Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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eae








ESTABLISHED 1895



THE WESTERN END of the ground at Kensington Oval was again flooded yesterday. Mr. Bruce Inniss
(third from left), with fork in hand is clearing the sucks on the field.

February
In Forty Years

THIS IS THE WETTEST February that Barbados has
Records show that on Februray 6, 1911,
five inches of rain were recorded in St. Michael,
rainfall at Codrington on Tuesday, up to 3.00 p.m., was two
inches and 37 parts. Up to the same time yesterday it was



Chou En Lai
‘Warns’ U.S.

LONDON, Feb, 14
A strong warning against Amer-
ican attempts to conduct separate
r.egotiations on peace with Japan
was given by Chou En Lai, Prime
Minister and Minister of Foreign

Affairs of the Chinese Peoples
Republic, in an article in the
Moscow Pravda,

The article, written by the

Chinese Premier on the anniver-
sary of the signing of the treaty
of friendship, alliance and mutual
assistance between the U.S.S.R
and China, and broadcast by the
Moscow radio today, said that the
great alliance of the two countries
“is a fraternal alliance directed
against imperialism and servi
the cause of the defence of uni-
versal peace.”

Making a direct reference to
“the imperialist clique headed by
American imperialism,” Chou
said: “Not wishing to reconcile
itself to the defeat of its aggres-
sive policy in the East, it now con-
templates conducting separate ne-
gotiations on peace with Japatiyds
carrying out the remilitarisation of
Japan, is attempting to use the
territory of Japan as a place for
arms and the Japanese people as
cannen fodder for the continua
tion and extension of its criminal
acts of aggression in Korea and on
Taiwan, and intervention in Viet-
nam and South-East Asia,”

—Reuter |«



MILLER GOING ON

Ss. AMERICAN TOUR

WASHING ON, Feb. 14.

Mr. Edward Miller, United
States Assistant Secretary of Stute
for the Inter-American Affairs,
will leave here on Saturday for a
tour of South American Republics.
He will first visit Brazil for ex-
ploratory conversations with
members of President Getulio
Vargas’ new Government. He w i
also visit Uruguay, Argentina,
Chile and Peru.—Reuter. |









APPROVE MILITARY

PROGRAMME

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.
By a 13 to none vote the Senate
Armed Services Committee to-day
approved ur 1 military train-
ing and the services programme
including authority to draft 18-
year-olds.—Reuter,








lhe believed

Wettest

had since 1911.

one inch and 52 parts with a
in the shade.

Construction
Stopped On
U.C.W.I1.

(From Cur Own Correspondent)

JAMAICA, Feb. 14,

Construction work on University
College West Indies building
closed down indefinitely to-day at
2 p.m. as workers on strike re-
fused to return to the job. Early
this morning following consulta~-
tions between the contractors
Higgs and Hill and University
authorities a notice was posted on
the building compound stating
that if the workers did not return
at 2 o'clock, construction would
be suspended until a poll deter-
mined Union representation,

The strike, one of many since
the beginning of the year started
cn Tuesday called by the B.1.T.U,
over the refusal of the T.U.C. to
agree to a poll being taken among
workers because the B.I.T.U.
wi) not agree to a poll being
taken at Coir Factory, St. Thom-
as. Cases of violence and stone
throwing, were reported from
strike area.

|“Red Split In Italy

Of Great Interest”

WASHINGTON, Feb, 14.

United States Secretary of State
Dean Acheson, to-day described
reports of the recent split in the
Italian Communist Party as a
matter of very great interest. He
told his weekly news conference
that it was a development which
shouid take place
among all Communists who
really had interests of their own
countries at heart instead of
acting as agents for a foreign
power.—Reuter.

May Get

St. Kitts

Sugar Station

(From Our Own

CONSIDERATIONS are being given



Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb, 14.
in St, Kitts to

the establishment of an experimental sugar station on

profit sharing lines.
afternoon.

question by Socialist M.P.

“Pepublicans Want
Exid Of U.S. Aid
To West Europe







WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.
The stopping of American Aid
to Western Europe, “unless Am-
erica is persuaded that these
countries are bearing their full
share of the burden” is suggest-
ed ina declaration on foreign

policy signed more than 100
of the larg
can members of the United States

House of Representatives.

by



The declaration will be spon-
sored in the House by Repres
tative Lawrence H. Smith (Wi
consin) and five cther Republi-
cans.

Other poir in
tion are:

Allow
cipation
policy.

Make America impreg
attack

Cut non-defence spending

Build TT ere d



declar



full



This was revealed by
Minister for the Colonies in the House of Commons this
He was replying
Mr. James Johnson.

number of Republi-!



-| negative.







Mr. Dugdale, |

in a written answer to a

Mr. Johnson had suggested that
the Leewards Government should
acquire absentee owned sugar plan-
tions, and run them on a profit
sharing basis for the benefit of the
islanders.

He suggested that a precedent
jhad been _ established by the
Americans in Puerto Rico.- Mr.
Dugdale went cn to say~that al-
neevly in the Leewards useful
progress had been made in ac-
quiring estates for land settlement
on an individual holding ba
particularly in Antigua where
| 12,600 acres had been so utilised.
| Referring to the suggestion
| that absentee estates should be
| acquired by Government he sai
| “uniform policy cannot be laid
down for the Leeward Islands
generally, since conditions difer
i widely between the Presidencies.
|The answer therefore is in the
The Puerto Rico
being borne










sy3-

ih



item. is however
| mind,” q f
Later Mr. Johnson said he had













THURSDAY,





The

temperature of 80° Fahrenheit

For the last 40 years Barbados
has been enjoying dry Februarys
but this February, the time sche-
duled for the Intercoloniai Tour-
nament with Trinidad, the weath-
er has made a change. Apart
from affecting the cricket it is
also hampering the progress of
the crop.

At Baxters a temporary bridge
was erected to allow lorries and
earts to get across with canes |
Spring Vale, Baxters and Friend-
ship, This bridge was. washed
away and the road is again im-
passable,

Labourers are however pulling
their weight. and whenever the
rain stops fot short periods they

quickly load carts and get them, Said,

eff to the factories, Lorries are
finding it difficult to remove canes

from the fields.

residence, St. Andrew, was als9
damaged by a small landslide,

There were no major faults t
telephone communications. M«
T. G. McKinstry, Secretary of tne
Telephone Company, told the
Advocate that only the usual wet
weather faults, common to all
telephone systems, were exper:
enced but they were dealt with
immediately.

Police telephone communica-
tions at District “D’’, St. Thomas,
District “F”’, St. Joseph, and at
Belleplaine, St. Andrew, were put
out of order yesterday because of
the continuous heavy rains.

The rain fell heaviest in St
Michael, the District “A” police
station there recording two inches.
At about 8 o'clock last night, the
water which had come down from
the country to pass through the
Constitution River on its way to
the sea reached a foot and a half
below the Constitution Road,
under the bridge.

Following are the figures: Dis-
trict “A’’ 2 inches, Boarded Hall
1.50, District “C” .53, District “E”
1.05, Holetown 1.36, Four Roads
1.25, and Crab Hill 1.48.

Three Ships in Port

Waterfront and: board-of-sh.p
labourers were allowed only
hours of work, Three ships w
in Carlisle Bay — two discharging
cargo and the other taking a load
of sugar for the U.K, They were
much handicapped because of the
steady showers during the day,

Schooner Lucille M. Smita,
which called during the morning
with a load of rice, could not start
discharging her cargo and quite .




rumber of Vessels in the Careen- |

age kept their hatches covered
with tarpaulins.

In the flood areas — Halls Road,
Constitution and Delamere Land—-
the water did not rise to dange’ ous
heights, but the few people stili
living in these districts kept pre-
pared for an emergency. F

The corner of the old road at

|

A pipe line leading to a

« Prime



South Boreans



15,

FY BRUARY

Winston Church

onfidence Vo

Land 80 Miles

North Of Parallel

TOKYO, Feb. 14,

Tough South Korean Marines struck a surprise blow at

the east coast port of Wonsan 8°

parallel to-day.

They went ashore under thg#protection of the heavy
guns of the world’s biggest baleship Missouri, cruisers | Opposition
Eighth Army headquarters

and destroyers.

marines had also occupied two islands off the coast. Tnose

said the

on the mainland had reached the outskirts of the city after

accomplishing the landings.

Must Unite:

Say 2 Premiers

SANTA MARGHERITA,
(ITALIAN RIVIERA), Feb. 14.
French
broke up their three-day confer-
nee here to-day with a declaration
that Europe must unite “in the
fece of those forces which are
‘ttempting to divide our nations.”

A Communique said the Minis-
ters had made a full examination
of all questions affecting France
and Italy.

It said that the two countries
had agreed on the necessity of in-
cluding Germany for
European defence.

Foreign Minister Robert Schu-
man at a press conference at the
close of the



in plans

meeting emphasised
that Germany would have “equal
rights” in the European Army.
He said that if possible, agree-
ment on the inclusion of Germany
would be mgr



ide with Russia which
was a party to the four-power
German occupation § statute,

“Events do not stand still how-
,”’ he warned, “We will try to
reach agreement with Russia,”
but if necessary “we will go ahead
on our own.’

Schuman said that Italy
France had discussed at this meet-
ing the projected big four Foreign
Ministers* ‘Conference, France, he
had agreed to keep Italy in-
formed of developments,

Pleven and De Gasperi con-
cluded the Press Conference each
with a declaration reaflirming the
“traditional bonds of friendship
between the two countries,
—Reuter.



Tories Expect
Win Today

BRISTOL, Feb, 14

Conservatives expect a com-
fortable win at west Bristol to-
morrow in a Parliamentary bye-
election caused by the death of
Mr. Oliver Stanley, one of Mr.
Churchill’s chief lieutenants.

The election has set a problem
for the Labour Government Par-

ty, whose candidate, Mr. Harold
Lawrence, has expressed pacifist
views.

Minister Clement Attlee
has withheld the supporting let-
ter which he customarily sends to
Party candidates, and Mr.
rence’s vote may suffer in
sequence.

con-

But despite the absence of the! pared with 1948

Prime Minister’s blessing, a num-
ber of Labour M.P.’s including
leftwingers, have spoken at Bris-
tol on Mr. Lawrence’s behalf.
Conservatives, who hold the
seat, have put up a strong can-
didate for this straight fight. He
is S'r Walter Monekton, consti-
tutional expert who was Solicitor
General in the wartime coalition
Government. —Reuter.



No Pressure On
West Germany
—Says ACHESON.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.
United States Secretary of
State Dean Acheson said to-day
that the United States did not
intend to put “pressure” on
western Germany to participate

Harmony Hall, Christ Church, was/in western European defence.

flooded and impassable to traffic
and pedestrians. In order to get



new section of this road.
A well at'the Ivy which collects
water from surrounding districts,
@ On page 8. t



WET SAILS IN THE RAD

He told his weekly press con-
ference today that this had al-

through, vehicles and pedestrians | ways been the policy of the Uni-
were forced to use a part of the /ted States.

He added that there

had becn no change since Gen-

eral Eisenhower reported on his

visit to Europe’s capitals.



and)



Law-| higher than pre

Observers thought the aim of
the raid was to burn supplies and
kill as many Communists as poss-
ible.

Wonsan is 100 miles across the
country east of Pyongyang, the
Nérth Korean capital. American
Marines landed last October at
Wonsan which became the supply

ase for the campaign in northeast

Korea from which United Nations
forces withdrew after Chinese
intervened in December

The main ground fighting today |
and Jtalian Premiers}Wa@S on the central front around
Ww

oAju, communications and sup-
ply town which has been the scene
of bitter fighting during the past
month.

The United Nations fought well
to hold a determined twin-pronged
Cormunist counter offensive
lauaeched at the week-end.

Tae garrison at Chipyong, made
up ef American and French troops
held firm northwest of Wonju,
which powerful Communist forces
tried to overwhelm last night.

But flares thrown down by
planes allowed artillery and other
planes to wreak havoc in the Com-
mutnist drive which stowed up,
and today's attacks were described
as “moderate”.

While this arm of the Commun-

ist drive was pinned down the
other arm immediately north of
Wonju was receiving reinforce-

ments which United Nations air-
eraft harassed all day.

One particularly successful air
strike Was made against a south-
bound Communist column on its
way to join strong concentrations
northwest of Wonju,

A 10th Corps spokesman said it
Ww 8 exaggeration of this air
a ‘to say that one river was
red with blood and that oxen and
caris were biown to bits and scat-
tered all over the landscape.

Communist onslaughts were of
the yelling “Banzai” pattern and
United Nations troops had to
withdraw north of Ichon.-Reuter,

C.0.L. Higher
Than Pre-war
IN. BRITAIN

GENEVA, Feb. |4

The cost of living in Britain was
nine-tenths higher in September
1950 than pre-war, according
the United Nations Economic
Commission for Europe ‘

A bulletin of the Commission is -
sued tonight said the cost of living
in Britain remained constant 1
the first three quarters of 1950 at
105, except for a vise in April to
106, compared with 100 in 1948.

The 1948 level was given in the
bulletin as 181 compared with fou
in 1938, which would make the
cost of living in 1950 nine-tenth:
war,

Western Germany, Turkey and
Switzerland showed a fall corm
All other coun
tries showed a rise, but the cost
of living fell towards the 194%
level in several European coun
tries in the first three quarters
1950 the bulletin said.

—Reuter

SLOVAK WOMAN HAS
FOUND NEW COMET

PRAGUE, Feb, 13.
woman astronomer






io

of



A_ Slovak

has ‘discovered a new comet, the

miles north of the 38th |

Webb Asked
About Meat

LONDON, Feb. 14
| Maurice Webb, British Food
Minister told the Commons to-
j}day that the enly other country
beside Argentina which had “any

substantial quantity of meat for
sale abroad” was Uruguay.

Webb answering questions from
members on the
>|plight of meat-hungry Britain
with its ration reduced from 10d
to 8d. worth per week said “in
iddition we get offers of small
quantities from time to time from
varicus European countries which
are considered on their merits
Thornton Kemsley asked him “is
it not a fact that Uruguay has
ganged up with Argentina and is
not that just one more example
of the failure of Government
policy of bulk buying?”

Webb described Thornton-
Kemsley’s remark as “another
example of a reckless and un-
helpful statement’.

Anthony Eden, Deputy Oppo-
sition leader said that throughout
the earlier stages of the Argen-
tine negotiations “we did our ut-



most if reluctantly to support
Government attitude, and it is
only their recent utter failure
that has compelled us . Meee
rest of the sentence was lost in
Government jeer!ng. —Reuter





King Proclaimed |

For United Lybia

TRIPOLI, Feb, 14.

The Libyan National Assembly,
set up to create a constitution for
Libya when it becomes self gov-
erning next year, today reserved
its vote on the form of a con-
stitution for the future State,

The National Assembly has
approved the proclamation of the
Emir of Cyrenaica, as king of
the United Libya comprising
Tripolitania, Cyrenaica and the
Fezzan.

The United Nations Council
on Libya, which is discussing the
transfer of power from the ad-
ministering powers, Britain and
Franee, to the Libyans, has post-
poned its meeting, fixed for to-
morrow until Wednesday 2).

—Reuter,



India And America best sellers including Green Light,
Have Similar Aims aage, which were filmed,

NEW YORK Feb, 14.

President Truman’s message to
Congress asking permission to
send India 2,000,000 tons of food
grains was ‘everlastingly’ right
in emphasising the similarity be-
tween India and the United States
rather than the temporary nar-

row differences, said"a statement | poured

issued on behalf of the India
league of America today.

Both were striving for a free
and peaceful world, said — the
statement, which was _ issued
jointly by Mr. J. Singh, Presi
dent, and Mr. Richard J, Walsh,
chairman of the Executive Com-
mittee of the League. “This ob-
jective cannot change, but there
is room for difference: in how to
achieve it” the statement added.

“Prompt fulfilment of the Pre-
sident’s request would be a long
step toward improving the un-
derstanding between the two
countries and consequently to-
ward strengthening the free
world everywhere” —Reuter



Isracl Government
Forced To Resign

JERUSALEM, Feb. 14
The Israel Government resigned
to-day after a non~confidence vote
in Parliament on religious educa
tion policy.
Parliament threw out the Labour



Central Astronomical Institute in! jeq four party coalition by 49 votes

Prague reported yesterday,

was sighted on Sunday,

Institute said’ the doctor macde]*". * a
her discovery from an Observa- withdrawal S the ee ae
tory in the Tatra mountaing of |'isious bloc, the second’ strongest |

Slovakia,
the previous discovery
ether comets.—Reuter,

PARTY CRITICISM

COPENHAGEN, Feb. 14

of



Two former Danish Communists

who resigned after a meetirfe ot
Sunday said today there had bee:
criticism ameng party members 0

the “dictatorial tendencies in the
—Reuter | administration.”

~—Reutec







learned that certain holders of
>| plantations on St. Kitts might be
prepared to sell their interests]
nd he was anxious that if that |
local populaiior | CARLISLE BAY at 11.30 yesterd:
of their fishing boats. By 4 p.m





mn took the





t opportunity of
had returned and they we

unning the wet
re once more soaking wet

The

’ The to 42 with three abstentions.
report gave no indication of the

Iccation of the new comet, which the end of last October after a
ine}

The Government was formed at

two-week crisis following

She is credited. with|party in the coalition,
three

The religious bloc had refuse:
to support the plan to broaden

the cabinet by the inclusion of the |
Minister for Trade and Industry. |
but after many days’ negotiations |
they agreed to support the coalition |

until the January, 1953, elections
i —Reuter

Term Extended

LONDON, Feb. 14
Sir Alexander Clutterbuck, Brit-



ish High Commissioner in Canada |

has had his térm of office extend
ed for about one year from May

1951, the Commonwealth Relations

Office announced on Tuesday night
Sir Alexander, 53, succeeded Rt.

Hon. Malcolm MacDonald as High
Commissioner to Canada in May
1946. _—(CP)



FOURTEEN "BURIED
FOKMOSA, Feb. 14,

The bodie
n a Royal Air
flying boat on
mountain east of Formosa,
buried near the spot with’a sim
ple ceremony, by the local Presby
terian pastor, investigators
ported today



rt t crashed on a
|from J Hong Kong «
\J t 28 with n irvivor
i Reuter

of 14 people, killed
Force Sunderland
a remote. Taiping |
were |

| GARDINER AUS
sgh BRIDG





| On Defence

LONDON, Feb. 14.
WINSTON CHURCHILL to-night tabled a sur-
prise amendment to the British Labour
Government’s Defence Programme. He has asked
for a vote of no confidence in the Government’s
Defence policy. The amendment was made duri
the two-day debate on defence in the House o
Defence Minister Emanuel
Commons. Shinwell who ,ened the debate
told the House of Commons to-dey
that Britain will send another
division to Germany, increasing
her army there to three divisions.
He said this would be part of
Britain's contribution to the
defence of Western Europe.







New measures now proposed
would able the nation to mobil-
ise al rve division with much
greater speed than ever before.

Shinwell said that the danger
of war had become more acute in

the past few months. If the Com-
munist “Korean experiment” was
uccessful, Berlin or Western
Cermany might be the next step.
The threat to western Europe had
become plain.

Shinwell ended by saying that
the new arms drive did not mean
war was inevitable —- its purpose
was to prevent war,





—Reuter

)

Aborigine
Banished

MELBOURNE, Feb. 14,
A writ was sought in the Hyth
Court here today to bring back to
his birthplace the Australifn
aborigine Fred Nadpur who Was
banished yesterday to the heart of
Australia’s most desolate country
His banishment to Haast Bluif
Settlement near Alice Springs was





CHURCHILL,

WINSTON

sfbcepasliaiansemmiieaies,

Lloyd Douglas
Dies At 73

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 14,
Lloyd C. Douglas, 73, author
of some ‘of the most coftrover-

sial and widely read religious |ordered by Northerm Territory
novels of the century, died on | Director of Natig’ Affairs, Mr. Fy
Tuesday night of a heart disease |11, Moy, becauseNadpur—known
He had suffered from arthritis | Joc Ally 3 Fi Waters — led a





since 1944 and his condition had | lightning of aborigines tor
grown steadily worse in revent} higher ‘i amantldeiert ries with

months, whites,

Douglas’ greatest books were The application to the High
Mugnificent Obsession his first} Court for a writ of habeas corpus
published in 1929 and The Robe’) was lodged today by Mr. Murray
printed in 1942, In the period | Norris, President of the North
oetween there were numerous | Australian Workers’ Union, Mr,

Justice Fullager, who is dealing
White Banners, and Disputed Pas. |, rhe 7s apeli ate for a whit
’ ee F : eg ainst Mr. H, L. Anthony, Acting

His last work was The Big | yh): ter for the Interior, Mr. Moy

a ee PC to a! Robe: | »..4 the Superintendent of Haast
ouglas relusec to allow a ’ rn . ay sai i he -
movie to be made of The Big Plu Betterment, said Is eaters



he was not certain whether he hac

. annie > because of :
Fisherraan apparently because of |) icdietion in the ease and would



the treatment The Robe received |\ | lacisinn teomorrelr

in Hollywood. Handling of the} *'¥e ® AI Pak Ser athe ce eee Be

book for films was debated for The Judge sald that if he: found

years, Finally after $750,000 was he had jurisdiction he would grant
into the ente rprise the ihe application on the evidence

picture was dropped, —Reuter,





Chinese Demonstrate
LONDON, Feb, 13.
Thousands of people in various
Chinese cities took part in pro
test demonstrations against Ja-
pan’s “remilitarisation” the Soviet
news agency Tats reported from

Peking to-day.—Reuter

TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT





—(C.P.) before him,



CLIMAT-E

OUR NE Ee De ees

|
|
|
|

i



BERGER PAINTS

In a climate like ours, you need paints which will take a lot of

punishment without fading or peeling. Berger Paints are the answer.

Specially formulated for the Barbados climate, they bring lasting



beauty, inside and out. Try them on your own house.

Walls and ¢ primed with DUSSEAL, then painted
with MATROLL oil bound water paints stay fresh and

| lourful

|
The J t | by LASTIRON,

|
Wood } ht and unharmed by salt air
Ninel f t Brickwork outside BERGERTEX

1760







| All these BERGER pro ts ore stocked in Barbodos by

TIN & GO. LTD.
ETOWN

»

SUBX, 3



























PAGE TWO





Caub Calling

R. S. E. V. LUKE, C.M.G.,

head of the West Indian De-
partments of the Colonial Office.
arrived in Barbados yesterday
evening by B.W.1.A. from Trini-
dad and will be remaining until
February 19 as a guest of Sir
George and Lady See] at “Bemer-
syde”, Christ Church.

Mr. Luke who is making an
official tour of the Caribbean
has already visited British Hon-
duras, Jamaica and Trinidad.

Doctor's Lecture Tour
R. P. SNELLEN, the well-
known Dutch physician, now
in Britain, plans to give a number
of lectures on the West Indies
during his stay. Dr. Snellen said
he had visited all the main West
Indian territories except Jamaica.
“But I have read a good deal about
Jamaica and I have met Busta-

mante in England,” he added,

Superintendent’s Visit

AJOR O. F. C. Walcott, Su-

perintendent of the Govern-
ment Industrial Reform School in
Barbados arrived in Enigland just
ever a week ago on a ten-week
educational visit. He will spend
the greater part of his time in
London where the British Council
has arranged for him to pursue
study. in Prison Administration
with the Home Office Authorities,

After 30 Years

RS. WILLIAM RAMSEY

whose husband works with
the General Post Office in Brook-
lyn, arrived by the Lady Nelson
ch Tuesday to spend two months’
holiday in Barbados, She is stay-
ing with Mr. and Mrs. D. H. L.
Ward of “Glendon,” Hindsbury
Road. Her husband is a cousin of
Mrs. Ward. This is Mrs. Ramsey’s
first visit to Barbados in thirty
years.

Delegates Return
R. C. E, HITCHINS, Editor

of the Trinidad Guardian,
Mr. F. Seal-Coon, Editor of the








POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

‘‘—you have been selected
for training under the

scheme and will be required

to train with—M.1.5.”
oo

Married Yesterday

ESTERDAY afternoon St, Mat-

thias Church was decorated in
pink and white oleander, Queen
Anne’s lace and roses for the
marriage of Mr. Michael Lynch,
son of Mrs. Louis Lynch of White
Hall Flats, Codrington Hill and
the late Mr, Cyril A. Lynch, to
Miss Patsy Mitchell, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Mitchell of
“Palm Beach”, Hastings.

The ceremony performed by
Bishop Bentley, took place short-
ly after 5.30 p.m, The Bride who
was given away by her father
wore a dress of needlerun lace
with a sweeping train, net yoke
and fitted bodice. Her veil of eld
lece was kept in place by a head-
dress of roses and coralita. Her
bouquet was of Queen Anne's
lace and pale shell pink roses,

Governing Director

. A. S. BRYDEN, Goverh-

ing Director of Messrs. A. S.
Bryden and Sons (B’dos) Ltd.,
was among the passengers leaving
for Trinidad yesterday afternoon
6n a short visit.

From Montreal

tired Engineer of Montreal
and Mrs. Schofield arrived from
Canada on Tuesday by the Lady
Nelson to spend two weeks in
Barbados, They are staying at
the Marine Hotel. They are re-
turning by the Lady Nelson when
she calls here on her way north.

Staying with the Lords

RS, PHELPS NEWBURY ar-
rived by the Lady Nelson

on Tuesday morning to spend two THE HUNGRIEST

months and is staying with Mr.
and Mrs. Robert ©. Lord at
“Queen’s Fort”, St. James. Mrs.
Newbury’s home is in Grosse
Pointe Farms, Michigan.

She is Mrs. Lord’s

wife.
Sixth Visit

orc two weeks’ holiday

in Barbados are Mr; and Mrs,
B. G. Dean of Canada. They
arrived yesterday morning by the
Lady Nelson and are staying at
the Windsor Hotel.

Mr. Dean who is President of
the Dean-Chandler Company Lim-
ited of Toronto, told Carib that
this is his sixth visit to the island
while for his wife, it is the second,

brothers

Jeweller

Aten on Saturday from
Canada by T.C.A. were Mr,
and Mrs. Frank McKenney of
Winnipeg. They are here for twa
months’ holiday staying at the

Hastings Hotel,
Mr. McKenney is a jeweller in
Winnipeg. They also have an office

Daily Argosy, B.G., and Mr. T. &. _ Matron of pepeur was Mrs in Toronto.

Sealy, Associate Edit f the Norman Marshall, the _bride’s ‘ia

énenion Gleaner who ere here sister. There were two other at- Pomeroy Interested
for a meeting of the Caribbean tendants, Miss Ann Parris and R. and Mrs, Horace B, Pome-

Press Association left yesterday
for Trinidad by B.W.I.A,

M.G.M.
R. and Mrs. G. M. Carter
from Jersey, the Channel

Mrs. Douglas Alleyne, Mrs. Mar-
shall wore helio facone and her
head-dress which was of the same
style as the other two attendants
was of gerberas and victorian
posies. Miss Parris and Mrs,

roy of Buffalo, New York
arrived from the U.S. via Jamaica
on Monday by B,W.1.A, They are
for two weeks, staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.
Equipped with a fishing rod and

Isiands are at present in Barbados, Alleyne wore blue facone over !0ts of tackle, fishing is no doubt

ee for a holiday, but
with a view to set here and
making Barbados theft Hpmae, For
the Ume being they are staying
at Caerabank. Both Were associ-
ated for many years with Metro
Goldwyn Mayer Motion Pictures,
both in Hollywood as well as in
London, They lived in Hollywood
for about fifteen years.

Painting and Photography

R. and Mrs. John Fischer

have returneg to Venezuela
after a short holiday in Barbados.
The Fischers have lived for
eleven years at Santa Barbara in
Venezuela, Mr, Fischer’s hobbies
are painting and photography.
thy were guests at Cacrabank.

rs. Margaret Manning wite
of Mr. Justicé Manning has left

Barbados to join her husband whe Cochrane is a retired business- ready been

is doing duty in Antigua,
home is in St. Vincent.

Take up Appointment
R. and Mrs. Dick Davies left
2 for Trinidad yesterday after-
noon by B.W.1.A, They were
accompanied by their baby daugh-
ter. Mr. Davies has gone over to
take up an appointment with Apex
Oilfields Ltd., in South Trinidad,

Month

R. GERRY LOMER who is

on the engineering staff of
Rediffusion, Barbados Ltd., left on
Tuesday afternoon by B.W.I.A.
for Trinidad. He will be away for
one month visiting Rediffusion
itd,, in Trinidad.

Their

Insurance Broker

AYING their second visit to

Barbados are Mr. and Mrs.
Kk, Percy Adams from Montreal.
They arrived. on Tuesday morn-
ing by the Lady Nelson and are
here for two weeks, until the
Nelson returns on her way north.
Mr, Adams is an insurance broker
in Montreal, They are guests at
the Marine Hotel.

BY THE

HEN you read “Yesterday

was fine and warm with
light breezes,” does it not occur
to you that a weather backcast
would be much more reliable than
a forecast?

The herds of meteorologists and
prophets and seers, labouring at
their instruments, have no time
to look at the sky or to sniff the
air.. That is why any old country-
man is a far more reliable weather-
prophet than the whole crowd of
cxperts lumped together, and
fastened to their gadgets.

Short Detective Story

AC 12.23 p.m., on a Wednesday,
a haulage contractor shot a
hippopotamus in the bathroom of
his hotel at Wakua Falls. He
then escaped by a window, When
the Manager, who had heard the
shot, arrived on the scene the
body of the animal had vanished,
but there was a female footmark
on the bath-mat. Detectives found
a bullet embedded in the wall,
and a pair of scissors in the bath.

helio,

Page boy was Mr, John Lynch.
He wore a Scottish costume com-
plete with kilt.

Bestman was Mr. Douglas
Lynch, the groom’s twin brother.
Ushers were Mr, Richard Ni-

cholls, Mr. David Read and Mr.
Richard Parris. The reception
was held at White Hall, Codring-
ton Hill,

Mr. and Mrs. Lyneh are due
to leave this afternoon for Gren-
ada for their honeymoon,

**Nelson”’ Arrivals

MONG the passengers arriv-
i ing by the Lady Nelson on
Theedas morning were Mr. and
Mrs. [. C, Cochrane and Mr.
and Mrs. W. M. Currie. Mr,

man of Toronto and Mr, Currie
is in the manufacturing business
in Hamilton, Ontario. They are
staying at the Marine Hotel.

a must on his list of things to do
whilst in Barbados.

He was most interested to learn
that a former Manager of the Ma-
rine Hotel was named Pomeroy.
He wondered if there were any
more Pomroys living in the
island,

Mr. Pomeroy is now retired, he
pg to be with am investment
firm.

May go to Nigeria

MONG Colonials who signed

their names in the Barris-
ters’ Roll gt the Inns of Court last
week was Lorenzo Williams
Barbados.



A MAN WHO leaves his

BARBADOS, ADVOCATE

Woman to Woman

Do Husbands Really
Want Slim Wives?

by SUSAN

OMEN, dieting down to the

last ounce of raw cabbage, Highlights
find that they get no encourage-
ment from their husbands.
R. E. A. SCHOFIELD, a re- IF A WOMAN refuses potatoes

bread it is enough to cause
@ major seene in m o 5 t
families.

wife holding one drink the
entire evening will simply
pour liquor down her
throat if he so much as
suspects that she is diet-
ing. And a diet is a very
difficult thing to keep
secret,

man,
however interested he is
in his own plate, cannot
fail to notice when his
wife is munching raw car-
rots and water biscuits.

WHY DO MEN object to
women dieting? Is it be-
cause they are afraid they
will be made to join in,
or do they suspect that a



< “LACHASSE:

+ veiled with black chiffon.



From Paris. .

To Two Newsmen

The State Department
denied passports to two
paper reporters.

The Department
New York Daily Worker and the

to-day
news- |

advised the}

DEACON Daily Peoples’ World of San Fran-
cisco that it-had decided to re-
lots of chiffon and lace. ject foreign travel applications

of collections

the under the 1950 Internal Security
A

et.

The Act forbids the issue of
passports to members of Com-
munist or “Communist action”,
organisations registered as such
with the Justice Department.

—Reuter

CROSSWORD
de

were: — 3
Tailored lace eoat





7





A biscutt - coloured fine
Eye-vetls are out; this

Across

















. styaw spring hat
new slim figure will need efptted veiling decorates the back of 1 An e¢lderdown quilt, (5)
new slim clothes? the hat. 5 Dogs this mane money for
‘ i gardeners *
TEIBEL: White net strapless; 9, Gonyentional behaviour. (9)
Longer Jacket ae dress, its bustline} 9 Whoge part of the camera is
: ‘ j S 18
i ri io covered in sprigs of mimosa. | 11. Could be an order to a steno-
HE biggest spring fashion DIGBY MORTON’S tangerine games” i
change London designers * ac za coat over a| 13. Absurd to put the pet in, (4)
j i nist ‘ and black organza 4 ny Bt
show is in the suit jacket : HARDIE] 14. One from Scotian ar
which is longer, with a bell. black dress, and wr Couid be. 14)
shaped Sane : " AMIES’ black and whi te 1g. Measure.” (8)
lo - 7 shecke edingote 17. Sco ohn G ,
MOST SKIRT cut in a heundstooth checked Reding ey ee heii: aaa cei
IRTS are cu . ; lvet half-
straight, slim line. Hardie ¢°8t with a black velve (5) 20. Chinese water jar, (4)
: 1 -ollar 21 No go for the colour bliin
Anica shows. fin-like godsts, éitoues lace or broderie Anglais} 22. In ever, paristenes eae (8
‘ . an . : g 3 "Boy anag,
which flare from the knees. is used for rever facing on navy| 23. Stor oy. (anag
The Redingote coat, unbelted and Down
waist-fitting, is in again. Even- *U!**: L. Betraying ecstasy. (9)
i ress as-v AA Se . 3 2. Even nuts tie like th ye
Steatte ee Bre a8-yourplease. paTENT LEATHER is a popular| 3: Pura grave in this shape..(7)
rapless or halter-neck, wide- “trimming. . .Hats are small,| 4 Attends the Lord Mayors dinner
skirted or straight, : often a _ pillbox shape worn 5 sh including’ tea. (6)
Cone eee prlanter. 4 ie straight. 6 The twentieth ietter, (3)
a ae a tO ee OUT . Dolman sleeves, all-| 8. What a foreigner calls n shogun
white. Glamour colours are et ae cab ver 10. [t Nas neen introducea inty the
a tet > * —velvet — pr pac —_ works before now, (7)
royal or sapphire blue with bottle green. 12. Part of a spinning wheel. (3)
black. L.E.S 15 Not so damp. (4)
laaatia 19. To" little Josephine it suggests
Organza Leads 1 ‘ 20. ul blow a fellow to Bray. (3)
Solut! esterda t aie ee
RGANZA is the materia ot | B.B.C. Radio Programme |. 9,9! geiegtins eaten
‘ : V ; 5. ee: 5. ar
the season (it is often used] yuRspay., FEBRUARY 15, 1951 1m ties, 19, etal heck
for coats). Runners-up are slub | 6.80 a.m.—t115 p.m, — 19.76 ; 9 et. thudich: a theo
falc iach emer nate — == roe mo F Certal 6. Haversack
materials, birdseye tweeds, and 6.30 a.m. Football Fixtures, 45 a.m. aioe Taamer ai those ee fee 28
Sporting Record, 7.00 a.m. The News, Pen i



—

Leaving Shortly

R. G. O. FORD of Dayrells
Road expects to leave next
month for Aruba where he is go
ing to work with the Lago Oil anc
Transport Refinery in that island

Manley Reception

PQtHE reception to Mr. Normai

Manley, K.C., which took
place in London last week was an
international affair, This was un-

of!derstandable in view of his fine
After the Call to the}reputation and that the organiser:

Bar ceremony he said that he may|were the League of Coloured Peo-

shortly travel to Nigeria to take|pies.
the | from

up a legal appointment in
Government service. He has al-
interviewed by
Colonial Office Appointments
Board. After passing his Bar Fin-
als, Lorenzo joined the legal de—
partment of the Pakistan Embassy

Mr, Arthur Cole, a barriste:
Sierra Leone introduced «Me
Manley and afterwards there were

the speeches from Mr. James Griffiths

Colonial Secretary, Mr. Krishna
Menon, High Commissioner fo:
India in the United Kingdom and
of course, Mr. Manley-himself,














lysis, 7.15 a.m, From

Programme
erally Speaking,
hoice, 8.00 am
8.30 am. Peter

7.10 aim. News A
Editorial
7.30 am
Listeners
Livestock,
Plain English, 9,00 a.m,

The
Parade
7456 am

Land and
Cooper, 8.45 am





G

‘GLOBE







» News, 9.10 a.m. Home News From W
n, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m, LAST SHO ING
amme Parade, 11,30 a.m. Listeners
e, 11.45 aon. Special Dispatch, 12.00
noon) The News, 12.10 pm. News TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
Analysis, 12.15 a.m. Close Down, RNG i
Li5—6.00 pm, — 25,53 m. iS
4.15 p.m. Listeners Choice, 5.00 pm.
Composer of the Week, 5.15 pm. Seot-
ush Magazine, 5.45 p.m. Melody on
Strings
6.00—7.15 pom

31.32 m. & 48.43 m,
6.00 p.m. How to Look at a Town, 6.40
>m Interlude, 6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade, 7,00 p.m, The News, 7.10 pm
News Analysis, 7.15 pm We See Britain,
745—11.00 pom. — S02 & 4845 m,





7.45 p.m, Think On These Things, 8.00
».m, Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m, Sir John
Magill’s Last Journey, 8.45 p.m. Composer
if the Week, 9.00 p.m, Special Dispatch,



115 p.m. Have A Go, 10.00 p.m. The
Yews, 10.10 pm. From The Editorials,
0.15 p m. Communism in Practice, 10.30

»>m. Melody on Strings, 10.45 p.m. The
Jebate Continues, 11.00 p.m, Ring Up The

Curtain.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 10. |

in London in order to acquire
practical experience. During the
Second World War he served in
the Royal Air Force and rose ‘+o
the rank of Flight Sergeant.

Refired Mining Engineer

R. H, E. COLL, retired
mining engineer of New
Glasgow, N.S., accompanied by

his wife arrived on Tuesday by o Place Like Ho
the Lady Nelson to spend a holi- N ee Li Home

GROUP of Oxford under-
day in Barbados. They are here "
until March 28th staying at the A graduates have been greatly
Ocean View Hotel. eer with “Lord Kitchener's

This is Mr. Coll’s first visit &P lity to make calypsoes in an
here but his wife has been here ¢*tempore way. The inspiration
before with her mother, came to Kitch at a London night

club the other evening during
LouiseBennett’sPantomime ©#baret hour. For forty-tive min-
utes he created a riot of fun and
] HEAR that Louise Bennett, laughter with his humorous
the well - known writer of rhymes. Kitch was really at his
Jamaican dialect is busy writing a best and the magnificence of his
pantomime. This however is not performance led another Trinidad.
her first attempt at this “difficult ian to declare “there’s no place
task. While she was in Jamaica like home”.
she wrote a pantomime which I There is a real LORD KITCH-
understand was very popular. But ENER, son of the famous Lord
this latest pantomime is a rather Kitchener. He was at Catterick
more difficult job for she plans to Signals OCTU at the same time

present in it all aspects of Carib- ag George Hunte—Assistant Editor
bean culture. Good luck, Louise. of the Advocate.

WAY....

The finger-prints on the scissors
were those of the head-waiter,
How did the body of the hippo-
potamus disappear?

By Beachcomber

Simple Criticism

‘Ts owner of a restaurant put

a pound note in the window
“as a prize for sales-promotion,”
Under it was a notice saying,
“Tell us what you think of self-
eervice,” A man with nothing
particular to do heaved a_ brick
through the window, and took
the pound.

Preparing for the Rush

A QUESTION is already inflam-

ing many brains—where on
earth are the hundreds of millions
child is cracking a safe or telling of visitors to the Exhibition going
Ministry spies about his father’s to be housed? Here are some
infringement of some regulation suggestions: —
or other dealing with the setting 1. A huge camp in the Lake
of mouse-traps. District.

i : 2 Bring the Fleet up the Thameg

Disgraceful Incident as far as it will go, and let

the visitors live aboard.

Sweet and Low

HIS is evidently the month of

amazing discoveries. A Gallup
poll has found that lullabies are
dying out. Mothers no longer sing
to their children. One reason is
that, at what used to be a lullaby
time, the mother is at the pictures
or working in a factory, and the

‘T T was an utter disgrace... 3. Use billiard tables, box-rooms
Nobody has any manners and telephone-boxes in the
nowadays. The bus was full of big hotels.

people, comfortably seated, and 4. Throw open Government
there was my poor dog forced to offices.

Stand all the way. Nobody 5. Put more seats on the Em-
dreamed of getting up and offer- bankment,

ing him a seat,”

6. Erect huts in one-way streets.

Saeartanusateees eas ree ree

PANTIES

WS

WX
OS

PETTICOATS. ws
NIGHTIES

Dial 4606

=m CELANESE Underwear

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

AN. A A A A A A A. A Py 2
126. & 139 CHAIR-BACK >a

1's) ¢ CRETONNES >
Cents > 7

wx os ¢ yd,

200 2.02 = ? :
FOR HOTEL and HOME > s

. er A remarkable 27” value %

PPD DP De WW We

Your Shoe Stores
{









:

Dial 4220 a



It is early November and Rupert
is out on the common with Pong-
Ping and the rabbit twins, ‘1 say,
look at that great pile of wood,"
says Reggie Rabbit, ** What can be
happening up there?" "| know
what it is.”” says Rupert. “It's the
bonfire that Freddy and Ferdy Fox

ALL CA
AT THE

PLAZA £ eS
2g
(Bridgetown)

Pick up the
Pieces Folks,

else join them, And that reminds
me; | haven’t bought any fireworks
yet."’ “Nor have 1,"" says Pong:
Ping, ‘‘.and there's not much time
left, Let's go down to the village.”
They run down to Nutwood and
into the shop, but Mr. Hippo shakea
his head. “* You're too late. Fire:
works are all sold out,”’ he says
mers





GNEY BREAKS LOOSE

meee

JAMES FRIDAY

— with —
CAGHEY 9, snows
) '





JIMMY'S in 0p LY ive i 2.30 —
Action cee) fe 5.00
Again! Ga
a and
Extra Special ! . le [: 4.) f % 8.30 p.m.
BOB WILLS
Ce and Continuing
and his
TEXAS Daily at
PLAYBOYS .
‘~ 445 & 8.30 p.m.
so ~BOMOND FRE ;
WORLD NEWS OBRIEN Cust (Dial 2310)

MRS. HOUSEWIFE

We offer a wide range of House-
hold

EARTHENWARE

Medina Shape

io

Maroon Band & Gold Decoration
Dishes



Plates
Tea Cups & Saucers, Cream Jugs
Platters Tea Pots
Also
TEA SETS 24 Pieces
DINNER SETS 34
DINNER SETS 63 ‘ diate Rh
Obtainable from our Hardware Department —Tel. No. 2039
|



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Tee TS





EMPIRE THEATRE

Frid. 2.30 & 830 pm.

and Continuing at
Mat. & Night Shows
Daily up to Tuesday

DR Ld
Lh de

ture is called
aFourAward f
Thriller’

DAVID OF SELZNICK'
presen ‘%

(CAROL REED
Leese Averd ¥ hebirg

the

MAKE YOUR SELECTIONS FROM
THESE

Tins Cocktail Peanuts
Bots Cocktail Cherries
Tins Coektall Sausages
» Meat Rolls
» Potted Meat
» Sandwich Spread
» O% tail Soup
Vegetable Soup,
' » Asparagus Soup
{ , Chicken Soup
Tomato Soup
i » Carrots, (Sliced and whole)
. Rees
Tomatoes
Blancmange
Jellos
Salad Cream
Prepared Mustard
Bacon,

STUART & SAMPSON
LTD.

Pkgs
Rots

Sliced



|
‘



a
—







j

Passports Denied |

Headquarters for Best Rum. }

i
}
i



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1951









STOP THAT

COUGH















m Start taking VENO’S COUGH

bas, MIXTURE at once, and sce how

quickly your cough will stop!
} world - famous cough
' remedy soothes away hoarse-
| ness and soreness; eases
\ breathing, and protects the
, chest and lungs.

/

! Yee chia
at once!



The |
FAMI
EATARRH » CATANAHAL
CHESTY COLDS - NIGHT COUGHS
CHILDREN'S COUGHS

COUGH MIXTURE

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT AT 8.30
James STEWART :o: Jane WYMAN
in “MAGIC TOWN”
An RKO Radio Picture
* COMMENCING
Robert MONTGOMERY

mn BLYTH
in “ONCE MORE, MY DARLING”
NEW UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE

FRIDAY

o:

A



————aqq>——————E—_—__

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

carey errzcernio ww STORY OF SEABISCUIT

Color by TECHNICOLOR

Mat Today — 1.80 p.m. (Monogram)

“RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH”
Johnny Mack Brown and —
“RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL”
with Jimmy WAKELY

Big Special Opening — FRIDAY —
8 SHOWS — 2,80, 5.00 & $.30 p.m.
James CAGNEY in - - -

“WHITE HEAT”







es :

=== ——



\

»)

(
{



PLAZA Theatre=(/STIN (DIAL 8404)

LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY 5 & 8.80 p.m, (Paramount Double)

RED HOT and BLUE & THIS GUN for HIRE

Betty Hutton Alan Ladd












GRAND OPENING FRIDAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. and Continuing
MIRACULOUS JOURNEY & BAD MEN OF TOMBSTONE

Midnite Sat, 1jth—"CODE OF THE SADDLE” & “RIDERS OF THE DAWN”

GATET W—(rTHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TODAY (Only) 8.30 p.m. (Monogram Double)

Leo Gorecy with the Sidney Toler as
Bowery Bevs in - - - Charlie Chan in

DOCKS OF NEW YORK = & DARK ALIBI

FRID. SAT. — SUN, — 8.30 P.M, :
Paramount's Biggest Musical Hit ! |!

sinc crosey IN “RIDING HIGH”










Mat. SUN. — 5 P.M.

WITH COLEEN GRAY









EMPIRE

Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 and 8.30.

Columbia Big Double
Warner BAXTER and
Micheline CHIREL
in

CRIME DOCTOR'S

ROYAL

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.30.
Final Inst, Republic Serial

FEDERAL AGENTS

VERSUS
UNDERWORLD INC.
with Kirk ALYN and

GAMBLB James DALE
and Along with the picture ,..
SOUTH OF DEATH RENEGADES OF
VALLEY THE SONORA
Starring Starring

Charles STARRETT and
Smiley BURNETTE

ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 and 8.15.

United Artists Double

William BOYD as Hopalong
, Cassidy in

Allan (ROCKY) “Lane
LL

OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 and 8.15.

Columbia Smashing Double
Adele JERGENS and
Stephen DUNNE in

WOMAN FROM

FALSE PARADISE TANGIERS
and and
IMPACT WHIRLWIND RAIDERS
Starring Starring

Brian DONLEVY and
Ella RAINES

Charles STARRETT and
Smiley BURNETTE

We have just received a shipment of New

Hand Tools—

Sanderson HAND SAWS—24”—36”

COMPASS SAWS—12” & 16”

BACK SAWS—14”

Stanley PLANES—Jack, Fore and Jointer.
is RATCHET BRACES

HAND and BREAST DRILLS

SAW FILES, PLANE IRONS, SQUARES,

”

”



| PLANTATIONS LTD.



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

15, 1951



gemma PEUYU erat

course for Left-wing lions

AAeEsTTT



* Hair too short, Footcross!"



Reform Group
Return ToU.K.

‘From Our Own Correspoudent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G. Feb. 11
Sir John Waddington, Chair-
man of the three man constitu-
tion Reform Commission who
concluded the first part ef their
assignment will leave British
Guiana on Tuesday next on their
return to the United Kingdom to
sift evidence, write their report
and make recommendations, te-
day praised the goodness of the
witnesses from whom the Com-
mission took oral evidence.

Broadcasting a farewell mes-
sage to the people of this coun-
try at noon, Sir John declared
they had asked a great many
questions and their proceedings
might even have taken on the
character of a cross-examination,
but their sole object was to ob-
tain the underlying reasons for
opinions which had been given.

They fully realized that occa-
sionally a witness might reason-
ably have felt .some resentment
at the coolness of questions. That
they never detected any such
feeling was a tribute to the good-
ness of the witnesses and they
must appreciate that forbearance
had been ‘shown.

Constructive Solution

Earlier, Sir John had said the
leaders of all schools of thought
in British Guiana had _ placed
their views frankly before the
Commission and it now rested
with the latter to suggest a just
and constructive solution.

He could only assure people
that the Commission should bear
carefully in mind their very
proper political aspirations, and
endeavour to make _ proposals
which would enable British Gui-
ana to have a suitable and suc-
cessful political future.

Sir John said that much sifting
of evidence and many hours of
hard work lay ahead. “We sin-
cerely hope they will be profit-
ably spent for British Guiana,
We fully recognise the need for
speed. There is no time to lose
if everything is to be ready for
the next election, I can assure
you we are anxious to present
our report at the earliest possible
moment.”

The next general election takes
place in 1952.

—(CP)

500 Year-Old
Bible Found

NEW YORK, Feb:

A first. edition of the Guten-
berg Bible, considered one of the
great monuments of Christen-
dom, has ‘arrived in New York by
plane—after being lost for over
150 years.

The Bible, named after Johann,
Gutenberg, the inventor of print-
ing with movable type, was pub-
lished at Mainz, Germany, 500
years ago. The copy, one of the
180 published then, was “lost” in
1824, supposedly from the library
of a British Baronet, Sir George
Shuckburgh.

It was recently fe-discovered
and has been flown to this country
by John Carter, London director
of Charles A. Scribner’s Sons,
who negotiated its purchase,



The copy measures 16 by 11%
inches and is one of the half
dozen tallest known, The text is
St. Jerome’s Latin version and the
large Gothic type is considered a
masterpiece of printer’s art.

Neither the purchase nor saleg
price has been disclosed, but Scrib-
ner’s reported the cost was sub-
stantially in excess of the highest
price ever recorded for this
book. The last copy was sold at
auction in New York in 1926 and
brought $106,000.—I.N.S.



Cummugs seis a 15-day

KNOW YouR ENEMY

“Observe the outline of the

silhouette .. .”



ARMS DRILL



“

“Direy nib again,
>

ad
‘

Silverwell



++. and where,
is your vellum edition of the
works of Professor Laski

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Mikardey,

>”



Not Needed
From B.G.

. °
(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Feb, 9.
When Hon. E. F. McDavid,
C.M.G., C.B.E., Financial Sec-
retary and Treasurer appeared
before the Constitution Commis-
sion to give evidence in support
ef his memorandum for a new

HANIA, Crete, Feb.

Hania city jail is a lonely place
to a prisoner serving a life sen-
tence for murder.

So when Christos Tondos felt
he needed some living compan-
ionship in his small cell he decided
that a small animal would be an
ideal companion.

When he asked the warden for
permission to obtain a cat or a dog
as a pet he was told that prison
regulations forbade the importa-
tion of any living animals into the

Constitution for the Colony, he jail

declared that he was speaking
purely for himself. “I have had
the Governor’s privilege to come
here and give evidence,” he told
Sir John Waddington, Chairman
of the Commission, “and I want
it to be quite clearly understood
that anything I say is not evi-
dence of the Government or in
any way connected with the Gov-
ernment.

Mr, MeDavid in his evidence
spoke strongly in favour of the

| abolition of the literacy test for

voters and the granting of full
adult suffrage; the shortening of
the life of the Legislative Council
to three years and the increase
in the number of electorial dis-
tricts from 14 to 20 with minis-
terial status for unofficial mem-
bers of the Executive Council,

Touching on the financial out-
look, Mr. McDavid told the Com-
missioners that there is nothing
whatever in the Colony’s financial
situation which would preclude an
advance in the Colony’s constitu-
tional government. Mr, McDavid
went on: “I feel sure that, with
careful management, this Colony’s
finances would continue to be in
good shape over the next ten
years. There are many points of
difficulties obviously facing us,
notably, of requirements of social
services, education particularly,
health, but nevertheless I still
think that there is scope to over-
come these difficulties with care-
ful management.”



Smugglers’ Plane
Seized By French

PARIS, Feb. 12.

French security police have
seized a plane used by Spanish
anarchists to smuggle money and
men between the two countries
the French Ministry of the In-
terior said here to-day.

The French built plane a single
engined four seater was seized
at Shyanns aerodrome near
Versailles on warrant issued by
a Lyons magistrate. This followed
the arrest of 29 Spanish anar-
chists last month by Lyons police
when a post office van was held
up on January 18.

An attempt by five young men
to steal sacks containing 6,000,000
francs in the back of the van
failed when they were surprised
by two armed police sitting next
to the sacks, :

One policeman, Guy Arnaud
was killed and his comrade Louis
Morin seriously injured by gun-
fire. Interrogation of one of the
arrested anarchists revealed that
the Spanish anarchist federation
had an aircraft at their disposal
Police said.—Reuter,



American Arrested
By Swiss For Spying

WASHINGTON, Feb. 13

The United States has asked
the Swiss Government to release
or “put on trial speedily” the 23~-
year-old American negro Charles
Davis imprisoned in Geneva on
espionage charges.

The State Department said Davis
was arrested in connection with
the “misuse of mail” but appar-
ently no formal charges had been
made against him. He had been
in Swiss police custody since last
December,

That one regulation stumped
Christos but he had plenty of time
to think and finally came up with a
solution. He was in no particular
hurry to get a pet. He would be
around a long time.

He asked the warden that the
next time e were included in
the prison rations, if he could have
his uncooked.

Christos wrapped the egg in a
piece of flannel, tucked it under
his armpit and lay on the bed of
his cell for twenty days.

On the twenty-first day he felt
a slight stirring under his armpit
He removed the egg, unwrapped it
and found he had hatched a chick-
en,

Now Christos has his pet, the
warden has his regulations, and

the jail has a live animal.

The regulations said nothing
about keeping live animals in the
prison. They just prohibit their
importation through the prison
gates.

—IN.S.



DIM HOPE
Says Nehru

NEW DELHI.

Indian Prime Minister Nehru
teld Parliament today that the
United Nations’ Resolution brand-
ing China as aggressor put an
end for the time being at least
to any attempts at negotiation
or settlement.

