Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


ESTABLISHED 1895

Cuba Will Devote Her

Industry To U.S. Needs

WASHINGTON, Feb., 10.
CUBA has offered to devote her industry and
manpower to meet United States defence pro-

duction needs.

A Cuban delegation of six leading industri-
alists and the country’s two chief Labour leaders
laid a unique plen before a National Production
Authority yesterday. It had already been explained
to the State Department.

US.A. Favour

Pacific Pact |

By NORMAN WILSON
WASHINGTON, Feb. 10.

The United States is today more
rordial to the idea of a Pacific
Pact than ever before.

But there are so many obstacles
that it is by no means certain that
a formal anti-Communist alliance
of Pacific democracies will ever
be written.

Leading United States ministers
have said in the past week that
Washington at present has an
“open mind” and is prepared to
take a “sympathetic interest” in
the subject.

But observers here recognise
that America is still reluctant to
take the initiative. On the other
hand, probably the only point on
which all other potential Pacific
Pact members agree is that the
United States should be the key
member and therefore should take
the lead in calling them together.

Observers here consider the

A Production authority ap-
proved of the proposal and asked
the Cubans to translate their
offer into specific terms,

‘Tne Cubans said that they would
do this immediately. —

Burke Hedges, President of the
Cuban Manufacturers’ Associa-
tion said that the United States
would pay for the products it
bought.

Fiedges declared: “We were not
coerced into coming here to offer
Cuba’s help. We not only came
here on cur own free will but we
oviginated the idea,”

“Compare this with the Police
State methods used by Russia.
They beat their “Allies” over the
head to get co-operation,

Francisco Aguerre, the leading
Cuban Labour leader, said that
Labour Unions in Cuba were
wholeheartedly behind the plan.
The Cuban offer “called the bluff
of totalitarian countries,” he add-
ed.

The offer, one official said,
would give mobilisation officials
a new source of production and
& manpower pool. :

—Reuter.

—————————

question of membership may_be
an insurmountable stumbling
block, Australian reaction would
probably be violently against the
inclusion of the Japanese,
—Reuter.

U.S. Prices Rise

WASHINGTON, Feb, 10.
The wholesale price rise in the



in spite of the Government's price
freeze,

The Bureau of Labour statistics
said the rise for the week ending
February 6 was .7 per cent. bring-
ing ae wholesale price index tc
182.2.

The principal increases were in
food and farm products, which
went up by 1.9 and 1.6 per cent,
respectively. Meat rose 3.2 per
cent. and livestock 2.7 per cent,

The price freeze was intended
to halt prices at the highest levels
between December 19 and Janu-
ary 25, but many farm products
were excluded,

Allies Used Mines
To Hinder Russia
CHARGES RED PAPER

MOSCOW, Feb, 10.

The Soviet Navy newspaper Red
Fleet alleged to-day that the Brit-
ish and American air forces laid
sea mines during the war delib-
erately to hamper the Soviet army
offensives against the Germans
and Japanese,

It said that the mfnes were laid
in the Baltic Sea, the Danube
River, and off the coasts of China
and Korea in 1943 and 1945,

aoe , pos aper,. chained Lihat j WORST IN 20 YEARS

WELLINGTON, New Zealand,

—Reuter.

the history of the significance of

nirborne minelaying operations Feb. 10.
during the war, Hawke’s Bay Province, the
—Reuter. [scene of New Zealand’s greatest



earthquake, experienced to-day its
worst tremors since the disaster
which killed 255 people in 1931.

No serious damage has yet been
reported, but the earthquake

CRIMINALS PAROLED

TOKYO, Feb, 10.
General MacArthur’s headquart.

United States last week broke ail;
records for 13 consecutive weeks,




ee LT

ers have paroled four more sen-
tenced Japanes¢ war criminals
from Sugamo, bringing to 193 the
total number
criminals paroled so far.—Reuter,





Public Will Hear Debate
On U.S. Troops For Europe

The American Government leaders in the Senate have
given the surprising decision to hold hearings in public on
the Government’s policy on sending troops to Europe.

Defence Secretary, George Marshall, Secretary of State,
Dean’ Acheson and General Omar Bradley, Chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff will give evidence at hearings fixed

to begin next Thursday.

Leg. Co. Member
On Libel Charge

KINGSTON, Ja., Feb. 9,

A Corporation Council meeting
to-day decided to join Councillor
N. N. Nethersole, the second high-
est member of the P.N.P., in
bringing a libel action against the
Hon. R. L. M. Kirkwood, a mem-
ber of the Legislative Council, for a
statement made at a public meet-
ing of planters on February 3, and)
published in the newspapers that
two members and a Councillor
wete mixed-up in the meat racket
in the corporate area.

Members of the Labour Party
and P.N.P. also are considering
what action to take against Kirk-
wood who at some meeting said
he could name 12 politicians who
were not above taking even a £5
bribe.

Some members of the Labour
Party suggest asking the acting
Governor to oust Kirkwood from
the Legislative Council —(P).

2,000,000 German
Youth Will Attend
“World Festival Of Youth”

PRAGUE, Feb., 10.

“Two million German youths in-
cluding 100,000 from ‘Western
Germany will take part in the
“World Festival of Youth” which
the Communist-led World Feder-
tion of Demotratic Youth plans
to hold-in Berlin in August, the
Federation spokesman said here
to-night.

A spokesman said the Federa-
tion's Executive Committee, which
has been meeting here had come








to the conclusion that its most

urgent task was to organise a

“wer ‘

rem ation of Germany and

Jap i icularly to inten-

ify Zainst reart
—Reuter

of convicted wax! down shop window displays. *




alarmed many residents who rush.
ed into the streets,

The shock was severe enough tc
dislodge chimneys and knock

—Reuter.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 10,

General Dwight Eisenhower,
Atlantie Pact Supreme Comman-
cer, whose testimony last week on
the treops for Europe issue, Re-
publican policy leader Senator
Robert ‘Taft decribed as “hazy”
may also appear before the
Senate Foreign Relations and the
Armed Services Committees, who
are to hold the hearings.

The announcement of public
hearings was made by Senator
Tom Connally (Democrat Texas)
Chairman of the Foreign Relations
Committee who previously had
indicated that the doors would be
closed,

He gave no reason for the
change in plans, but other Sena-
tors said the question had been
debated so hotly this week that
Administration leaders were
anxious to get as large an
audience as possible for their
arguments for sending American
divisions across the ocean and into
the North Atlantic defence force.

Opponents of the Administration
view will te heard later it was
said, but just who they will be
was not known yet.

Another Plan

Senator Connally was expected
to offer a substitute proposal to
put the Senate on record as saying
it is desirable that armed forces be
sent out.

On Thursday, Senator Taft pro-
posed that the United States con-
tribute only one division for-every
nine raised by its western Eure-
pean allies.

He demanded an. opportunity
for Congress to pass on the issue
involved.

Senator Pat McCarran (Demo-
crat Nevada) joined the debate
yesterday with the assertion that
western Europeans would not fight
unless they believed they had “a
reasonable chance of winning.”

Senator Mc Carran, Chairman
of the Senate Appropriations Sub-
committee on Foreign Aid said

de struggle against the }that any programme for defence
j of Western Europe must be devel- |

oped with the realistic view that
\E necessarily regard
th





an o

ible.”—-Reuter

upatior “ur
pati a ur














LADY BADEN-POWELL addressing the Scouts at thei

—Story on page 7.



Meat Pact | Sending

Is Almost
Completed

MELBOURNE, Feb. 10.

Australia and Britain have al-
most concluded negotiations for a
15-vear meat agreement, the Aus-
tralian Commerce Minister, John
McEwen announced today.

McEwen said that he expected
the agreement to be signed “very
300n”’.

The main points of the agree-
ment were that Britain would buy
the whole of Australia’s surplus
production of beef, lamb, and mut-
ton, for 15 years and that local
production would have to be
expanded.

Price details had yet to be
worked out, McEwen said. There
vould be a “floor” price for beef
tor six years, and “floor” prices foe
mutton and lamb covering four
years, There would be a price re-
view annually, and the price could
tise above but not fall below
“floor” prices.

The 15-year meat plan is de-
signed to make Australia one of
the most important and largest
meat producing areas in the
world.

Capital development is expected
to open up large areas of North-
ern Australia for cattle-farming.

Discussions have been going on
for nearly two years. ,

The development scheme is es~
sentially long-term but Australian
sources have estimated the even-
tual. production at 500,000 tons of
beef annually.

(British Food Minister Maurice
Webb said in the Commons on
Wednesday that New Zealand was
also planning to increase produe-
tion still further to supply the
British market.

Webb said that Australia was
sending Britain considerably less
meat than pre-war partly because
of drought and partly because of
increased domestic consumption).

Last year Britain received 127,
000 tons of meat from Australia
as against 200,000 tons before the
war.

—Reuter.



Won,

“Shhh! Don’t inter-
rupt daady when he’s
carving the joint!”



Londen Express Service.



No Single Method

Can Ensure Peace

PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 10.
Averell Harriman, Special As-
sistant to President Truman on
Foreign Affairs said to-day that
the United States. must combat
Russia's global strategy with
world-wide strategy of. its own.
“Those who advise concentra-
ting our energies exclusively in
one part of the world or on one
aspect of the situation fail to up-
derstand the nature of the strug-
gle,” he declared. Harriman spoke
before the World Affairs Council
of Philadelphia.

“This struggle cannot be won
by any single method, nor by
military strength only, nor exclu-
sively: by economic and social
progfammes, nor by moral force

alone.
—Reuter.



SCENES OF RELEASE
OF. GERMANS BANNED

BRUSSELS, Feb. 10.
Brussels cinema managers said
to-day. they were
cutting from newsreels, shots of
the release of German war crim-
inals from Landsberg jail in the
American zone of Germany

Patrons hooted and booed ir
jsome cinemas here last night,
lwhen the release scenes were

jgium, —~Retter

—_—







BARBADOS, FEBRUARY 11,

1981

Headquarteys in Beckles Road yesterday.

mn; of US. Troops
To Japan Welcomed

By Japanese Government

, TOKYO, Feb. 10.
The Japanese Government has warmly welcomed pro-
posals to Station American troops in the country after the

#

conclugién of the peace treaty, John Foster Dulles, Presi-
dent Truman’s special envoy said here to-day before
*

leaving: for Manila.

YPulles added that Japan’s fu-





SIX CENTS

a ienmemal

U.K. Dock Strike
Holds Up 142 Ships

UN. Ent ep | THENATION.WIDE hoo Selle eaniee
Seoul And

to cripple Britain’s ports to-day when 20,000
dockers failed to report for work,

More than 142 ships were idle in London, Liv-

erpool, Birkenhead, and Manchester docks, most

Inchon of them with vital cargoes waiting to be unloaded.

Ten thousand were on strike in London. They came

TOKYO, Feb, 10. out strongly in support of the stoppage, after the seven

South Korean spearheads. today

reached the heart of the shattered

rat-infested “ghost city'’, Seoul

strike leaders were taken to court yesterday and charged
with incitement.

fe z ‘01 epecribstsipeatdinen iby sensipn —nolicatintin Aaah he strike which started in
British and American tanks and =

infantry columns occupied the ‘se ore eon last week-end,
South Korean capital's industrial eputies Plan Grew only 450 supporters in

suburb of Yongdongpo. London at first. They had decided
Advance units of the United
Nations Task force also entered In-
chon, deserted port of Seoul
Kimpo airfield, five miles west
of Seoul was taken by the Ameri-
can 25th Infantry Division.
The Chinese seem to have given

to go back to work when, the

W = seven leaders were arrested.
N ew Left ing A mass x strike ne rnovietnent
N developed in the capital last night,
lovement

after the news of the arrests was
carried around dockside taverns.
For many strikers, it was



Rearmament Will
Not Seeure Peace
BIRMINGHAM BISHOP

BIRMINGHAM, Feb. 10.

The Bishop of Birmingham, Dr.
Ernest Barnes, said today at a ser-
vice that he did not believe re-
armament would attain its object
of peace.

“In my opinion,” he declared,
rearmament leads to two evils—
inflation and war.

“I would bring rearmament and
its attendant evils to an end,

“No nation, great or small de-
sires war... . Think for example
of France, one of the most militant
nations in Europe... . . Military
leaders say with a shrug that the
French people will not fight,” the

ou -Peoble in thelr ais
ui e, hac bit whats
civil defence. There is the same
passionate desire for peace the
world over. . I ‘have letters and
speeches by leaders of the Orthe-
ox church in Russia. They also
show that,” Dr. Barnes declared.

—Keuter.



German Offers Eye

ture security had been one of the
Main points of discussion during
his fortnight’s talks here on the
treaty, formally to end the present
State of war.

He said that the treaty would
restore full sovereignty to Japan,
recognise her right to self defence,
establish provisional commercial
relations and pave the way for
her eventual entry into the United
Nations.

Dulles said : “We have discussed
the future security of Japan. On
February 2, with the authority of
my Government, I publicly said
that if desired by Japan, the
United States would sympatheti-
cally, consider the maintenance of
United States army forces in and
about Japan,

“The Japanese Government has
Le poor. that Le
so ve vetsations and
the maniféld expressions of opin-
ion which have come to us con-
vince us that if is the overwhelm-
ing desire f the Japanese nation

at that proposal be accepted, so
that the coming into force of the
treaty of peace, will not leave a
vacuum of power, with Japan
totally disarmed jand unable to
defend itself.

“Accordingly, we have discussed
provisional security arrangements





up the vital Seoul-Inchon area in BOLOGNA, Feb, 10. mainly a protest against the Gov-
the same way they had captured Italy's two rebel Communist}/ernment’s legal action.
it—without fighting, deputies Aldo Cucchi and Valdo The original strike demand—

Chinese resistance collapsed| Magnani to-night set up. an/for an extra four shillings per
suddenly and they fled northwards Action Committee to plan a new|day—was pushed into the backs
after Lieutenant General Matthew | left wing breakaway movement} ground.

B. Ridgway's 8th Army charged |free from Russian domination But the strike leaders backed

the last Communist defences south Cucehi Mains : , [by the Communist Party made

of the Han River, which runs Aon ae fagnani sail their} most of the popular support.

through Seoul, three days ago +e a co eet one The Daily Worker, the official
achieve 2 a Pp rty

Seoul has changed masters four] pendence of the wot kers’ wioek pay ae ee told the dockera
times within eight months. Three }|ment in Italy.” fo-nday MARE tHe. SETests. were: 3
days after the North Koreans oa “consplraay of the Government
crossed the 38th Parallel on June! In an interview with the Bol-|Conservative and Capitalist press
25 last year Seoul fell. (ogna correspondent of an Italiar against the workers.”

The United Nations regained it |"@ws agency Ansa, the “deputies Strike leaders were holding
after the Inchon landing. North | said: meetings a an effort to bring out
Koreans took it again in Januar “There is no question to-day London's 25,000 dock workers but
in the Allied retreat from the Jof setting up new parties now |â„¢@2y wharves were still working.
Chongchon Piver It remained|splitting the workers unity ir Thousands of tons of imported
this time only 87 days under jorganisations with economic anc food were ps board the affected
Communist control. social aims,” ships in London. In dockside

—Reuter. warehouses British-made goods
: (They were presumably refer-|for export were waiting to take
ih ‘i ring to Italy’s three main trade|their place in the holds.

Priest Offers Life union organisations Communist,| The seven strike leaders were

Socialist and Christian Demo-|arrested under a wartime regula-
7 ” . erat) tion which lays down that 21

For v Criminals ss ne * |days notice must be given before

agnani' and’ Cucchi said they[a_ strike statts. They were

MULHEIM, West Germany, hoped to recruit the “strong remanded on bail until February

Feb, 10. minded militants of the ‘Com-]20,

A Roman Catholic priest who |munist Party,” The Cabinet may congid

was tried by the Nazis and spent —Reuter. sending soldiers into the docks if

seven years in concentration

camps, hag offered to die in the

place of seven condemned Lands

berg war criminals, a West Ger

man News Aggns reported (o
G -sihadies. BH



Russia Wants

aa pete naeate,
“The ' priest) “Father “Auaiistin
Flossdorf, wrote to the American
High Commissioner, MeCloy, that
not all those wanting to help the
prisoners were Nazis,

~~ ADENAUER





No “Hot War”

stoppage cortinues., t
—Reuter.

Czech Authorities
‘Tatk Of Clementis

PRAGUE, Feb, 10.
Czechoslovak authorities are
considering making an _ official



| Korea.

tin World War One,

considering |.

between’ the United States and
Japan.

To Wounded Soldier

BERLIN, Feb. 10. | Need For Self-help

Walter Demand, a 45-year-old} “In this connection we have
unemployed German cook walked |pginted out that all regional and
into a West Berlin radio station }¢oflective security arrangements
today and offered an eye to a |o¢ defiite character to which the
blinded United Nations soldier in | United States becomes party, must

degide for ‘continuous and effec-
itive self-help and mutual aid’ by
yall parties in accordance with the
basic policy laid down by Vanden-
ioe resolution of June

Prime Minister Shigero Yoshida,
confirmed ,that his Government
and “the preponderant majority of
the Japanese people, warmiy wel-
comed ‘the arrangements made with the
United States including the gar-
risoning here of American troops.’

He said: “We realise fully ow
responsibility to protect ourselves
and defend our own land and will
do what we can in this respect.

—Reuter.

“I want to give one of my two
good eyes ,” he said. “I do not
want anything in return. All 1
want is to know that one young
blinded soldier will be able to see
again.” *

He felt that United Nations sol-
diers in Korea were fighting “for
all of us” and was anxious to make
his personal sacrifice.

He said his father lost both eves
—Reuter.

World Medical
Academy Founded

ROME, Feb. 10.
The founding of an Internation-
al Medical Academy with its seat
in Rome and branches abroad, was
announced here to-day.
Its work will be based on the
concept that “all men are equal

COMMEMORATED
before disease, and all are entitled

pa the same Way to treatment and VATICAN CITY, Feb. 10.
i





POPE’S DEATH

preventive: measures.” , Flags: flew at halfmast here to
The Academy will eneourage ‘fay “end requiem mass was cele-
| world-wide exchanges of medical brated here to commemorate

scientists and information and|the twelfth anniversary of the
will work to co-ordinate health|death of Pope Pius XI.
legislation. Pope Pius. XII, his syecessor

The President of the Academy |#ave absolution,
is Professor Mario Ceravolo, lung| The late Pontiff’s tomb in Saint
specialist and member of the| Pete's basilica .was covered. with
Italian Chamber of Deputies, flowers brought by his admirers.
—Reuter. —Reuter.



THE ONLY THING THEY MISSED





‘In Six Days .

By JOHN POMFRET
BARON MUNCHAUSEN, thebiggest liar in the world,
might have cast envious eyes at a post which became
vacant last week: the presiderfey: of the Soviet Science

Academy.

Sergei Vavilov, the last presi-
dent, has died. Here are some of
the progressive facts mentioned
recently by the Academy.

First: Russia devised radar long
before Britajn. and, secondly,
penicillin was in use in Russian
hospitals before the mould was
grown at St. Mary’s in London.

It ces without saying that}| /?2’ ed
the Russians were flying before “WOULD YOU SET
the Wright brothers; they were | HESS FREE ?”’

some 40 years before Sir Frank
Whittle, for there were “jet planes
over the Red Square in 1899.”
‘Invented’ Steam
Polzunoyv, of course, was “the
genuine inventor of the steam



nn



| using the telegraph before n to-morrow’s Evening

| Morse; they had radio before Advocate

| Marconi (Popov, they say, in- os: an

| vented it), and they were using | }————__________
| the telephone before Bell. er e.” James Watt

} Jt seems that a gentleman called | afterwards.

iConstantin T ikov visa a i t



tut hilit
the possibilities

| “Stalin Created The oe

Germany's war opponents had BONN, Feb. 10. statement on the subject of Doc-
also committed atrocities, —h« West German Chancellor Dr,| tor Vladimir Clementis, according
claimed, — Reuter Adenauer said to-night that Rus-|to indications here to-day,

Sta did not want a “Hot War} For the first time since the
es ally with the Atiantic Pact! former Foreign Minister disap-
4 *..9 . powers because one knows that| peared from his office in the

Stalin 5 Friend Is although she might have initial State Bank nearly a fortnight ago,

gains, she would lose in the end] informed Czechoslovak sources to-

Supervising Purge and have an annihilation defeat.

day expressed an opinion on the

‘ He declared that Russia would) ©#8e _. 3 %

; PARIS, Feb. 10. |not yepeat nor start another war| , S¢mi-official Czechoslovak cir-
_,Lavrenti Beria, wines erieie oF mainiy owing to the great dis-| cles minimised the case in a man~
Stalin, a tag ne a Bs parity between the economic] ner which appeared to amount to
i Bra jue supervisis . the hres of ‘potentials of the East and West| half-admission that Clementis had
Cza lav ats Gas nae ts. the | even if Germany were to make indeed fled the country or at
“ha ee gy phe pa a ose a defence contribution, least had been deprived of his
Freneh Socialist Party newspaper liberty —Reuter.
La Populaire said to-day “T am convinced that peace can ,

———${]$_$ > —_

TELL THE ADVOCATE

aoe newepaper said neat ONC | be preserved and I am convinced
w eputy Premier Valcerlan) that the Atlantic Pact countries
Zoriny: formery Ambassador :tojpaye no intention of attacking the

Frague, whose arrival in Czecho- Soviet’ Union and that Russia TER NEWS
slovakia was reported earlier this] ;nows this very well.” RING 3113
month from Vienna. The news- f : es Wiuter DAY OR NIGHT

paper said the reported disappear-
ance of Dr. Viadimir Clementis,
former Czech Foreign Minister had
touched off a wave of arrests in-
cluding that of Madame Pattova,

Communist Deputy and Clementis’ | RA E 1 G a
sister-in-law, Reuter. i 7
Killed Daughter |

beeaesabz bee Sept cot,









NEW YORK, Feb., 10,

A young father sat watching a : : ea
boxing match on television last |
night after killing his seven-!

.
months-old daughter by hanging

her on ihe bathroom door, police AYS AT YOUR SERVICE
here alleged, i 4 u

Police said he went to the home
of his brother and told the story
of the tragedy but the brother was ‘
engrossed in a television boxing
match and did not realise what
had happened.

The two men sat throughout the
bout and then the father repeated
his story. The brother rushed to
his flat and found the baby hang-
ing from a sash cord attached to
two nails, He informed the police
—Reuter,

A variety of models constantly in stock
and ready assembled for you to
choose from







See them on

display at...
99

fore Simon Lake, and tankers be-
fore Sir Joseph Isherwood.

A Russian astronomer saw
Venus (the planet) before Galileo,
and, naturally, there was a Russian
ship in the Antarctic before Cap-
tain Cook sailed there.

Anesthetics? Pirogov. No men-
tion is made of Sir Humphry Davy
Multipie lathes? Basichek.

Another Russian is given all the
| credit for the discovery of dyna-}







j mite (Alfred Nobel); another for |
}ineandescent bulbs (Thor Edi-|
son, who developed the electric
|\Jamp after Britain’s Sir Josepi |
| Swan), and yet other for smelt- |
furnaces (Henry Bessemer) |
Adding cuine bine har-|
vesters, rifle ind electric trens-
forme ri I ‘ red tar
mar A ' i

Cree i

CAVE SHEPHERD
& Co., Ltd.
10 - 13 Broad Street
' Sole Distributors

a



PAGE TWO

PLAZA



Y 445 and 430
WARNER'S TECHN
“STORY OF
with Shirley THMPLE
Also
MAT. THURS, 1.30 5
RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH

Johnny Maek BROWN

LAST * SHOWS

| BING CROSBY IN

with Coleen GRAY—Charles

MON, & TUES. — 5 & 8.

| SONG OF SURRENDER

Wanda Hendrix




~ McDonald Carey



GAIETY

LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY
Warner's Thrilling Adventure!

GARY COOPER IN

with Jane WYATT—Walter BRENNAN—Others

MONDAY & TUESDAY — 8.30 p.m, (Warner Double)

JUNE BRIDE

Bette DAVIS

&



Starring: DANNY

MONDAY and TUESDAY



Starring:
An R.K.O.




SOPOR EP OPP PPS SPESSSSSSSSSCVSESCS OSCE

SPEIGH
PLACE

LAST SHOW TO-NIGHT 8,30
JAMES STEWART

In
“BROKEN ARROW"

Your last Chance

Don't miss it.



EMPIRE

TODAY 4.45 and 8.45
MONDAY and TUESDAY
4.45 and 8.30
Columbia Pictures Presents :

Humphrey BOGART in

“IN A LONELY
PLACE”

— with —
Grahame;
and Carl

Gloria
Lovejoy
Reed.

Frank
Benton



ROYAL

Last 2 Shows TODAY
4.20 and 8.30
Republic Action Double...

Monte HALE
Roy BANCROFT
in

«PRINCE OF THE

PLAINS ””

AND
“BANDIT KING OF
TEXAS”
with

Allan (Rocky) LANE &
Black Jack
MONDAY and TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.30
“OUT OF THE
STORM ”
and
*A SPORTING

CHANCE”

\
BS
>
Si
=|
=
=
=
a
>

‘y

| TEMCO
ELECTRIC CLOCK

“TIME MARCHES 0.

HNICOLOR ROMANCE WITH THRILLS!

Barry FITZGERALD—Lon MeCALLISTER
— “80° YOU WANT TO BE A GAMBLER”

&

eee ee ST ESS
PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

TODAY —5 & 8.30 P.M.

30 p.m. (Paramount Double)



—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT at 8,30
Samuel Goldwyn’s Technicolor Musical Comedy!

THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY
KAYB-—VIRGINIA MAYO
MATINEE : MONDAY at 5 p.m.

CHILD OF DIVORCE
SHARYN MOFFETT—REGIS TOOMEY—MADGE MEREDITH

THEATRE





aS eeeeeEeaoaoEeee—e—E

Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

p.m. and Continuing Daily

SEABISCUITâ„¢

mm. (Monogram Double)

RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL
Jimmy WAKELY

(Paramount)

“RIDING HIGH”

BICKFORD—Frances GIFFORD

————————



&

with
William Eythe — George Reeves

SPECIAL AGENT

— 5 & 8.30 p.m, (Warner)

“TASK FORCE”

BULLET SCARS
Regis TOOMEY

NIGHT at 8.30

Radio Picture

TSTOWN
TIME 8.30

Ss MON & TUES. 8.30
United Artists Presents:

T “RED RIVER"

Oo Starring:
JOHN WAYNE — CLIFF MONT-
GOMERY,

R Two novrs of action packed

entertainmen’

ROXY

TO-DAY to TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.15

United Artist Double
Franchot TONE in

« JIGSAW”
‘AND
0.
with

Edmond O'BRIEN
Pamela BRITTON

OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows TADAY
4.30 and 8.30
Columbia Double
“ THE WALKING

JNLLS ”
And

«© ANNA LUCASTA'*”*

“D. 0. A”





MONDAY Only—Ist Inst.
Cofumbia Serial

“ BATMAN
ROBIN ”

Starring:
Robert Lowery; Jane Adams

AND

SET BY



BUT -TEMCO”’ KEEPS
GOOD TIME



THE CORNER

ON coe i EEE
_

ON SHOW



ADVOCATE

——

SUNDAY























IR VICE-MARSHAL an 4d
Mrs. Arthur T Cowley were

D0 YOU KNOW
THE VALUE OF A DOLLAR?
so matter ‘hee he proroy al ea eae

diamonds give you most for your money. ind
jewelry

wisely and shop for diamonds, watches,
here.

among the passengers arriving
from Canada yesterday morning
by TC.A Air Vice-Marsha!

s Director of Air Services,

Department of Transport § in

‘Ottawa.

-{” They are here for three weeks,
staying at Cacrabank.

Yeronto And Ontario

R. and Mrs. Bruce Hopkins
of Toronto and their daugh-
ter Mrs, Charles Hopkins
of Kingston, Ontario arrived
by T.C.A. yesterday morni to
spend a month’s holiday in Mere
bados, They are guests at Cacra-
bank.

Also staying at Cacrabank are
Dr, and Mrs, George Ingham of
Stratford, Ontario. They arrived
by the same plane and are here
for a month.





tifully set in 18ct white
or yellow gold mounting.





EASY CREDIT TERMS
ALPHONSO B. DE LIMA & (0,

The Jewel Box of Barbados
Corner of Broad and McGregor Sts.












GLOBE THEATRE

TONITE 8.30 & TO-MORROW 5 & 8.30 P.M.
Yvonne De ata. | and John RUSSEL
N

“The Gal who took the West”





MR. H. L. O, FLECKER

B.G. Medico

N Barbados for two months’

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1951

en LLL ALS
C: C ; C

Back From Grenada
Aro paying a visit to the
Grenada Sugar Factory, Mr.
Henry Watson, Manager of Searles
Plantation in Christ Churth and
ur. Theodore Alleyne, Manager
of Newcastle plantation in St.

John, returned yesterday morning
by the Lady Rodney.

Canadian Trade

Commissioner

R. T. GRANT MAJOR,

Canadian Government Trade
Commissioner for the Eastern
Caribbean with headquarters in
Trinidad, arrived here yesterday
morning by the Lady Rodney from
Trinidad intransit for Montserrat.
Mrs. Grant Major also arrived
yesterday by B.W.I.A. She is
here for a week staying at the
Marine Hotel.

Bluecoats Head
R. H. L. O, FLECKER,
C.B.E. Headmaster of
Christ’s Hospital, the Bluecoat
School, arrives here February 21st.
He is doing a three months’ tour
of the Caribbean for the British
‘Council, meeting other Headmas-
ters and lecturing on a variety of
Educational subjects. His itinerary
includes Venezuela, Trinidad,
Grenada, British Guiana, Antigua
and Jamaica. He is accompanied

by his wife and daughter.

Mr. Flecker was korn in 1896
at Dean Close School, Cheltenham
in Gloucestershire. His father was
the first headmaster: he started
with six boys in 1886 and when
he retired some forty years later
the numbers were 250. The eldest
of the family was the poet, James
Elroy Flecker, author of “Hassan.”

Mr. Flecker was educated at
Dean Close School and won a
Classical Scholarship at Brasenose
College, Oxford in December 1914,
He at once joined the army and.
saw active service in Mesopo-
tamia in 1916. After the war he
went to Oxford, took a first in





MR. AND MRS. RUPERT FARMER who spent a month's holiday in
Barbados returned to Canada yesterday by T.C.A. Mr. Farmer, who
is a Barbadian, is an Electrical Engineer with “Hydro Quebec” in
Montreal. He is a brother of Mr. “Guinea” Farmer of Oughterson Pin,








Honour Moderations and his
degree. In January 1920 he wad
appointed by Dr. (now Sir Cyril)
Norwood to the staff of Marlbor-
ough College, where he became a
House Master in 1924, In 1927 he
became headmaster of Berkham-

holiday prior to retirement is
Dr. R. N. Cozier, District Medical
Officer of West Coast, Demerara
He arrived yesterday morning by
the Lady Rodney accompanied by
by his wife and is staying at

Leaton First Viet Stream. sted School—an old foundation
irst isit whose six hundred boys were

R. C, S. MORTON from Hali- almost equally divided into board-
fax who made the round ers and day boys. It was one of

trip on the Lady Rodney from the biggest schools receiving
Canada to British Guiana, arriv- Direct Grant from the Board (now
ed here yesterday morning ‘on his Ministry) of Education. In 1930
first visit to the island, He will ne was appointed headmaster of
be staying for two weeks as a Christ's Hospital (popularly
guest at che Windsor Hotel. known as the Bluecoat School),

LOCAL TALENT AUDITION THIS MORNING 9.30 A.M.

Opening Tuesday 13th to Thursday 5 & 8.30
“ABANDONED” Dennis O'Keefe & Gale Storm

JANETTA DRESS SHOP
UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAWM’S, Lower Broad St,

Phone 2684
READY MADE DRESSES of all types

| EXTRA—Tex Beneke & The GLEN MILLER ORCHESTRA



Office Open

R. SIDNEY SPIRA, B.Sc.
O.D. who recently returned
from the U.S.A. has opened his
office in the building above Alfon-
so B. de Lima & Company in
McGregor Street. Dr. Spira ob-
tained his degrees at Colombia
University, New York, where he
was studying for four, years after
leaving Harrison College. After
graduating he was an Intern for a
ear at an Eye Clinic in New
ork. ;
Dr. Spira will examine eyes and
fill prescriptions with the latest
equipment from the U.S.A, which

Carib Press Assn., Meeting

ELEGATES for the Caribbean
Press Association meeting
arriving at Seawell yesterday were
Mr. G. C. Bloom, Latin American
Manager for Reuters stationed in
Buenos Aires, Mr. C. E. Hitehins
Editor of the Trinidad Guardian,
Mr. Jimmy Cozier, Acting Inform-
ation Officer of the Caribbean
Commission, stationed in Port-of-
Spain and Hon, Secretary of the
Caribbean Press Association, Hon.
Garnet Gordon, Editor of The
Voice of St. Lucia who is staying
with Mr. and Mrs. F. A. C. Clair-

THAT’S THE STANDARD

AT
STORE



WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Local Handicraft
EVENING MITTENS—in Pastel Shades and Black
READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty's of London,

HOURS: Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30

Dr. Morton is a retired surgeon
of Halifax Infirmary and the
Grace Hospital.

Frequent Visitors
R. and Mrs. 8. A. Stephens

from Montreal, Canada are
now spending two months’ holi-
day here. They came in on the
Rodney and are staying at the
Marine Hotel,

Mr, Stephens who is Chairman
of the Board of Directors of F. H.
Hopkins and €o., said that they
had been coming to Barbados off
and on since 1936,

For Four Months
O*

four months’ leave from his
dence, East Bank, Demerara

























MRS.: HOUSEWIFE

a offer a wide range of House-

“EARTHENWARE





duties at Plantation Provi-
is



Mr. D. I. Newman who arrived

yesterday morning by the Lady

Medina Shape Rodney. He was accompanied by

his wife and two sons and they

Maroon Band & Gold Decoration are staying at “Watersmeet”,
Plates Dishes Worthing.

Tea Cups & Saucers, Cream Jugs



Platters Tea Pots Were Here Last Year
Also ACK in Barbados for three
TEA months’ holiday are Mr. and
Stine Gas ce r Mrs. G. W. Bartlett of Nova
DINNER SETS os ck 49.34 Scotia who spent a holiday here

last year. They arrived from
British Guiana yesterday morn-
ing on the Lady Rodney and
are staying at the Windsor Hotel.

Mr, Bartlett who has _ just
rétired from business, was form-
erly President of G. W. Bartlett
Ltd., lumber dealers of Nova

Scotia,

Obtainable from our Hardware Department -—-Tel. No.2039



THE BHARHADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.





FOGARTY’S ... FOGARTY'S ...



Do you care

for Lovely Shoes ?

If so, then you must see the
New Shipment of - - -

LADIES, GBNIS', CHILDREN'S,
and: INFANTS’

SHOES

FOGARTY'S

It’s a Fashionable Collection
which provides a truly
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EVERY

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an



——————

{

which post he still holds. This
school was one of the Royal Hos-
pitals founded in 1552 to replace
in London the work previouly
done by the monasteries which
‘had been dissolved by Henry
VIII. In the late 18th and early
19th Centuries, Samuel Taylor
Coleridge, Charles Lamb and
Leigh Hunt were the most famous
of a brilliant generation educated
by the redoubtable Dr. Boyer. In
1902 the school was moved from
the site of its original home jn
Grey Friars’, Newgate Street, in
the City of London to the neigh-
bourhood of Horsham, some 40
miles due South of the City, The
boys still wear the lon

coat and yellow stock: a dress

which has changed but little from |

Tudor times. No child is admitted
whose parents are not in need of
financial assistance for his educa-
tion. The school thus still exactly
fulfils the purpose of its founda-
tion. It receives no funds from
public sources and is still entirely
dependent upon past and present
Benefactions.

In 1944 when the recent Edu-
cation Act was taking shape,
Flecker was elected President of
the Incorporated Association of
Head Masters, which he has since
served as Honorary Secretary and
as Treasurer. He has for many
years attended the meetings of the
Committee of the Head Masters’
Conference, either as an elected
member or as representative of
the Association of Head Masters.
He received the C.B.E. in the
Birthday Honours List of 1949.

Attended Synod
RRIVING from St. Vincent
yesterday morning by the
Lady Rodney were Rev. and Mrs.
Frank Lawrence, Rev. J. B.
Broomes, Rev. R. McCullough,
Rev. I. Thomas, Mr. G. Brewster,
Mr. and Mrs. H. Ward, Mr, and
Mrs. D. A. Scott and Mr. V. B.
St. John, They were some of
the delegates who attended the
Annual Methodist Synod which
j was held at Kingstown,

For Cricket
‘M®. ERNEST B. PARKER ot
Messrs, C. A. Phillips Ltd.,
Commission Agents of British
Guiana is now in Barbados for a
month’s holiday, He arrived yes-
terday morning by the Lady Rod-
mney and has come over princi-
pally to see the cricket,

_He was accompanied by his
wife and sister-in-law, Miss Fay
Phillips and they are staying at
the Hotel Royal.



MARCH

15 & 16

44" x 22” $1.27 54”

CRETONNES:

Dial 4606

tm

dark blue |f-

A MURDER HAS BEEN ARRANGED



BER BRR eee
CURTAIN NETS: White 4 Potiens, halinets 39¢

half nets. 527
Cream with toning cols. 36” 51g

BATH TOWELS:

27” in attractive designs

EVANS & WHITFIELDS
Your Shoe

has recently been installed in his monte, Worthing, and Mr. L. C.
office. Stevenson, Editor of The West-In-
dian in Grenada.

Mr. Stevenson is a nephew of
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Bvuileh,
“Emerald Villa”, Fontabelle, with
whom he resides while here. >

Mr, G. E, Willock, Editor ofthe
Daily Chronicle and Mr, T. E.
Sealy, Associate Editor of the
Jamaica Gleaner are expected: to
arrive to-day.

.The. meeting opens at Hastings
House to-morrow, tad

Managing Director __-

R. and MRS. W. M. ANDER-

SON were among the pas-
sengers arriving from Toronto
yesterday by T.C.A. They were
down here last winter.

Mr. Anderson is Managing
Director of North American Life
Assurance. They plan to. spend
a month, staying at the Marine
Hotel.

Here for Three Months
RS. GRAHAM ROSE and: her
son Hugh arrived from
Canada yesterday to spend three
months’ holiday in Barbados.
They are staying with Mrs. Rose’s
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Willie
Yearwood.
Graham is with Western Insur-
ance Co., in Toronto.

C.N.S. Officials ©
| APT. R. A. CLARKE, Gener-
. al Manager of Canadian
National Steamships and Mr. J. M.
Gauthier, Freight Traffic Manager
of Canadian National Steamships
who have been touring the W.I,
ee to Montreal yesterday by



MISS CAROL MALEC left yester-
day for Canada after spending a

holiday in Barbados. Canadian Engineer

Spent Two Weeks AYING their first visit to the

FTER spending two weeks’ island and remaining for sik

holiday in Barbados, Miss weeks are Mr. and Mrs. Ro
Carol Malec of the office staff of Henham of Toronto, They ar
T.C.A, in Montreal, Canada, rived yesterday morning by thé
returned home yesterday morn- Lady Rodney from Trinida
ing by T.C.A. She was staying where they had spent a we
at “Accra,” Rockley. and are staying at the Windsor

To Join Husband Hotel. is
RS. JOHN MARCH-PENNY Mr. Henham is wear aaa
left yesterday by B.W.1.A, Of Dominion Structural Sted

for St. Lucia to join her husband Limited.

who is at piconet there on the On Holiday e

Cable Ship Electra, She expects to R. RALPH GRIFFITH, ae

be away one week. employee of the Everla
7 Below Fountain Pen Co, of the U.S.Ax

N Friday night the tempera- was an arrival on Thursday mort-
O ture in Montreal was seven ing by the Fort Amherst to spend
below zero. So said one of the a holiday with his relatives. He
passengers arriving by T.C.A. staying at Mount Standfast, St
yesterday morning. James. ;

EMPIRE.
THEATRE!

white 36” wide 49¢

TIGER CALICO: 72¢
DOMESTIC: 3B s 55¢

x 30” $1.60

RSS 88 2 8 8-8

Dial 4220

;

Stores



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY

At the Cinema:

Mixe

G.

d

11, 1951

Grill

OVER THIS WEEK-END, movie-goers will have a
mixed grill to choose from in the line of entertainment,

co!

rising the story of a famous race horse; a rather farci-

cal Western; mystery melodrama; guerilla warfare in the
Philippines, a social problem and a second showing of one
of Danny Kaye's funniest comedies.

O TOOK THE WEST will pro-
have the most Repeller ap-

y
i
Peal shor are in Technicolor,

ith
orious, though widely dif-
ferent, scenic backgrounds.

“THE STORY OF SEABIS-
» show at the Plaza, is
just what its title implies and you
see the step-by-step training
ptoecess of one of America’s most
famous race horses. The Bis-
cuit was an extraordinary horse
in that he never really came into
his own until he was a four~year~
old and his famous match race with
War Admiral at Pimlico, in which
he won by four lengths and his
victory in his final try for the
Santa Anita handicap, are actu-
ally shown in the film, As a
point of interest, the role of tne
famous horse is played by two
of his sons, with the exception of
the two races mentioned above.
There is q slight, but pleasant
love story between Shirley Tem-
ple, as ah Trish colleen, whose
uncle Barry Fitzgerald is the Bis-
euit’s trainer, and Lon McAlister,
a8 a top jockey, but it is to Barry
d that acting honours go
Ag the “fey” Irish trainer and
lever of horses, he gives a warn
and endearing characterization of
the man whose unchanging faitn
in a knobbley-kneed colt made
him the world’s leading money
winning horse. From beginniyg
to end, this is Seabiscuit’s story
and the human actors, for once,
take second place.

Globe:
“THE GAL WHO TOOK
THE WEST”

This film is a farcical horse-
opera in a Western setting, and in
spots, is a lively burlesque of
sothe of the situations we are
fathiliar With in g film of this kind,
In brief, it centres on the bitter
feud between two cousins, who
fall in love with the same woman,
However, the tale ig told in flash-
back, from four different points
of view, with the lady in question
having the final word,

YVONNE DE CARLO is the
opera-singer who is brought to
Afizona from the East to open
General O’Hara’s new opera
house, and she promptly becomes
entangled with his two fighting
nephews, Though Miss De Carlo
ig not the opera singer envisaged
by the old man, her rendition of
two bar-room ditties of that era
are quite diverting and = she
shows herself highly capable of
handling an explosive situation. As
the two cousins, Scott Brady and
John Russell are like terriers in
a ring when they meet and their
final fight in the General’s home
is & grand and glorious affair on
the lines of all-in wrestling.
Charles Coburn, grand old man
of the movies, plays the General,
the only person capable of con-
trolling his nephews—along with
the help of the U.S. Cavalry!
His portrayal is delightful as the
wealthy Arizonian, who opens
the concert in the opera house
with two shots from his pistol
to subdue his nephews feuding
factions in the pit.

The costumes and settings are
colourful and ornate and the musi-
eal background appropriate.

“ABANDONED”

Beginning Tuesday, the Globe
Theatre is showing “Abandoned,”
ah absorbing documentary-type
film depicting a serious American

gee ba Pat ont



social problem—the black-market
sale of babies purchased from
their unwed mothers. Though we
out here do not have an evil of
this kind to contend with, the pic-
ture is none-the-less interesting.

It is the story of a young girl
who goes to Los Angeles to find
her missing sister, and with | the
help of a newspaper reporter, ex-
poses an illegal adoption syndi-
cate. The acting of the principals
is realistic and cee and in
supporting roles, Jeff Chandler
(who will be remembeted in The
Broken Arrow) as the district
attorney and Marjorie Rambeau,
as one of the top members of the
syndicate, both give good per-
formances,



Empire:
“IN A LONELY PLACE”

Starring Humphrey Bogart, this
film is the story of a neurotic
screen writer, who, because of his
outbursts of rage and tendency to
become involved in brawls, is sus-
pected by the police of murdering
a hat-check girl. He is cleared of
guilt by a young woman who falls
in love with him, but who will
net go through with their marriage
because she fears his emotional
cutbreaks and instability.

It is fairly obvious, from the
beginning that Mr. Bogart had no
hand in the murder, and the film
is therefore not entirely credible
from that point of view, but the
presentation of a man who is
wretched and broken by his own
compulsive behaviour is charac-
terised by honesty and under-
standing. Humphrey Bogart gives
one of the best dramatic perform-
ences I have seen him give, while
Gloria Grahame, as the woman
who loves him, is first rate too,





Roxy:
“AMERICAN GUERILLA IN
THE PHILIPPINES”

I was unable to see this recently
released film, but on checking
reviews which I received, it ap-
pears to be a semi-documentary
‘war-drama, produced with the co-
operation, of the U.S. and Philip-
pine governments. Photographed
in Technicolor on the island of
Leyte “the film points up the re.
markable ingenuity and teamwork
that went into the fortification of
ill-equipped Pacific Islands during
the second World War. Praise-
worthy tare has gone into the
recreation of situations and feel-
ings that prevailed in the Philip-
pines after the fall of Bataan,”
Another reviewer says “there are
a few popyincing glimpses of the
sort of fighting that went on in
the islands, during the war’—but
T am afraid that this last reviewer
‘was not impressed with the story
or the performances of Tyrone
Power and Micheline Prelle, who
are starred,

HOME, SwEre HOME

W YORK.

Home is sweeter to ten million
American families who now have
in the lounge. To tempt them
away from their sets, the desper-
ate cinemas..are making sweet
offers of free coffee and cake in

the foyer after the film,



ANONYMOUS
MI

ave
Winner of a £20,000 Italian
State lottery this week warned
newspapermen to keep his identity
secret. He said he was not worried
about begging letters but feared
the tax collectors,



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



Gardening Hints Farm And Garden

By AGRICOLA

For Amateurs

THE GARDEN in February
COLEUS
Yellow Alamanda

WHEN planting up the garden,
remember the lovely Coleus, and,
if possible find a spot for this
decorative and quick growing
plant, It’s fascinating to collect
the many varieties of this lovely
little plant, exchanges between
friends is-so easy. Just a snip off
from an established plant stuck in
the ground will quickly take root.
A bowl of these coloured leaves
will soon send out roots in the
water, and so they can be enjoyed
in the house and then planted out
in the garden,

Coleus do best in semi shade,
and thrive especially well under
trees, They are suitable to plant
as a thick border, or on a Rock-
garden where they look particu~
larly well, but they can be grown
in the sun, and look particularly
handsome when massed together
in large beds,

In planting the Coleus, see that
the cutting is short, as they are
inclined to get stalky rather
quickly. To keep them, after

planting, in good shape nip out
the top centre leaves now and



C.G.P. enquires:—

I should be grateful for
advice on “moss” on lawns,
coupled with bare patches,

Also scale blight on lime
frees and other citrus that
cause them to die.

With thanks,



then. This tends to make them

bunchy, so much prettier than

when they grow up tall,
Coleus are cultivated for their

brightly coloured leaves. The
flowers are insignificant, and
should be nipped out.

The plants grow to a height of
about two to three feet, and as
already stated prefer semi shade
and a moist condition,

FLOWERING VINES
The Yellow Alamanda

The Yellow Alamanda is one of
our flowering vines that can also
be grown as a shrub if so desired.

It is a slow growing plant, so
quick results are not to be ex-
pected,

Being rather woody, it will
tolerate better than most vines an
exposed position, and it will with-
ony fairly poor garden condi-

ons,

The flowers are a clean bright
yellow, bell-like in shape and
they grow in loose clusters on the
vine, It bears continuously
throughout the year, especially
during the rainy season.

There are two varieties of the
Yellow Alamanda, the garden
book tells us, One, the “Ala-
manda cathartica var Hendersonii”
has much larger flowers, some
measuring four to five inches in
diameter, than the ordinary Ala-
manda whose Botanical name
(from Garden book) is “Alamanda
Cathartica var Williamsii.

In deciding on a plant, the
larger variety is strongly recom-
mended, The Alamanda is grown
from cutting, or by layering.

Have you any Gardening ques-
tions you would like answered or
any garden information that would
be of interest to other Gardeners
to pass on?

Have you a surplus of seeds or
cuttings you would like to ex-
change?

Write to “GARDENING”

C/o The “Advocate”
and watch this Column for a
reply.

~VITACUP”



FOR HEALTH

(3¢ PER 1/2 LB. TIN.

AGRICULTURE is the host
which spreads the daily table of
mankind. We propose in this
series of notes to keep this broad
theme as a main thread and to
weave around it stich ideas and
informative matter as may help
to give general form and pattern
to the theme while, at the same
time, creating an appropriate
setting or background as the pic-
ture unfolds. together, not for
the specialist whe is already weil
informed, but for the general
reader and those interested in the
use of land who ono find the
notes helpful and perhaps stimu-
lating. That, at least, is our 7
and reason for attempting e
column, undertaken with the
knowledge and co-operation of
the local Department of Agricul-
ture, ié

Agriculture is, of course,
primarily a business, but it is also
a mode of life. In the hurly-burly
of present day existence and the
quickening of the tempo of life.
let us admit that much of the
mode of life element has been,
or, is in danger of being, lost,
unfortunately. The tendency to
specialized crop production has

momentum and much of

fun of growing and eating
one’s own productions and 2
simple pleasures of home life
which accompany such activities
are giving place to artificial dis-,
tractions which, in most cases,
are not only costly but ephemeral.
The effect soon passes off and we
are left with a result comparable
to, say, “I must have another
drink”. In other words, the habit
grows of seeking to spend all
leisure time away from home
which is then run, more *ften
than not, by remote control with
its concomitant evils. It will be
readily admitted that the new
outlook has brought; in well
organised rural enterprise, higher
standards of living and all that
these imply but, unless com-
munity and family life in general
is properly channelled to meet the

changed circumstances, we shall
lose permanently and beyond
recall the character building

effect that the old fashioned mode
ef life factor in farming and
related activities of self-help
generated.

Here in Barbados, there have
been many changes as one sees
going around the country side;
the ancient has given way very
markedly to the modern, Wind
mills and small plants in the
sugar industry have given place
to centralized factories, small land
units absorbed into larger—all
making for greater efficiency and
productivity. In fact, the creation

COOKERY

Few people realize what nutri-
tive value a sweet potato has. It
is rich in vitamins A and C, some
vitamin B and minerals. Very
few people dislike this vegetable
though it can, of course get.very
boring if just boiled



and buttered. The
other day I came
across a_ recipe for

sweet potatoes which
was indeed delicious.

Sweet Potato And
Orange.

Ingredients:

2 Sweet potatoes

1 large orange

1 tablespoonful

grated orange rind

1/3 cup orange juice

sugar

2 tablespoonsful fat

4 cup orange juice

Salt.

Peel, cook, and slice the pota-
toes, grate the rind of the large
orange then peel the orange and
slice it.

Place in a greased fireproof dish,
a layer of sweet potato, a layer
of orange slices. Sprinkle with
orange rind, salt and sugar, and
dot with fat.

Repeat in this way until all the
ingredients are used, then pour
the orange juice over the top, It





UU EESEIEEESREENEEEREneeneeeeee eee



a



guished Agriculturalist, writ-
ing under the pen-name
Agricola, brings you,—the
man and woman on the land,
the information you need to

get the best results from
your farm and gatden).

of wealth from the land appears
to be going on at a fair pace, and
this is shared too, in a manner
compatible with size of enterprise
and effort, by numerous small
cultivators who have profited by
following the lead of the larger

interests and the guidance given }if

by the Department of Agricul-
ture. Thus, there have been sub-
stantial gains but also some
losses. All change does this and
agriculture is no different in this
respect. The humanistic and
mode of life factor has heme the
principal loser: contacts ween
r and the individual
ee are not so close in the
r set-up; the skills and
jerafts associated with small units
have almost disappeared — the
blacksmith, carpenter, wheel-
wright, millwright, plumber, sad-
diet and harneéss-maker, sail-
make, cooper and so on. True, a num-
ber of these has been absorbed in the
latge foundries and workshops of
Bridgetown, but the fact remains that
the change recalls the lament of Gold-
smith in “The Deserted Village”. No
one would sug#est a return to the old
conditions; indeed, life itself is nothing
without change, What is required is
that the disabilities which result from
change should be faced and tackled in
such a way that losses are turned to
gain in the long run and that any upset
in the economic lance be kept within
reasonable limits. s calls for realism,
courage, includi some risk taking,
clear thinking long range planning
if the needs of an increasing population
are to be fairly met

We have spoken of certain economic
changes in the countryside, but the s-
cts of the island remain, funda-
mentally, the same. True, the aesthetic
has suffered to some extent by the dis-
appearance of working wind mills,
whose decapitated walls are a poor sub-
stitute. (We may return to this another
time), Generally speaking, however, the
term “beautiful Barbados" is as real as
ever. The landscapes, the vistat of hill
and dale stretching as far as the eye
can Carry to the sea, the well laid out
and cultivated fields, f the
air passi over meadows and freshly
cut rane “helde, crop, stock and other
activities, the breezes and the sunshine,
the radiant health of smiling faces—
all these must strike the visitor as
natural blessings for Which there should
be much thankfulness to the great Archi-
tect of the universe, Let us keep in
mind also that these assets spring direct-
ly or indirectly from the good earth and,
in our next note, we shall speak of the
soil, = dee

CORNER

is essential that you should cover
your dish, Bake in a moderately
hot oven for 45 minutes to one

hour.
This dish is very nice served

" Coconut kisses was
orice described to me
as, “A toothsome pass-
it-round titbit.” hy
not try it and see if
‘ou agree?
tnate jients:
Grated meat of two
coconuts
14~-lb, sugar
1 teaspoonful orange
flour water
4 egg yolks
2 tablespoonsful
flour
Mix the
sugar, and orange flour water and
bring it to the boil, take it off the
fire and add the flour and beat
vigorously for half an hour. Place
in a greased patty-pan and bake
in a moderate oven for twenty
minutes,
Remove them and springle
powdered sugar,

x



coconut,

with





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PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR

JOHN GODDARD FINDS
TALENT

BY O. S. COPPIN....,
\ HE news this week that the West Indies Cricket
\ * Board of. Control, acting upon the recommen-

f : dation of John Goddard, West Indies Captain, have

sponsored a visit to Barbados By C. O’B, Crick,

. former Barbados pace bowler and six-foot-three

e - Mason of St. Vincent, has met with complete

V Soe approval in local cricket circles.

Se rs It is planned that these candidates will take part
in a Trial Game @rranged for them at the end of the second Trini-
dad-Barbados ‘Test, and naturally if they establish any reasonable
claims for inclusion in the WJ. 1951 tour to Australia more use will
have to be made of them. 2

GOLF CAPTAIN TALKS i

OLONEL VIDMER, Captain of the Rockley Golf Club, which tour-

ed Trinidad recently; "has Bow returned and this is what he
has to say about the tour, ’

An overwhelming success, in spite of an overwhelming defeat,
was scored by the Barbados golf team which returned from its
matches with St. Andrew's in Trinidad last week. The men’s team
was beateh badly, but what seems to have been overlooked is the
fact that the ladies’ team won from the Trinidad contingent by four
matches to two, and congratulations for the Misses Isabel and Katy
Lenagan, Mrs. Brenda Wilson and Mrs. Elizabeth Vidmer, our ladies
representatives, seemed belatedly to be in_ order.

THE LADIES WIN:

OWEVER, it was not the ladies’ victory that made the trip an

overwhelming success, but the generosity, consideration and all
around hospitality of the St. Andrew’s hosts, ‘om the moment that
the Barbados contingent arrived at Piareo Airport until the last lin-
gering member of the team departed for home after the Carnival,
the St. Andrew’s members went all out to provide the visitors with
every pleasure and comfort they could command.

Another element which made the trip a pronounced success was
the co-operation and cohesion of the Barbados players themselves.
T'ney worked and played together, celebrating each other’s triumphs,
few as they were, and sympathizing with each other's defeats. In
spite of the daily setbacks laughter and gaiety dominated the atmos-
phere wherever the Rockley golfers gathered. :

Without attempting any excuses for the failure of the men’s team
io win, a few factors which prevented them from making a better
showing should be taken into consideration, First of these was the
loss of J. R. Rodger on the eve of the tearm’s departure. Rodger was
one of the three top players who were to lead the team, but a crushed
toe eliminated him from the group at the eleventh hour.

Knowing the ability of such Trinidad players as Bob Hill, Murray
Wilson and John Sellier, it was not expected that the Barbados
leaders would win more than one of the first three matches in any
day. However, it felt that Rockley’s strength thereafter would more
than compensate along the line, However, with the loss of Rodger
it meant that the last eight men had to move up one position and
the burden was a heavy one to impose.

Ian Christie and Dick Vidmer, playing at No. 1 and No. 2, took
the shock of Hill and Wilson in turn, but instead of Rodger, the
current holder of the Barbados open championship, to help with the
first wave, Michael Timpson and Will Atkinson had to be thrown into
the line-up where the going was toughest. And each player there~
efter was playing one better than had been anticipated.

It should be mentioned here that both Timpson and Atkinson
shouldered their heavier responsibilities splendidly, and when paired
in the four—bal] matches carried off the maximum three points, while
¢heir defeats in the singles were by the narrowest of margins in spite
of the fact that they were playing higher than anticipated. In fact,
almost all the defeats suffered by the Barbados players were by such
scores as 3 and 2 or 4 and 3, which is not entirely loy#ded.

NO EXCUSES ¢

NOTHER factor which was against the Barbados players, natur-

ally, was their unfamiliarity with the course. This is always an
element which favours the home team in golf matches, but in this
particular case it was enhanced by the bad weather which lasted
through the week, St. Andrews, unlike Rockley, is very hilly and
in the wet weather the ball stopped where it landed, with practically
no roll whatever, On many courses this would prove as much of a
hardship to one side as the other, but at St. Andrew’s, it often left
the player with a blind shot to the green. The St. Andrew’s players,
naturally, were thoroughly familiar with the location of the greens
and played with assurance; the Rockley players had to walk forward
and look, ahd then played uncertainly.

FAMILIARITY

RAM ARTY with the.course was a pronounced factor on nine of
the eighteen holes "OnNo. 1 a drive straight for the green leaves
a blind second shot and the ball has to be placed well to the right of
the fairway. On No, 3 the second shot also is a blind one, On No. 5
only experience convinces the player how far he can hit a drive
toward the Jeft--the shortest way home on a dog-leg—and still carry
to the top of the hill, The tee shot on No. 8 is a blind one, and No. 9,
like No. 1, must be played well to the right of the fairway in order

to see the green, g

The second shot on No, 10 is blind in wet weather with no roll,
and a good drive too far to the right, again the shortest way home,
Jeaves a blind second shot at No. 11, The tee shot at No. 15 is a blind
one and both No, 16 and No. 18 will produce bling second shots in
wet weather unless the ball is exceptionally long,

FAS\CINATED

ERHAPS because of these factors, possibly in spite of them, the

Barbados players were fascinated with the St. Andréws layout,
where the fairways, and especially the greens are far superior to
those at Rockley, However, they were factors which worked against
a better showing by the Barbados players but were not effective
against the Trinidadians who know the course backwards, forwards
and upside down.

The general opinion of the players on their return was that St.
Andrews had a stronger team of golfers, generally speaking; that the
weather, unfamiliarity with the course and the loss of Rodger made
the Rockley team appear weaker than it was; that the difference in
the strength of the two teams was not so great that the Barbados team
would not win in Barbados, where the St, Andrew's golfers would be
on strange fairways and greens, but that the margin of victory would
a be so great as the St. Andrew’s players scored on their own lay-
out, ”

TABLE TENNIS
] N THE first match played on Monday between Barna vs. Y.M.P.C.,

Barna had an-easy victory..Of the 9 games played Barna won
i. Both Greenidge and Stoute won 3 each and Howard one. For
Y.M.P.C., Smith and Hinds won their two games.

Stoute and Greenidge played good tennis throughout, while
Gooding seem to have lost some of his form, Howard shows promise
and should go far this year. “With some more practice Y.M.P.C.
will give a much better performance on Wednesday against Pelican.

FOUR PLAY
A BBEY MARINES defeated Y.M.C.A., five games to four on

Wednesday night, The standard’of play was poor and only three
players showed form in spells. Bynoe, Mayers and Corbin were all
brilliant in spells but not consistent. The outstanding match of the
night was Bynoe vs Cerbin, only in this match was a high standard
of play reached,4 after a very shaky start eame through to win
in fine style, Corbin from his play in all matches seems to be trying
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“RANGER” SCORES .. Arsenal Out.
FIRST VICTORY IN‘B’ Of F.A. Cup

Vidmer Tells Of Trinidad Golf Tour - By Our Yachting Correspondent

STANLEY CHEESEMAN’S Ranger scored her fir

victory since being promoted to the “B” Class this season.
Ranger, which was given three minutes by Fantasy, sailed
steadily and kept the lead throughout.

Forty boats sailed in the Fourth
Regatta of the R.B.Y.C. which
was held yesterday. The wind was
light to medium and the sea
smooth, Of the Tornadoes Teddy

Hoad’s Vamovuse ended with he
best average while Cyclone was
next. :

Ten boats started in.the B Class,
Ranger who had given Wizard
two minutes, quickly overtook her
and was leading at the end of the
lap. Wizard was -second with
Fantasy a few seconds behind.
War Cloud gave Rascal a minute
but was leading at*the end of this
lap. Gipsy, who also sailed very
well, gave Okapi four minutes and
overtook her.

After completing the first tap
in 37 minutes, 53;seconds, Ranger
finished the second lap in 39 min-
utes, 39 seconds, Fantasy came
around second ang Flirt, who
overtook Wizard, was third. Rascal
went back ahead of Wer Cloud
while Gipsy was still leading
Okapi. Moyra Blair, who had
given Okapi four: minutes, was
right behind her. At the end of
this round Wizzrd dropped out.

Fantasy made a brave attempt
but could not overtake Ranger in
the last round. She finished over
a minute ahead of Fantasy while
Fit came in third just barely
beating Gipsy.

Gennet First In “C”

Peter Ince brought in his Sea-
gull Gannet first in the C and Cen-
tre-board Class after giving six
minutes to Peggy Nan and Mag-
win, seven minutes to Scamp and
Missbehave and eight minutes to
Folly. :

Gannet sailed really good. At
the end of the first round Folly,
who started first, was still in the
lead, Scamp was second while ihe

Tornado Vamoose was third. Cy- g¢,

clone, who was sailing very’ well,
was still in the heat of the race.
Gannet’s time for the first round

was 38 minutes, eight seconds and)
while Felly had lost over four
minutes to her. She completed the”
last round in 40 minutes, 50 see-
onds. Folly’s time
round was 44 minutes, 54 seconds,

Competition

LONDON, Feb. 10.

ea Arsenal, holders of the trophy

eliminated from the F.A.

ip competition to-day, when a
st-half goal from Manchester
ited, at Manchester was suf-
ient to put them out. With Chel-
and Fulham concerned in the
ly draw among the eight fifth-
und ties, London are assured of

for the last One place im the quarter—finais.

Six of today’s ties were won by

Third in this class was Scamp, home teams, the. only away vic-

32 seconds behind Felly. Colin
Bellamy’s Magwin was third,
Intermediate

rs being Newcastle United three

times winners of the trophy who
Class honours beat Stoke in the highest scoring

went to Reen. Nine boats started game of the round, four goals to

in this Class and Reen gave Dawn two.
and Dauntless three minutes. At also

Wolverhampton Wanderers
hree times’ winners, sur-

the end of the first lap Dawn was Vived at the expense of Hudders-

leading with Dauntless 18 seconds
behind.

Reen completed the final lap in Rovers,

ld but the outstanding perform-
ce was probably that of Bristol
a Third Division team,

43 minutes, 58 seconds with Dawn who easily knocked out the Sec-

following in
Dauntless was
fourth,

second position.
third and Gnat

The D Class race went to Sinbad ed)

ond Division Hull, three to nil.

*Six of the surviving teams
(whoever wins the replays includ-
are from. division one, the

who completed the first round in} gthers being Bristol Rovers and

46 minutes, 49 seconds and
in 48 minutes, two

the last Second Division Birmingham City,
seconds. ho knocked out the other Bristo?
gave Olive Blossom, the second)

am—City—two nil at’ Birming~

boat, two minutes, and Buceaneer ham, To-day’s draw for the quar-

and Van Therndyke eight minutes
Van Thorndyke Second

Van Thorndyke sailed away
from Buecanece and was second at
the end of the first lap. Olive
Blossom, which gave two minutes.
to Rainbow and six minutes te
Buceaneer and Van Thorndyke
was third.

Olive Blossom soon after passed
out Van Therndyke and ended
second, Her first round was com-
pleted in 47 minutes, 33 seconds
and the last in 50 minutes, three
seconds. Van Thorndyke was third
and Bueccanec> fourth,

The Fifth Regatta will be sailed
on March 17, This long delay has
been caused through the Inter-
colonial Cricket and Horse Racing.

Results were as follows:

“B" Class: 1. Ranger; 2. Fantasying
Flirt; 4. Gipsy. :
“C'G@



. Gannet; 2. Folly{ 3

Intermediate : 1,
Dauntless; 4. Gnat,

"Class: 1. Sinbad; 2. Olive Blos-

sem; 8, Van Thorndyke; 4, Buccanger:,”
?



Commonwealth Lead.

India By

311 Runs

KANPUR, Feb. 10.

The Commonwealth cricket touring team were 311 runs
ahead with six second innings wickets standing at the end
of the third day of the fifth unofficial Test match against

India here to-day..

Hassett Hits
173 Not Out
AOE EE easily i 4
Against M.C.C.
MELBOURNE, Feb. 10,
Ausivalian Test captain Lind-
Say Hassett scored a century here
to-day against the M.C.C. and
helped to take Victoria’s total! to

307 for 6 wickets by the close of
play on the first day,



Victoria lost a wicket with only
4 runs scored but Hassett came in
and pulled the game round with
fir undefeated innings of 173. He

was at the crease just under 5
hours,

_Hassett. was the mainstay of
Victoria’s batting side. The high-

est score apart from his was H.
Turner who made 33, It was
Hassett’s first century of the seas-
on against the touring side.

VICTORIA Ist INNINGS
Mouleman ¢ Hutton b Statham
MeDonald b Hollies ‘
Harvey b Bailey
Loxton b Hollies .......,...
Turner ¢ Compton b Close
Hassett not out .

Jan Johnson ¢ Close b Hollies
Ring not out
Extras (4 byes, 3 legs

ee —
a28af.RBS8

Total (for 6 wkts,) 206

India who were 143 for four
overnight, were all out soon after
lunch for 240 in reply to the Com-
monwealth’s first innings of 413.
By the close the Commonwealth
had seored 188 for four wickets in
their second innings.

*

Reen; 2.»Dawn; — ’
a

ter finals is therefore awaited
th keen anticipation by all foot-
all fans to see how these lone
Second and third division survi-
vors fare against the giants,

The League programme was
naturally curtailed in view of the
cup ties. Most of the leading teams
if not in the cup being without
league games. An exception was
Blackburn Rovers whose comfort-
able win sent them to second
place in Division two with none
of the four teams previously above
them in action.

Forest, the Southern leaders of
Division three. lost,” but their
nearest rivals had Cup engage-
ments and so the position remains
unchanged as it does in the north-
ern section where the top two
teams won,

—Reuter.





Football Results

LONDON, Feb. 10.
The results of games Plaed to-day
fellow: —

F. A. CUP FIFTH ROUND
Brimingham City 2, Bristol City 0.
Blackpool 2, Mansfield 2.

Bristol Rovers 3, Hull City 0.
Chelsea 1, Fulham 1.
Manchester United 1, Arsenal 0.
Stoke City 2, Newcastle United 4,
Sunderland 3, Norwich City 1.
Wolverhampton Wanderers 2, Hudders-
field Town 0,

FIRST DIVISION
Bolton Wanderers 1, Burnley 1,
Liverpool 2, Portsmouth 1

SRCOND DIVISION
Blackburn Rovers 2, Leeds United 1.
Brentford 4, Bury 0.
SCOTTISH LEAGUE DIVISION A.
East Fife 2, Falkirk 1,

THIRD DIVISION
Southern Bournemouth 3. Nottingham

Forest 2.

Exeter City 0, Port Vale 3,
Gillingham 2, Torquay United 0
Ipswich Town 3, Brighton and Hove 0.
Leyton Orient 2, Crystal Palace 0,

. " ‘ Millwall 1, Swindon Town 0,
Five minutes from the el: Plymouth Argyle 1, Newport County 1.

tourists were 135 for the loss
two wickets, But then two bril-
liant catehes sent back Ikin for
63 and Fishlock without scoring.
Gaekwad, who claimed no vic-
tims in the first innings took the
wickets of Gimblett, Emmett and
Ikin to-day for 38 runs in 19
cvers of which 9 were maidens,
India soon lost Hazare, this
morning but Phadkar and Gopin-

ath who is playing in his first Test 2

defended stubbornly. Then Doo-
land, the Australian who plays in
the Lancashire League dashed
India’s hopes with his legbreaks.
In a spell of ten overs he took the
wickets of Gopinath, Phadkar and
Riumehant—the last two with suc-
cessive balls for 17 runs, He fin-
ished with the figures of four for
70, fi

The other India wickets were
taken by the two West Indian
players Ramadhin four for 90, and
Worrell two for 45,

Ikin and Gimblett started
brightly for the Commonwealth
and put on 79 before Gimblett
was caught. Emmett was soon out,

but Ikin continued to bat well and 0.

hit fives fours in his innings.



to change his half-volley game to a more orthodox style, this some-
what was a handicap on his part and he could not be at his best.
Mayers was erratic in his games, his defence was good, his attack weak.
His chief fault is his footwork as he is inclined to be lazy and not to

move around,

Bynoe showed quite good form in two matches but

flopped im his third against Alkins.
») Of the ‘other players little can be said. Alkins played a steady

ce (Griffith and Shields suffered from nerves and lack of practice.
her ene of these used their previous experience to any advantage

and played very poor tennis.

‘ Southend 3,
Town 0.
Walsall 3, Aldershot 1.
Watford 2, Colchester United 0,
THIRD DIVISION NORTHERN
Barrow 1, Carlisle United 2,
Bradford City 0, Chester 1.
Crewe Alexandra 0, Linecoin City 4.
Gateshead 5, Darlington 2.
Halifax Town 1, York City~3.
$ Hartlepools United 2, Stockport County

United Northampton

“New Brighton 0, Shrewsbury Town 9.
Rochdale 0, Oldham Athletic 1,
Rotherham United 6; Accrington Stanley

Seunthorpe United 1, Tranmere Rovers
1

Wrexham 3, Bradford 1.
SCOTTISH CUP SECOND ROUND
Aberdeen 4, Third Lanark 0.
Albion Rovers 0, Clyde 2
Morton 3, Airdrieonians 3.
Motherwell 4, Hamiiton Academicals 1.
Queen's Park 1, Ayr United 3.
Raith Rovers 5, Brechin City 2,
Rangers 2, Hibernian 3.
Saint Johnstone 1, Dundee 3.
SCOTTISH LEAGUE DIVISION B.
Dumbarton 0, Queer of the South J.
Dunfermline Athletic 5, Arbrowth 1.
Forfar Athletic 2, Alloa Athletic 4.
Kilmarnock 4, Cowdenbeath 0. Stirling
Albion 3, Dundee United 1
Doncaster Rovers 3, Barnsley 2. Gtimsby
Town 3, Chester 1. Luton Town 1, Aston
Villa 2.
Notts County 0, Everton 3.
Reading 2, Leicester City 2.
Sheffield Wednesday 2, Sheffield United
Southampton 1, Middlesbrough 1
West Ham United 1, Chariton Athletic
5.—Reuter.

———

COMMONWEALTH ist Innings . 413
INDIA_ Ist Innings .... ». 240
COMMONWEALTH 2nd INNINGS
Gimblett c Rajendra Nath b
MT CR Pea Gee
Ikin c Umrigar b Gaekwad ...





63

Emmett ¢ Mankad b Gaekwa 12
Worrell not out + 12
Fishlock ¢ Gopinath b 0
BOOB. finch gee 4
Total (for 4 wkts.) ........ 138



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Regime:
egument
Defeats
Ship’s Team
ips eam
The Regiment won their one
day cricket match against a team
from the H.M.S. Devonshire by
44 runs yesterday at the Garrison,
Play started at 1.30 °p.m., the
Regiment batting first on a good

wicket after winning the toss. The
Regiment were dismissed for 138

runs, this amount of runs partly «

collected through a good wicket
partnership by J. Bynoe, retired
44 and A. Phillips 48.

Both of these batsmen who
opened the first innings for Regi-
ment, started out to play soundly
and punished the Devonshire pace
bowlers when they bowled short.

The most troublesome bowler
of the Deyenshire team proved to
be R. Sanderson, a medium pace
bowler, who took three of the
Regiment. wickets for the loss of
51 runs. M. Matterson, another’
medium pace bowler, bowled well
to take two wickets for five runs.

In their turn at the wicket the
Devonshire team was_ dismissed
for 94 runs, their collapse due
mainly to the steady bowling of
A. Phillips, 2 for_16, R. Parris
2 for 21 and C. Price 2 for 10.
V. Conach and FR. Stanhope each
scored 16, while R. Matterson got
15 runs before he was given out
teg before.

Barnia Beat YMPC.
At Table Tennis

Three Inter-Club Table Tennis
matches were played last week.
On Monday Barna met Y.M.P.C
and defeated the Beckles Road
team by a wide margin.

It was simply a walk over for
Barna. Out of the nine games
played they won seven, Louis
Stoute and Campbell Greenidge
winning three each. The other
game went to Howard. The two
games for Y.M.P.C. were wor
by Smith and Hinds.

Both Greenidge and Stoute play-
ed excellent tennis while Good-
ing was out of form. Howard
shows promise and should go far
this year.

The match on Wednesday night
was between Abbey Marines and
Y.M.C.A. Both teams gave a poor
display but Mayers, Corbin and
Bynoe were good at various
periods, Abbey Marines won by
the odd game in nine—Corbin and
Mayers scoring two each and
Alkins one. For Y.M.C.A.
Bynoe scored two, Griffith and
Shields one each,

The outstanding set of the night
was between Corbin and Bynoe.
Bynoe, after a very shaky start,
came through to win in fine style.
Mayers made many errors and
his attack was weak. On the
other hand his defence was quite
good, He was also very slow in
getting around the table.

The final match of the week
was between Everton and Peli-
can. Honours went to Everton
who Won five—four, Blair Mur-
ray was the most outstanding
Everton player. He won three
sets, Malcolm Murray won two
and Norman Gill one.

For Pelican, Worrell won two
while Willoughby and Phillips
won one each,

The matches this week are as
follows:—



Monday; Barna vs. Abbey
Marines.
Wednesday: ¥.M.PC.: ‘ve.
Pelican.

Friday: Y.M.C.A. vs. Everton,
Trinidad Players
Expected Monday

THE thirteen members of the
Trinidad Cricket Team with their





Manager Mr. Harold Burnett,
ex-Intercolonial player, will be
arriving at Seawell tomorrow

morning at 11,00 o’clock and will
be met by a Reception Committee
from the Board of Management
of the Barbados Cricket Associa-
tion,

It is expected that the Trinidad
players will loosen up at Ken-
sington later in the afternoon
about 2.00 o’clock.

They will be staying at Abbe-
ville Guest House.

GOLFERS RETURN

The remaining members of the
Barbados Golf team, which recent-
ly toured Trinidad, returned yes-
terday by B.W.I.A.

They were Mr. John Grace, Miss
Katy Lenegan and Mrs, Isabelle
Lenegan.

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“SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1951

HARD OR SOFT GOING?
Whichever It Is, The March Meeting

Will Be Good
BY BOOKIE

HE March meeting is now just under three

weeks off, the, entries close on Thursday next

- and“yet we are still very much in the dark about
potential form. The track was opened for the first

ume yesterday morning, outside the barrels, but

in most cases gallops were restricted to quick be-

ginnings and slow finishes. After the first set of

gallops we are therefore no nearer to picking fav-

ourites than a month ago.

The condition of the track has received a mixed reception, Some
say it is covered with a layer of megass which is too thick, others that
it is just right. It will be interesting to see what it turns out like in
the final analysis but it is quite obvious that it will favour those who
1 the soft going better. Quite a number of them looked very tired
yesterday when they pulled up. A few others worked on the outside

the megass and it was noticeable the way their hoof beats rang out
in contrast to the swish of the grass which is all that could be heard
when they were working on the soft cover.

Nevertheless I should imagine that one good point about the soft.
going will be less breakdowns and therefore a fuller entry. I am
told that about seventy are expected to race but this number sounds
very :>flated to me. JI do not propose to go through the list here as
this would be too lengthy to fit Inte one column, However, I do agree
that we should see over sixty.

LOT of interest is centred around the very first race on the pro-

gramme. This is the Maiden Stakes for which a number of new-
comers are in paration. We will have Doldrum, Lunways, High
and Low and Court O’Law who will be making their debut to racing
in the West Indies. There will then be such as Arunda, Miss Panic,
No-to-Nite and Kitchen Front who were seen only briefly last Novem-
ber but are yet to produce anything like their best form. That gives us
a choice of eight before we throw in Ability and Fair Sally and for
the other C class races there will still be such as Harroween, Tiberian
Lady and Flieuxce. If on top of that we also get Carefull Annie from
Trinidad, where, I would like to know, are we going to start them?
To make for more congestion a few from D class like Bow Bells and
Watercress may be sent in a C class event. We therefore face the
possibility of having sixteen in one event. I sincerely hope not.
ee of D class it is likely that we will see some good racing

in this division as well. Thank goodness our classifiers have not
followed thejr Trinidad counterparts in this respect and we will be
able to see Bow Bells, Watercress, Cross Roads, and Best Wishes have
the opportunity to prove themselves before they are pushed into a
crowded field of importeds among which may well be lurking some
would-be Salamanca or Tom Peason, It will also make our D class
racing have some class about it instead of the usual bunch of second
raters which it is customary to see at Trinidad meetings now-a-days
in this section.

N FACT, I look forward to this racing to provide us with what we

missed at the Christmas meeting after the Derby had been run,
although, naturally the horses are now all four-year-olds, But it is
not long after and none of them could have made any particular pro-
gress except to regain their true form. In this connection the rivalry
between Bow Bells and Watercress will be the most important while
if the filly with the big knees can stand up to it we will also see what
part she might have played in the last classic. The latter is none
other than Mary Ann, who in spite of two blisters and hard going
continues to take her morning’s work. I have seldom seen the likes
of it,

ITH respect to the Guineas the form of the classic candidates is

perhaps more obscure than in any other group in training for
the meeting. At present Cross Roads stands out as the horse to be
beaten and although his general appearance is not very pleasing to the
eye, (he is decidedly dry-coated) I cannot say that I am other than
impressed with the way he has been going with his half-brother
Atomic II, I also like how Vanguard and Usher are shaping up but
they were so far behind Cross Roads only last November that it is
difficult to say exactly how much leeway they have made up. Mean-
while nothing is known of Best Wishes, who only arrived from St.
Vincent yesterday, except that she is a very good filly. But 7% fur-
longs is not a simple affair for a three-year-old at the beginning of
March and if her stamina is no better than it was when she won her
first race in Trinidad her opponents will have a good chance against
her.

If we are to judge from past experience then let us look back at
three-year-olds who have raced over 7% furlongs in March, I cannot
remember all of them but we saw five or six last year and also two
or three years before that. Two performances which stick in the
memory most are those of The Gambler and Watercress. Both of
these we might say were eventually better at middle distances than
sprints. Yet even for them 7% furlongs proved to be a good test.
Although they both won I cannot remember that they looked very
comfortable at the finish. Perhaps Watercress more so than The
Gambler, but this I put down to a longer and more carefully thought
out preparation. The latter, after all, was not prepared for a special
classic, but only for a 5%furlong sprint and then sent in a 7% furlong
race on the second day of the meeting. ‘

Yet, without seeming to contradict my argument that our Guineas
should be shifted to August, I must admit that the case of Watercress
is a strong one in favour of making our classic races longer towards
the end of the year. Here was a small filly who was never a good
feeder and inclined to go overboard at the slightest amount of over
exertion. Yet given the proper grade of work she could manage nine
furlongs by August as comfortably as any imported and by the end
of the year 9% furlongs was like child’s play. .

Â¥ Feeay admit that as a rule small horses come to hand quicker
than the big ones, and that is precisely why to even up matters I advo-
cate a classic at the November meeting. The owners of the precocious
type would be able to have their fling in March and still have the
edge on the backward type in August. Meanwhile, the owners of the
backward type would be able to have some sort of chance, however
slight, in August and come into their own on equal terms in November.
By the time the Trinidad Derby arrived everybody would have had the
necessary experience to race like seasoned campaigners over 9% or 10
furlongs. I feel confident that under such circumstances we would
have nothing to fear from Jamaica.

ND speaking of Jamaica I come to a very serious matter, I have

just received my copy of the Bloodstock Breeders’ Review Vol.
XXXVIII, 1949. The book, as usual, is a valuable addition to any
Racing Library in spite of its material being a bit behind hand. I have
no fault to find in this.

But what I must not let pass is an article in the “Review” in which
there is another attempt by some writer in Jamaica to decry horses
bred in the South Caribbean. Repeatedly in the past I have noticed
that whenever they get the opportunity to air their views internation-
ally, Jamaican writers like to stress the superior quality of their blood-
stock over that of the rest of the British Caribbean. We admit that
their average of good ones is higher.

But when, without bothering to check the circumstances, a Jamai-
can writer states: “.. . an indication of the class of the 1949 two-year-
eids (in Jamaica) is that Fair Profit, who would not rank among our
first eight, went to Trinidad and won their biggest two-year-old
event”; he must be told that this victory was also the biggest fluke in
the history of the biggest event.

Blue Streak, a Jamaican Derby winner, was roundly beaten in
this island by the Barbados creole Gun Site, Yet nobody suggested
thet this was an indication that racing here was on a higher level
than in Jmaica. There were extenuating circumstances for Blue
Streak. So too were there extenuating circumstances for the good
horses which Fair Profit defeated in the Breeders’ Stakes, As for
Fair Profit himself, he has not won a race since.

.

WZ

\










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NDAY, FEBRUARY 1

1, 1951



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





CARNIVAL IN BARBADOS



:
BAND OF HUNGARIAN DANCERS which took First Prize for the Best Band.

@eling in front and dressed as Sir Walter Raleigh
for the Prettiest Costume at the Ursuline Convent Annual Fancy Dress Party.





INIDAD
ARNIVAL

® Our Own Correspondent)
$

_ PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Sparkle and brilliance that
flown the curtain of this
a. is something that
ine back through the
y of the years. A new tone
% for masquerading that
& out originality and
tof vision in the revellers.
lly. this is something
t will take some time to
fistomed to, but the inno-
-were pleasing in several
§. Sailor bands are no
Sailors as such and in some
“was hard to tell where the
‘ended and part of some
lisguise not in any special
Gent of the Carnival

year for one thing they
hemselves famous for their
te heads that ranged in
on from over-sized cam-
a giant octopus; and one
lar band did not represent
at all, but must have been
ing belonging to the
of divers to judge from
idgear.

tong feature this year was
tge number of “Indians”
terally took charge of the
vn Carnival almost as if
ad been a conspiracy among
© emphasise this form of
3. The headgear was so
ive and elaborate that
af them standing side by

a one of the wide City
} would find there was
}room for them, The
@ Indians* who came out

first day were there again
second day.

“Hosea” Band, about 100
had its moon dancer lead-
@ big following to hot
stones and the entourage
d taj-bearers, pundits and
With orhnis and_lotahs,
fe was no “big belly Ram-
w® the Indian girl of the
hditty “grinding massala.”

wt Cumana Gestapos” a
of sailors in jet black,
@ up Henry Street and into
itreet to a slow tune and
ossed on Frederick Street
peppery-going “Mexican
Sellers.” These girls, in
inbreros and a smart cos-
wf green and purple, each
}a plush carpet across the
& as they jigged their way

ts, cat calls, whistles,
» jumping and an atmos-
f gaiety and levity pre-
Every one tried to outdo
hbour in merry-making
antics.
ts and visitors from the
ring islands enjoyed
es thoroughly—many 0:
ing part in the events of

Meraders and onlookers
owed they could enjoy
ién from work and worry
m a longer period The
fie with regret to thousands
part in the last “jump up.
or the Road Mareh, that
utable. Suffice it to say
ia might pick your choice
“Tiny, Tiny, blow your
t for me,” “Loomat say ¢
iysie,” “I have a lovely
of coconuts” and a number

te for which Trinidadians
cipally, ended with regret

%

Te

THE

is Little Wendy Mackay,



who carried off. the

“BARRACUDA” and “The Lady from Martinique” came late for the
competition at the Children’s Goodwill League,





THE Guide Rally at Pax Hill
on Thursday 8th February, 1951
in honour of the Chiet Guide, was
the biggest ever held in Barbados,
There were 11 Commissioners, 1
Secretary, 76 Guiders, 16 Colour
Party, 52 Rangers, 471 Guides, 170
Brownies and 153 Recruits, mak~
ing a total of 950. It was amazing
to see how the Brownie Branch
has grown and is expanding,

The Chief Guide, accompanied
by Lady Savage, the President
of the Girl Guides’ Association
and Miss Bridget Ramsden, ar~
rived at 4.30 p.m. The Colour
Party was drawn up at the en-
trance of Pay Hill with the Island
Colour having an escort of 2
Rangers. The Brownies and re-
cruits were on the path leading to
the building and the Chief Guide
inspected them, shaking hands
with each one of them, Among

for participants and spectators
alike. Colourful costumes have
been put away now. Many of

them will be used next Carnival.
Spectators, will for quite a while,
have the din of the steel bands
particularly vibrating in_ their
ears, and the echoes of calypsoes
resounding joyously. Parents will
have difficulty in restraining
children from singing the catchy
tunes of the season, adults would
hardly be able to do so too
for 40 days now that the jumping
and the shouting have.ceased, anc.
the “warriors and kings” depart,
the sobering period of Lent is
ence more here again.

KEY TO

R. M.

JONES & CO. LID. ~

rere I RNINSLE sgeeatene—anystgientineep——nee ene

- Guide Rally A

t Pax Hill

the recruits was the new Guiae
Company now being started at
Queen’s College.

The Chief Guide then inspected
the Rangers and Guides in her
own inimitable way. After the
Inspection she talked to the chil-
dren who will never forget her
stirring words of encouragement.
As it was now 5.40 p.m, Capt.
Raison played God Save The
Rangers and Guides then marehed
past, the Chief Guide taking the
Salute. It was a wonderful sight
and one then realised how many
were on parade, After the Guides
had disappeared the Chief Guide
called on the Brownies to “run
past,” which they thoroughly en-
joyed.

It has been a wonderful thrill
to the Guides of Barbados that
they could at last welcome the
Chief Guide to their OWN Head-
quarters and Camp site, which
is named Pax Hill after her home
and our Founder’s in England.

PLAYED MASK WHILE
HOUSE WAS BURNING

(From Our Own Corre: naent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 7.
A house valued at about $2,500
and owned by Mr. B, Mahabir of
Barataria, was completely destroy-
ed by fire on Monday afternoon.
No. 1 unit of the Central Fire
Brigade under Inspector Phillip
was despatched to the scene, but
was, delayed by heavy traffic and
on arrival found the building
almost destroyed. The Mahabir
family was in the city attending
the Carnival celebrations,



x Na

By TONY VANTERPOOL

Nearly all West Indian islands
go Carnival crazy on the last two
days before Lent but in Barbados
these days are just “ordinary
working days”. A few Barbadians
however brought the Carnival at-
mosphere to the island at various
functions held during that period.

One of these functions was held
at the Ursuline Convent on Mon-
day and a large number of chil-
dren were gaily dressed up and
looked very attractive.

On Tuesday one of the
biggest local Carnival attractions
took place en the Riverside
Club held. their Carntval Ball at
the Children’s Goodwill League.
This is an ann event. J

Contestants in a variety
of costumes. chap who wore
the costume of a beggar paid the
penalty. He arrived at the ball
with his ants and shirt partly
torn but when ready to leave they
were nearly off. 5

Another chap preferred to dis-
guise as a Bathing Beauty. He
wore a flowing bath robe over his
bathing trunks and occasionally
the inquisitive girls could be seen
trying to lift the robe,

A man, ‘“Boysfe” Buteher, was
chosen Carnival Queen, Butcher,
an expert dressmaker and perhaps
the only dress designer in the
island, was also responsible for
making nearly all the prize win-

costumes.

is was a blue off-the-shoulder
dress. He wore black gloves and
carried a handbag to match. His
false hair was made of rope dyed,
pressed and then curled. He called
himself Rosie Malleen in the For-
est.

Other prizes were awarded to
the West Indian Cricket team.
Stanley Jackman who represented
“The Turkish Lady”, Clyde Phil-
lips “The nor”, Dalton Babb
“Phe Madonna”, Winston Hackett
“The Mexican", Dr. Winston
Wooding, “The Scavenger’ and
Nesta ne as “Jockey Holder.”

Conrad Petersen, who was
dressed as “Barracuda” (Tyrone
Power) in the motion picture
“Spanish Main” and his partner
Madame Drayton, dressed as the
“Lady from Martinique” looked
extremely attractive but unfortun-
ately arrived late for the compe-
tition,

The Judges were Mrs. G. H,
Adams, Mrs. D. H. L. Ward and
Mrs. Olga Symmonds, all of whom
are well acquainted with costumes.
They were assisted by Mr. John
Beckles, M.B.E.

At another Carnival Ball at the
Girls’ Industrial Union on the
same night another collection of
lovely costumes could be seen. A
ladies’ steel band led a parade
around the hall and this especially
amused the dancers.

“The Peanut Vendor”, a fat girl
wearing a weather beaten dress,
straw hat and a pair of “dry
weather” shoes was given first
prize, She carried a tray on her
head. Cedrie Phillips, represent-
ing “The Sheik of aby” was
awarded second prize. The third
prize went to the steel band.

Unlike Trinidad some of these
celebrations continued through
the wee hours of Ash Wednesday.
Some people were against this be-
cause they felt that all celebrating
should cease at mid-night on
Shrove Tuesday.



TEST AVERAGES

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,--The following Test aver-
ages of the England team in Aus.
tralia may be of interest to other
lovers of cricket, who are follow.

ing the present Test series in

Australia.
BATTING

No. of Ings, T.N.O, Total Runs H.S, Avg
L. Hutton - & 3 394 156" 78.80
F. R. Brown 7 0 204 9 20.14
D. S. Sheppard 2 0 50 41 25.00
R. Simpson 8 0 146 61 22.00
C, Washbrook 8 O 172 34 21,50
T. G. Evans 8 Lb 14% 49 20.42
W. G. A. Park-

house 4 0 7 28 19.25
T. Bailey 8+2 35 25 7.00
J. G, Dewes 4 0 23 9 5.75
A. V. Bedser 8 2 32 14° $33
D. S. Compton 6 0 31 23 5.16
D. V. Wright 6 1 22 4 4.50
W. J. Mcintyre 2 0 8 7 4.00
J, Warr 460 4 4 1.00;
B. Close 2 0 1 1 50

* Signifies not out
BOWLING

; 9. M. R. W. Avy,
Bailey $1.1 14 137 13 10.63
Bedser 131.2 25 377 20 18.85
Brown 82 7 209 12 25.75
Close 7 1 28 1 28.00
Tattersall 626 7 21 4° 42.25
Compton 1é 2 43 lL 43.00
Wright 89 3 304 8 49,25
Warr 73 6 261 1 281.00

The averages given above are
for the series up to and including
the Fourth Test just completed at
Adelaide.

