Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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arbados

ESTABLISHED 1895

Europe Will
Forces

ACHESON WARNS U.S.
AGAINST ISOLATION

WASHINGTON, Feb. 16

SECRETARY OF STATE Dean Acheson said
today: “The combat forces of our European
Allies may be expected to double in the next year.”’
He testified before the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions and Armed Services Committees to support
the Administration’s plan to send 100,000 addi-

tional troops to Europe to bolster its defences.
Answering questions Acheson said he hoped progress
would be made in fitting Spain into Western defence plans.
Whether that objective could be accomplished depended
on the actions of many nations as well as those of Spain.

Acheson said that the United States must use the time
it had by virtue of its lead over Russia in fire power



and atomic weapons to build up with its allies “balanced
‘collective forces” needed to deter aggression.
_ He said; “The value of our lead -——
in atomic weapons would decline, ° .
but balanced land, sea and air H

forces in Western Europe would : err 10t Quits
offset that.”

America’s Allies were “taking P P. ‘
steps which bring us measurably | arty ost
closer to the realisation of our ce
ultimate goal” of adequate defence PARIS, Feb. 16.
force. Edouard Herriot, Speaker of

“Roughly speaking,” he went] the Frenclr National Assembly
on: “Combat forces of our Euro.} has resigned from the presidency
pean Allies may be expected to!0f the Radical and Radical So-
double in the next year.” cialist Party, the National As-

Acheson attacked the proposals|S@™bly Office’ announced today.
for concentrating American de-| Party headquarters said Herriot
fenees in this Hemisphere, and nee given no reason for his step.
for insisting that Europe prepare erriot’s Secretariat, however,
its defences before it receive !Said his resignation was brought
American aid about by the fact that he. had

He saia the fundamental pur- been unable to secure unanimity
pose of the Atlantic Pact was “to that the eree, aa ne
preserve peace.” It provided for ae not yet Saverd to aie rd.
mutual help among members and posal that Radicals who had ‘aio
for consideration of what should joined General Charles De
ore a attack as well) Gaulle’s French Peoples’ Rally

On the argument that the United} ould ee res ae
States should await development ‘ :
of Europe’s own defensive force Herriot has ‘strosigly opposed






) this “politi .
before ‘waaning tis cpsteibution,/ seta ng ical bigamy” as he
Acheson said the need for strength Herriot, who is 78, was re-

against aggression was the imme-
diate aim of America and he
Allies,

“If each of the North Atlantic
nations should wait to see its part-
rers’ efforts before determining its
own,” Acheson said, “the result
would be as disastrous as it would
be obvious. We might once again
sing the bitter refrain: “too little
and too late” and this time there
may be no opportunity to remedy
the mistake.”

The argument that the United
States should “concentrate on its
own shores and leave the rest of
the world to its fate” once had
scme appeal for Americans, but
they now understood Western
Europe’s importance to American
security.—Reuter.

Basis For Treaty
Now In Sight

CANBERRA, Feb, 16.

John Foster Dulles, American
Special Envoy who is holding pre-
liminary talks with Australia and
New Zealand on a Japanese peace
treaty, said here today: “I feel we
are now in a position where we
can actually find and formulate a
basis for peace’’—Reuter.

War Not Inevitable

LONDON, Feb. 16
Marshal Stalin said in an inter-
view broadcast by Moscow radio
to-night that war was not inevi-
table. Replying to a correspond-

ent of the newspaper Pravda,
said: “No.” At least at the present
time it cannot be regarded as

inevitable.
—Reuter,

elected Speaker last month.

’ Between the wars he was
three times Prime Minister «and
he has been Mayor of Lyons,
France’s second city for 45 years.
He is said to esteem that post
more highly than all ministries
he has held.

—Reuter.



Approve Letter

BONN, Feb. 16.

The Bundestag Foreign Affairs
Committee approved unanimously
a letter which Chancellor Konrad
Adenauer proposes to send to the
allies giving the required guaran-
tee on foreign debts, informed
German sources said today.

The Chancellor told the Com-
mittee that the allies had said
they would accept the letter.

—Reuter

Three Withdraw

WASHINGTON, Feb. 16.

Three trades union members of
America’s Wage Stabilisation
Board withdrew; today in protest
against its decision to recommend
a general 10 per cent, wage in-
crease,

They described the plan as “un-
fair and unworkable” and advo-
cated a 12 per cent. increase in
addition to any future cost of
living adjustments.—Reuter,









REJECT PLAN

OTTAWA, Feb. 16

In less than a minute the Cabi-
net on Thursday night rejected
compulsory military training in
the reserve forces for Home De-
fence. The rejection came from
Defence Minister Claxton late in
the Commons debate which pro-
duced a split in the Progressive
Conservative ranks over the con-
troversial issue.



EMPLOY BLIND GIRLS

NEW YORK.
So hard up is the U.S. govern-
ment for typists. that they are out
to recruit blind girls. They tried
30 as an experiment which proved
“highly successful.” The salaries
range from £883 to £954 yearly.

—(CP)

COLLECTORS’ DAY



FIRST ;
West Indies drew the nsual queue of collectors at the Post Office

day sales of

the stamps of the University College of the

yesterday 4



















’ SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1951

Advorate



FIVE CENTS

PRICE :





























Up Defence

' Allies Preparing

Seoul Offensive

TOKYO, Feb. 16.
NAVAL WORKING PARTIES lead by frogmen, were
to-night working feverishly to restore the west coast port
of Inchon, gateway for supplies to United Nations forces in
ao They had orders to get the docks working within
0 hours.

with the current year.

"the year by
_ £4,026,050,100. A

Tories Will
Challenge
The Govt.

On Groundnuts

LONDON, Feb. 16.

Winston Churchill gave notice
today that Conservatives will
challenge the Government next
Tuesday on their handling of the
post war scheme to grew ground-
nuts in Africa.

Scarcely 12 hours after the Con-

Servative challenge on Defence
policy had been beaten off with
@ 21 majority, Churchill! and five
other Conservatives tabled what
can be interpreted as a new cen-
sure motion,
. The Groundnuts Scheme waz
meetically pruned recently and
236,500,000 were written off as
Authority is being sought
now to spend £6,000,000 on the
modified scheme.

Fierce fighting went on all day
on the central front with United

e eye 7
Civilians , Nations aeroplanes hammering the
Communists.
e British mfantry artillery’ ana
u erin tanks fought their first big offen-
sive action of the Korean war to-
\day in a raging blizzard, Co-op-
erating with American troops,
Os n a jthey attacked Chinese Commu-
{nists entrenched in the hills who
bar the way to battered Seoul, the
South Korean capctal.



(Prom Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb, 16. mete

A shockihg revelation’ awaits! At dusk in -itterly cold weather
the world when figures for civili-|Allied forces had secured their
an casualties in Korea are pub- objective and were digging in for
lished, According to a well-in-|the night. The Communists had
formed sourte in London today,| defeated all attempts to drive
these casualties may approach the|them from the hills in the past
million mark, three days. Today’s move was the

Famine, disease and almost/|first big action to try to smash
continuows air attacks have con- | down their opposition and open
tributed towards this terrible =k way for the United Nations





of life, fianking movement on the capital

On the military side several Lieutenant General Frank H.
factors have emerged in the past} Milburn, American First Corps
few weeks which strengthen the|Commander who watched Allied
hand of the United Nations;troops battle their way up the
Forces in Korea, But the military|steep slopes said he had “coms
solution to the war is now con-|plete confidence in their action}.
sidered virtually impossible, It}and was completely satisfieq with
seems certain that fighting will|the progress..”
continue in Korea until a political
solution can be found.

No move north of the 38th paral-
lel will be made, according to an
authoritative source here, until
after full consultation among the

Yet stiff opposition was still to
be expected from Chinese troops.
Elsewhere along the western
front today Americans on the
right flank toward Wonju took

—Reuter.

Taft Will Question



Allied’ Nations, but the British|their objective and were holding i °
firm tonight against a small arms The Witnesses
@ On page 8. attack.-—Reuter,

WASHINGTON, Feb. 16,

Senator Taft told reporters that
he hoped to question witnesses at
joint sittings of the Senate Foreign.
and Armed Services Committees
About the possible existence of
any agreement to apportion
ground forces among Atlantic
Nations.

STILL RAINING



are consid
A resolution submitted by Senator
Wherry, ublican floor leader,
which wants no United States
troops to be despatched to Europe
until Congress has fixed an over-
all policy. —Reuter

Avalanches Kill 16
In Italian Alps

MILAN, Feb. 16.

Avalanches in the Trento region
killed two more people making
the death toll 16 in the Italian
Alps since Sunday,

Two villages in the Bergamo
Alps were isolated today, Aval-
anches had been hanging over
them for several days, Both vil-
lages had been evacuated except
for 15 people at one Ludrigno,
who refused to leave.

The Po river overflowed at
Casal Maggiore 36 miles east of
Piacenza flooding some 200 acres
of farm lands, Five yards above
its normal level, the river was still
rising steadilv.—Reuter.

Flu Outbreaks

Increase In Canada

TORONTO, Feb. 16
_ Federal health officials have
indicated their belief that influen-
za, which has spread through
Canada may be the same deadly
virus which took almost 8,000
lives in the United Kingdom in
the last few months.
Reports of outbreaks arr in-
creasing daily with at least 25
tario centres among the latest
aflectéd by the disease. Hardest
hit centre in Canada has been
Montreal followed by Quebec in
General and the Maritime Pro-
vinces. Schools have been closed,
factories made idle and normal
life disrupted in many other com-
munities across the country. No
official explanation has been ad-
vanced as to why the virus whic?
proved so lethal in England has
resulted in a total of fewer thar
100 deaths in Canada. It attacks
both old and young alike.—(CP)





THESE GIRLS are not going to get wet rain or no rain.

Truman Must Make
Meaning Clear

LONDON, Feb. 16.
BRITAIN WILL SEEK elarification of President
Truman’s statement that the question of crossing the 38th
Parallel in Korea was a military and strategic matter only,
usually well informed quarters said to-day.
Ta cada aoe Truman made his statement
in Washington yesterday when he
said General MacArthur had all
the authority necessary to cross
the parallel and it was his busi-
ness. 7
A British Foreign Office spokes-
man refused to comment directly
on what the President said, but
he referred to Prime Minister
Attlee’s statement last Monday
that Britain had told the United
States that in its view the parallel
ought not to be crossed again.
—Reuter.

Crowds Queue
Up For Stamps

Besides the usual stamp buyers,
many stamp collectors crowded
the General Post Office yesterday
to buy West Indies University
College stamps,

This new issue of stamps wi'l
be sold for three months unless
they are sold out before. The
stamps are intended to cormmem-
orate the inauguration of the
University College and the insta}-
lation of Her Royal Highness,
Princess Alice, Countess of
Athlone as Chancellor.

LITHUANIA HEARS
“VOICE”

WASHINGTON, Feb. 16

The Voice of America to-day
began a daily broadcast in Lithu.
arian, It was the first time th
Voice had beamed a programme
daily to the country whose inco~
poration into the Soviet Union, tho
United States has never reco,~



Morphia Smugglers
Gaoled And Fined

BREMEN, Feb. 15.
‘ Fifteen people were sentenced | nised.
ere last night to imprisonment, sae
and fined for smuggling about EXCHANGE GOODS
20 tbs of morphia. NEW DELHI, Feb. 16
_Chief defendant, Dr. Arno! India is to exchange goods with
Grosse, chemist was sentenced to Spain, the Government announced
one year and two weeks’ impris-
onment. here to-day.
Dr. Grosse had stolen morphia Trade arrangements were agreed
from some chemical works during|9% the result of discussions held
with the Spanish trade mission

an air raid in 1943. Part of it ; a7 :
was hidden away to be gmuggied during its visit to India in October

The 3 cent stamps bear the
arms of the University and the
penny stamps the full portrait of
Her Royal Highness the Countess
of Athlone, in her Chancellor’s
robes. Other colonies are issuing
Stamps to commemorate the same
occasion,

When a middle-aged man was
asked yesterday whether he want-
ed stamps to post a letter or to




- a
a ——,

keep, he replied that he had to Austria. It was confiscated be-|/ast the statement added.
son at the University College and|fore it reached consumers, evi- —Reuter.
was buying the stamps for senti-|dence showed. nm
mental reasons. He intended} The Bremen salesman who at- AID FOR BRITAIN
sending some to his son too, |cepted 10 lbs. from Grosse was SYDNEY
'sentenced to eight months’ Sydney’s Lord Mayor has just
An old lady wi nto |imprisonment returned from London, where he
the office with ¢ at The m who was to dispose|attended the official winding-up
she was a: @ ‘lof the remaining 10 lbs. took|ceremony of Australian Food for
ground j rted to American|Britain Fund But he Va oO
I ed a | € He also got] appalled Britain’ ynit
she tl he ontt ent ; ng that he } ‘
as "a memol —Reuter. rev



fund

womediately,

i} Poses.”

“UK. Will Spend |
£31l1m More On
Her Defences

LONDON, Feb. 16.

BRITAIN’S Navy, Army and Air Force estimates
; show an increase of over £311,000,000 for the
coming financial year starting on April 1, compared

The total Bill which will be increased during
supplementary

estimates is

Two thirds of the £41,880,000
wanted for the Army will buy new
modern weapons including tanks
and anti-aircraft weapons. Estim-
ates are based on the original
programme which scheduled
£ 3,600,000,000 for Defence in
three years, It has since risen to
£4,700,000,000,

British naval experts are con-
centrating on building a fleet of
small speedy warships — some
atom powered—to combat the
submarine menace in any future
war.

Yearly naval estimates present-
ed to Parliament to-day showed
they had abandoned the construc-
tion of battleships considered too
cumbrous for modern warfare.

Britain has a naval strength of
five battleships and six fleet car-
riers (23,000 to 26,000 tons) with
two modern fleet carriers under
construction, six light fleet car-
riers (about 13,000 tons) and eight
under construction.

—Reuter,



Take Up New Job

NEW YORK, Feb 16,

General Dwight D. Eisenhower
sailing today in the Queen Eliza-
beth to assume command at
Supreme Headquarters of Allied
Powers in Europe said in an in-
terview that “It is our firm hope
that our job over there will be
done soon, We really believe if
we do ourjob the job will be
promptly done.”

He said the only reason for the
United States being in “this great
effort is because of our enlight-
ened self-interest. We are trying
to preserve peace. Everybody |
knows we have no warlike pur-

The General was accompanied
by his wife.—Reuter,

Nehru Chides
Forty Three M.Ps

|
NEW DELHI, Feb. 16,
Prime Minister Nehru today
deprecated a message sent by 43
members of the Indian Parlia-
ment to presiding officers of the
American Congress about legisla-
tion before Congress to supply
food grains to India. The mes-
Sage urged the approval of the
legislature.
Signatories including India’s
former Ambassador to Brazil said
they recognised that the liberty of
free Asian countries was ‘‘menaced
by Communist expansion,”
Nehru told Parliament today
that he was “considerably sur-
prised” by the message.
He said: The House will realise
how embarrassing that must be not
orly for the Government but for
this House.
—Reuter



Prisoners Stage

}
Handicraft Show |

PARIS, Feb, 16.

Murderers, robbers and lepers
were the artists responsible for
an exhibition of pictures opened
here today.

All pictures were painted by
convicts in the French penal. col-
ony, Saint Laurent, French Gui-
ana and were brought to Paris by
prison officials,

“Escapism” is the main motif—
seen in pictures of ships sailing
away, scenes of home life, women

—imagined white ones or real
native women. Vivid tropical
colour is seen in paintings of

lizards and rare butterflies,

Among handicrafts exhibited is
a seale model of a gallows for use
as a cigar cutter.—Reuter,

Women Wanted

COPENHAGEN, Feb. 16

Civil defence authorities to-
day called for women between
18 and 22 to volunteer for a six-
months’ training course,

Two camps for women open or
May 1. Preliminary plans cover
the call up of 1,200 women for}
civil defence in the event of
general mobilisation.

—Reuter.

10 GO; 20 COME

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 14
The immigration question is
now one of the colony’s problems





PORT-OF-SPAIN
riplet all boy
mic Thon f San Ped
la Frida The he

were born t

It has worsened within recent
months. For every 10 arrested tc
be deported as prohibited _immi-
grants, 20 would enter And
Grenadians are in the malo |
they form 75 per cent. of those
entering the colony every week |
HAS TRIPLETS |
From Our Own Correspondent }
Feb, 14 |

|

|

'

+

|
‘i : iers on board.
Eisenhower Sails To iers on boarc

ITs

oe

I
THE



ARMY

JUST BEFORE THREE, but not before the rain, the “Copinsay”
came alongside the Baggage Warehouse and the Royal Inniskillings
were back in Barbados, after a very long absence.

Inniskillings Pay
Goodwill Visit

SHORTLY AFTER two o’clock yesterday afternoon
the Royal Army Service Corps 5.S. Copinsay steamed into
the outer basin of the Careenage with a company of two
officers and 37 other ranks of the Royal Inniskilling Fusil-

Among the company are 25 drummers and

pipers, all under the command of Major F, M. Cunning-

ham.



ON THE
@ SPOT

ALEXANDRIA,

Egyptian police are baf-
fled by two carrier pigeons,
one caught near Alexandria
and the other in Upper
Egypt. Both had metal disks
with “Moscow” engraved on
them. Now the police are
trying to find out whether
messages to Egyptian Com-~-
munist cells are being car-
ried through carrier pigeons.

Cricket Will
Start Monday

The first match of the Inter-
colonial Cricket Tournament be-
tween Trinidad and Barbados will
now begin on Monday, February
1?





Oving to the condition of Ken-
sington Oval Messrs. F. A. C,
Clairmonte, E. L. G. Hoad, N.
Nethersole, E. J. Marsden
and M. Green, members of the
West Indies Cricket Board of Con-
trol, in conjunction with the Bar-
bados Cricket Association and
Mr, Jeffrey Stollmeyer, Trinidad
Captain, arrived at this decision.
They have agreed to have two
five-day matches without any rest
period between,



WILLS‘'S

GOLD FLAKE

ARE eR NARA NOSEIML NE .



The Fusiliers ar-
;rived in Jamaica in November
1949 and have been stationed
there ever since, They are here on
a goodwill two-day visit. They will
be relieved of their duties in
Jamaica by the Royal Welsh Fusi-
liers next month,

On arrival the 178-ton Copingay
tied off near the Baggage Ware-
house. Major Cunningham was
met by Major Skewes-Cox, Stat
Officer, Local Forces and Captain
Jordan, A Barbados Regiment
truck transported the company to
the St. Anns Fort,

The Copinsay, formerly a Navy
minesweeper, is under the com-
mand of Captain A. C, Bodden, a
Cayman-born naval officer, now
living in Jamaica, It is an oil burn-
er and fitted with troop decks to
accommodate 46, These decks are
air-conditioned, It is being used
as a troop. transport for the
R.A.S.C, in the Caribbean area,
It carries a crew of 18.

Major F. M. Cunningham,

Inniskilling

Officer Commanding the Battal-
ion, is from Belfast, Northern Ire-
land. For the past 20 years he
has been with the Inniskilling
Fusiliers, He joined as an Officer
in 1931 and during the war he
served in France, Belgium, and

other places, :
He said, "We hive always had
close connections with the West

@ On page 8



TELL THE ADVOCATE

THE NEWS
RING 3113
DAY OR NIGHT |

SRA AE TOR NE



PAGE TWO

Sir Johan Waddington. extreme
Himden arrived fram Trinidad

att,

jasterday iy 3. W.t «A





Prof. Harlow,



nest ta Six Join, Mr. Join Hemmings and Dr. Rita
an voute from BG

They are pistared here ou their wag from the ‘piune accompaniad ty Maj. Dennis Vaughn the Governor's

A.D.€.

S* JON
accompanied

Eindter,, Profes
and We.
fom B
day bor B
be here

WADDINGTON














Sir Da sion
to BuaG e type
ot com it e nile to the
people of that col lony. “Dr, Hinden

and Professor Harlow were mem-
bers of the Commission and Mr
John Hemmings Secre-
tary.

acted ag

Sir John who was Governor of
Barbados from 1938 to 1941 told
Cari® thal at present he wes un
able to say. anything about the
results of the Commission. He
Said he was extremely pleased
that his work on the Commission
had brought = him,;.onee» again
through the Caribbeah, especially
Barbados,

Nepture’s Daughter
T midnight tonight, Nep-
tuine’s daughter will be chosen
during the dance at the Barba-
dos Aquatic Club Judges are
Mrs. Jean Iverson, Mr. R. W.
Bell and his camera and Mr, J.
H, Reddekopp. Mr. Reddekopp is
Holiday Travel’s representative in
Barbados.
Competitors must
the ages of fourteen
one and they must
shorts and shirt.
The winner gets a silver cup,
Collapsible Canoe
R. & MRS PETER TERENT-

between
twenty
white

be
and
wear

JEV are at present holi-
daying in Barbados. Peter is
with Avensa Airlines in Vene—
zuela and has been with them
since 1947. This is their first
visit here. They are guests at
Cacrabank.

Mr. Terentjev has a_ collapsi-
ble canoe made of canvas and

ply rubber with a polished wooa-
eh framework inside, equipped
with paddles and a sail. It is 18
feet long and almost three feet
wide. He was born in Latvia
and his wife in Iran, ‘Persia.

Off To B.G.
R. GILBERT YVONET was
among the passengers leav-
ifig for B.G. yesterday by
B.W.1.A. He has gone over to
ride in the Demerara Turf Club's
meeting which begins today,



General Manager



RAWLINE
fF. A
rietors of the

raphic in British Guiana,
was in Barbados for a meet
ing of the Caribbean Press
Association returned to B.G,
yesterday afternoon by B.W.1LA
Leaving by the same plane w
Mrs, J. Bernstein who has gone
to B.G, for a week or two ‘on
heliday

W.I. Test Selector

who

M* Ww. M GHEEN, West
Indies Test Selector (British
Guiana) arrived from B.G. yes

terday afternoon by B.W.1.A. He
here for the forthcoming cricket!

tournament between Barbados and

Trinidad

Mr, Green told Carib that like

Rarbados, it has been very rainy

They have only been able to have
so far Mr
ntevenen sal

practice match
Green is a former

one

cricketer in the days when Greer

Browne and Wight were a farmi : B BC. Radio Programme tinique, where they were not al
dable trio in the British Guiana ‘ lowed to leave the airport due
team, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY #7, 1950 to Government regulations. They
He is staying at the Hotel Royal,| 6.00 am.—12,15 pm, — 19.76 1m, enjoyed their brief stay immense
6.30 a.m. Force Fivouslthe 7.00 a.m ly and plan to return for a longer
. . i. WO a foes Fa Ps, a eae =
Electrical Engineer The News, 710. am. News’ Analysis, | Stay next year.
R. ARTHUR COOPER, Elec-] }youramine Parade, 740 a.m, Prom the
trical Engineer arrived fromm] Third Programme, 7.50 a.m. Interlude,
, 1 y atte 8.00 a.m. BBC Symphony Orchestra
Eo - iy oe ; acirme tt DY} 945 a.m. Colonial Questions, 9.00 a.m
3.W.LA, e is here for fifteen The News, 9.10 a.m, Home News from
days staying at the Hastings] Britain, 945 am. Close Down, 11.15
Hotel before leaving for Antigua.) }m., yrowusmme Forade, 11-20 a.m
enude 40 a.m. Shhdy Macpherson
Brothers at the Theatre Organ, 11.45 a.m oven- °
trp City ve Manchester City 12.00
R. & MRS JOHN McINTOSII (noon) ‘The News, 12.00 p.m. News
f accompanied by their two Apalysis, 1215 pam, Close Down,
children and Mr. and Mrs, James| 4:!5--#.00 pam, -— 95.58 m,
MeIntosh arrived from Trinidad] “45pm. Strike Up the Music, 6.00
by B.W.1.A. yesterday after-} p.m. Composer of the Week, 6.15) p.m
noon. Mr. John MelIntosh is ap] Standord Rabinson Presents, 6.00 p.m.
Engineer with T.L.L, and Mr. | gies jpn, pancing, aS ——
James MelIntosh is with sew tAS pret x
stationed at Piareco. They are! Fie’ xpronre nay 7.00
aaa p.m The ews, 10 pom News
oom here for three month Lets oie Rt ene one awe
‘ 7.4--11.00 pan, — SL32 mm. & 43
and James for two weeks, Mrs To ‘ .
‘ . * . so " . pom @an dy Macpherson at ¢ ce
semen seeliitoeh 8 the : former Theatre Organ, 8.00 pm acdio Newsreel,
Joyce Dean. They are staying at} 6.15 p.m. Composer of the Week, 8.30

Coral Sands.

From Chicago
RS. CLARA MORRIS
Chicago arrived from Trini-
cad yesterday. Here for a week
she is staying at the Paradise
Seach Club. She was only in
Trinidad overnight,

ot



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Ballerinas
Velvet Finish, Rubber Sole

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1455
UTFIELOS

Wite Arrives To-day

M®; H. L. BLACHFORD of

Miontreal arrived from Can-
da yesterday via Trinidad by
B W.1.A. to spend a month’g
holiday in Barbados. He expects
his wife to arrive this morning by
T.C eh.

Mr. Blachford is proprietor of
H. L. Blachford Limited, Chem-
|! manufacturers in Montreal,

ical
He is a guest av the Hotel Windsor.

With Shell Caribbean

R. AND MRS. Micnael God-
frey arrived from Venezuela
Trinidad yesterday after
by B.W.1.A. to spend

weeks’ holiday here,
the Hastings Hotel.
accompanied by their

via
noon
t ree
staying at
The y were
two sons.

Mr. Godfrey is with Shell Carib
bean Petroleum Corpn,, and :5
stationed at Bachaquero field which
is near Maracaibo,







p.m
News,
wO.15
p.m
Song

Radio Theatre, 10.00 p.m, The

10.10 pm. From the Editorials,
pm. Anything to Declare, 10.45
Yours Falthfully, 11.00 p.m. Your
Parade

EMPIRE THEATRE

TODAY 4,45 & 8.30 and continu-
ing at MAT, & NIGHT

SHOWS DAILY UP TO
TUESDAY

the Bak LL
lable f

cure is called
aBourAward
Thriller

Brown

234

to

Dial 4220

1 eron Iron Works in Houston,

BARBADOS



ADVOCATE



THE VILLA GE

John Moore, author of so many
books on country life and 4
broadcaster of note, recently
talked about “The Village” in a
BBC series called “British Mas-
terpieces” . He felt ~that the
English village was different
from other masterpieces because
no one set down to design it;
just grew. Some, he knew, had
been growing for hundreds of
years “literally like trees, be-
cause the stone which they are
built of comes out of quarries
almost at their doorsteps and the
thinner stones which roof them
comes out of the quarries too;
so that each little house is part
of the landseape, growing out of
the earth.” A score of these vil-
lages lay near his home on the
Cotswold Hills, all different, all
beautiful, and the best of them
perfect works of art. They most-
ly began by some accident of
geography, such as a_ sheltered
fold in the hills or a river cross-
ing, or because there was a big
manor house in the district and
cottages sprang about it like chil-
dren around their mother’s skirt.

Wool had*a great deal to do
with the origin and development
of the Cotswold villages. Cots-
wold churches, glorious buildings
with splendid towers, were built
by woolstaplers who made for-
tunes out the boom in Cots-
wold sheep§ “The golden ficect
was a realty in the Cotswolds
in 1450,” said Moore and in many
villages it could be seen how the
wool was turned into money that
with loving labour made such
rich memorials to the wealthy
merchants as many a king would
envy. The long chain of cause
and effect began with the lime-
stone of which the Cotswolds
were made. This was laid down
as an ocean bed millions of years
ago and later heaved up by some
vast convulsion to form a range
of hills. The limestone soil grew
a grass called Fescue which was
favourite grazing for sheep, To
keep their sheep apart Cotswold

“Hedge- Hopping”
R. ED LOREHN, Executive
Vice President of the Cam
Texas
and a party of five who arrived
here en Thursday in one of the
company’s private planes, a Lock
heed Lodestar, left yesterday for
Curacao. They are ‘hedge—hop-
ping” through the W.1

Members of the party were Mr
and Mrs. Tom Shartle, Mrs. C. M
Taylor, Mrs. Stanley Shipness and
Mrs. J. B. Hayes.

Leaving Texas a week ago they
have already visited Jamaica, St.
Thomas, Virgin Islands, and Mar



























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shepherds bu stone walls and
so learned how to quarry and
fashion stone. When the mer-
chants grew rich from wool ex-
per! ced quarrymen, masons ane
craftsmen were already at hand
and up went the churches, mills,
arched stone bridges, farmhouses.
manors and cottages. “The bare
Bilis blossomed during those two

England's
was born,

denturies which were
“spring and the village
said Moor It grew slowly and
for three hundred years thos*
clustered habitations were pre-
earious Outposts in a wasteland
until a great and sudden change
came. New inventions in agri-
culture made it possible to feed
more sheep and grow more corn,
new inventions in industry and
the growth of towns created a
huge demand for meat and corn.
For years the countryside was in
turmoil while greedy and hungry
men scrambled for soil but out of
the unlovely dogtight a new and
beautiful pattern emerged, farms
with their patehwork of fields,
spacious parkland, Georgian man-
elaborate gardens, coverts,
spinneys and trout streams for
sportsmen, the pattern of ‘the
English countryside and English
life which is the background of
the village masterpiece. But the
ahineteenth century was not all

greed and scramble and the na-
tive kindlines which runs

rough British history began to
‘ ke ftself felt. Schools were
suilt, hovels gave way to decent
houses, drinking dens grew injo
the village pub. The village be-
came a mixed community of all
social degrees in which everyone
knew everyone else, intensively
individual yet inter-related and
inter-responsible, perhaps the most
civilised way of living that man-
kind had yet devised, This motley
collection of people living and
working together at close quarters
provided the spirit or soul of a
village. They knew that they
were part of a vere ancient tra-

sions,



Pilot of the plane was Ben Clapp
d co-pilot was W. R Schmidt.

Port-Of-Spain Councillor
ery NCILLOR C. B. MATHURA

Port-of-Spain was among
the passengers arriving from
Yvinidad yesterday by B.W,LA.
tere for two weeks’ holiday he is
siaying at “Super Mare” Guest
House, Worthing.

Three Days

RS. W. FRED DAY has her

two sons John and Frank
visiting her from Canada. They
are staying with her at the Hotel
Royal. Mrs. Day has been living
here for about three years. Her
sons arrived over the week-end,
Both of them live in Toronto where
John is the proprietor of the Day
and Frank is with Paper

Sign Co.,

Sales Co.

To-night

visit

Dancing

Streets






!

House-

RE

Plates Dishes
Tea Cups & Saucers, Cream Jugs
| Platters Tea Pots
Also
TEA SETS 24 PIOOUE © ec des eee cet beeevece $12.41
{ DUNNE SETS. 264. 0 Ree Nie es 28.62
DINNER SETS 63 49.34

e Department —Tel. No.2039



THE BARKADOS €0-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.



————=














dition for on the moss grown
tombstones in the village church-
yards the same names were seen
for generation after generation.
Amongst these men lay some of
the nameless craftsmen whose
hands long ago fashioned the vil-
lages. “They were the shapers
of the masterpiece,” said Moore,
“but we who live here to-day,
parson, policeman, schoolmaster,
squire, farmer and labourer, pub-
keeper and post office lady, we
and our forefathers and our sons
and daughters after us, are the
breath and spirit which gives. it
life”,

CROSSWORD





Acruss
ts this Kind of dog ts

1. Prom repor
s tast une

4 and 5 DOW:

a party

How ¢ ibe woulda describe the

diat (@) 8. Sarcastic? (6)

May be called peak. (3)

He's roped when caught m0

doubt (5)

Sroma to get both ways. (4)

. No dog ljoyer would. surely, (7)

ij. Contend, (3)

. Sort of cake to get at one, (5)

». Direction. (4)

1. Has been quoted as a must when
the devil drives. (5)

. Returning brick carrier. (3)

3 Mrs. Brown _was exhorted to keep
them up. (5) 24. See 3 Down.

Dowp

1. L admit this is grating, (8)

. An easy word for beginners. (8)

and 24 Across. Ian Brine, Ph.D.,

dislikes this turn when’ motor-

(3-3)
The watehword of
Or

1er.

ing, (7, 4) 4, Despatched, (4)

5, See 4 Across.

6. A word for elves in the Shet-
lands. (4)

7. We find it no Jorg to sacrifice
things this way, (8

9, Fine sort of fist eooording to

Shakespeare. (4)

10. Metal, (6) 15, PNAS, 6)

16. City of North France. (4 }

19, Our Cabinet huinleter in
Sweden. (8)

Solution of, yeaverday’ 8 Dyssle. —Across:
1, Phas: 8 |. Analyse; umb; 12,
Send; Rutilant: 14, ofits if Ayah:
16, Centaur ae . Nylghau: 22,

; e" +. Farrier,
4, Essay; 5,

8 10, 5

18, Alum; 19,







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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1951

GLOBE THEATRE —ropay 5 & 8.30 P.M. TO TUESDAY
oe

spy HUNT

coving HOWARD DUFF - MARTA TOREN

PHILIP FRIEND » ROBERT DOUGLAS - PHILIP DORN - WALTER SLEZAK
A UNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL PICTURE

BRITISH AND AMERICAN NEWS REELS

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA ‘Members Only)

MATINEE TODAY AT 5 P.M.
TO-NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
ROBERT MONTGOMERY ANN BYLTH
in “QNCE MORE, MY DARLING”
with JANE COWL
Based on The Hiiarious Saturday Evening Post
Serial Story, “Come Be My Love”









Extra :







A New Universal-International Release



PLAZA Wuishdre—bridgitown ‘sal 2310)

TWO SHOWS TODAY — 445 & 830 P.M, and CONTINUING DAILY

sames cacneyin VWWHITE HEAT

with Virginia MAYO — Edmond O'RRIEN
Also “Bob Wills and Bh | Texas Play Bere



Sat.) 17th

MATIN TODAY ~ 9.30 a.m. & 1.30 p.m,
Ken Maynard — Hoot Gibson Johnny Mack Brown in

DEATH VALLEY RANGERS & RAIDERS OF THE BORDER

i= =

PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

TODAY 5 & 8.80 P.M, & CONTINUING DAILY
MIRACULOUS JOURNEY & BAD MEN OF TOMBSTONE

in Colorful Cinecolor Barry Sullivan — Marjorie
with Rory Calhoun — Audrey Long : Reynolds — Brod Crawford
Virginia Grey — Gee. Cleveland

















MIDNITE TONITE (Sat.) 17th (Monogram Action Double)

CODE OF THE SADDLE & RIDERS OF THE DAWN

Johnny “Mack Brown Jimmy WAKELY

G: ABET W—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TODAY TO SUNDAY 8.30 p.m, — Mat, SUN, 6 P.M,

It’s Bine’s Biseest Yet! ! RIDING HIGH

BING CROSBY_ IN

with Coleen GRAY - Charles BICKFORD — others











MIDNITE TONITE (Sat,) 17th (Monogram Action Double)
LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT & RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL
Johnny Mack Brown Jimmy Wakely

NEW HIT...

NEW MEIGHTS!!

AN UNFORGETTABLE PORTRAYAL AS HITDOM

CAN OFFER!

CAGNEY ee

FLAMES INTO 7
| ACTION
| MAYO
'] FANS IT TO

“WHITE
HEAT”

PLAZA

BRIDGETOWN
NOW
PLAYING

EMPERE

Today 445 & 8.30 p.m.
and continuing to Tuesday



ae

saves

Extra Special
HOB
WILLS
and his
TEXAS
PLAYBOYS

Also
WORLD NEWS
TODAY

and Continuing

DAILY
DIAL 2310



or

~CAGREY





FRED
CLARK



“FOMOND OBRIEW







ROYAL

Today to Sunday

4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
United Artists Double

Cesar ROMERO in

ONCE A THIEF
AND
LOVE HAPPY

with
The MARX BROTHERS

_—_—
TONIGHT at MIDNIGHT
Columbia Whole Serial

“BATMAN & ROBIN”
OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows Today
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Republic Smashing Double
James LYDON and
Lois COLLIER in

“Out Of The Storm”

AND

“Bandit King
Of Texas”

Starring
Allan (Rocky) LANE and
his Stallion Black Jack

David O. Selznick presents

“The Fallen Idol”

Starring
Ralph RICHARDSON
Michele MORGAN

with Sonia DRESDEL
and Dennis O'DEA

ROXY



Today to Tuesday
4.45 & 815 p.m.
20th Century Fox presents

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Growing Mash is used.

FUL-Q-PEP

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Box



i i a ileal eatin

SATURDAY,

FEBRUARY



17, 1951



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ro



Problems And Treatment Of Soil Steady Rain

Erosio

Asricultural Adviser to Britain's

Colonial Secretary from 1940-1946

whe has written many books on the
subject of tropical agriculture

Soil erosion has achieved recent
world wide prominence as a men-
ace to man’s existence. The top-
most layer of the earth’s crust—
the soil—when it is exposed to the
influence of moving water and
wind, tends to be washed and
blown away. The process is in-
sidious but under natural condi-
tions erosion is held in check by
vegetational cover, and losses are
balanced by gains from rock
weathering. It is when this is re-
moved without adequate precau-
tions, and when the land is im-
properly farmed that the position
becomes dangerous. Soil erosion
is, therefore. essentially a symp-
tom of wrong land use.

Risks are greatest in those
regions where the rain comes in
heavy downpours, as in tropical
countries, or where high winds are
associated with long dry spells as
on the prairies and steppes of con-
tinental countries, Owing to the
increase in world populations,
there has been of late years un-
paralleled penetration and devel-
opment of the erosion-prone lands
by people without experience and
knowledge of the dangers, It has
led to extensive losses and wide-
spread destruction. Not only has
this occurred on the plantations
and farms of new settlers and
planters in these regions, but with
the advent of law, order and im-
proved living conditions in many
primitive regions, native popula-
tions have increased rapidly; to
provide the necessary food and to
satisfy the increasing demand for
crops for export, traditional agri-
cultural practices, which formerly
provided a measure of protection

have fallen into disuse. In conse-
quence erosion has rapidly in-
creased,

On larger farms, worked by in-
telligent farmers with adequate
resources, the problem, although
great, is by no means insuperable.
Indeed progress towards its solu-
tion is becoming, evident all over
the world, On small and scatter-
ed holdings, especially those of
primitive cultivators in partially
developed regions, however, the
menace 1S great,

Conservation | Methods

In general the measures taken
against erosion have for their ob-
ject the protection of the soil from
erosive influences, and the main-
tenance of condition of the soil
itself. This resolves itself into the
general layout of cultivation, the
prevention of cultivation of lands
that are excessively liable to eros-
ion, the construction or provision
of protective terraces, drains and
so forth, the planting of protect-
ive forests and shelter belts and
similar aids, as well as the em-
ployment of appropriate methods
of cultivation, choice of suitable
crops and rotations and appropri-
ate methods of husbandry. To be
effective they must be suited to
conditions and applied to the
countryside as a whole and not
piecemeal to individual properties;
moreover they may involve larger
issues, such as the siting of towns,
villages, roads and railways, the
conduct of mining and other mat-
ters. In its widest aspect soil con-
servation is inseparable from
planned and controlled land use,
it demands accurate knowledge of
the conditions and its application
is eventually dependent on legis-
lation to enable it to be enforced.
Such legislation has already been
enacted in many countries, but a
necessary prerequisite is that
agricultural communities must be
educated to appreciate thn need
and be willing to co-operace.

Practically all the British Colo-
nial dependencies lie in regions
where erosion is liable to occur.
On estates and larger properties
erosion was at one time very seri-+
ous, especially in the Far East and





THIS —



IF YOU—
FEEL LIKE

TAKE

WINCARNIS

By Sir Harold Tempany



STRIP CONTOUR

A PERFECT EXAMPLE of strip contouring as practised by the Bakiga tribe in south-west Uganda,

East Africa owing to unsuitable
practices such as clean weeding
absence of contouring, inadequate
protection and unsuitable drain-
age provision, This has, however,
been remedied to a considerable
extent and the position is continu-
ing to improve.

Was this the only factor, there
would not be much cause for
alarm but it is in the much larger
areas cultivated by indigenous
peasant cultivators that the chief
danger resides, It is an adminis-
trative rather than a purely agri-
cultural problem. Often the first
step may be large-scale popula-
tion transfers, and coupled with
this must be the supersession of
unsuitable agricultural practices
by modern methods adapted to the
change of conditions. Its solution
is complicated by low education
standards, tribal customs, super-
stitions and boundaries and, at
times, by political agitation.

Dangers Widely Recognised

Throughout the Colonies the
dangers are widely recognised and
considerable sums are being ex-
pended in efforts to improve mat-
ters, Appropriations and grants
to this end have been made from
local revenues and from Britain
through the Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Acts,

In Kenya, for example,
£1,000,000 has been provided for

—











conservation work and the 1950
oil conservation staff numbered
34 Europeans and. 551 Africans.

sIn Uganda strip cropping and the

ust of protective grass strips is
now widely practised and al-

though erosion occurs it is local-
ised, Much progress has been
made with the construction of
dams and boreholes to provide
water for Stock,

In Tanganyika the value of con~
toured tied ridges has been proved
and considerable improvements
have also been made in grazing
management.

In Nyasaland, too, there has
been progress and on estates ade-
quate conservation measures are
becoming the rule. In Cholo and
in the Misuku Hills in the North
a complete change in agricultural
practice with corresponding im-
provement is reported.

In Northern Rhodesia there has
been steady progress on estates
which will, no doubt, be accelerat-
ed when soil conservation legis-
lation, recently enacted, becomes
fully operative, In Jamaica, in
the West Indies, it is estimated
that at least 12,000 acres (4,856
hectares) have “been protected
during the past two or three years
by means of contour drains and
protective bunds, while parallel
progress has been made in many
of the other smaller islands,





TONIC WINE



AND
_ LIKE



FEEL
THIS !

BE HEALTHY
& HAPPY.





Holds Up
Reaping

4

Most of the plantations in the
island are having difficulty in
reaping the present crop because

they are not able to get the re-

qvired amount of canes due to the

abnormal rainfall which fell dur-

ing the Week, the Advocate was
reliably informed yesterday.

‘ ar

The rain force An 4

workers to stop cutting the canes
and some of the factories had to
cease operations on more than one
oceasion,

The ground was so thoroughly
soaked, that it was impossible for
lorries and carts to go into the
fields as was customary, to draw
the canes. In some instances,
canes had to be headed out to
the border of the field and that
eaused a considerable delay in
transport.

At some plantations however,
workers were trimming around
the fields so that there was not
much difficulty in loading.

The weather was fair yesterday
morning and the labourers re-
sumed their work, but it would
take several days before the lor-
ries and carts would be able to
go into the plant cane field.

Mr. W. F. Harris, Manager of
Haggatts in St, Andrew told the
Advocate yesterday that they had
10 inches of rain. for the week
up to Thursday and were forced
to stop grinding on three occa-
sidns during the week as a re-
sult of not having sufficient canes,

Work Resumed

He said that they started again
yesterday morning and had a
shower at 9 o'clock, but when he
left an hour later for the city
the weather was fair, everything
Was running smoothly and he was
expecting a reasonable day’s work.

At Haymans, St. Peter, where
11,09 inches fell for the week,
the factory never stopped work-
ing as they had received a suffi-
cient number of canes during the
time the rain was not falling
and over the week-end to keep
them going.

They did not get in as many
canes as they would have liked,
but in spite of that, they got
through better than they had an-
ticipated. Many of the peasants’
canes in that area which were

The problem is particularly dif- placed near the road side over
ficult in Cyprus because of the the week-end, were however
natural conditions and also of the | Washed away down in the Bowl-

ing Alley.

Mr. R. E. King, Manager of
Fisherpond in St. Joseph said
that they had 8.77 inches for the
week and the ground was so
thoroughly soaked, that they had
to head out the canes, hence at
Andrews, the factory could not
get the full supply and had
to stop on two or three occasions.

smallness of the holdings and the
poverty of the cultivators. The
policy has been to demonstrate a
technique and then induce culti-
vators to apply it. Another direc-
tion in which progress has been
made is the construction of small
storage reservoirs to control the
flash floods which follow every
storm, thus enabling the water to
be used for irrigation, Useful re-
sults have also followed measures
for the protection of forests,

a

_———

More Canes

The foregoing examples show
that the problem is being ener-
getically handled in many terri-
tories; it is far from being com-
pletely solved but it is hoped that,
eventually, these efforts will meet
the success they deserve, since on
them the future largely depends.

He said that with two or three
days of sunshine, they would be
able to supply a great deal more
canes, but it would be sometime
before they would be able to
get their lorries and carts back
into the plant cane field,

He said that the juice was still
very poor and the first week of
the crop, it took Andrews nearly
11 tons of cane to make a ton of
sugar,



Rates Of Exchange

February 16, 1951

—_——

At Apes Hill which had 7
CANADA inches and Blowers 5.26 inches,
4 5/1080 pri: Cheon both in St. James, labourers only
Bankers 623/10% pr.| had to stop work on Tuesday due
Demand | ek: aid to rain, but they were now en-
Sight Drafts 62% pr. | 84ged in trimming the _ fields
043/10% pr. Cable against the road so that there
628/10% pr. Currenéy 60 8/10% pr. ad-
oaent 80 110% pr} Was not much difficulty in load

Silver ing the canes,



“it feels as if there’s always some-
thing in my eyes,” eries John. Mother
worres: “Oh! Is his sight alright?”

“His sight is fine!” says Doctor. The
inflammation caused by
advise Optrex.”

trouble is
glare and dust, I



“Well!” says Mother qome days later,
“I'm glad we learned about Optrex—
you're a real ‘bright-eyes’ now John!”

PROTECT YOUR EYES werk

trex |=

EYE LOTION

poe
MAKE THIS TesT

The r of the eye and inner

with Optrex, washing away all dirt
and germs, soothing tiny eye veins.








° es eer emcee erence

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x _THE BEST AT THE LOWEST COST $3.00 each
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% PRESTCOLD $1.80 each
x | CHILDREN’S

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‘ Domestic | $1.67 each
x \) LADIES’ TEE SHIRTS
3 $1.42 each
s





—~—

>
heed

he eon ao at






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EARLS COURT—10 groups of trades,
represented by 700 exhibitors in
260,000 square feet of display area,



OLYMPIA—Iin an area of 300,000 square
feet, over |, 000 exhibitors will display
# wide variety of their latest goods,

CASTLE BROMWICH —The section
for Building and Heating, Electricity,
Engineering and Hardware, Exhibi-

tors: 1,300. Display area: 500,000
square feet (including outdoor),

BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR

LONDON APRIL 30—MAY 11








INFORMATION about exhibitors, advance

be obtained from the « [ ler of Cu



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in blending —added care of





PRICES

BRASSIERES.
BB? per pair
PLASTIC PARASOLS

$1.42 each
LADIES’ COTTON

VESTS
GO¢ each
BOYS’ COTTON VESTS
66¢ each
ART SILK HALF SLIPS
$1.92 each

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PRINT SKIRTS

$2.40 each
LADIES’ BLOUSES

$3.60 each
PLASTIC HEADTIES

23¢ each
ART SILK PANTIES
78? per pair
ZIPPS,

All Colours and Sizes
in Stock Now!



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THE MODERN.

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BIGGER
AND BETTER

A hundred years have passed since Queen Victoria
opened in London the first ‘Great Exhibition’ and
revealed to the world the manifold ways in which
British enterprise and skill were pioneering to increase
the ease and interest of life. For some time past, we
have been planning to celebrate this anniversary by
a Festival in which every aspect of British life will
be on display. In particular, we are making the 1951
British Industries Fair an occasion for the world to



see the full extent of our recovery and our resources.
We can promise that the B. I. F., like British Industry
itself, will be bigger and better than ever. Over three
thousand exhibitors from a hundred trade groups
will put their latest and finest products on show.

Few enterprising buyers will miss this unparalleled
opportunity of seeing what Britain has now to offer.
Thousands have made early arrangements for their
visit, so please make your reservations without delay.

BIRMINGHAM





catalogues

special displays and facilities at the Fair can

toms, Bridgetown

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‘

PAGE FOUR >



Saturday, February 17, 1951

EMIGRATION

THE House of Assembly on Tuesday
voted the sum of $80,000 to be put at the
disposal of the Labour Commissioner to
meet the cost of emigration of Barbadian
workers to the United States of America.
The number of emigrants to be) selected
from this island is not yet known but it
was estimated that Barbados would get a
good quota of the required 10,000 or 16,000
from the West Indies.

The benefit of emigration to the U.S.A,
during the last six years cannot be over-
estimated. Remittances from the 11,000
who have gone in recent years, some of
them more than once, amounted to
approximately three million dollars. But
the schemes not only brought substantial
funds iftto the island but gave those who
went an opportunity to live and work
under conditions entirely different from
those to which they had been accustomed
in Barbados; it also reduced unemploy-
ment as it brought work to many who had
never been so inclined.

In addition to the benefits to the indi-
vidual the emigration schemes improved
the spending power of the people and
raised the standard of living. Several of
these workers were able to acquire proper-
ty and the means of earning a livelihood,
an opportunity which they never had be-
fore.

If there is to be a West Indian quota of
anything like ten thousand workers to the
United States it might be well to press the
claims of Barbados whose 1,100 to the
square mile gives her priority for relief.

The question of transport and its cost
will have to be faced. In 1946 it was point-
ed out that the reason for including the
majority of Jamaicans in the quota was
that the cost of transport was less because
of the close proximity of that island to the
United States. The employer who had
undertaken to pay the cost of transport was
not satisfied to pay the higher fare for Bar-
badians when it could be avoided by con-
tracting with Jamaicans,

It might be as well for the Government
to make up its mind and let it be under-
stood that half of the transport cost for
each labourer will be paid on condition
that it be repaid from the earnings of the
worker. If the Government can set up an
organisation, the United States Workers’
Savings Branch of the Labour Department,
in which debts and fines by the Courts are
collected, it would add nothing to the
work now being done to deduct from the
remittances the sums owing to the Gov-
ernment as half of the cost of transport. It
might also be the means of preventing
‘premature return of workers not too willing
to work for lengthy periods.

There is not one worker who would ob-
ject to such deduction from his remittances.

It is on record, as the Labour Commis-
sioner said in a recent Press Conference on
his return from the United States that the
employers are not only willing but desir-
ous of having Barbadians in their employ
because of the reputation which thousands
of them have gained as food workers.

There is however one domestic problem
to be settled. There are still those who feel
that an early selection of labourers from
this island would rob the ranks of agricul-
tural labour.

In fact, the number of agricultural
labourers in previous emigration schemes
has been small and did not interferé with
the reaping of the crop. Several people
who registered as labourers were not in the
real sense agricultural labourers but
attracted by the type of work to be done
and the wages it brought not only went as
labourers but Worked well. It was particu-
larly noticeable that many youngsters who
had never been inclined to work before
and those who found it difficult to obtain
employment joined in the scheme and
made a success of it. It is true to say that
these are not included among those who
broke their contracts or returned at an
early time. \

Beyond these minor difficulties the Gov-
ernment should make every effort to re-
cruit suitable personnel as early as possible.



ecemcmennatesninens % Veiniannameaceiy

EEE SU NEENES = Snnneipenmenemeeeremeneeme ee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Economic Consequen ces|

Of Staying In Bed

THE LIFE OF JOHN MAYNARD

KEYNES. By R. F. Harrod. By George Malcolm Thomson
Macmillan, 25s. 674 pages.

ANYONE who wishes to solve two years he had shipped one
the problem of how to make pedigree bull to Bombay. During
money without actually working the war he was in the Treasury
should consider the method adopt- Where he managed the nation’s
ed by Keynes, who, starting from external finances.
poverty, made a respectable for- Now the war over, he’ was a
tune by staying in bed in the don, a business man, a polemical
mornings. This is not, however, writer of international Influence,
the whole art of easy money. bursar of his old college—raising

It is advisable to be an expert the capital value of the “Chest”
economist and to have the nerve from £30,000 to £380,000 when he
of a gambler. It is also a good died. He was also high priest of
idea to have some capital. “Bloomsbury.”

Keynes did not have enough.

The consequence was that after For those were the days when
making a net profit of £19,000 in the nightingales sang — and the
1920 in speculations in the franc parakeets chattered — in Gordon
and the dollar he found himself Square, to which Keynes brought
faced with a demand for £7,000 Lydia Lopokova, the exquisite
in transactions in dollars and ballerina who became his wife.
marks. Characteristically, almost Keynes’s

He had gambled on the expec- first act on meeting her was to
tation that the mark would slump SUggest improvernents in her in-
and the dollar would rise. Both vestments.
unaccountably stuck fast. Between the wars Keynes in-

It was idle to say that in the fluenced thought a great deal,
long run everything would be all policy less, events hardly at all.
right. As Keynes himself said He was a Liberal in the sense that
later, “In the long run we are he agreed with Asquith one day,
all dead.”. The demand for cash Lloyd George the next, and
was immediate. A financier whom Beaverbrook the day after. He was
he did not know lent him £5,000. a Liberal in the sense that he
After that Keynes went into the entertained the Liberal Summer
commodity markets. School with a Greek tragedy. The

a ° Liberals could provide all the
AT the same time, he had a Greek tragedy they needed,

*

stroke of misfortune over his

impending book, Eeonomic Con- * * *
sequences of the Peace Treaty, on ;

which he was taking all the WHEN the second war came he
financial risk. was back in the Treasury. The

Half of the first edition, coming only’ difference was that the
by sea from Edinburgh, was jetti- Treasury was a step nearer bank-
soned in a gale. Three bales, cast ruptey.
ashore in Denmark, were sold Keynes the statesman, as dis-
there by auction. tinct from Keynes the profound

Ultimately all the profits on economist, will be judged by those
the English edition went to meet final years. Judgment will be
his losses in speculation, A less based not on a sheaf of State
self-assured young man would papers incomparable in dialectical
have gambled no more. Keynes elegance but on whether. the
plunged deeper and, in four years, decisions he took, and forced on
had £57,000. He died worth others by his extraordinary gift
£450,000, allowing £31,000 for his for persuasion, were, in fact, sound,
pictures and £20,000 for his books.