He said “we hope still it may
be possible for events to take a
better turn in the future but /
must confess that at the moment
hope has grown very dim”.

Nehru, who was making a
statement on foreign affairs said
India’s friendly relations with
China had been “very helpful”
in attempts for a negotiated set-
tiement of Far East problems. In
spite of differences of opinion,
India would continue to try to
maintain her friendly relations
with the United States he said.

Referring to the India-Pakistan
dispute over Kashmir, Nehru
said the struggle there was “s
struggle of progress against re-
action-”

India stood by her pledge that
it was for the people of Kashrhir
to decide their own future. India
would not give up “ at anybody’s
bidding and under any threat,”
the principles involved in the
Kashmir issue. —Reuter.

Robbed Of $1,626

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 14.



A masked bandit, armed with a %
revolver walked off with $1,626 ¥

cash in a daylight hold-up on the
Saddle Road, Santa Cruz, at about
11 a.m. on Saturday. Victim is
Mrs. Maria Correia, of Vidale

Street, St. James, who had just
left the Santa Cruz R.C, Church

and was going home.
Wearing a makeshift nylon
mask, apparently made from a

woman’s stocking the thief order- ¢

ed the woman to standstill at
revolver point and demanded ali
her money. Before she could move,
he grabbed her handbag with the

money, a gold bracelet and a wrist ¢
The man escaped X
om a bicycle which was parked %
nearby. The money was made up §
of ten and twenty-dollar bills, one %
five dollar note and one dollar ¢

watch inside.

note.

whether you talk cricket or play cricket you probably know
of the wonderful help that LIMACOL is to all athletes.



Literacy Test He Got His Pet 3MoreResign From Sold Him His

Italian Red Party

BOLOGNA, Feb. 13,

The rebellion against Italy's
Communist party started by De-
puties Valdo Magnani and Aldo
Cucchi to-day gained added
strength from two Bologna parti-
San leaders and a mayor.

Giovanni Galletti, officer in a
wartime partisan formation an-
nounced his resignation from the
Communist party.

Secondo Negrini, another ex-
partisan who is not a member of
the party, wrote to Magnani and
Cucchi pledging support to their
cause,

Communist Mayor Paolo Salva-
tore of a tewn near Salerno also
joined the breakaway. He was
reported to have told a meeting
attended by some 1,000 people,
that his decision was the result of
a “crisis of conscience.”

He said he agreed with Mag-
nani and Cucchi that Italy must be
defended against attack from any
direction including the Soviet
Union.

—Renten



Air Defence

Insoluble
WISCONSIN, Feb. 13.
General Nathan F, Twining

Chief of the United States Air
Force said here that the air de-
fence of the United States was “an
almost insoluble problem”.

General Twining in an address
said the difficulties of locating and
attacking fast moving bombers az
various levels im an atmosphere
six miles deep and as wide as the
entire continent were tremendous,

But he added: “No enemy .of
the United States should be de-
ceived that our retaliatory
strategic striking power would be
ineffective.

—Reuter



Get Jobs For
The Idle
Archbishop of Milan

{ MILAN.
Cardinal Schuster, Archbishop
of Milan has urged the Italian

Government to provide jobs for the
country’s unemployed to fight
Communism. “The phalanx of job-
less represents a veritable sixth
column” he said in a_ lenten
pastoral letter,

“It is useless to prepare arms
and soldiers for the nation’s de-
fence in case of war if some
2,000,000 unemployed are left to
roam the streets in Italy.”

The postwar economic misery
was the strongest ally of interna-
tional Communism and one of the
causes of immorality and irreligion
he said. The church had _ spent
much money on relief but at pres-
ent these people, “embittered and
disillusioned, no longer want alms
but demand imperiously that the
Government take energetic steps
to fight unemployment.”

—Reuter.



Naturally it’s the chief topic of conversation at present. But

55% i ! Is
S99S9SS9SS 999 FO99OSS9 GOD DOD FPODO IDI AVG IY OPPO





CT

cP

NATIONALISATION
EXERCISE

Own Cocoa

* (From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 14
Mr. F. J. Camacho magistrate
acting in the First Police Court
told Charles Sam of Gonsalves
Place and Lambert Larode of
Port-of—Spain that selling their}
employer’s Cocoa to their employ-
er “was not a bad idea if it works,’
Lambert worked with Atbert
Lucien and Co,, cocoa store



|
|
and
wanted to make some extra mon-
ey. He labelled a bag of cocoa
“Johnson Thomas Maracas’’ and
left it outside the store where
“Johnson Thomas” who was
feally his friend Charles Sam
would claim it and se}l it to
WUG).. +.2 \Albert Lucien and Com
pany.
They were caught when the
manager of the store became sus-|

picious as to the amount of cocoa) |,
“Johnson Thomas” was selling to|
him, They both pleaded guilty
and being of tender age the mag-
istrate remanded both of them to
February 19 for sentence,

Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Emanuei C
field, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Sch. C
Ipana, Sch. Philip H, Davidson
Vagabond Prince, Sch. Mary EB. Caroline
M.V. Moneka, Sch. Pmeline, Sch. Marion



In ginger ale or club soda,
you can’t beat Canada Dry.
As a straight beverage,
Canada Dry is delicious —
truly “the best of them all.”

Gordon, M.V. Sedge
M. W

Belle Wolfe, Sch. Franklyn D. R As a mixer, Canada Dry
Sch, Timothy A. H. Vansluytman, 4. c : ;
Islandside, Sch. Julmar, Sch, Wonderful Water makes drinks taste
Counsellor, pa ee M better, stay lively

Schooner Lucille M. Smith, 74 tons net longer. -eep
Capt, Hassell, from British Guians 8 Ke i

DEPARTURES
8.8. Alcoa Pilgrim, 3,921 tons net, Capt
Haagensen, for St, Vincent
POST OFFICE NOTICE
AIR MAILS

plenty of both on
hand,
\






With effect from 2th February, air
mails for Canada id Bermuda will be
closed General Post Office on
Tuesda p.m, instead of on Monday



and . respectively By this
opportunity the postage to Canada will
be the lower rate namely 20 cents per |
oz
Air Mail Schedule:
excordingly.
Gentral Post Office,
14th February, 1951,

hould be a nded

,» MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Trinidad by the s.s. Golfito
will be closed at the General Post Otfice
as under:—

Porcel Mail at 2 p.m., Registered Mail
at 3 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 4 p.m. on the

16th Februany, 1951



Rates Of Excharige

February 14, 1951
CANADA
Cheques on

Bankers
Demand

Drafts
Sight Drafts
Cable
Currency
Coupons

63 5/10% pr.

61 6/10% pr
61.46% pr
61 3/10% pr
63 5/10%
62%) pr.

r,
2 601/10
59 4/10

pr
pr



Leave It, Please!

LONDON

A divorce sought by Henry John
Peed on the grounds that his wife,
Laura, tried to cut off his mous
tache. was denied in London
divorce court. Reed maintained
his wife’s action constituted
cruelty. —ILN.S.



Sarena nie
——
























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PAGE THREE



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EQUIPMENT

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supply of the following—

42 LP. 6 cyl DIESEL WHEEL
TRACTORS





IMACOL-



Before the game a rub with LIMACOL makes you feel
as fresh as a daisy, and ready for anything. And after a
hard day in the field it’s the very thing for a brisk massage
to pep you up and ease your aching muscles.

But even if you're not an athlete, LIMACOL is fine for
you to use for a rub down whenever you are tired and suffer-
ing from muscular soreness. So whether you are a real
cricketer or the pavilion variety, take advantage of LIMACOL
and enjoy the freshness of a breeze in a bottle.

LIMACOL can be obtained Plain or Mentholated to suit your
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PAGE FOUR

ADVOGATE

sees eS Pome)

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd. Broad St., Bridgetown.
Thursday, February 15, 1951

SPENDING

THE continued depletion of the finances
of the island despite increases in taxation
has been the cause of some degree of alarm
in the minds of those who take any interest
in the maintenance of that standard of fin-
ancial independence which has been the
boast of Barbados.

If evidence were needed to prove that the
financial resources of this island have not
been handled to the best advantage, it is to
be found in a close examination of the
dwindling of our surplus balance during
the last three years. In 1948 the surplus
amounted to £1,213,901. In 1949 after the
method of preparing the colony’s estimates
had been changed from sterling to dollars,
the estimated revenue was $8,899,974 and
after a quarter million dollars had been set
aside for capital works in addition to ser-
vices, the estimates showed a deficit of
$55,506. .

The Government, and by this was meant
the Executive Committee, was warned then
that it was unstatesmanlike to budget for
a deficit at a time when Barbados had had
four good crops and the remittances from
Barbadians abroad had reached more than
two million dollars. In the same year the
increased taxation was estimated to yield
sums of $200,000 from income tax” arid
$60,000 from death duties. In that same
period the increase in Old Age Pensions
constituted the only action to offset the
dissatisfaction caused by the taxation
policy.

The Government then embarked on an
orgy of spending, or allocating to various
heads of expenditure huge sums which
would be tied up or cease to become avail-
able for current use, The lands of the Cen-
tral Foundry were bought and up to the
present have not been used, the Town
Planning Officer and Architect was given
a separate department outside the Public
Works Department and the result has been
the spending of large sums of money which
have not brought any service such as the
new Coleridge and Parry School costing
$98,000 although half finished, and the pay-
ment of Legislators.

The condition of the Treasury has now
caused some alarm and on Tuesday Mr. J. H.
Wilkinson, Leader of the Opposition warn-
ed the Government that it was a danger-
ous policy to continue to send down reso-
lutions for these large sums of money
without knowing whether the financial
resources of the island can stand it. This
attitude will have the support of all right
thinking people who are anxious to see that
Barbados remains in the position to boast
that she has always been able to balance
her budget. Judging by Mr. Wilkinson’s
veiled hint of the possibility of a commis-
sion being appointed, aad his habit of un-
derstatement in order to avoid alarm, there
seem to be more reasons for anxiety than
the public suspects.

Mr. Adams was sorons to admit that the
financial condition of\ the Treasury was
giving cause for anxiety even if not alarm.
He could not, however, resist the tempta-
tion to pass on some of the blame to the
civil servants who he declared sent in
estimates in some instances too high. But
it was not this detail to which Mr. Wilkin-

son was referring, It was to the policy of
the Government in undertaking expendi-
ture without first ensuring that the Treas-
ury can bear the strain.

This unhappy pass has come about be-
cause of the comparatively recent policy
adopted by the Governor-in-Executive
Committee in sending down to the House
oranibus resolutions embodying sums for
various projects and services, instead of in
separate resolutions. The House has on
more than one occasion passed resolutions
which would have been rejected were it not
for the fact that they included sums for
services which could not be held up to the
embarrassment of the Government. The
Legislative Council also registered objec-
tion to the inclusion in these of resolutions
which were obviously of a controversial
nature.







Plea For Commonwealth |2atbados Arts

And Colonial “Parliament”

Colonial Secretary

LONDON, Feb. 5.

A scheme for a Commonwealth
and Colonial “Parliament” in
which each coleny would have
six representatives was suggested
to the House of Commons in a
short debate before the adjourn-
ment on Friday afternoon,

Wing - Commander Geoffrey
Cooper, Labour Member for Mid-
ilesborough, West, put forward
the scheme when seconding a
motion by a Labour colleague,
Squ-Ldr. Ernest Kinghorn, (Yar-
mouth), that a permanent body
be set up of delegates from parli-
aments and legislative bodies of
the Commonwealth and _ the
colonial Empire, “together with
& permanent secretariat to meet
regularly and discuss problems of
common interest”.

The Secretary of State for the
Colonies, Mr. James Griffiths,
rejected the idea outright so far
as the Commonwealth countries
were concerned, pointing out that
it might impair unity. And he
coubted the wisdom of such a
step so far as the colonies were
concerned—at this moment, at any
rate,

The motion was withdrawn.

In submitting his motion, Squ.-
Ldr. Kinghorn spoke of the need
for getting to know “our fellow,
citizens” and the need for dis-
cussing common problems.

Sad

He continued: “It is so sad
sometimes to read about a
coloured person in a part of our
Dominions who is a great hero to
his own folk and whom we get
to know only after he has made his
reputation there by being cast into
jail. I am certain from my own
knowledge that when we meet
and face problems together we
find that we are the same kind
of human beings and have pretty
well the same approach to most
human problems”.

Discussing common problems he
instanced the housing shortage,
the need for more railways partic-
ularly in Australia and = East
Africa, and so on. “Food”, he said,
“is a problem which confronts us
all in the manufacturing parts of
the Empire and those who pro-
duce mineral raw materials or
need more, such as in East Africa.
In these days, there is the overall
need for quick action on defence.

“Tt would pay us all if we had
a permanent body such as a
secretariat here, or in some other
place whie' would be more
handy to consider these prob-
Jems and act quickly. If wa
find ourselves in still greaten
difficulties we might be forced by
circumstances to set up such an
organisation in the next year or
so. It would serve us much better
if we did it now, while we have
peace and are able to set up a
permanent body”.

Mr. Cooper, in seconding,
maintained that the proposed
assembly should ke a body enjoy-
ing a status similar to the House
of Commons. “It has been sug-
gested,” he said, “that a certain
number of colonial Members of
Parliament might be elected to
this Chamber, but that would not
overcome the difficulty of finding
sufficient time adequately to
debate colonial affairs I wish to
make some suggestions as to the
nature of the assembly. I suggest
that it should sit, in the main,
in London, and that its sessions
could perhaps coingide, in the
main, with these of this House.
It would consist of about 60 to
100 members, which would mean
that there would be up to six or
more selected from each Colony,
They would be chosen in a way
which would give representa-
tion to the main interests of .each
Colony, the economic interests ag
well as political interests, so that
the full aspect of each Colony’s
problems might be spoken of by
those who have first-hand know-
ledge of the particular matter
about which they are speaking.

Three Years

“Members should sit for a
period of about three years and
have their elections staggered so
that they could ensure continuity
and that all members did not
have to return to their countries
at the same time. The assembly



BARBADOS

Turns ft Down In

Rt. Hon. JAMES GRIFFITHS

would also consist of a number of
hon. Members from this House
so that the debates could have
the effect of fully informinjgg Mem-
bers of this House and when
colonial debates took place here,
in addition to these in the assem-
bly, they would be speaking from
knowledge gained through being
members of the assembly”’.

He went on to say, “It would
afford to the colonial people a
far closer contact with England
than at present. From discussions
I have had recently when in West
Africa and the West Indies I have,
found that among the people there
is a feeling of remoteness and of
resentment that decisions seem to
be imposed over their heads.
Some decisions have necessarily
to be made from this country; it
cannot always be left to the
colonial Government to debate
and decide on all the matters
affecting the interest of that Col-
ony. In some cases. colonial
Governors have not been as suc-
cessful as they might have been,
It would be a good thing if even
matters of that sort could be the
Subject of some kind of discus-
sions between the representatives
of people in the Colonies and the
British Government so that if need
be, changes could be affected if
it was found that appointments
had not been so happy as they
might have been.

Two-Way Chain

“My. last point is that in our
system of democracy it has be-
come recognised that we should
have a two-way chain for inform-
ation, From the Government
there is the chain of information
which flows out through its
Departments and their officials
to the people of the country. In
addition, there are the elected
representatives, and this applies
both to local government, and to
this House, who can bring forward
matters which affect their con-
stituents, where regulations have
pressed hardly upon them, so as to
have anomalies and injustices re-
n:oved. That does not apply in
full to the Colonies. There is
a gap in the chain. There is not
the same two-way discussion by a
two-way chain of information
between the colonial Governments
and this House. That incomplete
system of democracy’ which
applies to the Colonies is that
dealt with almost entirely by
reports which come from colonial
Governors or officials to the
Colonial Office. The setting up of
the representative assembly
have suggested would mean that
that gap would be filled and there-
by give the Colonies a far closer
feeling of co-operation with this
country”.

-

Distress

Mr. Leonard Gammai’s, (Horn-
sey, Conservative), recalled his
“distress” when the Prime Min-
ister was asked in the House who
Was to represent the Colonial
Empire at the recent Conference
of Dominion Prime Ministers, said,
“Myself and the right hon. Gen-
tleman”, (the Colonial Secretary).

From a constitutional point of

view, Mr. Gammans said, the
Premier was right, but “The
Colonial Empire, however, is a

different thing today from what
it was 10 or 15 years ago. We
have ballots and Ministers with







ADVOCATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1951

15,









D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

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FOR YOUR BATHROOM

By RICHARD Le FANU















quasi Cabinet powers. They will
not be satisfied with representa-
tion by the right hon. Gentleman

when matters like defence, foreign} SOME 150 pictures are now on show at the

affairs, communications, trade, q. ied
industry, and so on, are being} Sixth Annual Exhibition of the Barbados Arts —
discussed. We have to do better

& Crafts Society at Queen's Park: over 100

than that” f th ater BASINS with Pedestal
; of these are by Barbados artists, the remain- 25”x18”
i & BASINS with or without Pedestal
Regret that there was so little} der 4 ‘ati Ae
Mina Anne taiblernnekk te iaaate by members of the Arts Societies of 22”x16

Low-down SUITES

High-up SUITES

W.C. PANS, S & P TRAPS

W.C. SEATS {Plastie White and
1Bakelite Mahogany

Cast Iron CISTERNS

Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS

HARPIC, Large and Small.

what he described as “this very] Trinidad, Antigua, St. Lucia and Dominica,
important matter” was expressed
by the Colonial Secretary. In
dealing with the position so far
as the Colonies were concerned,
he made the following statement,
“The colonial territories, are in a
transition stage. They are at
varying stages of constitutional
advance. They are also at vary-
ing stages of économie and social
advance. The result is that I
have considerable doubts whether
at this moment, it would be wise
to make any attempt to call to-
gether representatives of all the
colonial territories—the large ones
the small ones, those which are
well advanced towards self-gov-
ernment, including the Gold Coast,
Nigeria, the territories in the West
Indies and others, as well as those
which in a sense are not so far
advanced along that road.

One cannot fail to be struck by the variety
of subject and treatment and by the high
standard of artistic achievement. This exhi-
bition should certainly not be missed—
indeed it is worth several visits. I hope a few
personal impressions will not deter anyone
from going to see it for himself and confirm-
ing the general opinion of its excellence.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,

For me, the most exciting picture was
Geoffrey Holder’s “Creole Woman” (119) —
the head and shoulders of a girl wearing a
bright yellow madras with 3 spiky knots, long
gold earrings and a low cut white dress: she
is turned away so that one can only see the
long eyelashes and the hint of a profile and

painted against a background of vivid fiery
orange.



RANSOMES
LAWN

Very Long Time

“It will be noted that, not only
during the life of the Government
to which I belong and during my
tenure of office, but indeed for a
very long time, the whole tendency
has been to decentralise rather
than to centralise, Colonial con-
ferences were called by some of
my predecessors back in the
twenties and thirties. In recent
years, however, the whole trend
has been to set up regional organ-
isations and regional conferences
For instance, there is the regional
organisation in East Africa
Recently, there was a very im-
portant conference in the West
Indies to consider the future con-
Stitutional development of those
areas. From that conference
emerged the proposals now being
considered for federation,

“That has been the whole ten-
dency, We ought to be careful
not to suggest in a debate — even
in a short one like this — that
we are seeking to centralise. It
is particularly important that we
should not give the impression
that any suggestion of this kind
is intended in any way to retard
the movement towards the devel-
opment of constitutional advance
towards self-government, I know
that that is not in the minds of
my hon. Friends. It becomes
increasingly important that there
should be the closest contact be-
tween members of legislative
councils and Members of this
House of Commons. We are
bringing members of the colonia
legislative councils into contact
with us and also into international
movements. Last year and the
year before a representative ot
one of the colonial legislative
councils accepted an invitation to

























Madame de Kuh has happily several pic-
tures from her January exhibition. Her por-
traits have great charm. I liked particularly
that of her husband (86) and the two studies
in pencil and crayon (105 and 106). In her
landscapes and her delicate study of a Coco-
nut trees (90), one can admire the same lumi-
nous perception of detail and colour.

It is unfortunate that both John Harrison
and Karl Broodhagen are exhibiting at the
Museum and are therefore under-represented
at Queen’s Park, “Time off” (104a) shows
terrific vitality in the lounging figures: Brood-
hagen’s Portrait of Cameron Tudor (31) is
very well done and of his other pictures I
liked “Pensioners in the Park” (33) and
“Sandhills” (98). Harold Connell’s flowe1
paintings—Poinsettia (14) and White Ipo-
moea (15) are both outstanding.



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Ivan Payne's three pictures are arresting
for their texture and colours. “Glitter Bay,
St. James” (23) is excellent. J. C. Carter had
a number of watercolour sketches which
combine vitality in composition with a bold
and pleasing use of colour. “Dover Woods”
(65) is a good &xample.

AT THE SAME TIME!

join our delegation te United emer MacLond's Sptighitown’ (17) *
Nations, very pleasing and my favourite from his re- a i
Reurtechted me exhibition. A. G. E. Kendall’s “Careen- THE NEW MOY GASHEL
age” (46) and “Schooner” (47) attract by
“When the conference on the

their composition and colour. I also liked

“The Smirk” (53) a portrait by Mrs. D. St.
John.

Colombo plan was held in London.
Singapore and the Federation of
Malaya were represented there
by very distinguished and eminent
members of their legislative coun-
cils. In that way we are bringing
them into ever closer association.
I pay tribute to the magnificent
work done by the Commonwealth
Parliamentary Association, who
bring us into contact with mem-
bers of the legislative councils
who are on their way through
London, I am most anxious that
we should take every opportunity
which will bring us into closer
touch as Members of Parliament
with members of the legislative
councils of the colonial territories.
There is much more I should like
to say. I thank my hon, Friends
for raising this matter. I hope
that they feel disposed to with-
draw this Motion, otherwise I
should have to ask the House to
reject it.”

ANTI-CRUSHABLE

LINENS

... ARE JUST THE TICKET

Of other Barbados artists who paint in a
minor key I enjoyed the work of Kathleen
Hawkins as in “Country Road” (82). J. March-
Penny (94 and 95) and Elmer Jordan, with
two nice flower pictures (20 and 21).

It was good to see some of the President’s
work at the exhibition. The Old Building,
Museum (25) was particularly pleasant.

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The Trinidad contribution contained some
very striking work. Sybil Atteck’s “Althea”
(112) with the long limbs and neck is strange-
ly attractive. Evril Rawle’s “Cabinet Maker”
(125) is full of vigour: there is a lot in the
picture but it does not appear crowded: his
“Beggar Man” (126) is spectral and disturb-

_Mr, Peter Smithers, Conserva-
tive M.P. for Winchester speak-
ing of the need for an increased
share to representatives of the







-

Colonies a fe ee: oe eae ing. D. Vereker’s “Bertha” (130) shows an :
ommonwe et :

that the Sect ey of ie Ne| old woman with gnarled clay coloured face %

gone some way towards opening| and hands—Geoffrey Holder also has a tropi- %

the door.” - vita : . y

cal Seascape (120) which is bold in design and bs



execution. Kathleen Ogier has two excellent

eo,

A-Bomb City Lives On Its Postcards And Yosuko Smiles

(From LIONEL CRANE)

HIROSHIMA

Little Yosuko San -is still very
pretty, although seven pieces of
glass were once blasted in her
face.

She came smiling into my hotel
room this morning with a cup of
tea, and in her black and gold
kimono looked dainty enough to
have stepped off one of those fra-
gile Japanese bridges in a willow-
pattern plate.

Yosuko was 17 when the atom
bomb dropped on Hiroshima in
August 1945. Today she folded
her hands and knelt on a bro-
eaded cushion to tell me what
she remembered about it.

“It was a nice day”, she said,
“The sky was sunny and blue
like a_ cornflower. I was at
home. There was a big bang





and our little house fell down.

“It was uncomfortable. Glass
cut my face. Look”, and she
pointed to seven ridges in her
round smooth cheeks.

Then, almost as an afterthought,
she said: “My mama San and
papa San I see no more”

Yosuko kept smiling, and her
voice was like a child’s reciting a
party piece. It sounded naive and
unreal, but I found later it wa
the attitude of the whole cit

To the rest of the world Hir«

shima is another name fo:

disaster but here where it hap-

pened the years have dredged

away the fear and awe and left

a kind of pride in the fame that

has come to the city,

The Bomb—which killed at least
78,150 people—has been. turned
into big business. The exact aim-
ing point was a T-shaped bridge
over one of ‘the city’s seven rivers
and around here the ruins have
been left just as they were on the
day of the big bang.

The spot is now a tourist centre
and hub of the souvenir trade
which has become one of Hiro-
shima’s major industries.

The big attraction is the ruined

Industry Promotion Hall which
was formerly used for trade
shows.

The cracked and blasted walls of
this building, with its rusty iron
deme stand in a garden of rubble.
When I went in a Japanese work-
man was turning over the rubble
with a rake.

The guide explained he was
looking for souvenirs’. He
already had several pieces of
burned metal in a box, but the
guide said these are not so val-
uable as pieces of bone

Dove Of Peace
On a concrete plinth in front of
the building is a carving of three
doves of peace flying in front of an
atomic cloud. A notice in English

ssys: “This building which pre-
serves its damaged state most
conspicuously, is an object of
many reminiscences to the pop-
ulace”,

A finger-sign’ points to a green |

hut and says: “Please rest awhile
in this room. Use no ceremony”.
Inside the rest room is like one
of the cheese shops in Cheddar
Gorge. But instead of cheese the
attendants sell souvenirs,

These include small drinking
cups dirty with atomic dusts,
pieces of metal that look as
though they have come from a
meteor, and picture postcards
like those on the stalls on
Brighton front, except that they
show a ruined city.

Outside another souvenir stall

sells pots half-melted by heat
from the. bomb, and American
magazines with such titles as

“True Love Stories” and “Experi-
ences”.

“Peace Tree”

Near the ruins three British
soldiers asked a Buddhist priest
to pose for pictures on the steps
of a temple. He hurried inside to
put en his best robes,

Close to the temple are two
pieces of charred wood labelled
“Peace Tree. No more wars.”

A cluster of clover grows at the

foot of

a small

the tree. Eacl
hole in it and

leaf has
botanists

say this is the result of atomic
radio-activity,

The guide led me to the Osaka
Bank to see the shadow of a man
left on the steps by the bomb
explosion, On the way we passed
two cinemas and a theatre specia-
lising in strip-tease shows,

On a hill overlooking the city is
a research station called the Ator
Bomb Casualty Commission. In
this glass-walled building U.S. and
Japanese doctors have spent two
years studying the effect of the
bomb on the people of Hiroshima.

No New Iliness

They have examined all known
casualties, and all the women who
have had babies since the explos-.
ion,

“We have found nothing new.”
said Dr, Warner Wells, a senior
surgeon. “All the injuries we
have seen could have been caused
by any other explosion, and we
have come across no new illness.”

My souvenir of Hiroshima is a
piece of scarred stone with a gilt-
painted edge. My name has been
written on it in English and
Japanese above the words
“Explosion centre, Hiroshima.”

It is so big I had to carry it

in my hand in a crowded tram.
and elderly women kept staring at
it and then at me.
It was the only time I felt The
Bomb was embarrassing
—LE.S.

|
|

drawings in Bistre (132 and 133). I thought
Mildred Almandoz picture “Beating the
Drums” (113) was lively and the colouring
in M.P. Alladin’s “Composition” (116) is very
good,



From Antigua, “Willie” (137) by Cecil!
Adams seems an outstanding portrait. Dun-
stan St. Omer’s oil paintings from St. Lucia

are vigorous and interesting. :
i sc x .

Dominica is represented by two good ‘WORLD S MOST REFRESHING DRINK $
artists, Mrs. J. K. Howe in oils and Percy : IDA, j ! :
Agar in Watercolour. Mrs. Howe's “Jump-Up” GOLD B RAID Rk UM 8
(144), a picture of a raffish dance hall, is full AND 3
of energy and colour. Percy Agar draws a sun : :
and raindrenched tropical scene with a CANADA DRY CLUB SODA >
clarity and balance which make his two pic- $
tures “House in the Forest” (151) and “Bana- OR 3
nas” (152) rank among the most satisfying : “7 x
in the whole exhibition. CANADA DRY GINGER ALE %
o

°

It remains to add that the artists and the AT 8
public have been well served by the care with : 5 %
which the pictures are grouped and hung GODD ARD ty %
and for this, as well as for their initiative and co x
encouragement, Mrs. Golde White and her! Tol ; 7 Wy %
Committee deserve our praise and thanks. RESTAL } RAN i x

(Pictures on p. 5)



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY
AT

=
rHE



15, 1951

ART EXHIBITION



SS OO

WILLIE—By Cecil Adams

Jéssamy Lane

Behind the Bridgetown Plaza
Theatre is a bye street from River
Road, Jessamy Lane, It is the big-

gest fruit selling district of the
city, and. the street where one
hears the foreign twang of the

women who come from St, Lucia
and other neighbouring islands to
sell.

For these women it is a day of
all business and the houses are
nearly all half filled with oranges.

Jessamy Lane, too, is a sort of
hang-out for some of the working
men about the wharf and for
fishermen. There is a cook shop
in the lane on the door of which is
written, refreshments for sale and
about 12 o’clock any day one can
see the tall old cook, proprietor of
the business, dishing out rice to
the sweating men

These women wno have a large
share in the fruit trade of the
island are not talking women;
they always seem to feel that one
would try to push them out of
their trade. An old seller who
has been to Barbados selling fruit
now for many years, however,
told the Advocate that in St. Lucia
where she came from many of her
people begin to dream from when
they are girls of the day when
they, too, will make a trip to, Bar-
bados and set up as fruit sellers.
The women who go back to their
islands, tell of the good trade that
can be carried on,

They usually get in contact with
schooner agents and it is not diffi-









cult to get their people in the
other islands to send their. fruit
es fruit selling in Jessamy

there ar broom and hat

I yals and coconut sellers,

the



GLITTER BAY—By Ivan Payne



CARIB NEWS AGENCY
WILL BE FORMED

After three days the Caribbean
Press Association presided over
by Mr. C. E, Hitchins of the
Trinidad Guardian came to a
unanimous agreement today to
proceéd with the formation of a
Caribbean News Agency.

Amended draft articles and
proceedings, will be circulated to
various newspapers for approval
and confirmation. Reuter’s Latin
American Manager ‘attended the
talks and gave valuable advice,



30/- For Overloading

A fine of 30s to be pa‘d in 28
days or one month’s imprison-
ment was yesterday imposed on
Byron Kellman, a "bus conduc-
tor oi ine motor bus G. 140 by
His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma,
for overloading.

When the offence was commit-
ted on January 9 the bus was
being driven along Roebuck St.



KNOWLES ACCEPTS JOB



GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 14
3arbados-born W. H G
Knowles accepted the post of
Sugar Cultivation Officer in his
home island’s Agriculture De
partment and expects to leave
Br h-Guiana on February 23
4 aduate of the Col

Imperial





ees

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



Want Shops
Act Amended

Mr. R. M. Cave of the

ing Act should be amended, I

special necessity.

Mr, Cave made the suggestion
at the meeting of the Council of
the Chamber of Commerce held
yesterday. He gave as his reason
the unusual occurrence of a tour-
ist ship arriving in the colony on
Sunday, and the loss to the colony
poF hundreds of American dollars
because the stores were closed.

| This, he said, was a pity.

The ship was the Nieuw Ams-
terdam which brought nearly 800
ourists to the island,

Mr. Cave was of the opinion
hat the matter should be brought
o the attention of Government by
che Chamber. The law as it stood
it present, he said, not only pré-
vented shops opening on closed
jays, but made no provision for
ywny Authority to use discretion in
siving permission tor opening on
special occasions.

The President., Mr. D. G. Lea-
sock Jnr., was in favour of the
suggestion. It should be borne in
mind, he said, that at present per-
mission could be obtained from
the Commissioner -of Police to
open produce warehouses on
bank-holidays and Sundays under
special circumstances. He saw no
reason why some Authority should
not be given the same discretion-
ary powers with respect to stores.

Principle Disliked

Mr, Trevor Bowring said that he
did not like the principle but he
daresay it would receive the sup-
port of the majority of members.
He thought they should find out
what was the feeling ofthe Cham-
ber’ as a whole before doing any-
thing.

Mr. G. D. Bynoe expressed
agreement and it was decided to
place the matter for discussion on
the Agenda for the next Quarterly
Meeting of the Chamber,

Mr, Leacock reported to the
meeting the activities of the com-
mittee who had been appointed to
go _il into the matter of advertising
signs and hoardings, with adver-
tisers. This was a matter that
had been brought up by Mr.
Trevor Bowring at a meeting of
the Chamber when he spoke of
the unfavourable’ effect these
signs were having on the scenic
beauty of the island.

Mr. Leacock said yesterday
that Mr. Bowring and himself
who were the committee, had met
some of the biggest advertisers,
and there had been general agree-
ment that advertising hoardings
should not be put up in country
districts as a whole, It was left
to a sub-committee to define the
exact limits of each highway and
certain residential districts as
well, where advertising hoardings
should be permitted, This com-
mittee actually consisted of Mr.
Bowring and three representatives
of the biggest advertisers. Co-
operation was promised by vari-
ous small advertisers.

Mr. Bowring pointed out that
the Civic Circle had been written
to asking them to send a repre-
sentative to the meetings of the
committee,

Publicity Contributions

The Council appointed Mr, A,
R. Toppin and Mr, Vernon Knight
to meet representatives from the
hotels and Publicity Committee,
with a view to classifying the
various firms with respect to their
contributions to the Publicity
Committee.

Members of the Council were
told that the Journal Committee



had appointed Mr, Ian Gale as
the Editor of the Journal.
Mr. Cave asked for and was

granted leave of absence until the
next Annual General Meeting of
the Chamber.

A notice from the Shipping and
Mercantile Association to the
Chamber informed them that the
Association would be holding a
meeting on February 17, Among
the matters for discussion would
be counsel’s opinion on the appli-
cation of the Shop Act and Shops
Orders; the Wages Board's
(Bridgetown) Decisions 1950, and
the Holidays with Pay Bill in its
present form,

The Association thinks that the
Chamber would be interested in
these matters and invited them to
send representatives.

Mr. D. Clairmonte of the firm
of Canada Dry was proposed to be
a member of the Chamber.

The proposal was made by Mr.
R. M. Cave and seconded by Mr.
S. H. Kinch,

Barbados Needs

More Hotels
=—TOURIST AGENT

There is need for more hotels in
Barbados and if this should come
about, the island would get many
more U.S. dollars, Mrs, Margaret
H. Mc Vaugh, representative of
the Philadelphia Office of Messrs,



Thomas ‘Cook and Son Ltd., told
the Advocate yesterday.
Mrs. McVaugh arrived here

over the week end on a short holi-

day visit and is staying at the
Aquatic Club, She expects to
leave this evening by B.W.I.A.

for Trinidad.

She said that her job In Phila-
delphia is to discuss with pros-
pective travellers any arrange-
ments they would like to make
for a trip to any part of the world
whether it was by air or ship.

In addition to that, she has to
do a lot of travelling to various
places to get first hand and up-
to-date information for their
clients.

She said that she had visited
the Virgin Islands, San Juan and
‘Trinidad before, but this was her
first visit to Barbados,

Exchange Favourable

She had been to most of the
hotels in the island and was very
impressed by everything she had
seen. She said that the favour-
able exchange rate was a big In-







ducement to people coming here

from the U.S. and added that it

was also encouraging to find that

hotel expenses were less than in

the U.S.A and that English

goods were , obtainable in the
island

ne observed that there were

y locally produced articles

1 would be of great nterest

is had’ arpa ¢

t € te } +

1a tr € et
prices

Ideal
Store, thinks that the Shops Clos-

should be so amended as to give





Kensington New

discretionary ‘powers to some of the places that will at
Authority for allowing shops to Moscue 16 he erected
open on closed days in case of = ao =

Mosque is sithated in Kens
deplorable State,

‘Your Guess’
Was A Patt

Winner of Monday’s

Evening
Advocate “Your Guess”

com pe-



tition was Ormie Browne of Cul- with grass and weeds.

toden Road, St. Michael.
guess was that it was
down pail with its
Dotiom.” It was

Ormie’s

cover
the first

on

nearest to the



correct answer.
There were only two other gues
which were opened later that
might have won the prize, They
were “A bucket turned down with
cover” and “a household gust-
bin,”
The correct answer supplied

by the photographer who took
picture was “A galvanized bucket
painted white—turned upside
down with its cover on the upturn-

the

ed_ bottom.”
Most popular guess was “the
top of an old windmill.” Some

people even placed the parish and
estate. The second most popular
fuess was “The Silo at oe ye! -
tral Livestock Station.” Thes
answers constituted about e
per cent. of the guesses
little girl, was so sure it was
top of an old windmill! that
sent in three coupons with
answer,

Other answers
light and shade,”
“tent”, “The top of South Point
lighthouse,” “The clock at Da-
Costa’s”’, “Bowling Green electric
tower,” “An _ incinerator.” “A
siren”, “a heap of megasse,

Two of.the most startling an-



ghty
“O ne
th
she
that

were “Electric
“a Lineman’s

”



swers were “A part of a_ wal)
lying on a house with a degree
angle” and “A firmnet for cre-

menting bones at a hospital.”

Leaf Seald
Rampant
In B.G.

—STEVENSON

Mr, G. C, Stevenson, Cytogen-
eticist of the B.W.I Central
Sugar Cane Breeding Station, who
has just returned from a tour of
the sugar preducing areas of
British Guiana investigating Leaf
scald Disease of sugar cane, tad
the Advocate yesterday that it is
of widespread occurrence, particu-









larly on the West Coast and on
some of the Berbice estates.
Infection is least on the East
> and the Demerara River
Banks, he went on to’ say. “Even
on the most heavily infected
estates, the occurrence of the
Cisease varies considerably from
field to field, and although there

is no evidence of its reaching epi
demic proportions anywhere, it
undoubtedly represents a_ poten-
tial danger to the industry, and re
quires energetic steps to be taken
for its control,

The estate surveys which are
being made are of the utmost
value in defining the extent of in-
fection in the commercial sugar
cane varieties, and in familiarising
the field staffs with the symptoms
of the disease and its effect
the growing cane.
Although there is a jgood deal

information available on the
in other countries, much
rimental work will be re.
quired before the details of its
vate of spread and its effect on
yield under British Guiana
conditions can be elucidated
Such experimental work has al-
ready been started, and should be
pursued and extended, and_ it
would be advisable for the whole
programme to be under the direct
supervision of a qualified plant
pathologist.

Cause of Disease

“The disease is caused by a bac-
terium which infects the vascular
system of the living canes and can
exist only for short periods outside
the plant. Infection by way of the
soil or water is impossible, and
the spread of the disease is largely
by way of infected planting mate-
rial or by knives used in cutting
the cane.

Infection by rats is also a
sibility to be borne in mind. The
bacterium responsible for the
disease has been isolated with the
help of Mr. Hutchinson, plant
pathologist on the staff of the
Imperial College of Tropical Agri
culture, Trinidad, who visited the
colony last month, and the disease

on

of



pos-

in “the history



“an upside der
the
guess
pulled out of the box which was



Road After Rain

WHEN TOURISTS visit the island in 1952 perhaps one

tract them jis the first Indian
of Barbados. This
ington New Road which is in a

inter—zong¢
New houses are being built Cricket in the hope of discovering
yearly and the area looks very @2d encouraging new talent.

ettractive. The people try to keep
their small aa of land in a san-
itary condition, but the road is
reugh, rocky, full. of holes and has
proper drainage. The wide
canals at the lower part of the
road, Which are the only means of
draining the water, are overrun
The hard
bottom of these canals hin-
the waiter penetrating the
ground and forms a breeding spot
for mosquitoes.

At the upper end
near Baxters Road,
draiz system at all
falls the water runs in all direc-

ns and eventually ends up in

people’s yards causing many
rown or die from disease,
back of the road going
Chapman’s Lane is Mur
sture, while on the other
side is the thickly populated New

no

mossy

of the road,
there no
When rain

1s

ige



tock to ¢

At the
wards

phy’s pa





T.T.C.A. Aim At
lnter-zorie Cricket

The newly formed Trinidad and
Tobago Cricket Association aims at
regulating, organising and infusing
discipline into local cricket ‘n
Trinidad, Dr. A. G. Francis, Presi
dent of the Association, told the
Advocate yesterday.

He said that another
Association was to have

Dr
Trinidad Cricket Selectors, ar
rived on Monday for the tourna-
ment between Barbados and Trin-
idad. He is staying at Indramer
Guest House, Worthing.

He said that Queen's § Park
Cricket Club was the recognised
and accredited body for Inter
national and Intercolonial Cricket,
but there was no body which con
trolled cricket in Trinidad as
such and they had been hoping
that there would be such a body,

In different parts of Trinidad,
there were different organizations
running cricket. In the South,
there was St. Patrick Cricket
Association, in San Fernando, the
Rahamut Cup Association and at
Caroni, there were also different
Sodies running cricket competi
tions, the chief of them being Sun-

Orleans where people also Pridge. . ‘ aie
live in fear of being marooned Minor Competitions
in their houses when there is In the North, there was Bonanz3,
a heavy downpour At the.the oldest and most powerful
entrance of the Seventh Avenue body and they also had the Mer-
from Kensington New Road chants and a few other minor
s a dust-bin Yesterday this competitions,
hin was surrounded with water He said that they hoped to have
and one of its sides was broken the confidence of and be, recog-
dewn. It is nearly impossible for nized by all those bodies, so that
vengers to wade through the their influence would be really
large pool ef water surrounding felt over matters concerning
the bin to remove the stuff, The Cricket in Trinidad ‘ .
refuse and stagnant water togeth Asked what was the attitude ol
er attract a swarm of flies the Queen’s Park Cricket Clut

towards

House Surrounded







the present Association

Dr. Francis said that irresponsible

stat.ments had got about that they
There was also a large pool of were out to oppose Queen’s Park
water at the entrance of thy but that was absurd. They neither
Kigh a Avenue yesterday, A house wished, nor could oppose Queen's
at the corner was surrounded by Park. .
water inches deep and made it im- Queen's Park was - responsible
pe sible for its occupant to enter for international and intercolonia
without getting wet, cricket and not only did he feel a:
Gwendolyn Gregg, who has President of the Association tha‘
been living at Kensington New Queen's Park did not look ot
Read for eight years, told tha them as rivals or opponents, bu
Advocate that there is no outley was fairly sure that Queen’s Park
for the water when rain falls. glad of and approved of the}
Bince Murphy's pasture has aac pick. iation, and would support ii

filled in, the water is thrown back



to the best of their ability,



e been hoping to expect
into her vard. On many occasions, He had
Si fowls and ducks were drown- that should their organizatior
od The water settles in the road continue to be run along the best
for wWwealiae: end the dampness lines, and merit the confidence o!
c apne her +n catch colds Re. the cricket loving community
cently she had to buy E.C. to Queen’s Park would hand over te
“yap ancinll her house because them, many of the duties it now
of stagnant water and the “bad performed,
smell coming from Murphy’s
pasture.” . st
Fifty nine-year-old Mr. ches ,C,. Agenda For
terfield Ifill has been living in
Kensington New Road from the e sat?
time he was 13. “I am one of the Ne xt Me eting
many tax-payers in this road and he or , om-
surely something could be done to es sn Pr aspen Siwy
the road to improve conditions,” Merce foll .
General Meeting the following
ao bie oe’ hvn: teen’ will be among the matters that
ill saic t she > bouts

the land he was told that half of
the land was his. He would sur-





will be discussed,
The President Mr. D, G. Lea-
cock will move that the Chamber

render his half anytime to get 4 consider the advisability of estab-
proper road to walk on, lishing Standing Committees re-
At this stage his Wife put in: presenting different sections of the
“Boats could float through here commercial community, in order
sometimes”; being a very pub- that prompt action may be taken if
lie spirited woman, she added: necessary, in any matter affecting
“Where are all the taxes going?”’ any such sections. ‘
When Mr. Ifill spoke again he Mr. D. V. Scott will move that
iid that when he first came te Mme Chamber obtain some indica-
live in Kensington New Road, the “on from Government as to what
conditions were the same, Tho action they propose to take on the
mer r » |g § . report of the Commission which
owner of the land soon after : ;
scattered a few stones in the road “45 appointed to investigate the
et ; ‘ate question of mark-ups on food-
ut this did not stop the water vaults
from flooding the road during the ” Mr. J. O'D. Egan will move that
ny see the Chamber inquire into the re-
When the whole district was hort of the Committee appointed
privately owned he used to pay py the Governor under Sir John
his rent to Messrs Cottle Catford. saint, re the price de-controlling



Now, nearly all the land has

been of

certain items, and to refer to

sold out in plots and is owned by the number of items which have
many tax-payers. been de-controlled in Trinidad
and elsewhere,

Petition Sent In

He said that once a petition was
signed by residents of the area
and sent to the authorities, bu
“perhaps this was thrown into the
waste paper basket where all good
things go.”

Mr. Colin Roach, an upholsterer,
has been living in Kensington New
Road for the past 16 years. He
has seven small children who, as
all children do, enjoy playing in
the open air.

Whenever there is a downpour
Mr. Roach and his children are
marooned inside the house, When
he has work to deliver he finds it
difficult to cross this water, He
sid that once the drainage was
O’neal’s pasture, but since that had
been filled in, the water settled
in the road

“For days



water can be seen
n the gutters,” he said, “I hav
to keep an eye on the children
Uf they play in this stagnant wate)
they may catch an itch or pick up|

the

ring worms.’
“As a tax-payer I feel sore about]
these conditions, Can’t something,







has been reproduced experimen- Fe done?” He is anxiously looking
tally at Uitvlugt by innoculation forward to the day when Kensing
cf cane material with a pure ton New Road will be properly
culture. paved and the drainage system
Further experiments with this improved. He said, “the gutters
culture on other commercial vari- ajong Fontabelle and Baxter
eties and new importations from Poads are ting to receive the

the B.W.1I. Central Sugar Cane water,”

@ On page 8. @ On page 8.
POLPEVOELEV LOVE PLL VAP VALLE ELLIS),
%
+
Ld Te —

IF YOURE :
7: J r ¥
ALWAYS ON g

THE RUSH

also

CAC

|
1g CHILDREN

8 KNIGHT’

4,466,466

You'll need a

â„¢" REVITONE
TONIC

FOR RESTORING

A VITAMIN AND MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT FOR
AND

DRUG

4,446,464
PPCLSOF ELSE LLLP LOPE A





Tonic

VITALITY

C - TOSE



SSOSESCSSSOOESE SCE

*, 6 $S990S9O69S

ADULTS

STORES.

-

HOt
LLC LEST PE >

To point out to the Government
the advisability of such action, in
view of the fact that certain mer-
handise under the present sys-
tem of controls are being sold for
very muchless than their present
replacement est; gnd that liquid




sisseâ„¢s On the market are pecoming
less and le
To request that certain items

which are sought by tourists from
Venezuela and elsewhere be per-
mitted importation from dollar
sources, as it is well-known that
tourists come to this island espe-
cially from Venezuela, and return
with their dollars, because they
are unable to spend_their money
due to the fact thaf these items
are not being stocked by the mer-
shants. -





MUSCULAR FATIGUE?
Get back in step
with ALKA-SELTZER |!

; tin,

++ Seltzer at

J *s “ the first sign
| of muscular

fatigue. The

‘Take
Alka-

same safe an-
algesic, so effective
as a headache rem-
edy, relieves discom-

fort quickly, helps
you to relax, Keep
it handy — always!

These are a MUST

BREAD BOXES
in green, blue and

Cream .......65........ $3.70
e
FRY BASKETS
Each 32c., 50c., $1.11
$1.20
*

CAKE PAN SETS
for making Checkered
Cakes. Set 78c. & 97c.

———



Cave Shepherd & Co.,

12 &



f

aim of the

Francis who is one of the





PAGE



SUGAR GOES
TO LONDON

The steamship Colonial,

Pay 15

now in






FIVE

— ae

Took Rice: war





A S-year-oid sailor of t

Carlisle Bay, is loading 1,975 tons g-hooner, Emeline, Jeffers James,

of sugar for London. was yesterday ordered by Hi

This shipment is part of the Worship, Mr. H \. Talma to
produce of sugar for 1951 The pay a fine of 15 forthwith

Colonial started to take her load jndergo one month’ imprison
on Monday and is not expected to ment with hard labour
complete loading before the weet! Jame was found guilt of

end unlawful possession of a quantit

Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd., of rice which he was tal along

are her agents. the wharfside. Cpl. — phy 0

the Bridge Police Station who

Liitle Fishermen made the arrest saw James with









the bag of rice and got suspiciou






Boys of between 10 and 14 were — —, cal nt sac eg ,
hooking many small fish on the See ee sineat teisctin
wharf pelow the Victoria bridge
yesterday at about 12 o'clock. The
boys show much skill in fish ‘
caching One of them told the FINED 40/-
Advocate that small fish hooking | ‘ vig
on the wharf is preliminary train- _ Sinclair Jemmott of Lakes Folly,
ing for the time when they will = ee Oe C sarin ot
ee eater ined Son. t6 be yout does
ue ” . 4 x” they will undergo one month's
Smith Discharges Today imprisonment with hard labour
Schooner Lucille M. Smith call- for the larceny of a quantity of
ed from British Guiana yesterday srticles valued at £1. 9s. from the
with 1,500 bags of rice and quaao- § S Islardside, by His Worship
tities of firewood and chareo Mr. H. A. Talma yesterday

The Smith is expected to begin







to discharge her cargo to-day. Hex Cp!. Carter of the Bridge Police
lceal agents are Messrs. Robert m said that on January 13
Thom, Ltd. he saw both defendants with the
articles in a boat and on question-

Y.W.C.A. MEETING ing them learnt that they had re

Members of the Y.W.C.A. Com-— ceived them from the S.S, Island-
mittee will meet on Tuesday Feb- jiide. .
ruary 20 for women who have He took them back to the
taken out forms for membership steamship and there the articles
of the Association. The meeting were identified as the ship's prop-
will take place between 4.30 and erty. Both of the defendants were
6 p.m, when the entrance fees then taken to the 3ridge Post and
will be collected, charged



Bovait gives that extra flavour to all soups, pies and
savouries. And nourishment, too !-for Bovril
the concentrated goodness of becf. Bovril is also
a tasty sandwich spread—and a cup of hot Boyril
daily makes you feel fine |



. FRESH SUPPLY OF

“PURINA HEN CHOW 5 :

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

aN JASON JONES & CO., LID.—Distributors c
SERB ERB REERPREREBae sa



SPECIFY

“EVERITE

ASBESTOS-CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

“TURNALL’

ASBESTOS
WOOD











on the list for

YOUR KITCHE

BREAD BOXES
in White Enamel $3.17

CAKE & FLOUR TINS

in green and cream

6
POTATO RICERS, — 9
Each .. $140 CAKE COOLERS
© Each $1.09
ICING SETS $4.56 2
© JELLY MOULDS
SIEVES .......... 53ce. Each 16, 19, & 63ce

Ltd. |

13 Broad Street









N

eee OC I. iy a



PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1951

Guma, Sore Mouth and Loose
teeth mean that you have prarhes.
Trench Mouth or some bad . ne
that a nee or later cause your tee
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trou Amosan stops gum
bleed!





BY CARL ANDERSON









d save your teeth or
ew aoe on. return of empty pack-
age. Get Amosan from your chemis:

y. The guar-
antee protects
:




HARPIC
CLEANS IT
FOR YOU



4 ‘al | :
| i
Ss

EET BS







MICKEY MOUSE

[ THOSE... BLOSSOMS! THEY'RE GIVING |
OFF A SCENT..LIKE
CHLOROFOR/A!

— ~~" . css
ve |
LOOK OUT,.JEFFREY ! THIS FLOWER a
TREE iS APTER US!

FRESH orin



















Bij cewet = TOM ATO SAU c E Just sprinkle some ‘ Harpic’ into the lava-

! che “a gins ememasis 0's, ae tory bowl leave overnight —then flush,

ty \ VV POU a at peat aS *Harpic’ cleans, disinfects and deodorises

| alliage weer. ah Ee the whole pan, including the S-bend,
7 c=

HARPIC

THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER
RSS SPOT9SSS >

| OBSERVE

y that different brands of



a Tooele 4
Cope, 1981, Walt Gainey Protactrons =e.”
\ orld Rights Reserved



~ Bay Rum come, and they
% go, but - - -





HE'S HIDING











y 5
" ) THE ALBUM WITH ‘ BORNN S
WHAT'S ALL.“ A, ( HIS BABY PICTURES ) %
THE MYSTERY ) \ IN: IT )
WITH “aN A Y I JM
ALEXANDER? ) NN oe B R
TNS ‘ 4 .
; will go on forever

WHY ?
QUALITY
That's Why





.
9,555.59 65 9 GO OSOG VIDOE SOOO OOGES



AND WE WILL USE A
SECHEAPER PERMUTATION

oe Oe LO
WE MUST STARTEBAN OCCAG| —— \WHAT (VE BOUGHT
A SAVINGS BET 7 ? WITH THE MONEY
CAMPAIGN a: ee mee” ‘ we : SAVED

















Confectionery The Finest Eitan
Ba) AML the Delighttul Assortment tig th ay

Brands Bottles COINTREAU .o....cccccccseceeescesun $6.00 3.25
KUMMEL



|












































Boxes ROLS LIQUEUR CHOCOLATES
SHERIFF, | WAS WITH THE RAILROAD DETECTIVE WHENHE DIED. s vend Oe "HENNESSY XXX BRANDY _
HERIFE, | WAS WITH THE RAILROAD DE a | EEA ne Teen Oar) [GaN Ne NOI ee ORTO » MELTIS FAVOURITE CANDIES .... $1.85 1.02 » HENNESSY XXX BRANDY
HE A BEEN oe a » _MELTIS COFFEE CHOCOLATE MINT » MARTINI VERMOUTH
EO un ect Lane tee lewiniy 1.82 » NOILY PRAT VERMOUTH
Tins FRYS CHOCOLATE HAZEL NUTS ....... 2.02 » BOOTHS GIN ooo
» NESTLES TOASTED ALMONDS .........__ 1.05
» PASCALL'S FRUIT SALAD... ae tt :
id FRUIT BARLEY SUGAR ....... .98 i i fog iapeen
» . GLUCOSE BARLEY SUGAR. 38 Biscuits Qe =Sap
ae,
a f lea : “
= iis fey
LVF }
malades Tins PEEK FREAN’S MARLINE CRACKER ........ $1.75




















































Tins LYLE’S GOLDEN SYRUP ................ $ .47 .28 # a » | PLAYBOX BISCUITS ........ 1.20

BY GEORGE MC. MANUS Bottles BERCHEN CASTLE G, SYRUP ............... 69 « ROMARY GINGER BAKE BUSCUITS ...... 79

ee be MM Soe thaa uted UAE Tus aetesfusiteouliaread 44 ia es HONEY BAKE e eae 78

; « GOLDEN SHRED MARMALADE .......... 47 “ “ WATER BISCUITS .................. 1.12

Mat os ae «» SILVER SHRED Se Wnt phe ilass 47 » JACOB’S AFTERNOON TEA BISCUITS. 1.45

TO SEE IF THOSE SHUT UP! HWE HAS-AN! HE TOOK on HARTLEY’S MARMALADE ................... .38 im - CREAM CRACKERS .................... 1,52
Saetees cer |) THeeas THE TRLEWISIOS ST Tins S.A. MARMALADE (2-15) ............. ai 46
2 W VE PUTTIN’ UP THE » TRINIDAD MARMALADE 36

LEVISION SET IT || ANTENNA ON DUGAN'S





LD KEEP HiM HOME! SALOON !/








NO
ON
\
ney
y £
——

Suices and
















Meats
~y

Squashes Easy-to-Serve

Tins BAHAMAS PINEAPPLE JUICE «000000 53° Tao tidied! Weendite
" even Ls TOMATO Juice “ep » C&BBREAKFAST ROLL... "40
* IRORA tomate . SWIFT'S OX TONGUES (2-15) ne 980
RAYMOND ” RIDAT: Gaalent vores” ie EMI ab 55 ease coenerdessto lead 20
TM COMIN’ CLEAN WITH YOU, RIGHT OFF THE “i fia 4s , - » ORANGES GRAPE! FRUIT JUICE 29 . Sees a with CORRES, . oan
Rei arorres' war mame Bie Re Keon aA | = Lah Bottles ROSE'S LIME JUICE CORDIAL... 1.08 “KRAFT MACARONI & CitéesE "7

» COAPICIE ORANGE SQUARE... 40. | nae eee eee me ae
. » LEMON SQUASH ....... 98



Lamb...