It may be also of interest to
cricket lovers to learn that Eng-
land’s opening fast bowler, Trevor
Bailey, whose thumb was frac-
tured by a ball from Lindwall in
the Third Test at Sydney, is a
probable for the next State match
vs. Victoria at Melbourne, so
“Radio Australia” reported on, the
8th inst,

Yours truly,
CELT.

Wd

ESSO. STANDARD
OIL

Agents



“THE SHEIK OF
Second Prize at the Girls’ Industrial
Union.







From left to right:

ARABY”

GUILTY

NEW YORK.
A 34-year-old bookie, who drew
in 20 million dollars a year, sur-
prised « New York court recently
when he laid himself open to 65
years in prison.
making is illegal in New York, he
was on trial for taking bets, but
he suddenly dropped his innocence
plea and pleaded guilty.
be sentenced on February 19.



BOXING

at the
YANKEE STADIUM
Brittons Hill

@
Tuesday night, Feb. 13th

@
KID RALPH
(163 Ibs.)
vs.
KID FRANCIS
(162 Tbs.)

In return match for the
Light-Heavy weight
eee of
BARBADOS

10 Rounds

e
Semi-Final
SAM KING (130 Ibs.)
vs.

HAL WILLIAMS
(181 Ibs.)

8 Rounds

Preliminary
VICTOR LOVELL
(122 lbs.)
vs.
BELFIELD KID
(125 lbs.)







6 Rounds
Ring Side $2.00
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WEIGHT

LIFTING

Hy CALVIN ALLEYNE

Can our local weightlifting boys ciation and a few of them were

make it possible to send up a team
at — scarcely at the 1952 Olym-
Plad—but say the
meet? [T think they can. British
Guiana and Trinidad have had
a shot and why can we not. We
have the talent, tall big men, and
short stocky ones.

For years now weightlifting has
fitted in as a hobby to many of the
burlier set of Barbadians and I
remember a few years ago when
Bison our then local strong man
Who is now abroad, made a game
attempt at throwing Whiskers
Blake and Joe Gotch. Yes, but
he was more of a weightlifter than
a wrestler and did not get the
better of the bouts,

Scme of the weigntfters in the
game today, import their equip-
ment, but others make shift with
lead weights which they make
themselves. Sets of enthusiastic
young men pooled together and
in the course of time formed
clubs,

You will see them on the
beaches of an evening getting a
light work out of exercises. They
do the tougher work indoors “at
the clubs. Sometimes you even
get the weightlifters of say Shot
Hall beach going up to Bathsheba
to stage a contest with Bathshéba
weightlifters.

Formerly there was no well-
organised weightlifting associa-
tion. A few years ago Clement
Jackman, known in the game as
Bobby Goff, was adjudged to be
Mr, Barbados when such toughs
as the Warner brothers and Mr
Selomon, then a master at Com-
bermere School, were competing
= then the business has been
ow,

A few days ago I dropped in at
Queen's Park and saw some of
these knotty muscled chaps trying
to figure out some knotty ques-
tions, to wit, the how and what
about forming a Barbados Ama.
teur Weightlifting Association4

There are some eight clubs
which are joined to form this
association and doubtless others
will join up» When I got there
and sat around the table in the
Park House with them, they were
discussing the rules of the Asso.

a



subsequent which I

r

ustins area

contracting their facial museles
as though they were lifting irgns

took tO be a way of
expressing disapproval to some
of the rules,

But in the main they seem to
be pulling together and I do not
doubt but that they will soon 5
emerging with something tangi-
ble. They intend calling them-
selves the Barbados Amateur
Weightlifting Association.

The first Vice President is
Stanley Linton; an old chap in
the line. Second Vice President
is Reuben Jones, Kid Ralph’s
Trainer and the Honorary Sectre-
tary is Winfield Grannum, school.
teacher of St. Mary’s Boys’ School.
The Treasurer is Joubert Bullen
and there is a four-man committee,

When I spoke to Grannum, he
emphasised that the Association is
not connected with the Barbados
Amateur Athletic Association
but they hope to be affiliated to
the British Amateur Weightlifting
Association in time

The way he told me of the ais-
connection, gave me a vivid idea
of how these boys feel, They do
not want anyone to butt in on
‘hem and try to run the show
dietator like, although they would
not mind getting some help, *

So jumping ahead to two months
henee when the Association will
have been formed, I see them
staging competitions among them-
selves — sort of by way of back-
woods weeding to get a final pick

far public shows. They usually
practise hand balancing and
aymnastic pyramids and these

with good display of weightlifting
and perhaps a wrestling bout,
would be a pleasant novelty to, f
think, the major portion of Bar-
bados sporting public. And people
ado not mind paying for a good
entertainment.

Some of the money thus
acquired could go to the clubs to
help them buy good equipment
and get things going smoothly
ard the bulk to the Association.
Naturally the Association woyld
huve to be well managed and good

eceounts regularly given of the
funds.

So if the boys get things orggn-
ised quickly, they could stgge

at theatres too-

3

regular shows —

‘pul

FEB, 11

tosieeeeensegapriaasniegortiamageenes _———

PAGE FIVE

NO.. 158

The Topic
of

Last Week





It was Ash Wednesday morning
The day that begins Lent
When Lou that old-time devil

Wake up without a cent

And this caused all the trouble
She met a certain gal

Who invited her on Tuesday
To Barbados Carnival

Low felt that she could “breale-qut”
And nothing Joe would know

But Joe was there wo disguised
From his head right to his toe,

Lou swung inside Joe's corner
And as her dark-skin shined
You could see those damsels cheking
A delightful bedy-line.
; ; .
Lou cried out, I'm delightful
To join this happy crowd
When she heard somebody saying
“Shape up Boysie’—very loud

Joe turned and said my dear Lou
I'm here to-night don't fear

And as Joe unmasked, Lou shivered
Aud right then both start to stare.

Cam you guess what start the staring?
Well my friends ‘twas simply this
A sweet man dressed like a lady
Was mistaken for # Miss
+ . .

He waa chested as in ‘‘tru-form”
With contraptions extra-fine

And his cheeks were red like cherries
With » crowd of boys behind.

Joe cried out Lou come go home
Lou said, don't he a pest
I must stay and admire RBoysie
Why he made my wedding dress.
. : °

“Oh Joe!" Lou said—"don't grumble”
Don’t be rough to-night; be kind
Don't take me home so early
And leave all these bays behind.
* . .

Lou cried in desperation
Please Joe don't bully me

Look at all those other nice boyre-
They are happy; can you see?

And all the time Joe grumbled
Boys were saying, what a night! !
And Joe's face was like a sour-sop
When the camera-man flashed the
light
. . .
Joe then joined the other boys jiving
Lou mot vex; Joe said be kind
I must stay dear Lou ‘till morning
I can't leave the sweete behind.
. . .

That was Tuesday boys, but look out
For the J & R Easter spree
All the world will be at Gall Hill
Joe and Robert, Lou,--all three,
. . .
Things in Christ Chureh will be hum-
ming
Not a moment will be dead
Come and see all the reaction
That you get from J & R Bread,
* . *
Se prepare for Easter Monday
Do get ready for this spree

‘Tie the day when oll Barbadians
Will enjoy a Carnival FREE,

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PAGE FOUR





JOHN GODDARD FINDS
TALENT

BY O. S. COPPIN. _.,

former Barbados pace bowler and six-foot-three
Mason of St. Vincent, has met with complete
Â¥ approval in local cricket circles.
- It f% planned that these candidates will take part
in a Trial Game “arranged for them at the end of the second Trini-
dad-Barbados Test, and naturally if they establish any reasonable
claims for inclusion in the W.1. 1951 tour to Australia more use will
have to be made of them. ,
GOLF CAPTAIN TALKS

OLONEL VIDMER, Captain of the Rockley Golf Club, which tour-

ed Trinidad’ recently, has gow returned and this is what he
has to say about the tour.

An overwhelming success, in spite of an overwhelming defeat,
was scored by the Barbados golf team which returned from its
matches with St. Andrew's in Trinidad last week, The men’s team
was beaten badly, but what seems to have been overlooked is the
fact that the ladies’ team won from the Trinidad contingent by four
matches to two, and congratulations for the Misses Isabel and Katy
Lenagan, Mrs. Brenda Wilson and Mrs. Elizabeth Vidmer, our ladies
representatives, seemed belatedly to be in order,

THE LADIES WIN:

OWEVER, it was not the ladies’ victory that made the trip an

overwhelming success, but the generosity, consideration and all
around hospitality of the St, Andrew's hosts, rom the moment that
the Barbados contingent arrived at Piarco Airport until the last lin-
gering member of the team departed for home after the Carnival,
the St. Andrew's members went all out to provide the visitors with
every pleasure and comfort they could command,

‘Another element which made the trip a pronounced success was
the co-operation and cohesion of the Barbados players themselves.
ney worked and played together, celebrating each other’s triumphs,
few as they were, and sympathizing with each other's defeats. In
spite of the daily setbacks laughter and gaiety dominated the atmos-
phere wherever the Rockley golfers gathered. /

Without attempting any excuses for the failure of the men’s team
{o win, a few factors which prevented them from making a better
showing should be taken into consideration. First of these was the
loss of J. R. Rodger on the eve of the team’s departure. Rodger was
one of the three top players who were to lead the team, but a crushed
toe eliminated him from the group at the eleventh hour.

Knowing the ability of such Trinidad players as Bob Hill, Murray
Wilson and John Sellier, it was not expected that the Barbados
Jeaders would win more than one of the first three matches in any
day. However, it felt that Roekley’s strength thereafter would more
than compensate along the line. However, with the loss of Rodger
it meant that the last eight men had to move up one position and
the burden was a heavy one to impose.

Ian Christie and Dick Vidmer, playing at No. 1 and No. 2, took
the shock of Hill and Wilson in turn, but instead of Rodger, the
eurrent holder of the Barbados open championship, to help with the
first wave, Michael Timpson and Will Atkinson had to be thrown into
the line-up where the going was toughest. And each player there~
efter was playing one better than had been anticipated.

It should be mentioned here that both Timpson and Atkinson
shouldered their heavier responsibilities splendidly, and when paired
in the four-ball matches carried off the maximum three points, while
sheir defeats in the singles were by the narrowest of margins in spite
of the fact that they were playing higher than anticipated, In fact,
almost all the defeats suffered by the Barbados players were by such
scores as 3 and 2 or 4 and 3, which is not entirely loy@#ded.

NO EXCUSES -

NO factor which was against the Barbados players, natur-

ally, was their unfamiliarity with the course. This is always an
element which favours the home team in golf matches, but in this
particular case it was enhanced by the bad weather which lasted
through the week. St. Andrews, unlike Rockley, is very hilly and
in the wet weather the ball stopped where it landed, with practically
no roll whatever, On many courses this would prove as much of a
hardship to one side as the other, but at St, Andrew’s, it often left
the player with a blind shot to the green. The St. Andrew’s players,
naturally, were thoroughly familiar with the location of the greens
and played with assurance; the Rockley players had to walk forward
and look, ahd then played uncertainly.

FAMILIARITY

ARAMILIARITY with the course was a pronounced factor on nine of

the el#itéen héles“ON'No. 1 a drive straight for the green leaves
a blind second shot and the ball has to be placed well to the right of
the fairway. On No. 3 the second shot also is a blind one, On No, 5
only experience convinces the player how far he can hit a drive
toward the left—the shortest way home on a dog-leg—and still carry
to the top-of the hill. ‘The tee shot on No, 8 is a blind one, and No. 9,
like No. 1, must be played well to the right of the fairway in order
to see the green. ‘

The second shot on No, 10 is blind in wet weather with no roll,
and a good drive too far to the right, again the shortest way home,
leaves a blind second shot at No. 11, The tee shot at No. 15 is a blind
one and both No, 16 and No. 18 will produce blind second shots in
wet weather unless the ball is exceptionally long.

FASCINATED
ERHAPS because of these factors, possibly in spite of them, the

Barbados .players were fascinated with the St. Andrews layout,
where the fairways, and especially the greens are far superior to
those at Rockley, However, they were factors which worked against
a better showing by the Barbados players but were not effective
against the Trinidadians. who know the course backwards, forwards
and upside down,

The general opinion of the players on their return was that St.
Andrews had a stronger team of golfers, generally speaking; that the
weather, unfamiliarity with the course and the loss of Rodger made
the Rockley team appear weaker than it was; that the difference in
the strength of the two teams was not so great that the Barbados team
would not win in Barbados, where the St. Andrew's golfers would be
on strange fairways and greens, but that the margin of victory would
not be so great as the St. Andrew's players scored on their own lay-

out.
TABLE TENNIS

N THE first match played on Monday between Barna vs. Y.M.P.C.,

Barna had an-easy victory,..Of the 9 games played Barna won
7. Both Greenidge and Stoute won 3 each and Howard one. For
Y.M.P.C., Smith and Hinds won their two games,

Stoute and Greenidge played good tennis throughout, while
Gooding seem to have lost some of his form, Howard shows promise
and should go far this year. With some more practice Y.M.P.C.
will give a much better performance on Wednesday against Pelican.

FOUR PLAY
A BBEY MARINES defeated Y,M.C.A., five games to four on

Wednesday night, The standard’ of play was poor and only three
players showed “form in spells, Bynoe, Mayers and Corbin were all
brilliant in spells but not consistent, The outstanding match of the

A qe news this week that the West Indies Cricket
om. '| 4 Board of Control, acting upon the recommen-
£ , dation of John Goddard, West Indies Captain, have

eho sponsored a visit to Barbados by C. O’B. Crick,
. d =

night was Bynoe vs Corbin, only inthis match was a bigh standard +

of play reached. 1 oe after a very shaky start came through to win
in fine style; Corbin from his play in all matches seems to be trying



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



“RANGER” SCORES

FIRST VICTORY IN ‘B’

Vidmer Tells Of Trinidad Golf Tour © By Our Yachting Correspondent

Arsenal Out.
Of F.A. Cup

Competition

LONDON, Feb.. 10.

STANLEY CHEESEMAN’S Ranger scored her first At"), holders of the fophy
victory since being promoted to the “B” Class this season.
Ranger, which was given three minutes by Fantasy, sailed

. Steadily and kept the lead throughout.

Forty boats sailed in the Fourth
Regatta of the R.B.Y.C. which
was held yesterday. The wind was
light to medium and the sea
smooth, Of the Tornadoes Teddy
Hoad’s Vamoose ended with -he
best average while Cyclone was
next. s

Ten boats started in. the B Class.
Ranger who had given Wizard
two minutes, quickly overtook her
and was leading at the end of the
Jap. Wizard was second with
Fantasy a few seconds behind,
War Cloud gave Rascal a minute
but was leading at*the end of this
lap. Gipsy, who also sailed very
well, gave Okapi four minutes and
overtook her.

After completing the first iap
in 37 minutes, 53;seconds, Ranger
finished the second lap in 39 min-
utes, 39 seconds, Fantasy came
around second and Flirt, who
overtook Wizard, was third. Rascal
went back ahead of Wer Cloud
while Gipsy was still léading
Okapi. Moyra Blair, who had
given Okapi four minutes, was
right behind her. At the end of
this round Wizerd dropped out.

Fantasy made a brave attempt
but could not overtake Ranger in
the last round, She finished over
a minute ahead of Fantasy while
Flirt came in third just barely
beating Gipsy.

Gannet First In “C”

Peter Ince brought in his Sea-
gull Gannet first in the C and Cen-
tre-board Class after giving six
minutes to Peggy Nan and Mag-
win, seven minutes to Stamp and
Missbehave and eight minutes to
Folly. r

Gannet sailed really good. At
the end of the first round Folly,
who started first, was still in the
lead, Scamp was second while ihe
Tornado Vamoose was third, Oy-
clone, who was sailing very’ well,
was still in the heat of the race.

Gannet's time for the first round



was 38 minutes, eight seconds 4
while Felly had lost over four

minutes to her. She completed the ‘

last round in 40 minutes, 50 see-
onds. Folly’s time for the last
round was 44 minutes, 54 seconds.

Third in this class was Seamp,
32 seconds behind Folly. Colin
Bellamy’s Magwin was third,

Intermediate Class honours
went to Reen. Nine boats started
in this Class and Reen gave Dawn
and Pauntless three minutes. At
the end of the tirst lap Dawn was
leading with Dauntless 18 seconds
behind.

Reen completed the final lap in
43 minutes, 58 seconds with Dawn
following in second position,
Dauntless was third and Gnat
fourth.

The D Class race went to Sinbad
who completed the first round inj
46 minutes, 49 seconds and the last
in 48 minutes, two i
gave Olive Blossom, the secon
boat, two minutes, and Bucca

and Van Vhorndyke eight minutes Pter finals is

Van Thorndyke Second

Van Thormdyke sailed away
from Buceanece and was second at
the end of the first lap, Olive
Blossom, which gave two minutes.
to Rainbow and six minutes to
Buceaneer and Van Thorndyke
was third.

Olive Blossom soon after passed
out Van Therndyke and ended
second, Her first round was com-
pleted in 47 minutes, 33 seconds
and the last in 50 minutes, three
seconds. Van Thorndyke was third
and Buccanec~ fourth,

The Fifth Regatta will be sailed
on March 17. This long delay has
been caused through the Inter-
colonial Cricket and Horse Racing.

Results were as follows:

“B" Class: 1. Ranger; 2. Fantasyi93

Flirt; 4. Gipsy
“C' Class: 1. Gannet; 2, Follyf 3

Magwin,



terme

Dauntless; 4. Gnat.
“D” Class: 1. Sinbad; 2. Olive

som; 8. Van Thorndyke; 4, Buccaneer.”

de®

Commonwealth Lead.

India By

311 Runs

KANPUR, Feb. 10.

The Commonwealth cricket touring team were 311 runs
ahead with six second innings wickets standing at the end
of the third day of the fifth unofficial Test match against

India here to-day..

Hassett Hits
173 Not Out
' . at “ a
Against M.C.C.
MELBOURNE, Feb, 10,
Australian Test captain Lind-
say Hassett scored a century here
to-day against the M.C.C, and
helped to take Victoria’s total to

307 for 6 wickets by the close of
play on the first day.



Victoria lost a wicket with only
4 runs scored but Hassett came in
and pulled the game round with
an undefeated innings of 1738. He
was at the crease just under 5
hours.

_Hassett was the mainstay of
Victoria’s batting side. The high-
est score apart from his was H.
Turner who made 33. It was
Hassett’s first century of the seas-
on against the touring side.

VICTORIA ist INNINGS
Meuleman c¢ Hutton b Statham
McDonald b Hollies bas ; 2
Harvey b Bailey ene ee
Loxton b Hollies .
Turner ¢ Compton b Close 2a nae
Hassett not out 175

Jan Johnson ¢ Close b Hollies .. 22
Ring not out : ‘ 17
Extras 14 byes, 3 legs: = 7
Total (for 6 wkts.) 306

India who were 143 for four
overnight, were all out soon after
lunch for 240 in reply to the Com-
monwealth’s first innings of 413.
By the close the Commonwealth
had seored 1388 for four wickets in
their second innings.

Five minutes from the @oub the:

tourists were 135 for the loss of
two wickets. But then two bril-
liant catehes sent back Ikin for
63 and Fishlock without scoring,

Gaekwad, who claimed no vic-
tims in the first innings took the
wickets of Gimblett, Emmett and
Ikin to-day for 38 runs in 419
overs of which 9 were maidens,

India soon lost Hazare, this
morning but Phadkar and Gopin-

ath who is playing in his first Test 2

defended stubbornly. Then Doo-
land, the Australian who plays in
the Lancashire League dashed
India’s hopes with his legbreaks.
In a spell of ten overs he took the
wickets of Gopinath, Phadkar and
Ramchant—the last two with suc-
cessive balls for 17 runs, He fin-
ished with the figures of four for
70. f

The other India wickets were
taken by the two West Indian
players Ramadhin four for 90, and
Worrell two for 45,

Ikin and Gimblett started
brightly for the Commonwealth
and put on 79 before Gimblett

was caught. Emmett was soon out,

but Ikin continued to bat well and 0.

hit fives fours in his innings.



to change his half-volley game to a more orthodox style, this some-
what was a handicap on his part and he could not be at his best.
Mayers was erratic in his games, his defence was good, his attack weak.
His chief fault is his footwork as he is inclined to be lazy and not to

move around.

Bynoe showed quite good form in two matches but

flopped. in, his third against Alkins.

», Of the ‘other players little can be said, Alkins played a steady
ape. {Griffith and Shields suffered from nerves and lack of practice.

her one of these used their previous experience to any advantage

and played very poor tennis,
















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re eliminated from the F,A.
ip competition to-day, when a
st-half goal from Manchester
ited, at Manchester was suf-
ient to put them out. With Chel-
and Fulham concerned in the
ly draw among the eight fifth-
und ties, London are assured of
one place in the quarter—finais.

Six of today’s ties were won by

me teams, the only away vic-

rs being Newcastle United three
times winners of the trophy who
beat Stoke in the highest scoring
game of the round, four goals to
two. Wolverhampton Wanderers
also three times winners, sur-
vived at the expense of Hudders-

ld but the outstanding perform-

ce was probably that of Bristol
Rovers, a Third Division team,
who easily knocked out the Sec-
ond Division Hull, three to nil.

*Six of the surviving teams
(whoever wins the replays includ-
@d) are from division one, the
Others being Bristol Rovers and
cond Division Birmingham City,
ho knocked out the other Bristot
team—City—two nil at’ Birming-
ham. To-day's draw for the quar-
therefore awaited
th keen anticipation by all foot~
all fans to see how these lone
Second and third division survi-
wors fare against the giants.

The League programme was
naturally curtailed in view of the
cup ties. Most of the leading teams
if not in the cup being without
league games. An exception was
Blackburn Rovers whose comfort-
able win sent them to second
place in Division two with none
of the four teams previously above
them in action,

Forest, the Southern leaders of
Division three. lost, but their
nearest rivals had Cup engage-
ments and so the position remains
unchanged as it does in the north-
ern section where the top two
teams won,






—Reuter.



. Football Results

LONDON, Feb. 10.
The results of games plaved to-day
fellow: —

F. A. CUP FIFTH ROUND
Brimingham City 2, Bristol City 0.
Rlackpool 2, Mansfield 2.

Bristol Rovers 3, Hull City 0.
Chelsea 1, Fulham 1.
Manchester United 1, Arsenal 0.
Stoke City 2, Newcastle United 4.
Sunderland 3, Norwich City 1
Wolverhampton Wanderers 2, Hudders-
field Town 0,
FIRST DIVISION
Bolton Wanderers 1, Burnley 1,
Liverpool 2, Portsmouth 1
SECOND DIVISION
Blackburn Rovers 2, Leeds United 1.
Brentford 4, Bury 0.
SCOTT: LEAGUE DIVISION A.
East Fife 2, Falkirk 1,
THIRD DIVISION
Southern Bournemouth 3 Nottingham
Forest 2. 5
Exeter City 0, Port Vale 3.
Gillingham 2, Torquay United 0,
Ipswich Town 3, Brighton and Hove 0.
Leyton Orient 2, Crystal Palace 0.
Millwall 1, Swindon Town 0,
Plymouth Argyle 1, Newport County 1,
Southend United 3, Northampton
Town 0.
Walsall 3, Aldershot 1.
Watford 2, Colchester United 0,
THIRD DIVISION NORTHERN
Barrow 1, Carlisle United 2,
Bradford City 0, Chester 1.
Crewe Alexandra 0, Lincoin City 4,
Gateshead 5, Darlington 2.
Halifax Town 1, York City~3.
2 Hartlepools United 2, Stockport. County

New Brighton 0, Shrewsbury Town ‘.
Rochdale 0, Oldham Athletic 1.
Rotherham United 6, Accrington Stanley

Scunthorpe United 1, Tranmere Rovers
1

Wrexham 3, Bradford 1,

SCOTTISH CUP SECOND ROUND

Aberdeen 4, Third Lanark 0,

Albion Rovers 0, Clyde 2.

Morton 3, Airdrieonians 3%.

Motherwell 4, Hamiiton Academicals 1,

Queen’s Park 1, Ayr United 3,

Raith Rovers 5, Brechin City 2,

Rangers 2, Hibernian 3,

Saint Johnstone 1, Dundee 3.

sc LEAGUE DIVISION B.,

Dumbarton 0, Queer of the South J.
Dunfermline Athletic 5, Arbroath 1.
Forfar Athletic 2, Alloa Athletic 4
Kilmarnock 4, Cowdenbeath 0, Stirling
Albion 3, Dundee United 1.

Doncaster Rovers 3, Barnsley 2. Gtimsby
Town 3, Chester 1, Luton Town 1, Aston
Villa 2.

Notts County 0, Everton 3.
Reading 2, Leicester City 2.
Sheffield Wednesday 2, Sheffield United

“Southampton 1, Middlesbrough 1.
West Ham United 1, Charlton Athletic
5.—Reuter.



COMMONWEALTH Ist Innings 413
INDIA Ist Innings Shsbciss ss 240
COMMONWEALTH 2nd INNINGS

Gimblett c Rajendra Nath b
Gaekwad ,... ‘

SY ata? Ge +. 47
Ikin c Umrigar b Gaekwad ... 63
Emmett ¢ Mankad b Gaekwad .. 12
Worrell rot out .. ... ie eeeeee * Pb 4
Fishlock ¢ Gopinath b Hazare ....., 0
PER ssa aa eres oh ae oink 4 4
Total (for 4 wkts.) ....,... 138



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Regiment
Ship’s Team

The Regiment won their one
day cricket match against a team
from the H.M.S. Devonshire by
44 runs yesterday at the Garrison.

Play started at 1.30°p.m., the
Regiment batting first on a good
wicket after winning the toss. The
Regiment were dismissed for 138
runs, this amount of runs partly
collected through a good wicket
partnership by J. Bynoe, retired
44 and A. Phillips 48.

Both of these batsmen who
opened the first innings for Regi-
ment, started out to play soundly
and punished the Devonshire pace
bowlers when they bowled short.

The most troublesome bowler
of the Devenshire team proved to
be R. Sanderson, a medium pace
bowler, who took three of the
Regiment, wickets for the loss of
51 runs. M. Matterson, another
medium pace bowler, bowled well
to take two wickets for five runs.

In their turn at the wicket the
Devonshire team was dismissed
for 94 runs, their collapse due
mainly to the steady bowling of
A. Phillips, 2 for_16, R. Parris
2 for 21 and C. Price 2 for 10.
V. Conach and R. Stanhope each
scored 16, while R. Matterson got
15 runs before he was given out
teg before.

Barna Beat YMPC.
At Table Tennis

Three Inter-Club Table Tennis
matches were played last week.
On Monday Barna met Y.M.P.C
and defeated the Beckles Road
team by a wide margin.

It was simply a walk over for
Barna. Out of the nine games
played they won seven, Louis
Stoute and Campbell Greenidge
winning three each. The other
game went to Howard. The two
games for Y.M.P.C. were wor
by Smith and Hinds.

Both Greenidge and Stoute play-
ed excellent tennis while Good-
ing was out of form. Howard
shows promise and should go far
this year.

The match on Wednesday night
was between Abbey Marines and
Y.M.C.A. Both teams gave a poor
display but Mayers, Corbin and
Bynoe were good at various



periods. Abbey Marines won by im

the odd game in nine—Corbin and
Mayers scoring two each and
Alkins one. For Y.M.C.A.
Bynoe scored two, Griffith and
Shields one each.

The outstanding set of the night
was between Corbin and Bynoe.
Bynoe, after a very shaky start,
came through to win in fine style.
Mayers made many errors and
his attack was weak. On the
other hand his defence was quite
good, He was also very slow in
getting around the table.

The final match of the week
was between Everton and Peli-
can. Honours went to Everton
who Won five—four, Blair Mur-
ray was the most outstanding
Everton player. He won three
sets, Malcolm Murray won two
and Norman Gill one.

For Pelican, Worrell won two
while Willoughby and Phillips
won one each,

The matches this week are as

follows:—
Monday; Barna vs. Abbey
Marines.
Wednesday: Y.M.P.C. vs.
Pelican.

Friday: Y.M.C.A. vs. Everton,

Trinidad Players
Expected Monday

THE thirteen members of the
Trinidad Cricket Team with their



Manager Mr, Harold Burnett,
ex-Intercolonial player, will be
arriving at Seawell tomorrow

morning at 11.00 o’clock and will
be met by a Reception Committee
from the Board of Management
of the Barbados Cricket Associa-
tion,

It is expected that the Trinidad
players will loosen up at Ken-
sington later in the afternoon
about 2.00 o’clock,

They will be staying at Abbe-
ville Guest House.

GOLFERS RETURN

The remaining members of the
Barbados Golf team, which recent-
ly toured Trinidad, returned yes-
terday by B.W.LA.

They were Mr. John Grace, Miss
Katy Lenegan and Mrs. Isabelle
Lenegan.



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'
Over

the World

1951



NDAY,

HARD OR SOFT GOING?
Whichever It Is, The March Meeting

Will Be Good
BY BOOKIE

7 March meeting is now just under three
weeks off, the entries close on Thursday next
a and “yet we are still very much in the dark about
form. The track was opened for the first

ume yesterday morning, outside the barrels, but

in most cases gallops were restricted to quick be-

ginnings and slow finishes. After the first set of

gallops we are therefore no nearer to picking fav-

ourites than a month ago.

The condition of the track has received a mixed reception. Some
say it is covered with a layer of megass which is too thick, others that
it is just right. It will be interesting to see what it turns out like in
the final analysis but it is quite obvious that it will favour those who
like the soft going better, Quite a number of them looked very tired
yesterday when they pulled up. A few others worked on the outside
of the m and it was noticeable the way their hoof beats rang out
in contr: to the swish of the grass which is all that could be heard
when they were working on the soft cover.

Nevertheless I should imagine that one good point about the soft
going will be less breakdowns and therefore a fuller entry. I am
told that about seventy are expected to race but this number sounds
very :>flated to me. I do not propose to go through the list here as
this would be too lengthy to fit into one column. However, I do agree
that we should see over sixty.

LOT of interest is centred around the very first race on the pro-
gramme. This is the Maiden Stakes for which a number of new-
comers are in aration. We will have Doldrum, Lunways, High
and Low and Court O’Law who will be making their debut to racing
in the West Indies. There will then be such as Arunda, Miss Panic,
No-to-Nite and Kitchen Front who were seen only briefly last Novem-
ber but are yet to eg anything like their best form. That gives us
a choice of eight before we throw in Ability and Fair Sally and for
the other C class races there will still be such as Harroween, Tiberian
Lady and Flieuxce. If on top of that we also get Carefull Annie from
Trinidad, where, I would like to know, are we going to start them?
To make for more congestion a few from D class like Bow Bells ana
Watercress may be sent in a C class event. We therefore face the
possibility of having sixteen in one event. I sincerely hope not.
PEAKING of D class it is likely that we will see some good racing
in this division as well. Thank goodness our classifiers have not
followed thejr Trinidad counterparts in this respect and_we will be
able to see Bow Bells, Watercress, Cross Roads, and Best Wishes have
the opportunity to prove themselves before they are pushed into a
crowded field of importeds among which may well be lurking some
would-be Salamanca or Tom Peason. It will also make our D class
racing have some class about it instead of the usual bunch of second
raters which it is customary to see at Trinidad meetings now-a-days
in this section. .

N FACT, I look forward to this racing to provide us with what we

missed at the Christmas meeting after the Derby had been run,
although, naturally the horses are now all four-year-olds, But it is
not long after and none of them could have made any particular pro-
gress except to regain their true form. In this connection the rivalry
between Bow Bells and Watercress will be the most important while
if the filly with the big knees can stand up to it we will also see what
part she might have played in the last classic. The latter is none
other than Mary Ann, who in spite of two blisters and hard going
continues to take her morning’s work. I have seldom seen the likes
of it.

ITH respect to the Guineas the form of the classic candidates is

perHaps more obscure than in any other group in training for
the meeting. At present Cross Roads stands out as the horse to be
beaten and although his general appearance is not very pleasing to the
eye, (he is decidedly dry-coated) I cannot say that I am other than
pressed with the way he has been going with his half-brother
Atomic II. I also like how Vanguard and Usher are shaping up but
they were so far behind Cross Roads only last November that it is
difficult to say exactly how much leeway they have made up. Mean-
while nothing is known of Best Wishes, who only arrived from St.
Vincent yesterday, except that she is a very good filly, But 7% fur-
longs is not a simple affair for a three-year-old at the beginning of
March and if her stamina is no better than it was when she won her
first race in Trinidad her opponents will have a good chance against
her.

If we are to judge from past experience then let us look back at
three-year-olds who have raced over 7% furlongs in March, I cannot
remember all of them but we saw five or six last year and also two
or three years before that. Two performances which stick in the
memory most are those of The Gambler and Watercress. Both of
these we might say were eventually better at middle distances than
sprints. Yet even for them 7% furlongs proved to be a good test.
Although they both won I cannot remember that they looked very
comfortable at the finish. Perhaps Watercress more so than The
Gambler, but this I put down to a longer and more carefully thought
out preparation. The latter, after all, was not prepared for a special
classic, but only for a 54%furlong sprint and then sent in a 7% furlong
race on the second day of the meeting.

Yet, without seeming to contradict my argument that our Guineas
should be shifted to August, I must admit that the case of Watercress
is a strong one in favour of making our classic races longer towards
the end of the year. Here was a small filly who was never a good
feeder and inclined to go overboard at the slightest amount of over
exertion. Yet given the proper grade of work she could manage nine
furlongs by August as comfortably as any imported and by the end
of the year 9% furlongs was like child’s play. .

I freely admit that as a rule small horses come to hand quicker
than the big ones, and that is precisely why to even up matters I advo-
cate a classic at the November meeting. The owners of the precocious
type would be able to have their fling in March and still have the
edge on the backward type in August. Meanwhile, the owners of the
backward type would be able to have some sort of chance, however
slight, in August and come into their own on equal terms in November,
By the time the Trinidad Derby arrived everybody would have had the
necessary experience to race like seasoned campaigners over 9% or 10
furlongs. I feel confident that under such circumstances we would
have nothing to fear from Jamaica.

As speaking of Jamaica I come to a very serious matter. I have
just received my copy of the Bloodstock Breeders’ Review Vol.
XXXVIII, 1949. The book, as usual, is a valuable addition to any
Racing Library in spite of its material being a bit behind hand. I have
no fault to find in this.

But what I must not let pass is an article in the “Review” in which
there is another attempt by some writer in Jamaica to decry horses
bred in the South Caribbean. Repeatedly in the past I have noticed
that whenever they get the opportunity to air their views internation-
ally, Jamaican writers like to stress the superior quality of their blood-
stock over that of the rest of the British Caribbean. We admit that
their average of good ones is higher.

But when, without bothering to check the circumstances, a Jamai-
can writer states: “. .. an indication of the class of the 1949 two-year-
cids (in Jamaica) is that Fair Profit, who would not rank among our
first eight, went to Trinidad and won their biggest two-year-old
event”; he must be told that this victory was also the biggest fluke in
the history of the biggest event.

Blue Streak, a Jamaican Derby winner, was roundly beaten in
this island by the Barbados creole Gun Site. Yet nobody suggested
thet this was an indication that racing here was on a higher level
than in Jmaica. There were extenuating circumstances for Blue
Streak. So too were there extenuating circumstances for the good
horses which Fair Profit defeated in the Breeders’ Stakes. As for
Fair Profit himself, he has not won a race since,

FEBRUARY 11,

.








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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY



il,

1951



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



CARNIVAL IN BARBADOS



THE BAND OF HUNGARIAN DANCERS which took First Prize for the Best Band.

Kneeling in front and dressed as Sir Walter Raleigh is Little Wendy Mackay,

who carried off. the

Prize for the Prettiest Costume at the Ursuline Convent Annual Fancy Dress Party.





TRINIDAD —

By TONY VANTERPOOL

Nearly all West Indian islands
go Carnival crazy on the last two
days before Lent but in Barbados
these days are just “ordinary
working days”. A few Barbadians
however brought the Carnival at-
mosphere to the island at various
functions held during that period.

One of these functions was held
at the Ursuline Convent on Mon-
day anda large number of chil-
dren were gaily dressed up and
looked very attractive.

On Tuesday night ome of the
biggest local Carnival attractions
took place en the Riverside
Club held their Carntval Ball at
the Children's Goodwill League.
This is an anni event. f

Contestants in a variety
of costumes. One chap who wore
the costume of a beggar paid the
penalty. He arrived at the ball
with his nts and shirt partly
torn but when ready to leave they
were nearly off.

Another chap a te to dis-
guise as a Bathing Beauty. He
wore a flowing bath robe over his
bathing trunks and occasionally
the inquisitive girls could be seen
trying to lift the ,

A man, ‘“Boysfe” Buteher, was
chosen Carnival Queen, Butcher,
an expert dressmaker and perhaps
the only dress designer in the
island, was also responsible for
making nearly all the prize win-
ning costumes.

His was a blue off-the-shoulder



From loft to right:
priges at the Goodwill League.

“The Mexican”, “Rosie Malleen”, “The Madonna” and “The Turkish Lady” all won



FEB. 11

PAGE FIVE

NO. 158

The Topic
of

Last Week





It was Ash Wednesday morning
The day that begins Lent
When Lou that old-time devil

Wake up without a cent

And this caused oll the trouble
She met a certain gal

Who invited her on Tuesday
To Bowbados Carnival

Louw felt that she could “brealk-qut”
And nothing Joe would know

But Joe was there too dismised
From his head right to his toe,

Lou swung inside Joe's corner
And as her dark-skin shined
You could see those damsels shaking
A delightful bedy-line,
Lou cried out, I'm delightful
To join this happy crowd
When she heard somebody saying
“Shape up Boysie’’-—very loud

dress. He wore black gloves and ig Serans, en Sa, et One Ea
carried a handbag to match. His Q And ae dee Catered Tau ahh ered
false hair was made as — WEIGH IF ING. And right then both start to stare.
pressed and then curled. He called 1 L , ] ] . : :

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN.
The sparkle and brilliance that
rang down the curtain of this
year’s carnival is something that
will shine back through the
memory of the years. A new tone

himself Rosie Malleen in the For-
est.

Other prizes were awarded to
the West Indian Cricket team,
Stanley Jackman who represented
“The Turkish Lady”, Clyde Phil-
lips “The Senor”, Dalton Babb
“The Madonna”, Winston Hackett

Can our local weightlifting boys
make it possible to send up a team
at — scarcely at the 1952 Olym-
Plad—but say the subsequent

He CALVIN ALLEYNE

ciation and a few of them were
contracting their facial museles
as though they were lifting irgns
which’ I t

qo
a

Can vou guess what start the staring?
Well my friends ‘twas simply this
A sweet man dressed like a lady
Was mistaken for @ Miss
. . .

He was chested as in “tru-form’”
With contraptions extra-fine

And his cheeks were red like cherries
With @ crowd of boys behind.

‘ 5 : took to be a way of Joe cried out Lou com > home

was ‘set for masquerading that Wostins tee ‘act bageet ena meet? T think they can, British expressing disapproval to some Lou said, don't be . pest .
brought out originality and Nesta Layne as “Jockey Holder.” Guiana and Trinidad have had of the rules. I must stay and admire Boysie
breadth of vision in the revellers. Conrad Petersen, who was a shot and why can we not. We nig ; : Why he meade my wedding Grea.

Naturally . this is something dressed as “Barracuda” (Tyrone have the talent, tall big men, and "ee Me the main they seem, to “Oh Joe!" Lou said-—‘don'’t grumble”
which it will take some time to Power) in the motion picture short stocky ones, e pulling together and I do not! Don’t be rough to-night; be kind
get accustomed to, but the inno- “Spanish Main” and his partner Le doubt but that they will soon Don't take me home sg early
vations were pleasing in several Madame Drayton, dressed as the For years now weightlifting has emerging with something tangi- And leave all these bays behind.
respects. Sailor bunds are no “Lady from Martinique” looked fitted in as a hobby to many of the ble. They intend calling them- tots wtee de. Adeaneatian
longer sailors as such and in some extremely attractive but unfortun- burlier set of Barbadians and I selves the Barbados Amateur Please Joe don't bully me
casés it was hard to tell where the ately arrived late for the compe- remember a few years ago when Weightlifting Association. Look at all those other nice boys~=
sailors ended and part of some tition. Bison our then local strong man The first Vice President is They are happy; can you see?

other disguise not in any special

The Judges were Mrs. G. H,

who is now abroad, made a game

Stanley Linton; an old chap in

And all the time Joe grumbled

department of the Carnival Adams, Mrs. D. H. L. Ward and attempt at throwing Whiskers the line. Second Vice President Boys were saying, what a night! !
began. Mrs. Olga Symmonds, all of whom Blake and Joe Gotch. Yes, but is Reuben Jones, Kid Ralph's And Joe's fa0e was like a eur see a
This year for one thing they are well acquainted with costumes. he was more of a weightlifter than TYainer and the Honorary Secre Ta ee er
made themselves famous for their They were assisted by Mr. John a wrestler and did not get the try is Winfield Grannum, school. . ‘ ’
grotesque heads that ranged in Beckles, M.B.E. better of the bouts, teacher of St. Mary’s Boys’ School. | Joe then joined the other boys jiving
limitation from over-sized cam— At another Carnival Ball at the The Treasurer is Joubert Bullen Lou got vex; Joe said be kind

eras to a giant octopus; and one
‘particular band did not represent
sailors at all, but must have been
something belonging to the
family of divers to judge from
the headgear.



Girls’ Industrial Union on the
same night another collection of
lovely costumes could be seen. A
ladies’ steel band led a parade
around the hall and this especially
amused the dancers.

“The Peanut Vendor”, a fat girl

Scme of the weigntfters in the
game today, import their equip-
ment, but others make shift with
lead weights which they make
themselves. Sets of enthusiastic
young men pooled together and

and there is a four-man committee,

When I spoke to Grannum, he
emphasised that the Association is
not connected with the Barbados
Amateur Athletic Association
but they hope to be affiliated to

I must stay dear Lou ‘till morning
I can't leave the sweete behind.
* ° .

That was Tuesday boys, but look out
For the J & R Easter spree
All the world will be at Gall Hill
Joe and Robert, Lou,-—all three,
’ . .

A strong feature this year was wearing a weather beaten dress _ — course of time formed the British Amateur Weightlifting Thing jn, Chalet Chureh will be hum-
s re this year ws S, , cacutatinn 4 o
the aces number of “Indians” straw hat and a pair of “dry _— Assoclation in time eNot & moment will be den

‘ , ” ; y aud se
who literally took charge of she Wernher, stare Wee oe nn = You will see them on the | The way he told me of the gis. That you get from J & R Bread,
downtown Carnival almost as i head. Cedrie Phillips, represent- beaches of an evening getting a Connection, gave me a vivid idea idee Yor Davies Monday
there had been a conspiracy among pow ph Sh ik oP aiw AT eee light work out of exercises, They f how these boys feel. They do] S)Prenite ee ee this apres
them to emphasise this form of ing e Sheik of an, Pa do the tougher work indoors’ at NOt Want anyone to butt in on) paket GaMnen ait Berematene
disguise. The headgear was so orareee Pe vee “anak - the clubs. Sometimes you even em and try to run the show Will enjoy @ Carnival PREF.
expansive and elaborate that Unlike Trinidad some of these

three of them standing side by











get the weightlifters of say Shot
Hall beach going up to Bathsheba

dictator like, although they weuld
not mind getting some help, *

sponsored by

; ; ‘ ‘ . p through : :
side in one of the wide City . «paRRACUDA” and “The Lady from Martinique” celebrations continued to stage a c i she So jumping ahead to two months

s : . que” came late for the the wee hours of Ash Wednesday. stage a contest with Bathshéba I | cu
a would i ener ee competition at the Children’s Goodwill League, Some people were against this be- weightlifters, hence when the Association will J &R BAKERIES -
“Apache Indians* who came out — welt li cause they felt that all celebrating orgnmenty there was no ell. steetad comiatittons cman tome, .
on the first day were there again a ey mianig of tion, : See ae selves — sort of by way of back- makers of

on the second day.

Guide Rally At Pax Hill





A few years ago Clement
Jackman, known in the game as

woods weeding to get a final pick

ENRICHED BREAD

The “Hosea” Band, about 100 he Cor was adjudged to be is public, sawie. ons eae

nN ad its Jancer lead- 2 ; . r, Barbados when such tough: actise han¢ bala €
oer tas hig "following to hot THE Guide Rally at Pax Hill the recruits was the new Guiae TEST AVERAGES “ as the Warner brothers and Mr. &/™nastie pyramids and these and the blenders of
calypso tones and the entourage 0 Thursday 8th February, 1951 Company now being started at “THE SHEIK OF ARABY” won Solomon, then a master at Com. With good display of weightlifting

included taj-bearers, pundits and

in honour of the Chief Guide, was





Queen’s. College.



To the Editor, The Advocate—








Second Prize at the Girls’ Industrial







bermere School, were competing



and perhaps a wrestling bout,

J&R RUM








Ny eer | : int Toe ; ‘haloe ; ‘ : SIR,—The following Test aver- Union. Since then the business has *n Would be a pleasant novelty to, I
lasses with orhnis and_ lotahs. the biggest ever held in Barbac os. The Chief Guide then inspected ages of the England team in Aus; i e business has been thinks the maion- portion ‘of Bae
But there was no “big belly Ram- There were 11 Commissioners, 1 the Rangers and Guides in her li be aa int tt then ow, Cate athe ic. And ‘Henne —_—
lal” nor the Indian girl of the Secretary, 76 Guiders, 16 Colour own inimitable way. After the [t¥o8 ‘Of cricket, who are follow. A few days ago I d sa mat Ge not mind’ paying for a gala
tuneful ditty “grinding massala.” Party, 52 mee 471 Guides, 170 Inspection ve talked to the chil- Sus the reset Test series in GUILTY Queen’s Park =e oaaeTaapae of entertainment ae re es be
Brownies and 153 Recruits, mak- dren who will never forget her : _ Ja, ao eeieie F : : a . f

“Poi ” r c 4 these knotty scled chaps trying Some the t ,

Point Cumana : yee - ing a total of 950, It was amazing stirring words of encouragement. Australia. BATTING P as Ganee ae eee ee nae sealed Or oS te: tne 7s Ni
band of sailors in jet black, t4 see how the Brownie Branch As it was now 5.40 p.m, Capt. No. of Ings, T.N.O. Total Runs H.S. Ave NEW YORK. Faken es csth Hi ity ae Mein [erate ie’ end | ene ; a
marched up Henry Street and into hae ge a ia din Rais 1 d dq Ss The b. Hutton @ 3 394 156° 78.80 A 34-year-old bookie, who drew tions, to wit, the how and what help them buy good equipment Don't let morniug an tf
Park Street to a slow tune and 74S 8rown an espancing, maison played Co ave © FR. Brown. 7 0 204 %§ 2914 in 90 million dollars a year, sur- bout forming a Barbados Ama. and get things going smoothly eg Aa a
rere crossed on Frederick Street nee ; _ , Rangers and Guides then marched ps: Sheppard 2 0 (50 41 — 25.00 prised « New York court recently teur Weightlifting Association4 avd the bulk to the Association.| efthout trying MENDAGO. fbi
ty the peppery-going “Mexican The Chief Guide, accompanied past, the Chief Guide taking the = SWashbrook é 0 ihe Sa 2180 when he laid himself open to 65 There are some eight clubs Naturally the Association woyld| tmtermal medicine works (orn

y-s' € , a shap age 2 resj <, " . ; R 5 5 te 7. - ¥ 19 hee

Carpet Sellers.” These girls, in by Lady Savage, the ae Salute. It was a wonderful sight pq "fans. @ 1 143 49 2042 years in prison. Because book- Which are joined to form this have to be well managed and good en ey a ed
pert sombreros and a smart cos- of the Girl ae sa m via and one then realised how many Pose Park- 4 0 1 2% ©1995 Making is illegal in New York, he association and doubtless others eccounts regularly given of the] {immediately to remove thi
tume of green and purple, each oe ao arn tte eiinne hea sige aera ain cane ee T Bailey |. 6 1 35 2 700 Was on trial for taking bets, but wit join up: When I got there funds, os mesos tee orang og Sah

rried a plush carpet across the ’ eres had disappeared the Chief Guide J’G@. Dewes.. 4 0 23 9 5.75 he suddenly dropped his innocence and sat around the table in the — So if the boys get things orggn-) PO%feshing sleep. Get Biel) 4
shoulder ss they jigged their way Party was drawn up at the en- called on the Brownies to “run A V. Bedser @ 2 32 14° 5.33 plea and pleaded guilty. He will Park House with them, they were ised quickly, they could stage romp your shemist today along. trance of Pay Hill with the Island past,” which they thoroughly en~ 5 y.“Wrent 6 1 22 14 450 be sentenced on February 19, discussing the rules of the ASso. regular shows — at theatres too or mener bank eu)

Shouts, cat calls, whistles, Colour having an escort of 2 joyed, W. ¥ Mcintyre 2 @ § 7 4.00

ews i se A eo 3

singing, jumping and an atmos~ Rangers. The Brownies and re Tt has been a wonderful thrill arr ‘
apa al gaiety and levity ane cruits were on the pene g a Fe to the Guides of Barbados that 8. F Ranities “o ai 1 1 50 Bo rE
vailed. Every one tried to outdo the building and the Chief Guide they could at last welcome the BOWLING " B O XIN G
his neighbour in merry-making inspected them, shaking hands Chief Guide to their OWN Head- gajtey fa i it tod s ‘
and in antics. he With each one of them, Among quarters and Camp site, which Bedser 192 25 377 20 18.85 } :

Tourists and vanes an = is named Pax Hill after her home Brown § 1 lag eee at the Yr u im a ower
neighbouring islands enjoye’ - nen Se and our Founder’s in England. Tattersall 525 7 212 4° 42.95 YANKEE STADIUM '
themselves thoroughly—many ne for participants and spectators a Compton aie 2 2} $3.00 wm & i"

. ate events 5 articipants 4 ; $ rig 9 3 394 «8 48, ‘ i

them taking part in the alike Colourful costumes have PLAYED MASK WHILE Wis ae ee ee Brittons Hill

Masqueraders and onlookers been put away now. Many of HOUSE WAS BURNING The averages given above are

alike showed they could enjoy
relaxation from work and worry

them will be used next Carnival.
Spectators, will for quite a while,

‘From Our Own Correspongent)

for the series up to and including
the Fourth Test just completed at











e
Tuesday night, Feb. 13th

ustins are ahead!

5 : iod The have the din of the steel bands PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 7. Adelaide. e

ond cia it ranret to thousands particularly vibrating in their A house valued at about $2,500 It may be also of interest to KID RALPH

faicin art in the last “jump up.” ears, and the echoes of calypsoes and owned by Mr. B. Mahabir of cricket lovers to learn that Eng- (163 Ibs.)

“a Sor the Road Mareh, that resounding joyously. Parents will Barataria, was completely destroy- land’s opening fast bowler, Trevor a

r $ disputable. Suffice it to say have difficulty in restraining ed by fire on Monday afternoon. Bailey, whose thumb was frac- KID PRANCIS

that you might pick your choice children from singing the ane No, 1 unit of the Central Fire tured by a ball from Lindwall in ‘ § ce | Bare

Soh TINY aa eLoomat 88y,,© hard re eae i ie wat Gn atched te the ne ie pieces t Test at Sydney, is alll | -, (162 Ibs.) You can take on the tough jobs when you bave an Austin.
e,” “Loomat' say .e oatey ,50 100 «was despatched to the scene, but probable for the next State match , . 4 0 5 ,

see Boysie” i have a lovely for 40 days now that the jumping was delayed by heavy traffic and.vs. Victoria at Melbourne, sa]|! In return match for the They’re built to deal with rough loads and bad roads year after

bunch of coconuts” and a number

hers. iy ;
ot whe fete for which Trinidadians

live principally, ended with regret



THE

THE MOTORISTS SS

and the shouting have. ceased, anc
the “warriors and kings” depart,
the sobering period of Lent is
ence more here again.

KEY TO

=

on arrival found the building
almost destroyed. The Mahabir
family wa; in the city attending
the Carnival celebrations,

Ss

—
=

OIL

ESSO STANDARD

“Radio Australia” reported on, the
8th inst,

Yours truly,
CELT.

\7







Light-Heavy weight
Championship of
BARBADOS

10 Rounds

@
Semi-Final
SAM KING (180 lbs.)
| vs.
HAL WILLIAMS
(131 Ibs.)

8 Rounds
e
Preliminary

VICTOR LOVELL
(122 Ibs.)






vs.
BELFIELD KID

(125 lbs.)

6 Rounds
Ring Side $2.00
Balcony .... $1.50
Cage $1.00
|} Arena ... $1.00
Bleachers .. A8

Winner of the champion-
ship will receive a Belt
presented by

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Os

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‘PAGE SIX



Brintea by the Advocate Co., Ltd, Broad 8t., Bridgetown.



Sunday, February 11, 1951



= POLICE DOGS

THE gift of two Alsatian Dogs by the
Metropolitan Police to the local Force will
give the Barbados Police an opportunity
to develop a branch of police work that
has been ignored for too many years in
this ‘island. Almost every Police Force
of-any standing has long recognised the
value of trained dogs as an essential ad-
junct to the Force.

Much of the spade work in training
police dogs was done in Germany before
the first World War and the marvellous
record set up by these dogs during the
war opened the eyes of the authorities to
the possible service which dogs could ren-
der if enrolled in a Civil Police Force.

For many years the Germans pinned
their faith on the Alsatian Shepherd Dog,
whose speed and agility, skill in tracking
and intelligence in emergency, marked him
out as an ideal assistant to the Civil Police.

The Alsatian was one of the pioneers in
police work, but he is by no means the
only breed that has been found suitable
for training in police work. The Germans
themselves soon discovered that the Dober-
mann Pinscer and the Boxer made equally
good police dogs, and within recent years
the Boxer has found great favour in Pales-
tine and hot climates where certain strains
of Alsatians proved to be subject to skin
ailments. In England, the Airedale Ter-
riey-and the Flat Coated Retriever have
shown qualities almost approaching that
of the German breeds. The young age at
which an Alsatian can be trained still
calisés the breed to be preferred above all
others. for training in police work.

Not only can a trained police dog be
used. for tracking and arresting, but he
seryes as a valuable protector to consta-
bles on lonely beats and he is invaluable
as a searcher of buildings or fields.

| When specialised tracking On a_ cold
scent is required, however, the police em-
ploy a specialist tracker, the Bloodhound,
whose breeding has been directed for
centuries to the building-up of an acute
sense of smell,

The. training of Police Dogs is a com-
plicated and a tedious task demanding an
abundance of patience, firmness, and kind-
liness, and Colonel Michelin is indeed for-
tunate to find in the island a fully qualified
trainer, eager and willing to undertake the
task. There is hardly a limit to what a
good trainer can teach an intelligent dog,
and the performances put up at field and
police work trials are so outstanding that
the watcher is truly amazed.

The Commissioner of Police proposes to
build up a sizable corps of Police Dogs
using the two Alsatians as the foundation
of hiz kennels. He will have to watch
carefully the progress of his particular
strain of Alsatians and should they prove
unsuitable, it may be as well for him to
substitute the Boxer, who has proved his
suitability to hot climatic conditions, or
the Dobermann Pinscer, another short-
haired breed.

In Kensington Gardens, London, the
Boxer is now being used almost exclusive-
ly. “His. size and his gentleness until
roused, is making him a strong favourite
for the job, but the Alsatian is still holding
his own except under unsuitable climatic
conditions.

Colonel Michelin’s experiment will be
watched with interest.

V.H.F.

The use of very high frequency Radio
Communication in recent years has been
associated in the public: mind with the
police more than any other service. In
Barbados on the other hand, few people
have, seen this type of radio telephone at
work and it is only very recently that com-
mercial firms have been installing V.H. F.
Sets for use from ship to shore.

| The main advantage of very high fre-
quency operation for radio work is the
fact that these frequencies are free from
finterference caused by normal low-fre-
quency wireless operations.

ae ‘
;-3t has been particularly useful for
police, taxis and other organisations where
mobility is synonymous with efficiency.
In Barbados where there is hardly any
interference from hills, very high fre-
quency sets can be used with maximum
efficiency.

It is no compliment to the Government
of Barbados that private firms have been
able to forestall the Police in the use of
V. H. F. Radio.communication.. The Com-
missioner of Police, Colonel R. T. Michelin,
told the Advocate last week that he had
been trying for over a year to get V. H. F.
Radio Communication sets for the Barba-
dos Police Force. The Government are
evidently not communication minded.

,; It may be that they are not fully aware
of the importance of Communications.
They may, isolated as they are on a small
island in the Atlantic, aot yet have heard
that whereas victory in the days of Napo-
leon was achieved by paying due regard to
the slogan that “an army marches on its
stomach;” the slogan during the last world
war which ended in victory for the United
Nations, was that “without Communica-
tions the battle is lost.”

It is almost useless to train, equip, and
raise the Barbados Police Force
to the high level of — discipline
and organisation which it has
reached, if the one thing needful—Com-
munications—is overlooked because funds
are not forthcoming. It is better to have
tess policemen with modern facilities «f
their disposal than more policemen work-
ing in isolation from contro] headquarters.
A Police patrol car that is not in contact
with headquarters by radio’ telephone is
restricted to one patrol. A police car that
is on patrol, but fitted with V. H. F. Radio
Communication, can be redirected by con-
trol headquarters to any part of Barbados
where its presence is required.

The efficiency of the Barbados Police
Force, the service that it renders the pub-
lic, demands an up-to-date Communication
system. The small expenditure involved
in equipping the Police with a system of
Mobile Radio Communication will be a
small fraction of the cost to the public
which the present antiquated system of
communications makes necessary, solely
because control is impossible.

The Commissioner of Police knows only
too well the value of such communication
to Barbados. It is incredible that he
should be kept waiting even on the plea
of economy. It is no economy to keep’the
Police Force immobile, That is what lack
of mobile radio communication means in
fact.

A FOOT IN THE DOOR

A SALESMAN’S chief qualifications, we
always understood, were to have strong
feet and strong boots—the object being to
get one foot in the door and keep it there.
However, an interesting little booklet
which reached this office during the week
claims that salesmanship can be learned
by correspondence — eighteen lessons for
$90.

In the first lesson the student is scnooled
in, among other things, social conversation,
general deportment, initiative, and atti-
tude to colleagues. By the next lesson the
prospective salesman is learning about
“Cultivating Polished Expression, the
Voice, Facial Expression, Gesture, and
Correct Posture.”

SUNDAY ADVOCATE




INSIDE LOOKING. OU

THE LAST TIME THERE Was Music
AT CLUB wirow, PITPERbUG was












THESTO
INNISKILLINGS

THE ROYAL INNISKILLING
FUSILIERS arrive in Barbados
next Friday.

Raised in Enniskillen, Co. Fer-
managh, N, Ireland and taken on
the British Establishment on 20th
June, 1689.

Battle Honours 1689—1914

Martinique, 1762; Havannah; St.
Lucia, 1778; St. Lucia, 1796;
Maida; Badajoz; Salamanca; Vit-
toria; Pyrennees; Nivelle, Orthes;
Toulouse; Peninsula; Waterloo;
Egypt; South Africa 1935; Soutn
Africa, 1846-7; Central India; Ré-
lief of Ladysmith; South Africa,

1899-1902.
Great War $08

Le Gateau; Somme, 1916-18;
Ypres, 1917-18; St. Quentin; Hin-
denburg Line; France & Flanders,
1914-18; Macedonia, 1915-89;
Landing at Helles; Gallipoli,
1915-16; Palestine, 1917-18.

During the second World War
battalions of the Royal Inniskill-
ing Fusiliers served in:

France & Flanders, 1939-40,
Burma, N. Africa, Sicily.
Italy. ~

The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,
formerly the 27th (Enniskillen)
Regiment of Foot have, as their
Battle Honours show, many con-
nections with the Western Hemi-
sphere. They were one of the
first four Regiments to be station-
ed in the West Indies, arriving in
Antigua in 1702 for a five year
tour. This was only the first of

many tours both in peace and-war-

in this part of the world. The
Seven Years War (1754-61) saw
them again present at the cap-
ture of Martinique and Grenada
and, following the outbreak of
War with Spain in 1762 they took
part in the capture of Havannah
described at the time as the rich-
est prize ever to fall to British
Arms. In October 1762 the Regi-
ment returned home to Ireland,

They did not remain long at
home. During the American War
of Independence they saw service
in North America from 1775 to
1778 when, France having declared
war, an expedition was sent
against St. Lucia. This was the
first of two actions the Regiment
fought on this Island, the more
famous one of 1796 being one of
the proudest Battle Honours of
the Inniskillings. Shortly after-
wards they helped in the capture

of Grenada.

This was the last active service
seen by the Inniskillings in the
Indies, but further peace time
tours followed from 1824 to 1830
in British Guiana, St. Vincent,
Grenada and _ Barbados.

“| When the Regiment sailed from

By the third lesson the course gets down
to brass tacks, or rather to bicycles, wire-
less sets, breakfast foods, toilet soaps, and
most difficult of all, calculating machines.

The next lesson on “Developing Moral
Courage” will cause the student to search
his soul. Among the subjects discussed are :
“Timidity and Shyness — an analysis of
fear—overcoming your fear—being friend-
ly—developing social ‘activity—snobs—in-
trospectian—dver-introspection—harmjony
in dress—the voice—and the eyes.”

In the fifth lesson buying motives are
laid bare. They are: “self-preservation,
approbativeness, vanity, cupidity, pride,
acquisitiveness, self-gratification, imita-
tiveness, and curiosity,”—a fairly compre-
hensive catalogue of vices. The budding
salesman is then urged to observe “a house-
wife considering. an Electric Iron” (a dan-
gerous mission no doubt) and “a profes-
sional man considering a medium-priced
car.”

The lesson on the “Mechanics of Selling”
which follows teaches the salesman how to
create a desire for anything from “a new
table sauce” to a fountain pen, and how to
convince a board of directors of a bank
or a public house proprietor.

The section on “Overcoming Resistance”
is perhaps the most terrifying; it literally
provides the salesman with “all the an-
swers”. For instance, it teaches him how
to handle people who make such stupid
objections as “Price too high”, “Never
handle such goods”, “Unsuitable to our
neighbourhood” or the pitiful “I cannot
afford”. With such a salesman at large
nobody is safe.

The final lesson, appropriately enough,
teaches the salesman how to-sell himself.

the last mamed place in 1830 it
did not return until 1949 when a
tour in Jamaica was begun thus
renewing the tie between the
Regiment and the West Indies.

Antigua

It was in Antigua that the In-
niskillings began their long con-
nection with the West Indies.
They were stationed in this Island
and probably some others from
1702-1706.

During its visit to Antigua the
Regiment took part in the expedi-
tion which led to the capture of
“Guadeloupe in 1703. Unfortun-
ately disease took a henvy toll of
Officers and men and the numbers
sailing home in 1706 were less
than half of those who had arriv-
ed five years earlier.

Two Companies were left be-
hind, being forcibly transferred
to another Regiment and in 1710
these unfortunates are heard of as
having been without pay for three
years and “dependent on the in-
habitants of Antigua for their
bread”,

Barbados

The Inniskillings have been
more often in Barbados than any
other of the West Indian Islands.
After taking part in the operations
leading to the final capture. of
Canada they were sent to seize
the French owned West Ingian
Islands and landed in thet cet
on Christmas Eve 1761. T set
sail again shortly afterwa’ as
art of an expedition to capture
Martinique, This Island fe in
February 1762 and a foree was
immediately sent to reduce m-
ada. i n

After the capture of St. cia
in 1778 the Inniskillings were'sta-
tioned in Barbados for two years
before returning to Ireland and
in 1796 stayed there prior to
sailing to St. Lucia for the more
famous attack of 1796 and, after




the capture of that island and
Grenada, once more returned to
Barbados.

In January 1829 the Inniskil-
lings were again in Barbados
where they remained until the
end of ‘1830 when they were
ordered home to Ir d. Before
the Twenty-Seventh embarked,

General Sir James

jLieutenant

~ * he
mB



Lyon, K.C.B. G.C.H., Commanding
at Barbados, issued the following
General Order: —

“BARBADOS, November 22nd
1830.

The Twenty-Seventh Regiment,
being on the eve of embarkation,
the _ Lieutenani-General Com-
manding. in the separation of so
valuable a part of his force, begs
to convey to Lieutenant-Colonel
Hare, his Officers, his Non-Com-
missioned Officers, and men, his
anxious wishes for their prosper-
ous voyage, happy landing and
future success, Sir James Lyon
must ever bear in recollection the
Zeal with which the 27th, whilst
serving under him, has performed

every duty; and he views, there-

fore, their departure with sincere
regret but his knowledge of their
former more active and splendid
service satisfies him that to what-
ever destination the commands of
their sovereign may hereafter
direct the Inniskilling Regiment,
they will maintain that distin-
guished reputation which has se-
cured to them the respect and
applause of those under whom
they have served”,

During their seyen years tour
of duty in the tropics the Twenty-
Seventh, as they had done before,
suffered greatly from the climate
and left three hundred and two
Inniskillingers behind them in the
graveyards of the various colonies
in which they had been quartered.

The survivors of the Regiment
were brought home in three ships,
the slowest of which réached Cork
at the, of. January, 1831. This
was their last visi fo the Western
Hemisphere until’ their present
tour began in 1949.

British Guiana

The Inniskillings did not visit
British Guiana until fairly late in
their history.

From 1824 to 1826 the Regiment
was in Demerara and Berbice and
in December 1826 it was ordered
to St. Vincent and Grenada. Be-
fore they left Demerara, the civil
population, with whom the Twen-

ty-Seventh were extremely popu-
lar, entertained the officers at a

great farewell ball and Major-
General Sir Benjamin D’Urban, in
a general order expressed “the
high opinion and regard which
the Regiment has so amply merit-
ed by its exemplary conduct since
he had the happiness to have it
under his command”,

Dominica

After the capture of St. Lucia
in 1796 a detachment of the Regi-
ment was stationed in Dominica
where they remained until the
following year.

The Inniskillings. have been
three times in Grenada in all,
so their visit in March 1951 will
be their fourth. After taking part
in the captdre of Martinique from
the French, which-fell in February
1762, they were immediately sent
to reduce Grenada. The Inniskil-
lings lended on 5th March and the
Island fell without g shot being
fired, its submission being follow-
ed by that of the Grenadines.

Again in 1796, a few days after
the..capture of St. Lucia the
Tnniskillings and the Fifty-
Seventh Regiment were hurried
eff to Grenada where tha
British Garrison was, with diffi-
culty, holding its own against the
French This reinforcement
turned the scale anq after ag little
fighting in which the Regiment
lost one man, the enemy sur-
rendered and Grenada was
added to the possessions of the
crown. For nearly two years the
Regiment remained quartered in
Grenada with small detachments
at Barbados and Dominica and
suffered terribly from the ravages

of tropical diseasés. At the end
ot the year 1786 more than four
hundred officers and men,/had died
while most of the remainder were
lying sick. Drafts of recruits ar-
rived only to fall victims of yellow

BUT THE NEXT TIME A BAND PLAYS ®
THERE, DITPERBUG WILL BE OUTSIDE
LOOKING IN,

* at sea on June Ist it consisted of

SSUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1951





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fever, and on December 24th 1797
the effective strength all told was
only two hundred and eighty-three.
The Regiment was ordered home|] %
in March 1798 and when mustered | ¢

three hundred and eighty thr
effectives of all ranks; one hun—
dred and seventy five men
had already been sent to hospitals
in. England and ten men were
in the sick bay of the transport.
The Regiment's last visit to the
island was in peace time—from
1826 to 1829 when it moved to
Barbados en route for home. _

Jamaica

Until their present tour began
in 1949 the Inniskillings had only
once previously been to Jamaica.
In 1741 they sailed for Kingston
the journey taking four months.
This short tour was a tragic story
of ill-managed and abortive ex-
peditions of privation and disease.
Although they had left Ireland
six or seven hundred strong ana
had not once seen action, they
landed in England little more
than a year later with twelve
officers and forty eight men.

Fortunately to-day the condi-
tions are altered and the Innis-
killings are sailing from Jamaica
on a peaceful invasion of the
places with which they have been
so closely connected in the past.

St. Lucia

i} i
CULE











E 18tSS

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The connection of the TIanis—
killings with ST. LUCIA is a very
special one. In fact the relation-
ship between the island and the
Regiment is probably unique
They have twice taken part in its
capture the second time most
gloriously and their monument
to-day marks the site of their] .
gallantry 150 years ago.

After seeing service in the
American war of Independence
France having declared war, the
Inniskillings sailed for the West
Indies in i778. They first pro-
ceeded to Barbados, from where
the Regiment sailed to St. Lucia
and helped in its capture, remain-
ing there till when they were once
more back in Barbados,

1796 once again saw the Innis-
killings landing in Barbados
preparatory to an attack on St.
Lucia, the famous attack of 24th
May being commemorated thi
year by members of the Regiment
iy person after gq space of 155
years.

TO KEEP COOL...
AND KEEP WELL-GROOMED
AT THE SAME TIME!
THE NEW MOYGASHEL
ANTI-CRUSHABLE

LINENS

-.. ARE JUST THE TICKET

The Commander of the assault-
ing troops was Brigadier-Genera
(afterwards Lieutenant-General
Sir John Moore of Peninsula
fame who summed up the battle
in the words “We owed the pos:
to, the gallantry of the Twenty-
Seventh Regiment”,

After desperate fighting the
French sent in the flag of truce
to ask,for terms, and the negotia
tions ended in capitulation, whict
took place on the 26th.

In recognition of the conspicu-
ous service rendered on the 24th
by the Inniskillings, Sir Ralph
Abercrombie paid them the ver)
high compliment contained in the
following General Order dated
26th May, 1796:—

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ARRIVED

s
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“Parole—Enniskillen
Countersign—Gillman”

The 27th Regiment, under the
command of Brigadier-General
Moore, will this day at 12 o’clock
take possession of Fort Charlotte
(Morne Fortune), the present gar-
rison having first marched out and
Taid down their arms on the glacis.
Brigadier-General Moore will then
plant the Colours of the Regiment
on the fort to be displayed one
hour on the flagstaff previous to
hoisting the usual Union Flag.”

The General Order after eulo-
gising General Moore, refers to
the Twenty-seventh in very appre-
ciative terms.

SOSDSO SOS OSSS GOGO SOOGOOGIRA HG

199

9999

“The behaviour of the Enniskil-
len Regiment of Infantry, who
acted on that day with him (i.e
Moore) was so worthy of praise
that it deserves the Commander-
in-Chief’s highest approbation. Tc
Lieutenant-Colonels Gillman and
Drummond, the officers and men of
that gallant Regiment he also re-
turns nis best thanks and regrets
extremely the loss of Major Wil-
son of that Corps, who fell exert-
iwg himself in the service of his
country.” The honour accorded
the Regiment in permitting them
to fly their Colours on the cap-
tured fort is unique in British
Military History.

THERE IS NO OTHER
RUM LIKE

GODDARDS
cotp prAD RUM

VOD

OOS

4

VIOOCOSSOOS




The visit in the year 1951 is $ S
indeed a historie occasion. @ It's Mellow in Flavour >
ats @ It’s Best in Quality x

St. Vincent © ls First i $

n Popularity. >

The last station of the Inniskil- $
lings in the West Indies was St.j § 3
Vincent Arriving from British}% ENJOY JIT AT -YOUR CLUB x
Guiana they spent three years 8 h : 3
here from 1826 to 1829 and finally | § . Ts .
Sine te ae ce eae | AND GODDARD’S RESTAURANT %

ing England in 1830.

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY

Il, 1951

Hridgetown Never Sleepsam3



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



Electricity—‘Greatest Servant Of Man’:

GALE

I MUST admit I felt rather lost
when Mr. Morley, the Engineer,
ushered me into the brightly lit
forest of generators, transformers,
volts, amps, watts and what not
that make up the generating plant
of the Barbados Electric Corp.
However, I will try to explain ia
the language of John Doe what
makes your electric bulb light up.

When I entered the large gal-
vanise shed I saw a line of sevea
generators and the foundation for
another one which is expected
shortly. The most modern
machine, which was made by the
English Electric Co., cost over
thirty thousand pounds.

The generators,
turned by 1,500 hp diesel motors,
which have flywheels weighing
about fifteen tons. The engines
are water-cooled, the water being
pumped from g twelve foot well
in the Company’s yard which is
capable of producing 250,000 gal-
lons an hour. There are eight
pumps, two of which can pump
24,000 gallons an hour while the
others pump half that amount.
After the water has passed
through the engine it is cooled by
being run down a cooling tower,
and it is reckoned that 6,000 gal-
lons a day are lost by evaporation,

I learned, are

Renner Oe Nees

i

=

i
it
a3

While we were walking from

the generator to the main switch-

board, Mr. Morley told me that
the Electric Co., was started forty
years ago and employs a staff of

At
night there are only three men on

duty in the engine room—the shift

at-
tendant. The shift engineer looks

the

forty at the generating plant.

engineer, the driver and an

after the
shift in

switchboard
general, and

and
the driver

is in charge of starting and stop-—

ping the generators. Three other
men are on duty all night besides
those in the engine room. They
are the breakdown crew who have
a truck ready to go to any part of
the island in case wires comé
down,

The switchboard was a very
complex affair. From there the
generators are controlled, and
there are numerous instruments
for recording the amount of elec
tricity being generated and the
amount being sent out. One of the
switches was marked HOSPITA
in large letters, and I was told
that in the case of a breakdown at
the works every effort is made to
keep up the supply of current to
the hospital and other public in-
stitutions,

From the readings taken every





half hour at the switchboard I
sould see that the period when
the electricity load is heaviest is
at about seven o'clock at night,
Then it is necessary to use all
seven generators, but later on they
are shut off one by one until two
in the morning when only three
are needed.

The generators generate elec
tricity at 3,300 volts, and under
the old system, which is still in
use for Town and the suburbs,
this electricity is taken through
the switchboard and then goes
direct to the sub-stations in the
areas where it is transformed
down to 110 volts for lighting and
200 volts for power. Under ithe
new system, which is used fer
Bathsheba and other outlying
districts, the electricity is step-
ped up by transformers at the
plant to 11,000 volts, and then
transformed down again at
the sub-stations, There is an
electricity law, I was told, which
says that by doubling the voitage
the transmission losses are halved.

The noise in the engineering
room was terrific, and I left the
Electric Company a little hoarse
after shouting questions for about
an hour.

aetna a ees

THE TRANSFORMERS shown here step up the voltage. from 3,300 to 11,00 11,000.

PUT LIFE IN SCOUTING — Toy Maker
C.G. Tells Scoutmasters

LADY BADEN-POWELL, Chief Guide of the World
told 262 scouts at a scouts’ rally at the Scouts’ Headquarters,
Beckles Road yesterday that they should be enthusiastic
and energetic. They did not seem as though their eyes were
opened, but seemed dense. Scoutmasters should put life in
scouting, she said, and let the scouts hike especially on the



beautiful Barbados beaches.

The Chief Guide inspected the
262 scouts who represented 27
trceops. The Governor, Lady
Savage and the Hon. H. A. Cuke
attended the Scouts’ Rally.

The Governor who introduced
the Chief Guide after the inspec-
tion of the scout troops, said that
it was a privilege to be allowed
to introduce Lady Baden-Powell.
Lord Baden-Powell and Lady
Baden-Powell in his opinion had
made one of the greatest contri-
butions in the present century to
peace and happiness in the world.

The Chief Guide told the scouts
that the movement had grown in
vast dimensions because of the
valiant army of men and women
all over the world who had put
their enthusiasm into it. It was a
movement which had grown to iis

tremendous size and _ standing
entirely on its own.
It was because of its direct

appeal to the youngsters as well
as the grown-ups that scouting
was kept very much alive. They
needed badges and emblems, she
said. Badges and emblems gave
inspiration and a goal to which
to look forward. Inspiration was
a feeling which has to be within
the scout. It could not be imposed

or brought from outside.
Patrol System
The parol system had to be

stressed, she told them. It helped
to develop within the scouts a
sense of powsr and a birth of
leadership.

Scouts need never be short of
something interesting to do.
There should always be some
exciting programme — something
with a touch of adventure which
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was so suggestive of a scout.

The Education Department in
Egypt believe that scouting was a
great help to education and all
over the world the movement was
flourishing.

They had to be propagandists
because the ignorance of the aims
of scouting was amazing.

Moving a vote of thanks, the
Hon. H. A. Cuke said that the

voices of those who made appeals

on spiritual and cultural values

were being somewhat dimmed out say of the Barbadian policemen, He ‘is Vice-President of the
by those who made appeals on the women sellers at their trays National Association of Boys’
more material, values. Her pres- as they sit on their benches, the Cjyps, and Chairman of its De-

ence there would be a real source
of inspiration for the scouts. The
movement was a first class move-
ment and he hoped to see it flour-
ishing in Barbados.



“Rodney” Sails With
Molasses To-night

R.M.S. Lady Rodney called
from South yesterday to take a
load of rum and molasses for ports
on her homeward voyage.

She will be leaving Barbados
to-night for Bermuda, St. John
and Halifax via the British North
ern Islands, The last launch leave
the Baggage Warehouse at 8 p.m.

For St. John, she will be tak-

ing 200 puncheons of molasses and
1,450 cartons of rum and for Hal-

ifax 212 puncheons of molasses

and 50 cartons of rum. She will
also be loading a quantity of rum
for Bermuda.

Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co.,
Ltd. her agents,

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COCOESS

FOOD

OSS

THERE is a little child-face man
of 48, Arnel Kirton who has
gained the respect of proprietors
of some city stores as a born car-
ver. His father was a joiner, his
two uncles were joiners and his
brother is a joiner.

Yes, the craftsman's touch is in cil. He will visit Jamaic
his veins and after 18 years as a Mr. Henriques started a boys’
joiner himself, Arnel Kirton or elyb in 1914 with 25 members
Smarty as he is known by his petween the *ages of 14 and
friends, ae a that trade This eventually grew to
as something he liked passing fair, Bernhard Baron Settlement
but work which he thought too Vien before the war had over

hard. From ten and for the past
14 years, Smarty Kirton has been
craving toy soldiers, policemen,
boats and lots of other toys.

To look at Smarty Kirton you
would not think he is a deep think-
er, You would just see him shuff-
ling along the street with the little
card box in which he keeps his
work and seeming to be vaguely
ponderjng.

But 14 years ago it struck Kirton
that if he could carve some toys,

men behind donkey carts, tourists
to the island might think it nice
to have such to carry back as me-
mentos of the island's life.

So he set about his idea with a
knife and two steel pointed instru-
ments he made, and saw ordinary
pieces of deal board and cedar
taking shape under his guidance.
Besides sandpaper and other pol-
ishing materials, those three pieces
are all the tools he uses.

He is so accustomed to giving
wood light handling that even
the cigarettes he smokes are held
as though they were eggs. Little
boys know him as the toy-boat
maker. Years ago they liked him
better than nowadays, for then he
was not so strictly professional as
ne is now.

Far into the night you may see
; Smarty Kirton’s lamp burning at
his home at Bank Hall, for it is
at night when it is quiet that Kir-
ton carves better. He ean carve
a three inch tall toy of a policeman
in a pose of regulating traffic in
45 minutes and after it is var-
nished he charges 36 cents for it.

He sells to some city stores. He
does not normally sell them by
| retail.

At Christmas time life goes well

ORIENTAL
GOooDs

From INDIA, CHINA,
EGYPT !

Silk, Curios, Brassware,

Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak-

wood, Sandals, French Per-

fumes, Barbados Scarves in

Pure Silk, Etc., Etc., Etc.
The Souvenir Headquarters

THANI Kros.

KASHMERE
Pr. Wm. Henry 8t.—Diul 5466



-———







==







[0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Whittaker’s Almanack,
1951



| Pint, 14 Pint and Cocktail |
| Glasces



JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

&!
Sl

Hy HAN

THIS NEW GENERATOR cost over £30,000.

es

nee



Another generator is expected shortly.



THE GENERATORS are controlled from the Main Switchboard. The driver in the picture is turning

off one of the generators.



BOYS’ CLUB FOUNDER
ARRIVES NEXT MONTH

MR. BASIL HENRIQUES, C.B.E., J.P.,

is expected to

arrive here March 2nd, to lecture on Juvenile Delinquency
and Youth Welfare, under the auspices of the British Coun-

end,
other,
age groups, between these two age
groups.

The Settlement
world

3,000 members and catered
them from birth to death,
there was a Play Centre at one
and a Burial Society at the

and clubs, according

has

renowned, and

a and B.G,

in that

become
is visited
by social workers from all parts
of the Commonwealth
foreign countries.

and other

velopment Committee. His book,
“Club Leadership” is considered
the handbook for all club leaders.

Mr. Henriques has sat in the
Juvenile Court for 26 years, and
has been Chairman of the East
London Juvenile Court for 11
years.

He was sent by the Home Office
to speak on juvenile delinquency
in America in 1943, He took ithe
part of the Magistrate in the film
“Children on Trial”.

Mr. Henriques was pupil and



with Smarty Kirton, he told the
Advocate yesterday for it is then
that little children tell their
mothers, “Ma, I like that toy sol-
dier in that glass case,"’ more often
than usual,

He knows when a boat will ar-
rive and how many tourists it will
bring. He keeps himself well in-
formed for the tourists are the
people who buy most of his good
The big moments of his life ar«
when he may be standing in a
store, and hears a tourist exclaim,
“Oh, isn’t it nicely carved?” as
they often do.
is just the chuckling Smarty Kir
ton in the background.




10,

At such times he

before coming here.



Mr, BASIL HENRIQUES

very great friend of Claude
Montefiore, and he is Vice Presi-
dent of the World Union for
Progressive Judaism. He and
Mrs. Henriques founded the St
George’s Settlement Synagogue
in what was the “Ghetto” of
East London. He is also founder
and Chairman of the Jewish Fel-
lowship, which stands to uphold
that the Jews are a religious com-
munity, and not a national politi-
cal group,





‘Nieuw Amsterdam’
To Bring 700
Tourists

THE 700 tourists coming to
Barbados to-day from the U.S.A,
by the tourist liner © Nieuw
Amsterdam will find Bridgetown
shut off to the buyer, but will
still be able to do a little window
shopping.

Nevertheless, during their short
stay in Barbados, they will find a





number of surprises awaiting
them.
They will first be greeted by

the Barbados Publicity Committee
who have a good stock of curios
stamps, cards and envelopes to
offer them in exchange for their
American dollars, At this bureau
they will also be able to get
British currency in exchange for
American currency.

Leaving the Publicity Commit-
tee, the tourists will find curio
and fruit sellers who have spe
cially kept: their baskets
meet them, and_ shining
will take them to the beauty
of the island.

full t
taxit
spot

Sunday will not interfere with
those who prefer to spend the
day sea-bathing, relaxing over a
drink at a cafe or restaurant, o:
taking a Barbadian lunch

A country tour, with visits t
some historic paris of the
island, has been arranged for over

200 of the tourists by Mr. U. J
Parravicino.

the tourists
Cathedral

Perhaps some of
will take service at the

or other churches of the island
The Nieuw Amsterdam sails
from Jarbados during the

evening.





‘Devonshire’ Leaves Barbados To-night

H.M.S. Devonshire leaves Bar-
bados to-night at 9 o'clock for
Antigua after spending a “most
enjoyable” stay here.

Those cadets and officers who
were privileged ta come ashore
yesterday made most of the day
they were spending on an island
which they were sorry to leaye so

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equipped with engines

SANDERSON FURNISHING
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PAGE EIGHT “

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





American Horticulturist Improves Tomatoes

-. Dr A. F. Yeager of the
Experiment Station of the
',University of New Hampshire
has bred early-ripening toma-
tees. for the short summer

season of northern

‘growing :
- omic in the United

» By WILLIAM GILMAN

; Nature Magazine
*During World War II an Ameri-
¢im woman living in a large city
wanted to.do her bit by raising a

le Victory Garden; but she was
af Invalid, ‘Her request was for
a» practical. vegetable that she
eould grow in the windowbox of
her apartment.

‘That problem was Dr. A. F.
Yeager's specialty. The skilled
American plant-breeder crossed
two tomato varieties— smallish
Dwarf Champion with extremely
early Redskin—and produced a
new hybrid. It was a tomato
large enough for slicing, yet grow-
ing on plants that need to be only
eke inches apart,

Dr. Yeager and his colleagues at
the University of New Hampshire
Experiment Station in the north-
egstern. section of the United
States have originated so many
varieties of fruits, berries, and
vegetables that he sometimes has
to puzzle about new names for
them, This time, there was no
difficulty. With a chuckle, he
christened the new tomato
“Windowbox.” And it has become
a useful new variety.

Difficult Time
The ordinary gardener is in-

_4 clined to take the tomato, symbol

’

oi juicy garden freshness, for
granted.. Actually, the tomato
has had a difficult time, Like the

tato, it was originally without

onour in its native hemisphere.
Both originated in the New World;
both had to go to Europe and win
popularity there, before returning
across the Atlantic to become
standard American foods. As
Zecently as a century ago, the
tomato was still an object of
suspicion, Some called it the
“love apple”, and wanted no part
of it.. Others considered it pois-
cnous-

Glance through the pages of
any present-day American seed
catalogue, and it is obvious how far
the tomato has come. But not
far enough, in the belief of Dr.
Yeager, who heads the Horticul-
ture Department’ of the University
at New Hampshire, Here for 11
years, and. during 20 preceding
years while he was experimenting
at state agriculture colleges of

Dakota, Pennsylvania, and
higan, he has been pursuing
the perfect variety.

Mueh of this research has been
aimed at making the tomato better
adapted to shott growing seasons
fn the cold northern States. In
this, Dr. Yeager has been a good
example of the scientist who will
net be satisfied. At North
Dakota ultural College, when
he gave the Great Plains States
their quick-maturing, hardy Bison
variety, he thought he would drop
tematoe work’ But ‘he could not:
aud went on to put the Victor
variety into 8éed catalogues. It was
en All-American prize-winner,
and remains a standard among
earliest tomatoes.

Not Satisfied

But Dr. Ye could not be
satisfied with these honours. His
fav is a new variety
which wished somebody

for he
would donate an ap ate
name, Ite fruit is mot only larger
‘than. Victor; it ripens a week or
more earliér-

“Some' people raise tomatoes,”
another horticulturist once said.
“Yeager races them,”

But ripening speed is not all.
Another ‘highly important project
is to raise tomatoes full of Vita-
min C, and thereby make them
rival oranges'as a mealtime juice,
Thanks to help from a_ grape-
sized Peruvian tomato, Dr. Yea-
ger already has normal-looking
varieties containing two and three
times as much this precious
vitamin as do ordinary tomatoes.
All this, obviously, is plant breed-
ing with a ‘purpose, to provide
healthier, more appetizing menus
for the northerner, whose gar-
den and orchard must face
spring’s -frosts and autumn's
early ones: ~

Tomatoes are only one example
of both the motive and method-
Yeager originated the now-stan-
dard Buttercup variety of squash
4o give northerners a meal-sized
ype equivalent im nutrition,

itamin A, and cooking methods
te the sweet potato of the Ameri-
can South. From bya . an
gone on to produce Bush Butter-
cup and, most recently, Baby
oo oes aiee Hubbard, Tt sets
tencup ue Hubbard. It sets
its meal-sized squash at the vine’s
stem, instead of first taking time
te grow ten or twelve feet before
Producisig female blossoms, And
his “perfect flowering” muskmel-
‘om, with self-pollinating blos-



DR. A. F. YEAGER, American horticulturist working with the
University of New Hampshire, in the northeast section of the United
States, kneels beside a vine of the latest tomato he has originated,
which is exceptionally rich in Vitamin C. In his hands are the new-
comer’s ancestors, ordinary tomatoes that were crossed with tiny,

greenish-white Pernvian ones.



soms possessing both pistils and
stamens, similarly shorten the
time required for ripening fruit.

Not Fit To Eat

When Dr. Yeager went to New
Hampshire in 1938, a farmer an-
swered a question with the reply,
“Yes, we can raise inelons, but
they are not fit to eat.” The horti-
culturist went to work to cure
that situation. Eight years later,
he introduced Granite State, a
firm, excellent-tasting muskmel-
on that grows fast enough for
the short summers im the north-
eastern section of the United
States. In 1949, he produced a
watermelon that ripens more
quickly than his muskmelons —
and promptly set out to get a
muskmelon that would beat the
watermelon,

Much of this breeding haw in-
corporated Dr. Yeager’s favourite
strategy — less vine or foliage,

smaHer but quicker fruit. An
extreme example is the New
Hampshire Midget, the cante-
joupe-sized watermelon that
ripens around 65 days from seed.

Tt is large enough for two serv-
ings. In modern days of crowded
refrigerators and small families,

this convenient size is a virtue.

In his many prajects Dr. Yea-
ger is helped by graduate stu-
cents who soon catch his infee-

tious enthusiasm and dovetail his
work with that of talented col-
Jeagues. Dr. Yeager’s new asso-
ciate is E. M. Meader, who was a
horticulturist with the U.S. Army
in Korea and brought back 150
varieties of shrubs, | vegetables,

and fruits, many of which had
never been seen before in the
United States,
Best Varieties
Most of the research follows

the pattern that has governed Dr.
Yeager’s career. As he puts it:
“We search for the best varieties
that exist and then, if possible,
improve them.” With co-operation
from the U.S. Department of
Agriculture’s plant explorers, Dr.
Yeager is able to search all over
the world — Turkey, Siberia,
Japan, India, South America —
for the seeds and cuttings he
wants to try in breeding work.

