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The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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ESTABLISHED 1895



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

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PRICE: FIVE CENTS

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10 VOTES SAVE*LABOUR GOVT.



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Russia, - Satellites

Causing

Tension

WASHINGTON, Feb.7. _.

SECRETARY OF STATE DEAN ACHESON said
today it was not German re-armament but

the maintenance and building up of the armies of
Russia and its satellites, which was creating inter-
national tension. Acheson at his news conference
today strongly criticised the latest Soviet note in
a series of exchanges between Russia and the three

Western Powers on the
meeting to discuss East.

9 Arabs Killed
By Israel Army

AMMAN, Feb. 7.
Arab authorities today alleged
that nine Arabs, including women
and children, had been killed anc
two seriously injured by an
Israeli Army force which raided
a village. They said that before
dawn to-day the raiders had
blown up two houses in Sharafat
Village, which lies a few hundred
yards from the “armistice line” 3

miles south-west of Jerusalem.

They added that the Jordan
ernment had asked for an
urgent armistice meeting to con-
sider complaints about the inci-
dent.

Arab sources’ also said that
Israeli forces ~had built a 3-mile
deviation road inside Jordan
territory south of the Dead Sea.

—Reuter.

7 Years For Arson

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Feb. 7.

Lezjor Teper, Polish born Brit-
ish naturalised Georgetown busi-
ness man was sentenced to-day to
seven years’ penal servitude by
Justice Hughes when a jury re-
turned a guilty verdict on a charge
of setting fire to premises owned
by his wife, Pola Teper on Octo-
ber 9 last with intent to injure or
defraud. Defence Counsel asked
the sucige to reserve certain points
for the West Thdian Court of =
peal. The Judge will hear the
argument in this connection on
Thursday. Teper was defended
by .L. M. S. Cabral, associated
with Lloyd Luckhoo.





FIND ARMS DUMP

TURIN, Feb. 7,
Police arrested a worker here
to-day after finding a secret arms
dump in the cellar of his home.
The arms included a_ heavy
machine gun, 12 rifles, 25 hand
grenades, two mortars, bombs,
and more than 2,000 rounds of
ammunition. Ten people were
under detention in Milan to-day
as a result of the discovery of the

arms arsenal.
—Reuter.



ssibility of a Big Four
-West differences.

Acheson said there was nothing
particularly new in the Soviet
note. It contained cuits
which was the usual Soviet tech-
nique charging other people with
what Russia herself was doing.

He said the Western Powers in
their previous notes have pointed
out there were plenty problems to
be discussed and a solution to any
or all of them was likely to re-
duce the tension in the world.

Acheson said the three Western
Powers thought representative
Foreign Ministers of the four
Powers should meet to draw up
on an acceptable basis on agenda
for Big Four Foreign Ministers’
meeting.

The Russian’s last note was
some grudging move in that direc-
tion but still ed to restrict
the freedom of Foreign Ministers
in discussing questions other than
demilitarisation of Germany.

—Reuter.

USS.A. Reject
Spy Charges

FRANKFURT, Feb. 7.

The United States Embassy in
Prague today sent a note to the
Czech Foreign Ministry rejecting
charges that German - based
American aircraft had spied on
Czech border areas and two towns
in the interior. .

It also denied that aircraft had
dropped radio transmitters to sub-
versive elements inside Czechoslo-
vakia,

The Czech charges, the Ameri.
can note said, “appear to have
been fabricated solely for propa-

a purposes.”

The American note was in
answer to the Czech protest of
January 22 listing 58 alleged viola-
tions on Czech air space between
October and January 15, and say-
ing that Czechoslovakia wouid
take her own measures if alleged
air violations continued.

—Reuter,



2

Schuman For Italy

PARIS, Feb. 7.
Prime Minister Rene



French

ert Schuman will leave Paris on
Sunday _ for conversations with
Italian Prime Minister Alcide De
Gasperi and Foreign Minister
Count Carlo Sforza in Porto Fino,
Italy, it was announced today.
—Reuter.



82 Dead: 500 Injured
As Train Crashes In U.S.

Eighty-two people died

NEW JERSEY, Feb. 7.
according to counts early to-

day and 500 were injured when a packed suburban train
plunged over a temporary bridge at top speed here last

night rolling into the street
The train “The Broker”

with people going home from wor

20 feet below.
was jammed to the corridors
in New York city to a

residential district of New Jersey.
The steam engine had just cleared the bridge—a wood-

en trestle—when it jumped

STORMS KILL
8 IN ITALY

ROME, Feb. 7.

Avalanches, floods and high
winds had killed eight and injured
many more up to to-day when
snow and rain storms lashed cen-
tral and north Italy for the third
day in succession.

Avalanches and snow falls iso-
fated dozens of villages in the
Alpine valleys. Flooding along
the banks of the Reno river in
Ferrara and Bologna provinces
isolated many villages and left
hundreds of families homeless.

Reuter.

33 Die, 6987 Injured

RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 7,

Thirty three deaths, six by
murder, and 6,987 injuries—a re-
cord number—were the result of
a four days carnival frolic here
which ended early to-day.

While record crowds filled cen-
tral streets, the extremely high
temperature and lack of loud-
speakers in public places, which
this year were not installed by
the municipality, kept popular
funmaking little below the nor-
mal level.—Reuter.

9 DIE IN EXPLOSION

BETHUNE, Northern France,
Feb. 7,

Nine men were killed, and
seven seriously injured by a fire
damp explosion in a codl pit at
Bruay near here to-day. The fate
of another man completing the
working team of 17 was not
known.—Reuter.





the rails.

« Panic broke out in some coach-

es as the injured screamed for
help.

The side of one coach was com-
pletely ripped off and the carnage
inside was almost beyond descrip-
tion. Other coaches which tele-
scoped into one another trapped
the living and dead in a twisted
vault of steel. Some victims were
cut to bits by sharp metal.

One man trapped underneath <
heavy wheel whispered “Help me,
help”, while rescue workers with
acetylene torches cut their way
through debris.

Some bodies crushed by the ton-
nage, were unrecognised as they
were removed. Some coaches
were bent into a “U”,

Ambulances brought blood
plasma from nearby hospitals,

It was the third major train
erash in New York in less than a
year. ‘wo previous crashes
claimed 111 lives. :

The wooden bridge bolstered up
with big beams was put up when
the tracks were moved to make
room for a new road being built.
It apparently sagged as the train
passed over it. “The Broker”
was one of the first trains to cross,
The driver; ioe Fitz-Simmons,
who is in hospital, told police “I
hit the trestle at about 25 miles
an hour. The moment the engine
passed over the trestle it lurched
Sharply. It started to sway and
I applied brakes, but it was too
late”.

The train normally carried
about 900 passengers. But more
than that were jammed on board
last night because of a strike on
other lines.

Norman Merz who crawled from
the wreckage unhurt said, “The
train just went bounce, bounce,

@ On Page 7

Pleven and Foreign Minister Rob- |.



we veo

THIS MAKES HER GO



r -
A GROUP of Harrison College Cadets were yesterday shown around the

v

forward ongine room of H.M.S.

“Devonshire” by Cadet England, R.N. Here they are inspecting one of the engines.

7



U.S. Will Draft
Peace Treaty
FOR JAPAN.

TOKYO, Feb. 7.

The United States Mission here
is to draft a simple and short
peace treaty restoring Japan’s
sovereignty with the minimum of
restrictions, it was said to-day by
sources close to John Foster
Dulles, its leader.

Dulles, Republican Foreign Af-
fairs expert, is President Tru-
man’s special envoy to Tokyo.

These sources said that when
the Treaty granted Japan sdver-
eignty, the nation would have the
right of collective defence as de-
fined by United Nations charter.
How Japan achieved this, would
be her own ¢éoncern, they added.
—Reuter.

Pearson Declinés

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 7.

Lester Pearson, Canadian For-
eign Minister, has declined an in-
vitation to serve on the United
Nations Korean Committee, it wag
learned to-day. Pearson was one
of the original choices for the
Three-Member Committee. Sir
Benegal Rau also declined mem«
bership.—Reuter,





Plane In Distress

ROME, Feb. 7,
The British naval oil tanker
Echodale was searching for an
aircraft which crashed into the
sea 100 miles southeast of Crete,
Rome airport officials said to-day.
Officials said they had received
this news from Athens airport.
Malta radio picked up early to-
day, a distress signal from the

aircraft giving its position.
—Reuter.

Clock Tower Kills 7

NEW DELHI, Feb. 7,
Seven people were killed and
about 15 injured when the top of
an 80-year-old clock tower in Old
Delhi’s centre, collapsed to-day.
Five passersby were killed out-
right by falling debris, and two
more died in hospital.
car passengers, passing at
the time had a narrow escape.



—Reuter.
NINE KILLED

EASTWILLE, Virginia,
Feb, 7

A United States Marine Trans-
ort plane crashed in a storm near
ere to-day killing all nine men
on board.—Reuter.

FOUR DIE IN CRASH
MADRID, Feb. 7.
Four people died when a Span-
ish army Junkers plane ecrasned
in a hill near Toledo where the



plane disappeared during a snow-
storm yesterday.—Reuter.



wreckage was found to-day. |
i

O’NEILL, INJURED
SALEM, Mass., Feb. 7.
Nobel Prize winning dramatist
Eugene O’Neilbis in hospital here
with a fractured knée, his doctor
said td-day. The doctor said
O'Neill, who is 62, fractured his!
knee in a fall. a



U.N. Troeps Push

Closer

‘0 Seoul

TOKYO, Feb. 7,

United Nations troops who to-day advanced to within
six miles of Seoul were believed here to have cracked the
last Communist defence line south of the Hah River.

They advanced between 2,000 and 7,000 yards to-day

after Chinese, scorched by
artillery, armour and air

the. pigacss concentration of
wer of the Koréan war had re-

treated more than five miles to a héw mountain line for a
stand before the South Korean ¢apital which they now hold.

Strong Peace
Front Needed

__To Stem Red Threat, ,

BONN, Feb. 7.

West German Chancellor Kon-
rad denauer said today the
“only means to maintain peace
against the Soviet threat is the
establishment ! a strong western
peace front”,

He rejected the idea that Ger-
many could be neutralised by
Four Power talks because she was
not strong enough to defend her
frontiers. Speaking over Radio
Munich tonight, Adenauer said
that the Soviet Union would seek
the demilitarisation of Germany,
the withdrawal of occupation
troops and the “neutralisation” of
the country in any Big Four talks,

“We know that there are cir-
eles abroad which believe that
this ideal can be realised”, he said.
“However appealing such neu-
tralisation might appear, the
country could remain neutral
amid war if politically and econo-
mieally strong enough to defend
its frontiers.

“If the country did not. have
this strength, it could find the
necessary protection only in con-
nection with the defence system
of friendly powers.

“Nobody can seriously believe
that should hot war come, both
warring armies would respect a
Germany bare of arms”, ,

He hoped that his Government
would be informed of every phase
of any such talks and any pre-
liminary negotiations. It wished
to have the chance of stating its
own views “in good time” in any
decisions which might affect Ger-
many.—Reuter.

Missing Czech Was
Last Seen In Brno

VIENNA, Feb. 7,
Friends of Dr. Vladimir
Clementis, missing Czechoslovak
ex-Foreign Minister said here to-










day he was last seen at Brno
central railway station on Thurs-
day to goto Bratislava on the

Austrian border,
—Reuter.

FOURTH TEST
e eat Oy Pes the Fourth
sss Se
Australia 371 and 403 for 8

declared. England 272 and
228.





!Laurence reported to-day in the

Neither General Ridgway, nor
his officers, made extravagant
claims of success, but the United
Nations line was moving slowly

. methodically forward in
it fay himself du
a“ Ghjettive oltensive,?

oe

thto which

Allied troops thrust to-day, were

believed to be the new defence
line to which Communists have
been retreating for two days. One
tank patrol reached a point within
four miles of the Han River
which runs through Seoul, before
it withdrew, In this area negro
soldiers swept up a hill behind a
wall of bayonets and captured a
rugged slope.

The heaviest aerial artillery
barrage of the 14—day-old offen-
sive presaged the capture by
American troops of two hills
north of Anyangni southeast of
Seoul, on which entrenched Com-
munists had held back the Allied
advance for the past 48 hours.

—Reuter.



Atom Explosions
Were The Test

NEW YORK, Feb. 7.
Five atomic explosions in Nev-
ada were believed to be the test
for artillery weapons and guided
missiles, science writer William

New York Times,

Laurence, leading lay authority
on atomic energy said this was
suggested by the “very fact that
tests were held in Nevada instead
of the atomic proving grounds at
Enijetok.

Laurence said that “whatever
topes used in Nevada there can
be no question that they were de-
signed to extend the use of the
atom bomb from purely strategic
to tactical purposes. tt can also
be certain that each of the five ex-
plosions tested a different model,
each designed for different pur-
potes.—Reuter,

PRINCESS ROYAL ILL

LONDON, Feb. 7.
The Princess Royal was admit-
ted to a London nursing home to-





day, treatment for antrum
trouble. —Reuter,
BEAVER MEAT

LONDON, Feb. 7,
Britons may soon be eating
beaver meat from Denmark.

A London firm has just bought
abott five tons of this méat but a

spokesman for the firm said to-


























20 Asked To
Increase Raw
Materials

WASHINGTON, Feb. 7
The United States, France and

Britain, have invited about 20
western countries to set up
international machinery to in-

crease production of 11 scarce raw
metered Peal or ge their use.
‘otton wool, sulphur com-
modities, exempted cm control
during the last war, would be
affected for the first time.

Other commodities covered are
copper, lead, zinc, tungsten,
molybdeum, manganese, nickel
and cobalt. Rubber and tin are
not ine Zi

The State Department declined
to disclose the names of the
countries which had been invited,
but it was learned from other
sources that Spain would be
represented on at least one of the
six committees
dealing with

derived.

The meetings are expected to; to

begin late in February and
stretch through April.
—Reuter.



Another Italian
Quits Red Party

BOLOGNA, Feb, 7,

Dr, Rickardo Cocconi prominent
Communist in Reggio Emilia pro-
vince has joined two members of
Italy's Chamber of Deputies who
seceded from the Communist
party a fortnight ago.

He tendered his resignation as
member of the party’s provincial
secretariat and announced that he
would not renew his patty mem-
bership card for 1951, |

Cocconi said he believed the
stand taken by Valdo Magnani |
and Aldo Cuchi, the two rebel
Deputies was “in the, rests of
workers, socialism and Italy.”

Cocconi arrived in Bologna last

night and. ir lately joined the
two deputies who are still work-
ing ona for the na-
tional movement they

y.

are expected to wens or



U.N. Turn Down
Red Resolutions

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 7.
The United Nations Political
Committee today rejected a Soviet
resolution that the United States
be condemned for alleged aggres~
sion in China. Only the Soviet bloc
of five voted for condemnation,
Fifty nations opposed the Soviet
resolution and two, Yugoslavia and

Afghanistan abstained.

The Soviet Union submitted two
resolutions to the Committee.
The first dealt with the alleged
invasion of Formosa and blockade
of the island. It ested the
Security Council to take steps to
stop this “aggression”.

The second resglution concerned
an alleged air bombing attack on
Manchuria by American aircraft
After condemning the United
States this resolution also request~
ed the Security Council to take
immediate action to prevent furs
ther United States “aggression”
against China. —Reuter.

West Will Reply

LONDON, Feb. 7.
A Foreign Office spokesman in-
dicated today that Britain, France,
and America would probably reply
to the latest Soviet note on the
possibility for power talks within
two or three weeks after consulta-
tions. He said the general im-
pression of those who had seen the
note was that further clarification
as required on whether Russia
finitely wished to restrict the
agenda more than Western Gov-

ernments.
—Reuter,

Agree To Reforms

PARIS, Feb. 7.

An agreement was reached at
today’s Cabinet meeting among
representatives of various parties
in the coalition on the Bill provid-
ing for some modification of the
present system of proportional re-
presentation at the General Elec-
tions.

The Bill provides for two bal-
lots and for the mixture of maj-





day es mostly for manufacture |ority elections and proportional
ded

and a

: “I do not think it ig trepresentation.
going to be widely sold.”—Reuter.

Unified Sea Force Planned

WASHINGTON, Feb. 7.

|European forces, but to. have

submarines, bombers and warships

Atlantic Treaty nations have | something like a co-equal status. |to cut the flow of reinforcements

almost completed. plans. for set-
ting up a unified sea force like

the combined land and air forces | autumn’'s navy sessions here spoke |

on the Continent, with an Ameri-
can Admiral as top commander.

Admiral William Fethteler,
Commander-in-Chief of the Atlan—
tic Fleet will probably be named
soon to head the Supreme Allied
‘Command Organisation for the
{North Atlantic Ocean region, it

A communique, issued after last

of “a Supreme Allied Command”

jfor the North Atlantic Ocean

| Area.

| Upon this command will de-

|volve the task of “keeping open

| ¥itally important sea lanes to
Europe in the event of

| Western
on that continent. Surfacc

}
| War

became known to-day. { ships, submarines and carrier and

This command is apparently not
intended to be subordinate to
General Eisenhower’s Western

land based aéroplanes of the com-
| bined navies of ten of the treaty
|Mations would be responsible for
holding in check efforts by enemy

and supplies to Eisenhower’s arm-
jies and air forces.

As defined by the treaty, the
North Atlantic Ocean area is thaf
part of the sea north of the irene
jof Cancer line running slightly
| south of Florida, to a correspond-
ing position on the North African
coast.



The regional planning group
which has been drafting plans
for sea defence has a permanent
office here. Its membership in-

forces

land, The Netherlands, Norway,
Portugal, the United Kingdom,
and the United States,
Luxembourg and Italy are not
ih the Atlantic Ocean region set-
up.
Admiral Fechteler, veteran of
years’ naval service and many
acific Ocean campaigns in World
War Two, has been Atlantic Fleet
Commander-in-Chief since Jan-
uary 21, 1950. He is an expert in
amphibious operations. He com-
manded amphibious and attack
in a_ seriés of American

blows at Japanese strongholds

|cludes representatives of Belgium, | extending through the Pacific.

Canada, Denmark, France, Ice-

|
'

—Reuter

9} misunderstandings

From General Election

LONDON, Feb, 7.

HE GOVERNMENT to-night defeated by 10
votes the Conservatives’ eleventh hour at-
tempt to prevent nationalisation of Britain’s steel
industry. The fate of the Labour Government de
pended on the result of the House of Commons vote

which wai
industry,
15. Labour
Conse:

USShip For
Indo-China

PARIS, Feb, 7.
The French National Assembly
tonight approved Prime Minister
Rene Pleven's report on his talks

with President Truman by 400
votes to 182.
Reporting on his talks with

President Truman in Washington,
Pleven told the National Assembly
that the United States will soon
hand over to France an aircraft

wolfram from which tungsten ist carrier which will be sent to Indo+

Chinese waters.

Pleven said his visit to Washing.
m and Canada had dissipated
created in
American public opinion by pro-
paganda which described France
as “morally exhausted” or alleged
that French governments were
com d of “ineapable people”.

Such propaganda had tended to
strengthen isolationist tendencies
in the United States.

He said he had had “very
frank and friend'y” talks with

President Truman. He had ex-
plained to Truman the importance
of quicker and greater military
aid because of increased Chinese
aid to Vietminh forees.

In all cases where material I
asked for was available, agree-
ment was reached at once to

send it without delay, Pleven
said that in his talks there was
no question of France asking for
American ps in Indo-China,
On Korea, Pleven said: “Tru.
man thinks ag we do that an i
ourable solution should be found
to the problem by the Korean
people Gan their own destiny
freely and without pressure.”
—Reuter.

Strike In Grenada

(From Our Qwn Correspondent)
GRENADA, Feb, 7,

Steel-helmeted police with tear-
gas for emergency today went to
preserve order at La Sagesse
estate where workers have been
idle since Tuesday last week with
out presenting any definite reasons
for the stoppage or making de-
mands. Union leaders held a
morning meeting behind closed
doors and then marehed to the
estate urging those willing to work
to continue the stoppage while
others sought to intimidate the
non-strikers. The day passed
without major incident, The
thinking public is becoming out-!
raged at the senseless walkouts |
and exploitation of the mentality |
of the labourers to advance the
ends of aspirants to the Legisla-
ture under universal suffrage at
next elections.—Can, Press.



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have stopped nationalisation of the
to come into operation on February

tered 308 votes against 298 for the
nd Liberal opposition.

- Government Party managers
\ were sve by the size of the
majority, best estimate last

night was-a majority of three to
four, as some of the invalids were
considered too ill and too far from
London to be present.

Winston Churchill was cheered
in the House today as he launched
his last bid. As the critical debate
started, the Labour Government
was confident it could survive the
Opposition’s motion of censure by
a few votes. Churchill likened the
nationalisation move to a man
walking towards a precipice in
pelled by some “deep and
motive,”

Mr. Churchill began in a mood,
beaming with good humour, re-
torting swiftly to Socialist inter-
ruptions. But the fate of the Gov-
ernment and the possibility of 4
General Election hung tensely
over the debate.

Churchill called the decision
to go ahead with nationalisation

of steel “a deed of partisan
aggression". It was a “major
stumbling block to national
unity,” he said. He added:

“This act will be a deep and
major injury to the whole pro-
cess of rearmament.”

Churchill said that if the Con-

servatives came to power they
would immediately repeal the
Steel Act and revive the former

Tron and Steel Board which would

have general supervision of the
industry. He was interrupted al-
most from the start to the finish
of his speech.

Supply Minister George Strauss
for the Government said that the
raw materials position in the last
few months had developed in a
way which made it doubtful if a
continued Increase in the steel
production was possible for the
time being. He added: “Whatever
shortage of materials there may
be, our armament obligations must
be carried out,

Strauss said that any more delay
in nationalising the steel industry
w y injure it, He

‘ ‘worl? no longer
be able to import large quantities
of serap iron from Germany be-
cause they were no longer avail-
able, and iron ore would be
scarcer owing to heavy American
buying.

Strauss suggested that the Iron
and Steel Federation formed by a
privately owned industry should
continue its functions for three
months pending discussions on
the future of the industry's organi-
sation. Representatives of the
corporation. which is to run the
nationalised industry should. at-
tend its meetings where problems
affecting each side of the industry
(privately and state owned) were

discussed,
—Reuter.



TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT



PPPOE LLDPE LDAP LAPP EER ALLE 3

~
>

1

for very young babies up to
Rich in Maltose,

~~ $1.76
























SOOOCOOOL LLLP LLL LL PPL LLLP VOLPE

ALLL’ AS

LLP EA IDS

>
v
“4

PO LPPPO DOSES

GOL

~





PAGE TWO



TVE members of the Barbados
Golf team which played a
series of matches against the St.
Andrew’s Golf Club of Trinidad
turned yesterday afternoon by
.W.1;A, from Trinidad.

They -were: Col. and Mrs.
Bick Vidmer, Hon. K. R. Hunte,

: iilia: insor Mrs. Sherman and Miss Sherman, subject to cure, as over-drinker: ‘ked pantry!’ °

pg “Eben de Wilkos" They who arrived here on Sunday by — The idea is that they need net . B B. C Radio
were. accompanied by Mrs. Mene | Grande Oil Company's from fellow sufferers as desper. — Mrs. Douglas, who started her ° eo Le p
Hunte and Mrs, Atkinson private plane, returned to Vene~ ately as do members of “alcoholics 0N-profit organization (dues, $10 bp

TPMT d. i a ; zuela yesterday. anonymous.” year) in 1947, says she got the Pro amme - SSS SESE = =

Arriving by 9 mate lane Pu ¢ Ms. Hamilton’ Through i: dea.one day when she was re . ; UA CCLUE CI M Gnly)
were . Shirley Atwell, Mana- _Purpose 0 . é s s #rouv therapy, mass ing a newspaper account of ar x. 2, 1981. TI NEMA embers Onl

of the City Garage and Dr. we th ae eet eee confession of off-diet binges, a “alcoholics anonymous” meeting. oanckea peccas Ry AY AQ MATINEE: TO-DAY at 5 p.m. ¥
o

E rbara Lloyd-Still.
~ Nurse In Caripito

R. C. W. HAMILTON, Vice-
President of the Gulf Oil
Corporation in New York, Mrs.
Hamilton, Mr. Robert Boggs,
Manager of the Gulf Oil Produc-
tion in the Western Hemisphere,

Gulf Oil Company.

BARBADOS



By PHYLLIS BATTELLE

NEW YORK, Feb, 3,

Women (and men too) who are
frankly fat—and admit it—are
eligible to shed literally hundreds
of pounds in a mutual-help club
called “Fatties Anonymous.”

It’s a three-year-old organiza—
tion that operates on the theory
that over-eaters are as emotion»,
ally and physically “sick,” and

social programme and aé_ ruling
that says you must lose at least
five pounds a month, its more than

most

ADVOCATE



katties Anonymous

Learning good etiquette is a
important part of the drive
to get slim, according to Mrs
Douglas. She explains: “We eat
what we eat for a variety of emo-
tions. One of the strongest

emotions is the feeling of insecur-

ity. It can drive us into any
number of banand splits.
“A faux pas in etiquette can

' drive an over-eater to a well-

“It suddenly clicked,” she re-
calls. “I realized that alcoholism
was a serious social problem. But



|
ot
Housewives
Guide |
PRICES of tomatoes and |
cabbage when the Advocate
checked yesterday were:
Large tomatoes 24 cents per
pound.
Cabbage 30 cents per pound







6.20 a.m. The Music Goes Round, 7 a.m. | })
The News, 7.10 a.m. News Analysis, 7,15 |}




Baby

Powde:







TONIGHT AT 8.30

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1951
—————— A



Tyrone POWER :o: Jean PETERS ;0: Cesar ROMERO :o: John SUTTON

“CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE”

in Technicolor

Dr. W. Auer, Manager of the 0 a.m, eet ne eevee eee i ae Geos ae ahich
. . , ; Tamme ri . 7,30 a.m. as ere, h ntury-Fox icture.
Iss SYLVIA WESTFALL. Barbades branch and ‘s. Auer, 400. members are doing big fat was just as serious, except jas a.m. The Wornan in Blue, 8.30 a.m. :

who is a nurse at Creole
Petroleum’s hospital in Carjpito,
arrived-from Venezuela via Trini-
dad. yesterday by B.W.1A., to
spend ten days’ holiday in Barba-
dos, The first part of her stay
will be spent at the St. Lawrence

»'Way Above

Engineering Co., in Maracaibo, is M First, as Mrs. Douglas explains, “ Gordon McRAE
. 5 r. Wells’ is with T. Geddes » as | strong for a couple of weeks, and —¢ p.m. Pawilion Players, 6.15 p.m. From
“JACOB MILLER, proprie- Sie an tas Los Angeles, Grant Ltd 2 prospective member has to be then we'd drop back into our old the Third Programme, 6.39 p.in. Interlude,
. eave, ,

‘tor of Miller Harness Co., in
New York is touring the West
Indies: He arrived here yester-

via Miami, Venezuela and
frinidad by B.W.I.A.

He was in Venezuela for their
Carnival and in Trinidad for Car-
niyal on Monday, and Tuesday.
The terrific pageantry of the

“I went out and found a psychol- {aix, 11.p.m. From the Third Programme, i le y
Trinidad Carnival was way above A CANADIAN lady bought two “But it’s plain over-eating,” ogist and convinced him to come ——-————_______- PLAZA eatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)
the standard of the one in Vene- .,™ hair nets in a shop in Broad With Creole Petroleum snaps Mrs, Douglas, “because work with us. their matrimonial chances as ‘0-DAY 5 and 8,30 p.m. only (Monogram Double)

2uela.

Mr. Miller is staying at the
Marine Hotel. He leaves here in
a few days for St. Croix,

7 ‘Back From Trinidad

AR. and Mrs. Jim Wilson and
A Mr. Wilson’s brother “Bill”
who went to Trinidad over the
week-end returned yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. Mr. Wilson
Was away on business and his wife
and brother went over to see
Carnival. Mr. Wilson is the Can-
adian Government Engineer on
to the Barbados Government,
looking after their interests in the
construction of the new runway at
Seawell. His brother has been
eee on holiday for several
weeks.’ .

4n-B.G. and Trinidad

AR. COLIN WEEKES, Customs
.' icer here, who has been on
holiday for the past seven weeks,
Spent most of his vacation in Brit-
ish Guiana, but arrived in Trini-

t , fed. . Me ca i 7 , fe DY 4.30 and 8.30
party which was conducted over for over ear, report the activity to fellow mem home." And lifting her up he Constable’Growler chuckles. Tis 4.45 and 8.30

p chads. ella Sha iad piallardes the “Evening Standard” building a yea bers at the next meeting. strides away over the common with all a mystery ma'am," he says.

morning by B.W.I.A, last week. This trip, one of 2

Carnival in Trinidad he told
Carib was hard to describe—it was
such a tremendous spectacle,

Distant Relative

{ynich, each, produces papers at ~ woNnICA LEWIN, _ brilliant i " 0 AND “STRANGE
ON NR scr ae she. phate of Between 40,000 and ake” the tan tee le | The Thrill-pounding Story of the “Orphan Horse” who G. re

arrived front Venezutla via
Trinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. to spend five days’
holiday. in Barbados. They are
staying at the Marine Hotel, Mr.
Iturbi is a Civil Engineer in Cara-
cas; i),

Asked if he was any relation
to Jose Iturbi, the famous pianist,
Mr. Iturbi told Carib, he was a
distant relative of his.



Across with
i Uibed fp msgs oa ala ; — eel pean Gregory Peck and J
3 an own. Shows a lastin or ‘ ory Peck and Joan
ae ‘ quality. (10) ay rit ~)F 4:30 stasnimc LON Bennet
BY THE WAY.. e+ By BEACHCOMBER: I: What Baba would ail frost) (31 SHIRLEY TEMPLE: F ) M CAILISTER —
: ql ; 12. Makes things run smoothly. (3) * g
‘“WOMEN who obey the orders Fruitarian Society. M 83 hen they 18: Goddess ‘of destruction ta) Sanches) 4 C : ROXY
ot he lotpr® aay re Shgnt Rec, Se, Mest was yelvingo thelr Repnte when they 1 Bedi gion one DAVID_BUTLER 2 meta on con OLYMPIC
lant fellow, “would stop at noth- it was the food of bishops and: hideous—or just revolting? 19. You've met the silliest unui! vou 2.30 & &. 30 To=emorrow (Frida ) Last Two Shows To-day
ing to be considered smart.” barons.” And again. “To-day we meet this, (6) . « Y Pe Last Hee bows tots
- oy hes thay provid stop at. know that flesh food cannot be Yes? Then order now our im-, 23. Hovel. | (3) 4a. Tear (4) SATURDAY — 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily _ 430 and 8.15 y
ow the oiliest of clothiers could compared for f 1 pregnable one-way veil. Light and 59° . h AT ee . *
make a woman wear prvieginoots nae eared” * iene that Sa compact, it clips easily to bowler 30; ihe water pind: wea late. (4) PLA ZA=Bridgetown=(DIAL 2310) Universal Double 4.30 and 8.15
with evening dress — unless, of people can enjoy meat without hat or toque, gives complete im- 80. If has ite points. (3) : ” 4
course, slits were made, so that muttering. “Ha! Now. I've ‘got Munity to friends and kiddies. Down Also: “SO YOU WANT TO BE A GAMBLER” and Marlene Dietrich and James 20th Century Fox Double
she. could show her entrancing even with those. bishops jand ‘hs ditien i writes: sa aupumn, Payee ea Welt Latest “WORLD NEWS (Warner-Pathe) Stewart
toe-nails. barons.” And as for “food values.”’ oe customer * 4 Bird-like (5) 8. Plaything. (97 | {= Jeanne Crain and C
pe : . i s : ornel
Murder At Muckhurst (IX) those who treat a men! as a chems. pence wearing the, ‘Maufair m= 109 0 cnangs trom, aura 3h, in Wilde in a5
Fe panic-stricken behavious enue Wie gk, Mig _ Tun screaming from me. In fact, 1 § Not guite to aims. (6
Gigglesworth convin . ormaliy consiitu : . + j be :
Serene ee hiding Man: eats what he enjoys eating, N int SR dee tee ee 19, Why leave the Inlay so Upset. (3) OPENING TO-MORROW — WITH A BANG. DESTRY ““ CENTEN;)
something. But what? Eh? But and not what someone tells him }ife, 15. BDC. UG. driver wants ~ We a s : INTENNIAL
what?’ “Lady Gigglesworth,” he is good for him. ee ee When you call RIDES AGAIN”? a
Said suavely, “why does the men- Ores saw to: avold: disappoint 2 Cover Tent sirerations 4) SUMMER”
meee ha een gate Tellplece ae ee 2 het Pt me a Lady... 3UMM
2 ' ’

chatelaine. “It’s just the shock of
all this, and seeing him—er—it

slead like that. It isn’t every day pnilosoph sou] Fak'Sh Nareets cess “ode 2 is

paren ren teeee th ule Mires ee ee subilation, that the sclestiste now | Gai Mi Bie TeHh Uae “WHO DON, MINE

Seem tant: 2, Can rel Delieve,” re. have a bomb so powerful that only pore te Retread: 5. Ora: 4. Tally ho; E Oo W NV
i : Re 6, Swarthyv: 8. Mvyriads' 10.

plied Malpractice severely. “But it Mobile Toes ay tors borat could: set tt oi tee

was the words ‘circus horse’ which
drew that heartrending cry from
you.” “No, no,” she protested, “It

. j Starring
was just seeing Dandelion like that children ought to walk barefoot to But there is something even more u ‘ with
—————” Malpractice cut in like keep the mobility of their toes. hopeful. A homb, says the author G L 0 B E Bud Abbott and Lou B :
a revolver shot, “Why do you call of a recently-published book of TO-DAY MAT. & NITE Costell urgess Meredith and
the horse Dandelion? You recog- As everyone now admits, it is comfort and heartsease, one mil- Last Showing fa - Kieron Moore ‘
nise him!” ‘I—I—it’s his name.” the young man with mobile toes lion times as powerful as the atom f
“How do you know that?” Flound- who gets the £5,000-a-year job. bomb would destroy more than “HOLIDAY IN MEXICO" ~ 5 . 4
ering pitifully, Lady Ginpeeworts I ee a barefooted Director who ares aquare wiles. aco B will we pak i eer
ir, “Gl y ted can pla a Donna obile on always be someon ’ A :
ee. — 3 - a e4 oe ae tes e with his toes. He plays all, it’s only like ordinary bomb- Tturbi ne Powell Biory and Screenplay by WILLIAM BOWERS and OSCAR BRODNEY - Directed by FREDERICK De CORDOVA
mean?” “I can explain,” mumbled execrably, but all that matters is ing, but a bit more destructive. Produced by ROBERT ARTHUR « A Universal-International Picture

his sagging consort. “It was like

this :..” (Any reader who is not To Keep the fingers mobile, chil- aS the rourteen Redskins cut HERE'S SOME EXTRA DISHES!
OA Reterhooles ae, ark for is dren should walk on their hands. tyeir oar ‘toletigh the barra c Gans AND oe TEX BENEKE AND en MILLER ORCHESTRA
mo ack. And a fat chance he 3 aie balloon the glamorous Freda Fal-
has 0 ting it!) One-Way Veil kirk (known as Svelte Seeling LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
No Dried Cereals For throughout the Sfort) discarded FL = ————— |
h 1S your face unfit to be photos her upper garments as she sfelt
Bishops yraphed? Do your fffends shudder the whirlpool’s drag, and suddenly

I LIKE the explanation of meat-
eating given by a member of the





On Way Home :
yt pounds, was the smallest. member sane a
Hotel and the latter part at the M®: Se a ee Wells and their two children. foods. of the group. They called her sis pm souveum ot Music. s pmill PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)
Paradise Beach Club. ” ican who for the past two They expect to return on Febru- Here’s how _ the operation “Rosebud.” Australia vs. England, 5.15 pan. Irene LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY — 4.45 & 8.30
and a half years has been working 4 17 works “The first year, it didn’t work Scharrer, 545 p.m. Rhythm Rendezvous,
under contract with the Martin *Y *’ rite i

He ar-
rived from Venezuela via Trinidad
yesterday by B.W.1.A. accom-
panied by his wife. They plan to
spend five days here at the Has-
tings Hotel before leaving for the
U.S. via Jamaica,

She Forgot !

