Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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|

I

ESTABLISHED 1895

Hav bados

cn a et







Chinese

Should

Negotiate Now

—SAYS

(CLEMENT ATTLEE,

ATTLEK

LONDON, Feb. 12.
Prime Minister, told the

House of Commons this afternoon that in the
British view the “38th parallel ought not to be cross-

ed
the

ain until there has been full consultation with
nited Nations, and in particular those states

which have provided forces.’’

Speaking after Anthony Eden in a one-day
Foreign Affairs debate, Attlee said the position in
Korea was much more stable and there were possi-

bilities for negotiation.



Brazil Appoints
Montero As Chief
Of Armed Forces

RIO De JANEIRO, Feb. 12
General Pedro Aurio Montero
was to-day appointed Chief of
the Combined General Staff of
Brazilian armoured forces. A
veteran soldier and_ politician
General Montero has twice occu-
pied the War Ministry and was

Senator in the last Legislature.
It was reliably disclosed to-day
that during a meeting held yes-
terday between President Vargas
and the Ministers of war, navy,
air and foreign affairs, it was de-
cided that the Brazilian delega-
tion to the Inter American Con-
ference to be held in Washington
next. March will uphold the prin-
ciple that it is essential for Ameri-

can defence that Brazil be
in a state of military pre-
paredness, and that it is in-

cumbent on the United States to
help her obtain this objective,
through economical and military
assistance. —Reuter.

Trinidad May Get
Paper Industry

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 12.
The Colonial Development Cor-
poration are studying the possibi-



nS A

jities of establishing a paper
manufacturing industry in the
Brit West Indies — possibly

Trinidad. The industry wouid be
a subsidiary to sugar, utilising
bagasse_and pEneaane fine quality
papers ~ an wrapping paper,
Newsprint production would not
be undertaken. Financial experts
ot the Corporation have been
closely studying the economics of
such a scheme for several montns,
paying ahaa moa attention to the
availability of supply, bearing in
mind the meed for alternative
sources of fuel for the sugay

industry.
When. they have\reporied back,
the Corporation will decide

whether or not to go ahead with
the project.

“Naturally we are interested in
doing whatever we can to alleviate
the present paper shortage.” a
C.D.C- spokesman said today.

Referring to the possibilities of
the scheme in a letter to the Man-
chester Guardian today, Mr. F. W.
Winterbotham, a C.D.C. Press
Officer, points out that in addition
to the raw materials for the actual
manufacture of fibre-board and
paper from bagasse, large quanti-
ties of fuel and water are needed
to maintain an economic opera-
tion of the plant. And in the case
of bagasse, an alternative cheap

@ On page 3.



Imrie Named Head

Of Local Govt.
IN TRINIDAD

From our own Correspondent
ONDON, Feb. 12.

Sir John Imrie, C.B.E., has
been appointed Commissioner of
the local Government in Trinidad

He was held to be in charge
of a newly formed local Govern-
ment Department in Trinidad—
the Ministry of Health and local
Government, -

In 1949 Sir John visited Trini-
dad as one of two members of a
Commission which reported on the;
financial relationships between the
municipalities and the Central
Government.

Since 1926 he has been
Chamberlain of Edinburgh,

He is 59.

City

The Chinese he added would be
wise to negotiate now. Opening
the debate Deputy Conservative—
Opposition-Leader Eden said “as
we look at problems of West Eu-
rope, Germany remains a domin-
ant theme”. He said that an-
swers in the Commons last week
on German rearmament _ by
Bevin’s Parliamentary Under Sec-
retary Ernest Davies had created
some uncertainty abroad as well
as at home, as to what Govern-
ment’s policy was.

Eden said “we have signed the

Atlantic Pact and we have to build | —————"__——__—-——-———

up a defence of the West to make
it a reality. He asked if Govern-~
ment still adhered to the Brussels
decision to authorise the inclusion
of German armed contingents in
the Atlantic Pact forces Paral-
lel with this there was the ques-
tion of talks with Russia in which
Germany would certainly be the
main theme.

Eden said they ought to try to
draw up an agenda for a meeting
with the Soviets which was wider
than Germany alone.

Soviet satellite forces were con-
tinuing to grow in strength while
notes of protest were being hurled
at the West for relatively modest
defensive preparations in Ger-
many.

Russia had in Eastern Germany,
forces overwhelmingly superior to
the West and not content with
that Russia had taken the initia-
tive in German rearmament.

Rumania and Hungary had in-
creased their forces beyond peace
treaty limits. In any four power
discussions the West should re-
quire that armaments of ex-enemy
satellites be reduced.

Eden thought that the increased
threat these forces constituted to
Yugoslavia was subject for con-
sultation between Britain, France,
the United States and the Com-
monwealth powers. If the West
was not prepared to allow Yugo-
slavia to be made a victim of
aggression then it should express
itself clearly on this topic soon, as
a contribution to peace.

‘Duty Is To Hold On

Turning to the Far East Eden
said the duty of the United Nations
was to hold on until the aggressor
were willing to negotiate on the
basis which took account of inter-
national obligations. Formosa was
an issue which must form part of
the general settlement in the Far
East. This was part of the question
of the treaty with Japan. Terms of
such a treaty must be agreed by
the Allies who fought against
Japan from the beginning. -

Attlee said there was no break
in the continuity of Government
policy-support for the United Na-
tions and acceptance of obligations
of membership. Attlee said tha4
Korea was a direct challenge to
the United Nations.

He was cheered as he added
“it is really no good making lit-
tle legal points about this matter”.
He said Britain had had great
experience in Asiatic affairs
“without condoning in any way
the action of Chinese in Korea
We understood some of their
reasons, however misguided they
might appear. “equally we under-
stood and sympathised with our
friends in the United States.”

Attlee said Britain had no doubt
that China had committed ag-
gression but considered there
should be no question of applying
sanctions until it was made clear
that there was no further hope o!
achieving a peaceful settlement

“To-day the position in Korea
lis much more stable”’,-he said.
“There is a good position there for
negotiation and I think the Chin-
ese might be wise to negotiate.

—-Feuter.



B.O.A.C.

Increase

Passenger Rates

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 12.

THE B.O.A.C. have to-day announced further details
of increases on their dollar earning non-stop flights between

New York and Nassau.

Trade Record
For B.G.

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, Feb. 12.
British Guiana’s aggregate ex-
ternal trade in 1949 was a record,
The annual report for the col-
ony published in London to-day
(Tuesday) by

rama seeeerenenrinreneenretincteret, One fhousand snd ‘ €
| nue passengers were carried in

H.M.. Stationery |

one reve-

both directions during January—
an increase of 23.1 per cent over
the previous highest of 813 in
December Cargo figures also
reached a new height,

To deal with this improved
business, the B.O.A.C. have
just added another round trip to
the present schedule of three per

i a ane





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

HERE

Wathys,,..



13, 1951





THE TRINIDAD Cricket Team which arrived here yesterday to contest honours with the local boys.

Left to right: Clarence Skeete, Lennox Butler, Prior Jones, Ralph Legall, Jeffrey Stollmeyer (Capt.), Simpson Guillen, Brunell Jones (‘Trin-
idad ‘Guardian’ Sports Writer), Harold Burnett (Manager), Sydney Jackbir.
Squatting in front are: Wilfred Ferguson, Chicky Sampath, Nyron Asgarali, Andy Ganteaume, Rupert Tang Choon, (The Mascot, Brunell

France Restricts \RedChietCalls

Jones’ son), and Frank King.

Avalanches
Bury Villages

GENEVA,. Feb. 12
Fresh avalanches’ thundering
loose from mountain-sides engulf-
ed two Swiss villages today, buried
dozens of people, flattened homes
and stopped express trains.

Snow rolling down the local
“death valley” at Airolo, near St.
Gothard Vass, killed six people
including two women and two
children, Rescuers gave up hope
of finding several other people.
Troops were called in to evacuate
ihe whole valley.

An avalanche, according to sur-
vivors, burst “like a thunder-clap”
over the village. Terror-stricken
people jumped from beds and fled
before the white tidal wave as it
obliterated houses and stables and
finally came to a halt near the
village church.

A second village was completely
entombed by an enormous fall of
snow which left only the church
spire showing. Ten of sixteen
people buried were rescued “but
there was little hope for the
others,

An avalanche came down with
unexpected violence and wrecked
places which had been considered
safe despite .gathering snows.

A north-bound express train
from Halian Switzerland found its}
way blocked by masses of snow,
bul passengers were unhurt. Dur-
ing the night railway traffic be—
tween Switzerland and Italy was
cut.

Gangs of workers cleared the
way for the Rome—Amsterdam;
train but further slides stopped
the Genca—Zurich night express
at Ambri.

In Grisons, avalanches tore up
electric posts and telephone com-
munications last night and people
tad-to evacuate part of a village
Another avalanche plunged one
village without causing casualties.

The Swiss meteorological office
later announced that the ava-
lanche danger north of the St.
Gothard Pass was “critical.”

—Reuter.



Exiled Europeans
Sign Anti-Red Pact

PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 12.
The exiled people of ten “iron

o’clock this
Honour Mr. Justice D.
son, Chief Justice of the Windward
and Leeward Islands, was given

Foreign Diplomats,



PARIS, Feb. 12.

4

FRANCE TO-DAY ordered restrictions on the move-
ments of Rumanian, Albanian, and Bulgarian diplomats in
Paris. This was reprisal for similar restrictions placed on
the movement of the French Embassy staff in the three

countries.

Rumanian, Albanian, and Bulgarian ministers in Paris
were summoned to the French Foreign Ministry to-day
and informed that their movements in France would hence-

forth be restricted.

$$.

ON THE
° SPOT

MANILA, P.I., Feb.

Molasses—thick, brown
syrupy product obtained
from sugar cane—will be
sold on a commercial scale
soon.

The product, heretofore
used primarily as horse feed,
is being purchased by San
Fernando housewives by the
gallons. A gallon of mo-
lasses sells at 38 cents.

Reports from the Central
Luzon town state that black-
straps and molasses are sell-
ing fast as a result of maga-
zine articles claiming that
molasses is a cure for high
blood pressure, anemia, con-
stipation, insomnia and
asthma.

Experiments are reported
underway at the Pampanga
Sugar Development labora-
tories in San Fernando to-
remove the burnt-sugar
taste in molasses to make it
more palatable.

The new “wonder food”
will be bottled, a spokesman
for the company said, and
shipped to all parts of the
Philippines. A pint will cost
around 25 cents.

LN.S,





Jackson Welcomed

e
In Antigua
From our own Correspondent
ANTIGUA, Feb. 12
A large crowd was present at
St. John’s Court House at 10
morning when His
E. Jack-

curtain” nations have signed here|2n Official welcome as a tribute

an anti-Communist “declaration

cf liberation” for central and ener

ern European peoples.

Many of them wept as they
signed the declaration. The signa-
tories pledged themselves to these
principles.

A return to the spirit of the
Atlantic Charter and the assurance
by the free world that it intends
to apply that Charter to “captive”
countries.

Elimination of deportation by
Russians of free peoples, the re-
establishment of full democracy
in the iron curtain countries and
the right of peoples to freedom of
movement and goods and the
choice between private and public
enterprises.

The elimination of all iron cur-
tains; measures for raising stand-
ards of living, restoration to farm-
ers of the right to dispose their
lands privately or co-operatively

as they see fit, and protection off

workers against ex/loitation.”
—Reuter.

Sir George Seel, Comptroller for
Development and Welfare in the
West Indies, welcoming delegates
of the Caribbean Press Associa-
tion Meeting yesterday and ex-
tending to them the freedom of
Hastings House, said it is impera-
tive that the people of the Carib-
bean Area should be served by an

week. Their services were orig~-jalert, well informed snd objective

Office shows that the figure was | inally begun in November on the} press,

£20,210,440 which was four times
greater than that of 1938

It also exceeded the
best of 1948 by £2,505.584.

A substantially greater quanti-
ty of sugar was exported 173,818
tons valued at £4,375,000

| creased to three early in Janu-

previous |

two a week basis, but were in-

ary.

| Fi



s are operated excl
R ;

Asivé
60 iter Bocing Strato.



| That Press, he said, should be
;well equipped to expound the
‘economic, political and social
| eres and fearless both to detect
and to expose those who seek to
juse these trends for personal ad

vancement and to support those

to the honour conferred on him by
His Majesty the King in confirm-
ing his appointment to the highest

judicial post in these islands,

Mr. Justice Manning in con-
gratulating the new Chief Justice,
said he could testify of the greai
esteem the Brother Judges of the
Bar and the public hela for him.

The acting Attorney - General,
the Honourable R. H. Lochart,
spoke of a brilliant and wide legal
experience Mr. Jackson had from
the day of his first appointment
to the Colonial Service in British
Guiana on the 18th of April, 1931,
to the present time and referrec
particularly to the great work he
had done in reducing the arrears
of legal work which had accum-
ulated in these islands,

Crown Attorney Cecil Kelsich
referred to the elarity and forth
rightness of the approach with
which His Honour had conducted

@ On page 3.



The restrictions, which apply to
all members of the three legations
{are tighter for Rumanians and
{Albanians than for Bulgarians as
| Bulgaria did not place such strict
restrictions on French diplomats
as the other two Governments.

Rumanian and Bulgarian diplo-
mats may not gp more than 50
miles from Paris*without permis-
siol.. They may not visit Fontaine.
blesu* and areas near Versailles
what there are Allied military
establishments,

If a member of these legations
wishes to travel outside this 50+

mile limit, he must apply for a!

permit 48 hours before his jour-
ney, declaring his destination,
means of travel and route.

These restrictions are the same
as those imposed a week ago on
Hungarian diplomats in Paris.

The Bulgarian Minister may
travel freely in France but mem-
bers of his legation must apply for
travel permits 48 hours before a

journey.
—Reuter.



Dockers Will |

Return To Work

Until Trial Starts

LONDON, Feb. 12
Right thousand dock strikers in
London to-day voted to resume
work until seven of their arrested
colleagues appear at a magistrate’s
court next week charged with in |
citing an illegal strike,

On the recommendation of the
Port Workers’ Defence Committee
which does not have union back-
ing, they decided to resume work
to-morrow.

Over 9,000 strikers in North
western docks of Liverpool, Bir-
kenhead and Manchester were ex-
pected to follow the London men

The dockers gave their unani-
mous approval to the programme
drawn up by the Port Workers’
Committee. This called for the
resumption of work to-morrow
until Tuesday, next week when|
the seven appear in court. On
that day, the strike begins again

About 1,400 strikers had gone
back, before the meeting, attend-
ed by over 2,000, was held.



Official figures issued by the
Dock+Labour Board as the men
were meeting showed that in Lon~
don, 7,190 men were on strike and
65 ships idle. Liverpool and Bir-
kenhead had 9,200 men out and
71 ships idle, while in Manchester
2,110 men were striking with 15

ships idle. Many other ships
were undermanned, In Mersey
ports where the original strike

began over a dispute, men were
meeting later to-day to decide their
action, ‘

—Reuter.

Sir George Seel Tells Press Delegates

who are genuinely striving to pro
mote the well being of their fellow
West Indians.

Purpose of the meeting is to
consider plans for the formation
of a West Indies Press Agency
Delegates attending are; Mr. L. C
Stevenson, Editor of the West
Indian, Grenada, Mr. F. Seal Coon,
Editor of the Argosy, British Gui-
ana, Mr. G. E. Willeck Editor of
the Daily Chronicle British
Guiana, Mr. C A. L. Gale
Fditor of the Barbados Advocate,

Mr. ¢€ E. Hitchins, Editor of

the TriMidad Guardian, Hon'ble

Garnet Gordon, Editor of the
Voice of St. Lucia, Mr. E. G
Rawlins, Editor of the Guiana

Graphic, Mr. T. E. Sealey, Asso-
ciate Editor of the Jamaica
Gleaner,

Also present were Mr. E. L
Cozier, Honorary Secretary of the
Association, Mr. G. C. Bloom,

Latin American Manager _ for

Reuters’ Limited, Mr. G. H. Hunte

Assistant Editor of the Advocate

and Mr. Philip Hewitt-Myrir

Public Relations Adviser to the
‘

*

b

’ 2 4

9



For New Drive

FRANKFURT, Feb. 12
The West German Communist



IVE CENTS

_ Allies Nearing

38th Parallel

By JULIAN BATES.

TOKYO, Feb. 12.

MORE than 5,000 Chinese and North Koreans
to-day rammed back the centre of the United

Nations offensive, surro
and threatened to break
Wonju.

Shattering hopes
general
Commi

vance up to the 38th Pa
, divisions punched solidly at the South

unded advanced elements
through the key town of

of the United Nations
railel, about six

Karean force advancing up the mountainous part

i ‘uhe peninsula.

Big 4 Talks
Planned For
March In Paris

NEW YORK, Feb. 12.

The United States, Britain and,
France will offer to hold a meet-
ing of “Big Four” Foreign Minis
ters deputies in Paris early in
Mareh, New York Times diplo-
matic correspondent James Res-
ton writing from Washington saic
to-day.

He said this had been agreec
on in a series of exchanges amons
fepresentatives from Washington
Paris and London in the past feu
Gays. Reston addeq that the fine

Party is preparing a fresh all-out] wording of the Allied reply te

campaign against West

German] Moscow had not yet been agreec

re~armament, and for all-German]on but a note was expected to be

unity.

sent to Moscow in the middle oj

In a speech published in a Com] the week,

munist newspaper to-day, West
German Communist leader Max

The three western nations hac

Reimann emphasised the need for}4&reed on the meeting in Paris

a review of Communist party tac-

to discuss a broad range of prob

tics “in view of the increasingly |J¢ms but they had not been able

dangerous __ political
West Germany.”

The speech was made in Dussel-
dorf on February 9, and was tc
prepare discussion of a fresh in-
tensified campaign against Wes!
German re-armament and for all-
German Unity,

situation in

The new party tactics to be
adopted are to be decided upon
at the party’s annual congress in
Munich from March 2 to 4.

“The party’s most important
task is to turn the passive attitude
of many West Germans into active
mass resistance against re-arma~
ment “Reimann told q closed par-
ty executive meeting in his speech.

“The second important task is to
achieve new activity for unity,
rallying together all non party and
above all social democratic oppo
nents of re-militarisation, It is
most decisive to make all friends
of peace join our camp whatever
their party affiliations may be.

Reimann strongly criticised par-
ty officials in general for failing
to train young party members as
new cadres for all levels of party
leadership. —Reuter.

Persia’s Shah
Weds Again

TEHERAN, Feb. 12

The wedding of Shah Monam-
med Reza Pahlev, of Persia to
Soraya Bakhmiarim took place at
the Royal Palace here to—day in
accordance with Moslem rules
which included the religious wed-
ding ceremony, and the signing 6
the marriage contract.



“Lucky” snow blanketed — the
Persian capital for the wedding
It kept many people indoors, bu)
Persians who decorated their win-

|} dows with flags, flowers and car-

pets said it was a happy omen,
white being a lucky colour.

The Shah’s witnesses at the
wedding were Prime Minister Haj,
Ali Razmara, and Sayed Hassan
Zadeh, President of the Persian
Senate and former Persian ambas
sador to London,

The bride is the daughter of a
German woman, and a member
of the Bakhtiari tribe of Southern
Persia,

The bride wore a pearl em-
broidered wedding gown of silver
lace, and white tulle designed by
Christian Dior of Paris, as she
arrived at the marble Royal Pal-
ace to become Empress of Persia,
She was escorted by the Shah's
sisters Princess Chams and Prin-
cess Asraf in a golden. painted
Rolls Royce.

Two Moslem priests placed the
Mosiem wedding symbol, — the
Koran, a mirror and candlesticks-
in front of the royal couple, before
Soraya agreed to the marriage.
The bridegroom then put the ring
on her finger. —Reuter.

Caribbean Press Should Be Alert











to agree on whether some of those
topics should be listed in their
replies to Moscow

Britain and France apparently
were willing to notify Moseow
that they were prepared to Mave
the Deputies meet in Paris
if they could work out an
for Big Four Foreign
meeting on all European
lems that have been causing ten
sion Reston said,

The Unite States favoured list
ing Fi vf the tenice a note
Oo the Maussi at Soviet

hae aniline ore ORE
knowledge that the Western Na-
tions wanted to discuss other
fhings besides rearming western
Germany. —Reuter,







France, Italy
Start Talks

SANTA MARGHERITA
? Feb, 12,

Italian and French Premiers anc
Foreign Ministers opened thet
three-day conference here to-day
with what informed sources des-
cribed as “very general exchanges
of view”, French Premier Reni
Pleven and Foreign, Minister
Robert Schuman and Italian Pre-}
mier Alcide De Gasperi and For-
eign Minister Count Carlo Sforza
met with their top Foreign Office
efficials in the salon of the luxu-
rious seafront hotel “Miranda” at
4 p.m to-day.

South Koreans were sent reel-
ing back to the town of Hoengstong
where hand to hand fighting took
place as Communist crossed in on
three sides.

Enemy resistance stiffened sud-
derly to-day in the western sector
where the United Nations forces
pulled back across the Han River
to the south bank under severe
pressure, Many Communists in
Seoul area were known to have
“side slipped” to take part in the
sudden blow in the centre.

On the east coast, South Koreans
moved 4 miles porth of the 38th

Parallel, Attacking at midnight
through heavy United Nations
air and artillery bombardment,

Communists had by this afternoon
forced 6 miles in the line between
Hoengsong and Chipyong about 19
miles to the West Hoengsong
was still in allied hands as the Sec-
ond night fighting began but de-
fenders were hard pressed.

United Nations troops also held
Chipyong and the surrounding
area against rapidly mounting
Chinese reinforcements,

An Eighth Army communique
to-night reported one South
Korean regiment surrounded
North of Hoengsong. The com-
munique said that at least two

Communist divisions were spear-
heading the attack on Hoengsong
Pilots said a large group of Com-
munists were moving southeast in
the battle zone

Army sources said it wag too
Gariy to tell if the Communist
stroke was the beginning of a gen.
eral offensive, The United Nations
line in the central sector made
deep pit into Communist positions

and Chinese or North Koreans
out the there.

was relatively little action to-day

on the west and east flanks of the

line across the Peninsula,
—Reuter,

Franes On Tanks

BERNE, Feb. 12.
Switzerland is to spend 400,000,-
000 frances over the next five years
to equip its army with heavy
tanks, the Swiss Federal Council
announced to-day. This was. said
in a message to Parliament giving
details of its 1,460,000,000 francs
five-year defence plan.
—Reuter.
ee

TELL THE ADVOCATE ~
THE NEWS
RING 3113
DAY OR NIGHT





—Reuter.

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S59

‘ FOR WEDDINGS

THERE ARE NO WINES BETTER THAN

K. W. V.

WHITE TABLE WINES — (

are of distinctive flavour

companions,

SPSS SOSPOOOSS SS SISO FOP

are of the highest quality

flavour make them indispensable companions at Meals
during which Meat is served,

K. W. V. CAPE DRY RED (Full-bodied) ic. BURGUNDY

K. W. V. CAPE DRY RED (

K. W. V. CABERNET SAUVIGNON — A very popular Red

These are rich in natural aroma and fruity acids and

or off the Ice during Meals, to which they are pleasing

K. W. V. RIESLING CAPE DRY WHITE (Selected)
K. W. V. SAUVIGNON BLANC

RED TABLE WINES, — (Bottled by the K

These should be served at room temperature — They



Bottled by the K. W. V.)

64

They should be served chilled

oo

SLL PL LLP LAO

Ww. Vv.)

and their pleasing aroma and

Light-bodied) ie, CLARET

Comptroller for Development and & Wine &
Welfare 4 < x
Mr. C. E. Hitchins, President of % %
the Caribbean Press Association, x 2
introduced Sir George Seel ands & WEDDIN( BELLS 8
then extended a welcome to the'¢ %
various delegates. He said that % 2
they had met to consider the func- & will sound their Swect Chimes for Many Couples ! ! %
tion of a co-operative news agency Is °
in the Caribbean and as Sir George |X The entertainment of Guests at a Wedding Celebration x
was one of the architects of the | & can be less costly and at the same time lose none of the %
proposed federation of the Betlieh |S sparkle of Champagne if you serve less Champagne and more
Caribbean, he knew that they | % of that most delicious SAUTERNE Type Wine %
could count on him for sympathy, x 3S
.

*

Communication % K. W. V. WEMMERSHOEK Ss

One ¢ th major items with / %
@ On page 3 156565466669 966665555465956950O656660556559956999900

/



Re

PAGE TWO





Caub Calling

IS EXCELLENCY the Gov-
ernor opened the Barbados
Arts and Crafts Exhibition at
Queen's Park yesterday afternoon.
Lady Savage was also present for
the ming. They were accom-
panied by the Governor’s A.D.C.
Maj. Dennis Vaughan.

Arriving To-morrow
XPECTED to arrive to-morrow
are Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred
Mr. Woodhouse is
Building Development Adviser to
C.D. and W. They have been in
England on long leave.
e ’Plane
NTRANSIT for Antigua yes-
terday by B.W.I.A. from
Trinidad were Mr. Rex Stollmeyer,
Trade Commissioner in Canada
for the B.W.I. and Brig. Eric
Mount, representative of Colonial
Development Corporation with
headquarters in Trinidad.
Travelling on the same plane
for Jamaica was Lt. Gen. Sir Otto
Lund, Commissioner in Chief of
the St. John’s Ambulance Brigade.
Venezuelan Surgeon
R. and Mrs, Alejandro Vera-
Diaz arrived from Venezue-
la Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.1.A. Here for two weeks,
they are staying at Cacrabank. Dr.
Vera-Diaz is a surgeon at the hos-
pital in Cristobal.

Short Holiday
RS. CHARLES BAEZA and
her youngest son Rodney
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. ‘to spend
ten days’ holiday in Barbados,

For Press Conference
R. T. E. SEALY, Associate
Editor of the Jamaica Glean-
er arrived from Jamaica yester-
day morning by B.W.I.A. for the
meeting of the Caribbean Press
Association at present being held
at “Hastings House.”
Mr. Sealy is staying at “Super
Mare” Guest House, Worthing.

Auto Dealer

. and MRS. D. F. PROUD-

FOOT arrived from *Canada
on Saturday by T.C.A. to spend a
month with Mr. and Mrs
Somers at “The Camp”, St. Law-
rence.

Mr Proudfoot is an auto dealer

in Kitchener, Ontario.



MR. RONALD TREE

Back Again
R. AND MRS. Ronald Tree
and their daughter Penelope
arrived by air on Sunday afternoon
to spend six weeks at their Bar-
bados home “Heron Beach,”’ St,
James.

A Delightful Spot
MONG the tourists arriving
here on one of the tourist
boats from New York were Mr.
d Mrs. S. M. Hall, Mr. and
rs. John Griffith of California
and Mr. D. S, Norton and his
ister Mrs. N. Hasbrouck of Long
Istana, They were all paying
their first visit to the island and
were favourably impressed by it.
Mr. Hall who is a retired busi-
nessman said that Barbados seem-
ed to be a delightful spot and
fiought it was a wonderful place
for a sail boat.
Both Mr. Griffith and Mr, Nor-
ton are in the Real Estate busi-
ness.



MR. JOHN MACGREGOR, Field
Commissioner of the Boy Scouts’
Association, in Quebec arrived yes-
terday by B.W.LA. on a short visit.

Boy Scout Field

Commissioner

M* JOHN MACGREGOR,
Field Commissioner of the
Boys Scouts’ Association in the
Province of Quebec, Canada ar-
rived from Trinidad by B.W.I.A.
yesterday morning. His visit is
under the auspices of the Boy
Scouts’ Imperial Headquarters in
London. He is here to conduct
training courses and help the local
association wherever he can.

Mr. MacGregor is staying at’the
Hastings Hotel. He has just at-
tended the Caribbean Scout Com-
missioners’ Conference in Trini-
dad. He has already visited Jamai-
ca, Grand Cayman Island, St.
Kitts, Antigua and Trinidad. He
leaves Barbados February 17th to
continue his tour of the Eastern
Caribbean and B.G.

The Commissioner visited the
Leeward District yesterday after-
noon in company with Mr. L. T.
Gay. He stopped at three cen-

G epher, OÂ¥S
School, where he was met by Mr,
L. B. Waithe, and Mr. ¢. “D.
Cuffley.

He will speak to Scout and
Rover Leaders on Friday evening
at Scout Headquarters,

Week-end Arrival
RRIVING from Trinidad on
Sunday by B.W.I.A. to
Spend about three weeks’ holiday
in Barbados was Mr, Peter Know-
les. He is staying with his mother
at “Midget”, Palm Beach, Hastings.
Mr. Knowles is Manager of
Cannings Groceries in P o in t
Fortin.

Here for a Week
R. NORMAN PITT, Presi-
dent of Canadian Refractor-
ies Ltd., in Montreal accompanied
by his wife arrived here over the
week-end to spend a short holi-
day in Barbados. They are stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel, They
expect to be here for one week.
President
R. A. G. FRANCIS, President
of the newly formed Trini-
dad and Tobago Cricket Associa-
tion arrived here yesterday with
the Trinidad cricket team, He is
staying at Indramer Guest House,
Worthing.

BY THE WAY....

MONG recent suggestions for
making traffic mobile, I
choose this: “Why not prevent
all private cars from stopping (ex-
cept at lights)?”
long to see thousands of cars
stopping at ‘the lights nearest to
their destination, As people are
not to be allowed to park their
cars, they cannot dismount to join
the gay throng of pedestrians in-
side “tubular railings installed
along the streets” to prevent them
crossing the road. So there are the
drivers, stopped at the lights, and
unable to do anything, and there
are the pedestrians who must not
erass the road. The probability is
that by evening the pedestrians
would be scrambling along over
the jammed cars, whose drivers
would all be had up for parking,

Is Goatacre
England’s Hope?

OME may remember the con-
‘siderable stir made years

ago. by an English heavyweight
boxer who worked on the theory
that, by attacking all the time with
both fists simultaneously, he would

develop the aggressive spirit we
need. ‘Two fists,” he said, “are
twice as powerful as one.” Un-
fortunately he left himself un-
guarded, and was always knocked
out. But it is possible that a lad
in training to-day, and working
on this unorthodox theory, may
be the English hope. He is Bobby
Ghatacre, and reports say that
he uses his two fists simultaneous-
ly to deliver such terrific’ double
pufches that nobody can stand up
to him. His sparring partners say
it is like being hit by a heavy oak
door on each side of the head at
the same time. Goatacre is to
fight the Belgian Rieux next week
at the East Norwood Brickworks.
Angry Persians

SAY, sir! Where pleeze, ho yes,

is yore Brittish fairplay what

you are boosting about? Here are
riters to you of carsting lack of
creddit hupon hus. Can we holp
it if we was of being born hin Per-
sia but not hin Hingland at all?
Must we be gnationalised as Brit-
tish men before we are of being
romitted to play seesaw for you?
ot about Wargener sang by





Coming Shortly

M* S. B. LUKE, head of the
West Indian Department of
the Colonial Office, has arrived in

Trinidad from Jamaica by
B.W.I.A. for a ten-day stay.

He is a guest at Government
House,
Mr. Luke has come to the West

indies to make a comprehensive
tour to last three months. He has
already visiteq British Honduras:
and Jamaica where he held talks

with the Government, and me‘
the people with the view of
familiarising himself with the
existing conditions.

On leaving Trinidad he will first
come here before visiting the
Leeward and Windward Islands

and then British Guiana.

He last visited the West Indies
in 1934, a

Among the Passengers

HE Holland-America Line

flagship Nieuw Amsterdam
arrived here on Sunday morning
from New York via San Juan on
her 18-day cruise through the
West Indies and South America
with 796 passengers,

Prominent passengers on board
included: Mr. Homer P. Hargrove
Chairman of the Board of the
Chicago Stock Exchange and Mrs.
Hargrove, the former film actress;
Colleen Moore, Mr. Eugenie Baird
popular singer of radio, stage and
television, Mr. Aaron Rabinowitz,
Chairman of. the Board of the
Fred F. French Co., leading New

York realtors and Mrs. Rabino-
Witz, Mr. John fF. Ferguson,
President of the Ferguson Pro-

veller Co., Hoboken, New Jersey
and Mrs. Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs.
Sumner Ford, socially prominent
residents of New York City and
Mr. Abraham Carnow, Treasurer
of the Bulova Watch Company
Wew York and Mrs, Carnow. Mr.
Samuel Cottler, Executive of
Paramount Pictures and Mrs.
Cottler from Baltimore, Maryland
US.A.

K.L.M. Station Manager
R, AND MRS. Peter Nieu-
wenhuys arrived from Vene-

zuela via Trinidad yesterday morn-

ing by B.W.1.A. to spend ten
days here, staying at the Marine

Hotel. Mr. Nieuwenhuys is Sta-

tion Manager of K.L.M. Air-

ways at Maiquetia.

In Antigua

R, D> SEMPLE, father of Mr.

G. G. Semple Engineer of
the Antigua Sugar Factory is in
Antigua on q short visit, Mr.
Semple Snr., is associated with
the firm of Mirlees Watson &
Company of Glasgow. He was in
the West Indies twenty-one years
ago when he sat with the late
Lord Olivier on ag commission to
enquire into the Sugar Industry.





MRS. “JEPF” STOLLMEYER

Cricketers’ Wives
RS. JEFF STOLLMEYER and

Mrs. Rupert Tangchoon
companied their husbands over
for the cricket tour, The; arrived
at Seawell with the team yester-
day. Accompanying them was
Miss Zenna Gomez v/ho has come
over for a couple 0. weeks’ holi-
day. She is sta;ing with Mr. and
Mrs, Tom Taylor at Worthing.

ac-

By Beachcomber

Geormann peeple at Kovink Gar-
dens? Wot about Pickahso and his
poctures? Wot about the Yugger-
slavick futballers? Seesaw shud
not know sum frountiers like hart.
Hon the plank hall men hare
broothers wite, yaller nor redd. Hit
is of being a trooly hintranatural
bit _hov hintertanement ho yes.
The Filthistan Trio much hurt.

Endier Endpiece

ITH the invention of “wetter

water” recently tsed by a
Kent fire brigade for putting out
hotter-fires, comes a new angle of
thought for the science of back-
room boys (sometimes known
nowadays the “wandering
boys”).

The things to work on (we can
tell them) are: (a) a rational ra-
tion of beerier beer; (b) a whis-
kier-whisky (not bearded but
older—i.e., a Scottier Scotch); (c)
doughier doughnuts, and more po-
litic politicians.

The sausagier-sausage was, of
course, the result of Mr. Webb's
advance knowledge of wetter-
water.

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CARNIVAL



MME. GONZALES DE MENDOZA, wife of Cuba's Minister in Lon-
don, in the giant head-dress she wore at the Carnival ball in aid of
the chaplaincy to London University Catholics. aie



eich Book—3l

a



While Mrs. Pig is speaking-sternly
to Rosalie Rupert goes to see how
poor Podgy is getting on. He
enters the room so slowly that he
doesn’t notice his pal hurriedly
ceooping.. a comic paper on the
floor, he

Rosal

the

nd a sly grin steals over
her's face. Finally the sketeh
book is handed over, and Podgy
sits up and roars with laughter.
* Good gracious! My drawing wasn't
meant to be funny,’” cries Rupert,
little bear tells of all ‘but it's done you good; you're
his troubles in the long search for looking much better already."
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED





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no matter what its present worth is, our quality
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‘3

B.B.C. Radio Programme

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1951
638 am.—12.15 p.m.—i9.76 m,

6.30 am, Forces Favourites, 7.00 a.m.
The News, 7.10 a.m, News Analysis, 7.15
a.m. From the Editorial, 7.25 a.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 7.30 am. Generally
Speaking, 7.45 a.m. Think On These
Things, 8.00 a.m. Souvenirs of Musie,

8.45 a.m, Letter From America, 9.00 a.m.
The News, 9.10 a.m. Home News From
Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m
Programme Parade, 11.30 a.m. Listeners
Choice, 11.45 a.m, Report From Britain,
12.00 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 12.15 p.m, Close Down,
4.15—6.00 p.m.—25,53 m.





4.15 p.m. Music From Grand Hotel, 5,09
p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m
Welsh Magazine, 5.45 p.m, Music Masa-
zine.
6.00—7.15 p.m. — 31.52 m, & 48.48 m.

6.00 p.m, New Records, 6.45 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News.
7.10 p.m, News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. The
Musie of Sid Phillips and His Band.
7.45—11.00 p.m. — 31,32 m, & 48.43 m.

7.45 p.m. Generally Speaking, 8.00 p.m.
Radio Newsree}, 8.15 p.m. Meet The Com-
monwealth, 8.45 p.m, Composer of the
Week, 9.00 p.m. Report From Britain.
9.15 p.m. Ray Martin and His Orchestra,
10.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. From
The Editorials, 10.15 p.m. The Heritage
of Britain, 10.45 p.m, Getting Ready for
the Festival of Britain, 11.00 p.m, BBC
Northern Orchestra.





EGGS! EGGS!
LONDON, Feb.,

Joyful housewives scrambled
for cracked and broken eggs when
several crates fell from a heavily- j
laden truck in a London suburb.

More than 3,000 eggs were scat-
tered in the roadway and “res-
cued” by the women. Eggs,
although not officially rationed,
are at a premium in London, with
rationbook holders getting one or
two a week.—ILN.S.



CROSSWORD



Agross
The male on a broken drain

(8
Doubtful if 1 can be friendly
<7) 10. The highest leat.
Abandoned. (7)

Sort of fish you may tose.

(7

(4)
(6)
{In which Iris plays her part. (2

You may settle for dismal.
Ornamental feather. (5)
You've got an anima!
father too. (5)

This gang is a bird. (3)
Sort of basket where fish

and
credit. (5)
. The time of other areas

see
SS FSees6 xp

ge

to
*

(3)
Down
Male fruit provides a legal com

mand trom a superior (7)
May nest for an act of oblivion
(7)

Gin or net provides sumething
towards atmosphere. (8)
. Challenge. (4)
This is poptar (5)
Mend about two 6)
. The Tree are inciuded
fetching pair. (3)
. Usualiy used during ele
(4) 11. Phantom fion dc ‘
You need a comedian for mora

in tt

c Poof « we

luns







ing use. (5)
16, Dole for the watercvurse (4)
17. Stoney greeting to a friend’ (4
20. This age is an optical tilusion
(3)
Solution of vesterday's purzie — Acros»
1, Sombre; 6. A 9 vel, 10. Ni
AMuent: 12 Vac 14. Entire. 16





17, Tread: 2 e; 21 Omit

Jown



94, Ascend; 25
2, Officious:
Flect; Anna

15, Rain
oD



Mut



ti 8
Ante: 18 Road

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13,

1951



TALCUM
POWDER



PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DiAL 2310) ||

SEE IT NOW! HELD OVER...
TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m, and Continuing

“THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT”

Color by TECHNICOLOR
with Shirley TEMPLE—Berry FITZGERALD—Lon MeCALLISTER

SPECIAL MAT. THURS.

RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH
Johnny Mack BROWN









1.30 p.m, (Monogram Double)

& RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL
Jimmy WAKELY







LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY 5 & 830 P.M. (Paramount Double)

| PLAZA Theatre=OISTIN (DIAL 8404)

|
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SONG OF SURRENDER & SPECIAL AGENT

Wanda Hendrix — MeDonald Carey William Eythe — George Reeves

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY —‘5 & 8.30 p.m. (Paramount Double)
RED HOT AND BLUE ©=©& ~_— THIS GUN FOR HIRE
Betty Hutton with Allan LADD
Midnite Sat, 17th—CODE OF THE SADDLE” & “RIDERS OF THE DAWN”
= eee lll —E

GAIETY—cHe GARDEN) ST. JAMES

















LAST SHOW TONITE — 8.30 (Warners. Double)

JUNE BRIDE & BULLET SCARS
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“AND SO THEY WERE

}) THURS,
em Leo Goreey and Bowery Boys in

Robert MITCHUM and — “ be

“DON'T GAMBLE WITH BROS OF NEW Tees and
STRANGERS” DARK ALIBI” with

Kane Richmond — Gloria Warren Sidney TOLER as Charlie Chan





AQUATIC CLUE CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT AT 8,30

CHILD OF DIVORCE
Starring — Sharyn MOFFET :o0; Regis TOOMEY :o:
An RKO Radio Picture

MATINEE : WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
James STEWART :0: Jane WYMAN
in Robert Ruskin’s “MAGIC TOWN”

An RKO Radio Picture

Madge MEREDITH





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GLOBE THEATRE

OPENING TODAY TO THURSDAY — 5 & 8.30

PAN: TN YoY Tao

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EMPIRE

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Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 and 8.15

United Artists Double :
Franchot TONE in

“JIGSAW and D.0. A.”

To-day Last Two Shows,
4.45 and 8.30

Columbia Pictures Presents :

Humphrey BOGART in

“IN A LONELY PLACE”

— with —
Gloria Grahame; Frank Starring :
Lovejoy and Carl Benton Edmond O’BRIEN and
Reid.

Pamela BRITTON

OLYMPIC

To-day Only 4.45 and 8.15
Final Instalment Columbia







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Last Two Shows To-day,
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Republic Smashing Double :

James LYDON and Serial :
Lois COLLIER in “BATMAN and ROBIN"
“OUT OF THE STORM” aa

AND Robert LOWERY
Â¥ iris John DUNCAN
“A SPORTING CHANCE’ ~
— Jane ADAMS
Jane RANDOLPH
and and
John O'MALLEY Lyle TABOT

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

13,

1951

CARIBBEAN PRESS
SHOULD BE ALERT

@ From Page 1

which they were going to deal was
the question of communication, He
felt sure they would all agree that
it was an essential pre-requisite
for any federation in the Carib-
bean to have a satisfactory system
of communications, By satisfac-
tory, they as newspaper people
felt that it should not only be
rapid and efficient, but also cheap.
In asking for that, they were not
asking for anything unprece-
dented.

He said that the Empire Press
rate for cables was a a
word, but lower rates still were in
operation in certain specific re-
gions in the Commonwealth.

He told Sir George that they
might have some concrete pro-
posals to put to him and he knew
the delegates would like to hear
the few inspiring words from him.
He therefore had much pleasure
in declaring the Conference open,

Sir George Seel said :

It gives me great pleasure to
welcome you as delegates to this
meeting of the Caribbean Press
Association and to extend to you
the freedom of Hastings House.
In doing so I must apologise for
the present disorderly state of our
precincts, and hope that you will
not be unduly interrupted by
all these evidenees of activity on
the part of the Development and
Welfare Organisation,

In offering our premises for
meetings such as this, we believe
that we are discharging one of our
most useful functions. As a body
maintained by His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment to do all we can on a
regional basis to help progress in
the West. Indies, our services must
always be at the disposal of those
who are studying West Indian
problems in their regional aspects,
and that, I take it, is the purpose
for which you are met today, In-
deed, I can think of no more pow-
erful regional influence than an
association of the newspapers in
this area, and none which requires
a greater sense of responsibility on
the part of those who wield it.

Prospect of Stability

As even a superficial observer
cat, see, the British West Indies
are approaching a fresh stage in
their history, when more than
ever will depend on the guidance
they receive from their respons-

ible leaders and the Press, After
negotiations marked by frank
speaking. on both sides, as is

always. possible when the parties
are not afraid of falling-out irre-
trievably, there is a prospect of
stability for some years in the
sugar industry. But tnis might
well be jeopardised, if confidence
between the two sides of the in-
dustry. cannot be achieved and
maintained. In Jamaica, Trinidad
and elsewhere, manufacturing in-
dustries are springing up, The
social institutions of the area are
developing and expanding; and
with increased social conscious-
ness, there is a tremendous up-
surge in political expectations.
Yet over all hangs the problem
whether the growth of popula-
tion will not outstrip the resources
of the area. Meanwhile, West In-
dian eae nises Kin;
dom a ‘e are eager!
seeking to acquire the technical
and philosophical equipment
necessary to conduct the affairs of
a nation. Proposals for political
federation, the unification of pub-
lic services, and now for the
creation of a Customs Union of
the West Indian territories, are
under debate. In the next year
or two crucial decisions will fall
to be taken, :

A Well-Iinformed Press

I am_not mentioning these points
with the idea of giving a thumb-
nail sketch of the British West
Indies at this time. The Press,
which has to keep its eyes on
everything, can do this much bet-
ter than I, My purpose is to
remind you that with so much
happening around us, it is im-
perative that the people of the
area should be served by an alert,
well-informed, and objective
Press, well-equipped to expound
the economic, social and political
trends; and fearless, both to detect
and expose those who seek to use
these trends for personal advance-
ment, and to support tho%e who
are genuinely striving to promote
the well-being of their fellow
West Indians,

Fortunately, we in the British
West Indies have a Press which
is for the most part intelligent and
objective, as well as lively and
interesting. I would not pre-
sume to lecture you on thrt score.
But, having seen your agenda, I
observe that you agree with me
in recognising the importance of
yet another factor. You are to
consider the possibility of institu-
ting a news agency which will
carry news both within the Carib-
bean, and between this area and
the rest of the world,

Democratic Traditions

Believe me, gentlemen, it is of
cardinal importance to the West
Indies that the trends, to which f
have briefly referred, should be
studied by West Indians against
the background of an informed
appreciation of events in the world
at large. A nation turned in upon
itself, and engrossed in its own
affairs to the exclusion of the rest
of the world, is not likely to



cevelop cither.a sense of propor-
tion, or a satisfying culture, or to
exert any beneficial influence on
human history. It could indeed
keeome a nuisance even to its
friends, through failure to under-
stand their point of view, and
especially, 1 would add, the diffi-
culties which those friends are
also facing at the present time,
and the sacrifices they are bearing.
If a West Indian nation is to join
the upholders of liberal and dem-
ocratic traditions—and I, as you
might guess, hope to see it do so,
in line with the other nations of
the Commonwealth—it is essential
that it should be kept in touch, by
its own newspapers, with what
goes on outside; not only in
ericket, exciting as that is, but
with advances in scientific and
technical knowledge, with the
currents of trade and commerce,
and with the broad stream of
spiritual aetivity. I am convinced,
therefore, that what you are about
to diseuss today is a question of
supreme significance to the West
Indies. I know nothing of the
detailed plans which will be put
before you. But you have my most
fervent good wishes in your search
for the most efficient and econom-
ical means of placing a first class
world news service before the
West Indian public. No doubt, as
in, the civil service, questions of
finance will figure prominently as
you go along. I am glad to seq
that you do not propose to ask for
any element of Government sub-
sidy for this service, I think that
the last thing to be desired is a
press dependent, even in a smail
way, upon financial payments
from the State. I sometimes feel
muzzled myself as a paid official:
God forbid that any self-respecting
newspaper should ever feel that
way.
Ass’n Open To All

Before I leave you to youn
business, I would like to make one
last observation, I referred earlien
to the fact that the Development
and Welfare Organisation is a
body whose objectives are re.
gional, and it would be difficult
for me, as its head, to support a
Press Association which was not
also truly regional. I am assured
that the Caribbean Press Associa-
tion is open, on payment of course,
to all newspapers in the British
West Indies, and I trust that you
‘will be able to devise a plan which
will enable every journal in the
area, which is genuinely devoted
to the presentation of news to par-
ticipate according to its means ani
circulation, In confidence that this
will be so, I have great pleasure
in declaring your meeting open.

Mr. . Cromarty Bloom,
Latin American Manager for
Reuters Ltd. said that Reuters
had a tremendous interest in the
designs on which the Association
was working and offered their
closest sympathy and_ practical
co-operation in bringing them
about.

Reuters regarded the develop-
ment of any co-operative news
agency with great interest, They
a: the Sestiane | of the a
erative Press ociations of Aus-
tralias New Zealand and India
which were now partners with
Reuters.

Co-operation Asked

In the West Indies until now,
Reuters had not done a good job
because of the inherent difficul-
ties in dealing with individual
newspapers scattered over a wide
area and that was one of the
major reasons why’ they looked
on the new development here with
so much interest,

He said that they were looking
forward for the first time to the
establishment of a really close
co-operation with the Press of the
BW.I. through a Regional Press
Association here.

From the point of view of
communications, efficient opera:
tion was only possible through
constant contact with a regiona)
eentre. From that of the services
themselves, Reuters would look
forward to guidance from the
the area they served here, It
was difficult to work out any
form of effective guidance based
on the views of scattered news-;
papers rather than the combined
view of a single entity.

With regard to the question of
features and other supplementary
services, they felt that the only,
way in which they could co-op-y
erate was through the local organ-
isation.

He said that they had been
following this development for
several years and would like to!



London’s most pampered rabbit lives in Park Lane flat



a a

FIRST COURSE



- BARBADOS ADVOCATE

YES, | WOULD LIKE A DRINK

Lateann

Frorese Sernice

THE RUINS

By H. 0. HUSBANDS

A NIGHT in June, 1941,
Speightstown was still. The St.
Peter’s Church clock had already
banged out 12 midnight and only
the faint lights of lowered kero-
sene oil lamps filtered through the
windows the old buildings
which comprised the better part
of the town.

Speightstown was asleep, but
not for long. Suddenly, an alarm,
loud and distinct was heard,
Shouts of “Fire! Fire!” inter-
rupted the stillness of the town
and everyone was up and peeping
through his window to see the
skies lit up by flames which seem-
ed well on their way to destroy
Orange Street and the adjoining
streets, Church Street and Sandy
Street .

Orange Street, Speightstown, at
the time a fine residéntial district,
was the locality of the fire which
broke out from a two storied
grocery store and residence then
on the right hand going north and
about 30 yards from Church Street
corner. A strong easterly wind
hurried the flames along.

Firemen and residents fought
the fire all night and the follow-
ing morning, got the flames under
control. They found six build-
jags gutted, another badly dam-
aged and two others, which
were more fortunate, singed here
and there,

Almost 10 years have passed
since the fire, but the surround-
ings still suggest that a tragedy
had befallen the town.

“The Ruins” as the area is now
called by some Speightstonians, is
now more or less a little business
centre punctuated by two sea
windows,

Bringing Church Street to an
end on the West is the formidable
looking three storied buildings
where once a thriving ironmon-
gery and hardware business was
earried on,

Immediately on the North of
that building is a little rum shop
which always flies a flag and car-
ries the name “‘Labourite—Bar 20
Rides Again”. Here begin the
ruins. The spot once accommo-
dated a two storied building, to
the ground floor of which many
flocked to buy themselves a pair
of shoes or a suit length and the
top floor of which housed the
family who carried on the busi-

ness .

Next to “Bar 20” wil’ be found
an even smaller shop, this time ran
by a joiner who has reserved part
cf it as the living room for him and
his son. This joiner’s shop has
tuken the place of a hardware

lead to the closer association
lacking until now with the West
Indian Press. His instructions
were to offer to the Association
whatever assistance he could and
ne expressed the fervent hope
that the plans of the Association
would quickly bring about the
type of co- tive press agency
which they had seen develop in
various parts of the world and
which had produced a much more
efficient flow of unbiassed news
between the Press in the region
leoncerned and the Press of the
rest of the world. He offered
them on behalf of Reuters, his
best services and warm wishes for
success at their meeting.

Mr. P. Hewitt-Myring was then
introduced to the m g by the
President of the Association who

sreferred to the help and sympathy

lcok forward to the day when they,twhich he had always accorded the

would have West Indian journal
ists at Reuters in London helping'
to serve the Association with th
sort of services they needed.

Closer Contact Wanted

They had in Fleet Street, a
regular flow of journalists from
Australia, New and
South Africa and they would
like to feel that they could draw
upon j from the West
Indies to come to Lomdon and so
develop in the course of time, a
still ¢ contact with
the Association here and the mem-
bers of it.

As a result, he said they could
not but look upon this develop-
ment with enormous interest with
the Hope that it would quickly

Association, '

! Mr. Hewitt-Myring said that on’
occasions like this, the printers’
nk that had flowed in his veins
for 20 years had stirred again and
he was very happy to have
a chance of wishing the meeting
every © asnggins success in its de-

ons.

-libera .

An Honest Press
: He said that there was no sub-
istitute for a concrete, honest and
igenuinely commercial press free
rom any sort of subsidy whether
officially or otherwise. Of course
he strongly believed that as did
the Association and was more than
ready to do artything at any time
to be of assistance,
@ On page 5.



store which was no more after the
fire.

Another small shop comes next
in line. A jeweller and watch re-
pairer has perched his shop on
this spot which is much too large
for it. Around the shop is rough
ground where stones have been

ttered ‘est traditions as they too could
ica ae ee ae where rove themselves capable of reach-

bush and shrubs are trying to find.
moisture on which to live.

The first sea window finds itself
between the jeweller’s shop and
another rum shop going further
North called “De Lone Ranger”,
The fire removed a house from
the piece of land which has since
been unoccupied. Rambling vines,
thick bush, stones, and a man-
chineel tree just about four feet

tall but already branching out
cover the spot,
The window ends the ruins

eaused by fire on that side of the
street, but skipping out “De Lone
Ranger,” which was not touched
by the fire but was since reno-
vated there is to be found the
second sea window, on which once
stood an ill-shaped three storied
building—indeed one of the tall-
est edifices of Speightstown.

Some months ago, the building
was flattened by masons and car-
penters. It was so situated that
it narrowed considerably the
width of the street and formed at
that point, a dangerous curve,
The government, it is understood,
bought it over and got it dug
down for the purpose of widening
the road,

On the opposite side of the road,
the evidence of ruins is nil, but
it was on that side that the fire
started and where three buildings
were destroyed.

The building at which the fire
started_gnd another building join-
ed to the former by a party wall
were ruined by the fire and then
at the corner another residence
was badly damaged.

The residence had attached to
it a storeroom which was cqm-
pletely destroyed. :

St. Peter’s Parish Church has
taken over the area which accom-
modated the attached buildings
and kas used it for planting flow-
ers and trees for beautifying the
West end of the Church. The spot
has been enclosed by a wall bear-
ing green rails and the grass on it
has got a good spring.

A bungalow has replaced the
“badly damaged” building and
gutted storeroom covering the
whole spot except for a small plot
which has been planted in flowers,

“The Ruins” are being encroach-
e- on by the sea and it is doubt-
ful whether it will become a resi-
dential area again.

Trinidad May Get



Paper Industry

@ From page 1.

fuel has to be found for sugar
factories.

He says “Trinidad is the only
area where adequate supplies of
alternative fuel are economically
available in the Caribbean.”

He adds that the paper from
bagasse in its present stage of
development has not been found
to possess the characteristics de-
sirable for newsprint,

Mr. Winterbotham was unable
to say definitely where the head-
quarters of a new paper-producing
fuetory might be, but referred
again to his previous statement
about the availability of supplies.

eeeeeeeenneame

Magistrate Resumes Duties

Mr. A. J. Hanschell, Se-
nior Police Magistrate of District
“A” Police Court resumed his
duties yesterday morning in the
Central Police Court.

While Mr, Hanschell was acti
as Judge of the Petty Debt Court,
Mr, C, L, Walwyn was sitting
for him.

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Madeira, the United King-
dom, Antwerp and Amsterdam by the
S.S. Oranjestad will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:-—

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Registered
Mail at 3 p.m, and Ordinary Mail at
4.00 p.m. on the 2ist of February, 1951.





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SCPE EEF ESSOESES SS CES



Floods Threaten
N. W. Washington

SEATTLE, Feb.

A state of emergency was de-
clared in northwest Washington
state today as whole communi-
ties fled flood waters of three

10.

rampant rivers. Across the
Canadian border in British
Columbia thousands of people

were threatened by the Fraser
rivea and its tributaries. Over
1,300 have already escaped to
higher ground,

Flood and storm deaths have
been reported on the other side
of the continent. The Susque-
hanna river in Pennsylvania state
was frozen solid for seven miles
and 12,000 residents of the town
of Columbia were without water.
Warmer weather which brought

NO “HEEL-TAP.” rain and thaws is blamed for the

floods. About 700 people —
entire population of Conway,
50 miles north of Seattle —

Jackson Welcomed

@ From rage 1.

three important enquiries in these
islands. He spoke of the appre-
tiation of the reorganised legal
library. On behalf of the outer
har S. T. Christian spoke of the

pular appointment of another

est Indian to such a high post
‘ama it was a great inspiration for
young lawyers to follow the high-

were evacuated after angry river
waters were coursing hip deep
through the town.