Fine for





































NG Roasting :

PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF—STEAK—ROAST—STEW Tins BATCHELOR PEAS ooo... $ -26

LAMB—in LEGS, LOIN, SHOULDER—CHOPS—VEAL m CHALEENGE PEAS 0... ccccccsscesceseecsesers .20

for ROASTING & CUTLETS—TRIPE—OX TONGUES » ASPARAGUS (WHITE) Large ... nw SMD

CALVES KIDNEYS—LAMB & VEAL for STEW— » MUSHROOMS .............. i weieeubentey 55

PPP LEB ooo isccsessscssssecds, $10.00 per case: 30c. per Ib » SWEET CORN .... 48

, dae; RP REE ae athe os ahh cadanches Recdvdue sonia Saves ie 35

THE WAY THAT SAP IS FLYIN US, NO_] [NOW!WHATS THIS 7 SOWHAT? WEDONT ) (IMWITHROYON | |—h SALAMI SAUSAGE... oo. $1.00 per Ib » MIXED VEGETABLES FOR SOUP ............ AS
TELLIN’ WHAT'LL HAPPENS ABOUT YOU TWO TRYIN © WANT HER WITH US. THAT! WE Sore
NE. | [1M PUTTIN’ ON THIS TO TOSS THIS DAME OFFN ) 7 DAMES IS A JINX? MOVE FAST

YOU WANNA GET US ===]. | PARACHUTE! TAKE THE PLANE, AGAINGT — ( SHELLBE IN OURWAYs)









——

ALLKNT? CE

=== THAT ONE.




“
t
WV



ew ne ee eee ee

NGS A Ak Le a

{





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN







PUBLIC NOTICES | Chemumnardnecd Terns or SiGe, Barrells “Ronstadt can
CLASSIFIED ADS. |zumxer*.$6,000More Passed Overpriced Tou |F igo Pad ——





f £3 to be paid i t ol Ww pack

ne mont! a e e tea at 21. cents,

rd labo é nh exce f the sehe.| G eddard
I i 1 January 17 i And

eyes |

TELEPHONE 2508 on eases

and $1.80 on Sundays. month or in defau







imprisenment with i

aralsilellcatndibnisirrscteneeesiticinicieeesiene
The charge for announcements of “£25 > od, easily earned by obtaining ,
Dirthe, TRS. eeths. pxeee PUBLIC SALES order for privese Caristmas Corde Or a our was on Tuesday impo
gments, and In Memoriam notices from your friends. previous expert
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on ainaeys Write H for

sed on Gar-|dule price ¢
Ten cents per agate line on week-days|enee necessary - § tollmeyer
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, | bi ? or eeeeel ; awe
for any number of words up to 50, and| minimum charge $i on us, | besutiful free sample Book to ‘s
50 on weekdays largest and meet Publishers; wanes A Lt Do ad ds names as popular in cricket?



3 cents per word on week-days and] and $1.80 en Sundays.

(oj


































































4 cents per word on Sundays for each commission; mi money king in a 7 t “ool
tdaitlondd word a gppertunity. | Jones, Willams &° Con MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW) === | me GAS: fe Se
announcements in Carib Calling the REAL ESTATE England.” TH x : . ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED | ; Y a M . } | Soebtacat- nny al
charge Js $8.00 tor any number of words 25.1.51—18n E HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY at their meeting on (M.A.N.Z, LIN! | hI . ae Te
—- -—-_-_eoeo '
gdeitional ward, Terths cosh. hone 2508 i lala Y. M. P Cc Sueetey poo * hone em to be added to} ws «roxGaRrRo™ is scne as 7 Pn ys eee eee esos
ween 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death un ed will offer for sale at man” . rovi in the 1950—51 i tes ail Adelaide Jaz y 2 Melbourne |
Notices only after 4 p.m. their office No. 17 High Street, . seurrapens oe soe to submit any ds 5 tati Th fe timates for labour at February §#h, brilar 17th, | [0 DAY'S NEWS
town, on Friday the 10th -. ions ‘they may desire to place on the antation. e latter sum proved insufficient to] srisbane Februsry = Arriving at ; ave j
som sAix nim, The mestinge or! welling house | Meeting te'be held st ihe charter | Meet the expenses for the 1951 sugar crop. ge ee 3rd | ——
: od Cae Wire? oe, new call: on the 14th March, te 4, oe came. tak : . his vesse pas ample “space for Hard “ re ated gine |
Minimum charge week 12 cents and prac oon es by estimation 12,087 eo we ee 8 aan evewree expenditure )expected to get under paragraph nares Tran ood "trois Bills of cept. Oa go” and if Whittaker's Almanack,
98 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24] Ville Avene. tenon, the sea at Car- Jia g the year included the pay-|(C) of the addendum which stated | Lading with transhipment at ‘Trinidad ||| St, bucia, G |
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a} 3, Sepnes Worthing, Christ Chureh, SaTeNy, | Ment of 124% increase in. wages|that the usual bonus paid to lab-|‘F, British Guiana, Barbados, Windward |{] 824 Passengers only for 1951
“eee , spection any day except, Sundays arising out of the Ministry of Food| ourers was on the same basis as|°"? ‘*e¥2rd Tslends. goa re. oe Relies: to. te Pint, 44 Pint and Cocktail
Mare, Fale one Yee ©n application to ‘ NOTICE See for aver is 1950; — 7%|was paid to labourers of private For further particulars apply — Tel. 4047 ita Glasses
For ARISH OF ST. JOHN bon out of an] estates, FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD and
AUTOMOTIVE of tne eee S and conditions| SEALED tenders are invited for agreement between the S Da COSTA & Co. LitD., |} at
to: plying approximately 42 pint aE dd ’ ugar Pro- Trinidad Barb ;
COTTLE, CATFORD, & Co., | lowe rahe aaimately 42 pints pure fresh dlcers’ Federation and the Barba~ Labourers’ Bonus BW. ewe ISON’
ae Solicitors, in two deliveries, “as 4 ‘ae ae ws Workers’ Union; for every D ; ; sa dean cdeiaienonntondaaencancaibiior bi — Pa Seer ha
BEDFORD DELIVERY VANS — ship-| _________—_32.8i~-12n. | Merch 1951. Applications wit be re-| 9,000 tons over 120,000 (which is r. Cummins said that those | and HARDWARE
ment just to hand and ready for im-| PROPERTIESCTwo acannon. | y the undersigned up to the 17th) considered an average crop) aj '8¥Fes were worked out by the [ —————
mediate ‘positasion. Courtesy Garase, dene situeea a Ton fe ot {ostaont, yt ss as im ote ar eed that bonus of 1% is paid — the 1060 Attorney of the plantation and by
4.2.51—6n. Chureb Both having 3 bedrooms with | #arily Be accepted. sugar crop amounted to 165,000) t?® Labour Commissioner along ee ee een
condition: Rare Sage vlinder.,. Perfect | Gardens well laid out, Wun Spsmetion } 5, PEA, tons; the usual bonus paid to lab~| ‘8? wsual lines done by sugar : }
smaller car, Dr. Simon. Telephone De petiand. For ic emenable: offse: will Board of Poor Law eee the same basis as is paid pee eee the smount required to Pf MRS. STEWART
. 10.1.51—6n | or 2398. es Eee ee Guardians, ¥ ownery 2 private estates, bey, Banus to the labourers was NEW» YORK ' BERVICN YE. Q
PETS . John, + H. G. Cummins (L) took ee ; SS. “Essi” sail i? Sanher cc eees ; DANCING SCHOOL
ELECTRICAL ee Oe and well built Bungalow on I | charge of the resolution. He said b Mr, Crawford said that it would| 8.8. “Byfiord” sails ‘dnd’ Pebeun bon Ta. Pebreary PUPILS raat dealeous at
TC; n { 4 AW ’ ‘ a” saila and Fe 144 ‘ A a s
RAGIOGRANT Sas Som | Pate a Ga PRR, tape | NOTICE that its purpose was to meet cer-|P*, SUEPHISing to the honourable oom | fotutng My.” STEWARTS
gramophone in Mahogany Cabinet, per-| ,,7M® Bungalow stands on 18,020 square adbpcants are invited for the post of | ‘in changes at Dodds, The matter | °+ th at the majority NEW ORLEANS SERVICE \ DANOING SCHOOL will
feet condition, For further particulars ma of jand and contains one large) 4; a nt Nurse at St. Lucy's Almshouse|WaS ventilated last Tuesday by other labourers at the other} A Steamer sails 18th January vitor : a be interviewed on
dial 2293, 15.2.51—2n, | Public | room, two bedrooms, kitchen, 3. Balers of er.00 0 per month, uniform) the senior member for St. Philip. states only got last year, the| » s mo Mae Pebryary rs 188 Thursday, February :
FURNILURE In a separate building’ there is a Applicants must be fully certiieated, | bUt earlier that day, the resolution 2 na a aie in sub paragraph | ————---—-——-—~ ne Lee 15th from 4.30
garage ie. one car and two servants | “Te ‘suncocer ee a was laid on the table of the House. » ° eniioa ete ee 7% | ‘courmpounp : arene p.m. onwards.
cae Mids eee of| The property will be ai areas sale| Mtie® on 25th February 1951. It dealt with the wonus paid! mentioned in sub ehuph ib). ’ y) Sade
Electric’ Tosster, Phonrimtgazine Stand. | at our office on Wednesday the 2ist day 4 pplications will be received by me up| tg estat “y Pas ee ee re soe : prhedin : ee cea
Bath, Nickel Waites” oe sae aby % of February 1961, at 2 p.m. to Saturday 17th. February 1951. e labourers at Dodds anij The bonus referred to in sub pera-|.. arco ce ; Barbadiva { For further information
ae og ALD L, arm ; a. GRID ebruary 5 .
rations Lights. Phone 8477. | undersigned. of Se apply-to the) crerk, moard og Peer Law Guardians, coreen in harmony with certaiajgraph (c) had not been paid to| $s. “ALCOA PENNANT” Pobruary ths Dial 2440
15,2.51~-In.] Inspection any day between 10,30 a.m. St. Lucy. | Prod ents made by the Sugar} Quite a large number of labourers | ss. “ALCOA POLARIS" usr, aren eae
ana § p.m. ‘Telephone Lady Walton, 10.2.51~7n ee er kweeiation and the, on sugar estates, en ee eee | SSS
. i Rie orkers ion. It ap. t was surprising to see that j= =
LIVES10CK COTTLE, CA ce ‘ plied, he & to e tha These vessels have mited passenger accommodation. —_
TFORD , y understood, to almost all/ with regard to the 1214%, the = ~ re
i SSusieyy,, | Friendly Societies Act (1905) |te estates in the isians. Government was $0 far behind pri ROBERT THOM T50—Now Yor and Gulf Sorvice. ORIENTAL
os ‘ARE quite, Over 18 Nanas, 7 years eieaniabetadine ~SEeteiwes : [See, 75) irae ers Lad Sp Rg being | vate owned sugar estates. Apply: DA COSTA & 09., LTD.-—-Canadian : Sorvico. Goons
7 jantation ‘ ” ¥ agricultu abourer® potent sone
work. Phone 3344. wy COUNTRY, ROAD, ST. Adverti é ernment | SS " ,
one 14.2.51—2n.| Fe os LA Sataty sT. _ MICHAEL. | ve} ee Dissolution by. and was also the property of the He said that the Government SS <= E
————— W,0. "Collymore ; u NOTICE is hereby given that the s:,|G@Overnor — in - Executive Com fxperted to make some money - From INDIA, CHINA,
e tal . = 7 year’s rati é 3 " 5 " 0)
MISCELLANEOUS —_| ara rounds (i acres "St. Sentneay*"| Michael ‘Regisiey Nor "0 fe diewhea oy [meters He, therefore begged 121 Piontation and it would be an PASSAGES TO EUROPE RO aes
The By Md comprises verandah, draw- pistrusant registered at this oMee the rs ove the passing of the Resolu - excellent idea if the. Sovabea at eR. Coes’ tose :
Senge a ni af . Sth day of Feb : on. > ; men . tee ha okie Ba ini os e
weATHS = _in Porcelgin Foamel, Tt ha ee gore i Ldedreone ome | rep tamane tant R soa nest witnin My, 8. BW. Can (2) secended | night set an example at Dodds by Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, for sail Sat neat tyesys, Paes”
units ‘to compl imro: matching | tories, convenient kitchen and ntry,| Newspaper in which this adverti nt “| providin, canteen at which lab- ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, Londen, or , Sa Si
units to complete colour suites, Top| reams for 8 servants, garage tor & cary, | abDears, proceedings. be ‘commensey wt Mr, W. A. Crawford (C) said |? & aca na ieh lal & pe, F j , fumes, Barbados Scarves in
. A. BARNES & Co,, Ltd. and. stables. "|g member or other persona interesied 2, (that he would appreciate if the| "ers who worked there daily Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. Pure Silk, Ete., Ete., Ete.

could get a hot meal at midday,

26.1.51—tf.n.| | Water suppky for garden and grounds] or having any claim on the funds of |honourable member for St, Thomas The Souvenir Headquarters





















CEREALS — Cc i from a weil with mill; water service in] the Society to set aside such dissolution, especiall rin sea! ae eniae eaten ae ¥

ween. Quaker Oats in Ting & prea euen ben si servants rooms (shower | and the same 4 - apie accordingly. Soule Wales i or He. felt that fe eae ie eat THANI Hiros.
le; i = . . . CHENER rs were ey ~
Ford, 98 Rocbuck St Day Gran W. M.| ‘The residence completely wired and Registrar, if al] plantations and factories were KASHMERE
; Bice furnished | with electric” lighting from 13.2,51—3n to take that step | Pr. Wm. Henry 8t--Diel Mes
nae EB. ‘s mains. PR ects r a cols seal

CHELSTON LIME = House convertible into flats and out- » Many of those sugar plantation TYN mal aa! Teg =
supply, Temper te Building Lime, moat | Pines converte, inte a Teottes| SUPPLIES POR TH Fined 20/- For | viovees. worked ‘sme’ distance FERS NE
ders, Concrete Stone Grit, Marl & Sand.| iment or kitchen wantens. TCVCloP” OF THE E POOR from their homes and found it ; Ant BAM.

Trucks on hire. P. S, Brooks. Phone i
True ks. Phone prone undersigned will offer the PARISH OF | SAINT MICHAEL Unlawful Possession bye ht oat aa ee
CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win- Sobee Varnt’ Pal: te aa” dees on the envelope “TENDER FOR ee FitzGerald Agard a labourer of Soule Rae re nveunas serine Se

dow styling, light control, Valances and| February 1951 at 2 pam. crop season to supply labourers

REAL ESTATE







1+..." will be received by the Clerk ‘ ,
draperies. By Kirsch, Dial 4476 A.| Inspectio Tussle Thurs-| of the Vestry up to 12 o'clock noon on Dukes Alley, St. Michael was|{" : i . 7.S.S. GOLFITO will arrive from England at
BARNES & CO,, LTD, 13.2.51—t.0.0 | days roy "petwroen 3 pe ia iaoma ee Zeyrnery. Sor ie under: Aned 20s to _ paid in one month os es Re WG ine 4> Bal
“HAMS _ ix Hawa Je Sine santas For further particulars apply “os supplies in such quantities as|Or One month’s imprisonment with e : : EEC ai Rel
© $1.25 per 1b, 2b Tins @ $2.96 a 2 COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., may from time to time be ordered for | hard labour by His Worship Mr labourers themselves and even the 9.30 a.m. on the morning of [7th february an
for $1.38 also Bacon sliced $117 oF slab, Solicitors, Jone, Year commencing on the Ist April/— A. McLeod Police Magistrate | employers, since the ability to ob-
Whole. W. M. Ford, Dial 280, 35 loe- 42.61—10n-| FRESH MEAT of District “A” on Tuesday, j tain a hot meal during the -niddle wit) sail ot 6.00. pari. the same evening for 4
et 18.9.81—-Sn Lon nth, PEtPeL oF jand. containing | 1.986 ps ae Agard was found guilty of the! of the day must be reflected in the Ball Ot ONY pin. | : .
er nrnemnoremmnen | SERRE: eet With the Buildings thereon. | gach Seek tetas must send in} UMlawful possession of a quanti-/ amount of work as well as the sk ance ie
MODERNFOLD DOORS—The alsin. | twate in Taucas street, segtows. 26: a letter, along with the Tender, simea|t¥ Of goods which he was carry.) quality of work which the workers Trinidad. She has limited accommodation tot 4p a ( a qp r |

guished solution to your special by two 1 1ifi +{ing along N

eauhitectumal Telephone Company Limited. and at pre- Properly qualified persons ‘not g along Nelson Street. could do.

sree ne Re co easy | ten cecupied ge to part bye Observer Being members af the Vesiny)” auting| | Harbour Police Constable Gill |

A. BARNES & CO. LID. Newspaper and as to part by Miss Cado-| ine" enderer in the scent oe’ itn |who made the arrest said that on
13.2.51—ti.n. | Hen. property will be set up for sate at] Tender being accepted for the due ful- nda 12 he saw Agard with

filment to the Contract.
sider lnaning your glasses, try a Clear—| ot", ofions on Thureday, Ast Mareh 1951.1 "itty respect to Sar ahha tie pleat nee good By © ne hm
" e Lens "i MI . proba! , i
sides and polish. Price 2/6 each. I"spection by application to the ten- ie Tea seas is 24,000" gallows tnd the | Was unable to give him a_ satis-
KNIGHT'S LTD, 14.2.51—2n, —. further particulars and condition o¢ | WesttY_ Teserve the right to accept the factory explanation.
O—Bentley (almost new). Phone sale, apply to:— - tan i ee hur are a all ae He then seek bits to the Bridge |
PIAN| " ni » : pply o: and a . i * i
8435. 13,2.51—4n. COTTLE oe & CO., , sons tendering for this article ghall aoe oun where he’ wasi\*
“Son eRibes oS Sl 0. 17 High Street, | forward, along with their tender, e Cer- | °Parged.
: SHADES — Very attractive and Bri WN. | tificate by a properly qualified Veterinary Set. King prosecuted for the;
nexpensive, Just right to protect your 14.2,51—-12n.} Practitioner stating that the cattle from! Police from information received.
oN which the milk will be suppiied are ed

LIMA & Co., LTD. 14.2.51—6n. w D free from -eeren ests. 2
See Ee oe aaeemeneeeemese eee ANTE Forms of tenders can be obtained at

STAK-A-BYE TUBULAR Steel Chairs the Churghwarden’s ce.
and Tables on show at Ralph Beard’s Minimum charge week 72 cents and Order,
Show rooms, Hardwood Alley, Trade} 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24 FE. C, REDMAN,
enquiries cordially invited. words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.
13.2.51—6n | Word Sundays, 13.2.51--t.f.n,



Ist class passengers linimum Fare

24 A.F.S., F.V.A.

Formerly Dixon & Bladon



"PHONE 4230,



























eee

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co, Lid.

AGENTS

FOR SALE






























‘WINSLOW: Bathsheba, St
Joseph A comfortable holiday
bungalow constructed of timber
situated in one of the most populer
houeeny resorts = in Barbados,
Splendid sea-bathing and delight-
ne i lena ful scenes Verandah on $3 sides,
ee eae living room, 3 bedrooms, kitchen
ete,, Standing on over 1 acre of
land



tates







a aa
= see

ADENAUER RECEIVED | qyy this cough!
Will it never stop? JUST TO REMIND YOU

FRENCH MEMORANDUM
If only | could find something to relieve
BONN, Feb. 18 this tickling throat. . . When You Shop at:
Andre Francois Poncet, French ;
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

High Commissioner to-day met
Dr. Konrad Adenauer, West Ger.

Our Motor Van Delivers the Goods to your door,
jj CENTRAL FOUNDRY UL?fD.— Proprietces.

man Chancellor, when politicians
Cnr. ef Broad and or Streets

"DEANE HOLLOW", St. Lucy
Pleasant country home of stone
with shingle reef containing 3
bedyooms, living ond dining
rooms, kitehen, servant's Quarters,
2 gerages and = storerepms, 2%
reves, ‘Of fertile land, option
further 2% acres, Offers con-
sidered,

one ee

koala — rrceee, Tyres & Tubes
So Roebuck’ Bt Biat’sdoar” > M> Fone HELP Public Official Sale

15,2,51—2n,
re The st ‘s Act 1904
TINNED MEAT Selman Gorm beer, | LADY—Suitable Indy with know! (Tho Bravest seats
Cereal Beef, Steak & Kidney Pudding, | &f book-keeping, fling amd office work.) On Friday the 23rd day of February
Mutton & Peas & Meat Roll, W, M. Ford, | APPly Y. de LIMA & Co. Ltd, Post ©1195) at the hour of 2 o'clock in the
35 Roebuck St. Dial 3489. Box 221, Bridgetown. 11.2.51—-6n | afternoon will be sold at my office to
152.5120, | | the highest bidder for any sum not

MISCELLANEOUS under the appraised value.
VAPEX INHALANT and INHALERS c L 0 All that certain piece of Land con-

are easy to carry and use at the first siga taining about twenty-five perches situate
of a cold, Can be obtained from all Drug PIANO — State make, condition amd] in the Parish of Saint Michael, butting
Stores. KNIGHT'S LTD., Distributors. ] price, Box No: B.B. C/o Advocate. and bounding on lands late of Fred
15.2.51—2n. | Maloney but now of H. O. Exmtage & Co.
= ant Lt, late st geepe Adolphas wre
—eeireah = — $0,000 empty, white, plai ut now © . 8. Hope and on two
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to] three. Botti. packed ‘Q Tee 18 public roads, at Upper Bank Hall Main

your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476 | dozen each — at le, per bottle including} Road, appraised as follows:—
BARNES & CO., LTD, 13.2,51—t.f.n. packing. Please apply to 8. P. Musson Son The whale aren of en sppgniged to
ars

We have in stock Cooper's Sheep Dip BS Son Teds AE eee aah, be bg Peeat ce

51—10n. | ($846.00). Attached from Coleridge

wee ae ae a Sn Sten oe ee i . Saraviace Field for and towards satis-
r thoroughly cleansing the fleece. ice WANTED TO PURCHASE fretion, &e,

§/- tin, KNIGHT'S LTD, 142.51—2n] BUNGALOW or NOUSE = Reasonable | N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day

WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower- price, 3 bedrooms, windward coast, new) of purchase,

Telephone T. T. HEADLEY,
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all pore. Sieh, en. REERETeT a vie Provost ees:
- 8.2.

We cut to your requirements, G. §1—3n.
HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd, Dial 4222.
15,2.51—10n.











assumed he handed over the
French memorandum on Euro-
pean army.

The memorandum approved
last week by the French Cab-
inet, sets out French views on
the European army as part of] »
we ae. ive saree 7] \

t was ng circu to na-|
tions taking part in Thursday’s e Zubes
conference in Paris on the for~ An hes

.

mation of such an army.—Reuter.

“THOUMATIA’ Dayrell’s

!
1 Roady Navy Gardens. Attractive
| and imposing property Dr
v flanked by mahogany tr
% reveption, 6 bedrooms, kiichen,
pontey,. large verandehs, garage
and storerooms, -€rounds ap-
proximately 2 a@res, Ideal Guest
iiouse propostion,
| “BRANDONS’—ft, Michael. A
3% acres of enclosed grounds, the
major part of it planted with pro-
ductive coconut and fruit trees,















RECENT
ARRIVALS
of

| meliowed old stone property on
the coast with good boat anchor-
age about 1 mile from town, with

;



Relief at once!
My throat's soothed and that wretched
cough eased in no time,







There are 3 reception, 4 bedrooms, {

JEWELS SEIZED

FRANKFURT, Feb, 13.
American military police armed
with sub-machine guns today; ©
took two large boxes of jewels
from the Rheinman for experts REC?
to decide whether any belonged



galleries, 2 garages ete, Suitable
either for continued use as a pri-
vate residence, or as a club er




























SY Or BIT boarding house

s
q







ELSWICK—4#th Avenue, Belle-
ville. A stone and timber house
on approx. 3,600 sq. ft. Enclosed
verandah 2 reception roome,



: SOVERNMENT NOTICES
FOR RENT AIR MAILS







int h the Rothschil bedrooms, kitchen and pantry, Full
od Gente Bundens 20 waits. © ope tt With effect from 20th February, air mails for Canada and orn a ee it sus- information an applieasion.
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a] Bermuda will be closed at the General Post Office on Tuesdays at | ected the jewels stored at the | j i *
word Sundays. 9 fhate f Monda: d Tuesday, respectively, By this B , . ee BUILDING LAND -— Nearly 2
2 p.m. instead of on Monday an’ Reien 7 ow heinman Bank since the war,| _ Simoniz Wax & Kleener | acres of land on edge of escarp~
opportunity the postage to Canada will be the lower rate, namely | which were either Rothschild Chamols & Polishing Cloths pe One the Nee Me man. 1ONe

HOUSES 20 cents per 4 oz. ; jewels or other French property | Back Up Lamps ROMNEY RAG ae ane et Retr
Air Mail ScheduJ+ should be amended accordingly. stolen by the Nazis during the Spot Lamps | “WINDY WiLt.ow ar st d ames
Delightful bungalow house with



Tractor Lamps

Mluminated Fender Guides
Jeweled Exhaust Pipe Extensions
Steering Wheel Covers

Bumper Jacks

Grease Guns

occupation of Paris—Reuter, i
14.2. 51—2n | 9909990999990009 5559060 559554



t com-
w of sea
ach, Large
verandahs,

epen verandah on
nanding manificent
} and stretches of t
lounge, 3 bedrooms
kitchen, pantr snd servant's
quarters. Storerooms in besement

HIGH ROCK—Bathsheba. From March | General Post Office,
to July. Phone 4048. r *90.2.51--4n 14th February, 1951.

ROOM, HASTINGS — A newly fur-
rished room with running water. Phone

4718. 13.2.51—3n. POLICE TRAFFIC RULES

— ‘

LOST Barbados—Trinidad Cricket Matcnes at Kensington Oval on the

geMfinimum charge, week 72 cents and! 18th, 16th, 17th, 19th, 20th, 22nd, 28rd, 24th, 26th and 27th days of
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents aj February, 1951.
word Sundays,
















6 Volt & 12 Volt Horns



well maintained and productive

Miracle Adhesive

Mechanics Bearing Blu> The house is worthy of special

SELECT THESE EARLY... .

Valve Grinding Compound

Cylinder Black Heat IicsisUng Paint notice and possesses great charm

Its general condition is excellent

Flake Graphite

and there is spacious accommoda-





Eeatate of some 32 acres in a very
lovely posttion 2 miles from City,

| “ROCK DUNDO"—Cave Hill. A
TGRAMGES in 4 Groot Gan Pike RULES made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee under Fluxi ia
GLASSES in G Case. uxite tion,
return to the mavosite Cio. . oer Section 37 (2) of the Police Act, 1908, for the regulation of Battery Testers |
offered. 142.5120 |, traffic between the hours of 10 a.m, and 7 p.m. on the days Battery Cables RENTALS
SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS — ; n which Cricket Matches against Trinidad will be played at Brass Shim Metal ‘ty towed bite ive.
£965, and B. 5964. Finder ae Aen tavisaen Oval r . wil Body Solder Plane and Plades } hits eunesiiee eModern:: Fun
ont to the Advocate Co, Reward offer- — Algo — k | “4 LORES Kent, Unfurnished
Oe a te se 1. In these Rules— Decarbonizing Gasket Scts for all popular Tmglish | 5 ; p
‘i ieek ana 1006. Picaer plesee quo “vehicle” includes carriages, wagons, carts, motor vehicles, and American Cars and Trucks | Ree
to R. Thompson, Roebuck St. bicycles, tricycles, vans, handcarts trucks, barrows and all e \ REAL ESTATE AGENT
Inet, other machines for the portage of goods or persons. B nn 7 E AUCTIONEER
cs 2. All vehicles proceeding in the direction of Kensington Oval ECKSTEIN pe RO j Hi IS | | 1OM UMD
PERSONAL between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. shall approach by way of - . 4 ; “ - ig) SLANTATIONS © ING
!




Bay Street Phone 4640

Lakes Folly and Fontabelle Road only and shall proceed in single line |
The public are hereby warned against down Fontabelle Road. |

eat tae Rikon ee ae yor 3, Between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. no vehicle shall pro-
hold myself responsible for her or wy. ceed on Fontabelle Road in the direction of Lakes Folly, except the
° el contractin, any el debt
ring "yoy in dae” i's Written order | Motor- buses on route No. 25. e
sighed by me. 4. Between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. no vehicle shall enter
Sed. hab ggg Pe nerep re -, | Kensington Gap from Westbury Road.
St. Michaei 5. Between the hours of 10 a.m. and 6 p.m no vehicle shall be
2 15.2.51—2n. | parked in Fontabelle Road from the junction of Lakes Folly to the
Tne Public are hereby, warned against | junction of Westbury New Road.
Bisekiman nee daeaheir es fas nek 6. After 6 p.m. all vehicles leaving Kensington Oval shall do
wld myself responsible for her or any-| so by way of Fontabelle Road.
ls tracti di
inmyname ‘atte a witien ‘San 7. Between the hours of § p.m. and 6.80 p.m. no vehicle shall
signed by me. enter Fontabelle Road from the Direction of Lakes Folly except
Sed. IL Bi ‘i ; : s
eee Fant ped motor-buses on route No. 25 and all vehicles approaching Kensington
ispu gn | Oval shall do so from the direction of Westbury Road.
ae 8. Drivers of vehicles shall obey all orders given by any mem-

ber of the Police Force.



PL LCPPELLLEPPL



SUPPLIES

— WE OFFER —

GOODYEAR TRANSMISSION
BELTING
3” — 34” — 4” — 5” — 6” — 8”
— ALSO —

CAMEL HAIR & in. BELTING
STEAM HOSE

y, 3,” and 1”
: 1 cuapies MeaNRARNEY & C
(Sei) A. A. HINDS : | a ¢ | THARLES MeRNRARNEY & CO. LTD.
eae ADVERTISE | chu at dly nen IR, cry GARAGE TRADING 00. LD. Is , on ty :

—9n ~ Ob rbitb byt tyt ot 6, Chg ytptytyt ¢ OGG ot ¢ . 50% S65
14.2,.51.—2n PLLGSSEE PEEP OPEL LOL PALLETS 80S SSO 9 OO FOOLS GPELE SL LG POF SECSOEE OSL FOF SOSSSOOSSSS SOSH,

} f











ive-Star
*



ah
%
motorl

LPL SLES SLES



Made by the Goverhor-in-Executive Committee this thirteenth
BE WISE. one day of February, 1951.



6)

-





PAGE EIGHT



BARBA

DOS ADVOCATE



Kensington Oval
1897-1951

By O. S. COPPIN

# KENSINGTON OVAL, as cele-

se4 brated a stage in the history of
RS West Indian cricket as the Fens}

sai in the struggles of the Saxons
and Danes, in early English his-
tory, was partly covered by
water yesterday when I paid_a} ~
visit there to speculate upon how ?
i} soon there could be any play-this |”
week in the First Test between
Trinidad and Barbados, sched-
uled to open there to-day.

Well, from what I saw there,

I am sure there is little hope of
any play even by Saturday un-
less there is a. complete change
in the weather to make this
possible.



TIM
TARILTON

. GEORGE
‘CHALLENOR

: Memories

1 sat in the Kensington Stand for a while and memories of the
eple struggles staged at this ground, since the first regular Triangular
Intereolonial match was staged there, came flooding back to me.

Of some of these I had read George and Tim
avidly as a fourth former, some | George Challenur and Tim Taril—
had watched with bated breath in ton put on 183-for the first wicket
the schoolboy stand and others I in the opening match against Brit-

had had to record with a pen held ish Guiana and scored individual
by fingers, moist from nervous a total of 715 for 9

sweat and again others [{ had sat centuries in d
caren aiid hed recorded on the Wickets. In this remarkable scare
keys of my portable typewriter. John Brown 131 not out, and E. L.
But at all these stages there was Bartlett 88, put on 216 in a record
Kensington in the background, 8th wicket partnership,
sometimes offering batsmen the British Guiana, with scores of
paradise in which to bring their 265 and 336 were defeated by an
dreams and aspirations to happy innings and 114 runs.
fruition or “at another time pre- In the next match against Tri-
senting the ideal conditions for nidad, Barbados could raise but
bowlers to reduce batsmen s hopes 475 in their first innings to which
to-eibpty shadows. (Trinidad replied with 559. Archie
Wiles, an expatriated Barbadian
top scored with 192, an even cen-
nial tournament between Barba- tury by Joe Small and 98 not out
dos, Trinidad and British Guiana by Ben Sealy at number 9 were
at Kensington took place in 1897 the best scorers,
and aptly enough was won by
Barbados. Barbados had won the Grand Recovery
first of these series in Trinidad in Faced with a deficit of 384 runs
1893, British Guiana at Bourda in Barbados entered upon their sec-
1895 and now Barbados had cnd innings. A fine first wicke*
scored a second win. partnership by George and Tin:
that put on 292 for the first wicket
Barbados scored a decisive win, laid the foundation for the second
oyer British Guiana by the mar-' 700 runs innings of this tourna
gin of ten wickets and in the ment. A double century by George
opening game Trinidad vs. Bar- Challenor, another ; Tim .Tarilton

s, G. B, Y. Cox (167), and century and a stonewall 174 aot
HLB.G. Austin (129), established oe oy “Teddy” Hoad — helpe:l
a second wicket record by putting

First Tournament
The first Triangular Intercolo-

Barbados to score 726 for 7
on 263 runs. wickets declared.
cr re Trinidad were bowled out in
Trinidad Win their second innings for 217 runs
At Kensington again seven

to give Barbados victory by 125

years later—1904, the sixth In- runs,

teveclonial tournament was played
and Trinidad, who had won the
fifth of these series in British ‘
Guiana in 1901, notched their Five years later the three cylo-
second win here. nies met again at Kensington and
Five years later, Barbados won Barbados bowed the knee to
at Kensington again and the tour- Trinidad, Scoring 71 and 249 as
nament saw Perey Goodman score against 264 and 59 for 4 wickets
180 against British Guiana and. by Trinidad, Barbados lost by. a

116 against Trinidad. By this feat six wicket margin.
dman became the first Inter- In 1936 at Kensington Trinidad
al batsman to score two again earned the distinction of
separate hundreds in these tourna- defeating Barbados. Headed by
ments. another Barbadian domiciled in
Another Win Trinidad, Derek Sealy, who scored

Tn 1912 Barbados won again at

123, Trinidad put up 457 and 195.
historic Kensington but twelve PRKNSdw, wrt SPOESS OF 844 SRC
years elapsed before another of

372, lost the game by a marin
these series was staged and in of 3@-runs,
1924 Barbados were again cham-
pions at Kensington. Trinidad,
baying beaten oe aes in
opening match, dismissed Bar-
bados for 145 in their first in- (131 not out) and BE, A, Martindale
nings. 1384 almost won the day ‘for
A great bowling spell by pace Parbados. : :
bowler Herman Griffith, who took _ The last of these Triangwar
6 for 34, helped Barbados to dis- Intercolenial tournaments, the
miss Trinidad for 127. But Learie twénty-seventh, was played at
Constantine then turned in a per- Kensington in 1939. Led by Rolph
formance that overshadowed that Grant, who was afterwards ap-
of Griffith. He took 8 for. 38 while pointed captain of the 1939 West
George Challenor scored 114 out Indies team to England, Trinidad
of Barbados’ 200, defeated Barbados by an innings
Good Bowling and 19 runs and went on to defeat

P : British Gui as well and win
Good bowling again by Griffith the Tatenecionasd wan, : 4

(4 for 43) and H. F. K. Greaves ~ with this win for Trinidad, the
(5 for 18) helped to dismiss Trini- i . ;
dad for 83 in Their second innings DHRNBRIOT Henin, CANE: HO. 9 ANF
and so give Barbados victory by
135 runs,

Perhaps never again in this cen-
tury nor in the next will Kensing—
ton be able to boast of as magnifi-
cent a feast of run-making as was
witnessed there when the eign-
teenth Triangular Intercolonial
tournament was staged there.
Seven Hundred Tournament

This immortal tournament is
familiarly known as the “seven
hundred tournament”. Most Bar-
badian students of Intercoloniul
cricket history, view this tourna-
ment from the level that it served
to bring out the combined genius
of George Challenor and Tim
Tarilton.

A Doctor's Praise

Dr. Hamilton in his excellent
publication “Cricket in Barbados”
writes of George Challenor and
Tim Tarilton’s achievement on
this tour: Neither had finished
with the game, but they had reach-
ed the pinnacle of achievement,
and the fine innings they were to certainly it will not be given ant
play in the future were more an in which the needle-keenness that
evocation of past memiories than pervades the game oft brooked n»
em integral part of the cricket of interference even with the spirit
the period”. of the cricket law.

They'll Do It Ev . Time Aepictered , 5 Potent Oftee

Vimy —— 3
TOOTHACHE?

Barbados Defeated

Brilliant Partnership
A brilliant eighth wicket part-
nership of 261 by E, A, V. Williams

Goodwill Tours Open

Goodwill cricket tours during
the war served to discover mony
players who might have been lost
to West Indies cricket if these
tours had not taken place, Weekes,
Worrell and Walcott are the pro-
ducts of these series and it is
enough but to mention their names
te prove that this is so.

A World’s Partnership

Kensington too came in for its
share of the good things of these
series and in iv44 playing against
Trinidad at Kensington, the pre-
sent West Indies captain John
Goddard and Frankie Worrell
established a world’s fourth wicket
record of 502. Worrell scored 308
not out and Goddard 218 not out.

Yes, Kensington has been the
stage of many a dire struggle,
There cricket fans have thrilled
‘to that atmosphere of downright
fight ever present in Intercolonial
cricket in which no one wastes
time in asking for quarter since

ae
CATE. Ine



WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED

MCC-Victoria
‘Tall Seore’
Mateh Drawn

By REGINALD HAYTER
MELBOURNE, Feb. 14

The match between Victoria and
the M.C.C. ended heré in a
dvaw. Victoria with three second
innings wickets down, steod 158
runs ahead of the M.C.C,,at tea
on the final day of their match
here. The M.C.C., all out for 414,
failed by 27 runs to reach Vic-
tcria’s first inningg score of 441,
and Victoria had scored 131 for 3
in. their second innings at tea.

Trevor Bailey, 107 not out over-
night brought his scere to 125 be-
fore he was stumped off the
wicket-keeper’s pads. He batted
just. under five hours and hit 16
fours. .The last four M,C.C.
wicke"s" fell’ this morning fer the
addition of 23 runs.

Just over four hours remained
for play when Victoria went in a
second time, Bob Berry, Lanca-
shire left-arm spinner, took all
three wickets of Victoria’s second
innings before tea, At the fall of
the third wicket, his analysis was
three wickets for 30 runs in 11
overs.

Hassett turned down a suggcs-
ticn by Compton that steps should
be taken to bring an interesting
finish to the match. At the close ot
play last night, Compton suggested
twat if Hassett was prepared to co-
operate, the M.C.C. would accept
any challenge offered them to go
for ‘runs in quick time in the
fourth innings, and so give tne
spectators entertainment. Hassett
replied that he thought it better
for the game to take its course.’

Less than 200 people were pie
sent when Bailey and Close re-
sumed on a pitch which was still
perfect. «

In Johnston's third over Close
was bowled after seven runs had
been added. So ended what is
almost certain to be Close’s last
first class innings of the tour, The
next three wickets fell quickiy.

Hollies missed a straight ball.
tailey was stumped off the wicket-
keeper’s pads. Berry played out
side the first ball bowled to him,

Bailey batted four hours and 58
minutes, and hit 10 fours. Just
over four hours remained for
play when Victoria went in again.

Harvey who opened with Colin
Mc Donald, was aggressive from
the start.

In the 40 minutes to lunch,
the opening pair scored the same
number of runs. Berry, bowling
accurately to an offside field,
pegged down the batsmen after
the interval and with the last ball
of his fourth over dismissed
Me Donald, who lifted a catch
trying to pierce the field.

Berry nagged at the batsmen’s
patience by pitching the ball well
up and dispensing with any fields-
man behind the wicket. Harvey
and Loxton repeatedly thrashed
the ball but the setting of the
field was well calculated to keep
down runs,

The Australians were finally
bowled out for 234, and the M.C.C
given 15 minutes, made 36 runs
of the 262 needed for victory,
losing one wicket in the process.

The Scores:—

VICTORIA 18ST INNINGS “41

M.C.C, 18T INNINGS

Washbrook stpd. MeDonald b. Ring 49
Compton b, Ian Johnson.,... a |
Dewes c. and b, Ring . ‘ see 88
Parkhouse c, Hill b. Ring eee
Hutton ¢, Loxton b. Ring .. . 128
Mcintyre b. Ring ... 18

125

Bailey stpd. McDonald b, Hill...
Close b. Johnston ote 2
Hollies not out ..... 0

Extras (5 byes, 12 legs, 1 noball) 18
Total byes Al4
VICTORIA 2ND INNINGS
C. McDonald c. Hollies b. Befry,. 6
Harvey c, Hutton b. Berry .. 56
Loxton c, Compton b. Berry iy
Meuleman run out .......... . 30
Turner c. Hutton b. Compton .... 40
Hassett c. Close b. Washbrook .... #3
Ring c. MelIniyre b. Washbrook 15
I, Me, Donald Lb.w. Close . »
Hill not out ............, 3
Bill Johnston stpd, Melntyre b.
Hutton : rae
Ian Johnson (absent) . ‘ 0
Extras ‘byes 4, legs 5) . 9
Total 234
BOWLING ANawYSIS
Oo M R Ww
USF yea hss nsciees 4 0 19 0
Statham .. Cevbasl coe 1 25 0
CIONR ce sishiysesecceas a8 2 50 1
Hollies .,....; 6 2 22 0
Berry . 13 3 34 3
Compton 9 1 43 1
Washbrook 2 0 8 2
Hutton a bres a ° 4 1
ENGLAND 2ND INNINGS
Statham ec. Hill b. Turner 16
Berry not out : - 18
Hollies not out ‘ é ‘ 1
Extras (6 byes) . Tr | ‘ 8

Total (for 1 wicket) 36

MATHESON 81.0G., oO
MOUNT VERNON, WASHING TOW,
we ———. -

Ask Me FAMILY
DOCTOR::-THEY’LL DO
IT EVERY BAD NIGHT>-+
THA “ts WARREN I GILBERT:

WORLD ¢











DAGMAR LERCHOVA, Czechoslovakian skater pictured as she won





‘HAMPION

the World Academic Figure Skating Championship for Women at the

Winter Stadium, Prague.



—Express.



\Wettest
February

@ From page 1.
overflowed yesterday. In this area
the water rose about three feet
and prevented pedestrians from
getting across. ‘Buses ploughed
through, but one car stalled in an
attempt. '

Salt Pond at Speightstown
overflowed its banks. This pond
however has an appropriate outlet
—the sea.

Water Dries Off
At Kensington Oval some of the
water that had collected during
the morning was drying off by
midday.

When the Advocate visited the
Oval Mr, Bruce Inniss, one of the
Pickwick members, and a cricket

Leaf Scald

2 @ From page 5.
Breeding Station in Barbados
have been planned, and _ these
should provide information as to
whether control of the disease will
be possible by the use of available
resistant varieties. Their results
will be followed closely by the
Barbados Station's staff, for they
may indicate breeding lines neces-
sary for the production of new
varieties suitable for British Gui-
ana conditions.
Spread Minimised

“Immediate steps are being
taken on the estates to ascertain
areas which are free from the dis-
ease and to use them when mak-
ing cuttings for planting. In this
way the further spread of the dis-
ease should be minimised, even in
the varieties known to show some
degree of susceptibility. At the
Same time, every precaytion

enthusiast, was on the field with should be taken to protect from

fork in hand. ‘There are three
sucks on the ground and Mr.
Inniss cleared these to allow the
water to run off. He afterwards
took the fork and made holes in
the ground for the water to pene-
trate,

The water was nearly dried up,
but soon after Mr. Inniss’ efforts,
another downpour came _ and
again flooded the field. ony
frogs and pond flies played in
the water while crows soared
overhead in search of worms.

“The sucks are working hard,
but the rain is not giving them a
chance to dry the field,” a
groundsman said,

Mr. Inniss told the Advocate
that he was in St. Lucy on Tues-
day and in that area nearly four
inches were recorded.

He said, “Now that the ground
at Kensington Oval is soft it
would not be wise to allow people
to swarm the field when conditions
allow the Trinidadian cricketers
to practise. Apart from digging
up the ground they throw cigar-
ette and match boxes and bits of
paper all over the field, making
extra work for the groundsmen,
They can easily watch the play-
ers practising from the pavilions,

Bathers at Shot Hall, who took
a pleasure swim out to the moor-
ings off the Aquatic Club, climbed
on to yachts when a_ sudden
shower caught them in the water,



WE

Wfection the new and promising
varieties from Barbados which are
now reaching commercial prom-
inence. The campaign will re-
quire continued care and atten-
tion, but with the knowledge now
available, and with the experi-
mental programme being carried
out, it is hoped that the disease
will be brought under control in
British Guiana as it has been in
other countries where it was once
a menace to the sugar industries.
Much progress has been made
since the discovery of the disease
in British Guiana, and great credit

is due to the authorities of the}

Department of Agriculture, the
Sugar Experiment Station and the
Sugar. Producers’ Association for
the energetic way in which the
problem has been tackled.”



Cricket Brogdcast
From Kensington

There will be a ball by ball
commentary broadcast on the
cricket Tournament which
cpens at Kensington this
week, This is being done by
Cable and Wireless in con-
junction with Rediffusion Ltd.
and can be heard each day of
play beginning on Saturday.

The wave length will be
39.76 metres, 7547 k/es on
ZNX32, and the time approxi-
mately 11.25 a.m. to 5.35

P.m, each day.

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© Leaves body sweet and dainty

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{
|

RINSO for alf
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X-R 244-800 (



| Kensington New
Road After Rain

@ From page 5.
Ebrouham Swat, an Indian mer-
chant, is another of the residents
who find the condition of the road
deplorable. He travels- long dis-
tances into the country in his car
selling cloth. When he returns
late at night, it is almost impossi-
ble to drive through Kensington
New Road. He is constantly do-
ing repairs to his car.
A Central Spot
asked about the -new
Swat said, “We have

When
Mosque,
built our
New Road because it is a central
position. Many Indians live at
Cheapside, Baxters Road . and
surrounding districts.”

Living at the same house is his
brother who uses a motor-cycle
for transportation. He even suffers
worse when he has to ride through
the Kensington New Road.

Another Indian merchant, Solo-
mon Degia, lives next to Swat. He
also, uses a motor-cycle when
travelling inte the country | dis-
tricts to sell cloth and experiences
the same hardships as Swat’s
brother.

Other residents, too numerous
to mention, all complain of the
deplorable condition of Kensington
New Road and the bad drainage.
system.
thing will soon be done.
—

The Weather |





TO-DAY

Sun Rises; 6.20 a.m.

Sun Sets; 6.08 p.m,

Moon (Full) February 21
Lighting; 6,30 p.m.

High Water: 10.05 a.m.

| YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington)
ins.

Total for Month to Yester-
day: 4.93 ins.

Temperature (Max) 82.0°F

Temperature (Min) 73.5°F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.)

. E.S.E., (3 p.m.) S.S.E.

Wind Velocity 7 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.964
(3 p.m.) 29.895

1.52





-——

|



Mosque at Kensington |

They all hope that some-}

THURSDAY,~ FEBRUARY - 15, 1951
















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Whatever you do,

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nied

BEER

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The Rich Man’s
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BEERS COME

AND

BEERS GO

IS DIFFERENT ...