Street a few days ago. She gave
the girl serving her a dollar and
was amazed, when she received
a dollar and few cents change,

She had forgotten about the
exchange on her Canadian dollar.

Jamaican Tea Plantation

gcs had an interest in a

British television programme
on February 2nd. On that date
Richard Dimbleby, famous com-~
mentator, visited the oldest tea
merchants in the world at the
sign of the Three Sugar Loaves
and Crown in connection with a
TV programme called “London
Town”. The firm was established
in 1650 and in their office in the
City they still have a number of
very old ledgers and a book with
the names and occupations of the
slaves who worked on_ their
estate in Jamaica,

Journalist Visitors

NUMBER of West Indian
journalist students were

A

included in the Polytechnic course P.

number arranged to London news-
papers in connection with the
course, greatly impressed the vis-
itors. They were particularly
attracted by the rotary presses,

In Charge

N the absence of Mr, Charles

/ Mills, Colonial Office Liaison
Officer, on leave, Mr. W. A.
Richardson is temporarily respon~-
sible for West Indian students in
Britain. Richardson, who comes
from Trinidad, is a graduate of
King’s College, London Univer-
sity. He finds his temporary job
“very interesting”,

A man sprang up and, with his
trousers falling, shouted, “Only

A LECTURER recently told an
audience of school-mistresses that

that his toes should remain mobile.

when you say “Good morning”?
Do strange dogs cower or fun

a at Seawell to see the party
°

Returning On February-17

T present holidaying in Gren-
ada are Mr. and Mrs. Willie

Carnival Queen

ISS CHRISTINE GORDON,
“Miss Jeffrey’s Beer” and
Carnival Queen 1951 of Trinidad
went ‘to school in Barbados. She
is a former student at the Ursuline
Convent.

RRIVING from Trinidad yes-

terday morning en route from
Venezuela were Mr. and Mrs, Wil-
bert Heitman. They are here for
five days staying at the Paradise
Beach Club. Mr. Heitman is
with the Creole Petroleum Cor-
poration in Caracas. They spent
the first part of their holiday in
Trinidad for Carnival.

Assistant Secretary

Mz ? GEORGE SKEETE,

Assistant Secretary of
B.W.1.S:A. ‘stationed in Trini-
dad was among the passengers
arriving from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A.

Leaving For U.S.

RS. G. LOWE, of Jackson,
St. Michael, will leave the

island on Friday afternoon for the ©

U.S.A. via Trinidad by plane.

She will join her husband, Mr.
. T. Lowe, who has been there

Mrs. Lowe was formerly an
elementary school teacher.

From Jamaica

Jamaica, will shortly be resum-
ing studies at the Royal Free
Hospital, London. Her husband is
a medical student at Cambridge
University.

Happy Birthday

ISS. AURIEL MAHON of
Jubilee Gap, Bank Hall cele-
brates her birthday to-day with a
small party at her home to-night.



Science And Progress

is described, of course, as a deter-
rent against war, and it would de-
stroy an area of 314 square miles.

Serjal Story

an amazing thing happened (to
be continued).



a
we .



2



CONGOLEUM SQUARES

things toward conquering bigness.

Ruth Douglas, plump but shape-
ly founder and president, shed
60 pounds last year and aims to
drop 25 more by early spring.
Others have trimmed off as many
as 200 pounds by signing into
“FLA.” and signing off fattening

honest and possessed of some will
power to join any club with a
“shocker” mame like “fattigs®
anonymous.” |

That name, she says, is a mem~'
ber’s first test. Unless he’ll ad nit
his guilt, he’s not in a mental
mood to be cured. Too many peo-
ple blame obesity or glandular
disturbances or heredity.

science has proved that glands
and family tendencies to fat are
over-rated. Anyone can lose
weight by eating the right—and
nothing but the right---things.”

Mrs. Douglas decided tong ago
that overweight was:more an emo-
tional and psychological problem
than a physical one. For that
reason she hires psychiatrists and
psychotherapists to speak to her
group alongside the doctors and
nufitionists,

And on the theory that diets
“take something away’ ‘from thg
heavyweight but “provide no su
stitute for the loss,” she has in-~+
stituted several programmes 1%
give members food-substitutes.

For example, each member
must read a book a month and
briefly report on it. “That,” she
says, “is so their mental horizons
will broaden while their chassis
slim,”

And there’s a “do something
different day” when each member
must see a new play, hear a lec-
ture, try a new (non-fattening)
dish, meet a new friend, etc., and





CROSSWORD
Po ff







AEB Snes
il Liat kT

Pe |
rrr
FLEErL

faked












. Peurteen provides the answer.
. (3) 27. Beam, (3)
~Acrosy:

8 puzzle
: Elm. 9

Serial: 7,
ers

T Vato is. Edith; 16. Exact: 19
0. Herb






“CRISIS"






|
|

that obese people don’t hurt any-
one but themselves. They just sit
in a corner and dig their owr
graves with their teeth.” i

Mrs. Douglas called on her
bridge club to help her use some
will-power. She weighed 254

too well,” she says. ‘“‘We’d be very

rcutine of serving refreshments at

midnight.

“T could see we ueeaed more
will-power, and it was then that
I got the idea: Emotions seemed
to be so much stronger in fat girls
than in normal ones, Our in-
hibitions were as big as we were.

“We've been going hot—but not
so heavy—ever since.”

By the end of the first year, the
crew of 60 in “Fatties Anonym-
ous” had lost an average of 46
pounds each, Of the original
group, 60 per cent of the men and
women who never considered





Rosalie still refuses to answer any
questions, and at length Constable

Growler smiles quietly, ‘It's no
good,"’ he says. “ The only thing
we can do is to make sure she gets

Rupert trotting behind him and feel-





MURTLING OUT OF THE HILLS
OF THE BLUE GRASS...

raced to Glory !













-_



-ENAMELWARE

A wide range to select from...



Skeich Book—:











Work and Worship, 8.45 a.m. People and
Resources, 9 a.m. The News, 9.10 a.m.
Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close
Down, 11.15 a.m. Programme Parade, 11,25
mm, Australia vs. England, 11.45 a.m.
Statement of Account, 12 (noon) The
News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis, 12.15
p.m. Close Down.

4.15—6.00. pom, 25.53 m.



6.0—7.15 p.m. 31.82 & 48.43 m.





6.45 p.m, Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The
News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m.
Calling the W.L, 7.45 pam. 1 Was There.
7.45—11.00 p.m. 31.32 & 48.43.m.

8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. Books
to Read, 8.30 p.m. Film Review, 8.45 p.m,
Composer of the "sek, 9 p.m, Statement
of Account, 9.15 p.m, Alan Loveday, 9.30
p.m. Tip Top Tunes, 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m,
Frankie Howard, 10.45 p.m, Mid Week



“likely,” have been maniricd.

They’ve done it, Mrs. Douglas
says, by slimming down the in-
vigorating way ... by developing
“mental muscles” and supplant-
ing food for living with food for
thought.

—INS.

29

,




Ss



ing very relieved. At the door Mrs.
Pig greets them anxiously. My
what a time you've been!" she
cries. ‘* What's happened? And
why has the policeman brought you
back ?'’ Rosalie remains silent, but

“Only Rupert can explain it.”






















ce —————————— ————— Senne eas ae
liens ceeds ice caligtaepe arene ety meet Aft ere mane nies indaacperieepteigtg aoa seoeeeaiotaauenatee EE ae =—_— ++ —— >



COMMENCING FRIDAY

Samuel Goldwyn’s Technicolor

9TH
Musical Comedy

“THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY”

June HAVER

Starring DANNY KAYE :o: VIRGINIA MAYO

DAUGHTER of ROSIE O'GRADY







MATINEE TODAY: — 1,30 pon.
CRIMINAL COURT (R.K.O. Double)
Tom CONWAY—Martha O'DRISCOLL

and Zane Grey’s
THUNDER MOUNTAIN
with Tim HOLT

Mat. Friday 4.45 p.m, (only)
DEATH VALLEY RANGERS
Ken MAYNARD—Hoot GIBSON

and
RIDERS OF THE DAWN

Jimmy WAKELY



Tomorrow — 2.30 & 8.30 p.m. — “SEABISCUIT” (Color)









Leo Gorcey & The Bowery Boys

“DOCKS OF NEW YORK” &

FRIDAY — SAT. — SUN.
5 and 8.30 p.m,
Paramount Presents
Bing CROSBY in -

“RIDING HIGH”



GATET Y—(rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE — 8.30
Zane GREY'S

Sidney Toler as Charlie Chan in

Midnite Sat. 10,

“LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT”
Johnny Mack BROWN and
“RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL”



“DARK ALIBI”

(Monogram Double)

Johnny WAKELY

eee eel



— (RKO Double)
Tim HOLT in

WANDERER of the WASTELAND & BROTHERS in the SADDLE

JAMES WARREN

FRIDAY, SAT. SUN. 8.30 p.m.
Mat. Sun. 5 p.m, (Warner)

GARY COOPER in
TASK FORCE









EMPIRE

Last Two Shows To-day

Columbia Pictures Presents

** FAUST

THE
DEVIL *
Starring

Italo TAJO and Nelly
CORRADI with



and

I 199





William Boyd as Hopalong

** MACOMBER



EXECUTIONER

MIDNITE SAT. 10th (Monogram)
DEATH

Ken MAYNARD — Hoot GIBSON and
“DYN.

With Tom KEENE

——_»_rwrw«wr——

VALLEY RANGERS
AMITE CANYON”

ROYAL

To-day and To-morrow

United Artists Double

Cassidy in

GAMBLE”

and

AFFAIR ”’

and













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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1951

Wanted: Influenza Menace

Ne Ww a ea ders Recalls Canada’s
Scourge Of 1918

ws. LONDON.
ne weekly newspaper Re- OTTAWA,
corder has launched a nation- Will flu epidemic now spread-
wide petition to “remove” the ing through Britain, Sweden, North

British Labour Government. Germany and Belgium eventually
The petition is addressed to strike Canada where the disease

Premier Attlee as constitutionally caused untold sufferins and close

he alone is competent to advise to 40,000 deaths in 1918?

the King to dissolve Parliament. That is a question Canadian

The newspaper claims that medical authorities are asking
“more than half the people of while watching developments over-
Britain anxiously want a change seas. Influenza appears in differ-
of government.” The Recorder ent parts of the world every
soe year. Each time doctors wonder

‘They want a clean sweep made j¢ they can expect loeal epidemics
of the men who have no moral 6 g pandemie—a world outbreak
right to cling to office, so that We of the disease 4 Neen
can then: Ships from overseas carried the
flu virus to Quebee during the
1918 pandemic and within a few
months every province in Canada
had felt the ravages of the disease,
The disease continued during 1919,
i920 and 1921, but with greatly
diminished force.

To-day no one will claim that
Canada can be isolated, but asa
precaution a close check is being
made on travellers from overseas,

Doctors in the federal govern-
ment's quarantine service say that
a traveller might pass a medical
examination on arriving in Can-
ada. A few days later, he might
have the flu. The period of in-
cubation of the flu virus is 24 to
72 hours,

Any traveller suffering from in-
fluenza on entering the country
will be taken at once te hospital
and placed in isolation until he

“1. Put the country straight;
stop the nationalization and other
political schemes which are ruin-
ing industry and forcing up the
cost of living.

“2. Strengihen our
making war impossible;

“3. Re-establish Britain's
prestige in the world so that once
again we can lift up our heads.”

The Petition reads as follows:

“We, people of Britain,
believing that our country
urgently needs, new, bold and
able leadership.

“Britain’s spirit needs a
surge of hope and vigour which
ean come only by ending the
present blundering, ending tha
shortages which never should
have happened, and curbing the
rising cost of living.

defences,

“Our foreign policy needs has recovered and can travel again
firmer and more intelligent’ without danger of spreading the
direction. infection,

“Our defence needs to be

Information Centre
The Federal Health Department

strengthened against aggressors
without, to ensure that all live

in peace. has established an influenza in-

“Declare that the present 10rmation centre to keep Canadian
Government does not represent Medical authorities abreast of de-
the will of the people, and— Velopments’ in all parts of the

world, The Federal Department's
Laboratory of Hygiene has been
equipped to identify quickly any
specimens of virus sent to it by
provincial health laboratories,

Medical authorities hope that
these precautionary moves coupled
with the use of new drugs devel-
oped since 1918 will help minimize
any flu outbreak in this country.

The 1918 outbreak originated in
Spain and quickly spread through
Europe, hitting both Allied and
German troops. The first cases
reported in Canada were found
among the crew of an Indian ship
examined at the quarantine sta-
tion on Crosse Isle, in the St. Law-
rence River below Quebec, That
was July 9, 1918.

The bureau of statistics, on the
basis of reports from the nine
provinces, estimated the death toll
at 37,665.—(CP)

More Germans Will
Work In Coal Mines

BERLIN, Feb. 7.

Stronger Labour measures to
draft more manpower to coal
mines in East Germany were
hinted today by Selbmann, Heavy
Industries Minister, as he disclosed
that hard coal production in
1950 fell by 50,000 tons below
the planned output of 3,300,000
tons,

This underweight production is
“threatening the development of
the entire East German industry”
Selbmann warned.

Tnereased demands made upon
West Germany’s economy by a
five year plan which went into
operation last month have also
shown deficiencies in the railway
transport system and in the non-
ferrous metals market. The man-
power shortage is thought to be
one reason for reported drastic
cuts in the strength of police alert
squads.

An American occupation papev
in West Berlin to-day wrote “A
new labour law is being prepared
by the East German Labour Min-
istry, and 251,000 men between
the ages of 28 and 45 will be reg-
istered for compulsory labour. The
age limit for the uranium mines
along the Czech border, where
working conditions are bad has
been raised from 45 to 55 years
the paper said,

“Petition the Prime Minister
to advise His Majesty The King
immediately to dissolve Parlia-
ment straightaway and _ ~=so
allow the people of Britain to
elect a government of their
choice.” —(1.N.S.)

For Pilots

LONDON.

Britain’s planes in the future
will be fitted with a Flight Log—
a small machine that draws the
track of an aircraft on a map so
the pilot can instantly see where
he is,

A strip map travels across the
screen and a small pointer with a
coloured pen controlled by the
radio beams traces the aircraft's
track over the map.

Electrical impulses at regular
intervals indicate a time scale so
the pilot can rapidly check his
speed over the route,

Tests have shown that in an
area covered by the beams which
work the Flight Log the device
can be used to navigate an air-
craft to within 250 yards of the
end of a runway.

The device is simple to operate:
A track drawn between two towns
on a map by a pilot can be fol-
lowed by the coloured line drawn
by the machine when the aircraft
is in flight. He will see immedi-
ately if he is off course —I.N.S.







Fancy Pants

LONDON.

Hundreds of Britain’s young
actors have shocked the nation’s
sober-minded my sporting “fancy
pants” in flashy two-tones.

Traditional grey flannel “bags”
have been happily discarded for
the American-style trousers with
legs of one colour and cuffs, pocket
facings and waistband in a con-
trasting shade.

Blackpool's Harry Black, who
runs a chain of men's wear shops,
is responsible for the surge of sar-
torial recklessness.

Black “lifted” the idea from
Philadelphia and was “amazed” at
the initial reaction. Theatrical
folk quickly caught on to the idea
and since then Black has been



busy with orders from all over the —Reuter.
font | 1 the bl

ost popular are the blue-green
trousers with grey facings and PRISONERS WILL TELL
cuffs with a dark brown and fawn
combination the runner up. LONDON.

Home Secretary Chuter Ede has
lifted the strict prison restriction
forbidding prisoners to take their
notebooks with them when they

The trousers, made in gaber-
dine and hopsack, retail at be-
tween $6 and $9.

In the spring Black plans to

turn out even more “fancy pants” Jeave jail. A flood of prison re-
miniscences is expected.—I.N.S.

in very bright colours.—IN.S.



You'll feel so fresh and full of vigour after
you’ve washed with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap.
Its deep-cleansing lather frees you of weari-
ness, and keeps you fresh the whole day
through, Keep a tablet of Lifebuoy Toilet
Soap handy and use it regularly—for all
day freshness !

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

WART GS-1 OSE

Lee Seseeeetnennewene

‘

THIS strange looking fish was cau
Town during her two-year



N. Zealand Give
18-Year-Olds

Arms Training
WELLINGTON, N.Z.

voyage around the world.

feet during operations north of Walvis Bay off the South African

lieved to be a form of primitive cod-fish of an unknown species.
A

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

STRANGE FISH

tht by the Danish



The

fish was
N. Zealand To Send
Meat To Britain

WELLINGTON, New Zealang,

Feb. 7.
New Zealand is to divert to

Thousands of 18-year-old’ New Britain the bulk of 5,000 tons of

Zealanders entered camp_ this

They are the first intake for the
new year under the Dominion’s
compulsory service law, the only
conscription scheme operating in
the wien outside the
United Kingdom,

But some military authorities
are asking whether the country is
training the right men, and
whether a change should be made
to meet the urgent needs of the
times. “a

The present scheme is a long-
range one. Under New Zealand
law men are not eligible for mili-
tary service abroad until they are
21. The first of the 18-year-olds
under the presefit scheme began
their training last year and hence
will not be available for service
overseas until 1953. Those now
going into camp will be available
correspondingly later.

Some distinguished New Zea-
land soldiers of the last war are
urging that the scheme be changed
to train men who will be immedi-
ately available for an expedition-
ary force if need arises. The men
most suitable for such a force have
had no training at all. They are
the men who have become 21 since
the war and are now a 21a
27. These men would be 8
cream of any expeditionary force
as a large proportion of veterans
of the Second World War are al-
ready past the best age for mili-
tary operations,

Scheme Works Well

The New Zealand compulsory
service scheme was planned at a
time when there seemed likely to
be at least several years of
before any call came for
service.
well, The training has been mod-
ern and well-planned so that no
time is wasted. Recruits do 14
weeks’ continuous training in their
first year and shorter periods in
the following three years.

The object is by that time to
have them sufficiently trained to
be able to take their place in a
field formation and form the back-
bone of a force which could be
mobilized at short notice. Judg-
ing from the enthusiasm shown
by both instructors and recruits
there is a good prospect of this
aim being attained if there is suf-
ficient time.

Meanwhile, however, New Zea-
land has no troops available for
active service abroad, The time
taken to raise and train a force for
Korea showed _ the difficulties in-
volved. New Zealand’s contingent
did not reach Korea until the be-
ginning of January, although a
prompt start was made in raising
it after the United Nations’ call for
ground forces. It consisted of a
mixture of war veterans and men
who have become 21 since the war
and had no military training.

130

LONDON.
The Home Office reported only
131 Russian citizens are registered
with the British police. This fig-
ure does not include the Soviet
diplomatic mission.—I.N.S.

a LEVER prove cH

, meat
month to’ begin military training,’

active 1

It has worked extremely to










which it was intended to
sell‘this season’ in Canada and

the United States it was an-
nounced to-day.
K. J. Holyoake, Minister for

Marketing, who announced this,
Said the decision was made be-
cause it considered the produce
would not reach Canadian and
United States markets at the best
time, and because of the accen-
tuated meat shortage in Britain.

Unfortunately, this quantity
will not in itself permit any alter—
ation in the meagre British ration,
but it will be a contribution in the
right direction Holyoake said.
Sample quantities for educative
Purposes would be sent to Canada
and the United States, and it was
hoped to pursue at the next ses—
sion, development of a limited
market in America.—Reuter,



U.S. Specialists
Go To Morocco

PARIS, Feb, 7.

The newspaper Le Monde re-
ports that the first American
Specialists who will undertake the
enlargement of the five chief
airports in Morocco, have arrived
in Casablanea. Six ships bringing
material and 250 technicians, are
expected shortly.

It was r

xy nd: t
France and anaieel

erica had agreed
evican airforce planes using
five see in Morocco. Le Monde
says six new runways will be
built at Port .Lyautey. It adds
that two-mile long runways will
be built near Casablanca, A base
will be created at Agadir and
aerodromes built near Rabat and
at Marrakesh.
—Reuter.



Quarrel In Church

MILAN Feb., 7.

Italian monarchists all but came
to blows in San Babila Church
here during a Memorial Mass for
King Vietor Emmanuel III of Italy
who died: in Egypt in December
1947. The priest appealed fo
order from his pulpit.

The trouble started when some-
one laid an Italian tri-coloured
flag emblazoned with the Royal
Armes on a Catafalque standing in
the aisle for the mass.

Cries of protest prompted a pos
liceman plain clothes to remove
the royalist flag. Then shouts of
disapproval came from monarchist
sympathisers, who redoubled their
clamour when the tri-colour of
the present Italian republic, the
same flag but without Royal Arms,
Was laid by another citizen on the
Catafalque.

The police bundled noisy ring-
leaders of both sides out of church
as the priest mounted the pulpit.

—Reuter.

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This Set Greene
Writing ...

By JON HOPE
@ What were the first stories
you ever read?

Did any one book
your future?

For Graham Greene, a blood-
eurdling shocker featuring Dixon
Brett, detective, came first. Then
The Private Aeroplane, by Cap:
tain Gilson (he read it six times)
King Solomon's Minés* fascinated
him, At 14, however, it was
Marjorie Bowen's The Viper of
Milan that brought about the
crisis. ‘From that moment,” says
Greene, ‘I began to write.” Exer-
cise books were filled with imita-
tions of what he ealls ‘Miss
Bowen's magnificent book.”

In reminiscent mood, Greene
recalls his early literary life in
The Lost Childhood—a collection
of essa) due March.

(Tip for children with ambi-
tions to grow up into a big seller:
Be cagey about your accomplish-
ments. Master Graham could
read when very young, But he
kept mum about it.)

@ Man who wrote The Ground-
nut Affair — Alan Wood — now
turns from fact to fiction, calls
his first novel simply Herbert,
Story has been rewritten from
draft originally produced when
he was convalescing after war
wounds, Wood’s immediate plans
to stick to book writing.
@® Publishers of Burke’s Landed
Gentry are busy preparing first
edition since before the war. En«
tries will be about the same nim-
ber as before, reason being that
land ownership is not the sole
qualification. An interesting
enough pedigree will suffice,
Chagrined xs ex-Covent Gar-
len Market executive H, F. Par-
kinson, At the end of the war
BG. want to Australia, got a job
a newspaper. From his expe-
riences in settling down, mak-
ng good, he wrote a book called
A Corner In Australia. “Migrants
coming out complain background
information is not available in
Britain,” he claims, Idea was
that his book would put that
right. But publishers over here
have fought shy of it. And Par-
kinson, over there, wonders why.
2 Enfield-born J. Radford—
vans has been a car salesman,
charity. dance organiser, chauf-
feur (that lasted a week), teacher
farmhand, _ builder’s labourer,
And now? He is finding fame as
the author of four adventure
books for girls, is under contract
to produee two new novels a
year. Main character in his stor-
ies is called Brenda Dickson’ and
she, claim his publishers, “is
achieving a popularity which may

influence

Searle put her in the class of
Frank ichards’s Tom Merry,
Billy Bunter, etc.” So go to it.

Radford-Evans. Brenda lookes
like being a permanent job.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED



—L.E.S,

LONDON,
Britain’s new Minister of
Health, Hilary Marquand, told
the House of Commons that
216,795,000 _—_ prescriptions had
been dispensed free under the

National Health Service in the 12
months ending Nov. 30, 1950.

He said the estimated cost of
these prescriptions was $93,847,-
600.—I.N.S.




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Odds On
Shaweross

LONDON.
Attorney General Sir Hartiey
British prosecutor at
berg war crimes trials,
an odds-on

The

Se ae
vi
ia te tetene'

to ane —
a good
under doctors’ care,
from the critical
State, because of a
Spiveaio’ Biase —
ic i
Prime Minister Ch ttl
in ee Attlee
Conservatives and Labour
leaders to replace
But Attlee has insisted
re bi one ae could stay until
Besides yoke

o

return to his | forward might be’ Hon, Dr.

and}should be given

Shaweross, a few other |told the Commissioners

Coloured Peoples
Ask 2-Chamber
Legislature In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
fu

GEORGETOWN, Feb. {.

A’ three-man deputation from
the British Guiana branch of the
League of Coloured Peoples giv-
ing evidence before the Wadding-
ton Constitution Commission to-
day suggested a two-chamber

is _sufféring | Legislature as a definite step for-

ward to more responsible gov-
ernment. “Whatever that step
J.
A. Nicholson said, “It should be
of such ‘nature that if British
Guiana accept Caribbean Feder-
ation we could easily fall within
its framework.”

Failing that, Nicholson said they
a constitution
to responsible

which will
government,

The L.C.P. was

lead

represented

+; by Nicholson, Dr, Claude Denbow,
> jand Mr. Lewellyn John.

In the
Denbow
he was

course of the discussion

names have been mentioned as|Cconfident that the party already
possible successors to Bevin —|in being would cut right across

State f Scotland
or “4

tary Chuter
orrison,

Council and No, 2 man-.to Attlee,
But the suave, 48-year-old

Shaweross, a brilliant lawyer,
considered by ft o men
to be head and *shoulders above
any other likely candidate from
the Labour Party ranks.

Shawcross, who has_ been
Attorney General since 1945, is
an effective speaker and Britons
who have seen him in action look
forward . to. .the - possibility. of
Shawcross » duelling’ with ‘the
vitrolic Russian Foreign Minister,
Andrei Vishinsky, across a bar-
gaining table.

The most xotable case Shaw-
cross has handled in Britain as
prosecutor was the trial of Dr,
Klaus Fuchs, confessed atomic
spy who was sentenced to 14,
years’ imprisonment last March
for giving A-bomb secrets to
Russia.



Some Flower
Show

LONDON.

Covent Garden, London’s great
flower-selling market, will hold its
own flower show this summer foi
the first time in 300 years.

For hundreds of years the his-
toric market -has helped other
shows, like the famous Chelsea
Flower Show and the Horticultu-
ral Hall exhibitions, with rare
blooms, from -all ‘over, the. world,
but ‘never Held one of its own, ©

Now tourists and other visitors
will be able to savour England's
fairest flowers—roses, carnations,
chrysanthemums and some of the
orchids which earn. Britain $250,-
000 a year. ;

Covent Garden, on the spot
where the monks of Westminster
once tilled their gatden and
buried their brethren, will be
turned into a blazing, colourful
flowerland on June 12 and 18,

But the show will not include a
“Battle of flowers.”

One of the judges, Mrs. Violet
Stevenson, who lives in’ Nell
Gwynn’s: garret apartment high
over the Garden said:

“It was decided that the English
love flowers so much they would
hate to see them treated that

way.’
. —I.N.S.



MORE U.S. STRIKERS

RETURN TO WORK

CHICAGO, Feb. 7.
Mora American rail shunters
whose unofficial strike hag dis-
rupted transport and held up ship-
ments for Korea, were going back
to work to-day. But there was not
yet a full seale return of 12,000
men who had stayed away “sick”
in support of the 40-hour: week
demand. Service was almost nor-
mal in many cities, but not many
Trains were moving in Chicago
St. Louis and Cleveland.—Reuter.



RATES OF EXCHANGE
CANADA

64 1/10% pr, Cheques on
Bankers
Demand
Drafts
Sight Drafte
Cable

62 1/10% pr,

61.95% pr.
61 8/10% pr.
64 1/10% pr.
62 6/10% pr, Currency
Coupons
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60. 6/10% pr.
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PAGE THREE —

éd for five years and
House or Legislative Council of
eight members, four nominated
by the Governor-and four by the
Prime Minister.

an Upper

The Prime Minister shall bea
member of the majority party in-
the House of Representatives and
shall appoint ten. members ‘tf

whom two shall be members of

the Legislative Council to serve
with him in the Executive Council
with ministerial responsibility, ;
Except in matters of externai
affairs and defence, the Governor:-
shall act in accordance with the
Executive Council's adviee. In the.
exercise of mercy prerogative,
and in discipline of civil servants’,
he shall be assisted by the advice
of the Privy Couneil. -



Help For Doctors -

LEIGHTON BUZZARD, Eng. Feb.

So many Leighton Buzzard
people have asked for medigal
treatment that the town’s seven
doctors have appealed to the pub-
lie for merey.

An advertisement in the local

weekly newspaper asks the public
to “avoid requests for evening or
night visits except in cases of ex-
treme urgency” and to ask for
visits only if unable to attend sur-
‘peries, >>

The doctors say that they have
never Known. such a busy , time,
‘One of the seven doctors is Dr.
W. H. Square who, at 90, is believ» -
ed to be Britain's oldest practi~
sing doctors, :
—I.N.S)*

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eee

PAGE FOUR

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid. Broad St., Bridgetown.
a i ee

Thursday, February 8, 1951

ANSWER

THE Hotel Industry in Barbados has
been. very approximately estimated to
have been worth three million dollars to
Barbados in 1950. Actual statistics exist to
prove that from Venezuelan sources alone,
Barbados gained no less than three quar-
ters of a million United States’ dollars.

The domestic exports of Barbados in
1948 have been estimated at $13,311,000.

Of these, Sugar products account for
$12,621,000, It is an old saying worthy
of repetition that ‘Barbados has far too
long packed all her eggs in one basket’ —
A Sugar Basket.

Economists, theoreticians, businessmen,
politicians, Government Officials, and
amateurs of all kinds, have for years now
been arguing the toss whether or no Bar-
bados. can look to anything other than
sugar to expand her economy.

Facts exist to prove that the tourist in-
dustry does provide a valuable source of
reyenue, and is capable of being quadru-
pled, if only a constructive and far-sighted
policy is adopted by the Government of
Barbados.

One does not need to be a financial ex-
pert to note that the tourist industry of
Barbados in 1950 earned, according to
available information from well-informed
sources, almost one quarter of the value of
exported sugar products in 1948.

For more thah a year, high officials of
Trans-Canada Airlines have been telling
Barbados that because of shortage of the
only kind of hotel accommodation that will
attract Canadian visitors, the island was
losing hundreds of potential tourists from

Canada in the winter and summer months. ,

As far back as the 24th June, 1950, a
mémorandum was presented to His Excel-
Jeney the Governor by the Barbados
Chamber of Commerce. That memoran-
dum absolves the Barbados Chamber of
Commerce from any charge of failing to
realise the importance of tourism to the
economy of this island.

In its opening paragraph it reads: “The
low standard of living and the heavy and
inereasing population make it essential
that additional sources of income and em-
ployment be’sought, After the main indus-
try of the island, namely sugar and its
by-products, the tourist industry appears,
apart from emigration, to offer the best
prospects of assistance in maintaining the

direct and indirect, afforded by this indus-

try, benefits all sections of the community -

and in addition brings in much needed
revenue which is mostly hard currency.”
The Memorandum draws to the attention
ofthe Governor that as far back as 1946,
a resolution from the Chamber of Com-
merce was sent to Government urging
assistance to the Hotel Industry.

~The first item of that resolution passed
on 9th January, 1946, reads that “every
effort be made to encourage private enter-
prise in the construction of Hotels on a
modern basis.”

“Those responsible for the maintenance
of living standards, steadily won for Bar-
bados by ‘hard work and enterprise, are
today faced with a challenge of no mean
order. All around them in the West Indies,
territories are competing with one another
for a high position in the race to attract
capital investment.

The near-by island of Trinidad gallops
past all British West Indian territories
with domestic exports valued in 1948 at
$127,105,000. Jamaica for the same year
has been estimated to have exported com-
modities valued at $53,560,000. British Gui-
ana is third on the list with an estimated
value of $36,627,000 in export commodities.
Barbados was fourth with $13,311,000.

The question to be answered by the Gov-
ernment of Barbados is — “CAN BARBA-
DOS maintain its present high position and
draw nearer to those who lead in the race,
or is it steadily to. deteriorate, because
those guiding its destinies allow their
vision to be impaired by secondary issues
based on prejudice and ignorance?” The
answer to that question is a vital one for
every voter.





_Our Readers Say:

; _ Thanks

To the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—On behalf of my Commit-

..tee and myself I should like to

living... Employment, . both...



LEARNING TO SEE WITHOUT EVES



~ BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

: <
TYPING is one of many courses given at an American school for the blind to-prepare the students for
their life ahead. Their blindness does not necessarily limit their achievements iy nany occupations,

The Blind Are Not Helpless

the
blind, boys and girls learn to live
and be happy despite their handi-
cap.

At an American School for the
Blind at Raleigh, capital of: the
east coast State of North Carolina,
there are 187 boys and girls handi-
capped by blindness or near-
blindness. But they are not feel-
ing sorry for themselves; neither
are they resigned to their afflic-
tion. These children simply have
too much to do and to learn to sit
and brood about their lack of
eyesight. ys

For, contrary to the prevailing
idea, the blind are not helpless;
are not unable to: take care of
themselves, and do not want any-
one to pity them, They simply
need a little encouragement: like
anyone else.

That is what they are getting at
the School for the Blind, The
school is identical with any other
state public school in curriculum
and text with the exception that
aids to the blind and vocational

and musical emphasis are added,
And the children at the school are
the same as those in any state
public school except for their
blindness,

A visitor to the school campus
ig surprised to find boys and girls

skating, riding bicycles, and carry-
ing on the everyday functions of
growing up, but without the use
of sight. Nobody stands on the
sidelines at the school. The being-
left-out—of-things complex is one
of the most devastating for any
handicapped person, and the staff
of the school stresses the idea that
everyone takes part in everything.
The school presents a programme
from kindergarten to the 12th
grade, and as long. as a student
continues _to progress as he would
in a-wegular public school, he ad-
vances from class to class.” ,

What happens when a student
graduates from the school’s sec-
ondary school? That is one of the
amazing things about the institu-
tion. As of last year over 75 per-
cent of its graduates were going
on to college. The State of North
Carolina aids those who are col-
lege-minded by providing the
funds to cover all their expenses
including reader service, under
which someone is paid to read
necessary texts to the student.

Admittance to the school is
granted to any blind child with a
visual acuity of 20—200 or less.
No fees are charged, and parents
are required only to clothe. the
children and transport them to
and from Raleigh; The school.
operates from September to June
with the pupils returning to their.
homes during the summer months.
Students also “enjoy the usual
Christmas and Easter holidays and
may go home for week ends
throug! it the year,



At an American school for

By BILLY CARMICHAEL

From "The State’

The school, which was founded
in 1844, follows the regular course
of study for public schools in
North Carolina with reading, writ-
ing, and arithmetic leading the
way as always. But the blind chil-
dren, needing a little more, get
it. Learning to read and write in
Braille is, of course, essential to
all students. They are taught to
write Braille by hand with the
use of a small aid and later the
students learn the operation of the
Braille typewriter which allows
much more speed,

The reading of Braille books
opens the field of literature to all
students. Before the introduction
of Braille, books with raised let-
tering were used, but reading in
this manner was slow and tedious.
To-day, some of the students at
the school can read a book in
Braille as fast as a pair of eyes
can scan any regular book. Books
on the phonograph records are
available in the extensive school
library, but this is considered the
lazy man’s way, and the use of
the discs is discouraged.

Music is taught with great em-
phasis at the school with six of
the teachers on the staff devoted
to this study, a much higher per-
centage than found in the public
schools, Since the blind children
cannot enjoy the beauties.of life,
the school tries to give the stu-
dents a coneept of some of the
finer things through their ears.-All
students of the schoo! are required
to take piano training for several
years, After that, stiidents. who
show little or no musical ability
are allowed to discontinue the
study, but those with average or
better than average ability will
continue as long as they stay at
the school. Some students shift
to other instruments besides the
piano and many of them study
voice.

Another very important part ‘of
the training of the school is done
in voeational subjects and handi-
work. A boy begins instruction
in chair caning at the age of ten
and requires about three to four
years to master the art. Then he
is advanced to mattress making,
Which calls for About three years
of experience. Those with ,ausical
ability are taught piano tuning,
probably the most profitable of all
the major occupations of the blind.
The girls, meanwhile, are taught
home economics and handicrafts,

beginning in the third grade‘ and



continuing through secondary
school. They learn cooking, sew-
ing, and dressmaking. In craft
classes the girls master crocheting,
learn to make baskets, to cane and
repair chairs, to weave rugs, and
make other articles.