Bonar Law, when Chancellor, aking, as he did, a tragic view
was indirectly responsible for of Britain’s immediate financial
starting Keynes’s picture collec- prospects, was he right in pressing
tion. Keynes, about to visit Paris the Government to accept the
on Treasury business, discovered American Loan, which he negoti-
that Degas’s private collection ated in Washington, having gone
was coming up for auction. With there determined to accept the
£20,000 of the nation’s money, money only if it was free of inter-
which the Chancellor let him play est? He had misjudged the change

with, he bought 13 pictures for
the National Gallery. Big Bertha
was shelling Paris at the time
so that the market was depressed,
At the same time, Keynes bought
a Cezanne for himself. Z
*

BEFORE the war Keynes had

been in the India Office, where in





in American temper. ‘

But, convinced Britain must have
the money, he also persuaded
himself she must swallow the
terms. There will be no doubt
whether, in the last year of his
life, Keynes had the steadiness of
spirit which critical decisions
require. He is not, of course,



responsible for the scandalous
mismanagement of the money later
on.

Harrod’s life, of a man_ he
admired and ed is affec-
tionate without being uncritical.
Making skilful of a jarge num-
ber of private , it gives a
fascinating it of one of the
most brilliant Englishmen of the
century .

THE STRANGE LAND. By Ned
Calmer, Cape, 12s. 6d. 416 pages.

A CRISP American novel about
a war in which an ambitious gen-
eral risks the lives of his troops
in order to enhance his own pres-
tige as a tough, fighting command-
er. The operation goes badly.
Various explanations are offered.






But on one point, there is some-
thing like unanimity among the
characters. Listen to this chorus:
“The British outfits he’s got aren’t
making him f any more com-
fortable.” “The British may feel
much less, well, reluctant.” “Up
on Montgomery’s front they don’t
move at all.”

You remember that war? It has
been raging. Ever since 1945.

Calmer’s dese . are vivid;
conversation lean’ ards the ele-
mental.

Like this:

“AlL mem are bad.”

“You are very cold.”

She shrugs “C’est la guerre.”
“What's your name?”
“Yolande.”

After you with the phrase-book
mademoiselle,

THE ASSYRIAN, AND OTHER
STORIES, By William Saroyan
Faber 10s, 6d, 288 pages.

SAROYAN in these stories, con-
tinues his impersonation of an
absent-minded man going for a
stroll along a tight-rope. He ought
not to reach the other end, he
ought not to be on the rope at all,
the meandering creature, But he

has our sympathy, in the end our
confidence,

In an expansive preface, he tells

how much money he was paid by |

magazines for the eleven stories
in this new collection. For The
Cocktail Party 5,000 dollars; for
The Pheasant Hunter 3,000,
Big money, but they are good
stories. For the rest he got about
500 dollars. For three of them, no
money at all, They appeared in
The American Review.

(WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED)
—L.E.S.



“Two Socialist Millionaires”

LONDON, Feb. 9.

“The Tories have a plan”, says
a Socialist M.P. They plan to
bring the Government down, he
alleges, by bringing two motions
of censure each week and talking
Parliament to death for the rest
of the week. By so doing, this
Socialist M.P. writes, they will
persuade the country that ne
Government is doing nothing,
and, that in the end, the influenza
germ or ill-luck will lead to a
General Election,

That is what a somewhat bitter
Socialist wrote this week, after
two votes of censure pressed by
the Conservative Party. But next
week he will have to change his
theory because the principal busi-
ness is a debate on Foreign Affairs,
and a debate on defence, during
which the Conservative leaders
and the Government will be in
almost complete agreement.

But this week the House of
Commons made the best use of
its opportunities for a bit of party
welfave. Mr. Churchill came
down for the steel debate. He
was in his best form. The case he
was making was of the best.
He argued that the Government
should postpone the take-over of
the steel industry in view of the
need for an uninterrupted re-
armament programme, It was a
simple argument. Everyone knew
what there was to say, and neither
Mr. Churchill nor Mr, George
Strauss, the Socialist Minister
concerned, made any new sub-
stantial point. Instead Churchill
rubbed in some of the peculiari-
ties of the situation—two million~
aires who happened to be social-
ists banded together to take over
the steel industry. One is Mr.
George Strauss himself, whose
father made a large fortune as
a metal broker. He is now
Minister of Supply and_responsi-
ble for steel as well as for British
atomic energy. The other is Mr.
Hardie who is now chairman of
the corporation set up by the
Government to own and _ control
most of steel production, Churchill
described him as “‘a past master of
monopoly’’—a description that put
at least four ideas into four words,
Mr. Hardie built his fortune on
the manufacture of oxygen,

Everything in this debate was
a foregone conclusion—except the

By David Temple Roberts

vote. In theory the Government
has a majority of six, even if all
ten Liberals vote against it. But
the party managers had been
counting heads and estimating the
need to bring influenza victims in
ambulances to Westminster,
Earlier in the day their information
reached the sporting community
and bookmakers were offering 10
to 1 against the fall of the Govern-
ment, And in fact Mr. Attlee sur-
vived by 10 votes. Steel — the
16,000,000 ton steel-producing in-
dustry — will become national
property next Thursday.

; This should be seen in perspec-
tive as a gigantic operation. It is
the largest single industry ever
brought under national control in
any country in the world—includ-
ing the Soviet Union, In a certain
sense it is the British Labour
Party’s one and only stroke of
doctrinaire socialism. Previous
nationalisations have been confined
to coal, transport, the central bank,
electricity and gas. Many Europ-
ean governments that are far from
socialist own their railways and
cut their own coal. It has often
been a _ surprise to European
visitors that there has been all the
fuss about Labour’s previous
acquisitions. But steel is another
matter. The British steel industry
is a controlling unit in British in-
dustry as a whole. If there is to
be a major conversion to war pro-
duction it will be in the steel
industry, and the Opposition’s
principal argument for oppos-
ing the Bill. But I doubt whether
there will be a sudden dislocation
of British industry. In the nego-
tiations between the Government’s
new corporation and the Federa-
tion, of the steelmasters, there has
been already that most remarkable
tendency to toleration. Mr.
Hardie, the “Socialist millionaire”,
and Sir Andrew Duncan, the con-
servative politician, are the main
protagonists. First they were
cautiously hostile. The “Federa-
tion” had, of course, all the man-
agers and technicians of the steel
industry in its employment. The
new corporation had of course the
political power and the ownership
vested in it by an Act of Parlia-

ment. Either there would be
warfare between the two or
negotiations. At first the Federa-
tion refused to allow any of its
employees to work for the cor-
poration. That is still so but now
ێ kind of tacit agreement has been
reached that the Federation should
remain in existence and the cor-
poration should pick its brains.
In the debate Mr. Strauss, in the
one passage where he was unwise
enough to show the edge of his
temper, reminded the Federation
that it was, in the end, the Cor-
poration that held all the big guns
—if it were to come to a fight. But
it will not come to a fight. The
Conservative Opposition has
sworn to reverse nationalising
should it come to power—after a
year or so it will be almost im-
possible to do that. But even if
steel remains nationalised under
a Labour Government, it will be
an industry scarcely run on the
doctrinaire lines laid down in the
phrase “control of the means of
production”, It will be run by
political and technical compromise
—not the best safeguard against
muddle.

The “Consul”

Chian-Carlo Menotti is an Ital-
ian-American. His opera, “The
Consul”, has just arrived in Lon-
don with a first-night success.
New Yorkers have raved about it.
But the opera fan audiences of
Milan have turned their thumbs
down. 4

Portuguese Poetess

The young poetess from the
Portuguese Azores who ‘stowed
away” on the yacht of a passing,
bearded Englishman has gained
the public sympathy. The best
comment I find from the dispatch





from an English reporter who
went all the way to Casablanca.
‘Poets read o ihings as well
as *verse”’, Ww: -feporter sen-
tentiously, why Otilia
Fréyao . wed away”. #

ymph

The Swediph b: has come to
town. You might shudder at the
thought of a dozen exceedingly
large, well-built young women
prancing athletieally in the corps
de ballet. But surprisingly, you
need not. The Swedish ballet has
in its company the smallest suc-
cessful ballerina fn the world.



Our Readers Say:

Emigration

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Allow me to inform those
members elected by us, that we
are. not as forgetful as they
imagine us to be, During the last
election campaign, they told us
that the only remedy for the acute
unemployment isin emigration and
they solemnly promised us that
any country giving the remotest
hint that they need labourers, wil!
be explored immediately to get as
large a quota for this island as
is possible,

On the 22nd November, 1950 that
hint was given, and what a hint!
Mr. Von R. Hunte, an official, of
the Panama Government intransit
at Piarco Airport, Trinidad, said
and was reported in the Advocate
on the 29th November, Many West
Indians may get work in 1951 in

travelling

Knowing
fathers,

has happened?
done about

Mindful of an

by one of the







Panama, many West Indians may 8fation to the U.S.A. of the available dollars. by Tourists visiting Barbados, but
be invited to work on the new Some time ago, he said that _ As a result of the visit of the I feel that to carry our Tourist
Sea Level project costing every labourer selected to go Tourist Ship last week over Industry beyond

$7,000,000,000., lasting for eleven should be made to pay his trans- $30,000.00 in U.S.A. Funds were would be a tragedy for the middle
year's, and over 3,000 West Indians portation, the Government ad- paid into the several Banks. class inhabitants

will be ernployed. Actual immigra- vancing it, to be later deducted When the Tourist Ship visitea for the people as

tion talks have alre: started, from his wages and refunded. For us on Sunday, Shops were closed present moment

and contractors from S.A., have that, we would be very grateful. so consequently we failed,to earn another large hotel te

preferred to take as mi from We are left to conjecture whether probably another $30,000.00 date-300 more visitor

Jamaica as possibl The € n it i hort-sightedness o1 wilful The General Pubic are opposed not dream and |

is understood that the cont disregard for the economic plight to the opening of Shops on Sun- by the thousands

were trying to minimise ov of the unemployed, With the reap- day or Bark holicay so that there economic structur

expenditure
Jamaica is the nearest of the West
Indian Islands to Panama.

the reputation our
brothers,
cousins established in Panama as
conscientious workers, and appre-
ciated by the Panama Government
by making a pension available to
those retired and returned home
to live in peace and contentment,
we considered our chanees very
rosy. We bore in mind the promise
by our Government that it is not
averse to pass legislation as ex-
peditiously as they desire. What

it? We are not un-

matter tabled by the Honourable
Junior member for St. Philip. We
are not forgetting the exhortation
counsellors when
speaking on a resolution for emi-

ing season in full swing, and few
people employed, we are
with consternation relative to the
emigration
U.S.A., this year, and how easy

and
anticipated
promises can be

AGARD
Sunday

uncles, and

Stores should be
when a Tourist

Meeting of the

What has been
address on the
Council was
earning dollars f

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—The question as to whether

on a Sunday or Bank _ holiday
on such days was discussed at a

Chamber of Commerce on Wed-
nesday the 14th and it was decid-
ed to refer the matter to a Gen-
eral Meeting of the Chamber.
The idea in 4 mind of the
the

the Sterling area, which in turn
would allow the West Indies to
claim and expect a larger share

filled

to * the

dishonoured,
H. LEWIS.

Closing
that it is in the

allowed to open
Boat is arriving
Council of the
special Act might

SHOP
Tourist

question of

‘or the benefit of

appears little prospect for an
amendment of the
Act, again if the Act were amend-
ed it would be the thin edge of
the wedge for it to be amended
for other reasons and may lead
to the desecration of the Sabbath.

If Government however, feel

the British Government that the
dollars should be earned, the Gov-
ernor might have sufficient power
under the Emergency Act to pro-
claim the opening of the Shops on
such Sundays or Bank holidays,
and if there is no power then a

on no consideratiom should the
Shop Closing Act be amended.

To the Edite., The Advocate—
SIR,—I am one of those people
who benefit directly and indirectly

re ,Will then be-

—_—

come dependent on an industry
that could disappear overnight.
House rent is now beyond the
means of the average salaried
man due to the higher prices that
visitors can afford to pay while
vegetables, eggs, servants etc., are
a money problem to the local

Closing

hest interest of housewife who is

pete with what

be provided) PR se unfortunately

ATTENDANT,
Trade

ers are making
$30.00 higher.

fourist industry
more, and 10,000

a certajn point
that will
particularly, and
a whole. At the
we can do with
accommo-
but let us a
lan for

‘of natural beauty

serve
lovely home
tourists

our whole

neighbour from Venezuela pays.
It, is argued by those anxious to
xtensively develop the Tourist
lustry that the earning capacity

' @very Barbadian will increase
“eS a result of a Tourist invasion,

the case. A clerk
salary raised by $20.00 per month
more, only to find that the invad-

; Workers
sugar industry will find that the
bados will not raise the price of
Sugar to meet the higher wages
dissipation and the disappearance

want for our Island
Barbados for

West Indian atmosphere. Only thi
morning I received
aa American friend of mine now

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY

TANKERS ARE ‘SAFE a dhieclonss' Ueiork aoesiad
SHIPS IN PORT

& CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
LONDON,

The recent Swansea Docks accident when an_oil-tanker
exploded, serious though it was, draws attention to one
striking fact--the extreme rarity of such accidents. Here,

17, 1951









Usually NOW

a few 8 She ser ea peaa ene observed in handling oll Tins S.A. APRICOT JAM—(2-1b) wines $ .35 $ 50
TODAY, oil and oil products are: am Tins OVALTINE (Large) «0.0.00 ae Ae

the chief items of commerce reaching the
world’s great ports. Indeed, without such car-
goes, international industry in general would
swiftly stop. Their volume is indicated by
the fact that tankers now account for some
20% of the world’s entire merchant shipping
tonnage. These ubiquitous vessels are essen-
tial links in the supply line between oilfieids’
and refineries and consumers of oil products
in all quarters of the globe.

Besides being among the most important,
tankers are some of the safest ships at sea,
Their accident record compares favourably
with that of any other class of vessel. And
only a proportion of tankers, of course, are
concerned with the transport of “dangerous”
oil cargoes, i.e. cargoes having a low flash-
point (below 73 degrees F.), such as motor
spirit. When such consignments are being
loaded or unloaded, special precautions are
observed to keep accident risk at a minimum.
Here are a few of the measures normally
employed:

A generally accepted principle, contained
in the Model code of Harbour By-Laws for’
Tankers, is that at least 100 ft. shall separate | Ke ceccnoessssessessesesst

tankers handling low flash-point oils from] ;
WHAT A COMFORT...

each other or from the nearest general cargo
to have Hotwater throughout your Home —

ship. Oil jetties are usually constructed so
that no metal fittings protrude which might
WATER-HEATERS

lead to “sparking” through friction and thus
well known for quality products

FOR YOUR BATHROOM


















































































Coree BASINS with Pedestal

25”x18”

& BASINS with or without Pedestal
22”x16”

Low-down SUITES

Bakelite Mahogany
Cast Iron CISTERNS
Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS
HARPIC, Large and Small,

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,

possibly cause a fire. All electrical gear—fuse-
boxes, switchboards, ete.—is normally equip-
ped with fireproof fittings. Pumping installa-
tions are insulated and “earthed” to discharge
static electricity as and when this is built up.:
Rate of pumping when low flash-point car-
goes are being loaded is strictly controlled
according to the size of the gas vents in a
ship’s tanks. This prevents any excess of gassy
vapours being released into the atmosphere;
the normal loading rate being up to 1,000 tons
per hour per tank. ¢
Entrances to tanker basins are frequently
guarded by floating fireproof breakwaters,
which can seal off the basin if an accident
occurs and stop oil spreading across the water
to reach other berths. Wherever possible,
lay-out of shore storage tanks is arranged so
that a group of tanks holding low flash-point
products is separated from any similar group
by intervening tanks containing less inflam-
mable oil, such as heavy fuels. Each tank is
generally surrounded by a wall of such a size
that, if a leak occurs, the entire contents of
the tank can, if necessary, be contained in the
enclosure formed. Likewise, the foundations
upon which the tanks stand are proofed
against leakage, so that even if the tank’s
bottom springs a leak, the oil cannot seep
down into the ground and percolate under
the base of the safety wall.
In view of the comparative immunity of
tankers and oil installations from serious acci-
dents, these stringent precautions may be con-
sidered as being unduly elaborate. But, it is
due to this very strict regard for safety that
accidents such as the Swansea explosion are
of extremely rare occurrence.

New Moth Trap Catches 25,000

LONDON.

DESCRIPTION of a new mercury-vapour
trap for night flying insects was given before
the Royal Entomological Society.
The inventors, amateur naturalists H. S.
Robinson and his brother P. M. Robinson,
said that observation and experiments led
them to conclude that contrary to a widely
held belief, moths and other night-flying
insects are not attracted by light but are
dazzled by it. They said the light creates an
“unbalance” in them and causes the insects
to approach the light in a series of curves.
The brothers told how on this hypothesis
they constructed a trap many times more
effective than any known and with the aid
of a mercury-vapour lamp in one year
secured for the British Museum two species
and two sub-species of moths new to the
British Isles.

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holding an important post in the
U.S. Navy, and in which he ex-
presses the hope that Barbados has
not been spoilt by a large tourist
trade as have so many other places
where he used to enjoy the local
conditions and set-up. O. H. J.
Cruelty
To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—Yesterday I was walking
on Rockley beach and 1 saw a
little boy digging a hole with a
hoe, Nearby on the sand lay a| ¥
young goat. I asked the boy what]
he was going wo do and he said
that his father had sent him to
bury the goat. The animal was
still alive!

I called the boy’s father and
made him kill the goat, which had
been ill for some time.

This is only one incident of
cruelty, but every’ day in this
island animals are sbeing treated
abominably. The streets swarm
with starving dogs, sheep are

unable to com-
her next door

WORLD'S MOST REFRESHING DRINK

GOLD BRAID. RUM

AND
CANADA DRY CLUB SODA
OR
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this will not be
may get his

his living cost
in the

can pay them
tourists in Bar-

So

tethered in the sun all day without AT g

be expected, Inflation, “@ter, little donkeys are forced to 3
pull loads that are too great for 5 §

— ‘ . them, x
is not what we Wh: he 2
Sat aw aie” me That can be done about it? or >
oe ae Bach of us can help by trying to} &
sarbadians— sreven ot e aaal y | ¥

with its natural prevent cruelty whenever we see! TOF . we °
. Ma WEES it, and by contributing to the| RE fm, r Al R \ ray >

‘ett S.P.C.A., whose mission it to/ 8 sail Ze j l L S

a letter from protect animals from the sues 3S

of men. ANIMAL’ LOVER. - } 50g 6660959S6050600595445o SoS EUS Sooteeeetoseouss”



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY

Admitted To
o
Local Bar

The number of barristers prac-
tising at the local Bar was ia-
creased by one yesterday when
Mr. Vere lan de Lacey Carrington
Was admitted to practise by His
Honour the Chief Judge, Sir Allan
Collymore. The brief ceremony
which took place before the sitting
of the Court of Ordinary was seen
by many of Mr. Carrington’s
friends and well wishers. He was
introduced by Mr. F. E. Fieid,
Attorney General,

Mr. Field told the Chief Judge
that Carrington had been educated
at Harrison College from i927 to
1935, in which year he won the
Island Scholarship to Codringten
College. In 1936 he passed the
Durham Inter-Arts Examination
with Second Class Honours im
Division I, but relinquished the
Scholarship in July of the same
year to accept an appointment as
a Cadet in the Assistant Court of
Appeal. From the Court of Appéal
he was transferred to the Income
Tax Department in 1943.

Mr. Carrington was admitted to
Gray’s Inn in absentia on Decem-
ber 12, 1945. He passed two sec-
tions of Part I of the Law Exam
inations at Trinidad and _ the
remaining sections at Barbados.
He went to England in November
1949 and passed the Bar Final in
May 1950. On November 17, 1959,
he was called to the Bar and he
signed the Roll of Barristers
three days later.

He had much pleasure in asking
that Mr. Carrington be admitted
to practise, Mr. Field said.



Local Service

The Chief Judge addressing Mr,
Carrington said it was always a
pleasure for him to welcome from
the Bench a Barrister-at-Law on
his introduction to the Bar of
Barbados. In Mr.’ Carrington’s
case, the pleasure was intensified
by the knowledge that he had
rendered years of valuable ser-
vice to the island in various
capacities.

“In this connection”, the Chief
Judge said, “the tongue of good
report has been heard on all sides
in your favour, and the presence
here this morning of your many
friends and well wishers is a
happy augury of your future
success, Wherever and in what-
ever capacity your future lies I
wish you every success, “You are
now admitted to practise in all the
Courts of this Island and I extend
a welcome to you.”

Mr. Carrington replying
thanked the Chief Judge for
admitting him and thanked the
Acting Attorney General for in-
troducing him, Among the mem-
bers of the Bar of Barbados, Mr.
Carrington said, there was always
a spirit of friendliness, and he
pledged with that friendship and
assistance, that if at any time he
appeared in either of the Courts
as a Barrister or otherwise he
would do his utmost to uphold the
tiaditions of the Bar.

17, 1951

neeeierancrananeneaatereednten tn eeliNemeeMoR bt wis Been

THREE

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



HEIFERS
4 4a



THE VETERINARY SURGEONS
Experiment Farm at Friar’s Hill,



Reversed Decision
In. Stone Throwing
Case

Judgment was entered for de-
fendants Violet Hollingsworth
and_ Beatrice Hollingsworth, both
of St. Lucy, yesterday by Their
Honours Mr. G. L. Taylor and
Mr. J. W. B. Chenery, Judges
of the Assistant Court of Appeal,
after hearing in a suit brought by
Madeline Roach, plaintiff of Jo-
sey Hill, St. Lucy, claiming dam-
ages to the amount of £10 from
both defendants,

In entering judgment for. the
defendants, Their Honours re-
versed the decision of His Wor-
ship Mr. S. H. Nurse in the
Petty Debt Court of District “E”
St. Peter, who gave judgment
for the plaintiff and awarded £2
10s.

Giving evidence yesterday Ma-
deline Roach said that on Octo-
ber 20 she was in her house and
both defendants Violet and Bea-
trice Hollingsworth threw stones
at her house, damaging the door
and the flaps of the door. She was
forced to call in a carpenter to
repair the damage. Violet and
Beatrice Hollingsworth both de-
nied that they threw stones at
Roach’s house. One witness said
that she saw Celeste Hinds throw
stones at the house, but could
not remember seeing any of the
defendants throwing stones.

Madeline Roach was ordered
to pay the costs of both Courts.
Mr. H. Clarke appeared on be-
half of the defendants in the case.



Car Washed Away

In Frizer’s River

MR. WILKEY, Manager

of Frizer’s Plantation, got into

difficulties yesterday in the Frizer’s River when he was
assisting Lionel Williams of Canbar, St. Joseph, to get his

ear (O 3) out of the river.
by men who happened to be

He was pulled out of the river

nearby.

When there is heavy rain up St. Joseph, the Frizer’s

River overflows. Williams’

car was stalled by the water

which came across the road. He left the car and went to

get assistance and when he
into the small river.

returned it had been washed

The car was carried by the current

for about 300 yards and only the top of it could be seen.





SEAWELL MANAGER

His Excellency the Governor has
been notified by the Secretary of
State for the Colonies that he has
approved of the appointment of
Mr. D, E. Henderson as Mana-
ger, Airport, with effect from Ist
September, 1950.

Prior to the establishment of the
office of Airport Manager under
the recent departmental reorgani-
sation Mr. Henderson has been
serving in the non-established post
since April, 1950.

It will be recalled that Mr. Hen-
derson was commissioned in the
Royal Air Force at the outbreak of
the war, was twice mentioned in
despatches and eventually com—
pleted service with the rank of
Squadron Leader.

INSPECTORS PASS ~
EXAMINATION

Twenty-seven candidates took
the local examination for Sanitary
Tnspectors and thirteen were suc-
cessful,

The examination was conducted
on Saturday, February 10 and
Tuesday, February 13, The ex-
aminers were: Dr. J. P. O’Mahony,
Director of Medical Services, Dr.
F. N. Grannum, Senior Medical
Officer of Health and Mr. W. A.
Abrahams, Government Chief
Sanitary Inspector.

Those successful were:—

Martin Collymore, Samuel Ince, James
Leslie, Arthur Lewis, Aubrey Lewis,
Vernon Maycoek, Ivan Nurse, Ivan
Preseod, Alfred Prescott, Leo Small,
Armond Todd, Ralph Wason, Joseph
Welch.

BANK ON WHEELS
GETS STARTED

The Travelling Office of the Gov-
ernment Savings Bank will be
starting its tri-weekly visits to the
various sugar factories throughout
the island from Monday, Febru-
ary 26 and will continue until the
end of the crop season,

This is the third year for the
Bank which goes out on Mondays,
‘Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

The Bank is expected to do even
better business this year than it
did on the previous two years
when it collected $13,277.60 in
1949 and $13,621.56 the following
year.

RICE, FUEL COME

A supply of 2,000 bags of rice
was included in the cargo brought
to ers dos yesterday by the 74-

2 : Smith.

ton schoo





Owners’ Association, j

After three days 6f steady down-
pours all over the island, the rain
held off yesterday until after mid-
day, when it began to fall again
until late evening. The rain fell
heavily in St. Thomas last night
between 9 and 10 o’clock, but St.
Michael again received the heavi-
est rainfall, this time .32 inches.

Telephone communication at
District “E”’, St. Peter, “F’, 3t.
Joseph and at Belleplaine, St

Andrew which were put out of
order early in the week were still
out of order up to last night.

The following are the figures
recorded at the various stations up
to 6 o’clock last night: Districy
“Ar .32,. “B" -.16;. “C20, “D"
.16, Crab Hill, St. Lucy, .16 and
Four Roads, St. John,

No major breakdowns of the
public utilities, electric and gas
supplies or telephone communica-
tion occurred because of the rain.

About 15 telephone lines in scat-
tered parts of the island were
damaged.

Though rain was heaviest in St
Michael, telephone trouble in tnat
parish was not more than in wher
parisfies,

Gas lighting was also affected,
mainly in the Christ Church area
along Hastings, Worthings and
Rockley where the street lamps
were out of working order.

The steady spell of rain stop-
ped in the City yesterday morning
but after 3.00 p.m., the skies
again became overcast and rai
fell continuously during the even-
ing.

The morning, although a little
cloudy, was. sunny and nearly
every one expected a dry day.
Some even risked going to work
without umbrellas or raincoats.
They were however disappointed
in the evening.

At Kensington Oval nearly all
the water.was pumped off the
western end of the field by mid-
day. Everything looked promising
and the groundsmen even attempt-—
ed to clean up the outfield around
the wicket. Unfortunately -more
water collected on the field during
the evening. At about 1.00 p.m.
the Sigmund Pump from the Fire
Brigade had pumped off approx-
imately 135,000 gallons and two
other pumps were also working.

Two telephone posts at St.
Andrew, the property of Haggatts
estate, were washed away by
strong currents of water on Thurs-
day. The lines were broken and
there were no possible means of
communication with St. Andrew

For mont

falls heavily
the Ivy area, tt f
the Ivy Road gets choked and
water covers the road to- about four



now whenever ra
Michael abr





¢t the



Mr. 8. L. Hignett and Dr. Leonard





Case Dismissed

The Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal Mr, G. L. Tay-
jor and. Mr. J. W. B.. Chenery
yesterday reversed a decision of
Police Magistrate Mr. E. A.
McLeod and dismissed a case
brought against C. F. Bourne of

M. E. R. Bourne & Co., Provi-
sion Merchants of Roebuck
Street.

The Police Magistrate had fined
Bourne £5 when he found him
guilty of having failed to produce
books, documents and vouchers
for inspection when he was called
upon to do so by an authorised
person.

Mr. Edward Evans, Chief Price
Control Inspector, prosecuted the
case, Mr. G. B. Niles represent-
ed Bourne who had appealed
against the Lower Court’s
decision.

Mr. Niles argued that the sec-
tion under. which. Bourne was
charged did “not specifically give
the Price Control Inspector power
to inspect the books,



Decision Reversed

The decision of His Worship
Mr. H. A. Talma Magistrate of
District “A” Police Court — who
ordered Manning Mayers of Halis
Road, St. Michael to pay a fine
of £5 in 14 days or in default two
months’ imprisonment with hard
labour for stealing one alarm
clock — was yesterday reversed
by Their Honours Mr. G. L. Taylor
ond Mr. J. W. B. Chenery Judges
“cf: the Assistant’ Court of Appeul.

Their Honours dismissed the
case which was brought by the
Police on its merits. Counsel for
Mayers was Mr. D. H. L. Ward.

In his evidence in the lower
court Herbert Gittens of Martin-
dales Road said that he was
“short” in cash and carried tha
alarm clock to Mayers to see if "he
would buy it. When he produced
the clock to Mayers he (Mayers)
took the clock in a room but never
paid him for it. All of this hap-
pened on October 15. Mayers
showing no intention of paying
him for the clock, he reported th
matter to the Police who brought
a case of larceny against Mayers.
The clock is valued at 25/-.

Mr. Ward submitted that the
evidence that the prosecution
brought against his client was
ccrflicting and there were many
discrepancies. He. further sub
mitted that the case be dismissed,

Another case brought by the
Police against Mayers of assault-
ing a policeman while in the exe-
cution of his duty — on the same
date that the larceny offence was
alleged to have been committed—
was also dismissed by Their Hon-
ours on its merits.

Mr. H. A, Talma had imposed
a fine on Mayers.

REMANDED

George Sabian Ojolet, a native of
French Guiana and a sailor from
the schooner Ipana, was remanded
until February 19 by His Worship
Mr. E. A. McLeod, Police Magis-
trate of District ‘A’ after he was
charged by the Police with the
larceny of articles valued $30 from
George Harewood, a shipmate of
his, on February 4.

Giving evidence for the Police,
H.P.C. Gill, attached to the
Bridge Police Station, said that on
‘February 15 he was entrusted
with a warrant signed by Captain
W. Farmer for the arrest of Ojolet.
Ojolet was charged with the lar-
ceny of articles valued at $30,

About 6.50 p.m. on the same
Gay he saw the defendant on the
Chamberlain Bridge and arrested
him. He was cautioned and on
arriving at the Bridge Post made
a voluntary statement,

Harewood said that he had left
the Ipana sometime in the early
part of February and when he
returned to the ship he found that
cash to the amount of $26 and a
black fountain pen valued at $4
were missing. He reported the
matter to the Police.

UNLAWFUL POSSESSION

Rosa Yarde of Lodge Road
Christ Church, was fined 20/— to be
paid in seven days or in defauit
one month’s imprisonment’ witt
hard labour for the unlawful pos-
session of wood which she was
carrying along the wharf on Feb-
ruary 16.

The case was brought by Cpl.
Murphy who said that he saw
Yarde taking a quantity of wooc
along the wharf. When he the
her what she was doing with the
wood she said that someone had
given the wood to her.

After finding that her explana-
tion was not satisfactory, he took
her to the Bridge Police Station
where she was charged with tne
unlawful poss ion of the wood









Hutson with 3 Young Nelthropp Heifers at the Antiguan Central

Vet. Praises Nelthropp
Cattle In Antigu

(From Our Own Correspondent)

MR. S. L. HIGNETT, B.Sc., M.R.C.V.S.,

ANTYGUA.
has come to

Antigua at the request of the Administration to investigate

a cattle breeding problem in
ment Station, He arrived

the herd at the Central Experi-
on the 4th February and his



“Sedgefield”

Converted

To Passerger Ship

Motor vessel Sedgefield, which
once provided space for tons of
cargo will in another three or
four months cater only for cabin
class and deck passengers and their
baggage.

The Sedgefield is now lying
alongside the dock in the Careen-
age under conversion into a pas-
senger ship. She will in the future
be run between the West Indies
by the Guadeloupe Governmen,
who have bought her over from
Mr. Bernard Agerard, a French
millionaire from Martinique.

When a representative of the
Advocate boarded her yesterday
he found welders and engineers vu,
Messrs. Central Foundry Ltd. ai
work on the deck while the ship’:
crew were beating away with their
hammers and other pieces of tool
in the hatches to get rid of the
rust,

These workmen began the job
of converting tHe Sedgefield on
Monday. They could not work o,
Wednesday and Thursday because
of the heavy rainfall, but yester-
day, they were able to push aheac
with their work, making much oi
the cool atmosphere of the har-
bour.

After they have completed most
of the internal repairs, the ship
will be taken on dock for clean-
ing, painting and other minor re-
pairs. She now appears to be a
masg of iron rust, with spots here
and there to tell one that she was
painted white when built six years
ago. Her bottom is covered with
moss and barnacles. She has.
however, a “clean look” on the
inside.

The converted Sedgefield will be
fitted with 12 cabins and will ac

stay in the colony of approximately one month has been ¢ommodate over 100 deck passen-

made possible through a financial grant from

Development and Welfare
Wellcome Foundation.

ADMITTED TQ
PROBATE

The wills of ten people were
admitted to Probate py His Hon~
our the Chief Judge Sir Allan



Collymore at yesterday’s sitting®

of the Court of Ordinary as
follow:—
Annie

Walrond Skinner, St,
Peter;

Pearla Healis Rose, St.
James; Keturah Matilda Albertha
Davis, St. Michael; Lilian Melvin
Pitt, St. Michael; Louise Agard,
St. James, Florence Odell, St,
Michael; Philip Albert Gibbs, St.
James; Theresa Augustus Hinds,
St. James; Robert Benjamin
Clarke, St. Michael; Delbert
Graham DeC, Leacock, also known
as Delbert Graham DeCourcy
Briggs or Captain Briggs, ~St,
Lucy.

His Honour allowed the reseal-
ing of Probate and Letters of Ad-
ministration with will annex-
ed of Emily Margaret. Gardner
Young, late of British Guiana,
under section 37 of the Court of
Ordinary Act, 1891.

The application was made by
Messrs Cottle Catford & Co.

It Rained In Antigua Too

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA.
Rarely does a party in Antigua
have to be cancelled owing to wet
weather during the early months
of the year, but this was the case
yesterday when a large number
of folks expected to attend an ‘At
Home” on the H.M.S. Devon.
shire. The day was cloudy but by
afternoon when the atmosphere
got really cold and rainy the half
hour’s launch journey to the ship
would not have been pleasant,

NOT @NE
LONDON, Feb.
Moscow’s radio reported today
that the Russian representative
basketball team has completed its
“friendly matches” with basket-
ball teams of a number of towns
in China.
The radio said :
“The Soviet sportsmen have not
lost a single game there.”
—I.N.S,.

, IMPERIAL LEATHER

Stiff joints? Aches?

oan teantte
es

You will feel Sloan’s doing you
It acts quickly —
soothes and comforts and drives

good at once.

out all Inflammation.

OTD
An,

LINDEN BLOSSOM



LOOK FOR THE PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN ON THE PACKET.

Colonial
and the co-operation of the

He is the resident veterinary
surgeon at the Wellcome Veter-
inary Research Station at Frant,
Sussex. He has been associated
for a long period with investiga-
tions into cattle infertility of
various types in a number of
countries, including the Argen-
tine,

Nelthropp Cattle

“IT am very much ‘impressed
with the quality and performance
of the Nelthropp Cattle main-
tained at this Experimental Sta-
tion”, says Mr. Hignett.
Nelthropp Cattle originated in
St. Croix and were established
there by the late Bromley Nel-
thropp. Their introduction into
Antigua five years ago at the
time of the inception of the Ex-
periment Station at Friar’s Hill
has been largely due to recom-
mendation of the Director of Ag-
riculture Mr. R. Johns and Dr.
Leonard Hutson. They are dual
purpose animals, beef and milk,
and it is considered that these
Jarge, red, docile creatures are
suitable to the Leeward Islands
Colony because with so much un-
cultivated land available a Pas-
turage Programme is being car-
ried on. Pasturing rather than
stall feeding has always been
the practice of peasants in these

islands.
Adaptable

Nelthropp cattle adapt them-
selves well to prevailing condi-
tions in that they possess a high
resistance to heat, ticks, tick-
borne diseases and _ drought.
There are seventy-six animals in
the paddocks, a number of bulls
having been already distributed
throughout the islands. The most
striking cow roaming the pasture
is “Duchess” who in her sixth
month of lactation produces 144
Ibs of milk daily and has already
given 400 gallons to date.

Mr. Hignett and Doctor Hut-
son will shortly be visiting both
the British and American Virgin
Islands to further their investi-
gations.





SMALL FIRE

A small fire broke out at the
Windsor Hotel, Hastings, last
night about 7.30 when the soot in
the chimney caught afire. The

gers, Her present saloon cruise
quarters will be extended, and the
spar and boom will be moved
forward,

Her conning tower will be re-
moved to make place for a new
bridge deck while the other deck
will be extended. More life boat
actommodation will be provided
and new lavatory conveniences
installed.

The Sedgefield is about 180 feet
long, She was formerly an Ameri-
can troop transport. After the
war, she was bought over by Mr
Agerard and converted into a
freighter. She is now undergoing
her second conversion,

She was in Barbados since
December 3 to be converted, Her
skipper, Captain Valentin Deric
has gone up to US.A., to send
down material for her conversion

Bridges Will Be
Replaced Soon

Immediate action will be taken
to make some temporary arrange
ment for accommodating traffic
over Lake’s bridge, the Director o,
Highways and Transport told the
Advocate yesterday. Part of this
bridge was washed away this weey
by flood water,

The temporary bridge at Bax~-
ters which was also washed away,
will have to be replaced, he said,
Despite the heavy rains, no other
flood damage had been reported.

Speaking of the Department’s
1949-50 programme, the Director
said that this had been completea
with the exception of one item,
This was the reconstruction of a
section of Newcastle Road which
had suffered badly from flood
damage and wag presently closea
to the public.

The repair of previous flood
damage work on Highway 1 from
Spring Vale to Bruce Vale includ-
ing the temporary bridge at Bax-
ters, had now been set back by
the rains and the collapse of the
bridge,

He said that during the year a
great deal of work had been done
on the roads of the Bay Estate
Housing Scheme and was continu-
ing. Work was also in progress on
an entrance road to the Pine Hous-
ing Scheme. Thig would be com-



Fire Brigade was called to the ;pleted by the end of the year. This

scene and quickly put it out,

LUXURY

SOAPS

BLUE HYACINTH

+

Sprains?

Just apply Sloan’s Liniment lightly





Prom ail chemists and stores. , an



FRESH SUPPLY OF

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‘| (SCRATCH GRAIN)

‘BU. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.- ine
“\ossesssemeseeen| oe

work was not in the year’s pro-
gramme of the Department, but
the Department had been askec
to carry it out.

Work on the Harmony Hw!
diversion was nearing completion
and it wags hoped to get through
with it before the end of the fio
ancial year.

The removal of the crushing
plant from the yard of the De
partment and the installation of it
at the new site Prospect (Lazaret
to) should also be completed by
the end of the year.

re toa COLD

oie Ya Tid 4



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Have it handy ~— always!

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“BRECKNELL”
PLATFORM SCALES

WEIGHING FROM 1 TO 1,120 LBS.
Stamped ready fc. use and complete with all necessary weights

ONLY $179.90 EACH.

“DOMO"
CREAM SEPARATORS

CAPACITY 10 GALLONS PER HOUR

i BRARRERESQ@N’S BROAD STREET
$56.74 EACH.

PAGE FIVE

: " ste
99999999999 F 995 F999 FO FOF OSS OES PPS POSSE ISS



ai

tye

oodessonees
SF





RANSOME LAWN MOWERS

“TIGER” and “ARIEL” Grades, each in two sizes

From $36.08 to $46.18
Complete with Grass Boxes.







BUTTER CHURNS

I GALLON CAPACITY

$29.90 EACH.



“BLOW”

BUTTER CHURNS

FOR DOMESTIC USE

AT $6.66 and $7.38 EACH.



AGRICULTURAL FORKS

HIGH GRADE FORKS, FULLY STRAPPED

ONLY $4.70.



| HARRISON'S



























Os.



Size 48” square

LINEN GLASS CLOTHS
22 31 — Each

—_—





Hardware

LINOLEUM
WOOD FLOORS
AND FURNITURE

hy

HYGIENIC WAX

OLIS

FOR BRIGHT AND
HEALTHY HOMES

PLASTIC TABLE CLOTHS
Blue & Green 54”

Dept.
2364

$2.42
$1.92

¢









PAGE SIX

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

eee ST DON'T THINK THIS PART OF THE }
SMUNGLE iS VERY HEALTHY!

GOSH... LOOK WHAT
THE TREE'S DOING )
TO OUR





BLONDIF:









| earns | PEO
| |WHAT ARE 2 ( PLENTY )) ere
a



i | G Sons “ed
AND HE SAID SOME / / HE. \ T
TERRIBLY MEAN § | DID 2 }








THINGS ABOUT » Py il
ee
















AND NOW-LADIES AND
GENTLEMEN ~ -YOUR T.'V
REPORTER WITH NEWS
AND VIEWS OF SIGHTS IN
OUR BIG CITY’

RATS/I'LLGO TO
DINTYS -I WANNA
1 | SEE IF THOSE
RUSTLERS GIT
TH’ HERD OVER
TH BORDER!

AND HERE I AM ACROSS
FROM DINTY MOORES - -AND
LOOK // WHO I6 THAT? -= NO

OTHER PERSON THAN JIGGS
HIMGELF - GOING INTO DINTYS/















=.

RIP KIRBY
vom. CY THE CORMORANTS
&f EH,

GOOD NORNING, SKIPPER! 2 —~J
L HOPE WE HAVE
| | WOK TODAY! p—1




ABOARD THE ESCAPED V say AIN'T IT
CONVICTS’ PLANE««~ \TIME WE WAS

SEEIN’ THE OCEAN?
é



}




-
a4?

SS

tim le vie
oo . -
‘

f







WHAT XINDA CRAZY PILOT HAVE WE
GOT” JOE* JOE! OPEN UP! HUH + 5

POOR'S LOCKED! IS THIS am,
A nous cos? oa

OPEN UP OR TLL
SHOOT THRU THE
WDOOR!

as



















OUR PEN Si'WE WAS FLYIN’ IN THE

ALL RIGHT? 7-7 OTHER DIRECTION?
Cae cs x






THE ESCAPED CON
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SATURDAY,










FEBRUARY 17, 1951



TInt

WOW! Denial Science Reveals




OOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH
i AFTER EATING IS THE
SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY 70

HELP STOP
FOOTH DECAY

WITH COLGATE
DENTAL CREAM

6S Foto
25c 45¢< 75¢

ea Blood Pressure
Kills Men & Women

Twice as many women as men
fer from High Blood Pressure, which
is @ mysterious disease that starts
about the time of Change of Life and
is the real cause of much heart trouble
and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
mon symptoms of High Blood Pres-
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ressure in head, dizziness, short

reath, pains in heart, palpitation,
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easily excited, fear and worry. If you
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delay treatment a single day, because
your life may be in danger. Noxco
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Pressure with the first dose, takes a
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you feel years younger in a few days.
Get Noxco from your chemist today.
It is guaranteed to make you feel fit
and strong or money bask,

‘
5
'







Rheumatism
and Backache
Gone'in 1 Week

Fiush Kidneys With Cystex and You'll Feel Fin

Cystex—the prescription of a famous doctor—
| ends all troubles due to faulty kidney action in
double quick time, so, if you suffer from Rheu-
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* Cystex Helps Nature 3 Ways
The Cystex treatment is highly scientific, being
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3) Strengthens and reinvigorates the kidneys,
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_
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The GUARANTEED Remedy RHEUMATISM







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NEW ARRIVALS

DOG COLLARS — LEADS
WHIPS — MUZZLES
JOCKEY WHIPS B24
GREENS LAWN MOWERS
Spare Wheels, Pinions, Pawls



PPLE PLLA IE

-

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¢
$
a
%
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%
x















Whitiaker’s Almanack,
1951




6 Pint and Cocktail |
| Glasses {

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE



at









SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.















TELEPHONE 2508
The charge for announcements of RE ES
a Sieerinaen. |, Daetns, Acknow- PU i SAL
igments, and In Memoriam notices is agate line
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays int wna agate Be
for any number of words up to 50, and| minimum char 1 aad 5
3 cents per word on week-days and| and $1.80 on Gece oe weet-daye
¢ cee per word on Sundays for each 4
additional word.
For Births, Marriage or Engagement AUCTION
announcements in Carib Calling the ns
charge is $3.00 for any mumber of words AUCTION SALE OF CARS
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each| | CARS — At the Cosmopolitan Garage,
#dditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 | Magazine Lane next Friday 23rd Febru-
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death | ®T/. at 1 o'clock sharp. One 1937 Chev-
Notices only after 4 p.m. rolet with new tyres and good engine
also One Austin 8 in good condition.
DI D’Arey. A. Scott, Auctioneer.
5 ED . 17.2.61—4n
KIRTON—On February 16th, 1951, at
her residence, Progressive Land, Bank UNDER THE SILVER
Heli, St. Michael, Mrs. Louise Kirton,
Age 54 years. Her funeral leaves the t HAMMER
Sethe ieee at 2 -m, today
or then:
the Wonbure Comet” ce to] BY recommendations of Lloyds Agents
Evelyn Kirton (Widower) we will sell_on Monday the 19th at
Gordon, Doreen and Olive (children). eg Seitteettor Street.
rvine Seale (brother) . 3 Jars Pate Seaet Gras

























| WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents end
96 cents Sundays 24 word,
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a

FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents end
96 cents mdays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a























near suburbs acceptable. Must contain

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GOVERNMENT NOTICES





pected will have to be imported from:—

a

PAGE SEVEN



SHIPPING NOTICES



Se ae ne enn me se















word Sundaye. word Sundays. OFFICIAL REPORTER — LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW| (|
HELP HOUSES APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Official Reporter of ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED The M.V. “Caribbee” will accept
- B Upstairs of building in| the Legislative Council. The post is non-pensionable, and the salary AMS, LINE) Se igs ce eset
LADY=-Sultable lady with knowledges | teen St., opposite Country Ba. ng attached is at present fixed at $960 x $120 — $1,440 per annum. MS. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Frida:
of book-keeping, filing and office work. : ooo 2. Applicants should hold a certificate of at least 120 words per | }¥),,.(.° Se ey = _ereene 23rd.
Sor T: ie ‘9. Ltd. Post Offer} ROOM—Qne Furnished or Unfurnishea | minute in a recognised system of Shorthand, and applications, stating | Srisbane February 2rd, Arriving at The M.V. “Daerwaod” will ac-
: . 112.51—€n | large, airy room at Bel Air. Ppl"? | age, education, qualifications, etc, should reach the Clerk of the wepperes S00. of ee eee ise aeasie geet Cargo und Passengers tor
MISCELLANEOUS . Debates Committee, House of Assembly, Bridgetown, before the 28th | vrozen and General cargo. she. behueon ae ae
SWANSEA — Worthing fully furnish- February, 1951 Cargo accepted on through Bills of Vincent. Date cf Sailing to be
PIANO -- State make, condition ,and edt aan. RGR a y> * 16.2.5 2 Late with transhipment at Trinidad notified. }
jee. . B. hi ; . oO arage. Dial 3578. or ' 1s. .~~2n. | for British Guiana, Barbadus, Windward
price. Box No. B.B. C/o Aavorate. a $63.81-030 ond Leeward Islands, ae ai ey B.WI. SCHOONER OWNERS
I — 50,000 empty, white, plain} , TANGLIN — Beachmont, sheba, For further particulars apply — ASSOCIATION INC
from Feb: i 7 J Ss. W ; ‘ :
Goren aupenttles packed in bales of 15 | Cherwise, 3 double vecrosme wah tingie| PROGRAMME OF REQUIREMENTS OF SCARCE = |!Y*XE*S: Mon Oe Coe. TH ren. soar,
Cora Broad Steet Dia gnis” "| ening Tour and icunge. Retrgerta SUOETIAL MATENEAL mitt wie
| 13.2.51—10n. | Ring 3626. i3 151th. IMPORTERS of the articles set out in ths schedule attached
eeeses =e iad VALAMBROSA — My lords Hui,| hereto are hereby notified that they should submit returns of their °
From ist April. Dean ee situatea | {0M Ist March, Dial 2175, minimum essential requirements for the year 1951. 0.
Ea eae Salle ines 16.8. ie GS. 2. The return should set out the quantities which it is ex-
. . . or
Pak.

























Mrs. Lashley (sister-in-law) . 70 pkgs. Weetabix. three bedrooms, drawing and dining LOST & FOUND
WALI—On Feb. 19th 1051 Ai New Vork| patie 10 o'clock, Terms Cash, garage. ‘Apply. to Bvelsn Roach % Co.

Aletha Wall (nee Carrington). BRANKER, TROTMAN & co., Ltd. Rice Street. ene ae eer Minimum charge week 72 cents and
Percy Carrington, Rosalind Gittens, Auctioneers 16.2.51—-t.f.n, | 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
Cyril Carrington, William Phillips. . Oe ae words 3 cents a word week—@ cents 0
Louise Lee, Cyrillene Byer. hla word Sundays. ;

ir51—In ee | PUBLIC NOTICES REF. NO
THANKS EAL ES TE Téa cents per agate line on week-days| THREE SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS -| 322905
nf and 12 ceuts per agate line on Sundays,| Series N. 0652, 0653, 0655. Finder

BARTLETT — We beg to return thanks minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| return same to Mr. Croney C/o Telephone
to all those kind friends who sent BUILDING — One Woode Buiidi ne ees =“ _}12 511g 516400
wreaths, cards and letters of sympa-| consisting of a centre room r. about at o, ” ‘Td, easily earnea by obtaining
thy in our recent bereavement caused| feet square, with windows and fe £25° . easily earned by obtaining] PURSE — One green purse with
by the death of Joseph Bartlett. Late} surrounded by a verandah of Pl Dent sur arlene eee Greustmas Cards) containing sweepstake ticket J. 180m | 601605
of Brereton Village. 22. ft square, the entie aden J ine about | from your friends. No previous experi | Finder please return to Advocate Adver 601606
Rachal Bartlett and children, ed by a shingled roof, Further patton: | Beentifun ies mpl ee to ey ato! tising Dept, el 609

17.2.51—1n, | lars Dial 8105, ‘ ee en sample Book to Britain’s ‘1 601

KING — The gned gratefull CHATTEL = —— commission; “marvellots. money making | rimmed ‘spectacles at Collin ani

a g ully re- H a ; rimm les al ‘0! r
turn thonks to sll who ‘attended the | 1¢ 3 10. Two wr tex ioe House ppparhinlty. Jones, Yelere Here Store or tn way to Cave Shephertt 602010
funeral, sent wreaths or in any other | shedroof 22 x 9. Kitchen with wall back. | Engiand.” Soe ee | Binder planes. Saeum, te Syline. Drus | 602050
way expressed sympathy with them | Electricity, Bath, Water Toilet v8 : t STS Se “TOSR YR Tower 11 Spier
on the occasion of the passing of Mrs.| bedrooms, dining’ room, land can be eae fat epneeo
Drucilla King, late of Roberts’ Tenan-| rented by the quarter. Going cheap, can 602100
try. be seen from 10 a.m. to 5 pam. Apply NOTICE LADY'S PURSE — At Marine Hote!

Lacay King (husband) Douglas, Bric,| @wner, Mrs. A. I. Hall, Near on Applicants are invit for the post of} One Lady's Purse on Sat. Byening Afte 602200

Bindley (sons), Mrs, Anita Morris, Mrs.| Black Rock or phone 4523, St. James.” | 4S°!tant Nurse at St. Lucy's Almshouse | Canadian Dance. Please apply in perso >| 602300

Gwendolyn King, Daphne, Ira (daughters) re * at a salary of $57.50 th, unifor: : oor

172.51—In 17.2.51—1n. re. and ioedeens eae . m] to the Manager. 47.2.51—2» 602500

| _ PROPER TY—A’ twtr Ta.'. Applicants must be fully certiticated, 602

WAITHE—Through this medium we beg| ing suitable for business oF private vesl: midwives, and pone urses. 90}
to return thanks to all our friends ac-} dence, standing on approximately 2 The successful ca: must assume PUBLIC 0 1 A 602900
quaintanees and well-wishes for tne} acres of land, Blectricity and Govern. | *Â¥ties on 26th Fi 1951. 603120
various expressions of sympathy shown| ment water, dairy stalls, fruit trees and #pplications will be received by me up
us in our recent bereavement ocea-| vegetable garden with modern’ costless | t? Saturday 17th. February 1951, (The Provost Marshal's Act 1904 603130
sioned by the death of our loving aunt irrigation unit and fan mill. Spacious OSWALD L. DEANE, Ceoees) 3 30), 604790
Georgiana Waithe. Garage. Apply Williams Court opposite| Clerk, Board of Poor Law Guardians, ON Friday the 2nd day of March 195

The Waithe'’s end Harris* Family. Sayers Court Farm, Christ Church, Sil St. <7 at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternpo: 603350)

17,2.51—in, | ver Sands,, Bus stop in front. lhe 10.2.51—7n | Will be sold at my office to the highes 603390

- oe eel eeete*? pagers: 17.2.51—2n bidder for any sum not under the ap

——*| BARBADOS CHORAL SOCIETY | Ptaiset value, 608450
IN MEMORIAM PROPERTY — At 69 Roebuck Strect.| All members of the Society who pro-! , All that certain piece of Land eon-| 603490
A two storey Wall Building on 4,362| Pose to take part in the 1951 Season are, Mine about 5.991 sq. ft, situate in
CADOGAN In sad sa. fi. of land. Downstairs, Store, Store| Rotified that music will be issued at| Patish of St, Michael, Tweedside Road} 603520
-— In sad and ever loving | Rooms and Garage. Upstairs 4 bedrooms,| the Cathedral Church House on Tuesday, | >Utting and bounding on lands now 603530
memory of our dearest Ruby who] Drawing and ining rooms etc. Fr ‘| 20th February, at 7.45 p.m “Jor late of the Barbados © tive
died on Feb. 16th 1948. age: 43 ft. Depth: 100 are ec ee Bank Ltd. on land ‘or Inienot Git, | 608600
Tod, bei ae Be: ow pth: ft. A sound In- 17.2.51—17, . on lands now or late of Gil
lay brings back the shock vestment. Contact M. Abbadi. Dial 2 — ———— | tens (deceased), on Tweedside R

That just two years ago was wrought ; se a. es cn the road called St, ¥ il Roe oad and | 603710

Without a farewell or Goodbye Fete ret NOTICE with the mess 5 owen Beetne: | gQBB10{

You left us with heavy hearts PROPERTIES—Tw. Re Estate of Cee ee ae rere

The w ng : , ts o delightful __rest- . Buildings, &c., appraised as follows:— 604110

e wounds in our hearts will never | dence situated at. Top i, Christ JAMES HENRY FIELD The whole property appraised to Five
heal Church, Both having 3 bedrooms with NOTICE Decensed Thousand, five hundred and Eight dott 604150
se ee in our hearts no one can] 2 Toilets and Baths recently constructed sons emer perees roe ee * ers and Seventy five cents ($5,508.75) wary 604170
: Gardens wel! jon Leon Jones for.