GOES

TENNENTS
|



BUT @

IT
ON FOREVER



=——_—_.
— S| CO SS





Full Text

PAGE 1

THURSDAY. FEFMt'ARY 15, 151 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THBEF, P minimum PMMM 'M^ sets a 15-day course for Left-wing lions ffo Reform Group Literacy Test He Got His Pet %  R <* %  F !" ' Sold Niin His Not Needed ,,alian Roiiiiiiuni>t p.,r!\ sijrt*d by Heu ,. So when Chris tos Tondos leJi puties Valdo U Aldo f* .> needed some living companCucchi lo-day gained added ?£,*,.. tonshlp in his small cell he decided strength from two Bologna partiJ""*! that a small animal would be an san leaders and a mayor. *?*" ideal companion. ' '^ilett.. officer In a !" fi*~2E When he asked the wurdun fr* •* % %  %  .wi.isai. format i.i SB[Trass K)RT-OF SPAIN Police %  LsUttb) i .strode i* 1 a felling their . :'!'' I %  %  -.h Albert •Troir, Our Own Cor t u pr adent) (.KOIUIFTOWN. B.G. Feb. 11 Sir Joha Waddington, Chairman Of \t\f I'll tlon Reform Commission who concluded the first p*rt of their C H,fl C B.I Financial Sec%  .. %  %  —<.u --. !" *.nit will leave British ratal? and Treasurer appeared permission to obtain a cut or don !"'—.£ „l Guiana on Tuesday next on their before the Constitution Commit as a pet ho was told that prison ^"''"i" Neertni innther r n.ted Kingdom to simii to give evidence In support regulation* forbade the import*pa ^n who ,% 0 i a member of Wi sift evidence, writs) their report Of his memorandum for a new tlon of any living animals into the &. purlv Alll ... ,,, Magnanl and ST. He labelled %  iv and make roco.nn.em.a-U.ns toCmUUttelor the Colony he Jgfl Cucchi pledging auppSTto tbeB ?. Thomas Mnrscas" af day praised the goodre^ of the declared that he was speaking That one regulation stumped | rIt |t oul from whom the Compurely for himself. "I have had Christ u* but he had plenty of Hn> Johnson Tb mission took oral cvidcnc. J"* Oovernoi s privilege to come t 0 uilnk and finally came up with a Communist Mayor Paolo Salvarvallv hi* friend Ch %  .s.m Broadeastine a farewell mesSfr^jXl! VrluSSS^\^ l ' d <"Utlon. He was' in no particular lore "',t ,( n near Salerno ah,. „,. ftrocidcasting a rarcwm mes s, r John Vfaddinifton. Chairman hurrv to uei A >t UP WOUW I* ln >•"' breakaway. He <>u vcs AIIH'H Luclen and Corntbis counof the Commission, -and I want ^ml lonJ* t bSr reported to have told a meeting try at noon. Sir John declared it to be quite clearly understood "ST l£ fh. ^LMW .h.i tha>ded by ,me 1.000 they had asked a great many that anything I say is not evi" e a8ke %  ,-tain the underlying reasons for Mr. McDavId in his evidence piece of flannel, lucked il under direction including the Soviet %  opinions which hod l>eeti given. SDOke strongly in favour of the his armpit and lay on the bed ot Union. pnj nana>;er of tha %  istratt % %  abolition of the literacy test for his cell for twenty day*, r i allied that occavoters and the granting of full On the twenty-first day he felt lOftalry %  Wltneaa might reasonadult suffrage; the shortening of a slight sttrtStnte fcu ... rSMntznaM the tit, of the Legislative Council H r remove he l^mS Nolnes* of QW*lBO*\ Thgt to three years and the increase "Zil^^ft. | n ,£, ,hZVX>Y rMvar detected any Men In the number of electorial dis"! ^0"" "e had hakhetl a chickm a tribute to the g.-xltricts from 14 to 20 with minis..,. -^,„„ ... kl „, ,, „ nrsa of th,witnesses and they torial HMug for unofficial memN w < L hrl "? 8 hM J* U P**" U '1 must appreciate thai forbearance ben of the Executive Council .. w !" n "* %  ".** >Uo*, and hod been shown. , the Jail has a live animal. rouehing on the llnancial outThe regulations said nothing COsUtrMtiTC Solutinn look. Mr. McDavid told the Comabout keeping live animals in the missioners that there is nothing prison. They just prohibit their whatever in the Colony's financial Importation through the prison vhlch would preclude an gates. — Kenlen Febru .ry 19 fi Air Defence Insoluble Harbour Log Earlier. Sir John had said the Cbools S"S • %  nde.uou. 10 make .proposals ^j^ ^ ^^^ T „ ul J.N.S and conslructive solutioi He could only assure people that the Commission should bear jifficultie* DIM HOPE Says \ohru vhlch would enable British Guina to have a suitnbli essful political future. think that there Is scope to over k come these difficulties with coreWISCONSIN i General Nathan F Tw.ruu.! Chief of the United States Air Force suid here that Ihe an CM fane* of the United States was "an almost insoluble problem". General Twining in an address %  %  r ; f,isi moving iMHtibers a', various levels in an ntmonphire 'ix miles deep and a* \> e-'lirc continent were tremendout. But he added: "No rnemv >i the United States should be ds> reived that our retaliatory „,"£' strategic striking power would be ,| U IM Ineffective. —Renter ful management." Sir John said that much sifting of evidence and many hours of hard work lav ahead. "We sincerely hope they will bo profitably spent for British Guiana. recogniM.' ihe need for speed. There is no dme to lose If everything is to be ready for the next election. I can assure you m are anxious to present our report ot the earliest possible moment Smugglers' Plane Seized By French PARIS. Fvb 12 French security pol" seized a plain anarchists to i men between the two countr The next general election takes the Frenc^ Ministry of th place in 1952. — (CP) NEW DELHI. Indian Prime Minister Nehru tdd Parliament today that the United Nations* Resolution branding China as aggressor put an end for the time being at leas* to any attempts ot negotiation or settlement. He said "we hope still it may be possible for rvcrvts to luke a l>etter turn In the future but must confess that at the moment In pe has grown very dun". MILAN Nehru, who was making a Cardinal Schu used by Spanish „iatemont r.n foreign affairs said of Milan has urged Ihe Italian iggle mon^yjind Ind|a s f rien ri| y relation* with Government to provide jobs for the China had been "very helpful" countrj I bo t\ght Get Jobs For The Idle Archbishop of Milan '"* in attempts for a negotiated setCommunism "The phalanx of jobVr£V^ cr f . V" .tlement of Far East problems. In toss represents a veritable sixth The French built plane a single „,._ _ A m „ r __i-i M h.m" h„ ^ rngfned four sealer was seized Cuyuncouru aerodrome lenten 500 Year-Old Bible Found Vt*r .pitp of riiffcrpncp5 bl opinion, oolumn? ho suid Indiii would continue to try !o pt n ..inuln W friendly r.l:.tion8 "It It useless to prepare arm* illes on warrant Issued by W| h 1||t Ullilol| s a „ s hp a „, „,,,, „ M „ n ,„ r Hr „,„,,•, deis louowe i D B .„i p,,. .v.. .„,ii Lyons magistrate. This eaaa. ..: ar if some Referring ti> the Intliii-Paklstan fence .„ LI\ 7; !" ~ u !" 'M"o <*"' KMbmlr. rlohm : %  .100.000 unemployed are left to ehist, last month by 1-yons police h ,„^, lc ,,,,.„. w „ roam h e ti.. • I: uu^t JaCriM? Vi '" "" !" ie of Xrei again., reTin. powar e. up on January 18. a ction" as the strongest all. .1 1?, nl. .1 ih. tartl ,Jf ?h. Z !" 'I w << %  lho people ,,l K ..flmuioraldy and irrellglon UINIXJN A (lr*t edition of the Gutennanes in me beck o* the van .leeide their ev?i future Iniii.i he said. The church had spent Sfi""*?5 ber, Bible, conatdetttl one of the 'a'd when the, were..surprised iSoulsl not B.v^ up" ",i'. much money on relief hut at pre. >.,..., monuments of Christen>>y o armed police sitting next J£J J 1 '" J ^ r on y 5 hr e„,,e.,l these p-Viple. embittered and r.00m, ha. arrived in New York by • the sjckie ^prindpies Involved in the di.illusioned. „„ lender ... alms 1-au.a. tried U 'at oil his mou pl„e_after being lost for over ^% u £ ll !" < m !" ; conSide^Su" lE-hS." SS -'"ter b NEW YORK. Fob: '^tTBTble. named after Johann ^f 1 ",""^,'^".^VVh: "•" S^'^^SS. "re^ef SZ inb.li anarchist federation aircraft at their disposal n,-l years ago. The copy, one of the „,,,„.,.' .TJ _.,,,.. 180 published then, was "lost" in **" *oid.-euter. i ippo'Cdlv from the library ___...—^ of a British Baronet. Sir George s T k "as' ',ecentiy rediscovered Americait Arrested bTj^'olrtlrriSto 5S.S By Swiss For Spying I^IIA* of Charlr-i A Scrlbner's Sons. Street. St. Jar Robbed Of $1,626 ivho negotiated its purchase. loin "IIOWTI ( nrre.li^.ij(il> PORT-OF-SPAIN. Feb. 14. A masked bandit, armed with i i-evolver walked off with $1.8 J ceah in a daylight hold-up on the j Saddle Rood. Santa Cruz, at about on Saturday. Victim l* Of Vldale .. _ames. who had Jus* j left the Santo Cruz R.C. Church 1 BTHH take energetic step* divorce apuri to light unemployment.' his wife's -Renter. sWU| IKS The r VAMIIi:>l-V 2-WAY BEAUTY IREArMENI \ u.i in M \ Skin Youth I'' WASHINGTON, Feb. u The I 1 States has asked ^Zl^*' mak^hi.t nylci Inoha.'and 1* om Of th. half r "put on trial speedily the U wonu ; n fJ sMK -ldng the thief orderUir vear-ald American negro Charles lhe W0|nari lu gmndstlll at largi Gothic type is considered a Davis imprisoned in Geneva on rwvtav9r point an* ctaudsd *B masterpiece of primer's art. espionage charges^ her money. Before *he could move. Neither the purchase nor sale* The state Department said Davis M grabbed her handbag with the i.t. but Scribwas arrested in connection with money, a gold bracelet and a wrist i.er-s reported the cost was subthe misuse or mail" but apparwalcn inside. The man escape.i toy | %  o of the higher.! ently no formnl charges had bee,i ^ a bicycle which was poiked • \er recorded for this made agalnit him. He had been nearby. The money was made up book. The last copy was sold at In Swiss police custody since last of ten and twenty-dollar bills. Kuction in New York in 1926 and December. five dollar note and rroughl $106.000.—I.N 8. —Renter. note. VALtLUMA : Foundation On tains rare nils that make your skin Soft and Supple. Special Oil in water Emulsion means it cannot dry on the skin. dolbu -*-•. i r-i . s. H | — Urn H SCSI. T rwUi \ II VwMhoU i.u-.a lr. > t'liuriDor, I Aide %  ih Out 1 (.liiMrcn grow husky and tall . bigger, stronger — better equipped for school tad pUy, aad for the future, with s hearty Quaker Oats brcakfist HVERY MORNING! No other whole grain t crcal is more delicious and satisfying, no other gives greater nourishment at less cost. GREAT Hl.-.LTH FOOD... Oa.Wr...,. i. ri.n in us. DM lo('|uilieoctB).*UTnaih ami health. I f i .r.K. proud •. isirlxtliyilrates. sail cisea* ,>*,! inn rnrrxr. Ojuakcr Oils ii ncalih| BRI .Kl \s| KHlDfurevvrybodv. AsksorQusI i < IJUIIHIJV 4t your favorite More... serif Onaker ,.cr, day! LOOK! QUAKER OATS GIVES YOU MQftf ENERGT fc'i kl M c*wa**yara**s MOHi STUINOTM **MV •* i*l*k" MORE STAMINA . .ikas*. Is •••*••* Tkissii* (Vfrssw ,) MQR£ ENJOYMENT dslkkwt Havw g— T Ud> lsW* ht Cr< for Wt> especially tho-e over l"> | v. imooth and clean. "/III >Tr:OL" to guard you ag;ui A perfect Powder Baa* for Normal 1 Skins, an Essential for DRY SKINS Made by the Makers of the iamiui:— • VALDtRMA' SKIN OINTMENT A Positive Beauty TrealmeBt, which brines rrmarh..b!e resul Obtainable at: BOOKKK'K IBDOSI DRlfi ST1IKKS LTD. Broad M. erl *, %  ad HASTINGK. ALPHA PHARMACY PIMPLES sawushej ssaVl St* thrill %  >P" SMdicalcl. **t Qsstsnai Rootl" '%  *>' •'' %  '' Unc %  h.W.JJ DR. CHASE'S i Antiseptic OINTMENT „.-..*•• sall When wl*17** * B DOKS THEY'RE TALKING CRICKET OF COURSE LIMACOL Naturally it's Ihe chief topic of conversation at present. But whether you talk cricket or play cricket you probably know of the wonderful help that LIMACOL is to all athletes. Before the game a rub with LIMACOL makes you feel as fresh as a daisy, and ready for anything. And after a hard day in the field it's the very thing for a brisk massage to pep you up and ease your achinn muscles. But even if you're not an athlete, LIMACOL is fine for you to use for a rub down whenever you are tired end suffering from muscular soreness. So whether you are a real cricketer or the pavilion variety, take advantage of LIMACOL and enjoy the freshness of a breeze in a bottle. 1.IMACOIcan be obtained Plain ,,r Mi nlliolaled to suit your personal lasle, at your nearest druit store. THE FAVOURITE TOILET LOTION OF THE CARIBBEAN The above equipment is available (or early delivery from the U. K. >I\SSI;Y-II AIUUS EQUIPMENT EoquUM cordially invited for the supply of the following— 19 II..I.I". O ryl. mi SI I WHEEl THAI TORS • Si.. I 11 lu Is ;ils MViiilabl> for I'louShiiiS) GRASS < ITTKIIS S A 611 >IVM UK ISl'IIKAIIEHS Sllli: IUI.IVKIIV RAKES Mill MM IS COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM Ltd. | HHTII.m.VI. RRILLS





PAGE 1

r.VGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. FEBRrVRY IS, 1*51 HENRI BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY BY CHIC YOUNG .•.'. TW6GAMBOLS ALL. TMC-! 1 IBH THEN HVftl TRAIL KUW/! THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES JCt.TAKE'T EAS> ftirmms HAXE. WCHJ WANNA GET i ALL MH.lt LTV I ABO." .. TOTtSSTHU DAWEO"'!] TUE PLANE, ASAlNST~ t MV OWEPST 3 MW %  '.r (OUT .WANrnEBWlTHUS > MIMESIS A JlNf ISMEaBEINClRWAY %  —^B I MO@0N IONDON Gums Bleed! yt'hemngs / 1 i \^'*BrTJ2l FRESH OR m W U TOMATO SAUCE H 'l i • four IMK %  U li m ll— Moa gum ..ii4 H*.n Tii-i" TT. -iS^iifc f, F,.rrfc-Tr..h *•• HARPIC CANS IT R fOll iLiuiprinhlr wflK'HatpN' iMdiht tanlory bo*l —kvrc ("-unufii— ihn. flwh. tUip clectM, dUUifeOi nd dfodorlm (h* whole pan. including (be S-btnd. HARPIC THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSED v OBSERVE I thai different brands of Bay Rum come, and They go. but BORNN'S BAY RUM will co on forever ^ WHY? 'SSSSSSSSSSSSS.'SSSSSS? t ontwtinnwfi %  III lh.Ih-lif/hlful ttramls Boxes POLS UQUEUR CHOCOLATES MELTIS FAVOURITE CANDIES $1.85 MELTIS COFFEE CHOCOLATE MINT CREAMS Tin. FRYS CHOCOLATE HAZEL NUTS .. NESTLES TOASTED ALMONDS ,. PASCALL'S FRUIT SALAD FRUIT BARLEY SUGAR GLUCOSE BARLEY SUGAR .. $2.54 1.02 Th*> Finfst ,4 Hsnrt in t-nt Botll.8 COINTREAU tuinEs LIQUOR* KUMMEL APRICOT BRANDY MARASQU1N HENNESSY XXX BRANDY MARTINI VERMOUTH NOLLY PRAT VERMOUTH BOOTHS GIN U.00 3.25 Syrups mill Mtsrnittlitdi-s Tin. LYLES GOLDEN SYRUP $ Bottl.. BERCHEN CASTLE G. SYRUP HONEY .. GOLDEN SHRED MARMALADE .. SILVER SHRED HARTLEY'S MARMALADE Tin. U. MARMALADE (2-lb) .. TRINIDAD MARMALADE Juifvs tint I Sl/llll.slll'S Tin. BAHAMAS PINEAPPLE JUICE $ .53 .. THREE BAY'S TOMATO JUICE S5 .. SILVER LEAF PINEAPPLE JUICE 39 .. LETONA TOMATO JUICE 34 TRINIDAD ORANGE JUICE .33 ORANGE S GRAPE FRUIT JUICE .29 Bottle. ROSE'S LIME JUICE CORDIAL ... 1.06 .. CLAYTONS ORANGE SQUASH .96 LEMON SQ UASH 93 Itoi-t'. . I.I I III It ... # %  '.€• far KiniHlinif PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF—STEAK ROAST STEW LAMB—in LEGS. LOIN. SHOULDER CHOPS -VEAL lor ROASTING & CUTLETS-TRIPE—OX TONGUES CALVES KIDNEYS LAMB 4 VEAL lor STEW— APPI-ES $10.00 per COM: 30C. per lb BACON and HAM—SLICED SALAMI SAUSA'JE SUM pe. lb IlisniilH Just What ONMNi I.IH,' ;• v Tin. PEEK FREANS MARLINE CRACKER CHEESELETS PLAYBOX BISCUITS .. ROMARY GINGER BAKE BUSCUITS HONEY BAKE WATER BISCUITS ,. JACOB'S AFTERNOON TEA BISCUITS CREAM CRACKERS 1 lllllll'll \l 1-11 is Uiis/i-lti-Si't-r,' $ .70 Tin. LAMBS' TONGUES C & B BREAKFAST ROLL .40 ,. SWIFT'S OX TONGUES (20J) 3.20 .. PATE DE FOIE 20 .. CORNED BEEF with CEREAL .31 .. COOKED HAMS (2-lb) 3.10 „ KRAFT MACARONI S CHEESE J7 QucUit Tin. BATCHELOR PEAS .. CHALLENGE PEAS .. ASPARAGUS (WHITE! Lara. .. MUSHROOMS .. SWEET CORN .. TOMATOES „ MIXED VEGETABLES FOR SOUP JJJJ ITIHIE




eae








ESTABLISHED 1895



THE WESTERN END of the ground at Kensington Oval was again flooded yesterday. Mr. Bruce Inniss
(third from left), with fork in hand is clearing the sucks on the field.

February
In Forty Years

THIS IS THE WETTEST February that Barbados has
Records show that on Februray 6, 1911,
five inches of rain were recorded in St. Michael,
rainfall at Codrington on Tuesday, up to 3.00 p.m., was two
inches and 37 parts. Up to the same time yesterday it was



Chou En Lai
‘Warns’ U.S.

LONDON, Feb, 14
A strong warning against Amer-
ican attempts to conduct separate
r.egotiations on peace with Japan
was given by Chou En Lai, Prime
Minister and Minister of Foreign

Affairs of the Chinese Peoples
Republic, in an article in the
Moscow Pravda,

The article, written by the

Chinese Premier on the anniver-
sary of the signing of the treaty
of friendship, alliance and mutual
assistance between the U.S.S.R
and China, and broadcast by the
Moscow radio today, said that the
great alliance of the two countries
“is a fraternal alliance directed
against imperialism and servi
the cause of the defence of uni-
versal peace.”

Making a direct reference to
“the imperialist clique headed by
American imperialism,” Chou
said: “Not wishing to reconcile
itself to the defeat of its aggres-
sive policy in the East, it now con-
templates conducting separate ne-
gotiations on peace with Japatiyds
carrying out the remilitarisation of
Japan, is attempting to use the
territory of Japan as a place for
arms and the Japanese people as
cannen fodder for the continua
tion and extension of its criminal
acts of aggression in Korea and on
Taiwan, and intervention in Viet-
nam and South-East Asia,”

—Reuter |«



MILLER GOING ON

Ss. AMERICAN TOUR

WASHING ON, Feb. 14.

Mr. Edward Miller, United
States Assistant Secretary of Stute
for the Inter-American Affairs,
will leave here on Saturday for a
tour of South American Republics.
He will first visit Brazil for ex-
ploratory conversations with
members of President Getulio
Vargas’ new Government. He w i
also visit Uruguay, Argentina,
Chile and Peru.—Reuter. |









APPROVE MILITARY

PROGRAMME

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.
By a 13 to none vote the Senate
Armed Services Committee to-day
approved ur 1 military train-
ing and the services programme
including authority to draft 18-
year-olds.—Reuter,








lhe believed

Wettest

had since 1911.

one inch and 52 parts with a
in the shade.

Construction
Stopped On
U.C.W.I1.

(From Cur Own Correspondent)

JAMAICA, Feb. 14,

Construction work on University
College West Indies building
closed down indefinitely to-day at
2 p.m. as workers on strike re-
fused to return to the job. Early
this morning following consulta~-
tions between the contractors
Higgs and Hill and University
authorities a notice was posted on
the building compound stating
that if the workers did not return
at 2 o'clock, construction would
be suspended until a poll deter-
mined Union representation,

The strike, one of many since
the beginning of the year started
cn Tuesday called by the B.1.T.U,
over the refusal of the T.U.C. to
agree to a poll being taken among
workers because the B.I.T.U.
wi) not agree to a poll being
taken at Coir Factory, St. Thom-
as. Cases of violence and stone
throwing, were reported from
strike area.

|“Red Split In Italy

Of Great Interest”

WASHINGTON, Feb, 14.

United States Secretary of State
Dean Acheson, to-day described
reports of the recent split in the
Italian Communist Party as a
matter of very great interest. He
told his weekly news conference
that it was a development which
shouid take place
among all Communists who
really had interests of their own
countries at heart instead of
acting as agents for a foreign
power.—Reuter.

May Get

St. Kitts

Sugar Station

(From Our Own

CONSIDERATIONS are being given



Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb, 14.
in St, Kitts to

the establishment of an experimental sugar station on

profit sharing lines.
afternoon.

question by Socialist M.P.

“Pepublicans Want
Exid Of U.S. Aid
To West Europe







WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.
The stopping of American Aid
to Western Europe, “unless Am-
erica is persuaded that these
countries are bearing their full
share of the burden” is suggest-
ed ina declaration on foreign

policy signed more than 100
of the larg
can members of the United States

House of Representatives.

by



The declaration will be spon-
sored in the House by Repres
tative Lawrence H. Smith (Wi
consin) and five cther Republi-
cans.

Other poir in
tion are:

Allow
cipation
policy.

Make America impreg
attack

Cut non-defence spending

Build TT ere d



declar



full



This was revealed by
Minister for the Colonies in the House of Commons this
He was replying
Mr. James Johnson.

number of Republi-!



-| negative.







Mr. Dugdale, |

in a written answer to a

Mr. Johnson had suggested that
the Leewards Government should
acquire absentee owned sugar plan-
tions, and run them on a profit
sharing basis for the benefit of the
islanders.

He suggested that a precedent
jhad been _ established by the
Americans in Puerto Rico.- Mr.
Dugdale went cn to say~that al-
neevly in the Leewards useful
progress had been made in ac-
quiring estates for land settlement
on an individual holding ba
particularly in Antigua where
| 12,600 acres had been so utilised.
| Referring to the suggestion
| that absentee estates should be
| acquired by Government he sai
| “uniform policy cannot be laid
down for the Leeward Islands
generally, since conditions difer
i widely between the Presidencies.
|The answer therefore is in the
The Puerto Rico
being borne










sy3-

ih



item. is however
| mind,” q f
Later Mr. Johnson said he had













THURSDAY,





The

temperature of 80° Fahrenheit

For the last 40 years Barbados
has been enjoying dry Februarys
but this February, the time sche-
duled for the Intercoloniai Tour-
nament with Trinidad, the weath-
er has made a change. Apart
from affecting the cricket it is
also hampering the progress of
the crop.

At Baxters a temporary bridge
was erected to allow lorries and
earts to get across with canes |
Spring Vale, Baxters and Friend-
ship, This bridge was. washed
away and the road is again im-
passable,

Labourers are however pulling
their weight. and whenever the
rain stops fot short periods they

quickly load carts and get them, Said,

eff to the factories, Lorries are
finding it difficult to remove canes

from the fields.

residence, St. Andrew, was als9
damaged by a small landslide,

There were no major faults t
telephone communications. M«
T. G. McKinstry, Secretary of tne
Telephone Company, told the
Advocate that only the usual wet
weather faults, common to all
telephone systems, were exper:
enced but they were dealt with
immediately.

Police telephone communica-
tions at District “D’’, St. Thomas,
District “F”’, St. Joseph, and at
Belleplaine, St. Andrew, were put
out of order yesterday because of
the continuous heavy rains.

The rain fell heaviest in St
Michael, the District “A” police
station there recording two inches.
At about 8 o'clock last night, the
water which had come down from
the country to pass through the
Constitution River on its way to
the sea reached a foot and a half
below the Constitution Road,
under the bridge.

Following are the figures: Dis-
trict “A’’ 2 inches, Boarded Hall
1.50, District “C” .53, District “E”
1.05, Holetown 1.36, Four Roads
1.25, and Crab Hill 1.48.

Three Ships in Port

Waterfront and: board-of-sh.p
labourers were allowed only
hours of work, Three ships w
in Carlisle Bay — two discharging
cargo and the other taking a load
of sugar for the U.K, They were
much handicapped because of the
steady showers during the day,

Schooner Lucille M. Smita,
which called during the morning
with a load of rice, could not start
discharging her cargo and quite .




rumber of Vessels in the Careen- |

age kept their hatches covered
with tarpaulins.

In the flood areas — Halls Road,
Constitution and Delamere Land—-
the water did not rise to dange’ ous
heights, but the few people stili
living in these districts kept pre-
pared for an emergency. F

The corner of the old road at

|

A pipe line leading to a

« Prime



South Boreans



15,

FY BRUARY

Winston Church

onfidence Vo

Land 80 Miles

North Of Parallel

TOKYO, Feb. 14,

Tough South Korean Marines struck a surprise blow at

the east coast port of Wonsan 8°

parallel to-day.

They went ashore under thg#protection of the heavy
guns of the world’s biggest baleship Missouri, cruisers | Opposition
Eighth Army headquarters

and destroyers.

marines had also occupied two islands off the coast. Tnose

said the

on the mainland had reached the outskirts of the city after

accomplishing the landings.

Must Unite:

Say 2 Premiers

SANTA MARGHERITA,
(ITALIAN RIVIERA), Feb. 14.
French
broke up their three-day confer-
nee here to-day with a declaration
that Europe must unite “in the
fece of those forces which are
‘ttempting to divide our nations.”

A Communique said the Minis-
ters had made a full examination
of all questions affecting France
and Italy.

It said that the two countries
had agreed on the necessity of in-
cluding Germany for
European defence.

Foreign Minister Robert Schu-
man at a press conference at the
close of the



in plans

meeting emphasised
that Germany would have “equal
rights” in the European Army.
He said that if possible, agree-
ment on the inclusion of Germany
would be mgr



ide with Russia which
was a party to the four-power
German occupation § statute,

“Events do not stand still how-
,”’ he warned, “We will try to
reach agreement with Russia,”
but if necessary “we will go ahead
on our own.’

Schuman said that Italy
France had discussed at this meet-
ing the projected big four Foreign
Ministers* ‘Conference, France, he
had agreed to keep Italy in-
formed of developments,

Pleven and De Gasperi con-
cluded the Press Conference each
with a declaration reaflirming the
“traditional bonds of friendship
between the two countries,
—Reuter.



Tories Expect
Win Today

BRISTOL, Feb, 14

Conservatives expect a com-
fortable win at west Bristol to-
morrow in a Parliamentary bye-
election caused by the death of
Mr. Oliver Stanley, one of Mr.
Churchill’s chief lieutenants.

The election has set a problem
for the Labour Government Par-

ty, whose candidate, Mr. Harold
Lawrence, has expressed pacifist
views.

Minister Clement Attlee
has withheld the supporting let-
ter which he customarily sends to
Party candidates, and Mr.
rence’s vote may suffer in
sequence.

con-

But despite the absence of the! pared with 1948

Prime Minister’s blessing, a num-
ber of Labour M.P.’s including
leftwingers, have spoken at Bris-
tol on Mr. Lawrence’s behalf.
Conservatives, who hold the
seat, have put up a strong can-
didate for this straight fight. He
is S'r Walter Monekton, consti-
tutional expert who was Solicitor
General in the wartime coalition
Government. —Reuter.



No Pressure On
West Germany
—Says ACHESON.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.
United States Secretary of
State Dean Acheson said to-day
that the United States did not
intend to put “pressure” on
western Germany to participate

Harmony Hall, Christ Church, was/in western European defence.

flooded and impassable to traffic
and pedestrians. In order to get



new section of this road.
A well at'the Ivy which collects
water from surrounding districts,
@ On page 8. t



WET SAILS IN THE RAD

He told his weekly press con-
ference today that this had al-

through, vehicles and pedestrians | ways been the policy of the Uni-
were forced to use a part of the /ted States.

He added that there

had becn no change since Gen-

eral Eisenhower reported on his

visit to Europe’s capitals.



and)



Law-| higher than pre

Observers thought the aim of
the raid was to burn supplies and
kill as many Communists as poss-
ible.

Wonsan is 100 miles across the
country east of Pyongyang, the
Nérth Korean capital. American
Marines landed last October at
Wonsan which became the supply

ase for the campaign in northeast

Korea from which United Nations
forces withdrew after Chinese
intervened in December

The main ground fighting today |
and Jtalian Premiers}Wa@S on the central front around
Ww

oAju, communications and sup-
ply town which has been the scene
of bitter fighting during the past
month.

The United Nations fought well
to hold a determined twin-pronged
Cormunist counter offensive
lauaeched at the week-end.

Tae garrison at Chipyong, made
up ef American and French troops
held firm northwest of Wonju,
which powerful Communist forces
tried to overwhelm last night.

But flares thrown down by
planes allowed artillery and other
planes to wreak havoc in the Com-
mutnist drive which stowed up,
and today's attacks were described
as “moderate”.

While this arm of the Commun-

ist drive was pinned down the
other arm immediately north of
Wonju was receiving reinforce-

ments which United Nations air-
eraft harassed all day.

One particularly successful air
strike Was made against a south-
bound Communist column on its
way to join strong concentrations
northwest of Wonju,

A 10th Corps spokesman said it
Ww 8 exaggeration of this air
a ‘to say that one river was
red with blood and that oxen and
caris were biown to bits and scat-
tered all over the landscape.

Communist onslaughts were of
the yelling “Banzai” pattern and
United Nations troops had to
withdraw north of Ichon.-Reuter,

C.0.L. Higher
Than Pre-war
IN. BRITAIN

GENEVA, Feb. |4

The cost of living in Britain was
nine-tenths higher in September
1950 than pre-war, according
the United Nations Economic
Commission for Europe ‘

A bulletin of the Commission is -
sued tonight said the cost of living
in Britain remained constant 1
the first three quarters of 1950 at
105, except for a vise in April to
106, compared with 100 in 1948.

The 1948 level was given in the
bulletin as 181 compared with fou
in 1938, which would make the
cost of living in 1950 nine-tenth:
war,

Western Germany, Turkey and
Switzerland showed a fall corm
All other coun
tries showed a rise, but the cost
of living fell towards the 194%
level in several European coun
tries in the first three quarters
1950 the bulletin said.

—Reuter

SLOVAK WOMAN HAS
FOUND NEW COMET

PRAGUE, Feb, 13.
woman astronomer






io

of



A_ Slovak

has ‘discovered a new comet, the

miles north of the 38th |

Webb Asked
About Meat

LONDON, Feb. 14
| Maurice Webb, British Food
Minister told the Commons to-
j}day that the enly other country
beside Argentina which had “any

substantial quantity of meat for
sale abroad” was Uruguay.

Webb answering questions from
members on the
>|plight of meat-hungry Britain
with its ration reduced from 10d
to 8d. worth per week said “in
iddition we get offers of small
quantities from time to time from
varicus European countries which
are considered on their merits
Thornton Kemsley asked him “is
it not a fact that Uruguay has
ganged up with Argentina and is
not that just one more example
of the failure of Government
policy of bulk buying?”

Webb described Thornton-
Kemsley’s remark as “another
example of a reckless and un-
helpful statement’.

Anthony Eden, Deputy Oppo-
sition leader said that throughout
the earlier stages of the Argen-
tine negotiations “we did our ut-



most if reluctantly to support
Government attitude, and it is
only their recent utter failure
that has compelled us . Meee
rest of the sentence was lost in
Government jeer!ng. —Reuter





King Proclaimed |

For United Lybia

TRIPOLI, Feb, 14.

The Libyan National Assembly,
set up to create a constitution for
Libya when it becomes self gov-
erning next year, today reserved
its vote on the form of a con-
stitution for the future State,

The National Assembly has
approved the proclamation of the
Emir of Cyrenaica, as king of
the United Libya comprising
Tripolitania, Cyrenaica and the
Fezzan.

The United Nations Council
on Libya, which is discussing the
transfer of power from the ad-
ministering powers, Britain and
Franee, to the Libyans, has post-
poned its meeting, fixed for to-
morrow until Wednesday 2).

—Reuter,



India And America best sellers including Green Light,
Have Similar Aims aage, which were filmed,

NEW YORK Feb, 14.

President Truman’s message to
Congress asking permission to
send India 2,000,000 tons of food
grains was ‘everlastingly’ right
in emphasising the similarity be-
tween India and the United States
rather than the temporary nar-

row differences, said"a statement | poured

issued on behalf of the India
league of America today.

Both were striving for a free
and peaceful world, said — the
statement, which was _ issued
jointly by Mr. J. Singh, Presi
dent, and Mr. Richard J, Walsh,
chairman of the Executive Com-
mittee of the League. “This ob-
jective cannot change, but there
is room for difference: in how to
achieve it” the statement added.

“Prompt fulfilment of the Pre-
sident’s request would be a long
step toward improving the un-
derstanding between the two
countries and consequently to-
ward strengthening the free
world everywhere” —Reuter



Isracl Government
Forced To Resign

JERUSALEM, Feb. 14
The Israel Government resigned
to-day after a non~confidence vote
in Parliament on religious educa
tion policy.
Parliament threw out the Labour



Central Astronomical Institute in! jeq four party coalition by 49 votes

Prague reported yesterday,

was sighted on Sunday,

Institute said’ the doctor macde]*". * a
her discovery from an Observa- withdrawal S the ee ae
tory in the Tatra mountaing of |'isious bloc, the second’ strongest |

Slovakia,
the previous discovery
ether comets.—Reuter,

PARTY CRITICISM

COPENHAGEN, Feb. 14

of



Two former Danish Communists

who resigned after a meetirfe ot
Sunday said today there had bee:
criticism ameng party members 0

the “dictatorial tendencies in the
—Reuter | administration.”

~—Reutec







learned that certain holders of
>| plantations on St. Kitts might be
prepared to sell their interests]
nd he was anxious that if that |
local populaiior | CARLISLE BAY at 11.30 yesterd:
of their fishing boats. By 4 p.m





mn took the





t opportunity of
had returned and they we

unning the wet
re once more soaking wet

The

’ The to 42 with three abstentions.
report gave no indication of the

Iccation of the new comet, which the end of last October after a
ine}

The Government was formed at

two-week crisis following

She is credited. with|party in the coalition,
three

The religious bloc had refuse:
to support the plan to broaden

the cabinet by the inclusion of the |
Minister for Trade and Industry. |
but after many days’ negotiations |
they agreed to support the coalition |

until the January, 1953, elections
i —Reuter

Term Extended

LONDON, Feb. 14
Sir Alexander Clutterbuck, Brit-



ish High Commissioner in Canada |

has had his térm of office extend
ed for about one year from May

1951, the Commonwealth Relations

Office announced on Tuesday night
Sir Alexander, 53, succeeded Rt.

Hon. Malcolm MacDonald as High
Commissioner to Canada in May
1946. _—(CP)



FOURTEEN "BURIED
FOKMOSA, Feb. 14,

The bodie
n a Royal Air
flying boat on
mountain east of Formosa,
buried near the spot with’a sim
ple ceremony, by the local Presby
terian pastor, investigators
ported today



rt t crashed on a
|from J Hong Kong «
\J t 28 with n irvivor
i Reuter

of 14 people, killed
Force Sunderland
a remote. Taiping |
were |

| GARDINER AUS
sgh BRIDG





| On Defence

LONDON, Feb. 14.
WINSTON CHURCHILL to-night tabled a sur-
prise amendment to the British Labour
Government’s Defence Programme. He has asked
for a vote of no confidence in the Government’s
Defence policy. The amendment was made duri
the two-day debate on defence in the House o
Defence Minister Emanuel
Commons. Shinwell who ,ened the debate
told the House of Commons to-dey
that Britain will send another
division to Germany, increasing
her army there to three divisions.
He said this would be part of
Britain's contribution to the
defence of Western Europe.







New measures now proposed
would able the nation to mobil-
ise al rve division with much
greater speed than ever before.

Shinwell said that the danger
of war had become more acute in

the past few months. If the Com-
munist “Korean experiment” was
uccessful, Berlin or Western
Cermany might be the next step.
The threat to western Europe had
become plain.

Shinwell ended by saying that
the new arms drive did not mean
war was inevitable —- its purpose
was to prevent war,





—Reuter

)

Aborigine
Banished

MELBOURNE, Feb. 14,
A writ was sought in the Hyth
Court here today to bring back to
his birthplace the Australifn
aborigine Fred Nadpur who Was
banished yesterday to the heart of
Australia’s most desolate country
His banishment to Haast Bluif
Settlement near Alice Springs was





CHURCHILL,

WINSTON

sfbcepasliaiansemmiieaies,

Lloyd Douglas
Dies At 73

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 14,
Lloyd C. Douglas, 73, author
of some ‘of the most coftrover-

sial and widely read religious |ordered by Northerm Territory
novels of the century, died on | Director of Natig’ Affairs, Mr. Fy
Tuesday night of a heart disease |11, Moy, becauseNadpur—known
He had suffered from arthritis | Joc Ally 3 Fi Waters — led a





since 1944 and his condition had | lightning of aborigines tor
grown steadily worse in revent} higher ‘i amantldeiert ries with

months, whites,

Douglas’ greatest books were The application to the High
Mugnificent Obsession his first} Court for a writ of habeas corpus
published in 1929 and The Robe’) was lodged today by Mr. Murray
printed in 1942, In the period | Norris, President of the North
oetween there were numerous | Australian Workers’ Union, Mr,

Justice Fullager, who is dealing
White Banners, and Disputed Pas. |, rhe 7s apeli ate for a whit
’ ee F : eg ainst Mr. H, L. Anthony, Acting

His last work was The Big | yh): ter for the Interior, Mr. Moy

a ee PC to a! Robe: | »..4 the Superintendent of Haast
ouglas relusec to allow a ’ rn . ay sai i he -
movie to be made of The Big Plu Betterment, said Is eaters



he was not certain whether he hac

. annie > because of :
Fisherraan apparently because of |) icdietion in the ease and would



the treatment The Robe received |\ | lacisinn teomorrelr

in Hollywood. Handling of the} *'¥e ® AI Pak Ser athe ce eee Be

book for films was debated for The Judge sald that if he: found

years, Finally after $750,000 was he had jurisdiction he would grant
into the ente rprise the ihe application on the evidence

picture was dropped, —Reuter,





Chinese Demonstrate
LONDON, Feb, 13.
Thousands of people in various
Chinese cities took part in pro
test demonstrations against Ja-
pan’s “remilitarisation” the Soviet
news agency Tats reported from

Peking to-day.—Reuter

TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT





—(C.P.) before him,



CLIMAT-E

OUR NE Ee De ees

|
|
|
|

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punishment without fading or peeling. Berger Paints are the answer.

Specially formulated for the Barbados climate, they bring lasting



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Walls and ¢ primed with DUSSEAL, then painted
with MATROLL oil bound water paints stay fresh and

| lourful

|
The J t | by LASTIRON,

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Ninel f t Brickwork outside BERGERTEX

1760







| All these BERGER pro ts ore stocked in Barbodos by

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»

SUBX, 3
























PAGE TWO





Caub Calling

R. S. E. V. LUKE, C.M.G.,

head of the West Indian De-
partments of the Colonial Office.
arrived in Barbados yesterday
evening by B.W.1.A. from Trini-
dad and will be remaining until
February 19 as a guest of Sir
George and Lady See] at “Bemer-
syde”, Christ Church.

Mr. Luke who is making an
official tour of the Caribbean
has already visited British Hon-
duras, Jamaica and Trinidad.

Doctor's Lecture Tour
R. P. SNELLEN, the well-
known Dutch physician, now
in Britain, plans to give a number
of lectures on the West Indies
during his stay. Dr. Snellen said
he had visited all the main West
Indian territories except Jamaica.
“But I have read a good deal about
Jamaica and I have met Busta-

mante in England,” he added,

Superintendent’s Visit

AJOR O. F. C. Walcott, Su-

perintendent of the Govern-
ment Industrial Reform School in
Barbados arrived in Enigland just
ever a week ago on a ten-week
educational visit. He will spend
the greater part of his time in
London where the British Council
has arranged for him to pursue
study. in Prison Administration
with the Home Office Authorities,

After 30 Years

RS. WILLIAM RAMSEY

whose husband works with
the General Post Office in Brook-
lyn, arrived by the Lady Nelson
ch Tuesday to spend two months’
holiday in Barbados, She is stay-
ing with Mr. and Mrs. D. H. L.
Ward of “Glendon,” Hindsbury
Road. Her husband is a cousin of
Mrs. Ward. This is Mrs. Ramsey’s
first visit to Barbados in thirty
years.

Delegates Return
R. C. E, HITCHINS, Editor

of the Trinidad Guardian,
Mr. F. Seal-Coon, Editor of the








POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

‘‘—you have been selected
for training under the

scheme and will be required

to train with—M.1.5.”
oo

Married Yesterday

ESTERDAY afternoon St, Mat-

thias Church was decorated in
pink and white oleander, Queen
Anne’s lace and roses for the
marriage of Mr. Michael Lynch,
son of Mrs. Louis Lynch of White
Hall Flats, Codrington Hill and
the late Mr, Cyril A. Lynch, to
Miss Patsy Mitchell, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Mitchell of
“Palm Beach”, Hastings.

The ceremony performed by
Bishop Bentley, took place short-
ly after 5.30 p.m, The Bride who
was given away by her father
wore a dress of needlerun lace
with a sweeping train, net yoke
and fitted bodice. Her veil of eld
lece was kept in place by a head-
dress of roses and coralita. Her
bouquet was of Queen Anne's
lace and pale shell pink roses,

Governing Director

. A. S. BRYDEN, Goverh-

ing Director of Messrs. A. S.
Bryden and Sons (B’dos) Ltd.,
was among the passengers leaving
for Trinidad yesterday afternoon
6n a short visit.

From Montreal

tired Engineer of Montreal
and Mrs. Schofield arrived from
Canada on Tuesday by the Lady
Nelson to spend two weeks in
Barbados, They are staying at
the Marine Hotel. They are re-
turning by the Lady Nelson when
she calls here on her way north.

Staying with the Lords

RS, PHELPS NEWBURY ar-
rived by the Lady Nelson

on Tuesday morning to spend two THE HUNGRIEST

months and is staying with Mr.
and Mrs. Robert ©. Lord at
“Queen’s Fort”, St. James. Mrs.
Newbury’s home is in Grosse
Pointe Farms, Michigan.

She is Mrs. Lord’s

wife.
Sixth Visit

orc two weeks’ holiday

in Barbados are Mr; and Mrs,
B. G. Dean of Canada. They
arrived yesterday morning by the
Lady Nelson and are staying at
the Windsor Hotel.

Mr. Dean who is President of
the Dean-Chandler Company Lim-
ited of Toronto, told Carib that
this is his sixth visit to the island
while for his wife, it is the second,

brothers

Jeweller

Aten on Saturday from
Canada by T.C.A. were Mr,
and Mrs. Frank McKenney of
Winnipeg. They are here for twa
months’ holiday staying at the

Hastings Hotel,
Mr. McKenney is a jeweller in
Winnipeg. They also have an office

Daily Argosy, B.G., and Mr. T. &. _ Matron of pepeur was Mrs in Toronto.

Sealy, Associate Edit f the Norman Marshall, the _bride’s ‘ia

énenion Gleaner who ere here sister. There were two other at- Pomeroy Interested
for a meeting of the Caribbean tendants, Miss Ann Parris and R. and Mrs, Horace B, Pome-

Press Association left yesterday
for Trinidad by B.W.I.A,

M.G.M.
R. and Mrs. G. M. Carter
from Jersey, the Channel

Mrs. Douglas Alleyne, Mrs. Mar-
shall wore helio facone and her
head-dress which was of the same
style as the other two attendants
was of gerberas and victorian
posies. Miss Parris and Mrs,

roy of Buffalo, New York
arrived from the U.S. via Jamaica
on Monday by B,W.1.A, They are
for two weeks, staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.
Equipped with a fishing rod and

Isiands are at present in Barbados, Alleyne wore blue facone over !0ts of tackle, fishing is no doubt

ee for a holiday, but
with a view to set here and
making Barbados theft Hpmae, For
the Ume being they are staying
at Caerabank. Both Were associ-
ated for many years with Metro
Goldwyn Mayer Motion Pictures,
both in Hollywood as well as in
London, They lived in Hollywood
for about fifteen years.

Painting and Photography

R. and Mrs. John Fischer

have returneg to Venezuela
after a short holiday in Barbados.
The Fischers have lived for
eleven years at Santa Barbara in
Venezuela, Mr, Fischer’s hobbies
are painting and photography.
thy were guests at Cacrabank.

rs. Margaret Manning wite
of Mr. Justicé Manning has left

Barbados to join her husband whe Cochrane is a retired business- ready been

is doing duty in Antigua,
home is in St. Vincent.

Take up Appointment
R. and Mrs. Dick Davies left
2 for Trinidad yesterday after-
noon by B.W.1.A, They were
accompanied by their baby daugh-
ter. Mr. Davies has gone over to
take up an appointment with Apex
Oilfields Ltd., in South Trinidad,

Month

R. GERRY LOMER who is

on the engineering staff of
Rediffusion, Barbados Ltd., left on
Tuesday afternoon by B.W.I.A.
for Trinidad. He will be away for
one month visiting Rediffusion
itd,, in Trinidad.

Their

Insurance Broker

AYING their second visit to

Barbados are Mr. and Mrs.
Kk, Percy Adams from Montreal.
They arrived. on Tuesday morn-
ing by the Lady Nelson and are
here for two weeks, until the
Nelson returns on her way north.
Mr, Adams is an insurance broker
in Montreal, They are guests at
the Marine Hotel.

BY THE

HEN you read “Yesterday

was fine and warm with
light breezes,” does it not occur
to you that a weather backcast
would be much more reliable than
a forecast?

The herds of meteorologists and
prophets and seers, labouring at
their instruments, have no time
to look at the sky or to sniff the
air.. That is why any old country-
man is a far more reliable weather-
prophet than the whole crowd of
cxperts lumped together, and
fastened to their gadgets.

Short Detective Story

AC 12.23 p.m., on a Wednesday,
a haulage contractor shot a
hippopotamus in the bathroom of
his hotel at Wakua Falls. He
then escaped by a window, When
the Manager, who had heard the
shot, arrived on the scene the
body of the animal had vanished,
but there was a female footmark
on the bath-mat. Detectives found
a bullet embedded in the wall,
and a pair of scissors in the bath.

helio,

Page boy was Mr, John Lynch.
He wore a Scottish costume com-
plete with kilt.

Bestman was Mr. Douglas
Lynch, the groom’s twin brother.
Ushers were Mr, Richard Ni-

cholls, Mr. David Read and Mr.
Richard Parris. The reception
was held at White Hall, Codring-
ton Hill,

Mr. and Mrs. Lyneh are due
to leave this afternoon for Gren-
ada for their honeymoon,

**Nelson”’ Arrivals

MONG the passengers arriv-
i ing by the Lady Nelson on
Theedas morning were Mr. and
Mrs. [. C, Cochrane and Mr.
and Mrs. W. M. Currie. Mr,

man of Toronto and Mr, Currie
is in the manufacturing business
in Hamilton, Ontario. They are
staying at the Marine Hotel.

a must on his list of things to do
whilst in Barbados.

He was most interested to learn
that a former Manager of the Ma-
rine Hotel was named Pomeroy.
He wondered if there were any
more Pomroys living in the
island,

Mr. Pomeroy is now retired, he
pg to be with am investment
firm.

May go to Nigeria

MONG Colonials who signed

their names in the Barris-
ters’ Roll gt the Inns of Court last
week was Lorenzo Williams
Barbados.



A MAN WHO leaves his

BARBADOS, ADVOCATE

Woman to Woman

Do Husbands Really
Want Slim Wives?

by SUSAN

OMEN, dieting down to the

last ounce of raw cabbage, Highlights
find that they get no encourage-
ment from their husbands.
R. E. A. SCHOFIELD, a re- IF A WOMAN refuses potatoes

bread it is enough to cause
@ major seene in m o 5 t
families.

wife holding one drink the
entire evening will simply
pour liquor down her
throat if he so much as
suspects that she is diet-
ing. And a diet is a very
difficult thing to keep
secret,

man,
however interested he is
in his own plate, cannot
fail to notice when his
wife is munching raw car-
rots and water biscuits.

WHY DO MEN object to
women dieting? Is it be-
cause they are afraid they
will be made to join in,
or do they suspect that a



< “LACHASSE:

+ veiled with black chiffon.



From Paris. .

To Two Newsmen

The State Department
denied passports to two
paper reporters.

The Department
New York Daily Worker and the

to-day
news- |

advised the}

DEACON Daily Peoples’ World of San Fran-
cisco that it-had decided to re-
lots of chiffon and lace. ject foreign travel applications

of collections

the under the 1950 Internal Security
A

et.

The Act forbids the issue of
passports to members of Com-
munist or “Communist action”,
organisations registered as such
with the Justice Department.

—Reuter

CROSSWORD
de

were: — 3
Tailored lace eoat





7





A biscutt - coloured fine
Eye-vetls are out; this

Across

















. styaw spring hat
new slim figure will need efptted veiling decorates the back of 1 An e¢lderdown quilt, (5)
new slim clothes? the hat. 5 Dogs this mane money for
‘ i gardeners *
TEIBEL: White net strapless; 9, Gonyentional behaviour. (9)
Longer Jacket ae dress, its bustline} 9 Whoge part of the camera is
: ‘ j S 18
i ri io covered in sprigs of mimosa. | 11. Could be an order to a steno-
HE biggest spring fashion DIGBY MORTON’S tangerine games” i
change London designers * ac za coat over a| 13. Absurd to put the pet in, (4)
j i nist ‘ and black organza 4 ny Bt
show is in the suit jacket : HARDIE] 14. One from Scotian ar
which is longer, with a bell. black dress, and wr Couid be. 14)
shaped Sane : " AMIES’ black and whi te 1g. Measure.” (8)
lo - 7 shecke edingote 17. Sco ohn G ,
MOST SKIRT cut in a heundstooth checked Reding ey ee heii: aaa cei
IRTS are cu . ; lvet half-
straight, slim line. Hardie ¢°8t with a black velve (5) 20. Chinese water jar, (4)
: 1 -ollar 21 No go for the colour bliin
Anica shows. fin-like godsts, éitoues lace or broderie Anglais} 22. In ever, paristenes eae (8
‘ . an . : g 3 "Boy anag,
which flare from the knees. is used for rever facing on navy| 23. Stor oy. (anag
The Redingote coat, unbelted and Down
waist-fitting, is in again. Even- *U!**: L. Betraying ecstasy. (9)
i ress as-v AA Se . 3 2. Even nuts tie like th ye
Steatte ee Bre a8-yourplease. paTENT LEATHER is a popular| 3: Pura grave in this shape..(7)
rapless or halter-neck, wide- “trimming. . .Hats are small,| 4 Attends the Lord Mayors dinner
skirted or straight, : often a _ pillbox shape worn 5 sh including’ tea. (6)
Cone eee prlanter. 4 ie straight. 6 The twentieth ietter, (3)
a ae a tO ee OUT . Dolman sleeves, all-| 8. What a foreigner calls n shogun
white. Glamour colours are et ae cab ver 10. [t Nas neen introducea inty the
a tet > * —velvet — pr pac —_ works before now, (7)
royal or sapphire blue with bottle green. 12. Part of a spinning wheel. (3)
black. L.E.S 15 Not so damp. (4)
laaatia 19. To" little Josephine it suggests
Organza Leads 1 ‘ 20. ul blow a fellow to Bray. (3)
Solut! esterda t aie ee
RGANZA is the materia ot | B.B.C. Radio Programme |. 9,9! geiegtins eaten
‘ : V ; 5. ee: 5. ar
the season (it is often used] yuRspay., FEBRUARY 15, 1951 1m ties, 19, etal heck
for coats). Runners-up are slub | 6.80 a.m.—t115 p.m, — 19.76 ; 9 et. thudich: a theo
falc iach emer nate — == roe mo F Certal 6. Haversack
materials, birdseye tweeds, and 6.30 a.m. Football Fixtures, 45 a.m. aioe Taamer ai those ee fee 28
Sporting Record, 7.00 a.m. The News, Pen i



—

Leaving Shortly

R. G. O. FORD of Dayrells
Road expects to leave next
month for Aruba where he is go
ing to work with the Lago Oil anc
Transport Refinery in that island

Manley Reception

PQtHE reception to Mr. Normai

Manley, K.C., which took
place in London last week was an
international affair, This was un-

of!derstandable in view of his fine
After the Call to the}reputation and that the organiser:

Bar ceremony he said that he may|were the League of Coloured Peo-

shortly travel to Nigeria to take|pies.
the | from

up a legal appointment in
Government service. He has al-
interviewed by
Colonial Office Appointments
Board. After passing his Bar Fin-
als, Lorenzo joined the legal de—
partment of the Pakistan Embassy

Mr, Arthur Cole, a barriste:
Sierra Leone introduced «Me
Manley and afterwards there were

the speeches from Mr. James Griffiths

Colonial Secretary, Mr. Krishna
Menon, High Commissioner fo:
India in the United Kingdom and
of course, Mr. Manley-himself,














lysis, 7.15 a.m, From

Programme
erally Speaking,
hoice, 8.00 am
8.30 am. Peter

7.10 aim. News A
Editorial
7.30 am
Listeners
Livestock,
Plain English, 9,00 a.m,

The
Parade
7456 am

Land and
Cooper, 8.45 am





G

‘GLOBE







» News, 9.10 a.m. Home News From W
n, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m, LAST SHO ING
amme Parade, 11,30 a.m. Listeners
e, 11.45 aon. Special Dispatch, 12.00
noon) The News, 12.10 pm. News TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.
Analysis, 12.15 a.m. Close Down, RNG i
Li5—6.00 pm, — 25,53 m. iS
4.15 p.m. Listeners Choice, 5.00 pm.
Composer of the Week, 5.15 pm. Seot-
ush Magazine, 5.45 p.m. Melody on
Strings
6.00—7.15 pom

31.32 m. & 48.43 m,
6.00 p.m. How to Look at a Town, 6.40
>m Interlude, 6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade, 7,00 p.m, The News, 7.10 pm
News Analysis, 7.15 pm We See Britain,
745—11.00 pom. — S02 & 4845 m,





7.45 p.m, Think On These Things, 8.00
».m, Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m, Sir John
Magill’s Last Journey, 8.45 p.m. Composer
if the Week, 9.00 p.m, Special Dispatch,



115 p.m. Have A Go, 10.00 p.m. The
Yews, 10.10 pm. From The Editorials,
0.15 p m. Communism in Practice, 10.30

»>m. Melody on Strings, 10.45 p.m. The
Jebate Continues, 11.00 p.m, Ring Up The

Curtain.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 10. |

in London in order to acquire
practical experience. During the
Second World War he served in
the Royal Air Force and rose ‘+o
the rank of Flight Sergeant.

Refired Mining Engineer

R. H, E. COLL, retired
mining engineer of New
Glasgow, N.S., accompanied by

his wife arrived on Tuesday by o Place Like Ho
the Lady Nelson to spend a holi- N ee Li Home

GROUP of Oxford under-
day in Barbados. They are here "
until March 28th staying at the A graduates have been greatly
Ocean View Hotel. eer with “Lord Kitchener's

This is Mr. Coll’s first visit &P lity to make calypsoes in an
here but his wife has been here ¢*tempore way. The inspiration
before with her mother, came to Kitch at a London night

club the other evening during
LouiseBennett’sPantomime ©#baret hour. For forty-tive min-
utes he created a riot of fun and
] HEAR that Louise Bennett, laughter with his humorous
the well - known writer of rhymes. Kitch was really at his
Jamaican dialect is busy writing a best and the magnificence of his
pantomime. This however is not performance led another Trinidad.
her first attempt at this “difficult ian to declare “there’s no place
task. While she was in Jamaica like home”.
she wrote a pantomime which I There is a real LORD KITCH-
understand was very popular. But ENER, son of the famous Lord
this latest pantomime is a rather Kitchener. He was at Catterick
more difficult job for she plans to Signals OCTU at the same time

present in it all aspects of Carib- ag George Hunte—Assistant Editor
bean culture. Good luck, Louise. of the Advocate.

WAY....

The finger-prints on the scissors
were those of the head-waiter,
How did the body of the hippo-
potamus disappear?

By Beachcomber

Simple Criticism

‘Ts owner of a restaurant put

a pound note in the window
“as a prize for sales-promotion,”
Under it was a notice saying,
“Tell us what you think of self-
eervice,” A man with nothing
particular to do heaved a_ brick
through the window, and took
the pound.

Preparing for the Rush

A QUESTION is already inflam-

ing many brains—where on
earth are the hundreds of millions
child is cracking a safe or telling of visitors to the Exhibition going
Ministry spies about his father’s to be housed? Here are some
infringement of some regulation suggestions: —
or other dealing with the setting 1. A huge camp in the Lake
of mouse-traps. District.

i : 2 Bring the Fleet up the Thameg

Disgraceful Incident as far as it will go, and let

the visitors live aboard.

Sweet and Low

HIS is evidently the month of

amazing discoveries. A Gallup
poll has found that lullabies are
dying out. Mothers no longer sing
to their children. One reason is
that, at what used to be a lullaby
time, the mother is at the pictures
or working in a factory, and the

‘T T was an utter disgrace... 3. Use billiard tables, box-rooms
Nobody has any manners and telephone-boxes in the
nowadays. The bus was full of big hotels.

people, comfortably seated, and 4. Throw open Government
there was my poor dog forced to offices.

