi.trjt. %  ". of a Irada mark In Part "A" of Rraiaiet il watrhea. watrn aerond wicket. Weekes reeeived a great 'alion as he went In to partner Hunte and obliged with a lal rut for four, a cover drive fo another four and nn on-drtv for a third four to send up ISO as many minutes. Hunte pulled one from Jackbir i the square leg boundary for four but was out In the i He attempted a square cut a shortish one outside the stump and pulled the ball hla wicket. md part. Mat of and caaa*. bra** let* and ehalni watrhea. and fastening! therefor mac* wholly, in port of. or pitted l. preclou* metal*, with or without Jarweia. precloua and arml-precloua Man**, particularly need lor th* part* of watch**. arlet band*. bracelets. Urapa lor %  at, her made of le,.lixer Imltahaa leather. f*brlc and fabric cord, and will titled to refiner the tame %  nth fru thr SIX •4 Februa . in thr meanume ffv* none* in dupll. ta me al my oeBee at oppoaftlon of i ledlalrMion The bade mark can ie*n on application at my office paled IM. IPlh da> ..f Frbtaorv. ItJI. H W11X1AM5. RrifKlrai of Trad* Mark II ESI id three quarter hour and had hit nine fours. Nine Siryling Fours Weekes hit nine fours all around the wicket to help hoist th' double century In 182 mlnutei and two balls after executed powerful ondrive off Rlteele complete his individual half century' in 38 minutes Weekes had now hit ten fours Seven nins later Denis Atkinson, who had partnered Wer-kt-.was out to a fine return catch to Skeete He came down the wicket and drove a well flighted deiiver. back to Skeete who readiU accepted the catrh Another wicket fell before tea %  hat of Eric Atkinson He played over one well up from Skeete and was bowled for 13. The score wai now 231 for 5 and Weekes wai 85 not out when the game stopped for tea. Brilliant Dismissal A pull stroke .by Weekes m ahich the brilliance of its cxecu lion was overshadowed only by the magnificence of the effor that made it a catch, brough: iboul Weekes* dismissal Ho got into his wicket and lifted mi ins winger with the new ball from Jackbir to deep square leg I-ogall anticipated well dived ami held the catch but had to I deld as he fell heavily In doing so. Weekes took 80 minutes BVtM 'tis attnttllating 75 th*t in, luded •hi i teen fours ('oddani and Norman Marshall >ut on 29 for the next wicket jefore another successful bowlJlg C< a asrae by Stollmeyei saw Ferguson beat and bowl Marshall with a well pitched leg break fer a plucky 23 Marshall had hit ihe only aix of the day. 5k.-ne characteristic baiting by -kip-ier Cioddard saw the 30" nark reached in 2ei5 minutes with his own contrlhu-.ion being 30 A useful effon !•> Hood that earned him '.'A bafore he was bowled off the pad playing back to a googly from Skeete saw the score reach 322 for 8 Millington's urrival at the wicket made it igtlir for thTrinidad fleldsmen with Skipper Goddard now at the Wlekai H wall, as Ibu nrari |%v*j left handers. Millington onlv made a i-oupl< before he croose-l a perfect 1% Kf>od length ball from Ferguson and was bowled Mulling scored a single off the Hrst ball he received and skipper Goddard too. Mullins played tut the over, the last of the day Barbados, at close of play on the first day had scored So. 1 ", foi 9 wickets Goddard had carried out his bat for 43 and MuUins 1 not out. Victoria Win Cricket Shield MKLHOURNE. Feb 20. Victoria won the Sheffield shield. Australia's chuinploiishii, i katflrl trophy, by beating West Atist alia t>) eiKht ivtckaii today fjirlier in ihe day. New South Wales, thholder., beat South Australia by 10 wickets in Sydney. and Victoria hud to win nutiigh 1 to regain tha shield. Scores:—West Australia 12fl and 103, Victoria 182 for 8 declared and 49 for 2 wickets. South Australia 20? and 233 New South Wales 398 and 44 for no wicket.—Renter. WrlfSRf T* Visimrs O oddard Ami S tollmpyer names as populur in rrirkrt as GAS for Cooking. GOVERNMENT \U I M I ATTENTION If. drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence (Amendment) Order. 1951, No 2 which will be published in thi Official Gazette of Thursday, 22nd r-bruary. 1951. 22 2 81 M V ta; s*n band PTin SadgeAold. Srh Marea Hem t Caroline. M V v„, Vb. Vmenna *. rranaivn u n Rrh Ttmail.v A II \i"d\iirmii. Srh Waauteri lor SV-h Rauibow M M S I > rla. M V Daerwood. Srh Harrart Whit Uker Sah TSartle Dave Srh M..u v Jonaa. Rrh Mman. RATES OF EXCHANGE-: fRRt'ARV SI. tSBI Cheojuea otv Ranker* S3 S, IS' Demaad Dran* ia.11-. Slghl Dran. OS 0/10". Osaoj i t-nrrer^i HI 4 11Tanner Oulpoinlod IXJNDON, Feb. 20 Allan T.miu'1 el Muii-h Guiana tvas outpointed over right rounds b> J<-I.ucv. the London lightweight, at Streathnmnce Kink. London, untight IYOTTI the outset Lucy was on the letreat, but kg K0TI islly with right jabs, Tannei li;i\lng difficulty in overcoming his %  southpaw" ItaaVM Tanner tried to land a knock, mi in later rounds, but Lots] hough flustered, was able lo ke**p out of trouble and retnhateu strongly in the last round to g the decision.—Reater ki-rf. -Oui la>alo<> >rm(l*r> .kin io,.k Shaioomt H*JB-<; tato lb* k %  an otrmight. thrSaid 'HarBSt' Jr.aaad drodoriw ih* .hole pan"ai* no bru.h RM irh HARPIC in iPKi.i tatitoit tin. GRASS MATS FOR REIfROOM $1 tl EACH THAWS "Ml \cuvantle inited Favoured To Win English F.A. Cup LONDON. Feb 19 In the First Division N> United at odd* of a—2 hove irtilacto Blackpool aa favourites to win the R Aaaocialion C*U> Thev not th, tiookiiai after drawing the home S UM i\th lound on fbruary 24 against remaining Ihird division club Bristol Rover' a*, follows Blackpool 7—2. Sun' (Inland i 1 —1, Mat %  • \eihampton Wanderer* ~. -l Unmincham lie—!. Fulham 12—I, and Bristol Rovers 100—I Although Bristol nai. been haili irta Manager Bert Tann said his club is not dismayed. "From our supporters standpoint, a draw m good hut %  %  ' the laat flglui". said 1 Stan Se.ir.our. Newca<'.le dirt: tftr. was just aopti.nistie Only *iad beaten Newcastle on their own he-rne groutui this seaaori That was rulhan who turned the trick on NOVBTTIber 11 land tvts continued Its run of cup-draw-luck. falnlng ground advantage fm the fourth succegsive lime The\ i highly fancied Wolves, the only team from the first dlvr" have had to battle In five tt>Unma In winnint r hr cup m 19J7. Sund-ilsnd by s co-Incidence. defeated Wolves in the sixth round In the other sixth round tie* let United visit Birmlimh,tm while Blackpool tak-him —r p SHIPPING NOTICES MONTREAL. AUSTRALIA. NEW ZEALAND LINE. LIMITED %  M AN .'. i nn MS "TONCARinCi i, li—lllll ta — Il Art* .'' 1 .'. Mill.. ,l februa.. Hh. s>orv Feb-uar* inh, Irrlabane Frbrnarv 33rd. Anoiiig al Barbadoa end ol March. INI Thi* v.'aael hea ample •na.-e for Hart Finreii an.I Qenet.. Cargo seoai Ck Bllla of lading with Iraii.lilpn.eiil al Tn i.i.,1 r.n nm..' tin B..'ii..i I id leeward |*land* I), corr \ I 111. t. CO l.TT> lUrbartia. The HI "CARIRRrT -i'l eorpt rarpi a-id Paaaenger. lo. Don i in ar a. Antigua. Montaerrul Fildav Elid no The Seh 'MARY FCARO I.IKE' will decent Cargo and F. --enger. fm fhn.ut.. •tediteeda) %  ! M 4tlantl<|iir SAILING-. TO ENGLAND g ti: \M I l' I Mil... M. RaaM -t aaat* AlilA PKMNANT" ALCOA I'AltrNFR A1A)A PEOASVli AlaTOA PENNANT" Pel..,,.., I Pebmarv Aaaivrs ar "I'M r. JtHh Marrh atii Mann jou, MIRTMROIMt ALCOA PRNN \\T Tbaaa ••***!* hare llartlled aaaaeager ae*aaimedBU>.ri kOBP.RT TII0M LTDe—afew Vora and Onlf Rorricd. Apply: DAOOBTA ft CO. LTD Causdlan Barrlco. PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Products, Limited. Roseau, Dominie., for sail 'ng to Europe. T'.te usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. 21st February, 1951 The public are herebwarned m gtvinar rredll lo m; wife DUDCIN A TAYLOR mee Barrow) as I do not hold myall rerponalbl* for h*r or anyon* i la* contrartlnaT any debt or debt* in n.r name unie>a bv a written order %  tgned by me Bad jnaseFH TAYLOl' ram. nn Bl. JO-rph tl.SSi a*. T hat BT AViatT. ZIOOMAl^ t DJ11EU a Companv registered Ihe Compaadea Act of England. ItpoS trade or buMnea* Oddresa i. 0. Mlnah.i street. Manrhe.ter I. England. h: -pplle,! for Ih* regUWniton of a trM mar. In Part 'A" of Begiiti m rerpect of cotton peace gooda. rapon piac a good* and woollen wool and eotton ptere good*, and meantime gU. ragl.lration Th> trade mark ran aaori on apalirati... at my offVe Datrd thi. IStn dav of Febraa*' IR H WILLIAMS RefiiUar ol Trad* M.rli It 911 TAKE NOTICE SCMENLEY I RCIDKNLBY rNTXISTRtErt. ISC poraUon organised and Banal t the lawa of Ihe Rtaie of Del-.-—. United State, of America. Manulaturera. who** trad* or budnaaa addroi I. SOD Fifth Avenue. Rlasv York 1. Rial* .,( New York. USA., ha* api trie r rgt all potabrf alcohol if age* be entitled Ip la and rum. and will legltter the aar-* al— from th* 30th da> • Febni^>. IHI. unleaa •"'". per—. ' I in tho meantime gtv* notke tn duple' to m* at my ofrlc* of OOrpodtlon of *ie regtetraUan The trade mark raw I aaen on applaeatlon at my oAVe Dateo this iSfh day o* PObroar*. isoi H wnA4AML Roglitrar of Trad* Mark. TAKE NOTICE ESQUIRE That FJROt'lRC INC. a rnrporatl orsaf.lred under tha law* ol IhRial* of Drlnware. united Rtale. of Ame—lcv whoae trade or buRiioaa addreea la bat South Water Street City oi Chk-afo. Stale of nilnol*. USA., ha* applied for th* raflatratio.1 of a '.rad* mark In Part '*A' of Hr.i.i'r Ireaperl of puhltrallone. rjganw. and pertodtraK partMTula>tr mapi.e* leaned leoalhlv. and Will b* enlltled lo rea*t*r l*.e .ame alter anmonth (ram the 3i day of FObruarv. Itftl. unleaa aom* peraon ihal |r the meantime give notice In dtipllrj'to me al my ofBre of oppoeition of surii legirtraUon. The trade mSik cmn b* seen on aapUraUon at my orRee Dated this ltth day of February. 1011 II. WILLIAMS. Raffidrar ol Trade Mark Ml SI-J". [0-DAV "S NEWS FLASH POSITION OFFERED LADY with some kr of Cash and Account: ed for mir Office v ledge wantSALARY $4000 per month Johnson's Slalionm v/// ;;%',',;'.;', XOTIII: The I'ubl fled Hint C Is hereby notiICanadian "Catelli" Macaroni again obtainable r v.u,t\v a An excellent opportu awaits stenographer desi of obtaining perrnanent ployment with attra remuneration. rmI tlve X Apply to .; Bradahaw ft Company I PO Box 2 222M —a)n I ##• yM' WANT A hotiMpauit. ;t roonnc paint, a wall paint, a boat goats*, a dull paint, a bright paint, a cheap paint, an exosowive pauil. faU at , THE CEMHAL i Ui'OHtM \1 :nr of Broad Street & Tudor Streets CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD — Vi oprietors Real FaUte Agents— AsrtlonerrJOHN M. BLADON *F r v A (Forsaerly Dixan A B4sgaR) Connection', in IK—CANADA—I'H A —VENBEUELA Refore baying examine our extensive lexta f high FToperty and L*nd located In all arras 'Phone MM —; Plantation* Buildu - * If •c I e available for delivery (torn COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT TH0M Ltd. I McENEARNEY & (JO. LTD. MASSEY-alAKIMS K"IIIMli:>T %  viquiriea cordially invited for the supply of the following— 12 if.u.p. apt, IHI si i %t in i i TIIAtTOHS (Sie.l HI.. .Is nl nvailnble for Plnughingl I.II \SS < I TTKIIS .1 A lili 1IVMIII KPREADERS SIIK III I 111 in ll\KIS inn MII.I.S 11 inn lAivt. IMIII is



PAGE 1

PACK FOl R BARBADOS ADVOCATE THUMDAY, nminKiw BARBADOS &£ ADVuGttE f. 1 — T -1 rrbaM. b, ikt A....... C.. IM %  >••* •*.. MM•** %  Ilmndijr, l.lm.irv %  -', 19.11 COUOTHH2 THK Houso of Assembly on Tuesday passed a bill to amend and consolidate UM Treasurer. The %  amontf other title to that of Accountant C.encral and to transfer some of UM functions >f the Auditor General lo tinoil in initial step along the lines advocated that the Treasury be attached to the department of the Financial Secretary and b Wider the supervision of that ; he Audit Department as the final check on the disbursements from the iry. The introdui lion of the bill shows Ihat it illacftOUl belief that the House of ,y could control the puTM strings of the Treasury by retaining the appointment of the Colonial Treasurer The new bill now bring! the Treasurer within the l the Civil Establishment and makes that officer no longer responsible to the but to the Governor, The change was long overdue. It was not explained however whether p now taken was one in a series which would being the departments together. It might be that the wholesale change of the appointment and control of the Treasurer by the Governor*and the amalgamation of the two offices might have been regarded as too much to be done at .i fUlgU : LTOke of the pen, but the suggesalready been made and the public have grown to expect, as Mr. Adams said during the debate, "that as the administration of the departments becomes more complex the Island should go forward." [n view of ihe complexity of which the Leader of the House spoke, it is worth noting that ihere has always been a system of pro-audit and it is this which lias saved Barbados on several occasions from ilties. Under that system the funds from the Treasury can only be paid out after the Auditor General has certified the voucher. It is the duty of the Audit Department to make sure that the original sum voted by the Houso has not been already expended when demands are made on the Treasury. The amount on the voucher can only be paid when the vote has not been exhausted. If as HI the other places there was a post-audit system it might happen that demands might be made by way of voucher for payment under heads which have already been exhausted. Tlie result can easily be Uni I It has always been the boast of the people of this island that we have been able to pay our own way because of our methods oi handling our financial resources. This must never be relaxed. Kven "with the ...ivocatcd that the Financial Secretary be head of the two departments with an Accountant General as cashier responsible for the funds paid and an accountant to check the payments, it is necessary to maintain the supervision of the Auditor General. It is hoped that the changes proWed for In Ibis bill constitute only the n TII %  series which will bring our system of financial control up lo a standard in keeping with modern rulministration the world over. \vo>n:\ A PUBLIC notice in the Press yesterday advised women who are unemployed to %  hour Department in order to be evallable >i opportunity arises migration to the United States. time when 11 was first stated that the United States would need a quota of West Indians for work in field and factory the hope was expressed that some opportunity would be found for women who desire to emigrate. „ ^lt is to be hoped that they will not be dssapp • suitable employment will be found for Barbadian women in the Ssetes. The (; %  %  • n ent has at least given an earnest ol [ion to keep good faith with then.. I well thai this is 10 inasmuch as the adult suffrage now gives them the right to vote and it is well known that they arc more i from Government and en in public life than the men folk. ( %  eorge Washington DUMAS MALONC General George Waliin*to.i beime a national hem in time ol war, but he did not cease to be the -ther of his coaatTj WSM) bi "fr* laid down his sword. As the nrst ,n.m TH. N !" torn laaai sufuii Chaff Executive of the Unltea States. Washington guarded a new In the basjaiuns. Washingt 1 'it in its infancy and was the Executive umi.rn. tor guided its first steps. No other man toon the acwlj organized Congre*. waa'The'one that"u-ls most exiecldld o much to establish ihe U.S. some lime lo create the Executive ^ pf ^i— Q^^uned oolitic*! garConstitulion and create the Union, departments. Congress, after he-ttief ,„ tbm ma -rn s £nse appear He was the indispensable Pre*.ed debates, eventually made the ^ ln I ^ tlIlfl|Ur „ to m during dent, just as he had been the >nheads of incee executive departrU administration b.t he did not menis responsible to tlie l-resi 1KP Ihem H e had been elected National unlt% was President Washington's political ideal, and he did far mora than anyboi> ctta to maintain it during the critical early years In the life of the new American nation Probably this was his gata>t service to his lOunSry, and .unquestionably 1t (ih*pen*aiic Oeaersi In the eight years Washington dent and removable by him. Thus %  .nanlmrmslv nnd held office as the f.r.t President of W. S hitn became tne master of tnouf>t %%J£ t as T h e Pre.1the United Stair*, he inspired his own household and began to dcn| of a| , ne s at( v jm( M 1ht confidence in the untried governrealize on the potentialities of people. He realised that clashes ment and gave it dignity through what was to become perhaps Uie of iniereat would be inevitable his distinguished person and his greatest oflVe m the world. lnat no s ale nr rei 10n „ rlato famous name. Virtually the creator The first President personally wou m ever get all it wanted But of the Executive Branch, he gave directed his administration in a nfr reasoned that lust as the Consubstance and enduring form to way which no modern successor gtltutlon had ben baaed on the the Presidency. An able admlnlscould hope to do. Besides Hamilton tpirit ot ^^1 accommodation tralor by any standard he was and Jerfcrson he had only one ^ mutt ^ govcrnm ent be, anC superior in judgment to his brilother department.bead, the Secrethe peopla must realize that the Ham assistant*; and, by means of tary of War. General Henry Knox. galm of Union far exceeded any liis own person and character, he There were no Cabinet meetings at u KC |„ logj maintained unity wiUiin the govfirst, and the three Secretaries within hii official family Washenunent until it was .sufficiently were supposed to be assistants to Jngton expected unity of spirit itroDi i •rithstanit the : trains o| UM Plaatttsil JtaTiss. i. ass k fl u .. :niHl djaaeartj %  r tahftfi Ud ilil internal dissension and political interesting description of the way ferine points of view though hi warture which are the inevitable official correspondence w a did not re||jv nyw ,,„. dl7 concomitant" of democracy. handled by the first President and ferences would turn out to be At the beginning what Washinghis three assistants. Every day each when he in\tted both Alexander ton did was less Important than Secretary made up a package ol i| ani i| t Qn and Thomas Jefferson (. what he was. Since he already had letters received, with ihe drafts Join iX T,,,, (0U) wnlcn arote t^. me rullrst possible respect or of his replies, and submitted this i ween these two was InsvltsMl eyer>LKxly. he needed no title to Washington. The President kept 0ne man oved f nl c |hc other than Mr. President But his eye on everything, but he was o(hcr f Cared i t ,£,> ( iistnitcd the he rightly attached importance to not dictatorial in spirit. Generally common ^^^ whlle Im other the dignity of his office since so he returned the letters without d i 9lru s,ed rulers; the Secretary ot much ridicule had Wen heaped on comment, thus signifying his aplhe Treasury was predominant I > the reeble government which had proval; sometimes he attached ,. oncPrned wlln economic ptOffTegs preceded this one. B nd he went to comments and suBSestions In little while the Srtrcturv of State great pains to establish good Focial notes. Sometimes he held matters supremely Interested in the right: forms. The tall President did not up until he could confer with a 0( mcn Washington f,.| t lha ( h> untK-nd easily in public He was Secretary. Thus he preserved unity could ^ n neltner Secretary ami scrupulously fair In his distribu of action among the department* ne d j d no j wholly agree with tlon of social favours and very through his own person. He was either War was Imminent ir. conscientious In the performance lhe hub from which the spokes of Europe, threatening the commerce of what he'regarded his social the wheel radiated an „ security of the United State* duties Although he found such It was doubtful if the United ^torr the young republic had official occasions as senatorial dinStates ever had a President who gafned for ilsc ., f sIandlng amon j ners and format receptions exwas Washington s superior -is an lne nations It was no time for tremely boring, he thought them administrator. He was prompt, i„t Prna i dissension and the wise ?^^ y ^ d t il!!^ that trlCt J udlc oua bu decisive, exceedingly and ^ Uenl Wa8h | ngl o n made formality be observed exacting of his %  ubordlnates, and p^cp oc t we .-ii his warring Secre Unlike Thomas Jefferson, his probably too exacting of himself. lnH „ Resolutely, he steered the highly intellectual Secretary of He did not succeed in avoiding ahl _# (.,„ --ekinu ihe middle Slate, Washington wa 5 relatively petty details, though he tried to. !" J "iXSmSt umty in policy uninterested in ideas as such u s hence his business was generally despite diswnslon within the ranks a practical man be had leu faith onerous and often vexatious This ,„,,-, nc mitA „,",,, c ,, s ,. IC ,h f nn .,!!l^l h !" ^ toe £* c,a ""n w" 6 irue even of the planning of n t and tIvj new HOVCrnmPnt wag of Independence in the natural the new federal city, which lears -j-,,,,,.!,,-,) .,,„<-s.s Integrity and discretion of ordinhis name Jefferson was his inter ory human beings. But he had medUry and spokesman in this Giving himself so unstintingly none of the cynicism of Alexander complicated matter of designing to the task of bringing unity anc Hamilton, the young genius of a capital city and made notable Mrength to the new nation, finance and administration whom contributions of his own, though Washington* own physical he appointed Secretary of the the Trench engineer Ma)or Pierre strength began to wane. Toward Treasury. Washington wanted his 1,'Enfant drew the famous plan. the end of nl s first term as l"rcsindmlniitration to be liked and George Washington's capacity dent he was reported to have said supported by the great body of for wrath was well-known. But 'hat he would rather go to his citizens, but he did not conceive ordinarily he vented hij anger only farm, take his spade in hand, ana hl immediate task to be that of In private and against men whom work for his bread than remain extending political democracy, he regarded as disrespectful, uun his present situation. Hut the His business was to set a nntion patriotic, or dishonest. He kept leaden who were In hla confidence going, and his idea of the way to his naturally strong passions under protested with one voice that he gain popular support was to dostern control and in his dealings could not yet be spared. Hamllserve It. with trusted subordinates ho was ton said that his retirement would At this initial stage of its dethe soul of patience Those who **-' lhe greatest evil that velopment it was evident thut the were most intimately associated possibly befall the young, country; Government of the United States, with him In his late fifties and and Jefferson wrote him: "North and especially the executive part early sixties saw In him Just wlpt and South will hang together, il of it. must be strengthened. ITChis officers had seen in their young they have you to hang on." t'nvlously the Federal Government colonel a quarter-century before^b!e to escape. Washington reuchad consisted solely of a legislative "steady adherence to impartial tantly yielded to their pcrauaMoni body, and the States had been justice." and "quick discernment and was unanimously re-elected supreme. The result had been Inand Invariable regard to merit " wa > still obligated lo no KTOUP efficiency and chaos. It has been said that General or party, still president of the Impetuous Hamilton would have Washington, as commander of the entire United States In %  sense liked to create a centralized nation Continental Army, did not smile that no successor of his ever has %  vernlght, and if he had had his once during lhe entire American been. way. federal strength would have Revolution, and the prevailing Thomas Jefferson, who became been gained at too great sacrifice impression during his Presidency the third President of the United of personal liberty and local rights, was that he had no sense of States (1801-1809). in his own old On the other hand, if Jefferson's humour. At his official dinners he ace looked back upon George ideas had been followed. Individoccasionally might tell a story but Washington, the man who had ual and local freedom would he gained no more fame as a rabeen his leader and his friend, have been safeguarded but contour than a public speaker. His and made this appraisal of htm: the general government might not wtate papers are generally heavy, "On the whole his character wai have grown strong enough to enbut his personality Is better reln Its mass perfect. In nothing bad, dure. The eternal merit of the first vealed in the private letters which in few points indifferent; and It Prealdent Is that he established a he wrote In his clear, round Land, may truly be sold that never did strong and effective admiimtrain these, there Is evidence of a nature and fortune combine more tlon, while guaranteeing by hla quiet humour, along with a vast perfectly to make a man great." own character that there should amount of sympathetic underThis Judgment commands respect bo no tyranny In the United Slates. Handing. at the bar of history Even the King Feels the Itise LONDON. King George, like the majority of his subjects. Is having u tough time trying to stretch his purse lo meet the spiralling; cost of living. It came as a shock to most Britons to hear that their King could not make ends meet on his official solary and was being forced to dip into his own pockets to keep up the Iloyal splendour. To help King; George close the financial gap. the British government announced His Majesty would get an unnual $112.000 worth of aid. This would consist of tfSS telephone and telegraph services and some fuel and lighting costs in the Itoyal levssBM, The government aid would also pay the salaries of the King's official bodyguards known as the Yeomen of the Guard and Gentlemen al Arms. Out of his personal desire to help meet deficit. King George has promised to make "personal economics" In the Royal Household to the extent of S56.000 annually. King George * by no means lirokc. King George has estates and heirlooms estimated to be worth at least $8,000,000 but these can not he turned Into ready cash for they must be pssed on to his successor Draw* Sl.148,000 Tho King, whose income Is voted to him bv Parliament, draws 81.148,000. But he Is probably less By fRED SMITH well off than any British Sover eign since tjueen Victoria for despite the hiked cost of living his income has remained unchanged since his Coronation in 1937. The King's income is made up of two main parts. His salary— the Privy Purse — amounts to $308,000; from this the King pays his own and the Queen's personal expenseslike clothes and private entertainment. It is known thai the King also gives financial stf to gome members of the RcQ/al family who do not draw State •alaries It is the Privy I>urse expenditure thai King George hopes tc cut by S56.000 n year. Of the rest of the Incopte, $375,200 goes In salaries and pensions for the Itoyal household, $427,840 in the living expenses of the household and $36,980 In Royal gifts and alms. Contrary to popular belief. Kini; George has to pay for everything he needs (or he can accept itothing gratis. The only transportation which does not cost him anytnlng is a naval vessel or a plane of the official King's Flight. Prom his household I King George has to pay for all decorating, plumbing, furnishing wr repairs for those parts <>f the nine Roy..] P.,1 ed evrhiiively (or Itoyal use At Buckingham palace the King pays for all electricity, gas n nd water except that used for lighting and washing down the courtyards. I.es Dinner* Another major hole In the royal pocket is made by salaries paid to his domestic staff. Buckingham Palace alone has a domestic staff of 280 people. Although salaries of the Royal Household are not limed many employees 1( t Buckingham Palace have joined trade union* thereby receiving higher pay. II Is not expected that King George will cut any of his Palace staff for they already have Seen pared to the bone. The IM.000 he has promised to make in N peitonnl economies" will bo saved from domestic expenses. Private dinner parties at Buckingham Palace are expected to become fewer and more auMerc while house parties at Windsor will be smaller. Such thinki as Christmas and Birthday prr-ents will be less expeitMVe Although King George pays no income tax. her members of the Royal family are not so lucky. Their State claries are listed as follows: Queen Murv. $l9fl.000 ., year. Princess Elizabeth. $112,000, Prince Philip. S28.000; Duke of Gloucester, SlMt.000. and the Princess Royal $10,800. ; Princess Margaret will receive $18,800 when *hr reaches her 21st birthday in August.—1.N S. Oiir HeufJern SayCommvmUition lost, so much damage would not To The Editor, The Adeocofehav r b n *** c T |, „,„,. „ l" ii [ih-ndid Idea, a nd deci!^, Y S\. mC ""^ugh serve, credit Hoping sir. to see h* E&St ' h *. hly c ? mm T na %  *( %  * m other'ways'so as the Authorities who placed a to help ou Harbour Police Boat in the Conpic %  UtUtiOO Road district, so as to save people, who might have been marooned in their houses during the heavy rains winch fell during UM lest few davs i other ways 'so p poor unfortunate peoL. B. CLARKE IT a thought hke this vren given on the last occasi< so many people lost thi r,. S ataeTg y Opening *7%a Ediior, The Adtwale answer to the f stores, on Sunday for .— ."* .' .-.-•* %  .i in-iuii* i.i More*, on w and houses* brok* down. *orto--the accommodation of i f'om andse stlps—I am also tourist on your beautiful Island— however, I a^ree most wholeheartedly with the letter written by 'Layman" in Wednesda Advocate Surely one need not desecrate the Sabbath. It would be tunic if any further thoujglu be gi pasting; of shops on the ne convenience of us tourists or anyone else. Sincerely, r: MANBERT. Feb 14. 1951. n nuiull By JOHN PKIDEAl'X BARBADOS has had many -listinuished visitors to its shores, but tew were aeasasWd to be greater than a nineteen-year-old lad who visited it in 1751. George Washington (17321799) came to Barbados as companion to his invalid brother Major Lawrence Washington, the Proprietor of Mount Vernon on tl. Pot* mac in Virginia. Lawrence Washington was .suffering from consumption, and they had been advised to try the West Indies as the change of climate might have been a remedy fur IIIH complaint. George Washington, in his daily journal. published by Joel Munsell. Albany, N.Y.. 1892, records^— "We were greatly alarm'd with the cry of Land at 4 AM.: we quitted our beds with surprise and found ye land plainly appearing at 3 Leagues distance when by our reckonings we shou'd have been near 150 Leagues to the Windward we to Leeward abt ye distance above mention d and had we been but 3 or 4 Leagues more we shou'd have been out of sight of the Island run down the Latitude and probably not have discover'd our Error in time to have gain'd the land for 3 Weeks or More." On the 4th of November, the day after their arrival, Washington states that they received a card from Major Clarke welcoming them to Barbados, with an invitation to breakfast and dine with him. He records that he went with some reluctance as the smallpox was in the Clarke family. He also records that 'after drinking tea they wen Invited to Mr. Carter's, and desired to make his house ours till we could provide lodgings agreeable to our wishes, which offer we accepted.' After several trips into the country-side, of which he states—'were perfectly enraptured with the beautiful prospects which on every side presented to our view. The fields of Cain, Corn, Fruit Trees &c. in a delightful Green.' They accepted the house of Contain Crofton, the commandant of Fort Jan though they considered it extravagantly dear his brother was obliged-to give JL 15 per month exclusive of liquors and washing, which they had to find. He records that this houso was pretty near the sea and about a mile from town, the prospect is extensive by land and pleasant by sea as It commanded the prospect of Carlisle Bay and aM the shipping in such a manner that none could go in or out without been seen by them. Washington relates how he was entertained by the 'Beefsteak and Tripe Club.' This simple Virginian appears to have been astounded by the elaborate spread at these dinners, for he reports—"We were entertain'd by the Company, they have a meeting every Saturday, this being Colo. Mayr.ards. After Dinner was the greatest Collection of Fruits I have ever seen set on the Table. We received invitations from every Gentleman there. Mr. Warren desired Majr. Clarke t shew us the way to his house; Mr. Hackt. insisted on our coming Saturday next to his. being his Day to treat with Beef Stake and Tripe, but above all the invitation of Mr. Maynard was the most kind and friendly, he desir'd and even insisted as well as his Lady with him and promis'd nothing should be wanting to render our stay agreeable my Br. promis'd he wou'd as soon as he was a Little disengag'd from the Drs" While here, George Washington visited a theatre for the first time. The play was the tragedy of 'George Barnwell.' This drama was supposed to be of a very improving nature, and suited to young men. As was usual of plays in those days, it pointed a boisterous moral. George Barnwell was an idle apprentice who, after robbing his master, passed thorugh the various Hogarthian states of vice, and finally committed murder, for which crime he was hanged. His last moments were peculiarly embittered by the reflection that his sweetheart was to be hanged at the same time, he having led her astray. Washington's foreboding came to pass; fourteen days after their arrival he developed smallpox. Tlie attack was not severs. bul he bore the marks of this disease upon his face to the day of his death. On Saturday, 17th November, Washington records— 'Was strongly attacked with the small Pox sent for Dr.tLanahan whose altendence was very constant till my recovery, and.going out which was not till Thursday the I2th of December." He records how kind Major Clarke's family was to him during hi* illness. On the 22nd of December. 1751, George Washington took leave of his brother and all the friends he had made in Barbados and sailed on the Industry, Captain John Saunders. for Virginia. Soon after this his brothi-r Lawrence went to Bermuda In search of better health, but did not succeed in regaining strength. He died soon after and George inherited Mount Vernon. In 1759, George Washington married the beautiful young widow, Martha Curies. In 1774 when the dispute between the British home government and the colonists broke out, he became one of the leaders of the local opposition, and later was elected to the first Congress at Philadelphia. In the following year 1775, he was made Commander-in-Chief of the American army, and from that time to the end of the struggle in 1783 he was trusted and adored by the people. Deeply dejected, he left Mount Vernon on April 16th, 1789. as he expressed in a letter to General Knox. "with feelings not unlike those of a culprit going to his place of execution. integrity and firmness are all I can promise." On April 30th, from the portico of the Federal Building in New York, in the presence of ;t 'vast concourse.' he took the Presidential oath, and then went to tVe Senate Chamber where he delivered his inaugural address. Senator Maclay of Pennsylvania recorded in his journal that 'this great man was agitated and embarassed more ttwn tver he was by levelled cannon or pointed musket. He trembled and several times could scarce make out to read.' He was not accompanied by Mrs Washington, ai *hv had not been able to leave a in time for the own!. Washington ierved I second term of office .mm 17t3 onwards, and refused tfectiotl for third time. He was one ol the noblest characters in history, good, simple, honest. brave, and efficient. D. V. SCOTT It CO., LTD. TO-DAY'S SPECIALS at THE COLONNADE Pkgs: A P MACARONI Tin-. SPA.lTTI with TsW SAU.Iand < ti<-. •., %  BolUes ALLKOPP'S BF.fcR t'tiully NOW | .35 S .31 26 .*• 0S>0********'**^**i-'*****''*'*; FOR YOUR BATHROOM Corner BASINS with Pedestal 2S'xl8" 1 fc [ BASINS with or without Pedes'al irxl6" ] Low-down SUITES High-up SUITES W.C PANS, S ft P TRAPS W.C. SEATS (Plastic White and IBakellte Mahogany Cast Iron CISTERNS Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS HARPIC, Large and Small. WILKINSON & IIAVNKS Co, Ltd. Successors TO C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phono — 4472, 1687, ;;;:v,',;;' A MAZAWATTEE TEA • PREFERRED FOR ITS DISTINCTIVE FLAVOUR • DaC'OSTA A <... Lid. IMAI. Ilill't Now in Slock in our Clothing Dept. RAINCOATS I by Chus. Mrlnliish TOOTALS I ANDJAYBRA 1 In Men's and Boys' Sizes — Also — MEN'S OVERCOATS in Harris .mil Mnnx Tweeds DA COSTA & CO, LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT En joy AS iu-ui Trmu with lli,-.,II i,t,-\ I It,il t.lti,l,l,-ii Thtt II, in I .... Pale Dry N.illy Slurry Amontillado Partners Port Ruby Port ;: .Veir .trrirals Carr's Cream Crackers C.ouda Cheese Edam Cheese '•#* VulH I Cooked Hams, J slits Salami Sausage Ox tonfues Crned Beet Keep up Your Spirit with our famous UUI.lt lilt Mil H r 3i (it never Falls) I PHONE GODDARDS WE DELIVER I



