Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Parbad0os

SATURDAY FEBRUA z 10







ESTABLISHED 1895 1951









Adbvorat

ITALIAN REDS REVOiLT AGAINST RUSSIA

U.N. Close la On eee | Biggest Communist Group









— es

SO NEAR SUT ...

The “Ghost City” ‘In Free World Breaking Up

TOKYO, Feb. 9,

United Nations Forces ‘to-day closed in on the “ghost
city” Seoul which has changed hands three times already

and reached the Han River
ern suburbs.

Tanks drove to within

which runs through its south-

1,600 yards of the industrial

| Suburb Yongdongpo one mile from the heart of Seoul and
hurled shells into the city for the second day running.



Woman Bei
“Thawed Out”

CHICAGO Feb, 9.

A 23-year-old negress with a
body temperature of 64 degrees is
being “thawed out” at the Michael
Reese hospital here according to
astonished physicians,

Members of the staff said the
woman was found . unconscious
early yesterday while the tempera-
ture was about 11 degrees below.
zero. When admitted, she was
“frozen hard’.

“She was in a deep freeze and
Suffered from frostbite,” said Dr.
Harold Laufman, surgeon at the
hospital.

The lowest body temperature
—— so far for survival is
76.2.

A doctor said that the woman
was breathing three to five times
a minute, compared to the normal
18 to 20. Her pulse was 12, com-
pared to the normal 70 to 80 beats
a minute, and no blood pressure
could be recorded.

She had to be handled gently
because the slightest pressure
would have broken off a leg or an
arm.

Treatment so far has included
large injections of plasma and
cortisone. An opening was also
made in her neck and a tube in-
serted to facilitate breathing.

—Reuter.

9 Killed In Crash

SUDBURY, Ontario, Feb. 9.

A bus full of passengers was
hurled 10 yards after a collision
witha Canadian Pacific train at
a level crossing near here today.
Nine bus passengers. were killed
and 22 injured.

The bus rolled over aften the
rls a but the driver escaped un-
vurt.



—Reuter.

R.C. Home Cut Off

‘ ROME, Feb. 9. ~

A big avalanche today cut off a
Roman Catholic home of 300 chil-
dren and a company of Italian Al-
pine troops 25 miles southeast of
the Brenner Pass. In Ferrara pro-
vince, flood waters at Reno River
have inundated more than 80
square miles creating Central
Italy’s biggest “lake.”

—Reuter,





5 Firemen Killed

ROTTERDAM, Feb. 9.
Five firemen were killed and
two saved when their fire engine
phanged through thick smoke into
otterdam harbour today near
burning ships and a pool of blaz-
ing oil. Two scrambled out un-
aided. The bodies of the drowned
were recovered when the oil pool

Was extinguished,
—Reuter,

Czechs Send Note

{ PRAGUE, Feb. 9.
The Czechoslovak Government



tonight claimed that two Ameri-
can jet planes flew over an air-
field near Prague in daylight yes-
terday. The note sent to the
American Embassy here to-day
asserts that planes “with Ameri-
can markings” crossed over the
Czechoslovak border
afternoon and
territory,
They were observed over Let-
nany airfield near Prague and re-
turned over the airfield 5 minutes
later. the note said.—Reuter,

yesterday

flew into Czech



ALL CLEAR IN BG.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 9.
Dr. Subryan, Deputy Director
of Medical Services, to-day noti-
fied the Trinidad and Barbados
Governments that no further cases
of alastrin had been reported in
B.G. Following reports of a few
cases 80 miles up the Berbice
River, the Island governments had
demanded small pox vaccination
for all passengers arriving from

British Guiana.

MALAN WARNS U.K.
CAPETOWN, Feb. 9.
Dr. Daniel Malan, South Afri-
ean Prime Minister, warned Brit-

ein tonight that the transfer of
British Protectorates to the Union

The Han was reached by Eighth
Army units near Karangni, a
south-east suburb. They were
maintaining their positions.

In some sectors south of Seoul
which was taken by North Koreans
on January 4, Communists seemed
to have abandoned their defence
network,

American tanks had advanced
five miles from Anyang to the
southeast of Seoul, brushing aside
light resistance and “delayed only
by minefields.

Another tank force reached a
point six miles from Inchon, the
port for Seoul where General Mac
Arthur made his big landing last
September.

The port was heavily bom-
barded by Allied warships which
have been standing off the shore
for over a week and shelling Com-
munist concentrations.

United Nations men went for-
ward right acfoss the 153 miles
waist of Korea. Communist oppos
tion was stiff in the central moun-
tain range spine of Corrior from
Winju to Hongchon which is only
18 miles to the south of the 38th
Parallel.




—Reuter.

COLLINS DENIES
PRESS CHARGES

CHICAGO, Feb. 9.

General Lawton Collins, United
States Army Chief of Staff today
denied American press charges
that the American Army was over
mechanised and at a disadvantage
against the “ruthless life sacrific-
ing methods” of Russian trained
Communist Armies.

Addressing the club here, Col-
lins who recently returned from
an inspection trip to Korea, said
“these statements were not justi-
fied on the bases in Korea or in the’
World War.

“Our new medium tanks have
proved to be extremely effective
against enemy armour, The most
outstanding, of course, has been
the performance of the 3.5 Baz-
zoka which has more than lived up



to our expectations,” Collins
udded,—Reuter,



More War Feeling
In U.S. Than Europe

NEW YORK, Feb, 9.

Former Republican President,
Herbert Hoover, said to-day
“There is no such war hysteria
in Europe, as there is in the
United States.”

“£uropean Governments have
made no declarations of emergen-
ey, and their citizens have organ-
ised no propaganda committees
of alarm,

“The American people and Con-
gress should not be hurried into
decisions which will affect Amer- |
ican life for the next 100 years
without ample considerations and
discussions.” {

Hoover will broadcast to-night
a half-hour speech entitled: “We
should revise our foreign policies.”

—Reuter.

Defence Tests In US

NEW YORK, Feb. 9.
A four-day test of the air de-
fences of the Northeastern United
States was under way here today





with regular units of the Air
Force, Army and Navy, taking
part.

To-morrow and on Sunday

15,000 civilian volunteers in 2,700
ground observation posts will join.
manoeuvres to spot and track air-
craft simulating enemy flights, the
Air Forces said. Reuter





EXECUTED NAKED

MUNICH, Feb., 9.

General Hans Lunding, Danish
Army General told a court here to-
Gay that he saw Admiral Wilhelm
Canaris, former Germun Military
Intelligence Chief,
to his execution in a Nazi con-
centration camp in 1945,

Lunding was giving evidence in

the trial of the former S. S.
Colonel Walter Huppenkoehen,
for complicity im the Canaris
murder.

—Reuter.



COAL OUTPUT CUT

PRAGUE, Feb. 8.
Production in Czechoslovakia’s
hard (black) coal mines in Janu-

ary was 3.7 per cent below plan-| ister Clement Attlee told the 70-
ned targets and in soft (brown)| year-old Minister, that he wishes
coal mines 2.3 per cent below, the} him to continue in office when he

Weekly

Economic

of South Africa could not be de- | ported —Reuter,

laved indefinitely .—Reuter. |



30 FOR FESTIVAL

BERLIN. Feb. 9

Thirty nations have been invit
ed to the International Berli
film festival from June 6 to 17

They include France, the Argen-
tine, Belgium, Hol d

o, Sweden and Spain
abe —Reuier






, Italy, Mex-| polic:



GRAIN FOR INDIA
WASHINGTON, Feb. 9.








THESE 3\PIOTURES taken yesterday- illustrate-what the Princess
URe but does NOT.

_

Alice Playing Pield could look

U.K. PAPERS
COMMENT

On Meat Issue

LONDON, Feb. 9.

Nearly every British newspaper
to-day commented on the lack of
meat over which the Labour
Government won an eight vote
majority in the Conservative
censure motion in the House of
Commons last night.

The influential Times said Food
Minister Maurice Webb could not
have chosen more unhappy words
to end his speech.

It said that his words—‘We
believe that this great and proud
country, Great Britain, is prepared
to stand up to the Argentine’—
were bombastic, empty of mean-
ing, offensive to a friendly coun-
try, and served only to underline
the remoteness of Webb
public opinion.

“There was no meat (in any
meaning of the word) in the
Minister’s speech and there was
no hint that his department was
seeking to end the deadlock this
month or even next month,” the
Times said.

The Liberal Manchester Guar-
dian said Webb’s review was a
“depressing picture of well inten-
tioned policy gone wrong.”

The Labour Daily Herald said
Webb did a difficult job with
“great skill and courage”, and it
vdded that successful negotiation
with Argentina was the only way
\o achieve a desirable end

The Conservative Daily Tele-
eraph said the system of bulk
buying had broken down and
needed scrapping. “There is less
me@at available for purchase than
before the war The Argentine
Government has used this short
age to drive tough, if not unscru-
pulous bargains,” it said

The Conservative Yorksh’ve
Post quoted Webb as saying the
Argentine has asked three times
as much for their meat as before
the war and commented: “British
coal is being sold to the Argen-
tine at four times the prewar
price.

The Liberal News Chronicle
suggested that Britain
frozen and chille
the latter off ration, so taxed, that
it will keep down the price of the
former to the consumer.

“If the Food Minister will not
do this, he will find that his only
alternative is to go cap in hand to
Argentina, before the price goes
up.

The Financial Times said Webb
and his Ministry had made two
“profound” mistakes — they had
mistaken obstinacy for diplomacy,
and had badly miscaleulated the
movement of world prices.

{

Reuter,

London Dockers In
Protest Strike

LONDON, Feb, 9.

Hundreds of dockers stopped
work in the port of London to-
day to demonstrate outside the
Magistrate's Court where seven
unofficial strike leaders were
being charged.

When the dockers learned this



from}

mest ahd tei |

(By JOHN MANNERS)

ROME, Feb. 9,
EFECTIONS from the Italian Communist Party the
biggest outside the “tron Curtain”, which began about
a fortnight ago have spread slowly but tellingty. :
A clarion eali-te a large-scale nationalist reyoll agains:
Russian directives has yet to come.

But personalities in three important spheres of Com
munist influence—parliament, local government and wa:
time partisan associations—have given a lead which man
party members may follow when the standard of a n¢
political group 1s raised.

wr 1h apes The pattern of that standard is
being stitched now by two influen
tial members of parliament, who
led the “national commu: ,
breakaway movement A
Cucchi and Valdo Magnani.
Ex-Communist “third man” «
rebellion leftwing social democ
Rolando Maramotti who has been
in constant touch with the tw
deputies has said that a man)
festo will be issued soon. It may
have world-wide repercussions
Cucchi and Magnani represe










Crick Coming
For Trial Game

WEST INDIES Captain }
John Goddard who accepted
an invitation from the West
Indies Cricket Board of
Control to attend the recent
cricket tournament between

jing constituencies in Emila pr
the Windward and Leeward | vince in the industrial “red belt”
Islands in St. Lucia and have been virtually in hidin:

report upon any talent }since their defection rocked th

which he thought should be Italian Communist party to. it
developed, has recommend- foundations
ed C. O'B, Crick former | Police protection has beer

Combermere and
pace bowler and
six-foot-three ‘fast
from St. Vincent
Acting on this
mendation the West
Cricket, Board of Control
have invited these players
to come to Barbados and
take part in a Trial game
here immediately after the
second Barbados-Trinidad
Test which ends on Feb
ruary 27. The dates for
this game will be February

Jarbado
Mason a
bowler

given to them and to about
dozen others including
munist mayors who hay
for them without
vally call which the
expected to give

The manifesto will undoubted
ly appeal to many Italian Commu-
nists in whom the _ idem of
patriotism is deeply rooled.«
pecially former p&artisadge still
| “Cyce in strong associatton

two Com-
e declared
iwaiting the

manifesto



recom
Indies



Cycchi holder ot che coveted
gold medal for valour anteMag-
nani, a distinguished partisan
28 and March | leader who fought under Marshal

It is expected that some of Tito both have personal glamour
the Trinidad teum who can to attract recruit
remain will be asked to play But a pledge to defend Ttaly
in the match as well. Crick from attack by Russia would in
and Mason are being asked no way lessen the rebels oppost-
to come here by February 19 tion to the Atlantic pact or we t-
so that they can have some ern policy in general
net practice and accustom tor Br’ id oe oo ae

x las % : , é al .¢ isi
themselves to wurt wickets Adapted to ‘Italy's. special. ned
and free from Russian domina
tion.

Meanwhile uneasy suspicion ha
enveloped Italian Communis:
headquarters in the “street of
darkships” and thousands of it
branches throughout the country
cathing party eat-
tacks on “the unimportan



Smuggler Prince

SOUTH WEST GERMANY,
Feb. 9 :
Prince Hans Von Liechtenstein | are following

was today fined 6,000 marks for

smuggling watches into Germany | traitors’
from Switzerland In their inaccessible hidin
place Magnani and Cuechi and
The 40-year-old Prince was ac~| their lieutenants are working «



watches Ja potentially expensive manifest:

under]In the lull Italy’s 2,000,000 com-
cover of his diplomatic pass on}munist party member re 9
four occasions last year serving the maxim “hear all, sev
all, say nothing.”

cused of smuggling
through West Germany

Prince Hangs must also pay 530,
600 marks to cover the value of
13,270 watches,

— Reuter,



TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3115

DAY OR NIGHT

The court ruled that should the
Prince not pay the fine, he must
spend a day in prison for every
1,500 marks.



—Reuter.



driven. re



* TOP: The park-like beauty of the Fisheries Office next door to the Princess Alice Playing Field.
These trees were planted by Mr. Wiles at about the time the trees of the Princess Alice Playing

Pield were being cut down,

CENTRE: This bush next-to a canal which separates the Fisheries Office from the Princess Alice
Playing Field sets the note of untidiness and wilderness atmosphere of the Princess Alice Playing Pield
where grass and bush grow faster than sports fields. ;

BOTTOM: Imagine playing any kind of game in this grass, except hide and seek.



Princess Alice Play
Field Runs To Grass

THE closely. cropped playing, Yesterday the Advocate made aj;trusted with keeping the’ grounds
field at Kensington is adm ‘by |spot Check’ of playing fields and] in good condition are a caretaker
everyone and now that an extra! found them all in good condition|and three groundsmen. They are
effort has been made to. put it| with the exception of the Princess|equipped with a small roller,
into even better order for the| Alice Playing Field, At the Reef/a small hand mower and some
forthcoming Trinidad-Barbados |'there were two tennis lawns side| knives etc., for cutting the weeds
Tests it presents an appearance} by side and these were not in the|and tall grass.
that is a credit to Barbados. best kept condition, but they could

The playing field at Queen’s}be playéd upon.

Park for which the Spartan Crick- The playing field proper how-|favourably with that used for

et and Football Club and the| ever was covered in tall grass and|keeping most playing fields in

Police Cricket and Football Club | could hardly be even walked upon|order. A further check at some

are jointly responsible, is also’ with comfort, of the best known playing fields

noted for its well-kept appearance Investigations showed showed the following strengths for
ground staffs :—

This’ e@stablishment compares



that en-









Pickwick Cricket Club Six sgrounds-
(Kensington) men, two
rollers, 1

motor driven

Bevin Will Carry One Perish In°
On In Office | Trinidad Fire | 6 ..sc0:sscow ee

LONDON, Feb. 9. (Bay Land) ggoundsmen,

British Foreign ' Secretary PORT-OR-SPAIN, Feb, 9 hail aware
Ernest Bevin will continue in} The charred remains of a man | Spartan & Police Creket &
Office despite his present illness} believed to be Anthony Chinchin, ee ae es
it was learned from authoritative] joint proprietor of the San Fer-| - ‘?°°*"*** in ericket
sources to-day, nando Club, was c@tovered be- eee ee
> ; tween two beds on the top floo: ‘in. football
The source said that Prime Min- of a two-storey welling. house) season, 1
in Sap Fernando which was par- | Hey 1 te 4 1B
tially destroyed by fire early on) youn» Men's Progressive Club
Heospodar re-| visited Bevin at his home in Lon- ‘Whursday morning en actihdeens
don to-day. The Fire Brigade tound the| 1 roller, 1
. c + at large
ac . body after a small party brought inbwer
Bevin is making a good recov-|the @ames under control. The srnall hh



ery from pneumonia, but so far
there are no definite plans for his
convalesenee,

fire damage estimated $15,000.00
rendeting five homeless and caus-
ing serious injury to one of the



Harrison Gollece
Crumpton Street











1
President Truman to-day dis-} He was understood to have hadj tenants. hand
jcussed with Congressional Foreign} no intention of offering his resig- ; Th
|Policy leaders the proposal to send] nation unless he knew Attlee de-| The injured tenant who lived) “o2pr™ts eee eeinaia
{two million tons of food grains] sired it on the top storey jumped 30 feet roller,
\to famine-stricken India. Secre- ..,. | to safety when the fire broke ovi ERY
ta State Dean Acheson and Attlee was Bevin’s first visitor) injuring his right hip and ankle F Oricke Rootball C
ivisor Averell Harrim: \a from members of his family | apart from severe burns to bott 'B Ha)
ince his illness (hands, face and oR s
—Reuter —Reuter body 1 unretognisa



4

‘ _| ADVANCE: SAYS CHIEF
|
}

‘ eratec

morning that the men had been
arrested last night, they travelled
straight to Central London,

There they formed an are
around the police court singing the
national song “Land of Hope and
Glory”, and cheering the accused
men as they arrived in pouring
rain, They carried one of them
on their shoulders.

Police arrested one demonstra-
tor after a scuffle.

The seven defendants were
charged with conspiracy to incite
an illegal strike.—Reuter,



Back To Work

NEW YORK, Feb. 9.

Thousands of striking railway-
men flocked back to work in the
United States to-day in the face
of an yltimatum by the army to
“work or be fired”.

The army announced that the
10-day strike of shunters was vir-
tually ended in Chicago, key cen-
tre for trans-continental traffic,
and it was also reported ended
in Northern California, Reuter.

Be
Refuse $181,360



PITTSBURGH, Feb, 9.

A 90-year-old Benedictine nun
and her nephew, a Roman Catho-
lic priest to-day renounced clairn
to a $181,360 estate left by her
brother, also a Catholic Priest.

The nun, Sister Mary Martina
of the Benedictine order of Saint
Mary’s, Pennsylvania, said it would
violate the yow of poverty she
made many years ago.

She has been blind for several
years,

Sister Mary passed her
to the estate to her

rights

nephew, who

|also declined to accept them
—Reuter.



HONG KONG, Feb. 8
General Chu Teh, Chinese Peo-
| ple’s Army Commander in Chief,
+ to-day cabled North Korean forces
| urging them to continue ad-
vancing” Peking radio reported
| He asked North Koreans to co-
operate with Chinese volunteer af
t of Korea was lib-|

~—-Reuter ,







PAGE TWO



BARBADOS,



Carub Calling



ARRIVING from B.G. yesterday for a meeting of the Caribbean Press
Association were Mr. Frederit Seal Coon, Editor of the “Daily Argosy”
and Mr. Eustace Rawlins, General Manager of F. A. Persick Ltd.,
proprietors of the “Guiana Graphic’.

IR GEORGE SEEL, Head of
Development and Welfare,

will open a meeting of the Carib-
bean Press Association at Hastings
House on Monday. f

B.G. delegates arriving on
B.W.1LA,’s B.G, flight yesterday
afternoon were Mr. Frederic Seal
Coon, Editor of the Daily Argosy,
and Mr. Eustace Rawlins, General
Manager of F. A. Persick, Ltd.,
who are proprietors of the Guiana
Graphic. .
- Delegates from other West In-
dian islands are expected to arrive
here to-day and to-morrow,

=En Route To England
R. WILL HANSCHELL, who
has. been here for the past
fur moths on long leave, left
yesterday-by B.W.I.A. for Trini-
dad. He is on his way to England
where he will spend six months
ding im Chambers, before he
turns ‘to Accra, Gold Coast,
=e helis Acting Crown Coun-
Sel. we
: > Contrast
Py “OURISTS are the most curious
“ and observant people on earth,
and the .ones arriving yesterday
by the Mauretania were no excep-
tion. Ag they stepped off the
launches, at the Baggage Ware-
House, their first ‘stop Was the
Publicity: Bureau where they
bought postcards, asked questions,
and looked at the various pictures

‘local interest hanging in vari-
ous parts.of the Bureau,

They mext passed through the
Baggage - Warehouse. at was
there of ‘interest in there? Three
Travel Association Photographs
advertising Britain and a Health
Message from the Sanitation De-
partment of St. Michael.

Golf Bow!

‘HE Barbados golf team, which

played an intercolonial match
with St. Andrews in Trinidad last
week, presented a beautiful silver
bow! to the St. Andrews Club in
gratitude. for the wonderful recep-
tion they received during the visit.
This trophy is to be called the
Charles McIntyre Memorial Bowl
in honour of a St. Andrews play-
er who endeared himself to all the
golfers at Rockley during the visit
of the Trinidad team here in 1948
and who died a few weeks before
the latest St. Andrews—Rockley
tmatches .

Although the Rockley team
made no stipulations regarding the
Bowl, it is probable that it will
serve as.a permanent trophy to be
played for between the teams of
the two» Islands, with the next
meeting'\taking place here some-
time early in 1952.

Back To Trinidad

ISS“ AUDREY COLE of the

office staff of B.W.I.A, Ltd.
ine Potf-of-Spain, returned to
Trinidad on Tuesday evening by
B.W.1-A. after spending a shor!
hol'day;* She was staying at
“Accra’,: Rockley.

Wwiet on earth is happening
to. the Empire Exchange
Rates? With a buying rate of 1%
per cent. discount and a selling
rate of % per cent. premium, the
price of silver for forward deliv-
ery remains at six shillings and
fourpence halfpenny per ounce!
What this means in plain lan-
guage is that bullion, which is no-
toriouslyt sensitive to market
rumours-is too late for the demand
for Marth bills by the clearing
houses, ~ With mail transfers of

bank notes at a steady official rate, |

the discoiinting of day to day loans
ean only-end in an increase in the
pened to Portuguese escudos in
1947. There is no room for com-
Murder At Muckhurst (XI)
“W WANTED to surprise my hus- |
“I bought him this horse Dande-
lion without his knowledge, in-
this morning and give “him his!
birthday surprise.” “When did you !
asked Malpractice. “Last night. I
gave him a bit of sugar and an
horse should have left the stable
to come up here, lock himself int«
“T cannot explain,” said Lady
Gigglesworth, “except that circus
“Circus horses!” shouted Malprac-
tice. “Just what I said,” muttered
ered her eyes. “I bought Dande-
jion cheap from the circus at

deposit rates. This is what hap-
placency;

band”, said Lady Gigglesworth.
tending to take him to the stables
last see the horse in the stables?”
apple.” “Can you explain why this
the study and drink rat poison?”
horses are sometimes eccentric.”
Bucket. Lady Gigglesworth low-
Swiffenham,” she said. “What was

With Sprostons

RRIVING on B.W.1.A’s B.G.

flight yesterday afternoon
were Mr. and Mrs. W. Buchan
and their daughter Susan. Here
for two weeks’ holiday, they ara
staying at a bungalow in Max-
wells; “Leiton’”’.
with Sprostons Ltd., in George-
town,

*

Field. Engineers

Me: HAROLD ROSE, Field
Engineer, International Aer-
adio Ltd., after five months in
Antigua returned yesterday after.
noon by B.W.1.A. He was accom-
panied by Mr. Huggons another
Fielq Engineer of I.A.L.

They expect to leave \this morn-
ing for Grenada,



After Six Weeks

ISS LONA GOMES of E. F.

Correia, Georgetown, her
sister Miss Monica Gomes and
Miss Celeste Faria who has a hair
cressing parlour in Georgetown,
returned to British Guiana yester-
day by B.W.I1.A. after spending
about six weeks’ holiday in the
island as guests at “Acora,” Rock-
ley.

School Teacher Returns

FTER three months in the
4 U.S. Mr. and Mrs. Darnley
Gibbons returned home yesterday
by B.W.1.A. Mr. Gibbons is a
teacher at the Wesley Hall Boys’
School,

After Ten Years

MONG the passengers making
the 18-day cruise on the
Mauretania which. arrived in Bar-
bados yesterday morning were
Mr. Robert L. Clarkson, Chairman
of the. Board of Directors of the
Ameri¢an Express Company and
Mrs. Clarkson.
They told Carib that they had
not been to Barbados for about ten
years and were very happy to be

back. They had an excellent trip!

and the weather so far has been
very good.

First Visit

AYING their first visit to the

island are Mr. Roger Sherman,
a retired manufacturer of Provi-
dence, Rhode Island and Mrs.
Sherman. They arrived on Thurs-
day morning by the Fort
Amherst and will be spending
about eight weeks’ holiday stay-
ing at the Colony Club, St
James.

Back From U.S. Visit

Iss GLORIA EV.LYN,
daughter of Mr, and Mrs
C. D, Evelyn of “Dulce Domum,”
Fontabelle returned from the U.S.
yesterday afternoon by B.W.I.A.
via Puerto Rico.
Miss Evelyn has been away for
eight months, staying in Brooklyn
with Mrs. Phyllis Brown, Mr. Eve-

Mr, Buchan is lyn’s sister.

Canadian Chemist

R, and Mrs. Ambrose McNeil

and their daughter Carol-
Ann arrived from B.G. yesterday
afternoon by the B.W.I.A. to
spend two weeks’ holiday staying
at the St. Lawrence Hotel. Mr,
MeNeil is a Canadian and has been
living in B.G. for two years,
where he is a Chemist with the
Demerara Bauxite Co. in Me
Kenzie.

JUST TWO of the many smart girls who arrived yesterday by the

“Mauretania” to spend the day in

Barbados,

They are pictured shortly after they landed at the Baggage Ware-

house.

They are Virginia Moulton and Alyce Cronin of Massachusetts.

BY THE WAY....

his act?” asked Malpractice, great-
ly excited. “I’m not sure,” replied
Lady Gigglesworth, “but I believe
it was something to do with open—
ing a locked cash box with his
mouth, He used tg twist the key

A ery of triumph interrupted
this temfool narration,

Hey, For The Open Road!

HE suggestion that disguised
police cars, driven by dis-



BEB RBBB BPeeeeeeee eee
a CURTAIN NETS: White 4 Patterns, halfnets J9¢

half nets _ ag
Cream with toning cols. 36” 517

BATH TOWELS:

44” x 22” $1.27 54” x 30" $1.60

CAETUNNES:

Dial 4606



27” in attractive designs



By BEACHCOMBER

guised policemen, may be used to
trap dangerous motorists raises a
question. If a “courtesy” spy re-
ports a disguised policeman to an
undisguised policeman, and the
ear the disguised policeman was
chasing turns out to be another
disguised police car, what happens
if the “courtesy” spy is found to
be-an ordinary non-official motor-
ist trying to escape from another
non-official motorist disguised as a
policeman? There is no room for
complacency.



TIGER

DOMESTIC: 38 & S5¢

4¢

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

-Your Shoe Stores

“are separated, it’s an easy means

white 36”



'

|

.



6 Heignt

. (3
May be peat. (4)
. Nothiug. (3) 11.
Thoughtiess. (6
Compiete. (6) 16
Rated as o lyread pattern
Our opera provides it. (4)
it’s Tom 1! ieave out (4)
Indian milies 5)
t pt (6) 25. To Stan
(3)
Dow

Abounding (3
’

it 44
(or

a
twister.
n
Flag. ‘

(8) 2. Pompous. (9,
Vothing uniform a

DOUL this 19)
alsed turret. 19) 5. Choose. (3)
She's in the money. (4)
in church, (3)

Pelt a piece of crockery. (5)

Take a net and make a bet. (4)
It's often dripping. (4)

One way with motorists. (4)
The mule brings the bird. (3)
The big one has clowns. (3)

Solution of yesterday's

uzele. — Across;
%@. Revival: 9. Revue. 1) 1

2 Titer

3,
Interi

ock!
Roc: eo

19. T

bn incrianieeenatitnereasage
DRASTIC TREATMENT
DURBAN, South Africa,

To stop his wife from smoking,
an African named Patrick tried
to cut off the two iingers with
which she holds a cigarette. ‘The
magistrate fined him $25.

—(C.P.)

LONG SERVICE
AUCKLAND, N.Z.

Six women employed by the
Colonial Ammunition Company
here have a combined total of
245 years’ service. The eldest,
Miss Margaret Barclay, M.B.E.,
has been with the Company 50
years.

__ Lackiaw:
@ ‘Trent: 17

—(C.P.)

Cruise Lecturer

TILL with Cunard White Star
as their Cruise Lecturer is
Watterson Lowe. This is his 430th
trip in twenty years and he has
visited Barbados forty times.

“Watty” as he is familiarly
known to everyone on board is
perhaps the most popular man on
the Mauretania. Everyone goes to
him with their troubles, and ques-
tions about the island they are
next going to visit.

“Watty” started the “flower for
the day” which is so popular or
these cruises, For each port he
has a different coloured flower.
When passengers get on shore and





of récognising them as members
of the cruise,

When I first saw “Watty” yes-
terday he was standing at the bot-
tom of a stairway on the Maure-
tania handing out yellow flowers
and “thoughts for the day.” The
thought he handed me was “Grow
up as soon as you can, it pays. The
only time you really live fully is
from thirty to sixty.”

Fourth Visit
M®*: and Mrs. Hugh A, Gage,
and their son Hugh, Jnr.
arrived from New York via Puerte
Rico yesterday by B.W.I.A. This
is their fourth visit to Barbados
Mr. Gage is the owner of the
“Cove” Restaurant on 42nq Street
which overlooks the United
Nations building, Their home is
Bronxville.
There are here until the end of
February, staying at the Paradise
Beach Club.

“Mauretania” Passengers

Yes = the passengers on the
\ Mauretania yesterday were
Mr, and Mrs, Charles H. Scribner
President of H. Scribner
Publishing Company, Mr. Norman
F.S. Russell, Director of Pennsyl-
vania Company, Colgate — Palm-
olive Peet Company, Mrs. Dorsey

Richardson, wife of the Director].

of Columbia Broadcasting Com-
pany, Mr. Irving Kathmern, Vice
President of the Eversharp Pen
Company, Mr. Leander
McCormick - Goodhart, Former
Official in the British Embassy in
Washington and _ his daughter
Leandra, and Miss Mary A. Boyle.
Personal Secretary to Mr. Bernard
M. Baruch.

‘Mauretania’ Photographer

EEN at the Baggage Warehouse
yesterday morning taking a
number of pictures was Mr. R. L.
Dawson, photographer of the
Cunard Steamship Company.

He told Carib that he was em-
ployed with the company for the
past two years and was then pay-
ing his second visit to Barbados.

Originally from England, Mr.
Dawson first started as a news-~
paper photographer and was on
the staff of the Creyden Weekly
in the South of London during the
early part ot une War. He later
joined the Army and was with the
12th Honorary Artillery Company,
the oldest Regiment in the Britis.
Army. After seeing service in
North Africa, Italy and Austria,
he was demobbed in 1947 and
went back to the Crveydon for
about six months after which he
joined the Cunard Line.

Mr. Dawson first worked on the
Queen Mary, then the Queen Eliz-
abeth before he was shifted to the
Mauretania.

wide Au¢

CALICO: 7e¢

Dial 4220

‘
|

4

ADVOCATE



a
Fi ry ~~
COCKTAILS
TORQUAY, England,

Cocktail mixicologists all over
Europe are dreaming up potent
elixirs in readiness for the Euro-
pean Cocktail Competition at
Torquay February 21-23.

Two-hundred and sixty experts
from most European countries
Outside the Iron Curtain have
entered for the event and 360
judges already are readying their
palgtes.
rst prize for the best cocktail
ig a large silver cup and $140,
ond and third prizes are $60
$26 respectively. All prizes
ry a diploma.
team of ppecialists will be
available to conjure up the recipes
of entrants who cannot attend
the competition,

British experts took time off
from their bottles to declare that
the favourite cocktails for men are
still the Dry Martini and Man-
hattan.

For women, the experts de-
clared the White Lady (half gin,
quarter lemon and quarter Coin-
treau) is still the tops.—LN.S.

ULTIMATUM

. CAIRO.

Four naked men entered the
lice-station in a poor quarter of
airo and told the police officer
that they would not leave until
the police found their clothes,
which had apparently been stolen
while they were in a public bath.
The clothes were recovered within
a few hours and the men then left.



B.B.C. Radio

Programme

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951
6,.30-—12.00 (noon) 19.76 m.

6.30 a.m. Forces Favourites, 7 a.m. The
News, 7.10 am, News Analysis, 7.15 a.m.
From the Editorials, 7.25 2.m. Programme
Parade, 7.30 a.m. From the Third Pro-
gramme, 7.50 a.m. Interlude, 8 a.m, BBC
Scottish Orchestra, 845 a.m. Colonial
Questions, 9 am. The News, 9.10 a.m.
Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close
Down, 1.15 a.m. Programme Parade,
14.30 a.m. Interlude, 1145 a.m. Ireland
vs. England, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10
p.m. News Analysis, 12,15. p.m. Close
Down.

415-600 p.m, %5.53 m.

4.15 p.m. Strike up the Music, 5 p.m.
Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m. Stanfor
Rebinson Presents, 6 p.m. Musie for
Dancing.
6.00—7.15 pom. 31.32 & 48.45 m,

* 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m.
The News 7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15
p.m. Behind the News, 7.45 p.m. Sandy
MacPherson at the Theatre Organ.
71.45—11.00 p.m. 31.32 m. & 48.43 m,

"8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, #15 p.m. Com-
poser of the Week, 4.30 p.m. Radio
Theatre, 10 p.m. The i
From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Anything
to Declare, 10.45 p.m. Yours faithfully,
Hi p.m. Your Song Parade,



DIAMONDS GALORE

GEORGETOWN.
More than £50,000 worth of
precious diamonds have been

mined from the River Mau, Brit-
ish Guiana-Brazilian border. This
area is fast developing into a little
frontier town.



-unert and the

Ite ffinli
WTA AG

ia
Aah hi

eer LAU) |



Vhile Mrs, Pig is speaking sterntly
to Rosalie Rupert goes to see how
poor Podgy is getting on. He
enters the room so slowly that he
doesn’t notice his pal hurriedly
dropping a comic paper on the
floor. The little bear tells of all

* his troubles in the long search for

Sketch Bock—?s




Rosalie, and a sly grin steals over
the other's face. Finally the sketch
book is handed over, and Podgy
sits up and roars with laughter.
a gracious! My drawing wasn’t
meant to be funny,’’ cries Rupert,
‘but it’s done you good ; you're
looking much better alread» *








~
oe

The drape of it



z

— a”

The grace of it . .
The feather-lightness of it

Lingerie in ‘Celanese’... lovely as a dream ... light as a whisper.
Its visible beauty is equalled only by the hidden strength and lasting
quality that distinguishes all ‘Celanese’ Fabrics. Look for the Tab
when you shop, and feel assured that in spite of its seeming delicacy
this exquisite Lingerie is a very wise-buy.



)



{

Every lovely thing about it says . .

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‘Celanese? Fabrics are made by British Celanese Limited, London ,



To-night

visit

CLUB MORGAN

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Club from Miami to Rio

with a world-wide reputation for good food

Music, Dancing

Entertainment

throughout

the night

Dial 4000 for reservations





MRS. HOUSEWIFE

%
hold

We offer a wide range of House~

EARTHENWARE

Medina Shape

Maroon Band & Gold. Decoration

Plates Dishes
Tea Cups & Saucers, Cream
Platters

Also
TEA SETS
DINNER SETS
DINNER SETS

34
63

”

”

Obtainable from our Hardware Department —Tel.



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY

Tea Pots

24 Pieces



Jugs

49.34
No. 2039

LTD.







SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951







] a
————————————————— nnn
| 1 gy .
|| AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
| MATINEE: TO-DAY xt 5 p.m
| TO-NIGHT TO SUNDAY NIGHT at 8,30
Samuel Goldwyn’s Technicolor Musical Comedy!
“THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER |. MITTY
Starring: DANNY KAYE--VIRGINIA MAYO
BORIS KARLOFF—FAY BAINTER—ANN RUTHERFORD
and the GOLDWYN GIRLS

with

MONDAY and TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30
MATINEE: TUESDAY at 5 p.m.

5
“CHILD OF DIVORCE”

Starring: SHARYN MOFFETT—REGIS TOOMEY—MADGE MEREDITH

An R.K.O. Radio Picture
=

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TO-DAY 445 and 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily
WARNER'S TECHNICOLQR ROMANCE WITH THRILLS!

“STORY OF SEABISCUIT”

with Shirley TEMPLE--Barry FITZGERALD—Lon McCALLISTER



—



MATINEE: TO-DAY 9.30 a.m. and 1.30 p.m. (

RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL & CODE OF THE SADDLE
with TOM KEENE JOHNNY MACK BROWN



MONOGRAM DOUBLE)

PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

TO-DAY and TO-MORROW 5 and 8.30 p.m. (PARAMOUNT’S MUSICAI

sing CROSBY ww RADING HIGH”

with Coleen GRAY~—Charles BICKFORD—Frances GIFFORD











MIDNITE TONITE 10th. (MONOGRAM DOUBLE!)

LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT
Johnny Mack BROWN

& RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL

Jimmy WAKELY




GATET Y—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TO-DAY TO SUNDAY 8.30 pm. Mat. SUNDAY 5 p.m.

Warner's Thrilling Adventure!
“TASK FORCE”

GARY COOPER IN

with Jane WYATT—Walter BRENNAN—Others

MIDNITE TONITE 10th. (MONOGRAM DOUBLE!)
VEATH VALLEY RANGERS & “DYNAMITE CANYON”
with Ken MAYNARD—Hoot GIBSON—Bob STEELE~Tom KEENB

oo





GLOBE

TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 TO MONDAY

“The Gal who took the West”

Yvonne De CARLO — Scott BRADY — Jonn RUSSEL

Extras: :
Tex BENEKE and GLEN MILLER Orchestra
British & American News Reels

ial heslatintets ata adinaemipiaaeiiiihininneniatciniendl













Fiery Drama! Roaring Excitement!

Tender Romance! Technicolor !

The Thrill-pounding Story of the “Orphan Horse” who
raced to Glory!





TEC

AR RY ere

FY TEMPLE: GERALD-UsCTiTER

: pirecteo ey LJMAV|D BUTLER _DS WRITTEN BY JOHN TAINTOR FOOTE
TO-DAY (Saturday) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing DAILY

PLAZA-Bridgetown-=(01AL 2310)

Also: “SO YOU WANT TO BE A GAMBLER” and
Latest “WORLD NEWS (Warner-Pathe)





sR








EMPIRE |

TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30 & Continuing to Tuesday






a f 3 eee ‘
ee GLORIA GRAH
Fra LOVES Ca) Boon RD dt STH

Het DOMRELL «Matha STEWART
Scroen Play by Ande: Salt + A SANTANA Pahrtion
Prods ty RoBERT LORD

Direteé y wicnoLas RAY



a0 SOONG OCIA a nnaenane






OLYMPI

TO-DAY & TOMORROW
4.30 and 8.15

ROYAL

TO-DAY & TOMORROW
4.30 and 8,30

Republic Action Double .. .
Monte HALE

Columbia Double Roy BANCROFT
in

Randolph SCOTT “PRINCE OF THE
Ella RAINES PLAINS”
in AND
“BANDIT KING OF
} TEXAS”
“The WALKIN G with

Allan (Rocky) LANE &
His Stallion Black Jack

ROXY

TO-DAY to TUESDAY
4.30 and 8.15

United Artist Double
Attraction ‘
Franchot TONE in

“JIGSAW”

HILLS ”’



And

** ANNA
LUCASTA ”

AND
Starring sD. O. A”
with
Paulette GODDARD Edmond O’BRIEN
William BISHOP Pamela BRITTON
me : — _ ae









———— =





iwet

tt

satire

eed ee eee

£5



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951

Helicopter Saves

By FRANK CONNIFF
LN.S. War Correspondent
WITH THE UNITED STATES MARINES IN KOREA.
A GROTESQUE gadget that flies through the air with
blithe defiance of the laws of gravity has proved the sur-
prise success of a war not always compliméntary to
America’s vaunted skill in machinery.

Catching Cold youseno has finally won accept-

Is A Tough Job
ON SCOTTISH ISLE

LONDON.

A call has gone out for 300 vol-
unteers, aged between 18 and 40,
willing to accept a free holiday
with fare, board and lodgings, as
well as pocket money thrown in.

All they have to do is spend 10
ays in isolation and risk the
chance of catching a cold.

The appeal for human “guinea
pigs” comes from the research unit
cf Harvard Hospital, Salisbury,
Wiltshire, whose scientists for the
last five years have been seeking

a cure for the common cold-

So far the research workers
have succeeded in producing arti-
ficially-induced colds and devised
a firm technique for studying their
baffling symptoms. But the specific
cause or a cure for this universal
trouble-maker has eluded them,

Latest disclosure of failure
came as one of the worst epidemics
of colds and influenza spread
#cross the land and millions went
around sniffling sneezing and
coughing and praying for quick
relief from the miseries.

The setback to the government
investigators centred on an ex-
periment with a group of 12
students on the uninhabited island
of Eilean Nan Ron, (Isle of Seals)
off the northern coast of Scotland.

The students were taken to the
island with camp equipment,
stores and other necessities for a
three-months’ stay, Divided into
three separate groups for experi--
mental purposes, they settled
cown in the solidly-built stone
house evacuated about 12 years
ago by families unable to eke a
livelihood from the barren moor-
lands-

No persenal contact with the
outside world was permitted. Even
letters were banned. Only com-
munication was by radio. Members
of the three groups were forbidden
to trespass-on each’ other’s terri-
tory.

Took Every Risk

The volunteers were exposed to
every risk normally known to
bring on a cold. They took steam-
ing hot baths and then stood in
wet socks in a draught, Later
they mingled with subjects inocu-
lated with artificially-propagated
virus—all to no avail.

The scientists discovered it
isn’t so easy to ecateh a cold when
you try- It was not until a main-
land farmer, with a rip-snorting
natural cold, was brought to the
island that three of the volunteers
were laid low.

The scientists, however, aré far
from discouraged. In launching
the drive for a new panel of
volunteers, a spokesman said:
“Although Wwe haven’t been lucky
enough to discover an effective
way of warding off the common
cold, we have learned a tremend-
ous amount. We certainly Teel it
is worthwhile persevering.” —C.P,

FINED 20/- FOR
WOUNDING

CECIL INNISS of Garden Land,
St. Michael was found guilty
yesterday by His Worship Mr.
E. A. McLeod of wounding Don
Sandiford on his right eye on
January 19.

For the offenee Inniss ‘was
ordered to pay a fine of 20/- in
one month or in default undergo
14 days’ imprisonment with hard
labour.

Sh

allt



The- humble helicopter,
stepchild of the

once
aviation

ance alongside its big brothers by
a glittering in the
Korean War. Korean natives who
barely look up at planes, Patton
tanks, and other testimonials to
Unele. Sam’s talent for machine
precision still gaze in awe at this
gawky monstrosity as it whirs on
its appointed rounds through the
war zones,

When its flapping rotor idles
the craft to a_ straight down
landing on postage stamp space,
Koreans come running for blocks
around to witness the apparent
miracle, I watched a ’copter. sink
to rest on a tiny area the other
day and remarked to an air officer
that the Koreans just couldn’t un-
derstand how the darn thing oper-
ated without visible means of
support such as wings and engines,

“Yes,” said the officer, a man
who has flown jets in combat,
“they're baffled by it, but I’ve
fot news for yon, Sc am I.”

"Copter chauffeurs will fight
anyone, however, who hints that
their craft is a mere freak. The
solid utility of the ‘copter has
been demonstrated in a number of
ways. It has saved lives, It has
rescued pilots stranded behind
enemy lines, It has enabled com-
manders to keep a close check on
developments in the field, It has
been a courier for the delivery of
urgent messages

Cached in “litter blisters” at-
tached to thé helicopters’ flanks,
wounded men have-been rushed
to rear area fields, transferred
to bigger planes, and sometimes
have been under surgery in Japan
ae a few hours after being

it,

Army medics wax. enthusiastic
when they diScuss the contribu-
tions of the ’copter. }
Practically every high commander
in the Eighth Army, from Lt. Gen.
Matthew Ridgway on down, de-
pends on the helicopter to main-
tain tight liaison with develop-
ments at the front, It is no trick
anymore for a general to get a
personal peek at the war. He
climbs into his ‘copter and in a
matter of minutes is huddling over
tactics with the combat. echelons.

Your first ride in a helicopter
is liable to provide one of the
strangest somes. in your life.

I hitehed a ride from Marine Di-
visional Headquarters back to
Taegu,

You take off straight into the
air and seem to come to a dead
stop. For a moment you toy with
the notion that this can’t be true.
There you are hanging suspénded
in mid-air, unable to the en-
gines or glimpse the wings which
usually support.a plane. Only the
throbbing of the rotor behind
gives a clue to the ’copter’s pro-
pulsive power.—I.N.S,

Stage Set For
Arms Battle

WASHINGTON, Feb. 8.

East-West negotiations over a
big four Foreign Ministers meet-
ing have reached a point where
responsible diplomats believe the
stage is being set for a first class
fight over e rearmameént race
between the West and Russia.

This is likely to lead to a new
Soviet demand for outlawing
atomic weapons in Which the
United mae is assumed to have
a commanding Tead over Russia,
and to Western demands for a re-
duction in the size of Communist
armed forcés.

Barring some_ unexpected
change in world policies, no con-
crete agreements to slow down or
limit re-armament are expected to
come from the developing inter.



.. national debate.





Lives BLAMES FLU Trinidad: Land

ON LABOUR

LONDON. Feb.

The Sunday Chronicle news—
paper charged that the British
Labour Government has de
liberatély deprived doctors fight-
ing the present influenza epidemic
of the new golden-powder drug
auereomycin for the sake of saving
dollars.

The Sunday Chronicle claimed
doctors estimated five hundred
i tas oe Sena wave who

ave rom oes,
could have been saved if the new
drug had been freely available in
Britain. :

The doctors pointed out that
auereomycin is on sale generally
to anyone in any drug store in
France, Italy and Germany, said
the newspaper.

Many British doctors in an effort
to overcome the Labour Govern-
ment’s parsimonious attitude have
admitted they have bought su
plies of the drug in the black mar-
ket, according to the Chronicle.

Some have had small supplies
sent in gift parcels from the
United States, the newspaper said.
Many others aré réported to have
obtained supplies from drug storés
on the continent,

Dr. H. H. Goodman, Public
Relations Officer to the Newcastle
branch of the British Medical
Association said:

“There is no doubt that many
lives could have been saved if the
anus had béen more readily avail-
able.”

It is estirnated that the cost of
saving the lives of five hundred
British victims would have been’
$22.40 , head. Auéreomycin costs
about 70 cents a capsule. A four~
day treatment with 32 capsules
(two every six hours) is neces—

sary.

The National Blood Transfusion
Service centre at Sutton, Surrey,
where small quantities of the drug
are stored, has received hundreds
of requests from doctors for any
available supplies for life-or-death
cases, ; ;

Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin,
who has been ill with pneumonia,
made a marked improvement after
auereomycin had beén adminis-
tered. —1.N.8.

FOR SALE:
NAPOLEON’S
DEATH MASK

LONDON,
A wax mask of Napoleon, madé
a few hours after his death on St.
Helena island, will be auctioned

soon,
The death mask, together with



other valuable - historical
ems, will be put under the

at Sir Archibald Weigall’s .
¢

y estate near Ascot in March.
The mask was made by a Dr.

Automarchi, Napoleon’s Italian
physician, who sent it to. Sir
Archibald’s _ grandfather,” Lord

Burghersh, in Florénce.

The famed Duke of Wellington
was Sir Archibald’s great~great-
uncle. ;

The déath mask will rémain in
the vaults of a bank until the
auction.

“Tt would be far too risky to
keep it in the house,” explained

Sir Archibald. “If a maid knocked

it over it would crumble to dust.”
—LN.S.



DUTCH MINISTER TO
SPAIN. APPOINTED

THE HAGUE, Feb, 9.

Willem Constantin Count Van
Recheern Limpurg, former Dutch
Minister in Cairo was officially
appointed Netherlands minister ts
Spain to-day.

The appointment of the ss
who is 53 years old, follows the
lifting of the diplomatic ban in
Spain by the United Nations Gen-~

sembly. a baits
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BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Of Shortages
(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 5.

Trinidad, once the land of plen-
ty, is now a land of shortages.
When we have the potato, we in-
variably have not beef to go with
i soon. For the past week,
there have beén no potatoes. Less
than a fortnight ago a congign-
ment arrived in Port-of-Spain,
but nobody seems to have eaten—
or éven seen them,

Several city housewives com-
plainéd that they were unable to
obtain any meat in the groceries
y + We aré promised more
airlift beef,

We are promised that the milk
shortage will soon be eased. We
sh patient people—but we can-
not live on promises. 5



>- Self-Styled “Priest”

Steals His Outfit

(From Own_Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 5,

A self-styled “Baptist preacher”,
who it is alleged, stole a priest's
outfit—eape, stole gown—
from the Presb; of the Cathe-
dral of the Immaculate Conception
on day hight, was this morn-
ing remanded for medical obser-
vation. The “Baptist preacher”
is Wilfred Harewood, a middle-
aged man, of Mission Road, San
Juan. He was held by constable
Calvin Trotman at 4.30 o’clock
yesterday morning, five hours or
so after he was said to have enter-
od, the Presbytery where he took
off his shirt and watchekong, put
on the cape, stole and gown.



Royal Summons

LONDON, Feb.
Five London saloon and restau-
rant Sropets ave been summoned
to Buckingham Palace on Febru-
ary 7—not for an investiture or
gardén party—but to renew their
licenses.

The five are the only licenses in
Britain whose prectishs are con- O

trolled by King George.

The summons to atténd the
palace is sent out by the “Board
of The Green Cloth,” which super-

vises_ kitchen and_ domestic
arrangements at Buckingham
Palace. =5.N.8,



ie? ”

Caiitival “Lawyer
Was Confotttided
(from Our Own C indent)
Ne OF-SPAIN, oe des
ever was a Carnival revéller
So flusteFéd than G. Fortune of
Siparia Hill, Lavehtille, Who
decided to dress himself up as a
prominent mémber of the Bar.

All unsuspecting, he came up
beforé the judges at the Savannah
competition announced to the
crowds over the radio that having
only received his papers yester-
Gay, he would be unable to go
on with the case. As the crowds
cheered he backed and turned to
the judges table.

Imagine his surprise when ho
came face to face with Mr.
H. 0. B. Wi , K.C., and the
Solicitor General Mr. C. T. W. E.
Worrell. Thus confronted, he
tried to make his escape but this
was not to be,

Cornered by Mr. Wooding, he
was ordered to show his papers;
for proudly he was carrying some
books and a grip. Giving a sheep-
ish smile, he declared that this
was against the “professional
@thics,” “Then,” demanded the
K.C., “let us see your books.”
These turned out to be “The
Truth shall make you Free.” Said
some voices in the crowd: “Boy
you can see that you are not well
acquainted with the law.”

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
HAIR cuit
Nos. 0; 00; 000

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Paper Rebukes
Slovak Mines

And Factories

PRAGUE, Feb. 9.

The Slovak Communist Party’s
newspaper Pravda to-day severely
rebuked heavy industry in Slova-
kia “because mines and factories
failed to fulfil their January pro-
duction,

Analysing the shortcomings in
the region now being rapidly in-
dustriglised, Pravda said the fail-
ure “though not really great, gives
cause for some very anxious re-
flections.”

Pravda ascribed the shortcom-
ings to faults in the political and
organisational preparations in the
third year of the five-year plan.

Communist Party officials in fac-
tories in Slovakia were devoting
too much time to technical matters
which were the duties of factory
managers, Pravda said.

“They must first of all devote
themselves to the political orienta-
tion and activation of workers.”

The paper listed considerable
shortcomings in the manufacture of
precision machines and_ the
wood, glass, paper and cellulose
industries had not fulfilleg the
plan. :

Other branches had fulfilled it
fin “a seriously uneven way” and
uneven production was also re-
corded between different weeks of
one month.

Not a single mine had completed
its coal plan. Absenteeism here had
increased to eight per cent. over
the estimated figure,

In the iron ore section Slova-
kia’s industry man has fulfilled

92.7 per cent.
bid . —Reuter.

Trinidad May Tax
Municipal Lands

(trepuodsetI0g UMNO Ino wo)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 7,

Government will soon be callec
upon to revise the Municipal Or-
dinance to permit taxation to be
levied on land owners within
Municipal areas,

This much was embodied in an
amendment of Councillor Quintin
‘Connor at the continuation of
the Council's Statutory meeting
on Wednesday morning. And the
Council accepted the amendment
on_a majority vote,

The debate took members to far
away places—even behind the
“Tron Curtain”, Theories touching
on the question of land and taxes
to be derived therefrom were
propounded. And passing refer-
ence was made of Karl Marx
during the course of the debate,

Only member who was unhur-
ried to pass the amendment was
Councillor George Cabral. He
was for going into the pros and
cons, and the appointment of a
committee to consider the matter.
So he did not vote.





Paper Threatened
With Boycott

BUENOS AIRES, Feb, 9.

Napoleon Sollazo, head of the
Newsvendors Union, whose boy-
cott of La Prensa has kept Argen-
tina’s leading daily off the streets
for the past fortnight, last night
issued a statement threatening
another great independent daily,
Lanacion, with retaliation.

Sollazo accuses Lanacion of ar-
bitrary reporting of the Union’s
conflict with La Prensa and of
repeated publication of comments
on the situation from the “yellow
press of the continent, which is
under the economic domination
of Wall Street and the city,” and
castigates the paper for publication
yesterday of a statement from a
Federation of Newsvendors in
Rosario in opposition to Sollazo’s
boycott of La Prensa—Reuter.

If you're feeling out o-sorts, Ge
Nights, or suffer from Dizziness, Wettig’
ness, Backache, Leg Pains, Swollen Ankles,
Rheumatism, Burning Pa:

ity, or Loss of Energy

* sages,
fore your time, Kidney
cause

Excess
and feel old be-
rouble is the true

Teeth Will
Hurt Less

NEW YORK, Feb.,
America’s
frice industry was reported to
be planning to market at least
four new toothpowders contain-
ing penicillin which, it is said,
will reduce tooth decay.

The disclosure was made by Dr.
Philip Adams, Cincinnati Indus-
trial Research director, who said
that research projects preliminary
to introducing new penicillin den-
trifrices are well under way at
the University of Louisville, Uni-
versity of Cincinnati and in New
York City and Cleveland Public
Schools.