Stand all the way. Nobody 5. Put more seats on the Em-
dreamed of getting up and offer- bankment,

ing him a seat,”

6. Erect huts in one-way streets.

Saeartanusateees eas ree ree

PANTIES

WS

WX
OS

PETTICOATS. ws
NIGHTIES

Dial 4606

=m CELANESE Underwear

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

AN. A A A A A A A. A Py 2
126. & 139 CHAIR-BACK >a

1's) ¢ CRETONNES >
Cents > 7

wx os ¢ yd,

200 2.02 = ? :
FOR HOTEL and HOME > s

. er A remarkable 27” value %

PPD DP De WW We

Your Shoe Stores
{









:

Dial 4220 a



It is early November and Rupert
is out on the common with Pong-
Ping and the rabbit twins, ‘1 say,
look at that great pile of wood,"
says Reggie Rabbit, ** What can be
happening up there?" "| know
what it is.”” says Rupert. “It's the
bonfire that Freddy and Ferdy Fox

ALL CA
AT THE

PLAZA £ eS
2g
(Bridgetown)

Pick up the
Pieces Folks,

else join them, And that reminds
me; | haven’t bought any fireworks
yet."’ “Nor have 1,"" says Pong:
Ping, ‘‘.and there's not much time
left, Let's go down to the village.”
They run down to Nutwood and
into the shop, but Mr. Hippo shakea
his head. “* You're too late. Fire:
works are all sold out,”’ he says
mers





GNEY BREAKS LOOSE

meee

JAMES FRIDAY

— with —
CAGHEY 9, snows
) '





JIMMY'S in 0p LY ive i 2.30 —
Action cee) fe 5.00
Again! Ga
a and
Extra Special ! . le [: 4.) f % 8.30 p.m.
BOB WILLS
Ce and Continuing
and his
TEXAS Daily at
PLAYBOYS .
‘~ 445 & 8.30 p.m.
so ~BOMOND FRE ;
WORLD NEWS OBRIEN Cust (Dial 2310)

MRS. HOUSEWIFE

We offer a wide range of House-
hold

EARTHENWARE

Medina Shape

io

Maroon Band & Gold Decoration
Dishes



Plates
Tea Cups & Saucers, Cream Jugs
Platters Tea Pots
Also
TEA SETS 24 Pieces
DINNER SETS 34
DINNER SETS 63 ‘ diate Rh
Obtainable from our Hardware Department —Tel. No. 2039
|



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Tee TS





EMPIRE THEATRE

Frid. 2.30 & 830 pm.

and Continuing at
Mat. & Night Shows
Daily up to Tuesday

DR Ld
Lh de

ture is called
aFourAward f
Thriller’

DAVID OF SELZNICK'
presen ‘%

(CAROL REED
Leese Averd ¥ hebirg

the

MAKE YOUR SELECTIONS FROM
THESE

Tins Cocktail Peanuts
Bots Cocktail Cherries
Tins Coektall Sausages
» Meat Rolls
» Potted Meat
» Sandwich Spread
» O% tail Soup
Vegetable Soup,
' » Asparagus Soup
{ , Chicken Soup
Tomato Soup
i » Carrots, (Sliced and whole)
. Rees
Tomatoes
Blancmange
Jellos
Salad Cream
Prepared Mustard
Bacon,

STUART & SAMPSON
LTD.

Pkgs
Rots

Sliced



|
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Passports Denied |

Headquarters for Best Rum. }

i
}
i



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1951









STOP THAT

COUGH















m Start taking VENO’S COUGH

bas, MIXTURE at once, and sce how

quickly your cough will stop!
} world - famous cough
' remedy soothes away hoarse-
| ness and soreness; eases
\ breathing, and protects the
, chest and lungs.

/

! Yee chia
at once!



The |
FAMI
EATARRH » CATANAHAL
CHESTY COLDS - NIGHT COUGHS
CHILDREN'S COUGHS

COUGH MIXTURE

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT AT 8.30
James STEWART :o: Jane WYMAN
in “MAGIC TOWN”
An RKO Radio Picture
* COMMENCING
Robert MONTGOMERY

mn BLYTH
in “ONCE MORE, MY DARLING”
NEW UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE

FRIDAY

o:

A



————aqq>——————E—_—__

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

carey errzcernio ww STORY OF SEABISCUIT

Color by TECHNICOLOR

Mat Today — 1.80 p.m. (Monogram)

“RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH”
Johnny Mack Brown and —
“RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL”
with Jimmy WAKELY

Big Special Opening — FRIDAY —
8 SHOWS — 2,80, 5.00 & $.30 p.m.
James CAGNEY in - - -

“WHITE HEAT”







es :

=== ——



\

»)

(
{



PLAZA Theatre=(/STIN (DIAL 8404)

LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY 5 & 8.80 p.m, (Paramount Double)

RED HOT and BLUE & THIS GUN for HIRE

Betty Hutton Alan Ladd












GRAND OPENING FRIDAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. and Continuing
MIRACULOUS JOURNEY & BAD MEN OF TOMBSTONE

Midnite Sat, 1jth—"CODE OF THE SADDLE” & “RIDERS OF THE DAWN”

GATET W—(rTHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TODAY (Only) 8.30 p.m. (Monogram Double)

Leo Gorecy with the Sidney Toler as
Bowery Bevs in - - - Charlie Chan in

DOCKS OF NEW YORK = & DARK ALIBI

FRID. SAT. — SUN, — 8.30 P.M, :
Paramount's Biggest Musical Hit ! |!

sinc crosey IN “RIDING HIGH”










Mat. SUN. — 5 P.M.

WITH COLEEN GRAY









EMPIRE

Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 and 8.30.

Columbia Big Double
Warner BAXTER and
Micheline CHIREL
in

CRIME DOCTOR'S

ROYAL

To-day Only 4.30 and 8.30.
Final Inst, Republic Serial

FEDERAL AGENTS

VERSUS
UNDERWORLD INC.
with Kirk ALYN and

GAMBLB James DALE
and Along with the picture ,..
SOUTH OF DEATH RENEGADES OF
VALLEY THE SONORA
Starring Starring

Charles STARRETT and
Smiley BURNETTE

ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 and 8.15.

United Artists Double

William BOYD as Hopalong
, Cassidy in

Allan (ROCKY) “Lane
LL

OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 and 8.15.

Columbia Smashing Double
Adele JERGENS and
Stephen DUNNE in

WOMAN FROM

FALSE PARADISE TANGIERS
and and
IMPACT WHIRLWIND RAIDERS
Starring Starring

Brian DONLEVY and
Ella RAINES

Charles STARRETT and
Smiley BURNETTE

We have just received a shipment of New

Hand Tools—

Sanderson HAND SAWS—24”—36”

COMPASS SAWS—12” & 16”

BACK SAWS—14”

Stanley PLANES—Jack, Fore and Jointer.
is RATCHET BRACES

HAND and BREAST DRILLS

SAW FILES, PLANE IRONS, SQUARES,

”

”



| PLANTATIONS LTD.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

15, 1951



gemma PEUYU erat

course for Left-wing lions

AAeEsTTT



* Hair too short, Footcross!"



Reform Group
Return ToU.K.

‘From Our Own Correspoudent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G. Feb. 11
Sir John Waddington, Chair-
man of the three man constitu-
tion Reform Commission who
concluded the first part ef their
assignment will leave British
Guiana on Tuesday next on their
return to the United Kingdom to
sift evidence, write their report
and make recommendations, te-
day praised the goodness of the
witnesses from whom the Com-
mission took oral evidence.

Broadcasting a farewell mes-
sage to the people of this coun-
try at noon, Sir John declared
they had asked a great many
questions and their proceedings
might even have taken on the
character of a cross-examination,
but their sole object was to ob-
tain the underlying reasons for
opinions which had been given.

They fully realized that occa-
sionally a witness might reason-
ably have felt .some resentment
at the coolness of questions. That
they never detected any such
feeling was a tribute to the good-
ness of the witnesses and they
must appreciate that forbearance
had been ‘shown.

Constructive Solution

Earlier, Sir John had said the
leaders of all schools of thought
in British Guiana had _ placed
their views frankly before the
Commission and it now rested
with the latter to suggest a just
and constructive solution.

He could only assure people
that the Commission should bear
carefully in mind their very
proper political aspirations, and
endeavour to make _ proposals
which would enable British Gui-
ana to have a suitable and suc-
cessful political future.

Sir John said that much sifting
of evidence and many hours of
hard work lay ahead. “We sin-
cerely hope they will be profit-
ably spent for British Guiana,
We fully recognise the need for
speed. There is no time to lose
if everything is to be ready for
the next election, I can assure
you we are anxious to present
our report at the earliest possible
moment.”

The next general election takes
place in 1952.

—(CP)

500 Year-Old
Bible Found

NEW YORK, Feb:

A first. edition of the Guten-
berg Bible, considered one of the
great monuments of Christen-
dom, has ‘arrived in New York by
plane—after being lost for over
150 years.

The Bible, named after Johann,
Gutenberg, the inventor of print-
ing with movable type, was pub-
lished at Mainz, Germany, 500
years ago. The copy, one of the
180 published then, was “lost” in
1824, supposedly from the library
of a British Baronet, Sir George
Shuckburgh.

It was recently fe-discovered
and has been flown to this country
by John Carter, London director
of Charles A. Scribner’s Sons,
who negotiated its purchase,



The copy measures 16 by 11%
inches and is one of the half
dozen tallest known, The text is
St. Jerome’s Latin version and the
large Gothic type is considered a
masterpiece of printer’s art.

Neither the purchase nor saleg
price has been disclosed, but Scrib-
ner’s reported the cost was sub-
stantially in excess of the highest
price ever recorded for this
book. The last copy was sold at
auction in New York in 1926 and
brought $106,000.—I.N.S.



Cummugs seis a 15-day

KNOW YouR ENEMY

“Observe the outline of the

silhouette .. .”



ARMS DRILL



“

“Direy nib again,
>

ad
‘

Silverwell



++. and where,
is your vellum edition of the
works of Professor Laski

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Mikardey,

>”



Not Needed
From B.G.

. °
(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Feb, 9.
When Hon. E. F. McDavid,
C.M.G., C.B.E., Financial Sec-
retary and Treasurer appeared
before the Constitution Commis-
sion to give evidence in support
ef his memorandum for a new

HANIA, Crete, Feb.

Hania city jail is a lonely place
to a prisoner serving a life sen-
tence for murder.

So when Christos Tondos felt
he needed some living compan-
ionship in his small cell he decided
that a small animal would be an
ideal companion.

When he asked the warden for
permission to obtain a cat or a dog
as a pet he was told that prison
regulations forbade the importa-
tion of any living animals into the

Constitution for the Colony, he jail

declared that he was speaking
purely for himself. “I have had
the Governor’s privilege to come
here and give evidence,” he told
Sir John Waddington, Chairman
of the Commission, “and I want
it to be quite clearly understood
that anything I say is not evi-
dence of the Government or in
any way connected with the Gov-
ernment.

Mr, MeDavid in his evidence
spoke strongly in favour of the

| abolition of the literacy test for

voters and the granting of full
adult suffrage; the shortening of
the life of the Legislative Council
to three years and the increase
in the number of electorial dis-
tricts from 14 to 20 with minis-
terial status for unofficial mem-
bers of the Executive Council,

Touching on the financial out-
look, Mr. McDavid told the Com-
missioners that there is nothing
whatever in the Colony’s financial
situation which would preclude an
advance in the Colony’s constitu-
tional government. Mr, McDavid
went on: “I feel sure that, with
careful management, this Colony’s
finances would continue to be in
good shape over the next ten
years. There are many points of
difficulties obviously facing us,
notably, of requirements of social
services, education particularly,
health, but nevertheless I still
think that there is scope to over-
come these difficulties with care-
ful management.”



Smugglers’ Plane
Seized By French

PARIS, Feb. 12.

French security police have
seized a plane used by Spanish
anarchists to smuggle money and
men between the two countries
the French Ministry of the In-
terior said here to-day.

The French built plane a single
engined four seater was seized
at Shyanns aerodrome near
Versailles on warrant issued by
a Lyons magistrate. This followed
the arrest of 29 Spanish anar-
chists last month by Lyons police
when a post office van was held
up on January 18.

An attempt by five young men
to steal sacks containing 6,000,000
francs in the back of the van
failed when they were surprised
by two armed police sitting next
to the sacks, :

One policeman, Guy Arnaud
was killed and his comrade Louis
Morin seriously injured by gun-
fire. Interrogation of one of the
arrested anarchists revealed that
the Spanish anarchist federation
had an aircraft at their disposal
Police said.—Reuter,



American Arrested
By Swiss For Spying

WASHINGTON, Feb. 13

The United States has asked
the Swiss Government to release
or “put on trial speedily” the 23~-
year-old American negro Charles
Davis imprisoned in Geneva on
espionage charges.

The State Department said Davis
was arrested in connection with
the “misuse of mail” but appar-
ently no formal charges had been
made against him. He had been
in Swiss police custody since last
December,

That one regulation stumped
Christos but he had plenty of time
to think and finally came up with a
solution. He was in no particular
hurry to get a pet. He would be
around a long time.

He asked the warden that the
next time e were included in
the prison rations, if he could have
his uncooked.

Christos wrapped the egg in a
piece of flannel, tucked it under
his armpit and lay on the bed of
his cell for twenty days.

On the twenty-first day he felt
a slight stirring under his armpit
He removed the egg, unwrapped it
and found he had hatched a chick-
en,

Now Christos has his pet, the
warden has his regulations, and

the jail has a live animal.

The regulations said nothing
about keeping live animals in the
prison. They just prohibit their
importation through the prison
gates.

—IN.S.



DIM HOPE
Says Nehru

NEW DELHI.

Indian Prime Minister Nehru
teld Parliament today that the
United Nations’ Resolution brand-
ing China as aggressor put an
end for the time being at least
to any attempts at negotiation
or settlement.

He said “we hope still it may
be possible for events to take a
better turn in the future but /
must confess that at the moment
hope has grown very dim”.

Nehru, who was making a
statement on foreign affairs said
India’s friendly relations with
China had been “very helpful”
in attempts for a negotiated set-
tiement of Far East problems. In
spite of differences of opinion,
India would continue to try to
maintain her friendly relations
with the United States he said.

Referring to the India-Pakistan
dispute over Kashmir, Nehru
said the struggle there was “s
struggle of progress against re-
action-”

India stood by her pledge that
it was for the people of Kashrhir
to decide their own future. India
would not give up “ at anybody’s
bidding and under any threat,”
the principles involved in the
Kashmir issue. —Reuter.

Robbed Of $1,626

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 14.



A masked bandit, armed with a %
revolver walked off with $1,626 ¥

cash in a daylight hold-up on the
Saddle Road, Santa Cruz, at about
11 a.m. on Saturday. Victim is
Mrs. Maria Correia, of Vidale

Street, St. James, who had just
left the Santa Cruz R.C, Church

and was going home.
Wearing a makeshift nylon
mask, apparently made from a

woman’s stocking the thief order- ¢

ed the woman to standstill at
revolver point and demanded ali
her money. Before she could move,
he grabbed her handbag with the

money, a gold bracelet and a wrist ¢
The man escaped X
om a bicycle which was parked %
nearby. The money was made up §
of ten and twenty-dollar bills, one %
five dollar note and one dollar ¢

watch inside.

note.

whether you talk cricket or play cricket you probably know
of the wonderful help that LIMACOL is to all athletes.



Literacy Test He Got His Pet 3MoreResign From Sold Him His

Italian Red Party

BOLOGNA, Feb. 13,

The rebellion against Italy's
Communist party started by De-
puties Valdo Magnani and Aldo
Cucchi to-day gained added
strength from two Bologna parti-
San leaders and a mayor.

Giovanni Galletti, officer in a
wartime partisan formation an-
nounced his resignation from the
Communist party.

Secondo Negrini, another ex-
partisan who is not a member of
the party, wrote to Magnani and
Cucchi pledging support to their
cause,

Communist Mayor Paolo Salva-
tore of a tewn near Salerno also
joined the breakaway. He was
reported to have told a meeting
attended by some 1,000 people,
that his decision was the result of
a “crisis of conscience.”

He said he agreed with Mag-
nani and Cucchi that Italy must be
defended against attack from any
direction including the Soviet
Union.

—Renten



Air Defence

Insoluble
WISCONSIN, Feb. 13.
General Nathan F, Twining

Chief of the United States Air
Force said here that the air de-
fence of the United States was “an
almost insoluble problem”.

General Twining in an address
said the difficulties of locating and
attacking fast moving bombers az
various levels im an atmosphere
six miles deep and as wide as the
entire continent were tremendous,

But he added: “No enemy .of
the United States should be de-
ceived that our retaliatory
strategic striking power would be
ineffective.

—Reuter



Get Jobs For
The Idle
Archbishop of Milan

{ MILAN.
Cardinal Schuster, Archbishop
of Milan has urged the Italian

Government to provide jobs for the
country’s unemployed to fight
Communism. “The phalanx of job-
less represents a veritable sixth
column” he said in a_ lenten
pastoral letter,

“It is useless to prepare arms
and soldiers for the nation’s de-
fence in case of war if some
2,000,000 unemployed are left to
roam the streets in Italy.”

The postwar economic misery
was the strongest ally of interna-
tional Communism and one of the
causes of immorality and irreligion
he said. The church had _ spent
much money on relief but at pres-
ent these people, “embittered and
disillusioned, no longer want alms
but demand imperiously that the
Government take energetic steps
to fight unemployment.”

—Reuter.



Naturally it’s the chief topic of conversation at present. But

55% i ! Is
S99S9SS9SS 999 FO99OSS9 GOD DOD FPODO IDI AVG IY OPPO





CT

cP

NATIONALISATION
EXERCISE

Own Cocoa

* (From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 14
Mr. F. J. Camacho magistrate
acting in the First Police Court
told Charles Sam of Gonsalves
Place and Lambert Larode of
Port-of—Spain that selling their}
employer’s Cocoa to their employ-
er “was not a bad idea if it works,’
Lambert worked with Atbert
Lucien and Co,, cocoa store



|
|
and
wanted to make some extra mon-
ey. He labelled a bag of cocoa
“Johnson Thomas Maracas’’ and
left it outside the store where
“Johnson Thomas” who was
feally his friend Charles Sam
would claim it and se}l it to
WUG).. +.2 \Albert Lucien and Com
pany.
They were caught when the
manager of the store became sus-|

picious as to the amount of cocoa) |,
“Johnson Thomas” was selling to|
him, They both pleaded guilty
and being of tender age the mag-
istrate remanded both of them to
February 19 for sentence,

Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Emanuei C
field, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Sch. C
Ipana, Sch. Philip H, Davidson
Vagabond Prince, Sch. Mary EB. Caroline
M.V. Moneka, Sch. Pmeline, Sch. Marion



In ginger ale or club soda,
you can’t beat Canada Dry.
As a straight beverage,
Canada Dry is delicious —
truly “the best of them all.”

Gordon, M.V. Sedge
M. W

Belle Wolfe, Sch. Franklyn D. R As a mixer, Canada Dry
Sch, Timothy A. H. Vansluytman, 4. c : ;
Islandside, Sch. Julmar, Sch, Wonderful Water makes drinks taste
Counsellor, pa ee M better, stay lively

Schooner Lucille M. Smith, 74 tons net longer. -eep
Capt, Hassell, from British Guians 8 Ke i

DEPARTURES
8.8. Alcoa Pilgrim, 3,921 tons net, Capt
Haagensen, for St, Vincent
POST OFFICE NOTICE
AIR MAILS

plenty of both on
hand,
\






With effect from 2th February, air
mails for Canada id Bermuda will be
closed General Post Office on
Tuesda p.m, instead of on Monday



and . respectively By this
opportunity the postage to Canada will
be the lower rate namely 20 cents per |
oz
Air Mail Schedule:
excordingly.
Gentral Post Office,
14th February, 1951,

hould be a nded

,» MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Trinidad by the s.s. Golfito
will be closed at the General Post Otfice
as under:—

Porcel Mail at 2 p.m., Registered Mail
at 3 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 4 p.m. on the

16th Februany, 1951



Rates Of Excharige

February 14, 1951
CANADA
Cheques on

Bankers
Demand

Drafts
Sight Drafts
Cable
Currency
Coupons

63 5/10% pr.

61 6/10% pr
61.46% pr
61 3/10% pr
63 5/10%
62%) pr.

r,
2 601/10
59 4/10

pr
pr



Leave It, Please!

LONDON

A divorce sought by Henry John
Peed on the grounds that his wife,
Laura, tried to cut off his mous
tache. was denied in London
divorce court. Reed maintained
his wife’s action constituted
cruelty. —ILN.S.



Sarena nie
——
























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PAGE THREE



SOLD EVERYWHERE
78¢.

_ 30e.

3 oz. size ‘

1 oz.

” ccc ion cota aie wand







Children grow husky
and tall. s 3 bigger,
stronger— better
equipped for school
and play, and for the
future, with a hearty
Quaker Oats. breakfast
EVERY MORNING!
No other whole grain
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and satisfying, noother
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—

GREAT HEALTH FOOD... Quaker Outs is rich in the
elements needed hy everyone for quick energy, strength and health.
It supplies essential minerals, proteins, carbohydrates, and essen-
tial Vitamin By that éris food into energy. Quaker Oats is a health-
ful, delicious BREAKEAST FOOD for everybody.

Ask for Quaker Oats today at your favorite store... serve Quaker
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LOOK! QUAKER OATS GIVES YOU

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EQUIPMENT

Enquiries cordially invited for the

supply of the following—

42 LP. 6 cyl DIESEL WHEEL
TRACTORS





IMACOL-



Before the game a rub with LIMACOL makes you feel
as fresh as a daisy, and ready for anything. And after a
hard day in the field it’s the very thing for a brisk massage
to pep you up and ease your aching muscles.

But even if you're not an athlete, LIMACOL is fine for
you to use for a rub down whenever you are tired and suffer-
ing from muscular soreness. So whether you are a real
cricketer or the pavilion variety, take advantage of LIMACOL
and enjoy the freshness of a breeze in a bottle.

LIMACOL can be obtained Plain or Mentholated to suit your
personal taste, at your nearest drug store.

THE FAVOURITE TOILET LOTION
OF THE CARIBBEAN





ll SSS 3



| Ta
MASSEY-HARRIS |



(Steel Wheels also available for

Ploughing)

The equip-

above



|W} ment is available for GRASS CUTTERS = 35 & Git

)| early delivery from

1 MANURE SPREADERS
i the U. K.

2}

i} SIDE DELIVERY RAKES

a

FEED MILLS

| courtesy
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ROBERT THOM Ltd.



FERTILIZING DRILLS

BE



an OS SS
PAGE FOUR

ADVOGATE

sees eS Pome)

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd. Broad St., Bridgetown.
Thursday, February 15, 1951

SPENDING

THE continued depletion of the finances
of the island despite increases in taxation
has been the cause of some degree of alarm
in the minds of those who take any interest
in the maintenance of that standard of fin-
ancial independence which has been the
boast of Barbados.

If evidence were needed to prove that the
financial resources of this island have not
been handled to the best advantage, it is to
be found in a close examination of the
dwindling of our surplus balance during
the last three years. In 1948 the surplus
amounted to £1,213,901. In 1949 after the
method of preparing the colony’s estimates
had been changed from sterling to dollars,
the estimated revenue was $8,899,974 and
after a quarter million dollars had been set
aside for capital works in addition to ser-
vices, the estimates showed a deficit of
$55,506. .

The Government, and by this was meant
the Executive Committee, was warned then
that it was unstatesmanlike to budget for
a deficit at a time when Barbados had had
four good crops and the remittances from
Barbadians abroad had reached more than
two million dollars. In the same year the
increased taxation was estimated to yield
sums of $200,000 from income tax” arid
$60,000 from death duties. In that same
period the increase in Old Age Pensions
constituted the only action to offset the
dissatisfaction caused by the taxation
policy.

The Government then embarked on an
orgy of spending, or allocating to various
heads of expenditure huge sums which
would be tied up or cease to become avail-
able for current use, The lands of the Cen-
tral Foundry were bought and up to the
present have not been used, the Town
Planning Officer and Architect was given
a separate department outside the Public
Works Department and the result has been
the spending of large sums of money which
have not brought any service such as the
new Coleridge and Parry School costing
$98,000 although half finished, and the pay-
ment of Legislators.

The condition of the Treasury has now
caused some alarm and on Tuesday Mr. J. H.
Wilkinson, Leader of the Opposition warn-
ed the Government that it was a danger-
ous policy to continue to send down reso-
lutions for these large sums of money
without knowing whether the financial
resources of the island can stand it. This
attitude will have the support of all right
thinking people who are anxious to see that
Barbados remains in the position to boast
that she has always been able to balance
her budget. Judging by Mr. Wilkinson’s
veiled hint of the possibility of a commis-
sion being appointed, aad his habit of un-
derstatement in order to avoid alarm, there
seem to be more reasons for anxiety than
the public suspects.

Mr. Adams was sorons to admit that the
financial condition of\ the Treasury was
giving cause for anxiety even if not alarm.
He could not, however, resist the tempta-
tion to pass on some of the blame to the
civil servants who he declared sent in
estimates in some instances too high. But
it was not this detail to which Mr. Wilkin-

son was referring, It was to the policy of
the Government in undertaking expendi-
ture without first ensuring that the Treas-
ury can bear the strain.

This unhappy pass has come about be-
cause of the comparatively recent policy
adopted by the Governor-in-Executive
Committee in sending down to the House
oranibus resolutions embodying sums for
various projects and services, instead of in
separate resolutions. The House has on
more than one occasion passed resolutions
which would have been rejected were it not
for the fact that they included sums for
services which could not be held up to the
embarrassment of the Government. The
Legislative Council also registered objec-
tion to the inclusion in these of resolutions
which were obviously of a controversial
nature.







Plea For Commonwealth |2atbados Arts

And Colonial “Parliament”

Colonial Secretary

LONDON, Feb. 5.

A scheme for a Commonwealth
and Colonial “Parliament” in
which each coleny would have
six representatives was suggested
to the House of Commons in a
short debate before the adjourn-
ment on Friday afternoon,

Wing - Commander Geoffrey
Cooper, Labour Member for Mid-
ilesborough, West, put forward
the scheme when seconding a
motion by a Labour colleague,
Squ-Ldr. Ernest Kinghorn, (Yar-
mouth), that a permanent body
be set up of delegates from parli-
aments and legislative bodies of
the Commonwealth and _ the
colonial Empire, “together with
& permanent secretariat to meet
regularly and discuss problems of
common interest”.

The Secretary of State for the
Colonies, Mr. James Griffiths,
rejected the idea outright so far
as the Commonwealth countries
were concerned, pointing out that
it might impair unity. And he
coubted the wisdom of such a
step so far as the colonies were
concerned—at this moment, at any
rate,

The motion was withdrawn.

In submitting his motion, Squ.-
Ldr. Kinghorn spoke of the need
for getting to know “our fellow,
citizens” and the need for dis-
cussing common problems.

Sad

He continued: “It is so sad
sometimes to read about a
coloured person in a part of our
Dominions who is a great hero to
his own folk and whom we get
to know only after he has made his
reputation there by being cast into
jail. I am certain from my own
knowledge that when we meet
and face problems together we
find that we are the same kind
of human beings and have pretty
well the same approach to most
human problems”.

Discussing common problems he
instanced the housing shortage,
the need for more railways partic-
ularly in Australia and = East
Africa, and so on. “Food”, he said,
“is a problem which confronts us
all in the manufacturing parts of
the Empire and those who pro-
duce mineral raw materials or
need more, such as in East Africa.
In these days, there is the overall
need for quick action on defence.

“Tt would pay us all if we had
a permanent body such as a
secretariat here, or in some other
place whie' would be more
handy to consider these prob-
Jems and act quickly. If wa
find ourselves in still greaten
difficulties we might be forced by
circumstances to set up such an
organisation in the next year or
so. It would serve us much better
if we did it now, while we have
peace and are able to set up a
permanent body”.

Mr. Cooper, in seconding,
maintained that the proposed
assembly should ke a body enjoy-
ing a status similar to the House
of Commons. “It has been sug-
gested,” he said, “that a certain
number of colonial Members of
Parliament might be elected to
this Chamber, but that would not
overcome the difficulty of finding
sufficient time adequately to
debate colonial affairs I wish to
make some suggestions as to the
nature of the assembly. I suggest
that it should sit, in the main,
in London, and that its sessions
could perhaps coingide, in the
main, with these of this House.
It would consist of about 60 to
100 members, which would mean
that there would be up to six or
more selected from each Colony,
They would be chosen in a way
which would give representa-
tion to the main interests of .each
Colony, the economic interests ag
well as political interests, so that
the full aspect of each Colony’s
problems might be spoken of by
those who have first-hand know-
ledge of the particular matter
about which they are speaking.

Three Years

“Members should sit for a
period of about three years and
have their elections staggered so
that they could ensure continuity
and that all members did not
have to return to their countries
at the same time. The assembly



BARBADOS

Turns ft Down In

Rt. Hon. JAMES GRIFFITHS

would also consist of a number of
hon. Members from this House
so that the debates could have
the effect of fully informinjgg Mem-
bers of this House and when
colonial debates took place here,
in addition to these in the assem-
bly, they would be speaking from
knowledge gained through being
members of the assembly”’.

He went on to say, “It would
afford to the colonial people a
far closer contact with England
than at present. From discussions
I have had recently when in West
Africa and the West Indies I have,
found that among the people there
is a feeling of remoteness and of
resentment that decisions seem to
be imposed over their heads.
Some decisions have necessarily
to be made from this country; it
cannot always be left to the
colonial Government to debate
and decide on all the matters
affecting the interest of that Col-
ony. In some cases. colonial
Governors have not been as suc-
cessful as they might have been,
It would be a good thing if even
matters of that sort could be the
Subject of some kind of discus-
sions between the representatives
of people in the Colonies and the
British Government so that if need
be, changes could be affected if
it was found that appointments
had not been so happy as they
might have been.

Two-Way Chain

“My. last point is that in our
system of democracy it has be-
come recognised that we should
have a two-way chain for inform-
ation, From the Government
there is the chain of information
which flows out through its
Departments and their officials
to the people of the country. In
addition, there are the elected
representatives, and this applies
both to local government, and to
this House, who can bring forward
matters which affect their con-
stituents, where regulations have
pressed hardly upon them, so as to
have anomalies and injustices re-
n:oved. That does not apply in
full to the Colonies. There is
a gap in the chain. There is not
the same two-way discussion by a
two-way chain of information
between the colonial Governments
and this House. That incomplete
system of democracy’ which
applies to the Colonies is that
dealt with almost entirely by
reports which come from colonial
Governors or officials to the
Colonial Office. The setting up of
the representative assembly
have suggested would mean that
that gap would be filled and there-
by give the Colonies a far closer
feeling of co-operation with this
country”.

-

Distress

Mr. Leonard Gammai’s, (Horn-
sey, Conservative), recalled his
“distress” when the Prime Min-
ister was asked in the House who
Was to represent the Colonial
Empire at the recent Conference
of Dominion Prime Ministers, said,
“Myself and the right hon. Gen-
tleman”, (the Colonial Secretary).

From a constitutional point of

view, Mr. Gammans said, the
Premier was right, but “The
Colonial Empire, however, is a

different thing today from what
it was 10 or 15 years ago. We
have ballots and Ministers with







ADVOCATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1951

15,









D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE



And Crafts

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FOR YOUR BATHROOM

By RICHARD Le FANU















quasi Cabinet powers. They will
not be satisfied with representa-
tion by the right hon. Gentleman

when matters like defence, foreign} SOME 150 pictures are now on show at the

affairs, communications, trade, q. ied
industry, and so on, are being} Sixth Annual Exhibition of the Barbados Arts —
discussed. We have to do better

& Crafts Society at Queen's Park: over 100

than that” f th ater BASINS with Pedestal
; of these are by Barbados artists, the remain- 25”x18”
i & BASINS with or without Pedestal
Regret that there was so little} der 4 ‘ati Ae
Mina Anne taiblernnekk te iaaate by members of the Arts Societies of 22”x16

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W.C. PANS, S & P TRAPS

W.C. SEATS {Plastie White and
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Cast Iron CISTERNS

Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS

HARPIC, Large and Small.

what he described as “this very] Trinidad, Antigua, St. Lucia and Dominica,
important matter” was expressed
by the Colonial Secretary. In
dealing with the position so far
as the Colonies were concerned,
he made the following statement,
“The colonial territories, are in a
transition stage. They are at
varying stages of constitutional
advance. They are also at vary-
ing stages of économie and social
advance. The result is that I
have considerable doubts whether
at this moment, it would be wise
to make any attempt to call to-
gether representatives of all the
colonial territories—the large ones
the small ones, those which are
well advanced towards self-gov-
ernment, including the Gold Coast,
Nigeria, the territories in the West
Indies and others, as well as those
which in a sense are not so far
advanced along that road.

One cannot fail to be struck by the variety
of subject and treatment and by the high
standard of artistic achievement. This exhi-
bition should certainly not be missed—
indeed it is worth several visits. I hope a few
personal impressions will not deter anyone
from going to see it for himself and confirm-
ing the general opinion of its excellence.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,

For me, the most exciting picture was
Geoffrey Holder’s “Creole Woman” (119) —
the head and shoulders of a girl wearing a
bright yellow madras with 3 spiky knots, long
gold earrings and a low cut white dress: she
is turned away so that one can only see the
long eyelashes and the hint of a profile and

painted against a background of vivid fiery
orange.



RANSOMES
LAWN

Very Long Time

“It will be noted that, not only
during the life of the Government
to which I belong and during my
tenure of office, but indeed for a
very long time, the whole tendency
has been to decentralise rather
than to centralise, Colonial con-
ferences were called by some of
my predecessors back in the
twenties and thirties. In recent
years, however, the whole trend
has been to set up regional organ-
isations and regional conferences
For instance, there is the regional
organisation in East Africa
Recently, there was a very im-
portant conference in the West
Indies to consider the future con-
Stitutional development of those
areas. From that conference
emerged the proposals now being
considered for federation,

“That has been the whole ten-
dency, We ought to be careful
not to suggest in a debate — even
in a short one like this — that
we are seeking to centralise. It
is particularly important that we
should not give the impression
that any suggestion of this kind
is intended in any way to retard
the movement towards the devel-
opment of constitutional advance
towards self-government, I know
that that is not in the minds of
my hon. Friends. It becomes
increasingly important that there
should be the closest contact be-
tween members of legislative
councils and Members of this
House of Commons. We are
bringing members of the colonia
legislative councils into contact
with us and also into international
movements. Last year and the
year before a representative ot
one of the colonial legislative
councils accepted an invitation to

























Madame de Kuh has happily several pic-
tures from her January exhibition. Her por-
traits have great charm. I liked particularly
that of her husband (86) and the two studies
in pencil and crayon (105 and 106). In her
landscapes and her delicate study of a Coco-
nut trees (90), one can admire the same lumi-
nous perception of detail and colour.

It is unfortunate that both John Harrison
and Karl Broodhagen are exhibiting at the
Museum and are therefore under-represented
at Queen’s Park, “Time off” (104a) shows
terrific vitality in the lounging figures: Brood-
hagen’s Portrait of Cameron Tudor (31) is
very well done and of his other pictures I
liked “Pensioners in the Park” (33) and
“Sandhills” (98). Harold Connell’s flowe1
paintings—Poinsettia (14) and White Ipo-
moea (15) are both outstanding.



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Ivan Payne's three pictures are arresting
for their texture and colours. “Glitter Bay,
St. James” (23) is excellent. J. C. Carter had
a number of watercolour sketches which
combine vitality in composition with a bold
and pleasing use of colour. “Dover Woods”
(65) is a good &xample.

AT THE SAME TIME!

join our delegation te United emer MacLond's Sptighitown’ (17) *
Nations, very pleasing and my favourite from his re- a i
Reurtechted me exhibition. A. G. E. Kendall’s “Careen- THE NEW MOY GASHEL
age” (46) and “Schooner” (47) attract by
“When the conference on the

their composition and colour. I also liked

“The Smirk” (53) a portrait by Mrs. D. St.
John.

Colombo plan was held in London.
Singapore and the Federation of
Malaya were represented there
by very distinguished and eminent
members of their legislative coun-
cils. In that way we are bringing
them into ever closer association.
I pay tribute to the magnificent
work done by the Commonwealth
Parliamentary Association, who
bring us into contact with mem-
bers of the legislative councils
who are on their way through
London, I am most anxious that
we should take every opportunity
which will bring us into closer
touch as Members of Parliament
with members of the legislative
councils of the colonial territories.
There is much more I should like
to say. I thank my hon, Friends
for raising this matter. I hope
that they feel disposed to with-
draw this Motion, otherwise I
should have to ask the House to
reject it.”

ANTI-CRUSHABLE

LINENS

... ARE JUST THE TICKET

Of other Barbados artists who paint in a
minor key I enjoyed the work of Kathleen
Hawkins as in “Country Road” (82). J. March-
Penny (94 and 95) and Elmer Jordan, with
two nice flower pictures (20 and 21).

It was good to see some of the President’s
work at the exhibition. The Old Building,
Museum (25) was particularly pleasant.

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The Trinidad contribution contained some
very striking work. Sybil Atteck’s “Althea”
(112) with the long limbs and neck is strange-
ly attractive. Evril Rawle’s “Cabinet Maker”
(125) is full of vigour: there is a lot in the
picture but it does not appear crowded: his
“Beggar Man” (126) is spectral and disturb-

_Mr, Peter Smithers, Conserva-
tive M.P. for Winchester speak-
ing of the need for an increased
share to representatives of the







-

Colonies a fe ee: oe eae ing. D. Vereker’s “Bertha” (130) shows an :
ommonwe et :

that the Sect ey of ie Ne| old woman with gnarled clay coloured face %

gone some way towards opening| and hands—Geoffrey Holder also has a tropi- %

the door.” - vita : . y

cal Seascape (120) which is bold in design and bs



execution. Kathleen Ogier has two excellent

eo,

A-Bomb City Lives On Its Postcards And Yosuko Smiles

(From LIONEL CRANE)

HIROSHIMA

Little Yosuko San -is still very
pretty, although seven pieces of
glass were once blasted in her
face.

She came smiling into my hotel
room this morning with a cup of
tea, and in her black and gold
kimono looked dainty enough to
have stepped off one of those fra-
gile Japanese bridges in a willow-
pattern plate.

Yosuko was 17 when the atom
bomb dropped on Hiroshima in
August 1945. Today she folded
her hands and knelt on a bro-
eaded cushion to tell me what
she remembered about it.

“It was a nice day”, she said,
“The sky was sunny and blue
like a_ cornflower. I was at
home. There was a big bang





and our little house fell down.

“It was uncomfortable. Glass
cut my face. Look”, and she
pointed to seven ridges in her
round smooth cheeks.

Then, almost as an afterthought,
she said: “My mama San and
papa San I see no more”

Yosuko kept smiling, and her
voice was like a child’s reciting a
party piece. It sounded naive and
unreal, but I found later it wa
the attitude of the whole cit

To the rest of the world Hir«

shima is another name fo:

disaster but here where it hap-

pened the years have dredged

away the fear and awe and left

a kind of pride in the fame that

has come to the city,

The Bomb—which killed at least
78,150 people—has been. turned
into big business. The exact aim-
ing point was a T-shaped bridge
over one of ‘the city’s seven rivers
and around here the ruins have
been left just as they were on the
day of the big bang.

The spot is now a tourist centre
and hub of the souvenir trade
which has become one of Hiro-
shima’s major industries.

The big attraction is the ruined

Industry Promotion Hall which
was formerly used for trade
shows.

The cracked and blasted walls of
this building, with its rusty iron
deme stand in a garden of rubble.
When I went in a Japanese work-
man was turning over the rubble
with a rake.

The guide explained he was
looking for souvenirs’. He
already had several pieces of
burned metal in a box, but the
guide said these are not so val-
uable as pieces of bone

Dove Of Peace
On a concrete plinth in front of
the building is a carving of three
doves of peace flying in front of an
atomic cloud. A notice in English

ssys: “This building which pre-
serves its damaged state most
conspicuously, is an object of
many reminiscences to the pop-
ulace”,

A finger-sign’ points to a green |

hut and says: “Please rest awhile
in this room. Use no ceremony”.
Inside the rest room is like one
of the cheese shops in Cheddar
Gorge. But instead of cheese the
attendants sell souvenirs,

These include small drinking
cups dirty with atomic dusts,
pieces of metal that look as
though they have come from a
meteor, and picture postcards
like those on the stalls on
Brighton front, except that they
show a ruined city.

Outside another souvenir stall

sells pots half-melted by heat
from the. bomb, and American
magazines with such titles as

“True Love Stories” and “Experi-
ences”.

“Peace Tree”

Near the ruins three British
soldiers asked a Buddhist priest
to pose for pictures on the steps
of a temple. He hurried inside to
put en his best robes,

Close to the temple are two
pieces of charred wood labelled
“Peace Tree. No more wars.”

A cluster of clover grows at the

foot of

a small

the tree. Eacl
hole in it and

leaf has
botanists

say this is the result of atomic
radio-activity,

The guide led me to the Osaka
Bank to see the shadow of a man
left on the steps by the bomb
explosion, On the way we passed
two cinemas and a theatre specia-
lising in strip-tease shows,

On a hill overlooking the city is
a research station called the Ator
Bomb Casualty Commission. In
this glass-walled building U.S. and
Japanese doctors have spent two
years studying the effect of the
bomb on the people of Hiroshima.

No New Iliness

They have examined all known
casualties, and all the women who
have had babies since the explos-.
ion,

“We have found nothing new.”
said Dr, Warner Wells, a senior
surgeon. “All the injuries we
have seen could have been caused
by any other explosion, and we
have come across no new illness.”

My souvenir of Hiroshima is a
piece of scarred stone with a gilt-
painted edge. My name has been
written on it in English and
Japanese above the words
“Explosion centre, Hiroshima.”

It is so big I had to carry it

in my hand in a crowded tram.
and elderly women kept staring at
it and then at me.
It was the only time I felt The
Bomb was embarrassing
—LE.S.

|
|

drawings in Bistre (132 and 133). I thought
Mildred Almandoz picture “Beating the
Drums” (113) was lively and the colouring
in M.P. Alladin’s “Composition” (116) is very
good,



From Antigua, “Willie” (137) by Cecil!
Adams seems an outstanding portrait. Dun-
stan St. Omer’s oil paintings from St. Lucia

are vigorous and interesting. :
i sc x .

Dominica is represented by two good ‘WORLD S MOST REFRESHING DRINK $
artists, Mrs. J. K. Howe in oils and Percy : IDA, j ! :
Agar in Watercolour. Mrs. Howe's “Jump-Up” GOLD B RAID Rk UM 8
(144), a picture of a raffish dance hall, is full AND 3
of energy and colour. Percy Agar draws a sun : :
and raindrenched tropical scene with a CANADA DRY CLUB SODA >
clarity and balance which make his two pic- $
tures “House in the Forest” (151) and “Bana- OR 3
nas” (152) rank among the most satisfying : “7 x
in the whole exhibition. CANADA DRY GINGER ALE %
o

°

It remains to add that the artists and the AT 8
public have been well served by the care with : 5 %
which the pictures are grouped and hung GODD ARD ty %
and for this, as well as for their initiative and co x
encouragement, Mrs. Golde White and her! Tol ; 7 Wy %
Committee deserve our praise and thanks. RESTAL } RAN i x

(Pictures on p. 5)
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY
AT

=
rHE



15, 1951

ART EXHIBITION



SS OO

WILLIE—By Cecil Adams

Jéssamy Lane

Behind the Bridgetown Plaza
Theatre is a bye street from River
Road, Jessamy Lane, It is the big-

gest fruit selling district of the
city, and. the street where one
hears the foreign twang of the

women who come from St, Lucia
and other neighbouring islands to
sell.

For these women it is a day of
all business and the houses are
nearly all half filled with oranges.

Jessamy Lane, too, is a sort of
hang-out for some of the working
men about the wharf and for
fishermen. There is a cook shop
in the lane on the door of which is
written, refreshments for sale and
about 12 o’clock any day one can
see the tall old cook, proprietor of
the business, dishing out rice to
the sweating men

These women wno have a large
share in the fruit trade of the
island are not talking women;
they always seem to feel that one
would try to push them out of
their trade. An old seller who
has been to Barbados selling fruit
now for many years, however,
told the Advocate that in St. Lucia
where she came from many of her
people begin to dream from when
they are girls of the day when
they, too, will make a trip to, Bar-
bados and set up as fruit sellers.
The women who go back to their
islands, tell of the good trade that
can be carried on,

They usually get in contact with
schooner agents and it is not diffi-









cult to get their people in the
other islands to send their. fruit
es fruit selling in Jessamy

there ar broom and hat

I yals and coconut sellers,

the



GLITTER BAY—By Ivan Payne



CARIB NEWS AGENCY
WILL BE FORMED

After three days the Caribbean
Press Association presided over
by Mr. C. E, Hitchins of the
Trinidad Guardian came to a
unanimous agreement today to
proceéd with the formation of a
Caribbean News Agency.

Amended draft articles and
proceedings, will be circulated to
various newspapers for approval
and confirmation. Reuter’s Latin
American Manager ‘attended the
talks and gave valuable advice,



30/- For Overloading

A fine of 30s to be pa‘d in 28
days or one month’s imprison-
ment was yesterday imposed on
Byron Kellman, a "bus conduc-
tor oi ine motor bus G. 140 by
His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma,
for overloading.

When the offence was commit-
ted on January 9 the bus was
being driven along Roebuck St.



KNOWLES ACCEPTS JOB



GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 14
3arbados-born W. H G
Knowles accepted the post of
Sugar Cultivation Officer in his
home island’s Agriculture De
partment and expects to leave
Br h-Guiana on February 23
4 aduate of the Col

Imperial





ees

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



Want Shops
Act Amended

Mr. R. M. Cave of the

ing Act should be amended, I

special necessity.

Mr, Cave made the suggestion
at the meeting of the Council of
the Chamber of Commerce held
yesterday. He gave as his reason
the unusual occurrence of a tour-
ist ship arriving in the colony on
Sunday, and the loss to the colony
poF hundreds of American dollars
because the stores were closed.

| This, he said, was a pity.

The ship was the Nieuw Ams-
terdam which brought nearly 800
ourists to the island,

Mr. Cave was of the opinion
hat the matter should be brought
o the attention of Government by
che Chamber. The law as it stood
it present, he said, not only pré-
vented shops opening on closed
jays, but made no provision for
ywny Authority to use discretion in
siving permission tor opening on
special occasions.

The President., Mr. D. G. Lea-
sock Jnr., was in favour of the
suggestion. It should be borne in
mind, he said, that at present per-
mission could be obtained from
the Commissioner -of Police to
open produce warehouses on
bank-holidays and Sundays under
special circumstances. He saw no
reason why some Authority should
not be given the same discretion-
ary powers with respect to stores.

Principle Disliked

Mr, Trevor Bowring said that he
did not like the principle but he
daresay it would receive the sup-
port of the majority of members.
He thought they should find out
what was the feeling ofthe Cham-
ber’ as a whole before doing any-
thing.

Mr. G. D. Bynoe expressed
agreement and it was decided to
place the matter for discussion on
the Agenda for the next Quarterly
Meeting of the Chamber,

Mr, Leacock reported to the
meeting the activities of the com-
mittee who had been appointed to
go _il into the matter of advertising
signs and hoardings, with adver-
tisers. This was a matter that
had been brought up by Mr.
Trevor Bowring at a meeting of
the Chamber when he spoke of
the unfavourable’ effect these
signs were having on the scenic
beauty of the island.

Mr. Leacock said yesterday
that Mr. Bowring and himself
who were the committee, had met
some of the biggest advertisers,
and there had been general agree-
ment that advertising hoardings
should not be put up in country
districts as a whole, It was left
to a sub-committee to define the
exact limits of each highway and
certain residential districts as
well, where advertising hoardings
should be permitted, This com-
mittee actually consisted of Mr.
Bowring and three representatives
of the biggest advertisers. Co-
operation was promised by vari-
ous small advertisers.

Mr. Bowring pointed out that
the Civic Circle had been written
to asking them to send a repre-
sentative to the meetings of the
committee,

Publicity Contributions

The Council appointed Mr, A,
R. Toppin and Mr, Vernon Knight
to meet representatives from the
hotels and Publicity Committee,
with a view to classifying the
various firms with respect to their
contributions to the Publicity
Committee.

Members of the Council were
told that the Journal Committee



had appointed Mr, Ian Gale as
the Editor of the Journal.
Mr. Cave asked for and was

granted leave of absence until the
next Annual General Meeting of
the Chamber.

A notice from the Shipping and
Mercantile Association to the
Chamber informed them that the
Association would be holding a
meeting on February 17, Among
the matters for discussion would
be counsel’s opinion on the appli-
cation of the Shop Act and Shops
Orders; the Wages Board's
(Bridgetown) Decisions 1950, and
the Holidays with Pay Bill in its
present form,

The Association thinks that the
Chamber would be interested in
these matters and invited them to
send representatives.

Mr. D. Clairmonte of the firm
of Canada Dry was proposed to be
a member of the Chamber.

The proposal was made by Mr.
R. M. Cave and seconded by Mr.
S. H. Kinch,

Barbados Needs

More Hotels
=—TOURIST AGENT

There is need for more hotels in
Barbados and if this should come
about, the island would get many
more U.S. dollars, Mrs, Margaret
H. Mc Vaugh, representative of
the Philadelphia Office of Messrs,



Thomas ‘Cook and Son Ltd., told
the Advocate yesterday.
Mrs. McVaugh arrived here

over the week end on a short holi-

day visit and is staying at the
Aquatic Club, She expects to
leave this evening by B.W.I.A.

for Trinidad.

She said that her job In Phila-
delphia is to discuss with pros-
pective travellers any arrange-
ments they would like to make
for a trip to any part of the world
whether it was by air or ship.

In addition to that, she has to
do a lot of travelling to various
places to get first hand and up-
to-date information for their
clients.

She said that she had visited
the Virgin Islands, San Juan and
‘Trinidad before, but this was her
first visit to Barbados,

Exchange Favourable

She had been to most of the
hotels in the island and was very
impressed by everything she had
seen. She said that the favour-
able exchange rate was a big In-







ducement to people coming here

from the U.S. and added that it

was also encouraging to find that

hotel expenses were less than in

the U.S.A and that English

goods were , obtainable in the
island

ne observed that there were

y locally produced articles

1 would be of great nterest

is had’ arpa ¢

t € te } +

1a tr € et
prices

Ideal
Store, thinks that the Shops Clos-

should be so amended as to give





Kensington New

discretionary ‘powers to some of the places that will at
Authority for allowing shops to Moscue 16 he erected
open on closed days in case of = ao =

Mosque is sithated in Kens
deplorable State,

‘Your Guess’
Was A Patt

Winner of Monday’s

Evening
Advocate “Your Guess”

com pe-



tition was Ormie Browne of Cul- with grass and weeds.

toden Road, St. Michael.
guess was that it was
down pail with its
Dotiom.” It was

Ormie’s

cover
the first

on

nearest to the



correct answer.
There were only two other gues
which were opened later that
might have won the prize, They
were “A bucket turned down with
cover” and “a household gust-
bin,”
The correct answer supplied

by the photographer who took
picture was “A galvanized bucket
painted white—turned upside
down with its cover on the upturn-

the

ed_ bottom.”
Most popular guess was “the
top of an old windmill.” Some

people even placed the parish and
estate. The second most popular
fuess was “The Silo at oe ye! -
tral Livestock Station.” Thes
answers constituted about e
per cent. of the guesses
little girl, was so sure it was
top of an old windmill! that
sent in three coupons with
answer,

Other answers
light and shade,”
“tent”, “The top of South Point
lighthouse,” “The clock at Da-
Costa’s”’, “Bowling Green electric
tower,” “An _ incinerator.” “A
siren”, “a heap of megasse,

Two of.the most startling an-



ghty
“O ne
th
she
that

were “Electric
“a Lineman’s

”



swers were “A part of a_ wal)
lying on a house with a degree
angle” and “A firmnet for cre-

menting bones at a hospital.”

Leaf Seald
Rampant
In B.G.

—STEVENSON

Mr, G. C, Stevenson, Cytogen-
eticist of the B.W.I Central
Sugar Cane Breeding Station, who
has just returned from a tour of
the sugar preducing areas of
British Guiana investigating Leaf
scald Disease of sugar cane, tad
the Advocate yesterday that it is
of widespread occurrence, particu-









larly on the West Coast and on
some of the Berbice estates.
Infection is least on the East
> and the Demerara River
Banks, he went on to’ say. “Even
on the most heavily infected
estates, the occurrence of the
Cisease varies considerably from
field to field, and although there

is no evidence of its reaching epi
demic proportions anywhere, it
undoubtedly represents a_ poten-
tial danger to the industry, and re
quires energetic steps to be taken
for its control,

The estate surveys which are
being made are of the utmost
value in defining the extent of in-
fection in the commercial sugar
cane varieties, and in familiarising
the field staffs with the symptoms
of the disease and its effect
the growing cane.
Although there is a jgood deal

information available on the
in other countries, much
rimental work will be re.
quired before the details of its
vate of spread and its effect on
yield under British Guiana
conditions can be elucidated
Such experimental work has al-
ready been started, and should be
pursued and extended, and_ it
would be advisable for the whole
programme to be under the direct
supervision of a qualified plant
pathologist.

Cause of Disease

“The disease is caused by a bac-
terium which infects the vascular
system of the living canes and can
exist only for short periods outside
the plant. Infection by way of the
soil or water is impossible, and
the spread of the disease is largely
by way of infected planting mate-
rial or by knives used in cutting
the cane.