PAGE 1

TIURPDAY, FEBRUARY M, 1M1 BARBADOS ADVOC VTF PACE FIVE Sugar Yield May Exceed 175,000 Tons According to reports received the yields of cane per acre are much above the estimates says the Director of Agriculturt in his notes for January. Some plantations in the innate rainfall areas have reported average yields of Of cane per acre for plan! canes and ratoons. During the month the sucrose content of the juice was low. and the Jutee quality varied from dts3ooNewBook S |Skeete Takes Four On Preview ^ fishermen Ask For Lights W ill N THK ADVOCATE visitM the Public Market on BUM the fish department wits in darkness. Shortly afterwards over tf Improvised lamps— bottles of oil with paper stuffed Into them—lighted up the market. This i ui PBd aftr Uu word went thai two boat.their way to the Careenage. Kenneth Connell, a fish seller, also had a lighted bottle. He said %  t Is wired and equip|>c1 Superintendent of the local Mental Hospital. Title of the bonk L "Dr. Barbara". Books dealing with the negi i are represented bv "Rules of Prejudice against the Negro" by Mines, and "The Negro in the U.S." by Goldstein. Other good works are, '"Dollar Crisis, its Causes and Cures": "A west Indian Fortune"; "Flood Estimation and Control"; "A Thousand Garden Questions Answered"; and in the Famous British Trial Series. "The Trial of Peter Griffiths'*. Griffiths was the defendant In the Blackburn Baby Murder of 1948. About 4.000 people witnessed the firs' day of play in the match between Trinidad ano Barbados at KensinKton yesterday. Barbados occupied the wicket for the day and at the drawing of stumps had made 333 lor the Iocs of 9 wa ch t tl It was a keen contest throughout. hi ( ilighted by the customary fine display of batting; by international batsmen Clyde Walcott and Everton VrWkas, the former making 77 runs and the latter 75. Frank King bowled to Hunte from the southern end. He played the tirt delivery and square cut the second for two runs. He drove the fourth delivery to long off •nd ran 4, Ganteaume having to run from cover point to the boundary He was U-aten bv the next delivery the ball just missing the stumps. The next ball he on-drove for 2 and played out the remainder of the over Jackbir continued from the northern end and with the last ball of the over beat Marshall With the pace of the hall and bowled him for 2 with the score •t 10. It was a maiden over Marshall was at the wicket for 15 minutes. Clyde Walcott was the next man In and Hunte faced Km; trom the other end. The batsman edged the third delivery dangerously to Skeete at second alfp but cover drove the fifth beautifully to the boundary. He singled the seventh to the leg side and Walcott repeated the stroke off the next ball for another single. Facing Jackbir, Walcott ondrove the second ball for 4 ami played out the remainder of the over Youthful Conrad Hunte newcomer to Intercolonial cricket and one of the island's opening batsmen, scored a valuable 63. He started off conlidently and was giving a good display, but Just before the luncheon period he seemed to lose concentration and played shakily to the spinners. It was at this stage that he was given a "life" He was 94 when he cover drove a delivery from Wilf>ed Ferguson to Clarence Skeete at cover point and was dropped. He gave another before his innings closed. He was then 44. John Goddam played a skipptT*l innings. Going in at number 8 he batted well and scored with some measure of freeness. At the close of play he was undefeated with 43 to his credit. The Trimdad bowling was steady throughout the day and Captain Jeffrey Stollmeyer handled it admirably. The fielding, however, left much to be desired and quite a few catches went abegging. Slow right arm spinner Clarence Skeete and left-arm medium pacer Sydney Jackbir gained %  i uie of roped. The first andad with i bowling %  natysls of 4 wickets for SO runs and the other 3 for 62 Ferguson captured 2 for 89. Play John Goddard won the toss and decided to bat on an easy-paced wicket. Roy Marshall and Conrad RuBtg] opened the innings and left arm medium pacer Jackbir bowled to Marshall from the nnrihern end. Marshall played the seventh ball to square leg for two runs and played out the over. CAREENAGE CONGESTED FOR the past two days. \h ,a Careenage was very congested Schooners and motor vessels have been steadily arriving with cargo from other Wot Indun • %  ionds since Sunday, but haw l-een finding no berths available l\r them to discharge mat cargoes. From the latter days of last t.eek, the Careenage was already setting crowded, having IH.Mc loom for subsequent arrivals, it has now come to the pitch where some eight vessels laden with car go *eie lying in Carlisle Bay because there were no berths lo. them in the Careenage or inner basin. Some of the vessels brought fupplies of fruit, chiefly bananas plantains and oranges. In order t,i avoid their spoiling, the oNtWI of the vessels had to bring then* f.om Carlisle Bay Into the Careen age by row boats. Port authorities had the headache of arranging the shipping i.ttivltiett in such a way that all the possible space in the Careen age was lH'.ed In with v. A r.umc points, veaels weiv b*BB| two abreast. COUGHING b "Your Guess" j Was St. John's Church About sixty percent of the guessers in the Evening Advocate's 'Your Guess" competition guessed correctly that the picture wa* The roof of St. John's Church". Sybil Browne of Eagle Hall. St. Michael was the winner. Hcts was the first correct answer to be pulled out of the box. Thirty percent guessed it was taken in the West bury Cemetery. Other guesses were "This is at Graves End Cemetery," "The roof of St. Patrick's B.C. Church". "St. Joseph Church Yard." "Belmorv Chapel". St. Paul's Church," and at least two dozen other churches In the island. Gaoled On Three Charges Of Larceny LIONEL, BEST a labourer of Church Village. St. Michael wa found guilty on three charge* of larcenv brought bv the Police yesterday .Ills Worship Mr. E. A McLeod before whom Best appeared sentenced him to 12 months' Imprisonment with hard labour for each charge. On the first charge Be*, was found guilty of the larceny of a pair of glasses, the property of St Clair Burketi of Chapman Lane. on January 22. On the second charge Best stole articles to the value of £3 5s. Id. from the houm. Of Svdney Reece on January 12. On the third charge he stol articles valued id $1926 from th house of TK. Davis of Hasting* ; .nd the property of KaUilee Maitland on January 25. Best was i.rrested by Police Constable Devonian attached to the C.I.U Department. Best had three previous convictions for larceny. 'Athelbrook' Comes For Molassis THE 286-ton molasses tanker Athelbroafc began her yearly series of visits to Barbados yesterday to take vacuum pan molasses for Trinidad. The Athelsrook arrived shortly after daybreak and later took her herth in the inner basin of th Careenage from where she wa upplled with her load of molasses She came out of the inner basin of the Careenage yesterday evenng ready to start on her voyage to Trinidad. The Athelbrook is expected return within a week or so for another load. Her local agents Messrs. Jason Jones a Co., Ltd What Do You Think? Mr. E. R Edmett, Senior Producer Df the West Indies Section of the B B.C. arrived in Trinidad from Jamaica on Saturday last. Mr. Edmett is on a 28-day tour of the Caribbean-Jamaica, Trinidad. British Guiana, Barbados and St Lucia. 'Making a survey of the listening interest of West Indians billing the West Indies'" programme He wants to know the success the programme has had. how many people are listening to it. and what improvements can be made. / Remember When The Chief Scout Visited Barbados BY W. 8. MILLAR Z"P AY ;, Februar ^ 22nd is an important day for Scouts and Guides all over the world. It is "Thinking Day", for them, and as the birthday of the founder of the Scout movement, the late Lord Baden-Powell, as well as the birthday of his widow Lady Baden-Powell. Chief Guide, it is of more than passing interest lo both boys and girls Fha Chief Guide, at present on a tour of the West Indies was in "arbados .onto days ago. and ?£**£ '?. return before leaving the Caribbean. She is a dynamic personality, and seems to have lost nothing in her keenness and drive since that Wednesday morning in January twenty-one years ago when I saw her for the first time. I was one of the scouts at the "iKCacc Warehouse who welcomed B.P. the Chief Scout of alt the world and his wife, when they paid a visit to this colony. How well do I remember how anxious we scouts were to catch a glimpse of one of the world's greatest mm. in the flesh The lucky fellows who had gone to the World Jamborees in I9?4 and 1929 at Arrowe Park had told us of him. but we were all very eager lo see him for ourselves. "The Chief" And at last he came, in full Scout uniform, with a light cloak hanging loosely over his square shoulder. Long well past the middle of his life, the soldier still carried himself as erect as we anticipated, and there was a twinkle in his eye as he walked between the boys shaking left hands with those whom he had met before, as well as those he was greeting for the rlrst time. He remembered faces easily, and called names correctly in many cases. There was an amusing Incident which well illustrates | of humour whlcii never deserted -HP." all through Ills life. Rover Scout Charles Morris, row a Rover Leatcr was standing next lo mo as "B.P." came down the line*. I got my firm hand-shake and then "B.P." paused and looked nt Charles with a rmlle on his face "All those service stars" he said peintinf to the twelve years' service stars an Charles' shirt. "This rhap seems lo have been a Scout befare me." he ehurkled This wrs characteristic rf founder of the movement his wife was cast Mi the mould. CONTRACT FOR UNIFORMS GRANTED AT a meeting of the Hospital kdvisory Board yesterday members dealt with the award of tenders for the making of uniforms. The contract has been awarded to the six lowest tenders on the understanding that each will submit the first portion of work done. to the Medical Superintendent. If the work of each of them is satisfactory, the contract will be awarded to all six at the price quoted by the highest tender. Names of the six are, Violet Waldron, Katie Phillips, Ellen Crawford. Grace Forde. Beryl Mason and Eleanor Byer. Tickets Overworked At Kensington THE Advocate was in receipt of complaints yesterday that the majority of ticket-holders in the Kensington Stand were unable claim their seats as 1he*e occupied by people who did not have the tickets with the numbers corresponding and in some a those occupying the seats did not have tickets at all. was suggested that some people, after they had gained admission, had passed their tickets' outside and others had entered with the same tickets. In a n interview with the cricket uthorilles it was learnt that precautions will be tak?n today to ensure that every one in the Stands wear their tickets and that they sit in seats that the boundary. He played out tht over. The score was now 41 and Ferguson came on in place o Jones from the Screen End. Hi sent down a maiden to Walcott Jackbir continued lo bowl fron the other end and each butsman made a single in the over The bowler was mixing his deliveries well and the batsmen were taking no chances. In Ferguson's next over Walcott on-drove the fourth ball to the boundary to bring the %  core to 47. He then cover drove the sixth to Legal!. The Batde* failed to stop the ball and the batsman got 2 runs. The batsman played out the remainder of the over. Hunte made a single off Jackbir"* first delivery t< bring the score to 50 in 80 minutes. Walcott off-drove the IIflh hall for 4 mid on-drove the next for a single. Hunte played out the over Ferguson conceded one run In lUs next over and this wa.% made by Walcott Jones now came on from the Pavilion End and bowled to Walcott with the sciire at 57. A Boundary The batsman on-drove the second ball to the boundary, but Ukf in-xt delivery was a "beauty' which Walcott just managed to dig out of his wicket. No more ns were scored ofT the over. A single went to each batsman I Ferguson's next over, but Hunte cover-drove the last ball high to Skeete who failed to take the catch Hunte was now 34 runs. A single went to Walcott In Jones' next Frrguson's next yielded 3 Jones' first delivery in his next was to Walcott who hit tin ball lo the fine leg boundary II" sniKlcd the third ball Hunte hit the flfth ball neatly to square leg for a brace and played out the remainder of the over. The luncheon interval was now taken th the score at 74 for 1. made 90 minutes, Hunte beir t out and Walcott 34 not Britain, U.S. Make New Kashmir Plans g From Page I provided that due account Is taken of geographical and economic conlidi>. iti. Mi!—subsequent boundary adjustments In areas contiguous lo the frontier of India or Pakistan n which Ihe vote is overwhelmingly In favour of the party with the minority of votes in the slat".It ^lebisoile." He would also lake into account the possibility that different dt> grees of supervision of the funcs of Government might Inappropriate for different areas of the state. The representative would be instructed to report back to the % %  diitv Council when arrange. ments for the plebiscite might t>c put into effect, or In any case within three months.—Beuler Holiday In U.S.A. TODAY the birthday of George Washington, one of US I famous figures in Amerkcaii History is celebrated all over the United States and In all American territories as a National Holiday February 12 is the birlh day of another famous American. Abraham Lincoln. His birth day Is not a national holiday. It is kept as a holiday in some of the 48 States. HOTEL DAMAGED BY FIRE The roof of Enmore Hotel. Collymore Hock, caught lire IssM nMhl about 7.50 p.m. and was slightly damaged The holel is ihe property of G. C. Hards. The Fire Brigade under Capt. Grant went to Ihe scene and put out the lire. The people of Ihe hotel had al ready begun to use a garden hose to help put out the fire and the Fire Brigade did not have much dlhV illy. The damage is covered by insurance In The Courr For Divorce And Matrimonial Causes IN the suit of Neville Seymoui BsUnabsxry, Petitioner, and EstreAnne Salisbury, Respondent. Mr <;. II. Niles holding the papers of Mr. E. K. Walcott, K.C. intruded by O. L W. Clarke and Solicitors, appeared for Ihe Petitioner. Ir. W O Haynea. Solicitor, appeared for the Respondent His Honour. Sir Allan Collymore, pronounced tht decree nisi, diid made no order as to costs. After I .inn li On nwumpt on after lunch, Ferguson bowlrd the first over from the screen end to Walcott who took a single to fine leg off the fourth to send up Hunte who off drove beautifully to the (boundary and then played out the remainder. Frank King bowled from the i*vilion end lo Walcott who (urned the second beautifully • Oa page . Always ready to relieve the first of a cold it."", tL U |W *• nassi s*' 1 hint K IS DANGEROUS ssspkssl itop "rota iou|h t>i taking VBMV'I imtji mi rim* i Thi, wocUl famous icmJy ul i-ouaJUng, BSSBSS hrwihin* sSSjE sooth** % %  ray icwcncst, cemanr u and pnttevii (he lungi VENDS OUCH MIXTURE tde&v /fad&X, \ v \ MISS ARDEN'S Personal Representative is coming FOR THt FIRST TIME to give you ths same wondetlul TREATMENTS AND CONSULTATIONS en In her famous London Salon. A Treatment make* you look much prettier, leol so much younger. Wa know you'll wanl to book an appointment at onca I Commencing Monday. March 5th. lor Ihrae weeks, at: KNIGHTS LTD. 33. BROAD STREET BRIDGETOWN FOR THE BEST I KtlTIFIL UIT-TI-4LE1I i n>OQl COVBHINC 'SILVER STAR' CONGOLEUM INSIST ON SILVER STAR SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES ODEX THE FAMILY SOAP O Gels skin really clean O Banishes perspiration Oder Leaves body >veet and dainty n.ld %  ! ntl f'•. Id. M< 4.il. AVOID OFFENDING -USE ODEX a FRESH SUPPLY OF :PURINA HEN CHOW %  (SCRATCH GRAIN) "H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.-Dutributor. Satin /or Brides )\ WIIITI: STAMPED SATIN :lll i.l.-. IVr Yd |2 jj V — 'KJP OYSTER STAMPIO SATIN 36" wide. Per Yd. $2.92 PLAIN CREPE SATIN in heal j fVaUfj for Itriili-s ot Fvonins: Wear. 36" idr. IVr Yd. $2.4-1 (;AVESIIEPIIF,III)&(O.,I.TD. lO. II. 12 £ 13 BROAD -1 HI II



PAGE 1

THl'RSOAY, FEBRUARY 22. 1*51 HARBADOS ADVOCATE FACE TIULFX INSMIWH DhMIt Anti-Sub Helicopters LONDON. Feb. HeUeaptera may be bated on nterchant ships to warn convoys of npproaching submarines. Extensive trial, of ihe plan have been carried out in the English Channel This means instead M light carrier with every convoy, cne or more merchant -hips can be fitted with a special flight platform loi u-lin r>: ( i Sea-lanes near the convoy could then be sean-hcl for v.ibmarim-s which have escaped Ihe longrange, shore-baser! aircraft. Specially stieiigthi-neil gtgaj platforms would be fitted ib->ve the deck at the stern of the ship. clear of all rigging. For the special tests %  strengthened steel platform was fitted above the deck at the otcri of a ftOOO ton merchant ship For take-off the pilot n.on* the platform in the normal way. During flight DM lieUcopttff kept in touch with the ship by radio. When landing, the pilot brought the machine own to within about 20 ft. of the stern of the ship and hovered above the platform. He than slowly lowered It to the platform, directed by a '-controller" who used two flays to guide him m. When not in use. the hell_ _,. n . _, copter is anchored" to the flight (_,OW GlVt'h' Birth I fl (AIIHKIH Is AV U"f platform. ____.. O Kaval pilots have mastered the difflcultie, of bringing the helicopter un a small platform which rolls and dips in rough seas. NORTH AMERICAN LIFE DINKER at Xanadu. Marino Hotel Iu tbs Picture. Loft to Right: Harold Kidney. Cecil de Calres, Mrs Hiretd Kid'iry. D'Arey Oslt. Mrs. Han Edghill. Harley Hughes, Mrs. Robert Challrnor. Win. Andero.i. Vice President at Worth American Lit.. Uri-.Hsrlry lingua* Hon. Robt. CaalUnor. MrWm. Anderson, Ken William*. Ml— Hettl ekaflcfjer, sun MfHB. Calf Of Another WISCONSIN. Feb 20 ulf conceived by one cow been born here to another It has proved possible to land a cow to which a fertilised ovum helicopter when the deck is pitchhad^heen transferred ing and rolling as much as to and 20 II. at a time. Tests have been made in varying winds and it ha* been found Of Trappiat Monks Who Fled Chinese U.S. Saved West Europe From Communism -REYNAUD blades about when they turning at very low speeds. To overcome this a canvas icraen was lilted to the forwnrd part of the platform to protect wind.—I.N.S. ST NORBERT. Man.. Feb., Ten Trappist monks — nine The first cow had had to be Chinese and i,,. )•• tared immediately after tho Notre Dame De La Prairie fertilisation so that eggs could be monastery here a year ago aftei 1SF2SJ1S £?SSS%iSlS gg* 5 rom *• *. ,„ ,fc Recently granted permission to *£" animals survived. This would ir for a high grade Ova for many OMAHA, Neb, Feb. 20. Paul Heynuu.i. former Premier France, said here that the tern Europe from Commu.: v i : live won a great Life Assurance Celebrates 70th Anniversary An. Agency am Hug, of the repreaentatlves in the Hrilish West 'ion of the North Amerlean Life Assurance Co ; was hald •t the Marine Hotel on the lain imtant a t i SO p.m. under the efcairmaiuhip ,,f Mr. W. M An*" C 11 F F.S A. Managing Director an,i Vice-President ,.f ggg l"i>"ti.ni> The Heprescntayree attending were Mr. U'Arev Gait of Trinidad. Mr Ken Williams of Grenada. Mr. Caen F. de Calres ol British Guiana. Mr Stanley Edghill, Director Of the firm of ft. A G Challenor Ltd 1-x-al Agenu and Mr. Harold KMncy, Local Ht* pro-tentative North American Life, a purely ML ri'AL Company of Tororrtr Canana. ia this \ear celeb-ating ita 7uth ANNIVEIt.SARY This year 1050 has been a record year In the tualorv oi tha Com pany, which reflects the outstanding service rendered to policyholders by their rapraaaniattvaj throughout the world On Ihe occasion of the anm\er sary. a dinner was held on Monday Jflst nt the Ocean View Hotel al write**, the following were preaent:Mr W. M Anderson. Cfl.E F IA. and Mrs Anderson, thi lion. Robt. Challenor nnd Mrs Challenor. Mr. Harley Hughe* K.C. and Mrs. Hughes. Mr and Mrs. Stan lev Edghill. Mr and Mrs Harold Kidney. Miss II M Challenor, Mr D A. Gait, Mr Xen Williams and Mr. Cecil de Calrea. Suitable speeches and replies ware made proposing the tonstf to the Company, the Vire-Presldent and to the Branch on their outstanding achievements durlnfl the year. • .jives each t against the which could then be bred in low grade animals —Reuter. bia 'P* 8 to reporter—by religious vMnry in Europe through the" cow to Solide VOW **** ro worn * I %  * Marshall Plan," among themselves-i:. s ,.t 2 Vietnam Ministers Resign New Cabinet vear %  *"*"'•> inu. <-nang, leader of the Chinese monks and Rev. Victor Chu said "You have saved Europe from they ardently deatre lo return to Cewllen*Bjt," he continued "It China. remains to make it safe. The •But" they said, "it may be problem Is to remove from the two years—it may be 10—before Russians the temptation i.. lav We can return. It me* be n.ver Uienf hands upon the Ruhr gfaf They served In the llllllllll iaWOpa." of Our Lady <>f Joy in Cheng'i"* 1 lnn '' '"' ,rl %  me *he Trny. Hopeh Provinre. before %  •** wttb aixtj dni-ions backed fleeing after lOftUnj and oppivs,v '* tn "''" f a ,ur e s,ock •* atom bon.ba.—Heater SAIGON. Feb. 21, tn by the Com. Vietnam Premier. Tran Van Huu announced to-night One of their numi" he had accepted the resignations or Defence Minister, Benedict Joseph, is in good health Nguyen Huu Tri and Education Minister Dr. Phan Hub no Quat from his new Cabinet which met for the first time vesterday. beginning; had expressed (bssatIsfaction the Premier said and he had decided Ui carry on without them. The formation cabinet had resolved the country's 30-day crisis. Reliable sources here mid the cabinet *• a "caretaker" Government which waa expected to remain in office for about three month* The two ministers wli Vlthtn 24 hours of the He said he would himsell accept the defence portfolio in addition resigned hi the portfolio of Foreign Affairs Cabinet's and the Interior.—Reuter U.S. Consider Part With Auslrulin \nritniH ti> usu.iily well informed sources here to-day. fired Just for fun," entered hu ehaat and came out of his back while h was standing In the Of the Chinese monastei> The monki here have a selfcontained little world of some 50 fathers, lay brothers and students for the priesthood. The monastery Is 10 miles south of Winnipeg. Versatile Monks The monks pitch Into anv Jgb. Father Chu, 40. and Father Chang. 32. for instance, work with eleciri cal equipment In Ihe mechanical bhop. The monastery's prize dairy herd of 300 or more Hulsteln caIl!L! n T a y W i ^, "IT .t W ", r ^ fi %  a Pt during his visit to the shows In Canada and the United ;wo r: un inr si „ua. .i J , Alternative* being discussed Valley res,dents. the monk, suf,„ U1 „, hl -I||B1|)T a! fered in last spring's flood Tnc —Hntter water damaged caves which for years have been the curing place for 'he monastery's famous Trappist cheese. The monastery, with its cowled and silent monks, oilers a strange contrast hvluccn me.!, and the ::wh century, Modern Pop<-Piu8XWi!lBe Beatified la Way VATICAN CITY Feb 20 The Vatican's congregation of rites to-dny completed the last step before the beatlllraflnn of Pope Pius X (1903—1914) ex pected some time in May. The congregation gathered I the Throne Hall of the VattM P.ilare handed to the presefi pi („ %  (heir written vnte declartn, thut ft us X was "blessed" aiv *akln| him to fix a date for hif 'glorification". The congregation had eeilier approved two "miracles" attributed to Pope Pius X as prerequisite lor beatification. These were the cures of two nuns suffering from malignant groM'.b The first nun died In 1931) The second is still alive and Is expected lo attend the beatification ceremony. -Jt enter. They mud John Foslcr Dullet. President Truman'n special envoy .ould rhseuaa the poasibility of J\o More Guards WASHINGTON. Feb 20. The American Army will call DO nmrc National Guard OaviftOM 11 unless the world HIUM SSU^lL: "* £> ,h :, IB ; :i nvuions now on acre farm where 400 gallons of )uIy wl „ De n^nd a ftcr their milk i* produced daily for Ihe g month .ervlcea, it was anwininpeg market. nounc.xi today. Cen. Maxwell !" ^Y e 1 ^ Ut 7S T^PP*** Taylor, the Army Training Comm T?T!^r\ K T" • ? riMOdOr, told reporters that M,0OO in Europe. In each, the monks repinion:,! Gunrdsmen were or lire at a p.m — i in winter months wtive duly —I —and rise at 2 a.m to pray until < a.m. They spend the racoaiadar of the day alternately at work. study and prayer— < icntist predict ed .Saturday that Canada is entering an age of pipeline comtructinn that will bring Alberta natu gas ami oil eastward as far Ontario and Quebec. Dr. G. Hume. Director General ol the Scientific Services Department ol Mines, Ottawa, told the Hoy a I Canadian Institute that although it would cost *2S0.uOQ.OO0 to build a pipeline serving eastern Canada the line would be built aa toon MS wcktorn reserve* of oil and g< exetcled the needs of the prairie provinces. Next %  JaTtnl many of you will be driving ears on gasoline refined at Snrnla, Ontario from Alberta crude oil he said in referring to the new 1,121 mile pipeline from Edmonton r Supenor. Wis.*• W.INDIES MAY BE NEXT DURHAM. South England, Feb. 21. The British West Indies, when federated will probably be the next Do achieve Commonwc*llli status Patrick Gordon Walker Ilntlsh Secretary of Slate for Commonwealth Relations told a press conference here to-day —Reuter I use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP Don't let weariness make your day seem Jong! Wash regularly with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap and you'll feel fresh and free of weariness. Its dccp-clcansing; lather keeps you fresher so much longer. So keep a tablet of Lifebuoy heady — for day-long frethneai! FOR PERSOSAL FRESUSESS ALWAYS SELECT THESE EARLY . fllmonls Wax aV aUeeaer Ctumeis & Pellahlng Cloths Back i i i .mil,, Hpat Lanspe Trarter limp-, Illuminated Fender Guide* Jeweled Exhaust I'lyr 1 Steering Wheel Covers Hum per Jacks Grease Guns 0 Volt A 12 Volt Herns Miracle Adhesive Valvt Grinding Compound Mechanics Bearing Blue Crllnder Blaek Heat RemtsUflr Fatal Flake (iraphlte FIusHe Battery Teasera flattery ('able* Braas Shim Metal Bed? Haider Plane and Blades — Ass* — Dresrbonlilng Gasket HeU for all saaalir Fmllah .ml American Cars anal Track* ECKSTEIN BROTHERS YOU'RE SURE TO LIKE Maralyn MILK fLII HOT NIGHT DRESSES Pink, Blur, While tvilli ,'lastlr wait! S.1..16 each RRASSJERES Lfe Trimmrd Sl.'ll per pair DRASSIERES Nylon 9 1. 11 per pair PANTY C.IRDI.KS 9 l.aO per pair BRIEF PANTIES Olove Silk rlnl,h Pink, While 78 {2 per pair llhlrf • THE MOHEII V DRESS SHOPPE BROAD STREET ADVERTISE—It Pays Mararrri is a hnc Ned time drink aod help* you to der?p toutully' And nixhing ooidd Maralyn it creams milk dclidoaar* •around. ..! | Bhang tugar. asah i ^ i k I0VRIL QUALITY PMOtfCT .MARALYN HU mi DOCTORS SAY: • QUAKER OATS is so Nourishing and Delicious Qiukir OM i^ives you a generous supply of important food oJoaBOStl in .i healthful, wholc-^r.iiii CMtoJ. 9 Rich in Vii.imin B, wUck turns food into "bodyfuel", Quaker Oau aids in building resisunc* to fatigue. Bccausu it supplies needed nourishment with M> liitlc lav on the digestire syitem, this "natural" food is favored by elderly people is welt as growing youngsters and active adults. Quaker Oafs is the perfect breakfast for mil the family! MOgf REASON THAN EVER TO BUY QUAKER 0ATSI 4ffi£e? ENERGY Its rich kt aarkseyerefes MOtU STRENGTH plenty el otteen M0££ STAMINA., batease el a-a..%wi laha. to (VllaaMa I,) MQfif ENJOYMENT., .cvwykeey IHOW TO MnVAM A TASTY NOUBIsHfnr MIANCAST Moil 1 cups of MM!. Add sale. When boiling, add I cap of (JHiahar Oat*. < ook ie. stirrlag* lur i',i in in-i*,. That's all. YEAR BOOK 1951 Th Advocate Co Lid. will publish a Year Book ol Barbados In 1951. The Year Book will contain three parts:— (1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on a wide variety ol subjects e.g., agriculture, finance, industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport, art, literature and all the things we want to know about Barbados but have until now not been able to find under one cover. (2) Special supplement on Barbados' industries: e.g. sugar, soap, butter, lard, ice, gas. tobacco, electricity, hotels etc. (3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about this information solicited should be sent in immediately or not later than March 15th 1951. A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale M.L.C., Managing Director ot the Advocate Co. Ltd.. Vice President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce. Mr. George Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate. Mr. Neville Connell Director ol the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale. Advertising Manager of the Barbados Advocate will be responsible for the publication. The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that tho Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies Clubs. Institutions, and business, social and other organisations of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisations immediately or not later than Match 15th 1951. Year Book. C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate. 34 Broad Street. Names and addresses of all those to be considered fot inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed. Advertisements close April 30th 1951. Advertisers are asked to get in touch with Mr. Trevor Gale, Advertising Manager, Barbados Advocate. 34 Broad Street. This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to Ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to bo without the Year Book of Barbados 1951. (AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E5AQUCOG2_PKRW23 INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T16:48:07Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02515
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

PACK TWO I1\KI1MM>S ADVOCATE Qahib falling \ S from yesterday. TransCanada Airline r, tended their Canada-Trinidad OIKM:. through ft bados. Thu eanmsion will last throughuul lluicmatri tourist Mason i-i II a| It.irtMdo* on Saturdays and Wednesdays ThiI of this ran.i ati vi. i through here ytsierday. bundna: Ihifty paaMiajtn to Barbados nnd taking seven pavnger<. hack to Canada. Successor Named M R ADAM I. SFI.LAR Of lluntincdnri (IS.'incr Inc.. publisher* ol ihe OmndaWest Indie* llagaune h.is b**n named iha editor and publisher of the Canada-Wast Indie* Magazine in succession to the late Mr II. C. Collier Th.name Sellar is widely known in Canada as an able and sucoussful (arm;.. Mr. Adam Sr!lar\s bratlhsr, whi of Canada Carib has been informed thai Mr. Frank Napci. an experienced and favourably known magazine editor has been erisMai. to do the actual cditinit of ihimagazine >id he will I-P supported by Mho members >f the slan* of V Huntingdon OlasrtUr inc. Former Student A T present holidaying In Barbados is Miss Barbara Ann Sheppard of Trinidad. Barbara has just loft school and was formerly a student at the Holy Name Convent m Port-of-Spain She is staying with the Carringtons in Cheapside. Also staying there Is Mr Lennox Johnston who arrived from Trinidad on Xues4a*y afternoon by B.W.I A .V. is with Traders Association In Port-of-Spain. U.S. National Holiday T"*HE birthday of George WashJington is celebrated in the USA and in C S possessions today as a national holiday. It is one of the bigsja st Holidays in the U.S. calendar Abraham Lincoln's is celebrated on February ltth. bu: it is not a national holiday it -,* a holiday only in OIM of the 48 states. Chasm* Sunshine M R AND MRS HOIXJHLAND of Vancouver who srtr*) ir Brrbados a week ago returned yestfcrday by T C-A from Trim dad. Due to the rainy weather here they thought they would trv Trinidad The weather there however, ii worse so they have returned Mr. Houghland IN a lumberman in Vancouvri Tht) are staying at the Crane Hotel Leaving Tomorrow A RRIVING from Trinidad on Tuesday afternoon by B.W.IA. were Mr. and Mrs Dick Ruyter. They are staying nt Paradise Beach Club. Mr. Ruyter is Inspector for Heinekcns Brewery in Central and SsauUa America. TJtay Wave tomorrow ifii'miKiii for p.O bvB.W.I. A. Back To Trinidad M R. JOHN KEKBEY and Mr. A. E. F. BARNES. Mnnager and Assistant Manager respectively of the Petroleum Marketing Co. (W.I.) Ltd Trinidad who were m Barbrtdos on a short visit returned to Trinidad yesterday by BWI.A, En Route M R. KENNETH IX>WE who is en route to the U.S., and England from Buenos Aires. ,f Commerce in Barbados. Six years later he left Barbados and this was his tlrst visit here since that time. En Rout? To Canada M R AND MHS. HAROIJJ E DAHL arrived from Trinidad morning by T.C.A., to FJ i net i*o weeks in Barbados be| to Canada for a combined business and holiday visit • accompanied by thcll two sons and daughter. Tot thi past lour years they have been living in Venezuela Where Mr. Dahl used to do some flying before he joined up with the "Caium" Sales Agency in Caracas, Ml Dahl told Carib that they got out of Venezuela Just before ilosrd due to the rabl weather. 11 staying at the BarlwdoM Aquntic Club. AT th* as, Paris, n i > -hwoma !" with a comfortable fUP %  up before a company national lawyers at a banque attended by MM. Rene Mayer and health of the French Bar. Her speech was in Fr Host was no dutnuiiv lor Jovial Britain's first two womci K Mrs Normantnn was unsy fctudrnl at Dijon University where she won a diploma in French language and literature and leerr. as] the French trick ol wash irk her hair In red wine Now she is in Paris to reprccnt the English Bar at the Mirations o[ the golden Jubtaafol rench women lawyers Before leaving, Mrs Normanton got herself a special licenN'i: tin i ing by TC.A. yssrterd Mrs. Lorraine D. Forninn of Kingston, Ontario, Mrs Pielnlicker and Mrs. Mary Grace of Toronto. Mrs. Foiman and Mrs. '"race are here for six weeks staying at Cacrabank Mrs. Plelstieiter i< Maying at Sam Ixirds. %  down for six ueeks. Extended I SEE that the Barbados Arts and Crafts Exhibition Queen's Park, has been extended until March 3rd. Due to the rainy weather, attendance has been poor no to the present. I( was to have ended at the end of this month. With T.C.A., Vancouver M ISS MARY WATSON who %  rotta with T.C.A. In Vancouver ha returned to Canada itftcr three weeks' holiday here staying at Cacrabank. This Is her second visit to Barbados. Nephew A RRIVING from Bermuda yesterday morning by T.C.A was Mr. M. V. Redman's nephew Mr. Arnold Redman who Is here lor three weeks' holiday accompanied by hl wife. They are staying with Mr. and Mrs M V Redman at "Beach gate". Hastings. From Michigan M R and MRS. CHARLES F. WARKICK ..rrived from Canada yesterday morning by TC.A to spend three weeki holiday. They are staying at the Enmore Hotel. Mr. Warrtck Is an Electrical Engineer in Detroit Michigan. Also arriving yesterday from Michican were DT. and Mrs. Edgar James who are here for eighl dovs. staying at Sam I.ordx. Dr. James is %  dentist. Managing Director M R GEORGE de NOBKIGA, Managing Director of the Barbados Telephone Co., arrived irom Trinidad on Tuesday afternoon by B W I A. He is a guest %  1 the Marine Hotel. Sisters M ISS JOAN BHIS1.EY and her sister Donna have been impending a holiday in Barbados. They are Maying at Cacrabank. Joan Is Secretary in the Canadian Consulate and Donna Is a nurse Bolta arc from Winnipeg They expect to leave today on theli i i'tum journey home. BY THE WAY.... My Bpavhvomher A WEIGHT-LIFTER who has been struggling for eight month* io lift a horse, gave up yesterday. He said he ha-l tried clasping it round the body Then he had gripped the two hind legs, and alter that the two forelegs He got his shoulder* under tho horse and heaved. Hemade the lior.se lie down and tried to pick it up by the head and neck. He placed it on a trestle table, stood on a chair and tried to lift It in that way. Yesterday he said, "There is no future In this country for a weight-lifter." So he has gone to France, to the Ardeche, where the horses are smaller. f.'mit, nifit of Court Goosebsote: Will you please tell the jury in your own words what you painted on your kennel. BotUe: A .(>,, Then, niv own words. Corklrrarrot: You will please leave out the explc'.iviBattle: The what" Cecklrrarrot: Tr^*c oaths. atotilr Well, I painted a ship. just a ship, not a ship, but a >fiip, only them's not my words. Cackleearrot: Please miss out the adjective. BotUe: You mean the T CaefcleesiToi: I do. Battle: Then you mean tell em in your own words, eh? {To lha jury) Gents. I painted a ship on my kennel, and why the Cackleearrot: I fine you £5 for contempt of court Bottle. Put it down to my account, cully Ivc got | "undred quids worth of contempt f..r this court. In .Short Supply The recission of cool ihrouahpto, onribMlfd by experts Io an overall undtY-delirerp •leccsstloti'd by a temporary non-surplus 0/ stocks available for basic distribution, fs thought by other spokesmen in foucli u -ilh aufhoriISnos circles lo be due (o a seasonal diminution of man-hours Tcsultiiitf in a iou-er potential of total output operaliny otter a wide ranee and acceiituatinff the larprl-yap betu-een production and consnilssued bv Beachcomber News Service. Copyright in all musichalls.) Crttmmnl M,//i HvpiTilohulin A l'TtMlTS to make plastic coal have resulted in th* Ml -t Ciomer of an edible substance which gives off a smell of seaweed The Ministries of Fond and Fuel shotud at once issue a propaganda leaflet, saying fa the bad old Tory days only children alt coal. Now u*e ran all eal it. Atl About 1.1> S OMEONE asked me what actually occurs when lea Is blended. It Is fortunate that the seeker of information hit on me, as what 1 don't know abntn lea-blending would fill forty volumes However, the matn point is that It \s not a question. n many seem to think, of smelling and ogle le.if of tea in a pile. The blender works to an average, smelling handfuls of the stuff, and putting them dawn in smaller heaps. The assistant blender smells smaller handfuls. chewing an occasional leaf, and SSleeSj the different kinds, which he puts in a heap remote from the others This heap Is then smelled. scrutinised, and tasted by the Mender himself, who makes the final selection after working out pcrcen'aees with a delicate machine called the Theasinenstdeeoctomeler. This registers leaf content, weight and scent In parallel columns, by %  small noodle attached to a ring If I ean l>e of any further hindrance, I shall be overjoyed. I iTajagfan I IifiiL-hl 1 THINK it was Longfellow who said. "If you are going In for weight-lifting, the first thing is B3 in. Lie wli.il is .>rth lifting." The words came back to me when 1 read alxiui the famous Mr. Sugrue, of Killorglln. County K.i i >. He picks up with his teeth containing B fourteenstone man playing an accord) If l were an impresario I would gnther together a team of lifters and an orchestra. As far as I know no orchestra has ever played while held aloft In mid-air by the teeth of strong men. Many people who take no notice of i ssfl BtusSS would, by th no attracted to it. Wnmun is Tlll'RPOAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1951 tkr JI rr la couple Mr. Clark, a chartere'i accounUr i ago For much of her legal career. Mrs. Normanton has had to right prejudice Sgatl But now that she has ceased i struggle and has becom? an rcepted feature of ihc lawtoj's landscape, her feminut sheathed. see that men get fair rest merit." he advises kindly. rtTmen often get u poorer deal in the lower courts tnan unen WORLD COPYRIGHT RFSERVEI1 —LBS. Mrs. Helena Normanton. Can Also Cook or W ml *aPi,n Reason—the necklace ajsaPUts %  ented to her by members nf the Old Bailey Bar Mess, of whfeh she was "Junior and honor%  treasurer" (equivalent to secrctar'. in non-legal language) until he became a K.C. two years m§P She Is Proud They threw a dinner party tOX her in the judges' dining-room at the "Bailey" to celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of w men being called to the Bar aim her the necklace. She Is iinnu -i. ly proud of it. It was the first time such a thing had happened in the JsjdgSS dining-room and Mrs Normanto.i was the first woman to be responsible for the Bar Mess. But a list of the things she haionc for the first time is so l" that It becomes a bore, rvd to Mrs. Normanton herself. It began in 1919 when shi* became the first woman ever :o be admitted as a bar student. She was the first woman bSU be briefed fl t the High Court, the Old Bailey and London Sessions; the first to appear (or the Crown In a criminal appeal (that was when Private "obert Sloaati^st his case and was hanged for*ivife murder In 1048). Kish—Plu* Sitting at ease by the fire in the book-cluttered living-room Of her Victorian villa in Beckenham. Mrs. Nor mar ton waves these matters aside to talk of other things. "I may be a poor barrister." she chuckles, "but 1 can cook." There was fish for lunch, but she bad titivated it up with herbs nnd fried It In feather-light batter so that it remained cod only In *h strict ly legal sense She recalled the 'noble stuflinx" she had devised fur the Christmas Lasjtsan ("It no appealed to an American guesl that he demanded a whole plateful of it">. From the kitchen her talk skipped nimbly to Shakespeare. Why did Shakespeare put Portia In Padua when the original woman luwyer studied at Bologna* Mrs. Normanton, one-time at Bologna I herself ("I was the first barrister to study there since the Reformation"), explained that in considerable histories! detail. Frost Shakespearean re se arch. via a racent lasj wrote about Twelfth Night and the Te-nple. ;„ her favourite modern writers. "My pet Is Dear Inge." says she. "I dote on Dr by EVELYN IRONS Inge". Among the poets she picked on Edith Sitwell as "undoubtedly the best living." Women M I' "I loathe laborious wit," ihe announced recalling hours of tedium in (he courts. Who wss the wittiest Judge in her experience'. Harry Eve. His brilliance was so easy". (Sir Harry Eve died 10 years ago.) %  .. woman lawyer capable ol being a Judge'" "Well, why no: Rose Hellbron? Myself? Certalnl> not." Miss Hellbron. 36 now. toofc -Ilk nt the same time as Mrs Normanton, two years ago. But although she looks forwarr hopefully to the d;iy when ; woman will be a judge—and ever Lord Chief Justice—the quality o ) is somewhat stumo towards women MPs. After thai titanic fight for the vote what j bunch of nonentities they have been up to date! she exclaims. This is .-I change from the old feminist days when married as a law viudent m lw2l, Helena Nor. rnanti i. refused t" take the name ol her husband. Mr. Gavin Clark inr 1 was the fliit married Englishafornsaj to uke on: a passport ir her own m DU) They were a devoted, childless Reports From French Dress Shops PARIS. The elegant woman of 1951 will Mill be wearing a 1950 suit Basic lines have not changed. Length remains the same shoulders natural. Waists are ir the right place, and small Newest fashion features are the ohvouhaped apron fronl skirt, introduced by Dcsses and the pinafore by Alwynn. Colours All shades of yellow, from palest yoghourt white So toasted apricot. Favourites are citron, canary aiul mini grey for day wear feature lavish touches of while pique. For cocktails and evening dresses, smoky putt is first choice. Materials This Is a season of deception. Wool* look like silk or linen, silks look like wool, and cuttoi* t.i<-ilk All are crisp-lookliut and light In weight, either plain in colour cr very finely striped. Suits Skirts arc shm-rilting. often with wrap-over backs. Jack.-are held by leather belts %  out Ions, have kmg, low revert and flaring basques, matching or contrasting waistcoats or starched tfiirt-ironts Pockets are portunt feature jutting forwards with big flaps. Dresses The coat dress is smart wiih a wrap-over front and white pique eolisrs and cuAT" Puakcfc again provide Uie matn detaS Interest. Afternoon dresses have decollete square Off rcctang ilar necklines and full skirl .i matching or contr sting apron front. A pntl has side-pleated fullness. Many dresses' are teamed with c-.c*. Vhich can also be worn m t'eisible apron fr SIGMAVAR John White Men's Shoes 8 3 6 "10 19 BOOTS '•* H' 5 Dress * TAN.SAD 1227 Ballerinas Velvet Finish, Rubber Sole Black, Brown 225 to 234 Go-Carts 14" EVANS H WHITFIELDS Diel 4606 Your Shoe Stores Dial 4220 ICveiting Frocks Evening frocks are either slim or sheath-lute, softened with floating chiffon scarves and huge bows, or crinoline style with lavish embroidery. The strapless lOf Is still lirsi choice but there arc many one-sleeved models. Jewellery Prettiest fashion was shown by Paquln whose mannequins pinned diamond brooches one side below the waist belt. Earrings In diamond half coops outline the contour of the ear Jacques Fath models wore a big jewelled orooch on one shoulder, and a diamond stick-pin in their chignons. Gnfle uses jewelled bees on eye-veils, sleeves and high-necks. Accessories Mats have forward brims and higher .rowns. Many are masculine in style, and trimmed with ribbon. Tiny cuffed gloves are worn in bright yellow with man> outfits. Shoes are unsubstantial locking, with pastel straps or cutaway sides. Fath shows slim while i, which do double duty for. ra.n or sun Hair Styles Hair styles are new and not too becoming. They wave softly back from the face, caught by gilt hair combs into large flat buns or chig• vermin. (Iintlur: I eu I are worn at the nape of the neck. tied back with velvet ribbon. woaLb-oevRiGirr atiumvED —§,... ft. Water and Weatherproof VARNISH The Ideal n11-in 15i ind of pub found in nrw ivrfab towns, and ill i'j whit tnr beer mat a, ^^^ 13. Part Of British Rllssj 131 H Ust ll -...,,! ,1 aa*ll from oci#tf. (7( is vnriru on the move. (7) 31 niTni away. C| 23. SoM(41 33. CTrib. 1S1 3J. Sewn quits diawrnilr. 1*1 23. Moods cnsnss It ssems. iSI assn Nut Ml. rnliiBl. tor S supph itogi i) i'riL>t.Htnpmc halo produced oy r'lipei.ua. IH 1 He BtSkej ti. 1 t %  rni m, |g] r-lH1 Ofwtli.r duttl dice. |) UiU'm.j produced rnunv an unupsctsd mis (and not lu tha "' taga 1 Hsssd i A kin II Dona it in IB. Baa. (A) IS. Appesr Indirtinttiy. 1*1 to. They occur In tanntt. |4| -1 its IIUI put Oil. i a tn BatstW*.; • am. Ttte NrR e Mew^ from %  nlun It am. Cloae Iki.n ll U J r.inn.e-rnSe. IIJS • %  aja Bfescial niasaira. ij %  •an taa Mew*. is IU a>a* Nr— Anabaia. II IS P m Cloie Down ..la—CSS a a>. — -XS t4 IS pn. Uatsnarv Cnolcei b p n> Cmpo-er at ihe Week. 1 IS s.ai. Voikhan Masailne. S. pa afafcadr on Sump t p -. Moo io ..re.)*. i.Vi pm loleilud' I. S S... S JS 9 1 — SMS -. a IS 41 m Attention Children BEGINNING from nest week and continuing weekly children not older than || years are asked to send to the Editor. Children* Corner, shnvt stories on any subject ihey choose. Stories must not lie more than 300 word'> in length A prtxe will be given for the bast story, which will be published In our Sunday's paper (children's corner). Stories must be sent in not later than Thursday every week John Ma*itV* Lam Composer of Ihe w-k. I pn. Spefui impatrh. SIS p.m Have a so. IS p no .1.11 remember. 10 p.m. The Nra. lb 10 pin nwi the UlterUli: I0; 1 p.m. Take 11 lr..m i.e.e. ISak p.n Mor^ McLaren lalkin|. 11 p.m. Thi nuali M SIJ phiiiipi aaa fcis aaaa. A4,l A I II 4 II II 4 1\K>I.\ (AA.mbw.Onlyl TONIGHT >t JO ROBERT Cl'MMINCS — SUSAN HAYWARD u ith Ancs MOOREHEAD — Joan LORRINC-John ARCHER in THE LOST MOMENT" A Universal-International Release rmnaamns rvtdny sard DANA ANUKKUS st'HAN HAYWAJtD In -SiV rooi.r*M BSABT" Dtainbuled b KKO SUSm Plclurea PLAZA Thenlr YOUTt 1-^*T OPPOKTtTNlTY TO DAY TO SEE' JAMES CAGNEY IN %  Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) and p.m. WHITE HEAT TODAY I SU pm. oi.lv IA Monomam Aciwn Dovekal IOIII in nil -\mill i Sllil\. Ml"' TS TSMtl. any Mark BamVN Jlmmv WAKU.Y ir— Sh..w. I-HII>AY S4lh 3D, 4 and Sill I v 4 40 and S pin. HKO i/v. AND THS .S1.AVS OlkL. I>1i I1AKKKK VaasSH BSoWN TOV Radio ri —... The Timeiv Sh AN BIAI THS ll. A/A Theaire— 0ISTIN [DIAL 8404) laUV J SHOW* TO-DAY S and S 3D p m. BELOW THF. DEADLINE & MR. MUGGS RIDES AGAIN Warren Doualat wiih t %  .. Oottey and ihe Bowery Boy* \tTDNlTT: SATtTIDAY Mth iA atoiiogram Double Action• JOHNNY MATK B"OWN H. .bolh. mini .-oi iii) iiin.t.1 ii a K Miu --or Tiir. SOVTS t. AIKTY — [THE GARDEN! ST. JAMES RED HOT and BLUE & THIS GUN for HIRE FHIU. SAT. SLTH H 30 p I %  MIRACULOUS I jovwmr Colorful (Tlnerolc Ih lloiv Caltioun Audie> Lena. Oerae Cleveland k, MAT. SON. S pm BAD MEN OF TOMBSTONE With Barrv Snimin %  ftorle Beynoldi It •rod Crawford GLOBE THEATRE TODAY 4 45 A 8 M P.M. Year Double: THE MUMMY & DANGEROUS GAME Boris KMIKIII /it.. JOH.4.NN Richard AIID.N Jranae KKL1.V ciri MM. TOMORROW 5 A 131 P.M. "A TOAST OF NEW ORLEANS" Mario Lansa and Kalhyrn G/ayson LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE EMPIRE LART TWO SHOWS TO DAV 4 30 Si 8 30 Republic Big Double . Dorothy PATRICK at Arthur FRANZ In TARMSHED" AND "PRINCE OF THE PLAIN" Monty HALE it Roy BAH CROFT 1IOYY LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY I ".<> A 8 15 20lh Century Fox Double . Gregory PECK at Hugh MARLOWE In •TWELVE O'CLOCK HIGH AND DEEP WATERS" Ik Dana ANDREWS & Jean PETERi' ROYAL LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4 M 4s 8 30 Columbia Smashing Double Charles STARRETT & Smiley BURNETTE in WHIRLDWiND RIDERS' AND SOUTH ol DEATH VALLEY Charles STARRETT A Smiley BITRNETTE OLYMPIC LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 411 8 15 United Artists Double . Gregory PECK At Joan SENNET In i HI: MACOMBER AFFAIR AND N[RANGE GAMBLE" StjnliiK Wllllnn BOYD a Andy CLYDE WE CAN SUPPLY GALVANISED BARBED WIRE NOW AT PRICES THAT CANNOT BE REPEATED Plantations Ltd. 'eVV-*'V%V ,-^^-,*-*,^^V-%**V*<*^^^090^^