—Reuter.

ing heights.

Mr. Dias paid tribute on behalf
of the Lower Bench and Mr, Nev-
ie Berridge on behalf of the
Registry spoke of the great appre-
ciation and honour it was for
himself and his staff to work with
His Honour.

Mr, Jackson thanked all for
the overwhelming tributes anc he
was grateful for the untiring assis
tance he had always received
since his arrival here,

Club Willow Under
3 Months’ Repairs

Col. R- T. Michelin, Commis-
sioner of Police, told the Advecate
yesterday he hoped that the Fire
Prigade and Police Band would
be able to occupy “Club Willow
i about the next three months.

The Legistature has already
yoted money for purchasing the
site, but a further sum has to be
voted for renovation and decora-
tion purposes.

Col. Michelin said that as Soon
the Band leaves its present
the quarters will be
used as barracks for the police
corporals, At present the cor~
porals are housed with privates,
a practice not conducive to keep-
ing the standard of discipline at
a high level. 2

No plans have yet been made
for use of the quarters Mow oct-
cupied by the Fire Brigade

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PAGE THREE



Fires Sweep
Queensland

Sheep Lands ya ae

4 lane
i v



ny

shea { f

others were
by fir
00 Kal

iroos over

the heat were seen piled
the

tence in

cooperating with
and local radio

mnall

BRISBANE, Feb. 10



s to keep property owners

Twelve big bush fires ere fire fighters informed of the
raging over about one eighth of ection of the fires Station
Queenland’s 670,500 square mil ds, graziers and volunteers
today. re ing to keep the flames in

The fires. are the wors Y
record in the Wyancra ec One man said he saw flames up
country 500 miles west of Brisbane 10 yards high near his preperty.
One fire roaring along a 120 mile ey were travelling at about 20
front had already burned out mors iles an hour and “making noise
than 2,000,000 acres of the be <@ an express train going through
sheep country in Southwest tannel
Queensland. Ten sheep and cattle stations

It had travelled 70 miles ir i so far. been burned out
three weeks. Police said that no the Charleville and Wyandra
towns were threatened yet by the . Pilots saw desolate homes
fires, but stock losses were ex rding with miles of blackened
pected to be heavy. One recor burned out country round
naissance plane reported thousand

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PAGE FOUR





Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid. Broad &t., Bridgetown.



Tuesday, February 13, 1951



ELECTION YEAR

THIS is election year. The present ses-
sion of the Legislature will end in Novem-
ber when a new House will be elected for
the first time under an adult suffrage
franchise.

Already the parties have begun their
campaign for capturing the support of the
electorate. The two parties which have
been able to maintain membership have
held their caucuses and public meetings
have been held in some parishes.

It would be well at an early time for the
electorate to assess the value of such work
as has been done in the House of Assembly
and to ask themselves whether it has been
satisfactory or whether it was enough hav-
ing regard to the demands of the times.
Having decided on the merit of that work
the next step is to consider whether the
complexity in the problems of Government
does not warrant better and more states-
manlike handling.

Barbados is too small to get the best of
party government; but it has been intro-
duced and judging by the instructions of
the Colonial Office it has come to stay. But
because Barbados must have party govern-
ment, it does not mean that the members
of the party are not to be measured in their
individual capacities and assessed on their
ability to contribute to the common wel-
fare.

The Labour Party, now responsible for the
conduct of Government business have inti-
mated that they should have ministerial
status. This alone makes it imperative that
high calibre be demanded from men who
after election will be potential ministers.
They will be responsible for the running of

1: |CO

The General Election of 1950
| fought and won largely on

lost in effectiveness with every
year that went by.”
Old Battles

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



A NEW ELECTION?

An Oxford Don’s survey of the General Election, 1950, gives
what might happen next time... .

some poiriters to

issues which less than a year later
have been obscured or forgotten in
the larger movement of world
events.

That must be the conclusion
which any reader, whatever his
party affiliations, must reach after
examining the fascinating and
detailed survey of the contest
given in The British General
Election of 1950° by H. G. Nicho-
las, University
Politics at Oxford,

The Socialist Party, which was
on the defensive throughout,
omitted all mention of defence
from its manifesto and put the
theme of “full employment” first
in all its propaganda, both broad-
east, written and spoken.

In areas which had experienced
heavy unemployment before the
wars this was successful in brak-
ing the swing to the Right. But,
as Mr. Nicholas points out, “as an
appeal to the past it necessarily

Lecturer in

The Tories, with the supreme
exception of Mr. Churchill, were
equally heavily engaged in fight-
ing past battles.

They devoted the most strenu-
ous efforts to showing that Mar-
shall Aid had masked unemploy-
ment and to refuting Socialist
charges about conditions between
the wars.

It was not until February 15, 12
days after the dissolution of Par-
liament and only a week before
the poll, that Mr. Churchill spoke
at Edinburgh about the possibil-
ity of “another talk with Soviet
Russia upon the highest level.”

Mr. Bevin at once dismissed
this as a “stunt proposal.” But it
was taken up, notably by the
Beaverbrook Press, and remained
almost the sole effort by a lead-
ing member of any party to relate
the election to the world crisis,

How far Mr. Churchill’s state-
ment influenced the voters one
way or the other it will never be
possible to analyse with any pre-

My Charles Wintour

cision. From the polls of public
opinion quoted by Mr. Nicholas,
it would seem however, that there
was remarkably little movement
of opinion during the last fort-
night of the campaign. If any-
thing, the Tories started the cam-
paign with a slight lead but the
Socialists gradually improved
their position until they establish-
ed a winning margin.

Perhaps the party bosses were
right: realism does not pay off in
votes,

The explanation for the Tories’
flying start lay in the immense
superiority of ,their electoral ma-
chine in the country,

Woolton’s Machine

By the time of the election the
Tories could boast of 428 fully
qualified agents in charge of con-
stituencies in England and Wales,

These agents were paid between
£500 and £800 a year, and could
look forward to progressive pro-
motion in the highly organised
Woolton machine.

The Socialists, on the other
hand, could orly muster 279 full-
time agents on the eve of the poll
in England, Wales and Scotland
as well. Their agents were lower
paid and had less attractive pros-
pects,

Unquestionably this big lead in
professional organisation helped
the Tories gain votes, But Nicho-
las gives a cautionary reminder
that the machines cannot dragoon
the voters to the polls.

In Birmingham, where the
Tories possessed an excellent
machine which had been working
for years to re-establish Birming-
ham as a Tory citadel, Tories only
recaptured one seat out of 10.

In Liverpool, where they had
only one professional agent, they
secured five seats out of nine.

Liberals Blamed

Since better organisation failed
Tories were naturally inclined to
blame the Liberal intervention for
“splitting the anti-Socialist vote.”

Nicholas is highly sceptical of

this charge, plumping for the view
that Liberal intervention drew
votes from both sides fairly equal-
ly over the country as a whole.

This fascinating study illumi-
nates many other aspects of the
last election and British election-
eering in general. There is for
instance the importance of Dr.
Charles Hill’s broadcast—heard
by 42 per cent of the adult popu-
lation, a bigger audience than any
Socialist Minister achieved with
the single exception of Mr. Attlee.
But will he ever be able to repeat
his triumph?

And Mr. Nicholas’s dispassion-
ate examination of the Press con-
tains much of interest, though he
thinks it played a rather second-
ary role in this campaign. He
appears to believe that “someone
had very effectively laid an ox
upon Lord Beaverbrook’s tongue.”
If such an operation is possible,
which I beg leave to doubt, there
was certainly no-heifer lying on
his lordship’s pen.

Attlee’s Handicap

The statistical appendix by Mr.
David Butler shows how, follow-
ing redistribution the existence of
numerous impregnably safe So-
cialist seats produces a marked
bias to the Right.

If the party vo1es had been
equal at 45.2 per cent then the
Tories would have won 35 more
seats than the Socialists. In fact
‘Labour is likely to continue to
enter political contests with a
handicap of half-a-million votes
for some time to come,”

Mr. Butler also prints a rough
diagram showing the broad rela-
tionship between seats and votes.
By applying the latest Gallup poll
figures to this chart, it appears
that the Tories would win at least
420 seats if an election were held
now, The Socialists would win
190 or fewer, giving the Tories a
majority of more than 230 seats.

In fact Mr. Morrison has every
reason, from a party viewpoint,
to delay the election as long as
possible,

World Copyright Reserved



the various departments of

and despite the fact that the Civil Servant
will always be on hand to handle the de-
tails of any policy adopted, it is the
minister who will be the liaison between
the general public and the department,

Government

—London Express Service.

erent oi
They Won't Let Jungle Maria
Be Just A Little D

IN Dutch the word is “behekst”,

uteh Girl

the reason:—





The handling of public finance during
the last five years has not been such as to

win the confidence of people who con-

tribute by way of taxes to the Treasury.
The present Government took over office
“with a surplus in the Treasury. Since then
it has dwindled despite the annoying
increase in taxation. The members of that
Government have on more than one occas-
ion voiced their intention to maintain a
“soak the rich” policy. Other sections of
society have also suffered as a result; and
today the economic condition of the people
is not as sound as it should have been.

Barbados like every other country in the
world has been willing to give labour its
opportunity to serve. That it has failed its
fondest supporters will admit. The present

. is a period when all the statesmanship and
goodwill is needed in the solution of prob-
lems. Barbados has not ceased to produce
men of ability but they are not to be found
in such numbers as in the past; and even
those who are within reach are denied, for
one reason or another, opportunity to make

in English “bewitched”, Either
way, the planners of Bergen-op—
Zoom are making a fool of 13—
year-old Maria Bertha Hertogh,

The child, who was brought

back from a Moslem husband in
Malaya seven weeks ago to be
an ordinary Dutch = girl,” still
reigns over this town of 30,000
people,
. Her father and mother are doing
their best to fit her in with their
six other children, But outside
the tiny house in Emma-square
she is the talking-point around
which everything revolves.

Maria would become part of the

Dutch scene much more quickly
and easily than she is doing if her
parents could exercise full con-
trol over her,
, The committee formed to
organise her homecoming how-
ever is still the power to which
they bend — though it was dis—
banded weeks ago.

At the Roman Catholic school
she attends, Maria is the pet of
the sisters.

She is the envy of the 350 other
children —- for the new expensive
dress she appears in every other
aay, her new sports bicycle, which
has no match for miles, the jewel-
lery she wears in class, her fur-
lined bootees,

From ARTHUR COOK

BERGEN-OP-ZOOM (Holland)

Dutch slowly—the girl is one of
the class. But when she is askec
to stand to repeat a sentence from
the blackboard she scowls at the
sister’, scowls at her classmate and
reads aloud uninterestedly.

At first she would take no
interest in a gymnasium class.
She stood aside from the other
girls and the sister said nothing.
One day recently she joined in
but for only a few minutes.

Recently a girl was standing
in front of the class. Maria
nudged 11—year-old Janneke
Segers: ‘How old is she?’ Told
she was 12 Maria sniffed “Her
figure—it is too short, too fat’,

Not long ago she caused a new
stir. The others were used to her
gold watch and gold bracelet,
Their eyes opened wide at the
sight of two huge earrings and a
large, green stone brooch,

Not A Word

The children chattered, Then
Sister Edward told them to be
quiet. To Maria not a word.

A plain-clothes policeman sits
at the back of the class. He



MME, WHY DOES'NT THAT

cycles to and from the school with
Maria,

Every time she leaves the other
children crowd round to gape at
her bicycle and her latest in
clothes and startling hair—bows.

Maria loveg it. She holds her
head. high... faint sophisticated
smile on her Tice. And the sisters
beam their pleasute.

They find only one fault in her,
True she attends Sunday Mass
with her family, but at prayers in
school she folds her arms and at
religious lessons she doodles,

The planners have tried to force
the conversion from Moslem to
Roman Catholic. Their methods
are meeting little success.

I asked Police Commissaire
Van ’t Hol why 16 of the town’s
42 policemen are permanently on
guard inside and outside the
Hertogh home (there have been
no days off for them since Maria’s
return,

He said “Anything could happen
from Moslem influences. The
guard will be kept on till March
at least.”

Not A Thing

Lawyer Jan Bervoets self-styled
head of the homecoming committee
told me: “Mr. Hertogh can do
nothing without my permission—

any contribution to the affairs of govern-

ment.

favours shown

At the same time the others
are jealous of her —



for the
her the lack of

MAN | Wean A wia LiKe
THE SPEAKER Does 2”:

It is time that this was changed. If Bar-
bados is to continue to make any progress,
her affairs must be handled by the collec-
tive abilities of men of recognised ability
and public spirit willing to serve their
country. Men in trade, commerce, indus-
try and scholars have their respective con-
tributions to make and if there was ever
a time when this country needed them it
is now, The electorate should refuse to
countenance the candidature of men who

reprimands when she chooses to
be naughty or does what she
pleases when the rest of the class
is regimented into a_ particular
lesson or game.

Mr. and Mrs. Hertogh intended
that Maria should have a private
tutor for six months,

Not Enough

But the planners decreed “Put
her to school at once”, and im-
mediately it was found her
standard of education was that of
a girl of eight and she needed




I know what is
“Nothing





only journalists

paper. Go home
Haberdasher

about
appear in the British Press, ‘The

said “The committee is finished,
Mr. Hertogh doés as he pleases.”

best.

Maria ray

ULD THE TORIES WEN Thehemnants0fAn Army
Committed Suicide

And Their General
ied

In Disgrace

By BERNARD DREW

HOW British, Indian, Gurkha, and Ameri-
can troops by sheer “guts” and superior tac-
tics smashed the myth of the “invincible Jap”
is told today by Vice-Admiral Earl Mount-
batten of Burma.

He pays tribute first to the Chindits, those
gallant men under the late Major-General
Wingate who were the first to beat the Japs
at.their own game—infiltration and attacks
miles beyond any known or established base.

‘UNSURPASSED RECORD’

And putting into practice the lessons the
Chindits had learned came the 14th Army
with its “unsurpassed record of service and
achievement.”.

Earl Mountbatten found that there were
120 sick casualties for every man wounded in

A Medical Advisory Division of experts on \ %
tropical medicine and a dose of 40,000,000 | y
anti-malaria tablets per month put that right. | ¥
By the time the Japs surrendered the sick-
ness ratio was downto one in ten.

Then the Supreme Commander found that
it was generally accepted that fighting occur-
red during only seven months of the year at
the most. The monsoon was a “closed season,”

So Mountbatten devised military and medi-
cal tactics to enable his men to battle forward
in the monsoons and take the enemy by sur-

HIGHLIGHTS

Final victory throughout South-East Asia
was built on keeping open the sea routes, and
after seeing all enemy plans for defending
Malaya and Singapore he is satisfied that the
projected wperations to capture those objec-
tives would have been “completely success-

But surrender came first. These are the
highlights of his report:—

KOHIMA. This operation by General
(now Field-Marshal) “Bill” Slim’s brave 14th
Army drove the fanatical enemy back to the
Central Plains of Burma and inflicted the
major land defeat of the war in the Far East.”

PRISONERS. Comparatively few Japan-
ese were taken prisoner. This incident gives

On the day that Monywa fell other units
of the 20th Indian Division surprised a large
body of Japanese trying to escape over the
Irrawaddy river, and annihilated most of
these in hand-to-hand fighting.

CEREMONIAL SUICIDE

When the fighting was nearly over a de-
tachment of Japanese put on ceremonial
equipment, and formally committed suicide
by marching into the river.

Of the way the Japanese were sapped of
the will to fight I can testify personally.

I was with the few Britons who witnessed
the end at Saigon, French Indo-China.

Outside the Government palace an ailing
Japanese Field-Marshal, Count Terauchi,
came forward leaning heavily on a stick—
the fall of Mandalay had caused him to have
a stroke—and surrendered his sword to Lord
Mountbatten in a five-minute ceremony.

‘VINEGAR JOE’

He never recovered from the disgrace, and
died a few months later.

DIFFICULTIES. Relations with Ameri-
can “Vinegar Joe” Stilwell were not always
happy. Stilwell had a dual appointment,
partly under Mountbatten and partly directly

T have allowad to under the U.S. Chiefs of Staff.

see her are from a Dutch Catholic

to England.”
Frans Houtman

But when I called at Adrian
Hertogh’s home he telephoned Mr.
Houtman: “May I talk to an
English journalist?” And what-
ever he was told the man who had
wished to be friendly refused
information. .

Are the planners working only
for March 25, when Maria is due
to see the British Consul? That







might be suitable to tow the party line but
who have nothing to contribute to the pro-

gress of the island.



Our Readers Say:



Freedom

To The Editor, The Advocate,

‘SIR,—It was heartening on
Tuesday to listen to the speech of
the leader of the House on the
issue of immigrants into this
Colony, He said on this what
wanted saying, and any refutation
of what he said amounted to a
waste of time and breath, Al
talk of federation is unrealistic to
the point of hypocrisy if barriers
are to be erected to the free and
untrammelled movement of the
peoples within the area of the
British Caribbean. Whatever may
be the inconveniences to the Gov-
ernments concerned, these will
always be insignificant coinpared
to the advantages from freedom
of travel accruing to the residents
and trade of the area. If we are
to move forward at all, it is a
compulsory condition of that
movement that West Indian
politicians must abandon the
parochial outlook and learn to
regard other West Indians with
the same interest—yes, the same
interest — as they do their own
islanders. Barbados as ‘the
Assembly leader pointed out. be-
cause of its population problem
should be the last countrv in the
world to dream of erecting bar-
riers to the free entry of people

into the island. Retaliation by
others would be tragic for our
situation,

There is a regrettably ignorant
tendency by people who should
know better, to regard residents
from other British Colonies as
aliens. They are not. They are
British subjects—maybe strangers
to this particular Colony—but as
British subjects, entitled to all
the privileges and rights that Bar-
badians are similarly entitled to
in other British Colonies. Some
members of the Assembly confuse
strangers with aliens, even some
officials do. To the everlasting
credit of the leader of the House
he made it clear that even aliens
were welcome within the gates,

Barbadians leave this Colony
and hold positions of every con—
ceivable grade in other British
West Indian Colonies. They con—
tinue to do so daily. But to go even
further, within the British Carib-
bean, those few immigrants who
do become destitute should be the
responsibility of the respective
Governments. The official ex-
pense will invariably cancel out.
The meeting of the various peoples
is of value in itself, and some-—
thing that cannot be measured
in £. s. d. Barbadians can be
comparatively ignorant of their

individual attention.

In mathematics Sister Edward
gives Maria separate lessons,

For language — and she learns

ree! virtues and shortcomings
until they have lived and worked
outside of Barbados,

The transfer to the Police De-
partment of immigration affairs
formerly in charge of the Harbour
Master is a retrograde step from
the angle at which I view the
mixing of the peoples, The police
psychology is the very worst to
deal with so important a civilian
affair as the intercolonial move-
ment of groups and peoples The
psychology of coercion is basic
to their training, and they cus-
tomarily bring the influence of
suspicion to bear on the affairs of
those who lack financial security
but are in all other respects
decent and commendable citizens,
We still retain in this Colony
customs that are fundamentally
sound from the point of view of
freedom and democracy. Bui it
is distressing to detect almost
every Tuesday in the House of
Assembly the tendency to accept
or impose Authoritarian control
on the life of the people of this
land. Because many Colonies
have abandoned those customs we
still retain, our politicians make
this an argument for a similar
abandonment of them by us.

Freedom and democracy in the
essential virtues of these political
philosophies are disappearing
from the big areas of the earth.
We have not the problems of the
big places of the earth Why
pretend that we have, by per-



Malaya.



sistent legislation to coerce the
free movement of our peoples and
so annihilate the Caribbean area
and Barbados specially as prob-
ably the last remaining refuge of
that freedom which means so
much to the spirit and progress
of its people. We have certainly
not achieved “freedom from want”.
Let us not so hastily abandon
those other freedoms that we do
possess,
V. B. VAUGHAN.

Leave The Clock Alone
To the Fditor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Permit me space to say a
few words on this Clock question.
In the first place advancing the
time would create a hardship on the
poorer class who would be called
to duty at an earlier hour and end
their task by the setting of sun.
Secondly, it serves no useful pur-
pose in Barbados where there is
almost thirteen hours ‘of brignt
sunshine every day, and during
this period there is quite @éncugh
time for recreation. No one needs
half a dey for recreation, two or
three hours are quite sufficient for
golfers, the fishermen, the swim-
mer or tennis players, etc. Let
those who need more time for re-
‘reation approach their employers
for earlier morning hours of work
and they will have more time in
the evening. For instance, I am
one whose work does not afford
me recreation—not even for a
funeral, but there are some of us
who love more play than work
and that is the thing that makes

day, she can decid
to stay in By or, return to
oe he

for herself—

LE.S.

"¢
‘Jack a dull boy.”

If ther- “4 need for more recrea-
tion, let us ask our employers for
a seven till three working period
and this would harm nobody; but
let us leave the clock alone.

FAIR PLAY.

A Dangerous Corner

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—Please allow me space to
comment on a dangerous situation.
At the junction of Welches, Fair-
field, and Bridge Roads, I think

- the traffic signs are well-placed

with one omission which may
cause an accident, Traffic from My
Lord's Hill direction going to
Fairfield Road, stop at the Major
Road sign for Welches Road, but
traffic to Bridge Road from the
some direction go straight through
non-stop. If they stop (which is
seldom) they do so in the middle
of the road.

Monday evening last, I saw a
"bus belonging to St. George’s Bus
Co,; stop at the corner; a car trav-
elling behind it passed out and
went straight down Bridge Road
without stopping If another ve—
hiéle had been proceeding from
Welches Road in the direction of
Flint Hall around and in front of
the Bus, an accident might have
occurred. I suggest, therefore, that
a ‘No Entry’ sign be placed at the
upper entrance of Bridge Road and
allow the traffie coming from My
Lord’s Hill going toward Bridge
Road, to stop at the Major Road
and proceed around the light just



When he disagreed with the Mountbatten
plan at the start of the campaign Stilwell
considered it his duty to send his own mission
to Washington ahead of the Supreme Com-
mander without telling him.

There were clashes, too, about policy with
Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek, and how his
Chinese should be used.

Earl Mountbatten wrote this 280-page report
to the Combined Chiefs of Staff when he
was in Delhi in 1947 as India’s last Viceroy.

—L.ES.



as the traffic from Welches Road
do. This would make that corner

fer,
re ANOTHER MOTORIST.
IIM.S. Devonshire At
Barbados

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—May I beg-a small space
in your columns to say “Thank
You” on behalf of the officers,
eadets, and ship’s company of
H.M.S. Devonshire. The friendly
wélcome and generous hospitality
extended to us by the people of
Barbados has become proverbial
in this ship, with the result that
we return year after year for
more. But you are all so kind that
there is never any sign of your
generosity flagging.

usual we have had a most
enjoyable round of sporting fix-
tures and social functions, and I
would like those involved in the
organisation side to know that we
are really grateful for all the hard
work they must have put in.

I would also like to express my
personal thanks to all those kind
people who have looked after our
eadets so well by entertaining
them in their homes. This side of
the hospitality of Barbados is per-
haps the most appreciated of all
by lads who are experiencing their
first taste of ship life and their
first venture overseas.

Once again, thank you, Barba-
dos,

Yours faithfully,
G. STOKES
Captain, Royal Navy.



Phones — 4472, 4687,

SOOO SSSS9SSOS SDSS OSS OSG FP FSP OOPS SSOP SSOP SSSSS GE”,

THE NEW MOYGASHEL







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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1951









D. V. SCOTT TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
& CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
a)
Usually NOW
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Pkgs. QUAKER OATS .............-55+5 53 48
Tins TRIN. GRAPE FRUIT JUICE .....-- 24 22





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W.cC. PANS, S & P TRAPS
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Red Snapper
Canadian Salmon

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Eggs

Anchor Milk Powder
1th & 2'4Ibs

J. & R. Bread
Cheese-Butter=Apples

Cucumber Salad
Celery Hearts
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Spinach
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acini teatime ini iii tae iaasiahauaaatmmmaiacaatst iiiitataaiiaaaaien



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1951



vst ? = a? r {) 99S9GS6S555 99555555 SFSS FOF DD FOOOPHOGOOSOIOSOO
4th Boys’ B'dos May Get Gas Co. Ask Y.W.C.A.Gets Caribbean Svimary: ror a

Club Opens _ First Theatre
Friday tas 3u,. eee i

new Y.M.C.A, is erected it will
HE FOULTH BOYS’ CLUB have a hall on the second storey,
will be opened at Cliff Cot. Neatly 90 feet long by 38 feet
non St. John, at 5 o'clock on a ane this will be used as a

iday evening, ~ a

aes Oe The site

have rencrated “and palsies ng building will be on the west sige
pec: 2 ieecant yes for the open- Caton tates Culler t will
nisi ae ean Boys’ Club has have an open verandah on the
cee - room to accommodate east, west and north sides. The
8 ear ~ mn ie Pa ots site. ground floor will accommodate
-. PT. Michelin, Com- the billiard room, table tennis

missioner of Police, told the re i
— ’ 90m, restauran
Advocate yesterday that Mr. Basil Rey feaen : emelee film

Henriques, bys’ C 2 ; *
ane < rahe . — eee _ ng Arte will be given in
Boys’ Clubs when he visits the efor eee
: Bits Messrs D,. M.- Simps Engin-
island on March 2. eers wy h au .
J Henriques will be introduc- iiae. ae ee ae ee
sak ae of the various clubs — Mr. H, H. Williams, Secretary
asked to lecture to them. of the YÂ¥.M.C.A told the
These Concerts are expected to Advocate yesterday | that these
become a monthly feature, plans will be placed bef th:
HE FIRST SUNDAY Concert Boar inectote at a meeting
, Concert Board of Directors at a meeting
» at the’ Esplanade by the to-morrow afternoon for. their
hoc: rg coincided with the approval.
arrival of the tourist ship Nieuw After the Board agrees, tenders
Ameterdam. Many tourists were will be received ‘warts eons
at the Esplanade on Sunday eve- tion of the building, They have
ning to listen to this Concert of already started a Building and
classical music, Ground Fund and donations will
By their applause they seemed be gratefully accepted.
to have really enjoyed listening to Basket ball fans, who are mem-
Captain Raison and his Band. bers of the “Y”, are taking more
A large number of parents and than a keen interest in the game
children also turneti out. Tha this season. They are preparing
crowd was as big as that seen in their own plot of ground at Wake-
Queen’s Park when the Band give field. During the past few weeks
their Sunday Concerts there. they could regularly be seen
HE LARGEST CANE FIRE for with their forks and _ shovels
the year occurred at Hamp. levelling off this piece of land.
ton Plantation, St, Philip, over the The most of the work is done
week-end. The fire broke out at during the evening after business
about 5,30 a.m. on Sunday, Nine- hours.
teen acres of first crop ripe and Mr. Williams said that these
nine and a half acres of second members must be congratulated.
crop ripe canes were burnt. The They are not given any financial
damage is covered by insurance, assistance.
The canes are the property of the | Mr. Williams received the fol-
trustees of the estate of A. Cam- lowing letter from Captain Stokes
eron, of the H.M.S. Devonshire:
The trustees of the estate of A. “Please accept my sincere thanks
Cameron suffered another loss on behalf of the Ship’s Company
when a fire of unknown origin Of H.M.S. Devonshire, for your
broke out at Bushy Park Planta- 800d work in making our stay
tion, St. Philip, on Saturday night $0 pleasant.

and burnt seven and a half acres “The existence of a place ashore
of first crop ripe canes. like your Y.M.C.A, adds tre-

At Dodds Plantation, St. Philip, mendously to the enjoyment of
ten and a quarter acres of first ® Visit of this kind, and we are

crop ripe canes were burnt when grateful to you for extending its
a fire broke out on Saturday night. facilities to us.
‘They are the property of the Gov- ‘Thank you also for the very
eruor-in-Executive Committee. great amount of trouble you have
Another fire at Bentley Planta- taken in organising our sporting
tion, St. Philip on Saturday burnt [Xtures for us. The arrange~
six acres of first crop ripe and six Ments have been perfect and T
and a‘half acres of sec oe hope the problems with which
é a s of second crop |
ripe canes, They are the property you. have been faced have not
of A. E. Skeete of the same plan- Seok sen aan TBYCH “ WOCRY,
tation and were insured. Mee UTTit
A fire at Joes River Plantation, ee ee ae eee te tee
on seeeye oprah ee thank all those who assisted him
hae (anes the eerartr ot Joes making these games possible.
River Limited and were also aie
insured. Ca of
HE WALL enclosing the new re, ul Driving
burial ground at St, Joseph . Police have noticed a definite
is nearly completed. Labourers improvement in the driving of
are now working upon the en- loaded lorries this crop season
closure at St Ann’s Chapel. For- since they issued a notice to all
merly this Chapel was only partly or nearly all drivers of these vehi-
enclosed. ? \ eles recently, Col. R. T. Michelin
told the “Advocate” yesterday.
The notice which is in leaflet

: * form makes these points; Drive
Coconut Thief Gets slowly; Do not overtake at corn—
ers; Observe the major road sig-
Month Term In Gaol nals; Do not cut in—wait your
turn; Drive as you would wish to
Milton Farrell, a labourer of be driven.
Geodland, St. Michael, was yes- Police are paying strict atten-
terday sentenced to one month’s tion to the way these lorries are
imprisonment with hard labour being driven, the Commissioner
by His Worship Mr. H, A. Talm® said, and they hope that the im-
Police Magistrate of District “A” provement they have noted will be
Police Court. oor up
Farrell was found guilty of ‘This message to drivers is in-
stealing a quantity of coconuts chided in the notice:—
the property of Mary Blenman of “The 1951 Crop which is

Hindsbury 2 February 11. i
On. Poa “tt apout "8.40 starting now should be a record
; one. You will have plenty of

p.m. Farrell was arrested after :
he was seen with a coconut in his Cane to take to the Factory and

hand on Blenman’s land on which a large number of bags of sugar

were growing trees bearing co- to the Wharf.
conuts. We want to see a GREAT

Erwin Wilson chased after him IMPROVEMENT in your driv—
and gave him into custody, Be- ing this year. Extra Police
fore passing sentence Mr. Talma patrols are being put on the

a rarer aaa aa



called on Seibert Waldron—keep- highways to observe your driv-
er of the criminal record—to ing, and action will be taken
read the previous convictions, against all persons who drive

Waldron who knows the de- without due regard for the safe-

fendant said that he has eight ty of others using the road, Re-
previous convictions for larceny member that the extra trip or
and on the last conviction he was two you make by the fast driv—
sentenced to six months’ impris- ing of a loaded lorry will not
onment with hard labour for make up for the loss of life you
stealing galvanise sheets valued might cause or for the fine and
at $6. loss of time you might spend
in Court,”



FIR COMES STUDYING W.I, ROADS
Making a cruise through the
A record shipment of lumber West Indies for the purpose of
arrived for Barbados when the studying road conditions in the
S.S. Islandside brought a million islands is Mr. James Barrett,
and a half feet of fir lumber from prominent road _ contractor of
Vancouver on Sunday. This ship- New Jersey.
ment was consigned to Messrs T. He arrived here on Sunday
Geddes Grant Limited. morning from San Juan by the
The Islandside began to unload Nieuw Amsterdam and was ac-
her cargo shortly after her arrival companied by his wife and coun-
in Carlisle Bay and is expected to sel, Mr. John H. Reiners, At-
spend a few more days here beforg torney of Camden.
leaving. Mr. Barrett is one of the
Yesterday the inner basin of 2uthorities in New Jersey on
the Careenage was becoming con- hot-mix asphalt, and has shown
gested with the lumber although that asphalt cannot retain heat
lorries and carts were busy at @nd compaction, He hopes to
work removing it ‘to various lum- visit the Pitch Lakepsat La Brea
ber yards during the day. when he reaches Trinidad. |
Messrs Robert Thom Limited One of the outstanding pieces
are the agents of the Islandside, of road construction he has done

The ship sailed for Barbados via 38 the paving of the roa d
San Petro and Curaeao, i bed which runs between Phila-

=~









MAKE THESE....

FOODS,

ae



SLICED HAM SLICED BACON

EDAM CHEESE EMPIRE COFFEE

CHASE & SAN BOURNE'’S COFFEE

MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE ~ _ NESCAFE

A good assortment of 141 Pkts, of Cream Filled Biscuits

| A A Packet of CAKE MIX will be
given to every customer spending
$3.80 and oves.



{} STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.





delphia and Camden, New Jersey.!




More For
| Lighting

The Vestry of St. Michael yes-
terday appointed a Committee to
go into the matter of an increased
price for street lighting asked by
the Gas Company.

The company. are asking for
33-1/3 per cent for a year, as
from and after February 28. At
the end of the year they propose
to reconsider the increased price
with a view to existing condi-
tions. =

The Vestry’s” committee are
empowered to co-opt non
members. The view expressed
by most members at the meeting
yesterday, was that though an
increase was probably justifiable,
the Vestry should be made aware
of the facts relative to this in-
crease.

Mr. E. D. Mottley, M.C.P.,
said that this was a matter which
in his opinion, should be given
very careful consideration. He
was not opposed to giving the
the Gas Co. an increase, but the
Vestry should be in a position to
know whether or not the increase
asked for was justifiable.

Again, he did not think it
right for the Gas Co. to give them
a month’s notice only, before the
proposed increase was put on.
He thought they should have been
given about three months’ notice.
In his opinion the Vestry should
write the Gas Co. telling them
that they deprecated the short
notice they had been given. He
would also suggest that they ap-
point a small committee to go
into the matter with the com-
pany and report back to the
Vestry. Mr. Mottley then moved
a motion to the effect adding
that non-members should be
co-opted.

Motion Seconded

Mr. B. A. Weatherhead sec-
onded the motion and told the
Vestry how he had talked and
argued with the Manager of the
Gas Co. about the matter.

Mr. Victor Chase expressed
the view that the company’s pro-
posed increase was quite justifi-
able.

Mr. A. S. Bryden said that he
was not at all surprised that the
company were asking for an in-
crease in price, but he thought
the Vestry in a matter of that
sort, should deal with it as a
private concern would. That was.
they should have a full investi-
gation into it.

Mr. Fred Goddard said that
when the Gas Co, made their
first contract with the British
Union Oil Co. for the price of
Natural Gas, the price was based
on the prices ruling at Gulf ports.

It would be remembered that
on the arrival of the devaluation
of the pound, the price of the oil
jumped and the Gas Company’s
price for Natural Gas_ having
been fixed on these prices, the
company had to pay a substan-
tial increase to the British Union
Oil Company.

This increased price was now
being enjoyed by the Barbados
Government who had taken over
Natural Gas in the island, ‘and
were only allowing the British
Union Oil Company to operate
on a fifty-fifty basis, Therefore it
could be seen that both the Brit-
ish Union Oil Company and the
Barbados Government were bene-
fiting at the hands of the Gas
Company. Furthermore, as the
present Government had not al-
lowed the Gas Bill to go through
on the grounds that the company’s
price was too high, it could be
seen that the company were get-
ting squeezed in the centre, as
they were not permitted to charge
the consumer the increase put on
them,

100% Natural Gas

Again, if the Gas Bill was
passed instead of having to op-
erate 50 per cent gas and 50 per
cent coal gas, they might be able
to use 1006 per cent, Natural Gas
at a reasonable price.

A suggestion came from Mr.
Mottley that Sir John Saint and
Mr. C. A. Coppin might be ask-
ed to serve on the Vestry’s Com-
mittee.

POTATO THIEF
GETS ONE MONTH

Sentence of one month’s im-
prisonment with hard labour was
yesterday passed on Charles Tay-
lor a 48-year-old labourer of Bay
Land St. Michael by His Wor-
ship Mr. H. A. Talma.

Taylor was found guilty of
stealing a quantity of potatoes
growing on the Belle Plantation
and the property of J. D. Las-
celles on February 10.

The case was brought by the
Police.





The above — equip-

ment is available for

early delivery from

the U. K.

|| COURTESY
|| GARAGE

|
i ROBERT THOM Ltd.

——



* best water supplies in the world. every satisfaction.









Ce ee ee a re

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE







IF YOURE

ALWAYS ON

THE RUSH ENE
You'll need a Tonic

“ REVITONE
TONIC

FOR RESTORING VITALIPY

-; CAC-O-TOSE

A VITAMIN AND MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT FOR
CHILDREN AND ADULTS

KNIGHT’S DRUG STORES.

£100 Grant Press Should: M. Howard Smith

’ The death occurred at his resi-
The St. Michael Vestry have B Al ili
agrond that the NMLGK wiht he me Paeers Se See Seer = oe
a good service to the women of @ From page 3 Smith retired planter and popu-
Barbados and the Vestry will put The West Indies in the past had /@" public figure at the age of 80.
£100 on its Estimates to provide been somewhat outside the main Mr. Smith who was educated
a grant for the Association, news channels of the world; that ®t the Lodge School took to the
The Vestry came to this deci. Was perhaps, to some degree. Of planting profession. Success came
sion when they were considefing course, they had not seen any~ fis way early by reason of his
a letter from the Association ask. thing in past years to represent a thorough going methods, First he
ing. whether the Véetry “would very good news story, but that bought Golden Grove and later
ive the Adsstiafion a yearby was now changed. when he saw the needs of, the
arent: we ne seein of a ey, “| this island he was in
a m ore one’s sStrumental in es ishi
Mr, Goddard said that the As- eyes—whether it took the form of Houses Fectery Liniied whisk
scciation was behind a very de- a definite political federation or he was a Director, As time went
serving cause. It had been brought not—was a fascinating one and by he obtained interest in ‘Thick-
about by some ladies who had the more fully and accurately the et, Sanford, and Map) S my
zealously given over their service World was informed of what was ‘Mr. Smith found tiie to serve
to the community and the mer- 8g on, the better for every one. on the Vestry of the Daria. oad
chants of Barbados had contrib. . Mr.C .A. L. Gale first extended “was highly respected both as an
uted to the cause, a welcome to the visitors and employer and a public amare. He
The house for the Association ee ot oon Seel for al- retired from parochial affairs
had been first rented on a nominal jn sn aaa te. ae ar years ago when his health began
rent but he had learnt that they be a press agency in the West In. (2 {il but maintained an interes:
had since been given the first dies. * s'n in things around him.
year free. The Vestry would be He told the delegates that it ./#® Was @ man of varied inter-






60665000009 90000006506555055 0000 9SE0SS9SIGE)



wise to set it off with its right foot they had any time outside the con- Ln and besides his planting and %
forward. ference room, they would see that MS, activities in parochial affairs ECCS SCOSLESOCOO LOS SOOOCOOOL

, 4 we he took part in racing and cricket
He hoped they would do such Barbados on the whole, was one ine See Tae
work that whenever they returned of the ideal spots for a holiday. a hehe ee ne

to the V , _ He would also like them to re- : ‘ owned
be Bo nk Pee cee te aan member that they could do quite Bedelia a favourite on the local
help. , . lot dor the West Indies from the a ae gw his oc were
ourist angle and there was no ¢atried by gona who won the

On eee that he thought good one part of the West Indies T:T.C. Cup in 1927. Mr. Smith
te Y.W.C.A. should be of reai trying to push their wares and not WS also a member of the Com-

pe bag to the whole island. It had the other. He thought that they â„¢ittee of the Barbados Turf Club.
a itely started off on its vig should get together and those from In recent years he was con~-
oot already. The Vestry should outside like Mr. Bloom from Reu- fined to bed owing to continued
put a substantial sum on its estim- ters, could do quite a lot to fur- failing health and his death oc-
ates by way of a grant for ‘hem, ther the interests of the West In- curred on Saturday. He leaves

pel
O
O
KJ
a
e

LINENS

Mr. Weatherhead supported the. dies as a whole. to meurn their i :
eee net gee Be . as Gat he was one of the +35 iver ie bas ‘Sent bee: g
" a or’ al members of the Associa- Mrs. Daysh recentl lect g W
Board he said, would now thc ion and had seen it grow and also member of the Ventty. of est THE TALK OF THE tO N !
great help the Association wouk §} ad every hope that they would Philip. , ‘
pe ie _ poorly paid shirt makers oe at to arrive at some work- M La e e
of the'city. vs j able solution. » =
: Mr. uae made a motion that Reuter’s C ti Me urence Clarke 36 ins wide x
hey should start off the Vestry ers Co-operation The sad news has been receiv: ° $
with a grant of £50. He was very pleased to hear Mr. of the death ie “Mr yaurende : ‘
Mr. Mottley agreed that £50 Bloom say that Reuters had ex- Clarke of New York ‘Mr Clarke in 2
shculd be given to the Association, tended their co-operation and who was only 47, was born : ir
From the personnel he had seen Whatever assistance they could in st, Andrew, Barbados, and edu- ¥
; ‘: S, . s



; NIL
| AQUA

in the ociation, work Working towards this solution. In

would re He be gee ee the past, the service left room for Gated at the Alleyne School, as
lieve that they were working for improvement and he was glad to was the only son of Mrs. Sarah
themasivée, hear of the close co-operation and Clarke.

Mr. Chase said that that was Cl0Ser association between Reuter | He left the colony 29 years ago
ene occasion when they could be and the West Indian Press which for the States, There he marriec
liberal. There was not any person would result in a workable solu- Miss Millicent Mahon daughter oi
Meith 4 ahhh] aehsh in Warsadas we ot a difficulties. 5 Mrs. Lilian Mahon of Jubilee Gap
who would: criticise any. reaapn. pee res that out of the Con- Bank Hall. A daughter — Lor.

j they would be able t nical
able amount they should give. The work out somethi able to raine was born to the couple E< :
er ‘ thing to t as |
Association was really going to fit of the news agancine — ene Mr. Clarke way fortunate to sec
serve a useful purpose. As it was bers of the West Indies. her attain womanhood, marry anc

in its first year, they would have Mr. Garnet Gordon in , begin to raise a family of her own
. x ;

niore expenses $2 coves, but — the vote of thanks to Sir ieacat About six days ago, Mr, Clarke

a aaa nt eee onto Seel, thanked him for his encour— ise a) Me 8S home trom work

eee eer 2 if e ooh felt aging and weighty words of wis- ecame involved in a collision with

eat — a ee a8 8 dom and ‘for the freedom of Has- ae He died a few hours

ae Sion. | _.». tings House which he had so gen- *!!€- ;

‘ke eee Mr. Chase’s ergusly extanded to them. ; ot has mt to more his Iga
; ; . e said that they who had been 's wife, daughter, two granc
Mr. Mottley said that he would \atching the activities of Colonial Children and his mother,

FLESH
LEMON





not support more than £50. They

Heege ete ye ge Te 93 Derelennay ana Weitere, knew jc WI ITE
subscribe money to then than the °Y too well of the chairmanship

Y.W.C.A. There was a moticn on °f Sir George and the chairman- MIXED CARGO

the same agenda for old women. ship of his predecessors, A shipment of 1,250 bags ol

Mr. Hewitt said that he felt that _ The activities to which Sir rice arrived in Barbados yester-
such an institution was long over- George had referred and of which day by the 76-ton schooner
due in Barbados and they should he had made excuses suggested Timothy A. He Vansluyimar
give it a good send off and be as Very clearly that C.D. and W, as {rom British Guiana, She also
genercus as possible, an original body, had outgrown brought a supply of rice bran,

Mr, Tudor withdrew his motion its habitat. ; firewood, charcoal, wallaba poles

for £50, It was a clear indication that &4 wallaba_ posts.
the time was ripe for the federal , From St. Vincent, the Wonder-

Pyeienest to take over many of ft! Counsellor brought a supply

POWDER TOOTAL
ay LINEN
GOAL yds tent eruzeo

HARRISONS—BROAD ST.

DIAL 2664.



i interes: of firewood while the Julnar
Caught In Ambush ing cared out by C.D. and w, wzived from. Martinique’ with
I a + . fres ruit.

The Judges of the Assistant ‘bask - May ao caethina tak Sir etiam ioe oc nia meie aban oan
Court of Appeal, Mr. G. L. Taylor never been of more importance
and Mr. J. W. B. Chenery yes- than in the life of the West Indies
terday fined Edgar McClean of to-day, There was a tremendous
Bailey Alley, St. George and challenge to the members of the
Jackie Skeete of Redland Ten- press with the extension of politi—
antry, St. George 10/- each. They cal power as far as it Cohid ¥6
agreed with Police Magistrate Mr with the granting of Cpe
A. W. Harper who had fined Me- aqult suftra ois Pig Me

; ge practically through
Clean and Skeete when he had the grea. and the responsibility
icund them guilty of having com- 4),,, eee h nae a Yh
mitted bodily harm. on Oscar ae upon the press was tre-
Hoyte of Sweet Bottom, st. Me7dous. ‘
George. Introspection < ae

The offence was committed on _ There was need for a responsi-

December 21 last year, McClean) ble, reliable, well balanced and COUGH LOZENG
and Skeete ambushed Hoyte, conscientious press. If the press

When he was passing near some did not fulfil its functions in the wW. 4 A
canes in which they were hiding, development of this community,
they jumped out on him and beat, many grave errors would be com—
him with sticks. Hoyte ran into’ mitted.

a house nearby. They were mindful of his advice
a, against introspection and for tha
/-reason they were most happy tc

SURPRISED concern themselves, not only with

a °
A Dutch se .., the distribution of any Caribbean
liner _. ior are news, but also by forming this e@ n nu es









ANIMATED OPINIONS







representative of the Advocate @%ency to interest themselves it |” your sldin has nearly 60 million tiny seams

admiring the ship's swimming pool W9rld news. and pores where germs hide and cause ter-

on Sunday and asked: “Do you They were most happy to be pee cece a ee ee ee esis:

have swimming pools in Barbados €?couraged by, and feel that they | Blackheads, Pimples, Foot Itch and other

too?” could work in co-operation with | blemishes, Ordinary treatments give only
? c e

He seemed very surprised when Reuters ig orgy whey nae, oer tee nore on: use. The how @lacovery, Nixe-

a e . 1 7 minutes *

he got the reply “Barbados has few felt sure Wat they wees rea eed tb Pre pots ph soft, doar, attrac-

tive, smooth skin in one week, or socnes



swimming pools, but the majority Mined to do a good job,

» le, rt: kag:
of homes have fresh water baths.” only by those around that table bak oe a Nixoderm trom Pour chemia

The seaman said that he but by the press generally through today and re-
thought Barbadians relied on the out the area. erm neve Oe ren
sea for bathing and expressed He thanked Sir George for his | Fog im Troubles trou.
even more surprise when he was kind wishes and looked forward
told that Barbados has one of the to proceeding with their work with pes

Says Mr. Leo King:

“YOU CAN RE-LION IT
BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT!”

“ Walters

trouble, |

-



Pye . FREE BROOK ‘

ul aro Toffee
|

+

MASSEY-HARRIS | i} «cop's way or °§
MADE IN UK.

SALVATION |
The Perfection of Confection

Please write for one ‘to
Samuel Roberts, Gospel
Beok and Tract Service,

Enquiries cordially invited for the , Bi Seeee seen Se

EQUIPMENT as. et
WALTERS’ ‘PALM’ TOFFEE LTD. ‘PALM’ WORKS,

LONDON. W.3

supply of the following—

42 W.ILP. 6 cyl DIESEL WHEEL {}| AT;
: TRACTORS ua : RUactois

(Steel Wheels also available for
Ploughing)





SANDERSON FURNISHING
FABRICS

A new range of beautiful styles has arrived—

GRASS CUTTERS = 5 & Git

3.77; $3.42; $2.83
$2.40; $2.06; $1.93
«

4B” wide—per Ye oo... ccecseccecreeeneniapeensen $5.23



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MANURE SPREADERS



SIDE DELIVERY RAKES

FERD MILLS | , CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.
:

|
FERTILIZING DRILLS 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET |
} |

sha. einem amieaasrmininiliatasaiaasiinia ieetinnnmesimtsiinibaiiiiinniaieatdlaaiaatiiasiitailai Al is ctileesataaaemhcaell



PAGE SIX . BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1951

‘cancienasrienenttiletinatiniiaitnacasiaintses
HEADACHE ?
tei
Double your chances for relief
with Double-Acting ALMA-SELTZER!
You are doubly sure of relief when
you take Alka-Seltzer for your
headache, because Alka-Seltzer

t contains an analgesic to ease peins,
| and an alkalizing agent to offset
|
i
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i
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excess gastric acidity, so often as-
sociated with headaches. Have a
Ga) supply handy always.

’ “tt





8 > Alka-Seltzer





STOPPING THE TIDE
True old saying, “YOU cant
stop the tide,” however good
your intention. WE find that
as much as we would like to
keep our prices stabled, the
1} constant increases in prices
i} of our raw materials force us
to revise some of our prices,
as under:
Supr. bay Rum still .. 36c.
No. 3 bay Rum still .. 30c.
Limolene Highergrade 60c.
f Mentholated 72e.
7 No, 2 grade 24c,
o- No. 2 grade
Mentholated 30c.
Floralene 6 oz. ......
i POE aig we 24c.
Cologne 3 oz. ........ 24c.
In spite of the increases our
products are still best value
to-day.
On sale at ail good stores.

Cars.

Ans

;
|

GOSH! FEATHER For
ONIONS... HU
GET OUT OF H



me good looks tell you they're just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price

puree eS
aa OP aI cpa
ae ea ete
I at Sia gett on ale




tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated






the John White Guarantee Shicld—the sign

which means ‘just right’! Look for it in
HTT Ts
HATTA

DADDY, ONE OF THE fe aan
PUPPIES ATE THE CANDY ) Tota tao Cua oe THERE ---
YOU BROUGHT ME +7 . IN'T Y CAN . ELMER DID IT!
LAST NIGHT J Cvaaneie WW cH ”% it o yer < T CAN TELL BY
Ze ONE? ey ieee eed we f

leading stores in Barbados.



parag Soup

ken Soup

to Soup

ts, (Sliced and whole)

}
is a Full Brogue Oxford. Tied to every pair is |
|
|
}
1
|
|

THE LOOK ON



=, HIS FACE

5 wy Me ‘ ; pe £ ee aa af ki
Lae y i \\ rw ' PS ) @& 5 ; =f ae
as 4 ewe me: ae 4 Jas BO) = oy as oe % inn; :
he : Os

BOW WAH ”. a bE 4 I? LOOK AT THE TIME] PANO TOLO HIM THAT LAST NiGuT
FEEL TERRIBLE : =e - =# & PARTY 7) TAREE-$
——— "LL GET YOU A ; “A HANGOVER GR = DON'T woray ; =

CuP OF TEA ANOFELIKE THIS FOR YEARS 4a- ‘? You! arse

SOME ASPIRING 1 ! (carrie 28 EY AT_THE OFFICE eam 3

* CONTAINS VITAMINA&D |
IN A DELICIOUS FORM

|
%* INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS
%* ENSURES STRONG LIMBS
|

i

}




Peas
» Tomatoes
Pkgs Blancmange
. Jellos
Bots Salad Cream
" Prepared Mustard
Sliced Bacon,

STUART & SAMPSON
LID.

Headquarters for Best Rum.

















YOU'RE DRESSED THE SAME AND

THE MAN! I'D KN
RIDE THE SAME HORSE, BUT

THAT VOICE ANYWHERE! {

AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN





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Haliborange

The nicest way of taking
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ee pe mem SoR tnee ER e ee A A TTL
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LISTEN, CHIEF... THE CORMORANT ) SORRY IF I

IS CHARTERED BY ONE CRAZY SEEMED
LITTLE COOT WHO WANTS To
or. ASAI



LFISH...NOW
‘M Busy!

weses,|| Peake’ | || (eaaareerne| | 0. big car features | :
SS | PREG | | Wastin actin BAe LECH at small car costs ee
G TELEVISION 4 HE ‘ ity
xe 5 Mee" FREIGHT
Xe ad | , ; SERVICES
Regular
Save






From B'dos to




Flying Time jFlights WeeklyjKilo Rates



BERMUDA 12.15

2 $2.16
: LISBON 24, $4.
This superb Morris has every LONDON A , 00 hrs. ; Hie =

feature you expect to find in the larger, more Costly cars,
Engine of 27 horse power. Within-the-wheelbase seating
for four. Independent front wheel suspension.
Controlled ventilation. Lockheed hydraulic brakes. Over 7 cubie
feet of luggage accommodation. Easier to steer through
traffic. Less costly to operate and maintain. Fuel consumption
35-40 miles per gallon. The worlds biggest small car buy!

jm Also “Connecting Services to the “whole World,

THE PHANTOM
~~




ITS’ FASTER BY FAR BY SPEEDBIRD,
Book through your local =~
B.O.A.C. Forwarding Agent

who makes no charge for

advice, information or book- / ;
ings by “Speedbird” to all EB @ ohne ge
sta continents,
z 2 xe , Ae SE
: b Ase . SAT fi







ViOM, WATCHING AT
THE CONTROLS



a ‘arr * eet

a a
: : &
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HW SAVE YOUR BREATH, LADY
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TO WAKE HIM! py
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pane see them at
{

{

|

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION
BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED



, Bndgetown
Phone 4565
anna cl a a iN iT I aE A Ral Se eat
a } RRO PB Liu se ini i









TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

1

LASSIFIED ADS.

°
wy

1951

TELEPHONE 2508



The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
fov any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m,





IN MEMORIAM



TUDOR—In loving memory, of my Dear
beloved wife Carmen Sylvia Tudo-,
who feli asleep on February 13, 1950

Dear is the grave, in which she is

laid.

Dear is the memories, that never
shall fade.

Sweet is the hope, that again we
shall meet,

Kneeling together at Jesus feet.
Ever to be remembered by (Husband!
Austin L. Tudor (Son) Horace Ham-
leit (Step daughter) Sheila Welch and
Family. 13,2.51—1n



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week~4 Cents a
word Sundays.

AUTOMOTIVE







CAR—One (1) Style Master Chevrolet
Car n very good condition, owner driven.
Apply to L. M. Clarke, Jeweller, No, 12

James Street. Phone 3757. 13.2.51—In
CAR—One Vauxhall 25 hp. Six
Cylinder, 5 new Tyres. Upholstery in’

excellent condition. Engine running good
Dial 4514 for inspection. 11.2.51—an

CAR—6 Cylinder, 18 HP. Vauxhall
(Velox) in excellent condition, Phone
MacKinnon 4739 or 2900. 11.2.61—2n.

—_——___..
CARS—1936 Ford V-8 Tourer. Excellent
Condition, 1938 Ford V-8 Sedan Bargain.
1949 Morris Oxford Saloon. Low Mileage
and well cared. FORT ROYAL

GARAGE LTD. Telephone 4504,
11.2.51—3n.





Perfect
Purchasing
Dr. Simon — Telephone
10.1.51—6n

CAR—Packard 8 Cylinder.
condition. Reason for sale,
smaller car,

ELECTRICAL

ONE TURNER WALKER
, electrically driven,
Apply: Mr. . de Souza,
Geddes Grant Ltd.

FURNILURE

RALPH BEARD offers upright rush
bottom chairs $3.75 each, with arms
$4.80 and rockers $5.00 each. New
mahogany upright chairs $17.00 per pr.
New mag. rockers $36.00 per pair, Tub
chairs $26.00 per pr. Mahogany cocktail
tables from $8.00. Tea trolleys $15.00
each, Mahogany Vanities, from $75.00;
Mog. bedends 3 ft. 6 ins. $35.00 per pr.
also a good variety of second hand
furniture.

For further particulars Dial 4688. Call
on view at Ralph Beard’s show room
Herdwood Alley. 9.2.51—3n

DRILL
new.
Cfo T.
1,2.51-—6n.



MISCELLANEOUS

ACTUMUS—The new Fertiliser for
canes, vegetable and flower gardens $3.60
per lb, from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store, Coleridge Street. Phone 2999.

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites, Top
grade, A. BARNES & Co,, Ltd.

26,1.51—t-f.n.

CHELSTON LIME WORKS Can
supply, Temper & Building Lime. Boul-
ders, Concrete Stone Grit, Marl & Sand.
Trucks on hire. P, S. Brooks. Phone
8335. 13,2.51—6n.
a

CLOTHING English family have
for sale ladies cashmere sweaters, linen
frocks, tweed riding jacket, new Suede
Sandals, Man's tweed Jackets (new)
Ayessing gowns, Tel, 8173.