Busene Cadogan, (Husband) Bivsira| an March"ist, "No Sesuonable Bice wal | Sait Seed mistake oats Henty | wards eaatactonsske, et M4 | 04800
avers (mother) Eloise an ildved | be refused, For viewing etc, Ring 4683] Saint Michael, who died in this : ‘ )

r ; island on | N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day of 10450

(Sisters) George (Brother). 112.51--tn, | ot 2 13.2.51—6n| the 7th day of September, 1950, are re- | purchase. r " ¢ ved

2. spo A hie Gan wa ere Sugsted. to seria ae particulate of their T. T. HEADLEY, 6046' 0
eimai ea I 7 w , :

EDWARDS — Sacred to the memory of| Pine Hill ealled WESTFIELD, the prow Mortimer. Vere gt Cindsey Breit Provost Marshal’ ene 08000
gur beloved husband and dear father| perty of the late Sir George Walton, | R¥eburn Gill and Perey’ Gordon Taylor,| ‘12th day of Fet con. 606000)
Sgt. Julian Edgar Edwards who fell} The Bungalow stands on 18,020 square wualified executors of the will of the 4 ny ot Pepwaneg- i963. 606100
asleep Feb. 16th. 1940. feet of land and contains one large ased in care of Cottle, Catford & Co. Aaa i+-t

Oh how sad to part with loved ones public room, two bedrooms, kitchen,| }? High Street, Bridgetown, solicitors, on 606250

Oh how much of grief we bear laundry, bath and lavatory. "| oF before the 7th day of April 1951 after 606:

But in that bright land of glory Tn a’ separate building there is a| Wyhieh date we shall roceed to distribute NOTICE 290

e sha united there ari f serv, a eceased among the LIE THE POO 606

Mrs, Inez Edwards (wife) Mrs. Sybil ae with Sati; and iat ants| parties entitled thereto having regard SUPPLIES FOR E R B50

Nuree; Muirita’ “end Anderton (onde | Waa preperts wilt Wen eke ter ‘ents only 2 such claims of which we shall OF THE 606390

seu fan oe A aee (Son-in-law | at our office on Wednesday the 2ist day liable che the deals do kaa eee eiee PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL 606400
rs Augu loore (Aunt). ot February 1951, at 2 p.m. so distributed to any

. yY person of whos
17,2.51—1n. ima" of sale apply to the aor claim we shall not then have had oa the kee i Soearace eeehs oaas
f otige. codaes

EASTMOND — In loving memory of our} Inspection any day between 10,30 a.m.| And all persons indebted to the said | ‘;°;: “Will be received by the Clerk
dear beloved husband, father andjana & p.m, Telephone Lady Walton,| estate are requested to settle their in-|°! the Vestry up to 12 o'clock noon on 607100
Srandtashar, Clamnant Bastmond, 1 who No. PO etn debtednegs without delay. eae Feneusty) for the under- | 607300(
ell asleep on February 17th. 1947. CATFO! he a’ this 2nd day of Fi v mien supplies in such quantities as 400

Dear is the grave, in which he js aad ot, Oe MORTIMER VERE REDMAN i may from time to time be vordered for | 607

laid, 9.2,51—1ln. LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL one year commencing on the Ist Aprit} 607500

Dear is the memories, that never § ————————____ PERCY GORDON TAYLOR ext.

Shall 20d6, The parcel Gf land containing 1805 Executors of the will of James Henry TREse MEAT 607705

Sweet is the hope, that again we] square feet with the Buildings thereon, Field deceased. FRESH 607798 |

shall meet, situate in Lucas Street, Bridgetown, ad- FRESH BREAD.

Kneeling together at Jesus Feet, joining the property of the Barbados Each person tendering must send in 608100
Ever to be remembered by (wife) Mrs. | Telephone Company Limited. and at pre- BARBADOS MUTUAL AID {a letter, along with the Tender, signed REF. NO.
Beatrice Eastmond, (daughters) Mrs. | sent occupied as to part by the Observer} ASSESSMENT ASSURANCE |>Y, two properly qualified persons (not
Matella Franklin, Mrs. Ottiline Bladgs, | Newspaper and as to part by Miss Cado- SOCIETY being members of the Vestry) stating} 608200
Mrs. Evelyn Gollop, (grand-children) | gan. their willingness to ‘ome bound witn | §08800
Ivan Harewood, Euris Gollop, Edsil Gol-] The property will be set up for sale at Re Lost Policy the Tenderer in the event of their
lop, Leslie Eastmond, Barbara Eastmond. | our offices on Thursday, Ist: March 1951 Drucilla Augusta Taylor the nominee] Tender being accepted for the due ful- 608500

17.2.51—1n. | at 2 pam. '| of the Policy numbered 727 issued by the | filment to the Contract, 608710)
Inspection by application to the ten- Society on the life of Ernest Theodore] With respect to the tender for FRESI

HOLDER—In loving memory of our fants, Zavior, pew, docansed, haviog Housed ae, the probable quantity required 608750 |

D. Beloved Mother Mrs, Thereasa For hi ard © rectors of this iety | for one year is 24,000 gallons and the

Holder who departed this life on 16th I sale, Seen eer eruiats and condition of | that the said Policy has been lost or| Vestry reserve the right to accept the 608800 |
February 1961, COTTLE CATFORD & co misplaced, NOTICE IS hereby given thit|Tender of more than one person for | 608900\
Sad and sudden was the call. No. 17 High Street, unless any objection is raised within|the supply of this article and all per- 609200

Of that dear one loved by all
Deepest of sorrow no words can tell
Of the last one we loved so well

Bridgetown
14.2,51—12n.



Edith, Budene, Daphne, Alma (Daugh- “DUNSINANE”

ters) Milton, Robert, Ralph (Sons),] GouNTRY, ROAD. ‘or MICHAEL.

Joan Arrindelle, Yvonne, Janet, An-| he residence latery secuptae to Mrs,

thony, (Grand-children). eh W. O. Collymore. ,
6.2.51—1n The. . i

The house stands in well kept gardens
and grounds (2 acres 37 perches).

The whole comprises verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 5 bedrooms, one

FOR SALE with marble bath, 2 showers, 2 lava-

Minimum charge week 72 cents and | tories, convenient kitchen and pantry,
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24) rreoms for 5 servants, garage for 2 cars,
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a|and stables,

word Sundays, Water supply for garden and grounds
from a well with mill; water service in

AUTOMOTIVE house and also servants rooms (shower

wd
AUTO CYCLE — One Norman Auto

and lavatory).

aon ag completely wired and
Cyele. Good condition, Owner leaving rnished with electric lighting from
shortly. Dial 3939, the company’s ma

ins.
House convertible into flats and out-















a ee

CAR — 1947 Ford Prefect 10 in good e lend is) eaitable fer develop-

condition, No reasonable offer refused. te OF Seba enrhene fr ny

Apply W. I. Griffith. Phone 4173 or 2469. ° | ES). One -

17.2.51—2n, | Premises for sale by public auction at

their office, No. 17, Street, roa

yo - _, town, on y 23rd y oO
CAR — 1938 Dodge, Excellent condi February 1951 at 2 p.m,

tion. Suitable for taxi. C. A. E. Beckles,
Department of Agriculture or Perry's
Gap, Roebuck Street.

nspection on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days only between 3 and 5 p.m.



17.2.51—20 For further particulars apply to
~ : COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
CARS—1936 Ford V-8 Tourer. Excellent Tt,
Capet son, ie ere ee weene ae a
1949 Morris Ox joon. Low eage
and well cared. FORT ROYAL FOR SALE
GARAGE LTD. Telephone 4504.) | ea
11,2,51—3n
ieee MISCELLANEOUS

—————
BEDFORD DELIVERY VANS — Ship-





ment just to hand and ready for im- GALVANIZED SHEETS — A_ limited
mediate possession, Courtesy Garage,| quantity 11 ft, x 2 ft 6 ins. 2% gauge
dial 4616. 14,2.51—6n. | Galvanized plain Sheets at $5.74 per
sheet. 17.2,.51—3n.

CAR — Latest Model “Prefect” Ford, |
in perfect condition, Just done 8,/0 MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin-
Phone 2143. 16.2.51—an. { guished solution to your special
erchitectural problem of door closures,

screens, movable partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
13.2.51-—t-f.n.

_——_ —— —
PIANO—Bentley (almost new). Phone
8435. 13.2.51—4n.

PIANO-—-Lipp. Apply to Mrs, Hutson
Inniss Ayshford, 13.2,51—3n

a —

PANTS — Men's Pants made to Order

————

CAR—1947 Standard 14 h.p. Saloon in
excellent condition only 12,000 miles, May
be seen at Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd,,
Pinfold Street. 16,2.51—an

————
CAR — One (1) Standard Vanguard
in good condition, mileage under 15,000

— Apply F. C. Hutson, Tel, 3905.
16,.2.51—-3n.









in Grey, Brown and Striped Materials.
ELECTRICAL $1.50 each, STANWAY STORE, Lucas
St. Dial 4910. 16.2.51-—2n.



Eee SS eed
POOLE POTTERY — More of this at-
tractive modern pottery has arrived ot
Harrison/s, comprising seagull and duck
wall ornaments, vases, tea and coffce
sets in lovely shades. Visit Harrison's

Showroom on the first floor,
16,2,51-—3n.

ELECTRIC IRONS — Attractive Elec-
tric Trons Chromium finish with handles
enamelled in Red, Blue, Black and
Green. Price $5.30 each. G. W, Hutchin-
son & Co. Ltd. Dial 4222.

16.2.51—4n.

RADIOGRAM — One ‘Bush’ Radin-
gramophone in Mahogany Cabinet, per- SHIRTS — Gent's Shirts in Khaki.
fect condition. For further particulars! Linen, Silk. Gaberdine and Skin.
dial 2293. 15.2.51—3n. | From $3.60 up. STANWAY Lucas
St.. Dial 4010. .2,61—2n.





FURNITURE

FURNITURE — (1) Mahogariy Vanity
dresser, (1) Wardrobe, (1) China Cabinet,
(1) Iee box, (1) Simmons double bed.
Dial 3939. 17.2.51-—6n.

————
SUN SHADES — Very attractive and
inexpensive. Just right te protect bh 4
eyes duri Cricket, $1.60 up. ¥.
LIMA & Co., LTD, 14.2.51-—~6n.

ee
STAK-A-BYE TUBULAR Steel Chairs
and Tables on show at



Beard's

MISCELLANEOUS Show rooms, Hardwood Alley. Trade
ens | enquiries cordially invited.

A MOBO TOY — Means lasting joy 13.2.51—6n

for a girl or a boy. Harrison's have a
fine assortment, including the famous
Bronco & Porgy Express.

TEA SERVICE — One Mappin and
Webb tea service in good condition, Wm
D, Richards & Son, Mc Gregor Prete

17,.2.51—2n.

16.2.51—3n

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching

units to complete colour suites. Top



VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirsch Sun-air®
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to

Friendly Societies Act (1905)

one month of the date hereof, the Di-|sons tendering for this article shall
rectors will issue a new policy in lieu | forward, along with their tender, 5 Cer-
thereof. tifieate by a properly qualified Veterinary

By Order, Practitioner stating that the cattle from

D. A. BANFIELD, which the milk will be supplied ars
Secretary. | free from Tuberculosis.

17.2.51—3n, Forms of tenders can be obtained at





















the Churchwarden's Office.
By Order,
E, C. REDMAN,

Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.



13,2.51-—1.f.n.
ae [See. 75]
vertisement of Dissolution by.
Instrument. :
Worcs is hereby given that the St. MAIL NOTICES
ael's F.S. in th Parish of St.
Michael Register No. 479 is dissolved by |. Mails for British Guiana by the
Instrument registered at this office the | Schooner Marion Belle Wolte will be
Sth day of February 1951 unless within | losed at the General Post Office as

three months from the date of the
Newspaper in which this advertisement
appears, proceedings be commenced by
# member or other persons interested is
or having any claim on the funds of
the Society to set aside such dissolution,

Purcel Mail at 9 a.m., Registered and
Ordinary Mails at 11.45 a.m, on the
19th February, 1951.

Mails for St. Lucia vy the Schooner
Wonderful Counsellor will be closed at

and the same is setyaside accordingly.|the General Post Office as under;—
J. W. B, CHENERY Parcel Mail at 9 a.m., Registered and
Registrar. Ordina Mails at 11.45 a.m. on the

13.2.51—3n * 19th February, 195¥.



SOVERNMENT NOTICES

Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1951, No. 4 which will be published in the Official |
Gazette of Monday, 12th February, 1951.

2. Under this Order the item “Cocoa Essence” has been deleted in
ne entirety from the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amendment)
1951, No. 2,

14.2.51.—2n.



‘TRAVEL FACILITIES TO THE UNITED KINGDOM
With reference to the Government Notice published in this papér
on the 4th and Sth February relative to the possibility of the

“ASTURIAS” taking passengers at Jamaica aid Trinidad for the]

United Kingdom in May, it is now known that accommodation on this
ship will consist of 4—, 3—, 2— berth and a few single cabins.
16.2.51,—2n.

CHANCERY SALE

The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the Registrat’

Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between

date specified below. “if not then sold, It wilt be set up on onek wan na

ae ane place and during the same hours until
o me

LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL — Plaintiff

VIOLET spon — Defendant

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parece! of land situate at Spooners Hill
in the parish of Saint Michael and Island aforesaid containing by admeasurement
two roods two and two-tenths perches or thereabouts Abutting and unding on
lands formerly of W. T. E. Richards but now of one Walrond on lands dy of
G. G. Medford but now of one Farnum on lands formerly of red F. Green but
now of one Pilgrim and on the public road called Spooners aif or however else
the same may abut and bound Together with the messuage or dwelli

called itead” and all singular the buildings and erections both freehold
oe ae on the said lands erected and built stending and being with the appur-

UPSET PRICE: £1350 0. nd.
ATE OF tate: 2nd March, 1951.

Office
m the
on each sueceeding Vriday
Full particulars on appli-

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chanci
Sth February, 195

CHANCERY SALE

The under-mentioned property will be set up for sale’at the Registrat, Office
Public Buildings Bridgetown, between 12 noon'and 2 pan. for the einy won onthe
date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding Friday
at the same place and during the same hours until sold. Full particulars on appli-

cation to me,
CYRIL BRUCE BROOKS—Piaintifl
vs.
ELBANOR PARK BAKER—Defendant



grade, A. BARNES & Co., Ltd. your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dia) 4476] PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Pinfold Street
26.1.51—t-£.n. | A. BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.£.n. in the City of Bridgetown in this Island containing by admeasurement Two
——$—$—_—— thousand one hundred and fourteen square feet or thereabouts butting and

CHELSTON LIME WORKS — Can WINDOW GLASS — Sparkie Flower- bounding on lands of T. E. Went on lands of Mrs. E. G. De Reys on lands of

supply, Temper & Building Lime. Boul-| ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.







ders, Concrete Stone Grit, Marl & Sand.| We cut to your requirements. G Ww
Trucks on hire. P. S. Brooks. Phone} HUYCHINSON & Co., Ltd. Dil 4222
8335. 13.2.51—6n 15.2.51—10n
a ee
CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win- WALL PLAQUES With figures 1
dow styling, light control, Valances an¢i] relief of specially beautiful design. $3.08
draperies. By Kirsch jal 44796 A.| upwards. Y. De LIMA & Co., Lid., 20
B. & CO., LTD. f 13.2.51—t.f D| Broad Street 17.2,51—T™n,

Horace Savoury on lands of Mr. Cozier on lands of Violet L. Barrow and on
Pinfold Street aforesaid or howeve- else the same may butt and bound Together
with the messuage or dwelling house thereon called “Kenworth” and a!!

other buildings and erections both freehold and chattel thereon erected
UPSET PRICE: £416-13-4d
Date of Sale: 23rd February, 1951
H. WHAAAMS,
{ Registrar-in-Chancery
2%h January, 1951

09500
610410)
610490
610700
810800;

630301
630998

641200

642200
642300
642400
642500
709810
709830
709850
|
}
643998
644900
645000
645300
sso
| 645700
647901)

647913
647998

650750

650800
651200
651515)
651537 {
651510
651530
651598}

654509

654998

656503
656507

656598)
656502,

657198

657206
657209

657398

663000
662000
664945)
669108 |

800600
831450
571400
571500
829985



3.

(1) the U.S.A.
(2) other sourees.

Returns should be submitted to this office not later than

the 8rd March, 1951.

TEXTILE FIBRES

Sen UN os a tia0'd 0:48 ais 99:04 0b > tas CREED ae See Ce in lbs
BUILDING MATERIALS
Cement, Standard Portland (Barrel=376 Ibs.)....in Bbl.
IRON AND STEEL

Carbon steel ingots, blooms, billets ,slabs and :

sheet bars ...... SPE rn ee ee eg ee . in S, tons,
Tube rounds, carbon alloy and stainless in S. tons.
Cold finished iron and

Steel bars—carbon,

alloy, and stainless ........ Wasirin aya cee in S. tons
Iron bars and hot rolled bars—-carbon only,

including reinforcing bars .............. in S, tons,
Hot rolled bars--alloy and stainless......... in S. tons.
Wire, TOES. i... vs evesnds os Gidea kee Oud? oes in S. tons,
Carbon steel plates, including fabricated .,.... in Lbs.
Galvanized iron and steel sheets ...........005 in Lbs

Ungalvanized black iron and steel sheets, carbon—in Lhs

Iron and steel strip, hoop, band, and scroll,
earbon

Tin plate

Tanks
Structural, fabricated and unfabricated

Sheet piling. (Govt.)
Boiler tubes

Casing and line pipe

Seamless and welded black pipe and galyan-
ized steel pipe

Wrought iron pipe

“Mechanical and stainless pipe and miscellan-

eous pipe & fittings .........cgesseeeeeee

Bright & Misc. wire
IRON & STEEL—contd.

Galvanized wire

Barbed wire .

Fencing

Rope and strand

Welding rods and electrodes

Nails and staples

Iron and steel castings, carbon and alloy

Tron and steel forgings, carbon and alloy

NON-FERROUS METALS AND MINERALS
Aluminum and Aluminum Base Alloys
Sheets, plates and strips
Aluminum and aluminum base alloy manu-

factures such as perforated sheets, pipe

fittings, ete.
Copper and Manufactures

Refined copper in cathodes ,billets, ingots,

wire rods or other refinery/shapes

Copper pipes, tubes, plates, sheets, strips,

rods & bars .

Bare copper wire & cable
Copper wire and cable;
Building wire & cables; weatherproof &
slow-burning wire, insulated copper
wire, ete., except rubber-covered lamp
cord
Copper manufactures, n.e.s,
Brass and Bronze Manufactures
Brags & bronze, bars, rods, & shapes
Brass & bronze plates, sheets, strips, tubes,
pipes & pipe fittings .

Brass & bronze wire, bare & insulated

Other brass & bronze products ........-6. +540
Lead and Manufactures
Lead pigs, bars, anodes, blocks & ingots,
(Govt.) ,
Lead sheets, pipes & tubing
Lead Solder
Antimonial lead including battery plates,...

Other lead manufactures .......-..00e eee
Nickel and Manufactures
Nickel metal in ingots, bars, grains, rods,
sheets, strips, shot, plates, & other forms
Nicke}) manufactures except nickel alloy manu-
factures .

Tin folk... see, Adee ;
Tin metal in ingots, pigs, bars, blocks, slabs,

& other crude forrns .
Tins tubes & other tin manufactures

Zine Manufactures
Other zine cast in slabs, pigs, or blocks; Zinc
rolled in sheets, plates, & strips: .
Photoengraying sheets & plates
Sheets, plates, & strips, n.es, Zine in other
forms, including zine manufacturers; ..
Other forms, n.¢.s.

ne - ES

Other Non-Ferrous Metals & Alloys
Nickel-chrome electric resistance wire
Babbitt metal
Molybedenum metal & alloys including wire
& scrap

CHEMICALS
Benzene (Benzol)
Glycerine, crude & refined
Sulphur, crude
Sulphur, refined ....

Hydrave brake fluid:

in Lbs,

in Lbs.

in Lbs.
in Lbs.

in Lbs.

in Lbs.

Ine.



ie NEW YORK SERVICE

§ “Essi” sails 10th January - errives arbad

&.5. “Byfjord” sails 2nd February - " i - nents Tain Paar
NEW ORLEANS sEnVicE

A Steamer = sails 18th Fu REBANS SERVICE 2nd

, Ist February — ; 18th *

To eee ee



LL LTT
CANAD:AN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND















Name of Shi Sé 8 AFAX JES A
88. “ALCOA PENNANT" Soruay te tee wee
8. “ALCOA TNE Pebruary 2are arch 6 ’
38. “ALGOA PEGASUS Mach on casey ott
$8, “ALCOA PENNANT Mareh Sard Apri id
NORTHBOUND
£8. “ALCOA PENNANT” Due March 5th Sails for St. John &
Halifax
eee a
Them voessets have Mmited passenger accommodation.
ROBERT THOM LTD.-—New Yor and Gulf Service,
Apply: DA COSTA & OO., LTD.—-Canadian Service.
OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
; ‘ Due
Vessel from Leaves Barbados
SS. “PROSPECTOR” London 3rd Feb. 26th Feb.
$.S. “FACTOR” Glasgow
at & Liverpool 6th Feb 19th: Feb,
S.S. “TRIBESMAN” M/brough &
5 oe . ; Lendon 8th Feb. 24th Feb,
S.S STATESMAN” London lfth Feb. 5th Mar.
s Ss “SPEAKER ; Liverpool 17th Feb 4th Mar,
S.S. “PACIFIC STAR” Liverpool 20th Feb. 6th Mar,
ineaeessentarensnsaeangyronypessenaseseeenepeerethagee
HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S.S. “PLANTER ; tis London 2nd Mareh
S.S. “STREATHAM. HILL” Liverpool 20th Feb.

For further information apply to - - -

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia , for sail.

| ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam,

|

Single fare £170; usual reductions for children,





—<—






















































Lbs. | Pe ce er ee Mi: salt Sea Sir na BRE ARAN ee |
ot : A Ae A i a i
in tos. || Welcome To Visitors ||| ("<4 . 4
| G odaard q Christian Science »
in Lbs. And . 5
in Los. || |S toltmeyer (heading Room
in Lbs. names as popular in cricket d ‘oP he Oren & SONS )
as GAS for Cooking. Hours: 19 a.m.—2 p.m, i
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
> Fridays. }
in Lbs. | aera ¢ 10 ae
a
| REWARD OF — {fl @ us oom, tne, mie at
in Lbs. $ 2 5 0 0 | the Drain Sekenes text-book,
Ralonay and tn witn K
Ci . Bl Coe siictenen' ty same make
in Lbs. will be given to anyone fur- EDDY may de read, borrowed,
nishing information which | OF putehesed.
will lead to the whereabouts | Visitors Are Welcome %
| of Miss ADA DEANE, also)
_.. Lbs. {| known as ADA BYNOE, of | a a ae
| Bay Street, opposite Espla- SFE FFE
nade, Information should be
communicated to— ; " ; .
in toe Rate Ponce COLLECTION OF RENTS
is |
&: BENOE, THE CENTRAL
y Street. |
cin Lbs. |) eaplanaede, Rey Siver® | AUCTION MART
ere is willing to undertake
ee ' v RTT
ty ie the collecting of RENTS
in Lbs ORIENTAL for any one, and only a
” : Commission of 10% is
—— GOODS charged. Why not allow
From INDIA, CHINA, us to collect your rents,
EGYPT ! and so avoid any trou-
Lbs. Silk, Curios, on ble ? For further in-
; Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak- formation dial 3743.
wood, Sandals, French 9
fumes, Barbados Scarves in CENTRAL
in Lbs Pure Silk, Etc., Ete., Ete. Ee) Se ;
The Souvenir Headquarters AUCTION MART
in Lbs. THAN! Kfros. Per D'Arcy A. Scott i
KASHMERE :
in Lbs. | Pr, Wm. Henry St-—-Dial 6466 SSS SS ee
in Lbs =
| " am er
| DONATIONS ASKED 10
an ui '
in bbe ERRECT REESOR
mn ws: | ny r 1
in Lbs. 1 MEMORIAL CHURCH
i 4bs. (4
woh bas Officials, Firms, Com-
| panies and enthusiasts of
Lb c the Rev. J. B. Reesor and
in s+ | c } the general public are in-
SUCCESSFUL | formed through this medium
| that in carrying out the
ae ccere eee of =
a Revds. H. C. Stoppe ane
in Lbs. AUE | IQiN | J. B. Reesor, donations of
| cash, block stone, concrete
in Lbs. blocks, timber, galvanise and
other building materials to
in Lbs SA erect the Reesor Memorial
a Church to be dedicated by
in Lb | } | Rev. J. B. Reesor on his
i Lune. i | return to Barbados.
in Lbs. } John hd. Bladon | | Donors are asked to com-
| ||] municate with Rey. A. R,
y Ss, | Brome by Dialag 4191 or
} a | write to his aceiiae ra
i | Prompt Payment. tons Hill, St. Michael No.
as \6, Barbados, P.O, Box
| PLANTATION BUILDING | 156. Z
| 14.2.51—8n.
in Lbs. | | Rhone 6060.
in Lbs. | ff ¥Y NOW & SAVE LATER
in Lbs, )) We have just received a shipment of
IRON BEDSTEADS WITH SPRINGS
Gallons THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM i
noe | { Central Foundry Ltd.--Proprietors) i
in Bes |) i & Tudor Streets i}
in Lbs { the : =
in Lbs, ,







PAGE EIGHT

BOXING ACADEMY — 2

Don’t Let That Left-Hand
Fetish Trap You

IN THE OLD, and often brutal, days of bare-knuckle
fighting a pugilist could lose in only three different ways
—by being “knocked out of time” (i.e., failing to recover
in the half-minute interval allowed after a knock-down
which alone ended a round); by retiring, or by fouling his
opponent.

Fights were always to a finish
—unless broken up by the police
or by ruffians whose favourite
was getting beaten.

The rules are very aifferent now.
First of all the contests are of a
definite duration,

In professional boxing they con-
sist of four, six, eight, ten, 12 or
15 rounds, three minutes to each
round, with a minute’s interval
between each round. (In some of
the smaller halls the pestilential
two-minute rounds have been re- fight of 15 rounds and one man is
introduced.) by far the superior boxer, By the

Nowadays the most common way time the bout is three-quarters
of winning a contest is ‘‘on points.” over he may be a clear 5 points
That's to say, one boxer has scored @head. And the referee must stop
more clean direct punches, with the fight. For this very good reason.
the knuckle part of the clenched A knock out (which, incidental
glove on the “target area.’ ly, is never mentioned in the

What is this “target area’? t's Tules) is only the equivalent of 5
the front or sides of the head ang lear points. vat
the front or sides of the body The man who delivers it is

‘above the belt” (and the belt is credited with the maximum num-
an imaginary line drawn across Der Of Points (5) for that round
the body from the top of the hip and “a contestant failing to con-
os of ten Sooands shall Dok be award.

, ~ 0. ,
suneeen ee Fo kta ed any marks for that round and
five points or marks, at the end the contest shall then terminate

of each round and his opponent i
is given proportionately Taos. If Tareieek, It 3".
they’ve each done equally well
both get the full five points,

Most referees score in fractions



Second session of Boxing
Academy, by PETER WIL-
SON, deals with punching
and the system of points
scoring.

The tutor explodes the
miviaken idea that a ‘British
straight left’ counts more

than a right-hand punch.



Now say there’s a British title

So, if the referee did not stop
a bout when one man was 5 points
ahead and that man were knocked
of a point and in a normal close out with the first punch of the
reund they would give boxer A next round, the decision would
5 points and boxer B 4%, A score have to be a draw.
of 5 to 4% would mean that A And if the man were 5} or more
had shown a considerable superi- points ahead he would have to be
crity over B. Five to 4; means given the decision on points, al-
that A has been all over his man though he had been. knocked
and has possibly floored him, colder than a polar bear’s nose.

And 5 to 4—the largest differ- This may seem farcical but it is
ence I’ve ever come across— none the less true and it marks
ee met the boxer losing that one of the prime differences be-
nook as almost certainly been iween prize-fighting (which is of

nockeq down more than — course illegal) and boxing.

and has, in fact, done nothing but

manage to last out the three Another signal difference is ‘that

THURS ti. . , the (physical) lot of the modern
Paint Brush” exer continues to be looked after.

You may be one of the people One of the most recent amend-
who think that a punch with the ments to the rules now allows fly-
left hand counts more than one weights to middleweights to wear
with the right. This, most cer- ft, of bandages and tapes on their
tainly, is not so. But it underlies hands, and cruiser and heavy-
the fetish which has been made weights up to 12ft.
of the straight left—sometimes
known as the “traditional weapon
of British boxing,” tell .you .the .difference .betweei

The straight left, correctly amateur and professional boxing,
delivered, with the full weight of what the referee has to watch for,
the body behind it, can be as and what are the fouls in boxing.
dominating as a conductor's baton
—it’s often known as “the paint
brush” since it is with this punch
that an opponent’s nose is ‘so
often reddened.

But two hands are better than
one, and — boxers have often >
been at a disadvantage against AÂ¥ . H
Americans or Continastile wit 'e€ ere
correctly use both hands in at-
tack and don’t save their right @ From page 1.
solely for blocking or parrying the Indies and look forward to these
other man’s punches. visits,”

Incidentally it’s absurd to re- Captain Bodden has only been
gard the straight left as “tradi- the skipper of the Copinsay for a
tionally British.’” Anyone who saw year, His father visited Barbados
the fight in which Joey Maxim, but this is his first visit, He served
from Cleveland, UWS.A., took the in both the Royal and Merchant
world’s light- heavy- -weight cham- Navy during the last war.
pionship from Freddie Mills, Asked about his visil to Trini-
of Bournemouth, England, would cad, he said: “I have discovered
have seen the triumph that the wharfs at Trinidad is a
of the straight puncher hundred per cent cleaner than
using a correct proportion of those of Jamaica,”
straight lefts—over the rugged At 4.45 p.m. the Inniskilling
hooker and swinger, But it was t:oops, along with three compan-
the American who employed the jes from the Barbados Regiment,
“traditional British” methods. marched through Trafalgar Square

and as they passed the War Mem-
It’s Untrue erial, the command “eyes right”

And a number of people think W&S given.

that you get more points for a

punch to the head than you do for
.a body blow, Again untrue.

There is nothing laid down in

the rules whereby even the weignt

of*& punch should inffuence the panies gave the general salute,

distribution of points. But an ex- The route of the march was
ception must be made, I feel, in along the Chamberlain Bridge,
the case of a knock-down, for around Nelson’s Statue, by the
when a man is on the floor he is Public Buildings, along Bridge
temporarily right out of the fighi, Street, Victoria Bridge, Probyn
doing nothing, and therefore un- Street, along Bay Street and back
able to score any points; and he to St. Anns Port Pipers and
should then be suitably penalised, drummers from the Ingiskillings

NEXT WEEK Peter Wilson will

—L.ES.



Inniskillings

They assembled at the Baggage
Warehouse, The colours were
brought from the left of the
parade to the front and the com-

One of the least-known and accompanied the march,
least-used rules is the one whicn
says: ‘If at the conclusion of any By the time the companies

round during a contest one of the reached the Garrison every man
contestants should attain such a Was soaked through, The march
lead on points as to render it an Was continued all through tho
impossibility for his opponent to rain
win, he must then be declared

the winner.”

That K.O, PRACTICE SHOOT

The basis of modern boxing is The first practice of the B.R.A.
that the two men are trying to will take place at the Government
outscore one another on points. The Range on Saturday, 17th at 1
knock-out is almost an accident-— P.M.
and was certainly introduced to The practice will be at 200
save a man from sustaining too yards to enable members to zcro
much punishment. and adjust their rifles for the com-

In other words, if he’s not capa— ing season.
ble of rising unassisted inside ven Practices will be held regularly
seconds, then it’s felt that he’s in on the first and third Saturdays
no fit state to continue a contest. of each month,



[ Theyil Do It Every Time wmesnm on By Jimmy Hatlo

Lucus mexire is $0 DARN POLITE
HE WON'T LET THE HOSTESS
SERVE UP A BITE +++







Gf ¥Y 7 sented to the Lady selected
7 mro0n ue \// PLEASE! von't Y I'M FAMISHED! | GO Rees |. acta:
A MOMENT--- 7/ BOTHER! WE NEVER HOW'S ABO! (de Ry NEPTUNE'S DAUGHTER
EAT BEFORE BE you RUSTLING s/t op - Competitors must be be-
TIME, AND IT'S so UP SOME BACON, Br?” Swot. tween the ages of 14 and
LATE ANYHOW ! EGGS AND iss Ge 21 years.
WERE NOT A BIT COFFEE +? ;oie
HUNGRY +++
TK" ws,
S| TAR. (Forte,
ALL! | , | \MANKS one



e, WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED Tian Tt

WORRELL
SCORES 285

COLOMBO, Feb. 16.
Frank Worrell, the West Indies

player, scored 285 and William
Sutcliffe, son of the former Eng-
land player, made 95 and shared

a fifth wicket partnership of 301

for. the Commonwealth cricket
team against. Ceylon to-day.
Commonwealth batted all . day

and punished the Ceylon attack
for 444 runs for the loss of eight
wickets.

STs

FRANK WORRELL.

Worrell gave
display. Favoured
luck—before reaching 100 and
twice later—he hit. with power
and freedom and had five sixes
and 31 fours as his most profit-
able strokes. His innings, which
lasted four hours and 34 minutes
did not end: till the last ball of
the day when he was caught at
cover.

Sutcliffe, with much more se-
date stroke-play, kept one end
going and left most of the scor-
ing to Worrell. He was unfor-
tunate to be run out in trying
for a quick single when only five
short of his century. Sutcliffe
batted for three hours.

—Reuter.

Victoria Score

a scintillating

with a little



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Civilians Suffering;

Most In War

@ From Page 1.
Government would like to avoid a
military stalement in which two







NOTICE

es
SAVINGS BANK TRAVELLING OFFICE.

It is notified for the information of the General

Public with

opposing armies would be ranged | Special reference to workers on sugar factories that the Travelling
against’ each other on either side] Offic® of the Barbados Government Savings Bank will again be visit-
ing the principal sugar factories during the reaping of this year’s
There seems to be little hope of | Sugar cane crop and will be operating on Mondays, Tuesdays and

of the parallel,

a political solution,
while the Chinese Government

is expected that the Allied air
attacks will be stepped up and
bridges will again be the main
target, Although better weather

The routes will be as follows.

LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.

however | Wednesdays. The service will commence from Monday 26th February.



maintain -their present attitude MONDAYS
towards the United Nations, | Searles “ oe a Approx. 9.30 a.m.
Britain would like to a! Foursquare we ee ee ; af 10.00 a.m.
talks with the Chinese based on} Oldbury - “3 . »~ 1030 a.m.
cease-fire and the establishment | Carrington a - ‘a a 11.15 a.m.
of a “neutral zone” between the} Three Houses aie : a5 ” 12.00 Noon
two armies, But these terms are | Guinea ‘ es oe ee 6 12.45 p.m.
not likely to be accepted by the] Bulkeley “i ie ae “3 # 1,30 p.m
Chinese while they are in their }
present truculent frame of mind. TUESDAYS
Meanwhile Allied Intelligence] Lower Estate ae eS tS Approx. 9.30 a.m.
Officers in Korea are beginning to} Applewhaite = ; : a 10.15 a.m.
detect signs of collapse in the} Andrews ‘ ; = 10,45 a.m.
Chinese: morale, American day-}Lemon Arbor z ‘ , 11.15 a.m.
light bombing of the enemy’s} Pool “ 5 R 11,45 a.m.
lines of communication and mili-! Bruce Vale ss : 12.30 p.m.
tary strong points has had an] Haggatts i iy : ; 1,00 p.m.
enormous effect on the Chinese! Swans .. a ips ¥ 1,30 p.m
troops and while it is difficult to, Vaucluse a a re 2.00 p.m.
j compute the ae S ——- ;
inflicted by these raids, there
no doubt that this’ continuous} warrens eee : Approx. 9.30 a.m.
deluge of bombs has badly shaken Haymans : : he X v 10.30 a.m.
the Chinese forces. : Fairfield f Y 11.30 a.m.
Damage to their supply lines} springhall ‘ 12.00 Noon
has been aggravated by a hard| porters. ss ae : 1.15 p.m.
Korean winter, Unable to obtain] sandy Lane He % 4 1.45 p.m.
supplies of food, the Chinese for- "47-2. 51—2n,
ward troops have turned to the ¥
land, but found it an.amprovident =
larder .
Frostbite has inflicted = sad tant % eae
casualties on ese troops than YO INS FROM
have combined efforts of Allied ‘Tae , STOPP. ING THE TIDE
forces, Prisoners of war report Tins Cocktail Peanuts True old saying, “YOU cant
in some units that the Chinese Bots Cocktail Cherries stop the tide,” however good
Army, as many as 50 per cent. Tins Cocktail Sausages your intention. WE find that
have ‘been affected by frostbite. » Soe as much as we would like to
Moreover, typhus has broken out . Sandwich Spread keep our prices stabled, the
and this too has helped to lower » Ox tail Soup constant increases in prices
saan. RS ” heiekite pears of our raw materials force us
ere is as yet no sign that the Chicken Soup to revise some of ‘our prices,
present Chinese et ss Zarate Soup ee hy as under:
is the beginning of a_ fullscale 19 ESET AOR RI. WHOL) Supr. bay Rum still .. 36c.
attack similar to that which drove ’ aerial No 3 nie Rum still .. 30c.
allied forces back to their present Pkgs Blanemange Limolene Highergrade 60c.
” ellos .
The Chinese counter-offensive is Bots oo eke vi : sf a mee bry
seen here as an attempt to pre-||] iiveq mona? Mustard v No. 2 grade :
vent the anise a forces e Mentholated 30c
from retaking Seoul and its pur- = +
pose is believed to be no more than STU ART & SAMPSON Floralene ; aa Sy eee po
to maintain the status quo. Col Pere He
With the approach of Spring, it 0: ogne oz. c.

In spite of the increases our
products are still best value
to-day.

On sale at all good stores.

-% Touch With Barbados

= — Only)
ona here: ~* THIS EVENING
Bor wien riey GET HOME AND 9 o'clock
WIFE'S READY FOR BED HE PUTS IN A -

REQUEST FOR A BIG BANQUET SPREAD:

“UNSIGNED *, ST: HELENA, ORE.

will enable the allies to make even
greater use of their overwhelming
superiority in the air, the
approaching thaw will bog down
mechanised forces and make
movement on the ground difficult.

Indications are therefore that
the allies will continue to inflict
heavy casualties on the enemy by
air attacks, but the situation on
the ground will remain fairly
static,

Outside of Korea, one of the
most damaging effects of the war
has been its alarming impact on
the raw material's’ — situation.

ed Shortages and high prices which
well to score 84. The lefthander Spring directly from the war have
seemed well set for his century had the effect of drawing supplies
when he was cag after batting away from Western Defence Pro-
230 minutes and hitting 11 fours, grammes and the situation so far
Heard and J, Sing who.made 48 as Britain is concerned is now
not out, figured in the best stand critical,

of the innings = far adding 56
for the fifth wicket.

Sanaa The Weather
TODAY

Wins Boat Race.
Sun Rises: 6.20 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.09 p

NASSAU, Bahamas, Feb. 15 .m,.
Moon (Full) February 23

Slowly Against MQC

VICTORIA, Feb. 16

Victoria Country .XI. found it
difficult to score rapidly against
the M.C.C. on the opening day
of their two-day match here. At
the close, they had scored 201 for
the loss of five wickets.

The M.C.C. bowlers toiling in
intense heat got no assistance
from the pitch but the batsmen
were mainly on the defensive es-
pecially in the early stages:

Heard, a_ lefthander, mixing
aggression with defence, batt



Harvey Conover’s Revonoe on
Thursday was named winner of Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
the 13th annual Miami to Nassau High Water: 1.31 a.m.,
sail yacht race in the time of 26 12.34 p.m,
hours, 30 minutes, 17 seconds, It
was the second victory for Cono- YESTERDAY

York and h trim
in aoe Rainfall (Codrington) .58 ins.
Total for Month to Yester-

day: 7.51 ins.
‘Temperature (Max.) 82.5°F
‘Temperature (Min.) 73.5°F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E,
(3 p.m.) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour



Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Emanuel C, Gordon, M.V. Sedge-

field, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Sch, C. M.

W. Ipana, Sch. Mary E. Caroline, M.V. Barometer (9 am) 29.965,
Vegabond Prince, M.V. Moneka, Sch, (3 p.m,) 29.8

Emeline, Seh, Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch,

Franklyn LD. R., Sch. Timothy A. H.
Vansluytman, S.S, Islandside, Sch, Jul-
nar, Seh. Wonderfut Counsellor, Sch,

Rainbow M., Sch. W. L.. Eunicia, M.V,

Daerwood
ARRIVALS
Schooner Freedom Fleary, 23 tons nett,















KEEP FIT

Copt. De Roche, from Trinidad vin ,
Union Isles, LADIES’ KEEP FIT
Schooner Frances W. Smith, 74 tons CLASSES

nett, Capt. Hassell, from British Guiana,

will be held at the
B’DOS AQUATIC CLUB
Every Monday at 5.15 p.m

commencing
Monday, February 19th

. .
Coastal Station
CABLE AND WIRELESS (West Indies:
Lid. advise that they can now commu-
nicate with the following ships through
their Barbados Coast Station,

ao Saguaro, S.S. Regent Hawk, Enquiries at the 3 * alone
.S. D. Granada, SS. Orione, SS, +
Missionary Ridge, S.S. Gascogne, 8.58. AQUATIC CLU

Italia, S.S. Byfjord, S.S. Saxon Star,
S.S. Loide Cuba, S.S, Craftsman, 8.S
Argentina, S.S.. Trykon, S,.S. Bonito,
S.S. Lady Rodney, S.S. Maurentania,
S.S. Fort Amherst, S.S, Nieuw Am-
sterdam, §S.S, Esso Richmond, S.S.
Castor, S.S. Republica De Venezue'a,
§.S. Goifito, 5.S. Queen er ka anne
De Grasse, §.S. Sunwalt, S.S
ee S.S. S. Rosa, 8S. * yapoeee
S.S. Gangitane, 8.8. ay Jose,
3.9. Sandwich, S.S. Seatle, 5S, Auris;
8s. Sun Prince, 8,8, British Success,
S.S. Salinas, S.S. Bouplate, S.S. Liber-
bille, S.S, Yamhill, S.S. Essa Brossels,
8.8. Pendleton, SS. Macoris, S.S.
Sothern Collins, S.S. Yeorgid Gratos, | ,
S.S. Rio Orinoco, S.S. Meline, S.S
Panama Express, S.S. Alcoa Pioneer,

Enrolment — Monday 5 p.m.



DANCE

at
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
(Local & Visiting Members

A Silver Cup will be pre-

Costume: White Shorts and
Shirt.

Judging will take place at
Midnight.

Judges: Mrs. Jean Iverson
Mr. W. Bell
Mr. Jim Reddekopp
During the Performance
Photographs will be
taken by Mr. Bell

THE FIRST SHOW OF ITS
KIND IN BARBADOS,

DANCING with...
Music by Arnold Meanwell’s
Orchestra
There will also be a.:.
DOOR PRIZE of $5.00

Admission to Balicoom

~ 17

2/-
2.51

.
SOSSSOSS o OFOOSSSS POCOS -

Senccstanannel 66006000 UCCESOO OOOO OOOO

|
|











e” PRLEOSPP SPSS POP OOOO OOOO LOO LPL

! DUE TO CIRCUMSTANCES beyond our
\ control, we shall be unable to RECEIVE
any more CLOTHES until further notice.
We shall not be able to guarantee any
DELIVERY DATES for the Clothes

already received but shall endeavour to

SLL CEES ESSE

get them ready by the earliest opportunity.
x
%
x

SANITARY LAUNDRY
CO., LTD. OF BARBADOS

Re

SPSS SLESE SOLOS



The world’s most sought

after small car with all the

features of a BIG car. Seats four within
» wheelbase. Engine develops 27 horse-
2? power. Petrol consumption 35-40 miles per
gallon. Torsion-bar independent front-
wheel suspen.ion smoothes out the rough-
est road, 7-cubic feet of luggage space.

Easy to park. Easy to steer through traffic.
Easy to garage. Choice of three body
styles, 4 door saloon, 2 door saloon and
convertible. Make a date now for a
demonstration run in the world’s biggest
small car buy.

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385



Sole Distributors Phone —_





/tds

it





{e








FEBRUARY 17, 1951

SATURDAY,

edts with one muse
-Dolicyowners security

North American Life reports continued financial strength
to its 140,000 policyowners at the close of its 70th years
The enterprising Canadians who founded the Company
in the horse and buggy days of 70 years ago had but one
purpose—the lifetime security of the policyowners and



their families. That singleness of purpose has been a
guiding principle since 1881.

Every day North American Life policyowners are bene-
fiting from their protection in this Mutual Company:
In 1950, policyowners and beneficiaries received
$7,812,866, bringing the 70 year total of policy benefits
to over $163,000,000, For the future, the Company
holds over $144,000,000 in assets to meet obligations
to policyowners who own life insurance and annuities
totalling over $621,000,000.

The 70th Annual Report at a Glance

New Assurance and Annuities arranged $ 88,350,772

Net Life Insurance and Annuities in force$62 1,988,890
(Increase $67,652,263)

Total Premiums Received
Payments to Policyowners

$ 17,506,557

and Beneficiaries -----+--++-+ $ —7,812,866
Liabilities to Policyowners and Others $136,611,374
Special Reserves and Surplus Funds -- §$ 7,419,321
Total Assets -------+-+-+-+-+- - $144,030,695

(Increased $11,759,505)
The complete Annual Report will be mailed upon request.

weele AMERICAN LIFE

R. & G. CHALLENOR LTD.—Agent
H. D. KIDNEY,—Representative









BROAD,
MEDIUM,
SMALL
BRIMS.
A variety
of Styles

and Colours.

* Prices from $3.02 to $5.87



Cave Shepherd & Co., Lid.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street



RED HAND PAINTS

FOR ALL PURPOSES |

“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT
in Cream and Green,
For interior decoration of Walls,
Ceilings and Woodwork.
“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT
in White
HARD GLOSS TULIP GREEN
PAINT
HARD GLOSS PERMANENT
GREEN PAINT
For exterior or interior use.
“SPECIAL” HOUSE PAINTS
In Grey, Tropical White, Oak
Brown, Barbados Light and Dark
Stone.
For exterior or interior use

CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS





















The Sign ot

In Grey, Bright Red, Mid Green.
QUALATY RED ROOF PAINT
” ; For Galvanise or Shingles.
yee oe PAINT REMOVER
For the easy removal of old paint
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.
AGENTS.