It takes time, sometimes years
of patient crossbreeding and se-
lection, for worthwhile results,
but Dr, Yeager has tricks of the
trade that often reduce labour
considerably. In tomato work,
for instance, he cuts time one-
third by raising three crops a
year — two under glass and one
outdoors. Even before a peach pit
has sprouted, he can examine its
interior and decide whether he
wants the color of the fruit that
the tree would produce. From first
leaves put out by a seedling, he











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went to New Hampshire. It start-
ed by crossing a greenhouse vari-
ety with a wild tomato from
Peru. The latter was a sweet,
greenish-white fruit only one
inch in diameter. But Dr. Yeager
knew that this grape-like vari-
ety’s Vitamin C content was four
umes that of ordinary tomatoes.
From several hundred matings,
many fruits were set. But the sum
total of all that work was only
one, Solitary hybrid seed, It was
this lone freak that Dr. Yeager
planted nervously: Luckily, it was
fertile, ang it ced enough
fruit for a sizable second genera-
tion. This enabled the long job
of more crossings and selection
of best y to get underway.
Gradually, Dr. Yeager built size,
quality, and colour into the new-
comers,
Introduction

In 1948, he was ready with his
first introduction. It is called
High C. In addition to the vita-
min feature, it has determinate
growth for early ripening: It is
round, red, very firm, but some-
what small — about five fruits
to the pound. Highly productive
in an average growing season,
its Vitamin C content runs es
ly double that of standards like
Victor and Marglobe. In 1949,
Yeager finished work on a vari-
ety he is calling New Hampshire
No. 50 umtil a good name is
found, This indeterminate vari-
ety is later bing oye 8 than High

C, but superior in er respects,
Along with. increased size, its
Vitamin C content approaches

tnree times normal.
Dr. Yeager prediets that such
tomatoes will become standard
varieties within ten years. Along
with such serious work, however,
he finds time for novelties. One
originated in a project under-
taken by a class in plant breed-
ing. The idea was to see how
small a tomato plant could be
produced that would mature
fruit. A cross was made between
Windowbox and Red Currant.
This variety produces cherry-
sized tomatoes nicely while grow-
ing in a three-and one-half-inch
flower pot. Yeager does not like
to have an unusual variety go to
can tell what color its beans or he wondered if it might not have
woes ote aver value as an ornamental for
n he went to New Hamp- Christmas decorations. This time,

shire, he astonished a green . ‘
house labourer by sprouting 1,000 = a ope ea

tomato seedlings, then throwing ; ‘
after the little boy in the beloved
away 997 of the plants, keeping story “A Pactaueke Carol” by the

only three at blossoming time. - i
He had discovered a way to save English author Charles Dickens.

blossoms and growing space,
keeping only the plants that



would bear large enough fruit. Ma , i
By glancing at the _ blossom’s nufacturers Life
embryo, and multiplying this

Annual Report

The Manufacturers Life report
Business in Force of $1,309,000,-

Giameter by 20, he knew what
gize the ripe fruit would be.

The Public 000.

At the end, it is the public that The new business in 1950 was
judges whether a new ‘tomato $22 million greater than that writ-
will be a success or not. For in- ten in the previous year and
stance, Dr. Yeager points out, amounted to $179 million,
there is little interest in a tomato Payments made to policyholders
that is not red. Yellow ones are under their contracts totalled $22
still unusual and pink ones dis- million. and were distributed. to
tinctly unpopular, Actually, he beneficiaries and policyholders in
explains, red and pink varieties death claims, matured endow-
are brothers under the skin, The ments, annuity payments and

pink tomato’s pinkness is.due to other policy benefits, including &

$3 million in dividends to policy-
Dr. Yeager’s big work concerns hoa
. a Ss rk cone §

earlier and higher-vitamin toma- steko on We Cee Pes
toes, He got extreme earliness by Government guftranteed bonds
pioneering with “determinate” constituted 25% of Assets and cor-
varieties, of which the Victor is poration and municipal bonds
the best-known example, Here, 37%. mortgages constituted 174%
again, is the principle of reducing of Assets and preferred and com-
useless foliage growth Such vari- mon stocks 10%

eties “prune themselves.” They -
behave like true annuals, reach-
ing a certain height, and
stopping growth, As a
they bear fruit earlier and
sprawling habits, they do

a transparent skin.

The rate of interest earned on

then the Assets was 4.22%, an increase
result, over the previous year’s rate of
lack 4.02%, the increase being due to
not the cumulative effect of change in
need staking. The work with the distribution of invested Assets.
high-vitamin tomatoes not only The mortality experience was
has looming economic importance, very favourable and Contigency
but illustrates the large amount Reserve and Surplus now amount
vot patient breeding that can ac- to $25,600,000, The local agents
cumulate in the background be- for the Manufacturers Life Insur-
fore a new variety reaches its ance Co., are W. S, Monroe & Co:
debut. Many crossings result in Ltd. the Chief representative is

what Dr. Yeager calls his Mr. Peter DeVerteville and the
“mules” — hybrids that do not well known cricketer Mr. Cly
reproduce, "| Walcott is an agent. ’



Vital To Health
In the, past the American Medi- MISSING

cal Association has classed toma- i

to juice far below orange juice in vere pide incmcaan tae
vitamin C content: This is the peared last year. The problem of
vitamin known chemically as as- where they have gone is worrying
corbic acid, and is vital to health. the French authorities. It is be-
After 11 years, Yeager has now lieved some seek to avoid con-
created tomatoes with Vitamin C seription by losing their own
content that rivals that of citrus identity. Others are misanthropes
fruits, and is retained in the can- who renounce society and seek re-
ned product. Amount of sunlight fuge in unknown hiding places,
produces variations, but, in gen-
eval, standard tomatoes contain
around 20 milligrams of this vita-
min per 100 grams. The new vari-

eties run up to three times ‘this

amount, and have even reached eospenmes, We eee Sl eae
30 milligrams of Vitamin C per kicked with such force that when
es tat 5 the boy stopped it with his chest
2 ig vitamin ‘pioneering began jt crushed Wis ribs, and he died
in 1988, shortly after Dr. Yeager instantaneously.

KILLED
MADRID.
A 16-year-old boy, playing at



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SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND

}
i

A GENERAL

‘SPEAK



{ say tke Government's conscription
policy sineo 1845 has failed .

We need Z-men to pull ‘83 out |

By Lieut. Gen, .
SIR GIFFARD MARTEL ‘

THE WHOLE WORLD is aghast
at the lack of decision and action
by the Western nations of Europe
at this time of great peril.

Tf. this indecision is prolonged,
Western civilization | be lost
for a long time and perhaps for-
ever.

Action is needed in ways.
One of the most important is the
raising of the mecessary. land
forces. But let me say straight
away that it is all nonsense to
of recalling the bulk, or even a
very large proportion, of the Class
Z reservists.

Between the two world wars
many of us preached that the
British should produce a nly
trained army of limited size whic
should make full use of mobility
and armour.

The proposal was that the
Frengh should produce the larger
man-power which would

hold defensive positions at times

and provide a pivot for the arm-

oured forces and guard dpe bases.
German Copy

ALTHOUGH we worked out the
whole idea we never made our
Army into a striking force of this
nature, but the Germans copied all
our ideas and raised those -mag-
nificent Panzer forces which were
the finest mobile forces that the
world had ever seen.

With these forces, Germany
overran Poland in a fortnight,
France in a month, and nearly an-
nihilated the Russian army in
1941. ;

If we had taken this good advice
and, raised a mobile armoured

army we would probably have
been able to counter the German
Panzers and save France. The

whole course of the war would
have been changed.

Did we not see exactly the same
position arising again after the
Second World War?

The Russians had a great man-
power army and were errified of
being attacked by mobile arm-
oured forces of the panzer t
which caused ther such frightful
easualties in 1941.

Towards the end of the war,
when I was on their battlefield, a
Russian general told me that it
would be a long time before they
could rid their minds of this ter-
vible. fear. "
Tofkgain the advice was given that
we should concentrate on raising
these mobile forces with the U.S.A.
ariek let France with her larger
man-power army carry out most
of the defensive role.

Conscript Waste

THIS advice could have been
earried out quite easily. We had
reat numbers of cruiser tanks of
he Cromwell and Sherman types
which were just what we wanted
for this role. But this time we did
even worse than between the wars
for we changed our well-trained
army into a large man-power con-
script affair. j

For the money that we were
spending we could easily have had
the necessary regulars which are
essential as a basis for well-
trained mobile forces.

If the Western nations had
maintained 20 such divisions after
the war instead of turning to a
man-power army we would soon
have been able to talk to Russia
from strength and many of our
world-wide problems might al-
ready have been solved.



AFTER-DINNER
MISERY?



When gastric discomfort, head-
ache, a “sickish” fecling, follow
vet - eating, take Alka-Seltzer
right away. Drop one or two tab-
lets into a glass of water. Watch
it sparkle into a refreshing solu-
tion — then drink it, Repeat — if
yecessary — for continued relief.
Combining alkaline ingredients
for neutfalizing excess gastric
acidity with an analgesic for
“dothing headache, Alka-Seltzer
actstwo ways to check discomfort.

‘Pleasant-tasting Alka-Seltzer con-
tains no laxative, may be taken
any time. Keep a supply on hand
‘always!

Sep Alka-Seltzer helps
if millions daily

a) Tubeso?
cell? 12& Cotablets
es 2

Alka Seltzer

ere at eee eo Gee











Why did we fail to follow
this advice for a second time?
Was it due to polities? If so,
why did not our military leaders
stand out against the mass con-
scription policy that was adopt-
They were nearly all

HAVING missed this great op-
rtunity what should we do to-
jay? here are those who say
that as Russia now has large num-

x bers of Stalin tanks we would no

longer be able to raise havoc be-
hind the enemy lines with our
mobile armoured forces.

That is not true, The Russian
army is still mainly horse drawn.
So long as our forces are really
mobile they will be able to evade
these heavy tanks with ease and
carry out their task.

The Western nations must
therefore raise 20 first-class
armoured divisions supported

air force. In addi-
need a number of
visions from Europe

whieh will form the most vital
component of the Western nations
land ‘ek

we

are we not acting in this
conv ae are we not making a
full drive for munitions produc-

course,
must have a proportion of trained
men,

Why has not the true state of
affairs been explained to the
people?

Is it that the Government can-
not bear the exposure of one more
failure? For it is clear that the
conscription system since 1945 has
failed to produce the skilled men
that Class Z can provide.

Never before has our Army bee!t
in a worse state for the task that
lies ahead. No one will admit his
mistakes.

There is still talk of using heavy
tanks with our armoured forces.
These are wanted for position war-
fare but not for our mobile forces.

I am probably the only officer
who has discussed with the Rus-~
sians those mobile operations on
their front which were carried out
on a far greater scale than any-
thing which happened on the
Western Front.

Three To One

REAL mobility is essential for
this task, and that means really
mobile tanks,

It is no use trying to meet the
Russian threat in any other way.

We cannot take them on with a
man-power army for they will
outnumber us by at least three to
one.

On the other hand, if we raise
these mobile forces I do not be-
lieve that the Russians will dare
to advance against us,

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED.

L.E.S.


















SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1951
A

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40?

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PHYLLOSAN

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You may well ask why we permit our scientists to do anything
sO foolhardy. But the plain answer is that we have to do it to
satisfy ourselves that even after prolonged storage; REGENT .
will not form gum to stick valves and clog fuel systems.

The tests which consist.of boiling samples under 100 tb. per
8q. inch oxygen pressure in “bombs”’, are quitesafe. Wehhve _,
never lost a sci¢ntist—or for that matter—a customer becquse
of a sticky valve. This test is one of many which guarantee the

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a



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY

Motorists in the United
States enjoy motion pictures
and moonlight at the same
time from the comfortable
seats of their own automo.
biles by patronizing. the out-
door theatres which are alter-
ing the habits and landscapes
of many communities.

By MARGUERITE W.
: CULLMAN
From The Ni
Motoring ‘th
countryside of Europe, the impos-
ing outline of a great cathedral

ahead of the graceful Spires of a
smaller thurch usually -are -the

York Times Magazine

proaching a town, Driving through
America — especially the
southern arid western sections—
a less romantic symbol of the town
to come is often the great, blank,
precise rectangle of the elevated
screen, signature. of the outdoor
motion picture theatre.

The first outdoor motion picture
or “drive-in” was built near Cam..
den, in the eastern seaboard
State of New Jersey, in 1933, and
within a few years duplic tes
were scattered all over the United
States. These early outdoor mo-
tion picture theatres rarely ae-
commodated more than 100 auto-
mobiles and were likely to resem-
ble an enclosed..cow pasture,
motorized, The outbreak of World
War II halted the number : of
theatres at 160, but when build~
ing was resumed after the war
more elaborate versions” ~ were
built and the number leaped in
1948 to 800. Now, according to
latest figures, over 2,100 (more
than 10 per cent of the number
of conventional, enclosed motion
picture houses) dot the landscapes
0! 48 States. At capacity attend-
unce that would mean an audience
of 1,453 in each of the 2,100 drive-
ins, or normally 3,000,000 people
gathering at sunset for the first
show, with an equal number -re-
placing them for the second per-
formance, making a total of 6,-
000,000 people a night,

Similar

No two of these American out-
door theatres are identical, but in
general they follow a_ similar
pattern. The amount of land in-
volved is considerable, with a
basic requirement of at least ten
acres to.enter for every 500 auto-
mobiles. This is necessary to allow
cars to enter through a toll gate,
circulate in the theatre, and exit
by a different route. The entire
area must be paved, or at least
finished with: a hard surface.
Ramps are laid out in a semicir-
cle from a point in front of the
screen and are spaced about 25
feet apart to leave an aisle be-
tween. These ramps form a series
of tilted terraces facing the screen,
so that thé passengers can sit back
and look upward as they do in a
conventional theatre,

Sound is brought to the cars
parked along these -ramps by a
network of wires laid under the
paving, with each wire terminat-
ing in a speaker post. Each post
has a pair of speakers which re-
semble portable microphones and
are equipped with separate volume
control to serve the two cars on the
right and left, Although the area
must be reasonably Plark to show
the pictures, outdoof- theatres can
not be blacked out. By putting
blue and amber lights on high
poles toward the back of the
theatre a sort of artificial moon-
light is provided. Rest rooms and
refreshment stands usually are
located in a low building some-

, where toward the center of the-southern - State
area. As receipts from the ‘sale of-
| réfreshments
“much as 50 per cent of the entire

often provide as
income of the theatre, ample and
attractive space, is.,allotted. Most
f the theatres have small carts
hich are pushed around the

ie “ramps during the show, offering

easy car-side service. e rest of

the theatre, its general decor and

location is purely individual and
varies from the most modest little
construction, handling no more
than 200 cars, to the most’ de luxe
jandsciped affair with ponds of
Jakes and accommodations for as
many as 2,000 cars,

_ New Sources

Owners.and sponsors of the out-
door theatres in the United States
feel that in three-quarters 6f their
patrons they have tapped hitherto
non-motion—picture patrons. The
majority of the patrons admit that
the films are generally older and
often less desirable. than those
offered at a more gonveniently
located, conventional, enclosed
_motion picture house. And yet,
they cheerfully will take a longer



-

x

il,

hrough much of the |

first indication that you are ap-

To Mothers !!

1951

trip to see a less appealing
and pay more,money. T|
ple who do this inelude,

show;
peo-

Married couples with one or

mere young children whom they
cannot leave with anyone. It is
not at all unusual to see infants

in- the back of ‘ears, and
most of the theatres include a
warming “service, Two

and three-year-olds sometimes
are
and

provid ‘ with an adequate
supper from the refreshment
stand, }

standing in line. This is especial-

ly true of people who, owing

ight along in, pajamas
ied down on the back
Seat. Plder children may be

Elderly, infirm or physically
handicapped people who cannot
cope with. crowds, jostling, or



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



to an accident, may be tem-
porarily obliged to use a wheel

chair, crutches or a cane,

People who are extremely
health-concious, Despite the fact

that sitting in a car provides no
more fresh air than sitting at.

home next to an open window,
a surprising number of people
look upon outdoor theatres as
healthful recreation, Others, who
fear to expose their children og
themselves to local epidemics

own, cars,

Obviously, any time this nurn-

r of cars join in a common
meeting place there is bound to
be a certain amount of congestion.
But this is the sort of problem
encountered in varying degrees
at college and municipal stadiums

all over the nation. A number of+

States have endeavoured to meet
the problem locally by writing
rules governing drive-ins inte
their building codes in an effort
to establish a ‘standard for con-
struction and location.

Free Service

One well-known outdoor
theatre chain’s list of instructions
to its managers urges them to
“watch for elderly patrons and
offer to park their cars or perform:
other services for them . . give
free gasoline to run car heaters
in cold weather . give the
utmost in service at all times,
including such little courtesies a3
changing tires and _ supplying
emergéncy gasoline to cars.”

Until recéntly, outdoor theatres
have had to be content with
either the oldest or the least
desirable motion pictures on the
market, But with their rapid
growth and increased strength
they are beginning to demand,
and to get, better products. The
motion picture companies have
begun to realize that outdoor
theatres not only represent 10
per cent of their domestic market
but that they are an ever-increas—
ing potential market. They are
beginning to take seriously the
Claims of the operators who say
that, far. from merely taking
away from the established indoor
film trade, they are creating a
new audience.

The enclosed theatre seems to
be gravitating away from the
enormous downtown “hall” or
“palace” (withs the attendant
parking problems) to the smaller,
modern building in decentralized
locations. ..Conversely, the -out-
door theatre, which has no park-
ing problems, shows a tendency

to larger places’ with © their
resultant greater facilities. In-
deed, they often develop ~ to
amazing and giddy heights in
their fancies. One in Miami in the

ef Florida is

called “a theatre in a garden” and
is equipped with exotic palm
trees, flowering shrubs and a
hanging .garden (back of the
screen tower) with tropical
flowers and vines. °

Some of the outdoor theatres
report that new heating units will
prolong the time they can stay
open, in some cases moving them
into~>the- all-year-round-~ class.
Experiments are going on to
develop a “recessed, movable
screen in a shadow box arrange-
ment. This might make possible
a late afternoon matinee with the
screen set at the extreme rear of
the housing and visibility limited
to the center sections of the
ramps. As daylight faded the
screen “could move _ forward
slowly until with total darkness
it reached the front of the shadow
box, thus increasing its visibility
until reaching total capacity.

“Drive-ins” may not represent
the sophisticated urbanite’s idea
of a glamorous evening, but they
have captured the fancy — and
the steady trade—of millions of
Americans.

a



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feel safe in the privacy of their §







THREE MURALS have

building at Coolidge Field which is being converted into \
They have been painted by three of

a waiting room,

(Advocate Correspondent)

ST. JOHN’S.
been painted on the walls of a

Antigua’s young artists Arnold Prince, Garner Francis and

Cecil Adams and the subject
of the island.

The paintings reproduced above
were taken by Mr. Risely Tucker,
British Council Representative in
the Eastern Caribbean,

Prince’s picture is a quiet
street scene where two or _ three
women are gathered together

having a chat. There is no other
object on the street but a small
boy walking on the opposite side
towards the waterfront. From
deep to light shades of blue is the
colour used and Prince has suc-
ceeded in demonstrating the
peace of .one of Antigua’s main
streets with its buildings. and
overhanging galleries. A perfectly
straight wide street to the wharf
with no traffic or even a parked
car on it.

Francis’ painting is a colourful
street scene where a woman with
a tray of fruit including bananas
and pineapples is on her way to
the market. A lad. is following
her carrying a large bunch of
bananas on his shoulder. Cactus
is in the foregrgund and goats
on the dry pasture in the back-
ground,

Adams’ work on the opposite”

wall catches the eye as soon as
you enter the room. His is a
beautiful tropical seascape, In a
crisp choppy sea a man is putting
to sea in a small boat with his
fishpot. There is a stretch of
beach and a background of hills

Both Prince and Francis have









e

4 5:65 OOOO 9 SSP O SOO PI PPP SOOO FOE

FOS

s chosen are all typical scenes

visited Barbados and ¢xhibited
their paintings here.

MISSING FIGURES

The difference between two
consecutive “odd numbers is of
course, two. The sum of the square
of thesqgtwo numbers is 650. How
quicklyâ„¢ can you find the two
niissing numbers?



“Ud9}0UTU puke UVEzUeAeg :NOLLA'TOS



CAME PREPARED

TORQUAY, England
A boy here took his pet pigeon
on his first day at a new school,
At lunch recess the boy tried a
school meal but didn’t finish it.
He released the pigeon with the
message; “Don’t. like the stew,

Coming home”,
—Can. Press.

‘



BIRTHDAY GREETINGS

Happy birthday fo Marina Nicholls
who celebrates her birthday this week,

May you have a jolly time.

ITCHING
INFLAMED

Â¥



Distributors :

F.B.Armstrong Ltd., Bridgetowr

PRESCRIPTION



Outdoor Motion Picture ANT/GUANS DECORATE DART W
Theatreain The U.S. 42? ORT WAITING ROOM

THE OBJECT in DARTWORDS
is to arrange all the 50 words
shown in the circle in such a way
thas they lead logically from MAY
to MAXWELTON: The relation-
ship between two successive words
must be governed by ONE of the
following six rules, and no rule
may be invoked more than twice
consecutively .

1. A word may be an anagram
of the word that precedes it.

2. AIT may be a synonym of

* the word that precedes it

It may be achieved by add-
ing one letter to, subtracting one
letter from, or changing one letter

NUMBER ENIGMA

VP
MRE
DOABLE

DERIVE our common

mathematical digits from

the Arabs. The figures were in

common use in the Middle Rast

for eenturies before they re-

placed Roman numerals in the
West.

An ancient tomb in India, iden-
tified as that of a potentate, is
said to have bovne a group of
figures arranged o5 above, and
it is a legend that the figures
represented the age of the man
who was buried there. Certainly,
there is a method to the arrange-
ment that attains a result unlike-
ly to have been produced by ac»
cident. .

Perhaps by studying it, you
can determine what. that result
is or, if it does represent the
ruler’s age at death, what his
age was,

‘TVBeP It dieINe}od oy Jo oFe
ou) SBM Fe JEU) OUNsTY UO OM ‘sOLOET
‘bE OF ppy ORE‘ efoys eyR UWI sa9q
una jusovfpe anoy jo dnoris Auw ‘o#yy

eee, olive Ou) ee Ayleuosyyp pow
i abe oy *
oseur uv

AYTBOlOA MO’ YOrM ‘ouunbs
Rupert and





uuoz sandy op Keay



Scampering home, Ruper: shows
his sketch and tells his story again.
Next morning he starts out to see
«his pal is better, and to his
amazement the first pérson he meets
is@pPodgy himself striding along
stutdily, ** Tt. was jolly good of you
to’ look after Rosalie yesterday,"’
says the litthe pig. She's too much

ALPHABET CONUNDRUMS

What two letters of the alphabet
have nothing between them?
ula) ueMIeq

MAMSNV





fuyjem ooaey 6d pur ON

What word of three letters can

be spelled with two letters and
spoken with one letter.

093 p4ow
ayy ose 969 PioM OUL “WEMSNY

to



By

FACE POWDER

TALC COLD CREAM

‘BOOTH

Qe









73
iS
x
<
?

in the’preceding word.

IT may be associated with
the previous word in a saying,
simile, metaphor, or association of
ideas ‘

5 IT may form with the pre-
ceding word the name of a well-
known person or place in fact or
fiction

6 IT may be associated with
the preceding word in the title
er action of a book, play or other
composition.

A typical succession of words
might be: Turnip—Turpin—Dick
— Dock —Lock -—-Stock —Barrel
— Barred — Marred — Spoiled —

Despoil,
—LES.

Children’s Letter

Dear Children,

Thanks for your letters last
week but there are still some of
you from whom I haven't heard
for quite a long time, and I shoula
be very glad to hear from you.

Peggy Dean and Erin Jones
have reached the age where they
can no longer be members of our
children’s league; I should like
them to know how nice it was
to have had them among us and
it is with regret we wish them
goodbye. Good luck to you, both
and all the best in the future.

Those of you who are Scouts,
Guides ang Brownies I am sure
will have quite a. lot to tell me
in your letters this week and I
am anxiously looking forward to
hearing from you.

I must wish you all
happy week-end,

Yours very truly,
CHILDREN’S EDITOR.

WEIGHTY MATTER

With ‘how few weights is it
possible to weigh any amount be-
tween 1 and 127 on an oldfashioned
balance scale? only whole num-
bers must be considered, What
will be the denominations of the
weights?

By the way, if a chicken weighs
two pounds plus threefourths of
its own weight, how much does
it weigh?



a very



‘spuned 4uUne
SYUROM VoxoTyo aug, ‘spunod anoj-A)xXIs
PUB OMP-ALATUR ‘U@opXIs GUB}e ‘anoz ‘Omg
‘uo 407 SYAIeM UaAeg *NOLLN'IOS





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PAGE TEN



Pr

*
t z

“ : N the stage of the London Pavilion
aa that night the spotlights burned
af Z on a lithe, loose, shiny-limbed

a generation.
London was

SESE

&,
6

excitement up to boiling-point,
Up in the

te the cheers and

intermixed wi

: ; “Shame ! ”
e That week



ce ming costume,
into

out She went. stil
in bat dress.
on to the parade
to comb her hair
in the mirror ot
a car. ’
Three _— police-
men had to clear
the crowd bejore

; &VELYN “ i
E they could arrest
nm /— her, charged with
B

PEPE SERRE USES 5G

<
»



BEBE S

She was. fe-
méanded. in. cus-
tody for a medi-
cal report...
~ It was nigh-summer, 1923 It
wes the startfor Cochran and
‘tor Engiand—of.a Year of
Change and Revélation.

{ publie exrposure.

|

a



black figure which writhéd and shimmied
—and shook the manners and modes of

: eeing Florénce Mills for the
4) frst time, and didn’t quite know how to react.
Every shake und undutation of the body
ander the scant covering of feathers. every
uctive sound from her mouth, pushed the

dregs circle. as the Mills bomb-
ll exploded into the finale of her frenetic,
roid recital. Charles Blake Cochran listened

handciaps + and ard.
them, infuriated cries of.

te Oe ennbeat. at
rr isiter§ = undresse on the
« beach, @limbed into



heard

her swim-

.

Guests
ot 1923 he had to have something acures like Bea Lillie and
violently, “sensationally mew. Not ‘Pajiu) Bankhead sat ut one
in order to make anything for table and the Negroes at the
himself put to pay off the other ’
mounwng heap of debts. “

if was the beginning of a year
in which he fought for survival.
and attempted to cash in of
everythmeg

. PROMISE

—of new wonders .

T wasa mement when
British




from the peerage,

Britain gasped at this new
kind of fraternisation, and: it was
another two years before they had
digested the
change enough
to welcome jo
Mills and
company back
egain—and give
them the rap-

SUNDAY ADYOCATE ~





While it lasted. If England had
eBasped ‘at Negroes, ic gogeled at
the crew of whooping cowboys
and cowgirls who swarmed into
London, As the Daily Express
said :—

“The cowgirls

nt who are all
beautiful. a

ear at luncheon in
afternoon resses and pink
beucoir caps, All wear immense
diamond and platinum rings, and
one girl shocked everuone by
actualiy saunte;ing toe the bath-
room in black silk pyjamas. ‘

" The greatest sensation today

was when Mrs. Buck Lucas
appeared in a ‘ of men’s blue
trousers ! The cowgirls are

forward and rouge io excess,
while their mentolk are bronzed
and ojten unshaven.”

They went into the ring at

= ‘THE DUNS

—at his heels tanta Of Change

OR 2 years the Life was full and cheap

FPoene of C. B. Coco» —and rich Im promise of new

avenrds ran nad been growing wonders to come. Ineome tax
oowebigger and bigger in the minds 48. 6d. in the & You could
- ot British public as a show. buy a sportS coat for 17s. 6d.,
srs a pair of shoes for five bob.

an,

By 1923 ne nad got nimselt
ralmost a supreme reputation as
the nation’s arbiter of entertain-

& pram for £3. You could hear
the B.B.C. on your crystal. set
oe a 100-mile range.

ment. He was ucknowledged as ad in the homes, women were
@ master of talent-spotting and ‘beginning to unlace their stays,
Star-making. shorten, theit hair, and go out

Already tucked under nis for thejr first adventure with
*mpresario’s wing, he Had such unrestricted, ibited.
‘Money-makers a5 Beutrice Lillie, emanc un, but with a
Alice Delysia. Jack Buchanan. Certain timidity too. They were
Dorothy Dickson, the Dolly not yet the bold hussies of the

Anna later ‘20's,

Sisters. Evelyn maye.
Fapoce i ane at orndike, And
t the c not, ‘know ipeeaat that som

was that the duns were biting at the old prekuctipes y ich he
his heels—and he had | few was stamping tu round and
Moneyed friends to nead them ‘stung him.

He found it first with Floren
Mills and com of Neg

, all
Commen mas te Rha, al

ao

Practically every show he nad




‘put on had made headlines, often singers dancers. re were
a cake peaked the | indignant outeries at his as
2. ouse, given the put coloured players on the
was. country - .some- @ as white ur

tists.
o Mills was getting £700 a
week from C.B., and he had to

thing new in
amusement—and

turous suctess
the ri paopte in
: were avid for e- 4 Blackbirds.”

+ There was the scent But. in that
of @ new-kind of ‘post-war stage of his
freedom in the air, career, the only

The people would Ee the wa Cochran
Socialist Party into or the could draw the
first time, because they wanted a masses he needed



to his box office

them and sur
prise them. After
Negro singers
and dancers,

what next ?

There was Competition specta-
cular enough to daunt the greatest

Wwinam. For, in 1924, the
mpire Exhibition opened at
Wembley.

The rain came down in a
deluge. on the white pavilions.
the great fun fair. the gadgets
wnd the sideshows. But every day
more ne 150,000 filed
into the Wembley
the prizes their Empire had to

OW.

t eould Cochran give them,
to persuade those tight-waisted,
thin - trousered. bowlér - hatted
men with umbrellas. those flat-
hested women in ‘their bulky.
onger-than-mid-calf skirts to pay
some of their money to him ?

THE RODEO

—a riot, then...

Wembley to ride their bucking
broncos and rope their steers—
and ran slap into trouble.

The R.S.P.C.A. had its eve on
the Rodeo. and decided that
there was cruelty imvolved. ‘A
steer broke a _ leg and had to be
shot, and an R.S.P.C.A. inspector
tried to get hold of the leg. There
was a fight.

The upshot was a case against
Cochran as the organiser—and
though it was as near to a circus
2s a trial will ever get in

ngland (with a witness in the
box wearing two gu on his
belt, and cowboys and cowgirls
Signing autographs outside the
court)-—-the publicity didn't do
much good for Cochran.

Though the case was dismissed,
C.B. had been vilified as a
torturer of animals.

It was, in actual fact, a sin of
which the great showman was
not guilty.

Many of his friends
sometimes
that he liked
animals better
than humans,
He once had
no compunction
in advertising for
old, grey-bearded
men to fill parts

felt





production of “The. Miracle,”
Cochran cherished them as if
they were his own children. and
never m & daily visit to
them backstage.

Not long after the Rodeo ended
the crash came.

Cochran walked into the bank-
ruptcy Cort. Oak tor ie frst
time in pu vealed sorry.
state of his affairs,

He had = tos

t thousands
pounds On ‘show after show, Ev:
hant visit
On. ~- great

the s! and triw
Of Pavlova to
success though it
was, pea tailed
to pay 10S way.
Mrs, Cochran
nad sold her
janels, . his ve-
oved pictures by
‘oulouse-Lautrec
had gone to
dealers.
havent a &
note
world,”





ALRPFOORAPEE mezeseear
m like the con-
" still lost money. ride down ‘convention to make : in one of his nd £100,000. PAVLOVA fusion that reigned in the affairs
ochran’s. her pay her way, He was a WE finally decided on a plays, get the The great a Cc, B, Tan,
backers had been stubborn man, and he was deter- Rodeo. It was new, maximum pub- Showman was
burned too often mined to have his plans go lavish. and exciting. licity by letting © his uppers.
in their bank through. So he bucked his head, It was plastered over with master a vast, doddering with nothing for "
: Yow balances, and he not for the first or last time, ip, Wet even before line of them his 25 years of
: to the against prejudice and tion. it began it was doomed not to queue outside his Work ‘his reputation— ;
“im for . a make any money. office—and then img his reputation for extrava-
his-finance, - for his coloured yers, an C.B. had to borrow so much, send them away #s4nce. l
: Their rates invited white celebrities to meet at such hi rates, that he | empty-handed. In Britain itself the sun had .
wee came high. On them. But ee didn't have goudn't Possibly profit even from .- oo Ww) ee Same eee men ena Prod
: « . nave whites a success. C > : er, e excursion trains
, DICKSON, BAR a Soa ‘Pincha ait’ votetner But it was @ memorable show. . were used in the 10 the sea were packed, At the
4 — = os wo = oo ‘ = ey os r i" -- dleailaieme
JI rate per . : ® ds sai 3
4 cent. interest
¢ ) r annum,
g * ee Thal summer
4 : , pare
; f ° asking the e Court to turn +. ’ .
e American Column: thumbs down on ra on an appeal court U.S. Atom-Bombers tebe amen
: . : 3 isi it ss Coplon was , .
: Dis Sten Sate et. To Fly Fro INLY ONE SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN
a : | A CHESTNUT COLT called THIS EXCITING FRAGRANCE
ie : Your Host, insured for a quarter N th Af . B.
te Me Blo of a million dollars, will be oper- ‘NOT rican Bases
. ay Ow 1 £. Your skin willbecooler, sweeter
g ated gn) in California tomorrew. ; eee
5 : Your Host broke his right elbow , AMERICAN heavy bombers are ms ee ee
; Cash Back in four places when fell last t@ US¢ bases in French Morocco desirably dainty from head-to-to
n A y ¥ under’ an agreement signed be- tes . + ger
; " month. Dr, James Farquarson, tw te’ US and F te. PT
; of Colsrade, will pin the broken *ween the U.S. a rance to- if, you bathe with fragrant?
a Ee 5. wan tens. \ pieces of bone’ together with a ike a aig + & sth ame
ee Penni ee ant sani ee ayy wteek pte, Caen ened wal be Casa« (Cashmere Bouquet Beauty Soap.
2 Swnhilée ericans are, still sadly blanca-Cazes and Port Lyautey. 7
A shaking their heads over President | 4 DAPPER THUG named My- Meknes, Marrakesh, and Rabat-
is Truman's latest-call for ten billion yon Selik was arrested in Brook- Sale will also be used.
© doffars ‘In taxes there came a‘faint jyn while trying to hold up a The Morocco agreement is part
ri ray of hope. cashier for 20,000 dollars ., and of the American plan for a world-
7. Br oe gv yee tripe seed aM = his cing g a pa x — air bases. Basis of
si sh trom teuc some c s in ec- Plan is:—-
Ra payments if it was valuable and tives’ memories. & 5 1, Establishment of a string
vi a storm destroyed it. f Now the Detroit police are in ef forward atom-bomber bases
ti Hundreds of thousands of anes New’ York, questioning thim about round the Russian - dominated
Â¥ icans on the cast coast were affect- the murder of Michigan. Senator central land mass of Asia and
A = the great storm in Novem- Warren ree shot to death in continental Europe but separated
ii s . . his car in f° from it by sea so that naval and
So this ruling—contained in Sec-
} } tion 23 E-3, regulation Ill of the TV AUDIENCES have been lost ee. Pe Se che aorta
% Internal Revenue Bureau's codes— in admiration at the way news-
; may¥--mean big money kept from readers apparently memorised 4," pena Bd y sre aon oe
ert “Sam. : their scripts. But the secret is }aune, that of = mecium,
*. * * out. The announcers script is og iy a at concentration
All the taxpayer has to do is simply unrolled on a_ special part of kee one
¢ prove that the gnarled old elm machine perched above the cam- 8 Snother.
; } really did stand for centuries, and era. = an Ma: © of a force of
« } that its“disappearance has affected | EVEN the dog kennels are air- @avy See capable of flying
4 | the-value of his property. _ conditioned in the Independence, °¥® as Production centres
+ -£| He must get an affidavit froni a newest ship of the American Ex- fect from America.
4 reat-estate expert, then a few port Line, . AM American medium and 7
i j sworn statements from “tree sur- aory Sears means (8 ae
‘ ‘geons, foresters, or ts, , 13it ic Command,
...ndg while .“‘photographs taken , ‘headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska.
i * immediately .after the storm are a— POPULATION INCREASE © ihe mobile ‘medium bomber

great help, ‘before-and-after’
photos are even better to sup-
port the claim.” ‘

gieind Hse

tures electrical equipment,
has mompeioned for years against

the U.S. Government because “~
she says that to deduct taxes frém
a person’s pay before he has even
rec@ivéd the pay is “straight rob-
bery”; and Judith Coplon, , the
: pretty Government girl who was

sia,

Washingtor—preparing to chal- this
le a Cotinecticut court. which pneumatique has been doubled, to
s Miss Kellems could have 35 miles an hour.
some tax money back again -— take a fast letter only 12 minutes
“wilful.” to cross Paris, one hour from
e Depattment of Justice is lover to lover.

says angrily that she is





The statistics office
naunced the European population
TWO WOMEN, vastly different, .of the Union of South Africa has
are again in America’s headlines: increased by 611,000, or 30 per
Vivien Kellems, president of a cent. in the past 14 years.
Connecticut firm that manuface total
who compared with 620,000 in pene

aim ¢@ i .

Frenah Jovers.who have always
favoured ‘the Cent raese oe pad

und il f ing for Rus- underground which carries fast
a ao eae ee majl-in Paris—heard good news



PRETORIA, South Africa
here an-

tis
a

The

population is 12,320,000



NO TEME LOST

PARIS.

#0 refuel. —LES.

ALL CONVENIENCES |
KENILWORTH, England



week, The speed. of the

for visitors to
Britain.

It will now

a central dining hall.—(CP)

~ For white teeth, use the PEROXIDE
tooth paste—use Macleans every day.



Superforts with an atom bomb
range of more than 6,000 miles.)

A luxury drive-in motor-—car
ag ‘to, be opened near here in time
the Festival of
Each cabin has its own
television set and telephone witb





































= e = ae
Engineering Opportunities
A handbook of advice and guidance to the
Best-Paid Engineering Posts which explains
the easiest way to prepare at home an “NO
Pass — NO FEE” terms for A.M1.Mech£.,
A.M.1.E.E., A.M.1.CE., CITY OF GUILDS,
ETC. Full details of hundreds of DIPLOMA
Courses in Mechanical, Electrical, Automobile,
Radio, Television. Aeronautical and Produc-
tion Engineering, Building, Plastics, Draughts-
manship, Petroleum — Technology, Forestry,
Etc, ,
To AMBITIOUS Teachers, Civil Servants,
Accountants, Reporters, etc., a Handbook en-
titled : “High Pay and .” Teachers
Lower Examination Parts 1 and 2, Cambridge
School eae, London Méatricmilation

(June 1951), Accountancy, Local Entrance
Examinati for Civil Service, Short-hand,
Book-keeping, Economics, November En-
trance Examination for S.C. 1951, Bachelor

of Commeree (Lond.) Bachelor of Science
Econ, (Lond.), etc.
Make sure e your copy of this unique book,

entirely and without obligation by
posting the coupon at once.
post Ss UPON NOW!

of (a) “ EERING OPPORTUNITIES”
Send me s copy ©" (>) “HIGH PAY AND SECURITY”
CROSS ROOK NOT WANTED
NAME . }
“ADDRESS ...............
SUBJECT. OR RKAM, .|. .cccescasdeenacsejsbawbutiacwasnes’
% The British Institute of Engineering Technology and the
x British Tutorial Institute, London. .
g address ali communications to:—Loeal Représentatives:—





“lack of paper”) loathe them. = ———)
Anyone volunteer to say a few | [J a
kind words on behalf of the men | 4 r —i aH
with the runaway pens? =| ] [——
South Africa-born Helga Moray | -ii—7——4
is hereby elected this month's | -ii--\¥7—9t am
career woman. Her first novel, | C-—*—— =
“Untamed”, puts her in the news. Fa ‘on ——_] i
Following dramatic school and a oh — =
Shakespeare tour with Sir Frank f= i
Benson, she turned buyer for a] |—i———_/
South African mins house, | 3 =
travelled Europe. Film. next, | Cig 4 fem,
FLORENCE then a 40,000-mile roundthe- |—-a-——f ged
MILLS — world trip, a
she sent the a
exrcitement up’ After living in New York, Paris, a &
to ‘voiling-point she came ‘to London, where she | [——§ — >
wrote “Untamed”. It is already | gal —#ar ae
paying dividends. A top-seller in | |——}—-R dd
ae seven __ translations, a ——
resorts bowlers ‘ paddiers nch book of the month choice, | ———¥"— i Sa —
mingled =u ae film rights bought by Hollywood. rtd al |
bathing sui the new Miss Moray is now at work on/}-+———4 ie
shortened leg. and men with two- her second book, can be seen{ |+——@ a
piece suits which were white and most days at the British Museum. | |([——J at tae
transparent wt the top, Doin, h—fro} 5 Ve j ro ia
E y ig research—from +9 to 5. =} 3
CONFUSION yithen, April brings _ Peter | >= ge ———
*. 4 oble’s biography of Ivor Novel- | (———4 pf
—not only in France & lo, added attraction will be intro- -——4 anos |
; duction by Noel Coward, Here is | -——4 ae
BP ear eee Coward on Noel and “Ivor: “For | /-——4 oe
Rain No More.” many years it has been fairly ||/-——4 po
= sane ss fashioned if generally assumed. that we aS
Velebtinn was must be fierce rivals. Acquaint-

Pp by his performance

is aim, “

A piay called “WI
red.

Was craw)

from the bishops,

England uffed at cigarettes
eae and drank beer at Po

Tt was

























x The Caribbean Educational Institute, Port~of-Spain, f
z : Trinidad, B.W.1., P.O. Box 307
PLPOSCSPS EPL EZEFEESSISES ESOS OSES SOLIS.



. & & A CHAMPAGNE SERIAL OF THE HALF-CENTURY .. begins coday...by LEONARD MOSLEY x & x)
This writhing girl shocked a generation—and shook o~
_. the fortunes of a master showman... . That’s
where the curtain goes up on— |
















SUNDAY, FEBRUARY li, 1951

... But Are|










, Hy JON HOPE


















Fe aienedaeneitcniaiiaieanel

ARE best-selling authors of re a ae]
long novels given too big a share} & i >
of hard-to-get paper supplies? Pe) is
At jeast four giant tomes will | {Biff jiz
crowd booksellers’ shelves this |-——iil -———— FF ei
year. Each may be more than = | —1
200,000 words long. On previous | }——}iig ——____—_# |
form, threes may sell 100,000 | gg =
copies each. <9 ae | i et
Paper consumed by }o0,000 ————4 4 Ih fT
— of a 200,000-wonder: 45 —— fo i a







By
PP,

Librarians frown on marathon
novels (readers. take such a long
time to wade through them);
reviewers regard them through
jaundiced eyes; tyro authors of
80,000-word efforts (remember-—
in the oft-quoted fob-off about

iit)
anes

Fee,



LIT)

co
Mtge

EIEN



cate aeeenn
Ps











ances who know neither of us
attempt to curry favour by
deprecating either me to Ivor or
net to me. They are wasting

eir time. We have, ‘of course,
a lot in common, We were both
boy sopranos and we both drink
a lot of tea. We are middle-
aged, fortunate, talented and
successful.”

World Copyright Reserved
{ —L.ES.



BRANCHING OUT
MARIOTT’S COVE. N.S.
Boat builders along Nov a-
Scotia’s South Shore have lomg
done a flourishing business, but

now it’s expanding. Three 28-
foot boats built here were loaded };
aboard a freighter at Halifax for
shipment to the Canal Zone, an
—(




ee NS PN





AERO O/Y—FINNISH AIRLINES



The flying take-off!

March 1924 and the first aircraft of Aero O/Y, Fionish Air Lines, takes off on
its maider flight. Then year by year Aero O'Y cxtends its operations until
moze than 30 million kilometres have been flown and over 300,000 passéngers
¢carried—and still the graph mounts upwards: ‘

To-day Aero O/Y have an extensive network covering the ten. principal
towns and cities of Finland, and also routes to Stoekholm, Norrkoping,

Copenhagen and Amsterdam. linking with European and world airlines

FOR AN UPWARD CURVE IN AVIATION

SUELUAMIATION SERVICE
Ge



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1i, 1951 — SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN























i RR RAN OR TS SN ES AT SIT
BY WALT DISNEY
seer serertegne a ae te ease Su-- ze 3 tats aot i ME 2 Y.°ONE WORE C\CG_E ) | GOSH «.C SNIFF)... NOW WE re NA | A TVENTION I!
WE'VE GOT TO GET OUT OF THIS Be eee: Ce... ates

.-

AVE KILLED ME&...1... 4

on { af

J sos Na
Se: Mt |

SNUFF ns

PEATHER-TREE FOREST BEFORE WE-
\\0! HOI-LAUGH OURSELVES TO DEATH!








| FACTORY MANAGERS

Taki this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :~—










GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from 4 in. upwards



Watches Saiz Valentines




from your Jewellers:



NEVER SEND A
COMMITTEE LIKE THAT
TO CONVOY A BAG OF
DOUGHNUTS HOME
SAFELY

t }
g H)

* TEEL i

‘ MILD S Calender Watches in stain- Dainty Ladies’ Watches in }
; | Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes less steel, chrome and rold many styles. 17 Jewel and }
_gol@. 17 Jewel Waterproof, 15 Jewel, in Rold Gold and

BOLTS & - NUTS—AIll Sizes shock-proof and -non-mag- ‘Chrome. »

, netic, N)
| FILTER CLOTH~White Cotton Twill : ‘ :

)

At PRICES. that cannot be repeated.












YOU WAIT IN
F OF THE BAKERY:
1 WANT TO MAKE
SURE DADDY GETS
HOME Wii THAT
DOZEN SUGAR




The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lui.

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST. MICHAEL

Y. DELIMA & CO. LTD. |

20 BROAD STREET
} DIAL 4528

a

_— . . = SASS SSR i
' f ‘ Beane : 5, BONN '





featwie:

TAKE HIM TO JAIL! WE'LL) [

f HOLD HIM, BOYS, AND
oy SEE IF GRAFTON CAN

TAKE OFF HIS
MASK



|
eats | |—_----—---

|
'
| Ka
| TOMORROW IS MY | rere AFTER THIS i WHAT DO YOU THINK MY |
BROTHER DANNY’S | OMMERCIAL- THE ||. BROTHER DANNY WOULD









MOTHER-WHAT |
IN THE WORLD |










-~BUT HOW KIN YOU







































ARE YOU SO || BIRTHDAY-I_ DON'T WESTERN GOES ON! \|| LIKE FOR HIS BIRTHDAY. | (~~~) WRAP UP A SALOON H
SERIOUS ‘) KNOW WHAT TO GET | | I WONDER IF THE | il] THAT WE COULD WRAP HUHST | AN! DELIVER IT TO
ABOUT ? HIM- MAYBE JIGGS | RUSTLERS GIT THE ||| UP AND SEND OVER TO |} KNOW | HIS HOUSE ®
a COULD SUSGEST | 1] HESD OVER THE | | | ey HIM TONIGHT ? WHAT ||
; | | BcikOER BEFORE, | 1 Go HE'D {I “OM Me ,
MIDNIGHT! | \| (45) A LiKe” |} | VO tar
| — ) 1} vi f ey
, ly ~ |i | > “
f | >
Paice fv ll AR = eee
cts eek a
Raa V7 Vaan :

























ea as

“ | ELECTRIC FANS

CALL OFF YOUR. \ ABOUT A LITTLE MAN WITH A
TRIGGER MAN, \ BIG SATCHEL ¢ I’M PSYCHIC,

I WANT TO GO SAILFISHING. .. SORRY, CHIEF...
JOE SEVEN... near

Your. BOAT'S BEEN *THE CORMORANT”
RECOMMENDED TO ME...

FOR OFFICES
roR HOMES
12” Diam. OSCILLATING
16” Diam. OSCILLATING
DESK AND WALL MOUNTING









r TEN DOLLARS ADAY ISA ) YOU NEVER GO STEPPIN’ DO
YOU, MR, SMITH 2 TEN .
: DOLLA 5 WOULDN'T BUY YOU

\
600D 3 4 el i
: — | 6a . q A LAMB CHOP IN THE es () ees
EVENIN, MR. SMITH Br : ja ] , {

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED

Tweedside Road St. Michael
Phone 4629 & 4371

|
| THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK
|














|
|
¢
JEFF FELL ASLEEP + ‘
THEY WANT TO 57 WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,
are and Associations to make the compilation of information in
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities;
religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports,
radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed
below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:
THE EDITOR,
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street. a
FORM po
eo Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Ete. .....,.... pagyteqiorensessseinns gesengeonns
meee tees ESO JEFF WAKE (.{2222.LEMME | | NOTHIN PERSONAL IN THIS MISS. ME ‘ yo
>| tips WAKE UPs? ALONE SEIN THE Aan se Me Tee argc} | EXTRA CARAG ANID WE Te | Ramee RAT ef Ek taennbetearanerininner aencannonenlie BIA Nescilssicsasbeckasiiasiinbens veces
ABOARD THE , : GOTTA TRAVEL LIGHT. Sod
ESCAPING | President or Chotirmain.....s...csssscsssssescsesesssessssseseeeserevenssnsneeneneecsssessegeestees
CONVICTS PLANE}
DIANA /:
TERRIFIED Council or Committee Memberi..i...ccscccsssccseecrssscsrenseesees Raihisiviopensss*
‘| : OO oa. casscsoisecessstencbelOesiiseis SORORITY, oc csssscesssdcisonbebon osobeveondsryetvete
} +
i Short historical account of the origin, functions and current é
|? activities : +A | eS 4
jg tu Son dG ECO eel memes! | TS LT a
} $ } f





PAGE TWELVE



CLASSIFIED ADS.

we ae:

reilitcepiticrinntentenenstineiiaininiemsnge

The
Births,
le

announcements of
Deaths. Acknow-
Memoriam noticts is

charge for
Marriages.
ents, and In



$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
ie: any number of words up to 50, and
2 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents pér word on Sundays for each
adiditional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement

abneluncements in Carib Calling ‘the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 60 and 6 cents per word for etch
edaitional word. Terms cash, Phone 2506
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

ne Eee

DIED

COX-—On February 10th,
residente Bush Hall Road, St. Michael
Simeon St. Clair Cox. His funeral
leaves the above residence at 4.15 p.m
to-de,; for the Seventh Day Adventist
Chureh, King S and thence to the
Westbury Cemete:

Nurse Olivier Cox twitow) Olivier
George and Edward ichildre
: 11,

— —

SMITH—On February 10th, 1951, at his
residence “Natts”, St. Philip. Haward
Murre!l Smith. His funeral leaves the
pbove residence at 4.45 p.m. to-day for



19f1, at his













Bt. Philip’s Church
Evelina Smith, Lisle Smith, Clarence
Daysh. 11,2.51—1n.



VEACOCK—On February 6th, in George-
town, British Guiana, Miss Agnes
Veacock formerly Matron of the Bar
Dados General Hospital 11.2,.51—1n.

10th








1951.,
Hospital. Nurse Eva
Her funeral leawes

WALDRON On
gt the General
Florence Waldron
her late residence, Brittons Cross Road
Bt. Michael, for the Seventh Day Ad
ventist Church, King Street and thence

Februar







Ro the Westbury Cemetery.
Mrs. Sheila Arthur and William
Protaine (children), Lionel Arthur
(son-in-law), Mr, and Mrs, Lisle
* — Curwen. 11.2.51—1n

Ninos
IN MEMORIAM

ITH-—-In “loving memory of our “dear
heother Margaret Catherine Smith, who
Fell asleep om February 12th 1950.

Safe in the arms of Jesus.



: tie, Syb and Mrs. Ermyn Morrison
(Daughters: Cora Lashley (Niece) |
Jackie (Grandson).

Y 11,2,51—1n

ARVILLE—In loving memory of Mr

James Marville who parted this life on
February 11th, 1950
The midnight stars
grave
’ For one we loved but could not save
For those he loved he did his best
God erent him now eternal rest

ver

shine on his

be remembered by Mrs

Eisbrocine Marville (Wife). Mr. Chester-
fieic Nurse (Son), Owen and Gloria
(Grand-Children),
> 11,2.51—1n
‘. "
. FOR SALE
‘Minimum charge week 72 cents and

cents Sundays 24 words — over 24

ords 3 cents a
ord Sundays.

word week—4 Cents a

AUTOMOTIVE
*CAR—One Vauxhall 25 hp. Six
5 new Tyres, Upholstery inv

Engine running good

deepens
Best vais condition.
inspection. 51

Dial 4514 for

“CAR—6 Cylinder, 18 H.P?. ~Vauxhali
(Weiox! in excellent condition. | Phone

MacKinnon 4739 or 2900. 11.2.1+2n.
—



‘ CARS—1936 Ford V-8 Tourer. Excellent ] Of the late Mrs.

indition. 19°) Ford V-8 Sedan Bargain
9 Morris Oxford Saloon, Low Mileage
a well cared. FORT
P RAGe LTD. Telephone 4504,
a 11.2,51~3n

CAR — Ford Prefect 1947. One owner.






















F on REN T



Minimum charge week 12 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words over 24
words B cents «a word week—4 cents a
werd Sundays.

HOUSES

BUILDING— Upstairs
Roebuck St.,
2625

of building in
opposite Country Rd. Ring
11.2.51—3





” FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast, Furhish-
ed; 3 bedrooms, _Water-mill supply,
Lighting Plant. Double carport, 2
servants’ rooms. From February 15th.

Dial 4476 28.1.51—t.f.n.



BLUE HOUSE—Lucus Street. A _ fine
business stand Immediate possession
Apply THANT -BROS. Pr. Wm. Hry St.

3466 11,2,51—3~



OUSES—Gibbs' — Beach, St
“IN-an-OUT” Suitable for couple
March. ‘Restawile"’

to December 1951.
Apply Wesley

Peter.
— from
August/Octaber
Both fully furnished.
Bayley, High Street.

10.2.51—2n






HIGH ROCK—Bathsheba.
to July. Phone 4048. 10,2.51—4n-

NEWHAVEN, Crane Coast. Furnished;
4 bedrooms, Water-mill supply, Lighting
Plant, Double Garage, 3 Servants’ Rooms.
For June, November and December:
Dial 4476, 284 .51—t.f.n.

From March





STEWARTVILLE—3 bedrooms, Draw-
ing and Dining Room, Pantry, Kitchen,
2 Servants’ Rooms, Seaside, Hastings.
Phone 3904. 8.2.51—4n
‘noenisesintdepeiapsiamecteneniatemnemessnnencssemetenenanlttil

UNFURNISHED FLAT--At Ramsgate,
Boy Street, within walking distance of
Aquatic Club and City Dial 3065.

7,2,.51—t.f.n.

—————
WINSLOW—Cattiewash, for the months
of February, ch, May and Junie,
Apply: Mrs, T, Gooding, Strong
Hope, St. Thomas. 4.2.51—3n

WENDOVER — Abbeville Gardens









Rockley to be let, furnished, » June
and July. Apply: 2861, P. D. Me te
4.2,51—3n



PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cénta per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

AUCTION

By instructions received from the
Director of Department of Highways &
Transport I will set up for sale by
public auction at their yard on Thurs-
cey the 15th, beginning at 12.30 p.m.
the following items:— (383) Steel Brooms,
(127) Oil Brooms, (75) Shovels, (51)
Agriculture Forks, (19) Pickaxes, (54)
Lanterns, (57) Rakes, (141) Buckets,
(28) Wheel Barrows, (45) Twist Drills





and several other items of interest.
DARCY A. SCOTT,
Govt. Auctioneer.
7.2.51—4n,



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Tuesday 13th and Wednesday 14th
by order of the Executors of the Will
M. E. Collymore, we
will sell the Furniture which is both

modern and antique at ‘“Dunsinane’

ROYAL | Country Road

whieh includes
Extension Dining Table (seat 12), Up-
right and Arm Chairs, Ornament Tables,
Pedestal and other Sideboards; Book

te ‘arefully driven and serviced. Telephone | C#Se (#lass doors). Card Tables (Antique),





4.2.51—3n |Corner Cabinet (glass doors); Writing

Sets Tables, Roc s, Berbice Chair, Book-

PCAR—Chevroiet style mag . in first shelves all old Mahogany; 2 very
condition (M-180). 2550 any epi sortae upholstered Arm Chairs;

“ex Sunday, Die Sin: ictures, Paintings and



ae
) CAR—Packard 8 Cylinder.
Bondition. Reason for sale,
a@malier car. Dr.
3085.



FURNICURE

MAHOGANY and Pine Presses. OWEN

T. ALLDER, Roebuck Street. Dial 890. Moaéter anit

10,2.51—





MAHOGANY Dining Tables. (Large and
Small); OWEN T. ALLDER. Roebuck
Street. Dial 3299. 10,2,51—3n

LIVES10CK

CALVES—Ten - day old Heifer Calves,
Apply; Bulkeley Ltd., Dairy.

8.2.51—3n. | Presses;







PIG—One
last Exhibition. Dial 3741, 9.2.51--3n
MISCELLANEOUS





ANTIQU4S — Of every description
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver
Watercolours. Early books, Maps. Auto-
graphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shop
ecjoining Royal Yacht Club.

2 3.9.50—t.f.n,
peeeeninlenpn Re ae
BATHS -— In Porcelain Enamel, in

White, Green, Primrose with matching
its to complete colour suites, Top
‘ade. A. BARNES & Co,, Ltd.

~3.1.61—t.f.n,

DIVING MASKS -, 10/- each obtain-
fble in the Toy Dept, at Cave Shepherd
& Co, Lid, 28.1,51—t,f.n,





[a
DESCHIENS SYRUP OF HEMOGLO-
BINE: Especially valuable after an
aitack of influenza or whooping cough.
Give it to your children: Nothing better.
Fresh supply to hand. at all Druggists.

4.2.51—4n
——
EGGS — Pure bred Barred Plymouth

Rock Eggs, from Cup winning Exhibition

k. $3.60 per dozen. John Alleyne,
bworth, St. Peter. Phone 91-20.
4.2.51—3n

——————

GREY GANDER-—Prime breeding con-
2 gears old. $15.00. Tucker
8.2,51—2n

— <_<
GALVANISED PIPE in the following
%in., Yin., %in., lin. 1% ins,

2% ins., 3ins. and 4 ins, Also fit
Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

lgar Street, Phone 2696.

3.2.51.—t.f.n.
——————_—
HUMBER CYCLE











COMPETITION
firanaé New Humber Bicycle. On view
at Harrison’s Store. Tickets 1/- each.

wy one now! 9.2.51—3n,
NUTROGEN—Fresh shipment. 1 Ib, Tin
$1.24 % tb. Tin 69c. From all Grocers
ahd Chemists. 10.2.51—4r

OPTICAL Available at Impertal
Optical Co: (over Bata Shoe Store,
Lower Broad Street) Sunshades, Bino-
eulars, Barometers, Microscopes, Hand-
readers, and all Optical requisits. Phone















4075. 24.1.51—ti.n.
_— —=

WATCH—One 17 Jewel Elgin Gent's
Geld Filled Pocket Watch in_ perfect
working order. Apply to W. D. Richards
& Son, McGregor Street 10.2.51—20

Tieibertininete health ieinemernentsenenstnts-temnnenenenease
PIANO--Upright "Piano made by John
Brinsmead, well tuned. Best offer over
$200,00 accepted. Apply Ralph Beare,

Hardwood Alley, Phone 4683.
10.2.51

STHEL STEP LADDERS—6-tread and

an









A-tread, Just the thing for Stores, Schools,} on the 14th February 1951 at 2 p.m., by
Offices, and Household uses, 4 tread $8.88! public Competition, one Modern Stone-
eoch; 5 tread $12.95 each. Cannot be] built property known as “Hill Crest",
repeated at this price, at RALPH | Siivated at Upper Collymore Rock, oppo-
BEARD'S Show Ttooms Hardwood | site the A.M.E. Church, with 5,000 sq. ft,
Alley. 10,2.51—2n | of Lond, 2 bedrooms, open verandah, tiled
—————___——_—_—— beth and water toilet, Electricity, can be
~ WHITE LEGHORN EGGS F. LL | seen from 8 aa. to © p.m. Apply the
Burton, Cotton Factory owner on premises, L. A, M. WATTS,
1),.2.51—1n.) James Street. Dial 4523,
10.2,.51-—4n,
WOOD & COAL STOVE—In perfect | ———— eho
condition. Apply W. A. Medford MARWIN—Maxwell’s Road, Modern
11.2.51—8n | stone-built Bungalow, 3 Bedrooms,
—— eet eset aecineaman Drawing and Dining Room Breakfast
LOST Room and Kitchenette, Toilet and Bath,
| Servants’ Room, Garage in ward, Water
Minimum charge week 72 cents and;and Electric Light installed. Approx-
% cente Sundays 24 words over 24) imately 14,000 sq, ft. of land. Apply:
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents o|} E. H. Farmer, Andrews Plantation or
word Sundays. Dial 95267. 4.2.51—6n,
© asians =
WATCH —Lady Gold Watch Arta ENTERPRISE—An adjoining Property
with Gold Strap. Lost between Two Mile| with 7 acres of land and stone building,
Hill and City. Reward offered. Phone|% acres of arable, 4 acres of pasture
es i a 10.2.5) with nice Mahogany’ trees to be sold
any one, who has ives of
WATCH—-On Wednesday night WATCHOn Wednesday night between friends in the U.S. Amerie who is
Pine and Culloden Roads, éne lady's go!d | desirous of buying for cash. To be sold
wrist watch, Finder will be rewarded) iy the U.S. America
on returning same to Advocate Adve:-| Apply to G. Holder, Enterprise, Christ |
titing Dept. or may dial 324) Chureh Gap, Attorney for the Estate
10,2,51-20 | tor full infermation, 6.2,5)—n. |



hings, vety Fine Marble Top
Sewing Tables; Glass Ware, Dinner, Tea,

Perfect | Coffee and Fruit Services; Sangaree Glass,
Purchasing {Green and Red, Table Glass;
Simon — Telephone | Ornament; Brass Jardinieres, Plated and
10.1.51—6n | Silver Ware in Entre Dishes, Ice Tank-

Brouge

ard, Waiters, Vases, Dish Covers; Tea

and “Coffee Sets; Forks, Spoons, Cutlery
&c., Rugs and Stairs Carpet, Chiming
and other Clocks; Electric Lamps,

Kettle, G. E. Radio; Double
and Single Iron Bedsteads with Box
Springs; Mahogany Twin Bedsteads with
Box Springs, Dunlopillo, Deep Sleep and
Hair Beds, Dressing Tables Marble Top
Washstands, Mird. Presses, Couches, old
Linen Press; Cheval Glass all in Mahog+
any; Old French Press, Cedar Linen and
Hang: Presses; Chamber Ware, Frigidaire
in perfect working order; Lard Ware
Kitehen Utensils and Tables,
Coal Stove, Linen, Mosquito Nets, Garden

(1) Sow. 2nd Prize Winner ] Benches, Tennis Nets and Poles; Roller,

Trunks, Valeses, Books, Including 28
vol, Eney: Brittanica, Enam. Bath,
Geyser, Nice lot of Ferns, Palms,
Anthuriums,

Sale 11,30 o’¢lotk, Terms CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers.
9.2.51—2n





REAL ESTATE



mate beach. Good Yacht, “An Breen
nehora|
Phone 91-50. 16.11.00-ttn,

_———
HOUSE—At Inch Marlow Road, Christ
Church, 2 roofs and shedroof, willing to
sell in parts, no reasonable offer refused.
Apply Frances Ville, Inch Marlow Road,

Christ Church to Frank Clarke,
10.2.51—2n

SHARES—With Accruing Dividends:
30 Shares in Barbados Shipping & Trad-
ing Co., Ltd. The above will be set
up for sale by Public Competition at our





OmMce, James Street, Bridgetown, on
Tuesday the 13th February at 2 p.m.
G, L. W. CLARKE & Co.,
Solicitors.
10.2.51—3n

a +

HOUSE—One new board and shingle
house, 18 x 11 x 8 ft, build with screws,
easy to move, Apply to Sherlock Field
leul Bay, St. Philip. 8.2.51—-4n

GRANDVIEW, Bathsheba — Three (3)
Bedroomed Bungalow, standing on 14,919
Sq. Feet Land.

Offer in writing for the same, will be
received by E. C. FIELD C/o James A.
Lynch & Co., Ltd. up to 4 p.m, 28th
February 1951. 8.2.51—én

a
The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office No, 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 16th February 1951 at
2 p.m. The messuage or dwelling house
formerly known as Tullyera now eall-
ed “CRYSTAL WATERS” with the land
thereto containing by estimation 12,087
square feet situated on the sea at Car-
ville Avenue, Worthing, Christ Chureh,
at present used as a boarding house.

between 4 and 6 p.m. on application to
Mra. Talma on the premises,

of sale apply to:—
COTTLE, CATFORD, & Co.,
Solicitors,
3,2.51—12n.



The undersigned will offer for sale at
Drug Store

James St., over Minds & Co.,












Inspection any day except Sundays

For further particulars and conditions



SUNDAY



PUBLIC NOTK ES

a cents per ag
12 cents per agete
pi Pi um ch * MO «

herve

and $1.80 on Sunda
“£95: -. -4 easily earned by obtaining
order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends, No previous experi
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Pyblishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making
opportunity. Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
England.”

on weekrde

n eek-d



25.1.51—18n



NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. JOHN
SHALED tenders are invited for sup-
plying approximately 42 pint’ pure fresh
coWs’ milk daily to St, John’s Aimshouse
ih two deliveries, as from the 25th
Match 1951. Applications will be re-
ceived by the undersigned up to the 17th
instant, and it is to be understood that
the lowest or any tender will not neces-

sotily be accepted.
R. S. FRASER,

Clerk,
Board of Poor Law
Guardians.
St. John.
10.2.51—6n



NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH.
Applications for the Post of Parochial
Treasurer will be received by the un-
dersigned not later than the 28th Feb-
Yuary 1951 Applications must be ae-
companied by Baptismmal and Medical
Certificates, and marked on the En-
velope, applications for Post of Paro-
chial Treasurer
Sad. Rev. L. C. MALLALIEU,
Chairman
Joseph's Vestry
11,2.51—-6n.

St.



ALEXANDRA “SCHOOL |
The new school year will begin in Sep-
tember. Entrance =- examinations will
take place in July ata date to be akd-
vertised later. Parents and guardians
who wish to enter pupils should obtain
application forms from the Headmistress.
No applicamts can be accepted who are
over 12 on March Ist 1951,
11,2.51—1n,



NOTICE

Applicants are invited for the post of
Assistant Nurse at St. Lucy's Aimshouse
at o salary of $57.50 per month, uniform
€te. and quarters provided.

Applicants must be fully certiticated,
midwives, and general Nurses.

The successful candidate must assume
duties: on 25th February 1951.

Applications will be received by me up
to Saturday 17th. February 1951.

OSWALD L. DEANE,

Clerk, Board of Poor Law Guardians,

St. Lucy
10,.2.51—-7n

PUBLIC SALES.

“WORTHY DOWN” = Situated at Top
Rock, consisting of 3 bedrooms with coh-
necting toilets and showers, large lounge,
dining room, ultra modern kitehen, large
front balcony, and breakfast balcony,
Q-car garage, 2 servants’ rooms with
teilet and showers also laundry, The
grounds are fully enclosed and the gar-
dens well laid out ete. Available on
March Ist, 1951.

The above property is well constructed
i 12-inch stone, with an Everite roof.
Best offer above £4,000 will be accepted.
Further particulars etc, Ring 4683,

7.2.51—5n

SOUND INVESTMENT
PROPERTY Standing on
square feet of land with new), erected
Wali Building which »yields $75. pe
meonth—in geod residentiol district, Dial
o947 KR. Archer MeKenzie, 11,2.81—1n

HOUSE At Coles Pasture, St.
Philip to be removed not later thaa
eight weeks after sale. Ali offers and tor

mil particulars, Dinl 96268.
/Masein
A new and wel

pit iy esl on
Pine il called WESTF. he pro~
peut of the late Sir Georke Wi sons

te SEES tad eatin,

ublie “reo! two s, kitcheri,
jaundny, bi and lavatory.

In a separate building there is a
garage for one car and two servants
rooms with bath and lavatory.

The property will be set up for sale
at our office on Wednesday the 2ist day
ot February 1951, at 2 p.m,

For conditions of sale apply to the
undersigned.

Inspection any day between 10,30 a.m.
and & p.m, Telephone Lady Walton,
No, 4581.

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
9.2.51—11n,









10.616



Ke





FOR KENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din-
ing room, Breakfast room atid Kitchen-
ette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone.
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1.51.—6n.

ADVOCATE





GOVERNMENT NOTICES



UNIVERSITY OF LONDON
Matriculation Examination

The following is an extract from a letter dated 18th November,
1950, from the Secretary to the Matriculation and Schoo! Examinations
Council of the University of London:—

“The University of London will c@ase to issue notifications of
exemption from the Matriculation Examination“after
who expect to matriculate

1951. Candidates,

School Certificate or Higher’ School Certificate of December
should write to the Secretary of the Matriculation and School

Examinations Council,

Secertary of the Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate.
must mention their index number and centre, and forward with

No Requests

WASHINGTON, Feb. 8
President Truman held up his
hand in_salute to the Prime Minis-}
ter of New Zealand, Sidney Hol-|
iene; to-day ~when Holland’ told!
him at the White’ House that -

had no requesty for ffancial



30th April;] material help for his country oor
by means of the} &merica.
1950, Holland, who.is here for a five-
day visit, has been discussing the
Senate Hotsse, London, W.C.1., not to the] Far Eastern questions with th@
They| United States Secretary of State,

Dean Acheson .-—Revter.

the letter the matriculation registration fee of three guineas s0

that the information and fee is received by the University of

London during February 1951.

Certificate.

Similarly, if they expect to com-
plete their matriculation exemption by passing the Higher School
Certificate or a single subject a the School Certificate Examina-
tion, they must state the date (with index number and centre)
of the examination on which they. were awarded the School

WANTED

Minimtém charge week 72 cents and)
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word«week— cents a

word Sundays,

HELP

“The authorities of the Loeal Examinations Syndicate of
Cambridge University and the University of London have made

special arrangements in connexion with the December examina-
tion so that successful candidates may matriculate before 30th

April, 1951.

“Matriculation fees, will. be refunded to those who do not

qualify.

“Any candidate who intends to follow this procedure should,

therefore: —

(a) Write to London not Cambridge.
(b) Give his address clearly, and full name.
(c) State index number, centre, date and name of the examina-

tion.

(d) Forward fee of three guineas to reach the University of Lon-

don during February.

“These instructions countermand any already given to persons
who have been in touch with the University of London about this}

matter.”









SUNDAY, FEBRUARY li, 1951



MINERS STRIKE
NORTHERN FR

FRANCE, Feb. 10
About 45,000 miners, about half
the total in the French coalfields
of the north and Pas De Calais
| departments, obeyed a 24-hour
strike call from the Communist+
ied General Confederation of
Labour today.

‘. They stopped work at an hour

|

MRS, JEMMOTT. TEL, 8196

CANADIAN Retcommends.
on Beach. Excellent Cooking.

fixed for the funeral of 12 mer

killed in an explosion of fire

damp at Bruey En Artois,
—Reuter.

————$_

AN OPPORTUNITY

TO BUY
1Smalt Gas
Enamel finish.
2 Bolling Burners
1 Grell Burner complete with
even cooker traded in to buy.
A large Cooker
PRICE $60
see it at your Gas Show Room.

Cooker Grey

OFFERS will be received
by the undersigned up to the
16th day of February for the
block of buildings, (land a

LADY-Guitabie lady with Knowledge included), situated on

of book-keeping, filing and office work William Henry and Victor

Apply Post Office Box 221, Peano Streets and Bolton Lane,
Se he vlc haere sections of which are # at
CAPABLE, WELL EDUCATED ent occupied by W. A. ed=

YOUNG MAN. Quick and accurate at ford & Co., The Manhattan

figures, typing, also able to handle cor-
respondence. Apply in writing and
person to the British Bata Shoe Co.,
\ Ltd., Broad St. 10,2.51—3n

ALEXANDRA SCHOOL

in

Club, and until quite recent-
ly by the Bridgetown Ice
Company. Purchaser to de-
molish the buildings and
clear the land within sixty



From May tee] an "Acsintant ‘Mistress Mr. K. C. GOODRIDGE days from date of purehase.
f ti fo fi
to teach ohe oF more of the follomtne.|Member of the New Testament ||] EVELYN ROACH & CO.,
matics. Sony according to anenree. Goa t aly ‘LTD,
tions an experience, on scale ‘or rc 0: or many y Ss, S
Secondary, Teachers. ya ; Church of God yy Rickett Street,
muniects” ottered. ped Tcanidented i now pastors the work at Green’s, —tin.

testimonials,
‘ress not later than February 15th,





must reach the Headmis-





St. George.



12.11.50.—6n.
Department of Education,
6th February, 1951. 10.2.51—2n. MISCELLANEOUS HAvE YOU GOT A
Pana TaN Hil erms COLD or COUGH
PART ONE ORDERS RETIRED ENT aor Seeks, em-
ployment in Office, ub or Hotel. To re-
By y@ the intolerable boredom of idling IF so TRY
iaihotias a1? ., BD., Salary, Lunch & Bus Fare. Reply Box
Liewt-Col. J. Cofthell. O.B.E., B T. Advocate 112. 31—am e ‘in BROWNE'S
The Barbados Regiment.
tenes e,-A eT ae Te 9 Feb. 51 WANTED TO BUY * Your skin bas nearly 50 million tiny seams
USED POSTAGE STAMPS--Of the] and pores where germs hide and ¢ onuse ter-
British West Indies. Good Prices Paid Cracking,

1 PARADES

Ail ranks will parade
Feb. $1,_ The Regiment will then
jers ‘to St. Ann’s
the baggave warehouse,
Arrangements will be
transport from the ba¢gavge

then be collected from St,
Dress : Shirts
(Other ranks),

2 VOLUNTARY NIGHT

Ann's

There will be no voluntary night off Tuesday, 13 Feb. 51.

3. BAND

at the baggagé warehouse at 1630 hours on Friday,
escort the drummers and pipers of the Fusil-
Fort via Bridgetown.

16] at the Caribbean Stamp Society No.

Swar Street.
Rifles and sidearms will be issued at

made to bring the bicyeles of volunteers in Regimental
warehouse to St,
Fort after the parade.

shorts, boots and short puttees, berets, web beits and frogs
Sam BroWne belts and swords

Ann's Fort, These bicycles can

Br WISE...

+Officers).

Band practice parades will be held oh Monday 12, Wednesday 14 and Thursday

15 Feb, 51.

BEATING THE RETREAT
All ranks and _ their
1 Innisks on Sunday 18 Feb.

ure,

FEB, 51.
Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant
Next for Duty
Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant

PART Ii ORDERS

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
8TH FEBRUARY,



Lt PROMOTIONS

case peleeapel abate ge

families are invited to attend the
Sl at 1645 hours.
the Reserve and Retired listsyof the Regiment are invited to the Officers’ enclos-
Dress for those attending will be plain clothes

ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR



Lieut, H, R, Daniel Bn HQ
8 LRAVE—Privileee
» Cpl, Turney, D. G. “B” Coy
















CENTRAL FOUNDRY ‘LTD.—
Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets.



‘Beating of Retreat’ by
Officers and their families on

wo
10.2.51—3n



-. - ADVERTISE

SHIPPING ” NOTICES

rible pening.
Burnin c
Blackh Pimples, t Itch
blemishes. Ordinary ronticente give on
temporary relief because they do not ki
the germ cause. The new discovery, Nix
derm kills the germs in % minutes and Is
guaranteed to give you a soft, dear, attrac
tive, smooth skin in one week, or money
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ixederm from your chemis'



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C. CARLTON BROWNE
Wholesale & Retell Dragtist
138 Roebuck St. Dial 9819













———————
Se se eNpING | ROYAL NETHERLANDS ——
/Lt. . ' arke
381 L/S Robinson, °V. N. STEAMSHIP CO. The M/V. “CARIBBEE” will
Lieut. T. A. Gittens Sailing from Amsterdam, Dover and accept Cargo and Passengers for
217 L/S Blackett, L. L. Madeira—s.s. ‘‘Cottica’ 2nd, 3rd, 9th Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
. February, 1951. M.S. “Bonaire” 9th, Nevis and St Kitts, Sailing
M. L. Dy SKEWES-COX, Major, 10th. 16th March 1951. Friday, 28rd February, 1951,
8.0.L.F. & Adjutant, Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam--
The Barbados Regiment. |m.s, “Helena” 12th, 15th, February 1951, The M/V. *“DAERWOOD” will
m.s. “Willemstad” 9th, 16th, -Pebruary accept Car@o and Passengers for
e - 1951, m.s. “Oranjestad” Sth, 15th Mareh Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba,
SERIAL NO. 5 1951. and Passengers only for St, Vin-
SHEET NO. 1 Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and cent, Date of Sailing to be “
Georgetown—m.s, “Bonaire” 27th Janu- notified.
romotién to captain approved by His | #t¥ 1951; ms. “Cottica” 20th, February
Beocieney the Governor wet 4 Dec. 50, | 1951; ms, “Helena” 3rd March 1951. B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN-

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guiara, Cura-
“Oranjestad” ist February

cao
1951

Eranted 4 months P/Leave wef 19 Jan ete—m.s.
1,

M, L. D, SKEWES-COX, Major, dam—m.s,
S.O.L.F, & Adjutant, 8. P,
The Barbados Regiment.

“Oranjestad”

N, & co. UTD.,

bers.

Proprietors,
GARDINER AUSTIN
























Agents: W.S . MONROE & CO., LTD.

Note:

"

ht
*

Be6

PETER DeVERTEVILLE—Chief Representative

_—

SIXTY-FOUR YEARS OF WORLD: WIDE LIFE INSURANCE SERVICE

THE CORNERSTONE OF
OUR WAY OF LIFE

Today, more than ever before; a sound family life is an essen-

tial background for the preservation of our way of life. Since
* the founding of the Manufacturers Life in 1887, hundreds of

thousands of breadwinners have used its facilities to safeguard
_ the futures of their families,

*390,000 CLIENTS ARE NOW entrusting substantial
s amounts of their savings to the Manufacturers Life to protect their
dependents and their own retirement. r

$1,309,344,457 OF INSURANCE AND RETIRE-
MENT protection is provided by the policies they own.

$413,855,443 IS SECURELY INVESTED 10 quaran-
tee payment of the benefits promised under these policies. The
interest earned on these funds ~ which are principally accumu.
lated premium deposits — reduces the cost of insurance.

HOMASED IN 342 OF NEW INSURANCE WAS PUR-

SO by over 35,000 clients, many of whom
were en iM owners of Manufacturers Life policies.

$23,287,268 WAS PAID TO LIVING POLICY-
OWNERS, and to the families of those who died, The Life Insur-
ance programs under which these payments were made have been
carefully arranged by trained Life Underwriters — one of whom is

available to perform the:same service for you. .



THE

MANUFACTURERS
ECT LIFE eet RZ =

CLYDE WALCOTT—Ageni.

Phone 4317, P.O. Box 102, High Street.

The above figures are given in Canadian Dollars.

Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp, Amster-
23rd_ Feb, 1951.

Agents.

ee eg en clea
Canadian National Steamships



N.B,—Subject to change Without notice, All vessels fitted with cold storage cham.
Passenger Fares and freight 1gtes on application to :—



BLABDON

AF.S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

ERS ASSOCIATION, In
Consignee—Tel. No. 4047














































| “ROCK DUNDO”—Cave Hill. A

| well maintained and productive

) Estate of some 32 acres in a

| lovely position 2 miles from
The house is worthy of
notice and possesses great
Its general condition is excellent
gue there is spacious accommoda-
ion,

ity,

MAPLE MANOR CRICKETERS sourmBOUND
Greet our comrade CRICKETER Sal Arrives Sails sabe =
GUEST HOUSE in BLAZERS and FLANNEL at Halifax poten” ‘Barbados’ Barbados ellakta mae inte “anaes
OPPOSITE HASTINGS ROCKS a tea tee eae “LADY NELSON” = 2Feb. 4 Feb. IB Feb. 33 Fee cpen verandah on West corh-
a RAYMOND JORDAN “CAN. CHALLENGER” =_ 1b Fev. _ 25 Feb. 25 Feb. ooeing magnideent view oF bed
Tel. s021, I, BOURNE, in Bay Street it “LADY RODNEY” ah 3 Mar. 6 Mar, 14 Mar. 15 Mar.
Monageréss in y Street, opposite 1} «any NELSON” ion 19 Mar, 21 Mar. 30 Mar, 31 Mar and stretches Of beach. Large
See) Combermere Street. V1 “GAN, CHALLENGER” a Ae = 12 Apr. 12 Apr. lounge, $ bedrooms, 3 verandahs,
P kitch antry and servant's
|] “LADY RODNEY" = 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 27 Apr = 27 Apr. | chen, Pi

quarters, Storerooms in basement.
f NORTHBOUND Arrives Bails Arrives Arrives Arrives “DEANE HOLLOW", St. Luey.
SEE US FOR...... Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax Pleasant country home of stone
“LADY RODNE' 10 Feb. 11th Feb, 21 Feb, 22 Feb. - eat cnn ne. Od
\ LAWN MOWERS & PARTS "EADY NELSON” a Feo. 27 Fel. 8 Mar, 9 Mar = — ama, blichen, servaat's quarters
\ “LADY RODNEY” 27 Mar. 28 Mar. 6 Apr. 7 Apr. = a gare pt Pygae toro rin
i) “LADY NELSON” 12 Apr. 14 Apt. 23 Apr. _ 24 Apr garages rooms. By
i . “LADY RODNBY” 10 May. 12 May. 21 May. nto 22 May ee Si nae a ae:

yy }.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM sidered,

& CO. LTD. — Agents.





PERSONAL

ELSWICK—8th Avenue, Belle-
ville. A stone ahd timber house
on approx. 3,600 sq. ft. Enclosed



The public are hereby warned against

giving credit to my wife, MARIE HOPE verandah 2 reception fi 3

{nee CLARKE) as I do not hold myself bedrooms, kitchen ahd pantry, Full

responsible for her or anyone else con~ information on application.

tracting any debt or debts in my name ‘a +

unless by @ written order signed by me. BETMAR” — Navy Gardens,
LIVINGSTONE HOPE, Modern stone bungalow with

everite roof, detached garage ahd
servant's quarters on over 14,000
sq. ft. of land. There are 2 large
reception rooms, 2 verandahs, 5
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms etc.
Suitable for conversion into two
semi-detached houses at little
cost.

MODERN STONE BUNGALOWS
—Also a Stone and Timber house
ere available in a pleasant part of
Dayrell’s Road at prices ranging
upwards from £1,700, Particulars
and appointments to view on
application.

HOTEL—Old established ey
property on coast is now availa!
as a going concern at a low figure,

Chalky Mount,
St. Andrew.
10,2,5—2n



NOTICE
ENCLOSURE WALL

COMBERMERE

Tenders are invited for the erection
of an enclosure wall approximately 800
ft. long 6 ft. high along the Hall's
Road boundary of Combermere School.

The wail will be of cast concrete
er block supported on reinforeed con-
crete pier and befm structures. Details,
specifications, ete., can be seen at the
Headmaster's Office, Combermere School,

woeen should sats the aut nes Full information on application.
t or the erection ereof an freti
must be submitted on or before 15th Sotnle Ry SR She x
February. The Governing Body does t
not bind. itself to accept the lowest or “SILVERTON” — Ch ae
fany tender Commodious 2-storey stone
M. PINDAR standing i rox, 1% noses
Secretary, planted with fruit trees, large {
Governing Body of Combermere reception rooms, 4 2
School. galleries, kitchen, 2 ‘Toons
7.2.51—3n. etc. Centrally located and suitable
for ¢ jon into flats or board-
SRE eee a ene ates ing house,



——————
SCIENTIFIC MASSAGE

Permanent relief guaranteed
from Chronic Headache = and
Neuralgel. Skin and face improv-
ed through Manipulative process.
W. Johnson, D.M.T. Crumpton

* Street.
Graduate of N.C.M.P, Chicago,
LLL. U.S.A. — Rio.

TOWER GARAGE—St, Matthids
Gap. An almost new property
suitable for a large variety of
purposes other than @ garage.

“LILA COTTAGE” — ittons
Cross Road, Timber Bungalow on
11,000 sq. ft. Contains Ten room,
verandah 2 sides, 3
kitchen and pantty. Offers ers will
be considered,

BUILDING, LA LAND — ofteatty 2
acres of moter escarp-
ment near the Club Morgan. Ideal
position for good class property.

COASTLAND St. James.
acres of excellent building lan
with sea frontage which may be
_ sold in half acre lots if required.

NAVY GARDENS.-- Excellent
building site 31,288 sq. ft whieh
may be sold as two plots if desired,

PINE ROAD—Good building plot
of 12,612 sq. ft, in select and eens
tral position.

RENTALS

“FLORES"—Kent. Unfurnished.

‘IN CHANCERY'—Modern Fiirn-
| ished Bungalow.



WEST INDIAN CRA ANSHIP
AND Pottery - Gifts - Antiques -
Fabrics Manufacturers of Uphol-
stered Furniture
DECORATION HOUSE
Coast Rd., St. James,
. ~ 4.2.$1—2n-

CHELSTON
LIME WORKS

can supply





Temper & Building Lime
Boulders, Concrete Stone REAL ESTATE AGENT
Grit, Marl and Sand AUCTIONEER
} Praeks’ on hire PLANTATIONS BUILDING
i} 3ROOKS, Phorie 8335 {f Phone 4640

fete)

DS SSE SS SE












































SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11,

B.B.C. RADIO NOTES

1951



In “Caribbean Voices”
HENRI CHRISTOPHE: Part II
AS we told you in this column

last week the BEC is broadcasting

She will speak at 7.45 p.m. on
Wednesday, 14th inst.
Radio Theatre
The play to be broadcast by

‘Henri Christophe’ the verse play the BBC on Saturday, 17th inst.
by Derek Walcott of St. Lucia in at 8.30 p.m. is ‘Interference’ by
two parts in a radio adaptation Roland Pertwee and Harol?
by Errol Hill of Trinidad. Part I Dearden. The story is teld with
Was given last Sunday and Part pace and skill that holds the lis-
TI will be on the air in ‘Carib- tener’s attention and even more
bean Voices’ commencing at convincing is the treatment of the
7,15 p.m. to-day If time permits underlying moral, the effects of
this will be followed by a critical publicity run amok, in effect
appreciation cf the play—the critic What the hero describes as ‘the
not yet having been decided, deadly sin of interference.’

She lived as Recluse:



leaves £44 Million

Richest Woman
Never Went Out

From R. M. MAC COLL

NEW YORK,
The world’s richest woman has
died—in bitter and bleak seclu-
sion.

to save a few pennies for .her
avaricious mother, Sylvia did the
cooking and sewing.



While on the subject of critical
appreciation we should let our
readers know that on February
18th Henry Swanzy, producer of
‘Caribbean Voices’ will give
oe, * pis half-yearly
appraisals of this programme—
the weekly broadcast, of West
Indian prose and poetry. His
review comes at the end of the
programme and we shall remind
you of it again next week.

Heritage of Britain
second in the current

series of BBC pro-
grammes “The Heritage of
Britain” will be broadcast on
Tuesday next, 13th February.
This series is being broadcast at
this time because it has seemed
appropriate with the Festival of
Britain on this year to pause and
consider what Britain owes to her
past. No. 2 in the series which
you can hear at 10.15 p.m. on
Tuesday next is entitled ‘The
People — the formation of a
nation.’ Paul Johnstone, the pro-
ducer of the series says: “The
moulding of the British is indeed
a fascinating and extraordinary
story, the complexity of which is
frequently forgotten.” He points
out that we have now reached a
crisis in history and one of the
things at stake is a peculiarly
British contribution to the art of
living—justice, individual free-
dom, and democratic methods of
government in which the British*
contribution has been outstand-
ing.

The
monthly

End of an Era?

Another current BBC series to
which we wish to call your atten-
tion is ‘The First Half Century’
which comes to an end to-day.
This final programme deals with
‘The Closing Years? of the half
century—the post-war world of
1945—1950. The author of this
last’ programme is Dr. Jacob
Bronowski, who is the rare
combination of literary man
and mathematician. He has
often broadcast from London and
has written three outstanding
feature programmes for the BBC.
Broadcast of ‘the Closing Years’
Will begin at 9.00 p.m, to-day.

Sinking of the “Lusitania”

Next Wednesday’s broadcast
from London in the current
series ‘I was There’ in which eye-
witnesses have been - giving
accounts of famous events will be
a talk by Viscountess Rhondda
on ‘The Sinking of the Lusitania’.

B.B.C. Radio
Programmes

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 11,
6.30 a.m. — 12 noon 19.76 m.

_—_
6.30 a.m. Week-end Sports Report, 6.45
am. Sandy MacPherson at the Theatre
Organ, 7 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials,
7.25 a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m.
English Magazine, 8 am. Calling all
Forces, 9 a.m, The News, 9.10 a.m. Home
news from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down,
11,15 a.m. mme Parade, 11.20 a.m.
Interlude, 11.30 a.m, Sunday Service, 12
roon The News, 12.10 p.m. News Analy-
sis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down.
4.15— 6 pam, 2553 m. .. ..

1951

415 pan. Music Magazine, 4.30 p.m
Sunday half hour, 5 p.m. Composer of
the week, 5.15 p.m, Listeners’ Choice,.
7.1% pam. 31.32 & 48.43

_
6 pam. BBC Symphony Orchestra, 6.45

te Programme Parade, 7 p.m, The
ews, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m.

Caribbean Voices,

7.45—11,00 p.m. 31.32 m. & 48.43 m.

—_—_—_—_—_—_____.

7.45 p.m. The whole Armour of God
8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. Sun-
day Service, 8.45 p.m. C
week, 9 p.m. The half century, 10 p.m.
The News, 10.10 p.m Frem the Editori-
als, 10.15 p.m. The Cathedral Organs,
one p.m, don Forum, 11 p.m. Louis

entner.
RKOSTON: WRUL, 15.29 Mc, WRUW 11.75
Me, WRUX 17.75 me. 3 p.m. Lecture on
Christian Science, 4.30 p.m. Christian
Science Programme.
TAS, 31.32 m & 48.43 m.

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 1951
6.390 am. — 12.15 p.m, 19.76 m.

—_——_,
6.30 a.m. Billy Cotton Band Show, 7
am, The News, 7.10 a.m. News Analysis
7.16 a.m. From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m
Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m. Watebing «
Town Grow, 7.45 a.m. Singing is so good
a thing, 8.00 a.m, Let's make Music, 8.45
a.m, The Debate Continues, 9 a.m. The
News, 9.10 a.m. Home News from
Britain, 11.15 a.m. Programme Parade,
11.30 a.m. Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 a.m.
Commonwealth Survey, 12 noon The News
12.10 p.m. News Analysis, 12.15 p.m
Close Down.
4.15—-6.00 p.m., 11.75 m.
—_—_——

4.15 p.m, Ray Martin and his Orches-
tra, 5 p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15
p.m. The Story Teller, §.35 p.m. Inter-
lude, 5.45 p.m, Say it with Music, 6 p.m.
Nights at the Opera.