13.2.51—1n.

SS .
CURTAIN FPITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and

draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD, 13,.2,51-—t.f.0

MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin-
fuished solution to your special

architectural problem of door closures,
screens, movable partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD,

13,2.51-—t.f.n,

peepee erento bapleentianen soeetineeeenmnenteeie
GALVANISED PIPE in the following
sizes: “in., 4in., %in., lin., 1% ins,
2ins., 24% ins., 3ins, and 4 ins. Also fit~
tings. Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

Trafalgar Street, Phone PS ae
2 O1.——t.t.n.



HEARING AID Almost New with
spares including Batteries — Apply Box
“E” C/o Advocate Co.

13.2.51—2n,



O,K COFFEE—Pronounced by users as
the best packaged Coffue they can buy,



and a fresh supply is now at your
grocer, 13.2,51—2n
PIANO—Lipp. Apply to Mrs. Hutson

Inniss Ayshford. 13.2.51—3n,
PIANO—Bentley
8435.

a
SUEDE SADDLE — Excellent condition
Large American Wardrobe trunk, fitted.

also sheet of 3 ply wood. Tel. 8173.
13,2.51—1n

——
STAK-A-BYE TUBULAR Steel Chairs
and Tables on show at Ralph Beard’s
Show rooms, Hardwood Alley. Trad?

enquiries cordially invited.
13.2,51—6n

—

STEEL STEP LADDERS—6-tread and
4-tread. Just the thing for Stores, Schools,
Offices, and Household uses, 4 tread $9.88



{almost new). Phone
13.2,51—4n,

eoch; 6 tread $12.95 each, Cannot be
repeated at this price, at RALPH
BEARD'S Show Rooms Hardwood
Alley. 10,2,51—2n





VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirsch Sun-aire

delivery 3 weeks, Dial 4476
S & CO., LTD. 13.2.51-+t.f.n.

your sizes,



WEETABIX—Fresh supply of this most
delicious of all cereals is now at your
grocer. 13.2,51—2n

lena a

WOOD & COAL eae
. Apply W. A. Medford.

condition. pply 11.2.51—3n







FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.

HOUSES

BLUE HOUSE—laicas Street. A fine
business stand, Immediate possession
Apply THANT BROS. Pr. Wm. Hry St.
Dia’ 3466. 11.2,51—39

HIGH ROCK—Bathsheba. From March
to July. Phone 4048, 10.2.51—4n
FO Oro

ROOM, HASTINGS — A newly fur-
rished room with running water. Phone
47i8. 13.2.51-—3n,





a
Maxwells

SEA-C.AZE — On-the-sta z

oast, illy furnished including tele
pis“e and refrigerarcr. for March, June.
July. For further information Pisin’
13.2.51-——1n



WENDOVER Abbeville

and July. Apply: 2851, P. D. Me Dermott

4.2.51—In



een

BE WIUHSE...

«. - ADVERTISE





Gardens
Roekley to be let, furnished. May, June

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate tine on Sundays,
on week-days

minimum charge $1.50
and $1.80 on Sundays,





AUCTION
By instructions received from the
Director of Department of Highways &

Transport I will set
pects sce at their
sey the lth, beginn:
the following len tae
(127) Oil Brooms, (75)
s.grieulture Forks, (19)
Lanterns, (87) Rakes, (41)
(29) Wheel Barrows, (45)
and several other items of interest.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Govt. Auctioneer.

Shovels,
Pickaxes,

up for sale by
yard on Thurs-
at 12.30 p.m.
Steel Brooms,
(51)
154)
Buckets,
Twist Drills

7.2,51—4n,



REAL ESTATE

See a

GRANDVIEW, Bathsheba —
Bedroomed Bungalow, rattan
Sq. Feet Land,

Offer in writing for the same,
received by E, C.
Lynch & Cec, Ltd.
February 195

LAND—1 acre 4
in Rampart Hil,
Hill, St. Michael.
Gill's Av



Apply: K. M, Griffith,
enue, Eagle Hall, St. Michael,
7.2.51—3n.
ar niente eee ai
“DUNSINANE”
Pee eee ae ST. MICHAEL,
e residence latel, ‘upi
W.' Ogee 'Y occupied by Mrs.

The house stands in well kept gardens
and grounds (2 acres 37 perches),

The whole comprises verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 5 bedrooms, one
with marble bath, 2 showers, 2 lava-
tories, convenient kitchen and Pantry,
reoms for 5 servants, garage for 2 cars,
and stables.

Water supply for garden and grounds
from a well with mill; water service in
heuse and also servants rooms (shower
and lavatory).

The residence completely wired and
furnished with electric lighting from
the company’s mains.

House convertible into flats and out-
buildings convertible into a cottage

The land is suitable for develop.
ment or kitchen gardens.

The undersigned will offer the
premises for sale by public auction at
their office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 23rd day of
February 1951 at 2 p.m,

Inspection on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days only between 3 and 5 p.m,

For further particulars apply to

Cc » CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors,

4.2.51—10n,

—_—

The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office No, 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 16th February 1951 at
2 p.m. The messuage or dwelling house
formerly known as Tullycra now call-
ed “CRYSTAL WATERS" with the land
thereto containing by estimation 12,087
square feet situated on the sea at Car-
ville Avenue, Worthing, Christ Church,
at present used as a boarding house.

Inspection any day except Sundays
between 4 and 6 p.m, on application to
Mrs. Talma on the premises,

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD, & Co.,
Solicitors,
3.2.51—12n.

The undersigned will offer for sale at
James St., over Hinds & Co., Drug Store
on the 14th February 1951 at 2 p.m., by
public Competition, one Modern Stone-
built property known as “Hill Crest",
Situated at Upper Collymore Rock, oppo-
site the A.M.E. Church, with 5.000 sq. ft.
of Land, 2 bedrooms, open verandah, tiled
beth and water toilet, Electricity, can be
seen from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Apply the
owner on premises. L, A. M. WATTS,
James Street. Dial 4523,

10.2.51—4n,

PROPERTIES—Two delightful __resi-
dence situated at Top Rock, Christ
Chureh. Both having 3 bedrooms with
2 Toilets and Baths recently constructed,
Gardens well laid out. With possession
on March ist. No reasonable offer will
be refused, For viewing etc. Ring 4683









or 2228. 13.2 1—6n
“ MARWIN—Maxwell's Road. Modern
stone-built Bungalow, 3 Bedrooms,

Drawing and Dining Room Breakfast
Room and Kitchenette, Toilet and Bath,
Servants’ Room, Garage in ard, Water
and Electric Light installed. Approx-

imately 14,000 sq. ft. of land. Apply:
E. H. Farmer, Andrews Plantation or
Dial 95267. 4,2.51—6n.



A new and well built Bungalow on
Pine Hill called WESTFIELD, the pro-
perty of the late Sir George Walton,

The Bungalow stands on 18,020 square

feet of land and contains one large
rublic room, two bedrooms, kitchen,
laundry, bath and lavatory.

In a separate building there is a
Garage for one car and two servants
rooms with bath and lavatory,

The property will be set up for sale
at our office on Wednesday the 2ist day
of February 1951, at 2 p.m.

For conditions of sale apply to the
undersigned,

Inspection any day between 10.30 a.m.
ana — p.m, Telephone Lady Walton,
No, 4581.

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors,
9.2,51—11n.



LOST

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.



BROOCH — In Bridgetown Sat. Feb.
10th. Half Moon Diamond Brooch.
Finder will be rewarded. Phone 2592.

13.2.51—I1n,



SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series L. 1859.
Finder please return same to Timothy
Rice, Ivy Land, St. Michael,

13.2.51—I1n



GOVERNMENT

——————
UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

Matriculation Examination

The following is an extract from a letter dated 18th November,

1950, from the Secretary to the Matriculation and School Examinations
2 il of the University of London: —

SP aen, cuivers con oT “The University. of London will cease to issue notifications of
exemption from the Matriculation Examination after 30th April,
Candidates, who expect to matriculate by means of the
School Certificate or Higher School Certificate of December 1950,
should write to the Secretary of the Matriculation and School
Examinations Council, Senate House, London, W.C.1., not to the
Secertary of the Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate, They
must mention their index number and centre, and forward with
the letter the matriculation registration fee of three guineas so
that the information and fee is received by the University of
London during February 1951.
plete their matriculation exemption by passing the Higher School
Certificate or a single subject at the School Certificate Examina-

1951.



standing on 14,919

will be
C/o James A.

up to 4 p.m, 28th
8.2.51—6r

perches of land situated
St. Michael, near Cave

PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate tine an week-days
and 12 cents per agete line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on weekdays
end $1.80 on Sundays.





“£25: ~. -d. easily earnea by obtaining

order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends, No previous exper!
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making

opportunity, Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works,
England.”

25.1.51—18n

Ss
THE ASSOCIATED BOARD OF THE
a ROYAL SOHOOLS OF a

e Board begs to notify the teachers
that the Practical exam will take place

between the 6th and 16th April 1951.
Mr. H. E. Wilson will be the examiner

this year for the West Indies.

All forms and fees must be forwarded





Y. M. P. C.

Members are asked to submit
motions they may desire to place on
Agenda for the half yearly General
Meeting to be held at the Club House
on the 14th March, to the Secretary, not
jater than the’ 1?th February, 1951.

P. G.

Secretary.
13.2.61—3n

the

NOTICE

PARISH OF 8T. JOHN
SEALED tenders are invited for sup-
plying approximately 42 pints pure fresh
cows’ milk daily to St. John's Almshouse
in two deliveries, as from the 25th
March 1951, Applications will be re-
ceived by the bndersigned to the 17th
instant, and it is to w stood that
the lowest or any tender will not neces-
sarily be accepted.
R. S. FRASER,
Clerk,
Board of Poor Law
Guardians.
St. John.
10.2.51--6n

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST, JOSEPH.
Applications for the Post of Parochial
Treasurer will be received by the un-
dersigned not later than the 28th Feb-
ruary 1951 Applications must be aic-
companied by Baptismal and Medical
Certificates, and marked on the En-
velope, applications for Post of Paro-
chial Treasurer,
Sed. Rev. L. C. MALLALIEU,
Chairman
St. Joseph's Vestny.
11,2,51—6n,

NOTICE

Applicants are invited for the post of
Aseistant Nurse at St. Lucy's Almshouse
at a salary of $57.50 per month, uniform
ete. and quarters provided.

Applicants must be fully certifleated,
midwives, and general Nurses.

The successful candidate must assume
duties on 25th February 1961.

Applications will be received by me up
to Saturday 17th. February 1951.

OSWALD L. DEANE,

Clerk, Board of Poor Law Guardians,

St. Lucy.
10.2.51—7n.



NOTICE

The Parochial Treasurer's Office, St.
Michael will be closed at 12 o'clock Noon
on Thuredey 15th and Tuesday 20th Feb-

ruary 1961,
PERCY H, BURTON,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Michael,
13.2.51--2n,
I
NOTICE
SUPPLIES FOR THE POOR
OF THE

PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL
Sealed Tenders in duplicate marked
on the envelope “TENDER FOR

» will be received by the Clerk
of the Vestry up to 12 o'clock noon on
Thursday 22nd February, for the under-
mentioned supplies in such quantities as
may from time to time be ordered for
one year commencing on the Ist Aprii
next,

FRESH MEAT

FRESH MTLK

FRESH BREAD.

Each person tendering must send in
a letter, along with the Tender, signed
by two properly qualified persons (not
being members of \the Vestry) stating
their willingness to become bound witn
the Tenderer in the event of their
Terder being accepted for the due ful-
filment to the Contract.

With respect to the tender for FRESH
MILK, the probable quantity required
for one year is 24,000 gallons and the
Vestry reserve the right to accept the
Tender of more than one person for
tive supply of this article and all per-
rons tendering for this article shall
forward, along with their tender, 9 Cer-
tifiecate by a properly qualified Veterinary
Practitioner stating that the cattle from
which the milk will be supplied are
free from Tubereulosis.

Forms of tenders cam be obtained at
the Churchwarden’s Office,

By Order,

E. C. REDMAN,
Michael's Vestry.

13.2.51.--t.f.n,

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of William and Ursula
Jones trading as Jones & Co, holder of
Liquor License No, 18 of 1951 granted
to Wm. Jones in respect of a board &
rhingle shop attached to residence at
Eagle Hall, St. Michael for permission
to use said Liquor License at said pre-
mises, Bable Hall, St, Michael.

Dated this 12th day of February 1951.
T.:—E. A. Me LEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A"
Signed WILLIAM R. JONES.
For Applicants.

N.B.—-This application will be consi-
dered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District ‘A’ on Thursday
the 22nd day of February 1951 at 11

‘clock, a.m.
ne E. A. McLEOD.
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
13,.2.511n.













Clerk, St.



NOTICE

Similarly, if they expect to com-

tion, they must state the date (with index number and centre)
of the examination on which they were awarded the School

Certificate.

April, 1951.
qualify.

therefore; —

tion.

don during February.

matter.”
| Department of Education,
| 6th February, 1951,

i

“The authorities of the Local Examinations Syndicate of
Cambridge University and the University of London have made
special arrangements in connexion with the December examina-
tion so that successful candidates may matriculate before 30th

“Matriculation fees will be refunded to those who do not
“Any candidate who intends to follow this procedure should,
(a) Write to London not Cambridge.
(b) Give his address clearly, arid full name.
(c) State index number, centre, date and name of the examina-

(d) Forward fee of three guineas to reach the University of Lon-

“These instructions countermand any already given to persons
who have been in touch with the University of London about this

10.2.51—2n



ers, whose trade or business address is 100 Park

and will be entitled to register the same after one month

a
application at my office.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE
SOVERNMENT NOTICES





OKRA CLOSE SEASON
Order

In pursuance of Section 4, sub
Prevention Act, 1928, (1928-7),

has fixed the period from the Ist of May to the 30th of June, inclusive,
to be a Close Season for Okras.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this Ist day of |
Preston/| February, one thousand nin

nae and fifty-one.
By*Command,
A. A, HINDS,

Clerk, Executive Committee.
Note.

Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-

from the provisions of sub-section (3) of Section 4 may

Agriculture.
10.2.51—2n,



COTTON CLOSE SEASON
Order

In pursuance of Section 4 sub:

sections (1) and (2) of the Cotton
Diseases Prevention Act, 1928

(1928-7), the Governor-in-Executive
Committee has fixed the period from the Ist of May to the 30th of
June, 1951, inclusive, to be a Close Season for Cotton.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this Ist day of
February, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-one.

By Command,
A. A, HINDS,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
10.2.51—2n.





CHANCERY SALE

The under-mentioned property will be Set up for sale‘at the Registration Office.
Public Buildings Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and on the
date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding Friday
at the same place and during the same hours until sold. Full particulars on appli-

cation to me.
CYRIL BRUCE BROOKS—Piaintift

vs. ’
ELEANOR PARK BAKER—Defendant

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Pinfold Street
in the City of Bridgetown in this Island containing by admeasurement Two
thousand one hundred and fourteen square feet or thereabouts butting and
bounding on lands of T, E, Went ov lands of Mrs. E.G, De Roys on lands ot

Pinfold Street aforesaid or howeve> c'se the same may butt and bound Together
with the messuage or dwelling house thereon called “Kenworth and ail
other buildings and erections both freehold and chattel thereon erected.
UPSET PRICE: £416-13-4d.
Date of Sale: 23rd February, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.
2th January, 1951.



TAKE NOTICE

THREEJFEATHERS

That PEATHERS DISTRIBUTORS INC.
existing under the laws of the State of Delaware, Uni States of America, Whole-
sale Liquor Distributors, whose trade or business a: is 350 Fifth Avenue, New
York 1, State of New York, U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of whisky, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 10th cay of February 1951, unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of
such registration. The trade mark can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 9th day of February 195},

H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.
10.2.61-—3n.

.» @ corporation organized and



TAKE NOTICE

That SCHENLEY INDUSTRIES, INC., a corporation organised and existing
under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, whose trade or
business address is 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, State of New York, US A.,
Wholesale Liquor Distributors, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in

rt “A" of ister in ct of wines, and will be entitled to register the same

r one month from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such

registration. The trade mark can be seen on application at my ice,
Dated this 9th day of February 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.
10,2.516


TAKE NOTICE

r 9

That ZONITE PRODUCTS CORPORATION, a corporation organized and exist-
under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Manufactur-
Avenue, New York 17, State of
New York, U.S A., has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of products for oral hygiene, such as dental paste, powders, and
creams and dentifrices all of which being of medicinal value, and also astringenta,
from the 10th day of Peb-
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
ation. The trade mark can be seen on

ing

ruary 1951 unless some person shall in the
my office of opposition of such registr

Dated this 9h day of February 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

TAKE NOTICE
CRESTA BLANCA

That SCHENLEY INDUSTRIES INC., a corporation organized and ex*-ting under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Manufacturers, whose
trade or business address is 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, State of New ‘York,
U.S.A. has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of wines, and will be entitled to register the same after one month
from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such registration, The trade
mark can be seen on application at my office,

Dated this 9th day of February 1961,
H_ WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,

TAKE NOTICE

pp CHARTER

That OLD CHARTER DISTILLERY CO., a corporation organized and existing
under the laws of State of Delaware, United States of America, Distillers,
Phase trade or bus ddress is 100 West 10th Street, Wilmi State of
ware, U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A”

in ot whisky, and will be entitled to register the same after
from the 10th da



one mont y of ary 1951, unless some person shall in
the meantime give 2 duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The can be seen on application at my office.
Dated this 9th day of February 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

10.2.51—3n.



TAKE NOTICE
TRUBENISED

That TR COMPANY (Rexistered Trust), a corporation organized
rding to w of Liechtenstein, whose tr or business address is Vaduz,
Liechtenstein, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part

of Register in respect of men's and boys’ shirts, collars and cuffs and ladies’
uses, dresses and trimmings and corsetry, and clothing of all kinds, and will
be entitled to register the same after one month from the 10th day of February.
1951, unless some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such registration. The trade mark can be seen on

arr rmten toe Oth rig February 1951
is ay °
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Mark:
10.2.51





TAKE NOTICE



That PAUL JONES AND COMPANY. INC., a corporation organized under the
laws of the State of Maryland, United States of America, Distillers, whose trade
or business address is 405 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York, United States
of America, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of alcoholic beverages, especially whisky, and will be entitled
to register the same after one month from the 10th day of February, 1951, unless
some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office af
opposition of uwuch registration, The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office

Dated this 9th day of February 1951

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks

10.2.51 $i?

section (3) of the Cotton Diseases 7
the Governor-in-Executive Committee | Caroli





PAGE SEVEN













] " Geeding, for St. ‘Vince aie Siedighain: ea. Sear Seer
ar our 0g a aAaatinn, 50 tor et, Cap Lady Nelson, 9s, Uruguay.
8.8. Lady Rodney, 4,907 tons net, Capt. 5: Rosa. s a ere Fu
. “ ee ie , rir Byfjerd, <.s. Alcon Ranger, 2.007%
In Carlisle Bay LeBlanc. for St, Leis 5 Gorenier a, Askren, hs Sepa A
‘n Touch With Barbados «=: Fort En Bessin, 3.4. Aleos
Ses. Emanuel C. Gordon, MV Sedge- . * Pionee ss. San Jose, ss. Mormactern
field Sch. Marea Henrietta, Sch Coastal Station Cervais. mv. Samana, m.t, Athos,
M. W. Ipana, Sch Philip H. Davidson.| Cybie and Wireless advise that they car %. $. Monica, ss, Italia
V.. Vagabond Prince, Sch. Mary E.| now communicate with the toflowin Cotonial, ss. Nuey
ine. M.V. Moneka, Sch. Emeline,| sips through their Barbados Coast \ ss. Esso Cambridge,
Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch* Franklyn Station:~ Bowhill, s. Borito, ss. Demosthe
ae S.S. Gascogne, «5. Empress of Scot s.s. American Sailor, ¢.s. Rosina vas
ARRIVALS land, ss. Fort Amherst, $s. Mauretania, «5 Willemstad, 5,5. Cristalina, 4
Schooner Timothy A. H. Vansluytman, | ;\. Bros. s.s. Golfito, &.s. Nieuw Amster. Allerton, s.s. Hersilia,
a — net, Capt. Stoll, from British
ulana.

S.S, Mulberry Hill, 4.223 tons net, Capt

Campbell, from London

Attention is drawn to sub-section (6) of Section 4 of the Cotton | Mettineau, from Martinique.
7) whereby special exemption | to:



CHANCERY SALE z

BARBADOS

SS. Islandside, 4421 tons net, Capt The undermentioned property will be set vp for sale at the Registration Ottee
Usher, from Curacao. Public Bulidings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and ae
Schooner Juinar, 54 tons net, Capt. | date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding Pr ay
at the same place and during the same hours until sold, Full particulars on appli
Schooner Wonderful Counsellor, 39] cation to me.
ns net, Capt. soon. from St. Vincent LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL — Plaintiff
Ul vs.
Vv. Carteenn 100 on net, Capt VIOLET JOHNSON —~ Defendant

be granted] .,
by the Director of Agriculture with the consent of the Board of | con

umbs, for Dominica.

Schooner Enterprise S., 68 tons net,

Capt. Gregg, for St. Lucia.

Schooner D’Ortac, 58 tons net, Capt.
i

words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a

WANTED

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Spooners Mil!
in te parish of Saint Michael and Isiand aforesaid containing by admeasurement
two roods two and two-tenths perches or thereabouts Abutting and bounding on
lands formerly of W. T. EB. Richards but now of one Walrond on lands formerly of
G. G. Medford but now of one Farnum on lands formerly of Alfred FP. Green but
now of one Pilgrim and on the public road called Spooners Hil) or however else
the same may abut and bound Together with the messuage or dwelling house
called “Homestead” and all and singular the buildings and erections both freehold
and chattel on the said lands erected and built standing and being with the appur-

a...

Minimum charge week 72 cents and | tenances,
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24) UPSET PRICE ; £1350 0. 0d

word Sundays,

SALE: 2nd March, 1951.
Pree " ’ H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar-in-Chancery

















i. Sth February, 195)
HELP Niet oe ee A oa * rel 951
SESS aeeetanre semen aticnseemnagetiseesiinieieeeene:
LADY-—Suitable lady with knowledge
of book-keeping, filing and office work.
Apply Post Office Box 221, Bridgetown
11.2.51—8n
7 I AUSTRALIA, NEW ——— ad
MISCELLANEOUS ae
aerate panei miiievesnsie haiaas ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED the < 30/4“ CARIRERE : ean
snk cies Dial ee cniendniel (M.A.N.Z. LINE) accept Cargo and Passengers {sr
13.2,51—2n M.S. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to cee oe hee ae
POS sail Adelaide January 4th, Melbourne ee. Se i me
ee ee young Lady requires} February sth, Sydney Februs ry 17th, Friday, 23rd February, 1951
crportenee th ene cee pe Brisbane February 23rd, Arriving at ji sik e
C/o. Advocate Co, » Apply J. K-| Boxbados end of March,” 1951. The M/V. “DAERWOOD” wi

EMPLOYMENT~-No salary, by retired
Gentleman to relieve intolerable boredom
of idling, useful in ofee, Hotel or Club,

Apply Box T. A. C/o Advocate Co,

th

dozen each —

&

pens, cameras, clothing, ete. will
sent in exchange. Send 300 stamps or
more, Pagewood 1355 N. Dearborn,

Chicago 10, Tl. U.S.A

13.2.51—1n

BO’

Co., Lid, Broad Street. Dial 3713,

13.2.51—10n
Horace Savoury on lands of Mr. Corier on lands of Violtt L. Barrow and on | ——_____.
USED POSTAGE STAMPS WANTED
Prompt cash paid for used stamps if
you Wish, merchandise such as fountal
be

WANTED TO BUY

USED POSTAGE STAMPS-—Of the
British West Indies,
at the Caribbean Stamp Society No. 10
Swan Street.

~~ 50,000 empty, white, plain
ree-gill bottles packed in bales of 16
at le, per bottle including
packing. Please apply to S. P. Mussun Son

13.2.5leo1n

Good Prices Paid
10,2.51—3n

accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba,
and Passengers only for St. Vin-
cent, Date of Sailing to be
notified,

This vessel has ample space for Hard
Yrozen and General cargo.

Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Laing with transhipment at Trinidad
for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
anid Leeward Islands,

B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, tno.

For further particulars apply —-
YURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. and
Da COSTA & CO, LTD,
Trinidad, Barbados,
B.W.1. B.W.I,

Consignee—Tel. No, 4047



\e Alcon Steele OF

NEW YORK SERVICE
SS, “Essi” sails 16th January arriv

SS. “Byfjord” sails and February nil an a
En CN

4th February
14th







ret}





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
— —w——w=| A Steamer sails 18th January —
WANTED TO SUB-LET a, . E ist ‘Webrugry w ” 2nd “
HOUSE — At Maxwell's " ” Sth “
Coast on the Sea, From ith ‘o 3190) ee
March. For particulars Dial 8346 CANAD:AN SERVICE
13,2.51—2)) -OUTHBOUND
=e oe Name of Ship Sails Arrives
Halifax Barbados
88. “ALCOA PILGRIM” Januany 26th, Feb
AN OPPORTUNITY — }}) 2: saves wevnanre February ath’ Faluat’ Sh
8.8, “ALCOA POL. ; February 23r, March 6th,



TO BUY
1Small Gas
Enamel finish,
2 Boiling Burners
1 Grell Burner complete with
oven cooker traded in to buy.
A large Cooker
PRICE $60
see it at your Gas Show Room.

Cooker Grey





MRS. STEWART'S
DANCING SCHOOL

PUPILS who are desirous of
joining Mrs. STEWART’S
DANCING SCHOOL will
be interviewed on
Thursday, February
15th from 4.30
p.m. onwards,
Classes will begin on
Saturday 17th
For further infcermation
Dial 2440

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Whittaker’s Almanack,

1951

Pint, 1% Pint and Cocktail
Glasses

at

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE



ORIENTAL
GOODS
From INDIA, CHINA,
EGYPT !
Silk, Curios, Brassware,
Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak-
wood, Sandals, French Per-
fumes, Barbados Scarves in
Pure Silk, Ete., Ete., Etc.
The Souvenir Headquarters
THANI Kross.

KASHMERE
Pr. Wm. Henry 8t.—Dial 5466





FURNISH

Home & Office

The Money-Saving Way

Bedsteads,
Wood, Springs

Cradles in Tron and
Beds $5 up--
Bureaus, Stools, Wardrobes &
Dresser-Robes, $18 up Night
Chairs. Morris Suites and Separ-
ate Pieces, Berbice and Bergere
Chairs, Tub Suites and separate
Rockers, Rush Furniture, Desks
with Flat and Sloping Tops, $6 up;
Book Cases, Book Racks.

\BSOOGSV OSS GOO 89 TNSOF VFO SSS GOOFS

>.








Them vessels have limited passenger accommodation.

—eeenerecnacueaninatnmenne
ROBERT THOM LTD.—-New York and Gulf Service.
Apply: DACOSTA & OO,, LTD,-—Canadian Service.

hoy H ISON LINE



HARR

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM







rfrr'w Due
Vessel From §{ = Leaves Barbados

8.S. “MULBERRY HILL” "Ptescen & f

London 23rd Jan. lith Feb,
S.S. “PROSPECTOR” oy d Feb, 23rd Feb.
88. “PACTOR” week eee

L/pool 6th Feb, 19th Feb,
$8. “TRIBESMAN” ..M/brough&
8.8. “SPEAKER’ t seca ath Feb: “ath Mares
5.8. SP , .» Liverpoo 17t eb. 1. Mare
5.S. “S'TATESMAN” . London 17th Feb, Sth March

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Closes in Barbados
12th Feb,

For

Vessel
5.8. “COLONIAL” .. Liverpool

For further information apply to - - -
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents



CANADIAN SERVICE

From Halifax, N.S., St. Jolin, N.B,
To Barbados, Trinidad, Demerara, B.G.

LOADING DATES _

| Expeeted Arrival
| Halifax







at. John { Rees Sriaenows,
ao, ” { arbados
ve “poupener fis: [tom | gee
40, “BERCH HILL" | 12 Feb | 28 Feb.
Sa. pT Cem, 26 Feb. 23 Feb 14 Mar.
58. “POLY CREST \12 Mar. | 28 Mar,
8, VESSEL... 126 Mar. | 93 Mar, lf Apr
U.K. SERVICE
From Glasgow, Liverpool, Newport, London.
| { Newport , Expected Arrival
| Glaswow | Liverpool| Swansea | Dates Bridgetown,
85, “OAK ILL” 13 Feb 8 Feb 1 "Mer
ae if 4 Mar. 28 Peb 14 Feb 20 Mar.
ss. “SUNWHIT" 27 Mar. | 22 Mar. | 19 Mar. | 12 Apr
From ited Antwerp, London bi i Expected ‘Arrivat
a : otterdam Antwer Lond Date th
5.8, “SUNAVIS 15 Mar 17 Mar. , 27 Mas “ Ape one
Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED.
Phone 4703





PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, for sail-

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.

mexsecnannas












7

=

{ SEE US FOR......

LAWN MOWERS & PARTS










THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

!
| CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.— Proprietors, }

thigh Gndy



CHARLES McENEARNEY & C0. LYD.

GEOGCSOGGVIG TOF F9STOSHSSS GGSSSSHOSOOON

'

%



i














































,
PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1951
a aieeeeceepemmnntaliiapaninait
7 ' > /} ‘ ns vq" : wea J
rymi ee TWO CAPTAINS CHATTING ¢ : ie Bank Clerks End Strike Temporary uncwvil servant <3
rinidad leam | What's om Today | | oor Bike soins : (
7 A | nire’s 4,000 bank clerks to-day} now works fy 1, yf a? }
ei Exhibition of Sculpture and | jended their seven weeks strike égu arly
e Paintings by K. R. Brood- for more pay after an arbitration
ee | % hagen, Paintings and | jcourt had granteq some of their ~oagaay "y ‘ sa
i t a Ss a ain water colours by Marjorie | |pay demands. ab eka
9 Ereodhagen and paintings | |- But the banks, closed since ““Teha!™ he verurned, sharp as a final
o and water colow's by John | December 23, will not open till demand. “I feel as if someone had filled
he j Harrison at Barbados | ee. oy tenes of, work me mm - this ponarpetion een a sub-
Mus ob ated 10.00 | § jared, section like mine, what can e but non-
Good Cricket Expected fp, ents ee eee | —Reuter. tmpleyed, clas G2"
a ete at Bunsimane™, | | = | sia ear Suton isu e>! Baty buying” iy “and
THE TRINIDAD. TEAM, thirteen strong, headed by Country Roa uction- | | | “Nothing,” prowled Mr. P. “All my: ™eans buying — Kellogg's" All-Bran.
ieir captain, Jeffrey Stolimeyer and manager Harold Bur- ae Branker, rr - The Weather ens ete breakfast (ocd, supply the tan the
; tt, arrived at Seawell Airport shortly after ten o'clock Legislative Council meets | - baht ol | the trouble.” ae eee wthieerGie A
rday I ert tree 2.00 un Rises : 6.20 a.m. “Clarify that statement,” commande . ‘i
————- —-- ‘he team was Jeffrey Stoll- Members will consider four | Sun Sets : 6.68 p.m. fr. P i 4 neat he ed es ee eee
‘é me re meyer (Captain), N. Asgaralli, | Resolutions, making it | Mogn (First Quarter) Feb- | * Well it's like this,” I said. “You've 1th portfolio. “ So the charm worked,
Christie W ins ° Jones, R. Tangehoon, R. Le- | lawful fc. Vestries—St. | | Puary i3 3 | | got about 30 ft. of tubing inside you, did it #1 asked’ him. |
S ; S yall. L. Butler, C. Sampath S. ; Andrew, St. Michael, St. | Lighting : 6.30 p.m. ; oe everything you eat has to pass “It certainly did,” he replitd. “A. d
~ ¥ 4 Guillen, Frank King, C. Skeete Philip, St. Joseph and St, | High Water ; 8.08 aah, 8.58. ceateraes thane gue ie ae. dige Ale Bran three days running — and 5
( If . tl : W. Ferguson, A. Ganteaume, S. George, to lease land for | p.m. \ But the soft, starchy foods you get nowa- ULB interwar "il Me Bee wae 3
xO ite Jackbir, playing fields. Two Bills YESTERDAY { days don’t give muscles anything to" oa fee a ei ‘ ficat?,”*
“T have two regrets’, skipper are also on the Agenda— | | | Rainfall (Codrington) : work on.” ae say that in teiplicacé,” 1
eee 8 lan) Christie led Stcllmeyer told the Advocate one to provide for the | | -08 in. | _ “Non-utilization of resources, eh?”
hon e lrrgest Id that ever Spcrts Editor on arrival at Sea- regulation of Public Utili- | | Total for Month to Yester- | asked our Mr. P. KELLOGG'S ALL-BRAN relieves constis
i Fj Cham- well yesterday. “The first is that ties and the other to amerid | day : 1.04 ins. | * Precisely,” I said. “And that means ny ~~ “regular.” Made from rich
wh Berges \ ice duri | : } a bottleneck—in fact, constipation. outer layers of whole wheat, oven-
Golf due te rain our practice ng the Supervision and ; Temperature (Max.) : Only one thing can save you” I said toasted with malt, salt and sugar. a
ib over tho, week- the past two weeks has been se- | Weighing of Sugar Canés | 81.0° F. a, ore woe y Rote ig. joltadid breaktast, snd many appetizing cakes,
c ieft-hander from Scot- riously hampered and_ secondly Act, 1939. Temperatue (Min.) : | aa is jock capitals, please,” demanded — wens, avd surprise dishes,
Ne d off the honours with that no young Trinidadian bats- | The Heuse of Assembly | 74.0° F. j
three-stroke lead over his man has performed _ sufficiently Meets 3.00 | Wind Direction OO an) EE O_o
ne contenders at the end of well in the Trials to merit selec- pera CR Ts Ra ty a ae é (3 p.m.) : E.N.E. }
he 1} hard 36-hole struggle, tion.” Dr. Cummins is expected to Wind Velocity : 10 miles j
° h eighieen were played on Jeff declined to comment on introduce a Supplement- per hour I —~ F owere
Si d eighteen on Sunday. the individual members of the ary Resolution for $6,000; Barometer (9 a.m.) : 29.932 | ba)
Dick John Rodger and team and said that ‘their success | Mr. Adams will introduce | , (3 p.m.) : 29.852 ‘
Jack Egan were tied for second would not depend upon _indi- one for $337,735; Mr. Cox t > D
| pisee, followed by Michael Timp- viduals but rather on good team | will move the passing of ress
§ en strokes back of the new



a 79 on Saturday, Christie
fth place in the field cl
Sunday he
eat with a 74 and
ave him a clear
Vidmer, Rodger

ers, but on




il of

margin of vic

work
All Fit
Everyone was fit, he said, and
he expected the team to give a
good account of itself, In view of
the fact that the Australian tour
was in the offing he was sure that



a third for $2,500; and Mr.
Adams will take charge of
a forvth fer $1,300.
Police Band gives concert ai
Leper Hospital 4.00
Mobile Cinema gives show
at Boscobel School Pasture





PUBLIC MEETING

There will be a Public Meeting
held under the auspices of





Goods

“Bembergs” in small de-

signs. 36” wide.

: T
r 4 is i eae every cricketer taking part in St; Péteee.. ai. 7.30 THE eer LABOUR 1.92
Bean finished with totals ©! the tournament: realised that he Boxing at Wankee Sta- Per Yd.—$172 and $1.
rim} son | with 161, Rodger's was a potential selectee, duis 8.00 di : m
reed the field on the first day. te was looking forward, he ou ia
hn. Timpson with a +i was 1 said, to meeting many friends in - a BARBADOS WORKERS’
1 : on ver he eorioen Barbados particularly those play- Z i UNION
both ¢ these o s ay. 2 TS e $ 20) anions . 7 :
Rodger took an 80 and Timpson Fee ee eT ae 10 W.L. Cyclists Will at MILE & QUARTER, St. Peter Printed Crepes
collapsed on the last two holes to England. â„¢ >

finish with an 84.

Handicaps

In the handicap section for the

“May we witness good cricket,
and may the best side win,’
Stollmeyer concluded.

The team turned out for prac-

WEST INDIAN Captain John Goddard (right) and his deputy on the
W.I. Tour to England Jeff Stolimeyer, having a chat at Seawell yes-
terday when the Trinidad Team arrived. Jeff is captain of the Trini-



Ride In B.G. Easter

From our own Correspondent

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 9

On THURSDAY 15th FEBRUARY,
1951 at 8 P.M.
Speakers:—F, L, Walcott, M.C.P.

K, N. R. Husbands,



A beautiful qual-
ity fabric in small

President's Cup, Jack Egan car- te at Kensington later in the dad Team. A three-man team of West M.C.P. designs. Coloured
ried off the honours, his two °8Y- Indian cyclists will be visiting F. E. Miller, M.C.P. rounds with White
rounds of 78 with an 8 handicap Welcomed British Guiana at Easter time to 8

fiving him a net 140, which was

A: Seawell yesterday to meet

Worrell High

U.S. MAKE SWEEP IN
CARIBBEAN TENNIS

take part in an Intercolonia] Sports

G. H. Adams,
M.C.P.



and Black & White.

four strokes better than Roy Wil- the team were Mr. J. M. Kid- KINGSTON, Ja, Feb. 11. | megting. to. be staged at Goed 36” wide.
son, playing off a twenty handi- Bey J BntOr lee: Epenceat os, ie n vera es The Americans made a clean}B nen Land, Canje District,

cap, and five strokes better than Garbados — icke soci: . Ewee ‘aribbear ham- rbice n Easter Sunday ana "

Timpscn's net 145, gained off an West Indies and. Barbados cap- e sweep of the Caribbean Char Berbice County on Easter 3 THE BARBADOS ARTS &

eight handicap.




tain, John Goddard, Mr. T. N.

KANPUR, Feb. 12

pionships ended at Montego Bay
to-day when Straight Clark and

and Monday.

CRAFTS SOCIETY
Present their

spite > hi 7 at Peirce, former Barbados’ Captain : 5 fie The te 1 jen 8
emditios oa ee hip: “wy aoe — and selector, Mr. S. O'C. *Git- Frank Worrell, West Indian vice Beverley Baker Fea the mixed ; ror pee ge sin 3 Ref |
re coated a hoe asbebe tens, selector, Mr. E. D. Inniss captain of the Commonwealth Ce Behan oor et “eb F erkg 8 ey iL llemiadaaen cncen
the scoring for the most part was 4 member of the Board of Man- touring team finished second in and Barbara Scolt "_@P ; Tuesday, February 13th. to i:

very good. Christie’s total of 153

agement of the Cricket Associa-

the batting and third in the bowl-



Wednesday. February 28th 1951.

Annual Exhibition |
|

Saas 34 shies < i . ry ing averages in the Test series OPEN Daily

was 21 strokes better than the tion, Mr. W. Hoyos, Honorary : ; 1 i ;

winning score “when the cham- Secretary, Mr. Clyde Walcott, against India which ended with From 10 am Nak pa
gs : ae sie . oe m. .m,

pionship was last played in the West Indies player and his broth- the fifth Test here today. Admission: 1/- Children Half

Fall of 1949. In fact ten players
equalled or beat that performance,

er Mr. Keith Walcott. and Mr.
Harold Kidney.

His batting figures were 8 in-
nings, one not out, highest score




SN SUSHIESS DADO

Price
Parties of School Children ac-



Per Yd.: $1:85



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. |

i companied by their Teachers
when only three players competed aaa one is if residence at 116, total 445 average 63.57, His LIC SERVICES _ \| will be admitted at Special Rates. 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
Christie’s’: was no hollow ic- pbeville Guest ouse . ¢ “ ‘ : ; puB Members of~the B.A.S.C. wiil
e's s n Vv bowling 294.3 overs, 110 maidens RS
tory, therefore, as thirty playérs i , eins — boctol be admitted at half price on pre-

teéd-off for the first round and



605 runs, 18 wickets, average 33.61





OF

RIVATE HIRE COMPANIES



sentation of their Members

Cards for the current year











twenty-three of them played F; 4 3 Ai d The bowling was headed by his ODOT

proven to the nee — _ rancts nl fellow countryman Sonny Ramad- NEWs EDITORS E == ‘ x os

ae - ea acer tihees 7 ; “ Si hin with figures of 209.5 O., 82 M., ] a nee ERC. 5 The new “VALCR EMA”
w afte f Ber } 433 R., 15 W,, av. 28.87. The A ; * “UTY ‘

holes, although he was in a fine Ralph Fight Commonwealth batting a tisced e With the Radio Telephone you can keep in con- B O X IN G 2-WAY BEAUTY TREATMENT

position to challense for the ' by John Ikin of Lancashire with . VALCREMA : VALCREMA :

President’s Cup, having turned iv
an 83 for a net score of 71, only
two strokes off the handicap pace

Little Scope

oss



P innings, 2 not outs, highest score
111, total 625, average 89.29.
The best all-round performance
of the series was by Vijay Hazare
Who headed the Indian batting



stant touch with any vehicle or vessel at any

time, saving your business time and money,

We have considerable experience in this field of

>

radio communication and will be glad to give

at the
YANKEE STADIUM
Brittons Hill

Foundation Cream, con-
tains rare oils that make
your skin Soft and Supple.
Special Oil in water Emul-
sion means it cannot dry on

Skin Youth—Deep Cleans-
ing Greasy Night Cream
for Women of all ages
especially those over 25.
Keeps skin velvety, smooth

' There was little scope for the and came second in the oer DIE, you further details and information. e the skin, and clean, y ;

\ second-guessers concerni the —Reuter. | , $ Contains Youth Element :
Hockley team which was named Telecomi - TO-NIGHT % A perfect Powder Base for “ZEVESTEOL” to guard
: to play against St, Andrews in Telecommunications e % Normal Skins ‘an Essential you against tell tale age
! Trinidad, as ten of those who won ic ; Pao for DRY SKINS lines.

places on the team finished among FANATICS NOT BIGOTS. e R. D. STEWART KID RALPH _








nee pan snatch by the Makers of the famous :—

the first eleven, The exceptions i 163 Ibs. Made
were William Atkinson, who haa Rs as eae ee eee guntek Tarkeons | ‘ va ; y “WALDERMA” SKIN OINTMENT

; ¢ ave , 7 ” rw ¢ ’ Bae 4 SAN ps tae "
= ee ae ee eke which monitors Moscow Radio DIVISION KID FRANCIS A Positive Beauty Treatment, which brings remarkable results,
oak Gala whe husnka RE ae broadcasts in London and circul- PYE LTD. (162 Ibs.) Obtainable at :
82 on Saturday but tore up his bm English wengeetignk sent the P.O. Bex 260, Bridgetown, BOOKER’S (B'DOS) DRUG STORES LTD., Broad Street

¢ ¢ Sins selll des eethien Aira * following correction to a_ story Dial 3248 i S 4 PHARMACY
male a Se Seedie ait | attacking American actions in In return match for the and HASTINGS, ALPHA PH
failed (6: phbh ite sbene. tore Korea: Light-Heavy weight $5999 999655998999 SSS OCIS POPSET FOSS SOS OOSS

Curing the tryouts for the team
came into his own in Sunday’s
play and with a 78° finished in u
tie for sixth place.

The scores follow:









“In second line please read it
‘fanatics’ instead of ‘bigots’.”
—LN.S.





| BARBADOS TURF CLUB

Championship of
BARBADOS

10 Rounds

MEDAL PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP rend

I. K. K. Christie . . 19 T4153 Semi-Final

R. Vidmer 718— 18-156 POCKET CART

TR. Rodger 76-- 10186 OON SAM KING (130 Ibs.)

g, Sint Eain oy GESRIN LAC ASINE WN 1951 ‘t.

B. Wybrew a7 710-168 EAS HAL WILLIAMS

R. P. Gooding 83-— 78—168 @ =O (131 Ibs.)

I Inniss ~ oon ‘

5: \arece o8-- Ailes KID RALPH. STANDING AT CASTLE GRANT, ST, JOSEPH

eee sr fi-'1 Tonight at the Yankee Stadium

E, A. Benjamin 90 aur age ey end Kid Francis meet O [ (

D Lucie-Smith i 89 8 in their return light heavyweight “ : :

wy seins or es bout, These boys put on such a

R. Wilson ; 92—~- 92—184 srod ron when they met recently (Brown Horse 1928, by Obliterate out of Telephone Call)

R. Norris 101— 90-191 a oxing circles have clam- 1G

W. Grannum /., 99-- 91-198 gured for their return, THOROUGHBRED MARES ........ $24.00 vs. ais MADE IN ENGLAND BY
ay eramey nt 101-100-209) The winner. will BELFIELD KID my A sate
8. Toppin j 90—112—202 nner will be the un- OTHER MARES .......00.. 66000, $12.00 } ae potion

K, Girling 103— 98-203 Srowrnee am pearrvetahy cham- (125 Ibs.) ® es ?
Tt. Inntss 112— £9-—211 ion © ne island until tk for- * Tw , (Bata
Ian Niblock witndrew atic ai ata ceabtandens exion STANDING AT BULKELEY, ST, GEORGE @ Rounds SEB

H, Weaver





Board of Control nominates the







~—L_—



B. Pai ° . vithdrew
Cc. Bayley : ee dace sr ye ed
W Nurse ; no card good supporting programme f y
een ote is also carded. In the semi-final eras Side ............ $2.00 SMART d DURABLE or
oe PRESIDENTS CUP “~~ Sam King, former amateur lignt- ‘ i ‘ aleony .. f
: i vei ad weight. champion,. who: has: now (Bay or Brown Horse 1945, by Colombo out of The Bud) cass an
Zan 156— 16-140 joined the professional ranks, PAE... cab ines « cae $48.00 1
a ier igctas Meets Hal Williams over eight GROOMS’ FEE — §1.00 €ash per Service arene. 0 H/TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS
Christie... 153— G~L4T rounds while in the preliminary eachers .... “
Pe Gsdias 3121352 goed aah le glee Rca atte nedie aeaee Barren Mares HALF FEE Return for One (1) Year Only wihuliveoiat tha hind pted New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White
G. Manning 183— 32—152 ” ta te FE} “ 1) you ask me, miss, what w ‘ ae : . ; a . - .
D.| Tonia. 16a 16—189 Tickaa nae eae “Naseem iste Aaa is ot few annowndert ee Regarding the Above, Apply respec ship will receive a Belt Sizes: 6—11
Vv. rannun ; 44— < , ‘ ae © realy ws
R. P. Gooding 166-— 14-152 return bout, solaranactneas P. B. WALKER Esar., Castle Grant, St. Joseph. presented by