Dr. Adams said that only one
penicillin dentifrice — dentocillin
is now available and is sold only
on the prescription of a dentist.

He said that it was a favourable
report on the cavity-inhibiting
effectiveness of dentocillin that
started the industry's trend to-
ward dentifrices containing the
miracle drug.

e@ report came from Tufts
College Dental School in Boston.
The report published in the jour-
nal of American Dental Association
in May, 1950, said that 500 units
of penicillin used in a gram of
dentifrice had reduced tooth
decay by 55 per cent in a Clinical
study among 350 school children.

Dr. Adams said “it is safe to
predict that penicillin tooth pow-
der will dominate the dentifrice
field in this country as soon as the
big manufacturers complete their
marketing preparations and go
into production.”—I.N.S

Yugoslav Govt. Do
Not Know Where
Dr. Clementis Is

BELGRADE, Feb. 9.

An official spokesman of the
Yugoslay Government Information
Office said to-day that the office
had no knowledge of the present
whereabouts of former Czech
Foreign Minister Clementis.

Further independent inquiries
at the Adriatic coast résort of
Abbazia where according to some
western reports Clementis has
sought refuge, continued to pro-
duce negative results,

Meanwhile, feeling among
informed Yugoslavs here, was
that Clementis was in a Prague
prison and stories of his escape
were deliberately being put about
by the Cominform so as rather
to make this an excuse for his
arrest. —Reuter.

Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

Sch, Emanuel C. Gordon,, M.V. Se
field, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Sch. C, M.



ge
Ipona, Sch. Philip H. Davidson, H.M. 8.
Devonshire, Sch, Eastern. Eel, a
Adelina, M.V. Laacy Jey, MLV. Vapabo'

Prince, Sch, Mary §E. Caroline, $.8.
Osetes, M.V. Caribbee, M.V. Blue Star,
M.V Monéka, Sch. Emeline, Sch. Marion
Belle Wolfe. ‘

Al

8.S, Mauretania,
Thompson, from Ne
Dutch Tanker Rufina,
Copt. . ‘inid,

ALS
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w York.

1,856 tons net,
jad.

RES
Schooner Lady Noeleen, 41 tons net,
Capt. Noel, for Dominica.
S.S. Mauretania, 19,691 tons net, Capt
Thompson, for Grenada,

% Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd., advise
that they can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbados
Coast Station:—

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PAGE THREE

his discovery that
atomic nucleus has

career came to a tragic end
on the Gallipoli beaches
when he was only 28, will
always be remembered for

the

electrical charge the size
of which is charactert#ie.__
of the atom. The ~

numerical value of this charge isknown.as the Atomic Number. Moseley’s—

discovery has been of the greatest importance in the

of atomic physics.

subsequent developiient ~~

The son of a distinguished zoologist, Moseleywas born at Weymotidh
Dorset, in 1887. After a brilliant career at Eton and Trinity Colleges ~



Oxford, he became a lecturer in physics. at Manchester University. He
resigned this appointment two years later, when he was

elected to the John Harling Fellowship. His labours were
interrupted by the outbreak ofwarin.1914, but wot before he
had accomplished the researcheswhichwere destinedto have

@ dramatic effect on the course of the second World War.
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PAGE FOUR



om
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid, Broad St., Bridgetown.

Saturday, February 10, 1951

CIVIL SERVANTS

AN addtess tabled in the House of
Assembly by Mr. F. E. Miller, member for
St. George, seeks to provide a privilege for
Civil Servants which ill accords with the
essentials of the service which they must
render to the general public, It is to be
sincerely hoped that that address will
reach no farther than the table of the
House.

On the face of it the address asks the
Governor to allow Civil Servants to make
use of the Civil Establishment to earn a
livelihood, to kick it aside at any time they
feel so disposed and to return to it if and
when they have failed in their political
pursuits.

In essence it unwittingly attempts, let it
be admitted, to engender ill feeling among
some sections of the Service and to under-
mine the morale of the Civil Service.

The absurdities of the address are obvi-
ous: If an officer in the Service is allowed
to stand for election and to be reinstated,
it will raise dissatisfaction among the
members of the service who have been
denied such privilege and who are serving
in junior positions.

Some explanation is needed to satisfy
any Governor as to what must be done
with the vacant post while the member
serves his constituency for one session. But
the purple patch of the document is the
paragraph which assumes that such dan-
-gerous permission will be given, and asks
that the Vestries be invited to extend this
privilege to their employees. ‘The Vestries
are elected bodies operating under an Act
and except by Legislation cannot be con-
trolled by the Government.

But apart from the inherent blemishes
of the address itself, it is well to look at
the effect it must inevitably have on the
members of the Civil Service. They are
being made to feel that in their capacity
as servants of the Government they are
being denied a right. They knew when
they joined the Service that membership
in the Legislature and membership of the
Civil Service were incompatible, they sub-
scribed to the conditions of service then
and have received such benefits as are
to be derived from that service.

There have been occasions in the past
when members of the Service have re-
nounced those benefits for the glamour of
political life. “The late Mr. C. L. Elder, a
Registrar of this island, resigned his post
to become member for St. George. Mr.
Hugh Blackman, Accountant in the Gen-
eral Post Office timed his entry into poli-
tics with his retirement from the service,
and at present there are two members of
the.House, Mr. Speaker, Member for St.
Peter and Mr. R. G. Mapp, Member for St.
Thomas, who resigned from the Teaching
and Civil Service to become members of
the House. It is late in the day to ask
that the rule be discarded.

The Civil Servant has his right to attend
public meetings, join political parties and
to vote for members of the party which he
serves. His active participation is frowned
upon because of the issues involved. It is
the Civil Servant who must carry out the
policy of Government irrespective of the
party in power. He itis who supplies that
continuity of service which makes the
standard something worth while and which
ensures ‘the respect of the individual for
the Civil Service! and the Government..
Even in places where there are ministers
of the Crown, it is the Civil Servant who
is responsible for the maintenance of
policy and it would be asking too much of
human nature to expect a man who had
spoken against the adoption of a particular
line of policy to carry out details to perfect
the major issues.

It is true that the Labour Party might
be in need of disciples but there should be
no attempt to fill party ranks at the ex-
pense of the Government. It is an attempt
to incite Civil Servants to please the party
in power whose-backing they will have in
case of failure.





Our Readers Say:









There are two classes of Un-
happy workmen in the world, and
by workmen we mean everyone
from the president of a large cor-
poration to the day labourer:

First, there are those who have
jobs which wholly satisfy their
creative and energy needs, but
do not provide what they desire
in the way of monetary reward
or social life.

Second, there are those who
work hard and earn a good living,
but who have jobs which give
them the “fenced-in” feeling
common to persons whose ability
is denied expression and whose
talents are unrecognized,

In addition, of course, there are
people who believe that work is
something to be cut to the mini-
mum, There are so many in this
class as to give cheer to ambitious
people, who find less competition
than there might otherwise be.

Today's working mam (and
again we include everyone from
the highest-salaried to the lowest-
paid worker) needs more than
skill and smarimess. These are
days when qualities of character
are more important than ever be-
fore: stability, toleration, | co-
operation, and self-restraint. They
are days when a knowledge of
economic affairs is needed, not
only of the family budget kind,
but the kind that tells the reason
for the taxes deducted from one’s
pay envelope.

Work has as its purpose the
production of things to use and
services to enjoy. Business is not
a struggle for wealth that already
exists, but a system of co-opera-
tion in producing and exchanging
things that people want, The more
things we produce, the greater
choice we have of things to enjoy,
and the more we will have to ex-
change for things we desire.

Looked at in this way, work is
not’ a curse. The law “In the
sweat of thy brow shalt thou eat
bread” may be read as one of the
most beneficent laws of life. It
was probably because.they. hac
nothing to do that Adam and Eve
became so easy victims for the
tempter:

Social and political dreamers
foster the fallacy that work was
imposed upon mankind as A
punishment. They do this because
the notion breeds discontent and
thereby furthers their purposes,
In fact, as every thinking man and
woman will admit, work is
strengthening, satisfying, and) a
great blessing. It is essential to
human happiness. f

But to discharge its responsi-
bilities work must have certain
qualities, It must be honest, use-
ful and cheerful, It was of this
kind of work that all the great
men of the past century spoke
when they preached the Gospel
of Work: liberals like Mill, sotial-
ists like William Morris,
reactionaries like Carlyle, Chris-
tian socialists like Kingsley, and
half-socialists like Ruskin. Tolstoi
said: “It is pleasant to dream of
eternity, but for an honest man
it is enough to have lived his life,
doing his work.”

We Are Making The World

Ours: is a civilization that never
could have been built without
labour, and if it is to be sustained
it must be by work which adds
te life as well as maintains life
The world is not diminished,
small though it may appear in
the light of today’s speed records
in travel and communication, It is
in the process of being made, and
we are the makers.

Work is helpful to our minds.
It is the best outlet for our anger,
and the truest escape from self-

| pity and self-centredness. There is

a very special kind of joy in rest
after work. As a Vedda cave-
dweller told a scientist: “It is
pleasant for us to feel the rain

mg om our shoulders, and
good to go out and dig yams,
and come home wet, and see the
fire burning in the cave, and sit
round it”

Work is not what it used to be.
Dr. D.»Ewen Cameron, Professor
cf Psychiatry at McGill Universi-
ty, describes it quaintly: “In the
days ‘of the horse plough and the

Jcoach, when tandles and cloth

and chairs were} made in the
house, when you. elambered out
of bed in the d and stumbled
back again when the moon came
out, it was lit true that if
you did not wi you did not
“Working in order to. Mve is
Wi at in order” ki
joe we mi nis not lost
it may. er co! .
it, ‘Sut the bum’s claim chet ihe
world owes him a living is
near to paying off.”
Well, in a_ nation. like ours
seople are not likely to give in to
iving on charity. ere are too
many opportunities for the better
life we all desire, and we have
not yet receded to the thinking
of the spoiled child kind, | that

when people demand payment for
things we want they dhe Sertosind

‘mere. husks~ unless

a

(With acknowledgments to

the Roval
Benk of Canada Newsletter.

Jan. 1951.)

on us: We still believe that re-
ward follows effort.

We of this. generation in
Canada have higher ideas than
had the cave-dwellers. We feel
that when we work we are ful-
filling a. part of earth’s furthest
dream, assigned to us when that
dream was born, “And,” says
the philosopher-peet Kahlil
Gibran, “if you cannot work with
love but only with distaste, it is
better that you should leave your
work and sit at the gate of the
temple and take alms of those who
work with joy.”’

There have been people in all
ages who believe that a man who
can produce twice+as much as
another with the same effort ought
to be punished instead of reward-
ed if he does so.

Schemes that would make buy
ing power easy to get without
giving anything for it are prolific
sources of trouble, The only real
purchasing power in the markets
is that of the goods and services
offered there. The idea that we
can eontinue our civilized pro-
aress if we insist on giving less
and less for more and more is a
dangerous fallacy:

About Being Tired

There is no denying that there
is such a thing as work-fatigue.
lt is a safety device of nature to
keep us within safe limits. The
trouble is that many of us have
set the safety valve to blow off
under a pressure so low that our
daily efficiency is impeded, and
we miss many of the joys of life.

Much of the “slow down” in
life is not caused by work-fatigue,
but by psychological factors.
Shorter hours will not help that
situation. Suppose we knocked
off work for all but four hours a
day, and turned ourselves loose
for the rest of the time to get
what. good we could out of a set
of fine abstract nouns. such: as






1 HAD A GIMA\
ON THE FOUR
WEEK - LUCKILY IT WAS ON

YOUR COUPON AND. NOT MINE

seience, and art, “friendship -and
love and the contemplation of the
universe, We should find them
we pegged
‘away at them so hard that they,
too, became work. :

No cheating or bargaining of
smartness will ever get a single
one of our wants out of nature’s
storehouse at half price. Our
physical strength depends upon
working our muscles) Our men-
tal strength depends upon
working our brains. If we want
more, we must.work more, As a
nation, we cannot buy and con-
sume twice as much goods as our
grandfathers did unless we pro-
duce twice as much goods,

If mankind had adhered to the
»rimitive custom of each person
Seams for himself and supplying
all his own. wants, this fact would
be clear. The man who foraged
twice. as efficiently as his neigh
botr would have twice as much
to eat. There has been no.change
in the law, but only in the method
of foraging.

Everyone wants a higher stand-
ard of living. No redistribution
of money or goods now existing
will raise the average Only
through increased production of
the things people want can our
standard of living be raised.

That inereased production can
be brought about by the conjunc-
tion of four efforts: education, tu
develop .greater intelligence and
competence; -research, to develop
new products and find» better
ways of doing things; capital, to
build and expand industries; and
work,

Nothing can raise our standard

retty, Of living without work, The great-

_@St disservice to-our-age-is any!

reaching, whether by sentimental

. manitarians or by agitators, of

‘the gospel of reward without
effort. :

Wages
‘The world’s doers §| sll “wages

and diversion in small letters and
‘WORK in capitals, because getting

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Mien Miust Work

things’ done jg their main ob
jective. Wages and diversion
must be earned. Except as it is
given in charity, there is no

rational way of distributing money

but by payment for production
cr for servicesy ah
There are only four places

from which the money to pay stil!
higher wages cam come: increased
prices, reducediéaxes, corporation

profits, or ing sed production
by workers. |

The logical to rise buying
power is by ing production
per factory worker. This

doesn’t mean Tonger hours of
work, but mote efficient work,
a full day’s work for
a full day’s pay, This is the only
one of the four -ways by which in-
creased wages can be paid safely.

There are two remaining obser-
vations to be made about wages,
Sir Andrew Caird said, and many
other successful men have said it
in different words, ‘The work that
has paid me best is the work I
have done for nothing.”

The young man eager to syc-
ceed in life (and the older man
seeking advancement) is cheating
himself if he concentrates on wage
rates and hours. The man with
desire for success in him knows
that what he earns in future years
will not -be determined by
schedules of hours and wages, but
by the value he gives.

The second*observation is that
workmen should not lose sight of
the personal income problems of
their employers» The decimal
points im all the boss’s accounts
may be one or two places to the
right of anything in the work-
man’s bank book, but, as Fortune
remarked in an article “fiscally
speaking, the boss is slowly going
down the drain.” Income tax,
profits. tax, social welfare pay-
ments, and support of an increas-
ing number of good causes—ali

these, added to the generally
higher cost of doing business.
impose a burden that is very
heavy.

-About Dignity

There are certain principles to
be observed by both employers
and workers if they are to have
reasonable satisfaction out of
work, ~ ot

Employers ‘neéd to remember
that an @iémentary demand
among mankind is for mainten-
ance of dignity. The dignity of
man is just as important within
the factory cafetefia as it is jin
an exclusive city club.

Dignity of workers may be
maintained when employers
praise generously, give credit
publicly when credit is due, un-
bend in the presence of employees
so as to raise the employees’
self-esteem, judge justly and not
hastily, and accept criticism with
appreciation, ;

Employees owe it to them-
selves to choose among. the
occupations open to them the one
in which they can best serve, and
they owe it to their employers
to do their best in it, to develop
and preserve a working discipline,
to see against letting their
emotions run away with their
working sense, and to avoid, as
they expect their superiors to
avoid, shop politics,

It is often a bit of silly social
pride that makés people unhappy
in their work. Brain workers and
muscle workers are equally im-
portant in keeping the wheels
turning. No matter how magnifi-
cent may be the city planning
done by architects and ivory
tuwer dreamers, no city beautiful
will ever arise unless there are
men to use their hands on pick-
axes and trowels, on the throttles
of steam shovels and bulldozers,

There is no room for snobbish-
ness in a good society. We need
to beware ‘of the growth of
manners of thought that will tend
to ruin us, Like the Polynesian
chiefs who, because it was a
matter of d form, refused to
carry food)te. their mouths with

iheir own ds. They starved.
Or like the’ g of France whose
story is t by Veblen in The
Theory of Leisure In

the absencef of the functionary
whose duty it was to shift his
master’s séat, this king sat un-
comprainin ators a huge fire 2
allowed his 3% person to be
toasted pel ceaeebovery.

Labour can be made truly
dignified, not by the bogus ex-
altation 0: the worker by
Communism, but by workers
themselves evaluating a man for
what he is, and his usefulness to
society. The man who coaxes a
street car safely and competently
through city traffic, the man who
sweats in a Saskatchewan grain
field, the man who tends a great
machine which produces goods it
would take a thousand slaves to
make, the girl who operates an
‘levator or types letters, or. sells,

a store all these are con-
tributing ir share to the life
and productiveness of the country.





_—_—_ ---




























Cricket Broadcast

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,— The thousands, who will
listen to the broadcast of the
Intercolonial Cricket Matches be-
tween Barbados and_ Trinidad,
starting at Kensington Oval next
Thursday, should be told that a
cebt of gratitude is due the Hen-
ourable R. N- Turner, Colonial
Secretary, in particular and also
Mr, Frank Field, Acting Attorney
General for having had the
question of the granting of a
licence settled in a practical and
satisfactory manner in spite of
stubborn and tedious arguments,
Micawber suggestions and plain
humbug. By its decision the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
may rest assured that it has public
opinion firmly behind it,

The ready assistance and helpful
‘Suggestions of Mr. E. S. Bennett

end Mr. E. H. C. Robinson of
Messrs, Cable & Wireless Ltd.,
fhould also be recorded,
Yours faithfully, .
ERIC INNISS.
Teachers And The
Honours List
To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,- The following extract
from the front page 6f The Timés

Educational Supplement, is not
without local significance: — 4
“Though each year now the
names of a not insignificant
number of men and women who
have given distinguished service .
in education or an allied field
appear in the Honours list, one
would still like to see more
teachers thus singled out for
recognition. There is to-day in-
creasing acknowledgement of_
the crucial importance of the
teacher’s role—and there aré so
many devoted and successful,
teachers whose lives and work
offer convincing evidence that
the importance of the class-
room practitioner is not over-
rated. This is not to wish any
diminution in the numbers of
those whose service to education
has been given wholly or main-
ly outside the classroom, for
they make it possible for the
steacher to do a good job, and
many if not most of them have
graduated to their present posi-
tion from the classroom, But it
is still possible to wish that
those who advise His Majesty
could find it in their hearts to
include more entries like “X. Y.,
Class-teacher, Z County Primary
+ School.’”

The situation in Barbados with

respect to teachers and _ other
workers in the educational field is
even worse; and your correspond-

ent hopes that those who make

the jiocal recommendations will
make a note of the above extract
and adopt the suggestion made

therein.
Yours faltntnily,
TEACHERS’ FRIEND.

Reckless Driving

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—Kindly allow’ me to corh-
ment on an Article in your paper
‘of Tuesday 6th February, re Cam-
paign against, reckless Driving.

-I think that if the Police Force >

themselves could set, 4 better ex-
ample while driving both-v: and-
motor cycles, the public would eo-
operate. c ‘

I recently witnessed a scene on
Constitution Road, near Queen’s
College, where a Policeman riding
a motor cycle at a very dangerous
rate, nearly collided with a cyclist.
The Policeman, although riding
dangerously was not interested in
where he was going. He was look-
ing back at his rear wheel.

I believe the reason for this dis-
gusting driving: by- the Police, is
the idea the Police seem to believe
that they can do no wrong re-
gardless,

I will agree that freight Lorries
are a menace to the road user, but
so are other motorists. The num-
ber of. drivers at night that have
not the least bit of common decen-

ey to dip their lights to ctor
traffic is utterly, disgusting.
should estimate that at least 99.9%
of drivers at night do not dip their
lights.

Drivers of cars and especially
taxis, have not the slightest regard
for cyclists or pedestrians they

“may meet on the road. Their out-

look is that their car is the larger
object, and as such, everything
else should get off the roa@® when
they are around,

Hoping this will meet the eyes

- of all concerned.
A DISGUSTED ROAD USER.

City Traps

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly.,permit me space
to draw to the attention of the
correct Authority, «two dangerous
traps in the city.

Just above the Garden, on that
bridged gutter, which serves as a
pavement, where passengers await
the “buses for Brittons Hill, My
Lord's Hill, ete. A small portion
of which has either rot or broken
away is quite a menace to ladies’
shoe heels and second i§ a ring
in one of the planks which pro-
trudes and serves as a trip. Only
this morning quite a fat lady
tr'nped and would have got quite



a fall if it were not for the -quick
assistance of ‘a Bus Conductor.
Thanking you for space
WILKINS

| themselves how America works.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951



EES lleeEeEEe—_————eeeeeeeeee oO ee _ evan

AMERICA HAS A SOUL

NEW YORK.
The most promising weapon in the whole
U.S. propaganda armoury is the exchange
movement, Fortune magazine declares in its
current issue, urging the government to
quadruple its present expenditure for bring-
ing visitors here from abroad.

D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE



Usually NOW
33 30

Pkgs: QUAKER MACARONI
Tins PILCHARDS (44)

Seek Lipiak Sava eEs 19

The magazine quotes comments of British,
French, Norwegian and other members of
visiting “productivity teams” to show that
some of these people went home and opened | %
the eyes of their left-wing fellow citizens “in ¢
a way that all the money in the world would
not buy us.”



FOR YOUR BATHROOM

















» Corner BASINS with Pedestal

25”x18”
& BASINS with or without Pedestal
22”x16”

The free world is seen endangered by a
myth: the myth that America is “all money
and no spirit,” a country without a soul.

“If we do not destroy this myth, it will
destroy us. Already it has sapped the will of
our allies, made those who benefited from
the ECA cynical of its purpose.”





Bakelite Mahogany
Cast Iron CISTERNS

Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS
HARPIC, Large and Small.

Takei White and

The U.S. needs help from its friends over-
seas in the task of explaining how America
works. The exchange movement enables
Europeans and others to come and see for
themselves whether the American “secret”
is gadgets, or ruthlessness, or something
more profound.

Among Fortune’s quotations from_Euro-
pean productivity-team reports :



WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,
“The American employer seems to be al§ ;
psychologist aware that his prosperity is tied | ¢
directly to that of the workers.”....“Some-
times we had to ask ourselves whether it was
manufacturer or union member speaking to
us.”....“Contrary to the impression gained
from many American films, only a small per -
centage of American workers and _ their
families live in tenements.”

Through the State and Defence Depart-
ments and ECA, the government is now
bringing over about 13,000 persons a year to
observe and study American methods, and
the cost is about $45 million, Fortune dis-
closes.

“Meantime, private organizations this year
will have arranged roughly 40,000 exchanges
of their own. The 4-H clubs have been ex-
changing young farmers; the Rotary clubs
have been bringing over students; the Girl
Scouts ‘youth leaders’...... ete.

“Measured against the need, however, our
over-all exchange effort has been piddling.
It has been very frustrating for many middle-
management people, for example, to return]
to Europe all steamed up about, say, labour-
management councils, only to realize that no
one else in the outfit has got the word. Like|$
plasma, exchange is best in massive doses.

= } 18153

With “ seithout Motors

Now's THE TIME
TO SELECT YOURS.

DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — Acents.





FOR THOSE WHO LIKE
TO KEEP COOL...
AND KEEP WELL-GROOMED







“We have a tremendous opportunity before
us. We should seize it by expanding our
total propaganda budget to at least $500
million a year—and of this devote at least
$180 million to exchange.

“We could not legislate a bigger bargain
for ourselves.” Fortune adds, pointing out
that government spending for this purpose
stimulates more spending on exchange by
private groups in the U.S. and abroad, as well
as by foreign governments.




AT THE SAME TIME!
THE NEW MOYGASHEL
ANTI-CRUSHABLE

LINENS

-.- ARE JUST THE TICKET

, Perhaps not much can be done about the
hostility of certain European intellectuals
who deery American culture as “barbarous,”
Fortune implies: “The myth satisfies them.
In it they find the rationalization for their
own spiritual vacuum.”

Moreover, American culture is a popular
culture, Fortune continues: “Ii is a proclama-
tion to. the world of the cultural enfranchise-
ment of the common man. But to a
Europe that is still culturally an aristoc-
racy the symbols of hse nfranchise-
ment are often vulgar and shoddy.” (As one
French writer said, bemoaning Coca Cola,
Buicks, Chryslers, nylon stockings, and
chewing gum, “As soon as they appear these
habits become an invasion. It is a question
of the entire French moral landscape!”)

NEW STOCKS JUST

AT
DA COSTA & CO., LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

ARRIVED














“Is it the implicit revolutionary promise}
of these symbols that makes them so pro-
foundly disturbing?” Fortune asks.

European workers, on the other hand, are
cool to American capitalism because they
conceive of it in terms of their own—of which
they are sick—Fortune continues,

“The European does not see the rapidly
changing, socially conscious capitalism of
1950. He has not been shown the tremen-
dous difference between our capitalism and
the capitalism of Europe.

ERY MORNING

MORNING”

with a CUP of

COFFEE

— We Offer —

“In this respect it is startling to listen to
en American businessman just returned from
Europe; almost invariably he will so revile
its low-wage, high-markup, monopoly eco-

nomics that he sounds much more the howl- Coffee Specials
ing revolutionists than the European socialists pagie coe Cpeneh Dele SNe ane, Set Bet

‘ Cook’s Paste, 6 cents per tin
who ‘so mistrusts him.” _ Luncheon n

> Maxwell House Coffee yn. Cheese, 1.21 each

Chase & Samberne Coffee





But the European masses are“ignorant of

this businessman’s philosophy, and European Liquors Breakfast
capitalists are utterly unconvinced _ of its Son Braid — Foods
value: “It is high time that the American Dry Sack Sherry Wheat Puffs
businessman realized that it is not Europear pearl: tae ry jg Pulled Wheat
socialism, but European capitalism, that is Vielle Cure Prunes

Tuborg Beer

Meat

the chi ‘ icp)? Crushed Pineapple
chief block to ‘free enterprise’. cake danice

Canadian Eggs



We must develop far better means of

Calves Liver
reaching the European masses with our pro- een Tees Swweaky Bacon x
paganda, Fortune maintains. Reaching them] Bed Apples Manburgers g
the editors feel, will require the co-operatior oe ae erent x

of our friends abroad who have seen for PHON E G 0 D ) A R D S$ 3

FOSS SO SPSS SS SSS S SSS 99S SSO SPOS OOF OFOCCOSS

—I.N.S,



SATURDAY, FEBRUAR

i et

Y 10, 1951



Clerks’Spanish
Class, Opens

HE BARBADOS Clerks’ Union
is now starting a Spanish
Class for the purpose of assisting

City clerks in dealing with -cus-
tomers from Venezuela and other
Spanish countries. Mr. S. I.
Smith will be the tutor.

At present they have Arithmetic
and English Classes started by the
Barbados Evening Institute. The
Spanish Class is on their own in-
itiative.

The class will begin on Wedanes-
day, February 14 at 5.30 p.m., but
those clerks who are interested in
Spanish should communicate with
the General Secretary before 4
o’clock on Tuesday evening.

IGHTY-THREE-year-old Mary

¢ Jemmott of Orange Hill, St.
James, was taken to the General
Hospital yesterday morning and
detained. Jemmott was struck by
a pole which carried a major road
sign.

WO LORRIES were extensive-

ly damaged when an accident
occurred on Banatyne Road, Christ
Church on Thursday evening, One
P. 127 is owned by Oldbury Es-
tates Ltd., and was being driven
by Herman Chandler of Kirtons,
St. Philip. The other is, owned
by Louisa Layne of Sargeants Vil-
lage, Christ Church and was
being driven by her son Perry
Layne. ‘
[28-YEAR-OLD Maureen|

Blackett, a pedestrian of Ken-!
sington Land, St. Michael, . wasj
involved in an accident with motor
ear M 285, owned by E. C, Good-
ing of Warrens Factory and driven
by Ivan Lynch of Prout Hill, St.
Thomas, at the corner of Bridge!
and Trafalgar Streets on Thursday i
afternoon. She was only slight-!
ly injured. t

Wounding Cas
Dismissed

A CASE brought by the Police
charging May Lane of Spooner’s
Hill, St. Michael with wounding
Molly Vaughan on her head on
January 9 with a bucket was yes-
terday dismissed on its merits by
His Worship Mr. C, L. Walwyn,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”. .

Dr. Tony Gale, who gave the
medical evidence, said that he saw
Vaughan at the General .Hospital
on January 10. She was. bleeding
trom a woung on the scalp which
in his opinion was not serious,

Vaughan said in her evidence
that while she was..at the pipe,
Lane and herself “got into a row.”
Cross examined Vaughan did not
say that Lane’had struck her with
the bucket,

In passitig his, decision Mr
Walwyn told Vaughan that there
was no evidence to convict Lane
for wounding.

Set. B. King, prosecuted on, be-
half of the Police.

ON THREE MONTHS’
BOND





Dudley Jones of Halls Road was
put‘on a bond for three months
by Mr. E. A. MeLeod yesterday
for the unlawful possession: of a
quantity of sugar which he was
conveying or Bridge Street on
February 8.





NURSING GIRLS

[

/

THIS ARTIST takes advantage of the ideal conditions yesterday. She is seen here sketching the block
of buildings including the Advocate Co., Ltd., and Messrs J. N. Goddard & Sons. Many people looked on.

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



SKETCHING





Tourists Crowd | charity Group

Bridgetown

AMERICAN TOURISTS were everywhere in the City
yesterday. The Mauretania called at 7 a.m. with 626

pleasure seekers from all the
The Mauretania had not long
dropped anchor before trim, white
and open Jaunches were on their
way tothe Baggage Warehouse
bringing in the tourists to spend
a while on “Bimshire.”

In the cafés, stores, curio shops
and jewel shops groups of them
lingered around to make pur-
chases, Many of them could be
seen going back to the ship with
bags and arms filled with parcels,

About 250 of them went on
country tours, visiting all the
historic parts of the island, They
left early during the day and did
not get back until evening.

Sea Bathing

Quite a number of them spent
the day at beaches, while others
walked through the principle
streets of the City window-shop-
ping and taking snaps with their
cameras.

The Mauretania is on a 18-day
cruise, She left New York on
February 3 and is expected to be
back in New York by February 22.

On her way down, she made
stops at St. Thomas and) Martin-
ique, spending a few hours at
each port. }

A tourist toid the .-Advocate,
yesterday that he enjoyed fine
weather throughout the voyage to
Barbados.

Occasionally ‘there were little |
swells, he said, but nothing te



j make the..passengers uncomfort—

able,

He found Barbados
interesting of the ports
already visited.

the most
he- had

PAY

INCOME TAX:
Send Money Back

Of the 38 Barbadian girls who went to England to
work in Hospitals, 37 are still working in Hospitals. The
38th is in Hospital herself and is likely to remain there
for some little time. Soon after reaching England, she de-
veloped symptoms of a long standing trouble which had
apparently cleared up but which flared up again in the
changed circumstances of her new life.

The other 37 girls are contented
and happy; their main complaint
being about the cold and the fact
that they have, some of them to
pay Income Tax! Those working
as domestics earn between £2 and
£2. 15s. Od., per week left from
wages for themselves after deduc-



Nurse SYLVIA BREEDY

tions. All girls have to contribute
compulsorily ‘like other English
workers to National Health and
Unemployment Insurance
Schemes.

Girls who have transferred from
the domestic to the Student Nurs-
ing Grade get less; £1, 4s. 0d. per

week being the minimum earn-)no complaints

ferred to the Student Nursing
Grade.

They are: Idalia Fergusson,
Aletha Holder, Gwennie Inniss,
Daphne Roachford, Thelma Rock,
Doris Sargeant, Elsie Webster and
Gertrude Maxwell. :

Preliminary Training

Three others, Sylvia Breedy,
Adela Shaw and Margaret Lewis
have been sent to a Preliminary
Training School to see whether
they could pass the actual examin-
ations to enable them to enter the
Nursing Grade. The others work
as Hospital domestics, ward maids
orderlies, housemaids, kitchen as-
sistants.

The 37 girls are scattered over

the British Isles in: Stoke-on-
Trent, Manchester, Birmingham,
Bristol, Aylesbury, ,.London and
Swindon,

Most of the girls have already
had some leave during their stay
and have taken the opportunity to
visit other parts of the. British
Isles, One yisited North Wales
and a group took their holidays in
London during the period of the
Test Matches so as to meet other
West Indians. A number of the
girls have joined local Girls’ Club,
the Y.W.C.A., or Church Groups -
Many of them are paying volun-
tarily a sum from their weekly
wages regularly into the Post
Office Savings Bank so as to build
up a reserve; and about half of
them are sending money back to
their relatives here in Barbados.
The girls are all, with the excep-
tion of the one sick member, pay-
ing 5/- a week towards the cost of
their passages. This sum is de-
ducted from their wages and is
remitted through the Crown
Agents_to the Government of Bar-
bados. By the end of November
a sum of approximately $1,620 had
already been repaid in this way.

The girls seem to have stood up
to the ¢limate fairly well. There
has been some influenza among
them : four of them caught chick-
en pox and had to be isolated for
a period and many of them have
had attention to their teeth since
they arrived. There thave been
about “food; but

ings during the period of nursing} great care was taken before they

apprenticeship-

Most of the girls |left to tell them exactly what to

who are still domestics are earn- | expect at meal time



ing more than when they first took; On the whole the girls seen to
up their posts and nearly all, think that their work is hard, but
earn more than the minimum | do not appear to find it beyond
amount for their grade because |their capacity Not one so far
holidays and overtime are paid |expressed a regret that she went
extra } Or 0 return ho €

Last December eight girls trans-!



her contractual period i

States of America.

He thought Bridgetown a very
busy port and was surprised to
find shipping so full of activity—
much more active than he had
seen at St. Thomas and Martin-
ique,

Comfortable Cruise

Mr. Victor Ogley the cruise
Director, told the Advocate ‘that
they had done everything possible
on this cruise to’'make the tour-
ists comfortable, He said that in
addition to their 13 cruise direc-
tors who saw after the shore
excursions, they had put on 10
people on the ship from Radio
Station WOR Entertainment
Bureau for the benefit of the tour—-
ists. Those people were well
known on Broadway as far as
night clubs, radio, stage and tel-
evision were concerned.

The latest movies including
“Harvey,” “All about Eve,” ‘Call
me Mister” and “Magnificent
Yankee”, were put on every night
for the entertainment of . the
tourists. There were also deck
sports. and tournaments includ-—
ing deck tennis and ping pong as
well as bridge tournaments and
canaster tournaments,

Lectures on the islands were
given by Mr, Watterson Lowe be—
fore they reached the various
ports, These lectures were supple—
mented with colour travel films
of the islands,

He said that they had nice
weather throughout the trip so
far and the tourists had enjoyed
every moment of their visits es—
pecially in Barbados as many of
them had been here before and
were longing to be back.

The Mauretania ieft about
midnight for Grenada and will
stop at La Guaira, Curacao, Cris—
tobal, Kingston, and Havana be-
fore returning to New York on
February 22.

THE FIRST LAUNCH to arrive at
from the “Mauretania’ deposits its ‘



STAMP sellers at the General
Post Office will certainly be hay-
ing one of their busiest periods
on February 16, The occasion will
be the issuing of stamps to com-
memorate the «inauguration of
the University College of the
West ‘Indies and the installation
of Her Royal Highness Princess
Alice, Countess of Athlone,
Chancellor,

as



The stamps will be of two de-
nominations, one being sold tor 3
cents and the other for 12,

The 3 cents stamp will carry

TOURIST INVASION

}
|

5





PAGE FIVE



There Is Always Some }
Game At Queen’s Park

NEARLY half.a mile from the centre of Bridgetown,
the shady grounds of Queen’s Park stand. Forty-four years
ago it used to be the residence of the General in command |
of the Troops. Now it is the quiet hang-out of the young, |
the middle-aged, but for the most part the grey-headed.

Letters Of
Administration

In the Court of Ordinary yes-

terday His Honour the Acting |

Chief Judge, Mr. J. W. B. Chenery,
granted the petition of Tdalie St:
Clair Prescod, of Mt. Standfast,
St. James, for Letters of Adminis-




















PEEPS OSS PD ECP OOOO POPPE EOFS

TOOTAL LINENS

THE TALK OF THE TOWN!
36 ins. wide

NIL

4

$

3S
>
:
:
When an Advocate reporter

passed through Queen's Park yes-
terday, the cricket wickets which
a few weeks ago were on the
Park's fresh cut turf were taken
up and the football goal posts were
erected, On a smaller pasture of
the park, the basket ball poles
were ready for playing. Yes, at
all seasons of the year, some

ame is in the spotlight at Queen’s
ark.

oo




























%
+
:
:
BS
s
8 j
tration to the estate of her late : errs y |
husband, Vernon. Augustus Pres- inher a eens te ae $
C i > re alls. any
She was represented by Mr, | Occasions the Park walls were
W. W. Reece, K.C., instructed by} thrown down after heavy rain
Messrs ‘Haynes & Griffith. when the water flowed down from
His Honour also. granted the | the country.
petition of Joseph Donald Corbin, At the side of the cricket and
also known as Joseph Donald | football ground there are twa *
Newsam of Ashton Hall, St, Peter, | Pavilions, one about 70 by 35 feet LEMON
for Letters of Administration to | 0d the other a little bigger. To x
the estate of his wife the late Mar- |the Eastern side there is a stretch | ¥
garet Ann Corbin or Newsam. of mahogany trees, not as big as
Petitioner was represented by | Some you see about the island, but $
Mr._C. H. Clarke; K.C. instructed | shady enough to induce boys to f
by, Messra Hutenioase * menhela. piteh underneath them,
e Acting ef Judge admit- .
ted to Probate the will of Pearla|ine land of the flying, fish. in Wie E 7
Healis Rose, late of St. James and 7 \
that of Blanche Skeete late of S days when the park first became
a er eee and Lady Garter who got : :
’ 2 : er a stone and wooden roo e ,
P. resident Comes shed. with a conical top near the L I N EN
; pasture, had a drawing of a flying e ‘
Mrs. Undine Newton, Organiser REMANDED pg Se ved Bay o'clock any _ Branded TEBILIZED,
eri hen a Md ante LIONEL BEST a 23-year-old day there can be heard the pleas- . - for tested crease-resistarice
Group in New York, arrived in| @bourer of Christ Church, was Se I I an agi ae ge ae
Barbados. yesterday. accompanied esterday remanded by His Wore |i), Sitast. Most of the old men
by her niece, Miss Daisy Thomp.|S%ip, Mr. E. A, McLeod, Police oe ; —BROAD ST
yt F “AY are men who cut canes in Cuba .
son. She told the Advocate that| Magistrate of District “A” whe | years ago and killed snakes too
the organisation is pleased with| he was charged with breaking |ippere ite some among them who
the way the: work is being done, 2nd entering the dwelling house of fought in Africa and who knew DIAL 2664.
here by Canon Read, Chairman,| Walter Boyce at Marine Garden, )}ine days when transportation was| Se
and the other members of the lo-| Christ Church, and stealing ar/q matter of “going by foot”. odo acta cineca tn tected tata telat tit tatatne einiiaiassiienieinls
cal Committee. ticles to the value of £7 on Janu~ M .. °
ary 18, any lrees ‘
She plans during her two! The charge was brought by the
months’ stay in Barbados te sea Police. There are many types of trees a et
the work at first hand. ALSO remanded by His Worship | almost all over the grounds and of |
: Mr. E. A. McLeod until February | course the tall palm trees that are r
The Organisation which Mrs. 15, was 23-year-old. William |$0 much tropical, are among them. | ff) FOR , I HE BES’ | ' |
Newton represents is one of those Joseph of no fixed place of abode There are many evergreen trees|#)
in New York which sends over after he appeared in the court on too, and one is about 36 feet in| §)
money and shipments of articles|a charge brought by the Police ae. sak eat tha ade
for distribution among the poor of, of stealing a bunch of bananas| ang doubtless the mangoes from
Barbados. This group has its)the property of E. C. Gill of|the blossoming mango tree that is| fl! ~~
gifts distributed — through . the| Cavell Avenue, St. Michael. in the grounds will belong to the| fl AO DEASTIFEL
Church. ’ The offence was alleged to} Vestry. But two to one the boys| §f! 4
\ «| have been committed sometime on| who get their toes stumped when| §) CAS¥~TVO-CLEAR s
A shipment of such articles wil] February 8 kicking the little hopping ball j >. st
be Th Of ee ie said | eanigihegfemsieaie — the mango tree will get most} §) ) ~ COVERING
rganisation which is com- of the mangoes no matter how .
posed ps Analg eons is DROVE DANGE ROUSLY wary the park watehmen are. r ’
ree years rs. Newt tat
described itw secretary, Mr | D@ Pald i foe | Under the trees which overhang | ff “SILVER STAR
Charles Roy King as good and Heal iy cred was tmposed "oh [Re walls of the park, mothers |
i carry their children to have a
efficient. He was one of the Found-| Reuben Rice of Upper Collymore} wall. Youngsters not. yet: ready
ores Secs by. ton ; ‘Ear oh for school ride their tricycles on| @;
a4 or rivin, a the green too.
Mrs. Newton said that sopisp of! Harmony Hill on December 5. At luncheon time, children com-
the Advocate containing “write-| When the offence was commit-|ing home from school stop in to
ups” of the delivery of goods fromy ted Rice was driving the motor] turn on the garden pipes when the
the Organisation to the local} jorry M—1395. gardener's back is turned, After
branch had reached New York ’ —_————. school they take to the see-saws,
and that the members of the Or- DOG FIGHT the .swingers and the chutes in
ganisation haq@ appreciated those THE Judges of the Assistant| crowds.
“write-ups” very much, Court of Appeal Mr, G. L, Tay-|. The gardens near the Constitu-
i, v |orand Mr HA. Vaughn agreed|tion Road are well kept and the
This is her first visit to Barba-] with a decision of Police Magis-| hedges neat. And bees like Queen's |
dos in 13 years, Mrs, Newton said }trate Mr. §. Nurse and| Park for the honey they get from
and from a casual look around the} yesterday dismissed on its merits} the many flowers.
city she has seen some improve-} 4 case in which Hilary Chandler , ; t
ments, which please her, very charged ‘Walter Lopey if Roaches, wot Sale neih teks armen
much. She went to the U.S.A.] st. Lucy of having caused un-|1o be registered as unemployed a
from Barbados 32 years aso. OTe ey’ waa nileeae Se. ad tha unanplovsent agency sete.
While here, she will reside at} his two dogs on Chandler’s on somewhat slalisedy: af ts ante
her own home at Salters, St] September 5 last year, Chandler's! of the monkeys, peacock, turtles
George, where her sister, Mis*] dog was badly beaten. Lopey’s)and other unfamiliar things that INSIST ON
Maude Thompson now lives, defence was that although his} are kept there.
dogs did beat Chandler's, he had| There is an evergreen tree In
“I not been there at the time, but}the park above the steel shed
arrived when the beating was} which was planted in 1913 by
almost finished. Prince Albert, Duke of York,
aaa Tages AW gine George VI. It Hl SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
DECREE NISI sas named Ficus Benjamin. ' as eek he crt ses
HIS Honour the Acting Chie a
Judge, Mr. J. W. B. Chenery,
sitting in the Court for Divorce
and Matrimonial Causes yester-
day, pronounced decree nisi in
the suit of S. St.A. Sands
(Petitioner), E. G. Sands (Re-
spondent) and J. Harewood (Co-
Respondent) .
The petitioner appeared in y
person, There was no order as. to
costs. , : e
A letter which appeared in the Advocate
of February 8, stated that though in the
laying down of mains in né@w tenantries
the Waterworks Department insists that
provision ig made for new hydrants, when
mains were being Ipid along “Blue
Woters, “The Garden” and Worthing
View" no provision was made for
hydrants.
The Advocate was informed (yesterday
that provision has been made in laying 4
: down the mains ng ee oe
the Baggage Warehouse yesterday eis bit ate Set atte and as s0on
‘cargo” of tourists on shore. as they arrived, they will be installed.
New Stamp Issue Sasateasaaeeeneas
tt: JASON JONES & CO., LID.—Distibutore
INFECTION
’ 3 , NE ce ¥
WE OFFER _. « How about it? Well, here’s 0 pla .

the Arms of the University, and
the other, g full length seatex
portrait of Her Royal Highness ir
her robes as Chancellor.

Other colonies will also be
issuing special stamps for the same
purpose though not nécessarily at
the same price. For example
Grenada’s two denominations arc
for 3 and 6 cents respectively.

DEEP SEA FISH COME
FISHING schooner Sunshine R.
25 tons net. brought 760 deep sea
f from the fishing banks for
terday. The fis
Messrs
» Ltd










was
J N

J



KOSSOLIAN
KOSSOLIAN
KOSSOLIAN
KOSSOLIAN



10D





The better they condition, t

SLPS SCSO GSO OSS

BLOOD SALTS
POULTRY TONIC
RACE HORSE TONIC

STOCK FARM CONDITION POWDERS

LL LLELLELLLPLLLLLPLLLEPLLLSALLY

IZED SPICE





he more likelihood of Survival







where you won't feel that tightness
across the back or middle . . . here’s :
ONE place where you won't hear “We can let it out a little for you.”
No, sir! At THIS store we have suits made to fit you in the first place,
designed to flatter you—and, not just a few—but a whole big range of
colors, fatrics and patterns!

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

Tailoring Department 10, 11, 12 & 13, Broad Street.






BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951

chit CHIC
iHitikaniii THETA w Hy |

A
ea y tear YOU KNOW, TREATING
ip | BLANKETS THE S SO NICE
by











i gnt your

os HEADACHES

while they're slight













MI MEAN A
RAISE FOR US



When headaches start —
due to worry, overwork, over in-
dulgence—be smart, take Alka-
Seltzer right away. Sparkling
effervescence makes Alka-Seltzer
pleasant-tasting, helps its pain-
killing analgesic go to work

fast. Keep it handy.

Alka-Seltzer |












Kill those throbbing pains in
your muscles at once! Apply
Sloan's Liniment lightly—

You don’t ru in “Sloan's” you dab it
on the affected part gently —“ Sloan's”
——>




HA! AO! HO!
+--HEE-HEE }
KLE... ! d







does the rest! Good for
aches and pains and stiff





~ ke
aS
TAD UOD)

ee Ae








x Heart Trouble
mn a \ ofall prasad by High
is








Â¥

HE RRINGS

ERESH ov in TOMATO SAUCE

MY DRAW REIN, OR rl i
PB.\E S1/007/ sf Ts) BF}
Ba Ses

Ba Sa



a

4AM YA
44 ay






A.S. Bryden & Sons (Barbados) Ltd.—Agents.



SPS COSSPEESEO FOES PIEDPOPOS ESL SS OSE SSOSS SS SSPPPSSSOSS

THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK

©

WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,

and Associations to make the compilation of information in
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities:
réligious, commercial, cultural, educational, health; «sports,
radio, agricultural, etc., are asked io have the form printed
below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:

THE EDITOR,
pies THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street.

FORM
i isla ; Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Etc, ......ssssssvsssseeseseusseeeninnen
;
A C e |

» Potted Meat
WATCH THE FIFTY-DOLLAR WINDOWS, DENNY... hE, LoS Magi cana sigs couch cccbant kok cou VOLS LIST sce Uelehlia hestwalino ob Eeasts DOD ak vodwtian ” SandWien Spend
CUTTLE DIDN'T STEALA MILLION BUCKS (Neha t eee eeteeneeenereeteresereerensenseenesenesnesesn eager eneceeassesenter ses » Gm tah Boue
TO MAKE PIKER. : ? » Vegetable. Soup,
! es) Ys » ASparagus Soup

BETS ee Chicken..Soup
w Tomato Soup
» Carrots, (Sli¢éd and whole)

» Peas

Council or Committee Member?6..........:sssssssssssesseenenesensenesnersneeenseeneanees $ Tomatoes

s Pkgs Blahcmange
a7






fn. ee

Christian Science
Reading Room

1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS
(Broad Street)

Hours: 10 a.m.-—2 p.m,






curses!

Te See

MY CHANCE To j
THE BADGE OFF

Hi6 CHEST //



Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
10 aih—i8 o’clock,
Saturdays.

4t this Room the Bible and
the Christian Scleace text-book,
Sclence and Henita wita Key to

ARY BAKER

the Seriotures by M.
£DDY may De revd, borrows,

( oF purchased
Visitors Are Welcome
a a

—arneraarer el





MAKE YOUR SELECTIONS FROM
THESE:

Tins Cocktail Peanuts

Bots Cocktail Cherries

Tins Cocktail Sausages
» Meat Rolls

SOOSSESESES EOD SSS SES SESS SSS SOS SSIS SSCSS

d
B
g
2
8.
3
F
SOSS

a Jellos
Bots Salad Cream
Prepared Mustard

Disemnideh ccc sia icc Hea caccecssresiiletectns ‘ STUART & SAMPSON
| LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum,

"Short historical account of the origin, functions and current

activities :
Didoiihclceiiete enc i —
PESOS COOP OCee 0 Aa A © SBE BAAS IN A RB







You don’t have to forego big
ear features when you drive
the Morris Minor. Here isa
big car in a small way. Svat-
ing for four. Over 7 cubic



feet of luggage space. Torsion

\s if iz
bar, independent front wheel
t he @ a. O rf) , suspension for smoother rides.

It’s easy to steer through






ITS NO FALSE ALAR!
WARDEN. THE PHANTOM
NEVER FAILS.





ALITTLE *ER*ILLY,
FOLLOWING THAT ANIMAL.





My eyes often used to smart and At the Club Jim traffic: easy to park; easy to

robably sufferi ; ;
hed ue strata, Why not garage. If economy interests
E you, its 35-40 miles per gallon

means longer runs for your
money,




> ip >
LUI
Mite






= KOT TOOFAR,! HOPE.
MPUFF) I'M NOTAS YOUNG

— eye strain now!” I said to Jim
a acd

away dirt later. ““Thanksto you—and
~ and germs, toned up eye muscles. I'll never be without it again.”

PROTECT YOUR EYES ‘zzzh'

Optrex



Let us give you a demonstration ride
in the world’s biggest srnall car buy.

FORT ROYAL GARAGE Ltd.

Phone 2385 SOLE DISTRIBUTORS Phone 4504

MAKE THIS TEST
SS The rim of the eye and inner

liming should be heaithy flesh

Pe) colonr. If they are red or irri-
B tated‘or the whites bloodshot,
your cyes need treatment. designed eyebath









SATURDAY, FEBRUARY

10, 1951



CLASSIFIED ADS.



TELEPHONE 2508
he -
Births, ete ‘Deaths, aeeaoee FOR RENT

ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for. any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
udditional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for ereh
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

DIED

February 9th,
“White House”,



wooD—On 1951 at his
residence St. James,
Hinkson Ashby Wood. His funeral
leaves the above residence at 9.15 a.m.
to-day for the Westbury Cemetery.
Mrs. E. M. Greenidge and Leonard
Archer,

THANKS

BRYAN—Through this medium I beg
to return thanks to all those who sent
Cards, Wreaths, and letters, or in any
way condoled with me in my recent
loss occasioned by the death of my
dear mother Ida.

Harold Bryan (Corpl.) 10.2.51—1n

MORRIS—Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Morris
and family beg to convey their heart
felt thanks to all their friends, ac-
quaintances and well wishers for the
various expressions of sympathy shown
them in their bereavement occasioned
by the death of their loved one
Edired Neilson. 10,2.51—1n

SMITH—Oscar. We beg through this
medium to return thanks to all those
kind friends who sent wreaths, letters
of condolence, or in any way expressed
their sympathy in our recent bereave-
ment.

Mrs. Elaine Smith (wife), Joan, Yvonne,

Msureene (daughters), Emerson (son),

Mr. awd Mrs, Gerald Dottin (parents),

10.2,51—1n,











IN MEMORIAM

rage re
WALKEB—In loving memony of our dear
beloved mother Martha Walker, who
fell asleep on Feb. 10th, 1945.
“Happly and smiling always content
Loved and respected where ever she
went
To a beautiful life came a noble end
She died as she lived, everybody's
friend.”
Remembered by Mrs. A, Layne (Daugh-
ter), Mr. J. Layne (Son-in-law), Mrx L.



Coppin (Grand-Daughtor).
10.2.51—1n
a
ADAMS—In loving memory of my be-
loved husband Dentam Reginald

Adams who fell asleep on February
10th, 1950.

Sleep on and take your rest.

May ‘you rest in peace.
Mrs. Elvira Adams (Wife)
Mrs. Carlotto. Wilkinson,
Wilkinson.

and Family,
Mr. Lionel

10.2.51—1n

FOR SALE

Three cents per word on week-days
and 4 cents per word on Sundays, mini-
mum charge 72 cents on week-days and
96 cénts on Sundays.

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—1938 Vauxhall motor car. (in good
order), OWEN T. ALLDER, Roebuck
Street. Dial 3299.







10.2,51—1n

i
CAR—Chevrolet style master, in first
class condition (M-180), Dial 2550 any

day except Sunday, for particulars.
10,2.51—2n.

enon

CAR—Packard 8 Cylinder. Perfect
condition, Reason for sale, Purchasing
smaller car. Dr. Simon — Telephone
3085. 10.1,51—6n

ELECTRICAL

REFRIGERATOR—Westinghouse, One
year old, Phone 3904. 9.2.51—4r

——————————
REFRIGERATOR—@ld Spot Refriger-
ator, (in good working order). Elec.
motor and Compressor, OWEN T.

ALLDER, Roebuck Street. Dial 3299.
10.2.51—In

—_—_—_—
ONE TURNER WALKER DRILL
PRESS, electrically, driven, new.
Apply: Mr. R,. de Souza, C/o T.
Geddes Grant Ltd. 1,2.51—6n.

ES

WINDCHARGER — 12-Volt complete
with Tower. Ag. good as new. Apply
Cole’s Garage. hone 4316. 8.2.51—4n

FURNIIURE

——_————
MAHOGANY end Pine Presses, OWEN
T. ALLDER, Roebuck Street. Dial 3299.
10,2.51—3n

rr ——

MAHOGANY CHEST of Drawers,
Book Shelf, Set of Golf Clubs. Phone
8477. ® 10.2,51—1n.

SS
MAHOGANY Dining Tables. (Large and
small). OWEN T. LLDER. Roebuck
Street. Dial 3299. 10,2,51—3n

Or
RALPH BEARD offers upright rush
bottom chairs $3.75 each, with arms
$4.50 and rockers $5.00 each. New
mohogany upright chairs $17.00 per pr.
New mag. rockers $36.00 per pair, Tub
choirs $36.00 per pr. Mahogany cocktail
tables from $8.00, Tea trolleys $15.00
each, Mahogany Vanities, from $75.00;
Meg. bedends 3 ft. 6 ins. $35.00 per pr.
also. a good variety of second hand
furniture,

For further particulars Dial 4683. Call
on view at Ralph Beard’s show aoe
Herdwood Alley. 9,2,51—3n

’ LIVES10CK

———— —
CALVES—Ten - day old Heifer Calves,

: Bulkeley Ltd., Dairy.
— : 8,2.51—3n.