Physical education is required
of all students in the interest of
building strong and healthy bodies
not retarded by the lack of eye-
sight. The school has teams in
track and wrestling which com-
pete against sighted teams with
excellent results. A pool is locat-
ed on the campus where students
may swim the year round,

The school’s biggest problem is
teaching normalcy, to show the
student that his blindness will not
keep him from leading a normal
life. The stideénts aré not-pam-
pered or “institutionalized,’ but
treated like normal individuals.
Canes, the old-time indication of
blindness, are no longev used. -_In-
stead, the students learn to get
about through using their ears to
pick up sound vibration tones. A
boy swimming, for example, will
notice the sound waves getting
shorter and shorter as he reaches
the side of the pool, while a girl
roller skater can tell by the same
method when she is nearing the
edge of a sidewalk.

Blindisms, which are nervous
movements of blind children such
as working of hands and fingers,
waving objects before the eyes,
rocking to and fro while sitting,
and so forth, are other barriers
that must be removed before the
child can lead a normal life. Most
of these blindisms are caused by
idleness, and giving the child
something to,do will help correct
this problem. The school finds it
can remedy even the toughest of
these cases in the first few years
the child is at the school.

The abolition of old fashioned
methods and out-of-date practices
by leaders such as Principal T. W.
Stough have helped the drive to-
ward normalcy. Not many years
ago boys and girls in the school
were segregated at all times be-
cause of the belief that two blind
persons should not marry. Now-
adays many such marriages turn
out very successfully.

With happy and contented stu-
dents, as unrestricted by the
school as by their lack of eye-
sight—attending motion pictures,
football games, and other sup-
posedly eye-filling attractions with
the maximum of enjoyment—the
State School for the Blind is an
putstanding example of the pro-
@uctive and progressive methods
North Carolina is using to make
its handicapped citizens happy,
capable, and self-sufficient.



Big Lake Fleet Develops From
Single Vessel

TORONTO.

Capt. R. Scott Misener, 71,
President and General Manager of
the largest individually-owned
fleet of Canadian freighters on the
Great Lakes, can count his suc-
cess from the day he and his chief
engineer, John O. McKellar,
bought a small and not very
staunch freighter.

But the vessel took every cent
the two men possessed—or could
borrow. Their venture depended
on their skill in guiding her from
port to port. and in keeping her
hold crammed with good-paying
cargo,

That. was in 1916, when Canada.,
was busy meeting the strains and
demands of the First World War.
The two lake sailors made the
operation of their little freighter
pay and in two years they sold her
and. bought a bigger and better
ship that was the foundation of



ea

\

a new shipping concern named
Sarnia Steamships Ltd.

As the Company prospered, they
bought other ships until they had
a fairly big fleet on. their own.
Then Capt. Misener and Mr. Mc-
Kellar took over the venerable
Matthews Line, renaming it Colo-
nial Steamships Ltd., and their
fleets continued to grow and pros-
per.

Sailed as a Boy

John. O. McKellar .is_ retired
now. Scott Misener owns a big
combined fleet and a growing busi-
ness. He still has the love for the
lakes that led him to strike out
from his birthplace on Manitoulin
Tsland ‘before he was 17 and ship
out as boy-before-the-mast on a
three-and-aft lumber hooker at
$15 a month, a wage later ad-
vanced to $25 when he gained the
status of a regular hand,

From the. lumber hooker, he

——————$

went on to a wheelsman’s berth in
a steam barge. During the years
when sail gave way to steam on
the lakes and the wooden ships
were replaced by steel, he climbed
through the certified ratings of
second mate and first mate to a
master’s ticket.

After that, to become a_ ship
owner was for him but a single
step.

The big fleets of passenger and
cargo ships, ore and grain carriers,
tankers and other types that ply
the five Great Lakes go into win-
ter harbour‘late in December when
lake ports freeze up. But in: the.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY §8, 1951



Cardinal
Mindszenty

D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

Tins BROOKS PEARS

Documents on the Mindszenty Case. Budapest, January
1949. Cardinal Mindszenty Speaks. Published by order |,
of Joseph Cardinal Mindszenty Prince-Primate of Hun-
gary. New York: Longmans, Green and Co. 1949. |

Perhaps no other event in recent years has
aroused such a world wide interest and gen-
eral indignation as the arrest and the life
condemnation of Cardinal Mindszenty. The
decuments published by the Budapest gov-
ernment controlled exclusively by the Com-
munists and the authorized white book of
the Cardinal will make the tragic case clear,

though its details will probably always remain
hidden by the tactics of the Bolsheviks who

destroy disagreeable documents and falsify
them according to the expediency of a given
situation. What is a terrific vision in the
prophetic nove! of George Orwell, is a long
established aspect of daily life in the region
behind the curtain: where dictatorial power,
called people’s democracy, has made an end

to history. ‘Not only the present, but also|¢
the past and the future is shaped by terror]
and propaganda. 5
* * *

After the crushing of some independent}
leaders of the opposition by the Bolsheviks | %
the Cardinal remained as the only upright] ¥

25”x18”

&
22”x16” |
Low-down SUITES
High-up SUITES

Cast Iron CISTERNS

Phones — 4472, 4687,

and unbroken man in Hungary, both as a
Catholic and as a patriot. He has opposed
with the same determination both Nazism
and Bolshevism and was put by both into
prison. Soon he was attacked with the
charges of treason, espionage, crimes direct-
ed at the overthrow of the Republic, and
foreign exchange speculation. All the neces-
sary documents had been produced by the
means of the classic Russian purges which
led finally to the inevitable “confession,”
written confession of Mindszenty. Enough
to compare a picture of the Cardinal before
the trial with that taken after the trial to
be convinced that by criminal methods his
entire mental life has been undermined.

* * *

No sane man will believe, after having
read the writings, sermons and pastoral
letters of Mindszenty collected in the author-
ized white book, that a man with his acute-
ness of vision and strong feeling for reality
would have committed crimes against the
Republic at a time when the Bolshevik dicta-
torship thoroughly excluded even the possi-
bility of such acts. What he really did was
to arouse the national and Christian public
opinion of the country not by political
means, but by showing the tyrannical nature
of the new system. Already in his first pas-
toral letter (October 18, 1948), at the very
beginning of the “liberation” by the Russian
army, he realized that the Communists under
the military and diplomatic. preponderance
of Soviet Russia were driving not towards
the popular democracy which they pretended
and solemnly promised to establish with a
coalition of democratic parties, but towards
a dictatorship of the Russian type. Against
this ever growing tendency he drew atten-
tion to the dangers of a perverted democracy
and the real meaning of true democracy,
asserting: “The cornerstone of a true democ-
racy is the recognition of the fact that all
natural rights are inviolable and that no
human power can alter or invalidate them...

Ss

’



True democracy inscribes upon its banner:
freedom of conscience, the right of parents
to educate their children, the right of the
worker to develop his abilities according to
his own choice and inclination, What is
more, true democracy puts an.end to slave

labour.” (p. 60) This has remained his fun-

damental point of view from which He criti-
cized the deeds of the new system. His voice
became stronger and more articulate when
the real aims of the system: ihe suppression
of individual freedom, the dictatorship ‘of a

the ‘growing terrorism and propaganda exas-
perated all groups of the nation, even the
more intelligent elements of the privileged
proletariat. As the democratic coalition was
cowed or corrupted into the’ acceptance of
the secret aims of the Communists, Minds-
zenty became the symbol of Hungarian inde-
pendence and religious and political freedom.

* * *

In spite of the vicious and brutal electoral
practices, two subsequent general elections
had demonstrated that the overwhelming
majority of the country understood the
teaching of Mindszenty ‘and a few intact] $
leaders of the opposition and rejected Bal-
shevik rule and dictatorship, And when, all
serious opposition was liquidated, all xe-
‘ligious and political protest silenced, national

Sizes 80"

season they carry trémendous my Sree i . .
traffic. Through the Sault Ste. |@espair and humiliation found its ultimate 66
Marie canals between.Lake Su- ‘ A GOooD

perior and the lower Lakes passes
a larger traffic than through any
other canal in the world, including
the Suez Canal, despite the shorter
season,

,manoeuvres could not discredit him, on the
}contrary they only increased the prestige of

expression in_ the strong personality of
Mindszenty. The press of the government
(practically all other organs of public opinion
were suppressed) began a calumniatory cam-
| paign against Mindszenty, denouncing him as
) a Fascist, as an advocate of the expropriated
, big landed interests. And when all these

|
small group trained and bet by Moscow,

MORNING ”’

with a CUP of

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DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

take this opportunity to thank all
those wh6 supported the Bridge

Drive in aid of St. Gabriel's School

Building Fund held at Merton
Lodge on Saturday, 3rd February,

‘I. should specially like to thank

Dr. and Mrs. Massiah for the loan
ef their house, and the kind

. friends who donated prizes, food,

and drinks.
~ I am pleased to announce that

. the proceeds amounted to $281.33.

Yours truly,
HILDA WILKINSON
on behalf of
ORGANIZING COMMITTEE.
“Tockerbie House,”

‘’ Britton’s Cross Roads,

St. Michael,
7.2.51.

Fire

fo the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—In your issue of today

there is a paragraph stating that

there’ are 1,300 Fire Hydrants in

the Island, of which 1,001 are if “(laying a rate in respect of the City 4a box or some other container |his name and.the driving force of hi
. 5 ‘ q . ¢ are S the 3 St nite S mes-
BS. mae pnd. 3ee in the parish god m If mile beyond the former a J pa dumped alongside the |sage, Rakosi and ‘his colleagues realized that
rist Church, | ate to be twice that of the latter, SWeOIS i :
It may be interesting to note There is no proVision in the The .obvious thing to’ tie ther f aerndea tS moe must be demolished. — We Offer —
‘hat the mains in the City,are Fire Brigade Act to call on any would. be to make the servants i wise the final aims of the dictatorship

from 10 to 14 inches and are in a
duplicate system running parallel
to each other, those in the suburbs
are frora 4 to 6 inches,

The Fire Hydrants in the City

are 50 yards apart and those be-
yond the City are 100 yards apart,

In the laying of Mains in any
new tenantries such as the Navy
Gardens, Graeme Hall Terrace
and the Cot area, the Waterworks
Department have insisted that the
Mains shall be provided with Hy-
drants at the expense of the
Tenantry Owner, a very wise step

on the part of Government. For
some reason this provision has
been abandoned in the case of
Biue Waters, the Garden 2nd
Worthing View where no Hy-

drants are provided

Under the Fire Brigade Act the
Vestry of St. Michael is required
to contribute two-thirds of the
of the upkeep of the Brigade
and to reimburse themselves—by

through

other parish to contribute.
TAXPAYER,
62.51,

Refuse Removal
To the Editor, The Advocate—

_ SIRI wish to make a few
remarks re the difficulties. en-
countered by the housewife
_ the removal © of refuse
once a day.

Some years ago the servants
started to work at 7 o'clock in
the, morning and the scavenging
carts came around to collect re-

fuse between the hours of 8.06
&m..and.9.00 a.m.

Changes have been made. Ser-
vants now usually come into
work at 8 o’clock in the morn-
Sng whilé ‘the scavenging carts

come around to collect refuse at
6.00 a.m. When they pass a dis-
trict once they. do not return
The Sanitary Department has
a by-law which states that all
such-refuse’ must be put out in

put. out. the refuse before they
leave work during the evening
but it has been: discovered that
the containers have a funny way
of disappearing during the night.
TAXPAYER

Poker Diee Team lor
Trinidad

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Following the defeat of
our Golf Team in Trinidad, I
would suggest we should try and
regain some of our reputation for
skill in Sport by sending a Poker
Dice _Team to compete against
those neighbours who have beaten
us in Tennis and Golf. There
are some very gifted players who
practise regularly on _ certain
mornings of the week, and after
many years of play in everp posi-
tion of sun and moon, should, I
em sure now be able‘to give a
good account of themselves

Vou







uly,
ACES IN ONE,

tion of the Mindszenty trial and its final owc-|% Coffee
} come eliminated the last obstacles of the|$ ztplon comer (S7ound Daily)

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* * ee se
Even some noted foreign correspondents
became the victims of the enormous Bolshe-
vik propaganda. Fortunately the .dictators
themselves had revealed their real aims and
methods. he chief political theorist of
Hungarian Communism, presently Minister
of People’s Culture, Joseph Ravia explained
in a speech to the party leaders with shame- g Meat
less Machiavellism how the Hungarian dic-|% Canadian Salmon
tatorship was established and how it was|% " sarees
conceived from the very beginning of the x ein es

“liberation.” The picture given by Rivia]%

supports in all essential points the judgment.}%
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| could not be achieved. The careful prepara-

the admonitions and the fears of Cardinal
Mindszenty.

[Oberlin College

Russian system.



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

lt Was Th

8, 1951

e Animal

Flower Cave

WINNER of Monday Evening Advocate’s “Your Guess”
competition was Cecelia Thomas, of “Marine Villa,” St.

James She guessed correct]
the Animal Flower Cave, St.

MARINES
PARADE

Eighty marines from the H.M.S
Devon-hire accompanied by the
ship’s band conducted by. Band-
master C. Fairall, staged a drill
parade at the Regimental barracks
Square, Garrison, yesterday morn-
ing.

The parade was under the com-|
mand of Capt. C, E. J. Eaglos
and lasted for about one hour and
a half. The marines, dressed in
open neck khaki shirts and long
pants with rifles on their shoul-
ders, marched up and down the
square to the crisp commands of
their drill instructor,

_ About 200 people witnessed the
display of the marines whose tim-
ing in ordering and sloping arms
was faultless. After the parade,
the marines marched down to the
Aquatic Club where a launch took
them to the ship.

Capt. Eagles told the Advocate
yesterday that the display was
not intended to be an exhibition
but strictly “routine.” He said
that the space on the ship would
not be enough for a full drill par—
ade and that was why they resort—
ed to the Regimental barracks
square,

C.G. Addresses |

Headmistresses

LADY BADEN-POWELL, Chief
Guide of the Worid, gave a very
interesting world picture» of
guiding when she addressed about
60 headmistresses both secondary
and elementary at Queen’s Col-
lege yesterday evening. ».

She told them of the good the|
guide movement was doing. to
girls of every nation, even in
places like India and Egypt where
girls’ lives were “restricted.

She said that thé educational
authorities in the civilised coun-
tries of the world gave their
support to the movement, also
the church, civic and government
authorities, as they saw in it, the
value that it, could be for the
rising generations in building a
better citizenhood for the future.

Lady Baden-Powell appealed to
the headmistresses whether they
had guide companies or not to do
their best to forward the guide
movement.

There was a general discussion
about the difficulty of getting
guide leaders, and the Chief
Guide and other speakers Offered
some valued suggestions.







y that the picture was taken in
Luey.

Sixteen of the two hundred
other entrants guessed right but
Cecelia Thomas was the lucky
person. Hers was -the first cor-
rect answer to be pulled out of
the box.

There were three major clues
to the picture. Light coming from
ene direction, the smooth round
stones in the foreground of the
picture and part of the pool in
the cave with rocks refiect’ng on
the surface of the still water.

Some people who may know
the Caves well may remember
the rock on which the man is
standing. Others may even
remember standing on the same
rock to see more clearly out of
the “window” of the cave to get
a better look at the rough sea
which beats against the rocky
cliffs outside,

This of course was the logical
way to go after the correct solu-
tion. The majority of guessers
however, let themselves go to
send in some of the wildest
guesses ever received in this com-
petition.

The man

in the picture led
almost

everyone completely
astray. Most popular guesses
were “The Statue of Fatima.”
Guessers placed the statue at
Seawell, at St. Patrick's Church.
at Verdun and at the Ursuline
Convent.

The Baptist
Next most popular guesses were
“At Brandon’s Beach,” and “the

Rev. Reesor, (the faith healer’
during Baptism at Brandon’s
Beach.”

Then there were the really fan-
tastic guessers, “This picture was
taken in the Wilderness”, “Pic-
ture was taken in EGYPT”. This
guesser gave the Advocate’s
cameraman credit for some
lightning travelling.

ie three most baffling
answers were “Jesus on Mount
Sinai’, “Jesus | preacheth on
Mount Sinai”, and “this picture
was taken from a Bible story
booky It is the scenery of Jesus
in the Wilderness of Judea.” -

Photographs in the Advocate’s
“Your Guess” are not taken from
the “Bible or any other book.
They are taken locally.

Many guessers placed the pic~
ture in almost . every parish,
“Christ Church”, “Cole’s Cave,
St, Thomas,” “River Beach, St.
Lucy,” “at Triopath, St. Andrew”,
“Cattlewash, St. Joseph,” “Crane
Beach, St. Philip,” and “St.
John’s Church, St. John.”

Other ‘guessers thought it was
taken either in St. Patr-ck’s
Church, Jemmott’s Lane or in the
Ursuline Convent, behind the
kitchen or St. Michael’s Cathe-
dral.

The last four guesses to be

opened were “Landzen”, pre-
sumably Lands End, ‘Pelican
Island Beach”, “The Olympic
Theatre’, and the “Empire

Theatre”, during the film “Song
of Bernadette”. -

Chief Guide Tells Of
World Guide Movement

Lady Baden-Powell, Chief Guide, who is at present
on a week’s visit to Barbados, told a Press Conference at
Government House yesterday that her chief ambition in
life is to help. in any way she could to foster the growth
and standard of work of the Scout and Guide Movement
which her husband had invented.



Alley With
No Name

N ALLEY AT ROEBUCK
STREET, beside Messrs
Carlton Browne, Druggists, has no
name, A few weeks ago an acci-
dent occurred in this alley and
the Police Constable, when taking
a statement, was at a loss as to
what name he would call this
alley.

Tt leads to Church Village; so a
bystander bravely suggested that
it should be called Church Village
Alley. The Constable did not
wait for another suggestion but
quickly jotted this down in his
notebook, ‘

He afterwards said that it would
be much easier for him if the
alley was “christened” and the
name placed on a sign board
where he could see it.

OME DOMINO CLUBS have

been formed and many
people are taking an interest in
this game. This evening a match
will be played between Eagles
and Emmerton at the Sunnyside
Club room, Suttle Street.
EAVY RAINS in St. Andrew
earlier this week prevented
lorries from drawing canes from
the fields. Some eal =r were
already loaded cou not move
out of the fields and had to be

d by tractors.
pk oO FACTORIES—Bruce Vale
and Haggatts — are now

yinding canes in St. Andrew.
Brite Vale began on Monday, The
other factory which will soon
start to work is Swans.

Haggatts sulle) i$ first set-
pack when w bre: bwn occurred
on Friday. This” was;however re-
paired over the aveek-end and
work resumed.

ALPH ALLEYNE, a mason of
R Haggatt Hall, St. Michael,
was injured yesterday morning
when a wall fell on him. He was
working at Rickett Street.

Alleyne was taken to the Gen-
eral. Hospital and detained for
treatment.

HORTLY AFTER 3 o'clock

yesterday afternoon the Police
van picked up’ a man along Tra-

It is not always known, she said,
that he invented the Cniide Move-
ment although it was well known
that he had started the Scout
Movement.

The lives of millions and millions
of girls and boys had been influ-
enced by the ideals for which the
movement stood and so in that
way the scout and guide move-
ment constituted a very big force
for good, ‘

They stood for the promotion
of goodwill and understanding
between peoples, a useful active
service to the community and
the development of high quali-
ties of character that would help
each individual to live a richer,
fuller life.’

On her way here, Lady Baden-
Powell said, she had visited the
French islands of Martinique and
Guadeloupe. She was immensely
impressed wi# the work she saw
there being done by the French
scouts and guides,

The movement in Trinidad had
always been on a good footing
and she found it healthy and
flourishing still, both in Trinidad
and Sees sas ae

Duri er ree «ays’ stay
in Grenada she had found the
movement there definitely on the
upgrade. She was glad to be back
and was extremely proud to find
that the guides here had acquired
their own headquarters. It was
obvious that this had mzant
a great deal of effort and hard
work and energy on those re~-
sponsible for making the head-
quarters a reality.

In her tour of Europe and
Africa last year she had been sur-
prised to see the popularity and
strength of the movement there.
Twenty thousand strong, they con-
stituted one of the finest branches
of guiding: y

In Cyprus there were Cypriot
and Turkish Guides. The move-
ment was strong in the Sudan and
Uganda, the last mentioned of
which had.a long Guide "history
and was one Of the first territories
to take up guiding:

The movement was strongly
supported in the schools ard “The
Kaboka” of Uganda was very in-
terested and gave it his strong
support. e

The moveinent was also growing
very fast in Tanganyika and Zan-
zibar as well as in Northern Rho~
desia, Belgium, French Equatorial}

falgar Square. He was taken t0/ Africa, the Gold Coast and Sierra

the General Hospital and detained

On arrival at the Hospital the
man was still in a semi-conscious
condition and did not know his
name. He later said that it was

Pohet Greenidge of Bush Hall.
ADY BADEN-POWELL, Chief
Guide of the World, will
broadcast over Rediffusion and by
Cable & Wireless transmitter over
ZNX31 on a frequeney of 7365
K/es, a wavelength
metres, at 8.15 o’clock tonight,

Leone. ,

The movement was strong in
Finland and she had found the
Finns courageous, interested and
unafraid. ‘

Switzerland which had provided
a meeting place for scouts and
guides of al) nations for the past
twenty years was still doing so
and the movement was as strong
as ever there.

The movement now numbered
five million scouts and two and a

of 40.73/half million guides, Lady Baden-

Poreli said in conclusion,

GUARDIA

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
SEAS



Or THE
bh





SHIP'S CADET LAST shows a group of Lodge School Cadets how the 4 inch gun works.
a Visit to H.M.S, “Devonshire” yesterday.





Carrington’s
Playing Field
Not Affected

BY RAIN

ALTHOUGH yesterday the
roads in the Carrington’s Village
district showed all the evidence
of the showers ‘which had fallen
in the early morning and during
the preceding night, the playing
field there was not affected.

It is one of the playing fields
that Government has decided to
acquire, and in due course the
residents of the district may get
an opportunity to welcome the
erection of a long-desired pavilion
as has just taken place in the
Deacon’s Road Housing Scheme
area.

Cricket, football, tennis and
other games have been played
there for over twenty years, dur-
ing which time the playing field,
a comparatively small area, has
been steadily built up by the men
of the district.

On the south-western side not
far away from the cricket pitch,
what. was once a drop of several
feet, has been filled up over the
years with refuse. In recent years
the Scavenging Department has
done much to accomplish this and
now keeps a man there to spread
the stuff and do any other scaveng-
ing that might be necessary on the
spot. A fairly large area has there-
fore been reclaimed and will in due
time serve in the expansion of
the present field. On the north-
western side some reclaiming has
been done but not to the extent
as on the other side. This is,
supposedly, because of the nearby
waterway. It would appear,
however, that some expansion can
still be made there and will very
likely be when the Government
buys the site and arrangements
are made to develop it fully for
the purpose intended.

At this end stands three small
houses and on the north-eastern
side of the field there are no less
than four. How long these may
be permitted to interfere to any
extent with the progress of a
cricket or football match isvleft to
be seen.

Many residents of the district
expressed their delight to the
Advocate yesterday that the
Government had decided to buy
the playing field.“Some confessed
that they .were amazed when
they heard it was to be cut up
into house spots, These believed
that however a change had come
about in the ownership of the
district somehow or other, the
playing field would remain a
playing field.

When the Advocate visited the
site yesterday, many children were
playing there.

Should Princess
Alice Playing
Field Be A Park?

_ Should the Princecs Alice Play-
ing Field be turned into a park
where as is the custom in England
and elsewhere city workers could
take their lunch, and relax and

The cadets paid



Sovt. May Rent
Land At Seawell
To Farmers

ON TUESDAY when the House of Assembly were dis-
cussing Bonus, a matter raised by Mr. D. D, Garner con-
cerning Christmas bonus for sugar workers at Dodds, Mr.
W. W. Reece (E) said that he was glad to hear the remarks
of the senior member for St. Joseph about the intention of
Government to consider letting plots of land at Seawell to

farmers on a co-operative basis.

Only that week he had

been approached by some peasants from that district who
would be willing to lease parts of Seawell or to work land



there on a co-operative basis,
wpm th sates pcan

Vegetables Of
Every Kind

Fifty-five-year-old Mr. Sam
Marshall is extremely interested
in vegetable gardens. He has
seven and a half acres of land at
Deacons Road and Ecksiein Vil-
lage, Eagie Hall, and has planted
every type of kitchen garden pro-
duce, He also has a quantity of
banana, plantain, oranges, grape-
fruit, limes and lemon trees
planted,

Mr. Marshall is a teetotaler, He
stopped drinking alcoholic bever-
ages and smoking in 1926. He
stopped eating fish, fowl, and
meat in 1929. At present his diet
is made up of greens and occa-
sionally the yolk of an egg.

His father used to take an
interest in gardening and, during

that time Mr. Marshall did
woodwork. When he found this
boring he decided to do both

woodwork and gardening.

The family gardening career
started in 1902 and by 1929 they
had 70 square feet of land. Mr.
Marshall’s father became ill in
1941 and retired. At that time they
were renting the land, .

Mr. Marshall then took over

yearly.

His customers are mainly huck-—
sters and they average about two
dozen per day. When there is a
shortage of carrots or beets, in
the City, over a hundreq huck-
sters flock around Mr. Marshall's
storeroom trying to make
chase.

Mrs. Irene Branch takes care of
selling, paying labourers,
taking on labourers,

a pur-

and

Headquarters

There is aiso Mr. Marshall’s
headquarters which is equipped
with office, .storeroom for produce
and storeroom for machines. In
the last mentioned he keeps his
Spraying equipment, a grinding
machine, rotary hose and also a
tractor which he bought when
there was a’ shortage of labour,
This tractor can plant three rows
at a time. It will cut, drop tne
seeds, cover and press them for
germination all in one operation.

All his land is irrigated by an
automatic overhead irrigation
system which is worked by an
electric pump. The pump is in-
side a well 49 feet deep. It is

eat it in beautiful surroundings? | fifteen feet from the bottom of

This is a suggestion which an Ad-

vecate reporter discussed with

verious people yesterday, but it} During World War I Mr. Mar-

fies

did not find much favour.

One of the leading mercantile
men in town said in his opinion
Princess Alice Playing Field
should remain a _ playing

field, |

'the well and can pump 100 gallons

of water a minute.

was stationed in Dublin
Ireland with the Third. Royal
Berkshire Regiment. He was a
factory guard, When the war
broke out he was in Boston,

since thore centres of recreation;U.S.A. and enlisted there,

are so badly needed.’ He said
that children everywhere were
hungry for places to play games,
and so they often played them
on the road to the discomfort of
motorists and pedestrians too,

On the other hand, when work-
ers got their hour luncheon period,
they looked for a cafe or res-
taurant, or went home, if homa
was not too far away.

Part of the suggestion, was that
the Police Band might’ play on
the Reef Grounds during the
luncheon period: or occasionally,
and the merchant said he saw no
harm in haying the band play
there on some occasions.
was no need, however, to scrap
the playing field idea at the Reef
Grounds.

Getting into conversation wit):
two city workers, the Advocate
put the suggestion to them. They
both agreed that if many people
wanted to eat their lunch in a
park or relax in ohne during the
luncheon period, Queen’s Park
would do just as well.

Queen's Park was more central,
it was more roomy,
were already henches there, along
with trees and gardéns there
giving a weicome snade, Princess
Alice Playing Field could be sup-
plied with benches too, and gar-
dens could be planted But it

@ On Page 7

There|y,

and there |

A few days ago certain vege-
table seeds were scarce. On Tues-
day a boat which was overdue
arrived with a full supply and
the Seed section of the Agricul-
tural Department again have all
the varieties the planters dernand,



SCRAP IRON LEAVES
TO-DAY

TWO HUNDRED tons of scrap
iron is expected to leave Barbados
to-day for Trinidad by the Nor-
wegian S.S. Essi. The scrap iron
vo be shipped to New
ork.

The Essi spent two days here
taking the load, which included
seven-ton factory roller.

INJURED

Ralph Alleyne of Roberts Ten-
entry, St. Michael, was detained
at the General Hospital yesterday
with a laceration to his left arm,
and injuries to his spine and head.

Alleyne was working at a build.
ing at Rickett Street, City, when
{@ portion of the roof fell in on him





The St. John Ambulance Brigade in
this island was founded by Capt. and
Mrs. Arthur Jones and «luring her stay
in this island Lady Bushe gave it her
support,

the management and now owns
the lands, He extends his :

Now that Seawell only com-
prised 30 acres, it had ceased to be
an economic plantation entity and
the Government should seriously
consider letting it to farmers as
indicated so long as its productiv-
ity was not diminished.

Only a few days ago he had read
in a labour paper vent to him by a
friend in England that bonus was
only deferred wages and was an
iniquitous form of payment. The

writer suggested that the workers! the evening — with
should be paid the wage the in-|
dustry could afford and not a de- when they work from 8
noon,

ferred wage.
Sound Argument

That argument, he said, was
sound, particularly for industrial
countries. In Barbados, conditions
were different and no one could
tell before hand what tonnage a
crop would yield or what condi-
tions would prevail . Perhaps, the
bonus system was the best for Bar-
bados, all circumstances consid-
ered,

As far as Christmas bonus was
concerned, it was really a gift
from the planter to the worker
and did not come under the argu-
ment between the sugar producers
and the union as did the percent-
age payable at the end of the
crop.

He said that the Government
had answered the point raised by
thS senior member for St. Philip
in the resolution which was given
notice of that day, and in taking
the action they had, were doing
the right thing.

Mr. Garner thanked the leader
of the House for his assurance and
said that he was not in the House
when the Addendum to the Reso-
lution was read. He said that it
was his intention to bring the mat-
ter to the notice of the House two
weeks ago, but unfortunately, he
was not in his place.

Xmas Bonus Expected

He tuanked the iast speaker for
stressing the point so very care-
fully and added that it was cus-
tomary for workers after putting
in a year’s work to loon for that
Christmas bonus.

Mr. A, Crawford (C) said
that he did not hear the entire de-
bate, but he hoped that the sugges-
tion had not been made that there
should be any reduction during the
year inthe wages of which should
accrue to workers as a result of the
price of, sugar, in order to give
them a bonus at Christmas time.
A Christmas bonus was a special
gift, a goodwill gesture which
most reasonable private employers
made to their employees at the
end of the year and had nothing
to do with the actual-wages which
an industry could afford.

Within the past few years, the
practice had grown up to pay
workers an increased wage, out of
any increase in the price of sugar,
and then at the end of the crop,
a bonus based on the actual es

roduction. It was claimed t
he workers liked that money at
the end of the crop. He was not
sure that was correct. The prac-
tice lent itself to a number of evils
and he thought it was better if the
workers were given the full wages
to which they were entitled dur-
ing the crop. For one thing, many
worked at more than one place
during crop and in many in-
stances, got no bonus from any
place.

Increases Unpaid

He was surprised that a Gov-
ernment plantation did not even
pay the 12%% and the 7%% in-
creases to its employees last year,
especially as those figures did not
really represent the total increase
in wages which the worker should
have received out of the price for
sugar.

The 5% which the sugar work-
ers had been clamouring for all
over the island at the end of last
year was not any Christmas bonus
they were demanding, but the re-
mainder of the wage which they
knew was due to them for last
year in consequence of the price of

sugar. They were still owed that
money.

The motion was eventually
withdrawn.



HELICOPTER CRASHFS

ROME, Feb. 7

An helicopter crashed on
the roof of a small
the town of Albano,
Rome, to-night

to
villa near
South of
shortly after

taking off on a publicity flight |
The pilot and one passenger were}

not injured.
Reuter,

at} road and some _ people

lA Look In At The

Govt. Spirit Bond

On his way down Cheapside, it
is most likely that one’s attentio<
will be attracted by a formidabl
facade to be found op the left anc
inset from the road. There stands
the Government Spirit Bond.

On entering the bond he see
first a number of posters tellin;
him “ne entry without permis-
sion” and then the strong smel
of rum, Only seven wyears. ago
he wotild have been induced t

enter by a butcher, or vegetable

and fruit seller who were ther
sheltered in the Public Market

No exterior changes have bee>
made to the Spirit Bond. Or
the inside, wire partitions have
been put up everywhere, dividin:
the extensive building into quit«
a number of compartments.

It is in these compartment:
that most of the rum for export
is being bottled. The process o
bottling is done by employees of
various firms in the island, bu‘
all under the supervision of thr
Government.

Hoiding compartments in the
bond are J. N. Goddard & Sons
Ltd., Martin Doorly & Co., Ltd.
Mount Gay Distilleries, D. V
Scott & Co., Ltd., Stansfeld Scott
& Co., Ltd., H. B. Kinch, Re
nown Manufacturing Co., Ltd
Hanschell Larsen & Co., Ltd.
Barbados Import & Export Co.
Ltd., The C. H. Kinch Co., Ltd.
and Alleyne Arthur & Co., Ltd

At Work

When the Advocate visited the
bond yesterday, only four of the
compartments were at work
While women were washing bot
tles, labelling ready filled bot
tles and packing them into car
tons, men were busy filling ou
the bottles.

The bottles were filled fron
vats, the rum having first to pas:
through a filter machine—whict
takes out the sediments and ther
through a filling machine,

The bond is very congtsted, I
accommodates 35 vats, whose
cupenies range between 1,50
gallons and 10,000 gallons; 2,30(
casks of rum and quite a numbe?
of cartons filled with bottlec
rum. In case the industry ex-
pands, more room will have t
be provided, d

Some of the casks of rum bave
been lying in the bond over three
years, The thickness of the dus
that has gathered on them is evi
dence to this.

Clerks working on the bonc
complain of heat and the absence
of adequate light. They have
to endure this from 8 o’clock in
the morning until 4 o'clock in
an hour’s
breakfast — except on Saturdays
until

Heat Attracted

The galvanised top of the
building supported by steel props
and girdles contribute to the
heat experienced by those who
work within its walls,

The bond carries five large
gables. In the middle gable,
are let in rectangular pieces of
glass which are used for filtering
through sunlight. The er

gables once carried similar pieces
of glass but these have been re-
placed by asbestos, The glass ee)

removed because it was found
out that more heat was concen-
trated in the building with their

presence,
Flowers, grass and bougain-
villea which have been planted

to the front by the Civic Circle
add a touch of beauty to the
building. Two palms are also
growing up in front of the. build-
ing. H



Newspaper Selling
Is A Paying Business

THE fast going newspaper
sellers about the City take well
to the idea that instead of just
saying “paper? *paper?” to the
passerby they might shout a few
of the headlines or just suffic ent
of an article to get the people
interested.

A newspaper seller told the
Advocate yesterday that he
thinks he will in future tell the
public such things as, “Twenty
thousand soldiers for Korea,” or
“Read of the old fisherman
whose boat overturned when he
was 30 miles out to sea!”

For some people in Barbados
newspaper selling is a paying
concern. The agents who sell the
most papers are usually men
with other jobs who live in a
district where the people are of
a reading turn of mind. A man
may be a_ Civil Servant for
instance and be able to make
more money through newspaper
selling than he gets as a salary.

There are paper agents all over
the island. At an early hour the
Advocate’s delivery van is on the
in §St
@ On Page 7



PAGE FIVE



Cadets

Inspect

H.M.S. Devonshire

The Government, water boat Ida took off 124 eadets from
Harrison College and Lodge {chool yesterday evening to
spend two hours sightseeing aboard the Devonshir2. ;

Sixty-four of the cacets wader the sweet smell of food struck

wecond Lt. Rudder were from
farrison College while the other

0 under Capt. McComie were
rom Lodge School,
As soon as the boys were

board, they were met by cadets
f the ship who conducted them
o all the principal parts of the
lip, all the whiie explaining the
urpose of each part,

The school cadets were

split up
1 small groups. While one group
vas taking a look at the 4-inch
runs, and another at the engine
Som, other groups were in the
cadets’ Chart Room, or the
o’c'sle where the Ship’s biggest
suns—f in. guns—sre mounted,
m the codets’ bridge, the ship's
widge or in the mess room where

SERRE REE ee eee
FRESH SUPPLY OF

their noses.
Good Exereise
The school cadets were com

tainly getting a good “exer iG
pulling themselves up and dowh
the steep and narrow iron steps
which led from one deck to an-

_ other,

&

At one point during the visit,
everyone of them was still. it
was when the buglers soun‘ed
“Sunset”. The school cadets
along with those of the ship's
compliment on board were at
“attention” and facing aft.-Some
gave the salute, -

Shortly after, most of the cadets
were again on the “J@a heading
for the Baggage Warehouse, The
others followed by a Jeunch,

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Se BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1951
iinet par,’ !