PAGE 1

I'M.I III.Ill llAKRADOS ADVOCATH Till RSJIAV, FF.BMARY Skeete Takes Four Wkls. In 1st. Match oj Krom Page 5 gle. while Skeete i yielded 14 loin MK brace and then gt eeeaton by Weekes. an on drive. t boundary wide or mid-off. t p„ii to square leg and an off Walcott look another boundary ... > % %  • %  >UWM< from the to ii took a single screen end to W nuke his score 46 now 44 and the baf*man rat singic to mi* on off Ih i iin K on drw fl tad ihc ball to .. eoup> t.. %  v -.topped by ihe tins In i2 minutes He :.ii" %  . .'.v. \g %  % % % % %  .. on verfuJl) io the boundi i isT ihe MM and later Wulcolt his 50 Including 10 boundaries in 'mil Skeete 38 minuU-v V,,-, -. n.i he bill went lo the Wldg "I Tuu (/noon Ui send up 0 includAtMlteon *7n0 in Hi minutes.. next 'he bowler who took a %  1] from King was hard low return to dismiss him He leg *.de and the 'L4. %  [lad t, bold it The total w W ..-.,i I i, n Atkinson joined Wo KM and was altar 104 minuted %**** off the mark wtU ve King to lv square leg off the last for and later Legal! o n •> %  > the line leg boundary fielded ntlj to col oil another bounWaiCOtt The tntsman ierguson III s Ol I ;ing.e and then faced i tron Jackbir. WNk* go) ni < v v single it mid-wicket oft Atkinson got one to AM |M Weekes then took another i ..,,.. • v.,*i >nld-off. Atkinson took a short one ,„,ll,,l hi. aocond b> wiare ,„"'<• * t alnutor .hot i maka i Ira Rl,llv n r^'au.on 'or a wiiKle' %  3 S ^H r WTCKWWSB lh, JOJflUJ kol Werkos not %  Ea£ lo km On uid,. ..f rmd-wicket and oH |hl Mnx bow|cr |o mn|cp h|> '•"' '"*; icore 99 nnd later AlkUami aM If, mid-olt. TinI .. Il J BOW 111 ., ,„.„.,. ,„ „,„,,„. lcgi h Walcott MUd """= • A cri.p square rul by W.tk., Walcott tickled one Irorrt „„ j„ ckblr „.„„ nlrcly ln „p„| 1)y I tn line leg for a *'"*• Tana Choon. but the next ball, a and Hunte Rot ;>n >thcr to back| OV elv off drive found Its wav to ,is next Uia boundary. Weekex then slnrcstilted in a Hngle. a e |ed to mld-on and later Atkins,,n ,,ff drive b/ Wnlcott. cover drove for another Hunte then ri'iise I Out the re Atkinson beat Jackblr with < >l\ iiipir r'luillf IOn ^ ay To B.Aires ROME, Feb. 20. The eternal (lame from Mount Olympus, universal symbol of sportsmanship reached Rome '.he "Eternal City" today on Its way to Buenos Aires for the opening of the pan-American games on February 25. The torch, lighted yesterday at the Olympiad flame, started its 6.000 miles Journey this morning when it was taken on to an Italian airliner which brought it to Rome It was to be transferred to another plane for Buenos Aires. Accompanying the symbol: flame were two Greek athletes, the Greek Olympic Committee Secre tary and two journalists. —Renter. THIS is the otroke Clyde Walcott made to end his inning* at 77 jrtsUrday. He was brilliantly cauaht by Tang Cboon off Ikeetc. ^ the boundary to make the total to fine leg. Facing Ferguson, .got a single to the right of Skeete 293 He took a sharp single to Hoad. lifted one overhead for a at mid-wicket. Millington got a mid-off off the seventh to send up single and Goddurd pulled to single lo fine leg to send up Godhard cut off Skeete which went Hoad who survived the last. square leg for another. Hood got dard who drove the next to the singled King's fourth to the boundary to enter double Goddard pulled one from a boundary with „ pull to the midlong on boundary to make his delivery I) mid-on nnd Hunte nguroi and then got a single to Ferguson to long on for a gtSlH wicket boundary and later on score 40 %  pain played OJl > h "' remainder, mid-off Wi.k.s pot a long single and later Hoad back drove this drov for another. Hoad had 0 .,,.„•„-., n .,„ -.-..-. rontinued from the to mid-on. hut from the last ball bowler to the boundary and then life" when Asgarall. dropped ... tf ,^ Th* totil , „ !" JM '! rcminnder. mid-off Week. fmin the to mid-on. hut Trom the last ball „d nnd bowled lo Vvalcott before tea. Atkinson was bowled took u couple with l late : .i single wide of square hv^fceeic when He missed one ^^ Im 3o0 | n 265 minutes ... . jn >*i st lll'h U"l>, tviH 11 11 Ifn W&_a 1 Kuiiif then COM1 i--nutilully to % %  l^nmlarv to Kct his V) mclud.n: 5 bounJ-nes in UI minutes. A lovely off drive oft UMat jail iiom King's next ovui. genii ninth boundary out his score of 68. He UkBD %  Dl %  i An uppii-h but drovi "hiiii well red 13 and five wieket 5 were now down for 231. with Weekes 65 not out. with his score at 23. Goddard took „ single to mid-off g. r „ 1|(Wd KmB .. lh SLSSjl SLTfTj 'SfS ,h ^ m i^in., nj iine.,1 -„t •. %  n.ikor : *"<* itpiricea n.uig ai in* incoming batsman was qukkly off ,ff King and load tot another, pavilion end and bowled Hoad off ,hc marie with an easy single to a? syrs z^x f^who^s ^t^A* g%sss s?HS 01 Weekes. Prior Jones bowled from lined this bowler to the off oundaries the screen end to Weekes who boundary to enter double figures Millington the incoming bat*mDn hv Walcott gave him took a single to mid-wleket off tho and ihen singled to square leg got a single to square leg and .n.lc ami later M edMd ll '^, i 1 Inter Marshall paQad A ufc Goddard singled past gully. '"^ ".' hrn^^^^^i."^! 0 : Kmg's next over yielded a Ferguson continued to bowl title which was scored by Hoad from the screen end and Goddard of 9 wickets. Mullins 1. nd th 133. Fergusons next over was a the third for i 1 11 Hunte short one to the on boundary for the first six of the day to open hie account, and later got .single to square leg. With the total at 239 Jackbir took the new ball from the screen end and sent down a maiden lo Walcott Out Marshall Weekes square cut one With the t.it.il at 133, Skeete from Jones beautifully to the was brour.il <,n mm the pavilion boundary and then glanced tim i-nwtcd lo Walcott who bowler for another boundary. tingled in long on. The batsmen Marshall took a single to cover to then ran a leg by nnd later Walsend no 250 in 225 minutes, hut iott pulled at one from this later Weekes hooked one from this ,: tl Tang Choon who was bowler and Lcgall fielding on the mid-wlcktet, took n boundary after covering Mad running catch to dismiss this good ground brought off a magniflSandhurst Unbeaten GKOHGKTOWN. B.G. Feb. 21 Sandhurst scored a "double", the second day's D.T.C. New Foot bailor Fined LONDON Bobby Flevell, "ace" Scottish footballer who went lo llogoia la*'. .ear. habeen lined 9490 by Ihc Scottish Football Association and informed that he cannot play again in Scotland until next season What's on To-day Court af Original Juris**?lion — u> am. Second day of flrat Trinidad —Barbados cricket tournament t-ontlnuea .. at Kensington Oval — ll-3f a as. Christ Church Vestry meeting — 2 p m Sale: i l.iul at I'lnfold Street with wall and wooden bulUlnn — z p m Mobile Cinema give* show at the "Home" Agr. Stn fart. Charity Concert (Boys Heouta) Welches School, St. Thomas — 8 p.m. CINEMAS AOI'ATIC CLUB <•! %  *A: -Tfc NEW RELIEF FOR ARTHRITIC PAINS But rww treatment does more than ease these terrible agonies. A now product, DOLC1N. baa bwn created which not only gives prompt ralief from the pains do* to the symptoms of nrthn.i* and rheumatism, but also nffecta the metabolic proceaaes which constitut* a vary important part of lh* rheumatic state's background. DOLCIN haa Wn thoroughly tested in, medical in.tiluti..n DOLCDJ b being used nout with unprecedenled succeaa. DOLCIN is bsing prsacribed by doctors now. And "inny sufferers have a I read > mumul normal livlaa a. a rssult of taking IXH/IN Don't delay, Profit by ihs experience of fllc>w.vK-tiaM of these pains. Get DOLCIN today. A bottle of 100 piwiuua tsbleta costs only '^BOOKCBS DRUG STORES— Brtdfletoum and Alpha "' Pharmacy. Tin. CoChUll rMnii), Bot. Cwkutl Ch.tri- Tint CackUil buMln MMI Roll. PttllsS HfM %  aaeowa ganeg .. Os l.i| sou. .. Vss.ubir ^ up .. T*ito nop c.rrol.. iShrpd ,. Pa, Tom. loci nui %  lag. J.-H.S BOU Sslsd Crssm Pteparnl Mu.Urd S.IICM Bacon. FREE BIBLE LECTURES Prof. R. G. JOLLY of Pa. USA. susutay. ZftUi. B p m ( IIHISTS SECOND COMING". --Whj.' How? When? Wednesday. 28th. 8 i> m "THE JUDGMENT DAY" How long will It be? Is It to be feared? Is there any hope beyond the jrave? At THE STEEL SHED QUEEN'S PARK BM of The Laymen's Home %  y Movement Admiwlon free No Collectlo-i eluding in 121 mln75 mcludi utes. This partnership had yieldminutes cd 123. The total arae I3S nnd Everion Weekes the incoming batsman. I .under of ii Hunte look I atngle i>H the lirtl from FcrtuM'ii and Weekes %  later on drove lot* another. Each b it man than ataakd and We a fc M Stf-t yiJK^.rtJiii'rs si iVj!S*:ftt S-TB ^Z^SIZ Goddard In Skipper Goddard lillcl the breach and saw Marshall pull one from Jackbir to the long on iiiiuinlaiy and then got an easy : lDf]e l<' mid-off to make hll score 14. Marshall got into hit wicket and again reached the boundary with pullet' • short one from a cover drive which beat Legal I ,,, ,, iiodary and then iKisiUon 150 then look an 00sv Binfj|e n n exactly 150 Goddard broke bu iluik will. %  .L J i.^ nicely placed shot past gullv foi .-. • '' el I warn uptofacaJackbli fmm Skeete^ for a single Ul ( ,. V(| „,„„. „„. ,„„,,, ( ,,.i iv ,. |v Hunte got a single with or a col|p|( on(| |n r| ^ a ""I""'' hot. l ur amount with a well was now brought back sh upHunU who playt Il Ik. £**£$— Mar, hall oil drov ider on drove the first from ban Park, to be the only horsi race unbeaten for the DteetsU, Sandhurst who won the only < tiling on the opening day Is In the io.it far the D.T.C A big suipnse came when Surprise Pncket romped home wrlth Montgomerv second. Combine paid S615.00 on a $1 00 forecail ticket, 1 i i.r i \ i i l v i. I is M.i.,,,1.iu a Ul SANDHURST iJoxrj.li> IN ll ,.i sVMWV OAJQ Munlehi 1*1 Its lid MISS SKIRLgY .(.Nfiii 01 li>*. %  %  (1AI.I.A.NT J..AN (Oobii %  Kurd deUran au a etanja placed (or a tingle and Goddard off drovo fie m M to the boundary i the score at 275. King was mid-on. brcught on vice Jackbir from the pavilion end He bowled to Marshall who got n single lo mldwleket off the second delivery. 24 with Goddard stopped one In front of not her one him and the batsmen ran a quick 10 the boundary and then nigle with ol Hun'.e drove past the bowler to the boundary and got a brace to off 'he next. who was 4 boundaries, added —I hen he pulled the first !" 1 Marshall also got a smgli he received from Jaikbir's next ' the last, | short one from over to the equare id He got a King, to fine leg. single to point to send up Hunte illed the nexi lo the square Marshall Bowled leg bout Ferguson replaced Jones at the Mroun end with the total at 279 t Hunte Oul He bowled to Marshall and bent Trinidad cot their third success and bowled this batsman with his •"hen lh nte played on the fourth first delivery. He had scored 23 from Jackbir with his score at 63 including 1 six and 2 fours In 40 ! boundaries in 165 minutes. mlnutee Hoad the next man in got a .1 was 178 and the batssingle to fine leg off the first ball men had put on 43 in 21 minutes, he raoutved OcAldard got H couple .>..nsoii filled the breach hrough hc 8 | ips and then took red out the remainder. ". uij -g^lHi v single off m wS£y*&£*rlS'A~m* .be lei Atkinson pulled B F ac h,K h K '" K ^ e o(T droV ,P rier m the square leg fit to the boundary to in..k. hi liourular.. to open his account. "• 24 and then placet one be next over vlelded a sintween second slip and guily to FOR AIX PURPOSES "MATINTO" FLAT PAINT In (ream and Green. For interior decoration ot Walls. Ceilings and Woodwork. "S" ENAMEL FINISH PAINT in White HARD C.I.OSS Tl'LIP GREEN PAINT HARD GLOSS PERMANENT GREEN PAINT Fir exterior or Interior use. SPECIAL' HOUSE PAINTS In Grey. Tropical While. Oak Brown. Barbados Light and Dark Stone. or interior i CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS In Grow Bright Red. Mid Green. RED ROOF PAINT For Galvanise or Shingles. PAINT REMOVER For the easy removal of old point. & HAYNES'C(3., LTD. \(.i UTS.




—Parbados

LT
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22,



ESTABLISHED 1895

U.N. Troops Need More

Rigorous
—Gen.

Training —
Clark

TOKYO, Feb. 21.

ENERAL MARK CLARK, Chief of the United

States Army Field Forces, said teday American
troops would get more bayonet training in future.
Lessons from the Korean War, he said on a visit
to the central front, would not change the United
States Army’s basic concept of war.

But hardships endured by

United Nations troops had

emphasised the need for more rigorous training.

The bayonet would feature more predominantly in future
training to prepare American soldiers for the exacting con-
ditions for the type of warfare experienced in Korea.



Norway Will
Increase
Forces 30%

OSLO, Feb, 21

Norway will increase her armed
forces about 30 percent within the
next two years aiming at an
armed force of about 270,000 men
by the end of 1952, Defence
Minister Jens Hauge announced
here today. The army would
have four field divisions and the
air force 11 squadrons including
Jet fighter planes.

Army, air force and anti-air-
craft artillery would be double
their present strength.

The navy, in accordance with
Atlantic Pact plans would concen-
trate on coastal defence, The
United States was supplying ten
destroyers.

The Government planned to
spend up to 80 million kroner on
new storehouses, workshops and |
airfields. Another 200 million]
kroner would be spent in piling up |
important industrial raw materi-
als and equipment, Hauge told
Parliament,

The defence plan was based on,
the theory of western experts |
that the main strategic threat to/|
northern Europe and to Norway
would come from the south.

Demonstrators

|
5 the public
interrupted Hauge by



in
gallery
throwing pamphlets attacking
“Americanisation” into the

Assembly hall.

Hauge’s speech was held up for
15 minutes while Police cleared
them out.—Reuter.



Italy Admitted
To U.N. Council

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 21.

The United Nations Trusteeship
Council agreed by 11 votes to none
last night to allow Italy to take
part in its deliberations, but with-
but a vote.

The Soviet Union abstained
from the vote which gave Italy
its first seat in a major United
Nations organ. Italy is alreafiy a
member of the educational, scien-
tific and cultural organisation and
some ‘other agencies.

In extending non-voting rights
to Italy the Council approved the
change in its own rules of proce-
dure to allow Italy to take part,
especially in the discussion on
Somaliland, the African territory
it administers under Uniied
Nations Agreement, and also on
issues concerning the trusteeshiv
system in general.—Reuter.

General Clark said the Ameri-
can field commander in Korea had
learned the importance of:

1. Special emphasis on train-
ing for night fignting.

2. Fighting off roads
tough mountainous terrain.

3. Operating on wide fronts.

4. ‘raining soldiers to stay
in their foxtoles and “hold!
their positions until enemy pen-
etrations have been knocked

(cf,

General Clark said the Army
would conduct training in cold
places in’ the United States and
“try to make it as realistic and
rugged as we can,”

But General Clark said that
while taking remedial action “we
must not change our doctrine of
training”.

The General said: “I only wish
micre people could see the grand
job the United Nations trocps are
doing and the courage and stam-
ina they are displaying.

“It is a real team—all nations,
Army, Navy and Air Force, Their
tails are up and they have fine
morale General Ridgway (Eighth
Army Commander) has got it
buttoned up very nicely.”

—Reuter.

Busta’s B.G. Visit
Not Approved
By P.P.P.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Feb. 21.
The People’s Progressive Party
issued a statement today disasso-

in



ciating the Party with the pro-
posed visit of Bustamante to
British Guiana. “We are not

opposed to Hon’ble W. A. Busta-
mante visiting B.G., but our
party is Socialist and from the
information at our disposal, we
have learned that Bustamante and
his party are far

Socialist.
Consequently our Jamaica
affiliation and sympathies are

towards the Jamaican Party with
a Socialist programme, namely,
the People’s National Party.

“We have no_ personal
pathies toward Bustamante,
on political grounds we
invite him to B.G.”

The statement was signed
Mrs. Janet Jagan,
tary.

anti-
but
cannot

by
Party Secre-

DAKOTA CRASHES

RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 21

A twin engined Dakota cargo
plane crashed and moments later
caught fire after landing on one
wheel in Galeao airport today. |

The crew of four barely had
time to rush out of the aircraft
before it was completely destroy-
ed by flames. —Reuter.









- Britain, U.S. Make

New Kash

mir Plans

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 21.

Britain and the United States made new proposals today for
ending the three-year-old dispute between India, and Pakis-

: tan over Kashmir.

They introduced in the Security Council a resolution pro-
posing the appointment of a new United Nations represent-
ative to effect the demilitarisation of the state and present
plans for a “free” plebiscite on its future.

This representative would ae 5 Miners Trapped



W. Germany Bans
wee .
Atonr Scientist
BERLIN, Feb. 21. j

Professor Frederick Joliot Curie,
French atom scientist and Presi-
dent of the World Peace Council,
was today barred by the West
German Government from attend-
ing the Council’s meeting which
bpened in East Berlin this morn-
ing.

He had been refused permission
to cross to West Germany, it was
said.

Opening the meeting Pietro
Nenni, Italian leftwing Socialist
leader who presided in Joliot’s
place said the West German Gov-
ernment’s withdrawal of the
transit visa for the French Com-
munist atom expert was “a barbar-
ous act to a distinguished scien-
tist” in whom rested one of the
great hopes for world peace.

Nenni said that Joliot Curie
would not arrive in Berlin in time
to preside over the closing stages
of the four day-congress. .. .. ..

—Reuter.

W.I. SERVANTS CAN
ENTER VENEZUELA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 19.

Because of industrialisation
end better pay in factories, Vene-
zuelan domestic servants are re-
ported to be deserting their jobs
It is for this reason that West
Indian servants are in demand.
Any West Indian servaut is given
permission Venezuela,
but she 1 prove







ceed Sir Owen Dixon, Australian
arbitrator who last year reported
the failure ef his mission as Me-
diator in the dispute.

The new representative would
be authorised to take into account
“the possibility that any forces
required for the purpose of facili-
tating demilitarisation and the
holding of the plebiscite might be
provided from member states of
the United Nations or raised local-
ly”.

In the event of failure to reach
full agreement on arrangements,
the Security Council would call
upon parties “to accept arbitra-
tion upon al! outstanding points of
difference” by an arbitrator . or
panel of arbitrators appointed hy
the International Court of Justice

in consultation with the parties! Director

concerned.
Impzrtial Plebiscite

The resciution reminded “Gov-
ernments and authorities con-
cerned” of the principle approved
by the Secur'ty Council that “the
final disposition of the States of
Jammu and ikashmir will be madd
in accerdance with the will of the
people expressed through an im-
nartial plebiscite conducted under
the auspices of the United
Nations”.

The new United Nations repre-
sentative would be instructed to
consult with the Governments of
India arid Pakistan with regard to
their differences. He would then



“effect the demilitarisation of the}

state” and ‘present to India and
Pakistan detailed plans for cari
ing out-a plebiscite in

“The possibility that although
the future. accessi of ‘the stat
should be décic



the state




sion

tiof votes cast in a state





1951

TWENTY FIVE _UP ~



EIGHTEEN-YEAR-OLD B.C.L. player Conrad Hunte yesterday made his initial appearance when he open-
,ed the batting innings for Barbados against Trinidad. He made 63.

the boundary to reach his first 25,

Greek Cabinet

Faces Crisis

ATHENS, Feb, 21

The fate of the Greek Cabinet
will be decided when Parliament
meets tonight, probably on.a vote
of confidence,

Political instability turned into
crisis last night when Panayotis
Canellopoulos announced in Par-
liament that his Populist Unionist
Party would withdraw its support
from the Government, The party
has 87 deputies. The coalition of
Liberals and Democratic Social-
ists which supports the 15-man
cabinet of Prime Ministers Sopho-
cles Venizelos has only 100 of the
250 Parliamentary seats.

The Prime Minister was expect-
ed to cut short his tour of Epirus
and return to Athens today, He
will be received by the King.

The most important Parliament-
ary groups including the Populists
and the Centre Progressive Group
were today believed to be against
the overthrow of the Cabinet.

Some political quarters believed
these two parties would either
give Venizelos a vote of confi-
dence, or abstain, thus allowing
the coalition to obtain a majority
by its own voting strength,

— Reuter,

Split In Italy’s





from beins/Red Parties Widens!

ROME, Feb. 21:
The split in Italy’s extreme left-
wing parties deepened today with
reports of 10 new defections ‘in
The South, a resignation at Siena,

and two expulsions at Rovigno.
At Gravina near Bari in South-
ern Italy, another 10 leftists were
reported to have handed their
membership cards to the local sec-
retary of the Christian Democratic
Party. This followed a wave of
defections at Gravina last week)

The total of Gravina rebels in-
cluded 211 Communists, four mem-
bers of the extreme left-wing
Socialist Party of Pietro Nenni,
and five members of the Commu-
nist dominated National Associa-
tion of Partisans.

_At Siena, south of Florence, Dr.
Luiez Fantocci was said to have
resigned from the Nenni Socialist
Party. He was described as a
prominent intellectual
local politics.

A report from Rovigno said Sil-
vio Baruchello, former local sec-
retary of the Nenni Socialists, and
Bottari of the party’s newspaper
Avanti
party.

Rovigno is the home town of
Deputy Giancarlo Matteotti, who
yesterday expressed views =

figure in

were expelled from the

parallel to those of the Commu-
nist rebel Deputies Valdo Magnani
and Aldo Cucchi.—Reuter,



CHARLEROI, Feb, 21,

Four out of five miners, trapped
by a roof-fall about 700 yards be-
low ground in a coal pit near here
yesterday, were brought out alive
by rescue workers during
the night.

One of the rescued men however
cied this morning in hospital. The
body of the fifth trapped man, an
Italian, was. found today. Forty
four men were working in the
gallery. —Reuter.



New Director

(From Our, Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN,
Captain E, W. Daniel, Deputy
of Education has been
officially appointed D2/rector, In
1927 Capt. Daniel was Principal

when 220 leftists broke with their}
parties.

Gairy



Here he is seen driving Jones to

Leads

Demonstration
IN ST, GEORGE

(From Our on

NOTHING has yet been

dent)
GEORGE'S, Feb. 21.

done to the public road block-

U.N. Warships
Pound North,
South Korea

‘ TORYO, Feb, 21.

United Nations infantry, armour,
aircraft and warships today joined
in to hammer Communists in both
South and North Korea.

The latest campaign reports
were;
SEA—Surface and carrier ait

attacks were intensified on both
coasts. The world’s mightiest bat-
Ueship Missouri hurled shells from
her sixteen—inch guns on rail and
road installations at Tanchon,

AIR—Superforts based on Oki
nhawa ranged far north of the 38th
parallel. Supply and storage cen.
tres at Kamsang, 124 miles north
of the 38th parallel, were also
bombed. No opposition was met
from fighters or anti-aircraft, Bat-
tlefields south of the parallel were
also well covered,

CHIPYONG — Tanks, infantry
and motorized patrols ranged over
a wide area in an are from the
northeast. British Commonwealth
patrols southeast of the old de-
fence box went more than three

ed during the past three days due to week-end rain, despite ; miles ahead without making con
excellent weather, but thousands of all categories of un-

skilled workers ‘and several artisans are idle. Others flock} q
into St. George's from day to day. By 9.30 people w

the market square awaiting.

to march to York House where

meet, in order to protest the
ed yesterday. g

ON THE . ||
*sPOT

DURBAN, South Africa,

_ There was a stir in mag-
istrate’s court when Joe
Stalin was called on a
charge of being drunk, The
magistrate chided the offen-
der with his frivolity only

to get the dignified retort:
‘No, your. Worship, 1 told |!

the police m; +
4 po. —



World War III
Can Be Prevented
—TRUMAN

WASHINGTON, Feb, 21,

President Truman said in a
speech today: “We are gradually
approaching the position in which
a third world war can be preven-
ted if we have the support and
co-operation of all elements of
the population.”

All current attempts to build
up men and material was merely
an effort to prevent such a war,
he told a group of Masonic leaders,

Mr. Truman said\ the moral
forces in America must be
mobilised “to prevent the selfish-
ness of certain groups from
endeavouring to take advantage
of this situation.”

“Everybody, I do not care who
he is or what his conditions or
position is, from the President of
the United States to the labourer
who digs in the trench, must make
some sacrifice in order that the
whole country may be mobiliaey
to meet the serious situation with
which we are faced”, he said,

—Reuter.



Barbara Stanwyck
Gets A Divorce

LOS ANGELES, Feb, 21
Barbara Stanwyck today
obtained a divorce from Robert
Taylor—a divorce which she testi-
fied he requested, She

“shortly after Mr. Taylor returned
from Italy in December where he
had been making films he came to
me and asked for a divorce,

“He said he had enjoyed free-
dom during the month he had been
in Italy and he wanted to continue
to be able to come and go as he
pleased without restrictions of
marriage.”—Reuter.



12 BURMESE M.P.’s

RESIGN

RANGOON, Feb, 21.
Twelve members of the Bur-
mese Parliament have resigned
irom the Government party,
anti-Faseist. People’s

League to form an

block m Parliament.
They claimed that the Leagye
longer

the
Freedom
independent

r.0 represented popular

of Government Training College | opinion and that the Government
and in 1934 he was made rt was suppressing democratic rights. making a total of 8,346 combet}by prior commitments, he added.

Director of Education,





Britain’s Stockpiling Programme Will Cost £140m.—

fFrom Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 21.
Britain’s Stockpiling Programme

for the next financial year be-
ginning in April will cost
£140,000,000. This figure has been

announced by Mr. Hugh Gaitskell,
Chancellor of the Exchequer.

It ineludes approximately
£3,000,000 to be spent on essential
| foodstuffs. But top secrecy sur-
| rounds the identity of goods to be
| purchased
3usines
qua > §



interests and
t that

informed









r are

told
Superior Judge Thurmond Clarke:
j

—Reuter.

K.C.B., former Chairman of the
Advisory Council of the Inter-
national Bank. Writing in the
Financial Times he suggests that
sugar should be high on the list of
priorities.

He points out that stockpiling
only relieves the task of: mer-
cantile marine “under more
hazardous conditions.” It does hot
reduce its importance,

For that reason consideration
should be given to the advisability
cf laying in stocks of goods that
heavy, bulky and cheap.

Storage of Goods

hat that she



At

the deciding factor

Union leader Gairy expecting
the Legislature was due to

state of emergency proclaim-
steel-helmeted police

Srpg!l
tart carrying truncheons eX-| moved into positions level with

as_ the) Seoul. Communists stealing across
around | the icebound river to set up strong.

ere great restraint
erowd started marching
oecasionally following G
whenever he appeared
scene,

ai?
on the

Secondary and primary schools] south
in the capital were closed down] Turks scoured the Kimpo Penin-
aS a precaution soon after open-| sua,

ing, while later in the day be-
cause of the tumult in the vicin-
ity and the possibility of disor-
der, stores bordering the Square
were closed,

Gairy addressing
within 3 stone's throw of the
Roman ee Church® wsked
them to return to the market
where he will address them, be-

cause he said the authorities},

warned them about York House,
Speaking again he said it was

unnecessary to declare a stater Of} to je;

emergency after two days of a
strike in the absence of violence
and he believed the employer
were using their influence on the
acting Governor.

Throughout the day ti.ere were
repeated instances of intimidation
such as stopping and. strik'ng
workers renovating the
House and vendors selling
market, while = simular
came from the coun.ry

After adjournment cf the Leg-
islature the crowd still paraded
the town expecting to hear
Gairy who said he awaited
interview with the Governor.
Vr ith o luck, the crewd broke up,
several certain, trudging some
distance home when the message
reached the roadtlock. During
the interval the de nonstrators
sang songs.

Many members of the
despite no opposition from the
workers, are indignant at tne
leneral paralysis and apparent

sdain of authority.

in the
reports

publis



“,ROZEN WOMAN”
UNBANDAGED

CHICAGO, Feb, 21.

Bandages will be removed
within a few days from Mrs
Dorothy Mae Stevens, 23-year-old
negress, found frozen stiff in an
alley. on February 8, doctors said
here.