Full Text

PAGE 1

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1K1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE i'Ac.i: nvt_ Admitted To Local Bar The number of barristers pratUsing ot the local Bar was 1ft. neased by one yesterday when Mr. Verc Ian de Lacey Caningteu was admitted tO Honour the Chief Judg.-. Sir Allan tollvmuriv The brief ceremony which took place before the sitting of the Court of Ordinary was seen by many of Mr, Carrt melon's friends and well wlatam H was introduced by Mr. F. E. field. Attorney General. Mr. Field told the Chief Judgo that Carrington hid been educated at Harrison College from IB27 ti 1935. in which year he ana in.Island Scholarship to Codringtti. College. In 1930 he passed the IXuham Inter-Arts Examination with Second Class Honours in Division I, but relinquished tne Scholarship in July of the sari>? year to accept an appointment N 0 Cadet In the Assistant Court >.f Appeal. From the Court of Appeal he was transferred to Ihe lncom~ Tax Department in 1943. Mr. Canington was admitted to Gray's Inn In absent! : on December 12, 1945, He passed two sections of Part I of the Law Exam matlons at Trinidad and the remaining sections at Barbados IIIICI I III II I MS THE VETERINARY SURGEONS Mr. B Eiperintrnt Farm at Friar's Hill. L Hignstt and Dr. Leonard Hutson with 3 Voting NelUiropp Helfei lie went to England in Novembe IS4B and passed the Bar Final in May 1950 On November 17, 1950. ffniartllMsa.il 11.^,..,.,*.. he was called to the Bar and he n*\*rSt*a sJOflglOtl Mgned the Roll of Barristers Ihree days later. He had much pleasure in asking that Mr. Carrington be admitted to practise, Mr. Field said. In Stone Throwing Case I-oca I Service The Chief Judge addressing Mr, Carrington said It was always i pleasure for him to welcome froir the Bench a Barrister-at-Law nr Ms introduction to the Bar of The Judges of the Assistant Judgment was entered for deCourt of Appeal Mr. G. L. Tayfendants Violet Hollingsworth lor 0"d Mr. J. W. B. Chenery .nd Beatrice Hollingsworth, both yesterday reversed a decision of if St. Lucy, yesterday by Their Police Magistrate Mr. E, A. Honours Mr. G. L. Taylor and McLeod and dismissed a ease Mr. J. W. B. Chenery. Judgebrought against C. F. Bourne of of the Assistant Court of Appeal. M. E. R. Bourne & Co., ProvinWt. afIer hear n 8 n a su brought by ''<" Merchants of Roebuck ZZ?A?' i Carrington s Madeline Roach, plaJntlfl of JoStreet. ^miSSSBZ^Jt^SVi ey Hl]l *• ^*>claiming damThe Police Magistrate had fined S,Zl "I ,hLwI agM lo ,hc nwHint or tit) from Bourne C5 when he found him endered years of va liable serbtAh defendants. Ifuilty of having failed to produce !" i H„. lhe Sland '" VarlOUS In """ rln Judgment for the books, documents and vouchers SEfSu M Mn u w .r-Ki^r defendants. Their Honours refor inspection when he was called r. / y^iJ t?w VOT ed lne decision of His Worupon to do so by an authorised Judge said the tongue of good sh ip Mr. S. H. Nurse In the person. icport has been heard on all sides p^y Debt Court of District "E" Mr. Edward Evans. Chief Price in your favour, and the presence st. Peter, who gave judgment Control Inspect-, prosecuted the here this morning of your many f or the plaintiff and awarded £2 case. Mr. G. B. Niies represent friends and well wishers is a 10tw ed Bourne who had appealed happy augury or your CUtttTa Giving evidence ycslardav Maagainst the Lower Court'* success Wherever and in whatfeline Roacn MJd lhat m Qctodecision. ever capacity your future lies I ber 20 she was in her house and Mr. Niles ergwish you every success. "You are both defendants Violet and Beation under which Bourne was now admitted to practise m all the trice Hollingsworth threw stones charged did not specifically id I extend at her house, damaging the door the Price Cont Vet. Praises Nalthropp Case Dismissed Cattl& III AutigUd (From Our Own Correspondent) ANTJGUA. MR. S. L. HIGNETT, B.Sc., M.R.C.V.S.. has com..lo Antigua at tht request of the Administration lo investigate a cattle LreniinK problem in the herd at the Cental Bxpn Imen! Station. He arrived on the 4th February and his stay in the colony of approximately one month' has been made possible through a financial grant from Colonial Development and Welfare and the co-operation of the Wellcome Foundation. ADMITTED TO PROBATE is the resident vete surgeon at Ihe Wellcome Veterirwny Research Station at Krant, H baa bam .associated for .1 lung period with inviMigiilions Into cattle infertility of various types in a number of countries. Including the ArgenTtW wills of len people were ('dmitted lo Probate ny His Honour the Chief Judge Su Allan Lollymore at yesterday's sitting d that the see" f the Court of Ordinary give Annie Walrond Skinner. St. JS? 1 l xh £ Experimental Stall Inspector power Peter; Pearla Healis Rose. St Nelthropp Cattle "1 am very much impressed with the quality and performance the Nelthropp Cattle mainspirit of friendliness, and pledged with that friendship and defendants ihn Assistance, that if at any time ne iippcared in either of the Courts Madeline Roach Courts of this Island I ; w.'kwie to you." end the flap* of the door. She wa* to inspect the books Mr. Carrington replying forced to call in a carpenter to — thanked the Chief Judge for repair the damage. Violet and s-s • %ZK^"&£Ste !„: fffSpSSKES %L*S> teuton Reversed trodurlng him. Among the mom. Roach'., house. One witness said The deei.i !" „! m. w u. J.m T ...„' „.„.,,.. ii,'..... '""' "' lc Inception of the Exbcr. of the liar of Btrtxta, Mr. ,.,„, sh e saw Celeste Hind, throw Mr H. A^ T. n.a M.i,"e o it Jam" BoWrt llcnw I !""","'"' ?""T T l '""'' ""' C,„m e to„ ,.id, there wa, always stones „, the house, but could District -A" PoTiec Cou". woo Clarke. St. Michael; Mbert r^tSSS, oMhJ DtrtetS3E 1 £__ r ? n n "? r <"•" .•" <* ,h "lcf British Guiana, turage Programme Is being caraTietr Honours dismissed th ANTIGUA. ilarm clock to Mayers to see if'he Rarely does a party in ADttguj ellcd owing to wet borne months There would do his utmost to uphold the Mr. H. Clarke appeared tiaditlons of the Bar. half of the defendants in the case. Car Washed Away In Frizer's River MR. WILKEY, Manager of Frizer's Plantation. j:ot into difficulties vcslerday in ihe Frizer's River when he was wou,< bu >' "\, Wh *"> he produce I have to be t_.„. a ss ,s.ing Lionel W.lliam, of Canbar. St Joseph, to, ge, his tUSi£X7S,H bS?SS Z'^TZ &?2& car (O i) cut Of the liver. He was pulled out of the river paid him for it. All of the. hapjesterd'.., when a large mj says Mr Hignett .-, Ketursh MatUd. Albertha m'^.jjff "g, *\ r AJTBa#S JS3K; n-v^y^r"Sedgefiekf Converted To Passer$tr Ship Motor vessel Hedgefleld. which once provided space for tons of cargo will in another three 01 four months cater only for cabin class and deck passengers B nd their baggage. The 8 i'. pA&Uti YOUR HEALT *ik Your Physician, youi through kng years of prt I tiainiiid df/vcsOptKl Rne ]u j analyzing and solving yotir DM-ml problems. This fine judgment, which comes from acquiring a body of specialized knowledge and ;ipplyun. that specialized know cal situations, has saved human life. T0U can r.-ly on Ul Ml Compound your next Pi 1 with Accuracy-thus prota health. KNIGHTS DRUG STOKES 5 VrexcriplitMi S|h'ii:ili->ls Island! Adaptable NHthinpp rattle adopt themselves well to prevailing conditions In that they possess a high resistance lo heat, ticks, tickdiseases und drought re seventy-six animaU in the cose the paddocks, a nuinlwr of bulls .... „ „.„ .._ r ..e-h id.i.v when a large number having been olre.idy distributed by mon who happened to be nearby. MOM on October 15. Mayers of folks expected to attend on -At throughout the islands The most When there is heavy rain up St. Joseph, Ihe Frizer's i, ow i nl no l,lt *' mio ot Paying Home" on the 11 M s i>evm. Miming cow roaming the pasture River overflows Williams' car wn stnllrrl hv th* tenter "? l c c, 5 k hc reportetl tn • shire. The day was cloudy but by is "Duchess" win, m br MXth !..M^.l/i Q ^ u ^i D i h; !" ^ the water matter to the Police who brough'. .Memo..,, when Ihe atmnaphetmonth of lacUUon pr-luee* 14( which came across the road. He left the car and went to a case or larceny against Mayers. K ot really cold and rainy ihe hair lbs of milk dally ami has almdy Ret assistance and when he returned it had been washed Tie clock 1* valued at /-. hour's launch journey to the ship given 400 gallons to date. inlo the small rivet. The car was carried by the current M r Ward submitted that the would not have been pleasant. Mr. Hignett and Doctor Huttor about .100 yard, and nn .y the top of it could be s^n. S2E? £, ^ <%~> mr QNE KJ gfejy >-^-^ After lhrdyf>lydo-n.„ ifllktlnii and Ihcre were many ,,V tnirxJN Fob lUmds to fuilhe. Ihelr inve.llSEAWELL MANAGER GS'jPySSg&Zi&XZ XTSStt.S.M^tM h Most r s '•" !" & '^ 8a, ms .1,, E,„.|le„, y .he Governor „.. d.y. whe'n U beU lo f.l, „„,,, "*]£&!?S^toXtfTSi SS^S. ^"Z,"ZSS£'Z been .mulled by .he Secretary „f until late evenln. The rain fell Police aiwlmt Mayer, of Mndt. -MrTendlv !" eompH.ed bl,l,i ll,4 r. IAAllaAA\< %  L:IA 11 Bridges Will Be Replaced Soon Immediate action will be tuk-n to make some temporary arrange incnt for accommodating mull. over Lake's bridge, ihe Director o Highways und Transport told ttk Aavorate yesterday. Part of this bridge was washed away this weo\ by flood water. The temporary bridge at Bax ters which was also washed away will have to be replaced, he said Desi-ite the he.ivi i.iniv mi ollni Hood damage had been reported S|>caking of Ihe Department't 1949-30 programme, the Director Mild that this had been complete* with the exception of one item This was the nconitrueUon ol .. tti-tioii of Newcastle Road had suffered damage and v tn tiie public The repair damage work badly from IUCHI UH presently clos State for the Colonies that hi approved of the appointment latches" with basket heavily in St. Thomas last night ing a policeman while m the exeiZx TZZUT ZTZ.^? JTZZ between 9 and 10 o'clock, but St. culion of his duty — on the sam.Jj, chfnt^ numbei or towns w(| SMALL FIRE Mr. D. E. Henderson as Kan*Michael again received the heavidate that the larceny offence was gcr, Airport, with effect from 1st Mt rainfall, this lime .32 inches, alleged to have been committed— September, 1950. Telephone communication at was also dismissed by Their HonPrior to the establishment of the District "E", St. Peter. "P". 3t ours onits merits, office of Airport Manager under Joseph and at Belleplaine. St r ; %  Talma had imposI the recent departmental reorganiAndrew which were put out ..f n *' %  '• %  M ayersation Mr. Henderson has bee.i order early In the week were still serving in the non-establlshed po-t "t of order up to lost nighl. /(*/'" 1/ -1 JVHKi) .since April, 1950. The following are the flgurMWWSilWnMS It will be recalled that Mr. Henrecorded at the various stations UJ George Sabian Ojolet. a native o! derson was commisaioned in thj to 8 oclock^ last night: Districi French Guiana and a sailor from Royal Air Force at the outbreak of "*•**•, '„,.;')"' Z0, Ihe schooner Ipana. was remanded the war, was twice mentioned fn fl t,rab Hill, St. Lucy. .16 and L ,, ..j February in bv (h>. Worship despatches and eventually comFour Roads, St. John, .17. Mr. E A. McLeod." Police Magi* pleled service with the rank of No major breakdowns of the trato of Dlntnct 'A' after he was Satiadron Leader. public utilities, electric a nd gan charged by Uie Police with the • supplies or telephone communicalarceny of articles valued 30 froi INSPECTORS PASS "on occurred because of the rain George Harewood. a shipmate 1 V V VMIN ATlfiN About IS telephone lines in scathis, on February 4. E.Amnirt 1 iwn tered uris Qt the 5 i and wer€ Giving evidence for the Polic mdidates took damat!Dd H.P.C Gill, attached to lh-> Though rain was heaviest In St Bridge Police Station, said that on Michael, telephone trouble in tnat February 15 he was entrusted the local examination for Sanitar Inspectors and thirteen were ,C The examination was conducted j^KL*" n ( more man to "*** on Saturday. February 10 and pa ^ n f| Tuesday. February 13. The ex~ a „ rmineri were: Dr, J. P. CMahony. ra ln Jy '" he Chrut Church .... Director of Medical Services. Dr. %  J on Hastings, Worthings and F. N. Grannum. Senior Medical "ockley where the sUeet lam^s Officer of Health and Mr W A W *J* out of working order. Abrahams. Government Chief The steady spell of rain stopBamtary Inspector. P^ 1 ,n the City yesterday morning Those successful were:— but after 3.00 p.m. the skies Martm coiiymore. Bantua) In. Jimn again became overcast and ran i*.ii-. -wiiru.il, Abrr, i**i.. f e n continuously during the venMitcnrk Inn Nurip. Ivin Alfred Pre Iiccod. Lro SmslL BANK ON WHEELS GETS STARTED The Travelling Office of the Government Savings Bank will be starting its trl-weekly visits to the Ing. The morning, although a little cloudy, w.as sunny and nearly every one expected a dry da/. Some even risked going to work without umbrellas or raincoats They were however disappointed in the evening. At Kensington Oval nearly ill Ith a warrant signed by Capt. W. Farmer for the arresl of OJolet. affected. Ojolct was charged with the larceny of articles valued at $30, About 6.50 p m. on the same cay he saw the defendant on the Chamberlain Bridge and arrested r.im. He was caunoned and on jrnving at the Bridge Post made a voluntary statement. Harewood said that he had left The Ipana sometime In the early part of February and when in returned to the ship he found thai cash to the amount of $26 and a black fountain pen valued at $4 were missing. H* reported the matter to the For various sugar factories throughout the water was pumped off the 1 end of trie Held by midUNLAWFUL POSSESSION Rosa Yarde of Lodge Christ Church, was fined 20 paid In seven days or in default one month's imprisonment wit 1 the -sland from Monday. Febniwesleu. — one montn, imprisonment wif ary 26 and will continue unUl the day. Everything looked promising hard abour for thp un)l|wfu i -„,. endof the crop season. and the groundsmen even attempt„ uton of wood wnich she ^ This i< the third year for the ed to clean up the outfield around -.i,, !" !,.Ainrm ih u-hnrf ... P^IBank which wes out on Mono.,,, th* wlck Worlun.tel, more ^'"ui Tuesdays and Wednesdays. watar collected on the field durln Th brouaht bv Col The Bank!, exited to do even the evening At about 1.00 p^m. M urph,^h !" kl mat he* better business this year than il the Slgmund Pump from the Fire Y Brdc tB kina a quantity of did on the previous two years Brigade had pumped off approx B i ono h( wharf When he ...kerf .hen ,. collect. I .13.277.60 .n im.tel, U5.000 gallon, and two !" %  ? jJ'wM doing with. ST wood she said that someone had IMS and H3.621.56 the following other pumps \ I also working year. RICE, FUEL COME Two telephone posts at St given the wood to her. Andrew, the property of Haggat-s Aflcr flndi .„„ nor expl8na estate, were washed away by t(on wu not ttt ufaetory. he too* A supply of 2.000 bags of rue strong currents of water on Thuriner t „ lhe Bri( Ke P(llirf Su[lo iiided in Ihe cargo brought day. The lines were broken and w h ere she wa rharged with tne to Barbados yesterday by the 74there were no possible means of unlaw f u i passion of the woo-1 ner Franeea W. %mhh. communication with St. Andrew *"" JWIU P"* !"!" *' %  %  %  %  %  The schooner also brought 500 For monthg now whenever rain feet in parts. All this week wat-r bags of charcoal. 150 tons of walfalls heavily in St Michael about was over the road and up laba wood and IS2 wallaba posts, the Ivy areo. the well at the side c t night the Howells Cross Road unsigned to the Schooner the Ivy Road gets choked and 'buses had difficulty in Owners'Association, j watee eowra theroasl to about four throu*. small fire bioke out al Ihe idsor Hotel. Hastings, last The radio said : night about 7.30 when the soot in "The Soviet sportsmen have not '.IKchimney caught afire. The lost a Single game there." Fire Brigade was railed to the —I.N.S. rcene and quickly pu*. it out. IMI'IKIM I. I V J III M UVMt 111 UNSOM 1 . HVAriNTH Stiff joints? Aches? Sprains f Just apply Sloan's Liniment lightly and — of previous BOOd m Highway 1 from Spring Vale to Bruce Vale in.lul IIIIC the temporary bridge at Bax ters, had now been set back bv the rains and the collapse of tlv bridge. He said that during the year u meat deal of work had been done OH the roads of the Bay Estate Mousing Scheme and was continuing. Work was also in progress on n entrance ro,i I to the Pine rfOUS ing Scheme. Thi 9 would be completed by the end of irn>iai Tinwork was not in the year's pro gramme or the Department, but Ihe Department had been a*kc< to carry It out. Work on the Harmony H i 1 diversion was ncaring completion and It was hoped lo gel through ith it before the end of the Hfl anclal year The removal of Ihe crushing plant from the yard of the n parlment and the Installation or |l t the new site Prospect (Lazarci to) should also be completed b) ha and of the year There's more fo a COtD fhan SniffUs! ii. You will feel Sloan good at once. It acts q soothe, and comforts and drives out all Inflammation. uac paa rat riCTiai as asuoi as nil EEEQa HW ji ekimUn wd ,, FRESH SUPPLY OF m :PURINA HEN CHOW: %  (SCRATCH GRAIN) %  !H. JAS0M JONES & CO., LTD.-Di.tribuu,r. %  idarho that fvnrlh 'l: %  il "vn feallng-MMihaaiCold ditromfofii with Alka-Ssltser. Alka-Seltaer it.ni.mi alkaline in^rt-ij."iii to neutralise asreai gaitric af-idity pfui an analgavic for %  ,.,.,(!, INK ii...„i. ...,-, r^c, Hava It handy — alwayl iir''ll ll.\HIM)\S BROAD STREET RANS0ME LAWN MOWERS "TIGER" d "AK1H. f.r*de. each In two sliea rVKI>= lfm ^SS.OB l-> S46 IK t'omidt'te Milh <-'rass Boxes. BRECKNELL' PLATFORM SCALES %  I ILIUM, | I.OM 1 1(1 I IN LBS Stamped read> h. u-.ml i i imilete \\\iU .11 necestarj \\elIONI m HOUR $56.74 EACH. 'D0M0' BUTTER CHURNS I GALLON V \V\t m $29.90 EACH. "BLOW" BUTTER CHURNS FOR IIOMi:sTI< I'SK AT $6.66 and $7.38 EACH. AGRICULTURAL FORKS HIGH GR4.IU-: FORKS. HIM sTRAI'I'HI ONLY $4.70. IIAII It I SO VS Hord T w c r 23 D 6 f • aa_____....B.......BS>KaB •. •'' FOR LINOLEUM WOOD FLOORS AND FURNITURE MANSION HYGIENIC WAX POLISH FOR BRIGHT AND HEALTHY HOMES V HtiJfyat6ity0ic '!.#• sow PLASTIC TABLE CLOTHS Blur & firrrn 54" Miuarr ...?. — MZ %  a. IH ' I.IM N CLASS CLOTHS St A 31 — FMch COTTON (U X^s CLOTHS 71CCave Shepherd & Co., Ltd; 10, II. 12 c 13 Broad Slreel


: cc rl a

arbados

ESTABLISHED 1895

Europe Will
Forces

ACHESON WARNS U.S.
AGAINST ISOLATION

WASHINGTON, Feb. 16

SECRETARY OF STATE Dean Acheson said
today: “The combat forces of our European
Allies may be expected to double in the next year.”’
He testified before the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions and Armed Services Committees to support
the Administration’s plan to send 100,000 addi-

tional troops to Europe to bolster its defences.
Answering questions Acheson said he hoped progress
would be made in fitting Spain into Western defence plans.
Whether that objective could be accomplished depended
on the actions of many nations as well as those of Spain.

Acheson said that the United States must use the time
it had by virtue of its lead over Russia in fire power



and atomic weapons to build up with its allies “balanced
‘collective forces” needed to deter aggression.
_ He said; “The value of our lead -——
in atomic weapons would decline, ° .
but balanced land, sea and air H

forces in Western Europe would : err 10t Quits
offset that.”

America’s Allies were “taking P P. ‘
steps which bring us measurably | arty ost
closer to the realisation of our ce
ultimate goal” of adequate defence PARIS, Feb. 16.
force. Edouard Herriot, Speaker of

“Roughly speaking,” he went] the Frenclr National Assembly
on: “Combat forces of our Euro.} has resigned from the presidency
pean Allies may be expected to!0f the Radical and Radical So-
double in the next year.” cialist Party, the National As-

Acheson attacked the proposals|S@™bly Office’ announced today.
for concentrating American de-| Party headquarters said Herriot
fenees in this Hemisphere, and nee given no reason for his step.
for insisting that Europe prepare erriot’s Secretariat, however,
its defences before it receive !Said his resignation was brought
American aid about by the fact that he. had

He saia the fundamental pur- been unable to secure unanimity
pose of the Atlantic Pact was “to that the eree, aa ne
preserve peace.” It provided for ae not yet Saverd to aie rd.
mutual help among members and posal that Radicals who had ‘aio
for consideration of what should joined General Charles De
ore a attack as well) Gaulle’s French Peoples’ Rally

On the argument that the United} ould ee res ae
States should await development ‘ :
of Europe’s own defensive force Herriot has ‘strosigly opposed






) this “politi .
before ‘waaning tis cpsteibution,/ seta ng ical bigamy” as he
Acheson said the need for strength Herriot, who is 78, was re-

against aggression was the imme-
diate aim of America and he
Allies,

“If each of the North Atlantic
nations should wait to see its part-
rers’ efforts before determining its
own,” Acheson said, “the result
would be as disastrous as it would
be obvious. We might once again
sing the bitter refrain: “too little
and too late” and this time there
may be no opportunity to remedy
the mistake.”

The argument that the United
States should “concentrate on its
own shores and leave the rest of
the world to its fate” once had
scme appeal for Americans, but
they now understood Western
Europe’s importance to American
security.—Reuter.

Basis For Treaty
Now In Sight

CANBERRA, Feb, 16.

John Foster Dulles, American
Special Envoy who is holding pre-
liminary talks with Australia and
New Zealand on a Japanese peace
treaty, said here today: “I feel we
are now in a position where we
can actually find and formulate a
basis for peace’’—Reuter.

War Not Inevitable

LONDON, Feb. 16
Marshal Stalin said in an inter-
view broadcast by Moscow radio
to-night that war was not inevi-
table. Replying to a correspond-

ent of the newspaper Pravda,
said: “No.” At least at the present
time it cannot be regarded as

inevitable.
—Reuter,

elected Speaker last month.

’ Between the wars he was
three times Prime Minister «and
he has been Mayor of Lyons,
France’s second city for 45 years.
He is said to esteem that post
more highly than all ministries
he has held.

—Reuter.



Approve Letter

BONN, Feb. 16.

The Bundestag Foreign Affairs
Committee approved unanimously
a letter which Chancellor Konrad
Adenauer proposes to send to the
allies giving the required guaran-
tee on foreign debts, informed
German sources said today.

The Chancellor told the Com-
mittee that the allies had said
they would accept the letter.

—Reuter

Three Withdraw

WASHINGTON, Feb. 16.

Three trades union members of
America’s Wage Stabilisation
Board withdrew; today in protest
against its decision to recommend
a general 10 per cent, wage in-
crease,

They described the plan as “un-
fair and unworkable” and advo-
cated a 12 per cent. increase in
addition to any future cost of
living adjustments.—Reuter,









REJECT PLAN

OTTAWA, Feb. 16

In less than a minute the Cabi-
net on Thursday night rejected
compulsory military training in
the reserve forces for Home De-
fence. The rejection came from
Defence Minister Claxton late in
the Commons debate which pro-
duced a split in the Progressive
Conservative ranks over the con-
troversial issue.



EMPLOY BLIND GIRLS

NEW YORK.
So hard up is the U.S. govern-
ment for typists. that they are out
to recruit blind girls. They tried
30 as an experiment which proved
“highly successful.” The salaries
range from £883 to £954 yearly.

—(CP)

COLLECTORS’ DAY



FIRST ;
West Indies drew the nsual queue of collectors at the Post Office

day sales of

the stamps of the University College of the

yesterday 4



















’ SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1951

Advorate



FIVE CENTS

PRICE :





























Up Defence

' Allies Preparing

Seoul Offensive

TOKYO, Feb. 16.
NAVAL WORKING PARTIES lead by frogmen, were
to-night working feverishly to restore the west coast port
of Inchon, gateway for supplies to United Nations forces in
ao They had orders to get the docks working within
0 hours.

with the current year.

"the year by
_ £4,026,050,100. A

Tories Will
Challenge
The Govt.

On Groundnuts

LONDON, Feb. 16.

Winston Churchill gave notice
today that Conservatives will
challenge the Government next
Tuesday on their handling of the
post war scheme to grew ground-
nuts in Africa.

Scarcely 12 hours after the Con-

Servative challenge on Defence
policy had been beaten off with
@ 21 majority, Churchill! and five
other Conservatives tabled what
can be interpreted as a new cen-
sure motion,
. The Groundnuts Scheme waz
meetically pruned recently and
236,500,000 were written off as
Authority is being sought
now to spend £6,000,000 on the
modified scheme.

Fierce fighting went on all day
on the central front with United

e eye 7
Civilians , Nations aeroplanes hammering the
Communists.
e British mfantry artillery’ ana
u erin tanks fought their first big offen-
sive action of the Korean war to-
\day in a raging blizzard, Co-op-
erating with American troops,
Os n a jthey attacked Chinese Commu-
{nists entrenched in the hills who
bar the way to battered Seoul, the
South Korean capctal.



(Prom Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb, 16. mete

A shockihg revelation’ awaits! At dusk in -itterly cold weather
the world when figures for civili-|Allied forces had secured their
an casualties in Korea are pub- objective and were digging in for
lished, According to a well-in-|the night. The Communists had
formed sourte in London today,| defeated all attempts to drive
these casualties may approach the|them from the hills in the past
million mark, three days. Today’s move was the

Famine, disease and almost/|first big action to try to smash
continuows air attacks have con- | down their opposition and open
tributed towards this terrible =k way for the United Nations





of life, fianking movement on the capital

On the military side several Lieutenant General Frank H.
factors have emerged in the past} Milburn, American First Corps
few weeks which strengthen the|Commander who watched Allied
hand of the United Nations;troops battle their way up the
Forces in Korea, But the military|steep slopes said he had “coms
solution to the war is now con-|plete confidence in their action}.
sidered virtually impossible, It}and was completely satisfieq with
seems certain that fighting will|the progress..”
continue in Korea until a political
solution can be found.

No move north of the 38th paral-
lel will be made, according to an
authoritative source here, until
after full consultation among the

Yet stiff opposition was still to
be expected from Chinese troops.
Elsewhere along the western
front today Americans on the
right flank toward Wonju took

—Reuter.

Taft Will Question



Allied’ Nations, but the British|their objective and were holding i °
firm tonight against a small arms The Witnesses
@ On page 8. attack.-—Reuter,

WASHINGTON, Feb. 16,

Senator Taft told reporters that
he hoped to question witnesses at
joint sittings of the Senate Foreign.
and Armed Services Committees
About the possible existence of
any agreement to apportion
ground forces among Atlantic
Nations.

STILL RAINING



are consid
A resolution submitted by Senator
Wherry, ublican floor leader,
which wants no United States
troops to be despatched to Europe
until Congress has fixed an over-
all policy. —Reuter

Avalanches Kill 16
In Italian Alps

MILAN, Feb. 16.

Avalanches in the Trento region
killed two more people making
the death toll 16 in the Italian
Alps since Sunday,

Two villages in the Bergamo
Alps were isolated today, Aval-
anches had been hanging over
them for several days, Both vil-
lages had been evacuated except
for 15 people at one Ludrigno,
who refused to leave.

The Po river overflowed at
Casal Maggiore 36 miles east of
Piacenza flooding some 200 acres
of farm lands, Five yards above
its normal level, the river was still
rising steadilv.—Reuter.

Flu Outbreaks

Increase In Canada

TORONTO, Feb. 16
_ Federal health officials have
indicated their belief that influen-
za, which has spread through
Canada may be the same deadly
virus which took almost 8,000
lives in the United Kingdom in
the last few months.
Reports of outbreaks arr in-
creasing daily with at least 25
tario centres among the latest
aflectéd by the disease. Hardest
hit centre in Canada has been
Montreal followed by Quebec in
General and the Maritime Pro-
vinces. Schools have been closed,
factories made idle and normal
life disrupted in many other com-
munities across the country. No
official explanation has been ad-
vanced as to why the virus whic?
proved so lethal in England has
resulted in a total of fewer thar
100 deaths in Canada. It attacks
both old and young alike.—(CP)





THESE GIRLS are not going to get wet rain or no rain.

Truman Must Make
Meaning Clear

LONDON, Feb. 16.
BRITAIN WILL SEEK elarification of President
Truman’s statement that the question of crossing the 38th
Parallel in Korea was a military and strategic matter only,
usually well informed quarters said to-day.
Ta cada aoe Truman made his statement
in Washington yesterday when he
said General MacArthur had all
the authority necessary to cross
the parallel and it was his busi-
ness. 7
A British Foreign Office spokes-
man refused to comment directly
on what the President said, but
he referred to Prime Minister
Attlee’s statement last Monday
that Britain had told the United
States that in its view the parallel
ought not to be crossed again.
—Reuter.

Crowds Queue
Up For Stamps

Besides the usual stamp buyers,
many stamp collectors crowded
the General Post Office yesterday
to buy West Indies University
College stamps,

This new issue of stamps wi'l
be sold for three months unless
they are sold out before. The
stamps are intended to cormmem-
orate the inauguration of the
University College and the insta}-
lation of Her Royal Highness,
Princess Alice, Countess of
Athlone as Chancellor.

LITHUANIA HEARS
“VOICE”

WASHINGTON, Feb. 16

The Voice of America to-day
began a daily broadcast in Lithu.
arian, It was the first time th
Voice had beamed a programme
daily to the country whose inco~
poration into the Soviet Union, tho
United States has never reco,~



Morphia Smugglers
Gaoled And Fined

BREMEN, Feb. 15.
‘ Fifteen people were sentenced | nised.
ere last night to imprisonment, sae
and fined for smuggling about EXCHANGE GOODS
20 tbs of morphia. NEW DELHI, Feb. 16
_Chief defendant, Dr. Arno! India is to exchange goods with
Grosse, chemist was sentenced to Spain, the Government announced
one year and two weeks’ impris-
onment. here to-day.
Dr. Grosse had stolen morphia Trade arrangements were agreed
from some chemical works during|9% the result of discussions held
with the Spanish trade mission

an air raid in 1943. Part of it ; a7 :
was hidden away to be gmuggied during its visit to India in October

The 3 cent stamps bear the
arms of the University and the
penny stamps the full portrait of
Her Royal Highness the Countess
of Athlone, in her Chancellor’s
robes. Other colonies are issuing
Stamps to commemorate the same
occasion,

When a middle-aged man was
asked yesterday whether he want-
ed stamps to post a letter or to




- a
a ——,

keep, he replied that he had to Austria. It was confiscated be-|/ast the statement added.
son at the University College and|fore it reached consumers, evi- —Reuter.
was buying the stamps for senti-|dence showed. nm
mental reasons. He intended} The Bremen salesman who at- AID FOR BRITAIN
sending some to his son too, |cepted 10 lbs. from Grosse was SYDNEY
'sentenced to eight months’ Sydney’s Lord Mayor has just
An old lady wi nto |imprisonment returned from London, where he
the office with ¢ at The m who was to dispose|attended the official winding-up
she was a: @ ‘lof the remaining 10 lbs. took|ceremony of Australian Food for
ground j rted to American|Britain Fund But he Va oO
I ed a | € He also got] appalled Britain’ ynit
she tl he ontt ent ; ng that he } ‘
as "a memol —Reuter. rev



fund

womediately,

i} Poses.”

“UK. Will Spend |
£31l1m More On
Her Defences

LONDON, Feb. 16.

BRITAIN’S Navy, Army and Air Force estimates
; show an increase of over £311,000,000 for the
coming financial year starting on April 1, compared

The total Bill which will be increased during
supplementary

estimates is

Two thirds of the £41,880,000
wanted for the Army will buy new
modern weapons including tanks
and anti-aircraft weapons. Estim-
ates are based on the original
programme which scheduled
£ 3,600,000,000 for Defence in
three years, It has since risen to
£4,700,000,000,

British naval experts are con-
centrating on building a fleet of
small speedy warships — some
atom powered—to combat the
submarine menace in any future
war.

Yearly naval estimates present-
ed to Parliament to-day showed
they had abandoned the construc-
tion of battleships considered too
cumbrous for modern warfare.

Britain has a naval strength of
five battleships and six fleet car-
riers (23,000 to 26,000 tons) with
two modern fleet carriers under
construction, six light fleet car-
riers (about 13,000 tons) and eight
under construction.

—Reuter,



Take Up New Job

NEW YORK, Feb 16,

General Dwight D. Eisenhower
sailing today in the Queen Eliza-
beth to assume command at
Supreme Headquarters of Allied
Powers in Europe said in an in-
terview that “It is our firm hope
that our job over there will be
done soon, We really believe if
we do ourjob the job will be
promptly done.”

He said the only reason for the
United States being in “this great
effort is because of our enlight-
ened self-interest. We are trying
to preserve peace. Everybody |
knows we have no warlike pur-

The General was accompanied
by his wife.—Reuter,

Nehru Chides
Forty Three M.Ps

|
NEW DELHI, Feb. 16,
Prime Minister Nehru today
deprecated a message sent by 43
members of the Indian Parlia-
ment to presiding officers of the
American Congress about legisla-
tion before Congress to supply
food grains to India. The mes-
Sage urged the approval of the
legislature.
Signatories including India’s
former Ambassador to Brazil said
they recognised that the liberty of
free Asian countries was ‘‘menaced
by Communist expansion,”
Nehru told Parliament today
that he was “considerably sur-
prised” by the message.
He said: The House will realise
how embarrassing that must be not
orly for the Government but for
this House.
—Reuter



Prisoners Stage

}
Handicraft Show |

PARIS, Feb, 16.

Murderers, robbers and lepers
were the artists responsible for
an exhibition of pictures opened
here today.

All pictures were painted by
convicts in the French penal. col-
ony, Saint Laurent, French Gui-
ana and were brought to Paris by
prison officials,

“Escapism” is the main motif—
seen in pictures of ships sailing
away, scenes of home life, women

—imagined white ones or real
native women. Vivid tropical
colour is seen in paintings of

lizards and rare butterflies,

Among handicrafts exhibited is
a seale model of a gallows for use
as a cigar cutter.—Reuter,

Women Wanted

COPENHAGEN, Feb. 16

Civil defence authorities to-
day called for women between
18 and 22 to volunteer for a six-
months’ training course,

Two camps for women open or
May 1. Preliminary plans cover
the call up of 1,200 women for}
civil defence in the event of
general mobilisation.

—Reuter.

10 GO; 20 COME

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 14
The immigration question is
now one of the colony’s problems





PORT-OF-SPAIN
riplet all boy
mic Thon f San Ped
la Frida The he

were born t

It has worsened within recent
months. For every 10 arrested tc
be deported as prohibited _immi-
grants, 20 would enter And
Grenadians are in the malo |
they form 75 per cent. of those
entering the colony every week |
HAS TRIPLETS |
From Our Own Correspondent }
Feb, 14 |

|

|

'

+

|
‘i : iers on board.
Eisenhower Sails To iers on boarc

ITs

oe

I
THE



ARMY

JUST BEFORE THREE, but not before the rain, the “Copinsay”
came alongside the Baggage Warehouse and the Royal Inniskillings
were back in Barbados, after a very long absence.

Inniskillings Pay
Goodwill Visit

SHORTLY AFTER two o’clock yesterday afternoon
the Royal Army Service Corps 5.S. Copinsay steamed into
the outer basin of the Careenage with a company of two
officers and 37 other ranks of the Royal Inniskilling Fusil-

Among the company are 25 drummers and

pipers, all under the command of Major F, M. Cunning-

ham.



ON THE
@ SPOT

ALEXANDRIA,

Egyptian police are baf-
fled by two carrier pigeons,
one caught near Alexandria
and the other in Upper
Egypt. Both had metal disks
with “Moscow” engraved on
them. Now the police are
trying to find out whether
messages to Egyptian Com-~-
munist cells are being car-
ried through carrier pigeons.

Cricket Will
Start Monday

The first match of the Inter-
colonial Cricket Tournament be-
tween Trinidad and Barbados will
now begin on Monday, February
1?





Oving to the condition of Ken-
sington Oval Messrs. F. A. C,
Clairmonte, E. L. G. Hoad, N.
Nethersole, E. J. Marsden
and M. Green, members of the
West Indies Cricket Board of Con-
trol, in conjunction with the Bar-
bados Cricket Association and
Mr, Jeffrey Stollmeyer, Trinidad
Captain, arrived at this decision.
They have agreed to have two
five-day matches without any rest
period between,



WILLS‘'S

GOLD FLAKE

ARE eR NARA NOSEIML NE .



The Fusiliers ar-
;rived in Jamaica in November
1949 and have been stationed
there ever since, They are here on
a goodwill two-day visit. They will
be relieved of their duties in
Jamaica by the Royal Welsh Fusi-
liers next month,

On arrival the 178-ton Copingay
tied off near the Baggage Ware-
house. Major Cunningham was
met by Major Skewes-Cox, Stat
Officer, Local Forces and Captain
Jordan, A Barbados Regiment
truck transported the company to
the St. Anns Fort,

The Copinsay, formerly a Navy
minesweeper, is under the com-
mand of Captain A. C, Bodden, a
Cayman-born naval officer, now
living in Jamaica, It is an oil burn-
er and fitted with troop decks to
accommodate 46, These decks are
air-conditioned, It is being used
as a troop. transport for the
R.A.S.C, in the Caribbean area,
It carries a crew of 18.

Major F. M. Cunningham,

Inniskilling

Officer Commanding the Battal-
ion, is from Belfast, Northern Ire-
land. For the past 20 years he
has been with the Inniskilling
Fusiliers, He joined as an Officer
in 1931 and during the war he
served in France, Belgium, and

other places, :
He said, "We hive always had
close connections with the West

@ On page 8



TELL THE ADVOCATE

THE NEWS
RING 3113
DAY OR NIGHT |

SRA AE TOR NE
PAGE TWO

Sir Johan Waddington. extreme
Himden arrived fram Trinidad

att,

jasterday iy 3. W.t «A





Prof. Harlow,



nest ta Six Join, Mr. Join Hemmings and Dr. Rita
an voute from BG

They are pistared here ou their wag from the ‘piune accompaniad ty Maj. Dennis Vaughn the Governor's

A.D.€.

S* JON
accompanied

Eindter,, Profes
and We.
fom B
day bor B
be here

WADDINGTON














Sir Da sion
to BuaG e type
ot com it e nile to the
people of that col lony. “Dr, Hinden

and Professor Harlow were mem-
bers of the Commission and Mr
John Hemmings Secre-
tary.

acted ag

Sir John who was Governor of
Barbados from 1938 to 1941 told
Cari® thal at present he wes un
able to say. anything about the
results of the Commission. He
Said he was extremely pleased
that his work on the Commission
had brought = him,;.onee» again
through the Caribbeah, especially
Barbados,

Nepture’s Daughter
T midnight tonight, Nep-
tuine’s daughter will be chosen
during the dance at the Barba-
dos Aquatic Club Judges are
Mrs. Jean Iverson, Mr. R. W.
Bell and his camera and Mr, J.
H, Reddekopp. Mr. Reddekopp is
Holiday Travel’s representative in
Barbados.
Competitors must
the ages of fourteen
one and they must
shorts and shirt.
The winner gets a silver cup,
Collapsible Canoe
R. & MRS PETER TERENT-

between
twenty
white

be
and
wear

JEV are at present holi-
daying in Barbados. Peter is
with Avensa Airlines in Vene—
zuela and has been with them
since 1947. This is their first
visit here. They are guests at
Cacrabank.

Mr. Terentjev has a_ collapsi-
ble canoe made of canvas and

ply rubber with a polished wooa-
eh framework inside, equipped
with paddles and a sail. It is 18
feet long and almost three feet
wide. He was born in Latvia
and his wife in Iran, ‘Persia.

Off To B.G.
R. GILBERT YVONET was
among the passengers leav-
ifig for B.G. yesterday by
B.W.1.A. He has gone over to
ride in the Demerara Turf Club's
meeting which begins today,



General Manager



RAWLINE
fF. A
rietors of the

raphic in British Guiana,
was in Barbados for a meet
ing of the Caribbean Press
Association returned to B.G,
yesterday afternoon by B.W.1LA
Leaving by the same plane w
Mrs, J. Bernstein who has gone
to B.G, for a week or two ‘on
heliday

W.I. Test Selector

who

M* Ww. M GHEEN, West
Indies Test Selector (British
Guiana) arrived from B.G. yes

terday afternoon by B.W.1.A. He
here for the forthcoming cricket!

tournament between Barbados and

Trinidad

Mr, Green told Carib that like

Rarbados, it has been very rainy

They have only been able to have
so far Mr
ntevenen sal

practice match
Green is a former

one

cricketer in the days when Greer

Browne and Wight were a farmi : B BC. Radio Programme tinique, where they were not al
dable trio in the British Guiana ‘ lowed to leave the airport due
team, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY #7, 1950 to Government regulations. They
He is staying at the Hotel Royal,| 6.00 am.—12,15 pm, — 19.76 1m, enjoyed their brief stay immense
6.30 a.m. Force Fivouslthe 7.00 a.m ly and plan to return for a longer
. . i. WO a foes Fa Ps, a eae =
Electrical Engineer The News, 710. am. News’ Analysis, | Stay next year.
R. ARTHUR COOPER, Elec-] }youramine Parade, 740 a.m, Prom the
trical Engineer arrived fromm] Third Programme, 7.50 a.m. Interlude,
, 1 y atte 8.00 a.m. BBC Symphony Orchestra
Eo - iy oe ; acirme tt DY} 945 a.m. Colonial Questions, 9.00 a.m
3.W.LA, e is here for fifteen The News, 9.10 a.m, Home News from
days staying at the Hastings] Britain, 945 am. Close Down, 11.15
Hotel before leaving for Antigua.) }m., yrowusmme Forade, 11-20 a.m
enude 40 a.m. Shhdy Macpherson
Brothers at the Theatre Organ, 11.45 a.m oven- °
trp City ve Manchester City 12.00
R. & MRS JOHN McINTOSII (noon) ‘The News, 12.00 p.m. News
f accompanied by their two Apalysis, 1215 pam, Close Down,
children and Mr. and Mrs, James| 4:!5--#.00 pam, -— 95.58 m,
MeIntosh arrived from Trinidad] “45pm. Strike Up the Music, 6.00
by B.W.1.A. yesterday after-} p.m. Composer of the Week, 6.15) p.m
noon. Mr. John MelIntosh is ap] Standord Rabinson Presents, 6.00 p.m.
Engineer with T.L.L, and Mr. | gies jpn, pancing, aS ——
James MelIntosh is with sew tAS pret x
stationed at Piareco. They are! Fie’ xpronre nay 7.00
aaa p.m The ews, 10 pom News
oom here for three month Lets oie Rt ene one awe
‘ 7.4--11.00 pan, — SL32 mm. & 43
and James for two weeks, Mrs To ‘ .
‘ . * . so " . pom @an dy Macpherson at ¢ ce
semen seeliitoeh 8 the : former Theatre Organ, 8.00 pm acdio Newsreel,
Joyce Dean. They are staying at} 6.15 p.m. Composer of the Week, 8.30

Coral Sands.

From Chicago
RS. CLARA MORRIS
Chicago arrived from Trini-
cad yesterday. Here for a week
she is staying at the Paradise
Seach Club. She was only in
Trinidad overnight,

ot



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UTFIELOS

Wite Arrives To-day

M®; H. L. BLACHFORD of

Miontreal arrived from Can-
da yesterday via Trinidad by
B W.1.A. to spend a month’g
holiday in Barbados. He expects
his wife to arrive this morning by
T.C eh.

Mr. Blachford is proprietor of
H. L. Blachford Limited, Chem-
|! manufacturers in Montreal,

ical
He is a guest av the Hotel Windsor.

With Shell Caribbean

R. AND MRS. Micnael God-
frey arrived from Venezuela
Trinidad yesterday after
by B.W.1.A. to spend

weeks’ holiday here,
the Hastings Hotel.
accompanied by their

via
noon
t ree
staying at
The y were
two sons.

Mr. Godfrey is with Shell Carib
bean Petroleum Corpn,, and :5
stationed at Bachaquero field which
is near Maracaibo,







p.m
News,
wO.15
p.m
Song

Radio Theatre, 10.00 p.m, The

10.10 pm. From the Editorials,
pm. Anything to Declare, 10.45
Yours Falthfully, 11.00 p.m. Your
Parade

EMPIRE THEATRE

TODAY 4,45 & 8.30 and continu-
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SHOWS DAILY UP TO
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the Bak LL
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BARBADOS



ADVOCATE



THE VILLA GE

John Moore, author of so many
books on country life and 4
broadcaster of note, recently
talked about “The Village” in a
BBC series called “British Mas-
terpieces” . He felt ~that the
English village was different
from other masterpieces because
no one set down to design it;
just grew. Some, he knew, had
been growing for hundreds of
years “literally like trees, be-
cause the stone which they are
built of comes out of quarries
almost at their doorsteps and the
thinner stones which roof them
comes out of the quarries too;
so that each little house is part
of the landseape, growing out of
the earth.” A score of these vil-
lages lay near his home on the
Cotswold Hills, all different, all
beautiful, and the best of them
perfect works of art. They most-
ly began by some accident of
geography, such as a_ sheltered
fold in the hills or a river cross-
ing, or because there was a big
manor house in the district and
cottages sprang about it like chil-
dren around their mother’s skirt.

Wool had*a great deal to do
with the origin and development
of the Cotswold villages. Cots-
wold churches, glorious buildings
with splendid towers, were built
by woolstaplers who made for-
tunes out the boom in Cots-
wold sheep§ “The golden ficect
was a realty in the Cotswolds
in 1450,” said Moore and in many
villages it could be seen how the
wool was turned into money that
with loving labour made such
rich memorials to the wealthy
merchants as many a king would
envy. The long chain of cause
and effect began with the lime-
stone of which the Cotswolds
were made. This was laid down
as an ocean bed millions of years
ago and later heaved up by some
vast convulsion to form a range
of hills. The limestone soil grew
a grass called Fescue which was
favourite grazing for sheep, To
keep their sheep apart Cotswold

“Hedge- Hopping”
R. ED LOREHN, Executive
Vice President of the Cam
Texas
and a party of five who arrived
here en Thursday in one of the
company’s private planes, a Lock
heed Lodestar, left yesterday for
Curacao. They are ‘hedge—hop-
ping” through the W.1

Members of the party were Mr
and Mrs. Tom Shartle, Mrs. C. M
Taylor, Mrs. Stanley Shipness and
Mrs. J. B. Hayes.

Leaving Texas a week ago they
have already visited Jamaica, St.
Thomas, Virgin Islands, and Mar



























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shepherds bu stone walls and
so learned how to quarry and
fashion stone. When the mer-
chants grew rich from wool ex-
per! ced quarrymen, masons ane
craftsmen were already at hand
and up went the churches, mills,
arched stone bridges, farmhouses.
manors and cottages. “The bare
Bilis blossomed during those two

England's
was born,

denturies which were
“spring and the village
said Moor It grew slowly and
for three hundred years thos*
clustered habitations were pre-
earious Outposts in a wasteland
until a great and sudden change
came. New inventions in agri-
culture made it possible to feed
more sheep and grow more corn,
new inventions in industry and
the growth of towns created a
huge demand for meat and corn.
For years the countryside was in
turmoil while greedy and hungry
men scrambled for soil but out of
the unlovely dogtight a new and
beautiful pattern emerged, farms
with their patehwork of fields,
spacious parkland, Georgian man-
elaborate gardens, coverts,
spinneys and trout streams for
sportsmen, the pattern of ‘the
English countryside and English
life which is the background of
the village masterpiece. But the
ahineteenth century was not all

greed and scramble and the na-
tive kindlines which runs

rough British history began to
‘ ke ftself felt. Schools were
suilt, hovels gave way to decent
houses, drinking dens grew injo
the village pub. The village be-
came a mixed community of all
social degrees in which everyone
knew everyone else, intensively
individual yet inter-related and
inter-responsible, perhaps the most
civilised way of living that man-
kind had yet devised, This motley
collection of people living and
working together at close quarters
provided the spirit or soul of a
village. They knew that they
were part of a vere ancient tra-

sions,



Pilot of the plane was Ben Clapp
d co-pilot was W. R Schmidt.

Port-Of-Spain Councillor
ery NCILLOR C. B. MATHURA

Port-of-Spain was among
the passengers arriving from
Yvinidad yesterday by B.W,LA.
tere for two weeks’ holiday he is
siaying at “Super Mare” Guest
House, Worthing.

Three Days

RS. W. FRED DAY has her

two sons John and Frank
visiting her from Canada. They
are staying with her at the Hotel
Royal. Mrs. Day has been living
here for about three years. Her
sons arrived over the week-end,
Both of them live in Toronto where
John is the proprietor of the Day
and Frank is with Paper

Sign Co.,

Sales Co.

To-night

visit

Dancing

Streets






!

House-

RE

Plates Dishes
Tea Cups & Saucers, Cream Jugs
| Platters Tea Pots
Also
TEA SETS 24 PIOOUE © ec des eee cet beeevece $12.41
{ DUNNE SETS. 264. 0 Ree Nie es 28.62
DINNER SETS 63 49.34

e Department —Tel. No.2039



THE BARKADOS €0-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.



————=














dition for on the moss grown
tombstones in the village church-
yards the same names were seen
for generation after generation.
Amongst these men lay some of
the nameless craftsmen whose
hands long ago fashioned the vil-
lages. “They were the shapers
of the masterpiece,” said Moore,
“but we who live here to-day,
parson, policeman, schoolmaster,
squire, farmer and labourer, pub-
keeper and post office lady, we
and our forefathers and our sons
and daughters after us, are the
breath and spirit which gives. it
life”,

CROSSWORD





Acruss
ts this Kind of dog ts

1. Prom repor
s tast une

4 and 5 DOW:

a party

How ¢ ibe woulda describe the

diat (@) 8. Sarcastic? (6)

May be called peak. (3)

He's roped when caught m0

doubt (5)

Sroma to get both ways. (4)

. No dog ljoyer would. surely, (7)

ij. Contend, (3)

. Sort of cake to get at one, (5)

». Direction. (4)

1. Has been quoted as a must when
the devil drives. (5)

. Returning brick carrier. (3)

3 Mrs. Brown _was exhorted to keep
them up. (5) 24. See 3 Down.

Dowp

1. L admit this is grating, (8)

. An easy word for beginners. (8)

and 24 Across. Ian Brine, Ph.D.,

dislikes this turn when’ motor-

(3-3)
The watehword of
Or

1er.

ing, (7, 4) 4, Despatched, (4)

5, See 4 Across.

6. A word for elves in the Shet-
lands. (4)

7. We find it no Jorg to sacrifice
things this way, (8

9, Fine sort of fist eooording to

Shakespeare. (4)

10. Metal, (6) 15, PNAS, 6)

16. City of North France. (4 }

19, Our Cabinet huinleter in
Sweden. (8)

Solution of, yeaverday’ 8 Dyssle. —Across:
1, Phas: 8 |. Analyse; umb; 12,
Send; Rutilant: 14, ofits if Ayah:
16, Centaur ae . Nylghau: 22,

; e" +. Farrier,
4, Essay; 5,

8 10, 5

18, Alum; 19,







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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1951

GLOBE THEATRE —ropay 5 & 8.30 P.M. TO TUESDAY
oe

spy HUNT

coving HOWARD DUFF - MARTA TOREN

PHILIP FRIEND » ROBERT DOUGLAS - PHILIP DORN - WALTER SLEZAK
A UNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL PICTURE

BRITISH AND AMERICAN NEWS REELS

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA ‘Members Only)

MATINEE TODAY AT 5 P.M.
TO-NIGHT TO TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
ROBERT MONTGOMERY ANN BYLTH
in “QNCE MORE, MY DARLING”
with JANE COWL
Based on The Hiiarious Saturday Evening Post
Serial Story, “Come Be My Love”









Extra :







A New Universal-International Release



PLAZA Wuishdre—bridgitown ‘sal 2310)

TWO SHOWS TODAY — 445 & 830 P.M, and CONTINUING DAILY

sames cacneyin VWWHITE HEAT

with Virginia MAYO — Edmond O'RRIEN
Also “Bob Wills and Bh | Texas Play Bere



Sat.) 17th

MATIN TODAY ~ 9.30 a.m. & 1.30 p.m,
Ken Maynard — Hoot Gibson Johnny Mack Brown in

DEATH VALLEY RANGERS & RAIDERS OF THE BORDER

i= =

PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

TODAY 5 & 8.80 P.M, & CONTINUING DAILY
MIRACULOUS JOURNEY & BAD MEN OF TOMBSTONE

in Colorful Cinecolor Barry Sullivan — Marjorie
with Rory Calhoun — Audrey Long : Reynolds — Brod Crawford
Virginia Grey — Gee. Cleveland

















MIDNITE TONITE (Sat.) 17th (Monogram Action Double)

CODE OF THE SADDLE & RIDERS OF THE DAWN

Johnny “Mack Brown Jimmy WAKELY

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TODAY TO SUNDAY 8.30 p.m, — Mat, SUN, 6 P.M,

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LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT & RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL
Johnny Mack Brown Jimmy Wakely

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Today 445 & 8.30 p.m.
and continuing to Tuesday



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HOB
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4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
United Artists Double

Cesar ROMERO in

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Columbia Whole Serial

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Last Two Shows Today
4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

Republic Smashing Double
James LYDON and
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“Bandit King
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Starring
Allan (Rocky) LANE and
his Stallion Black Jack

David O. Selznick presents

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Starring
Ralph RICHARDSON
Michele MORGAN

with Sonia DRESDEL
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Box
i i a ileal eatin

SATURDAY,

FEBRUARY



17, 1951



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ro



Problems And Treatment Of Soil Steady Rain

Erosio

Asricultural Adviser to Britain's

Colonial Secretary from 1940-1946

whe has written many books on the
subject of tropical agriculture

Soil erosion has achieved recent
world wide prominence as a men-
ace to man’s existence. The top-
most layer of the earth’s crust—
the soil—when it is exposed to the
influence of moving water and
wind, tends to be washed and
blown away. The process is in-
sidious but under natural condi-
tions erosion is held in check by
vegetational cover, and losses are
balanced by gains from rock
weathering. It is when this is re-
moved without adequate precau-
tions, and when the land is im-
properly farmed that the position
becomes dangerous. Soil erosion
is, therefore. essentially a symp-
tom of wrong land use.

Risks are greatest in those
regions where the rain comes in
heavy downpours, as in tropical
countries, or where high winds are
associated with long dry spells as
on the prairies and steppes of con-
tinental countries, Owing to the
increase in world populations,
there has been of late years un-
paralleled penetration and devel-
opment of the erosion-prone lands
by people without experience and
knowledge of the dangers, It has
led to extensive losses and wide-
spread destruction. Not only has
this occurred on the plantations
and farms of new settlers and
planters in these regions, but with
the advent of law, order and im-
proved living conditions in many
primitive regions, native popula-
tions have increased rapidly; to
provide the necessary food and to
satisfy the increasing demand for
crops for export, traditional agri-
cultural practices, which formerly
provided a measure of protection

have fallen into disuse. In conse-
quence erosion has rapidly in-
creased,

On larger farms, worked by in-
telligent farmers with adequate
resources, the problem, although
great, is by no means insuperable.
Indeed progress towards its solu-
tion is becoming, evident all over
the world, On small and scatter-
ed holdings, especially those of
primitive cultivators in partially
developed regions, however, the
menace 1S great,

Conservation | Methods

In general the measures taken
against erosion have for their ob-
ject the protection of the soil from
erosive influences, and the main-
tenance of condition of the soil
itself. This resolves itself into the
general layout of cultivation, the
prevention of cultivation of lands
that are excessively liable to eros-
ion, the construction or provision
of protective terraces, drains and
so forth, the planting of protect-
ive forests and shelter belts and
similar aids, as well as the em-
ployment of appropriate methods
of cultivation, choice of suitable
crops and rotations and appropri-
ate methods of husbandry. To be
effective they must be suited to
conditions and applied to the
countryside as a whole and not
piecemeal to individual properties;
moreover they may involve larger
issues, such as the siting of towns,
villages, roads and railways, the
conduct of mining and other mat-
ters. In its widest aspect soil con-
servation is inseparable from
planned and controlled land use,
it demands accurate knowledge of
the conditions and its application
is eventually dependent on legis-
lation to enable it to be enforced.
Such legislation has already been
enacted in many countries, but a
necessary prerequisite is that
agricultural communities must be
educated to appreciate thn need
and be willing to co-operace.

Practically all the British Colo-
nial dependencies lie in regions
where erosion is liable to occur.
On estates and larger properties
erosion was at one time very seri-+
ous, especially in the Far East and





THIS —



IF YOU—
FEEL LIKE

TAKE

WINCARNIS

By Sir Harold Tempany



STRIP CONTOUR

A PERFECT EXAMPLE of strip contouring as practised by the Bakiga tribe in south-west Uganda,

East Africa owing to unsuitable
practices such as clean weeding
absence of contouring, inadequate
protection and unsuitable drain-
age provision, This has, however,
been remedied to a considerable
extent and the position is continu-
ing to improve.

Was this the only factor, there
would not be much cause for
alarm but it is in the much larger
areas cultivated by indigenous
peasant cultivators that the chief
danger resides, It is an adminis-
trative rather than a purely agri-
cultural problem. Often the first
step may be large-scale popula-
tion transfers, and coupled with
this must be the supersession of
unsuitable agricultural practices
by modern methods adapted to the
change of conditions. Its solution
is complicated by low education
standards, tribal customs, super-
stitions and boundaries and, at
times, by political agitation.