6 0O—7.15 p.m,, $1.32 m, 48.43 m.
—_—_—

645 p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m.
The News, 7,10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15
p.m, Our Mutual Friend, 7.45 p.m.
watching the town grow.
7A5—11.00 pom. 31.82 m. & 48.48 m.

p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8,15 p.m. Com-
monwealth survty, 8.30 p.m. Singing is 0
good thing, 8.45 p.m. Composer of the
week, 9 p.m. BBC Concert Hall, 10 p.m.
the News, 10.10 p.m. From the Fdito-
rials, 10.15 p.m. Ray's a laugh, 10.45

.m. Science Review, 11 p.m, How to
ok at a town,



Church Services

ANGLICAN -
*s 'T. LEONARD'S
‘Sunday Feb. 11, 1981, 8 a.m. Holy
€ommunion. 9 a.m. Choral Eucharist &
Address, 11 a.m. Matins and sermon,
3 p.m. Sunday School, 7 p.m. Evensong
and Sermon. Holy Communion cele-
eevee daily throughout Lent. Mondays,
vesdays, Wednesdays and Saaturdays
Qt 7.30 am. Thursdays at 5
hymns) Fridays at 6 ».m,

ST. PAUL'S. Lent I.
Communion, 9.15 a.m. Litany in Pro-
cession, Sunday School Prefects and
garters taking part. 9.30 a.m. Solemn

ass and Sermon, Subject: ‘Exhortation
ip H.C. Service". 3 p.m. Sunday School,
330 p.m. Solemn Baptism, 7 p.m. Even-
song and Sermon, Preacher: Bishop
Bertley.

am. (with

7.30 a.m, Holy

SALVATION ARMY
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL
. 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
Pany Meeting, 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting.
Preacher: Major Smith.

¢ WELLINGTON STREET

© 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Preacher; Sr. Major Gibbs.

SPEIGHTSTOWN
11 a.m, Holiness Meeting, 2 p.m. Com-
Dany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Preacher; Sr. Captain Bishop.
! DIAMOND CORNER
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
peny Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
acher: Lieutenant Moore.
PIF, CORNER
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m, Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Preacher: Sr. Major Hollingsworth,
Ct LL

*11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Preacher; Lieutenant Reid,

OISTIN

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-

ny, Beeting 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Pe tal: Lieutenant Gunthorpe.

THE NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH
{ OF GOD

ST, MICHABL—11 a.m. Brittons Hill.
Rev..A R. Brome, 2.30 p.m. Brittons Hill
Sunday School, 7 p.m. Brittons Hill
Evangelical Open Air Meeting, Rev.
4. R. Brome for Harvest to which all
are invited.

iT.. PHILIP-——11 a.m. Long Bay, Rev.
fw. Weekes, 4 p.m. Long Bay, Ray,
&. R.. Brome.

_CHRIST CHURCH—7 p.m. Cox Road,
Rev. E, W. Weekes for Observance of
Lerd’s Supper.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street.
Sundays: li a.m. and 7 p.m. Wednes-
dgys: 8 par. A Service which includes
Testimonies of Christian. Salence Healing,

Sunday, February 1
Subject of Lesson-Sermon; SPIRIT.
Golden Text: Ezekiel 39.20. [ have
poured out my spirit upon the house of

Israel, saith the Lord God.



%

Harbour Log
!n Carlisle Bay

Sch. Emanuel C. Gordon, M.V. Sedge-
fiold, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Sch. C. M. W.
Ipona, Sch. Philip H, Davidson, H.MS.
Devonshire, Sch. Adalina, M.V. Vagabond
Prince, Sch. E. Caroline, M.V,
Sroneee, Sch, Emeline, Sch. Marion Belle

elfe,

ARRIVALS

S.S. Lady Rodney, 4,907 tons net, Capt.
LeBlane, from British Guiana via
Trinidad, Grenada and St. Vincent,

Schooner Franklyn D. R., 82 tons net,
Capt. Sealy, from British Guiana,

DEPARTURES

Schooner Eastern Eel, 35 tons net, Capt.
David, for Grenada.

M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons net Capt.
Persons, for St. Lucia. i

SS. Defender, 5.011 tons net, Capt.
Peuston, for Dominica,

M.V. “Caribbee, 100 tons net,
Gumbs, for Dominica,

Yn Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1) Ltd., advise
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through their Bar-
bados Coast Station:

SS. Golfito, S.S. Demosthenes,
President Dutra, SS, Evans Creek, S.S.
James Stove Kentucky S.S. Spurt, 58.8.
Carimari, S.S. Adabellé Lykes, S.S, Fio
Orinoco, S.S. Defender, S.S. Amiki, 8.8.
Lia, S.S. Lady Rodney, S.8, Lady Nelson,
5.8. Rangitiki, S.S. Pdlarchief, S.S, Fort
Amherst, Randford, 5.S. Macoris, S.S.
Greenhaven Trails S.S. New Jersey, S.S.
Bessggen, S.S, Republic, S.S. Monte
Urbasa, S.S. Gertud, S.S. Schligwen.
SS. Norman Diet, S.S. Empress of Scot-
land. SS. Exanthia, S,S, Ciodad De
Caracas, S.S. Salamis, 8.8. Regent Tiger,
§.S. Bacchus, S.S. Islandside, S.S. Celilo
S.S. Mormactern, 8.8. Mormacdove, S.g.
Boskoop, S.S. Uruguay, S.S, Mount
Oxford, S.S. Federal, S'S. S. Gaspar

Capt.

S.S.
8.

CHURCH

METHODIST
STP£ET—11 a.m, Rev. E. Grif-

JAMES
fin, 7 p.m.
P.

Rey. F. Lawrence,
BAY—9.30 a.m, Mr, W. St. Hill,
7 p.m, Rev. E. Griffin. S.

WHITE .30 a.m. Mr. G. Barke7’
7 pan Rev. H. C. Payne. S.

GILL MEMORIAL—9.30 a.m. Rev. R
McCullough, S. 7 p.m. Mr. F. Roach.

HOLETOWN—8.30 a.m, Rev, E. Griffin.
S. 7 p.m. Mr. J. A.

BANK HALL—@.30
Payne, 7 pum. Mr. G,
SPEIGHTSTOWN--11 am. Mr. J. Layne.
7 p.m. Rev. R. McCullough. S.

SELAH—9.30 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrence. 8.
7pm. P.M.

BETHESDA—11 a.m, Rev. F, Lawrence.
S.7 pm. P.M.

ae

:

ST. CATHERINE EPISCOPAL CHURCH

DASH ROAD—3 p.m, Sunday School,

7 p.m. Solemn Evensong and Intercession,

Preacher: Mr. Gamble.

N.B. Stations of the Cross every Friday

night during Lenten Season. ‘



: BRING US YOUR

PRESCRIPTIONS

WE DISPENSE CAREFULLY
and ACCURATELY



The Cosmopolitan Pharmacy
FOCOOC3 06006600500 99900800600SOSLOTDON0S 6596R










See us for - - -



BRC

Phone
4306

1f-& 11 Roebue



EXPANDED METAL
TEMPERED HARD BOARD
OIL STOVES & OVENS

T. HERBERT Ltd.



k St., & Magazine Lane.

FABRIC

Phone |
4267
|

Mrs. Sylvia Wilks leaves some-
thing like £44,000,000. And her
last recorded words were: “Dogs
are truer friends than humans”.

She had 80 years to make up
her mind about that—80 years in
which the cliche “Poor little rich
girl” seemed made to measure
her.

Except that she was not little.
She was six feet tall and 134
stone. Self-consciousness about
her size was one reason she be-
came an unhappy recluse.



MOTHER, HETTY
Misery on £21,000.000

The other reason was in her
blood. Her mother was recluse
Hetty Green—that fabulous figure
in the world of money of whom

Wall-street said: “She is better
than the men.”
Hetty Green made her mil-

lions in estate deals right across
America—and then terror enter-

ed her life,
This was a_ nightmare that
some good-for-nothing fortune

hunter would contrive to marry
her daughter and get her money.

Young men were chased away,
and Sylvia already haunted by
her outsize measurements, learn-
ed to pursue privacy with her
mother’s fanatic determination.

She had been born in London,
the daughter of a foreign ex-
change broker named Edward
Green, who became an invalid.

Hetty took Sylvia and her sec-
ond child, Edward, to live in a
cheap, sordid flat in the New
York suburb of Hoboken where,



GOVERNMENT NOTICES

ATTENTION is drawn to the Price of Goods (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1951 which will be published in the Official Gazette of



Monday 12th February, 1951.

2. In this Order the following new item has been inserted; —

10th February, 1951.

Linseed *s i

ATTENTION is drawn to the Defence (Control of Drug and

Patent and Proprictary Medicine

will be published in the Official Gazette of Monday 12th February, |

1951.

Husband Found

_ While runn:ng her vast finan-
cial enterprises with a firm hand.
Hetty Green never took her bel-
ligerently watchful eye off her
daughter .

They lived a life of frugality,
and there were acid disputes with
tradespeople on the slightest sus-
picion of over-charging. '

At long last, when Sylvia was
38, a husband was found who |
came up to her mother’s speci- |
fleations.. He ‘was Matthew Astor
Wilks, great-grandson of multi-
millionaire Jaeob Astor, and with
a fortune of his own.

He was 64, a “good clubman”
and lover of good food. But the
marriage was loveless.

Hetty, despite the bridegroom's
ample fortune, made him sign a
document waiving all claims to
Sylvia’s money,

In 1916 the “Dragon of Wall-
street” died because she argued

about money with a drunkes
cook. Her reply gave her a
stroke.

She left 100 million dollars—

at that time £21,000,000—between
son, and daughter, witha “sur-
vivor take all” clause when one
died.

The son died. In 1926 Sylvia's
husband. died. She took all—and
began to fade quietly out of the
world,

She ignored fashion changes
dressed in black, and avoided ol: |
friends. She barred, innovations |
like radio.

And at her big estates in Mas-
sachusetts and Connecticut she
studied birds and bred dogs.

At her Fifth Avenue home she
closely studied the financial pa-
pers and issued instructions |
her brokers. But she never went
out and she never entertained.

This sad woman, who slunk
through life behind a wall of
wealth once gave an indication
of how things were for her.

During a legal fight over her
brother’s personal estate a law-
yer asked her where her brother
had lived in New York.

She replied bitterly. With my
mother—if you can call that liv-
ing.”

L.E.S.

PERCENT
30

11,2.51.—1n,
|

Prices) Order, 1951, No. 2 which |



2, Under this Order (a) the maximum retail selling prices. of |
“Analgesic Balm” and “Glycerine” are as follows: —





MAXIMUM RETAIL





ITEM UNIT OF SALE PRICE
geen
Analgesic Balm
(Parke Davis & Co.) | Small sized tube ee 66c.
» we Large sized tube we 90ce, {
Glycerine .. aod. O8, 15e. |

(b) by deleting in its entirety the article “Linseed” from the \
Control of Drug and Patent and Proprietary Medicine |
Prices (Amendment) Order, 1949 No, 6. |

10th February, 1951.









WHATEVER

BUY

PRICES OF ALL COMMODITIES ARE ON THE UPSURGE

WE HAVE

IN STOCK AT THE MOMENT

JUDGE BRAND ENAMELWARE
(Now Opening)

ALUMINUM WARE

ELECTROPLATED

GALVANISED PAILS &- TUBS

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Central Foundry

| Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets

Phone

A Tip of Sound Advice

YOUR REQUIREMENTS

tt tn en nese grt palpate inetd

11,2.51.—-1n.



NOW

WARE

Ltd.—Proprietors.)

4200





rr
Ut
eregerat

*-e'n nai + idee
BLTCAAM CAVEND ER

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Beauty, you lifted
up my sleeping eyes,
And filled my heart

with longing with a look.’”

JOHN MASEFIELD

4

Like a happy memory, the haunting

fragrance of Mitcham Lavender brings

the English countryside to Barbados
~ Originally made by Potter & Moore
in their Mitcham Distillery two hun-
dred years ago, Mitcham Lavender
has ever since been dedicated to
Beauty the World over. ‘

>a




Ben

UIANTINE
AFTER-SHAVE LOTION



'

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(

a
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Obtainable at BOOKERS' DRUG STORES __

MRS. HOUSEWIFE!

Have you experienced difficulty to obtain - -- -

SAD IRONS?

we have

If so received a limited quantity in

sizes 5, 6 and 7.



N.B. HOWELL

LUMBER and HARDWARE

PERKINS & CO., LTD.

DIAL 2072 & 4502

Roebuck St.



~ 12, HIGH ST. 12 HIGH ST.

ROYAL STORE

Headquarters for
Shirts

— 12 HIGH ST.

12 HIGH ST.



NOW IS THE TIME
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@ CUPS o 4 3 BOWLS (All Sizes)
@ JUGS PIE DISHES (All Sizes)

e@ pREAKPAg? CARRIERS
And Many Others too Numerous to Mention

Pay us a Visit Before Making Your Purchase Elsewhere

Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
No, 16 SWAN STREET

PHONE 2109, 4406, or 3534 i
i
{





| BEFORE STEEL PRICES

“a Sanderson HAND SAWS—24’-~36”
vs COMPASS SAWS—12” & 16”
” BACK SAWS—14”
Stanley PLANES—Jack, Fore and Jointer.
RATCHET BRACES
‘i HAND and BREAST DRILLS
SAW FILES, PLANE IRONS, SQUARES.
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A ethics

PAGE THIRTEEN
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TO-DAY!!

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HANDCRAFTS

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WEST INDIAN CRAFTSMANSHIP

Beautiful Bracelets, Brooches, Pendants and Earrings

Scatter Pins .... Dainty and inexpensive

that will afford you adequate protection and peace
mind.

For information and rates, apply to the Agents:—

NEW CELANESE PANTIES



CHILDREN’S COTTON DRESSES

on




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FIRE!
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STREETS

TOURISTS
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SUN HATS

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RISE
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PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY ii, 1951
MAKING READY Grex:ada May Not Civil Servants Ask — rR ee
a = * 4 1 ORG p , x

eae import B’dos Sugar For More SE ape
t a : at Our Own ene All * VOLES rh O V ns a
i Ce ae ST. GEORGE'S, Grenada, | owalice 4 oe es
i : ; eb. i a Me ae ‘ Vi ihe
iN pk ge : Prospects of the 1951 sugar crop ST GEORGE'S. Grenada, ; MLD

make it unlikely that there will
have to be importations from Bar-
bados to supplement the. locally
produced supply

‘Feb. 8.
Requests from the Civil Ser=
vice Association “and ine in-
dividual«members of the vice
Last year a production peak of 1. an increese in the cost of liv-
1,660 tons was reached, the most ing allg;-nce will be examined

successful since the operation of mitt ich has recent-
the Grenada Sugar Factory Ltd. oe $ Lemnmittee whic



Yjis
Ml,

14 vears ago, and this year an out- '* 3 sot up.
put of about 2,300 is anticipated. Wher His Excellency Sir Robert
Production was 1,350 toms in Arundéil ad@ the Budget}

1948 and 1,600 im 1949.

Annual sugar imports from Bar-
hados have been a little over 1,000
tons.

The factory also aims at produ-
‘ing this season a grade which it
is hoped will compare favourably
with Searles super sugar.

Grinding is now in the fourth
week

HOTEL PROPRIETER DIES

From Our Own Correspondent
ST. GEORGE'S, Grenada,
Feb. 10.
The death took place last Mon-
day afternoon of Robert E. Henry,
aged 82, proprietor of the ground
floor store of the Savoy Hotel
building which was destroyed in

session of the Legislative Council
on Decormber 14, He’ mentioned
these requests but’ said there had
not been sufficient. data to assess
the mérits of the claims. 7

Sinee leaving for England on
official business, . His. Excellency
has ‘consulted the Secretary .of
State and as a result a two-man
committee has been appointed to
establish facts and to report con-
fidentially thereon to His Excel-
lency.





; THESE YACHTS are getting ready to sail in the Fourth Regatta of the R.B.Y.C. yesterday.
a ee

Band Plays Governor Asked To
ae Esplanade Settle Grenada Strikes

J This Evening From Our Own Correspondent



Members of the Committee are :
Mr. Alistair McLeod-Smith, Fin-
ancial and Economic Adviser,
Windward Islands, and Mr, T. D.
To s, Principal Auditor, Wind-
wardgisiands.

Mre G. E. Luck, Acting Assist-

. : ~ Er 1 saa util is last January's tragic fire. ant @hiet Secretary, is Secretary,
ol Sosace Bc ont wh ST. GEORGE'S Gr mneeis, Feb. ee stan aioe sot tee fire tke, Heder @hie y
pte . Raison, will An urgent request to His Excellency the Acting Gov- \ 4; 4 patient at the Colony Hos-



start giving Sunday Concerts once
a incnth at the Esplanade Band-
stafd. The first of this series will
ke-at 4.45 o’clock this evening
Tie continuance of these con
certs will depend on public sup
é port and upon special Sunday
engagements in the country dis-

ernor, Mr. G. C. Green, C.M.G., M.B.E., to take immedi- pital where he died.

ate measures to settle the new wave of labour unrest pre- * The deceased was a brother of
cipitated by labourers downing tools on two estates over Mr. F. M. Henry, Barrister-at-
the past two weeks and creating a delicate situation at a Law

third, is to be made by the Agricultural Employers’ Society.
Last Thursday, the Society had done nothing except put tne







. .» with a skin that is.

STUDENT RETURNS soft... smooth... free

1/674. |

cart before the horse but they

tricts. The recent addition of twice
as much seating accommodation
anti the now attractively painted
Bandstand, together with the view

of vessels of all sizes silhouetted

in,fiie setting sunlight across Car-

lisle- Bay, should all tend to
heighten the enjoyment of music

Mhe programmes will be com-

piled from the Band’s repertoire of
classical and concert music, with
well-known excerpis from the

, great. Oratorio’s—Handel’s ‘“Mes-
siah,” Mendelssohn's “Elijah” and

i Paul”; Haydn's “Creation”
@ Stainer’s “Crucifixion.” The
v s iterns will be interspersed
! renderings of seasonable
hymns:

‘The ground immediately around
the Bandstand is covered with
asphalt and parents and jguardians
ofssmall children are earnestly




ted to keep them under
contfol and from running and
playing around the stand, while
the programme gooes on,

_ whe following programme has
been*arragned for this evening:—
Grand Marth—La Reine de Seba. Gounod
Overture —Egmont Beethoven
Selection—Melodies of Schubert. Godfrey

Bell Solo—Cathedral Chimes Howgill
Suite—Water Music G,. F. Handel
Mofeésu—Bells Across the Meadow

. Ketelbey
Clagsio—Prelude, Chorale and Fugue in
“C" Minor J. 8. Bach

re Excérpt—The Heavens are Tell-
. dng fvom The Creation J. Haydn
é—The Homage March Gries
ymns:—Eternal Father, Strong to Save.
4 Son of My Soul, Thou Saviour

GOD SAVE THE KING.
. EBRIC DENNY, an em-
ployee of the Public Mar-
Ket, has been keeping fowls for
many years but recently he had
a queer experience.
en the price of fowl feed was
increased one of Denny's hens be-
gan, to crow. It laid an egg, and
mstéeid of cackling as the other
hens do, it crowed like a eéck. It

a
* Re

has now stopped laying, and ia
réhdy to sit but Denny told the
Adiveeate yesterday that he is

playing safe. He will wait a week
before putting eggs under her.
*PUE COLONIAL EXHIBITION

was opened in Newecastle-on-
Tyne by the Secretary of State for
ue Colonies recently.

. The Lerd Mayor of Newcastle-
on-Tyne sent His Excellency the

¢vernor a telegram expressing
cordial greetings to the people of
Barbados from the citizens of
Neweastle-on-Tyne with the best
wishes for prosperity.

‘The Lord Mayor said: “May I
algo-ask you to convey good wishes
» te the authorities of Codrington
College with which we are happy
to be identified through the city's
association with King’s College ot
the University of Durham.”

His Excellency replied: “On be-
half of the people of this loyai
and ancient cclony of Barbados
I send our deep appreciation of
the good wishes of the Citizens
of Newceastle-on-Tyne and reci-
procate the sentiments you have
expressed. The authorities of Cod-
rington College are grateful for
your remembrance of them,”

NOSFORD HUSBANDS was

awarded first prize at the
focal Talent Show at the Globe
Theatre on Friday night. Hus-
bands sang the popular hit “Our
Very Own.”
,. Second prize went to Sam Gor-
‘don who enlivened the atmosphere
with “Sunnyside of the Street.”
Other contestants who gave good
jporformances were Cheston Holder
with “Maybe It’s Because” and
“Sonny” Morris with “Slow Boat
t6 China.”



| They'll Do ‘Tt Every” Time










Premerecuin (









4g MR.OEBUNKER / ONE WITH HALF A MIND ; ARE UPR)
HIMSELF WHEN / COULD FALL FOR THAT WORD TLE / AND JUST, A SINCEE I
| IT COMES TOHIS [ CRYSTAL BALL BUNK _ |] PENNY ScALE ( COUNSELOR AND Wek You
| +) WIFE WANTING BEATS ME! OF ALL THE | 9 SHOOTS OUT! / LEADER “ss UNQUOTE»

HER FORTUNE

NOINOT WHILE Z'M |
witH YOU! HOW ANY-

GULLIBL
A LOT OF POPPYCOCK !!

which has the support of all cocoa
and nutmeg estates, the island’s
staple industries, at a very repre-
sentative meeting passed a resolu-
tion instructing its Executive
Committee to send.a seven-man
deputation to the Governor with
tne above plea.

The Society named the follow-
ing to comprise the deputation :
Hon. C. A. O. Phillips, Messrs.
F. M. Henry, David Lang, Her-
bert Neckles, Louis Strauss, Dud-
ley Ferguson and Dr. J.
Groome

An eariier resolution reaffirmed
the Society’s loyalty to its agree-
ment with the Trades Union
Council, on which the striking
Manual and Mental Workers’
Union has declined. representation,
fixing a bonus on the existing min-
imum wage at the rate of 3%
per cent of every ten cents above
the basic price normally paid for
cocoa by dealers in the local mar-
ket and in calculating the bonus
regarding any portion of ten cents
exceeding five as ten cents. These
rates are subject to revision every
three months according to fluctua-
tions in the prices of cocoa in the
Jocal market.

Minimum Wage

Minimum — agricultural wage
here is 82 cents for men and 68
cents for women, but late last year
an Arbitration Tribunal taking
local conditions into consideration,
awarded a 25 per cent increase io
Sugar workers.

The Agricultural
Society—T.U.C, agreement is
Subject to revision every three
months and the first quarter this
year shows a three cents drop on
the last quarter of 1950, though
there is every prospect of a new
peak prevailing April—June.

At the Society's meeting, pro-
prietors of the strike-bound es-
tates reported on what had been
experienced, expressing exaspera-
tion at the fact that the workers
gave no notice whatever of dis-
Satisfaction or stated any specific
grievances, but at the instigation
of their leader, Mr. E. M. Gairy,
just stopped working. r

Members in the
which followed suggested that
Government be asked ;to intro-
duce legislation to prevent what
they called these “lightning
strikes” which were not conducted
according to approved Trade
Union lines Not merely their
own interest or that of the work-
ers was at stake, but the economic
Stability of the island.

Views were divided on a pro-
Posal to form a Labour Poo!
whereby the Society’s members
would mutually assist with la-
bourers in cases of emergeacy,
some considering that this might

Employers’

discussion

cause lead to ill-feeling and per-*

haps clashes among workers,
Labour Office Attacked

Other members attacked the
Labour Office, charging that it



The Guest Star was Percy
Welch. He sang “I Don’t See
You” and “San Fernando Valley.”

FIRE at Durarts Plantation,
Christ Church on Friday night
burnt a quantity of ripe canes.
They are the property of H. Ward
of the same plantation.
EN-YEAR-OLD Minorvya
Thomas of Belfield Land,

Black» Rock, was taken to the Gen-
eral Hospital yesterday afternoon
and detained.

Thomas was injured in an ac-
cident along Black Rock Road.
Also involved was a motor car,
driven by F. Watts of Black Rock.

Registered US Patent OfMee





E+SUCH TRIPE!

>
5
‘









From Our Own Correspondent
ST. GEORGE'S, Grenada,
Feb. 10.
Mr. George Clyne, son - m=
vorkers’ side resi- and Mrs. H. A. Clyne o ;
1 £. M. Gairy Prev: David’s, has returned from Eng-
: - land where he recently qualified

did not direct this criticism at the
young Labour Officer in person as
he had to carry out Government’s
instructions.
On the
dent—General E.

adamant on a 45 per cent. in- |
crease in pay for cocoa and nut- a a Barrister-at-Law- Acting
meg estate labourers. Deputy Registrar here when he

This he said at a meeting ai left in November, 1949, he was
La Sagesse which Mr, Louis called at Gray’s Inn last June.

Strauss, the English proprietor While awaiting a steamship oppor-

R. only three months in the island, tunity, he did post-graduate study

nge so that at the Inn.
ess the work-

asked him to
they could both adc
ers,







HEAD TEACHER DIES

Only concession Mr, Gairy
made, speakinz three times, was "i x
‘ r nr o Correspondent
that his followers were wrong pra chee See Serene

ST. GEORGE'S, Grenada,

Feb. 10.
Hildred Modeste, retired

when last Wednesday some forty
of them entered on the estate to Miss
prevent a fellow worker from re- yy,

suming and gave him chase, Even Methodist School, died last Thurs-



not recognise the'T.U.C. as re
presentative of labour in Gren,
ada. You are not going to starve
as people may try to impress upor
you. In Trinidad where worker
have no peas and corn or blug-
goes to fall back on they strike
for months. It will not be as hare
on you.”

He aiso had a word for Mr
G. S. DaBreo, Labour Officer anc

Saturday night, Feb, 24

Music by Percy Green’s
full Orchestra

ADMISSION ©:
Strictly by invitation only

PPP PDL LPL

at this he “me he could oe day at the Colony Hospital. She

what gWES AG INOwVE OS. os*; recently returned from a visit to

who chased the man and his was} relatives in the United States.

only a moral obligation to in-

struct his workers, oy VIOLENCE] & 42GG99SGS9S9999SS9 999997

on their part was their. responsi-

bility. fie also said he would 14" q

bring to the notice of Police FLANNEL DANCE }

Headquariers allegations that Under the tronage of

thie officers posted for duty in the H Nd c a 2 a ie

area had used threats to the ON Ve: Ge GEG ME, tach

workers, to be given by

Cannot Starve BARBADOS PRESS CLUB

“Anyhow,” he said, “tnis strike

is indefinite. You want mort in honour of the members

wages and better conditions o! of the visiting Trinidad

work and Mr, Strauss has tole ‘ Cricket Team

us that he cannot negotiate wit! |

our Union because he has an} 4 at

agreement with the T,U.C. I de QUEEN'S PARK

i rn

$1.00

666 56 poo OOO









Barrister-at-Law who was_ also} s** OPEC ESS PIOAS,
present. Mr. DaBreo had ex- % %
plained the existing wage agree-|&\ a»; . ~
ment and in the course of doing * NEPTUNE'S DAUGHTER s
so said that such a pact was ex-|\ %
pected to be as binding on em- % e x
ployers as workers were expectec|% .
to stand by their Union’s policy % ENTERTAINMENT & t
Mr. Gairy declared he was of1$ y
opinion that Mr, DaBreo war) ¢$ DANCE
taking the side of the employer:| %
and if he continued he would % at Rf
stop his labourers listeniny tc] ¥
ni fe aetiocee: 3
Such is the present impasse] } Q ¥
here, and Gairy has publicly saic x (Local & Visiting Mémbers : ;
he would similarly tie-up ever) & Only) ~1 @
estate if necessary for the de-| x ,
mands of his Union, ‘ on ¥ ,
ea x Saturday, February 17th, x ;
% 9 p.m. N ,
rv 4
The Weather || ° 313
x 8 A Silver Cup will be pre- Q!§
TODAY x sented to the Lady selected 9| g
Sun Rises: 6.22 am. % ee te. x1 ¢
(Sun Sets: 6.04 p.m. 8 x1
Moca (First Quarter) Feb- % NEPTUNE’S DAUGHTER 3} %
ruary 13 s$ Competitors must be be- %]§
Lighting: 6.30 p.m. % tween the ages of 14 and $j §
High Water: 7.10 a.m., 7.34 |] 21 years. x }
p.m. e ,
YESTERDAY S$ Costume: White Shorts and }]Q |
Rainfall (Codrington) .02 in. |] % Shirt.
Total for Month to yester- s Judging will take place at $| pos
day: .96 in. x Midnight, a
. or x
Temperature (Min.) 75.5°F % THE FIRST SHOW OF ITS d
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) % ‘A DOs
E.N.E. (11 am.) ENE, [| KIND IN BARBADOS.
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per |) KEEP THIS DATE OPEN.
oO =, 1.
BRaremeter (9 a.m.) 30.008, . DANCING WIND. (> g
(iL a.m.) 29.998 , Music by Arnold Meanwell’s
" > Orchestra
s There will also bea...
. = x DOOR PRIZE of $5.00 R
, nm i x
By Ju ¥ Hatlo | JR Admission to Batiroom 2/- %
- A 8 11.2.51.—1n, %






eS

34 (SIS LPO OOS







H/MMM LISTEN Ti
THiS QUOTE: "yy }



















GOSH! HOW THEY HIT
THE OLD NAIL, EY 2

SUFFER





STIFF NECK,

RHEUMATISM,
PAINS IN_ THE

JOINTS

You can get speedy re-
lief by rubbing in

| SACROOL

This great







Knights Drug Stores

Â¥
Y;
3

| Pain-Killer on Sale at

ANDREWS
4a

om



ad Teacher of the St, George’s }}, «

SAVE your Woodwork

~ and all wood-destroying insects, rot and fungi. Also timber

GET READY




from blemishes.

Women everywhere will find that
DREAM is a beauty soap beyond
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will yield a new Skin Beauty he-
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conditions,
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Toilet Goods counter,

IVER SALT



a




















FOR SALE
IMMEDIATE POSSESSION
MODERN BUNGALOW
NAVY.

Newly Built Bungalow, comprising
Three Bedrooms, Toilet and Bath,
Large Living-dining room, Kitchen,
Servants Room and Toilet, Garage,
All combined in one well-designed
unit. Running water Bedrooms.
Grounds enclosed by walls, with
area approx 6,000 sq ft, faeing
South. Complete neatly kept
open grass area (Different owner)
in front of Grounds.

Keys for inspection at our Office.
Electric Light, Garden water laid
on, so MOVE RIGHT IN NOW.

A. BARNES & CO., LTD.




Atlas -A’

CONCENTRATED

from destruction by
USIAGE Ee

Wood Preservative

HEAVIEST RAINS CANNOT WASH IT OUT.
THAT IS THE ADVANTAGE OF IMPROVED ATLAS “A”

Once in the Wood it is there for Good !
The timber is PERMANENTLY protected against Termites



treated with it can subsequently be painted or varnished

WITHOUT ANY ADDITIONAL PREPARATION OF THE
SURFACE. ATLAS “A” is odourless, easy to apply and eco-
nomical. When made ready for use by diluting 1 part
ATLAS A” with 3 parts water, this Wood Preservative costs
as little as $1.03 per gallon.

Stocked in '4 gin., 1 gin., and 5 gln. Drums
Retailed in any Quantity from 1 gill upwards.

_

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid.

AGENTS.






FOR THE CRICKET




Let. us. fit. you now
~~ with a

_ FINE
TROPICAL SUIT

BLAZER

AND

FLANNEL _ }
PANTS 3







P.C.8. MAFFET & C0. LTD.

“Top Scorers in Tailoring”

« seeps deep
down into the pores flushing out dirt and
perspiration acids that caure abnormal skip

Play safe . . . use DREAM Toilet Soap
and see for yourself the improvement it

DREAM -is available at your favourite



SS SSBOSOSODES SS SSS SOS!
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e—an—n—aoOo mE =





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RICH BEAUTY | ATHER
FRAGRANTLY PERFUMED

: “ze |
YY

+
a_/
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TOILET SOAP

<
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XN

oe. —







*s

WRITING NEEDS !!

WATERMAN BALL POINT PENS AND REFILLS

COLOURING BOOKS FOR CHILDREN
CRAYONS AND PENCIL BOXES

ROBERTS & Co.

Dial 3301





Flowered
Dress

Goods




“Bembergs” in small de-
signs. 36” wide.

Per Yd.—$172 ard $1.92

— and —

Printed Crepes

A beautiful qual-

ity fabric in small

- designs. Coloured

Â¥ grounds with White

and Black & White.
36” wide.

i Per Yd; $]-85



Cave Shepherd & Co. Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

COMFORT.

STYLE.
DURABILITY.

THESE ARE WHAT YOU
SHOULD DEMAND OF
GOOD CLOTHES.
THESE ARE WHAT YOU
GET IN CLOTHES MADE BY

C. B. RICE & CO.

BOLTON LANE



c00seseese$





Full Text

PAGE 1

I'M.I I'M I.VI SUNDAY ADVOCATE SI'MDAY. FEBRUARY II. IS31 CLASSIFIED ADS. Ths Ark newi M entertain net*** la %  ana llMon Sunday. if -miU up m 90. and ,1 ..„ .-ek d* h on n I 91 February ln. I1. -i %  tlmeon St Clan CM Hie .'iner II e abotr res-Serce al 4 IS pi V>-*lor Ihe Seventh D-. AHvnHi C'iirh King Slreel end Ihrnee la II Westbm" < i •Nutir OHvlM i.' ..I-OWI Olivi Owrif end F-i*...i >S*I .i |M General Hospllal Huiee Br florence Waldn>n lift funeral Iese i %  %  -. %  WtWOl Dal Ail V*M.- IV IN MEM( RIAM lit hi. ItARYII I E-I, Marviite who parted ihu lif< rWtuir) lllh. Istta The midniahf lUK .hlrte un hU •rave To* on* we loved hut could (Ml %  *• rot those he loved he aid hi be.t I Cod grant him noeternal nut %  at ta. he I'mtmbrr-d by Mr*. An b rot me MarvHIr i" Mi "• %  %  Ark Man* in ->* Gloria tOiaitd-ClMkUei.i FOR WALE ems*, charge ureek Tl %  n't ' I. Xnadau. M i.-ord ee*< 1 ceai. u > i %  • ffajajiaaja. 'urnlintd; Lighting ttmf Mil i~, % %  Mi -'1.1 M -tl I. Ml IH II MUM I S tins -aSaes p. NM< I >u*ai mfctvfflnua nvot*. mMiiii niBBrlu'ils J<*e, WlUlaani a, c. DMM. Victoria Wo.--, Fiftan. mUnd • IS I 51 Itn NOTICE r \m-ii or "T. JOHN Vllllll IrU'lv %  IHnc apptoiimat'lv *1 pfnta purr (IM ** milk dail lo St John* Almahoiar In two dallveilm. aa) ftom lha * Marti IMI Applwnllon* will k••nlWO b> lha und>-r**" iratant, ..nil II H to bf unaWaMwtf tnkl tha Wm or anv itnart lll nnl nacaaIv M atci-plad n s rAiir.ii. Clatk. Hoard nl l*nar La*/ Oiiardiarc %  •TI'.WAHTVIUX 3 bedroom. DramIna and Dlnlni Room. PanUT. KiirHan, : Saivari.' Rootle. Seaudr. Haatlnca. C m • aM i.i.l— 4J NOTICF PAMIH Ol -T % %  %  i .i Appl.-.ti.*.. fui Ihr l'...t of ParochU; Til Miner will b* racoived b. th un. dpr. antllcalkHH lot Po-l of T Apply: Mfi W 1 Hop*, ftl Tlv>ma . Mi anal Ji T. i;i~*n. 1ro 4IM-JK WTNOOVew Itorklay to ba 1.1 and July Apply; 9 ALtM-rill* Gatdam I'llllK SALES mtt pat opal* % % %  %  -i p eaait In m •harm' >l 10 %  0 oa .\fioK . I .,u. AUCTION GOVERNMENT NOTICES Joaaph iiin m ALEXANDKA IHKI. Thm h..>i vrai arW bMOn in INlaJM ia<-r In July M a data lo uml k.ilix-d lala* Paranli -. idler the matriculation rrajlairatlon feo of three guineas to that :i"' infurmittion and fee Is roeelved by theUniversity of I-ondnn durfnc Fehmary 1951. Similarly, If they expect to comllctitheir main.-ulatlon exemption by passing llw Higher School Certificate or a single subject at the School Certiorate Examination, they niuM fttato the Give his address clearly, and full name. H i Stale index nutnl>er. centre, dtte and name of the examination. £d) forw a rd fee of three H'linens to reach the University of I-rmilon duiiiiB KeUruai>. TltOM instruction* countermand any already peiven to pervans who have been In touch with the University of London about thl matter Department of Education. flth February, lMl. 10.2.51—2n. No ReauvntH ^ ,NKKS STRIKE JTO Kpquosls \ ,„ Abttat 45,000 miner*, about half WASHINGTON. Feb 8. the total In the French coalfield* Prealdent Truman hold up hit ot (h e n0 rth and Pa* Do hand in salute to the Prime Minisj department*, obeyed a 14-hour ter of Ne* Zealand. Sidney Hoi \ ttrikv ra n frpm the CommunistMti led Genera) Corlederat.on of him a' the Whrte ||,.u-e th*( K| nboUr loday %  %  lp for his roan who i* here for a five. : .Mllg trln(. UU.t and Aupi Poit OaVa Box Til. Ilridaa'oan 11 J.S1" %  t. oil Brooma. IT /. %  rWultura Porxa. ill Lanlama. "Mi ttakaa > wi„i Bairo*i AUTOMOTIVE f *J BM VaohaU II h livdar. i naw Tyraa itphob allani rotadltton Bi|i lunnd I tail lor Infprcllon II II II %  • V:iu*nati vndlllon. Phona %  I'?'! T ivad from U %  arlmanl of llian-ayt I) ael up for ulc b %  I their yard on Thuti beginnlrul at 113* p •ma ->J*Si Hlaal Broon.,. Shovala, illi PMbaka*. iMi .Ml. Biitkrl.. n Twlat DrilU of lnlai*,i %  AHl. V A SCOTT. Oovt. Auctioneer Till l!'. Applicants are invited for lha peal •( i Almahouaa it a aalary of ST u*e month, UP if or m Iaid quarterprovided A pot leant i ,r.ul be fully carl I ia-sled. iitowive*. and irenefal NurWM Thi ,ia'tearful candidate m lulir en th Icbruar* IKI. appuMtatMM u ill Itreceived by t : "tn Pewruar* 11*01. UKWALD L l-HANF. C'ark Board of Poor Law nuardl. I'l lll.it SAILS CAi'ABIJ: Watt. VOUNQ MAN w• l.*ure*. tu fii on ID ltd Broad si i .i AMXANtHtA SCHOOL WANTBO from May 11*1. an A—Ulan* Mlstr-ai lo tea.h DM or more of lha folio...a Ar". Lalln Ftanch, Spanlah. Malhematlca. Satary. accnrdin* to qualifications and amparience. on acala Secondary Taachei. ... Appllcatlona. la'in q-ulinratlona and iiiblect* offered and accompanied by leitimonlalii. muat tcicb the Headml,>*•• not (alar than rrbruary 1MB. U.1IM.Mr K C GOODBIUOE Member of the New Testament Church of God for many years now pwgton UM o*Bt** .'t Green's, St. George. MISCIXLANEOUS PART ONE ORDERS PAR All* %  An ran*, will pan lb Si Tn • R'li'i it. ',:. .*.',•VBirrtoiiae at %  • hout the drummer, and pipei PMN MM -uteain | m Fnday. I* of Ik* in--B. Ill be laaued %  i tlia bareaaea warehouap l>.c Mill I Hi ma tli in.y-lee of volunteertn rWlroe louap in Hi AMI'. Fort Theaa blcyrlee i >n .1>. iha parade d aSort pulieaa. beiet". wab belt, and Irnei %  -te bait* and -.word* lOmet-rat. UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER CARS itlSfi I Ss Morn. ,c w..l iVHAOlI CC.,. %  CAP Ford P]-re BE-t IMT One o.ner -etMced. Telephoni 4 I SI -Si *?. w FURNU-URE MAHiKiANV arvd Pine Preaae T A1XDCP. Hocl.il. StreH I MAHOGANY Dininf Table* . OWtJV T AUJHJt atlreet Dial MS* 1 LrVEwiOCK rAL\1\t—Tan day old Heifer Cahe Apply: Bulkeley lid. Dairy. mil it MISCELLANEOl'S ANTiwt Ol eeeey deacrlpllon Olaaa. China, old J..-H fine Bllvar Wataecoloun. Early booba. Map, Aulo%  rapha etc at (iorringn Antique Shop adjoiningRoyal Yacht Club %  a.aO-t.f.a. BA'ntS In Porccraiii H-iarocl. White. Oiean. Prunroaa with n.Mihi-i unit* lo complete colour •ulte,. Top grade A BAHNEK A Co. Ltd. DIVING MASKS able In the Toy Dept S Co. Lid. Ilt.sClllE.VS SVNUP Of I.INC Eapeciall. valuable ..lie. a attack of influent* ot vhoopln* coual Oive il lo vour children N"lMln kettei rreah supply to hainl al all DruafUU 4S.BI—4 li,.-i -Men I Fiuda, Pftenmon Dlnlna Table ..eat HI. Up. 1(M and Arm Chair,. Oinamenl Table*, Pedeatal an* other Stdeuoai d, Bo..k CMS i*la.wan..i. Card Table* •Antique!. Corner Cabinet '*laaa doora). Wrlllnf Table-. Porkara. Beriilee Chair. Bonk(M :.ll IH old M.iho*any. 1 vet* ... table upnoltleccd Arm ChamJ Cabinet. rutuiH. Paanllna* and Oond Xtehinta, t v-ev ttne Martiir Top ffenina Tablaa. Glai* Ware. Dinner. T Coflre ..nil Ftull Hervlcn; !tanaaiee Gl, Red. Table Giau. Bro. acnamant) Braaa Jarrtmietea, Plated i Btlrat Ware In Entre Dlabaa. Ice Tai ar*L Waiter*. Vo*>. Di*n Covers: Tea Coffee Seta; perk*. Bpeana, Cutlery Hue* and Slant Carpal. Chlmlne other Clock.. Clectr.c laimp.. To—ler -.id Kettle G t. Radio: Double Si.i||le Iron Bedileada with Bo (a. Mahoaany Twin Bed.tead. with Iprnia.. Dunlopillo. Deep Sleep and Beda. Dtenlna T.iblr, M.irblr Tap WaihPtand*, Mini Ptaaar., Cawche*. old %  Ml Chaal Olaaa ail in MahoaPieiich I'll'*., Cadat Linen and Mae*; Chamber Wate, Prl|ldalie In perleet workiruf order, l-roer*. Ware Ptaaaea Kitchen Utenul, and Table*. Leal Otovt. linen. Moaquiui Nrta. Garde Tennia Net, and Pole.; Rollei Including 3 <.. rare, I 11 of la..,. Palm i gale 1110 o clock Ternia CASH 1RANKER. TROTMAN A CO., Auctioneers. REAL ESTATE OH Tn SSA Modern Bunaelow. ) bedroom., twe baths. Oeerloeklruj Sea, own private bathing beach. Good Yacbt Anchotaaa Phone Bl-8*. ISII.aO-tf.n aXMO ... Easi. f nock S3 SO per i •aajpajru st I'.-.i GKEY GANDER Prun Ottlon. S :nn old 1 nee p ea, 01 Jame* lireedKHl -<>npjajt tucaot SIM -*n GALVAK1BKD PIPB •taaa %  a m '. In >, I lini. the follow ina HVMfUXJt CYCLE (-..MITTITION %  rind Haw Mumbe. Bleyele. Hn v-w al ilj.rrieon a sier Ticket. I'eaett. Bo. one now! a i M -in SITIUM.I-'. SlJ M ,i ( it. I lb. Tl. <;,..,.r 10SM-4I HOiryOE-At Inch Mallow Road. Cl lu.rch. I roofe and shedrnol. wllllnf to aeli in parti, no reaaonable offer refused Appl. Plancaa Vllle. Inch Marlow Po-d Clrl.t Church in Pra.uk Clarke IIIll In SHARESWith Accruing Dividend, SO Share. In Barbado* Shipping, tt Trading Co Ltd. The abttve will be *et up for sale b\ Public Competition at our OffWe. Jamea Street. BrMgeMmn. on T.ieada> the IJth rabtuarv al I pm G 1 W I'UKKE CO.. M %  cllora. HOUSBOne new board and ahlnal* louae. II • il x a fi build -ith %  -!• %  aay to move. Apply to gherlock Pleld uul Bay. Si Philip. SJ.V. ,,. Hq. Pee* land. Offer In wrltlna h* the aasne. i recHved bv B. C FUQ-D C. o Jai %  Co Ltd up In pi i-: OPTICAL, — Aval'aMe al Imperial Optical Cotoeet BaU Sluye Store. Lamer Broad Street • Sunahadea. Btnocubi.. Hnronietei*. Mwr.iarope*. Handreader* and all Optical .equiwli. J*hone 4*tV JalSI-l-f.n WATCH Oold Fill-* working or, a %  > ... Mi • ic 11 Jew Vat Appllo w l> 'WORTHY UOWM— Situated at Top Rock. con>i.ung of 3 bed-ooma with conretting toilet, and ahowec large lo.ir.ge. dlnln* room, ultra modern kluhefi. large front balcony, and breakfast balcony, garage. 3 servant*' rooms with and showers also laundry. The fround* ar* fully enclosed and th* garwall laid out etc. Available on h 1st. IMI rabove property Is well constructed ... .J-inch atone, with an PAenle roof Best offer above fct.OOO will be MC* pied her particulars etc. Ring e*M oa Tuesday. 13 rab SI -ill Ml lv\ 1 -IM S t %  Ul K 1 I0*1r fret ol 1 with new, %  •recta.< h iicldi IM pe n.'lith In good en||>l .1,-1... 1 .-I %  41 w K. irle. 1 %  |i, .1 %  ) M r Paatu SI 'llllill %  „ni -ells -He %  I and tu H pa Li iBj >,l.l *M itaiin A i sw and well hull'. Bun low n VOLONTABI sinBT There anil be no voluntai Hand Practice parades w.ll be held a* Ma-utay II. Wadm-day 14 and Thursda: IS Fab II. RfAllNI. THi: RSTRIAT AH rank* ami Iheu ranuli'* are invited la attend the 'Healing ol Reireai l.' 1 Inntaks on Sunday IS Feb II at It** hou.Officerand Iheir families oi the Reserve and Reii.ed lisliwl Ihe nea.rrvent are invited lo ilie Officer.anChM ure. Dress for those altemtina will be plain clollieoaiiiRi v orrn vn AND ORBERLIsroir ANT I on WIFK ENBINQ I HI. it Orderly Officer Orderly Serieant Sf.i fai ii-t. niderlv Officer .. I leut. T A. Gittcn. Orderly Serieant .. Hi L S Blacked. 1 1. M L D SKgWES-COX Ma SOL P. A Adlutani The barbado. POSlTIOS' WANTFB RRTIFCD C.F.NTITMAN Seeks. ployment in OnVe. Club or Hole! To .i Mat) i"'e h,„do.ii of i.lli Salary. Lunch A Bus Pai> i Advoc.ile I1IMW AN TIB TO BIT I'SXD POeTTACK •TAMP*—Of Ihe British West linlle. Cood P he Caribbean Stamp Society No u Slrecl. lb.IJI-111 nt: nisi:. .. .. tniiiinsi Itch Germs Killed in 7 Minutes' • Tour skin bMneortyW million tiny *-a*is| and pores -herBeeajja hide and "ause they do not Kill, !h"garmcause The hew d1s.o-.ry. Nteadsrm kill* the g-.m. In Y mitiutis and Is auaranleed lo glv, you a soft, cjear. attnsr. ] a**si oa tftotB, sToaaatg s**tagf> asjl guarant—d Niaa**in from your ehamlai Nixdderm for Skin TrOBBlo* tnj >y andr> e there r-nine r* i" Hill called WBSTI IF1.I). the proniv of the late Sir George Walton The nunaain* stain** on is.urn nmiland aanl ConUins one latttteom. t*o bedfoorfi*. kiteheii; lath and lavato-v. %  p. rale building there la a irage far one car and Iwo servant* Con* with bath aitd lavatory. Th. property will be aat up for sale our office on Wednesday the Il-l day rebruan 1*51. at I pm Fo. conditions ef sale apply to tn* >dersifned Inspection iitiv day belween 10 30 p m in C p.m. Telephone Lady Walton, K > 4**1. COTTU:. CATFORD A CO. Solicitor* *.9l-lln l"i: I'M SAI.K OB LEAS* nAGATELLE ltOVSC. Si. Thomas Upalrs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Dlnig room. Braakfaet room and Kiiciienett* ) bedrooms running water In each. Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed Oallary. Living-room, Breakfast room nod Kllchenelta. 2 Uedrooms Toilet and Bath. Use trie Ught and Tel* ph. Apply Mana-a* of bagalalla Pianist •H Thomas Dial tttl. l.|l.r-tat II MI i.ii I I TUN-VARY. IMI r::r; i approved by II. Coy Granted 4 I iKI-Wr-i-CoX Majot Ol I' A Adjutanl. Tl* Barbado. Ilccmi SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. S HIP ( Madeira-I I'ebruarv. iitrrdam, Dover and a. "Cot lira" fed, 3rd, Ui IMI. MS. -Bonaire" tlh. v,il lllng from Antwerp arid Amsterdam-'Helena'' III". IMh, February IMI. -Wlllemilad-' PH.. loth. February PA* •'Orime.tadrth. lllh kUrch Trinidad, Paramaribo and ?:th J,. arv IMI. m s. "Cotnca at*ih, February IMI: m*. -Helena'' 3sd March IMI. Sailing to TtinldBd, La Ouiare. Curacao etc—m.s. -Orsniestad" 1st Februaty 1M1. Sailing to Plymouth. Antwerp. A malar. rtam-m < "Oranjesjad" 73rd Feb. IKI. s. p. MvaatON. SON A ro., LTD. Agent* CARimTEg" wil 1> eg. Aniiaua. a B ala i rrat and si Kill.. Salhni .' %  : I l.'i aW*. •*• \1 V nAFRWOODwill .ept Cata and Paasangen foi i Lucia. Grenada, and A rube *d Pasaenaer. LTIIV for St Vin MIT. Dale of Sailing in lu B.W.I. SCnOONER OWNERS ASSOCIATION. Inr Conslxnee—Tel. No. 4041 SEE US FOR. LAWN MOWERS & PARTS nil-; < i:\iii ii. iMi'onn ti CENTRAL FOCNDRV WD— Pnvrlelan. I nr of Broad And Tudor Mrrrt. Canaflian National Steamships OOCTTWOlTBa* -W.DY NEl*ON" "CAN. CHALLENGER" "LADY RODNEY-%  lAPV NEIAON" "CAN. CHALLCN'GUl" l A1JY HODNXV lb P*J 3 Mar IS Mm. I Apr iu Apr. 4 F i Anis-ea Saila %  Barbado* Barbadoa f n, It P*b. 13 Fep a* r-b. aft Fab 8 Mar. 14 Mar IS Mar 31 Mar. 3 Mar War — I* Apr. IS Apr. IS Apr Tl Apr St Apr NOBTBBOCNB •LADY RODNEY" •i A1>Y Nl l.SON 1 •I-S.DT nODNa7\%  I^IiY NKLBON" "LADY BODNBY" 1* Peb. lllh Feb. IS Feb. IT Ft It Mai. M Mar. 13 Apr. 14 Apr. la May II May. 31 Fab 33 T*b. a Mar. • M*r Apr. 1 Apr GARDINER AUSTIN 4k CO. LTD. — A*mt*. -1ANO -Vp.,,li RliiiBinead. wall t MOJ. (si accepted Hardwood Alia Tundeolgnrd -ill niter l.ir >sle i their office No, II High Street Hridgi MB, on rrklny the i*ih Pelwuary IMI I p.m The messuage or dwelling house lormerlv known as Tallyrra now called "CRYSTAL WATTPaV' with the land thereto containing U' estimation II.Og' square Seat alluatad on In* aea al Car villa Avenue. Woilhlng. Christ Church, at present used as a boarding house. In.pecllen any day sac*** Sunday* % %  elween 4 and • p-m. on applicatt. Mis. Talma on Ma peasnlaeav For furlher particulars and condltlont f sale apply to:— COTTLE. CATFORD. A Co saii—iin 4-liaad. Just Use l-u.ig for Sto, !" Oflarag, ..id He..-.".'1 •*-, U. each; S tread ll each. Caau-M be riaaati* at lh" pi.ee, at KAi.ru •asAfttvs ar*.w iu !" ... H...I.,,-I Alley it>> si E LOST The uoderslgned -.III offer for sale al J-,1 %  *. St ..ver Hind* A Co Drug Store ... it. inn leMuary IMI al I p m by pub* i.„upeiition. one Mlem Sionehuill property known aa "Hill Creel". • i. •. .. : \ |.|.. i-.i mure R.~ -. oppo site Ihe AMR Chuich milh 5 SM q ft ol 1-i.d I brdmoms. ogatn verand>h. tiled i.. th and n-tei toilet. EletttNlty, can be fiom g .in lo I pro Applv lb* M w. I A M WATTS. James Strrct ll..,l 1113 103*1—4*1. WATCH WATCH 'li %  %  Plaa and Culloden Koade. on M • rial watcn I indet tUII lie Mlg aame lo Advncat imsyg Depi et may dial 3341. MAKWIN Maxwell, Band Modern >inor-l:..lt Bungalow. 3 Bs dr oom*. Dranlng and Dining Room Brrahfasl Room and Kllrhenelf-. Toilet snd Bath aWsnasHl Room. Uaraa* In card. Watei ind Elaclilc Ught installed Approximatelt E II Parr IX. I 0*3*7 PM 4.3.11 ENTEBPHISF A.. a ith 1 acre, of land i arable 4 •laliogaiiv' itjiiin.ng Propel ltd sl.iiie building. acres of paetute trees to be sold %  %  frasak*a I* Ihe t. AatacWa. wh> d*-slrous of bu ing far cash To be sell I I the US America Applv lo G Holder. Enterprise Christ Church Oap, Attorney for the EMate lor full infarmation. tlli-dn !• Today, more than ever bssloro. a sound lamily lllo la an essential background for th* preservation of our way ot lite. Since tho founding of tho Manufacturer* Life in 18S7, hundreds of thousand* ol broad winner* have used It* iaellllie* to safeguard tho futures of their famille*. 3§0,t*> CLIENTS ABC NOW *t.a*Ma| .uut.n.i.i •mounts ol their ssvlnq* policies they c 1413,(11,441 I* SECURELY INVESTED Mm Ma payment ol lh* benefil* promised undei thaee policies The Inletaat aained on these, lands wiv.ch are piincipaily lated pramlura depeait* — iedi.**a 1171,857,342 Or NEW INSURANCE WAS PUCHASED IN 1*10 by o..l H.000 cll.nu. mwy ol hoB ilitady PWH.I. ol M.nulac.uiott Lllo j.o..c..i. 523,217,2*1 WAS PAID TO LIVING POLICYOWNERS, and to th* Umllie* ol thene who Hie-.l TV.* Lie Insurance proqiami under which lha** payments were made have been caialully ananqed by irained Lie UnUarwiileia — one w | whom la arallabl* lo petlorm the same aarvlce lot you. MANUFACTURERS '-" %  *-" LIFE "> :• IMIISOMI. The public ..re hereby warned against giving credit lo n.> wife. MARIF. HOPE .nee CLARKE, a. 1 do not hold myself isepoi Hble lor her or anyone else contracting any debt or debts In my name ui leas by a written order signed b) me LIVINGSTONE HOPE. Chalky Mwint. St. Andrew NOTICE FNCLOSI'Rt: WALL tOMBERMERE Tenders are Invited foi enclosure wall appi .tely ho. long fi ft. high along the It air boundary of Combennere Sctn~'l T>ie all supported on reinforced connete pier and I-Mhn structure*. Detail*, specification*, etc can be Been at the Headmasters Office. Combermere School TenU.-r. Uioukl slate lh* cost pel 10* ft for Ihe erect uhmitted befoi lit *mg 11 >l the I M. PTNDAR Secretary. I Body of Comberme Bchool. SdENTIFIC MABSAOE Permanent reUet guarinteerl from Chronic H**lflaehe and Seuralgel Sklo ..nd far* Impro*pd through M.mip-.lative procesi ft'. Johnson. DM T. Crumpton V>V*'eVr.V>*, WEST ThrQCAIf CRAFTSMAN 4.181-3". J PETER DoVERTEVILLE—Chief Kcprt>sentatiYo ::: CLYDE WAI.COTT Aarnl: W.S MONROE Ic CO., LTD. — Phnne 4317. P.O. Box 102, Ilii-li SirrW. Sole: The above huures are given in Canadian Dollars. SIXTY TOUR YEARS Of WORLD-WIDE LITE INSURANCE SERVICE CHELSTON LINE WORKS Temper & lluilding Lime rote Btone Id Sand i D hire P.S. BROOKS, Phone 8335 AN OPrORTlNin TO BUY 1 Small Oas Ceokrr Grev Enamel Aniah i iier compsat* with oven cooker traded In I* buy A large Cooker PRICE Ml are it at Vou' Oa* gtk*W Room. FOR SALE OFFERS will be received by the undersigned up to the 18th dav of February for the block or buildings, (land not included), situated on Prince William Henry and Victoria Street* and Bolton Lane. arction* of which are at present occupied by W. A. Medford li Co.. The Manhattan Club, and until quite recently by the Bridgetown 1c* Company. Purchaser to demolish the buildings and clear the land within slaty days from dale of purchase. EVELYN ROACH ft CO., LTD. lUckett Street. 32.51—t.f.n. HAvl rOU GOT A COLD or COUGH IF SO TRY BROWNE'S CERTAIN COUGH CURE The UrUs.ua Remedy rot Coughl, Colds. Bronchitis. Sore Throat. Hoarseness. Bronchial Attains. Whooping Ceugh. Disease of Us* Cheat and Lungs, etc. etc. C CARLTON BROWNE Waeleamle A BaaaB BtfsfgM ISt BoebucA 51 — Dial SSI REAL ESTATE JOHN M. BLABON A.r.s.. r.T.A. Formerly Dlxen A Bladoa FOR SALE "IMH W11XOWH St James l>. lig.,;:j bungalow house with (pen verandah on West eons* maa-niAeent vl*** ot sen and OI MrHes Of beach. L*tg* lounge. 3 bedroom*. ) verandah., kill-nan, panliv and aervanl'* qu-ittet". Storernoms In baaement. "DFANF HOLLOW, gt, Lucy Plrss.nl ountrv home ol st*a* with shingle roof conlaining brdroom*. living and dinln* moms, kitchen, servant'* quart* J garegea and storeroom', acres of fertile land, option further !'. acre*. Offer* sldered. "ROCK Dt'KDO"—Cave HID. A welt maintained and productivF-state ol some 31 acre* In a very lovely position 1 miles from City The house is worthy of ape '"" notice and possaaae* great eha.... Its general condition I* *kr*Uent and Ihcra It spac:ous a ceo m mo tlon. %  LSWICK—*lh Avgnue. Belleville A stone and timber house on appro* 3*00 >q. ft. BhcWaert bedrooms, kitchen and pan try. PMII Informalion on sppliraUon. '-BgTls AB %  • — Nav"' Oard*n<. Modern si one bungalow With event* roof, detached awrace i aervanl'a quarters on over 14.000 so. n. of land. There are 9 large reception looms. S veisna-irn. bedroom*. I bathrooms etc Suitable for conversion into twe semi-detached house* at little MODERN HTOXF Bl'NOALOW* Aaso a Btone and Timber Rouse are available in a pleasant part of Davtell Road at price* ranging upwarda from 1100 Paeticulais and appolniments to view on appllrallon. BOTH— Old established hotel pmpertv on coast I* now avaiiabl. a* a going concern al a low figure. Pull Information on nppliclllon. Good opportiiBtir tar energetic people. • %  stLTgBTOlf" — Cheaaslo* Commodious 2--tor*y stone home • landing In nppms 1', act** planted wilh null tree*, t large reception roorna, 4 bedtooei,.. 1 galleries, kitchen. I bMhr*MM etc Centrally located and euttabl* flats or boarding houre. TOWER GABAQg—4. •statthlSa Oap An almoat new peopert• uiiable for n large variety ol purpose* other lhan a *ar*g* %  IH.A COTTAOg" — Bnnoa*. ci..' Food. Timber Bunealew on 11 000 so. ft Coniains living room, verandah a -me-. 3 bedtoom,. kitchen and pantry. Offers will be considered. I'l li HIM. LAND Nearly ai re* ol land on edge of escarpment near the Club Mortar, ideal position lor good das* property. COAaTLAND Si James J .ii n*B of excellent In. tiding land sold In half acre lota if requintd. NAVY (1ABDINS -btcelleol huildme .He Jl ?af -q H whlsh may be sold n* two plots if desired. rM ROAB—Onod building plat of ll.Sir aq. B. In select and •*!• Iral position RENTALS • rLOBI.' -K..., Unff.l*Wd IN CMANCfM -Modnv TvartSIAL 1ITATS AGSKT ADOTIONSSB rt^NTATION. BCTLDWO Phone 1640 \



PAGE 1

Cuba Will Devote Her Industry To U.S. Needs; WASHINGTON, Feb., 10. £UBA has offered to devote her industry and manpower to meet United States defence pro duction needs. A Cuban delegation of six leading industri alists and the country's two chief Labour leaders laid a unique pirn before a National Production Authority yesterday. It had already been explained to the State Department. A Production authorin au provcu of tin' proposal and the Cubans lo translate of*cr Into specific terms. t XM Cubans said that they orthis immediately. i iturke TTcdKrs. President of Uv Cuban Mat.ufaclurer*' Assorts id that the United State Si Ol IS I Ml I lllll 4.1,111*: U.S.A. Favour Pacific Pact I-. NORMAN WILSON WASHINGTON. Feb. 10. The Unite.! Staleis today mote • oraljl lo the idea of a Pacific Pact than ever before. But there are so many obstacle* that It is by no means certain thai u formal anU-Communist alliance of Pacific democracies will ever ixwritten. Leading United Stales ministers have Mid in the past week that Washington gl OMMOt has an "open mind" and is prepared to take I "sympathetic interr-t' m the subject. But observers lure recognise that America is still reluctanl to take the initiative. On the other hand, prnbabh the only point on which all other potential Pacific Pact members agree is that the United States should be ihe ke> member and the. I f< ir* should take the lead in calling them together. Observers here consider the question of membership may lie an Insurmountable stumbling Hock. Australian reaction would urobably be violently against the inclusion of the Japanese. —KeiiteiAllit's Used Mines To Hinder Russia CHARGES RED PAPER MOSCOW, Feb. 10. The Soviet Navy newspaper flel Fleet alaafOd to day that the Brit ish and American air forces laid %  eg Mimes during the VH ovuberately to hamper the Soviet army offensives against the Germans and Japanese. It said that the mines were laid In the Baltic Sen. the Danube Hiver, and off the coasts of China and Korea in 19*3 and 1045. wSSL'-wrlfeV %  MgtOO Of tbc ignillcai :nrbnrne mlnclaying f operations CRIMINALS PAROLED TOKYO. Feb. 10. General MacArthur':. heauquarlers have paroled four more ear* tenred J| U ll war criminals Iron. Sugaino. lunging to 193 th* lOUl hUmbel of convicted wai (liminals paroled so far.—Rruler. iv..uld pay for the products it bought ll -dfes delnn*d: "We were not ceived into coming here to offer Cuba's hrlp We not only csene %  ierc on lur e-wn free will but we 9>ig nated tha MM." "Compare this with the Police State methods used by Russia Thcv beat their "Allies" over the .'i cooperation. Kitinciscu Aguerre. the leading Cuban Labour leader, said that Labour Unions in Cuba were wholeheariedlv behind the plan The CulN.ii offer "called the blufl ff totalitarian countries," ha addILK. Dock Strike Holds Up 142 Ships n oner. give one official said, iioblltsation officials of production and npower pool. —Renter LADY BADEN POWELL addressing the Scout* at their %  ftstrt on page f. Road yesterday. U.S. Prices Rise WASHINGTON. Feb. 10. The wholesale price rise in the Untied Stales last week broke ad. records' for 13 consecutive weeks, if, spite of the Government's price Irtm The Bureau of Labour stnllsl.es said the use for the week ending February 6 was .7 per cent bringing the wholesale price index tr 182.2. The principal increases were in food and farm products, which wtnl up by l.'t and 1.6 peg ml respectively. Meat rose 3.2 pet cent, and livestock 2.7 per cent. The price ireeze was intended to halt prices ul the highest levels between December 19 and January 25, but many farm products were excluded. — R cuter. Meat Pact h Almost Completed MKI.BOURNE. Feb. 10 Australia and Britain have almost concluded negotiations <>r a i Hie Australian Commerce Minister. John McEwen .innouneed today. McEwen said thai he expected the agreement to be slgneti "very 1MB • a The main points of the agreement wenlhat Britain would buy the whole nf Australia's surplus production of beef, lamb, and mutton, for 15 Tears and that local production would havo to be [panded Price details had worked out, McEwen s vould be a % %  floor" prii for six years, and "floor mutton and lamb WORST IN 20 YEARS WEU.INGTON. New Zealand Feb. 10 Hawke's Bay Province, the sceng of New Zealand's greatest cuthquake, experienced to-day its worst tremors since the disaster which killed 255 people in 1831 No serious damage has yet beer reported. but the earthquake alarmed many residents wrtb rush. ed into the streets. The shock was severe enough tr dislodge chimneys and knock I down shop Window d-splays. —Renter. Public Will Hear Debate On U.S. Troops Far Europe WASHINGTON. Feb. 10. The American Government leaders in the Senate have given the surprising decision to hold hearings in public on the Government's policy on sending troops to Europe. Defence Secretary. George Marshall, Secretary of State. i General Omar Bradley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff will give evidence at hearings fixed to begin next Thursday General Dwight Eisenhower. Atlantic Pact Supreme Comman whose testimony last week Leg. Co. Member On Libel Charge KINGSTON. Ja Feb % A Corporation Council meeting to-day decided to join Councillor N. N. Nethersolc. the second highest membei of the P.N P in bringing a libel action against the lion R. L M. Kirk wood, a member of the Legislative Council, for a statement made at a public meeting of planters on February 3, and published in the newspapers that two members and a Councillor were mixed-up in ihe meat racket in the corporate area. Member* of the Labour Party and PN.I 1 also are considering i to take against KirklaudienceIhe troops for Europe Issue. Republican policy leader Senator %  %  raft decribed as "haz may also appear before the S. natc Foreign Relations and the Armed Sen-ices Committees, who are to hold the hearings. The announcement of public hearings was made by Senator Tom Connally (Democrat Texas) Chairman of the Foreign Relat" Committee who previously had indicated that the doors would be closed. He gave no reason for the change in plans, but other Senators said the Question had been debated so hotly this week that Administration leaders were get as large vet to he laid. There I for beef prices fwiring four years. There would he a price relew annually, and the nrire could rise above but not fall below •floor" prices. The 15-year meat plan is designed to make Australia one of the most important and largest meat producing areas in the world. Capital development is expected to open un large areas of Northern Australia for cattle-farming Discussions have been going on for nearly two years. The development whim* la essentially long-term but Australian Hourrei have estimated the eventual production at 500.000 ton* beef annually. (British Food Minister Maurice Webb said in the Commons on Wednesday lhat New Zealand was also planning to increase production stili further to supply the British market Webb said that Australia i sending Britain considerably less meal than pre-war parti' becaUM of drought and partly because of increased domestic consumption) Last year Britain received 121. 000 tons of meat from Australia as against 200,000 tons before the —Keuler -Shhhf Don't interrupt uuiiilv uilien tie's caning the join!/* Sending Of U.S. Troops To Japan Welcomed By Ja/mnese government TOKYO, Feb. 10. The Japanese Government has warmly welcomed proposals to *tation American troops in thr country after the cunclusKm of the peac* 1 treaty. John Foster Dulles, President Truman's special envo; said here to-day before leaving for Manila. Rearmament Will Not Secure Phace blRMMGHAM BISHOP — In hue BIRMINGHAM. Feb. 10. The Bishop ol lllrmingh.ni. Dr, Ernest Barnes, said today at a serce that he did not believe remnment would attain its object i.i pen v. "In my opinion," he declared, rearmament leads lo two evils — inflation and war. 'I would bring rearmament and Its attendant evils tn an end. "No nation, great or small desires war. . Think tor example af France, one uf the most militant nations in Europe . Military Icadns sny Vnth B shrug that the French people will not fight." the bishop -aw. "Our own people In their ..>like, hold back from what Is called %  Ivil defence There is the same passionate desire for peace orld over. I have They alga llarn.-s declared. —K.-ui-i. show that." Di *.rnnai. Offers Eye To Wounded Soldiei BERLIN, Fob. 10. Walter Demand, a *r> .employed German cook walked into %  weal Hei liu radio station oday and offered an eye to n blinded t'nited Nations soldier in Korea "I want to give one of my two good eyes ." he said. "I do not ant anything in return. All ant is to know that one young blinded soldier will be able to see %  gain He felt that United Nations soldiers in Korea were fighting "for all of us" and v-as anxious to make t personal sacrifice. I 1 I Ins father lost both eves WOgJd War One. —Renter. what orlii — — wood who at some meeting said he could name 11 politicians who were not above taking even a £5 bribe. Some members of the Labour Party suggest asking the admit Governor to ousi Kirk wood tTCfB the legislative Council— ">. 2,000,000 German Youth Will Attend 'World Festival Of Youth' PRAGUE, Feb. IC Twn million German eluding 100.000 fron Germany will lake part in the "World Festdval of Youth" which •led World Federratic Youth plan-. to hold in Berlin in August, the m spokesman said here A spokesman said the Federation's Executive Committee. v.hich has been meeting here had to the conclusion that urge"l ask was to organ ti ugglc against the possible for the! arguments for sending American divisions across the ocean and Into the North Atlantic defence force Opponents of the Administration view will re hear,! later it wn id. hut )ust who they will i# was not known yet. Another Plan Senator Connally was expected to offer a substitute proposal to put the Soiele on record as sayln%* tr is desirable that armed forces be ent out. On Thursday Senator Taft proposed that the United Stales contribute only one division for every' nine raised by its western European allies He demanded an opportunity for Congress to pass on the issue .r.vi.lvcd. Senator Pat McCarran (De crat Nevada) joined the debate yesterday with the assertion that Europeans would not Tight %  3 had reasonable chance of winningSenator Mc Carran. < %  f ihe Senate Appropriations Subcrmmi'tee on Foreign Aid said lhat any programme for defence No Single Method Can Ensure Peace PHILADELPHIA. Feb. 10. Averell Hamman, Special Assistant to President Truman on eign Affairs said to-day that the United States, must combat Russia's global strategy with worldwide strategy of its own "Those who advise concentrating our energies exclusively in DIM part Of UH world or on onispect of Ihe situation fail to uu ier.tand the nature of the ttrva> gle." he declared Harriman spoke befcre the World Afl.ors Council Of Philadelphia. I niggle cannot be won by any single method, nor by military strength only, nor exclusively by economic and social programmes, nor by moral fore* alone. %  Hail World Medical Academy Founded POME, Feb. 10. The founding of an Inlernation ..I Madscal Acaremy with its %  #• in ROOM aOd branches; abroad, was i:nnounor\l here to-day. Its work will be based on the concept that "^11 men are equal before disease, and all are en tit lad in the same Wav to treatment and preventive measures." The AcaaWn.y will eneourmaT 'de exchanges of med: scientist* and Informal.on -, will work to co-ordinate health legislation. The President of the Academy Is Professor Mario Ceravolo. lung jpaclalist and member of the Italian Chamlier of Deputies risation of Germany and i 0 f Western Europe must be develtnd particularly to intenloped \ ith the re., %  campaign against rearmI Europe eo not necessarily regard jng Germany. 'Russian occupation at "unlhink-Reater. SCENES OF RELEASE OF GERMANS BANNED BRUSSELS. Feb. 10 Brussels cinema managers said to-day they were considering (lilting from newrsrcels, shots the release of German war criminals from Landsberg jail in the American rone of Germany. Patrons hooted and booed i" some cinemas here last night, when the release scenes were shown for the first time in Belglum —Reaier les added lhat Japan's fuDcunty had been one of the points ol discussion during hk" fortnight's talks heie on the tally to end the p res ent state* of war. Iff said that the treaty would etlOie full %  OVfjrtlfnt) to .l.ipan. hai i ifhi to -if defence, eit;ihli th provisional commen inl u)d pave the ".i for her cventiuil entry mto the United NsiiMi. Dalles said We have diatusted %  security of Japan. On .!. with the authority • I erasnant, I publicly said hai if I pan, the United St.ii ( 'woul.l i ider the maintenance of United States army forces in and Japanese Government has w-.i ^-'< W hiwl ih.it ttropoaal o "^B" I 'ir.-e::.,' % %  -.,. %  IMTO and ilir iiniii'm.1 expressions of opinMI which have come to us conin< %  ns tbat it is the overwhelming leaire pf the Japunese nation that that proposal bo accepted so that the coming nto fa treaty of peace, will net I vacuum of powei with Japan totally disarmed pud unable lo defend itself i d %  iliseussed pro\ivional secui I between the United Slates and Jspon. Need For Self-help U.N. Enter Seoul And Inchon %  ."in today reached the heart of the rat-lnfi ited 'ghost it., Seoul and American tanks and occupied the South Kon suburb oi Yongdongpu. Advance UIU.N of th%  Kimpo alrflau, Rvs units w.-.i of Seoul was taken by the AmeriInfsntr) nt Thii Chinese M up the vital Seoul-Inchon area In : .ting %  %  %  Matthew '.i ommunutl defi n of Ihe II | n.-li un %  through :. %  %  p. North crossed the 38th P 2S last yeai Seoul fell The t nit Imhi.n 1LIT.-1.II Koreans look it again In in the Alii. M i. :n .' fmni the I this time only Communist control, —Renter onnectlon we liavc %  it that all region I ind eoMs Ktiye seetn it., .niangenic nts of (ierm,te hfeh ihi t I St LONDON, Feb., 10. 1"HE NATION WIDE unofficial strike threatened to cripple Britain's ports to day when 20,000 dockers failed to report for work. More than 142 ships were idle in London, Liv orpool, Birkenhead, and Manchester docks, most ol them with vital cargoes waiting to be unloaded. I. n.HI strike in London. They came t.nt %  trOCigry '" lupporl of the stoppage, after the seven i*tlike lender* were taken to court yesterday and charged with incilemen!. like which started in northern ports last week-end. Dcpiilies Plan New Left Wing Movement \ \ rah 10 %  tanmunM AMo Cucchl and Void*Msgnunl to Bl§M sal up an m to plan u new aTaeJ n ino\ement i Itussian dun 1 I t] and inde.> i %  %  movo nienl In | in ,,ii Interview \ %  Priest Offers Life For 7 Criminals Ml'l.limi. Wi I r.-rmany. A It gj .... triad seven years in nun IDS, has offered to die in UU oiidemne-1 Mods \,' %  \I1SJ oi irtlea n unity %  ring lo lt;il>'. three l %  rnmunli t. %  %  era!) %  i % %  I led million miiiusi Pi — Itriitrr. drew only 450 supportei I i i ii B ..: ilrst They had deeded go back to work when, the en leaders were arrested. i mass strike movement developed in the capital last night, after tjM news of the arrests was und dockslde taverns. For many strikers, it was mainly a protest against the Goviegal action. The oilninal strike demand— for an egtra four shillings per day—wag pushed into the backgretaed Hut the strike leaders backed bj the Conununial Party made Ml of the |H>piilur support. The Dally Worker, the official party newspaper told the dix'kci | i.-tln% that the .nivsis ,eere of the Government Conservative and Capitalist presi %  the workers Smke leaders were holding meetings in an effort to bring ou'.'.'i.otlfl dock workers but many wharves were slill WOtsOnS. Thousands of tons of importtd food were on board the affectesl ships in London. In dockslde uarrhouM-s British-made good'. for %  Xport wenwaiting to takt their place In the holds. The -even strike leaders were arrested under a wartime reflate* i Ah SB lays down that 31 days notice must lie gWan before a strikr starts. Thev were remanded i.n had until February I The pi i %  Fios-s-ioi America High ('onI,irk i ••!. M I not all those wanting to help 'I" I %  also committed B trWRIes, hi eaSSIned —Reaier gtaliil*! Friend IK Sopervisiifg Purge* PARIS' I %  staiin. and leading mem n Soviei Politburo li i ("/I:''" States becomes party, must Krcn.i. S-K ...ii ; i decide for continuous and enV -1 ^ %  •• %  uUirr ..: i self-help and mutual -" gU partial basic berg' 11. HUB." !id elle.--1 1 aid' h> •rt'.es in accordance with the I w u n Deputy Senate rcsoilrtfor. t* June iharue. whose arrival in HI 1'runo MinisterShigero Yoshida. Fonnrmed thai his G and 'the preponderant majority id the Japanese people, warmiy wci> %  • 'the provisional sevuri> ents made with I' e States including tne gar' Mining here ol American troop..' Ha o.i Ws realga fuilj n re&ponsihility to proetei ourssUet and defend ou r own land and v ill what we can in this re*peel —Rruler reported earlier thli nonth from Vienna T paper said the rei ance of Dr Vladimir former Cxech Foreign aUnlStl r nod ll duding that uf Ma no I U i Communist Ih'puiy and -law. —IRetit'-. POPES DEATH COMMEMORATED VATICAN CITY. Feb. 10. i 'f Hew at nalfrssUl here lo brates here to commemorate the twelfth anniversary of th death QJ pope I'm. XI. Pops Plus XII, his successor gave absolution. %  l ( e!< s basilica was COVS flu*' rs brought i>y his —Renter. Itussiu \\ an Is No u Jlol\\cir" -ADENAUER Fob 10. P1 lor i>, %  \, riot War' one knows that i ..,.ni have initial jot lion detent that B Other war >., nun i bi %  I %  .o,l We t 10 make %  contribution. M The Cabinet i riding soldiers. Into tl %  .limits. —Reaier. "*l I ant i t | te" %  I i vlncod i w harve no miw.'irn of altaching Ihe >.( that Rita know, this ver> —Reuter 4,zveh AufteWriltfut Talk Of dementis PRAGUE, Feb. 10. i '. %  ei-hmlovak authorities an* making an official §fl ihe subject of Hoc. Vladimir dementis, according %  dnations here to-day. For ihe firsl time since the elgn Minister dfsap MI horn his office in the SI ite Ilank nearly a fortnighi ago. iverhorlovak sources to daj i <|.n"-M*d an opinion on the sea Semiofficial Czechoslovak ctr|< | minimised the case In inanter which appeared to amount lo half-admission that dementis hn.i indeed fled the country or at least had been deprived of his _Reeter. hilled Ouughler NEW YORK. %  > retching a %  night after killing I Id daughter b) %  %  hathioeiii Bk ud he went %  %  if the ii.i.. i .II bovina not M-alise what had happencl .i. throughout the bout and then lh< his story The kg his flat and found the H nig from a sa-li coid al two nails. H 'I'-' world, might have ca>.t envious eye. at a pool which bcceJI i vacant last week: the presid. ncv ol the £ Academv. some 40 years before Sir Frank A %  'Invented Steam Poizunov, of course, was "the r aa o raaOi' o) i fore Sli Joseph i A Russian aslron Venus (th. i ally, there was n Russian Plrogov. No mi'!.Uon is rnade of Sir Rum i : Sergei Vavilov. the last president, has died. Hare are some of the progressive fad-, mentioned recently bv the Academy. First: Russia devised radar Ion;; before I'.ntatn. and, secondly, peninllln was in use in Russian hospitals before the mould was grown at St. Mary's in I II fees w.laeut saying lhat the Rasatans were flvlnr hefnr" ll r Wright brothers; lh-. were using the leler.~aph before Morse: they had radio before Marcf.nl 'Popov, they say. Invrnlrd ill, and User wer* aoint the lelepheor before Hell It seems that a gentleman called afiewarde. Conttantln T ) ul HKT TIEh / HI i %  rale. [credit foi libs 'Thomas Edi1 son, who develiiitwi th lamp afb I Swan). (Henrv tsaSSSi TF.LL TIIK ADVOCATE THi: NEW* It IN-. SI 13 DAV OR NIGHT RALEIGH THE ALLSTEELBICYCLE ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE A variely ol models constantly in slock and ready assembled (or you lo choose Irom Sw Ihtm on ditptay at .. CAVE SHEPHERD & Co, Ltd. 10.13 iretd SlfMl Sola Distributor,



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SUNDAY. FEBRl'AKV II. 151 M \HH VDVOCATF. PACE III VI S MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY -0-'—*JS" OJC#B.\ ES -J PEA*. J SW==...T %  %  J ^ .• '-,.--' .5\--\..v.-\\ E^t \ A wsn ON ON I r BLONDIE : % % %  :: %  LJ (74 BY C HIC YOUNG THE LONE RANGER ,-->,J/"OLD HIM,&OYS,AND / UV—77W TAKE OfF HIS ^y JJaRT^ ^_^iiw'' \ ff ^MR .—_v "Mn^x riSt. e r* V*JB> i JM/ iik£%^ \ ,/L I 1-^tH r ^J%Hn^KT' 1*^ m ^ 1/ Jfl) BY FRANK STRIKER TAKE HiM TO JAIL'WEli-l .-V, %  .>'!'• %  '. '. -N IFY HIM' VfAM, SHERIFF ft Kl 1 LCD ^^ IF W? THE TELKMAPH 0*RATOR> CAN AND TUC STRANGE'i WHO jfl PROVt WAS IN TME Of FIC' f-rj*y THAT C WIU. BRINGING UP FATHER ml ("H BY GEORGE MC. MANUS MOTUBC-'VMAT •. rHl % %  ."%  7 "".Si A90UT %  TOMOMCW I* MV %  Bil7TKv-r HOMT K—CiV *A*AT I f" wM-MAVBeJK3GS CO-.-LD *.( %  AGiFT. S !3WT ACTFC TMS 3MMOAi.-TME ^C^TEON GOB* ON' M3NCW3 r %  '' BUbTLGW. &T -WE nero ovso TME Bc>ji7ff ee^oce,, MON % %  •' r WHAT DO MXl TMUk MV 1 0POTMEC? PAKMV WrCULD : %  I COUUD WffAP UP *N40 GE^JO cveu TO _ MM TON16HT cCO RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND r HOLO TH6 \. PKC, **. MVM ..LOOKWHC^ THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES Ai/PAfjfrf mz leABee.ccev\ AMMMSM etcu vs DIANA IS KIWOOFKE I MWaVUS %  TactE Dtvs> r KOTU k KG ONAlHUM IW HI M.orn6ji5rns*Evou'iE EnrPA CA&SO AND WE %  SC/WTSAVEl LISHT: ,1 TTEXTMONU FACTORY MAV14.I IIS GALVANISED & STEAM P'PE BnclB( fruoi i, la. % %  ward* MILD STEEL Ibu. tau*. 8,..r I. .11 MM BOLTS & NUTS—All Slim FILTER CLOTH -White CoUoo Twill At PRICES thai rkQMt be rtMatrL f #... It \llllAlHtS I 4)1 XIHtY Ltd. WIUTB PARK ROAD ST. IdCBAEL Watches for Valentines ( 4lnut.-t Wlrhn In UinIIM %\t+\. rhramr and rold Kld IT Jewel UBlerproor. lirk pror and nui-mii* Mftc l>alnty Ltdlm' Wklehra In mnj •IIIM 17 Jewel and IS Jewel. In Rold Gld and Chrwit* (rm inur NtNMafM Y. UK LIMA & CO., LTD. 20 BROAD STREET VE1UTVS -NEW ORBIT 49 ELECTRIC FANS I OH OFFiVES FOU HOMES 12" Diam. OSCILLATING 16" Diam. OSCILLATING IMSk AMI WALL MOI \ll\f. ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED Tweedsido Road St. Michael Phon. 4679 & 4371 THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK WITH A VIEW to auditing the Secretaries oi Societies. Clubs, and Associations to make the compilation of inlormation in THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as possible, all organisations embracing all forms ol activities; religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports, radio, agricultural, etc.. are asked to have the form printed below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to: THE EDITOR. THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK IM1. Co Advocate Co. Ltd.. 34 Broad Street. FORM Title oi Society. Club. Organisation. Etc President or Chairman Council or Committee Member* Treasurer.. Secretary.. Short historical account of the origin, functions and current actlvIHe*: %  •+. (