ES
PIG—One (1) Sow. 2nd Prize Winner
last Exhibition. Dial 3741. 9.2.51—3n

—$—$—_——————
PUPPIES — Half-bred wire - haired.
Phone 8222. 10.2,51—1n

MECHANICAL

MACHINES—Singer Sewing Machines.
(Hend and Treadle) OWEN T. ALLDER,
Roebuck Street. Dial 3299.

10.2.51—In



—[_—_—

MISCELLANEOUS

——————
ACTUMUS—The new Fertiliser for
canes, vegetable and flower gardens $3.60
per lb. from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store, Coleridge Street. Phone 2999.

—————

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete eee eee, Top

. A. BARNES & Co., le.

ee 26,1.51—t.f£.n.
a

CHEAP Reading Glasses and Shades.
Apply to Leonard M. Clarke No. 12
James Street. 10,2.51—1n

———$_————— ET

CRYSTALISED FRUIT—By the Pound

and in one pound original packages.

Also Maraschino oe oS re they
vely. Knight's Drug Stores.

are lovely nig! ere

ee
GALVANISED PIPE in the following
sizes: %ein.,, Yin, %in., lin, 1% ins,
Qins., 2% ins., 3ins, and 4 ins. Also fit-
tings. Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

Trafalgar Street, Phone 2696.
3.2.51.—t.f£.n.





—

MERRY-GO-ROUND — Complete with
nicely shaped and painted Horses in
working order. Contact B. H, King,
Chapel Street, St. Peter, 7.2,.51—2n.

NUTROGEN—Fresh shipment. 1 lb, Tin
$1.24 % Ib. Tin 69c, From all Grocers
and Chemists. 10.2.51—4r

————_— ——E

ONE (1) 17 Jewel Elgin Gent's. Gold
Filled Pocket Watch in perfect working
order, Apply to W. D. Richards & Son,
McGregor Street. 10,.2.51—2n









eee tne ena
PIANO—Upright Piano made by John
Brinsmead, well tuned. Best offer over
$200.00 accepted. Apply Ralph Beard,

Hardwood Alley, Phone 4683.
10.2.51—2n

RUBBER GOODS — Ice Caps, Hot
Water Bottles, Syringes, Air Cushions
Secure yours y as the price of Rubber

goods is going higher and_ higher
Knight’s Drug Stores. 9.2.51—2n
SHEET TIN—Just received heavy

Quality Size 28 x 20. JOHN D. TAYLOR
& SONS Ltd, 8.2,51-—2n

Three cents per word on week-days
and 4 cents per word on Sundays, mini-
mum charge 72 cents on week-days and
9€ cents on Sundays. .



HOUSES



HIGH ROCK—Bathsheba. From March
to July. Phone 4048. 10.2.51—4n

= HOUSES—Gibbs’ Beach, St. Peter.
‘IN-an-OUT” Suitable for couple — from
March. “Restavile’ — August/October
to December 1951. Both fully furnished.
Apply Wesley Bayley, High Street.
10.2.51—2n

MORNINGSIDE, Bathsheba: Renovated
rooms, ‘water, electric light, garage. Dial
» water, ight, garage. Dial

2481. Mr. W. Chandler. 4.2.51—3n

STEWARTVILLE—3 bedrooms, Draw-
ing and Dining Room, Pantry, Kitchen,
2 Servants’ Rooms, Seaside, Hastings.
Phone 3904. 8.2.51—4n
———

TANGLIN — Beachmont, Bathsheba,
from Fel onwards, monthly or
otherwise, 3 double bedrooms with single
Simmons bedsteads, children’s





room.
dining room and lounge. Refrigerato~,
Garage, servant's room. Apply: Howe.
Ring 3626. 13.1.51—t.£.n.



WINSLEY, Bathsheba: Renovated and
refurnished, From Feb. 15th. 3 bedrooms,
wuter, electric light, garage.
Mrs. W. Chandler.

PUHLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
ont 12 see eee, “oe line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1. on ke
and $1.80 on Sundays. eae





REAL ESTATE





ee
HOUSE—One new board and shingle
house, 18 x 11 x 8 ft. build with sorews,
asy to move. Apply to Sherlock Field
oul Bay, St. Philip, 8.2.51—4n

——
ee! ee — Three (3)
room: fungalow, stand:
Say Peet Pb ing on 14,919
er in writing for the same, will be
received by E. C, FIELD C/o James A.
Lynch & Co., Ltd. up to 4 p.m. 28th
February 1951, 8.2.51—6n

ee
The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office No, 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 16th February 1951 at
Fame cmmaggre gg dwelling house
nown as Tullyera now ~
ed “CRYSTAL WATERS" with the fand
thereto containing by estimation 12,087
square feet situated on the sea at Car-
ville Avenue, Worthing, Christ Church,
at present used as a boarding house.
Inspection any day except Sundays
between 4 and 6 p.m, on application to
Mrs. Talma on the premises,
For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—
COTTLE, CATFORD, & Co.,
Solicitors,
3.2.51—12n.

ee

The undersigned will offer for sale at
James St., over Hinds & Co., Drug Store
on the 14th February 1951 at 2 p.m., by
public Competition, one Modern Stone-
built property known as “Hill Crest",
Situated at Upper Collymore Rock, oppo-
site the A.MLE. Church, with 5,000 sq. ft.
of Land, 2 bedrooms, open verandah, tiled
beth and water toilet, Electricity, can be

secn from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Apply the
owner on premises. L, A, M. WATTS,
James Street. Dial 4523, .

10.2.51—4n.





FOR KENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din-
ing room, Breakfast room and Ki od
cette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
‘Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1.51.—6n.

ENTERPRISE—An adjoining Property
with 7 acres of land and stone building,
3 acres of arable, 4 acres of pasture
with nice Mahogany trees to be sold
to ony one who has relatives or
friends in the U.S. America, who is
desirous of buying for cash. To be sold
in the U.S. America.

Apply to G. Holder, Enterprise, Christ
Church Gap, Attorney for the Estate
for full information, €.2.51—6n.



“WORTHY DOWN" — Situated at Top
Rock, consisting of 3 bedrooms with con-
necting toilets and showers, large lounge,
dining room, ultra modern kitchen, large
front baleony, and breakfast balcony,
2-car garage, 2 servants’ rooms with
tcilet and showers also laundry, The
grounds are fully enclosed and the gar-
dens well laid out ete. Available on
Merch. Ist, 1951.

The above property is well constructed
in 12-inch stone, with an Everite roof.
Best offer above £4,000 will be accepted.
Further particulars ete, Ring 4683.
7.2.51—5n

Caen EEUU EEE EEE

“DUNSINANE”

COUNTRY, ROAD, ST. MICHAEL.

The residence lately occupied by Mrs.
W. O. Collymore.

The house stands in well kept gardens
and grounds (2 acres 37 perches).

The whole comprises verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 5 bedrooms, one
with marble bath, 2 showers, 2 lava-
tories, convenient kitchen and pantry,
reoms for 5 servants, garage for 2 cars,
and stables.

Water supply for garden and grounds
from a well with mill; water service in
house and also servants rooms (shower
and lavatory).

The residence completely wired and
furnished with electric lighting from
the company's mains.

House convertible into flats and out-
buildings convertible irto a _ cottage

The land is suitable for develop-
ment or kitchen gardens.

The undersigned will offer the
premises for sale by, public auction at
their office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 23rd day of
February 1951 at 2 p.m.

Inspection on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days only between 3 and 5 p.m.

For further particulars apply to

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO,
Solicitors,
4.2.51—10n.

NY

A new and well built Bungalow on
Pine Hill WESTFIELD, the pro-
perty of the late Sir George Walton.

The Bungalow stands on 18,020 square
feet of land and contains one large
public room, two bedrooms, kitchen,
laundry, bath and lavatory.

In a separate building there is a
garage for one car and two servants
rooms with bath and lavatory.

The property will be set up for sale
at our office on Wednesday the 21st day
of February 1951, at 2 p.m.

For conditions of sale apply to the
undersigned.

tion any day between 10.30 a.m.
and £ p.m, Telephone Lady Walton,
No. 4581.

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,

Solicitors.
9.2.51—1l1n.

a
HOUSE—At Inch Marlow Road, Christ
Church, 2 roofs and si , willing to
sell in parts, no reaso’ le offer refused.
Apply Frances Ville, Inch Marlow Road.
Christ Chureh to Frank Clarke.
10.2.51—2n
———__
SHARES—With Accruing Dividends:—
30 Sheres in Barbados Shipping & Trad-
ing Co., Lad. The above will be set
up for sale by Public Competition at our

Office, James Street, Bridgetown, on
Tuesday the 13th February at 2 p.m.
G. L. W. CLARKE & CO.,
er Solicitors.
10.2.51—3n

———————

For Sale—Cont'd





MISCELLANEOUS





STEEL STEP LADDERS—-tread and
4-tread. Just the thing for Stores, Schools,
Offices, and Household uses, 4 tread $9.88
each; 5 tread $12.95 each. Cannot be

repeated at this price, at RALPH
BEARD'S Show Rooms Hardwood
Alley. 10.2.51—2n

VICTROLAS, Prams, Clocks, Portable
Corona Typewriter. OWEN T. ALDER,
Roebuck Street. Dial 3299,







BARBADOS. ADVOCATE



PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 ceats per agote line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
end $1.80 on Sundays.

“fa5 > easily earnea by Sbtainine

order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making



opportunity, Jones, Williams & Co.

Dept. 9 Vict ..

rs mi oria Works, Preston,
25.1.51—18n

_—_—

HUMBER CYCLE COMPETITION—
Brand New Humber Bicycle. On view
at Harrison's Store. Tickets 1/- each.
Buy one now! 9.2.51—In,

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. JOHN
SEALED tenders are invited for sup-
plying approximately 42 pints pure fresh
cows’ milk daily to St. John’s Almshouse
in two deliveries, as from the 25th
Merch 1951. Applications will be re-
ceived by the undersigned up to the 17th
instant, and it is to be understood that
the lowest or any tender will not neces-
sarily be accepted,
R. S. FRASER,
Clerk,
Board of Poor Law -
Guardians.
St. John,
10.2.51—6n





NOTICE
All owners of Dogs are reminded that
‘they must be Licensed ' during the
month of February, according to law.
N.B.—All Taxes due to the Parish will
also now be collected, according to law.
Signed A. A, B. GILL,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Joseph.
4,2.51—3n.

Publi¢ Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904
(1904-6) § 30).

On Friday the 23rd day of February
1951 at the hour of 2 o'clock in the
afternoon will be sold at my office to
the highest bidder for any sum not
under the appraised value.

All that certain piece of Land* con-
taining about twenty-five perches situate
im the Parish of Saint Michael, butting
and bounding on lands late of Fred
Maloney but now of H. O. Emtage & Co,
Ltd., late of Cleophas Adolphas Forde
but now of K. S. Hope and on_two
public roads, at Upper Bamk Hall Main
Road, appraised as follows:—

The whole area of land appraised to
Eight Hundred and Forty Six dollars
($846.00). Attached from Coleridge
Beresford Field for and towards satis-
fection, +&ec.

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day
of purchase.



T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal.





8.2.51—3n.
NOTICE
Re Estate of
BLANCHE SKEETE
deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any debt or claim
against or affecting the
Blanche Skeete deceased,
Spooner’s Hill,
Michael in this Island Spinster who

died in the parish of Saint Michael on
the 28th day of January, 1951 are re-
quested to send in particulars of their
claims duly attested to the undersigned
EMMANUEL FITZPATRICK JOHNSON
Qualified Executor of the will of the
said Blanche Skeete deceased, c/o
Haynes & Griffith, Solicitors, No, 12
High Street, Bridgetown, on or before
the 15th day of April, 1951 after which
date we shall proceed to distribute the
assets of the deceased, among the
parties entitled thereto having regard
only to such claims of which we shall
then have had notice and we will not
be liable for the assets or any part
thereof so distributed to any person of
whose debt or claim we shall not then
have had notice.
And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their
indebtedness without delay.

Dated this 9th day of Februany, 1051.
EMMANUEL FITZPATRICK JOHNSON
Qualified Executor of the Will of
Blanche Skeete, deceased.

10,2.51—4n.

——

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1951, No, 3 which will be published in the Official Ga-
zette of Thursday 8th February, 1951.

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Milk-Condensed” are as follows :—

WHOLESALE PRICE
(not more than)



ARTICLE
soahcaeicamletisieiaseasliasialipncnnta
Milk-Condensed pe

7th February, 1951.



Attention is drawn to the Control of Lumber Prices (Defence)

(Amendment) Order, 1951, which

Gazette of Monday 12th February, 1951. ,

2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of “Mer-
chantable Pitch Pine”, “Merchantable White Pine” 1”x6”—11”, eV
and up and “Merchantable Spruce” 1”x6”-—11”, 6’ and up are as fol-

lows: —

COLUMN ONE
Article

a
(1) Merchantable Pitch Pine
(Basic Sizes) in
Merchantable White Pine
1”x6”—11", 6 and up
(Basic Sizes) a
Merchantable Spruce
1”x6"—11”, 6’ and up
(Basic Sizes) z.



ALTERATION TO SERVICES

It has been found that alterations and extensions to water services,

estate of] unless by a written order signed by mer
late of LIVINGSTONE HOPE,
in the parish of Saint Chalky Mount,

NS
$12.00 per case of
48x14 oz, tins

EEE a? ae

.. | $240.00 per 1,000 board feet

. «{ $240.00 per 1,000 board feet



LOST

Three cents per word on week-days
and 4 cents per word on Sundays, mint-
mum charge 72 cents on week-days and
96 cents on Sundays.

ONE (1) “EBOSA”" TRAVELLING
CLOCK. Square Brewn Leather. Cause.
Either at Hospital or outside “Accra”
Rockley, Reward offered. Phone 8290.

WATCH—Lady’s Gold Watch “Arta”
with Gold Strap. Lost between Two Mile
Hill and City. Reward offered, Phone
10.2.51—2n.

—_——
WATCH—On Wednegday night between
Pine and Culloden Roads, one lady’s gold
wrist watch. Finder will be rewarded
on returning same to Advocate Adver-

tising Dept, or may dial 3241,
10,2.51—2n

WANTED

Three certs per word on week-days
and 4 cents per word on Suntlai/s, mini-
mum charge 72 cents on week-days and
96 cents on Sundays.







HELP

CAPABLE, WELL EDUCATED
YOUNG MAN. Quick and accurate at
figures, typing, also able to handle cor-
respondence. Apply in writing and in
person to the British Bata Shoe Co.,
Ltd., Broad St. 10,2.51—3n





MISCELLANEOUS

es

GORRINGES undertake expert watch
and clock repairs, cleaning and resto-
retion of ofl paintings, valuation for in-
surance and_ probate. GORRINGES,
Upper Bay St. 2.2,51.—7n.

WE BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and
Silver jewellery, coins, dentures, etc ,
write, call or Dial 4429. “VORRINGES,
Antique Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht
Club. 1 3.2.51.—T7n.

WE BUY FOR CASH—Clocks, watches
a musical boxes in condition
Write, call or dial 4429, GES An-
tique Shop, Upper Bay Street.

3.2.51,—7n.

WANTED TO RENT
HOUSE—In Rockley or in Hastings.
Furnished with 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and



Dining Room and Kitchen, Toilet and
Bath. From the Ist of March. Call or
Telephone 8626. 9.2.51—2n







WANTED TO BUY
USED POSTAGE STAMPS-Of the
British West Indies. Good Prices Paid
at the Caribbean Stamp Society No. 10
Swan Street. 10.2.51—3n

BOARDERS—For furnished or unfurn-
ished rooms or boarding, at a quiet
residence in the Hastings Area. Apply to
Cc. J. C/o Advocate Co. 10.2.51—I1n

PERSONAL









The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, MARIE HOPE
(nee CLARKE) as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone else con-

St. Andrew. .
10,2.51—2n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of L, J, Williams
Merketing Co., Ltd,, of Broad Street, St.
Michael for permission to sell Spirits,
Malt Liquors, &c., at 2nd floor front
room of wall building at Bookers Drug
Store, Broad Street, City.

Dated this 9th day of SNebruary 1951.
To:—H, A. TALMA, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
Signed F, M. ODLE,
per L. J. WILLIAMS MARKETING CO.,
Applicants.

N.B.—This application will be consfd-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
on Monday
1951, at 11

Police Court, District “A”
the 19th day of February,
o'clock, a.m.
H,'A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
10.2.51—1n

RETAIL PRICE
(not more than)

—_—————

27c, per 14 oz. tin

8.2.51.—2n.

will be published in the Official

COLUMN TWO
Ordinary Retail Price
(not more than)

_——————_——
$312.00 per 1,000 board feet

supplied from the Government's water mains, are being carried out
without the prior consent of the Waterworks Department,
This constitutes an offence under Section 65 of the Waterworks

Act, 1895-1, which renders consumers, as well as plumbers and con-
tractors, liable to a penalty not exceeding Five Pounds without preju-
dice to the right of the Department to recover the cost of any damage
done to their property, or the value of any water used or wasted. —

to be a Close Season for Okras.

Agriculture.

10.2.51—1n



OKRA ee SEASON

r
In pursuance of Section 4, subsection (3) of the Cotton Diseases
Prevention Act, 1928, (1928-7), the Governor-in-Executive Committee
has fixed the period from the 1st of May to the 30th of June, inclusive,



COTTON CLOSE SEASON
Ord

In pursuance of Section 4 subsections (1) and (2) of the Cotton | been farmed out at approved céntres, The fee for service is 2/- and
Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-7), the Governor-in-Executive | these centres are located as follows: —
Committee has fixed the period from the Ist of May to the 30th of
June, 1951, inclusive, to be a Close Season for Cotton.
Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this 1st day of
February, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-one.
By Command,

Chief Engineer,
Waterworks Department...
10.2.51—In,

er

A. A. HINDS,
Clerk, Executive Committee.

Note. Attention is drawn to sub-section (6) of Section 4 of the Cotton
Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-7) whereby special exemption
from the provisions of sub-section (3) of Section 4 may be granted
by the Director of Agriculture with the consent of the Board of

10.2.51—2n,

er

A. A, HINDS,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
10.2,51—2n.

‘
























PAGE SEVEN



TAKE NOTICE

THREE'FEATHERS

That THREE FEATHERS DISTRIBUTORS INC., a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Whole-
sale Liquor Distributors, whose trade or business address is 300 Fittm Avenue, New
York 1, State of New York, U.S.A,, has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of whisky, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of
such registration, The trade mark can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 9th day of February 1951,

H WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
10.2.51-——3n.

TAKE NOTICE

That SCHENLEY INDUSTRIES, INC., a corporation organised and existing
under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, whose trade or
business address is 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, State of New York, US As
Wholesale Liquor Distributors, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A” of sister in respect of wines, and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such

registration. The trade mark can be seen on application at fice.
Dated this 9th day of February 1951, a inet
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.

TAKE NOTICE eee

rhan‘

That ZONITE PRODUCTS CORPORATION, a corporation organized and exist-
ing under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Manufactur-
ers, whose trade or busi address is 100 Park Avenue, New York 17, State of
New York, USA, oe oan ied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A" of
Register in respect of products for oral hywiene, such as dental paste, powders, and
creams and dentifrices all of which being of medicinal value, and also astringents,
and will be entitled to register the same after one month from the 10th day of Feb-
re tee ger grees rege a in ne eens give notice in duplicate to me

office ion of such registration,
application at my alfioe. 4 n. he trade mark can be seen on
Dated this 9h day of February 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

TAKE NOTICE ve
CRESTA BLANCA

That SCHENLEY INDUSTRIES INC., a corporation organized and ¢= ving under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Manufacturers, whose
trade or business address is 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, State of New York,
U.S.A. has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of wines, and will be entitled to register the same after one month
from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of auch registration, The trade
mark can be seen on application at my office,

Dated this 9th day of February 1961,

MH. WILLIAMS, |
Registrar of Trade Marks,

TAKE NOTICE 2

oiD CHARTER

That OLD CHARTER DISTILLERY CO., a corporation organized and existing
under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Distillers,
whose trade or bus.noss address is 100 West 10th Street, Wilmington, State of
Delaware, U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A”
of Register in respect of whisky, and will be entitled to register the same nfter
one month from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 9th day of February 1951,

H, WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks,
10.2.51—3n

GOVERNMENT NOTICES



POST OFFICE NOTICE
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES

An issue consisting of two stamps, namely 3 cents and 12 cents,
to commemorate the inauguration of the University College of the
West Indies ane the installation of Her Royal Highness Princess Alice,
Countess of Athlone, will be made in Barbados on Friday, 16th Febru-
ary instant. The issue will be for three months or until stocks are
exhausted, if sooner, Current issue stamps of similar values will be
temporarily withdrawn.

The designs of the stamps are:—

3 cents, the Arms of the University.

' 12 cents, a full length seated portrait of Her Royal Highness
in her robes as Chancellor.

' Both denominations are vertical format.

(a) Advance orders from local residents for these stamps
will be received at the General Post Office and dealt with in
strict order of rotation provided they are for complete sheets of
60 of each or multiples of 60.

(b) Orders must be accompanied by remittance to cover face
value. '

(c) A receipt will be sent and must be preserved.

(a) Stamps will be put up in sealed packets and delivered
on 16th February from 8.00 a.m. on application at Poste Restante?
on presentation of the receipt referred to above signed by the
recipient of the stamps. This will be detained by the delivery
clerk in whose presence the stamps should be checked.

(e) Stamps must be affixed by the sender preferably at the
top right hand corner of the envelope, the Department cannot
undertake to do this, and posted not later than 4.00 p.m,

Persons desiring to register 25 or more envelopes will be supplied
in advance with numbered registration receipts in duplicate and num-
bered labels. The labels will be affixed by the sender to the letter
intended for registration and the address, abbreviated, filled in on the
receipt.

Letters duly labelled and bearing the correct postage and registra-
tion fee, with receipts in duplicate, will be presented at the Registra-
tion Branch for acceptance. After verification the original receipt,
date stamped and signed will be handed to the applicant and the
duplicate retained as an office record. '

General Post Office,

8th February, 1951.

> wanda |

9.2,51—2n,
cE
POSTMASTER — PARISH OF ST. PHILIP

Applications are invited for the vacant office of Postmaster/
Postmistress, St. Philip.

Appointment will be made subject to the selected candidate
being passed as medically fit for employment in the Public Service,
and will be on one year’s probation. The minimum educational stand-
ard which will be accepted is a pass in the Cambridge Local School
Certificate or a similar examination of equivalent standard. Appli-
cants should preferably be between the age of 21 and 30 years.

The salary attached to the Post is at the rate of $1,056 by $72
to $1,776 (E.B,) by $96 to $2,160 per annum. Further particulars may
be obtained from the Colonial Postmaster.

Applications should be made on Forms obtainable from the Colo-
nial Secretary’s Office and must be returned not later than the 14th
of February, 1951,
6.2.51.—2n,



NOTICE TO FISHERMEN AND BOAT-OWNERS
Fishermen and boat-owners who contemplate the building of new

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this Ist day Of] §.hing boats, for which assistance by loan from the Government may
February, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-one.

By Command,

be required, are advised to discuss their problem with the Fishery
Officer before expending any money towards such construction,



SERVICE OF BULLS AT THE PINE PLANTATION
The public is hereby notified that two Friesian bulls, progeny of
the imported Friesian bull “Burgate Hillarious” are now available for
service at the Pine Plantation. The service fee is 3/- and cows and
heifers may be brought for service from 7.30 to 8.30 a.m, or 4.00 to
4.30 p.m. i



Service of Boars
The Department of Science and Agriculture has instituted a
scheme whereby boars reared at the Central Livestock Station have

(1) J. C. Marsh, Esquire, Bannatyne Plantation, Ch. Ch.

(2) D. A. V. Weekes, Esquire, Jordans Plantation, St. George.

(3) J. A. Bethell, Esquire, Hopewell Plantation, St. Thomas.

(4) R. Coward, Esquire, Sugar Hill, St. Joseph.

(5) M. A. Alleyne, Esquire, Wakefield Plantation, St. John.

(6) R. E. King, Esquire, Fisherpond Plantation, St. Thomas.

(7) L. N. Hutchinson, Esquire, Black Rock, St Michael.
10.2.51--1n



















—

TAKE NOTICE = ee
TRUBENISED :

That TRUBENISED COMPANY (Re
according to the law of Liechtenstein, whose trade or
Liechtenstein, Rathaus, has applied for the
“A” of Register in respect of men’s and boys
blouses, dresses and trimmings and corsctry, and clothing of all kinds, and will
be entitled to register the same after one month from the 10th de’ of FeBrudry.
1951, unless some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to» me
at my office of opposition of such registratior The trade mark can be*seen on
application at my office

Dated this 9th day of February 1951.

istered Trus a corpse

business adc

tion organized
ros is” Vaduz,
egistration of a trade mark in.Part
shirts, collars and cuffs and ladies’














H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
10.2,51+-3n

TAKE NOTICE PaaS





That PAUL JONES AND COMPANY, INC., a corporation organized under the
laws of the State of Maryland, United States of America, Distillers, whose trade
or business address is 405 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York, United States
of America, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of alcoholic beverages, especially whisky, and will be entitled
to register the same after one month from the 10th dey of February, 1951, unless
some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office af
opposition of such registration. The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 9th day of February 1951

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,















SHIPPING NOTICES |



MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW }j
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)

“TONGARTRO”

The M.V. “Caribbee” will
arriving here on the 8th, and

MS be accepting Cargo & Passengers ~

ig scheduled to for Dominica, Antigua itser" *
sal Adelaide January 24th, Melbourne at) Nevis & st. Kitts. Saluae*
February 9§th, Sydney February 17th. Saturday 10th.

Brisbane February 23rd, Arriving at ;

Barbados end of March, 1951.

This vessel has ample space for Hard
Frozen and General cargo,

Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad
for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
and Leeward : Islands,

The M.V. “Daerwood will, ae-
cept Cargo and Passengers for St>
Lucia, Grenada, & Aruba and Pas-
sengers only for St, Vincent, coin
of departure to be eotified,

B.W., SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, two,



For further particulars apply —

YURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. and

Da COSTA & CO. LTD,, o eee omen
Trinidad, Barbados, Telephone; 4047 os
BWI. B.W.l, - sament

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM-







re 3 :
Vessel >» From |. Leaves Barbiths a
S.S. “MULBERRY HILL” .. M/brough & aie
S.S. “PROSPECTOR” % Lon an ae Feb. 28 a
S'S. “FACTOR” 3 eo a 3rd Feb. 3rd Feb. st
L/pool 6th Feb. = 19th Feb”
S.S, “TRIBESMAN” ov M/brough & fie 2B in
London 8th Feb. 27th Feb,
S.S. “SPEAKER” .» Liverpool 17th Feb. 4th. March
S.S. “S'TATESMAN” .. London 17th Feb, Sth March

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel For Closes in Barhado
S.S. “COLONIAL” . Liverpool 12th Feb, r

For further information apply to - - -




































DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents.. =:
; er
Tn on
oe. ee
4 «
“ 7
, a eee
e Inc. PE... SY! 3
ss. “pel” wane aan NEW, YORK SERVICE : ser
8.8. \s : J ae ,
8S. “Byfjord" sails 2nd Pobniniy ree satan ith FORE ETY us
aici bad on an whe a
NE
A Steamer sails 18th , Seeans es 2nd
i ji » Ist’ February — $ i. 15th ny
enepeerenesecene SDN,
CANADIAN SER
SOUTHBOUND irae "inate
Name of Ship Sails Arrives , i paves
58. “ALCOA PILGRIM" ag ea 7 8

Januany 26th,
February 9th
February 23r.

February Sth.
February 20th,
March 6thy - . =

“ALCOA PENNANT”
“ALCOA POLARIS”



. r * a
v FALE ®

ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service, > ~
Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD,—-Canadian Service.

Them vessels have limited passenger accommodation.








~~
_<— ~~

PASSAGES TO EUROPE >=’

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, for sail- 3

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.



SEE US FOR...... td -

a ae -

LAWN MOWERS & PARTS



THE CENTRAL EMPOR



Na

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.— Proprietoes,
Cnr.. of Broad and Tudor Streets.












q

4

Â¥
PCCP LLL PL LEP PPP LLPPLP AAPA APP PS POE

% >

‘ *

% , Ni

5 . nck

t 4S
% x nll
* %

> : .

eo

“‘We’re Not Magicians,
but...”

——
... with the vast resources of Ford of Dagenhant>"*

CLLPPOP PSPSPS SESE OES SSS SPE

behind us, we can produce most Genuine Ford -—~ x :
spares either on the spot or at very short notice, * z t
@ What's more, these spares are available to you =. t
at low fixed prices and are fully guaranteed, The ~. % i
mene.
Â¥ finest Service Facilities in this district are at your <=="
x disposal. ‘ * — = 2
* — (
$ S ~ S48
% 5.0
° x a
: (CHA ENEARNEY LTD. 34
Vie iM
% f, M ¢ Ul R & (0. ‘ . $

-

%
Ah bbb 6:6 66,6 ,456,6 656 5S OOOO

$656609%
PPP APP POE IEE P OA POL A OOP LET SVOOSOOS SFOS O 998

s
POOCPFEOFIS

oe.



PAGE EIGHT

No New Players In

Trinidad Team

(From Our Own Correspondent)
. PORT-OF-SPAIN.
None of the young players invited for the trials in





preparation for the Intercolonial tournament succeeded in
the endeavour to impress the Trinidad selectors and as a
result thirteen players all of whom havewon colony caps



C’wealth Score
413 In 5th Test

INDIA 143 FOR 4

KANPUR, India, Feb. 9.

The Commonwealth cricket
touring team were dismissed in
their first innings for 413 in the
fifth, and final unofficial Test here
today, and at the close India had
replied with 143 for four wickets.

Ken Grieves, an Australian who
plays for Lancashire, was in an
aggressive mood for the Common-
wealth today. He excelled with
euts and forceful pulls and batted
two hours 43 minutes in scoring
89. He was extremely unlucky to
miss his first century of the series.

With Fred Ridgeway, Kent fast
bowler, scoring a useful 27 and
adding 88 runs in 73 minutes with
Grieves for the ninth wicket, the
Commonwealth team were all out
for 413, after adding 106 im 90
minutes to their overnight score of
307 for six.

India lost their opening pair
Merchant and Rege with only 42
scored, but Umrigar and Hazare
added 98 runs for the third wicket
before two more wickets fell. Um-
vigar scored 57 in 180 minutes be-
fore being dismissed while Hazare
Was not out at the close with 42.

When stumps were drawn, India
were still 270 runs behind with six
wickets in hand.—Reuter.





Regiment Defeats

Devonshire 5—0

THE. Regiment drubbed a team
from H.M.S. Devonshire 5—0 yes-
terday in a football match which
was played at the Garrison Savan-
nah. Three of the goals were
scored in the first half,

R. Roach. kicked in two goals,-'
J. Parris one, S. Sealy one and, .

the other goal was sliced in by one!
of the Devonshire backs. The’
Regiment were on top all the time!
in the game but the main caus
why the Devonshire boys were s
badly beaten is their lack of Sal
control and accurate kicking. The
‘teams were:

egiment: Brathwaite; Chase,
Bispham; Marshall, Ishmael,
Grant; Parris, Roach, Sealy,

Phillips and Price.

Devonshire: Wood; Finlayson,
Allan; Owen, Lemming, Wilson;
Bayley, Nancholas, Grant Ander-
son and Callignam,

SHIP’S MATCH

A cricket team from H.M.S.
Devonshire will oppose one from
the Barbados Regiment in a game
to be played at the Garrison to-
day. Play begins at 1.30 p.m.

The following will represent the
Regiment: C. i . Ishmael,
R.S.M. Marshall, Sgt. Edwards,
Privates Clarke, Bynoe, Brath.
waite, Phillips, Burrowes, Green,
Price and Rowe.



“Devonshire” Lose
Shooting Match
To Regiment

‘The Barbados Regiment defeated

the H.M‘S~ Devonshire in a rifle
match which took place at the
Government Rifle Range yester-
day morning. The Regiment got
@ grand total of 431 as against 398
by the Devonshire.

The shoot consisted application
at 200 yards, snap at 200 yards,
Rapid at 200 yards and application
at 300 yards. .

Highest possible score was made
by Capt. C. E. Neblett of the Bar.
bados Regenene who got 93, while
Lieut, roth-Knowles of the
Devonshire and R.S.M. H. B. G.
Marshall of the Regiment each
scored 90.

Following are the results:—

Applic. :

were chosen for the series at Kensington Oval.

ye team over which the selec-
tors t6ok about
draw up was

10 minutes to
received with

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BRITONS Ra
BET LESS Box

LONDON, Feb,
The rising cost of living is caus-
ing Britons to wager less on their
favourite weekly gamble — the
Football Pools. Stakes on horse-
racing and greyhound racing are
ong being cut,
igures issued by the Churches’
Committee on gambling show. the
average weekly stake on football
pools fell from 52 cents in 1949 to
50 cents in 1950. Other figures
covering the first three months of
1950 showed 25.1 per cent of men

Welterweight champion

Manager George Gainford said
fore leaving foe New York that
the try for a boxing grand slam
may begin this fall, He explained,

: and women wagered on the pools “Ray is contract boung to give
ee taeda large ee compared with 33.1 per cent in Lamotta a return match in June.
? . : But after that I’ i try t
the final trial and only those who The report estimated) that in the dronitne mas Light "hvewente
af eae 54, PO ee Bre eee nae eae eon championship fight ‘with Joey
a, ¥ ictor illiamson ritons participated in footbal ;
and veteran Derek Sealy podls weekly compared with 11, Maxim and a heavyweight title

could be said to have felt dis-
appointed. But neither William -
son nor Sealy played well enough
on Sunday to force the selectors
to as undisputed
candidates for the No. 5 place on
the. Trinidad batting list.
The full team selected is: —

Jeff Stollmeyer (Captain),
Andrew Ganteaume, Nyron
Asgarali, Ralph Legall, Ru-
pert Tang Choon, Clarence
Skeete, V Ferguson,
Simpson Guillen, Sydney
Jackbir, Prior Jones, Frank
King, Charles Sampath, Lev-
nox Butler.

The team shows six changes
from the one which represent-
ed Trinidad at Kensington Oval
in 1949. Edgar Marsden, Kenny
Trestrail, Elias Constantine,
Derek Sealy, Lance Pierre and
Cecil Pouchet, who played in
1949 have been replaced by
Stollmeyer, Legall, Jones, Fer-
guson, Jackbir and King. Stoll-
meyer, Jones and Ferguson
were in India with the West
Indies team during this series.
The selection of Tang Choon
and Jackbir will enable the
two players full opportunity
to celebrate their 17th year in
Intercolonial cricket. Both made
first appearances on the ‘Trinidad
team in 1934. At the other end of
the line is Butler youngest player
in the side, who will be making
his second trip to Barbados. He
earned virtuous figures on his last
appearance at Kensington Oval,
eke ng eden in overs in
the first Bar innings of the
second match of that tour.

30 Contest
Golf To-day

Thirty golfers have entered for
the Medal Play Championship
which will be played to-day and
to-morrow over the Rockley|Golf
and Country Club course, con-
stituting a record field for the
event. This is one of the two
competitions played off scratch,
and the long list of entries is due
to the fact that it has been com-
bined with the President's Cup, a
handicap event.

Both tests are over thinty-
holes, of which eignteen wae
played to-day and eighteen
tomorrow, the low gross score
deciding the championship pro-
per and the low net score gain-
ing the President’s Cup. All
twelve, of the players who rep-
resented Roc! in the team
match with Trinidad last week
have entered.

The starting times and pairings
for both days follow:—



.m. -- C, Bayley, W. Nurse, S.
liesh

% p.m. — B. Wybrew, M, Timpson, L.
Maskell.

2.00 p.m. —D. Inniss, W. Atkinson, J:
Christie,

05 p.m. — D, Lucie-Smith, G. Chal-
lenor, R, Norris. :

2,10 p.m. — J. O'Neal, J. Grace, R. P.
Goodi

215 pm. — I. Niblock, J, Bean, B.
Rolfe,

2.20 p.m. — G. Manning, W. Grannum,
Toppin.
2.25 p.m. — R. Vidmer, R, Inniss, K. Ry

es cp
30 p.m. — R. Wilson, J. R, Rodger, D.
Perceval.

2.35 p.m. — E. Benjamin, H. Weaver,
K. Girling.



WATER POLO THIS
’ AFTERNOON

re. will be a Water Polo
match at the Barbados Aquatic
Club this afternoon between two
teams from H.M.S. Devonshire.
Play is expected to begin shortly
after 4 o'clock,

THE B'DOS REGIMENT eee ae.
200 yds, 200 yds. 200 yds. 300 yds.
Lt.-Col. J. Connell . 26 9 28 26 ~s
Captain C. E. Neblett .. 28 15 28 22 93
Lieut, T. A. og ae 28 15 18 22 83
RS.M. H. B. @ Marshall 26 15 27 22 90
L/Sjt. H. A. Stuart .. ie 6 24 21 16
Totals - 2 60 125 13 431
H.M.S. DEVONSHIRE
Mr. Smith a 24 0 30 21 cis
Lieut. Norman .. 22, 3 27 21 3
Sjt. Turner oe 22 12 24 4 82
Lieut, -Knowles 25 15 30 20 90
L/Tel Turton at 26 6 26 20 78
Totals . 119 36 14 106 398

They'll Do It Eve



ELL,AT LAST THE TOWN

FATHERS ACTED “+
1S JUST

INCE bast SPRING THE “LL,

Rosistored U. 5, Petons Otten

Time

BY? OR
Se




WORK
STARTING’ -

THE PLANNING COMMISSION PASSED
IT das ve SANITATION





Se aaa
LD OE VO

IWS

fight with Ezzard Charles.”
Gainford simply took it for
granted that Robinson would re-
vive memories of the St. Valen-
tine’s day massacre in the 15-
round bout with Lamotta at the
Chicago Stacium next Wednesday,

250,000 in the same period of 1949.

According to the report, the
average pool stake for all classes
of the population fell, compared
with 1949, “in the case of the
wealthy from 84 cents to 54 cents,”
(weekly)

“While people in the older age
groups have continued participa.
tion, there is a very marked de-
crease among the younger age
group,” the report declared,

“Whether this indicates that the
habit is beginning to lose its grip
is difficult to judge.”

The report said that in 1949,
2,110,000 Britons staked more than
70 cents a week each and 400,000
others more than $1.40 a week on
the pools; in 1950 only 1,390,000
were staking more than 70 cents
and 235,000 more than $1.40.

The turnover for all forms of
gambling in Britain in 1950 was
given as $1,820,000,000 compared
with $2,020,000,000 in 1949,

Downward trend in gambling
was also reflected in money staked
on horseracing—$1,190,000,000 in
1950 against $1,260,000,000 in 1949,

Greyhound racing turnover was
down from $560,000,000 in 1949 to
$448,000,000 in 1950.—I.N.S.

Peke Backs
Horses
AND WINS

More Years

The husky fight manager estim-
ated that 29-year-old Robinson
still has “two or three more good
years” of boxing left before retir-
ing. Gainford figured that was
time enough for Robinson to be-
come ruler of the light heavy-
weight and heavyweight divisions.

Sugar Ray lost a reading of the
Illinois Athletic Association’s box-
ing primer when Lamotta was
granted a 10 a.m, weigh-in. Gain-
ford had demanded that the
weighing be done at the usual
noon hour,

The Boxing -Commission agreed
that Lamotta was within the rights
in asking for the earlier weigh-
in. Chairman Joe Triner said
regulations require a weighing “no
later than 12 o’clock” and not at
exactly 12 o’clock. Triner added:

Two Hours

“Lamotta will have two hours
to trim his weight should he fail
to make 160 pounds at 10 a.m. The
champion will lose his title, how-
ever, if he is not at that weight or
less by noon. In that event, the

LONDON. fight will go on as scheduled anda

London bookies to-day give the Robinson will be declared the
horse laugh to the old law that Champion regardless of the result
“Man’s best friend is his dog.” in the ring.”

For one of their clients is a r
smug, flatnosed Pekingese which . Jake was denied a request pro-
has been picking and backing win. hibiting a technical knock-out.
ners with inhuman accuracy for Lamotta was assured that the bout
for the past two. seasons. would not be stopped unless a

The WPeke, 5-year-old Black fighter was suffering from a severe
Knight, is owned by Lady Mun-~ eye cut and was in danger of
nings, wife of the famous painter permanent injury. The explana-
of horses, Sir Alfred Munnings, tion did not satisfy the stocky

Lady Munnings said: slugger from the Bronx. He said:

“Black Knight started racing “I’m willing to lose an eye to
two years ago and has been very win this fight. I can get along on
successful as a punter, He is much one eye.”
better than I at picking winners,

“He has his own account with a
firm of bookmakers and it shows Robinson had been sitting next
a handsome balance.” to Jake at the time of the remark.

Lady Munnings explained that The Harlem dandy gave Lamotta
as dogs are banned from race a startled look and moved away
tacks Black Knight is taken. into to a safe distance. Lamotta paid
the paar, ina small blackbag no gitention and continued:
with a window at each end. “You know, Commissioner, 1

“When the horses parade in the have a way of boxing where I play
ring Black Knight gives a woof of possum, I make out like I’m hurt
approval when the one he wants and then I suddenly start swing-
to back passes by.” , ing.” Commissioner Triner ad-

Among his winning selections vised Jake not to play possum
during the past two years was since this was the sixth bout be-
Freebooter, 10 to 1 winner of the tween the two and because Robin-
1950 Grand National Steeplechase, con wasn't casily tooled. Lamotta
and Nimbus, winner of the Derby replied: ,
at Epsom in 1949,

But his winnings are not spent
on extra juicy bones.

Certainly not,” said Lady
Munnings,” I do the spending for
bim.” —INS.

Standard Canasta

By M. HARRISON-GRAY
_— wr es
THE EARLY MELD

‘THE auestion of when to
meld early 18 a contro-

versial one.
pinyer should
var’ vi 1

He Moved

“But I could be hurt and Rob-
inson might think that I was play-
ing. possum,”’

riner then, queried Robinson on
this point. Ray answered:

“No one knows when
(Lamotta) hurt.”

—LN.S.



he's










2.
ni the
, vou ‘Shout
8 nt num) cards
pe a

4 0
H tunity, of is 1
aie Ba, * ftoutd Be ae

A a,

4 it Foursery, Betors the
gpbonents are in & position
to freeze the pack, But
remember — having melded
early, you will be teft with

cards, so you must take

pportun

rep lenishing your
taking even a smal! pack that
is offered to 3Ou. with the aid
of one of your remaining wild

ese tactics may fall on
the occasions where one or

Beebe kn

©

winn: >
London Express Service.

By Jimmy Hatlo



Hazer Courr
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DEPT: BUT



the light heavyweight and heavyweight boxing crowns if
he wins the middleweight title from Jake Lamotta Feb, 14.

















Robinson Seeks Passetigers Should |
ing Pastures New

By KEN OPSTEIN

CHICAGO,
Ray Robinson is going to seek



HUNTE GETS
A BAT

MR. D. A. FOSTER, M.C.P.,
has given a cricket bat to B.C.L.
player Conrad Hunte in apprecia-
tion of his selection in the Barba-
dos Cricket team. The bat will
be presented to Hunte on Sunday
evening before the i

Party at Belleplaine, St. Andrew.
eines

FRACTURED, LEG

MARY JEMMOTT of Orange
Hill, St. James was detained at the
General Hospital after she was
carried there suffering from a

lorty coming along the road and
in an atadige to get out of its way
fell.





What's on Today

B.M.S. “Rodney” arrives at

daybreak.
Exhibition of Sculpture and
' Paintings by K. R. Brood-
hagen, Paintings and
water colours by Marjorie
. EBroodhagen and paintings
and water colours by John

Harrison at Barbados
Museum ........... 10.00
Cricket match between
H.M.S. “Devonshire” team

ment at the : 130
H.M.S. “Devo: ‘ss m .
vs. an island team at
Harrison College .... 4.30

Two teams from H.M.S.
“Devonshire” play a foot-
I match at the Garri-
Fhe 6 BAW EEN Oo koe 5.00
Valentine Dance at Mariue
NE rsh ace doa's s+ dhe 9.00
CINEMAS:
Aquatic Club:
“The Secret Life of
Walter Mitty” ..... siege
Plaza Theatre (Bridgetown)
“Stony of Seabiscuit’ 445 & 8,30
Gaiety (St. James):

- 8.30

VER Forde’? i eects 8.20
Empire:

“In a Lonely Place” ...... 8,30
Olympic:

“Walking Hills” and
“Anna Lueasta” .. 4.30 & 8.15







The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.21 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.03 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter) Feb-
ruary 13.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 6.41 a.m., 6.49

p.m.

High Water: 6.41 a.m., 6.49
p.m,
YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington) nil.

Tetal for Month to Yester-
day: .94 in.

Temperature (Max.) 83.0 °F

Temperature (Min,) 74.5 °F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.), E.
(3 p.m.) ENE.

Wind. Velocity: 12 miles per
hour.

Barometer; (9 a.m.) 30.012,
(3 p.m.) 29.937.



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the natural beauty of your
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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951







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Face Tail Of Plane

LONDON, Feb. 9.
Britain is urging that all pas-
sengers in civil aircraft should sit
facing the tail to improve their
ehances of survival in case of acci-|
dents.
She will make the recommenda- |






































people were killed.



64.67,

Dakota crash at Mill Hill, north-
west London, last October when 28 |

—Reuter.

AN OPPORTUNITY

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1 Grell Burner complete with
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see it at your Gas Show Room.

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PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE -SATl'RDAY. FF.BRIWRY l'i-.l tim &&v -••a" IWCKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY LOO Tj-C*_Z! I3B -roci = ...TJIV"p. A J THBV...HEE-HEE ...TintLB ... | ...HO..\VE<-. =-aa A* Hun /. LAJMlNO! 1 ...CAS.-., y WV* THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS WILL. 'vOU Wave I WAtJT TO H5t (XjTtvrr Tiej •>*r(=f: RIP KIRBY TW AT*PCUT OIAM9UP1WM I HAVE >v H0Tfl9 H TPT*4 f i. wua, sofus-et V __ jf X/ TMC pt>oi. T i*fi raa= essarrt-i \ BY ALEX RAYMOND W*WILE, ATiKffOA^CU*: ] Mi >, Pcy! < Bi6 CMP GAA*> A ***X* A WHIT KINGS \ ANO A un\e t^,^ '? YOUSOJTH f^i, GUV WHO* *£ C;> <* *&, W S< TWCBW AIN'T MMN* AW/ prrTBt LUCK...it TT/THt WttUW AGAiM TDHKWT, THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK a RAY MOORES I HOPE THIS KW N IT'S NO FALSE AiARH FALSE AlAUM I FEEL Li WARCfN.THE PHANTOM AiniLE-E6-5IU-V, ^V, NEVER FAIL? F01L0WIN&THAT ANIMAL. %  N iH'ER RINGS 11 FRESH ..ill TOMATO SAUCE A. S. Bryden & Sons (Birkados) Ltd.—Agents. * t ynt ,<--i HEADACHES ,,,„•„ .1,.-When hNdMhH Mirldue to worry, overwork, over indidgonca-be smart, take AlkeSaJtxer right away. Sparkling %  RarvMCtoff mak** Alka-Rr I tcer cliiiint-MaHnj, helps Iti palnkilling ana) (•etc go to work fast Keep It handy fJ2 Kill trtttt throwing fiint In your MUSCIM tt once Apply Sloan a Liniment lightly— You don'i ro* in "Sloan'i" you dab it on (he enacted pan gcnuy— "gtoam'i" (loam tlw nu! Good Tor #1 ^^ r ^ achet and pains and > mi, loo! LOOK PM IBe S. Pimm Of M tLOAM on mi MOOT Jr—air*—ifctia—TW Hurt Trouble Caused by High Blood Pressure If you have (..I nit atloa, f p and ehottnai. lor tram and En SB < %  £MM loee af BMmnry aji i %  • babW aauaed a. TVla la %  THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK WITH A VIEW lo assisting the Secretarial ol Societies. Clube. and Associations to make the compilation of Information in THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as possible, all organisations embracing all forms ol activities; religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports, radio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to : THE EDITOR. THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951. C o Advocate Co. Ltd.. 34 Broad Street. FORM Title of Society, Club. Organisation. Etc President or Chairman Council or Committee Members.. Treasurer.. ..Secretary.. Plaart Troubla or a aaumlyilo itroka and you a&auM start treatment %  • once. Tha rery Brat doaa of No.ci If oi aaarlT known aa Hyno*), a naa tnadleaJ tlacovary. radueaa High Blood l"raa*ara and makea you r..: y M r> you near in a law dan. Gat Noxct from your chamlit today It la rtivanlaao t* maka you faal waL'tind % %  -or* ; %  %  -17 back 9m ram •aavtr aAoaaaak idiriMian Science | i Reading Room I %  1ST FLOOR, BOtTBf 4k •ONa> I 1 (Broad UtreMI W M noun,: 10 a.m.—a p.m. k 1 TUMdBY*9, WodneadAja, I rrldan. I 10 a.m.—12 o'clock I Saturda.a. I t Ihli Hoom Ika nibl. .od I ^ ma Christian Sdaaoa lam.book, F M i-"-aad %  - iwii Ky i, k %  -*-> N-falare. ki Ntlt HAt.ll %  < IDDI aaay • raad. borrowo. I o pun>aaa4. | Vititon Are Welcome J Ca y a ^^ajaa.^,J Short historical account ol the origin, functions and current activities: MAKE YOI'R SRI.rX'TIOS^ tWOti Tumtr. Tina Cocktail Paanul. Bota Cocktail Chortiaa Tina Cocktail Sauuifataai RolM Pottad Meat .. >4andwlch Spr-ad Ox tall Soup Ynatabi. no r. \ L'.i-.a-iRoup Chtckaai BU Tomato Soup Carrot.. iSllrad and Whole) Faa. Tomalor* PHfa BtarKitbanfa J'llo. Bota Ralad Cirim Sliced Bacon STUABT & SAMPSON WD. Headquarters (or Beat Ram. %  &*L0* My cyea oftan uvd to amart and iche aJler a dat'i iork Somclimn I e*n bad to Uy 1st,ip ge, finMted. At the Club Jim aaid. "You'at prub^bly tuflennj froan a toocti of rff 'iraln. Why not try OprrttT the 4door MIXOll You don't hare to tcrrfo onj car feature* when you drive the Morrii Minor. Here It a bi> car m a irnaH war. Si-aiing for four. Over 7 cubic feet of luggage ipace. Tortioa bar, independent from wheel auspenwon for smoother ride*. It 1 easy to iteer through traffic: caiy to park; eaty to garage. If economy interims you, it* 35-40 mile* per gallon meant longer runs for. your money. 80 I took Jan'a advico. Eyarv day "No eye airatn oc I aaad Optra --washed away dirt laiac. "liankaioyou—and Unite.' and terms, tossed up eye muscles. I'll never be without It again" PROTECT YOUR EYES urtA Optrex AH %  EYE EVE LOTION MAKi THIS Til J The ran of tbr eye and inner I aavag aheasU be bralrhy fWsb I oaloer Ifdryirrred or iiriI ttD-dortbrahii-.H-oJ^.-. [ yeast eyas need 1 FltEE' in each packet a wicniincaOy dcaigned eyebaih. Lt 111 pli* you n rfrnifnilr.ifin.i rirff /n thr worltVt higgeit small cur buy. FORT ROYAL GARAGE Ltd. PV>~ 23?5 SOLE DISTRIBUTORS Phew <504