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PAGE FOl'R R\RRADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FKBRl'ARY 13. 151 BARBADOS tft* A 1)\(MTE rrUUi a>I U>* AlTMtH C. II* B>Mi St. SbMlfUn. Tuesday. February 13. 19S1 II M I IO\ YEAR THIS is election year. The present session of the Legislature will end in November when a new House will be elected for the first time under an adult suffrage franchise. Already the parties have begun their campaign for capturing the support of the electorate. The two parties which have been able lo maintain membership have held their caucuses and public meetings have been held in some parishes. It would be well at an early time for the electorate to assess the value of such work as has been done m the House of Assembly and to ask themselves whether it has been satisfactory or whether it was enough having regard to the demands of the times. Having decided on the merit of that work the next step is to consider whether the complexity in the problems of Government does not warrant better and more statesmanlike handling. Barbados is too small to get the best of party government; but it has been introduced and judging by the instructions of the Colonial Office it has come to stay. But because Barbados must have party government, it does not mean that the members of the parly are not to be measured in their individual capacities and assessed on their ability to contribute to the common welfare. The Labour Party, now responsible for the conduct of Government business have intimated that they should have ministerial status. This alone makes it imperative that high calibre be demanded from men who after election will be potential ministers. They will be responsible for the running of the various departments of Government and despite the fact that the Civil Servant will always be on hand to handle the details of any policy adopted, it is the minister who will be the liaison between the general public and the department. The handling of public finance during the last live years has not been such as to win the confidence of people who contribute by way of taxes to the Treasury. The present Government took over office With a surplus in the Treasury. Since then it has dwindled despite the annoying increase in taxation. The members of that Government have on more than one occasion voiced their intention to maintain a "soak the rich" policy. Other section* of society have also suffered as a result; and today the economic condition of the people is not as sound as it should have been. Barbados like every other country in the world has been willing to give labour its opportunity to serve. That it has failed its fondest supporters will admit. The present is a period when all the statesmanship and goodwill is needed in the solution of problems. Barbados has not ceased to produce men of ability but they are not to be found in such numbers as in the past; and even those who are within reach are denied, for one reason or another, opportunity to make any contribution to the affairs of government. It is time that this was changed. If Barbados is to continue to make any progress. her affairs must be handled by the collective abilities of men of recognised ability and public spirit willing to serve their country. Men in trade, commerce, industry and scholars have their respective contributions to make and if there was ever a time when this country needed them it is now. The electorate should refuse to countenance the candidature of men who might be suitable to tow the party line but who have nothing to contribute to the progress of the island. COULD THE I OKI IS WL\ The Kemnanls Of An Army A NEW ELECTION? An Oxford Don's survey of the General Election, 19.0, gives some pointers to what might happen next time .... The General Election ol I MO |[l < ||i|r les U illlimr lhi> cha.ge. plumniiu (or the view •1 louahl and won largely on "•* "'"" !" IlllOUr ^ L| £„f ,„£",,„,„„ ,|„w issues which less than a year later votes from both sides (airly equalhave been obscured or forgotten m ciMon from the polls of public ly over the country as a whole, the larger movement of world opinion quoted by Mr. Nicholas. This fascinating study illumi'ents. it would seem however, that there nates many other aspects of the .... %  ... Bfc_ . WM remarkably little movement last election and British vleclionThat must be the conclusion of opinion during the last fortocring in general There is for Ay\fflk.t!rj'^muS r"e.7h..^" S= 2 "* %  """"" •">'"Stance the impoit.nce of Dr !" X r \Z !" L„J """ %  "" To "" ,r d 0* m %  •"'• Hlll-l broudcast-heard ...rv.v „F 5K "„„?? E"'"". "'"' '" ht lMd bul " b > "• !" nt of the adult popu•n m Th. V (MttS 6 r£iS *"'•''•'• radually improved l.tion. a bigger audience than any The British General their position until they establish. Socialist Minister achieved with oed a winning margin. the single exception of Mr Attle.. Perhaps the party bosses were But will he ever be able to repeat right, realism does not pay o(t in his triumph? Th %r'a?.rIt? y 'thr h ouho u !* %  "Nation for the Tories" And Mr Nicholn.'. dlspwsionomitted all meftnon of deCc ">'" '" %  '" << >"""< examination of the Precon[rHraS !" ^W.o„„„, Machine ap^o^^.^ w.r?,Vf^J. J. !" l ..^! r l u C T " M MUld """I < "" '""y "n a operation ,s jSBL !" J h !" UC C ,ff m i.1 b, „" k .•."•lined Menu in charge of conwhich I beg leave to doubt, there 2. v si^i. ?. „A *^ .. """"ncies n En 8l „ d and Wales, was certainly no heifer lying on ? ^ %  *""'? '""• H Th "' •"" %  -•" W between hir lordship's pen. appeal to the past it necessarily £500 and £100 a year, and could lost in effectiveness with every look forward lo progressive proAllle* Handicap year that went by. motion ,n th. highly organised „ siu n...t„ Woolton machine !" e statistical apbendix by Mr. Uld Battles David Butler ahows how, followThe Tories with the eunr.m., t j SoclalUs. on the other ing redistribution the existence of ...2H.J.lY'J? ,:„. r „ !" p hand, could only muster 2? fullnumerous impregnablv safe Socqu.K heavily enaS in' nAt" ,im i "• %  "'-•>""> "e of the poll cl.lisl seat, Sroduce.' TiaiilSita engaged In fight,„ England. Wales and Scotland bios to the Higlrt Wdetot'Sth. most strenu" ^ 7h r ''"'* !" ">" Election of 19S0* University Politics ..I Oxford. '' % %  i k> I Committed Suicide And I lu'ir (.rill-rill Died In Hisi*rar !" IO showing thut Marpoc. m iKjual at 45.2 pei cent then the the most. The monsoon was a "closed season. shall Am had masked unemployTones would have won 35 more ment and to refuting Socialist Unquestionably this big lead in seats than the Socialist*. In (act charfM about conditions between professional oraanisation helped 'Labour is likely to continue to the war*. the Tories gain voles. Hut Nichoenter political contests with a It wn not unttl F.hr.„rv it io ?'. giv ** cau >onar. v reminder handicap of haH-a-mlllion ntm daysXrthraisso^r^f'krIne'v^ten to theTou"" 0 drn,t00n %  — %  "*-*" hament and only a week before ] n Birminahan, where the Mr Bu,,er ot* 0 prints a rough the poll, that Mr. Churchill spoke Tories possessed an excellent d,a K ram mowing the broad rela%  'e possibilmachine which hud been working lll lsh| l ) between seats and voles. ith Soviet f or y ars i„ re-establish BirminvBy a PPl>'"-* (he latMt Gallup pol ham as a Tory citadel. Tories only na "'*' ,n ,hl "*" H "* "^ at Edinburgh abou ity of "another talk Russia upon the highest level." aptured one seat out of 10. Liverpool, where they had Mr. Bevin nt once dismissed this as a "stunt proposal." But it „t was taken up, notably by the y J? P tof """"'l agent, they Beaverbrook Press, and remained **' ^ ^ *' ttvm "*" most the sole eflort by a leadin member ot any party to relate the election to the world crisis. Since better How far Mr. Churchill's stateTones were naturally inclined "to ment influenced the voters one blame the Liberal intervention for way or the other it will never be "splitting the anti-Socialist vote" nos•*" %  'he other year-old Maria Bertha Hertogh. jZ S". ,?„ "J* L me '. *"" !" d round lo tape at The child, who was breast ,„ -Snd'to ~LZ .?,.J ,""" : ", er bieyc,e ,nd "" ' ,e!l "' • %  i 'o siiiiKi to repent a fntaifv— iron <.i~*ka_ -%  ->__>n %  -_•_ . Modern husband in h(1 blackboard s h. back fn reigns over this town of JO 000 At ti„, "">">. wnllc onlierTaee. And the sisters people. .,. At rsl sh wo "'d lake no beam their pleasure SlT^Li 11 y mna '"ni c 's. They find "only one fault ii She stood aside from the other True she attend; girls and the sister said nothing One day reeentlv ahc Joined and easily than she Is doing if her parents could exercise full control over her. Ttie committee %  formed to organise her homecoming however is still the power to which they bend — though it was disbanded weeks ago. At the Roman Catholic school she attends. Maria is the pel of the sisters. She U the envy of the 350 other . children for the new expensive £ Edward told them lo be dress she appears in ever? Oliver qu ct T ? ""'" not WOrd day. her new sporu bicycle which A h P J fl '^' 0lh f 9 ,r U T ,,,,n ^ has no match for mile*, ibe (ewcl,1 lhc back r the c,ass Ho lcry she wears In class, her furlined bootees. At the same lime the others are jealous of her — for the favours shown her the lack of reprimands when she chooses lo he naughty or does what she pleases when the rest of the class is regimented into a particular lesson or game. Mr. and Mrs. Hertogh Intended that Maria should have .1 private tutor for six months. Not Enough nethod: people. Her father and mother or their best to lit her toVhh Uwtr 22. 'SS't^L^^^ l ner Tr e she atlPIwls Sundl '>' "" six other children. But oils; It ?£* HL lhc "V "^ "* h n with her family, but at prayers the tiny house .n Emma-square %!? £ y J£* Mi ? ^Jfft? 1 m srho01 s1 "' fold h >n"> and she is the talking-point ar ',und bU J,/ r „,? nly fi" m,nul rtUglOUi lessons she doodles, which everything "evolves b, R ?2j y J IL' 1 *? b i*?* !" The planners have tried to fo Maria would become part of the "Ljl?" ,, v r .vi'i '" 1 "u" !"" l '"" V1 ^""' '"•< M..k-m Dutch scene much more quickly S? .!, l ~Z "t:' d JjFgSi R m n CaU h fTh '" a ,,H M .u„ ih n -.1. J_.„_ „ t „t( p rs. How old is she? Told are meeting little success slie wasill Maria sniffed "Ikr | ttskc d Police Commissai ngure—it is too short, too fat". Van 't Hoi why 16 of the town's .1 J2" B ?3 5hc caU8Cd a new *2 policemen are permanently on sur The others were used to her guard inside and outsldo the gold watch and gold oracele. Hertogh home (there have been Their eyes oiwncd wide at the no days off for them sin, 1 sight of two huge earrings and a return. large, green stone brooch. He said "Anything could happen m 4 it lv j rom Moslem Influences. The Not A Word gliaPd w)1 ] be kept on t in March The children chattered. Then at least rhumwie, WHY rioeVnr nigf MAN WtAft, A WlA LIKl THfc APeAKAi^ bOCflf ? But the planners decreed "Put her to school at once", and immediately tt was found her standard of education was that of a girl of eight and she needed individual attention. In mathematics Sister Edward gives Maria separate lessons. For language — and she learns Not A Tlunj; Lawyer Jan Bervocts self-styled head of the homecoming committee told me: "Mr. Hertogh can do nothing without my permission— 1 know what is best. "Nothing about Maria r/iy appear in the British Press. The only Journalists I have allo'^sd to see her are from a Dutch Catholic paper. Go home to England." Haberdasher Frans llmitman said "The committee is finished. Mr Hertogh duos as he pleases." But when 1 called at Adrian Hertogh's home he telephoned Mr. Houtman: "May I talk to an English Journalist"" And whatever he was told the man who hud wished to be friendly refused information. Are the planners working 0 for March 25, when Maria is duo to see the British Consul That day. she can decide for herself— lo stay in 11< 1:l ;• t.d <>r return to Malaya. L.E S So Mountbatten devised military and medical taclics to enable his men lo battle forward in the monsoons and take the enemy by surprise. HIGHLIGHTS Final victory throughout South-East Asia was built on keeping open the sea routes, and after seeing all enemy plans for defending Malaya and Singapore he is satisfied that the projected 'jperations to capture those objectives would have been "completelv successful.** But surrender came first. These are the highlights of his report:— KOHIMA. This operation by General (now Field-Marshal) "Bill" Slims brave 14th Army drove the fanatical enemy back to the Central Plains of Burma and inflicted the major land defeat of the war in the Far East.' PRISONERS. Comparatively few Japanese were taken prisoner. This incident gives the reason:— On the day that Monywa fell other units of the 20th Indian Division surprised a ItUga body of Japanese trying to escape over the Irrawaddy river, and annihilated most of these in hand-to-hand fighting. CEREMONIAL SUICIDE When the righting was nearly over a detachment of Japanese put on ceremonia equipment, and formally committed suicide by marching into the river. Of the way the Japanese were sapped of Ihe will to fight I can testify personally. I was with the few Britons who witnessed Ihe end at Saiyon, French Indo-China. Outside the Government paiacc an ailing Japanese Field-Marshal, Count Terauchi came forward leaning heavily on a stick— the fall of Mandalay had caused him to have a stroke—and surrendered his sword to Lord Mountbatten in a five-minute ceremony. •VINEGAR JOE" He never recovered from the disgrace, and died a lew months later. DIFFICULTIES. Relations with American "Vinegar Joe" Stilwell were not always happy. Stilwell had a dual appointment partly under Mountbatten and partly directly under the U.S. Chiefs of Staff. When he disagreed with the Mountbatten plan at the start of the campaign Stilwell considered it his duty to send his own mission to Washington ahead of the Supreme Commander without telling him. There were clashes, too, about policy with Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek, and how his Chinese should be used. Earl Mountbatten wrote this 2K0-page report lo the Combined Chiefs of Staff when he was in Delhi in 1947 as India's last Viceroy. —L.E.S. Our It..iil 1 ~ Say: To Th.Editor, The Adt'ocafc. SIB,—It was heartening on Tuesday to listen to the speech of ihe leader of the House on the issue of Immigrants into this Colony. He said on thin what want.il saying, and any refutation of what he said amounted to ;i waste of lime and breath. All talk of federation is unrealistic to the point of hypocrlsv if barriers are to be erected to the free and untrammelled movement of the peoples within the area of the British Caribbean. Whatever may be the inconveniences to the Gov•raunti concerned, these will always be insignificant compared lo the advantages from freedom of travel aciruini; to I,-.and trade <,f the gr**. If we arc to move forward at oil, it is u compulsory condition of that movement that West Indian politician'must abandon the parochial outlook and learn to legar.i other West Indians with interest—yes. the same 1 merest — %  they do their own Ititrbados as the Agoemblv leader pointed out. be cMSe of iu population problem should bo 1 1 :1 ( countrr In the world to dream of erecting barriers to the fo'' entry of people into the island. Retaliation by others would be tragic for our situation. There is a regrettably ignorant tendency by people who should know better, to regard residents from other British Colonies as aliens They are not. They are British subjects—maybe strangers to this particular Colony—but as British subjects, entitled to all tha privileges and rights that Barbadians are similarly entitled to in other British Colonies. Some members of the Assembly confuse strangers with aliens, even some officials do. To Ihe everlasting credit of the leader of the House he made it clear thai even alien* were welcome within the gates. Barbadians leave this Colony and hold positions of every con ceivable grade In other British West Indian Colonies. They con • tinue to do so daily. But to go even further, within the British Caribliciin, those few immigrants who do become destitute should be the responsibility of the respective Governments. The official expense will invariably cancel out The meeting of the various peoples is of value in itself, and something that cannot be measured In C. s. d. Barbadians .an IT comparatively Ignorant of their rep* virtues and shortcomings until they have lived and worked outside or Barbados. The transfer to the Police Deportment of immigration affairs formerly In charge of the Harbour Master is a retrograde step fro", the angle at which I view the mixing of the peoples. The police psychology It the very worst 10 deal with so Important n civilian affair as the intercolonial movement of groups and peoples The psychology of coercion is basic to their training, and they customarily bring the influence of suspicion to bear on the affairs of those who lack financial security but are in all other ru p oe tl decent and commendable citizens. We still retain in this Colony customs thai are fundamentally i.ound from the point of view <-t freedom and democracy. Uu; it is distressing to detect almost every Tuesday in the House of Assembly the tendency to accept or Impose Authoritarian control on th.life uf the people of this land. Because many Colonies have abandoned those custom* we still retain, our politicians make this an argument for a similar abandonment of them \.\ Freedom and democracy in th* essential virtues of these political philosoohles arc disappcnrini: from the big areas of the on). We have not the problems of the big places of the earth. Why pretend that we have, by persistent legislation to coerce the free movement of our peojlcs and so annihilate the Caribb.-.-m area and Barbados specially as probably the last remaining refuge of that freedom which means so much lo the spirit and progress of its people. We have certainly not achieved "freedom from want". Let us not so hastily abandon those other freedoms that m ri" I DffJCsss. V. B. VAUGHAN. UanThv CUck Monr To 'he Fliior, The Adrocate— SIH.—Permit me space to say a few words on this Clock question. In the first place advancing the time would create a hardship on the poorer class who would be called lo duty at an earlier hour and end their task bv the setting of,sun. Secondly, it serves no useful purpose in Barbados where tl.eie ll %  lmetvl thirteen hours 'of brlgnt %  mshine every d.*y. an I lurtrig tliis period then* |nuil" MouM lime for recreation. No one needs half a dry for recreation, two or three hours are quite sufficient for golfers, the fishermen, the swimmer or lennts players, etc I,et those who need more UHM for re-reation approach their employers tot curlier morning hour* of work ud thev will have nuie lire in Ihe 1,1'iiin;.' F"r r,.t.nicc. I am one whose work does not afford me recreation—not even for a meral, but than gra MOM of us who love more play than work and that Is the thing that makes "Jack a dull boy.*' If the; s need for more recreation, let ui ask .mr employers for a seven till three working period and this would harm nobody; but let us leave the clock alone FAIR PLAY. .-. Ihinyvrow* llornvr To The Fditor, The Advocate, SIR,— Please allow me space to comment on a dangerous situation. At the junction of Welches, Fairlield. and Bridge Roads. I think th* traffic signs arc well-placed with one omission which may cause an accident. Traffic from My Lord's Hill direction going to Faii-Hcld Road-, stop at the Major Road sign for Welches Road, but IrafAc to Bridge Rood from the some direction go straight through non-stop. If ihey stop (which is seldom) they do so in the middle of the road. Monday evening last. I saw a *buj belonging to St. George's Bus Co., stop at the corner; a car travelling behind it passed out and went straight down Bridge Road without stopping If another vehicle had been proceeding from Welches Road In the direction of Flint Hall around and in front of the Bus. an accident might have Occurred I suggest, then 1 1 y' sign be placed at ihe upper entrance of Bridge Road and ail u the traffic coming from My Lord's Hill going toward Bridge atop at the Major Road and proceed around the light Just as the traffic from Welches Road do. This would make that corner safer. ANOTHER MOTORIST. il.W.S. Dvronthirc At BarbaiUm To The Editor, The Advocate. SIR.—May I beg a small space in your columns to say "Tha: You" on behalf of the officers, cadets, and ship's company II.M.S. Devonahlre. The friendly welcome and generous hospitalit> extended to us by the people of Barbados has become proverbial in this ship, with the result that we return year after Mat for more. But you are all so kind tha'. t^iere is never any sign of j geiu-roaity flagging. As usual we have had a moat enjoyable round of sporting fixtures and social functions, ar would like those Involved in the organisation side to know that we ore really grateful for all the hard work they must have put in. I would also like to express personal thanks to all those kind people who have looked after oadets so well by entertaining them in their homes. This side of the hospitality of Barbados is perhaps the most appreciated erf all by lads who are experiencing their ta of ship life and their first venture overseas. Once again, thank you, Barba dos. Yours faithfully. G. STOKES Captain, Royal Navy. FOR YOUR BATHROOM Corner BASINS with Pedestal 2Vxl8" | & 1 BASINS with or without Pedestal 22-xlOI Low-down SUITES High-up SUITES W < CANS. S fc P TRAPS W.C. SEATS lPlastic White and iBakaUta Maheapny Cast Iron CISTERNS Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS HARPIC, Large and Small. WILKINSON & HAYNES Co.. Ltd. Successor* To C.S. PITCHER & CO. Phonoa — 4472, 4687. MWW'AW.'.'/.'.'.'.V/.'. RANSOMES LAWN MOWERS With or trithout Motor* JVOtVS THE TIME TO SELECT YOVHS. DA COSTA & CO., LTD. *GEMTS FOR THOSE WHO LIKE TO KEEP COOL . AND KEEP WELL-GROOMED AT THE SAME TIME! THE NEW MOYGASHEL ANTI-CRUSHABLE LINENS . ARE JUST THE TICKET NEW SUM KS .n si AltlllVED AT DA COSTA & CO., LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT NOURISHING FOODS SrmwjB FISH Red Siupprr Canadian Silmon Sardines Mackerel rili-hards Smoked Haddock Cod Fillet, Fillet Sole Kggs Anchor Milk Powder lib & Z';tb% JAR. Bread ChmmmmMmi1*r Ijayftw Cucumber Salad Celery Hearts Rhubarb Kale Spinach Caoose berries Gaavas f.rape* Mangoes not / t 0ts Vlelle Ogd I'nni ii r Brandy Itrm-ih. '.11. Crrme d* Mrnthc Gold P.-jid Rum feajaMawev-,',',^',*^. CALL GODDARDS WE DELIVER '.'.•S.'.'.'.'S.'SSSSS-', WWA**'/-'>'/*'.\



PAGE 1

PACI BAM IDOS IIIIIK \Ti: il l-liw. FMML'ARV 13. 131 Trinidad Team All Fit. Says Captain Cuoil Cricket Kx/tocU'd %  I IAD TEAM UUrtam strong, headed hy TWO < API tl\\ ril.\lll\4. Christie Wins Golf Title 3toJinMyer md nunamr Haro!<' -> || > %  : i A • ih< i tly after Itn o'clock — The Mom WM Jeffrov SlOll* • -,.i lain m Asa II. T-mRehoon. R L*Butler, C Sampath S. QuUlen, frank Kin* C. Skeetc W Ferguson. A Ganteaume. S. "1 have two regrets"*, skipper J K llmever toH the Advaeale Ittor i n arrival at SeabamA rli yesterday "The first 15 that 1 mi OUT practice during has been se"iriously hampered and secondly Mil thai DO young Trlnidadlan l*t>OVOr hi-* man has peiformed sufficiently i In the Tt ela to root H M %  • TiT-ale Don *' cd on Jeff declined to fOTiment on Ihi Individual membeni of the ,.e r and team and said that their MOO I HIT second would not depend upon utdiluall but rather nn good team work. All Kit ... Otrtfltie Ev Cr yone was tit, he soid. and i: ,Ki • I he exacted the team to Kiv... .... MctNinl of itsell In vie*of ted that UM Australian tour rat in ibe offlnfl he was sure that ,. eriefceter taking part in '",' w l £ x *J* %  'h. caused that ha son with 161. Rodger, w„ ^ u mijl electee Hi was looking forward, he mpeon with a 77 was in „ 1(l ft mrcnn|| manv f, leilds n %  "J, Ilirbados particularly' those playboth of ibMc on Sun ., who w ,. rt n 8 comoamon, '''; n during the 1950 W 1 tour to the l;it two holes to ; -, finish with aa 64. „ Wl t n es* good cricket. — — % %  and may the best side win,' ll.inUir.ipa Stollmeyer concluded. hU two %  .,, , DJ 78 with .-in 8 handicap Welcomed net 146, which en '"H yesterday to meet etter ihon Roy Wilthe .cam wra Mr J. M. Kid%  i %  twenta h;.iuiinay. Jualoe v no-president or the live stroke* betti .tliados Cricket Assoc ution. 145, n.iined off an West Indies and Barbados capndlcap. tnln. John Goddard. Mr T. N. %  1 r the hlfh wind thai Pclrre. former Barbadoa Captain %  yi and the nd elector. Mr S Ot (.itble condition K the greem tana, selector. Mr E 1) Inn ring for the most iMtrt wa> 8 member of the Hoard ot M WEST INDIAN OapUlfl John Ooddaul (right > and InW.I. Tour to Eiu-lMid Jeff atollmcycr. having chat n terdajr when the Trinidad Team arrived. Jeff is captai dad Tern:: ot the Trim %  ring team nniahed second in rlitM'l total of i3 agonic-nt of the Cricket Assocla'he batting and third In th. 1 te, than the •<">. Mr. W f Home, Honorary irg average* in the Tr • .:„. (il IM Hacratary, II. Clyde Walcott, fnlnat IndU which andaxl ( ,| :i |„ HJ. Weal Indies player and hU broththe (IfTh Test here today. 10. In Cad tan Ptayeri ••< Mr Keith Walrott and Mr i ,.-. ormance, Rafpld hVdney. llri i The team is 111 residence hollow vieAbbeville Guest House I ..Ml. U.S. MAKE SWEEP IN CARIBBEAN TENNIS KINGSTON. Ja, Pah. 11 The Americana made 1 d e a n iween ol the Caribbean Champlonahipi en-led at Montcgo Bay to-d..\ when Btralfthl CUi Frank W..ireii. w. i i,.t,„ rice Bevarlaj Bakei won U* mixed aptaln of the OromoriweaHh *i..ubl. beating Harui.i Bu Worrell High In Averages KANPUR, reb. IS and Barbara Scofield 9_7, 6—4 —tle Croodl.acrit and |Miiiii'ir and jler rolwivs 0> Jahii lUnlsan al B^rhadoMu.rum I a no Aurtlun sale af rurnllHrr. Ii *t "Huii.inumI unlit Itoad (Auiliuii• Hunter I rot man A aa.) 11 ii 1 1 m 1 1 tiui.i ii Heeta MO Heath r. M ill eoiwtder tour Kekclutloiih. maklna it i..wfui I.. Veetraia—t AndrcM >l Miilurl. SI "tall* si < %  and SI. Oewir. lu Irasc laad fur htrkaa 0Ma Tan Binarc also on the A-enda— one to provldr for the leiulation of Tublir t'llll llr and the oth*.* lo amend the Supervlaion and Wrj-htm ol Sutr i inr> Aci. 1939. The House t Assemhly Meeu s.aa lr Cummlm la expected to Introduce a Supplementary Resolution tor 66.666; Mr. Adam. Mill in'.-odme one for 6317.735; Mr. Cox Will mOVr Mir pi*ttlg Of %  third for *?.VMI; and Ml Adams will Ukr charge of a foi.lli for 61 360. I'IIII. Band elveo ronrerl at Lener Hospital . 4.60 Mobile Cinema lives ahow al 1; %  .„(,. 1 School Paature SI I'eler 1.J1 Hoxliut *l Yankee Stadium K.W0 Bank Clerks End Strtke DUBUN, Keb 12 .kj to-d> ended their seven wei %  a pay after an • court had granted tome of their pay demands. But the banks, closed since December 23, will not open till Thursday as aireark ol avert must first he cleared. —Heuter The Weather TO-DAY Sun Kkse* ; 628 am Sun Set* : fi8 p m Moan (First Quarter) Frb.-uarj 13 I 1 iniNi: : 6 30 1m lllih Water ; 8.60 a.ifi i< m YFSTr.RUAY Rainfall (Codrlngton) : 86 in l m.1 for Month to Yesterday : 1 84 Ins Ti mprrature (Max.) : 81 U F. Tempriatu'e (Mln.l : 74 0 F. Wind Direction O am.i : I (3 p m > ; K N t Wind Velocity : la miles i per hour Itar^melrr (9am.); 29932 I (3pm ) ; 29 852 Temporary uncivil servant now works "regularly" ... I wd ID kii Mf P. how'i in* foem >" A. 'tfsnwi. ••<• V< .; irur tw intulcJ to irlxf." I >h.i in you douuj aW aw," jraaW ifr / %  "Ai'm.. %  riWmfi^ilfi-raM." "Ah he." I (Md (SB00>, -ihH'U h* ilBI ^^ a> p "s6a*t6ki das." I taal-lta'w got abOiH to ft. of lub.ni letedc you. I'IJU ftm "J etked him -ft 1 NA H" ae repft^J. "A U:iU All-Br** IV** ievi nmu* — #ij i*4t* I ta-rapoW a. -., ni*/ i,m AM-*mfm? ij:Vir./• "You CM uy (bat to iru>lKatl," | aria KIHOCCS *LL-aaAN nbsi team pML*^>, r*e-l>' MMikMiir* MI.' Un il -u,U %  W>i,eU*Hli*HB mail aab u .,k u u .^ .,, M. M ..s) (wrrae *ak*>. \\ .1. Cyclists W ill Ride In B.G. Easter Press set swa p iii n |ia j ial GKOHGETOWN, Feb. 0 A three man team Ol vTOOl Indian cyclists will be visiting 1 iian a at Raster time to lake perl In an tnteroolonlal Sporti iibcuting to be staged at Goed So/amen Land, Canjc Dattrld County an Easter Sundaj % %  day. The team will comprise tl Youna and 8. deFrettaj (Trinidad) and S Stuart (Barbados). i.>nnd and thi m played 1 ttM Anal lode I.in Viblock was one of those wh< %  inugh he was in a fin-: pillion iu challente lor tht Cup, having turned u' ol 71, only two smokes off thi' hundlcnp race l-iltle Slope tit i a ii" ttM concerning the Hock ley waa named st. Andrews in Ihi who won were William Atkinson, who haa two off days but who was one ol Colin Uayley who turned in an 82 on Saturday bill ten US BH Bard aflet a disastrous round on Sunday, R. P Gooding, wht %  IT;\C1I his l>^ fturinfi the inmu for the Man %  .-ii in Sunday'i 78 finished in 0 lie for sixth place. The scores follow; HIDAL ri.yv c 11 \*niiNMir J K K 1 M %  isas its J. O-D Ka-.i IB— 1S--1W H. Tlmpeon '.; M lai His bailing figure* were H r.lngs, one not out. highest :ore : Hi • • %  11 ,v. 1.1,. tii H.. bowling 2943 overs. 110 maidens 60S raw, 18 wickets, average 33.61 Francis And Ralph Fight Tonight %  1 %  1: IntilM %  II. Weovtr HI I 111" i,* a] tl II ::i The bowling was headed b) hil fellow countryman BoBO] bin iih figures of 209.fi O 8^ M 433 H., 15 W, i.v. L'H 87. Tht Commonwealth bnttiivg was topped by John Ikin of Lancashire with p Innirvas, 2 not outs, highest score ill. total MS, avsrasnj 89.29. The bast all-round performance nf the atrlea ami by vljay Rasa Vho headed the Indian batting and came second in Ihe bowling. —Rrutrr F.WATICS NOT fiir.OT^ hich roadei LONDON I : he Soviet news aeenc> OTaltl i I sfoaoOW lt;i II 1 i in London and elrculoorracuon boa tot American acUou "In second line please read 'les' instead of %  blgl —I.N.8. KID RAI.ril I at the Yankee Stadium so n 11; Kid lt.il|.li and Kin Frauds meet T ? %  'I? '" ,l,c,r ,(,, rn ''*h| heavyweight r, 1* ID boul Tl, c h"*" P ul " uch a ,„ good show when they met lecentlv 10!^ so-it. that boxing circles have clam,^! !" iJ! <""d for their return aa-iil^Ei The winner will be the unan crowned light naavywelghl crtam111 IS 911 %  1 111III N I (I. irfcrri T*-> %  J K h (1. Muiniiuj ,1)1(11 rw Hitndrr* %  no *rd pion 1 f the island untu the formation of the Barbados Boxing Board of Control nominates the (hiunpion. A good supporting programme is also carded In the semi-niiiil Sara King, former amateur ligntw.jght champion, who has now is* is i mined the professional [\\ meets Hal Williunis nvei eight :,rounds while in ihe praUminaro ;*• 14. houl Victor Lovcll and Bcllleld "2~ •-'" Kid. who fought to a hectic draw IS' la-UO M *• lir Kid-FrancU-Kid n* u—tM Rjlpl> card, are meeting In n it* it isi icturn bout. POCKET CARTOON t> OSBERT LANCASTHR They'll Do It Every Time %  -~-~. By Jimmy Hado e^REEPLy IS SO CAREFUL A80UT HIS ^NCIE'JT HEAP, HE DOES EVERVrUlNS BUT WRAP IT IN WAX PAPER — n 3uT DRIVING TWE C0MWNY !" £<"' TUATSI OTPweKT.' *coweoy CREEPLV !" iy C4LLHIMATTMCRBWR SHOP! %  %  -"=3 [ HAVE I TOLD YOU ^TTOLETTWElOQSl k EAT PEANUTS IN, JTMSCAR?, mmm mm t p.Hii' si5!l! s ^liJ'. Vhoel Chlldrrn .1 rompanll bv Ih. H I -ill Ue admlltra al Rpe.l-1 Rat. Mnubfp. < Ihr H A I ( IIIIM il hall pine Car %  .>,. M. %  I.. Flowered Dress Qoods "BemberRs" in small designs. 38" wide. Per Yd.—SI 72 and SI 92 — and — Printed Crepes A beautiful quality fabric in small designs. Coloured grounds with White and Black & White. 36" wide. Yd, $1 .85 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II, 12 & 13 Broad Street BARBADOS TURF CLUB SEASON 1951 STANDINC AT CASTLE liRANT. ST JOSEPH O. T. C. (Rrown Horse 128. b> Obliternte out of Telephone Call) THOROl (illllRFD MARES 624 00 OTHER MAKER $K.OO STANDING AT BULKELKY, BT, OEORGE PRIDE OF INDIA BOXING at the YANKEE STADIUM Britlons Hill /O-.VffVII? • KID RALPH (IU lbs.) vs. KID FRANCIS (162 lbs.) • In return match for the LiRht-Heavy weight Championship ot BARBADOS 10 Rounds • Sfini 1 ilKil SAM KING (130 lbs.) va. HAL WILLIAMS (131 lbs.) 8 Rounds • Preliminary VICTOR LOVELL (122 lbs.) va. BELFIELD KID (125 lbs.) G Rounds S2.00 SI..-.II M (HI S1.00 .48 Winner of the championship will receive a Belt presented by Da COSTA & CO.. LTD. • LUTHER FIELDS Promoter The % %  <• "VAMHKMA" 2-WAY BEAUTY TREATMENT VALCREMA : Skin Youth—Deep Clcansmx (Jreasy Night Cr.-Jin for Women of all ages especially those over 2.1. Keeps skin velvety, smooth and clean. VALCREMA I found contains rare oils that make your skin Soft and Bupplo. Special Oil in water Emulsion means it cannot dry on the skin. Contains Youth Element : "/1VFSTEOL" to guard you aaalnat tail tule age lines. 8 A perfeel powder I % Normal Skins, an Essential S for DRY SKINS X Made hy the Makers of the famous :— J "VAL0ERMA" SKIN OINTMENT V A Pf.itl\c Beauty Treatment, which brim* remarkable result*.. OMeosssMe *i : S BOOKER'S IRDO.S) DR( C. STORES LTD. Broad Street and HASTINGS. ALPHA PHARMACY LION (Jiaia) SMART and DURABLE for TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White Sizei: 6—11 PRICE: $1.60 ENRICHED BREAD ^ the j LOAJF tnat mattes \j A CHAMPION. • ~^vO$j ^ ^06>0>0OOaoOO U O U >00J0^06>OOBOOBOOO<06S4Vc your Woodwork AOflafcaa */%' CONCENTRATED V: fiom destruction by using Wood Preservative HEAVIF.ST RAINS CANNOT WASH IT Ol'T. TUAT IS THE ADVANTAGE OF IMPROVED ATLAS "AOn In thr Wood It Is Ihrrc for (.....d I Thp limber U PERMANENTLY protected against Termite. %  nd Ml wooddpstroyinu insects, rot and lunjl. Also timber If.'.i 1 .''.'!.,:^'" '" n "Ubsequenlly be painted or varnished S!I5?^T ANY ADDITIONAL PREI'AKATION Or THE SURFACE. ATLAS -A" is odourless, easy to apply and eeo. noniieal When made ready toe use by diluting I part !" A "Itn 3 pnrt. unirr. this Wood PreservMlve cosli as little as JI.03 per Ballon. stoekfd In I.eln I tin and 5 aln Drum I RrUilrd in any Qusnllly from I rill upward. WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid. •----.'. '.:V.'.V.VS.-IA*.





PAGE 1

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13. ISSl CLASSIFIED ADS. BARBADOS ADVOCATE TCLEPHONI 2S0 The charge for w-umiwrii %  .nj in' Mewinriaan %  totac*' %  i on wr.*M tiM II %  • %  Sunda} BM any numMi of word* up to I*. am a .em. per word on *N>- n levin, memory of Dm bknfrt wife Carmen S Me Twilo who tell iilrrp on Wtnr* 1' !"*' Dear > %  the crave, in Mch -he % %  laid. Dear Ii th* memone. %  %  hall fade %  •"* la Ihe hop*. that again we %  ru.ll meet. Kneeling together at JMJI feet Ever to bo mmmhrnd by iltu-oand AuaUn IT.idn, .Son. Hieac* Ham leu 'Step daughter. Shei... Family. HI n -i„ PIHIIt Te*> mil pei SALES float* liar oa i'-adj.i • t-mi cr-irpe ii : un %  reek-dae: I IIMon Saadnki. AUCTION %  ^lrrtk !" received from the !" 'oc*ee iJepartment of Highways 1^!?^ *'" %  up ' •<* r publ.r auetKm .1 n „ r y-rd OT ThMiV.%  the Isth brilnntng al 1130 pm ^V'ST" 1 : "•"" '**' *'~ l %  room.. i.lTt On Brooms. ITSI Sh,. • %  grjeulture Fork.. -IB. Ffcfca<* *, ^•U^-'l' ***•* %  "*" %  " %  •. • Whfd Ba.row*. U Twit nt.ll, ai* several nth,, „, „, inter**. DAItCV A SCOTT. GOVt Antl-neei 7*I—4n. I'imir \OIIIIS I M H a I i pee apsl* In* "•o* II %  *> na i, .V-*Vi.. £25 "*• •"*• by ektoaaBat order lor private Chrletma. Catda from your friend. No ptrt-bu. ... ere* tarv. Write today I beautiful free sample Booh b> Brltal.. largevt and foretnoet Publlahers; higneat rcaaaitHBMn: marvellous money making or.portui it>. Jones, Williams. Co., PajN a Victoria Work Ir.giand." aaUSI-Utt 111! ""i t\TI II r Hn\ \l. HOOI,I %  I % %  . ..-n KIl Ol REAL ESTATE OrTer in writing for In* reived py g. c nfXD C-_ .. rnch C Ltd. up to p m Mm will b* itm SAU MinlmHM rhoro* nwl r *-r> and H rntij Aimdaui M ajaadbj — 0 i'*> 24 iroroi 3 fii a umi) r*< %  word Snndaid. AUTOMOTIVE CAIt .!> %  (II Snl* Master CnvvrolC Car n vary af—1 coinliin.ri II.I BrrVda AppK lo L M Clark*. Jfv.i Jainrm L4tr**l Ph.in. STSI. 11)11 -li CAR-Ona Vanxnall h.p Kl Cyl^id*r B n*w Tyrw. l/p i'X**ll*nt rniTilllioTi Eti|in* DUI asu f,.r infection. II.Ml -f CAH f. O'lin. IV*lo*t In .., MKKini.nl 4T3B I awo. II 3 51 hi CAR* 193A *..nl VB Tonr*r. Rap*!!**! 1M F....I V-B Srd !•*• Morn< Oxford Saloon 1. ond w*ll carad FOttT ROYAL nAltAQC LTD Tclaphon* 44IM. .l.l%  %  iRampart BUL St Michael, near Cbvi *!|": S V * l *h**l. Apply K U. (trlfflih -. r>cl* Hall. St MKfcMl ^^ T..8l_sn tOWrRV, ROAD. ST. MICHAEI. THrrmdrnc* lately occupiad by Mil %  O Collymora" The Mouaa atanda In ' il iruundi ii acre in* ahola roniprla* %  K and dining rooma v-llh nuirbl* ball.. S lone*, convenient klichen -all kapt garden* ST parrhaai. verandah, dr.w. 9 bedrooma. ona lava—whan a"d pant -—for S aertanU. garage lot I I %  1.1..-. Water aupplv for garden •m a well Kith mm; wo i >i*w and abu aervanta roonx i.ti The i**lderVe completely v.i.e.1 lumuned with clrrtrkllahtlng from I cart. I grounda that the Vyoi **.*-.. il.r eth and \t\U AMI Mr It F W.l-ee. will h* \\ it %  thia vaw lor the We.t Indlei All formand fee* mu be fe*ardad b> me see.*rar> Mr. Hotaan Intuaa by ULMI Y. M. P. C. Member, are „ed to ...bnui .ay ^?F M* > •*" ***" to ""a** " ' Agenda for the half ygarlr na-aral %  MMffl W be held at the Club Houae •m tUth March, to Ih* Sacretarv. .-.-. lain than In* 17th February lt*i * a POTTTH :i: % %  :| NOTICE SSI'S "T^'V !" '"viw lor aup•in appro.imai.i, pmt. pure treati •J* milk daily lo 91 J„ hlll ATmah,'^ ...rhrac^ed"-" d "* m !" 1 B %  FRA9U. Ci.rk. Board of Poor t-,w Guaitllanr Bt .'... 10.2.31 n T'\(.l SEVEN %Ot I II\IM \OI 14 I S OKRA CL03E 1EA80N Order I I; puruanc* of SevUon 4. %  .Motion (3> of ihc Colion DiwaMf Prrvrntion Acl. 1928. (.IMS-Ti. ih,Governor-in-Executive Commlll hs nxed the period frewi Ihr Ut nr May to the SOlh of June. IncluiWe, to be b CIOM Season for Otua*. M d b> the Governor-'in-rx.-cutive Committee this lit day of *r"Kan/ Februar>, one thousand nineMiiindred gnd fifty-one. Byfcominand, A. A. HINDS. Clerk. Exerutiwe Committee Note. Attention is drawn lo sub-Motion (6) of Section 4 of the Cotton Diieaaes Prevention Act. 192S | iKS-7> whertbv spefial examptlon from the proxialofn of •ub-*evtion (3) of Section 4 mav be framed by the DUector of Afncvlture with the conient of the Board of Afrlculture. 10.1 SI— 2n. COTTON CLOSE SEASON Order In pursuance of Section 4 ill Illy (1) an d (2> of the Cotton DiMHM, Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-7). the Governor-tn-Executlvc Comm ttee has fixed the period from the 1st of May to the 30rh of June. il. Inclusive-, to be a ClowSeason for Cotton Made by the Covernor-ln-Ex,., utlve Committee this 1st dav of wwtiary, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-one. By Com: m l, A. A. HINDS. Clerk. Executive Committee. 10.8.51—2i Harbour Log I aII A In Carlisle Bay \o Touch With Barbados Coastal Station ldy Bt* %  %  XI V Vagabond rm-. >• Manor Bella W,.l., oroton M V "*eUg. BaaaWSW Philip 1. : rh Sla*v I •kh KmeUi. VtFt.rkU ARNIVA.1 iMMh, A II i -I-BJhM T4 Mna Qutana M'. Tea irniici. sistrt •da*. Mahogany Vanltlei, from fTBOO; Mg. bedenda III < ,„*. SUM per pr. •lav a good vartelv nl aerond hand MHIIaSM Fpr rtullaft r-mu-ular Dial MSS Call on *l*w at Ralph Deoid'a Uiow room Ilftdwooil All.. Tbe -Ttibla* into flat* txmdins* conveillble Ir.lo i %  and la ailltable for %  ilfhen a-idcn* underalgned will .a for aale by public i. F I'd. „nVe. No. IT. rligh sueet, Bridgetown. 01. Friday He C ,d dav February 1131 at 3 p n > l.upeetlun on TueMay. and Tlmr dav. onlv between 3 and S pjn. lo. fu.ther parllrulara apply lo COTTIJ:. CATFORD A CO., % % %  silaii 41.51—10 .MISCELLANEOl'S At-rUMUS-The new FVrllllaar for r^inea. vegeLibie ai-.d nowrr garden* UN p-r lb. from II. Keith Archer'. Drug Store. ColerldB* Street. Phone NBH BA'niS In Porcelain Enamel. In White. Green, nimioae wllh malehlng unite lo complete colour auilea. Top grade. A. HAHKES 4k Co.. Ltd. SSI 91—Ifn. I %  Cl^TMlNr. %  frocka. tweed riding HA Ct'HTAIN FITT1NOS—For iw aivling. light control. Va raperlea. By Kirwh I>'..| liNti. %  rn 1 LTD MOIIFR.VFOIJ) LX_>QHS r a talied anl..li..n to rchneciural problem of 1 arretna. movable partition A BARNEn A CO. LTD. GALVANISED P1PT In the followipd • fee: S In , groce. 13)ftl -In The undersigned will offer for aal theli olnce No. IT High Street, pndaeMwn, on Friday the IBIh February ISSl at I pm The mraauage or dwelling house formerly known a Taltyera now call%  1 '-nvsTAI. WATIMB" with the land thereto containing by estimation 13.017. anunre feet aituated on Ihe aea at Carvllle Avenue. Worthinu. Chn.t Chure al present used ai a boarding houaa In*pection any day except Sunda** between 4 and A p.m. on application to MiTalma on the premlsea. For further particular, and condlllpn* of sale apply to: COTTLF. CATFORD. A Co.. Solicitor.. 31 SI—I3n The undortigMd (U offer (or aale at %  mi' *t.. o*-*r Hind, at Ci 11K Mapg w ih. uth rebruarr ISSl t t p.m by %  anala* uumpetitioii, one Modem BtSfaf•Hill Cle.t *. u it Upper Cnllymor Kock. oppu. %  Hath* AM E. Church, wll 1 f.000 tq. ft randnh. tiled wlh and water toilet. Elect 1 M WATTS lamea Street DUI M3. 10.2 SI -en. lr.lf.il Chrl.1 FaaOPawaTIEaS—Two dalightfu deiu-e asluated at Tap Rock. Cl.urch Both having 3 bedrow 2 Tollela and Batha recently Garden* well l-bd Stlt With peaseeilo-i mi Match l.t No rraaonabl* "Her -ill be refuted. For viewing ft*, Ring 4H83 Sff 2MB. 112 31 t. MAKWIN Maxwrll'i Rnad. Modem •lone-built Bungalow. 3 Bedroom*. Drawing and Dining Boom Bteakfa.t Boom and Kitchenette. Toilet and Bath. Servants' Boom. Garaue in yard, Water nd Electric Ught Inalalled aWfaTOR...lately U.0OS M| 't. of land. Appl. E. H. rarmer. Andrew. Plantation 01 Dial S32J. 4.SJI1—n. A new and well bulll ftungalow on Pi-i inn called WFJCTFIFIJI. the propeilv of th* late Sir Qeorge W.iU.-n Th* nungalow stand, on 1S.0S0 aquar* feet of land and contain* one large ruMic room, two bedroom*, kllchen'. lavincr-r, bath and lavatory. In a aeparata building there la a g-irage for one car and two servants rooms wilh bath and to valor v. Tn< proper" *ill be i up for aale at our ortlce .-. Wedne-daT th* Slat day .•SI at 2 pm For conditions n aaie apply lo Ihe under, lined. Inspection anv day between lo TO am bnu t pm. Telapharie Lndy Walton. No. MI. COTTIE. CATFORD St CO i.ovr SUFJIF.SAIlIll.lI Lirge American War.li. alao *haet of 3 pi. wi— %  unk. rltteU I. UK' 113SI—ISTAK-A-nVE Tintri>R Sl.-I Chalrt and Table* on how al Ralph Beard'. Show room*. Hardwood A 1 enqulrle. cordlaliy Invited 13151-On STEEL STFJ' 1 ADDERS—8-tread and 4-lrend. Just the intna lo> Sloro. School*. Ofrlces. and Houawbold uaaa. t tread •> BB eiK-h. tread SUSS aacli I 1 rspeated at this price, at RALPH BEARDS Show VOOAUM Hardwood Allay IS1.SI—tn VENETIAN BUNTja Kirioh S.m-alr I metal De LuM Veoetaln bltnda. t ,ur *l*c*. delivery 3 -4 c*>i I .-i.r 1 fjg',.l.;-.!" %  3 cewu a 1 ru'cl Su i|ilci[/. BKIKH-H In RMdKetuw.ii Sal Feb irth Half Moon Diamond Brooch Finder will be rewarded. Phone StaEt 13 2 31—in SWERFWIAKF. TICKET ISTM I Finder plaaae return same Race. Iv> Land. St. Michael ttJJM—la NancE *_'****" Of ST. JIMIPH ApplleatlOM (nr u„ *„ o| p,,^.^, Treoauier will bo received b> in. a.r.iiied not later than th* ath Fer,ruary ISSl Application, mu.t be accompanied by BaMiamal and Medh-al lertinrate*. and marked on the En. vetop*. application. f, p, llBl ,„ p,,-. •*gd. (lev L MAU.ALIFV. Chairman St. JlfSFph V%  11231 NOTICE ivlted for Ihe Antilienni. aie H ime . ,.. it a aalaay of SSTSO par month, to and quarter, provided. A,>Pliifil* ,nuat be fully c*i nlaaive*. and eeneTHl Nurat* Tbc %  uc t aaaful candidate must ai "tie ..„ 23th FabruaoISSl n.la*dfl r, *. Empreaa ..I '. % % %  Sailor. *.* Roalna 1 ia.l. CHANCERY SALE %  — %  .11 be *t date tpeciAed I %  .1... OfHr. end S pm f,.r the .urn be sat up on each succeeding I ne>' 1 Full parlMMlar* on appl. I LINDSAY rani BVEBVPN <;ILI Defendant aarcel a* Land •Itnate 1 Island afcr--ard ee.„ia,ning by Sdn Hi*rol.,ui. Abutting and bmindina "" w of ene Walrood on land, tonaaerly of rrl> ol Alfred F Green but 1 called Sp—mera Hill aaerli ..1 rj i. M.-M,.'.I bui now of on* Pilarn i r ii.. '-.MI. 1 it %  I and bound Toaetliei and all and uni.iiai Ihe bulMmaa and erections both fr-elHild tied and built .tandini and beina "h the appur1 i......I. n 1 : .-.• Rnnatrar in-Chancery •th F.'-i I^DV Suitable IW, with knowledge I ol b.k.keeplng. fll,ng vll „ m „ .,_ Appl. Pu„ Olftre Boa SSI, Brtdgeto*. NOTICES Clerk. NOTICE a.. ? P*rochial Treasurer-. Office. St. MKhael will be closed at II o'clock Noon i**!" v "" l T -WU> Kh F bPERCY It BURTON Pamchui Treasurer. St Mi.li.iel 112.3 NOTICE Rl'PPLIER FOR THE POOR OF THE PARISH OF KA1NT MICHAEL •,. tgn .,!,:,. looe "TENI,EH poa win be received bv the V.etry up to 1* oi-LeK Tl'iinday 33nd Fabruary. lor the imdeintentloned auppllaa In narh quan'liie* 1. •y from time to lime he ordered foc iie year commencing on the I. Apr' U'ERII MEAT FRESH MII.K FPaTSH lUtFAD Each peraon tendering nui send In letter, along with ihe Tender, ngned by two properly qu„Hfl.-.i person* .not belr.g inaWabajB of Hi.Vawtpei %  heir wlllingneas lo 1 Tenderer in th* event ol Teiater lielnK .srrpted for the r.bnent to th* Cotiiracl. With respect to Ihe tender loi MILK. Hi* probable quantity for one vc.ir I. 14,000 K .,1iona am \eatrjreserve ihe right to accept l.i %  gt of thlartH-lr and a t*nd*rlng for U11* oitlrto shall loswtard, aiitiig with their tendn. 1 Cer tlflcate by a properly qualified Veterinary II act limner fating that the cattle from which Ihe milk will be aupplied nr Tuberculoal* rot in 'il. II,. LI %  %  lanajag Off..-. ISJ LIQUOB LICENSE NOTICE The -ipplication of William and Urnilj ones tiadlng as Jones A Co. holder ol anaa kSg 18 of ISSl a-r anted ,. Win Jone* In leapert of a board ft hingle thop if Inched to residence at Ragle Hall. St Muhael (or peni.iaal.in us* said Liquor Larensr al said pr*ire*. Eablc Hall. St Mi.hn"! Daird Ibis 12th day of Fel.ru... \ 1S91 -K. A. McUBOD. Rsq. Police Magistrate. Dial. "A" Hlined WI1XIAM R JONER For App'p KB Thl* application will be 1 irad at n IJcenUin Court to he held a Blk CourtDlatrirl "A" on Ttvirada the 3>d dav of February ll at 1 clock. 1. in. E. A. Mfl£OD Police Magiatrata. Dat t.OVIUXMtVT XOTHK HOUSES BLUE HOL'SX—l.uca. Street. A 11 business aland. Immediate po*a-*sn Applv TMANI RROS V. WnHi %  Dia' S4SB 11.S SIMOOM. HASTINGS A newly fur• l-hed room wiih 1 .noir.e -%  4T1S. %  SEA-(.A7E II 1 '. .. Coaat. lUy fumshed ... Bt-"* -r*d refrlgeroi. • for Maiek. Jurt* July. For f.irlhee Infoi.-iallon dial 2SS0 %  yaWDOVaTR — Abbeville Racklev 10 be let. furnished M A t .pty. ISSl. P D Mc BK WISE. . •> . ADVERTISE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON Matriculation Examination The following is an extract from a letter dated 18th November, 1950. from the Secretary to the Matriculatmn ,-md School Examinations Cuuntil of the University of London: — "The University of London will cease to Issue notification! exemption from the Matriculation Examination after 30th April, 1951. Candidates, who expect to matriculate by means of the School Certificate or limner School Certificate of December 1950. should write to the Secretary of the Matriculation and School Examinations Council. Senate House. London, W.C.I not lo (he Stcertary of Ihc Cambrfdoc Local EraminattoBs i'j/ndicauv They must mention their index number und centre, and forward with the letter the matriculation registration fee of three guineas that the information and fee Is received by the University of London diirtno February 1951. Similarly, if they expect to complete their matriculation exemption by passing the Higher School Ctriiflcate or a single subject at the School Certificate Examination, they must state the date (with index number and centre) Of the examination on which they were awarded the School Certificate. "The authorities of the Loral Examinations Syndicate of Cambridge University and the University of London have made special arrangements in connexion with the December examination so that successful candidates may matriculate before 30lh April. 1951. 'Matriculation fees will be refunded to those who do not qualify. 'Any candidate who intends to follow thl procedure should. therefore:— (a) Write to London not Cambridge. (b) Give his address clearly, and full name. Ii) State index number, centre, date ond name of the examination.


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PACE TWO R\KII.WM>S M.VOCATl: TUESDAY, FEBRUARY IS, l 5 | Qeuai falling H IS EXCELLENCY the Governor oprncrt thf llarbsdos Crafts Exhibition at Vu**ri\ Park yesterday afternoon. Lady Savage wu also present for the opening. They were accompanied b\ the Governors ADC. Ma). Dennis VauKhun. Arriving To-morrow E XPECTED lo arrive to-morrow •re Mr and Mrs Wilfred Woodhoussj. Mr Mfoodhoune is Buildlni Development Adviser lo CD. and W Thty have been In England on long leave. Same 'Plane I NTRANS1T for Antigua yesterday by B.W I A from Trinidad were Mr. Rex Stollmeyer. Trade Commissioner in Canada 'or the B W 1 and Brig En. Mount, represent*live of Coloni.il Development Corporation with headquarters In Trinidad Travelling on the same plane for Jamaica was Lt. Gen. Sir Otto Lund. Commissioner in Chief of the St John's Ambulance Brigade. Venezuelan Surgeon D R. and Mrs. Alejandro VeraDiar. arrived from Venezuela via Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A. Here for two weeks, they are staying at Cacrabank. Dr Vera-Dtaz Is a surgeon at the hospital in Cristobal. Short Holiday M RS. CHARLES HAEZA and her youngest son Rodncv arrived from Trinidad venterday morning by B W I A. to spend ten days' holldav in Barbados For Preg Conference M R. T. E SKAI.Y. Associate ldltor ol the Jamaica Gleaner arrived from Jamaica yesterday morning by B.W. I. A. for the meeting of the Caribbean Press Association at present being held at "Hastings House." Mr. Sealy is staying at "Super Mare" Guest House, Worthing Auto Dealer M R and MRS D. T PROUDrOOT arrived from "Canada on Saturday by T.C A to spend a month with Mr. and Mrs l at "The Camp". St. LawMr Proudfoot is an auto dealer Kitchener. Ontario. MB RONALD TREE Back Again M R. AND MRS Ronald Tree and their daughter Penelope arrived by air on Sunday afternoon to spend six weeks at their Barbados home "Heron Beach," si. James. A Delightful Spot A MONG the tourists arriving here on one of the tourist boasts from New York were Mr. I nd Mn. S M Hall. Mr. and Irs. John Griffith of California and Mr D. S. Norton and his e iter Mr* N Hasbrouck of Long land. They were oil paying their first visit to the b were favourably Impressed by it. Mr. Hall who is a retired businessman said that Barbados seemed to be u delightful spot and Thought it was a wonderful place for a sail boat. Both Mr. Griffith and Mr. Norton are in tinReal Esutc business. MS. JOHN MAOOREOOR. Tlvld CociBiioioiiri of the Boy Scouts' Association. In Quebec arrived y*aterdsy by B W.I.A. on a nhort viiit. Boy Scout Field Commissioner M R JOHN MACGREC.OR. Field Commissioner of the Boys Scouts' Association in the Province of Quebec. Canada arrived from Trinidad by B.W.I.A. yesterday mwirtlsf His visit is under the BUSBacas Of the Boy Scouts' Imperial Headquarters In London He is her** to conduct training courses and help the local association wherever he ran. Mr MacGregor Is staying at'the Hastings Hotel. He has Just attended the Caribbean Scout Commissioner:.' Conferffuim Trimdad. He has already visited Jamaica, Grand Cayman Island, St. Kitts. Antigua and Trinidad. He leaves Barbados February I7th to continue hU tour of ehe Eastern Carihheon and B G. The Commissioner Vtattat. |hi Leeward District yasttrta* after r.oon in company with Mr. L T Gay. He stopped at tn ttiA'Krafr JtMRKHBg School, where he was met by Mr L B. WaiUie, and Mr. C. D Cuflley. He will speak to Scout and Rover leaders on Frldl at Scout Headquarters' Week-end Arrival A RRIVING from Trinidad OB Sunday by B W.I A. spend about three weeks' holm.. In Barbados was Mr Peter Know les. He Is slaying with hi •t "Midget". I'.ilin Mr. Knowles is Mai Cannings Groceries in | Fort in Here for a Week M R. NORMAN PITT. Pre*, dent of Canadian H. ies Ltd.. in Montreal accompanied by his wife arrived ban week-end to spend a short noli day in Barbados. They are staying at theOcean View Hotel. They export to be here far ork President D R A G FRANCIS, IVesident of the newly formed Trinidad and Tobago Cricket Association arrived bare yaaterda] wtth the Trinidad cricket team He is staying at Indramr, GtM Worthinii. Coming Shortly M R S H III, %  .irrived in Trinidad from B.W I A for ;i ten-di guest at Governmenl House. .kc has come to indies to make a comi tour lo last three montl already visited British Hondi and Jamaica where he held talki vith the Oovemrreiit. and me the people with the | i.iiiuliarislng himself with the existing conditions. On leaving Trinidad he will first coma here before visiting the Leeward and Windward Island: Bd [hen British Guiana. He Isst visited the West Indiei in 1934. Among the Passengers T HK Holland-Ameri. flagship Nienw Amsterdam .irrived here on Sundav morning from New York via San Juuii 0 her 18-day cruise through lb West Indies and with 796 passengers. Pro m i n e n t passengers on board inchided: Mr. Homer P. Hargrnv. Chairman of the Board ol tht Chicago Stock Exchange and Mrs Hargrove, the former lllni actress laoora, Mr. EuHeni*. Baird l>opular singer of radio, stage ana lehtvlsson, Mi A ird of the rrad f Free* i Co ksodli i Hi Wit/. Mr John F Ferguson, Ltfon PropeUoi Co HobosMsi v v., i Of New Vofl I Mr. Abraham Cai of the Bulova v. 7*cw York .md Mi>. Carnoa M Cottier. Executive Paramount pictureBBd Mil Ciller from IlalUmerr, Maryland I'S A. K.L.M. Station Manager M R. AND MHS. Peter Niei •reniuiyg afftvad tn* V> %  zuela via Trinidad yesterday morr ing by H W.I A to spend ten days here, staying at the Marin Hotel. Mr Nieuwenhuys is Sta.liter of K.L.M. Airways at Maiquelia In Antigua M R. D, SEMPLE. lath. < G. G. Semple Ennmeer of the Antigua Sugar Factory is In Antigua on u short visit. Mr. Semple Snr., is associ. the llrm of Mirlces Watson Company of Glasgow. He v.. the Wsst Indies twenty-one years n he sat wild Lord Olivier on n commission to enquire into the Sugar Industry MRS JEFr STOLLMEYrr Cricketers' Wives M RS .'. | YER and Mrs. Rupert Tangchoon accompanied their husbands over for the cricket tour Tin*;, driver at Sea well with I day .Accompanying oa Gomez v ho has come ( couple o. weeks' holiday. She is *••;.:-.t with Mr. and Mrs. Tom Taylor at Worthing. BY THE WAY. A MONG recent suggestions for making traffic mobile, I choose this: "Why not prevent all private cars from stopping (except at lights)?" I long lo see thousands of cars stopping at **ic lights nearest to their destination. As people arc rot to be allowed to park their cars, they cannot dismount to join the gay throng of pedestrians inside "tubular railings installed along the streets" to prevent them crossing the mad drivers, stopped al the lights, and unable to do anything, and Users are the pedestrians who must not erosat the road. The probability la that by evening the iiedestrians would be scrambling along over the jammed cars, whose arlverr would all be had up for parking. In GouUivrv EnglumVs Hope? S OME may remember the considerable stir made years ago by an English heavyweight bOMTfrfao worked on the theory that, by attacking all the time with '""" "is simultaneously, he would develop the ajpjp need. "Two list';." lie ,i.t. %  ,i. twice as powerful ah one' V • fortunately ha left hiniMlf unguarded, and was alwava knockad out. But it Is possible thai %  lad in training to-day, and working on this unorthodox tin 4 be the English hope He is Hobby G*>atacrs>. and reports say that he uses his two Rai ly to deliver such territte double pufichcs that nobody con stand up to him. Hi. snarling Manners say it ts like being hit by a heavy oak dOOl on each side of the bsssd ; %  %  %  %  is por.Brifllsfi /airploy u-lial pou ore boosfinp about:' Hert ar* rtu-Ti |o pou of canting lack of crcddil hupun IIUM. Can I0 hosfl If it ice i/'flsof being bora Jiin I'rrMia but not Ala ifmula'id at alt? Musf gag be psaf ION allied as BrilMSh men he/ore KSS are of belnp C d 10 plop srcsaic fnr pou? Ol a(Mil(t hnry.il,., j. anu t>V Hy /'< -tn In am/,! / %  Georniann perpie at KofftaJe f7irientt WnX about Picka'iso and his Wot about the Yupfli rslooicJ. fttfballsrsf Seesaw shud not *;i(>urum frounflera like hart. HOD IA ;dank liall man hare broofaeri lofts, yoner nor n-dd. flit is of bring a Iruolp liintranatura/ ksssefa)sie*Renf ho yes. The Filthisran Trio much hurt Emlirr Hmlpitw W ITH the lm l water" recenth u Kent fire brigade fnr putting out hotter-tires. OHMS • new angle o[ HSOUgfal '.. room boys (sometimeknown as Hie boj i'' The ttaJngi tn Work on twe can tell them) arc: (at a rational ration of heerier beer; (b) a whiskier-whisky (not bearded but %  %  •.,-, Beofeh); (c) doughier doughnuts, and more poBtfc politldani Tha saiisatfaraausaaai arai ol pgHBae, the result of Mr WebhkDOwledga of wetter%  l^fti.LAI\EkE Underwear i AHMVAI. MME OONZALES DE MENDOZA don, in the giant headdress ska the cbsplaincy to London Umvmit ich t'jok—31 WhdrMrj. P.^,. .pr.k.ng ste.nl> IO Resilir Rupert (toe* lo %rr ho poof Podgy it ,' %  " on. H enter* the roon *lol ihji hr doetn't noii( hu pal hurriedly dropping a conpaper on the floor. The lift;* Sear tetli of all hu troubles in the long %  ALL main. Iftd a i grin i (.:. over 'if p-twr\ ta. Finally %  ,. .ketch 1 k hinded over, ard Podgy • l* up and rout with laughter. %  Good gractouil My drawtntwasn't meant to b* furiny." ern kupert, but its done you good.' you're look ng much btttef already." gfW 4 IS p.m Mutie rrom (irsr I W m Coi*po*r o* tn* W*h. 11 l> n ateh Masaaln*. SU p.m. Muile H.s> tm~-, ii a \ns %  a •tn a. Il.l.('. Ralii Prttnaar irimn* 1 I a u k r* Aiislr*: I ISO I;.-Tn* t**< On Th*iw tonv.mn of Mu.w. L*lt*r Sfoni AmMifl. • m %  .tin a.n. Ikai* N> From Pimrammr Kararti 1 IISO S.I ii prea Brlsssn ISOS -nooni Tn* !•.. 1110 p r-. Nrv.. It IS p-m Cl-# Dn. SS m He* 1 H*ro.d.. SIS pm. "roramnw Psrsd*. ts pm. Th* !•• IB p.m N*wa AnalyiK. IIS pm Tlw Ionic ol Bid Phillip* and Rl> B*n. T*S pm Gintoily SpMSinB. SSO pm SMui N*wn*l SIS P m Is-M Th* C&m m.w*-llh. B p HI Compoaar ml th* Wa*h. BBB p.m VMpoH From ril*.r. p m Kav Martin and Kla Orettaatra Th. Maw* in to p.m. From Th* Cditoitala. 10 IS p m Thr llarllasa"l'.i.iv 10*' i. in tlrtilns Bi^dy 1m PMtlval <•! II-.lam. II DO o m BBC hntt Or.' EGGS : EGGS : LONDON. Feb Joyful housewives scrambled for cracked and broken eggs when wve-ral cratefvll from a heavilyInden truck in a London suburb. More than 3.000 eggs were scattered In the roadway and "rescued" by the women. Ego"*ilthough not officially rationed. are at a premium in London, with rationbook holders getting one or two a week.—I.N.S. askjbr CussonS TALCUM POWDER CROSSWORD t. The rosle on a DtoKr-i 7. Uoubllul ir I can b* ir:*un., '.7, 10. Tna nuine.*: 13. AD-nJ-oid. i7i 13. Bort ut rtun you may lose, KI IS. You mar settle tor OMI IS. Ill *-..<•:• IT. L 1*. ui-iiammtal leuUier. i&i _'l. VJI'P got aa amma. ana it fnthrr too. til a. Ttna gnng %  a D'.rd. jp*rior lli 3. May ne*t lor ait act of jhllvlop 1. Oin ur nn proKH* aumnhlcis 4. Ctialirngc. 14) B. Tnu i |Hpir r^i |. Mr-.d 10 i.i taasj H Tn* rc-i ara Uf e iudea fetcMng pair. <8> %  Dauali> uacd dn.un Mi II. I'haunmi lion d l*. You rieei n eomedinti loi tna iiMf. I&I 10 Dole loi ti..30. ThlB age la t fifl > U I %  :.. I'LAZA TUeutrr—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310; HT.r. IT NOW HELD OVER TO DAY 4 so a S JO p-m and OODllnoing THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT" Cjlmby TtXTHNICOLOR with h.ri* y TBMFLK~Baer> FTTZO*1tAU>-Um MeCAU-WTBSl SPgClAI. MAT. tsTDsM 1 : RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH A Jutu>nr Mac* bttoWN MI .btanofliani OptuMai RIDING DOVVhl THE TRAIL Ji"imv WAKEI \ 1*1.A/A Theatre— QISTIH [DIAL 8404) i |J)| | a fOM Tt'lA\ s t, BIB I'M 'Paramount Ovibiv SONG OF SURRENDER & SPECIAL AGENT Wanda Henfln* MeDoiiakl Car*> William gytha 0*>rir H**vr> ;<.,-,: I %  >... A HiiKM'n A | s Rku H.di s Plelare MATIN** WEI1NESIIAY AT ^ I'M WtUMSOAV 0. THUHSDAV NIGHT AT I Jame. STEWART a, Jane WVMAN iSla'a -MAOIC TOWN* \u RKO Kadlo nl*r* *o GLOBE THEATRE OPEMIN'G TODAY TO I III ll-HM — S 30 WILL "COUNTING SHEEP" HELP YOU TO SLEEP? If aaWploksness is caused by being 1, oervous, rua-oown an.l — it takes more than sbeep" to help you yon toss and turn, assssranar aoar, roa osa't "orbh" Maar asadtast taajng a tonic psasalarfg as bsnaAoisJ—and helps them rest more easily at night. Aad Dr. Cassae'a Nerve Food ia BBBt choice with thousands! *os Ihe Wssoin Eh, iroo sod other asBSdad asastsraas it coistaios aro aasBastaSkss iuat srhst your ayDfOTaag digasCiOB. So it worry, aruiety, a mn-dosro condition or the strexraons pace of BDodem living is upsetting your nervea so yom can't relas and rest -—try taking Dr. Chase'a Nervo • Pood for a while. The naate "Dr. Chass" ia your aasu r a nc a. II JANETTA DRESS SHOP OVEri NKWsAMS U'7r'H KROAD STRUT EXCLlhlVI i \.iilii\< n Ml T>pe> of Dresses ItAllllNi, BOlTH — uNonn !.( \1\ M \lli OKI SStS In M.leriala by — — UBtRTYS Of LONDON PANTIES PETTICOATS ws 1.26 & 139 wx 138 & 1 44 OS 150 WS 14 wx 200 305 410 OS 202 389 418 CHAIR-BACK CRETONNES 64 C ;T FOR HOTEL and HOME A remarkable 27" value Dial 4606 EV/WS fi WHITFIEUiS Your Shoe Stores Dial 4220 1 MRS. HOUSEWIFE Wa ttftt-r ;i whlc range ol 1 hold EARTHENWARE Medina Shot* Maroon Band & C.<>: ri.ii.'. T1.1 Cnpi & Saun r Plaf. AUo TKA DINN1 DINNER SETS Obtainable from our Hardware Drparlment .1 MWM J4 „ Wv havr juat received a shipmenl of Now Hand Tnnll— %  aaaanaa HAND SAWS— 24"—3" ., COMPASS SAWS—12" & 16" BACK SAWS—14" Slanlev PLANES—Jack. Fore and Jointer. RATCHET BRACES HAND and BREAST DRILLS SAW FILES. PLANE IRONS, SQUARES. I UK IIAIIIIAIIOS 'MPt:ilATIVE OTTO.\ FAt-TOHV LTD. PLANTATIONS LTD.