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i' \(.l l ill R SUNDAY ADVOCATE BVNDA1 I nilil ARY II. I3! JOHN GODDARD FINDS TALENT Vulnwr Tell* Of TrinUlml Golf Tour BY 0. S. COPPIN "RANGER" SCORES Arsenal Out Regiment FIRST VICTORY IN B' Of F.A. Cap Defeats By Our Yachting Carreipomkmd ^ oin P^fj l ,' on Ship's Team erage whilr Cyd-mr dpiion ol John t C. O'D. Crick. .....! ,-ind six-foot-; i has mo! with complrte Pccalta of the R tt V | u held yesterday Tic wind wa* %  i l take part light W medium ami I In a Trial Game arranged fi i Ul'i at the end ..I aooth <>* th ( l n dad-Baruedo* I orally II ihey esl.blnd. am i.-..son %  -• ni -the Wl |K1 low toAufltrtUi mure %  tiOLr" CAPTAIN TALKS C OI.ONEI. VIE i ; %  *!* c "" CloAk, whh lly, has Bow %  Ut he has to any about id* %  i. HI. ... An overwhelming fuccess, in spite *f an the Barbados golf learn which returned I with si And i ,i l..st week Th.iw va> beaten badly, but what RCffll to have bean overlooked is the fact that the laes'team won from the rrinldad contingent by four matches to two for 'he Hi-**-? nabel and K.M. Lenagan. Mrs. Brcnda Wilson beta Vidmer. our Indies representatives, seemed belatedly to be in order. THE LADIES WIN H OWEVER. It was not the lad! that made the overwhelming oaltjr, consideration and nil \^ 39 seconds. Jaataa* STANl BY I Rangei 1 n Rrtl %  Ruagvr, which wu given three minutes t > r'antaay, sailed and kc i.t the lead throughout WWLM 38 minutes, eight seconds and WhOa Fally had lost i completed the I in 4i> minutes, SO seeLOMXJN, Fell Arsenal, holders of the trophy The Hcghnent won their one w*cro Sjl BM l a aiaJ from i' el match against a team #ip competition to-dav tha II.M.S. PeviwaUre l>> tt-half goal from Manchester run. yesterday at the Garrison. Wilted, at Manchester was ml Hav started at I 30 p.m.. the ftieni (o put them out. With Cl < bailing first on a good Ka and rVimam concerned in ths *** after winning the toss Tho •hly draw among the eight firthRegiment were dismissed fc tund tlas, London arc assure,! A ru !" "V" HARD OR SOFT GOING? Whichever It Is, The March Meeting Will Be Good BY BOOKIE ^S %  I three a Thursday next %  dark about r.ick wa* opened fur the flr-i time yesterday morning, outside the barrel*, but in most cases gallops were restricted to quirk beginning.and glow jgaahea. After Ibe Just set of gallops we are therefore no nearer k) (ticking favourites than a month ago. itid A. Phillip. 48. The condition of the track has received a mixed reception. Rome Both of these batsmen who "*y it Is covered willi a layer of megass which is too thick, others that It is Just right. It will be Interesting to see what it turns out like in started out to play soundly *!)* flnal """lysis but It is quite obvious that it will favour those who and punished the Devonshire paces-hen they twwled short moat troublesome bow like the soft going better. W'itc %  number of them looked very tired yesterday when they pulled up. A few others worked on the outside nf the megass and n was noticeable 'he way their hoof beats rang out n contrast to the swish of the grass which is all that rould be heard a-fUi S rtng member of tho team departed fir homo after the C Undrew*! members went all out to provide the vMtO every pleasure and comfort they could command Another aleavBDl wluch made tlic trip a pronounced success wai ihe eo-Operatlon and cohesion of the Barbados players themselves. played together, celebrating each other's triumphs, d -rympathizinK with •ach OUK %  d Caleb dominated the atmusharever the Kockley golfers gathered. mount of runs partly ds rally*a time for the last e place la the quarter-ibtai*. collected through good wlgg und was 44 nuuitee, 54 iaconda. six of to-day. t-e, were won by ^^T^W&2L X It,ire tins class wat. Seaaap. home teams, the only away vlco* seconds behind Pally. Colin ters being Newcastle United thrw Tm boats started In th< Itegwln was third. Umw winners of the tropb v who i thto t>ehind an., was probably that ol Bristol „ ",„ k t fnr u,, Qgasy, wne ahso sailed verj Reen completed the final lap m Bovcrs. well, gave Okapl four minutes and 43 minutes. 58 seconds overtoc.1. After completing Ihe first lap launtlr< was third and <;nat Six of the surviving Menu t ,,,,.,, llU|l Jt ne wic^t thiT.SiKhi^S SSnris-se% %  fyhewrer srtm the replays Inehgdnevaahlre team was dismissed J\ ra mme. This is the Maiden Stakes ir which a numisfr of newrheriCla) ..<, wenttoRlnbad e.1 > j,re from divuion one. the f( r iM runs, the.r collapse du>* cornrr9 arc tn preparation We wlU have Dokfrum. 1-jnw-jys. High pleted ihe llrst round „i others being Bristol Rovers an-l maim> to the steady bowling of and Ix.w and Court O'IJIW who will be making then debut to racing "J if HiaV-ood oivision n-rmlngham City. A Phillips. 2 for 16. R. Parri* i n the West Indies. There will then be such ns Arunda. Miss Panic. cnvw xuuu. .• miiu. IUM-W MI w miuun., i-u ^r-nids. AinaaaT n>< knocked out the other Bristol 2 for 21 and C Price 2 for 10 No-lo-Nite and Kitchen Front who were seen only briefly last Novemnieaaaan. the secondr%am—City—two nil at BlrmiogV ConachandP. Stanhope each ber but are yet to produce anything like their be>t f01 m. That gives us ules. and Baeeaneer.ham To-day's draw for the quarscored 18. while It. Matterson got a choice of eight before wc throw in Ability and Fair SaMy and for iimrs winners, sur, .. ,_, .-ii • in contrast to ih^ swish of the grass which ( expense of Hudders1'J 0 STaT?'.* ?T~Z !" L rZ hc l e V w * • on ttweafl %  outstanding perform^^ f P Sa "^^w Sti^rf ^ Nevertheless I should imagine that on. robably that ol Bristol J 0 1 tT ( w ^ lllf \S r !" £ \L* v5 go,ns wlU ^ lcs b "'l "' own •""• he ^ re final lap in Hovers, a Third D.visi..,. team, ?f a r !" m M Stt-^rT Jnoiher lold lhB i aboul BCVenl y arc ex * r,ed to riK ds with Dawn who casilv knocked out the Sec41 runa M t M "; i r on %  not !" V ver y -Hinted to me I do not propose to go through the list here ami IS ond DWSTOITHT.U three to nil "'"" u ce bo ,er ; bow, a **" this would be too lengthy to lit Into one column. However, I do ngr, "I ...,,!. .; ., U|V "'" Hu lflIce w ""• t. lake two wickets for five runs o... we Bh-mld see over sixtv. one good point about the soft going will be less breakdowns and therefore a *uller enlry. I am told that about seventy arc expected to race but this number sounds tt.t we should see over sixty. A LOT of interest is centred around the very first race on the pro gramme. This is the Maiden Stakes for 1 .^uiww.......-..*. .... UW s f Jb seconus. ranusv cams wt arourd hospitality of the St \iuirrv .hoata. From the %  mppt thai atourid second and nirt. who 46 minutes, 49 seconds and the la*t "aw, ''• "" ..rnved alji.reo Airport untiMi.t-^.o. 1.uV ett-.k Wlaard. wai third. Raaeel in 48 minutes, two aeconds. SinWar Etv went bock ahi i 4 ..Cloud gave Olive Blsssss n the secnnoTau, while Gipsy was still leading Lout, two minutes, and Baecanrer a.,,. (Ikapl. atavra Itlair. who had and Van Tharndyke right minutes ter finals is therefore awaited 15 run5 before tv OkapJ roul rntoutei waa Van Thorndyke Second snih keen anticipation by all foot*eg before right bemnd her. At the end "f v ,„ Thorndyke sailed away hall fans lo see how these lone this round H'buvd dropped out ,,, ,. %  Buccane..and w ,.s second at second and third division survi %  viinr Fantasy made a brave attempt lhc eml ot | he nrst ] BD oihro eors faro against the giants. |>UrT|U DCUI I HTli but could not overtake I Hhrsxom Win to Rainbow Bureanrer Without attempting any excuses for the failure of the mon's team the last round She to win', a few factors which prevented then Iroiu making %  bettei a mlnuta ahead of Fantasy while showing should be taken into eonsKleration. First of these was the n'.-t Oame in third jurt borely loss of J. It Rodger on the ei departure. Rodger was banting Gipsy. one of the three lop players who were to lead the team, but a crushed — . „_„ toe eliminated him from ihe group at the eleventh hour. Gunnrt r irst In C Knowing the ability of such Trinidad players as Bob Hill. Murray Peter Ince brougnt' in his SeapM1a d Wilson and John Seller, :'. wag not expo le-l that the Barbados gull Gsnini : md C~ leadera would win more than one ol the first three matches in gaj trc-boarri Class after day. However, it fell thai M. nuke to NttS Man than OOmpanaata along the Una, HOweWer, with the loss of Rodger win, seven minutes to Scamp and It meant that the last oiehl men hud to move up one position and MUibehave and eight minutes to the burden was a heavy one to impose. Folly. fan Christie and Dick Vidmer, playing at No. 1 and No. 2. took Gaxr.rl sailed really good. At the shock of HIM and Wilson in turn, bul Instead of Rodger. Ihe the end of the first round Follv. current holder of the Barbados open championship, to help with the who started first. w. still in the u-, Michael Tunpson and Will Atkinson had to be thrown into lean gaaanV %  econd while "ie the Une-UD where the going was toughest. And each player IheW T tfl ado V.imasr was thud, f > (.tier was playing one better than had been anticipated. elene. who was sailinc * II should be mentioned here thai both Tlmpson and Atkinson wns still in the heat of the race. shouldered their heavier responsibilities splendidly, and when pain 1 Oannrt'a time f or the first round in the four-ball matches carried off the maximum three points, while their defeats in the singles were by the narrowest of margins In spite of the fact thai Ihey were playing higher lhan anticipated. In fact, kDO l I %  %  %  I tent niftured by the Barbados players were by such M-ores as 3 and 2 or 4 and 3, which is not entirely lodaVlcd NO EXCUSU A NOTHER factor which was against the Barbados playeis, naturally, was their unfamillarity wllh Ihe course. This is always an element which favours the home tenm in golf matches, but in this particular case It was enhanced by the bad weather which lasted through the Wets Bl Andrews, unlike Rockley. Is very hilly and In the wet weattu-i the ball stopped where It landed, with practically no roll whatever, On many course* Ihis would prove as much of a hardship lo 0M bul nt 81, Andre A'S. it often left the player with a blind bot lo Bv preen Tha St Andrew's players, naturally, were thoroughly familiar with Ihe location of ihe great and played vcith kssuranoti the Rockley players had to walk forward and look, and then plays uncerti FAMILIARITY T^AMU.IAHITY with the courgn was a pronounced factor on nine of r • . rmNn 1 n drive ntmlght for the graan leaves n blind ball has lo if placed well to the light ol .... 1 in No. 3 the second shot also Is a blind one. On No. 3 Only 1 •: %  %  1 ivei how far he can hit a drive toward the left—the shortest way home on a dog-leg—and still carry lo the lop of the hill. The tee shot on No. 8 is a hlind one. and No. 8, Ilka N %  I, inusi u> played well ti> Ina right .>f the Mru to see ihe green. The No, Id i> blind 111 wet weather with no roll, and a 1 Ear to the right, again Ihe shortest was In .me. leaves a hlind second shot ot Nn ll, The tee shot nt No. IS is a blind one and both No. 16 and No. IS will produce blind second shots In wet weather unless the ball is exceptionully long. FASCINATED T>Ki(HAI'S I f.Ktoi i. ch gave two minutes The League programme was and six minutes to naturally curtailed in view of the nd Van Thorndyke cup ties Most of the leading teems If not in Ihe cup being without after passed league games. An exception was Th was given out the other C class races there will still be such as Harroween. Tiberian Lady and Flieuxce. If on top of that we alsu get Carefull Annie from Trinidad, where, I would like to kaow, arc wc going to start them" To make for more congestion a few fiom I) class like Bow Bells and Watercress may be sent In a C class event. Wc therefore face the possibility of having sixteen in one event, I sincerely hope not. S PEAKING of D class it is likely thai we will see some good racing in this division as well. Thank goodness our classifiers have not rco Inler-Club Table Tennis followed the;r Trinidad counterpart* in jhis respccl_and__we will be qVtlA lf\ DAI At Table Tennis able to see Bow Bells, Watercress. Cross Roads, and Best Wishes hav-i Ihe opportunity to prove themselves before they are pushed into 1 Olive >~mjoon after passed league games. An exception was matches were played last week M Van Th-.-adyke and ended Blackburn Rovers whose comfortOn Monday Barna met V.M.P.C crowt Ted field of imported, among which may well be lurking some <-r first round was comable win sent them to second and defeated the Becklcs Road wou ij_be Salamanca or Tom Peason It will also make our D class minutes, 33 second, pi.ee in Division two with none learn by a wide margin. racing have some class about it instead of the usual bunch of second -nd the last In SO minutes, three 0 f the four teams previously above it was simply a walk over lor ra i ei which tt is customary to see .it Trinidad meetings now-a-days 1 **' Thorndyke wa t third them in action Barna. Out of the nine games m this sectwn. and rMwranot.* fourth. Forest, the Southern leaders ol played Ihey won seven. Louis N FACT, I look forward to this racing to provide us with what we u Th iv TK i* i i I Division three lost, but their stoute and Campbell Greenidge J. mlssed al lho Chr sUniM1 meeting after the Derby had been run. On March 17. This long delay has nearest rivals had Cup engagewinning three each. The other a „ hough( naturally the horses are now all fmir-ycar-olds. But it is ,' %  L!" !iul.n nwnt and so ,he V* ilMn re'""'"* nn>o went to Howard. The two nol long „,,„ and none o( hein cou ) ( hftVP ma(ir any particular prounchanged as it does in the northgames for Y.M.P.C. were won gre,, except to regain Iheir true form. In this connection the rivalry ern section where the top two bv__Smith and Hinds. between Bow Bells and Watercress will he tha most important while colonial Cricket and Horse Racing. Itosulls were as follows: I'anMuv: 4 teams %  (.11 1. roii —KeuU-r H.--.K gr Football Results Commonwealth Lead India By 311 Runs KANPUR. Feb. 10. The Commonwealth cricket touring tejim wore 311 runs %  bend with six .second innings wickets standing at the end of ihe third day of the fifth unofficial Test match against India here to-day.. ———— India who were 143 for four %  vunighl. were all out soon after hu ch for 24C in reply to the Com. ,. monwealth's first innings of 413. By the i lean Ihe ConunonweeMi %  13H fur four wickets i: nd Inninsa. ules from the clone the llasm-tl Hits 173 Not On I Against M.C.C. j.i.i r on I i ud e from %  %  ^"encc then let us look back at Mayers made many error, ana nrec ycar<)ld5 who nave race d over 7\i furlongs in Murch. I cannot his attack was weak, on the remember aU o( them but we saw live or six last year and also two other hand his defence was quite 0f n|W yfm i^ t0Te tnal< Two performances which stick in the good. He was also very slow in m emory most are those of The Gambler and Watercress. Both of getting around the table. these we might say were eventually letter at middle distances than The final match of the week sprlnls. Yet even for them 7'^ furlongs proved to be a good test. u.i between Everton and PellAlthough they both won I cannot remember that they looked very can. Honours went to Everton comfortable at the finish. Perhaps Watercress more so than The Who Won five—four. Blair MurGambler, but this I put down to a longer and more carefully thought ray was the moat outstanding oul preparation. The latter, after nil, .. .i. mil pivpur.-d u \., |„, ; .i i* vert on nlaver He won three elasslc, bul only for a SMurlong sprint and then sent in a 7V furlong c.,i c Uaiwdn Miirrow won two race on Ihe second day of the mceUng. 55' N^rnY-T ru one Vet, without seeming to conliad.ct my argument that our Guineas %  UTnaaw Wnrroll' won two should * htf,cd lo August. I mug admit that the case of Watercress For Pelican. Worrell won iwo ltr „,. u ,,„,. , r.vn'— -' — •*'— """'—-•in!" i nu >fi F /4 B hile Willoughby and Phillips J %  stron a onc '" ,avo day lor 38 runs in 19 cvers or which 9 were maidens. Victoria lost o wicket with only | lldte ^ loBl Haiare. this V ms I" : !| *! '"" In morning but phadkar and Gopinpossilily in spite of them, the nneJ pulled I plaving in his llrst Test Barbadaj with Ihe St Andrews layout. ; undefeati I . i rfended stubbornly Then Doosena are far superior to ** %  "' under .'< Utnd, the Australian who plnvs In ihey nera factors which worked against th." Lancaahlni League flashed whera the fairways, and those nt Rockier, Howet D better ahowh but were not effective' against ihe TrtaMa d la n g who know tho course beckwarda, rorwar '.dOWB Tha gei in their return wa i I Andrews hod a stronger le.im of golfers, generally %  paoJtlng; that the weather, unfaiuihanty wttfa the COBrM nnd the loss of Itodgcr made the Rockley leum appear weaker than n waa; that the difference b) the strength of the two taanui was nol .-o great that the Barbed' would nol win in Barb) the St. Andrew's golfers would be lid grcene, but that the margin of victory would Dot bo so great as the St. Andrew's players scored on the! out. TABLE TENNIS I N THE lirst natch played on Monday between Barna vs. Y M P.C Barna had an easy victory. Of ihe 9 gaanea ptavad Barna won Both Greenidge and Stoule won 3 each and Howard ana For Y M P.C., Smith und Hinds won their two games. Stoute and Greenidge played good tennis throughout, while Gooding seem lo have losi some of bii form. Howard ihowg promlK and should go far this year. With some more practice Y M PC will give a much better pcrforroai.ie on Wednesday ngain-t Pelican. FOim PLAY A BBEY MARINES defeated VMl'.A, five games to four on Wednesday right. The standard*of plwv w. %  dv three ran I Perm in peH.. Bynoe, Mayers and Corbui were all brilliant in s|x-lls but nol con standing iruilch of the night was llynoc VI Curum. onl> |Q (hla match -. a high Standard of pliuj n ached. Bynoe after a very shaky start came threu In fine style, Corbln from his play in all matches flgi %  %  %  pert H Turner who made 33. It wa ll.es.tt'first een:i %  on against the touring side. of India's hopes with his legbreaks. io pell of tan oven he took the • i of i;,i|niaili. i'hadkur und I;.nn d.uit the last two will) 'tiiC Ite 1 -ills for 17 runs. He finuhed with the llgures of foui for \ l""ll.\ I %  M. Mrlld t. H l ...., I, ll.il., % %  I i %  > Char %  l %  >.. ;t ies %  70. Fha othei India wicketa were taken, bv law two Waft Indian players Ramiidhin four for 90. and \\ m II two for 45, and Gimblett started brlghtl) for the Commonwealth vats a On 7!l before Gimblett Nolu Cnoniv 0. E>i %  Light Fmmott was soon out, SJ^ta*, wt**^* ed to bat well and n bit lives tour smuhampton I. Middle•brniifh I WrU Ham United I. ChBillon Ainlct The renilu of iiifiiiri pi. vd lo-dsy r A cur rnTM ROUND niLimnslmii, Cll> 1 Rnmn Cil> 0 IO*tk|v.,| I. MUIIKDMI I Rimtnl Roitr* J Hull CUV 0 Ofl*. I. n.llu'm I Manrhntrr Untied I. Ararnal 0 niok* City I. Sr.wlk Uiillcd 4 Stundriland 3. Norulrh Cll> 1 Wi.l.nliumpliiii Wii>1trri. J II .Jil^i — r.*ld Town 0. rlRST DIVUION Bollon WjraJrrrr. I. Burnley 1 l.ivrrpool 3. PorlafniHith I aiNT) DIVUION lllackbuni lli-vrr. I l*dm t'litirt 1 Hirnirotd Burr 0 r^TTeUI IJDAGUF. Dl\ : %  ul Fl( I. FMklrk I lllllin DIVISION %  ouUMrn Ron mm to nn 3 NottirghBrn FO.M 7 gaahsr Cil •. Port Valr 3. nillln.liiim 1. Turqi:.n In IM 0 fl.—I. T• Hi., 11. Lr.vton OtWnl S, Cn"H Pnlxt 0. lllllwall 1. N*u,i>io[> TVwn • Waawll ). Aldn.h..! I Watford I. CoWhcKrt tlnllrd 0 TIIIRJ) DIVISION NORTKKItN Barrow I. CarUito Unlll J. Iltadlanl Cllv 0. On-.lrr I. Cnsn Alnsaara a, 1.1....in city 4. OaUwItsad 5. D-arllnflon 2. Halifaa Town I. York Clly 3 lUrllrponli United 1. Slockport CiBUilv N*w 111 mliton 0. SnrrwOnirv Town 1 Rorhdnlc 0. Oldham AlhlHlc I. Holhrihiun Untl'd S. Acrrln.Uin SaW ..cunihonw Uniu-d I. Tranniere Rovrr. Wreaham t, nradfoid 1 S.\*TTIMl CUP saxx>Nn ROUND AbndHii 4. Tlilnl I.. Anaan R-^rr. . ci a* 1 Mt tm 1 3. AirtinronMna 3. MoUirruoii 4. HainUtoa AessHmH d> 1 Qucen'i Park I. Ayr Unllrd J ll.-.ilh Hovrt. 5. nrn-hin Cllv I Rnxi'ri 1. IQbFinUn J. Saint JohnMon* I, Diindr.3 flCOTTlSIf 1XAOIX DIVISION p Dumbarton 0. Ounr of thr S...nh 1 Dimfnilln AOilrllo S. Arbfo.Ul I SaHarAUilHIC I. Alloa AUlMM 4 Sba.VTD.i 4 l rt^ 0 t^H t5 r "i' h t Un morning ai 11.00 o'clock and w.ll no fauil lo find in this. DonraMer Rovr* 3. Buwiiy 7 Orimain be mel by a Reception Committee But what I must not let pass is an article ChasUr 1. Luion Town I, ASSai %  one each. aking our classic i the end of the year. Here was a small Ally feeder and inclined to go overboard at the slightest 1 I longer towards 1 good unt of i follows:— Monday Marines. Wednesday: Y.l Pelican. Friday: Y.M.C.A Barna vs. Abbe? Trinidad Players :. siwnteid UmtMi to change his half-volley game to a more orthodog stvl.thai %  onet oMMOS-wr-M.TH M Inninp 4i! ' rt and he could not be at his iiest IKDIA irt Inmnaa M. erratic Inhutl nod, hla attack weak —gJP io g WK 1 TH ** %  IWWINOB Hla Ohli .. c lazy and not l> aZk"ad | roovti around Bynoe ahowe< quite load rom hi tena matches but itin> I'mriai \> ci#Kwad a noppad ... hi third against Alkin*. B U .II r M~k,id b ci.k*M 1: little can bo saiil. Alkins played o steady W 0 S?L I I, ? J V %  %  „ %  %  „ I! gam. r.rinuh .,1 %  „.,i | at k ol practice. *'"££.* Co, """ h "' %  | it TT one of these uuxi theli ; revlous experience lo any advantage "e tryinj, and played v.-ry poor tennU, Toui dor 4 wkui 11 The matches th*s week are as exertloni yel given the proper grade of work she could manage nine furlong, by August as comfortably as any imported and by the end of the year BV< furlongs was like child's play. a I freely admit that as a rule small horses come to hand quicker than the big ones, and that is precisely why lo even up mutters I advocate a classic at the November meeting. The owners of the precocious type would be able to have their lliug in March and Mill have tho edge on the backward type In August. Meanwhile, ihe owners of Ihe backward type would be able lo have some sort of chance, however slight, in August and come into their own on equal terms in November. By the time the Trinidad Derby arrived everybody would have had the *VFI/!/./OI/ Xt/\ti4lrwAf necessary experience to race like seasoned campaigners over 9''4 or 10 M^fttrVttftM tJM*&n%MSM>y iva \ on g^ \ Jecl confident that under uuch circumstances we would THE thirteen members of the have nothing to fear from Jamaica. Trinidad Cricket Team with Iheir a ND speaking of Jamaica I come to a very serious matter. I have Manager Mr. Harold Burnett, /\j u .t received my copv of the Bloodstock Breeders' Review Vol. ex-lntercoli.il la I player, will be XXXVIII. IMP. The book, as usual, is a valuable addition lo any arriving at Seawell tomorrow Racing Library in spite of its material being a bit behind hand. I have Ihe "Review" in which from the Board of Management there Is another attempt by some writer in Jamaica to decry horses of the Barbados Cricket Associabred in the South Caribbean. Repeatedly in the past I have noticed Mon. that whenever they gel the opportunity to air their views inlernalionIt is expected thai the Trinidad ally. Jamaican writers like to stress the superior quality of their bloodplayera will loosen up at Kenstock over that of the rest of the British Caribbean. We admit lhal sington later in the afternoon their average of good ones is higher about 2 00 o'clock Bul when, without bothering to check the circumstances, a Jam.11Thcv will be slaving at Abbecnn wTtta? states' ". . an indication of the rlass of the 1H49 two-yearvine Guest House ild ln Jmiica> 's that Fair Profit, .ho would not rank among our : first eight, went to Trlnid.nl and won their biggest two-year-old rrtl cuoc DFT1IDN event"; he must be told that this victory was also the biggest fluke in OUUrCKD KE.I UKN h( | llstnrv of it,,, biggest event. The remaiping members of the Blue "Streak, a Jamaican Derby winner, was roundly beaten In Barbados Golf team, which recentthis island by the Barbados ereole Gun Site Yet nobody suggested ly toured Trinidad, returned yeslht this was nn Indication that racing here was on a higher level lerday by BW.I.A. than in Jmaica. There were extenuating circumstances for Blue They were Mr. John Grace, Miss Streak. So too were there extenuating circumstances for the good Katy Ix-negan and Mrs. Isabelle horses which Fair Profit defeated in the Hreeders' Stakes. As for l^enegan Fair Profit himself, he has not won a race since. RECENT ARRIVALS of 8XLECT TliESB EARi.\ .... Kliaenli Was a Kle^nrr Chamois A Polbhing Cloths Back I p laMBfja Spot Lamps Tractor Ijimp* llluminnled Fender fiuldes Jeweled Exhaust i*ip r Extension* Sleerlnjr Wheel Covers Bumper Jacks t.riMMrjaai •* Volt t\ It Volt llorm Miracle Adbe.hc Valve ;rlndlnc Campound M, ''i' •, Bearkag Bka Cylinder Bl.ek Heat Krdstlng Faint Hake Craehhe Fhraks It.,11.1, Testers Ballery ( *hl.-. Brau shim MrUI o-l> Salder Plane ana Blades _Abo%  >orlKnlsln. Casket gelt for all popula und Ameriran Cars and Trucks BICYCLEF111II.I1 ECKSTEIN BROTHERS SUGAR FACTORY SUPPLIES — WE OFFER — GOOIt YE. tit Il XSMISSIO.X 111:1. II XV r-ii" — e — •-•"r — ALSO — r.ll#*X HUH Mim. HE1.TIXU Sll 1 11 HOSE 'A" and I" flTV CABAGE TliADINf. (0., LTD. >.V.V,V.V.V.V.V,V/,V.',V.V.V,V/.',y,V.'/.V.'W the Craftsman's Pride Study the linn of this Phillip, bicycle and note the aplcciid dengn and sturdy construction. Ii it ro.de in England by maticr craftsmen and is ihe finest machine you can buy — and GiiJrjnued for al long tt VJU own n. The sturdy trsme is of true-temper siecl and the awiponenrt are of the haghrst quality. Look at ilie luitroui e.iimrl finish, the sparkle of ihe chromium p'-iting, and the modem mudguards with the strcunhncJ chromium tip The bicycle is available ia a range of colours as well as black. | PHOSFERINE a for a new appetite! If you wc off your food, fe.lng nervy or run-down, it may he th; I'HOSFF.RINE u tun what you nee 10 brine you back to a happ" ncrauue ofheslm. PHOSFERINE : grand reitoradv*: when reserves run !' %  enovmed tke World 0\ ver When die appetite fails, the vital resources of the body rail to be replaced. Menial and physical energy sag. Rcs.licnc? weak?as. The cuecrful nbouo-! ;o life'f dJhcxJue* descru you. Itiswilhia the power of PHOSFERINE to reverse this pro;en — hy reviving Ihe appetite it creates new energy %  ud vitality. 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PAGE 1

PACK SIX SUNDAY AIlSlK VTI SUNDAY, FEBKl'AKV INI BARBADOS | A0VD6KIE hUUi hj l*. Ail-MttU C*. LM *.• I Sunday, February 11. 1951 I'OI HI fHHiS THE Rift of two Alsatian Dogs by the Metropolitan Police to the local Force will glva the Barbados Police an opportunity to develop a branch of police work that ha* been ignored for too many years in this Island. Almost every Police Force of any standing has long recognised the value of trained dogs as an essential adjunct to the Force. Much of the spade work in training police dogs was done in Germany before the first World War and the marvellous record set up by these dogs during the war opened the eyes of the authorities to the possible service which dogs could render if enrolled in a Civil Police Force. For many years tbt Germans pinned their faith on the Alsatian Shepherd Dog. whose speed and agility, skill in tracking and intelligence in .-mergency, marked him out as an Weal assistant to the Civil Police. The Alsatian was one of the pioneers in police work, but he is by no means the only breed that has been found suitable for training in police work. The Germans themselves soon discovered that the Dobermann Pinscer and the Boxer made equally good police dogs, and within recent years the Boxer has found great favour in Palestine and hot climates where certain strains of Alsatians proved to be subject to skin ailments. In England, the Airedale Terrier and the Flat Coated Retriever have shown qualities almost approaching that of the German breeds. The young age at which an Alsatian can be trained still causes the breed to be preferred above all others for training in police work. Not only can a trained police dog be uwd for tracking and arresting, but he serves as a valuable protector to constables on lonely beats and he is invaluable as a searcher of buildings or fields. When specialised tracking on a cold scent is required, however, the police employ a specialist tracker, the Bloodhound, whose breeding has been directed for centuries to the building-up of an acute sense of smell. The training of Police Dogs is a complicated and a tedious task demanding an abundance of patience, firmness, and kindliness, and Colonel Michelin is indeed fortunate to find in the island a fully qualified trainer, eager and willing to undertake the ta&k. There is hardly a limit to what a good trainer can teach an intelligent dog, and the performances put up at field and police work triels are so outstanding that the watcher is truly amazed. The Commissioner of Police proposes to bufld up a sizable corps of Police Dogs using the two Alsatians as the foundation of hi? kennels. He will have to watch carefully the progress of his particular strain of Alsatians and should they prove unsuitable, it may be as well for him to substitute the Boxer, who has proved his suitability to hot climatic conditions, or the Dobennann Pinscer, another shorthaired breed. In Kensington Gardens, London, the Boxer is now being used almost exclusively. His size and his gentleness until roused, is making him a strong favourite for the job, but the Alsatian is still holding his own except under unsuitable climatic conditions. Colonel Michelin's experiment will bo watched with interest. v.H.r. The use of very high frequency Radio Communication in recent years has been associated in the public mind with Use pUfel BOM than any other sen-ice. In Barbados on the other hand, few people have seen this type of radio telephone at work and it is only very recently that commercial firms have been installing V. H. F. Sets for use from ship to shore. The main advantage of very high frequency operation for radio work is the fact that these frequencies are free irom interference caused by normal low-frequency wireless operations. It has been pariicularly useful for police, taxis and other organisations where mobility is synonymous with efficiency. In Barbados where there is hardly any interference from hills, very high frequency sets can be used with maximum efficiency. Il is no compliment to the Government of Barbados that private firms have been able to forestall the Police in the use of V. H. F. Radio communication. The Commissioner of Police. Colonel R. T. Michelin. told the Advocate last week that he hai been trying for over a year to get V. H. F. Radio Communication sets for the Barbados Police Force. The Government are evidently not communication minded. It may be that they are not fully aware of the importance of Communications. They may. isolated as they are on a small island in the Atlantic, not yet have heard that whereas victory in the days of Napoleon was achieved by paying due regard to the slogan that "an army marches on its stomach;" the slogan during the last world war which ended in victory for the United Nations, was that "without Communications the battle is lost." It is almost useless to train, equip, and raise the Barbados Police Force to the high level of discipline and organisation which it has reached, if the one thing needful—Communications—is overlooked because funds are not forthcoming. It is better to have itfs policemen with modern facilities ','• their disposal than more policemen working in isolation from control headquarters. A Police patrol car that is not in contact with headquarters by radio telephone is restricted to one patrol. A police car that is on patrol, but fitted with V. H. F. Radio Communication, can be redirected by control headquarters to any part of Barbados where its presence is required. The efficiency of the Barbados Police Force, the service that it renders the public, demands an up-to-date Communication system. The small expenditure involved in equipping the Police with a system of Mobile Radio Communication will be a small fraction of the cost to the public which the present antiquated system of communications makes necessary, solely because control is impossible. The Commissioner of Police knows only too well the value of such communication to Barbados. It is incredible that he should be kept waiting even on the plea of economy. It is no economy to keep the Police Force immobile. That is what lack of mobile radio communication means in fact. THE STORY Oil IIL IWISKII I IM.N THE ROYAL 1NNISKII.MNC. (-yon, K.C.B G.C H Commanding lever, and on December 24th 1197 Fl'SIUKRS arrive m Barbados .it Barbados, Issued the (oUowlog the effective strength all told was next Friday. General Order:— t-nly two hundred and eighty.three Haised in Enniskillen, Co. FerThe Regiment was ordered home ..i.agh, N. Ireland and taken on "BARBADOS, November 2Snd In March 1798 and when mustered the British Establishment on 20th June. 1689. 1830 at sea on June 1st it consisted of Toulouse; Peninsula; Waterloo; missioned < fliers, and men. his Egypt; South Africa 1935; Soutn fdoui wishes for lldrprwperAfrica 184(1-7; Central India; Rejw voyage, happy landing and lief of Ladysmith; South Afrtea, '" tu r* * % %  Jam * £* 1800.100? " u * evpI **" ltl recollection the * w "" real with which the 27th. whiM Great War serving under him. hai performed every duty; and he views thereLa Gateau; Somme, I9nt-18; ''*e. the*' departure with sincere Ypres, 1917-18; St. Quentln; Hinregret but his knowledge at their (i'nhiirn I in* France & Flanders, farmer more active and splendid 19 4-ifl llJSBS mfJfi! rvice satisfies Mm that to whatthe tourney taking four months. 1 anding at Helta; GaUipOu, *ver destination the commands of This short tour was a tragic stor> 115-16' Palestine 1017-18. their sovereign may hereafter cf Ill-managed and abortive exDurui'g the wmid World War direct the Inniskilling Regiment, pcdilions of privation and disease. battalions of the Royal InnltMU*y wl LL m a i "!?"!..J! 1 i l ^'. slm Although they had left Ireland /% FOOT I \ THE DOOR A SALESMAN'S chief qualiiications. we always understood, were to have strong feet and strong boots—the object being to get one foot in the door and keep it there. However, an interesting little booklet which reached this office during the week claims that salesmanship can be learned by correspondence — eighteen lessons for (90. In the first lesson the student is scnooled in, among other things, social conversation, general deportment, initiative, and attitude to colleagues. By the next lesson the prospective salesman is learning about "Cultivating Polished Expression, the Voice, Facial Expression, Gesture, and Correct Posture." By the third lesson the course gets down to brass tacks, or rather to bicycles, wireless sets, breakfast foods, toilet soaps, and most difficult of all, calculating machines. The next lesson on "Developing Moral Courage" will cause the student to search his soul. Among the subjects discussed are : "Timidity and Shyness — an analysis of fear—overcoming your fear—being friendly—developing social 'activity—snobs—introspection—rjver-in trospect ion—harmony in dress—the voice—and the eyes." In the fifth lesson buying motives arc laid bare. They are; "self-preservation, approbativeness, vanity, cupidity, pride, acquisitiveness, self-gratification, imitativeness. and curiosity,"—a fairly comprehensive catalogue of vices. The budding salesman is then urged to observe "a housewife considering an Electric Iron" (a dangerous mission no doubt) and "a professional man considering a medium-priced car." The lesson on the "Mechanics of Selling" which follows teaches the salesman how to create a desire for anything from "a new table sauce" to a fountain pen, and how to convince a board of directors of a bank or a public house proprietor. The section on "Overcoming Resistance" is perhaps the most terrifying; it literally provides the salesman with "all the answers". For instance, it teaches him how to handle people who make such stupid objections as "Price too high", "Never • handle such goods". "Unsuitable to our neighbourhood" or the pitiful "I cannot afford". With such a salesman at large nobody is safe. The final lesson, appropriately enough. teaches the salesman how to sell himself. The Twenu-Seventh Regiment, three hundred and eighty three Rattle Honours 1689—1914 '"'"' <"> the ^ v *> •>' embarkation, effectives of ah ranks; one hunKattlt Honours IMV—ISM ^ LleulPni(tl (l ,. neral Com arcd and -evenly live men Martinique. 1762. Hav.nnah; St. manding. in the separation of so hid already been sent to hospital.Lucia, 1778; St. l-ucia. 17fl; valuable a part of his force, begs lr. England and ten men were The Regiment's last visit to the island was in peace time—from 1828 to 1829 when it moved to Barbados en route for home. Jamaica Until their present tour began in 1949 tne Innisklllings had only once previously been 10 Jamaica In 17-*l they sailed for Kingston ing Fusiliers Forvcd In: France Flanders. 1939-40. Burma. N. Africa, Sicily. Italy. guished reputation which has se§ i x or seven hundred strong a.ic cured to them the respect and applause of those under whe they have served". their seven years toi had not once seen action, they landed in England little more than a year later with twelve officers and forty eight men. Fortunately to-day the cond mmm usesm m&m? formerly Regiment Haltle Honours show, many con%  "'"" %  num. !" ana .wa — necUoni with the WMn HemlInniskillingera behind thorn in the P" sphere. They were one ol the praveyard. o( the various colonies -" first tour Kegmients to be ilaUonIn which they had been quartered, ed in the West Indies, arriving in The survivors ot the Regiment AMi.ua In 1701 lor I live year were brought home In three hlps, tour This was only tho first or the slowest ol wnn li reached link many tours both In pure and war l %  >"" and ol January. ISSI. Thl %  >'1 ... .. %  < 1 1. 1 .. this port of the world. The peaceful with which they have beei closely connected In the past. St. Lucia The connection of the Innisklllings with ST I.UCIA is a very heir last vlsUto the Western sp ^, u l one. In fact ihe relationSeven Years War (I7S4-H1I saw Hemisphere until their present hlp „.,„,„.„ the Island and the t at, the captour began In IMS Regiment Is probably them again present turc of Martinique and Grenada and, following the outbreak of British ( .111,111 1 War u<.rh .Spain in 1762 they took part in the capture of Hnvannah The Innisklllings did not visit described at the time as the richBritish Guiana until fairly late in cst prize ever to fall to British their historv. Arms, in October 1762 the Regiment returned home to Ireland. From 1824 tn 1826 the Hcgiment _. ,_ .„„„ „, was in Demerar., and Berbice and ? !" nce having declared war. the They did not remain long_ot ln Deewnber I826 lt waB orderC(t Innisklllings sailed for the West Indies in 1778. They first proRegiment is probably unlqi They have twice taken part in iu capture the second time moat gloriously ond their monuinenl to-day marks the site of their gallantry 150 years ago. After becing service in th American war of Independence home During the American War to St. Vincent and Grcnada."Bo?' '2^^ !" .^JI1 ." r !" fore thp > lc I>6 once again saw Ihe Innisklllings landing in Barbados preparatory to an attack on St. Lucia, the famous attack of 24th May being commemorated thi year by members of the Regimeni u, person after a space of 15f years. The Commander of the assaulting troops was Brigadier-Genera (afterwards Lieutenant-General Sir John Moore of Peninsula fame who summed up the battle in the words "We owed the poslo. the gallantry of the TwentySeventh Regiment". After desperate fighting th French sent in the (lag of truce to ask^for terms, and the negotta lions ended in capitulation, whict took place on the 26th. In recognition of the conspicuous service rendered on the 24th by the Inniskillings, Sir Ralpr. 1 extremely poptiAbcrcrombic paid them the verx rTeifi twohahlv Maine others from r?.T**" ?' !" .—? v*** !" ** pupiiAbercromble paid them the ver\ l-n" 706 UV 1 r tert,l " l L lhf offlcer; at .. high nmplimcnt cmUained in the 17021 m EZLSFSZil bn ". n J^. Majorrollow.r./General Order dated During its vis,. .0 Antigua the L^ZsSS'^"SfilAt 26th May. 1796:Uoo which led ...the easkuee J „,,. ,.„,„,..,,, na sn 3SJ m „ lt Ouad e l p up e In .llW ^orWsV ed hy u, exemplary conduct mice he had the happiness to hav .pUii' 703 UnfortuniUl\ disease took a heavy loll >f Officers and men and the numbers sailing home in 1706 were less than half of those who had .i-rived five years earlier. Two Companies were lefi behind, being forcibly tranaterred undfi M Bmaadr, Dominica It After the capture of St Lucia n I79fi a detachment of the Regl(0 another Regiment and In 1710 n, ^' lt wga stationed in Dominica these unfortunates are heard i>f as wh cre 1,v 'mained until the having been without pay for three following year, an and "dependent t>n the Inhabitants bread". Antigua their The "Parole—Finii ski lien Counton..K;n<—GHIman" The 27th Regiment, under the command of Brigadier General Moore, will this day at 12 o'clock take possession of Fort Charlotte (Morne Fortune), the present gar. ruon having first inarched out and Taid down their arms on the glacis Brigadier-General Moore will ther plant the Colours of the Regiment the fort to be displayed Barbados The Innisklllings have .,,,, %  ••.-i an nr uriviiii ra flit Inniskllllng. have lioen hour on the nagslafl previous tc three times in Grenada in all, hoisting the usual Union Flag." so their visit In March 1951 will Th General Order after eulo be their fourth. Alter taking pan glsing General Moore, refers to in the rapture ol Martinique Irom the Twenty-seventh in verv appre the French, which Kll Ln February dative terms more often in llaiWos than any 762 t „,. IC Immediately ,e„'t other of the West Indian IJjl*to rodu,.Grenada. The Inniskil-The behaviour ol the Enniskil. Canada thev were senI toT iic <,0 ? '"" w,,hou """ "'"' %  <' " f 1 1 <" %  > %  Witt him (l.e •h."French owned WeMliiKn ,M |U """hi"!"" > !" lollowMoore) was .o worth, ol pra.se sland! iiul T.tlchil ni ^rbJdS c bs """ •' "" Crcnadines. that il dervea the Commander nartolnn x-• iit.on to eaSur. ho "f"" "' st I-uel the Drummed, the officer, and men ol ft .r.ira.l"" Th ."ana fffl in J J""l*.'" m " ,lnd " Fi ">'h.l gallant Regtment he also re. Februarl T.C2 and a !" re was ?* Regiment were hurried turns nls best thanks and regret. immediately sent to reduce OHti',",' G !" nadn where tha extremely the loss ol Major Wll .... .-w^ British Garrison was, with dimson of that Corps, who fell exert cnlty. holding its own against the lag himself in the service of hi! Alter the capture ol St. UKKI trench Thla reinforcement country.The honour accorded In 1778 Ihe InnlakJUIngs wereVaturned the scale and after ; little the Regiment in permitting them tioncd 111 Barbados fen two years fighting in which the Regiment to fly their Colours on the cap! M '' 0 r -„J '"'. r l "5 "ftSfa lo "•" •<" %  lhc enemy stir lured fnrt is unique in British '"...''t 'Sr y ^ r .? rtW j2 rendered and Grenada was MUlla S!!f?. !..*-u '.r?,J. r , !f "%Z •*"" to Ihe possession, of th, famous attack of 1796 and. after &ssr^: nSs tSu'r'oed-io & jStSS .!-li-tdos Orenada with small detachmenti at Barbados and Dominica and In January 1829 the Inniskil-"'''red terribly fro,n the ravages The Last itaU igs were again in Farl-ados "I tropical diseases. At the end lings m the W< Ihslory. The visit in the year 1951 indeed .< historic occasion Grenada with small detachmentt St. Vincent t Barbados and Dominica and of the Innisklllings were "again in Fnrbados 01 fopical diseases. At the end lings m the West Indies was St where they remained ui 7ae n, rc tha four Vincent Arriving from British end of liSO when thev were hundred officors and men-hud died. Oman., thev spent three vear ordered home to Ireland BafPN uri1 l osI "f "' p remainder were here from 1826 to 1829 and flnall the Twenty-Seventh embarked, l v "; ** Oi.ifts of recruits aru.ied heme by way of Barbados. Lieutenant General Sir James rived only to fall victims el yellow reaching England in 1830. WILKINSON A HAYNES Co., Ltd. Successors To C.S. PITCHER & CO. Phone. — 4472, 4M7. RANSOMES LAWN MOWERS 11'gVl. or without Motors JVOWS THE TIME TO SELECT VOtJRS. DA COSTA & CO., LTD. AGINIS FOR THOSE WHO LIKE TO KEEP COOL . AND KEEP WELL-GROOMED AT THE SAME TIME! THE NEW MOYGASHEL ANTI-CRUSHABLE LINENS . ARE JUST THE TICKET MW STOCKS II si ARRIVED AT DA COSTA & CO, LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT Jo TTbm 0f ihs Wavy Jo Whtn fcvaJufwfauui THERE IS NO OTHER RUM LIKE GODDARDS GOLD BRAID RUM • It's Mellow In flavour • It's Beat In Quality • ll's First In Popularity. EV/Ol IT AT YOIR CLLB i\;< <;iiun\Rhs USTAtBMtn ^•;-^^^-.• %  .^^^•.^•.-.-.-,-.-.•.-.-.-.•.-.-.•.•.••.•,-.-.•.-.-.-,-,•,..-.•,^.-.•.',' %  .-,'.-^ I



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SUNDAY. FKBRl'ARV 11. 1931 SI SOAY ADVOCATE TAC.E TMRI'.K \l ilia' I ill. ill.i Mixed Grill a. iiOVER THIS WEEK-END, movie-goers will have a mixed grill to choose from in the line of entertainment. comprising the story of a famous race horse, a rather faiocal Western; mystery melodrama; yuerilla warfare in the Philippines, a social problem and a stconj showing of one of Danny Kaye's funniest comedies. -a? f -L h *'_ n £ nim THE STORY social |,rnl>lcm—the blmk-matkrl 2,%.?^ B, ?. CUIT jnrt T,,E GAL SJ, ot babies purchased from WHO TOOK THE WEST will protheir unwed mothers Though we bably have the most popular apout hei.do not have an tvll of peal. Both nrt in Technicolor. !! %  kind to contSsMl with, the plcwith glorious, though widely diftine la iiono-th.* loss interesting. ferent. scenic backgrounds li U the story of a voung girl %  >rua> CTOBV !" crime ^ ho H 0 ** * L Angalea to find i !" STORY OF SEA11IS tWT miialng sister, nnd with the help of n newspaper reporter, exihowtng at the Plaza, is I Its title implies and yo CUIT", showin, just what tee the step-by-step lralriin B process of one of America's moat fsmeus race horses The Bifi post* an IHasjal adoption svndiate. The acting of the principal* realistic and convincing and in supporting miss, Jeff Chandler cult was an extraordinary horse $*JP wlU hi remembered In Thi in that he never realh came .ntn ><*eii Arrow) sj the district his own until he was |i four-vear SS^/fl M r 'one Rambeau. old and his famous match race with "SSJi ^th^.ET^ 0 lh War Admiral at Plmlico. in which EKK& * ^ r he won by four lengths and his ___ victory In his final try for the Santa Anita, handicap, are actually shown In the him. A*, a point of interest, the role of tnc famous horse is played by two of his tons, with the exception nl the two races mentioned above There Is %  slight, but pleasant love story between Bdrl pie, as an Irish colleen, whose uncle Barry Fitzgerald If the Bis^L?j£i h ^' , f m 1 ur,1 m cult's trainer, and Lon McAlister. %  ft?***?* ,r "* '" c,Parod < guilt by a young woman who falls love with him. but who will fcmpim "IN A LONELY PLACE" Starring Humphrey Bogart. this Blm i* thtstory of a neurotic '.nt-ri writer, who. because of his outbursts of rage and tendency to evolved In brawls, Is sus* Gardening Hints For Amateurs THE CAEDEN in February COLELS Yellow Muin.iml.i WHEN planting up the garden, remember the lovely Coleus, and. it possible find a spot Bat tindecorative and quick growing plant, it's fascinating to collect the many varieties of this lovely little plant, exchanges between friends is so easy. Just a snip oft from an established plant stuck in the ground will quickly take root A bowl of these coloured leaves will soon send out roots In the water, and so they can be enjoyed In the house and then planted out in the garden. Coleus do best In semi shade. and thrive especially well under tram They are suitable to plant as a Ihiok border, or on a Rock%  artBB where they look particularly well, but they can be grown In the sun, and look particula-iv handsome when massed together in large beds. In planting the Coleus. see that the cutting is short, as thev are inclined to get stalky rather quickly. To keep them, after planting, in good shape nip out the top centre leaves now and Farm And Garden By AGRICOLA AGKICl'LTURfc is the teat which spread* the daily table of mankind. We propose in thia series of notes to keep this in >.. 1 theme as a main thread and t.> weave around it such Ideas and Informative matter as may help to give general form and pattern 10 'ho theme while, ai the sasne lime. Treating an appropriate setting or background as the picture unfolds. Altogether, not for the specialist who is already well informed, but for the general reader and those interestedin uV' use of land who might find the notes helpful and perhaps stimulating. That, at least, is our hope rf ^.^ tin an arriesRaraa earnmimii. like HarbuK*. tha Lauad a> rvtsett*; One. Beg Inning Shis week and rontiiiMlnc every Sun day on thu page a sllstlniui*hed Asrirulturslist, writ ing under the pen-name Agrieola. brings yon,—the man and woman on Use toad, the InfermaUon yea gel the beat results from >enr farm and garden) knowledge and co-opemtloi the local Department of AgrtculaS a top Jockey, but it Is to Bjrry FH2gerald that acting honours HO Ag the "fey" Irish trainer nnd lever of horses, he gives s warm and endearing eharacterliatloii of the man whose unchanging faith in a knobbley-kneed colt made the world's leading money not go through with their marriage because she fears his emotional lutbreoks and Instability It is fairly obvious, from the beginning that Mr. Bogart had no hand in the murder, and the film Is therefore not entirely credible ( G.P. eMulrea:-1 should be grateful for advice on "mow" on lawns. coupled Wit* bare patches. Ahw scale blight on lime trees and other citrus that cause them to die With thanks. column, luck-ruton v.lh lh. ,„,, „ ^^ |oft ,„ „,„„„„ impatibl* with ill. of itrppn*f md cftori. by numerous s.uall '"*•• rulUvators who hiv# profiled by Aarlcullui* is. of coune. ; o i'', n ,h f }" a •*. "• '"*" rrlmanlr -1 busiMB. bill 11 II •!* ">' Deperlmenl of Aarlc of prmnil dv exlswnc* .nd Ihe U". Thuv Ihere have been tuBuuiekrnmi of ihe lompo ol life ntil ialiu bul abw ill m lmi-, ih.i much of the low* All •hanndoM ihi. • %  . In danger of beir* io.1. TT y rt -, J."' .""T !^„ *,', unfortunately. The tendency i.. !" d •>' "'• '•<' ,"•• f"."' 0 inTpleTl.^ o^hatn.* Si K^ *'• wllh nall unit which accompany such actlviU^ hve almost disappeared th are giving plaTe to artificial dlsw f5jj* mill ?; 1 !" V*"\"-*"* tractions which, In most case*. ***'. millwright, plumber, sad; .re not only costlv but ephemersl dls* and harnes^maker. %  'The effect soon passes oft and we f*** %£'£* J,?^^ ., are left with a result comparaoli, tw foundne. i>.i "i-h ( .: to, say, "1 must have another Bndeeiown. but th# laci i>> drink". In other words, the habit ^.J^' sSTssseksT^Wns grows of seeking to sp*ni spots. Is a lively burlesque of some of the situations we at* familiar with in a film of this ki-id. In brief, it centres on Ihe bitter feud between two eotsttsB, srho rail in love with the same woman. However, the title is told In flashcompuisive behaviour is charac tensed by honesty and under.standing Humphrey Bogart gives 'i.nnkllc performetires I have seen him give, while Gloria Gran a me. as the woman who loves him, Is first rate too. Roxv: AMERICAN fU-ERTLLA IV THE PHILIPPINES" I was unable to see this recently lelcased film, but on cheeking — reviews which I received, it ap~ back, from four different points pears to be n semi-documentary of view, with the lady in question war-drama, produced with the eohsving the final word. operation of the U.S and Phillp..„.. ,P' nfl aovernments. Photogrnphe-t YVONNE DE CARLO is the in Technicolor on ihe li&M of opera-singer who Is brought to I-cytc "the film points up Ihe re. Arizona from the East to open markablc ingenuity and teamwork General O'HanTs new opera that went into the fortification of house, and she promptly becomes Ill-equipped Pacific Islands during entangled with his two fighting the second World War. Praisenephews. Though Misi De Carlo worthy tare has gone into the, is not the opera singer envisaged recreation of situations and feelby the old man. her rendition of Ings that prevailed in the Philiptwo bar-room ditties of thut era pines after the fall of Bataan." are quite diverting and she Another reviewer says •'there are shows herself highly capable of '•* convincing glimpses of the handling an explosive situation. As < "'t of fighting that went on in the two cousins. Scott Brady nnd the islands, during the war"—but John Russell are like terriers in I am afraid that this last reviewer a ring when they meet and their was not impressed with the story llnal fight in the General's home " the performances of Tyrone is a grand and glorious affai the lines of ull-in wrestling. Charles Coburn, grand old man of the movies, plays the General, the only person capable of controlling his nephews—alone with the help of the U.S. Cavalry! Power and Michelit are starred. Prelle, who HOME. SWEET HOME NEW YORK Home Is sweeter to ten million American families who now ha\ ^"concert in Se opeJa rS SfJSSS^tiS^SSi with two shots from K *l Xf7&ZU?5'JX to subdue his nephews feuding the fover after the film factions in the pit. The costumes nnd settings ore — %  -— colourful and omate and the musisunvvumiu cal background appropriate. ANONYMOUS MILAN. "ABANDONED" Winner of a £20,000 Julian State lottery this week warned Bcatiiinlng Tuesday, the Globe newspapermen to keep his Identity Theatre is showing "Abandoned.' %  %  a-Cr**. He said he was not worried ah absorbing documentary-type : bout begging letters but feared lilm depleting a serious American the lax collectors. then. This tends to make ihem bunchy, so much prettier than when they grow up tall. Coleus are cultivated for then brightly coloured leaves. The flowers are insignillcant, and should be nipped out. The plant* grow to a height of about two to three feet, and as already stated prefer semi shade and a moist condition. FLOWERING VINES The Yellow Alumanda The Yellow Alamanda is one of i.ur ftowerlng vines thut cun also be grown as a shrub If so desired It Is a slow growing plant, so quick results are not to be expected. Being rather woody. It will tolerate better than most vmc an exposed position, and it will withstand fairly poor pardon conditions. The flowers r.re a clean bright yellow, bell-like m shape and they grow In loose clusters on the vine. It bears continuously throughout the year, especlallv during the rainy season. There are two varieties of the Yellow Alnmandu. the garden book tells us. One, the "Alamanda catrtartica var Hendersonii" has much larger (lowers. ome measuring four to five inches in diameter, than the ordinary Alamanda whose Botanical name (from Garden book > is "Alamanda Cathartlca var Wllliomsii. In deciding on a plant, the larger variety Is strongly recommended. The Alamanda is grown from cutting, or by layering. Have you any Gardening questions you would like answered or any garden information that would be of interest to other Gardener to pass on? Have you a surplus of scads or cuttings you would like to exchange? WrMe to 'GARDENING" C/o The "Advocate" nnd watch this Column for a reply. which Is then run. more often than not. by remote control with its concomitant evils. It will be readily admitted that the new outlook has brought. In well organised rural enter prise, higher standards of livit. and oil that these imply bin. unless community and family life in general is properly channelled lo meet the changed circumstances, we shall lose permanently und beyond ._.. recall the character bulldlnC h. .f CMU-I* •em i-hin. In Ihe ff.mtr*.l**. l"il Ihe hj|M| Mpnl. * live Ulwtd rem-ln. hind* -itslllf. Ov. uin>*. Tru. Ihe •e-tlietn MS* r.tml br Ihe Si tWiaraws of n*rainS wind ml lb vhote decM"taled welU It %  •mute >, the well lai) led llel*.. Ihe .mell of th mr-n-.-i and rmnl. crap, ituek and olhaa ,1 i.le.Mns. for i, ilui kl.il % %  • % %  ..Ithe univertie. inakinc for greater efficiency and |> 1 ", 1 ,' n ne ^' n Xti r, 'we'rtiaTt %  ) l.i.kKtivity. In tact, the creation wll> COOKERY CORNEK Few people realize what nutritive value a lariat potato lias. It Is rich in vitamins A and C. some vitamin B and minerals. Very few people dislike this vegetable ihouidi it gas. of coui-se get vary boring if just boiled and buttered. The other day I came across a recipe for sweet potatoes which WU indeed delicious. Sweet Potato And Orange. Ingredients: 2 Sweet potatoes 1 large orange I t:iblesp o o n f u 1 grated orange rind l/l cup orange Julre sugar :! lahlcspoonsful fat A cup orange Juice Salt. Peel. cook, and slice the potatoes, grate the nnd of the large orange then peel the orange and -lice 11 Place in a greased fireproof dish, a layer of sweet potato, a layer ..f orange slices. Sprinkle with orange rind, salt and sugar, and dot with fat Repeat in this way until all the ingredients are used, then pour the orange Juice over the top. It i essential lhat you should cover vour dish. Bake In a moderately "hot oven for 4S minutes to one hour. Thia dish is very nice served *'U^rf* t c^onut kisses wa> onre described to me as, "A toothsome passll-rounri titbit Why not try It and see if you ng^^c Ingredients: Orated meat of two coconuts •4-lb. sugar 1 teas.roonful orange flour water 4 egg yolks 2 tablespoonsful flour Mix the coconut. aiiear, and orange flour water and bring it to the boll, take It off the Hrr and add the flour and beat vigorously for half an hour Place in K> i' 1 -' patty-pan :".'' iiake In %  moderate oven for twenty minutes. lli-movc them and springle with powdered sugar.


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PACE RK.I1T SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. FEBRUARY American Horticulturist Improves Tomatoes A r* FIVFIfA T Dr A F t>n'F of tke> 'W W Nrw llampihlr. It iun-* %  %  \*J M-MJ!" _L_f _L C_ M. .M—J SPEAKS J y Esgw-ruwn. *U>MI of thr University of \r Hampshire tt* bred Mili-riprmiu lomu NK for lor sheet immr gtu*.*-. _m of i.tmh#rii iWimuniinin (be United b WILLIAM OILMAN Frooo *itur. Magaita* -During World War II an Amorictoi wt—an living In a large city wanted tt do her bit by raising a IlltU* Victory Garden: but she was .A invalid FTer request was for apractacul vegetable that the <'9Vld grw " %  wirdowbox of I #* apartment. That problem was In*. A. F. wag*.'specially. The skilled itoneric;m plant-breeder crossed 1Wto tomato varieties—smalll*h Uwarf Champion with extrtmel' early Redskin—and produced u new hybrid II Ml %  tomato jKr enough lor slicing, yet growing tn plants that need to be only tn inches apart. Dr. Yeager and his colleagues M Iht University of New Hjirnpshiie fcxperiment Station in the northa^gtern section of the United Slates have originated w many varieties of frulti-, berries, and vegeuble. that he sometimes ha* to puzrif about new name* for Ihrm. Thai tlmo. there was BO difflcuity. With a chuckle, he iJtfiitmrd the new tomalo % %  Windowbox. • And It has become %  useful new variety. Difficult Time The ordinary gardener i* 'nclined to take tho tomato, symbol oi Juicy Harden freshness, for gmted. Actually, '.he tomato iia* had a difficult lime. Like the C to, it wag originally without rur in ill native hemisphere. Both originated In the New World; both had to go to Europe and win popularity there, before returning across the Atlantic to become standard American foods. As recently as a century *fo. th* tomato was still an object of suspicion. Some called it the "love apple", and wanted no part of it. Others considered It poisCIIOIK Qlance through the page* of any present-day American seed soms possessing both pisUls and catalogue, and it is obvious how Ui stamens, similarly shorten the the tomato has come But not lime required for ripening fruit. far enough. In the belief of Dr. Ycager, who heads the Horttcul lure Department o.' the University • i New Hampshire. Here for 11 years, and during; 20 preceding years while he was experimenting at state agriculture colleges of £ th Dakota. Pnuigylvi hlgon. he has been pursuln. the perfect variety. Much of this research has been aimed at making the tomato better adopted to short growing seasons In the cold northern Stales. In thli. Dr. Yeager has beam a good example of the scientist who will I.Q be easily sttlsBed. Dakota Agricultural College, wh.d by crossing; a greenhouse variety with a wild tomato from I'ern The latter was a swee*. gramidi-white fruit only on*inch in utarm-li i Bui D ki.e u thai ihl ''y'* Vitamin C rornvrnt uas four %  From several hundred mating-, many ftuil lut the sum total of all that w-.rk was only one. solitary hybrid seed. I| wa* *'iia lone freak that Dr. Yeager planted nervously Luckily, it wo* fertile, and 't produced enough fruit for a sizable second fcenerunon This enabled the long Job of more crossing* and selection of best progeny to get underway Gradually. Dr Yeager built Mae, quality, and colour Into the newcomers. Introduction In 1MB. he was ready with his first introduction. It is called High C. In addition to the vitamin feature, it has determinate "iowin for early ripening It Is round, red, very firm, but somewhat small — about five fruits to the pound. Highly productive In an average growing season, its Vitamin C content runs roughly double that of standards like victor and Marglobe. in Yeager finished work on I Mytfca C r v.rtnaaat'. caste rift > on %  alicy state 1945 has failed W: imi Z-x* ta anil is oat Whj J.il lU <• fnw this advlr. fa* a a^and Mm. Wit H da. 10 politics? If M. *hy did na* aer military leader. sund out .sal.*! * maaa can icilptlon palter that was mdopt ed? Th.r Wee* aaaalP ail ...cad to mis Horse-Drawn Reds 194.. On. o[ lb* mo.1 intporl.nl I. IB. SJ" ^,e arl tnU who w vor,. raliini oi the ne.etMryl.na ?hil Rttwl. now h.. l.rf num. cty he B ..lllng New H.mpihlre (orcel But ^lel tne nay !" "' ,„. r 0 sulln unk> we would no No. 50 until ood name bj away ihat It ','„'" "S s n J* !" ', lon iCT 0. able to raise hdvejc be(ound. Thia utdeterminate v.ri. ol ree-llirt "te bulk• ?' • v " hinc i ,he enemy lines with our tor Hos-nin, than Hllh wry 1I. proportion, ol the Class armour ed force.. B Lieut, Gen. Sin OIFFAKD MATEU THE WHOLE WORLD U ofhail at the lark o( dcislon and action by the Western nations of Europe at this time ol great peril. If this Indecision is prolonged. Western clviliistton may be lost for a long time and perhaps forever. C. but Along iperior in other respects. Jd ,w t ,..,_ .. „,._, That is not true. The Russian th increase .Ue. lu %  !" n ,te '^.Jt^tit SJ "my is stiU mainly horse dr.wn -ny of us preached that the r „ Uy V.tamm C content approach., m "> < "'.''"'^ .h,.hl *> ^>" " '" •" rMl y lnr. lime, normal. ?"JS", £S. uW „, ^S f Ac w mobile they will be able to evade Dr Yeapr predlO. that such "*? '"K . m !" J Z *£x ',, these heavy tanks, wllh s* .nd fuU use of mobility horticulturist working with ike DB. A. T. YEAOBR. Amerl. University of New Hampshire, in the northtsst section of the United %  tales, kneels betide s vine of th* latest tosaato he has originated, which is exceptionally rich in Vitamin C. In his bands an the newcomer's ancestors, ordinary tomatoes that were crossed with tiny. greenish-whito Peruvian ones. Yeager predicts mi. BU>. 'omatoes will become standard sn *I u „,,,,, r vanctics within ten years Along an h proposal was that the with such serious work how.ve.. Fre ^ h ihould pro duce the larger he nnds time for novelties. One m>n .po WPr Br fnv which would originated in a project undernoW de ( Cnf i V e positions at times t-ken by a class m plant breedand prov ide a pivot for the armJng. The idea was to see how nur ^ forces and guard J*e bases. .•mall a tomato plant could be German Copy produced that would mature ALTHOUGH we worked out the fruit. A cross was made between „. hftl ,,i ea w never made our %  •— — -— a m ""tCl'r t ^it v \*-,\ V^ndowbo^ and ^d Currant. *JS into "triking force of this wjuch wi this purpose we mast small BTopertleet of the carry out their task. 'The Western nations must therefore raa-e 2 first class areae-reel sUvtoUoa •t"**^* 1 by a tactical air farce In ae>dltlea we will need a number of infantry ill visions fretn Euree* far defensive HTgll Our country must produce their share of these armoured divisions Not Fit To Eat he g-ve the Great Pla When Dr Ycager went to New Hampshire in 193H, a farmer answered a quest iun with the IMly, "Yes, we enn ralsr .nelona, but and ,llpy ore no "' ' i **'*' Tne • u,rt 'cullunst went lo work to cure that situation. Eight year* later. he introduced Granite State. ; (lfBL excellent-tasting; muskmelon that grows fict enough fur the short kuniinor. In tinnorth' eastern section of th* United States. In 1W. ha pivducod a Ai fiirtii watermelon that ripens more when %  **• wan his muikmelons — StalaJ n "' 1 P'^niptu sei iit :.< gi led tomatoea nicely while growQur )(JfftS and (aj^d those magland if ,1 tug In a threa-and one-half-inch ni n cen t Panzer forces which were flower pot. Yeager does not like (tlo nnes t mobile forces that the "'" — %  to have an unusual variety go to world had aver seen. wasteLooking at the new tomato, with this* forces. Germaay can tell what color its beans or fte wondered if it might not haveoverran Poland in a fortnight, *' l 1 T.V ... .. \alue as an ornamental for France in a month, and nearly anWhen he went to New HampChristmas decorations. This time. oUtiialc'l the Russian army in %  hlra, he astoniahed a green h( h ^ no dlffVcu u y in thinking 1041 house labourer by sprouting 1.000 „ nafnc H J, called Tinv Tim if we hag) taken this good odv tomato seedlings, then throwing j,f Wr (he i M \ v ^y i n the beloved and ra %  wae 097 of the plants, keeping [OJ v A Christmas Carol" by the army only three at blossoming time. s n ,,ikk author Charles D He had discovered a way to save blossoms and growing, space. For take u ~ e.aao.taa man In Class. % -rrve. These splendid men who fought se well In the war must io straight u> smile. Thai is whera they are wanted. They will Into their plaoa auataat at enee. H is flihtini forms tlons and net a grea* training machine that wo need taejay. Why are we not acting in this ay? Why are we not naklng a judges fhrtrnulck-mitUTlTUl hardv Bison n-uskmelon that would beat ihe slailcr | )r Yeager points out. amounted to 179 million mobile armoured 'ould probably have 'ki>. brm able to counter the Corman Pawn and save Franco. The — t — ... whole course of the war would u u drive for munitions proauc have been changed. lion? Did wo not see exactly the same conscription Li needed in warnoalunn irlslng again niter th. Ume and the young men will all iScand World W* corr, out their '"'" • The Russians had a great mancourse, but lor the moment we power army and were tcrrlfted ot must h.v. proportion ol tralld Business in Fore of .1.30..000, ^' %? !" b lh "SmzJr !" "wh, lut. no. thf ..ruj sUte_o. 000. wh |ch caused Ihein "Yeeger races them." Itaguc Dr. Yeger'> new ossnBut ripenlog speed is not alli_, a te is E. M. Mcadcr. who was a Another highly Important project horticulturist with the U S Army is to raise torratoe'i full of Vitahi Korea and brought back 150 mm C, and .thereby make them varieties nl shrubs, vegetables, rival orongeS as a mealtime juice. ; ,nd fruits, many of which had tin ic LUtl* curporated Dr. Yeager" .'trate^i smaller but quicker t extreme example la tlie Hampshire Mldgaf, the ljupe-siied wutennelon ilpens around '15 day Iroi It is large enough for tw .fe. In modern day -ators and sma iivciiient site 1a virtue ,.1 1 : %  Dr helped bj graduate itufjj ^t^ ,, nts out, iimounteti 10 i< rniiuwii. nuanan gfrifi-Hi wm .. .... % %  a ",,"~" ._,',,.1,.^., a tomato Payments made to poltcyholdcri would be a long time liotore they conscription -Q">S ^met are Uivder their coiUi-acb. totalled *B cuukl rid their minds of this tertg£*j2JKPJB£ pn^dl,. mUllM nnd wee* U,mtrlbu*ed V. r ttoto (ear. a ... ^^SXASSiSnShi .,... ... >...n.i u -,,„ „.,iit vh,,liU-i.i in surkln tti" ndviv.* given that N-V>T before has our AI foj it Ifl clear that the stem since 1K45 has illed men still iinusiiul and pink one* disnunwn "" w—-— %  —— %  — --" — • %  • !" %  ' % %  tlnnl. um-opular. Actually, he beneficiaries and policy holders .11 *aln the advice; waa g~^ .! and pink varlet.es death claims, matured endowweshou 1< c-Jnea.n>r. %  on iaUnt, ;.,brothel und-i Uuskin. The ingcttg. annuity payments and ilieae, m b r e i ^ r ( c, ^ u t pink tomato* pinknes* is due to other policy benefits, mcludiry, anfi * a tiutispuient skin. $3J million in dividends to policy l>olders. Dr. Yeagvr's big work concerns The Assets of the Company grew earlier and highcr-\-ltamin tomaio $413 million. Government and with her larger man-power army carry out most of the defensive role. before has our Army been state for the task that lies ahead. No one will admit his mistakes. There is still talk of using heavy tanks with our armoured forces. These are wanted for position warfare but not for our mobile forces probably the only offlcebefoj Conscript Waslo of crowded ZZThTZt'ZSZZZZZto^rto XJ2 jmui on SFIZS^JSSl THIS Mdvice could have been tlfjg, .f which t IKViHor hi M£* and municipal beftde g? no laxative, may be ukcii say time. Keep a >.! ilka-Seltzer helps rollliens daily Alka-Seltzer You may wall ask why Wc permit our scientists to do .nylhinf so foolbaniy. But the plain answer is that we have to do it to satisfy ourselves that even alter prolonged storage. REGENT will not form gum to stick valves and clog fuel systems. The tests which consist of boiling sampies under 100 lb. per sq. inch oxygen pressure in "bombs", are qttiteaafc. Wehava never lost a scientist—or for that matter—a customer he m n ee of a sticky valve. This test is one of many which guarantee the> aualuy and performance of RECENT petrol. L I REGENT PETROL StirliigQaalltj 3 DISTRIBUTORS:— DA COSTA & CO., LTD. AND JAMES A. LYNCH 8c CO.. LTD.



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SUNDAY. FKBRt'ARY II, l5l SUNDAY ADVOCATE fAGE FIVE CARNIVAL IN BARBADOS THE HAND OF HUNGARIAN DANCERS which took First Prise for the BI Band Kneeling in rront and dressed %  % Sir wAltar Raleigh in I.ittliWendy Mackay. who carried Ofl. the Prise for the PretUett Coatum* at the Ursuline Convent Annual fancy Dress Party. TRINIDAD CARNIVAL %  limitation from over-sized camera* to a giant octopus; and one particular band did nul lepresent sailor* at all. hut must have been something belonging to the family of diver: to judge from tho headgear A strong feature this year was the large number <>f "Indiana" who literally took eharasj 1 "' downtown Carnival almost || there had been a conspiracy among them to emphasise this form of disguise. The headgear was so expansive and elaborate that three of them standing aide by side In ono of the wide City streets would find there was barely room for them. The "Apache Indians' 1 who came out on the Itart day were there again on the second day. The Hosea" Band, about 100 stiong had its moon dancer lidding the big following (0 hot calypso tones and the entourage Included taj-bcarers. pundits and t'\&* C. g iiJu fsm %  PT'^ 'I •JS V.* %  aasaaaasVaSBafl •M LaaaW rl %  ^H JH 1 y^ BARRACtTDA" and "The Lady from Martinique" cane late for the competition at the Children'* Ooodwlll League, Guide Rally At Pax Hill fly TONY VANTERPOOL Nearly all West Indian island 'iiiival crazy on the last two days before Lent but in Ban. these days are lust "ardour) working days' AfewRarha.t. however brought the Carnival atmosphere lo the island at VM functions held during that period One of these functions was held %  d the Ursuline Convent on Monday and a large number of ch i dren *ere gaily dressed up Baa •ooked very attractive. On Tuesday night one of trie biggest local CarniVaUattruclion. took place when the Hiversioe Club held their Carntval Ball ai the Children's Goodwill League This la an annual event. Contestants *raaai rt in a v,u • of costume*. One chap who More the costume of a beggar paid the penally. He arrived at the ball with his pants and shirt partly torn but when rcadv to leave they were nearly on*. Another chap preferred to disguise as a Bathing Beaut* He wore a flowing bath robe over his bathing trunks and occasionally the inquisitive girls could be seen trving lo hit the robe. A man. "Boysle" BuUhcr. was chosen Carnival Queen. Butcher. an expert dressmaker and perhaps the only dress designer in the Island, was also responsible for making nearly all the prise winning costumes. His was a bh.ic ofT-the-shoulder dress. He wore black gloves and carried a handbag to match. Nn false hair was made of rope Md pressed and then curled. He called himself Roue Malleen in the Forest. Other prizes were awarded to the West Indian Cricket team. Stanley Jackman who represented "The Turkish Lady". Clyde Phillips "The Senor", Dillon Bahb •The Madonna". Win.ton Hackett "The Mexican". Dr. Winston Wooding. "The Scavenger" and Nesta Layne a% "Jockey Holder Conrad IMerscn. who was dressed as •Barracuda" (Tyrone Power) in the motion picture "Spanish Main" and his partner Madame Drayton. dressed as the "Lady from Martinique" looked extremely attractive but unfortunately arrived late for the competition. The Judges were Mrs. o. H. Adams. Mrs. D. H. L. Ward and Mm. Olgn Symmonds. all of whom are well acquainted with costumes. They were assisted by Mr. John Beckle*!. M.B.E At another Carnival Ball nt the Girls' Industrial Union on UM same night another collection of lovely costumes could be seen A ladles' steel band led n purade around the hall and this especially amused the dancers. "The Peanut Vendor", a fat girl wearing a weather beaten dress, straw rat and a pair of "dr> weather" shoes was given flrsl prtae. She carried a tray on her head. Cedrlc Phillips, representing "The Sheik of Araby" was awarded second prir.e. The it mi prue went to the steel bend Unlike Trinidad some of these celebrations continued through the wee hours of Ash Wednesday. Some people wore against this because they felt that all celebrating should cease at mld-nlght OB Shrove Tuesday FEB. 11 — NO. 158 The Topic of Last Week r?0Bl left to right"The Mesic pruts* et the Ooodwill League Roiie Malleen", "The Madonna" and "The Tnrki.li Lady' all won THE Guide Rally at Pax Hill the recruits was the new Guioe n Thursday 8th February. 19.M Company now being started at honour 0 f the Chiaf Guide, was Queen's College. i-er held In Barbados. The Chief Guide then inspected the Hanger, and Gukit TEST AVERAGES aiM 1 ^^m V ^fni H vftJf H I I w* sW "r -*4kS aH\' %  jfl aaaaaUK 3 ^Un P ~~-4W *•* % ;£" i.^^^^f* WEIGHT LIFTING ii* ALVIJV .VI.I.I:Y\K lapses with orlmU :ind lotahs, 'he biggest But Ihere was no "big belly RamThere were II Commission i lal" nor the Indian girl of the Secretary, 76 Gulden. 16 Colour own inimitable way. After the tuneful nitty -grinding massala." Parly. M Rangers, 471 Guides. 170 Inspection she talked to the chllBrownies and I5S Recruits, makdren who will never forget her i total of 950 It was amazing stirring words of encouragement "Point band Cumana sllors <;< %  :.t|i<>:.'' black, To the Editor. The Advocate— SIR,—The following Test over her a 1 '* uf (ne ^Hand team in Au-. trails may be of interest lo other lovers of cricket, who are follow. Ing the present Test series HI Australia. HATTlNtl 'THE SHEIK Or Second prtte at the i Union ARABY" won \UW Industrial to see how the Brownie Branch As It was now 3.40 p.m. Capt. N.>. t* in U Hulinn Ranger, and Guides then marched £ !h^r.i The Chier Guide, accompanied pfart, the Chief Guide taking tlie H siins-m Ladv Savage, the President Aalme. It was a wonderful sight %  T r, W a. funiw -• i; j i • "' iv riui* kiit ncdwnii' pi. KS h ar p i"o n 72STi u IIS h " %  "1 "" 1 "" Wggsj i-rossed on Frederick Stree*. by the peppei>-tjoinK "Mexn..m KSeoT green fnd \ZZ$2 each "d Mis. Bridget RnnUden. arwerv on parad. After the Guides carried a plush carpet across the rlyed at 4.30 p.m. The Colour hfd disappeared the Chief Guide ^.mlder *M thiv iSSd their way Pnrty was drawn up at the enr3 ned on the Brownies to "run iiloni x,aiic of Pay H '" wHh ,he ,8,0nd P" 1 -" whlch lhc V th n>ughly tnShouts cat calls, whistles. Colour having an escort of 2 joyed, singing, jumping and an almosRangers. The Brownies and reIt has bee phore of gaiety and levity precrmta were on the path leading lo t 0 the Guides of Barbados that vailed. Evcrv one tried to outdo ,hc building and the Chief Guide i ncv could at last welcome the his neighbour in merry-making inspected them, shaking hands Cn i,f Quid* to their OWN Head>ai u r iid m antics. iL with each one of them. Among quarters and Camp site, which i named Pax Hill after her home Total RunH s ParkMclntrre S t GUILTY NEW YORK. A 34-yrnr-old bookie, who draw In .''i lb m dnUara year, surprised .. New York court lecently When he l.nd himsc If open to 65 years in prison. Because IxMikmaklng is Illegal in New York, he was on trial for taking bets, hut he suddenly dropped his innocence E lea and pleaded guilty. He will B ibil'-rin I mi February 19. our local welghtlifting boys it possible to send up a learn %  <\irrely at Ihe 1952 Olympiad bill sgy the subsequent meet? [ think they can. British Guiana and Trinidad have had a shot and why can we net. We km HM talent, tall big men, and short stocky ones. For years now weightlidmg ban fitted in as a hobby to many of tin burlier set of Barbadian* and l remember a few >ears ago when Bison our ihcn local strong man who is now abroad, made a game attempt at throwing WhiskenBlake and Joe Golch. Yes. bul he was more of a welghtlifter than n wrestler and did not gel the better of the rxuiu. Si me of the weigntufters ui UM game today, import their equipment, but others make shift with lead weights which they make themselves. Sets of enthusiastic young men pooled together and In the course of time formed Clubs, You will see them on ihe beaches of an evening gelling .. Jigh' work out of exercises. The> di> llu* tougher work indoors "at the riube,. Sometimes you even Mi tha weight lifters of soy Shoi Hall bench going up to Rathshebi. to stage a contest with Ilatlisheha wcightlifters. Formerly there was no welloiganlsed weight lifting as*ocl" tion A few years ,ig„ CessQeail J..i krnan. known in the gaarM gs li^bby Goff. wns adjudged lo UMr. Barbados when mjch tough o: Ihe Warner bioth.-r. ;il ,| M, Selomon. then a master .1 I'orobermere School, woncompeting S-iice then the business has been 1. w. A few days ago I dropped in at Quren'a Park and saw some of the*., knotty mifcii-d < hapt tryim; to figure out some knotty tuitions, to wit. the how and what about forming a BarbadoAiu.i teur Weightlifting Associatlon4 There are some eigtit dubs vhlh are lafcMd to limn this itsocialion and doubtlevs OtcMI will }otn up When I got there and sat around tho table In the Park House with them, they were discussing the rules of the Asso. now Lt so M. m. Tourists and visitors from the neighbouring islands enjoyed %  ' ffi'gSS.'SnSSrSffil. i ^ tmg&m -a S p>;-" .ETH.V alik0 fnluurful MMima HJ Mi,iiader. .nd onlooker* born put %  .•' %  JSH_f olikr Snowo.1 th could nJoy Ihen, will b* ud next Cumval from work nd -orr>SpectMor., U1 _for quit. whilo III, I'. STI M and our Founder'i in England. PLAYED MASK "WHILE HOUSE WAS BURNING 10 M in v a Sr'VwIT-^fcr^riod'Th;. ***^*Ej£m steel bands i^d ^me with reV^ to thousands particularly vibrating in their rdTlnB^irt in the last "jump up" r*rs. and lha echoes of calypsocs and owned by M t3 A?*for the BK1 March, tharm^S^^^VMT^m WM dlspuiable. Suffice it to say have difficultv in lra '" in that %Tn?5fht plcx your choee children from singing the catchy frotn Tiny Tiny, blow your tunes of the season, adults would truIPDet fw me." "Loomat say e har.llv Boys*." "1 have a loveVy ft bunch of coconuu" and a number of others, The fete Tor which Ti live) principally, ended \ ., he able to do so too „. 40 dars now that the jumping nd the shouting have ceased, and the "warriors and kings" depart. nldadians the sobering period of l*nt is ith regrv: ence more here again. 8S T aWensll Complen lie I ai l .3D WrlShl M j 3M S 1 Wnrr J S Ml I Mia The averages given above ar, for the series up lo and including • rrom Our Own Coest>ocenii the Fourth Tesl just completed at FOKT-OF-SPAIN. Feb. 7. Adelaide. A bouse valued at about $2,500 It may be also of interest ., R Mahabir of cricket lovers to learn that Eng. i. wai completely destroyland's opening fan bowler. Trevor ed by fire on Monday afternoon. Bailey, whoso thumb was frarNc. 1 unit of the Central Fire tured by a ball from Llndwall llngnde under Inspector Phillip The Third Teat at Sydney, is „ was despatched to the scene, but probable for tha next State match wni.d-layed by heavy traffic and vs. Victoria at Melbourne, al found the building -^Radlo Australia" reported on. the Imost destroyed. The Mahabir 8th inst. family wn In the city attending the Carnival celebrations. Yours truly, CEI-T THE KEY TO THE MOTORISTS HEART. R. M. JONES 8t CO. LTD. *>•"'• ESSO STANDARD OIL BOXING ot the YANKEK STADIUM Britton* Hill • Tuesday night. Teh. i:iih KID K ALP II (163 lbs.) VS. KID FRANCIS (l2 His.) In return match for th L nht-Hoavy weight Championship of BARBADOS 10 Koiiiuls Semi-Final SAM KING (130 lbs.) HAL WILLIAMS (131 lb*.) H Rounds Preliminary VICTOK LOVELL (122 lbs.) vs. BELFIELD KID (125 lbs.) ti Rounds Kin* Sid* $2.00 Balcony Sl-M Cse $1,00 Arena 11.00 in. iii-i 4% • Winner of the championship will receive a Belt prt-MM it) Da COSTA A CO LTD. • LUTHER FIELDS Promoter ciatlon and a few of them were contracting their facial muscles .is though they were lifting iron* which 1 took to be a way ol i i miu diaapprovaj la ajassj of the rules. But in the main they seem to be pulling together and I di doubt but that they will ux emerging with aomethlns tangible. They intend calling ihem selves the Barbados Amaleur Weighthftinit Association. The flr*t Vice President 1: Stanley I.mton; an old chap in the line. iMond Vlca Pi-esidont i.s Reuben Jones. Kid Ralphs Trainer and the Honorary Secre lary is Winileld Grannum. sctkOQl teacher of SI. Mary's Boys' School. Tha Traajjurai U Joubaai Huiien and tlii-ie is a four-man cofflinittge). When i sposM lo Qrannum, )* emphasised that the AaSQ not connected wllh the B .i...iil -. Aiiiatcui Athli'tiiAssociation but they Impe lo be affllialed to ihiHiiiuii AiMteur VI*elflhUiftb-i| Association in tiuuThe way he told nu> uf the ik connection, gave me a vivid idea 0l bOW ti.. | agg f l I They d not want anyone lo uuU In hem and try to run the ano< dictator like, although they Mould not mind icelliim HIM h.l|i So Jumping alieal lo two month: heicv wlicii lli' A % % %  .., uiti< %  will have been formed, I see Ihem slatting compelilions amniia themselves — sort of by way of oackwooda weeding to el a Una) pick fol public shows. Thev UBUoulj hand balancing and M>miuislic pyramids and these with goo.1 display of wefghtllfllng and (HI haps a wrestling bout, would be a pleasant novalty 10. 1 think, UM majoi portion qjl narbados sporting publn And peonlo no not mind pnying for a good i n-itainnient. BKHM >•! the iniiney tluis ai quired could *•> u. tiic luUs to liclp them buy good aOjulpnwM and uel thing'. |oul| simnilhlv and tha bulk i" ihe Association. Naturally lha A %  • ill OUld have to 5a wall managed and nooIi -hiking A itoi.fhilul I i. Mass 1 sal Tt> joii. Ihi. """ SM l>.ir wmrkMy Myi| "Shap* up Hor>H>"-A**v loud Joe turn** *rd tnld my dnr L-u l.n (>•(• lo-iiaSMI dwii t>ar And %  • J— .innuihad. L0.1 Oilv ~tad And right ih* both >IWl 10 SBSSB. Oan % %  ^1 KUM< what atari the elanng* W#ll my fewnda lwa> iUmpl> thlt A sefeat m*n diraavd DDa a ladv '•" mliUKaii lor %  Mat Ha *a cnnled aa li"iru-totm" WIIM runliaplloiia •iira.fliw And hla cherka wvra rwl likd i(lM With > croo-d 01 Wmn Whind 1P4> rrlad oul Ion come go henw l*u aald. oant be %  pea* t muai atav and admire lh>v*i.. Why h-nadmy >*ddwg dr %  oa Jasr i-u ana "Sasi stumw.Iii ( b* rough to-night: ba kind riao'l lakv n>* haina •* aally And Iravo all thaw bo., bah.rg. U11 "il In iksajwnitHtn Plaaa* Jo* danl buUy me l.-.n M all ihoa* other -.. %  boy— Ihv at* happ\. ran you *r*T • -.d dll ih* MM Joo gruanbkd And Joaa Faao •RMaBaS a aourtae Whan lha ran.at*-maa rtaahad Ih. light Jo* than jolnrd lha olhar hnva livkas IAU gut .-• Joo aaid ba Hind I mual v dr Ion 'till mornu.g I • .11 1 Icava tha iveete baatlnd. That % % %  Titradaiv boyi. bin look out fur tha J al K E**t*r apra* All tha wa*M -HI bd al tlall Mill Jo* and Robail. Lou.-all ihi<-. Tl.i'd" In Chrlat Chiirrh tll bo htMnsaaaa Not a rnomant will be daoal COIM aiHl MS> all lb* roartWn That >uS*t from J B Btrad. Will anJo Catnlv.il FPfF.. iponiored bv JAR BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of JAR RUM MORNING Don't tat norning > % %  llho-i V.d-.B "IbUaiuaU inaJw-lrw -ortbkMd. IbM raa-'UlBJi ' :baa> fc4 luar-i%  %  %  UbHJ *roea rdSSr aja'lal " D 'for puHmQ-power You can take on ihe r-)u,;/i |ofai when jno bam * Ausun. They're buili 10 deal with tough loads and bad roajs year attar year. They're ahead in efficiency and economy. Their higher torque, belter power to weight ratio and longer working life arc ihe result* o! unceasing research and development at Austin's 120 acre factory at Longbndgc, Birmingham, England, where nearly 20,000 people arc employed. A U 8 i 1 N—you can depend on It Ctt full Jtfaih not /rgajt." ilC.UIH MSI. TMI AUSTIN MOTOR |XORT CORPORATION i. %  T t 0 a I %  n i N C M A -I a tNfii-NO



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KIMV. FEBRIARV II. 1SS1 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE CARNIVAL IN BARBADOS BAND Or HUNGARIAN DANCERS which took Pint Prut for the Rout Rand. I In from and dreued a Rlr Walter Ralemti it Little Wendj Mack-ar. who carried off. the for the Prettiest Costume at the Ursullne Convent Annual Fancy Dies* Party. miXIDAD ARMVAL Our Own forti-ponclc-.i. PORT-OF-SPAIN. gparklc ami hrill.nirc that Iftwn the curtain of this nlnl i%  %  nfhl"! thai Sine back through the i of the years. A new tOfM ( for masquerading thai out orifiinalily and )of vision in the revellers, illy this is something t will take some time to automed to. but the Innowere pleasing lit several |. Sailor bonds are im tailors as such and in some )was hard to tell where the ended and part of some (fguise not in any special of the C.innval arm jycar for one thing Kiev bemselVwl famous [Of tlit'lr ie heads thai ranged In On from iM.plia-i iIhi %  f rm of |. The lieudgcar was so h*e and elaborate that it Uiem -.tnnding side by l one i.' the wide City I would find there was • room for them. The • Indian*'' who came out l.i-l il n (lii-re again fcccond day. *llosea" Band, about 100 kad ii< moon dancer lendI big following to hot {tones and the entourage %  BAKRACUDA" and "The Lady from Martinique' competition at the Children'* Goodwill League. cane late for the Guide Rally At Pax Hill By TONY VANTERPOOL Nearly all West Indian island-; an Canuval crary on the last two days before Lent but In Barbiiiiotheae days are lust "ordinary working days". A few Barbadians however brought the Carnival jlmuspherc to the island at various functions held during that period One ul these functions was held at the Ursullne Convent on Monday and a large number of children were* fatly droated up and looked very attractive On Tuesday night one of the biggest looe I Carnival,attract ions took place when the Riverside Club held their Carnival Bull at the Children's Ooodwill League. Thu> Is an annual event. Contestants dressed in a variety of costumes. One chap who wore the costumei of a beggar paid the penalty Ho arrived at the ball with his pants and shirt partly torn but when ready to leave they were nearly off. Another chap preferred to disguise as a Bathing Beauty. He wore a flowing bath robe over his bathing trunks and occasionally the inquisitive girls could be seen Tying to lift the robe. A man, "Boyst*" Butcher, was choeen Carnival yueen. Butcher, an expert dressmaker and perhaps the only droaa designer In the Island, was also responsible for making nearly all the; prlie winning costumes. His was a bUie ofT-the-shoulder dress. Ha wore black gloves and carried a handbag to match, lb false hair was made of rope dyed, pressed and then curled He called himself Rosle Malleen in the lbs* eat Other prizes were awamed as the West Indian Cricket teenStanley Jarkman who represent"! 'The Turkish Lady". Clyde Phillips "The Senor" D.ilton Babb "The Madonna", Win-ton Hackeit The Mealcan". Dr. Winston Wooding. "The Scavenger" and Neata Layne a* "Jockey Holder." Conrad Peterson, who was dresaed as "Barracuda" (Tyrone Power) in the motion picture "Spanish Main" and his partner Madame Dray ton, dressed as the "Lady from Martinique" looked extremely attractive but unfortunately arrived late for the competition. The Judges were Mrs. O. 11. Adams, Mrs. D. H I. Ward nnd Mm. Olga Symmonds. nil of whom are well ucquainted with costumes. They were assisted by Mr. John Boeklc*. M.B.E. At another Carnival Ball nl the Girls' Industrial Union on the same night another collection of lovely costumes could be seen. A ladles' steel band led n parade around the hall and this especially amused the dancers. "The Peanut Vendor", a fat girl wearing a weather benten dress, straw bat and a pair of "dry weather" shoes was given first prize. She carried a tray on her head. Cedrie Phillips, representing "The Sheik of Araby" *'* awarded second prire. The third prize went to the steel band. Unlike Trinidad some of these celebrations continued through the wee hours of Ash Wednesday. Some people were against this because they felt that all celebrating should cease at mid-night on Shrove Tuesday FEB. 11 — NO. 158 The Topic of Last Week rwai left to right: The Me prltes at tlie Ooodwill Leag' THE Guide Rally at Pax Hill the recruits wan the new C.uiae i Thursday 8th February. 1951 Company now being started at pundits ami '" honour 0 r the Chief Oulde. was Queen's College. Ith orhnis and lotahs, the biggest ever held In Barbados. The Chief Guide then inspected t OO -blR belly ItamThere were II Commissioners, I the the Indian girl "of the Bacratary, 76 Gulden,_16 Colour I ditty "grinding TEST AVERAGES To the Editor, The Advocate— S1H,—The following Totl nverWEIGHT LIFTING is> CALVIN ajuMwmt Can our local welgntltfting boys make it possible to send up a team at — scarcely at the l5l! Olympiad—bul say the subsequent meet? I think they can Brittt Guiana and Trinidad have hail a shot and why can we not. We have the talent, tall big men. and short stocky ones. For years now weightlifiiuji h*a titled in as u hobby to manv of the burlier set of Barbadians and 1 remember a few years ago when Bison our then local Mrong man who i now abroad, made a game attempt at throwing Whisker* Blake and Joe Gotch. Yes, but he was more cf ., welghtlifter than a wrestler and did not get the Letter of the bouts. S. me of the weigntnfters in ihe game today, import then aOUlp* ment. but others make shift with lend weights winch they make m** H.rs. Sets of enthusiastic young men pooled together nnd in the course of time formed clubs. You will see them on the beaches of on evening getting u light work out of exercises. They do the tougher work indoors "ni lne club*. SomeUmcs you even gel the weightlifters of say Shot Hall beach going up to Rathshebi. to stage u contest with llntl.-h. I. wuichtllflera. Formerly there was no wellorganised welghllifling ash.K'la tion. A (ew years ago Cleniem km. !" known m the |B*rM %  081 giid Gu,de S in her •*>* of the England loam in Aw, .. Inimitable way. Alter the J !" 1 "•"''' Interest to other) ssala." Party, 51 Rangers. 471 Ouldgs. 170 Inspection he talked to the chil v r e !" ' % %  %  % h ,"' T Zl ,, Rrownn-s and 1SS Recruits, makdren who will never lorgel her ,n lhc P rwen i 1 ins a total of 950. It was amazing -lining words of encouragement. "THE IHEIK Or ARABY won Second Prire at the Girls' Industrial Union %  bby Goff. was adjudged to be Ch leWff as the Warner brothers a iul Mr I-bby ( Mi. Bar arbados when block. It Cun of %  aOoPf a J* DiyeK. to see how ne Brown i e Branch As it was now & 40 p.m. Capt. s f rect to 7 atwT tunV and h !" Krow and ta "Pandlng. Ralson played God Save The r rtsed on Frederick Sii'-cpepppiy-i'.oini: M> > %  > %  > Cnlli^rc Tlll~l Au tralui. €l Inn. TNO. TWlal Ranger;: and Guides then marched D H ^. 'he Chief Guide, acconu.,,1,,. p, , h( chief Guide taking the IMW n "Theie idrls In uv Ladv Sava ' ,,,e president Salute It was a wonderful sight h o EST*^ fcbrcros and n tmart coso 'ho Girl Guides' Amov'.aUv* and one than realised how many w 6. A *-.. k green and purple, each <"d Miss Bridget Romidcn. orwtrr on parade After the Guides _>?"• a plush carpet across the r 'ved at 4.30 p.m. The colour hrt | disappeared the Chief Guide at ai they ligjed their way Party was drawn up at the enrailed on the Brownies to "run trance of Par Hill with the Island past." which they thoroughly enfa, cat calls, whistles. Colour having an escort of 1 joyed. jumping and an atmosRangers. The Brownies and reft has been a wonderful thrill f gaiety and levdy preemits were on the path leading to Io th e Guides of Barbados that %  £niflf"not e-i Every one tried to outdo nc building and the Chief Guide they could at last welcome the BOWLING [hbour in merry-making inspected them, shaking hands Cn ief Guide to their OWN Headuarv f lx JJr nuca. ••-wtlh Kn o"* ' ,nfrrn Among qua rters und Camp site, which B^..< IHI 7\ j named Pox Hill after her home lf*~ Bail*' a J a Dtwe* A v. rw-r-r %  D S. Camplun • %  Wright • ts and visitors from the iring islands enjoyed es thoroughly—many o. ting part In the events of fc and our Founder's in England OeaaH Wilthl US IIS 111 43 41 n •ISO 4S.SS Ml H alike. Colourful costumes have PLAYED MASK WHu*C wan raders and onlookers been put away now. Many of HOUSE WAS BURNING Th •"! %  • %  *t lvcn abovc iowed thev could enjoy them v, ill be usrt next C'armvi.l "*'•• -* vwn i. u for hc ^.^ uj> ^ and lncIud n from work and worry Spectators, will for quite a while. ,Ff ?-> i.r on Correaoono.nl. the Fourth Test ju completed W a loligeir period The have the din of the steel band* FORT OF-SPA1N. >eb 7. Adelaide. Z with regret to thousands particularly vibrating in their A house valued al about J2.500 it may be also of interest to %  art in the last "jump up ears, and the echoes of calypsoes and owned by Mr. B. Mahablr of cricket lovers to learn that &IB m the Road March, that resounding Joyously Parents will jUjrataria. was completely destroyland's opening fast bowler. Trevor aautable. Suffice it io say have difficulty in restraining ,d t>v fire on Monday afternoon. Bailey, whose thumb waa frac* might picK your cho'ce children from singing the cch> No. 1 unit of the Central Fire tured by a ball from Undwall m "liny Tinv. blow your tunes of the season, adults uuiiw jjni-ade under Inspector PluUip the Third Tatt at Sydney t for m*." "Loomat say e hardlv be %  •*> Jo o wa despatched to the scene, but probable for the next State match Kr *' " vc a ,ove ^ fo * da ? s "^ l l^T 1 wa <*'yd hy heavy trafnc and vs. Victoria at Melbourne | coconuta" and a number and the vhouUng have ceased ; nd „ fcrrhr> fourd lhc toOtUr* "Radio Australia" reported orlth' tunes of the season, adults i __. e hardlv be able to do have a lovely for 40 days now that the jumping waj dc | ayod la," and a number and the shouting have ceaaed. i ml ., ., rnV nl fourd the the "warriors and kings depart. „i,noat deetroyed. The Mahablr 8th Inat. ile for which Trinldadians the sobering period of Lent is (tm ji y WB ln tftc gUy attending Scipally ended with regrvt ence morw here again. the carnival celebrations. Yours truly. CELT THE KEY TO THE MOTORISTS HEART. R. M. JONES & CO. LTD. *** ESSO STANDARD OIL 1 UL'II.TY NEW YORK, i A 34-yenr-old bookie, who drew j in 20 million dollars a year, suri prised New York court recently i when he bud himself open to 65 yejiin piiwn BecauM> baokmukinx i* illegal in New York, he i was on trial for takinn bet., but i he suddenly dropped his innocence E lea .ind pleaded guilty. He .ll resrnesaaM un February IB. BOXING at the YANKKK STADIUM KriltoitH Hill • Tuesday night. Feb. i::ila • KID RALPH (163 Iba.) vs. KID FRANCIS (162 lbs.) • In leturn match for the Light-Heavy weight Championship of BARBADOS 10 Rounds Selomon, then a mastei ... bermcre Hchooi, were conipetlna S'nte then the business has been lew, A few days .IKO 1 drnppwt in at Queen's Park and saw some at Iheee knotty muscled chaps trymi; Io figure out some kimtiy qua) tmn |o wit. the how and what about forming a Barbados Amateur Weighllifttng A.*ncialion4 There are some eight clubs which arc joined to hum \). i isociulion und doubtless other will )ofn up When I got there and sal around the table in the I'ark llouic with thorn, I %  %  diicusslng the rules of the AssoSemi-Final SAM KING (130 lbs.) Vt. HAL WILLIAMS (131 lbs) K K..11111U Preliminary VICTOR LOVELL (122 lbs.) vs. BELFIELD KID (125 lbs.) 6 Uoiinils Rinif Sid* $2.00 Balcwny • 1 :,-i Cage Si.00 Arena $100 lllr :l hl-r 48 • Winner of the championship will receive a Belt prvsented bv DJ COSTA & CO., LTD. LUTHER RELDS Promoter ciation and a few of them 'ver* it.iiti'acliug their facial muscles -is though they were lifting iron's which I took to be a way ol I disapproval to some o< the rules. Out in the main They seem to Upulling together and I do no', doubt bui ih;t they will soon be enicrinK with tumetluug tangi'le. They intend culling themeelvoa the Barbados Amateur Wcighilifling Association The llr-it Virr l-r.-sident i Stanley I.niton; ;i r i old chap il the line. Second Vice President is Reuben Jo n as Kid Ralph's Trainer ,nu\ the Itonoi-itry Secre tary is Winiield Orannura, v*iu.ol teacher of St. Mary's Biiys' School. The Treasurer 1, Joubakrl llulleii ..till then 1 1.1 teui -man eommittee. When I spoke to Crannum, JM emphasised that the AaaoeUUon is not eonneeied with the Birnad'm Amateur Athletic Association but they hope to be amiiaied to the Hriti-Ui Amateur Weightlitti.ng AaBsOCBailon 111 turn* The way lie told me of the oiconnection. gave me 11 vind ide" "f how tin % %  %  i" IMI They do not want unyonc to butt m ust hem and try tet ,1 11ri.il pi.k fui public In-,. They uj 1 ill. practise hand bulnnclng and Ujinnaitle pyramids und these with gooil display nl weltchtliftlng %  no jH'ihaps a wrestling bout. would be .1 plenum it m.veltv to, I think, the 1 IJI ; f Mar budos 'porting |uibli< Aiid'peorilo no not mind pitying foi .1 gojxl ei'tei'tnilinicnt. Borne ->i the money th.ua .11 qulrad could n>lo u.< he^lp them buy good aojUlpmaiii and get things going Mn...itbl> %  rd the bulk to the A Nuturally the Aaaoelatlon WeNJld h;ive to pa well managed ami gooil 1 oounl 1 1 1,,! Sn if the boys gel thlng-t nrgifii[S| .1 qulcklx thev 1 MUIII l^g.n gular shows — at thr In .. Il BNM AaM Waeneadav mernmi The day iHel beeina l.m Wh#n Utu Ihet old-uma Sevtl ** up without a *enl And g*ei m U *l nil (he trouble SMr niel a nrlaln ul *'" l"lll Kr o" T.*-rt-v n %  gflspsai C 11 "-1 l-i fit h*l gee r.*,li •••,k-,.ul Ann notniue J< would hnow Bul JDP waa th* , JI^!ul.rJ rrom him noad rieni lo MB bee. Lou iwum imlde Jee'a corner And her derk-eklMin*d Ytiu rould --* Ihow dimallt •lUkkV A de)if>t(ul Uedr-IUM. La 1 %  M---I aes, ran aettgWal to loin IMa h>pp\ rrowd wi..i uif tward emetoed> aarl a ShApe up Bevde"—vetv leud • •• lo-rUStll doti'l lr And aa Joe unmaUted. Laxi UiH-rM Aud -n-hl il*i both itul M atare. Waa mtauken lor Mue He wee cheated aa le. %  tTU.(ofm" With (ontraetfcm* rilra-HT* And hti !l*i w.-a red like rheitle Wllh r•,. rea hente •* aajly And leave all thoao bo,, behind. Cl*o Joa tMt balls : look M all theer other IIIH Th#v are happt 1 ran >n Jo* crumbled 1 ..1 a ruchlt 1 %  %  a aour-aee Itaihrd Ihv %  ir-.rd Ibe other lva lirlM lu xul v-e. Joe aaid be hied I • %  .,..! rie* dear !•• %  • 'nil mornu %  I I.,. -I..I ..r all ILleertlaii Thai U u set iiom J a> a md. If RrpP lirtrattrr Mendev n,. eat raodv 1-r Oilaw< Tia tho day when U ttaifeodtene Will enjoy a Cernlval Flr.r.. %  poQiored || JAR BAKERIES makera of ENRICHED BREAD and the blendera of JAR RUM Itam Don't lat montlne % % %  Bag. MUVcka of i-r^., 1 ruin *•• ind %  WIU1.-1 Utli.. al>...L>Ai IMIIMI iBedlelrta -..r. blowd, UkMe tao-'Ulrul U • lubat iM liiiif ilia..laaeaailimalf le remote '" %  preeaotlne Qreor broethlna. alraablna '1>| V nraem peer etoemUt lo.!" %  a*'aa a> line tdaab %  D '-for puHinQ-powtr 4usffiisareaWf You can fike on th: tmfA job when yt>u hfi| an Au-iUn. They're built to deal whfj rough lemls and bad roads year after year. They're ahead in efficiency and economy. Their higher torque, better power to weight ratio and longer working life arc the result. ot unceasing research and development at Austin's 120 acre t'actorv at Longbridge, Birmingham, England, where nearly 20,000 people are employed. A U S T I N you can depend on It I flu full uVroi/i now /rum I IOWDINI IITATIS a TRAOIMS CO.. LTD.. II71-I1TS BAY ITSIII, IRIDItTIWN THl AU1TIN noTOH |0T COH'O'ATIOK LIM 'ID I'nlNflHAn




ESTABLISHED 1895

Cuba Will Devote Her

Industry To U.S. Needs

WASHINGTON, Feb., 10.
CUBA has offered to devote her industry and
manpower to meet United States defence pro-

duction needs.