Dangers Widely Recognised

Throughout the Colonies the
dangers are widely recognised and
considerable sums are being ex-
pended in efforts to improve mat-
ters, Appropriations and grants
to this end have been made from
local revenues and from Britain
through the Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Acts,

In Kenya, for example,
£1,000,000 has been provided for

—











conservation work and the 1950
oil conservation staff numbered
34 Europeans and. 551 Africans.

sIn Uganda strip cropping and the

ust of protective grass strips is
now widely practised and al-

though erosion occurs it is local-
ised, Much progress has been
made with the construction of
dams and boreholes to provide
water for Stock,

In Tanganyika the value of con~
toured tied ridges has been proved
and considerable improvements
have also been made in grazing
management.

In Nyasaland, too, there has
been progress and on estates ade-
quate conservation measures are
becoming the rule. In Cholo and
in the Misuku Hills in the North
a complete change in agricultural
practice with corresponding im-
provement is reported.

In Northern Rhodesia there has
been steady progress on estates
which will, no doubt, be accelerat-
ed when soil conservation legis-
lation, recently enacted, becomes
fully operative, In Jamaica, in
the West Indies, it is estimated
that at least 12,000 acres (4,856
hectares) have “been protected
during the past two or three years
by means of contour drains and
protective bunds, while parallel
progress has been made in many
of the other smaller islands,





TONIC WINE



AND
_ LIKE



FEEL
THIS !

BE HEALTHY
& HAPPY.





Holds Up
Reaping

4

Most of the plantations in the
island are having difficulty in
reaping the present crop because

they are not able to get the re-

qvired amount of canes due to the

abnormal rainfall which fell dur-

ing the Week, the Advocate was
reliably informed yesterday.

‘ ar

The rain force An 4

workers to stop cutting the canes
and some of the factories had to
cease operations on more than one
oceasion,

The ground was so thoroughly
soaked, that it was impossible for
lorries and carts to go into the
fields as was customary, to draw
the canes. In some instances,
canes had to be headed out to
the border of the field and that
eaused a considerable delay in
transport.

At some plantations however,
workers were trimming around
the fields so that there was not
much difficulty in loading.

The weather was fair yesterday
morning and the labourers re-
sumed their work, but it would
take several days before the lor-
ries and carts would be able to
go into the plant cane field.

Mr. W. F. Harris, Manager of
Haggatts in St, Andrew told the
Advocate yesterday that they had
10 inches of rain. for the week
up to Thursday and were forced
to stop grinding on three occa-
sidns during the week as a re-
sult of not having sufficient canes,

Work Resumed

He said that they started again
yesterday morning and had a
shower at 9 o'clock, but when he
left an hour later for the city
the weather was fair, everything
Was running smoothly and he was
expecting a reasonable day’s work.

At Haymans, St. Peter, where
11,09 inches fell for the week,
the factory never stopped work-
ing as they had received a suffi-
cient number of canes during the
time the rain was not falling
and over the week-end to keep
them going.

They did not get in as many
canes as they would have liked,
but in spite of that, they got
through better than they had an-
ticipated. Many of the peasants’
canes in that area which were

The problem is particularly dif- placed near the road side over
ficult in Cyprus because of the the week-end, were however
natural conditions and also of the | Washed away down in the Bowl-

ing Alley.

Mr. R. E. King, Manager of
Fisherpond in St. Joseph said
that they had 8.77 inches for the
week and the ground was so
thoroughly soaked, that they had
to head out the canes, hence at
Andrews, the factory could not
get the full supply and had
to stop on two or three occasions.

smallness of the holdings and the
poverty of the cultivators. The
policy has been to demonstrate a
technique and then induce culti-
vators to apply it. Another direc-
tion in which progress has been
made is the construction of small
storage reservoirs to control the
flash floods which follow every
storm, thus enabling the water to
be used for irrigation, Useful re-
sults have also followed measures
for the protection of forests,

a

_———

More Canes

The foregoing examples show
that the problem is being ener-
getically handled in many terri-
tories; it is far from being com-
pletely solved but it is hoped that,
eventually, these efforts will meet
the success they deserve, since on
them the future largely depends.

He said that with two or three
days of sunshine, they would be
able to supply a great deal more
canes, but it would be sometime
before they would be able to
get their lorries and carts back
into the plant cane field,

He said that the juice was still
very poor and the first week of
the crop, it took Andrews nearly
11 tons of cane to make a ton of
sugar,



Rates Of Exchange

February 16, 1951

—_——

At Apes Hill which had 7
CANADA inches and Blowers 5.26 inches,
4 5/1080 pri: Cheon both in St. James, labourers only
Bankers 623/10% pr.| had to stop work on Tuesday due
Demand | ek: aid to rain, but they were now en-
Sight Drafts 62% pr. | 84ged in trimming the _ fields
043/10% pr. Cable against the road so that there
628/10% pr. Currenéy 60 8/10% pr. ad-
oaent 80 110% pr} Was not much difficulty in load

Silver ing the canes,



“it feels as if there’s always some-
thing in my eyes,” eries John. Mother
worres: “Oh! Is his sight alright?”

“His sight is fine!” says Doctor. The
inflammation caused by
advise Optrex.”

trouble is
glare and dust, I



“Well!” says Mother qome days later,
“I'm glad we learned about Optrex—
you're a real ‘bright-eyes’ now John!”

PROTECT YOUR EYES werk

trex |=

EYE LOTION

poe
MAKE THIS TesT

The r of the eye and inner

with Optrex, washing away all dirt
and germs, soothing tiny eye veins.








° es eer emcee erence

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revealed to the world the manifold ways in which
British enterprise and skill were pioneering to increase
the ease and interest of life. For some time past, we
have been planning to celebrate this anniversary by
a Festival in which every aspect of British life will
be on display. In particular, we are making the 1951
British Industries Fair an occasion for the world to



see the full extent of our recovery and our resources.
We can promise that the B. I. F., like British Industry
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ll ti li inne


‘

PAGE FOUR >



Saturday, February 17, 1951

EMIGRATION

THE House of Assembly on Tuesday
voted the sum of $80,000 to be put at the
disposal of the Labour Commissioner to
meet the cost of emigration of Barbadian
workers to the United States of America.
The number of emigrants to be) selected
from this island is not yet known but it
was estimated that Barbados would get a
good quota of the required 10,000 or 16,000
from the West Indies.

The benefit of emigration to the U.S.A,
during the last six years cannot be over-
estimated. Remittances from the 11,000
who have gone in recent years, some of
them more than once, amounted to
approximately three million dollars. But
the schemes not only brought substantial
funds iftto the island but gave those who
went an opportunity to live and work
under conditions entirely different from
those to which they had been accustomed
in Barbados; it also reduced unemploy-
ment as it brought work to many who had
never been so inclined.

In addition to the benefits to the indi-
vidual the emigration schemes improved
the spending power of the people and
raised the standard of living. Several of
these workers were able to acquire proper-
ty and the means of earning a livelihood,
an opportunity which they never had be-
fore.

If there is to be a West Indian quota of
anything like ten thousand workers to the
United States it might be well to press the
claims of Barbados whose 1,100 to the
square mile gives her priority for relief.

The question of transport and its cost
will have to be faced. In 1946 it was point-
ed out that the reason for including the
majority of Jamaicans in the quota was
that the cost of transport was less because
of the close proximity of that island to the
United States. The employer who had
undertaken to pay the cost of transport was
not satisfied to pay the higher fare for Bar-
badians when it could be avoided by con-
tracting with Jamaicans,

It might be as well for the Government
to make up its mind and let it be under-
stood that half of the transport cost for
each labourer will be paid on condition
that it be repaid from the earnings of the
worker. If the Government can set up an
organisation, the United States Workers’
Savings Branch of the Labour Department,
in which debts and fines by the Courts are
collected, it would add nothing to the
work now being done to deduct from the
remittances the sums owing to the Gov-
ernment as half of the cost of transport. It
might also be the means of preventing
‘premature return of workers not too willing
to work for lengthy periods.

There is not one worker who would ob-
ject to such deduction from his remittances.

It is on record, as the Labour Commis-
sioner said in a recent Press Conference on
his return from the United States that the
employers are not only willing but desir-
ous of having Barbadians in their employ
because of the reputation which thousands
of them have gained as food workers.

There is however one domestic problem
to be settled. There are still those who feel
that an early selection of labourers from
this island would rob the ranks of agricul-
tural labour.

In fact, the number of agricultural
labourers in previous emigration schemes
has been small and did not interferé with
the reaping of the crop. Several people
who registered as labourers were not in the
real sense agricultural labourers but
attracted by the type of work to be done
and the wages it brought not only went as
labourers but Worked well. It was particu-
larly noticeable that many youngsters who
had never been inclined to work before
and those who found it difficult to obtain
employment joined in the scheme and
made a success of it. It is true to say that
these are not included among those who
broke their contracts or returned at an
early time. \

Beyond these minor difficulties the Gov-
ernment should make every effort to re-
cruit suitable personnel as early as possible.



ecemcmennatesninens % Veiniannameaceiy

EEE SU NEENES = Snnneipenmenemeeeremeneeme ee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Economic Consequen ces|

Of Staying In Bed

THE LIFE OF JOHN MAYNARD

KEYNES. By R. F. Harrod. By George Malcolm Thomson
Macmillan, 25s. 674 pages.

ANYONE who wishes to solve two years he had shipped one
the problem of how to make pedigree bull to Bombay. During
money without actually working the war he was in the Treasury
should consider the method adopt- Where he managed the nation’s
ed by Keynes, who, starting from external finances.
poverty, made a respectable for- Now the war over, he’ was a
tune by staying in bed in the don, a business man, a polemical
mornings. This is not, however, writer of international Influence,
the whole art of easy money. bursar of his old college—raising

It is advisable to be an expert the capital value of the “Chest”
economist and to have the nerve from £30,000 to £380,000 when he
of a gambler. It is also a good died. He was also high priest of
idea to have some capital. “Bloomsbury.”

Keynes did not have enough.

The consequence was that after For those were the days when
making a net profit of £19,000 in the nightingales sang — and the
1920 in speculations in the franc parakeets chattered — in Gordon
and the dollar he found himself Square, to which Keynes brought
faced with a demand for £7,000 Lydia Lopokova, the exquisite
in transactions in dollars and ballerina who became his wife.
marks. Characteristically, almost Keynes’s

He had gambled on the expec- first act on meeting her was to
tation that the mark would slump SUggest improvernents in her in-
and the dollar would rise. Both vestments.
unaccountably stuck fast. Between the wars Keynes in-

It was idle to say that in the fluenced thought a great deal,
long run everything would be all policy less, events hardly at all.
right. As Keynes himself said He was a Liberal in the sense that
later, “In the long run we are he agreed with Asquith one day,
all dead.”. The demand for cash Lloyd George the next, and
was immediate. A financier whom Beaverbrook the day after. He was
he did not know lent him £5,000. a Liberal in the sense that he
After that Keynes went into the entertained the Liberal Summer
commodity markets. School with a Greek tragedy. The

a ° Liberals could provide all the
AT the same time, he had a Greek tragedy they needed,

*

stroke of misfortune over his

impending book, Eeonomic Con- * * *
sequences of the Peace Treaty, on ;

which he was taking all the WHEN the second war came he
financial risk. was back in the Treasury. The

Half of the first edition, coming only’ difference was that the
by sea from Edinburgh, was jetti- Treasury was a step nearer bank-
soned in a gale. Three bales, cast ruptey.
ashore in Denmark, were sold Keynes the statesman, as dis-
there by auction. tinct from Keynes the profound

Ultimately all the profits on economist, will be judged by those
the English edition went to meet final years. Judgment will be
his losses in speculation, A less based not on a sheaf of State
self-assured young man would papers incomparable in dialectical
have gambled no more. Keynes elegance but on whether. the
plunged deeper and, in four years, decisions he took, and forced on
had £57,000. He died worth others by his extraordinary gift
£450,000, allowing £31,000 for his for persuasion, were, in fact, sound,
pictures and £20,000 for his books.

Bonar Law, when Chancellor, aking, as he did, a tragic view
was indirectly responsible for of Britain’s immediate financial
starting Keynes’s picture collec- prospects, was he right in pressing
tion. Keynes, about to visit Paris the Government to accept the
on Treasury business, discovered American Loan, which he negoti-
that Degas’s private collection ated in Washington, having gone
was coming up for auction. With there determined to accept the
£20,000 of the nation’s money, money only if it was free of inter-
which the Chancellor let him play est? He had misjudged the change

with, he bought 13 pictures for
the National Gallery. Big Bertha
was shelling Paris at the time
so that the market was depressed,
At the same time, Keynes bought
a Cezanne for himself. Z
*

BEFORE the war Keynes had

been in the India Office, where in





in American temper. ‘

But, convinced Britain must have
the money, he also persuaded
himself she must swallow the
terms. There will be no doubt
whether, in the last year of his
life, Keynes had the steadiness of
spirit which critical decisions
require. He is not, of course,



responsible for the scandalous
mismanagement of the money later
on.

Harrod’s life, of a man_ he
admired and ed is affec-
tionate without being uncritical.
Making skilful of a jarge num-
ber of private , it gives a
fascinating it of one of the
most brilliant Englishmen of the
century .

THE STRANGE LAND. By Ned
Calmer, Cape, 12s. 6d. 416 pages.

A CRISP American novel about
a war in which an ambitious gen-
eral risks the lives of his troops
in order to enhance his own pres-
tige as a tough, fighting command-
er. The operation goes badly.
Various explanations are offered.






But on one point, there is some-
thing like unanimity among the
characters. Listen to this chorus:
“The British outfits he’s got aren’t
making him f any more com-
fortable.” “The British may feel
much less, well, reluctant.” “Up
on Montgomery’s front they don’t
move at all.”

You remember that war? It has
been raging. Ever since 1945.

Calmer’s dese . are vivid;
conversation lean’ ards the ele-
mental.

Like this:

“AlL mem are bad.”

“You are very cold.”

She shrugs “C’est la guerre.”
“What's your name?”
“Yolande.”

After you with the phrase-book
mademoiselle,

THE ASSYRIAN, AND OTHER
STORIES, By William Saroyan
Faber 10s, 6d, 288 pages.

SAROYAN in these stories, con-
tinues his impersonation of an
absent-minded man going for a
stroll along a tight-rope. He ought
not to reach the other end, he
ought not to be on the rope at all,
the meandering creature, But he

has our sympathy, in the end our
confidence,

In an expansive preface, he tells

how much money he was paid by |

magazines for the eleven stories
in this new collection. For The
Cocktail Party 5,000 dollars; for
The Pheasant Hunter 3,000,
Big money, but they are good
stories. For the rest he got about
500 dollars. For three of them, no
money at all, They appeared in
The American Review.

(WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED)
—L.E.S.



“Two Socialist Millionaires”

LONDON, Feb. 9.

“The Tories have a plan”, says
a Socialist M.P. They plan to
bring the Government down, he
alleges, by bringing two motions
of censure each week and talking
Parliament to death for the rest
of the week. By so doing, this
Socialist M.P. writes, they will
persuade the country that ne
Government is doing nothing,
and, that in the end, the influenza
germ or ill-luck will lead to a
General Election,

That is what a somewhat bitter
Socialist wrote this week, after
two votes of censure pressed by
the Conservative Party. But next
week he will have to change his
theory because the principal busi-
ness is a debate on Foreign Affairs,
and a debate on defence, during
which the Conservative leaders
and the Government will be in
almost complete agreement.

But this week the House of
Commons made the best use of
its opportunities for a bit of party
welfave. Mr. Churchill came
down for the steel debate. He
was in his best form. The case he
was making was of the best.
He argued that the Government
should postpone the take-over of
the steel industry in view of the
need for an uninterrupted re-
armament programme, It was a
simple argument. Everyone knew
what there was to say, and neither
Mr. Churchill nor Mr, George
Strauss, the Socialist Minister
concerned, made any new sub-
stantial point. Instead Churchill
rubbed in some of the peculiari-
ties of the situation—two million~
aires who happened to be social-
ists banded together to take over
the steel industry. One is Mr.
George Strauss himself, whose
father made a large fortune as
a metal broker. He is now
Minister of Supply and_responsi-
ble for steel as well as for British
atomic energy. The other is Mr.
Hardie who is now chairman of
the corporation set up by the
Government to own and _ control
most of steel production, Churchill
described him as “‘a past master of
monopoly’’—a description that put
at least four ideas into four words,
Mr. Hardie built his fortune on
the manufacture of oxygen,

Everything in this debate was
a foregone conclusion—except the

By David Temple Roberts

vote. In theory the Government
has a majority of six, even if all
ten Liberals vote against it. But
the party managers had been
counting heads and estimating the
need to bring influenza victims in
ambulances to Westminster,
Earlier in the day their information
reached the sporting community
and bookmakers were offering 10
to 1 against the fall of the Govern-
ment, And in fact Mr. Attlee sur-
vived by 10 votes. Steel — the
16,000,000 ton steel-producing in-
dustry — will become national
property next Thursday.

; This should be seen in perspec-
tive as a gigantic operation. It is
the largest single industry ever
brought under national control in
any country in the world—includ-
ing the Soviet Union, In a certain
sense it is the British Labour
Party’s one and only stroke of
doctrinaire socialism. Previous
nationalisations have been confined
to coal, transport, the central bank,
electricity and gas. Many Europ-
ean governments that are far from
socialist own their railways and
cut their own coal. It has often
been a _ surprise to European
visitors that there has been all the
fuss about Labour’s previous
acquisitions. But steel is another
matter. The British steel industry
is a controlling unit in British in-
dustry as a whole. If there is to
be a major conversion to war pro-
duction it will be in the steel
industry, and the Opposition’s
principal argument for oppos-
ing the Bill. But I doubt whether
there will be a sudden dislocation
of British industry. In the nego-
tiations between the Government’s
new corporation and the Federa-
tion, of the steelmasters, there has
been already that most remarkable
tendency to toleration. Mr.
Hardie, the “Socialist millionaire”,
and Sir Andrew Duncan, the con-
servative politician, are the main
protagonists. First they were
cautiously hostile. The “Federa-
tion” had, of course, all the man-
agers and technicians of the steel
industry in its employment. The
new corporation had of course the
political power and the ownership
vested in it by an Act of Parlia-

ment. Either there would be
warfare between the two or
negotiations. At first the Federa-
tion refused to allow any of its
employees to work for the cor-
poration. That is still so but now
ێ kind of tacit agreement has been
reached that the Federation should
remain in existence and the cor-
poration should pick its brains.
In the debate Mr. Strauss, in the
one passage where he was unwise
enough to show the edge of his
temper, reminded the Federation
that it was, in the end, the Cor-
poration that held all the big guns
—if it were to come to a fight. But
it will not come to a fight. The
Conservative Opposition has
sworn to reverse nationalising
should it come to power—after a
year or so it will be almost im-
possible to do that. But even if
steel remains nationalised under
a Labour Government, it will be
an industry scarcely run on the
doctrinaire lines laid down in the
phrase “control of the means of
production”, It will be run by
political and technical compromise
—not the best safeguard against
muddle.

The “Consul”

Chian-Carlo Menotti is an Ital-
ian-American. His opera, “The
Consul”, has just arrived in Lon-
don with a first-night success.
New Yorkers have raved about it.
But the opera fan audiences of
Milan have turned their thumbs
down. 4

Portuguese Poetess

The young poetess from the
Portuguese Azores who ‘stowed
away” on the yacht of a passing,
bearded Englishman has gained
the public sympathy. The best
comment I find from the dispatch





from an English reporter who
went all the way to Casablanca.
‘Poets read o ihings as well
as *verse”’, Ww: -feporter sen-
tentiously, why Otilia
Fréyao . wed away”. #

ymph

The Swediph b: has come to
town. You might shudder at the
thought of a dozen exceedingly
large, well-built young women
prancing athletieally in the corps
de ballet. But surprisingly, you
need not. The Swedish ballet has
in its company the smallest suc-
cessful ballerina fn the world.



Our Readers Say:

Emigration

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Allow me to inform those
members elected by us, that we
are. not as forgetful as they
imagine us to be, During the last
election campaign, they told us
that the only remedy for the acute
unemployment isin emigration and
they solemnly promised us that
any country giving the remotest
hint that they need labourers, wil!
be explored immediately to get as
large a quota for this island as
is possible,

On the 22nd November, 1950 that
hint was given, and what a hint!
Mr. Von R. Hunte, an official, of
the Panama Government intransit
at Piarco Airport, Trinidad, said
and was reported in the Advocate
on the 29th November, Many West
Indians may get work in 1951 in

travelling

Knowing
fathers,

has happened?
done about

Mindful of an

by one of the







Panama, many West Indians may 8fation to the U.S.A. of the available dollars. by Tourists visiting Barbados, but
be invited to work on the new Some time ago, he said that _ As a result of the visit of the I feel that to carry our Tourist
Sea Level project costing every labourer selected to go Tourist Ship last week over Industry beyond

$7,000,000,000., lasting for eleven should be made to pay his trans- $30,000.00 in U.S.A. Funds were would be a tragedy for the middle
year's, and over 3,000 West Indians portation, the Government ad- paid into the several Banks. class inhabitants

will be ernployed. Actual immigra- vancing it, to be later deducted When the Tourist Ship visitea for the people as

tion talks have alre: started, from his wages and refunded. For us on Sunday, Shops were closed present moment

and contractors from S.A., have that, we would be very grateful. so consequently we failed,to earn another large hotel te

preferred to take as mi from We are left to conjecture whether probably another $30,000.00 date-300 more visitor

Jamaica as possibl The € n it i hort-sightedness o1 wilful The General Pubic are opposed not dream and |

is understood that the cont disregard for the economic plight to the opening of Shops on Sun- by the thousands

were trying to minimise ov of the unemployed, With the reap- day or Bark holicay so that there economic structur

expenditure
Jamaica is the nearest of the West
Indian Islands to Panama.

the reputation our
brothers,
cousins established in Panama as
conscientious workers, and appre-
ciated by the Panama Government
by making a pension available to
those retired and returned home
to live in peace and contentment,
we considered our chanees very
rosy. We bore in mind the promise
by our Government that it is not
averse to pass legislation as ex-
peditiously as they desire. What

it? We are not un-

matter tabled by the Honourable
Junior member for St. Philip. We
are not forgetting the exhortation
counsellors when
speaking on a resolution for emi-

ing season in full swing, and few
people employed, we are
with consternation relative to the
emigration
U.S.A., this year, and how easy

and
anticipated
promises can be

AGARD
Sunday

uncles, and

Stores should be
when a Tourist

Meeting of the

What has been
address on the
Council was
earning dollars f

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—The question as to whether

on a Sunday or Bank _ holiday
on such days was discussed at a

Chamber of Commerce on Wed-
nesday the 14th and it was decid-
ed to refer the matter to a Gen-
eral Meeting of the Chamber.
The idea in 4 mind of the
the

the Sterling area, which in turn
would allow the West Indies to
claim and expect a larger share

filled

to * the

dishonoured,
H. LEWIS.

Closing
that it is in the

allowed to open
Boat is arriving
Council of the
special Act might

SHOP
Tourist

question of

‘or the benefit of

appears little prospect for an
amendment of the
Act, again if the Act were amend-
ed it would be the thin edge of
the wedge for it to be amended
for other reasons and may lead
to the desecration of the Sabbath.

If Government however, feel

the British Government that the
dollars should be earned, the Gov-
ernor might have sufficient power
under the Emergency Act to pro-
claim the opening of the Shops on
such Sundays or Bank holidays,
and if there is no power then a

on no consideratiom should the
Shop Closing Act be amended.

To the Edite., The Advocate—
SIR,—I am one of those people
who benefit directly and indirectly

re ,Will then be-

—_—

come dependent on an industry
that could disappear overnight.
House rent is now beyond the
means of the average salaried
man due to the higher prices that
visitors can afford to pay while
vegetables, eggs, servants etc., are
a money problem to the local

Closing

hest interest of housewife who is

pete with what

be provided) PR se unfortunately

ATTENDANT,
Trade

ers are making
$30.00 higher.

fourist industry
more, and 10,000

a certajn point
that will
particularly, and
a whole. At the
we can do with
accommo-
but let us a
lan for

‘of natural beauty

serve
lovely home
tourists

our whole

neighbour from Venezuela pays.
It, is argued by those anxious to
xtensively develop the Tourist
lustry that the earning capacity

' @very Barbadian will increase
“eS a result of a Tourist invasion,

the case. A clerk
salary raised by $20.00 per month
more, only to find that the invad-

; Workers
sugar industry will find that the
bados will not raise the price of
Sugar to meet the higher wages
dissipation and the disappearance

want for our Island
Barbados for

West Indian atmosphere. Only thi
morning I received
aa American friend of mine now

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY

TANKERS ARE ‘SAFE a dhieclonss' Ueiork aoesiad
SHIPS IN PORT

& CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
LONDON,

The recent Swansea Docks accident when an_oil-tanker
exploded, serious though it was, draws attention to one
striking fact--the extreme rarity of such accidents. Here,

17, 1951









Usually NOW

a few 8 She ser ea peaa ene observed in handling oll Tins S.A. APRICOT JAM—(2-1b) wines $ .35 $ 50
TODAY, oil and oil products are: am Tins OVALTINE (Large) «0.0.00 ae Ae

the chief items of commerce reaching the
world’s great ports. Indeed, without such car-
goes, international industry in general would
swiftly stop. Their volume is indicated by
the fact that tankers now account for some
20% of the world’s entire merchant shipping
tonnage. These ubiquitous vessels are essen-
tial links in the supply line between oilfieids’
and refineries and consumers of oil products
in all quarters of the globe.

Besides being among the most important,
tankers are some of the safest ships at sea,
Their accident record compares favourably
with that of any other class of vessel. And
only a proportion of tankers, of course, are
concerned with the transport of “dangerous”
oil cargoes, i.e. cargoes having a low flash-
point (below 73 degrees F.), such as motor
spirit. When such consignments are being
loaded or unloaded, special precautions are
observed to keep accident risk at a minimum.
Here are a few of the measures normally
employed:

A generally accepted principle, contained
in the Model code of Harbour By-Laws for’
Tankers, is that at least 100 ft. shall separate | Ke ceccnoessssessessesesst

tankers handling low flash-point oils from] ;
WHAT A COMFORT...

each other or from the nearest general cargo
to have Hotwater throughout your Home —

ship. Oil jetties are usually constructed so
that no metal fittings protrude which might
WATER-HEATERS

lead to “sparking” through friction and thus
well known for quality products

FOR YOUR BATHROOM


















































































Coree BASINS with Pedestal

25”x18”

& BASINS with or without Pedestal
22”x16”

Low-down SUITES

Bakelite Mahogany
Cast Iron CISTERNS
Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS
HARPIC, Large and Small,

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,

possibly cause a fire. All electrical gear—fuse-
boxes, switchboards, ete.—is normally equip-
ped with fireproof fittings. Pumping installa-
tions are insulated and “earthed” to discharge
static electricity as and when this is built up.:
Rate of pumping when low flash-point car-
goes are being loaded is strictly controlled
according to the size of the gas vents in a
ship’s tanks. This prevents any excess of gassy
vapours being released into the atmosphere;
the normal loading rate being up to 1,000 tons
per hour per tank. ¢
Entrances to tanker basins are frequently
guarded by floating fireproof breakwaters,
which can seal off the basin if an accident
occurs and stop oil spreading across the water
to reach other berths. Wherever possible,
lay-out of shore storage tanks is arranged so
that a group of tanks holding low flash-point
products is separated from any similar group
by intervening tanks containing less inflam-
mable oil, such as heavy fuels. Each tank is
generally surrounded by a wall of such a size
that, if a leak occurs, the entire contents of
the tank can, if necessary, be contained in the
enclosure formed. Likewise, the foundations
upon which the tanks stand are proofed
against leakage, so that even if the tank’s
bottom springs a leak, the oil cannot seep
down into the ground and percolate under
the base of the safety wall.
In view of the comparative immunity of
tankers and oil installations from serious acci-
dents, these stringent precautions may be con-
sidered as being unduly elaborate. But, it is
due to this very strict regard for safety that
accidents such as the Swansea explosion are
of extremely rare occurrence.

New Moth Trap Catches 25,000

LONDON.

DESCRIPTION of a new mercury-vapour
trap for night flying insects was given before
the Royal Entomological Society.
The inventors, amateur naturalists H. S.
Robinson and his brother P. M. Robinson,
said that observation and experiments led
them to conclude that contrary to a widely
held belief, moths and other night-flying
insects are not attracted by light but are
dazzled by it. They said the light creates an
“unbalance” in them and causes the insects
to approach the light in a series of curves.
The brothers told how on this hypothesis
they constructed a trap many times more
effective than any known and with the aid
of a mercury-vapour lamp in one year
secured for the British Museum two species
and two sub-species of moths new to the
British Isles.

in immersion heaters and switches of all kinds.
We have just received stocks in
2-gln., 5-gIn., 6-gln., and 12-gIn. sizes
and shall be pleased to quote for

complete installation.

DaCOSTA & Co... Ltd.

Dial 4710 38 Electrical Department

NOW IN STOCK...

HYPNOS ALPHA
MATTRESSES

IN THE FOLLOWING SIZES:
4 ft.6 inches and 3 ft. 3 inches
¢t;ALSO <3

A Big Variety of - - -

RUGS

-~- - For Your Selection



e
ge SEE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY

DA COSTA & CO, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

—IN.S.

holding an important post in the
U.S. Navy, and in which he ex-
presses the hope that Barbados has
not been spoilt by a large tourist
trade as have so many other places
where he used to enjoy the local
conditions and set-up. O. H. J.
Cruelty
To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—Yesterday I was walking
on Rockley beach and 1 saw a
little boy digging a hole with a
hoe, Nearby on the sand lay a| ¥
young goat. I asked the boy what]
he was going wo do and he said
that his father had sent him to
bury the goat. The animal was
still alive!

I called the boy’s father and
made him kill the goat, which had
been ill for some time.

This is only one incident of
cruelty, but every’ day in this
island animals are sbeing treated
abominably. The streets swarm
with starving dogs, sheep are

unable to com-
her next door

WORLD'S MOST REFRESHING DRINK

GOLD BRAID. RUM

AND
CANADA DRY CLUB SODA
OR
CANADA DRY GINGER ALE 3

this will not be
may get his

his living cost
in the

can pay them
tourists in Bar-

So

tethered in the sun all day without AT g

be expected, Inflation, “@ter, little donkeys are forced to 3
pull loads that are too great for 5 §

— ‘ . them, x
is not what we Wh: he 2
Sat aw aie” me That can be done about it? or >
oe ae Bach of us can help by trying to} &
sarbadians— sreven ot e aaal y | ¥

with its natural prevent cruelty whenever we see! TOF . we °
. Ma WEES it, and by contributing to the| RE fm, r Al R \ ray >

‘ett S.P.C.A., whose mission it to/ 8 sail Ze j l L S

a letter from protect animals from the sues 3S

of men. ANIMAL’ LOVER. - } 50g 6660959S6050600595445o SoS EUS Sooteeeetoseouss”
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY

Admitted To
o
Local Bar

The number of barristers prac-
tising at the local Bar was ia-
creased by one yesterday when
Mr. Vere lan de Lacey Carrington
Was admitted to practise by His
Honour the Chief Judge, Sir Allan
Collymore. The brief ceremony
which took place before the sitting
of the Court of Ordinary was seen
by many of Mr. Carrington’s
friends and well wishers. He was
introduced by Mr. F. E. Fieid,
Attorney General,

Mr. Field told the Chief Judge
that Carrington had been educated
at Harrison College from i927 to
1935, in which year he won the
Island Scholarship to Codringten
College. In 1936 he passed the
Durham Inter-Arts Examination
with Second Class Honours im
Division I, but relinquished the
Scholarship in July of the same
year to accept an appointment as
a Cadet in the Assistant Court of
Appeal. From the Court of Appéal
he was transferred to the Income
Tax Department in 1943.

Mr. Carrington was admitted to
Gray’s Inn in absentia on Decem-
ber 12, 1945. He passed two sec-
tions of Part I of the Law Exam
inations at Trinidad and _ the
remaining sections at Barbados.
He went to England in November
1949 and passed the Bar Final in
May 1950. On November 17, 1959,
he was called to the Bar and he
signed the Roll of Barristers
three days later.

He had much pleasure in asking
that Mr. Carrington be admitted
to practise, Mr. Field said.



Local Service

The Chief Judge addressing Mr,
Carrington said it was always a
pleasure for him to welcome from
the Bench a Barrister-at-Law on
his introduction to the Bar of
Barbados. In Mr.’ Carrington’s
case, the pleasure was intensified
by the knowledge that he had
rendered years of valuable ser-
vice to the island in various
capacities.

“In this connection”, the Chief
Judge said, “the tongue of good
report has been heard on all sides
in your favour, and the presence
here this morning of your many
friends and well wishers is a
happy augury of your future
success, Wherever and in what-
ever capacity your future lies I
wish you every success, “You are
now admitted to practise in all the
Courts of this Island and I extend
a welcome to you.”

Mr. Carrington replying
thanked the Chief Judge for
admitting him and thanked the
Acting Attorney General for in-
troducing him, Among the mem-
bers of the Bar of Barbados, Mr.
Carrington said, there was always
a spirit of friendliness, and he
pledged with that friendship and
assistance, that if at any time he
appeared in either of the Courts
as a Barrister or otherwise he
would do his utmost to uphold the
tiaditions of the Bar.

17, 1951

neeeierancrananeneaatereednten tn eeliNemeeMoR bt wis Been

THREE

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



HEIFERS
4 4a



THE VETERINARY SURGEONS
Experiment Farm at Friar’s Hill,



Reversed Decision
In. Stone Throwing
Case

Judgment was entered for de-
fendants Violet Hollingsworth
and_ Beatrice Hollingsworth, both
of St. Lucy, yesterday by Their
Honours Mr. G. L. Taylor and
Mr. J. W. B. Chenery, Judges
of the Assistant Court of Appeal,
after hearing in a suit brought by
Madeline Roach, plaintiff of Jo-
sey Hill, St. Lucy, claiming dam-
ages to the amount of £10 from
both defendants,

In entering judgment for. the
defendants, Their Honours re-
versed the decision of His Wor-
ship Mr. S. H. Nurse in the
Petty Debt Court of District “E”
St. Peter, who gave judgment
for the plaintiff and awarded £2
10s.

Giving evidence yesterday Ma-
deline Roach said that on Octo-
ber 20 she was in her house and
both defendants Violet and Bea-
trice Hollingsworth threw stones
at her house, damaging the door
and the flaps of the door. She was
forced to call in a carpenter to
repair the damage. Violet and
Beatrice Hollingsworth both de-
nied that they threw stones at
Roach’s house. One witness said
that she saw Celeste Hinds throw
stones at the house, but could
not remember seeing any of the
defendants throwing stones.

Madeline Roach was ordered
to pay the costs of both Courts.
Mr. H. Clarke appeared on be-
half of the defendants in the case.



Car Washed Away

In Frizer’s River

MR. WILKEY, Manager

of Frizer’s Plantation, got into

difficulties yesterday in the Frizer’s River when he was
assisting Lionel Williams of Canbar, St. Joseph, to get his

ear (O 3) out of the river.
by men who happened to be

He was pulled out of the river

nearby.

When there is heavy rain up St. Joseph, the Frizer’s

River overflows. Williams’

car was stalled by the water

which came across the road. He left the car and went to

get assistance and when he
into the small river.

returned it had been washed

The car was carried by the current

for about 300 yards and only the top of it could be seen.





SEAWELL MANAGER

His Excellency the Governor has
been notified by the Secretary of
State for the Colonies that he has
approved of the appointment of
Mr. D, E. Henderson as Mana-
ger, Airport, with effect from Ist
September, 1950.

Prior to the establishment of the
office of Airport Manager under
the recent departmental reorgani-
sation Mr. Henderson has been
serving in the non-established post
since April, 1950.

It will be recalled that Mr. Hen-
derson was commissioned in the
Royal Air Force at the outbreak of
the war, was twice mentioned in
despatches and eventually com—
pleted service with the rank of
Squadron Leader.

INSPECTORS PASS ~
EXAMINATION

Twenty-seven candidates took
the local examination for Sanitary
Tnspectors and thirteen were suc-
cessful,

The examination was conducted
on Saturday, February 10 and
Tuesday, February 13, The ex-
aminers were: Dr. J. P. O’Mahony,
Director of Medical Services, Dr.
F. N. Grannum, Senior Medical
Officer of Health and Mr. W. A.
Abrahams, Government Chief
Sanitary Inspector.

Those successful were:—

Martin Collymore, Samuel Ince, James
Leslie, Arthur Lewis, Aubrey Lewis,
Vernon Maycoek, Ivan Nurse, Ivan
Preseod, Alfred Prescott, Leo Small,
Armond Todd, Ralph Wason, Joseph
Welch.

BANK ON WHEELS
GETS STARTED

The Travelling Office of the Gov-
ernment Savings Bank will be
starting its tri-weekly visits to the
various sugar factories throughout
the island from Monday, Febru-
ary 26 and will continue until the
end of the crop season,

This is the third year for the
Bank which goes out on Mondays,
‘Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

The Bank is expected to do even
better business this year than it
did on the previous two years
when it collected $13,277.60 in
1949 and $13,621.56 the following
year.

RICE, FUEL COME

A supply of 2,000 bags of rice
was included in the cargo brought
to ers dos yesterday by the 74-

2 : Smith.

ton schoo





Owners’ Association, j

After three days 6f steady down-
pours all over the island, the rain
held off yesterday until after mid-
day, when it began to fall again
until late evening. The rain fell
heavily in St. Thomas last night
between 9 and 10 o’clock, but St.
Michael again received the heavi-
est rainfall, this time .32 inches.

Telephone communication at
District “E”’, St. Peter, “F’, 3t.
Joseph and at Belleplaine, St

Andrew which were put out of
order early in the week were still
out of order up to last night.

The following are the figures
recorded at the various stations up
to 6 o’clock last night: Districy
“Ar .32,. “B" -.16;. “C20, “D"
.16, Crab Hill, St. Lucy, .16 and
Four Roads, St. John,

No major breakdowns of the
public utilities, electric and gas
supplies or telephone communica-
tion occurred because of the rain.

About 15 telephone lines in scat-
tered parts of the island were
damaged.

Though rain was heaviest in St
Michael, telephone trouble in tnat
parish was not more than in wher
parisfies,

Gas lighting was also affected,
mainly in the Christ Church area
along Hastings, Worthings and
Rockley where the street lamps
were out of working order.

The steady spell of rain stop-
ped in the City yesterday morning
but after 3.00 p.m., the skies
again became overcast and rai
fell continuously during the even-
ing.

The morning, although a little
cloudy, was. sunny and nearly
every one expected a dry day.
Some even risked going to work
without umbrellas or raincoats.
They were however disappointed
in the evening.

At Kensington Oval nearly all
the water.was pumped off the
western end of the field by mid-
day. Everything looked promising
and the groundsmen even attempt-—
ed to clean up the outfield around
the wicket. Unfortunately -more
water collected on the field during
the evening. At about 1.00 p.m.
the Sigmund Pump from the Fire
Brigade had pumped off approx-
imately 135,000 gallons and two
other pumps were also working.

Two telephone posts at St.
Andrew, the property of Haggatts
estate, were washed away by
strong currents of water on Thurs-
day. The lines were broken and
there were no possible means of
communication with St. Andrew

For mont

falls heavily
the Ivy area, tt f
the Ivy Road gets choked and
water covers the road to- about four



now whenever ra
Michael abr





¢t the



Mr. 8. L. Hignett and Dr. Leonard





Case Dismissed

The Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal Mr, G. L. Tay-
jor and. Mr. J. W. B.. Chenery
yesterday reversed a decision of
Police Magistrate Mr. E. A.
McLeod and dismissed a case
brought against C. F. Bourne of

M. E. R. Bourne & Co., Provi-
sion Merchants of Roebuck
Street.

The Police Magistrate had fined
Bourne £5 when he found him
guilty of having failed to produce
books, documents and vouchers
for inspection when he was called
upon to do so by an authorised
person.

Mr. Edward Evans, Chief Price
Control Inspector, prosecuted the
case, Mr. G. B. Niles represent-
ed Bourne who had appealed
against the Lower Court’s
decision.

Mr. Niles argued that the sec-
tion under. which. Bourne was
charged did “not specifically give
the Price Control Inspector power
to inspect the books,



Decision Reversed

The decision of His Worship
Mr. H. A. Talma Magistrate of
District “A” Police Court — who
ordered Manning Mayers of Halis
Road, St. Michael to pay a fine
of £5 in 14 days or in default two
months’ imprisonment with hard
labour for stealing one alarm
clock — was yesterday reversed
by Their Honours Mr. G. L. Taylor
ond Mr. J. W. B. Chenery Judges
“cf: the Assistant’ Court of Appeul.

Their Honours dismissed the
case which was brought by the
Police on its merits. Counsel for
Mayers was Mr. D. H. L. Ward.

In his evidence in the lower
court Herbert Gittens of Martin-
dales Road said that he was
“short” in cash and carried tha
alarm clock to Mayers to see if "he
would buy it. When he produced
the clock to Mayers he (Mayers)
took the clock in a room but never
paid him for it. All of this hap-
pened on October 15. Mayers
showing no intention of paying
him for the clock, he reported th
matter to the Police who brought
a case of larceny against Mayers.
The clock is valued at 25/-.

Mr. Ward submitted that the
evidence that the prosecution
brought against his client was
ccrflicting and there were many
discrepancies. He. further sub
mitted that the case be dismissed,

Another case brought by the
Police against Mayers of assault-
ing a policeman while in the exe-
cution of his duty — on the same
date that the larceny offence was
alleged to have been committed—
was also dismissed by Their Hon-
ours on its merits.

Mr. H. A, Talma had imposed
a fine on Mayers.

REMANDED

George Sabian Ojolet, a native of
French Guiana and a sailor from
the schooner Ipana, was remanded
until February 19 by His Worship
Mr. E. A. McLeod, Police Magis-
trate of District ‘A’ after he was
charged by the Police with the
larceny of articles valued $30 from
George Harewood, a shipmate of
his, on February 4.

Giving evidence for the Police,
H.P.C. Gill, attached to the
Bridge Police Station, said that on
‘February 15 he was entrusted
with a warrant signed by Captain
W. Farmer for the arrest of Ojolet.
Ojolet was charged with the lar-
ceny of articles valued at $30,

About 6.50 p.m. on the same
Gay he saw the defendant on the
Chamberlain Bridge and arrested
him. He was cautioned and on
arriving at the Bridge Post made
a voluntary statement,

Harewood said that he had left
the Ipana sometime in the early
part of February and when he
returned to the ship he found that
cash to the amount of $26 and a
black fountain pen valued at $4
were missing. He reported the
matter to the Police.

UNLAWFUL POSSESSION

Rosa Yarde of Lodge Road
Christ Church, was fined 20/— to be
paid in seven days or in defauit
one month’s imprisonment’ witt
hard labour for the unlawful pos-
session of wood which she was
carrying along the wharf on Feb-
ruary 16.

The case was brought by Cpl.
Murphy who said that he saw
Yarde taking a quantity of wooc
along the wharf. When he the
her what she was doing with the
wood she said that someone had
given the wood to her.

After finding that her explana-
tion was not satisfactory, he took
her to the Bridge Police Station
where she was charged with tne
unlawful poss ion of the wood









Hutson with 3 Young Nelthropp Heifers at the Antiguan Central

Vet. Praises Nelthropp
Cattle In Antigu

(From Our Own Correspondent)

MR. S. L. HIGNETT, B.Sc., M.R.C.V.S.,

ANTYGUA.
has come to

Antigua at the request of the Administration to investigate

a cattle breeding problem in
ment Station, He arrived

the herd at the Central Experi-
on the 4th February and his



“Sedgefield”

Converted

To Passerger Ship

Motor vessel Sedgefield, which
once provided space for tons of
cargo will in another three or
four months cater only for cabin
class and deck passengers and their
baggage.

The Sedgefield is now lying
alongside the dock in the Careen-
age under conversion into a pas-
senger ship. She will in the future
be run between the West Indies
by the Guadeloupe Governmen,
who have bought her over from
Mr. Bernard Agerard, a French
millionaire from Martinique.

When a representative of the
Advocate boarded her yesterday
he found welders and engineers vu,
Messrs. Central Foundry Ltd. ai
work on the deck while the ship’:
crew were beating away with their
hammers and other pieces of tool
in the hatches to get rid of the
rust,

These workmen began the job
of converting tHe Sedgefield on
Monday. They could not work o,
Wednesday and Thursday because
of the heavy rainfall, but yester-
day, they were able to push aheac
with their work, making much oi
the cool atmosphere of the har-
bour.

After they have completed most
of the internal repairs, the ship
will be taken on dock for clean-
ing, painting and other minor re-
pairs. She now appears to be a
masg of iron rust, with spots here
and there to tell one that she was
painted white when built six years
ago. Her bottom is covered with
moss and barnacles. She has.
however, a “clean look” on the
inside.

The converted Sedgefield will be
fitted with 12 cabins and will ac

stay in the colony of approximately one month has been ¢ommodate over 100 deck passen-

made possible through a financial grant from

Development and Welfare
Wellcome Foundation.

ADMITTED TQ
PROBATE

The wills of ten people were
admitted to Probate py His Hon~
our the Chief Judge Sir Allan



Collymore at yesterday’s sitting®

of the Court of Ordinary as
follow:—
Annie

Walrond Skinner, St,
Peter;

Pearla Healis Rose, St.
James; Keturah Matilda Albertha
Davis, St. Michael; Lilian Melvin
Pitt, St. Michael; Louise Agard,
St. James, Florence Odell, St,
Michael; Philip Albert Gibbs, St.
James; Theresa Augustus Hinds,
St. James; Robert Benjamin
Clarke, St. Michael; Delbert
Graham DeC, Leacock, also known
as Delbert Graham DeCourcy
Briggs or Captain Briggs, ~St,
Lucy.

His Honour allowed the reseal-
ing of Probate and Letters of Ad-
ministration with will annex-
ed of Emily Margaret. Gardner
Young, late of British Guiana,
under section 37 of the Court of
Ordinary Act, 1891.

The application was made by
Messrs Cottle Catford & Co.

It Rained In Antigua Too

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA.
Rarely does a party in Antigua
have to be cancelled owing to wet
weather during the early months
of the year, but this was the case
yesterday when a large number
of folks expected to attend an ‘At
Home” on the H.M.S. Devon.
shire. The day was cloudy but by
afternoon when the atmosphere
got really cold and rainy the half
hour’s launch journey to the ship
would not have been pleasant,

NOT @NE
LONDON, Feb.
Moscow’s radio reported today
that the Russian representative
basketball team has completed its
“friendly matches” with basket-
ball teams of a number of towns
in China.
The radio said :
“The Soviet sportsmen have not
lost a single game there.”
—I.N.S,.

, IMPERIAL LEATHER

Stiff joints? Aches?

oan teantte
es

You will feel Sloan’s doing you
It acts quickly —
soothes and comforts and drives

good at once.

out all Inflammation.

OTD
An,

LINDEN BLOSSOM



LOOK FOR THE PICTURE OF DR. SLOAN ON THE PACKET.

Colonial
and the co-operation of the

He is the resident veterinary
surgeon at the Wellcome Veter-
inary Research Station at Frant,
Sussex. He has been associated
for a long period with investiga-
tions into cattle infertility of
various types in a number of
countries, including the Argen-
tine,

Nelthropp Cattle

“IT am very much ‘impressed
with the quality and performance
of the Nelthropp Cattle main-
tained at this Experimental Sta-
tion”, says Mr. Hignett.
Nelthropp Cattle originated in
St. Croix and were established
there by the late Bromley Nel-
thropp. Their introduction into
Antigua five years ago at the
time of the inception of the Ex-
periment Station at Friar’s Hill
has been largely due to recom-
mendation of the Director of Ag-
riculture Mr. R. Johns and Dr.
Leonard Hutson. They are dual
purpose animals, beef and milk,
and it is considered that these
Jarge, red, docile creatures are
suitable to the Leeward Islands
Colony because with so much un-
cultivated land available a Pas-
turage Programme is being car-
ried on. Pasturing rather than
stall feeding has always been
the practice of peasants in these

islands.
Adaptable

Nelthropp cattle adapt them-
selves well to prevailing condi-
tions in that they possess a high
resistance to heat, ticks, tick-
borne diseases and _ drought.
There are seventy-six animals in
the paddocks, a number of bulls
having been already distributed
throughout the islands. The most
striking cow roaming the pasture
is “Duchess” who in her sixth
month of lactation produces 144
Ibs of milk daily and has already
given 400 gallons to date.

Mr. Hignett and Doctor Hut-
son will shortly be visiting both
the British and American Virgin
Islands to further their investi-
gations.





SMALL FIRE

A small fire broke out at the
Windsor Hotel, Hastings, last
night about 7.30 when the soot in
the chimney caught afire. The

gers, Her present saloon cruise
quarters will be extended, and the
spar and boom will be moved
forward,

Her conning tower will be re-
moved to make place for a new
bridge deck while the other deck
will be extended. More life boat
actommodation will be provided
and new lavatory conveniences
installed.

The Sedgefield is about 180 feet
long, She was formerly an Ameri-
can troop transport. After the
war, she was bought over by Mr
Agerard and converted into a
freighter. She is now undergoing
her second conversion,

She was in Barbados since
December 3 to be converted, Her
skipper, Captain Valentin Deric
has gone up to US.A., to send
down material for her conversion

Bridges Will Be
Replaced Soon

Immediate action will be taken
to make some temporary arrange
ment for accommodating traffic
over Lake’s bridge, the Director o,
Highways and Transport told the
Advocate yesterday. Part of this
bridge was washed away this weey
by flood water,

The temporary bridge at Bax~-
ters which was also washed away,
will have to be replaced, he said,
Despite the heavy rains, no other
flood damage had been reported.

Speaking of the Department’s
1949-50 programme, the Director
said that this had been completea
with the exception of one item,
This was the reconstruction of a
section of Newcastle Road which
had suffered badly from flood
damage and wag presently closea
to the public.

The repair of previous flood
damage work on Highway 1 from
Spring Vale to Bruce Vale includ-
ing the temporary bridge at Bax-
ters, had now been set back by
the rains and the collapse of the
bridge,

He said that during the year a
great deal of work had been done
on the roads of the Bay Estate
Housing Scheme and was continu-
ing. Work was also in progress on
an entrance road to the Pine Hous-
ing Scheme. Thig would be com-



Fire Brigade was called to the ;pleted by the end of the year. This

scene and quickly put it out,

LUXURY

SOAPS

BLUE HYACINTH

+

Sprains?

Just apply Sloan’s Liniment lightly





Prom ail chemists and stores. , an



FRESH SUPPLY OF

=PURINA HEN CHOW §

‘| (SCRATCH GRAIN)

‘BU. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.- ine
“\ossesssemeseeen| oe

work was not in the year’s pro-
gramme of the Department, but
the Department had been askec
to carry it out.

Work on the Harmony Hw!
diversion was nearing completion
and it wags hoped to get through
with it before the end of the fio
ancial year.

The removal of the crushing
plant from the yard of the De
partment and the installation of it
at the new site Prospect (Lazaret
to) should also be completed by
the end of the year.

re toa COLD

oie Ya Tid 4



Headache, that feverish “ache-
all-over” feeling—ease these Cold
discomforts with Alka - Seltzer,
Alka-Seltzer contains alkaline
ingredients to neutralize excess
gastric acidity plus an analgesic
for soothing headaches,
Have it handy ~— always!

MLSS Seltzer

COTTON
CLOTHS

GLASS

22 32 Each

21 32 Each

4,



Your Physician, your
through long years of

analyzing and solving
problems.
comes from
specialized knowledge

OOOOPPOTT OOOH

acquiring a

cal situations, has saved
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Compound your next

health.

KNIGHTS
DRUG

Prescription Specialists

GOS

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WEIGHING FROM 1 TO 1,120 LBS.
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ONLY $179.90 EACH.

“DOMO"
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i BRARRERESQ@N’S BROAD STREET
$56.74 EACH.

PAGE FIVE

: " ste
99999999999 F 995 F999 FO FOF OSS OES PPS POSSE ISS



ai

tye

oodessonees
SF





RANSOME LAWN MOWERS

“TIGER” and “ARIEL” Grades, each in two sizes

From $36.08 to $46.18
Complete with Grass Boxes.







BUTTER CHURNS

I GALLON CAPACITY

$29.90 EACH.



“BLOW”

BUTTER CHURNS

FOR DOMESTIC USE

AT $6.66 and $7.38 EACH.



AGRICULTURAL FORKS

HIGH GRADE FORKS, FULLY STRAPPED

ONLY $4.70.



| HARRISON'S



























Os.



Size 48” square

LINEN GLASS CLOTHS
22 31 — Each

—_—





Hardware

LINOLEUM
WOOD FLOORS
AND FURNITURE

hy

HYGIENIC WAX

OLIS

FOR BRIGHT AND
HEALTHY HOMES

PLASTIC TABLE CLOTHS
Blue & Green 54”

Dept.
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$2.42
$1.92

¢






PAGE SIX

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

eee ST DON'T THINK THIS PART OF THE }
SMUNGLE iS VERY HEALTHY!