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TUESDAY, I I Kill Utl I :. ltd BARBADOS ADVOCATE 4th Boys* BdosMayGet Gas Co. Ask Club Ojtena First Theatre More For tTw*igl^*%f d may oon have Its r a %  • M I lll>*\ lirst UlII* Thcalrc When Ihe / I (ill I I 111} ^S \ ..reeled It will lultflllirUf T HE HI, ...Til mils ( || n .'..mi. HI a uVlmk on fri.l.u evening. The boys who have so far joined PAGE FIVE •! I-ittip Theatre. When the .-reeled it will Mil on the second storev. 10 fleet long by 38 feel The Vestrv of St. Michael yesI thin will be used H BpOUlsad a Committee to go into the matter of an increased The site agreed on for the new price for street lighting asked by haverSw ,„d aHta bU ". d n8 "" %  %  on "" WCM sid ihe G C"P"V building The,,... Lodte. parallel .10 the The company Y.W.C.A. Gets £100 Grant The St. Michael Vestry have agreed that the YWC.A will i. a good service to the women if Barbados and ihe Ve*tt i wxti kit £100 on its Estimates to provide a grant for the Association. The vestrv came to this dec! Obiluury: Caribbean PfeSS Should & Howard Smith Be Alert U Aftl new Boys* Club ha Union r .viIxxtge building. It :ompany are asking .11 33-1.3 per em. (or (or open verandah on the from and after February 28. ES.Z &!., rssrsr-s S> pmn also at a good i T. Miehelln. Comd :hc ,vill Polk. 1 %  by the Band coin, i,:. u uiili the of ihe tourist %  ; \ ..., Amlrraam. Mmv ton •" ""• %  fepianade on s rang to listen b classical music. By their appla to have really enjoyed I Captain Raison and his Band, accommodate to reconsider the increased price table tennis with a view to existing condlAdl ^;.' m, restaurant and kitchen. .ions Sln?£5 J* £ l flom "rani-ilx-.. Mm The VeslrTs' committee are SfS '" f^"--; -vhows and lect-ures will be givenh. ernpowered to co-opt nan BOYS' C l.hi l£, K V" Vv tar hn on ,nr sclol,d floor niemben. The view expressed MUnd nnU.S Mt ,s M Simpson. Englnby most members at the meeting Mr HnnJ, ,; r "'.,.. . ccr *rircw lne P ,an '"" I* 1 '' yesterday, was that though an fd t',nS r b "" dto f %  Increase was probably justifiable. M i,^ . c Vi lou8 clubs Mr. H. H Williams, Secretary .he Vestry should be made aware Th^i r !" ; £S f( ""' Y c A • ,olu •* o' the facts relative to this ta>Jtn !" M f I**ted to Advocate yesterday that these crease. rfffi IM'.I £ '.' ,ilacrd bPfore ,he Mr E D MoI*y. MC P. r !" ,f \ lv '" d ' Directors at a meeting said that this was a matter wlucn '— hHUorrow afternoon (or ihe*'in his opinion, should be given opprov.il. v <-rv careful consideration. He the Board agrees, tenders was not opposed to giving the i for the construethe Ga Co. an increase, but the me building. They have Vestrv should be In a position to ;liv.niv Itarbsd a Building and know whether or not the increase Ground Fund and donations will asked (or was justifiable. be gratefully accepted. Again, he did not think it Basket ball fans, who are iiemright for the Gas Co. to give them bcrs of the "Y*\ are taking more a month's notice or.ly, before the A large number of parents and than a keen interest in the game imposed increase was put on children also turned out. T.iu this season. They are preparing He thought thoy should have been crowd was as big us that seen In their own plot of ground at Wakegiven about three months* notice. ( %  fueen'j. Park when the Band give field. During the past few weefci i n his opinion the Vestry should HUM Sunday ConcexbJ then. Hits' could regularly be seen writo the Gas Co. telling them 'pilCLAKOKSKAMiiKit. • '" Hivir forks and shovels that they deprecated the short X the year o> implevelling off this piece of hind, notice they had been given He ton Plantation, SI. Philip. ( ,vei tlio The most of the work Is done would also suggest that they apT. i | ...... am ;,, (lurmi! the evening after business point a small committee to go about 5.30 a.m. on Sunday Nineh urs. Into the matter with the comteen acres of ftrsl crop rlpa and Mr. Williams said that these Pny and report back to the %  i.-Tubers must be congratulated Vestry. Mr. Mottley then rnovrnt crop rip* canes wan burnt 1\ fhtj an not given any financial n motion to the eiTect adding damage is covered r>> u latance, *" al non-members should be The cane* irs U Ut Williams received the (olco-opted. trustees of \tw %  tgtt > i A Camlowing letter from Captain Slokes .. ,, .. ._^ eron. .[ the II M.S. Devoaahire: Motion Seconded Tlutruitaag of ttW estate of A. "Please accept my sincere thanks Mr_ li. A. Weatherhead secLOOtnar loss en beha'f of the Ship's Company nnded the motion and told the H U.S. nevoiuhlre. for your Vestry how he had talked and broke out it B ood work in making our stay "Bued with the Manager of the %  ,..o( a place ashore t^JS S£aT^prad like your Y H C A. adds trethe view that the company s prolv to the enjoyment of posed increase was quite Justifi0f thb kind, and we nre able. grateful to you (or extending Its Mr. A. S. Bryden said that ti? to uj was not at all surprised that the Thank you also for the very company were asking (or an ingreat amount o( trouble you have crease in price, but he though* organising our sporting the Vestrv in a matter of that Bxtum for us. The arrangesort, should deal with it as a ment* have been perfect and I private concern would. That was, hope the problems with which they should have a full mvestiyou have been faced have not galion Into it. i utad you ioo much worry Mr IVM Oo o dard aM Uw vou again." when the Gas Co.. made their Mr Williams told the Advseate first contract with the British that he in turn would like to Union Oil Co. for the price of thank all those who assisted him Natural Gas, the price was based dng these games possible, or the prices ruling at Gulf ports. It would l>e remembered that *-t %  %•• on the arrival of the devaluation Careful Driving of the pound, UM price of un oti and burnt Mvan of first crop ripe AM Dodda Plant ition, si Philip ten and a quarter an. i a fire broke out on Another lire nl Bcntl> i i lion, s;. Piniip on Sai>.i six acres of first crop rip ami | h.,ii acre ripe oanae. They are UM o( A. E. Ski tation and % % %  %  A lire at Joes Rival P burnt six acres • f (list crop i T:iey art Ihl River Limited and |. %  %  Insured *-p*i>WAIi anclo 1 u. The death occurred at his residence. Mapps. St Philip on Saturday of Mr Murret] H Ot Fressi past S Smith r*tin*d planter and popue West InfUea ui the past hft; public SgUff* at the somewhat outstds in.* nuttn "" !" 1TP f*" f'ueaUed channels of Use world; that *\ ,h f Lodge School took to the perhaps, to some degree. Of U'e^lng profession Success cam* rion when they were consider**-* cou.se. use] had not seen any• ••* '••'!* by lesson -f h.wr>. -j L a .-. -. nation being born liefore one's struinentul in establishing Three Mr Goddard said that U.e Aseyss—whether it took lh,form of Hou*M PaCtOr) Limited of whlcl seciation was behind a very de %  ,uunite political federation or he was a Director. As Ma serving cause. It had been brought not—w.-.s a fascinating one and L> he obtained interest in Thick about by some ladies whu hid the more fully and accurately tin | and Mapps. zealously given over their se.-vtce. world was inform. ,i ni whai !, found time to serve to the community and ihe inerKig on, the better (or every one. on the Vestry o( the parish and chants o( Barbados had contrib r t A. L. Gale first extended was hi,;hlv respected l->th as at) uted to the cause. ?*„uI^J W ^T ? c V*?V und ""i' 1,,v,i •'" ll %  > >ubl:c P" n H J&^^JXSSZ ^SSSS^sS r5h8 t gauta year free. The Vestry would bHe told the delegates that if wise to set it off with its right foot 'hey had any time outside the con(orward %  iciuc roOflB, IhO) would see that He hoped they would do such ;' r bados on the whole, was one work that whenever they returnexi o( J nr ,de fi •P ol , !" r a holiday to the Vestry, the Vestry would be only too willing to give them inure help. tl-J I VW^*"-lL U l| l H U ?"£\ %  ^""^'TwVt^rthe'West" Indies T T C <*9 ^21 Mr Smith tlte Y.W.t.A. should be or real ti vim: to push their wares and not was also a member of the Comservice to the whole island It had lhe ptber. He thought that thev mittet ut a grant DM baa) thei U* Intereel o| the was) (i twnad on s.it.i,,(. ( n.leave Mr. Weatherhead supported the ,i,c* as a whole. to mrurn their loss a widow and motion. Any member who had_\ He said that he was one o( the lw o children Mr Lisle Smith and ever served on the Poor La*Bnginal members o( the AssociaMrs Daysh recently elected I Board he said, would know thi %  ion and had seen it grow and also member of the Vestrv of St hrcat help the Association wouh H ad every hope that they would Philip be to the poorly paid *hirt makers .c able to arrive at some work %  %  ,of aha city able solution |\l r l^urfllff <.lurk' Mr. Tudor made a motion that tiiey should start oh* the Vestry Keuier s t o-nprraliun The sad news has been receive. with a grant o( CM "(• was very pleased tO hear Mr. Of the death of Mi Lamenci Mr Mottley agreed that C50 Bloom gay tliat Realen had exClarke of New York. Mr Clark. should be given to the Association, 'ended their co-operation and wno was nnlv *1 was born i. From the personnel h c had seen whatever assistance the. could m s *, u i row M. r bdoa and ado in ahe Association, good work J£Jg *g !" ^jf2 £ 2tT& SSSfidA."* themselves. Mr He would also like them to remember that they could do quite a lot (or the We.-t Iminf,,,,,, th. tourist angle and there in things around hi n li'' .%  .. 1'i.u' of Varlad interests and besides his planting and his activities In parochial affai'i he took oart in racing and i 11 k.' In the years following the World War he owned Ik'delia a favourite on the local turf and Inter h.s colours were earrtad t Trigona who won lhe hear of the close co-operation and *latK e, B WB closer association between' Kesrtar He left the colony 29 years age rasi'n when they could be and .' hr Wt.Indian Press which [. r ,h ." S, u T ^ rf> ^ marrtet wS^ST^nTSSSmS^S would result In a workable soil,Miss Milllcent Mahon daughter o able amount SS^^it^ KSTS — —_-l Mahon of Jubilee Gup %  hoprtl IhlH OUI of llio COO. Hank Hall A dauhler Lor ..o„-a„,.,o e.„,o M TI„ :.',; :;;,,'':';,',,,;i ;;;:',, ',, 1 ;' h 1, '" '"" %  r" '""" %  ""• """' r :„.,, was really ggtag lo ftSX^STsS&lS ud SSL VL ^ k lorlunil. lo • .erve a useful purpose. As II ww bers of ihe V?esl Ind e. her allaln womanhood, marry an. its first year, they would have Mr. Garnet Gordc. raoro expenses to cover, but subt l-' %  T""-'".""' turn; Drive as you would wish to only too well o( the chairmanship of -Sir George and the chairman 'hip of his predecessors. The activities to a George dad referred ,md of which due in Barbados and they shouW h ha <' "nada e I i uggeatad TlmMhy A live n Q good send off and be as very clearly that CD. and W. as > generous as possible. Mr. Tudor withdrew his motio*. M Merlbe money to then than the Y.W.C.A. There was a motion on the same agenda for old women Mr. Hewitt said that he felt ttuV such an Institution was long overday for £50. MIXED CARGO shipment of UM bugs Ol arrived in llarba.i. by the 76-ton leMOOe II' \ .ll-ll'.S llll.l. Guiana. She alw on original body had oulgrown hrought a supply of rice bran. Its habitat firewood, charcoal, wallaba pfilei It was a clear Indication that u "^ wallaba uoats l-r.aii M Vincent, tinMondrr Caught In Ambush of be driven. could be seen that both the British Union Oil Company and th< Barbados Government were bone. Mil!'-' i Grodlund. St ..:. P .-. arc paying strict alienfi nt the hands of the Gas erday sentenced to • month., tion lo the way these lorries are Compailv Furthermore, ns lhe imcrIsonnient >• %  -*** by li IVilice Magistrate Police Court. Farrell was found guilty of stealing a quantity I the prop. lenman ( llindsbury Rood on February 11. On February 11 about 6.30 p.m. Farrell was im he was seen with a coconut In hli hand on Blanman'a land on which were growing trees bearing coconuts Brain WUaon cnasad after him and g:ive him into custody. Before passing sentenre Mr. Talma called on i m—keeper of the criminal record—lo rand thi prevti is eon Waldron who knows lhe defendant said 'hat he has elr.ht previous convi and on the last conviction he was sentenced to six months' imprisonment with hard labour (or stealing galvanise sheets valued at $6. M lh 2 ar s x^ bc ng drlve "? e Commissioner presenl Government had nol ol'# ru I'I "V ,aK1, and they h0p ' "" lowed the Gas Bill lo go through i.rnvement they have noted will be on Inc grounds that the company's kept up. price was too high, it could be This message lo drivers is lav seen that the company were getcluded In the notice;— ting squeezed in the cenlre, as "The 1951 Crop which is they were not permitted to charge starting now should be a record the consumer the Increase put on Vou will have plenty o( them. cane lo take to the Factory and 100% Natural GHS a large number o( bags of sugar Again, i( the Gas Bill was to the Whar(. passed instead o( having lo opWe want lo see a GRF.AT orole 50 per cent gas and 50 per IMPROVEMENT in your driv cent coal gas, they might be able ing this year. Extra Police to use 106 per cent. Natural Gas patroll are being put on the at a reasonable price. highwavs to observe your drivA suggestion came (rom Mr. Ing, and action will be taken Mottley that Sir John Saint and against all persons who drive Mr. C A Coppin might be askwithout due rsgard (or the saleed to serve on the Vestry s Comty o( others using the rood. Rent" r memVcr that lhe extra trip or two you make by the fast driving of a loaded lorry will nol make up for the loss o( life you might cause or (or the fine and iVTli ^ on Char|cs T oss of time you might spend f a 48-yoi.r-old labourer o( Bay in Court." POTATO THIEF GETS ONE MONTH Sentence of one month's pnsonment with hard labour was lhe time was ripe for lhe fede aovvrnment to lake over many of the (unctions now of interest being carried out by ( ll .uul W l( the Press was an Important The Judges of the Assistant part in the life of anything, n had Court of Appeal, Mr G. L. Taylor never been o( more Importance and Mr. J. W. B. Chenery yes than In the life of the We,t Indies terday lined Edgar McClean of to-dav. There was a tremendous Bailey Alley. St. George and challenge to the members of the Jackie bkcete of Redland Ten pre** with the extension of polIII anlry St George 10/. each. The. M cr „, tmT „ ,. could g „ agree,! wilh Police Magistrate Mr wlln lnc gTBnllna o1 universal A W. Harper who had lined Meadu|t ufIrilBP practically through Clean and Skeete when he hau tho „„, and lhv „,,,„. Hoyte of Sweet Bottom, St """" mMm, t George Ir.lrnsperlioil The offence was committed on Thenwas need (or a respoiuiiDecember 21 last year. McClean ble, reliable, well balanced and and Skeete ambushed Hoyte •onscienlious press. If lhe press When he was passing near some, did nol fulfil its functions in the canes in which they were hiding, development of this community. the? lumped out on him and beat many grave errors would be com bun with sticks. Hoyte ran int>/ milled. a house nearby. They were mindful o( hli advice — against Introspection and for tha reason they were most happy U concern themselves, nol only will the dislribution of any Caribbeiu news, but also by funning thi' agency to interest themselves Ir world news. They were most happy to be Cut Counsellor brought of nrewood while lhe j arrived front. Martinique fresh fruit ni i COUGH LOZENGES '* %  .'.',:;;-,',',* s.'.'.vs.'.::'.','s.'S,'.~ r vsssssss.:'.'SSS If VOI-Hh ALWAYS ox nut in ^ a Ynu'll m-fil f'.nir I thi tlnn REVITONE TONIC KIR Hl.sroKIVI. VITALITY CAC c TOSI; A VITAMIN AND MINERAL HMU) SUPPLEMENT FOR CIIILIIREN AND AID I I s KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES. ,::%:•,*,;',*.'**,>,*.:'*'.'.'.•,'.'**.•.'.*+*.'*. TOOTAL LINENS THE TALK OF THE TOWN! 36 ins. wide NIL AQUA ECRU x FLESH | LEMON | WHITE POWDER $3.41 yd. TOOTAL L'INEN .BrJnJcJ U SI 11/fD forfeited rr yards during the daj en he readies Trinidad. Mm Itobcri Thorn Llmilrd One of the outolaoding piece. are UW aianU of tl ,IslandMde of road construction he has doro The ship sailed for H Son Pvtro and Curaei irbade the be' which riolrhui and C -,2 of the r f ins between Phllanden. New Jersey A Dutch seaman on the tourist liner Nleuw Amsterdam saw a representative of the Advoratn admiring the ship's swimming po<>l on Sunday and asked: "Do you hove swimming pools In Barbados encouraged by, and feel mat ihc\ too could work in %  .%  ... i .,'e.n willHe seemed very surprised when "** representative here They he got the reply "Barbados has (. %  %  ** "" that they were deter swimming pools, but the majority mined to do a good job, not of homes have fresh water baths. 1 only by those around that table, The seaman said that ho but by the press generally through thought Barbadians relied on lhe out the area. tea for bathing and expressed He thanked Sir f'.eorneven moTe surprise when he was kind wishes and looked (orwair told thai Barbados has one o( tho to proceeding with their work with best water .supplies In the world, every satisfaction. Itch Germs Killed in 7 Minutes ANIMATED OPINIONS tibit. it-hina cmWoar. nii< kii'ail-. I'lmjiln. root llih •n4 nth* 1 bl-mlih-a OrtlMfr lfMH"'Hli|l'""> %  •mptrarr riur_•>*• >?• %  %  •'' %  ' MAKE THESE FOODS YOUR BEST BUY MK 11. II \M SLICED BACON EDAM tin i -i iMi'ini: mra CHAM I MH BODBUl %  COFFEE MAXHll.I. HOI SK COFFEE — HWC*FI A norf aiaorlminl ..I .11. Fkta ol Cmara Fllltd Bbrulla FREE \ PaataM at I \KI MIX will be ftvaa lo ever> customer nenlANSI .-IIAUIMS i:t>i IP>II:M Enquiriea cordially invited for the supply of the following— 42 H.H.I*. 6 rrl. III! SI I \\ III I I TRAITORS (So-.l Ulii-.lalso a. .il .1.1. for % %  lounhiiiiO l.ll ASS I III IIS .'. A till >l Wl Hi: SI'lll AIHIIS sun mi IVI ill nihi.s I lll MILLS I I Kill l/IVI. I S %  •aria H iarj5" ''' J "" 1 %  out II. li ltd nlh*r I.T-j.-.'..rv ITI. |-V*V'. I III i: HOOK which makes COD'S WAY OF SALVATION PLAIN Please write for one w Samuel RoberU, Oospel Bcok and Tract Hervtec, SO, Central Avrnae. Bangar N. InhuseV' Says Mr. I.rn King: -YOU CAN RK-LION IT BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT:" Toffee MADE IN U.K. The Perfection oi Confection WAUtRS %  PALM' TOfFEE LTD. PALM' WOW* LONDON. WJ 7^ # & st\ni:iiso.\ riii.Msiiix. %  \IHII.S A new rung? "I bi-auliful ulylcs has iirrivt'd— 30" wide—per yd. 4R" wid..—per yd. 13.7.! S3.I-': K 13 iUU; $2.0; $1.9a sr.2.1 CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.. LTD. 10. 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET



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I'M.I Sl\ I! Vltll MM1S ADVOCATE %  i | I'd MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS -HUT NCV -C'S MtbTAKEM w oom a ma POO THI TBLKV6OI *7T—MB MA6 l*J6COS*tO*LL. TH' KMOB6 CM THOOMJOHTSVIM* TO GIT A RCTUIS CH TK U0OCC-WMICH MG TVtUK* 6AW 6CSEHN >' HEADACHE? P—Ma yaur dMMM far ra*tal with D*MMiM nai You ara douWy aura of r*lwf whan ,OJ Uko Alka-Saltiar fof youi UidttU, bocauM Alka-S*lur coMaina u analgaaie •• paint. and aa alkali in agant to oflaat axcai* gaatric acidity, ao often aitoriated with haadachaa. Hava a %  '(>ply bandy ahraya. fTMIEIR goon" looki tell yon thr-,'r> just right. You know, too, MM yon !< A ;it \ht price tug, that vou can't pet finer value. 1. I i* a Full Brogue Oxford. Tied to ev. the John White Guarantee 9 which mean" *jtut rifkl't Look for it in leading store in Karbadon. made by JOHN WHITE STOPPING THE TIDE True oll >a>ing. "\OU MM ha :idc," however MOd your intention. WE tlnd that h H we would like to keep our prices itaMMt, BM Ml increases In price" of our raw materials I m IN KM, % %  I nn .sull .. 38c. No. 3 bay Kum lUB %  HlRhirsr.ide Mentholated I MM N I crada hfi nthotatod Me IOe He I to Cologne 3 oz. In spite of the i products are still best value On aale at all good store*. means made just right y HEALTH BENEFITS I• CONTAINS VITAMIN A & D IN A DELICIOUS FORM • INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS • ENSURES STRONG LIMBS AND SOUNO TEETH IN CHILDREN Haliborange The nice* way of taking HALIBUT LIVER OIL a, Itii II ILLII I H1RBURVS LID., LONDON MAKE Vul'H SELECTIONS FROM Ttr. Cn,MUil PlMbta : i i Mail SJU*B** a Rnlli i %  :. %  %  i k I .i i in soi.p Bota>, A-ni(,Bir( Soup Ok'%  Tomato Soup and whola) Pica* MUncmanra faUaa mm & SAMPSON LTD. llradQUatten for Beat Rum. You cant sec the difference.,.! Her old nightdress looks new —because it's always washed in LUX to keep ["'ciiy doth** looking like new ... wash them regularly in Lux. For i HII in rtatnij iMngi. Inpi colours bright, Ray, MI* hohuif I Try. acif and see how much longer your dainty Jollies last. Keeps all. dainty clothes like NEW f&t # big car features at small car cost* m his superb Morris has every feature you expect lo find in the larger, more costly can, Fnfjne of 27 horse power. Within-ihe-whcelbase sealing for four. Independent front wheel mincmion. Controlled ventilation. Lockheed hydraulic brakes. Over7cubaJ feet of luggage acconiinoil.itii>n. |MMi 10 >lecr through traffic. Less costly to operate ;irkl niaimain. Tucl consumption 55-40 miles per gallon. The work!, biggest small car buy! MORRIS Mmor SALOON and IIIWI R I I B I. E mrr Ihrm nt FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Pbone 2385 Sole Distributor, Phone 4504 i AIR FREIGHT SERVICES lo and from Regular Services Save Time From B'IIOH to BEBM1 DA UBBON KIMMiN Flying Timp li! 15 it 45 2S 00 hn IliabU WMfcb t Z 2 Kilo Rates St M %  \Uo t'Min Uni Sfn.-i. lo the uhole World. ITS'FASTER Bl I \!,'II) SPEED-BIRD. Book ttttrmoh your local .irditii; .4,0*111 Who mokes no charge for advirr. i-if^rr-iotlon or bookings by ."peed bird" fa all six conlintufs. FLY-BO AC "-"-. %  !> -'*^ IBfiL* • MMl/B~aSlM A BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED BoJfton



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Chinese Should Negotiate Now —SAYS ATTLEB LONDON. Feb. 12 (^LEMENT ATTLEE, Prime Minister, told the House of Commons this afternoon that in the British view the "38th parallel ought not to be cross ed again until there has been full consultation with the United Nations, and in particular those states which have provided forces." Speaking after Anthony Eden in a one-day Foreign Affairs debate, Attlee said the position in Korea was much more stable and there were possi bilities for negotiation. Brazil Appoint* Montero As Chief Of Armed Forces HIO Do JANEIRO, Feb. 12 General Pedro Aurio Montcm was to-day appointed Chief of ihe Combined General Staff <-! Brazilian armoured forces. A veteran soldier nnd politician General Montero has twice occupled the War Ministry and wai Senator in the last legislature. It was reliably disclosed to-day that during a meeting held yesterday between President Vargas nnd the Ministers of war, navy. air and foreign affairs, it was decided that the Brazilian delegation to the Inter American Conference to be held in Washington next March will uphold the principle that It is essential for Amcri can defence that Brazil be In a state of military preparedness, and that it Is incumbent on the United States u help her obtain this objective, through economical and military assistance. —Reuler. in 111 roil wm.viwivi Trinidad May Got Paper Industry • From Otit Own Corr*pi>ndeiH> I.ONDON. Feb. 12. The Colonial Development Coriteration are studying the possibilities of establishing a paper manufacturing Industry in the British West Indies — patsibly Trinidad The industry wouid be a subsidiary to sugar, utlli) l %  ugusse unit producing fin* quality pa pent and wrapping pape Newsprint production would not IK 1 undertaken. Financial experts nf the Corporation have been flosely studying the economic* of MU'II a scheme for several months, paying particular attention to availability of supply, bearing in mind the need for alternative sources of fuel for the sugar industry. When they have rent the Corporation will decide whether or not to go aheod w the project. "Naturallv we are interested doing whatever we can to allevlam tic present paper shortage.' C.D.C spokesman said today. Referring to the possibilities of t) %  '.-heir.in %  letter to the Manchester Guardian today. Mr. F. W Winterbotham. a C 1) C Pres. Officer. points out that In aildit lo the raw materials for the actual manufacture of fibre-board and paper from bagasse, large quantl ties of fuel and water are needed to maintain an economic operation of the plant. And In the ca of bagasse, an alternative cheap • On page 3 Imrie Named Head Of Local Govt. IN TfilNIDAD LONDON. Feb 12 Sir John Imr e. C.B.E.. r been appointed Commissioner the iocal Government in Trinidad He was held to be In charge of a ncwiv formed local Government Department in Trinidad— the Ministry of Health and loc; Government In 1MB Sir John visited Tnr. dad as one of two members of a Commission which reported on the nnaaeW relationships between the municipalities and the Central Government Since 1926 he has been City Chamberlain of Edinburgh. He is 59. he Chi. nose he added now. WOUid be t ti r.ru tunt Opening ueh.it. Depot, conservative— O Kitl -Leader Edei said "as look %  nroble ns of West Eue. Gen If" MMSM a dominthem He said that anm the Commons last week German rearmament by I'S Parliamentary Under Secret.it> Euiest Davies had created %  "me uncertainty abroad as well at home, as lo what Government's policy was. Eden said "we have signed the Atlantic Pad and we have to build i defence of the West to make reality. He asked it Goveinment still adhered to the Brussels decision to authorise the inclusion of German armed contingents In the Atlantic Pact forces Parallel with this there was the question of talks with Russia in which Germany wouid certainly be the am theme. Eden said they ought to try to draw up an agenda for a meeting h the Soviets which was wider than Germany alone. Soviet satellite forces wenMtV tinuing to grow in strength while notes of protest were being hurled [1 the West for relatively modest defensive preparations in Germany. Russia had in Eastern Germany. forces overwhelmingly lunarte §0 the West and not content with that Russia had taken the initiative in German rearmament. Rumania nnd Hungary had Ineased their forces beyond peace treaty limits. In any four power discussions the West should fathai armaments of ex-enemy satellites be reduced. Eden thought that the Increased threat these forces eonM.' | iYugoslavia was subject (or consultation between Britain, France, the United Slates and the Commonwealth powers. If the West was not prepared to allow Yugoslavia to be made a victim of aggression then it should express itself clearly on this topic soon, as %  contribution to peace. Duly Is To Hold On Turning to 'he Far East Eden said the duly nf the United Nations was to hold on until the aggressors* were willing to negotiite on the baall which took account of international obligations. Formosa wr an issue which must fonn pan of the general settlement in the Far Eaat, This was part of the question of the treaty with JajHUI I'. i.ii' of such n treaty must be agreed by 'he Allies who fuiiRht against Japan from the beginning Attlee said there was no break in the continuity of Co %  policy-support 'or the United Nations and acceptance of obligations of membership. Attlee nud thai Korea was a direct challenge to Ihe United Nation*. He was cheered as "it is really no good making lit tlr legal points abr.ul this matter" He said Britain had had greai experience in Asiatic affairs "without condoning In the action of Chinese in Korea We understood some of their reasons, however misguided they might appear, "equally an stood and sympathised with our the United states" Attlee said Britain had no doubt that China had conm. gression but considered there should be no question of applying eancticns until It that there was no further hope o' aehiavtnf apeaceful settlement "To-day the position In Korea if much more stable".-he said. "There is a good position there for negotiation and 1 think the Chln' be wise to negotiate —Healer THE TRINIDAD Cnckot Team which arrived here ye.trday to contest honour with the local boys. Laft to right: Clarence Skoote. Lennox Butler. Prior Jones, Ralph Legal). Jeffrey Stollmrvei (Capt I. Simpson Oulllen. Brunei) Jonss ('Trinidad Ouardlun' Sports Writer), Harold Burnett (Manager). Sydney Jackbir Squatting in front are: Wilfred Ferguson. Ohicky Sampstti. Myron Asgarali. Andy Oaiite.ium, Rupert Tang Choon, (The Mascot, Brunei! Jones' son), and Frank King. Avalanches Bury Villages GENEVA, Feb. 12 Fresh avalanche* thundering loose from mountain-sides engulf. ed two Swisvillages today, buried dozens of people, flattened homes end stopped e: press trains. Snow rolling down the local death valley" at Atrolo, near St Oottjard lias, killed six people including two women and two children. Rescuers gave up hope of finding several other people. Troops were called in lo evacuate • whole valley. An avalanche, according to survivors, burst "like a thunder-clap" r the village. Tetror-etrickan people jumped from beds and fled before the white tidal wave as it obliterated houses and stables and ii.illy came to a halt near the illagc church. A second village was completely entombed by an enormous fall of snow which left only the church o showing. Ten of sixteen people buried were rescued hut there w:is little hope for the others. n avalanche came down with x pee ted violence and wrecked places which had % %  ft despite .gathering snows. norlh-bound express train From Kalian Switzerland found Kg blocked by masses of snow. lie unhurt. During the night railway traffic between Switzerland and Italy was cut. Gangr of wotkers cleared Ike way for the Home—Amsterdam train but further gUdea stopped the Genoa—Zurich night cxprc^ at Ambri. In Grisons, avalanches tore up lcctric posts and telephone comriMitiieiitions la*t night and people bed lo evacuate part of a village Another avalanche plunged one village without causing casualties. The Swiss meteorological office later announced that the avalanetH danger north of the st Cot hard Pass was "critical." —Renter France Restricts | ited Chief Call Foreign Diplomats For 2Z^? PARI?-,. Fi'b. 12. FRANCE TO-DAY ordetrd restrictions on Uw movemenu of Rumanian, Albanian, nd Bulgarian diplomat* in Paris. This was reprisal lor similar restrictions placed on the movement of Ihe French Embassy staft in tn< three countries. Rumanian, Albanian, and Bulgarian ministers in Paris were summoned to the French Forelcn Ministry I and informed that their movements in France would henceforth bo restricted. The restrictions, which apply to all members of the three legations %  are tighter for Rumanians and 'Albanian* than for Bulgarians lid not place such sti ru on French diplomats as 1ho other two Governments Rumanian and Bulgarian diplomat, may not go more than 5u mil, fiom Paris'without pern slot. They may not visit Pi nU nil ureas, near Vei .idle. w fa sK* there are Allied military establish men f o\ TIII: • SPOT MANILA. P I Feb. Molasses—thick, brown syrupy product obtained from sugar cone—will be sold on a commercial scale soon. The product, heretofore used primarily as horse feed, Is being purchased hv Ban Fernando housewives by the gallons A gallon of molasses sells at M cents. Reports from the Central Lumn town stale lh.it blackstraps and molgssea are selling fait 01 'iingnirilelog claiming thai molatsc i!, • c-iinfoi ti 'i> bioii pleasure, anemia, coostlpation, insomnia and asthma. Experiments are reported underway at Ihe Peajpsnga Sugar Development Uibomtories in San Fernando toremove the hurni-sugar taste in molasses to make it more palatable. The new "wonder food'' will be bottled, a spokesman for the cempany said, ami %  •tupped to all part.-; of tin Philippine. A pint will cost around ZS tents IMS. B.O.A.C. Increase Passenger Rates (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON. Feb. 12. THE B.O.A.C. have to-day announced furtl of increases on their dollar earninfi non-stop flights between NJW York and Nassau. — Q M thousand and one reveT nue paasengei rade ItVcord For B.G. Exiled Euro/teans Sign Anti-Red Pact PHILADELPHIA. Feb. II The exiled people of ten "Iron curtain" nations have signed here an anti-Communist "di I f lilx-r:ition" for central and eastern European peoples. Many of them wept as they signed the declaration. The signatories pledged themselves to these principles. A return to the spirit of the Atlantic Charter and Ihe assurance liy the free world that it intends to apply that Charter to "captive" countries Elimination of deportation by Russians of free peoples, the reestablishment of full democracy In the iron curtain countries and the right i*f peoples to freedom of rement and good-, and the choice between private and public enterprises. The elimination of all iron curtains, measures for raising standards of living, restoration to farmers of the right to dispose then lands privately or co-< %  eg fit, and protection of workeis against exploitation." —Renter. LONDONTreb 12. riritish C.uiuna's aggregate extefna] trade in 1&49 was a record. The annual report for the coliished :-i Ixtndon to-day (Tuesday) by H M Stationery Office shows that the tlguie was £20-210.440 which was four times greater than that of 1938. It also exceeded the previous best of 1948 bv C2.505.584. A substantially greater quantiFlights are 00. igar was exported 173.818 lv with GO water Boeing Strsto, tons valued at £4.375,000. %  Jan lK>th directions during January — ent over rlOui highest of 813 Cargo figures reached a new heighr. To deal with this improved business. Ua B.O.A.C. have just added another round trip lo the present schedule of I week *n> inelly begun in N %  creased to three early In January. Jackson Welcomed In Antigua I IBM • %  > ><•! %  (.ftlltun^Dl ANTiGUA. Kcl) 12 A large crowd was present jl St. John's Court H'm o'clock this morning when His Honour Mr. Justice D. E Jack. Chief Justice of the Windward %  nd I-eev.anl l^liinds. f | on ofllcial welcome as a tribute to the honour conferred on him by His Majesty the King In ing his appointment to the 'llghtfl judicial post In these islands. Mr. Juatiec Manning m BOB gralulating the new Chief Jus'.lce. said he could testify of the grca esteem the Brother Judges of the Bar and the public held for him The acting Attorney the Honourable R. H Loehart spoke of ii brilliant and %  Di Mr. Jackson bad from the day of his first appouitme.it :-. the Colonial Service in llrltish Guiana on the 18th of April, 1931. to the present time a i.d referrec particularly lo the great word hi had done in reducing the arreart of legal work which had acct ulated In these Islands. Crown Attorney Cecil Kel-ict reftarrt 1 to the clarity aa 1 %  .•. rightness of the appron-h *itl which His Honour had conducted c ti • Oa page I. If a member of these legalions Ishes to travel outside this 50iile limit, he must apujv for tf permit 4H hours before his Jour, declaring bis destination, ins of travel and route. The %  restriction 11 'I an ilipl'iin; The Hi b real rreeli lo |i bers of his Ic travel pern )rurne>. are the same 1 week ago on in Peru. Minister may mce but memit apply for its 4: hours before The Vfeat Oettnaa communist my is preparing a fresh all-out mpaign against Weal Germar '-armament, and for all-German unity. In a speech published in a C< munlst newspaper to-day. West German Communist lender Ma: Reimann emphasised the need for .1 review %  if Communist party tactics "in view of the inerensinglv dangerous political si1ii.il ton in West Germany The speech was made in Dusseldorf on February 9, mid was t< prepare discussion of a fresh Intensified campaign against West German re-armament and for allGerman Unity, The new party tactics to be adopted are to be decided upon at the party's annual congress in Munich from March 2 to 4. "The party's moat important t*k l> to turn lh p—*W. attttud* of many We*t Germans into ncli moss resistance against re-armament "Reimann told a closed par ty executive meeting in his speech "The second Important task is to achieve new activity for unity. rallying together all non party and i>bovc all social oamocraUc oppo i ic mlUtarintion. it is most decisive to make all friend* of pence Join our camp whatever v affiliations may be. Reimann strongly criticised par ty officials in general for failing to traiti jroung party members a* MW cadres for all levels of party leaderehlp —a>uter. Allies Nearing 38th Parallel By JULIAN BATES TOKYO, Feb 12. JVJ0RE than 5,000 Chinese and North Koreans to day rammed back the centre of the United Nations offensive, surrounded advanced elements and threatened to break through the key town of Wonju Shattering hopes of the United Nations general advance up to the 38th praiJ*l, about six Communist diviitions punched solidly at the South Kawwn force advancing up the mountainous part c. i,he peninsula Soutl reellns back to the town of lloengstong d to band fistrt place as Communist crossed |n on Knen reatttanc i HuTaj • wtere the nulled beek i u the Han Wt i i !o the oinh beak under •evert pressure Mnny Conunun i Oi in thsudden bMM lei the M-ntie On the east coast. Soutli | moved miles north of Ihe 'IKih Pamllel throufh hr.il> United Nations .in and ,'iiiliti v botnbi I forced 8 miles HI hSo line between %  I %  Hi %  Vi %  wag tiit In allied hands m ond night tight mi: began but de% %  %  %  area aajtlnat rapldh m^untm/ Chinese lelnforeements. An Kichth Army communion* to MI lil reported one South K n regiment stuveunded ih of Hoengsong. The comHlQlM '.Hi' tli.it nl Ii heeding UW .iii.uk on iioengsor.g p jf Co-.nmi ni'.iaren ovlng southeast in %  Big 4 Talks Planned For March In Paris MEW YORK. Feb 12 The United States. Britain and Frame will offei to hold a meeting of "Big Four" Foreign Minis ters deputies in Peril I March. New York Times diplomatic correspondent James Reston writing from Washing! n to-da>. He suiri this had b.-en agree on in a *cne i>f exchanges union representatives from Washington Paris and r^widnn in the flays. Kesi-.ii added thai weeding el the AJlled repl] b Moscow had not yet beei on but a note weg •xfMKted I" bi sent to Moscow m the middle oi the week. The tliree weeti agreed on Ihe meetiiiK in 1'an lo discuss a broad range oil prob lems but they had not b to agree on whether some of th %  < topics should be lute I In then replies to Moscow. Illttain ind IiI n|>U* ere willing to noUf] that they were pre) the Uepulie, met-t in Puns, If they could work out an for Rig Four Foreign meeting on all European lems that have been causing ten %  ion Re&ton said. The United States favoured Usl jng o> -f ihe topn, m .< not to the 'itwao.ai.. so thai Huvlu flelegat^^ would come with tji knowledge that the Western Nutlotia wanted to disco things besides rearming westerr Cermany. Krutrr Dockers Witt Return To Work Until Trial Starts LONDON, Feb. 12 Kiht thouaand dnek i.tnkerl.i London lo day voted b vorfc unui seven of then olleagues appe.ii nurt next week d i'uig mi illegal strike, i iCeoiTiiiieiiilation of the r..ri Workers' Defence committee which does not havi ui | ing, they decided to resume work to-morrow. Ow %  •-'.! MlaM Is N ftll western dockg of Liverpool. Blri aasaaad tad Manrhegh i peeted to follow the l>mdon men. The dockers gave their unanimous approval to the programme an b) Ihi Port workara 1 Committee This tailed for Ihe lesuiTiptinn of Work 10 HIOIJIPW until Tuesday, next nwk when the seven appear in court. On that day. the strike liegins again About 1,400 strikers had gone hack, before the meeting, attended hv over 2.000, was held Official figures Issued by the Dock-Labour Board as the men vug showed that in Lun don. 7.190 men were on strike and •8 ships ktl Ol gnd Blrkenheud had 9.200 men put gnd 71 ships idle, white in Manchester %  were striking with IS sin) idle Mat,. other ships w*ii undermanned. In M 1 ports where the original atrUH M ., .i pufcl rrn-eling later to-day to lei Keuter. Persia's Shah Weds Again TEHERAN. Feb 12 The welding of Shah Monantrned Ii".. P.ihh-v. of Pel-in t.i Borara Bakluniarim Uiok place at the Royal Palace here to-day In ICO with Moslem rules which included the religious wedding ceremony, and the signing 0: the marriage contract. "Lucky" snow UaaskeeM tht Persian capital for the wedding It kept many people indoors, bu. who decorated their win dows with flags, tlowera and car pels said it was a happy omen. while l>elng a lucky colour. The Shan's witnesses at th< wedding were Prime Mid All Mi/mara. and Sayed Hassan at ol ike Penlai Senate and former Persian ambas norinr to I>iii t a Dior of Paris, as she j i at the maible R yal Pal £ ace to become Empress or Persia • She was escorted by the Shah's g %  ksterg Princess Chams and Jh-incess Asraf In a golden painted Rolls Royre Two Moslem priests panted the S Moslem wedding symbol. — the o .i miiror and candle*!Id 1 In front of the royal couple, bel ;Soraya agreed to the marriage. 9 The bride g room then put_the ring on hor finger. Frnncv, Italy Start Talks' SANTA MARCIHF.RITA Feb IS. hilnin and French Pi. r Piireign Ministeni ..pencl then three-day eonferenee heie iw tun ith what Informed sources deeibed aa "very general of view". French l':emier Ren< Pleven and Forela,, MlnisiQi Robert Schumai. and llL^:. p aler Alclde lie Qaapeti an.I I'oi tgn Minister Count Carlo Itforia met with their top Foreign Onice ctllciala in the salon of the IUKU. rlous seafiont hotel "Miranda" at 4pm to-day R>ul<. i.'ivnld it wns ton tarty to tell H tbe Communist stroke was the tginnmg of a gen. oral offensive The United Nation, line in the central aectoi deep pii Into Communm pnetUoni %  nd Chinese or Korth I was relatively little action to-dM on the west and east flankof ihe line across Ihe Pel —Iteuter. Will S|HIHI lOOm FraiHs On Tanks BauMflK, fi Bwttxerland u lo spend 400.000.000 francs over the next t to equip its army with lie,,.. tanks, the Swiss Federal Council id to*daa Thl In a message to Parllanh 1 Ml I francs I plan Heuter. TIXL Tilt ADVOCATE Tilt NEWS KING 3113 DAY Oil NKillT *•,;',*.:%',::',•.',• .;',;;::'.• %  ''•• Caribbean Press Should Be Alert K. W. V. TABLE WINES FOR WEDDINGS THERE ARE NO WINES BETTER THAN K. W. V. WHITE TABEF WINES — iRoltlrd by the K W. V.) these are rich In natural aromi and fruity arlds and are of distinctive Havour Ttwj thould he servrd chilled or otl Ihe Ice during MraU. to which lhe\ are plr^alng companions. %  K W. f RIEHLINO QAM DRV WIHIi: ISrlected) X K W V SAIVICNON BEANT RED TVBEE WINI>i (Bottled by the K \\ V ) These should he aeffved at room temperature — They are or the hlghr*! qualll> .inrt their plruiiiK aromi and flavour make them i-idi -1 hi. companion* at Mral* .l.iri.ii: which Meat is servrd. %  W V CAPE DRV RED lKull-tdiedi i.e IIK.I NFIV K W V CAPE DRV RED I ., l,s 1...,(,, .1 Ic. CI.ARCr K W V CAB4TKNET SACVK1NON — A Mr. C. E. Hitchins. President of Trinidad f.uardian. Hoo"ble the Caribbeen Pre.. Av..lation. the K^SSSC^S *V George Seel Tells Press Delegate* ggjj;* *t-M West Indies, welcoming delegates of the Caribbean Press Aasocia who are genuinely Rtiiving to pr. (hi 1 erterday and exmote the well being of their fellow Garnet Gordon, Editor" nf tending to them the freedom or West Indians. Valre of B| LueJj Mr E Hastings House, said It is ImperaPurpose of the meeting is to Rawlins. Editor of' the Gulan. tive that the people of the Caribconsider plans for the formatne C.rapaJc. Mr T E Sealey Aisobean Area snould be served by an of a West Indies Prcs* Agencv dats FVIitor of the Jamaica alert, we)) informed nd objective Delegates attending are: Mr I, C Gleaner. Preas. KM. Editor of the We*t Also oresent were Mr E L Thd Press, he said, ihould bo IneUaa. Grenada. Mr. F Seal Coon. Cozier, lion „f the well equipped to expound th* Editor of the Argeey, British GuiAi oeletlon. Mr G C I ..I and social ana. Mr (; E Wlilock Editor of Latin Ajnefiean Idanaatr for cc tiends, and fearless both to detect I he Dally tiara a d rie British Realera' Limited. Mr G H. Hunte. those who seek t> Guiana. Mr r A I. Gab trfyocanf'miintiinictitMin use these trends for persona) a''Fditor of the Barbados Advocate and Mr Phil),, H< the major Hi vsneements. and to support those Mr. C E. Hitchins, Editor of Public Relations Advxcr to the e> On ease 3 popular Red ii.troduied Sir George Seel and then extended a welcome to the various delegate* He said that the* hm! met to consider Ihe rune itlve news agency' U ti %  Carlbl ean and as Sir George 'was One • %  t of the ol UM HI Itith he knew that they for sympathy. WEDDING BELLS will sound their Sweet Chime* f,.r Maat] ( ouales : The entertainment of Guests at a Wedding Cell can be less COM ee none of the sparkle of Champagne ll ougne and more of that most delleleaa SAI'TERNITyee Uinr K. W. V. WEMMERSHOEK




|

I

ESTABLISHED 1895

Hav bados

cn a et







Chinese

Should

Negotiate Now

—SAYS

(CLEMENT ATTLEE,

ATTLEK

LONDON, Feb. 12.
Prime Minister, told the

House of Commons this afternoon that in the
British view the “38th parallel ought not to be cross-

ed
the

ain until there has been full consultation with
nited Nations, and in particular those states

which have provided forces.’’

Speaking after Anthony Eden in a one-day
Foreign Affairs debate, Attlee said the position in
Korea was much more stable and there were possi-

bilities for negotiation.



Brazil Appoints
Montero As Chief
Of Armed Forces

RIO De JANEIRO, Feb. 12
General Pedro Aurio Montero
was to-day appointed Chief of
the Combined General Staff of
Brazilian armoured forces. A
veteran soldier and_ politician
General Montero has twice occu-
pied the War Ministry and was

Senator in the last Legislature.
It was reliably disclosed to-day
that during a meeting held yes-
terday between President Vargas
and the Ministers of war, navy,
air and foreign affairs, it was de-
cided that the Brazilian delega-
tion to the Inter American Con-
ference to be held in Washington
next. March will uphold the prin-
ciple that it is essential for Ameri-

can defence that Brazil be
in a state of military pre-
paredness, and that it is in-

cumbent on the United States to
help her obtain this objective,
through economical and military
assistance. —Reuter.

Trinidad May Get
Paper Industry

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 12.
The Colonial Development Cor-
poration are studying the possibi-



nS A

jities of establishing a paper
manufacturing industry in the
Brit West Indies — possibly

Trinidad. The industry wouid be
a subsidiary to sugar, utilising
bagasse_and pEneaane fine quality
papers ~ an wrapping paper,
Newsprint production would not
be undertaken. Financial experts
ot the Corporation have been
closely studying the economics of
such a scheme for several montns,
paying ahaa moa attention to the
availability of supply, bearing in
mind the meed for alternative
sources of fuel for the sugay

industry.
When. they have\reporied back,
the Corporation will decide

whether or not to go ahead with
the project.

“Naturally we are interested in
doing whatever we can to alleviate
the present paper shortage.” a
C.D.C- spokesman said today.

Referring to the possibilities of
the scheme in a letter to the Man-
chester Guardian today, Mr. F. W.
Winterbotham, a C.D.C. Press
Officer, points out that in addition
to the raw materials for the actual
manufacture of fibre-board and
paper from bagasse, large quanti-
ties of fuel and water are needed
to maintain an economic opera-
tion of the plant. And in the case
of bagasse, an alternative cheap

@ On page 3.



Imrie Named Head

Of Local Govt.
IN TRINIDAD

From our own Correspondent
ONDON, Feb. 12.

Sir John Imrie, C.B.E., has
been appointed Commissioner of
the local Government in Trinidad

He was held to be in charge
of a newly formed local Govern-
ment Department in Trinidad—
the Ministry of Health and local
Government, -

In 1949 Sir John visited Trini-
dad as one of two members of a
Commission which reported on the;
financial relationships between the
municipalities and the Central
Government.

Since 1926 he has been
Chamberlain of Edinburgh,

He is 59.

City

The Chinese he added would be
wise to negotiate now. Opening
the debate Deputy Conservative—
Opposition-Leader Eden said “as
we look at problems of West Eu-
rope, Germany remains a domin-
ant theme”. He said that an-
swers in the Commons last week
on German rearmament _ by
Bevin’s Parliamentary Under Sec-
retary Ernest Davies had created
some uncertainty abroad as well
as at home, as to what Govern-
ment’s policy was.

Eden said “we have signed the

Atlantic Pact and we have to build | —————"__——__—-——-———

up a defence of the West to make
it a reality. He asked if Govern-~
ment still adhered to the Brussels
decision to authorise the inclusion
of German armed contingents in
the Atlantic Pact forces Paral-
lel with this there was the ques-
tion of talks with Russia in which
Germany would certainly be the
main theme.

Eden said they ought to try to
draw up an agenda for a meeting
with the Soviets which was wider
than Germany alone.

Soviet satellite forces were con-
tinuing to grow in strength while
notes of protest were being hurled
at the West for relatively modest
defensive preparations in Ger-
many.

Russia had in Eastern Germany,
forces overwhelmingly superior to
the West and not content with
that Russia had taken the initia-
tive in German rearmament.

Rumania and Hungary had in-
creased their forces beyond peace
treaty limits. In any four power
discussions the West should re-
quire that armaments of ex-enemy
satellites be reduced.

Eden thought that the increased
threat these forces constituted to
Yugoslavia was subject for con-
sultation between Britain, France,
the United States and the Com-
monwealth powers. If the West
was not prepared to allow Yugo-
slavia to be made a victim of
aggression then it should express
itself clearly on this topic soon, as
a contribution to peace.

‘Duty Is To Hold On

Turning to the Far East Eden
said the duty of the United Nations
was to hold on until the aggressor
were willing to negotiate on the
basis which took account of inter-
national obligations. Formosa was
an issue which must form part of
the general settlement in the Far
East. This was part of the question
of the treaty with Japan. Terms of
such a treaty must be agreed by
the Allies who fought against
Japan from the beginning. -

Attlee said there was no break
in the continuity of Government
policy-support for the United Na-
tions and acceptance of obligations
of membership. Attlee said tha4
Korea was a direct challenge to
the United Nations.