When the bandages are taken
cf doctors will decide whether
Mrs. Stevens will need skin en-
praftments. When she was brought

te hospital Mrs. Stevens’ ten
perature was only 64 — the low-
est recorded in medical his-
tory in which the patient sur-

vive.—Reuter.

U.S. CASUALTIES UP.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 21.

American casualties in Korea
rose to 49,132 today, an increase
of 1,097 in a week. Total casualties
reported to next of kin up to ana
including February 17 included
7,408 killed in action, 32,230
wounded and 9,494 missing in
action, The wounded total in-
cluded 853 who later died of thely
wounds, The over-all figure for
missing included 85 known deaa



deaths, —Reuter.

tention should. be paid to the way
goods can be stored without fear
of.-deterioration; also to their
pricés and to their availability.
“Sugar stores are better than
wheat; and we should therefore
store more weeks’ consumption of
sugar. than 6f wheat”, says Sir
Arthur. “Such an extra store ot
sygar is then in effect also a wheat
reserve since the knowledge that
it exists will enable us on the out

break of the war to allocate some

of our limited shipping which

would otherwise have been r«

quired for sugar to carry
Referring to other comr

he states that there is now

tact
South Koreans on the right
ank continued to push north un-

ere in| opposed

HAN RIVER — British patrols
came under heavy fire from the
north as they patrolled the south
bank, eight miles to the north of
Kyongan. Other British units

points in the hills behind the
United Nations forces Were held
up. Americans ranged on its banks
and east of Seoul while

Reuter.

leita einai



Israel Parliament

the crowal Reject Red Motion

JERUSALEM, Feb, 21,

The Israeli Parliament today re-
jected a motion sponsored by
Communist and extreme leftist
nited workers parties charging
the Government with “conspiring
with the Anglo-America bloc
ase Israeli bases to western
powers.” The debate arose out of
‘the visit of General Sr Brian
|Robertson, British land torces
Commander in the Middle East
who is on a three day visit to
Isracl as part of his Middle East
tour,

Another

motion by the right

Town! wing. freedom movement claiming

that the Government should have
got Parliamentary approval before
inviting General Robertson, was
also defeated,
On Foreign

Minister Moshe

from | Sharet’s suggestion, it was agreed
80) To discuss the

who'e matter in the
Foreign Affairs Committee.

“We must realise that Israel
occupies a special political and
military position in this part of the
world”, Sharet said, “We cannot
merely ignore the spotlight from
foreign countries, nor can we re-
ject any request from any quarter
to discuss matters with us.”
—Reuter,



Blockade Russia

NEW YORK, Feb. 21

The New York Times Stock-
holm correspondent reported to-
day that the Swedish Government
was reliably reported to be taking
a “dim view” of any move to
blockade Russia and her satellites
on strategic raw materials and
products,

The Swedes felt there were two
good reasons why they could not
accede to such requests,

Namely :

1. The
neutrality.

2, Its credit and barter agree-
ment with the Soviet Union
plus trade treaties with Soviet
satellites such as Poland.

But some leading Swedish in-
dustries, the correspondent report-
ed, saw eye to eye with Washing-
ton in this matter.

country’s traditional

The major Swedish ball bearing
concern had already cut its ex-
ports of ball bearings to the
Soviet to sizes unusable for mili-
tary purposes,

Producers of electrical equip-

ment and tool machinery would
like to do the same but were tied

—Reuter.



more limited choice than there was

a year ago, For that reason
“availability” has to be a principal
factor Britain must consider

what can be stored in the existing
accommodation or anything extre
that can be quickly improvised
and in some cases-—-for example
oil fuel—specialised shipping will
set certain limits

Sir Arthur concludes by
gesting a list of commodities
stocks of which might be increased
advantage. His list includes

vat and sugar, cocoa

sug

with



vegetable

————$—— $e

CP)

BY O.

S.




FIVE CENTS

WALCOTT 77 WEEKES 75
HUNTE 63,

BAT WELL

COPPIN

CINTILLATING batting by Everton Weekes, a
fine crisis knock by Clyde Walcott and accurate

bowling principally by
googly and

Trinidad’s slow right arm

leg break bowler Clarence Skeete, were

the outstanding features of today’s play when the
first Trinidad-Barbados Test opened at Kensing-

ton. Barbados scored

N. Zealand
Offers Meat
To Britain
Free Of Charge

WELLINGTON, Feb, 21

New Zealand’ Prime Minister
Sidney Holland said today he had
offered Britain the meat cargoes
for four ships to be diverted from
the Argentine free of charge if
necessary. .

Holland said that while he was
in England for the Commonwealth
Prime Ministers’ conference, Brit-
ish Food Minister Maurice Webb
had asked him whether the four
ships which were to have been
loaded with Argentine meat could
get meat from New Zealand.

“T said ves,’ Holland told ‘a
civic reception held in Christ
Church to mark his return home.
Then I said ‘we will load it. If
certain people will not load it, we
will find other people to do it’,.”

“I told him too that if they could
not pay for it they could have it
without payment,”’—Reuter,

Reds Sabotage
Call-up Programme

LONDON, Feb, 21.

Britain's Labour Government,
today threatened to gaol anyone
inciting military reservists to
disobey call up orders.

The move follows the circula~
tion of a chain letter urging
236,000 wartime servicemen to
ae recall for 15 days training
this "summer .



Sir Hartley Shaw-Cross, Attor-
ney General told Parliament last
week he believed the chain letter
was sent out by a Communist-
run organisation,

The new Government Bill sent
to the Commons for approval lays
down penalties up to two years
imprisonment or a £500 fine for
incitement to disaffection.

The penalty would apply to
anyone who had _ possession or
control of any document likely to
incite neglect of duties under the
reserve call up.—Reuter

335 for 9 by close of play.

As I predicted yesterday, the
Kensington wicket proved to be
an easy one and in my opinion,
skipper John Goddard, after hav-
ing won the tass, took a_ wise
decision in going in to bat first

Barbados—although for the first
two hours the scoring was behind
the clock—caught up and passed
the clock and finished up by scor-
ing 335 for the loss of nine wickets
after 300 minutes of playing time.

Jeffrey Stollmeyer deserves the
greatest credit for the astute way
in which he handled the bowling
at his disposal and whenever he
made a distinct bowling change it
bore fruit, :

The fielding of the Trinidad
team was good by all comparative



standards. It is true that on
isolated occasions a few balls
actually p sd through — fields-

men's legs and arms but on the
whole, the. anticipation, picking
up and refurns to the wicket is
far and away above the general
standard obtained in the Trial
games here.

Simpson Guillen is a much im-
proved wicket-keeper and gave a
splendid performance.

Good Bowling

Skeete’s final figures of 4 for 60
in 11 overs are the result of cour-
ageous and clever bowling while
Jackbir’s 3 for 62 in 18 overs and
Ferguson's 2 for 89 in 18 overs
were fine supporting perform-
ances.

And now for the actual play: —

Stollmeyer opened his bowling
attack with King from the sereen
end and Jackbir from the Ken-
sington end. I thought that Jones
would have been given charge
from the screen end,

- Jackbir howled! some aglow
medium inswingers whic e@
varied cleverly and had set four
men in the leg trap. One soon
saw why Stollmeyer tried this
experiment for with the last ball
of his second over Jackbir floated
one of his inswingers a bit and
completely deceived Roy Marshal).
It pierced his defence and took
the middle and leg stumps.

One Down

Barbados in fifteen minutes had
lost the first wicket for 10 runs
and Marshall's contribution was
two,

On Clyde Walcott’s broad shoul-
ders most of the responsibility

@ On Page 7



TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113
DAY OR NIGHT



—_—



“AndI’ve cmuked

Swedes Unwilling To| them ever since! "













“What's the real purpose
of the filter tip? I suppose
you'll tell me that’s the secret
of the exquisite favour.” |




“No, the flavour, strange
to relate, comes from the

There'll never be a better cigarette

Ze
Me
/ 7a

“You're fun to know, Jimmy.
The last time we came here
it was a new cocktail: this
lime it’s my first du Maurier —
and very nice, too.”

“We do our best to
please. i thought you'd
like then. They do
seem to give a cleaner
and a cooler smoke.”

FAS}
( B00!

“ae












“It’s discovery night, David.
Jimmy's just introduced me
to my first du Maurier.””




“You are behind the times,
Nina’s been lyrical about
them for years.”

$1. for 50

MADE IN
ENGLAND

du MAURIER

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

SOLE DISTRIBUTOR: WILKINSON

& HAYNE

cCO,, LTD,, BR ETOWN



98
PAGE TWO





Carub Calling

A*s from yesterday, Trans-
Canada. Airlines have ex-
tended their Canada-Trinidad

flights through Bermuda and Bar-

bados. This eatension will last
throughout the remainder of the
tourist season. These flights will
Saturdays
The first flight

call at. Barbados ‘on
and Wednesdays.
of this extra service operated
through here yesterday, bringing
thirty passengers to Barbados
ahd taking seven passengers back
to Canada.

Successor Named

R. ADAM L. SELLAR of

Huntingdon Gleaner Inc.,
pu Shers of the Canada—West
ndies Magazine has be€n named
the editor and publisher of the
Canada-West Indies Magazine in
succession to the late Mr. H. C.
Collier.

e name Sellar is widely
known in Canada as an able and
suce@ssful family of publishers.
Mr. Adam Sellar’s brother, who
was formerly a partner in the
business, is now Auditor General
of Canada. Carib has been in-
formed that Mr. Frank Napier,
an experienced and favourably
known magazine editor has been

of “magazine and he will be

supported by other members of
the . staff of» the Huntingdon
Gleaner Inc. 2=

Former Student

M* one:

_do the actual editing Christ's Hospital



Mr. H. L. O. FLECKER
Bluecoat Headmaster

ae Oy
Headmaster

School)
yesterday afternoon
accompanied by his
daughter, Mr. Flecker

by B.W.LA.
wife and
is on a

Short Visit
R ARTHUR DeLIMA
Managing Director of Messrs.
Y. de Lima and Co. Ltd., w
in Barbados on a short visit, has
returned to Trinidad, He left by
B.W.LA., on Tuesday afternoon.
First Manager
AJOR and Mrs. Robert

Watson who have been in







AT the George Visuper

hotel
Englishwoma
figure stoac

Paris, an elderly
with a comfortable

up before a company of inter
national lawyers at a banquet
*lattended by Minister of Justicc
René Mayer and proposed the

ho was |health of the French Bar.

Her speech was in French, but

that was no diificulty for joviel
Mrs. Helena Normanton, oreo
Britain’s first two women K.Cs

Mrs. Normanton was on@ a

Barbados since December 9, 1950, student at Dijon University where

returned to Canada

Major and Mrs.

Thirty one years ago,

En Route To Canada
R AND MRS, HAROLD E.

DAHL arrived from Trinidad|mond an d
yesterday morning by T.C.A., to|pearl necklace
FLECKER, spend two weeks in Barbados be-|she wore at
of fore going to Canada for a com-|the banquet.
(The Bluecoat bined business and holiday visit, ,
arrived from Trinidad They are accompanied by their|ing to have it with me,” sh

two sons and daughter,
For the past four years they
have been living

yesterday|shé won a diploma
morning by T.C.A. Their home is} language and literature and learn-
in Montreal.

in French

ed the French trick of washing

Watson have|her hair in red wine.
been holidaying with their son-in-
law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs.
Lionel Williams at “Canbar” St.Jsent the English Bar at the gele-
Joseph,

Now she is in Paris to repre-

prations of the golden jubile# of

Major| French women lewyers.
Watson opened the present branch
of the Canadian Bank of Com- 3
merce in Barbados. Six years later] ton got herself a special licence
he left Barbados and this was his
first visit here since that time.

Before leaving, Mrs. Norman-

from the

Board of
Trade to take
out of the
country the

handsome dia-

“T had a
old
me.

Reason—the necklace was

a@ecial reason, mee

pre-

in Venezuela} sented to her by members of the
three-month tour of the Caribbean where Mr. Dah] used to do some] Old Bailey Bar Mess, of which
for the British Council, meeting fiying before he joined up with the]she was “junior and honorary

7T present holidaying in Bar- ther headmasters and lecturing “Canan” Sales Agency in Caracas.] treasurer” (equivalent to seeretary
bados is Miss Barbara Ann ° 2 Variety of educational sub-

Sheppard of Trinidad.
has just left school and was
formerly a student at the Holy
Name Convent in Port-of—Spain.
She is staying with the Carring-
tons in Cheapside.

Also staying there is Mr.
Lennox Johnston who _ arrived
from Trinidad on Tuesday. after-
noon by B.W.1.A. Mr: Johnston
is with Traders Association in
Port-of-Spain .

U.S. National Holiday

ington is celebrated
U.S.A. and in U.S

in the

Canada

Crane

Barbara Jects. His itinerary includes Vene- got out of V
‘zuela,
Guiana, Antigua and Jamaica.

Trinidad, Grenada, British

Natural Gas Director

R. AND MRS. JULIAN
GARRETT arrived = fror
yesterday morning by
T.C.A. They are staying at the
Hotel. Mr. Garrett has

come to take up the duties of

Director of Petroleum and Natural
Gas.
aoe birthday of George Wash- agreement.

He is here on a two-year

Until 1948, Mr. Garrett told

. possessions Carib, he was Vice-President and

today as a national holiday. It is General Manager of Northwestern
one ofthe biggest holidays in the Utilities Ltd. This gas company

U.S. calendar.
Abraham .Lincoln’s is celebrated

supplies gas to Edmonton, Alberta,
and a dozen other adjacent towns.

Mr. Dahl told Carib that they

the airport was closed due to the
rainy weather.

They are staying at the Barba-
dos Aquatic Club,

Extended

SEE
and Crafts Exhibition
Queen’s Park, has been extended

until March 3rd. Due to the rainy|haq happened in the

in non-legal language) until she

enezuela just before] became a K.C. two years ago.

She Is Proud
They threw a dinner party for
her in the judges’ dining-room at
the “Bailey” to celebrate the
twenty-fifth anniversary of women
being called to the Bar and gave

that the Barbados Arts |her the necklace. She is immense-
at} ly proud of it,

It was the first time such g thing
judges’

weather, attendance has been poor | dining-room and Mrs, Normanton

up to the present,
ended at the end of this month.

With T.C.A., Varicouver

It was to have} was the first woman to be re-

sponsible for the Bar Mess.
But a list of the things she has
done for the first time is so long

ISS MARY WATSON whorthat it becomes a bore, @ven to

works with T.C.A. in Van-
couver has returned to Canada

on February 12th, but it is not a Early in 1948 he retired from the after three weeks’ holiday here

national holiday
only in some of the 48 states.

Chasing Sunshine

M*. AND MRS, HOUGHLAND supply

of Vancouver who were in sota with gas from Alberta.
dos ‘a week ago returned

Barba
yestérday by T.C.A., from Trini-
dad. Due to the rainy weather
here they thought they would try
Trinidad. The weather there
however, is worse so they have
returned. Mr. Houghland is

lumberman in Vancouver. They
are staying at the Crane Hotel,

Leaving. To-morrow
RRIVING from Trinidad on

Tuesday afternoon
aes we Mr, and Mss. Pick
uyter. ey are staying a

Pa Beach Club.

r, Ruyter is Inspector for

Heineken’s Brewery in Central and
leave to-
for |B.G., by morhing by T.C.A. accompanied James who are here for eight days,

Tmorrpw siterncd
B.W.LA.
Back To: Trinidad

R. JOHN KERBEY and Mr.
A. E. F. BARNES, Manager

a Natural Gas Consultant and has
been very busy since especially
in connection with a project to
Saskatchewan and Minne-

the Engineering Institute of
Canada, the American Petroleum
Institute and the American Gas
Association, was at one time Presi-

tion.

When he left Alberta, he told
Carib, there was about eighteen
inches of snow on the ground. It
was the beginning of what they,

by in Canada, called a “Chinook”.

From Ontario
R. GERALD E, GREENE, a

farmer in Agincourt, Ontario,

from Canada yesterday
by his wife to spend about two
months in Barbados staying at the
Marine Hotel.

Arriving on the same plane
were Mr, and Mrs. Fred K, Jas-

and Assistant Manager respective. person of Kingsville, Ontario. Mr.
ly of the Petroleum Marketing Co. Jasperson is a Barrister, They are Barbados Telephone Co., arrived

(W.1.) Ltd. Trinidad who were in
Barbados on a short visit returned
to Trinidad yesterday afternoon
by B.W.LA.,

~> En Route
A(R. KENNETH LOWE who. is

enroute to the U,S.,
8 from Buenos Aires,
a few days in Barbados en
with Mr. Duncan at “Boylston”,

St. James. He left yesterday
afternoon for Trinidad by
B.W,LA. >

and Kingston, Ontario, Mrs, Syrie
spent Pjelsticker and Mrs, Mary Grace
route of Toronto. Mrs. Forman and Mrs,
Crace are here for six weeks stay-

guests at the Enmore Hotel,
Six Weeks

MONG the passengers arriv-
ing by T.C.A, yesterday were
Lorraine D. Forman of
H.

Mrs,

ing at Cacrabank, Mrs. Pielsticker
is Staying at Sam Lords, she too is
down for six weeks,

BY THE WAY....

A WEIGHT-LIFTER who has
been Struggling for eight
months to lift a horse, gave up
yesterday.

_. He said he had tried clasping
it round the body, Then he had
gripped the two hind legs, and
after that the two forelegs. He
got his shoulders under the horse
and heaved. He made the horse
lie down and tried to pick it up
by the head and neck. He placed
it On a trestle table, stood on a
chair and tried to lift it in that
way. Yesterday he said, ‘There
is no future in this country for a
weight-lifter.” So he has gone to
France, to the Ardéche, where the
horses are smaller.

Contempt of Court
Gooseboote: Will you please
tell the jury in your own words
what you painted on your kennel.
le: A — ship. Them’s my

own words,

Cocklecarrot: You will please
leave out the expletives.

Bottle: The what?

Cocklecarrot: These dockyard
oaths.

Bottle: Well, I painted a ship,

just a ship, not a —— ship, but a
ship, only them’s not my words,
.-Cocklecarrot; Please miss out
the adjective.

le: You mean the —— ?

Cock! : Ido.
: Bottle: Then you mean tell
em in your own words, eh? (To

the jury) Gents,'I painted a ship
on my aly pi and why the ——
Cocklecarrot: I fine you £5 for

contempt of court.
tle: Put it down to my

account, cully. I’ve got a *undred
quid's worth of contempt for this
~——- court,

In. Short Supply

The recission of coal through-
put, attributed by experts to an
overall wunder-delivery necessi-
tated by a temporary non-surplus
of stocks available for basic dis-
tribution, is thought by other
spokesmen in touch with authori-
tative circles to be due to a sea-
sonal diminution of man-hours
resulting in a lower potential of
total output operating over a
wide range and accentuating the
target-gap between production
and consumption.
(Issued by Beachcomber News
Service. Copyright in all music-

halls.)

Crammed With
Hyperdobulin

TTEMPTS to make plastic

coal have resulted in the
production at Cromer of an edible
substance which gives off a smell
of seaweed, The Ministries of
Food and Fuel should at once
issue a propaganda leaflet, say-
ing: In the bad old Tory days
only children ate coal, Now we
can all eat it.

All About Tea
OMEONE asked me what actu-

ally occurs when tea _ is
blended. It is fortunate that the
seeker of information hit on

me, as what I don’t know about
tea-blending would fill forty vol-
umes.

second visit to Barbados.

Nephew
RRIVING from

Mrs. Normanton herself.
It began in 1919 when she be—

. It is a holiday company and opened an office as Staying at Cacrabank. This is her|came the first woman ever to be

admitted as a bar student, She
was the first woman barrister to
be briefed at the High Court, the

Bermuda]|Olq Bailey and London Sessions;

yesterday morning by T.C.A.|'the first to appear for the Crown
Mr. Garrett who is a member of 8s Mr. M, V. Redman’s nephew/in a criminal appeal (that was

Mr. Arnold Redman who is here| when Private Robert Slo
for three weeks’ holiday accom-|his case and was hanged fo
They yy. murder in 1948).

panied by his wife.
staying with Mr. and Mrs.M.

adent of the Canadian Gas Associa- Redman at “Beachgate”, Hastings.

From Michigan

lost
wife

Fish—Plus
Sitting at ease by the fire in
the book-cluttered living-room of

M* and MRS. CHARLES F.|her Victorian villa in Beckenham,
WARRICK

arrived
Canada
T

from | Mrs,
yesterday morning by!matters aside to talk of other

Normanton waves these

C.A. to spend three weeks’ | things.

holiday. They are staying at the
Enmore Hotel. Mr. Warrick is

ngs
“I may be a poor barrister,” she
chuckles, “but I can cook.” There

an Electrical Engineer in Detroit, was fish for lunch, but she had

Michigan,
Also arriving yesterday from
Michigan were Dr. and Mrs, Edgar

staying at Sam Lords,
is a dentist.

Maraging Director
R. GEORGE de NOBRIGA,
Managing Director of the

Dr. James

trom Trinidad on Tuesday after-
noon by B.W.I.A. He is a guest
at the Marine Hotel.

Sisters
ISS JOAN BRISLEY and
her sister Donna have been
spending a holiday in Barbados.
They are staying at Cacrabank,
Joan is Secretary in the Canadian
Consulate and Donna is a nurse.
Both are from Winnipeg. They
expect to leave today on their

return journey home.

By Beachcomber

titivated it up with herbs and fried
it in feather—light batter so that
it remained cod only inti strict-
ly legal sense.

She recalled the “noble stuffing”
she had devised for the Christmas
turkey.
American guest that he demanded
a whole plateful of it’).

Reports From French Dress Shops

The elegant woman of 1951 will still be wearing a 1950 suit
Basic lines have not changed. Length’ remains the same
shoulders natural. Waists are in the right place, and small
Newest fashion features are the olive-shaped apron front
skirt, introduced by Desses and the pinafore by Alwynn.

Colours

All. shades of yellow, from
palest yoghourt white to toasted
apricot. Favourites are citron,
canary and mimosa, Navy and
grey for day wear feature Javish
touches of white piqué. For cock-
tails and evening dresses, smoky

However, the main point is pink is first choice,

that it is not a question, as many
seem to think, of smelling and
chewing every single leaf of tea
in.a pile. The blender works to

Materials ;
This is a seagon of deception.
Wools look like silk or linen: silks

an average, smelling handfuls of | 100k like wool, and cottons resem-

the stuff, and putting them down

ble silk. All are crisp-looking and

in smaller heaps. The assistant|light in weight, either plain in
blender smells smaller handfuls, | colour cr very finely striped.

chewing an occasional leaf, and
selects the different kinds, which
he puts in a heap remote from
the others. This heap is then
smelled, scrutinised, and tasted by

Suits
Skirts are slim-fitting, often
with wrap-over backs. Jackets are
held by leather belts instead of

the blender himself, who makes | 0Uttons, have tong, low revers and
the final selection after working | flaring basques, matching or con-

out percentages with a delicate
machine called the Theasinenside-
coctometer.
content, weight and _ scent
parallel columns, by a_ small
needle attached to a ring. If I
can be of any further hindrance,
I shall be overjoyed.

A Passing Thought

j THINK it was Longfellow who | again provide the
said, “If you are going in for|terest. Afternoon dresses

This registers leaf | portant feature
in | with big flaps.

trasting waistcoats or starched
shirt-fronts. Pockets are an im-
jutting forwards

Dresses

The coat dress is smart with a
wrap-over front and white
piqué collars and cuffs. Pockets
detail in-
have

weight-lifting, the first thing is] décolleté square or rectangular
to decide what is worth lifting.” |necklines and full skirts, some-

The words came back to me when | times with

I read about the famous Mr.
Sugrue, of Killorglin, County
Kerry. He picks up with his teeth
a chair containing a fourteen-
stone man playing an accordion,
If I were an impresario I would
gather together a team of lifters
and an orchestra. As far as I
know no orchestra has ever per
ed while held aloft in mid-air by
the teeth of strong men. Many
people who take no notice of
yood music would, by this means,
be attracted to it.

SEE BEES EEE EEBEBEEEHESS

BOOTS *%#

Dress

Dial 4606

John White

Men's Shoes 86-1019

115

4

Ballerinas
Velvet Finish, Rubber Sole

Black,
D225
TAN-SAD Go-Carts
12

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Your Shoe Stores

1 455

Brown

to 234

Dial 4220

a matching or contrast-
ing apron front. A pretty siyle

has side-pleated fullness, Many
dresses are teamed with capes,
Which can also be worn as

reversible apron fronts,





Dries Quicker

DIAL

THE HARRADOS
COTTON



the week

Mrs. K. C.

Can Also Cook

(“It so appealed to an’



SIGMAVAR
‘ Water and Weatherproof
VARNISH

The Ideal all-in-one Varnish for
Yachts, Floors and Household

WHATEVER IT IS—Sigmavar can

Stocked by Our Hardware Department



FACTORY LTD.

20S ADVOCATE

Cee eee cores nana

| couple. Mr. Clark, a chartered
accountant died nearly three years
ago.

For much of her Jegal career,
Mrs. Normanton has had to fight
prejudice against her sex.

But now that she has ceased
to struggle and has become an
laccepted feature of thé lawyer’s
landscape, her feminist claws are
sheathed.

“Let us see that men get fair
treatment,” she advises kindly,

“Married men often get g poorer
deal in the lower courts than
women,”

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
—L.E.8.





CROSSWORD

Diba S. Lal olednked
oe Ee
dd ahead J
£8 £9 Gee ew
lh Metedhcl bs beeieed cd

el dh i le)



From the kitchen «her talk
skipped nimbly to Shakespeare.
Why did Shakespeare put Portia in
Padua when the original woman )
lawyer studied at Bologna? Mrs. ; wave the Humber
Normanton, one-time at Bologna | 10. bub found tn new prefab

towns, and (3)

University herself (“I was the first 12. What the ear may be. (7)
ritish Ya ways. (3)



A
» Wild duck. (9
. Sort of saa

barrister to study there since the] 13. Part of
Reformation”), explained that in is ay oneself fi tety. (7
considerable historical detail. ia. Uariete Oh ti mee Th
From Shakespearean research, | 21 siven ing (7) 22. Sole. (4)
via a recent learned article she ‘ aen é
A + wn quite differently. (4)
wrote about Twelfth Night and} 25. Moods change it seems. (5)
the Temple, to her favourite Down
modern writers. “My pet is Dear 1 Ho¥, Jong, seemingly, for @ sup-
” “ . iter,
Inge,” says she, “I dote on Dr] 4 Photographic halo produced by
reflection. (8)
3. He makes ties go this way. (6)
4. Could produce dated dice. (9)
5. Christmas produced many an
unexpected one (and not in the
milis). (4)



by EVELYN IRONS



$ He ree on be generals, (4)
Inge”. Among the poets she] 9: A Ring mae es det ~
picked on Edith Sitwell as “un- i pone aa knot, Y bin;
f er ’ . cams. o n.
doubtedly the best living.” 19. Appear indistinctly. (4)
20. They oceur in tennis. (4)
Women M.P.s 41. It's Just put on. (3)

“T loathe laborious wit,” she an-

Solution of Saturday's puzzle —Across:
nounced recalling hours of tedium Fait

l pote: 6. Uncanny;
eh 2 tr :



ous; il,

, h Foes ie aan? oR 15 o 3 it

* it- ‘orn; py: 16 re ‘ease; »

in the courts, Who was the wit- rm:' 19 Year: 80, Beare.’ Beww: 4

tiest judge in her experience? Luck: a Antelope Pe :

“ ha . .. * sence; 5, annock; : elery; 8,

Harry EV e. His brilliance was] yitrate: 9.Noematic: 12, Tara: 15, ste’
so easy”. (Sir Harry Eve died 10

years ago.)



Is there a woman lawyer capable
of being a judge? .“Well, why not






rTM mea

Rose Heilbron? Myself? Certainly
not,” Miss Heilbron, 36 now, took |] Bed tt 3
silk at the same time as Mrs Wath 1 of



Normanton, two years ago.

But although she looks forwarc
hopefully to the day when =
woman will be a judge—and ever
Lord Chief Justice—the quality o/
her mercy is somewhat strainec
towards women MPs. After that
titanic fight for the vote what ¢
bunch of nonentities they have
been up to date! she exclaims.

This is q change from the old
feminist days when married as a
law student in 1921, Helena Nor-
manton refused to take the name of
her husband, Mr. Gavin Clark and
was the first married English-
woman to take out a passport in
her own name.

They were a devoted, childless

Treeline lets (oh MES ia al

When headache, fatigue and upset
stomach ruin your morning, you can
“save the day” with Alka-Seltzer.
Take it on arising, again—if needed
—later in the day. Keep a supply of

quick acting Alka-Seltzer
handy — always!

Alka-Seltzer




























wv



OPENING FRIDAY (23)
s=aSHOW S=3
2.30-4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

iP 96

a F a



PARIS, :

PRIZE
FOR AN
EVIL
PRINCE!

Evening Frocks
Evening frocks are either slim
sheath-like, softened with
floating chiffon scarves and huge

or

bows, or crinoline style with The one and only
lavish embroidery. The strapless Tarzan’s greatest
top is still first choice but there adventure — hunt-
are many one-sleeved models. ing down the
Jewellery terror-men
Prettiest fashion was shown by of a wicked
Paquin whose mannequins pin- '
ned diamond brooches one side jungle ruler!

below the waist belt; Earrings in
diamond half loops outline the
contour of the ear.

Jacques Fath models wore a
big jewelled brooch on one shoul-
der, and a diamond stick-pin in
their chignons. Griffe uses jewel-
led bees on eye-veils, sleeves and
high-necks,

Accessories

Hats have forward brims and
higher crowns. Many are mascu-
line in style, and trimmed with
ribbon. Tiny cuffed gloves are
worn in bright yellow with many
outfits. Shoes are unsubstantial
ldcking, with pastel straps or cut-
away sides. Fath shows slim white
umbrellas, which do double duty
for rain or sun.

Hair Styles

Hair styles are new and not too
becoming. They wave softly back
from the face, caught by gilt hair
combs into large flat buns or chig-
nons, For evening, clusters of curls
are worn at the nape of the neck,
tied back with velvet ribbon.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.




Furniture



STAND IT!

Wears Longer




fa evak Matee TOR
Distributed by RKO RADIO PICTURES, te)
KNOW WHAT TO DO, IF
THE FLAMING TERROR
STRIKES !

SEE HOW . . . FRIDAY ..

| PLAZA

,/
| B'TOWN (DIAL 2310)








2039



CO-OPERATIVE







SSS





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22,

| B.B.C. Programme

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 1951

3 am. — 12.55 pm. 19.76 m
6.30 a.m. Football Fixtures; 6.45 a.m.
Sperting Reeord; 7 a.m, The News; 7.10

a.m. News Anatysit; 7.15 a.m. From the
Editorials; 7.25 aim. Programme Parade;
7.30 am. Generally Speaking; 7.45 a.m
Listeners’ Choice; 8 a.m. Land and
Livestock, 8.30 a.m. Susheela Devi; 8.45
em, Plain Baglish; 0 am. The News;
9.10 am, Home News from Britain;
9.15 am, Close Down; 11.15 a.m. Pro-
gramme Parade; 11.25 a.m Listeners’
Choice, 11.45 aan, Special Dispatch; 14
‘noon’ The News; 12.10 pm. News
Analysis, 12.15 p.m, Close Down,
4.15—6,00 p.m. — 25.53 m.

4.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice; 6 p.m.
Composer of the Week; 5.15 p.m. Scot-
tish’ Magazine; 5.45 p.m. Melody on
Strings: 6 p.m. How to argue, 640 p.m
Interlude



6.00715 pm. — 31.32 m. & 4843 m.
645 p.m, Programme Parade; 7 p.m

News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis;

te We see Britain; 7.45 p.m. Gen-
3 aking.

7AG—11.00 — 31.32 m & 48.43 m,

8 p.m, Radio Newsreel; 8.15 p.m. Sir

AQUATIC CLUB C
TONIG

ROBERT CUMMINGS



1951





Altention
Children

BEGINNING from next
week and continuing weekly
children not older than 12
years are asked to send to
the Editor, Children’s Cor-
ner, short stories on any
subject they choose. Stories
must not be more than 200
words in length. A prize
will be given for the best
story, which will be publisr-
ed in our Sunday's paper
(children’s corner), Stories
must be sent in not later
than Thursday every week.

J jagili's Last Journey; 845 p.m.
Composer of the week; 9 p.m. Special
Dispatch; 9.15 p.m. Have a go; 9.45 p.m.
Do you remember; 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m, From the Editorials; 10.15
p.m. Take it from here; 10.45 p.m Moray
McLaren talking; 11 p.m, The music of
Sid Phillips and his band.

ENEMA (Members Only)

HT at 8.30

SUSAN HAYWARD

with Agnes MOOREHEAD — Joan LORRING—John ARCHER

in “THE LOST

MOMENT”

A Universal—International Release

Commencing Priday 23rd
D:

ANA ANDREWS—SUSAN HAYWARD
in “MY FOOLISH HEART"
! Distributed by R.K.O, Radio Pictures





TO SEE! JAMES CAGNEY

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

YOUR LAST OPPORTUNITY TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

IN WHITE HEAT



CODE OF THE SADDLE &
Johnny Mack BROWN

Three Shows FRIDAY th 2.30,
daily 4.45 and 8.30 p.m

TARZAN AND THE
lex BARKER—Vanessa BROWN





\= ——

TO-DAY 1.30 p.m. only (A Monogram Action Double)

SLAVE GIRL,






RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL
Jimmy WAKELY

4.45 and 8.30 p.m. and continuing
. R.K.O, Radio Presents

Plus: The Timeiy Short Feature
YOU CAN BEAT THE A-BOMB



PLAZA Theatre=O)STIN (DIAL 8404)

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p.m.

BELOW THE DEADLINE & MR. MUGGS RIDES AGAIN

Warren Douglas

MIDNITE SATURDAY 24th
JOHNNY MACK
RAIDERS OF THE BORDER

. _ FRIDAY, SAT., SUN. 5 and 8.30
Errol FLYNN—Alexis SMITH in ‘



with Leo Goreey and the Bowery Boys

(A. Monogram Double Action)
BROWN in (both)
& RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH

p.m, (Warner's Action Spectacle)
*‘MONTANA”, Color by Technicolor

GATET WY—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE 8.30 (Paramount Double)

RED HOT and BLUE & THIS GUN for HIRE

with Betty Hutton

FRID., SAT,, SUN, 8.30
“MIRACULOUS &

in Colorful Cinecolor

with Rory Calhoun

JOURNEY”
Audrey Long, George Cleveland



with Alan Ladd

p.m. MAT: SUN. 5 p.m,

BAD MEN OF TOMBSTONE

with Barry_ Sullivan
Marjorie Reyn
Brod. Crawf

GLOBE THEATRE

TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. Your Double!

THE MUMMY &

&
Boris KARLOFF
Zita JOHANN

DANGEROUS GAME

&
Richard
Jeanne

LEN
LLY

OPENING TOMORROW 5 & 8.30 P.M.

“A TOAST OF
Mario Lanza and

LOCAL TALENT ON

NEW ORLEANS”
Kathyrn Grayson
PARADE



EMPIRE

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.30

Republic Big Double . .

Dorothy PATRICK &
Arthur FRANZ

“TARNISHED ”
AND
“PRINCE OF THE PLAIN”

with
Monty HALE &
Roy BARCROFT

ROXY

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15

20th Century Fox Double . .

Gregory PECK &
Hugh MARLOWE
n

i
“TWELVE O'CLOCK HIGH





2
e
as



ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.30

Columbia Smashing Double

Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETTB
n

‘WHIRLDWIND RIDERS’
SOUTH of DEATH VALLEY

wit
Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETTE

OLYMPIC

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15

United Artists Double...

Gregory PECK &
Joan BENNET

THE MACOMBER AFFAIR



-~

S——————S_a===Q"==|



AND AND
“DEEP WATERS” “STRANGE GAMBLE”
with Starring
Dana ANDREWS & William BOYD &
L Jean PETERS Andy CLYDE
COCLEPOSSLEOP OPEL LELOLSE SLES VSEPSSS CS SPSSOSSSOS
WE CAN SUpPLy at
GALVANISED
‘ BARBED
%
$ NOW. AT PRICES :
‘ THAT CANNOT | S
: BE REPEATED :
% ° :
Pn i
* Plantations Ltd. a
, SeococeeesesoetoseocoocobossssseooeeeEebeestete 3

‘
«

gy RS


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

Anti-Sub
Helicopters

LONDON, Feb.
Helicopters may be based on
merchant ships to warn convoys
of approaching submarines.
Extensive trials of the plan have
been carried out in the English
Channel.



This means instead of having a
light carrier with every coxivoy,
ene of more merchant ships can
be fitted with a special flight plat-
form for helicopters.

Sea-lanes near the convoy could
then be searched for submarines
which have
range, shore~based aircraft.

Specially strengthened _ stecl
platforms would be fitted above
the deck at the stern of the ship,
clear of all rigging.

For the special tests a specially
strengthened steel platform was
fitted above the deck at the stern
of a 9,000 ton merchant ship.

For take-off the pilot rose off
the platform in the normal way.
During flight the helicopter kept
in touch with the ship by radio.

When landing, the pilot brought
the machine own to within about
20 ft. of the stern of the ship and
hovered above the platform. He
then slowly lowered it to the
platform, directed by a “control-
ler” who used two flags to guide
him in. When not in use, the heli-
copter is “anchored” to the flight
platform.

Naval pilots have mastered the
difficulties of bringing the heli-
copter on a small platform which
rolls and dips in rough seas.

It has proved possible to land a
helicopter when the deck is pitch-
ing and rolling as much as 10
and 20 ft. at a time.

Tests have been made in vary-
ing winds and it has been found
that gusts of wind flex the rotor-—
blades about when they are re-
turning at very low speeds. To
overcome this a canvas screen was
fitted to the forward part of the
platform to protect it against the
wind.—LN.S.

escaped the a

22, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE
INSURANCE DINNER



NORTH AMERICAN LIFE DINNER at Xanadu, Marine Hotel--

In the Picture. Left to Right:

Mrs. Han Edghill, Harley Hughes, Mrs. Robert Challenor,

Harold Kidney, Cecil de Caires, Mrs. Harold Kidney, D'Arcy Galt,

Wm. Anderson,

Vice-President of North

American Life; Mrs.,Harley Hughes, Hon. Robt. Challenor, Mrs. Wm. Anderson, Ken Williams, Miss Hetti

Challenor, Stan Edghill.



Cow Gives Birth To Canada Is Refuge

Calf Of Another

WISCONSIN, Feb. 20.