GOSH... LOOK WHAT
THE TREE'S DOING )
TO OUR





BLONDIF:









| earns | PEO
| |WHAT ARE 2 ( PLENTY )) ere
a



i | G Sons “ed
AND HE SAID SOME / / HE. \ T
TERRIBLY MEAN § | DID 2 }








THINGS ABOUT » Py il
ee
















AND NOW-LADIES AND
GENTLEMEN ~ -YOUR T.'V
REPORTER WITH NEWS
AND VIEWS OF SIGHTS IN
OUR BIG CITY’

RATS/I'LLGO TO
DINTYS -I WANNA
1 | SEE IF THOSE
RUSTLERS GIT
TH’ HERD OVER
TH BORDER!

AND HERE I AM ACROSS
FROM DINTY MOORES - -AND
LOOK // WHO I6 THAT? -= NO

OTHER PERSON THAN JIGGS
HIMGELF - GOING INTO DINTYS/















=.

RIP KIRBY
vom. CY THE CORMORANTS
&f EH,

GOOD NORNING, SKIPPER! 2 —~J
L HOPE WE HAVE
| | WOK TODAY! p—1




ABOARD THE ESCAPED V say AIN'T IT
CONVICTS’ PLANE««~ \TIME WE WAS

SEEIN’ THE OCEAN?
é



}




-
a4?

SS

tim le vie
oo . -
‘

f







WHAT XINDA CRAZY PILOT HAVE WE
GOT” JOE* JOE! OPEN UP! HUH + 5

POOR'S LOCKED! IS THIS am,
A nous cos? oa

OPEN UP OR TLL
SHOOT THRU THE
WDOOR!

as



















OUR PEN Si'WE WAS FLYIN’ IN THE

ALL RIGHT? 7-7 OTHER DIRECTION?
Cae cs x






THE ESCAPED CON
PLANE+
































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Enquiries



cordially invited for the

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nN — — ——————— ——————

SATURDAY,










FEBRUARY 17, 1951



TInt

WOW! Denial Science Reveals




OOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH
i AFTER EATING IS THE
SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY 70

HELP STOP
FOOTH DECAY

WITH COLGATE
DENTAL CREAM

6S Foto
25c 45¢< 75¢

ea Blood Pressure
Kills Men & Women

Twice as many women as men
fer from High Blood Pressure, which
is @ mysterious disease that starts
about the time of Change of Life and
is the real cause of much heart trouble
and later on of paralytic strokes. Com-
mon symptoms of High Blood Pres-
sure are: Nervousness, headaches at
top and back of head and above eyes,

ressure in head, dizziness, short

reath, pains in heart, palpitation,
poor sleep, loss of memory and energy,
easily excited, fear and worry. If you
suffer any of these symptoms, don't
delay treatment a single day, because
your life may be in danger. Noxco
(formerly known as Hynox), a new
medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure with the first dose, takes a
heavy load off the heart, and makes
you feel years younger in a few days.
Get Noxco from your chemist today.
It is guaranteed to make you feel fit
and strong or money bask,

‘
5
'







Rheumatism
and Backache
Gone'in 1 Week

Fiush Kidneys With Cystex and You'll Feel Fin

Cystex—the prescription of a famous doctor—
| ends all troubles due to faulty kidney action in
double quick time, so, if you suffer from Rheu-
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Nervousness, Leg Pains, Dizziness, Circles under
Eyes, frequent Headaches and Coids, Poor En-
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Smarting Passages, or have frequently to Get
up Nights, go to your chemist today for Cyste
and be fit and weil next week.

* Cystex Helps Nature 3 Ways
The Cystex treatment is highly scientific, being
specially compounded to soothe, tone and clean
raw, sore, sick kidneys and bladder and to re-
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3) Strengthens and reinvigorates the kidneys,
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@ attack on the delicate filter organism, and

, stimulates the entire system.

9 Weeks in Hospital—Now Well
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® Health Improved in 2 Days
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NEW ARRIVALS

DOG COLLARS — LEADS
WHIPS — MUZZLES
JOCKEY WHIPS B24
GREENS LAWN MOWERS
Spare Wheels, Pinions, Pawls



PPLE PLLA IE

-

PPE

¢
$
a
%
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g
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%
x















Whitiaker’s Almanack,
1951




6 Pint and Cocktail |
| Glasses {

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE



at






SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.















TELEPHONE 2508
The charge for announcements of RE ES
a Sieerinaen. |, Daetns, Acknow- PU i SAL
igments, and In Memoriam notices is agate line
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays int wna agate Be
for any number of words up to 50, and| minimum char 1 aad 5
3 cents per word on week-days and| and $1.80 on Gece oe weet-daye
¢ cee per word on Sundays for each 4
additional word.
For Births, Marriage or Engagement AUCTION
announcements in Carib Calling the ns
charge is $3.00 for any mumber of words AUCTION SALE OF CARS
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each| | CARS — At the Cosmopolitan Garage,
#dditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 | Magazine Lane next Friday 23rd Febru-
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death | ®T/. at 1 o'clock sharp. One 1937 Chev-
Notices only after 4 p.m. rolet with new tyres and good engine
also One Austin 8 in good condition.
DI D’Arey. A. Scott, Auctioneer.
5 ED . 17.2.61—4n
KIRTON—On February 16th, 1951, at
her residence, Progressive Land, Bank UNDER THE SILVER
Heli, St. Michael, Mrs. Louise Kirton,
Age 54 years. Her funeral leaves the t HAMMER
Sethe ieee at 2 -m, today
or then:
the Wonbure Comet” ce to] BY recommendations of Lloyds Agents
Evelyn Kirton (Widower) we will sell_on Monday the 19th at
Gordon, Doreen and Olive (children). eg Seitteettor Street.
rvine Seale (brother) . 3 Jars Pate Seaet Gras

























| WANTED

Minimum charge week 72 cents end
96 cents Sundays 24 word,
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a

FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents end
96 cents mdays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a























near suburbs acceptable. Must contain

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GOVERNMENT NOTICES





pected will have to be imported from:—

a

PAGE SEVEN



SHIPPING NOTICES



Se ae ne enn me se















word Sundaye. word Sundays. OFFICIAL REPORTER — LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW| (|
HELP HOUSES APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Official Reporter of ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED The M.V. “Caribbee” will accept
- B Upstairs of building in| the Legislative Council. The post is non-pensionable, and the salary AMS, LINE) Se igs ce eset
LADY=-Sultable lady with knowledges | teen St., opposite Country Ba. ng attached is at present fixed at $960 x $120 — $1,440 per annum. MS. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Frida:
of book-keeping, filing and office work. : ooo 2. Applicants should hold a certificate of at least 120 words per | }¥),,.(.° Se ey = _ereene 23rd.
Sor T: ie ‘9. Ltd. Post Offer} ROOM—Qne Furnished or Unfurnishea | minute in a recognised system of Shorthand, and applications, stating | Srisbane February 2rd, Arriving at The M.V. “Daerwaod” will ac-
: . 112.51—€n | large, airy room at Bel Air. Ppl"? | age, education, qualifications, etc, should reach the Clerk of the wepperes S00. of ee eee ise aeasie geet Cargo und Passengers tor
MISCELLANEOUS . Debates Committee, House of Assembly, Bridgetown, before the 28th | vrozen and General cargo. she. behueon ae ae
SWANSEA — Worthing fully furnish- February, 1951 Cargo accepted on through Bills of Vincent. Date cf Sailing to be
PIANO -- State make, condition ,and edt aan. RGR a y> * 16.2.5 2 Late with transhipment at Trinidad notified. }
jee. . B. hi ; . oO arage. Dial 3578. or ' 1s. .~~2n. | for British Guiana, Barbadus, Windward
price. Box No. B.B. C/o Aavorate. a $63.81-030 ond Leeward Islands, ae ai ey B.WI. SCHOONER OWNERS
I — 50,000 empty, white, plain} , TANGLIN — Beachmont, sheba, For further particulars apply — ASSOCIATION INC
from Feb: i 7 J Ss. W ; ‘ :
Goren aupenttles packed in bales of 15 | Cherwise, 3 double vecrosme wah tingie| PROGRAMME OF REQUIREMENTS OF SCARCE = |!Y*XE*S: Mon Oe Coe. TH ren. soar,
Cora Broad Steet Dia gnis” "| ening Tour and icunge. Retrgerta SUOETIAL MATENEAL mitt wie
| 13.2.51—10n. | Ring 3626. i3 151th. IMPORTERS of the articles set out in ths schedule attached
eeeses =e iad VALAMBROSA — My lords Hui,| hereto are hereby notified that they should submit returns of their °
From ist April. Dean ee situatea | {0M Ist March, Dial 2175, minimum essential requirements for the year 1951. 0.
Ea eae Salle ines 16.8. ie GS. 2. The return should set out the quantities which it is ex-
. . . or
Pak.

























Mrs. Lashley (sister-in-law) . 70 pkgs. Weetabix. three bedrooms, drawing and dining LOST & FOUND
WALI—On Feb. 19th 1051 Ai New Vork| patie 10 o'clock, Terms Cash, garage. ‘Apply. to Bvelsn Roach % Co.

Aletha Wall (nee Carrington). BRANKER, TROTMAN & co., Ltd. Rice Street. ene ae eer Minimum charge week 72 cents and
Percy Carrington, Rosalind Gittens, Auctioneers 16.2.51—-t.f.n, | 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
Cyril Carrington, William Phillips. . Oe ae words 3 cents a word week—@ cents 0
Louise Lee, Cyrillene Byer. hla word Sundays. ;

ir51—In ee | PUBLIC NOTICES REF. NO
THANKS EAL ES TE Téa cents per agate line on week-days| THREE SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS -| 322905
nf and 12 ceuts per agate line on Sundays,| Series N. 0652, 0653, 0655. Finder

BARTLETT — We beg to return thanks minimum charge $1.50 on week-days| return same to Mr. Croney C/o Telephone
to all those kind friends who sent BUILDING — One Woode Buiidi ne ees =“ _}12 511g 516400
wreaths, cards and letters of sympa-| consisting of a centre room r. about at o, ” ‘Td, easily earnea by obtaining
thy in our recent bereavement caused| feet square, with windows and fe £25° . easily earned by obtaining] PURSE — One green purse with
by the death of Joseph Bartlett. Late} surrounded by a verandah of Pl Dent sur arlene eee Greustmas Cards) containing sweepstake ticket J. 180m | 601605
of Brereton Village. 22. ft square, the entie aden J ine about | from your friends. No previous experi | Finder please return to Advocate Adver 601606
Rachal Bartlett and children, ed by a shingled roof, Further patton: | Beentifun ies mpl ee to ey ato! tising Dept, el 609

17.2.51—1n, | lars Dial 8105, ‘ ee en sample Book to Britain’s ‘1 601

KING — The gned gratefull CHATTEL = —— commission; “marvellots. money making | rimmed ‘spectacles at Collin ani

a g ully re- H a ; rimm les al ‘0! r
turn thonks to sll who ‘attended the | 1¢ 3 10. Two wr tex ioe House ppparhinlty. Jones, Yelere Here Store or tn way to Cave Shephertt 602010
funeral, sent wreaths or in any other | shedroof 22 x 9. Kitchen with wall back. | Engiand.” Soe ee | Binder planes. Saeum, te Syline. Drus | 602050
way expressed sympathy with them | Electricity, Bath, Water Toilet v8 : t STS Se “TOSR YR Tower 11 Spier
on the occasion of the passing of Mrs.| bedrooms, dining’ room, land can be eae fat epneeo
Drucilla King, late of Roberts’ Tenan-| rented by the quarter. Going cheap, can 602100
try. be seen from 10 a.m. to 5 pam. Apply NOTICE LADY'S PURSE — At Marine Hote!

Lacay King (husband) Douglas, Bric,| @wner, Mrs. A. I. Hall, Near on Applicants are invit for the post of} One Lady's Purse on Sat. Byening Afte 602200

Bindley (sons), Mrs, Anita Morris, Mrs.| Black Rock or phone 4523, St. James.” | 4S°!tant Nurse at St. Lucy's Almshouse | Canadian Dance. Please apply in perso >| 602300

Gwendolyn King, Daphne, Ira (daughters) re * at a salary of $57.50 th, unifor: : oor

172.51—In 17.2.51—1n. re. and ioedeens eae . m] to the Manager. 47.2.51—2» 602500

| _ PROPER TY—A’ twtr Ta.'. Applicants must be fully certiticated, 602

WAITHE—Through this medium we beg| ing suitable for business oF private vesl: midwives, and pone urses. 90}
to return thanks to all our friends ac-} dence, standing on approximately 2 The successful ca: must assume PUBLIC 0 1 A 602900
quaintanees and well-wishes for tne} acres of land, Blectricity and Govern. | *Â¥ties on 26th Fi 1951. 603120
various expressions of sympathy shown| ment water, dairy stalls, fruit trees and #pplications will be received by me up
us in our recent bereavement ocea-| vegetable garden with modern’ costless | t? Saturday 17th. February 1951, (The Provost Marshal's Act 1904 603130
sioned by the death of our loving aunt irrigation unit and fan mill. Spacious OSWALD L. DEANE, Ceoees) 3 30), 604790
Georgiana Waithe. Garage. Apply Williams Court opposite| Clerk, Board of Poor Law Guardians, ON Friday the 2nd day of March 195

The Waithe'’s end Harris* Family. Sayers Court Farm, Christ Church, Sil St. <7 at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternpo: 603350)

17,2.51—in, | ver Sands,, Bus stop in front. lhe 10.2.51—7n | Will be sold at my office to the highes 603390

- oe eel eeete*? pagers: 17.2.51—2n bidder for any sum not under the ap

——*| BARBADOS CHORAL SOCIETY | Ptaiset value, 608450
IN MEMORIAM PROPERTY — At 69 Roebuck Strect.| All members of the Society who pro-! , All that certain piece of Land eon-| 603490
A two storey Wall Building on 4,362| Pose to take part in the 1951 Season are, Mine about 5.991 sq. ft, situate in
CADOGAN In sad sa. fi. of land. Downstairs, Store, Store| Rotified that music will be issued at| Patish of St, Michael, Tweedside Road} 603520
-— In sad and ever loving | Rooms and Garage. Upstairs 4 bedrooms,| the Cathedral Church House on Tuesday, | >Utting and bounding on lands now 603530
memory of our dearest Ruby who] Drawing and ining rooms etc. Fr ‘| 20th February, at 7.45 p.m “Jor late of the Barbados © tive
died on Feb. 16th 1948. age: 43 ft. Depth: 100 are ec ee Bank Ltd. on land ‘or Inienot Git, | 608600
Tod, bei ae Be: ow pth: ft. A sound In- 17.2.51—17, . on lands now or late of Gil
lay brings back the shock vestment. Contact M. Abbadi. Dial 2 — ———— | tens (deceased), on Tweedside R

That just two years ago was wrought ; se a. es cn the road called St, ¥ il Roe oad and | 603710

Without a farewell or Goodbye Fete ret NOTICE with the mess 5 owen Beetne: | gQBB10{

You left us with heavy hearts PROPERTIES—Tw. Re Estate of Cee ee ae rere

The w ng : , ts o delightful __rest- . Buildings, &c., appraised as follows:— 604110

e wounds in our hearts will never | dence situated at. Top i, Christ JAMES HENRY FIELD The whole property appraised to Five
heal Church, Both having 3 bedrooms with NOTICE Decensed Thousand, five hundred and Eight dott 604150
se ee in our hearts no one can] 2 Toilets and Baths recently constructed sons emer perees roe ee * ers and Seventy five cents ($5,508.75) wary 604170
: Gardens wel! jon Leon Jones for.

Busene Cadogan, (Husband) Bivsira| an March"ist, "No Sesuonable Bice wal | Sait Seed mistake oats Henty | wards eaatactonsske, et M4 | 04800
avers (mother) Eloise an ildved | be refused, For viewing etc, Ring 4683] Saint Michael, who died in this : ‘ )

r ; island on | N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day of 10450

(Sisters) George (Brother). 112.51--tn, | ot 2 13.2.51—6n| the 7th day of September, 1950, are re- | purchase. r " ¢ ved

2. spo A hie Gan wa ere Sugsted. to seria ae particulate of their T. T. HEADLEY, 6046' 0
eimai ea I 7 w , :

EDWARDS — Sacred to the memory of| Pine Hill ealled WESTFIELD, the prow Mortimer. Vere gt Cindsey Breit Provost Marshal’ ene 08000
gur beloved husband and dear father| perty of the late Sir George Walton, | R¥eburn Gill and Perey’ Gordon Taylor,| ‘12th day of Fet con. 606000)
Sgt. Julian Edgar Edwards who fell} The Bungalow stands on 18,020 square wualified executors of the will of the 4 ny ot Pepwaneg- i963. 606100
asleep Feb. 16th. 1940. feet of land and contains one large ased in care of Cottle, Catford & Co. Aaa i+-t

Oh how sad to part with loved ones public room, two bedrooms, kitchen,| }? High Street, Bridgetown, solicitors, on 606250

Oh how much of grief we bear laundry, bath and lavatory. "| oF before the 7th day of April 1951 after 606:

But in that bright land of glory Tn a’ separate building there is a| Wyhieh date we shall roceed to distribute NOTICE 290

e sha united there ari f serv, a eceased among the LIE THE POO 606

Mrs, Inez Edwards (wife) Mrs. Sybil ae with Sati; and iat ants| parties entitled thereto having regard SUPPLIES FOR E R B50

Nuree; Muirita’ “end Anderton (onde | Waa preperts wilt Wen eke ter ‘ents only 2 such claims of which we shall OF THE 606390

seu fan oe A aee (Son-in-law | at our office on Wednesday the 2ist day liable che the deals do kaa eee eiee PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL 606400
rs Augu loore (Aunt). ot February 1951, at 2 p.m. so distributed to any

. yY person of whos
17,2.51—1n. ima" of sale apply to the aor claim we shall not then have had oa the kee i Soearace eeehs oaas
f otige. codaes

EASTMOND — In loving memory of our} Inspection any day between 10,30 a.m.| And all persons indebted to the said | ‘;°;: “Will be received by the Clerk
dear beloved husband, father andjana & p.m, Telephone Lady Walton,| estate are requested to settle their in-|°! the Vestry up to 12 o'clock noon on 607100
Srandtashar, Clamnant Bastmond, 1 who No. PO etn debtednegs without delay. eae Feneusty) for the under- | 607300(
ell asleep on February 17th. 1947. CATFO! he a’ this 2nd day of Fi v mien supplies in such quantities as 400

Dear is the grave, in which he js aad ot, Oe MORTIMER VERE REDMAN i may from time to time be vordered for | 607

laid, 9.2,51—1ln. LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL one year commencing on the Ist Aprit} 607500

Dear is the memories, that never § ————————____ PERCY GORDON TAYLOR ext.

Shall 20d6, The parcel Gf land containing 1805 Executors of the will of James Henry TREse MEAT 607705

Sweet is the hope, that again we] square feet with the Buildings thereon, Field deceased. FRESH 607798 |

shall meet, situate in Lucas Street, Bridgetown, ad- FRESH BREAD.

Kneeling together at Jesus Feet, joining the property of the Barbados Each person tendering must send in 608100
Ever to be remembered by (wife) Mrs. | Telephone Company Limited. and at pre- BARBADOS MUTUAL AID {a letter, along with the Tender, signed REF. NO.
Beatrice Eastmond, (daughters) Mrs. | sent occupied as to part by the Observer} ASSESSMENT ASSURANCE |>Y, two properly qualified persons (not
Matella Franklin, Mrs. Ottiline Bladgs, | Newspaper and as to part by Miss Cado- SOCIETY being members of the Vestry) stating} 608200
Mrs. Evelyn Gollop, (grand-children) | gan. their willingness to ‘ome bound witn | §08800
Ivan Harewood, Euris Gollop, Edsil Gol-] The property will be set up for sale at Re Lost Policy the Tenderer in the event of their
lop, Leslie Eastmond, Barbara Eastmond. | our offices on Thursday, Ist: March 1951 Drucilla Augusta Taylor the nominee] Tender being accepted for the due ful- 608500

17.2.51—1n. | at 2 pam. '| of the Policy numbered 727 issued by the | filment to the Contract, 608710)
Inspection by application to the ten- Society on the life of Ernest Theodore] With respect to the tender for FRESI

HOLDER—In loving memory of our fants, Zavior, pew, docansed, haviog Housed ae, the probable quantity required 608750 |

D. Beloved Mother Mrs, Thereasa For hi ard © rectors of this iety | for one year is 24,000 gallons and the

Holder who departed this life on 16th I sale, Seen eer eruiats and condition of | that the said Policy has been lost or| Vestry reserve the right to accept the 608800 |
February 1961, COTTLE CATFORD & co misplaced, NOTICE IS hereby given thit|Tender of more than one person for | 608900\
Sad and sudden was the call. No. 17 High Street, unless any objection is raised within|the supply of this article and all per- 609200

Of that dear one loved by all
Deepest of sorrow no words can tell
Of the last one we loved so well

Bridgetown
14.2,51—12n.



Edith, Budene, Daphne, Alma (Daugh- “DUNSINANE”

ters) Milton, Robert, Ralph (Sons),] GouNTRY, ROAD. ‘or MICHAEL.

Joan Arrindelle, Yvonne, Janet, An-| he residence latery secuptae to Mrs,

thony, (Grand-children). eh W. O. Collymore. ,
6.2.51—1n The. . i

The house stands in well kept gardens
and grounds (2 acres 37 perches).

The whole comprises verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 5 bedrooms, one

FOR SALE with marble bath, 2 showers, 2 lava-

Minimum charge week 72 cents and | tories, convenient kitchen and pantry,
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24) rreoms for 5 servants, garage for 2 cars,
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a|and stables,

word Sundays, Water supply for garden and grounds
from a well with mill; water service in

AUTOMOTIVE house and also servants rooms (shower

wd
AUTO CYCLE — One Norman Auto

and lavatory).

aon ag completely wired and
Cyele. Good condition, Owner leaving rnished with electric lighting from
shortly. Dial 3939, the company’s ma

ins.
House convertible into flats and out-















a ee

CAR — 1947 Ford Prefect 10 in good e lend is) eaitable fer develop-

condition, No reasonable offer refused. te OF Seba enrhene fr ny

Apply W. I. Griffith. Phone 4173 or 2469. ° | ES). One -

17.2.51—2n, | Premises for sale by public auction at

their office, No. 17, Street, roa

yo - _, town, on y 23rd y oO
CAR — 1938 Dodge, Excellent condi February 1951 at 2 p.m,

tion. Suitable for taxi. C. A. E. Beckles,
Department of Agriculture or Perry's
Gap, Roebuck Street.

nspection on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days only between 3 and 5 p.m.



17.2.51—20 For further particulars apply to
~ : COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
CARS—1936 Ford V-8 Tourer. Excellent Tt,
Capet son, ie ere ee weene ae a
1949 Morris Ox joon. Low eage
and well cared. FORT ROYAL FOR SALE
GARAGE LTD. Telephone 4504.) | ea
11,2,51—3n
ieee MISCELLANEOUS

—————
BEDFORD DELIVERY VANS — Ship-





ment just to hand and ready for im- GALVANIZED SHEETS — A_ limited
mediate possession, Courtesy Garage,| quantity 11 ft, x 2 ft 6 ins. 2% gauge
dial 4616. 14,2.51—6n. | Galvanized plain Sheets at $5.74 per
sheet. 17.2,.51—3n.

CAR — Latest Model “Prefect” Ford, |
in perfect condition, Just done 8,/0 MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin-
Phone 2143. 16.2.51—an. { guished solution to your special
erchitectural problem of door closures,

screens, movable partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.
13.2.51-—t-f.n.

_——_ —— —
PIANO—Bentley (almost new). Phone
8435. 13.2.51—4n.

PIANO-—-Lipp. Apply to Mrs, Hutson
Inniss Ayshford, 13.2,51—3n

a —

PANTS — Men's Pants made to Order

————

CAR—1947 Standard 14 h.p. Saloon in
excellent condition only 12,000 miles, May
be seen at Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd,,
Pinfold Street. 16,2.51—an

————
CAR — One (1) Standard Vanguard
in good condition, mileage under 15,000

— Apply F. C. Hutson, Tel, 3905.
16,.2.51—-3n.









in Grey, Brown and Striped Materials.
ELECTRICAL $1.50 each, STANWAY STORE, Lucas
St. Dial 4910. 16.2.51-—2n.



Eee SS eed
POOLE POTTERY — More of this at-
tractive modern pottery has arrived ot
Harrison/s, comprising seagull and duck
wall ornaments, vases, tea and coffce
sets in lovely shades. Visit Harrison's

Showroom on the first floor,
16,2,51-—3n.

ELECTRIC IRONS — Attractive Elec-
tric Trons Chromium finish with handles
enamelled in Red, Blue, Black and
Green. Price $5.30 each. G. W, Hutchin-
son & Co. Ltd. Dial 4222.

16.2.51—4n.

RADIOGRAM — One ‘Bush’ Radin-
gramophone in Mahogany Cabinet, per- SHIRTS — Gent's Shirts in Khaki.
fect condition. For further particulars! Linen, Silk. Gaberdine and Skin.
dial 2293. 15.2.51—3n. | From $3.60 up. STANWAY Lucas
St.. Dial 4010. .2,61—2n.





FURNITURE

FURNITURE — (1) Mahogariy Vanity
dresser, (1) Wardrobe, (1) China Cabinet,
(1) Iee box, (1) Simmons double bed.
Dial 3939. 17.2.51-—6n.

————
SUN SHADES — Very attractive and
inexpensive. Just right te protect bh 4
eyes duri Cricket, $1.60 up. ¥.
LIMA & Co., LTD, 14.2.51-—~6n.

ee
STAK-A-BYE TUBULAR Steel Chairs
and Tables on show at



Beard's

MISCELLANEOUS Show rooms, Hardwood Alley. Trade
ens | enquiries cordially invited.

A MOBO TOY — Means lasting joy 13.2.51—6n

for a girl or a boy. Harrison's have a
fine assortment, including the famous
Bronco & Porgy Express.

TEA SERVICE — One Mappin and
Webb tea service in good condition, Wm
D, Richards & Son, Mc Gregor Prete

17,.2.51—2n.

16.2.51—3n

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching

units to complete colour suites. Top



VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirsch Sun-air®
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to

Friendly Societies Act (1905)

one month of the date hereof, the Di-|sons tendering for this article shall
rectors will issue a new policy in lieu | forward, along with their tender, 5 Cer-
thereof. tifieate by a properly qualified Veterinary

By Order, Practitioner stating that the cattle from

D. A. BANFIELD, which the milk will be supplied ars
Secretary. | free from Tuberculosis.

17.2.51—3n, Forms of tenders can be obtained at





















the Churchwarden's Office.
By Order,
E, C. REDMAN,

Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.



13,2.51-—1.f.n.
ae [See. 75]
vertisement of Dissolution by.
Instrument. :
Worcs is hereby given that the St. MAIL NOTICES
ael's F.S. in th Parish of St.
Michael Register No. 479 is dissolved by |. Mails for British Guiana by the
Instrument registered at this office the | Schooner Marion Belle Wolte will be
Sth day of February 1951 unless within | losed at the General Post Office as

three months from the date of the
Newspaper in which this advertisement
appears, proceedings be commenced by
# member or other persons interested is
or having any claim on the funds of
the Society to set aside such dissolution,

Purcel Mail at 9 a.m., Registered and
Ordinary Mails at 11.45 a.m, on the
19th February, 1951.

Mails for St. Lucia vy the Schooner
Wonderful Counsellor will be closed at

and the same is setyaside accordingly.|the General Post Office as under;—
J. W. B, CHENERY Parcel Mail at 9 a.m., Registered and
Registrar. Ordina Mails at 11.45 a.m. on the

13.2.51—3n * 19th February, 195¥.



SOVERNMENT NOTICES

Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1951, No. 4 which will be published in the Official |
Gazette of Monday, 12th February, 1951.

2. Under this Order the item “Cocoa Essence” has been deleted in
ne entirety from the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amendment)
1951, No. 2,

14.2.51.—2n.



‘TRAVEL FACILITIES TO THE UNITED KINGDOM
With reference to the Government Notice published in this papér
on the 4th and Sth February relative to the possibility of the

“ASTURIAS” taking passengers at Jamaica aid Trinidad for the]

United Kingdom in May, it is now known that accommodation on this
ship will consist of 4—, 3—, 2— berth and a few single cabins.
16.2.51,—2n.

CHANCERY SALE

The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the Registrat’

Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between

date specified below. “if not then sold, It wilt be set up on onek wan na

ae ane place and during the same hours until
o me

LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL — Plaintiff

VIOLET spon — Defendant

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parece! of land situate at Spooners Hill
in the parish of Saint Michael and Island aforesaid containing by admeasurement
two roods two and two-tenths perches or thereabouts Abutting and unding on
lands formerly of W. T. E. Richards but now of one Walrond on lands dy of
G. G. Medford but now of one Farnum on lands formerly of red F. Green but
now of one Pilgrim and on the public road called Spooners aif or however else
the same may abut and bound Together with the messuage or dwelli

called itead” and all singular the buildings and erections both freehold
oe ae on the said lands erected and built stending and being with the appur-

UPSET PRICE: £1350 0. nd.
ATE OF tate: 2nd March, 1951.

Office
m the
on each sueceeding Vriday
Full particulars on appli-

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chanci
Sth February, 195

CHANCERY SALE

The under-mentioned property will be set up for sale’at the Registrat, Office
Public Buildings Bridgetown, between 12 noon'and 2 pan. for the einy won onthe
date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding Friday
at the same place and during the same hours until sold. Full particulars on appli-

cation to me,
CYRIL BRUCE BROOKS—Piaintifl
vs.
ELBANOR PARK BAKER—Defendant



grade, A. BARNES & Co., Ltd. your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dia) 4476] PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Pinfold Street
26.1.51—t-£.n. | A. BARNES & CO., LTD. 13.2.51—t.£.n. in the City of Bridgetown in this Island containing by admeasurement Two
——$—$—_—— thousand one hundred and fourteen square feet or thereabouts butting and

CHELSTON LIME WORKS — Can WINDOW GLASS — Sparkie Flower- bounding on lands of T. E. Went on lands of Mrs. E. G. De Reys on lands of

supply, Temper & Building Lime. Boul-| ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all needs.







ders, Concrete Stone Grit, Marl & Sand.| We cut to your requirements. G Ww
Trucks on hire. P. S. Brooks. Phone} HUYCHINSON & Co., Ltd. Dil 4222
8335. 13.2.51—6n 15.2.51—10n
a ee
CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win- WALL PLAQUES With figures 1
dow styling, light control, Valances an¢i] relief of specially beautiful design. $3.08
draperies. By Kirsch jal 44796 A.| upwards. Y. De LIMA & Co., Lid., 20
B. & CO., LTD. f 13.2.51—t.f D| Broad Street 17.2,51—T™n,

Horace Savoury on lands of Mr. Cozier on lands of Violet L. Barrow and on
Pinfold Street aforesaid or howeve- else the same may butt and bound Together
with the messuage or dwelling house thereon called “Kenworth” and a!!

other buildings and erections both freehold and chattel thereon erected
UPSET PRICE: £416-13-4d
Date of Sale: 23rd February, 1951
H. WHAAAMS,
{ Registrar-in-Chancery
2%h January, 1951

09500
610410)
610490
610700
810800;

630301
630998

641200

642200
642300
642400
642500
709810
709830
709850
|
}
643998
644900
645000
645300
sso
| 645700
647901)

647913
647998

650750

650800
651200
651515)
651537 {
651510
651530
651598}

654509

654998

656503
656507

656598)
656502,

657198

657206
657209

657398

663000
662000
664945)
669108 |

800600
831450
571400
571500
829985



3.

(1) the U.S.A.
(2) other sourees.

Returns should be submitted to this office not later than

the 8rd March, 1951.

TEXTILE FIBRES

Sen UN os a tia0'd 0:48 ais 99:04 0b > tas CREED ae See Ce in lbs
BUILDING MATERIALS
Cement, Standard Portland (Barrel=376 Ibs.)....in Bbl.
IRON AND STEEL

Carbon steel ingots, blooms, billets ,slabs and :

sheet bars ...... SPE rn ee ee eg ee . in S, tons,
Tube rounds, carbon alloy and stainless in S. tons.
Cold finished iron and

Steel bars—carbon,

alloy, and stainless ........ Wasirin aya cee in S. tons
Iron bars and hot rolled bars—-carbon only,

including reinforcing bars .............. in S, tons,
Hot rolled bars--alloy and stainless......... in S. tons.
Wire, TOES. i... vs evesnds os Gidea kee Oud? oes in S. tons,
Carbon steel plates, including fabricated .,.... in Lbs.
Galvanized iron and steel sheets ...........005 in Lbs

Ungalvanized black iron and steel sheets, carbon—in Lhs

Iron and steel strip, hoop, band, and scroll,
earbon

Tin plate

Tanks
Structural, fabricated and unfabricated

Sheet piling. (Govt.)
Boiler tubes

Casing and line pipe

Seamless and welded black pipe and galyan-
ized steel pipe

Wrought iron pipe

“Mechanical and stainless pipe and miscellan-

eous pipe & fittings .........cgesseeeeeee

Bright & Misc. wire
IRON & STEEL—contd.

Galvanized wire

Barbed wire .

Fencing

Rope and strand

Welding rods and electrodes

Nails and staples

Iron and steel castings, carbon and alloy

Tron and steel forgings, carbon and alloy

NON-FERROUS METALS AND MINERALS
Aluminum and Aluminum Base Alloys
Sheets, plates and strips
Aluminum and aluminum base alloy manu-

factures such as perforated sheets, pipe

fittings, ete.
Copper and Manufactures

Refined copper in cathodes ,billets, ingots,

wire rods or other refinery/shapes

Copper pipes, tubes, plates, sheets, strips,

rods & bars .

Bare copper wire & cable
Copper wire and cable;
Building wire & cables; weatherproof &
slow-burning wire, insulated copper
wire, ete., except rubber-covered lamp
cord
Copper manufactures, n.e.s,
Brass and Bronze Manufactures
Brags & bronze, bars, rods, & shapes
Brass & bronze plates, sheets, strips, tubes,
pipes & pipe fittings .

Brass & bronze wire, bare & insulated

Other brass & bronze products ........-6. +540
Lead and Manufactures
Lead pigs, bars, anodes, blocks & ingots,
(Govt.) ,
Lead sheets, pipes & tubing
Lead Solder
Antimonial lead including battery plates,...

Other lead manufactures .......-..00e eee
Nickel and Manufactures
Nickel metal in ingots, bars, grains, rods,
sheets, strips, shot, plates, & other forms
Nicke}) manufactures except nickel alloy manu-
factures .

Tin folk... see, Adee ;
Tin metal in ingots, pigs, bars, blocks, slabs,

& other crude forrns .
Tins tubes & other tin manufactures

Zine Manufactures
Other zine cast in slabs, pigs, or blocks; Zinc
rolled in sheets, plates, & strips: .
Photoengraying sheets & plates
Sheets, plates, & strips, n.es, Zine in other
forms, including zine manufacturers; ..
Other forms, n.¢.s.

ne - ES

Other Non-Ferrous Metals & Alloys
Nickel-chrome electric resistance wire
Babbitt metal
Molybedenum metal & alloys including wire
& scrap

CHEMICALS
Benzene (Benzol)
Glycerine, crude & refined
Sulphur, crude
Sulphur, refined ....

Hydrave brake fluid:

in Lbs,

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in Lbs.
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in Lbs.

Ine.



ie NEW YORK SERVICE

§ “Essi” sails 10th January - errives arbad

&.5. “Byfjord” sails 2nd February - " i - nents Tain Paar
NEW ORLEANS sEnVicE

A Steamer = sails 18th Fu REBANS SERVICE 2nd

, Ist February — ; 18th *

To eee ee



LL LTT
CANAD:AN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND















Name of Shi Sé 8 AFAX JES A
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8. “ALCOA TNE Pebruary 2are arch 6 ’
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eee a
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Apply: DA COSTA & OO., LTD.—-Canadian Service.
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; ‘ Due
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at & Liverpool 6th Feb 19th: Feb,
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For further information apply to - - -

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents

PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia , for sail.

| ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam,

|

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PAGE EIGHT

BOXING ACADEMY — 2

Don’t Let That Left-Hand
Fetish Trap You

IN THE OLD, and often brutal, days of bare-knuckle
fighting a pugilist could lose in only three different ways
—by being “knocked out of time” (i.e., failing to recover
in the half-minute interval allowed after a knock-down
which alone ended a round); by retiring, or by fouling his
opponent.

Fights were always to a finish
—unless broken up by the police
or by ruffians whose favourite
was getting beaten.

The rules are very aifferent now.
First of all the contests are of a
definite duration,

In professional boxing they con-
sist of four, six, eight, ten, 12 or
15 rounds, three minutes to each
round, with a minute’s interval
between each round. (In some of
the smaller halls the pestilential
two-minute rounds have been re- fight of 15 rounds and one man is
introduced.) by far the superior boxer, By the

Nowadays the most common way time the bout is three-quarters
of winning a contest is ‘‘on points.” over he may be a clear 5 points
That's to say, one boxer has scored @head. And the referee must stop
more clean direct punches, with the fight. For this very good reason.
the knuckle part of the clenched A knock out (which, incidental
glove on the “target area.’ ly, is never mentioned in the

What is this “target area’? t's Tules) is only the equivalent of 5
the front or sides of the head ang lear points. vat
the front or sides of the body The man who delivers it is

‘above the belt” (and the belt is credited with the maximum num-
an imaginary line drawn across Der Of Points (5) for that round
the body from the top of the hip and “a contestant failing to con-
os of ten Sooands shall Dok be award.

, ~ 0. ,
suneeen ee Fo kta ed any marks for that round and
five points or marks, at the end the contest shall then terminate

of each round and his opponent i
is given proportionately Taos. If Tareieek, It 3".
they’ve each done equally well
both get the full five points,

Most referees score in fractions



Second session of Boxing
Academy, by PETER WIL-
SON, deals with punching
and the system of points
scoring.

The tutor explodes the
miviaken idea that a ‘British
straight left’ counts more

than a right-hand punch.



Now say there’s a British title

So, if the referee did not stop
a bout when one man was 5 points
ahead and that man were knocked
of a point and in a normal close out with the first punch of the
reund they would give boxer A next round, the decision would
5 points and boxer B 4%, A score have to be a draw.
of 5 to 4% would mean that A And if the man were 5} or more
had shown a considerable superi- points ahead he would have to be
crity over B. Five to 4; means given the decision on points, al-
that A has been all over his man though he had been. knocked
and has possibly floored him, colder than a polar bear’s nose.

And 5 to 4—the largest differ- This may seem farcical but it is
ence I’ve ever come across— none the less true and it marks
ee met the boxer losing that one of the prime differences be-
nook as almost certainly been iween prize-fighting (which is of

nockeq down more than — course illegal) and boxing.

and has, in fact, done nothing but

manage to last out the three Another signal difference is ‘that

THURS ti. . , the (physical) lot of the modern
Paint Brush” exer continues to be looked after.

You may be one of the people One of the most recent amend-
who think that a punch with the ments to the rules now allows fly-
left hand counts more than one weights to middleweights to wear
with the right. This, most cer- ft, of bandages and tapes on their
tainly, is not so. But it underlies hands, and cruiser and heavy-
the fetish which has been made weights up to 12ft.
of the straight left—sometimes
known as the “traditional weapon
of British boxing,” tell .you .the .difference .betweei

The straight left, correctly amateur and professional boxing,
delivered, with the full weight of what the referee has to watch for,
the body behind it, can be as and what are the fouls in boxing.
dominating as a conductor's baton
—it’s often known as “the paint
brush” since it is with this punch
that an opponent’s nose is ‘so
often reddened.

But two hands are better than
one, and — boxers have often >
been at a disadvantage against AÂ¥ . H
Americans or Continastile wit 'e€ ere
correctly use both hands in at-
tack and don’t save their right @ From page 1.
solely for blocking or parrying the Indies and look forward to these
other man’s punches. visits,”

Incidentally it’s absurd to re- Captain Bodden has only been
gard the straight left as “tradi- the skipper of the Copinsay for a
tionally British.’” Anyone who saw year, His father visited Barbados
the fight in which Joey Maxim, but this is his first visit, He served
from Cleveland, UWS.A., took the in both the Royal and Merchant
world’s light- heavy- -weight cham- Navy during the last war.
pionship from Freddie Mills, Asked about his visil to Trini-
of Bournemouth, England, would cad, he said: “I have discovered
have seen the triumph that the wharfs at Trinidad is a
of the straight puncher hundred per cent cleaner than
using a correct proportion of those of Jamaica,”
straight lefts—over the rugged At 4.45 p.m. the Inniskilling
hooker and swinger, But it was t:oops, along with three compan-
the American who employed the jes from the Barbados Regiment,
“traditional British” methods. marched through Trafalgar Square

and as they passed the War Mem-
It’s Untrue erial, the command “eyes right”

And a number of people think W&S given.

that you get more points for a

punch to the head than you do for
.a body blow, Again untrue.

There is nothing laid down in

the rules whereby even the weignt

of*& punch should inffuence the panies gave the general salute,

distribution of points. But an ex- The route of the march was
ception must be made, I feel, in along the Chamberlain Bridge,
the case of a knock-down, for around Nelson’s Statue, by the
when a man is on the floor he is Public Buildings, along Bridge
temporarily right out of the fighi, Street, Victoria Bridge, Probyn
doing nothing, and therefore un- Street, along Bay Street and back
able to score any points; and he to St. Anns Port Pipers and
should then be suitably penalised, drummers from the Ingiskillings

NEXT WEEK Peter Wilson will

—L.ES.



Inniskillings

They assembled at the Baggage
Warehouse, The colours were
brought from the left of the
parade to the front and the com-

One of the least-known and accompanied the march,
least-used rules is the one whicn
says: ‘If at the conclusion of any By the time the companies

round during a contest one of the reached the Garrison every man
contestants should attain such a Was soaked through, The march
lead on points as to render it an Was continued all through tho
impossibility for his opponent to rain
win, he must then be declared

the winner.”

That K.O, PRACTICE SHOOT

The basis of modern boxing is The first practice of the B.R.A.
that the two men are trying to will take place at the Government
outscore one another on points. The Range on Saturday, 17th at 1
knock-out is almost an accident-— P.M.
and was certainly introduced to The practice will be at 200
save a man from sustaining too yards to enable members to zcro
much punishment. and adjust their rifles for the com-

In other words, if he’s not capa— ing season.
ble of rising unassisted inside ven Practices will be held regularly
seconds, then it’s felt that he’s in on the first and third Saturdays
no fit state to continue a contest. of each month,



[ Theyil Do It Every Time wmesnm on By Jimmy Hatlo

Lucus mexire is $0 DARN POLITE
HE WON'T LET THE HOSTESS
SERVE UP A BITE +++







Gf ¥Y 7 sented to the Lady selected
7 mro0n ue \// PLEASE! von't Y I'M FAMISHED! | GO Rees |. acta:
A MOMENT--- 7/ BOTHER! WE NEVER HOW'S ABO! (de Ry NEPTUNE'S DAUGHTER
EAT BEFORE BE you RUSTLING s/t op - Competitors must be be-
TIME, AND IT'S so UP SOME BACON, Br?” Swot. tween the ages of 14 and
LATE ANYHOW ! EGGS AND iss Ge 21 years.
WERE NOT A BIT COFFEE +? ;oie
HUNGRY +++
TK" ws,
S| TAR. (Forte,
ALL! | , | \MANKS one



e, WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED Tian Tt

WORRELL
SCORES 285

COLOMBO, Feb. 16.
Frank Worrell, the West Indies

player, scored 285 and William
Sutcliffe, son of the former Eng-
land player, made 95 and shared

a fifth wicket partnership of 301

for. the Commonwealth cricket
team against. Ceylon to-day.
Commonwealth batted all . day

and punished the Ceylon attack
for 444 runs for the loss of eight
wickets.

STs

FRANK WORRELL.

Worrell gave
display. Favoured
luck—before reaching 100 and
twice later—he hit. with power
and freedom and had five sixes
and 31 fours as his most profit-
able strokes. His innings, which
lasted four hours and 34 minutes
did not end: till the last ball of
the day when he was caught at
cover.

Sutcliffe, with much more se-
date stroke-play, kept one end
going and left most of the scor-
ing to Worrell. He was unfor-
tunate to be run out in trying
for a quick single when only five
short of his century. Sutcliffe
batted for three hours.

—Reuter.

Victoria Score

a scintillating

with a little



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Civilians Suffering;

Most In War

@ From Page 1.
Government would like to avoid a
military stalement in which two







NOTICE

es
SAVINGS BANK TRAVELLING OFFICE.

It is notified for the information of the General

Public with

opposing armies would be ranged | Special reference to workers on sugar factories that the Travelling
against’ each other on either side] Offic® of the Barbados Government Savings Bank will again be visit-
ing the principal sugar factories during the reaping of this year’s
There seems to be little hope of | Sugar cane crop and will be operating on Mondays, Tuesdays and

of the parallel,

a political solution,
while the Chinese Government

is expected that the Allied air
attacks will be stepped up and
bridges will again be the main
target, Although better weather

The routes will be as follows.

LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.

however | Wednesdays. The service will commence from Monday 26th February.



maintain -their present attitude MONDAYS
towards the United Nations, | Searles “ oe a Approx. 9.30 a.m.
Britain would like to a! Foursquare we ee ee ; af 10.00 a.m.
talks with the Chinese based on} Oldbury - “3 . »~ 1030 a.m.
cease-fire and the establishment | Carrington a - ‘a a 11.15 a.m.
of a “neutral zone” between the} Three Houses aie : a5 ” 12.00 Noon
two armies, But these terms are | Guinea ‘ es oe ee 6 12.45 p.m.
not likely to be accepted by the] Bulkeley “i ie ae “3 # 1,30 p.m
Chinese while they are in their }
present truculent frame of mind. TUESDAYS
Meanwhile Allied Intelligence] Lower Estate ae eS tS Approx. 9.30 a.m.
Officers in Korea are beginning to} Applewhaite = ; : a 10.15 a.m.
detect signs of collapse in the} Andrews ‘ ; = 10,45 a.m.
Chinese: morale, American day-}Lemon Arbor z ‘ , 11.15 a.m.
light bombing of the enemy’s} Pool “ 5 R 11,45 a.m.
lines of communication and mili-! Bruce Vale ss : 12.30 p.m.
tary strong points has had an] Haggatts i iy : ; 1,00 p.m.
enormous effect on the Chinese! Swans .. a ips ¥ 1,30 p.m
troops and while it is difficult to, Vaucluse a a re 2.00 p.m.
j compute the ae S ——- ;
inflicted by these raids, there
no doubt that this’ continuous} warrens eee : Approx. 9.30 a.m.
deluge of bombs has badly shaken Haymans : : he X v 10.30 a.m.
the Chinese forces. : Fairfield f Y 11.30 a.m.
Damage to their supply lines} springhall ‘ 12.00 Noon
has been aggravated by a hard| porters. ss ae : 1.15 p.m.
Korean winter, Unable to obtain] sandy Lane He % 4 1.45 p.m.
supplies of food, the Chinese for- "47-2. 51—2n,
ward troops have turned to the ¥
land, but found it an.amprovident =
larder .
Frostbite has inflicted = sad tant % eae
casualties on ese troops than YO INS FROM
have combined efforts of Allied ‘Tae , STOPP. ING THE TIDE
forces, Prisoners of war report Tins Cocktail Peanuts True old saying, “YOU cant
in some units that the Chinese Bots Cocktail Cherries stop the tide,” however good
Army, as many as 50 per cent. Tins Cocktail Sausages your intention. WE find that
have ‘been affected by frostbite. » Soe as much as we would like to
Moreover, typhus has broken out . Sandwich Spread keep our prices stabled, the
and this too has helped to lower » Ox tail Soup constant increases in prices
saan. RS ” heiekite pears of our raw materials force us
ere is as yet no sign that the Chicken Soup to revise some of ‘our prices,
present Chinese et ss Zarate Soup ee hy as under:
is the beginning of a_ fullscale 19 ESET AOR RI. WHOL) Supr. bay Rum still .. 36c.
attack similar to that which drove ’ aerial No 3 nie Rum still .. 30c.
allied forces back to their present Pkgs Blanemange Limolene Highergrade 60c.
” ellos .
The Chinese counter-offensive is Bots oo eke vi : sf a mee bry
seen here as an attempt to pre-||] iiveq mona? Mustard v No. 2 grade :
vent the anise a forces e Mentholated 30c
from retaking Seoul and its pur- = +
pose is believed to be no more than STU ART & SAMPSON Floralene ; aa Sy eee po
to maintain the status quo. Col Pere He
With the approach of Spring, it 0: ogne oz. c.

In spite of the increases our
products are still best value
to-day.

On sale at all good stores.

-% Touch With Barbados

= — Only)
ona here: ~* THIS EVENING
Bor wien riey GET HOME AND 9 o'clock
WIFE'S READY FOR BED HE PUTS IN A -

REQUEST FOR A BIG BANQUET SPREAD:

“UNSIGNED *, ST: HELENA, ORE.

will enable the allies to make even
greater use of their overwhelming
superiority in the air, the
approaching thaw will bog down
mechanised forces and make
movement on the ground difficult.

Indications are therefore that
the allies will continue to inflict
heavy casualties on the enemy by
air attacks, but the situation on
the ground will remain fairly
static,

Outside of Korea, one of the
most damaging effects of the war
has been its alarming impact on
the raw material's’ — situation.

ed Shortages and high prices which
well to score 84. The lefthander Spring directly from the war have
seemed well set for his century had the effect of drawing supplies
when he was cag after batting away from Western Defence Pro-
230 minutes and hitting 11 fours, grammes and the situation so far
Heard and J, Sing who.made 48 as Britain is concerned is now
not out, figured in the best stand critical,

of the innings = far adding 56
for the fifth wicket.

Sanaa The Weather
TODAY

Wins Boat Race.
Sun Rises: 6.20 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.09 p

NASSAU, Bahamas, Feb. 15 .m,.
Moon (Full) February 23

Slowly Against MQC

VICTORIA, Feb. 16

Victoria Country .XI. found it
difficult to score rapidly against
the M.C.C. on the opening day
of their two-day match here. At
the close, they had scored 201 for
the loss of five wickets.

The M.C.C. bowlers toiling in
intense heat got no assistance
from the pitch but the batsmen
were mainly on the defensive es-
pecially in the early stages:

Heard, a_ lefthander, mixing
aggression with defence, batt



Harvey Conover’s Revonoe on
Thursday was named winner of Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
the 13th annual Miami to Nassau High Water: 1.31 a.m.,
sail yacht race in the time of 26 12.34 p.m,
hours, 30 minutes, 17 seconds, It
was the second victory for Cono- YESTERDAY

York and h trim
in aoe Rainfall (Codrington) .58 ins.
Total for Month to Yester-

day: 7.51 ins.
‘Temperature (Max.) 82.5°F
‘Temperature (Min.) 73.5°F
Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) E,
(3 p.m.) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour



Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Emanuel C, Gordon, M.V. Sedge-

field, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Sch, C. M.

W. Ipana, Sch. Mary E. Caroline, M.V. Barometer (9 am) 29.965,
Vegabond Prince, M.V. Moneka, Sch, (3 p.m,) 29.8

Emeline, Seh, Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch,

Franklyn LD. R., Sch. Timothy A. H.
Vansluytman, S.S, Islandside, Sch, Jul-
nar, Seh. Wonderfut Counsellor, Sch,

Rainbow M., Sch. W. L.. Eunicia, M.V,

Daerwood
ARRIVALS
Schooner Freedom Fleary, 23 tons nett,















KEEP FIT

Copt. De Roche, from Trinidad vin ,
Union Isles, LADIES’ KEEP FIT
Schooner Frances W. Smith, 74 tons CLASSES

nett, Capt. Hassell, from British Guiana,

will be held at the
B’DOS AQUATIC CLUB
Every Monday at 5.15 p.m

commencing
Monday, February 19th

. .
Coastal Station
CABLE AND WIRELESS (West Indies:
Lid. advise that they can now commu-
nicate with the following ships through
their Barbados Coast Station,

ao Saguaro, S.S. Regent Hawk, Enquiries at the 3 * alone
.S. D. Granada, SS. Orione, SS, +
Missionary Ridge, S.S. Gascogne, 8.58. AQUATIC CLU

Italia, S.S. Byfjord, S.S. Saxon Star,
S.S. Loide Cuba, S.S, Craftsman, 8.S
Argentina, S.S.. Trykon, S,.S. Bonito,
S.S. Lady Rodney, S.S. Maurentania,
S.S. Fort Amherst, S.S, Nieuw Am-
sterdam, §S.S, Esso Richmond, S.S.
Castor, S.S. Republica De Venezue'a,
§.S. Goifito, 5.S. Queen er ka anne
De Grasse, §.S. Sunwalt, S.S
ee S.S. S. Rosa, 8S. * yapoeee
S.S. Gangitane, 8.8. ay Jose,
3.9. Sandwich, S.S. Seatle, 5S, Auris;
8s. Sun Prince, 8,8, British Success,
S.S. Salinas, S.S. Bouplate, S.S. Liber-
bille, S.S, Yamhill, S.S. Essa Brossels,
8.8. Pendleton, SS. Macoris, S.S.
Sothern Collins, S.S. Yeorgid Gratos, | ,
S.S. Rio Orinoco, S.S. Meline, S.S
Panama Express, S.S. Alcoa Pioneer,

Enrolment — Monday 5 p.m.



DANCE

at
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
(Local & Visiting Members

A Silver Cup will be pre-

Costume: White Shorts and
Shirt.

Judging will take place at
Midnight.