Infection by rats is also a
sibility to be borne in mind. The
bacterium responsible for the
disease has been isolated with the
help of Mr. Hutchinson, plant
pathologist on the staff of the
Imperial College of Tropical Agri
culture, Trinidad, who visited the
colony last month, and the disease

on

of



pos-

in “the history



“an upside der
the
guess
pulled out of the box which was



Road After Rain

WHEN TOURISTS visit the island in 1952 perhaps one

tract them jis the first Indian
of Barbados. This
ington New Road which is in a

inter—zong¢
New houses are being built Cricket in the hope of discovering
yearly and the area looks very @2d encouraging new talent.

ettractive. The people try to keep
their small aa of land in a san-
itary condition, but the road is
reugh, rocky, full. of holes and has
proper drainage. The wide
canals at the lower part of the
road, Which are the only means of
draining the water, are overrun
The hard
bottom of these canals hin-
the waiter penetrating the
ground and forms a breeding spot
for mosquitoes.

At the upper end
near Baxters Road,
draiz system at all
falls the water runs in all direc-

ns and eventually ends up in

people’s yards causing many
rown or die from disease,
back of the road going
Chapman’s Lane is Mur
sture, while on the other
side is the thickly populated New

no

mossy

of the road,
there no
When rain

1s

ige



tock to ¢

At the
wards

phy’s pa





T.T.C.A. Aim At
lnter-zorie Cricket

The newly formed Trinidad and
Tobago Cricket Association aims at
regulating, organising and infusing
discipline into local cricket ‘n
Trinidad, Dr. A. G. Francis, Presi
dent of the Association, told the
Advocate yesterday.

He said that another
Association was to have

Dr
Trinidad Cricket Selectors, ar
rived on Monday for the tourna-
ment between Barbados and Trin-
idad. He is staying at Indramer
Guest House, Worthing.

He said that Queen's § Park
Cricket Club was the recognised
and accredited body for Inter
national and Intercolonial Cricket,
but there was no body which con
trolled cricket in Trinidad as
such and they had been hoping
that there would be such a body,

In different parts of Trinidad,
there were different organizations
running cricket. In the South,
there was St. Patrick Cricket
Association, in San Fernando, the
Rahamut Cup Association and at
Caroni, there were also different
Sodies running cricket competi
tions, the chief of them being Sun-

Orleans where people also Pridge. . ‘ aie
live in fear of being marooned Minor Competitions
in their houses when there is In the North, there was Bonanz3,
a heavy downpour At the.the oldest and most powerful
entrance of the Seventh Avenue body and they also had the Mer-
from Kensington New Road chants and a few other minor
s a dust-bin Yesterday this competitions,
hin was surrounded with water He said that they hoped to have
and one of its sides was broken the confidence of and be, recog-
dewn. It is nearly impossible for nized by all those bodies, so that
vengers to wade through the their influence would be really
large pool ef water surrounding felt over matters concerning
the bin to remove the stuff, The Cricket in Trinidad ‘ .
refuse and stagnant water togeth Asked what was the attitude ol
er attract a swarm of flies the Queen’s Park Cricket Clut

towards

House Surrounded







the present Association

Dr. Francis said that irresponsible

stat.ments had got about that they
There was also a large pool of were out to oppose Queen’s Park
water at the entrance of thy but that was absurd. They neither
Kigh a Avenue yesterday, A house wished, nor could oppose Queen's
at the corner was surrounded by Park. .
water inches deep and made it im- Queen's Park was - responsible
pe sible for its occupant to enter for international and intercolonia
without getting wet, cricket and not only did he feel a:
Gwendolyn Gregg, who has President of the Association tha‘
been living at Kensington New Queen's Park did not look ot
Read for eight years, told tha them as rivals or opponents, bu
Advocate that there is no outley was fairly sure that Queen’s Park
for the water when rain falls. glad of and approved of the}
Bince Murphy's pasture has aac pick. iation, and would support ii

filled in, the water is thrown back



to the best of their ability,



e been hoping to expect
into her vard. On many occasions, He had
Si fowls and ducks were drown- that should their organizatior
od The water settles in the road continue to be run along the best
for wWwealiae: end the dampness lines, and merit the confidence o!
c apne her +n catch colds Re. the cricket loving community
cently she had to buy E.C. to Queen’s Park would hand over te
“yap ancinll her house because them, many of the duties it now
of stagnant water and the “bad performed,
smell coming from Murphy’s
pasture.” . st
Fifty nine-year-old Mr. ches ,C,. Agenda For
terfield Ifill has been living in
Kensington New Road from the e sat?
time he was 13. “I am one of the Ne xt Me eting
many tax-payers in this road and he or , om-
surely something could be done to es sn Pr aspen Siwy
the road to improve conditions,” Merce foll .
General Meeting the following
ao bie oe’ hvn: teen’ will be among the matters that
ill saic t she > bouts

the land he was told that half of
the land was his. He would sur-





will be discussed,
The President Mr. D, G. Lea-
cock will move that the Chamber

render his half anytime to get 4 consider the advisability of estab-
proper road to walk on, lishing Standing Committees re-
At this stage his Wife put in: presenting different sections of the
“Boats could float through here commercial community, in order
sometimes”; being a very pub- that prompt action may be taken if
lie spirited woman, she added: necessary, in any matter affecting
“Where are all the taxes going?”’ any such sections. ‘
When Mr. Ifill spoke again he Mr. D. V. Scott will move that
iid that when he first came te Mme Chamber obtain some indica-
live in Kensington New Road, the “on from Government as to what
conditions were the same, Tho action they propose to take on the
mer r » |g § . report of the Commission which
owner of the land soon after : ;
scattered a few stones in the road “45 appointed to investigate the
et ; ‘ate question of mark-ups on food-
ut this did not stop the water vaults
from flooding the road during the ” Mr. J. O'D. Egan will move that
ny see the Chamber inquire into the re-
When the whole district was hort of the Committee appointed
privately owned he used to pay py the Governor under Sir John
his rent to Messrs Cottle Catford. saint, re the price de-controlling



Now, nearly all the land has

been of

certain items, and to refer to

sold out in plots and is owned by the number of items which have
many tax-payers. been de-controlled in Trinidad
and elsewhere,

Petition Sent In

He said that once a petition was
signed by residents of the area
and sent to the authorities, bu
“perhaps this was thrown into the
waste paper basket where all good
things go.”

Mr. Colin Roach, an upholsterer,
has been living in Kensington New
Road for the past 16 years. He
has seven small children who, as
all children do, enjoy playing in
the open air.

Whenever there is a downpour
Mr. Roach and his children are
marooned inside the house, When
he has work to deliver he finds it
difficult to cross this water, He
sid that once the drainage was
O’neal’s pasture, but since that had
been filled in, the water settled
in the road

“For days



water can be seen
n the gutters,” he said, “I hav
to keep an eye on the children
Uf they play in this stagnant wate)
they may catch an itch or pick up|

the

ring worms.’
“As a tax-payer I feel sore about]
these conditions, Can’t something,







has been reproduced experimen- Fe done?” He is anxiously looking
tally at Uitvlugt by innoculation forward to the day when Kensing
cf cane material with a pure ton New Road will be properly
culture. paved and the drainage system
Further experiments with this improved. He said, “the gutters
culture on other commercial vari- ajong Fontabelle and Baxter
eties and new importations from Poads are ting to receive the

the B.W.1I. Central Sugar Cane water,”

@ On page 8. @ On page 8.
POLPEVOELEV LOVE PLL VAP VALLE ELLIS),
%
+
Ld Te —

IF YOURE :
7: J r ¥
ALWAYS ON g

THE RUSH

also

CAC

|
1g CHILDREN

8 KNIGHT’

4,466,466

You'll need a

â„¢" REVITONE
TONIC

FOR RESTORING

A VITAMIN AND MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT FOR
AND

DRUG

4,446,464
PPCLSOF ELSE LLLP LOPE A





Tonic

VITALITY

C - TOSE



SSOSESCSSSOOESE SCE

*, 6 $S990S9O69S

ADULTS

STORES.

-

HOt
LLC LEST PE >

To point out to the Government
the advisability of such action, in
view of the fact that certain mer-
handise under the present sys-
tem of controls are being sold for
very muchless than their present
replacement est; gnd that liquid




sisseâ„¢s On the market are pecoming
less and le
To request that certain items

which are sought by tourists from
Venezuela and elsewhere be per-
mitted importation from dollar
sources, as it is well-known that
tourists come to this island espe-
cially from Venezuela, and return
with their dollars, because they
are unable to spend_their money
due to the fact thaf these items
are not being stocked by the mer-
shants. -





MUSCULAR FATIGUE?
Get back in step
with ALKA-SELTZER |!

; tin,

++ Seltzer at

J *s “ the first sign
| of muscular

fatigue. The

‘Take
Alka-

same safe an-
algesic, so effective
as a headache rem-
edy, relieves discom-

fort quickly, helps
you to relax, Keep
it handy — always!

These are a MUST

BREAD BOXES
in green, blue and

Cream .......65........ $3.70
e
FRY BASKETS
Each 32c., 50c., $1.11
$1.20
*

CAKE PAN SETS
for making Checkered
Cakes. Set 78c. & 97c.

———



Cave Shepherd & Co.,

12 &



f

aim of the

Francis who is one of the





PAGE



SUGAR GOES
TO LONDON

The steamship Colonial,

Pay 15

now in






FIVE

— ae

Took Rice: war





A S-year-oid sailor of t

Carlisle Bay, is loading 1,975 tons g-hooner, Emeline, Jeffers James,

of sugar for London. was yesterday ordered by Hi

This shipment is part of the Worship, Mr. H \. Talma to
produce of sugar for 1951 The pay a fine of 15 forthwith

Colonial started to take her load jndergo one month’ imprison
on Monday and is not expected to ment with hard labour
complete loading before the weet! Jame was found guilt of

end unlawful possession of a quantit

Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd., of rice which he was tal along

are her agents. the wharfside. Cpl. — phy 0

the Bridge Police Station who

Liitle Fishermen made the arrest saw James with









the bag of rice and got suspiciou






Boys of between 10 and 14 were — —, cal nt sac eg ,
hooking many small fish on the See ee sineat teisctin
wharf pelow the Victoria bridge
yesterday at about 12 o'clock. The
boys show much skill in fish ‘
caching One of them told the FINED 40/-
Advocate that small fish hooking | ‘ vig
on the wharf is preliminary train- _ Sinclair Jemmott of Lakes Folly,
ing for the time when they will = ee Oe C sarin ot
ee eater ined Son. t6 be yout does
ue ” . 4 x” they will undergo one month's
Smith Discharges Today imprisonment with hard labour
Schooner Lucille M. Smith call- for the larceny of a quantity of
ed from British Guiana yesterday srticles valued at £1. 9s. from the
with 1,500 bags of rice and quaao- § S Islardside, by His Worship
tities of firewood and chareo Mr. H. A. Talma yesterday

The Smith is expected to begin







to discharge her cargo to-day. Hex Cp!. Carter of the Bridge Police
lceal agents are Messrs. Robert m said that on January 13
Thom, Ltd. he saw both defendants with the
articles in a boat and on question-

Y.W.C.A. MEETING ing them learnt that they had re

Members of the Y.W.C.A. Com-— ceived them from the S.S, Island-
mittee will meet on Tuesday Feb- jiide. .
ruary 20 for women who have He took them back to the
taken out forms for membership steamship and there the articles
of the Association. The meeting were identified as the ship's prop-
will take place between 4.30 and erty. Both of the defendants were
6 p.m, when the entrance fees then taken to the 3ridge Post and
will be collected, charged



Bovait gives that extra flavour to all soups, pies and
savouries. And nourishment, too !-for Bovril
the concentrated goodness of becf. Bovril is also
a tasty sandwich spread—and a cup of hot Boyril
daily makes you feel fine |



. FRESH SUPPLY OF

“PURINA HEN CHOW 5 :

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

aN JASON JONES & CO., LID.—Distributors c
SERB ERB REERPREREBae sa



SPECIFY

“EVERITE

ASBESTOS-CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

“TURNALL’

ASBESTOS
WOOD











on the list for

YOUR KITCHE

BREAD BOXES
in White Enamel $3.17

CAKE & FLOUR TINS

in green and cream

6
POTATO RICERS, — 9
Each .. $140 CAKE COOLERS
© Each $1.09
ICING SETS $4.56 2
© JELLY MOULDS
SIEVES .......... 53ce. Each 16, 19, & 63ce

Ltd. |

13 Broad Street









N

eee OC I. iy a
PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1951

Guma, Sore Mouth and Loose
teeth mean that you have prarhes.
Trench Mouth or some bad . ne
that a nee or later cause your tee
to fall out and may also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trou Amosan stops gum
bleed!





BY CARL ANDERSON









d save your teeth or
ew aoe on. return of empty pack-
age. Get Amosan from your chemis:

y. The guar-
antee protects
:




HARPIC
CLEANS IT
FOR YOU



4 ‘al | :
| i
Ss

EET BS







MICKEY MOUSE

[ THOSE... BLOSSOMS! THEY'RE GIVING |
OFF A SCENT..LIKE
CHLOROFOR/A!

— ~~" . css
ve |
LOOK OUT,.JEFFREY ! THIS FLOWER a
TREE iS APTER US!

FRESH orin



















Bij cewet = TOM ATO SAU c E Just sprinkle some ‘ Harpic’ into the lava-

! che “a gins ememasis 0's, ae tory bowl leave overnight —then flush,

ty \ VV POU a at peat aS *Harpic’ cleans, disinfects and deodorises

| alliage weer. ah Ee the whole pan, including the S-bend,
7 c=

HARPIC

THE SPECIAL LAVATORY CLEANSER
RSS SPOT9SSS >

| OBSERVE

y that different brands of



a Tooele 4
Cope, 1981, Walt Gainey Protactrons =e.”
\ orld Rights Reserved



~ Bay Rum come, and they
% go, but - - -





HE'S HIDING











y 5
" ) THE ALBUM WITH ‘ BORNN S
WHAT'S ALL.“ A, ( HIS BABY PICTURES ) %
THE MYSTERY ) \ IN: IT )
WITH “aN A Y I JM
ALEXANDER? ) NN oe B R
TNS ‘ 4 .
; will go on forever

WHY ?
QUALITY
That's Why





.
9,555.59 65 9 GO OSOG VIDOE SOOO OOGES



AND WE WILL USE A
SECHEAPER PERMUTATION

oe Oe LO
WE MUST STARTEBAN OCCAG| —— \WHAT (VE BOUGHT
A SAVINGS BET 7 ? WITH THE MONEY
CAMPAIGN a: ee mee” ‘ we : SAVED

















Confectionery The Finest Eitan
Ba) AML the Delighttul Assortment tig th ay

Brands Bottles COINTREAU .o....cccccccseceeescesun $6.00 3.25
KUMMEL



|












































Boxes ROLS LIQUEUR CHOCOLATES
SHERIFF, | WAS WITH THE RAILROAD DETECTIVE WHENHE DIED. s vend Oe "HENNESSY XXX BRANDY _
HERIFE, | WAS WITH THE RAILROAD DE a | EEA ne Teen Oar) [GaN Ne NOI ee ORTO » MELTIS FAVOURITE CANDIES .... $1.85 1.02 » HENNESSY XXX BRANDY
HE A BEEN oe a » _MELTIS COFFEE CHOCOLATE MINT » MARTINI VERMOUTH
EO un ect Lane tee lewiniy 1.82 » NOILY PRAT VERMOUTH
Tins FRYS CHOCOLATE HAZEL NUTS ....... 2.02 » BOOTHS GIN ooo
» NESTLES TOASTED ALMONDS .........__ 1.05
» PASCALL'S FRUIT SALAD... ae tt :
id FRUIT BARLEY SUGAR ....... .98 i i fog iapeen
» . GLUCOSE BARLEY SUGAR. 38 Biscuits Qe =Sap
ae,
a f lea : “
= iis fey
LVF }
malades Tins PEEK FREAN’S MARLINE CRACKER ........ $1.75




















































Tins LYLE’S GOLDEN SYRUP ................ $ .47 .28 # a » | PLAYBOX BISCUITS ........ 1.20

BY GEORGE MC. MANUS Bottles BERCHEN CASTLE G, SYRUP ............... 69 « ROMARY GINGER BAKE BUSCUITS ...... 79

ee be MM Soe thaa uted UAE Tus aetesfusiteouliaread 44 ia es HONEY BAKE e eae 78

; « GOLDEN SHRED MARMALADE .......... 47 “ “ WATER BISCUITS .................. 1.12

Mat os ae «» SILVER SHRED Se Wnt phe ilass 47 » JACOB’S AFTERNOON TEA BISCUITS. 1.45

TO SEE IF THOSE SHUT UP! HWE HAS-AN! HE TOOK on HARTLEY’S MARMALADE ................... .38 im - CREAM CRACKERS .................... 1,52
Saetees cer |) THeeas THE TRLEWISIOS ST Tins S.A. MARMALADE (2-15) ............. ai 46
2 W VE PUTTIN’ UP THE » TRINIDAD MARMALADE 36

LEVISION SET IT || ANTENNA ON DUGAN'S





LD KEEP HiM HOME! SALOON !/








NO
ON
\
ney
y £
——

Suices and
















Meats
~y

Squashes Easy-to-Serve

Tins BAHAMAS PINEAPPLE JUICE «000000 53° Tao tidied! Weendite
" even Ls TOMATO Juice “ep » C&BBREAKFAST ROLL... "40
* IRORA tomate . SWIFT'S OX TONGUES (2-15) ne 980
RAYMOND ” RIDAT: Gaalent vores” ie EMI ab 55 ease coenerdessto lead 20
TM COMIN’ CLEAN WITH YOU, RIGHT OFF THE “i fia 4s , - » ORANGES GRAPE! FRUIT JUICE 29 . Sees a with CORRES, . oan
Rei arorres' war mame Bie Re Keon aA | = Lah Bottles ROSE'S LIME JUICE CORDIAL... 1.08 “KRAFT MACARONI & CitéesE "7

» COAPICIE ORANGE SQUARE... 40. | nae eee eee me ae
. » LEMON SQUASH ....... 98



Lamb...

Fine for





































NG Roasting :

PRIME AUSTRALIAN BEEF—STEAK—ROAST—STEW Tins BATCHELOR PEAS ooo... $ -26

LAMB—in LEGS, LOIN, SHOULDER—CHOPS—VEAL m CHALEENGE PEAS 0... ccccccsscesceseecsesers .20

for ROASTING & CUTLETS—TRIPE—OX TONGUES » ASPARAGUS (WHITE) Large ... nw SMD

CALVES KIDNEYS—LAMB & VEAL for STEW— » MUSHROOMS .............. i weieeubentey 55

PPP LEB ooo isccsessscssssecds, $10.00 per case: 30c. per Ib » SWEET CORN .... 48

, dae; RP REE ae athe os ahh cadanches Recdvdue sonia Saves ie 35

THE WAY THAT SAP IS FLYIN US, NO_] [NOW!WHATS THIS 7 SOWHAT? WEDONT ) (IMWITHROYON | |—h SALAMI SAUSAGE... oo. $1.00 per Ib » MIXED VEGETABLES FOR SOUP ............ AS
TELLIN’ WHAT'LL HAPPENS ABOUT YOU TWO TRYIN © WANT HER WITH US. THAT! WE Sore
NE. | [1M PUTTIN’ ON THIS TO TOSS THIS DAME OFFN ) 7 DAMES IS A JINX? MOVE FAST

YOU WANNA GET US ===]. | PARACHUTE! TAKE THE PLANE, AGAINGT — ( SHELLBE IN OURWAYs)









——

ALLKNT? CE

=== THAT ONE.




“
t
WV



ew ne ee eee ee

NGS A Ak Le a

{


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN







PUBLIC NOTICES | Chemumnardnecd Terns or SiGe, Barrells “Ronstadt can
CLASSIFIED ADS. |zumxer*.$6,000More Passed Overpriced Tou |F igo Pad ——





f £3 to be paid i t ol Ww pack

ne mont! a e e tea at 21. cents,

rd labo é nh exce f the sehe.| G eddard
I i 1 January 17 i And

eyes |

TELEPHONE 2508 on eases

and $1.80 on Sundays. month or in defau







imprisenment with i

aralsilellcatndibnisirrscteneeesiticinicieeesiene
The charge for announcements of “£25 > od, easily earned by obtaining ,
Dirthe, TRS. eeths. pxeee PUBLIC SALES order for privese Caristmas Corde Or a our was on Tuesday impo
gments, and In Memoriam notices from your friends. previous expert
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on ainaeys Write H for

sed on Gar-|dule price ¢
Ten cents per agate line on week-days|enee necessary - § tollmeyer
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays, | bi ? or eeeeel ; awe
for any number of words up to 50, and| minimum charge $i on us, | besutiful free sample Book to ‘s
50 on weekdays largest and meet Publishers; wanes A Lt Do ad ds names as popular in cricket?



3 cents per word on week-days and] and $1.80 en Sundays.

(oj


































































4 cents per word on Sundays for each commission; mi money king in a 7 t “ool
tdaitlondd word a gppertunity. | Jones, Willams &° Con MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW) === | me GAS: fe Se
announcements in Carib Calling the REAL ESTATE England.” TH x : . ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED | ; Y a M . } | Soebtacat- nny al
charge Js $8.00 tor any number of words 25.1.51—18n E HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY at their meeting on (M.A.N.Z, LIN! | hI . ae Te
—- -—-_-_eoeo '
gdeitional ward, Terths cosh. hone 2508 i lala Y. M. P Cc Sueetey poo * hone em to be added to} ws «roxGaRrRo™ is scne as 7 Pn ys eee eee esos
ween 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death un ed will offer for sale at man” . rovi in the 1950—51 i tes ail Adelaide Jaz y 2 Melbourne |
Notices only after 4 p.m. their office No. 17 High Street, . seurrapens oe soe to submit any ds 5 tati Th fe timates for labour at February §#h, brilar 17th, | [0 DAY'S NEWS
town, on Friday the 10th -. ions ‘they may desire to place on the antation. e latter sum proved insufficient to] srisbane Februsry = Arriving at ; ave j
som sAix nim, The mestinge or! welling house | Meeting te'be held st ihe charter | Meet the expenses for the 1951 sugar crop. ge ee 3rd | ——
: od Cae Wire? oe, new call: on the 14th March, te 4, oe came. tak : . his vesse pas ample “space for Hard “ re ated gine |
Minimum charge week 12 cents and prac oon es by estimation 12,087 eo we ee 8 aan evewree expenditure )expected to get under paragraph nares Tran ood "trois Bills of cept. Oa go” and if Whittaker's Almanack,
98 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24] Ville Avene. tenon, the sea at Car- Jia g the year included the pay-|(C) of the addendum which stated | Lading with transhipment at ‘Trinidad ||| St, bucia, G |
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a} 3, Sepnes Worthing, Christ Chureh, SaTeNy, | Ment of 124% increase in. wages|that the usual bonus paid to lab-|‘F, British Guiana, Barbados, Windward |{] 824 Passengers only for 1951
“eee , spection any day except, Sundays arising out of the Ministry of Food| ourers was on the same basis as|°"? ‘*e¥2rd Tslends. goa re. oe Relies: to. te Pint, 44 Pint and Cocktail
Mare, Fale one Yee ©n application to ‘ NOTICE See for aver is 1950; — 7%|was paid to labourers of private For further particulars apply — Tel. 4047 ita Glasses
For ARISH OF ST. JOHN bon out of an] estates, FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD and
AUTOMOTIVE of tne eee S and conditions| SEALED tenders are invited for agreement between the S Da COSTA & Co. LitD., |} at
to: plying approximately 42 pint aE dd ’ ugar Pro- Trinidad Barb ;
COTTLE, CATFORD, & Co., | lowe rahe aaimately 42 pints pure fresh dlcers’ Federation and the Barba~ Labourers’ Bonus BW. ewe ISON’
ae Solicitors, in two deliveries, “as 4 ‘ae ae ws Workers’ Union; for every D ; ; sa dean cdeiaienonntondaaencancaibiior bi — Pa Seer ha
BEDFORD DELIVERY VANS — ship-| _________—_32.8i~-12n. | Merch 1951. Applications wit be re-| 9,000 tons over 120,000 (which is r. Cummins said that those | and HARDWARE
ment just to hand and ready for im-| PROPERTIESCTwo acannon. | y the undersigned up to the 17th) considered an average crop) aj '8¥Fes were worked out by the [ —————
mediate ‘positasion. Courtesy Garase, dene situeea a Ton fe ot {ostaont, yt ss as im ote ar eed that bonus of 1% is paid — the 1060 Attorney of the plantation and by
4.2.51—6n. Chureb Both having 3 bedrooms with | #arily Be accepted. sugar crop amounted to 165,000) t?® Labour Commissioner along ee ee een
condition: Rare Sage vlinder.,. Perfect | Gardens well laid out, Wun Spsmetion } 5, PEA, tons; the usual bonus paid to lab~| ‘8? wsual lines done by sugar : }
smaller car, Dr. Simon. Telephone De petiand. For ic emenable: offse: will Board of Poor Law eee the same basis as is paid pee eee the smount required to Pf MRS. STEWART
. 10.1.51—6n | or 2398. es Eee ee Guardians, ¥ ownery 2 private estates, bey, Banus to the labourers was NEW» YORK ' BERVICN YE. Q
PETS . John, + H. G. Cummins (L) took ee ; SS. “Essi” sail i? Sanher cc eees ; DANCING SCHOOL
ELECTRICAL ee Oe and well built Bungalow on I | charge of the resolution. He said b Mr, Crawford said that it would| 8.8. “Byfiord” sails ‘dnd’ Pebeun bon Ta. Pebreary PUPILS raat dealeous at
TC; n { 4 AW ’ ‘ a” saila and Fe 144 ‘ A a s
RAGIOGRANT Sas Som | Pate a Ga PRR, tape | NOTICE that its purpose was to meet cer-|P*, SUEPHISing to the honourable oom | fotutng My.” STEWARTS
gramophone in Mahogany Cabinet, per-| ,,7M® Bungalow stands on 18,020 square adbpcants are invited for the post of | ‘in changes at Dodds, The matter | °+ th at the majority NEW ORLEANS SERVICE \ DANOING SCHOOL will
feet condition, For further particulars ma of jand and contains one large) 4; a nt Nurse at St. Lucy's Almshouse|WaS ventilated last Tuesday by other labourers at the other} A Steamer sails 18th January vitor : a be interviewed on
dial 2293, 15.2.51—2n, | Public | room, two bedrooms, kitchen, 3. Balers of er.00 0 per month, uniform) the senior member for St. Philip. states only got last year, the| » s mo Mae Pebryary rs 188 Thursday, February :
FURNILURE In a separate building’ there is a Applicants must be fully certiieated, | bUt earlier that day, the resolution 2 na a aie in sub paragraph | ————---—-——-—~ ne Lee 15th from 4.30
garage ie. one car and two servants | “Te ‘suncocer ee a was laid on the table of the House. » ° eniioa ete ee 7% | ‘courmpounp : arene p.m. onwards.
cae Mids eee of| The property will be ai areas sale| Mtie® on 25th February 1951. It dealt with the wonus paid! mentioned in sub ehuph ib). ’ y) Sade
Electric’ Tosster, Phonrimtgazine Stand. | at our office on Wednesday the 2ist day 4 pplications will be received by me up| tg estat “y Pas ee ee re soe : prhedin : ee cea
Bath, Nickel Waites” oe sae aby % of February 1961, at 2 p.m. to Saturday 17th. February 1951. e labourers at Dodds anij The bonus referred to in sub pera-|.. arco ce ; Barbadiva { For further information
ae og ALD L, arm ; a. GRID ebruary 5 .
rations Lights. Phone 8477. | undersigned. of Se apply-to the) crerk, moard og Peer Law Guardians, coreen in harmony with certaiajgraph (c) had not been paid to| $s. “ALCOA PENNANT” Pobruary ths Dial 2440
15,2.51~-In.] Inspection any day between 10,30 a.m. St. Lucy. | Prod ents made by the Sugar} Quite a large number of labourers | ss. “ALCOA POLARIS" usr, aren eae
ana § p.m. ‘Telephone Lady Walton, 10.2.51~7n ee er kweeiation and the, on sugar estates, en ee eee | SSS
. i Rie orkers ion. It ap. t was surprising to see that j= =
LIVES10CK COTTLE, CA ce ‘ plied, he & to e tha These vessels have mited passenger accommodation. —_
TFORD , y understood, to almost all/ with regard to the 1214%, the = ~ re
i SSusieyy,, | Friendly Societies Act (1905) |te estates in the isians. Government was $0 far behind pri ROBERT THOM T50—Now Yor and Gulf Sorvice. ORIENTAL
os ‘ARE quite, Over 18 Nanas, 7 years eieaniabetadine ~SEeteiwes : [See, 75) irae ers Lad Sp Rg being | vate owned sugar estates. Apply: DA COSTA & 09., LTD.-—-Canadian : Sorvico. Goons
7 jantation ‘ ” ¥ agricultu abourer® potent sone
work. Phone 3344. wy COUNTRY, ROAD, ST. Adverti é ernment | SS " ,
one 14.2.51—2n.| Fe os LA Sataty sT. _ MICHAEL. | ve} ee Dissolution by. and was also the property of the He said that the Government SS <= E
————— W,0. "Collymore ; u NOTICE is hereby given that the s:,|G@Overnor — in - Executive Com fxperted to make some money - From INDIA, CHINA,
e tal . = 7 year’s rati é 3 " 5 " 0)
MISCELLANEOUS —_| ara rounds (i acres "St. Sentneay*"| Michael ‘Regisiey Nor "0 fe diewhea oy [meters He, therefore begged 121 Piontation and it would be an PASSAGES TO EUROPE RO aes
The By Md comprises verandah, draw- pistrusant registered at this oMee the rs ove the passing of the Resolu - excellent idea if the. Sovabea at eR. Coes’ tose :
Senge a ni af . Sth day of Feb : on. > ; men . tee ha okie Ba ini os e
weATHS = _in Porcelgin Foamel, Tt ha ee gore i Ldedreone ome | rep tamane tant R soa nest witnin My, 8. BW. Can (2) secended | night set an example at Dodds by Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, for sail Sat neat tyesys, Paes”
units ‘to compl imro: matching | tories, convenient kitchen and ntry,| Newspaper in which this adverti nt “| providin, canteen at which lab- ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, Londen, or , Sa Si
units to complete colour suites, Top| reams for 8 servants, garage tor & cary, | abDears, proceedings. be ‘commensey wt Mr, W. A. Crawford (C) said |? & aca na ieh lal & pe, F j , fumes, Barbados Scarves in
. A. BARNES & Co,, Ltd. and. stables. "|g member or other persona interesied 2, (that he would appreciate if the| "ers who worked there daily Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. Pure Silk, Ete., Ete., Ete.

could get a hot meal at midday,

26.1.51—tf.n.| | Water suppky for garden and grounds] or having any claim on the funds of |honourable member for St, Thomas The Souvenir Headquarters





















CEREALS — Cc i from a weil with mill; water service in] the Society to set aside such dissolution, especiall rin sea! ae eniae eaten ae ¥

ween. Quaker Oats in Ting & prea euen ben si servants rooms (shower | and the same 4 - apie accordingly. Soule Wales i or He. felt that fe eae ie eat THANI Hiros.
le; i = . . . CHENER rs were ey ~
Ford, 98 Rocbuck St Day Gran W. M.| ‘The residence completely wired and Registrar, if al] plantations and factories were KASHMERE
; Bice furnished | with electric” lighting from 13.2,51—3n to take that step | Pr. Wm. Henry 8t--Diel Mes
nae EB. ‘s mains. PR ects r a cols seal

CHELSTON LIME = House convertible into flats and out- » Many of those sugar plantation TYN mal aa! Teg =
supply, Temper te Building Lime, moat | Pines converte, inte a Teottes| SUPPLIES POR TH Fined 20/- For | viovees. worked ‘sme’ distance FERS NE
ders, Concrete Stone Grit, Marl & Sand.| iment or kitchen wantens. TCVCloP” OF THE E POOR from their homes and found it ; Ant BAM.

Trucks on hire. P. S, Brooks. Phone i
True ks. Phone prone undersigned will offer the PARISH OF | SAINT MICHAEL Unlawful Possession bye ht oat aa ee
CURTAIN FITTINGS—For smart win- Sobee Varnt’ Pal: te aa” dees on the envelope “TENDER FOR ee FitzGerald Agard a labourer of Soule Rae re nveunas serine Se

dow styling, light control, Valances and| February 1951 at 2 pam. crop season to supply labourers

REAL ESTATE







1+..." will be received by the Clerk ‘ ,
draperies. By Kirsch, Dial 4476 A.| Inspectio Tussle Thurs-| of the Vestry up to 12 o'clock noon on Dukes Alley, St. Michael was|{" : i . 7.S.S. GOLFITO will arrive from England at
BARNES & CO,, LTD, 13.2.51—t.0.0 | days roy "petwroen 3 pe ia iaoma ee Zeyrnery. Sor ie under: Aned 20s to _ paid in one month os es Re WG ine 4> Bal
“HAMS _ ix Hawa Je Sine santas For further particulars apply “os supplies in such quantities as|Or One month’s imprisonment with e : : EEC ai Rel
© $1.25 per 1b, 2b Tins @ $2.96 a 2 COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., may from time to time be ordered for | hard labour by His Worship Mr labourers themselves and even the 9.30 a.m. on the morning of [7th february an
for $1.38 also Bacon sliced $117 oF slab, Solicitors, Jone, Year commencing on the Ist April/— A. McLeod Police Magistrate | employers, since the ability to ob-
Whole. W. M. Ford, Dial 280, 35 loe- 42.61—10n-| FRESH MEAT of District “A” on Tuesday, j tain a hot meal during the -niddle wit) sail ot 6.00. pari. the same evening for 4
et 18.9.81—-Sn Lon nth, PEtPeL oF jand. containing | 1.986 ps ae Agard was found guilty of the! of the day must be reflected in the Ball Ot ONY pin. | : .
er nrnemnoremmnen | SERRE: eet With the Buildings thereon. | gach Seek tetas must send in} UMlawful possession of a quanti-/ amount of work as well as the sk ance ie
MODERNFOLD DOORS—The alsin. | twate in Taucas street, segtows. 26: a letter, along with the Tender, simea|t¥ Of goods which he was carry.) quality of work which the workers Trinidad. She has limited accommodation tot 4p a ( a qp r |

guished solution to your special by two 1 1ifi +{ing along N

eauhitectumal Telephone Company Limited. and at pre- Properly qualified persons ‘not g along Nelson Street. could do.

sree ne Re co easy | ten cecupied ge to part bye Observer Being members af the Vesiny)” auting| | Harbour Police Constable Gill |

A. BARNES & CO. LID. Newspaper and as to part by Miss Cado-| ine" enderer in the scent oe’ itn |who made the arrest said that on
13.2.51—ti.n. | Hen. property will be set up for sate at] Tender being accepted for the due ful- nda 12 he saw Agard with

filment to the Contract.
sider lnaning your glasses, try a Clear—| ot", ofions on Thureday, Ast Mareh 1951.1 "itty respect to Sar ahha tie pleat nee good By © ne hm
" e Lens "i MI . proba! , i
sides and polish. Price 2/6 each. I"spection by application to the ten- ie Tea seas is 24,000" gallows tnd the | Was unable to give him a_ satis-
KNIGHT'S LTD, 14.2.51—2n, —. further particulars and condition o¢ | WesttY_ Teserve the right to accept the factory explanation.
O—Bentley (almost new). Phone sale, apply to:— - tan i ee hur are a all ae He then seek bits to the Bridge |
PIAN| " ni » : pply o: and a . i * i
8435. 13,2.51—4n. COTTLE oe & CO., , sons tendering for this article ghall aoe oun where he’ wasi\*
“Son eRibes oS Sl 0. 17 High Street, | forward, along with their tender, e Cer- | °Parged.
: SHADES — Very attractive and Bri WN. | tificate by a properly qualified Veterinary Set. King prosecuted for the;
nexpensive, Just right to protect your 14.2,51—-12n.} Practitioner stating that the cattle from! Police from information received.
oN which the milk will be suppiied are ed

LIMA & Co., LTD. 14.2.51—6n. w D free from -eeren ests. 2
See Ee oe aaeemeneeeemese eee ANTE Forms of tenders can be obtained at

STAK-A-BYE TUBULAR Steel Chairs the Churghwarden’s ce.
and Tables on show at Ralph Beard’s Minimum charge week 72 cents and Order,
Show rooms, Hardwood Alley, Trade} 96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24 FE. C, REDMAN,
enquiries cordially invited. words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.
13.2.51—6n | Word Sundays, 13.2.51--t.f.n,



Ist class passengers linimum Fare

24 A.F.S., F.V.A.

Formerly Dixon & Bladon



"PHONE 4230,



























eee

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co, Lid.

AGENTS

FOR SALE






























‘WINSLOW: Bathsheba, St
Joseph A comfortable holiday
bungalow constructed of timber
situated in one of the most populer
houeeny resorts = in Barbados,
Splendid sea-bathing and delight-
ne i lena ful scenes Verandah on $3 sides,
ee eae living room, 3 bedrooms, kitchen
ete,, Standing on over 1 acre of
land



tates







a aa
= see

ADENAUER RECEIVED | qyy this cough!
Will it never stop? JUST TO REMIND YOU

FRENCH MEMORANDUM
If only | could find something to relieve
BONN, Feb. 18 this tickling throat. . . When You Shop at:
Andre Francois Poncet, French ;
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

High Commissioner to-day met
Dr. Konrad Adenauer, West Ger.

Our Motor Van Delivers the Goods to your door,
jj CENTRAL FOUNDRY UL?fD.— Proprietces.

man Chancellor, when politicians
Cnr. ef Broad and or Streets

"DEANE HOLLOW", St. Lucy
Pleasant country home of stone
with shingle reef containing 3
bedyooms, living ond dining
rooms, kitehen, servant's Quarters,
2 gerages and = storerepms, 2%
reves, ‘Of fertile land, option
further 2% acres, Offers con-
sidered,

one ee

koala — rrceee, Tyres & Tubes
So Roebuck’ Bt Biat’sdoar” > M> Fone HELP Public Official Sale

15,2,51—2n,
re The st ‘s Act 1904
TINNED MEAT Selman Gorm beer, | LADY—Suitable Indy with know! (Tho Bravest seats
Cereal Beef, Steak & Kidney Pudding, | &f book-keeping, fling amd office work.) On Friday the 23rd day of February
Mutton & Peas & Meat Roll, W, M. Ford, | APPly Y. de LIMA & Co. Ltd, Post ©1195) at the hour of 2 o'clock in the
35 Roebuck St. Dial 3489. Box 221, Bridgetown. 11.2.51—-6n | afternoon will be sold at my office to
152.5120, | | the highest bidder for any sum not

MISCELLANEOUS under the appraised value.
VAPEX INHALANT and INHALERS c L 0 All that certain piece of Land con-

are easy to carry and use at the first siga taining about twenty-five perches situate
of a cold, Can be obtained from all Drug PIANO — State make, condition amd] in the Parish of Saint Michael, butting
Stores. KNIGHT'S LTD., Distributors. ] price, Box No: B.B. C/o Advocate. and bounding on lands late of Fred
15.2.51—2n. | Maloney but now of H. O. Exmtage & Co.
= ant Lt, late st geepe Adolphas wre
—eeireah = — $0,000 empty, white, plai ut now © . 8. Hope and on two
all metal De Luxe Venetain blinds, to] three. Botti. packed ‘Q Tee 18 public roads, at Upper Bank Hall Main

your sizes, delivery 3 weeks. Dial 4476 | dozen each — at le, per bottle including} Road, appraised as follows:—
BARNES & CO., LTD, 13.2,51—t.f.n. packing. Please apply to 8. P. Musson Son The whale aren of en sppgniged to
ars

We have in stock Cooper's Sheep Dip BS Son Teds AE eee aah, be bg Peeat ce

51—10n. | ($846.00). Attached from Coleridge

wee ae ae a Sn Sten oe ee i . Saraviace Field for and towards satis-
r thoroughly cleansing the fleece. ice WANTED TO PURCHASE fretion, &e,

§/- tin, KNIGHT'S LTD, 142.51—2n] BUNGALOW or NOUSE = Reasonable | N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day

WINDOW GLASS — Sparkle Flower- price, 3 bedrooms, windward coast, new) of purchase,

Telephone T. T. HEADLEY,
ed Sheet and Plate Glass for all pore. Sieh, en. REERETeT a vie Provost ees:
- 8.2.

We cut to your requirements, G. §1—3n.
HUTCHINSON & Co., Ltd, Dial 4222.
15,2.51—10n.











assumed he handed over the
French memorandum on Euro-
pean army.

The memorandum approved
last week by the French Cab-
inet, sets out French views on
the European army as part of] »
we ae. ive saree 7] \

t was ng circu to na-|
tions taking part in Thursday’s e Zubes
conference in Paris on the for~ An hes

.

mation of such an army.—Reuter.

“THOUMATIA’ Dayrell’s

!
1 Roady Navy Gardens. Attractive
| and imposing property Dr
v flanked by mahogany tr
% reveption, 6 bedrooms, kiichen,
pontey,. large verandehs, garage
and storerooms, -€rounds ap-
proximately 2 a@res, Ideal Guest
iiouse propostion,
| “BRANDONS’—ft, Michael. A
3% acres of enclosed grounds, the
major part of it planted with pro-
ductive coconut and fruit trees,















RECENT
ARRIVALS
of

| meliowed old stone property on
the coast with good boat anchor-
age about 1 mile from town, with

;



Relief at once!
My throat's soothed and that wretched
cough eased in no time,







There are 3 reception, 4 bedrooms, {

JEWELS SEIZED

FRANKFURT, Feb, 13.
American military police armed
with sub-machine guns today; ©
took two large boxes of jewels
from the Rheinman for experts REC?
to decide whether any belonged



galleries, 2 garages ete, Suitable
either for continued use as a pri-
vate residence, or as a club er




























SY Or BIT boarding house

s
q







ELSWICK—4#th Avenue, Belle-
ville. A stone and timber house
on approx. 3,600 sq. ft. Enclosed
verandah 2 reception roome,



: SOVERNMENT NOTICES
FOR RENT AIR MAILS







int h the Rothschil bedrooms, kitchen and pantry, Full
od Gente Bundens 20 waits. © ope tt With effect from 20th February, air mails for Canada and orn a ee it sus- information an applieasion.
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a] Bermuda will be closed at the General Post Office on Tuesdays at | ected the jewels stored at the | j i *
word Sundays. 9 fhate f Monda: d Tuesday, respectively, By this B , . ee BUILDING LAND -— Nearly 2
2 p.m. instead of on Monday an’ Reien 7 ow heinman Bank since the war,| _ Simoniz Wax & Kleener | acres of land on edge of escarp~
opportunity the postage to Canada will be the lower rate, namely | which were either Rothschild Chamols & Polishing Cloths pe One the Nee Me man. 1ONe

HOUSES 20 cents per 4 oz. ; jewels or other French property | Back Up Lamps ROMNEY RAG ae ane et Retr
Air Mail ScheduJ+ should be amended accordingly. stolen by the Nazis during the Spot Lamps | “WINDY WiLt.ow ar st d ames
Delightful bungalow house with



Tractor Lamps

Mluminated Fender Guides
Jeweled Exhaust Pipe Extensions
Steering Wheel Covers

Bumper Jacks

Grease Guns

occupation of Paris—Reuter, i
14.2. 51—2n | 9909990999990009 5559060 559554



t com-
w of sea
ach, Large
verandahs,

epen verandah on
nanding manificent
} and stretches of t
lounge, 3 bedrooms
kitchen, pantr snd servant's
quarters. Storerooms in besement

HIGH ROCK—Bathsheba. From March | General Post Office,
to July. Phone 4048. r *90.2.51--4n 14th February, 1951.

ROOM, HASTINGS — A newly fur-
rished room with running water. Phone

4718. 13.2.51—3n. POLICE TRAFFIC RULES

— ‘

LOST Barbados—Trinidad Cricket Matcnes at Kensington Oval on the

geMfinimum charge, week 72 cents and! 18th, 16th, 17th, 19th, 20th, 22nd, 28rd, 24th, 26th and 27th days of
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents aj February, 1951.
word Sundays,
















6 Volt & 12 Volt Horns



well maintained and productive

Miracle Adhesive

Mechanics Bearing Blu> The house is worthy of special

SELECT THESE EARLY... .

Valve Grinding Compound

Cylinder Black Heat IicsisUng Paint notice and possesses great charm

Its general condition is excellent

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and there is spacious accommoda-





Eeatate of some 32 acres in a very
lovely posttion 2 miles from City,

| “ROCK DUNDO"—Cave Hill. A
TGRAMGES in 4 Groot Gan Pike RULES made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee under Fluxi ia
GLASSES in G Case. uxite tion,
return to the mavosite Cio. . oer Section 37 (2) of the Police Act, 1908, for the regulation of Battery Testers |
offered. 142.5120 |, traffic between the hours of 10 a.m, and 7 p.m. on the days Battery Cables RENTALS
SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS — ; n which Cricket Matches against Trinidad will be played at Brass Shim Metal ‘ty towed bite ive.
£965, and B. 5964. Finder ae Aen tavisaen Oval r . wil Body Solder Plane and Plades } hits eunesiiee eModern:: Fun
ont to the Advocate Co, Reward offer- — Algo — k | “4 LORES Kent, Unfurnished
Oe a te se 1. In these Rules— Decarbonizing Gasket Scts for all popular Tmglish | 5 ; p
‘i ieek ana 1006. Picaer plesee quo “vehicle” includes carriages, wagons, carts, motor vehicles, and American Cars and Trucks | Ree
to R. Thompson, Roebuck St. bicycles, tricycles, vans, handcarts trucks, barrows and all e \ REAL ESTATE AGENT
Inet, other machines for the portage of goods or persons. B nn 7 E AUCTIONEER
cs 2. All vehicles proceeding in the direction of Kensington Oval ECKSTEIN pe RO j Hi IS | | 1OM UMD
PERSONAL between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. shall approach by way of - . 4 ; “ - ig) SLANTATIONS © ING
!




Bay Street Phone 4640

Lakes Folly and Fontabelle Road only and shall proceed in single line |
The public are hereby warned against down Fontabelle Road. |

eat tae Rikon ee ae yor 3, Between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. no vehicle shall pro-
hold myself responsible for her or wy. ceed on Fontabelle Road in the direction of Lakes Folly, except the
° el contractin, any el debt
ring "yoy in dae” i's Written order | Motor- buses on route No. 25. e
sighed by me. 4. Between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. no vehicle shall enter
Sed. hab ggg Pe nerep re -, | Kensington Gap from Westbury Road.
St. Michaei 5. Between the hours of 10 a.m. and 6 p.m no vehicle shall be
2 15.2.51—2n. | parked in Fontabelle Road from the junction of Lakes Folly to the
Tne Public are hereby, warned against | junction of Westbury New Road.
Bisekiman nee daeaheir es fas nek 6. After 6 p.m. all vehicles leaving Kensington Oval shall do
wld myself responsible for her or any-| so by way of Fontabelle Road.
ls tracti di
inmyname ‘atte a witien ‘San 7. Between the hours of § p.m. and 6.80 p.m. no vehicle shall
signed by me. enter Fontabelle Road from the Direction of Lakes Folly except
Sed. IL Bi ‘i ; : s
eee Fant ped motor-buses on route No. 25 and all vehicles approaching Kensington
ispu gn | Oval shall do so from the direction of Westbury Road.
ae 8. Drivers of vehicles shall obey all orders given by any mem-

ber of the Police Force.



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Made by the Goverhor-in-Executive Committee this thirteenth
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6)

-


PAGE EIGHT



BARBA

DOS ADVOCATE



Kensington Oval
1897-1951

By O. S. COPPIN

# KENSINGTON OVAL, as cele-

se4 brated a stage in the history of
RS West Indian cricket as the Fens}

sai in the struggles of the Saxons
and Danes, in early English his-
tory, was partly covered by
water yesterday when I paid_a} ~
visit there to speculate upon how ?
i} soon there could be any play-this |”
week in the First Test between
Trinidad and Barbados, sched-
uled to open there to-day.

Well, from what I saw there,

I am sure there is little hope of
any play even by Saturday un-
less there is a. complete change
in the weather to make this
possible.



TIM
TARILTON

. GEORGE
‘CHALLENOR

: Memories

1 sat in the Kensington Stand for a while and memories of the
eple struggles staged at this ground, since the first regular Triangular
Intereolonial match was staged there, came flooding back to me.

Of some of these I had read George and Tim
avidly as a fourth former, some | George Challenur and Tim Taril—
had watched with bated breath in ton put on 183-for the first wicket
the schoolboy stand and others I in the opening match against Brit-

had had to record with a pen held ish Guiana and scored individual
by fingers, moist from nervous a total of 715 for 9

sweat and again others [{ had sat centuries in d
caren aiid hed recorded on the Wickets. In this remarkable scare
keys of my portable typewriter. John Brown 131 not out, and E. L.
But at all these stages there was Bartlett 88, put on 216 in a record
Kensington in the background, 8th wicket partnership,
sometimes offering batsmen the British Guiana, with scores of
paradise in which to bring their 265 and 336 were defeated by an
dreams and aspirations to happy innings and 114 runs.
fruition or “at another time pre- In the next match against Tri-
senting the ideal conditions for nidad, Barbados could raise but
bowlers to reduce batsmen s hopes 475 in their first innings to which
to-eibpty shadows. (Trinidad replied with 559. Archie
Wiles, an expatriated Barbadian
top scored with 192, an even cen-
nial tournament between Barba- tury by Joe Small and 98 not out
dos, Trinidad and British Guiana by Ben Sealy at number 9 were
at Kensington took place in 1897 the best scorers,
and aptly enough was won by
Barbados. Barbados had won the Grand Recovery
first of these series in Trinidad in Faced with a deficit of 384 runs
1893, British Guiana at Bourda in Barbados entered upon their sec-
1895 and now Barbados had cnd innings. A fine first wicke*
scored a second win. partnership by George and Tin:
that put on 292 for the first wicket
Barbados scored a decisive win, laid the foundation for the second
oyer British Guiana by the mar-' 700 runs innings of this tourna
gin of ten wickets and in the ment. A double century by George
opening game Trinidad vs. Bar- Challenor, another ; Tim .Tarilton

s, G. B, Y. Cox (167), and century and a stonewall 174 aot
HLB.G. Austin (129), established oe oy “Teddy” Hoad — helpe:l
a second wicket record by putting

First Tournament
The first Triangular Intercolo-

Barbados to score 726 for 7
on 263 runs. wickets declared.
cr re Trinidad were bowled out in
Trinidad Win their second innings for 217 runs
At Kensington again seven

to give Barbados victory by 125

years later—1904, the sixth In- runs,

teveclonial tournament was played
and Trinidad, who had won the
fifth of these series in British ‘
Guiana in 1901, notched their Five years later the three cylo-
second win here. nies met again at Kensington and
Five years later, Barbados won Barbados bowed the knee to
at Kensington again and the tour- Trinidad, Scoring 71 and 249 as
nament saw Perey Goodman score against 264 and 59 for 4 wickets
180 against British Guiana and. by Trinidad, Barbados lost by. a

116 against Trinidad. By this feat six wicket margin.
dman became the first Inter- In 1936 at Kensington Trinidad
al batsman to score two again earned the distinction of
separate hundreds in these tourna- defeating Barbados. Headed by
ments. another Barbadian domiciled in
Another Win Trinidad, Derek Sealy, who scored

Tn 1912 Barbados won again at

123, Trinidad put up 457 and 195.
historic Kensington but twelve PRKNSdw, wrt SPOESS OF 844 SRC
years elapsed before another of

372, lost the game by a marin
these series was staged and in of 3@-runs,
1924 Barbados were again cham-
pions at Kensington. Trinidad,
baying beaten oe aes in
opening match, dismissed Bar-
bados for 145 in their first in- (131 not out) and BE, A, Martindale
nings. 1384 almost won the day ‘for
A great bowling spell by pace Parbados. : :
bowler Herman Griffith, who took _ The last of these Triangwar
6 for 34, helped Barbados to dis- Intercolenial tournaments, the
miss Trinidad for 127. But Learie twénty-seventh, was played at
Constantine then turned in a per- Kensington in 1939. Led by Rolph
formance that overshadowed that Grant, who was afterwards ap-
of Griffith. He took 8 for. 38 while pointed captain of the 1939 West
George Challenor scored 114 out Indies team to England, Trinidad
of Barbados’ 200, defeated Barbados by an innings
Good Bowling and 19 runs and went on to defeat

P : British Gui as well and win
Good bowling again by Griffith the Tatenecionasd wan, : 4

(4 for 43) and H. F. K. Greaves ~ with this win for Trinidad, the
(5 for 18) helped to dismiss Trini- i . ;
dad for 83 in Their second innings DHRNBRIOT Henin, CANE: HO. 9 ANF
and so give Barbados victory by
135 runs,

Perhaps never again in this cen-
tury nor in the next will Kensing—
ton be able to boast of as magnifi-
cent a feast of run-making as was
witnessed there when the eign-
teenth Triangular Intercolonial
tournament was staged there.
Seven Hundred Tournament

This immortal tournament is
familiarly known as the “seven
hundred tournament”. Most Bar-
badian students of Intercoloniul
cricket history, view this tourna-
ment from the level that it served
to bring out the combined genius
of George Challenor and Tim
Tarilton.

A Doctor's Praise

Dr. Hamilton in his excellent
publication “Cricket in Barbados”
writes of George Challenor and
Tim Tarilton’s achievement on
this tour: Neither had finished
with the game, but they had reach-
ed the pinnacle of achievement,
and the fine innings they were to certainly it will not be given ant
play in the future were more an in which the needle-keenness that
evocation of past memiories than pervades the game oft brooked n»
em integral part of the cricket of interference even with the spirit
the period”. of the cricket law.

They'll Do It Ev . Time Aepictered , 5 Potent Oftee

Vimy —— 3
TOOTHACHE?

Barbados Defeated

Brilliant Partnership
A brilliant eighth wicket part-
nership of 261 by E, A, V. Williams

Goodwill Tours Open

Goodwill cricket tours during
the war served to discover mony
players who might have been lost
to West Indies cricket if these
tours had not taken place, Weekes,
Worrell and Walcott are the pro-
ducts of these series and it is
enough but to mention their names
te prove that this is so.

A World’s Partnership

Kensington too came in for its
share of the good things of these
series and in iv44 playing against
Trinidad at Kensington, the pre-
sent West Indies captain John
Goddard and Frankie Worrell
established a world’s fourth wicket
record of 502. Worrell scored 308
not out and Goddard 218 not out.