A calf conceived by one cow
has been born here to another
cow to which a fertilised ovum
had been transferred.

The first cow had had to be
slaughtered immediately — after
fertilisation so that eggs could be
removed the announcement said,
but attempts were being made to
perfect the technique so that both
animals survived. ;

This would make it possible
for a high grade cow to provide
Ova for many calves each year
which could then be bred in low
grade animals.—Reuter.



2 Vietnam Ministers

Resign New Cabinet

Vietnam Premier, Tran

SAIGON, Feb. 21,
Van Huu announced to-night

he had accepted the resignations of Defence Minister,
Nguyen Huu Tri and Education Minister Dr. Phan Hub
Quat from his new Cabinet which met for the first time

yesterday.

The formation of the new
cabinet had resolved the coun-
try’s 30-day crisis. Reliable

sources here said the cabinet was
a “caretaker” Government which
was expected to remain in Office
for about three months.

The two ministers who resigned
within 24 hours of the Cabinet’s









OMPONG _-° AP,
y~ CHAM fe WS
~~ *PREYVENG: ‘
VE SAIGON "et
KAMPOT ‘ >
wt“ eS
CHA-TIEN Sy ARIA Aq
me ~)

beginning; had expresséd dissat-
isfaction the Premier said and he
had decided to carry on without
them,

He said he would himself accept
the defence portfolio in addition
to the portfolio 6f Foreign Affairs
and the Interior,—Reuter.



HRATIE







CANTHO
CLiEU




| British Secretary





Of Trappist Monks
Who Fled Chinese

ST. NORBERT, Man., Feb.,

Ten Trappist monks — nine
Chinese and one Belgian—entered
the Notre Dame De La Prairie
monastery here a year ago after
escaping from the Communists in
China.

Recently granted permission to
speak to a reporter—by religious
vows they are sworn to silence
among themselves—Rev. Simeon
Chang, leader of the Chinese
monks and Rev. Victor Chu said
they ardently desire to return to

ina.

“But” they said, “it may be
two years—it may be 10—before
we can return. It may be never.”

They served in the monastery
of Our Lady of Joy in Cheng-
Tmy, Hopeh Province, before
fleeing after torture and oppres-
sion by the Communists,

One of their number, Rev.
Benedict Joseph, is in good health
now. A Communist bullet, “fired
just for fun,” entered his chest
and came out of his back while
he was standing in the doorway
of the Chinese monastery

The monks here have a self-
contained little world of some 50
fathers, lay brothers and students
for the priesthood. The monastery
is 10 miles south of Winnipeg.

Versatile Monks

The monks pitch into any job.
Father Chu, 40, and Father Chang,
82, for instance, work with electri-
cal equipment in the mechanicai
shop. The monastery’s prize dairy
herd of 300 or more Holstein cai-
tle annually wins top awards in
shows in Canada and the United
States.

Along with other Red River
Valley residents, the monks suf-
fered in last spring’s flood. Tne
water damaged caves which fo
years have been the curing place
for the monastery’s famous Trap-
pist cheese.

The monastery, with its cowled
and silent monks, offers a strange
contrast between medieval life
and the 20th century. Modern
methods are used on the 1,600-
acre farm where 400 galions of
milk is produced daily for the
Winnipeg market.

They are about 75 Trappist
monasteries in the world, mostly
in Europe. In each, the monks re-
tire at 8 p.m.—7 in winter months
—and rise at 2 a.m. to pray until
6 a.m. They spend the remainder
of the day alternately at work,
study and prayer.—(CP)



W. INDIES MAY BE NEXT

DURHAM, South England,
Feb. 21,
The British West Indies, when
federated will probably be the
next to achieve Commonwealth
status Patrick Gordon Walker
of State for
Commonwealth Relations told a
press conference here to-day.
—Reuter.



Don’t let weariness make your day seem long!
Wash regularly with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap

and you'll feel fresh and

Its deep-cleansing lather keeps you fresher
so much longer. So keep a tablet of Lifebuoy
handy — for day-long freshness !

free of weariness.

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS








oo



U.S. Saved West
Europe From
Communism

—REYNAUD

OMAHA, Neb., Feb. 20.

Paul Reynaud, former Premier
of France, said here that the
United States had saved Western
Europe from Communism.

“You already have won a great
victory in Europe through the suc-
cess of the Marshall Plan,” he
said. ;

“You have saved Europe from
Communism,” he continued. “It
remains to make it safe. The
problem is to remove from the
Russians the temptation to lay
their hands upon the Ruhr and
Western Europe.”

That threat could be met, he
said, with sixty divisions backed
by the threat of a large stock of
atom bombs.—Reuter,



U.S. Consider Pact
With Australia
And New Zealand

WASHINGTON, Feb. 24,
The United States is consider-
ing a triangular alliance with
Australia and New Zealand as a
move towards a projected Pacifie
pact similar to the North Atlantic
treaty aceording to usually well

informed sources here to-day.

They said John Foster Dulles,
President Truman’s special envoy
would diseuss the possibility of
such a pact during his visit to the
two countries.

Alternatives being discussed
left a way epen for other nations
to join in the alliance later.

—Reuter.

No More Guards

WASHINGTON, Feb, 20.

The American Army will call
no more National Guard divisions
into service unless the world situa-
tion worsens. Divisions now on
duty will “be released after their
21 months services, it was an-
nounced today, Gen. Maxwell
Taylor, the Army Training Com-
mander, told reporters that 98,000
National Guardsmen were or
active duty.—Reuter.



Boby
Pawela’

Pe Baad

of

SELECT THESE EARLY
Simoniz Wax &

Kleener
Chamois & Polishing Cloths

Back Up Lamps
Spot Lamps
Tractor Lamps

Tituminated Fender Guides
Jeweled Exhaust Pipe Extensions
Steering Wheel Covers

Bumper Jacks
Grease Guns

6 Volt & 12 Volt Horns

Miracle Adhesive

Valve Grinding Compound
Mechanics Bearing Blue
Cylinder Black Heat Resisting Paint

Flake Graphite
Fluxite

Battery Testers
Battery Cables
Brass Shim Metal

Body Solder Plane and Blades

— Also
Decarbonizing Gasket Sets for all popular English
and American Cars and Trucks

CKSTEIN BROTHERS

_
E
4

Bay

i

1
Street

)
)
}?
(pO



_ ARRIVALS














































Life Assurance
Celebrates
70th Anniversary

An Agency meeting of the re—
presentatives in the British West
Indies division of the North Amer-
jean Life Assurance Co.; was held
at the Marine Hotel on the 19th
imstant at 2.30 pm. under the
chairmanship of Mr. W. M. An-
derson C.B.E. F.S.A. Managing }}
Director and Vice-President of |
the Company ",

The Representatives attending
were Mr. D’Arey Galt of Trinidad,
Mr. Ken Williams of Grenada, Mr.
Ceci] F. de Caires of British Gui- }}
ana, Mr. Stanley Edghill, Director |}
of the firm of R. & G. Challenor
Ltd. Local Agents, and Mr. Harold
Kidney, Local Representative,
North American Life, a purely
MUTUAL Company of Toronto
Canada, is this year celebrating
its 70th ANNIVERSARY

This year 1950 has been a record]
year in the history of the Com-
pany, which reflects the outstand-
ing service rendered to policy-
holders by their representatives
throughout the world.

On the occasion of the anniver-
sary, a dinner was held on Monday
Jast at the Ocean View Hotel at
whict# the following were pres-
ent:—

Mr. W. M. Anderson, C.BE.,
F.S.A., and Mrs. Anderson, the
Hon. Robt. Challenor and Mrs
Challenor, Mr. Harley Hughes
K.C. and Mrs. Hughes, Mr.
and Mrs. Stanley Edghill, Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Kidney, Miss H
M. Challenor, Mr. D, A. Galt, Mr
Xen Williams and Mr, Cecil de
Caires.

Suitable speeches and replies
were made proposing the toasts
to the Company, the Vice—Presi-
dent and to the Branch on their
outstanding achievements during
the year. #)



Pope Pius X Will Be
Beatified In May

VATICAN CITY, Feb. 20.
The Vatican’s congregation of
rites to-day completed the last
step before the beatification of
Pope Pius X (1903—1914) ex-
pected sorne time in May.

The congregation gathered in
the Throne Hall of the Vatican
Palace handed to the _ present
Pope their written vote declaring
that us X was “blessed” and
asking him to fix a date for his
“glorification”,

The congregation had earlier
approved two “miracles” attribut-
ed to Pope Pius X as pre
requisite for beatification.

These were the cures of two
nuns suffering from malignant
growth. The first nun died in
1939, The second is still alive and
is expected to attend the beatifi-
cation ceremony.

—Reuter.






$250m. Pipeline

TORONTO, Feb. 19.

A Government scientist predict-
ed Saturday that Canada is enter-
ing an age of pipeline construction
that will bring Alberta natural
gas and oil eastward as far as
Ontario and Quebec. Dr. G. 5S.
Hume, Director General of the
Scientific Services Department of
Mines, Ottawa, told the Royal
Canadian Institute that although,
it would cost $250,000,000 to build
a pipeline serving eastern Canada
the line would be built as soon
as western reserves of oil and gas
exceeded the needs of the prairie
provinces, Next spring many ol
you will be driving cars on gaso~
line refined at Sarnia, Ontario
from Alberta crude oil he said
in referring to the new 1,127 mile
pipeline from Edmonton tc
Superior, Wis.- —(CP)











































Dial 4269 }





} JERSEY REGULAR
} SLIPS

ADVERTISE—It Pays

PAGE THREE

> amie saseee omen ts ena oo YR ANN Me a

Sy
SS

BARGAINS

IN
LINGERIE



en

YOU'RE SURE TO LIKE

Maralyn

MILK PLUS

HOT

JERSEY HALF SLIPS
White, Pink, Black

$1.92 each



Maralyn is a fine bed-time drink
and helps you to sleep soundly.’
And nothing could be nicer...
Maralyn is creamy milk deliciously
flavoured, and enriched with ener-
gising sugar, malt and yeast.

A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT

NO NEED TO ADD
MILK OR SUGAR

MARALYN anc eros







Assorted Colours e ae ‘ 7
$1.92 each t e DOCTORS SAY: e




"QUAKER OATS

is so Nourishing

NIGHT DRESSES
Pink, Blue, White with
elastic waist

$3.36 each

BRASSIERES

Lace Trimmed

$L.31 per pair

BRASSIERES
Nylon

$1.41 per pair

Delicious Quaker Oats gives you
a generous supply of important
food elements in a healthful,
whole-grain cereal.



e Rich in Vitamin B, which turns food into “body-
fuel’’, Quaker Oats aids in building resistance to
fatigue. Because it supplies needed nourishment
with so little tax on the digestive system, this
“natural” food is favored by elderly people as well
as growing youngsters and active adults. Quaker
Oats is the perfect breakfast for a// the family!

PANTY GIRDLES
$1.80 per pair

BRIEF PANTIES

Glove Silk Finish

Poe MORE reason THAN EVER TO BUY QUAKER OATS!

TB¢Y per pair MORE ENERGY............... it's rich in carbohydrates
MORE STRENGTH..................plenty of proteins
it. @ MORE STAMINA. . because of generous Thiamin (Vitamin B;)

MORE ENJOYMENT. . . everybody loves the delicious fever
THE MODERN

‘DRESS SHOPPE









HOW TO PREPARE A TASTY
NOURISHING BREAKFAST

DRESS

Boil 2 cups of . Add sali
BROAD STREET 1 2 cups of water. A ts

When boiling, add 1 cup of
Quaker Oats. Cook it, stirring,
for 2% mioutes. That's all.





YEAR BOOK 1951

The Advocate Co Ltd’, will publish a Year Book of Barbados
in 1951.

The Year Book will contain three parts:--

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know ut
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.
Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
etc.

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about
this information solicited should be sent in immediately or not
later than March 15th 1951.

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd. Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book-is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about:their respective organisa-
tions immediately or not later than March 15th 1951.

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951.

Advertisers are asked to get in touch with
Mr. Trevor Gale,

Advertising Manager,
Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)

(2)

























PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS 49 ADVOGATE

Sy ee Oe eee |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd, Broad 8!., Bridgetown.



Thursday, February 22, 1951



COUNTING

THE House of Assembly on Tuesday
passed a bill to amend and consolidate the
acts relating to the Colonial Treasurer. The
provisions of this bill seek among other
things to change the title to that of Ac-
countant General and to transfer some of
the functions ef the Auditor General to
the officer.

it is at least an initial step along the lines
advocated that the Treasury be attached
to the department of the Financial Secre-
tary and be under the supervision of that
officer leaving the Audit Department as the
final check on the disbursements from the

Treasury.

The introduction of the bill shows that it
was a fallacious belief that the House of
Assembly could control the purse strings
of the Treasury by retaining the appoint-
ment of the Colonial Treasurer. The new
bill now brings the Treasurer within the
ranks of the Civil Establishment and makes
that officer no longer responsible to the
House but to the Governor. The change
was long overdue.

It was not explained however whether
the step now taken was one in a series
which would bring the departments to-
gether. It might be that the wholesale
change of the appointment and control of
the Treasurer by the Governor+and the
amalgamation of the two offices might have
been regarded as too much to be done at
a single stroke of the pen, but the sugges-
tion has already been made and the public
have grown to expect, as Mr. Adams said
during the debate, “that as the administra-
tion of the departments becomes more com-
plex the island should go forward.”

In view of the complexity of which the
Leader of the House spoke, it is worth
noting that there has always been a sys-
tem of pre-audit and it is this which has
saved Barbados on several occasions from
financial difficulties. Under that system the
funds from the Treasury can only be paid
out after the Auditor General has certified
the voucher. It is the duty of the Audit
Department to make sure that the original
sum voted by the House has not been
already expended when demands are made
on the Treasury. The amount on the
voucher can only be paid when the vote
has not been exhausted.

_ Tf as in the other places there was a
post-audit system it might happen that
demands might be made by way of vouch-
er for payment under heads which have
already been exhausted. The result can
easily be imagined.

It has always been the boast of the peo-
ple of this island that we have been able to
pay our own way because of our methods
of handling our financial resources. This
must never be relaxed. Even ‘with the
change advocated that the Financial Secre-
tary be head of the two departments with °
an Accountant General as cashier responsi-
ble for the funds paid and an accountant to
check the payments, it is necessary to
maintain the supervision of the Auditor
General. It is hoped that the changes pro-
vided for in this bill constitute only the
early step in a series which will bring our
system of financial control up to a standard
in keeping with modern administration the ,
world over.

»
rh eee aL

WOMEN

A PUBLIC notice in the Press yesterday
advised women who are unemployed to
register with the Labour Department in
order to be available if opportunity arises
for emigration to the United States.

At the time when it was first stated that
the United States would need a quota of
West Indians for work in field and factory
the hope was, expressed that some oppor-
tunity would be found for women who de-
sire to emigrate.

"It is to be hoped that they will nat be
disappointed and that suitable employment
will be found for Barbadian women in the
States. The Government has at least given
an earnest of its intention to keep good
faith with them. It is well that this is so
inasmuch as the adult suffrage now gives
them the right to vote and it is well known
that they are more exacting in demands
from Government and men in public life
than the men folk.

—



George Washington

General George Washington be-
came a national hero in time of
war, but he did not cease to be the
father of his country when he
laid down his sword, As the first
Chief Executive of the United
States, Washington guarded a new
government in its infancy and
guided its first steps. No other man
did so much to establish the U.S.
Constitution and create the Union,
He was the indispensable Presi~
dent, just as he had been the in-
dispensable General,

In the eight years Washington
held office as the first President of
the United States, he inspired
confidence in the untried govern—
ment and gave it dignity through
his distinguished person and his
famous name. Virtually the creator
of the Executive Branch, he gave
substance and enduring form to
the Presidency. An able adminis-
trator by any standard, he was
superior in judgment to his bril-
liant assistants; and, by means of
his own person and character, he
maintained unity within the gov—
ernment until it was sufficiently
strong to withstand the strains of
internal dissension and political
warfare which are the inevitable
concomitants of democracy.

At the beginning what Washing-— his three assistants. Every day each
made up a package of
what he was. Since he already had letters received, with the drafts
possible respect of of his replies, and submitted this

ton did was less important than

the fullest
everybody, he needed no title
other than “Mr, President,” But
he rightly attached importance to
the dignity of his office, since so

much ridicule had been heaped on comment, thus signifying his ap-

the feeble government. which had
preceded this one, and he went to
great pains to establish good social
forms. The tajl President did not
unbend easily in public. He was
scrupulously fair in his distribu-
tion of social favours and very

conscientious in the performance the hub from which the spokes of

of what he regarded as his social
duties. Although he found such

official occasions as senatorial din— States ever had a President who

ners and formal receptions ex-—
tremely boring, he thought them

formality be observed.
highly

ary human beings. But he had

Hamilton,

Treasury, Washington wanted his
administration to be liked and

extending political
His business was to set a nation

serve it,

viously the Federal Government
had consisted solely of a legislative
body,
supreme, The result had been in-
efficiency and chaos,

Impetuous Hamilton would have

liked to create a centralized nation Continental Army, did not smile

overnight, and if he had had his
way, federal strength would have

been gained at too great sacrifice impression during his Presidency

of personal liberty and local rights,
On the other hand, if Jefferson's
ideas had been followed, individ—
ual and local freedom would
have been safeguarded but
the general government might not
have grown strong enough to en-
dure, The eternal merit of the first
President is that he established a
strong and effective administra—
tion, while guaranteeing by his
own character that there should
be no tyranny“in the United States,



Even the King Feel

King George, iike the majority
of his subjects, is having g tough
time trying to stretch his purse
to meet the spiralling cost of
living.

it came as a shock to most
Britons to hear that their King
could not make ends meet on his
official salary and was being forced
to dip into his own pockets to
keep up the Royal splendour.

To help King George close the
financial gap, the British govern-
ment announced His Majesty
would get an annual $112,000
worth of aid, This would consist
of free telephone and_ telegraph
services and some fuel and light-
ing costs in the Royal palaces,

The government aid would also
pay the salaries of the King’s
official bodyguards known as the
Yeomen of the Guard and Gentle—
men at Arms.

Out of his personal desire to help
meet deficit, King Geor, has
promised to make “personal econ—
omies” in the Royal Household to
the extent of $56,000 annually,

King George is by no means
broke.

King George has estates and
heirlooms estimated to be worth
at least $6,000,000 but these can-
not be turned into ready cash for
they must be pssed on to his suc-
cessor. ‘

Draws $1,148,000

The King, whose income is
voted to him by Parliament, draws
$1,148,000, But he is probably less



Our Readers Say:



—

Commendation

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly allow me through
your columns, to highly commend
the Authorities, who placed a
Harbour Police Boat in the Con-
stitution Road district, so as to
save people, who might have been
marooned in their houses during
the heavy rains which fell during
the last few days.

If a thought like this were
given on the last occasion, when
so many people lost their lives,
and: -houses~-brokedown,;

t

stooks-

(The first President of the United States
was born on February 22, 1732)

By DUMAS MALONE

(From The New York Times Magazine)

In the beginning Washington
was the Executive grancn, tor it
took the newly organized Congress
some time to create the Executive
departments. Congress, after heat-
ed debates, eventualiy made the
heads of tnese executive depart—
ments responsible to the Fresi-
dent and removable by him. Thus
Washington became ‘the master of
his own household and began to
realize on the potentialities of
what was to become perhaps the
greatest office in the world.

The first President personally
directed his administration in a
way which no modern successor
could hope to do, Besides Hamilton
and Jefferson he had only one
other department, head, the Secre-
tary of War, General Henry Knox,
There were no Cabinet meetings at
first, and the three Secretaries
were supposed to be assistants to
the President. Jefferson has left an
interesting description of the way
official correspondence was
handled by the first President and

Secretary

to Washington. The President kept
his eye on everything, but he was
not dictatorial in spirit. Generally
he returned the letters. without

proval; sometimes he attached
comments and suggestions in little
notes, Sometimes he held matters
up until he could confer with a

Secretary. Thus he J ge lr unity

of action among the departments
through his own person, He was

the wheel radiated.
It was doubtful if the United

was Washington’s ‘superior as an
administrator. He was

mediary and spokesman

L’Enfant drew the famous plan.

George Washington’s capacity
supported by the great body of for wrath was well-known, But
citizens, but he did not conceive ordinarily he vented his anger only
his immediate task to be that of in private and against men whom
democracy. he regarded as disrespectful, un-
He kept
going, and his idea of the way to his naturally strong passions under
gain popular support was to de- stern control and in his dealings
with trusted subordinates he was

At this initial stage of its de- the soul of patience. Those who
velopment it was evident that the were most intimately associated
Government of the. United States, with him in his late fifties and
and especially the executive part early sixties saw in him just what
of it, must be strengthened. Pre— his officers had seen in their young

patriotic, or dishonest.

colonel a quarter-century before:
“steady adherence to impartial

and the States had been justice,” and ‘quick discernment

and invariable regard to merit.”
It has been said that General
Washington, as commander of the

once during the entire American
Revolution, and the prevailing

was that he had no sense of
humour, At his official dinners he
occasionally might tell a story but
he gained no more fame as a ra-
eonteur than a public speaker, His
state papers are generally heavy,
but hig personality is better re-
vealed in the private letters which
he wrote in his clear, round band,
In these, there is evidence of a
quiet humour, along with a vast
amount of sympathetic under-
standing.

By FRED SMITH

well off than any British Sover-
eign since Queen Victoria for
despite the hiked cost of living
his income has remained unchang-
ed since his Coronation in 1937,

The King’s income is made up
of two main parts. His salary—
the Privy Purse — amounts to
$308,000; from this the King pays
his own and the Queen’s personal
expenses—like clothes and private
entertainment. It is known that
the King also gives financial aid
to some members of the Royal
family who do not draw State
salaries ’

It is the Privy Purse expendi-
ture that King George hopes te cut
by $56,000 a year,

Of the rest of the income,
$375,200 goes in salaries and pen—
sions for the Royal household,
$427,840 in the living expenses of
the _ household and $36,960 -in
Royal gifts and alms.

Contrary to popular belief, King
George has to pay for everything
he needs for he can accept noth-
ing gratis, The only transportation
which does not cost him anything
is a naval vessel or a plane of the
official King’s Flight;

From his household allowance,
King George has to pay for all
decorating, plumbing, furnishing
and interior repairs for those parts
of the nine Royal Palaces reserv—
ed exclusively for Royal use. At
Buckingham Palace the King pays

lost, so much damage would not
have been done. .

It is a splendid idea, and de-
serves credit. Hoping sir, to see
Steps taken in other ways ‘so as
2 help our poor unfortunate peo-
ple.

L. B, CLARKE.

Sunday Opening
To ‘he Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—In answer to the letter re
opening of stores, on Sunday for
the—aecdmmodation of visitors

prompt,
necessary and insisted that strict judicious but decisive, exceedingly
exacting of his subordinates, and
Unlike Thomas Jefferson, his probably too exacting of himself.
intellectual Secretary of He did not succeed in avoiding
State, Washington was relatively petty details, though he tried to,
uninterested in ideas as such; as hence his business was generally
a practical man he had less faith onerous and often vexatious. This
than the author of the Declaration was true even of the planning of
of Independence: in the natural the new federal city, which bears
integrity and diseretion of ordin- his name. Jefferson was his inter-
in this
none of the cynicism of Alexander complicated matter of designing
the young genius of a capital city and made notable
finance and administration whom contributions of his own, though
he appointed Secretary of the the French engineer Major Pierre

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

National unity was President
Washington's political ideal, and
he did far more than anybody else
to maintain it during the critical
early years in the life of the new
American nation, Probably this
was his greatest service 10 his
cou » and .unquestionably it
was the one that was most expect-—
ed of him. Organized political par-
ties in the modern sense appear—
ed in rudimentary form during
his administration, but he did not
like them, He had been elected
unanimously, and he always
thought of himself as the Presi-
dent of all the States and all the
people. He realized that clashes
of interest would be inevitable;
that no State or region or class
would ever get all it wanted. But
he reasoned that just as the Con-
stitution had been based on the
spirit of mutual accommodation,
so must the government be, and
the people must realize that the
gains of Union far exceeded any
likely loss.

Within his official family Wash-|\'

ington expected unity of spirit
amid diversity of talents and dif-
fering points of view, though he
did not realize how great the diT-
ferences w, turn out to be
when he inVited both Alexander
Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson tc
join it. The feud which arose be-
tween these two was inevitable.
One man loved power while the
other feared it; one distrusted the
common people while the other
distrusted rulers; the Secretary of
the Treasury was predominantly
concerned with economic progress
while the Secretary of State was
supremely interested in the rights
of men, Washington felt that he
could spare neither Secretary and
he did not wholly agree with
either. War was imminent in
Europe, threatening the commerce
and security of the United States
before the young republic had
gained for itself standing among
the nations. It was no time for
internal dissension, and the wise
and patient Washington made
peace between his warring Secre-
taries. Resolutely, he steered the
ship of state, seeking the middle
way, maintaining unity in policy
despite dissension within the ranks
until the most crucial years were
past and the néw government was
a recognized success.

Giving himself so unstintingly
to the task of bringing unity ana
strength to the new nation,
Washington's own physical
strength began to wane. Toward
the end of hig first term as Presi-
dent he was reported to have said
that he would rather go to his
farm, take his spade in hand, and
work for his bread than remain
in his present situation. But the
leaders who were in his confidence
protested with one voice that he
could not yet be spared, Hamil-
ton said that his retirement would
be the greatest evil that could
possibly befall the young country;
and Jefferson wrote him: “North
and South will hang together, if
they have you to hang on.” Uné
able to escape, Washington. reiuc—
tantly yielded to their persuasions
and was unanimously re-elected,
He was still obligated to no group
or party, still President of the
entire United States in a sense
that no successor of his ever has
been, >

Thomas Jefferson, who became
the third President of the United
States (1801-1809), in his own old
age looked back upon George
Washington, the man who had
been his leader and his friend,
and made this appraisal of him:
“On the whole his ‘character was
in its mass perfect, in nothing bad,
in few points indifferent; and it
may truly be said that never did
nature and fortune combine more
perfectly to make a man great.”
‘This judgment commands respect
at the bar of history.



s the Rise

for all electricity, gas and water

except that used for lighting and

washing down the courtyards,
Less Dinners

Another major hole in the royal
pocket is made by salaries paid
to his domestic staff. Buckingham
Palace alone has a domestic staff
of 260 people.

Although Salaries of the Royal
Household are not listed many
employees at Buckingham Palace
have joined trade unions thereby
receiving higher pay.

It is not expected that King
George will cut any of his Palace
staff for they already have been
pared to the bone. The $56,000 he
has promised to make in “person—
al economics” will be saved from
domestic expénses.

Private dinner parties at Buck-
ingham Palace are expected to
become fewer and more austere
while house parties at Windsor
will be smaller,

Such things as Christmas and
Birthday presents will be less ex-
pensive.

Although King George pays_no
income tax, other members of the
Royal family are not so lucky.
Their State salaries are listed as
follows: '

Queen Mary, $196,000 q year;
Princess Elizabeth, $112,000,
Prince Philip, _ $28,000; Duke of
Gloucester, $98,000, and the Prin-
cess Royal $16,800. , i

Princess Margaret will receivé
$16,800 when she reaches her 21st
birthday in August.—LN.S.

from cruise sHips—I am also a
teurist on your beautiful Island—
however, I agree most whole-
heartedly with the letter written
by “Layman” in Wednesday's
Advocate,

Surely one need not desecrate
the Sabbath. It would be a crime
if any further thowght be given
to the opening of shops on the
Lord’s Day, for the convenience of |
us tourists or anyone else.

Sincerely, |

JOYCE MANBERT. |

Marine Hotel |
Feb. 14, 1951.

.
.



GEORGE WASHINGTON

By JOHN PRIDEAUX

BARBADOS has had many distinguished
visitors to its shores, but few were destined
to be greater than a nineteen-year-old lad who
visited it in 1751. George Washington (1732-
1799) came to Barbados as companion to his
invalid brother Major Lawrence Washington,
the Proprietor of Mount Vernon on the Pota-
mac in Virginia, Lawrence Washington was
suffering from consumption, and they had
been advised to try the West, Indies as the
change of climate might have been a remedy
for his complaint.

George Washington, in his daily journal,
published by Joel Munsell, Albany, N.Y., 1892,
records—

“We were greatly alarm’d with the cry of
Land at 4 A.M.: we quitted our beds with
surprise and found ye land plainly appear-
ing at 3 Leagues distance when by our
reckonings we shou’d have been near 150
Leagues to the Windward we to Leeward
abt ye distance above mention’d and had we
been but 3 or 4 Leagues more we shou’d
have been out of sight of the Island run
down the Latitude and probably not have
discover’d our Error in time to have gain’d
the land for 3 Weeks or More.”

On the 4th of November, the day after
their arrival, Washington states that they
received a card from Major Clarke welcoming
them to Barbados, with an invitation to
breakfast and dine with him. He records
that he went with some reluctance as the
smallpox was in the Clarke family. He also
records that ‘after drinking tea they were
invited to Mr. Carter’s, and desired to make
his house ours till we could provide lodgings
agreeable to our wishes,
accepted,’

After several trips into the country-side,
of which he states—‘were perfectly enraptur-
ed with the beautiful prospects which on
every side presented to our view. The fields
of Cain, Corn, Fruit Trees &c. in a delightful
Green.’ They accepted the house of Captain
Crofton, the commandant of Fort James, al-
though they considered it extravagantly dear
his brother was obliged'to give £15 per
month exclusive of liquors and washing,
which they had to find. He records that this
house was pretty near the sea and about a
mile from town, the prospect is extensive by
land and pleasant by sea as it commanded
the prospect of Carlisle Bay and all the
shipping in such a manner that none could
go in or out without been seen by them.

Washington relates how he was entertain-
ed by the ‘Beefsteak and Tripe Club.’ This
simple Virginian appears to have been
astounded by the elaborate spread at these
dinners, for he reports—‘We were entertain’d
by the Company, they have a meeting every
Saturday, this being Colo. Maynards. After
Dinner was the greatest Collection of Fruits
I have ever seen set on the Table. We re-
ceived invitations from every Gentleman
there. Mr. Warren desired Majr. Clarke to
shew us the way to his house; Mr. Hackt. in-
sisted on our coming Saturday next. to his,
being his Day to treat with Beef Stake and
ee but above all the invitation of Mr.

a
desir’d and even insisted as well as his Lady
with him and promis’d nothing should be
wanting to render our stay agreeable my
Br. promis’d he wou’d as soon as he was a
Little disengag’d from the Drs.”

While here, George Washington visited a
theatre for the first time. The play was the
tragedy of ‘George Barnwell.’ This drama
was supposed to be of a very improving na-
ture, and suited to young men. As was
usual of plays in those days, it pointed a
boisterous moral. George Barnwell was an
idle apprehtice who, after robbing his mas-
ter, passed thorugh the various Hogarthian
states of vice, and finally committed murder,
for which crime he was hanged. His last
moments were peculiarly embittered by the
reflection that his sweetheart was to be hang-
ed at the same time, he having led her
astray.

Washington's foreboding came to pass;
fourteen days after their arrival he devel-
oped smallpox. The attack was not severe,
but he bore the marks of this disease upon

his face to the day of his death. On Satur-| ¢

day, 17th November, Washington records—
‘Was strongly attacked with the small Pox
sent for Dr.\Lanahan whose attendence was
very constant till my recovery, and. going
out which was not till Thursday the 12th of
December.” He records how kind Major
Clarke’s family was to him during his ill-
ness.

On the 22nd of December, 1751, George
Washington took leave of his brother and all
the friends he had made in Barbados and sail-
ed on the Industry, Captain John Saunders,
for Virginia. Soon after this his brother
Lawrence went to Bermuda in search of bet-
ter health, but did not succeed in regaining
strength. He died soon after and George
inherited Mount Vernon,

In 1759, George Washington married the
beautiful young widow, Martha Curtes. In
1774 when the dispute between the British
home government and the colonists broke
out, he became one of the leaders of the local
opposition, and later was elected to the first

ongress at Philadelphia. In the following
year 1775, he was made Commander-in-Chief
of the American army, and from that time
to the end of the struggle in 1783 he was
trusted and adored by the people.

Deeply dejected, he left Mount Vernon on
April 16th, 1789, as he expressed in a letter to

\| General Knox, “with feelings not unlike those

of a culprit going to his place of execution,
- «+» Integrity and firmness are all I can
promise.” On April 30th, from the portico
of the Federal Building in New York, in the
resence of a ‘vast concourse,’ he took the
"residential oath, and then went to the
Senate Chamber where he delivered his in-
augural address. Senator Maclay of Penn-
sylvania recorded in his journal that ‘this
great man was agitated and embarassed more
than ever he was by levelled cannon or point-
ed musket. He trembled and several times
could scarce make out to read.’ He was not
accompanied by Mrs. Washington, as she had
not been able to leave Mount Vernon in time
for the event.

Washington served a second term of office
from’1793 onwards, and refused election for
a third time. He was one of the noblest
characters in history, good, simple, honest.
brave, and efficient. t

ard was the most kind and friendly, he] $



D. V. SCOTT TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
& CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
ey
Usually NOW
Pkgs: A.P. MACARONI .........---.+++° $ 35
Tins SPAGHETTI with Tomato Sauce i
and Cheese ...........-- es 4 Nes sete 28
Bottles ALLSOPP’S BEER ........-.----+ 26 20

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1951





FOR YOUR BATHROOM

Corner BASINS with Pedestal
BASINS with or without Pedestal
-up SUITES
wc. PANS, S & P TRAPS
W.C. SEATS {Plastic White and
Bakelite Mahogany
Cast Iron CISTERNS

Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS
HARPIC, Large and Small.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,



which offer wel 46696699666966699996

MAZAWATTEE



TEA

PREFERRED FOR ITS
DISTINCTIVE FLAVOUR
e

DaCOSTA & Co.. Ltd.

DIAL 4689

$ 31

oo

|



pings ve ; Wines That
ea rea
sedate divine: Gladden The









Salami Sausage

Corned Beef

Keep up . Your

GOLD BRAID










\ ( oa
Cold Cuts £1
Cooked Hams, 3 sizes
Ox
$
x
gz

Now in Stock in our Clothing Dept.

RAINCOATS

by Chas. McIntosh |

TOOTALS
AND JAYBRA

in Men’s and Boys’ Sizes

— Also —

MEN'S OVERCOATS

in Harris and Manx Tweeds

DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

S96

Amontillado
Partners Port
Ruby Port

Carr’s Cream Crackers
Gouda Cheese

‘Edam Cheese

tongues ¢

Spirit

with our famous

RU MM

FRPSPPPSP PDI FFP” §

COSCSOSY

SSCSSSESOSOSOS
PPOOOPO PPPS POPP OCPD PPPOE,

Meart ...«
Pale Dry Nutty Sherry

New Arrivals





cM CRN EINER TUNES
—

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

Sugar Yield May

22, 1951

300 New Books

Exceed 175,000 Tons | On Preview

According to reports received the yields of cane per acre
are much above the estimates says the Director of Agricul-
ture in his notes for January. Some plantations in the in-
termediate rainfall areas have reported average yields of

Fishermen Ask
For Lights

HEN THE ADVOCATE visit-

ed the Public Market on
Tuesday night the fish department
was in darkness. Shortly after-
wards over 17 improvised lamps—
bottles of oil with paper stuffed
into them—lighted up the market.
This cccurred after the word went
around that two boats were on
their way to the Careenage.

Kenneth Connell, a fish seller,
also had a lighted bottle. He said
that the market is wired and
equipped with fluorescent lighting.
‘These lights are switched off when
the fish is sold out but no con-
sideration is given to the boats
which are still out to sea.

Sometimes the counters are
crowded with people awaiting
boats to come in and it becomes
miserable to wait in darkness.
Owing to the darkness it takes the
fishermen and vendors more time
to distribute and count their fish.

Connell said that in another
section which is occupied by “fish
boners” electric lamps burn all
the time. it is not as necessary
for lights to be in this section as
it is for. them to be in the fish
department, he said.

Connell, feels that the lights
could be allowed to burn for a
longer period and the watchman
could switch them off. He is
hoping that this will soon be done.
He said, “We have to pay six-
pence per day to sell fish in the
market place and still buy kero-
sene oil for bottle lamps.”

: - L. O. FLECHER,

M.A., Headmaster of Christ’s
Hospital, will lecture at the
British Council at 8.30 p.m, on
Thursday, February 22nd. His
lecture, “From the Cradle to the
Grave,” constitutes g survey of
education in Britain today.

Mr, Flecher is spending a week
in Barbados as guest lecturer for
the British Council. With Mrs.
and Miss Flecker, he will be a
guest at Government House for
three days and of Mr. and Mrs.
Risely Tucker for the remainder
of his stay. In addition to this
public lecture he will be having
talks with Sir George Seel who
is a governor of Christ’s Hospital,
and with Barbados educationalists,
visiting the principal secondary
schools and renewing aquaintance
with old ‘bluecoats’. Among these
may be mentioned the Director
of Education, Major Reed, Mr.
Frampton, Mr, Haskell, Mr.
Smithies and, in Antigua, the
Governor and the Colonial Secre-
tary.

HIEVES REMOVED three six—

volt batteries, valued $90,
from three lorries at Seawell Air-
port between Monday and Tues—
day. The batteries are the|
property of Messrs. J. N. Harri-
man & Co., and their foreman,|
Lenville Jacob,
cident.

The home of Horace Farrell at
Fairfield, Black Rock, was broken
and entered between 11.15 p.m.
Monday and 5.30 a.m. on Tues—
day and a quantity of ‘silvers and
clothing valued $40.15 were stolen.

Gordon Young, an employee of
Hill’s Dairy, Fontabelle, reported
that his watch, a pen and a
quantity of clothing, total value
of $27.96, were stolen from a room
at the same dairy between Feb-
ruary 11 and Monday,

A thief stole a ladder from the
enclosed yard of Arthur C. Bailey
at Vauxhall Road, Christ Church
during the month.

EVENTEEN MOTORISTS were

reported for traffic offences on
Tuesday including two for ex-
ceeding the speed limit. Other
motorists were reported for carry-
ing weight in excess,
woe IFILL of Queen

Street, St. Peter, was taken
to the General Hospital on Tues—
day and detained with injuries to
his head.

7All was involved in an accident
with the motor lorry E-99, owned
by Allendale Plantation, St. Peter
and driven by Lisle Hendy of Rose
Hill, St. Peter,

Gaoled On Three
Charges Of Larceny

LIONEL BEST a labourer of
Church Village, St. Michael was
found guilty on three charges of
larceny brought by the Police yes-
terday .His Worship Mr. E, A.
McLeod before whom Best appear-
ed sentenced him to 12 months’
imprisonment with hard labour
for each charge,

On the first charge Bes: was
found guilty of the larceny of a
pair of glasses, the property of St.
Clair Burkett of Chapman Lane,
on January 22. On the second
charge Best stole articles to the
value of £3 5s. 1d. from the house
of Sydney Reece on January 12.