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'waaV' • ITALIAN REDS REVOLT AGAINST RUSSIA U.N. Close In On The "Ghost City" ..,_,,, „ TOKYO, Feb. 9, united Notions Forces to-dav closed in on the "uhosl City b.<.,ul which has changed hands three limealready e!'-i.suburb R VCr Wh ' h ""*" ,hrnuch ,ls soulh ...K,.Tk n i S dr J 0VI ' wilhin '• M0 V ards o' ">c industrial suburb Yongdon^n,. one mile from the heart of Seoul and hurle dshclbmto the city for the second day running. The Hnn was readied by Eighth Woman Being "Thawed Out" CHICAGO Feb. 0. A 23-ycar-old ncgress with a body temperature of 64 degrees Is *f\ng • thawed our a! the Michael Jrfeese hospital here accordion to astonished physicians. Members of the surf said the woman was found unconscious arly yesterday while the temperature was about 11 degree* below ?ero. When admitted, she warn "frozen hard". "She was in a deep freeze and Puffered from frostbite." said Dr. Harold Laufman, surgeon at the hospital The lowest body temperaturq recorded so far for survival is nf A doctor si'*! that the woman was breathing three to Sve times u minute, compared to the normal 18 to 20. Her pulse was 12. coflfrpared to the normal 70 to 80 beat* a minute, and no blood pressure could be recorded. She had to be handled gently the slightest pressure would have broken off a WK or an arm. Treatment so far has included large injections of plasma and cortisone. An opening was also made in her neck and a tube in•erted to facilitate breathing. —Renter. units %  uth-east suburb. They were maintaining their positions. In some sectors south of Seoul which waj taken by North Koreans on January 4. Communists seemed to have abandoned thendefence network. American tanks had advanced five miles Crom Anyang to the southeast nf Seoul, brushing aside light resistance and delayed onlj by minefields. Another tank force reached a point -ix milti* from Inchon, the port for Seoul where General Ma* Arthur made his big landing last Seplcmbei The port was heavilv bombarded by Allied warship; have been standing off the shore for over a week and shelling Communist concentrations. United Nations men went forward right across the 153 miles] valet of Korea. Communist opposl-J tlon was stiff in the central mountain nmee spine of Corrior from Wlnju to Hangchcifi which is only iles to the south of the 38th Parallel. —Reuter. 9 Kill. .1 In Crash SUDBURY. Ontario, Feb. 9. A bus full of passengns WSJ Ituilvd 111 yards after a collision wiiit u Canadian Pacific train .it I ItWl • tossing near hentoday Nine bus passengers were killed and 22 injured. The bus rolled over aftee, the crash but the dmet escaped unhurt. —Realer. R.C. Home Cut Off ROME. Feb. 9. A I.IK avalanche today cut off a Roman Catholic home of NO children and a company of Italian Alpine troop 2ft miles southeast of the Brenner I'.t-v In K, %  in., ttiiod waters at Reno River have inundated more than 8U square mUts creating Central Italy'biggest "lake." —Reuter. COLLINS DENIES PRESS CHARGES CHICAGO, Feb. 9. General Lawton Collins. United States Army Chief of SUfT today denied American press charges that the American Army was over ed and at a disadvantage against the "ruthless lite %  acriffc> tug methods" of Russian trameJ Communist Armies. Addressing the club here, Colts who recently returned from i '.ion tiip to Korea, said "these statements ware not Justified on the bases in Korea or m the World War. "Our new medium tanks have proved to be extremely effective against enemy armour The most outstanding, of course, has been the performance of the 3.5 Bazzoka which has more than lived up to our expectations" Coll' added.—Reuter. 5 Firemen Killed ROTTERDAM, Feb. 9. Five firemen were killed and two saved when their lire engine plunged through thick smoke into Rotterdam harbour today near burning ships and a pool of blazing oil. Two scrambled out unaided. The bodies of the drowned were recovered when the oil pool was extinguished. —Reuter. Czechs Send Note PRAGUE. Feb. 9. The Czechoslovak Government tonight claimed that two American jet plants (lew over an air i;cld near Prague in daylight yesThe note sent to the American Embassy here to-day i-sseri.i that planes "with Amcrl GEORGETOWN. Feb. 8 Dr. Subryan. Deputy Director of Medical Services, to-day notified the Trinidad and Barbados Governments that no furthci caSM of alastrrn had been reported iu B-G. Following reports of a few cases 80 miles up the Berbice %  Island govern >demanded small pox fl for at) passengers arriving from British Guiana. MALAK WARNS U.K. CAPETOWN. Fob i Dr. Danl.-l Malan, South Afrlcan Pnn.e Minister, warned BritI'm tonight that the transfer of ProMotontes to the Union o* South Africa could not be d> oVflnltalt -Reuter 30 FOR FESTIVAL BERLIN, l Thirty natiesu have been invited io the International Berlin film festival from June 6 to 1? Thev include France, the Argentine, Belgium, Holland, I ico. Sweden and Spain. —Renter EXECUTED NAKED MUNICH. Feb., 0 Ocnanl Hans Lunding. Danish 04 ial told a court here today that he saw Admiral Wilhelm Canarls, former German Military Intelligence Chief, driven naked o hlji execution in a Nazi conentratlon camp in 1945. Lunding was giving evidence In (he trial of the former S S Colonel Walter Huppenkoehen. for complicity in the Canarls murder. —Reater THESE 3 PICTURES taken yesterday illustrate what the Princess Alice Playing Plaid could look tUe but doe* NOT. TOP: The park-like beauty of the Fisheries Ottce nest door to tlic Princess Alien Playing Field. These trees were planted by Mr. Wiles at about the UBM tlio trees of the Princes. Alice Playing Field were being cut down. CENTRE' This bnia next to a canal which separates the Fisheries Office from the Princes* Abce Playing Tield set' the note af imudlium and wilderness gtmophere of tl.e Princess Alice Playing Tield where grass and bush grow faster than sports Balds. BOTTOM: Imagine playing any kind el gases in tills grass, except hide and seek. Princess Alice Play Field Runs To Grass COAL OUTPUT CUT PRAGUE, Feb. I. Production in Czechoslovakia's hard (black* coal mines in Janu ary was 3 ? per cent below planned targets and in BOfl (brown) %  • 2.3 per cent below, the Economic Weekly llospadir re ported—Reuter. GRAIN FOR INDIA WASIIINGTo:. Truman to—day disIth Congressional Foreign Ihl proposal to send two million tons of food gram to famine-stncKen India. Scere tarv-of-State Dean Aeheson and pohev advisor Averell i also "attended. —Reater. pU> Held at Kensington is admired by everyone and now that an nh.i effort bus been made to put it into even belter order for the forthcoming Tnnidad-Uarbadn-. M il pre enti an gp p ean n i that If .i credit to Barbados. The playing Held at Queen's Park for which the Spartan Cricket and Football Club and the Pol i Cricket and Football Club •re jointly responsible, is also noted (or its well-kept appearance day the pot dioek <:f i Advocate made a playing found them all in good condition with the exception of itnPrlnoasi Aim PUytnj Field At the Reef them %  '•re two tennis ll i. Idol these were not i" the best kept condition, but they could i> makiJiaj t e.oud recovery from pneumonia, but so far there are no definite plans for u. understood to I ."oring his resignation unless he knew, A sired it AUlee was Bevin** first visitor apart from members of his family {since his illness. One Perish In* Trinidad Fire PORT-OR-SPAIN, Feb. 9 The charred remains of a man| believed to be Anthony Chinefun.j joint propiietor of the San Fei-I lando Club, HU djfeoTI tween two beds o n the top flooi' of ii two-storey dwelling housiwhich was parI tlally destroyed by fire early on Thurnrtnv morning The nre Bs-baad* """' %  '•* Ijody after a small party biough: (be flames under control The .nated 5lS.0fWiKi rendering live homcles* and causing serious injury to one of the tenants. The injured tenant who lived on the to^ store) Jumped SO feet to safety when the fire broke out injuring hi', right hip and ankle apart from severe bums to both hand*, face and legsThe burnt beery was unrecognisable—CPt trusted with keeping the'si ajndi .. %  %  ... i 1 men They are i with II MIIIIII roller, a Mnall ii and some tc foi i ittling 'he weeds ..id tall grass. This establishment compares Livourably with that used for keeping most playing fields in niei A fmthei chart* St some i f the best known playing Beldi -bowed the following strengths foi cround staffs :— an eiuond'KciKinttotK men. lw(•aars, i ,i .mi arlvas U.K. PAPERS COMMENT On Meat Issue IX>NDON. Feb Nearly every British newspapeto-day commented on the lack of meat over which the Labour Government won an eight vote majority in the Conservative iensure motion in the House of Commons last night The influential Time-, said Food Minister Maurice Webb could not havg chosen more unhappy words to end his speech It said that his words—"We behove that this great and proud ntoy.Oreal Bt tali li preparad Itand up to tne Argentine"— i* bombastic, empty of mean. offensive to a friendly COUD> and served only to underline the lemoleness ol Webb from public opinion. was no meal (in any meaning of the word! in the speech and than .i* no hint that his department wa> -coking to end Uie deadlock thi-. month or even next month." the Time, snld The Uberal Manchester C.uar dlan said Webb's review w.s a "depressing picture % %  ( well mten isonea* policy gone wrong The Labour Dally Herald said Webb did a difficult job with %  great skill ..IKI couraja" ind II I'dded that rnjcceasful nafoUetloti with Argentina was the OAl) %  *;•> •o achieve a desirable end I i1" MM. i r, %  *. %  Daih Irlr i.ph raid lha system of hulk Inlying had broken dovrn -*< lecded acrapptng %  Tiietiilag iLible for purchase than efore the wai fha ArfMUn* Ciovernment has usetl tin-. ahOrl %  ige to drive touah, d not unscru. % %  ulous bargains .1 -ml The Consei-v-hv. larhshVr Foal uuolcd Webb a. s..ying tin Argentine has nskcd thXl as much foi linn mc.it a befotn the wsr and commented "Biltish coal is being sold lo the Argen tine at four time* the The Liberal News Chronicle Migge-dea that Britain should buy frozen and chilled meat ah.! sell •he laltei off ration, so taxed, that it will keep down the pin. oj the former to tbe consumer "If the Food Minister will not do this, he will llml that his only alternative is to go cap in hand to i. before the price goes The Financial Times said Webb and his Ministry had made two 'profound" mistakes — they hail nlstnken obstinacy for diplomacy. %  nd had badly miscalculated the novcraenl of world prices Reuter. (By JOHN M \S\FRS) KOMI I [yVtt TIONS front the Ituliun (umiutim biiiuevl outside the 'Iron turl.it.". liici u [ortni Jit % %  have iprcud lul> but u A clarion cali to a large-scale nationals*! Kussu .ii diT.ctives has \.i t.. come But porsonaiilies in UifM Important Bpher< n.uirst influence— parliament, lt political tfroup is n£wd The pattern of tl %  betrui stitched no*a tla] met lad ii e bi takav %  %  A l d <• \ %  iani, i %  ,. ,inn %  Bolando Maramotti a ho %  | with the two h %  said thai Icto will b %  I (rick Coming For Trial (iunu* WK.Nr IN1UKS f..f .. John Goddaid a h an Invitation from the West %  Control to attend tin recant cricket ton rna men t he tween MM windward and Lei nrd Islands in si Lucti i report upon any talent which l.c ihousht should be %  %  ed C. OH Ci > . %  i six-foot-lhn i i.. trora Bt Vincenl Attiiin on Ugh mandatlon the wI i i rtdp %  Board of Control have in\ itad a lo i< I It.n I ere Imn i diatob ->t<> i % %  second Barb Pi 'I end on r"h runry 'XI. The dab fi Oil. purno will be Fubruai j 28 and Ml I i eclcd unit onic ..f the Trinidad team who enn resnaui tvUI b. askIn thC match M well (ll.k and MUM .n arc %  SO '.hat tin net practice and accustom thasnetlVei t. .ml wicketLoiltloil I 'orki'l's In Protest Strike LONDON. Feb. 8. Hundreds of dockers stopped Work in the port of London today to demonstrate outside the Magistrate's Court where seven unofficial strike leaders were I'fiiin charged. When the dockers learned this morning that the men had been lines ted last night, they travelled '.truishl to Central Ixindon. There they formed an are around the police court singing the national song "Land of Hope and Olory", and cheering the accused men as they arrived in pouring rein. They carried one of them on their shoulders Police arrested one demonstrator after a scuffle The seven defendants were charged with conspiracy to incite an illegal strike.—heater. w AI Three •NY L*(l(i M4uUI>(Hin. i teiin. hand %  panan a Poiic* crran a FWIMIJ Club* Four IQ nea Pad i"i"n**n two arounei I..4T strike of shunters was %  led in Cbicago. key (cure for trans-continental traffic, nd il was also reported ended II Northern California Reuter. Refuse 3181..'160 PITTSBURGH. Feb. A bO-year old Benedictine nun and her nephew, a Roman Catholic priest to-dsv renounced claim lo a $181,360 estate left by her brother, auto a Catholic I'I .< The nun. Sister Marv Martini of the Benedictine order of Saint Mery's. Pennsylvania, said il would violate the vow of poverty sh made meny years a|u. She has been blind for several year Sister Mary passed her rights pi the estate to hei nephew, who them. er, ADVANCE: SAYS CHIEF HONG KONG. Fel, | General Chu Teh. Chinese People's Armv Commander in Chief, lOead North Korean forces urging thrm lo > ontinue advanclng" Peking radio reported .i North Korean until the whole of Koreu crated —Reater Smuggler Prigee SOUTH WEST fiERMANV. Prince Han.. V. as today lined tl.OOO n nuggllng rrorri Bwlbp rland Tluin ri aid ft < was aeised of MniigKlini; through West Oarmai i mi i of hli dlfjocnatli pa fntn OCI.IMOII. last reai Prince Hans must .il-. i •lilt murks to cot 13.270 W/Bfa The court ruled that should the %  pay lha Ana. he must spend a day In prison for every 1 MO marks; —Renter vine* In the Indu I i^^,boon irurtually %  Italian COBVDUnlat pai'' lo IB lioni I'l.lli e |.i. % %  %  slvai % %  than u about n noaon others Including two Comfor ihern without rally call • %  i i i in KI^ I %  H-nt %  perlally formei pan,. iijsirstiti hjncli >t i i !: %  — Cucchl emted .•M Mm: leader who louuht under Unrsh-l %  I Hot a i %  fn iltai k by Ru i \ lard fW [dapted in fall ill f from llui-ian doin.n. '.: ti Meanwhile um invasopod iiiiii.in ('omnium-' hc.idiiuartcc in the II i. of it' .' folio* II t.n ka on lha a traitors". thoti place Maun.mi their he..'. %  %  In the bill n ily'a 1st 1 mi thi kOthlng." —-Reutrr. TKI.L Till! ADVOCATE 1111 MWKING 3113 OAV OR NIGHT



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PAC.F FOl'R BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, FEBRfARY 1" MM B^^SjglAmmffE r-imi.* k. Ik* *<•. ltd DM Bl %  rUl.l Saturday February 1(1. 1951 £ r Work %  MOR NVO.I tlVII. SERVANTS AN address tabled in the House of Assembly by Mr. F. E. Miller, member for St. George, seeks to provide a pit* I Civil ServanU which ill accords with the essentials of the service which they must render to Ihe general public. It is to be sincerely hoped that that address will reach no farther than the table of the House. On the face of it the address asks the Governor to allow Civil Servants to make use of the Civil Establishment to earn a livelihood, to kick il aside at any time they feel so disposed and to return to it if and when they have failed in their political pursuits In essence it unwittingly attempts, let it be admitted, to engender ill feeling among some sections of the Service and to undermine the morale of the Civil Service. The absurdities of the address arc obvious. If an officer in the Service is allowed to stand for election and to be reinstated, it will raise dissatisfaction among the members of the service who have been denied such privilege and who are serving in Junior positions. Some explanation is needed to satisfy any Governor as to what must be done with the vacant post while the member serves his constituency for one session. But the purple patch of the document is the paragraph which assumes that such dangerous permission will be given, and asks that the Vestries be invited to extend this privilege to their employees. The Vestries arc elected bodies operating under an Act and except by Legislation cannot be controlled by the Government But apart from the inherent blemishes of the address itself, it is welt to look at the effect it must inevitably have on the members of the Civil Service. They are being made to feel that in their capacity as servants of the Government they are being denied a right. They knew when they joined the Service that membership in the Legislature and membership of the Civil Service were incompatible, they subscribed to the conditions of service then and have received such benefits as are to be derived from that service. There have been occasions in the past when members of the Service have renounced those benefits for the glamour of political life. The late Mr. C. L. Elder, a Registrar of this island, resigned his post to become member for St. George. Mr. Hugh Hlackman. Accountant in the General Post Office timed his entry into politics with his retirement from the service, and at present there arc two members of the House, Mr. Speaker, Member for St. Peter and Mr. R. G. Mapp, Member for St. Thomas, who resigned from the Teaching and Civil Service to become members of the House. It is late in the day to ask that the rule be discarded. The Civil Servant has his right to attend public meetings, join political parties and to vote for members of the party which he serves. His active participation is frowned upon because of the issues involved. It is the Civil Servant who must carry out the policy of Government irrespective of the party in power. He it is who supplies that continuity of service which makes th standard something worth while and which ensures the respect of the individual for the Civil Service and Ihe Government. Even in places where there are ministers of the Crown, it is the Civil Servant wM is responsible for the maintenance of policy and it would be asking too much of human nature to expect a man who had spoken against the adoption of a particular line of policy to carry out details to perfect the major issues. It is true that the Labour Party might be in need of disciples but there should be no attempt to fill party ranks at the expense of the Government. It is an attempt to incite Civil Servants to please the party in power whose backing they will have in case of failure. There are two tirtsies of unhappy wvrtuMii In tht . by workmen wr "n-;m every from the president of a large corFinl. thrrr an those who hnve r od h „ h lob. hich wholly .atlsT, U...r ^ ^ „„.,„,„„„. Wr lrrl on us We •till believe that effort. creative and energy need", but do not provide what they desire i?i lh*> way of monetary or social lilV Second, there are those who *uik turd and earn a good living, but who have Jobs which givt them the "fenced-in" fooling common to persons whose ability (. denied expression and who** talents are unrecognized. In addition, of course, there are peepta who believe that work is %  ornethtea to !• <"t i> QM minimum. There are so many in this class as to give cheer to ambitious 7" r^,ni5^Tta.rtMrt ~S "-"%  .ho >, m—mmm siycrs-TV.' thing* done Is V< u main ob WftM inversion must be mnmd. F*cept as it is .oven In charity. thera Is no %  %  but by i %  %  iiodurtKiP in onlv i i van of earths furthest ['"? wrUn "• !" nc y * %  *?"I profits, or ingfeggLietl production by Wdrt The logical Wft to r.|se buying power ts by ingjpVarnft product!' per factory aaH*~ par worker. This doesn't rriean longer hours of work, but mote efflciani work. a full day's work for who a full day's pay. Thb. is Uw only produce twice %  us much as <*" %  <*. ,h ' wuys by wruch in another with the same effort ought V£TL *.?*? "O-J^&L'L 5!!!T that when wr work we are ful dream. dream was l> rt*. "And." -.*> %  | I, | [*l:jL-.lophei-port Kjhlil Gibran, "If you caftDos work with love but only with distaste, it is belter that you should leave your work and sit at the gale of the ad take alms of those who work with joy." There have been people in all j^es who believe that a man rewardthan there might otherwise be. Today's working man (and again we include everyone from again we include everyone from '"Zi n V*Mthinmtnr it are r.r, Schemes that would make buy Ing power easy to get vrKhout it are prolific real %  hasing power in the markets 4 that of the goods and services cm-red there, continue ing les: Hid less for more and The .Kingerous l a J Urga About Being Tired young man eager to >u The idea that we ^^ in „ fe Bnd lhe olo>r mil Proseeking advancement! is cheating himself if he concentrate* on wage ,i hours The man ci-iri' fur success in him knows that what he earns in future yea will not b* determined by skill and smartness. These are days when qualities of character are more Important than ever before: stability, toleration, co"~ ~i f "„;; Wi-i operation, and tell .estralnt They f~-li 7~ ^ are days when a knowledge ol (conomlc affairs la needed, not only of lhe family budget kind. but the kind that tells the reason for the taxes deducted from ones Tt„„ ls no deoyln. that there ^j! 1 !" J h !" '*,ZH? *""* iray envelope. l B auch a thing aa work fatigue u. 11 is a safety device of nature t i Work has as its purpose the within safe limits. The ... production of th.ny. to use and £ !" V u hal many oI u havc • V^£* Mrvlcea to enjoy. Husmeas is not h , ,„ ,„ blow 0 „ their a slruulc for wealth that already d pressure so low that our % ">"•<• exists, but a system of co-opera• JBS i impeded, and nW.be lion In producing and exchanging M h m thing, that people want. The more C M '„^ of i'-jj i,,,,,„. AMERICA HAS A SOUL NEW YORK. The most promising weapon in the whole U.S. propaganda armoury is the exchange movement. Fortune magazine declares in its current issue, urging the government to quadruple its present expenditure for bringing visitors here from abroad. The magazine quotes comments of British. French. Norwegian and other members of visiting "produ'-'ivity teams" to show that some of these people went home and opened the eyes of their left-wing fellow citizens "in a way that all the money in the world would not buy us." The free world is seen endangered by a myth: the myth that America is "all money and no spirit." a country without a soul. "If we do not destroy this myth, it will destroy us. Already it has sapped the will of our allies, made those who benefited from the ECA cynical of its purpose." The U.S. needs help from its friends overseas in the task of explaining how America works. The exchange movement enables Europeans and others to come and see for themselves whether the American "secret" nmmM £S!^SrSSAS i **•. r ruthlessness, or something D. V. SCOTT & COLTD. TO-DAVS SPECIALS at TM COLONNADE Usually NOW rka: Ql'AKER MACARONI so Tina PILCHARDS n l9 Bottle* ALLSOPP8 BEER *• uges There ore two rcmaining vations to be made about < Sir Andrew Caard said, and many other successful men have said it in dlfferartt words, "The work that has paid me brst is the work I nave done for nothing." by Hie vahli .'.• v. orkmen erso their employers FOR YOUR BATHROOM problems of The decimal all the boss's account ir or two places to the ght of anythlnfi in the workman's bank book, but. as Fertune remarked in :nt article "fiscall* Ihtttffai WO] produce, the greater ,,~" „"""_, "-O.IM^I hv wnrk-fntlene choice we have of thing, to en j9 y, ft* " '^3X^,1* facto" ^""""t %  %'"?' % %  i"^ "fa".' and the more we will have to exSL. *|,„J;"wlll not help Uiat dtw "" drain." Income tax. H.nge for thin(. we desire Lesion SuUDOsc we knocked P'" "• •*•> %  %  ">" fine nbirtracl nouns such Looked at in this way. work Is f „., bul four ^^ not a curse. The low In the ed oursplvM loogc iweat of thy brow shall tho. nt *• f |h( Um# to get „ breadmay be read as one of lhe w n t highei moat beneficent Inws of life. It .. „_7*Tw-,—. ....„. -,-. , impose was probably becuuso they rvd nothing lo do that Adam nnd F.ve became so easy victims for the tempter Social and political dreamers fouler the fallacy that work ws* imposed upon mankind a* a punikhment. They do this because tho nation breeds discontent and thereby furthers their purposes. In fact, as every thinking man and vonun will admit, work i* trcngthcfiing, satisfying, and a itn-.it blessing It is essential to iman happiness Hut to discharijc its responsibilities work must have certain qualities. It must be honest, useful and cheerful. It was of this kind of work that all the great men of the past century spoko hen thev preached the Gospel of Work: liberals like Mill, social Ms like William Morns. reactionaries like Carlyle. Christian socialists like Kingsley. and half-socialists like Ruskin Tolstoi said: "It is pleasant to dream ol eternity, but for an honesl man it Is enough to have lived his life, doing his work." I HAD A SIAAU. KJfiTUNt ON ruttone AWAY; IAT ..---L-/ LUWILV rr M ON VOUC COuPDM AMD NOT MlMfe Corner BASINS with Pedestal ft l BASINS with or without Pedestal 22-xie] Low-down SUITES High-up SUITES WC. PANS, SaP TRAPS W.C. SEATS l Plastic White amd IBakelitc Mahogany Cast Iron CISTERNS Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS HARPIC, Large and Small. We Are Making The World ents. and support of an increas ig number of good causes—all these, added to the generally cost of doing business ipose a burden that Is very heavy. About Dignity There are certain principles to be observed by both employer and workers if they are to havi reasonable satisfaction out o' work. Employers need to remember that an etetnentary demand among mankind is for maintenance of dignity. The dignity of man Is just as important within the factory cafeteria as it is .in in .'vi lusive city club. Dignity of workers may ba maintained when employers praise generously, ghra credit publicly when credit is due, unbend in the presence of employees so as to raise the employees' self-esteem, judge justly and not l.i-ritily. and accept criticism appreciation. Employees owe it to themMlvcs to choose among the occupations open to them the one 111 which they rnn best serve, and they owe It to their employers to do their best la it, la MVwo|) and preserve ,i working discipline, to uuord against letting their emotions run away with their working sense, and to avoid, as they expect their superiors to rclence nml nrt. friendship and loVt and the contemplation of the universe. We should find them tueva husk* unless we pegged away at them so hard that they. Ours is a civilization that never too, became work. could havo been built without No chentlng or bargntnlng or avolt j shyp poi.i,, labour, and if it is to be sustained smartness will ever get a smglo Il must be by work which adds on* of our wants out of nature s jt is often a bit of silly social le life as well as maintain-, life storehouse at half price Our prido that makes people unhappy The world is not diminished, ( hysical strcnRth depends upon j„ melr work. Brain workers and small though it may appear in working our musclesOur menmuscle workers are equally Im|h light of today's speed records ml strength depends upon ncrtivnt in keeping the wheels In tr.ivel and communication. It Is working our brains. If we want turning. No matter how magnillin the process of being made, and more, we must work more. As a ,, n t m ay bo the city planning %  rt .inthe makers. nation* we cannot buy and condone by architects and ivory Work is helpful to our minds, turn* twice as much goods as our tower dreamers, no city beautiful Il is the best outlet tor our anger, grandfathers did unless we prow m CV er arise unless there arc and the truest escape from selfdine twica .is much goods. nien to use their hands on pickpity and sell-centrodnoss. There is If mankind had adhered to the axes an %  % %  -— ..._... 'ina* li.viessya production car. —' * rJ'S.^-.".".^.'^^ H. brotigh. about b, the Sk ; 2 tion of four efforts: education, 1 develop greater Intelligence ano competence; research, to develop Labour can be made trulv pw products and fmd bettei digr.ified. not by the bogus exways of doing things: capital, to filiation of the worker by build and expand Industries; and Com muni MIL but by workers work. themselves evaluating a man for standard w b** he fe ant l lu usefulness to ---iety. The man who coaxes a fely and competently mgh city traflV. the man who Saskatchewan grail Nothing can ralao our world owes him a living is pre">' ' "ving without work The great?"*' nr*r to oayina off." •' our age is any S !" neer to paying on. pieachlng. wheiher by wnlimental lh ^L Well, In a nation Uk ours. J,umanitarii or by agitators, of %  *"'* fc l*eople are not likely to give in to tllP go ,pei 0 f reward without nrto J the man wh0 tends %  Breat living on charity. There are too C ff or t machine which produces goods il manv opportunities for the hettei would take a thousand slaves to life "we all desire, and we have \\.,.,,. inuke. the girl who operates an ii..t vet receded to the thinking Uevator or lypea letters, OK sells of the spoiled child kind, that The world's doers spell wages in a store j— all these are cotiwhen people demand payment for i.nd diversion In small letters and iiibuting tlfeu share to 'h* life things we want ihey are impc*in WORK In eapHala, iecause gettitu,>nd productiveness of the country. more profound. Among Fortune's quotations from European productivity-team reports: "Tl'i? American employer seems to be a psychologist aware that his prosperity is tied directly to that of the workers." "Somelimes we had to ask ourselves whether it was manufacturer or union member speaking to us." "Contrary to the impression gaine 1 from many American iilms. only a small p*r centage of American workers and their families Hve in tenements." Through the State and Defence Departments and ECA. the government is now bringing over about 13,000 persons a year to observe and study American methods, and the cost is about $45 million. Fortune discloses. "Meantime, private organizations this year will have arranged roughly 40,000 exchanges of their own. The 4-H clubs have been exchanging young farmers; the Rotary clubs have been bringing over students; the Girl Scouts 'youth leaders' etc. "Measured against the need, however, our over-all exchange effort has been piddling. It has been very frustrating for many middlemanagement people, for example, to return to Europe all steamed up about, say. labourmanagement councils, only to realize that no one else in the outfit has got tho word. Like plasma, exchange is best in massive doses. "We have a tremendous opportunity before us. We should seize it by expanding our total propaganda budget to at least $500 million a year—and of this devote at least $180 million to exchange. "We could not legislate a bigger bargain for ourselves." Fortune odds, pointing out that government spending for this purpose stimulates more spending on exchange by private groups in the U.S. and abroad, as well as by foreign governments. Perhaps not much can be done about the hostility of certain European intellectuals who decry American culture as "barbarous," Fortune implies: "The myth satisfies them. In it they find the rationalization for their own spiritual vacuum." Moreover, American culture is a popular culture, Fortune continues: "Ii is a proclamation to the world of the cultural enfronchiseof the common man. But to a Europe that is still culturally an aristocracy the symbols ofhisenfranchisement are often vulgar and shoddy." (As one French writer said, bemoaning Coca Cola. Buicks, Chryslers, nylon stockings, and chewing gum, "As soon as they appear these habits become an invasion. It is a question of the entire French moral landscape:") WILKINSON HAYNKS Co., Ltd. Successor* To CS. PITCHER & CO. Phone. — 4*72,1687, iiiiiiiiinniiiinnnnirinrrnrT-t-T-r-T--~-**rri RANSOMES LAWN MOWERS With or without Motors XOWS THE TM3IE TO SELECT YOVBS. DA COSTA & CO., LTD. warn Our II* iiih is S;i>: Cricket BrttadvuKt To lhe Editor. The ^dtfocurr— SIR,— The thousands who will 1 ten to the broadcast of the li.utcolonial Cricket Matches between Barbados and Trinidad, iiarting at Kensington Oval naotf Thursday, should be told that a debt of gratitude Is due the Hen. curable H. NTurner, Colonial Secretary. In particular and also Mr. Frank Field. Acting Attorney General for having had lhe Question of the granting of a licence settled In a practical *ai!sfactory manner in spile of stubborn and tedious arguments. AUcawber suggestions and pknn humbug By Its decision the Governor in-Executive Committee may rest assured that it has public opinion tiimly behind il The ready assistance and helpful suggestions of Mr. E. S. Bennett and Mr V II C, Hi>hinson of Messrs. Cable it Wireless IM\ should also be recorded. YOUM faithfully, ER|C IVNISS l.a./ur* And Thv Honour* Lht To TIW Editor, The Adrocate, SI from the front page of The Times I .hi. .iilonal Supplement, is not without local significance: — "Though each year now the names of a not insignificant i number of men and women who have given distinguished service in education or an allied field appear in the Honours list, one would ttill like to sec more toaebari thu* singled out for recognition. There i* to-day increasing acknowledgement of the crucial Importance of Ufa teacher's role—and there are to many devoted and successful. teachers whose lives and work offer convincing evidpnee that the importance of ihe classroom practitioner is not overrated. This is not to wish any diminution in the numbers of those whose service to education has been given wholly or mainly outside the classroom, for they make It possible for the 'teacher to do a good Job, and many if not most of them have graduated to their present i>osition from the classroom. But it Is still possible to wish that those who advise His Majesty could find it In their hearts to include more entries like "X. Y.. Class-teacher, Z Countv Primary School • The situation in Barbados with respect to teachers and other workers in the educational field Is even worst; and youi n>i respondent hopes that those who make the local recommendations will make o note of the above extract and adopt the suggestion made therein. Yours failhfull* TEACHERS' FRIENO Rfvilrig .llv. PR Driving To The Editor. The Advocate. SIR.—Kindly allow me to comment on an ArtU-le In your paper of Tucsdav 6th February, re Campaign against reckless Driving. 1 think thai If the Police Force themselves could itt a better example while driving both vans and motor cycles, ihe public would cooperate. I recently witnessed a scene on (Mhstitiition Road, near Queen's College, where a PoUrcimin riding a motor cycle nt a very dangerous rate, nearly collided with a cyclist. TinPoliceman, although riding dangerously was not interested In where he was going. He was looking back at his rear wheel. I batteva the reason for this disKiistiiiK driving by the Police, is DM Maa the Police seem to believe that they can do no wrong regardleaa 1 will agree that freight l-.mrs aaes to the road user, but so are other motorists. The numbtr ul unv-r ;it night that have not the least bit ol common decencv to dip their lights to oncoming traffic Is utterly, disgusting 1 should estimate that at least M% of drivers at night do not dip their lights. Drivers of car* and especially taxis, have not the slightest regard for cyclists or pede-lnans they nay meet on the road. Their outlook is that Iheir car ts the larger object, and *as ouch, everything else should got otT the ro.-;# when %  %  Hoping this will meat the eye* of all concerned. A DISGUSTED ROAD USER. City Trap* To The Editor. The Advocate— SIR,—Kindly permit me space to draw to the attention of the correct Authority, two dangeroui traps in the city Just hbove the Garden, on that bridged gutter, which serves as :i paverMnt, where passem.' the 'bum roj Brtttona Hill, My LonTl Hill. etc. A small portion of which bai either rat or broken %  way Is < %  hoe heels and second I in one of tlie planks which protrudes and serves as a trip. Only i.ing quite %  fat lady and would hsve go* qure a fail if it were not lOf I e of a Bust Conductor. Thanking you for space WILKINS. "Ia it the implicit revolutionary promise of these symbols thai makes them so profoundly disturbinR?" Fortune asks. European workers, on the other hand, are cool to American capitalism because they conceive of it in terms of their own—of which they are sick Fortune continues. "The European does not see the rapidly changing, socially conscious capitalism of 1950. He has not been shown the tremendous difference between our capitalism and the capitalism of Europe. "In this respect it is startling to listen to BO American businessman just returned from Europe; almost invariably he will so re vile its low-wage, high-markup, monopoly ceo nomics that he sounds mrch more the howling revolutionists than the European soc.al.stt who so mistrusts him." But the European masses are ignorant ol this businessman's philosophy, and Europear capitalists are utterly unconvinced of it; value; "It is high time that the American businessman realized that it is not Europear socialism, but European capitalism, that is the chief block to 'free enterprise'." We must develop far better means of reaching the European masses with our pro^ paganda, Fortune maintains. Reaching them the editors feel, will require the co-operat uf our friends abroad who hf-vc seen for themselves how America works. MUA FOR THOSE WHO LIKE TO KEEP COOL . AND KEEP WELL-GROOMED AT THE SAME TIME! THE NEW MOYGASHEL ANTI-CRUSHABLE LINENS . ARE JUST THE TICKET M H STOCKS Jt ST YltltlVI II | AT DA COSTA & CO., LTD. DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT •; liii ii l i W T ii i i J i in %  MAKE EVERYMORMWG "A GOOD *w MORNING" with > CUP of COFFEE — We Offer — rrtw> Empire Coffee (ground D.iily) Lipton COflM Msiwell House COSM Casse ft %  aaaberne Coffee Liquor* Gold Braid Bum Top Notch Bom Dry Sack 8arry Bnstol Cream Sherry Sandemsn'n J0rt ViUo Cura Tuborg Beer /. Canadian Salmon Kippers Bed Apple. string Bean* S/H'ciuis 1dm Kola Tonic. 1.00 per Bot. CookPast*. 6 ceats per tin Luncheon Cheats, 1.21 each !/#-#' A tost Foods Wheat Puffi All Bran Puffed Wheat Prunes Crushed Pliifspple Orange Juice Canadian Eggs Cal*es Liver Streaky Bacon H*TI agoa Kamburgars J. ft R. Bread PHONE G0DDARDS ^W*/*//,V.V.V.V.'.V/.H*.'.',V,V'.V.V/, -.-.-.-/ I



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SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 10. 151 BARBADOS ADVOCATE. PACE SI \ I \ CLASSIFIED ADS. TCLCPMONK I 50S D*."... i *m* n %  Birth*, Ka ..,., % %  ... 1 I BB*g -!'• %  • i on .**ii-d*y* and (ias Mr any number of word* up w w •" %  1 itnU P*r od on *.*k-d**a arm cent* per word *n Sundar* lor ooen .oditional word lor Birth. MarrU*** or b|.if %  W W and • ttnU p*r word lor en iWdllMPDl -'d Tfiuiuh. H wdlW Ori—en I and p.m.. 31U tor %  %  ** WOOD-On February SU. l**t %  ( hi residence "White Hou***'. SI Jam* lllnknon A.hbv Wood 111* lunar; leeve* thv above residence al t IJ an lo-day for Ihe Wrtfbury C**-enee*TT. Mr. C M. Ur.enrdgr and Lrouai Archer. !• 1 *l — li THANKS KYAM-Through thla death ol m> lOJ&l In M""l--M >nd Mr. Duncan M.-rrt. / brt to convey their heart i* to all Iricir (rirndr. ecr* and wall aUMn (or the prrvinn* o( *ymp*thy ihowtl IS I lISMITH Oncar Wo bad through thi* medium to return thank* to all Iho*e Kind friend, who **nt wreath*, ttrtter* of condolence, or In BAT wa/ e*pr***rd thair sympathy In our r*c*ni berrarveMr*. Elaine Smith MM, Joan. Yvonn*. Munreene 'daughter.'. Kmeraon laon*. Mr aad Mr-. Oerald Dottin • parent**. IN MEMC'RIAM LIB—In loving mrmor.r ol our door vrd mother Martha Walker, who aaleep on r*t> lath. 14S (apply and amlllng alwaya content ived and respected where ever ahe Reirembered by Mr. A t teri. Mr J l-ayn* iSon-in Coppin i Grand-DaughLi i. ADAMS -In loving memor? loved husband Denial Adama who fell a.kep Sleep on and lake your May joo i**t In I Mr*. Elvira Adam* Mi Carloiiu i Wife i FOR SALE n MM. AUTOMOTIVE FOR HIM HOUSES PI in i< XOTIIIS I %  .....I %  >.. %  rr>-d.--.l CibbBoach. *t Pour "lA-an-OUT" SMKabe* rot couple — fro.' March "Rastavi'i Aua-uat Ortobct lo December IBM Both fully futnlahad Apply Wealey Barley, High Street Will w VURN1NGBIDC Balh.l.ab* Rrti. %  .nti rel*iirnllhed From Frb 15 room*, water. electric light, garag* MSI Mr. W. Chandler 41 ,!iM BTKWAHTVnJX-1 bedroom*. Drowig and Dining Room. Pantry. Kitchen. Servant*' Room*, Sea-idr. Itaatlng* none IBM 1111 i. TANOIJN Beaehmont. om robrwary onward*, monthly or IherwiM. 3 doub:. bedrooa n* with Magi* Simmon* bodataada. children'* room. dining room and lounge Rofnfento*. garage, aarvanl'i room. Apply: Howe Hint MM. lllSl--tf r WarrSftTXY, Bathahaba: Renovated and refurnished Prom Pact 13th 1 bedroom* *r. electric light, earase Dial Mil. W. Chancier. 4 111 -Sn PI HI H SAM'S Taw cenla per aoale Jin* ind II oaila par aoale Hi mlifmum ckorv. (I 10 • ad II a) on Suadavt. M f* B1|I I I --!.(.: %  REAL ESTATE HOUSE—One new board an, uae. II II (t. build wit *y to move. Apply to Snerl. ml Bay. St. Philip. ORANDVBW. Hathaheba Three O Bodroomed Buivfalow, Handing r>n Ml Svk. Peel IJI.O OrTer In wrltlruj (or the aamo. will bo received by T. C PIXXJ> C. o Janvea A. ich a. CO. Lid up to 4 pm. Mlh robruary mi • ISl—fln The undaruaned will offer (or aalo at their olBc* No. IT Utah Street. Bridgetown, on Friday the lath rebruary IHI at 1 p.m The meaauaar or dwelling hou*o ronnarly known • Tallyrra now called •'CRY9TAI. WATDM" with th* land thereto containing b/ eatlmatlon IT. ran arguaro (oat altuatad on tho aaa at CarvlUa Avenue. Worthing. Chrlit Church, at prearnt uard a* a boarding hoiiM Inspection any day eicept Bundi between 4 and • p.m. on application to Mr.. Talma on the pr iL ti ta aa. Pot lurtbrr particular* and condition! ol sale apply lot— COTTLI, CATTORD. ft Cc Solicitor.. ll.fl | ardor (or private Chn.tma* Card. Irom your frMmda No prorloaat npaai anoa neceaaarr Writ* today for beautKul (re* .ample Book to Britain*, large*1 and ( o r* m oat Publlahar*. hur>*at ronu.iiaaton: mancUoua money nuking otportunity Jon**, William* ft Co Deri a Victoria Work*. Pre, ton. tcgland." 1' I 11 lfci VMRKR CYCLE COMPrrtTIOH. Brand New Rumbor Bicycle. O*. tM H.-riaon Btor*. Tickrl. 1 •acti I MM M*i tlsi >i NOTICE i ii l-n OP T. JOHN — laD tondrra are Invited tor auppl'.mg approalmately 41 pint* pur* freah .• milk dally to SI John* Almahouae two deliver!**. >. limn the thh i-h la&l. Applicatton* will b* read by th* iinderalgned up to th* ITth iratajit. and It la to be und*T*to.id that loweat or anr tender will not neeealy b acceptod. H 8 FBASCB. Clark. Board ol Poor Law All < NOTICE th*y mint ninth ol rebruary. according to law N B— All Taaea due to th* Pariah will alto now be collected, according Iff. l.Sign*d A. A. B OIU. Parochial Trea.urer. St. Joaeph % %  n m PuMir Official Sak On Friday 1 til IN IIM d.-.> rttBgwa the altornoon will b* aold al my orBe* to th* hlgheat bidder (or any BUR under th* aprn-alard value All that r*rUln pl*c* o{ land t.mlng about tweutv-rne perrhre .1111*1* i.. th* Pariah o( Saint Michael, bu and bounding: on Undo bit ol Frvd Molonoy but now of II. O. Etntac* ft Co. Ltd. late of Cleopha. Adolpha* For.le bin now of K 8 Hop* and on Iwo piblic road*, at Upper Bank Hall Main Road, appralaed aa follow. Tlie v. hole a real of land appralaed In Eight Hundred and Fortv Sm dollar* IM4SQ0' Attached (rom Coleridge Br**lord Field lor and toward, oall.fKtlon. -ftc. NB m% Depo.it to be paid on day c( purcha**. T. T IIKADIJSY. Provoot Marahal %  All—Ml NOTICE -IVM Vaiixhall motor car. nn good iiWt-N T AIJ.DCR. Borbuck Dial MM. will U I fkj < %  *-.-, .-tyle maatai in drat iU.. condition >l-ln 103*1—Sn i. upright %  UTl each. With arm„ .jckert M.00 **elv N*w (any uprlghl chair. H00 per pr SS -k-r. tXDO per pal. Tub aw 00 per pr Mahogany coektaU from M00 Tr* trolley. M> ; I tttgg. •330 roo. %  p* Pot further particular* Dial *"M r, n Mew at Ralph B*ard a • no '" ll.idwood Alloy. "" NTEHI'BISE An adj u ilni rllh M„MBKI who I tr*** to b* %  relative. ...li to i frtendi In the tic .1 1 li.. ol I i th* US. Apply in O. Holder. Enterprise. Chrl.t hurch Cap. Attorney for the Eatate ir lull information. t I 11 •)• I-OST %  ' gar* word on u-* %  ** l p** leoil on tuaiU*! **i*lw tt cr-i. !" weel-d !" .. •• OrtX ill CIOCK Bl fither at Huaplti MMMM IU-.,.I ;i"vru ivt. WATCH lady'* Gold Watch -AM*" with Gold *ti.p 1,-1 between Two MilHlll and Of. Reward ..Itrred, Phone ntil %  In •ATCH On Wedne*p>< night brtW*an and Culloden Rood., one lady-* r at wateai. Finder will be rewarded returning aame to Admicata Advri %  lain*; Dept or may dial JStl. mji-!f WANTED Three iriata per w. i-d 4 crata per word %  am charge Tl cenlr rt ceari on Soadau* HELP CAPABIX. WELL EDUCATE" YOUNG MAN Quick and accurate a ftguraa. typing, alao able to handle cor i on dene*. Apply in writing and li p*r*on to the Brltuh Bat* Shoe Co. Ltd.. Broad Bt Mill-*) MISCELLANEOUS GOWRINGES undertake expert watch and clock repair*, cleaning and n Wi of oil pointing*, valuation for nc* and pr.balo UOkkiN'i.rs Upper Bay Bt. SJ11 WE Bt T FOB (All — Old G*d ant invar Jewellery, coin., denture., etc ncrlle. caU or Dial 4* lOBBlst.l-t Antique Shop, adjoining Hoval Yacht "lub 3131 Tn wr BI'T FOB CAII-Cloeka. waichet rut "i'i> il bovr* in any condition rrBV. call or dial •, (.OIIIMilAr tlqur Bhop. Upper Bay Str.et JI.-Tn. WANTED TO RENT HOUSE--In Hock ley or In Ha.tlnga Purntahed with 3 Bedroom*, Drawing and Dining Boom and Kitchen. Toilet and Rath. Prom the lit of March. Call ol Trie phone MM. MJ1—** WANTSP T*0 BUT KED POSTAGE ST AMI'S Of tlM Brltlah W**t India* Good Price. Paid at the Caribbean Stamp Society Nfl Swar si...-t 10111 Jn F.OAKDBRA-For furnlahed I laled rooma or boarding, al rrald*nr* In th* HaaUng* Area r .infunti. quart Appl: %  :••! In PI:IISO\\I. TAKE NOTICE THREEFEATHERS That THREE FEATHEBS DISTItlBUTOBB INC. • eorpor*tUrl __ .Una under th* tew* ol tho State ol Delaware. Untied Stale, of America. Whol*laquar Diatribulor. who-e irle tn buain*a addnraa u Kff I %  1 State of Haw TtwtJ I "• A ha* aga>E*d lor the regi.i mark In Part "A" ol Reai all in the meantime give *W>Ur* In jyff B ega* 10 m* at v ,.rnrr of oppo>it*.i ,ch rrai>tr*iion. Th* trade mark can be -eea on application at my office Dated thi. tt*. day of Petwii*r> I*S1. H W 11.11 AM* Brgi.'rat of Trade Mark. TAKE NOTICE TRUBENISED Thai TBfnrXISF.D COMPANY 'It. cording to the i— ,v.le or buainew odilr* i* V*dQ>. %  Balhau.. ha* .ppBed h>i k In Part l~ ol Reguter in mpact of nun*'* and BOM %  ladi*a' o*e. 4r**a*a giul inmmn.-..!,.•• and will I entitled to raatlatrr th* mm* alter my ofBc* of appoaitlon of auch re*la'ratu>n The In rpllralion al n Doted tht* Plh da* of Pehruary IML II WIIIUMI Rgglfftiai TAKE NOTICE AOMA Thai SCIIENITY INDl'-tTIIIF* INC ^der the lawof the state of Delaware. V ...ne addien t. 130 Fifth Avenue. Nrw Torfc 1. noleanl* Laauor Uftnbutoi. haa appHptl hM ihe lei •rt 'A" uf Begiiter in mpeel of im. and Will be ler on* month from the 10th dav of Frbtuaiy 1M1. gi.tratlon The Itailr mark (an be >*rii mi *ppl:c* Doted thi* ffth day of Pebruary' 1*11 a corporation organtaed god *nVe .,f oppoaluon on at my oflce. A MS. I Trad* Mark. 10 131 J. TAKE NOTICE That 7-ONITT PRODUCTS CORPORATION. corporation organlied at*d n ng under th r law. of the Slate *>( HeUwai.. Umlrrl BtatO* ol AinerK*. Manutac art, -n.— Had* ot buaineaa addr**. •• 100 Park Avonvff Nc* York II. Ittati New York. USA. ha. applir.t loi th* i.-ai.ti ation of a trade nuirk In Part A Begi.trr In ir.pevl gg p.uducU for oral hyalene. tiMh a. dental paate. powdeta. cream, and dentifrice, all ol which being of medicinal value, and alao aatrlngem.. and will be entitled to regtatrr the *ame after one month from the Ifflh day of Febluarv IMI unle'i *om* person "hall in the meantime give notice In dupli.atc IK mi at my office ol opposition of auch icantiation The trade mark can be aern or application at m< arflce Doted thi* BU day of February Il. II WIII.IAU4. Rem-lrar ot Trade Mffik. 10 1 II In TAKE NOTICE CRESTA BLANCA That SCIirNI.FY INnUlTBIES INC a ffg*T if* law* of tnr State of Delaware. United Mau trade or buainew addr*** i* 3M Fifth Atrenu* USA. haa applied for tho rrgi.tiatlon of t In reipect of wine., and will lie entitled la (rom the loth day ol February 1*51. unh<*> i-.n nolle* in duplicate to me at n" OflM mark can be *een on appllcat...n %  Doled thu ffth day o( Fetwuary 1WI. %  rganiird and in* *ll*M lenca. Manufacturer*. * ork 1. Slate of New Tort . i' -it 'A of Regleli Th* public are hn givii.g credit to my me* CLARKE, aa I reatMMia-ble for her Imrtlng any debt j |g *> warned agai life. MARIE HOPF. do luit hold n r anyone eUe debt* i order elffr-ed by me. UVINGSTONE HOPE. Chalky Mo.mt. Bt. Andrew. I* 1.31—En C|iie*ted to *n.d In particular* of claim, duly attested to the under*lgi>rd EMMANUEL FITZI'ATIUCK JOtlMflDN a>allAed K*ec utor of th* will of Blanche Sheet* deceaaed. Haynea ft Griffith. Solicitor*. No HUh Btroat. Bridgetown, on or bthe lith day of April. 1M1 after which dale we ahall proceed to dletrlbut* % %  *•!• of th* deceaaed. among partle* entitled thereto having regard rmly to auch clnlma of wtinh we ahall then hav* had imtlc* and we will i->t be liable for th* aaaet. or any part Hereof en distributed to any perwjn Of whoa* debt or claim we .hall not then hive had notice And all peraon* indebted to the aald i -l.it e ar* nq ue ite. I to art tie their indebted net. without delay Dated, thi* *th day of Februar/. IMI EMMANVia. FfTZPATRICK JOHN*->N qualified Executor of th* Will of Blanche Skeete. dcctancd HlflHfi LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Th* application of L. J. William* Mitkrtmg Co. Ud. of Broad Street. St Michael (or pernUaalon to aril Spirit.. Mall liquor*, ftc. at lnd Boor f room of wall building at Booker* Drug Store. Broad Street. City. Dated thi* *th day of fJebru-iry I T-. 11 A. TALMA. Eaq. p Police Magl*trate. bl*tnet "A". Sifmed F M OD1JE. per L J Wn.UAMS .MAHKirTING Co Applicant* N H Thi. application will be conaldrred al a lacen.lng Court to be held at Police Court. Dlalrtct "A" an Monday the llth day of February. IMI, al II o'clock, a.m. H. A. TALMA. Police Mafttlnit*. Dial "*-. ItlH W TAKE NOTICE i Ml i KMOf AMI i OMPAJIY, INC. a corpoi af Ihe tale (4 M.nl.n.1 UMMd Slat. ..I Amen " %  "" addre.. I. 401 lanungTI Tor*. New York. Ui America, ha. applied for the regutrafon of a trade mark % %  > ttegi.ter in reaped u ( alcoholic beverage-. c>p*rtally -h; M to irglstcr the aame alter on* month flum th* 10th da> "I >' %  H>me perron ahall In the meantime gue nolle* In duplicate to t i--jp-i-Hit.il ,,( ,i, v h rniitrail.in The lr*d* mark nn be ***n Datr.1 thi. (Hh day of February l-UI -i MM %  i Pi.t "A" ol iv111 be entitled •y. 1*11 ta*dff*j M aju a**aM n* apullcatlon at It WILLIAMS G If. SHIPPING NOTICES MONTRKA1-. ArSTRALIA. NCTV ZEALAND LINE. LIMITED " St.I ucla Grenada, ft Aruba and l*a> M-.g*r* only for St. Vlnrmt JJpU cf d*pait ire to be a.nlU-d. KWJ. M inn iNl K OWNEJI9 ASSOCIA-nON. \pe TelejphBB-: MIT "~ TAKE NOTICE Thai OLD CHAItTFIt ItlHTIII FltY CO i-.iatMB M*MBM* •"^' •"•f 1 ,i B under the law. ,.' •!.'nte of )>elaw*re. United Stale* of America. DMtlller*. whoa* trade or b< ^ddie^. i. lot) Writ 10th Street. Wilmington. State ol Delawar*. USA. ha ... ii-t (Or ihe reai.uati.in of a IfMa mark in rart A i.l Keel.ler in reapeci ..; whl.k-., and Will be entitled to regUtrr the -am* after one month from the 10th dav or February IMI. unleaa aom* permn ahail In th* meanllin* fflv* notice In dunluatu M RM at my .itnre of >piMialti.in Of iriKlratlon The trade "unk can lie MTII oft application at Doled Ihla *th day of FCI.H.PN If-1 HARRISON LINE :-0 -It: OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINODOJl tl Wll HAMS of Trod* Mark* I01SI m t,OVi;H.\>IIM NOTICES • %  WORTHV DOWN" — Siluated at Top Bock, confuting of 3 bedroom* with connecting toilet* and Uiower*, Urge lounge, dining room, ultra modem kitchen, large front balcony, and br*akfa*t balcony. '-ear garage. 1 aervantt' room* with Ullet and ihowera alao laundry. The ground, ar* fully enclo**d and th* garwell laid out etc. Available on id ltd. M ibov* property 1* well conrtructed in 11-inch rtone. with an Event* roof Bet offer above JT.4.000 will be accepted Furthvr particular, etc. Ring 4M3. UVEslOCK Apply: Dulketay Lid. Dairy. I lleifrr Calv**. Half-bred lr MECHANICAL MACHINESMISCELLANEOVS ACTUMUS~Th* n*w FrtllU*r canaf, v*tabl* and (lowrr gaid*'* H p-r lb from H. Keith Archer'* I Store. Colerlde* Street Phone MM -Bt'NSDfANI" COUNTRY, ROAD. ST. MICHAEL The re*ldence lately occupied by Mr*. W. O. Collyrnor*. Th* hou** itanda In w*ll k*pt girden* ard ground* <1 acre* 31 perchen. Th* whole comprlaea verandah, drawing and dining room*. S bedroom*, on* with maibl* bath. ? ahowert. 1 lavatorie*. convenient kitchen and pantry. r*-oin* for t aarvant*. larag* (or t car*. and .table. Water aupplv lor garden and a-round* Irom a well wilh mill; water a*rvlc* In hcua* and aUo imanti room* ihower and lavatory* The re.ldenc* completely wired ano furnlahed with electric lighting from th* company* main*. Hou** convertible Into Bat* and outbuilding* convertible Ir.to a cottajf* The land U m liable for develop mnt or kitchen garden* The under*igi-d will olfer tht premUe* lor *al* by public auction ' their otTlce. No n. High Street. Bridgetown, on Friday th* l*d day February IMI al 1 p m. Inapectlon on Tuoadaya and T dayj b*l*c .,-,,Ui MM app:y to ft CO.. 4X> lO-i Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amendment) Order. 1951. Ko, 3 which will be published in the Official Gazette of Thursday 8lh February. 1951. I. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling prices of "Milk-Condensed" are as follows >— ARTICLE Mi Ik-Condensed WHOLESALE PRICE (not more than) 12.00 per case of 48x14 oz. tins RETAIL PRICE (not more than) 27c. per 14 on. tin 8.2.51—2n 7th February, 1951. Attention is drawn to the Control of Lumber Prices (Defence) (Amendment) Order. 1951. which will be published in the Official Gazette of Monday 12th February, 1951. J. Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of "Merchantable Pitch Pine". "Merchantable While Pine" l'xfl-—II". fl' and up and "Merchantable Spruce" r*e"—11'. 6' and up are as follows:— GOVERNMENT NOTICES Vetitl Mil 11KI1RY 1I1LI." SS ss "PROSPECTOR" FACTOR" SS. "TRIBESMAN" SS "SPEAKER" SS. STATESMAN" rvom M/brouh & Ltmoon latndon Glasgow ft L/poul M/brough fc I,ond"ii tivarpool I'liitinii ) ; JLT rd Jan. Hi.l Ft! fillt Feb. !9thTe1i." Bth Fb. 17th Pab. ITth F.b ITth PM 4th M-rvh 51h MTtrdi HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM Veisel S.S. "COLONIAL" Closes i.'ih Pel For further information apply to DA COSTA & CO.. LTTX-A f eu COLUMN ONE Article (1) Merchantable Pitch Pine (Basic Sizes) Merchantable White Pine l"x6"— U", ' and up (Basic Sizes) Merchantable Spruce rxtr—11". ' and up (Basic Sizes) COLUMN TWO Ordinary Retail Price (not more than) $312.00 per 1.000 board feet $240.00 per 1.000 board feet 1240.00 per 1.000 board feet BATH* In Porr*l*in ^""'l-*" Wh* GrMfi. Primro** with malchtni u nlU to complete roiour rutu* grade A BABNES Co.. Ud. T.>i, %  nVlH-l-f.n. aca and fthade* .-i.,,1,.so. u 103 it —ln CRV-TAiJ-trn muiT n> ihe Poun< ,,. ,„ one pound original package* Al-o Ma.aerhlno Cnrrrle. Oet me the) ire IMV Knlgbl. Dm* S""^,^,, OALVAKISKD !" *^ ^^^ S'fU! *.i" a in*' and 4 In*. Atao Auto Tyr* Come. JJKBRYCiO-BOirs'D O ric*ly .h.ped and painte*. i. .ikiivg order. Contact 1 Cnapel Mnwt. B*. Pefr. rnpl*te wlln llorie* Id li Kmg. TJ41 n. A new and well built Bungalow M Pint Hill called WBSTTEIJ). the prone. Iv of th. Ule Sir Oeorge Walton The Bungalow Hand* on li.OSO aauai* feet of land and ronlaina on* large puli lie room, two bedroom-, munrn. laundr/. b*tt •"* lavatory building Over* la a gnrafj*. (oe one far and two **rvanU r.-r-iri* with bath *nd lavatory Thr property will be *et up lor *ale Dt our amV* on Wrdneaday th* SIM day ol rebruary 1*81. at I pm for condition* of aale apply to the •nderalgned Inapeclion an* day between I0.JB am ir, l pm Taiaphnn* 1-r-ly Walton. ALTERATION TO SERVICES It has been found that alterations and extensions to water service-, supplied from the Government's water mains, are being carried out without the prior consent of the Waterworks Department. This constitutes an offence under Section W of the Waterworks Act, 1895-1. which renders consumers, as well as plumbera and contractors, liable to a penalty not exceeding Five Pounds without prejudice to the right of the Department to recover the cost of any damane done to their property, or the value of any water used or wasted. Chief Engineer, Waterworks Department... 10.2.51—In. and No 4HI COTTU. CATFORJJ CO. •anllcltora MM iir %  DV**V At Inch Mario* Hood. ChrMt Chutrn. 1 roof* and ahfdrool. willing •ell In par Appl.' Pa Chriat Ch %  ea-ionabl* ofter 1 ill*. Inch M*T i Prank Clark* li. -1 II: II Ti MTHlKiHV Pr**h .hlPn*nt I Jb Tin II M "i lb Tin #C. Prom all Grocer, %  naj Ch*mut*. WJ.S1—4r hHAJ TradIrut Co UdTh* above will be et lip lor f*J* b> Public CampetHIOn at our Office. Jam** Street. Bridgetown, on Tueaday th* llth Februarv at 1 p m. o L w C-LAIIKJ* a CO. S-.ll. '-ONE ill IT Jewel EUin Cent G..ld Tilled Pocket Wateh In perfect working order. Apply to W. D "l^,**?; MrCinw Street 10 1*1—In Brlnamead. well tuned. Beat oiler nvei •jfagng arcrpted. Apply Ralph B*ard. 1 %  IA> !" *" %  >.--* \\\ r.iiFJt GOODS — Ir* Cap*. HOT Water Bottlaa.^Syringe*. Air Cuahlon atveur* your* ntV a. Ih* price tt Rubber rood* I* going hither and htfher Knight** Drug matm. iI- -f mam TIN -Ju.t received h [ M. JOMK D TAYLOB 'SONUI srsi-m OKRA CLOSE SEASON Order In pursuance <.f Section 4, subsection (3) of the Cotton Diseases Prevention Act. 1928, (1928-7), the Governor-in-Exeeutive Committoe has fixed the period from the 1st of May to the 30th of June, inclusive, to be a Close Season for Okras. Made by the Govern orin-Executive Committee this 1st day of February, one thousand nlnr hundred and flfty-onc. IIv Command, A. A. HINDS. Clerk, Executive Cotnmiltei Note. Attention Is drawn to sub-section (6) of Section 4 of the Cotton Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-7) whereby special exemption from the provisions of sub-seetion (3) of Section 4 may be granted by the Director of Agriculture with the consent of the Board of Agriculture. 10 2 M -2II POST OFFICE NOTICE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES An issue consisting of two stamp*, namely 3 cents and U cents, to commemorate lh inauguration of the Uiuversity College of the West Indies and Die installation ol Hei Royal Highness Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone, will be made In Barbados on Friday, 16th February instant. The Issue will be fur three months or until stocks are exhausted, if sooner. Current issue stamps of similur values will be temporality withdrawn. The designs of the stamps arc: — 3 cents, the Arms of the University. 12 cents, a full length sented portrait of Her Royal Highness In her robes as Chancellor. Both denominations are vertical format. (a) Advance orders from local residents for those stamps will b A reciipt will be sent and must be preserved. (d) Stamps will be put up in sealed packets and delivered on 10th February from 8.00 a.m. on application at Poste Restantif on presentation of the receipt referred to above signed by the recipient of the stamps. This will be detained by the delivery ?lerk in whose presence the stamps should be checked. (e) Stamps must be affixed by the sender preferably at the top right hand corner of the envelope, the Department cannot undertake to do this, and posted not later than 4.00 p.m. Persona desiring to register 25 or more envelopes will be supplied idvance wilh numbered registration receipts In duplicate and numbered labels. The labels will be affixed by the sender to the letter Intended for registration and the address, abbreviated, filled in on the receipt. Letters duly labelled and beating the correct postage and registration fee, with receipts In duplicate, will be presented at the Registration Branch for acceptance. After venllciitloii the original receipt, date stamped and signed will be handed to the applicant and the* duplicate retained as an office record. General Post Office, 8th February, 1951. .2.5l-2n %  -a POSTMASTER — PARISH OF ST. PHILIP Applications are invited for the vacant office of Postmaster' Postmistress, St. Philip. Appointment will be made subject to the selected candidate being passed as medically fit for employment in the Public Service, and will be on one year's probation. The minimum educational standard which will be accepted is a puss in the Cumbridge Local School Certificate or a similar examination of equivalent standard. Applicants should preferably be between the age of 21 and 30 years. The salary attached to the Post Is at the rate of |1.0S0 by $72 to $1,776 (E.B.) by $86 Jo S2.1fl0 per annum. Further particulars may be obtained from the Colonial Postmaster. Applications should be made on Forms obtainable from the Colonial Secretary's Office and must be returned not later than the 14th of February. 1051. == i 9nc. HEKVII-I nim B*rhada. •a A Steamer *all* Km NRW ORLEANS SERVICE Ih Joniary Sale— Cont'd MISCELLANEOUS Otmm STEP lADDias -lr**d and ul Ih* tnlng (or Store*. School* i-.d Honwh.i.d u***. 4 tread IS SS tread 111 SS each. Cannot be rIAHI.N' CANAPiAN BEItVILI) %  tar* llanltad •**< aapeaiaaeSaM**. ROBERT TIIOM LTD—New York and Oulf Berries. Aply; DACOBTA CO., LTD.-Oansdiaa Bsrvtce. PASSAGES TO EUROPE i> Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Domlnla,. for sailing to Europe. Tho usual ports of call arc Dublin. London, or Rotterdam. Single faro £70; usual reductions for children. NEE IIS FOR LAWN MOWERS & PARTS THE riSXTRJlM* E.UPOMt'M CENTRAL FOt'MiRY LTD—Pi < or of Broad and Tudor Mrr62.51.—2n NOTICE TO FIHMERMEN AND BOAT-OWNERH Fishermen and boat-owners who contemplate the building of new n-hing boats, for which assistance by loan from the Government may be required, are advised to discuss their problem with the Fishery Officer before expending any money towards such construction. SERVICE OF BULLS AT THE PINE PLANTATION The public is hereby notified that two Friesian bulls, progeny of the imported Friesian bull "Burgate Illllarious" are now available for service at the Pine Plantation. The service fee is 3/and cows and heifers may be brought for service from 7.30 to 8.30 a.m. or 4.00 to 4*30 p.m. Sorvice of Bonn The Department of Science and Agriculture ha Instituted a scheme whereby boars reared at the Central Livestock Station have been f-irmed out at approved centres. The fee for service is 2/and these centres are located as follows — (1) J. C. Marsh. Esquire. Bannatyne Plantation. Ch. Ch. (2) D. A. V. Weekes, Esquire. Jordans Plantation, St OOOCg* (3) J. A. Bet I.. M>we)l Plantation, St. Thomas. (4) R. Coward. Esquire, Sugar Hill. St. Joseph. (5) M. A. Alleyne. Esquire. V/akefleld Plantation, St. John. (6) B. E. King. Esqulic. Fisherpond Plantation, St. Thornn*. (7) L N. Hutchirv10 2 51 —In We're Not Magicians, but..." ^T ... with the ran reirrjrces of Foed of Dagenhsm— behind in, w< can produce most Genuine l\rj_ — iparc cither on the spot or at very ihoet notice. # Wbat'i more, thc*c prc* arc available to you %  % %  si low fixed p-flM and are fully guaranteed. The finest Service I'acilitict in tlut diiri.-i are at your dl.potal. • MAS. Me ENFARNEY & CO. LID. v.:::::-.::;::-,:-.:;::::::v.vs.'s.:::: % % % % % % %  % % % % %  % % % % %  '<