Yes, Kensington has been the
stage of many a dire struggle,
There cricket fans have thrilled
‘to that atmosphere of downright
fight ever present in Intercolonial
cricket in which no one wastes
time in asking for quarter since

ae
CATE. Ine



WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED

MCC-Victoria
‘Tall Seore’
Mateh Drawn

By REGINALD HAYTER
MELBOURNE, Feb. 14

The match between Victoria and
the M.C.C. ended heré in a
dvaw. Victoria with three second
innings wickets down, steod 158
runs ahead of the M.C.C,,at tea
on the final day of their match
here. The M.C.C., all out for 414,
failed by 27 runs to reach Vic-
tcria’s first inningg score of 441,
and Victoria had scored 131 for 3
in. their second innings at tea.

Trevor Bailey, 107 not out over-
night brought his scere to 125 be-
fore he was stumped off the
wicket-keeper’s pads. He batted
just. under five hours and hit 16
fours. .The last four M,C.C.
wicke"s" fell’ this morning fer the
addition of 23 runs.

Just over four hours remained
for play when Victoria went in a
second time, Bob Berry, Lanca-
shire left-arm spinner, took all
three wickets of Victoria’s second
innings before tea, At the fall of
the third wicket, his analysis was
three wickets for 30 runs in 11
overs.

Hassett turned down a suggcs-
ticn by Compton that steps should
be taken to bring an interesting
finish to the match. At the close ot
play last night, Compton suggested
twat if Hassett was prepared to co-
operate, the M.C.C. would accept
any challenge offered them to go
for ‘runs in quick time in the
fourth innings, and so give tne
spectators entertainment. Hassett
replied that he thought it better
for the game to take its course.’

Less than 200 people were pie
sent when Bailey and Close re-
sumed on a pitch which was still
perfect. «

In Johnston's third over Close
was bowled after seven runs had
been added. So ended what is
almost certain to be Close’s last
first class innings of the tour, The
next three wickets fell quickiy.

Hollies missed a straight ball.
tailey was stumped off the wicket-
keeper’s pads. Berry played out
side the first ball bowled to him,

Bailey batted four hours and 58
minutes, and hit 10 fours. Just
over four hours remained for
play when Victoria went in again.

Harvey who opened with Colin
Mc Donald, was aggressive from
the start.

In the 40 minutes to lunch,
the opening pair scored the same
number of runs. Berry, bowling
accurately to an offside field,
pegged down the batsmen after
the interval and with the last ball
of his fourth over dismissed
Me Donald, who lifted a catch
trying to pierce the field.

Berry nagged at the batsmen’s
patience by pitching the ball well
up and dispensing with any fields-
man behind the wicket. Harvey
and Loxton repeatedly thrashed
the ball but the setting of the
field was well calculated to keep
down runs,

The Australians were finally
bowled out for 234, and the M.C.C
given 15 minutes, made 36 runs
of the 262 needed for victory,
losing one wicket in the process.

The Scores:—

VICTORIA 18ST INNINGS “41

M.C.C, 18T INNINGS

Washbrook stpd. MeDonald b. Ring 49
Compton b, Ian Johnson.,... a |
Dewes c. and b, Ring . ‘ see 88
Parkhouse c, Hill b. Ring eee
Hutton ¢, Loxton b. Ring .. . 128
Mcintyre b. Ring ... 18

125

Bailey stpd. McDonald b, Hill...
Close b. Johnston ote 2
Hollies not out ..... 0

Extras (5 byes, 12 legs, 1 noball) 18
Total byes Al4
VICTORIA 2ND INNINGS
C. McDonald c. Hollies b. Befry,. 6
Harvey c, Hutton b. Berry .. 56
Loxton c, Compton b. Berry iy
Meuleman run out .......... . 30
Turner c. Hutton b. Compton .... 40
Hassett c. Close b. Washbrook .... #3
Ring c. MelIniyre b. Washbrook 15
I, Me, Donald Lb.w. Close . »
Hill not out ............, 3
Bill Johnston stpd, Melntyre b.
Hutton : rae
Ian Johnson (absent) . ‘ 0
Extras ‘byes 4, legs 5) . 9
Total 234
BOWLING ANawYSIS
Oo M R Ww
USF yea hss nsciees 4 0 19 0
Statham .. Cevbasl coe 1 25 0
CIONR ce sishiysesecceas a8 2 50 1
Hollies .,....; 6 2 22 0
Berry . 13 3 34 3
Compton 9 1 43 1
Washbrook 2 0 8 2
Hutton a bres a ° 4 1
ENGLAND 2ND INNINGS
Statham ec. Hill b. Turner 16
Berry not out : - 18
Hollies not out ‘ é ‘ 1
Extras (6 byes) . Tr | ‘ 8

Total (for 1 wicket) 36

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DAGMAR LERCHOVA, Czechoslovakian skater pictured as she won





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the World Academic Figure Skating Championship for Women at the

Winter Stadium, Prague.



—Express.



\Wettest
February

@ From page 1.
overflowed yesterday. In this area
the water rose about three feet
and prevented pedestrians from
getting across. ‘Buses ploughed
through, but one car stalled in an
attempt. '

Salt Pond at Speightstown
overflowed its banks. This pond
however has an appropriate outlet
—the sea.

Water Dries Off
At Kensington Oval some of the
water that had collected during
the morning was drying off by
midday.

When the Advocate visited the
Oval Mr, Bruce Inniss, one of the
Pickwick members, and a cricket

Leaf Scald

2 @ From page 5.
Breeding Station in Barbados
have been planned, and _ these
should provide information as to
whether control of the disease will
be possible by the use of available
resistant varieties. Their results
will be followed closely by the
Barbados Station's staff, for they
may indicate breeding lines neces-
sary for the production of new
varieties suitable for British Gui-
ana conditions.
Spread Minimised

“Immediate steps are being
taken on the estates to ascertain
areas which are free from the dis-
ease and to use them when mak-
ing cuttings for planting. In this
way the further spread of the dis-
ease should be minimised, even in
the varieties known to show some
degree of susceptibility. At the
Same time, every precaytion

enthusiast, was on the field with should be taken to protect from

fork in hand. ‘There are three
sucks on the ground and Mr.
Inniss cleared these to allow the
water to run off. He afterwards
took the fork and made holes in
the ground for the water to pene-
trate,

The water was nearly dried up,
but soon after Mr. Inniss’ efforts,
another downpour came _ and
again flooded the field. ony
frogs and pond flies played in
the water while crows soared
overhead in search of worms.

“The sucks are working hard,
but the rain is not giving them a
chance to dry the field,” a
groundsman said,

Mr. Inniss told the Advocate
that he was in St. Lucy on Tues-
day and in that area nearly four
inches were recorded.

He said, “Now that the ground
at Kensington Oval is soft it
would not be wise to allow people
to swarm the field when conditions
allow the Trinidadian cricketers
to practise. Apart from digging
up the ground they throw cigar-
ette and match boxes and bits of
paper all over the field, making
extra work for the groundsmen,
They can easily watch the play-
ers practising from the pavilions,

Bathers at Shot Hall, who took
a pleasure swim out to the moor-
ings off the Aquatic Club, climbed
on to yachts when a_ sudden
shower caught them in the water,



WE

Wfection the new and promising
varieties from Barbados which are
now reaching commercial prom-
inence. The campaign will re-
quire continued care and atten-
tion, but with the knowledge now
available, and with the experi-
mental programme being carried
out, it is hoped that the disease
will be brought under control in
British Guiana as it has been in
other countries where it was once
a menace to the sugar industries.
Much progress has been made
since the discovery of the disease
in British Guiana, and great credit

is due to the authorities of the}

Department of Agriculture, the
Sugar Experiment Station and the
Sugar. Producers’ Association for
the energetic way in which the
problem has been tackled.”



Cricket Brogdcast
From Kensington

There will be a ball by ball
commentary broadcast on the
cricket Tournament which
cpens at Kensington this
week, This is being done by
Cable and Wireless in con-
junction with Rediffusion Ltd.
and can be heard each day of
play beginning on Saturday.

The wave length will be
39.76 metres, 7547 k/es on
ZNX32, and the time approxi-
mately 11.25 a.m. to 5.35

P.m, each day.

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X-R 244-800 (



| Kensington New
Road After Rain

@ From page 5.
Ebrouham Swat, an Indian mer-
chant, is another of the residents
who find the condition of the road
deplorable. He travels- long dis-
tances into the country in his car
selling cloth. When he returns
late at night, it is almost impossi-
ble to drive through Kensington
New Road. He is constantly do-
ing repairs to his car.
A Central Spot
asked about the -new
Swat said, “We have

When
Mosque,
built our
New Road because it is a central
position. Many Indians live at
Cheapside, Baxters Road . and
surrounding districts.”

Living at the same house is his
brother who uses a motor-cycle
for transportation. He even suffers
worse when he has to ride through
the Kensington New Road.

Another Indian merchant, Solo-
mon Degia, lives next to Swat. He
also, uses a motor-cycle when
travelling inte the country | dis-
tricts to sell cloth and experiences
the same hardships as Swat’s
brother.

Other residents, too numerous
to mention, all complain of the
deplorable condition of Kensington
New Road and the bad drainage.
system.
thing will soon be done.
—

The Weather |





TO-DAY

Sun Rises; 6.20 a.m.

Sun Sets; 6.08 p.m,

Moon (Full) February 21
Lighting; 6,30 p.m.

High Water: 10.05 a.m.

| YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington)
ins.

Total for Month to Yester-
day: 4.93 ins.

Temperature (Max) 82.0°F

Temperature (Min) 73.5°F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.)

. E.S.E., (3 p.m.) S.S.E.

Wind Velocity 7 miles per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.964
(3 p.m.) 29.895

1.52





-——

|



Mosque at Kensington |

They all hope that some-}

THURSDAY,~ FEBRUARY - 15, 1951
















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PAGE 1

TIURSDW FKBRl \RV IS, 1K1 KARBVOOS ADVOCATI'. PAC.I: ; i\ i. AT mi VIM i MIIHITMI* Wanl Shops Act Amended i Mr. R M I m I ihe Ideal 1 Slot*, thinks that the Shops Closing Act should ba amended. It should be ao amended nto give discretionary powers to tome Authorlt) open on closed days in case of special m< Mr. Cave made I at the meeting of the Council of the Chamber of Comtneiee held yesterday. He gave as his reason the unusual occurrence of a tourist ship arriving in the colony on Sunday, and the loss to the colony of hundreds of Ameriran dollars because the stores were closed. (This, he said, was a pily Th. Kensington New Road After Rain T.T.C.A. Aim At liili-r-zoiitCricket SUGAR GOES TO LONDON The newly formed Trinidad and Tobago Cricket Association alms I Took Rice: Will Pay 15'The steamship WHEN TOURISTS n! tinplaces that will MUacl them 11 Iha I '££ of the AM %  VBJ ><< %  --iday. I i!>. thai m i %  %  ."in ,.t the deplorable slate. %  New houses are being built * % %  %  %  • %  * i looks very and noour * l "£ new talent. „,cp Dr. Francis who Is one of the their small plots of land in .. ^anTrinidad Cricket Selectors, ar i u( tin* road li rived on Monday for the tourna1 %  i between Barbados and Trin mage. The \ %  I I h m i j 11 I H %  ''. Worthing 11'• %  ^ %  "l ih.n gucen'-s Park %  i tat dub igauai i ^ilor of tho Carlisle Bay, is loading 1.075 tons Cfhooner amdlne. JetTers Jamet. .iL*iplinc into local e| %  Dr A O FrJt Your Guess* Was A Pail Evening ArivocsUship was the Nleuw Al terdam whirh brought nearly 800 tition was Ormie Brown,' l *. wharf ueluu Iha Vleioi %  look The boys show much --kill in Bth catching. One of them WvecaUthai • •• ill i on tin' wharf u praUmlnai ing for the tune whan they become full %  %  oner, r.*wi %  %  unlawful pea* > th wharf side. Cpl. Mui i arrest saw J-. Ihe bag of rice and got su Jamaa e Mhcteruy explain how he had obtained th.' FINED 40'riifterent parts of 1 %  ninning cricket. In Uv there was St Patriot. Cn.k %  >thei -• %  %  •>*—<••••* ..-. ,^...1^.. — mid r-> obtained from painted white—turned ,..-' ,io„ie nlsa bridi *.. L •uggestion. It should be borne in by the phologra. i %  nind. he nission could he obtained Trom painted white—turned peopte also ihe Commissioner of Police to down with iU eover on the upturny yr bo*n| in:iroone*l Minor t iiinpetitions %  pen produce warehouses on ed bottom." ti t , s in the Worth, there wag Bo n anat, bank-holidays and Sundays under Most popular RIH ., (l A. UI tbt DMI and most powerful special circumstances. He saw no top of an old windmill" :ll Avenue body and they also had the Merreason why some Authority should people even p.aced U N ,. .., B rvs )lt lier minor got be given the same discretionM ory powers with respec to1 stores rues, I that they hoped to haw Printipl,Dalllkod Mr. Trevor Bowring said that lie -'"swers constituted iboul ,.,.., „, ;ill lh)lM ,„„,„ did not like the principle but he P^'vnt of the gues.o (n nnuoncawould I daresay ., would reeeW. ihe sup&• k.H. was go wn; I ; ,;, over mBtWri port of the majority of members, top ol an old Windmill I rWwl 1M Tl He thought they should rind out >-' %  < '" "" %  COUPON with thai Vk M wh, w .„. lhl .,„,„„,,. o: wtatWM the feeling of the Chain %  " . %  hole before domg any lh,M -"'-'•'ware "Klectr.c ei atti.ul a lowardi UM praaanl \ Uaa ii.-ht and shade, ^g n „. s-s r> t rrancta said that irreap Mr C. D. Braoa expressed '<-"' %  'The top ot South fetal M *"' M ^'"'nuniled y .,. nK (l ul ^ .,,„,„, tnil[ „„., agreement and it was decided to [Ig t h OUt e The clock at Darh . t )l( „,.,,. ,„,, ,,, oppOOfl Oueat P rt place the matter for discussion on Costa s "Bowling ^C.rcen eMCtno j^ th> but that wa* absurd ThOj IWithei hi Agenda for the next Quarterly lower "An incinerator. "A | R LI(1I wU hed. 1101 could npimsr Queen 1 Meeting of the Chamber. heap of mi a' the Mr. Leacock reported to the Tt *"' of ttl1 mo startling an„ a cr fa^t* deep and made It ImQueen'l Path WM responslbh meeting the getlvMH Ol thi OOCO', I,0,S W ,|V %  vv -'" ... hla for u> nminant to enter for international and UltaftolOnll mittee who had bean appointed to "y'ng on a house with a degree (( .. h u) no wi> (tld hl lr ,.i ., angle" and "A llrmnet for ere0 ^ who tof. thaJXgaoctatlOn Iha Smith" Discharges Today I o. Mi. M. Smith 1 ed from British OuhOM Mith 1,500 bags > I titles of %  1 charcoal TinSmith la ei to discharge hei Folly, !eorge Clarke of are both 1ned 40s. to be paid in %  i labour dr me i.. i lantitv of %  %  I ii l.i.h M \li H \ .day. Y.W.C.A. MEETir*. i-ti( thr V W C A Coin mJttaa win meet on Tuead a f* b ruarj M tar woman who have taken otrl PorsB f the Associat %  McitsrI that on Janual 1 m both itefn %  ,: ing tiiem learnt thai tin MM tde Hilook them back to the ind there the 1 The meeting 1.90 aw ertj iioth or the %  Whan the entrance (*> Post and will be i chart) into the matter of advertising and hoardings, with advertisers. This was a matter lhat had been brought up by Mr. Trevor Bowring at 11 meeting ol the Chamber when he spoke of the unfavourable effeci these gns were having on the scenic beauty of Ihe island Mr. Leacock said yesterday that Mr. Bowring and himself ho were the committee, had met some of the biggevt advertisers. nd there had Ix % %  ment that advertising b should not be put up m eountn districts as a whole. It i< r to a sub-committee to define the exact limits of each blaht certain residential dr 1 'ell, where advertising hoardings should be permitted. This committee actually consisted of Mr. Bowring and three repreaat of the biggest advertisers rat Ins bonaa ot a hosnital l-i-iil Seuhl luuii|iaiil In B.G. -STCVENSON CjlU MII comlBI rtom Murphj's 1 Hi.II.w I tnll 1] 1 SUior Can<> Urcp-linR Slshoii. whu nits |U|M-Jai ..•.I Ml tvns )unl n-luriHHl fiom ;i lou Itvln| 111 inc sujfar pradudju imi <>f Kriulngton N'.. Road from Uw ..itmil Leaf tin % %  1 II I an % %  %  %  ""' I '. %  1 1 ,,.,,• %  f 0 "' urrencc. parllruIne road Inalon Ni-w Qutenl Part i"ii ""i look 1 11 m a. rivals or opponanla. bu "" I "" ,„ lh r||,.. wa glad 1.1 ami upwioynl oMhrl I in, la-,, As*. ...11..11 and mil.l sup-iit i >",;"-,"'-', %  ",'•";"'",""„,„,.. 11,. had btn I throw at. ,.l!rt C.C. Agenda For Next Meeting BOVRIL makes good cook better ROVRII. give* that Man! liivour to all IODJBSI pics and fta\-ouric. AnJ nouri%hnicnl, too '--lor Ilovnl i* the eonixntrald goodnc%> ol bac£ Bonfl is al>o a tasty ^andM iJi spread — Jlld a sun ol but UoviU ilulv makes vou led Ivu I When the Chamber of ComIheti next Cfuarterly operation was promised by van'" rly '"' ?•*••! Co; ''' 1 '" ul "" •' ,1oi;hl Wll be d(, CUISP d Mr. Bowring pointed out that • nation U least on the East. „,. ).,, ..,. wM 0 | (l n .,i n ,,|f „f C. I'Mthe Civic Circle had been wntleti '''''".'• %  nd ,hr Dotnerara Rlvot 1 his. He would -111 ,, w y w ,n nwiV lhat the Chamber to asking them to send n repre"f !" ^_—' wgnt P .'*/; Ev *'l rit.T the advisability of estabsentative to the meetings of Mir committee. I'tihlit'.iy (/ontriiiutiiuis ouncil apiKiinled Mr. A. It TOppill and Mr. Vcrnon Knight lo meet representatives from the hotels and Publlclb C %  lllvl heavUj Infect* road I ab on, ilshlng standing Committees the occurrence of the At ihli Co put In. pi lantlng dUferent gectlon a of the .t tliiollgli henrininnlilal roininimdy. in ol'lc Bold, and although ti being pul t prompt action may IKtaken if 1 uf its reaching epii : dad nnessary, in any matter affecting dcmlc proportions anywhere, %  etloni undoubtedly represents a potenWhen Mr 11111 ipoke tgaln ii air D, V. Bcoti ith a il! move thai LSMfvllirih!; lai danger'to thv i: .me Indlcaquln } niton New Road ' %  "ve.nment as to wh %  ,, 1 control Uon ^.ffOMW tatakat Tlur estate surveys which on after "P *. !" < ?^ u 5 u ?!fS5. being made are of the utmost scat'< 1 Iha road feet ion In road during the and in familiarising ,. 4i „ v najpn. h rti>i*thr in.iuirf int the field staffs with the symp• ., & < iST^c!Z:: •tuntelv owniil he U %  ed to pas .... t „ %  ,.„—.„„ ,..,-i„r SUi InKn various firms with respect lo thi contributions lo the Publicity Committee. Members of the Council were told lhat the Journal Committee had appointed Mi [an C.i'e U the Editor of the Journal Mr. Cave asked for and was granted leave of absence until the next Annual General Meeting of the Chamber. A notice from the Shipping and Association to Ihe Chamber informed them that the ASMB .tition would be holding a meeting on February 17. Among Ihe matters for discussion would be counsel's opinion on the appli, the hlch appointed tO investigate the of mark-ups on food1 lifts MJ %  on Egan will 1 oi the dlaaaaa and %  *. . owi 1 'i ha undei Sir John the growing cane. ,., %  Although there is a igood d N 1 rmatlon avaiiat.;. pkrta and H owned by %  1 other countrlea, much pa ye rs. In i-ntiil work will be required before thjg deiailg of Its rrtition Sent I" rate of spr ad yield under British Guiana Ha ni that once a petition wai .. conditions can le ehuniat.-d .. ijned by rei ation of the Shop Act and Shops Such rxpenmentnl work has alnod nnt lo Iha authorities, bu' Orders: the Wages (Bridgetown) Decision! the Holidays with Pay Hill ... present form. programme to be under the direct Mr. Col :pholsterer. The Association thinks that the Mini vision of a qualified plant heWbeon livmg In Kenahifton Nee Chamber would be interested in pathologist. t(l ,. M i f, .|,. these matters and invited them to Cause of Disease mail children who, a ^ send representatives. "The disease Is caused In a bar II .-hii >>. ,.„,.„ u ^ lt i% wc ||-known lhat Mr D. Clairmonte of the firm terluni which infecU the vaacular 'he open air. 01m 1 COIM i" thi* island espeof Canada Dry was propOMd to I-tygtam Of the living canes and can I ripour iiilly from Venetueia, and return a member of the Chamber. exist only for short periods outsid.Mr Roach and hi children %  |, dollars, beeauaa they The proposal was made by Mi the plant I• ,.r | Whei ,,,. una hta lo si-'inl Ihetl mo "' lue to the fact that Board'! f*ady been started, and should bo >. .is thrown into Ihe very muchless 'ban ; 1950. and pursued and extended, and it wa %  pap' % %  %  %  ,l rn "' :,t Hill in Us WOUld be advisable for the whole | %  '"" Saint, re the price de-controUln| I certain items, and to reCtf tO ir mimhet it it< 1 %  %  i..ntr' * Mr H"tehlngOO, plan') Bar^dos an?.f thi, M.ould come fStSr u" %  .bOUt, the island would let man, ln ,i'f ^'' ^1^'T'T AW ^" more US. dollars. Mrs Margaret < ujlure. Trinidad, who Vl Ited thi H. Mc Vaugh. repiceiilative of rut i•< %  < %  '• %  %  "h*ing Thomas Cook and Son ltd., told •"> %  '•' Ui'v ugt l,v ,1 ,,. 1. h.ni~; foHomc or Ihr working ^SSrSJlZ^ i !" a B l'.ov.l "' • 5 ; S m -.,i .I...rh.rf !" .i /^r BI 'O us newspapers lor approval .„„,,,_ rillh c hr ..vreri to Iha Ad vacate yesterday. cf cane material with Mn. McVaugh ai uved here cuu re the week end on a short hollfurther experiments with the men about the wha.l-and: for Bnd C o nnrrnallon R„tert Lat fishermen. There i> a cook shop Am „ ican Manager T altended the m the lane on the door of which is ta ^ on(J va i Ui ,ble advice, written, refreshments for sale and Aquatic Club. She expects leave this evening bv BW.I.A for Trimdaii She said that her job In Philadelphia is to discuss with prospective travellers any arrangements they would like for a trip lo any part of Ihe world whether it was by air or ship. A fine of 80s to be pad In 2R In addition to thai, she has to imprisonio a lot of travelling bo various posed 0.1 places to get first hand and upmformation for their 30*For Overloading about 12 o'clock any day one saa the tall old cook, proprietor of %  ess, dishing out rice to the sweating men These women WHO have a large share in the frui" liade of the island are nol talking women; days or one month's NU B to feel that one ment was yesterday would try to push them out of Byron K.-llman, a 'bus conducto-date then trade. An old seller who t<-r u." ine motor bus G. 140 by rlients has been to Barbados selling fruit %  Worship .Mr. H. A. Talma. She said that she had visited now fot however, for overloading. the Virgin Islands. San J told the Advocate lhat In St. Lucia Trinidad before, but this was her • from many of her When the offence was commitnrsl vlgll ,„ Barbados. people begin to dream from when I"" "" nu.-r> o the bu wa* KxchunL-e Favourable %  • girls of the day when * o, ,,,... %  x ton New Road will %  %  d the drainage Inproved Ha nld. "the nittan along Fontalclle and Coal dust i ally parked about British Guiana.—C.P. prices. ir YOIIU: ALWAYS 0\ THK mvsB MUSCULAR FATIGUE? Gal back in tit-p wiihAUXA-SlirZIIII 'v".-; rdy, i'tl'v.< dixi.nifarl quick I y, halp* la ..I... Kp IJIHJ %  mtwmyt! FRESH SUPPLY OT U m Z PURINA HEN CHOW S %  (SCRATCH GRAIN) %  %  H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD. -D,.i,ibutor. %  SPECIFY EVERITE ASBESTOS-CEMENT CORRUGATED SHEETS AND TUHMLL ASBESTOS WOOD. I'OMV/ TAKB ni'fil — Tunir ulxn REVITONE TONIC FOR msiOKIM'. VITAUTV CAC c TOSI: ft A VITAMIN 1MB MINI i: U POOD -( in I MI M MIK ( llll.DKI S \M Mil I 1KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES. t Thes arc a MUST on the list (or YOUR KITCHEN lll.'l Mi BOXKS in green, blue anil cream SI.70 BRKAI) BOXKS ( \Kl: & KI.OI'K TDM In While BMII S3.I7 (,, „,„„ „„) rre,,,, • FRY BASKETS Kuch :i2e.. 50r.. SI.II Sl.2'1 POTATO UK BU • Kach S1.4II CABS COOU BS # Eut %\M • CAKK PAN SFTS for making Checkered Cakes. Sel 78c. & 97c. rCWO SITS S4.5S • su:\rs sic. • TI 1 1 i MOULDS Back II Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. ^riS 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street \\ S Sir 1 %  •sgj^gi^r 1



PAGE 1

PAGE PIGIIT BAKBADOS ADVOCATE THIRSDAV. FEBRl'ARV 13. 1S51 Kensington Oval 1897-1951 MCC-Victoria 'Tall Score' Match Drawn By REGINALD HAYTER MELBOURNE. Fab. 14 The match between Victoria and UM MCC (led her* ti. .1 diaw. Vletcrla irlth three second innings wickets down, htpod 158 iun ahead of in. M C C .at tea on the 1tn.1l dav of their match here. The MCI. all oul fT 414. fulled toy 27 ruin to reach VlcICTM'I Drat innlng*eor of 441. mio Vicuna hart ac*rd 131 for 3 Mend innings at tea. Trevor Bailey. 10" not out over night brought hi;, sccre to 125 before he wa* stmp-. momma, fcr tho addition nf 23 runJust over four hours remained fnr ptav when Victoria went in .. second lime. Bob Berry, Lancunhire left-arm pinner. took all Tarlln, r0 e wicket* of Victoria's second inning* before tea. At the fall of * %  % % % % %  — %  — ,j in MHii|^-n..if, niiitu m-ii u... ihe third wickei, his analyila wa Uad had to record with a pen held ^ GUiana Hn< | scored individual i nrec wickets for 30 runs In U by fingers, moist.from *rvoiii centuries in a total of 716 for 9 CV er.. n others I had sat , _. remarkable *(" %  "" ..led on the 7 !" "J'J ",*,, F, Haaaeu turned down a sugg" n, portable typewriter John]Brown 31 not out and E 1 ; compton that steps ahonU /? & !" &3 %  *££££ to "*** b. taken to bring an interest ten. At the close 01 H OH I II I II \>II'M"\ By O. S. COPPIN KKNMNC TON OVAL, as eelentcd a stage in the history of rsi Indian cricket as the Fen* HM 'tinagiei of OH B id Danes, in early English hlsBgftJ) invered by tangaj sf J laB I patt a M to speculate upon how soon there could be any play this week in the First Test between Tnncl.i.1 and Barbados scheded to open there to-day %  w from what 1 saw there, fV - 1 nc there is lutle hope of T^S^^Br any j.la> wen by Saturday un_JRSat— i, : ,hrre 15 a complete change n Ife WMlatf to make thi* GEORCii: rn.u.i.iNoK u-*DIC Memories 1 sat m the Kensington Stand for a while and memories of the epic struggles staged at this ground, since the ttral regular Triangular Intercolonial match was staged there. came flooding back to me. Of some of these I had read George and Tim vidly as a fourth former, some 1 GeorgeChallenor and Tir.. __ had watched with bated breath in ton pu <„ 18 3 f^ nP nnI WK .^> the schoolboy stand and other* I m ^ opc nuig match against BntWS*, DAOMAR LEHCIIOVA. Ciechoilovakian -kuter pictured an the won the World Academic Figure Skating Championship for Women at the Winter Stadium. Prague. —Cxprris. John Brown 131 not out. and E L was Bartlett 88, put on 216 in a record Kensington in the""~background. 8th wicket partnership mes Bering batsmen the British Guiana, with^ sco.es ol n c Wn mttettet i paradise in which to bring their 265 and 338 were defeated by Ml P ilreams and aspirations to happy innings and 114 runs fruition or *i.l another, time pre|„ (he next match against Tnnenting the ideal conditions for n idad, Barbados could raise but ixnvier* to reduce Iwtsmen's hopes !75 ^ lnelr flr8l innings to which to amply shadows. Tnnldad replied with 559. Archie .10., Tri1.ul.1rt nrt British Guiana by Ben Sraly at mimWi ,1 Kensington took place In I87 the best scorers. .ind optly i-nnugh was won by Grand Recovery Faced with a deficit of 384 ling Barbados entered upon their secmil innings. A fine first wicket partnership liy George .nd fin "JJ" that put on 2>2 for the dial wicket laid the foundation for the second 700 runs innings of this tounui Wettest February Leaf Scald From yestei pane I iba Kensington Nw Road Aflvr Rain • From page 5 Ebiouham Swat, an Indian mer bant. Is another of the .ho find the condition of the road ncplorahle. He travels long dislances into the country in his car ing cloth. When he returns %  %  ugh Kemirr.toii i.intly doing repairs to his oar. A Central Spot tsked about the nev/ MUM, tie. Swal mU, "We have built our Mosque at Kensington | i i because il is a central position Mirny Indian* live Kb llaxii'i-.--. Road and surrounding di-' Living at the same house is hin • %  a motor-cycle OfftgUOD He even sufTers worse when he has to ride through -inglon New Road. Another Indian merchant. Solo... lives next to Swat. Ho also uses a nuli cycle when trsmlUng Into the country dis* .nid experiences the >>ume hardships as Swat's brother i %  .. ,ants, ion numerous 'o mention, nil complain of tr Uon oj Kensington and the bad drainage rrgten They nil hope that something will soon bo done. I not out 9 were BarbadV Barbados |,ad won the lirst of these Mfiog in Trinidad i lg3. British Guiana at Bourda i 18M and now Barbados had scored a second win. • From page 5 Breeding Station in Barbado* have btta planiwd, and should provide information as to win tin : control o( the disease will be possible by the use of iiv.illnble V^J^'JUS resistant varieties. Then PMUltl will be followed closely by the Barbados Station's staff, for they may indicate breeding Unas necessary for the production of new vuiiclies suitable for British Guiana conditions Spread Minimised "Immediate steps are being taken on the estates to ascertain In Barbados scored a decisive ivn Hi Itiih Quiang by the .vin gin'of ten wicket" ;uid In Ihe ment. A double century by George opening gmr.e Trinidad vs. BarChallenor. another Tim T mhun taB-dos. (i r. V > % % %  < i\i\~,\. and ccn t ury and a stonewall 114 dot il.CX: Austin 0291. estabUshed (Ut bV -Teddy" Hoad hclpe I n second wicket record by putting Barbados to score 126 tor 7 on 263 i %  ickets declared Trinidad were bowled oul i> their second innings for 217 runs to give Barbados victory by 125 runs. tnat if Hassett was prepared operate, the MCC would accept overflowed r.r.v challenge offered them to go the water lor ruri in quick time in tho and prevented pedestrians from .ourth innings, and so give tnr ***** • Buses ploughed t£c*M0n enteruuinient. HtU through, but one car stalled In an tl plied that he thought il belter nl, m J*_^ SneighLstown for .he game to take its course ^SSawSH Jnks^Tn^S l,ess than 200 people were pie however has an appropriate outlet sen* when Bailey and Close u—the aea. sumed on a pilch whith was stl'l Water Dries Off P* rfecl AI Kensington Oval some of the %  " which are free from the disJohnston's tnird over Close water that had collected during ease and to use them when makbowled aficr seven runs had the morning was drying off by "" %  cuttings for planting In this TddS. So ended whu: is midday way the further spread of the disaimrst certain m be Close's last %  r mouM i-' minlmiaad, arm In lint class innings of the tour. T>\* When the Advocate visiled the the varieties known to show some next three wickeU fell uuickiy. Oval Mi BrUC* Inniss. one of the degree of susceptibility. At the Hollies missed a straight ball. Pickwick members, and a cricket.same time, every precaution I.atlev was stumped off the wicketenthusiast, was oil the field wilh jhould he taken to protect from amanaVl pads b^rry played out fork In hand. There are three tafectlon the new ami promising sidVthe rtrst ball bowled to htm sucks on the ground and Mr varieties from Barbados which aie Innisa cleared these to allow the now reaching commercial promBailey batted four hours and 58 water to run off. He afterward* inence. The campaign will icminules and hit 10 fours. Just took the fork and made holes in quire continued care and attenover four hours remained foi the ground for the water to penetion. bul with the knowledge now play when Victoria went in again i ra te. available, and with the expertHarvev who opened with Colin mental programme being earned Mc Donald, was aggressive from The water was nearly dried up. 0llt )t ls hoped that the disease the start bul %  oorl a ler Mr lnn,M efforts. w ,n be brought under control in another downpour came and British Guiana as it has been in the 40 minutes to lunch, again Hooded the field. Mcny olner countries where It The Weather TO-DAY Sun Rises: 6.?0a.m. Sur. Selsi 6.08 p.m Moon (Full) February 31 j Lighting: 6.30 p.m High Water: lt.05 a.m [ YESTERDAY li.inl.ill (Codringtotw 1.52 Ina. ToUl fer Month to Yesteri day: 4.93 Ina. Temperature (Max) 2.0"F Temperatre iMtoi) ;:.:.•! j Wind Direction (9 ajn.) I K S.E (3 p.m.) S 8.E. Hind Velocity 7 miles per hour. I Barometer (9 a-m.) ?9 964 %  3 p-m.) 29.895 rd Trinidad Win At Kensington again seven ^r latar1904. the sixth Intavcoloriinl totirn.imcnt was played and Tnnldad. who had won the ilftli Of these scries In British Guiana in 1901, notched their second win here. Five years later. Barbados won .it Kensington again and the tourn n—m fawiH-a % %  — %  • %  .— %  -. -jr^ |l JUU ~ ,._. t,.„ m n „,„ pament uPercy Goodman score against 264 and 59 for 4 wicket, pegged down the batmen aite 110 against Mnt.sh Guiana and by Trinidad. Barbados lost by a the interval and with the^last ball but lhp rfl i n ), not giving them 111 against Tiinidiid. By this feat six wicket margin. of his fourth over dismissed chanco l0 dry the field. Goodman became the first InterIn 1936 at Kensington Trinidad Mc Donald, who^ lifted^ a catch groundsman said, colonial batsman to score two again earned the distinction of '"' separate hundreds in these tournoDefeating Barbados. Headed by merit:. another Barbadian domiciled li Barbadoa Defeuled Five years later the thre, .nies met again m Kensington and the opening pair scored 'he same frog* and pond flies pi Barbados Mmd K knee to number of runs. Berry, bowling | he water while crows soared Trinidad. Scoring 71 and 24J -s accurately to on offside field, overhead in search of worms. against 264 and 59 for 4 wicket, pegged down the batsmen after "The sucks are working hard. menace to the sugar industries. Much prop-ess has been made since the discovery of the disease in British Guiana, and great credit is due to the authorities of the Deportment of Agriculluic. the catch groundsman said. Sugar Experiment Station and the pierce the fleld. Mr. Inniss told the Advocate Sugar Producers' Association for t the batsmen's that he W1 in St lMc y on Tur *the energctic i way in which the Another Win In 1U12 Barbados woi historic Kensington hut twel years elapsed before another of these series was staged and In 1924 Bnrbadoh were again chamlaons .it Kensington. Trinidad, having beaten British Guiana In :he opening match, dismissed Barbados for 145 in their Qrst innings A great bowling spell by pace Iwwlcr Herman Cirimth, who took 0 for 34, helped Barbados to dls'?**",. a l Barbados, with scores of 244 -m 372. lost tho game by a margin ol 36 runs. Brilliant Partnership A brilliant eighth wicket partnership of 261 by E. A. V. Willnni.(.31 not out) and E A. Martii.l.ile 134 almost won ihe f'jirbfldi patience by pitching the boll well ?* y L and VI dispensing with any fields*~* behind the wicket Hrvey u Mld .. Now |h „ the tround and I.oxton repeatedly thrashed ui Kensington Oval is soft it the ball but the setting of the wou \^ not be wise to allow people Held was well calculated to keep (n swarm the field when conditions down i that area nearly four problem has been tackled." Trinidad. Derek .Scaly who scored [Jp'^'dUpen^ng'witri'anTnerdV>ches were recorded. ... -M a**, MM m. -,..,.,., Cricket Broadcast From Kensington The Australians were finally bowled out for 234, and the M C.C given 15 minutes, lor of the 262 needed losing one wicket The Scores:— VICTOaiA IHT INNING* MC.C. 1ST INN1NOS The last of these Triangular Intercolonial tournaments, ihe miss Trinidad for 127. But Learie twenty-seventh, was played a Constantlne then turned in a perKensington in 1939. Led by Rolph formance that overshadowed that Grant, who was afterwards ap mfl king l for victory. oxtrfl work (or lnt groumUmeu. They can easily watch Ihe players practising from the pavilion*. Bathers at Shot Hall, who took a pleasure swim out to the moorings oR the Aquatic Club, climbed on to yachts when a sudden shower caught them In the water. i the process. There will be a ball by ball commentary broadcast on the cricket Tournament whirh i pens at Kensington this week This U being done by Cable and Wireless In conjui'itio.i wilh ..rdi.Tiisii.ti Ltd and CJI. be heard rarh day of play beginning on Saturday The wave length will be 39 76 metres. 7547 k cs o:> ZNX3*. and the lime approximately 1125 a m to 5 35 p.m. each day. (3 for 18) helped to dismiss Trinidad for 83 in their second IIIIIIUKand so give Barbados victory by 135 runs. Perhaps never again In this con • lury nor In the next will Kensington be able to boast of as magnlfiGoodwiU Tours Open Goodwill cricket lours dunnc the war served to discover nvny plover* who might have been log'. West Indies .neket if thel -ent i feast of run-makUig as was ^ urs h-(| nol aKon Uo Wec k'efl, witnessed there when the eig iWonell and Walcotl are Ihe proTlLlj.kt 1..... 1 ... teenth Triangular IntaftOlonl il tournament was staged there. Seven Hundred Tournament This immortal tournament is lan.iiiarly known ,,s the "sevjn hundred tmirnament" Most Bai ft ii. "f these enough but to mention the to prove thiit this is so. Toui ,.,., . ... VICTOHM *ND aaJMrat C MtDonsId r Holltri b B^r, KMVT> C Muiton b Br> luHlon ( Coxiplort to Hcrry Mrulrnaii run oul Tlimar r. Hutlon b Comptun lli-rll c Ch.it b Wnilibr.-.k Ring c. Mctn* r* b. Whbrook lamen i M, D..,M |b.w. CVMC A World's Partnership u" j Kin niguin too came in lor Its K li&dlan student!, of Intertoloniul share of the food things of'theso i ticket history, view this town-ecjlci and in .*44 playing again*' ment from the level that it served Trinidad at Kensington the pre lo brin out the combined genius aent West Indies captain John of George Challenor ami Tim Ooddard and frankie Worrell XarOto] established a world s fourth wickel „„,,,, \ i\ -' i..-.;. record of 502. Worrel! scored 308 m-ini A lliKtnr s t ruse .,m ol snd nnrtrisrd Sill iml mil Closi Dr. Hamilton In his exeolltfiU publication "Cricket in Barbados" SOHLINO AN..TS.S not out and Goddard 218 not out Yaa, Kensington has been tnc *££." stage of many a dire struggle compton fans have thrilToi washbr* writes of George Challenor and T,, cr e cricket Tim Torilton's achievement on t0 hal atmosphere of downr.ghl this tour Neither had finished nght ever present in lntorcoloni.il with the game, but they had reachticket In which no one waste, ed the pinnacle of achievement. •;„,,. m asking for QAiarter and the fine Innings they were to tvrtamly it will not be give play In the future were more JII m v hieh the needle-keenness that evaeatlnn of past memories than pervades the game oft brooked n %  • r integral p-rt of the cricket of interference even with the %  pu I Use period". ol the rricket law. Mf$Wf IMPROVED ODEX SOAP O Gets skin really clean Banishes perspiration odour leaves body sweet end dainty Odes make* A deep rtramiw; lather that AVOID OFFENDING-USE ODEX RINSO washes BRIGHTERquicker! All your coloured clothes are so much brighter when washed with Rirtso and your whites arc whiter tool Rinso's rich suds soak out the dirt so thoroughly, so quicklyyet so gently! For easier washing, and a cleaner, gayer result, always use Rinso. R/NSOforqf/ your wash! Wherever you go. Whatever you do. GLOBE TROTTER Will s*e? you through WE haVc received yet another shipment of . Globe Trotter Suit Cae* including the Wardrobe Case. This wonderful luggage has ideal qualities for rough handling and it can withstand h*lfa-ton placed on top without the slightest impression. Suit Casp.s 539.53 Wnnlmbfi Cases $59.71 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 1, 11. 12, & 13 Broad Street START THEM OFF It.MI.Y WITH J m n ENRICHED BREAD CV II The Vitamin Loaf TENNENTS BEER BEERS The Poor Man's Champagne The Rich Man's Beverage COME AND BEERS GO BUT TENNENTS IS DIFFERENT ... IT GOES ON FOREVER _=7Z?=X: I


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PACK TWO BARBADOS \DVO( Ml THIRSDAY. FEBRUARY 15, !51 Ccudb Catting M R S. F V head of ihc WOM in part mints Q| %  evening by II W.l A fron. dad and will be rtmumu.i February is us ., guesl .* ami LaOy 9 Mr Luke who Is making an official lour of the Caribbean has .already visited British Honduras, Jamniu and 1 %  Doctor's Lecture Tour D R. P. SHELUDf, known DlKcfa pM'teian. now in Britain, plan-, to give a number of lectures on lh We* durum hia stay. Dr. Sncllen said he had visited nil the main West Indian territories except Jamaica. •Bui I have read a good deal about Jamaica and 1 have ate, BuaUmante In England." he added. Superintendent's Visit M AJOR O F C. W.-ilcott. Superintendent ,1 the ment Industrial Reform School In Barbados arrived in England just ever a week ago on a ten-week educ.ii. H will spend the greater pun of his time in Londi.. i •: lti-ih Council has arranged for him to pursue study tn 1*nson Admir.i % %  < wilh the Home Office AuUKH After 30 Years M RS WILLIAM RAMSEY whose husband works with i:. Brooklyn, arrived by the Lady Nelson on Tuesday to spend two months' holiday in Barbados. She is stayinn with Mr. and Mrs. I) ll I. Ward of %  Glendim." Hindsbury Road. Her husband is a oaoatq of Mrs. Ward. This it Mrs. Ramsey's first visit to Barbados in thirty years. Delegate* Return M RC. E. HITCHINS. Editor of the Trinidad (..untUu Mr. F. Seal-Conn, Editor of th Isally Argosy, B.C., and Mr. T. P. Sealy. Associate Editor of the Jamaica filesne-wha erera hare for a meeting of the I Preaa Association left yesterday for Trinidad by B.W.I A, M.G.M. M R. and Mrs. G. M. Carter from Jersey, the Chnnnel Islands are at present in Barbudos. not merely for a holiday, but v ith a view to koituna heia and making Bnrbadoa thrtr home Foi lhe ,:me being they e staying at Carrabank. Both were WIAIate,| for many years with Metro Coldwyn Mayer Motion Pictures, bofli in Hollywood as London, They lived in Hollywood for about fifteen yean. Painting: and Photography M R. and Mrs John Fischer have returned to Venezuela after a short holiday In Barbados. The Fi'chcrs have lived for tan at Santa Barbara In Venezuela. Mr. Fischer's hobbles are painting and photography. Tliey were guests at Cacrabank. Mrs. Margaret Manning wit* of Mr. Justin. Manning has left Barbados to Join her husband who Is doing duty m Antigua. Their home is in St. Vim.nl. Take up Appointment M R. and Mrs. Dick Davitm left for Trinidad yi noon by B W.l A Thry were accompanied by their baby daughter. Mi hike up an appointment with A|ex Oilfields Ltd.. in South TrlnkUd. Month M R C.F.RHY LOMER who is on the engineering staff ot Redlffusion, Barbados Li Tuesday afternoon by 11 W I A for Trinidad. He will be away for one month vii Ltd.. in Trinidad Insurance Broker P AYING their second visit to Barbados are Mr. and Mrs. R. Percy Adoim from MontnjaL They arrived on Tuesday morning by the Lady Nelson and are here foi two week.', until the Nelson, returns on her way north. Mr. Adams is an insurance broker in Montreal The v are guests ^t lhe Marine Hotel.' POCKET CARTOON by OSBERT LANCASTER to train uith—M.I.5." Married Yesterday Governing Director Ml Woman In Woman Do llnsliiiiitts llV.iliv Want Slim Wives? by SI SA.\ BEACON hlffea and tajes oUecUooj A. S. BRYDFN ng Directwt of Messrs A I Hivden and Sons (B'dos) Ltd was among the psssengris leuvmg "W/OMEN. dieting do* n to the r.._, Me*l ftm n,nl ,hcv *** nn ane<.i!i from montreai men t from their huil .....ccr T>iinv*d L-iee M R E A. BCHOriKU). a re. IP A WOMAN refuses potato.* a* '^^K £ kThlfTon Hied Engineer o(.Montiei bread It is enough to ea.ise 7 vriitti wh MPIB enmon. and Mr* ftchefleld arrived from a malor seen* m m o • t Canada on Tuewiay by 'lie Lady Nelson to spend two weeks in B.irbados. They arelaying at lhe M .nne Hole! They are returning by the Lady Nehon when she calls hure on her way north. Staying with the Lords M RS PHELPS NEWRURY arnved by the Lady Nelaea < i Tuesday morning to spend two THE Dtoatakl ..-iU Is staying with Mr. and Mr* Robert O. Lord at "Queen's Fort", St. James. Mrs. Newbury's home ia In Grosse Polnte Farms, Michigan. She is Mm Lord's brothers MAN WHO leaves hi* wife holding one drink the 'Minn i]| simply pour liquor down her throat if he so much as suspects that shi ing. And a diet Is a very difficult thing to keep secret. *-lfe. •d in Opsji .... .^ Sixth Visit PENDING two weeks' holiday Barbados are Mr and Mrs. Dean of Canada. They HUNGRIEST man. however interested he u In his ou*n plafr. cannot fall to fioitee when his u'tfe is munrhina rate car. rofs and water biscuits. WHY fX) MEN object to women dieting cause they are afraid thOJ will bi made Jo join IT:. or do they suspect that n new slim figure will need new slim clothes? I.angvr Jurkvl V ISTl ;:..AV tfti rnooa It. Matihins Church was decorated pink and white oleander, Qui Anno's lace and roses for th< marriage of Mr. MM II rlved jeaterdsy morning by''the ^"l"'.., Ll "" s i s ,n "' wtl1 "' I-*d> Nelaasi and are staying at Hull Flats Codr.ngton Hill and the Windsor Motel. -„ % % %  U> Mi Cyril A Lynch, to Mr. Dean who ia President of r T* HE biggest spring fashion Miss Patsy Mitchell daughter <.f the Dean-Chandler Company L*m* change London M ; .M.. \.i. .i M M-rK-n ,t .„.,,,., Tl(1 llltl ,„,,, rii(|uet was of Queen Anne's lace Jind pale shell pink roses. Passports Denied To Two Mewsmvn WASHINGTON, rcb. 10. The State Depaitincut to-d*. dOBtad passports to tSM paper reporters The Department advised the New York Dally Warfcr. Dally resdr* W*rU of Sen Fran Cisco that .if travel ap under the I95U Inicmal Security Act The Act forbids the issue of paasports to members of Communist or "Communist action". organisations registered as juch Ith the Justice Department. —Reuter u tilin i -ire of. rt'inrtttf* lilt back lhe 401. vhlch is longer shaped basque. MOST SKIRTS are < straight, gUa Amies shows fln-liki Saturday from whlcn nare rom h( Canada by T C A were Mr. The Hedlngote cojit, unbelted and %  d Mrs. Frank McKenuey of waist-ntling. is In agaii Innlpeg. Thry are here for two Ing dresses are as-you-plcase onths' holiday staylnn at the Strapless or halt. ..SflUngfl Hotel skirted or straight. Mr, MeKenn.-y bj a jeweller In COLOURS are brighter. Winnipeg. They BIKO have an nfflci Matron of honour was Mrs '" Toronto. Norman Marshall, the bride's %  ,_— a^ %  sister. There were two other atrumeroy—interested lendanta. Miss Ann Parr's and VfR and Mr< Horace B. PomeMis Douglas AI ley m* Mrs Mar%  "* rev of buffalu. New York shall wore hello facone and her arrived from the U.S. via Jamaica hcad-draes which was of the same '" Monday by BW.I.A. They are stylo as the other two attendanu 'r two weeks, staying at the was of gerberas and vlctonan Ocean View Howl, posies. Miss Parrls and Mr*. Equipped with a Bahing rod and Alleyne wore blue facone over lots ' c '*l*'. nshinst is no doubt hello. a m ust on his list of things to do Page boy was Mr. John Lynch. W *JJW In Barbnrtns. Ht' .in. .. Sruttr-h ui.'uu, mmll '' w "* l "'" intert'sled 1.. k-,tin plete with kilt ,nat a 'orn>er Manattei of the MBestman was Mr Douglas '.',"* ""'f 1 wM # narnetl I' Lyach, the groom's twin brothri 1U "L'""* ' 'here Ushers were Mr. Richard Ni"fff. Pomroys living cholis, Mr rtauirt nnii .~* u r wiand. Rieha A litth t.ingenne with black. lts ni yellow and navj Mut with white Gliimour colours ore royal or sapphire blue with black Organza Lead* O RGANZA is lhe material o! the season (it is oftt for coats), Runners-up are slutmaterials. Inidseyc tu, any Leaving Shortly M R. G. O. FORD of Dayrell Rood expects to |o month lor Aruba where he is going to work with tin 1 jgo Oil anr | in that islann s. *ir David iteiid and Mi ul p !" ,.^ i. !" i„ rf w tng to work le lean this ofteriionn to, Gun!" y * t0 Wiferia ada for their honeymoon. AMONG Colonials who signed -** their names in the Burn* "Nelson" Arrivals ,rrs Ro11 at the Inns of Court U| week was Lorenzo Williams of AMONG the passengers univBarbados. After the Call to the iV Ing by the Lady Nelson o-i ljBr ceremony ho sal I'oulMII I'niurti. 6 is rSO %  ... Th N>. 110 %  m. NeAnsh-aU, 1 15 • m rror i at, m Praaramnk I ., 1.,-i.n-ll} 8|>*aMinS Ch las, soo • m I .1 IVT, Conoer, (I'.JIII Plain Knglwh, HSU am %  I" ri Horn* Nrw> rui Inlim. SIS mm. Clone Down. II.IS am n^raninr I'jradr 11 JO a in Llitrnn> .. m Siwi-ui Dii>atch. line Nr —. ll 10 m New* 11 IS a m Clota Duwn. am wm — f.lAI m. until Match 28th staying at the graduates have been ureatly Ocean View Hotel "' '^pressed with Urd Kitchener's This is Mr. Coil's flrst visi*. ablm y IO m hl calypsoes In here but his wife hns been heiv extempore way Th inspiration before with her mother. tame to Kltch at a London night club the other evening during LouiseBennett'sPantomima cabaret hour. For forty-rive mm I i.p, !" -._. ul ** he created a riot of fun a n<\ HEAR that Louise Bennett, laughter with hie humorouthe well known writer of rhymes. Kltch was really at his Jamaican dialect is busy writing a best and the magnificence of hi* pantomime. This however is ngt performance led another Trinidadher llrst attempt at thi,-difficult ian to declare 'there's no place task While she was In Jamaica like home". she wrote a pantomime whie n i There is a real LORD KITCHunderstand was very popular. But ENER. son of the famous Lord this latest pantomime is a ratrjer Kitchener. Ho waa at Catterkk more difficult Job for she plans to Signals OCTU at thesame time present in it nil aspects of Cant,Hs George Hunte—Assistant Editor bean culture. Good luck. Louise. 0 f the Advocate. CROSSWORD i %  r %  %  p B" TT r-1t An io.ruu*n aunt. (Si IAMM Una muka aionor tor .(ItdBliciI I*) It Osssf sntlonai Oeliaviour. i' a WfeMJe !" %  • %  o| u.• rameia is itn? Hi 11. i''-im ba an ordai (u a ateaoOsurd to put Ilia pti in iti 14. Out from acuilaud Tara 1 • %  ..ma ot i*i Jl No go lew .... ... JJ III awr cnn.tmaicar J Even millie n.e '.111* (7) %  l>e. ill itli* Lord Mil' .-. S3U '" a Uasi inciuaing tta IDI II rti* i-o. !!< %  :. tuai i ii B. What a fo>e:ae.or ealla n anuun 10. It na onn iiitiouueea iaU> " •urna oetuir now. Ill 12. PSrt ul a a01ii'il"S %  IWfrl. n 'IJ.'" i pariali %  %  go GLOBE LAST SHOWING TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. cue** STOP THAT COUGH SUii ukuig VtfWS COtCB Nit It Kb at once, snd see how K ckly your cough will stop I %  world • famous cough remedy soothci away hoars*nets and turtntit; cases hrcathlng, and protects the chest and lungs COUGH MIXTURE HHATIKIIII CINEMA (M.mb.r.Oniy) TONIOHT AT I W %  ass STttViART II Janr WVUAN in 'MAGIC TOWN" An BKO K.ai. Plrlate rOMMgNCWQ FRIIIAV 1STH MIHV -. Ann nt-VTH la UNO MOB*. MV IPVUIIM, A SIV UN1VKRSAI.-INTFWNATIONAI. PICTl'BE PLAZA Theatre— Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) %  STORY OF SEABISCUIT 1 \-T -' MRRr FITZGEeL0 Calor by TFTHMCOl-OB Hal TaS — S Sa a ia .M. nal a -RAioiaa or THE SOITH" Julmni Mk Hloon %  — RIIIIM. DOWN TNI TBAII." S Satrlal n p ,:,,n, — raiDAI i MKiSS :.w. Mia i ia a.ia %  up* CAONgV in %  WHITE HEAT" PLAZA Theatre— QISTIN {DIAL 8404) LAST 1 KIIOWS TODAY 3 A H.JS p m ipaiamuni Dooblai RED HOT and BLUE & THIS GUN (or HIRE Meter Pulton Alan Ladd UKAND i B.W pm iM"Oft.ni D-mble. LM laSM i -iih ihr Sltaa* Tala aa •••rat) B> %  < in %  %  %  I'kailla Cksa m DOCKS OF NEW YORK & DARK ALIBI IHIP ran I'M • Mat SUN J p.M. ParaaMisCi ni*'i M.I.I HII • %  BISG CfcOSBY IN "RIDING HIGH" WITH COLCEN CRAY ROYAL Today Only 4 30 and 8.3. Final Inn. Republic Satijl FEDERAL AGESTS VERSUS i:\DERWORL0 1\C. BY THE WAY.... W HEN you read "Y.-slerday was tin* and warm with light breezes." dors it not occur lo you thai a •veeUtci would be much more reliable than a forecast? ..is. nf meteoroli irophrts and seers, labouring al their instrumenls. hnve no time to look at the sky or to sniff the air. Thai Is why any old countryu an is a for more i-'ii,,i Ls weetttei iiian the whole i lumped togrther. uud fastened u> ihelr gadgets. MfV* Ih'tvvliw Slary AT 12 23 |> m. 00 a Wi %  %  %  .i haulage contractor shot a I %  lhe bathroom of his hotel at Wakua FalU. Ho %  I %  ipttl by a window. When egsn wbo had heard lha shdl. nrrived on the Lody of the animi uut there was a female footmark on the baUi-mal. Dele* a bullet embeddc I In I and a pair of scissors in the bath. The nnger-print* on the scissors were thoas of the haad.waltar. How did the body of the hippo pot am us disappear? Surrt am/ Law T his Ii evidently lhe month of ama/inn dJsCOTSflsM, A Oallup pull has found that lullabies ar dying out. Mothers DO longer sing to their children One reason is that, at what used to be a lullaby time, the mother Is at the pictures oi working in a factory, anil the t-hild is cracking a safe or telling Ministry spies about his father's infringement of some regulation in nther dealing with the SttttU of mouse-traps. Dinfrrarr/uf In, i,/n,l T T was an utter disgrace . I Nobody has any Dialing. nowadays. The bus was full Of .imfoitably seated, and %  my poor dog forced to % %  I the way. Nobodv 111 """l f gettingup and offer%  %  > .,: By Bt'acheomher Simplv Vriliv'mn T ill, owner of a restaurant put a pound note (n the e/bsdOW "as a prise for sulea-promotion." Under it was a notice saying. "Tell IU what you think of selfnr\ic -." A man uilh nothinsj particular to do heaved a brick through the window, and look II,e pound. Preparing fur Ihr Hush A QUESTION is already inflaming many brains—where on earth are the hundreds of million? Of visitors to the Exhibition goinif to be housed? Here arc some %  uggestions: — I. A huge camp in the Lake District 2 Bring the Fleet up lhe Thames as f;r as it will n. ,md M (he visitors live aboard. Use billiard table*, box-room. and tele phone -boxe* in the big hotels. Throw open Government offices. Pul more seats on the Em bankment. Erect huts in one 1 -way streets. %  CELAIVESE Underwear %  PETTICOATS ws wx OS ws 184 150 J CRETONNES wx 200 3 05. 410 OS 202 64 C.nli yd. j FOR HOTEL and HOME ._ !" A remark able 27" value *. %  . f w f f f __* EVANS k WHITFIELDS Dial 4606 Your Shoe Stores Dial 4220 i TEA SETS DINND DINNER SETS talnabl. frcn THE II MillAIMtS ( O-OIM 11 \ s t\ s: COTTOX IKTOIIV LTD. 11 T %  %  %  %  %  % %  — — %  % %  — ..../ / I