A Cuban delegation of six leading industri-
alists and the country’s two chief Labour leaders
laid a unique plen before a National Production
Authority yesterday. It had already been explained
to the State Department.

US.A. Favour

Pacific Pact |

By NORMAN WILSON
WASHINGTON, Feb. 10.

The United States is today more
rordial to the idea of a Pacific
Pact than ever before.

But there are so many obstacles
that it is by no means certain that
a formal anti-Communist alliance
of Pacific democracies will ever
be written.

Leading United States ministers
have said in the past week that
Washington at present has an
“open mind” and is prepared to
take a “sympathetic interest” in
the subject.

But observers here recognise
that America is still reluctant to
take the initiative. On the other
hand, probably the only point on
which all other potential Pacific
Pact members agree is that the
United States should be the key
member and therefore should take
the lead in calling them together.

Observers here consider the

A Production authority ap-
proved of the proposal and asked
the Cubans to translate their
offer into specific terms,

‘Tne Cubans said that they would
do this immediately. —

Burke Hedges, President of the
Cuban Manufacturers’ Associa-
tion said that the United States
would pay for the products it
bought.

Fiedges declared: “We were not
coerced into coming here to offer
Cuba’s help. We not only came
here on cur own free will but we
oviginated the idea,”

“Compare this with the Police
State methods used by Russia.
They beat their “Allies” over the
head to get co-operation,

Francisco Aguerre, the leading
Cuban Labour leader, said that
Labour Unions in Cuba were
wholeheartedly behind the plan.
The Cuban offer “called the bluff
of totalitarian countries,” he add-
ed.

The offer, one official said,
would give mobilisation officials
a new source of production and
& manpower pool. :

—Reuter.

—————————

question of membership may_be
an insurmountable stumbling
block, Australian reaction would
probably be violently against the
inclusion of the Japanese,
—Reuter.

U.S. Prices Rise

WASHINGTON, Feb, 10.
The wholesale price rise in the



in spite of the Government's price
freeze,

The Bureau of Labour statistics
said the rise for the week ending
February 6 was .7 per cent. bring-
ing ae wholesale price index tc
182.2.

The principal increases were in
food and farm products, which
went up by 1.9 and 1.6 per cent,
respectively. Meat rose 3.2 per
cent. and livestock 2.7 per cent,

The price freeze was intended
to halt prices at the highest levels
between December 19 and Janu-
ary 25, but many farm products
were excluded,

Allies Used Mines
To Hinder Russia
CHARGES RED PAPER

MOSCOW, Feb, 10.

The Soviet Navy newspaper Red
Fleet alleged to-day that the Brit-
ish and American air forces laid
sea mines during the war delib-
erately to hamper the Soviet army
offensives against the Germans
and Japanese,

It said that the mfnes were laid
in the Baltic Sea, the Danube
River, and off the coasts of China
and Korea in 1943 and 1945,

aoe , pos aper,. chained Lihat j WORST IN 20 YEARS

WELLINGTON, New Zealand,

—Reuter.

the history of the significance of

nirborne minelaying operations Feb. 10.
during the war, Hawke’s Bay Province, the
—Reuter. [scene of New Zealand’s greatest



earthquake, experienced to-day its
worst tremors since the disaster
which killed 255 people in 1931.

No serious damage has yet been
reported, but the earthquake

CRIMINALS PAROLED

TOKYO, Feb, 10.
General MacArthur’s headquart.

United States last week broke ail;
records for 13 consecutive weeks,




ee LT

ers have paroled four more sen-
tenced Japanes¢ war criminals
from Sugamo, bringing to 193 the
total number
criminals paroled so far.—Reuter,





Public Will Hear Debate
On U.S. Troops For Europe

The American Government leaders in the Senate have
given the surprising decision to hold hearings in public on
the Government’s policy on sending troops to Europe.

Defence Secretary, George Marshall, Secretary of State,
Dean’ Acheson and General Omar Bradley, Chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff will give evidence at hearings fixed

to begin next Thursday.

Leg. Co. Member
On Libel Charge

KINGSTON, Ja., Feb. 9,

A Corporation Council meeting
to-day decided to join Councillor
N. N. Nethersole, the second high-
est member of the P.N.P., in
bringing a libel action against the
Hon. R. L. M. Kirkwood, a mem-
ber of the Legislative Council, for a
statement made at a public meet-
ing of planters on February 3, and)
published in the newspapers that
two members and a Councillor
wete mixed-up in the meat racket
in the corporate area.

Members of the Labour Party
and P.N.P. also are considering
what action to take against Kirk-
wood who at some meeting said
he could name 12 politicians who
were not above taking even a £5
bribe.

Some members of the Labour
Party suggest asking the acting
Governor to oust Kirkwood from
the Legislative Council —(P).

2,000,000 German
Youth Will Attend
“World Festival Of Youth”

PRAGUE, Feb., 10.

“Two million German youths in-
cluding 100,000 from ‘Western
Germany will take part in the
“World Festival of Youth” which
the Communist-led World Feder-
tion of Demotratic Youth plans
to hold-in Berlin in August, the
Federation spokesman said here
to-night.

A spokesman said the Federa-
tion's Executive Committee, which
has been meeting here had come








to the conclusion that its most

urgent task was to organise a

“wer ‘

rem ation of Germany and

Jap i icularly to inten-

ify Zainst reart
—Reuter

of convicted wax! down shop window displays. *




alarmed many residents who rush.
ed into the streets,

The shock was severe enough tc
dislodge chimneys and knock

—Reuter.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 10,

General Dwight Eisenhower,
Atlantie Pact Supreme Comman-
cer, whose testimony last week on
the treops for Europe issue, Re-
publican policy leader Senator
Robert ‘Taft decribed as “hazy”
may also appear before the
Senate Foreign Relations and the
Armed Services Committees, who
are to hold the hearings.

The announcement of public
hearings was made by Senator
Tom Connally (Democrat Texas)
Chairman of the Foreign Relations
Committee who previously had
indicated that the doors would be
closed,

He gave no reason for the
change in plans, but other Sena-
tors said the question had been
debated so hotly this week that
Administration leaders were
anxious to get as large an
audience as possible for their
arguments for sending American
divisions across the ocean and into
the North Atlantic defence force.

Opponents of the Administration
view will te heard later it was
said, but just who they will be
was not known yet.

Another Plan

Senator Connally was expected
to offer a substitute proposal to
put the Senate on record as saying
it is desirable that armed forces be
sent out.

On Thursday, Senator Taft pro-
posed that the United States con-
tribute only one division for-every
nine raised by its western Eure-
pean allies.

He demanded an. opportunity
for Congress to pass on the issue
involved.

Senator Pat McCarran (Demo-
crat Nevada) joined the debate
yesterday with the assertion that
western Europeans would not fight
unless they believed they had “a
reasonable chance of winning.”

Senator Mc Carran, Chairman
of the Senate Appropriations Sub-
committee on Foreign Aid said

de struggle against the }that any programme for defence
j of Western Europe must be devel- |

oped with the realistic view that
\E necessarily regard
th





an o

ible.”—-Reuter

upatior “ur
pati a ur














LADY BADEN-POWELL addressing the Scouts at thei

—Story on page 7.



Meat Pact | Sending

Is Almost
Completed

MELBOURNE, Feb. 10.

Australia and Britain have al-
most concluded negotiations for a
15-vear meat agreement, the Aus-
tralian Commerce Minister, John
McEwen announced today.

McEwen said that he expected
the agreement to be signed “very
300n”’.

The main points of the agree-
ment were that Britain would buy
the whole of Australia’s surplus
production of beef, lamb, and mut-
ton, for 15 years and that local
production would have to be
expanded.

Price details had yet to be
worked out, McEwen said. There
vould be a “floor” price for beef
tor six years, and “floor” prices foe
mutton and lamb covering four
years, There would be a price re-
view annually, and the price could
tise above but not fall below
“floor” prices.

The 15-year meat plan is de-
signed to make Australia one of
the most important and largest
meat producing areas in the
world.

Capital development is expected
to open up large areas of North-
ern Australia for cattle-farming.

Discussions have been going on
for nearly two years. ,

The development scheme is es~
sentially long-term but Australian
sources have estimated the even-
tual. production at 500,000 tons of
beef annually.

(British Food Minister Maurice
Webb said in the Commons on
Wednesday that New Zealand was
also planning to increase produe-
tion still further to supply the
British market.

Webb said that Australia was
sending Britain considerably less
meat than pre-war partly because
of drought and partly because of
increased domestic consumption).

Last year Britain received 127,
000 tons of meat from Australia
as against 200,000 tons before the
war.

—Reuter.



Won,

“Shhh! Don’t inter-
rupt daady when he’s
carving the joint!”



Londen Express Service.



No Single Method

Can Ensure Peace

PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 10.
Averell Harriman, Special As-
sistant to President Truman on
Foreign Affairs said to-day that
the United States. must combat
Russia's global strategy with
world-wide strategy of. its own.
“Those who advise concentra-
ting our energies exclusively in
one part of the world or on one
aspect of the situation fail to up-
derstand the nature of the strug-
gle,” he declared. Harriman spoke
before the World Affairs Council
of Philadelphia.

“This struggle cannot be won
by any single method, nor by
military strength only, nor exclu-
sively: by economic and social
progfammes, nor by moral force

alone.
—Reuter.



SCENES OF RELEASE
OF. GERMANS BANNED

BRUSSELS, Feb. 10.
Brussels cinema managers said
to-day. they were
cutting from newsreels, shots of
the release of German war crim-
inals from Landsberg jail in the
American zone of Germany

Patrons hooted and booed ir
jsome cinemas here last night,
lwhen the release scenes were

jgium, —~Retter

—_—







BARBADOS, FEBRUARY 11,

1981

Headquarteys in Beckles Road yesterday.

mn; of US. Troops
To Japan Welcomed

By Japanese Government

, TOKYO, Feb. 10.
The Japanese Government has warmly welcomed pro-
posals to Station American troops in the country after the

#

conclugién of the peace treaty, John Foster Dulles, Presi-
dent Truman’s special envoy said here to-day before
*

leaving: for Manila.

YPulles added that Japan’s fu-





SIX CENTS

a ienmemal

U.K. Dock Strike
Holds Up 142 Ships

UN. Ent ep | THENATION.WIDE hoo Selle eaniee
Seoul And

to cripple Britain’s ports to-day when 20,000
dockers failed to report for work,

More than 142 ships were idle in London, Liv-

erpool, Birkenhead, and Manchester docks, most

Inchon of them with vital cargoes waiting to be unloaded.

Ten thousand were on strike in London. They came

TOKYO, Feb, 10. out strongly in support of the stoppage, after the seven

South Korean spearheads. today

reached the heart of the shattered

rat-infested “ghost city'’, Seoul

strike leaders were taken to court yesterday and charged
with incitement.

fe z ‘01 epecribstsipeatdinen iby sensipn —nolicatintin Aaah he strike which started in
British and American tanks and =

infantry columns occupied the ‘se ore eon last week-end,
South Korean capital's industrial eputies Plan Grew only 450 supporters in

suburb of Yongdongpo. London at first. They had decided
Advance units of the United
Nations Task force also entered In-
chon, deserted port of Seoul
Kimpo airfield, five miles west
of Seoul was taken by the Ameri-
can 25th Infantry Division.
The Chinese seem to have given

to go back to work when, the

W = seven leaders were arrested.
N ew Left ing A mass x strike ne rnovietnent
N developed in the capital last night,
lovement

after the news of the arrests was
carried around dockside taverns.
For many strikers, it was



Rearmament Will
Not Seeure Peace
BIRMINGHAM BISHOP

BIRMINGHAM, Feb. 10.

The Bishop of Birmingham, Dr.
Ernest Barnes, said today at a ser-
vice that he did not believe re-
armament would attain its object
of peace.

“In my opinion,” he declared,
rearmament leads to two evils—
inflation and war.

“I would bring rearmament and
its attendant evils to an end,

“No nation, great or small de-
sires war... . Think for example
of France, one of the most militant
nations in Europe... . . Military
leaders say with a shrug that the
French people will not fight,” the

ou -Peoble in thelr ais
ui e, hac bit whats
civil defence. There is the same
passionate desire for peace the
world over. . I ‘have letters and
speeches by leaders of the Orthe-
ox church in Russia. They also
show that,” Dr. Barnes declared.

—Keuter.



German Offers Eye

ture security had been one of the
Main points of discussion during
his fortnight’s talks here on the
treaty, formally to end the present
State of war.

He said that the treaty would
restore full sovereignty to Japan,
recognise her right to self defence,
establish provisional commercial
relations and pave the way for
her eventual entry into the United
Nations.

Dulles said : “We have discussed
the future security of Japan. On
February 2, with the authority of
my Government, I publicly said
that if desired by Japan, the
United States would sympatheti-
cally, consider the maintenance of
United States army forces in and
about Japan,

“The Japanese Government has
Le poor. that Le
so ve vetsations and
the maniféld expressions of opin-
ion which have come to us con-
vince us that if is the overwhelm-
ing desire f the Japanese nation

at that proposal be accepted, so
that the coming into force of the
treaty of peace, will not leave a
vacuum of power, with Japan
totally disarmed jand unable to
defend itself.

“Accordingly, we have discussed
provisional security arrangements





up the vital Seoul-Inchon area in BOLOGNA, Feb, 10. mainly a protest against the Gov-
the same way they had captured Italy's two rebel Communist}/ernment’s legal action.
it—without fighting, deputies Aldo Cucchi and Valdo The original strike demand—

Chinese resistance collapsed| Magnani to-night set up. an/for an extra four shillings per
suddenly and they fled northwards Action Committee to plan a new|day—was pushed into the backs
after Lieutenant General Matthew | left wing breakaway movement} ground.

B. Ridgway's 8th Army charged |free from Russian domination But the strike leaders backed

the last Communist defences south Cucehi Mains : , [by the Communist Party made

of the Han River, which runs Aon ae fagnani sail their} most of the popular support.

through Seoul, three days ago +e a co eet one The Daily Worker, the official
achieve 2 a Pp rty

Seoul has changed masters four] pendence of the wot kers’ wioek pay ae ee told the dockera
times within eight months. Three }|ment in Italy.” fo-nday MARE tHe. SETests. were: 3
days after the North Koreans oa “consplraay of the Government
crossed the 38th Parallel on June! In an interview with the Bol-|Conservative and Capitalist press
25 last year Seoul fell. (ogna correspondent of an Italiar against the workers.”

The United Nations regained it |"@ws agency Ansa, the “deputies Strike leaders were holding
after the Inchon landing. North | said: meetings a an effort to bring out
Koreans took it again in Januar “There is no question to-day London's 25,000 dock workers but
in the Allied retreat from the Jof setting up new parties now |â„¢@2y wharves were still working.
Chongchon Piver It remained|splitting the workers unity ir Thousands of tons of imported
this time only 87 days under jorganisations with economic anc food were ps board the affected
Communist control. social aims,” ships in London. In dockside

—Reuter. warehouses British-made goods
: (They were presumably refer-|for export were waiting to take
ih ‘i ring to Italy’s three main trade|their place in the holds.

Priest Offers Life union organisations Communist,| The seven strike leaders were

Socialist and Christian Demo-|arrested under a wartime regula-
7 ” . erat) tion which lays down that 21

For v Criminals ss ne * |days notice must be given before

agnani' and’ Cucchi said they[a_ strike statts. They were

MULHEIM, West Germany, hoped to recruit the “strong remanded on bail until February

Feb, 10. minded militants of the ‘Com-]20,

A Roman Catholic priest who |munist Party,” The Cabinet may congid

was tried by the Nazis and spent —Reuter. sending soldiers into the docks if

seven years in concentration

camps, hag offered to die in the

place of seven condemned Lands

berg war criminals, a West Ger

man News Aggns reported (o
G -sihadies. BH



Russia Wants

aa pete naeate,
“The ' priest) “Father “Auaiistin
Flossdorf, wrote to the American
High Commissioner, MeCloy, that
not all those wanting to help the
prisoners were Nazis,

~~ ADENAUER





No “Hot War”

stoppage cortinues., t
—Reuter.

Czech Authorities
‘Tatk Of Clementis

PRAGUE, Feb, 10.
Czechoslovak authorities are
considering making an _ official



| Korea.

tin World War One,

considering |.

between’ the United States and
Japan.

To Wounded Soldier

BERLIN, Feb. 10. | Need For Self-help

Walter Demand, a 45-year-old} “In this connection we have
unemployed German cook walked |pginted out that all regional and
into a West Berlin radio station }¢oflective security arrangements
today and offered an eye to a |o¢ defiite character to which the
blinded United Nations soldier in | United States becomes party, must

degide for ‘continuous and effec-
itive self-help and mutual aid’ by
yall parties in accordance with the
basic policy laid down by Vanden-
ioe resolution of June

Prime Minister Shigero Yoshida,
confirmed ,that his Government
and “the preponderant majority of
the Japanese people, warmiy wel-
comed ‘the arrangements made with the
United States including the gar-
risoning here of American troops.’

He said: “We realise fully ow
responsibility to protect ourselves
and defend our own land and will
do what we can in this respect.

—Reuter.

“I want to give one of my two
good eyes ,” he said. “I do not
want anything in return. All 1
want is to know that one young
blinded soldier will be able to see
again.” *

He felt that United Nations sol-
diers in Korea were fighting “for
all of us” and was anxious to make
his personal sacrifice.

He said his father lost both eves
—Reuter.

World Medical
Academy Founded

ROME, Feb. 10.
The founding of an Internation-
al Medical Academy with its seat
in Rome and branches abroad, was
announced here to-day.
Its work will be based on the
concept that “all men are equal

COMMEMORATED
before disease, and all are entitled

pa the same Way to treatment and VATICAN CITY, Feb. 10.
i





POPE’S DEATH

preventive: measures.” , Flags: flew at halfmast here to
The Academy will eneourage ‘fay “end requiem mass was cele-
| world-wide exchanges of medical brated here to commemorate

scientists and information and|the twelfth anniversary of the
will work to co-ordinate health|death of Pope Pius XI.
legislation. Pope Pius. XII, his syecessor

The President of the Academy |#ave absolution,
is Professor Mario Ceravolo, lung| The late Pontiff’s tomb in Saint
specialist and member of the| Pete's basilica .was covered. with
Italian Chamber of Deputies, flowers brought by his admirers.
—Reuter. —Reuter.



THE ONLY THING THEY MISSED





‘In Six Days .

By JOHN POMFRET
BARON MUNCHAUSEN, thebiggest liar in the world,
might have cast envious eyes at a post which became
vacant last week: the presiderfey: of the Soviet Science

Academy.

Sergei Vavilov, the last presi-
dent, has died. Here are some of
the progressive facts mentioned
recently by the Academy.

First: Russia devised radar long
before Britajn. and, secondly,
penicillin was in use in Russian
hospitals before the mould was
grown at St. Mary’s in London.

It ces without saying that}| /?2’ ed
the Russians were flying before “WOULD YOU SET
the Wright brothers; they were | HESS FREE ?”’

some 40 years before Sir Frank
Whittle, for there were “jet planes
over the Red Square in 1899.”
‘Invented’ Steam
Polzunoyv, of course, was “the
genuine inventor of the steam



nn



| using the telegraph before n to-morrow’s Evening

| Morse; they had radio before Advocate

| Marconi (Popov, they say, in- os: an

| vented it), and they were using | }————__________
| the telephone before Bell. er e.” James Watt

} Jt seems that a gentleman called | afterwards.

iConstantin T ikov visa a i t



tut hilit
the possibilities

| “Stalin Created The oe

Germany's war opponents had BONN, Feb. 10. statement on the subject of Doc-
also committed atrocities, —h« West German Chancellor Dr,| tor Vladimir Clementis, according
claimed, — Reuter Adenauer said to-night that Rus-|to indications here to-day,

Sta did not want a “Hot War} For the first time since the
es ally with the Atiantic Pact! former Foreign Minister disap-
4 *..9 . powers because one knows that| peared from his office in the

Stalin 5 Friend Is although she might have initial State Bank nearly a fortnight ago,

gains, she would lose in the end] informed Czechoslovak sources to-

Supervising Purge and have an annihilation defeat.

day expressed an opinion on the

‘ He declared that Russia would) ©#8e _. 3 %

; PARIS, Feb. 10. |not yepeat nor start another war| , S¢mi-official Czechoslovak cir-
_,Lavrenti Beria, wines erieie oF mainiy owing to the great dis-| cles minimised the case in a man~
Stalin, a tag ne a Bs parity between the economic] ner which appeared to amount to
i Bra jue supervisis . the hres of ‘potentials of the East and West| half-admission that Clementis had
Cza lav ats Gas nae ts. the | even if Germany were to make indeed fled the country or at
“ha ee gy phe pa a ose a defence contribution, least had been deprived of his
Freneh Socialist Party newspaper liberty —Reuter.
La Populaire said to-day “T am convinced that peace can ,

———${]$_$ > —_

TELL THE ADVOCATE

aoe newepaper said neat ONC | be preserved and I am convinced
w eputy Premier Valcerlan) that the Atlantic Pact countries
Zoriny: formery Ambassador :tojpaye no intention of attacking the

Frague, whose arrival in Czecho- Soviet’ Union and that Russia TER NEWS
slovakia was reported earlier this] ;nows this very well.” RING 3113
month from Vienna. The news- f : es Wiuter DAY OR NIGHT

paper said the reported disappear-
ance of Dr. Viadimir Clementis,
former Czech Foreign Minister had
touched off a wave of arrests in-
cluding that of Madame Pattova,

Communist Deputy and Clementis’ | RA E 1 G a
sister-in-law, Reuter. i 7
Killed Daughter |

beeaesabz bee Sept cot,









NEW YORK, Feb., 10,

A young father sat watching a : : ea
boxing match on television last |
night after killing his seven-!

.
months-old daughter by hanging

her on ihe bathroom door, police AYS AT YOUR SERVICE
here alleged, i 4 u

Police said he went to the home
of his brother and told the story
of the tragedy but the brother was ‘
engrossed in a television boxing
match and did not realise what
had happened.

The two men sat throughout the
bout and then the father repeated
his story. The brother rushed to
his flat and found the baby hang-
ing from a sash cord attached to
two nails, He informed the police
—Reuter,

A variety of models constantly in stock
and ready assembled for you to
choose from







See them on

display at...
99

fore Simon Lake, and tankers be-
fore Sir Joseph Isherwood.

A Russian astronomer saw
Venus (the planet) before Galileo,
and, naturally, there was a Russian
ship in the Antarctic before Cap-
tain Cook sailed there.

Anesthetics? Pirogov. No men-
tion is made of Sir Humphry Davy
Multipie lathes? Basichek.

Another Russian is given all the
| credit for the discovery of dyna-}







j mite (Alfred Nobel); another for |
}ineandescent bulbs (Thor Edi-|
son, who developed the electric
|\Jamp after Britain’s Sir Josepi |
| Swan), and yet other for smelt- |
furnaces (Henry Bessemer) |
Adding cuine bine har-|
vesters, rifle ind electric trens-
forme ri I ‘ red tar
mar A ' i

Cree i

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& Co., Ltd.
10 - 13 Broad Street
' Sole Distributors

a
PAGE TWO

PLAZA



Y 445 and 430
WARNER'S TECHN
“STORY OF
with Shirley THMPLE
Also
MAT. THURS, 1.30 5
RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH

Johnny Maek BROWN

LAST * SHOWS

| BING CROSBY IN

with Coleen GRAY—Charles

MON, & TUES. — 5 & 8.

| SONG OF SURRENDER

Wanda Hendrix




~ McDonald Carey



GAIETY

LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY
Warner's Thrilling Adventure!

GARY COOPER IN

with Jane WYATT—Walter BRENNAN—Others

MONDAY & TUESDAY — 8.30 p.m, (Warner Double)

JUNE BRIDE

Bette DAVIS

&



Starring: DANNY

MONDAY and TUESDAY



Starring:
An R.K.O.




SOPOR EP OPP PPS SPESSSSSSSSSCVSESCS OSCE

SPEIGH
PLACE

LAST SHOW TO-NIGHT 8,30
JAMES STEWART

In
“BROKEN ARROW"

Your last Chance

Don't miss it.



EMPIRE

TODAY 4.45 and 8.45
MONDAY and TUESDAY
4.45 and 8.30
Columbia Pictures Presents :

Humphrey BOGART in

“IN A LONELY
PLACE”

— with —
Grahame;
and Carl

Gloria
Lovejoy
Reed.

Frank
Benton



ROYAL

Last 2 Shows TODAY
4.20 and 8.30
Republic Action Double...

Monte HALE
Roy BANCROFT
in

«PRINCE OF THE

PLAINS ””

AND
“BANDIT KING OF
TEXAS”
with

Allan (Rocky) LANE &
Black Jack
MONDAY and TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.30
“OUT OF THE
STORM ”
and
*A SPORTING

CHANCE”

\
BS
>
Si
=|
=
=
=
a
>

‘y

| TEMCO
ELECTRIC CLOCK

“TIME MARCHES 0.

HNICOLOR ROMANCE WITH THRILLS!

Barry FITZGERALD—Lon MeCALLISTER
— “80° YOU WANT TO BE A GAMBLER”

&

eee ee ST ESS
PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

TODAY —5 & 8.30 P.M.

30 p.m. (Paramount Double)



—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

TONIGHT at 8,30
Samuel Goldwyn’s Technicolor Musical Comedy!

THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY
KAYB-—VIRGINIA MAYO
MATINEE : MONDAY at 5 p.m.

CHILD OF DIVORCE
SHARYN MOFFETT—REGIS TOOMEY—MADGE MEREDITH

THEATRE





aS eeeeeEeaoaoEeee—e—E

Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

p.m. and Continuing Daily

SEABISCUITâ„¢

mm. (Monogram Double)

RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL
Jimmy WAKELY

(Paramount)

“RIDING HIGH”

BICKFORD—Frances GIFFORD

————————



&

with
William Eythe — George Reeves

SPECIAL AGENT

— 5 & 8.30 p.m, (Warner)

“TASK FORCE”

BULLET SCARS
Regis TOOMEY

NIGHT at 8.30

Radio Picture

TSTOWN
TIME 8.30

Ss MON & TUES. 8.30
United Artists Presents:

T “RED RIVER"

Oo Starring:
JOHN WAYNE — CLIFF MONT-
GOMERY,

R Two novrs of action packed

entertainmen’

ROXY

TO-DAY to TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.15

United Artist Double
Franchot TONE in

« JIGSAW”
‘AND
0.
with

Edmond O'BRIEN
Pamela BRITTON

OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows TADAY
4.30 and 8.30
Columbia Double
“ THE WALKING

JNLLS ”
And

«© ANNA LUCASTA'*”*

“D. 0. A”





MONDAY Only—Ist Inst.
Cofumbia Serial

“ BATMAN
ROBIN ”

Starring:
Robert Lowery; Jane Adams

AND

SET BY



BUT -TEMCO”’ KEEPS
GOOD TIME



THE CORNER

ON coe i EEE
_

ON SHOW



ADVOCATE

——

SUNDAY























IR VICE-MARSHAL an 4d
Mrs. Arthur T Cowley were

D0 YOU KNOW
THE VALUE OF A DOLLAR?
so matter ‘hee he proroy al ea eae

diamonds give you most for your money. ind
jewelry

wisely and shop for diamonds, watches,
here.

among the passengers arriving
from Canada yesterday morning
by TC.A Air Vice-Marsha!

s Director of Air Services,

Department of Transport § in

‘Ottawa.

-{” They are here for three weeks,
staying at Cacrabank.

Yeronto And Ontario

R. and Mrs. Bruce Hopkins
of Toronto and their daugh-
ter Mrs, Charles Hopkins
of Kingston, Ontario arrived
by T.C.A. yesterday morni to
spend a month’s holiday in Mere
bados, They are guests at Cacra-
bank.

Also staying at Cacrabank are
Dr, and Mrs, George Ingham of
Stratford, Ontario. They arrived
by the same plane and are here
for a month.





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GLOBE THEATRE

TONITE 8.30 & TO-MORROW 5 & 8.30 P.M.
Yvonne De ata. | and John RUSSEL
N

“The Gal who took the West”





MR. H. L. O, FLECKER

B.G. Medico

N Barbados for two months’

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1951

en LLL ALS
C: C ; C

Back From Grenada
Aro paying a visit to the
Grenada Sugar Factory, Mr.
Henry Watson, Manager of Searles
Plantation in Christ Churth and
ur. Theodore Alleyne, Manager
of Newcastle plantation in St.

John, returned yesterday morning
by the Lady Rodney.

Canadian Trade

Commissioner

R. T. GRANT MAJOR,

Canadian Government Trade
Commissioner for the Eastern
Caribbean with headquarters in
Trinidad, arrived here yesterday
morning by the Lady Rodney from
Trinidad intransit for Montserrat.
Mrs. Grant Major also arrived
yesterday by B.W.I.A. She is
here for a week staying at the
Marine Hotel.

Bluecoats Head
R. H. L. O, FLECKER,
C.B.E. Headmaster of
Christ’s Hospital, the Bluecoat
School, arrives here February 21st.
He is doing a three months’ tour
of the Caribbean for the British
‘Council, meeting other Headmas-
ters and lecturing on a variety of
Educational subjects. His itinerary
includes Venezuela, Trinidad,
Grenada, British Guiana, Antigua
and Jamaica. He is accompanied

by his wife and daughter.

Mr. Flecker was korn in 1896
at Dean Close School, Cheltenham
in Gloucestershire. His father was
the first headmaster: he started
with six boys in 1886 and when
he retired some forty years later
the numbers were 250. The eldest
of the family was the poet, James
Elroy Flecker, author of “Hassan.”

Mr. Flecker was educated at
Dean Close School and won a
Classical Scholarship at Brasenose
College, Oxford in December 1914,
He at once joined the army and.
saw active service in Mesopo-
tamia in 1916. After the war he
went to Oxford, took a first in





MR. AND MRS. RUPERT FARMER who spent a month's holiday in
Barbados returned to Canada yesterday by T.C.A. Mr. Farmer, who
is a Barbadian, is an Electrical Engineer with “Hydro Quebec” in
Montreal. He is a brother of Mr. “Guinea” Farmer of Oughterson Pin,








Honour Moderations and his
degree. In January 1920 he wad
appointed by Dr. (now Sir Cyril)
Norwood to the staff of Marlbor-
ough College, where he became a
House Master in 1924, In 1927 he
became headmaster of Berkham-

holiday prior to retirement is
Dr. R. N. Cozier, District Medical
Officer of West Coast, Demerara
He arrived yesterday morning by
the Lady Rodney accompanied by
by his wife and is staying at

Leaton First Viet Stream. sted School—an old foundation
irst isit whose six hundred boys were

R. C, S. MORTON from Hali- almost equally divided into board-
fax who made the round ers and day boys. It was one of

trip on the Lady Rodney from the biggest schools receiving
Canada to British Guiana, arriv- Direct Grant from the Board (now
ed here yesterday morning ‘on his Ministry) of Education. In 1930
first visit to the island, He will ne was appointed headmaster of
be staying for two weeks as a Christ's Hospital (popularly
guest at che Windsor Hotel. known as the Bluecoat School),

LOCAL TALENT AUDITION THIS MORNING 9.30 A.M.

Opening Tuesday 13th to Thursday 5 & 8.30
“ABANDONED” Dennis O'Keefe & Gale Storm

JANETTA DRESS SHOP
UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAWM’S, Lower Broad St,

Phone 2684
READY MADE DRESSES of all types

| EXTRA—Tex Beneke & The GLEN MILLER ORCHESTRA



Office Open

R. SIDNEY SPIRA, B.Sc.
O.D. who recently returned
from the U.S.A. has opened his
office in the building above Alfon-
so B. de Lima & Company in
McGregor Street. Dr. Spira ob-
tained his degrees at Colombia
University, New York, where he
was studying for four, years after
leaving Harrison College. After
graduating he was an Intern for a
ear at an Eye Clinic in New
ork. ;
Dr. Spira will examine eyes and
fill prescriptions with the latest
equipment from the U.S.A, which

Carib Press Assn., Meeting

ELEGATES for the Caribbean
Press Association meeting
arriving at Seawell yesterday were
Mr. G. C. Bloom, Latin American
Manager for Reuters stationed in
Buenos Aires, Mr. C. E. Hitehins
Editor of the Trinidad Guardian,
Mr. Jimmy Cozier, Acting Inform-
ation Officer of the Caribbean
Commission, stationed in Port-of-
Spain and Hon, Secretary of the
Caribbean Press Association, Hon.
Garnet Gordon, Editor of The
Voice of St. Lucia who is staying
with Mr. and Mrs. F. A. C. Clair-

THAT’S THE STANDARD

AT
STORE



WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Local Handicraft
EVENING MITTENS—in Pastel Shades and Black
READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty's of London,

HOURS: Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30

Dr. Morton is a retired surgeon
of Halifax Infirmary and the
Grace Hospital.

Frequent Visitors
R. and Mrs. 8. A. Stephens

from Montreal, Canada are
now spending two months’ holi-
day here. They came in on the
Rodney and are staying at the
Marine Hotel,

Mr, Stephens who is Chairman
of the Board of Directors of F. H.
Hopkins and €o., said that they
had been coming to Barbados off
and on since 1936,

For Four Months
O*

four months’ leave from his
dence, East Bank, Demerara

























MRS.: HOUSEWIFE

a offer a wide range of House-

“EARTHENWARE





duties at Plantation Provi-
is



Mr. D. I. Newman who arrived

yesterday morning by the Lady

Medina Shape Rodney. He was accompanied by

his wife and two sons and they

Maroon Band & Gold Decoration are staying at “Watersmeet”,
Plates Dishes Worthing.

Tea Cups & Saucers, Cream Jugs



Platters Tea Pots Were Here Last Year
Also ACK in Barbados for three
TEA months’ holiday are Mr. and
Stine Gas ce r Mrs. G. W. Bartlett of Nova
DINNER SETS os ck 49.34 Scotia who spent a holiday here

last year. They arrived from
British Guiana yesterday morn-
ing on the Lady Rodney and
are staying at the Windsor Hotel.

Mr, Bartlett who has _ just
rétired from business, was form-
erly President of G. W. Bartlett
Ltd., lumber dealers of Nova

Scotia,

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{

which post he still holds. This
school was one of the Royal Hos-
pitals founded in 1552 to replace
in London the work previouly
done by the monasteries which
‘had been dissolved by Henry
VIII. In the late 18th and early
19th Centuries, Samuel Taylor
Coleridge, Charles Lamb and
Leigh Hunt were the most famous
of a brilliant generation educated
by the redoubtable Dr. Boyer. In
1902 the school was moved from
the site of its original home jn
Grey Friars’, Newgate Street, in
the City of London to the neigh-
bourhood of Horsham, some 40
miles due South of the City, The
boys still wear the lon

coat and yellow stock: a dress

which has changed but little from |

Tudor times. No child is admitted
whose parents are not in need of
financial assistance for his educa-
tion. The school thus still exactly
fulfils the purpose of its founda-
tion. It receives no funds from
public sources and is still entirely
dependent upon past and present
Benefactions.

In 1944 when the recent Edu-
cation Act was taking shape,
Flecker was elected President of
the Incorporated Association of
Head Masters, which he has since
served as Honorary Secretary and
as Treasurer. He has for many
years attended the meetings of the
Committee of the Head Masters’
Conference, either as an elected
member or as representative of
the Association of Head Masters.
He received the C.B.E. in the
Birthday Honours List of 1949.

Attended Synod
RRIVING from St. Vincent
yesterday morning by the
Lady Rodney were Rev. and Mrs.
Frank Lawrence, Rev. J. B.
Broomes, Rev. R. McCullough,
Rev. I. Thomas, Mr. G. Brewster,
Mr. and Mrs. H. Ward, Mr, and
Mrs. D. A. Scott and Mr. V. B.
St. John, They were some of
the delegates who attended the
Annual Methodist Synod which
j was held at Kingstown,

For Cricket
‘M®. ERNEST B. PARKER ot
Messrs, C. A. Phillips Ltd.,
Commission Agents of British
Guiana is now in Barbados for a
month’s holiday, He arrived yes-
terday morning by the Lady Rod-
mney and has come over princi-
pally to see the cricket,

_He was accompanied by his
wife and sister-in-law, Miss Fay
Phillips and they are staying at
the Hotel Royal.



MARCH

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has recently been installed in his monte, Worthing, and Mr. L. C.
office. Stevenson, Editor of The West-In-
dian in Grenada.

Mr. Stevenson is a nephew of
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Bvuileh,
“Emerald Villa”, Fontabelle, with
whom he resides while here. >

Mr, G. E, Willock, Editor ofthe
Daily Chronicle and Mr, T. E.
Sealy, Associate Editor of the
Jamaica Gleaner are expected: to
arrive to-day.

.The. meeting opens at Hastings
House to-morrow, tad

Managing Director __-

R. and MRS. W. M. ANDER-

SON were among the pas-
sengers arriving from Toronto
yesterday by T.C.A. They were
down here last winter.

Mr. Anderson is Managing
Director of North American Life
Assurance. They plan to. spend
a month, staying at the Marine
Hotel.

Here for Three Months
RS. GRAHAM ROSE and: her
son Hugh arrived from
Canada yesterday to spend three
months’ holiday in Barbados.
They are staying with Mrs. Rose’s
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Willie
Yearwood.
Graham is with Western Insur-
ance Co., in Toronto.

C.N.S. Officials ©
| APT. R. A. CLARKE, Gener-
. al Manager of Canadian
National Steamships and Mr. J. M.
Gauthier, Freight Traffic Manager
of Canadian National Steamships
who have been touring the W.I,
ee to Montreal yesterday by



MISS CAROL MALEC left yester-
day for Canada after spending a

holiday in Barbados. Canadian Engineer

Spent Two Weeks AYING their first visit to the

FTER spending two weeks’ island and remaining for sik

holiday in Barbados, Miss weeks are Mr. and Mrs. Ro
Carol Malec of the office staff of Henham of Toronto, They ar
T.C.A, in Montreal, Canada, rived yesterday morning by thé
returned home yesterday morn- Lady Rodney from Trinida
ing by T.C.A. She was staying where they had spent a we
at “Accra,” Rockley. and are staying at the Windsor

To Join Husband Hotel. is
RS. JOHN MARCH-PENNY Mr. Henham is wear aaa
left yesterday by B.W.1.A, Of Dominion Structural Sted

for St. Lucia to join her husband Limited.

who is at piconet there on the On Holiday e

Cable Ship Electra, She expects to R. RALPH GRIFFITH, ae

be away one week. employee of the Everla
7 Below Fountain Pen Co, of the U.S.Ax

N Friday night the tempera- was an arrival on Thursday mort-
O ture in Montreal was seven ing by the Fort Amherst to spend
below zero. So said one of the a holiday with his relatives. He
passengers arriving by T.C.A. staying at Mount Standfast, St
yesterday morning. James. ;

EMPIRE.
THEATRE!

white 36” wide 49¢

TIGER CALICO: 72¢
DOMESTIC: 3B s 55¢

x 30” $1.60

RSS 88 2 8 8-8

Dial 4220

;

Stores
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY

At the Cinema:

Mixe

G.

d

11, 1951

Grill

OVER THIS WEEK-END, movie-goers will have a
mixed grill to choose from in the line of entertainment,

co!

rising the story of a famous race horse; a rather farci-

cal Western; mystery melodrama; guerilla warfare in the
Philippines, a social problem and a second showing of one
of Danny Kaye's funniest comedies.

O TOOK THE WEST will pro-
have the most Repeller ap-

y
i
Peal shor are in Technicolor,

ith
orious, though widely dif-
ferent, scenic backgrounds.

“THE STORY OF SEABIS-
» show at the Plaza, is
just what its title implies and you
see the step-by-step training
ptoecess of one of America’s most
famous race horses. The Bis-
cuit was an extraordinary horse
in that he never really came into
his own until he was a four~year~
old and his famous match race with
War Admiral at Pimlico, in which
he won by four lengths and his
victory in his final try for the
Santa Anita handicap, are actu-
ally shown in the film, As a
point of interest, the role of tne
famous horse is played by two
of his sons, with the exception of
the two races mentioned above.
There is q slight, but pleasant
love story between Shirley Tem-
ple, as ah Trish colleen, whose
uncle Barry Fitzgerald is the Bis-
euit’s trainer, and Lon McAlister,
a8 a top jockey, but it is to Barry
d that acting honours go
Ag the “fey” Irish trainer and
lever of horses, he gives a warn
and endearing characterization of
the man whose unchanging faitn
in a knobbley-kneed colt made
him the world’s leading money
winning horse. From beginniyg
to end, this is Seabiscuit’s story
and the human actors, for once,
take second place.

Globe:
“THE GAL WHO TOOK
THE WEST”

This film is a farcical horse-
opera in a Western setting, and in
spots, is a lively burlesque of
sothe of the situations we are
fathiliar With in g film of this kind,
In brief, it centres on the bitter
feud between two cousins, who
fall in love with the same woman,
However, the tale ig told in flash-
back, from four different points
of view, with the lady in question
having the final word,

YVONNE DE CARLO is the
opera-singer who is brought to
Afizona from the East to open
General O’Hara’s new opera
house, and she promptly becomes
entangled with his two fighting
nephews, Though Miss De Carlo
ig not the opera singer envisaged
by the old man, her rendition of
two bar-room ditties of that era
are quite diverting and = she
shows herself highly capable of
handling an explosive situation. As
the two cousins, Scott Brady and
John Russell are like terriers in
a ring when they meet and their
final fight in the General’s home
is & grand and glorious affair on
the lines of all-in wrestling.
Charles Coburn, grand old man
of the movies, plays the General,
the only person capable of con-
trolling his nephews—along with
the help of the U.S. Cavalry!
His portrayal is delightful as the
wealthy Arizonian, who opens
the concert in the opera house
with two shots from his pistol
to subdue his nephews feuding
factions in the pit.

The costumes and settings are
colourful and ornate and the musi-
eal background appropriate.

“ABANDONED”

Beginning Tuesday, the Globe
Theatre is showing “Abandoned,”
ah absorbing documentary-type
film depicting a serious American

gee ba Pat ont



social problem—the black-market
sale of babies purchased from
their unwed mothers. Though we
out here do not have an evil of
this kind to contend with, the pic-
ture is none-the-less interesting.

It is the story of a young girl
who goes to Los Angeles to find
her missing sister, and with | the
help of a newspaper reporter, ex-
poses an illegal adoption syndi-
cate. The acting of the principals
is realistic and cee and in
supporting roles, Jeff Chandler
(who will be remembeted in The
Broken Arrow) as the district
attorney and Marjorie Rambeau,
as one of the top members of the
syndicate, both give good per-
formances,



Empire:
“IN A LONELY PLACE”

Starring Humphrey Bogart, this
film is the story of a neurotic
screen writer, who, because of his
outbursts of rage and tendency to
become involved in brawls, is sus-
pected by the police of murdering
a hat-check girl. He is cleared of
guilt by a young woman who falls
in love with him, but who will
net go through with their marriage
because she fears his emotional
cutbreaks and instability.

It is fairly obvious, from the
beginning that Mr. Bogart had no
hand in the murder, and the film
is therefore not entirely credible
from that point of view, but the
presentation of a man who is
wretched and broken by his own
compulsive behaviour is charac-
terised by honesty and under-
standing. Humphrey Bogart gives
one of the best dramatic perform-
ences I have seen him give, while
Gloria Grahame, as the woman
who loves him, is first rate too,





Roxy:
“AMERICAN GUERILLA IN
THE PHILIPPINES”

I was unable to see this recently
released film, but on checking
reviews which I received, it ap-
pears to be a semi-documentary
‘war-drama, produced with the co-
operation, of the U.S. and Philip-
pine governments. Photographed
in Technicolor on the island of
Leyte “the film points up the re.
markable ingenuity and teamwork
that went into the fortification of
ill-equipped Pacific Islands during
the second World War. Praise-
worthy tare has gone into the
recreation of situations and feel-
ings that prevailed in the Philip-
pines after the fall of Bataan,”
Another reviewer says “there are
a few popyincing glimpses of the
sort of fighting that went on in
the islands, during the war’—but
T am afraid that this last reviewer
‘was not impressed with the story
or the performances of Tyrone
Power and Micheline Prelle, who
are starred,

HOME, SwEre HOME

W YORK.

Home is sweeter to ten million
American families who now have
in the lounge. To tempt them
away from their sets, the desper-
ate cinemas..are making sweet
offers of free coffee and cake in

the foyer after the film,



ANONYMOUS
MI

ave
Winner of a £20,000 Italian
State lottery this week warned
newspapermen to keep his identity
secret. He said he was not worried
about begging letters but feared
the tax collectors,



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



Gardening Hints Farm And Garden

By AGRICOLA

For Amateurs

THE GARDEN in February
COLEUS
Yellow Alamanda

WHEN planting up the garden,
remember the lovely Coleus, and,
if possible find a spot for this
decorative and quick growing
plant, It’s fascinating to collect
the many varieties of this lovely
little plant, exchanges between
friends is-so easy. Just a snip off
from an established plant stuck in
the ground will quickly take root.
A bowl of these coloured leaves
will soon send out roots in the
water, and so they can be enjoyed
in the house and then planted out
in the garden,

Coleus do best in semi shade,
and thrive especially well under
trees, They are suitable to plant
as a thick border, or on a Rock-
garden where they look particu~
larly well, but they can be grown
in the sun, and look particularly
handsome when massed together
in large beds,

In planting the Coleus, see that
the cutting is short, as they are
inclined to get stalky rather
quickly. To keep them, after

planting, in good shape nip out
the top centre leaves now and



C.G.P. enquires:—

I should be grateful for
advice on “moss” on lawns,
coupled with bare patches,

Also scale blight on lime
frees and other citrus that
cause them to die.

With thanks,



then. This tends to make them

bunchy, so much prettier than

when they grow up tall,
Coleus are cultivated for their

brightly coloured leaves. The
flowers are insignificant, and
should be nipped out.

The plants grow to a height of
about two to three feet, and as
already stated prefer semi shade
and a moist condition,

FLOWERING VINES
The Yellow Alamanda

The Yellow Alamanda is one of
our flowering vines that can also
be grown as a shrub if so desired.

It is a slow growing plant, so
quick results are not to be ex-
pected,

Being rather woody, it will
tolerate better than most vines an
exposed position, and it will with-
ony fairly poor garden condi-

ons,

The flowers are a clean bright
yellow, bell-like in shape and
they grow in loose clusters on the
vine, It bears continuously
throughout the year, especially
during the rainy season.

There are two varieties of the
Yellow Alamanda, the garden
book tells us, One, the “Ala-
manda cathartica var Hendersonii”
has much larger flowers, some
measuring four to five inches in
diameter, than the ordinary Ala-
manda whose Botanical name
(from Garden book) is “Alamanda
Cathartica var Williamsii.

In deciding on a plant, the
larger variety is strongly recom-
mended, The Alamanda is grown
from cutting, or by layering.

Have you any Gardening ques-
tions you would like answered or
any garden information that would
be of interest to other Gardeners
to pass on?

Have you a surplus of seeds or
cuttings you would like to ex-
change?

Write to “GARDENING”

C/o The “Advocate”
and watch this Column for a
reply.

~VITACUP”



FOR HEALTH

(3¢ PER 1/2 LB. TIN.

AGRICULTURE is the host
which spreads the daily table of
mankind. We propose in this
series of notes to keep this broad
theme as a main thread and to
weave around it stich ideas and
informative matter as may help
to give general form and pattern
to the theme while, at the same
time, creating an appropriate
setting or background as the pic-
ture unfolds. together, not for
the specialist whe is already weil
informed, but for the general
reader and those interested in the
use of land who ono find the
notes helpful and perhaps stimu-
lating. That, at least, is our 7
and reason for attempting e
column, undertaken with the
knowledge and co-operation of
the local Department of Agricul-
ture, ié

Agriculture is, of course,
primarily a business, but it is also
a mode of life. In the hurly-burly
of present day existence and the
quickening of the tempo of life.
let us admit that much of the
mode of life element has been,
or, is in danger of being, lost,
unfortunately. The tendency to
specialized crop production has

momentum and much of

fun of growing and eating
one’s own productions and 2
simple pleasures of home life
which accompany such activities
are giving place to artificial dis-,
tractions which, in most cases,
are not only costly but ephemeral.
The effect soon passes off and we
are left with a result comparable
to, say, “I must have another
drink”. In other words, the habit
grows of seeking to spend all
leisure time away from home
which is then run, more *ften
than not, by remote control with
its concomitant evils. It will be
readily admitted that the new
outlook has brought; in well
organised rural enterprise, higher
standards of living and all that
these imply but, unless com-
munity and family life in general
is properly channelled to meet the

changed circumstances, we shall
lose permanently and beyond
recall the character building

effect that the old fashioned mode
ef life factor in farming and
related activities of self-help
generated.

Here in Barbados, there have
been many changes as one sees
going around the country side;
the ancient has given way very
markedly to the modern, Wind
mills and small plants in the
sugar industry have given place
to centralized factories, small land
units absorbed into larger—all
making for greater efficiency and
productivity. In fact, the creation

COOKERY

Few people realize what nutri-
tive value a sweet potato has. It
is rich in vitamins A and C, some
vitamin B and minerals. Very
few people dislike this vegetable
though it can, of course get.very
boring if just boiled



and buttered. The
other day I came
across a_ recipe for

sweet potatoes which
was indeed delicious.

Sweet Potato And
Orange.

Ingredients:

2 Sweet potatoes

1 large orange

1 tablespoonful

grated orange rind

1/3 cup orange juice

sugar

2 tablespoonsful fat

4 cup orange juice

Salt.

Peel, cook, and slice the pota-
toes, grate the rind of the large
orange then peel the orange and
slice it.

Place in a greased fireproof dish,
a layer of sweet potato, a layer
of orange slices. Sprinkle with
orange rind, salt and sugar, and
dot with fat.

Repeat in this way until all the
ingredients are used, then pour
the orange juice over the top, It





UU EESEIEEESREENEEEREneeneeeeee eee



a



guished Agriculturalist, writ-
ing under the pen-name
Agricola, brings you,—the
man and woman on the land,
the information you need to

get the best results from
your farm and gatden).

of wealth from the land appears
to be going on at a fair pace, and
this is shared too, in a manner
compatible with size of enterprise
and effort, by numerous small
cultivators who have profited by
following the lead of the larger

interests and the guidance given }if

by the Department of Agricul-
ture. Thus, there have been sub-
stantial gains but also some
losses. All change does this and
agriculture is no different in this
respect. The humanistic and
mode of life factor has heme the
principal loser: contacts ween
r and the individual
ee are not so close in the
r set-up; the skills and
jerafts associated with small units
have almost disappeared — the
blacksmith, carpenter, wheel-
wright, millwright, plumber, sad-
diet and harneéss-maker, sail-
make, cooper and so on. True, a num-
ber of these has been absorbed in the
latge foundries and workshops of
Bridgetown, but the fact remains that
the change recalls the lament of Gold-
smith in “The Deserted Village”. No
one would sug#est a return to the old
conditions; indeed, life itself is nothing
without change, What is required is
that the disabilities which result from
change should be faced and tackled in
such a way that losses are turned to
gain in the long run and that any upset
in the economic lance be kept within
reasonable limits. s calls for realism,
courage, includi some risk taking,
clear thinking long range planning
if the needs of an increasing population
are to be fairly met

We have spoken of certain economic
changes in the countryside, but the s-
cts of the island remain, funda-
mentally, the same. True, the aesthetic
has suffered to some extent by the dis-
appearance of working wind mills,
whose decapitated walls are a poor sub-
stitute. (We may return to this another
time), Generally speaking, however, the
term “beautiful Barbados" is as real as
ever. The landscapes, the vistat of hill
and dale stretching as far as the eye
can Carry to the sea, the well laid out
and cultivated fields, f the
air passi over meadows and freshly
cut rane “helde, crop, stock and other
activities, the breezes and the sunshine,
the radiant health of smiling faces—
all these must strike the visitor as
natural blessings for Which there should
be much thankfulness to the great Archi-
tect of the universe, Let us keep in
mind also that these assets spring direct-
ly or indirectly from the good earth and,
in our next note, we shall speak of the
soil, = dee

CORNER

is essential that you should cover
your dish, Bake in a moderately
hot oven for 45 minutes to one

hour.
This dish is very nice served

" Coconut kisses was
orice described to me
as, “A toothsome pass-
it-round titbit.” hy
not try it and see if
‘ou agree?
tnate jients:
Grated meat of two
coconuts
14~-lb, sugar
1 teaspoonful orange
flour water
4 egg yolks
2 tablespoonsful
flour
Mix the
sugar, and orange flour water and
bring it to the boil, take it off the
fire and add the flour and beat
vigorously for half an hour. Place
in a greased patty-pan and bake
in a moderate oven for twenty
minutes,
Remove them and springle
powdered sugar,

x



coconut,

with





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The refrigerating unit of the G.E.C,
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This refrigerator will stand wu)
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20 Solid chromium-plated
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+

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THE CITY GARAGE

REPRESENTING THE GENERAL

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

TRADING CO. LTD.





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PAGE THREE



RUPTURE
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inflatable sir-

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hernia “with
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cushion, Suh”
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it full details and Free Booklet
write to

BEASLEY'S LTO, Dept. 190

4 Cork Street, London, W.1, England.



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the lovelies:

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Match your perfume to your mood or to what you

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make the subtle difference
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Goya’s lovely perfui

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= . for lilting Goya fram es lend enchantment to
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Made in England by Gilt size at £2.8.1.

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Distributors: L. M. B, Meyers & Co, Ltd., P.O. Box 171, Bridgetown



For the Cool
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that ENO has a

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e and is a perfect cor-
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THE MODERN Sod tn bttee for lasting freshness

Dress Shoppe

BROAD STREET

Eno’s ‘Fruit Salt’

Ths words " Eno” and “ Pruit Sais" are registered wade marke,

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Wise is the sufferer from headache or nerve pain
who keeps a supply of Phensic! In a matter of
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Sool as the pein coats ~ a fit eee! cheerful,
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FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,
NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, ’FLU, COLDS & CHILLS


PAGE FOUR

JOHN GODDARD FINDS
TALENT

BY O. S. COPPIN....,
\ HE news this week that the West Indies Cricket
\ * Board of. Control, acting upon the recommen-

f : dation of John Goddard, West Indies Captain, have

sponsored a visit to Barbados By C. O’B, Crick,

. former Barbados pace bowler and six-foot-three

e - Mason of St. Vincent, has met with complete

V Soe approval in local cricket circles.

Se rs It is planned that these candidates will take part
in a Trial Game @rranged for them at the end of the second Trini-
dad-Barbados ‘Test, and naturally if they establish any reasonable
claims for inclusion in the WJ. 1951 tour to Australia more use will
have to be made of them. 2

GOLF CAPTAIN TALKS i

OLONEL VIDMER, Captain of the Rockley Golf Club, which tour-

ed Trinidad recently; "has Bow returned and this is what he
has to say about the tour, ’

An overwhelming success, in spite of an overwhelming defeat,
was scored by the Barbados golf team which returned from its
matches with St. Andrew's in Trinidad last week. The men’s team
was beateh badly, but what seems to have been overlooked is the
fact that the ladies’ team won from the Trinidad contingent by four
matches to two, and congratulations for the Misses Isabel and Katy
Lenagan, Mrs. Brenda Wilson and Mrs. Elizabeth Vidmer, our ladies
representatives, seemed belatedly to be in_ order.

THE LADIES WIN:

OWEVER, it was not the ladies’ victory that made the trip an

overwhelming success, but the generosity, consideration and all
around hospitality of the St. Andrew’s hosts, ‘om the moment that
the Barbados contingent arrived at Piareo Airport until the last lin-
gering member of the team departed for home after the Carnival,
the St. Andrew’s members went all out to provide the visitors with
every pleasure and comfort they could command.

Another element which made the trip a pronounced success was
the co-operation and cohesion of the Barbados players themselves.
T'ney worked and played together, celebrating each other’s triumphs,
few as they were, and sympathizing with each other's defeats. In
spite of the daily setbacks laughter and gaiety dominated the atmos-
phere wherever the Rockley golfers gathered. :

Without attempting any excuses for the failure of the men’s team
io win, a few factors which prevented them from making a better
showing should be taken into consideration, First of these was the
loss of J. R. Rodger on the eve of the tearm’s departure. Rodger was
one of the three top players who were to lead the team, but a crushed
toe eliminated him from the group at the eleventh hour.

Knowing the ability of such Trinidad players as Bob Hill, Murray
Wilson and John Sellier, it was not expected that the Barbados
leaders would win more than one of the first three matches in any
day. However, it felt that Rockley’s strength thereafter would more
than compensate along the line, However, with the loss of Rodger
it meant that the last eight men had to move up one position and
the burden was a heavy one to impose.

Ian Christie and Dick Vidmer, playing at No. 1 and No. 2, took
the shock of Hill and Wilson in turn, but instead of Rodger, the
current holder of the Barbados open championship, to help with the
first wave, Michael Timpson and Will Atkinson had to be thrown into
the line-up where the going was toughest. And each player there~
efter was playing one better than had been anticipated.

It should be mentioned here that both Timpson and Atkinson
shouldered their heavier responsibilities splendidly, and when paired
in the four—bal] matches carried off the maximum three points, while
¢heir defeats in the singles were by the narrowest of margins in spite
of the fact that they were playing higher than anticipated. In fact,
almost all the defeats suffered by the Barbados players were by such
scores as 3 and 2 or 4 and 3, which is not entirely loy#ded.

NO EXCUSES ¢

NOTHER factor which was against the Barbados players, natur-

ally, was their unfamiliarity with the course. This is always an
element which favours the home team in golf matches, but in this
particular case it was enhanced by the bad weather which lasted
through the week, St. Andrews, unlike Rockley, is very hilly and
in the wet weather the ball stopped where it landed, with practically
no roll whatever, On many courses this would prove as much of a
hardship to one side as the other, but at St. Andrew’s, it often left
the player with a blind shot to the green. The St. Andrew’s players,
naturally, were thoroughly familiar with the location of the greens
and played with assurance; the Rockley players had to walk forward
and look, ahd then played uncertainly.

FAMILIARITY

RAM ARTY with the.course was a pronounced factor on nine of
the eighteen holes "OnNo. 1 a drive straight for the green leaves
a blind second shot and the ball has to be placed well to the right of
the fairway. On No, 3 the second shot also is a blind one, On No. 5
only experience convinces the player how far he can hit a drive
toward the Jeft--the shortest way home on a dog-leg—and still carry
to the top of the hill, The tee shot on No. 8 is a blind one, and No. 9,
like No. 1, must be played well to the right of the fairway in order

to see the green, g

The second shot on No, 10 is blind in wet weather with no roll,
and a good drive too far to the right, again the shortest way home,
Jeaves a blind second shot at No. 11, The tee shot at No. 15 is a blind
one and both No, 16 and No. 18 will produce bling second shots in
wet weather unless the ball is exceptionally long,

FAS\CINATED

ERHAPS because of these factors, possibly in spite of them, the

Barbados players were fascinated with the St. Andréws layout,
where the fairways, and especially the greens are far superior to
those at Rockley, However, they were factors which worked against
a better showing by the Barbados players but were not effective
against the Trinidadians who know the course backwards, forwards
and upside down.

The general opinion of the players on their return was that St.
Andrews had a stronger team of golfers, generally speaking; that the
weather, unfamiliarity with the course and the loss of Rodger made
the Rockley team appear weaker than it was; that the difference in
the strength of the two teams was not so great that the Barbados team
would not win in Barbados, where the St, Andrew's golfers would be
on strange fairways and greens, but that the margin of victory would
a be so great as the St. Andrew’s players scored on their own lay-
out, ”

TABLE TENNIS
] N THE first match played on Monday between Barna vs. Y.M.P.C.,

Barna had an-easy victory..Of the 9 games played Barna won
i. Both Greenidge and Stoute won 3 each and Howard one. For
Y.M.P.C., Smith and Hinds won their two games.

Stoute and Greenidge played good tennis throughout, while
Gooding seem to have lost some of his form, Howard shows promise
and should go far this year. “With some more practice Y.M.P.C.
will give a much better performance on Wednesday against Pelican.

FOUR PLAY
A BBEY MARINES defeated Y.M.C.A., five games to four on

Wednesday night, The standard’of play was poor and only three
players showed form in spells. Bynoe, Mayers and Corbin were all
brilliant in spells but not consistent. The outstanding match of the
night was Bynoe vs Cerbin, only in this match was a high standard
of play reached,4 after a very shaky start eame through to win
in fine style, Corbin from his play in all matches seems to be trying
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“RANGER” SCORES .. Arsenal Out.
FIRST VICTORY IN‘B’ Of F.A. Cup

Vidmer Tells Of Trinidad Golf Tour - By Our Yachting Correspondent

STANLEY CHEESEMAN’S Ranger scored her fir

victory since being promoted to the “B” Class this season.
Ranger, which was given three minutes by Fantasy, sailed
steadily and kept the lead throughout.

Forty boats sailed in the Fourth
Regatta of the R.B.Y.C. which
was held yesterday. The wind was
light to medium and the sea
smooth, Of the Tornadoes Teddy

Hoad’s Vamovuse ended with he
best average while Cyclone was
next. :

Ten boats started in.the B Class,
Ranger who had given Wizard
two minutes, quickly overtook her
and was leading at the end of the
lap. Wizard was -second with
Fantasy a few seconds behind.
War Cloud gave Rascal a minute
but was leading at*the end of this
lap. Gipsy, who also sailed very
well, gave Okapi four minutes and
overtook her.

After completing the first tap
in 37 minutes, 53;seconds, Ranger
finished the second lap in 39 min-
utes, 39 seconds, Fantasy came
around second ang Flirt, who
overtook Wizard, was third. Rascal
went back ahead of Wer Cloud
while Gipsy was still leading
Okapi. Moyra Blair, who had
given Okapi four: minutes, was
right behind her. At the end of
this round Wizzrd dropped out.

Fantasy made a brave attempt
but could not overtake Ranger in
the last round. She finished over
a minute ahead of Fantasy while
Fit came in third just barely
beating Gipsy.

Gennet First In “C”

Peter Ince brought in his Sea-
gull Gannet first in the C and Cen-
tre-board Class after giving six
minutes to Peggy Nan and Mag-
win, seven minutes to Scamp and
Missbehave and eight minutes to
Folly. :

Gannet sailed really good. At
the end of the first round Folly,
who started first, was still in the
lead, Scamp was second while ihe

Tornado Vamoose was third. Cy- g¢,

clone, who was sailing very’ well,
was still in the heat of the race.
Gannet’s time for the first round

was 38 minutes, eight seconds and)
while Felly had lost over four
minutes to her. She completed the”
last round in 40 minutes, 50 see-
onds. Folly’s time
round was 44 minutes, 54 seconds,

Competition

LONDON, Feb. 10.

ea Arsenal, holders of the trophy

eliminated from the F.A.

ip competition to-day, when a
st-half goal from Manchester
ited, at Manchester was suf-
ient to put them out. With Chel-
and Fulham concerned in the
ly draw among the eight fifth-
und ties, London are assured of

for the last One place im the quarter—finais.

Six of today’s ties were won by

Third in this class was Scamp, home teams, the. only away vic-

32 seconds behind Felly. Colin
Bellamy’s Magwin was third,
Intermediate

rs being Newcastle United three

times winners of the trophy who
Class honours beat Stoke in the highest scoring

went to Reen. Nine boats started game of the round, four goals to

in this Class and Reen gave Dawn two.
and Dauntless three minutes. At also

Wolverhampton Wanderers
hree times’ winners, sur-

the end of the first lap Dawn was Vived at the expense of Hudders-

leading with Dauntless 18 seconds
behind.

Reen completed the final lap in Rovers,

ld but the outstanding perform-
ce was probably that of Bristol
a Third Division team,

43 minutes, 58 seconds with Dawn who easily knocked out the Sec-

following in
Dauntless was
fourth,

second position.
third and Gnat

The D Class race went to Sinbad ed)

ond Division Hull, three to nil.

*Six of the surviving teams
(whoever wins the replays includ-
are from. division one, the

who completed the first round in} gthers being Bristol Rovers and

46 minutes, 49 seconds and
in 48 minutes, two

the last Second Division Birmingham City,
seconds. ho knocked out the other Bristo?
gave Olive Blossom, the second)

am—City—two nil at’ Birming~

boat, two minutes, and Buceaneer ham, To-day’s draw for the quar-

and Van Therndyke eight minutes
Van Thorndyke Second

Van Thorndyke sailed away
from Buecanece and was second at
the end of the first lap. Olive
Blossom, which gave two minutes.
to Rainbow and six minutes te
Buceaneer and Van Thorndyke
was third.

Olive Blossom soon after passed
out Van Therndyke and ended
second, Her first round was com-
pleted in 47 minutes, 33 seconds
and the last in 50 minutes, three
seconds. Van Thorndyke was third
and Bueccanec> fourth,

The Fifth Regatta will be sailed
on March 17, This long delay has
been caused through the Inter-
colonial Cricket and Horse Racing.

Results were as follows:

“B" Class: 1. Ranger; 2. Fantasying
Flirt; 4. Gipsy. :
“C'G@



. Gannet; 2. Folly{ 3

Intermediate : 1,
Dauntless; 4. Gnat,

"Class: 1. Sinbad; 2. Olive Blos-

sem; 8, Van Thorndyke; 4, Buccanger:,”
?



Commonwealth Lead.

India By

311 Runs

KANPUR, Feb. 10.

The Commonwealth cricket touring team were 311 runs
ahead with six second innings wickets standing at the end
of the third day of the fifth unofficial Test match against

India here to-day..

Hassett Hits
173 Not Out
AOE EE easily i 4
Against M.C.C.
MELBOURNE, Feb. 10,
Ausivalian Test captain Lind-
Say Hassett scored a century here
to-day against the M.C.C. and
helped to take Victoria’s total! to

307 for 6 wickets by the close of
play on the first day,



Victoria lost a wicket with only
4 runs scored but Hassett came in
and pulled the game round with
fir undefeated innings of 173. He

was at the crease just under 5
hours,

_Hassett. was the mainstay of
Victoria’s batting side. The high-

est score apart from his was H.
Turner who made 33, It was
Hassett’s first century of the seas-
on against the touring side.

VICTORIA Ist INNINGS
Mouleman ¢ Hutton b Statham
MeDonald b Hollies ‘
Harvey b Bailey
Loxton b Hollies .......,...
Turner ¢ Compton b Close
Hassett not out .

Jan Johnson ¢ Close b Hollies
Ring not out
Extras (4 byes, 3 legs

ee —
a28af.RBS8

Total (for 6 wkts,) 206

India who were 143 for four
overnight, were all out soon after
lunch for 240 in reply to the Com-
monwealth’s first innings of 413.
By the close the Commonwealth
had seored 188 for four wickets in
their second innings.

*

Reen; 2.»Dawn; — ’
a

ter finals is therefore awaited
th keen anticipation by all foot-
all fans to see how these lone
Second and third division survi-
vors fare against the giants,

The League programme was
naturally curtailed in view of the
cup ties. Most of the leading teams
if not in the cup being without
league games. An exception was
Blackburn Rovers whose comfort-
able win sent them to second
place in Division two with none
of the four teams previously above
them in action.

Forest, the Southern leaders of
Division three. lost,” but their
nearest rivals had Cup engage-
ments and so the position remains
unchanged as it does in the north-
ern section where the top two
teams won,

—Reuter.





Football Results

LONDON, Feb. 10.
The results of games Plaed to-day
fellow: —

F. A. CUP FIFTH ROUND
Brimingham City 2, Bristol City 0.
Blackpool 2, Mansfield 2.

Bristol Rovers 3, Hull City 0.
Chelsea 1, Fulham 1.
Manchester United 1, Arsenal 0.
Stoke City 2, Newcastle United 4,
Sunderland 3, Norwich City 1.
Wolverhampton Wanderers 2, Hudders-
field Town 0,

FIRST DIVISION
Bolton Wanderers 1, Burnley 1,
Liverpool 2, Portsmouth 1

SRCOND DIVISION
Blackburn Rovers 2, Leeds United 1.
Brentford 4, Bury 0.
SCOTTISH LEAGUE DIVISION A.
East Fife 2, Falkirk 1,

THIRD DIVISION
Southern Bournemouth 3. Nottingham

Forest 2.

Exeter City 0, Port Vale 3,
Gillingham 2, Torquay United 0
Ipswich Town 3, Brighton and Hove 0.
Leyton Orient 2, Crystal Palace 0,

. " ‘ Millwall 1, Swindon Town 0,
Five minutes from the el: Plymouth Argyle 1, Newport County 1.

tourists were 135 for the loss
two wickets, But then two bril-
liant catehes sent back Ikin for
63 and Fishlock without scoring.
Gaekwad, who claimed no vic-
tims in the first innings took the
wickets of Gimblett, Emmett and
Ikin to-day for 38 runs in 19
cvers of which 9 were maidens,
India soon lost Hazare, this
morning but Phadkar and Gopin-

ath who is playing in his first Test 2

defended stubbornly. Then Doo-
land, the Australian who plays in
the Lancashire League dashed
India’s hopes with his legbreaks.
In a spell of ten overs he took the
wickets of Gopinath, Phadkar and
Riumehant—the last two with suc-
cessive balls for 17 runs, He fin-
ished with the figures of four for
70, fi

The other India wickets were
taken by the two West Indian
players Ramadhin four for 90, and
Worrell two for 45,

Ikin and Gimblett started
brightly for the Commonwealth
and put on 79 before Gimblett
was caught. Emmett was soon out,

but Ikin continued to bat well and 0.

hit fives fours in his innings.



to change his half-volley game to a more orthodox style, this some-
what was a handicap on his part and he could not be at his best.
Mayers was erratic in his games, his defence was good, his attack weak.
His chief fault is his footwork as he is inclined to be lazy and not to

move around,

Bynoe showed quite good form in two matches but

flopped im his third against Alkins.
») Of the ‘other players little can be said. Alkins played a steady

ce (Griffith and Shields suffered from nerves and lack of practice.
her ene of these used their previous experience to any advantage

and played very poor tennis.

‘ Southend 3,
Town 0.
Walsall 3, Aldershot 1.
Watford 2, Colchester United 0,
THIRD DIVISION NORTHERN
Barrow 1, Carlisle United 2,
Bradford City 0, Chester 1.
Crewe Alexandra 0, Linecoin City 4.
Gateshead 5, Darlington 2.
Halifax Town 1, York City~3.
$ Hartlepools United 2, Stockport County

United Northampton

“New Brighton 0, Shrewsbury Town 9.
Rochdale 0, Oldham Athletic 1,
Rotherham United 6; Accrington Stanley

Seunthorpe United 1, Tranmere Rovers
1

Wrexham 3, Bradford 1.
SCOTTISH CUP SECOND ROUND
Aberdeen 4, Third Lanark 0.
Albion Rovers 0, Clyde 2
Morton 3, Airdrieonians 3.
Motherwell 4, Hamiiton Academicals 1.
Queen's Park 1, Ayr United 3.
Raith Rovers 5, Brechin City 2,
Rangers 2, Hibernian 3.
Saint Johnstone 1, Dundee 3.
SCOTTISH LEAGUE DIVISION B.
Dumbarton 0, Queer of the South J.
Dunfermline Athletic 5, Arbrowth 1.
Forfar Athletic 2, Alloa Athletic 4.
Kilmarnock 4, Cowdenbeath 0. Stirling
Albion 3, Dundee United 1
Doncaster Rovers 3, Barnsley 2. Gtimsby
Town 3, Chester 1. Luton Town 1, Aston
Villa 2.
Notts County 0, Everton 3.
Reading 2, Leicester City 2.
Sheffield Wednesday 2, Sheffield United
Southampton 1, Middlesbrough 1
West Ham United 1, Chariton Athletic
5.—Reuter.

———

COMMONWEALTH ist Innings . 413
INDIA_ Ist Innings .... ». 240
COMMONWEALTH 2nd INNINGS
Gimblett c Rajendra Nath b
MT CR Pea Gee
Ikin c Umrigar b Gaekwad ...





63

Emmett ¢ Mankad b Gaekwa 12
Worrell not out + 12
Fishlock ¢ Gopinath b 0
BOOB. finch gee 4
Total (for 4 wkts.) ........ 138



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Regime:
egument
Defeats
Ship’s Team
ips eam
The Regiment won their one
day cricket match against a team
from the H.M.S. Devonshire by
44 runs yesterday at the Garrison,
Play started at 1.30 °p.m., the
Regiment batting first on a good

wicket after winning the toss. The
Regiment were dismissed for 138

runs, this amount of runs partly «

collected through a good wicket
partnership by J. Bynoe, retired
44 and A. Phillips 48.

Both of these batsmen who
opened the first innings for Regi-
ment, started out to play soundly
and punished the Devonshire pace
bowlers when they bowled short.

The most troublesome bowler
of the Deyenshire team proved to
be R. Sanderson, a medium pace
bowler, who took three of the
Regiment. wickets for the loss of
51 runs. M. Matterson, another’
medium pace bowler, bowled well
to take two wickets for five runs.

In their turn at the wicket the
Devonshire team was_ dismissed
for 94 runs, their collapse due
mainly to the steady bowling of
A. Phillips, 2 for_16, R. Parris
2 for 21 and C. Price 2 for 10.
V. Conach and FR. Stanhope each
scored 16, while R. Matterson got
15 runs before he was given out
teg before.

Barnia Beat YMPC.
At Table Tennis

Three Inter-Club Table Tennis
matches were played last week.
On Monday Barna met Y.M.P.C
and defeated the Beckles Road
team by a wide margin.

It was simply a walk over for
Barna. Out of the nine games
played they won seven, Louis
Stoute and Campbell Greenidge
winning three each. The other
game went to Howard. The two
games for Y.M.P.C. were wor
by Smith and Hinds.

Both Greenidge and Stoute play-
ed excellent tennis while Good-
ing was out of form. Howard
shows promise and should go far
this year.

The match on Wednesday night
was between Abbey Marines and
Y.M.C.A. Both teams gave a poor
display but Mayers, Corbin and
Bynoe were good at various
periods, Abbey Marines won by
the odd game in nine—Corbin and
Mayers scoring two each and
Alkins one. For Y.M.C.A.
Bynoe scored two, Griffith and
Shields one each,

The outstanding set of the night
was between Corbin and Bynoe.
Bynoe, after a very shaky start,
came through to win in fine style.
Mayers made many errors and
his attack was weak. On the
other hand his defence was quite
good, He was also very slow in
getting around the table.

The final match of the week
was between Everton and Peli-
can. Honours went to Everton
who Won five—four, Blair Mur-
ray was the most outstanding
Everton player. He won three
sets, Malcolm Murray won two
and Norman Gill one.

For Pelican, Worrell won two
while Willoughby and Phillips
won one each,

The matches this week are as
follows:—



Monday; Barna vs. Abbey
Marines.
Wednesday: ¥.M.PC.: ‘ve.
Pelican.

Friday: Y.M.C.A. vs. Everton,
Trinidad Players
Expected Monday

THE thirteen members of the
Trinidad Cricket Team with their





Manager Mr. Harold Burnett,
ex-Intercolonial player, will be
arriving at Seawell tomorrow

morning at 11,00 o’clock and will
be met by a Reception Committee
from the Board of Management
of the Barbados Cricket Associa-
tion,

It is expected that the Trinidad
players will loosen up at Ken-
sington later in the afternoon
about 2.00 o’clock.

They will be staying at Abbe-
ville Guest House.

GOLFERS RETURN

The remaining members of the
Barbados Golf team, which recent-
ly toured Trinidad, returned yes-
terday by B.W.I.A.

They were Mr. John Grace, Miss
Katy Lenegan and Mrs, Isabelle
Lenegan.

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“SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1951

HARD OR SOFT GOING?
Whichever It Is, The March Meeting

Will Be Good
BY BOOKIE

HE March meeting is now just under three

weeks off, the, entries close on Thursday next

- and“yet we are still very much in the dark about
potential form. The track was opened for the first

ume yesterday morning, outside the barrels, but

in most cases gallops were restricted to quick be-

ginnings and slow finishes. After the first set of

gallops we are therefore no nearer to picking fav-

ourites than a month ago.

The condition of the track has received a mixed reception, Some
say it is covered with a layer of megass which is too thick, others that
it is just right. It will be interesting to see what it turns out like in
the final analysis but it is quite obvious that it will favour those who
1 the soft going better. Quite a number of them looked very tired
yesterday when they pulled up. A few others worked on the outside

the megass and it was noticeable the way their hoof beats rang out
in contrast to the swish of the grass which is all that could be heard
when they were working on the soft cover.

Nevertheless I should imagine that one good point about the soft.
going will be less breakdowns and therefore a fuller entry. I am
told that about seventy are expected to race but this number sounds
very :>flated to me. JI do not propose to go through the list here as
this would be too lengthy to fit Inte one column, However, I do agree
that we should see over sixty.

LOT of interest is centred around the very first race on the pro-

gramme. This is the Maiden Stakes for which a number of new-
comers are in paration. We will have Doldrum, Lunways, High
and Low and Court O’Law who will be making their debut to racing
in the West Indies. There will then be such as Arunda, Miss Panic,
No-to-Nite and Kitchen Front who were seen only briefly last Novem-
ber but are yet to produce anything like their best form. That gives us
a choice of eight before we throw in Ability and Fair Sally and for
the other C class races there will still be such as Harroween, Tiberian
Lady and Flieuxce. If on top of that we also get Carefull Annie from
Trinidad, where, I would like to know, are we going to start them?
To make for more congestion a few from D class like Bow Bells and
Watercress may be sent in a C class event. We therefore face the
possibility of having sixteen in one event. I sincerely hope not.
ee of D class it is likely that we will see some good racing

in this division as well. Thank goodness our classifiers have not
followed thejr Trinidad counterparts in this respect and we will be
able to see Bow Bells, Watercress, Cross Roads, and Best Wishes have
the opportunity to prove themselves before they are pushed into a
crowded field of importeds among which may well be lurking some
would-be Salamanca or Tom Peason, It will also make our D class
racing have some class about it instead of the usual bunch of second
raters which it is customary to see at Trinidad meetings now-a-days
in this section.

N FACT, I look forward to this racing to provide us with what we

missed at the Christmas meeting after the Derby had been run,
although, naturally the horses are now all four-year-olds, But it is
not long after and none of them could have made any particular pro-
gress except to regain their true form. In this connection the rivalry
between Bow Bells and Watercress will be the most important while
if the filly with the big knees can stand up to it we will also see what
part she might have played in the last classic. The latter is none
other than Mary Ann, who in spite of two blisters and hard going
continues to take her morning’s work. I have seldom seen the likes
of it,

ITH respect to the Guineas the form of the classic candidates is

perhaps more obscure than in any other group in training for
the meeting. At present Cross Roads stands out as the horse to be
beaten and although his general appearance is not very pleasing to the
eye, (he is decidedly dry-coated) I cannot say that I am other than
impressed with the way he has been going with his half-brother
Atomic II, I also like how Vanguard and Usher are shaping up but
they were so far behind Cross Roads only last November that it is
difficult to say exactly how much leeway they have made up. Mean-
while nothing is known of Best Wishes, who only arrived from St.
Vincent yesterday, except that she is a very good filly. But 7% fur-
longs is not a simple affair for a three-year-old at the beginning of
March and if her stamina is no better than it was when she won her
first race in Trinidad her opponents will have a good chance against
her.

If we are to judge from past experience then let us look back at
three-year-olds who have raced over 7% furlongs in March, I cannot
remember all of them but we saw five or six last year and also two
or three years before that. Two performances which stick in the
memory most are those of The Gambler and Watercress. Both of
these we might say were eventually better at middle distances than
sprints. Yet even for them 7% furlongs proved to be a good test.
Although they both won I cannot remember that they looked very
comfortable at the finish. Perhaps Watercress more so than The
Gambler, but this I put down to a longer and more carefully thought
out preparation. The latter, after all, was not prepared for a special
classic, but only for a 5%furlong sprint and then sent in a 7% furlong
race on the second day of the meeting. ‘

Yet, without seeming to contradict my argument that our Guineas
should be shifted to August, I must admit that the case of Watercress
is a strong one in favour of making our classic races longer towards
the end of the year. Here was a small filly who was never a good
feeder and inclined to go overboard at the slightest amount of over
exertion. Yet given the proper grade of work she could manage nine
furlongs by August as comfortably as any imported and by the end
of the year 9% furlongs was like child’s play. .

Â¥ Feeay admit that as a rule small horses come to hand quicker
than the big ones, and that is precisely why to even up matters I advo-
cate a classic at the November meeting. The owners of the precocious
type would be able to have their fling in March and still have the
edge on the backward type in August. Meanwhile, the owners of the
backward type would be able to have some sort of chance, however
slight, in August and come into their own on equal terms in November.
By the time the Trinidad Derby arrived everybody would have had the
necessary experience to race like seasoned campaigners over 9% or 10
furlongs. I feel confident that under such circumstances we would
have nothing to fear from Jamaica.

ND speaking of Jamaica I come to a very serious matter, I have

just received my copy of the Bloodstock Breeders’ Review Vol.
XXXVIII, 1949. The book, as usual, is a valuable addition to any
Racing Library in spite of its material being a bit behind hand. I have
no fault to find in this.

But what I must not let pass is an article in the “Review” in which
there is another attempt by some writer in Jamaica to decry horses
bred in the South Caribbean. Repeatedly in the past I have noticed
that whenever they get the opportunity to air their views internation-
ally, Jamaican writers like to stress the superior quality of their blood-
stock over that of the rest of the British Caribbean. We admit that
their average of good ones is higher.

But when, without bothering to check the circumstances, a Jamai-
can writer states: “.. . an indication of the class of the 1949 two-year-
eids (in Jamaica) is that Fair Profit, who would not rank among our
first eight, went to Trinidad and won their biggest two-year-old
event”; he must be told that this victory was also the biggest fluke in
the history of the biggest event.

Blue Streak, a Jamaican Derby winner, was roundly beaten in
this island by the Barbados creole Gun Site, Yet nobody suggested
thet this was an indication that racing here was on a higher level
than in Jmaica. There were extenuating circumstances for Blue
Streak. So too were there extenuating circumstances for the good
horses which Fair Profit defeated in the Breeders’ Stakes, As for
Fair Profit himself, he has not won a race since.

.

WZ

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NDAY, FEBRUARY 1

1, 1951



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





CARNIVAL IN BARBADOS



:
BAND OF HUNGARIAN DANCERS which took First Prize for the Best Band.

@eling in front and dressed as Sir Walter Raleigh
for the Prettiest Costume at the Ursuline Convent Annual Fancy Dress Party.





INIDAD
ARNIVAL

® Our Own Correspondent)
$

_ PORT-OF-SPAIN.
Sparkle and brilliance that
flown the curtain of this
a. is something that
ine back through the
y of the years. A new tone
% for masquerading that
& out originality and
tof vision in the revellers.
lly. this is something
t will take some time to
fistomed to, but the inno-
-were pleasing in several
§. Sailor bands are no
Sailors as such and in some
“was hard to tell where the
‘ended and part of some
lisguise not in any special
Gent of the Carnival

year for one thing they
hemselves famous for their
te heads that ranged in
on from over-sized cam-
a giant octopus; and one
lar band did not represent
at all, but must have been
ing belonging to the
of divers to judge from
idgear.

tong feature this year was
tge number of “Indians”
terally took charge of the
vn Carnival almost as if
ad been a conspiracy among
© emphasise this form of
3. The headgear was so
ive and elaborate that
af them standing side by

a one of the wide City
} would find there was
}room for them, The
@ Indians* who came out

first day were there again
second day.