HENRY BR eRSON eee

Se cee ee ee ee


















IF YOU—
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Pickles & Sauces Cereals
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ee Olives 1.66 ee "
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“y xtracts
Condiments

Bovril ........ $1.60; .60 .49

Bonox (Beef Ex-
tract) .70, .40
Marmite........ -97, 60, .32





Morton’s Curry ........ AT
Morton’s Ground
| Spice .41
Madras Curry .......... 16
Bisto (for Gravies) .33
SS
Seto Blk. Pepper (Gnd.)
ri ev a Per OZ occ 27
Alu seeking cure
WIFREO SD Household
ee ema, ae
Prone - Requisites :
Limacol ..0.cccccesscseesee 81 Ovaltine &
Phillips Magnesia Milk Foods
| —.90; 46

























Eno’s Fruit Salts Ovaltine .......... $1.24 .73
2 1 = $1.00 .58 OUD | iivecmisisibansananias 2.21
al S ess Life Guard (Inseeti- Vitacup oo. cccccccn 13
PD hE ed a). ccc 72 42 Bair i a.
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES OP to sone Ie MAO Seren se $1.07 .62
HATE eo WANT T. a Mh RIB VOA HERE





GET RID OF ME+* LET HER KNOW YET« + Food).......$1.24 .69

3-in-one Qil .............. 28


















Liqueurs, Wines














MEAT DEPT. Ete
PRIME AUST. BEEF In Drambuie seseenie mn
ROAST, STEAK, STEW, |. Grand Marnier... 7.50
CANADIAN SALMON : |:: .: Chambertin (1943) 4.00
pacen ri Chateauneuf Du cai
SALAMI SAUSAGE FARE. secs a
—per Ib $1.00 Sparkling Bur-
APPLES gundy 4.00
—per case $10.00 Graves’ White Wine
| —per Ib 30c. (1943) 2.88
THE THREE WHO ESCAPED WITH Sanernys ay Sic

DIANA ARE ALL 'LIFERG's PART OF ; 3 | é “ , ‘
‘THE GRAY GANG. THEY ROBBED A cS Ls eee é
BANK OF THREE MILLION+«







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.|Newspaper

TELEPHONE 2508

FOR SALE FOR RENT

BARBADOS, ADVOCATE

HOLLOWED OUT HEELS USED
oe a

PAGE SEVEN













BY SMUGGLER.

‘SHIPPING NOTICES -

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW}}
| ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED |
(M.A.N.Z. LINE) |
















Selling abby hes

zg Cargo & Pas



From page 5. “"TONGARIRO” is me gers. al









nn ee ee


















































es scheduled t e : =
ydels e waar 24th for Do Anti 3, Montser-
AUTOMOTIVE HOUSES aieer mer gare a, Deer before arun. Semel hese rot, Nevis & St. Kilts, Sailing
: HOUSES — “Ha = _ n St. Michael. Setbuary Wied, Art Saturday 10th i
CAR—Studebaker 1947 Model, in ex- ‘Harmony Cottage”, St.
Suet gonetien panics, $2:650,06 Appiy Se ; me. Gate ee Fewest In St. Andrew Seeil tine oe . The M.V. “Daevwood wilh at- ~
Racer eae ee 2251—4n,|_. The most papers are sold int |¥rozen and General ez cept Cargo and Passengers for St. 4
ee —s+—— | STEWARTVNLE-S bedrooms” Deaw a. Michaet andthe least in St 1 Gare? accepted Bills of Lucia, Grenada, & Anibe sod Bas- i
—& Cylinder, 1949 Vauxhall (Velox) | ing and Dining R rooms, Draw-| Andrew. Christ Church and St. for British Guiar Windwar iS goat een 3
in excellent condition. Dia! 2000 or 4730. =: Serveank’ Hicomn, ieutie’ Gace Philip come after St, Michael, ek Seward Islands. sie kde ’ x 4
-2.51—3n. | Phone 3904. * g2s51-an| followed by St. John. In St dias Ville Mabdions B.W.I_ SCHOONER OWN- ‘
ELECTRICAL Lucy much more are not sold FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. __ and ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc. 4
PUBLIC than in St. Andrew. | " “Da COSTA & CO. LTD., Telephone: 46 . ‘ 3
ELECTRIC STOVE—In perfect order SALES For many sellers, newspaper Trinidad, Barbados, elephone: 4047 ;
Phone 8122. C25t a | | Selling is a side issue, but for at BW 4
~caatnsid ales iibeiet ‘ CT some it is an all day job. One ii
PRESS wee ae DRILL ihe hiss of the oldest sellers in the busi- — oi pene cai 3
Aer MK a ee ee ee prill offer for sale on FRIDAY oth. | Hess is Mary Mayers, the only a }
Geddes Grant Ltd. 1.2.51—6n. | Garage ‘FORD vib STATION WAGOGN 1995 st td ar Pfaonse yp onee — , / ;
‘- ————-.— | recently reconditioned. New 7 she used to sell along with 4
with Tower, As peak te eee plete | TERMS CASH. yFes-}a man called James Cozier, 4
Cole's Galeus. Pimieane. 63 Apoly ois eet ARCHER McKENZIE, known to race ticket sellers ana
: . 4.2.51—4n. men about town as “Wicked”. | Inc. Shae
ince 1934 when Cozier died, she; . :
FURAN LURE REAL ESTATE launched out on her own. She | Be ae giraia NEW YORK SERVICE a
renner ngs i ; * * sails 1€¢ Jan —-ertriv cen
Soe Cd has grey hair but is as active as $ ss. “ ” Sik aeaneees errives Barbados 4th February’
Pe sa ec ge ly ae Mev Bedroomed tee Bathsheba — Three (3)|ever. She is a short laughing! aa : 26. _Bytiord™ sails Sha February; — , Mth {
crawers, Book Shelf, used set of Clubs | Sq. Feet ungalow, standing on 14,919 Ss ito { ; a . F A " ¥ “ie ~
and several miscellaneous | Household Offer of stling fe . a week ~ eens meen hg . Y
articles also Kid Toys. in lor the same, a week at newspaper selling. . ve . anes a ~
es $351—In Lyahner tae C. FIELD C/o — rr Mary boasts she can fee up with u ED STATES ORNEY FRANK J, PARKER indicates the hollowed out heels with which ser A Steamer sails wk eee Basen to 2nd = “Sef
tile Ltd. up to 4 p.m, 28th | any man now in the business and Weitman (Right) sought to smuggle into the United States more than 250 industrial diamonds worth ” ” ‘. lst February — a i 16th Se
POULTRY 8.2,51—6n | the men respect her $280,000 in the open market and $500,000 in the Black Market. Assistant Attorney George W. Percy, Jnr., NE See a ra ;
HOUSE—One Th , looks on. Weitman was suspected by customs officials as a result of his “sort of glassy eyes” and “shift- CANADIAN SERVICE . *
house Te one new, Board and shingle @ man who has been selling f his head” SOUTHBOUND = fm
aor Pere eae breeding con- | easy to ade x aa nee with serews,|mnewspapers longest is Arthur ing ©: e Express. 5 ae
Thorpen, M6. derek Le ake es La Be thie, ehae ae Seaare bias sells in ‘Trafalgar me ue Name of Ship Sats Arrives “Wal, TY
he ‘ciation nie nipie nc uare an eeps his papers on sf ° - “Ate ‘ Halifax Rarbades ~~ «>
HOUSE—(1) 8 x 14. In good condi bo: . Prince. Al $e CALCOA ESLGRIN™ Januany * 26th, : i
" ition. |@ box. Connell knew Ss tce “ALO ” eral Febrviareain
LIVES10CK relbeaen a Hew Go maemae [old “aays when there were’ no] LOC e€ arhpour LOS | ts :ce wee on tomer SOE



Pebruary 23r.



reesei ation E March “ties
CALVES—Ten - day old Heller Calves. 6.2.51—%m. | agents all over the island. Then, ~ 5

Playfield In Touch With Barbados








































































Cherries $1,32 Ib,, Metz Fruits $2.40 box,
Glove Boxes
KNIGHT'S LTD,

Alb purposes)



e : e
Apply: Bulkeley Ltd., , “DU r instead of his i 5 t. I , > a, |
“od Pan: sa51—00. Oe ais ROAD. ‘sr, MICHAEL. | a day as he acne is ee to ure 9 irm @ From page 5 Cab! Coas tal Station Cee semeeememmetony ce “|
lence lately occupied by Mrs. | sell about 200, f 1 ‘able and Wireless (West Indies\ Ltd ROB :
W. 0. Collymore. . ut 200, for everybody who would take years before that ficld *lVise that they can now o = ERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Servic .
MISCELLANEOUS The house stands in well kept gardens | W@nted papers used to come to LONDON, Feb.7. | could) be “made as shady as Wit the following shina. ‘avon ehare Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Canadian ¥.. ae t
oes and grounds (2 acres 37 perches). town to get them. Then there/ With operators awaiting the! O.Wcen’s Park is Barhados Coast Station: te Re |
canes, vegetable ands Gomer Gavtens $00 ing and. date oe 3 aaaeeians iplgl altel ap osric Ti cia suet items wi paalnens on| “Where the Band is concerned, 88. auree s. SG af Fe — i a
per lb. from H. Keith Archer's Drug| With marble bath, 2° showers, 2 lava- alisation, business in} the workers again expressed the Gounares, S'S. Makiki, $8. Dolores, ‘89, |) > >> == een
E i a. Fe 4 a SS re : ~ Mi i, S.S.. Dolores, S.S :
Store, Coleridge Street. Phone 2000, | lorles, convenient kitchen and pantry, Waiting For The Train wrote a irae Byc sion Uap view that Queen’s Park was more fom ites gS S. Lady eae ee coe
Jaieceeicee htt aes : ae s : a > &.8. egon - = r
Gas wee Gon alee ened oe garage for 2 cars,|_ Connell remembers waiting for | };"late, Nevertheless, quiet firm- suitable for the luncheon park Stove, MV. Bresle, SS, Einwress nt Sane PASSAGES TO EUROPE i.
shipment in bulk. Get yours now 1/6] Water supply for garden and grounds the men who had just come off ness wee Patel rhe ; idea. Even the’ band stand is land, 8.S, Alcoa Clipper, $8 Cheat, wr
per lb. Knight's Ltd., all Branches. from ©, well with mill: water service in {the train and getting many sales. is was fairly widespread. already there, Matars $. Luganu, SS. Maure- . eit h
-2.51—2n. | hou 1 and. alan servants rooms (shower In those Gays all his papers would) pritisn Government Funds im Two sellers of light refresh- { coune, $8 Mormacdove, Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, for sail- {- 4
‘ is S - iat _narta na ale aia’ @ « . btus, §.S .
wee In Porcelain Enamel, in{ The residence completely wired and sold by 10 o'clock. Now that proved 1/16 to % and there were ments in carts were also inter- 8.8, Rio Orinoco, $.8, Ciudad De ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or... |) ~ .»

. n, Primrose with matching} furnished with electric lighting from more people share in the gains, i eee tats tri viewed. They had no particular 5.5. Francesco Morosini, 8.8. Loide Rotterd. Singh ‘ y “ts
units to complete colour suites. Top| the company's mains, he takes much longer to sell out.}™@ny small gains in indus rials. | ideas for or against the idea. Their “8: Fort Amherst, SS. Alcoa Co am, Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. »« .}h» grade. A. & Co., Ltd, House convertible into flats and out-| He can sell more Evening], Textiles were hesitant while! view was the business point of Spichael, SS. Monte Everest ea
eile ek Lae 26.1.51—t.f.n. ed ee ae ints a cottage;papers than Daily He thinks irons and steels remained steady. view. If the idea was wer into aoe Snietae Tomoge a : ‘

ee 5 . : ? = 4 : 2 o Me - § S oO O sc m a v7
{CHILDREN'S WARM CARDIGANS—| ment or kitchen uitaple _ for develop-|that this is accounted for by the Dullness in international ror! practice and people caught on to Tacitio, SS Fredrika, #e QESSSTSSSSSSSSSSSSGGSSS, wi
od Fang colours aio White $1.67 each.| The | undersigned will offer _ the | Sense of “Hot news,” the Evening| reflected overnight Wall Street ad-! jt and began to frequent the Reef S. Tartar, $.S, Perla, 8.8, Rio | X ‘4 % te ea ae Tee . ;
: et Rete Oho Nee er ei gunue auction at | creates. Mr. Husbands of the| Vices and there was a lower trend! Grounds for the luncheon purpose, gona JTree, 8.8. Fiador % NOTICE a [0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH }
DRESS FORM—One (1) Adjustable] town, on’ Friday’ the ‘gar’ Qid#e; | Advocate Circulation Department to oil shares. Burmese, however,} naturally the sellers of light re- dam, Emilia, Ce bee $
Dress Form. Size A. (small), — Apply| February 1951 at 2 p.m, ay flcaid that the Evening paper is| were resistant, following favour-! freshments would go down in Amu, SS. Gervais, Monte Altube WEST INDIAN KNITTING %} apes *
Hamilton, Merry Hill, Welches, | St-| | Inspection on Tuesdays and Thurs- | growing steadily in the public’s} able press reference. force, 8.8, Elise, S.S, S. Velino, SS. Wallowa, x MILLS LTD S|
6.2.51—8n/ days only between 3 and § p.m. favour.” ¥ iki ree ee > a ; 2/8) HAIR CLIPPING we }
; r particulars ly t eace treaty hopes r s - | ;
a Pay SRE Tg] COMME, ERRORS AMCO."" aera aso" sell race tiekets, Fo] sible for the useful ‘advances in MAIL NOTICES. |% * wnavvina’twist” § mee A wed
Apricots $2.16 Ib., Green Gages $2.16 lb., “0251 —-i0n. be out and out sellers,” they said, |Japanese bonds and there was Nos: 0; 00; 009 > iy
$

TRAIN CRASH
asstd. Fruit Unlike most of the other sellers,|Some speculative support for Ger-| * " Also —

$2.76 box. Mails for St. Lucia by the M.V. Lady

man potash loans. @ From Page 1 Joy will be closed at the General Post Orders for 1951 Require-

LAMP SHADE PLASTIC















The undersigned will offer f
8.2.51—2n. | public competition at hair bon, = bythe olé man in the job, Connell,







Â¥
on y : Office as under:~— its will be epted B
larson High Street, on Thursday th does not think that shouting the . b 4 5 P. ments Ww ageep up y the Yard
GALVANISED PIPE in the foll y the 8th day} ( : ; a bounce and then there was a ter- arcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered M
sizes: %in., Yain., % in, Ting 1 ins, ae Ee 1951, at 2 p.m, the dwelling.| “On the spot news” will get the} Early falls in minings on re) i¥)6 noise.” ond Ordinary Mail ‘at i218 pm on the R We SO Pevensey, S00). at

2ins., 2% ins., 3ins. and 4 ins. Also fit-

newed profit-taking attracted fresh
tings. Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

support. Many losses were re-
covered and the section closed
slenderly firm,.—Reuter,

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

paper sold any better. He thinks

bi with 7,444 square feet of that a buyer comes to town quite

afalgar Street, Phone 2096.) '| St The ‘arisen, containing pind situate! decided whether or not he will

2 public rooms, 2 bedrooms, toilet, bath,| buy a paper. :

LADIES' TEE SHIRTS — In_ white kitchen, etc. Garage, servants rooms and
and assorted colours $1.42 each, Mo- [enclosed garden.

aern Dress Shoppe. 3.2.51—6n. | The sale may be made with or with-

out the furniture,
LADIES’ PLASTIC APRONS 87c. each | Vacant possession will be given.
Modern Dress Shoppe. 3.2.51.

—6n. Further particulars from
LADIES’ and Children’s Handker-

Mh February 195}, %,

THE BOWER Irving E. Teeple, a New Jersey
lawyer said the driver had tried
to “hold the train down”.

“He was trying to stop her” he
said, “I heard him throw the
air brakes three times, as
came down the grading and
to the temporary tracks,” i,

A Pennsylvanian detective said s 5. Defeaner: ir ta eee iy the
the train was moving at top speed, General Post Office as underi—

Some passengers on board . also eee at at 12 (noon), Registered
said that the train was going faster }(3)' °t |.) Ram. and Ordinary Mail at

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
AND HARDWARE,

Communicate P.O. Box 231

he Py
Mails for Dominica, Antigu: ~| 8
ntigua, Mont- | ¥ or call 3679

arorat Nevis and St. Kitts by the M.v.|%
Caribbee will be closed at the Geners ,
Post Office as under:— ae
Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Registered
she Mail at 3 p.m, and Ordinary Mail at
on 4 Pm. on the Sth February. 191,












%
»
> |
%
Â¥!
y
\

X |
%|
|
x!
9 |
4
oe

STOPPING THE TIDE

True old saying, “YOU cant
stop the tide,” however good»
your intention, WE find that
as much as we would Tike to









COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.

ebiefs 17c. each. Modern Dress Shoppe. he ee eee
3.2.51—6n, The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office No. 17 High Street, Bridge-

INVITATION FOR TENDER
Department of Highways and Transport

FOR SALE

OFFERS will be received




























‘LADIES’ COATS for the cool eve- | town, on Friday the 16th February 1951 at SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Colonial Secretary’s | than the driver estimated. An in- 2.30 pm. POWAY, eth Mebruany 195t; by the undersigned up to the keep our prices stapieag a
an ae on re ethene cls en cena dwelling house | Office up to noon on the 28th February, 1951, for the supply of Bar-.| vestigation has been ordered, Mails for St. Lucia, Donsinica, Mont- 16th day of February for the he ih inc verte f eee "
Shoppe, | formerly, nown 25 rullyera now call | bados Limestone, Marl Filling and Earth Filling to the Department of Reuter. Sinton ang, John MB. be the Raemi fh Cee als buildings, Cand not . aviee somes at ae ntace: 4h
—WIPPLES—We have a fresh supply of bias Page cin by estimation 1a, e Highways and Transport for a period of twelve (12) months from the BIG 4 MAY MEET Lady Rodney’ iwi be “closed ae included, wee pone oe sider: Se
Davol Anticolic Nipples in stock. price ville Avenue, Worthing, Christ Chureh,| 1st April, 1951, ~ Pesuel fail at's tm. ontath oth Streets and Bolton Lane, Supr. bay Rum still .
tro Matias | tastucn lene ee ence nas 2, A separate tender for each division tendered for should be IN PARIS February (1051. Registered Matt and |}J sections of which are at pres- No. 3 bay Rum still .
between 4 and 8 pm on application to | submitted in respect of each or any of the following divisions: ~ PARIS, Feb. 7. Degiasey Fest Sh 10-20) ain em Sem, goth ent occupied by W. A. Med- Limolene Highergrad

—
PRETTY WHITE VELVET EVENING | Mrs, Talma on the premises,

ivision—-Parishes of St. Lucy and St, Peter.| Deputies of the Big Four For- ee ford & Co,,.The Manhattan Menthola
Shoppe eee sien. foes tb) ethics Danimadentae ot cri Church. St. Philip | ei# Ministers will pro ably meet . Mails for St. Lacia, Martinique, Guade-|j) Club, and Until quite recent- yey So Mou g
dn sin leanne fF OTTLE, , Ch) Ronyharn: Data r rl shoftly in Paris to discuss the eupey A mtiguay United) Kingdom vane ly» by the Bridgetown Jce yr cen i
RAZOR — SHAVE IN COMFORT by yO aon, : and St. John Agenda for. the’ meeting of the Zane? RY int® dehoral part ome as |{} Company, Purchaser to de- i
Baeeae eae bet athe aot COLLINS D 8.251—12n.) (c) Eastern Division—Parishes of St. Andrew and St, Joseph | Foreign Ministry of Russia, France, under: : ' molish the buildings and Pinealana Goes 2 cs

clear the land within sixty
days from date of purchase,

EVELYN ROACH & CO,,

(d) Western Division—Parishes of St. Michael, St. George,
St. Thomas and St. James.
3. A tenderer under paragraph 2 may also submit a separate

Parcel Mail &t 3 p.m, on the 15th
February 1951. Registered Mail at 1.30
p.m, and Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m, on
the 16th February 1951.

Great Britain and the United
States, a spokesman of the French
Foreign Office said here today.

8.2.51—2n 3 3 oz
Cologne 3 oz. ..

In-spite of the increases-our--

acai rset tec eteiaerentieine
DRUG STORE. BAGATI RENT, SALE OR LEASE

TELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-

SHEET TIN—Just received heavy. {stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din-

Quality Size 28 x 20. JOHN D. TAYLOR | ing room, Breakfast room and Kitchen-

vaeed ve ’
«94,













& SONS Ltd. 8.2.51—2n | ette $ bedrooms running water in each,| tender for any combination of Divisions tendered for under paragraph 4 LTD, he oa are still best value
Salers Linivncoora eee Closee | > on the basis of paragraph 6, except that for the final words “on spot a PRS Rickett Street, o-day. te
PUBLIC NOTICES ge er ae anes me and | anywhere within the Division” read “on spot anywhere within the Resto re Yo uthful Vi our 3.2.51—t.f.n, On sale at all good staves.
. ec! 8! an ‘elephone. | _,, * Hato ” |
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation, combined Division. ¢ = \
St, Thomas Dial 2221. arate ‘









“ 21.1,51.—6n. 4. Samples of limestone of the quality required may be seen, and
£25 order for private Christmas Cards} MARWIN—Maxwell’s Road. Modern particulars of quantity and size likely to be required, may be obtained,
from your friends. 5 peeve Bee phoa A Bungalow, 3 Bedrooms,|on application at the Department of Highways and Transport.

ence necessary. r ‘awing and Dini Room Breakfast i

beautiful free sample Book to Britain's} Room and Kitchenette, Toilet and ‘Bath, 5. Tenders are to be made on forms which can be obtained at the
leresat and foremost SuTaisinee: ae Servants’ Room, Garage in ward, Water | Colonial Secretary’s Office on payment of a deposit of Five Dollars
commission; marvellous mo 8} and ectric Light installed. A - i

opportunity, Jones, Williams & Co.,|imately 14,000 ta tt. of land. Apply: | (9-00). After a contract has been entered into, those persons who
Devt, a Victoria’ Works, Preston,|—, H. Farmer, Andrews Plantation or|may have submitted bona fide tenders will have their deposits re-
eis 25.1.51—18n ae See 4.2.51—6n. | funded; but no person or persons who may refuse to enter into a con-

-. -d. easily earned by obtaining

We have -- ;
CHARCOAL HOX IRONS DELUX!

Call and see them,

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

To Glands in 24 Hours

New Discovery Brings Pleasures
of Life to Men Who Feel Old
Before Their Time © "%,;







NT

ENTERPRISE—An adjoining Property | tract when so called upon shall have the deposits made by them re-
nor, crane eee eles funded, and these shall be forfeited and paid into the Treasury.
with nice Mahogany trees to be sold 6. The prices tendered must be based on the payment of wages
to ony one who, has, relatives;o ‘g|at current standard rates in the trade, and shall be the flat rates per
desirous of ‘buying for cash. To be sold] cubic yard at which the tenderer would contract to supply materials
in the U.S. America, ithin the Divisi

Apply to G. Holder, Enterprise, Christ | OM spot anywhere within the Division.

Church Gap, Attorney for the Estate
for full information, €.2.51—6n.

ne EEEEEERnE

NOTICE
Re ESTATE OF

SAMUEL HENRY HOWARD STREAT
Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all per-




7.2,.50—2n.







Do you feel older than you are? Are you
lacking in youthful animation? Do you
enjoy the eeeey, of beautiful women? Do
you suffer from loss of vigour, weak mem-
ory and body, nervousness, impure blood,
sickly skin, depression and poor sleep? In
other words, are You only half a man?

our body is itallzed and exhaust-
ed re is no need for you to suffer an-
other ony from such physical snterigrity.
because the discovery of an eminent physi-
clan now makes it possible for you to re-
store your youthful vigour and animation.





CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.— Proprietors,
Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets,








“WORTHY DOWN" — Situated at Top $ ye

| JOHN M. BLADON
|
























outht
endously active glands. body, Yvery one needs @ treatment such
as Vi-Tabs at some time in his life, some
sooner than others—but no one will make
test when In need o help to teed yopihe
ful animation.” 27 ere

——
$12.00 per case of
48x14 oz. tins

Milk-Condensed sessors of tre

‘An eminent physician, with more than
30 years of experience, has at last
fected a combination of ingredients
work with amazing speed to build
rich red blood, strengthen the nerves, and

REAL ESTATE AGENT -—- AUCTIONEER — SURVEYOR...
’Phone 4640 — Plantations’ Building. WS Aas

the 28th day of March 1961, after which | further’ particulars etc. Ring ae
ae in



sont paving ny y Gebt or glam upon oF mick cokauiae 13 beaieees wie. acme Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend~- Youthful Vigor Restored A AFS, F.V.A.
Howard Streat, late of Bloomsbury | necting toilets and showers, large lounge, | ment) Order, 1951, No, 3 which will be published in the Official Ga- rene, Depaltieg of advancing S Bow be she Youthful
plantation in the parish of Sait’ ‘jun day | front’ belooky, and Breakfast balcony, |2ette of Thursday 8th February. 1951. traed nod pounbtul ot? circuses mae | ee nt FOR
who in s and on ron » @ ‘ei a. y* " = ‘ ion restore o yo 0!
of January 1951 are hereby required to] 2-car garage, 2 servants’ rooms with 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling | new gland discovery, es ”
send in particulars of their claims, duly | tcilet and showers also laundry, The 4 “Milk Cond a” s follows :— Doctors throw hous the were how say aplival e
attested, to the oot ie srounds a ae rire ee tis gar- | prices of ilk-Condense! are a y tha She peat ot i Pe ere ot pu es wees ne |
Oswald Hamilton Harding, Oswa -| dens well laid out etc. Vi on { mi ho have ‘omen '
ard Streat and Milton Seale, the quali-| Murch Iet, 100 structed WHOLESALE PRICE| RETAIL PRICE been Roted for strength, enduraniet, bray A
w e dectas- above property is well construc in-power, and accom ment,
oe" tent or Cottle Catford & Co., No-| in ia-ineh aenk, with an Everite roof. ARTICLE (not more than) (not more than) ou ae arean: Caesar, STore Anthony, onresing. the glands, and thus tenas to re- |
17 High Street, Bridgetown, on or 42fore | Best offer above £4,000 will be accepted, rece ek, and Victor Hugo, were the fortunate pos- | store vigour and vitality to the |

date we shall proceed to distribute the 27Cc, per 14 oz. tin
assets’ of the said estate among the par-
ties entitled thereto, having regard to
the debts and claims only of which xi

er~
hat
new



a mistake in puttin



ee EIR REE menace” ang

7th February, 1951. 8.2.51.—2n.



OPED



PPP PPLE PEPL ASS

LOosT



h notice, most important of all, to activate, stimu- a = Wt: x
a oetaiail aot Ue jhable Sia 5 GI no acaenepeilieanietennatinath late, ssh fortify the’ glands. This great 24-Hour Results **’ 4
distributed to any person of whose debt] “TEATHER WALLET—Stamped R. J.P ITAL prescription, therefore, acts in a nett) era ee act directly: Unen id at aulate ,
= . u 0) "

or claim we shall not have had notice! incide, Reward. Phone Pearson — 2759. BARBADOS GENERAL HOSP. ee to men ‘whose weands have grown | the glands, there a ae lone wening: ne %&
at the time of such distribution. 7.2.51—1n, old too soon. This discovery, known ag) results, Within 24 hours most men report 8

‘And all persons indebted to the said} 20 MAKING OF NURSES’ UNIFORMS Vi-Tabs, is in pleasant, easy-to-take, tab- | u surprising increase in vitality, and with. | %&
estate are requested to settle their ac- SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—Series Q.6607 let form, and may be used secretly if you in one week's time most users find that .

Sealed tenders will be received at the Hospital up to 12 o'clock
noon on Wednesday, 14th February, 1951, for making 90 Uniforms
for Nurses within a period of 2 months from the date of acceptance

they feel and look ten years younger, The Ke

counts without delay. change ip some men is alin

Dated the 28rd day of January 1951.
Gordon /Oswald Hamilton Harding,
Oswald Howard Streat,

and 6608. Finder please return same to
E. O. Savoury, St, Barnabas, St. Michael.
Reward offered. 7.2.51—In.

ire, so that you can amaze your
$riends in @ short time with the restora-
fion of your vigour and vitality

Doctor Praises Vi-Tabs

miraculous.
Results Guaranteed ~ %




































Bo outstanding have been the results > \ \ Oe
Hilton Seale ONE (1) “EBORA” TRAVELLING | of tender Dr. N. G. Giannini, well-known surgeon | produced ie for weak and pre- | {s ABS
lifed execttors of the will of Samuel] clock, Square Brown Leather Case. : : ‘Fecal ysi- | maturely old men in all be wo ‘ \
Beary Howard Streat, d Shae Either at Hospital or eee ee Persons tendering may offer to make the whole or part of the clan, ‘recontly. ated that iit Is how offered nder ‘tn he World % ISS \
jo Bo DEES * . ie . iti ij e scien * Bi AO! nm \)
tihinds ee eee ie 8.2.51—2n quantities of garments required, and contracts may be awarded to pe eaeamnase> the "opinion that the fost. Under this written arentes ot Vie x , Nh
rn. persons tendering for making the whole or part of the quantities of Gry) true secret of youthful | Tabs from your chemis' today. ee for ,
A Dy 4 eens and vitality lies | yourself the new strength and vitality that % N
° oe al § le WANTED garments for which they tender. ti the glands, Bases on will be coursing through your body. Bee % f
Public Offici aie Persons tendering must have the statement on the tender form Py perience, , at dy" and | of lie and how Youu are able to enjoy them x ; :
j i i f iri ice, - » At r any ri
(The Provost Marshal's Act 1004 signed by two other persons known to possess property, expressing on that, the medical | do not agree that Vi-Tobs is easily worth | St a a
(1904-6) § 30). ees HELP their willingness to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of fonmile known, 85 ie | ten one e he small cost, merely return |X \
On Friday the 28 Phe k in the the contract. most modern and scien- | price will be refunded without question or - t ae
1951 at the hour of 2 o'cloc MAID—Reliable resident Maid or ‘ : tific internal method of | argument. Get Vi-Tabs from your chemist > f
afternoon will be ig _ at my Lr couple. References Phone Ibberson 3566 Specimens of the garments may be seen, and tender forms will tiimuluting and invig-\togay. The guarautee protects you. % By
ivi sd rage between 8.90 aim. and4pm. | | be supplied, on application to the Secretary, and tenders will not abe ~ Guaranfe ed » To Restore ¥
“All that certain of Land con- _ be entertained except they are on the forms supplied by the Hospital. Rif cae Manhood, Vitality | >
tanning about tw situate r “ one wvadll, *
in the Parish of Saint 1, butting ‘MISCELLANEOUS 7.2,51.—3n, ” x rt
and bounding on lands late of Fred xg
but now O. Emtage & Co. ; $
tid. late of Cl TAdotphas, Forde || TRAVEL FACILITIES TO THE UNITED KINGDOM Bre WISE... $
but now me = oe ge A a iia oe eae cleaning ot y torisas The Secretary of State for the Colonies has reported that there og ; >
Poad, appraised as follows:— CMA retion of off Seiatings valuation for in |is a possibility of arrangements being made whereby the Australian LA We re Not Magicians, 2.
Right enarea aad porty “Six dollars | Upper Bay’ St. 22.51.-7n,| Emigrant ship “ASTURIAS”, may call for passengers at Jamaica and A DVERTISE s-"
(go48.00)." Attached | from Coleridge | “we BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and | Trinidad in May on her way to the United Kingdom. Such a service) * * ° For Mellow Smoothness butsasn %
Beresfor eld for an | silver jewellery, coins, dentures, ete ,| will only be possible if a sufficiently large number of persons from <= Se ~~
fection, &c. . ite, call Dial ORRINGES, ; oh 4d pe ‘eg our, Tee
“TB -25% Deposit to be paid on day| Antique Shop, adjoining Royal GES: |the West Indies signify their willingness to take advantage of the ORIENT AL and distinctive flavour, . . with the vast resources of Ford of Dagenham x
. * oa A ; : ashe ‘
ef purchase. 7. HEADLEY, Club. 3.2.51.—7n. | opportunity, which is intended to provide travel facilities to the United s There is no rum that com- behind us, we can produce most Genuine Ford %
Provost Marshal, “WE BUY FOR CASH-—Clocks, watches | Kingdom for bona fide visitors, and not for persons seeking employ- Goon :
3.2.51—3n.| and musical boxes in any condition ; r . t spares either on the spot or at very short notice.
Write, call or dial 4429, GORRINGES An-| nent there. pares with... *. . : : 4
fique’Shop, Upper Bay Street, | 2. Tentative fares proposed are £70—2£80 from Jamaica and From eer CHIN. What's more, these spares arc available to you ;
R oh | £65—£70 from Trinidad. i : S S 5 ‘ ‘ ed, Th ~~ -4
E SONAL INES—Trw i . : | 8 at low fixed prices and are fully guaranteed. ie Dmg
P ond Police Magazines Spring ‘we end 8. It is empheaized that no. updestating ‘whatever gan be given eel pe I ee, Toat= & 3 finest Service Facilities in this district are at your =|. % 4
whatever yor eave. to Stanway store: that return passages to the West Indies will be.available later in the Lt sys? ve aah, Soest Per- x winmagh ities ; e S a ;
vacas Street. le }.2.51—3n. ood ’ te
The public are hereby warned against 6.2-51—3n. | year. As an early reply must be sent to the Secretary of State, per- duane, Barbados Scarves in STUART & SAMPSON x Pia i ry
giving | Set ee wuss ree ee Rin ee! Seen, nike, sons who, bearing in mind that they may find considerable difficulty Pure Silk, Etc., Etc., Ete. 1% 2 “Mend
not hold myself responsible for her oF | houcekeeping. ‘Phone Tbbersen 3568 from {iN Securing passages back to the West Indies in the Autumn, are de- The Souvenir Headquarters LTD \% a ;
anyone else contracting any or] 8.30 am. to 4 p.m, 8.2.51—1 i ili i i j i o y ‘
arene, ee eaereee oe talon 0 n- | sirous of availing themselves of this opportunity are invited to com THANI Kiros. . | $ 1 ‘ 1 LED 4
order signed by me. WANTED TO LEASE municate on or before February 17th wit hthe Acting Harbour & KASHMERE 1% j | ¢ Vi j e i . .
NATHAN YEARWOOD, , HOUSE-Easy reach Bridgetown, elec-| Shipping Master from whom turther details may be obtained Pr, Wm. Henry St.—Dial 5466 Headquarters for Best Rum. ||| % : na Be 3
King Street. | tricity, some land or large garden.; $ . : : Ls ma
8.2.51—% | Phone 3249. 8,2.51—2n j 4.2.51.—2n. Na Vesely tp PLEO EEA APPA









rene Sl maces a
a



a

this week.

PAGE EIGHT

Van Dam Spies Present Boys
Out The Land Beat Past

champion of Holland, and favour- AT CRICKET

ite for the job of fighting Randolph THE Present Xi won the
Turpin for the European title at annual Harrison Cdéllege Old
Harringay on February 27, is here Boys Cricket Match at College
¢ a “secret” spy-out-the-land yesterday. This was ae to to pee

i i illi-

bs him is Mrs. Suzie van
Dam, who combines the triple was
functions of wife, manager and \icket-keeper . 40.
promoter to her husband. They enabled the Present to score
Ostensibly they are hete to 129° rane for. the loss of six
see their English relatives. But in reply to the Old Boys
to-night_they visit Birmingham acore bf ae

LUC VAN DAM, middle-weight

to see wor meet bn ja
champion, ous M. Clarké topscored with 26
Lopez, who, at the weigh-in 45, the Old Boys while G. Mayers

and West Indian captain John
Goddard knocked up. 25 each.
. King the College slow right
arm bowler took four wickets for
16 runs and Dash three for five

Bile rivals. tad the tithe shot

again Turpi sige oe, the Old Boys, W.I.
Dam, -_ and another © eal claimed three
Frenchman Claude Ritter, are the Present wieeets gy Fee 4
three middle-weights being con- iy “and i a ne Spee |
sidered for the championship fight i rune ches Bonltns ef Sut overs,
a ee tain an tan Mason bowled
“Ihave never seen Turpin cob overs for four runs.

box,.but I would like to fight Winning the toss the Pree
him,” the 30-year-old Van Dam sent in the Old Boys on a wicke
told me. to-day that was taking a bit of turn.
valle am Aghting the French Skinner and Stuart opened for
et Lucien Corenthin, the Old Boys and the first ball of

at ihe. on February 6, but the first over bowled by a. Loe

that would leave me plenty of time ~ Stuart cocked to silly mid

to get ready for Turpin.” to give King an easy catch.
_LES. Clarke joined Skinner and béth
started to settle down. Skinner
struck his first four by nicely
pulling a bal! from Simmonds to
the leg bouncary. When the —

Farquharson Beats
had reached 39 Sk ine was. dis-
missed ‘for 15, off

Hanzia In Montego
The gam matty Conk up when West

.