He was cheered as he added
“it is really no good making lit-
tle legal points about this matter”.
He said Britain had had great
experience in Asiatic affairs
“without condoning in any way
the action of Chinese in Korea
We understood some of their
reasons, however misguided they
might appear. “equally we under-
stood and sympathised with our
friends in the United States.”

Attlee said Britain had no doubt
that China had committed ag-
gression but considered there
should be no question of applying
sanctions until it was made clear
that there was no further hope o!
achieving a peaceful settlement

“To-day the position in Korea
lis much more stable”’,-he said.
“There is a good position there for
negotiation and I think the Chin-
ese might be wise to negotiate.

—-Feuter.



B.O.A.C.

Increase

Passenger Rates

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 12.

THE B.O.A.C. have to-day announced further details
of increases on their dollar earning non-stop flights between

New York and Nassau.

Trade Record
For B.G.

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, Feb. 12.
British Guiana’s aggregate ex-
ternal trade in 1949 was a record,
The annual report for the col-
ony published in London to-day
(Tuesday) by

rama seeeerenenrinreneenretincteret, One fhousand snd ‘ €
| nue passengers were carried in

H.M.. Stationery |

one reve-

both directions during January—
an increase of 23.1 per cent over
the previous highest of 813 in
December Cargo figures also
reached a new height,

To deal with this improved
business, the B.O.A.C. have
just added another round trip to
the present schedule of three per

i a ane





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

HERE

Wathys,,..



13, 1951





THE TRINIDAD Cricket Team which arrived here yesterday to contest honours with the local boys.

Left to right: Clarence Skeete, Lennox Butler, Prior Jones, Ralph Legall, Jeffrey Stollmeyer (Capt.), Simpson Guillen, Brunell Jones (‘Trin-
idad ‘Guardian’ Sports Writer), Harold Burnett (Manager), Sydney Jackbir.
Squatting in front are: Wilfred Ferguson, Chicky Sampath, Nyron Asgarali, Andy Ganteaume, Rupert Tang Choon, (The Mascot, Brunell

France Restricts \RedChietCalls

Jones’ son), and Frank King.

Avalanches
Bury Villages

GENEVA,. Feb. 12
Fresh avalanches’ thundering
loose from mountain-sides engulf-
ed two Swiss villages today, buried
dozens of people, flattened homes
and stopped express trains.

Snow rolling down the local
“death valley” at Airolo, near St.
Gothard Vass, killed six people
including two women and two
children, Rescuers gave up hope
of finding several other people.
Troops were called in to evacuate
ihe whole valley.

An avalanche, according to sur-
vivors, burst “like a thunder-clap”
over the village. Terror-stricken
people jumped from beds and fled
before the white tidal wave as it
obliterated houses and stables and
finally came to a halt near the
village church.

A second village was completely
entombed by an enormous fall of
snow which left only the church
spire showing. Ten of sixteen
people buried were rescued “but
there was little hope for the
others,

An avalanche came down with
unexpected violence and wrecked
places which had been considered
safe despite .gathering snows.

A north-bound express train
from Halian Switzerland found its}
way blocked by masses of snow,
bul passengers were unhurt. Dur-
ing the night railway traffic be—
tween Switzerland and Italy was
cut.

Gangs of workers cleared the
way for the Rome—Amsterdam;
train but further slides stopped
the Genca—Zurich night express
at Ambri.

In Grisons, avalanches tore up
electric posts and telephone com-
munications last night and people
tad-to evacuate part of a village
Another avalanche plunged one
village without causing casualties.

The Swiss meteorological office
later announced that the ava-
lanche danger north of the St.
Gothard Pass was “critical.”

—Reuter.



Exiled Europeans
Sign Anti-Red Pact

PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 12.
The exiled people of ten “iron

o’clock this
Honour Mr. Justice D.
son, Chief Justice of the Windward
and Leeward Islands, was given

Foreign Diplomats,



PARIS, Feb. 12.

4

FRANCE TO-DAY ordered restrictions on the move-
ments of Rumanian, Albanian, and Bulgarian diplomats in
Paris. This was reprisal for similar restrictions placed on
the movement of the French Embassy staff in the three

countries.

Rumanian, Albanian, and Bulgarian ministers in Paris
were summoned to the French Foreign Ministry to-day
and informed that their movements in France would hence-

forth be restricted.

$$.

ON THE
° SPOT

MANILA, P.I., Feb.

Molasses—thick, brown
syrupy product obtained
from sugar cane—will be
sold on a commercial scale
soon.

The product, heretofore
used primarily as horse feed,
is being purchased by San
Fernando housewives by the
gallons. A gallon of mo-
lasses sells at 38 cents.

Reports from the Central
Luzon town state that black-
straps and molasses are sell-
ing fast as a result of maga-
zine articles claiming that
molasses is a cure for high
blood pressure, anemia, con-
stipation, insomnia and
asthma.

Experiments are reported
underway at the Pampanga
Sugar Development labora-
tories in San Fernando to-
remove the burnt-sugar
taste in molasses to make it
more palatable.

The new “wonder food”
will be bottled, a spokesman
for the company said, and
shipped to all parts of the
Philippines. A pint will cost
around 25 cents.

LN.S,





Jackson Welcomed

e
In Antigua
From our own Correspondent
ANTIGUA, Feb. 12
A large crowd was present at
St. John’s Court House at 10
morning when His
E. Jack-

curtain” nations have signed here|2n Official welcome as a tribute

an anti-Communist “declaration

cf liberation” for central and ener

ern European peoples.

Many of them wept as they
signed the declaration. The signa-
tories pledged themselves to these
principles.

A return to the spirit of the
Atlantic Charter and the assurance
by the free world that it intends
to apply that Charter to “captive”
countries.

Elimination of deportation by
Russians of free peoples, the re-
establishment of full democracy
in the iron curtain countries and
the right of peoples to freedom of
movement and goods and the
choice between private and public
enterprises.

The elimination of all iron cur-
tains; measures for raising stand-
ards of living, restoration to farm-
ers of the right to dispose their
lands privately or co-operatively

as they see fit, and protection off

workers against ex/loitation.”
—Reuter.

Sir George Seel, Comptroller for
Development and Welfare in the
West Indies, welcoming delegates
of the Caribbean Press Associa-
tion Meeting yesterday and ex-
tending to them the freedom of
Hastings House, said it is impera-
tive that the people of the Carib-
bean Area should be served by an

week. Their services were orig~-jalert, well informed snd objective

Office shows that the figure was | inally begun in November on the} press,

£20,210,440 which was four times
greater than that of 1938

It also exceeded the
best of 1948 by £2,505.584.

A substantially greater quanti-
ty of sugar was exported 173,818
tons valued at £4,375,000

| creased to three early in Janu-

previous |

two a week basis, but were in-

ary.

| Fi



s are operated excl
R ;

Asivé
60 iter Bocing Strato.



| That Press, he said, should be
;well equipped to expound the
‘economic, political and social
| eres and fearless both to detect
and to expose those who seek to
juse these trends for personal ad

vancement and to support those

to the honour conferred on him by
His Majesty the King in confirm-
ing his appointment to the highest

judicial post in these islands,

Mr. Justice Manning in con-
gratulating the new Chief Justice,
said he could testify of the greai
esteem the Brother Judges of the
Bar and the public hela for him.

The acting Attorney - General,
the Honourable R. H. Lochart,
spoke of a brilliant and wide legal
experience Mr. Jackson had from
the day of his first appointment
to the Colonial Service in British
Guiana on the 18th of April, 1931,
to the present time and referrec
particularly to the great work he
had done in reducing the arrears
of legal work which had accum-
ulated in these islands,

Crown Attorney Cecil Kelsich
referred to the elarity and forth
rightness of the approach with
which His Honour had conducted

@ On page 3.



The restrictions, which apply to
all members of the three legations
{are tighter for Rumanians and
{Albanians than for Bulgarians as
| Bulgaria did not place such strict
restrictions on French diplomats
as the other two Governments.

Rumanian and Bulgarian diplo-
mats may not gp more than 50
miles from Paris*without permis-
siol.. They may not visit Fontaine.
blesu* and areas near Versailles
what there are Allied military
establishments,

If a member of these legations
wishes to travel outside this 50+

mile limit, he must apply for a!

permit 48 hours before his jour-
ney, declaring his destination,
means of travel and route.

These restrictions are the same
as those imposed a week ago on
Hungarian diplomats in Paris.

The Bulgarian Minister may
travel freely in France but mem-
bers of his legation must apply for
travel permits 48 hours before a

journey.
—Reuter.



Dockers Will |

Return To Work

Until Trial Starts

LONDON, Feb. 12
Right thousand dock strikers in
London to-day voted to resume
work until seven of their arrested
colleagues appear at a magistrate’s
court next week charged with in |
citing an illegal strike,

On the recommendation of the
Port Workers’ Defence Committee
which does not have union back-
ing, they decided to resume work
to-morrow.

Over 9,000 strikers in North
western docks of Liverpool, Bir-
kenhead and Manchester were ex-
pected to follow the London men

The dockers gave their unani-
mous approval to the programme
drawn up by the Port Workers’
Committee. This called for the
resumption of work to-morrow
until Tuesday, next week when|
the seven appear in court. On
that day, the strike begins again

About 1,400 strikers had gone
back, before the meeting, attend-
ed by over 2,000, was held.



Official figures issued by the
Dock+Labour Board as the men
were meeting showed that in Lon~
don, 7,190 men were on strike and
65 ships idle. Liverpool and Bir-
kenhead had 9,200 men out and
71 ships idle, while in Manchester
2,110 men were striking with 15

ships idle. Many other ships
were undermanned, In Mersey
ports where the original strike

began over a dispute, men were
meeting later to-day to decide their
action, ‘

—Reuter.

Sir George Seel Tells Press Delegates

who are genuinely striving to pro
mote the well being of their fellow
West Indians.

Purpose of the meeting is to
consider plans for the formation
of a West Indies Press Agency
Delegates attending are; Mr. L. C
Stevenson, Editor of the West
Indian, Grenada, Mr. F. Seal Coon,
Editor of the Argosy, British Gui-
ana, Mr. G. E. Willeck Editor of
the Daily Chronicle British
Guiana, Mr. C A. L. Gale
Fditor of the Barbados Advocate,

Mr. ¢€ E. Hitchins, Editor of

the TriMidad Guardian, Hon'ble

Garnet Gordon, Editor of the
Voice of St. Lucia, Mr. E. G
Rawlins, Editor of the Guiana

Graphic, Mr. T. E. Sealey, Asso-
ciate Editor of the Jamaica
Gleaner,

Also present were Mr. E. L
Cozier, Honorary Secretary of the
Association, Mr. G. C. Bloom,

Latin American Manager _ for

Reuters’ Limited, Mr. G. H. Hunte

Assistant Editor of the Advocate

and Mr. Philip Hewitt-Myrir

Public Relations Adviser to the
‘

*

b

’ 2 4

9



For New Drive

FRANKFURT, Feb. 12
The West German Communist



IVE CENTS

_ Allies Nearing

38th Parallel

By JULIAN BATES.

TOKYO, Feb. 12.

MORE than 5,000 Chinese and North Koreans
to-day rammed back the centre of the United

Nations offensive, surro
and threatened to break
Wonju.

Shattering hopes
general
Commi

vance up to the 38th Pa
, divisions punched solidly at the South

unded advanced elements
through the key town of

of the United Nations
railel, about six

Karean force advancing up the mountainous part

i ‘uhe peninsula.

Big 4 Talks
Planned For
March In Paris

NEW YORK, Feb. 12.

The United States, Britain and,
France will offer to hold a meet-
ing of “Big Four” Foreign Minis
ters deputies in Paris early in
Mareh, New York Times diplo-
matic correspondent James Res-
ton writing from Washington saic
to-day.

He said this had been agreec
on in a series of exchanges amons
fepresentatives from Washington
Paris and London in the past feu
Gays. Reston addeq that the fine

Party is preparing a fresh all-out] wording of the Allied reply te

campaign against West

German] Moscow had not yet been agreec

re~armament, and for all-German]on but a note was expected to be

unity.

sent to Moscow in the middle oj

In a speech published in a Com] the week,

munist newspaper to-day, West
German Communist leader Max

The three western nations hac

Reimann emphasised the need for}4&reed on the meeting in Paris

a review of Communist party tac-

to discuss a broad range of prob

tics “in view of the increasingly |J¢ms but they had not been able

dangerous __ political
West Germany.”

The speech was made in Dussel-
dorf on February 9, and was tc
prepare discussion of a fresh in-
tensified campaign against Wes!
German re-armament and for all-
German Unity,

situation in

The new party tactics to be
adopted are to be decided upon
at the party’s annual congress in
Munich from March 2 to 4.

“The party’s most important
task is to turn the passive attitude
of many West Germans into active
mass resistance against re-arma~
ment “Reimann told q closed par-
ty executive meeting in his speech.

“The second important task is to
achieve new activity for unity,
rallying together all non party and
above all social democratic oppo
nents of re-militarisation, It is
most decisive to make all friends
of peace join our camp whatever
their party affiliations may be.

Reimann strongly criticised par-
ty officials in general for failing
to train young party members as
new cadres for all levels of party
leadership. —Reuter.

Persia’s Shah
Weds Again

TEHERAN, Feb. 12

The wedding of Shah Monam-
med Reza Pahlev, of Persia to
Soraya Bakhmiarim took place at
the Royal Palace here to—day in
accordance with Moslem rules
which included the religious wed-
ding ceremony, and the signing 6
the marriage contract.



“Lucky” snow blanketed — the
Persian capital for the wedding
It kept many people indoors, bu)
Persians who decorated their win-

|} dows with flags, flowers and car-

pets said it was a happy omen,
white being a lucky colour.

The Shah’s witnesses at the
wedding were Prime Minister Haj,
Ali Razmara, and Sayed Hassan
Zadeh, President of the Persian
Senate and former Persian ambas
sador to London,

The bride is the daughter of a
German woman, and a member
of the Bakhtiari tribe of Southern
Persia,

The bride wore a pearl em-
broidered wedding gown of silver
lace, and white tulle designed by
Christian Dior of Paris, as she
arrived at the marble Royal Pal-
ace to become Empress of Persia,
She was escorted by the Shah's
sisters Princess Chams and Prin-
cess Asraf in a golden. painted
Rolls Royce.

Two Moslem priests placed the
Mosiem wedding symbol, — the
Koran, a mirror and candlesticks-
in front of the royal couple, before
Soraya agreed to the marriage.
The bridegroom then put the ring
on her finger. —Reuter.

Caribbean Press Should Be Alert











to agree on whether some of those
topics should be listed in their
replies to Moscow

Britain and France apparently
were willing to notify Moseow
that they were prepared to Mave
the Deputies meet in Paris
if they could work out an
for Big Four Foreign
meeting on all European
lems that have been causing ten
sion Reston said,

The Unite States favoured list
ing Fi vf the tenice a note
Oo the Maussi at Soviet

hae aniline ore ORE
knowledge that the Western Na-
tions wanted to discuss other
fhings besides rearming western
Germany. —Reuter,







France, Italy
Start Talks

SANTA MARGHERITA
? Feb, 12,

Italian and French Premiers anc
Foreign Ministers opened thet
three-day conference here to-day
with what informed sources des-
cribed as “very general exchanges
of view”, French Premier Reni
Pleven and Foreign, Minister
Robert Schuman and Italian Pre-}
mier Alcide De Gasperi and For-
eign Minister Count Carlo Sforza
met with their top Foreign Office
efficials in the salon of the luxu-
rious seafront hotel “Miranda” at
4 p.m to-day.

South Koreans were sent reel-
ing back to the town of Hoengstong
where hand to hand fighting took
place as Communist crossed in on
three sides.

Enemy resistance stiffened sud-
derly to-day in the western sector
where the United Nations forces
pulled back across the Han River
to the south bank under severe
pressure, Many Communists in
Seoul area were known to have
“side slipped” to take part in the
sudden blow in the centre.

On the east coast, South Koreans
moved 4 miles porth of the 38th

Parallel, Attacking at midnight
through heavy United Nations
air and artillery bombardment,

Communists had by this afternoon
forced 6 miles in the line between
Hoengsong and Chipyong about 19
miles to the West Hoengsong
was still in allied hands as the Sec-
ond night fighting began but de-
fenders were hard pressed.

United Nations troops also held
Chipyong and the surrounding
area against rapidly mounting
Chinese reinforcements,

An Eighth Army communique
to-night reported one South
Korean regiment surrounded
North of Hoengsong. The com-
munique said that at least two

Communist divisions were spear-
heading the attack on Hoengsong
Pilots said a large group of Com-
munists were moving southeast in
the battle zone

Army sources said it wag too
Gariy to tell if the Communist
stroke was the beginning of a gen.
eral offensive, The United Nations
line in the central sector made
deep pit into Communist positions

and Chinese or North Koreans
out the there.

was relatively little action to-day

on the west and east flanks of the

line across the Peninsula,
—Reuter,

Franes On Tanks

BERNE, Feb. 12.
Switzerland is to spend 400,000,-
000 frances over the next five years
to equip its army with heavy
tanks, the Swiss Federal Council
announced to-day. This was. said
in a message to Parliament giving
details of its 1,460,000,000 francs
five-year defence plan.
—Reuter.
ee

TELL THE ADVOCATE ~
THE NEWS
RING 3113
DAY OR NIGHT





—Reuter.

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‘ FOR WEDDINGS

THERE ARE NO WINES BETTER THAN

K. W. V.

WHITE TABLE WINES — (

are of distinctive flavour

companions,

SPSS SOSPOOOSS SS SISO FOP

are of the highest quality

flavour make them indispensable companions at Meals
during which Meat is served,

K. W. V. CAPE DRY RED (Full-bodied) ic. BURGUNDY

K. W. V. CAPE DRY RED (

K. W. V. CABERNET SAUVIGNON — A very popular Red

These are rich in natural aroma and fruity acids and

or off the Ice during Meals, to which they are pleasing

K. W. V. RIESLING CAPE DRY WHITE (Selected)
K. W. V. SAUVIGNON BLANC

RED TABLE WINES, — (Bottled by the K

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Bottled by the K. W. V.)

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and their pleasing aroma and

Light-bodied) ie, CLARET

Comptroller for Development and & Wine &
Welfare 4 < x
Mr. C. E. Hitchins, President of % %
the Caribbean Press Association, x 2
introduced Sir George Seel ands & WEDDIN( BELLS 8
then extended a welcome to the'¢ %
various delegates. He said that % 2
they had met to consider the func- & will sound their Swect Chimes for Many Couples ! ! %
tion of a co-operative news agency Is °
in the Caribbean and as Sir George |X The entertainment of Guests at a Wedding Celebration x
was one of the architects of the | & can be less costly and at the same time lose none of the %
proposed federation of the Betlieh |S sparkle of Champagne if you serve less Champagne and more
Caribbean, he knew that they | % of that most delicious SAUTERNE Type Wine %
could count on him for sympathy, x 3S
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*

Communication % K. W. V. WEMMERSHOEK Ss

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PAGE TWO





Caub Calling

IS EXCELLENCY the Gov-
ernor opened the Barbados
Arts and Crafts Exhibition at
Queen's Park yesterday afternoon.
Lady Savage was also present for
the ming. They were accom-
panied by the Governor’s A.D.C.
Maj. Dennis Vaughan.

Arriving To-morrow
XPECTED to arrive to-morrow
are Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred
Mr. Woodhouse is
Building Development Adviser to
C.D. and W. They have been in
England on long leave.
e ’Plane
NTRANSIT for Antigua yes-
terday by B.W.I.A. from
Trinidad were Mr. Rex Stollmeyer,
Trade Commissioner in Canada
for the B.W.I. and Brig. Eric
Mount, representative of Colonial
Development Corporation with
headquarters in Trinidad.
Travelling on the same plane
for Jamaica was Lt. Gen. Sir Otto
Lund, Commissioner in Chief of
the St. John’s Ambulance Brigade.
Venezuelan Surgeon
R. and Mrs, Alejandro Vera-
Diaz arrived from Venezue-
la Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.1.A. Here for two weeks,
they are staying at Cacrabank. Dr.
Vera-Diaz is a surgeon at the hos-
pital in Cristobal.

Short Holiday
RS. CHARLES BAEZA and
her youngest son Rodney
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. ‘to spend
ten days’ holiday in Barbados,

For Press Conference
R. T. E. SEALY, Associate
Editor of the Jamaica Glean-
er arrived from Jamaica yester-
day morning by B.W.I.A. for the
meeting of the Caribbean Press
Association at present being held
at “Hastings House.”
Mr. Sealy is staying at “Super
Mare” Guest House, Worthing.

Auto Dealer

. and MRS. D. F. PROUD-

FOOT arrived from *Canada
on Saturday by T.C.A. to spend a
month with Mr. and Mrs
Somers at “The Camp”, St. Law-
rence.

Mr Proudfoot is an auto dealer

in Kitchener, Ontario.



MR. RONALD TREE

Back Again
R. AND MRS. Ronald Tree
and their daughter Penelope
arrived by air on Sunday afternoon
to spend six weeks at their Bar-
bados home “Heron Beach,”’ St,
James.

A Delightful Spot
MONG the tourists arriving
here on one of the tourist
boats from New York were Mr.
d Mrs. S. M. Hall, Mr. and
rs. John Griffith of California
and Mr. D. S, Norton and his
ister Mrs. N. Hasbrouck of Long
Istana, They were all paying
their first visit to the island and
were favourably impressed by it.
Mr. Hall who is a retired busi-
nessman said that Barbados seem-
ed to be a delightful spot and
fiought it was a wonderful place
for a sail boat.
Both Mr. Griffith and Mr, Nor-
ton are in the Real Estate busi-
ness.



MR. JOHN MACGREGOR, Field
Commissioner of the Boy Scouts’
Association, in Quebec arrived yes-
terday by B.W.LA. on a short visit.

Boy Scout Field

Commissioner

M* JOHN MACGREGOR,
Field Commissioner of the
Boys Scouts’ Association in the
Province of Quebec, Canada ar-
rived from Trinidad by B.W.I.A.
yesterday morning. His visit is
under the auspices of the Boy
Scouts’ Imperial Headquarters in
London. He is here to conduct
training courses and help the local
association wherever he can.

Mr. MacGregor is staying at’the
Hastings Hotel. He has just at-
tended the Caribbean Scout Com-
missioners’ Conference in Trini-
dad. He has already visited Jamai-
ca, Grand Cayman Island, St.
Kitts, Antigua and Trinidad. He
leaves Barbados February 17th to
continue his tour of the Eastern
Caribbean and B.G.

The Commissioner visited the
Leeward District yesterday after-
noon in company with Mr. L. T.
Gay. He stopped at three cen-

G epher, OÂ¥S
School, where he was met by Mr,
L. B. Waithe, and Mr. ¢. “D.
Cuffley.

He will speak to Scout and
Rover Leaders on Friday evening
at Scout Headquarters,

Week-end Arrival
RRIVING from Trinidad on
Sunday by B.W.I.A. to
Spend about three weeks’ holiday
in Barbados was Mr, Peter Know-
les. He is staying with his mother
at “Midget”, Palm Beach, Hastings.
Mr. Knowles is Manager of
Cannings Groceries in P o in t
Fortin.

Here for a Week
R. NORMAN PITT, Presi-
dent of Canadian Refractor-
ies Ltd., in Montreal accompanied
by his wife arrived here over the
week-end to spend a short holi-
day in Barbados. They are stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel, They
expect to be here for one week.
President
R. A. G. FRANCIS, President
of the newly formed Trini-
dad and Tobago Cricket Associa-
tion arrived here yesterday with
the Trinidad cricket team, He is
staying at Indramer Guest House,
Worthing.

BY THE WAY....

MONG recent suggestions for
making traffic mobile, I
choose this: “Why not prevent
all private cars from stopping (ex-
cept at lights)?”
long to see thousands of cars
stopping at ‘the lights nearest to
their destination, As people are
not to be allowed to park their
cars, they cannot dismount to join
the gay throng of pedestrians in-
side “tubular railings installed
along the streets” to prevent them
crossing the road. So there are the
drivers, stopped at the lights, and
unable to do anything, and there
are the pedestrians who must not
erass the road. The probability is
that by evening the pedestrians
would be scrambling along over
the jammed cars, whose drivers
would all be had up for parking,

Is Goatacre
England’s Hope?

OME may remember the con-
‘siderable stir made years

ago. by an English heavyweight
boxer who worked on the theory
that, by attacking all the time with
both fists simultaneously, he would

develop the aggressive spirit we
need. ‘Two fists,” he said, “are
twice as powerful as one.” Un-
fortunately he left himself un-
guarded, and was always knocked
out. But it is possible that a lad
in training to-day, and working
on this unorthodox theory, may
be the English hope. He is Bobby
Ghatacre, and reports say that
he uses his two fists simultaneous-
ly to deliver such terrific’ double
pufches that nobody can stand up
to him. His sparring partners say
it is like being hit by a heavy oak
door on each side of the head at
the same time. Goatacre is to
fight the Belgian Rieux next week
at the East Norwood Brickworks.
Angry Persians

SAY, sir! Where pleeze, ho yes,

is yore Brittish fairplay what

you are boosting about? Here are
riters to you of carsting lack of
creddit hupon hus. Can we holp
it if we was of being born hin Per-
sia but not hin Hingland at all?
Must we be gnationalised as Brit-
tish men before we are of being
romitted to play seesaw for you?
ot about Wargener sang by





Coming Shortly

M* S. B. LUKE, head of the
West Indian Department of
the Colonial Office, has arrived in

Trinidad from Jamaica by
B.W.I.A. for a ten-day stay.

He is a guest at Government
House,
Mr. Luke has come to the West

indies to make a comprehensive
tour to last three months. He has
already visiteq British Honduras:
and Jamaica where he held talks

with the Government, and me‘
the people with the view of
familiarising himself with the
existing conditions.

On leaving Trinidad he will first
come here before visiting the
Leeward and Windward Islands

and then British Guiana.

He last visited the West Indies
in 1934, a

Among the Passengers

HE Holland-America Line

flagship Nieuw Amsterdam
arrived here on Sunday morning
from New York via San Juan on
her 18-day cruise through the
West Indies and South America
with 796 passengers,

Prominent passengers on board
included: Mr. Homer P. Hargrove
Chairman of the Board of the
Chicago Stock Exchange and Mrs.
Hargrove, the former film actress;
Colleen Moore, Mr. Eugenie Baird
popular singer of radio, stage and
television, Mr. Aaron Rabinowitz,
Chairman of. the Board of the
Fred F. French Co., leading New

York realtors and Mrs. Rabino-
Witz, Mr. John fF. Ferguson,
President of the Ferguson Pro-

veller Co., Hoboken, New Jersey
and Mrs. Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs.
Sumner Ford, socially prominent
residents of New York City and
Mr. Abraham Carnow, Treasurer
of the Bulova Watch Company
Wew York and Mrs, Carnow. Mr.
Samuel Cottler, Executive of
Paramount Pictures and Mrs.
Cottler from Baltimore, Maryland
US.A.

K.L.M. Station Manager
R, AND MRS. Peter Nieu-
wenhuys arrived from Vene-

zuela via Trinidad yesterday morn-

ing by B.W.1.A. to spend ten
days here, staying at the Marine

Hotel. Mr. Nieuwenhuys is Sta-

tion Manager of K.L.M. Air-

ways at Maiquetia.

In Antigua

R, D> SEMPLE, father of Mr.

G. G. Semple Engineer of
the Antigua Sugar Factory is in
Antigua on q short visit, Mr.
Semple Snr., is associated with
the firm of Mirlees Watson &
Company of Glasgow. He was in
the West Indies twenty-one years
ago when he sat with the late
Lord Olivier on ag commission to
enquire into the Sugar Industry.





MRS. “JEPF” STOLLMEYER

Cricketers’ Wives
RS. JEFF STOLLMEYER and

Mrs. Rupert Tangchoon
companied their husbands over
for the cricket tour, The; arrived
at Seawell with the team yester-
day. Accompanying them was
Miss Zenna Gomez v/ho has come
over for a couple 0. weeks’ holi-
day. She is sta;ing with Mr. and
Mrs, Tom Taylor at Worthing.

ac-

By Beachcomber

Geormann peeple at Kovink Gar-
dens? Wot about Pickahso and his
poctures? Wot about the Yugger-
slavick futballers? Seesaw shud
not know sum frountiers like hart.
Hon the plank hall men hare
broothers wite, yaller nor redd. Hit
is of being a trooly hintranatural
bit _hov hintertanement ho yes.
The Filthistan Trio much hurt.

Endier Endpiece

ITH the invention of “wetter

water” recently tsed by a
Kent fire brigade for putting out
hotter-fires, comes a new angle of
thought for the science of back-
room boys (sometimes known
nowadays the “wandering
boys”).

The things to work on (we can
tell them) are: (a) a rational ra-
tion of beerier beer; (b) a whis-
kier-whisky (not bearded but
older—i.e., a Scottier Scotch); (c)
doughier doughnuts, and more po-
litic politicians.

The sausagier-sausage was, of
course, the result of Mr. Webb's
advance knowledge of wetter-
water.

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the chaplaincy to London University Catholics. aie



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While Mrs. Pig is speaking-sternly
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poor Podgy is getting on. He
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doesn’t notice his pal hurriedly
ceooping.. a comic paper on the
floor, he

Rosal

the

nd a sly grin steals over
her's face. Finally the sketeh
book is handed over, and Podgy
sits up and roars with laughter.
* Good gracious! My drawing wasn't
meant to be funny,’” cries Rupert,
little bear tells of all ‘but it's done you good; you're
his troubles in the long search for looking much better already."
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED





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stent ats a eer ener aerate

‘3

B.B.C. Radio Programme

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1951
638 am.—12.15 p.m.—i9.76 m,

6.30 am, Forces Favourites, 7.00 a.m.
The News, 7.10 a.m, News Analysis, 7.15
a.m. From the Editorial, 7.25 a.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 7.30 am. Generally
Speaking, 7.45 a.m. Think On These
Things, 8.00 a.m. Souvenirs of Musie,

8.45 a.m, Letter From America, 9.00 a.m.
The News, 9.10 a.m. Home News From
Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m
Programme Parade, 11.30 a.m. Listeners
Choice, 11.45 a.m, Report From Britain,
12.00 (noon) The News, 12.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 12.15 p.m, Close Down,
4.15—6.00 p.m.—25,53 m.





4.15 p.m. Music From Grand Hotel, 5,09
p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m
Welsh Magazine, 5.45 p.m, Music Masa-
zine.
6.00—7.15 p.m. — 31.52 m, & 48.48 m.

6.00 p.m, New Records, 6.45 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News.
7.10 p.m, News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. The
Musie of Sid Phillips and His Band.
7.45—11.00 p.m. — 31,32 m, & 48.43 m.

7.45 p.m. Generally Speaking, 8.00 p.m.
Radio Newsree}, 8.15 p.m. Meet The Com-
monwealth, 8.45 p.m, Composer of the
Week, 9.00 p.m. Report From Britain.
9.15 p.m. Ray Martin and His Orchestra,
10.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. From
The Editorials, 10.15 p.m. The Heritage
of Britain, 10.45 p.m, Getting Ready for
the Festival of Britain, 11.00 p.m, BBC
Northern Orchestra.





EGGS! EGGS!
LONDON, Feb.,

Joyful housewives scrambled
for cracked and broken eggs when
several crates fell from a heavily- j
laden truck in a London suburb.

More than 3,000 eggs were scat-
tered in the roadway and “res-
cued” by the women. Eggs,
although not officially rationed,
are at a premium in London, with
rationbook holders getting one or
two a week.—ILN.S.



CROSSWORD



Agross
The male on a broken drain

(8
Doubtful if 1 can be friendly
<7) 10. The highest leat.
Abandoned. (7)

Sort of fish you may tose.

(7

(4)
(6)
{In which Iris plays her part. (2

You may settle for dismal.
Ornamental feather. (5)
You've got an anima!
father too. (5)

This gang is a bird. (3)
Sort of basket where fish

and
credit. (5)
. The time of other areas

see
SS FSees6 xp

ge

to
*

(3)
Down
Male fruit provides a legal com

mand trom a superior (7)
May nest for an act of oblivion
(7)

Gin or net provides sumething
towards atmosphere. (8)
. Challenge. (4)
This is poptar (5)
Mend about two 6)
. The Tree are inciuded
fetching pair. (3)
. Usualiy used during ele
(4) 11. Phantom fion dc ‘
You need a comedian for mora

in tt

c Poof « we

luns







ing use. (5)
16, Dole for the watercvurse (4)
17. Stoney greeting to a friend’ (4
20. This age is an optical tilusion
(3)
Solution of vesterday's purzie — Acros»
1, Sombre; 6. A 9 vel, 10. Ni
AMuent: 12 Vac 14. Entire. 16





17, Tread: 2 e; 21 Omit

Jown



94, Ascend; 25
2, Officious:
Flect; Anna

15, Rain
oD



Mut



ti 8
Ante: 18 Road

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13,

1951



TALCUM
POWDER



PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DiAL 2310) ||

SEE IT NOW! HELD OVER...
TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m, and Continuing

“THE STORY OF SEABISCUIT”

Color by TECHNICOLOR
with Shirley TEMPLE—Berry FITZGERALD—Lon MeCALLISTER

SPECIAL MAT. THURS.

RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH
Johnny Mack BROWN









1.30 p.m, (Monogram Double)

& RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL
Jimmy WAKELY







LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY 5 & 830 P.M. (Paramount Double)

| PLAZA Theatre=OISTIN (DIAL 8404)

|
|

SONG OF SURRENDER & SPECIAL AGENT

Wanda Hendrix — MeDonald Carey William Eythe — George Reeves

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY —‘5 & 8.30 p.m. (Paramount Double)
RED HOT AND BLUE ©=©& ~_— THIS GUN FOR HIRE
Betty Hutton with Allan LADD
Midnite Sat, 17th—CODE OF THE SADDLE” & “RIDERS OF THE DAWN”
= eee lll —E

GAIETY—cHe GARDEN) ST. JAMES

















LAST SHOW TONITE — 8.30 (Warners. Double)

JUNE BRIDE & BULLET SCARS
Bette DAVIS Regis TOOMEY
WED. “(only “8.30 “pam. ( Monograrn) (only) 8.30 p.m. (Monogram)

“AND SO THEY WERE

}) THURS,
em Leo Goreey and Bowery Boys in

Robert MITCHUM and — “ be

“DON'T GAMBLE WITH BROS OF NEW Tees and
STRANGERS” DARK ALIBI” with

Kane Richmond — Gloria Warren Sidney TOLER as Charlie Chan





AQUATIC CLUE CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT AT 8,30

CHILD OF DIVORCE
Starring — Sharyn MOFFET :o0; Regis TOOMEY :o:
An RKO Radio Picture

MATINEE : WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
James STEWART :0: Jane WYMAN
in Robert Ruskin’s “MAGIC TOWN”

An RKO Radio Picture

Madge MEREDITH





i
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”
SAW FILES, PLANE IRONS, SQUARES.



GLOBE THEATRE

OPENING TODAY TO THURSDAY — 5 & 8.30

PAN: TN YoY Tao

..is the drama behind the




shadow of one
woman's shame!
.. terror!
Chm hay







fete

EMPIRE

ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 and 8.15

United Artists Double :
Franchot TONE in

“JIGSAW and D.0. A.”

To-day Last Two Shows,
4.45 and 8.30

Columbia Pictures Presents :

Humphrey BOGART in

“IN A LONELY PLACE”

— with —
Gloria Grahame; Frank Starring :
Lovejoy and Carl Benton Edmond O’BRIEN and
Reid.

Pamela BRITTON

OLYMPIC

To-day Only 4.45 and 8.15
Final Instalment Columbia







ROYAL

Last Two Shows To-day,
4.30 and 8.30

Republic Smashing Double :

James LYDON and Serial :
Lois COLLIER in “BATMAN and ROBIN"
“OUT OF THE STORM” aa

AND Robert LOWERY
Â¥ iris John DUNCAN
“A SPORTING CHANCE’ ~
— Jane ADAMS
Jane RANDOLPH
and and
John O'MALLEY Lyle TABOT

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PLANTATIONS LTD.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

13,

1951

CARIBBEAN PRESS
SHOULD BE ALERT

@ From Page 1

which they were going to deal was
the question of communication, He
felt sure they would all agree that
it was an essential pre-requisite
for any federation in the Carib-
bean to have a satisfactory system
of communications, By satisfac-
tory, they as newspaper people
felt that it should not only be
rapid and efficient, but also cheap.
In asking for that, they were not
asking for anything unprece-
dented.

He said that the Empire Press
rate for cables was a a
word, but lower rates still were in
operation in certain specific re-
gions in the Commonwealth.

He told Sir George that they
might have some concrete pro-
posals to put to him and he knew
the delegates would like to hear
the few inspiring words from him.
He therefore had much pleasure
in declaring the Conference open,

Sir George Seel said :

It gives me great pleasure to
welcome you as delegates to this
meeting of the Caribbean Press
Association and to extend to you
the freedom of Hastings House.
In doing so I must apologise for
the present disorderly state of our
precincts, and hope that you will
not be unduly interrupted by
all these evidenees of activity on
the part of the Development and
Welfare Organisation,

In offering our premises for
meetings such as this, we believe
that we are discharging one of our
most useful functions. As a body
maintained by His Majesty’s Gov-
ernment to do all we can on a
regional basis to help progress in
the West. Indies, our services must
always be at the disposal of those
who are studying West Indian
problems in their regional aspects,
and that, I take it, is the purpose
for which you are met today, In-
deed, I can think of no more pow-
erful regional influence than an
association of the newspapers in
this area, and none which requires
a greater sense of responsibility on
the part of those who wield it.

Prospect of Stability

As even a superficial observer
cat, see, the British West Indies
are approaching a fresh stage in
their history, when more than
ever will depend on the guidance
they receive from their respons-

ible leaders and the Press, After
negotiations marked by frank
speaking. on both sides, as is

always. possible when the parties
are not afraid of falling-out irre-
trievably, there is a prospect of
stability for some years in the
sugar industry. But tnis might
well be jeopardised, if confidence
between the two sides of the in-
dustry. cannot be achieved and
maintained. In Jamaica, Trinidad
and elsewhere, manufacturing in-
dustries are springing up, The
social institutions of the area are
developing and expanding; and
with increased social conscious-
ness, there is a tremendous up-
surge in political expectations.
Yet over all hangs the problem
whether the growth of popula-
tion will not outstrip the resources
of the area. Meanwhile, West In-
dian eae nises Kin;
dom a ‘e are eager!
seeking to acquire the technical
and philosophical equipment
necessary to conduct the affairs of
a nation. Proposals for political
federation, the unification of pub-
lic services, and now for the
creation of a Customs Union of
the West Indian territories, are
under debate. In the next year
or two crucial decisions will fall
to be taken, :

A Well-Iinformed Press

I am_not mentioning these points
with the idea of giving a thumb-
nail sketch of the British West
Indies at this time. The Press,
which has to keep its eyes on
everything, can do this much bet-
ter than I, My purpose is to
remind you that with so much
happening around us, it is im-
perative that the people of the
area should be served by an alert,
well-informed, and objective
Press, well-equipped to expound
the economic, social and political
trends; and fearless, both to detect
and expose those who seek to use
these trends for personal advance-
ment, and to support tho%e who
are genuinely striving to promote
the well-being of their fellow
West Indians,

Fortunately, we in the British
West Indies have a Press which
is for the most part intelligent and
objective, as well as lively and
interesting. I would not pre-
sume to lecture you on thrt score.
But, having seen your agenda, I
observe that you agree with me
in recognising the importance of
yet another factor. You are to
consider the possibility of institu-
ting a news agency which will
carry news both within the Carib-
bean, and between this area and
the rest of the world,

Democratic Traditions

Believe me, gentlemen, it is of
cardinal importance to the West
Indies that the trends, to which f
have briefly referred, should be
studied by West Indians against
the background of an informed
appreciation of events in the world
at large. A nation turned in upon
itself, and engrossed in its own
affairs to the exclusion of the rest
of the world, is not likely to



cevelop cither.a sense of propor-
tion, or a satisfying culture, or to
exert any beneficial influence on
human history. It could indeed
keeome a nuisance even to its
friends, through failure to under-
stand their point of view, and
especially, 1 would add, the diffi-
culties which those friends are
also facing at the present time,
and the sacrifices they are bearing.
If a West Indian nation is to join
the upholders of liberal and dem-
ocratic traditions—and I, as you
might guess, hope to see it do so,
in line with the other nations of
the Commonwealth—it is essential
that it should be kept in touch, by
its own newspapers, with what
goes on outside; not only in
ericket, exciting as that is, but
with advances in scientific and
technical knowledge, with the
currents of trade and commerce,
and with the broad stream of
spiritual aetivity. I am convinced,
therefore, that what you are about
to diseuss today is a question of
supreme significance to the West
Indies. I know nothing of the
detailed plans which will be put
before you. But you have my most
fervent good wishes in your search
for the most efficient and econom-
ical means of placing a first class
world news service before the
West Indian public. No doubt, as
in, the civil service, questions of
finance will figure prominently as
you go along. I am glad to seq
that you do not propose to ask for
any element of Government sub-
sidy for this service, I think that
the last thing to be desired is a
press dependent, even in a smail
way, upon financial payments
from the State. I sometimes feel
muzzled myself as a paid official:
God forbid that any self-respecting
newspaper should ever feel that
way.
Ass’n Open To All

Before I leave you to youn
business, I would like to make one
last observation, I referred earlien
to the fact that the Development
and Welfare Organisation is a
body whose objectives are re.
gional, and it would be difficult
for me, as its head, to support a
Press Association which was not
also truly regional. I am assured
that the Caribbean Press Associa-
tion is open, on payment of course,
to all newspapers in the British
West Indies, and I trust that you
‘will be able to devise a plan which
will enable every journal in the
area, which is genuinely devoted
to the presentation of news to par-
ticipate according to its means ani
circulation, In confidence that this
will be so, I have great pleasure
in declaring your meeting open.

Mr. . Cromarty Bloom,
Latin American Manager for
Reuters Ltd. said that Reuters
had a tremendous interest in the
designs on which the Association
was working and offered their
closest sympathy and_ practical
co-operation in bringing them
about.

Reuters regarded the develop-
ment of any co-operative news
agency with great interest, They
a: the Sestiane | of the a
erative Press ociations of Aus-
tralias New Zealand and India
which were now partners with
Reuters.

Co-operation Asked

In the West Indies until now,
Reuters had not done a good job
because of the inherent difficul-
ties in dealing with individual
newspapers scattered over a wide
area and that was one of the
major reasons why’ they looked
on the new development here with
so much interest,

He said that they were looking
forward for the first time to the
establishment of a really close
co-operation with the Press of the
BW.I. through a Regional Press
Association here.

From the point of view of
communications, efficient opera:
tion was only possible through
constant contact with a regiona)
eentre. From that of the services
themselves, Reuters would look
forward to guidance from the
the area they served here, It
was difficult to work out any
form of effective guidance based
on the views of scattered news-;
papers rather than the combined
view of a single entity.

With regard to the question of
features and other supplementary
services, they felt that the only,
way in which they could co-op-y
erate was through the local organ-
isation.

He said that they had been
following this development for
several years and would like to!



London’s most pampered rabbit lives in Park Lane flat



a a

FIRST COURSE



- BARBADOS ADVOCATE

YES, | WOULD LIKE A DRINK

Lateann

Frorese Sernice

THE RUINS

By H. 0. HUSBANDS

A NIGHT in June, 1941,
Speightstown was still. The St.
Peter’s Church clock had already
banged out 12 midnight and only
the faint lights of lowered kero-
sene oil lamps filtered through the
windows the old buildings
which comprised the better part
of the town.

Speightstown was asleep, but
not for long. Suddenly, an alarm,
loud and distinct was heard,
Shouts of “Fire! Fire!” inter-
rupted the stillness of the town
and everyone was up and peeping
through his window to see the
skies lit up by flames which seem-
ed well on their way to destroy
Orange Street and the adjoining
streets, Church Street and Sandy
Street .

Orange Street, Speightstown, at
the time a fine residéntial district,
was the locality of the fire which
broke out from a two storied
grocery store and residence then
on the right hand going north and
about 30 yards from Church Street
corner. A strong easterly wind
hurried the flames along.

Firemen and residents fought
the fire all night and the follow-
ing morning, got the flames under
control. They found six build-
jags gutted, another badly dam-
aged and two others, which
were more fortunate, singed here
and there,

Almost 10 years have passed
since the fire, but the surround-
ings still suggest that a tragedy
had befallen the town.

“The Ruins” as the area is now
called by some Speightstonians, is
now more or less a little business
centre punctuated by two sea
windows,

Bringing Church Street to an
end on the West is the formidable
looking three storied buildings
where once a thriving ironmon-
gery and hardware business was
earried on,

Immediately on the North of
that building is a little rum shop
which always flies a flag and car-
ries the name “‘Labourite—Bar 20
Rides Again”. Here begin the
ruins. The spot once accommo-
dated a two storied building, to
the ground floor of which many
flocked to buy themselves a pair
of shoes or a suit length and the
top floor of which housed the
family who carried on the busi-

ness .

Next to “Bar 20” wil’ be found
an even smaller shop, this time ran
by a joiner who has reserved part
cf it as the living room for him and
his son. This joiner’s shop has
tuken the place of a hardware

lead to the closer association
lacking until now with the West
Indian Press. His instructions
were to offer to the Association
whatever assistance he could and
ne expressed the fervent hope
that the plans of the Association
would quickly bring about the
type of co- tive press agency
which they had seen develop in
various parts of the world and
which had produced a much more
efficient flow of unbiassed news
between the Press in the region
leoncerned and the Press of the
rest of the world. He offered
them on behalf of Reuters, his
best services and warm wishes for
success at their meeting.

Mr. P. Hewitt-Myring was then
introduced to the m g by the
President of the Association who

sreferred to the help and sympathy

lcok forward to the day when they,twhich he had always accorded the

would have West Indian journal
ists at Reuters in London helping'
to serve the Association with th
sort of services they needed.

Closer Contact Wanted

They had in Fleet Street, a
regular flow of journalists from
Australia, New and
South Africa and they would
like to feel that they could draw
upon j from the West
Indies to come to Lomdon and so
develop in the course of time, a
still ¢ contact with
the Association here and the mem-
bers of it.

As a result, he said they could
not but look upon this develop-
ment with enormous interest with
the Hope that it would quickly

Association, '

! Mr. Hewitt-Myring said that on’
occasions like this, the printers’
nk that had flowed in his veins
for 20 years had stirred again and
he was very happy to have
a chance of wishing the meeting
every © asnggins success in its de-

ons.

-libera .

An Honest Press
: He said that there was no sub-
istitute for a concrete, honest and
igenuinely commercial press free
rom any sort of subsidy whether
officially or otherwise. Of course
he strongly believed that as did
the Association and was more than
ready to do artything at any time
to be of assistance,
@ On page 5.



store which was no more after the
fire.

Another small shop comes next
in line. A jeweller and watch re-
pairer has perched his shop on
this spot which is much too large
for it. Around the shop is rough
ground where stones have been

ttered ‘est traditions as they too could
ica ae ee ae where rove themselves capable of reach-

bush and shrubs are trying to find.
moisture on which to live.

The first sea window finds itself
between the jeweller’s shop and
another rum shop going further
North called “De Lone Ranger”,
The fire removed a house from
the piece of land which has since
been unoccupied. Rambling vines,
thick bush, stones, and a man-
chineel tree just about four feet

tall but already branching out
cover the spot,
The window ends the ruins

eaused by fire on that side of the
street, but skipping out “De Lone
Ranger,” which was not touched
by the fire but was since reno-
vated there is to be found the
second sea window, on which once
stood an ill-shaped three storied
building—indeed one of the tall-
est edifices of Speightstown.

Some months ago, the building
was flattened by masons and car-
penters. It was so situated that
it narrowed considerably the
width of the street and formed at
that point, a dangerous curve,
The government, it is understood,
bought it over and got it dug
down for the purpose of widening
the road,

On the opposite side of the road,
the evidence of ruins is nil, but
it was on that side that the fire
started and where three buildings
were destroyed.

The building at which the fire
started_gnd another building join-
ed to the former by a party wall
were ruined by the fire and then
at the corner another residence
was badly damaged.

The residence had attached to
it a storeroom which was cqm-
pletely destroyed. :

St. Peter’s Parish Church has
taken over the area which accom-
modated the attached buildings
and kas used it for planting flow-
ers and trees for beautifying the
West end of the Church. The spot
has been enclosed by a wall bear-
ing green rails and the grass on it
has got a good spring.

A bungalow has replaced the
“badly damaged” building and
gutted storeroom covering the
whole spot except for a small plot
which has been planted in flowers,

“The Ruins” are being encroach-
e- on by the sea and it is doubt-
ful whether it will become a resi-
dential area again.

Trinidad May Get



Paper Industry

@ From page 1.

fuel has to be found for sugar
factories.

He says “Trinidad is the only
area where adequate supplies of
alternative fuel are economically
available in the Caribbean.”

He adds that the paper from
bagasse in its present stage of
development has not been found
to possess the characteristics de-
sirable for newsprint,

Mr. Winterbotham was unable
to say definitely where the head-
quarters of a new paper-producing
fuetory might be, but referred
again to his previous statement
about the availability of supplies.

eeeeeeeenneame

Magistrate Resumes Duties

Mr. A. J. Hanschell, Se-
nior Police Magistrate of District
“A” Police Court resumed his
duties yesterday morning in the
Central Police Court.

While Mr, Hanschell was acti
as Judge of the Petty Debt Court,
Mr, C, L, Walwyn was sitting
for him.

MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Madeira, the United King-
dom, Antwerp and Amsterdam by the
S.S. Oranjestad will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:-—

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Registered
Mail at 3 p.m, and Ordinary Mail at
4.00 p.m. on the 2ist of February, 1951.





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SCPE EEF ESSOESES SS CES



Floods Threaten
N. W. Washington

SEATTLE, Feb.

A state of emergency was de-
clared in northwest Washington
state today as whole communi-
ties fled flood waters of three

10.

rampant rivers. Across the
Canadian border in British
Columbia thousands of people

were threatened by the Fraser
rivea and its tributaries. Over
1,300 have already escaped to
higher ground,

Flood and storm deaths have
been reported on the other side
of the continent. The Susque-
hanna river in Pennsylvania state
was frozen solid for seven miles
and 12,000 residents of the town
of Columbia were without water.
Warmer weather which brought

NO “HEEL-TAP.” rain and thaws is blamed for the

floods. About 700 people —
entire population of Conway,
50 miles north of Seattle —

Jackson Welcomed

@ From rage 1.

three important enquiries in these
islands. He spoke of the appre-
tiation of the reorganised legal
library. On behalf of the outer
har S. T. Christian spoke of the

pular appointment of another

est Indian to such a high post
‘ama it was a great inspiration for
young lawyers to follow the high-

were evacuated after angry river
waters were coursing hip deep
through the town.

—Reuter.

ing heights.

Mr. Dias paid tribute on behalf
of the Lower Bench and Mr, Nev-
ie Berridge on behalf of the
Registry spoke of the great appre-
ciation and honour it was for
himself and his staff to work with
His Honour.

Mr, Jackson thanked all for
the overwhelming tributes anc he
was grateful for the untiring assis
tance he had always received
since his arrival here,

Club Willow Under
3 Months’ Repairs

Col. R- T. Michelin, Commis-
sioner of Police, told the Advecate
yesterday he hoped that the Fire
Prigade and Police Band would
be able to occupy “Club Willow
i about the next three months.

The Legistature has already
yoted money for purchasing the
site, but a further sum has to be
voted for renovation and decora-
tion purposes.

Col. Michelin said that as Soon
the Band leaves its present
the quarters will be
used as barracks for the police
corporals, At present the cor~
porals are housed with privates,
a practice not conducive to keep-
ing the standard of discipline at
a high level. 2

No plans have yet been made
for use of the quarters Mow oct-
cupied by the Fire Brigade

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PAGE THREE



Fires Sweep
Queensland

Sheep Lands ya ae

4 lane
i v



ny

shea { f

others were
by fir
00 Kal

iroos over

the heat were seen piled
the

tence in

cooperating with
and local radio

mnall

BRISBANE, Feb. 10



s to keep property owners

Twelve big bush fires ere fire fighters informed of the
raging over about one eighth of ection of the fires Station
Queenland’s 670,500 square mil ds, graziers and volunteers
today. re ing to keep the flames in

The fires. are the wors Y
record in the Wyancra ec One man said he saw flames up
country 500 miles west of Brisbane 10 yards high near his preperty.
One fire roaring along a 120 mile ey were travelling at about 20
front had already burned out mors iles an hour and “making noise
than 2,000,000 acres of the be <@ an express train going through
sheep country in Southwest tannel
Queensland. Ten sheep and cattle stations

It had travelled 70 miles ir i so far. been burned out
three weeks. Police said that no the Charleville and Wyandra
towns were threatened yet by the . Pilots saw desolate homes
fires, but stock losses were ex rding with miles of blackened
pected to be heavy. One recor burned out country round
naissance plane reported thousand

m.—Reuter .







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PAGE FOUR





Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid. Broad &t., Bridgetown.



Tuesday, February 13, 1951



ELECTION YEAR

THIS is election year. The present ses-
sion of the Legislature will end in Novem-
ber when a new House will be elected for
the first time under an adult suffrage
franchise.

Already the parties have begun their
campaign for capturing the support of the
electorate. The two parties which have
been able to maintain membership have
held their caucuses and public meetings
have been held in some parishes.

It would be well at an early time for the
electorate to assess the value of such work
as has been done in the House of Assembly
and to ask themselves whether it has been
satisfactory or whether it was enough hav-
ing regard to the demands of the times.
Having decided on the merit of that work
the next step is to consider whether the
complexity in the problems of Government
does not warrant better and more states-
manlike handling.

Barbados is too small to get the best of
party government; but it has been intro-
duced and judging by the instructions of
the Colonial Office it has come to stay. But
because Barbados must have party govern-
ment, it does not mean that the members
of the party are not to be measured in their
individual capacities and assessed on their
ability to contribute to the common wel-
fare.

The Labour Party, now responsible for the
conduct of Government business have inti-
mated that they should have ministerial
status. This alone makes it imperative that
high calibre be demanded from men who
after election will be potential ministers.
They will be responsible for the running of

1: |CO

The General Election of 1950
| fought and won largely on

lost in effectiveness with every
year that went by.”
Old Battles

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



A NEW ELECTION?

An Oxford Don’s survey of the General Election, 1950, gives
what might happen next time... .

some poiriters to

issues which less than a year later
have been obscured or forgotten in
the larger movement of world
events.

That must be the conclusion
which any reader, whatever his
party affiliations, must reach after
examining the fascinating and
detailed survey of the contest
given in The British General
Election of 1950° by H. G. Nicho-
las, University
Politics at Oxford,

The Socialist Party, which was
on the defensive throughout,
omitted all mention of defence
from its manifesto and put the
theme of “full employment” first
in all its propaganda, both broad-
east, written and spoken.

In areas which had experienced
heavy unemployment before the
wars this was successful in brak-
ing the swing to the Right. But,
as Mr. Nicholas points out, “as an
appeal to the past it necessarily

Lecturer in

The Tories, with the supreme
exception of Mr. Churchill, were
equally heavily engaged in fight-
ing past battles.

They devoted the most strenu-
ous efforts to showing that Mar-
shall Aid had masked unemploy-
ment and to refuting Socialist
charges about conditions between
the wars.

It was not until February 15, 12
days after the dissolution of Par-
liament and only a week before
the poll, that Mr. Churchill spoke
at Edinburgh about the possibil-
ity of “another talk with Soviet
Russia upon the highest level.”

Mr. Bevin at once dismissed
this as a “stunt proposal.” But it
was taken up, notably by the
Beaverbrook Press, and remained
almost the sole effort by a lead-
ing member of any party to relate
the election to the world crisis,

How far Mr. Churchill’s state-
ment influenced the voters one
way or the other it will never be
possible to analyse with any pre-

My Charles Wintour

cision. From the polls of public
opinion quoted by Mr. Nicholas,
it would seem however, that there
was remarkably little movement
of opinion during the last fort-
night of the campaign. If any-
thing, the Tories started the cam-
paign with a slight lead but the
Socialists gradually improved
their position until they establish-
ed a winning margin.