“Hosea” Band, about 100
had its moon dancer lead-
@ big following to hot
stones and the entourage
d taj-bearers, pundits and
With orhnis and_lotahs,
fe was no “big belly Ram-
w® the Indian girl of the
hditty “grinding massala.”

wt Cumana Gestapos” a
of sailors in jet black,
@ up Henry Street and into
itreet to a slow tune and
ossed on Frederick Street
peppery-going “Mexican
Sellers.” These girls, in
inbreros and a smart cos-
wf green and purple, each
}a plush carpet across the
& as they jigged their way

ts, cat calls, whistles,
» jumping and an atmos-
f gaiety and levity pre-
Every one tried to outdo
hbour in merry-making
antics.
ts and visitors from the
ring islands enjoyed
es thoroughly—many 0:
ing part in the events of

Meraders and onlookers
owed they could enjoy
ién from work and worry
m a longer period The
fie with regret to thousands
part in the last “jump up.
or the Road Mareh, that
utable. Suffice it to say
ia might pick your choice
“Tiny, Tiny, blow your
t for me,” “Loomat say ¢
iysie,” “I have a lovely
of coconuts” and a number

te for which Trinidadians
cipally, ended with regret

%

Te

THE

is Little Wendy Mackay,



who carried off. the

“BARRACUDA” and “The Lady from Martinique” came late for the
competition at the Children’s Goodwill League,





THE Guide Rally at Pax Hill
on Thursday 8th February, 1951
in honour of the Chiet Guide, was
the biggest ever held in Barbados,
There were 11 Commissioners, 1
Secretary, 76 Guiders, 16 Colour
Party, 52 Rangers, 471 Guides, 170
Brownies and 153 Recruits, mak~
ing a total of 950. It was amazing
to see how the Brownie Branch
has grown and is expanding,

The Chief Guide, accompanied
by Lady Savage, the President
of the Girl Guides’ Association
and Miss Bridget Ramsden, ar~
rived at 4.30 p.m. The Colour
Party was drawn up at the en-
trance of Pay Hill with the Island
Colour having an escort of 2
Rangers. The Brownies and re-
cruits were on the path leading to
the building and the Chief Guide
inspected them, shaking hands
with each one of them, Among

for participants and spectators
alike. Colourful costumes have
been put away now. Many of

them will be used next Carnival.
Spectators, will for quite a while,
have the din of the steel bands
particularly vibrating in_ their
ears, and the echoes of calypsoes
resounding joyously. Parents will
have difficulty in restraining
children from singing the catchy
tunes of the season, adults would
hardly be able to do so too
for 40 days now that the jumping
and the shouting have.ceased, anc.
the “warriors and kings” depart,
the sobering period of Lent is
ence more here again.

KEY TO

R. M.

JONES & CO. LID. ~

rere I RNINSLE sgeeatene—anystgientineep——nee ene

- Guide Rally A

t Pax Hill

the recruits was the new Guiae
Company now being started at
Queen’s College.

The Chief Guide then inspected
the Rangers and Guides in her
own inimitable way. After the
Inspection she talked to the chil-
dren who will never forget her
stirring words of encouragement.
As it was now 5.40 p.m, Capt.
Raison played God Save The
Rangers and Guides then marehed
past, the Chief Guide taking the
Salute. It was a wonderful sight
and one then realised how many
were on parade, After the Guides
had disappeared the Chief Guide
called on the Brownies to “run
past,” which they thoroughly en-
joyed.

It has been a wonderful thrill
to the Guides of Barbados that
they could at last welcome the
Chief Guide to their OWN Head-
quarters and Camp site, which
is named Pax Hill after her home
and our Founder’s in England.

PLAYED MASK WHILE
HOUSE WAS BURNING

(From Our Own Corre: naent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 7.
A house valued at about $2,500
and owned by Mr. B, Mahabir of
Barataria, was completely destroy-
ed by fire on Monday afternoon.
No. 1 unit of the Central Fire
Brigade under Inspector Phillip
was despatched to the scene, but
was, delayed by heavy traffic and
on arrival found the building
almost destroyed. The Mahabir
family was in the city attending
the Carnival celebrations,



x Na

By TONY VANTERPOOL

Nearly all West Indian islands
go Carnival crazy on the last two
days before Lent but in Barbados
these days are just “ordinary
working days”. A few Barbadians
however brought the Carnival at-
mosphere to the island at various
functions held during that period.

One of these functions was held
at the Ursuline Convent on Mon-
day and a large number of chil-
dren were gaily dressed up and
looked very attractive.

On Tuesday one of the
biggest local Carnival attractions
took place en the Riverside
Club held. their Carntval Ball at
the Children’s Goodwill League.
This is an ann event. J

Contestants in a variety
of costumes. chap who wore
the costume of a beggar paid the
penalty. He arrived at the ball
with his ants and shirt partly
torn but when ready to leave they
were nearly off. 5

Another chap preferred to dis-
guise as a Bathing Beauty. He
wore a flowing bath robe over his
bathing trunks and occasionally
the inquisitive girls could be seen
trying to lift the robe,

A man, ‘“Boysfe” Buteher, was
chosen Carnival Queen, Butcher,
an expert dressmaker and perhaps
the only dress designer in the
island, was also responsible for
making nearly all the prize win-

costumes.

is was a blue off-the-shoulder
dress. He wore black gloves and
carried a handbag to match. His
false hair was made of rope dyed,
pressed and then curled. He called
himself Rosie Malleen in the For-
est.

Other prizes were awarded to
the West Indian Cricket team.
Stanley Jackman who represented
“The Turkish Lady”, Clyde Phil-
lips “The nor”, Dalton Babb
“Phe Madonna”, Winston Hackett
“The Mexican", Dr. Winston
Wooding, “The Scavenger’ and
Nesta ne as “Jockey Holder.”

Conrad Petersen, who was
dressed as “Barracuda” (Tyrone
Power) in the motion picture
“Spanish Main” and his partner
Madame Drayton, dressed as the
“Lady from Martinique” looked
extremely attractive but unfortun-
ately arrived late for the compe-
tition,

The Judges were Mrs. G. H,
Adams, Mrs. D. H. L. Ward and
Mrs. Olga Symmonds, all of whom
are well acquainted with costumes.
They were assisted by Mr. John
Beckles, M.B.E.

At another Carnival Ball at the
Girls’ Industrial Union on the
same night another collection of
lovely costumes could be seen. A
ladies’ steel band led a parade
around the hall and this especially
amused the dancers.

“The Peanut Vendor”, a fat girl
wearing a weather beaten dress,
straw hat and a pair of “dry
weather” shoes was given first
prize, She carried a tray on her
head. Cedrie Phillips, represent-
ing “The Sheik of aby” was
awarded second prize. The third
prize went to the steel band.

Unlike Trinidad some of these
celebrations continued through
the wee hours of Ash Wednesday.
Some people were against this be-
cause they felt that all celebrating
should cease at mid-night on
Shrove Tuesday.



TEST AVERAGES

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,--The following Test aver-
ages of the England team in Aus.
tralia may be of interest to other
lovers of cricket, who are follow.

ing the present Test series in

Australia.
BATTING

No. of Ings, T.N.O, Total Runs H.S, Avg
L. Hutton - & 3 394 156" 78.80
F. R. Brown 7 0 204 9 20.14
D. S. Sheppard 2 0 50 41 25.00
R. Simpson 8 0 146 61 22.00
C, Washbrook 8 O 172 34 21,50
T. G. Evans 8 Lb 14% 49 20.42
W. G. A. Park-

house 4 0 7 28 19.25
T. Bailey 8+2 35 25 7.00
J. G, Dewes 4 0 23 9 5.75
A. V. Bedser 8 2 32 14° $33
D. S. Compton 6 0 31 23 5.16
D. V. Wright 6 1 22 4 4.50
W. J. Mcintyre 2 0 8 7 4.00
J, Warr 460 4 4 1.00;
B. Close 2 0 1 1 50

* Signifies not out
BOWLING

; 9. M. R. W. Avy,
Bailey $1.1 14 137 13 10.63
Bedser 131.2 25 377 20 18.85
Brown 82 7 209 12 25.75
Close 7 1 28 1 28.00
Tattersall 626 7 21 4° 42.25
Compton 1é 2 43 lL 43.00
Wright 89 3 304 8 49,25
Warr 73 6 261 1 281.00

The averages given above are
for the series up to and including
the Fourth Test just completed at
Adelaide.

It may be also of interest to
cricket lovers to learn that Eng-
land’s opening fast bowler, Trevor
Bailey, whose thumb was frac-
tured by a ball from Lindwall in
the Third Test at Sydney, is a
probable for the next State match
vs. Victoria at Melbourne, so
“Radio Australia” reported on, the
8th inst,

Yours truly,
CELT.

Wd

ESSO. STANDARD
OIL

Agents



“THE SHEIK OF
Second Prize at the Girls’ Industrial
Union.







From left to right:

ARABY”

GUILTY

NEW YORK.
A 34-year-old bookie, who drew
in 20 million dollars a year, sur-
prised « New York court recently
when he laid himself open to 65
years in prison.
making is illegal in New York, he
was on trial for taking bets, but
he suddenly dropped his innocence
plea and pleaded guilty.
be sentenced on February 19.



BOXING

at the
YANKEE STADIUM
Brittons Hill

@
Tuesday night, Feb. 13th

@
KID RALPH
(163 Ibs.)
vs.
KID FRANCIS
(162 Tbs.)

In return match for the
Light-Heavy weight
eee of
BARBADOS

10 Rounds

e
Semi-Final
SAM KING (130 Ibs.)
vs.

HAL WILLIAMS
(181 Ibs.)

8 Rounds

Preliminary
VICTOR LOVELL
(122 lbs.)
vs.
BELFIELD KID
(125 lbs.)







6 Rounds
Ring Side $2.00
Balcony $1.50
Cage $1.00
Arena $1.00
Bleachers .............. A8

Winner of the champion-

ship will receive a Belt

presented by

Da COSTA & CO., LTD.
aS

LUTHER FIELDS

Promoter



won



Because book-

He will





“The Mexican”, “Rosie Malleen”, “The Madonna” and “The Turkish Lady” all won
priges at the Goodwill League.



WEIGHT

LIFTING

Hy CALVIN ALLEYNE

Can our local weightlifting boys ciation and a few of them were

make it possible to send up a team
at — scarcely at the 1952 Olym-
Plad—but say the
meet? [T think they can. British
Guiana and Trinidad have had
a shot and why can we not. We
have the talent, tall big men, and
short stocky ones.

For years now weightlifting has
fitted in as a hobby to many of the
burlier set of Barbadians and I
remember a few years ago when
Bison our then local strong man
Who is now abroad, made a game
attempt at throwing Whiskers
Blake and Joe Gotch. Yes, but
he was more of a weightlifter than
a wrestler and did not get the
better of the bouts,

Scme of the weigntfters in the
game today, import their equip-
ment, but others make shift with
lead weights which they make
themselves. Sets of enthusiastic
young men pooled together and
in the course of time formed
clubs,

You will see them on the
beaches of an evening getting a
light work out of exercises. They
do the tougher work indoors “at
the clubs. Sometimes you even
get the weightlifters of say Shot
Hall beach going up to Bathsheba
to stage a contest with Bathshéba
weightlifters.

Formerly there was no well-
organised weightlifting associa-
tion. A few years ago Clement
Jackman, known in the game as
Bobby Goff, was adjudged to be
Mr, Barbados when such toughs
as the Warner brothers and Mr
Selomon, then a master at Com-
bermere School, were competing
= then the business has been
ow,

A few days ago I dropped in at
Queen's Park and saw some of
these knotty muscled chaps trying
to figure out some knotty ques-
tions, to wit, the how and what
about forming a Barbados Ama.
teur Weightlifting Association4

There are some eight clubs
which are joined to form this
association and doubtless others
will join up» When I got there
and sat around the table in the
Park House with them, they were
discussing the rules of the Asso.

a



subsequent which I

r

ustins area

contracting their facial museles
as though they were lifting irgns

took tO be a way of
expressing disapproval to some
of the rules,

But in the main they seem to
be pulling together and I do not
doubt but that they will soon 5
emerging with something tangi-
ble. They intend calling them-
selves the Barbados Amateur
Weightlifting Association.

The first Vice President is
Stanley Linton; an old chap in
the line. Second Vice President
is Reuben Jones, Kid Ralph’s
Trainer and the Honorary Sectre-
tary is Winfield Grannum, school.
teacher of St. Mary’s Boys’ School.
The Treasurer is Joubert Bullen
and there is a four-man committee,

When I spoke to Grannum, he
emphasised that the Association is
not connected with the Barbados
Amateur Athletic Association
but they hope to be affiliated to
the British Amateur Weightlifting
Association in time

The way he told me of the ais-
connection, gave me a vivid idea
of how these boys feel, They do
not want anyone to butt in on
‘hem and try to run the show
dietator like, although they would
not mind getting some help, *

So jumping ahead to two months
henee when the Association will
have been formed, I see them
staging competitions among them-
selves — sort of by way of back-
woods weeding to get a final pick

far public shows. They usually
practise hand balancing and
aymnastic pyramids and these

with good display of weightlifting
and perhaps a wrestling bout,
would be a pleasant novelty to, f
think, the major portion of Bar-
bados sporting public. And people
ado not mind paying for a good
entertainment.

Some of the money thus
acquired could go to the clubs to
help them buy good equipment
and get things going smoothly
ard the bulk to the Association.
Naturally the Association woyld
huve to be well managed and good

eceounts regularly given of the
funds.

So if the boys get things orggn-
ised quickly, they could stgge

at theatres too-

3

regular shows —

‘pul

FEB, 11

tosieeeeensegapriaasniegortiamageenes _———

PAGE FIVE

NO.. 158

The Topic
of

Last Week





It was Ash Wednesday morning
The day that begins Lent
When Lou that old-time devil

Wake up without a cent

And this caused all the trouble
She met a certain gal

Who invited her on Tuesday
To Barbados Carnival

Low felt that she could “breale-qut”
And nothing Joe would know

But Joe was there wo disguised
From his head right to his toe,

Lou swung inside Joe's corner
And as her dark-skin shined
You could see those damsels cheking
A delightful bedy-line.
; ; .
Lou cried out, I'm delightful
To join this happy crowd
When she heard somebody saying
“Shape up Boysie’—very loud

Joe turned and said my dear Lou
I'm here to-night don't fear

And as Joe unmasked, Lou shivered
Aud right then both start to stare.

Cam you guess what start the staring?
Well my friends ‘twas simply this
A sweet man dressed like a lady
Was mistaken for # Miss
+ . .

He waa chested as in ‘‘tru-form”
With contraptions extra-fine

And his cheeks were red like cherries
With » crowd of boys behind.

Joe cried out Lou come go home
Lou said, don't he a pest
I must stay and admire RBoysie
Why he made my wedding dress.
. : °

“Oh Joe!" Lou said—"don't grumble”
Don’t be rough to-night; be kind
Don't take me home so early
And leave all these bays behind.
* . .

Lou cried in desperation
Please Joe don't bully me

Look at all those other nice boyre-
They are happy; can you see?

And all the time Joe grumbled
Boys were saying, what a night! !
And Joe's face was like a sour-sop
When the camera-man flashed the
light
. . .
Joe then joined the other boys jiving
Lou mot vex; Joe said be kind
I must stay dear Lou ‘till morning
I can't leave the sweete behind.
. . .

That was Tuesday boys, but look out
For the J & R Easter spree
All the world will be at Gall Hill
Joe and Robert, Lou,--all three,
. . .
Things in Christ Chureh will be hum-
ming
Not a moment will be dead
Come and see all the reaction
That you get from J & R Bread,
* . *
Se prepare for Easter Monday
Do get ready for this spree

‘Tie the day when oll Barbadians
Will enjoy a Carnival FREE,

sponsored by
J&R BAKERIES .-
makers of =
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM



P pnpgen ne
i Pap i eh)

Don't let morning and we
attacks of Bronchitis neve

sleep and enervy avoior &
without tytu KENVACO, Tlie eves
internal inedia ne works throw ob

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tubes and lungs. Starts helpiiur &
immediately to remove thi
mucus, thus alleviating cour! ¢
promotes freer brea thing Th
refreshing sleep. Get Mild i) 4
your chemist today Gio so
or mover bank oxy:





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PAGE FOUR





JOHN GODDARD FINDS
TALENT

BY O. S. COPPIN. _.,

former Barbados pace bowler and six-foot-three
Mason of St. Vincent, has met with complete
Â¥ approval in local cricket circles.
- It f% planned that these candidates will take part
in a Trial Game “arranged for them at the end of the second Trini-
dad-Barbados Test, and naturally if they establish any reasonable
claims for inclusion in the W.1. 1951 tour to Australia more use will
have to be made of them. ,
GOLF CAPTAIN TALKS

OLONEL VIDMER, Captain of the Rockley Golf Club, which tour-

ed Trinidad’ recently, has gow returned and this is what he
has to say about the tour.

An overwhelming success, in spite of an overwhelming defeat,
was scored by the Barbados golf team which returned from its
matches with St. Andrew's in Trinidad last week, The men’s team
was beaten badly, but what seems to have been overlooked is the
fact that the ladies’ team won from the Trinidad contingent by four
matches to two, and congratulations for the Misses Isabel and Katy
Lenagan, Mrs. Brenda Wilson and Mrs. Elizabeth Vidmer, our ladies
representatives, seemed belatedly to be in order,

THE LADIES WIN:

OWEVER, it was not the ladies’ victory that made the trip an

overwhelming success, but the generosity, consideration and all
around hospitality of the St, Andrew's hosts, rom the moment that
the Barbados contingent arrived at Piarco Airport until the last lin-
gering member of the team departed for home after the Carnival,
the St. Andrew's members went all out to provide the visitors with
every pleasure and comfort they could command,

‘Another element which made the trip a pronounced success was
the co-operation and cohesion of the Barbados players themselves.
ney worked and played together, celebrating each other’s triumphs,
few as they were, and sympathizing with each other's defeats. In
spite of the daily setbacks laughter and gaiety dominated the atmos-
phere wherever the Rockley golfers gathered. /

Without attempting any excuses for the failure of the men’s team
{o win, a few factors which prevented them from making a better
showing should be taken into consideration. First of these was the
loss of J. R. Rodger on the eve of the team’s departure. Rodger was
one of the three top players who were to lead the team, but a crushed
toe eliminated him from the group at the eleventh hour.

Knowing the ability of such Trinidad players as Bob Hill, Murray
Wilson and John Sellier, it was not expected that the Barbados
Jeaders would win more than one of the first three matches in any
day. However, it felt that Roekley’s strength thereafter would more
than compensate along the line. However, with the loss of Rodger
it meant that the last eight men had to move up one position and
the burden was a heavy one to impose.

Ian Christie and Dick Vidmer, playing at No. 1 and No. 2, took
the shock of Hill and Wilson in turn, but instead of Rodger, the
eurrent holder of the Barbados open championship, to help with the
first wave, Michael Timpson and Will Atkinson had to be thrown into
the line-up where the going was toughest. And each player there~
efter was playing one better than had been anticipated.

It should be mentioned here that both Timpson and Atkinson
shouldered their heavier responsibilities splendidly, and when paired
in the four-ball matches carried off the maximum three points, while
sheir defeats in the singles were by the narrowest of margins in spite
of the fact that they were playing higher than anticipated, In fact,
almost all the defeats suffered by the Barbados players were by such
scores as 3 and 2 or 4 and 3, which is not entirely loy@#ded.

NO EXCUSES -

NO factor which was against the Barbados players, natur-

ally, was their unfamiliarity with the course. This is always an
element which favours the home team in golf matches, but in this
particular case it was enhanced by the bad weather which lasted
through the week. St. Andrews, unlike Rockley, is very hilly and
in the wet weather the ball stopped where it landed, with practically
no roll whatever, On many courses this would prove as much of a
hardship to one side as the other, but at St, Andrew’s, it often left
the player with a blind shot to the green. The St. Andrew’s players,
naturally, were thoroughly familiar with the location of the greens
and played with assurance; the Rockley players had to walk forward
and look, ahd then played uncertainly.

FAMILIARITY

ARAMILIARITY with the course was a pronounced factor on nine of

the el#itéen héles“ON'No. 1 a drive straight for the green leaves
a blind second shot and the ball has to be placed well to the right of
the fairway. On No. 3 the second shot also is a blind one, On No, 5
only experience convinces the player how far he can hit a drive
toward the left—the shortest way home on a dog-leg—and still carry
to the top-of the hill. ‘The tee shot on No, 8 is a blind one, and No. 9,
like No. 1, must be played well to the right of the fairway in order
to see the green. ‘

The second shot on No, 10 is blind in wet weather with no roll,
and a good drive too far to the right, again the shortest way home,
leaves a blind second shot at No. 11, The tee shot at No. 15 is a blind
one and both No, 16 and No. 18 will produce blind second shots in
wet weather unless the ball is exceptionally long.

FASCINATED
ERHAPS because of these factors, possibly in spite of them, the

Barbados .players were fascinated with the St. Andrews layout,
where the fairways, and especially the greens are far superior to
those at Rockley, However, they were factors which worked against
a better showing by the Barbados players but were not effective
against the Trinidadians. who know the course backwards, forwards
and upside down,

The general opinion of the players on their return was that St.
Andrews had a stronger team of golfers, generally speaking; that the
weather, unfamiliarity with the course and the loss of Rodger made
the Rockley team appear weaker than it was; that the difference in
the strength of the two teams was not so great that the Barbados team
would not win in Barbados, where the St. Andrew's golfers would be
on strange fairways and greens, but that the margin of victory would
not be so great as the St. Andrew's players scored on their own lay-

out.
TABLE TENNIS

N THE first match played on Monday between Barna vs. Y.M.P.C.,

Barna had an-easy victory,..Of the 9 games played Barna won
7. Both Greenidge and Stoute won 3 each and Howard one. For
Y.M.P.C., Smith and Hinds won their two games,

Stoute and Greenidge played good tennis throughout, while
Gooding seem to have lost some of his form, Howard shows promise
and should go far this year. With some more practice Y.M.P.C.
will give a much better performance on Wednesday against Pelican.

FOUR PLAY
A BBEY MARINES defeated Y,M.C.A., five games to four on

Wednesday night, The standard’ of play was poor and only three
players showed “form in spells, Bynoe, Mayers and Corbin were all
brilliant in spells but not consistent, The outstanding match of the

A qe news this week that the West Indies Cricket
om. '| 4 Board of Control, acting upon the recommen-
£ , dation of John Goddard, West Indies Captain, have

eho sponsored a visit to Barbados by C. O’B. Crick,
. d =

night was Bynoe vs Corbin, only inthis match was a bigh standard +

of play reached. 1 oe after a very shaky start came through to win
in fine style; Corbin from his play in all matches seems to be trying



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



“RANGER” SCORES

FIRST VICTORY IN ‘B’

Vidmer Tells Of Trinidad Golf Tour © By Our Yachting Correspondent

Arsenal Out.
Of F.A. Cup

Competition

LONDON, Feb.. 10.

STANLEY CHEESEMAN’S Ranger scored her first At"), holders of the fophy
victory since being promoted to the “B” Class this season.
Ranger, which was given three minutes by Fantasy, sailed

. Steadily and kept the lead throughout.

Forty boats sailed in the Fourth
Regatta of the R.B.Y.C. which
was held yesterday. The wind was
light to medium and the sea
smooth, Of the Tornadoes Teddy
Hoad’s Vamoose ended with -he
best average while Cyclone was
next. s

Ten boats started in. the B Class.
Ranger who had given Wizard
two minutes, quickly overtook her
and was leading at the end of the
Jap. Wizard was second with
Fantasy a few seconds behind,
War Cloud gave Rascal a minute
but was leading at*the end of this
lap. Gipsy, who also sailed very
well, gave Okapi four minutes and
overtook her.

After completing the first iap
in 37 minutes, 53;seconds, Ranger
finished the second lap in 39 min-
utes, 39 seconds, Fantasy came
around second and Flirt, who
overtook Wizard, was third. Rascal
went back ahead of Wer Cloud
while Gipsy was still léading
Okapi. Moyra Blair, who had
given Okapi four minutes, was
right behind her. At the end of
this round Wizerd dropped out.

Fantasy made a brave attempt
but could not overtake Ranger in
the last round, She finished over
a minute ahead of Fantasy while
Flirt came in third just barely
beating Gipsy.

Gannet First In “C”

Peter Ince brought in his Sea-
gull Gannet first in the C and Cen-
tre-board Class after giving six
minutes to Peggy Nan and Mag-
win, seven minutes to Stamp and
Missbehave and eight minutes to
Folly. r

Gannet sailed really good. At
the end of the first round Folly,
who started first, was still in the
lead, Scamp was second while ihe
Tornado Vamoose was third, Oy-
clone, who was sailing very’ well,
was still in the heat of the race.

Gannet's time for the first round



was 38 minutes, eight seconds 4
while Felly had lost over four

minutes to her. She completed the ‘

last round in 40 minutes, 50 see-
onds. Folly’s time for the last
round was 44 minutes, 54 seconds.

Third in this class was Seamp,
32 seconds behind Folly. Colin
Bellamy’s Magwin was third,

Intermediate Class honours
went to Reen. Nine boats started
in this Class and Reen gave Dawn
and Pauntless three minutes. At
the end of the tirst lap Dawn was
leading with Dauntless 18 seconds
behind.

Reen completed the final lap in
43 minutes, 58 seconds with Dawn
following in second position,
Dauntless was third and Gnat
fourth.

The D Class race went to Sinbad
who completed the first round inj
46 minutes, 49 seconds and the last
in 48 minutes, two i
gave Olive Blossom, the secon
boat, two minutes, and Bucca

and Van Vhorndyke eight minutes Pter finals is

Van Thorndyke Second

Van Thormdyke sailed away
from Buceanece and was second at
the end of the first lap, Olive
Blossom, which gave two minutes.
to Rainbow and six minutes to
Buceaneer and Van Thorndyke
was third.

Olive Blossom soon after passed
out Van Therndyke and ended
second, Her first round was com-
pleted in 47 minutes, 33 seconds
and the last in 50 minutes, three
seconds. Van Thorndyke was third
and Buccanec~ fourth,

The Fifth Regatta will be sailed
on March 17. This long delay has
been caused through the Inter-
colonial Cricket and Horse Racing.

Results were as follows:

“B" Class: 1. Ranger; 2. Fantasyi93

Flirt; 4. Gipsy
“C' Class: 1. Gannet; 2, Follyf 3

Magwin,



terme

Dauntless; 4. Gnat.
“D” Class: 1. Sinbad; 2. Olive

som; 8. Van Thorndyke; 4, Buccaneer.”

de®

Commonwealth Lead.

India By

311 Runs

KANPUR, Feb. 10.

The Commonwealth cricket touring team were 311 runs
ahead with six second innings wickets standing at the end
of the third day of the fifth unofficial Test match against

India here to-day..

Hassett Hits
173 Not Out
' . at “ a
Against M.C.C.
MELBOURNE, Feb, 10,
Australian Test captain Lind-
say Hassett scored a century here
to-day against the M.C.C, and
helped to take Victoria’s total to

307 for 6 wickets by the close of
play on the first day.



Victoria lost a wicket with only
4 runs scored but Hassett came in
and pulled the game round with
an undefeated innings of 1738. He
was at the crease just under 5
hours.

_Hassett was the mainstay of
Victoria’s batting side. The high-
est score apart from his was H.
Turner who made 33. It was
Hassett’s first century of the seas-
on against the touring side.

VICTORIA ist INNINGS
Meuleman c¢ Hutton b Statham
McDonald b Hollies bas ; 2
Harvey b Bailey ene ee
Loxton b Hollies .
Turner ¢ Compton b Close 2a nae
Hassett not out 175

Jan Johnson ¢ Close b Hollies .. 22
Ring not out : ‘ 17
Extras 14 byes, 3 legs: = 7
Total (for 6 wkts.) 306

India who were 143 for four
overnight, were all out soon after
lunch for 240 in reply to the Com-
monwealth’s first innings of 413.
By the close the Commonwealth
had seored 1388 for four wickets in
their second innings.

Five minutes from the @oub the:

tourists were 135 for the loss of
two wickets. But then two bril-
liant catehes sent back Ikin for
63 and Fishlock without scoring,

Gaekwad, who claimed no vic-
tims in the first innings took the
wickets of Gimblett, Emmett and
Ikin to-day for 38 runs in 419
overs of which 9 were maidens,

India soon lost Hazare, this
morning but Phadkar and Gopin-

ath who is playing in his first Test 2

defended stubbornly. Then Doo-
land, the Australian who plays in
the Lancashire League dashed
India’s hopes with his legbreaks.
In a spell of ten overs he took the
wickets of Gopinath, Phadkar and
Ramchant—the last two with suc-
cessive balls for 17 runs, He fin-
ished with the figures of four for
70. f

The other India wickets were
taken by the two West Indian
players Ramadhin four for 90, and
Worrell two for 45,

Ikin and Gimblett started
brightly for the Commonwealth
and put on 79 before Gimblett

was caught. Emmett was soon out,

but Ikin continued to bat well and 0.

hit fives fours in his innings.



to change his half-volley game to a more orthodox style, this some-
what was a handicap on his part and he could not be at his best.
Mayers was erratic in his games, his defence was good, his attack weak.
His chief fault is his footwork as he is inclined to be lazy and not to

move around.

Bynoe showed quite good form in two matches but

flopped. in, his third against Alkins.

», Of the ‘other players little can be said, Alkins played a steady
ape. {Griffith and Shields suffered from nerves and lack of practice.

her one of these used their previous experience to any advantage

and played very poor tennis,
















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re eliminated from the F,A.
ip competition to-day, when a
st-half goal from Manchester
ited, at Manchester was suf-
ient to put them out. With Chel-
and Fulham concerned in the
ly draw among the eight fifth-
und ties, London are assured of
one place in the quarter—finais.

Six of today’s ties were won by

me teams, the only away vic-

rs being Newcastle United three
times winners of the trophy who
beat Stoke in the highest scoring
game of the round, four goals to
two. Wolverhampton Wanderers
also three times winners, sur-
vived at the expense of Hudders-

ld but the outstanding perform-

ce was probably that of Bristol
Rovers, a Third Division team,
who easily knocked out the Sec-
ond Division Hull, three to nil.

*Six of the surviving teams
(whoever wins the replays includ-
@d) are from division one, the
Others being Bristol Rovers and
cond Division Birmingham City,
ho knocked out the other Bristot
team—City—two nil at’ Birming-
ham. To-day's draw for the quar-
therefore awaited
th keen anticipation by all foot~
all fans to see how these lone
Second and third division survi-
wors fare against the giants.

The League programme was
naturally curtailed in view of the
cup ties. Most of the leading teams
if not in the cup being without
league games. An exception was
Blackburn Rovers whose comfort-
able win sent them to second
place in Division two with none
of the four teams previously above
them in action,

Forest, the Southern leaders of
Division three. lost, but their
nearest rivals had Cup engage-
ments and so the position remains
unchanged as it does in the north-
ern section where the top two
teams won,






—Reuter.



. Football Results

LONDON, Feb. 10.
The results of games plaved to-day
fellow: —

F. A. CUP FIFTH ROUND
Brimingham City 2, Bristol City 0.
Rlackpool 2, Mansfield 2.

Bristol Rovers 3, Hull City 0.
Chelsea 1, Fulham 1.
Manchester United 1, Arsenal 0.
Stoke City 2, Newcastle United 4.
Sunderland 3, Norwich City 1
Wolverhampton Wanderers 2, Hudders-
field Town 0,
FIRST DIVISION
Bolton Wanderers 1, Burnley 1,
Liverpool 2, Portsmouth 1
SECOND DIVISION
Blackburn Rovers 2, Leeds United 1.
Brentford 4, Bury 0.
SCOTT: LEAGUE DIVISION A.
East Fife 2, Falkirk 1,
THIRD DIVISION
Southern Bournemouth 3 Nottingham
Forest 2. 5
Exeter City 0, Port Vale 3.
Gillingham 2, Torquay United 0,
Ipswich Town 3, Brighton and Hove 0.
Leyton Orient 2, Crystal Palace 0.
Millwall 1, Swindon Town 0,
Plymouth Argyle 1, Newport County 1,
Southend United 3, Northampton
Town 0.
Walsall 3, Aldershot 1.
Watford 2, Colchester United 0,
THIRD DIVISION NORTHERN
Barrow 1, Carlisle United 2,
Bradford City 0, Chester 1.
Crewe Alexandra 0, Lincoin City 4,
Gateshead 5, Darlington 2.
Halifax Town 1, York City~3.
2 Hartlepools United 2, Stockport. County

New Brighton 0, Shrewsbury Town ‘.
Rochdale 0, Oldham Athletic 1.
Rotherham United 6, Accrington Stanley

Scunthorpe United 1, Tranmere Rovers
1

Wrexham 3, Bradford 1,

SCOTTISH CUP SECOND ROUND

Aberdeen 4, Third Lanark 0,

Albion Rovers 0, Clyde 2.

Morton 3, Airdrieonians 3%.

Motherwell 4, Hamiiton Academicals 1,

Queen’s Park 1, Ayr United 3,

Raith Rovers 5, Brechin City 2,

Rangers 2, Hibernian 3,

Saint Johnstone 1, Dundee 3.

sc LEAGUE DIVISION B.,

Dumbarton 0, Queer of the South J.
Dunfermline Athletic 5, Arbroath 1.
Forfar Athletic 2, Alloa Athletic 4
Kilmarnock 4, Cowdenbeath 0, Stirling
Albion 3, Dundee United 1.

Doncaster Rovers 3, Barnsley 2. Gtimsby
Town 3, Chester 1, Luton Town 1, Aston
Villa 2.

Notts County 0, Everton 3.
Reading 2, Leicester City 2.
Sheffield Wednesday 2, Sheffield United

“Southampton 1, Middlesbrough 1.
West Ham United 1, Charlton Athletic
5.—Reuter.



COMMONWEALTH Ist Innings 413
INDIA Ist Innings Shsbciss ss 240
COMMONWEALTH 2nd INNINGS

Gimblett c Rajendra Nath b
Gaekwad ,... ‘

SY ata? Ge +. 47
Ikin c Umrigar b Gaekwad ... 63
Emmett ¢ Mankad b Gaekwad .. 12
Worrell rot out .. ... ie eeeeee * Pb 4
Fishlock ¢ Gopinath b Hazare ....., 0
PER ssa aa eres oh ae oink 4 4
Total (for 4 wkts.) ....,... 138



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Regiment
Ship’s Team

The Regiment won their one
day cricket match against a team
from the H.M.S. Devonshire by
44 runs yesterday at the Garrison.

Play started at 1.30°p.m., the
Regiment batting first on a good
wicket after winning the toss. The
Regiment were dismissed for 138
runs, this amount of runs partly
collected through a good wicket
partnership by J. Bynoe, retired
44 and A. Phillips 48.

Both of these batsmen who
opened the first innings for Regi-
ment, started out to play soundly
and punished the Devonshire pace
bowlers when they bowled short.

The most troublesome bowler
of the Devenshire team proved to
be R. Sanderson, a medium pace
bowler, who took three of the
Regiment, wickets for the loss of
51 runs. M. Matterson, another
medium pace bowler, bowled well
to take two wickets for five runs.

In their turn at the wicket the
Devonshire team was dismissed
for 94 runs, their collapse due
mainly to the steady bowling of
A. Phillips, 2 for_16, R. Parris
2 for 21 and C. Price 2 for 10.
V. Conach and R. Stanhope each
scored 16, while R. Matterson got
15 runs before he was given out
teg before.

Barna Beat YMPC.
At Table Tennis

Three Inter-Club Table Tennis
matches were played last week.
On Monday Barna met Y.M.P.C
and defeated the Beckles Road
team by a wide margin.

It was simply a walk over for
Barna. Out of the nine games
played they won seven, Louis
Stoute and Campbell Greenidge
winning three each. The other
game went to Howard. The two
games for Y.M.P.C. were wor
by Smith and Hinds.

Both Greenidge and Stoute play-
ed excellent tennis while Good-
ing was out of form. Howard
shows promise and should go far
this year.

The match on Wednesday night
was between Abbey Marines and
Y.M.C.A. Both teams gave a poor
display but Mayers, Corbin and
Bynoe were good at various



periods. Abbey Marines won by im

the odd game in nine—Corbin and
Mayers scoring two each and
Alkins one. For Y.M.C.A.
Bynoe scored two, Griffith and
Shields one each.

The outstanding set of the night
was between Corbin and Bynoe.
Bynoe, after a very shaky start,
came through to win in fine style.
Mayers made many errors and
his attack was weak. On the
other hand his defence was quite
good, He was also very slow in
getting around the table.

The final match of the week
was between Everton and Peli-
can. Honours went to Everton
who Won five—four, Blair Mur-
ray was the most outstanding
Everton player. He won three
sets, Malcolm Murray won two
and Norman Gill one.

For Pelican, Worrell won two
while Willoughby and Phillips
won one each,

The matches this week are as

follows:—
Monday; Barna vs. Abbey
Marines.
Wednesday: Y.M.P.C. vs.
Pelican.

Friday: Y.M.C.A. vs. Everton,

Trinidad Players
Expected Monday

THE thirteen members of the
Trinidad Cricket Team with their



Manager Mr, Harold Burnett,
ex-Intercolonial player, will be
arriving at Seawell tomorrow

morning at 11.00 o’clock and will
be met by a Reception Committee
from the Board of Management
of the Barbados Cricket Associa-
tion,

It is expected that the Trinidad
players will loosen up at Ken-
sington later in the afternoon
about 2.00 o’clock,

They will be staying at Abbe-
ville Guest House.

GOLFERS RETURN

The remaining members of the
Barbados Golf team, which recent-
ly toured Trinidad, returned yes-
terday by B.W.LA.

They were Mr. John Grace, Miss
Katy Lenegan and Mrs. Isabelle
Lenegan.



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range of colours as well as black.

'
Over

the World

1951



NDAY,

HARD OR SOFT GOING?
Whichever It Is, The March Meeting

Will Be Good
BY BOOKIE

7 March meeting is now just under three
weeks off, the entries close on Thursday next
a and “yet we are still very much in the dark about
form. The track was opened for the first

ume yesterday morning, outside the barrels, but

in most cases gallops were restricted to quick be-

ginnings and slow finishes. After the first set of

gallops we are therefore no nearer to picking fav-

ourites than a month ago.

The condition of the track has received a mixed reception. Some
say it is covered with a layer of megass which is too thick, others that
it is just right. It will be interesting to see what it turns out like in
the final analysis but it is quite obvious that it will favour those who
like the soft going better, Quite a number of them looked very tired
yesterday when they pulled up. A few others worked on the outside
of the m and it was noticeable the way their hoof beats rang out
in contr: to the swish of the grass which is all that could be heard
when they were working on the soft cover.

Nevertheless I should imagine that one good point about the soft
going will be less breakdowns and therefore a fuller entry. I am
told that about seventy are expected to race but this number sounds
very :>flated to me. I do not propose to go through the list here as
this would be too lengthy to fit into one column. However, I do agree
that we should see over sixty.

LOT of interest is centred around the very first race on the pro-
gramme. This is the Maiden Stakes for which a number of new-
comers are in aration. We will have Doldrum, Lunways, High
and Low and Court O’Law who will be making their debut to racing
in the West Indies. There will then be such as Arunda, Miss Panic,
No-to-Nite and Kitchen Front who were seen only briefly last Novem-
ber but are yet to eg anything like their best form. That gives us
a choice of eight before we throw in Ability and Fair Sally and for
the other C class races there will still be such as Harroween, Tiberian
Lady and Flieuxce. If on top of that we also get Carefull Annie from
Trinidad, where, I would like to know, are we going to start them?
To make for more congestion a few from D class like Bow Bells ana
Watercress may be sent in a C class event. We therefore face the
possibility of having sixteen in one event. I sincerely hope not.
PEAKING of D class it is likely that we will see some good racing
in this division as well. Thank goodness our classifiers have not
followed thejr Trinidad counterparts in this respect and_we will be
able to see Bow Bells, Watercress, Cross Roads, and Best Wishes have
the opportunity to prove themselves before they are pushed into a
crowded field of importeds among which may well be lurking some
would-be Salamanca or Tom Peason. It will also make our D class
racing have some class about it instead of the usual bunch of second
raters which it is customary to see at Trinidad meetings now-a-days
in this section. .

N FACT, I look forward to this racing to provide us with what we

missed at the Christmas meeting after the Derby had been run,
although, naturally the horses are now all four-year-olds, But it is
not long after and none of them could have made any particular pro-
gress except to regain their true form. In this connection the rivalry
between Bow Bells and Watercress will be the most important while
if the filly with the big knees can stand up to it we will also see what
part she might have played in the last classic. The latter is none
other than Mary Ann, who in spite of two blisters and hard going
continues to take her morning’s work. I have seldom seen the likes
of it.

ITH respect to the Guineas the form of the classic candidates is

perHaps more obscure than in any other group in training for
the meeting. At present Cross Roads stands out as the horse to be
beaten and although his general appearance is not very pleasing to the
eye, (he is decidedly dry-coated) I cannot say that I am other than
pressed with the way he has been going with his half-brother
Atomic II. I also like how Vanguard and Usher are shaping up but
they were so far behind Cross Roads only last November that it is
difficult to say exactly how much leeway they have made up. Mean-
while nothing is known of Best Wishes, who only arrived from St.
Vincent yesterday, except that she is a very good filly, But 7% fur-
longs is not a simple affair for a three-year-old at the beginning of
March and if her stamina is no better than it was when she won her
first race in Trinidad her opponents will have a good chance against
her.

If we are to judge from past experience then let us look back at
three-year-olds who have raced over 7% furlongs in March, I cannot
remember all of them but we saw five or six last year and also two
or three years before that. Two performances which stick in the
memory most are those of The Gambler and Watercress. Both of
these we might say were eventually better at middle distances than
sprints. Yet even for them 7% furlongs proved to be a good test.
Although they both won I cannot remember that they looked very
comfortable at the finish. Perhaps Watercress more so than The
Gambler, but this I put down to a longer and more carefully thought
out preparation. The latter, after all, was not prepared for a special
classic, but only for a 54%furlong sprint and then sent in a 7% furlong
race on the second day of the meeting.

Yet, without seeming to contradict my argument that our Guineas
should be shifted to August, I must admit that the case of Watercress
is a strong one in favour of making our classic races longer towards
the end of the year. Here was a small filly who was never a good
feeder and inclined to go overboard at the slightest amount of over
exertion. Yet given the proper grade of work she could manage nine
furlongs by August as comfortably as any imported and by the end
of the year 9% furlongs was like child’s play. .

I freely admit that as a rule small horses come to hand quicker
than the big ones, and that is precisely why to even up matters I advo-
cate a classic at the November meeting. The owners of the precocious
type would be able to have their fling in March and still have the
edge on the backward type in August. Meanwhile, the owners of the
backward type would be able to have some sort of chance, however
slight, in August and come into their own on equal terms in November,
By the time the Trinidad Derby arrived everybody would have had the
necessary experience to race like seasoned campaigners over 9% or 10
furlongs. I feel confident that under such circumstances we would
have nothing to fear from Jamaica.

As speaking of Jamaica I come to a very serious matter. I have
just received my copy of the Bloodstock Breeders’ Review Vol.
XXXVIII, 1949. The book, as usual, is a valuable addition to any
Racing Library in spite of its material being a bit behind hand. I have
no fault to find in this.

But what I must not let pass is an article in the “Review” in which
there is another attempt by some writer in Jamaica to decry horses
bred in the South Caribbean. Repeatedly in the past I have noticed
that whenever they get the opportunity to air their views internation-
ally, Jamaican writers like to stress the superior quality of their blood-
stock over that of the rest of the British Caribbean. We admit that
their average of good ones is higher.

But when, without bothering to check the circumstances, a Jamai-
can writer states: “. .. an indication of the class of the 1949 two-year-
cids (in Jamaica) is that Fair Profit, who would not rank among our
first eight, went to Trinidad and won their biggest two-year-old
event”; he must be told that this victory was also the biggest fluke in
the history of the biggest event.

Blue Streak, a Jamaican Derby winner, was roundly beaten in
this island by the Barbados creole Gun Site. Yet nobody suggested
thet this was an indication that racing here was on a higher level
than in Jmaica. There were extenuating circumstances for Blue
Streak. So too were there extenuating circumstances for the good
horses which Fair Profit defeated in the Breeders’ Stakes. As for
Fair Profit himself, he has not won a race since,

FEBRUARY 11,

.








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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY



il,

1951



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



CARNIVAL IN BARBADOS



THE BAND OF HUNGARIAN DANCERS which took First Prize for the Best Band.

Kneeling in front and dressed as Sir Walter Raleigh is Little Wendy Mackay,

who carried off. the

Prize for the Prettiest Costume at the Ursuline Convent Annual Fancy Dress Party.





TRINIDAD —

By TONY VANTERPOOL

Nearly all West Indian islands
go Carnival crazy on the last two
days before Lent but in Barbados
these days are just “ordinary
working days”. A few Barbadians
however brought the Carnival at-
mosphere to the island at various
functions held during that period.

One of these functions was held
at the Ursuline Convent on Mon-
day anda large number of chil-
dren were gaily dressed up and
looked very attractive.

On Tuesday night ome of the
biggest local Carnival attractions
took place en the Riverside
Club held their Carntval Ball at
the Children's Goodwill League.
This is an anni event. f

Contestants in a variety
of costumes. One chap who wore
the costume of a beggar paid the
penalty. He arrived at the ball
with his nts and shirt partly
torn but when ready to leave they
were nearly off.

Another chap a te to dis-
guise as a Bathing Beauty. He
wore a flowing bath robe over his
bathing trunks and occasionally
the inquisitive girls could be seen
trying to lift the ,

A man, ‘“Boysfe” Buteher, was
chosen Carnival Queen, Butcher,
an expert dressmaker and perhaps
the only dress designer in the
island, was also responsible for
making nearly all the prize win-
ning costumes.

His was a blue off-the-shoulder



From loft to right:
priges at the Goodwill League.

“The Mexican”, “Rosie Malleen”, “The Madonna” and “The Turkish Lady” all won



FEB. 11

PAGE FIVE

NO. 158

The Topic
of

Last Week





It was Ash Wednesday morning
The day that begins Lent
When Lou that old-time devil

Wake up without a cent

And this caused oll the trouble
She met a certain gal

Who invited her on Tuesday
To Bowbados Carnival

Louw felt that she could “brealk-qut”
And nothing Joe would know

But Joe was there too dismised
From his head right to his toe,

Lou swung inside Joe's corner
And as her dark-skin shined
You could see those damsels shaking
A delightful bedy-line,
Lou cried out, I'm delightful
To join this happy crowd
When she heard somebody saying
“Shape up Boysie’’-—very loud

dress. He wore black gloves and ig Serans, en Sa, et One Ea
carried a handbag to match. His Q And ae dee Catered Tau ahh ered
false hair was made as — WEIGH IF ING. And right then both start to stare.
pressed and then curled. He called 1 L , ] ] . : :

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN.
The sparkle and brilliance that
rang down the curtain of this
year’s carnival is something that
will shine back through the
memory of the years. A new tone

himself Rosie Malleen in the For-
est.

Other prizes were awarded to
the West Indian Cricket team,
Stanley Jackman who represented
“The Turkish Lady”, Clyde Phil-
lips “The Senor”, Dalton Babb
“The Madonna”, Winston Hackett

Can our local weightlifting boys
make it possible to send up a team
at — scarcely at the 1952 Olym-
Plad—but say the subsequent

He CALVIN ALLEYNE

ciation and a few of them were
contracting their facial museles
as though they were lifting irgns
which’ I t

qo
a

Can vou guess what start the staring?
Well my friends ‘twas simply this
A sweet man dressed like a lady
Was mistaken for @ Miss
. . .

He was chested as in “tru-form’”
With contraptions extra-fine

And his cheeks were red like cherries
With @ crowd of boys behind.

‘ 5 : took to be a way of Joe cried out Lou com > home

was ‘set for masquerading that Wostins tee ‘act bageet ena meet? T think they can, British expressing disapproval to some Lou said, don't be . pest .
brought out originality and Nesta Layne as “Jockey Holder.” Guiana and Trinidad have had of the rules. I must stay and admire Boysie
breadth of vision in the revellers. Conrad Petersen, who was a shot and why can we not. We nig ; : Why he meade my wedding Grea.

Naturally . this is something dressed as “Barracuda” (Tyrone have the talent, tall big men, and "ee Me the main they seem, to “Oh Joe!" Lou said-—‘don'’t grumble”
which it will take some time to Power) in the motion picture short stocky ones, e pulling together and I do not! Don’t be rough to-night; be kind
get accustomed to, but the inno- “Spanish Main” and his partner Le doubt but that they will soon Don't take me home sg early
vations were pleasing in several Madame Drayton, dressed as the For years now weightlifting has emerging with something tangi- And leave all these bays behind.
respects. Sailor bunds are no “Lady from Martinique” looked fitted in as a hobby to many of the ble. They intend calling them- tots wtee de. Adeaneatian
longer sailors as such and in some extremely attractive but unfortun- burlier set of Barbadians and I selves the Barbados Amateur Please Joe don't bully me
casés it was hard to tell where the ately arrived late for the compe- remember a few years ago when Weightlifting Association. Look at all those other nice boys~=
sailors ended and part of some tition. Bison our then local strong man The first Vice President is They are happy; can you see?

other disguise not in any special

The Judges were Mrs. G. H,

who is now abroad, made a game

Stanley Linton; an old chap in

And all the time Joe grumbled

department of the Carnival Adams, Mrs. D. H. L. Ward and attempt at throwing Whiskers the line. Second Vice President Boys were saying, what a night! !
began. Mrs. Olga Symmonds, all of whom Blake and Joe Gotch. Yes, but is Reuben Jones, Kid Ralph's And Joe's fa0e was like a eur see a
This year for one thing they are well acquainted with costumes. he was more of a weightlifter than TYainer and the Honorary Secre Ta ee er
made themselves famous for their They were assisted by Mr. John a wrestler and did not get the try is Winfield Grannum, school. . ‘ ’
grotesque heads that ranged in Beckles, M.B.E. better of the bouts, teacher of St. Mary’s Boys’ School. | Joe then joined the other boys jiving
limitation from over-sized cam— At another Carnival Ball at the The Treasurer is Joubert Bullen Lou got vex; Joe said be kind

eras to a giant octopus; and one
‘particular band did not represent
sailors at all, but must have been
something belonging to the
family of divers to judge from
the headgear.



Girls’ Industrial Union on the
same night another collection of
lovely costumes could be seen. A
ladies’ steel band led a parade
around the hall and this especially
amused the dancers.

“The Peanut Vendor”, a fat girl

Scme of the weigntfters in the
game today, import their equip-
ment, but others make shift with
lead weights which they make
themselves. Sets of enthusiastic
young men pooled together and

and there is a four-man committee,

When I spoke to Grannum, he
emphasised that the Association is
not connected with the Barbados
Amateur Athletic Association
but they hope to be affiliated to

I must stay dear Lou ‘till morning
I can't leave the sweete behind.
* ° .

That was Tuesday boys, but look out
For the J & R Easter spree
All the world will be at Gall Hill
Joe and Robert, Lou,-—all three,
’ . .

A strong feature this year was wearing a weather beaten dress _ — course of time formed the British Amateur Weightlifting Thing jn, Chalet Chureh will be hum-
s re this year ws S, , cacutatinn 4 o
the aces number of “Indians” straw hat and a pair of “dry _— Assoclation in time eNot & moment will be den

‘ , ” ; y aud se
who literally took charge of she Wernher, stare Wee oe nn = You will see them on the | The way he told me of the gis. That you get from J & R Bread,
downtown Carnival almost as i head. Cedrie Phillips, represent- beaches of an evening getting a Connection, gave me a vivid idea idee Yor Davies Monday
there had been a conspiracy among pow ph Sh ik oP aiw AT eee light work out of exercises, They f how these boys feel. They do] S)Prenite ee ee this apres
them to emphasise this form of ing e Sheik of an, Pa do the tougher work indoors’ at NOt Want anyone to butt in on) paket GaMnen ait Berematene
disguise. The headgear was so orareee Pe vee “anak - the clubs. Sometimes you even em and try to run the show Will enjoy @ Carnival PREF.
expansive and elaborate that Unlike Trinidad some of these

three of them standing side by











get the weightlifters of say Shot
Hall beach going up to Bathsheba

dictator like, although they weuld
not mind getting some help, *

sponsored by

; ; ‘ ‘ . p through : :
side in one of the wide City . «paRRACUDA” and “The Lady from Martinique” celebrations continued to stage a c i she So jumping ahead to two months

s : . que” came late for the the wee hours of Ash Wednesday. stage a contest with Bathshéba I | cu
a would i ener ee competition at the Children’s Goodwill League, Some people were against this be- weightlifters, hence when the Association will J &R BAKERIES -
“Apache Indians* who came out — welt li cause they felt that all celebrating orgnmenty there was no ell. steetad comiatittons cman tome, .
on the first day were there again a ey mianig of tion, : See ae selves — sort of by way of back- makers of

on the second day.

Guide Rally At Pax Hill





A few years ago Clement
Jackman, known in the game as

woods weeding to get a final pick

ENRICHED BREAD

The “Hosea” Band, about 100 he Cor was adjudged to be is public, sawie. ons eae

nN ad its Jancer lead- 2 ; . r, Barbados when such tough: actise han¢ bala €
oer tas hig "following to hot THE Guide Rally at Pax Hill the recruits was the new Guiae TEST AVERAGES “ as the Warner brothers and Mr. &/™nastie pyramids and these and the blenders of
calypso tones and the entourage 0 Thursday 8th February, 1951 Company now being started at “THE SHEIK OF ARABY” won Solomon, then a master at Com. With good display of weightlifting

included taj-bearers, pundits and

in honour of the Chief Guide, was





Queen’s. College.



To the Editor, The Advocate—








Second Prize at the Girls’ Industrial







bermere School, were competing



and perhaps a wrestling bout,

J&R RUM








Ny eer | : int Toe ; ‘haloe ; ‘ : SIR,—The following Test aver- Union. Since then the business has *n Would be a pleasant novelty to, I
lasses with orhnis and_ lotahs. the biggest ever held in Barbac os. The Chief Guide then inspected ages of the England team in Aus; i e business has been thinks the maion- portion ‘of Bae
But there was no “big belly Ram- There were 11 Commissioners, 1 the Rangers and Guides in her li be aa int tt then ow, Cate athe ic. And ‘Henne —_—
lal” nor the Indian girl of the Secretary, 76 Guiders, 16 Colour own inimitable way. After the [t¥o8 ‘Of cricket, who are follow. A few days ago I d sa mat Ge not mind’ paying for a gala
tuneful ditty “grinding massala.” Party, 52 mee 471 Guides, 170 Inspection ve talked to the chil- Sus the reset Test series in GUILTY Queen’s Park =e oaaeTaapae of entertainment ae re es be
Brownies and 153 Recruits, mak- dren who will never forget her : _ Ja, ao eeieie F : : a . f

“Poi ” r c 4 these knotty scled chaps trying Some the t ,

Point Cumana : yee - ing a total of 950, It was amazing stirring words of encouragement. Australia. BATTING P as Ganee ae eee ee nae sealed Or oS te: tne 7s Ni
band of sailors in jet black, t4 see how the Brownie Branch As it was now 5.40 p.m, Capt. No. of Ings, T.N.O. Total Runs H.S. Ave NEW YORK. Faken es csth Hi ity ae Mein [erate ie’ end | ene ; a
marched up Henry Street and into hae ge a ia din Rais 1 d dq Ss The b. Hutton @ 3 394 156° 78.80 A 34-year-old bookie, who drew tions, to wit, the how and what help them buy good equipment Don't let morniug an tf
Park Street to a slow tune and 74S 8rown an espancing, maison played Co ave © FR. Brown. 7 0 204 %§ 2914 in 90 million dollars a year, sur- bout forming a Barbados Ama. and get things going smoothly eg Aa a
rere crossed on Frederick Street nee ; _ , Rangers and Guides then marched ps: Sheppard 2 0 (50 41 — 25.00 prised « New York court recently teur Weightlifting Association4 avd the bulk to the Association.| efthout trying MENDAGO. fbi
ty the peppery-going “Mexican The Chief Guide, accompanied past, the Chief Guide taking the = SWashbrook é 0 ihe Sa 2180 when he laid himself open to 65 There are some eight clubs Naturally the Association woyld| tmtermal medicine works (orn

y-s' € , a shap age 2 resj <, " . ; R 5 5 te 7. - ¥ 19 hee

Carpet Sellers.” These girls, in by Lady Savage, the ae Salute. It was a wonderful sight pq "fans. @ 1 143 49 2042 years in prison. Because book- Which are joined to form this have to be well managed and good en ey a ed
pert sombreros and a smart cos- of the Girl ae sa m via and one then realised how many Pose Park- 4 0 1 2% ©1995 Making is illegal in New York, he association and doubtless others eccounts regularly given of the] {immediately to remove thi
tume of green and purple, each oe ao arn tte eiinne hea sige aera ain cane ee T Bailey |. 6 1 35 2 700 Was on trial for taking bets, but wit join up: When I got there funds, os mesos tee orang og Sah

rried a plush carpet across the ’ eres had disappeared the Chief Guide J’G@. Dewes.. 4 0 23 9 5.75 he suddenly dropped his innocence and sat around the table in the — So if the boys get things orggn-) PO%feshing sleep. Get Biel) 4
shoulder ss they jigged their way Party was drawn up at the en- called on the Brownies to “run A V. Bedser @ 2 32 14° 5.33 plea and pleaded guilty. He will Park House with them, they were ised quickly, they could stage romp your shemist today along. trance of Pay Hill with the Island past,” which they thoroughly en~ 5 y.“Wrent 6 1 22 14 450 be sentenced on February 19, discussing the rules of the ASso. regular shows — at theatres too or mener bank eu)

Shouts, cat calls, whistles, Colour having an escort of 2 joyed, W. ¥ Mcintyre 2 @ § 7 4.00

ews i se A eo 3

singing, jumping and an atmos~ Rangers. The Brownies and re Tt has been a wonderful thrill arr ‘
apa al gaiety and levity ane cruits were on the pene g a Fe to the Guides of Barbados that 8. F Ranities “o ai 1 1 50 Bo rE
vailed. Every one tried to outdo the building and the Chief Guide they could at last welcome the BOWLING " B O XIN G
his neighbour in merry-making inspected them, shaking hands Chief Guide to their OWN Head- gajtey fa i it tod s ‘
and in antics. he With each one of them, Among quarters and Camp site, which Bedser 192 25 377 20 18.85 } :

Tourists and vanes an = is named Pax Hill after her home Brown § 1 lag eee at the Yr u im a ower
neighbouring islands enjoye’ - nen Se and our Founder’s in England. Tattersall 525 7 212 4° 42.95 YANKEE STADIUM '
themselves thoroughly—many ne for participants and spectators a Compton aie 2 2} $3.00 wm & i"

. ate events 5 articipants 4 ; $ rig 9 3 394 «8 48, ‘ i

them taking part in the alike Colourful costumes have PLAYED MASK WHILE Wis ae ee ee Brittons Hill

Masqueraders and onlookers been put away now. Many of HOUSE WAS BURNING The averages given above are

alike showed they could enjoy
relaxation from work and worry

them will be used next Carnival.
Spectators, will for quite a while,

‘From Our Own Correspongent)

for the series up to and including
the Fourth Test just completed at











e
Tuesday night, Feb. 13th

ustins are ahead!

5 : iod The have the din of the steel bands PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 7. Adelaide. e

ond cia it ranret to thousands particularly vibrating in their A house valued at about $2,500 It may be also of interest to KID RALPH

faicin art in the last “jump up.” ears, and the echoes of calypsoes and owned by Mr. B. Mahabir of cricket lovers to learn that Eng- (163 Ibs.)

“a Sor the Road Mareh, that resounding joyously. Parents will Barataria, was completely destroy- land’s opening fast bowler, Trevor a

r $ disputable. Suffice it to say have difficulty in restraining ed by fire on Monday afternoon. Bailey, whose thumb was frac- KID PRANCIS

that you might pick your choice children from singing the ane No, 1 unit of the Central Fire tured by a ball from Lindwall in ‘ § ce | Bare

Soh TINY aa eLoomat 88y,,© hard re eae i ie wat Gn atched te the ne ie pieces t Test at Sydney, is alll | -, (162 Ibs.) You can take on the tough jobs when you bave an Austin.
e,” “Loomat' say .e oatey ,50 100 «was despatched to the scene, but probable for the next State match , . 4 0 5 ,

see Boysie” i have a lovely for 40 days now that the jumping was delayed by heavy traffic and.vs. Victoria at Melbourne, sa]|! In return match for the They’re built to deal with rough loads and bad roads year after

bunch of coconuts” and a number

hers. iy ;
ot whe fete for which Trinidadians

live principally, ended with regret



THE

THE MOTORISTS SS

and the shouting have. ceased, anc
the “warriors and kings” depart,
the sobering period of Lent is
ence more here again.

KEY TO

=

on arrival found the building
almost destroyed. The Mahabir
family wa; in the city attending
the Carnival celebrations,

Ss

—
=

OIL

ESSO STANDARD

“Radio Australia” reported on, the
8th inst,

Yours truly,
CELT.

\7







Light-Heavy weight
Championship of
BARBADOS

10 Rounds

@
Semi-Final
SAM KING (180 lbs.)
| vs.
HAL WILLIAMS
(131 Ibs.)

8 Rounds
e
Preliminary

VICTOR LOVELL
(122 Ibs.)






vs.
BELFIELD KID

(125 lbs.)

6 Rounds
Ring Side $2.00
Balcony .... $1.50
Cage $1.00
|} Arena ... $1.00
Bleachers .. A8

Winner of the champion-
ship will receive a Belt
presented by

Da COSTA & CO., LTD.
Os

year. They’re ahead in efficiency

and economy.

Their higher torque, better power to weight ratio and longer
working life are the results of unceasing research and develop-
ment at Austin’s 120 acre factory at Longbridge, Birmingham,
England, where nearly 20,000 people are employed.

DOWDING ESTATES & TRA

from :

DING CO... LTD.,



AUSTI N you can depend on it?’

Get full details now

| LUTHER FIELDS
| Promoter

R. M. JONES & CO. LTD. — Asents

1372-1376 BAY STREET, BRIDGETOWN

(ECKSTEIN BRO






‘PAGE SIX



Brintea by the Advocate Co., Ltd, Broad 8t., Bridgetown.



Sunday, February 11, 1951



= POLICE DOGS

THE gift of two Alsatian Dogs by the
Metropolitan Police to the local Force will
give the Barbados Police an opportunity
to develop a branch of police work that
has been ignored for too many years in
this ‘island. Almost every Police Force
of-any standing has long recognised the
value of trained dogs as an essential ad-
junct to the Force.

Much of the spade work in training
police dogs was done in Germany before
the first World War and the marvellous
record set up by these dogs during the
war opened the eyes of the authorities to
the possible service which dogs could ren-
der if enrolled in a Civil Police Force.

For many years the Germans pinned
their faith on the Alsatian Shepherd Dog,
whose speed and agility, skill in tracking
and intelligence in emergency, marked him
out as an ideal assistant to the Civil Police.

The Alsatian was one of the pioneers in
police work, but he is by no means the
only breed that has been found suitable
for training in police work. The Germans
themselves soon discovered that the Dober-
mann Pinscer and the Boxer made equally
good police dogs, and within recent years
the Boxer has found great favour in Pales-
tine and hot climates where certain strains
of Alsatians proved to be subject to skin
ailments. In England, the Airedale Ter-
riey-and the Flat Coated Retriever have
shown qualities almost approaching that
of the German breeds. The young age at
which an Alsatian can be trained still
calisés the breed to be preferred above all
others. for training in police work.

Not only can a trained police dog be
used. for tracking and arresting, but he
seryes as a valuable protector to consta-
bles on lonely beats and he is invaluable
as a searcher of buildings or fields.

| When specialised tracking On a_ cold
scent is required, however, the police em-
ploy a specialist tracker, the Bloodhound,
whose breeding has been directed for
centuries to the building-up of an acute
sense of smell,

The. training of Police Dogs is a com-
plicated and a tedious task demanding an
abundance of patience, firmness, and kind-
liness, and Colonel Michelin is indeed for-
tunate to find in the island a fully qualified
trainer, eager and willing to undertake the
task. There is hardly a limit to what a
good trainer can teach an intelligent dog,
and the performances put up at field and
police work trials are so outstanding that
the watcher is truly amazed.

The Commissioner of Police proposes to
build up a sizable corps of Police Dogs
using the two Alsatians as the foundation
of hiz kennels. He will have to watch
carefully the progress of his particular
strain of Alsatians and should they prove
unsuitable, it may be as well for him to
substitute the Boxer, who has proved his
suitability to hot climatic conditions, or
the Dobermann Pinscer, another short-
haired breed.

In Kensington Gardens, London, the
Boxer is now being used almost exclusive-
ly. “His. size and his gentleness until
roused, is making him a strong favourite
for the job, but the Alsatian is still holding
his own except under unsuitable climatic
conditions.

Colonel Michelin’s experiment will be
watched with interest.

V.H.F.

The use of very high frequency Radio
Communication in recent years has been
associated in the public: mind with the
police more than any other service. In
Barbados on the other hand, few people
have, seen this type of radio telephone at
work and it is only very recently that com-
mercial firms have been installing V.H. F.
Sets for use from ship to shore.

| The main advantage of very high fre-
quency operation for radio work is the
fact that these frequencies are free from
finterference caused by normal low-fre-
quency wireless operations.

ae ‘
;-3t has been particularly useful for
police, taxis and other organisations where
mobility is synonymous with efficiency.
In Barbados where there is hardly any
interference from hills, very high fre-
quency sets can be used with maximum
efficiency.

It is no compliment to the Government
of Barbados that private firms have been
able to forestall the Police in the use of
V. H. F. Radio.communication.. The Com-
missioner of Police, Colonel R. T. Michelin,
told the Advocate last week that he had
been trying for over a year to get V. H. F.
Radio Communication sets for the Barba-
dos Police Force. The Government are
evidently not communication minded.

,; It may be that they are not fully aware
of the importance of Communications.
They may, isolated as they are on a small
island in the Atlantic, aot yet have heard
that whereas victory in the days of Napo-
leon was achieved by paying due regard to
the slogan that “an army marches on its
stomach;” the slogan during the last world
war which ended in victory for the United
Nations, was that “without Communica-
tions the battle is lost.”

It is almost useless to train, equip, and
raise the Barbados Police Force
to the high level of — discipline
and organisation which it has
reached, if the one thing needful—Com-
munications—is overlooked because funds
are not forthcoming. It is better to have
tess policemen with modern facilities «f
their disposal than more policemen work-
ing in isolation from contro] headquarters.
A Police patrol car that is not in contact
with headquarters by radio’ telephone is
restricted to one patrol. A police car that
is on patrol, but fitted with V. H. F. Radio
Communication, can be redirected by con-
trol headquarters to any part of Barbados
where its presence is required.

The efficiency of the Barbados Police
Force, the service that it renders the pub-
lic, demands an up-to-date Communication
system. The small expenditure involved
in equipping the Police with a system of
Mobile Radio Communication will be a
small fraction of the cost to the public
which the present antiquated system of
communications makes necessary, solely
because control is impossible.

The Commissioner of Police knows only
too well the value of such communication
to Barbados. It is incredible that he
should be kept waiting even on the plea
of economy. It is no economy to keep’the
Police Force immobile, That is what lack
of mobile radio communication means in
fact.

A FOOT IN THE DOOR

A SALESMAN’S chief qualifications, we
always understood, were to have strong
feet and strong boots—the object being to
get one foot in the door and keep it there.
However, an interesting little booklet
which reached this office during the week
claims that salesmanship can be learned
by correspondence — eighteen lessons for
$90.

In the first lesson the student is scnooled
in, among other things, social conversation,
general deportment, initiative, and atti-
tude to colleagues. By the next lesson the
prospective salesman is learning about
“Cultivating Polished Expression, the
Voice, Facial Expression, Gesture, and
Correct Posture.”

SUNDAY ADVOCATE




INSIDE LOOKING. OU

THE LAST TIME THERE Was Music
AT CLUB wirow, PITPERbUG was












THESTO
INNISKILLINGS

THE ROYAL INNISKILLING
FUSILIERS arrive in Barbados
next Friday.

Raised in Enniskillen, Co. Fer-
managh, N, Ireland and taken on
the British Establishment on 20th
June, 1689.

Battle Honours 1689—1914

Martinique, 1762; Havannah; St.
Lucia, 1778; St. Lucia, 1796;
Maida; Badajoz; Salamanca; Vit-
toria; Pyrennees; Nivelle, Orthes;
Toulouse; Peninsula; Waterloo;
Egypt; South Africa 1935; Soutn
Africa, 1846-7; Central India; Ré-
lief of Ladysmith; South Africa,

1899-1902.
Great War $08

Le Gateau; Somme, 1916-18;
Ypres, 1917-18; St. Quentin; Hin-
denburg Line; France & Flanders,
1914-18; Macedonia, 1915-89;
Landing at Helles; Gallipoli,
1915-16; Palestine, 1917-18.

During the second World War
battalions of the Royal Inniskill-
ing Fusiliers served in:

France & Flanders, 1939-40,
Burma, N. Africa, Sicily.
Italy. ~

The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers,
formerly the 27th (Enniskillen)
Regiment of Foot have, as their
Battle Honours show, many con-
nections with the Western Hemi-
sphere. They were one of the
first four Regiments to be station-
ed in the West Indies, arriving in
Antigua in 1702 for a five year
tour. This was only the first of

many tours both in peace and-war-

in this part of the world. The
Seven Years War (1754-61) saw
them again present at the cap-
ture of Martinique and Grenada
and, following the outbreak of
War with Spain in 1762 they took
part in the capture of Havannah
described at the time as the rich-
est prize ever to fall to British
Arms. In October 1762 the Regi-
ment returned home to Ireland,

They did not remain long at
home. During the American War
of Independence they saw service
in North America from 1775 to
1778 when, France having declared
war, an expedition was sent
against St. Lucia. This was the
first of two actions the Regiment
fought on this Island, the more
famous one of 1796 being one of
the proudest Battle Honours of
the Inniskillings. Shortly after-
wards they helped in the capture

of Grenada.

This was the last active service
seen by the Inniskillings in the
Indies, but further peace time
tours followed from 1824 to 1830
in British Guiana, St. Vincent,
Grenada and _ Barbados.

“| When the Regiment sailed from

By the third lesson the course gets down
to brass tacks, or rather to bicycles, wire-
less sets, breakfast foods, toilet soaps, and
most difficult of all, calculating machines.

The next lesson on “Developing Moral
Courage” will cause the student to search
his soul. Among the subjects discussed are :
“Timidity and Shyness — an analysis of
fear—overcoming your fear—being friend-
ly—developing social ‘activity—snobs—in-
trospectian—dver-introspection—harmjony
in dress—the voice—and the eyes.”

In the fifth lesson buying motives are
laid bare. They are: “self-preservation,
approbativeness, vanity, cupidity, pride,
acquisitiveness, self-gratification, imita-
tiveness, and curiosity,”—a fairly compre-
hensive catalogue of vices. The budding
salesman is then urged to observe “a house-
wife considering. an Electric Iron” (a dan-
gerous mission no doubt) and “a profes-
sional man considering a medium-priced
car.”

The lesson on the “Mechanics of Selling”
which follows teaches the salesman how to
create a desire for anything from “a new
table sauce” to a fountain pen, and how to
convince a board of directors of a bank
or a public house proprietor.

The section on “Overcoming Resistance”
is perhaps the most terrifying; it literally
provides the salesman with “all the an-
swers”. For instance, it teaches him how
to handle people who make such stupid
objections as “Price too high”, “Never
handle such goods”, “Unsuitable to our
neighbourhood” or the pitiful “I cannot
afford”. With such a salesman at large
nobody is safe.

The final lesson, appropriately enough,
teaches the salesman how to-sell himself.

the last mamed place in 1830 it
did not return until 1949 when a
tour in Jamaica was begun thus
renewing the tie between the
Regiment and the West Indies.

Antigua

It was in Antigua that the In-
niskillings began their long con-
nection with the West Indies.
They were stationed in this Island
and probably some others from
1702-1706.

During its visit to Antigua the
Regiment took part in the expedi-
tion which led to the capture of
“Guadeloupe in 1703. Unfortun-
ately disease took a henvy toll of
Officers and men and the numbers
sailing home in 1706 were less
than half of those who had arriv-
ed five years earlier.

Two Companies were left be-
hind, being forcibly transferred
to another Regiment and in 1710
these unfortunates are heard of as
having been without pay for three
years and “dependent on the in-
habitants of Antigua for their
bread”,

Barbados

The Inniskillings have been
more often in Barbados than any
other of the West Indian Islands.
After taking part in the operations
leading to the final capture. of
Canada they were sent to seize
the French owned West Ingian
Islands and landed in thet cet
on Christmas Eve 1761. T set
sail again shortly afterwa’ as
art of an expedition to capture
Martinique, This Island fe in
February 1762 and a foree was
immediately sent to reduce m-
ada. i n

After the capture of St. cia
in 1778 the Inniskillings were'sta-
tioned in Barbados for two years
before returning to Ireland and
in 1796 stayed there prior to
sailing to St. Lucia for the more
famous attack of 1796 and, after




the capture of that island and
Grenada, once more returned to
Barbados.

In January 1829 the Inniskil-
lings were again in Barbados
where they remained until the
end of ‘1830 when they were
ordered home to Ir d. Before
the Twenty-Seventh embarked,

General Sir James

jLieutenant

~ * he
mB



Lyon, K.C.B. G.C.H., Commanding
at Barbados, issued the following
General Order: —

“BARBADOS, November 22nd
1830.

The Twenty-Seventh Regiment,
being on the eve of embarkation,
the _ Lieutenani-General Com-
manding. in the separation of so
valuable a part of his force, begs
to convey to Lieutenant-Colonel
Hare, his Officers, his Non-Com-
missioned Officers, and men, his
anxious wishes for their prosper-
ous voyage, happy landing and
future success, Sir James Lyon
must ever bear in recollection the
Zeal with which the 27th, whilst
serving under him, has performed

every duty; and he views, there-

fore, their departure with sincere
regret but his knowledge of their
former more active and splendid
service satisfies him that to what-
ever destination the commands of
their sovereign may hereafter
direct the Inniskilling Regiment,
they will maintain that distin-
guished reputation which has se-
cured to them the respect and
applause of those under whom
they have served”,

During their seyen years tour
of duty in the tropics the Twenty-
Seventh, as they had done before,
suffered greatly from the climate
and left three hundred and two
Inniskillingers behind them in the
graveyards of the various colonies
in which they had been quartered.

The survivors of the Regiment
were brought home in three ships,
the slowest of which réached Cork
at the, of. January, 1831. This
was their last visi fo the Western
Hemisphere until’ their present
tour began in 1949.

British Guiana

The Inniskillings did not visit
British Guiana until fairly late in
their history.

From 1824 to 1826 the Regiment
was in Demerara and Berbice and
in December 1826 it was ordered
to St. Vincent and Grenada. Be-
fore they left Demerara, the civil
population, with whom the Twen-

ty-Seventh were extremely popu-
lar, entertained the officers at a

great farewell ball and Major-
General Sir Benjamin D’Urban, in
a general order expressed “the
high opinion and regard which
the Regiment has so amply merit-
ed by its exemplary conduct since
he had the happiness to have it
under his command”,

Dominica

After the capture of St. Lucia
in 1796 a detachment of the Regi-
ment was stationed in Dominica
where they remained until the
following year.

The Inniskillings. have been
three times in Grenada in all,
so their visit in March 1951 will
be their fourth. After taking part
in the captdre of Martinique from
the French, which-fell in February
1762, they were immediately sent
to reduce Grenada. The Inniskil-
lings lended on 5th March and the
Island fell without g shot being
fired, its submission being follow-
ed by that of the Grenadines.

Again in 1796, a few days after
the..capture of St. Lucia the
Tnniskillings and the Fifty-
Seventh Regiment were hurried
eff to Grenada where tha
British Garrison was, with diffi-
culty, holding its own against the
French This reinforcement
turned the scale anq after ag little
fighting in which the Regiment
lost one man, the enemy sur-
rendered and Grenada was
added to the possessions of the
crown. For nearly two years the
Regiment remained quartered in
Grenada with small detachments
at Barbados and Dominica and
suffered terribly from the ravages

of tropical diseasés. At the end
ot the year 1786 more than four
hundred officers and men,/had died
while most of the remainder were
lying sick. Drafts of recruits ar-
rived only to fall victims of yellow

BUT THE NEXT TIME A BAND PLAYS ®
THERE, DITPERBUG WILL BE OUTSIDE
LOOKING IN,

* at sea on June Ist it consisted of

SSUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1951





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fever, and on December 24th 1797
the effective strength all told was
only two hundred and eighty-three.
The Regiment was ordered home|] %
in March 1798 and when mustered | ¢

three hundred and eighty thr
effectives of all ranks; one hun—
dred and seventy five men
had already been sent to hospitals
in. England and ten men were
in the sick bay of the transport.
The Regiment's last visit to the
island was in peace time—from
1826 to 1829 when it moved to
Barbados en route for home. _

Jamaica

Until their present tour began
in 1949 the Inniskillings had only
once previously been to Jamaica.
In 1741 they sailed for Kingston
the journey taking four months.
This short tour was a tragic story
of ill-managed and abortive ex-
peditions of privation and disease.
Although they had left Ireland
six or seven hundred strong ana
had not once seen action, they
landed in England little more
than a year later with twelve
officers and forty eight men.

Fortunately to-day the condi-
tions are altered and the Innis-
killings are sailing from Jamaica
on a peaceful invasion of the
places with which they have been
so closely connected in the past.

St. Lucia

i} i
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The connection of the TIanis—
killings with ST. LUCIA is a very
special one. In fact the relation-
ship between the island and the
Regiment is probably unique
They have twice taken part in its
capture the second time most
gloriously and their monument
to-day marks the site of their] .
gallantry 150 years ago.

After seeing service in the
American war of Independence
France having declared war, the
Inniskillings sailed for the West
Indies in i778. They first pro-
ceeded to Barbados, from where
the Regiment sailed to St. Lucia
and helped in its capture, remain-
ing there till when they were once
more back in Barbados,

1796 once again saw the Innis-
killings landing in Barbados
preparatory to an attack on St.
Lucia, the famous attack of 24th
May being commemorated thi
year by members of the Regiment
iy person after gq space of 155
years.

TO KEEP COOL...
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The Commander of the assault-
ing troops was Brigadier-Genera
(afterwards Lieutenant-General
Sir John Moore of Peninsula
fame who summed up the battle
in the words “We owed the pos:
to, the gallantry of the Twenty-
Seventh Regiment”,

After desperate fighting the
French sent in the flag of truce
to ask,for terms, and the negotia
tions ended in capitulation, whict
took place on the 26th.

In recognition of the conspicu-
ous service rendered on the 24th
by the Inniskillings, Sir Ralph
Abercrombie paid them the ver)
high compliment contained in the
following General Order dated
26th May, 1796:—

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ARRIVED

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“Parole—Enniskillen
Countersign—Gillman”

The 27th Regiment, under the
command of Brigadier-General
Moore, will this day at 12 o’clock
take possession of Fort Charlotte
(Morne Fortune), the present gar-
rison having first marched out and
Taid down their arms on the glacis.
Brigadier-General Moore will then
plant the Colours of the Regiment
on the fort to be displayed one
hour on the flagstaff previous to
hoisting the usual Union Flag.”

The General Order after eulo-
gising General Moore, refers to
the Twenty-seventh in very appre-
ciative terms.

SOSDSO SOS OSSS GOGO SOOGOOGIRA HG

199

9999

“The behaviour of the Enniskil-
len Regiment of Infantry, who
acted on that day with him (i.e
Moore) was so worthy of praise
that it deserves the Commander-
in-Chief’s highest approbation. Tc
Lieutenant-Colonels Gillman and
Drummond, the officers and men of
that gallant Regiment he also re-
turns nis best thanks and regrets
extremely the loss of Major Wil-
son of that Corps, who fell exert-
iwg himself in the service of his
country.” The honour accorded
the Regiment in permitting them
to fly their Colours on the cap-
tured fort is unique in British
Military History.

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The visit in the year 1951 is $ S
indeed a historie occasion. @ It's Mellow in Flavour >
ats @ It’s Best in Quality x

St. Vincent © ls First i $

n Popularity. >

The last station of the Inniskil- $
lings in the West Indies was St.j § 3
Vincent Arriving from British}% ENJOY JIT AT -YOUR CLUB x
Guiana they spent three years 8 h : 3
here from 1826 to 1829 and finally | § . Ts .
Sine te ae ce eae | AND GODDARD’S RESTAURANT %

ing England in 1830.

.

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> 9999999999999 99S OF AF FO tt Et te 65 4; ISS =<, oS #444 oS
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY

Il, 1951

Hridgetown Never Sleepsam3



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



Electricity—‘Greatest Servant Of Man’:

GALE

I MUST admit I felt rather lost
when Mr. Morley, the Engineer,
ushered me into the brightly lit
forest of generators, transformers,
volts, amps, watts and what not
that make up the generating plant
of the Barbados Electric Corp.
However, I will try to explain ia
the language of John Doe what
makes your electric bulb light up.

When I entered the large gal-
vanise shed I saw a line of sevea
generators and the foundation for
another one which is expected
shortly. The most modern
machine, which was made by the
English Electric Co., cost over
thirty thousand pounds.

The generators,
turned by 1,500 hp diesel motors,
which have flywheels weighing
about fifteen tons. The engines
are water-cooled, the water being
pumped from g twelve foot well
in the Company’s yard which is
capable of producing 250,000 gal-
lons an hour. There are eight
pumps, two of which can pump
24,000 gallons an hour while the
others pump half that amount.
After the water has passed
through the engine it is cooled by
being run down a cooling tower,
and it is reckoned that 6,000 gal-
lons a day are lost by evaporation,

I learned, are

Renner Oe Nees

i

=

i
it
a3

While we were walking from

the generator to the main switch-

board, Mr. Morley told me that
the Electric Co., was started forty
years ago and employs a staff of

At
night there are only three men on

duty in the engine room—the shift

at-
tendant. The shift engineer looks

the

forty at the generating plant.

engineer, the driver and an

after the
shift in

switchboard
general, and

and
the driver

is in charge of starting and stop-—

ping the generators. Three other
men are on duty all night besides
those in the engine room. They
are the breakdown crew who have
a truck ready to go to any part of
the island in case wires comé
down,

The switchboard was a very
complex affair. From there the
generators are controlled, and
there are numerous instruments
for recording the amount of elec
tricity being generated and the
amount being sent out. One of the
switches was marked HOSPITA
in large letters, and I was told
that in the case of a breakdown at
the works every effort is made to
keep up the supply of current to
the hospital and other public in-
stitutions,

From the readings taken every





half hour at the switchboard I
sould see that the period when
the electricity load is heaviest is
at about seven o'clock at night,
Then it is necessary to use all
seven generators, but later on they
are shut off one by one until two
in the morning when only three
are needed.

The generators generate elec
tricity at 3,300 volts, and under
the old system, which is still in
use for Town and the suburbs,
this electricity is taken through
the switchboard and then goes
direct to the sub-stations in the
areas where it is transformed
down to 110 volts for lighting and
200 volts for power. Under ithe
new system, which is used fer
Bathsheba and other outlying
districts, the electricity is step-
ped up by transformers at the
plant to 11,000 volts, and then
transformed down again at
the sub-stations, There is an
electricity law, I was told, which
says that by doubling the voitage
the transmission losses are halved.

The noise in the engineering
room was terrific, and I left the
Electric Company a little hoarse
after shouting questions for about
an hour.

aetna a ees

THE TRANSFORMERS shown here step up the voltage. from 3,300 to 11,00 11,000.

PUT LIFE IN SCOUTING — Toy Maker
C.G. Tells Scoutmasters

LADY BADEN-POWELL, Chief Guide of the World
told 262 scouts at a scouts’ rally at the Scouts’ Headquarters,
Beckles Road yesterday that they should be enthusiastic
and energetic. They did not seem as though their eyes were
opened, but seemed dense. Scoutmasters should put life in
scouting, she said, and let the scouts hike especially on the



beautiful Barbados beaches.

The Chief Guide inspected the
262 scouts who represented 27
trceops. The Governor, Lady
Savage and the Hon. H. A. Cuke
attended the Scouts’ Rally.

The Governor who introduced
the Chief Guide after the inspec-
tion of the scout troops, said that
it was a privilege to be allowed
to introduce Lady Baden-Powell.
Lord Baden-Powell and Lady
Baden-Powell in his opinion had
made one of the greatest contri-
butions in the present century to
peace and happiness in the world.

The Chief Guide told the scouts
that the movement had grown in
vast dimensions because of the
valiant army of men and women
all over the world who had put
their enthusiasm into it. It was a
movement which had grown to iis

tremendous size and _ standing
entirely on its own.
It was because of its direct

appeal to the youngsters as well
as the grown-ups that scouting
was kept very much alive. They
needed badges and emblems, she
said. Badges and emblems gave
inspiration and a goal to which
to look forward. Inspiration was
a feeling which has to be within
the scout. It could not be imposed

or brought from outside.
Patrol System
The parol system had to be

stressed, she told them. It helped
to develop within the scouts a
sense of powsr and a birth of
leadership.

Scouts need never be short of
something interesting to do.
There should always be some
exciting programme — something
with a touch of adventure which
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was so suggestive of a scout.

The Education Department in
Egypt believe that scouting was a
great help to education and all
over the world the movement was
flourishing.

They had to be propagandists
because the ignorance of the aims
of scouting was amazing.

Moving a vote of thanks, the
Hon. H. A. Cuke said that the

voices of those who made appeals

on spiritual and cultural values

were being somewhat dimmed out say of the Barbadian policemen, He ‘is Vice-President of the
by those who made appeals on the women sellers at their trays National Association of Boys’
more material, values. Her pres- as they sit on their benches, the Cjyps, and Chairman of its De-

ence there would be a real source
of inspiration for the scouts. The
movement was a first class move-
ment and he hoped to see it flour-
ishing in Barbados.



“Rodney” Sails With
Molasses To-night

R.M.S. Lady Rodney called
from South yesterday to take a
load of rum and molasses for ports
on her homeward voyage.

She will be leaving Barbados
to-night for Bermuda, St. John
and Halifax via the British North
ern Islands, The last launch leave
the Baggage Warehouse at 8 p.m.

For St. John, she will be tak-

ing 200 puncheons of molasses and
1,450 cartons of rum and for Hal-

ifax 212 puncheons of molasses

and 50 cartons of rum. She will
also be loading a quantity of rum
for Bermuda.

Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co.,
Ltd. her agents,

SOF |



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COCOESS

FOOD

OSS

THERE is a little child-face man
of 48, Arnel Kirton who has
gained the respect of proprietors
of some city stores as a born car-
ver. His father was a joiner, his
two uncles were joiners and his
brother is a joiner.

Yes, the craftsman's touch is in cil. He will visit Jamaic
his veins and after 18 years as a Mr. Henriques started a boys’
joiner himself, Arnel Kirton or elyb in 1914 with 25 members
Smarty as he is known by his petween the *ages of 14 and
friends, ae a that trade This eventually grew to
as something he liked passing fair, Bernhard Baron Settlement
but work which he thought too Vien before the war had over

hard. From ten and for the past
14 years, Smarty Kirton has been
craving toy soldiers, policemen,
boats and lots of other toys.

To look at Smarty Kirton you
would not think he is a deep think-
er, You would just see him shuff-
ling along the street with the little
card box in which he keeps his
work and seeming to be vaguely
ponderjng.

But 14 years ago it struck Kirton
that if he could carve some toys,

men behind donkey carts, tourists
to the island might think it nice
to have such to carry back as me-
mentos of the island's life.

So he set about his idea with a
knife and two steel pointed instru-
ments he made, and saw ordinary
pieces of deal board and cedar
taking shape under his guidance.
Besides sandpaper and other pol-
ishing materials, those three pieces
are all the tools he uses.

He is so accustomed to giving
wood light handling that even
the cigarettes he smokes are held
as though they were eggs. Little
boys know him as the toy-boat
maker. Years ago they liked him
better than nowadays, for then he
was not so strictly professional as
ne is now.

Far into the night you may see
; Smarty Kirton’s lamp burning at
his home at Bank Hall, for it is
at night when it is quiet that Kir-
ton carves better. He ean carve
a three inch tall toy of a policeman
in a pose of regulating traffic in
45 minutes and after it is var-
nished he charges 36 cents for it.

He sells to some city stores. He
does not normally sell them by
| retail.

At Christmas time life goes well

ORIENTAL
GOooDs

From INDIA, CHINA,
EGYPT !

Silk, Curios, Brassware,

Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak-

wood, Sandals, French Per-

fumes, Barbados Scarves in

Pure Silk, Etc., Etc., Etc.
The Souvenir Headquarters

THANI Kros.

KASHMERE
Pr. Wm. Henry 8t.—Diul 5466



-———







==







[0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Whittaker’s Almanack,
1951



| Pint, 14 Pint and Cocktail |
| Glasces



JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

&!
Sl

Hy HAN

THIS NEW GENERATOR cost over £30,000.

es

nee



Another generator is expected shortly.



THE GENERATORS are controlled from the Main Switchboard. The driver in the picture is turning

off one of the generators.



BOYS’ CLUB FOUNDER
ARRIVES NEXT MONTH

MR. BASIL HENRIQUES, C.B.E., J.P.,

is expected to

arrive here March 2nd, to lecture on Juvenile Delinquency
and Youth Welfare, under the auspices of the British Coun-

end,
other,
age groups, between these two age
groups.

The Settlement
world

3,000 members and catered
them from birth to death,
there was a Play Centre at one
and a Burial Society at the

and clubs, according

has

renowned, and

a and B.G,

in that

become
is visited
by social workers from all parts
of the Commonwealth
foreign countries.

and other

velopment Committee. His book,
“Club Leadership” is considered
the handbook for all club leaders.

Mr. Henriques has sat in the
Juvenile Court for 26 years, and
has been Chairman of the East
London Juvenile Court for 11
years.

He was sent by the Home Office
to speak on juvenile delinquency
in America in 1943, He took ithe
part of the Magistrate in the film
“Children on Trial”.

Mr. Henriques was pupil and



with Smarty Kirton, he told the
Advocate yesterday for it is then
that little children tell their
mothers, “Ma, I like that toy sol-
dier in that glass case,"’ more often
than usual,

He knows when a boat will ar-
rive and how many tourists it will
bring. He keeps himself well in-
formed for the tourists are the
people who buy most of his good
The big moments of his life ar«
when he may be standing in a
store, and hears a tourist exclaim,
“Oh, isn’t it nicely carved?” as
they often do.
is just the chuckling Smarty Kir
ton in the background.