Lawn Tennis Games Indian captain Goddard was asso-
ciated with Mayers at the wicket.
KINGSTON, Ja., Feb. 6. They both hit the ball. A big cheer
On the second day of the Carib- went up for Adams when he left
bean Lawn Tennis Championships the pavilion on his way to the
at Montego Bay this afternoon, wicket. though a short time at
there was a big upset when Jimmy the wicket he thrilled the specta-
Farquharson, Jamaica, beat Philip tors when he opened his scoring
Hanna, New York. with a powerful straight drive
Carlton Rood, New York, beat which yielded him two runs. After
G, Hew, Jamaica 6—2, 6—2. scoring another run to bring his
‘Clarke, U.S.A., beat Frank total to three he fell a victim to
Quernsey 6—4, 75, slow bowler King when he played

Hi Burrows beat Carlton Rood over a yorker.

ye afternoon, was llst. 4%

Ys Ib, lighter than Turpin. To-

Morrow they will be at_ the

Albert Hall to watch Alex Bux-

os fight the French champion,
arcel—who is one of Van



6—2, 6—0.

emmy, abe, Jamaica, wien exits eh - an toe rae

oon. a anna, America, 8—6, lunch The, Pre ent opening a ¢ pair
Women’s Singles: Mrs. Helen ne started acorin

Ribbary, U.S., beat Mrs. Gover hoe but Hope # was dismissed when ’

Ramsay, Jamaican c ampion, 6—2

6—1. Mrs. Beverley Baker, U.S.
pt ape ers Davidson, Jamaica Skippe: "Williams were together
Men’s Doubles : Burrowes and Tey Punished oe ne nope 7
oak ene % be beat C. Langford In the fields, but a good piece of
F oT irkaldy, Jamaica stumping by _ ex-intercolonial
. player Adams who was keeping

All the Americans are in the

quarter finals starting tomaeeg. wicket im Oh ie Sage Hane

Smith of the chance of reaching



his fifty. ith at 40 while

stem ths ¥ ane “= pitched

Devonshire Play a aid Before, he goal get
Wa P, i nas Ww) s
ater lo Te ay ,, ai tak six * wks i 129 hike

THIS afternoon at the Barbados te r
two Water Polo of iW ae

Aquatie Club,
matches will be played. Play be-
gins at-6 o'clock. As the Aquatic
Club ot are unable to field a

sere

cadets

nately had to be cancelled, In-~
stead qa water polo team from
Harrison College will play a Cadet
team from H.M.S. Devonshire.

he other match will be between
a Barbados Men’s team and a
team from H.M.S. Devonshire.

Harrison College er F. wae
ning, B. Manning, RD
Jordan, C. Evelyn, we
head, A. Taylor, E. Jonnson.

nepsne a



r 0, 2 for 39, 3 for
for 62, 7 for 108,

BOWLING ANALYSIS

Fall ‘ick fi
2. 4a, 4 tr Bt, Stor 9,






Reserves. Keith Armstrong and oOo M R WwW
Rolf Feldman. ees Pe yee
team. P. Foster, M. x. 9 t @ 4

nue MacLean, M. Jor- ¢. ‘— a
dan, K. Ince, B, Patterson (Capt). 3 Rope Fi eae
and G. Foster. eae ae he
Reserves. vor Yearwood and oy ee. ae
Owen Johnson, seine ee SE eae
i 7 = INNINGS se

E. Hope o Wale b charg 2)" 3

Plan To Play For © Seah tad ‘tue samen w %
W. Churchill Cup i. Seutes 2"Geak om



LONDON, Feb. 7.

The British Ice Hockey Asso- eae fn
ciation announced plans for an Total (for 6 wkts.) ........ 120
international tournament here for
a ‘new trophy, the Winston BOWLING ANALYSIS
Churchill Cup. Countries com- « waicott ..
peting this year will be: Canada, ¥- Clarke ..
the United States and England, K. Mason .
Lethbridge, Maple Leafs and the 4 3. aidan
American Bates team, : amet >:

Respective representatives of c Cumberbateh «2. —

their countries in the forthcoming
Even Dripping

world tournament in Paris will
LONDON.

in the first game of the
Prices are going up on a good



Fi



‘meet

Churchill tournament here on
arch 21. The second, Canada

vs. England, will be played on

March 22, and the third U.S. vs.

= on a date yet to be de- many things in Britain, and now

The English oon will be select-
ed fi rs of %

re oo foe. ‘
ipping is the British word for
e ee Earls wet shortening. The Food Ministry an-
Wanvhy ad fae ae and nounced the price is being increas-
All these clubs are made up “al- ar Pe Oe eee
most entirely of Canadian ims | ~INS.

rom



Regieiored V. , Serene Ofiee







OLD STAGERS’

Picture aoe shows:
H. ADAMS leaving the



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PARADE

Pavilion on his way to the wicket

8 Harrison se Old Boys’ Match. Going at No, 6 in

a
the reer order he
e left is

. ©. S Sxiwnirne who received a “big hand” from

the crowd after he scored 15 for the Old Boys,



Australia In Sight
Of Fourth Test Win

England 114 Far 3

(From W. J.

O'REILLY)
ADELAIDE, Feb., 7.

When England batted the second time, Hutton and
Washbrook put together the best opening partnership. of
the series. Their effort came to a finish when Loxton,

substituting for the injured
handed catch high above his

Waglt bit p hit pull shot from Hutton.

Loxton fielding in the

oe position at short leg,
Bill Johnston, grabbed the
tech which gave Denis Comp-

At 44 Roach’ton his third blob of the series,

It was an identi¢al catch to the
Same bowler too, with which he
caught Compton at Brisbane.

They were two remarkably good
efforts for a man who was sub-
stituting for Iverson who would
undoubtedly have either one of
them inscribed in his family
archives had he been the fields-
man.

I imagine nevertheless that
there was a point of rules which
was involved in Loxton taking

; that important position at short

leg for Compton, I believe that
Compton, the de faeto Captain
of the team at the time, should
have protested as soon as Hassett
inviteq Loxton to take the posi—
tion. Compton would have been
well =e his rights to ask Has—
Sett to let Loxton do his subbing
in a less specialised position,

This Test has brushed aside any
illusions our selectors have had
about our attack. Some rapid
rearrangement of it must be done
before our next visitors, the West
Indies arrive. Without a _ leg
break bowler we cannot expect
to go on winning.

Don’t Cover Pitches

The chief point arising out of
this fourth Test now that it is to
all intents over and done with, is
the bearing it will have upon the
deliberations whith are certain
to come soon as to the advisabil-
ity of covering Test pitches,

After the first Test played at
Brisbane, there was a general out-—
cry from Australian officials that
pitches must be covered so that
Test cricket could carry on as a
paying concern.

That game was definitely ruined
by rain from England's playing
point of view, and from the profit
making side. But having sat out
this match in blazing sunshine,
nothing seems more utterly
ridiculous than a suggestion that
all Test pitches should be pro-

. tected from rain,

It is a retrograde step just as
surely as the step to limit the
number of overs for the use of
the ball was, Before English
officialdom agrees to any sugges~
tion towards this end, they must
think deeply.

If Brisbane is a risk in Novem-
ber then let the match be played
later when the weather becomes
settled, or allow for local rules to
apply there. It is absurd to legis—
late for all Test grounds just be—
cause Brisbane generally goes
contrary.

James Burke, our latest colt,
joined the band of first appear—
ance century makers. He batted
confidently and attractively. When.
he had reached 97, Compton

By: Timmy Hatlo

READY TO BREAK DOWN
AND CRY =. THEY/LL
DO IT EVERY TIME «=

Tame TO MANY Doctors
AND DENTISTS ++

Iverson, took a brilliant one-
head off a mistimed but fairly

bowled him a no-ball unintention-
ally, and he banged a four for
the coveted honour. That no-ball
must have been the most grate—

fully accepted no-ball in the
history of Test cricket.

The Scores:—

AUSTRALIA ist Innings ..,....... 371

ENGLAND Ist Innings .............. 212



AUSTRA: 2nd INNINGS |
Areher ec Bedser b Tattersall ,
Morris run out . a ; 2
Hassett I.b.w. e “Wright Awiaes » &
Harvey b Brown ........ sicctece &
Miller hit wicket b Wright ... 9
Burke mot Out ....6.eecse essences 102
Zan Johnson c Evans b Warr . 3
Lindwall run out ,..... vee . &
Tallon c Hutton b Compton ... 5
Bill Johnston not out ....... Te
Extras (7 byes, l leg.) .......... 8
Totat (for 8 wkts. decid.) ,

403
Fall of wickets: 1 for 26, 2 for 79, 3 for
95, 4 for 194, 5 for 281, 6 for 297, 7 for

367, 8 for 378.
BOWLING eae

me OR
Bedser 5. ..6eceecdees 23 6 62
Warr 21 3 6
Wright 2 82 «100
T: a 2 2 116
Brown 3 1 14
Compton 46 0 18



6

ENGLAND 2nd TNNINGS
Hutton ec Sub b Bill Johnston ......
Washbrook Lb.w. b Bill Johnston
Simpron not out . pied
Compton e Sub b Bill Johnston” os eke
Sheppard not out ease

xtras (6 byes, 3 no Balls) ....

* “
SacBSS nw cF

Total (for 3 wkts.) ........ 11#

Pall of. wickets: 1 for 74, 2 for 9,



3 for 90.
BOWLING ANALYSIS

G @& Rk W,
Limdwall 2.2.0... 0006 5 1 19 o
EGE ene n ss oe 7 1 17 a
Bili Johnston . 13 2 20 3
lan Johnson ... “4 4 32.0 («8
TPES woe eee eye dee 3 1 q 0























TAKING THE
DISCARD PILE
By M. HARRISON-GRAY
aN
Wee Sanne Seca pi
meld a rule whieh

aati a be taken into
a player's hand until tne, legal
pee be plet ered.

ras o
is
romalnien of the aon

yee © point is BRD oe
for the to following ri
A, A, 10, 10, 10, 7. 2, 5, 2, 2,
Yo right-hai
has 1 a even, ena.
aa ay part you ae att
eure Bortect m id

frou - normally fol-



13
This leaves yo
wild cards tn wan mate Net











ur natural

eee oa ieee ea

To this voit 4

ia y
remaining car necorde
ing t to whether 4 there

Seve:
























he same,
ot

t
& a layer a Low
a
stowed

Pite before ine ha”



the auspices of the
dos Yacht Club,



Regatta On
Saturday

“THE fourth re

of the at

yachting sédson Will be sailed i
Carlisle Bay on "ager
Barba-

Starting = and handicaps

are as fo!

Class Me. Yacht Start at at Flag |
B 4 Hi Ho iat
B % sean 220 «Red
D @ Peter Pan
7
B10 Van Phomdyke $81 Yellow
B 18 Ranger 2.92
ee
I 6 Eagie 253 Yéllow
tT. oe
12 Dawn 2% Red

nt oe OF tee,
oof
g }

co















B 6 Flirt 2.36 Red
BR @ Rascal
I tL Reen 2.37 Yellow
D 8 Olive Blossom
3 War Cloud 238 8 86Red
D 7 Sinbad 2.39 Yellow
1 18 Glytie % aif
D 2 Imp 2.40 Rea
q ot 2a = Yell
T 1 ‘ellow
1 4 Cornetta .
‘¢ & Folly
* 3S «Edril 2.42 Red f
"C7 Miss Behave
Cc 2 Seamp ~ 243 Yellow
K XS Comet 3
c¢ 8F Nan
c i in 24 Red
B 1 Gipsy
B 5 Mischiet 2.45 Yellow
B 7 Moyra Blair d
“K 38 Thunder
K 40 Vamoose 2.46 Red
K 42 Breakawaiy i
“K 29 Cyclone 247 © Yellow
€ 7 Rogue
Cc 10 Gannet 250 Red

N.B. The 5th Regatta will be held on
Saturday 17th March, 1951.
H. BLAIR

Starter.



FootballProgramme
Needs Pruning

By HAROLD PALMER
THE Football Association may
have to revise their ideas about
the Festival of Britain matches,
The plain truth is that too many
ames are being arranged. Some-

y must lose a iot of money.
Home clubs are determined it will
not be them. Will our foreign
visitors foot the bill?

Visiting clubs have to pay their

own travel expenses and trust to
getting them back through a 50-50

share from

What chance have the Turkish

_ Gaskin (Capt.), R.

, batsman at the Board’s expense

Air Races Por|
Festival |

LONDON. |
Special Festival of Britain air)
races will be held June 23 at Hat-
field Aerodrome, Hertfordshire.
Thrée of the races will be inter-
national events and invitations to
compete are being sent to flying
clubs all over the world. Thou-
sands of dollars and nine trophies
will be given as prices,

In addition to the international
races—which will be flown over
a 105-mile course—there will be
the annual King’s Cup Air Race
which is confined to British —





B.G. Selects Team

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 7.
The following were selected
to-day to represent British Guiana
in Jamaica in March: B. McG.
J. Christiani,
$i; A. McWatt, L. Wight, P.
ight, H. P. Bailey, J. L. Thomas;

Thomas, John Trim, A, B.
Saitox: G. Persaud, Jack Allen,
B. Patoir.

The Board decided to take L.
Jackman, useful on the side as a

for the sake of experience.

What's on Today

E m of Sculpture and
tings by K. R. Brood-
sclate te ike va, water
arj Sine
and water
a ao at Barba-
dos Museum ....... 10.
Sale of Land 6 at “Rockfield”,
St. Lucy by Seifert R.
Howard, Government
Auctioneer ......... 1,00
hare Beat at
at No, &
Sheet by Mi Cottle,
Catford & Co,



Committee of the Cham-
‘ ber of Commerce and all
hotels and firms interested
in tourist trade, at offices
of Chamber of Commerce,
Lucas Street ....... 2.00
Guide bg at “Pax Hill” in
honour of Lady Baden-
Powell with Police Band
in attendance 4.30
H.M.S. Devonshire vs, Carl-
ton at football at Carl-
i. hina e ainataah scade, $ 45
HMLS. Devonshire vs, Island
team at Water Polo and
Ship’s Cadets vs. Harrison
Serr at Aquatic Club

00
nik Devonshire vs. Har-
College at Boahet
H.MS. Devonshire vs. Island
at Table Tennis at
WME. Gis ic. cesss 5.00
Dance by Port Welfare Com-

clubs on this basis? There are mittee in honour of C.P.O’s
supposed to be three of them com— and P.O’s of H.M.S. Dev-
ing, Galatasaray, Besiktas and onshire at ores
Fenerbahee. - # — fj _ Cham .........-.-+5+

They will come by air, which

Club
Mobile Cinema gives ‘lew
Newcastle Plantation Yard

is not only quicker but cheaper St. John ........... 30
than the seven days’ journey by CINEMA <
sea. Cost is £106 each. Then | Slene — "Moldy in, Oe sto
hotels here can be expected to Plazgc-( rigetey™) “Daughter of
cost about £3 a day. So for a , « ;

party of about 20, here for 16 | “Yor! a Dark Alibe' 500 @ #30

days, the tour must cost about

A

When Galatasaray visited
Queen’s Park Rangers in Septem-
ber the attendance was about
8,000 The Turkish side took £300
I think | _
the attendance would be smaller *
in May, when most people have

as their share of the gate.

had enough football.
Spurs’ View

Then I question whether they
will draw bigger crowds at
Coventry or Barnsley, so there
must be a big deficit at the end of
the tour—and the Turks will not
take the chance.

Clubs coming from this side of

the Continent will not incur any-
thing like the same expenses, but

what sort of an attraction are

“Holland 3” going to be playing
Leyton Orient. Walsall and Bristol
Rovers.

There is going to be tco much
competition, especially for the
time of the year. The pro-
gramme must be pruned — at
once. Clubs involved must have
a meeting with the F.A. Only
the attractive sides should come,

Spurs even reject tne idea of

having a first-class side here at
the height of the season,
English public have not learnt to
appreciate foreign club sides,’ says
their manager, Arthur Rowe.

“The

Gates are on the decline this

os Explain that how you
wit,
like, but the end of an _ eight
months’ season is no time for this
sort of venture.

Shortage of money, if you

Galiety—(St. James) * “Wanderers of

the Wasteland” & rareneee
Empire— ‘Faust And The The
Devil - 445 & 8.30

Roxy— “Desir? | Rides an «
hep. Done It” .....- & 8.15
Olymp' e— ‘Centennial Summer" &
“Mine Own eee eras th até







The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.20 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.02 p.m
io ae Quarter) Feb-
Lighting : 6.30
High Water : 5.30 ‘J: 5.32
p.m,

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .28 in.
Th for —- to Yester-
wesapavoauine (Max.) 83.0 ° F
Temperature (Min.) 75.0 °F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
' E.N.E. (3 p.m.) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity 8 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.990
(3 p.m.) 29.895













AFTER-DINNER
Me) od


















START THEM OFF DAILY WITH

ENRICHED BREAD
The Vitamin Loaf

I &





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1951

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@ Banishes perspiration odour
© Leaves body sweet and dainty

Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that
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Babies are waiting for Cow and Gate. Something a

little better, something a little different, have made

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That is why Mothers say“ There is nothing quite like it
nothing so good when natural feeding fails.”



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AGENTS.





Full Text

PAGE 1

J&tocafe ESTABLISHED 1895 THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 11*1 PRICE flVf 10 VOTES SAVE LABOUR GOVT. From General Election Russia, Satellites Causing Tension WASHINGTON, Feb. 7. SECRETARY OP 8TATE DEAN ACHE80N said today it was not German re armament but the maintenance and building up of the armies of Russia and its satellites, which was creating inter national tension. Acheson at his news conference today strongly criticised the latest Soviet note in a series of exchanges between Russia and the three Western Powers on the possibility of a Big Pour meeting to discuss East-West differences. — ; Acheson Mid there was nothing. particularly new in the Soviet not*. 11 contained hich was the usual 9 Arabs Killed By Israel Army AMMAN, Feb. 7. Arab authorities today aliened th;it nine Arab*, including women and children, had been killed on.' two scrioufcly injured by an Its-Ball Army foree which ra'ded ;i village They said that before dawn to-day the raiders had blown up two houses fn Sharafat Village, which lies a few hundred yards from the 'armistice line*" 3 miles south-west of Jerusalem. They added that the Jordan Government had asked for an urgent armistice meeting to con,„ disVJssing questions" ft complaints about the incldemilitarisation of c.e dent. Arab source* also said that Israeli force* -had built a a-mil. deviation road inside Jordau territory south of the Dead Sea —Reuler. ptal. The Judge will hear the argument in this connection on Thursday. Teper was defended by L. M. S. Cibrnl. associated with Uoyd l.uckhoo. FIND ARMS DUMP TURIN. Feb. 7, Police a nested a worker here to-day after finding a secret arms dump in the cellar of his home. The arms included a heavy machine nun. 12 rifles. 25 hand grenades, two mortars, bombs, and more than 2.000 rounds of ammunition. Ten people were under detention in Milan to-day ;is a result of the discovery of the arm* arsenal. —Reuter. / U.S.A. Reject Spy Charges FRANKFURT. Feb 7 The Unitvd State. Em base v In Prague today sent a note to th.Czech Foreign Ministry rejecting charges that German based American aircraft had spied 00 Czech border areas and two towns in the interior. It also denied that aircraft had dropped radio transmitters to subversive elements Inside Czechoslovakia. The Czech charges, the American note said, "appear to have been fabricated loialy for prop-fnnrta purposes." The American note was in answer to the Czech protest of January 22 listing 58 alleged violations on Czech air space be-wren October and January 15, and saying that Czechoslovakia wouid take her own measures ir alleged air violations continued. —Heater. Srhuman For Ilaly PARIS. Feb. 7. French Prime Minister Rei-.e Pleven and Foreign Minister Robert Schuman will leave Paris on Sunday for conversations with Italian Prime Minister Alc.de De Gasper! and Foreign Minister Count Carlo Sforza in Porto Flno. Italy, It was announced today. —Heater. 82 Dead: 500 Injured As Train Crashes In U.S. NEW JERSEY. Feb. 7. Eighty-two people died according to counts early today and 500 were injured when a packed suburban train plunged over a temporary bridge at top speed here last night rolling into the street 20 feet below. The train "The Broker" was jammed to the corridors with people going home from work in New York city to a residential district of New Jersey. The steam engine had just cleared the bridge—a wooden trestle—when it jumped ihe rails. %  ~ Panic broke out in some coachthe injured screamed for STORMS KILL 8 IN ITALY ROME, Feb. 7. Avalanches, floods and high winds had killed eight and injured many more up to to-day when snow and rain storms lashed central and north Italy for the third day in succession, Avalanches and snow falls isolated dozens of villages in the Alpine valleys. Flooding along the banks of the Reno river in Ferrara and Bologna provinces isolated many villages and left hundreds of families homeless. Reuter. 33 Die, 6987 Injured RIO DE JANEIRO. Feb 7. Thirty three deaths, six by murder, and 8,987 injuries—a record number—were the result of a four days carnival frolic here which ended early to-day. While record crowds filled central street*, the extremely high temperature and lack of loudspeakers m public places, which this year were not installed by the municipality, kept popular (unmaking little below the normal level —Reater. A OROUP of Harmon Collrgc Cadots were yesterday shown arouad tea forward engine room of II.Ml % %  Devonshire" by Cadet England. IK. Here they rs iu.porting eae of the engine* U.S. Will Draft Peace Treaty FOR JAPAN. TOKYO. Feb 7. The United States Mils, to draft a simple and short peace treaty restoring Japan';. F<,vercignty with the minimum of restrictions, it was said to-day b> source* close lo John Foster Dulles, its leader. Dulles. Republican Foreign Affairs expert, is President Truman's special envoy to Tokyo. These sources said that when the Treaty granted Japan sovereignty, the nation would have the right of collective defence as de fined by United Nations charter. How Japan achieved this, would be her own concern, they added —Healer. Pearson Declines ForLAKE SUCCESS. Fel; 1-ester Pearson, Canadia eign Minister, has declined %  -/nation to serve on (ha Nations Korean Committee, it was) learned to-day. Pearson was ono of the original choices for the Three-Member Committee SiBrncgal Rau also declined mem< bersnip —Reuter. Plane In Distress ROME. Feb. 7, The British naval oil tanker Echodalf was searching for an aircraft which crashed into the sea 100 miles southeast of Crete, Rome airport officials said to-day. Officials said they had received this news from Athens airport Malta radio picked up early today. ;. djitftsjg signal from the rcraft giving its position — UraUf. Clock Tower Kills 7 NEW DELHI. Feb. 7. Seven people were killed and about IS injured when the top of an 80-year-old clock tower in Old Delhi's centre, collapsed to-day Five passcrsby were killed outright by falling debris, and two more died In hospital. Tramcar passengers, passing at the time had a narrow escape —Healer. U.N. Troops Push Closer To Seoul TOKYO. Feb 7. United Nations troops who to-day advanced to within six miles of Seoul were believed here tu have cracked the Idit Communist defence line south of the Han River. They .advanced between 2,000 and 7.000 yards to-day after Chinese, scorched by the biggest concenliatiun •! artillery, armour and air power of the Korean war had retreated more than five miles to a new mountain line for a stand before the South Korean capital which they now hold. 9 DIE IN EXPLOSION l.Fi H'N'F. Northern France, Feb. T. i en were killed, and injured by a fire damp explosion in i coil pit at •stf here to-da. i>f another man completing the working team of IT was not known.—R rater. help The side of one coach was ._. plctely ripped off and the carnage Inside was almost beyond description other coaches which telescoped into one another trapped the living and dead in a twisted vault of steel. Some victims we ut to bits by sharp metal. One man (rapped underneath heavy wheel whispered "Help nhelp". while rescue workers with acetylene torches cut their rough debris Some bodies crushed by the tonnage, were unrecognised as they were removed Some coaches were bent into a "U". Ambulance* brought blood plasma from nearby hospitals. It was the third major train crash in New York in less than a year Two previous crashes claimed 111 lives. The wooden bridge bolstered up with big beams was put up when the tracks were moved to make room for a new rbad being built. It apparently' sagged a* the tram passed over it. "The Broker" was one of the first trains to cross. The driver. Joseph Fit/-Simmons. who Is In hospital, told police "I hit the trestle at about 15 miles sn hour. The moment the engine passed over the trestle if lurched sharply, it started to sway and I applied brakes, but it was too late". The train normally carried about 900 passengers. But more than that were jammed on board last night because of a strike on other lines Norman Merr who crawled from the wreckage unhurt said. "The train Just went bounce, bruin a) On Page 7 NINE KILLED EASTWILLE. Virginia, Feb. 7 A United States Marine Transport plane crashed in a storm near here to-day killing all nine men on board —Heater. FOUR DIE IN CRASH MADRID. Feb 7 Four people died when a Spanish army Junkers plane crasned in %  Mill near Toledo tetter* tr. • wreckage was found to-dsy Thq plane disappeared during a snowstorm vesterday. —Reuter Strong Peace Front Needed To Stem Red Three! BONN. Feb. 7. West Herman Chancellor Konrad Adenauer said today the "only means to maintain peace against the Soviet threat is the establishment I a strong western peace front". He rejected the idea that Germany could be neutralised by Four Power talks because she wa.s not siring enough to defend her homier*. Speaking over Radio Munich tonight. Adenauer said thai the Soviet Union would seek the demilitarisation of (lermany. the withdrawal of occupation troops and the "neutralisation'' of the country in any Big Four talks. "We know mat there are circles abroad which believe thai this ideal can be realised", he said. "However appealing such neutralisation might appear, the country could remain neutral amid war if politically and economically strong enough to defend its front" "If the country did not have this strength, it could find the necessary protection only in connection with the defence system of friendly powers. "Nobody can seriously believe that should hot war come, both warring armies would lespect i Germany bare of arms". He hoped that his Government would be informed of every phase of any such talks and any preliminary negotiations. It wished to have the chance of stating Its i.wn views "in good time" in any decisions which mighl affect Germany.—Reater Missing Czech Was Last Seen In Brno .VIENNA. Feb. 7. Friends of Dr. Vladimir Cl erne nils, missing Csechnslovak ex-Foreign Minister said here today he was last seen at Brm eentral railway station on Thursday to go to Bratislava on the Austrian border. —Reuter Neither General Ridgway. nor his officers, made extravagant claim* of success, but the United Nations line was moving slowly and, melhodk.illt forward in what Ridgway himself dubbed a limited objective offensive."' Cowiitnsntet positions, ItUo which Allied troops thrust to-da>. were believed lo be the new defence bne t.i which Communists have been retreating for two days. One tank patrol reached a point within four miles of the Han River which runs through Seoul, before it withdrew. In this area negro soldiers swept up a hill behind a wall of bayonets and captured a rugged slope. Th ( > heaviest aerial artillery barrage of the lt-day-old offensive presaged the capture by American troops of two hill* north of Anyangni southeast of Seoul, on which entrenched Communists hod held beck the Allied ad'.nice for the past 48 hours. —Renter. Atom Explosions Were The Test NEW YORK. Feb. 7. Five atomic explosions in Neva< i were believed to be the test lor artillery weapons and guided missile*, science writer William Laurence reported to-day in the Nets York Times, Laurence, leading lay authority i atomic energy said this was BKNgcsted by the "very fact that tests were held in Nevada instead of the atomic proving grounds at Ei ijetok Laurence said that "whatever topes used In Nevads there can be no question that they were designed to extend the use of Ihe atom bomb from purely strategic to tactical purposes. It can also be certain Dun each of the five explosions tested a different model, each designed for different r. poses —Reater. OTTC.ILL INJURED SALEM, Mass.. Feb 7. Nobel Prize winning dramatist Eugene O'Neill Is in hospital here with s fractured knee, his doctor .d today. The doctor said O'Neill, who is 02. fractured Ins knee in a fall. —Reater PRINCESS ROYAL III LONDON, Feb. 7. The Princess Royal was admit. ted to a London nursing home today, for treatment for aritr'ji trouble —Reater. 20 Asked To Increase Raw Materials WASHINGTON. Felt 7 The United State*. France and Britain, have Invited about 2<> estern countries to set up international machinery to Increase production of 11 scarce raw materials and allocate their use. Cotton wool, and sulphur commodities, exempted from control during the last war. would be ..ffccied for the first time. Other commodities covered are copper, lead 1 ?inc. tungsten. molybdeum, manganese, nickel and cobalt Rubber and tin ar.' t included. The State Department declined disclose the names of the countries which hsd been invited. but it was learned from other sources that Spain would bo cpresentcd on at least one of th<* ix committees presumably that dealing with tungsten. Spain provides substantial quantities of wolfram lrom which tungsten is derived. The meetings are expected to begin late in February and ti LONDON, Feb. f, THE GOVERNMENT to-night defeated by 10 votes the Conservatives' eleventh hour attempt to prevent nationalisation of Britain's steel industry The fate of the Labour Government de pended on the result of the House of Commons vote whioh would have stopped nationalisation of the industry, due to come into operation on February 16. Labour registered 308 votes against 298 for the Conservative and Liberal opposition. stretch through April. -Heat*' Another Italian Quits Red Party BOLOGNA. Feb. 7. Dt. Rickardo Cocconi prominent Communist in He-agio Emilia province has Joined two members of Italy's Chamber < f Deputies who leccded from Ihe Communist party a fortnight ago. He tendered hit resignation •• %  ,cmber of the party's provincial secretariat and announced that he uld not renew his party membegehlp card for 1951. Cocconi said he believed the stand taken by Valdo Magnani and Aldo Cuchi. the two rebel Deputies was "In the Interests or workerb, socialism aiifT Italy Cocconi arrived in Bologna last night and immediately joined the two deputies w ho are still working en a manifesto tor ihe national Communist movement they are expected to proclaim shortly —Reuler. U.N. Turn Down Red Resolutions LAKE SUCCESS. Feb 7. The United Nations Political CommilUw today rejected a Sovitrt resolution that the Unite,! State: Le condemned for alleged aggros lion In China. Only the Soviet bio.if five voted for condemnation Fifty nations opposed the Soviet r dilution and Iwo, Yugoslavia and Afghanistan abstained The Soviet Union submitted two solutions to the Committee The first dealt with the alleged vssion of Formosa and hlotVade of the island It reauested the Securilv Council to take steps to stop this "aggression" The seeond resolution euncenivJ i alleged air itomh'ng sttaek on Manchuna by American aircraft After condemning the United States this resolution also reqiiestj the Security Council lo take nmediate action to prevent further United States "aggression" igsinst China — Reater West Will Reply LONDON, Feb. 7. A Foreign Office spokesman indicated today thst Britain France, and America would probably reply te the latest Soviet note on the possibility for power talks within two or three weeks after consultations. He said the general impression of those who hsd seen the note was that further clarification was required on whether Russia definitely wished to restrict Ihe agenda more than Western tlovcrnment —Reuter US Ship For Indo-China PARIS. Feb. 7 The French National Assemhl. tonight approved Prime Minister Rene Pleven's report on his talks with President Truman by too vi-tea tn IK'J Reporting on lus talks with President Trumnn in Washington, Pleven told the National Assembly thai the United States will soon hand over lo France %  •" aircraft carrier which will (> -cut BO IndoChinese waters. l'leven said his visit to Washington and Canada had dissipated misunderstandings created in American public opinion by propaganda which described Fraive as "morally exhausted" or alleged lhal Fieivch governments were composed of 'm. Such propaganda bad tended to itaengthen (eolaikonit' tendencies in tinUsgted >' He said he had hud "very [rank and friend'> talks with I'lesident Truman n. (ilained to Truman the In of onh-kei and greater military aid beeiiUM' of increiiM-d Chinese aid tn Victmmh ferrr* In all raeei wmre material I saked foi a %  callable, agreement was .e.iched id send it without del.i> Pleven said that in his talks Inert wsn no question of France asking for American troops In Indo-ChJnsj. On Korea, Pleven s.ud Truman thinks as we do thai .m honourable solution should be foma to the prohtern by th.. Kertssfi itlny people choosing tl freelv and without piesmii n by then i -Renter Strike In Grenada C.KENAUA, f b Sl.-el helmeted police with teargas for emergency today wcnl lo buying preserve order at La Sagesae estate where workers have been idle since Tuesday last week without presenting any definite reasons for the stoppage or msklng demands. Union leaders held .. iTionunn meeting behind closed doors and then marched to the estate urging those willing to work to continue the MoprMge while itther H sought to intimidate the nOO sinkers. The day passed without major inrtdenl The thinking public is becoming oulaged at the senseless walkouts ind exploitation of the mentality of the labourer*, to advance tha ends of aspirants to the Legislature under universal suffrage at next electioni.—<:aa, Preae Government Party managers %  i/ere urprised %  > %  majority, THimalc last night was a majority of three \o four. . some of the invalids were id. red %  :nd too far from London to be present. Winston Churchill was in ihe House today as he launched ins I i~i hni As ibe crittaaj deb-to started, Ihe Labour Go" lent it euuld survive Ihe Opposition's motion of censure by a few votes. Churchill likened the nationalisation move to a man walking tow a rds a precipice injp patled b) some ;deep and aark motive' Mr. Churchill began In a mood, beaming with ^"KI lumour. retorting swiftly lo Socialist Interruptions. Rut the fate of th ernmeiit and the possib'luy of T General Election hung tensely over the debate Churchill called the decision lo go ahead with nationalisation of steel "a deed of partisan aggression'. It was a "major stumbling block to national unity." Tie isid. He added "This act will i major injury lo the whole process of rearmai ChurehHI said lhal If me Consenratlvc came to tmwci ihev would immediately re. I St. cl A. .ind if. IvC Ihe former Iron and %  h would h general ipervlaVoti of the He v most from •> I his M" %  %  Strausr. for the Government .u.i tnat the raw material-! position in the last few months had developed in a hieh made it iloiihlful If .i %  ed Increase in the steel production for the time betm: Hi 0 tfnatever shortage Of materials there mnv be. our armament obligations must ne carried all Strauss said tnat any more delay in nationalism.! Ihe steel industry .".ubl B^twrewlv II.J..1,. it. HO sagaataV -SJettssm woeM rtn loeBjer be able to Import large t ( of serap iron from Oerp l i cause thev were no longer availing, and iron ore would be oavini to heavy Aim_. esteil that Ihe li ;md steei Federation inrmed by a prlvatciy owned industry should continue Its runcuoos HM three months pending discussions on ihe future of the Indu dry's organ!• ^filion Hepresrntntives of the corporation which is to run the nationalised Industi i M il lend it. meetings where %  tm U* tndustrv late i vned) awri %  i —Renter. TELL THE ADVOCATE THE NEWS RING 1111 DAV OR NIGHT ••.•s.:%'ss.::•..• NOW AVAILABLE at Leading Diug Stores g The Outstanding Baby Food NUTRINE Feed ibl/ on Nulrine and icoteli i's propress. /i is fiacked ,„ (u-o ilns. FOURTH TEST Avstrella won the Feerth Teat by %1A rmaa Enflaasl mage * runs In their see %  nd Innlnn final tcwres: Australia 111 and 403 fee deelared England Z72 and 2Jt BEAVER MEAT LONDON. Feb 7. Briton* may soon be eating I-aver meal from Denmark. A London firm has just bought .'.boot ftve tons of this meat but .i spokesman for the Arm said today it was mostly for manufacture, and added: "I do not think it .s going to bo widely sojd."—Renter. Agree To Reforms PARIS. Feb. 7 An agreement was reached at today's Cabinet meeting among representatives of various parties in the coalition on the Bill providing for some modification of the present system of proportional representation at the General Elections. The Bill provides for two ballots and for the mixtuiof maj orlty elections and proportional representation —Renter Unified Sea Force Planned WASHINGTON. Feb Atlantic Treaty nations havealmost completed plans for setting up a unified sea foree like the combined land and air force on the Continent, with an American Admiral as top commander. Admiral William Fechteler. Commander-in-Chief of the Allan tic Fleet will probably be named soon to beau the Supreme Allied Command Organisation for the North Atlantic Ocean region, it became known to-day. This command Is apparently not Intended to be subordinate to I General Eisenhower's Western European force something like but to have -o-eo.ua! status. A communique issued after last autumn's navy sessions here spoke of "a Supreme Allied Command*' for the North Atlantic Ocean Area. Upon thu command will devolve Ihe task of "keeping open vitally important sea lanes to Western Europe in the event of war on that continent. Sorfaa ships, submarines and carrier and land based aeroplanes of the combined navies of ten of Ihe treaty nations would be responsible for holding In cheek efforts by enemy 1 ibinarinos, bombers and warships (o cut the How of reinforcement* snd supplies to Elsenhower's armirt and air forces. As defined by the treaty, the North Atlantic Ocean area is that part of (he sea north of the Tropic uf Cancer line running slightly •outb of Florida, to a corresponding position on the North African -oast. The regions! planning group ban been drafting plane for sea defence has a permanent 'iff.ee here Its membership Iniluden representative'; of Belgium. Cinada, Denmark, France. Iceland, The Netherlands. Norway. Portug;.!. the United Kkigdom, snd the United Suites. Luxembourg and Italy are not In the Atlantic Ocean region setHPAdmiral Fechteler. veteran of K years' navgl service and many Pacific Ocean campaigns in World War Two. has been Atlantic Fleet Commander-in-Chief since January 21. 1050. He Is an expert in amphibious operations. He commanded amphibious and attack forces iii a series of American blows at Japanese strongholds extending through the PaeiflV —Reuler No. 1. (Buff vv->*,*.v.v----.-,-.-,'^'v',',',-,


*~

cinta atta aaa aaa eC ON



ESTABLISHED 1895



Harbad



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

8, 1









PRICE: FIVE CENTS

ae

10 VOTES SAVE*LABOUR GOVT.



a



Russia, - Satellites

Causing

Tension

WASHINGTON, Feb.7. _.