Judges: Mrs. Jean Iverson
Mr. W. Bell
Mr. Jim Reddekopp
During the Performance
Photographs will be
taken by Mr. Bell

THE FIRST SHOW OF ITS
KIND IN BARBADOS,

DANCING with...
Music by Arnold Meanwell’s
Orchestra
There will also be a.:.
DOOR PRIZE of $5.00

Admission to Balicoom

~ 17

2/-
2.51

.
SOSSSOSS o OFOOSSSS POCOS -

Senccstanannel 66006000 UCCESOO OOOO OOOO

|
|











e” PRLEOSPP SPSS POP OOOO OOOO LOO LPL

! DUE TO CIRCUMSTANCES beyond our
\ control, we shall be unable to RECEIVE
any more CLOTHES until further notice.
We shall not be able to guarantee any
DELIVERY DATES for the Clothes

already received but shall endeavour to

SLL CEES ESSE

get them ready by the earliest opportunity.
x
%
x

SANITARY LAUNDRY
CO., LTD. OF BARBADOS

Re

SPSS SLESE SOLOS



The world’s most sought

after small car with all the

features of a BIG car. Seats four within
» wheelbase. Engine develops 27 horse-
2? power. Petrol consumption 35-40 miles per
gallon. Torsion-bar independent front-
wheel suspen.ion smoothes out the rough-
est road, 7-cubic feet of luggage space.

Easy to park. Easy to steer through traffic.
Easy to garage. Choice of three body
styles, 4 door saloon, 2 door saloon and
convertible. Make a date now for a
demonstration run in the world’s biggest
small car buy.

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385



Sole Distributors Phone —_





/tds

it





{e








FEBRUARY 17, 1951

SATURDAY,

edts with one muse
-Dolicyowners security

North American Life reports continued financial strength
to its 140,000 policyowners at the close of its 70th years
The enterprising Canadians who founded the Company
in the horse and buggy days of 70 years ago had but one
purpose—the lifetime security of the policyowners and



their families. That singleness of purpose has been a
guiding principle since 1881.

Every day North American Life policyowners are bene-
fiting from their protection in this Mutual Company:
In 1950, policyowners and beneficiaries received
$7,812,866, bringing the 70 year total of policy benefits
to over $163,000,000, For the future, the Company
holds over $144,000,000 in assets to meet obligations
to policyowners who own life insurance and annuities
totalling over $621,000,000.

The 70th Annual Report at a Glance

New Assurance and Annuities arranged $ 88,350,772

Net Life Insurance and Annuities in force$62 1,988,890
(Increase $67,652,263)

Total Premiums Received
Payments to Policyowners

$ 17,506,557

and Beneficiaries -----+--++-+ $ —7,812,866
Liabilities to Policyowners and Others $136,611,374
Special Reserves and Surplus Funds -- §$ 7,419,321
Total Assets -------+-+-+-+-+- - $144,030,695

(Increased $11,759,505)
The complete Annual Report will be mailed upon request.

weele AMERICAN LIFE

R. & G. CHALLENOR LTD.—Agent
H. D. KIDNEY,—Representative









BROAD,
MEDIUM,
SMALL
BRIMS.
A variety
of Styles

and Colours.

* Prices from $3.02 to $5.87



Cave Shepherd & Co., Lid.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street



RED HAND PAINTS

FOR ALL PURPOSES |

“MATINTO” FLAT PAINT
in Cream and Green,
For interior decoration of Walls,
Ceilings and Woodwork.
“S” ENAMEL FINISH PAINT
in White
HARD GLOSS TULIP GREEN
PAINT
HARD GLOSS PERMANENT
GREEN PAINT
For exterior or interior use.
“SPECIAL” HOUSE PAINTS
In Grey, Tropical White, Oak
Brown, Barbados Light and Dark
Stone.
For exterior or interior use

CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS





















The Sign ot

In Grey, Bright Red, Mid Green.
QUALATY RED ROOF PAINT
” ; For Galvanise or Shingles.
yee oe PAINT REMOVER
For the easy removal of old paint
WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.
AGENTS.




PAGE 1

SATVRn.W, FKBRI'AKY 17. 1951 I:\UI: Mm-. \livof.\Ti: PAOI CLASSIFIED ADS. Th* charge for announeemenu Pirlhi. Marriage. De.ith. Arkn %  adB ai ii. t s. and In Memortam noUrr* a . m m -•-(... Mi n %  .-. IM %  i lo. an* number sf word* up to SB. and 3 rent, per word on wcek-dav. j 4 cinii pr word on Snnd.iva (or *i additional word Par Birth a. Mamas* <>i anno unearned i in Cat ID ehaig* la U 00 tor *n> numM of wo up to 3d and B rent* par wot* lo* n roolUonal word TMini caah. Phon* 1 between I.M and pm., )lll fur Dai KMIm only af<*T • pm DUD F*bruer> mil. 1H1 i "p. Piofrcun c Land. Ban H.I1. St. KMKI. atr* Looiae Kino Ada M year* Her funeral laarea Ui abov* reakdanc* al )M p m. led* roc All Soul. Chapel and (hence 1 IM WoMburv Cemetery Brady n Klrlon iWidowtn Gordon Dorr." and OIK Irvine Seal* .brother. Mr. Laakleai.aler-.n-Uw. WALL—On ph IMh IBSI Al Nn Tori Alrtha Wall , "ii-i-aorn rkerp* II S vn •teeft-de. aad |IMM aaadaiii. AUCTION AIITION BALK OP (AH* CAM Al the Coamaa.,1,1*,, Oa.a* M.ig.lln* Lea* ne.t Praia, Srd lrl.iv • .1 I o i lack aharp Otir 1BST Che rolet with new tyre* and g*d ni|>'.i Jl*. On* A..Mm • in good r'xidlliun L> Ar*> A Sce.lt. Auctioneer IT141 . UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER BY rooommandabooH of Lloyd* Ag*<. *.* will aall on Monday in, itth H our room.. IT Hl|h Street 1 KefHrerator Caaa 1 Jar* Pa la Foia Graa TO pkg*. Weetebm Sal* 10 o'clock Term* C*.h %  RANKER. TROTMAN A CO.. \ui 1 loner rx W1MIII read* leord* o.er 14 >-d araak-4 raw HELP LADYSuitable lady ajtu. __ Apply V da UNA aTco Lad Po. hada. arers Po-t OtB>.M1. %  r:da,| U .r. DIM *n MISCrXLANKOVS BOTTUK Vt.Ofs ,mpi. white %  Pad p HT Wtliaa parked „, bair. Mean ,oeh at la par hot II* in. ii inching 'Wear apply to o ttutm-a k Co Ltd Broad Street Dial J113 LBJUaWANTKD TO UNI FTBNISHF.D o. irKTCKNUHBD Prom IH April Dwelling Hoviae >miai*-l r*t further than two milaa from \n. Cats M.MKciyd, pWlraMlla H..t n,. %  laar a-iburtoa aaeapUbla Muet .OHI.IT ihraa badronriTt. diasina and dlnml | rara*' Applv tn Rvalyn Hoatli V Co Ud Hirferl M-rcl fltRTItri *,M,ir. „,„,„ |h, nk la all ihoaa Kind frtrtida who %  anl %  aatln rarda and laitam of avmpj u.v hi ihir raraail Iwir.ix mm( ,^ . i bv lha daath of Joaaprt I. of Braraton Vtllagr Rarhal BaMlall ami rhlldnm. i:.".i ., MM. Tha itmlaaatgnad iralaruUy w ti.rn thonka to all who allcixlrd Bad (• %  iiaral. a*nl wroatHa or in any olnai way caprraaad iym|iHih> wilh Iham on Ihr occaaloii ot thr pj-.ma ol Mi< Drucllla King, lata of HobatU' Tanantry Lorn %  Klni ihuibondi Douflaa. Kil. Blrdlay lapnn, Mr.. Amu Marrlx Mia (i*ndotyn Ktnit. Daphna. Ira iaUua1itF'i< 111*1in WAITMR-Truoulh thia maflliun *• baa] to return Uiank. to ail our IHanda -c Qaaliitaaaaa ana) w*1l-i.i— (or tna v jilou* anprao.UMia nl lyn-ii I Grornann Watiha. REAL ESTATE wajtata on| W|I Buudm, MfMtftanjJ o( rantra rac.n .bout l| '.at aaiiara. with aM-OW. m+ ^^n ir !" indad by i vatandah i>( P, p ab->i..; I'lHIK MIIIIIS T. caajl. pc avoir li. Hid 1] ,rni| par opaia In "••rn.rn.um rhariw SI U • ad Bin oa Suadova l. I'.-.LI',,, I .Vanddiii. I % %  '!.'.. .. C ?^T f & "OU1W rmni ho U -I* I" Two aart ago .a* wioun Without a torrwall or (;.ll.vYou irli u. witn haavy haariB tM Mpi m I" ,. .' -I..,%  Mnrara Edward* iwllai Nuroa. Ma.lU and Andan tan i Mr. Harbart Nuraa Mr" Aiajuata Moor, 'Aunt. who M Iwod ona l.BI-lr 1'I.OHPnTY A t.o-.,or.y ,„ blllPJ in .uiiabta to. buatr. or p,, v .t, „„ £? Dl tX t£"* -"' "H !" .mai.. "*" •• '*""• Blaclrkritv and Oi.var;' ii-ant watar. dairy ,4,11,. (,„„ lrM „, -rpalaM, Rll d v. ,ih n.Hta.n tnatlc M arid (an mill Bpwrioi. My William, Court ..pp...,ir *— Band.. Bu. U* n ,,„„, """' "£QR' %  %  *•• oaBlly earnad by obtaining ^ •*•* '-r private ChrUIma. Cordi from your (rlanda No piavloua rxparl anea nateaiapy. Writ a today foe, baautiiui f.„ umpla Book to Brttaln'a lar.t and foirnal Publiabara. huj^eat i marvalloua monay makkni opportuwty Jaataa, Wnha-i. A Co, Ifcpt B Victoria Warka. Praalon. Lnd'and." M1.BI—Itn FOR Mia.-.aa* ckn-oa HI vi -*•* • ll>>IIM XI'IKIS HOUSES I .' -I BOOM -One Puinlabad a. Ufuraai -a % %  *• %  -• 8.. \.. Dial SB.* Hisi ka SWANSEA — Worthing till ad. 4 bedroom.. Kafriparala Badio and Oarage Dial MIS TANOUN Boacbanont. lom Pabniary onward*. 3B . children, raear. i bj % %  ,< %  %  BBhWSBI %  ia roam. Apply: Howe 1J I SI—t.f.r VA1.AMBR05A LOST A I Ol \l LOST THBEX 'WtEPBTAKF TIC Kb?) Keilav S OSiBBU OUA Fi..dav 1 Mr CfajnPj I Tata • %  • T.l.i.,1, . On, grarn puraa with aa* .vroal.K.ti.-h,-l J IBOf laturn .. Advwai, Adva, 11 Sl-la. OFFiriAI. REPORTER — LEGISLATIVE COUNTIL APPLICATIONS -if mvita-d for the po i February IBSI. at j, m lor condition! of sal* apply to the rider* Igned Injpacllon any day between m. am TO 1 p.m. Telephone Lady Walton. COTTLa% CATPORX} A CO.. Bollrltoi* fSJaV—lip. NOTICE Ke Kaiata ol 11WI. BINHI III Ml Peed i NOTICE i. hereby given that all peima having any debt ur claim agamx •ftactlng tha eatal, of Jaaia. Hen.. %  eld drcea-ad late ol Sheldon. Shot Hall. Saint Michael, who die., in thi. r-l.iul „n he Tlh day of SeptemUer. IBM, ate rrlueated to .ml in pailirulkr. of ilieir %  aim* duly attested to Ihe unUrr-laned Mortimer Vere Redman, l.lnduy Kidl Ryebinn Gill and Percy Gordon Tavtnr, luallned eneculor. of thai will f the Jaeeaaad in rare of Cotlle. Cat ford *\ C# It High Sireet. Bridgetown. ...he.loron or befoie ih, !th day *f Aplll 1S11 after which dale we ahall proceed to dl.inbute the daceaard among the narllrii endtlril thrrrm having rra.nl nly to aurh claim* of which we .hall lien have had nolire and we will not ba %  bra for tha a-ncta or any pait thereof .. di.tnliutarl to mv per.ran Qf who** n,bl or claim we .hall not then have had The parcel of land containing l.gBl %  lunre ft with the Uuildlnga thereo" Jtuale In U*ca. St.rei. Bridgetown, adjoining lha property of tha Bartoado. Telephone Company Limited and at pre %  H occupied a* lo part by the Obaaive. awapaper and aa to part By Mkw CadoThe property wil Inapection by application an la. aali r further i—r COTTUC CATPORD •> CO No. II High Street. Bridgetown HIM Igfl 11.2(1 -In III S-INAKE" COUNTRY. ROAD. ST MICHAEI. The re.arlenre lately occupied vv Mn W. O. Collvnvore. The liouae -landa In well kept garden. id ground, il ana. TI aayrehaai. The whole comprx*. verandah, drawing and dining room., S bedrooma, on* with marble both, > ehowoe*. lavator!**, ronveiiiant kitchen and pantrv. fimi for 1 aarvanta. gi'ag* for 1 can. and .table. Water supptv for garden and ground* from a well with mill; water %  arvM* in hcuar and alto aarvanta room, .ahowei and lavatorvi. The raaidan furndhad wit i' cmuany • aaaini Houa* convertible late fl-U and out buikllngi ron^artibla li.lo a coltagi The land Ii atiltabla for develop menv or kitchen gar dona. The undraigiMd will oner thi premi** far Bale by public auction at their office, No. It, High Street. Bridge. i, en Friday th* Urd day February IBSI al t p m Inspection on Turtdaya and ThJ IVI onlr between 3 and 5 pm. Pol further partlrulara apply to COTTIX. CATFORD r. CO.. CARS— IB* Ford V-B Tour.I Condition. IB3B Pord V-B Sedan Bargain. 1*4* Mornj Oxford Saloon, tow Mileage ,-i.td well cared FOBT hDVAL OARAGB LTD. Telephone 4504. BEDPOKD DELIVERY VANS hlppi.ant luat to hand and ready for Immediate poaaeaalon, Courteay Garage. dial 4B1B lltgl-dn. CAR Latest Model "Prefect" Pord In perfect condition Juat don* B.W Phone 1143 IB.tBI—an CAB--1B4T Standard 14 hp BaVoo-i tn r .-ellent condition Ontg II OBB mils*. M.i/ lie aren al Chelara Garag* •!•• Ltd PinfoU Btreat. igg.si—in CAB -in good c Apl ELECTRICAL H — Km FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS l VI VAS-t7.cn SHEET* A % ii it > i n a a at aaugi Gaiva ired plain Bharta a 1434 pa aheat It gas Bn NOTICE Aitpiicani. a>* invlleg for the post ->1 M %  Nuraa at St Lucy. Almahouac •I o aalary of BBt SB per manth. uaiform rlc. and quartan provldad Ai-pi cain. IKIII I*F lull) rartiikatrd. niMiwrvra. and general Nuraea Th. •uccaeelul candidate muM %  '•imp daaus on Mth February ISBI e|.plicati..n. will be received by me up L> Saturday 11th lrbr,i.,,i IBSI OSWALD I. DBANE, Clerk. Boaid of Poor La* Ouarditnt St 1 ". • 10 1*1 7-! I.ARHAHOH ( IIORAI SIKIKTV th* ifi n iaeaa .. ( H Houa, on Tu. ada; Store or aw< %  atr of light hora> n at CoUln. DIM r to Cm* r SneaJtocaT um to Cullln. Dru, reward -IT S St tr FOUND '•'BE Al M-r.i,, trrgB *• %  Sal Bvei.n PIBIK OFFICIAL SALE i Arl ilk •f Land 'oi a. fled tha th. Cathedri Februai ITJ5I 1. %  tie* And all | BkaeBbaa the uld raaee .rrequeiiea in vet lie their In.btedne.. without delay Oate,l thi. rod dav -if Fahiuarv IHI. MiiltTIMEH VFItF RFDMAN %  INKS AY rrtrit nvrm'RN c.11.1. PERCY GORDON TAYIX)N Reeeutora of the will of Jam* Henry BARBADOS MI'TI'AI, AID ASSESSMENT AKSI RANCE SOCIETY Re Loal Policy V'U, ... of the Polcv ,mimed • ii.ued b> in* Society on the Ufa of Brne.i Theodo/a Tavlor. new rlecea.ed. h-Mng notified the Boaid f CHrerlon ol thja SocMlv that th* .-.id Pola. La. bean lo.i >r laptaced. NOTICE IS hereby given th %  ileaa arv nbJeclH>n ,. rai>e.inth from th* date of th.Nawipaprr in which thla advrrliarmeiil ippeara. proceedlnga be commenced bv manujor or nlhcr pcraona intcrealad a having aar* claim on th* fund accordingly I .nidia^*a The Prevaat Marahal • IMM-Bl I %  ON Prtday Ih* md dae of afarch IK k< the hour ol I o'clock in Ih* aflemoa Will lie auld nt my „nV e to the High* bidder < any sum not under th* a|> praieed value. All thai ..ruin p. tnlnlng about 1BBI a Pariah of St. Michael. TweedaHSe B. butting and beunduaf on landa n or late of the Bartaad.,. Co-op*r s i Bank Ltd on landa now or late ol C Irna idecjued.. on Twead.lde Hoad %  .(i the road oll.d St Hill R. wllh Ihe meaauage .„ I.-,, ahilldmg.. Ac appret one year la 24.000 gallon, and Ih. Vast** rrearv* tha right t.. accent Uu thai the supply of Ihla article and ..II aan* tendering ler Ihla ertlrt.lorwwrd. along with their lander. lihcate U.' a properly qualified Veteii Ptactitioner Mating Hut th* rattle which th* milk will b* siippBllI Forma iiu Cl %  %  • UHEF NO S22POS 516400 001605) NIN 6vlS09] 601800 6020101 6020Sol 602000j 602I00] 602200 i 602100) 602500/ 602600 \ H02900 603120) I 603I30J 0047tHlj 603350] 603390 60X450 6034BO 603520 603530 C0M0Q 603710 •OSS10 \ •041101 •04150} •04170) 604300 •04500/ *4IOOJ 6O50OO 606000 606100 606250 606290 606350/ 006300 606400 607000 607J00 607100) 607300\ 607400 607500 A0T70S| 607798 608H'" R1F NO 608200 608300 608500 608710/ 608750} 608800/ 608900 \ 609200/ 609(00t 610410/ 0104 90\ 6107001 fllOBOili r c i.iiMi-. N II. NOTIFKW .Imard at the under: P. reel Mall 1 Ordm-wy M1.1I1 Malli lor Lucia ny Ih, Sohooni it Counaellor will b* rlowd J era) Pert OnV* aa under Mall at am. Beglatarrd .1 IIVIHMIIM MHHIS Attention la drawn t. lovly ahad*. Vlall Harnwn'. Sl.owioorn on the dial ftoVar rn.ti i TRAVEL FACILITIES TO THE t'NITED KIN(.DOM Wilh reference lo Ihe Government Notice published in Ihis paper or. the 4th and Cth February relative to the possibility of the "ASTURIAS" taking passengers at Jamaica and Trinidad for the United Kingdom In May. It is now known that accommodation on thin ship will consist of 4—, 1—, 2— berth and u few single cabins. 16.2.51.—2n. G44900 L .;4Mjon 1 (• %  453(K)( U45410) 645700 I 847901) 647913 V 647998] 650750 CHANCERY SALE SHIRTS Gent'a Shirt, in Khaki. Litim. Silk Gab*edlrt and Shark S*. Pram USD up STAefWAY aTTOBuT laaeat Dial 4BI0 W J a W % %  SUN SHADES — V*ry attrartlv* an ineKprniive Juat right la protact yon area during Cnckat (1 .• up Y I> LIMA a> Co.. LTD. MS-S1-* STAK-A-BYE TUBULAR Bta.l Chair. and Tablea on ahow at Raheh Baard • Show Irani Hardwood Allay. Tradrnqulrt** cordlaUy .nviled BARBADOS ' ...*' *l ,d .Y 0 ^" 1 ? ToarUiw wilh th* meu*e> or dwelling li-.iae ffl A ^ il liT *f J'L '" •'" %  '"' •"• "uldlng. and e.eclion. l-th fraern-M tn* aBid land, ereried and buiti .trnding and being wi R WILLtAatt. Reii.irar.ln.Chani-erf Bth February. |*lf TEA SERVICE — On* Mappm an Webb tea aarvtte In good condition WD. Bkhaid. ft Son. Mr Oreger Rliret ItASI I tTHIajrTON UM! WORKS — Can aupplv. Temper ft Building Lima Beuldara. Conciete Stone Grit. Marl ft Sano Trucka on lure P PB33S lAlaa*n CURTAIN FrTTTHOS—Pi daw atyII draaarMw. B> BAJaMB A CO LTD. t VENETIAN BLINDS -Kiraeh Bun%  U metal Da Luae V*r**taln blind. M f atraa, delivery S waeka. Dial 4414 ft CO. LTD. II 2 SI l WINDOW' GLASS Spark* Ptowe ed Sheal and Plata talaaa lor all i' W* cut to yaur r**juir*n-.< %  %  Dafl am 1JJ3I —Id WAU I'lAQLaat With ngurea I n a n s' beautiful deetgn g upwaraa Y D* LIMA A Co. Ltd.. 10 awesi IMM IT2SI-V I at 1,1 <: CHANCERY SALE r. , m *.A ,2^2ZL *2?Z'. *'" ^t m " 1or "* *• %  etTirgtioB OdU* P .our BvnldlnaT. Bridgelown between It neon and 1 pm for in* aim and an gate -o-c.lWd brh* If not rh-t, .old. it will be art up on .aeh -,cee-d,ng Fr, at the aam* place ard dunrva tha aam* houra until aold. Fun particular, on at CYRIL BBUCE BROOKS"laintlf/ ELJaANOR PABK BAKER-Defendant l-nnmny ALL THAT c*rt—. par* <* parcel of land aituat* at PtnfaU Stra :n II in Lbs In Lbs 6iar.98, 156502 \ 657206 657200 RegBSrar-l 657398 "MS, askian 661000 •620OO 664945/ Miot 800600 831450 571400 571500 S29985 Welding rods and electrodes Nails and staple* Iron nnd steel castings, rorbon and alloy Iron and steel forging*, cnriron and alloy NON-FERROUS METALS AND MINERALS ,4.,-minim, find Ahi'fiihinn lllire Allwi/g (iluti-. and strips %  Aliiiiiinum anil aluminum bast' alloy manufactures such as perforated sheets, pipe fitting*, tto fopfier nnd Mflnuforflires Iteflned cooper in cathodes .billets, Ingots, wire rods or other refinery/shape* Copper pipes, tubes, plates, sheets, strips, rods A bars B;irc copper wire L cable Copper wire and cable; Building wire A cables; weatherproof slow-burning wire, insulated copper wire, etc.. except rubber-covered lamp cord Copper manufactures, n.es. flrnss nnd Broti--.. I mi. no IWh I'. S D*J aarina* nmi Feb. 411. MT. HOMEWARD FOR THE DNITED KIMOD0M S B li.VNTKK SS "STRCATMAM HILL" Hi llttbjd.M Ftb For further information apply lo . DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.-AfeaU PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Produ.U, L.i..iU'.l, Hoseau, DomlnlA fur sailing lo Europe. T.ie usual port* Ol -all are Dublin, l^ndon, or Rotterdam. Single fate £70; usual reduitions for .iiiUlrsm. H'rksBf In I'lMlnrs Q odd i And S tollmeyor names as popular In ,i i im roi.iu.. I: BVMll I asaasaaaaa*, Bay Sireet Ollll VTAI. liOOUS Frum IMH A. ( M1NA. K.IIYI'T flllk. CurloB, Braasware. Jewels. Lbirns, Ivory. Teakwotltl. Sandal*. French Perfumes, Barbados Ncarves In Pure Silk. BBae, I t< 'I' Th* Hauoalr flradqaarlera 111 IM Hr4. k IRIIHJ Kl Pr. Ba Baarr *l -Uial MM < (lirislian Scienre I iicailiiiil Kooni BT *LOOK. 1 K ooagj ".-in 10 a ni-2 pm. Tuesdays. Wetlnrfldays, Krldays 10 a.m. —12 o'clock Saturdaya. thli IUMI.1 la* Blbla and 'Ti.laiun flciaore teit-booX, I %  IB* aariataraa bf MAST BAt-SL 2 Bimt eur be read. BS t taS f i k • or puraiaaad | j Visitors Are Welcome | in I Aw. in Lbs OBBRTP Voii-rerr.-nij Meldls dS AIlon* Nlckel-chrotne eleetrif resistance wire .... Babbitt metal Molybedenum metal A alloys Including wire A scrap CHEMICALS Benzene (WU0ll ... i rude & refined Sulphur, crude Sulphur, refined Hydrat*i> brake fuid. In U hi I.lr in Lbs in Lbs SUCCESSFUL AUCTION SALES Jeb. I.IIW < harges Prompt Payment PLANTATION Bl ILIIINO Phune 4640 I.0VUI0NS ASkEll TO BIUI KELSOK MEMORIAL (IIUUII Offlcij Rt ..i.ii i. Fm. ui i-iithuMasl* J II ..i,l public are iniriugh this medium ng out ihe %  ii 11 oiis of the < Rt9fJM sjRl .1 I'. Id %  %  iber. Kalviuilse ami other iiniifiiiiK %  %  %  %  %  niiated by Raw j n Ra>SjpBr on his return 10 Barbados. Donors are asked to com• ith Rev. A. B. . DaStytl 4191 or ag at Bnttom Hill. St Murut'l Nil 16. Barbados. P O Box 1 If. IRON BEDST.: \I>S WITH SPRINGS rni: i i:\riiti. WBmHUUDM ( mtrul I'uutidrv Md.—Propriel.ira I ..lor Sliasts.



PAGE 1

PACE FIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE SMI ROW. FEBRUARY H, l51 I.OAI.M. AIAIUMV -1 Dtm't Let That Left-Hand Fetish Trap You IN THE OLD. and often brutal, days of barc-knuckle fighting a puKilist could lose in only three (iiUVn nt ways kcd out of time" (i.e.. failing to 11 In the half-minute interval allowed after a knock-down which alone ended a round); by retiring, or by fouling his n.'iit. ilways to a finish iiroken up by thc police r fit an* whose favourite %  'ling beaten. The ruin .'I'" v^r.v din>rem now. ll are of a daflalb miration. f.ssional boxing (bay cstfkkir, six. eight, ten. 12 or 13 rounds, ihree minutes to each round, with a mlnutr's interval tach round. (In some ot %  %  : %  lull, the pestilent! |] two-minute rounds have been lei n trod u cod. > M I M .^n Of IL.MIIr AeacVrsny. b> l*ssTU WII. HON, deals with punchint and the system of potnu Miirim I Intutor explode* tii f r '""l f 0 "" 0 ihe bod, (ran the io p of the hip ? nd "a conu^unt foiling to conIwnes) tinue the contest at the expiration The man who scores most clean H ,en spcond s ** %  l no t ** "wardPttOte. is given a maxunum of &^£SsFj^ SSSLSSi nits or marks, at the end ol each round ond his opponent proportionately less. If aada done cqiiiillv wrl! both gel the full live points. Most referees score In fractions the contest shall then terminate Farcical. But So, if thc referee did not stop a bout when one man was 5 potn-.s — ahead and that man were knocker: L!LP!!! .. a nornu clo out with the first punch of lh ...inrlihey would give boxer A next round, the decision would 5 point, and boxer B 41,. A acore have to be a draw. of 5 to 4i, would mean lhal A And If the man were 51 or nwa nnd shown a considerable luperipoints ahead he would have to be '.!,."V f"S '" 41 <"—P *>**> ,hc decision on potato, ..'.. _1 ... " •'" "VCT his man though he had been knocki-1 i.nd has possibly floored him. „ | d er than a |lar bear's nose. !" JL '" %  ""• 'i" 1 "" differThis may seem farcical but it Is SSL Jf l". '""I C ""J— none the less true and it mark. im.nvs thai he lx>cr losing that „„, „, „ic prime ditln. knock, j Jai certainly been ,„„,„ pnienghting (wtj Knocked down more than once nd has. ,n fact, done nt^uVbui l ,le " 1) Und boxlnK manago to lasi out the three Another signal difference ,s thai |l, „ the (physical) lot of the modem I aim If rush Jx xer continues to be looked Hit. i Yi>u may be one of the people One or the mwl recent aoMndwho think that a punch with the njenls to the rules now allowi H; (ft hand rounts more than one weights to middleweight* to wear%  tin the right. This, most cerlift of bandages and tapes on their tainly. is not so. But it underlies hands, and cruiser and bOBVJ the fetish which hai l>eeii made v.cighls up to 12ft. %  f DM straight left—sometimes Known as thc "traditioiial weapon NEXT WEEK Mar Wilson will of British boxing." tell .you .the .difference .belweei. Thc straight left, correctly amateur and professional boxing, delivered, with the full weight of what the referee has to watch for, FRANK w 01:1:1 1 1 Wnili gave a scintillating di.pl,,. P a vo Uf fl with a little luck—before reaching 100 and vr—he hit with power and fnaadon and had five sixes and 31 fours as his most profitable strokes. His innings, which lasted four hours and 34 minutes did not end till the last ball of the day when he was caught at SutclinV, with nuuh more sedate strnkc-play, kepi one end going and left most of the scoring to Worrell. He was unfortunate to he run out in trying for a quick single when only five short of his century. Sutcl'tTc batted for three hours. —B niter. the fouls in boxing. —I..F..S IaOniskillings Ai*e Here 1 From page 1 id look forward to these th* body behind it, can be ax doaUnatinx as a conductor's baton it's o(te n known as "the paint brash" vince it Is with this punch that an opponent's nose is so often reddened. But two hands are better thai' one, and British boxers have ofter i>cci. at a disadvantage again*' 1. or Continentals who correctly use both hands in attack and don't save thnr 11-ht %  olcly for blocking or parrying thi 1 [her man's punches. Incidentally |f s absurd to re gard the straight left as 'tradi*he skipper of the Cophway foi '.tonally British." Anyone who saw .ear His father visited Barbados the fight in which Joey Maxim, but this is his first visit .lie nrvt from Cleveland. US.A., took the j n both the Royal and Merchant worlds light heav>-weight chamNavy during the last war. Uloashlp from Freddie Mill/, Asked about his visil to Trimof Bournemouth, %  ogiand, would <'ad. hsaid: "I have discovered h.ivc ion QM triumph that the wharfs at Trinidad Is &f of the straight puncher — hundred per cent cleaner than uauu %  correct proportion of n :o se of Jamaica" rtnght >!( %  over th ruggajd A t 4.44 p.n tha inn.-k.iho,: .^*t r _""l! W i l ?! r '—."5Vl.il W !P' uU,n **h threo compan. iDtUtg visits.' Captain Bodden has been Victoria Score SloHlvAgaiiist MQC VICTORIA, Feb. 16 Victoria Country XI found it difficult to score rapidly against the M C.C on the opening dav of their two-day match here. At the close, they had scored 201 for the toss of live wtokats. The H.C.C. bowlers toiling in intense heat got no assistance from the pitch but the batsmen %  /•TO mainly on the defensive especially In the early stages. Heard, a lefthander, mixing aggression with defence, batted wall to M-ore 84. The lefthander seemed well set for his centurv when he was caught after batting 230 minutes and hitting 11 fours. Heard and J Sing who made 48 not out. figured in the best stand of the innings so far adding 58 for the fifth wicket. —Keuter. Civilians Suffering Most in War • r'r*tn Pag* I Government would like to avoid a military stalement in which two opposing armies would be ranged against each other on either side of the parallel. There seems to be little hope of .1 political solution, howevet; tvhtfe the Chinese Government maintain their present attitude towards the United Nations. Britain would like to arrange; Ldl" 1 with the Chinese based on ease-lire and the establishment of a "neutral zone" between the two armies. But these terms are not likely to be accepted by the Chinese while they are in their present truculent frame of mind. Meanwhile Allied Intelligence Officers in Korea are beginning to detect signs of collapse in the Chinese morale. American daylight bombing of the enemy's lines of communication and military strong points has had an enormous effect on the Chinese troops and while It Is difficult to compute the number of casualties inflicted by these raids, there is no doubt that this 1 continuous deluge of bombs has badly shaken the Chinese forces. Damage to their supply lines has been aggravated by a hard Korean winter. Unable to obtain supplies of food, the Chinese forward troops have turned to the land, but found it an improvident larder Frostbite has Inflicted more casualties on Chinese troops than have combined efforts of Allied forces. Prisoners of war report in some units that the Chinese Army, as many as 50 per cent, have been affected by frostbite. Moreover, typhus has broken out and this too has helped to lower morale. There is as yet no sign that the piesciit Chinese counter-offensive is the beginning of a fullscale attack similar to that which drove allied forces back to their present positions. The Chinese counter-offensive Is seen here as an attempt to prevent the United Nations' forces from retaking Seoul and its purpose Is believed to be no more than to maintain the state* que. With the approach of Spring, it is expected that the Allied air attacks will be stepped up and bridges will again be the main target. Although better weather will enable the allies to make even greater use of their overwhelming superiority in the air. the approaching thaw will bog down mechanised forces and make movement on the ground difficult Indications are therefore that the allies will continue to inflict heavy casualties on the enemy by air attacks, but the situation on thc ground will remain fairly static. Outside of Korea, one of thc most damaging effects of the war has been its alarming impact on the raw material's situation. Shortages and high prices which spring directly from the war hav had the effect of drawing supplies away from Western Defence ProKiammes and the situation so far as Britain Is concerned is now critical. AOIH ISAVINGS BANK TRAVELLING OFFK f. It 1* notified for the information of the Genets) 1'uoi reference to workers on sugar factor Travelling Of afl I the Barbados Government Savings Baik will again be visiting the principal sugar factories during the reaping of thl sugar cane crop and will be operating on Mondays, Tuaadays and Wednesdays. The service will commence from Monday 28lh February. The routes will be as follows. MONDAYS kajsjaj .. .. Approx. 9.30 am. Foursquare .. .. 10.00 a.m. OldUn> .. .. .. .. ,. 10JO a in Carringlon .. .. '.. 11.15 a.m. Three Houses .. .. .. „ 12.00 Noon Guinea .. .. .. ., 12.45 p Hi. Bulkeiey .. .. ..# ,. 1 3u p m Lower Estate Applewhaite Andrews Lemon Arbor Pool Bruce Vale Haggatts Swans Vaucluse Warrens Haymans Fairfleld Springhall Porters Sandy Lam Tt F.SDAVS WEDNESDAYS 9.30 a.m. 10.15 a.m. 10.45 a.m. 11 15 a.m. 11.45 am 1SJS ; %  -,. l.OO p.m. 1 30 p.m 2.00 p.m. K. 9.30 a.m. 10.30 am 11 H i at 12 0O Noon 1 15 p.m. 1.45 p.m 17.2.51—2n. WAKE YOUR ION*' FROM CorMUiil Pnnuti Cork uil Chrrrlrs CnrkUill Stmagr. Mral Itoll. I % %  '.. I \l. .,i •j ahrt "! :r .,1 ox UII ftoup VrgcUlbliSimp. A -l>.,r alii. Son i darken Soup Turn it to Soup Carrots, iSlic-d j Peas Tomatoes %  Sln<1 Crwatn Prepari-*! Mustard iM Baron. SHAM & SAMPSON LTD. Ileadausxters for Beat Hum. STOPPING THE TIDE True old saying, "YOU can* stop the tide," however good your intention. WE And that as much as we would like to keep our prices stabled, the constant Increases in prices of our raw materials force us to revise some of our prices, as under: Supr. bay Rum still No. 3 bay Kum still Limolene Floi HighiTgradc Mentholated No I prcstki No. 2 grade Mentholated Me. lOc 72c. Me Mc, H 24c. 3 or. Cologne 3 OT. ... In spite nf thc increases ou products arc still best vtltt to-day. On sale at all cood sUves. ^*''**-*''^''^"''*''*-**v*-%%%^v^^^^^v*',*,*,^^^%^^^^^^*,',%^^^-,-,- the American •traditional British" methods It's Untrue ^— --vsc|,*, n..,,Sgl I. I.ll IHIS.I. r j | *?.,+ %  I * -'iK ,e6 ,rym lne Bar"""!^ Regiment. marched through Trafalgar Square and as they passed the War Memorial. thc command "eyes right" was given. And a number of people think that you get more points for a pumh to the head than you do fur %  body blow. Again untrue There is nothing latd down in the rules whereby even the weig-U of a punch should influence the distribution of points. But an ex %  option must be made, I not, m the case of a knock-down. when a man is on the floor he is Public Buildings, along temporarily right out of the flgh;, fjireet. Victoria Bridge. doing nothing. n nd therefore unStreet, along Bay Street and •inle to score any points; and he to St. Anns Fort. Pipers und %  hould then be suitably penalise!, drummers from the Innjskillings They assembled at the Baggage Warehouse. The colours were brought from the left of Ihe parade to the front and the companies gave the general salute. Thc route of the along thc Chamberlain around Nelson's Statue, Bridge. by the Bridge Probyn >k One of the least-known .,M I least-used rules is the one whicn j...ys: 'If at the conclusion of any lotind during a contest one of the contestants should attain such i lead on points as to render it a<> impossibility for his opponent to r4ln win. he must then be dcclnred the winner." Thai K.O. i pa tiled the march. By the time thc companies reached the Garrison every man was soaked through. The march was continued all through tho Willt Boat Race NASSAU, Bahama-: |%fa I r > T1 -* % %  %  Conner's Itevonor ot. Thursday was named winner of the 13th annual Miami to Nassau sail yacht race in the time of 28 hours, 30 minutes. 17 seconds. It was the second victory for Conover of New York and his trim 45-foot yawl.—n) .fit Ins. Tetal for Month to Yeaterday: 7 51 Ins. Temperature (Max) tt.S'F Temperatore (Mia ) 73 5*F Wind Direction: INI Wind VHeelty; t miles per hour Barometer ( am) 29 985. (3 p m.) 29 U4 PRACTICE SHOOT NOTICE DUK TO CIRCUMSTANCES bound iiilr ronlrol. we shall be unable lii KKCEIVK any more CLOTHES until further notice. We shall not be able Is. guarantee any DELIVERY DATES for Ihe Clothes already rereived hut shall endeuvour to iiet them ready by Ihe earliest opportunity. SANITARY LAUNDRY | CO., LTD. OF BARBADOS SEE! TRY! THE WORLD'S /(years with one purpose ... policyowners' security North American Life reports continued financial strength to its 14O.000 policyowners at the close of its 70th year. Thc enterprising Canadian* who founded the Company in the horse and buggy days of 70 years ago had but one purpose—the lifetime security of the policyowners and their families. Hut singleness of purpose has been a guiding principle since 1881. Every day North American Life policyowners are benefiting from (heir protection in (his Mutual Company. In 1950, policyowners and beneficiaries received $7,812,866, bringing the 70 year total of policy benefits to over Sl63.000.000, For the future, (he Company holds over $144,000,000 in assets (o meet obligations (o policyowners who own life insurance and annuities totalling over $621.0(10,000. The "0th Annual Report at a Glance New Assurance and Annuities arranged S 88.350.772 Net Life Insurance and Annuities in force$62 1,988,890 (Increase $67,6*2.261) Total Premiums Received The basis of modern boxine, W The llntt practice of the B.H A that the two men n re trying to will take place at the Onvcrnmcn uuificorvone another on points The Range on Saturday, I7th at 1 knock-out is almost an accident P.M. and was certainly introduced to The practice will be at 200 %  am a man from sustaining to) yards to enable mrmbn %  much punishment. and adjust their rifles for the coinIll other words, if he's not eapjIng i !•' uf rising unassisted inside .en practices will be held regularly Bskeoada, Ihao K'l (all that he's U. on the first and third Satunlivs no tit state to continue a contest of each month. small-ear value! They'll Do It Every Time liUOUS M=l liLOSS TULIP CiRKEN PAINT HARM GLOSS PERMANENT GREEN PAINT I i i stcnor or interior use. "SPECIAL" HOUSE PAINTS In Orev. Tropical While. Oak Brown, Barbados Light and Dark StMMi tartar or interior use. CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS In (.rev. Bright Red, Mid Green. KF.H ROOF PAINT For Galvanise or Shingles PAINT REMOVER removal of old point. & HAYNES CO., LTD. \t.f \ I




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ESTABLISHED 1895 .ii: SATHB-'W. FKBRUARY 17. 1951 PKH.'E : KIYE C: Europe Will Up Defence Forces ACHESON WARNS U.S. AGAINST ISOLATION WASHINGTON, Feb. 16 SECRETARY OP STATE Dean Acheson said today : "The combat forces of our European Allies may be expected to double in the next year." He testified before the Senate Foreign Rela tions and Armed Services Committees to support the Administration's plan to send 100,000 additional troops to Europe to bolster its defences. Answering questions Acheson said he hoped progress would be made in fitting Spain into Western defence plans. Whether that objective could bo accomplished depended on the actions of many nations as well as those of Spain. Acheson said that the United States must use the time it had by virtue of its lead over Russia in fire power and atomic weapons to build up with its allies "balanced •collective forces" needed to deter aggression. Ho .id: "The value of our lead — > in atomic weapon* would deel but balanced land, sea and air forces in Western Europe would offset that." Ann-lieu'* Allies were -taking steps which bring us measurably c'.oser to the realisation of our ultimate goal" of adequate defence force. "Roughly "peaking." he went on: "Combat force* of our European Allies may be expected to double In the next year." Acheson attacked the proposal for concentrating Amem-an a*> fenecs In this Hemisphere. an I for insisting that Europe prepaie its defences before It receive American aid. He said the fundamental pur pose of the Atlantic Pact was "to preserve peace" It provided for mutual help among members and for consideration of what should be done before any attack as well as after any attack. On the argument that the United States should await development of Europe'* own defensive force before making its contribution. Acheson said the need for strength against aggression was the immediate aim of America and her Allies. "If each of the North Atlantic nations should wait to sec Its parti ers' efforts before determining its own." Acheson said, "the result would be as disastrous as it would be obvious. We might orce again sing the bitter refrain: "loo little and too late" and this lime there may be no opportunity to remedy the mistake." The argument that the United States should "concentrate on its own shores and leave the rest ol the world to its fate" once had si me appeal for Americans, hut they now understood Western Europe's importance to American secur ity. —Heater. Herriot Quits Party Post PARIS, Peb. 18. Edouard Herriot. Speaker of the French National Assemble has resigned from the presidenev of the Radical and Radical Socialist Party, the National Assembly Office announced today. Party headquarters said Herrlot had given no reason for his step. Herriot's Secretariat, however, said his resignation was brought ubout by the fact that he hao been unable to secure unonimiU the party, und particularly that the Executive Committee had not yet agreed to his proposal that Radicals who had abo joined i,.-iri.il Charles De Gaulle's French People*' Rallv hould be expelled from the Radical party. Herriot has strongly opposed this "political bigamy" at he %  Herriot. who is 78, was reelected Speaker last month. Between the wars he was three times Prime Minister and he has been Mayor of Lyons, France's second city for 45 years. He Is said to esteem that post more highly than all ministries he has held —Heater. Ha. HIS For Treaty Aoir In Sighl CANBERRA. Feb. 16. John Foster Dulles, American Special Envoy who is holding preliminary talks with Australia and New Zealand on a Japanese peace treaty, said here today: "I feel we are now In a position where wi! can actually find and formulate I basis for peace'" War Not Iiicvitabl. lA>NDON, Feb. 16 Marshal Si id hi said in an interview broadcast by Moscow radio to-night that war was not inevitable. Replying to a correspondent of the newspaper Pravda, he si-id; "No." At least at the present time It cannot be regarded Inevitable. —Heuter. KMPLOY BUND 01RI.S NEW YORK So hard up is the U.S. government for typists that they are out to recruit blind girls. They tried 30 as en experiment which proved "higfclv successful." The salaries range from £8*3 to £954 yearly. Approve Letter The BONN. Feb. lfl Bundestag Foreign Affairs Committee approved unanimously a letter which Chancellor Konrad Adenauer proposes to send to thu allies living the required guarantee on foreign debts, infonnc 1 German sources said today. The Chancellor told the Committee that the allies had said they would accept the letter. —Renter Three Withdraw WASHINGTON, Feb. 16 Three trades union members of America's Wage Stabilisation Board withdrew today in protest against Its decision to recommend general 10 per cent, wage increase. They described the plan as "unfair and unworkable* and advocated a 12 per cent, increase In addition to any future cost of living adjustments.— %  cuter. REJECT PLAN OTTAWA. Feb. 16 Tn less than a minute the Cabi net on Thursday night rejected compulsory military training the reserve forces for Home Defence. The rejection came from Defence Minister Claxton late In the Commons debate which pr> •lured a spilt In the Progressive Conservative ranks over the con iinvcrsi.il issue. —<•> Allies Preparing Seoul Offensive TOKYO. Feb. 16. NAVAL WORKING PARTIES lead by frogmen, were to-night working feverishly to restore the west cocst port of Inchon, gateway for supplies to United Nation* forces in Korea. Thev had orders to get the docks working within 20 hours. ft res ftfbUna went on all day on the central front with Uatted Nations aeroplanes hammering the Civilians Suffering Most In War LONDON. Feb. 16. shockihg revelat British infantry artillery ana i.niks fought their first bi" offensive action of the Korean war today in n raging blizzard. Co-op. crating with American troops. iti'v .-(tracked Chinese Corn nists entrenched In the hills who bin* the way to battered Seoul, the South Korean c-UUl. Id At %  itteily cold weather the world when figure* for civillAllieo forces hud secured their casualties In Korea arc pubobjective and were digging In for llshed. According to a well-in-'the night. The Communists had formed source in London today, defeated all attempts to drive these casualties may approach the i them from the hills In the past 1 in in mark. three days. Today's move was tho Jtim FIRST day sales of the West India, drew tha tuusl * yesterday „ „ •f the University Collage of the %  • of coUecwn at the Past OaYet disease and almost continuous air attacks have contributed towards this terrible tull of Ufa. On the military side several (actors have emerged in the past few week which strengthen the hand of the United Nations Forces m Korea. But the military solution to the war is now considered virtually impossible. It seems certain that lighting will continue in Korea until a political solution can be found. No move north of the 38th parallel will be made, according to an authoritative source here, until after full consultation among the Allied •Nations, but the British • On page I. llrst big action to try to smash clf-wn their opposition and oper. tba anaj tor DM United Nation* flanking movement on the capital Lieutenant General Frank H Mllburn. American First Corp: Commander who watched Allies] ti up*! kittle their way up the steep slopes said he had "com%  (Usance in their action and was completely satisfied wi'h %  Yet stiff opposition was still to bo expected from Chinese troops F.l %  %  In n .iU I.I: the western front today Americans on thje right Bank toward Wonju took Iheir objective and were holding Arm tonight against a small arms i.ttnek. -Healer Tories Will Challenge The Govt. On Groundnuts LONDON. Feb. :t. Winston Churchill gave notice today that Conservatives will challenge the Government next Tuesday on their handling of the poll war scheme to grow groundnuts in Africa. Scarcely 12 hours after the Con* irvallve challenge on Deferica policy hint been beaten off with a 2! majority, Churrhilr and live other Conservatives tabled what %  an be interpreted as a new censure motion. The Groundnuts Schema was dsfcslirally pruned recently and 4fl500.O00 were written off as lost. Authority is being sought now to spend tQOOO.OOO on the modified scheme. —Rel*r. Sill I IIAIM'S*. THESE GIRLS are not going to get wot rain i Truman Must Make Meaning Clear LONDON, Feb. 16. BRITAIN WILL SEEK clarification of President Truman's statement thai the question of crossing the 38th Parallel in Korea vu .i military and strategic matter only, usually well informed quarters said to-day. Truman made his statement n Washington yesterday when he Crowds Queue Up For Stamps Besides the usual stamp buyer*. many stamp collectors cro w ded the General Post Office yesterday t." buy West Indies University College stamps. This new issue of stamps wl'l DC. sold for three month Utuaaa they are sold out baton Tinstamps are Intended to r> mi i crate the inauguration of 111-_IrSMveralty College and the installation of Her Royal H P*inces* Alice. Countess of Athlcne as Chancellor. The 3 cent stamps bear the arms of the University and thpenny -stamp* the full portrait ol Her Roy-il Highness the Countc** o! Athlone. In her Chancellor'* robes Other colonies are issuing stamps to commemorate the same Wh<-n a middle-aged man wa* asked yesterday whether he wanted stamps to post a letter or to keep, he replied that he had r. son at the University College and was buying the stamps for sentimental rcavn*. He intended sending some to his an An old lady who hobbled into the office xald thjt she was in the Qi.> grounds when passed and waved her hand and she thought It good to i. as'a memoir. General MacArthur had all uthority necessary to cross the parallel and it was his busing aj British Foreign Office spoke*. man refused to comment directly what the President said, but referred to Prime Minlsti Altlee's statement last Monday ihi.t Ilntain had told the United States that in Its view the parallel ght not to be crossed again. —Heater. U.K. Will Spend £31 lm More On Her Defences LONDON, Feb 16 BRITAIN'S Navy, Army and Air Force estimates show an increase of over £311,000,000 for the coming financial ,year starting on April 1, compared with the current year The total Bill which will be increased during the year by supplementary estimates is €1,036.060,100 r" thirds of the m rttK'W\IIMV Ta/t Will Question The Witnesses WASHINGTON. Feb. 16 BShMoag Taft told reporters that be hoped to question witnesses a', joint sittings of the Senate ForeU • and Armed Service Committees about the possible existence of any agreement to apportion K .mnd force* among Atlartttr ct Nations. "-The Committees are eorwldcrln %  : ii resolution submitted by Sena'or Wherry, Republican floor leader. which uants no United States troops to be despatched to Europe until Congress has fixed an over ll policy. —stouter v.i.nted for the Army will but new modem weapons including tana* and aiiti-mrcraft weapons. Esum ates are based on the original programme which scheduled s_3.6W.OOO.O00 for Defence in three years. It has since risen to 14,700.000.000 BriUsal nan) expert* are concentrating on building a fleet of small speedy warships — some atom powered—to combat the submarine menace In any future Vi-.ii ], ii.iv ;il rst iii>i(". pi. sent ed to Parliament to-day ahowed they had abandoned the construci of battleships considrn-d too cumbrous for modem warfare. Britain has a naval strength of e battleships and six fleet car•rs (23.000 to 20.000 tons) with 'o modern fleet carriers under construction. x light fleet earlent (about 13.000 tonsl and eight under construction. —stouter. Avalanches Kill 16 In Italian Alps MILAN, Feb. 16 Avalanches in the Trento region killed two more people making Ihe death toll 10 in the Italian Alps since Sunday, Two village* in the Bergamo Alps were isolated today. Avalanches had been hanging; over them for several dayit. Both villages had been evacuated except for 15 people at one Ludrigno, who refuasxl to leave. The Po river overflowed al Casal Maggiore 36 miles east of Piacenza flooding some 200 acres >f farm lands. Five yards above ts normal level, the river wag still •islng steadilv.—Renter. Morphia Smugglers Gaoled And Fined BREMEN, Feb IS Fifteen people were sentenced here last night to imprisonment, and fined for smuggling about 20 lbs of morphia. defendant. Dr. Arno, Groffse, chemist was sentenced to MM Feat and two weeks' Imprtsi)r Oroaaa had stolen morphia from some chemical works during an air raid in 1M3. Part of it wa bidden away to be smuggled to Austria It was confiscated be Increasing daily with at least 25 Ontario centres among the latest •Itorted by the disease. Hardest lul centre In Canada has been MOaaraal fallowed by Quebec in General and the Maritime Provinces Schoolr have been closed, factories made idle and normal life disrupted in many other communities across the country No official explanation has been advanced as t.. why the virus whin proved so lethal in England hat resulted In a total of fewer thai 100 deaths in Canada. It attack* both old and young alike.—atf) LITHUANIA HEARS "VOICE 1 WASHINGTON. Feb. 16 The Votee of America to-day began a dally broadcast in lath i arflan. It was the first time ih Vatee had beamed a programme daily to the country whose ineoporation into the Soviet Union, the United States has never reco,rnaad EXCHANGE GOODS NEW DELHI, rah -. India is to exchange goods with Spain, the Government announced hero to-day. Trade arrangements were agreed U the result of discussions held with the Spanish trade mlssio: during it, visit to India in October hut the statement added. —Reuter AID FOR BRIT MX SYDNEY %  Lord Mayor has ju (••turned from London, attended the official winding up -eremony of Australian Food for Brttau rund But ba jppslled by Britain's continued food rationing that he pn revive tha fund ytuhedlately. Eisenhower Sails To Take Up New Job NEW YORK, Feb 16. General Dwight D Eisenhower sailing today in the Qaeen Elisabeth to assume command at Supreme Headquarters of Allied Powers in Europe said in an interview that "It Is our Arm hope that our job over there will be done soon. We really believe If we do our Job the Job will be promptly done He said the only reason for the United States being in "this greet effort is because of our enlightened self-interest. We arc trying to preserve peace. Everybody \ knows we have no warlike purpaaai The Oenersl was accompanied by his wife—Heater. Nehru Chides forty Three M.Ps NEW DELHI. Feb 16. Prime Mmr'n Nehru todiy deprecated a message sent by "*> nembers of too Indian Parlla neiil to presiding officers of the AmeiKiiii Congress about leglsla i before Congress to supply food grains to India. The message urged the approval of the legislature. Signatories including India's former Ambassador to Brazil said they recognised that the liberty of free Asian countries was "menaced by Communtit expansion." Nehru told Parliament today that he was "considerably surprised" by the message. He said: The House will realise how embarrasiing that must be not or ly for the Government but foe this House. -Healer JUST BEFORE THREE, but not before th* rain, tils "Copin-sy" came alonginW the Bsggage Warehouse and the Royal InnlsklUings wsrs back in Barbado*. after a very loni absence. Inniskillings Pay Goodwill Visit SHORTLY AFTMt two O'clock yesterday afternoon the Royal Army ServiceOorpa 8.S CaptNaj • %  tmodlnto the outer IKISIH oj th CMMMgi wiih a company of (wo olhccis .nil M other ranks of the Royal Inmskilhn;: Fusiliers on board. Arming the cumpnny are 25 drummers and KIpVU, all under |h commam! of Major P. M. CtU am. Thi o.\ Tin: • SPOT ALEXANDRIA. Egyptian police ant baffi.d by two cafftef in,' %  DM i eughi near Ataxandiis and the Other in UMSH Egypt. Both hail met.I With "MOOGOW" engtiivcit i'ii thfm. NIM the |Klice aie trying to find out wrsaUwr lusaaaacs l.. KgypUan Communist cells are being parried through currier pigeons. Cricket Will Start Monday The first match of Ihe Intercolonial Cricket Tournnment between Trinidad and Ihirbadoa will now begin on Monday, February If indltion of KniSSJVI y A C O M-....I. N. & J. Marsden i nt Hi.' West Indies Crick. Irul, in eonjunctlon with the Barbados Cricket Aaaociation and Mr. Jeffrey Stollm.-vrr. Tltaldad Captain, arrived ut this decision. The) bava I'tin-"''! tO have two five-day matches without any rest l 'ween. OVIIIK b On slniton < % %  ..,! Clairmontc. E M nd M. Gn %  ii arrlved m Jamaica in November MM'i ind have been sttUOttM lhara i vet sun.Theji an ,i goodwill iu da) wlait Thev will i. I.II.M-I • %  < thah tsuUai m .. month. %  ..I the 173-ton Cetrinaav 1 %  tastSBge War-louse. Major l'uniiingb:iin ssajg n at by M Cox, SUIT Officer. Local Poires and Ciptain .i.i.i.. A B irbadoa Ib-Himent tiiiek ttwtapartod the cot Ihe M Ann;. Foil. The l'optswa>y, form rl) B Nav minasweepir. ii und.-i the con>%  nand ol Captain A C. Boddeo, n l ortl naval offti i living in Jomalca. It is an oil btimei anil litlol with troop decks to data 46. These decks are .in conditioned n is batni aged as a troop transport for lh< II A S ( in Ihe Caribbean areu. It curries a crew of 18. Major F. M. Cunningham. | B| i CaWaaaldn| the HtW Ion, ll from DeliaSt, Northern Irei I ' has been with the lnniskilliu>| i Ha '"i %  %  si OOtoi: in 1U31 and dunlin <>"' mW hu irvad In Prance, Belgium, and other pli He -aid arayi hati laajajUessi with tho West S> On psge g TKLL THE airvooAn TMK NEWS KINO 3113 DAY OR NIGHT PrisoinTH Stage Hundicruft Show PAHIS, Feb. 10 lluYOaVBga, robbers and saperi ere the artists responsible for an exhibition of pictures opened here today. All picture! were painted by onvicti in the French penal col>ny. Saint l^urent, French Cuinu and were brought to Purls by irison official*. "Escapism" is the main motif seen in pictures of ships sailing away, scenes of home life, women -imagined white ones or real native women. Vivid tropical colour is seen in paintings of lizards and rare butterflies. Among handicrafts exhibited Is a vale model of a gallows for use as a eigar cutter.—T Women Wanted COPENHAGEN. Feb. 16 Civil defence authorities today called for women belw IH ^HI 22 to vohanteer for a si> rnonlhs' training course. Two camps for women open on May I. Prciiminao plana corn the call up of 1.200 women for dvll defence In the event of general mobilisation. —HeaU-r 10 GO; 20 COME i'~ i-i Oar On* i.tr..|* f *.li PORT OF-SPAIN. Tab. 14 II %  imiii .cf.itiriti ouestlon is now one of the Ol ll has wnrseneM within ie