10,

At such times he

before coming here.



Mr, BASIL HENRIQUES

very great friend of Claude
Montefiore, and he is Vice Presi-
dent of the World Union for
Progressive Judaism. He and
Mrs. Henriques founded the St
George’s Settlement Synagogue
in what was the “Ghetto” of
East London. He is also founder
and Chairman of the Jewish Fel-
lowship, which stands to uphold
that the Jews are a religious com-
munity, and not a national politi-
cal group,





‘Nieuw Amsterdam’
To Bring 700
Tourists

THE 700 tourists coming to
Barbados to-day from the U.S.A,
by the tourist liner © Nieuw
Amsterdam will find Bridgetown
shut off to the buyer, but will
still be able to do a little window
shopping.

Nevertheless, during their short
stay in Barbados, they will find a





number of surprises awaiting
them.
They will first be greeted by

the Barbados Publicity Committee
who have a good stock of curios
stamps, cards and envelopes to
offer them in exchange for their
American dollars, At this bureau
they will also be able to get
British currency in exchange for
American currency.

Leaving the Publicity Commit-
tee, the tourists will find curio
and fruit sellers who have spe
cially kept: their baskets
meet them, and_ shining
will take them to the beauty
of the island.

full t
taxit
spot

Sunday will not interfere with
those who prefer to spend the
day sea-bathing, relaxing over a
drink at a cafe or restaurant, o:
taking a Barbadian lunch

A country tour, with visits t
some historic paris of the
island, has been arranged for over

200 of the tourists by Mr. U. J
Parravicino.

the tourists
Cathedral

Perhaps some of
will take service at the

or other churches of the island
The Nieuw Amsterdam sails
from Jarbados during the

evening.





‘Devonshire’ Leaves Barbados To-night

H.M.S. Devonshire leaves Bar-
bados to-night at 9 o'clock for
Antigua after spending a “most
enjoyable” stay here.

Those cadets and officers who
were privileged ta come ashore
yesterday made most of the day
they were spending on an island
which they were sorry to leaye so

W912

30” wide—per yd.

48” wide—per y

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

13 BROAD STREET



soon,

At midday to-day two parties
of the ship will set off in 30-foot
cutters to be picked





up by the

Devonshire after they have sailed

and
crew

110 miles. Two officers
cadets will comprise the
each cutter. The cutters
equipped with engines

SANDERSON FURNISHING
FABRICS

A new range of beautiful styles has arrived—

. $3.77; $3.42; $2.83
$2.40; $2.06; $1.93

Se seeks is y00t $5.23

six
of
are not

PAGE SEVEN

ERURE BERS R ESE Se
- FRESH SUPPLY OF xs °

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PAGE EIGHT “

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





American Horticulturist Improves Tomatoes

-. Dr A. F. Yeager of the
Experiment Station of the
',University of New Hampshire
has bred early-ripening toma-
tees. for the short summer

season of northern

‘growing :
- omic in the United

» By WILLIAM GILMAN

; Nature Magazine
*During World War II an Ameri-
¢im woman living in a large city
wanted to.do her bit by raising a

le Victory Garden; but she was
af Invalid, ‘Her request was for
a» practical. vegetable that she
eould grow in the windowbox of
her apartment.

‘That problem was Dr. A. F.
Yeager's specialty. The skilled
American plant-breeder crossed
two tomato varieties— smallish
Dwarf Champion with extremely
early Redskin—and produced a
new hybrid. It was a tomato
large enough for slicing, yet grow-
ing on plants that need to be only
eke inches apart,

Dr. Yeager and his colleagues at
the University of New Hampshire
Experiment Station in the north-
egstern. section of the United
States have originated so many
varieties of fruits, berries, and
vegetables that he sometimes has
to puzzle about new names for
them, This time, there was no
difficulty. With a chuckle, he
christened the new tomato
“Windowbox.” And it has become
a useful new variety.

Difficult Time
The ordinary gardener is in-

_4 clined to take the tomato, symbol

’

oi juicy garden freshness, for
granted.. Actually, the tomato
has had a difficult time, Like the

tato, it was originally without

onour in its native hemisphere.
Both originated in the New World;
both had to go to Europe and win
popularity there, before returning
across the Atlantic to become
standard American foods. As
Zecently as a century ago, the
tomato was still an object of
suspicion, Some called it the
“love apple”, and wanted no part
of it.. Others considered it pois-
cnous-

Glance through the pages of
any present-day American seed
catalogue, and it is obvious how far
the tomato has come. But not
far enough, in the belief of Dr.
Yeager, who heads the Horticul-
ture Department’ of the University
at New Hampshire, Here for 11
years, and. during 20 preceding
years while he was experimenting
at state agriculture colleges of

Dakota, Pennsylvania, and
higan, he has been pursuing
the perfect variety.

Mueh of this research has been
aimed at making the tomato better
adapted to shott growing seasons
fn the cold northern States. In
this, Dr. Yeager has been a good
example of the scientist who will
net be satisfied. At North
Dakota ultural College, when
he gave the Great Plains States
their quick-maturing, hardy Bison
variety, he thought he would drop
tematoe work’ But ‘he could not:
aud went on to put the Victor
variety into 8éed catalogues. It was
en All-American prize-winner,
and remains a standard among
earliest tomatoes.

Not Satisfied

But Dr. Ye could not be
satisfied with these honours. His
fav is a new variety
which wished somebody

for he
would donate an ap ate
name, Ite fruit is mot only larger
‘than. Victor; it ripens a week or
more earliér-

“Some' people raise tomatoes,”
another horticulturist once said.
“Yeager races them,”

But ripening speed is not all.
Another ‘highly important project
is to raise tomatoes full of Vita-
min C, and thereby make them
rival oranges'as a mealtime juice,
Thanks to help from a_ grape-
sized Peruvian tomato, Dr. Yea-
ger already has normal-looking
varieties containing two and three
times as much this precious
vitamin as do ordinary tomatoes.
All this, obviously, is plant breed-
ing with a ‘purpose, to provide
healthier, more appetizing menus
for the northerner, whose gar-
den and orchard must face
spring’s -frosts and autumn's
early ones: ~

Tomatoes are only one example
of both the motive and method-
Yeager originated the now-stan-
dard Buttercup variety of squash
4o give northerners a meal-sized
ype equivalent im nutrition,

itamin A, and cooking methods
te the sweet potato of the Ameri-
can South. From bya . an
gone on to produce Bush Butter-
cup and, most recently, Baby
oo oes aiee Hubbard, Tt sets
tencup ue Hubbard. It sets
its meal-sized squash at the vine’s
stem, instead of first taking time
te grow ten or twelve feet before
Producisig female blossoms, And
his “perfect flowering” muskmel-
‘om, with self-pollinating blos-



DR. A. F. YEAGER, American horticulturist working with the
University of New Hampshire, in the northeast section of the United
States, kneels beside a vine of the latest tomato he has originated,
which is exceptionally rich in Vitamin C. In his hands are the new-
comer’s ancestors, ordinary tomatoes that were crossed with tiny,

greenish-white Pernvian ones.



soms possessing both pistils and
stamens, similarly shorten the
time required for ripening fruit.

Not Fit To Eat

When Dr. Yeager went to New
Hampshire in 1938, a farmer an-
swered a question with the reply,
“Yes, we can raise inelons, but
they are not fit to eat.” The horti-
culturist went to work to cure
that situation. Eight years later,
he introduced Granite State, a
firm, excellent-tasting muskmel-
on that grows fast enough for
the short summers im the north-
eastern section of the United
States. In 1949, he produced a
watermelon that ripens more
quickly than his muskmelons —
and promptly set out to get a
muskmelon that would beat the
watermelon,

Much of this breeding haw in-
corporated Dr. Yeager’s favourite
strategy — less vine or foliage,

smaHer but quicker fruit. An
extreme example is the New
Hampshire Midget, the cante-
joupe-sized watermelon that
ripens around 65 days from seed.

Tt is large enough for two serv-
ings. In modern days of crowded
refrigerators and small families,

this convenient size is a virtue.

In his many prajects Dr. Yea-
ger is helped by graduate stu-
cents who soon catch his infee-

tious enthusiasm and dovetail his
work with that of talented col-
Jeagues. Dr. Yeager’s new asso-
ciate is E. M. Meader, who was a
horticulturist with the U.S. Army
in Korea and brought back 150
varieties of shrubs, | vegetables,

and fruits, many of which had
never been seen before in the
United States,
Best Varieties
Most of the research follows

the pattern that has governed Dr.
Yeager’s career. As he puts it:
“We search for the best varieties
that exist and then, if possible,
improve them.” With co-operation
from the U.S. Department of
Agriculture’s plant explorers, Dr.
Yeager is able to search all over
the world — Turkey, Siberia,
Japan, India, South America —
for the seeds and cuttings he
wants to try in breeding work.

It takes time, sometimes years
of patient crossbreeding and se-
lection, for worthwhile results,
but Dr, Yeager has tricks of the
trade that often reduce labour
considerably. In tomato work,
for instance, he cuts time one-
third by raising three crops a
year — two under glass and one
outdoors. Even before a peach pit
has sprouted, he can examine its
interior and decide whether he
wants the color of the fruit that
the tree would produce. From first
leaves put out by a seedling, he











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went to New Hampshire. It start-
ed by crossing a greenhouse vari-
ety with a wild tomato from
Peru. The latter was a sweet,
greenish-white fruit only one
inch in diameter. But Dr. Yeager
knew that this grape-like vari-
ety’s Vitamin C content was four
umes that of ordinary tomatoes.
From several hundred matings,
many fruits were set. But the sum
total of all that work was only
one, Solitary hybrid seed, It was
this lone freak that Dr. Yeager
planted nervously: Luckily, it was
fertile, ang it ced enough
fruit for a sizable second genera-
tion. This enabled the long job
of more crossings and selection
of best y to get underway.
Gradually, Dr. Yeager built size,
quality, and colour into the new-
comers,
Introduction

In 1948, he was ready with his
first introduction. It is called
High C. In addition to the vita-
min feature, it has determinate
growth for early ripening: It is
round, red, very firm, but some-
what small — about five fruits
to the pound. Highly productive
in an average growing season,
its Vitamin C content runs es
ly double that of standards like
Victor and Marglobe. In 1949,
Yeager finished work on a vari-
ety he is calling New Hampshire
No. 50 umtil a good name is
found, This indeterminate vari-
ety is later bing oye 8 than High

C, but superior in er respects,
Along with. increased size, its
Vitamin C content approaches

tnree times normal.
Dr. Yeager prediets that such
tomatoes will become standard
varieties within ten years. Along
with such serious work, however,
he finds time for novelties. One
originated in a project under-
taken by a class in plant breed-
ing. The idea was to see how
small a tomato plant could be
produced that would mature
fruit. A cross was made between
Windowbox and Red Currant.
This variety produces cherry-
sized tomatoes nicely while grow-
ing in a three-and one-half-inch
flower pot. Yeager does not like
to have an unusual variety go to
can tell what color its beans or he wondered if it might not have
woes ote aver value as an ornamental for
n he went to New Hamp- Christmas decorations. This time,

shire, he astonished a green . ‘
house labourer by sprouting 1,000 = a ope ea

tomato seedlings, then throwing ; ‘
after the little boy in the beloved
away 997 of the plants, keeping story “A Pactaueke Carol” by the

only three at blossoming time. - i
He had discovered a way to save English author Charles Dickens.

blossoms and growing space,
keeping only the plants that



would bear large enough fruit. Ma , i
By glancing at the _ blossom’s nufacturers Life
embryo, and multiplying this

Annual Report

The Manufacturers Life report
Business in Force of $1,309,000,-

Giameter by 20, he knew what
gize the ripe fruit would be.

The Public 000.

At the end, it is the public that The new business in 1950 was
judges whether a new ‘tomato $22 million greater than that writ-
will be a success or not. For in- ten in the previous year and
stance, Dr. Yeager points out, amounted to $179 million,
there is little interest in a tomato Payments made to policyholders
that is not red. Yellow ones are under their contracts totalled $22
still unusual and pink ones dis- million. and were distributed. to
tinctly unpopular, Actually, he beneficiaries and policyholders in
explains, red and pink varieties death claims, matured endow-
are brothers under the skin, The ments, annuity payments and

pink tomato’s pinkness is.due to other policy benefits, including &

$3 million in dividends to policy-
Dr. Yeager’s big work concerns hoa
. a Ss rk cone §

earlier and higher-vitamin toma- steko on We Cee Pes
toes, He got extreme earliness by Government guftranteed bonds
pioneering with “determinate” constituted 25% of Assets and cor-
varieties, of which the Victor is poration and municipal bonds
the best-known example, Here, 37%. mortgages constituted 174%
again, is the principle of reducing of Assets and preferred and com-
useless foliage growth Such vari- mon stocks 10%

eties “prune themselves.” They -
behave like true annuals, reach-
ing a certain height, and
stopping growth, As a
they bear fruit earlier and
sprawling habits, they do

a transparent skin.

The rate of interest earned on

then the Assets was 4.22%, an increase
result, over the previous year’s rate of
lack 4.02%, the increase being due to
not the cumulative effect of change in
need staking. The work with the distribution of invested Assets.
high-vitamin tomatoes not only The mortality experience was
has looming economic importance, very favourable and Contigency
but illustrates the large amount Reserve and Surplus now amount
vot patient breeding that can ac- to $25,600,000, The local agents
cumulate in the background be- for the Manufacturers Life Insur-
fore a new variety reaches its ance Co., are W. S, Monroe & Co:
debut. Many crossings result in Ltd. the Chief representative is

what Dr. Yeager calls his Mr. Peter DeVerteville and the
“mules” — hybrids that do not well known cricketer Mr. Cly
reproduce, "| Walcott is an agent. ’



Vital To Health
In the, past the American Medi- MISSING

cal Association has classed toma- i

to juice far below orange juice in vere pide incmcaan tae
vitamin C content: This is the peared last year. The problem of
vitamin known chemically as as- where they have gone is worrying
corbic acid, and is vital to health. the French authorities. It is be-
After 11 years, Yeager has now lieved some seek to avoid con-
created tomatoes with Vitamin C seription by losing their own
content that rivals that of citrus identity. Others are misanthropes
fruits, and is retained in the can- who renounce society and seek re-
ned product. Amount of sunlight fuge in unknown hiding places,
produces variations, but, in gen-
eval, standard tomatoes contain
around 20 milligrams of this vita-
min per 100 grams. The new vari-

eties run up to three times ‘this

amount, and have even reached eospenmes, We eee Sl eae
30 milligrams of Vitamin C per kicked with such force that when
es tat 5 the boy stopped it with his chest
2 ig vitamin ‘pioneering began jt crushed Wis ribs, and he died
in 1988, shortly after Dr. Yeager instantaneously.

KILLED
MADRID.
A 16-year-old boy, playing at



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}
i

A GENERAL

‘SPEAK



{ say tke Government's conscription
policy sineo 1845 has failed .

We need Z-men to pull ‘83 out |

By Lieut. Gen, .
SIR GIFFARD MARTEL ‘

THE WHOLE WORLD is aghast
at the lack of decision and action
by the Western nations of Europe
at this time of great peril.

Tf. this indecision is prolonged,
Western civilization | be lost
for a long time and perhaps for-
ever.

Action is needed in ways.
One of the most important is the
raising of the mecessary. land
forces. But let me say straight
away that it is all nonsense to
of recalling the bulk, or even a
very large proportion, of the Class
Z reservists.

Between the two world wars
many of us preached that the
British should produce a nly
trained army of limited size whic
should make full use of mobility
and armour.

The proposal was that the
Frengh should produce the larger
man-power which would

hold defensive positions at times

and provide a pivot for the arm-

oured forces and guard dpe bases.
German Copy

ALTHOUGH we worked out the
whole idea we never made our
Army into a striking force of this
nature, but the Germans copied all
our ideas and raised those -mag-
nificent Panzer forces which were
the finest mobile forces that the
world had ever seen.

With these forces, Germany
overran Poland in a fortnight,
France in a month, and nearly an-
nihilated the Russian army in
1941. ;

If we had taken this good advice
and, raised a mobile armoured

army we would probably have
been able to counter the German
Panzers and save France. The

whole course of the war would
have been changed.

Did we not see exactly the same
position arising again after the
Second World War?

The Russians had a great man-
power army and were errified of
being attacked by mobile arm-
oured forces of the panzer t
which caused ther such frightful
easualties in 1941.

Towards the end of the war,
when I was on their battlefield, a
Russian general told me that it
would be a long time before they
could rid their minds of this ter-
vible. fear. "
Tofkgain the advice was given that
we should concentrate on raising
these mobile forces with the U.S.A.
ariek let France with her larger
man-power army carry out most
of the defensive role.

Conscript Waste

THIS advice could have been
earried out quite easily. We had
reat numbers of cruiser tanks of
he Cromwell and Sherman types
which were just what we wanted
for this role. But this time we did
even worse than between the wars
for we changed our well-trained
army into a large man-power con-
script affair. j

For the money that we were
spending we could easily have had
the necessary regulars which are
essential as a basis for well-
trained mobile forces.

If the Western nations had
maintained 20 such divisions after
the war instead of turning to a
man-power army we would soon
have been able to talk to Russia
from strength and many of our
world-wide problems might al-
ready have been solved.



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Why did we fail to follow
this advice for a second time?
Was it due to polities? If so,
why did not our military leaders
stand out against the mass con-
scription policy that was adopt-
They were nearly all

HAVING missed this great op-
rtunity what should we do to-
jay? here are those who say
that as Russia now has large num-

x bers of Stalin tanks we would no

longer be able to raise havoc be-
hind the enemy lines with our
mobile armoured forces.

That is not true, The Russian
army is still mainly horse drawn.
So long as our forces are really
mobile they will be able to evade
these heavy tanks with ease and
carry out their task.

The Western nations must
therefore raise 20 first-class
armoured divisions supported

air force. In addi-
need a number of
visions from Europe

whieh will form the most vital
component of the Western nations
land ‘ek

we

are we not acting in this
conv ae are we not making a
full drive for munitions produc-

course,
must have a proportion of trained
men,

Why has not the true state of
affairs been explained to the
people?

Is it that the Government can-
not bear the exposure of one more
failure? For it is clear that the
conscription system since 1945 has
failed to produce the skilled men
that Class Z can provide.

Never before has our Army bee!t
in a worse state for the task that
lies ahead. No one will admit his
mistakes.

There is still talk of using heavy
tanks with our armoured forces.
These are wanted for position war-
fare but not for our mobile forces.

I am probably the only officer
who has discussed with the Rus-~
sians those mobile operations on
their front which were carried out
on a far greater scale than any-
thing which happened on the
Western Front.

Three To One

REAL mobility is essential for
this task, and that means really
mobile tanks,

It is no use trying to meet the
Russian threat in any other way.

We cannot take them on with a
man-power army for they will
outnumber us by at least three to
one.

On the other hand, if we raise
these mobile forces I do not be-
lieve that the Russians will dare
to advance against us,

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED.

L.E.S.


















SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1951
A

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a



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY

Motorists in the United
States enjoy motion pictures
and moonlight at the same
time from the comfortable
seats of their own automo.
biles by patronizing. the out-
door theatres which are alter-
ing the habits and landscapes
of many communities.

By MARGUERITE W.
: CULLMAN
From The Ni
Motoring ‘th
countryside of Europe, the impos-
ing outline of a great cathedral

ahead of the graceful Spires of a
smaller thurch usually -are -the

York Times Magazine

proaching a town, Driving through
America — especially the
southern arid western sections—
a less romantic symbol of the town
to come is often the great, blank,
precise rectangle of the elevated
screen, signature. of the outdoor
motion picture theatre.

The first outdoor motion picture
or “drive-in” was built near Cam..
den, in the eastern seaboard
State of New Jersey, in 1933, and
within a few years duplic tes
were scattered all over the United
States. These early outdoor mo-
tion picture theatres rarely ae-
commodated more than 100 auto-
mobiles and were likely to resem-
ble an enclosed..cow pasture,
motorized, The outbreak of World
War II halted the number : of
theatres at 160, but when build~
ing was resumed after the war
more elaborate versions” ~ were
built and the number leaped in
1948 to 800. Now, according to
latest figures, over 2,100 (more
than 10 per cent of the number
of conventional, enclosed motion
picture houses) dot the landscapes
0! 48 States. At capacity attend-
unce that would mean an audience
of 1,453 in each of the 2,100 drive-
ins, or normally 3,000,000 people
gathering at sunset for the first
show, with an equal number -re-
placing them for the second per-
formance, making a total of 6,-
000,000 people a night,

Similar

No two of these American out-
door theatres are identical, but in
general they follow a_ similar
pattern. The amount of land in-
volved is considerable, with a
basic requirement of at least ten
acres to.enter for every 500 auto-
mobiles. This is necessary to allow
cars to enter through a toll gate,
circulate in the theatre, and exit
by a different route. The entire
area must be paved, or at least
finished with: a hard surface.
Ramps are laid out in a semicir-
cle from a point in front of the
screen and are spaced about 25
feet apart to leave an aisle be-
tween. These ramps form a series
of tilted terraces facing the screen,
so that thé passengers can sit back
and look upward as they do in a
conventional theatre,

Sound is brought to the cars
parked along these -ramps by a
network of wires laid under the
paving, with each wire terminat-
ing in a speaker post. Each post
has a pair of speakers which re-
semble portable microphones and
are equipped with separate volume
control to serve the two cars on the
right and left, Although the area
must be reasonably Plark to show
the pictures, outdoof- theatres can
not be blacked out. By putting
blue and amber lights on high
poles toward the back of the
theatre a sort of artificial moon-
light is provided. Rest rooms and
refreshment stands usually are
located in a low building some-

, where toward the center of the-southern - State
area. As receipts from the ‘sale of-
| réfreshments
“much as 50 per cent of the entire

often provide as
income of the theatre, ample and
attractive space, is.,allotted. Most
f the theatres have small carts
hich are pushed around the

ie “ramps during the show, offering

easy car-side service. e rest of

the theatre, its general decor and

location is purely individual and
varies from the most modest little
construction, handling no more
than 200 cars, to the most’ de luxe
jandsciped affair with ponds of
Jakes and accommodations for as
many as 2,000 cars,

_ New Sources

Owners.and sponsors of the out-
door theatres in the United States
feel that in three-quarters 6f their
patrons they have tapped hitherto
non-motion—picture patrons. The
majority of the patrons admit that
the films are generally older and
often less desirable. than those
offered at a more gonveniently
located, conventional, enclosed
_motion picture house. And yet,
they cheerfully will take a longer



-

x

il,

hrough much of the |

first indication that you are ap-

To Mothers !!

1951

trip to see a less appealing
and pay more,money. T|
ple who do this inelude,

show;
peo-

Married couples with one or

mere young children whom they
cannot leave with anyone. It is
not at all unusual to see infants

in- the back of ‘ears, and
most of the theatres include a
warming “service, Two

and three-year-olds sometimes
are
and

provid ‘ with an adequate
supper from the refreshment
stand, }

standing in line. This is especial-

ly true of people who, owing

ight along in, pajamas
ied down on the back
Seat. Plder children may be

Elderly, infirm or physically
handicapped people who cannot
cope with. crowds, jostling, or



SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



to an accident, may be tem-
porarily obliged to use a wheel

chair, crutches or a cane,

People who are extremely
health-concious, Despite the fact

that sitting in a car provides no
more fresh air than sitting at.

home next to an open window,
a surprising number of people
look upon outdoor theatres as
healthful recreation, Others, who
fear to expose their children og
themselves to local epidemics

own, cars,

Obviously, any time this nurn-

r of cars join in a common
meeting place there is bound to
be a certain amount of congestion.
But this is the sort of problem
encountered in varying degrees
at college and municipal stadiums

all over the nation. A number of+

States have endeavoured to meet
the problem locally by writing
rules governing drive-ins inte
their building codes in an effort
to establish a ‘standard for con-
struction and location.

Free Service

One well-known outdoor
theatre chain’s list of instructions
to its managers urges them to
“watch for elderly patrons and
offer to park their cars or perform:
other services for them . . give
free gasoline to run car heaters
in cold weather . give the
utmost in service at all times,
including such little courtesies a3
changing tires and _ supplying
emergéncy gasoline to cars.”

Until recéntly, outdoor theatres
have had to be content with
either the oldest or the least
desirable motion pictures on the
market, But with their rapid
growth and increased strength
they are beginning to demand,
and to get, better products. The
motion picture companies have
begun to realize that outdoor
theatres not only represent 10
per cent of their domestic market
but that they are an ever-increas—
ing potential market. They are
beginning to take seriously the
Claims of the operators who say
that, far. from merely taking
away from the established indoor
film trade, they are creating a
new audience.

The enclosed theatre seems to
be gravitating away from the
enormous downtown “hall” or
“palace” (withs the attendant
parking problems) to the smaller,
modern building in decentralized
locations. ..Conversely, the -out-
door theatre, which has no park-
ing problems, shows a tendency

to larger places’ with © their
resultant greater facilities. In-
deed, they often develop ~ to
amazing and giddy heights in
their fancies. One in Miami in the

ef Florida is

called “a theatre in a garden” and
is equipped with exotic palm
trees, flowering shrubs and a
hanging .garden (back of the
screen tower) with tropical
flowers and vines. °

Some of the outdoor theatres
report that new heating units will
prolong the time they can stay
open, in some cases moving them
into~>the- all-year-round-~ class.
Experiments are going on to
develop a “recessed, movable
screen in a shadow box arrange-
ment. This might make possible
a late afternoon matinee with the
screen set at the extreme rear of
the housing and visibility limited
to the center sections of the
ramps. As daylight faded the
screen “could move _ forward
slowly until with total darkness
it reached the front of the shadow
box, thus increasing its visibility
until reaching total capacity.

“Drive-ins” may not represent
the sophisticated urbanite’s idea
of a glamorous evening, but they
have captured the fancy — and
the steady trade—of millions of
Americans.

a



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feel safe in the privacy of their §







THREE MURALS have

building at Coolidge Field which is being converted into \
They have been painted by three of

a waiting room,

(Advocate Correspondent)

ST. JOHN’S.
been painted on the walls of a

Antigua’s young artists Arnold Prince, Garner Francis and

Cecil Adams and the subject
of the island.

The paintings reproduced above
were taken by Mr. Risely Tucker,
British Council Representative in
the Eastern Caribbean,

Prince’s picture is a quiet
street scene where two or _ three
women are gathered together

having a chat. There is no other
object on the street but a small
boy walking on the opposite side
towards the waterfront. From
deep to light shades of blue is the
colour used and Prince has suc-
ceeded in demonstrating the
peace of .one of Antigua’s main
streets with its buildings. and
overhanging galleries. A perfectly
straight wide street to the wharf
with no traffic or even a parked
car on it.

Francis’ painting is a colourful
street scene where a woman with
a tray of fruit including bananas
and pineapples is on her way to
the market. A lad. is following
her carrying a large bunch of
bananas on his shoulder. Cactus
is in the foregrgund and goats
on the dry pasture in the back-
ground,

Adams’ work on the opposite”

wall catches the eye as soon as
you enter the room. His is a
beautiful tropical seascape, In a
crisp choppy sea a man is putting
to sea in a small boat with his
fishpot. There is a stretch of
beach and a background of hills

Both Prince and Francis have









e

4 5:65 OOOO 9 SSP O SOO PI PPP SOOO FOE

FOS

s chosen are all typical scenes

visited Barbados and ¢xhibited
their paintings here.

MISSING FIGURES

The difference between two
consecutive “odd numbers is of
course, two. The sum of the square
of thesqgtwo numbers is 650. How
quicklyâ„¢ can you find the two
niissing numbers?



“Ud9}0UTU puke UVEzUeAeg :NOLLA'TOS



CAME PREPARED

TORQUAY, England
A boy here took his pet pigeon
on his first day at a new school,
At lunch recess the boy tried a
school meal but didn’t finish it.
He released the pigeon with the
message; “Don’t. like the stew,

Coming home”,
—Can. Press.

‘



BIRTHDAY GREETINGS

Happy birthday fo Marina Nicholls
who celebrates her birthday this week,

May you have a jolly time.

ITCHING
INFLAMED

Â¥



Distributors :

F.B.Armstrong Ltd., Bridgetowr

PRESCRIPTION



Outdoor Motion Picture ANT/GUANS DECORATE DART W
Theatreain The U.S. 42? ORT WAITING ROOM

THE OBJECT in DARTWORDS
is to arrange all the 50 words
shown in the circle in such a way
thas they lead logically from MAY
to MAXWELTON: The relation-
ship between two successive words
must be governed by ONE of the
following six rules, and no rule
may be invoked more than twice
consecutively .

1. A word may be an anagram
of the word that precedes it.

2. AIT may be a synonym of

* the word that precedes it

It may be achieved by add-
ing one letter to, subtracting one
letter from, or changing one letter

NUMBER ENIGMA

VP
MRE
DOABLE

DERIVE our common

mathematical digits from

the Arabs. The figures were in

common use in the Middle Rast

for eenturies before they re-

placed Roman numerals in the
West.

An ancient tomb in India, iden-
tified as that of a potentate, is
said to have bovne a group of
figures arranged o5 above, and
it is a legend that the figures
represented the age of the man
who was buried there. Certainly,
there is a method to the arrange-
ment that attains a result unlike-
ly to have been produced by ac»
cident. .

Perhaps by studying it, you
can determine what. that result
is or, if it does represent the
ruler’s age at death, what his
age was,

‘TVBeP It dieINe}od oy Jo oFe
ou) SBM Fe JEU) OUNsTY UO OM ‘sOLOET
‘bE OF ppy ORE‘ efoys eyR UWI sa9q
una jusovfpe anoy jo dnoris Auw ‘o#yy

eee, olive Ou) ee Ayleuosyyp pow
i abe oy *
oseur uv

AYTBOlOA MO’ YOrM ‘ouunbs
Rupert and





uuoz sandy op Keay



Scampering home, Ruper: shows
his sketch and tells his story again.
Next morning he starts out to see
«his pal is better, and to his
amazement the first pérson he meets
is@pPodgy himself striding along
stutdily, ** Tt. was jolly good of you
to’ look after Rosalie yesterday,"’
says the litthe pig. She's too much

ALPHABET CONUNDRUMS

What two letters of the alphabet
have nothing between them?
ula) ueMIeq

MAMSNV





fuyjem ooaey 6d pur ON

What word of three letters can

be spelled with two letters and
spoken with one letter.

093 p4ow
ayy ose 969 PioM OUL “WEMSNY

to



By

FACE POWDER

TALC COLD CREAM

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Qe









73
iS
x
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?

in the’preceding word.

IT may be associated with
the previous word in a saying,
simile, metaphor, or association of
ideas ‘

5 IT may form with the pre-
ceding word the name of a well-
known person or place in fact or
fiction

6 IT may be associated with
the preceding word in the title
er action of a book, play or other
composition.

A typical succession of words
might be: Turnip—Turpin—Dick
— Dock —Lock -—-Stock —Barrel
— Barred — Marred — Spoiled —

Despoil,
—LES.

Children’s Letter

Dear Children,

Thanks for your letters last
week but there are still some of
you from whom I haven't heard
for quite a long time, and I shoula
be very glad to hear from you.

Peggy Dean and Erin Jones
have reached the age where they
can no longer be members of our
children’s league; I should like
them to know how nice it was
to have had them among us and
it is with regret we wish them
goodbye. Good luck to you, both
and all the best in the future.

Those of you who are Scouts,
Guides ang Brownies I am sure
will have quite a. lot to tell me
in your letters this week and I
am anxiously looking forward to
hearing from you.

I must wish you all
happy week-end,

Yours very truly,
CHILDREN’S EDITOR.

WEIGHTY MATTER

With ‘how few weights is it
possible to weigh any amount be-
tween 1 and 127 on an oldfashioned
balance scale? only whole num-
bers must be considered, What
will be the denominations of the
weights?

By the way, if a chicken weighs
two pounds plus threefourths of
its own weight, how much does
it weigh?



a very



‘spuned 4uUne
SYUROM VoxoTyo aug, ‘spunod anoj-A)xXIs
PUB OMP-ALATUR ‘U@opXIs GUB}e ‘anoz ‘Omg
‘uo 407 SYAIeM UaAeg *NOLLN'IOS





for me, but she’s gone back home
now, so all's well."” “*You are an

old fraud, Podgy,”’ cries Rupert.
“You were just pretending to’ be
ilt’’ Podgy winks. “If ever you

hear that Rosalie is here again |
advise you to do the amar! he
grins,
THE END,
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED







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PAGE TEN



Pr

*
t z

“ : N the stage of the London Pavilion
aa that night the spotlights burned
af Z on a lithe, loose, shiny-limbed

a generation.
London was

SESE

&,
6

excitement up to boiling-point,
Up in the

te the cheers and

intermixed wi

: ; “Shame ! ”
e That week



ce ming costume,
into

out She went. stil
in bat dress.
on to the parade
to comb her hair
in the mirror ot
a car. ’
Three _— police-
men had to clear
the crowd bejore

; &VELYN “ i
E they could arrest
nm /— her, charged with
B

PEPE SERRE USES 5G

<
»



BEBE S

She was. fe-
méanded. in. cus-
tody for a medi-
cal report...
~ It was nigh-summer, 1923 It
wes the startfor Cochran and
‘tor Engiand—of.a Year of
Change and Revélation.

{ publie exrposure.

|

a



black figure which writhéd and shimmied
—and shook the manners and modes of

: eeing Florénce Mills for the
4) frst time, and didn’t quite know how to react.
Every shake und undutation of the body
ander the scant covering of feathers. every
uctive sound from her mouth, pushed the

dregs circle. as the Mills bomb-
ll exploded into the finale of her frenetic,
roid recital. Charles Blake Cochran listened

handciaps + and ard.
them, infuriated cries of.

te Oe ennbeat. at
rr isiter§ = undresse on the
« beach, @limbed into



heard

her swim-

.

Guests
ot 1923 he had to have something acures like Bea Lillie and
violently, “sensationally mew. Not ‘Pajiu) Bankhead sat ut one
in order to make anything for table and the Negroes at the
himself put to pay off the other ’
mounwng heap of debts. “

if was the beginning of a year
in which he fought for survival.
and attempted to cash in of
everythmeg

. PROMISE

—of new wonders .

T wasa mement when
British




from the peerage,

Britain gasped at this new
kind of fraternisation, and: it was
another two years before they had
digested the
change enough
to welcome jo
Mills and
company back
egain—and give
them the rap-

SUNDAY ADYOCATE ~





While it lasted. If England had
eBasped ‘at Negroes, ic gogeled at
the crew of whooping cowboys
and cowgirls who swarmed into
London, As the Daily Express
said :—

“The cowgirls

nt who are all
beautiful. a

ear at luncheon in
afternoon resses and pink
beucoir caps, All wear immense
diamond and platinum rings, and
one girl shocked everuone by
actualiy saunte;ing toe the bath-
room in black silk pyjamas. ‘

" The greatest sensation today

was when Mrs. Buck Lucas
appeared in a ‘ of men’s blue
trousers ! The cowgirls are

forward and rouge io excess,
while their mentolk are bronzed
and ojten unshaven.”

They went into the ring at

= ‘THE DUNS

—at his heels tanta Of Change

OR 2 years the Life was full and cheap

FPoene of C. B. Coco» —and rich Im promise of new

avenrds ran nad been growing wonders to come. Ineome tax
oowebigger and bigger in the minds 48. 6d. in the & You could
- ot British public as a show. buy a sportS coat for 17s. 6d.,
srs a pair of shoes for five bob.

an,

By 1923 ne nad got nimselt
ralmost a supreme reputation as
the nation’s arbiter of entertain-

& pram for £3. You could hear
the B.B.C. on your crystal. set
oe a 100-mile range.

ment. He was ucknowledged as ad in the homes, women were
@ master of talent-spotting and ‘beginning to unlace their stays,
Star-making. shorten, theit hair, and go out

Already tucked under nis for thejr first adventure with
*mpresario’s wing, he Had such unrestricted, ibited.
‘Money-makers a5 Beutrice Lillie, emanc un, but with a
Alice Delysia. Jack Buchanan. Certain timidity too. They were
Dorothy Dickson, the Dolly not yet the bold hussies of the

Anna later ‘20's,

Sisters. Evelyn maye.
Fapoce i ane at orndike, And
t the c not, ‘know ipeeaat that som

was that the duns were biting at the old prekuctipes y ich he
his heels—and he had | few was stamping tu round and
Moneyed friends to nead them ‘stung him.

He found it first with Floren
Mills and com of Neg

, all
Commen mas te Rha, al

ao

Practically every show he nad




‘put on had made headlines, often singers dancers. re were
a cake peaked the | indignant outeries at his as
2. ouse, given the put coloured players on the
was. country - .some- @ as white ur

tists.
o Mills was getting £700 a
week from C.B., and he had to

thing new in
amusement—and

turous suctess
the ri paopte in
: were avid for e- 4 Blackbirds.”

+ There was the scent But. in that
of @ new-kind of ‘post-war stage of his
freedom in the air, career, the only

The people would Ee the wa Cochran
Socialist Party into or the could draw the
first time, because they wanted a masses he needed



to his box office

them and sur
prise them. After
Negro singers
and dancers,

what next ?

There was Competition specta-
cular enough to daunt the greatest

Wwinam. For, in 1924, the
mpire Exhibition opened at
Wembley.

The rain came down in a
deluge. on the white pavilions.
the great fun fair. the gadgets
wnd the sideshows. But every day
more ne 150,000 filed
into the Wembley
the prizes their Empire had to

OW.

t eould Cochran give them,
to persuade those tight-waisted,
thin - trousered. bowlér - hatted
men with umbrellas. those flat-
hested women in ‘their bulky.
onger-than-mid-calf skirts to pay
some of their money to him ?

THE RODEO

—a riot, then...

Wembley to ride their bucking
broncos and rope their steers—
and ran slap into trouble.

The R.S.P.C.A. had its eve on
the Rodeo. and decided that
there was cruelty imvolved. ‘A
steer broke a _ leg and had to be
shot, and an R.S.P.C.A. inspector
tried to get hold of the leg. There
was a fight.

The upshot was a case against
Cochran as the organiser—and
though it was as near to a circus
2s a trial will ever get in

ngland (with a witness in the
box wearing two gu on his
belt, and cowboys and cowgirls
Signing autographs outside the
court)-—-the publicity didn't do
much good for Cochran.

Though the case was dismissed,
C.B. had been vilified as a
torturer of animals.

It was, in actual fact, a sin of
which the great showman was
not guilty.

Many of his friends
sometimes
that he liked
animals better
than humans,
He once had
no compunction
in advertising for
old, grey-bearded
men to fill parts

felt





production of “The. Miracle,”
Cochran cherished them as if
they were his own children. and
never m & daily visit to
them backstage.

Not long after the Rodeo ended
the crash came.

Cochran walked into the bank-
ruptcy Cort. Oak tor ie frst
time in pu vealed sorry.
state of his affairs,

He had = tos

t thousands
pounds On ‘show after show, Ev:
hant visit
On. ~- great

the s! and triw
Of Pavlova to
success though it
was, pea tailed
to pay 10S way.
Mrs, Cochran
nad sold her
janels, . his ve-
oved pictures by
‘oulouse-Lautrec
had gone to
dealers.
havent a &
note
world,”





ALRPFOORAPEE mezeseear
m like the con-
" still lost money. ride down ‘convention to make : in one of his nd £100,000. PAVLOVA fusion that reigned in the affairs
ochran’s. her pay her way, He was a WE finally decided on a plays, get the The great a Cc, B, Tan,
backers had been stubborn man, and he was deter- Rodeo. It was new, maximum pub- Showman was
burned too often mined to have his plans go lavish. and exciting. licity by letting © his uppers.
in their bank through. So he bucked his head, It was plastered over with master a vast, doddering with nothing for "
: Yow balances, and he not for the first or last time, ip, Wet even before line of them his 25 years of
: to the against prejudice and tion. it began it was doomed not to queue outside his Work ‘his reputation— ;
“im for . a make any money. office—and then img his reputation for extrava-
his-finance, - for his coloured yers, an C.B. had to borrow so much, send them away #s4nce. l
: Their rates invited white celebrities to meet at such hi rates, that he | empty-handed. In Britain itself the sun had .
wee came high. On them. But ee didn't have goudn't Possibly profit even from .- oo Ww) ee Same eee men ena Prod
: « . nave whites a success. C > : er, e excursion trains
, DICKSON, BAR a Soa ‘Pincha ait’ votetner But it was @ memorable show. . were used in the 10 the sea were packed, At the
4 — = os wo = oo ‘ = ey os r i" -- dleailaieme
JI rate per . : ® ds sai 3
4 cent. interest
¢ ) r annum,
g * ee Thal summer
4 : , pare
; f ° asking the e Court to turn +. ’ .
e American Column: thumbs down on ra on an appeal court U.S. Atom-Bombers tebe amen
: . : 3 isi it ss Coplon was , .
: Dis Sten Sate et. To Fly Fro INLY ONE SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN
a : | A CHESTNUT COLT called THIS EXCITING FRAGRANCE
ie : Your Host, insured for a quarter N th Af . B.
te Me Blo of a million dollars, will be oper- ‘NOT rican Bases
. ay Ow 1 £. Your skin willbecooler, sweeter
g ated gn) in California tomorrew. ; eee
5 : Your Host broke his right elbow , AMERICAN heavy bombers are ms ee ee
; Cash Back in four places when fell last t@ US¢ bases in French Morocco desirably dainty from head-to-to
n A y ¥ under’ an agreement signed be- tes . + ger
; " month. Dr, James Farquarson, tw te’ US and F te. PT
; of Colsrade, will pin the broken *ween the U.S. a rance to- if, you bathe with fragrant?
a Ee 5. wan tens. \ pieces of bone’ together with a ike a aig + & sth ame
ee Penni ee ant sani ee ayy wteek pte, Caen ened wal be Casa« (Cashmere Bouquet Beauty Soap.
2 Swnhilée ericans are, still sadly blanca-Cazes and Port Lyautey. 7
A shaking their heads over President | 4 DAPPER THUG named My- Meknes, Marrakesh, and Rabat-
is Truman's latest-call for ten billion yon Selik was arrested in Brook- Sale will also be used.
© doffars ‘In taxes there came a‘faint jyn while trying to hold up a The Morocco agreement is part
ri ray of hope. cashier for 20,000 dollars ., and of the American plan for a world-
7. Br oe gv yee tripe seed aM = his cing g a pa x — air bases. Basis of
si sh trom teuc some c s in ec- Plan is:—-
Ra payments if it was valuable and tives’ memories. & 5 1, Establishment of a string
vi a storm destroyed it. f Now the Detroit police are in ef forward atom-bomber bases
ti Hundreds of thousands of anes New’ York, questioning thim about round the Russian - dominated
Â¥ icans on the cast coast were affect- the murder of Michigan. Senator central land mass of Asia and
A = the great storm in Novem- Warren ree shot to death in continental Europe but separated
ii s . . his car in f° from it by sea so that naval and
So this ruling—contained in Sec-
} } tion 23 E-3, regulation Ill of the TV AUDIENCES have been lost ee. Pe Se che aorta
% Internal Revenue Bureau's codes— in admiration at the way news-
; may¥--mean big money kept from readers apparently memorised 4," pena Bd y sre aon oe
ert “Sam. : their scripts. But the secret is }aune, that of = mecium,
*. * * out. The announcers script is og iy a at concentration
All the taxpayer has to do is simply unrolled on a_ special part of kee one
¢ prove that the gnarled old elm machine perched above the cam- 8 Snother.
; } really did stand for centuries, and era. = an Ma: © of a force of
« } that its“disappearance has affected | EVEN the dog kennels are air- @avy See capable of flying
4 | the-value of his property. _ conditioned in the Independence, °¥® as Production centres
+ -£| He must get an affidavit froni a newest ship of the American Ex- fect from America.
4 reat-estate expert, then a few port Line, . AM American medium and 7
i j sworn statements from “tree sur- aory Sears means (8 ae
‘ ‘geons, foresters, or ts, , 13it ic Command,
...ndg while .“‘photographs taken , ‘headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska.
i * immediately .after the storm are a— POPULATION INCREASE © ihe mobile ‘medium bomber

great help, ‘before-and-after’
photos are even better to sup-
port the claim.” ‘

gieind Hse

tures electrical equipment,
has mompeioned for years against

the U.S. Government because “~
she says that to deduct taxes frém
a person’s pay before he has even
rec@ivéd the pay is “straight rob-
bery”; and Judith Coplon, , the
: pretty Government girl who was

sia,

Washingtor—preparing to chal- this
le a Cotinecticut court. which pneumatique has been doubled, to
s Miss Kellems could have 35 miles an hour.
some tax money back again -— take a fast letter only 12 minutes
“wilful.” to cross Paris, one hour from
e Depattment of Justice is lover to lover.

says angrily that she is





The statistics office
naunced the European population
TWO WOMEN, vastly different, .of the Union of South Africa has
are again in America’s headlines: increased by 611,000, or 30 per
Vivien Kellems, president of a cent. in the past 14 years.
Connecticut firm that manuface total
who compared with 620,000 in pene

aim ¢@ i .

Frenah Jovers.who have always
favoured ‘the Cent raese oe pad

und il f ing for Rus- underground which carries fast
a ao eae ee majl-in Paris—heard good news



PRETORIA, South Africa
here an-

tis
a

The

population is 12,320,000



NO TEME LOST

PARIS.

#0 refuel. —LES.

ALL CONVENIENCES |
KENILWORTH, England



week, The speed. of the

for visitors to
Britain.

It will now

a central dining hall.—(CP)

~ For white teeth, use the PEROXIDE
tooth paste—use Macleans every day.



Superforts with an atom bomb
range of more than 6,000 miles.)

A luxury drive-in motor-—car
ag ‘to, be opened near here in time
the Festival of
Each cabin has its own
television set and telephone witb





































= e = ae
Engineering Opportunities
A handbook of advice and guidance to the
Best-Paid Engineering Posts which explains
the easiest way to prepare at home an “NO
Pass — NO FEE” terms for A.M1.Mech£.,
A.M.1.E.E., A.M.1.CE., CITY OF GUILDS,
ETC. Full details of hundreds of DIPLOMA
Courses in Mechanical, Electrical, Automobile,
Radio, Television. Aeronautical and Produc-
tion Engineering, Building, Plastics, Draughts-
manship, Petroleum — Technology, Forestry,
Etc, ,
To AMBITIOUS Teachers, Civil Servants,
Accountants, Reporters, etc., a Handbook en-
titled : “High Pay and .” Teachers
Lower Examination Parts 1 and 2, Cambridge
School eae, London Méatricmilation

(June 1951), Accountancy, Local Entrance
Examinati for Civil Service, Short-hand,
Book-keeping, Economics, November En-
trance Examination for S.C. 1951, Bachelor

of Commeree (Lond.) Bachelor of Science
Econ, (Lond.), etc.
Make sure e your copy of this unique book,

entirely and without obligation by
posting the coupon at once.
post Ss UPON NOW!

of (a) “ EERING OPPORTUNITIES”
Send me s copy ©" (>) “HIGH PAY AND SECURITY”
CROSS ROOK NOT WANTED
NAME . }
“ADDRESS ...............
SUBJECT. OR RKAM, .|. .cccescasdeenacsejsbawbutiacwasnes’
% The British Institute of Engineering Technology and the
x British Tutorial Institute, London. .
g address ali communications to:—Loeal Représentatives:—





“lack of paper”) loathe them. = ———)
Anyone volunteer to say a few | [J a
kind words on behalf of the men | 4 r —i aH
with the runaway pens? =| ] [——
South Africa-born Helga Moray | -ii—7——4
is hereby elected this month's | -ii--\¥7—9t am
career woman. Her first novel, | C-—*—— =
“Untamed”, puts her in the news. Fa ‘on ——_] i
Following dramatic school and a oh — =
Shakespeare tour with Sir Frank f= i
Benson, she turned buyer for a] |—i———_/
South African mins house, | 3 =
travelled Europe. Film. next, | Cig 4 fem,
FLORENCE then a 40,000-mile roundthe- |—-a-——f ged
MILLS — world trip, a
she sent the a
exrcitement up’ After living in New York, Paris, a &
to ‘voiling-point she came ‘to London, where she | [——§ — >
wrote “Untamed”. It is already | gal —#ar ae
paying dividends. A top-seller in | |——}—-R dd
ae seven __ translations, a ——
resorts bowlers ‘ paddiers nch book of the month choice, | ———¥"— i Sa —
mingled =u ae film rights bought by Hollywood. rtd al |
bathing sui the new Miss Moray is now at work on/}-+———4 ie
shortened leg. and men with two- her second book, can be seen{ |+——@ a
piece suits which were white and most days at the British Museum. | |([——J at tae
transparent wt the top, Doin, h—fro} 5 Ve j ro ia
E y ig research—from +9 to 5. =} 3
CONFUSION yithen, April brings _ Peter | >= ge ———
*. 4 oble’s biography of Ivor Novel- | (———4 pf
—not only in France & lo, added attraction will be intro- -——4 anos |
; duction by Noel Coward, Here is | -——4 ae
BP ear eee Coward on Noel and “Ivor: “For | /-——4 oe
Rain No More.” many years it has been fairly ||/-——4 po
= sane ss fashioned if generally assumed. that we aS
Velebtinn was must be fierce rivals. Acquaint-

Pp by his performance

is aim, “

A piay called “WI
red.

Was craw)

from the bishops,

England uffed at cigarettes
eae and drank beer at Po

Tt was

























x The Caribbean Educational Institute, Port~of-Spain, f
z : Trinidad, B.W.1., P.O. Box 307
PLPOSCSPS EPL EZEFEESSISES ESOS OSES SOLIS.



. & & A CHAMPAGNE SERIAL OF THE HALF-CENTURY .. begins coday...by LEONARD MOSLEY x & x)
This writhing girl shocked a generation—and shook o~
_. the fortunes of a master showman... . That’s
where the curtain goes up on— |
















SUNDAY, FEBRUARY li, 1951

... But Are|










, Hy JON HOPE


















Fe aienedaeneitcniaiiaieanel

ARE best-selling authors of re a ae]
long novels given too big a share} & i >
of hard-to-get paper supplies? Pe) is
At jeast four giant tomes will | {Biff jiz
crowd booksellers’ shelves this |-——iil -———— FF ei
year. Each may be more than = | —1
200,000 words long. On previous | }——}iig ——____—_# |
form, threes may sell 100,000 | gg =
copies each. <9 ae | i et
Paper consumed by }o0,000 ————4 4 Ih fT
— of a 200,000-wonder: 45 —— fo i a







By
PP,

Librarians frown on marathon
novels (readers. take such a long
time to wade through them);
reviewers regard them through
jaundiced eyes; tyro authors of
80,000-word efforts (remember-—
in the oft-quoted fob-off about

iit)
anes

Fee,



LIT)

co
Mtge

EIEN



cate aeeenn
Ps











ances who know neither of us
attempt to curry favour by
deprecating either me to Ivor or
net to me. They are wasting

eir time. We have, ‘of course,
a lot in common, We were both
boy sopranos and we both drink
a lot of tea. We are middle-
aged, fortunate, talented and
successful.”

World Copyright Reserved
{ —L.ES.



BRANCHING OUT
MARIOTT’S COVE. N.S.
Boat builders along Nov a-
Scotia’s South Shore have lomg
done a flourishing business, but

now it’s expanding. Three 28-
foot boats built here were loaded };
aboard a freighter at Halifax for
shipment to the Canal Zone, an
—(




ee NS PN





AERO O/Y—FINNISH AIRLINES



The flying take-off!

March 1924 and the first aircraft of Aero O/Y, Fionish Air Lines, takes off on
its maider flight. Then year by year Aero O'Y cxtends its operations until
moze than 30 million kilometres have been flown and over 300,000 passéngers
¢carried—and still the graph mounts upwards: ‘

To-day Aero O/Y have an extensive network covering the ten. principal
towns and cities of Finland, and also routes to Stoekholm, Norrkoping,

Copenhagen and Amsterdam. linking with European and world airlines

FOR AN UPWARD CURVE IN AVIATION

SUELUAMIATION SERVICE
Ge
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1i, 1951 — SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN























i RR RAN OR TS SN ES AT SIT
BY WALT DISNEY
seer serertegne a ae te ease Su-- ze 3 tats aot i ME 2 Y.°ONE WORE C\CG_E ) | GOSH «.C SNIFF)... NOW WE re NA | A TVENTION I!
WE'VE GOT TO GET OUT OF THIS Be eee: Ce... ates

.-

AVE KILLED ME&...1... 4

on { af

J sos Na
Se: Mt |

SNUFF ns

PEATHER-TREE FOREST BEFORE WE-
\\0! HOI-LAUGH OURSELVES TO DEATH!








| FACTORY MANAGERS

Taki this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :~—










GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from 4 in. upwards



Watches Saiz Valentines




from your Jewellers:



NEVER SEND A
COMMITTEE LIKE THAT
TO CONVOY A BAG OF
DOUGHNUTS HOME
SAFELY

t }
g H)

* TEEL i

‘ MILD S Calender Watches in stain- Dainty Ladies’ Watches in }
; | Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes less steel, chrome and rold many styles. 17 Jewel and }
_gol@. 17 Jewel Waterproof, 15 Jewel, in Rold Gold and

BOLTS & - NUTS—AIll Sizes shock-proof and -non-mag- ‘Chrome. »

, netic, N)
| FILTER CLOTH~White Cotton Twill : ‘ :

)

At PRICES. that cannot be repeated.












YOU WAIT IN
F OF THE BAKERY:
1 WANT TO MAKE
SURE DADDY GETS
HOME Wii THAT
DOZEN SUGAR




The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lui.

WHITE PARK ROAD, ST. MICHAEL

Y. DELIMA & CO. LTD. |

20 BROAD STREET
} DIAL 4528

a

_— . . = SASS SSR i
' f ‘ Beane : 5, BONN '





featwie:

TAKE HIM TO JAIL! WE'LL) [

f HOLD HIM, BOYS, AND
oy SEE IF GRAFTON CAN

TAKE OFF HIS
MASK



|
eats | |—_----—---

|
'
| Ka
| TOMORROW IS MY | rere AFTER THIS i WHAT DO YOU THINK MY |
BROTHER DANNY’S | OMMERCIAL- THE ||. BROTHER DANNY WOULD









MOTHER-WHAT |
IN THE WORLD |










-~BUT HOW KIN YOU







































ARE YOU SO || BIRTHDAY-I_ DON'T WESTERN GOES ON! \|| LIKE FOR HIS BIRTHDAY. | (~~~) WRAP UP A SALOON H
SERIOUS ‘) KNOW WHAT TO GET | | I WONDER IF THE | il] THAT WE COULD WRAP HUHST | AN! DELIVER IT TO
ABOUT ? HIM- MAYBE JIGGS | RUSTLERS GIT THE ||| UP AND SEND OVER TO |} KNOW | HIS HOUSE ®
a COULD SUSGEST | 1] HESD OVER THE | | | ey HIM TONIGHT ? WHAT ||
; | | BcikOER BEFORE, | 1 Go HE'D {I “OM Me ,
MIDNIGHT! | \| (45) A LiKe” |} | VO tar
| — ) 1} vi f ey
, ly ~ |i | > “
f | >
Paice fv ll AR = eee
cts eek a
Raa V7 Vaan :

























ea as

“ | ELECTRIC FANS

CALL OFF YOUR. \ ABOUT A LITTLE MAN WITH A
TRIGGER MAN, \ BIG SATCHEL ¢ I’M PSYCHIC,

I WANT TO GO SAILFISHING. .. SORRY, CHIEF...
JOE SEVEN... near

Your. BOAT'S BEEN *THE CORMORANT”
RECOMMENDED TO ME...

FOR OFFICES
roR HOMES
12” Diam. OSCILLATING
16” Diam. OSCILLATING
DESK AND WALL MOUNTING









r TEN DOLLARS ADAY ISA ) YOU NEVER GO STEPPIN’ DO
YOU, MR, SMITH 2 TEN .
: DOLLA 5 WOULDN'T BUY YOU

\
600D 3 4 el i
: — | 6a . q A LAMB CHOP IN THE es () ees
EVENIN, MR. SMITH Br : ja ] , {

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED

Tweedside Road St. Michael
Phone 4629 & 4371

|
| THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK
|














|
|
¢
JEFF FELL ASLEEP + ‘
THEY WANT TO 57 WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,
are and Associations to make the compilation of information in
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities;
religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports,
radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed
below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:
THE EDITOR,
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street. a
FORM po
eo Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Ete. .....,.... pagyteqiorensessseinns gesengeonns
meee tees ESO JEFF WAKE (.{2222.LEMME | | NOTHIN PERSONAL IN THIS MISS. ME ‘ yo
>| tips WAKE UPs? ALONE SEIN THE Aan se Me Tee argc} | EXTRA CARAG ANID WE Te | Ramee RAT ef Ek taennbetearanerininner aencannonenlie BIA Nescilssicsasbeckasiiasiinbens veces
ABOARD THE , : GOTTA TRAVEL LIGHT. Sod
ESCAPING | President or Chotirmain.....s...csssscsssssescsesesssessssseseeeserevenssnsneeneneecsssessegeestees
CONVICTS PLANE}
DIANA /:
TERRIFIED Council or Committee Memberi..i...ccscccsssccseecrssscsrenseesees Raihisiviopensss*
‘| : OO oa. casscsoisecessstencbelOesiiseis SORORITY, oc csssscesssdcisonbebon osobeveondsryetvete
} +
i Short historical account of the origin, functions and current é
|? activities : +A | eS 4
jg tu Son dG ECO eel memes! | TS LT a
} $ } f


PAGE TWELVE



CLASSIFIED ADS.

we ae:

reilitcepiticrinntentenenstineiiaininiemsnge

The
Births,
le

announcements of
Deaths. Acknow-
Memoriam noticts is

charge for
Marriages.
ents, and In



$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
ie: any number of words up to 50, and
2 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents pér word on Sundays for each
adiditional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement

abneluncements in Carib Calling ‘the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 60 and 6 cents per word for etch
edaitional word. Terms cash, Phone 2506
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

ne Eee

DIED

COX-—On February 10th,
residente Bush Hall Road, St. Michael
Simeon St. Clair Cox. His funeral
leaves the above residence at 4.15 p.m
to-de,; for the Seventh Day Adventist
Chureh, King S and thence to the
Westbury Cemete:

Nurse Olivier Cox twitow) Olivier
George and Edward ichildre
: 11,

— —

SMITH—On February 10th, 1951, at his
residence “Natts”, St. Philip. Haward
Murre!l Smith. His funeral leaves the
pbove residence at 4.45 p.m. to-day for



19f1, at his













Bt. Philip’s Church
Evelina Smith, Lisle Smith, Clarence
Daysh. 11,2.51—1n.



VEACOCK—On February 6th, in George-
town, British Guiana, Miss Agnes
Veacock formerly Matron of the Bar
Dados General Hospital 11.2,.51—1n.

10th








1951.,
Hospital. Nurse Eva
Her funeral leawes

WALDRON On
gt the General
Florence Waldron
her late residence, Brittons Cross Road
Bt. Michael, for the Seventh Day Ad
ventist Church, King Street and thence

Februar







Ro the Westbury Cemetery.
Mrs. Sheila Arthur and William
Protaine (children), Lionel Arthur
(son-in-law), Mr, and Mrs, Lisle
* — Curwen. 11.2.51—1n

Ninos
IN MEMORIAM

ITH-—-In “loving memory of our “dear
heother Margaret Catherine Smith, who
Fell asleep om February 12th 1950.

Safe in the arms of Jesus.



: tie, Syb and Mrs. Ermyn Morrison
(Daughters: Cora Lashley (Niece) |
Jackie (Grandson).

Y 11,2,51—1n

ARVILLE—In loving memory of Mr

James Marville who parted this life on
February 11th, 1950
The midnight stars
grave
’ For one we loved but could not save
For those he loved he did his best
God erent him now eternal rest

ver

shine on his

be remembered by Mrs

Eisbrocine Marville (Wife). Mr. Chester-
fieic Nurse (Son), Owen and Gloria
(Grand-Children),
> 11,2.51—1n
‘. "
. FOR SALE
‘Minimum charge week 72 cents and

cents Sundays 24 words — over 24

ords 3 cents a
ord Sundays.

word week—4 Cents a

AUTOMOTIVE
*CAR—One Vauxhall 25 hp. Six
5 new Tyres, Upholstery inv

Engine running good

deepens
Best vais condition.
inspection. 51

Dial 4514 for

“CAR—6 Cylinder, 18 H.P?. ~Vauxhali
(Weiox! in excellent condition. | Phone

MacKinnon 4739 or 2900. 11.2.1+2n.
—



‘ CARS—1936 Ford V-8 Tourer. Excellent ] Of the late Mrs.

indition. 19°) Ford V-8 Sedan Bargain
9 Morris Oxford Saloon, Low Mileage
a well cared. FORT
P RAGe LTD. Telephone 4504,
a 11.2,51~3n

CAR — Ford Prefect 1947. One owner.






















F on REN T



Minimum charge week 12 cents and
96 cents Sundays 24 words over 24
words B cents «a word week—4 cents a
werd Sundays.

HOUSES

BUILDING— Upstairs
Roebuck St.,
2625

of building in
opposite Country Rd. Ring
11.2.51—3





” FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast, Furhish-
ed; 3 bedrooms, _Water-mill supply,
Lighting Plant. Double carport, 2
servants’ rooms. From February 15th.

Dial 4476 28.1.51—t.f.n.



BLUE HOUSE—Lucus Street. A _ fine
business stand Immediate possession
Apply THANT -BROS. Pr. Wm. Hry St.

3466 11,2,51—3~



OUSES—Gibbs' — Beach, St
“IN-an-OUT” Suitable for couple
March. ‘Restawile"’

to December 1951.
Apply Wesley

Peter.
— from
August/Octaber
Both fully furnished.
Bayley, High Street.

10.2.51—2n






HIGH ROCK—Bathsheba.
to July. Phone 4048. 10,2.51—4n-

NEWHAVEN, Crane Coast. Furnished;
4 bedrooms, Water-mill supply, Lighting
Plant, Double Garage, 3 Servants’ Rooms.
For June, November and December:
Dial 4476, 284 .51—t.f.n.

From March





STEWARTVILLE—3 bedrooms, Draw-
ing and Dining Room, Pantry, Kitchen,
2 Servants’ Rooms, Seaside, Hastings.
Phone 3904. 8.2.51—4n
‘noenisesintdepeiapsiamecteneniatemnemessnnencssemetenenanlttil

UNFURNISHED FLAT--At Ramsgate,
Boy Street, within walking distance of
Aquatic Club and City Dial 3065.

7,2,.51—t.f.n.

—————
WINSLOW—Cattiewash, for the months
of February, ch, May and Junie,
Apply: Mrs, T, Gooding, Strong
Hope, St. Thomas. 4.2.51—3n

WENDOVER — Abbeville Gardens









Rockley to be let, furnished, » June
and July. Apply: 2861, P. D. Me te
4.2,51—3n



PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cénta per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1.80 on Sundays.

AUCTION

By instructions received from the
Director of Department of Highways &
Transport I will set up for sale by
public auction at their yard on Thurs-
cey the 15th, beginning at 12.30 p.m.
the following items:— (383) Steel Brooms,
(127) Oil Brooms, (75) Shovels, (51)
Agriculture Forks, (19) Pickaxes, (54)
Lanterns, (57) Rakes, (141) Buckets,
(28) Wheel Barrows, (45) Twist Drills





and several other items of interest.
DARCY A. SCOTT,
Govt. Auctioneer.
7.2.51—4n,



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Tuesday 13th and Wednesday 14th
by order of the Executors of the Will
M. E. Collymore, we
will sell the Furniture which is both

modern and antique at ‘“Dunsinane’

ROYAL | Country Road

whieh includes
Extension Dining Table (seat 12), Up-
right and Arm Chairs, Ornament Tables,
Pedestal and other Sideboards; Book

te ‘arefully driven and serviced. Telephone | C#Se (#lass doors). Card Tables (Antique),





4.2.51—3n |Corner Cabinet (glass doors); Writing

Sets Tables, Roc s, Berbice Chair, Book-

PCAR—Chevroiet style mag . in first shelves all old Mahogany; 2 very
condition (M-180). 2550 any epi sortae upholstered Arm Chairs;

“ex Sunday, Die Sin: ictures, Paintings and



ae
) CAR—Packard 8 Cylinder.
Bondition. Reason for sale,
a@malier car. Dr.
3085.



FURNICURE

MAHOGANY and Pine Presses. OWEN

T. ALLDER, Roebuck Street. Dial 890. Moaéter anit

10,2.51—





MAHOGANY Dining Tables. (Large and
Small); OWEN T. ALLDER. Roebuck
Street. Dial 3299. 10,2,51—3n

LIVES10CK

CALVES—Ten - day old Heifer Calves,
Apply; Bulkeley Ltd., Dairy.

8.2.51—3n. | Presses;







PIG—One
last Exhibition. Dial 3741, 9.2.51--3n
MISCELLANEOUS





ANTIQU4S — Of every description
Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver
Watercolours. Early books, Maps. Auto-
graphs etc. at Gorringes Antique Shop
ecjoining Royal Yacht Club.

2 3.9.50—t.f.n,
peeeeninlenpn Re ae
BATHS -— In Porcelain Enamel, in

White, Green, Primrose with matching
its to complete colour suites, Top
‘ade. A. BARNES & Co,, Ltd.

~3.1.61—t.f.n,

DIVING MASKS -, 10/- each obtain-
fble in the Toy Dept, at Cave Shepherd
& Co, Lid, 28.1,51—t,f.n,





[a
DESCHIENS SYRUP OF HEMOGLO-
BINE: Especially valuable after an
aitack of influenza or whooping cough.
Give it to your children: Nothing better.
Fresh supply to hand. at all Druggists.

4.2.51—4n
——
EGGS — Pure bred Barred Plymouth

Rock Eggs, from Cup winning Exhibition

k. $3.60 per dozen. John Alleyne,
bworth, St. Peter. Phone 91-20.
4.2.51—3n

——————

GREY GANDER-—Prime breeding con-
2 gears old. $15.00. Tucker
8.2,51—2n

— <_<
GALVANISED PIPE in the following
%in., Yin., %in., lin. 1% ins,

2% ins., 3ins. and 4 ins, Also fit
Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

lgar Street, Phone 2696.

3.2.51.—t.f.n.
——————_—
HUMBER CYCLE











COMPETITION
firanaé New Humber Bicycle. On view
at Harrison’s Store. Tickets 1/- each.

wy one now! 9.2.51—3n,
NUTROGEN—Fresh shipment. 1 Ib, Tin
$1.24 % tb. Tin 69c. From all Grocers
ahd Chemists. 10.2.51—4r

OPTICAL Available at Impertal
Optical Co: (over Bata Shoe Store,
Lower Broad Street) Sunshades, Bino-
eulars, Barometers, Microscopes, Hand-
readers, and all Optical requisits. Phone















4075. 24.1.51—ti.n.
_— —=

WATCH—One 17 Jewel Elgin Gent's
Geld Filled Pocket Watch in_ perfect
working order. Apply to W. D. Richards
& Son, McGregor Street 10.2.51—20

Tieibertininete health ieinemernentsenenstnts-temnnenenenease
PIANO--Upright "Piano made by John
Brinsmead, well tuned. Best offer over
$200,00 accepted. Apply Ralph Beare,

Hardwood Alley, Phone 4683.
10.2.51

STHEL STEP LADDERS—6-tread and

an









A-tread, Just the thing for Stores, Schools,} on the 14th February 1951 at 2 p.m., by
Offices, and Household uses, 4 tread $8.88! public Competition, one Modern Stone-
eoch; 5 tread $12.95 each. Cannot be] built property known as “Hill Crest",
repeated at this price, at RALPH | Siivated at Upper Collymore Rock, oppo-
BEARD'S Show Ttooms Hardwood | site the A.M.E. Church, with 5,000 sq. ft,
Alley. 10,2.51—2n | of Lond, 2 bedrooms, open verandah, tiled
—————___——_—_—— beth and water toilet, Electricity, can be
~ WHITE LEGHORN EGGS F. LL | seen from 8 aa. to © p.m. Apply the
Burton, Cotton Factory owner on premises, L. A, M. WATTS,
1),.2.51—1n.) James Street. Dial 4523,
10.2,.51-—4n,
WOOD & COAL STOVE—In perfect | ———— eho
condition. Apply W. A. Medford MARWIN—Maxwell’s Road, Modern
11.2.51—8n | stone-built Bungalow, 3 Bedrooms,
—— eet eset aecineaman Drawing and Dining Room Breakfast
LOST Room and Kitchenette, Toilet and Bath,
| Servants’ Room, Garage in ward, Water
Minimum charge week 72 cents and;and Electric Light installed. Approx-
% cente Sundays 24 words over 24) imately 14,000 sq, ft. of land. Apply:
words 3 cents a word week—4 cents o|} E. H. Farmer, Andrews Plantation or
word Sundays. Dial 95267. 4.2.51—6n,
© asians =
WATCH —Lady Gold Watch Arta ENTERPRISE—An adjoining Property
with Gold Strap. Lost between Two Mile| with 7 acres of land and stone building,
Hill and City. Reward offered. Phone|% acres of arable, 4 acres of pasture
es i a 10.2.5) with nice Mahogany’ trees to be sold
any one, who has ives of
WATCH—-On Wednesday night WATCHOn Wednesday night between friends in the U.S. Amerie who is
Pine and Culloden Roads, éne lady's go!d | desirous of buying for cash. To be sold
wrist watch, Finder will be rewarded) iy the U.S. America
on returning same to Advocate Adve:-| Apply to G. Holder, Enterprise, Christ |
titing Dept. or may dial 324) Chureh Gap, Attorney for the Estate
10,2,51-20 | tor full infermation, 6.2,5)—n. |



hings, vety Fine Marble Top
Sewing Tables; Glass Ware, Dinner, Tea,

Perfect | Coffee and Fruit Services; Sangaree Glass,
Purchasing {Green and Red, Table Glass;
Simon — Telephone | Ornament; Brass Jardinieres, Plated and
10.1.51—6n | Silver Ware in Entre Dishes, Ice Tank-

Brouge

ard, Waiters, Vases, Dish Covers; Tea

and “Coffee Sets; Forks, Spoons, Cutlery
&c., Rugs and Stairs Carpet, Chiming
and other Clocks; Electric Lamps,

Kettle, G. E. Radio; Double
and Single Iron Bedsteads with Box
Springs; Mahogany Twin Bedsteads with
Box Springs, Dunlopillo, Deep Sleep and
Hair Beds, Dressing Tables Marble Top
Washstands, Mird. Presses, Couches, old
Linen Press; Cheval Glass all in Mahog+
any; Old French Press, Cedar Linen and
Hang: Presses; Chamber Ware, Frigidaire
in perfect working order; Lard Ware
Kitehen Utensils and Tables,
Coal Stove, Linen, Mosquito Nets, Garden

(1) Sow. 2nd Prize Winner ] Benches, Tennis Nets and Poles; Roller,

Trunks, Valeses, Books, Including 28
vol, Eney: Brittanica, Enam. Bath,
Geyser, Nice lot of Ferns, Palms,
Anthuriums,

Sale 11,30 o’¢lotk, Terms CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers.
9.2.51—2n





REAL ESTATE



mate beach. Good Yacht, “An Breen
nehora|
Phone 91-50. 16.11.00-ttn,

_———
HOUSE—At Inch Marlow Road, Christ
Church, 2 roofs and shedroof, willing to
sell in parts, no reasonable offer refused.
Apply Frances Ville, Inch Marlow Road,

Christ Church to Frank Clarke,
10.2.51—2n

SHARES—With Accruing Dividends:
30 Shares in Barbados Shipping & Trad-
ing Co., Ltd. The above will be set
up for sale by Public Competition at our





OmMce, James Street, Bridgetown, on
Tuesday the 13th February at 2 p.m.
G, L. W. CLARKE & Co.,
Solicitors.
10.2.51—3n

a +

HOUSE—One new board and shingle
house, 18 x 11 x 8 ft, build with screws,
easy to move, Apply to Sherlock Field
leul Bay, St. Philip. 8.2.51—-4n

GRANDVIEW, Bathsheba — Three (3)
Bedroomed Bungalow, standing on 14,919
Sq. Feet Land.

Offer in writing for the same, will be
received by E. C. FIELD C/o James A.
Lynch & Co., Ltd. up to 4 p.m, 28th
February 1951. 8.2.51—én

a
The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office No, 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 16th February 1951 at
2 p.m. The messuage or dwelling house
formerly known as Tullyera now eall-
ed “CRYSTAL WATERS” with the land
thereto containing by estimation 12,087
square feet situated on the sea at Car-
ville Avenue, Worthing, Christ Chureh,
at present used as a boarding house.

between 4 and 6 p.m. on application to
Mra. Talma on the premises,

of sale apply to:—
COTTLE, CATFORD, & Co.,
Solicitors,
3,2.51—12n.



The undersigned will offer for sale at
Drug Store

James St., over Minds & Co.,












Inspection any day except Sundays

For further particulars and conditions



SUNDAY



PUBLIC NOTK ES

a cents per ag
12 cents per agete
pi Pi um ch * MO «

herve

and $1.80 on Sunda
“£95: -. -4 easily earned by obtaining
order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends, No previous experi
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Pyblishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making
opportunity. Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
England.”

on weekrde

n eek-d



25.1.51—18n



NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. JOHN
SHALED tenders are invited for sup-
plying approximately 42 pint’ pure fresh
coWs’ milk daily to St, John’s Aimshouse
ih two deliveries, as from the 25th
Match 1951. Applications will be re-
ceived by the undersigned up to the 17th
instant, and it is to be understood that
the lowest or any tender will not neces-

sotily be accepted.
R. S. FRASER,

Clerk,
Board of Poor Law
Guardians.
St. John.
10.2.51—6n



NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH.
Applications for the Post of Parochial
Treasurer will be received by the un-
dersigned not later than the 28th Feb-
Yuary 1951 Applications must be ae-
companied by Baptismmal and Medical
Certificates, and marked on the En-
velope, applications for Post of Paro-
chial Treasurer
Sad. Rev. L. C. MALLALIEU,
Chairman
Joseph's Vestry
11,2.51—-6n.

St.



ALEXANDRA “SCHOOL |
The new school year will begin in Sep-
tember. Entrance =- examinations will
take place in July ata date to be akd-
vertised later. Parents and guardians
who wish to enter pupils should obtain
application forms from the Headmistress.
No applicamts can be accepted who are
over 12 on March Ist 1951,
11,2.51—1n,



NOTICE

Applicants are invited for the post of
Assistant Nurse at St. Lucy's Aimshouse
at o salary of $57.50 per month, uniform
€te. and quarters provided.

Applicants must be fully certiticated,
midwives, and general Nurses.

The successful candidate must assume
duties: on 25th February 1951.

Applications will be received by me up
to Saturday 17th. February 1951.

OSWALD L. DEANE,

Clerk, Board of Poor Law Guardians,

St. Lucy
10,.2.51—-7n

PUBLIC SALES.

“WORTHY DOWN” = Situated at Top
Rock, consisting of 3 bedrooms with coh-
necting toilets and showers, large lounge,
dining room, ultra modern kitehen, large
front balcony, and breakfast balcony,
Q-car garage, 2 servants’ rooms with
teilet and showers also laundry, The
grounds are fully enclosed and the gar-
dens well laid out ete. Available on
March Ist, 1951.

The above property is well constructed
i 12-inch stone, with an Everite roof.
Best offer above £4,000 will be accepted.
Further particulars etc, Ring 4683,

7.2.51—5n

SOUND INVESTMENT
PROPERTY Standing on
square feet of land with new), erected
Wali Building which »yields $75. pe
meonth—in geod residentiol district, Dial
o947 KR. Archer MeKenzie, 11,2.81—1n

HOUSE At Coles Pasture, St.
Philip to be removed not later thaa
eight weeks after sale. Ali offers and tor

mil particulars, Dinl 96268.
/Masein
A new and wel

pit iy esl on
Pine il called WESTF. he pro~
peut of the late Sir Georke Wi sons

te SEES tad eatin,

ublie “reo! two s, kitcheri,
jaundny, bi and lavatory.

In a separate building there is a
garage for one car and two servants
rooms with bath and lavatory.

The property will be set up for sale
at our office on Wednesday the 2ist day
ot February 1951, at 2 p.m,

For conditions of sale apply to the
undersigned.

Inspection any day between 10,30 a.m.
and & p.m, Telephone Lady Walton,
No, 4581.

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
9.2.51—11n,









10.616



Ke





FOR KENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din-
ing room, Breakfast room atid Kitchen-
ette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone.
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1.51.—6n.

ADVOCATE





GOVERNMENT NOTICES



UNIVERSITY OF LONDON
Matriculation Examination

The following is an extract from a letter dated 18th November,
1950, from the Secretary to the Matriculation and Schoo! Examinations
Council of the University of London:—

“The University of London will c@ase to issue notifications of
exemption from the Matriculation Examination“after
who expect to matriculate

1951. Candidates,

School Certificate or Higher’ School Certificate of December
should write to the Secretary of the Matriculation and School

Examinations Council,

Secertary of the Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate.
must mention their index number and centre, and forward with

No Requests

WASHINGTON, Feb. 8
President Truman held up his
hand in_salute to the Prime Minis-}
ter of New Zealand, Sidney Hol-|
iene; to-day ~when Holland’ told!
him at the White’ House that -

had no requesty for ffancial



30th April;] material help for his country oor
by means of the} &merica.
1950, Holland, who.is here for a five-
day visit, has been discussing the
Senate Hotsse, London, W.C.1., not to the] Far Eastern questions with th@
They| United States Secretary of State,

Dean Acheson .-—Revter.

the letter the matriculation registration fee of three guineas s0

that the information and fee is received by the University of

London during February 1951.

Certificate.

Similarly, if they expect to com-
plete their matriculation exemption by passing the Higher School
Certificate or a single subject a the School Certificate Examina-
tion, they must state the date (with index number and centre)
of the examination on which they. were awarded the School

WANTED

Minimtém charge week 72 cents and)
96 cents Sundays 24 words — over 24
words 3 cents a word«week— cents a

word Sundays,

HELP

“The authorities of the Loeal Examinations Syndicate of
Cambridge University and the University of London have made

special arrangements in connexion with the December examina-
tion so that successful candidates may matriculate before 30th

April, 1951.

“Matriculation fees, will. be refunded to those who do not

qualify.

“Any candidate who intends to follow this procedure should,

therefore: —

(a) Write to London not Cambridge.
(b) Give his address clearly, and full name.
(c) State index number, centre, date and name of the examina-

tion.

(d) Forward fee of three guineas to reach the University of Lon-

don during February.

“These instructions countermand any already given to persons
who have been in touch with the University of London about this}

matter.”









SUNDAY, FEBRUARY li, 1951



MINERS STRIKE
NORTHERN FR

FRANCE, Feb. 10
About 45,000 miners, about half
the total in the French coalfields
of the north and Pas De Calais
| departments, obeyed a 24-hour
strike call from the Communist+
ied General Confederation of
Labour today.

‘. They stopped work at an hour

|

MRS, JEMMOTT. TEL, 8196

CANADIAN Retcommends.
on Beach. Excellent Cooking.

fixed for the funeral of 12 mer

killed in an explosion of fire

damp at Bruey En Artois,
—Reuter.

————$_

AN OPPORTUNITY

TO BUY
1Smalt Gas
Enamel finish.
2 Bolling Burners
1 Grell Burner complete with
even cooker traded in to buy.
A large Cooker
PRICE $60
see it at your Gas Show Room.

Cooker Grey

OFFERS will be received
by the undersigned up to the
16th day of February for the
block of buildings, (land a

LADY-Guitabie lady with Knowledge included), situated on

of book-keeping, filing and office work William Henry and Victor

Apply Post Office Box 221, Peano Streets and Bolton Lane,
Se he vlc haere sections of which are # at
CAPABLE, WELL EDUCATED ent occupied by W. A. ed=

YOUNG MAN. Quick and accurate at ford & Co., The Manhattan

figures, typing, also able to handle cor-
respondence. Apply in writing and
person to the British Bata Shoe Co.,
\ Ltd., Broad St. 10,2.51—3n

ALEXANDRA SCHOOL

in

Club, and until quite recent-
ly by the Bridgetown Ice
Company. Purchaser to de-
molish the buildings and
clear the land within sixty



From May tee] an "Acsintant ‘Mistress Mr. K. C. GOODRIDGE days from date of purehase.
f ti fo fi
to teach ohe oF more of the follomtne.|Member of the New Testament ||] EVELYN ROACH & CO.,
matics. Sony according to anenree. Goa t aly ‘LTD,
tions an experience, on scale ‘or rc 0: or many y Ss, S
Secondary, Teachers. ya ; Church of God yy Rickett Street,
muniects” ottered. ped Tcanidented i now pastors the work at Green’s, —tin.

testimonials,
‘ress not later than February 15th,





must reach the Headmis-





St. George.



12.11.50.—6n.
Department of Education,
6th February, 1951. 10.2.51—2n. MISCELLANEOUS HAvE YOU GOT A
Pana TaN Hil erms COLD or COUGH
PART ONE ORDERS RETIRED ENT aor Seeks, em-
ployment in Office, ub or Hotel. To re-
By y@ the intolerable boredom of idling IF so TRY
iaihotias a1? ., BD., Salary, Lunch & Bus Fare. Reply Box
Liewt-Col. J. Cofthell. O.B.E., B T. Advocate 112. 31—am e ‘in BROWNE'S
The Barbados Regiment.
tenes e,-A eT ae Te 9 Feb. 51 WANTED TO BUY * Your skin bas nearly 50 million tiny seams
USED POSTAGE STAMPS--Of the] and pores where germs hide and ¢ onuse ter-
British West Indies. Good Prices Paid Cracking,

1 PARADES

Ail ranks will parade
Feb. $1,_ The Regiment will then
jers ‘to St. Ann’s
the baggave warehouse,
Arrangements will be
transport from the ba¢gavge

then be collected from St,
Dress : Shirts
(Other ranks),

2 VOLUNTARY NIGHT

Ann's

There will be no voluntary night off Tuesday, 13 Feb. 51.

3. BAND

at the baggagé warehouse at 1630 hours on Friday,
escort the drummers and pipers of the Fusil-
Fort via Bridgetown.

16] at the Caribbean Stamp Society No.

Swar Street.
Rifles and sidearms will be issued at

made to bring the bicyeles of volunteers in Regimental
warehouse to St,
Fort after the parade.

shorts, boots and short puttees, berets, web beits and frogs
Sam BroWne belts and swords

Ann's Fort, These bicycles can

Br WISE...

+Officers).

Band practice parades will be held oh Monday 12, Wednesday 14 and Thursday

15 Feb, 51.

BEATING THE RETREAT
All ranks and _ their
1 Innisks on Sunday 18 Feb.

ure,

FEB, 51.
Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant
Next for Duty
Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant

PART Ii ORDERS

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
8TH FEBRUARY,



Lt PROMOTIONS

case peleeapel abate ge

families are invited to attend the
Sl at 1645 hours.
the Reserve and Retired listsyof the Regiment are invited to the Officers’ enclos-
Dress for those attending will be plain clothes

ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR



Lieut, H, R, Daniel Bn HQ
8 LRAVE—Privileee
» Cpl, Turney, D. G. “B” Coy
















CENTRAL FOUNDRY ‘LTD.—
Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets.



‘Beating of Retreat’ by
Officers and their families on

wo
10.2.51—3n



-. - ADVERTISE

SHIPPING ” NOTICES

rible pening.
Burnin c
Blackh Pimples, t Itch
blemishes. Ordinary ronticente give on
temporary relief because they do not ki
the germ cause. The new discovery, Nix
derm kills the germs in % minutes and Is
guaranteed to give you a soft, dear, attrac
tive, smooth skin in one week, or money
back on return of empty package. Ge
ixederm from your chemis'



ne, Rin

CERTAIN COUGH



CURE

The Unique Remedy for Coughs,



Sore Throat,

Asthma,

Colds,
Hoarseness,

Bronchitis,
Bronchial

guaranteed
oday and re- Whooping Cough, Disease of the
Nixoderm PAM othe Pisa Chest and i etc., ete.
cause 8)
roubles trouble, ~

C. CARLTON BROWNE
Wholesale & Retell Dragtist
138 Roebuck St. Dial 9819













———————
Se se eNpING | ROYAL NETHERLANDS ——
/Lt. . ' arke
381 L/S Robinson, °V. N. STEAMSHIP CO. The M/V. “CARIBBEE” will
Lieut. T. A. Gittens Sailing from Amsterdam, Dover and accept Cargo and Passengers for
217 L/S Blackett, L. L. Madeira—s.s. ‘‘Cottica’ 2nd, 3rd, 9th Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
. February, 1951. M.S. “Bonaire” 9th, Nevis and St Kitts, Sailing
M. L. Dy SKEWES-COX, Major, 10th. 16th March 1951. Friday, 28rd February, 1951,
8.0.L.F. & Adjutant, Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam--
The Barbados Regiment. |m.s, “Helena” 12th, 15th, February 1951, The M/V. *“DAERWOOD” will
m.s. “Willemstad” 9th, 16th, -Pebruary accept Car@o and Passengers for
e - 1951, m.s. “Oranjestad” Sth, 15th Mareh Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba,
SERIAL NO. 5 1951. and Passengers only for St, Vin-
SHEET NO. 1 Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and cent, Date of Sailing to be “
Georgetown—m.s, “Bonaire” 27th Janu- notified.
romotién to captain approved by His | #t¥ 1951; ms. “Cottica” 20th, February
Beocieney the Governor wet 4 Dec. 50, | 1951; ms, “Helena” 3rd March 1951. B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN-

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guiara, Cura-
“Oranjestad” ist February

cao
1951

Eranted 4 months P/Leave wef 19 Jan ete—m.s.
1,

M, L. D, SKEWES-COX, Major, dam—m.s,
S.O.L.F, & Adjutant, 8. P,
The Barbados Regiment.

“Oranjestad”

N, & co. UTD.,

bers.

Proprietors,
GARDINER AUSTIN
























Agents: W.S . MONROE & CO., LTD.

Note:

"

ht
*

Be6

PETER DeVERTEVILLE—Chief Representative

_—

SIXTY-FOUR YEARS OF WORLD: WIDE LIFE INSURANCE SERVICE

THE CORNERSTONE OF
OUR WAY OF LIFE

Today, more than ever before; a sound family life is an essen-

tial background for the preservation of our way of life. Since
* the founding of the Manufacturers Life in 1887, hundreds of

thousands of breadwinners have used its facilities to safeguard
_ the futures of their families,

*390,000 CLIENTS ARE NOW entrusting substantial
s amounts of their savings to the Manufacturers Life to protect their
dependents and their own retirement. r

$1,309,344,457 OF INSURANCE AND RETIRE-
MENT protection is provided by the policies they own.

$413,855,443 IS SECURELY INVESTED 10 quaran-
tee payment of the benefits promised under these policies. The
interest earned on these funds ~ which are principally accumu.
lated premium deposits — reduces the cost of insurance.

HOMASED IN 342 OF NEW INSURANCE WAS PUR-

SO by over 35,000 clients, many of whom
were en iM owners of Manufacturers Life policies.

$23,287,268 WAS PAID TO LIVING POLICY-
OWNERS, and to the families of those who died, The Life Insur-
ance programs under which these payments were made have been
carefully arranged by trained Life Underwriters — one of whom is

available to perform the:same service for you. .



THE

MANUFACTURERS
ECT LIFE eet RZ =

CLYDE WALCOTT—Ageni.

Phone 4317, P.O. Box 102, High Street.

The above figures are given in Canadian Dollars.

Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp, Amster-
23rd_ Feb, 1951.

Agents.

ee eg en clea
Canadian National Steamships



N.B,—Subject to change Without notice, All vessels fitted with cold storage cham.
Passenger Fares and freight 1gtes on application to :—



BLABDON

AF.S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

ERS ASSOCIATION, In
Consignee—Tel. No. 4047














































| “ROCK DUNDO”—Cave Hill. A

| well maintained and productive

) Estate of some 32 acres in a

| lovely position 2 miles from
The house is worthy of
notice and possesses great
Its general condition is excellent
gue there is spacious accommoda-
ion,

ity,

MAPLE MANOR CRICKETERS sourmBOUND
Greet our comrade CRICKETER Sal Arrives Sails sabe =
GUEST HOUSE in BLAZERS and FLANNEL at Halifax poten” ‘Barbados’ Barbados ellakta mae inte “anaes
OPPOSITE HASTINGS ROCKS a tea tee eae “LADY NELSON” = 2Feb. 4 Feb. IB Feb. 33 Fee cpen verandah on West corh-
a RAYMOND JORDAN “CAN. CHALLENGER” =_ 1b Fev. _ 25 Feb. 25 Feb. ooeing magnideent view oF bed
Tel. s021, I, BOURNE, in Bay Street it “LADY RODNEY” ah 3 Mar. 6 Mar, 14 Mar. 15 Mar.
Monageréss in y Street, opposite 1} «any NELSON” ion 19 Mar, 21 Mar. 30 Mar, 31 Mar and stretches Of beach. Large
See) Combermere Street. V1 “GAN, CHALLENGER” a Ae = 12 Apr. 12 Apr. lounge, $ bedrooms, 3 verandahs,
P kitch antry and servant's
|] “LADY RODNEY" = 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 27 Apr = 27 Apr. | chen, Pi

quarters, Storerooms in basement.
f NORTHBOUND Arrives Bails Arrives Arrives Arrives “DEANE HOLLOW", St. Luey.
SEE US FOR...... Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax Pleasant country home of stone
“LADY RODNE' 10 Feb. 11th Feb, 21 Feb, 22 Feb. - eat cnn ne. Od
\ LAWN MOWERS & PARTS "EADY NELSON” a Feo. 27 Fel. 8 Mar, 9 Mar = — ama, blichen, servaat's quarters
\ “LADY RODNEY” 27 Mar. 28 Mar. 6 Apr. 7 Apr. = a gare pt Pygae toro rin
i) “LADY NELSON” 12 Apr. 14 Apt. 23 Apr. _ 24 Apr garages rooms. By
i . “LADY RODNBY” 10 May. 12 May. 21 May. nto 22 May ee Si nae a ae:

yy }.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM sidered,

& CO. LTD. — Agents.





PERSONAL

ELSWICK—8th Avenue, Belle-
ville. A stone ahd timber house
on approx. 3,600 sq. ft. Enclosed



The public are hereby warned against

giving credit to my wife, MARIE HOPE verandah 2 reception fi 3

{nee CLARKE) as I do not hold myself bedrooms, kitchen ahd pantry, Full

responsible for her or anyone else con~ information on application.

tracting any debt or debts in my name ‘a +

unless by @ written order signed by me. BETMAR” — Navy Gardens,
LIVINGSTONE HOPE, Modern stone bungalow with

everite roof, detached garage a