SECRETARY OF STATE DEAN ACHESON said
today it was not German re-armament but

the maintenance and building up of the armies of
Russia and its satellites, which was creating inter-
national tension. Acheson at his news conference
today strongly criticised the latest Soviet note in
a series of exchanges between Russia and the three

Western Powers on the
meeting to discuss East.

9 Arabs Killed
By Israel Army

AMMAN, Feb. 7.
Arab authorities today alleged
that nine Arabs, including women
and children, had been killed anc
two seriously injured by an
Israeli Army force which raided
a village. They said that before
dawn to-day the raiders had
blown up two houses in Sharafat
Village, which lies a few hundred
yards from the “armistice line” 3

miles south-west of Jerusalem.

They added that the Jordan
ernment had asked for an
urgent armistice meeting to con-
sider complaints about the inci-
dent.

Arab sources’ also said that
Israeli forces ~had built a 3-mile
deviation road inside Jordan
territory south of the Dead Sea.

—Reuter.

7 Years For Arson

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Feb. 7.

Lezjor Teper, Polish born Brit-
ish naturalised Georgetown busi-
ness man was sentenced to-day to
seven years’ penal servitude by
Justice Hughes when a jury re-
turned a guilty verdict on a charge
of setting fire to premises owned
by his wife, Pola Teper on Octo-
ber 9 last with intent to injure or
defraud. Defence Counsel asked
the sucige to reserve certain points
for the West Thdian Court of =
peal. The Judge will hear the
argument in this connection on
Thursday. Teper was defended
by .L. M. S. Cabral, associated
with Lloyd Luckhoo.





FIND ARMS DUMP

TURIN, Feb. 7,
Police arrested a worker here
to-day after finding a secret arms
dump in the cellar of his home.
The arms included a_ heavy
machine gun, 12 rifles, 25 hand
grenades, two mortars, bombs,
and more than 2,000 rounds of
ammunition. Ten people were
under detention in Milan to-day
as a result of the discovery of the

arms arsenal.
—Reuter.



ssibility of a Big Four
-West differences.

Acheson said there was nothing
particularly new in the Soviet
note. It contained cuits
which was the usual Soviet tech-
nique charging other people with
what Russia herself was doing.

He said the Western Powers in
their previous notes have pointed
out there were plenty problems to
be discussed and a solution to any
or all of them was likely to re-
duce the tension in the world.

Acheson said the three Western
Powers thought representative
Foreign Ministers of the four
Powers should meet to draw up
on an acceptable basis on agenda
for Big Four Foreign Ministers’
meeting.

The Russian’s last note was
some grudging move in that direc-
tion but still ed to restrict
the freedom of Foreign Ministers
in discussing questions other than
demilitarisation of Germany.

—Reuter.

USS.A. Reject
Spy Charges

FRANKFURT, Feb. 7.

The United States Embassy in
Prague today sent a note to the
Czech Foreign Ministry rejecting
charges that German - based
American aircraft had spied on
Czech border areas and two towns
in the interior. .

It also denied that aircraft had
dropped radio transmitters to sub-
versive elements inside Czechoslo-
vakia,

The Czech charges, the Ameri.
can note said, “appear to have
been fabricated solely for propa-

a purposes.”

The American note was in
answer to the Czech protest of
January 22 listing 58 alleged viola-
tions on Czech air space between
October and January 15, and say-
ing that Czechoslovakia wouid
take her own measures if alleged
air violations continued.

—Reuter,



2

Schuman For Italy

PARIS, Feb. 7.
Prime Minister Rene



French

ert Schuman will leave Paris on
Sunday _ for conversations with
Italian Prime Minister Alcide De
Gasperi and Foreign Minister
Count Carlo Sforza in Porto Fino,
Italy, it was announced today.
—Reuter.



82 Dead: 500 Injured
As Train Crashes In U.S.

Eighty-two people died

NEW JERSEY, Feb. 7.
according to counts early to-

day and 500 were injured when a packed suburban train
plunged over a temporary bridge at top speed here last

night rolling into the street
The train “The Broker”

with people going home from wor

20 feet below.
was jammed to the corridors
in New York city to a

residential district of New Jersey.
The steam engine had just cleared the bridge—a wood-

en trestle—when it jumped

STORMS KILL
8 IN ITALY

ROME, Feb. 7.

Avalanches, floods and high
winds had killed eight and injured
many more up to to-day when
snow and rain storms lashed cen-
tral and north Italy for the third
day in succession.

Avalanches and snow falls iso-
fated dozens of villages in the
Alpine valleys. Flooding along
the banks of the Reno river in
Ferrara and Bologna provinces
isolated many villages and left
hundreds of families homeless.

Reuter.

33 Die, 6987 Injured

RIO DE JANEIRO, Feb. 7,

Thirty three deaths, six by
murder, and 6,987 injuries—a re-
cord number—were the result of
a four days carnival frolic here
which ended early to-day.

While record crowds filled cen-
tral streets, the extremely high
temperature and lack of loud-
speakers in public places, which
this year were not installed by
the municipality, kept popular
funmaking little below the nor-
mal level.—Reuter.

9 DIE IN EXPLOSION

BETHUNE, Northern France,
Feb. 7,

Nine men were killed, and
seven seriously injured by a fire
damp explosion in a codl pit at
Bruay near here to-day. The fate
of another man completing the
working team of 17 was not
known.—Reuter.





the rails.

« Panic broke out in some coach-

es as the injured screamed for
help.

The side of one coach was com-
pletely ripped off and the carnage
inside was almost beyond descrip-
tion. Other coaches which tele-
scoped into one another trapped
the living and dead in a twisted
vault of steel. Some victims were
cut to bits by sharp metal.

One man trapped underneath <
heavy wheel whispered “Help me,
help”, while rescue workers with
acetylene torches cut their way
through debris.

Some bodies crushed by the ton-
nage, were unrecognised as they
were removed. Some coaches
were bent into a “U”,

Ambulances brought blood
plasma from nearby hospitals,

It was the third major train
erash in New York in less than a
year. ‘wo previous crashes
claimed 111 lives. :

The wooden bridge bolstered up
with big beams was put up when
the tracks were moved to make
room for a new road being built.
It apparently sagged as the train
passed over it. “The Broker”
was one of the first trains to cross,
The driver; ioe Fitz-Simmons,
who is in hospital, told police “I
hit the trestle at about 25 miles
an hour. The moment the engine
passed over the trestle it lurched
Sharply. It started to sway and
I applied brakes, but it was too
late”.

The train normally carried
about 900 passengers. But more
than that were jammed on board
last night because of a strike on
other lines.

Norman Merz who crawled from
the wreckage unhurt said, “The
train just went bounce, bounce,

@ On Page 7

Pleven and Foreign Minister Rob- |.



we veo

THIS MAKES HER GO



r -
A GROUP of Harrison College Cadets were yesterday shown around the

v

forward ongine room of H.M.S.

“Devonshire” by Cadet England, R.N. Here they are inspecting one of the engines.

7



U.S. Will Draft
Peace Treaty
FOR JAPAN.

TOKYO, Feb. 7.

The United States Mission here
is to draft a simple and short
peace treaty restoring Japan’s
sovereignty with the minimum of
restrictions, it was said to-day by
sources close to John Foster
Dulles, its leader.

Dulles, Republican Foreign Af-
fairs expert, is President Tru-
man’s special envoy to Tokyo.

These sources said that when
the Treaty granted Japan sdver-
eignty, the nation would have the
right of collective defence as de-
fined by United Nations charter.
How Japan achieved this, would
be her own ¢éoncern, they added.
—Reuter.

Pearson Declinés

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 7.

Lester Pearson, Canadian For-
eign Minister, has declined an in-
vitation to serve on the United
Nations Korean Committee, it wag
learned to-day. Pearson was one
of the original choices for the
Three-Member Committee. Sir
Benegal Rau also declined mem«
bership.—Reuter,





Plane In Distress

ROME, Feb. 7,
The British naval oil tanker
Echodale was searching for an
aircraft which crashed into the
sea 100 miles southeast of Crete,
Rome airport officials said to-day.
Officials said they had received
this news from Athens airport.
Malta radio picked up early to-
day, a distress signal from the

aircraft giving its position.
—Reuter.

Clock Tower Kills 7

NEW DELHI, Feb. 7,
Seven people were killed and
about 15 injured when the top of
an 80-year-old clock tower in Old
Delhi’s centre, collapsed to-day.
Five passersby were killed out-
right by falling debris, and two
more died in hospital.
car passengers, passing at
the time had a narrow escape.



—Reuter.
NINE KILLED

EASTWILLE, Virginia,
Feb, 7

A United States Marine Trans-
ort plane crashed in a storm near
ere to-day killing all nine men
on board.—Reuter.

FOUR DIE IN CRASH
MADRID, Feb. 7.
Four people died when a Span-
ish army Junkers plane ecrasned
in a hill near Toledo where the



plane disappeared during a snow-
storm yesterday.—Reuter.



wreckage was found to-day. |
i

O’NEILL, INJURED
SALEM, Mass., Feb. 7.
Nobel Prize winning dramatist
Eugene O’Neilbis in hospital here
with a fractured knée, his doctor
said td-day. The doctor said
O'Neill, who is 62, fractured his!
knee in a fall. a



U.N. Troeps Push

Closer

‘0 Seoul

TOKYO, Feb. 7,

United Nations troops who to-day advanced to within
six miles of Seoul were believed here to have cracked the
last Communist defence line south of the Hah River.

They advanced between 2,000 and 7,000 yards to-day

after Chinese, scorched by
artillery, armour and air

the. pigacss concentration of
wer of the Koréan war had re-

treated more than five miles to a héw mountain line for a
stand before the South Korean ¢apital which they now hold.

Strong Peace
Front Needed

__To Stem Red Threat, ,

BONN, Feb. 7.

West German Chancellor Kon-
rad denauer said today the
“only means to maintain peace
against the Soviet threat is the
establishment ! a strong western
peace front”,

He rejected the idea that Ger-
many could be neutralised by
Four Power talks because she was
not strong enough to defend her
frontiers. Speaking over Radio
Munich tonight, Adenauer said
that the Soviet Union would seek
the demilitarisation of Germany,
the withdrawal of occupation
troops and the “neutralisation” of
the country in any Big Four talks,

“We know that there are cir-
eles abroad which believe that
this ideal can be realised”, he said.
“However appealing such neu-
tralisation might appear, the
country could remain neutral
amid war if politically and econo-
mieally strong enough to defend
its frontiers.

“If the country did not. have
this strength, it could find the
necessary protection only in con-
nection with the defence system
of friendly powers.

“Nobody can seriously believe
that should hot war come, both
warring armies would respect a
Germany bare of arms”, ,

He hoped that his Government
would be informed of every phase
of any such talks and any pre-
liminary negotiations. It wished
to have the chance of stating its
own views “in good time” in any
decisions which might affect Ger-
many.—Reuter.

Missing Czech Was
Last Seen In Brno

VIENNA, Feb. 7,
Friends of Dr. Vladimir
Clementis, missing Czechoslovak
ex-Foreign Minister said here to-










day he was last seen at Brno
central railway station on Thurs-
day to goto Bratislava on the

Austrian border,
—Reuter.

FOURTH TEST
e eat Oy Pes the Fourth
sss Se
Australia 371 and 403 for 8

declared. England 272 and
228.





!Laurence reported to-day in the

Neither General Ridgway, nor
his officers, made extravagant
claims of success, but the United
Nations line was moving slowly

. methodically forward in
it fay himself du
a“ Ghjettive oltensive,?

oe

thto which

Allied troops thrust to-day, were

believed to be the new defence
line to which Communists have
been retreating for two days. One
tank patrol reached a point within
four miles of the Han River
which runs through Seoul, before
it withdrew, In this area negro
soldiers swept up a hill behind a
wall of bayonets and captured a
rugged slope.

The heaviest aerial artillery
barrage of the 14—day-old offen-
sive presaged the capture by
American troops of two hills
north of Anyangni southeast of
Seoul, on which entrenched Com-
munists had held back the Allied
advance for the past 48 hours.

—Reuter.



Atom Explosions
Were The Test

NEW YORK, Feb. 7.
Five atomic explosions in Nev-
ada were believed to be the test
for artillery weapons and guided
missiles, science writer William

New York Times,

Laurence, leading lay authority
on atomic energy said this was
suggested by the “very fact that
tests were held in Nevada instead
of the atomic proving grounds at
Enijetok.

Laurence said that “whatever
topes used in Nevada there can
be no question that they were de-
signed to extend the use of the
atom bomb from purely strategic
to tactical purposes. tt can also
be certain that each of the five ex-
plosions tested a different model,
each designed for different pur-
potes.—Reuter,

PRINCESS ROYAL ILL

LONDON, Feb. 7.
The Princess Royal was admit-
ted to a London nursing home to-





day, treatment for antrum
trouble. —Reuter,
BEAVER MEAT

LONDON, Feb. 7,
Britons may soon be eating
beaver meat from Denmark.

A London firm has just bought
abott five tons of this méat but a

spokesman for the firm said to-


























20 Asked To
Increase Raw
Materials

WASHINGTON, Feb. 7
The United States, France and

Britain, have invited about 20
western countries to set up
international machinery to in-

crease production of 11 scarce raw
metered Peal or ge their use.
‘otton wool, sulphur com-
modities, exempted cm control
during the last war, would be
affected for the first time.

Other commodities covered are
copper, lead, zinc, tungsten,
molybdeum, manganese, nickel
and cobalt. Rubber and tin are
not ine Zi

The State Department declined
to disclose the names of the
countries which had been invited,
but it was learned from other
sources that Spain would be
represented on at least one of the
six committees
dealing with

derived.

The meetings are expected to; to

begin late in February and
stretch through April.
—Reuter.



Another Italian
Quits Red Party

BOLOGNA, Feb, 7,

Dr, Rickardo Cocconi prominent
Communist in Reggio Emilia pro-
vince has joined two members of
Italy's Chamber of Deputies who
seceded from the Communist
party a fortnight ago.

He tendered his resignation as
member of the party’s provincial
secretariat and announced that he
would not renew his patty mem-
bership card for 1951, |

Cocconi said he believed the
stand taken by Valdo Magnani |
and Aldo Cuchi, the two rebel
Deputies was “in the, rests of
workers, socialism and Italy.”

Cocconi arrived in Bologna last

night and. ir lately joined the
two deputies who are still work-
ing ona for the na-
tional movement they

y.

are expected to wens or



U.N. Turn Down
Red Resolutions

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 7.
The United Nations Political
Committee today rejected a Soviet
resolution that the United States
be condemned for alleged aggres~
sion in China. Only the Soviet bloc
of five voted for condemnation,
Fifty nations opposed the Soviet
resolution and two, Yugoslavia and

Afghanistan abstained.

The Soviet Union submitted two
resolutions to the Committee.
The first dealt with the alleged
invasion of Formosa and blockade
of the island. It ested the
Security Council to take steps to
stop this “aggression”.

The second resglution concerned
an alleged air bombing attack on
Manchuria by American aircraft
After condemning the United
States this resolution also request~
ed the Security Council to take
immediate action to prevent furs
ther United States “aggression”
against China. —Reuter.

West Will Reply

LONDON, Feb. 7.
A Foreign Office spokesman in-
dicated today that Britain, France,
and America would probably reply
to the latest Soviet note on the
possibility for power talks within
two or three weeks after consulta-
tions. He said the general im-
pression of those who had seen the
note was that further clarification
as required on whether Russia
finitely wished to restrict the
agenda more than Western Gov-

ernments.
—Reuter,

Agree To Reforms

PARIS, Feb. 7.

An agreement was reached at
today’s Cabinet meeting among
representatives of various parties
in the coalition on the Bill provid-
ing for some modification of the
present system of proportional re-
presentation at the General Elec-
tions.

The Bill provides for two bal-
lots and for the mixture of maj-





day es mostly for manufacture |ority elections and proportional
ded

and a

: “I do not think it ig trepresentation.
going to be widely sold.”—Reuter.

Unified Sea Force Planned

WASHINGTON, Feb. 7.

|European forces, but to. have

submarines, bombers and warships

Atlantic Treaty nations have | something like a co-equal status. |to cut the flow of reinforcements

almost completed. plans. for set-
ting up a unified sea force like

the combined land and air forces | autumn’'s navy sessions here spoke |

on the Continent, with an Ameri-
can Admiral as top commander.

Admiral William Fethteler,
Commander-in-Chief of the Atlan—
tic Fleet will probably be named
soon to head the Supreme Allied
‘Command Organisation for the
{North Atlantic Ocean region, it

A communique, issued after last

of “a Supreme Allied Command”

jfor the North Atlantic Ocean

| Area.

| Upon this command will de-

|volve the task of “keeping open

| ¥itally important sea lanes to
Europe in the event of

| Western
on that continent. Surfacc

}
| War

became known to-day. { ships, submarines and carrier and

This command is apparently not
intended to be subordinate to
General Eisenhower’s Western

land based aéroplanes of the com-
| bined navies of ten of the treaty
|Mations would be responsible for
holding in check efforts by enemy

and supplies to Eisenhower’s arm-
jies and air forces.

As defined by the treaty, the
North Atlantic Ocean area is thaf
part of the sea north of the irene
jof Cancer line running slightly
| south of Florida, to a correspond-
ing position on the North African
coast.



The regional planning group
which has been drafting plans
for sea defence has a permanent
office here. Its membership in-

forces

land, The Netherlands, Norway,
Portugal, the United Kingdom,
and the United States,
Luxembourg and Italy are not
ih the Atlantic Ocean region set-
up.
Admiral Fechteler, veteran of
years’ naval service and many
acific Ocean campaigns in World
War Two, has been Atlantic Fleet
Commander-in-Chief since Jan-
uary 21, 1950. He is an expert in
amphibious operations. He com-
manded amphibious and attack
in a_ seriés of American

blows at Japanese strongholds

|cludes representatives of Belgium, | extending through the Pacific.

Canada, Denmark, France, Ice-

|
'

—Reuter

9} misunderstandings

From General Election

LONDON, Feb, 7.

HE GOVERNMENT to-night defeated by 10
votes the Conservatives’ eleventh hour at-
tempt to prevent nationalisation of Britain’s steel
industry. The fate of the Labour Government de
pended on the result of the House of Commons vote

which wai
industry,
15. Labour
Conse:

USShip For
Indo-China

PARIS, Feb, 7.
The French National Assembly
tonight approved Prime Minister
Rene Pleven's report on his talks

with President Truman by 400
votes to 182.
Reporting on his talks with

President Truman in Washington,
Pleven told the National Assembly
that the United States will soon
hand over to France an aircraft

wolfram from which tungsten ist carrier which will be sent to Indo+

Chinese waters.

Pleven said his visit to Washing.
m and Canada had dissipated
created in
American public opinion by pro-
paganda which described France
as “morally exhausted” or alleged
that French governments were
com d of “ineapable people”.

Such propaganda had tended to
strengthen isolationist tendencies
in the United States.

He said he had had “very
frank and friend'y” talks with

President Truman. He had ex-
plained to Truman the importance
of quicker and greater military
aid because of increased Chinese
aid to Vietminh forees.

In all cases where material I
asked for was available, agree-
ment was reached at once to

send it without delay, Pleven
said that in his talks there was
no question of France asking for
American ps in Indo-China,
On Korea, Pleven said: “Tru.
man thinks ag we do that an i
ourable solution should be found
to the problem by the Korean
people Gan their own destiny
freely and without pressure.”
—Reuter.

Strike In Grenada

(From Our Qwn Correspondent)
GRENADA, Feb, 7,

Steel-helmeted police with tear-
gas for emergency today went to
preserve order at La Sagesse
estate where workers have been
idle since Tuesday last week with
out presenting any definite reasons
for the stoppage or making de-
mands. Union leaders held a
morning meeting behind closed
doors and then marehed to the
estate urging those willing to work
to continue the stoppage while
others sought to intimidate the
non-strikers. The day passed
without major incident, The
thinking public is becoming out-!
raged at the senseless walkouts |
and exploitation of the mentality |
of the labourers to advance the
ends of aspirants to the Legisla-
ture under universal suffrage at
next elections.—Can, Press.



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have stopped nationalisation of the
to come into operation on February

tered 308 votes against 298 for the
nd Liberal opposition.

- Government Party managers
\ were sve by the size of the
majority, best estimate last

night was-a majority of three to
four, as some of the invalids were
considered too ill and too far from
London to be present.

Winston Churchill was cheered
in the House today as he launched
his last bid. As the critical debate
started, the Labour Government
was confident it could survive the
Opposition’s motion of censure by
a few votes. Churchill likened the
nationalisation move to a man
walking towards a precipice in
pelled by some “deep and
motive,”

Mr. Churchill began in a mood,
beaming with good humour, re-
torting swiftly to Socialist inter-
ruptions. But the fate of the Gov-
ernment and the possibility of 4
General Election hung tensely
over the debate.

Churchill called the decision
to go ahead with nationalisation

of steel “a deed of partisan
aggression". It was a “major
stumbling block to national
unity,” he said. He added:

“This act will be a deep and
major injury to the whole pro-
cess of rearmament.”

Churchill said that if the Con-

servatives came to power they
would immediately repeal the
Steel Act and revive the former

Tron and Steel Board which would

have general supervision of the
industry. He was interrupted al-
most from the start to the finish
of his speech.

Supply Minister George Strauss
for the Government said that the
raw materials position in the last
few months had developed in a
way which made it doubtful if a
continued Increase in the steel
production was possible for the
time being. He added: “Whatever
shortage of materials there may
be, our armament obligations must
be carried out,

Strauss said that any more delay
in nationalising the steel industry
w y injure it, He

‘ ‘worl? no longer
be able to import large quantities
of serap iron from Germany be-
cause they were no longer avail-
able, and iron ore would be
scarcer owing to heavy American
buying.

Strauss suggested that the Iron
and Steel Federation formed by a
privately owned industry should
continue its functions for three
months pending discussions on
the future of the industry's organi-
sation. Representatives of the
corporation. which is to run the
nationalised industry should. at-
tend its meetings where problems
affecting each side of the industry
(privately and state owned) were

discussed,
—Reuter.



TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT



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~


PAGE TWO



TVE members of the Barbados
Golf team which played a
series of matches against the St.
Andrew’s Golf Club of Trinidad
turned yesterday afternoon by
.W.1;A, from Trinidad.

They -were: Col. and Mrs.
Bick Vidmer, Hon. K. R. Hunte,

: iilia: insor Mrs. Sherman and Miss Sherman, subject to cure, as over-drinker: ‘ked pantry!’ °

pg “Eben de Wilkos" They who arrived here on Sunday by — The idea is that they need net . B B. C Radio
were. accompanied by Mrs. Mene | Grande Oil Company's from fellow sufferers as desper. — Mrs. Douglas, who started her ° eo Le p
Hunte and Mrs, Atkinson private plane, returned to Vene~ ately as do members of “alcoholics 0N-profit organization (dues, $10 bp

TPMT d. i a ; zuela yesterday. anonymous.” year) in 1947, says she got the Pro amme - SSS SESE = =

Arriving by 9 mate lane Pu ¢ Ms. Hamilton’ Through i: dea.one day when she was re . ; UA CCLUE CI M Gnly)
were . Shirley Atwell, Mana- _Purpose 0 . é s s #rouv therapy, mass ing a newspaper account of ar x. 2, 1981. TI NEMA embers Onl

of the City Garage and Dr. we th ae eet eee confession of off-diet binges, a “alcoholics anonymous” meeting. oanckea peccas Ry AY AQ MATINEE: TO-DAY at 5 p.m. ¥
o

E rbara Lloyd-Still.
~ Nurse In Caripito

R. C. W. HAMILTON, Vice-
President of the Gulf Oil
Corporation in New York, Mrs.
Hamilton, Mr. Robert Boggs,
Manager of the Gulf Oil Produc-
tion in the Western Hemisphere,

Gulf Oil Company.

BARBADOS



By PHYLLIS BATTELLE

NEW YORK, Feb, 3,

Women (and men too) who are
frankly fat—and admit it—are
eligible to shed literally hundreds
of pounds in a mutual-help club
called “Fatties Anonymous.”

It’s a three-year-old organiza—
tion that operates on the theory
that over-eaters are as emotion»,
ally and physically “sick,” and

social programme and aé_ ruling
that says you must lose at least
five pounds a month, its more than

most

ADVOCATE



katties Anonymous

Learning good etiquette is a
important part of the drive
to get slim, according to Mrs
Douglas. She explains: “We eat
what we eat for a variety of emo-
tions. One of the strongest

emotions is the feeling of insecur-

ity. It can drive us into any
number of banand splits.
“A faux pas in etiquette can

' drive an over-eater to a well-

“It suddenly clicked,” she re-
calls. “I realized that alcoholism
was a serious social problem. But



|
ot
Housewives
Guide |
PRICES of tomatoes and |
cabbage when the Advocate
checked yesterday were:
Large tomatoes 24 cents per
pound.
Cabbage 30 cents per pound







6.20 a.m. The Music Goes Round, 7 a.m. | })
The News, 7.10 a.m. News Analysis, 7,15 |}




Baby

Powde:







TONIGHT AT 8.30

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1951
—————— A



Tyrone POWER :o: Jean PETERS ;0: Cesar ROMERO :o: John SUTTON

“CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE”

in Technicolor

Dr. W. Auer, Manager of the 0 a.m, eet ne eevee eee i ae Geos ae ahich
. . , ; Tamme ri . 7,30 a.m. as ere, h ntury-Fox icture.
Iss SYLVIA WESTFALL. Barbades branch and ‘s. Auer, 400. members are doing big fat was just as serious, except jas a.m. The Wornan in Blue, 8.30 a.m. :

who is a nurse at Creole
Petroleum’s hospital in Carjpito,
arrived-from Venezuela via Trini-
dad. yesterday by B.W.1A., to
spend ten days’ holiday in Barba-
dos, The first part of her stay
will be spent at the St. Lawrence

»'Way Above

Engineering Co., in Maracaibo, is M First, as Mrs. Douglas explains, “ Gordon McRAE
. 5 r. Wells’ is with T. Geddes » as | strong for a couple of weeks, and —¢ p.m. Pawilion Players, 6.15 p.m. From
“JACOB MILLER, proprie- Sie an tas Los Angeles, Grant Ltd 2 prospective member has to be then we'd drop back into our old the Third Programme, 6.39 p.in. Interlude,
. eave, ,

‘tor of Miller Harness Co., in
New York is touring the West
Indies: He arrived here yester-

via Miami, Venezuela and
frinidad by B.W.I.A.

He was in Venezuela for their
Carnival and in Trinidad for Car-
niyal on Monday, and Tuesday.
The terrific pageantry of the

“I went out and found a psychol- {aix, 11.p.m. From the Third Programme, i le y
Trinidad Carnival was way above A CANADIAN lady bought two “But it’s plain over-eating,” ogist and convinced him to come ——-————_______- PLAZA eatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)
the standard of the one in Vene- .,™ hair nets in a shop in Broad With Creole Petroleum snaps Mrs, Douglas, “because work with us. their matrimonial chances as ‘0-DAY 5 and 8,30 p.m. only (Monogram Double)

2uela.

Mr. Miller is staying at the
Marine Hotel. He leaves here in
a few days for St. Croix,

7 ‘Back From Trinidad

AR. and Mrs. Jim Wilson and
A Mr. Wilson’s brother “Bill”
who went to Trinidad over the
week-end returned yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A. Mr. Wilson
Was away on business and his wife
and brother went over to see
Carnival. Mr. Wilson is the Can-
adian Government Engineer on
to the Barbados Government,
looking after their interests in the
construction of the new runway at
Seawell. His brother has been
eee on holiday for several
weeks.’ .

4n-B.G. and Trinidad

AR. COLIN WEEKES, Customs
.' icer here, who has been on
holiday for the past seven weeks,
Spent most of his vacation in Brit-
ish Guiana, but arrived in Trini-

t , fed. . Me ca i 7 , fe DY 4.30 and 8.30
party which was conducted over for over ear, report the activity to fellow mem home." And lifting her up he Constable’Growler chuckles. Tis 4.45 and 8.30

p chads. ella Sha iad piallardes the “Evening Standard” building a yea bers at the next meeting. strides away over the common with all a mystery ma'am," he says.

morning by B.W.I.A, last week. This trip, one of 2

Carnival in Trinidad he told
Carib was hard to describe—it was
such a tremendous spectacle,

Distant Relative

{ynich, each, produces papers at ~ woNnICA LEWIN, _ brilliant i " 0 AND “STRANGE
ON NR scr ae she. phate of Between 40,000 and ake” the tan tee le | The Thrill-pounding Story of the “Orphan Horse” who G. re

arrived front Venezutla via
Trinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. to spend five days’
holiday. in Barbados. They are
staying at the Marine Hotel, Mr.
Iturbi is a Civil Engineer in Cara-
cas; i),

Asked if he was any relation
to Jose Iturbi, the famous pianist,
Mr. Iturbi told Carib, he was a
distant relative of his.



Across with
i Uibed fp msgs oa ala ; — eel pean Gregory Peck and J
3 an own. Shows a lastin or ‘ ory Peck and Joan
ae ‘ quality. (10) ay rit ~)F 4:30 stasnimc LON Bennet
BY THE WAY.. e+ By BEACHCOMBER: I: What Baba would ail frost) (31 SHIRLEY TEMPLE: F ) M CAILISTER —
: ql ; 12. Makes things run smoothly. (3) * g
‘“WOMEN who obey the orders Fruitarian Society. M 83 hen they 18: Goddess ‘of destruction ta) Sanches) 4 C : ROXY
ot he lotpr® aay re Shgnt Rec, Se, Mest was yelvingo thelr Repnte when they 1 Bedi gion one DAVID_BUTLER 2 meta on con OLYMPIC
lant fellow, “would stop at noth- it was the food of bishops and: hideous—or just revolting? 19. You've met the silliest unui! vou 2.30 & &. 30 To=emorrow (Frida ) Last Two Shows To-day
ing to be considered smart.” barons.” And again. “To-day we meet this, (6) . « Y Pe Last Hee bows tots
- oy hes thay provid stop at. know that flesh food cannot be Yes? Then order now our im-, 23. Hovel. | (3) 4a. Tear (4) SATURDAY — 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily _ 430 and 8.15 y
ow the oiliest of clothiers could compared for f 1 pregnable one-way veil. Light and 59° . h AT ee . *
make a woman wear prvieginoots nae eared” * iene that Sa compact, it clips easily to bowler 30; ihe water pind: wea late. (4) PLA ZA=Bridgetown=(DIAL 2310) Universal Double 4.30 and 8.15
with evening dress — unless, of people can enjoy meat without hat or toque, gives complete im- 80. If has ite points. (3) : ” 4
course, slits were made, so that muttering. “Ha! Now. I've ‘got Munity to friends and kiddies. Down Also: “SO YOU WANT TO BE A GAMBLER” and Marlene Dietrich and James 20th Century Fox Double
she. could show her entrancing even with those. bishops jand ‘hs ditien i writes: sa aupumn, Payee ea Welt Latest “WORLD NEWS (Warner-Pathe) Stewart
toe-nails. barons.” And as for “food values.”’ oe customer * 4 Bird-like (5) 8. Plaything. (97 | {= Jeanne Crain and C
pe : . i s : ornel
Murder At Muckhurst (IX) those who treat a men! as a chems. pence wearing the, ‘Maufair m= 109 0 cnangs trom, aura 3h, in Wilde in a5
Fe panic-stricken behavious enue Wie gk, Mig _ Tun screaming from me. In fact, 1 § Not guite to aims. (6
Gigglesworth convin . ormaliy consiitu : . + j be :
Serene ee hiding Man: eats what he enjoys eating, N int SR dee tee ee 19, Why leave the Inlay so Upset. (3) OPENING TO-MORROW — WITH A BANG. DESTRY ““ CENTEN;)
something. But what? Eh? But and not what someone tells him }ife, 15. BDC. UG. driver wants ~ We a s : INTENNIAL
what?’ “Lady Gigglesworth,” he is good for him. ee ee When you call RIDES AGAIN”? a
Said suavely, “why does the men- Ores saw to: avold: disappoint 2 Cover Tent sirerations 4) SUMMER”
meee ha een gate Tellplece ae ee 2 het Pt me a Lady... 3UMM
2 ' ’

chatelaine. “It’s just the shock of
all this, and seeing him—er—it

slead like that. It isn’t every day pnilosoph sou] Fak'Sh Nareets cess “ode 2 is

paren ren teeee th ule Mires ee ee subilation, that the sclestiste now | Gai Mi Bie TeHh Uae “WHO DON, MINE

Seem tant: 2, Can rel Delieve,” re. have a bomb so powerful that only pore te Retread: 5. Ora: 4. Tally ho; E Oo W NV
i : Re 6, Swarthyv: 8. Mvyriads' 10.

plied Malpractice severely. “But it Mobile Toes ay tors borat could: set tt oi tee

was the words ‘circus horse’ which
drew that heartrending cry from
you.” “No, no,” she protested, “It

. j Starring
was just seeing Dandelion like that children ought to walk barefoot to But there is something even more u ‘ with
—————” Malpractice cut in like keep the mobility of their toes. hopeful. A homb, says the author G L 0 B E Bud Abbott and Lou B :
a revolver shot, “Why do you call of a recently-published book of TO-DAY MAT. & NITE Costell urgess Meredith and
the horse Dandelion? You recog- As everyone now admits, it is comfort and heartsease, one mil- Last Showing fa - Kieron Moore ‘
nise him!” ‘I—I—it’s his name.” the young man with mobile toes lion times as powerful as the atom f
“How do you know that?” Flound- who gets the £5,000-a-year job. bomb would destroy more than “HOLIDAY IN MEXICO" ~ 5 . 4
ering pitifully, Lady Ginpeeworts I ee a barefooted Director who ares aquare wiles. aco B will we pak i eer
ir, “Gl y ted can pla a Donna obile on always be someon ’ A :
ee. — 3 - a e4 oe ae tes e with his toes. He plays all, it’s only like ordinary bomb- Tturbi ne Powell Biory and Screenplay by WILLIAM BOWERS and OSCAR BRODNEY - Directed by FREDERICK De CORDOVA
mean?” “I can explain,” mumbled execrably, but all that matters is ing, but a bit more destructive. Produced by ROBERT ARTHUR « A Universal-International Picture

his sagging consort. “It was like

this :..” (Any reader who is not To Keep the fingers mobile, chil- aS the rourteen Redskins cut HERE'S SOME EXTRA DISHES!
OA Reterhooles ae, ark for is dren should walk on their hands. tyeir oar ‘toletigh the barra c Gans AND oe TEX BENEKE AND en MILLER ORCHESTRA
mo ack. And a fat chance he 3 aie balloon the glamorous Freda Fal-
has 0 ting it!) One-Way Veil kirk (known as Svelte Seeling LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE
No Dried Cereals For throughout the Sfort) discarded FL = ————— |
h 1S your face unfit to be photos her upper garments as she sfelt
Bishops yraphed? Do your fffends shudder the whirlpool’s drag, and suddenly

I LIKE the explanation of meat-
eating given by a member of the





On Way Home :
yt pounds, was the smallest. member sane a
Hotel and the latter part at the M®: Se a ee Wells and their two children. foods. of the group. They called her sis pm souveum ot Music. s pmill PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)
Paradise Beach Club. ” ican who for the past two They expect to return on Febru- Here’s how _ the operation “Rosebud.” Australia vs. England, 5.15 pan. Irene LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY — 4.45 & 8.30
and a half years has been working 4 17 works “The first year, it didn’t work Scharrer, 545 p.m. Rhythm Rendezvous,
under contract with the Martin *Y *’ rite i

He ar-
rived from Venezuela via Trinidad
yesterday by B.W.1.A. accom-
panied by his wife. They plan to
spend five days here at the Has-
tings Hotel before leaving for the
U.S. via Jamaica,

She Forgot !