roneesic BE

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Parbad0os

SATURDAY FEBRUA z 10







ESTABLISHED 1895 1951









Adbvorat

ITALIAN REDS REVOiLT AGAINST RUSSIA

U.N. Close la On eee | Biggest Communist Group









— es

SO NEAR SUT ...

The “Ghost City” ‘In Free World Breaking Up

TOKYO, Feb. 9,

United Nations Forces ‘to-day closed in on the “ghost
city” Seoul which has changed hands three times already

and reached the Han River
ern suburbs.

Tanks drove to within

which runs through its south-

1,600 yards of the industrial

| Suburb Yongdongpo one mile from the heart of Seoul and
hurled shells into the city for the second day running.



Woman Bei
“Thawed Out”

CHICAGO Feb, 9.

A 23-year-old negress with a
body temperature of 64 degrees is
being “thawed out” at the Michael
Reese hospital here according to
astonished physicians,

Members of the staff said the
woman was found . unconscious
early yesterday while the tempera-
ture was about 11 degrees below.
zero. When admitted, she was
“frozen hard’.

“She was in a deep freeze and
Suffered from frostbite,” said Dr.
Harold Laufman, surgeon at the
hospital.

The lowest body temperature
—— so far for survival is
76.2.

A doctor said that the woman
was breathing three to five times
a minute, compared to the normal
18 to 20. Her pulse was 12, com-
pared to the normal 70 to 80 beats
a minute, and no blood pressure
could be recorded.

She had to be handled gently
because the slightest pressure
would have broken off a leg or an
arm.

Treatment so far has included
large injections of plasma and
cortisone. An opening was also
made in her neck and a tube in-
serted to facilitate breathing.

—Reuter.

9 Killed In Crash

SUDBURY, Ontario, Feb. 9.

A bus full of passengers was
hurled 10 yards after a collision
witha Canadian Pacific train at
a level crossing near here today.
Nine bus passengers. were killed
and 22 injured.

The bus rolled over aften the
rls a but the driver escaped un-
vurt.



—Reuter.

R.C. Home Cut Off

‘ ROME, Feb. 9. ~

A big avalanche today cut off a
Roman Catholic home of 300 chil-
dren and a company of Italian Al-
pine troops 25 miles southeast of
the Brenner Pass. In Ferrara pro-
vince, flood waters at Reno River
have inundated more than 80
square miles creating Central
Italy’s biggest “lake.”

—Reuter,





5 Firemen Killed

ROTTERDAM, Feb. 9.
Five firemen were killed and
two saved when their fire engine
phanged through thick smoke into
otterdam harbour today near
burning ships and a pool of blaz-
ing oil. Two scrambled out un-
aided. The bodies of the drowned
were recovered when the oil pool

Was extinguished,
—Reuter,

Czechs Send Note

{ PRAGUE, Feb. 9.
The Czechoslovak Government



tonight claimed that two Ameri-
can jet planes flew over an air-
field near Prague in daylight yes-
terday. The note sent to the
American Embassy here to-day
asserts that planes “with Ameri-
can markings” crossed over the
Czechoslovak border
afternoon and
territory,
They were observed over Let-
nany airfield near Prague and re-
turned over the airfield 5 minutes
later. the note said.—Reuter,

yesterday

flew into Czech



ALL CLEAR IN BG.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 9.
Dr. Subryan, Deputy Director
of Medical Services, to-day noti-
fied the Trinidad and Barbados
Governments that no further cases
of alastrin had been reported in
B.G. Following reports of a few
cases 80 miles up the Berbice
River, the Island governments had
demanded small pox vaccination
for all passengers arriving from

British Guiana.

MALAN WARNS U.K.
CAPETOWN, Feb. 9.
Dr. Daniel Malan, South Afri-
ean Prime Minister, warned Brit-

ein tonight that the transfer of
British Protectorates to the Union

The Han was reached by Eighth
Army units near Karangni, a
south-east suburb. They were
maintaining their positions.

In some sectors south of Seoul
which was taken by North Koreans
on January 4, Communists seemed
to have abandoned their defence
network,

American tanks had advanced
five miles from Anyang to the
southeast of Seoul, brushing aside
light resistance and “delayed only
by minefields.

Another tank force reached a
point six miles from Inchon, the
port for Seoul where General Mac
Arthur made his big landing last
September.

The port was heavily bom-
barded by Allied warships which
have been standing off the shore
for over a week and shelling Com-
munist concentrations.

United Nations men went for-
ward right acfoss the 153 miles
waist of Korea. Communist oppos
tion was stiff in the central moun-
tain range spine of Corrior from
Winju to Hongchon which is only
18 miles to the south of the 38th
Parallel.




—Reuter.

COLLINS DENIES
PRESS CHARGES

CHICAGO, Feb. 9.

General Lawton Collins, United
States Army Chief of Staff today
denied American press charges
that the American Army was over
mechanised and at a disadvantage
against the “ruthless life sacrific-
ing methods” of Russian trained
Communist Armies.

Addressing the club here, Col-
lins who recently returned from
an inspection trip to Korea, said
“these statements were not justi-
fied on the bases in Korea or in the’
World War.

“Our new medium tanks have
proved to be extremely effective
against enemy armour, The most
outstanding, of course, has been
the performance of the 3.5 Baz-
zoka which has more than lived up



to our expectations,” Collins
udded,—Reuter,



More War Feeling
In U.S. Than Europe

NEW YORK, Feb, 9.

Former Republican President,
Herbert Hoover, said to-day
“There is no such war hysteria
in Europe, as there is in the
United States.”

“£uropean Governments have
made no declarations of emergen-
ey, and their citizens have organ-
ised no propaganda committees
of alarm,

“The American people and Con-
gress should not be hurried into
decisions which will affect Amer- |
ican life for the next 100 years
without ample considerations and
discussions.” {

Hoover will broadcast to-night
a half-hour speech entitled: “We
should revise our foreign policies.”

—Reuter.

Defence Tests In US

NEW YORK, Feb. 9.
A four-day test of the air de-
fences of the Northeastern United
States was under way here today





with regular units of the Air
Force, Army and Navy, taking
part.

To-morrow and on Sunday

15,000 civilian volunteers in 2,700
ground observation posts will join.
manoeuvres to spot and track air-
craft simulating enemy flights, the
Air Forces said. Reuter





EXECUTED NAKED

MUNICH, Feb., 9.

General Hans Lunding, Danish
Army General told a court here to-
Gay that he saw Admiral Wilhelm
Canaris, former Germun Military
Intelligence Chief,
to his execution in a Nazi con-
centration camp in 1945,

Lunding was giving evidence in

the trial of the former S. S.
Colonel Walter Huppenkoehen,
for complicity im the Canaris
murder.

—Reuter.



COAL OUTPUT CUT

PRAGUE, Feb. 8.
Production in Czechoslovakia’s
hard (black) coal mines in Janu-

ary was 3.7 per cent below plan-| ister Clement Attlee told the 70-
ned targets and in soft (brown)| year-old Minister, that he wishes
coal mines 2.3 per cent below, the} him to continue in office when he

Weekly

Economic

of South Africa could not be de- | ported —Reuter,

laved indefinitely .—Reuter. |



30 FOR FESTIVAL

BERLIN. Feb. 9

Thirty nations have been invit
ed to the International Berli
film festival from June 6 to 17

They include France, the Argen-
tine, Belgium, Hol d

o, Sweden and Spain
abe —Reuier






, Italy, Mex-| polic:



GRAIN FOR INDIA
WASHINGTON, Feb. 9.








THESE 3\PIOTURES taken yesterday- illustrate-what the Princess
URe but does NOT.

_

Alice Playing Pield could look

U.K. PAPERS
COMMENT

On Meat Issue

LONDON, Feb. 9.

Nearly every British newspaper
to-day commented on the lack of
meat over which the Labour
Government won an eight vote
majority in the Conservative
censure motion in the House of
Commons last night.

The influential Times said Food
Minister Maurice Webb could not
have chosen more unhappy words
to end his speech.

It said that his words—‘We
believe that this great and proud
country, Great Britain, is prepared
to stand up to the Argentine’—
were bombastic, empty of mean-
ing, offensive to a friendly coun-
try, and served only to underline
the remoteness of Webb
public opinion.

“There was no meat (in any
meaning of the word) in the
Minister’s speech and there was
no hint that his department was
seeking to end the deadlock this
month or even next month,” the
Times said.

The Liberal Manchester Guar-
dian said Webb’s review was a
“depressing picture of well inten-
tioned policy gone wrong.”

The Labour Daily Herald said
Webb did a difficult job with
“great skill and courage”, and it
vdded that successful negotiation
with Argentina was the only way
\o achieve a desirable end

The Conservative Daily Tele-
eraph said the system of bulk
buying had broken down and
needed scrapping. “There is less
me@at available for purchase than
before the war The Argentine
Government has used this short
age to drive tough, if not unscru-
pulous bargains,” it said

The Conservative Yorksh’ve
Post quoted Webb as saying the
Argentine has asked three times
as much for their meat as before
the war and commented: “British
coal is being sold to the Argen-
tine at four times the prewar
price.

The Liberal News Chronicle
suggested that Britain
frozen and chille
the latter off ration, so taxed, that
it will keep down the price of the
former to the consumer.

“If the Food Minister will not
do this, he will find that his only
alternative is to go cap in hand to
Argentina, before the price goes
up.

The Financial Times said Webb
and his Ministry had made two
“profound” mistakes — they had
mistaken obstinacy for diplomacy,
and had badly miscaleulated the
movement of world prices.

{

Reuter,

London Dockers In
Protest Strike

LONDON, Feb, 9.

Hundreds of dockers stopped
work in the port of London to-
day to demonstrate outside the
Magistrate's Court where seven
unofficial strike leaders were
being charged.

When the dockers learned this



from}

mest ahd tei |

(By JOHN MANNERS)

ROME, Feb. 9,
EFECTIONS from the Italian Communist Party the
biggest outside the “tron Curtain”, which began about
a fortnight ago have spread slowly but tellingty. :
A clarion eali-te a large-scale nationalist reyoll agains:
Russian directives has yet to come.

But personalities in three important spheres of Com
munist influence—parliament, local government and wa:
time partisan associations—have given a lead which man
party members may follow when the standard of a n¢
political group 1s raised.

wr 1h apes The pattern of that standard is
being stitched now by two influen
tial members of parliament, who
led the “national commu: ,
breakaway movement A
Cucchi and Valdo Magnani.
Ex-Communist “third man” «
rebellion leftwing social democ
Rolando Maramotti who has been
in constant touch with the tw
deputies has said that a man)
festo will be issued soon. It may
have world-wide repercussions
Cucchi and Magnani represe










Crick Coming
For Trial Game

WEST INDIES Captain }
John Goddard who accepted
an invitation from the West
Indies Cricket Board of
Control to attend the recent
cricket tournament between

jing constituencies in Emila pr
the Windward and Leeward | vince in the industrial “red belt”
Islands in St. Lucia and have been virtually in hidin:

report upon any talent }since their defection rocked th

which he thought should be Italian Communist party to. it
developed, has recommend- foundations
ed C. O'B, Crick former | Police protection has beer

Combermere and
pace bowler and
six-foot-three ‘fast
from St. Vincent
Acting on this
mendation the West
Cricket, Board of Control
have invited these players
to come to Barbados and
take part in a Trial game
here immediately after the
second Barbados-Trinidad
Test which ends on Feb
ruary 27. The dates for
this game will be February

Jarbado
Mason a
bowler

given to them and to about
dozen others including
munist mayors who hay
for them without
vally call which the
expected to give

The manifesto will undoubted
ly appeal to many Italian Commu-
nists in whom the _ idem of
patriotism is deeply rooled.«
pecially former p&artisadge still
| “Cyce in strong associatton

two Com-
e declared
iwaiting the

manifesto



recom
Indies



Cycchi holder ot che coveted
gold medal for valour anteMag-
nani, a distinguished partisan
28 and March | leader who fought under Marshal

It is expected that some of Tito both have personal glamour
the Trinidad teum who can to attract recruit
remain will be asked to play But a pledge to defend Ttaly
in the match as well. Crick from attack by Russia would in
and Mason are being asked no way lessen the rebels oppost-
to come here by February 19 tion to the Atlantic pact or we t-
so that they can have some ern policy in general
net practice and accustom tor Br’ id oe oo ae

x las % : , é al .¢ isi
themselves to wurt wickets Adapted to ‘Italy's. special. ned
and free from Russian domina
tion.

Meanwhile uneasy suspicion ha
enveloped Italian Communis:
headquarters in the “street of
darkships” and thousands of it
branches throughout the country
cathing party eat-
tacks on “the unimportan



Smuggler Prince

SOUTH WEST GERMANY,
Feb. 9 :
Prince Hans Von Liechtenstein | are following

was today fined 6,000 marks for

smuggling watches into Germany | traitors’
from Switzerland In their inaccessible hidin
place Magnani and Cuechi and
The 40-year-old Prince was ac~| their lieutenants are working «



watches Ja potentially expensive manifest:

under]In the lull Italy’s 2,000,000 com-
cover of his diplomatic pass on}munist party member re 9
four occasions last year serving the maxim “hear all, sev
all, say nothing.”

cused of smuggling
through West Germany

Prince Hangs must also pay 530,
600 marks to cover the value of
13,270 watches,

— Reuter,



TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3115

DAY OR NIGHT

The court ruled that should the
Prince not pay the fine, he must
spend a day in prison for every
1,500 marks.



—Reuter.



driven. re



* TOP: The park-like beauty of the Fisheries Office next door to the Princess Alice Playing Field.
These trees were planted by Mr. Wiles at about the time the trees of the Princess Alice Playing

Pield were being cut down,

CENTRE: This bush next-to a canal which separates the Fisheries Office from the Princess Alice
Playing Field sets the note of untidiness and wilderness atmosphere of the Princess Alice Playing Pield
where grass and bush grow faster than sports fields. ;

BOTTOM: Imagine playing any kind of game in this grass, except hide and seek.



Princess Alice Play
Field Runs To Grass

THE closely. cropped playing, Yesterday the Advocate made aj;trusted with keeping the’ grounds
field at Kensington is adm ‘by |spot Check’ of playing fields and] in good condition are a caretaker
everyone and now that an extra! found them all in good condition|and three groundsmen. They are
effort has been made to. put it| with the exception of the Princess|equipped with a small roller,
into even better order for the| Alice Playing Field, At the Reef/a small hand mower and some
forthcoming Trinidad-Barbados |'there were two tennis lawns side| knives etc., for cutting the weeds
Tests it presents an appearance} by side and these were not in the|and tall grass.
that is a credit to Barbados. best kept condition, but they could

The playing field at Queen’s}be playéd upon.

Park for which the Spartan Crick- The playing field proper how-|favourably with that used for

et and Football Club and the| ever was covered in tall grass and|keeping most playing fields in

Police Cricket and Football Club | could hardly be even walked upon|order. A further check at some

are jointly responsible, is also’ with comfort, of the best known playing fields

noted for its well-kept appearance Investigations showed showed the following strengths for
ground staffs :—

This’ e@stablishment compares



that en-









Pickwick Cricket Club Six sgrounds-
(Kensington) men, two
rollers, 1

motor driven

Bevin Will Carry One Perish In°
On In Office | Trinidad Fire | 6 ..sc0:sscow ee

LONDON, Feb. 9. (Bay Land) ggoundsmen,

British Foreign ' Secretary PORT-OR-SPAIN, Feb, 9 hail aware
Ernest Bevin will continue in} The charred remains of a man | Spartan & Police Creket &
Office despite his present illness} believed to be Anthony Chinchin, ee ae es
it was learned from authoritative] joint proprietor of the San Fer-| - ‘?°°*"*** in ericket
sources to-day, nando Club, was c@tovered be- eee ee
> ; tween two beds on the top floo: ‘in. football
The source said that Prime Min- of a two-storey welling. house) season, 1
in Sap Fernando which was par- | Hey 1 te 4 1B
tially destroyed by fire early on) youn» Men's Progressive Club
Heospodar re-| visited Bevin at his home in Lon- ‘Whursday morning en actihdeens
don to-day. The Fire Brigade tound the| 1 roller, 1
. c + at large
ac . body after a small party brought inbwer
Bevin is making a good recov-|the @ames under control. The srnall hh



ery from pneumonia, but so far
there are no definite plans for his
convalesenee,

fire damage estimated $15,000.00
rendeting five homeless and caus-
ing serious injury to one of the



Harrison Gollece
Crumpton Street











1
President Truman to-day dis-} He was understood to have hadj tenants. hand
jcussed with Congressional Foreign} no intention of offering his resig- ; Th
|Policy leaders the proposal to send] nation unless he knew Attlee de-| The injured tenant who lived) “o2pr™ts eee eeinaia
{two million tons of food grains] sired it on the top storey jumped 30 feet roller,
\to famine-stricken India. Secre- ..,. | to safety when the fire broke ovi ERY
ta State Dean Acheson and Attlee was Bevin’s first visitor) injuring his right hip and ankle F Oricke Rootball C
ivisor Averell Harrim: \a from members of his family | apart from severe burns to bott 'B Ha)
ince his illness (hands, face and oR s
—Reuter —Reuter body 1 unretognisa



4

‘ _| ADVANCE: SAYS CHIEF
|
}

‘ eratec

morning that the men had been
arrested last night, they travelled
straight to Central London,

There they formed an are
around the police court singing the
national song “Land of Hope and
Glory”, and cheering the accused
men as they arrived in pouring
rain, They carried one of them
on their shoulders.

Police arrested one demonstra-
tor after a scuffle.

The seven defendants were
charged with conspiracy to incite
an illegal strike.—Reuter,



Back To Work

NEW YORK, Feb. 9.

Thousands of striking railway-
men flocked back to work in the
United States to-day in the face
of an yltimatum by the army to
“work or be fired”.

The army announced that the
10-day strike of shunters was vir-
tually ended in Chicago, key cen-
tre for trans-continental traffic,
and it was also reported ended
in Northern California, Reuter.

Be
Refuse $181,360



PITTSBURGH, Feb, 9.

A 90-year-old Benedictine nun
and her nephew, a Roman Catho-
lic priest to-day renounced clairn
to a $181,360 estate left by her
brother, also a Catholic Priest.

The nun, Sister Mary Martina
of the Benedictine order of Saint
Mary’s, Pennsylvania, said it would
violate the yow of poverty she
made many years ago.

She has been blind for several
years,

Sister Mary passed her
to the estate to her

rights

nephew, who

|also declined to accept them
—Reuter.



HONG KONG, Feb. 8
General Chu Teh, Chinese Peo-
| ple’s Army Commander in Chief,
+ to-day cabled North Korean forces
| urging them to continue ad-
vancing” Peking radio reported
| He asked North Koreans to co-
operate with Chinese volunteer af
t of Korea was lib-|

~—-Reuter ,




PAGE TWO



BARBADOS,



Carub Calling



ARRIVING from B.G. yesterday for a meeting of the Caribbean Press
Association were Mr. Frederit Seal Coon, Editor of the “Daily Argosy”
and Mr. Eustace Rawlins, General Manager of F. A. Persick Ltd.,
proprietors of the “Guiana Graphic’.

IR GEORGE SEEL, Head of
Development and Welfare,

will open a meeting of the Carib-
bean Press Association at Hastings
House on Monday. f

B.G. delegates arriving on
B.W.1LA,’s B.G, flight yesterday
afternoon were Mr. Frederic Seal
Coon, Editor of the Daily Argosy,
and Mr. Eustace Rawlins, General
Manager of F. A. Persick, Ltd.,
who are proprietors of the Guiana
Graphic. .
- Delegates from other West In-
dian islands are expected to arrive
here to-day and to-morrow,

=En Route To England
R. WILL HANSCHELL, who
has. been here for the past
fur moths on long leave, left
yesterday-by B.W.I.A. for Trini-
dad. He is on his way to England
where he will spend six months
ding im Chambers, before he
turns ‘to Accra, Gold Coast,
=e helis Acting Crown Coun-
Sel. we
: > Contrast
Py “OURISTS are the most curious
“ and observant people on earth,
and the .ones arriving yesterday
by the Mauretania were no excep-
tion. Ag they stepped off the
launches, at the Baggage Ware-
House, their first ‘stop Was the
Publicity: Bureau where they
bought postcards, asked questions,
and looked at the various pictures

‘local interest hanging in vari-
ous parts.of the Bureau,

They mext passed through the
Baggage - Warehouse. at was
there of ‘interest in there? Three
Travel Association Photographs
advertising Britain and a Health
Message from the Sanitation De-
partment of St. Michael.

Golf Bow!

‘HE Barbados golf team, which

played an intercolonial match
with St. Andrews in Trinidad last
week, presented a beautiful silver
bow! to the St. Andrews Club in
gratitude. for the wonderful recep-
tion they received during the visit.
This trophy is to be called the
Charles McIntyre Memorial Bowl
in honour of a St. Andrews play-
er who endeared himself to all the
golfers at Rockley during the visit
of the Trinidad team here in 1948
and who died a few weeks before
the latest St. Andrews—Rockley
tmatches .

Although the Rockley team
made no stipulations regarding the
Bowl, it is probable that it will
serve as.a permanent trophy to be
played for between the teams of
the two» Islands, with the next
meeting'\taking place here some-
time early in 1952.

Back To Trinidad

ISS“ AUDREY COLE of the

office staff of B.W.I.A, Ltd.
ine Potf-of-Spain, returned to
Trinidad on Tuesday evening by
B.W.1-A. after spending a shor!
hol'day;* She was staying at
“Accra’,: Rockley.

Wwiet on earth is happening
to. the Empire Exchange
Rates? With a buying rate of 1%
per cent. discount and a selling
rate of % per cent. premium, the
price of silver for forward deliv-
ery remains at six shillings and
fourpence halfpenny per ounce!
What this means in plain lan-
guage is that bullion, which is no-
toriouslyt sensitive to market
rumours-is too late for the demand
for Marth bills by the clearing
houses, ~ With mail transfers of

bank notes at a steady official rate, |

the discoiinting of day to day loans
ean only-end in an increase in the
pened to Portuguese escudos in
1947. There is no room for com-
Murder At Muckhurst (XI)
“W WANTED to surprise my hus- |
“I bought him this horse Dande-
lion without his knowledge, in-
this morning and give “him his!
birthday surprise.” “When did you !
asked Malpractice. “Last night. I
gave him a bit of sugar and an
horse should have left the stable
to come up here, lock himself int«
“T cannot explain,” said Lady
Gigglesworth, “except that circus
“Circus horses!” shouted Malprac-
tice. “Just what I said,” muttered
ered her eyes. “I bought Dande-
jion cheap from the circus at

deposit rates. This is what hap-
placency;

band”, said Lady Gigglesworth.
tending to take him to the stables
last see the horse in the stables?”
apple.” “Can you explain why this
the study and drink rat poison?”
horses are sometimes eccentric.”
Bucket. Lady Gigglesworth low-
Swiffenham,” she said. “What was

With Sprostons

RRIVING on B.W.1.A’s B.G.

flight yesterday afternoon
were Mr. and Mrs. W. Buchan
and their daughter Susan. Here
for two weeks’ holiday, they ara
staying at a bungalow in Max-
wells; “Leiton’”’.
with Sprostons Ltd., in George-
town,

*

Field. Engineers

Me: HAROLD ROSE, Field
Engineer, International Aer-
adio Ltd., after five months in
Antigua returned yesterday after.
noon by B.W.1.A. He was accom-
panied by Mr. Huggons another
Fielq Engineer of I.A.L.

They expect to leave \this morn-
ing for Grenada,



After Six Weeks

ISS LONA GOMES of E. F.

Correia, Georgetown, her
sister Miss Monica Gomes and
Miss Celeste Faria who has a hair
cressing parlour in Georgetown,
returned to British Guiana yester-
day by B.W.I1.A. after spending
about six weeks’ holiday in the
island as guests at “Acora,” Rock-
ley.

School Teacher Returns

FTER three months in the
4 U.S. Mr. and Mrs. Darnley
Gibbons returned home yesterday
by B.W.1.A. Mr. Gibbons is a
teacher at the Wesley Hall Boys’
School,

After Ten Years

MONG the passengers making
the 18-day cruise on the
Mauretania which. arrived in Bar-
bados yesterday morning were
Mr. Robert L. Clarkson, Chairman
of the. Board of Directors of the
Ameri¢an Express Company and
Mrs. Clarkson.
They told Carib that they had
not been to Barbados for about ten
years and were very happy to be

back. They had an excellent trip!

and the weather so far has been
very good.

First Visit

AYING their first visit to the

island are Mr. Roger Sherman,
a retired manufacturer of Provi-
dence, Rhode Island and Mrs.
Sherman. They arrived on Thurs-
day morning by the Fort
Amherst and will be spending
about eight weeks’ holiday stay-
ing at the Colony Club, St
James.

Back From U.S. Visit

Iss GLORIA EV.LYN,
daughter of Mr, and Mrs
C. D, Evelyn of “Dulce Domum,”
Fontabelle returned from the U.S.
yesterday afternoon by B.W.I.A.
via Puerto Rico.
Miss Evelyn has been away for
eight months, staying in Brooklyn
with Mrs. Phyllis Brown, Mr. Eve-

Mr, Buchan is lyn’s sister.

Canadian Chemist

R, and Mrs. Ambrose McNeil

and their daughter Carol-
Ann arrived from B.G. yesterday
afternoon by the B.W.I.A. to
spend two weeks’ holiday staying
at the St. Lawrence Hotel. Mr,
MeNeil is a Canadian and has been
living in B.G. for two years,
where he is a Chemist with the
Demerara Bauxite Co. in Me
Kenzie.

JUST TWO of the many smart girls who arrived yesterday by the

“Mauretania” to spend the day in

Barbados,

They are pictured shortly after they landed at the Baggage Ware-

house.

They are Virginia Moulton and Alyce Cronin of Massachusetts.

BY THE WAY....

his act?” asked Malpractice, great-
ly excited. “I’m not sure,” replied
Lady Gigglesworth, “but I believe
it was something to do with open—
ing a locked cash box with his
mouth, He used tg twist the key

A ery of triumph interrupted
this temfool narration,

Hey, For The Open Road!

HE suggestion that disguised
police cars, driven by dis-



BEB RBBB BPeeeeeeee eee
a CURTAIN NETS: White 4 Patterns, halfnets J9¢

half nets _ ag
Cream with toning cols. 36” 517

BATH TOWELS:

44” x 22” $1.27 54” x 30" $1.60

CAETUNNES:

Dial 4606



27” in attractive designs



By BEACHCOMBER

guised policemen, may be used to
trap dangerous motorists raises a
question. If a “courtesy” spy re-
ports a disguised policeman to an
undisguised policeman, and the
ear the disguised policeman was
chasing turns out to be another
disguised police car, what happens
if the “courtesy” spy is found to
be-an ordinary non-official motor-
ist trying to escape from another
non-official motorist disguised as a
policeman? There is no room for
complacency.



TIGER

DOMESTIC: 38 & S5¢

4¢

EVANS & WHITFIELDS

-Your Shoe Stores

“are separated, it’s an easy means

white 36”



'

|

.



6 Heignt

. (3
May be peat. (4)
. Nothiug. (3) 11.
Thoughtiess. (6
Compiete. (6) 16
Rated as o lyread pattern
Our opera provides it. (4)
it’s Tom 1! ieave out (4)
Indian milies 5)
t pt (6) 25. To Stan
(3)
Dow

Abounding (3
’

it 44
(or

a
twister.
n
Flag. ‘

(8) 2. Pompous. (9,
Vothing uniform a

DOUL this 19)
alsed turret. 19) 5. Choose. (3)
She's in the money. (4)
in church, (3)

Pelt a piece of crockery. (5)

Take a net and make a bet. (4)
It's often dripping. (4)

One way with motorists. (4)
The mule brings the bird. (3)
The big one has clowns. (3)

Solution of yesterday's

uzele. — Across;
%@. Revival: 9. Revue. 1) 1

2 Titer

3,
Interi

ock!
Roc: eo

19. T

bn incrianieeenatitnereasage
DRASTIC TREATMENT
DURBAN, South Africa,

To stop his wife from smoking,
an African named Patrick tried
to cut off the two iingers with
which she holds a cigarette. ‘The
magistrate fined him $25.

—(C.P.)

LONG SERVICE
AUCKLAND, N.Z.

Six women employed by the
Colonial Ammunition Company
here have a combined total of
245 years’ service. The eldest,
Miss Margaret Barclay, M.B.E.,
has been with the Company 50
years.

__ Lackiaw:
@ ‘Trent: 17

—(C.P.)

Cruise Lecturer

TILL with Cunard White Star
as their Cruise Lecturer is
Watterson Lowe. This is his 430th
trip in twenty years and he has
visited Barbados forty times.

“Watty” as he is familiarly
known to everyone on board is
perhaps the most popular man on
the Mauretania. Everyone goes to
him with their troubles, and ques-
tions about the island they are
next going to visit.

“Watty” started the “flower for
the day” which is so popular or
these cruises, For each port he
has a different coloured flower.
When passengers get on shore and





of récognising them as members
of the cruise,

When I first saw “Watty” yes-
terday he was standing at the bot-
tom of a stairway on the Maure-
tania handing out yellow flowers
and “thoughts for the day.” The
thought he handed me was “Grow
up as soon as you can, it pays. The
only time you really live fully is
from thirty to sixty.”

Fourth Visit
M®*: and Mrs. Hugh A, Gage,
and their son Hugh, Jnr.
arrived from New York via Puerte
Rico yesterday by B.W.I.A. This
is their fourth visit to Barbados
Mr. Gage is the owner of the
“Cove” Restaurant on 42nq Street
which overlooks the United
Nations building, Their home is
Bronxville.
There are here until the end of
February, staying at the Paradise
Beach Club.

“Mauretania” Passengers

Yes = the passengers on the
\ Mauretania yesterday were
Mr, and Mrs, Charles H. Scribner
President of H. Scribner
Publishing Company, Mr. Norman
F.S. Russell, Director of Pennsyl-
vania Company, Colgate — Palm-
olive Peet Company, Mrs. Dorsey

Richardson, wife of the Director].

of Columbia Broadcasting Com-
pany, Mr. Irving Kathmern, Vice
President of the Eversharp Pen
Company, Mr. Leander
McCormick - Goodhart, Former
Official in the British Embassy in
Washington and _ his daughter
Leandra, and Miss Mary A. Boyle.
Personal Secretary to Mr. Bernard
M. Baruch.

‘Mauretania’ Photographer

EEN at the Baggage Warehouse
yesterday morning taking a
number of pictures was Mr. R. L.
Dawson, photographer of the
Cunard Steamship Company.

He told Carib that he was em-
ployed with the company for the
past two years and was then pay-
ing his second visit to Barbados.

Originally from England, Mr.
Dawson first started as a news-~
paper photographer and was on
the staff of the Creyden Weekly
in the South of London during the
early part ot une War. He later
joined the Army and was with the
12th Honorary Artillery Company,
the oldest Regiment in the Britis.
Army. After seeing service in
North Africa, Italy and Austria,
he was demobbed in 1947 and
went back to the Crveydon for
about six months after which he
joined the Cunard Line.

Mr. Dawson first worked on the
Queen Mary, then the Queen Eliz-
abeth before he was shifted to the
Mauretania.

wide Au¢

CALICO: 7e¢

Dial 4220

‘
|

4

ADVOCATE



a
Fi ry ~~
COCKTAILS
TORQUAY, England,

Cocktail mixicologists all over
Europe are dreaming up potent
elixirs in readiness for the Euro-
pean Cocktail Competition at
Torquay February 21-23.

Two-hundred and sixty experts
from most European countries
Outside the Iron Curtain have
entered for the event and 360
judges already are readying their
palgtes.
rst prize for the best cocktail
ig a large silver cup and $140,
ond and third prizes are $60
$26 respectively. All prizes
ry a diploma.
team of ppecialists will be
available to conjure up the recipes
of entrants who cannot attend
the competition,

British experts took time off
from their bottles to declare that
the favourite cocktails for men are
still the Dry Martini and Man-
hattan.

For women, the experts de-
clared the White Lady (half gin,
quarter lemon and quarter Coin-
treau) is still the tops.—LN.S.

ULTIMATUM

. CAIRO.

Four naked men entered the
lice-station in a poor quarter of
airo and told the police officer
that they would not leave until
the police found their clothes,
which had apparently been stolen
while they were in a public bath.
The clothes were recovered within
a few hours and the men then left.



B.B.C. Radio

Programme

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951
6,.30-—12.00 (noon) 19.76 m.

6.30 a.m. Forces Favourites, 7 a.m. The
News, 7.10 am, News Analysis, 7.15 a.m.
From the Editorials, 7.25 2.m. Programme
Parade, 7.30 a.m. From the Third Pro-
gramme, 7.50 a.m. Interlude, 8 a.m, BBC
Scottish Orchestra, 845 a.m. Colonial
Questions, 9 am. The News, 9.10 a.m.
Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close
Down, 1.15 a.m. Programme Parade,
14.30 a.m. Interlude, 1145 a.m. Ireland
vs. England, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10
p.m. News Analysis, 12,15. p.m. Close
Down.

415-600 p.m, %5.53 m.

4.15 p.m. Strike up the Music, 5 p.m.
Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m. Stanfor
Rebinson Presents, 6 p.m. Musie for
Dancing.
6.00—7.15 pom. 31.32 & 48.45 m,

* 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m.
The News 7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15
p.m. Behind the News, 7.45 p.m. Sandy
MacPherson at the Theatre Organ.
71.45—11.00 p.m. 31.32 m. & 48.43 m,

"8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, #15 p.m. Com-
poser of the Week, 4.30 p.m. Radio
Theatre, 10 p.m. The i
From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Anything
to Declare, 10.45 p.m. Yours faithfully,
Hi p.m. Your Song Parade,



DIAMONDS GALORE

GEORGETOWN.
More than £50,000 worth of
precious diamonds have been

mined from the River Mau, Brit-
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a gracious! My drawing wasn’t
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‘but it’s done you good ; you're
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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951







] a
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|| AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)
| MATINEE: TO-DAY xt 5 p.m
| TO-NIGHT TO SUNDAY NIGHT at 8,30
Samuel Goldwyn’s Technicolor Musical Comedy!
“THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER |. MITTY
Starring: DANNY KAYE--VIRGINIA MAYO
BORIS KARLOFF—FAY BAINTER—ANN RUTHERFORD
and the GOLDWYN GIRLS

with

MONDAY and TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30
MATINEE: TUESDAY at 5 p.m.

5
“CHILD OF DIVORCE”

Starring: SHARYN MOFFETT—REGIS TOOMEY—MADGE MEREDITH

An R.K.O. Radio Picture
=

PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

TO-DAY 445 and 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily
WARNER'S TECHNICOLQR ROMANCE WITH THRILLS!

“STORY OF SEABISCUIT”

with Shirley TEMPLE--Barry FITZGERALD—Lon McCALLISTER



—



MATINEE: TO-DAY 9.30 a.m. and 1.30 p.m. (

RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL & CODE OF THE SADDLE
with TOM KEENE JOHNNY MACK BROWN



MONOGRAM DOUBLE)

PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

TO-DAY and TO-MORROW 5 and 8.30 p.m. (PARAMOUNT’S MUSICAI

sing CROSBY ww RADING HIGH”

with Coleen GRAY~—Charles BICKFORD—Frances GIFFORD











MIDNITE TONITE 10th. (MONOGRAM DOUBLE!)

LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT
Johnny Mack BROWN

& RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL

Jimmy WAKELY




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TO-DAY TO SUNDAY 8.30 pm. Mat. SUNDAY 5 p.m.

Warner's Thrilling Adventure!
“TASK FORCE”

GARY COOPER IN

with Jane WYATT—Walter BRENNAN—Others

MIDNITE TONITE 10th. (MONOGRAM DOUBLE!)
VEATH VALLEY RANGERS & “DYNAMITE CANYON”
with Ken MAYNARD—Hoot GIBSON—Bob STEELE~Tom KEENB

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GLOBE

TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 TO MONDAY

“The Gal who took the West”

Yvonne De CARLO — Scott BRADY — Jonn RUSSEL

Extras: :
Tex BENEKE and GLEN MILLER Orchestra
British & American News Reels

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and Continuing DAILY

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951

Helicopter Saves

By FRANK CONNIFF
LN.S. War Correspondent
WITH THE UNITED STATES MARINES IN KOREA.
A GROTESQUE gadget that flies through the air with
blithe defiance of the laws of gravity has proved the sur-
prise success of a war not always compliméntary to
America’s vaunted skill in machinery.

Catching Cold youseno has finally won accept-

Is A Tough Job
ON SCOTTISH ISLE

LONDON.

A call has gone out for 300 vol-
unteers, aged between 18 and 40,
willing to accept a free holiday
with fare, board and lodgings, as
well as pocket money thrown in.

All they have to do is spend 10
ays in isolation and risk the
chance of catching a cold.

The appeal for human “guinea
pigs” comes from the research unit
cf Harvard Hospital, Salisbury,
Wiltshire, whose scientists for the
last five years have been seeking

a cure for the common cold-

So far the research workers
have succeeded in producing arti-
ficially-induced colds and devised
a firm technique for studying their
baffling symptoms. But the specific
cause or a cure for this universal
trouble-maker has eluded them,

Latest disclosure of failure
came as one of the worst epidemics
of colds and influenza spread
#cross the land and millions went
around sniffling sneezing and
coughing and praying for quick
relief from the miseries.

The setback to the government
investigators centred on an ex-
periment with a group of 12
students on the uninhabited island
of Eilean Nan Ron, (Isle of Seals)
off the northern coast of Scotland.

The students were taken to the
island with camp equipment,
stores and other necessities for a
three-months’ stay, Divided into
three separate groups for experi--
mental purposes, they settled
cown in the solidly-built stone
house evacuated about 12 years
ago by families unable to eke a
livelihood from the barren moor-
lands-

No persenal contact with the
outside world was permitted. Even
letters were banned. Only com-
munication was by radio. Members
of the three groups were forbidden
to trespass-on each’ other’s terri-
tory.

Took Every Risk

The volunteers were exposed to
every risk normally known to
bring on a cold. They took steam-
ing hot baths and then stood in
wet socks in a draught, Later
they mingled with subjects inocu-
lated with artificially-propagated
virus—all to no avail.

The scientists discovered it
isn’t so easy to ecateh a cold when
you try- It was not until a main-
land farmer, with a rip-snorting
natural cold, was brought to the
island that three of the volunteers
were laid low.

The scientists, however, aré far
from discouraged. In launching
the drive for a new panel of
volunteers, a spokesman said:
“Although Wwe haven’t been lucky
enough to discover an effective
way of warding off the common
cold, we have learned a tremend-
ous amount. We certainly Teel it
is worthwhile persevering.” —C.P,

FINED 20/- FOR
WOUNDING

CECIL INNISS of Garden Land,
St. Michael was found guilty
yesterday by His Worship Mr.
E. A. McLeod of wounding Don
Sandiford on his right eye on
January 19.

For the offenee Inniss ‘was
ordered to pay a fine of 20/- in
one month or in default undergo
14 days’ imprisonment with hard
labour.

Sh

allt



The- humble helicopter,
stepchild of the

once
aviation

ance alongside its big brothers by
a glittering in the
Korean War. Korean natives who
barely look up at planes, Patton
tanks, and other testimonials to
Unele. Sam’s talent for machine
precision still gaze in awe at this
gawky monstrosity as it whirs on
its appointed rounds through the
war zones,

When its flapping rotor idles
the craft to a_ straight down
landing on postage stamp space,
Koreans come running for blocks
around to witness the apparent
miracle, I watched a ’copter. sink
to rest on a tiny area the other
day and remarked to an air officer
that the Koreans just couldn’t un-
derstand how the darn thing oper-
ated without visible means of
support such as wings and engines,

“Yes,” said the officer, a man
who has flown jets in combat,
“they're baffled by it, but I’ve
fot news for yon, Sc am I.”

"Copter chauffeurs will fight
anyone, however, who hints that
their craft is a mere freak. The
solid utility of the ‘copter has
been demonstrated in a number of
ways. It has saved lives, It has
rescued pilots stranded behind
enemy lines, It has enabled com-
manders to keep a close check on
developments in the field, It has
been a courier for the delivery of
urgent messages

Cached in “litter blisters” at-
tached to thé helicopters’ flanks,
wounded men have-been rushed
to rear area fields, transferred
to bigger planes, and sometimes
have been under surgery in Japan
ae a few hours after being

it,

Army medics wax. enthusiastic
when they diScuss the contribu-
tions of the ’copter. }
Practically every high commander
in the Eighth Army, from Lt. Gen.
Matthew Ridgway on down, de-
pends on the helicopter to main-
tain tight liaison with develop-
ments at the front, It is no trick
anymore for a general to get a
personal peek at the war. He
climbs into his ‘copter and in a
matter of minutes is huddling over
tactics with the combat. echelons.

Your first ride in a helicopter
is liable to provide one of the
strangest somes. in your life.

I hitehed a ride from Marine Di-
visional Headquarters back to
Taegu,

You take off straight into the
air and seem to come to a dead
stop. For a moment you toy with
the notion that this can’t be true.
There you are hanging suspénded
in mid-air, unable to the en-
gines or glimpse the wings which
usually support.a plane. Only the
throbbing of the rotor behind
gives a clue to the ’copter’s pro-
pulsive power.—I.N.S,

Stage Set For
Arms Battle

WASHINGTON, Feb. 8.

East-West negotiations over a
big four Foreign Ministers meet-
ing have reached a point where
responsible diplomats believe the
stage is being set for a first class
fight over e rearmameént race
between the West and Russia.

This is likely to lead to a new
Soviet demand for outlawing
atomic weapons in Which the
United mae is assumed to have
a commanding Tead over Russia,
and to Western demands for a re-
duction in the size of Communist
armed forcés.

Barring some_ unexpected
change in world policies, no con-
crete agreements to slow down or
limit re-armament are expected to
come from the developing inter.



.. national debate.





Lives BLAMES FLU Trinidad: Land

ON LABOUR

LONDON. Feb.

The Sunday Chronicle news—
paper charged that the British
Labour Government has de
liberatély deprived doctors fight-
ing the present influenza epidemic
of the new golden-powder drug
auereomycin for the sake of saving
dollars.

The Sunday Chronicle claimed
doctors estimated five hundred
i tas oe Sena wave who

ave rom oes,
could have been saved if the new
drug had been freely available in
Britain. :

The doctors pointed out that
auereomycin is on sale generally
to anyone in any drug store in
France, Italy and Germany, said
the newspaper.

Many British doctors in an effort
to overcome the Labour Govern-
ment’s parsimonious attitude have
admitted they have bought su
plies of the drug in the black mar-
ket, according to the Chronicle.

Some have had small supplies
sent in gift parcels from the
United States, the newspaper said.
Many others aré réported to have
obtained supplies from drug storés
on the continent,

Dr. H. H. Goodman, Public
Relations Officer to the Newcastle
branch of the British Medical
Association said:

“There is no doubt that many
lives could have been saved if the
anus had béen more readily avail-
able.”

It is estirnated that the cost of
saving the lives of five hundred
British victims would have been’
$22.40 , head. Auéreomycin costs
about 70 cents a capsule. A four~
day treatment with 32 capsules
(two every six hours) is neces—

sary.

The National Blood Transfusion
Service centre at Sutton, Surrey,
where small quantities of the drug
are stored, has received hundreds
of requests from doctors for any
available supplies for life-or-death
cases, ; ;

Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin,
who has been ill with pneumonia,
made a marked improvement after
auereomycin had beén adminis-
tered. —1.N.8.

FOR SALE:
NAPOLEON’S
DEATH MASK

LONDON,
A wax mask of Napoleon, madé
a few hours after his death on St.
Helena island, will be auctioned

soon,
The death mask, together with



other valuable - historical
ems, will be put under the

at Sir Archibald Weigall’s .
¢

y estate near Ascot in March.
The mask was made by a Dr.

Automarchi, Napoleon’s Italian
physician, who sent it to. Sir
Archibald’s _ grandfather,” Lord

Burghersh, in Florénce.

The famed Duke of Wellington
was Sir Archibald’s great~great-
uncle. ;

The déath mask will rémain in
the vaults of a bank until the
auction.

“Tt would be far too risky to
keep it in the house,” explained

Sir Archibald. “If a maid knocked

it over it would crumble to dust.”
—LN.S.



DUTCH MINISTER TO
SPAIN. APPOINTED

THE HAGUE, Feb, 9.

Willem Constantin Count Van
Recheern Limpurg, former Dutch
Minister in Cairo was officially
appointed Netherlands minister ts
Spain to-day.

The appointment of the ss
who is 53 years old, follows the
lifting of the diplomatic ban in
Spain by the United Nations Gen-~

sembly. a baits
ora AS aah



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BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Of Shortages
(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 5.

Trinidad, once the land of plen-
ty, is now a land of shortages.
When we have the potato, we in-
variably have not beef to go with
i soon. For the past week,
there have beén no potatoes. Less
than a fortnight ago a congign-
ment arrived in Port-of-Spain,
but nobody seems to have eaten—
or éven seen them,

Several city housewives com-
plainéd that they were unable to
obtain any meat in the groceries
y + We aré promised more
airlift beef,

We are promised that the milk
shortage will soon be eased. We
sh patient people—but we can-
not live on promises. 5



>- Self-Styled “Priest”

Steals His Outfit

(From Own_Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 5,

A self-styled “Baptist preacher”,
who it is alleged, stole a priest's
outfit—eape, stole gown—
from the Presb; of the Cathe-
dral of the Immaculate Conception
on day hight, was this morn-
ing remanded for medical obser-
vation. The “Baptist preacher”
is Wilfred Harewood, a middle-
aged man, of Mission Road, San
Juan. He was held by constable
Calvin Trotman at 4.30 o’clock
yesterday morning, five hours or
so after he was said to have enter-
od, the Presbytery where he took
off his shirt and watchekong, put
on the cape, stole and gown.