On the third charge he stole
articles valued at $19.26 from the

reported the in-



and the property of Kathleen
Maitland on January 25. Best was
arrested by Police Constable
Devonish attached to the CLD,
Department. 4

Best had three previous convic-
tions for larceny.



What Do You
Think?

Mr. E. R. Edmett, Senior Pro-
ducer of the West Indies Section
of the B.B.C. arrived in Trini-
dad from Jamaica on Saturday
last.

Mr. Edmett is on a 28-day tour
of the Caribbean-Jamaica, Trini-
dad, British Guiana, Barbados
and St. Lucia.

He is making a survey of the
listening interest of West Indians
in the “Calling the West Indies”
programme He wants to know
the uecess the programme has
had, how many. people are listen-

what improvements



house of T. K. Davis of Hastings |

over 42 tons of cane per acre for plant canes and ratoons.

During the month the sucrose
content of the juice was low, and
the juice quality varied from dis-
trict to district. A poor juice
quality was to be expected in the
early part of the season, as reap-
ing was started before the canes
were mature; the quality should
greatly improve as the season
progresses. Taking the above
factors into account the crop
should exceed 175,000 toms sugar.

The young plant cane crop has

a healthy appearance and ‘sup-|-

plies’ planted during December
are germinating well.

The main yam crop was har-
vesied and stored during the
month. Sweet potatoes and eddoes
were also harvested and the
market supply was satisfactory.
Some “market garden’’ crops
were easily obtainable, particu-
larly tomatoes, carrots, French
beans and cabbage.

Peasant Agriculture

Light intermittent showers
which fell during the latter half
of the month, however, favoured
the growth of garden vegetables.
As a result, these were in better
supply than they had been for
some weeks past. Towards the
end of the month, tomatoes,
cabbages, carrots and lettuce
could be obtained at more reason-

able prices. Of the main food
crops, yams and eddqs ‘were
easily available, but sweet

potatoes were in short supply,
especially in parts of Christ
Church and some districts along
the leeward coast.

The yields of groundnuts reaped
during the month were again dis-
appointing. Experienced growers
of the crop are nevertheless
satisfied that, given suitable con-
ditions, the “local” and the
Virginia Bunch varieties can be
very heavy producers.

Coconuts and pananas were in
good supply in the market. Other
tree crops which were available
during the month included paw-
paws, guavas and limes. _

The principal plant pests re-
ported in January were the cab-
bage white butterfly, scale insects
and slugs. Suitablej control
measures are being advocated.

Several inquiries and applica-
tions for assistance under the
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare Irrigation Scheme continue
to be received. During the month
work was completed on the
erection of a 12’ windmill unit
with overhead spray lines on a
holding in St. Philip. Other
peasants were given assistance
with equipment and fittings for
overhead spraying. ;

Livestock at the six Stations
at the end of January, including
stud animals, cattle, goats, sheep,
pigs and equines, numbered 124.
Four hundred and _ sixty-five
gallons of milk were produced .
Fourteen head of stock, including
12 young pigs for rearing, were
sold.

Stud services paid for at the
Stations were as follows: bulls
145, bucks 48, rams 33 and boars
81, making a total of 307 for the
month.



“Your Guess” ;
Was St. John’s
Church

About sixty percent of thel
guessers in the Evening Advocate’s
“Your Guess” competition guessed
correctly that the picture was
“The roof of St. John’s Church”.
Sybil Browne of Eagle Hall, St.
Michael was the winner. Hers
was the first correct answer to be
pulled out of the box. Thirty per-
cent guessed it was taken in the
Westbury Cemetery. Other guesses
were “This is at Graves End
‘Cemetery,” “The roof of St.
Patrick’s R.C, Church”, “St, Jos-
eph Church Yard,” “Belmont
Chapel”, St. Paul’s Church,” and
at least two dozen other churches
in the island.



‘Athelbrook’ Comes
For Molasses

THE 286-ton molasses tanker
Athelbrook began her yearly
series of visits to Barbados yes-
terday to take vacuum pan
molasses for Trinidad.

The Athelbrook arrived shortly
after daybreak and later took her
berth in the inner basin of the
Careenage from where she was
supplied with her load of molasses.

She came out of the inner basin
of the Careenage yesterday even-
ing ready to start on her voyage
to Trinidad.

The Athelbrook is expected to
return within a week or so for
another load. Her local agents are
Messrs, Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.



CONTRACT FOR
UNIFORMS GRANTED

AT a meeting of the Hospital
Advisory Board yesterda m-
bers dealt with the aw of ten-
ders for the making of uniforms.
The contract has been awarded to

the six lowest tenders on the un- | peo

derstanding that each will submit
the first portion of work done,
to the Medical Superintendent.
If the work of each of them is
satisfactory, the contract will be
awarded to all six at the price
quoted by the highest tender.

Names of the six are, Violet
Waldron, Katie Phillips, Ellen
Crawford, Grace Forde, Beryl
Mason and Eleanor Byer.



Fined For Dangerous
Driving

A FINE of £2 to be paid in 28
days or one month's i i
ment was imposed on
Wiggins of Bank Hall for driving
the motor car M—521 in a danger-
Ous manner on December 5, by
His Worship Mr. A, J. H, Han-
schell yesterday.

















AT PUBLIC LIBRARY

Over 300 new books will be
put into circulation at the Bar-
bados Public Library next Mon-
day morning. They will be on pre-
view from today.

The majority of the new works
are non-fiction, and some of

po. a none th a British

unc on, rar, in
Trinidad. .

Three new books on cricket
are among the selection—“Gone
with the Cricketers” by John
Arlott, “A Wisden Century—1850-
19 * by John Hadfield, and
“Cricket” by Archer Sandham.
There are also works on Football
and Lawn Tennis.

For politicians and those inter-
ested in politics there is “History
of Trade Unionism” by Sidney
and Beatrice Webb. Those who
want some informative facts
about weather forecasting will be
interested in “Here is the Weather
Forecaster” by E. G. Bilham,
Chief of the E.T.A., the Centrai
Forecasting Station of the Air
os at Dunstable, Bedford-
shire,

‘Bungalow By The Beach”
A travel book that deals with

Grenada is “Bungalow by the
Beach”, and another in_ this
section is “Appointment in the

Sun” by Rosita Forbes. An out-
Standing book that has been
already requested by 30 people is
the auto-biography of Dr. Barbara
Lloyd-Still, wife of the Medical’
Superintendent of the local Mental
Hospital.
“Dr. Barbara’,

Books dealing with the negro
are represented by “Rules of
Prejudice against the Negro” by
Hines, and “The Negro in the
U.S.” by Goldstein.

Other good works are, ‘Dollar
Crisis, its Causes and Cures”; “A
West Indian Fortune”; “Flood
Estimation and Control”; “A
Thousand Garden Questions
Answered”; and in the Famous
British Trial Series, “The Trial
of Peter Griffiths”. Griffiths was
the defendant in the Blackburn
Baby Murder of 1948.

I Remember

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

‘Skeete Takes Four
Wkts. In Ist. Mate

About 4,000 og witnessed the first day

match between
terday.

PAGE FIVE



of play in the

inidad and Barbados at Kensington yes-

Barbados occupied the wicket for the day and at the draw-

ing of stumps had made 335

for the loss of 9 wickets.

It was a keen contest throughout, highlighted by the cus-
tomary fine display of batting by international batsmen
Clyde Walcott and Everton Weekes, the former making 77

runs and the latter 75.

Youthful Conrad Hunte new-
comer to intercolonial cricket and
one of the island’s opening bats-
men, scored a valuable 63, He
started off confidently and was
giving a good display, but just be-
fore the luncheon period he
seemed to lose concentration and
played shakily to the spinners. It
was at this stage that he was given
a “life.” He was 34 when he
cover drove a delivery from Wil-
fred Ferguson to Clarence Skeete
at cover point and was dropped.
He- gave another before his
innings closed. He was then 44,

John Goddare played a skip-
per’s innings. Going in at number
8 he batted well and scored with
some measure of freeness. At the
close of play he was undefeated
with 43 to his credit,

The Triridad bowling was
steady throughout the day and
Captain Jeffrey Stollmeyer
handled it admirably, The field-
ing, however, left much.to be de-
sired and quite a few catches
went abegging.

Slow right arm spinner Clar-

Title of the book is}ence Skeete and left-arm medium :

pacer Sydney Jackbir gained aj
great measure of respect. The first
ended with a bowling analysis of
4 wickets for 60 runs and the
other 3 for 62, Ferguson captured

2 for 89.
Play

John Goddard won the toss and
decided to bat on an easy-paced
wicket. Roy Marshall and Con-
rad Hunte opened the innings and
left arm medium pacer Jackbir|
bowled to Marshall from the
northern end. Marshall played the
seventh ball to square leg for two
runs and played out the over,

*

When The Chief Scout
) Visited Barbados

BY W. B. MILLAR ~
TO-DAY, February 22nd is an important day for Scouts and

Guides all over the world. It is

“Thinking Day”, for them,

and as the birthday of the founder of the Scout movement,

the late Lord Baden-Powell, as

well as the birthday of his

widow Lady Baden-Powell, Chief Guide, it is of more than

pasting interest to both
he Chief Guide, at present on
a tour of the West Indies was in
Barbados some days ago, and
hopes to return before leaving
the Caribbean. She is a dynamic
personality, and seems to have lost
nothing in her keenness and drive
since that Wednesday morning in
January twenty-one years ago
when I saw her for the first time.

I was one of the scouts at the
Baggage Warehouse who welcom-
ed B.P. the Chief Scout of alt
the world and his wife, when they
paid a visit to this colony. How
well do I remember how anxious
we scouts were to catch a glimpse
of one of the world’s greatest men,
in the flesh. The lucky fellows
who had gone to the World Jam-
borees in 1924 and 1929 at Arrowe
Park had told us of him, but we
were all very eager to see him
for ourselves.

“The Chief”

And at last he came, in full
Scout uniform, with a light cloak
hanging loosely over his square
shoulder, Long well past the mid-
dle of his life, the soldier still
carried himself as erect as we an-
ticipated, and there was a twinkle
in his eye as he walked between
the boys shaking left hands with
those whom he had met before, as
well as those he was greeting for
the first time.

He remembered faces easily,
and called names correctly in
many cases.

There was an amusing incident
which well illustrates the sense
of humour which never deserted
“B.P.” all through his life.

Rover Scout Charles Morris,
now a Rover Leader was stand-
ing next tome as “B.P.” came
down the line’. I got my firm
hand-shake and then “B.P.” paus-
ed and looked at Charles with a
emile on his face.

“All those service stars” he said
pointing to the twelve years’ ser-
vice stars on Charles’ shirt. “This
chap seems to have been a Scout
before me,” he chuckled.

This was characteristic cf the



Tickets Overworked
At Kensington

THE Advocate was in receipt of
complaints yesterday that the
majority of ticket-holderg in the
Kensington Stand were unable to
claim their seats as these were
occupied by people who did not
have the tickets with the numbers
corresponding and in some cases
those occupying the seats did not
have tickets at all.

It was suggested that some
“after they had gained

outside and others had entered
with the same tickets.

In an interview with the cricket
authorities it was learnt that
precautions will be taken today to
ensure that every one in the
Stands wear their tickets and that
they sit in seats that correspond
with their tickets,

—

Inquiry Adjourned

THE inquiry into the death of
50-year-old Donald Gittens of
Chatterton Road, St. Michael, was
further adjourned by Mr. A. J. H.
Hanschell, Coroner of District “A”
yesterday until February 23

Gittens suddenly took ill at his
home on January 1, bui died be-
fore he could reach General
Hospital.



the

boys and girls.










LADY BADEN-POWELL

And
same

founder of the movement.
his wife was cast im the
mould,

Big Rally

Later that day there was a
giant joint rally at Queen's Park
where Lord and Lady Baden-
Powell addressed the Scouts and
.Guides of Barbados.

The Governor Sir William
Robertson, the Island Commis-
‘sioner, the late Sir Frederick

larke, Mrs. Heidenstam wife of
the Police’ Commissioner and
Miss Daisy Yearwood Girl Guide
leaders were among the huge at-
tendance and it was an historic
occasion.

Both Chiefs expregsed apprecia-
tion of the welcome accorded
them, appreciation of the work
cone for both branches of the
movement, and urged one and all
to greater efforts.

It was gratifying to hear the
Chief Guide say on her visit 21
years after that those appeals
had not fallen on barren ground,
much has been done, but there is
yet opportunity for much more to
be done,

May “Thinking Day” help one
and all to think more about
Seouting and Guiding.

TH

Oo
°

z continued to bowl from

me

FRESH SUPPLY OF

PURINA HEN CHOW

(SCRATCH GRAIN)
SH. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distsibutore Mi
BEBUERE SEER

Frank King bowled to Hunte
from the southern end, He played
the first delivery and square cut
the second for two runs, He drove
the fourth delivery to long off
and ran 4, Ganteaume having to
run from cover point to the
boundary. He was beaten by the
next delivery the ball just missing
the stumps. The next ball he
on-drove for 2 and played out the
remainder of the over.

Jackbir continued from the
northern end and with the last
ball of the over beat Marshall
with the pace of the ball and
bowled him for 2 with the score
at 10. It was a maiden over.
Marshall was at the wicket for 15
minutes, Clyde Walcott was the
next man in and Hunte faced
King from the other end. The
batsman edged the third delivery
dangerously to Skeete at second
slip but cover drove the fifth
beautifully to the boundary, He
singled the seventh to the leg side
and Walcott repeated the stroke
off the next ball for another single,

Facing Jackbir, Walcott on-
drove the second ball for 4 and
played out the remainder of the
over,

Jones Bowls

Next over Prior Jones relieved
King with the score at 20, and
bowled to Hunte. The batsman
hit the sixth ball nicely to square
leg for 2 and singled the next to
cover, , Walcott played out the
over, Jackbir continued from the
northern end and Hunte cover
drove the fourth ball powerfully
for 4 to bring his score to 20. He
played out the over. Jones con-
tinued to Walcott and had the
ball, moving nicely away from the
wicket. Clyde hit the seventh de—
livery to square leg for 2 and
played the next.

Hunte then faced Jackbir and
after playing seven balls hit the
last high but safe to the square
leg boundary. Each batsman made
a single off Jones’ next over.
Hunte faced Jackbir and turned
the fourth ball neatly to the fine
leg boundary. He cover drove
the next and beat Ganteaume at
cover point for the ball to go te
the boundary. He played out the
over.

The score was now 41 and
Ferguson came on in place of
Jones from the Screen End. He
sent down a maiden to Walcott.

the other end and each batsman
made a single in the over, The
bowler was mixing his deliveries
well and the batsmen were takin:
no chances. In Ferguson's nex
over Walcott on-drove the fourth
ball to the boundary to bring the
score to 47. He _ then cover
drove the sixth to Legall, The
fielder failed to stop the ball and
the batsman got 2 runs, The
batsman played out the remainder
of the over. Hunte made a single
off Jackbir’s first delivery tc
bring the score to 50 in 66
minutes. Walcott off-drove the
fifth ball for 4 and on-drove the
next for a single. Hunte played
out the over. Ferguson conceded
one run in his next over and this
was made by Walcott. Jones now
came on from the Pavilion End
and bowled to Walcott with the

score at 57.
A Boundary
The batsman on-drove the

second ball to the boundary, but
the next delivery was a “beauty’
which Walcott just managed to
dig out of his wicket. No more
runs were scored off the over,
A single went to each batsman
off, Ferguson’s next over, but
Hunte cover-drove the last ball
high to Skeete who failed to
take the catch. Hunte was now
34 runs. A single went to Wal-
cott in Jones’ next over.
Ferguson's next yielded 3 more.
Jones’ first delivery in his next
over was to Walcott who hit the
ball to the fine leg boundary.
He singled the third ball. Hunte
hit the fifth ball neatly to square
leg for a brace and played out
the remainder of the over. The
luncheon interval was now taken
with the score at 74 for 1, made
in 90 minutes, Hunte being 37
not out and Walcott 34 not out,

After Lunch

On resumption after lunch,
Ferguson bowled the first over
from the screen end to Walcott
who took a single to fine leg off
the fourth to send up Hunte who
off drove beautifully to the

boundary and then played out the
remainder,

Frank King bowled from the
pavilion end to Walcott who
furned the second beautifully ‘to

On page 8



E FAMILY SOAP

Gets skin really clean
Banishes perspiration odor

© Leaves body sweet and dainty

Ode: kes a deep
mild: and sootia for face,
baths, Odex

“fece Maods and. daily

is ideal for family use.

4



CAREENAGE
CONGESTED

FOR the past two days, the!
Careenage was very congested
Schooners and motor vessels have
been steadily arriving with car-
go from other West Indian is-
isnds since Sunday, but have
been finding no berths available
fer: them to discharge their
cargoes.

From the latter days of last
week, the Careenage was already
getting crowded, having litfle
veom for subsequent arrivals. it
hes now come to the pitch where
some eight vessels laden with car-
go were lying in Carlisle Bay
because there were no berths for
them in the Careenage or inner
basin,

Some of the vessels brought
supplies of fruit, chiefly bananas,
plantains and oranges. In order
to avoid their spoiling, the crews
of the vessels had to bring them
fsom Carlisle Bay into the Careen-
age by row boats.

Port authorities had the head-
ache of arranging the shipping
activities in such a way that all
the pogsible space in the Careen-
age was filled in with vessels. At
sume points, vesels were lying
two abreast,

Britain, U.S. Make

New Kashmir Plans

From Page 1
provided that due account is taken
of geographical and economic con-
siderations—subsequent boundary
adjustments in areas contiguous to
the frontier of India or Pakistan
in which the vote is overwhelm-
ingly in favour of the party with
the minority of votes in the state-
wide plebiscite.”

He would also take into account
the possibility that different de-
grees of supervision of the func-
tions of Government might be
appropriate for different areas of
the state,

The representative would be
linstructed to report back to the

ecurity Council when arrange-
ments for the plebiscite might be
put into effect, or im any case
within three months,—Reuter.



Holiday In U.S.A.

TODAY the birthday of George
Washington, one of the most
famous figures in Americar
History is celebrated all over the
United States and in all American
territories as a National Holiday
February 12 is the birth day of
another famous American,
Abraham Lincoln, His birth day is
not a national holiday. It is kept
as a holiday in some of the 48
States,



HOTEL DAMAGED
BY FIRE

The roof of Enmore Hotel, Col-
lymore Rock, caught fire last night
about 7.50 p.m, and was slightly
damaged. The hotel is the pro-
perty of G. C. Hards, The Fire
Brigade under Capt. Grant went to
the scene and put out the fire.

The people of the hotel had al-
ready begun to use a garden hose to
help put out the fire and the Fire
Brigade did not have much diffi-
culty. The damage is covered by
insurance,



In The Court For Divorce
And Matrimonial Causes

IN the suit of Neville Seymour
Sainsbury, Petitioner, and Estre-
lita Anne Sainsbury, Respondent,
Mr, G. B, Niles holding the papers
of Mr. E, K. Walcott, K.C,, in-
structed by G. L. W. Clarke and
Co,, Solicitors, appeared for the
Petitioner,

Mr. W. O,.

Haynes, Solicitor,

appeared for the Respondent.

His Honour, Sir Allan Colly-
more, pronounced the decree nisi,
and made no order as to costs.

of a cold 4

fdeal for use during the day.
Easily recharged from Vapex pvecle.

’
vim co 110: exer

«aroot *
wt ee



















COUGHING

IS DANGEROUS

Every time you cough
your lungs are strained,
and your heart is over-
worked. Stop YOUR
cough by taking VENO’s
COUGH MIXTURE! ‘This
world-famous remedy
stops coughing, makes
breathing easy, soothes
away soreness,

and protects the lungs.



























































The IDEAL
FAMILY REMEDY for
: aes * BRONCHT

MISS ARDEN’S Personal Representative is coming

FOR THE FIRST TIME

to give you the same wonderful
TREATMENTS AND CONSULTATIONS '

as in her famous London Salon, A Treatment makes
you look much prettier, feel so much younger. We

know you'll want to book an appointment at once |

Commencing Monday, March 5th,

for three weeks, at:

KNIGHTS LTD.

33, BROAD STREET
BRIDGETOWN

FOR THE BEST |





A BEASTIFUL
@ASY-TO-CLEAN >
) FLOOR COVERING

‘SILVER STAR’
CONGOLEUM

INSIST ON

SILVER STAR

SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES





sos cs fOr Brides



WHITE STAMPED
SATIN
36” wide. Per Yd. ........ $2.63

OYSTER STAMPED
SATIN
36” wide. Per ¥d. ....... $2.93

PLAIN CREPE SATIN
in heavy quality for
Brides
Wear.

36” wide. Per Yd. ....... $2.45

or Evening

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.,LTD.

112 &

13 BROAD STREET



renner neni
PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1951
™ eee rears A “Have you heard about
f
upert on and the Blue wank Ps i and Bs — ind







:
an
tr
bd
ps)
O
CG
a
ae)
tri
Dp



Dow’? Miss Our on a long-planned
guting or party .. . when Paradol
quickly helps to relieve periodic





ES IT

clung | if floating upwards, and a muffled vowe tells him tuat inn he has his breath back waves him off. “ No fear, Pee a
Poe ft oe aveiel ‘ z any- his pal sale in anqiec tt<, so he ft turns ee pal and grins. enough,’ he declares. _ *? might | Pains, ee bong vn Abe
Sispg waril he touches the branches begins to clamber dowim very care- ‘Well, that really was a weird fyapoen again. I'm going home.” down orjafter-effects entifically
cia tall sree, There he cluches a fully. The hetle pee reaches the eka happen,'’ he says, ‘‘ but we . So Rupert starts his search alone. compounded from 4 ingredients
snc bough to prevent humselt from ground before him and looks up don’t seem to be any the worse For a long time he Paradol is exceilent for headaches,
going any higher, Gradually the — shakily. “| cold you queer chizigs for it, I’m dying to know what through the weod without too. Get Dr. Chase's - Paradol
‘iting ceases, «md he finds he is able were happening in this wood,” says caused the warm wind that sent any hing. He does not notice a y—the “Dr. Chase” is
to wm ameng the branches. He Pong-Ping. “Now you se whae us up into the air. Come on, let's strange figure is watching him A toda name 3 a
calig ug anxiously to Pong-Ping. I mieaat. ea try to find out.” But Pong-Ping on ind a tree. your assurance.
DR. CHASE’S
isiisiin e ° PARADOL

ager! and the — Pirin ops ane the Blue Firemans ——— ex Quick Relief from Pain me

Be ~ " aR



LES
( 187s: good

a oe

YOU DESIRE THE
BEST TEA — SO USE



SMALL USER | ADVERTISE



True old saying, “YOU cant



" STOPPING THE TIDE

: a : = = stop the tide,” however good

_ Rupert wolee on in the deonien } om. top. With great excitement “And what wee a little bear help ae was happening’ your intention. WE find that
fy warm wind came. that a number of little Hoe be doing here prying into my ot what the blue fireworks ie as much as we would like to
Tully, wy on 8 someching queer on 9 Zowecks are scattered neat it. affairs?" asks the stranger Dut Fil go away if you like. keep our prices stableti, the

ver the " he Te “No,” says the man m |

the: gone, ‘ oe oe # = a aha os plan ag me J severely. “* Please, F didn't meanany ++] have other plans spe eqnatant peecin. ie prices

discovers a tind of blackened _ Suddenly a voice from behind makes harm,” says Rupert in a nervous Picking up the round obj "Tren Of CUP TEW matsniate sores He

grass. In the middle isa curious him curn sharply. The strange man voice. “* We saw qenebedy Teng the ground, he returns to where a ‘ | to revise some of our prices,

round object pierced with many meer phat come forward and is frowning ing oe cough balloon = 5 nt s = vn lying, picks it up too ; rd a s i ¢

i and with a a _very_unfriendly .wa t in a sort of whithwi and marches Rupest firmly ~ way pr. bay Rum still .. ic.

eal eclee knob _on him in y_ y Ways ond Tve fgund this, Eoouldn's . through the thick wood, « ax } No, 3 bay Rum still .. 30c.
ow Limolene Highergrade 60c.

” Mentholated 72c.

IT IS GOOD TEA. | tee
|
|



Rupert a and the Blue F ‘rework —I 0 Rupert and the Blue Firework—I1








Mentholated 30c.

Floralene 6 oz, ...... 30c.

3 oz, ;

Cologne BOB ii cd nen 24c.

In spite of the increases our

products are still best value
to-day.

On sale at all good stores.



Seen PE TF







nn





aes not like being there is my house. [| built it pote re than ever. “ They'll

Ru
marched off so suddenly. “* Where cially for what I'm doing.” In



The strange man takes Rapert to

be here soon. I've no rime to lose."
are w taking me?" he asks e hollow of the forest Rupert can an irom table and gives him some !
shaki “I'm not going to hurt pa a curious ane building — sandwiches and a glass of milky man “a ' Foas more the

fou, ite bear,"’ says the man, all its windows igh - Ina few “You will need to be stroma tor geher grimly. "simply can'r stand
e

‘but you've seen too much already minutes he is insi house is ‘ 7 do,"’ he b
and if you want me to explain what filled with a low buzaing sound and Ses ey Sere “ 6 9 ioe gonewee)

t what am | going to do?” ie called a FPoglifter,



rth on,
is happening you'll have to come machines of differene shapes and pu a ;

sks the litle bear, And what I'l) show you everything.” And

\ and help me finish my work. Look, sizes are in every room. ne Whbse reitaad for?" “I's he leads him away (o some steps

Javember," says the man more and an underground workshop,

Household
mune e ec 2 Bln Ft irewon rk—12 isupert and the Blue Firework- -13 Requisites ney MEAT DEPARTMENT
ee am! | PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF: In Roast,

Dip: (Permanent





Starcher) ............. $ 06 FOO as ccsisiescath incase. A7
’ Drift Soap Flakes Quaker Oats ............ 52 Steak, Stew.
$50 .24 bain” i
Allson‘s R. Oats ...... A8 VEAL: in Legs, Roast, Stew.
Rinso Soap —— 58 23 Water Corn Flakes 24 nf
aie MUTTON: in Shoulders, and Chops.
Premier Soap Flakes .o0................. ‘ fhie
wey te 23 "6 jon 35 LAMB: in Legs, Shoulders, Chops.
Switching —- : 5 Di Ss OO Seiidsinesnniaae
points to a hted at tall seus hie Wye ie var" wy he 4 The inventor comes back fo ane | oke that strong wind Flakes 28 Quak Stew.
head. ‘That's the first of my Ae and hurt yous afterwards.” fears. one, otal ae we m; he ho fs ‘ vere ageeadls, ag bakoientdioteass f er Oats ....... ss. 22
rename he: mays. * Tha's-2 " Look here,"” he says. wa Tice oon wonlin ‘age for, They're the key to it. dew come te the tap of che Lux T. Soap (per OX TAILS . TRIPE e KIPPERS - BACON
most powerful new lifting gas in some nore round s like the the whole idea,"” he says. “There's txerse vid ht finish exsfa.ting Cake) once 16 :
there. it will litt fog or leaves or one I saw on the gtound, and there some of my new lifting &i pressed = Sings." He leads the frie bear and HAM (Sliced)
“ne't ea oo pa bike aa not Sas oa Sale Be aca ing ind v7 Na th ree tee in Mane as wary ~ you tat ome > Palmolive T. Soap
cries Rupert, Ge eth, if you is oe >, BS pe che wh “hey Tiss: Mee ate very powerful, much?” Y ashe Rupert. S| (per Cake) .............. .16 SALAMI SAUSAGE, Per Ilb..._—$.1.00

Bouquet T.
Soap (per Cake)... 23
mepert and ae ao Firework—14 Rupert and the Be Firework—15 cin” ate

Soap (per Cake)... 92

e Extracts &
Pickles and Sauces Sanenenty.

Rovril .... $1.60, $ .60 $ .49





Morton’s Mixed
Pickles .......00.......... $ .56 Marmite .97, .60 .30
| ‘ "= pagans Chow UE ass ii ficasibiiccss, 1.62 .85
Rupert is impatient to hear how clear it.” He bustles about, puts When he has fastened his fur "You had one like that when you er ang repo a Ground Ginger ........ 68
the’ ‘inventor lets off his done * a mules and a woolly cap, aud jacket the mam goes down from me found me in the wood." ‘“ No time Morton’s Pennie... . SB
ut when they reach the top room an ae wa one. to explain more new,'” says the adros Curry .......... .
b hen th h th 2 =o fur naar 4 4 don't and of the plai th M dros Curry 76
the man gives a start, and stares at tens ee fog,’ +e plait ony id objects, mans sure that it wh gruff. sak by be e Morton’s Silverskin.
the windows in the ceiling. ‘Look where Pm . f°" it's very cold fll a diectisns. ‘Then T Then he pk beet eee, i The fog ownte inte Onion ........ceesesseee 71 Bisto (for Gravies), 33
up there,”’ he cries. ‘“‘It's fog, indeed." t id bi
real fog. It must have come since seca says Ruy a ‘May fapeens to his se * aie ~ — ar a Holbrook’s Cocktail Heinz Browning (for
bes on ident et tcnte a = = i and watch how you what is that thing?” asks follow him. _. . Onions oc 59 Gravies) ................ 44

Anchovy Sauce$.55 45 PEARS, ach WE CO D9?

» Lea & Perrin’s Sauce

Rupert and the Blue Firework—16 Rupert and the Blue Firework —17 nag . PEACHES, tx_____—_—«99¢



| Custards & Desserts ee Wines APRICOTS, 16 & 3/1 ¢ |
J} came omeg Dom mam GRAPES, ta____ 334,



Ice Cream Powder... 1.23 Grand Mariner ........ 7.50 7 ‘
Se aa ;
Chivers’ T. Jellies... .22 Nolly Prat : GAUY AS, ti 5] ¢



‘The inventor marches quickly bear waits and listens, For a — - - ~—
‘forward, and Rupert wonders if he time nothing happens, and_ the nae waits and trembles, come quite clear so that he can
wonderin,



aught to go too. ‘May | .come world seems quite. still. Then vg if he is to be carried see right into the wood. He Hartley's T. Jellies... .20 ti 43
once more he hears the fizzing up into the air as before, and he watches the mist as it rises higher R 1 a
with rate i ete re has nearly preared in the fog Gradually it swells to a roar, and relief he is ee only A few jn among the trees. ‘* That Powder 16 Bols Genever Gin 3.00
his tin comes back faintly. again it is followed by ‘a mighty and then drops back, ‘| say, invention has worked waedesiole. 3 va

you mi; ee Jost if things \ wind, Leaves and twigs are flying look what's happening to the to he thinks, “but he himself hi ¢g

ta right. u’d better stay round the little bear, and next It's going up,” he mowers. And. disappeared. Where can he ha
use, So the little moment he is blown right over. sure enough, the air below as’ be» gone so quickly?"

ee









- Owing to delay caused by irregular shipping services the |
Advocate regrets that it has been' compelled to curtail its daily |

-eartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all available strips |
as they arrive will be appearing in this space.







ee






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY



LASSIFIED ADS.

22, 1951

TELEPHONE 2508



ape charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of werds up to 50,

3 cents per word on week-days 3a
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.










FOR RENT
Minimum cherge week 72 cents and

96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 2
Words 2 cents © word week—4 cents &
vs.









HOUSES ;
WHITEHALL — on February 21, at her} Gift Shop, suitable tox Flower on a
residence, Bridge Cot, St. George.| Greens Counter, Apply in writing to
Mrs. Samuel Whitehall. Her funeral] the Secretary, Mavfair Gift
i D the ~~ Tee at 4 . gn
Dm. today ‘or : ugustine
ay T Whit hall id )
mue e| (widower
nian chao Uline, Lioyd, Suel PURLIC SALES
Whit : ¢ r) Ten cents per agote line on us
n Alleyne (Nephew) and 12 cents per agate line on 3,

Marjorie Arthur (Niece),



IN MEMORIAM

WALCOTT—In loving memory of our
dear Gertrude Ophelia Waicott who
fell asleep Februany 2ist, 1946.

ys and moments quickly flying
Blend the living with the dead;
Soon will you and I be lying
Each within our. narrow bed
The Walcott Family, Orange Hill,
James.





FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 vents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.



AUTOMOTIVE

Sallie hnreniaisnittmiaccioemanshtie

AUTO CYCLE — One Norman Auto
Cycle. Good condition. Owner leaving
shortly, Dial 3939,



17.2.51—6n.



minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

AUCTION



921 BAGS D.C. SUGAR

By recommendations of Lioyds Agents
Wwe will sell on FRIDAY the 23rd at 12.30
o'clock 921 bags Dark Crystal Sugar at
the following places.

S. P. Musson Son & Co, Ltd., Bridge
Street, Jones & Swan, Fairchild St.
H. Jason Jones & Co., Hincks Street,
General Traders Ltd Roebuck St. Plan-
tations Ltd. Bay St.

Sale start 12.30 o'clock
Warehouse, Bridge St.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers.
21,2.51—2n,

at

I_ will sell at

Me
GARAGE on FRIDAY, 23rd at

2 pt,

Musson s | estate are requested to settle their ac-
counts without delay.

ne | Qualified executors of the will of Samuel
ENEARNEY’S | Henry Howard Streat, deceased.



PUBLIC NOTICES

Tea cents per agate line on weel-days
12 cents per

and agate line on ve,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.



is hereby given that the undersigned
Laan, La oy ys has this
HAT" carried on by us at Dottin’s Alley,
wh, and that the said wil

be continued to be carried on by the
——- SAMUEL VICTOR ASHBY
Dated this 17th day of February, 1951.

s 7 cox,

335 For

@ From Pagel .
now rested for g Barbadb:
in a more ible positi
Hunte assisted considerably with
a drive off King between
open mid-—off and extra cover
for and next over a misfield
with foot by Prior Jones ga
Walcott a welcome four past mi
on.

" A hovel cares Siva off Speer

or ave

2 ame cove SU

a e

wicketeger cute and
n

cone a

‘ort to catch the
Choon & his hand
but to hold i

ASHBY.
21.2.51—3n.



Howard Streat, late of Bloomsbury
plantatiun in the parish of Saint Thomas,
who died in this Island

of January 1951 are required to
send in particulars of their claims, duly
attested, to the undersigned Gordon

Oswald Hamilton Harding,

ard Streat and Hilton Seale, the quali-

fied executors of the will of the deceas-

ed in care of Cottle Catford & Co., No.
, Bridgetown, on or before

the 28th day of March 1951, after

date we shall pyceed to distribute the

assets of the said estate among the par-

ties entitled thereto, having

have had and
that we shall not be liable for assets so
distributed to any person of whose debt
or claim we shall not have had notice
at the time of such distribution.
And all persons indebted to the

Tang
eg ball

to
t. Hands flew
into the air and there was much
speculation as to whether it w
a catch. A checkup with U:
Cortez Jordan who was ‘ at
the time revealed that if J
Choon had held the ball, Hun
would not have been given out
since in his opinion the ball struck
the pad and not the bat.

Hunte whose cricket and crowd
pleasi powers increased at a
tremendous rate as the inni
got older, hooked a full toss from
Jackbir to the deep square }
boundary for four and got into the
thirties with a oe dri
oo sone Ned ‘toe tel ume =

joni e throug
the first half contins: came in
an hour’s time and Walcott who
had been restrained for most of
his forty-five minutes ‘stay at the

Dated the: 23rd day of January 1951.
Gordon Oswald Hamilton Harding,
Oswald Howard Streat,

Hilton Seale

24.1.51—3n,





_ Tet peteat eee teria SALCom aa wicket took four runs off Fer-
baci For Od PE ae moe eo RCH foe Beat execute brine Ove
as . r vate or use,

condition, 22,000 miles, Apply: Manager, * se tei. NOTICE drive off Jackbir for aaa
Marine Hotel. 23.2.51—3n . 18.2.51—4n, PARISH OF ST. PETER





CAR—One 1947 Mercury Sedan, done
22,000 miles, in perfect order (S.52)
Apply: Howard King, Taitts Plantation,
St. James. Ring 91-30. 20.2,.51—2n,





CAR—Singer 10 H.P. good condition,



TENDERS will be received by the | POUNdary.

undersigned for the following up to

Ferguson troubled Hunte with

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Barbados Score

9 Wkis

He had two chances, one at
{34 and another at 44 but his
jinnings as a whole was one of
the most promising entries into
Intercolonial cricket as an open-
ing batsman that I have seen in
Barbados for many years.

Hunte had been at the wicket
for two and three quarter hours
and had hit nine fours.

Nine Sizzling Fours

Weekes hit nine fours all around
the wicket to help hoist the
double century in 182 minutes
and two balls after executed a
powerful ondrive off Skeete to
complete his individual half
century in 38 minutes. Weekes
had now hit ten fours in 51.

Seven runs later Denis Atkin-
son, who had partnered Weekes
was out to a fine return catch to
Skeete. He came down the wicket
and drove a well flighted delivery
back to Skeete whv readily
aceepted the catch.

Another wicket fell before tea,
that of Eric Atkinson. He played
over one well up from Skeete and
was bowled for 13. The score was



ngsjnow 231 for 5 and Weekes was

65 not out when the game stopped

eS ifor tea.

Brilliant Dismissal

A pull stroke .by Weekes in
which the brilliance of its execu-
tion was overshadowed only by
the magnificence of the effor
that made it a catch, brought
about Weekes’ dismissal.

He got into his wicket and lifted
an inswin with the new ball
from Jackbir to deep square leg
Legall anticipated well , dived
and held the catch but had to
leave the field as he fell heavily

|
\
|
| M.V. Sedgefield, Sch. Marea Henriet-

stmerererenoeisesianpinsicie-aumppeninatniidindsiedes
UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the
Insurance Company I will sell on Friday
February 23rd at Fort Royal Garag2,

5 good tyres, new battery. Price $500.00.| St. Michael's Row (1) 146 Austin 10
A. G. Seale, Central Livestock Station,| H.P., (1) 1937 V-8 Ford Sedan. Both
Pine. Phone 3495. 22.2.51—2n.| demaged in accident. Sale at 2 p.m.

—_——

CAR—One 12 H.P. Vauxhall in good
condition. vy be seen at Straughn’'s
Garage, Roebuck Street. 20.2,.51,—4n.

CAR—One (1) Rennault 8 H.P. Apply
R. M. Farmer, Fairy Valley, Ch. Ch.
.2.51.—3n,

FURNI E

FURNITURE — (1) Mahogany Vanity
dresser, (1) Wardrobe, (1) China Cabinet,
()) Ice box, (1) Simmons double bed.
Dial 3939, 17.2,51—6n.