Street a few days ago. She gave
the girl serving her a dollar and
was amazed, when she received
a dollar and few cents change,

She had forgotten about the
exchange on her Canadian dollar.

Jamaican Tea Plantation

gcs had an interest in a

British television programme
on February 2nd. On that date
Richard Dimbleby, famous com-~
mentator, visited the oldest tea
merchants in the world at the
sign of the Three Sugar Loaves
and Crown in connection with a
TV programme called “London
Town”. The firm was established
in 1650 and in their office in the
City they still have a number of
very old ledgers and a book with
the names and occupations of the
slaves who worked on_ their
estate in Jamaica,

Journalist Visitors

NUMBER of West Indian
journalist students were

A

included in the Polytechnic course P.

number arranged to London news-
papers in connection with the
course, greatly impressed the vis-
itors. They were particularly
attracted by the rotary presses,

In Charge

N the absence of Mr, Charles

/ Mills, Colonial Office Liaison
Officer, on leave, Mr. W. A.
Richardson is temporarily respon~-
sible for West Indian students in
Britain. Richardson, who comes
from Trinidad, is a graduate of
King’s College, London Univer-
sity. He finds his temporary job
“very interesting”,

A man sprang up and, with his
trousers falling, shouted, “Only

A LECTURER recently told an
audience of school-mistresses that

that his toes should remain mobile.

when you say “Good morning”?
Do strange dogs cower or fun

a at Seawell to see the party
°

Returning On February-17

T present holidaying in Gren-
ada are Mr. and Mrs. Willie

Carnival Queen

ISS CHRISTINE GORDON,
“Miss Jeffrey’s Beer” and
Carnival Queen 1951 of Trinidad
went ‘to school in Barbados. She
is a former student at the Ursuline
Convent.

RRIVING from Trinidad yes-

terday morning en route from
Venezuela were Mr. and Mrs, Wil-
bert Heitman. They are here for
five days staying at the Paradise
Beach Club. Mr. Heitman is
with the Creole Petroleum Cor-
poration in Caracas. They spent
the first part of their holiday in
Trinidad for Carnival.

Assistant Secretary

Mz ? GEORGE SKEETE,

Assistant Secretary of
B.W.1.S:A. ‘stationed in Trini-
dad was among the passengers
arriving from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.I.A.

Leaving For U.S.

RS. G. LOWE, of Jackson,
St. Michael, will leave the

island on Friday afternoon for the ©

U.S.A. via Trinidad by plane.

She will join her husband, Mr.
. T. Lowe, who has been there

Mrs. Lowe was formerly an
elementary school teacher.

From Jamaica

Jamaica, will shortly be resum-
ing studies at the Royal Free
Hospital, London. Her husband is
a medical student at Cambridge
University.

Happy Birthday

ISS. AURIEL MAHON of
Jubilee Gap, Bank Hall cele-
brates her birthday to-day with a
small party at her home to-night.



Science And Progress

is described, of course, as a deter-
rent against war, and it would de-
stroy an area of 314 square miles.

Serjal Story

an amazing thing happened (to
be continued).



a
we .



2



CONGOLEUM SQUARES

things toward conquering bigness.

Ruth Douglas, plump but shape-
ly founder and president, shed
60 pounds last year and aims to
drop 25 more by early spring.
Others have trimmed off as many
as 200 pounds by signing into
“FLA.” and signing off fattening

honest and possessed of some will
power to join any club with a
“shocker” mame like “fattigs®
anonymous.” |

That name, she says, is a mem~'
ber’s first test. Unless he’ll ad nit
his guilt, he’s not in a mental
mood to be cured. Too many peo-
ple blame obesity or glandular
disturbances or heredity.

science has proved that glands
and family tendencies to fat are
over-rated. Anyone can lose
weight by eating the right—and
nothing but the right---things.”

Mrs. Douglas decided tong ago
that overweight was:more an emo-
tional and psychological problem
than a physical one. For that
reason she hires psychiatrists and
psychotherapists to speak to her
group alongside the doctors and
nufitionists,

And on the theory that diets
“take something away’ ‘from thg
heavyweight but “provide no su
stitute for the loss,” she has in-~+
stituted several programmes 1%
give members food-substitutes.

For example, each member
must read a book a month and
briefly report on it. “That,” she
says, “is so their mental horizons
will broaden while their chassis
slim,”

And there’s a “do something
different day” when each member
must see a new play, hear a lec-
ture, try a new (non-fattening)
dish, meet a new friend, etc., and





CROSSWORD
Po ff







AEB Snes
il Liat kT

Pe |
rrr
FLEErL

faked












. Peurteen provides the answer.
. (3) 27. Beam, (3)
~Acrosy:

8 puzzle
: Elm. 9

Serial: 7,
ers

T Vato is. Edith; 16. Exact: 19
0. Herb






“CRISIS"






|
|

that obese people don’t hurt any-
one but themselves. They just sit
in a corner and dig their owr
graves with their teeth.” i

Mrs. Douglas called on her
bridge club to help her use some
will-power. She weighed 254

too well,” she says. ‘“‘We’d be very

rcutine of serving refreshments at

midnight.

“T could see we ueeaed more
will-power, and it was then that
I got the idea: Emotions seemed
to be so much stronger in fat girls
than in normal ones, Our in-
hibitions were as big as we were.

“We've been going hot—but not
so heavy—ever since.”

By the end of the first year, the
crew of 60 in “Fatties Anonym-
ous” had lost an average of 46
pounds each, Of the original
group, 60 per cent of the men and
women who never considered





Rosalie still refuses to answer any
questions, and at length Constable

Growler smiles quietly, ‘It's no
good,"’ he says. “ The only thing
we can do is to make sure she gets

Rupert trotting behind him and feel-





MURTLING OUT OF THE HILLS
OF THE BLUE GRASS...

raced to Glory !













-_



-ENAMELWARE

A wide range to select from...



Skeich Book—:











Work and Worship, 8.45 a.m. People and
Resources, 9 a.m. The News, 9.10 a.m.
Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close
Down, 11.15 a.m. Programme Parade, 11,25
mm, Australia vs. England, 11.45 a.m.
Statement of Account, 12 (noon) The
News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis, 12.15
p.m. Close Down.

4.15—6.00. pom, 25.53 m.



6.0—7.15 p.m. 31.82 & 48.43 m.





6.45 p.m, Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The
News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m.
Calling the W.L, 7.45 pam. 1 Was There.
7.45—11.00 p.m. 31.32 & 48.43.m.

8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. Books
to Read, 8.30 p.m. Film Review, 8.45 p.m,
Composer of the "sek, 9 p.m, Statement
of Account, 9.15 p.m, Alan Loveday, 9.30
p.m. Tip Top Tunes, 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m,
Frankie Howard, 10.45 p.m, Mid Week



“likely,” have been maniricd.

They’ve done it, Mrs. Douglas
says, by slimming down the in-
vigorating way ... by developing
“mental muscles” and supplant-
ing food for living with food for
thought.

—INS.

29

,




Ss



ing very relieved. At the door Mrs.
Pig greets them anxiously. My
what a time you've been!" she
cries. ‘* What's happened? And
why has the policeman brought you
back ?'’ Rosalie remains silent, but

“Only Rupert can explain it.”






















ce —————————— ————— Senne eas ae
liens ceeds ice caligtaepe arene ety meet Aft ere mane nies indaacperieepteigtg aoa seoeeeaiotaauenatee EE ae =—_— ++ —— >



COMMENCING FRIDAY

Samuel Goldwyn’s Technicolor

9TH
Musical Comedy

“THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY”

June HAVER

Starring DANNY KAYE :o: VIRGINIA MAYO

DAUGHTER of ROSIE O'GRADY







MATINEE TODAY: — 1,30 pon.
CRIMINAL COURT (R.K.O. Double)
Tom CONWAY—Martha O'DRISCOLL

and Zane Grey’s
THUNDER MOUNTAIN
with Tim HOLT

Mat. Friday 4.45 p.m, (only)
DEATH VALLEY RANGERS
Ken MAYNARD—Hoot GIBSON

and
RIDERS OF THE DAWN

Jimmy WAKELY



Tomorrow — 2.30 & 8.30 p.m. — “SEABISCUIT” (Color)









Leo Gorcey & The Bowery Boys

“DOCKS OF NEW YORK” &

FRIDAY — SAT. — SUN.
5 and 8.30 p.m,
Paramount Presents
Bing CROSBY in -

“RIDING HIGH”



GATET Y—(rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE — 8.30
Zane GREY'S

Sidney Toler as Charlie Chan in

Midnite Sat. 10,

“LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT”
Johnny Mack BROWN and
“RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL”



“DARK ALIBI”

(Monogram Double)

Johnny WAKELY

eee eel



— (RKO Double)
Tim HOLT in

WANDERER of the WASTELAND & BROTHERS in the SADDLE

JAMES WARREN

FRIDAY, SAT. SUN. 8.30 p.m.
Mat. Sun. 5 p.m, (Warner)

GARY COOPER in
TASK FORCE









EMPIRE

Last Two Shows To-day

Columbia Pictures Presents

** FAUST

THE
DEVIL *
Starring

Italo TAJO and Nelly
CORRADI with



and

I 199





William Boyd as Hopalong

** MACOMBER



EXECUTIONER

MIDNITE SAT. 10th (Monogram)
DEATH

Ken MAYNARD — Hoot GIBSON and
“DYN.

With Tom KEENE

——_»_rwrw«wr——

VALLEY RANGERS
AMITE CANYON”

ROYAL

To-day and To-morrow

United Artists Double

Cassidy in

GAMBLE”

and

AFFAIR ”’

and













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SSS




THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1951

Wanted: Influenza Menace

Ne Ww a ea ders Recalls Canada’s
Scourge Of 1918

ws. LONDON.
ne weekly newspaper Re- OTTAWA,
corder has launched a nation- Will flu epidemic now spread-
wide petition to “remove” the ing through Britain, Sweden, North

British Labour Government. Germany and Belgium eventually
The petition is addressed to strike Canada where the disease

Premier Attlee as constitutionally caused untold sufferins and close

he alone is competent to advise to 40,000 deaths in 1918?

the King to dissolve Parliament. That is a question Canadian

The newspaper claims that medical authorities are asking
“more than half the people of while watching developments over-
Britain anxiously want a change seas. Influenza appears in differ-
of government.” The Recorder ent parts of the world every
soe year. Each time doctors wonder

‘They want a clean sweep made j¢ they can expect loeal epidemics
of the men who have no moral 6 g pandemie—a world outbreak
right to cling to office, so that We of the disease 4 Neen
can then: Ships from overseas carried the
flu virus to Quebee during the
1918 pandemic and within a few
months every province in Canada
had felt the ravages of the disease,
The disease continued during 1919,
i920 and 1921, but with greatly
diminished force.

To-day no one will claim that
Canada can be isolated, but asa
precaution a close check is being
made on travellers from overseas,

Doctors in the federal govern-
ment's quarantine service say that
a traveller might pass a medical
examination on arriving in Can-
ada. A few days later, he might
have the flu. The period of in-
cubation of the flu virus is 24 to
72 hours,

Any traveller suffering from in-
fluenza on entering the country
will be taken at once te hospital
and placed in isolation until he

“1. Put the country straight;
stop the nationalization and other
political schemes which are ruin-
ing industry and forcing up the
cost of living.

“2. Strengihen our
making war impossible;

“3. Re-establish Britain's
prestige in the world so that once
again we can lift up our heads.”

The Petition reads as follows:

“We, people of Britain,
believing that our country
urgently needs, new, bold and
able leadership.

“Britain’s spirit needs a
surge of hope and vigour which
ean come only by ending the
present blundering, ending tha
shortages which never should
have happened, and curbing the
rising cost of living.

defences,

“Our foreign policy needs has recovered and can travel again
firmer and more intelligent’ without danger of spreading the
direction. infection,

“Our defence needs to be

Information Centre
The Federal Health Department

strengthened against aggressors
without, to ensure that all live

in peace. has established an influenza in-

“Declare that the present 10rmation centre to keep Canadian
Government does not represent Medical authorities abreast of de-
the will of the people, and— Velopments’ in all parts of the

world, The Federal Department's
Laboratory of Hygiene has been
equipped to identify quickly any
specimens of virus sent to it by
provincial health laboratories,

Medical authorities hope that
these precautionary moves coupled
with the use of new drugs devel-
oped since 1918 will help minimize
any flu outbreak in this country.

The 1918 outbreak originated in
Spain and quickly spread through
Europe, hitting both Allied and
German troops. The first cases
reported in Canada were found
among the crew of an Indian ship
examined at the quarantine sta-
tion on Crosse Isle, in the St. Law-
rence River below Quebec, That
was July 9, 1918.

The bureau of statistics, on the
basis of reports from the nine
provinces, estimated the death toll
at 37,665.—(CP)

More Germans Will
Work In Coal Mines

BERLIN, Feb. 7.

Stronger Labour measures to
draft more manpower to coal
mines in East Germany were
hinted today by Selbmann, Heavy
Industries Minister, as he disclosed
that hard coal production in
1950 fell by 50,000 tons below
the planned output of 3,300,000
tons,

This underweight production is
“threatening the development of
the entire East German industry”
Selbmann warned.

Tnereased demands made upon
West Germany’s economy by a
five year plan which went into
operation last month have also
shown deficiencies in the railway
transport system and in the non-
ferrous metals market. The man-
power shortage is thought to be
one reason for reported drastic
cuts in the strength of police alert
squads.

An American occupation papev
in West Berlin to-day wrote “A
new labour law is being prepared
by the East German Labour Min-
istry, and 251,000 men between
the ages of 28 and 45 will be reg-
istered for compulsory labour. The
age limit for the uranium mines
along the Czech border, where
working conditions are bad has
been raised from 45 to 55 years
the paper said,

“Petition the Prime Minister
to advise His Majesty The King
immediately to dissolve Parlia-
ment straightaway and _ ~=so
allow the people of Britain to
elect a government of their
choice.” —(1.N.S.)

For Pilots

LONDON.

Britain’s planes in the future
will be fitted with a Flight Log—
a small machine that draws the
track of an aircraft on a map so
the pilot can instantly see where
he is,

A strip map travels across the
screen and a small pointer with a
coloured pen controlled by the
radio beams traces the aircraft's
track over the map.

Electrical impulses at regular
intervals indicate a time scale so
the pilot can rapidly check his
speed over the route,

Tests have shown that in an
area covered by the beams which
work the Flight Log the device
can be used to navigate an air-
craft to within 250 yards of the
end of a runway.

The device is simple to operate:
A track drawn between two towns
on a map by a pilot can be fol-
lowed by the coloured line drawn
by the machine when the aircraft
is in flight. He will see immedi-
ately if he is off course —I.N.S.







Fancy Pants

LONDON.

Hundreds of Britain’s young
actors have shocked the nation’s
sober-minded my sporting “fancy
pants” in flashy two-tones.

Traditional grey flannel “bags”
have been happily discarded for
the American-style trousers with
legs of one colour and cuffs, pocket
facings and waistband in a con-
trasting shade.

Blackpool's Harry Black, who
runs a chain of men's wear shops,
is responsible for the surge of sar-
torial recklessness.

Black “lifted” the idea from
Philadelphia and was “amazed” at
the initial reaction. Theatrical
folk quickly caught on to the idea
and since then Black has been



busy with orders from all over the —Reuter.
font | 1 the bl

ost popular are the blue-green
trousers with grey facings and PRISONERS WILL TELL
cuffs with a dark brown and fawn
combination the runner up. LONDON.

Home Secretary Chuter Ede has
lifted the strict prison restriction
forbidding prisoners to take their
notebooks with them when they

The trousers, made in gaber-
dine and hopsack, retail at be-
tween $6 and $9.

In the spring Black plans to

turn out even more “fancy pants” Jeave jail. A flood of prison re-
miniscences is expected.—I.N.S.

in very bright colours.—IN.S.



You'll feel so fresh and full of vigour after
you’ve washed with Lifebuoy Toilet Soap.
Its deep-cleansing lather frees you of weari-
ness, and keeps you fresh the whole day
through, Keep a tablet of Lifebuoy Toilet
Soap handy and use it regularly—for all
day freshness !

FOR PERSONAL FRESHNESS ALWAYS

WART GS-1 OSE

Lee Seseeeetnennewene

‘

THIS strange looking fish was cau
Town during her two-year



N. Zealand Give
18-Year-Olds

Arms Training
WELLINGTON, N.Z.

voyage around the world.

feet during operations north of Walvis Bay off the South African

lieved to be a form of primitive cod-fish of an unknown species.
A

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

STRANGE FISH

tht by the Danish



The

fish was
N. Zealand To Send
Meat To Britain

WELLINGTON, New Zealang,

Feb. 7.
New Zealand is to divert to

Thousands of 18-year-old’ New Britain the bulk of 5,000 tons of

Zealanders entered camp_ this

They are the first intake for the
new year under the Dominion’s
compulsory service law, the only
conscription scheme operating in
the wien outside the
United Kingdom,

But some military authorities
are asking whether the country is
training the right men, and
whether a change should be made
to meet the urgent needs of the
times. “a

The present scheme is a long-
range one. Under New Zealand
law men are not eligible for mili-
tary service abroad until they are
21. The first of the 18-year-olds
under the presefit scheme began
their training last year and hence
will not be available for service
overseas until 1953. Those now
going into camp will be available
correspondingly later.

Some distinguished New Zea-
land soldiers of the last war are
urging that the scheme be changed
to train men who will be immedi-
ately available for an expedition-
ary force if need arises. The men
most suitable for such a force have
had no training at all. They are
the men who have become 21 since
the war and are now a 21a
27. These men would be 8
cream of any expeditionary force
as a large proportion of veterans
of the Second World War are al-
ready past the best age for mili-
tary operations,

Scheme Works Well

The New Zealand compulsory
service scheme was planned at a
time when there seemed likely to
be at least several years of
before any call came for
service.
well, The training has been mod-
ern and well-planned so that no
time is wasted. Recruits do 14
weeks’ continuous training in their
first year and shorter periods in
the following three years.

The object is by that time to
have them sufficiently trained to
be able to take their place in a
field formation and form the back-
bone of a force which could be
mobilized at short notice. Judg-
ing from the enthusiasm shown
by both instructors and recruits
there is a good prospect of this
aim being attained if there is suf-
ficient time.

Meanwhile, however, New Zea-
land has no troops available for
active service abroad, The time
taken to raise and train a force for
Korea showed _ the difficulties in-
volved. New Zealand’s contingent
did not reach Korea until the be-
ginning of January, although a
prompt start was made in raising
it after the United Nations’ call for
ground forces. It consisted of a
mixture of war veterans and men
who have become 21 since the war
and had no military training.

130

LONDON.
The Home Office reported only
131 Russian citizens are registered
with the British police. This fig-
ure does not include the Soviet
diplomatic mission.—I.N.S.

a LEVER prove cH

, meat
month to’ begin military training,’

active 1

It has worked extremely to










which it was intended to
sell‘this season’ in Canada and

the United States it was an-
nounced to-day.
K. J. Holyoake, Minister for

Marketing, who announced this,
Said the decision was made be-
cause it considered the produce
would not reach Canadian and
United States markets at the best
time, and because of the accen-
tuated meat shortage in Britain.

Unfortunately, this quantity
will not in itself permit any alter—
ation in the meagre British ration,
but it will be a contribution in the
right direction Holyoake said.
Sample quantities for educative
Purposes would be sent to Canada
and the United States, and it was
hoped to pursue at the next ses—
sion, development of a limited
market in America.—Reuter,



U.S. Specialists
Go To Morocco

PARIS, Feb, 7.

The newspaper Le Monde re-
ports that the first American
Specialists who will undertake the
enlargement of the five chief
airports in Morocco, have arrived
in Casablanea. Six ships bringing
material and 250 technicians, are
expected shortly.

It was r

xy nd: t
France and anaieel

erica had agreed
evican airforce planes using
five see in Morocco. Le Monde
says six new runways will be
built at Port .Lyautey. It adds
that two-mile long runways will
be built near Casablanca, A base
will be created at Agadir and
aerodromes built near Rabat and
at Marrakesh.
—Reuter.



Quarrel In Church

MILAN Feb., 7.

Italian monarchists all but came
to blows in San Babila Church
here during a Memorial Mass for
King Vietor Emmanuel III of Italy
who died: in Egypt in December
1947. The priest appealed fo
order from his pulpit.

The trouble started when some-
one laid an Italian tri-coloured
flag emblazoned with the Royal
Armes on a Catafalque standing in
the aisle for the mass.

Cries of protest prompted a pos
liceman plain clothes to remove
the royalist flag. Then shouts of
disapproval came from monarchist
sympathisers, who redoubled their
clamour when the tri-colour of
the present Italian republic, the
same flag but without Royal Arms,
Was laid by another citizen on the
Catafalque.

The police bundled noisy ring-
leaders of both sides out of church
as the priest mounted the pulpit.

—Reuter.

for

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BASS

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FILES All Tenae eee
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STILLSON TYPE CHES 10”, 1
CHAIN PIPE WRENCHES %”—4”



coast.



This Set Greene
Writing ...

By JON HOPE
@ What were the first stories
you ever read?

Did any one book
your future?

For Graham Greene, a blood-
eurdling shocker featuring Dixon
Brett, detective, came first. Then
The Private Aeroplane, by Cap:
tain Gilson (he read it six times)
King Solomon's Minés* fascinated
him, At 14, however, it was
Marjorie Bowen's The Viper of
Milan that brought about the
crisis. ‘From that moment,” says
Greene, ‘I began to write.” Exer-
cise books were filled with imita-
tions of what he ealls ‘Miss
Bowen's magnificent book.”

In reminiscent mood, Greene
recalls his early literary life in
The Lost Childhood—a collection
of essa) due March.

(Tip for children with ambi-
tions to grow up into a big seller:
Be cagey about your accomplish-
ments. Master Graham could
read when very young, But he
kept mum about it.)

@ Man who wrote The Ground-
nut Affair — Alan Wood — now
turns from fact to fiction, calls
his first novel simply Herbert,
Story has been rewritten from
draft originally produced when
he was convalescing after war
wounds, Wood’s immediate plans
to stick to book writing.
@® Publishers of Burke’s Landed
Gentry are busy preparing first
edition since before the war. En«
tries will be about the same nim-
ber as before, reason being that
land ownership is not the sole
qualification. An interesting
enough pedigree will suffice,
Chagrined xs ex-Covent Gar-
len Market executive H, F. Par-
kinson, At the end of the war
BG. want to Australia, got a job
a newspaper. From his expe-
riences in settling down, mak-
ng good, he wrote a book called
A Corner In Australia. “Migrants
coming out complain background
information is not available in
Britain,” he claims, Idea was
that his book would put that
right. But publishers over here
have fought shy of it. And Par-
kinson, over there, wonders why.
2 Enfield-born J. Radford—
vans has been a car salesman,
charity. dance organiser, chauf-
feur (that lasted a week), teacher
farmhand, _ builder’s labourer,
And now? He is finding fame as
the author of four adventure
books for girls, is under contract
to produee two new novels a
year. Main character in his stor-
ies is called Brenda Dickson’ and
she, claim his publishers, “is
achieving a popularity which may

influence

Searle put her in the class of
Frank ichards’s Tom Merry,
Billy Bunter, etc.” So go to it.

Radford-Evans. Brenda lookes
like being a permanent job.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED



—L.E.S,

LONDON,
Britain’s new Minister of
Health, Hilary Marquand, told
the House of Commons that
216,795,000 _—_ prescriptions had
been dispensed free under the

National Health Service in the 12
months ending Nov. 30, 1950.

He said the estimated cost of
these prescriptions was $93,847,-
600.—I.N.S.




the following

SMISSION BELTING 314” x 4 Ply
INSERTION %” & 1-16"

GS all Types

°

& HACKSAW BLADES

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» 14-Ib., 2%-Ib., 3-1b.
4”, 18’, 24”, 36”

BROTHERS

DIAL 4269



Odds On
Shaweross

LONDON.
Attorney General Sir Hartiey
British prosecutor at
berg war crimes trials,
an odds-on

The

Se ae
vi
ia te tetene'

to ane —
a good
under doctors’ care,
from the critical
State, because of a
Spiveaio’ Biase —
ic i
Prime Minister Ch ttl
in ee Attlee
Conservatives and Labour
leaders to replace
But Attlee has insisted
re bi one ae could stay until
Besides yoke

o

return to his | forward might be’ Hon, Dr.

and}should be given

Shaweross, a few other |told the Commissioners

Coloured Peoples
Ask 2-Chamber
Legislature In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
fu

GEORGETOWN, Feb. {.

A’ three-man deputation from
the British Guiana branch of the
League of Coloured Peoples giv-
ing evidence before the Wadding-
ton Constitution Commission to-
day suggested a two-chamber

is _sufféring | Legislature as a definite step for-

ward to more responsible gov-
ernment. “Whatever that step
J.
A. Nicholson said, “It should be
of such ‘nature that if British
Guiana accept Caribbean Feder-
ation we could easily fall within
its framework.”

Failing that, Nicholson said they
a constitution
to responsible

which will
government,

The L.C.P. was

lead

represented

+; by Nicholson, Dr, Claude Denbow,
> jand Mr. Lewellyn John.

In the
Denbow
he was

course of the discussion

names have been mentioned as|Cconfident that the party already
possible successors to Bevin —|in being would cut right across

State f Scotland
or “4

tary Chuter
orrison,

Council and No, 2 man-.to Attlee,
But the suave, 48-year-old

Shaweross, a brilliant lawyer,
considered by ft o men
to be head and *shoulders above
any other likely candidate from
the Labour Party ranks.

Shawcross, who has_ been
Attorney General since 1945, is
an effective speaker and Britons
who have seen him in action look
forward . to. .the - possibility. of
Shawcross » duelling’ with ‘the
vitrolic Russian Foreign Minister,
Andrei Vishinsky, across a bar-
gaining table.

The most xotable case Shaw-
cross has handled in Britain as
prosecutor was the trial of Dr,
Klaus Fuchs, confessed atomic
spy who was sentenced to 14,
years’ imprisonment last March
for giving A-bomb secrets to
Russia.



Some Flower
Show

LONDON.

Covent Garden, London’s great
flower-selling market, will hold its
own flower show this summer foi
the first time in 300 years.

For hundreds of years the his-
toric market -has helped other
shows, like the famous Chelsea
Flower Show and the Horticultu-
ral Hall exhibitions, with rare
blooms, from -all ‘over, the. world,
but ‘never Held one of its own, ©

Now tourists and other visitors
will be able to savour England's
fairest flowers—roses, carnations,
chrysanthemums and some of the
orchids which earn. Britain $250,-
000 a year. ;

Covent Garden, on the spot
where the monks of Westminster
once tilled their gatden and
buried their brethren, will be
turned into a blazing, colourful
flowerland on June 12 and 18,

But the show will not include a
“Battle of flowers.”

One of the judges, Mrs. Violet
Stevenson, who lives in’ Nell
Gwynn’s: garret apartment high
over the Garden said:

“It was decided that the English
love flowers so much they would
hate to see them treated that

way.’
. —I.N.S.



MORE U.S. STRIKERS

RETURN TO WORK

CHICAGO, Feb. 7.
Mora American rail shunters
whose unofficial strike hag dis-
rupted transport and held up ship-
ments for Korea, were going back
to work to-day. But there was not
yet a full seale return of 12,000
men who had stayed away “sick”
in support of the 40-hour: week
demand. Service was almost nor-
mal in many cities, but not many
Trains were moving in Chicago
St. Louis and Cleveland.—Reuter.



RATES OF EXCHANGE
CANADA

64 1/10% pr, Cheques on
Bankers
Demand
Drafts
Sight Drafte
Cable

62 1/10% pr,

61.95% pr.
61 8/10% pr.
64 1/10% pr.
62 6/10% pr, Currency
Coupons
Silver

60. 6/10% pr.
59 9/10% pr,





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He looked forward to the time
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Lord President. of the}be coming forward. The League's

univergal

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lyn

PAGE THREE —

éd for five years and
House or Legislative Council of
eight members, four nominated
by the Governor-and four by the
Prime Minister.

an Upper

The Prime Minister shall bea
member of the majority party in-
the House of Representatives and
shall appoint ten. members ‘tf

whom two shall be members of

the Legislative Council to serve
with him in the Executive Council
with ministerial responsibility, ;
Except in matters of externai
affairs and defence, the Governor:-
shall act in accordance with the
Executive Council's adviee. In the.
exercise of mercy prerogative,
and in discipline of civil servants’,
he shall be assisted by the advice
of the Privy Couneil. -



Help For Doctors -

LEIGHTON BUZZARD, Eng. Feb.

So many Leighton Buzzard
people have asked for medigal
treatment that the town’s seven
doctors have appealed to the pub-
lie for merey.

An advertisement in the local

weekly newspaper asks the public
to “avoid requests for evening or
night visits except in cases of ex-
treme urgency” and to ask for
visits only if unable to attend sur-
‘peries, >>

The doctors say that they have
never Known. such a busy , time,
‘One of the seven doctors is Dr.
W. H. Square who, at 90, is believ» -
ed to be Britain's oldest practi~
sing doctors, :
—I.N.S)*

eas

es

iain

ange

Ts

LBBPPLDLBLDAPBABAPL ALLELE AEP RDG



Dress Shoppe

STREET,

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eee

PAGE FOUR

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid. Broad St., Bridgetown.
a i ee

Thursday, February 8, 1951

ANSWER

THE Hotel Industry in Barbados has
been. very approximately estimated to
have been worth three million dollars to
Barbados in 1950. Actual statistics exist to
prove that from Venezuelan sources alone,
Barbados gained no less than three quar-
ters of a million United States’ dollars.

The domestic exports of Barbados in
1948 have been estimated at $13,311,000.

Of these, Sugar products account for
$12,621,000, It is an old saying worthy
of repetition that ‘Barbados has far too
long packed all her eggs in one basket’ —
A Sugar Basket.

Economists, theoreticians, businessmen,
politicians, Government Officials, and
amateurs of all kinds, have for years now
been arguing the toss whether or no Bar-
bados. can look to anything other than
sugar to expand her economy.

Facts exist to prove that the tourist in-
dustry does provide a valuable source of
reyenue, and is capable of being quadru-
pled, if only a constructive and far-sighted
policy is adopted by the Government of
Barbados.

One does not need to be a financial ex-
pert to note that the tourist industry of
Barbados in 1950 earned, according to
available information from well-informed
sources, almost one quarter of the value of
exported sugar products in 1948.

For more thah a year, high officials of
Trans-Canada Airlines have been telling
Barbados that because of shortage of the
only kind of hotel accommodation that will
attract Canadian visitors, the island was
losing hundreds of potential tourists from

Canada in the winter and summer months. ,

As far back as the 24th June, 1950, a
mémorandum was presented to His Excel-
Jeney the Governor by the Barbados
Chamber of Commerce. That memoran-
dum absolves the Barbados Chamber of
Commerce from any charge of failing to
realise the importance of tourism to the
economy of this island.

In its opening paragraph it reads: “The
low standard of living and the heavy and
inereasing population make it essential
that additional sources of income and em-
ployment be’sought, After the main indus-
try of the island, namely sugar and its
by-products, the tourist industry appears,
apart from emigration, to offer the best
prospects of assistance in maintaining the

direct and indirect, afforded by this indus-

try, benefits all sections of the community -

and in addition brings in much needed
revenue which is mostly hard currency.”
The Memorandum draws to the attention
ofthe Governor that as far back as 1946,
a resolution from the Chamber of Com-
merce was sent to Government urging
assistance to the Hotel Industry.

~The first item of that resolution passed
on 9th January, 1946, reads that “every
effort be made to encourage private enter-
prise in the construction of Hotels on a
modern basis.”

“Those responsible for the maintenance
of living standards, steadily won for Bar-
bados by ‘hard work and enterprise, are
today faced with a challenge of no mean
order. All around them in the West Indies,
territories are competing with one another
for a high position in the race to attract
capital investment.

The near-by island of Trinidad gallops
past all British West Indian territories
with domestic exports valued in 1948 at
$127,105,000. Jamaica for the same year
has been estimated to have exported com-
modities valued at $53,560,000. British Gui-
ana is third on the list with an estimated
value of $36,627,000 in export commodities.
Barbados was fourth with $13,311,000.

The question to be answered by the Gov-
ernment of Barbados is — “CAN BARBA-
DOS maintain its present high position and
draw nearer to those who lead in the race,
or is it steadily to. deteriorate, because
those guiding its destinies allow their
vision to be impaired by secondary issues
based on prejudice and ignorance?” The
answer to that question is a vital one for
every voter.





_Our Readers Say:

; _ Thanks

To the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—On behalf of my Commit-

..tee and myself I should like to

living... Employment, . both...



LEARNING TO SEE WITHOUT EVES



~ BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

: <
TYPING is one of many courses given at an American school for the blind to-prepare the students for
their life ahead. Their blindness does not necessarily limit their achievements iy nany occupations,

The Blind Are Not Helpless

the
blind, boys and girls learn to live
and be happy despite their handi-
cap.

At an American School for the
Blind at Raleigh, capital of: the
east coast State of North Carolina,
there are 187 boys and girls handi-
capped by blindness or near-
blindness. But they are not feel-
ing sorry for themselves; neither
are they resigned to their afflic-
tion. These children simply have
too much to do and to learn to sit
and brood about their lack of
eyesight. ys

For, contrary to the prevailing
idea, the blind are not helpless;
are not unable to: take care of
themselves, and do not want any-
one to pity them, They simply
need a little encouragement: like
anyone else.

That is what they are getting at
the School for the Blind, The
school is identical with any other
state public school in curriculum
and text with the exception that
aids to the blind and vocational

and musical emphasis are added,
And the children at the school are
the same as those in any state
public school except for their
blindness,

A visitor to the school campus
ig surprised to find boys and girls

skating, riding bicycles, and carry-
ing on the everyday functions of
growing up, but without the use
of sight. Nobody stands on the
sidelines at the school. The being-
left-out—of-things complex is one
of the most devastating for any
handicapped person, and the staff
of the school stresses the idea that
everyone takes part in everything.
The school presents a programme
from kindergarten to the 12th
grade, and as long. as a student
continues _to progress as he would
in a-wegular public school, he ad-
vances from class to class.” ,

What happens when a student
graduates from the school’s sec-
ondary school? That is one of the
amazing things about the institu-
tion. As of last year over 75 per-
cent of its graduates were going
on to college. The State of North
Carolina aids those who are col-
lege-minded by providing the
funds to cover all their expenses
including reader service, under
which someone is paid to read
necessary texts to the student.