Royal Summons

LONDON, Feb.
Five London saloon and restau-
rant Sropets ave been summoned
to Buckingham Palace on Febru-
ary 7—not for an investiture or
gardén party—but to renew their
licenses.

The five are the only licenses in
Britain whose prectishs are con- O

trolled by King George.

The summons to atténd the
palace is sent out by the “Board
of The Green Cloth,” which super-

vises_ kitchen and_ domestic
arrangements at Buckingham
Palace. =5.N.8,



ie? ”

Caiitival “Lawyer
Was Confotttided
(from Our Own C indent)
Ne OF-SPAIN, oe des
ever was a Carnival revéller
So flusteFéd than G. Fortune of
Siparia Hill, Lavehtille, Who
decided to dress himself up as a
prominent mémber of the Bar.

All unsuspecting, he came up
beforé the judges at the Savannah
competition announced to the
crowds over the radio that having
only received his papers yester-
Gay, he would be unable to go
on with the case. As the crowds
cheered he backed and turned to
the judges table.

Imagine his surprise when ho
came face to face with Mr.
H. 0. B. Wi , K.C., and the
Solicitor General Mr. C. T. W. E.
Worrell. Thus confronted, he
tried to make his escape but this
was not to be,

Cornered by Mr. Wooding, he
was ordered to show his papers;
for proudly he was carrying some
books and a grip. Giving a sheep-
ish smile, he declared that this
was against the “professional
@thics,” “Then,” demanded the
K.C., “let us see your books.”
These turned out to be “The
Truth shall make you Free.” Said
some voices in the crowd: “Boy
you can see that you are not well
acquainted with the law.”

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
HAIR cuit
Nos. 0; 00; 000

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Paper Rebukes
Slovak Mines

And Factories

PRAGUE, Feb. 9.

The Slovak Communist Party’s
newspaper Pravda to-day severely
rebuked heavy industry in Slova-
kia “because mines and factories
failed to fulfil their January pro-
duction,

Analysing the shortcomings in
the region now being rapidly in-
dustriglised, Pravda said the fail-
ure “though not really great, gives
cause for some very anxious re-
flections.”

Pravda ascribed the shortcom-
ings to faults in the political and
organisational preparations in the
third year of the five-year plan.

Communist Party officials in fac-
tories in Slovakia were devoting
too much time to technical matters
which were the duties of factory
managers, Pravda said.

“They must first of all devote
themselves to the political orienta-
tion and activation of workers.”

The paper listed considerable
shortcomings in the manufacture of
precision machines and_ the
wood, glass, paper and cellulose
industries had not fulfilleg the
plan. :

Other branches had fulfilled it
fin “a seriously uneven way” and
uneven production was also re-
corded between different weeks of
one month.

Not a single mine had completed
its coal plan. Absenteeism here had
increased to eight per cent. over
the estimated figure,

In the iron ore section Slova-
kia’s industry man has fulfilled

92.7 per cent.
bid . —Reuter.

Trinidad May Tax
Municipal Lands

(trepuodsetI0g UMNO Ino wo)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 7,

Government will soon be callec
upon to revise the Municipal Or-
dinance to permit taxation to be
levied on land owners within
Municipal areas,

This much was embodied in an
amendment of Councillor Quintin
‘Connor at the continuation of
the Council's Statutory meeting
on Wednesday morning. And the
Council accepted the amendment
on_a majority vote,

The debate took members to far
away places—even behind the
“Tron Curtain”, Theories touching
on the question of land and taxes
to be derived therefrom were
propounded. And passing refer-
ence was made of Karl Marx
during the course of the debate,

Only member who was unhur-
ried to pass the amendment was
Councillor George Cabral. He
was for going into the pros and
cons, and the appointment of a
committee to consider the matter.
So he did not vote.





Paper Threatened
With Boycott

BUENOS AIRES, Feb, 9.

Napoleon Sollazo, head of the
Newsvendors Union, whose boy-
cott of La Prensa has kept Argen-
tina’s leading daily off the streets
for the past fortnight, last night
issued a statement threatening
another great independent daily,
Lanacion, with retaliation.

Sollazo accuses Lanacion of ar-
bitrary reporting of the Union’s
conflict with La Prensa and of
repeated publication of comments
on the situation from the “yellow
press of the continent, which is
under the economic domination
of Wall Street and the city,” and
castigates the paper for publication
yesterday of a statement from a
Federation of Newsvendors in
Rosario in opposition to Sollazo’s
boycott of La Prensa—Reuter.

If you're feeling out o-sorts, Ge
Nights, or suffer from Dizziness, Wettig’
ness, Backache, Leg Pains, Swollen Ankles,
Rheumatism, Burning Pa:

ity, or Loss of Energy

* sages,
fore your time, Kidney
cause

Excess
and feel old be-
rouble is the true

Teeth Will
Hurt Less

NEW YORK, Feb.,
America’s
frice industry was reported to
be planning to market at least
four new toothpowders contain-
ing penicillin which, it is said,
will reduce tooth decay.

The disclosure was made by Dr.
Philip Adams, Cincinnati Indus-
trial Research director, who said
that research projects preliminary
to introducing new penicillin den-
trifrices are well under way at
the University of Louisville, Uni-
versity of Cincinnati and in New
York City and Cleveland Public
Schools.

Dr. Adams said that only one
penicillin dentifrice — dentocillin
is now available and is sold only
on the prescription of a dentist.

He said that it was a favourable
report on the cavity-inhibiting
effectiveness of dentocillin that
started the industry's trend to-
ward dentifrices containing the
miracle drug.

e@ report came from Tufts
College Dental School in Boston.
The report published in the jour-
nal of American Dental Association
in May, 1950, said that 500 units
of penicillin used in a gram of
dentifrice had reduced tooth
decay by 55 per cent in a Clinical
study among 350 school children.

Dr. Adams said “it is safe to
predict that penicillin tooth pow-
der will dominate the dentifrice
field in this country as soon as the
big manufacturers complete their
marketing preparations and go
into production.”—I.N.S

Yugoslav Govt. Do
Not Know Where
Dr. Clementis Is

BELGRADE, Feb. 9.

An official spokesman of the
Yugoslay Government Information
Office said to-day that the office
had no knowledge of the present
whereabouts of former Czech
Foreign Minister Clementis.

Further independent inquiries
at the Adriatic coast résort of
Abbazia where according to some
western reports Clementis has
sought refuge, continued to pro-
duce negative results,

Meanwhile, feeling among
informed Yugoslavs here, was
that Clementis was in a Prague
prison and stories of his escape
were deliberately being put about
by the Cominform so as rather
to make this an excuse for his
arrest. —Reuter.

Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

Sch, Emanuel C. Gordon,, M.V. Se
field, Sch. Marea Henrietta, Sch. C, M.



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Ipona, Sch. Philip H. Davidson, H.M. 8.
Devonshire, Sch, Eastern. Eel, a
Adelina, M.V. Laacy Jey, MLV. Vapabo'

Prince, Sch, Mary §E. Caroline, $.8.
Osetes, M.V. Caribbee, M.V. Blue Star,
M.V Monéka, Sch. Emeline, Sch. Marion
Belle Wolfe. ‘

Al

8.S, Mauretania,
Thompson, from Ne
Dutch Tanker Rufina,
Copt. . ‘inid,

ALS
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w York.

1,856 tons net,
jad.

RES
Schooner Lady Noeleen, 41 tons net,
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S.S. Mauretania, 19,691 tons net, Capt
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PAGE THREE

his discovery that
atomic nucleus has

career came to a tragic end
on the Gallipoli beaches
when he was only 28, will
always be remembered for

the

electrical charge the size
of which is charactert#ie.__
of the atom. The ~

numerical value of this charge isknown.as the Atomic Number. Moseley’s—

discovery has been of the greatest importance in the

of atomic physics.

subsequent developiient ~~

The son of a distinguished zoologist, Moseleywas born at Weymotidh
Dorset, in 1887. After a brilliant career at Eton and Trinity Colleges ~



Oxford, he became a lecturer in physics. at Manchester University. He
resigned this appointment two years later, when he was

elected to the John Harling Fellowship. His labours were
interrupted by the outbreak ofwarin.1914, but wot before he
had accomplished the researcheswhichwere destinedto have

@ dramatic effect on the course of the second World War.
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PAGE FOUR



om
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid, Broad St., Bridgetown.

Saturday, February 10, 1951

CIVIL SERVANTS

AN addtess tabled in the House of
Assembly by Mr. F. E. Miller, member for
St. George, seeks to provide a privilege for
Civil Servants which ill accords with the
essentials of the service which they must
render to the general public, It is to be
sincerely hoped that that address will
reach no farther than the table of the
House.

On the face of it the address asks the
Governor to allow Civil Servants to make
use of the Civil Establishment to earn a
livelihood, to kick it aside at any time they
feel so disposed and to return to it if and
when they have failed in their political
pursuits.

In essence it unwittingly attempts, let it
be admitted, to engender ill feeling among
some sections of the Service and to under-
mine the morale of the Civil Service.

The absurdities of the address are obvi-
ous: If an officer in the Service is allowed
to stand for election and to be reinstated,
it will raise dissatisfaction among the
members of the service who have been
denied such privilege and who are serving
in junior positions.

Some explanation is needed to satisfy
any Governor as to what must be done
with the vacant post while the member
serves his constituency for one session. But
the purple patch of the document is the
paragraph which assumes that such dan-
-gerous permission will be given, and asks
that the Vestries be invited to extend this
privilege to their employees. ‘The Vestries
are elected bodies operating under an Act
and except by Legislation cannot be con-
trolled by the Government.

But apart from the inherent blemishes
of the address itself, it is well to look at
the effect it must inevitably have on the
members of the Civil Service. They are
being made to feel that in their capacity
as servants of the Government they are
being denied a right. They knew when
they joined the Service that membership
in the Legislature and membership of the
Civil Service were incompatible, they sub-
scribed to the conditions of service then
and have received such benefits as are
to be derived from that service.

There have been occasions in the past
when members of the Service have re-
nounced those benefits for the glamour of
political life. “The late Mr. C. L. Elder, a
Registrar of this island, resigned his post
to become member for St. George. Mr.
Hugh Blackman, Accountant in the Gen-
eral Post Office timed his entry into poli-
tics with his retirement from the service,
and at present there are two members of
the.House, Mr. Speaker, Member for St.
Peter and Mr. R. G. Mapp, Member for St.
Thomas, who resigned from the Teaching
and Civil Service to become members of
the House. It is late in the day to ask
that the rule be discarded.

The Civil Servant has his right to attend
public meetings, join political parties and
to vote for members of the party which he
serves. His active participation is frowned
upon because of the issues involved. It is
the Civil Servant who must carry out the
policy of Government irrespective of the
party in power. He itis who supplies that
continuity of service which makes the
standard something worth while and which
ensures ‘the respect of the individual for
the Civil Service! and the Government..
Even in places where there are ministers
of the Crown, it is the Civil Servant who
is responsible for the maintenance of
policy and it would be asking too much of
human nature to expect a man who had
spoken against the adoption of a particular
line of policy to carry out details to perfect
the major issues.

It is true that the Labour Party might
be in need of disciples but there should be
no attempt to fill party ranks at the ex-
pense of the Government. It is an attempt
to incite Civil Servants to please the party
in power whose-backing they will have in
case of failure.





Our Readers Say:









There are two classes of Un-
happy workmen in the world, and
by workmen we mean everyone
from the president of a large cor-
poration to the day labourer:

First, there are those who have
jobs which wholly satisfy their
creative and energy needs, but
do not provide what they desire
in the way of monetary reward
or social life.

Second, there are those who
work hard and earn a good living,
but who have jobs which give
them the “fenced-in” feeling
common to persons whose ability
is denied expression and whose
talents are unrecognized,

In addition, of course, there are
people who believe that work is
something to be cut to the mini-
mum, There are so many in this
class as to give cheer to ambitious
people, who find less competition
than there might otherwise be.

Today's working mam (and
again we include everyone from
the highest-salaried to the lowest-
paid worker) needs more than
skill and smarimess. These are
days when qualities of character
are more important than ever be-
fore: stability, toleration, | co-
operation, and self-restraint. They
are days when a knowledge of
economic affairs is needed, not
only of the family budget kind,
but the kind that tells the reason
for the taxes deducted from one’s
pay envelope.

Work has as its purpose the
production of things to use and
services to enjoy. Business is not
a struggle for wealth that already
exists, but a system of co-opera-
tion in producing and exchanging
things that people want, The more
things we produce, the greater
choice we have of things to enjoy,
and the more we will have to ex-
change for things we desire.

Looked at in this way, work is
not’ a curse. The law “In the
sweat of thy brow shalt thou eat
bread” may be read as one of the
most beneficent laws of life. It
was probably because.they. hac
nothing to do that Adam and Eve
became so easy victims for the
tempter:

Social and political dreamers
foster the fallacy that work was
imposed upon mankind as A
punishment. They do this because
the notion breeds discontent and
thereby furthers their purposes,
In fact, as every thinking man and
woman will admit, work is
strengthening, satisfying, and) a
great blessing. It is essential to
human happiness. f

But to discharge its responsi-
bilities work must have certain
qualities, It must be honest, use-
ful and cheerful, It was of this
kind of work that all the great
men of the past century spoke
when they preached the Gospel
of Work: liberals like Mill, sotial-
ists like William Morris,
reactionaries like Carlyle, Chris-
tian socialists like Kingsley, and
half-socialists like Ruskin. Tolstoi
said: “It is pleasant to dream of
eternity, but for an honest man
it is enough to have lived his life,
doing his work.”

We Are Making The World

Ours: is a civilization that never
could have been built without
labour, and if it is to be sustained
it must be by work which adds
te life as well as maintains life
The world is not diminished,
small though it may appear in
the light of today’s speed records
in travel and communication, It is
in the process of being made, and
we are the makers.

Work is helpful to our minds.
It is the best outlet for our anger,
and the truest escape from self-

| pity and self-centredness. There is

a very special kind of joy in rest
after work. As a Vedda cave-
dweller told a scientist: “It is
pleasant for us to feel the rain

mg om our shoulders, and
good to go out and dig yams,
and come home wet, and see the
fire burning in the cave, and sit
round it”

Work is not what it used to be.
Dr. D.»Ewen Cameron, Professor
cf Psychiatry at McGill Universi-
ty, describes it quaintly: “In the
days ‘of the horse plough and the

Jcoach, when tandles and cloth

and chairs were} made in the
house, when you. elambered out
of bed in the d and stumbled
back again when the moon came
out, it was lit true that if
you did not wi you did not
“Working in order to. Mve is
Wi at in order” ki
joe we mi nis not lost
it may. er co! .
it, ‘Sut the bum’s claim chet ihe
world owes him a living is
near to paying off.”
Well, in a_ nation. like ours
seople are not likely to give in to
iving on charity. ere are too
many opportunities for the better
life we all desire, and we have
not yet receded to the thinking
of the spoiled child kind, | that

when people demand payment for
things we want they dhe Sertosind

‘mere. husks~ unless

a

(With acknowledgments to

the Roval
Benk of Canada Newsletter.

Jan. 1951.)

on us: We still believe that re-
ward follows effort.

We of this. generation in
Canada have higher ideas than
had the cave-dwellers. We feel
that when we work we are ful-
filling a. part of earth’s furthest
dream, assigned to us when that
dream was born, “And,” says
the philosopher-peet Kahlil
Gibran, “if you cannot work with
love but only with distaste, it is
better that you should leave your
work and sit at the gate of the
temple and take alms of those who
work with joy.”’

There have been people in all
ages who believe that a man who
can produce twice+as much as
another with the same effort ought
to be punished instead of reward-
ed if he does so.

Schemes that would make buy
ing power easy to get without
giving anything for it are prolific
sources of trouble, The only real
purchasing power in the markets
is that of the goods and services
offered there. The idea that we
can eontinue our civilized pro-
aress if we insist on giving less
and less for more and more is a
dangerous fallacy:

About Being Tired

There is no denying that there
is such a thing as work-fatigue.
lt is a safety device of nature to
keep us within safe limits. The
trouble is that many of us have
set the safety valve to blow off
under a pressure so low that our
daily efficiency is impeded, and
we miss many of the joys of life.

Much of the “slow down” in
life is not caused by work-fatigue,
but by psychological factors.
Shorter hours will not help that
situation. Suppose we knocked
off work for all but four hours a
day, and turned ourselves loose
for the rest of the time to get
what. good we could out of a set
of fine abstract nouns. such: as






1 HAD A GIMA\
ON THE FOUR
WEEK - LUCKILY IT WAS ON

YOUR COUPON AND. NOT MINE

seience, and art, “friendship -and
love and the contemplation of the
universe, We should find them
we pegged
‘away at them so hard that they,
too, became work. :

No cheating or bargaining of
smartness will ever get a single
one of our wants out of nature’s
storehouse at half price. Our
physical strength depends upon
working our muscles) Our men-
tal strength depends upon
working our brains. If we want
more, we must.work more, As a
nation, we cannot buy and con-
sume twice as much goods as our
grandfathers did unless we pro-
duce twice as much goods,

If mankind had adhered to the
»rimitive custom of each person
Seams for himself and supplying
all his own. wants, this fact would
be clear. The man who foraged
twice. as efficiently as his neigh
botr would have twice as much
to eat. There has been no.change
in the law, but only in the method
of foraging.

Everyone wants a higher stand-
ard of living. No redistribution
of money or goods now existing
will raise the average Only
through increased production of
the things people want can our
standard of living be raised.

That inereased production can
be brought about by the conjunc-
tion of four efforts: education, tu
develop .greater intelligence and
competence; -research, to develop
new products and find» better
ways of doing things; capital, to
build and expand industries; and
work,

Nothing can raise our standard

retty, Of living without work, The great-

_@St disservice to-our-age-is any!

reaching, whether by sentimental

. manitarians or by agitators, of

‘the gospel of reward without
effort. :

Wages
‘The world’s doers §| sll “wages

and diversion in small letters and
‘WORK in capitals, because getting

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Mien Miust Work

things’ done jg their main ob
jective. Wages and diversion
must be earned. Except as it is
given in charity, there is no

rational way of distributing money

but by payment for production
cr for servicesy ah
There are only four places

from which the money to pay stil!
higher wages cam come: increased
prices, reducediéaxes, corporation

profits, or ing sed production
by workers. |

The logical to rise buying
power is by ing production
per factory worker. This

doesn’t mean Tonger hours of
work, but mote efficient work,
a full day’s work for
a full day’s pay, This is the only
one of the four -ways by which in-
creased wages can be paid safely.

There are two remaining obser-
vations to be made about wages,
Sir Andrew Caird said, and many
other successful men have said it
in different words, ‘The work that
has paid me best is the work I
have done for nothing.”

The young man eager to syc-
ceed in life (and the older man
seeking advancement) is cheating
himself if he concentrates on wage
rates and hours. The man with
desire for success in him knows
that what he earns in future years
will not -be determined by
schedules of hours and wages, but
by the value he gives.

The second*observation is that
workmen should not lose sight of
the personal income problems of
their employers» The decimal
points im all the boss’s accounts
may be one or two places to the
right of anything in the work-
man’s bank book, but, as Fortune
remarked in an article “fiscally
speaking, the boss is slowly going
down the drain.” Income tax,
profits. tax, social welfare pay-
ments, and support of an increas-
ing number of good causes—ali

these, added to the generally
higher cost of doing business.
impose a burden that is very
heavy.

-About Dignity

There are certain principles to
be observed by both employers
and workers if they are to have
reasonable satisfaction out of
work, ~ ot

Employers ‘neéd to remember
that an @iémentary demand
among mankind is for mainten-
ance of dignity. The dignity of
man is just as important within
the factory cafetefia as it is jin
an exclusive city club.

Dignity of workers may be
maintained when employers
praise generously, give credit
publicly when credit is due, un-
bend in the presence of employees
so as to raise the employees’
self-esteem, judge justly and not
hastily, and accept criticism with
appreciation, ;

Employees owe it to them-
selves to choose among. the
occupations open to them the one
in which they can best serve, and
they owe it to their employers
to do their best in it, to develop
and preserve a working discipline,
to see against letting their
emotions run away with their
working sense, and to avoid, as
they expect their superiors to
avoid, shop politics,

It is often a bit of silly social
pride that makés people unhappy
in their work. Brain workers and
muscle workers are equally im-
portant in keeping the wheels
turning. No matter how magnifi-
cent may be the city planning
done by architects and ivory
tuwer dreamers, no city beautiful
will ever arise unless there are
men to use their hands on pick-
axes and trowels, on the throttles
of steam shovels and bulldozers,

There is no room for snobbish-
ness in a good society. We need
to beware ‘of the growth of
manners of thought that will tend
to ruin us, Like the Polynesian
chiefs who, because it was a
matter of d form, refused to
carry food)te. their mouths with

iheir own ds. They starved.
Or like the’ g of France whose
story is t by Veblen in The
Theory of Leisure In

the absencef of the functionary
whose duty it was to shift his
master’s séat, this king sat un-
comprainin ators a huge fire 2
allowed his 3% person to be
toasted pel ceaeebovery.

Labour can be made truly
dignified, not by the bogus ex-
altation 0: the worker by
Communism, but by workers
themselves evaluating a man for
what he is, and his usefulness to
society. The man who coaxes a
street car safely and competently
through city traffic, the man who
sweats in a Saskatchewan grain
field, the man who tends a great
machine which produces goods it
would take a thousand slaves to
make, the girl who operates an
‘levator or types letters, or. sells,

a store all these are con-
tributing ir share to the life
and productiveness of the country.





_—_—_ ---




























Cricket Broadcast

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,— The thousands, who will
listen to the broadcast of the
Intercolonial Cricket Matches be-
tween Barbados and_ Trinidad,
starting at Kensington Oval next
Thursday, should be told that a
cebt of gratitude is due the Hen-
ourable R. N- Turner, Colonial
Secretary, in particular and also
Mr, Frank Field, Acting Attorney
General for having had the
question of the granting of a
licence settled in a practical and
satisfactory manner in spite of
stubborn and tedious arguments,
Micawber suggestions and plain
humbug. By its decision the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
may rest assured that it has public
opinion firmly behind it,

The ready assistance and helpful
‘Suggestions of Mr. E. S. Bennett

end Mr. E. H. C. Robinson of
Messrs, Cable & Wireless Ltd.,
fhould also be recorded,
Yours faithfully, .
ERIC INNISS.
Teachers And The
Honours List
To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,- The following extract
from the front page 6f The Timés

Educational Supplement, is not
without local significance: — 4
“Though each year now the
names of a not insignificant
number of men and women who
have given distinguished service .
in education or an allied field
appear in the Honours list, one
would still like to see more
teachers thus singled out for
recognition. There is to-day in-
creasing acknowledgement of_
the crucial importance of the
teacher’s role—and there aré so
many devoted and successful,
teachers whose lives and work
offer convincing evidence that
the importance of the class-
room practitioner is not over-
rated. This is not to wish any
diminution in the numbers of
those whose service to education
has been given wholly or main-
ly outside the classroom, for
they make it possible for the
steacher to do a good job, and
many if not most of them have
graduated to their present posi-
tion from the classroom, But it
is still possible to wish that
those who advise His Majesty
could find it in their hearts to
include more entries like “X. Y.,
Class-teacher, Z County Primary
+ School.’”

The situation in Barbados with

respect to teachers and _ other
workers in the educational field is
even worse; and your correspond-

ent hopes that those who make

the jiocal recommendations will
make a note of the above extract
and adopt the suggestion made

therein.
Yours faltntnily,
TEACHERS’ FRIEND.

Reckless Driving

To The Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—Kindly allow’ me to corh-
ment on an Article in your paper
‘of Tuesday 6th February, re Cam-
paign against, reckless Driving.

-I think that if the Police Force >

themselves could set, 4 better ex-
ample while driving both-v: and-
motor cycles, the public would eo-
operate. c ‘

I recently witnessed a scene on
Constitution Road, near Queen’s
College, where a Policeman riding
a motor cycle at a very dangerous
rate, nearly collided with a cyclist.
The Policeman, although riding
dangerously was not interested in
where he was going. He was look-
ing back at his rear wheel.

I believe the reason for this dis-
gusting driving: by- the Police, is
the idea the Police seem to believe
that they can do no wrong re-
gardless,

I will agree that freight Lorries
are a menace to the road user, but
so are other motorists. The num-
ber of. drivers at night that have
not the least bit of common decen-

ey to dip their lights to ctor
traffic is utterly, disgusting.
should estimate that at least 99.9%
of drivers at night do not dip their
lights.

Drivers of cars and especially
taxis, have not the slightest regard
for cyclists or pedestrians they

“may meet on the road. Their out-

look is that their car is the larger
object, and as such, everything
else should get off the roa@® when
they are around,

Hoping this will meet the eyes

- of all concerned.
A DISGUSTED ROAD USER.

City Traps

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly.,permit me space
to draw to the attention of the
correct Authority, «two dangerous
traps in the city.

Just above the Garden, on that
bridged gutter, which serves as a
pavement, where passengers await
the “buses for Brittons Hill, My
Lord's Hill, ete. A small portion
of which has either rot or broken
away is quite a menace to ladies’
shoe heels and second i§ a ring
in one of the planks which pro-
trudes and serves as a trip. Only
this morning quite a fat lady
tr'nped and would have got quite



a fall if it were not for the -quick
assistance of ‘a Bus Conductor.
Thanking you for space
WILKINS

| themselves how America works.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951



EES lleeEeEEe—_————eeeeeeeeee oO ee _ evan

AMERICA HAS A SOUL

NEW YORK.
The most promising weapon in the whole
U.S. propaganda armoury is the exchange
movement, Fortune magazine declares in its
current issue, urging the government to
quadruple its present expenditure for bring-
ing visitors here from abroad.

D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
at THE COLONNADE



Usually NOW
33 30

Pkgs: QUAKER MACARONI
Tins PILCHARDS (44)

Seek Lipiak Sava eEs 19

The magazine quotes comments of British,
French, Norwegian and other members of
visiting “productivity teams” to show that
some of these people went home and opened | %
the eyes of their left-wing fellow citizens “in ¢
a way that all the money in the world would
not buy us.”



FOR YOUR BATHROOM

















» Corner BASINS with Pedestal

25”x18”
& BASINS with or without Pedestal
22”x16”

The free world is seen endangered by a
myth: the myth that America is “all money
and no spirit,” a country without a soul.

“If we do not destroy this myth, it will
destroy us. Already it has sapped the will of
our allies, made those who benefited from
the ECA cynical of its purpose.”





Bakelite Mahogany
Cast Iron CISTERNS

Lavatory BRUSH HOLDERS
HARPIC, Large and Small.

Takei White and

The U.S. needs help from its friends over-
seas in the task of explaining how America
works. The exchange movement enables
Europeans and others to come and see for
themselves whether the American “secret”
is gadgets, or ruthlessness, or something
more profound.

Among Fortune’s quotations from_Euro-
pean productivity-team reports :



WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.
Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

Phones — 4472, 4687,
“The American employer seems to be al§ ;
psychologist aware that his prosperity is tied | ¢
directly to that of the workers.”....“Some-
times we had to ask ourselves whether it was
manufacturer or union member speaking to
us.”....“Contrary to the impression gained
from many American films, only a small per -
centage of American workers and _ their
families live in tenements.”

Through the State and Defence Depart-
ments and ECA, the government is now
bringing over about 13,000 persons a year to
observe and study American methods, and
the cost is about $45 million, Fortune dis-
closes.

“Meantime, private organizations this year
will have arranged roughly 40,000 exchanges
of their own. The 4-H clubs have been ex-
changing young farmers; the Rotary clubs
have been bringing over students; the Girl
Scouts ‘youth leaders’...... ete.

“Measured against the need, however, our
over-all exchange effort has been piddling.
It has been very frustrating for many middle-
management people, for example, to return]
to Europe all steamed up about, say, labour-
management councils, only to realize that no
one else in the outfit has got the word. Like|$
plasma, exchange is best in massive doses.

= } 18153

With “ seithout Motors

Now's THE TIME
TO SELECT YOURS.

DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — Acents.





FOR THOSE WHO LIKE
TO KEEP COOL...
AND KEEP WELL-GROOMED







“We have a tremendous opportunity before
us. We should seize it by expanding our
total propaganda budget to at least $500
million a year—and of this devote at least
$180 million to exchange.

“We could not legislate a bigger bargain
for ourselves.” Fortune adds, pointing out
that government spending for this purpose
stimulates more spending on exchange by
private groups in the U.S. and abroad, as well
as by foreign governments.




AT THE SAME TIME!
THE NEW MOYGASHEL
ANTI-CRUSHABLE

LINENS

-.- ARE JUST THE TICKET

, Perhaps not much can be done about the
hostility of certain European intellectuals
who deery American culture as “barbarous,”
Fortune implies: “The myth satisfies them.
In it they find the rationalization for their
own spiritual vacuum.”

Moreover, American culture is a popular
culture, Fortune continues: “Ii is a proclama-
tion to. the world of the cultural enfranchise-
ment of the common man. But to a
Europe that is still culturally an aristoc-
racy the symbols of hse nfranchise-
ment are often vulgar and shoddy.” (As one
French writer said, bemoaning Coca Cola,
Buicks, Chryslers, nylon stockings, and
chewing gum, “As soon as they appear these
habits become an invasion. It is a question
of the entire French moral landscape!”)

NEW STOCKS JUST

AT
DA COSTA & CO., LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

ARRIVED














“Is it the implicit revolutionary promise}
of these symbols that makes them so pro-
foundly disturbing?” Fortune asks.

European workers, on the other hand, are
cool to American capitalism because they
conceive of it in terms of their own—of which
they are sick—Fortune continues,

“The European does not see the rapidly
changing, socially conscious capitalism of
1950. He has not been shown the tremen-
dous difference between our capitalism and
the capitalism of Europe.

ERY MORNING

MORNING”

with a CUP of

COFFEE

— We Offer —

“In this respect it is startling to listen to
en American businessman just returned from
Europe; almost invariably he will so revile
its low-wage, high-markup, monopoly eco-

nomics that he sounds much more the howl- Coffee Specials
ing revolutionists than the European socialists pagie coe Cpeneh Dele SNe ane, Set Bet

‘ Cook’s Paste, 6 cents per tin
who ‘so mistrusts him.” _ Luncheon n

> Maxwell House Coffee yn. Cheese, 1.21 each

Chase & Samberne Coffee





But the European masses are“ignorant of

this businessman’s philosophy, and European Liquors Breakfast
capitalists are utterly unconvinced _ of its Son Braid — Foods
value: “It is high time that the American Dry Sack Sherry Wheat Puffs
businessman realized that it is not Europear pearl: tae ry jg Pulled Wheat
socialism, but European capitalism, that is Vielle Cure Prunes

Tuborg Beer

Meat

the chi ‘ icp)? Crushed Pineapple
chief block to ‘free enterprise’. cake danice

Canadian Eggs



We must develop far better means of

Calves Liver
reaching the European masses with our pro- een Tees Swweaky Bacon x
paganda, Fortune maintains. Reaching them] Bed Apples Manburgers g
the editors feel, will require the co-operatior oe ae erent x

of our friends abroad who have seen for PHON E G 0 D ) A R D S$ 3

FOSS SO SPSS SS SSS S SSS 99S SSO SPOS OOF OFOCCOSS

—I.N.S,
SATURDAY, FEBRUAR

i et

Y 10, 1951



Clerks’Spanish
Class, Opens

HE BARBADOS Clerks’ Union
is now starting a Spanish
Class for the purpose of assisting

City clerks in dealing with -cus-
tomers from Venezuela and other
Spanish countries. Mr. S. I.
Smith will be the tutor.

At present they have Arithmetic
and English Classes started by the
Barbados Evening Institute. The
Spanish Class is on their own in-
itiative.

The class will begin on Wedanes-
day, February 14 at 5.30 p.m., but
those clerks who are interested in
Spanish should communicate with
the General Secretary before 4
o’clock on Tuesday evening.

IGHTY-THREE-year-old Mary

¢ Jemmott of Orange Hill, St.
James, was taken to the General
Hospital yesterday morning and
detained. Jemmott was struck by
a pole which carried a major road
sign.

WO LORRIES were extensive-

ly damaged when an accident
occurred on Banatyne Road, Christ
Church on Thursday evening, One
P. 127 is owned by Oldbury Es-
tates Ltd., and was being driven
by Herman Chandler of Kirtons,
St. Philip. The other is, owned
by Louisa Layne of Sargeants Vil-
lage, Christ Church and was
being driven by her son Perry
Layne. ‘
[28-YEAR-OLD Maureen|

Blackett, a pedestrian of Ken-!
sington Land, St. Michael, . wasj
involved in an accident with motor
ear M 285, owned by E. C, Good-
ing of Warrens Factory and driven
by Ivan Lynch of Prout Hill, St.
Thomas, at the corner of Bridge!
and Trafalgar Streets on Thursday i
afternoon. She was only slight-!
ly injured. t

Wounding Cas
Dismissed

A CASE brought by the Police
charging May Lane of Spooner’s
Hill, St. Michael with wounding
Molly Vaughan on her head on
January 9 with a bucket was yes-
terday dismissed on its merits by
His Worship Mr. C, L. Walwyn,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”. .

Dr. Tony Gale, who gave the
medical evidence, said that he saw
Vaughan at the General .Hospital
on January 10. She was. bleeding
trom a woung on the scalp which
in his opinion was not serious,

Vaughan said in her evidence
that while she was..at the pipe,
Lane and herself “got into a row.”
Cross examined Vaughan did not
say that Lane’had struck her with
the bucket,

In passitig his, decision Mr
Walwyn told Vaughan that there
was no evidence to convict Lane
for wounding.

Set. B. King, prosecuted on, be-
half of the Police.

ON THREE MONTHS’
BOND





Dudley Jones of Halls Road was
put‘on a bond for three months
by Mr. E. A. MeLeod yesterday
for the unlawful possession: of a
quantity of sugar which he was
conveying or Bridge Street on
February 8.





NURSING GIRLS

[

/

THIS ARTIST takes advantage of the ideal conditions yesterday. She is seen here sketching the block
of buildings including the Advocate Co., Ltd., and Messrs J. N. Goddard & Sons. Many people looked on.

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



SKETCHING





Tourists Crowd | charity Group

Bridgetown

AMERICAN TOURISTS were everywhere in the City
yesterday. The Mauretania called at 7 a.m. with 626

pleasure seekers from all the
The Mauretania had not long
dropped anchor before trim, white
and open Jaunches were on their
way tothe Baggage Warehouse
bringing in the tourists to spend
a while on “Bimshire.”

In the cafés, stores, curio shops
and jewel shops groups of them
lingered around to make pur-
chases, Many of them could be
seen going back to the ship with
bags and arms filled with parcels,

About 250 of them went on
country tours, visiting all the
historic parts of the island, They
left early during the day and did
not get back until evening.

Sea Bathing

Quite a number of them spent
the day at beaches, while others
walked through the principle
streets of the City window-shop-
ping and taking snaps with their
cameras.

The Mauretania is on a 18-day
cruise, She left New York on
February 3 and is expected to be
back in New York by February 22.

On her way down, she made
stops at St. Thomas and) Martin-
ique, spending a few hours at
each port. }

A tourist toid the .-Advocate,
yesterday that he enjoyed fine
weather throughout the voyage to
Barbados.

Occasionally ‘there were little |
swells, he said, but nothing te



j make the..passengers uncomfort—

able,

He found Barbados
interesting of the ports
already visited.

the most
he- had

PAY

INCOME TAX:
Send Money Back

Of the 38 Barbadian girls who went to England to
work in Hospitals, 37 are still working in Hospitals. The
38th is in Hospital herself and is likely to remain there
for some little time. Soon after reaching England, she de-
veloped symptoms of a long standing trouble which had
apparently cleared up but which flared up again in the
changed circumstances of her new life.

The other 37 girls are contented
and happy; their main complaint
being about the cold and the fact
that they have, some of them to
pay Income Tax! Those working
as domestics earn between £2 and
£2. 15s. Od., per week left from
wages for themselves after deduc-



Nurse SYLVIA BREEDY

tions. All girls have to contribute
compulsorily ‘like other English
workers to National Health and
Unemployment Insurance
Schemes.

Girls who have transferred from
the domestic to the Student Nurs-
ing Grade get less; £1, 4s. 0d. per

week being the minimum earn-)no complaints

ferred to the Student Nursing
Grade.

They are: Idalia Fergusson,
Aletha Holder, Gwennie Inniss,
Daphne Roachford, Thelma Rock,
Doris Sargeant, Elsie Webster and
Gertrude Maxwell. :

Preliminary Training

Three others, Sylvia Breedy,
Adela Shaw and Margaret Lewis
have been sent to a Preliminary
Training School to see whether
they could pass the actual examin-
ations to enable them to enter the
Nursing Grade. The others work
as Hospital domestics, ward maids
orderlies, housemaids, kitchen as-
sistants.

The 37 girls are scattered over

the British Isles in: Stoke-on-
Trent, Manchester, Birmingham,
Bristol, Aylesbury, ,.London and
Swindon,

Most of the girls have already
had some leave during their stay
and have taken the opportunity to
visit other parts of the. British
Isles, One yisited North Wales
and a group took their holidays in
London during the period of the
Test Matches so as to meet other
West Indians. A number of the
girls have joined local Girls’ Club,
the Y.W.C.A., or Church Groups -
Many of them are paying volun-
tarily a sum from their weekly
wages regularly into the Post
Office Savings Bank so as to build
up a reserve; and about half of
them are sending money back to
their relatives here in Barbados.
The girls are all, with the excep-
tion of the one sick member, pay-
ing 5/- a week towards the cost of
their passages. This sum is de-
ducted from their wages and is
remitted through the Crown
Agents_to the Government of Bar-
bados. By the end of November
a sum of approximately $1,620 had
already been repaid in this way.

The girls seem to have stood up
to the ¢limate fairly well. There
has been some influenza among
them : four of them caught chick-
en pox and had to be isolated for
a period and many of them have
had attention to their teeth since
they arrived. There thave been
about “food; but

ings during the period of nursing} great care was taken before they

apprenticeship-

Most of the girls |left to tell them exactly what to

who are still domestics are earn- | expect at meal time



ing more than when they first took; On the whole the girls seen to
up their posts and nearly all, think that their work is hard, but
earn more than the minimum | do not appear to find it beyond
amount for their grade because |their capacity Not one so far
holidays and overtime are paid |expressed a regret that she went
extra } Or 0 return ho €

Last December eight girls trans-!



her contractual period i

States of America.

He thought Bridgetown a very
busy port and was surprised to
find shipping so full of activity—
much more active than he had
seen at St. Thomas and Martin-
ique,

Comfortable Cruise

Mr. Victor Ogley the cruise
Director, told the Advocate ‘that
they had done everything possible
on this cruise to’'make the tour-
ists comfortable, He said that in
addition to their 13 cruise direc-
tors who saw after the shore
excursions, they had put on 10
people on the ship from Radio
Station WOR Entertainment
Bureau for the benefit of the tour—-
ists. Those people were well
known on Broadway as far as
night clubs, radio, stage and tel-
evision were concerned.

The latest movies including
“Harvey,” “All about Eve,” ‘Call
me Mister” and “Magnificent
Yankee”, were put on every night
for the entertainment of . the
tourists. There were also deck
sports. and tournaments includ-—
ing deck tennis and ping pong as
well as bridge tournaments and
canaster tournaments,

Lectures on the islands were
given by Mr, Watterson Lowe be—
fore they reached the various
ports, These lectures were supple—
mented with colour travel films
of the islands,

He said that they had nice
weather throughout the trip so
far and the tourists had enjoyed
every moment of their visits es—
pecially in Barbados as many of
them had been here before and
were longing to be back.

The Mauretania ieft about
midnight for Grenada and will
stop at La Guaira, Curacao, Cris—
tobal, Kingston, and Havana be-
fore returning to New York on
February 22.

THE FIRST LAUNCH to arrive at
from the “Mauretania’ deposits its ‘



STAMP sellers at the General
Post Office will certainly be hay-
ing one of their busiest periods
on February 16, The occasion will
be the issuing of stamps to com-
memorate the «inauguration of
the University College of the
West ‘Indies and the installation
of Her Royal Highness Princess
Alice, Countess of Athlone,
Chancellor,

as



The stamps will be of two de-
nominations, one being sold tor 3
cents and the other for 12,

The 3 cents stamp will carry

TOURIST INVASION

}
|

5





PAGE FIVE



There Is Always Some }
Game At Queen’s Park

NEARLY half.a mile from the centre of Bridgetown,
the shady grounds of Queen’s Park stand. Forty-four years
ago it used to be the residence of the General in command |
of the Troops. Now it is the quiet hang-out of the young, |
the middle-aged, but for the most part the grey-headed.

Letters Of
Administration

In the Court of Ordinary yes-

terday His Honour the Acting |

Chief Judge, Mr. J. W. B. Chenery,
granted the petition of Tdalie St:
Clair Prescod, of Mt. Standfast,
St. James, for Letters of Adminis-




















PEEPS OSS PD ECP OOOO POPPE EOFS

TOOTAL LINENS

THE TALK OF THE TOWN!
36 ins. wide

NIL

4

$

3S
>
:
:
When an Advocate reporter

passed through Queen's Park yes-
terday, the cricket wickets which
a few weeks ago were on the
Park's fresh cut turf were taken
up and the football goal posts were
erected, On a smaller pasture of
the park, the basket ball poles
were ready for playing. Yes, at
all seasons of the year, some

ame is in the spotlight at Queen’s
ark.

oo




























%
+
:
:
BS
s
8 j
tration to the estate of her late : errs y |
husband, Vernon. Augustus Pres- inher a eens te ae $
C i > re alls. any
She was represented by Mr, | Occasions the Park walls were
W. W. Reece, K.C., instructed by} thrown down after heavy rain
Messrs ‘Haynes & Griffith. when the water flowed down from
His Honour also. granted the | the country.
petition of Joseph Donald Corbin, At the side of the cricket and
also known as Joseph Donald | football ground there are twa *
Newsam of Ashton Hall, St, Peter, | Pavilions, one about 70 by 35 feet LEMON
for Letters of Administration to | 0d the other a little bigger. To x
the estate of his wife the late Mar- |the Eastern side there is a stretch | ¥
garet Ann Corbin or Newsam. of mahogany trees, not as big as
Petitioner was represented by | Some you see about the island, but $
Mr._C. H. Clarke; K.C. instructed | shady enough to induce boys to f
by, Messra Hutenioase * menhela. piteh underneath them,
e Acting ef Judge admit- .
ted to Probate the will of Pearla|ine land of the flying, fish. in Wie E 7
Healis Rose, late of St. James and 7 \
that of Blanche Skeete late of S days when the park first became
a er eee and Lady Garter who got : :
’ 2 : er a stone and wooden roo e ,
P. resident Comes shed. with a conical top near the L I N EN
; pasture, had a drawing of a flying e ‘
Mrs. Undine Newton, Organiser REMANDED pg Se ved Bay o'clock any _ Branded TEBILIZED,
eri hen a Md ante LIONEL BEST a 23-year-old day there can be heard the pleas- . - for tested crease-resistarice
Group in New York, arrived in| @bourer of Christ Church, was Se I I an agi ae ge ae
Barbados. yesterday. accompanied esterday remanded by His Wore |i), Sitast. Most of the old men
by her niece, Miss Daisy Thomp.|S%ip, Mr. E. A, McLeod, Police oe ; —BROAD ST
yt F “AY are men who cut canes in Cuba .
son. She told the Advocate that| Magistrate of District “A” whe | years ago and killed snakes too
the organisation is pleased with| he was charged with breaking |ippere ite some among them who
the way the: work is being done, 2nd entering the dwelling house of fought in Africa and who knew DIAL 2664.
here by Canon Read, Chairman,| Walter Boyce at Marine Garden, )}ine days when transportation was| Se
and the other members of the lo-| Christ Church, and stealing ar/q matter of “going by foot”. odo acta cineca tn tected tata telat tit tatatne einiiaiassiienieinls
cal Committee. ticles to the value of £7 on Janu~ M .. °
ary 18, any lrees ‘
She plans during her two! The charge was brought by the
months’ stay in Barbados te sea Police. There are many types of trees a et
the work at first hand. ALSO remanded by His Worship | almost all over the grounds and of |
: Mr. E. A. McLeod until February | course the tall palm trees that are r
The Organisation which Mrs. 15, was 23-year-old. William |$0 much tropical, are among them. | ff) FOR , I HE BES’ | ' |
Newton represents is one of those Joseph of no fixed place of abode There are many evergreen trees|#)
in New York which sends over after he appeared in the court on too, and one is about 36 feet in| §)
money and shipments of articles|a charge brought by the Police ae. sak eat tha ade
for distribution among the poor of, of stealing a bunch of bananas| ang doubtless the mangoes from
Barbados. This group has its)the property of E. C. Gill of|the blossoming mango tree that is| fl! ~~
gifts distributed — through . the| Cavell Avenue, St. Michael. in the grounds will belong to the| fl AO DEASTIFEL
Church. ’ The offence was alleged to} Vestry. But two to one the boys| §f! 4
\ «| have been committed sometime on| who get their toes stumped when| §) CAS¥~TVO-CLEAR s
A shipment of such articles wil] February 8 kicking the little hopping ball j >. st
be Th Of ee ie said | eanigihegfemsieaie — the mango tree will get most} §) ) ~ COVERING
rganisation which is com- of the mangoes no matter how .
posed ps Analg eons is DROVE DANGE ROUSLY wary the park watehmen are. r ’
ree years rs. Newt tat
described itw secretary, Mr | D@ Pald i foe | Under the trees which overhang | ff “SILVER STAR
Charles Roy King as good and Heal iy cred was tmposed "oh [Re walls of the park, mothers |
i carry their children to have a
efficient. He was one of the Found-| Reuben Rice of Upper Collymore} wall. Youngsters not. yet: ready
ores Secs by. ton ; ‘Ear oh for school ride their tricycles on| @;
a4 or rivin, a the green too.
Mrs. Newton said that sopisp of! Harmony Hill on December 5. At luncheon time, children com-
the Advocate containing “write-| When the offence was commit-|ing home from school stop in to
ups” of the delivery of goods fromy ted Rice was driving the motor] turn on the garden pipes when the
the Organisation to the local} jorry M—1395. gardener's back is turned, After
branch had reached New York ’ —_————. school they take to the see-saws,
and that the members of the Or- DOG FIGHT the .swingers and the chutes in
ganisation haq@ appreciated those THE Judges of the Assistant| crowds.
“write-ups” very much, Court of Appeal Mr, G. L, Tay-|. The gardens near the Constitu-
i, v |orand Mr HA. Vaughn agreed|tion Road are well kept and the
This is her first visit to Barba-] with a decision of Police Magis-| hedges neat. And bees like Queen's |
dos in 13 years, Mrs, Newton said }trate Mr. §. Nurse and| Park for the honey they get from
and from a casual look around the} yesterday dismissed on its merits} the many flowers.
city she has seen some improve-} 4 case in which Hilary Chandler , ; t
ments, which please her, very charged ‘Walter Lopey if Roaches, wot Sale neih teks armen
much. She went to the U.S.A.] st. Lucy of having caused un-|1o be registered as unemployed a
from Barbados 32 years aso. OTe ey’ waa nileeae Se. ad tha unanplovsent agency sete.
While here, she will reside at} his two dogs on Chandler’s on somewhat slalisedy: af ts ante
her own home at Salters, St] September 5 last year, Chandler's! of the monkeys, peacock, turtles
George, where her sister, Mis*] dog was badly beaten. Lopey’s)and other unfamiliar things that INSIST ON
Maude Thompson now lives, defence was that although his} are kept there.
dogs did beat Chandler's, he had| There is an evergreen tree In
“I not been there at the time, but}the park above the steel shed
arrived when the beating was} which was planted in 1913 by
almost finished. Prince Albert, Duke of York,
aaa Tages AW gine George VI. It Hl SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
DECREE NISI sas named Ficus Benjamin. ' as eek he crt ses
HIS Honour the Acting Chie a
Judge, Mr. J. W. B. Chenery,
sitting in the Court for Divorce
and Matrimonial Causes yester-
day, pronounced decree nisi in
the suit of S. St.A. Sands
(Petitioner), E. G. Sands (Re-
spondent) and J. Harewood (Co-
Respondent) .
The petitioner appeared in y
person, There was no order as. to
costs. , : e
A letter which appeared in the Advocate
of February 8, stated that though in the
laying down of mains in né@w tenantries
the Waterworks Department insists that
provision ig made for new hydrants, when
mains were being Ipid along “Blue
Woters, “The Garden” and Worthing
View" no provision was made for
hydrants.
The Advocate was informed (yesterday
that provision has been made in laying 4
: down the mains ng ee oe
the Baggage Warehouse yesterday eis bit ate Set atte and as s0on
‘cargo” of tourists on shore. as they arrived, they will be installed.
New Stamp Issue Sasateasaaeeeneas
tt: JASON JONES & CO., LID.—Distibutore
INFECTION
’ 3 , NE ce ¥
WE OFFER _. « How about it? Well, here’s 0 pla .

the Arms of the University, and
the other, g full length seatex
portrait of Her Royal Highness ir
her robes as Chancellor.

Other colonies will also be
issuing special stamps for the same
purpose though not nécessarily at
the same price. For example
Grenada’s two denominations arc
for 3 and 6 cents respectively.

DEEP SEA FISH COME
FISHING schooner Sunshine R.
25 tons net. brought 760 deep sea
f from the fishing banks for
terday. The fis
Messrs
» Ltd










was
J N

J



KOSSOLIAN
KOSSOLIAN
KOSSOLIAN
KOSSOLIAN



10D





The better they condition, t

SLPS SCSO GSO OSS

BLOOD SALTS
POULTRY TONIC
RACE HORSE TONIC

STOCK FARM CONDITION POWDERS

LL LLELLELLLPLLLLLPLLLEPLLLSALLY

IZED SPICE





he more likelihood of Survival







where you won't feel that tightness
across the back or middle . . . here’s :
ONE place where you won't hear “We can let it out a little for you.”
No, sir! At THIS store we have suits made to fit you in the first place,
designed to flatter you—and, not just a few—but a whole big range of
colors, fatrics and patterns!

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

Tailoring Department 10, 11, 12 & 13, Broad Street.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951

chit CHIC
iHitikaniii THETA w Hy |

A
ea y tear YOU KNOW, TREATING
ip | BLANKETS THE S SO NICE
by











i gnt your

os HEADACHES

while they're slight













MI MEAN A
RAISE FOR US



When headaches start —
due to worry, overwork, over in-
dulgence—be smart, take Alka-
Seltzer right away. Sparkling
effervescence makes Alka-Seltzer
pleasant-tasting, helps its pain-
killing analgesic go to work

fast. Keep it handy.

Alka-Seltzer |












Kill those throbbing pains in
your muscles at once! Apply
Sloan's Liniment lightly—

You don’t ru in “Sloan's” you dab it
on the affected part gently —“ Sloan's”
——>




HA! AO! HO!
+--HEE-HEE }
KLE... ! d







does the rest! Good for
aches and pains and stiff





~ ke
aS
TAD UOD)

ee Ae








x Heart Trouble
mn a \ ofall prasad by High
is








Â¥

HE RRINGS

ERESH ov in TOMATO SAUCE

MY DRAW REIN, OR rl i
PB.\E S1/007/ sf Ts) BF}
Ba Ses

Ba Sa



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4AM YA
44 ay






A.S. Bryden & Sons (Barbados) Ltd.—Agents.



SPS COSSPEESEO FOES PIEDPOPOS ESL SS OSE SSOSS SS SSPPPSSSOSS

THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK

©

WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,

and Associations to make the compilation of information in
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities:
réligious, commercial, cultural, educational, health; «sports,
radio, agricultural, etc., are asked io have the form printed
below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to:

THE EDITOR,
pies THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street.

FORM
i isla ; Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Etc, ......ssssssvsssseeseseusseeeninnen
;
A C e |

» Potted Meat
WATCH THE FIFTY-DOLLAR WINDOWS, DENNY... hE, LoS Magi cana sigs couch cccbant kok cou VOLS LIST sce Uelehlia hestwalino ob Eeasts DOD ak vodwtian ” SandWien Spend
CUTTLE DIDN'T STEALA MILLION BUCKS (Neha t eee eeteeneeenereeteresereerensenseenesenesnesesn eager eneceeassesenter ses » Gm tah Boue
TO MAKE PIKER. : ? » Vegetable. Soup,
! es) Ys » ASparagus Soup

BETS ee Chicken..Soup
w Tomato Soup
» Carrots, (Sli¢éd and whole)

» Peas

Council or Committee Member?6..........:sssssssssssesseenenesensenesnersneeenseeneanees $ Tomatoes

s Pkgs Blahcmange
a7






fn. ee

Christian Science
Reading Room

1ST FLOOR, BOWEN & SONS
(Broad Street)

Hours: 10 a.m.-—2 p.m,






curses!

Te See

MY CHANCE To j
THE BADGE OFF

Hi6 CHEST //



Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
10 aih—i8 o’clock,
Saturdays.

4t this Room the Bible and
the Christian Scleace text-book,
Sclence and Henita wita Key to

ARY BAKER

the Seriotures by M.
£DDY may De revd, borrows,

( oF purchased
Visitors Are Welcome
a a

—arneraarer el





MAKE YOUR SELECTIONS FROM
THESE:

Tins Cocktail Peanuts

Bots Cocktail Cherries

Tins Cocktail Sausages
» Meat Rolls

SOOSSESESES EOD SSS SES SESS SSS SOS SSIS SSCSS

d
B
g
2
8.
3
F
SOSS

a Jellos
Bots Salad Cream
Prepared Mustard

Disemnideh ccc sia icc Hea caccecssresiiletectns ‘ STUART & SAMPSON
| LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum,

"Short historical account of the origin, functions and current

activities :
Didoiihclceiiete enc i —
PESOS COOP OCee 0 Aa A © SBE BAAS IN A RB







You don’t have to forego big
ear features when you drive
the Morris Minor. Here isa
big car in a small way. Svat-
ing for four. Over 7 cubic



feet of luggage space. Torsion

\s if iz
bar, independent front wheel
t he @ a. O rf) , suspension for smoother rides.