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THI'RSDAV. FEBRUARY 15, IMI RARHXDOS M)\>( All r\i.r CLASSIFIED ADS. TELETHONl 2100 The charge lor announcement* Birth*. Mamur'. Death. Arknoa. aSO a waia la and In M w iB M i notice* H •" wee*>-d*v. and II go on Sunday. U>. any number ol oru* up to SO. and 3 tool. *r word on aerM-da'. and 4 nun par ord on Sundavi (or eael iddlfto-ial word For Berth*. Marriage or a>l|ailgliil iBnounramrM. In Car lb Calling toe I barge I* 13 00 for any number ol word, up to SO and cent* par -.ord lor e.ch .-ddiUonal word. Trrmi rot* Phone IKd between g and pm.. mi lor Death lellee. a*l altar 4 pro. FOR SALE Ml..mum .-.a-jr .reel: TJ I M rent* Swadev. M >ord, wwrt 3 nau a iro-d tore*— ii-o'd Sim dan AUTOMOTIVE BrpFOilD DELIVERY VAMS — Shipman! iuat i hand and ready for Immediate pooa c oon. Courtesy Garage, dial Mil. Ul 91 ITHI.H SALES Te. MM par aoat. I.e.* ., tr*el.-du oid II fn per oegie Ii.e * S.adoi'i, %  S'lVS ***** M M i-*.i nod II M pa Ih-d^iat REAL ESTATE T". ifad will ^' n lor *al* at !o > Huh Street. Brtdge-"•-•' %  "->' "" mt '"*-xarr ItSl •' Li!lJ^ "~o* or dwelling EMM rd CRYSTAL WATERS' wilh the land thereto ronta.ntag bv animation i;c*T mure feet Mtuetrd on the *ea ai cH 'jy?' "— %  %  boarding he..*e baltrr^L_2". *** • %  * Bundav* between . W I p an application to Mr*. Talma on UM premi... ,. „J !" !5S Particular and condition* of Mia applyto:— COTTLE. CATroilD, a> Co. Solicitor*. 3 3SI_ Un iMimr xttTHs I) eeeMt pa* aaala war • %  £Qll %  -d aaaiia aatr.ni by nbtpmmg ,^^ "*•; l<* pflV*U ChrlMma* Ci %  '•*> rwat friend* No prevwu* cap ence n ereeaary Writ* today beautiful free temple Beak to B"k.to'. Urgoat and I-emoet publiaKara. hifkoM ceeiunlaaion. m.ryellove mono, making uvportunty. Jonaa, William* A CJ Da*. Victoria Work.. Eretlon, Ei-gland" Milt lan MY. M. P. C. leked to t-ubmii any dent* to pipe* on live Agenda lor me half roar I v Oanrral M>mf to M MM H tho Club Houaa an thai Mir, March, lo ihr Bocrotvv. no*. laiar than tha iTit. Fahnur P a POTTTR, %  • ratai t llltl—Sn PB i >Pt-RTH*-Two CAfV-P,,, i,ard Cyllndor Parfaci "i ror aala. Farchailm I); atmon — Tclrphon" 10 1 II Cn BLBCTUCAL FUBNlrUBE rtiUNiTrnr MaTZi7n> i.~„ ; Drawct. UoM^i. Book Mapaiit> rflfinrl Flaciri> Touiar. Electric iron. Balv" Balh. Nickal Walitra. Xma* Trre Daco latiom IjfhtPTtonr MTT. lUtli In LlYEaXOCK UAIir KB „ i.td and quit* ac r orV Phuxa 3344 I IS I 41 U. .' %  ., amrd to planiaUoi 1*131 In MISCELLANEOl'S BATHH Z 1,, F0R5C F.-.m,l. m ZH2? m t a !" n \* rmn wl,h n-alrh.m !" i to t-omplata colour ruila*. Top %  *•*•. A. 1IARNEA f, Co. Ltd. tfl T| lit! CBRFAI/l Co-r, rink-. j„-dj-d ^haot. Quaker Oat. „i Tint A ParKa> Ford. 33 ho.DL.-k St. Dial aui. U.Z3I—in C1CBL1TOH UMI WOflXS Cwn mpply. Tampar Building Lima. Boulmcrrtr Stone Orlt. fcl-rl t. Sand flora. C Truck C'UHTAIN FITTIMGS-For pnait Wintlcrw Myllna. Hht control, Valinj-rami S7C2S "* Klr *" owl H A. HAKNFci a CO. LTD. I12.*l-1 l.n HA Haoui m Tim t lb 10 l ^ l pn lb. lib Tm. r DM. 1 n> T|i" lor Si 3B alwj Baron .Ik-ad |l II or >lab WlyokW M Ford, thai MM. Hj*. buck St 11131—Jn liritful raw Top Rock, C"irl> %  toth havinf 3 brdroom. arW >nd Bath, rrrcnily ooaMluetM •oil UM out. With poaaa.M<. lat Mo roa^nabla oflar . H d. For viewing etc Ring 6t 132 11—4: I-i, Id.I Tl,, of ihr HI built Bungalow on WESTF1E1J>. thr proIU Sir Qoorgr Wallun I ".030 aquarBungalow itandi fort ol land and M ruiHir room, two boiraowt." kltch, lai-rWrv, bain and lavatory. In a arparau building there i. Koran for ona car and two -arv*! r|m. with bath and la v. to. v Tti. proparty will Da M l U (at %  M our olflco on WrdnrMay the II.I oav ol Fabruary 1MI. .t | p.m. For condllloni ol aaW apply ID o iiiirleriignrd. '"••"'on any day between ift.jp a Talephono l*dy Waltoi NOTICE -..,. % ** %  or at. IOIIN WLU lender, are invited lor ipPl'inaj appruimatalv a plot. p ur Ir **, ;o. milk daily to St John'a Almahouat 1. 1Z" ^. ,,V V*"** ""•" *• >•" Hfirh mi ApplKaUon. will M ro'%  >rd by Ibr undmignrd up to Ihr Itth innant. and II I. to b. i.n T arantp, thai fwa %  %  *'""" -" —• n. s iMffj. Cleik. Board of Poor law Ouardiani. SI. John. IB I SI 4 $6, OOOMorePassed For Labour At Dodds THE MOUSE OF AS.1EMBLY at their meotuu Tuesday passed a Ktwolullon for $8,000 h> ( %  addod i$20,760 provided In thr LI tor labour at Dodds Plantation. Tha latter sum proved insufficient to meet tin* expenses for the 1951 sugar crop. The extraordinary expenditure No. tall COTTLX. CATTORD a* CO. Solicitor. MM-Iln "S,rSS: MODFHWOl.0 DOORA-Th* .H.IIK rulahed aolullon lo vour aprrlal .rrhilmtiwal problem of door eloouro. wrrerw. movable partition* Dial 4T6 A HARNFX w CO LTD. IJ.3SI—I.f n. *lghl Bnlut %  Ida. and poh.h. KNlCiHrs LTD. t u'aaa PIANO -Brnlley %  UN SHADES Vrr, altr.K-t.va MS i.i.kpon.ive. j„it right lo protect row *r. during Cricket •! %  up. V. Df LIMA A Co LTD H I 51 -.; STAK-A-aVE TUBULAR fclel Chair* and Tjble. en ahow ai Ralph Boirj-. r.now room*. Hardwood Allev. Trodrnaju.rlo* cordUliy invllad. TYRF^ Roodyaar Tyi :.'u-l S only. Good buy. W. M. rotd. JJ Roaburk St Dial Man lllll gtl. TU.NIJ1 VUAT So I mti Corral Beef Hi, a k A Kid Mill tori A P-n. A Mrat Rol ji Rorbiark Si Dial MSB. VAPEX INHALANT INHALERS the f.r.t mgi rom all Drug VENETIAN BLINDS Kiraeh Sn all meljl Dr LaUM Vn rtaln bllm >our *lir.. dellrrry 3 wreb* I).a A. BARNES a> CO.. LTD. Dm W* ii.vr In ilock Ciwprr". Sheep Dii ii**B for killing Krd. and LKr. and ala for thoroughly c;**mlng thHerre. Pric /Un KNIOKT-S LTD. Ml.31-1. WINllOW GLASS .Sparkle rUn ed flheet mat Plate OU.*. for all •* %  %  * W cut to your requiremmla. O. HUTCHfKSON A Co. Ltd. Dial 4131 13231lOn. FOR HIM %  '"ii %  wndag] cl.aror i.rrl Tl rroli hdoi.i 14 u-ord. — orrr M rrrk-4 %  "DimamANB" fOUNTRV. ROAD. ST. MIOIAFI. Tor rrildencr Lilrl> ocriiplod b Ml W O. CoUtnor*. The home *tandi In well kept garden. d ground* H acraa 37 parch**!. Thr wholo i-ompriM. vrrondah. draw. in* *nd duuai room.. 3 bodroomi. on* with marble balh. I -lw.tr. 3 lavalaa. convert Ion I kitrhart ima for • aarvanli, gar and liable*. Wairr luppl* for gardr from a w.ll with mill. hanl tho i Houaa coovaitlbla Into Halt and outbuilding* <.>m.c!t idle Into a rottaaw land U iu nblc for dcvrlop1'iciit or kitchen gardrna. The undrr*igiKd -in oRrr lb* premier, for *alr by public auction at i' %  ofwer. No II. High Stierl. Bridgrtown, pn Friday the IVil .lay o( Fobruary INI at ) p.m. limp-rtW-i on Turaday. and Thurtdayi onl. between 1 ana] %  pm. For further parttrular. apply to COTTLX. CATFORD A CO, aVa H Mtagg. 4 111— 10n. NOT1CX la hereby ,en thai th. %  Mlchaer. FJl in me pprtob f Si Michael RcgLle. No 4TP 1. diaaolved by %  i.trumeni ragtatered .1 ihl. ofRce ih* lih day ol r>bru**lIBM u.ilrat within ihrer roonlh. from th* data of the New-paper '" which thl. adveriiieniiiil ppear. prwcerding* be commenced %  a member or othei peraon* imer.ird 1 The parcel of land containing i.tu aquare 'rrt witn ibe Building, thereon %  la In Luca* Street. Bridgetown, adjoining toe property of the Baruado. Telephone Company Limited and at preaent occupied a. to part by the Observer ripjpor and a. to part by Miaa Cado. Inapecltoii by application to Ibe len•nU. For luriber pariirular* and condition ol •ale. apply to COTTLE CATFORD A CO.. No. I? High Street. Hridgetown 14111 —Un. WANTED umd Sundoui. HELP l-ADV "-iltanl* Udv with knoilrdgw of bookeeping, filing Md pmcc work Afaply Y. de I4MA A Co. Ltd. Po.1 OAV, Ro< Btl. Rrldgelowr II 31— MISCELLANEOUS 13 f 31 -3n HOTTLRT* fO.IM empt.. while, plain t-i.ee-gill b..tile. perked In bale* of IS uoten each at le. per bottle lncludln.1 p..rking Plr-iw apply t" B 3* M"" Son A Co. Ltd. BioaM Street Dial XT ma i'" WANTED TO lli'igAM "ll.'I.MIHl or HOUSE — Be —1 %  >:! %  %  rice. 3 bedroom*, windward ceaat. n Ihe Bra prelerrad Tel*phim* IHl. 11.1.11 NOTICE APPUCBTII* are Invited for the root of Utirtaril Nun* at Si Lucy'a Almahoiiaa a -alary of gSTSn p., nwiilh. u;-.Hoim 4. on* quarter, provided Applicant* raut be fullv r %  ral Nun dutte on Klh Frbr-ia^ I Hi Application* il| be received by me u la Saturday iTth BVbruirv 1MI OSWALD L DEANS. Clerk, ftoard of Poor Lew (lua.di.n. at. ui. 102.11 ea "s; Friradly SsfaftfrsArt(lMS) |See. 751 !>! %  1 by lalrr •iich di**olu hte ucco.dmgl. I nBtaRBI K. *,,.,, HI" 3It dealt with the bonus pai to estate Ubourerg fl t Dodds an was In harmony with errta. afreenienta made by the 8ui fioducers' Association and BartMdoa Workers' Union. It _,, plied, he understood, to ulmoit at! tha estatcg In the Island The estate at Dodds was bein ; : worked by agricultural labourer and was also the properly of tlv Oovernor in Executive Com mittee. He therefore begged I' move the passing of the Resolu tion. Mr. M. E. COB (L) seconded Mr v\ A. Crawfaed (C) saiii that he would appreciate if the honourable member for St. Thorn. could tell the House the bonug which the labtn. NOTICE St'PPLIES FOR THE POOR OF THE PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL Sealed Tendm in duplicate narked >n Ihe envelope 'TENDtOI FOR ". will be received by the Clerk ol the Vfrtry up to 11 o clock noon on Tr.ur.de v Bud Februarj lor the undftnienllonrd .upplira in -.eh qn.iolilr, .. ma* from lime to lime be ordered to. year commencing on Ihe let April FPXSH MEAT FRBRH MILK MtEl.ll OREAD. *ch pereon tendering mint arid tn -tter. along with the Tender, ngned two pmpeily quallSed uaraon. MM>' *.* member* ol Ihe Ve-ir thai villingneea lo become % % %  nil witn ihe Tenderer m th* evgepl of their Tender being accepted for Ihe due fulfilment to the Contract With rcrpeel lo Ih* lender for FRESH MILK, the probable quantity required on* year li 14,000 g.ili.n. and thr Ve.liy reaerve the rlghl to accept the lender of more than one peraon lei 1 mipply of thl* article and all peril tendering for Ihi* article .hall %  word, along with their lender, r Certificate b,. a properly qualified Voter!".n haclitioner elating that the at lie Irom iriwh th* milk will be -uppliei an Ver from TuWrVuloat*. Form* ni lend*re ceai be obtained al :hc churrtwardeM-g on. %  By Order. E. C. REDMAN. Clerk. St. Michael'* Venn impriionnrcn hard labour by HiWorship M E. A. McIod Police Magistrate of District "A" on Tuesday Public Official Salr • Freraai Ma/.kal UBol-41 I sai. ridgy the 31rd day horn On IMI %  %  fternoon will be told gt mv of* in* 1 irne.1 bkldrr for any %  •%  > under the apptalerd value All that certain piece of Land perrhe* 1 M •H, I Of Fred Malone) but now of M. O Emlagje A • I'd late of CleophAB Adolpr.** Pol toil now of K. B. Hope and en t i, ibl.c rood*, al Upper He k Hall M Hn*0. apgralied a* fjollowa:Tlie whole area of land appraiaru Eight Hundred and Forty SI* doll itotg.Ooi. Attached from Coleridge Drreoford Field for and toward* Ball fi-ction. Ac N B IS'. Depo*lt to be paid on di if pure ha** T. T HEAD1XY. ProvoM Maiihil sir. 1 3, HOUSES ROOM. HASTINOa — A nowly fur. I ithed room with running water. Phone HIE .12 11 Ji. LOST ajA"?IFR 1 offered 1 Oreen Caae. Finder dvocale C/o. Rowan. 14111-dn BWEEJ'RTAKE TW'KETS Eerie' :.TS. and B. 33i.( Finder pleejae ic lam* to Ihe Advocate Co reward O*TTrd |II-|_ln SWFFpejTAKR TICKETS F." ian and IfdC Flndei pie. 10 B. Thorrpaon. Roebuck SI PEHSO.VtK SOVERIVIHENT Mil M IS AIR MAILS With effect from 20th February, air mails foF Canada and Bermuda will be closed at the General Post Office on Tuesdays nt 2 pm. instead of on Monday and Tuesday, respectively. By Ihh opportunity the postal.,* to Canada will be the lower rate, namely 20 cents per i or. Air Mail Schedul. should be amended accordingly. General Post Office. 14lh February, 1951. 14 2 81—2n during ih* year Included ihe y a> menl of 12W% Increase in wages arising out of the Ministry of Food Price for Sugar In lfMand 7* Crop bonus arising out of an agreement between the Sugar Producers' Federation and the Baiba dos Workers' Union; for every 3.000 tons over 120.000 (which is considered an average crop) a bonus of 1% is paid hc IH0 sugar crop amounted to 103,000 tons; the usual bonus paid to labourers on the same basis as is paid by owners of private estates Dr. Ho Cuaosaina of the addendum which stated that the usual bonus paid to labourers was on the game ba< was paid to labourers of private estates. Labourers' Hnnus Cummit Dr Cummins said that thoar figures were worked out by the Attorney of the plantation and by the Labour Commissioner along the usual lines done by s u g a estates and the amount required lo pay bonus to the labou $400 00. Mr (%  -.,, %  !..>.I iBirJ that it v.ould !*• surprising to thr honourable ber to learn thai tha >lh*r labourers at the othe'i iltate, only got last year, the 114% mentioned in sub paragraph ja> of the addendum ami tha limited period wiucn wi no-ntiotiod in gub paragraph ibi The bonus referred to in sub paragraph (c) hud not been BOM to •juitc a large number of labourers sugar estates, It was surprising to see that with icgard to the ll'l . i>, Government was so far bOMnd pi I Vale uwnem their home* and ttKBM) it linpoisible to get u hot rswal li tho big plantations BJM) | could find it necessary during the crop season to supply i Fined 20'For Unlawful Possession Ftulien.LI Agiid d labourer of or one month's imprisonment with ?' >^"'endous assistance to he labourers themselves and even the employers, since the ability to obtain a hot meal during un Agard was found guilty of the 1 ol the day must be reflected in thfl unlawful possession of a quantl-' amount ol work as well as the ty of goods which he was carry, iquality o* woik irhion tho arotosn Ing along Nelson Street 'eouH do. Haiimur Police Constable Gill I %  who made the arrest said that on January* '2 he saw Agard wit'i these goods and on asking hin. where he got them from Agard was unable to give him a satisfactory explanation. He then took him to the Bridge police station • where ha wa charged. Sgt. King prosecuted for the police from information received, ed. Overpriced Ten \ of £3 lu IH* ,; %  month or %  was on Tuesoai iinptMad SHIPPING NOTICES M"N imi \t M sti: w ZFA1 \M) MM. I i-UM ,i IBf AN* Ms T>>\.; .i"1i* eMkagydaxi a> Mil Adelai %  • %  Bn-bar,e Feb.. %  Bnrbadoa % %  of V ...*. MBB Tt.i. voearl baa a^pl* n-.T lor Hard %  Cargo T ted Lading with trajMblpriieiil u.rbada, Windward %  H -rwooo v.. a.id paaienger. D ( BWJ. WHtuimU Vlsiiiirs (. Jard i. \. SS -BHimd' kl tnd Febni NEW ffOKR BBal. I. %  -> ,. JFi SS Irv,rc Ol HIPOI '..) • Ali'UA I'MCiniM .Ala'OA I .. "ALCOA PO| Mils B*n.a 4... KORHRT TlldM LIUKo* Vo and Gulf Barrier. Apply: DA COSTA tt CO, LTD. Canadian BCTTlcfl. ni-MH MWS FLASH llhllukri Almanuk. 1951 r.nl. 11 liil anil CockUII UN. losMaom srviiiiMRv and HARDWARE MRS. niwAirs l\M IN(i S( MOOL tl I'll s BFBO %  !' dc.iroui of Killing Mrs -.TIAVART'S l VNt IM, M lllHll.wm b r Interviewed o n I l.braan 1Mb from 4.30 P III Oil" JI (1% Claaaea will begin on .Saturday 17th For inrthc. inL.initl-iii Dial -M-i ADENAUER RECEIVED FRENCH MEMORANDUM BONN. Feb. IS Andre Francois Por.cet, French High Commissioner to-aiay me' Dr. Konrad Adenauer. West Caiman Chancellor, when politician! assumed he handed over the French memorandum on EuroPASSAGES YO EUROPE Contact A d. Roseau, Dominie., for sail Ing tn In 'f fall are Dublin. London, or Rotterdam. Single fare dUCthaM for children. FYFFES TINE T.s.s. GOLF! IB D.M am on th* iw • will Mil ..I I I Trinidad. SI PHONl ORIENTAL I.OOIIS From INI1IA. CHINA, IdVIT silk, f'urlua. HraaaMW. Jflvi. .". Il Tak last week by the French CobInet, seta out French views on the European army as pan >•' tinAtlantic defence force. It was bt'ing circulated to na. tlons taking part in Thursday' tonforance in Paris on the for* %  nation of such an army.— Rruler JfYVftS Sf/Zt-D FRANKHIRT. Feb. 13. American military police armed with sub-machine guns today look two large boxes of Jewels from the Rheinman for expert-to decide whether any belonged to the Rothschild family. Tho Government gald it suspected Ihe jewels stored at the Rheinman Bank since the war, which wore either Rothschild jewels or other French propert> stolen by the Nazis during the occupation of Paris—Reuter. J^ee>r>r>*,.V>*iVeOOV^ Win 'i V.-; Shop al : rut: CBNTMAL BMmommM Our Hotot Van Dolll I il" <; (I '. rHAL I %  '•' VDRV LTII -In ;rlrl rs COUGH LOZENGES The publkare hereby warned agiir.d Fvlng credit to my wife. Countrb Elltabrlh Clarke lore Richard, a* I dc noi hrtld mywlf renpontble lor her or nn or stag coniractlng anv debt or Jeoie |r. fe." name .mire* by a written order %  igned by me. SOd. WILLIAM ( I ARKr. Cnapman Lane. Ol Vli-h..-l 13.U1—ltl The public are hereby wained agilu.' i.Ung rr-dlt to my wife. Ulaekm^n i-iee Hareballi a* | do not l.ild IM-:( pe-p*nIHe for bee or gjer! %  no elea contracting; any d*4H or debtt In any name unleo* by a written order BK WISE. . . ADVEmTtSE POLICE TRAF FIC RULXS Barbados— Trinidad Cricket Matcnes at Kensington Oval on tha 13th. 10th. 17th. 10th. 20th, 22nd, 2lrd, 24th, 26th and 27th days of February. 1061. RULES made by the Oovernor-in-E-eeuuvo Committee under Section 37 (21 of tho Police Act. 100f. for the regulation of traffic between the hours of 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. on the days on which Cricket Matches against Trinidad will be played at Kensington Oval. 1. In those Rules— vehicle" includes carriage', wagons, carts, motor vehicles, bicycles, tricycles, vans, handcarts trucks, barrows and all other machines for the portage of goods or persons. 2. All vehicles proceeding in the direction of Kensington Oval between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. shall approach by way of Lakes Folly and Fontabelle Road only and shall pioeeed In single line down Fontabello Road. 3. Between the hours of 10 am and 3 pm no vehicle shall pro%  eed on Fontabelle Road In the direction of Lakes Folly, except the motorbuses on route No. 23. • 4. Between the hours of 10 n.m and 5 p.m. no vehicle shall enter Kensington Cap from Wcstbury Road. 5. Between the hours of 10 a.m. and 6 pm no vehicle shall be parked In Fontabelle Road from the Junction of Lakes Folly to the junction of WoMbury New Road. 6. After S p m. all vehicles leaving Kensington Oval shall do to by way of Fontabelle Road. 7. Between the hours of 6 pm. and 0.M pin. no vehicle shall enter Fontabelle Road from the Direction of Lakes Folly except motor-buses on route No. 25 and all vehicles approaching Kensington Oval shall do so from the direction of Wesibury Rood. 8. Drivers of vehicles shall ot-ey all orders given by any member of the Police Force. Made by the Governor -in-Executive Committee this thirteenth day of Fobruary. 1031. (Sfd.) A. A HINDS. Clerk. Executive Committee. 14 231—2n CHECK-UP NOW ON YOUR SUGAR FACTORY SUPPLIES — WE OrFER — i.oofliim rnAXSMUssm.% BEI.liXV 3" J|" 4" — 5" — S" — 8" — ALSO — r 1 *7. R.MR it in. BF.LT1XV STEAM BnfJaV %" and 1" RECENT .C ARRIVALS of SKLKCT TffESK lAltIA .... Hlim.ei/ Raj I I i lt.uk l Lamps Spilt InoBBB* Ti*eto i ntamlaled i.i. i l .ii reeled i:\iisu-i Pin I .tensions Slprrlna VVhrrl (overs Baiunr-r Jack* Guns 6 Vnlt A U Vll Horns Miracle Adhesive Valve (.rimIn, | Mechanics Beailit.: I • lev Black Heal i blni Paint Hake Graphlte Pluxlle Battery Tenter* Battery Cables Brass Milm H.t.,1 Bilv Snider ri.ue ..n 'lades — At [i.< i lor all popular I and AtnoTet to I nicks ECKSTEIN .IROTHEKS REAL ESTATE JOHN M. BIAafON AM, r.r.a. 1 ....... .I. III,... a Blado* FOR SALE %  sod '• uinlng S ivine. m i .i %  ,i luithor li, oere. nfrcr. e.mIHA *.! inpoii r bodraasas. kiu-'.---'. i i %  'HASMb %  %  i. u at .iichorlown. with %  i il.i.lHr. ,. Tnere are 3 re.-.plum. 4 bedroom*. gallcne*. 1 gar.ige. %  nnued ua* a* a prill -HHK Mb Avenue. ITell*%  I i. i in-,. t IMI Hi iriy : r>n rdge ol eatorp! iraan Ideal Hiding iii-giiiiii.-nl of era l^rge %  nt Mill i B*g IMI A %  '. 1 1 1. v of (pecia I notice and l u i imn groat eAenri %  paeknil atcommodaRENTALS i .: bad U \i \ rrATI AGENT AUCTIONEER \ Pt-tNTA'ilO>rsj BCrXDING I'hnne 4640 U J 4-* foO I > IZ * CHARLES MfENEARNEY & CO. LTD. bO G •g O CITY GARAGE TRADING (0.. LTD.



PAGE 1

4 11 \lll\4. Till: SIIKS TnE WBSTBBM I (third from li-fti. with fork 11 hand Is dealing the Chou En Lai 'Warns' U.S. LONDON. Foi> U Lai, Prime of Foreign Affairs of the Chines.Peoples %  -. i tide In Of rratiU The article, written by the Chlneee Premter on the %  or friendship, alliance and mutual USSR end Chine, ami brosdca .. • the two oounti MM % %  >% a frsl aluun and atrvuK Ct of tintMaking S direct n* "the Imperialist clfcaua l l American lmp< ri ilism," Ch o U wild. "Si.\ Wishing to reconcile itself to the defeat ot M re poue) template* conducting Bi i i %  i-".' carrying mit the remilitarisation f ipttna to uw the territory i>f Jap d people as cannon fodder fot the i %  %  arta of aggression in K> ii f Taiwan, and Inlet ntffl nr\d South-East —Renter Wettest February In Forty Years THIS IS THE WETTEST February that Bum had since 1911. Records show that on ftbrunj 6, 1ft l. five inches ol rain wore recorded in St. Michael. The rainfall at Codrington on Tuesday, up to 3.00 p.m wi inches and 37 parts. Up to the same tins on* inch and 52 parts with a temperature of 80 Fahi i m the shade. Construction Stopped On U.C.W.I. irmn Own Co rr expend i i 14, MILLER GOING ON S. AMERICAN TOUR WASHIM. .ON. Fcb 14. r.'r Edward Miller. United Stale* Assistant Secret;.t American Affsir~. win leave here DM Saturday for ;( tour of South American Republics. Hi plqratcry conversations With members of Preside%  Vargas* new GovcrnmPit. He w.ll also visit Uruguay, Argentina, Chile and I'm; —Reuter. APPROVE MILITARY PROGRAMME WASHINGTON. Pi Armed & ; '"ft 18Muter. ,'A.MAK A, t. BOtlon work en Universit; College Wool uSaeM building r. indefinitely to-day t 2pm as workers on strike refused to return to Uie ton Earl) this momintc following consultation* lictween the contractors rOsaa and Hiil and University %  .i notice was poslod on the building compound rtrttnt Hot return at 2 o'clock, construct. % %  til i poll deter* pnamtatloa, trlke, one of many eanea the beiii>iiinK ol the year stared n Tuesday called by the B.I.T.U. refusal of the T.U C. to I pell being taken among liCcauso the B I.T.U. wi't not agree to a poll befell nken al Coir Factory. St. Thomas. Cases of violence and stone throwjng. were reported from area, •Had Splil In llah Of Grt'al Intorest" WASHINGTON, Feb. 14. United States Secretary of Stale Dean Aehcson. to-day described reports of the recent split in the Italian Communist Parly as a matter of very great interest. IItold his weekly news conferen.-c that it was a development which he believed should take pla-t among alt Communists w to really had interests of their own countries at heart instead of acting as agents for a foreign power—Renter. W inston Churcht^Calls For No South Koreans Confidence Vote Land 80 Miles North Of Parallel TOKYC %  %  Ti I ft I r %  world's biiv. %  Missouri. Eighth Army headquarters said th< %  upurd Iwi island off the i l Tnoea i mainland had reached me outskil accomplishing the kuMlinga, OhNcrvei: thought II I kill iblO, W in is 100 miles across the %  %  North K. n Mm %  landed last October at 1 ted Nations ] forci withdrew after Chinese inleTMin-i In Decen i St. Kitts May Get Sugar Station (Prrtm Our Own Co u e ap o n datj t ) LONDON. Fcb. 14. CONSIDERATIONS are boinv; given in St. Kitts to profit revwkd by Mr Djjdale, Minister for the Colonies In the House of Commons this moon. He was replying In a written answer to a , M.P Mr. James Johnson. Pt'publiruils Waul End Of l .s. Vid 7"o West Europe WASHtNOI %  rlca la persuaded U countries are Iwannr. %  hare ol • suggestthan 100 t f the lai ran members of The dsored in the I %  Other points in th %  Allow clpation In foi Make Build up hen —Renter Mr. Johnson had suggested 'hat UlO Leewards Government should i quire absentee owned sugar p*in:hem on a prold fl'jrmi basii for tne benefil oi the %  ,,:.;c". Si Dislnct "1", St. Joseph, and Belleplainc-. St. Andrew, ware put out of order yesterday because of the continuous heavy I The rain fell heaviest in St Michael, the District "A" poUcS station there recording two niche* Al about 8 o'clock last night, lbs water which had come da Ihe country to pass through the Constitution Rival the sea reached a foot and a half below the Constitution Road. under the hndgc. Following arc the Qgurt Dl trie! "A" 2 inches. Boarded Hall 1 50. District "C" .53. District "F. t 08 Holetnwn 1.36. Four RoaSS 1 29. and Crab Hill 1 48 Three Ships in Port Waterfront and labourer" %  in Carlisle Bay two dl cargo and the other takj i of sugar for the U.K. T • much handicapped because of Uic steady showers during the day, Schooner Lucille H which called during Uw with a load ot rice, coui i I d:rchargmg hvi < %  rumber • %  thl Carieflage kept theli I tChl with tarpaulins. In the flood areas — I 1 il Constitution and Detain n i did not rise t. I cichv. bill tl l living in these di>u-icts kepi prei | I The corner of tnl I Harmony rl flooded and impntwb! jod petkisarlsni In order to get Uirough. vehicles und pi were forced to t. %  I part of llti new section of ihis road. A well at Ihe Ivy whll I wstsff it*>ni auftoamdrag disirk-i S3 Oa pate 8 Europe Must Unite: Say 2 Premiers 1 Cit'TA. tN P1VIERA), Pah 14 Italian Premlari fcroko up their threedaj .' %  •claration units In the Mhleh are the Mmisrull examination 1 all qn< ng France %  lh il 'intwo Ity Ol 10 in plans fur mi! Bchtti 'eii.e .it the I %  i i do %  th Rui to the ( % %  Hi-power | %  .till hi *," he wnrnetl. "Wr will try DO I %  hat II %  Foreign I raid, had agreed to keep (tab Is %  hided I! 11 mi IIK UM ti,endshlp i ui triss, R. litre. Tories Expect W in Totlay BRISTOL. Fcb. 14 .%  oon n w ... %  Brsstol lamorrow Ii %  i % %  %  y.> < HIV.M Stanley, one .f Mr. Cburchlll'i < in.r i tub i Lion hri gel a probltn' tot the Labouj Ooven ment ParM i Harold that one i wd ma i.h-xi an I %  laughts were i.r the yelling "Banzai" petb i 'is* 1 -i Nation had lo north of u bon Kruu-r G.O.L. Higher Than Pre-uHtr IN BRITAIN I %  u .' %  •in waa %  %  %  i ordlni .': 1 %  %  HI for Europe 'II of the Comm i Iri Britain lemained conslaiit in the iirst three quarters '.t 1950 jr. %  SBS iI April i 106. empared with IfMi The ISSfl It vet WSJ gti mi i omparo I b) l38. win. (i than pre-war %  i <;.-IP' ..i . SwiUerland ihowi ps,red with itit All other coun living fell towards tl N %  I in %  • b illettn udrJ Raster Webb Asked' About Meal LONDON, Feb. 14 I Uauno n Fooit sUnleter told thi I.r. Mi..i %  h id an %  %  meal ti" ti Wrbb rUons fron renbers on the plieht of rifa:-hungry llntair. % %  fa it rat on iwauesd from lOd to ii.t worth per week iddJUOfl We get offers of small from Urns lo Urns from \ art) II Buropesn rounti %  on inetr nssrt tl %  Ken %  1'". .ivkrd hiro "H it not a fact lhat Uruauaj bss Lip With Argentina ami i^ not that Just one more example of the failure of f> f bulk buylnf?" Wroii deMiibeii Thornton%  nothei example ol i PRkleai and tin lielpfnl slateiiient" Anthoni Eden, Deputy Opp<> ii thai througni %  UUBM or las Argon %  negotiations "we did our u> t if reluctsnUy u> suppor* ttituda, and t k only ihcir recent utter failure i .ii ii bed u . ti it i>f the %  osssnes wss lost in %  nt )eer ng Itculet On Defence LONDON, Feb 14 yy INSTON CHURCHILL to night tabled a surprln ftmandmoni bo tisf British I^abour Qnvernment'a Dafonto Prngramma. Ha has asked for a vote ot no confidence in tle Oovr.rnment'a Defence policy. The amendment was made during the two day debate on defence in the House of Commons Kin; IVorluiiiird IIM I niiril Lvbiu TRIPOLI. Feb. II. Tiie Libyan National Assembly. il up to a Mutton for Ubys wbsn it kecoenss self govemlnsj next year, today reserved vote no ths form of a constitution for the future BtStS, Tho National Assembly hie pproved the proclnmation of the CyrensiOS, as king ol i i; ted Libya comprising ;nid the %  n.e United Nations council i Libya, which is discussing the Of power froiii th" adpowers, ni '. no and ant Libyans, his posi %  Minniw until Wednesday 21. — Reulrr • tcr Emunuel .h i ... %  iii-l tl e House of I 'antmn another %  %  to the BOO %  %  % % %  ; thl duMi to mobis a Ith much . | ; met Us %  i ncnthi If the Comr iinlst -.fiit" via* M be IhS next itspi nn Europe ti.it %  %  %  ui-. n, ive ,\u\ nol mesn pura % %  -• it war. —Rier Iiitlia \nil Aint'rica IIa\r Similar Aims NEW YORK lefa I 1 I %  ent Truman's message to CongTeei Baking puMiission to send India 2.roo m & tot of 6 %  nins 'everlastingly' rlgh' inphasising Ihe similarity betwren India and Ihe United St.ill's rather Mian the tempersr) sai differences, said'a Bl I I • -h.ilf of IBS India %  r.nth were striving tor a fre and peaceful world, said lh> i which wan Issued Mi J Sin. Ml MSHard J Walsh. chalrrnun of Ihe Executive Coin.1 This nbi lunge, but 1her i roon ha dlffeisnea In how lo i: added fulfilment of the Pre %  would DS a Ion* tip Una Sid improving Ihe un* between Ike Iwa %  ountrles and ward strengthening thi frel World SVI llrllW-f SLOVAK WOMAN HAS FOUND NEW COMET PRAOUB, Feh It, A Siovak woman nab new comet, the Centiid A ti i units In Piatti.i i. : Ths vpert gave no indication o| the I thu new comet, which was sighted on Sunday. The lor made her discovery from an Obeet tiny in the Talra mountains of Slovakia She u credited wiih the previous discovery of three Kruler Israi-I GoveniiDeitl Forced T< Retign WINVION i lit Ki nil i. Lloyd Douglas Dies A l 73 LOS ANGELES, Feb. 14. Uoyd CD i lial and wl.lely n-.ol died or Tuesday night of a hi He had suffered frum %  %  itlon had frown slesMllly worse in rerent 11 Mjinlliceni 0*81 nn. The Kohr printed in IB4I In th. neroui eluding t'-'rtm l.lsht. White Bsaaein. iaa| i r .... n rbs Mi i lakes • %  eqw t>i h lei %  Do* i. refused to DSds 0( The Hie ri-hMi.i..ii |..i'. the trestmi nl The it"'' in Hollywood. Hsndlii years. Fli poured lot %  „^i. —' p > Criinese D-monsirare LONDl I eh II Chun %  news age) I Peking lo-d;i.Reuter Aborigine Itanished MFLIUH'itNE. Feb. 14, was nought in theJ-^tfi to bring back 1 his birthplace Ihe All id, IN ho Stai heart ol %  ite country I InffJ wa I •i. ANkirs, Mr. F. %  %  Naea>u Murrsy ent of Ihe North Australian Workers' Union Mr. i ,. who lion f. r ii wrd rl. 1 v .... Actim %  %  %  id it. chambers. %  %  i 1 l TI it ii he f 'on.' evidence bofon him. Hrulrr TELL TIIE AllVOCATF. mi NEW! RING 111 I DAY Oil MOHT o V l< C LIMA T I \ / / D 8 JEKI'SAl.KM r>l i., .,!'i, confldsnes vot %  PARTY CRITICISM I Fi ; i 1 .mod alter a Sunday said to criticism arm TIC party n I Itculrr in I'.H lunun: lion policy. I nt threw out US led four part] oosUtlon by 49 votes to 42 wllh Uirec abstentions. The Government was formed nt the end of last Octolxcrisis f. llmviiiK '• H I withdrawal of the orthodox re ilglous bloc, the second stror.ge %  / j party in the coalition I ( The religious bloc had refusi x ** to support the plan to hroade.' the cabinet by the Inclusion of t'n M i fur Trsds and industry %  many days' w | i d to support the coolllio i until the Junuary. ISS3 i —ReiiP-r WI I SAI is i.\ Tin: II \l N iVrm Kxtindrd l/JNDON. Feb II Sir Alexander Cluttsrburh, Brll uh High Commissioner In I i.is term of olti. %  IDS I. the ( ornmonwealth Relationa I rxander, SJ, sue lion Malcolm MacDon.il H in May 1M6. 't pl it t: it 0M I: /*• /* .1 / V T S i. ii in i .i. kn In i raaruahn on the formulated ; i %  %  house. CARLISLE SAY at 11 SO ycuiday morning. Flahsraien took the epportunity of Manning th* of their flsiiing boat* By 4 pa boweYcr, the rains bad rsturned and they were once aaere soaking wet. FOURTEEN BURIED sfOftA. Fell 14 The lx>diis of 14 people, killed i i BundSfland flying bOSl OtS T-ipn. I n "-a. were terlan past'" investm.' %  •i a flight Hong Kong on ivivors. -Sealer i %  M ll 1 i IKON nuke na el* **i*.„ i GARDiHER AUSTIN & CO. LTD. BRIDGETOWN _j_



PAGE 1

PACK FOIR BARBADOS ADVOCATE TlirRMiW I F IIKI \I!V 13, 1951 BARBADOS &# ADVOCATE "III.* . U>. •<>-!-.!. C f -1 B.MNH Thursday I rlni.ir> 15. 195 SPENDING THE continued depletion of the imances of the island despite increases in taxation has been the cause of some degree ol alarm in the minds of tbOM who take any interest in the maintenance of that standard of financial independence which has been the boast of Barbados. If evidence WtK IWCdtd 1" pCOVt thai the financial > land have not been handled to tin.* best advantage, it is to be found in a close examination of the dwindling of our surplus balance during the last In I94H the surplus amount.! KM. In 1 co Mf ovnraia] nature. Pica For < oiiiiiionwealtli tlnd Colonial "Parliament** Colonial Secretary Turns It Down In Common* Dt>batrnoon. Wine Commnnder Geoffrey l i>our Member for Mitlleiborourh. West, put forward i me when seconding a motion by a Labour colleague, Squ-Ldr fenwri Kirmhorn. (Yarmouth), that n permanent body set up of delegates from parliaments and legislative bodies of the Commonwealth Mid llM Colonial Empire, "together with %  permanent secretariat to meet regularly anil discuss problems of common interest" The Secretary of State for the Colonies. Mr. James Griffiths. 'he idea outright so far as the CtBsawawtaWi oountrt— pointing out that it might impair unity And he MObttd the Wisdom of such a | | %  UM colonist ISSra boa, Members from tbl Houss • d -at this moment, at uny to that the debates could have* Tilt*. t ne efTtvl of fullv informing Mem. —,. „„ ,..„ „.„K^ bers of this Hmise and when wn "* n The motion was withdrawn , d ^ k h Ldr. Kmghorn spoke of the nee. I h t ,„. v wouUi x , fot (Siting to know "our fellow ,.„',..„„./„. m ,„.^ %  £££** riti/eni" and the need for di.*ciiniiiiuii pioblenu. Ha went on to say, "It would to which I belong and during my %  • %  afford to the colonial people a tenure of office, but indeed for a far closer contact with England very long time, lbs whole tendency Me oontinusd; It la so sad than at present. From discussions has been to decentralise rather •OmstimM to read about a I have had recently when tn West than to centrali.-e. Colonial con %  f< %  '%  i I-I on in .i pan %  %  • on AM %  d i Wt I b I* i navs "nnoai wars csllsd to sons ol Dominions who Is a great hero to found that among the pepie theremy predecessors back in the his own folk and whom we get | S a feeling of remolene: •and of twenties and tliirtics. In recent tc know only after he has made his resentment that decisions seem to years, however, the whole trend %  eputation there by being cast Into be imposed over their heads, has been to set up regional organjail I am certain from my own Seme decUlons have necessarily '"tlons and regional conferences knowledge lhat when we meet ( () be made from this country; it *"or instance, there is the regional and face problems together we cannot always be left to tho organisation in East Africa find that we are the same kind colonial Government to debate Recently, there was a very inv of human beings and have pretty and decide on all the matter* portant conference in the West well the same approach to most affecting the interest of that Col'"dies to consider the future eonhuman prci ony. In some cases colonial fctitutional development of those Mnaf powsrs, They will to latasnad with representation by the right hon Gentleman when matters like defence, foreigi !• BUBunlestions, trade. ladosbry, and so on. are being ci'cusicd '.V !o betti than that". Regret that there was so little tins that afternoon to debate what he described as "this very important matter" was expressed Colonial Secretary s ith the position so far ;.s UM CO ldiin r %  com si si d to made the fallowing statement. 'Tle COlonlSj territories, are in a transition stage. They arc varying stages of constitutional advance They are al><> Ing stages of economic ., TV result I. .I.I % %  ii IMfSblt it"'.. inmciit. it v.'ould be wise (o make any attempt to call toitatlvsi of all th< colonial territories—the large ones the small ones, those which an -i-t of a number of wrU advanced towards self-gov ernmrni. including the Gold COBSt, the territories in the West Indies and others, as well a* those In s sense ore not so far advanced along that road. Very Long Time It will be noted Lhat. not only during the life of the Government Rt Hon JAMES GRIFFITHS I aW knowledge gained through l>eing members of the assemble Barbados Arts And Crafts Exhibition By RICHARD Le FANU D. V. SCOTT & COLTD. TO-DAVS SPECIALS at THE COLONNADE Usually NOW I ins S \. APRICOT JAM—'. '*'*' v %  .I more, such as in East Africa liad nol „„„ so nnppy In these days, there Is the overall need for quick action on defence. "It would pay us all if we had !it body such 1st here. which would be more handy lo consider these MOB* Jems and act quickly If WSj find ourselves In still greater difficulties we might be forced bv circumstances to set up such an organisation In the next year or SO, It would ser if WS ftid it now. while we have are able to set up permanent body". ,:nt bava been. Two-Way Cluiiii "My last point thai Governors have not been as sueBre From that conference Discussing common problems he cessful as they might have been emerged the proposals now being nitanced the housing shortoge, lt wou |,| i )r a Koor ( thing if even <"iisidered '<" %  federation. Afric.. ,,,! on "FooT ho id. SK^.STh.'ISii.SlRS „'?„ .u^Un'a &£ 1"^ 11 a problem which confronts u „, f ,„ plP ,„ ho (>1 ,,„. lr nnd nr " l s t""^Li".'„?*SJJ '££ 11 in .he n,nutac.ur,n paru of Bun.h <;.„,,, %  „, ,„ ,ht II nc-d c .A .MkTli lo con rai !" 1 Ihc Empire and Ihow who prot,, chan.o. could be nffoded if u MrtteuSrto im^oruln Ml w ncral raw m l*r..l. or j, w „ (ound lhBl .pp,, in ,„„.„„ ZmMM^ST^SSLR ihey nnt nny suggestion of this kind is intended In any way to retard the movement towards the development of constitutional advance toward! self-government. I know X££ "'C S£ X SIS. "iSys. "i! "£&£ rseognised that we should increasingly important that there have a two-way chain for inform .huuld be the closest contact be ation. From tin OoVSflimsnl tween members of legislaliv* ttarS is the chain of Informalu.n councils and Members of thii which Hows out through its House of Commons. We are Departments and their ofllciols bringing members of the colonial t\ t'.'tii '' "''' %  rt 'l' 1 '' f ""' "'"""V ln legislative councils Into contact IL u_„_ Mdlllon, there are the elected with \u and also Into International representatives, and this applies movements. Last year and tne both to local government, afid to year before a representative this HOUSS, who can bring forward one of the colonial legislative Mr. Cooper, In seconding. mattSfS which affect their concouncils accepted an invitation to maintained that the proposed stituenls, where regulations have join our delegation to United assembly should re a body enjoypiessed hardly upon them, so as to Nations. Ing a status similar to the House have anomalies and Injustices reof Commons. "It ha* been sugn ; oved. That does not apply in Represented nested." he said, "that a certain full to the Colonies. There is number of colonial Members of a tap In the chain. There Is not "when the conference on the Parliament might be elected to the same two-way discussion by a Colombo plan was held in London this Chamber, but that would not two-way chain of Information Singapore and the Federation of overcome the difficulty of finding between the colonial Governments Malaya were represented there sufficient lime adequately to and this Howe. That incomplete ">' very distinguished and eminent n.lonial afluirs I wish l *-.v*tom of dem.-r.u which members of their legislative eouiimake some suggestions as to the I'pplics to lbs Colonies is that cils. In thai way we are bringing nature of the assembly. I suggest dealt with almr.sl entirely l>v " %  •" into ever closer association. tht it should sit, in the main, reports which come from colonial uav tribute lo the magnificent in London, and that its sessions Governors or official* lo the 0 none by the Commonwealth could perhaps coincide. In the Colonial Office. The setting up „f Parliamentary Association, in. with these of this House, the representative assembly I Urln 8 %  l nto !" htaci with memwould consist of about 60 to have suggested would mean that 100 msmbeis, winrh A.HIM mean jfeatanpn utd ba HUsd sndiharsthat there would be up to six or W K've the Colonies a far close fetlini; ol %  ountry". j-opcration with this Distress Mi selected from each Colony. They would be chosen in a way which would give representation to the main interests of each Colony, the economic interests as Wall ;.s H'liiii.d interests, so that ihc full aspect of each Colon i problems might be spoken of by "d: Ihose whn have first-hand know1st ledge of the particular matter Wd iiboul which Ihey ore speaking Empire at the recent Conferei of Dominion Prime Ministers, said. Three Years ind UM right hon. Gentleman" From bers of the legislative council who arc on their way through Ixmdon. I am most anxious that ;hou!d lake every opportunity which will bring us into closer touch as Members of Parliament with members of the legislative councils of the colonial territories. There is much more I should like to say. I thank my hon. Friend for roising this matter. I hope lhat they feel disposed lo withdraw ihis Motion, otherwise I 11,0 £K a '"""W h-ve to ask the House to reject il." Leonard Gammai f. (HornCn rvstlva), recalled his sss" whsn 'be Prims Mm was asked in the Utilise who "Membon should j ftnssTysnd *£•t. W S2S u ^ff nt ^ &S'Jg&SfTtil have their elections staggered SJ Premier was right, but The Colonies I T afTa" o Se thai Utsy could ensure rontinully Colonial Empire, however, is a Commonwealth ..aid "I believe jttferent thing twlay from what (bat the Secretary of Stale ha> IS years ugo. Wa gone some way towards opetiing .ilh the door." for and lh.it nil member, did letuin In tlnic i.mntriei || was at the SfemS lime The assembly hov Agar in Watercolour. Mrs. Howes "Jump-Up" (144). a picture of a raffish dance hall, is full of energy and colour. Percy Agar draws a sun and raindrenched tropical ;xene with n clarity and balance which make his two pictures "House in the Forest" (151) and "Bananas" (152) rank among the most H in the whole exhibition. It remains to add that the artists and the public have been well served by thf care with which the picn. uped and hung and for this, as well as for their Inll encouragement. Mrs. Golde White and her Committee deserve our praise and thanks. (Pictures on p. 5) FOR YOUR BATHROOM Corner BASINS with Pedestal M-xlB" I & } BASINS with or without Pedestal 22'xl6" ) I.ow-down SUITES High-up SUITES W.C. PANS, S & P TRAPS W.C. SEATS ll'lns'.le White and iit.-ikciiv Mahogany Cast Iron CISTKKNS Lavatorv BRUSH HOLDERS HARPIC, Large and Small. WILKINSON & HAYNFS Co, l.tJ Successors To C S. PITCHER & CO. I'hono, — 4472, 4687. ;'.***^>-.'.v.**W'.*.-.*.-*'.*,v.'.*.* WHO LIKE FOR THOSE TO KEEP COOL . AND KEEP WELL-GROOMED AT THE SAME TIME! THE NEW MOYGASIIEL ANTI-CRUSHABLE LINENS . ARE JUST THE TICKET NEW VMM KS .11 SI .VIIIIIVIvU AT DA COSTA & CO., LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT JOIN THE SMART SET AMI ENJOV THE WORLD'S MOST URBBHDiG DRINK GOLD BRAID RUM I AND CANADA DRY CLUB SOL 1 OR CANADA DRY GINGER ALE | AT GODDARD'S RESTAURANT I