MECHANICAL

SINGER TREADLE MACHINE—206K10
for plain sewing, buttonholes embroidery.
Fractically new. Owner leaving. $250
for quick sale which hundred below
current price. Dial 8266. 22.2.51—1n.

MISCELLANEOUS

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel,
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n.

CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and
draj es. By Kirsch, Dial 4476 A.
& CO., LTD. 13.2.51—tf.n

GALVANISED SHEETS. A_ limited
juantity 11 ft. 0 in. x 2 ft. 6 ins; 24 gauge
Ivanized plain sheets at $5 74 per sheet.
pply Eckstein Bros. 17 2 51.—3n,

Sees cele aeiegee oer ade egesiegetdaaees
MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin:
guished solution







:



>oe



movable partitions. Dial 4476
& CO., LTD.
13.2.51—t.f.n.

TWO HORSES, HARNESS and one (1)
Cart. Going cheap. Apply: S. FB. Cole
& Co., Ltd. Roebuck Street.

21.2.51—t.f.n.

VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirsch Sun-aire
ail metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to
your sizes, delivery 3 weeks, Dial 4476
A, BARNES & CO.,LTD, —13.2.51--t.f.n.

WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower-
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.
a cut to your requirements. G, W.

'UTCHINSON & Co., Ltd. Dial 4222.

15.2.51—10n.

WALL PLAQUES — With figures 'n
relief of specially beautiful design. $3.08
wards. Y. De LIMA & Co., Ltd., 20
ad Street. 17.2.51—Tn,

WANTED

Minimum charge week 2 cents and

96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24

is 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays,









HELP

EXPERIENCED ACCOUNTANT capable
assuming Office Management. Apply
letter only not later than February
26th stating age and giving references.
Electric Sales & Service Ltd., Tweedside
Road, St. Michael.

|



Fg



A COOK OR MAID nobody without
réferences need apply. Mrs, Massiah,
Merton Lodge, Collymore Rock.

22.2.51—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

Empty JEFFREYS BEER
complete with inner rtitions at 24c.
each—delivered to the Warehouse of S. 1’.
Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. Pierhead.

18.2.51—9n





cartons—



BOTTLES — 50,000 empty, white, plain
three-gill bottles packed in bales of 1b

13.2.51—10n.

IMMEDIATE CASH for diamond jewel-

, old China, silver and Sheffield Plate.

cre —, et ee en ten ad-
oyal Yac u

em * 20,2.51.—T.F.N.

IMMEDIATE CASH for broken Jewel-
lery, gold nuggets, coins, miniatures, jade,
Old BWI Stamps. GORRINGES,
Antique Shop. Dial 4429.

20.2.61.—t.i.n,

WANTED TO RENT
HOUSE, BUNGALOW OR FLAT—

Pasa, Nese ht AB Pe

TAKE NOTICE

~%



i









Terms cash.
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer.
18.2.51—4n,

I will offer for sale by public com-
petition at my office VICTORIA STREET,
on THURSDAY 22nd at 2 p.m. ALL
THAT certain piece or parcel of land by
estimation 2,000 square feet at PINFOLD
ora wore cr eee and wooden

uu thereon, House con-
eine enone tae room, kitchen
downstairs, 2 bedrooms upstairs with
running water, W.C. and Bath, electric
light, large enclosed yard. For inspec-
tion and conditions of sale apply to

R, ARCHER McKENZIE,
Dial 2947. 18.2.51—4n,





pointed the Church Boys’ School, near
the Parish Church, as the place where
all Parishioners of the Parish of
Philip and other persons duly qualified
to vote at an:
for the said

REAL ESTATE



“DUNSINANE”

COUNTRY, ROAD, ST, MICHAEL.
The residence lately occupied by Mrs.
W. ©. Collymore.

The house stands in well kept gardens | °f Prnest an Gecepsed.

and grounds (2 acres 3% perches).

The whole comprises verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 5 bedrooms, one
with marble bath, 2 showers, 2 lava-
tories, convenient kitchen and pantry,
reoms for 5 servants, garage for 2 cars,
and stables.

Water supply for m and grounds
from a well with mill; water service in
house and also servants rooms (shower
and lavatory).

The residence completely wired and
furnished with electric iighting from
the company’s ins,

House convertible into flats and out-
buildings convertible into a cottage

The land is suitable for develop-

March 8rd (Saturday)

11) The supply of Fresh Milk in bulk for

his spinners. He did not seem to
get them on the volley. In an
effort to relieve himself he lashed

in doing so.
Weekes took 80 minutes over

@





ing will be held on Wednesday,
Feb. 1951 at 4.30 p.m.

the Almshouse
12) The supply of Fresh Meat for the
Almshouse
The supply of Medicine and Drypes
for the Almshouse and outdoor
patients
The conveyance of paupers
(a) To and from the Almshouse to
and from any part of the Parish
(b) To and from the Almshouse or
any part of the Parish to and
from the General Hospital.

out at a well flighted one on the
off-stump and raised the ball.
Skeete at cover got one hand tu
it but failed to hold what would
have been a very smart catch.
Mid-Wicket Conference

A word of advice from Clyde
Walcott after a short mid-wicket

(4)

(5) The puna % Pauvers to thebeonference helped things and
emetery om ie imshouse oF any
pare of ti tone Hunte gradually settled down
G. S. CORBIN, once more.

Signed
Clerk of the Poor Law Guardians,
St, Peter.
22.2.61—4n.

When play stopped for luneh
Barbados had scored 74 for the
loss of one wicket in ninety
minutes. Hunte was 37 not out
and Clyde Walcott 34 not out.

The batsmen were in a happy
mood after resumption and both
Walcott and Hunte took bound-
aries off Frank King and Fer-
guson. Walcott scored a boundary
with a powerful backdrive off
Ferguson for four and completed
his individual half century in 83

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST, PHILIP
VESTRY BYE-ELECTION

I hereby give notice that I have ap-
St,

Election of Vestryrmea
arish may assemble on

Monday Sth day of March 1951 between|Minutes. This included eight
the hours of 10 and 11 o'clock im the} fours.
morning to elect a Vestryman in place First Century

P. S. W. SCOTT The first century was hoisted

Parochial Treasurer, |soon after this in 104 minutes.

es oe Hunte made his second mistake

t .|when he edged one from King to

Jones in the slip and got a life.

NOTICE aor oe me =, to his in-

lividua a century with a

ee EAR «boundary to extra. cover off
Owing to there not being @ quorum at oe. He thad now been
of ve ation. i

x Wednesday, rob. ‘Mist, 1951. The meet- atting for 127 minutes and his

scoring strokes had reached the

th
rs boundary no fewer than seven

ment or kitchen gardens.

The un will offer the
premises for sale % public auction at
their office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the
February 1951 at 2 p.m.

Inspection on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days only between 3 and 5 p.m.



23rd day Of! phat it is the intention of the Vestry
of the parish of Saint Michael to cause
x be introduced into the oye“
‘is Island a Bill to amend the Parochial

FOr OTTLE, CATFORD Bab, .° | Employees Pension Act 1944 (1944-14), as
COTTLE, a ae A amended by the Parochial Employees
4.2 Bi dore Pension (Amendment) Act, 1947 (1947-5),
“| end by the Parochial Employees Pension



at} (Amendment) Act, 1948 (1948-19), and
oo Smee Wiersma elas| "se" arate "Pence

(Amendment) Act 1949 (1949-20) and the

isi ar’ oe ee ae Parochial Employees Pension (Amend-
The dwellinghouse called ‘“Murray] ment) Act 1950, (1950-13) authorising the

Lodge” with the land thereto containi Vestry for each of the several parishes
Be eediesalls 9,200 . feet, Sint of this Island, (if they consider it ex-
Upper Bay Street, St. Michael, the resi-] pedient so to do) to continue to pay “|
dence of the late A, C. Greaves. the parochial employees who have retired
Inspection by appointment with Miss] or may hereafter retire from the service

Ida Greaves, Telephone No. 3060.
For further particulars and conditions| and on the terms and conditions set out
of sale, apply to :— in the Parochial Employees Pension Act
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO} i944 (1944-14) as amended by the

20.2.51.—10n.{ Parochial Employers Pension (Armend-

The parcel of land containing 1,685) ™°"" A er Var be SEALY
squmry fen tm ne Bus, tereo|souitors forthe Venn of he Bara of
si . . ? in ic b
joining the property of the Barbador
Telephone Company Limited. and at pre-
sent occupied as to part by the Observer
Newspaper and as to part by Miss Cado-



\the

Sgd. C. W. CUMBERBATCH, times.
Asst. Secretary. Jeffrey Stollmeyer made a
Sole phan ond Fives | on Skeete
or the first time, Ss proved
TAKE NOTICE immediately successful. He

tempted Walcott into crossing a
shortish leg-break and captured
fg valuable wicket for Trinidad.

alcott mistimed and put up a
catch to Tang Choon, fielding at
widish midon, who had to run
about ten yards to make the

catch,
Crisis Knock
Walcott played part in retrieving the fortunes of
game for Barbados, He
scored a much needed 77 and with
Hunte had put on 125 for the

of such Vestry an allowance at the rate second wicket.

Weekes received a great

ovation as he went in to partner}

Hunte and obliged with a late
cut for four, a cover drive for
andther four and an on-drive
for a third four to send up 150

20,2.51—2n. |iN_as many minutes.

Hunte pulled one from Jackbir
to the square leg boundary for



his scintillating 75 that included
thirteen fours.

Goddard and Norman Marshall
aut on 29 for the next wicket
sefore another successful bowl-
ng change by Stollmeyer saw
Ferguson beat and bowl Marshall
with a well pitched leg break
for a plucky 23. Marshall had
hit the only six of the day.

Some characteristic batting by
mark reached in 265 minutes with

his own contribution being 30.
A useful effort by Hoad that
earned him 24 before he was
bowled off the pad playing back
to a googly from Skeete saw the
score reach 322 for 8.
Millington’s arrival at ‘the
wicket made it easier for the
Trinidad fieldsmen with Skipper
Goddard now at the wicket as
well, as they were two left-hand-
ers, Millington only made a couple
before he crossed a perfectly good
length ball from
was bowled.
Mullins scored a single off the
first ball he received and skipper
Goddard too. Mullins played
out the over, the last of the day.
Barbados, at close of play on
the first day had scored 335 for
9 wickets. Goddard had carried
out his bat for 43 and Mullins 1
not out,
rf ~

Ferguson and



Victoria Win
Cricket Shield

MELBOURNE, Feb. 20.

Victoria won the Sheffield shield,
Australia’s championship cricket
trophy, by beating West Australia
by eight wickets today,

Earlier in the day, New South
Wales, the holders, beat South
Australia by 10 wickets in Sydney,
and Victoria had to win outright
to regain the shield,

Scores:—West Australia 126 and
103, Victoria 182 for 8 declared
and 49 for 2 wickets.

South Australia 207 and 233.
New South Wales 398 and 44 for
no wicket,—Reuter,

a

Welcome To Visitors

G oddard

And
S tollmeyer

sale, apply to:—
COTTLE

consisting of a centre room
feet square,

gan.

The property will be set up for sale at
our offices on Thursday, 1st March 1951,
at 2 p.m.

Tspection by application to the ten-

ants.

For further particulars and condition of

CATFORD & CO.,
No. 17 High Street,
Bridgetown
* 14,2,51—12n.

One Wooden Buildii
about 1
with windows and doors,



BUILDING —

surrounded by a verandah of Pine about
22 ft square, the entire building cover-
ed by a shingled roof. Further particu-
lars Dial 6105.

17.2.51—4n,



BELT—Sunday afternoon at Central

Police Station during parade, Brown Vel-} seen on application at
vet Belt with ornate Silver Buckle.

Re-
turned to Advocate Office.
ward if return o $09.51 Sn,

—
TINTED GLASSES--Pink-rims. Between
Goddards and Ocean View Hotel. Call:
Sam Lords. Reward. 22,2.51—2n.

PERSONAL

ving eredit to my wite DULCINA TAY-
Vv; credit to wil ao
Eo ines Harrow) tt toon not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
cise contracting any debt or debts in





my name uniess by a written order
signed by me. ‘
Sed. JOSEPH TAYLOR,
Parris Hill,
Joseph.
2.51—2n.



That SCHENLEY

Inc,
a corporation and existing

rganized
That STAVERT, ZIGOMALA & CO.| under the laws of the State of Delaware,

LIMITED, a Company registered under
the Compamies Act of England, whos?
trade or business address is 6, Minshull
Street, Manchester 1, England, has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of cotton piece yoods,
rayon piece goods ami woollen and
wool amd cotton piece goods, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 20th day of
February, 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be

seen on application at my office

Dated this 19th day of Februat
H WILLIAMS

Registrar of Trade Marks
20.2.51—3n-

1951

United States of Aanerica, lace
turers, whose trade or business address
is 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, State
ot New. York, U.S.A., has applied for
the registration of a trade mark it
Part “A” of Register in respect
of all potabie alcoholic bever-
ages including whisky, gin, brandy,
alcoholic cordials and rum, and will
be entitled to register the same alter
one month from the 20th day of
February, 1951, unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office

Dated this 19th day of February, 195!
H WILLIAMS
Registrar of Trade Marks
20.2.51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
BULOVA

mpany,|Off a shortish one outside the
gr poe ‘pametnes woes the/stump and pulled the ball on to
few York, United) his wicket.

INC., a corporation or;
Jaws of the State of

States of America, whose
business address is 630 Fifth Avenue,
City of New York, State of New York,
U.S.A., has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A" of Register
in respect of watches, watch move-
ments, and parts thereof and watch

trade or

cases, bracelets and chains for
watches, and fastenings therefor made
wholly, in part of, or plated with

precious metals, with or without jewels,
precious and semi-precious stones, par-
ticularly used for the parts of watches,
wrist bands, bracelets, straps for
watches made of leather, imitation
leather, fabric and fabric cord, and will
be ertitled to register the same adter
one month from the 2Ist day ot
February, 1951, unless some persom shall
in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade fees can be
my office.

ated this 19th day of February, 1951,
- wi of rade Mark

istrar of a arks.

foe 21.2.51—in,

TAKE NOTICE
ESQUIRE

That ESQUIRE, INC., a corporation
organized under the Jaws of the State
of Delaware, United States of America,
whose trade or business address is 65
East South Water Street, City of
Chicago, State of Miinois, US.A., has
applied for the registration of a ‘trade
in Part “A” of Register

of publications, magazines,

particularly maga-
zines issued monthly, and will ba
entitled to register the same after
one month from the 2ist day of



February, 1951, unless some person shall | |

in the meantime give notice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.
Dated this 19th day of February, 1951.
resis of Hn Ma
istrar of irks.
~ 21,2.5%—3n,



VACANCY
@

in],

four but was out in the same

over, He attempted a square cut names as popular in cricket

as GAS for Cooking.
Se,

GOVERNMENT NOTICE







ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence)
(Amendment) Order, 1951, No. 2 which will be published in the
Official Gazette of Thursday, 22nd February, 1951.

21st February, 1951. 22.2.51—I1n










NOTICE

The Public is hereby noti-
fied that

Canadian ‘Catelli’’
Macaroni

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

" POSITION
OFFERED

LADY with some knowledge
of Cash and Accounts want-
ed for our Office.

SALARY $40.00 per month.

Johnson's Stationery

ee "

IF YOU WANT
A house paint, a roofing paint, a wall paint,
















is again obtainable
at all grocers.
' 21.2.51—3n





EIS Ss



@ boat paint, a dull paint, a bright paint,
a paint, ‘an expensive paint, m

THE CE EMPORIUM

Cnr. of Broad Street & Tudor Streets
CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Proprietors



Real Estate Agents—Auctioneers—Surveyors

JOHN M. BLADON

An excellent opportunity AF.S., P.V.A.
awaits stenographer desirous
of obtaining permanent em- (Formerly Dixon & Bladon)
ployment with attractive Connections in ‘
remuneration.
Kaus tos U.K.—CANADA—U.S. A. —VENEZUELA
Bradshaw & Company, Before buying examine our extensive lists of high class
© P.O. Box 228 % Property and Land located in all areas
& 22,2.51—6n % "Phone 4640 —! : Plantations Building
% x sea
| 6662S SOOO STUS







1

Harbour Log
IN CARLISLE BAY

ta; Sch, Mary E. Caroline, M.V. Vaga-
bend Prince, Sch, Emeline, Sch
Franklyn D. R.. Sch. Timothy A. H
Vanstuytman, Sch. Wonderful Counse!-
lor, Sch. Rainbow M, Sch. W. L. Puni-
cla, M.V. Daerwood; Sch. Harriet Whit-
taker; Seh, Turtle Dove; Sch. Moll N
Jones, Sch. Emanuel C. Gordon, Sch
Belqueen, ss. Factor; Sch. Rosarene
Sch. United Pilgrim §., Sch, Lindsyd I



PAGE SEVEN
'
i r . “From 6 s 0 rs) st i-
Newcastle United | ,o0°°% oir, Supporters | stand

good but we shall show Newcastle
that we have justified our place in
the last fights”, said Tann.

Favoured To Win
| English F.A, Cup

Stan Seymour, Newcastle direc-
tor, was just as optimistic. Only

LONDON, Feb. 19. | one club, he said, had beaten New-
In the First Division Newcastle} castle on their own heme ground
United at odds of 5—2 have re-|this season. That was harm

placed Blackpool as favourites to] who turned the trick on Novem-
win the English football Associa-| ber 12

tion Cup. They got the nod from
bookies after drawing the home | Sunderland has continued its

S ; ° -draw-luck, gaining
Sch. Mandalay IL. game for the sixth round on/ Tun of cup: w .
ARRIVALS February 24 against -the only | ground advajtage for the fourth
Sch. Island Star, 37 tons net, Capt.lremaining third division club, | Successive time. They meet the
Joseph, from Trinidad.

M.V. Athelbrook, 286 tons net,
Cook, from Trinidad
M.V, Caribbee, 100 tons

Gumbs, from Dominicia.

‘n Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Capt

net, Capt

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd advise
that thay can now communicate with
the following ships through their Bar-
hados Coast Station: —

ss. Clarkes Wharf;
ss. Alcoa Pennant;
Atlantic Seaman;
ss. Kansi; 5,5.

88. Mormacland;
ss. Cottica; s.s.
ss. Imperial Toronto;
Fordsdale; s.6. Tampan;
8, Tamapoa; s.s. Ciudad de Maracaibo
8. Exso Hartford; 4.6. Paula; s.8.
Nieuw Amsterdam;
8.8. Jean Lykes;

s.8 Ioanian Pioneer
ss, Golfito; ss. Gas-
cogne; ss. Thebon!; 5.5, San Virgilio:
s Libreville; ss. Labraule; ss. Mu!-
berry Mill; s.s, Aleoa Patriot; ».s. Chesa-
peake; s.s. Vulfrano; s.s. Myriam,
Byfjord; s.», Bonite; «8. Sun Prince;
$6. Pioneer Isle; 8s. Lampania; s

Bewoll; s.s. Bulkoceanic; 6.8, Esso Arubs
8.5, Telamon.

Benn 8 p.m.

RATES OF EXCHANGE

PEBRUARY 21, 1951.

8.8



highly fancied Wolves, the only
team from the first divisicen they

Other cup survivors were quoted ; have had to battle in five rounds.
as follows: Blackpool 7—2, Sun-

Bristol Rovers.

derland §—1, Manchester United) In winning the cup in 1987,
6—1, Wolverhampton Wanderers | Sunderland by a_co-incidence,
7—1, Birmingham 10—1, Fulham /defeated Wolves in the sixth

| round.
In the other sixth cound ties
Although Bristol nas been hard | Manchester United visit Birming-
hit by injuries, Manager Bert Tano' ham while Blackpool take on Ful-

12—1, and Bristol Rovers 100—1



said his club is not dismayed ham.—C.P
ee ee





MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, |

ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
{(M.A.N.Z. LINE)

M.S, “TONGARINO” is scheduled to
sail Adelaide January 24th, Melbourne
February $th, Sydney February 17th,
Brisbane February 23rd, Arriving at eee
eee end of Mareh, 195), oat

ig vessel has ample space for Hard
SAILINGS TO

Prozen and General cargo.
ENGLAND & FRANCE

FRENCH LINE

Cie Gle Transatlantique

Cargo accepted on through Bills of



- yith vent ”
G4 9/10% pr Cheques on | for British ‘Guianc, Barbados, Windward | {| COLOMBIE: March 11
Seman Tee ee pr, | 2d Leeward stands. via Martininque and
ad ta iad Sight Drafts @2 6/10% pr For further particulars apply — Guadeloupe
64 S/i0% ‘pr. Cable FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. and $3
63 4/10% pr, Currency 61 4/10% pr Da COSTA & CO. LTD, GASCOGNE: March 31
50% pr. ae ae er sw via St, Lucia, Martinique,

Tanrier Outpointed



Guadeloupe, Antigua
[Se SE, 4

The M’‘V “DAERWOOD"
eccept Cargo and Passengers for

will

SOUTHBOUND

St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba, | COLOMBIE : Feb. 28
and P ger only = for St " ‘ -
LONDON, Feb. 20. Vincent, Siting Wednesday 21st Trinidad, La Guiara,
inst Curacao, Cartegena,
was outpointed over eight ree The ae ig eel wo | Jamaica
. - peept rgo and amengers for
by Joe Lucy, the London: light Denviniion, Antigua, Montserrat, Accepting Cargo, Mail
weight, at Streathamace Rink, Nevis and St. Kitts. Salling,
London, tonight. Friday 23rd inst, Passengers
From the outset Lucy was on athe. fh. “MARY & CANO. th
the retreat, but he scored con- : ce eee we eee
. : : . P.orrengers for Dominica, Sailing
tinually with right jabs, Tanner Medtneday fist. inet. R. M. JONES & (0., Lid.
having difficulty in overcoming his -
“southpaw” stance. Bw, FA feat one AGENTS
Tanner tried to land a knock- Tel, 4047. 7 ; Phone 3814
out in later rounds, but Lucy,
though flustered, was able take) Ee

out of treuble and _ retaliated
strongly in the last round to gain
the decision,-—Reuter.




Keep your lavatory spotlessly clean, It's
simple, Shake some ‘ Harpic’ into the bowl,
leave overnight, then flush. ‘Harpic’ will
clean and deodorise the whole pan —even
where no brush can reach.

HARPIC

RGD.

THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER

GRASS MAT
FOR BEDROOM
$1.01 EACH

THANT'S




DIAL
mo6








The above equip-

ment is available for

early delivery from

the U. K.

COURTESY
GARAGE

| ROBERT THOM Ltd.

Allan Tanner of British z












Alcoa *teamahip Co.

NEW YORK SERVICE







SS, “Myken” sails 3rd February arrives Barbados 6th March
5.5, “Seabreeze” sails 16th May arrives Barbados 27th March
an a a a panne ee ‘
NEW ORLEANS . SERVICE
S.S. “Runa” sails 15th Februan arrives Barbados Ist March
S.S. “Alcoa Patriot” sails 7th Mareh

arrives Barbados 23rd Mareh
SS





CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship





SAILS HALIFAX ARRIVES BDOS
“ALCOA PENNANT” February 9th February 20th
8. “ALCOA PARTNER” February 23rd March 6th
“ALCOA PEGASUS” Mareh Sth March 20th
. “ALCOA PENNANT" March 23rd April ard
NORTHBOUND
§.S. “ALCOA PENNANT” ., Due March 5th Sails for St. John &

Halifax,
ee



These vesseis have limited passenger acoommodation,

ROBERT THOM LTD.—Now Yorw and Guif Bervice.
Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Canadian Service.



PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, for satl-

ing to Europe, Tae usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.







ne ra



ALCO A OCEOCOOS

MASSEY-HARRIS
EQUIPMENT

the

cordially invited for

the

Enquiries

of following—

supply

42 B.0.P. 6 cyl. DIESEL WHEEL
TRACTORS

(Steel Wheels also available for
Ploughing)

GRASS CUTTERS =— 5 & Git
MANERE SPREADERS

SIDE DELIVERY RAKES
FEER MILLS

FERTILIZING



DRILLS

2


PAGE EIGHT

Skeete Takes Four
Wkts. In Ist. Match

gle, while Skeete’s yielded 14 in-
cluding three boundaries in suc-
cession by Weekes, an on drive,





@ From Page 5
fine leg for a brace and then got

a boundary wide of mid-off. 4 pull to square leg and an off
Walcott took another boundary drive.
this time to the left of Skeete at Jackbir continued from the
square leg and then took a single screen end to Weekes wite was
to mid-on to make his score 46 now 44 and the batsman gat en
and the total 90 easy singie-to muitc-on off the
Wailcttt powerfully on drove seventh. Weekes off drove Skeete
one from Ferguson and the ball jo- a Gdup'e to send up 2CO0 on
vas beautifully stopped by the tins in 182 minutes. He later
aralli. The batsman however back drove one from this bowler
Hot ingle. Hunte got a single powerfully to\the boundary to get
off the next and later Walcott his 50.including 10 boundaries in
cover drove one which Skeete 38 minutes, Weekes got a couple
missed and the ball went to the wide of Tang Choon to send up
boundary to give hm 50 includ- Atkinson who drove back the
ne 8 boundaries in 83 minutes.,, mext to the bowler who took a



The fourth ball from King was hard low return to dismiss him
wide on the leg side and the for,4. ‘ -
wicket-keeper failed to hold. it, The total was 207 and Eric
the ball going to the boundary to Atkinson joined Weekes and was
send up 100 aiter 104 minutes’ Quickly off the mark with a pull
pay. Walcott on crove King to tO Square leg off the last for a
the boundary and later Legall on Shee ee then faced a maiden
the fine leg boundary fielded ee pis oe athe ae
brilliantly to cut off another boun~ _ id ae att Sey ease Wicd
dary from Walcott. The batsman at mid-wicket off Skeete and
eventually got. a singie Atkinson got one to fine leg.

‘Weekes then took another one to
mid-off, Atkinson took a short one
to mid-on and Weekes got another
single with a similar shot.
A Chop

Weekes chopped one down to
gully off Ferguson for a single
and Atkinson got an easy single

Ferguson continued to bowl
from the sereen end and Hunte
pulled his second to square leg
10° a brace to make his score 44
end then played out the remainder,

Walcott took a single to fine leg
a short one from King to send



cn i i
re “s foana’? , to mid-on. Atkinson narrowly
P _ : wee Mt arene oe missed being run out when taking
s by ‘ee # te co aaa single to square leg off Skeete
clivery, The batsman tam 6°' Weekes got a single to long on

a singe wide of mid—wicket and
iater Walcott got an easy singie
to mid-off. The total was now 112
with Walcott 60 and Hunte 45.
Walcott tickled .one from
Ferguson to fine leg for a single
and Hunte got another to back-

off this same bowler to make his
score 59 and later Atkinson got
a brace to square leg.

A_crisp square cut by Weekes
off Jackbir was nicely stopped by
Tang Choon, but the next ball, a
lovely off drive found its way to

ward point. Ferguson’s next the boundary. Weekes then sin- ‘ . ; Q
delivery resulted in a single, a gled to mid-on and later Atkinson the boundary to make the total
powerful off drive by Walcott. cover drove for another. 293. He toek a sharp single to
Hunte then playel out the re- Atkinson beat Jackbir with a Mâ„¢id-off off the seventh to send up
mainder hard cut off Skeete which went Hoad who survived the last,
Walcott singled King’s fourth to the boundary to enter double Goddard pulled one _ from
delivery to mid-on and Hunte figures and then got a single to Ferguson to long on for a single
acain played out the remainder. mid-off. Weekes got a long single and later Hoad back drove this
Ferguson continued from the to mid-on, but from the last ball bowler to the boundary and then

sereen cnd and bowled to Walcott before tea, Atkinson was bowled took a couple with a late cut to

who got a single wide of square om ee oe he missed one senq up 300 in 265 minutes.
leg. Hunte then cover crow. oo yell + UD. one had Goddard took a single to mid-off
Ferguson beautifully to : ve wickets were of King and Hoad ot another,

now down for 231, with Weekes 65

C 2 is 50 including
boundary to get his re

7 bouncaries 1n 127 minutes,

A lovely off drive off the first
ball from King’s next over, gave
Walcott his ninth boundary out of
his score of 68. He then got a
couple pasi point. An uppish but
safe stroke by Walcott gave him
another couple and later he edged
this bowler to the boundary to
make his score 76 and the total

this time to mid-on and Goddard
did likewise. In Ferguson's next
over, Goddard got a single through
the slips to send up Hoad who
lifted this bowler to the off
boundary to enter double figures
and then singled to square leg.
A Life

King’s next over yielded a

single which was scored by Hoad

On resumption, Norman Mar-
shall went out to the wicket with
Weekes, Prior Jones bowled from
the screen end to Weekes who
took a single to mid-wicket off the
first and later Marshall pulled a
short one to the on boundary for
the first six of the day to open
his account, and later got an easy

aa single to si

Ferguson’s next over Was a *' 8! square leg. p
aiden the third for the day— | With the total at 239 Jackbir i d
to Hunte. took the new ball from the screen nical t

end and sent down a maiden to an urs
Walcott Out
vi e total at 133, Skeete from Jones beautifully to the UW b 4 t ah
Fe aac on from the pavilion boundary and then glanced this n ?a en
end. He bowled to Walcott who bowler for another boundary.

Marshall took a single to cover to
send up 250 in 225 minutes, but
later Weekes hooked one from this
bowler and Legall fielding on the
boundary ‘after covering some
good ground brought off a magnifi-
cent catch to end his innings of
75 including 18 boundaries in 80

singled to long on. The batsmen
then ran a leg bye and later Wal-
cott pulled at one from this
bowler and Tang Choon who was
fietding at mid—wicket, took a
good running catch to dismiss this
batsman with his score at 77 in-
cluding 11 boundaries in 127 min-

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G.
Feb, 21

the second day’s D.T.C. New
Year meeting concluded at Dur-



utes. This partnership had yield- minutes, race unbeaten. for the meeting.
ed 125. Sa ae of ae at

The total was 135 and Everton Goddard In cating on iden abet ee pred
Weekes the incoming batsman, ! the lead tor the D.C ane
played out the remainder of | Skipper Goddard filled the A big surprise came when S -
Skeete’s over. breach and saw Marshall pull one |... Back : r ae he ms nth

Hunte took a single off the first from Jackbir to the long on Soni fe ee ome wi Nn
from Ferguson and Weekes boundary and then got an easy ontgomery second. Combinc

paid $615.00 on a $1.00 forecast

square cut to the boundary and ,
: ‘ ‘ ticket,

later on drove for another, Each
batsman then singled and Weekes
again reached the boundary with
a cover drive which beat Legall
(fielding in that position, 150 then
went up on the tins in exactly 150
minutes.

Weekes

come to mid-off to make his score

Marshall got into his wicket and
pulled @ short one from Jones
to the fine leg boundary and then
took an easy single to mid-on.
Goddard broke his duck with a
nicely placed shot past gully for a
single and went up to face Jackbir,

PEBRUARY STAKES

(6 Furlongs) Class B
Ist. SANDHURST (Joseph) 136 ibs.
2nd. SUNNY GAME (Sunich) 126 Ibs,
3rd, MISS SHIRLEY (O'Neil) ‘@1 Ibs.
4th, GALLANT MAN (Gobin) 124 Ibs

Time 1 min, 17 2/5 secs.
JUVENILE STAKES

on drove the second he (6 Furlongs) Class H

; 5 i i. Jus P P 1) 19
received from Skeete for a single He cover drove the third delivery ws) | DY CHANCE (ivonnet) 124
and later Hunte got a single with for a couple and later got a simi- , 294. SURPRISE PACKET (Gobin) !24
a similar shot. : Ibs.

lar amount with a well

shot to square leg,
Marshall took an easy single to

mid-off and Goddard square cut

placed “gra. FLYING STEP (Beckles) 124 Ibs
4th. SLY FOX (Lutchman) 129 Ibs.
Time 1 min. 20 secs,
NEW YEAR HANDICAP
(Mile and Hundred Yards) Class F

Jackbir was now brought back
from the screen end and Weekes
greeted his first delivery with a
powerful cover drive to the boun-

; the next to the boundary and then Sunic
ha aan, ane, cent a hee t ya Ist. JOLLY MILLER (Sunich) 128 Ibs.
9 A gene ma Le ond got a single to fine leg to enter 2nd. BLACK SHADOW (Gobin) 126
misoft | 3 ne oe to Sthe double figures, Marshall off drove 3". ORMONDES BATTERY (Naidoo)
up Hun who play : 116 ibs
famainder: ~ a single and Goddard off drove 4th. BIG BOY (Lutehman) 108 Ibs.
Weckes on drove the first from Pe ine the er ae aes Time: 1 min, 56 secs,
Skeete to the boundary and then ith the score at 275, King was , d
took a single wid> of mid-on, breught on vice Jackbir from the ‘e Purlense Cleo
Hunte drove past the bowler to Pavilion end. He howled to Mar- 1st. BTOILE DE FLEURS (Sunich)
the boundary and got a brace to Shall who got a single to mid- | 114 Ibs,
fine leg off the next. wicket off the second delivery. 2nd yen KITTY (Lutchman)
Weekes who was now 24 with Goddard stopped one in front of 3:4, GALLANT MAN (Joseph) 112 Ibs,

him and the batsmen ran a quick
single. Marshall also got a single
off the last, a short one from

4 boundaries, added another one
to his list when he pulled the first
he received from Jackbir’s next
He got a

4th. SWISS ROLL (Lutehman) 118 Ibs
Time: 1 min. 19 secs,
DIRECTORS HANDICAP

(6 Furlongs) Class G

over to the square leg. King, to fine leg, Ist, SURPRISE PACKET (Gobin) 122
single to point to send up Hunte * Ibs.
who pulled the next to the square Marshall Bowled and, MONTGOMERY : (Hutphaien) "106
leg boundary. Ferguson replaced Jones at the — arq MOR? ELIER (O'nei!) 112 Ibs.
screen end with the total at 279 4th. ORMONDES BATTERY (James)
Hunte Out He bowled to Marshall and beat 126 Ibs

Time: 1 min, 20 secs,

Trinidad got their third success
when Hunie played on the fourth
from Jackbir with his score at 63

including 9 boundaries in 165

and bowled this batsman with his
first delivery. He had scored 23
including 1 six and 2 fours in 40
minutes.

PRESIDENT HANDICAP
(6 Furlones) Class E

C } and, JUST REWARD (Joseph) 134 Ibs

minutes. 7 Hoad the next man in got a 3rd. GOBLIN (Lutechman) 116 Ibs.
The total was 178 and the bats- single to fine leg off the first, ball | 4th. ANNA TASMAN (Yvonnet) 124

men had put on 43 in 21 minutes. he received. Goddard got q couple Ibs. y.

Denis Atkinson filled the breach a Time 1 min, 19 4/5 secs

through the slips and then took
a single wide of mid—on,
Facing King, he off drove the

THE GUIANA HANDICAP

(1 Mile and 100 Yards) Class A
Ist. SANDHURST (Joseph) 138 Ibs.
2nd, DOUBLE LINK (Forshaw) 136 lbs

and played out the remainder.
Weekes took an easy single off
Skeete and later Atkinson pulled

this bowler to the square leg first to the boundary to make his oa. MA SOR ee ae ibs
this s a 3 ‘TER is
boundary to open his account, Score 24 and‘ then placed one be- jy.

Jackbir’s next over yielded a sin- tween second slip and guily to Time 1 min, (51 sees.

By Jimmy Hatlo |





| ‘They'll Do It Every Time
ete TT



Registered U 5 Patent Offtee













































CH “Y
Arete, YOU CAN SAY BOSWELL THERE WON'T YY wilo DIGS UP THE

| (1M THE JERKIMER BLOWFISH“ARTIST, \/ BE TIME FOR A 7 GUESTS FOR THIS

| ANNOUNCER ON WORLD TRAVELER,BIG-GAME }) PROGRAM=JUST |/ PROGRAM SOME

| THIS FORUM HUNTER, AND RACONTEUR=» (\ THE COMMERCIAL [ MEAT PACKER ?




AND HIS INTRO-
DUCTION’

PROGRAM, MR.
BLOWFISH - WHAT
i WOULD YOU LIKE
ME TO SAY ABOUT
y YOU IN MY
INTRODUCTION?

AUTHOR OF’RED CHILBLAINS? WHAT HAMS 1!
“OUTSIDE TIMBUCTOO™: AND
"MAGENTA MIDNIGHT-MEMBER
OF THE TYPHOON CLUB,

FOUNDER OF -**s









8105

HE WON'T
OPEN HIS YAP
WHEN HE'S ON








Ame | iN

; Listenine TO THE

FREE GUEST BLOW HIS |
OWN HORN»

THANX to ED BILL,
386 474 AVENUE,
NEW YORK

9-8):







Sandhurst scored a “double”, as

‘st, BLACK SADDLE (Gobin) 134 lbs

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



HES OUT

THIS is the stroke Clyde Walcott made to end his innings at 77 yesterday. H
by Tang Choon off Skeete. ” . moor

to fine leg. Facing Ferguson,
Hoad, lifted one overhead for a
single and Goddard pulled to
square leg for another. Moad got
a boundary with ag pull to.the mid+

wicket boundary and later on
drove for another. Hoad had a
“life’ when Asgaralli dropped

him near the long on
with his score at 23.

Skeete replaced King at the
pavilion end and bowled Hoad off
his pads with the total at 332.
Hoad who was at the wicket for
31 minutes, scored 24 including 3
boundaries.

boundary

Millington the incoming batsman
got a single to square leg and
Goddard singled past gully.

Ferguson continued to bowl
from the screen end and Goddard



Footballer Fined
LONDON
Bobby Flavell, “ace”. Scottish

footballer who went to Bogota las:
year, has been fined $420 by the
Scottish Football Association and
informed that he cannot play
again in Scotland until next sea-
son.

Flavell, an inside forward or
left winger, played for the Million-
aires Club in Bogota after sud-

ban Park, to be the only horse to denly leaving the Hearts F.C.
—I.N.S.

re

|

Washing-up
ts done in .
half the time

with Rinso!



And Rinso is
Perfect for use
' in washing
machines !

|
;

JA

i
VARESE SS

START THEM OFF





brilliantly, caught



Zot a single to the right of Skeete

at mid-wicket. Millington got

a

single to fine leg to send up God-

dard who drove the next to the
long on boundary to make his
score 40.