It’s easy to steer through






ITS NO FALSE ALAR!
WARDEN. THE PHANTOM
NEVER FAILS.





ALITTLE *ER*ILLY,
FOLLOWING THAT ANIMAL.





My eyes often used to smart and At the Club Jim traffic: easy to park; easy to

robably sufferi ; ;
hed ue strata, Why not garage. If economy interests
E you, its 35-40 miles per gallon

means longer runs for your
money,




> ip >
LUI
Mite






= KOT TOOFAR,! HOPE.
MPUFF) I'M NOTAS YOUNG

— eye strain now!” I said to Jim
a acd

away dirt later. ““Thanksto you—and
~ and germs, toned up eye muscles. I'll never be without it again.”

PROTECT YOUR EYES ‘zzzh'

Optrex



Let us give you a demonstration ride
in the world’s biggest srnall car buy.

FORT ROYAL GARAGE Ltd.

Phone 2385 SOLE DISTRIBUTORS Phone 4504

MAKE THIS TEST
SS The rim of the eye and inner

liming should be heaithy flesh

Pe) colonr. If they are red or irri-
B tated‘or the whites bloodshot,
your cyes need treatment. designed eyebath






SATURDAY, FEBRUARY

10, 1951



CLASSIFIED ADS.



TELEPHONE 2508
he -
Births, ete ‘Deaths, aeeaoee FOR RENT

ledgments, and In Memoriam notices is
$1.50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for. any number of words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
udditional word.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents per word for ereh
edditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m.

DIED

February 9th,
“White House”,



wooD—On 1951 at his
residence St. James,
Hinkson Ashby Wood. His funeral
leaves the above residence at 9.15 a.m.
to-day for the Westbury Cemetery.
Mrs. E. M. Greenidge and Leonard
Archer,

THANKS

BRYAN—Through this medium I beg
to return thanks to all those who sent
Cards, Wreaths, and letters, or in any
way condoled with me in my recent
loss occasioned by the death of my
dear mother Ida.

Harold Bryan (Corpl.) 10.2.51—1n

MORRIS—Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Morris
and family beg to convey their heart
felt thanks to all their friends, ac-
quaintances and well wishers for the
various expressions of sympathy shown
them in their bereavement occasioned
by the death of their loved one
Edired Neilson. 10,2.51—1n

SMITH—Oscar. We beg through this
medium to return thanks to all those
kind friends who sent wreaths, letters
of condolence, or in any way expressed
their sympathy in our recent bereave-
ment.

Mrs. Elaine Smith (wife), Joan, Yvonne,

Msureene (daughters), Emerson (son),

Mr. awd Mrs, Gerald Dottin (parents),

10.2,51—1n,











IN MEMORIAM

rage re
WALKEB—In loving memony of our dear
beloved mother Martha Walker, who
fell asleep on Feb. 10th, 1945.
“Happly and smiling always content
Loved and respected where ever she
went
To a beautiful life came a noble end
She died as she lived, everybody's
friend.”
Remembered by Mrs. A, Layne (Daugh-
ter), Mr. J. Layne (Son-in-law), Mrx L.



Coppin (Grand-Daughtor).
10.2.51—1n
a
ADAMS—In loving memory of my be-
loved husband Dentam Reginald

Adams who fell asleep on February
10th, 1950.

Sleep on and take your rest.

May ‘you rest in peace.
Mrs. Elvira Adams (Wife)
Mrs. Carlotto. Wilkinson,
Wilkinson.

and Family,
Mr. Lionel

10.2.51—1n

FOR SALE

Three cents per word on week-days
and 4 cents per word on Sundays, mini-
mum charge 72 cents on week-days and
96 cénts on Sundays.

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—1938 Vauxhall motor car. (in good
order), OWEN T. ALLDER, Roebuck
Street. Dial 3299.







10.2,51—1n

i
CAR—Chevrolet style master, in first
class condition (M-180), Dial 2550 any

day except Sunday, for particulars.
10,2.51—2n.

enon

CAR—Packard 8 Cylinder. Perfect
condition, Reason for sale, Purchasing
smaller car. Dr. Simon — Telephone
3085. 10.1,51—6n

ELECTRICAL

REFRIGERATOR—Westinghouse, One
year old, Phone 3904. 9.2.51—4r

——————————
REFRIGERATOR—@ld Spot Refriger-
ator, (in good working order). Elec.
motor and Compressor, OWEN T.

ALLDER, Roebuck Street. Dial 3299.
10.2.51—In

—_—_—_—
ONE TURNER WALKER DRILL
PRESS, electrically, driven, new.
Apply: Mr. R,. de Souza, C/o T.
Geddes Grant Ltd. 1,2.51—6n.

ES

WINDCHARGER — 12-Volt complete
with Tower. Ag. good as new. Apply
Cole’s Garage. hone 4316. 8.2.51—4n

FURNIIURE

——_————
MAHOGANY end Pine Presses, OWEN
T. ALLDER, Roebuck Street. Dial 3299.
10,2.51—3n

rr ——

MAHOGANY CHEST of Drawers,
Book Shelf, Set of Golf Clubs. Phone
8477. ® 10.2,51—1n.

SS
MAHOGANY Dining Tables. (Large and
small). OWEN T. LLDER. Roebuck
Street. Dial 3299. 10,2,51—3n

Or
RALPH BEARD offers upright rush
bottom chairs $3.75 each, with arms
$4.50 and rockers $5.00 each. New
mohogany upright chairs $17.00 per pr.
New mag. rockers $36.00 per pair, Tub
choirs $36.00 per pr. Mahogany cocktail
tables from $8.00, Tea trolleys $15.00
each, Mahogany Vanities, from $75.00;
Meg. bedends 3 ft. 6 ins. $35.00 per pr.
also. a good variety of second hand
furniture,

For further particulars Dial 4683. Call
on view at Ralph Beard’s show aoe
Herdwood Alley. 9,2,51—3n

’ LIVES10CK

———— —
CALVES—Ten - day old Heifer Calves,

: Bulkeley Ltd., Dairy.
— : 8,2.51—3n.



ES
PIG—One (1) Sow. 2nd Prize Winner
last Exhibition. Dial 3741. 9.2.51—3n

—$—$—_——————
PUPPIES — Half-bred wire - haired.
Phone 8222. 10.2,51—1n

MECHANICAL

MACHINES—Singer Sewing Machines.
(Hend and Treadle) OWEN T. ALLDER,
Roebuck Street. Dial 3299.

10.2.51—In



—[_—_—

MISCELLANEOUS

——————
ACTUMUS—The new Fertiliser for
canes, vegetable and flower gardens $3.60
per lb. from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store, Coleridge Street. Phone 2999.

—————

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete eee eee, Top

. A. BARNES & Co., le.

ee 26,1.51—t.f£.n.
a

CHEAP Reading Glasses and Shades.
Apply to Leonard M. Clarke No. 12
James Street. 10,2.51—1n

———$_————— ET

CRYSTALISED FRUIT—By the Pound

and in one pound original packages.

Also Maraschino oe oS re they
vely. Knight's Drug Stores.

are lovely nig! ere

ee
GALVANISED PIPE in the following
sizes: %ein.,, Yin, %in., lin, 1% ins,
Qins., 2% ins., 3ins, and 4 ins. Also fit-
tings. Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

Trafalgar Street, Phone 2696.
3.2.51.—t.f£.n.





—

MERRY-GO-ROUND — Complete with
nicely shaped and painted Horses in
working order. Contact B. H, King,
Chapel Street, St. Peter, 7.2,.51—2n.

NUTROGEN—Fresh shipment. 1 lb, Tin
$1.24 % Ib. Tin 69c, From all Grocers
and Chemists. 10.2.51—4r

————_— ——E

ONE (1) 17 Jewel Elgin Gent's. Gold
Filled Pocket Watch in perfect working
order, Apply to W. D. Richards & Son,
McGregor Street. 10,.2.51—2n









eee tne ena
PIANO—Upright Piano made by John
Brinsmead, well tuned. Best offer over
$200.00 accepted. Apply Ralph Beard,

Hardwood Alley, Phone 4683.
10.2.51—2n

RUBBER GOODS — Ice Caps, Hot
Water Bottles, Syringes, Air Cushions
Secure yours y as the price of Rubber

goods is going higher and_ higher
Knight’s Drug Stores. 9.2.51—2n
SHEET TIN—Just received heavy

Quality Size 28 x 20. JOHN D. TAYLOR
& SONS Ltd, 8.2,51-—2n

Three cents per word on week-days
and 4 cents per word on Sundays, mini-
mum charge 72 cents on week-days and
9€ cents on Sundays. .



HOUSES



HIGH ROCK—Bathsheba. From March
to July. Phone 4048. 10.2.51—4n

= HOUSES—Gibbs’ Beach, St. Peter.
‘IN-an-OUT” Suitable for couple — from
March. “Restavile’ — August/October
to December 1951. Both fully furnished.
Apply Wesley Bayley, High Street.
10.2.51—2n

MORNINGSIDE, Bathsheba: Renovated
rooms, ‘water, electric light, garage. Dial
» water, ight, garage. Dial

2481. Mr. W. Chandler. 4.2.51—3n

STEWARTVILLE—3 bedrooms, Draw-
ing and Dining Room, Pantry, Kitchen,
2 Servants’ Rooms, Seaside, Hastings.
Phone 3904. 8.2.51—4n
———

TANGLIN — Beachmont, Bathsheba,
from Fel onwards, monthly or
otherwise, 3 double bedrooms with single
Simmons bedsteads, children’s





room.
dining room and lounge. Refrigerato~,
Garage, servant's room. Apply: Howe.
Ring 3626. 13.1.51—t.£.n.



WINSLEY, Bathsheba: Renovated and
refurnished, From Feb. 15th. 3 bedrooms,
wuter, electric light, garage.
Mrs. W. Chandler.

PUHLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
ont 12 see eee, “oe line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1. on ke
and $1.80 on Sundays. eae





REAL ESTATE





ee
HOUSE—One new board and shingle
house, 18 x 11 x 8 ft. build with sorews,
asy to move. Apply to Sherlock Field
oul Bay, St. Philip, 8.2.51—4n

——
ee! ee — Three (3)
room: fungalow, stand:
Say Peet Pb ing on 14,919
er in writing for the same, will be
received by E. C, FIELD C/o James A.
Lynch & Co., Ltd. up to 4 p.m. 28th
February 1951, 8.2.51—6n

ee
The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office No, 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 16th February 1951 at
Fame cmmaggre gg dwelling house
nown as Tullyera now ~
ed “CRYSTAL WATERS" with the fand
thereto containing by estimation 12,087
square feet situated on the sea at Car-
ville Avenue, Worthing, Christ Church,
at present used as a boarding house.
Inspection any day except Sundays
between 4 and 6 p.m, on application to
Mrs. Talma on the premises,
For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—
COTTLE, CATFORD, & Co.,
Solicitors,
3.2.51—12n.

ee

The undersigned will offer for sale at
James St., over Hinds & Co., Drug Store
on the 14th February 1951 at 2 p.m., by
public Competition, one Modern Stone-
built property known as “Hill Crest",
Situated at Upper Collymore Rock, oppo-
site the A.MLE. Church, with 5,000 sq. ft.
of Land, 2 bedrooms, open verandah, tiled
beth and water toilet, Electricity, can be

secn from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Apply the
owner on premises. L, A, M. WATTS,
James Street. Dial 4523, .

10.2.51—4n.





FOR KENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din-
ing room, Breakfast room and Ki od
cette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
‘Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1.51.—6n.

ENTERPRISE—An adjoining Property
with 7 acres of land and stone building,
3 acres of arable, 4 acres of pasture
with nice Mahogany trees to be sold
to ony one who has relatives or
friends in the U.S. America, who is
desirous of buying for cash. To be sold
in the U.S. America.

Apply to G. Holder, Enterprise, Christ
Church Gap, Attorney for the Estate
for full information, €.2.51—6n.



“WORTHY DOWN" — Situated at Top
Rock, consisting of 3 bedrooms with con-
necting toilets and showers, large lounge,
dining room, ultra modern kitchen, large
front baleony, and breakfast balcony,
2-car garage, 2 servants’ rooms with
tcilet and showers also laundry, The
grounds are fully enclosed and the gar-
dens well laid out ete. Available on
Merch. Ist, 1951.

The above property is well constructed
in 12-inch stone, with an Everite roof.
Best offer above £4,000 will be accepted.
Further particulars ete, Ring 4683.
7.2.51—5n

Caen EEUU EEE EEE

“DUNSINANE”

COUNTRY, ROAD, ST. MICHAEL.

The residence lately occupied by Mrs.
W. O. Collymore.

The house stands in well kept gardens
and grounds (2 acres 37 perches).

The whole comprises verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 5 bedrooms, one
with marble bath, 2 showers, 2 lava-
tories, convenient kitchen and pantry,
reoms for 5 servants, garage for 2 cars,
and stables.

Water supply for garden and grounds
from a well with mill; water service in
house and also servants rooms (shower
and lavatory).

The residence completely wired and
furnished with electric lighting from
the company's mains.

House convertible into flats and out-
buildings convertible irto a _ cottage

The land is suitable for develop-
ment or kitchen gardens.

The undersigned will offer the
premises for sale by, public auction at
their office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 23rd day of
February 1951 at 2 p.m.

Inspection on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days only between 3 and 5 p.m.

For further particulars apply to

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO,
Solicitors,
4.2.51—10n.

NY

A new and well built Bungalow on
Pine Hill WESTFIELD, the pro-
perty of the late Sir George Walton.

The Bungalow stands on 18,020 square
feet of land and contains one large
public room, two bedrooms, kitchen,
laundry, bath and lavatory.

In a separate building there is a
garage for one car and two servants
rooms with bath and lavatory.

The property will be set up for sale
at our office on Wednesday the 21st day
of February 1951, at 2 p.m.

For conditions of sale apply to the
undersigned.

tion any day between 10.30 a.m.
and £ p.m, Telephone Lady Walton,
No. 4581.

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,

Solicitors.
9.2.51—1l1n.

a
HOUSE—At Inch Marlow Road, Christ
Church, 2 roofs and si , willing to
sell in parts, no reaso’ le offer refused.
Apply Frances Ville, Inch Marlow Road.
Christ Chureh to Frank Clarke.
10.2.51—2n
———__
SHARES—With Accruing Dividends:—
30 Sheres in Barbados Shipping & Trad-
ing Co., Lad. The above will be set
up for sale by Public Competition at our

Office, James Street, Bridgetown, on
Tuesday the 13th February at 2 p.m.
G. L. W. CLARKE & CO.,
er Solicitors.
10.2.51—3n

———————

For Sale—Cont'd





MISCELLANEOUS





STEEL STEP LADDERS—-tread and
4-tread. Just the thing for Stores, Schools,
Offices, and Household uses, 4 tread $9.88
each; 5 tread $12.95 each. Cannot be

repeated at this price, at RALPH
BEARD'S Show Rooms Hardwood
Alley. 10.2.51—2n

VICTROLAS, Prams, Clocks, Portable
Corona Typewriter. OWEN T. ALDER,
Roebuck Street. Dial 3299,







BARBADOS. ADVOCATE



PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 ceats per agote line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
end $1.80 on Sundays.

“fa5 > easily earnea by Sbtainine

order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making



opportunity, Jones, Williams & Co.

Dept. 9 Vict ..

rs mi oria Works, Preston,
25.1.51—18n

_—_—

HUMBER CYCLE COMPETITION—
Brand New Humber Bicycle. On view
at Harrison's Store. Tickets 1/- each.
Buy one now! 9.2.51—In,

NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. JOHN
SEALED tenders are invited for sup-
plying approximately 42 pints pure fresh
cows’ milk daily to St. John’s Almshouse
in two deliveries, as from the 25th
Merch 1951. Applications will be re-
ceived by the undersigned up to the 17th
instant, and it is to be understood that
the lowest or any tender will not neces-
sarily be accepted,
R. S. FRASER,
Clerk,
Board of Poor Law -
Guardians.
St. John,
10.2.51—6n





NOTICE
All owners of Dogs are reminded that
‘they must be Licensed ' during the
month of February, according to law.
N.B.—All Taxes due to the Parish will
also now be collected, according to law.
Signed A. A, B. GILL,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Joseph.
4,2.51—3n.

Publi¢ Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904
(1904-6) § 30).

On Friday the 23rd day of February
1951 at the hour of 2 o'clock in the
afternoon will be sold at my office to
the highest bidder for any sum not
under the appraised value.

All that certain piece of Land* con-
taining about twenty-five perches situate
im the Parish of Saint Michael, butting
and bounding on lands late of Fred
Maloney but now of H. O. Emtage & Co,
Ltd., late of Cleophas Adolphas Forde
but now of K. S. Hope and on_two
public roads, at Upper Bamk Hall Main
Road, appraised as follows:—

The whole area of land appraised to
Eight Hundred and Forty Six dollars
($846.00). Attached from Coleridge
Beresford Field for and towards satis-
fection, +&ec.

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on day
of purchase.



T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal.





8.2.51—3n.
NOTICE
Re Estate of
BLANCHE SKEETE
deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any debt or claim
against or affecting the
Blanche Skeete deceased,
Spooner’s Hill,
Michael in this Island Spinster who

died in the parish of Saint Michael on
the 28th day of January, 1951 are re-
quested to send in particulars of their
claims duly attested to the undersigned
EMMANUEL FITZPATRICK JOHNSON
Qualified Executor of the will of the
said Blanche Skeete deceased, c/o
Haynes & Griffith, Solicitors, No, 12
High Street, Bridgetown, on or before
the 15th day of April, 1951 after which
date we shall proceed to distribute the
assets of the deceased, among the
parties entitled thereto having regard
only to such claims of which we shall
then have had notice and we will not
be liable for the assets or any part
thereof so distributed to any person of
whose debt or claim we shall not then
have had notice.
And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their
indebtedness without delay.

Dated this 9th day of Februany, 1051.
EMMANUEL FITZPATRICK JOHNSON
Qualified Executor of the Will of
Blanche Skeete, deceased.

10,2.51—4n.

——

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1951, No, 3 which will be published in the Official Ga-
zette of Thursday 8th February, 1951.

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Milk-Condensed” are as follows :—

WHOLESALE PRICE
(not more than)



ARTICLE
soahcaeicamletisieiaseasliasialipncnnta
Milk-Condensed pe

7th February, 1951.



Attention is drawn to the Control of Lumber Prices (Defence)

(Amendment) Order, 1951, which

Gazette of Monday 12th February, 1951. ,

2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of “Mer-
chantable Pitch Pine”, “Merchantable White Pine” 1”x6”—11”, eV
and up and “Merchantable Spruce” 1”x6”-—11”, 6’ and up are as fol-

lows: —

COLUMN ONE
Article

a
(1) Merchantable Pitch Pine
(Basic Sizes) in
Merchantable White Pine
1”x6”—11", 6 and up
(Basic Sizes) a
Merchantable Spruce
1”x6"—11”, 6’ and up
(Basic Sizes) z.



ALTERATION TO SERVICES

It has been found that alterations and extensions to water services,

estate of] unless by a written order signed by mer
late of LIVINGSTONE HOPE,
in the parish of Saint Chalky Mount,

NS
$12.00 per case of
48x14 oz, tins

EEE a? ae

.. | $240.00 per 1,000 board feet

. «{ $240.00 per 1,000 board feet



LOST

Three cents per word on week-days
and 4 cents per word on Sundays, mint-
mum charge 72 cents on week-days and
96 cents on Sundays.

ONE (1) “EBOSA”" TRAVELLING
CLOCK. Square Brewn Leather. Cause.
Either at Hospital or outside “Accra”
Rockley, Reward offered. Phone 8290.

WATCH—Lady’s Gold Watch “Arta”
with Gold Strap. Lost between Two Mile
Hill and City. Reward offered, Phone
10.2.51—2n.

—_——
WATCH—On Wednegday night between
Pine and Culloden Roads, one lady’s gold
wrist watch. Finder will be rewarded
on returning same to Advocate Adver-

tising Dept, or may dial 3241,
10,2.51—2n

WANTED

Three certs per word on week-days
and 4 cents per word on Suntlai/s, mini-
mum charge 72 cents on week-days and
96 cents on Sundays.







HELP

CAPABLE, WELL EDUCATED
YOUNG MAN. Quick and accurate at
figures, typing, also able to handle cor-
respondence. Apply in writing and in
person to the British Bata Shoe Co.,
Ltd., Broad St. 10,2.51—3n





MISCELLANEOUS

es

GORRINGES undertake expert watch
and clock repairs, cleaning and resto-
retion of ofl paintings, valuation for in-
surance and_ probate. GORRINGES,
Upper Bay St. 2.2,51.—7n.

WE BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and
Silver jewellery, coins, dentures, etc ,
write, call or Dial 4429. “VORRINGES,
Antique Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht
Club. 1 3.2.51.—T7n.

WE BUY FOR CASH—Clocks, watches
a musical boxes in condition
Write, call or dial 4429, GES An-
tique Shop, Upper Bay Street.

3.2.51,—7n.

WANTED TO RENT
HOUSE—In Rockley or in Hastings.
Furnished with 3 Bedrooms, Drawing and



Dining Room and Kitchen, Toilet and
Bath. From the Ist of March. Call or
Telephone 8626. 9.2.51—2n







WANTED TO BUY
USED POSTAGE STAMPS-Of the
British West Indies. Good Prices Paid
at the Caribbean Stamp Society No. 10
Swan Street. 10.2.51—3n

BOARDERS—For furnished or unfurn-
ished rooms or boarding, at a quiet
residence in the Hastings Area. Apply to
Cc. J. C/o Advocate Co. 10.2.51—I1n

PERSONAL









The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, MARIE HOPE
(nee CLARKE) as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone else con-

St. Andrew. .
10,2.51—2n



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of L, J, Williams
Merketing Co., Ltd,, of Broad Street, St.
Michael for permission to sell Spirits,
Malt Liquors, &c., at 2nd floor front
room of wall building at Bookers Drug
Store, Broad Street, City.

Dated this 9th day of SNebruary 1951.
To:—H, A. TALMA, Esq.,

Police Magistrate,
District “A”.
Signed F, M. ODLE,
per L. J. WILLIAMS MARKETING CO.,
Applicants.

N.B.—This application will be consfd-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held at
on Monday
1951, at 11

Police Court, District “A”
the 19th day of February,
o'clock, a.m.
H,'A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.
10.2.51—1n

RETAIL PRICE
(not more than)

—_—————

27c, per 14 oz. tin

8.2.51.—2n.

will be published in the Official

COLUMN TWO
Ordinary Retail Price
(not more than)

_——————_——
$312.00 per 1,000 board feet

supplied from the Government's water mains, are being carried out
without the prior consent of the Waterworks Department,
This constitutes an offence under Section 65 of the Waterworks

Act, 1895-1, which renders consumers, as well as plumbers and con-
tractors, liable to a penalty not exceeding Five Pounds without preju-
dice to the right of the Department to recover the cost of any damage
done to their property, or the value of any water used or wasted. —

to be a Close Season for Okras.

Agriculture.

10.2.51—1n



OKRA ee SEASON

r
In pursuance of Section 4, subsection (3) of the Cotton Diseases
Prevention Act, 1928, (1928-7), the Governor-in-Executive Committee
has fixed the period from the 1st of May to the 30th of June, inclusive,



COTTON CLOSE SEASON
Ord

In pursuance of Section 4 subsections (1) and (2) of the Cotton | been farmed out at approved céntres, The fee for service is 2/- and
Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-7), the Governor-in-Executive | these centres are located as follows: —
Committee has fixed the period from the Ist of May to the 30th of
June, 1951, inclusive, to be a Close Season for Cotton.
Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this 1st day of
February, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-one.
By Command,

Chief Engineer,
Waterworks Department...
10.2.51—In,

er

A. A. HINDS,
Clerk, Executive Committee.

Note. Attention is drawn to sub-section (6) of Section 4 of the Cotton
Diseases Prevention Act, 1928 (1928-7) whereby special exemption
from the provisions of sub-section (3) of Section 4 may be granted
by the Director of Agriculture with the consent of the Board of

10.2.51—2n,

er

A. A, HINDS,
Clerk, Executive Committee.
10.2,51—2n.

‘
























PAGE SEVEN



TAKE NOTICE

THREE'FEATHERS

That THREE FEATHERS DISTRIBUTORS INC., a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Whole-
sale Liquor Distributors, whose trade or business address is 300 Fittm Avenue, New
York 1, State of New York, U.S.A,, has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect of whisky, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of
such registration, The trade mark can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 9th day of February 1951,

H WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
10.2.51-——3n.

TAKE NOTICE

That SCHENLEY INDUSTRIES, INC., a corporation organised and existing
under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, whose trade or
business address is 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, State of New York, US As
Wholesale Liquor Distributors, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A” of sister in respect of wines, and will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such

registration. The trade mark can be seen on application at fice.
Dated this 9th day of February 1951, a inet
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks.

TAKE NOTICE eee

rhan‘

That ZONITE PRODUCTS CORPORATION, a corporation organized and exist-
ing under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Manufactur-
ers, whose trade or busi address is 100 Park Avenue, New York 17, State of
New York, USA, oe oan ied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A" of
Register in respect of products for oral hywiene, such as dental paste, powders, and
creams and dentifrices all of which being of medicinal value, and also astringents,
and will be entitled to register the same after one month from the 10th day of Feb-
re tee ger grees rege a in ne eens give notice in duplicate to me

office ion of such registration,
application at my alfioe. 4 n. he trade mark can be seen on
Dated this 9h day of February 1951.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

TAKE NOTICE ve
CRESTA BLANCA

That SCHENLEY INDUSTRIES INC., a corporation organized and ¢= ving under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Manufacturers, whose
trade or business address is 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, State of New York,
U.S.A. has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of wines, and will be entitled to register the same after one month
from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of auch registration, The trade
mark can be seen on application at my office,

Dated this 9th day of February 1961,

MH. WILLIAMS, |
Registrar of Trade Marks,

TAKE NOTICE 2

oiD CHARTER

That OLD CHARTER DISTILLERY CO., a corporation organized and existing
under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, Distillers,
whose trade or bus.noss address is 100 West 10th Street, Wilmington, State of
Delaware, U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A”
of Register in respect of whisky, and will be entitled to register the same nfter
one month from the 10th day of February 1951, unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 9th day of February 1951,

H, WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks,
10.2.51—3n

GOVERNMENT NOTICES



POST OFFICE NOTICE
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES

An issue consisting of two stamps, namely 3 cents and 12 cents,
to commemorate the inauguration of the University College of the
West Indies ane the installation of Her Royal Highness Princess Alice,
Countess of Athlone, will be made in Barbados on Friday, 16th Febru-
ary instant. The issue will be for three months or until stocks are
exhausted, if sooner, Current issue stamps of similar values will be
temporarily withdrawn.

The designs of the stamps are:—

3 cents, the Arms of the University.

' 12 cents, a full length seated portrait of Her Royal Highness
in her robes as Chancellor.

' Both denominations are vertical format.

(a) Advance orders from local residents for these stamps
will be received at the General Post Office and dealt with in
strict order of rotation provided they are for complete sheets of
60 of each or multiples of 60.

(b) Orders must be accompanied by remittance to cover face
value. '

(c) A receipt will be sent and must be preserved.

(a) Stamps will be put up in sealed packets and delivered
on 16th February from 8.00 a.m. on application at Poste Restante?
on presentation of the receipt referred to above signed by the
recipient of the stamps. This will be detained by the delivery
clerk in whose presence the stamps should be checked.

(e) Stamps must be affixed by the sender preferably at the
top right hand corner of the envelope, the Department cannot
undertake to do this, and posted not later than 4.00 p.m,

Persons desiring to register 25 or more envelopes will be supplied
in advance with numbered registration receipts in duplicate and num-
bered labels. The labels will be affixed by the sender to the letter
intended for registration and the address, abbreviated, filled in on the
receipt.

Letters duly labelled and bearing the correct postage and registra-
tion fee, with receipts in duplicate, will be presented at the Registra-
tion Branch for acceptance. After verification the original receipt,
date stamped and signed will be handed to the applicant and the
duplicate retained as an office record. '

General Post Office,

8th February, 1951.

> wanda |

9.2,51—2n,
cE
POSTMASTER — PARISH OF ST. PHILIP

Applications are invited for the vacant office of Postmaster/
Postmistress, St. Philip.

Appointment will be made subject to the selected candidate
being passed as medically fit for employment in the Public Service,
and will be on one year’s probation. The minimum educational stand-
ard which will be accepted is a pass in the Cambridge Local School
Certificate or a similar examination of equivalent standard. Appli-
cants should preferably be between the age of 21 and 30 years.

The salary attached to the Post is at the rate of $1,056 by $72
to $1,776 (E.B,) by $96 to $2,160 per annum. Further particulars may
be obtained from the Colonial Postmaster.

Applications should be made on Forms obtainable from the Colo-
nial Secretary’s Office and must be returned not later than the 14th
of February, 1951,
6.2.51.—2n,



NOTICE TO FISHERMEN AND BOAT-OWNERS
Fishermen and boat-owners who contemplate the building of new

Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this Ist day Of] §.hing boats, for which assistance by loan from the Government may
February, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-one.

By Command,

be required, are advised to discuss their problem with the Fishery
Officer before expending any money towards such construction,



SERVICE OF BULLS AT THE PINE PLANTATION
The public is hereby notified that two Friesian bulls, progeny of
the imported Friesian bull “Burgate Hillarious” are now available for
service at the Pine Plantation. The service fee is 3/- and cows and
heifers may be brought for service from 7.30 to 8.30 a.m, or 4.00 to
4.30 p.m. i



Service of Boars
The Department of Science and Agriculture has instituted a
scheme whereby boars reared at the Central Livestock Station have

(1) J. C. Marsh, Esquire, Bannatyne Plantation, Ch. Ch.

(2) D. A. V. Weekes, Esquire, Jordans Plantation, St. George.

(3) J. A. Bethell, Esquire, Hopewell Plantation, St. Thomas.

(4) R. Coward, Esquire, Sugar Hill, St. Joseph.

(5) M. A. Alleyne, Esquire, Wakefield Plantation, St. John.

(6) R. E. King, Esquire, Fisherpond Plantation, St. Thomas.

(7) L. N. Hutchinson, Esquire, Black Rock, St Michael.
10.2.51--1n



















—

TAKE NOTICE = ee
TRUBENISED :

That TRUBENISED COMPANY (Re
according to the law of Liechtenstein, whose trade or
Liechtenstein, Rathaus, has applied for the
“A” of Register in respect of men’s and boys
blouses, dresses and trimmings and corsctry, and clothing of all kinds, and will
be entitled to register the same after one month from the 10th de’ of FeBrudry.
1951, unless some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to» me
at my office of opposition of such registratior The trade mark can be*seen on
application at my office

Dated this 9th day of February 1951.

istered Trus a corpse

business adc

tion organized
ros is” Vaduz,
egistration of a trade mark in.Part
shirts, collars and cuffs and ladies’














H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
10.2,51+-3n

TAKE NOTICE PaaS





That PAUL JONES AND COMPANY, INC., a corporation organized under the
laws of the State of Maryland, United States of America, Distillers, whose trade
or business address is 405 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York, United States
of America, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of alcoholic beverages, especially whisky, and will be entitled
to register the same after one month from the 10th dey of February, 1951, unless
some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office af
opposition of such registration. The trade mark can be seen on application at
my office.

Dated this 9th day of February 1951

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,















SHIPPING NOTICES |



MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW }j
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)

“TONGARTRO”

The M.V. “Caribbee” will
arriving here on the 8th, and

MS be accepting Cargo & Passengers ~

ig scheduled to for Dominica, Antigua itser" *
sal Adelaide January 24th, Melbourne at) Nevis & st. Kitts. Saluae*
February 9§th, Sydney February 17th. Saturday 10th.

Brisbane February 23rd, Arriving at ;

Barbados end of March, 1951.

This vessel has ample space for Hard
Frozen and General cargo,

Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad
for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
and Leeward : Islands,

The M.V. “Daerwood will, ae-
cept Cargo and Passengers for St>
Lucia, Grenada, & Aruba and Pas-
sengers only for St, Vincent, coin
of departure to be eotified,

B.W., SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, two,



For further particulars apply —

YURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. and

Da COSTA & CO. LTD,, o eee omen
Trinidad, Barbados, Telephone; 4047 os
BWI. B.W.l, - sament

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM-







re 3 :
Vessel >» From |. Leaves Barbiths a
S.S. “MULBERRY HILL” .. M/brough & aie
S.S. “PROSPECTOR” % Lon an ae Feb. 28 a
S'S. “FACTOR” 3 eo a 3rd Feb. 3rd Feb. st
L/pool 6th Feb. = 19th Feb”
S.S, “TRIBESMAN” ov M/brough & fie 2B in
London 8th Feb. 27th Feb,
S.S. “SPEAKER” .» Liverpool 17th Feb. 4th. March
S.S. “S'TATESMAN” .. London 17th Feb, Sth March

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel For Closes in Barhado
S.S. “COLONIAL” . Liverpool 12th Feb, r

For further information apply to - - -




































DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents.. =:
; er
Tn on
oe. ee
4 «
“ 7
, a eee
e Inc. PE... SY! 3
ss. “pel” wane aan NEW, YORK SERVICE : ser
8.8. \s : J ae ,
8S. “Byfjord" sails 2nd Pobniniy ree satan ith FORE ETY us
aici bad on an whe a
NE
A Steamer sails 18th , Seeans es 2nd
i ji » Ist’ February — $ i. 15th ny
enepeerenesecene SDN,
CANADIAN SER
SOUTHBOUND irae "inate
Name of Ship Sails Arrives , i paves
58. “ALCOA PILGRIM" ag ea 7 8

Januany 26th,
February 9th
February 23r.

February Sth.
February 20th,
March 6thy - . =

“ALCOA PENNANT”
“ALCOA POLARIS”



. r * a
v FALE ®

ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service, > ~
Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD,—-Canadian Service.

Them vessels have limited passenger accommodation.








~~
_<— ~~

PASSAGES TO EUROPE >=’

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, for sail- 3

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.



SEE US FOR...... td -

a ae -

LAWN MOWERS & PARTS



THE CENTRAL EMPOR



Na

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.— Proprietoes,
Cnr.. of Broad and Tudor Streets.












q

4

Â¥
PCCP LLL PL LEP PPP LLPPLP AAPA APP PS POE

% >

‘ *

% , Ni

5 . nck

t 4S
% x nll
* %

> : .

eo

“‘We’re Not Magicians,
but...”

——
... with the vast resources of Ford of Dagenhant>"*

CLLPPOP PSPSPS SESE OES SSS SPE

behind us, we can produce most Genuine Ford -—~ x :
spares either on the spot or at very short notice, * z t
@ What's more, these spares are available to you =. t
at low fixed prices and are fully guaranteed, The ~. % i
mene.
Â¥ finest Service Facilities in this district are at your <=="
x disposal. ‘ * — = 2
* — (
$ S ~ S48
% 5.0
° x a
: (CHA ENEARNEY LTD. 34
Vie iM
% f, M ¢ Ul R & (0. ‘ . $

-

%
Ah bbb 6:6 66,6 ,456,6 656 5S OOOO

$656609%
PPP APP POE IEE P OA POL A OOP LET SVOOSOOS SFOS O 998

s
POOCPFEOFIS

oe.
PAGE EIGHT

No New Players In

Trinidad Team

(From Our Own Correspondent)
. PORT-OF-SPAIN.
None of the young players invited for the trials in





preparation for the Intercolonial tournament succeeded in
the endeavour to impress the Trinidad selectors and as a
result thirteen players all of whom havewon colony caps



C’wealth Score
413 In 5th Test

INDIA 143 FOR 4

KANPUR, India, Feb. 9.

The Commonwealth cricket
touring team were dismissed in
their first innings for 413 in the
fifth, and final unofficial Test here
today, and at the close India had
replied with 143 for four wickets.

Ken Grieves, an Australian who
plays for Lancashire, was in an
aggressive mood for the Common-
wealth today. He excelled with
euts and forceful pulls and batted
two hours 43 minutes in scoring
89. He was extremely unlucky to
miss his first century of the series.

With Fred Ridgeway, Kent fast
bowler, scoring a useful 27 and
adding 88 runs in 73 minutes with
Grieves for the ninth wicket, the
Commonwealth team were all out
for 413, after adding 106 im 90
minutes to their overnight score of
307 for six.

India lost their opening pair
Merchant and Rege with only 42
scored, but Umrigar and Hazare
added 98 runs for the third wicket
before two more wickets fell. Um-
vigar scored 57 in 180 minutes be-
fore being dismissed while Hazare
Was not out at the close with 42.

When stumps were drawn, India
were still 270 runs behind with six
wickets in hand.—Reuter.





Regiment Defeats

Devonshire 5—0

THE. Regiment drubbed a team
from H.M.S. Devonshire 5—0 yes-
terday in a football match which
was played at the Garrison Savan-
nah. Three of the goals were
scored in the first half,

R. Roach. kicked in two goals,-'
J. Parris one, S. Sealy one and, .

the other goal was sliced in by one!
of the Devonshire backs. The’
Regiment were on top all the time!
in the game but the main caus
why the Devonshire boys were s
badly beaten is their lack of Sal
control and accurate kicking. The
‘teams were:

egiment: Brathwaite; Chase,
Bispham; Marshall, Ishmael,
Grant; Parris, Roach, Sealy,

Phillips and Price.

Devonshire: Wood; Finlayson,
Allan; Owen, Lemming, Wilson;
Bayley, Nancholas, Grant Ander-
son and Callignam,

SHIP’S MATCH

A cricket team from H.M.S.
Devonshire will oppose one from
the Barbados Regiment in a game
to be played at the Garrison to-
day. Play begins at 1.30 p.m.

The following will represent the
Regiment: C. i . Ishmael,
R.S.M. Marshall, Sgt. Edwards,
Privates Clarke, Bynoe, Brath.
waite, Phillips, Burrowes, Green,
Price and Rowe.



“Devonshire” Lose
Shooting Match
To Regiment

‘The Barbados Regiment defeated

the H.M‘S~ Devonshire in a rifle
match which took place at the
Government Rifle Range yester-
day morning. The Regiment got
@ grand total of 431 as against 398
by the Devonshire.

The shoot consisted application
at 200 yards, snap at 200 yards,
Rapid at 200 yards and application
at 300 yards. .

Highest possible score was made
by Capt. C. E. Neblett of the Bar.
bados Regenene who got 93, while
Lieut, roth-Knowles of the
Devonshire and R.S.M. H. B. G.
Marshall of the Regiment each
scored 90.

Following are the results:—

Applic. :

were chosen for the series at Kensington Oval.

ye team over which the selec-
tors t6ok about
draw up was

10 minutes to
received with

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BRITONS Ra
BET LESS Box

LONDON, Feb,
The rising cost of living is caus-
ing Britons to wager less on their
favourite weekly gamble — the
Football Pools. Stakes on horse-
racing and greyhound racing are
ong being cut,
igures issued by the Churches’
Committee on gambling show. the
average weekly stake on football
pools fell from 52 cents in 1949 to
50 cents in 1950. Other figures
covering the first three months of
1950 showed 25.1 per cent of men

Welterweight champion

Manager George Gainford said
fore leaving foe New York that
the try for a boxing grand slam
may begin this fall, He explained,

: and women wagered on the pools “Ray is contract boung to give
ee taeda large ee compared with 33.1 per cent in Lamotta a return match in June.
? . : But after that I’ i try t
the final trial and only those who The report estimated) that in the dronitne mas Light "hvewente
af eae 54, PO ee Bre eee nae eae eon championship fight ‘with Joey
a, ¥ ictor illiamson ritons participated in footbal ;
and veteran Derek Sealy podls weekly compared with 11, Maxim and a heavyweight title

could be said to have felt dis-
appointed. But neither William -
son nor Sealy played well enough
on Sunday to force the selectors
to as undisputed
candidates for the No. 5 place on
the. Trinidad batting list.
The full team selected is: —

Jeff Stollmeyer (Captain),
Andrew Ganteaume, Nyron
Asgarali, Ralph Legall, Ru-
pert Tang Choon, Clarence
Skeete, V Ferguson,
Simpson Guillen, Sydney
Jackbir, Prior Jones, Frank
King, Charles Sampath, Lev-
nox Butler.

The team shows six changes
from the one which represent-
ed Trinidad at Kensington Oval
in 1949. Edgar Marsden, Kenny
Trestrail, Elias Constantine,
Derek Sealy, Lance Pierre and
Cecil Pouchet, who played in
1949 have been replaced by
Stollmeyer, Legall, Jones, Fer-
guson, Jackbir and King. Stoll-
meyer, Jones and Ferguson
were in India with the West
Indies team during this series.
The selection of Tang Choon
and Jackbir will enable the
two players full opportunity
to celebrate their 17th year in
Intercolonial cricket. Both made
first appearances on the ‘Trinidad
team in 1934. At the other end of
the line is Butler youngest player
in the side, who will be making
his second trip to Barbados. He
earned virtuous figures on his last
appearance at Kensington Oval,
eke ng eden in overs in
the first Bar innings of the
second match of that tour.

30 Contest
Golf To-day

Thirty golfers have entered for
the Medal Play Championship
which will be played to-day and
to-morrow over the Rockley|Golf
and Country Club course, con-
stituting a record field for the
event. This is one of the two
competitions played off scratch,
and the long list of entries is due
to the fact that it has been com-
bined with the President's Cup, a
handicap event.

Both tests are over thinty-
holes, of which eignteen wae
played to-day and eighteen
tomorrow, the low gross score
deciding the championship pro-
per and the low net score gain-
ing the President’s Cup. All
twelve, of the players who rep-
resented Roc! in the team
match with Trinidad last week
have entered.

The starting times and pairings
for both days follow:—



.m. -- C, Bayley, W. Nurse, S.
liesh

% p.m. — B. Wybrew, M, Timpson, L.
Maskell.

2.00 p.m. —D. Inniss, W. Atkinson, J:
Christie,

05 p.m. — D, Lucie-Smith, G. Chal-
lenor, R, Norris. :

2,10 p.m. — J. O'Neal, J. Grace, R. P.
Goodi

215 pm. — I. Niblock, J, Bean, B.
Rolfe,

2.20 p.m. — G. Manning, W. Grannum,
Toppin.
2.25 p.m. — R. Vidmer, R, Inniss, K. Ry

es cp
30 p.m. — R. Wilson, J. R, Rodger, D.
Perceval.

2.35 p.m. — E. Benjamin, H. Weaver,
K. Girling.



WATER POLO THIS
’ AFTERNOON

re. will be a Water Polo
match at the Barbados Aquatic
Club this afternoon between two
teams from H.M.S. Devonshire.
Play is expected to begin shortly
after 4 o'clock,

THE B'DOS REGIMENT eee ae.
200 yds, 200 yds. 200 yds. 300 yds.
Lt.-Col. J. Connell . 26 9 28 26 ~s
Captain C. E. Neblett .. 28 15 28 22 93
Lieut, T. A. og ae 28 15 18 22 83
RS.M. H. B. @ Marshall 26 15 27 22 90
L/Sjt. H. A. Stuart .. ie 6 24 21 16
Totals - 2 60 125 13 431
H.M.S. DEVONSHIRE
Mr. Smith a 24 0 30 21 cis
Lieut. Norman .. 22, 3 27 21 3
Sjt. Turner oe 22 12 24 4 82
Lieut, -Knowles 25 15 30 20 90
L/Tel Turton at 26 6 26 20 78
Totals . 119 36 14 106 398

They'll Do It Eve



ELL,AT LAST THE TOWN

FATHERS ACTED “+
1S JUST

INCE bast SPRING THE “LL,

Rosistored U. 5, Petons Otten

Time

BY? OR
Se




WORK
STARTING’ -

THE PLANNING COMMISSION PASSED
IT das ve SANITATION





Se aaa
LD OE VO

IWS

fight with Ezzard Charles.”
Gainford simply took it for
granted that Robinson would re-
vive memories of the St. Valen-
tine’s day massacre in the 15-
round bout with Lamotta at the
Chicago Stacium next Wednesday,

250,000 in the same period of 1949.

According to the report, the
average pool stake for all classes
of the population fell, compared
with 1949, “in the case of the
wealthy from 84 cents to 54 cents,”
(weekly)

“While people in the older age
groups have continued participa.
tion, there is a very marked de-
crease among the younger age
group,” the report declared,

“Whether this indicates that the
habit is beginning to lose its grip
is difficult to judge.”

The report said that in 1949,
2,110,000 Britons staked more than
70 cents a week each and 400,000
others more than $1.40 a week on
the pools; in 1950 only 1,390,000
were staking more than 70 cents
and 235,000 more than $1.40.

The turnover for all forms of
gambling in Britain in 1950 was
given as $1,820,000,000 compared
with $2,020,000,000 in 1949,

Downward trend in gambling
was also reflected in money staked
on horseracing—$1,190,000,000 in
1950 against $1,260,000,000 in 1949,

Greyhound racing turnover was
down from $560,000,000 in 1949 to
$448,000,000 in 1950.—I.N.S.

Peke Backs
Horses
AND WINS

More Years

The husky fight manager estim-
ated that 29-year-old Robinson
still has “two or three more good
years” of boxing left before retir-
ing. Gainford figured that was
time enough for Robinson to be-
come ruler of the light heavy-
weight and heavyweight divisions.

Sugar Ray lost a reading of the
Illinois Athletic Association’s box-
ing primer when Lamotta was
granted a 10 a.m, weigh-in. Gain-
ford had demanded that the
weighing be done at the usual
noon hour,

The Boxing -Commission agreed
that Lamotta was within the rights
in asking for the earlier weigh-
in. Chairman Joe Triner said
regulations require a weighing “no
later than 12 o’clock” and not at
exactly 12 o’clock. Triner added:

Two Hours

“Lamotta will have two hours
to trim his weight should he fail
to make 160 pounds at 10 a.m. The
champion will lose his title, how-
ever, if he is not at that weight or
less by noon. In that event, the

LONDON. fight will go on as scheduled anda

London bookies to-day give the Robinson will be declared the
horse laugh to the old law that Champion regardless of the result
“Man’s best friend is his dog.” in the ring.”

For one of their clients is a r
smug, flatnosed Pekingese which . Jake was denied a request pro-
has been picking and backing win. hibiting a technical knock-out.
ners with inhuman accuracy for Lamotta was assured that the bout
for the past two. seasons. would not be stopped unless a

The WPeke, 5-year-old Black fighter was suffering from a severe
Knight, is owned by Lady Mun-~ eye cut and was in danger of
nings, wife of the famous painter permanent injury. The explana-
of horses, Sir Alfred Munnings, tion did not satisfy the stocky

Lady Munnings said: slugger from the Bronx. He said:

“Black Knight started racing “I’m willing to lose an eye to
two years ago and has been very win this fight. I can get along on
successful as a punter, He is much one eye.”
better than I at picking winners,

“He has his own account with a
firm of bookmakers and it shows Robinson had been sitting next
a handsome balance.” to Jake at the time of the remark.

Lady Munnings explained that The Harlem dandy gave Lamotta
as dogs are banned from race a startled look and moved away
tacks Black Knight is taken. into to a safe distance. Lamotta paid
the paar, ina small blackbag no gitention and continued:
with a window at each end. “You know, Commissioner, 1

“When the horses parade in the have a way of boxing where I play
ring Black Knight gives a woof of possum, I make out like I’m hurt
approval when the one he wants and then I suddenly start swing-
to back passes by.” , ing.” Commissioner Triner ad-

Among his winning selections vised Jake not to play possum
during the past two years was since this was the sixth bout be-
Freebooter, 10 to 1 winner of the tween the two and because Robin-
1950 Grand National Steeplechase, con wasn't casily tooled. Lamotta
and Nimbus, winner of the Derby replied: ,
at Epsom in 1949,

But his winnings are not spent
on extra juicy bones.

Certainly not,” said Lady
Munnings,” I do the spending for
bim.” —INS.

Standard Canasta

By M. HARRISON-GRAY
_— wr es
THE EARLY MELD

‘THE auestion of when to
meld early 18 a contro-

versial one.
pinyer should
var’ vi 1

He Moved

“But I could be hurt and Rob-
inson might think that I was play-
ing. possum,”’

riner then, queried Robinson on
this point. Ray answered:

“No one knows when
(Lamotta) hurt.”

—LN.S.



he's










2.
ni the
, vou ‘Shout
8 nt num) cards
pe a

4 0
H tunity, of is 1
aie Ba, * ftoutd Be ae

A a,

4 it Foursery, Betors the
gpbonents are in & position
to freeze the pack, But
remember — having melded
early, you will be teft with

cards, so you must take

pportun

rep lenishing your
taking even a smal! pack that
is offered to 3Ou. with the aid
of one of your remaining wild

ese tactics may fall on
the occasions where one or

Beebe kn

©

winn: >
London Express Service.

By Jimmy Hatlo



Hazer Courr
(J. Arthur Rank Organisation)
Says lo you +
“TI always depend on the
entle daily care of Lux
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DEPT: BUT



the light heavyweight and heavyweight boxing crowns if
he wins the middleweight title from Jake Lamotta Feb, 14.

















Robinson Seeks Passetigers Should |
ing Pastures New

By KEN OPSTEIN

CHICAGO,
Ray Robinson is going to seek



HUNTE GETS
A BAT

MR. D. A. FOSTER, M.C.P.,
has given a cricket bat to B.C.L.
player Conrad Hunte in apprecia-
tion of his selection in the Barba-
dos Cricket team. The bat will
be presented to Hunte on Sunday
evening before the i

Party at Belleplaine, St. Andrew.
eines

FRACTURED, LEG

MARY JEMMOTT of Orange
Hill, St. James was detained at the
General Hospital after she was
carried there suffering from a

lorty coming along the road and
in an atadige to get out of its way
fell.





What's on Today

B.M.S. “Rodney” arrives at

daybreak.
Exhibition of Sculpture and
' Paintings by K. R. Brood-
hagen, Paintings and
water colours by Marjorie
. EBroodhagen and paintings
and water colours by John

Harrison at Barbados
Museum ........... 10.00
Cricket match between
H.M.S. “Devonshire” team

ment at the : 130
H.M.S. “Devo: ‘ss m .
vs. an island team at
Harrison College .... 4.30

Two teams from H.M.S.
“Devonshire” play a foot-
I match at the Garri-
Fhe 6 BAW EEN Oo koe 5.00
Valentine Dance at Mariue
NE rsh ace doa's s+ dhe 9.00
CINEMAS:
Aquatic Club:
“The Secret Life of
Walter Mitty” ..... siege
Plaza Theatre (Bridgetown)
“Stony of Seabiscuit’ 445 & 8,30
Gaiety (St. James):

- 8.30

VER Forde’? i eects 8.20
Empire:

“In a Lonely Place” ...... 8,30
Olympic:

“Walking Hills” and
“Anna Lueasta” .. 4.30 & 8.15







The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.21 a.m,
Sun Sets: 6.03 p.m.
Moon (First Quarter) Feb-
ruary 13.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 6.41 a.m., 6.49

p.m.

High Water: 6.41 a.m., 6.49
p.m,
YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington) nil.

Tetal for Month to Yester-
day: .94 in.

Temperature (Max.) 83.0 °F

Temperature (Min,) 74.5 °F

Wind Direction (9 a.m.), E.
(3 p.m.) ENE.

Wind. Velocity: 12 miles per
hour.

Barometer; (9 a.m.) 30.012,
(3 p.m.) 29.937.



You can be as lovely as
the film stars you admire. The
fragrant lather of pure white
Lux Toilet Soap wilt being out
the natural beauty of your
complexion, and leave your
skin clear and smooth. All you
have to do is wash in warm
water with the creamy lather
of Lux Toilet Soap, then splash
with cold, New fevclinest will
be yours!



| THE FRAGRANT WHITE SOAP OF THE FILM STARS |

a LEVER rropuct










SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1951







NOW! Dental Science Reveals

PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
IS THE SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY TO

Face Tail Of Plane

LONDON, Feb. 9.
Britain is urging that all pas-
sengers in civil aircraft should sit
facing the tail to improve their
ehances of survival in case of acci-|
dents.
She will make the recommenda- |






































people were killed.



64.67,

Dakota crash at Mill Hill, north-
west London, last October when 28 |

—Reuter.

AN OPPORTUNITY

TO BUY
1 Small Gas
Enamel finish,
2 Boiling Burners
1 Grell Burner complete with
oven, cooker traded in to buy.
A large Cooker
PRICE $60
see it at your Gas Show Room.

Cooker Gre7



CHELSTON
LIME WORKS

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Boulders, Concrete Stone
Grit, Marl and Sand

Trucks on hire
P.S. BROOKS, Phone 8335



Accountancy, Cost Ac-
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A six months’ “Intensive
Method" Course (Recognised for
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study. For details, write now:
The Principal, LONDON SCHOOL

ORIENTAL
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From INDIA, CHINA,
EGYPT !

Silkk, Curios, Brassware,
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THAN os.

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Pr. Wm. Henry St.—Dial 6466

FURNISH

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The Money-Saving Way

Bedsteads, Cradles in Tron and

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H. KEITH ARCHER’S
DRUG STORE

Coleridge Street
DIAL 2999



FOR SALE

OFFERS will be received
by the undersigned up to the
1éth day of February for the
block of buildings, (land not
included), situated on Prince
William Henry and Victoria
Streets and Bolton Lane,
sections of which are at pres-
ent occupied by W. A. Med-
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by the Bridgetown Ice

A Purchaser to de-

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clear the land within sixty
days from date of purchase.

EVELYN ROACH & CO.,

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3.2.51—t.f.n.