Perhaps the party bosses were
right: realism does not pay off in
votes,

The explanation for the Tories’
flying start lay in the immense
superiority of ,their electoral ma-
chine in the country,

Woolton’s Machine

By the time of the election the
Tories could boast of 428 fully
qualified agents in charge of con-
stituencies in England and Wales,

These agents were paid between
£500 and £800 a year, and could
look forward to progressive pro-
motion in the highly organised
Woolton machine.

The Socialists, on the other
hand, could orly muster 279 full-
time agents on the eve of the poll
in England, Wales and Scotland
as well. Their agents were lower
paid and had less attractive pros-
pects,

Unquestionably this big lead in
professional organisation helped
the Tories gain votes, But Nicho-
las gives a cautionary reminder
that the machines cannot dragoon
the voters to the polls.

In Birmingham, where the
Tories possessed an excellent
machine which had been working
for years to re-establish Birming-
ham as a Tory citadel, Tories only
recaptured one seat out of 10.

In Liverpool, where they had
only one professional agent, they
secured five seats out of nine.

Liberals Blamed

Since better organisation failed
Tories were naturally inclined to
blame the Liberal intervention for
“splitting the anti-Socialist vote.”

Nicholas is highly sceptical of

this charge, plumping for the view
that Liberal intervention drew
votes from both sides fairly equal-
ly over the country as a whole.

This fascinating study illumi-
nates many other aspects of the
last election and British election-
eering in general. There is for
instance the importance of Dr.
Charles Hill’s broadcast—heard
by 42 per cent of the adult popu-
lation, a bigger audience than any
Socialist Minister achieved with
the single exception of Mr. Attlee.
But will he ever be able to repeat
his triumph?

And Mr. Nicholas’s dispassion-
ate examination of the Press con-
tains much of interest, though he
thinks it played a rather second-
ary role in this campaign. He
appears to believe that “someone
had very effectively laid an ox
upon Lord Beaverbrook’s tongue.”
If such an operation is possible,
which I beg leave to doubt, there
was certainly no-heifer lying on
his lordship’s pen.

Attlee’s Handicap

The statistical appendix by Mr.
David Butler shows how, follow-
ing redistribution the existence of
numerous impregnably safe So-
cialist seats produces a marked
bias to the Right.

If the party vo1es had been
equal at 45.2 per cent then the
Tories would have won 35 more
seats than the Socialists. In fact
‘Labour is likely to continue to
enter political contests with a
handicap of half-a-million votes
for some time to come,”

Mr. Butler also prints a rough
diagram showing the broad rela-
tionship between seats and votes.
By applying the latest Gallup poll
figures to this chart, it appears
that the Tories would win at least
420 seats if an election were held
now, The Socialists would win
190 or fewer, giving the Tories a
majority of more than 230 seats.

In fact Mr. Morrison has every
reason, from a party viewpoint,
to delay the election as long as
possible,

World Copyright Reserved



the various departments of

and despite the fact that the Civil Servant
will always be on hand to handle the de-
tails of any policy adopted, it is the
minister who will be the liaison between
the general public and the department,

Government

—London Express Service.

erent oi
They Won't Let Jungle Maria
Be Just A Little D

IN Dutch the word is “behekst”,

uteh Girl

the reason:—





The handling of public finance during
the last five years has not been such as to

win the confidence of people who con-

tribute by way of taxes to the Treasury.
The present Government took over office
“with a surplus in the Treasury. Since then
it has dwindled despite the annoying
increase in taxation. The members of that
Government have on more than one occas-
ion voiced their intention to maintain a
“soak the rich” policy. Other sections of
society have also suffered as a result; and
today the economic condition of the people
is not as sound as it should have been.

Barbados like every other country in the
world has been willing to give labour its
opportunity to serve. That it has failed its
fondest supporters will admit. The present

. is a period when all the statesmanship and
goodwill is needed in the solution of prob-
lems. Barbados has not ceased to produce
men of ability but they are not to be found
in such numbers as in the past; and even
those who are within reach are denied, for
one reason or another, opportunity to make

in English “bewitched”, Either
way, the planners of Bergen-op—
Zoom are making a fool of 13—
year-old Maria Bertha Hertogh,

The child, who was brought

back from a Moslem husband in
Malaya seven weeks ago to be
an ordinary Dutch = girl,” still
reigns over this town of 30,000
people,
. Her father and mother are doing
their best to fit her in with their
six other children, But outside
the tiny house in Emma-square
she is the talking-point around
which everything revolves.

Maria would become part of the

Dutch scene much more quickly
and easily than she is doing if her
parents could exercise full con-
trol over her,
, The committee formed to
organise her homecoming how-
ever is still the power to which
they bend — though it was dis—
banded weeks ago.

At the Roman Catholic school
she attends, Maria is the pet of
the sisters.

She is the envy of the 350 other
children —- for the new expensive
dress she appears in every other
aay, her new sports bicycle, which
has no match for miles, the jewel-
lery she wears in class, her fur-
lined bootees,

From ARTHUR COOK

BERGEN-OP-ZOOM (Holland)

Dutch slowly—the girl is one of
the class. But when she is askec
to stand to repeat a sentence from
the blackboard she scowls at the
sister’, scowls at her classmate and
reads aloud uninterestedly.

At first she would take no
interest in a gymnasium class.
She stood aside from the other
girls and the sister said nothing.
One day recently she joined in
but for only a few minutes.

Recently a girl was standing
in front of the class. Maria
nudged 11—year-old Janneke
Segers: ‘How old is she?’ Told
she was 12 Maria sniffed “Her
figure—it is too short, too fat’,

Not long ago she caused a new
stir. The others were used to her
gold watch and gold bracelet,
Their eyes opened wide at the
sight of two huge earrings and a
large, green stone brooch,

Not A Word

The children chattered, Then
Sister Edward told them to be
quiet. To Maria not a word.

A plain-clothes policeman sits
at the back of the class. He



MME, WHY DOES'NT THAT

cycles to and from the school with
Maria,

Every time she leaves the other
children crowd round to gape at
her bicycle and her latest in
clothes and startling hair—bows.

Maria loveg it. She holds her
head. high... faint sophisticated
smile on her Tice. And the sisters
beam their pleasute.

They find only one fault in her,
True she attends Sunday Mass
with her family, but at prayers in
school she folds her arms and at
religious lessons she doodles,

The planners have tried to force
the conversion from Moslem to
Roman Catholic. Their methods
are meeting little success.

I asked Police Commissaire
Van ’t Hol why 16 of the town’s
42 policemen are permanently on
guard inside and outside the
Hertogh home (there have been
no days off for them since Maria’s
return,

He said “Anything could happen
from Moslem influences. The
guard will be kept on till March
at least.”

Not A Thing

Lawyer Jan Bervoets self-styled
head of the homecoming committee
told me: “Mr. Hertogh can do
nothing without my permission—

any contribution to the affairs of govern-

ment.

favours shown

At the same time the others
are jealous of her —



for the
her the lack of

MAN | Wean A wia LiKe
THE SPEAKER Does 2”:

It is time that this was changed. If Bar-
bados is to continue to make any progress,
her affairs must be handled by the collec-
tive abilities of men of recognised ability
and public spirit willing to serve their
country. Men in trade, commerce, indus-
try and scholars have their respective con-
tributions to make and if there was ever
a time when this country needed them it
is now, The electorate should refuse to
countenance the candidature of men who

reprimands when she chooses to
be naughty or does what she
pleases when the rest of the class
is regimented into a_ particular
lesson or game.

Mr. and Mrs. Hertogh intended
that Maria should have a private
tutor for six months,

Not Enough

But the planners decreed “Put
her to school at once”, and im-
mediately it was found her
standard of education was that of
a girl of eight and she needed




I know what is
“Nothing





only journalists

paper. Go home
Haberdasher

about
appear in the British Press, ‘The

said “The committee is finished,
Mr. Hertogh doés as he pleases.”

best.

Maria ray

ULD THE TORIES WEN Thehemnants0fAn Army
Committed Suicide

And Their General
ied

In Disgrace

By BERNARD DREW

HOW British, Indian, Gurkha, and Ameri-
can troops by sheer “guts” and superior tac-
tics smashed the myth of the “invincible Jap”
is told today by Vice-Admiral Earl Mount-
batten of Burma.

He pays tribute first to the Chindits, those
gallant men under the late Major-General
Wingate who were the first to beat the Japs
at.their own game—infiltration and attacks
miles beyond any known or established base.

‘UNSURPASSED RECORD’

And putting into practice the lessons the
Chindits had learned came the 14th Army
with its “unsurpassed record of service and
achievement.”.

Earl Mountbatten found that there were
120 sick casualties for every man wounded in

A Medical Advisory Division of experts on \ %
tropical medicine and a dose of 40,000,000 | y
anti-malaria tablets per month put that right. | ¥
By the time the Japs surrendered the sick-
ness ratio was downto one in ten.

Then the Supreme Commander found that
it was generally accepted that fighting occur-
red during only seven months of the year at
the most. The monsoon was a “closed season,”

So Mountbatten devised military and medi-
cal tactics to enable his men to battle forward
in the monsoons and take the enemy by sur-

HIGHLIGHTS

Final victory throughout South-East Asia
was built on keeping open the sea routes, and
after seeing all enemy plans for defending
Malaya and Singapore he is satisfied that the
projected wperations to capture those objec-
tives would have been “completely success-

But surrender came first. These are the
highlights of his report:—

KOHIMA. This operation by General
(now Field-Marshal) “Bill” Slim’s brave 14th
Army drove the fanatical enemy back to the
Central Plains of Burma and inflicted the
major land defeat of the war in the Far East.”

PRISONERS. Comparatively few Japan-
ese were taken prisoner. This incident gives

On the day that Monywa fell other units
of the 20th Indian Division surprised a large
body of Japanese trying to escape over the
Irrawaddy river, and annihilated most of
these in hand-to-hand fighting.

CEREMONIAL SUICIDE

When the fighting was nearly over a de-
tachment of Japanese put on ceremonial
equipment, and formally committed suicide
by marching into the river.

Of the way the Japanese were sapped of
the will to fight I can testify personally.

I was with the few Britons who witnessed
the end at Saigon, French Indo-China.

Outside the Government palace an ailing
Japanese Field-Marshal, Count Terauchi,
came forward leaning heavily on a stick—
the fall of Mandalay had caused him to have
a stroke—and surrendered his sword to Lord
Mountbatten in a five-minute ceremony.

‘VINEGAR JOE’

He never recovered from the disgrace, and
died a few months later.

DIFFICULTIES. Relations with Ameri-
can “Vinegar Joe” Stilwell were not always
happy. Stilwell had a dual appointment,
partly under Mountbatten and partly directly

T have allowad to under the U.S. Chiefs of Staff.

see her are from a Dutch Catholic

to England.”
Frans Houtman

But when I called at Adrian
Hertogh’s home he telephoned Mr.
Houtman: “May I talk to an
English journalist?” And what-
ever he was told the man who had
wished to be friendly refused
information. .

Are the planners working only
for March 25, when Maria is due
to see the British Consul? That







might be suitable to tow the party line but
who have nothing to contribute to the pro-

gress of the island.



Our Readers Say:



Freedom

To The Editor, The Advocate,

‘SIR,—It was heartening on
Tuesday to listen to the speech of
the leader of the House on the
issue of immigrants into this
Colony, He said on this what
wanted saying, and any refutation
of what he said amounted to a
waste of time and breath, Al
talk of federation is unrealistic to
the point of hypocrisy if barriers
are to be erected to the free and
untrammelled movement of the
peoples within the area of the
British Caribbean. Whatever may
be the inconveniences to the Gov-
ernments concerned, these will
always be insignificant coinpared
to the advantages from freedom
of travel accruing to the residents
and trade of the area. If we are
to move forward at all, it is a
compulsory condition of that
movement that West Indian
politicians must abandon the
parochial outlook and learn to
regard other West Indians with
the same interest—yes, the same
interest — as they do their own
islanders. Barbados as ‘the
Assembly leader pointed out. be-
cause of its population problem
should be the last countrv in the
world to dream of erecting bar-
riers to the free entry of people

into the island. Retaliation by
others would be tragic for our
situation,

There is a regrettably ignorant
tendency by people who should
know better, to regard residents
from other British Colonies as
aliens. They are not. They are
British subjects—maybe strangers
to this particular Colony—but as
British subjects, entitled to all
the privileges and rights that Bar-
badians are similarly entitled to
in other British Colonies. Some
members of the Assembly confuse
strangers with aliens, even some
officials do. To the everlasting
credit of the leader of the House
he made it clear that even aliens
were welcome within the gates,

Barbadians leave this Colony
and hold positions of every con—
ceivable grade in other British
West Indian Colonies. They con—
tinue to do so daily. But to go even
further, within the British Carib-
bean, those few immigrants who
do become destitute should be the
responsibility of the respective
Governments. The official ex-
pense will invariably cancel out.
The meeting of the various peoples
is of value in itself, and some-—
thing that cannot be measured
in £. s. d. Barbadians can be
comparatively ignorant of their

individual attention.

In mathematics Sister Edward
gives Maria separate lessons,

For language — and she learns

ree! virtues and shortcomings
until they have lived and worked
outside of Barbados,

The transfer to the Police De-
partment of immigration affairs
formerly in charge of the Harbour
Master is a retrograde step from
the angle at which I view the
mixing of the peoples, The police
psychology is the very worst to
deal with so important a civilian
affair as the intercolonial move-
ment of groups and peoples The
psychology of coercion is basic
to their training, and they cus-
tomarily bring the influence of
suspicion to bear on the affairs of
those who lack financial security
but are in all other respects
decent and commendable citizens,
We still retain in this Colony
customs that are fundamentally
sound from the point of view of
freedom and democracy. Bui it
is distressing to detect almost
every Tuesday in the House of
Assembly the tendency to accept
or impose Authoritarian control
on the life of the people of this
land. Because many Colonies
have abandoned those customs we
still retain, our politicians make
this an argument for a similar
abandonment of them by us.

Freedom and democracy in the
essential virtues of these political
philosophies are disappearing
from the big areas of the earth.
We have not the problems of the
big places of the earth Why
pretend that we have, by per-



Malaya.



sistent legislation to coerce the
free movement of our peoples and
so annihilate the Caribbean area
and Barbados specially as prob-
ably the last remaining refuge of
that freedom which means so
much to the spirit and progress
of its people. We have certainly
not achieved “freedom from want”.
Let us not so hastily abandon
those other freedoms that we do
possess,
V. B. VAUGHAN.

Leave The Clock Alone
To the Fditor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Permit me space to say a
few words on this Clock question.
In the first place advancing the
time would create a hardship on the
poorer class who would be called
to duty at an earlier hour and end
their task by the setting of sun.
Secondly, it serves no useful pur-
pose in Barbados where there is
almost thirteen hours ‘of brignt
sunshine every day, and during
this period there is quite @éncugh
time for recreation. No one needs
half a dey for recreation, two or
three hours are quite sufficient for
golfers, the fishermen, the swim-
mer or tennis players, etc. Let
those who need more time for re-
‘reation approach their employers
for earlier morning hours of work
and they will have more time in
the evening. For instance, I am
one whose work does not afford
me recreation—not even for a
funeral, but there are some of us
who love more play than work
and that is the thing that makes

day, she can decid
to stay in By or, return to
oe he

for herself—

LE.S.

"¢
‘Jack a dull boy.”

If ther- “4 need for more recrea-
tion, let us ask our employers for
a seven till three working period
and this would harm nobody; but
let us leave the clock alone.

FAIR PLAY.

A Dangerous Corner

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—Please allow me space to
comment on a dangerous situation.
At the junction of Welches, Fair-
field, and Bridge Roads, I think

- the traffic signs are well-placed

with one omission which may
cause an accident, Traffic from My
Lord's Hill direction going to
Fairfield Road, stop at the Major
Road sign for Welches Road, but
traffic to Bridge Road from the
some direction go straight through
non-stop. If they stop (which is
seldom) they do so in the middle
of the road.

Monday evening last, I saw a
"bus belonging to St. George’s Bus
Co,; stop at the corner; a car trav-
elling behind it passed out and
went straight down Bridge Road
without stopping If another ve—
hiéle had been proceeding from
Welches Road in the direction of
Flint Hall around and in front of
the Bus, an accident might have
occurred. I suggest, therefore, that
a ‘No Entry’ sign be placed at the
upper entrance of Bridge Road and
allow the traffie coming from My
Lord’s Hill going toward Bridge
Road, to stop at the Major Road
and proceed around the light just



When he disagreed with the Mountbatten
plan at the start of the campaign Stilwell
considered it his duty to send his own mission
to Washington ahead of the Supreme Com-
mander without telling him.

There were clashes, too, about policy with
Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek, and how his
Chinese should be used.

Earl Mountbatten wrote this 280-page report
to the Combined Chiefs of Staff when he
was in Delhi in 1947 as India’s last Viceroy.

—L.ES.



as the traffic from Welches Road
do. This would make that corner

fer,
re ANOTHER MOTORIST.
IIM.S. Devonshire At
Barbados

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—May I beg-a small space
in your columns to say “Thank
You” on behalf of the officers,
eadets, and ship’s company of
H.M.S. Devonshire. The friendly
wélcome and generous hospitality
extended to us by the people of
Barbados has become proverbial
in this ship, with the result that
we return year after year for
more. But you are all so kind that
there is never any sign of your
generosity flagging.

usual we have had a most
enjoyable round of sporting fix-
tures and social functions, and I
would like those involved in the
organisation side to know that we
are really grateful for all the hard
work they must have put in.

I would also like to express my
personal thanks to all those kind
people who have looked after our
eadets so well by entertaining
them in their homes. This side of
the hospitality of Barbados is per-
haps the most appreciated of all
by lads who are experiencing their
first taste of ship life and their
first venture overseas.

Once again, thank you, Barba-
dos,

Yours faithfully,
G. STOKES
Captain, Royal Navy.



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acini teatime ini iii tae iaasiahauaaatmmmaiacaatst iiiitataaiiaaaaien
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1951



vst ? = a? r {) 99S9GS6S555 99555555 SFSS FOF DD FOOOPHOGOOSOIOSOO
4th Boys’ B'dos May Get Gas Co. Ask Y.W.C.A.Gets Caribbean Svimary: ror a

Club Opens _ First Theatre
Friday tas 3u,. eee i

new Y.M.C.A, is erected it will
HE FOULTH BOYS’ CLUB have a hall on the second storey,
will be opened at Cliff Cot. Neatly 90 feet long by 38 feet
non St. John, at 5 o'clock on a ane this will be used as a

iday evening, ~ a

aes Oe The site

have rencrated “and palsies ng building will be on the west sige
pec: 2 ieecant yes for the open- Caton tates Culler t will
nisi ae ean Boys’ Club has have an open verandah on the
cee - room to accommodate east, west and north sides. The
8 ear ~ mn ie Pa ots site. ground floor will accommodate
-. PT. Michelin, Com- the billiard room, table tennis

missioner of Police, told the re i
— ’ 90m, restauran
Advocate yesterday that Mr. Basil Rey feaen : emelee film

Henriques, bys’ C 2 ; *
ane < rahe . — eee _ ng Arte will be given in
Boys’ Clubs when he visits the efor eee
: Bits Messrs D,. M.- Simps Engin-
island on March 2. eers wy h au .
J Henriques will be introduc- iiae. ae ee ae ee
sak ae of the various clubs — Mr. H, H. Williams, Secretary
asked to lecture to them. of the YÂ¥.M.C.A told the
These Concerts are expected to Advocate yesterday | that these
become a monthly feature, plans will be placed bef th:
HE FIRST SUNDAY Concert Boar inectote at a meeting
, Concert Board of Directors at a meeting
» at the’ Esplanade by the to-morrow afternoon for. their
hoc: rg coincided with the approval.
arrival of the tourist ship Nieuw After the Board agrees, tenders
Ameterdam. Many tourists were will be received ‘warts eons
at the Esplanade on Sunday eve- tion of the building, They have
ning to listen to this Concert of already started a Building and
classical music, Ground Fund and donations will
By their applause they seemed be gratefully accepted.
to have really enjoyed listening to Basket ball fans, who are mem-
Captain Raison and his Band. bers of the “Y”, are taking more
A large number of parents and than a keen interest in the game
children also turneti out. Tha this season. They are preparing
crowd was as big as that seen in their own plot of ground at Wake-
Queen’s Park when the Band give field. During the past few weeks
their Sunday Concerts there. they could regularly be seen
HE LARGEST CANE FIRE for with their forks and _ shovels
the year occurred at Hamp. levelling off this piece of land.
ton Plantation, St, Philip, over the The most of the work is done
week-end. The fire broke out at during the evening after business
about 5,30 a.m. on Sunday, Nine- hours.
teen acres of first crop ripe and Mr. Williams said that these
nine and a half acres of second members must be congratulated.
crop ripe canes were burnt. The They are not given any financial
damage is covered by insurance, assistance.
The canes are the property of the | Mr. Williams received the fol-
trustees of the estate of A. Cam- lowing letter from Captain Stokes
eron, of the H.M.S. Devonshire:
The trustees of the estate of A. “Please accept my sincere thanks
Cameron suffered another loss on behalf of the Ship’s Company
when a fire of unknown origin Of H.M.S. Devonshire, for your
broke out at Bushy Park Planta- 800d work in making our stay
tion, St. Philip, on Saturday night $0 pleasant.

and burnt seven and a half acres “The existence of a place ashore
of first crop ripe canes. like your Y.M.C.A, adds tre-

At Dodds Plantation, St. Philip, mendously to the enjoyment of
ten and a quarter acres of first ® Visit of this kind, and we are

crop ripe canes were burnt when grateful to you for extending its
a fire broke out on Saturday night. facilities to us.
‘They are the property of the Gov- ‘Thank you also for the very
eruor-in-Executive Committee. great amount of trouble you have
Another fire at Bentley Planta- taken in organising our sporting
tion, St. Philip on Saturday burnt [Xtures for us. The arrange~
six acres of first crop ripe and six Ments have been perfect and T
and a‘half acres of sec oe hope the problems with which
é a s of second crop |
ripe canes, They are the property you. have been faced have not
of A. E. Skeete of the same plan- Seok sen aan TBYCH “ WOCRY,
tation and were insured. Mee UTTit
A fire at Joes River Plantation, ee ee ae eee te tee
on seeeye oprah ee thank all those who assisted him
hae (anes the eerartr ot Joes making these games possible.
River Limited and were also aie
insured. Ca of
HE WALL enclosing the new re, ul Driving
burial ground at St, Joseph . Police have noticed a definite
is nearly completed. Labourers improvement in the driving of
are now working upon the en- loaded lorries this crop season
closure at St Ann’s Chapel. For- since they issued a notice to all
merly this Chapel was only partly or nearly all drivers of these vehi-
enclosed. ? \ eles recently, Col. R. T. Michelin
told the “Advocate” yesterday.
The notice which is in leaflet

: * form makes these points; Drive
Coconut Thief Gets slowly; Do not overtake at corn—
ers; Observe the major road sig-
Month Term In Gaol nals; Do not cut in—wait your
turn; Drive as you would wish to
Milton Farrell, a labourer of be driven.
Geodland, St. Michael, was yes- Police are paying strict atten-
terday sentenced to one month’s tion to the way these lorries are
imprisonment with hard labour being driven, the Commissioner
by His Worship Mr. H, A. Talm® said, and they hope that the im-
Police Magistrate of District “A” provement they have noted will be
Police Court. oor up
Farrell was found guilty of ‘This message to drivers is in-
stealing a quantity of coconuts chided in the notice:—
the property of Mary Blenman of “The 1951 Crop which is

Hindsbury 2 February 11. i
On. Poa “tt apout "8.40 starting now should be a record
; one. You will have plenty of

p.m. Farrell was arrested after :
he was seen with a coconut in his Cane to take to the Factory and

hand on Blenman’s land on which a large number of bags of sugar

were growing trees bearing co- to the Wharf.
conuts. We want to see a GREAT

Erwin Wilson chased after him IMPROVEMENT in your driv—
and gave him into custody, Be- ing this year. Extra Police
fore passing sentence Mr. Talma patrols are being put on the

a rarer aaa aa



called on Seibert Waldron—keep- highways to observe your driv-
er of the criminal record—to ing, and action will be taken
read the previous convictions, against all persons who drive

Waldron who knows the de- without due regard for the safe-

fendant said that he has eight ty of others using the road, Re-
previous convictions for larceny member that the extra trip or
and on the last conviction he was two you make by the fast driv—
sentenced to six months’ impris- ing of a loaded lorry will not
onment with hard labour for make up for the loss of life you
stealing galvanise sheets valued might cause or for the fine and
at $6. loss of time you might spend
in Court,”



FIR COMES STUDYING W.I, ROADS
Making a cruise through the
A record shipment of lumber West Indies for the purpose of
arrived for Barbados when the studying road conditions in the
S.S. Islandside brought a million islands is Mr. James Barrett,
and a half feet of fir lumber from prominent road _ contractor of
Vancouver on Sunday. This ship- New Jersey.
ment was consigned to Messrs T. He arrived here on Sunday
Geddes Grant Limited. morning from San Juan by the
The Islandside began to unload Nieuw Amsterdam and was ac-
her cargo shortly after her arrival companied by his wife and coun-
in Carlisle Bay and is expected to sel, Mr. John H. Reiners, At-
spend a few more days here beforg torney of Camden.
leaving. Mr. Barrett is one of the
Yesterday the inner basin of 2uthorities in New Jersey on
the Careenage was becoming con- hot-mix asphalt, and has shown
gested with the lumber although that asphalt cannot retain heat
lorries and carts were busy at @nd compaction, He hopes to
work removing it ‘to various lum- visit the Pitch Lakepsat La Brea
ber yards during the day. when he reaches Trinidad. |
Messrs Robert Thom Limited One of the outstanding pieces
are the agents of the Islandside, of road construction he has done

The ship sailed for Barbados via 38 the paving of the roa d
San Petro and Curaeao, i bed which runs between Phila-

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More For
| Lighting

The Vestry of St. Michael yes-
terday appointed a Committee to
go into the matter of an increased
price for street lighting asked by
the Gas Company.

The company. are asking for
33-1/3 per cent for a year, as
from and after February 28. At
the end of the year they propose
to reconsider the increased price
with a view to existing condi-
tions. =

The Vestry’s” committee are
empowered to co-opt non
members. The view expressed
by most members at the meeting
yesterday, was that though an
increase was probably justifiable,
the Vestry should be made aware
of the facts relative to this in-
crease.

Mr. E. D. Mottley, M.C.P.,
said that this was a matter which
in his opinion, should be given
very careful consideration. He
was not opposed to giving the
the Gas Co. an increase, but the
Vestry should be in a position to
know whether or not the increase
asked for was justifiable.

Again, he did not think it
right for the Gas Co. to give them
a month’s notice only, before the
proposed increase was put on.
He thought they should have been
given about three months’ notice.
In his opinion the Vestry should
write the Gas Co. telling them
that they deprecated the short
notice they had been given. He
would also suggest that they ap-
point a small committee to go
into the matter with the com-
pany and report back to the
Vestry. Mr. Mottley then moved
a motion to the effect adding
that non-members should be
co-opted.

Motion Seconded

Mr. B. A. Weatherhead sec-
onded the motion and told the
Vestry how he had talked and
argued with the Manager of the
Gas Co. about the matter.

Mr. Victor Chase expressed
the view that the company’s pro-
posed increase was quite justifi-
able.

Mr. A. S. Bryden said that he
was not at all surprised that the
company were asking for an in-
crease in price, but he thought
the Vestry in a matter of that
sort, should deal with it as a
private concern would. That was.
they should have a full investi-
gation into it.

Mr. Fred Goddard said that
when the Gas Co, made their
first contract with the British
Union Oil Co. for the price of
Natural Gas, the price was based
on the prices ruling at Gulf ports.

It would be remembered that
on the arrival of the devaluation
of the pound, the price of the oil
jumped and the Gas Company’s
price for Natural Gas_ having
been fixed on these prices, the
company had to pay a substan-
tial increase to the British Union
Oil Company.

This increased price was now
being enjoyed by the Barbados
Government who had taken over
Natural Gas in the island, ‘and
were only allowing the British
Union Oil Company to operate
on a fifty-fifty basis, Therefore it
could be seen that both the Brit-
ish Union Oil Company and the
Barbados Government were bene-
fiting at the hands of the Gas
Company. Furthermore, as the
present Government had not al-
lowed the Gas Bill to go through
on the grounds that the company’s
price was too high, it could be
seen that the company were get-
ting squeezed in the centre, as
they were not permitted to charge
the consumer the increase put on
them,

100% Natural Gas

Again, if the Gas Bill was
passed instead of having to op-
erate 50 per cent gas and 50 per
cent coal gas, they might be able
to use 1006 per cent, Natural Gas
at a reasonable price.

A suggestion came from Mr.
Mottley that Sir John Saint and
Mr. C. A. Coppin might be ask-
ed to serve on the Vestry’s Com-
mittee.

POTATO THIEF
GETS ONE MONTH

Sentence of one month’s im-
prisonment with hard labour was
yesterday passed on Charles Tay-
lor a 48-year-old labourer of Bay
Land St. Michael by His Wor-
ship Mr. H. A. Talma.

Taylor was found guilty of
stealing a quantity of potatoes
growing on the Belle Plantation
and the property of J. D. Las-
celles on February 10.

The case was brought by the
Police.





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BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE







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£100 Grant Press Should: M. Howard Smith

’ The death occurred at his resi-
The St. Michael Vestry have B Al ili
agrond that the NMLGK wiht he me Paeers Se See Seer = oe
a good service to the women of @ From page 3 Smith retired planter and popu-
Barbados and the Vestry will put The West Indies in the past had /@" public figure at the age of 80.
£100 on its Estimates to provide been somewhat outside the main Mr. Smith who was educated
a grant for the Association, news channels of the world; that ®t the Lodge School took to the
The Vestry came to this deci. Was perhaps, to some degree. Of planting profession. Success came
sion when they were considefing course, they had not seen any~ fis way early by reason of his
a letter from the Association ask. thing in past years to represent a thorough going methods, First he
ing. whether the Véetry “would very good news story, but that bought Golden Grove and later
ive the Adsstiafion a yearby was now changed. when he saw the needs of, the
arent: we ne seein of a ey, “| this island he was in
a m ore one’s sStrumental in es ishi
Mr, Goddard said that the As- eyes—whether it took the form of Houses Fectery Liniied whisk
scciation was behind a very de- a definite political federation or he was a Director, As time went
serving cause. It had been brought not—was a fascinating one and by he obtained interest in ‘Thick-
about by some ladies who had the more fully and accurately the et, Sanford, and Map) S my
zealously given over their service World was informed of what was ‘Mr. Smith found tiie to serve
to the community and the mer- 8g on, the better for every one. on the Vestry of the Daria. oad
chants of Barbados had contrib. . Mr.C .A. L. Gale first extended “was highly respected both as an
uted to the cause, a welcome to the visitors and employer and a public amare. He
The house for the Association ee ot oon Seel for al- retired from parochial affairs
had been first rented on a nominal jn sn aaa te. ae ar years ago when his health began
rent but he had learnt that they be a press agency in the West In. (2 {il but maintained an interes:
had since been given the first dies. * s'n in things around him.
year free. The Vestry would be He told the delegates that it ./#® Was @ man of varied inter-






60665000009 90000006506555055 0000 9SE0SS9SIGE)



wise to set it off with its right foot they had any time outside the con- Ln and besides his planting and %
forward. ference room, they would see that MS, activities in parochial affairs ECCS SCOSLESOCOO LOS SOOOCOOOL

, 4 we he took part in racing and cricket
He hoped they would do such Barbados on the whole, was one ine See Tae
work that whenever they returned of the ideal spots for a holiday. a hehe ee ne

to the V , _ He would also like them to re- : ‘ owned
be Bo nk Pee cee te aan member that they could do quite Bedelia a favourite on the local
help. , . lot dor the West Indies from the a ae gw his oc were
ourist angle and there was no ¢atried by gona who won the

On eee that he thought good one part of the West Indies T:T.C. Cup in 1927. Mr. Smith
te Y.W.C.A. should be of reai trying to push their wares and not WS also a member of the Com-

pe bag to the whole island. It had the other. He thought that they â„¢ittee of the Barbados Turf Club.
a itely started off on its vig should get together and those from In recent years he was con~-
oot already. The Vestry should outside like Mr. Bloom from Reu- fined to bed owing to continued
put a substantial sum on its estim- ters, could do quite a lot to fur- failing health and his death oc-
ates by way of a grant for ‘hem, ther the interests of the West In- curred on Saturday. He leaves

pel
O
O
KJ
a
e

LINENS

Mr. Weatherhead supported the. dies as a whole. to meurn their i :
eee net gee Be . as Gat he was one of the +35 iver ie bas ‘Sent bee: g
" a or’ al members of the Associa- Mrs. Daysh recentl lect g W
Board he said, would now thc ion and had seen it grow and also member of the Ventty. of est THE TALK OF THE tO N !
great help the Association wouk §} ad every hope that they would Philip. , ‘
pe ie _ poorly paid shirt makers oe at to arrive at some work- M La e e
of the'city. vs j able solution. » =
: Mr. uae made a motion that Reuter’s C ti Me urence Clarke 36 ins wide x
hey should start off the Vestry ers Co-operation The sad news has been receiv: ° $
with a grant of £50. He was very pleased to hear Mr. of the death ie “Mr yaurende : ‘
Mr. Mottley agreed that £50 Bloom say that Reuters had ex- Clarke of New York ‘Mr Clarke in 2
shculd be given to the Association, tended their co-operation and who was only 47, was born : ir
From the personnel he had seen Whatever assistance they could in st, Andrew, Barbados, and edu- ¥
; ‘: S, . s



; NIL
| AQUA

in the ociation, work Working towards this solution. In

would re He be gee ee the past, the service left room for Gated at the Alleyne School, as
lieve that they were working for improvement and he was glad to was the only son of Mrs. Sarah
themasivée, hear of the close co-operation and Clarke.

Mr. Chase said that that was Cl0Ser association between Reuter | He left the colony 29 years ago
ene occasion when they could be and the West Indian Press which for the States, There he marriec
liberal. There was not any person would result in a workable solu- Miss Millicent Mahon daughter oi
Meith 4 ahhh] aehsh in Warsadas we ot a difficulties. 5 Mrs. Lilian Mahon of Jubilee Gap
who would: criticise any. reaapn. pee res that out of the Con- Bank Hall. A daughter — Lor.

j they would be able t nical
able amount they should give. The work out somethi able to raine was born to the couple E< :
er ‘ thing to t as |
Association was really going to fit of the news agancine — ene Mr. Clarke way fortunate to sec
serve a useful purpose. As it was bers of the West Indies. her attain womanhood, marry anc

in its first year, they would have Mr. Garnet Gordon in , begin to raise a family of her own
. x ;

niore expenses $2 coves, but — the vote of thanks to Sir ieacat About six days ago, Mr, Clarke

a aaa nt eee onto Seel, thanked him for his encour— ise a) Me 8S home trom work

eee eer 2 if e ooh felt aging and weighty words of wis- ecame involved in a collision with

eat — a ee a8 8 dom and ‘for the freedom of Has- ae He died a few hours

ae Sion. | _.». tings House which he had so gen- *!!€- ;

‘ke eee Mr. Chase’s ergusly extanded to them. ; ot has mt to more his Iga
; ; . e said that they who had been 's wife, daughter, two granc
Mr. Mottley said that he would \atching the activities of Colonial Children and his mother,

FLESH
LEMON





not support more than £50. They

Heege ete ye ge Te 93 Derelennay ana Weitere, knew jc WI ITE
subscribe money to then than the °Y too well of the chairmanship

Y.W.C.A. There was a moticn on °f Sir George and the chairman- MIXED CARGO

the same agenda for old women. ship of his predecessors, A shipment of 1,250 bags ol

Mr. Hewitt said that he felt that _ The activities to which Sir rice arrived in Barbados yester-
such an institution was long over- George had referred and of which day by the 76-ton schooner
due in Barbados and they should he had made excuses suggested Timothy A. He Vansluyimar
give it a good send off and be as Very clearly that C.D. and W, as {rom British Guiana, She also
genercus as possible, an original body, had outgrown brought a supply of rice bran,

Mr, Tudor withdrew his motion its habitat. ; firewood, charcoal, wallaba poles

for £50, It was a clear indication that &4 wallaba_ posts.
the time was ripe for the federal , From St. Vincent, the Wonder-

Pyeienest to take over many of ft! Counsellor brought a supply

POWDER TOOTAL
ay LINEN
GOAL yds tent eruzeo

HARRISONS—BROAD ST.

DIAL 2664.



i interes: of firewood while the Julnar
Caught In Ambush ing cared out by C.D. and w, wzived from. Martinique’ with
I a + . fres ruit.

The Judges of the Assistant ‘bask - May ao caethina tak Sir etiam ioe oc nia meie aban oan
Court of Appeal, Mr. G. L. Taylor never been of more importance
and Mr. J. W. B. Chenery yes- than in the life of the West Indies
terday fined Edgar McClean of to-day, There was a tremendous
Bailey Alley, St. George and challenge to the members of the
Jackie Skeete of Redland Ten- press with the extension of politi—
antry, St. George 10/- each. They cal power as far as it Cohid ¥6
agreed with Police Magistrate Mr with the granting of Cpe
A. W. Harper who had fined Me- aqult suftra ois Pig Me

; ge practically through
Clean and Skeete when he had the grea. and the responsibility
icund them guilty of having com- 4),,, eee h nae a Yh
mitted bodily harm. on Oscar ae upon the press was tre-
Hoyte of Sweet Bottom, st. Me7dous. ‘
George. Introspection < ae

The offence was committed on _ There was need for a responsi-

December 21 last year, McClean) ble, reliable, well balanced and COUGH LOZENG
and Skeete ambushed Hoyte, conscientious press. If the press

When he was passing near some did not fulfil its functions in the wW. 4 A
canes in which they were hiding, development of this community,
they jumped out on him and beat, many grave errors would be com—
him with sticks. Hoyte ran into’ mitted.

a house nearby. They were mindful of his advice
a, against introspection and for tha
/-reason they were most happy tc

SURPRISED concern themselves, not only with

a °
A Dutch se .., the distribution of any Caribbean
liner _. ior are news, but also by forming this e@ n nu es









ANIMATED OPINIONS







representative of the Advocate @%ency to interest themselves it |” your sldin has nearly 60 million tiny seams

admiring the ship's swimming pool W9rld news. and pores where germs hide and cause ter-

on Sunday and asked: “Do you They were most happy to be pee cece a ee ee ee esis:

have swimming pools in Barbados €?couraged by, and feel that they | Blackheads, Pimples, Foot Itch and other

too?” could work in co-operation with | blemishes, Ordinary treatments give only
? c e

He seemed very surprised when Reuters ig orgy whey nae, oer tee nore on: use. The how @lacovery, Nixe-

a e . 1 7 minutes *

he got the reply “Barbados has few felt sure Wat they wees rea eed tb Pre pots ph soft, doar, attrac-

tive, smooth skin in one week, or socnes



swimming pools, but the majority Mined to do a good job,

» le, rt: kag:
of homes have fresh water baths.” only by those around that table bak oe a Nixoderm trom Pour chemia

The seaman said that he but by the press generally through today and re-
thought Barbadians relied on the out the area. erm neve Oe ren
sea for bathing and expressed He thanked Sir George for his | Fog im Troubles trou.
even more surprise when he was kind wishes and looked forward
told that Barbados has one of the to proceeding with their work with pes

Says Mr. Leo King:

“YOU CAN RE-LION IT
BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT!”

“ Walters

trouble, |

-



Pye . FREE BROOK ‘

ul aro Toffee
|

+

MASSEY-HARRIS | i} «cop's way or °§
MADE IN UK.

SALVATION |
The Perfection of Confection

Please write for one ‘to
Samuel Roberts, Gospel
Beok and Tract Service,

Enquiries cordially invited for the , Bi Seeee seen Se

EQUIPMENT as. et
WALTERS’ ‘PALM’ TOFFEE LTD. ‘PALM’ WORKS,

LONDON. W.3

supply of the following—

42 W.ILP. 6 cyl DIESEL WHEEL {}| AT;
: TRACTORS ua : RUactois

(Steel Wheels also available for
Ploughing)





SANDERSON FURNISHING
FABRICS

A new range of beautiful styles has arrived—

GRASS CUTTERS = 5 & Git

3.77; $3.42; $2.83
$2.40; $2.06; $1.93
«

4B” wide—per Ye oo... ccecseccecreeeneniapeensen $5.23



30” wide—per yd.



MANURE SPREADERS



SIDE DELIVERY RAKES

FERD MILLS | , CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.
:

|
FERTILIZING DRILLS 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET |
} |

sha. einem amieaasrmininiliatasaiaasiinia ieetinnnmesimtsiinibaiiiiinniaieatdlaaiaatiiasiitailai Al is ctileesataaaemhcaell
PAGE SIX . BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1951

‘cancienasrienenttiletinatiniiaitnacasiaintses
HEADACHE ?
tei
Double your chances for relief
with Double-Acting ALMA-SELTZER!
You are doubly sure of relief when
you take Alka-Seltzer for your
headache, because Alka-Seltzer

t contains an analgesic to ease peins,
| and an alkalizing agent to offset
|
i
}
i
}





excess gastric acidity, so often as-
sociated with headaches. Have a
Ga) supply handy always.

’ “tt





8 > Alka-Seltzer





STOPPING THE TIDE
True old saying, “YOU cant
stop the tide,” however good
your intention. WE find that
as much as we would like to
keep our prices stabled, the
1} constant increases in prices
i} of our raw materials force us
to revise some of our prices,
as under:
Supr. bay Rum still .. 36c.
No. 3 bay Rum still .. 30c.
Limolene Highergrade 60c.
f Mentholated 72e.
7 No, 2 grade 24c,
o- No. 2 grade
Mentholated 30c.
Floralene 6 oz. ......
i POE aig we 24c.
Cologne 3 oz. ........ 24c.
In spite of the increases our
products are still best value
to-day.
On sale at ail good stores.

Cars.

Ans

;
|

GOSH! FEATHER For
ONIONS... HU
GET OUT OF H



me good looks tell you they're just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price

puree eS
aa OP aI cpa
ae ea ete
I at Sia gett on ale




tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated






the John White Guarantee Shicld—the sign

which means ‘just right’! Look for it in
HTT Ts
HATTA

DADDY, ONE OF THE fe aan
PUPPIES ATE THE CANDY ) Tota tao Cua oe THERE ---
YOU BROUGHT ME +7 . IN'T Y CAN . ELMER DID IT!
LAST NIGHT J Cvaaneie WW cH ”% it o yer < T CAN TELL BY
Ze ONE? ey ieee eed we f

leading stores in Barbados.



parag Soup

ken Soup

to Soup

ts, (Sliced and whole)

}
is a Full Brogue Oxford. Tied to every pair is |
|
|
}
1
|
|

THE LOOK ON



=, HIS FACE

5 wy Me ‘ ; pe £ ee aa af ki
Lae y i \\ rw ' PS ) @& 5 ; =f ae
as 4 ewe me: ae 4 Jas BO) = oy as oe % inn; :
he : Os

BOW WAH ”. a bE 4 I? LOOK AT THE TIME] PANO TOLO HIM THAT LAST NiGuT
FEEL TERRIBLE : =e - =# & PARTY 7) TAREE-$
——— "LL GET YOU A ; “A HANGOVER GR = DON'T woray ; =

CuP OF TEA ANOFELIKE THIS FOR YEARS 4a- ‘? You! arse

SOME ASPIRING 1 ! (carrie 28 EY AT_THE OFFICE eam 3

* CONTAINS VITAMINA&D |
IN A DELICIOUS FORM

|
%* INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS
%* ENSURES STRONG LIMBS
|

i

}




Peas
» Tomatoes
Pkgs Blancmange
. Jellos
Bots Salad Cream
" Prepared Mustard
Sliced Bacon,

STUART & SAMPSON
LID.

Headquarters for Best Rum.

















YOU'RE DRESSED THE SAME AND

THE MAN! I'D KN
RIDE THE SAME HORSE, BUT

THAT VOICE ANYWHERE! {

AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN





—because it’s always
washed in LUX

It’s easy to keep pretty clothes looking like
new... wash them regularly in Lux, For
Lux gives longer life to dainty things, keeps
colours bright, gay, new-looking! Try.
Lux yourself and see how much longer
your dainty clothes last,

Haliborange

The nicest way of taking
HALIBUT LIVER OIL

@ Made by ALLEN &@ HANBURYS LTD., LONDON










Keeps all. dainty clothes like NEW

ee pe mem SoR tnee ER e ee A A TTL
eT X-LX 664-151 A LEVER propuct































to and from










LISTEN, CHIEF... THE CORMORANT ) SORRY IF I

IS CHARTERED BY ONE CRAZY SEEMED
LITTLE COOT WHO WANTS To
or. ASAI



LFISH...NOW
‘M Busy!

weses,|| Peake’ | || (eaaareerne| | 0. big car features | :
SS | PREG | | Wastin actin BAe LECH at small car costs ee
G TELEVISION 4 HE ‘ ity
xe 5 Mee" FREIGHT
Xe ad | , ; SERVICES
Regular
Save






From B'dos to




Flying Time jFlights WeeklyjKilo Rates



BERMUDA 12.15

2 $2.16
: LISBON 24, $4.
This superb Morris has every LONDON A , 00 hrs. ; Hie =

feature you expect to find in the larger, more Costly cars,
Engine of 27 horse power. Within-the-wheelbase seating
for four. Independent front wheel suspension.
Controlled ventilation. Lockheed hydraulic brakes. Over 7 cubie
feet of luggage accommodation. Easier to steer through
traffic. Less costly to operate and maintain. Fuel consumption
35-40 miles per gallon. The worlds biggest small car buy!

jm Also “Connecting Services to the “whole World,

THE PHANTOM
~~




ITS’ FASTER BY FAR BY SPEEDBIRD,
Book through your local =~
B.O.A.C. Forwarding Agent

who makes no charge for

advice, information or book- / ;
ings by “Speedbird” to all EB @ ohne ge
sta continents,
z 2 xe , Ae SE
: b Ase . SAT fi







ViOM, WATCHING AT
THE CONTROLS



a ‘arr * eet

a a
: : &
~ ke As

HW SAVE YOUR BREATH, LADY
IAT MTD TAKE AN EARTHQUAKE >
TO WAKE HIM! py
2” Th, \

: hn





: > DF â„¢

SALOON and CONVERTIBLE !
pane see them at
{

{

|

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504

BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION
BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED



, Bndgetown
Phone 4565
anna cl a a iN iT I aE A Ral Se eat
a } RRO PB Liu se ini i






TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

1

LASSIFIED ADS.

°
wy

1951

TELEPHONE 2508



The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow-
ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
fov any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m,





IN MEMORIAM



TUDOR—In loving memory, of my Dear
beloved wife Carmen Sylvia Tudo-,
who feli asleep on February 13, 1950

Dear is the grave, in which she is

laid.

Dear is the memories, that never
shall fade.

Sweet is the hope, that again we
shall meet,

Kneeling together at Jesus feet.
Ever to be remembered by (Husband!
Austin L. Tudor (Son) Horace Ham-
leit (Step daughter) Sheila Welch and
Family. 13,2.51—1n



FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week~4 Cents a
word Sundays.

AUTOMOTIVE







CAR—One (1) Style Master Chevrolet
Car n very good condition, owner driven.
Apply to L. M. Clarke, Jeweller, No, 12

James Street. Phone 3757. 13.2.51—In
CAR—One Vauxhall 25 hp. Six
Cylinder, 5 new Tyres. Upholstery in’

excellent condition. Engine running good
Dial 4514 for inspection. 11.2.51—an

CAR—6 Cylinder, 18 HP. Vauxhall
(Velox) in excellent condition, Phone
MacKinnon 4739 or 2900. 11.2.61—2n.

—_——___..
CARS—1936 Ford V-8 Tourer. Excellent
Condition, 1938 Ford V-8 Sedan Bargain.
1949 Morris Oxford Saloon. Low Mileage
and well cared. FORT ROYAL

GARAGE LTD. Telephone 4504,
11.2.51—3n.





Perfect
Purchasing
Dr. Simon — Telephone
10.1.51—6n

CAR—Packard 8 Cylinder.
condition. Reason for sale,
smaller car,

ELECTRICAL

ONE TURNER WALKER
, electrically driven,
Apply: Mr. . de Souza,
Geddes Grant Ltd.

FURNILURE

RALPH BEARD offers upright rush
bottom chairs $3.75 each, with arms
$4.80 and rockers $5.00 each. New
mahogany upright chairs $17.00 per pr.
New mag. rockers $36.00 per pair, Tub
chairs $26.00 per pr. Mahogany cocktail
tables from $8.00. Tea trolleys $15.00
each, Mahogany Vanities, from $75.00;
Mog. bedends 3 ft. 6 ins. $35.00 per pr.
also a good variety of second hand
furniture.

For further particulars Dial 4688. Call
on view at Ralph Beard’s show room
Herdwood Alley. 9.2.51—3n

DRILL
new.
Cfo T.
1,2.51-—6n.



MISCELLANEOUS

ACTUMUS—The new Fertiliser for
canes, vegetable and flower gardens $3.60
per lb, from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store, Coleridge Street. Phone 2999.

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites, Top
grade, A. BARNES & Co,, Ltd.

26,1.51—t-f.n.

CHELSTON LIME WORKS Can
supply, Temper & Building Lime. Boul-
ders, Concrete Stone Grit, Marl & Sand.
Trucks on hire. P, S. Brooks. Phone
8335. 13,2.51—6n.
a

CLOTHING English family have
for sale ladies cashmere sweaters, linen
frocks, tweed riding jacket, new Suede
Sandals, Man's tweed Jackets (new)
Ayessing gowns, Tel, 8173.





13.2.51—1n.

SS .
CURTAIN FPITTINGS—For smart win-
dow styling, light control, Valances and

draperies. By Kirsch. Dial 4476 A.
BARNES & CO., LTD, 13,.2,51-—t.f.0

MODERNFOLD DOORS—The distin-
fuished solution to your special

architectural problem of door closures,
screens, movable partitions. Dial 4476
A. BARNES & CO., LTD,

13,2.51-—t.f.n,

peepee erento bapleentianen soeetineeeenmnenteeie
GALVANISED PIPE in the following
sizes: “in., 4in., %in., lin., 1% ins,
2ins., 24% ins., 3ins, and 4 ins. Also fit~
tings. Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

Trafalgar Street, Phone PS ae
2 O1.——t.t.n.



HEARING AID Almost New with
spares including Batteries — Apply Box
“E” C/o Advocate Co.

13.2.51—2n,



O,K COFFEE—Pronounced by users as
the best packaged Coffue they can buy,



and a fresh supply is now at your
grocer, 13.2,51—2n
PIANO—Lipp. Apply to Mrs. Hutson

Inniss Ayshford. 13.2.51—3n,
PIANO—Bentley
8435.

a
SUEDE SADDLE — Excellent condition
Large American Wardrobe trunk, fitted.

also sheet of 3 ply wood. Tel. 8173.
13,2.51—1n

——
STAK-A-BYE TUBULAR Steel Chairs
and Tables on show at Ralph Beard’s
Show rooms, Hardwood Alley. Trad?

enquiries cordially invited.
13.2,51—6n

—

STEEL STEP LADDERS—6-tread and
4-tread. Just the thing for Stores, Schools,
Offices, and Household uses, 4 tread $9.88



{almost new). Phone
13.2,51—4n,

eoch; 6 tread $12.95 each, Cannot be
repeated at this price, at RALPH
BEARD'S Show Rooms Hardwood
Alley. 10,2,51—2n





VENETIAN BLINDS,—Kirsch Sun-aire

delivery 3 weeks, Dial 4476
S & CO., LTD. 13.2.51-+t.f.n.

your sizes,



WEETABIX—Fresh supply of this most
delicious of all cereals is now at your
grocer. 13.2,51—2n

lena a

WOOD & COAL eae
. Apply W. A. Medford.

condition. pply 11.2.51—3n







FOR RENT

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.

HOUSES

BLUE HOUSE—laicas Street. A fine
business stand, Immediate possession
Apply THANT BROS. Pr. Wm. Hry St.
Dia’ 3466. 11.2,51—39

HIGH ROCK—Bathsheba. From March
to July. Phone 4048, 10.2.51—4n
FO Oro

ROOM, HASTINGS — A newly fur-
rished room with running water. Phone
47i8. 13.2.51-—3n,





a
Maxwells

SEA-C.AZE — On-the-sta z

oast, illy furnished including tele
pis“e and refrigerarcr. for March, June.
July. For further information Pisin’
13.2.51-——1n



WENDOVER Abbeville

and July. Apply: 2851, P. D. Me Dermott

4.2.51—In



een

BE WIUHSE...

«. - ADVERTISE





Gardens
Roekley to be let, furnished. May, June

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate tine on Sundays,
on week-days

minimum charge $1.50
and $1.80 on Sundays,





AUCTION
By instructions received from the
Director of Department of Highways &

Transport I will set
pects sce at their
sey the lth, beginn:
the following len tae
(127) Oil Brooms, (75)
s.grieulture Forks, (19)
Lanterns, (87) Rakes, (41)
(29) Wheel Barrows, (45)
and several other items of interest.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Govt. Auctioneer.

Shovels,
Pickaxes,

up for sale by
yard on Thurs-
at 12.30 p.m.
Steel Brooms,
(51)
154)
Buckets,
Twist Drills

7.2,51—4n,



REAL ESTATE

See a

GRANDVIEW, Bathsheba —
Bedroomed Bungalow, rattan
Sq. Feet Land,

Offer in writing for the same,
received by E, C.
Lynch & Cec, Ltd.
February 195

LAND—1 acre 4
in Rampart Hil,
Hill, St. Michael.
Gill's Av



Apply: K. M, Griffith,
enue, Eagle Hall, St. Michael,
7.2.51—3n.
ar niente eee ai
“DUNSINANE”
Pee eee ae ST. MICHAEL,
e residence latel, ‘upi
W.' Ogee 'Y occupied by Mrs.

The house stands in well kept gardens
and grounds (2 acres 37 perches),

The whole comprises verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 5 bedrooms, one
with marble bath, 2 showers, 2 lava-
tories, convenient kitchen and Pantry,
reoms for 5 servants, garage for 2 cars,
and stables.

Water supply for garden and grounds
from a well with mill; water service in
heuse and also servants rooms (shower
and lavatory).

The residence completely wired and
furnished with electric lighting from
the company’s mains.

House convertible into flats and out-
buildings convertible into a cottage

The land is suitable for develop.
ment or kitchen gardens.

The undersigned will offer the
premises for sale by public auction at
their office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 23rd day of
February 1951 at 2 p.m,

Inspection on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days only between 3 and 5 p.m,

For further particulars apply to

Cc » CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors,

4.2.51—10n,

—_—

The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office No, 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 16th February 1951 at
2 p.m. The messuage or dwelling house
formerly known as Tullycra now call-
ed “CRYSTAL WATERS" with the land
thereto containing by estimation 12,087
square feet situated on the sea at Car-
ville Avenue, Worthing, Christ Church,
at present used as a boarding house.

Inspection any day except Sundays
between 4 and 6 p.m, on application to
Mrs. Talma on the premises,

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD, & Co.,
Solicitors,
3.2.51—12n.