Skeete’s next over yielded
single.

a

The total was now 333 and

Ferguson bowled Millington with

his fourth delivery.

the mar

Mullins’ the
incoming! batsman was quickly off
‘ with an easy single to
mid—on, Goddard also got a single

off Ferguson and the game ended
with the total at 335 for the loss

of 9 wickets.
Mullins 1,

Following are the scores:—
BARBADOS Ist Innings

Goddard is 43 and

R. E. Marshall b Jackbir ........ 2
C. Hunte b Jackbir o20 sopves0. Oe
Cc. L. Walcott ¢ Tang Choon b Skeete 77
E. D. Weekes c Legall b Jackbir .. 75
D. Atkinson c & b Skeete 4
EK, Atkinson b Skeete .. 13
'N. Marshall b Ferguson .. 23
J. Goddard not out . . 43
rE. L. G. Hoad b Skeete . pad
FE.. Millington b Ferguson ... 2
C, Mullins not out ............50.. 1

Extras b. 5, lb, 1, W. 1, n.b1 8

Total (for 9 wkts. .... 335

Fall of wickets: 1 for 10; 2 for 135; 3] \PSSGISSSSSSS9999999999%

for 178; 4 for 207; 5 for 281; 6 for.250;

7 for 279; 8 for 322; 9 fér 333.
BOWLING ANALYSIS

Oo M R
S. Jackbir 18 3 62
By WING «6.00. eee ul : 62
P. TOnes .. 6.50.5 .44+ 10 - 4
W. Ferguson 18 2 89
C. Skeete il - 60

You get whiter whites, brighter
coloureds when you use Rinso!
Rinso’s rich hard-working suds
work through and through every
article, cleaning out all the dirt,
so thoroughly—yet so gently.
Results are always so much better
when you use Rinso in the wash.

RINSO for all
your wash /

X-R 245 800

ew

SSS

aw oes
























DAILY

NRICHED BREAD
The Vitamin Loaf





THURSDAY,
Olympic Flame Is A,
ARTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than
ease these terrible agonies.

FEBRUARY 22, 1951





% ROME, Feb. 20.

The eternal flame from Mount
Olympus, universal symbol of
Sportsmanship reached Rome the
“Eternal City” today on its way
to Buenos Aires for the opening
of the Pan-American games on
February 25.

The torch, lighted yesterday at

A new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives

the Olympiad flame, started its| prompt relief from the pains due to the symptoms of arthritis and
6,000 mallee journey this morning ae , but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
when it was taken on to an Italian| @

airliner which brought it to Rome. |
{t was to be transferred to another
plane for Buenos Aires.

Accompanying the symbolic
flame were two Greek athletes, the
Greek Olympi¢e Committee Secre-
tary and two journalists.

—Reuter.

‘tism, > D
of the rheumatic state’s background. =—__
has oa thoroughly tested in, medical institutions.
DO! is used now with unprecedented success. DOI,CIN
is Babee | by doctors now. And many sufferers have already
cao normal living as a result of taking

LCIN.
Don’t delay. Profit by the serene of fellow-victims of these
pains. Get LCIN t 0

ay. A bottle of 100 precious tablets costs
ony
sy

.BOOKERS DRUG STORES— Bridgetown and Alpha
Pharmacy.















ienebiln caste tociia aaietiiliaieaiaaineiads

What's on To-day FREE BIBLE LECTURES

Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion — 10 a.m.

MAKE YOUR SELECTIONS FRO!
THESE; — ir

Tins Cocktail Peanuts
Bots Cocktail Cherrics

Tins Cocktail Sausages by
ond day of first Trinidad » M
SeeBarkades cricket tour- Prof. R. G. JOLLY
nament .. continues .. at Sandwich Spread of Pa. U.S.A.

Ox tail Soup
Vegetable Soup,
Asparagus Soup
Chicken Soup
Tomato Soup

Kensington Oval — 11.30 Sunday, 25th, 8 p.m.
“CHRIST'S SECOND COM-

a.m.
Christ Church Vestry meet- ING”’.—Why? How? When?

ing — 2 p.m. Carrots, (ait Wednesday, 28th, 8 p.m.
Sale: (land at Pinfold Sirert aes yay ced and whole) “THE JUDGMENT DAY”

with wall and wooden +» Tomatoes | How long will it be? Is it

building) — 2 p.m. Pkgs saueigecge ||] to be feared? Is there any
Mobile Cinema gives show Bete ‘Relat Crdan | hope beyond the grave?

at the “Home” Agr. Stn. At

» Prepared Mustard
Scouts) Welches School, STUART & SAMPSON Auspices of

LTD.

|
1
Headquarters for Best Rum. |



St. Thomas — 8 p.m.
CINEMAS

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA: “The
Lost Moment — 5 & 8.30 p.m.

The Laymen’s Home
Missionary Movement
Admission Free,














































PLAZA (Bridgetown): ‘White No Collection.
Heat" — 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

EMPIRE: “Tarnished” & ‘Prince
of the Plain” — 4.30 & 8.30 p.m.

ROXY: “Twelve O'clock High
and “Deep Waters” — 4.30 &

8.15 p.m,

OLYMPIC: “The Macomber

Affair” and “Strange Gamble”
—4.30 & 8.15 p.m.





The Weather

TO-DAY
‘Sun Rises: 6.18 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.09 p.m.
Moon (Full): February 23
Lighting: 6.30 p.m,
High Water: 4.43 a.m,
4.31 p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington): Nil
Total for month to yester-

day: 11.06 ins.
Temperature (Max.): 81.5° F
Temperature (Min.): 74.5° F
wre Gb mn) NINE. A variety of these
“Sear re pretty Fashionable
| a 29.853". aren and useful items

made in Jamaica





g and guaranteed to
=, - * ~ :
BARBADOS 3 make you 100k
x

MUSEUM ee

K. R. BROODHAGEN
Sculpture and Paintings
MARJORIE BROOD-
HAGEN
Paintings and
colours

1! Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street










8

Water-



WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT OUR
NEW PREMISES IN PINFOLD STREET ARE
NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS.













JOHN HARRISON
Watercolours of Barba-
dos and West Indies
Daily 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

.







Sundays 2.30 p.m.
to 6 p.m.
until 5th March.










We can supply you with...
GASOLINE, LUBRICATING OILS, SPARE PARTS
and ACCESSORIES, also BICYCLES, PARTS
and ACCESSORIES
e
WE HAVE THE FACILITIES to do the SERVICING

and REPAIRS ‘necessary for the upkeep of your car

Paper, @

SUST RECEIVED
A NEW SHIPMENT OF STANDARD VANGUARDS
AND TRIUMPH MAYFLOWERS







FLANNEL DANCE

Under the patronage of
Hon, V. C. Gale, M.L.C,
to be given by
BARBADOS PRESS CLUB

in honour of the members
of the visiting Trinidad
Cricket Team



























at
QUEEN’S PARK
Saturday night, Feb, 24

Music by Percy Green’s
full Orchestra

ADMISSION ::: $1.00
Strictly by invitation only

Qe For further Information call at...






CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LID.

PINFOLD STREET



FOR ALL PURPOSES
“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT

in Cream and Green.
For interior decoration of Walls,
Ceilings ‘atid Woodwork.
“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT
in White
HARD GLOSS TULIP GREEN
PAINT
HARD GLOSS PERMANENT
GREEN PAINT
For exterior or interior use.
| “SPECIAL” HOUSE PAINTS
In Grey, Tropical White, Oak
Brown, Barbados Light and Dark
Stone.
For exterior or interior usc.
CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS
In Grey, Bright Red, Mid Green.
RED ROOF PAINT
” For Galvanise or Shingles,
— PAINT REMOVER

| m For the easy removal of old paint.

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.

AGENTS,














wir






The Sign ot
QUALITY



4456
4267





)
PSS urenteanennmnll lL



2ALO000 00068 LOODL AP ABA NODOOOOOONHNOGOHSOO0OOG Sia,

|




PAGE 1

U.N. Troops Need More Rigorous Training —Gen. Clark TOKYO, Feb. 21. GENERAL MARK CLARK, Chief of the United States Army Field Forces, said today American troops would get more bayonet training in future. Lessons from the Korean War, he said on a visit to the central front, would not change the United States Army's basic concept of war. But hardships endured by United Nations troops had emphasised the need for more rigorous training. The bayonet would feature more predominantly in future training to prepare American soldiers [or the ditlons for the tvpe of warfare experienced in Koiea. Gencrul Clark said the American Acid c. mmandcr in Korea hail thf importance of: TK\TV Norway Will Increase Forces 30% OSLO. Feb. 21 Norway will increase her armed force* about 30 percent within tinnext two years aiming at an armed force of about 270.000 men by Ihe end of 1952. Defence Minister Jens Hauge announced here today. The army would have four field divisions and Ihe air force 11 squadrons including Jet fighter planes. Army, air force and anil-aircraft artillery would be double their present strength. The navy, in accordance with Atlantic Pact plans would concentrate on coastal defence. The United States was supplying ten destroyers. The Government planned to spend up to 80 million kroner on new storehouses, workshops and airfields. Another 200 million kroner would be spent in piling up important industrial raw materials and equipment. Hauge told Parliament. The defence plan was based on the theory of western experts that the main strategic ihir.a t>> northern Europe and to Norwav would come from the south. Demonstrators in the public gallery interrupted Hauge bythrowing pamphlets attacking "Americamsation" into the Assembly hall. Ilauge's speech was held up for 15 minutes while Police cleared them out.—Heater. Special emphasis on training for night flgnUng 2. righting oft roads in v;ugh 'rminlainous terrain. 3 Opcrallng mi wide front* 4 I r .lining WifHw to stay in their foxholes and "hold their positions until enemy penetrations have been knocked IT General Clark said the Army would conduct training in COM places in the United Suites and "try Bo make it a;; realistic and rugged as wc < %  But General Clark said that while taking remedial action " %  must not change our doctrlM <>f training". The General said: "I only wish RiDTO i-*oplicould see the Brand job the United Nations troops arc doing and the courage and itBnv ina they andi*pla\ nig "It Is fl real team—iill MtsDnf, Anny. Navy and AnFur< TbtV tails are up and they have fine morale General Hidgway t Eighth Amu c.rnmanderi has got It buttoned up very nJcet) —Renter. Italy Admitted To U.N. Council LAKE SUCCESS. Feb. 21. The United NatMne Trusteeship Council agreed by 11 votes to none last night to allow Italy to take part in its deliberations, but without a vote The Soviet Union abstained from the vote which gave Italy its first seat in n major United Nations trgan. Italy Is already ;i member of the educational, scientific and cultural organisation and some hcr age In extending non-voting rights to Italy the Council approved the change In its own rules of procedure to allow Italy to take part, especially in the discussion on Somallland. the African territory it administers under Uni ad Nations Agreement, and also on irsues contenting the trusteeship system in general.—Heater. Bute's B.C. Visit Mot Approv<-d By P.P.P. 'From |)iidri OW IBOBTOWN, Hb. II. The People's Progressive Party UBHMd %  .statement today dtsasao(lining the Party with the proposed visit of Bustamante to British Guiana. "We are not opposed lo Hon'ble W. A. IlurtanuuUe visiting III), bur. our party i* Socialist and from the Information at OUT d sposal. we have leorned that Bustamante ond his party are far mm li'int Socialist. Consequently our Jamaic". aAlitUon and sympathies are towards the Jamaican Put} a Socialist programme. n;i the People's National Party. "We have no personal antipathies toward Bustananlc. but on political grounds we cannot invite him to B.C." The statement was signed by Mrs. Janet Jagan, Par!-. B< tarv. • %  ! DAKOTA CRASHES RIO 1>E JANEIKO. Feb. 21 A twin engined Dak I plane crashed and moments Inter ought lire after landing on one a/hoa] in Galeao airport today. The crew of four barely had time to ruh out of the aircraft before it was completely destroyed by flames. —Renter Barbados St*ore 335 For 9 Wkts Britain, U.S. Make New Kashmir Plans LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 21. Britain and the United Slates made new proposals uxiay for tfRUng the three-year-old dispute between India, and Pakistan over Kashmir. They introduced in the Security Council a resolution proposing the appointment of a new United Nations representative to effect the demilitarisation of the state and present plans for a "free" plebiscite on its future. This representative would succeed Sir Owen Dixon. Australian arbitrator who last year reported the failure of his mission as Mediator in the dispute. The new representative would be authorised to take into account IbUlty that any forces EIGHTEEN -YEAR OLD BC.L. player Connd Hm.u TMtarday aisda eU tbi batting inning* for Barbados ssslnni Trinidad Ha made 6 tns bauadary to reach his first 26. initial appearance when he open Here be la seen driving Jone* to Greek Cabinet Faces Crisis ATHENS. Feb 21 The tide ol the Greek Cabinet wit] be decided when Parliament night, prohably on a vote i instability turned into crisis last night when PanayotU Canallopouloi announced in ParUanMDl ih;.l bit PMUlWI Unionist Parly would withdraw its support from the Government. The part) has 37 deputies. The coalition of did I>emocratic Soeialwhieh supports the I5-man cabinet of Prime Ministers Sophocles Venizelos has only 100 of the z.'iii ivniiumentnry seats. The Prime Minister was expected to cut short his tour of Eptrus ind return to Athens todav. He t. cued by the King. The most important Pnrliamentiry groups including the Populists ind the Centre Progressive Group were today believed to be against "e overthrow of the CtJ Some political quarters believed these two parties would either give Venirelos a vote of confidence, or abstain, thus allowing the coalition to obtain a majority by its own voting strength. R euU-r Split lit Ilaly'g KVd Parlies Widens ROME. Feb. 21. j %  %  wing parties deepened today with f 10 new defections in The South, i restitution at Siena, and two expulsions at Rovigno. At Gravina neai Bnti in Southn Italy, another IO krftteta wen reported to have handed their Up cards to the local secretary oTVie ChrleUan Denocrotlc Party. This followed a wave of defections at Gravina last week when 220 leftists broke The total of Gravina rebels ineluded 211 Communists, (Our mem lx-rs of the extreme left-wing Socialist Parly of Pletro Nenni, and live members of the Communist dominated National Astoria: I 1 %  : At Siena, south of Florence. i>r Luiez Fantoccl was said to have rtsigned from the Nenni Socialist Party Me was described as a pi eminent Intellectual figure In local politics. A report from Rovigno said Silvio H.irnchello. former local seclelary of the Nenni Socialists, and Bottan of the party*! newspaper Avaati were expeilcfl from the i itU Roeigno hi the home town of Deputy Giancarlo Matteotu. who yesterday expressed views closely parallel to those of the Communist rebel Deputies Valdo Magnani and Aldo Cucehi.—Renter. Gairy Leads Demonstration IN ST. GfORGE (From Our Own Correspondent) SiX GEORGES, rVb. 21. NOTHING has yet been done to tha public road blocked during the past three days due to week-end rain, despite excellent weather, but thousands; of all categories of unskilled workers and several artisans are idle. Others flock into St. George's from day to day. By 9.30 people were in the market square awaiting Union leader Gairy expecting to march to York House where> the Legislature was due to meet, in order to protest the state of emergency proclaimed yesterday. \ THE •SPOT DURBAN. South Africa. There was a stir in magistrate'.court when Joe Stalin was railed on a charge of being drunk. The magistrate thided the offender with his frivolity onlv to get the dignified retort: 'No, your Worship. 1 told the police my real name — Jue Starling."—V> %  -rented | iteel-hclmetori pi I neons exgreat restraint as the crowd started marching around occasionally following Gairy henever he appeared %  n the scene. Secondary and primary schools in the raph.it w 01 a precaution soon after opening, while later in the duv because of the tumult in tinvi in ity and the possibility of disorder, stores bordering the §OU i were closed. Gairy addressing the cron 1 Ithin a stone's thro*of the World War III Can Be Prevented -TRUMAN WASHINGTON, Feb, 21, President Truman said In a speech today: "We are gradually iippruachlng the position in which I third world war can be preven ted if we have the support and co-operation of nil elements o' the population." All turrent attempts to build n their up men and material was merely an effort to prevent such a war, he told a group of Masonic leaders. Mr. Truman said the moral force* in America must be mobilised 'to prevent the selfishness of certain groups from endeavouring to take advantage of this situation." •Everybody, I do not care who he Is or what his conditions position is, from the President of the United States to the labourer who digs In the trench, must make some sacrifice in order that the wholr country may be mobilise \ to meet the serious situation with which we are faced", he said, —neuter. W. Germany Bans Mom Scientist BERLIN. Feb 21 Professor Frederick Juliet Curie French atom scien'i-i and i'lesident of the World Peace Council, was todajf barred by the West German Government from attending the Council's meeting which evened in East Berlin this morning. He had been refused permission to cross to West Germany, it was said. Opening the meeting Pietro Nenni, Italian leftwing Socialist leader who presided in Joliot's place said the West German Government's withdrawal of tha transit visa for the French Communist atom expert was "a barbarous act to a distinguished scientist" in whom rested one of the great hODM for world peace. Nenni -aid that Jen would not arrive in Berlin in time the closing stages uf the four dav-congrcss. .. —Beater required for the purpose of facilitating demilitarisation and the holding of the plebiscite might be provided from member state* of the United Nations or raised localIn Uie event of failure to reac'i full agreement on arrangement*, the Securltv Council would call upon par'n i "to accept arbitration upon all outstanding pointof difference" I jr an arbitrator or panel of arbitrators appointed >>\ the International Court if *u ilca •consultation with the parties> -JJT"" ."> Miners Trapped CHARLEROI. Feb. 21^ Four out of nve miners, trapped by a root fall about 700 yards be low ground in a coal pit near here yrsterday, wcr, brought out alive by rescue workers during the night. One o' the re'.ued men however died this morning in hospital. The bran of the fifth trapped man. an ami found today. Forty four men were working In the —Reuter New Director W.I. SERVANTS CAN ENTER VENEZUELA -from Our Own Correspondent i PORTOFSPA1N. K liecaus*of indixtrialisatlon pud better pay in factories, Venezuelan domestic servants are re.-i-ted to be fleaai llm %  It is for this reason that WesIndian servants are in demand. Any West Indian aarvatsl permission to enter v but she will have to prove that rhe has already been employe* with a Venezuelan fair, ly concerned Imi>:rlial I'l. hi < %  The res. luttOfl n'mlnded 'Governments and eiiCawrrtHsi concerned" of the prim iplr approved by the %  MV ty CbUTlCtl that "the final dispositon of the S Jammu and Kashmir will iccerdat.-e with the will of the people expressed through an mttrtial plebiscite conducted under the auspices of the United Nattons". The new United Nations reprevould r.e instructed Io consult With the f.i-vernments of India and Pakistan with regard to their difference He t-ould then "effect the dcmilitnri^al.on if UM tatc" and pre*.e:t tl. Il Pakistan detailed plans for on ing out a plebis< i %  "The possibility that although the future accession of I should be decided by ,i %  %  biscite. this should not preclude— • On page 5 P()ltT-OF-Sl'AIN, Cnpuiin E. W. Daniel. Dcimt of Education has been ti-d D'rector. In 127 Capt Daniel acag ITincipal cf Government Training College | opinion and that the Governrni ind in 1934 he was made assistant was suppressing democratic right Director of Education. | —Reuter Barbara Stanwyek Gets A Divorce LOS ANGELES, Feb. 21 Barbara Stanwyck today obtained a divorce from Robert Taylor—a divorce which she testified he requested. She told Superior Judge Thurmond Clarfci "Fhortly alter Mr. Taylor returned from Italy in December where he had been making films he came to me and asked for a divorce. "He said he had enjoyed fi dom during the month he had been in Italy and he wanted to continue to be able to come and go as he pleased without restrictions o: marriage —Renter. 12 BURMESE M.P.'i RESIGN RANGOON, Feb. 21. Twelve members of the Bur •nese Parliament have resigned Government party, Un imtiFiscist People's Freedom l iOaajua to form an independent block m Parliament They claimed that the Leag;i longer represented popular hsence of VI<>I.-IHt u V|i|( if ( Robertson, British Roman */kshmMe Ctiureft asked ahem to return to the market where lie will address them, %  cause he said the authorities warned them about York House Speaking again he said it wai unnecessary to declare a state, cf emergency after two strike m the and he believed the 0MplO>ol were nun** their influence on the acting Governor. Thr-.i T %  i-ame fi-oni Ihe eoti After adJouritTtent .f Lbe l*u islature the crowd still paraded the town expecting to new front iry who said he .iwatted an IntesrVlew w,ith the Governor. With • .luck. th> r. I i rake up, several certain, trudm i distance home when the message reached the | ad k During the interval the dr iv>-strators sang songs. Many members of the publi • despite no opposition from thr workers, are indignant at tne general paralysis and apparent disdain of authority U.N. W arships Pound Norlh, South Korea l KYQ, Feb. 21 United Nations infantr _. urcrafl and warships today Joined n to hammer Communists in both South and North Koreu The latest campaign repor' % %  A Surface and carrier at %  "..k were intensified on both rhr rt-urlda mightiest hatMKoarl hurled shells from (teen in* h fuu on rail and road Installations at Tanchtm. AIR -Sup^rtorts based on (Iki nawa ranged far north of the Sflth parallel Supply and storage cen ties at Kamsaiif{, 124 miles north of ue agtii parallel, were afcM rombed No opposition was met from tighten ur anU-alrcrafl Bal MMth of the parallel were ilao tel l i %  ( HirVON.. Tanks. infnntr> and moton/i.i pahrohi rannd over from the rrartneenl Brinan r.'mmonweslth patrnls southeast of the OH de i want more than three mile ahead without making con tact. r>..uth Koreans on the right flank continued to push north uh%  AN HIVER British patrob tame under heavy lire from th* norlh M they patrolled the suuth bank, eight miles to the north of '(Rher British unitmoved into positions level Seoul Communists stealing across the m bound i Ivei in -et up strong points in Ihe hills behind Uw rnited NaUoni (orce Iran rteU up Americans ranged on Its banks •.-indages will be removed will la , few uays from Mr* Dorothy Mae Stevens. 23 year-old negresa, found froze.i stiff in an alley on February 8. doctors saij here. When the bandages are taken iff doctors will deeua Mr* Stevens w II need skin eft. rraftrnviil* When she was brought to hospital Mis Stevens' tern] uerature was only 64 — the lowest recoraed in medical histfjry in which tha patient I vi\c—Reater U.S. CASUALTIES UP WASHINGTON, Feb 21. American casualties in Korea rose to 49.132 today, an men of 1,087 In a week. Total casualtiej retorted to next of km up to an including February 17 include 7.408 killed in action. 32.2*1 wounded and 8,494 missing action. The wounded total i eluded 853 -ho latsi died of th wound*. The over-all figure RM missing include.! 85 known d"i<< making a total of 8.346 combo', deaths —Reuter. East isit b East Commander in the Middl on a II l-r.i. [ as part of his Mlddli t HI Another motion by the right log lieedotn movemeni imni, thai the Government slimild hsWI goi l',irlianienl.iry ,ip|ival iH-foti Inviting General H Programme LONDON, Feb. 21. HiHam's Labour Ooveu.uwnl today threatened to gaol anyone inciting military reservists lo disobey call up orders The move follows the circulation of a chain letter urging 23S.0OO wartime servicemen to I nore recall for 15 days training l| Bli Hartley Shaw-Cross, A'toinag OeneraJ i,id I'arliament last week he believed the chain letter %  r.' out by a Communlslrun organisation. The new (lovernment Hilt sent to the Commons for approv.il layi down i enaltlea up to *.w.. sassTI iiiipi isonment or a (500 ilii" f >r incitement to disaffection. The penalty would apply to anyone who had possession or control of any document likely to incite neglect of duties under the reserve call up.—Reuter i ThTcn*he two % %  . dcrs most of the raeponalbillt) a) On 1'are 1 Tr.LL THE ADVOCATE THE NEW4 RINO 111* DAY OR NKi|IT Swedes Unwilling To IMoikailf lluBtiia NEW V< d(K Feb. 21 The New York Time* Stockholm correspondent reported today that the Swedish Government bt] n polled to l>e taking %  dim view" of any move to blockade Russia and her satellites strategic raw materials and products. The Swede* fell Ihere wr-n tu good ieasons why Ihey could not accede lo such requests. Namely : 1. The country's traditional neutrality. 2. Its credit and barter agreement with UM Soviet Union plus trade treaties with Soviet satellites such as Poland. But some leading Swedish ini.. i orrespondent reported, saw eye to eye with Washington in this matter. I diah ball bearing concern had already cut its exports of ball bearings to the Soviet to absM unusable for military purposes. %  n of electrical equip* ment and tool machinery would %  the same but i i.ninutment*. he added —Reuter Britain's Stockpiling Programme Will Cost £140m. hrrom our on crrii.dmt> K.C.B.. former Chairman of the teotion should be paid to the way more limited choice than there was LONIK>N, Feb. 71. Advisory Council of the Intergoods can be stored without fear a year ago. For that reason Britain's Stockpiling Programme national Bank. Writing in the of deterioration; also to their -availability" has to be ., for the next financial year beFaaaawUI Times he suggests that prices and to their availability. factor Britain must consider mnln Aj n !" prt L W "L c ,*' *ar should be high on the list of "Sugar stores are better than what can be stored in the exiting C140.000.000. ^ "*" u '''', h,, "^ n Priorities. wheat, and w* .hould the,. steUon M .mvth.ng extr: announced by Mr Hugh (.aitskeil. He points out that stockpiling store more weeks' .ie..nnpii..i. .,1 that can be quickly Chancellor of the Exchequer. cly relieves the task of mersugar than of wheat", says Sir and in some rases-for example It includes approximately cantile marine "under more Arthur 'Such an exti.i .t„re m oil fiie'—s p ecialie < ( ,hipping will £3,fJ00.0OO to be spent on essential haaardous conditions •' It does hot sugar Is then In effect also a wheat set certain limits foodstuffs. But top secrecy surreduce it* importance. reserve since the knowledge that Sir Arthur concludes by sugroiind-s the identity of goods to be For that reason consideration it exists will enaulc us on the outgetting a list ol commodities purch^-cd should be given to the advisability break of the war to allol • ncreased Business interests and Informed ef laying In stocks of goods that of our limited shipping which with advantage fill list includes quarters here %  ussfsarl that sugar are heavy, bulky and cheap. would otherwise have been re wheat and sugar, cocoa, vegetab is almost certain to be li Storage of Gooels quired for sugar to carry whe.it" oils, aluminium, tin That suggestion is supported "oRut he warns that that should Referring to other comnsodltlei rubbei leiim. day by Sir Art! be tha deckling factor. Atho states that there hi l — 'Cf*> "And IVe smoked them ever since!" "You're fu kuoH.Jimm Mir l:.-l lime HI BBSSM I I il was a new ewkluil t tin. n fir i da Maavaar-nd very nice, loe." "Wt ih< our lit*! to ft/tair. i thought po %'d like lh: r. I In v •!• %  seem In give a tleaner and a urnier imr-A-s." "What's the real purpo*e of the filler lip 7 I -uap-e".t.ii'll l.-ll in-lli.il'ihr -i rrl of tlw riajui-ilr flavour." "No, the flavour, *trtt*%e lo relate, tames from Ihe tohacto." gssj discover mglil. David. % *jllxl fws4 dn inlriHliienl me Mnurirr." You are behind ihe times. Nina's bun lyrual about them Jar years." $ 1. for 50 There'll never be) a better cigarette INOIANO du MAURIER THE EXCLUS SOLS ntSTSiaUTOS: ) VE FILTER Tl \ 1MVVF" P CIGARETTE fO.. LTO.. Baior.BTQWII



PAGE 1

i-ACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATK TIU-RSOAV, FEBRUARY 22. Itil Rupert and the Blue Fireivork—6 Rupert and the Blue Firework — 7 uii em M* %  —!! i MI w and %  m-filed v~ >Ua lit. I %  • %  hi. pal i t.tr Ut twiner lie*, tu he LamfaM do.., vnv Uffr lully. The butt pen* reatl.it irit ground Be tore H.m and Mo"I. -f rVadaalj) tha mmtife. %  i Mafe*** . Kuaen "Well. (i.i too i %  .r.M %  lUI III... 0 hagtgen.'' he mi, Ml w %  MM t* be *ii| i ha worn rm dring to know what caaaed OM "ira wind ih.i tern tit up in* the air. Come on. lei'* try M fmd owl-" mil Peng-Ping nf'.tin agaui. In gejtng 1 So l|" inn. H ourch alone. tot i long :une he wander* ihictigh ih* weod without fading •ti) Sing. Ho doe not itauce that • -.irjne* figure M wetchrig Ktta ho ti bah'id I ura. Rupert and the Blue Firework^ fejSjjfe-; Rupan *i.ki on in the direction fro* which the warm wind came. "I!ui:.>. rh*>r*' toene;hii*g queer an '"f grettind over iHaaa." ha %  no.*. !!* hurrrea lerwerd and (itatwojas a rind of Hnk"*d CUM. In tha middle •ound atbiar! p.erotd trail Rupert and the Blue Firework—9 numbar of little f It* ; aaaa true firework, are .uttered mat H. Thu ihould be tha awrit." ha ufi. but what on earth ia it ?" Suddenly a vo.ee Irani behind nuke. him turn thai ply Tha at tinge man hit cone forward and. U fmwning ;erced wi-.h many hat come forward and i* I town ma; wnh a knob__e*JI at hjn ;n a very urthiaiidlT^way. "And vital might a Uila bcaa be deaittg hero pty.i 4 into my if....?" oiJu the tlnaiir teverely. Pleat*. I didn't moan any ham." aayi Rupert in a nerroui voice. "We HO teantbody hang' ."( from a balloo" and than we got caught -n a tort at whirlwind end MIH Iguae. this. I ca-jldt.': help woodenng what wa* happening or what the blue nnewotlu were. but I'll go away if fata Wat.", No." tayt tha man myttanowoly. I hive oihei ptana toe you." Picking up tha round object (mm the ground, he relume to where a btak box it lying, pick. 11 up too end rrurtbe* Rupeei fcraaiy .way Itiraufh ;Sa thick wood, —_— u Rupert and the Blue Firework—10 Rupert and the Blue Firework—11 arc yov taking thakify. Ire f not going 10 lyi ihe man. 1 much already ana > %  yvu -—x %  >1 elplam wli %  1 happer.nK you'B havr ;o come ind help me fimth my work. Look. thakily. you, little "but eoii-ti „t you* and il you 1 •H a curioua tauara building with all irt window, high up. In a lew mitmiei he n innde. The houae • filled wnh a tow buaatng aggnd and machine' of different ahapei and mmmolm**m % ible and t.vri hian eome orawxHa* "d a gUt* 01 milk. %  VOJ wilt need 10 be lining ir •feel yew are go." g to do." he gam R_i whit am I gomg to do 1 bill bejt. %  And *hat 'trie machmee lor >" "li't .enabee." mya iha man more -nywr-o-tf. itun #vf %  They'll h* oere toot'-r -*> mm J> km" "What w II be tie . Hupe-t '• Fog< antwot. the other grimly. I timplY on 1 (tend toei to I'm making a woidertut gS m aalaad a PogUftar. Come o". I'll *how yon awarv'h.ng. And he leadi hm away to tome t-rtta ind an underground work •hop. Rupert and i iilue Firework—12 Svitchinv nn tue light the man flmnit 10 a lnaa metal bjii gajgg hi* head. "'That't the urn of my invention*." he say*. There a a mow ixiwertut ne••limg gat in Ihtre. It wul nt| fog o leave* or aliythtng." On. pleatr. n that what .itted Pone-Ping and me ?" t.iea Rupert. Very likely, d you itupert and the Blue Firewo rk-13 TS1 Ha > iht o lucky II yourtalf aftcrwirdi." t end Rupen pau*e. t *ay*. There are aotne more reHind ihine* like >he one 1 aew on the gtaund. end ihcre are loud bhae fimwoiki .< around it. Do tel me mSff hey •ta l*r." ihu.k you mgh: eed what the Mue Ar*> wotka'aio loe. Ihey'rr | the whole idea." he tayt. "TI •mi ot my new litt.ng" g.11 preteri* ight m each ot ihem. when th:? go off they foeee it ot: in all dint tni. They art very cowertm hi that fAMg wind km il ffeead*. he gai .. mat .t N* eo-T' M -rUp ^ [• lw,>*t -. viv" Ha "da ih%  . inaa, .r-.. fc'l *bllm1lM. -,!i win J e ^ie-.Fg me m %  u;h?" atht Rupen. Rupert and the Blue Firework—14 i ww Rupert and the Blue Firework—15 Rupei: it impatient to hear how ikemvenoot lei. orT hit firework*, but when ihry reach the top room the man givet a tun. and uarei at the window* m the ceiling. Look up there." he trie*. ll'a fog. rail tog. It main hava cone tincc are arrived. Ar laal we cm ate ,t my new btnml to really worki :o clear ." He bati,. on a eauMer and a woolly cap. and then a ihick fur |ackct. "I don't like ihe cold weather and I CtM'j bear the IOR." he murmuri, "and where I'd 9'"% "'* W "T "^^ indeed." Il ell toun.ii tetnoly r*,.ue. tayt Rupen. "May I I with you and watch Sow >-ou ii?" VVhem he km*, laawned hit nor Itckec ihe man opeo earwn trom the top room and camaaet ona et ihe round obftat*. auii( >uie that n ii full of the blue ntewewfct pom*irl m all direcimtaa. Then he ptckw up a thallow Hjuare heat which ha laateni to hit back. "Oh. pleat*. whatt ta -hr. thing?" aaJu Rupen. You hid one hke that when you found me m the wood." No ime lo eaplain more now." taya ihe man gruffly;. I muot be off." When all m ready he opena ihe fiont door. The log twirl* into the houee but he atop* nraeght on*, and Rupert deaermirvm m toOw him. Rupert and the Blue Firework—16 "Km L-_'j'.. .Rupert and the Blue Firework—17 The uivtatm marche. quickly forward, and Ruptri wondara if he ought 10 go :oo. May I come wnh you?" he rait*. The man lui nearly duapfcarcd in ihe tog and h.a VOA. .one. back lainily "No. you mighi gel Ion if ihing ',:. You'd better Hnn' r me hou-r; So the link bear watt and liotttu. Foe a nme nothing happen*, and the world Mem* qu.ie .tilt. Then orH* more he heart the filling I*K*C futiher .off ihan hwmr*. Cradu.'ly it ,wrllt 10 a tear, again i it followed by wind, leave, and iwiga round ihr lulle bear, and next momeni he it blown tight wjf. Rjper wit. and irrmblet. wondeniig if he it to be carried up into ihe ait a> before, and he tlutchet lull ot gran To hit relief he t lifnd only a lew inehet and then drop. biekC I uy. look tenat*. hirtpennig 10 ihe fog. It'l gating up." he %  itttart And. tu:r enough, the air beW hai beo thai he Ml tec roghi into iha wood. He wauhea the mm a* u nte* higher and hgSet. then he tunt foiwjtd among the tr.e^ "That man'-, mvrniioii ha* e arked wen. Icit. illy."' lie ihMLg, but he hmtelf ha* (h'tppeartd. Wltere can he rtavo •tone *o Quickly? Owing to delay caused by irregular shipping services the Advocate regrets that it has been compelled to curtail its daily cartoon strips for a short period. Meanwhile all available strips as they arrive will be appearing in this space. i i^ !" ^ WHETHER YOU ARE A "Jaw yov Are/a" about Ar/eeW SMALL USER YOU DESIRE THE BEST TEA SO USE RED ROSE TEA! IT IS GOOD TEA. DoafT hrtiu OUT on a kmg-pUnwe.1 Outing or party . when Paradol quickly heap* to rckeve periodic pom*, without dUagreeoblr letdown or'after-effect*! ScientitVully coanpoaaawUd from 4 ingredirnte— Paaadol ia excellent for headathee. too. Get Dr. Caw'i ParaeW today — tb* name "Dr. Chaae" ia as Dl. CHASE'S PARADOL -QMtdi *•/<>( froenPoinSTOPPING THE TIDE True old saying, "YOU cant slop the tide," however good your intention. WE find that a* much as we would like to keep our pricea stabled, the constant Increases In price* of our raw materials force us to revise) some of our pricea, as undeyr: Supr. bay Rum still .. 36c. No. 3 bay Rum still .. 30c. Llmolene Highercradc 80c. Mentholated 72c. „ No. 2 grade 24c. No. 3 grade Mentholated 30c. Floralene Co*. 30c. Sot 34c. Cologne 3 ox 24c. In spite of the increase* our products are still best value to-day. On Bale *| all gated stores. Household Cereals Requisites Dip: (Permanent 8Wrchrl 5 .0* Drill Soap riak.. t JO .24 Rims Soap FlakM I 41 .39 Pramlw Soap Flak.. J. Dtopa Soap Flak.. as lu< T. Soap (p., Cak.) if PalmoIlT. T. Soap (p.rCak.1 || Cajhmor. Bouqu T. Soap (p.i Cak.l at Pon rTran.pai.tit) Soap (pot Calf.) .32 Br.aldait Food Fcmx Quak.r Oat. AlUon't R. Oats Water Cora Flak.. K.lloaq'. Corn Flake. All Bran Quak.r Oau .53 S .86 .47 .52 .49 .24 .35 .28 .32 at D. V. SCOTT & CO., LTD. MEAT DEPARTMENT PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF: In Roast. Steak. Stew. VEAL: in Legs. Roast, Stew. MUTTON: in Shoulders, and Chops. LAMB: in Legs. Shoulders. ChopsStew. OX TAILS TRIPE KIPPERS BACON and HAM (Sliced) SALAMI SAUSAGE, Per lb. $.1.00 Pickles and Sauces Morton's Mix.d PICUM Extracts & Condiments Morton's Chow Chow Marlon's Piccalilli Morion's Suvsrsldn. Onions Holbrook's Cocktail Onions Anchory Saucs t .55 Ua & PsTrin's Saucs .TT $ .56 .53 S3 .59 .45 Custards & Desserts Birds' Custard Powdsr S .38 Cniv.rs" Custard Powrtar S .53 M Ics Crsam Powdsr .... 1.23 Chlv.rs' T. Jslllss .22 Hanlsy's T. l.lliM 20 Mt. & O. Blanc Manas Powdsr || Honeycomb Spongs .11 Povril 51.60 S .10 $ .49 MannHs .97. .10 .30 Oxo 1.12 .15 Ground Glngsr .It Madras Curry 71 Bisto (lor Gravtss) .33 Hslns Brownlnc/ (lor Grarlssl 44 Liqueurs, Wines Etc D.O.M. IS.7I •Jausui Brandy. 12X0 Grand Marlnsr 7.50 NoUy Pral V.rmouth 3.60 Royal Club Gin 3.S0 Bohi Cn.v.r Gin 3X0 Booth. Gin 2J0 PEARS, R PEACHES, ii APRICOTS, Us ( %  RAPES* ii_ auvAs, iin._ TOE ^