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Wholesale & Retail Druggist
18f Roebuck St. Dial 2615





OOOO

a |

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next month, |
This was revealed to-day at a T

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Each $2.22; $2.36, $2.51, &
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Chairs, Morris Suites and Separ-
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RING 4908








PAGE 1

SATIRDAY. FF.BRIARY 1(1. 1931 BABBADOS ADVOCATK Helicopter Saves Lives BLAMES FLU ON LABOUR By FRANK CONNIFF I VS. War ond.nt WITH THE UNITED STATES MARINES IN KOREA. A CiROTESQUE gadget that flies through the air with LONDON. Ftb OhnaMe n*rcblithe defiance of the laws ol gravity has proved the sur£,5J, r ch riS '£', ""l.. 8 ""?" America s vaunted skill in machinery. in, lhc prr *Z, mflue !" ^io>r„ie %  The • humble helicopter, once of the new a "" Catching Cold Is A Tough Job j ON SCOTTISH tSL€ Thehumble helicopter, once of" the new golden-powder drug the stepchild ol the aviation auereomycin for the sake of savin* household, has Anally won acceptdollars. ance alongside 't hig brothers by The Sustday Chremlcle claimed glittering performance In the doctors estimated live hundred Korean War. Korean natives who victims of the influenza wave who barely look up at planes. Patton have died from arnplic.Uon< tanks, and other testimonials to could have been saved II the new Unele Sam's talent for machine drug had been freely available in precision stfll gate in awe at thi* Britain. LONDON *awky monstrosity as It whirs on The doctors pointed out that A call has gone wit for .100 vol%Xs •PPOinted rounds through the auereomycin ** on sale generally amm Public baffling symptoms. But the specific %  **•. • %  '> Relauoni Officer to the Newcastle Ui l! 0r c r *' for ,hhf ntver>al 'Copter chauffeurs will fight branch of the British Medical irouoic-inaker has eluded them. anyone, however, who hints that Association said: Latest disclosure of failure ahair craft is a mere freak. The "There is no doubt that many came as one of the worst epidemics tolld utility of the 'copter has lives could have been saved if the of colds and Influenza spread been demonstrated in a number of drug had been more readily availpcrost the land and millions went ways. It has saved lives. It has able." around sniffling sneezing and rescued pilots stranded behind It Is estimated thai the cost of coughing and praying for quick enemy lines. It has enabled comsaving the lives of flve hundred relief from the miseries. manders to keep a close check on British victims would have been TK,, u developments in the fleld. It has $2z.40 „ head! Aufreomvcln costs £ue£&a "rrr szr sss-, he d iv y iss" s I-Tim.nl with ,,roup of I] Cached in -hl, bliKers" .1nd other necessities for a within a few hours after being '". e stored, has received hundreds tmee-months' stay. Divided into hit of re< l u *> l s 'rom doctors for any Hiree separate groups for experiavailable supplies for life-or-death %  ental purposes, they settled Army medics wax enthusiastic ca ?*' t own in the solidly-built stone when they discuss the contrlbuForeign Secretary Ernest Bevin, house evacuated about 12 yctars ttons of the 'copter. wh has been ill with pneumonia. OHO by families unable to eke a Practically every high commander made a marked Improvement after livelihood from the barren moorin the Eighth Army, from Lt. Gen. auereomycin had been adminls1-indsMatthew Ridgway on down, detered—I.W.8 No personal contact with the pends on the helicopter to maino itside world was permitied. Even tain tight liaison with develop!ctiers were banned. Only comments at the front. It is no trick munication was by radio. Members anymore for a general to get a %  I the thiee Kroups were forbidden personal peek at the war. He to trespass on each other's terriclimbs into his 'copter and in a tory. matter of minutes is huddling over „ _. tactics wilh the combat echelons. Took hvery Risk Your first ride in a helicopter hB , '** '"able to provide one of the LONDON. me luitinteers were exposed To strangest sensations in your life. A * "">* of Napoleon, made c%ery risk normally known to i hitched a ride rrom Marine Din *>w hours after his death on St, .mngon a cold. They took steamvisional Headquarters back to Helena island, will be auctioned i.g not oaths and then stood in Taegu soon. WL Hff'^JT %  dra W hl i^**' You ,ak oH straight into the The death mask, together with .i.e> mingled with subjects iiu*uair and seem to come to a dead "^V other valuable historical Kited with artitlciaIly-propagated st0 p. For a moment you toy with •, win be put under the viTis—all to no avail. ( he notion that this can't be true, bstfajner nt Sir Archibald Weigails The vlentlst^ ( m M r.H u There >" ou a !" hanging suspended country estate near Ascot in March. Hn't L £'v eaten a cold when ln mM - ,r ; un,bl to at* the .The mn^k was made by a Dr. voutrv \i w ^not: imi!? ? main g,nes or Rlim P sc ,n wln B *"*" Automarchi. Napoleon's Italian iSbriwi'lKiirtS usually support a plane. Only the physician, who sent it .to hrU.,Lh, !" "E! throbbing of the rotor behind Archibald's grandrath gives a clue to the 'copter's proBuighersh, In Florence FOR SALE: NAPOLEONS DEATH MASK Self-Styled "Pries!" Steals His Outfit PORT-OP-SPA IN. Feb. & A self-styled "Baptist preacher", who it is alleged, stole a priest's oulnt—cape, stole and gown— from the Presbytery of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception on Sunday night, was this morning remanded for medical observation. The "Baptist preacher" is Wilfred Hare wood, a middleaged man, of Mission Road. San Juan. He was held by constable Calvin Trotman at 4.30 o'clock yesterday morning, five hours or so after he was said to have entered the Presbytery where he took off his shin and watchekong, put on the cape, stole and gown. Royal Summons LONDON. Feb. Five London saloon and restaurant keepers have been summoned to Buckingham Palace on February 7—not tor an investiture or garden party—but to renew their licenses. The flve are the only licenses in Britain whose premises are controlled by King George. The summons to attend ihc palace :s sent out by the "Board of The Green Cloth." which supervises kitchen nnd domestic arrangement* at Buckingham Piliee.—I.N S. Paper Rebukes Siotnik Mines And Factories PRAGUE. Feb. 9. %  vak Communist Party's newspaper Pravste to-day severely lebuked hez\\ industry in Slovakia 'because mines and factories fnlle4 lo fulm their January prodganggss. Analysing the shortcoming. the region now being rapidly io(iustrtahscd. PravsU said the failure "ihouiih not really great, gives cause for some very anxious reBactti a Pravda ascribed the shortcomings to faults In the political and organisational preparations in the third year of the flve-year plan. Communist Party officials In factories in Slovakia were devoting too much time to technk.il auttasni hich Were the duties of f nctory managers. Pravda said. "They must flrst of all devote themselves to the political onent.itlon and activation Of workers." The paper listed considerable shortcomings In, the manufacture of precision machines and the wood, glass, paper and cellulose Industries had not fulfilled the plan. Other branches had fulfilled H In "a seriously uneven way !" and uneven production was ab-o recorded between different weeks N one mrnth. Not a single mine had completed its coal plan. Absenteeism here had Increased to eight per cent, over the estimated figure. In the iron ore section Slovakia^ industry plan has fulfilled onlv tl7 per cent. —Heater. Teeth WU1 Hurt Less NEW YORK. Feb. America's billion-dollar dent. fries industry was lepo Y sc d to be planning to market at least four new toothpowders containing penicillin which, ii is sails, will reduce tooth decay The disclosure was made by Or Philip Adams, Cincinnati Industrial Research director, who said thnt research prefects preliminary to introducing new penicillin dentrifrices are well under way at the University of Louisville, University of Cincinnati and in New York City and Cleveland Public Schools. Dr. Adams said that only one penicillin dentifrice — dentot illin is now available and is sold onlv on the prescription of a dentist He said that it was a favourable report on the cavtty-inhibitlng cncctivcness of dcntocillin that suited the industry's trend toward dentifrices containing the miracle drug. The report came from Tufts College Dental School in Boston The report published in the Journal of American Dental Association m May. 1850, said that 500 unit* ol penu-illm used in a gram of dent If r ire had reduced tooth decay by 55 per cent in a clinical .*ludv among S0 school children Dr. Adams said "it is safe to predict that penicillin tooth powiiit will dominate the dentifrice field in this country as soon as the big manufacturers complete their marketing preparations and go into production."—I N.S .atur.il cold, was brought to IhS i-iand that three of the volunteers were laid low. The scientist*, however, are far from discouraged. In launching tilt diive for a new panel of volunteers, a spokesm "Although we haven't been lucky enough to discover an effective way of warding off the common cold, we have learned a tremondcus amount. We certnlnlv (eel \: Is worthwhile persevering." —C.P. Sir Lord pula. I power—INS. Stage Set Far Arms Hat tie The famed Duke of Wellington was Sir Archibald's great-greatuncle. The death mask will remain in the vaults of a bank until the auction. "It would be far too risky to keep it in the house," explained Sir Archibald. "If a maid knocked it over it would crumble to dust" l.K.M. F.W£D 20 / fOft WOUNDING DUTCH MINISTER TO SPAIN. APPOINTED WASHINGTON. Feb. .. East-West negotiations over a big four Foreign Ministers meeting have reached a point where responsible diplomats believe the stagy Is being set for n first class light over the rearmament race ln-tween the West and Russia. This is Ukelv to lead to a new atorr5c weapons in whicT'th? THE HAGUE Fcb 9 CECIL INNISS of Garden Land, United StateTis assumed to have Willem Constantln Count Van St. Michael was found gull'.v a commanding Trad over Russia, '*heern Uiirnirg. former Dutvn yesterday by His Worship Mr. and to Western demands fqr a reMln lWr In Cairo wai. onlciaily I. A. McLecxi of wounding Don ducUon in the size of Communist appointed Netherlands minister \i Sandiford on his right eye on armed forces. Spain to-day. January 19. Bnrring some unexpected The appointment of the Court For the offence tnnlss wan change hi world boliciea, no conwho Is 55 years old, follows the ordered to pay a fine of 20/in rrete agreements to slow down or lifting of the diplomatic ban In one month or in default undergo limit rearmament are expected to Spain by the United Nations Gen14 days' imprisonment with hard come from the developing intereral Assembly, labour. natlonaLdebate -^r fc . — ttemteT. WHETHER YOU ARE A LARGE USER SMALL USER YOU DESIRE THE BEST TEA SO USE RED ROSE TEA! IT IS GOOD TEA. Carnival "Lawyer" Was Confounded (From Our Own Cormepndo"' i PORT-OF-SPAIN. Feb. 7. Never was a Carnival reveller so flustered than G. Fortune of Siberia Hill, LavenUDe, who decided to dress himself up as a prominent member of the Bar. All unsuspecting, he came up before the Judges at the Savannah competition announced to the crowds over the radio that havlne only received his papers yesterday, he would be unable to go on with the case. Aa the crowds cheered he backed nnd turned to the judges table. Imagine his surprise when ho came face to face with Mr. H. 0. B. Wooding, K.C.. and the Solicitor General Mr. C. T. W. E. Worrell. Thus confronted, he tried to make his escape but this was not to be. Cornered by Mr Wooding, he was ordered to show his papers: for proudly he was carrying some books and a grip. Giving a sheepish smile, he declared that this was against the "professional hlcs.** "Then," demanded the K.C., "let us see your books These turned out to be "The Truth shall make you Free Said eome voices In the crowd: "Boy you can see that you are not well acquainted with the law Trinidad May Tax Municipal Lands (U'*I>II-K1VJLI U I u.o n0 >""Ji PORT-OF-SPAIN. Feb. 7, Government will soon be called upi-n to revise the Municipal Ordinance to permil taxation to be levied on land owners within MumMpal areas. This much was embodied In an amendment of councillor Quintiu O'Connor at the continuation of the Council's Statutory meeting on Wednesday morning. And the Council accepted the amendment on a majority vote. The debate took members to far away places—even behind the "Iron Curtain". Theories touching on the question of land and taxes to be derived therefrom were propounded And passing reference was made of Karl Marx during the course of the debate. Only member who was unhurried to pass the amendment nu Councillor Georg> Cabral. Hi waa for going into the pros and cons, and th• KI.IIII.. S. I, lj.ti.in %  Sch Adrima. M.V. ldy J*j. MV VaaaboinJ Pilnc. Sch Mary I. Catalan*. BH Of tn M V Cariba-pa, M V. Blue tsar M.V Mo"., Sch nmrtl.w. S-h Minor B*UV Wolf a Aaaivaxs S9 MiuirUnu. IS.atl lorn net. Cap* Ti'onipann. ftooi N r w Yor*. Dutch Tanker RuAnm. IJSS Una p*t CM. %  rim. iron. Triiildad "I I \l: 1 I ,v Srhonimldv Now. 41 ion* net Opl Norl tor Domlnka. y.S. Maurvlanta. IS.SSt lont Mf, rapt Tii I t>t atfvlaa IMI thrv ran now ronnnmrilrat* with tha (tnto*in* hlpa thn>ti*h ihH, natbaSi H .. M Latj ra|aaa Mikan. M Irvlnsdalr. S a. Lnsanii. s.a Marswathe % %  In. P A. in. a s %  Mm. N Ir 11 A malar dam. S H . tt.trLady Hodnry. US Unlntr*. H Alphnrra. S. 1 <-.lflio. HS aii. Orlnoru do. H •. HansUim. a i. Caw Ciimbartarul. H8 *. B-t Monta t'rha.. 8 9 •Suuiil Fv'rr.1 aa A nt*. TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH HAIK ILIPPINO MACHINES Kat. •; M; IH Also — LAMP SHADE PLASTIC n> (he yard %  JOHNSON'S STATIONEST AND HARDWARE Kidney Trouble;(auses Backache, Getting Up Nights hhaamailim baralna; ._ Arkllli or lx.-.„l KeatS nJ (,.| ( ,,,, for. >cn iln... Kidn> froubls iTlml f 2??? %  _^. d lBk "*'ry. rolte or alfilm r*.l hrlp and B:A. I.W.V" iT." p"V^ ttSl (fcT lua'llon por-tly B „d Malp Kirfnaya Doctor'. Way that a quirk nays at. ,, •lib a ,'| lual .._. l..l!.H. 1.1.1 Mflcallf prapatad p>.. iiulinn :%;, No Ian.fit—No Ny .Irity. tSta !" k „ Tha ,. f i> rrnrk hrlpln. aaa . I !. Qul asam. And iina n-w asam. And ao rartalii aia thi. rnaiara tha,, c,.,., m M!I,|," y ., ,,'„, *• Biar.nl.r Y.iu w lha Jujar If ,..,, rau. ao buy your traa,A,„, Cystexj IMflaiAi 1H1H1H a I IMHN WovsuM • Bltt H. ACINTII A T00TAL F ABRIC A Smart Sun Dress Wilh Holm. See Me Tootal Label on every Drew Besmliful r.iiii-m. Polka Ii.,i Pretty Stripes nnd lively All-Over Patterns A Sun Dress For Your VACATION-SIS.ill) each tshe fModern Dress Shoppe today. for I0NIYS LAOOIR TSa '.( %  .>!*.„ aaaa.a. KHIUMATISM The above equipmerit ii available for early delivery from the U. K. COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM Ltd. >lASM V-HAKItlS \A}\ 'IPML\T Inquiries cordially invited for the supply of the following— KIM'. 6 ,y|. DIESEL WIIKI I iii\s roiis (Me>l \\l... I, uhn avi.ilahl.for IMondhins) t.n \ss Minns all *m >I\M III SPREADERS SIDE nillVilll HAKES FEED MILES llltnilZIYC. DRILLS SMART and DURABLE for TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White Size*: 6—11 PRICE: $1.60



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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. FF.BKIARY 10. 1S31 No New Players In Trinidad Team (From Our Own Correspondent) PORT-OF-SPAIN. None of the young players invited for the trials in preparation Cor the Intercolunial touriianiant uiccoodad in ihe Mdeavour to impress the Tunidad selectors and U .1 result thirteen players all ol whoQ) h:ivwon colony caps were chosen for the series at KMtafnjrfOfi Oval. Tn.Mam over which the seleotoei took about 10 minutes to draw up was received with Satisfaction by a large crowd who lurnea up to wltneu the final trial and only those who keenly favoured the inclusion of voun Vutor Williamson and veteran Derek Sealv could be Mid to have felt disappointed, flui neither William %  on nor Sealy played well enough on Sunday to force the selectors — to consider them as undisputed fifth and nnsl unofficial Test here candidates for the No. 5 place on today, and at the close India had the Trinidad batting but BRITOMS Ray Robinson Seeks Boxing Pastures New CVealth Score 413 In 5th Test INDIA 143 FOR 4 KANPUK, India. Feb. 9 The Commonwealth cricket tonnng team were dismissed in their first innings for 413 in the replied with 143 for four wicket Ken Grieves, an Australian who ptayi iur l.ancahire. was in an aggressive mood tor the Commonwealth today. He excelled with cuts and (orccful pulls and halted two hours 43 minute* In scoring 8. He was extremely unlucky to miss his first century of the series. The full team selected is — Jeff StaJImeyer UaaUini. Andrew Ganteaume. Nyron Asgarall. Ralph I.ecsll, Rupert Tang Choon, Clarence Skeete. Wilfred fr>rguon. Simpson Guillen. Kidney i..< kbir. vrit.r J an—. Frank Km,; (hnriei Sampath. Lennox Bullrr. LONDON. Feb. nig cost of living i causing Briton-, to Waj,. weekly gamble — Ihc Football Pooh Stakes on horseracing and greyhound racing are also being cut 1 coounlttet M 11. 1.;.!.,. average weckh pools fell from 52 centl in 1949 to In 1950. Other Hgures before leaving foe New York ti.M covering the ilrsl three months of • try 101 ., bag 1950 showed 23.1 per cent 0/ men nay begin this fall. He explained and women wagered on the i*>ols K hound to give compared with 33.1 per cent In Lamotta a return match in June. n Tharaportesumated,nalinthe "rant" £"1 uThf^vywcht R %  E~~-*** first three months of 1930. 9.830. ^.J^ '£[„ nS! ^1 %  £* "** ,iven a ct,r * bat to B.C.L. 000 Britons participated ... football S „? Hi!., J,l. J .K nl >' er Conra < ""• PPclapodls weekly compared with 11. J 1 ** !" jn _* a i*"^*. el *n i tle "on of his selection In the Barba230.000 in the same period of 1949. " l w,ln Eward Charles. dos Cricket team. The bat will According to the icpoit the Oainford simply took It for be presented to Hunte on Sunday average pool stake for all classes granted that Robinson would reevening before the beginning of of the population fell, compared vive memories of the St Valena meeting bv the Barbados Labour with 1949. "In the case of the tine's day massacre in the 15Party at Be'lleplaine, St. Andrew, wealthy from 84 cents to 54 cent*." round bout with Lamotta at the Chicago Stadium next Wednesday. By RSN OPSTfcIN CHICAGO, Welterweight champum Roy Robmsun ladbtna in seek the light heavyweight and heavyweight boxing dowoi if he wiua the middleweight HUe from Jake Lejnotla rVu. 14 Manager George Oainford said HUNTE GETS A BAT A. FOSTHR, M.C.P., (weekly > "While people in the order age groups have continued pnrUeipa* lion, there is a very marked decrease among the voungor age group." the report declared, "Whethrr Ihit indicates thai the FRACTURED LEG General Hospital alter she I grip >'ei glad lhat 29 yanr-old two or Utree Hobir good Regimoiil Defeats Devonshire .1—0 With Fred Ridgeway. Kent fast hK-wli-r. scoring a uscrul 27 and adding 88 runs in 73 minutes with Grieves for the ninth wicket, the Tnc tcam how lx changes CommnnwealUi team were all out ,r on A ,h onc wiinn rcpiesentl .iftei adding 10U in 90 * T J' n,dad al K.-iumgton Oval minutes to their overnight Score of "> ,M8 Edgar Mursdcn. Kenn> 307 for she. Trestrsil. El i a s Conslantine, Inota lost their opening pair Derek Sealy. Lance Pierre and Merchant and Reae with only 42 Cecil Pouchet, who played in scored, but Umrigar and Hazarc '*** have been replaced by added 98 runs for the third wicket Stollmcyer, Legal), Jones. Ferix-fure two more wickets fellI'msuson. Jaekblr and King. Stollrigar scored 57 in 180 minutes bemeyer, Jones and Ferguson fore being dismissed while Hazare were in India with the West was not out at the close with 42. Indies team during this scries. When stumps were drawn. India The selection of Tang Choon were still 270 runs behind with six and Jackbir will enable the wickets tn hand.—Renter. two players full opportunity to celebrate their 17th year in Intercolonial cricket. Both made first appearancea on the Trinidad leam in 1934 At the other end ol the line is Butler youngest player In the side, who will IK* making his second trip to Barbados il. THE Regiment drubbed a team i r "" f virtuous figures „, hls lan from II MS Devonshire 5—0 yes•PPearoncc at Kensington Oval, terday in a football match which *" '*" for . '" wen in was played at the Garrison SavanIhc "f* 1 Ba ^ b ** 1 wiunas of the nah Three of the goals were on d m atch of that tou r. scored in the llrst half. R Roach kicked in two goals,J Papal one. 8. Sealy one and ihc other goal was sliced in bv one' of the Devonshire backs. Tt t were <>n top all the tinin the game but Ihc main causci why Ihe Devonshire boys were badly beaten Ls their luck of bal control and nccurate kicking. Thi (oams were : Raglmenl: Hijiliw.iitc: Chase. Bispham; Marslmll. Ishmael, Grant; Parris. ltoaeh. Sealy. Phillips and Prkc Devonshire : Wood; Finlnyson, Allan: Owen, lemming, WL1-,,I,. Bayley. Nancholas. Grant Andei Son and Callignam. habit is begiiuiirig tn li is difllcull to jud The report sa. 2,110,000 Britons f0 cents a week each and 400,000 weight and heavyweight divisions. '" %  SI 40 a week on carried thcr< uffering from thera more thi the pools; in 1950 only 1.39O.0OO were staking more than 70 cents and 235.000 more than SI 40. The turnover for all forms of gambling in Britain In 1930 was given as 11,820.000,000 compared with $2,020,000,000 in 1949. Downward trend was also reflected in on horseraeina—$1,190,000,000 1930 against S1,2fi0.0OO,Q00 | n \Q\Q Greyhound racing (UTBOVM wgji i •y coming alonf the road .n attempt to eat out of it Sugar Ray lost a reading of the **ll. Illinois Athletic Associations box%  %  % %  % %  %  mg primer when Lamottn wa* granted a 10 a.m. weigh-in. Gainford had demanded that the weighing be done at the usual gambling ,i0 £! hD r „ staked T c Boxing tommission agreed that Lumotta was within the rights asking for the earlier weighChnirman Joe Trlnf ^ri^ o !" W ?^' 00 V n l9 B ,0 regulations require a welshing "no 3448,000. 000 in IW0.-U 5. later than 12 o'clock" and not at __ exactly 12 o'clock. Triner addedPeke Backs Horses AND WINS I-ONDON. Two Hours "lamotta will have two hours lo trim his weight ihould he fail to make 160 pounds il 10 a.m. The ihampion will lost his title, however, if he is mil Bt that les-t by noon. In that event, the tight will go fii a.< scheduled the result 30 Contest | Golf To-dap SHIP'S MATCH A cricket team from 11 MS Devonshire will oppose one from the Barbados Regiment In a game to bt played at the Garrison today. Play begins at 1.30 p.m. The following will represent thrRegiment: C. S M Ishmael. R.S.U. Marshall, Sgt. Edwards, Privates Clarke, Byno.-. Brain waitc. Phillips, llurmwes. Green, Price and Rowe. Thirty golfers hove entered for %  Medal Play Championship which will be played to-day and to-morrow over the Buckley %  Golf and Country Club course, constituting a record Held for the • vent This la one of the two ecu'petitions played ofl scratch, and thr long list of enii i. i to iha fact ih;ii it gng been eota Lined with the Pntttdtnt'i Cup, .i handicap evi-nt. Both lcw are over thirly-six, holes, of which eighteen will ho played to-day and eighteen tr morrow, the low gross scoro deciding the championship proper and the low net score gaining the President's Cup. All twelve of the players who represented Rockley in the team mulch with Trinidad last week han entered. The starting limes and pairings for both days follow:— "Devonshire" Lose Simolin Match To Regiment The Barbados Regiment defeated the II M.S Devonshire in a rifle match which took placo tt tha Government Rifle Range yesterday morning. The Regiment got n grand total of 431 as against 39C by the DevMMhlre The shoot consisted application at 200 yards, snap at 200 yards, Rapid at 200 yards and application at 300 yards. Highest possible score was made by Cap:. C, E. Ncblett of the Barbados Regiment who got 93, while Lieu.. Broth.-Knowl** of the Devonshire and R S.M. II B. O. Marshall of the Kcgiiiicnt each scored 90. Following are the resuiU:— Jiir n no* KI I.IHI M 1). I,ll...ll 1S9 |,, Maikrll ' %  n Wvhrr. M teSffSSSl 1 1CD P.M. -D. lagan* w. Atkn.M..,. j (Anassa, ?W nn — D. I.ttelv-Sinllh. a. Cli.il. lnot, R Ifom*. I IO p,„ J. UNriiJ. J. Ui.i.r l( (ktodlng Zli pm I. NHktock. J. Btan. a 3 SB p m S. Toppln Q. MMnnMta, W. Onumum. IIS pm R Viamer, II tnnlu. K R. Hum* 190 p.m — B. Wltaon. J. R. tbxlpr P 136 it HI — g. Benjointti. It W.jivct. K. CJiihm: London bookies to-day gj V e the Robinson will be declared horse laugh to the old law thai champion regardless or the I "*** n s b*' 11 friend is his dog.'' In the ring. For one of their clients is a smug, Oatnoscd Pekingese which Jake was denied a rcqucsl prohti been picking and backing winh ibiling a technical lotock-OUt nvrs with inhuman accuracy for Lamotta was assured that the bout 'or the past two seasons. would not be sto|iped LID* The Peke. 5-year-old Black lighter was suffeni Knight, is owned by Ludy Muneye cut and was in d ningi, wife of ihe famous palntei lwrmancnl injury. The oxplana0C horses. Sir Alfred Munnin^ """ lM not satisfy the stocky lady Munnlngs snld: sluxgcr from the Bronx He said: "Black Knight started raelnR "I'rh willing to lost in eye to two yearn ago and has been very wi"> this flght. 1 can get along on successful as a punter. He is much tea eye." better than 1 at picking winners. "He has his own account with a lie Moved linn of bookmakers and it shows Robin Ml had bttfl lltt a handsome balance." u> Jake .,i the lime of Ihe Ijidy Munmngk explained that The Harlem dandv gave Lamotta %  ,l '"'">• huinied lloin i.. ,i .oiled loo* .-1,1 lm,V.,t aw.'iv Haeka Ulaek Knight i* taken into to a safe distance. I.... ,. the paddock, in %  unall biai-kbag BO aiietiiLou wu\ continued with n window at each tod "You know. Commissioner. 1 When the horses parade m the have u way of boxing where I play nog Black Knight gives a woof ot possum, I make oUt like I'm hurt approval when the one he wants and then 1 suddenly slart swingUi back pastes by.' ing." Commissioner Triner adi A m ""l M wlnnln B selwtlons vised Jake not to pit] diiring the past two year* was l | ne g this was the sixth bout befiSr5^. 1?: w i'J'"' : r ""' '*''''" l< tv '" ll '•" %  IH.41 <;'-and Nati.Hwl Steeplechase. .„„ w;is|1 -, eM ,u fn ,,, Pl) lnill(kt :i and Nimbus, winner of the Derby ,,. nhl ., t at Epsom in 1B49. "snsnw But his winnings are not spent -But I could be hun and Rob..n extra juicy bones. j|lsy|l ni inl u^,^ Ulill was pU(J Certainly not." said LadJ illi£ ,,us*uin." Munnlngs. I do the spending for Tlin ,. r ,,„.., ,,„,.,,, Robuisoq or bun __^^__ —INS. this point. Ray answered: ^^"" %  !" ^~" No "ne know when he'Standard (anasta *" What's on Today BUS. "Rodney" arrives at da. break. fcxtalbiUon of Sculpture and Paintings by K. R. Broodhagen. PabiUngs and water colour, by Marjorlc E.-oodhascii and palnlinxs and water colour* by Joint Har.lsen at Baxbado* Museum %  •.•() Cricket match between H.M.S "Devonshire" team and the Barbados Rcgtmrnt at the Garrison I jtf II MS. "UevoushW" team Vn an island team at Harrison Colleie 4.30 Two teams from II.M s "Devonshire play a football match JI the Garrison S.M Valentine Dance at *1.. n,.iioiel .an CINEMAS: AqiiaUc CluD -The Sn-t-t Ut* ol Waller Utllv" gaS Plm Thealif h g3B %  "Tarti Foi The Weather TO-DAY Sun Rises: fc U a.m. Sun Sets: kllpm M.Kiii .1 i. -i Quarte,-) February IS. UghUng: 6.10 pni Hish Uahv: fi 41 am ,S. 49 p m. High Water: 6 41 an p.m. VtSTLRDAY %  UinUli (Codrlngtunl nil. Total for Month lo Yestrrda>: 94 In Temperaiure %  M.v g3.t K imi" iini, (Mini 74 'j V Hind Direction 01 a.m.1, E. (3 p m ) K.N.K. Hliui Velocity: U miles prr hour. Barometer: <9 a.m.) 30 tU <3 p m > 20.937. RsMMtssUM Should Faee Tail Of Plarte LONDON. Feb. 9. Britain is urging that all passengers in civil aircraft should facing the tail to improve their chances of survn ..1 m c.iseof actidenis She will make the reo Hon it II Aelttsori i Montreal -.lh. resumed nm ilrj into U Dakjota crash tt Mill Mill, northin. la-t OtU>l*'r when 2fl iopU werg Idiltd — Eenler. AN OPPORTl'MTV TO BWV Co km O" S Bolllnff Bumn I T.r.il gitrctr COHIDI'"" ''" ovsf) .ooAr lr0-l la lo boj A largr laoKn PRICE SSO •M u ui >our Gut Show Room LIME WORKS can suppl) Temper 4 Budding Lime BouHera CuiHJtJIt Grit. Marl and Trucks on hu. P.S. BTIOOKS, Phone 8335 soo o e •> • e*>o a Sj* AerounUncy. Cost Aeenuntint. Company MerreUrynblp. Book-keepimt. StaUMKl" Couiw iHrco(niMd lor award of Diploma % %  AiwtUU or Prllowi will quality yon lot bi|hr •latm bv %parr tln posUI n.idj. Far Oelail-. wt*h NOW! Dental Science Reveal* PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH KIGMT AFTEP. EATINO IS THE SAFE. EFFECTIVE WAY TO HELP STOP TOOTH DECAY with Colgate Dental Cream SKfllPl C O LG AT E 1 i j*. ^^^Baiaaa*""^"" WATER POLO THIS AFTikNQQN %  km will be a Water Poll match at the Barbados Aquali Club this afternoon between twi teams from H.M S Devonshire Plsy is expected to begin short I after 4 o'clock Nrblrtl 1.1 -Cl.l i.i,i. i C Land. T. tSat It. n. a Stsrakali tVRlt. H A Stiuct Total* %  .M.S. trVONSHISS Mr. Smith UMII. Norman .. %  )t. Turnr l-lrul B*olb-KMOwto 1VTI T arson ToUb Gentlemen! Let your theme be BUY JVOWI REC.AI. VMilll SHIRTS, trubenised collar attarhrd Slses 14; to II) Kb J5.74 InUrlark Button Front VESTS. Short Sleeves Shies 38. 4t. 43, 44. Kach S2.it: $8.36, ttJU, & mm Endeavour Self Colour PYJAMAS In good quality Poplin Slies 38 to 44. Suit 39. U i i 111 -mi. i siUKTS In tod quality Spun, long sleeves, in shades or green, blue, grey, rream, dark bn Slies s M.. ML.. & lane Eaeh 5. u; III l. SHIRTS, two separale trabenlsed collars. • IT.. .-


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S4TVKMT, FTBRl'ARY 18, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACK FIVE Clerks'Spanisli Glass Opens T ilt; BARBADOS Clerks' Union now starting a Spanish Clan for the purpose of assisting City clerks in duong with customer(turn Venezuela and other rountries. Mi. S. I. ... bf tlM tutor At present they have Arithmetic and English Classes started by the Barbados Evening Institute The Spanish Class is on their own initiative. The class will begin on Wednesday. February 14 at 5.30 p m.. but those clerks who are interested in Spanish should communicate with Htral Secretary before 4 o'clock on Tuesday evening. E lGHTY-THREE-year-old Mary Jemmott of Orange Hill. St. James, VM taken to the General Hospital yesterday morning and detained. Jemmott was struck by a pole which carried a major road sign. T WO LORRIES were extensively damaged when an accident OOCumd on Banatync Road. Christ Church on Thursday evening. On* P. 127 is owned by Oldbury Esi %  • %  Ltd tR I was being driven b) Herman Chandler of Kirtons. St Philip. The other is owned by Louisa 1 Jiyne of SargeaDts Viliist Church and was 1 bunt; driven by her son Perry! Layne. T INYKAR-OLD Maurecn| hlin-keit. a pedestrian of Ken%  Ingtea 1-and. St. Michael, was involved in an accident with motor ear M 28!., owned by E. C. Gooding of Warrens Factory and driven by Ivan Lynch of Prout Hill. St Thomas, at the corner of Bridge and Trafalgar Streets on Thursday i afternoon. She was only slight-1 ly injured. Wounding Case Dismissed A CASE brought by the Police charging May Lane of Spooner*s Hill. St Michael with wounding Molly Vaughan on her head on January 9 with a bucket was yesterday dismissed n its merits bv His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwyn Acting Police Magistrate of District "A". Dr. Tony Gale, who gave the medical evidence, said that he saw Vaughan at the General Hospital on January 10. She was bleeding from a wound on the scalp which tn his opinion was not serious. Viiughan said in her evidence that while she was at the pipe l-ane and herself "got into a row." Cross examined Vaurhnn did n< say that Lane hid struck her with the bucket. In passing hi* decision Mi Wolwyn told Vaughan that there was no evidence to convict Lai for wounding. Sgt. B. King prosecuted on behalf of the Police. SHI l< lll\4. There Is Always Some i Game At Queen's Park NEARLY half a mile from the centre of Bridgetown, the hady grounds of Queen's Park stand. 'Forty-four y*Md*i ago it used t bv the residence of the General m command ol il* Troops. Now it is the quiet hann-uui "< %  *' young. the middle-a^ed. hut for the most part the nu-v-hcadVd. Letters Of A dm in istro tion in urt of Ordinary yesWhen aa Agvecate reportei passed through Wuecn s Park >i terday. the cricket wi.-kets which .i tt\> weeks ago were on the Park's fresh cut turf were taken up and the football goal posts were reeled. On a smaller pasture of Honour the Acting the park, the basket ball r poles THIS ARTIST take-, advantage of the ideal condition* yesterday. She is seen hare sketching of linildiiiM' including tht Advocate Co. Ltd.. and Mesara J. N. Ooddard a Son*. Many people Tourists Crowd Bridgetown Charity Group President Comes AMERICAN TOURISTS Mrs. Undine Ncwtc and President Ihe t'niled yesterday. The Manretania called at 7 a.m. with 626 pleasure seekers from all the States of America. He thought IJridgeiown a cry where in the City Parishes of Barbados Charts -. ... n , r:-o->*S! T00TAL LINENS THE TALK OF THE TOWN! 36 ins. wide NIL AQUA ECRU FLESH LEMON WHITE POWDER $3.41 yd. TOOTAt LINEN BfunJeJ ItiililtD fur itiltJ '.• J.C r.-iMi jfi. e HARRISONS-BROAD ST. DIAL 2664. UMVWWWWMAMWM FOR THE BEST I MtlTIFIl tm-Ti-ntu fZ/OOB COVKHING •SILVER STAR' CONGOLEUM 11ASoral* %  -!>. A truer nlnrh appeal* il IVbft*rv I •laird Hi **mi dnii ol mains In nw IwiinUMl 1.. WaKraorhi Departmrnl Ui*ll-h woikers to National Health and Unemployment Insurance Schemes. Girls who have transferred from the domestic to the Student Nursing Grade get less; £1. *s. 0d. per week being the minimum earnings during the period of nursing apprenticeship. Moat of the girls who are still domestics are earning more than when they first took posts and nearly all earn more than the minimum amount for their grade because holidays and overtime are paid extra. Last December eight girls transThe stamps will be of two danominations, one being sold 'or 3 rents and the other for 12. The 3 cents stamp will carrj the Arms of the University, and ST, a fill length seate< portrait of Her Royal Highness ii her robes as Chancellor. Other colonies will also bt issuing special stamps for the sami '.'.'.ugh not necessarily a' the same price. For example Grenada's two denominations an for 3 and 6 cents respectively. TO 1x1 %  •/•:* I IOX OR WJL'Z DHP SfA FISH COME nSHlKG "-hooner Kanahine R 25 tons net hroutit 750 deep sea •i-h frnm ih" ntriin* banks for Rarradc* yesterdav The fish 1 :onsigned to the Messrs J. Goddard ft Son Ltd. WE OFFER KOSSOMAN BLOOD SALTS KOSSOLIAN POULTRY TONIC KOSSOLIAN RACE HORSE TONIC KOSSOLIAN IODIZED SPICE STOCK FARM CONDITION POWDERS The batter they condition, the more likelihood of Survival • KNIGHTS LTD.-AU Branches Il..v. 1 II? >ll hrre't ONE li" Ofein %  >• •ml Itrl % %  Uthlnm-. arroM Ih* bach or mlddlf hrrr'ft ONE plirruhrrr you ml kMV ">W ran Id II !" i • mil* ft* Wa." N.. lit! AITIIIS Utr ... ban -un. mU*. lo Bt >ou in III* llr.1 Utr. >'• MKPM il to lUller you—anil, not Just a li-w—hut .. .vtiolr bl£ rani* ol • olori. fal.-|r* and pallrrn-.' CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. Tailoring Deparlmenf 10, 11, 12 & 13, Broad Street.



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PAGK TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATI Kl>AY. I I lllll VKY I". IW CaJiih Qallitu} aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaW aaaVs*. 1 m If ?' Hn* "-^*v 4& Jl r fi %  1 K] fcs-Jf I.I I CROSS wo: ARRIVING from B.O. yesterday for a meeting of the Caribbean Prats Association were Mi. Frederic Heal Coon. Editor of the "Dally Argoty" and Mr. Eustace RawUm. Oeueral Manager of F. A. Peril tic Lti, proprietor* of the "Guiana Graphic". After Six Week, M USS LONA GOMES of E Correla. Georgetown. %  MM* Miss Monica Gome* and Mia Criest* Farta who hat a hair parlour In Georgetown, .etumert to British Guiana yesterB W.I.A after spendln* about six week*' holiday In Uie 11 land as guests at Accra." Hock ley School Teacher Returns A FTER three months In the U S. Mr. and Mr* Djrnley Gibbons returned home yesterday h. B W.I A Mr Gibbons is teacher at the Wesley Hall Boys' School. After Ten Year* A MONO the passengers making the 18-day cruise on the Mauretaala which arrived in Barbados yesterday morning were Mr. Robert L. Clarkson, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the American Express Company and Mm. Clarkson. They told Carib that they had not been to Barbados for about ten years and were very happy to be back. They had an excellent trip and the weather so far has been very good. First Visit P AYING their first visit to the Island are Mr. Roger Sherman. a retired manufacturer of Providence, Rhode Island and Mrs Sherman. They arrived on Thursday morning by the Fort Amherat and will be spending about eight weeks' holiday slaying at the Colony Club, St COCKTAILS I . %  Fore** Kivounifi. 1 %  y>.< %  n FYom Ida ThUtl Pro.Muda. B a.m. BBC Kronlah Oirhaalra. %  *5 a.nv Colonial m Uom. "am. Tho N*wi 1' r.icli arwM UiooniT. II o llvioui Ma* w PI i) ; ,. I Nil 'il* OtMMM 0 44>e> in tie iiton.-) Mi 1. witu any m eh I 9 pt.l a piece ol crocsari. IS U lase a net and make a bat 0 Jr.Dp.nf i*l 18 U-.r way wilt, oiotorlat*. tt> IV. The mule ormga uie olrd. i n Die Dia one nae clown*. 13 TORQUAY. England. Cocktail .mxicologisu all over i %  dreaming up potent elixi. in readiness for the European Cocktail Competition at Torqii.iy February 21—23. T* .-hundred and rixty experts from moat European countries r^^'tU'mi outside the Iron Curtain have parade. : so oti at ihTh*iw or-.. haltan. ris-ii. -m IMS m. a u.u -. For women, the experts de%  pr Radio Nnd. sis pjn Ceav clarcd ihe White Lady "'" #jlor holiday, Ihey ar eight months, staying in Brooklyn V afternoon were Mr rrederic Seal *'ylng at a bungalow in Maxwith Mrs. Phyllis Brown, Mr %  "" Coon. Editor of ihe DaUv Argoay. w *". "Leiton". Mr. Buchan is lyn's sister, and Mi Eustace Rawlins, General Wllh Sprostons Ltd, m GeorgeManager of F. A. Perstck. ud lown t-Sirtadinn Chemist Cruise Lecturer who are proprietors of the Guiana Graphic Delegates from other West In_„ dlun islands are expected to arrive]y1 here tn day and to-morrow. Field Engineers M*'„,'; d Mr! TILL with Cunard White Star v V c""*' ns h Ptr Cruise 1-ecturer is Watlerson Lowe. This is Ms 4.'fMri trip in twenty years and he h. visited Barbados forty times. '•Watty" as he is fam.barly ;. Ambrose McNeil known to everyone on board It ._ their daughter Carolix' r hnps the most popular man on HAROLD ROSE. Field Ann arrived from B.G. yesterday hp Maaretanla. BvSryond) goes Engineer. International Aerafternoop y *" B.W.I.A. to Win wllh their; troubles, and quefive months In spend two weeks' holiday staying t C D t T C 1 ; """ '•"' % %  sater nve montns in spend two weeks' hoiuiny staying uvnm about the island the; tn KOute lo tngland Antigua relumed yeMerdav afterat the St. Lawrence Hotel. Mr. nexi going to visit. M R WILL HANSCHKLL. who noon by B.W.I A He was accomMcNeil is a Canadian and has been %  Wally" starled ihe flower for hat htsn here for the past panied by Mr. Huggons another living In B.G. for two years, the day" which is so popular or t\jur umajhs on long leave, lelt Field Engineer of I.A L where he is a Chemist with the these cruises. For each port he JCM< 1 layj by H W 1 A. for TriniThey expect to leave this mornDemerara Bauxite Co., in Mc has ,1 different coloured flower dad He 1* on In. way to England in,for Grenada. Where he* will spend six monthi rsading (n Chambers, before he Wurns 4o Accra, Gold Coast, •Irhere ha! is Acting Crown CounBel. Contrast T OURISTS are the most curious 1 I nfc_.orvam people on earth, and the-ones Brrl"Lng vesterda) by Ihe MgureUnia were m> execptton. A-r lhay otoppad <>lt the aauncbM-'t the Baggage WareK jsc. trjeir llrst stop was iho bllcity; Bureau whore they Houghi po>tcards, asked question*, and looked at the various pictures ot local taiterest rumtiing in various paitsiof ihe Bureau. Tliev ite-t ruined through Ihe Baggage Warehouse. What wai there of intercs: > HUM BUM Travel Associalion Photographs advertising Britain and a Health Message from the Sanitation Department of St. Michael. Golf Bowl T HF, Barbados golf team, which played an intefeolontal match with St. Andrews in Trinidad last week, presented a beautiful illv-sf bowl to the St. Andrews Club in gnbtudg for ihe wonderful reception they received during the visit This trophy ,-. 10 be called the Charles Mclntyie Memorial Bowl in honour of a St Andrews player who endeared himself to all the golfers at Rockley during the visit 3 the Trinidad tenin MTS m HUH and who die,j %  few weeks before the latest St. Andrew*— Rockley matches. Although the Rockley learn made no stipulations regarding the Bov.1. 11 is probable that' It will serve as a permanent trophy lo be played for between ihe teams of the two Island.-, wllh the next meeling'ltaking olace here somelima •'..•!> in 1952. Back To Trinidad M ISS AUDREY COLE of the oftloc staff of B.W.I.A Ltd. In PnfX-ut-Spain, returned To Trinid.-K* on Tuesday evening bv B.W.IJ,. after spending a shor. hoi day;" She was staying at "Accra", Rockley. M R B.B.C. Radio Programme llamt X*. rrom nVllaui. t IS COCktad Down. II 1* a m. %  "r-.sramm am. InTailudr. 11 45 am imand n>i(laii6\ II inooiii The Nrwa. II lo 11. (*•• Anaiym. II11 Down .IS~4M ) %  aus a*. 4 IS p m strin* up IM afuaif. S pm Ccmpowr of Ihr WND. SIS p m Suntor Mibira-. Prt-nU. p.m. Muaar lot Dancina %  • %  —7.14 pa. 'IK a H.41 -.. trcau) is still the tops.—I.N S. ULTIMATUM CAIRO. r'-j'ir naked men entered the E lice-station in a poor quarter of mi and told the police officer that they would not leave until the police found their clothes, which had apparently been stolen while they were In a public bath. The clothes were recovered II p.m. Y01 Son* i'aradr. a few hours and the men then left, frontier town DIAMONDS GALORE GEORGETOWN. More than £50.000 worth of precious diamonds have been mined from Ihe River MJU. British Gulana-Brazillan border. This thin area Is fast developing Into a little \OI A III H II CINEMA (MembersOnlyJ ^ M*.TINa-> IliS TO-NlOirT TO BUKDAV NltilfT at %  St Samwl Ooaiwyn'a Thnicolor Muai caJ C oiw dv 1 •THE SECRET LIFE OV HALTER MITTY" BUrnns: DANNY KAVE VIlDUtNIA MAYO _„___„ Wllti BOKW KABXOtT—FAY BADCTXR ANN KUTlirarOHD and Inr QOL DWVN OlHI* kSOMDAY TtnBDAY KTOUT al S30 MATLNTT TL'tSDAY -1 t p m lilll n Ol IIIMIW'I alarms SMANYN uomnworn ToosirsMADGI unuirrH f : PLAZA Theulrr— Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) TO-DAY 4.4S and B30 p.m. and Continuing Daily WARNER!* TECHNICOLOR ROMANCE WITH THHUXS' "STORY OF SEABISCIIT" •-, TEMI'LE Ban tTaMM TODAY ii n. < rrrzoxnALD—Um MCAIXISTER and lpm i MONOGRAM IXHIBlXi RIDING THt SUNSET TRAIL V.10, TOM KEENE CODE OF THE SADDLE IM.A/A Tkraire-0/Sr//V [DIAL 8404) TO-DAY and TO-MORROW S and 13tt BUSS. 'PARAMOUNT'S HUM U BING CROSBY IN "RIDING HIGH" wllh Colven GRAY-Cn.l BlCKPORD-rr*TC* GIFTORD M1DNITE TONtTlt imh. LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT Johnnj Mack BROWN (MONOGRAM OOUBtX-i & RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL Jimmj WAKEI.Y %  upert and the Sketch Book ~~ ~~ Mrs. Ki.itpHkinaHernlv Id Ha.il!* Kurf'l fo lo wc how poor Podgy is %  HUa] on. H caitrt th room so slowly thii h decin'i not.-c hi* pal hurriedly dro^p.na J tom< p*ptr 0.1 ihr floor. Th* I.11W b*r :c)U ol JII hit iroub!r< in ihr long March for Row IK, ind a tly grin nfj'i over tht oihcr't tut. Finally ih ikfich book u handed over, and Podgy iil up and roar* with laughtfr. "Good grattoutl My diawmgwan*t meani 10 be funny.*' cm K-iperi. bui it'i done you goodi^you'rc lookms much better ilread-*' GAIETY — (THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES KM SUNDAY S pjn. GARY COOPER IN wllh Jane WYATT Wal IASK FORCE" HIIENNAN OttSI M1DNITE TONrTE 10th. 'MONOGRAM DOUBLE i VALLEY RANOBRa &. • PTNAMTTB CANTON* STEELS Tom KRENF. MAYNARD—Hoot GIBSON S E Kenrie. When passengprs Rot on .shore and arc seiioriited. it's an ssvsy means of nvognislns them as incmb of UM rniisc When I flmt saw "Wntty" *a> tcrday he was sMndlni mH lbs bol torn of a slairu.iv on Hi* Maurr lanla hnndlntr out yellow flower and "thoughts for the day." Thr thought he handed me was up as soon as you can, it pays. Th< only time you really live fully Ii from Ihirtv to sWrtj." Fourth Visit and Mrs. Hugh A. Gage and IhT aoa Hiuch. Jnr. irrived from New York vis 1'iirrtr Him vcsUiil.is by B.W.I.A. Thii it. their fourth visit lo I'.aioad Mr. OSJM i !I>" BSr of Ihr %  COVS lleslaurant on 42nj Streel which overlooks the Unltod Nations building. Their home ii Bronxville. There are here until 0M Odd 1 Fehruary. staying at Ihe Par; disr Beach Chit*. "Mauretanin" Passenfers A MONG the passengers on the MaureUnla yesterday Mr. and Mrs. Charles II. Serlbiwr Pi-csldent of C. H. Scribner Publishing Company. Mr. Norman F. S. Russell. Director of Pennsylvania Company. Colgate — PulmoHvc Peel Company. Mrs. Dorso Richardson, wife of the Direclpr of Columbia Broadcasting Company. Mr. Irving Kathmern, President of the Ever*harp Pen Company. Mr Meander McCormiek Gi.-Ihait. foimci Official in the IlrlUnh EmbVStf '" Washington and his daughter Uandra. and Miss Mary A. Boyle personal Secretary to Mr. Bernard M Baruch. 'Maurctania' Photographer F.F.N at the Baggage Wnrehouie yesterday morning taking a number of pictures was Mr. R. L. Dawson. photographer Of th* Cunard Steamship Company Me told Carib (hat he was employed with the company for the past two years and was then paying his second visit to Barbados Originally from England. Mr. Dawson first started as a newspaper photographer and wys o: ihe sUrt of Ihe (.-ayda* Werkly in the South of London during ihe W HAT on earth is happening his act?" asked Malpractice, greatoulsed policemen, may be used to early part 01 .ne War He later to the Empire Excham-P K excited. 'I'm not sure." replied &U dangerous motorists raises a ( !" dt A,m >, 1"<* was with the V %  buying rate of '., Lady Giggl.sworth, -but I believe question It a "courtesy" spy re12* Honorary Artillery Company. per emu dtSCOUllt and a selling 1'. was something lo <|„ with openports a disguised policeman to an the oldest Regiment in the Brills). rate of 'j per cent premium, the ing a looked rash box with his undisguised policeman, and the Army. After seeing service in price i,f Mlver for forward dellvmouth, lie used \Q twist the key ear the disguised policeman was North Africa. Italy and A fry remains at six shillings and ." chasing turns out to be another h? was demobbed in 19-17 ami fourtK-ncc halfpenny per ounce' __ .. Il | limnh | n terrm.led disguised police ear, what happens went back to the %  H % % %  IB I WU aW Hi Wt aaV % %  aS aS % %  Tfl47. Tbere is no room for co-n| pl.-'-eniv. Munfar .1/ Huckhurst (\l) "J WANTED to surprise my hus-' X band", said I^ady CJigfilesworth. ; "1 bought him this horse Dande| thotil hi. knowLedge. in, tending lo take him to the stables | this marnlng and give, him his J birthday surprise." "When did you M last see the horse in the stables?" asked Malpractice. %  Last night. I gave turn a bit ol sugar anil an apple." "Can you explain why this horse should have ifl Ihe gtabts to come up here, luck himself intr the sludy and drink rat poison?" "I cannot explain," said Lady Gigglesworth, "excepi ihorses ore sometimes eccentric." "Circus horses!" shouted MalpraeI what I said," mullrred Bucket. orth lowered her eyes. "I bough' Dandelion cheap from Ihf cjrcUB a' Swiffenham," ihe said. "What was GLOBE TO-DAY 5 A 830 TO MONDAY "The Gal who took the West' Yvonne Do CARLO — Scon BRADY — John RUSSEL Eitm: Tex BENEKE and GLEN MILLER Orchestra BrllUh A AmerlcMi News Rrela The feather-lightness ol it linger). In • C.laneie'.. lovely as %  dreim ... light u a whltper. ha visible beauty Is equalled only by the hidden strength and lasting quality that distinguishes all 'Celaneae' Fabrics, look lor the Tab when you shop, and leel assured that In spite of its seeming delicacy this exquisite Lingerie It a very wls-ouy. Every lovely thing about it says . .'Cdmu' VAritt an mmdi h folh.-b Cil, Fivrfi itrama I Hoc*ri*$ff Beitm*mmmtt it-mtftiti.niiii,, t -: i,, h.tit t>tt,, The Thrill-pounding Slory of the "Orphan Horse" who raced to Glory! ION '" % % %  "' DAVID BUTLER T1t.lt. I 1St,;la„t 1.1.', A .//,.. and Conhnujng DAILY jPfc^l ZLi4 ~Brilfji>io$rn-(M i /2310) Also : "KO YOU WANT TO BE A GAMBLER" and Latest "WORLD NEWS (Warner-I'athr) jTUflT TWO of th* many smart girls who arrived yssterdaj bj th* "Msuretanla" to sptud the day In Barbados. Tliey are pictured shortly after thsy landed at the Baggage Warehousa. Tliey are Virginia Monlton and Aiyce Oronln of Massachusetts. BY THE WAY By BEACHCOMBER To-night visit CLUB MOIK. \\ The moil Oeauli/tii Night Club fron uitfi a uorld-tridf reputation ftn .Miami to RiO good food Music, Dancing Entertainmer. t throughout the night Dial 4000 loi reservations CURTAIN NETS: White 4 P^m,. win* 39/ vhite 36" wida 4!]^ hall nets 52^ Cream with toning cols. 36" 51^ BATH TGWELS: 44" x 22" $1.27 54 x 30' 11.60 U.LsTUNNES: 27" in attractive designs ()4^ TIGER' CALICO: 7iV UfJMEPiTIC: 3U i 55* EVANS H WHITFIELDS 4606 Your Shoe Stores Dial 4220 MRS. HOUSEWIFE We offer baM wide raince of HouseEARTHENWARE Medina Shape Maroon Band 4. Gold Decoration Pleu-s Dishes Tea Cups & Saucers, Cream Jugs Platters Ta Pots Also TEA SETS 24 Pieces S12 41 DINNER SETS 34 2862 DINNER SETS G3 49.34 Obtainable from our Hardware Department —Ti-l No.2039 Tin: II \IIII\IMIS o-ori it \ 11\ i llll'TOX FAlTOnY LTD. i: 3i i i it i %  : TO DAY 4.45 and 8 30 & Continuing to Tuesday OLYMPIC TODAY £ TOMORROW 4 30 and IIS IIOY..L TODAY & TOMORROW 4 30 and 8 30 Ifepuhlic Action Double . Monte HALE Columbia Double Roy BANCROFT Randolph SCOTT rila RAINES "PKl.VCF. OF THF. MAIMS lo AND •* %  WALKING %  BA.\DIT UNO OF TEXAS with HILLS Allen (Pocky) LANE & His Stallion Black Jack IIO.YY And TO DAY to Tl'ESDA\* 4 30 and 8 l "ANNA LUCASTA OMttd Arii-t Double Attraction . Franchot TONE hi "JIG&AH AND Starring & O. A" Paulettc GODDARD ,m DISHOP with E