The undersigned will offer for sale at
James St., over Hinds & Co., Drug Store
on the 14th February 1951 at 2 p.m., by
public Competition, one Modern Stone-
built property known as “Hill Crest",
Situated at Upper Collymore Rock, oppo-
site the A.M.E. Church, with 5.000 sq. ft.
of Land, 2 bedrooms, open verandah, tiled
beth and water toilet, Electricity, can be
seen from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Apply the
owner on premises. L, A. M. WATTS,
James Street. Dial 4523,

10.2.51—4n,

PROPERTIES—Two delightful __resi-
dence situated at Top Rock, Christ
Chureh. Both having 3 bedrooms with
2 Toilets and Baths recently constructed,
Gardens well laid out. With possession
on March ist. No reasonable offer will
be refused, For viewing etc. Ring 4683









or 2228. 13.2 1—6n
“ MARWIN—Maxwell's Road. Modern
stone-built Bungalow, 3 Bedrooms,

Drawing and Dining Room Breakfast
Room and Kitchenette, Toilet and Bath,
Servants’ Room, Garage in ard, Water
and Electric Light installed. Approx-

imately 14,000 sq. ft. of land. Apply:
E. H. Farmer, Andrews Plantation or
Dial 95267. 4,2.51—6n.



A new and well built Bungalow on
Pine Hill called WESTFIELD, the pro-
perty of the late Sir George Walton,

The Bungalow stands on 18,020 square

feet of land and contains one large
rublic room, two bedrooms, kitchen,
laundry, bath and lavatory.

In a separate building there is a
Garage for one car and two servants
rooms with bath and lavatory,

The property will be set up for sale
at our office on Wednesday the 2ist day
of February 1951, at 2 p.m.

For conditions of sale apply to the
undersigned,

Inspection any day between 10.30 a.m.
ana — p.m, Telephone Lady Walton,
No, 4581.

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors,
9.2,51—11n.



LOST

Minimum charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week—4 Cents a
word Sundays.



BROOCH — In Bridgetown Sat. Feb.
10th. Half Moon Diamond Brooch.
Finder will be rewarded. Phone 2592.

13.2.51—I1n,



SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series L. 1859.
Finder please return same to Timothy
Rice, Ivy Land, St. Michael,

13.2.51—I1n



GOVERNMENT

——————
UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

Matriculation Examination

The following is an extract from a letter dated 18th November,

1950, from the Secretary to the Matriculation and School Examinations
2 il of the University of London: —

SP aen, cuivers con oT “The University. of London will cease to issue notifications of
exemption from the Matriculation Examination after 30th April,
Candidates, who expect to matriculate by means of the
School Certificate or Higher School Certificate of December 1950,
should write to the Secretary of the Matriculation and School
Examinations Council, Senate House, London, W.C.1., not to the
Secertary of the Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate, They
must mention their index number and centre, and forward with
the letter the matriculation registration fee of three guineas so
that the information and fee is received by the University of
London during February 1951.
plete their matriculation exemption by passing the Higher School
Certificate or a single subject at the School Certificate Examina-

1951.



standing on 14,919

will be
C/o James A.

up to 4 p.m, 28th
8.2.51—6r

perches of land situated
St. Michael, near Cave

PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate tine an week-days
and 12 cents per agete line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on weekdays
end $1.80 on Sundays.





“£25: ~. -d. easily earnea by obtaining

order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends, No previous exper!
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making

opportunity, Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works,
England.”

25.1.51—18n

Ss
THE ASSOCIATED BOARD OF THE
a ROYAL SOHOOLS OF a

e Board begs to notify the teachers
that the Practical exam will take place

between the 6th and 16th April 1951.
Mr. H. E. Wilson will be the examiner

this year for the West Indies.

All forms and fees must be forwarded





Y. M. P. C.

Members are asked to submit
motions they may desire to place on
Agenda for the half yearly General
Meeting to be held at the Club House
on the 14th March, to the Secretary, not
jater than the’ 1?th February, 1951.

P. G.

Secretary.
13.2.61—3n

the

NOTICE

PARISH OF 8T. JOHN
SEALED tenders are invited for sup-
plying approximately 42 pints pure fresh
cows’ milk daily to St. John's Almshouse
in two deliveries, as from the 25th
March 1951, Applications will be re-
ceived by the bndersigned to the 17th
instant, and it is to w stood that
the lowest or any tender will not neces-
sarily be accepted.
R. S. FRASER,
Clerk,
Board of Poor Law
Guardians.
St. John.
10.2.51--6n

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST, JOSEPH.
Applications for the Post of Parochial
Treasurer will be received by the un-
dersigned not later than the 28th Feb-
ruary 1951 Applications must be aic-
companied by Baptismal and Medical
Certificates, and marked on the En-
velope, applications for Post of Paro-
chial Treasurer,
Sed. Rev. L. C. MALLALIEU,
Chairman
St. Joseph's Vestny.
11,2,51—6n,

NOTICE

Applicants are invited for the post of
Aseistant Nurse at St. Lucy's Almshouse
at a salary of $57.50 per month, uniform
ete. and quarters provided.

Applicants must be fully certifleated,
midwives, and general Nurses.

The successful candidate must assume
duties on 25th February 1961.

Applications will be received by me up
to Saturday 17th. February 1951.

OSWALD L. DEANE,

Clerk, Board of Poor Law Guardians,

St. Lucy.
10.2.51—7n.



NOTICE

The Parochial Treasurer's Office, St.
Michael will be closed at 12 o'clock Noon
on Thuredey 15th and Tuesday 20th Feb-

ruary 1961,
PERCY H, BURTON,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Michael,
13.2.51--2n,
I
NOTICE
SUPPLIES FOR THE POOR
OF THE

PARISH OF SAINT MICHAEL
Sealed Tenders in duplicate marked
on the envelope “TENDER FOR

» will be received by the Clerk
of the Vestry up to 12 o'clock noon on
Thursday 22nd February, for the under-
mentioned supplies in such quantities as
may from time to time be ordered for
one year commencing on the Ist Aprii
next,

FRESH MEAT

FRESH MTLK

FRESH BREAD.

Each person tendering must send in
a letter, along with the Tender, signed
by two properly qualified persons (not
being members of \the Vestry) stating
their willingness to become bound witn
the Tenderer in the event of their
Terder being accepted for the due ful-
filment to the Contract.

With respect to the tender for FRESH
MILK, the probable quantity required
for one year is 24,000 gallons and the
Vestry reserve the right to accept the
Tender of more than one person for
tive supply of this article and all per-
rons tendering for this article shall
forward, along with their tender, 9 Cer-
tifiecate by a properly qualified Veterinary
Practitioner stating that the cattle from
which the milk will be supplied are
free from Tubereulosis.

Forms of tenders cam be obtained at
the Churchwarden’s Office,

By Order,

E. C. REDMAN,
Michael's Vestry.

13.2.51.--t.f.n,

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of William and Ursula
Jones trading as Jones & Co, holder of
Liquor License No, 18 of 1951 granted
to Wm. Jones in respect of a board &
rhingle shop attached to residence at
Eagle Hall, St. Michael for permission
to use said Liquor License at said pre-
mises, Bable Hall, St, Michael.

Dated this 12th day of February 1951.
T.:—E. A. Me LEOD, Esq.

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A"
Signed WILLIAM R. JONES.
For Applicants.

N.B.—-This application will be consi-
dered at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, District ‘A’ on Thursday
the 22nd day of February 1951 at 11

‘clock, a.m.
ne E. A. McLEOD.
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
13,.2.511n.













Clerk, St.



NOTICE

Similarly, if they expect to com-

tion, they must state the date (with index number and centre)
of the examination on which they were awarded the School

Certificate.

April, 1951.
qualify.

therefore; —

tion.

don during February.

matter.”
| Department of Education,
| 6th February, 1951,

i

“The authorities of the Local Examinations Syndicate of
Cambridge University and the University of London have made
special arrangements in connexion with the December examina-
tion so that successful candidates may matriculate before 30th

“Matriculation fees will be refunded to those who do not
“Any candidate who intends to follow this procedure should,
(a) Write to London not Cambridge.
(b) Give his address clearly, arid full name.
(c) State index number, centre, date and name of the examina-

(d) Forward fee of three guineas to reach the University of Lon-

“These instructions countermand any already given to persons
who have been in touch with the University of London about this

10.2.51—2n



ers, whose trade or business address is 100 Park

and will be entitled to register the same after one month

a
application at my office.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE
SOVERNMENT NOTICES





OKRA CLOSE SEASON
Order

In pursuance of Section 4, sub
Prevention Act, 1928, (1928-7),

has fixed the period from the Ist of May to the 30th of June, inclusive,
to be a Close Season for Okras.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this Ist day of |
Preston/| February, one thousand nin

nae and fifty-one.
By*Command,
A. A, HINDS,

Clerk, Executive Committee.
Note.

Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-

from the provisions of sub-section (3) of Section 4 may

Agriculture.
10.2.51—2n,



COTTON CLOSE SEASON
Order

In pursuance of Section 4 sub:

sections (1) and (2) of the Cotton
Diseases Prevention Act, 1928

(1928-7), the Governor-in-Executive
Committee has fixed the period from the Ist of May to the 30th of
June, 1951, inclusive, to be a Close Season for Cotton.

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this Ist day of
February, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-one.

By Command,
A. A, HINDS,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
10.2.51—2n.





CHANCERY SALE

The under-mentioned property will be Set up for sale‘at the Registration Office.
Public Buildings Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and on the
date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding Friday
at the same place and during the same hours until sold. Full particulars on appli-

cation to me.
CYRIL BRUCE BROOKS—Piaintift

vs. ’
ELEANOR PARK BAKER—Defendant

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Pinfold Street
in the City of Bridgetown in this Island containing by admeasurement Two
thousand one hundred and fourteen square feet or thereabouts butting and
bounding on lands of T, E, Went ov lands of Mrs. E.G, De Roys on lands ot

Pinfold Street aforesaid or howeve> c'se the same may butt and bound Together
with the messuage or dwelling house thereon called “Kenworth and ail
other buildings and erections both freehold and chattel thereon erected.
UPSET PRICE: £416-13-4d.
Date of Sale: 23rd February, 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.
2th January, 1951.



TAKE NOTICE

THREEJFEATHERS

That PEATHERS DISTRIBUTORS INC.
existing under the laws of the State of Delaware, Uni States of America, Whole-
sale Liquor Distributors, whose trade or business a: is 350 Fifth Avenue, New
York 1, State of New York, U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of whisky, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 10th cay of February 1951, unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of
such registration. The trade mark can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 9th day of February 195},

H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.
10.2.61-—3n.

.» @ corporation organized and



TAKE NOTICE

That SCHENLEY INDUSTRIES, INC., a corporation organised and existing
under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, whose trade or
business address is 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, State of New York, US A.,
Wholesale Liquor Distributors, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in

rt “A" of ister in ct of wines, and will be entitled to register the same

r one month from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such

registration. The trade mark can be seen on application at my ice,
Dated this 9th day of February 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.
10,2.516


TAKE NOTICE

r 9

That ZONITE PRODUCTS CORPORATION, a corporation organized and exist-
under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Manufactur-
Avenue, New York 17, State of
New York, U.S A., has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of products for oral hygiene, such as dental paste, powders, and
creams and dentifrices all of which being of medicinal value, and also astringenta,
from the 10th day of Peb-
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
ation. The trade mark can be seen on

ing

ruary 1951 unless some person shall in the
my office of opposition of such registr

Dated this 9h day of February 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

TAKE NOTICE
CRESTA BLANCA

That SCHENLEY INDUSTRIES INC., a corporation organized and ex*-ting under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Manufacturers, whose
trade or business address is 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, State of New ‘York,
U.S.A. has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of wines, and will be entitled to register the same after one month
from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such registration, The trade
mark can be seen on application at my office,

Dated this 9th day of February 1961,
H_ WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,

TAKE NOTICE

pp CHARTER

That OLD CHARTER DISTILLERY CO., a corporation organized and existing
under the laws of State of Delaware, United States of America, Distillers,
Phase trade or bus ddress is 100 West 10th Street, Wilmi State of
ware, U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A”

in ot whisky, and will be entitled to register the same after
from the 10th da



one mont y of ary 1951, unless some person shall in
the meantime give 2 duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The can be seen on application at my office.
Dated this 9th day of February 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

10.2.51—3n.



TAKE NOTICE
TRUBENISED

That TR COMPANY (Rexistered Trust), a corporation organized
rding to w of Liechtenstein, whose tr or business address is Vaduz,
Liechtenstein, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part

of Register in respect of men's and boys’ shirts, collars and cuffs and ladies’
uses, dresses and trimmings and corsetry, and clothing of all kinds, and will
be entitled to register the same after one month from the 10th day of February.
1951, unless some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such registration. The trade mark can be seen on

arr rmten toe Oth rig February 1951
is ay °
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Mark:
10.2.51





TAKE NOTICE



That PAUL JONES AND COMPANY. INC., a corporation organized under the
laws of the State of Maryland, United States of America, Distillers, whose trade
or business address is 405 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York, United States
of America, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of alcoholic beverages, especially whisky, and will be entitled
to register the same after one month from the 10th day of February, 1951, unless
some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office af
opposition of uwuch registration, The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office

Dated this 9th day of February 1951

H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks

10.2.51 $i?

section (3) of the Cotton Diseases 7
the Governor-in-Executive Committee | Caroli





PAGE SEVEN













] " Geeding, for St. ‘Vince aie Siedighain: ea. Sear Seer
ar our 0g a aAaatinn, 50 tor et, Cap Lady Nelson, 9s, Uruguay.
8.8. Lady Rodney, 4,907 tons net, Capt. 5: Rosa. s a ere Fu
. “ ee ie , rir Byfjerd, <.s. Alcon Ranger, 2.007%
In Carlisle Bay LeBlanc. for St, Leis 5 Gorenier a, Askren, hs Sepa A
‘n Touch With Barbados «=: Fort En Bessin, 3.4. Aleos
Ses. Emanuel C. Gordon, MV Sedge- . * Pionee ss. San Jose, ss. Mormactern
field Sch. Marea Henrietta, Sch Coastal Station Cervais. mv. Samana, m.t, Athos,
M. W. Ipana, Sch Philip H. Davidson.| Cybie and Wireless advise that they car %. $. Monica, ss, Italia
V.. Vagabond Prince, Sch. Mary E.| now communicate with the toflowin Cotonial, ss. Nuey
ine. M.V. Moneka, Sch. Emeline,| sips through their Barbados Coast \ ss. Esso Cambridge,
Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch* Franklyn Station:~ Bowhill, s. Borito, ss. Demosthe
ae S.S. Gascogne, «5. Empress of Scot s.s. American Sailor, ¢.s. Rosina vas
ARRIVALS land, ss. Fort Amherst, $s. Mauretania, «5 Willemstad, 5,5. Cristalina, 4
Schooner Timothy A. H. Vansluytman, | ;\. Bros. s.s. Golfito, &.s. Nieuw Amster. Allerton, s.s. Hersilia,
a — net, Capt. Stoll, from British
ulana.

S.S, Mulberry Hill, 4.223 tons net, Capt

Campbell, from London

Attention is drawn to sub-section (6) of Section 4 of the Cotton | Mettineau, from Martinique.
7) whereby special exemption | to:



CHANCERY SALE z

BARBADOS

SS. Islandside, 4421 tons net, Capt The undermentioned property will be set vp for sale at the Registration Ottee
Usher, from Curacao. Public Bulidings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and ae
Schooner Juinar, 54 tons net, Capt. | date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding Pr ay
at the same place and during the same hours until sold, Full particulars on appli
Schooner Wonderful Counsellor, 39] cation to me.
ns net, Capt. soon. from St. Vincent LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILL — Plaintiff
Ul vs.
Vv. Carteenn 100 on net, Capt VIOLET JOHNSON —~ Defendant

be granted] .,
by the Director of Agriculture with the consent of the Board of | con

umbs, for Dominica.

Schooner Enterprise S., 68 tons net,

Capt. Gregg, for St. Lucia.

Schooner D’Ortac, 58 tons net, Capt.
i

words 3 cents a word week—4 cents a

WANTED

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Spooners Mil!
in te parish of Saint Michael and Isiand aforesaid containing by admeasurement
two roods two and two-tenths perches or thereabouts Abutting and bounding on
lands formerly of W. T. EB. Richards but now of one Walrond on lands formerly of
G. G. Medford but now of one Farnum on lands formerly of Alfred FP. Green but
now of one Pilgrim and on the public road called Spooners Hil) or however else
the same may abut and bound Together with the messuage or dwelling house
called “Homestead” and all and singular the buildings and erections both freehold
and chattel on the said lands erected and built standing and being with the appur-

a...

Minimum charge week 72 cents and | tenances,
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24) UPSET PRICE ; £1350 0. 0d

word Sundays,

SALE: 2nd March, 1951.
Pree " ’ H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar-in-Chancery

















i. Sth February, 195)
HELP Niet oe ee A oa * rel 951
SESS aeeetanre semen aticnseemnagetiseesiinieieeeene:
LADY-—Suitable lady with knowledge
of book-keeping, filing and office work.
Apply Post Office Box 221, Bridgetown
11.2.51—8n
7 I AUSTRALIA, NEW ——— ad
MISCELLANEOUS ae
aerate panei miiievesnsie haiaas ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED the < 30/4“ CARIRERE : ean
snk cies Dial ee cniendniel (M.A.N.Z. LINE) accept Cargo and Passengers {sr
13.2,51—2n M.S. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to cee oe hee ae
POS sail Adelaide January 4th, Melbourne ee. Se i me
ee ee young Lady requires} February sth, Sydney Februs ry 17th, Friday, 23rd February, 1951
crportenee th ene cee pe Brisbane February 23rd, Arriving at ji sik e
C/o. Advocate Co, » Apply J. K-| Boxbados end of March,” 1951. The M/V. “DAERWOOD” wi

EMPLOYMENT~-No salary, by retired
Gentleman to relieve intolerable boredom
of idling, useful in ofee, Hotel or Club,

Apply Box T. A. C/o Advocate Co,

th

dozen each —

&

pens, cameras, clothing, ete. will
sent in exchange. Send 300 stamps or
more, Pagewood 1355 N. Dearborn,

Chicago 10, Tl. U.S.A

13.2.51—1n

BO’

Co., Lid, Broad Street. Dial 3713,

13.2.51—10n
Horace Savoury on lands of Mr. Corier on lands of Violtt L. Barrow and on | ——_____.
USED POSTAGE STAMPS WANTED
Prompt cash paid for used stamps if
you Wish, merchandise such as fountal
be

WANTED TO BUY

USED POSTAGE STAMPS-—Of the
British West Indies,
at the Caribbean Stamp Society No. 10
Swan Street.

~~ 50,000 empty, white, plain
ree-gill bottles packed in bales of 16
at le, per bottle including
packing. Please apply to S. P. Mussun Son

13.2.5leo1n

Good Prices Paid
10,2.51—3n

accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba,
and Passengers only for St. Vin-
cent, Date of Sailing to be
notified,

This vessel has ample space for Hard
Yrozen and General cargo.

Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Laing with transhipment at Trinidad
for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
anid Leeward Islands,

B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, tno.

For further particulars apply —-
YURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. and
Da COSTA & CO, LTD,
Trinidad, Barbados,
B.W.1. B.W.I,

Consignee—Tel. No, 4047



\e Alcon Steele OF

NEW YORK SERVICE
SS, “Essi” sails 16th January arriv

SS. “Byfjord” sails and February nil an a
En CN

4th February
14th







ret}





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
— —w——w=| A Steamer sails 18th January —
WANTED TO SUB-LET a, . E ist ‘Webrugry w ” 2nd “
HOUSE — At Maxwell's " ” Sth “
Coast on the Sea, From ith ‘o 3190) ee
March. For particulars Dial 8346 CANAD:AN SERVICE
13,2.51—2)) -OUTHBOUND
=e oe Name of Ship Sails Arrives
Halifax Barbados
88. “ALCOA PILGRIM” Januany 26th, Feb
AN OPPORTUNITY — }}) 2: saves wevnanre February ath’ Faluat’ Sh
8.8, “ALCOA POL. ; February 23r, March 6th,



TO BUY
1Small Gas
Enamel finish,
2 Boiling Burners
1 Grell Burner complete with
oven cooker traded in to buy.
A large Cooker
PRICE $60
see it at your Gas Show Room.

Cooker Grey





MRS. STEWART'S
DANCING SCHOOL

PUPILS who are desirous of
joining Mrs. STEWART’S
DANCING SCHOOL will
be interviewed on
Thursday, February
15th from 4.30
p.m. onwards,
Classes will begin on
Saturday 17th
For further infcermation
Dial 2440

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Whittaker’s Almanack,

1951

Pint, 1% Pint and Cocktail
Glasses

at

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE



ORIENTAL
GOODS
From INDIA, CHINA,
EGYPT !
Silk, Curios, Brassware,
Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak-
wood, Sandals, French Per-
fumes, Barbados Scarves in
Pure Silk, Ete., Ete., Etc.
The Souvenir Headquarters
THANI Kross.

KASHMERE
Pr. Wm. Henry 8t.—Dial 5466





FURNISH

Home & Office

The Money-Saving Way

Bedsteads,
Wood, Springs

Cradles in Tron and
Beds $5 up--
Bureaus, Stools, Wardrobes &
Dresser-Robes, $18 up Night
Chairs. Morris Suites and Separ-
ate Pieces, Berbice and Bergere
Chairs, Tub Suites and separate
Rockers, Rush Furniture, Desks
with Flat and Sloping Tops, $6 up;
Book Cases, Book Racks.

\BSOOGSV OSS GOO 89 TNSOF VFO SSS GOOFS

>.








Them vessels have limited passenger accommodation.

—eeenerecnacueaninatnmenne
ROBERT THOM LTD.—-New York and Gulf Service.
Apply: DACOSTA & OO,, LTD,-—Canadian Service.

hoy H ISON LINE



HARR

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM







rfrr'w Due
Vessel From §{ = Leaves Barbados

8.S. “MULBERRY HILL” "Ptescen & f

London 23rd Jan. lith Feb,
S.S. “PROSPECTOR” oy d Feb, 23rd Feb.
88. “PACTOR” week eee

L/pool 6th Feb, 19th Feb,
$8. “TRIBESMAN” ..M/brough&
8.8. “SPEAKER’ t seca ath Feb: “ath Mares
5.8. SP , .» Liverpoo 17t eb. 1. Mare
5.S. “S'TATESMAN” . London 17th Feb, Sth March

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Closes in Barbados
12th Feb,

For

Vessel
5.8. “COLONIAL” .. Liverpool

For further information apply to - - -
DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents



CANADIAN SERVICE

From Halifax, N.S., St. Jolin, N.B,
To Barbados, Trinidad, Demerara, B.G.

LOADING DATES _

| Expeeted Arrival
| Halifax







at. John { Rees Sriaenows,
ao, ” { arbados
ve “poupener fis: [tom | gee
40, “BERCH HILL" | 12 Feb | 28 Feb.
Sa. pT Cem, 26 Feb. 23 Feb 14 Mar.
58. “POLY CREST \12 Mar. | 28 Mar,
8, VESSEL... 126 Mar. | 93 Mar, lf Apr
U.K. SERVICE
From Glasgow, Liverpool, Newport, London.
| { Newport , Expected Arrival
| Glaswow | Liverpool| Swansea | Dates Bridgetown,
85, “OAK ILL” 13 Feb 8 Feb 1 "Mer
ae if 4 Mar. 28 Peb 14 Feb 20 Mar.
ss. “SUNWHIT" 27 Mar. | 22 Mar. | 19 Mar. | 12 Apr
From ited Antwerp, London bi i Expected ‘Arrivat
a : otterdam Antwer Lond Date th
5.8, “SUNAVIS 15 Mar 17 Mar. , 27 Mas “ Ape one
Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED.
Phone 4703





PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, for sail-

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.

mexsecnannas












7

=

{ SEE US FOR......

LAWN MOWERS & PARTS










THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

!
| CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.— Proprietors, }

thigh Gndy



CHARLES McENEARNEY & C0. LYD.

GEOGCSOGGVIG TOF F9STOSHSSS GGSSSSHOSOOON

'

%
i














































,
PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1951
a aieeeeceepemmnntaliiapaninait
7 ' > /} ‘ ns vq" : wea J
rymi ee TWO CAPTAINS CHATTING ¢ : ie Bank Clerks End Strike Temporary uncwvil servant <3
rinidad leam | What's om Today | | oor Bike soins : (
7 A | nire’s 4,000 bank clerks to-day} now works fy 1, yf a? }
ei Exhibition of Sculpture and | jended their seven weeks strike égu arly
e Paintings by K. R. Brood- for more pay after an arbitration
ee | % hagen, Paintings and | jcourt had granteq some of their ~oagaay "y ‘ sa
i t a Ss a ain water colours by Marjorie | |pay demands. ab eka
9 Ereodhagen and paintings | |- But the banks, closed since ““Teha!™ he verurned, sharp as a final
o and water colow's by John | December 23, will not open till demand. “I feel as if someone had filled
he j Harrison at Barbados | ee. oy tenes of, work me mm - this ponarpetion een a sub-
Mus ob ated 10.00 | § jared, section like mine, what can e but non-
Good Cricket Expected fp, ents ee eee | —Reuter. tmpleyed, clas G2"
a ete at Bunsimane™, | | = | sia ear Suton isu e>! Baty buying” iy “and
THE TRINIDAD. TEAM, thirteen strong, headed by Country Roa uction- | | | “Nothing,” prowled Mr. P. “All my: ™eans buying — Kellogg's" All-Bran.
ieir captain, Jeffrey Stolimeyer and manager Harold Bur- ae Branker, rr - The Weather ens ete breakfast (ocd, supply the tan the
; tt, arrived at Seawell Airport shortly after ten o'clock Legislative Council meets | - baht ol | the trouble.” ae eee wthieerGie A
rday I ert tree 2.00 un Rises : 6.20 a.m. “Clarify that statement,” commande . ‘i
————- —-- ‘he team was Jeffrey Stoll- Members will consider four | Sun Sets : 6.68 p.m. fr. P i 4 neat he ed es ee eee
‘é me re meyer (Captain), N. Asgaralli, | Resolutions, making it | Mogn (First Quarter) Feb- | * Well it's like this,” I said. “You've 1th portfolio. “ So the charm worked,
Christie W ins ° Jones, R. Tangehoon, R. Le- | lawful fc. Vestries—St. | | Puary i3 3 | | got about 30 ft. of tubing inside you, did it #1 asked’ him. |
S ; S yall. L. Butler, C. Sampath S. ; Andrew, St. Michael, St. | Lighting : 6.30 p.m. ; oe everything you eat has to pass “It certainly did,” he replitd. “A. d
~ ¥ 4 Guillen, Frank King, C. Skeete Philip, St. Joseph and St, | High Water ; 8.08 aah, 8.58. ceateraes thane gue ie ae. dige Ale Bran three days running — and 5
( If . tl : W. Ferguson, A. Ganteaume, S. George, to lease land for | p.m. \ But the soft, starchy foods you get nowa- ULB interwar "il Me Bee wae 3
xO ite Jackbir, playing fields. Two Bills YESTERDAY { days don’t give muscles anything to" oa fee a ei ‘ ficat?,”*
“T have two regrets’, skipper are also on the Agenda— | | | Rainfall (Codrington) : work on.” ae say that in teiplicacé,” 1
eee 8 lan) Christie led Stcllmeyer told the Advocate one to provide for the | | -08 in. | _ “Non-utilization of resources, eh?”
hon e lrrgest Id that ever Spcrts Editor on arrival at Sea- regulation of Public Utili- | | Total for Month to Yester- | asked our Mr. P. KELLOGG'S ALL-BRAN relieves constis
i Fj Cham- well yesterday. “The first is that ties and the other to amerid | day : 1.04 ins. | * Precisely,” I said. “And that means ny ~~ “regular.” Made from rich
wh Berges \ ice duri | : } a bottleneck—in fact, constipation. outer layers of whole wheat, oven-
Golf due te rain our practice ng the Supervision and ; Temperature (Max.) : Only one thing can save you” I said toasted with malt, salt and sugar. a
ib over tho, week- the past two weeks has been se- | Weighing of Sugar Canés | 81.0° F. a, ore woe y Rote ig. joltadid breaktast, snd many appetizing cakes,
c ieft-hander from Scot- riously hampered and_ secondly Act, 1939. Temperatue (Min.) : | aa is jock capitals, please,” demanded — wens, avd surprise dishes,
Ne d off the honours with that no young Trinidadian bats- | The Heuse of Assembly | 74.0° F. j
three-stroke lead over his man has performed _ sufficiently Meets 3.00 | Wind Direction OO an) EE O_o
ne contenders at the end of well in the Trials to merit selec- pera CR Ts Ra ty a ae é (3 p.m.) : E.N.E. }
he 1} hard 36-hole struggle, tion.” Dr. Cummins is expected to Wind Velocity : 10 miles j
° h eighieen were played on Jeff declined to comment on introduce a Supplement- per hour I —~ F owere
Si d eighteen on Sunday. the individual members of the ary Resolution for $6,000; Barometer (9 a.m.) : 29.932 | ba)
Dick John Rodger and team and said that ‘their success | Mr. Adams will introduce | , (3 p.m.) : 29.852 ‘
Jack Egan were tied for second would not depend upon _indi- one for $337,735; Mr. Cox t > D
| pisee, followed by Michael Timp- viduals but rather on good team | will move the passing of ress
§ en strokes back of the new



a 79 on Saturday, Christie
fth place in the field cl
Sunday he
eat with a 74 and
ave him a clear
Vidmer, Rodger

ers, but on




il of

margin of vic

work
All Fit
Everyone was fit, he said, and
he expected the team to give a
good account of itself, In view of
the fact that the Australian tour
was in the offing he was sure that



a third for $2,500; and Mr.
Adams will take charge of
a forvth fer $1,300.
Police Band gives concert ai
Leper Hospital 4.00
Mobile Cinema gives show
at Boscobel School Pasture





PUBLIC MEETING

There will be a Public Meeting
held under the auspices of





Goods

“Bembergs” in small de-

signs. 36” wide.

: T
r 4 is i eae every cricketer taking part in St; Péteee.. ai. 7.30 THE eer LABOUR 1.92
Bean finished with totals ©! the tournament: realised that he Boxing at Wankee Sta- Per Yd.—$172 and $1.
rim} son | with 161, Rodger's was a potential selectee, duis 8.00 di : m
reed the field on the first day. te was looking forward, he ou ia
hn. Timpson with a +i was 1 said, to meeting many friends in - a BARBADOS WORKERS’
1 : on ver he eorioen Barbados particularly those play- Z i UNION
both ¢ these o s ay. 2 TS e $ 20) anions . 7 :
Rodger took an 80 and Timpson Fee ee eT ae 10 W.L. Cyclists Will at MILE & QUARTER, St. Peter Printed Crepes
collapsed on the last two holes to England. â„¢ >

finish with an 84.

Handicaps

In the handicap section for the

“May we witness good cricket,
and may the best side win,’
Stollmeyer concluded.

The team turned out for prac-

WEST INDIAN Captain John Goddard (right) and his deputy on the
W.I. Tour to England Jeff Stolimeyer, having a chat at Seawell yes-
terday when the Trinidad Team arrived. Jeff is captain of the Trini-



Ride In B.G. Easter

From our own Correspondent

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 9

On THURSDAY 15th FEBRUARY,
1951 at 8 P.M.
Speakers:—F, L, Walcott, M.C.P.

K, N. R. Husbands,



A beautiful qual-
ity fabric in small

President's Cup, Jack Egan car- te at Kensington later in the dad Team. A three-man team of West M.C.P. designs. Coloured
ried off the honours, his two °8Y- Indian cyclists will be visiting F. E. Miller, M.C.P. rounds with White
rounds of 78 with an 8 handicap Welcomed British Guiana at Easter time to 8

fiving him a net 140, which was

A: Seawell yesterday to meet

Worrell High

U.S. MAKE SWEEP IN
CARIBBEAN TENNIS

take part in an Intercolonia] Sports

G. H. Adams,
M.C.P.



and Black & White.

four strokes better than Roy Wil- the team were Mr. J. M. Kid- KINGSTON, Ja, Feb. 11. | megting. to. be staged at Goed 36” wide.
son, playing off a twenty handi- Bey J BntOr lee: Epenceat os, ie n vera es The Americans made a clean}B nen Land, Canje District,

cap, and five strokes better than Garbados — icke soci: . Ewee ‘aribbear ham- rbice n Easter Sunday ana "

Timpscn's net 145, gained off an West Indies and. Barbados cap- e sweep of the Caribbean Char Berbice County on Easter 3 THE BARBADOS ARTS &

eight handicap.




tain, John Goddard, Mr. T. N.

KANPUR, Feb. 12

pionships ended at Montego Bay
to-day when Straight Clark and

and Monday.

CRAFTS SOCIETY
Present their

spite > hi 7 at Peirce, former Barbados’ Captain : 5 fie The te 1 jen 8
emditios oa ee hip: “wy aoe — and selector, Mr. S. O'C. *Git- Frank Worrell, West Indian vice Beverley Baker Fea the mixed ; ror pee ge sin 3 Ref |
re coated a hoe asbebe tens, selector, Mr. E. D. Inniss captain of the Commonwealth Ce Behan oor et “eb F erkg 8 ey iL llemiadaaen cncen
the scoring for the most part was 4 member of the Board of Man- touring team finished second in and Barbara Scolt "_@P ; Tuesday, February 13th. to i:

very good. Christie’s total of 153

agement of the Cricket Associa-

the batting and third in the bowl-



Wednesday. February 28th 1951.

Annual Exhibition |
|

Saas 34 shies < i . ry ing averages in the Test series OPEN Daily

was 21 strokes better than the tion, Mr. W. Hoyos, Honorary : ; 1 i ;

winning score “when the cham- Secretary, Mr. Clyde Walcott, against India which ended with From 10 am Nak pa
gs : ae sie . oe m. .m,

pionship was last played in the West Indies player and his broth- the fifth Test here today. Admission: 1/- Children Half

Fall of 1949. In fact ten players
equalled or beat that performance,

er Mr. Keith Walcott. and Mr.
Harold Kidney.

His batting figures were 8 in-
nings, one not out, highest score




SN SUSHIESS DADO

Price
Parties of School Children ac-



Per Yd.: $1:85



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. |

i companied by their Teachers
when only three players competed aaa one is if residence at 116, total 445 average 63.57, His LIC SERVICES _ \| will be admitted at Special Rates. 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
Christie’s’: was no hollow ic- pbeville Guest ouse . ¢ “ ‘ : ; puB Members of~the B.A.S.C. wiil
e's s n Vv bowling 294.3 overs, 110 maidens RS
tory, therefore, as thirty playérs i , eins — boctol be admitted at half price on pre-

teéd-off for the first round and



605 runs, 18 wickets, average 33.61





OF

RIVATE HIRE COMPANIES



sentation of their Members

Cards for the current year











twenty-three of them played F; 4 3 Ai d The bowling was headed by his ODOT

proven to the nee — _ rancts nl fellow countryman Sonny Ramad- NEWs EDITORS E == ‘ x os

ae - ea acer tihees 7 ; “ Si hin with figures of 209.5 O., 82 M., ] a nee ERC. 5 The new “VALCR EMA”
w afte f Ber } 433 R., 15 W,, av. 28.87. The A ; * “UTY ‘

holes, although he was in a fine Ralph Fight Commonwealth batting a tisced e With the Radio Telephone you can keep in con- B O X IN G 2-WAY BEAUTY TREATMENT

position to challense for the ' by John Ikin of Lancashire with . VALCREMA : VALCREMA :

President’s Cup, having turned iv
an 83 for a net score of 71, only
two strokes off the handicap pace

Little Scope

oss



P innings, 2 not outs, highest score
111, total 625, average 89.29.
The best all-round performance
of the series was by Vijay Hazare
Who headed the Indian batting



stant touch with any vehicle or vessel at any

time, saving your business time and money,

We have considerable experience in this field of

>

radio communication and will be glad to give

at the
YANKEE STADIUM
Brittons Hill

Foundation Cream, con-
tains rare oils that make
your skin Soft and Supple.
Special Oil in water Emul-
sion means it cannot dry on

Skin Youth—Deep Cleans-
ing Greasy Night Cream
for Women of all ages
especially those over 25.
Keeps skin velvety, smooth

' There was little scope for the and came second in the oer DIE, you further details and information. e the skin, and clean, y ;

\ second-guessers concerni the —Reuter. | , $ Contains Youth Element :
Hockley team which was named Telecomi - TO-NIGHT % A perfect Powder Base for “ZEVESTEOL” to guard
: to play against St, Andrews in Telecommunications e % Normal Skins ‘an Essential you against tell tale age
! Trinidad, as ten of those who won ic ; Pao for DRY SKINS lines.

places on the team finished among FANATICS NOT BIGOTS. e R. D. STEWART KID RALPH _








nee pan snatch by the Makers of the famous :—

the first eleven, The exceptions i 163 Ibs. Made
were William Atkinson, who haa Rs as eae ee eee guntek Tarkeons | ‘ va ; y “WALDERMA” SKIN OINTMENT

; ¢ ave , 7 ” rw ¢ ’ Bae 4 SAN ps tae "
= ee ae ee eke which monitors Moscow Radio DIVISION KID FRANCIS A Positive Beauty Treatment, which brings remarkable results,
oak Gala whe husnka RE ae broadcasts in London and circul- PYE LTD. (162 Ibs.) Obtainable at :
82 on Saturday but tore up his bm English wengeetignk sent the P.O. Bex 260, Bridgetown, BOOKER’S (B'DOS) DRUG STORES LTD., Broad Street

¢ ¢ Sins selll des eethien Aira * following correction to a_ story Dial 3248 i S 4 PHARMACY
male a Se Seedie ait | attacking American actions in In return match for the and HASTINGS, ALPHA PH
failed (6: phbh ite sbene. tore Korea: Light-Heavy weight $5999 999655998999 SSS OCIS POPSET FOSS SOS OOSS

Curing the tryouts for the team
came into his own in Sunday’s
play and with a 78° finished in u
tie for sixth place.

The scores follow:









“In second line please read it
‘fanatics’ instead of ‘bigots’.”
—LN.S.





| BARBADOS TURF CLUB

Championship of
BARBADOS

10 Rounds

MEDAL PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP rend

I. K. K. Christie . . 19 T4153 Semi-Final

R. Vidmer 718— 18-156 POCKET CART

TR. Rodger 76-- 10186 OON SAM KING (130 Ibs.)

g, Sint Eain oy GESRIN LAC ASINE WN 1951 ‘t.

B. Wybrew a7 710-168 EAS HAL WILLIAMS

R. P. Gooding 83-— 78—168 @ =O (131 Ibs.)

I Inniss ~ oon ‘

5: \arece o8-- Ailes KID RALPH. STANDING AT CASTLE GRANT, ST, JOSEPH

eee sr fi-'1 Tonight at the Yankee Stadium

E, A. Benjamin 90 aur age ey end Kid Francis meet O [ (

D Lucie-Smith i 89 8 in their return light heavyweight “ : :

wy seins or es bout, These boys put on such a

R. Wilson ; 92—~- 92—184 srod ron when they met recently (Brown Horse 1928, by Obliterate out of Telephone Call)

R. Norris 101— 90-191 a oxing circles have clam- 1G

W. Grannum /., 99-- 91-198 gured for their return, THOROUGHBRED MARES ........ $24.00 vs. ais MADE IN ENGLAND BY
ay eramey nt 101-100-209) The winner. will BELFIELD KID my A sate
8. Toppin j 90—112—202 nner will be the un- OTHER MARES .......00.. 66000, $12.00 } ae potion

K, Girling 103— 98-203 Srowrnee am pearrvetahy cham- (125 Ibs.) ® es ?
Tt. Inntss 112— £9-—211 ion © ne island until tk for- * Tw , (Bata
Ian Niblock witndrew atic ai ata ceabtandens exion STANDING AT BULKELEY, ST, GEORGE @ Rounds SEB

H, Weaver





Board of Control nominates the







~—L_—



B. Pai ° . vithdrew
Cc. Bayley : ee dace sr ye ed
W Nurse ; no card good supporting programme f y
een ote is also carded. In the semi-final eras Side ............ $2.00 SMART d DURABLE or
oe PRESIDENTS CUP “~~ Sam King, former amateur lignt- ‘ i ‘ aleony .. f
: i vei ad weight. champion,. who: has: now (Bay or Brown Horse 1945, by Colombo out of The Bud) cass an
Zan 156— 16-140 joined the professional ranks, PAE... cab ines « cae $48.00 1
a ier igctas Meets Hal Williams over eight GROOMS’ FEE — §1.00 €ash per Service arene. 0 H/TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS
Christie... 153— G~L4T rounds while in the preliminary eachers .... “
Pe Gsdias 3121352 goed aah le glee Rca atte nedie aeaee Barren Mares HALF FEE Return for One (1) Year Only wihuliveoiat tha hind pted New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White
G. Manning 183— 32—152 ” ta te FE} “ 1) you ask me, miss, what w ‘ ae : . ; a . - .
D.| Tonia. 16a 16—189 Tickaa nae eae “Naseem iste Aaa is ot few annowndert ee Regarding the Above, Apply respec ship will receive a Belt Sizes: 6—11
Vv. rannun ; 44— < , ‘ ae © realy ws
R. P. Gooding 166-— 14-152 return bout, solaranactneas P. B. WALKER Esar., Castle Grant, St. Joseph. presented by






They'll Do It E



very Time ae ai By Jimmy Haztlo |

CREEPLY |S SO CAREFUL ABOUT



>

D. A. V. WEEKES Esoar., Bulkeley, St. George.

G, A. LEWIS,
Secretary.

Da COSTA & CO., LTD.

@
LUTHER FIELDS
Promoter



8 Rounds
e
Preliminary
VICTOR LOVELL
(122 lbs.)
!
!

price: $1.60


























HIS ANCIENT HEAP HE DOES
EVERYTHING BUT WRAP IT IN
WAX PAPERs++

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ATLAS “A” with 3 parts water, this Wood Preservative costs
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Stocked in 4% gin., 1 gin., and 5 gin. Drums
Retailed in any Quantity from 1 gill upwards.

COMPANY TRUCK
Bu i re ENT! COWBOY CREEPLY”

FFERE
THEY CALL HIM AT THE REPAIR sHoP!

GET THIS
© weer CRATE









J@ R ennicuep\
LOAF that makes |

| i ;
A CHAMPION.

ae,








HAVE I TOLD YOU
NOT TO LET THE KIDS
EAT PEANUTS IN
THE CAR?





TSN

aa
fu

ye ata . ;
IN EPY
( LLL > Y

G7

rr

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid.

AGENTS.








PAGE 1

IT, II lll.'l \KY 13, 1*31 BAKRADOS ADVOCATI. PAQB CARIBBEAN PRESS SHOULD BE ALERT f) irom Tit.* 1 • DM of p>l><-( going lu deal : %  lng culture, or in the question ol commur. i*i.eilcial inSuenc* on felt mre they would all agree that humu hiicrv. it could Indeed tt was an essential pre-requi. nu;tnce even to >1 for any federation in the Cai irjugh failure to under hean to have a satisfactory system aland their point of view, and of communications. B> sati*i1 would add. the dlfTt fid! those friends are felt that it should n 1 facing at ihe present lime, rapid and efficient, but also CM enflces They are bearing. In asking for that, they were not li a West Indian nation is to loan aafcaofl for anything unprecethe I liberal and dem'ic traditions—and I, as you He said that th*Empire Pres* might guess, hope to see It do o. rjle foi ctblaa Ml a penny u tn hue wilii the other nations of word, but lower rstr. still wri. Mflssltl)—N 1* essential ra> thai :t should be kept in touch, logjam In the Comrnoiiv.. am newspapers, with what Bl I. ill Sir Gcorn m on outside; not only In might have some concrete proiricHtt. exciting as that is. but postals to put to linn and he knev with advances in scientific and :;ite-, % %  .mid like to hear technical knowledge, with the 1 'f trad* and commerce. MiLhsWafOIC : %  %  t wiih •'•* hroad stream of In declaring the. pen. spiritual activity I am convinced. Sir George Seel said : ther-f irf, that what you arc about It given me great pleasure to | ,• „ ; ,, s todav is a question of welcome you as delegates to this supreme sigmAcance to the West meeting of the Caribbean Press Indies, 1 know nothing of the Association and to extend to p pfasu which will be put the freedom of Hastings turn %  it Hut you have my most 1 doing so 1 must apologise for f, London's most pampered rabbit lives in Park Lone flat •MUST COl'Ri; THE RUINS By H. O. HtSBANDS store which was %  %  In June. Wl, Another small The St. ln i, ne< x lewcller A NIGHT srne oil lamps filtered through th,lat k-on \\ i Ii nund f) I ram I .me tin.-,isapoi taBi enquii .> %  in Uw i i ndi. He spoke oi tha %  g*pr i> more after th* (1 lm \ VAA \ %  :y. On behalf uf. the OUM nop comet next ^ s T t hrislian spoke of th< %  *" popuiai appoiMmwl ol anothei Floods Threuten \. \\ Washiuglon BKACTLat Feb. 10 %  Me >f emergency was declared In northwest Washington slate today as whole communities fled flood waters of three rampart river* Across the Canadian border In i %  Columbia thousands of people artn Ihraalalita by Ihe Praser :(.•. ..-.binaries. Over I.30O have already escaped to higher ground. Flood and utorm deaths i i-ed on the other of the h.inna have side Absent, The Susque%  OW fa prran miles If) i ssdents of the town %  n were without water i %  rtbt i which brought thaws Is blamed for the About "00 people filiation of Con WHY. north of Seattle — Jated after .wigr\ fiver courting hu the town %  > %  %  %  Fires Sweep Qiieonslainl Sheep Lands Twalve big bual ranlng over al QueentarKT* fi7<. mi today. : %  %  iready burnt*, i than 2,000,000 arras of heep (ountf yuern.laiid. had B tlm*e wfat that no towns were threatened yet by the fires, bul stuck losses %  pifsstsi 10 natssance i tt (fMosirnd •n pikKl rttng with of the %  %  %  o the Hamas m u fiey were travfUing at about 20 less train going through deeoiaW iiomei. country round not be unduly interrupted by II these evidences of activity i the part of the Development and Welfare Organisation. In offering our premises for meetings such as this, we believe that we are discharging one of our most useful functions. As a body maintained by His Majesty's Government to do all we can on a regional busis to help progress in out aervseai mu>t always be at the disposal of those who are studying We-st Indian problems in their regional aspects, und that, I take it, is the purpose lor which you arc met today. Indeed. 1 can think of no more powerful regional Influence than u association of the newspapers in this area, and none which llililiea ii greater j-ense of responsibility on the part of tboM -.>ii" Pi—pecl of Stability As even a superficial obsei can are approaching a fresh stage their history, when more than ever will depend on the KUidance ihey receive from their responsible leadon and the Press. After mg" i;itions marked by both sides, as Is 'lie parties ssr^ssjK i beh.ll! Nev ItehaK of ihe II. the civil service, questions of windows of th* old buildings ja.f. sc a ttered around "d where ftmnce aril figure prominently as which comprised the batter part bl)lir HTta fihnib art trying U> nnn'*' I,> \* J ,|V %  iig. 1 am glad to se of the town moisture on which to live. ". h, **JP tt .: that you rl<; not propose to a*K for Speightstown was nsleep, but The nr5t ^a window tlnda itself *" %  ""& P* 1 t" 0 "** any element of Government subnot for long. Suddenly, an alarm, between the jeweller's shop and "' ,,l <* Low" Behs* J '" 1 I i\ tin tbJj service. I think thnr loud and distinct was heard, another run shop goinir further >"• Berridge Ihe Uit thing to be desired is a Shouts of "Fire! Fire!" Inter^ 0 rth called "De Lone Ranger". Registfy spoke of the greut appre%  %  ndem, even in a small rupted the stillness of the town The tire removed house from elation and hOB way, upon financial paymentand everyone was up and peeping ln ,. plcct of j inf) w j,ieh has 1 be so. I have great, DU taura ings still suggest that a tragedy |he ^gmmZ ^r-S" #LTS StaJdV birr** roc the Ibe two MM of the in". declaring ^urmeoting open had befallen the town. u wafl on hl( ^ thal the flrf ri(l At ^-.ent th. ilry cannot be achieved and t Mr. 4 9_^_Cr(miarty^ woom, ,^ rhe Ru ng „ a8 ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ utfcd am| uhcr< lhrw „„„,„,,,,, iK M n „, lt ^ with pi speaking jiosvible TtaaM '"* by %  omo Speithtstonians, l - r ueitroytd. "sides of "the Inm declaring your meeting open, had befallen the town I Mr. G Cromarty Bloom, ... Trinidad Latin American Manager for and elsewhere, manufacturing inHeaters Ltd. said that *"£" duttrles anspringing up. The bod %  tremendous interest w i the * m social irrstrluttons of the area are designs on which the Ajtsociattoi developing and expand,,*: and w *orkUj and **$£* "gXE* Church Street bneased social consdous^"SiJiiE^in brm^ ness, there |g .i iremendous upco-operation in bringing tn surge in politkul c.\iKCtations. about Yet over all hangs the problem Reuters regarded the de whether the growth i f uopulatnenl of any co-operative 1 not outstrip the resources aBency with great of the areaMeanwhile. West In* %  the exampli centre punctuated by windows. to an formldabli looking three storied buildings lopwhere once a thriving ironmone-ws Sery and hardware business a, .iterest Thev carried on. of the co-opImmediately on the North or of Austhat building Is a little runv shop Lha United Kinaeaatlve Press Assoclatl TSsn^etsewnire are eagerly tralla.* New Zealand and India wh ,ch t "'ways flies a flag and eartaken over the urea which accomThe building M wbieU the Are started ^nd another building Joined to the former by a party wall were ruined by the lire and then ;M the corner another lesldence was badly damaged. The residence had attached to It a storeroom which was comI-letcly destroyed. si iet< Parian chuni -eking to acquire the tcrhnic.-il •>"*> * now partners wit) and philosophical equipment Keutera. necessarv to conduct lhe affairs of , .i naUoa. Propos-ls for political lo-nperatiun Asked federation, the uniflcallon of pubIn the West Indies until the name •• Labourte—Bar 20 modated Ihe attached buildings I£ m ' S ^** and •* %  U!icd r l planting rlowrums The spot once aecommorr s and tree* for beautifying the dated a two atoned building, to West end of the Church. The spot the ground floor ol which many has been enclosed by a wall bearon it I'I l now for" the Reuters had not done a good Job ^iL^^^.lfl^iXf 8 "S r n *"*"* a ls and '" ' reat.on of a Customs Union of because of the inherent difflcul n sho ^V r or „ B s "l\l f n ? th ... B „ n d II 1 ,ia ?* • d spring West Indian territories, are ties in dealing with individual S^ M oor r J >I „_„,!, son This joiner s shop has rill full debate. >r two eriicia \o be taken. A Well-Informed Press I am not mentioning these points ..ith the idea of giving a thumbforward" for th*.... nail sketch of the British West establishment of a really close ttkon the place of %  Indies al thai time. The Press, co-operation with tlie Press of the which has to keep iu eyes on B W.I. through a Regional Press everything, can do this much betAssociation here. I m I. My purpose is to Prom the point of view of| remind you that with so much communications, efflcient opera happening around us. it is imtion was only possible through peratlve that the people of the constant contact with a regiona' i i ea should be served by on alert, centre. From that of the service| weO-informed, and objective themselves. Renters would look Press, well-equipped to expound forward to guidance from the the economic, social and political thtr area they served here. It trends, and fearless, both to detect wag difficult to work out an> nd expose those who seek to use form of effective guidani housed the A bungalow has replaced the busi'badly damaged" building gutted storeroom COVtVll whole spot except for a small pjot which has been planted ln flower*.! "IloKuins'are being encroaches' on by the sea and II it doubt-1 ful whether it will become a resi-l hardware dcnttal area agali .lead to the closer association -acklng until now with the West Indian Press. Hin Instructions were to offer to lhe Association whatever assistance he could and expressed the fervent hope (hat the plans of lhe Association would quickly bring about the type of co-operative press agency which they had seen develop in baser*!! various parts of the world and these trends for personal advanceen the views of scattered no ment. and to support the ""? who papers rather than the com bit are genuinely striving to promote view of a single entity. the well-being of their fellow With regard to the question West Indians. features and other supplementary rortunately. we in the British services, they felt that the only£them on behalf of Reuters, West Indies have a Press which way in which they could co-op-^best services and warm wishes for 'i ri iiitl.u I May Gol Paper Industry g> from page 1. fuel has to be found for sugar' factories. He says Trinidad is the only area where adequate suppio-^ of I alternative fuel are economicall,* -,]whieh had produced a much eu.Jefficent flow of unbiassed news available In the Caribbean between the Press in the region lle adtU hal |hl f| -eomtd and the Preof th. ^ , preicpt tBge EL-2 w. levelopnient hns not l>een found to poxscss the characteristics di M ruble for newsi>ruit. a pi .tic not condtlflfl Ing the standard of dlsri|iUiie i a high I f,.r %  f the qunrters rlbw OCi.;. the fife Itngade SCHOOL BOOKS • DUDLEY STAMP'S GEOGRAPHY WORLD GEOGRAPHY by LAY (Rook I) MARTEN ^CARTERS HISTORY (Book 3) New Lo\ linesa For You m PALM HIVE SOAP follow ii' BeaWfy / III .. /•i'. i.... i m • .itji— i i %  !. 1 ..... i MM -km rasai %  > hraUIIOt| rllct* OU* E CLARKE'S BLO MIXTURE 1 Cleanse the system om blood Impurities ; r.-nny z %  -• ; from rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago. neuritis, pimples, boitr. sores and minor skin ailments, can deriv benefit from this well-known medicine. LIQUID of TAB. r fORM of the world. Wlnierbotham was unableI i :.<> deflrntely where the head-1 observe recognising Ulg seen your agenda. I several years unu wuuiu nw i^mwi !" *. that you agree with ma lcok forward to the dny when they.1 which he had OMM the importance of **ould have West Indian joumalflAasoclation. et another factor. You are to i*ts .11 Re %  ten in London helping!' ith the*l^ isider the possibility of Instltuting a (Nil ill;!'-' 1 ulmli will n both within the Caribbean, and between this area and the rest of the world. ( for the mosi part intelligent and erate was through the local organ-Jmccess at their meeting. objective, as well as lively and isallon. 1 Mr. P. Hewltt-Myrlng was then interesting. I would not preHe said that they had becnHIntroduced to the meeting by the sume to lecture you on th-t score, following this devefopment fo.JPrtsulent of w the Association who V. !" „i^U"St^eSed : seen your agenda. 1 mm&jmn^mgi ^^^.^^^\\^J)^iSS!& ^\^m£to£Zx nhoul the avallabiltty iti supplies. Mr. HewHt-Mvrine RAid that on •„ ,rve 111* Association with" tho'Wci.slons lik.llui Hie printer.' li„_;,,,_[. p.,„ m ., (Uia ion of service, they needed. jink that had flowed in his vein. AlagiSlrale KesumtS UutieS n u r nn la.i W'.ntfl lfor 20 year, had stirred ag.in and Mr. A. i M. H.in.s.-nvii. aeT, K lJ *Sl ,hc was ver. happy to have rao, Poltn Maglitrate of Ditnr, They hod in Fleet street aj wishing the meet,n "A" Police Court reamed U '.T.l"„ Vl J 2S2f nd wtry possible succe.. In It, de. dutlM ycMerdiy mornlnt In tht Demoeratic Tr.dl,,.n, ^''Ski^nd**?'wild b "'' l.^Xn w M actina •tUm n.c. Mtlemm. II 1. 1 like to feel that they could drr.v.A „ Hon „, p rMS „ Judgo „. ,„,. Po „ v Ix bl Court lardinal importance to the Wet upon loumiliau from the West „ M . b M c L Wo i wvn .., ,„, to which I Indies to com. to Lo.,do„.nd K ,„„„•„ f ,J V concrete, honnl and tor him. have briefly referred, should b. develop In th. cour^of Umo a gmulnc |, ,„ mm „ cia | p,,., Ir ,,. pliul Ill clcaair Mnml oontjet with f rtm anv mi o( wbjldy wbMm fh# background of an informed the Association her. and lot memofficially or otherwise. Of course appreciation of events in th. world Lets of It. h stronaly believed that as did al iarsja. A nation lumed in upon As a result, he said they could the Association and was more than ana engrossed in its own not but look upon this developready to do anything at any time affairs to the exclusion of the rest ment with enormous interest with to be of assistance. of tha world, is not likcl% to tha hope that it would Quickly g) On sag. 5. 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