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SATURDAY, Fl niil' \KY IT, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE Problems And Treatment Of Soil ErOSiOn — By Sir Harold Tempany \lrt>*llal \d.-~r lo P.IUI* < alodial Srtrtint (ram l*M-IM*> M h -fUMB (MB* -*akt — Ik* • %  •H-.l • %  ir.pl>>! % %  •Itafiar' Soil erosion has achieved rartnt world wide promintnea as • %  — % %  ae* to man's n taamwl layer of ihc earth's a the soil—when ii is exposed lo the influence of moving water and lend* lo be washt-i blown .*y. Tht process Is Insidious but under natural conditions erobion is held In check by vegataltonal cover, and losses are balanced hy yams from rock weathering. It is when this is removed without adequate precautions, and when the land is improperly farmed that the position U-comes dangerous. Soil erosion is, therefore, essentially a symptom of wrong land use. Risks are greatest In those regions where the rain comes in downpours, as in tropical countt i< i.iKh winds arc associated with long dry spells as on thr prsurtM and -teppes of contlnantal eounttii owing io the increase in world populations. It* years unparalleled penetration and development of QM ei"*nin-prune lands by people wilhoul vxpemiue .,nu. tha constiuction or provision of protective terraces, drams and so forth, the planting of protective forests and shelter belts and I .ids, as well as the employment of appropriate methods of cultivation, choice of suitable crops and rotations and appropriate methods of husbandry. To be effective they must be suited to conditions and applied to the countryside as a whole and not : to individual properties: moreover thay raav involve larger issues, such as the siting of towns, villages, roads and railways, the conduct of mining and other matters. In its widest aspect soil conservation is inseparable from planned and controUad l.mil uaa, it demands accurate knowledge of the conditions and its application is eventually dependent on legislation to enable it to be enforced. Such legislation has already been rnacted In many countries, hut a necessary pffaraqulatta hi thai aericultural communities must be educated to appreciate uV need and be willing to co-opera.e. Practically all the Bi nlal depondeni its lie in regions tro al pn is liable to occur. On estates and aVjItt pronerties erosion was nt one time very sari* ous, especially In the Far East and sumrovioi it A PERFECT EXAMPLE •! strip contouring, as prsclUed by the Basic* tribe In soulli-uc.l I-gjuila. log owing to unsuitable pcaettCM surh as clean weed in* absence of contouring, inadoquati prote lion and insiritabla drainage provision. This has, howi been remedied to a considerable extent and the position is continuing to improve Wn thai the only factor, there would not be much causa tor alarm but it is in tha much larger areas cultivated by indigenous peasant cultivators that the chief danger reside*. It is an administrative rather than a purely agricultural problem. Often the first step may be large-scale population transfers, and coupled with this must be the supersession of unsuitable agricultural practices by modern methods adapted to the change of conditions. Its solution %  complicated by low education standards, tribal customs, superstitions and boundaries and, at timer., hy political agitation. Dangers Widely Recognised Throughout the Colonies the dangers are widely recognised and coiiMilrrable sums arc being expended in efforts to Improve matters. Appropriations and grant* to this end have been made from local revenues and from Britain through the Colonial Development and Welfare Acts. In Kenya. for example, £1,000.000 has been provided for ronsarva'.ion work and the 1990 oil conservation staff l) 14 Europeans and 591 AMeaJBB. In Uganda strip cropping nnd the use of protectm now widely practised and although erosion occurs it is localised. Much progress has been made with the construction of dams and boreholes to provide water for stock. In Tanganyika the value of contoured tied ridges has be i and considerable improvement* have also been made ta management. In Nyasaland, too. Iheie has been progress and on estates adequate conservation measures are becoming the rule. In C'holo and in the Misuku Hilts in the North a complete change in agricultural practice with corresponding improvement is nportan. %  pi ogress on estates which will, no doubt, be accelerated when soil conservation legislation, recently enacted, becomes fully operative. In Jamaica, in the West Indies, ii is estimated that at least 12,000 am hectares) have bean during the past two or three years by means of contour are not able to get the re%  ubm rmat rainfall which fell durng ihe week, tinAslvwcste M ."formed yesterday. arc* T | flu : i | e d the workers to stop cutting the canes i of the factorial had to cease operations on more than one <>cv.. iton The ground was so thoroughly soaked, that It was Impossible for .ml carts to go Into the held* as was customary, tq draw the canes. In some instances Bj ad to be headed out tr the border of the field and that caused a considerable delay I At some plantations however, worker* were trimming around the fields so that there was not much difficulty In loading The weather was fair yesterday muii'ing and the labourers resiuifd their work, but It would t;ik.* several days before the lornet. and carts would be able t< go Inlo the plant cane field. Mr W. F Harris. Manager if HaggatU in St. Andrew told the Advocate yesterday that they had 10 nchoa of rain for the week up to Thursday and were forced to stop grinding cm three on i slon.-, during the week as a suit of not having sufficient cm Work Resumed He said that they started again raaterday morning and had a %  y o'clock, but when lie left an hour later for Die city tha ••i.ither was fair, everything wag running smoothly gad at OBal expecting a reasonable day's work. At Haymans, St. Peter, where II ill' bMhaa fall f.r the week, the factory never stopped working u they had received a sufltiirr %  number of canes during the time the rain was not falling and over the week-end to keep tin gning. They did not get in as many canes as they would have liked, but in spite of that, they got through better than they had anMany of the peasants' cams In that area which were placed ueiii the road side <>ver '"' Bah end. were however %  raj dOWfl in the Bowling Alley. Mr It V. King. Manager of Ftaherpond In St Joseph said I had H niches for the the ground was to thoroughly soaked, thai they hud pr head out the canes, hence at Andrews, the factory could no* gel the full supply and had to stop on two or three occasions. CuutenA •* %  %  •"• %  '"• %  A ei>;irollO or linklhina> —nlra .Lill i iijjaii-iie ill M.n.l."— MI.1 .1 MM ||| in parking — ... .t. ... %  oa nrrfri'l ln-.lin. whtrrvrr CRAVEN A'r B....-I,!. T*. Ur$fit-irlhnt Co.4-7i/*../ Ctgmitl l>M'KTi:il I'NO.II I.IIMNIX, rare qua lily I fa It* World IM.IAMI V1-',*-^ PRESTCOLD Rales Of Exchange More C'anc-i He said that with two or Ihree days of sunshine, they would be able lo supily a great deal more i.ines. but it would be sometime before they would be able gel their lorries and carts back into the plant cane Held. He said Unit the Juice was still vagJF poor and the tint week of t'ie crop, it took Andrews nearly 11 tons of cane to make a ton of sugar. At Apes Hill which had 7 Inches and blowers & 2fl inches, both in St James, labourers only had to stop work on Tuesday dm to rain, but they were now engaged m trimming the fleldi i.gainst the road so that there was not much difficulty In loading the canes IF YOUFEEL LIKE THISTAKE WINCARNIS TONIC WINE AND FEEL LIKE THIS! BE HEALTHY & HAPPY. Refrigerators There is PRESTCOLD MODEL la nail Every Hume — Every Pocket Capacity 4.4 cu.li. and 7.7 rti ft. Incorporating Ihe Exclusive "PREST.UHHt inner door for extra food lion Made hy the largest Manufacturers of Automatic Refrigerators in Itrilain. Powered by thp l!ormWir:illy S. ., i I %  %  Unit which carn.-s n flvaj year QuanntOT. w* FOGARTY LTD. Representative for ihe West Indies HERE ARE TIMELY ITEMS At BETTER PRICES BRASSIEKES SHf pel pir PLASTIC PARASOLS $1.42 etch LADIES' COTTON VESTS HO; etch | BOYS' COTTON VESTS (Ml? etch ART SILK HALF SLIPS Sl.2 each ART SILK NIGHTDRESSES $3.00 etch NYLON ireADTIES (Triangles) $1.80 each CHILDREN'S CARDIGANS $1.07 each LADIES' TEE SHIRTS $1.42 each PRINT SKIRTS $2.40 each LADIES' BLOUSES $.60 each PLASTIC III UlTII-.S 25? each ART SILK PANTIES 78? per pair ZIPPS All Colour* and Sites in Slock Now! THK MOIII UN DJ.ESS SHOPPE BROAD STREET IABL1 COUNT-IO ('• •> in, It'"'"'' 'W ..!. %  .. 1S0.0BS .1.1'. I... e.1 .-.!>'.. t OLYMWa-in .. M v t00 000 .•-. Um. ...ifle..^Ho^ ..M.W. %  —*t ->r o* ih*. UII |oat. llW*J loha %  jiiiw tut tvet • ay all dirt 1.1.' gn %  -. laalHtll ;II.;<'.t fSSM |r" ur> Mother WM djyt Igaar, ii'jj %  learned *noin Opuci csie*roristil-e>et nowJoha!" PROTECT YOUR EYES wiU QQf rov W IE VI m Bataa • >sld 11 %  your cyei >•" EVE LOTION MM picket -- SCM deugncd e>ehath CASTLB aaOMWICH-Th* tMlaa* BBSaBBMBJ *4 M..


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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE s\TIRDAY, FEBRl'AUY IT, 11 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY T-.| T?6ES Tooua -BEP) N t BY CHIC YOUNG 4 I_\ £ %  %  yMQ pi %  %  .*. • %  fe_g V THE LONt RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER SLVEP 1 TWT MFAN5J *NOfMt INOW* Ycxmc THE LONE %  / \ou JAJLED IS RANGER! H^riY nwNOTCwro WHY DIDN'T VOU SAY JHOV WILLItXl SO IN TUE FIRST ggfl JVT GRAF TON PLACE BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS W5'iU.0OTO %  .-.. %  ..-..SCK IP TVOSS ffU'jAJEBS CiT ? %¡ LOOK"WWO TMAT--NO OT-dTB P6O6OJ THAW M&f. -Miv6ELB-GOdS JTD r>jTv,y RIP KIRBY _____ :•-;:, %  .v.--S -, IC.' RV Ifeffi BY ALEX RAYM ON D NWX UP, JHC.SEVEN... ) THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK 8t RAY MOORES -' LIFEGUARD THE WONDERFUL BR9TISH DISCOVERY A Supreme Germicide and Antiseptic FOR PERSONAL HYGIENE %  k TO STERILIZE CUTS AND DMA, TO DESTROY DISEASE GERMS | SAFETY AND RELIEF FOR BITES AND STINGS Tlir. i "i.trd" used in tens of _J1M $.ihou JII> of IK n es is the mml powerful protection t-sE* 3 you can use. At the -jmc lime it U quite safe for J ill total .::illy fragrant and non-staining. No home with -.mail children dare be without it. A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) LTD—Agents The above equipment is available for early delivery from the U. K. COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM Ltd. &&&V F m+ THAI'SIW1T WE K>W 8ACt HEBEV WHtOlNl'tt WMELYIN' INTHE ;.i BIGHVI-7 owes tnrecnoNfY VAWKINCACCAZV PHOT HAVE WE 60T7J0E* J0t. r OK N \! HUHv D0005 lOCKED.' ISWIS A COUBLECBOSS? i OPENUROBltL\ % % %  SV-OOT TUBJ TIE s Co\wa s statd Watt Reieals [Ml 0!UHlltG IHTH W1B IATING IS TM Sfl. IfMCIIVI WAT TO HELP STOP IOC7H DECAY WITH COLGATE DENTAL CREAM MASSEY-HARHIS EQUIPMENT Enquiries cordially invited (or the supply ol the following— 49 H.ii. I'. BL IMINI I w HI i I nukenwa (Sii-i-l WlictU also available lor %  'loiiithiiiitt GRASS II ITIIIS all Oil IIIMIII SI'lll AIM IIS Mill: IIKLIVEIIY HARKS I III) MILLS inun I/I\. DRILLS 25< 45c 75c High Blood Pressure Kills Men &' TWM M* from llish Hi.*, Hraiaiua. whk-h itnvsiarloiia diacaaa tut turu abu.il lha lima o( <'h.n i of paralfll..irubaa. Coaamon umpiomi uf llifh Blood 11-oaauia arc Natvou.n.... headache* at (op and back of haad and a boy* eyas, E raaaute In haad. .Imlnaaa, ahort raath. paina In hurt. p*iimikHi, poor alaap. U> of niainnry mil .ntrfv. aaallr rtillil faar and worry. If Mil %  IITIT an, of lhaaa •ympiomn, doti %  Itnani i - &day. ""~> nr I.fa may ba m danjvr. Noico n t-r ( i-Ju, %  lllK Blood Piaaxira tilth lha (ir.ii duac. lakes a I ..TT ih haart. and makaa you faal tcara yuungar In A taw data, (laj Noaco from your -ncnual l.-la. II la cuarantaad lo m.k, y uu !.,( QJ aim ai.-omj or ntonay b*. Rheumatism arid Back'achTe Gone In 1 Week -ai-a.. ...atna N.iani... Loiakaf """•.-. law Pi-i. Drtat-an. I I TI i iina fmatti. "r hi firqw • Cyitrx Helps Notwr* 3 Woyi Ti.. fnaaa t.-.t,.I .. !im* x.r:,nrk. baiai 11-. in] iMfBNafMd m M r ""i •'• %  naaaaridaaadai-iaaiuftaiii >a qui-iiy and mralT. t'< 'enlaln. oa haritl harntul or daafaraua dfaai i'yalat ae la and yoai irauhka — t Mla haa fti cjaa rid af liaallii dmlra.l a_ aanoui td> -ith ahxh y %  w* aacotiaa aalaralad 111 (KraaflhaiM and iHnvlfarala* lha tldw>. prataau yav fraai lha % %  •*aaa ol dUaa*( %  ante* on iita dalHau fllur anjaaiam. and %  iinulaiaa lha rnina ayaiam 9 WMIIS in Htf>ifl—Now Wall -( kaw tkfrrrd for art a*ri MM Ifxftir .' aaaal alar av'li la AjiaKal T'li MX I anaia %  of ar ikla f> >aar>. lali'r.i ••*• ( .l paaai iraaaarr. (PMI aid ilroaa." —idfd I J A F. M HMITK Imprevdd in 2 Days "I *u* ar fall raaUy n*l( t>r aari aaa liJfH Ca-liaaaUy fr.— aarU( %  ii tuaranlaad la aiata iCystex;^ iw I N I V S I D O I | I*m4f*utt9$9*m*i IHIUMATISM I*/,W,V,V,V,V/.W/-V/.V NEW ARRIVALS ji DOO COLUAB8 LEADS ;• WHIPS — MUZZLES >J JOCKEY WHIPS ;I uRLENS LAWN MOWERS O spara Wheel*, Pluioun, Pawl* v $ NEWSAM & Co. ^ rO-DAYS NEWS HASH Hliliuker Alnunack. 1951 Int. H l-lnt and CoeklaU OaMa ltlll\SO\ S -IIIIOMI'.I and HARIIW\RF



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PAGE rOLR BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, FKBRl'AKV 17. 131 BARBADOS 1 t..——i r.laUal kr Uu AIIIHM Saturday, February 17. 1951 ; Tin I oiioin K c I oiisi'i|iinins Of Staving In Bed in n...* at.. BtMai EMIGRATION THE HOUM "i AwimMy on Tuesday voted the sum of $80,000 to be put at the disposal of the Labour Commissioner to meet the cos*, of emigration of Barbadian worker 10 111* Uttltad Slates of America. The number of emigrants to be selected from this island is not yet known but it was estimated that Barbados would get a good quota of the required 10,000 or 16,000 from the West Indies. The benefit of emigration to the U.S.A. during the last six years cannot be overestimated. Remittances from the 11.000 who have gone in recent years, some of Ihem more than once, amounted to approximately three million dollars. But the schemes not only brought substantial funds IfttO the island but gave those who went an opportunity to live and work under conditions entirely different from those to which they had been accustomed in Barbados; it also reduced unemployment as it brought work to many who had never been so inclined. In addition to the benefits to the individual the emigration schemes improved the spending power of the people and raised the standard of living. Several of these workers were able to acquire property and the means of earning a livelihood, an opportunity which they never had before. If there is to be a West Indian quota of anything like ten thousand workers to the United States it might be well to press the claims of Barbados whose 1,100 to the square mile gives her priority for relief. The question of transport and its cost will have to be faced. In 194fi it was pointed out that the reason for including the majority of Jamaicans in the quota was that the cost of transport was less because of the close proximity of that island to the United States. The employer who had undertaken to pay the cost of transport was not satisfied to pay the higher-fare for Barbadians when it could be avoided by contracting with Jamaicans. It might be as well for the Government to make up its mind and let it be understood that half of the transport cost for each labourer will be paid on condition that it be repaid from the earnings of the worker. If the Government can set up an organisation, the United States Workers' Savings Branch of the Labour Department. in which debts and tines by the Courts are collected, it would add nothing to the work now being done to deduct from the remittances the sums owing to the Government as half of the cost of transport. It might also be the means of preventing "premature return of workers not too willing to work for lengthy periods. There is not one worker who would object to such deduction from his remittances It is on record, as the Labour Commissioner said in a recent Press Conference on his return from the United States that the employers are not only willing but desirous of having Barbadians in their employ because of the reputation which thousands of them have gained as ftood workers There is however one domestic problem to be settled. There are still those who feel that an early selection of labourers from this island would rob the ranks of agricultural labour. In fact, the number of agricultural labourers in previous emigration schemes has been small and did not interfere with the reaping of the crop. Several people who registered as labourers were not in the real sense agricultural labourers but attracted by the type of work to be done and the wages it brought not only went as labourers but worked well. It was particularly noticeable that many youngsters who had never been inclined to work before and those who found it difficult to obtain employment joined in the scheme and made a success of it. It is true to say that these are not included among those who broke their contracts or returned at an early time. Beyond these minor difficulties the Government should make every effort to recruit suitable personnel as early as possible. THE LIFE OF JOHN MAVNAKH KEYNFS n, K F lUrrod B/ Georo* Malcolm Thomson M.-milUn Z5> 674 MN ANYONE ttu* probl stun*'! pedigiw bull to Burn bay Du. %  for ihe (management of the •• %  H.III.KI'S lirt-isi a admire*, und feUo""! lionatc without being cnndalout !.. >e problem of how to make pedigree bull to Bombay DUI.UK u „nate without Win* uneri oney without actually working the war he was in the Tre.isuo M k nt h .|f,,i ,!>,€ *, i-.ro.> >ould consider the method adoptwhere he managed the nation's £"*'" JJiJXTtaaW it in ii'i.-.I l,<\ century. K portrait BUB uflecrlttcal. num. ves a >f on of the should ed by Keynes. who, starting from external finances. 82% XV, r raT„ IK *2?" SZS£X-&2Li SSL""" ** !" " mornings. This Is not. however, writer at inlcrnaliunal influence. itie whole art of easy money. burrar of hi* old cnllua ealllnil THE HTftANGE LAND Bf Ned It Is advisable to be an expert the MBMI value of the "Chest" C'alm-r taae 12s fid 411 parr. economist and lo have the nerve from £30.000 lo £380.000 when ha of a gambler. It Is also a Rood died. He was also l.irh priest of A CRISP American novel about idea lo have some capital. "Bloomsbury." B war In which an ambitious genKeynes did not have enough. era! n-kthe Ihrej of his troops The consequence was lhal after For ""we were the days when ,„ ora r ,„ enhance his own presmakinu a net profit of 119,000 In 'he nightingales sang — and the Ugc ,, „ touBh fi-hi.nB command193) in speculations In the franc parakeets chattered In Gordon '* The ^rSatogoeT badly and the dollar he found himself Square, lo which Keynes broughi virlcii. ...rj^r.i,,-s !" cllcrcd faced wilh a demand for £7,000 I-ydla Lopokova. Ihe exquiiile Various explanaUons are offered. In transactions In dollars and ballerina who became his wife Ihit on one paint. Ulcre la aeme: ,1 : ,_, .. Charaelenslirally. almost Keynes', ,„,„„ ik( unnnlB ,„ v among ihe He had gambled on Ihe expecfirst act on meeting her was lo h t ",..,.., ii.,,. ,„ ,hi. chorus n.llon that Ihe mark would slump suggosl improvements in her in£J"^'V," !" J '" !. f"" !" -, and the dollar would rise. Both vesl.nenls !" c *> !" "9 '•" "'"' """' unaccountably stuck fast. Iletween the wars Keynes InISru. ,le "Tl e Rr^-h mav (e,-l idle lo w lhal in lb. fluenced ihoughl a great deal. !" „ ,,,., well ISucant J '? long run everything would-be all policy less, even,, hard., a. ,11, T SonlTomer "i front Xy move at all." You remember lhat war' It ha* A* Keynes himself said He _ Liberal In the sense that later. "In the long run we are he agreed wilh Asquith one day, all dead.". The demand for cash Lloyd George the next, and was Immediate. A ilnancier whom Beaverbrook the day after He wa. been raging. Ev.r rU.CC 1945 he did not know lent him tS.OOO. a liberal in the sense thai he Calmr, l desormtions are vivid; After that Keynes went into the entertained the Liberal Summer conversation leahlow.jr.ls ihe clccommodity markets. School with o Greek tragedy. The Liberals could provide all the AT the same time, he had a Greek tragedy they needed, stroke of misfortune over his Impending book. Economic Con• • • sequences of the Peace Treaty, on which he was taking all the WHEN the second war came he financial risk. was back in the Treasury. The Half of ihejlrat edition, coming only difference was that mental. Like thU: "All men ore bad." "Von are very old." She shrugs "Ccsl fa oiierre. Whai'i your name?" "Yolande." Aftc -vtth the phrase-book by sen from Edinburgh, was jettiTreasury v/as a step nearer bankmadernoisell soned in a gale. Three bales, cast ruptcy. ashore in Denmark, were sold Keynes the statesman, as disTHE ASSYRIAN. AND OTHER there by auction. tincl from Keyiies the profound STORIES, By William Sau-oyan Ultimately all the profits on economist, will be judged l>v thoso Inner 18*. Cd 28H pages. the EngliBh edition went to meet final years. Judgment will be his losses. In speculation. A leas baaed not on a sheaf of State SAROYAiN m Muse stories, conaelf-assured young man would papers incomparable in dialectical tinues his impersonation of have gambled no more. Keync-. elegance but on whether the jbsent-minded man going fur a (.lunged deeper and, in four years, decisions he took, and forced on stroll along a tight-rope. He ought had (57.000. He died worth others by his extraordinary gift not to reach the other end he £430.000, allowing %  1.000 for his f or persuasion, were, in fact, sound, ought not to be on the rope at all, pictures and £20,000 for his books. ,.,_ mt , n( i r i Bff WMI.,*.. Hut h*. Bonar Law. when Chancellor Taking, as he did. a tragic view jjj !" !" !" \ '"£"£_' Jnd our was indirectly responsible for of Briloln's Immediate financial ""nXn !" ilanlng Keynes's picture collecprospecls. was he right in pressing !" iuioince. don, Keynes, about to visit Paris the Government to accept the In nn expansive preface he tells on Treasury business, discovered American lawn, which he negoll„ ow much m0 „ w „' pllld 0) lhal Degas's prlvale collector, alod In Wash ngton having gone n:aga 7lnes lor Ih, eleven .lories was coming up for auction. With there determined to accept the itl hi ,,_ w r „ii,.,. ll(ln Fljt TI. 0 £20.000 of the nation's money, money only if il was free of inlercactrnil l'Mlv 5 010 dollar, for which Ihe Chancellor lei him play eat? He had misjudged the change i£"'"'p-i-."', "''".,',., i U "; !" with, he boughl 13 plclures fo.in American lemper. !" !" "l' "'""•" 3 ;"" Ihe National Gallery. Big Berth, But. convinced Britain musl have "' money, but they are good was shelling Paris al Ihe time the money, he also persuaded Si"":. 15. I?' ."i' b so that the market was depressed, himself she must swallow the 3wi dollars, l-or three of them, no At the same lime, Keynes boughl terms. There will be no doubl h^ 11 *? al au *" cy appeared In a Ceianne for himself. whether, in the last year of his ne American Review. • life. Keynes had Ihe steadiness of BEFORE the war Keynes had splrll which critical decisions (WOBLB corvaicnr RUiavtol been in the Indio Office, where In require. He is nol, of course. — L.E.S. Two Socialist Millionaires' LONDON, Feb. 0. Socialist M P. They plan to bring ihe Government down, he lieges, by bringing two motions vote of censure each week and talking h. ment. Either there would be warfare between the two ncrgotiiillons. At l\rt the Federation re/used to allow any of In theory the Government employees to work for the cormajority of six, even if all poration. That la still so but Parliament to death for the rest ten Liberals vote against it. But # kind of tacit agreement has been of the week. By so doing, this the party managers had been reached that the Federation should Socialist M.P. writes, they w'll counting heads and estimating the remain in existence and the persuade the country that ne need to bring influenra victims in poration should pick its brains. Guvfi-nnieiit is doing nothing, ambulances to Wwtlllllslf I. |n tb# debMO Mr fwTllssl. In th* nd, that in the end. the influenza Earlier In the day their Information one passage where he was germ or Ill-luck will lead to a reached the sporting community enough to show the edge of his General Election. and bookmakers were offering 10 temper, reminded the Federation That Is what a somewhat bitter to 1 against the fall of the Governthat It was, in the end, the CorSociahsi wrote this week, after ment. And In fact Mr. Attlee surporation that held all the big guns voles of censure pressed by vtved by 10 votes. Steel — the —if it were to come to a fight. But the Conservative Party. But next 16.000,000 ton steel-producing init will not come to a fight. Th. week he will have to change his dustry — will become natlonnl Conservative Opposition has theory because the principal busiproperty next Thursday. sworn to reverse nationalising less Is a tlebate on Foreign Affairs, This should be sevn in perspeeshould it come to power—after and a debate on defence, during tive as a gigantic operation. It Is year or so it will be almost imwhich th.? Conservative leader* the largest single industry ever possible to do that. But even nd the Government will be in brought under national control in steel remains nationalised under almost complete agreementany country in the world—Includa Labour Government, it will be But this week the House of ing the Soviet Union. In n certain ,ni industry scarcely run on the Commons made the best use of sense it is the British Labour doctrinaire lines laid down In the its psportuniUM for a bit of party Party's one and only stroke of phrase "control of the means of ufelnufe. Mr. Churchill came doctrinaire socialism. Previous production". It will be run by down for the steel debate. He nationalisations have been con lined political and technical compromli i in his best form. The case he to coal, transport, the central bank, —not the best safeguard against i making was of the best, electricity and gas. Many Europmuddle. He argued that the Government can governments that are far from hould postpone the take-over of socialist own their railways and The "Consul" the steel industry in view of Ihe cut their own coal. It has often Chian-Carlo Menotti is an Induced for an uninterrupted rebeen a surprise to European Ian-American His opera. "The rmumenl programme. It was a visitors that there has been all tho Consul", has just arrived in Lonsimple argument. Everyone knew fuss about Labour's previous don with a first-night success. what there was to say. and neither acquisitions. But steel is nnother New Yorkers have raved about It. Mr. Churchill nor Mr. George matter. The British sleel industry But the opera fan audiences of Strauss, the BaetalM Minister | s a controlling unit In British InMilan have turned their thumbs concerned, made any new subdustry ns a whole. If there is to down. stantial point. Instead Churchill be a major conversion to war proPortliL'Uesc Poetess uBbad In some of the peeuliariductlon it will be In the steel The young poetess from titles of the situation—two millionindustry, and the Opposition's Portuguese Azores who "stowed Ires who happened to be socialprincipal argument for opposawav" on the vacht of a passing Is banded together to lake over ing the Bill. But I doubt whether bearded Englishman has gained the gteel industry. One is Mr. there will be a sudden dislocation the public sympathy. The best George Strauss himself, whose of British industry. In the negocomment I find from the dispatch father made a large fortune as tlations between the Government's from an English reporter who metal broker. He Is now new corporation and Ihe Fedorawent all the wax to Casabhi Minister of Supply and responsition. of the rteelmasters, there has "Poets read other things as well ble for steel as well as for British been already thai most remarkable M verae", writes. .{ha reporter senatomic energy. The other is Mr tendency to toleration. Mr. tenuously, "that rIs why Olilla Hardie who Is now chairman of Hardle, the "Socialist millionaire", Frgyao .... •towed away". • Ihe corporation set up by the and Sir Andrew Duncan, the conNordic Nymph Government to own and control servative politician, are the main The Swedi.h ballet has come to most of steel production. Churchill protagonists. First they were town You might shudder at the described htm as-a past master of cautiously hostile. The "Federathought of a dozen exceedingh monopoly"—a description lhat put lion" had, of course, all tho manlarge, well-built young women at least four Ideas Into four words, agers and technicians of ihe sleel prancing athletically In the corps Mr. Hardie built his fortune on industry in its employment. The de ballet. But surprisingly, you ihe manufacture of oxygen. new corporation had of course the need not. The Swedish ballet has Everything in this debate was political power and the ownership in its company the smallest suca foregone conclusion—except the vested in it by an Act of Parliacessful ballerina in the world. TANKERS ARE 'SAFE' SHIPS IN PORT LONDON. Th rvccnl SwsinaM Docl" urnHnl hn. an o.l-lanfcvr ritiludvd, seii.iii ihbinrn n ma. draw aiianllon lo on* %  iilkin* kt1 IH* oifrt-fixrarity of torn aarldanu llorr. a (.. i.f IKr •alrti-pii-raoOt-n* aibaarvrd in handlina oil iarn.it. at* briefly ravirwad. TODAY, oil and oil products are among the chief items of commerce reaching the world's great ports. Indeed, without such cargoes, international industry in general would ;wiftly stop. Their volume is indicated by the fact that tankers now account for some 20' of the world's entire merchant shipping ;onnage. These ubiquitous vessels are essential links in the supply line between oilfields and refineries and consumers of oil products in all quarters of the globe. Besides being among the most important tankers are some of the safest ships at sea. Their accident record compares favourably with that of any other class of vessel. And only a proportion of tankers, of course, are concerned with the transport of "dangerous" oil cargoes, i.e. cargoes having a low flashpoint (below 73 degrees F.), such as motor spirit. When such consignments are being loaded or unloaded, special precautions are observed to keep accident risk at a minimum Here are a few of the measures normally employed: A generally accepted principle, contained in the Model code of Harbour By-Laws f< Tankers, is that at least 100 ft. shall separate tankers handling low flash-point oils from each other or from the nearest general cargo ship. Oil jetties are usually constructed so that no metal fittings protrude which might lead to "sparking" through friction and thus possibly cause a fire. All electrical gear—fuseDoxes, switchboards, etc.—is normally equipped with fireproof fittings. Pumping installations are insulated and "earthed" to discharge static electricity as and when this is built up. Rate of pumping when low flash-point cargoes are being loaded is strictly controlled according to the size of the gas vents in a ship's tanks. This prevents any excess of gassy vapours being released into the atmosphere; the normal loading rate being up to 1,000 tons per hour per tank. Entrances to tanker basins are frequently guarded by floating fireproof breakwaters, which can seal off the basin if an accident occurs and stop oil spreading across the water to reach other berths. Wherever possible, lay-out of shore storage tanks is arranged so lhat a group of tanks holding low llash-point products is separated from any similar group by intervening tanks containing less inflammable oil, such as heavy fuels. Each lank is generally surrounded by a wall of such a size that, if a leak occurs, the entire contents of the tank can, if necessary, be contained in the enclosure formed. Likewise, the foundations upon which the tanks stand are proofed against leakage, so that even if the tank's bottom springs a leak, the oil cannot seep down into the ground and percolate under the base of the safety wall. In view of the comparative immunity of tankers and oil installations from serious accidents, these stringent precautions may be considered as being unduly elaborate. But, it is due to this very strict regard for safety that accidents such as the Swansea explosion are of extremely rare occurrence. D. V. SCOTT & CO., LTD. TO-DAY'S SPECIALS al THE COLONNADE Usually NOW Tins S.A. APKICOT JAM—(2-!b) $ .35 $ M Tins OVALTINE (Large) < %  ** Bottles AI.LSOPPS BEER %  *• 1.12 .20 WSS.'*','*'~'.'-'>'''''''''-'''''''''''''''''''''''' FOR YOUR BATHROOM 25"xl8" BASINS with Pedestal BASINS with or without Pedestal 22"xl~ Low-down SUITES Htgh-up SUITES, W.C. PANS, S & P TRAPS W.C. SEATS IPlas'.lc White and iBakelite Mahogany Cast Iron CISTEKNS Lawoturv BRUSH HOLDERS HARPIC. Large and Small. WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd. Successors To C.S. PITCHER & CO. Phone. — 447*, 4687, New Moth Trap Catches 25,000 LONDON. DESCRIPTION of a new mercury-vapour trap for night flying insects was given before the Royal Entomological Society. The inventors, amateur naturalists H. S. Robinson and lus brother P. M. Robinson. said that observation and experiments led them to conclude that contrary to a widely held belief, moths and other night-flying insects are not attracted by light but are dazzled by it. They said the light creates an "unbalance" in them and causes the insects to approach the light in a series of curves. The brothers told how on this hypothesis they constructed a trap many times more effective than any known and with the aid of a mercury-vapour lamp in one year secured for the British Museum two species and two sub-species of moths new to the British Isles. — I.N.S. Our Krucler* Say : /'.'<-/ %  %  -nhi.il ,vith consternation relative to the ni.ticipa.od emigration to th* US.A., this year, nnd travelling expenditure Jamaica is the nearest of the To T.ie Ediior. Tlie Adeocole, Indian Islands to Panama SIR. -Alh.u ma U) inform tfaou Knowing the reputation u* member, elect* by in, that w EtCHem, brothers, uncles, and P^-mes can be diahonoum 1. ;u-e not as nngetful us they cousins established in Panama as „ AU gT ATE. T 1 *' imagine us to be. During the hist conscientious workers, and oppre^iinanv rt>-iiiu elteUou oampaJsn, they told us dated by the Panama Government To The Editor, The Advocatt, that the only remedy for the LWUtg by making a pension available i" SIR.—The question as to whether unemplovmrtr i i and those retired and returned home Stores should be allowed lo open they v.Wv nh pnadaad us that lo live in pMt and contentment, on Sunday or Bank holiday jniy country giving tinremotMl wt conctdertd our chances very when a Tourist Boat is arriving hint that they need labourers, wilt rosy. We bore in mind the promise on such days was discussed at a l>e explore^ inim.d...u-l> to net as b> our Government that it is not Meeting of the Council of tho large a quota for Una Island as averse to ; is possible. peitttjously ing season in full swing, and lew appears little prospect for an come dependent on an Industry holding an important nost in the Mid l^ TMiptogd, we n re mijK *mendmt of the Shop Closmg ,hat could disappear overnight US. Navy, and in wh5The ex* West with consternation relative^ to the Act. again if the Act were amendHouse rent is now beyond the presses the hope that Barbados hav 3k £--;!* %  ..* S ( ^ mMIU of thp overage salaried not been spoilt bv a large tourist 0 ^h?d e e.eSfion S o; n tne Sa^h d ^SSL r B ^ ** "* —"^ ""* ^ **** If Government however, feel that it Is in the best Interest Hi eggs, servants etc.. are a money problem to the local housewife who is unable to eomIlntish Government that the pctr unh what her next door dollars should be earned, the Govneighbour from Venezuela pays on Rocklev bmek -nri i —^ Z ernor nughthave sufficient power u ., arcued by lhosc anxlou ; i o luStoyiSSS 1*J wTth r the Emergency Act to pre..twuii.-iv rintainn .K. T~,,... . w* ",.". .1. " :, !" !" conditions and set-up. O H. J. Cruoilv Tn Thp Kdlfor. The Advocate SI 11.—Yesterday I was walking under eta Ememcncy Act to preextensively develop the Tourist hoe. Nearpv m ihe opening of the Shops on industry that the earning capacitv young K oat I .r S Vh tUy r k h *S dW f "**> %  ""'badian will increase ho was 0l ng leKi.l;.ti..n a, ex( hainU-, ol (..onm-ree on Wed"d II Uwn II no power then a ,,, „ ,,.,,,1; oi a Tourllt Invatkn, that nil father had MOt Hun lo U.ey des.re. Whai nasday the 14U. and it wi> dccldspecial Act might be provided, but ,_._.._ ^ burv the oat The animal was the sand lay %  cod tbc boy what do and Eg said Cm the 22nd November 1950 that hflS huppened" What has beer ed to refer the matter to a Genon ,i i hint' done about it? We are not utieral Meeting of the Chamber Shop Closing Act be amended Mr Von It Hunte on Official Of "dndful of an address on the The Idea in the mind of the SHOP ATTENDANT, i for the benefit of Tommt Tratf<> are not forgetting the exhortation the Sterling area, which in turn To *he **ditc.. The Advocate-^ > nilndful of an address on the the Panai ,,l0r tab,e d by l h S, 0 "? uru u r Council WM M Junior member for St. Philip. We earning dollar: and was reixirtifl In th" tdvaeatc west "^ ?" c n 0 ne fr "7 ^ h ? w ,J lld al i ow the We f l lndle !lo Indians mav get work in 1951 in "Peaking on a resolution for emiclaim and expect a larger share Panama, man? West Indian. "' ,he U SA '* available dollars new Some time ago, he said tha' * %  ""'t or (he visit of the project costing every labourer selected to g.i T - ( u I ft ^ nn bn p ,, I". 1 Sf^f the ease. A clerk may get his siili *" v salary raised by $20.00 per month I called the boy's father and more, only to find that the invadTnade Ww kill ihe goat, which Ivad era are making his living cost been ill for some time. $30.00 higher. Workers in the "">'* only one incident of SIR.—I am one of those people gugar industry will find that the cruelty, but every day in thi: who benefit directly and indirectly fourlst industry can pay them l! *' an d animals are abeing treated by Tourists visiting Barbados, but more, and 10,000 tourists'in Baibeminably. The streets s* I feel that to cony nur Tourist bados will not raise Ihe price of v ''£ h _A larv,ns do **"h^P are Level proiect costing every labourer selected lo B < -lounsi snip ian ween over Industry beyond a certain pomL Sugar to meet the higher wages ^n* !" in the iun all day without $7000000000 ild be made lo pav his trans$30,000.00 in USA Funn. were would be a tragedy for the middle lhat will bo expected. Inflation, *,,, ''i lle do ri,te,s are * r eed to years, and over 3000 West Indians portalnm. Ihe Govcnimem adpaid into the several Banks. class inhabitants particularly, and dissipation and the disappearance thL l re IO an 1 will be employed.' Ad %  tnlgravancing it. to be later deducted When the Tourist Ship Visited for *e people as a whole. At tho tif natural beauty is not what 1 we „?,„, „ D „ . ._ .,_ %  ages and refunded. For us on Sunday. Shops were doted present moment e can do with want for our Island Let us pre^V^r i, *. haU^* %  ivould bo very grateful so consequently we failed to earn another large hotel to accommoserve Barbados for Barbadians— „,.„.„. !" .„it -Sll * irM K !" ti to conjecture whether probably another $30,000 00. dale 300 moi. i,.t U s a lovely home with Its natural !, ,,„. V ur y JJJ!! ? e ff* rilful The Get. nd plan for tourtsts West Indian almosphn P C A wh WHAT A COMFORT... to have Holwater throughout your Home — SANTON WATER-HEATERS well known for quality prtnluets in Immersion heaters and switches of nil kinds. We have just received stocks in 2-gln.. :.-:;! ii., 6-Kln., and 12-f-ln. sizes and shall be pleased to quote for complete installation. Da COSTA A to.. Ltd. Dial 47111 :-: Electrical Department JVOW MX STOCK HYPNOS ALPHA MATTRESSES IN TIIK FOLLOWING SIZES: 4 fl. 6 inches and :l fl. :i inches : : ALSO : : A Big Variety of RUGS For Your Selection SEE OUB WINDOW DISPLAY DA COSTA & CO., LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT lliv tic plight to the opening of Shops on Sunb> tha il ui whole morning I "••r from to minimise ol of .he unemployed. AJilh the reapday or Bank holHiay so that there economic structure ,w)ll then bean American friend of mine now of men. AKIMAL LOVKR sion %  protect animals from tl i ityJJ JOIN THE SMAKT SET AND ENJOY THE WORLDS MOST REFRESHING DRINK GOLD BRAID RUM AND CANADA DRV CLUB SODA OR CANADA DRY GINGER ALE AT GODDARDS RESTAl RANT oo c K ^y.-,'.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.'.-.'.-.-.y>^>.->c-.-.-.w >



PAGE 1

PACK TWO HARIIAIMlUl\()< Ml. SATUEDAT, KKIIRT-.RY IT. 1MI Qouub Calling THE VILLAGE John Moore, author ol so n -alls and i>ooJu on eour.tr> .try and broadcaster of note, rwently fashion iionc Whi-n the metUtted about "ThiVUlanc" in a chants grew r.rh from wool exBBC atr.es called "BrUlah Masperiei -ed quarry nu>n. masons and English village was .tifTrrent arJ up went the churcb Iron, other masterpieces bt . lees, farmhouses. no one set down to design it; u Banors and cottages just grew. Some, he knew. howold Hills. U .„..ted a beautiful, and the beat of t>, ... neat and cam. perfect works of art. They mostr vejri lnc r ,,,.ritrvsidr was hi b began by some accident hunIrv geography, such as a sheltered n ,0 **~ the unlovely dogtight a new .md r because there waa a big L . Mu llt .,* mcr .. t >yy to _la dWrtct Mi W|ln hPir ^ pil ,ehwork of laid*, .HI manelaborate intion for on the moss grown tombstones in the village churchyards the sajne names ware seen for generation after generation. Amongst these men lay some o* the nameless craftsmen whoa*" hands long ago fashioned the villagea. "They were the shapera 01 the masterpiece,'* said Moore. "but we who live here to-day. parson, policeman, schoolmaster. Miiitre farmer and labourer, nubi • .... II ,-ould .> „, turned mto "~\l, wlltl lovln. labon n .inking *•""*' ',"" ni.n-n.nt. .. mann kin, MUl L,^,J2 mv>-. Th. lone chain I. ID GrmJ hUMger Wite Arrive. To-d.j M il H. I. HI.ML'HFORO of stone Montreal arrived from CanWCT I a montha •• %  "• "ZJ^?'*!^ "'T' oil,, lion ol people Uvln, Ud 11 No 4oz torer l ll BamHBBBBBJ i cake to get at ooe, (a) HI. i*i _^ it. H>I DMI. quoted as a must when .-.' iiciunnog bn
1 A MemUrsOnly) aUTWI I rOOAT AT S P M TO-NiOHT TO TtfcSDAV NIGHT AT .• lONTCUMBRY AMN HVLTH in "ONCE MORE, MY DARLING" m th lANI OOITL B a< e d on Ine Hilarious Saturday Evrnini Post Serial MarT. "OWJM Be Mr Lewe" \ New I r.lvrnsl International Release (01 jt iea %  Down 111. ran % %  %  MM tral. I sdmlt tinU grstlne. (B) ifAn easy wont for beginners. %  •) 3 mid 1* Acre**. Inn tfrloe. Ph.D.. duiikc* i:ii.turn wnen motorms. i7. 4i . Despatched. 14) S. baa Aruua. In ths Bhetto aacrtBca A word im land.. ( And It no lea 1 W.I. Test Sefeelor With Shell Caribbean Vfl" AND MRS. Mlv: it Schmidt. %  that hn work on Ihe < %  lee again thmua^i the Caribbean •arbaaaaa. tai by uw 1 A. to reel holiday 1 W.I.A Mi ,t„yiiiii at the Hutimts Nrplurc'i Daughter A T midnight tonlghl, tune's dauttiUi Mill I dunng :<: dos Aquatic Club. Judges arc Mrs. Jean lvers.ni, Mr. it W. Bell and his camera and Mr. J. 11. Reddrkopp Mr. RedBarbado) iiiora must ii the oges HI i i one and I .ur while %  hortg Hal %  QaM The wiiniei actj .i Collapaible Canoe M R. 1 MRS I'ETEH TKIiKMJEV tire || present holldaMiiK with Avanaa Alrlinea in Venexuela and has ie'n vsith them abice. 1M7. This la Uv \ tiuests at Caere bank. has n oollapiiISVHS and ply rubber with ... i with paddles .ml a sail, h Is IB I wide, lie was born in Lalvid and hi*. i*crsis. Off To B.C. GILBERT WONKT \wi UP*. 1. tan 1.1 .c. B.W.I A He riiie m UM Dernerari Turf Club'. %  %  %  i %  Barbados. It ha %  %  .i former mil n 1 d.iUe im. m lha %  .i alb to spend here. Hot i %  % %  lirej is v.iih fth. it Ikiclianiiero lieId which Port-O^-Spain Councillor > I C B MATHURA M' ; M'L ii. taylnj I UM H Electrical Entinrer M R ARTHUR COOP1 I) .,!'. I-i. %  llj li.Wl.A Ha ihare I laytni .a the Hotel l>etore laavirui fof Anttgua. Brothers !. i|IN M.INTi 011 paaJad b| Ihaii children and Hi l.y UW I A John aji'liitoth is in Knginoar willi T.L 1and Mi ktelntaah is with BWIA atatlonad at Piarco. They are John is here fur lln.: I Jamre Mclntnsh la the IDIIIH" an. They me it From Chicago M ri.AUA MORRIS ol en Trim%  laying at th< 1 iiht. "Hedf;e-Hopping" M tt ED i-i >KHI\ i Vlca pn %  i < roa Iran worioi b H and a parly of live wlm srrivd tMg* M 1'hurstli.y In .. %  ompany'.s piivati planaa, a Lock heed LodaataT, left yeah I ('iiranin Tlie\ l>inc" IhrmiKh the W I %  md Mr?. Tom awnartla, Hi I Taylor. Mrs Stnnl. %  Shi] Mrs. J. B. Hayes. Leaving Texas a week ago Ih% i itlngj hat i % %  Caiiada. Th' nave alraady irlaitad Thienas, Virgin i h .i n'li Uvtng unique, vv thraa raan ll* f I to leave Ihl i.i %  i %  %  | irrlvad ovoi lha weak. ga>l t., c.vi %  Mi:,,--' tgulat lem live In Toronto where enjoyed their hi | the Day '> IM plan io raturn tar loni r r th Paper •My neat year. Hhsksspes.,. 10. Metal, <6l 19. Rhldo, (fi) }'. Norm Prsacs. (4i cabinet Uinuter In Sweden. Ol •*' %  %  :! %  a •>' fastards*'! ptn i> —Arr w : i. I'.milf: s. AIIIIIM; 9, P: 12. ra: 15. RutlUot: 14. fsit: IS, AT.n: 16. Om!iir: IW. Un: 81. NTlsntn: UJ. SMART and DURABLE for TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and While Site* 6—11 PRICE: $1.60 JSUUm John White Mm'. Shoo 8 36 -10 19 BOOTS yll 15 TAN-SAD 1227 Velvet Finish, Rubber Sol % %  Black. Brown %  225 0 234 %  Go-Carts 14 .55 % %  LAaCA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) JAMES CAGNEY IN WHITE HEAT ih vmaas kuVlO r.d.and ORRIBN AI M a.ii IIIIU „,4 HI. laasj rur "ri %  ..!....., Mark K.....11 la DEATH VALLEY RAWGERS ft RAIDERS OF THE BOBDER 1TA/A Their?— OISTIN {DIAL 8404) TOIHY A uio r M A rovTim*iNo DAILY MIRACULOUS J0URNEV & B AD MEN OF TOMBSTONE " a i \u4try l-*m : 1 •"' "",, i *•! mi Manatraai \.t gaatW CODE OF THE SADDLE & RIDERS OF THE DAWN -^ %  %  '''' %  ' '"... __ J "'"" ^AKgl.Y liAIETY— [THE GARDEN) ST. JAMS '•'" Mi 1'i" Mai MM f. p M BING'CROSBY IN RIDING HIGH wlit. Clean QHAV — rHr;r. BirKFORD olheni MIDNlri luMii ,. i;ih iMattaata-i Arilon Daakl*) LAW COMES TO GUN3IGHT & RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL EVANS H WHITFIELDS M 406 Your Shoe ^Stores Dial 4220 .Vftll' HIT... .XEU HEIVHTS11 AN UNFOHGETTABLE PORTRAYAL AS HITDOM CAN OFFER tAt.MV FLAMES INTOeV-iJi ACTION MAYO FANS IT TO wiiirtj BEAT BRIDGETOWNl NOW PLAYING aortal CAGNEY HtMONOOBRIEH -. E.Ira Sp.j HOB nnxa and his TEXAS PLAYBOYS Alio WORLD NEWS TOIIAV and Continuing DAILY DIAL 2310 E>1IIKE I.HI.I. A A:, A 839 p m BMi rontlnul-iK In Tuesaay Davld O. Sel/nlck presents "Ihe fallen Idol" Starting Ralph RICHARDSON Mirhcle MORGAN with Bonla DKESDEL Danala O'DEA IIO.W Tudj> to Turadai' 4.43 a n 15 p m. 20th Oarrtury not presents nOYAL Teday to Sundav :: a. m p m United Artixu Double Cesar ROMERO in O.VCE A THIEF AND LOVE tain with Tho MARX ilROTHF.flS TONIGHT Jl MIDNIGHT <*ilumblii Whole Serial "BATMAN & ROBIN" OLYMPIC l-ast THO Shews Today • S 13 p ra Republ. James LYDO Ix)is COLLIER in Soiiiahing Double DN and "OulOf Tie Slora" AND "Bandit king Of Irxis" ajMnf (Rnclcv) LANE and ion Black Jack SAVE KID M ore profitable egg product ion will usuallyfollowwhenafeedingplan calling for Ful-0-Pep Chick Starter £ Growing Mash U uaed. fUL-QPEP Ik. Qoakw Oati C.mpany (OITII\ FAI TOIIV 1.1 II. T JON11 a CQ.. ltd. lrl|*<*-> Aa lor r*l-Q-ep reollry Feedlwg Qulde-lfi freel % P. O. Bo T