Admittance to the school is
granted to any blind child with a
visual acuity of 20—200 or less.
No fees are charged, and parents
are required only to clothe. the
children and transport them to
and from Raleigh; The school.
operates from September to June
with the pupils returning to their.
homes during the summer months.
Students also “enjoy the usual
Christmas and Easter holidays and
may go home for week ends
throug! it the year,



At an American school for

By BILLY CARMICHAEL

From "The State’

The school, which was founded
in 1844, follows the regular course
of study for public schools in
North Carolina with reading, writ-
ing, and arithmetic leading the
way as always. But the blind chil-
dren, needing a little more, get
it. Learning to read and write in
Braille is, of course, essential to
all students. They are taught to
write Braille by hand with the
use of a small aid and later the
students learn the operation of the
Braille typewriter which allows
much more speed,

The reading of Braille books
opens the field of literature to all
students. Before the introduction
of Braille, books with raised let-
tering were used, but reading in
this manner was slow and tedious.
To-day, some of the students at
the school can read a book in
Braille as fast as a pair of eyes
can scan any regular book. Books
on the phonograph records are
available in the extensive school
library, but this is considered the
lazy man’s way, and the use of
the discs is discouraged.

Music is taught with great em-
phasis at the school with six of
the teachers on the staff devoted
to this study, a much higher per-
centage than found in the public
schools, Since the blind children
cannot enjoy the beauties.of life,
the school tries to give the stu-
dents a coneept of some of the
finer things through their ears.-All
students of the schoo! are required
to take piano training for several
years, After that, stiidents. who
show little or no musical ability
are allowed to discontinue the
study, but those with average or
better than average ability will
continue as long as they stay at
the school. Some students shift
to other instruments besides the
piano and many of them study
voice.

Another very important part ‘of
the training of the school is done
in voeational subjects and handi-
work. A boy begins instruction
in chair caning at the age of ten
and requires about three to four
years to master the art. Then he
is advanced to mattress making,
Which calls for About three years
of experience. Those with ,ausical
ability are taught piano tuning,
probably the most profitable of all
the major occupations of the blind.
The girls, meanwhile, are taught
home economics and handicrafts,

beginning in the third grade‘ and



continuing through secondary
school. They learn cooking, sew-
ing, and dressmaking. In craft
classes the girls master crocheting,
learn to make baskets, to cane and
repair chairs, to weave rugs, and
make other articles.

Physical education is required
of all students in the interest of
building strong and healthy bodies
not retarded by the lack of eye-
sight. The school has teams in
track and wrestling which com-
pete against sighted teams with
excellent results. A pool is locat-
ed on the campus where students
may swim the year round,

The school’s biggest problem is
teaching normalcy, to show the
student that his blindness will not
keep him from leading a normal
life. The stideénts aré not-pam-
pered or “institutionalized,’ but
treated like normal individuals.
Canes, the old-time indication of
blindness, are no longev used. -_In-
stead, the students learn to get
about through using their ears to
pick up sound vibration tones. A
boy swimming, for example, will
notice the sound waves getting
shorter and shorter as he reaches
the side of the pool, while a girl
roller skater can tell by the same
method when she is nearing the
edge of a sidewalk.

Blindisms, which are nervous
movements of blind children such
as working of hands and fingers,
waving objects before the eyes,
rocking to and fro while sitting,
and so forth, are other barriers
that must be removed before the
child can lead a normal life. Most
of these blindisms are caused by
idleness, and giving the child
something to,do will help correct
this problem. The school finds it
can remedy even the toughest of
these cases in the first few years
the child is at the school.

The abolition of old fashioned
methods and out-of-date practices
by leaders such as Principal T. W.
Stough have helped the drive to-
ward normalcy. Not many years
ago boys and girls in the school
were segregated at all times be-
cause of the belief that two blind
persons should not marry. Now-
adays many such marriages turn
out very successfully.

With happy and contented stu-
dents, as unrestricted by the
school as by their lack of eye-
sight—attending motion pictures,
football games, and other sup-
posedly eye-filling attractions with
the maximum of enjoyment—the
State School for the Blind is an
putstanding example of the pro-
@uctive and progressive methods
North Carolina is using to make
its handicapped citizens happy,
capable, and self-sufficient.



Big Lake Fleet Develops From
Single Vessel

TORONTO.

Capt. R. Scott Misener, 71,
President and General Manager of
the largest individually-owned
fleet of Canadian freighters on the
Great Lakes, can count his suc-
cess from the day he and his chief
engineer, John O. McKellar,
bought a small and not very
staunch freighter.

But the vessel took every cent
the two men possessed—or could
borrow. Their venture depended
on their skill in guiding her from
port to port. and in keeping her
hold crammed with good-paying
cargo,

That. was in 1916, when Canada.,
was busy meeting the strains and
demands of the First World War.
The two lake sailors made the
operation of their little freighter
pay and in two years they sold her
and. bought a bigger and better
ship that was the foundation of



ea

\

a new shipping concern named
Sarnia Steamships Ltd.

As the Company prospered, they
bought other ships until they had
a fairly big fleet on. their own.
Then Capt. Misener and Mr. Mc-
Kellar took over the venerable
Matthews Line, renaming it Colo-
nial Steamships Ltd., and their
fleets continued to grow and pros-
per.

Sailed as a Boy

John. O. McKellar .is_ retired
now. Scott Misener owns a big
combined fleet and a growing busi-
ness. He still has the love for the
lakes that led him to strike out
from his birthplace on Manitoulin
Tsland ‘before he was 17 and ship
out as boy-before-the-mast on a
three-and-aft lumber hooker at
$15 a month, a wage later ad-
vanced to $25 when he gained the
status of a regular hand,

From the. lumber hooker, he

——————$

went on to a wheelsman’s berth in
a steam barge. During the years
when sail gave way to steam on
the lakes and the wooden ships
were replaced by steel, he climbed
through the certified ratings of
second mate and first mate to a
master’s ticket.

After that, to become a_ ship
owner was for him but a single
step.

The big fleets of passenger and
cargo ships, ore and grain carriers,
tankers and other types that ply
the five Great Lakes go into win-
ter harbour‘late in December when
lake ports freeze up. But in: the.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY §8, 1951



Cardinal
Mindszenty

D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

Tins BROOKS PEARS

Documents on the Mindszenty Case. Budapest, January
1949. Cardinal Mindszenty Speaks. Published by order |,
of Joseph Cardinal Mindszenty Prince-Primate of Hun-
gary. New York: Longmans, Green and Co. 1949. |

Perhaps no other event in recent years has
aroused such a world wide interest and gen-
eral indignation as the arrest and the life
condemnation of Cardinal Mindszenty. The
decuments published by the Budapest gov-
ernment controlled exclusively by the Com-
munists and the authorized white book of
the Cardinal will make the tragic case clear,

though its details will probably always remain
hidden by the tactics of the Bolsheviks who

destroy disagreeable documents and falsify
them according to the expediency of a given
situation. What is a terrific vision in the
prophetic nove! of George Orwell, is a long
established aspect of daily life in the region
behind the curtain: where dictatorial power,
called people’s democracy, has made an end

to history. ‘Not only the present, but also|¢
the past and the future is shaped by terror]
and propaganda. 5
* * *

After the crushing of some independent}
leaders of the opposition by the Bolsheviks | %
the Cardinal remained as the only upright] ¥

25”x18”

&
22”x16” |
Low-down SUITES
High-up SUITES

Cast Iron CISTERNS

Phones — 4472, 4687,

and unbroken man in Hungary, both as a
Catholic and as a patriot. He has opposed
with the same determination both Nazism
and Bolshevism and was put by both into
prison. Soon he was attacked with the
charges of treason, espionage, crimes direct-
ed at the overthrow of the Republic, and
foreign exchange speculation. All the neces-
sary documents had been produced by the
means of the classic Russian purges which
led finally to the inevitable “confession,”
written confession of Mindszenty. Enough
to compare a picture of the Cardinal before
the trial with that taken after the trial to
be convinced that by criminal methods his
entire mental life has been undermined.

* * *

No sane man will believe, after having
read the writings, sermons and pastoral
letters of Mindszenty collected in the author-
ized white book, that a man with his acute-
ness of vision and strong feeling for reality
would have committed crimes against the
Republic at a time when the Bolshevik dicta-
torship thoroughly excluded even the possi-
bility of such acts. What he really did was
to arouse the national and Christian public
opinion of the country not by political
means, but by showing the tyrannical nature
of the new system. Already in his first pas-
toral letter (October 18, 1948), at the very
beginning of the “liberation” by the Russian
army, he realized that the Communists under
the military and diplomatic. preponderance
of Soviet Russia were driving not towards
the popular democracy which they pretended
and solemnly promised to establish with a
coalition of democratic parties, but towards
a dictatorship of the Russian type. Against
this ever growing tendency he drew atten-
tion to the dangers of a perverted democracy
and the real meaning of true democracy,
asserting: “The cornerstone of a true democ-
racy is the recognition of the fact that all
natural rights are inviolable and that no
human power can alter or invalidate them...

Ss

’



True democracy inscribes upon its banner:
freedom of conscience, the right of parents
to educate their children, the right of the
worker to develop his abilities according to
his own choice and inclination, What is
more, true democracy puts an.end to slave

labour.” (p. 60) This has remained his fun-

damental point of view from which He criti-
cized the deeds of the new system. His voice
became stronger and more articulate when
the real aims of the system: ihe suppression
of individual freedom, the dictatorship ‘of a

the ‘growing terrorism and propaganda exas-
perated all groups of the nation, even the
more intelligent elements of the privileged
proletariat. As the democratic coalition was
cowed or corrupted into the’ acceptance of
the secret aims of the Communists, Minds-
zenty became the symbol of Hungarian inde-
pendence and religious and political freedom.

* * *

In spite of the vicious and brutal electoral
practices, two subsequent general elections
had demonstrated that the overwhelming
majority of the country understood the
teaching of Mindszenty ‘and a few intact] $
leaders of the opposition and rejected Bal-
shevik rule and dictatorship, And when, all
serious opposition was liquidated, all xe-
‘ligious and political protest silenced, national

Sizes 80"

season they carry trémendous my Sree i . .
traffic. Through the Sault Ste. |@espair and humiliation found its ultimate 66
Marie canals between.Lake Su- ‘ A GOooD

perior and the lower Lakes passes
a larger traffic than through any
other canal in the world, including
the Suez Canal, despite the shorter
season,

,manoeuvres could not discredit him, on the
}contrary they only increased the prestige of

expression in_ the strong personality of
Mindszenty. The press of the government
(practically all other organs of public opinion
were suppressed) began a calumniatory cam-
| paign against Mindszenty, denouncing him as
) a Fascist, as an advocate of the expropriated
, big landed interests. And when all these

|
small group trained and bet by Moscow,

MORNING ”’

with a CUP of

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DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

take this opportunity to thank all
those wh6 supported the Bridge

Drive in aid of St. Gabriel's School

Building Fund held at Merton
Lodge on Saturday, 3rd February,

‘I. should specially like to thank

Dr. and Mrs. Massiah for the loan
ef their house, and the kind

. friends who donated prizes, food,

and drinks.
~ I am pleased to announce that

. the proceeds amounted to $281.33.

Yours truly,
HILDA WILKINSON
on behalf of
ORGANIZING COMMITTEE.
“Tockerbie House,”

‘’ Britton’s Cross Roads,

St. Michael,
7.2.51.

Fire

fo the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,—In your issue of today

there is a paragraph stating that

there’ are 1,300 Fire Hydrants in

the Island, of which 1,001 are if “(laying a rate in respect of the City 4a box or some other container |his name and.the driving force of hi
. 5 ‘ q . ¢ are S the 3 St nite S mes-
BS. mae pnd. 3ee in the parish god m If mile beyond the former a J pa dumped alongside the |sage, Rakosi and ‘his colleagues realized that
rist Church, | ate to be twice that of the latter, SWeOIS i :
It may be interesting to note There is no proVision in the The .obvious thing to’ tie ther f aerndea tS moe must be demolished. — We Offer —
‘hat the mains in the City,are Fire Brigade Act to call on any would. be to make the servants i wise the final aims of the dictatorship

from 10 to 14 inches and are in a
duplicate system running parallel
to each other, those in the suburbs
are frora 4 to 6 inches,

The Fire Hydrants in the City

are 50 yards apart and those be-
yond the City are 100 yards apart,

In the laying of Mains in any
new tenantries such as the Navy
Gardens, Graeme Hall Terrace
and the Cot area, the Waterworks
Department have insisted that the
Mains shall be provided with Hy-
drants at the expense of the
Tenantry Owner, a very wise step

on the part of Government. For
some reason this provision has
been abandoned in the case of
Biue Waters, the Garden 2nd
Worthing View where no Hy-

drants are provided

Under the Fire Brigade Act the
Vestry of St. Michael is required
to contribute two-thirds of the
of the upkeep of the Brigade
and to reimburse themselves—by

through

other parish to contribute.
TAXPAYER,
62.51,

Refuse Removal
To the Editor, The Advocate—

_ SIRI wish to make a few
remarks re the difficulties. en-
countered by the housewife
_ the removal © of refuse
once a day.

Some years ago the servants
started to work at 7 o'clock in
the, morning and the scavenging
carts came around to collect re-

fuse between the hours of 8.06
&m..and.9.00 a.m.

Changes have been made. Ser-
vants now usually come into
work at 8 o’clock in the morn-
Sng whilé ‘the scavenging carts

come around to collect refuse at
6.00 a.m. When they pass a dis-
trict once they. do not return
The Sanitary Department has
a by-law which states that all
such-refuse’ must be put out in

put. out. the refuse before they
leave work during the evening
but it has been: discovered that
the containers have a funny way
of disappearing during the night.
TAXPAYER

Poker Diee Team lor
Trinidad

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Following the defeat of
our Golf Team in Trinidad, I
would suggest we should try and
regain some of our reputation for
skill in Sport by sending a Poker
Dice _Team to compete against
those neighbours who have beaten
us in Tennis and Golf. There
are some very gifted players who
practise regularly on _ certain
mornings of the week, and after
many years of play in everp posi-
tion of sun and moon, should, I
em sure now be able‘to give a
good account of themselves

Vou







uly,
ACES IN ONE,

tion of the Mindszenty trial and its final owc-|% Coffee
} come eliminated the last obstacles of the|$ ztplon comer (S7ound Daily)

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* * ee se
Even some noted foreign correspondents
became the victims of the enormous Bolshe-
vik propaganda. Fortunately the .dictators
themselves had revealed their real aims and
methods. he chief political theorist of
Hungarian Communism, presently Minister
of People’s Culture, Joseph Ravia explained
in a speech to the party leaders with shame- g Meat
less Machiavellism how the Hungarian dic-|% Canadian Salmon
tatorship was established and how it was|% " sarees
conceived from the very beginning of the x ein es

“liberation.” The picture given by Rivia]%

supports in all essential points the judgment.}%
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:
| could not be achieved. The careful prepara-

the admonitions and the fears of Cardinal
Mindszenty.

[Oberlin College

Russian system.



|,

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

lt Was Th

8, 1951

e Animal

Flower Cave

WINNER of Monday Evening Advocate’s “Your Guess”
competition was Cecelia Thomas, of “Marine Villa,” St.

James She guessed correct]
the Animal Flower Cave, St.

MARINES
PARADE

Eighty marines from the H.M.S
Devon-hire accompanied by the
ship’s band conducted by. Band-
master C. Fairall, staged a drill
parade at the Regimental barracks
Square, Garrison, yesterday morn-
ing.

The parade was under the com-|
mand of Capt. C, E. J. Eaglos
and lasted for about one hour and
a half. The marines, dressed in
open neck khaki shirts and long
pants with rifles on their shoul-
ders, marched up and down the
square to the crisp commands of
their drill instructor,

_ About 200 people witnessed the
display of the marines whose tim-
ing in ordering and sloping arms
was faultless. After the parade,
the marines marched down to the
Aquatic Club where a launch took
them to the ship.

Capt. Eagles told the Advocate
yesterday that the display was
not intended to be an exhibition
but strictly “routine.” He said
that the space on the ship would
not be enough for a full drill par—
ade and that was why they resort—
ed to the Regimental barracks
square,

C.G. Addresses |

Headmistresses

LADY BADEN-POWELL, Chief
Guide of the Worid, gave a very
interesting world picture» of
guiding when she addressed about
60 headmistresses both secondary
and elementary at Queen’s Col-
lege yesterday evening. ».

She told them of the good the|
guide movement was doing. to
girls of every nation, even in
places like India and Egypt where
girls’ lives were “restricted.

She said that thé educational
authorities in the civilised coun-
tries of the world gave their
support to the movement, also
the church, civic and government
authorities, as they saw in it, the
value that it, could be for the
rising generations in building a
better citizenhood for the future.

Lady Baden-Powell appealed to
the headmistresses whether they
had guide companies or not to do
their best to forward the guide
movement.

There was a general discussion
about the difficulty of getting
guide leaders, and the Chief
Guide and other speakers Offered
some valued suggestions.







y that the picture was taken in
Luey.

Sixteen of the two hundred
other entrants guessed right but
Cecelia Thomas was the lucky
person. Hers was -the first cor-
rect answer to be pulled out of
the box.

There were three major clues
to the picture. Light coming from
ene direction, the smooth round
stones in the foreground of the
picture and part of the pool in
the cave with rocks refiect’ng on
the surface of the still water.

Some people who may know
the Caves well may remember
the rock on which the man is
standing. Others may even
remember standing on the same
rock to see more clearly out of
the “window” of the cave to get
a better look at the rough sea
which beats against the rocky
cliffs outside,

This of course was the logical
way to go after the correct solu-
tion. The majority of guessers
however, let themselves go to
send in some of the wildest
guesses ever received in this com-
petition.

The man

in the picture led
almost

everyone completely
astray. Most popular guesses
were “The Statue of Fatima.”
Guessers placed the statue at
Seawell, at St. Patrick's Church.
at Verdun and at the Ursuline
Convent.

The Baptist
Next most popular guesses were
“At Brandon’s Beach,” and “the

Rev. Reesor, (the faith healer’
during Baptism at Brandon’s
Beach.”

Then there were the really fan-
tastic guessers, “This picture was
taken in the Wilderness”, “Pic-
ture was taken in EGYPT”. This
guesser gave the Advocate’s
cameraman credit for some
lightning travelling.

ie three most baffling
answers were “Jesus on Mount
Sinai’, “Jesus | preacheth on
Mount Sinai”, and “this picture
was taken from a Bible story
booky It is the scenery of Jesus
in the Wilderness of Judea.” -

Photographs in the Advocate’s
“Your Guess” are not taken from
the “Bible or any other book.
They are taken locally.

Many guessers placed the pic~
ture in almost . every parish,
“Christ Church”, “Cole’s Cave,
St, Thomas,” “River Beach, St.
Lucy,” “at Triopath, St. Andrew”,
“Cattlewash, St. Joseph,” “Crane
Beach, St. Philip,” and “St.
John’s Church, St. John.”

Other ‘guessers thought it was
taken either in St. Patr-ck’s
Church, Jemmott’s Lane or in the
Ursuline Convent, behind the
kitchen or St. Michael’s Cathe-
dral.

The last four guesses to be

opened were “Landzen”, pre-
sumably Lands End, ‘Pelican
Island Beach”, “The Olympic
Theatre’, and the “Empire

Theatre”, during the film “Song
of Bernadette”. -

Chief Guide Tells Of
World Guide Movement

Lady Baden-Powell, Chief Guide, who is at present
on a week’s visit to Barbados, told a Press Conference at
Government House yesterday that her chief ambition in
life is to help. in any way she could to foster the growth
and standard of work of the Scout and Guide Movement
which her husband had invented.



Alley With
No Name

N ALLEY AT ROEBUCK
STREET, beside Messrs
Carlton Browne, Druggists, has no
name, A few weeks ago an acci-
dent occurred in this alley and
the Police Constable, when taking
a statement, was at a loss as to
what name he would call this
alley.

Tt leads to Church Village; so a
bystander bravely suggested that
it should be called Church Village
Alley. The Constable did not
wait for another suggestion but
quickly jotted this down in his
notebook, ‘

He afterwards said that it would
be much easier for him if the
alley was “christened” and the
name placed on a sign board
where he could see it.

OME DOMINO CLUBS have

been formed and many
people are taking an interest in
this game. This evening a match
will be played between Eagles
and Emmerton at the Sunnyside
Club room, Suttle Street.
EAVY RAINS in St. Andrew
earlier this week prevented
lorries from drawing canes from
the fields. Some eal =r were
already loaded cou not move
out of the fields and had to be

d by tractors.
pk oO FACTORIES—Bruce Vale
and Haggatts — are now

yinding canes in St. Andrew.
Brite Vale began on Monday, The
other factory which will soon
start to work is Swans.

Haggatts sulle) i$ first set-
pack when w bre: bwn occurred
on Friday. This” was;however re-
paired over the aveek-end and
work resumed.

ALPH ALLEYNE, a mason of
R Haggatt Hall, St. Michael,
was injured yesterday morning
when a wall fell on him. He was
working at Rickett Street.

Alleyne was taken to the Gen-
eral. Hospital and detained for
treatment.

HORTLY AFTER 3 o'clock

yesterday afternoon the Police
van picked up’ a man along Tra-

It is not always known, she said,
that he invented the Cniide Move-
ment although it was well known
that he had started the Scout
Movement.

The lives of millions and millions
of girls and boys had been influ-
enced by the ideals for which the
movement stood and so in that
way the scout and guide move-
ment constituted a very big force
for good, ‘

They stood for the promotion
of goodwill and understanding
between peoples, a useful active
service to the community and
the development of high quali-
ties of character that would help
each individual to live a richer,
fuller life.’

On her way here, Lady Baden-
Powell said, she had visited the
French islands of Martinique and
Guadeloupe. She was immensely
impressed wi# the work she saw
there being done by the French
scouts and guides,

The movement in Trinidad had
always been on a good footing
and she found it healthy and
flourishing still, both in Trinidad
and Sees sas ae

Duri er ree «ays’ stay
in Grenada she had found the
movement there definitely on the
upgrade. She was glad to be back
and was extremely proud to find
that the guides here had acquired
their own headquarters. It was
obvious that this had mzant
a great deal of effort and hard
work and energy on those re~-
sponsible for making the head-
quarters a reality.

In her tour of Europe and
Africa last year she had been sur-
prised to see the popularity and
strength of the movement there.
Twenty thousand strong, they con-
stituted one of the finest branches
of guiding: y

In Cyprus there were Cypriot
and Turkish Guides. The move-
ment was strong in the Sudan and
Uganda, the last mentioned of
which had.a long Guide "history
and was one Of the first territories
to take up guiding:

The movement was strongly
supported in the schools ard “The
Kaboka” of Uganda was very in-
terested and gave it his strong
support. e

The moveinent was also growing
very fast in Tanganyika and Zan-
zibar as well as in Northern Rho~
desia, Belgium, French Equatorial}

falgar Square. He was taken t0/ Africa, the Gold Coast and Sierra

the General Hospital and detained

On arrival at the Hospital the
man was still in a semi-conscious
condition and did not know his
name. He later said that it was

Pohet Greenidge of Bush Hall.
ADY BADEN-POWELL, Chief
Guide of the World, will
broadcast over Rediffusion and by
Cable & Wireless transmitter over
ZNX31 on a frequeney of 7365
K/es, a wavelength
metres, at 8.15 o’clock tonight,

Leone. ,

The movement was strong in
Finland and she had found the
Finns courageous, interested and
unafraid. ‘

Switzerland which had provided
a meeting place for scouts and
guides of al) nations for the past
twenty years was still doing so
and the movement was as strong
as ever there.

The movement now numbered
five million scouts and two and a

of 40.73/half million guides, Lady Baden-

Poreli said in conclusion,

GUARDIA

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
SEAS



Or THE
bh





SHIP'S CADET LAST shows a group of Lodge School Cadets how the 4 inch gun works.
a Visit to H.M.S, “Devonshire” yesterday.





Carrington’s
Playing Field
Not Affected

BY RAIN

ALTHOUGH yesterday the
roads in the Carrington’s Village
district showed all the evidence
of the showers ‘which had fallen
in the early morning and during
the preceding night, the playing
field there was not affected.

It is one of the playing fields
that Government has decided to
acquire, and in due course the
residents of the district may get
an opportunity to welcome the
erection of a long-desired pavilion
as has just taken place in the
Deacon’s Road Housing Scheme
area.

Cricket, football, tennis and
other games have been played
there for over twenty years, dur-
ing which time the playing field,
a comparatively small area, has
been steadily built up by the men
of the district.

On the south-western side not
far away from the cricket pitch,
what. was once a drop of several
feet, has been filled up over the
years with refuse. In recent years
the Scavenging Department has
done much to accomplish this and
now keeps a man there to spread
the stuff and do any other scaveng-
ing that might be necessary on the
spot. A fairly large area has there-
fore been reclaimed and will in due
time serve in the expansion of
the present field. On the north-
western side some reclaiming has
been done but not to the extent
as on the other side. This is,
supposedly, because of the nearby
waterway. It would appear,
however, that some expansion can
still be made there and will very
likely be when the Government
buys the site and arrangements
are made to develop it fully for
the purpose intended.

At this end stands three small
houses and on the north-eastern
side of the field there are no less
than four. How long these may
be permitted to interfere to any
extent with the progress of a
cricket or football match isvleft to
be seen.

Many residents of the district
expressed their delight to the
Advocate yesterday that the
Government had decided to buy
the playing field.“Some confessed
that they .were amazed when
they heard it was to be cut up
into house spots, These believed
that however a change had come
about in the ownership of the
district somehow or other, the
playing field would remain a
playing field.

When the Advocate visited the
site yesterday, many children were
playing there.

Should Princess
Alice Playing
Field Be A Park?

_ Should the Princecs Alice Play-
ing Field be turned into a park
where as is the custom in England
and elsewhere city workers could
take their lunch, and relax and

The cadets paid



Sovt. May Rent
Land At Seawell
To Farmers

ON TUESDAY when the House of Assembly were dis-
cussing Bonus, a matter raised by Mr. D. D, Garner con-
cerning Christmas bonus for sugar workers at Dodds, Mr.
W. W. Reece (E) said that he was glad to hear the remarks
of the senior member for St. Joseph about the intention of
Government to consider letting plots of land at Seawell to

farmers on a co-operative basis.

Only that week he had

been approached by some peasants from that district who
would be willing to lease parts of Seawell or to work land



there on a co-operative basis,
wpm th sates pcan

Vegetables Of
Every Kind

Fifty-five-year-old Mr. Sam
Marshall is extremely interested
in vegetable gardens. He has
seven and a half acres of land at
Deacons Road and Ecksiein Vil-
lage, Eagie Hall, and has planted
every type of kitchen garden pro-
duce, He also has a quantity of
banana, plantain, oranges, grape-
fruit, limes and lemon trees
planted,

Mr. Marshall is a teetotaler, He
stopped drinking alcoholic bever-
ages and smoking in 1926. He
stopped eating fish, fowl, and
meat in 1929. At present his diet
is made up of greens and occa-
sionally the yolk of an egg.

His father used to take an
interest in gardening and, during

that time Mr. Marshall did
woodwork. When he found this
boring he decided to do both

woodwork and gardening.

The family gardening career
started in 1902 and by 1929 they
had 70 square feet of land. Mr.
Marshall’s father became ill in
1941 and retired. At that time they
were renting the land, .

Mr. Marshall then took over

yearly.

His customers are mainly huck-—
sters and they average about two
dozen per day. When there is a
shortage of carrots or beets, in
the City, over a hundreq huck-
sters flock around Mr. Marshall's
storeroom trying to make
chase.

Mrs. Irene Branch takes care of
selling, paying labourers,
taking on labourers,

a pur-

and

Headquarters

There is aiso Mr. Marshall’s
headquarters which is equipped
with office, .storeroom for produce
and storeroom for machines. In
the last mentioned he keeps his
Spraying equipment, a grinding
machine, rotary hose and also a
tractor which he bought when
there was a’ shortage of labour,
This tractor can plant three rows
at a time. It will cut, drop tne
seeds, cover and press them for
germination all in one operation.

All his land is irrigated by an
automatic overhead irrigation
system which is worked by an
electric pump. The pump is in-
side a well 49 feet deep. It is

eat it in beautiful surroundings? | fifteen feet from the bottom of

This is a suggestion which an Ad-

vecate reporter discussed with

verious people yesterday, but it} During World War I Mr. Mar-

fies

did not find much favour.

One of the leading mercantile
men in town said in his opinion
Princess Alice Playing Field
should remain a _ playing

field, |

'the well and can pump 100 gallons

of water a minute.

was stationed in Dublin
Ireland with the Third. Royal
Berkshire Regiment. He was a
factory guard, When the war
broke out he was in Boston,

since thore centres of recreation;U.S.A. and enlisted there,

are so badly needed.’ He said
that children everywhere were
hungry for places to play games,
and so they often played them
on the road to the discomfort of
motorists and pedestrians too,

On the other hand, when work-
ers got their hour luncheon period,
they looked for a cafe or res-
taurant, or went home, if homa
was not too far away.

Part of the suggestion, was that
the Police Band might’ play on
the Reef Grounds during the
luncheon period: or occasionally,
and the merchant said he saw no
harm in haying the band play
there on some occasions.
was no need, however, to scrap
the playing field idea at the Reef
Grounds.

Getting into conversation wit):
two city workers, the Advocate
put the suggestion to them. They
both agreed that if many people
wanted to eat their lunch in a
park or relax in ohne during the
luncheon period, Queen’s Park
would do just as well.

Queen's Park was more central,
it was more roomy,
were already henches there, along
with trees and gardéns there
giving a weicome snade, Princess
Alice Playing Field could be sup-
plied with benches too, and gar-
dens could be planted But it

@ On Page 7

There|y,

and there |

A few days ago certain vege-
table seeds were scarce. On Tues-
day a boat which was overdue
arrived with a full supply and
the Seed section of the Agricul-
tural Department again have all
the varieties the planters dernand,



SCRAP IRON LEAVES
TO-DAY

TWO HUNDRED tons of scrap
iron is expected to leave Barbados
to-day for Trinidad by the Nor-
wegian S.S. Essi. The scrap iron
vo be shipped to New
ork.

The Essi spent two days here
taking the load, which included
seven-ton factory roller.

INJURED

Ralph Alleyne of Roberts Ten-
entry, St. Michael, was detained
at the General Hospital yesterday
with a laceration to his left arm,
and injuries to his spine and head.

Alleyne was working at a build.
ing at Rickett Street, City, when
{@ portion of the roof fell in on him





The St. John Ambulance Brigade in
this island was founded by Capt. and
Mrs. Arthur Jones and «luring her stay
in this island Lady Bushe gave it her
support,

the management and now owns
the lands, He extends his :

Now that Seawell only com-
prised 30 acres, it had ceased to be
an economic plantation entity and
the Government should seriously
consider letting it to farmers as
indicated so long as its productiv-
ity was not diminished.

Only a few days ago he had read
in a labour paper vent to him by a
friend in England that bonus was
only deferred wages and was an
iniquitous form of payment. The

writer suggested that the workers! the evening — with
should be paid the wage the in-|
dustry could afford and not a de- when they work from 8
noon,

ferred wage.
Sound Argument

That argument, he said, was
sound, particularly for industrial
countries. In Barbados, conditions
were different and no one could
tell before hand what tonnage a
crop would yield or what condi-
tions would prevail . Perhaps, the
bonus system was the best for Bar-
bados, all circumstances consid-
ered,

As far as Christmas bonus was
concerned, it was really a gift
from the planter to the worker
and did not come under the argu-
ment between the sugar producers
and the union as did the percent-
age payable at the end of the
crop.

He said that the Government
had answered the point raised by
thS senior member for St. Philip
in the resolution which was given
notice of that day, and in taking
the action they had, were doing
the right thing.

Mr. Garner thanked the leader
of the House for his assurance and
said that he was not in the House
when the Addendum to the Reso-
lution was read. He said that it
was his intention to bring the mat-
ter to the notice of the House two
weeks ago, but unfortunately, he
was not in his place.

Xmas Bonus Expected

He tuanked the iast speaker for
stressing the point so very care-
fully and added that it was cus-
tomary for workers after putting
in a year’s work to loon for that
Christmas bonus.

Mr. A, Crawford (C) said
that he did not hear the entire de-
bate, but he hoped that the sugges-
tion had not been made that there
should be any reduction during the
year inthe wages of which should
accrue to workers as a result of the
price of, sugar, in order to give
them a bonus at Christmas time.
A Christmas bonus was a special
gift, a goodwill gesture which
most reasonable private employers
made to their employees at the
end of the year and had nothing
to do with the actual-wages which
an industry could afford.

Within the past few years, the
practice had grown up to pay
workers an increased wage, out of
any increase in the price of sugar,
and then at the end of the crop,
a bonus based on the actual es

roduction. It was claimed t
he workers liked that money at
the end of the crop. He was not
sure that was correct. The prac-
tice lent itself to a number of evils
and he thought it was better if the
workers were given the full wages
to which they were entitled dur-
ing the crop. For one thing, many
worked at more than one place
during crop and in many in-
stances, got no bonus from any
place.

Increases Unpaid

He was surprised that a Gov-
ernment plantation did not even
pay the 12%% and the 7%% in-
creases to its employees last year,
especially as those figures did not
really represent the total increase
in wages which the worker should
have received out of the price for
sugar.

The 5% which the sugar work-
ers had been clamouring for all
over the island at the end of last
year was not any Christmas bonus
they were demanding, but the re-
mainder of the wage which they
knew was due to them for last
year in consequence of the price of

sugar. They were still owed that
money.

The motion was eventually
withdrawn.



HELICOPTER CRASHFS

ROME, Feb. 7

An helicopter crashed on
the roof of a small
the town of Albano,
Rome, to-night

to
villa near
South of
shortly after

taking off on a publicity flight |
The pilot and one passenger were}

not injured.
Reuter,

at} road and some _ people

lA Look In At The

Govt. Spirit Bond

On his way down Cheapside, it
is most likely that one’s attentio<
will be attracted by a formidabl
facade to be found op the left anc
inset from the road. There stands
the Government Spirit Bond.

On entering the bond he see
first a number of posters tellin;
him “ne entry without permis-
sion” and then the strong smel
of rum, Only seven wyears. ago
he wotild have been induced t

enter by a butcher, or vegetable

and fruit seller who were ther
sheltered in the Public Market

No exterior changes have bee>
made to the Spirit Bond. Or
the inside, wire partitions have
been put up everywhere, dividin:
the extensive building into quit«
a number of compartments.

It is in these compartment:
that most of the rum for export
is being bottled. The process o
bottling is done by employees of
various firms in the island, bu‘
all under the supervision of thr
Government.

Hoiding compartments in the
bond are J. N. Goddard & Sons
Ltd., Martin Doorly & Co., Ltd.
Mount Gay Distilleries, D. V
Scott & Co., Ltd., Stansfeld Scott
& Co., Ltd., H. B. Kinch, Re
nown Manufacturing Co., Ltd
Hanschell Larsen & Co., Ltd.
Barbados Import & Export Co.
Ltd., The C. H. Kinch Co., Ltd.
and Alleyne Arthur & Co., Ltd

At Work

When the Advocate visited the
bond yesterday, only four of the
compartments were at work
While women were washing bot
tles, labelling ready filled bot
tles and packing them into car
tons, men were busy filling ou
the bottles.

The bottles were filled fron
vats, the rum having first to pas:
through a filter machine—whict
takes out the sediments and ther
through a filling machine,

The bond is very congtsted, I
accommodates 35 vats, whose
cupenies range between 1,50
gallons and 10,000 gallons; 2,30(
casks of rum and quite a numbe?
of cartons filled with bottlec
rum. In case the industry ex-
pands, more room will have t
be provided, d

Some of the casks of rum bave
been lying in the bond over three
years, The thickness of the dus
that has gathered on them is evi
dence to this.

Clerks working on the bonc
complain of heat and the absence
of adequate light. They have
to endure this from 8 o’clock in
the morning until 4 o'clock in
an hour’s
breakfast — except on Saturdays
until

Heat Attracted

The galvanised top of the
building supported by steel props
and girdles contribute to the
heat experienced by those who
work within its walls,

The bond carries five large
gables. In the middle gable,
are let in rectangular pieces of
glass which are used for filtering
through sunlight. The er

gables once carried similar pieces
of glass but these have been re-
placed by asbestos, The glass ee)

removed because it was found
out that more heat was concen-
trated in the building with their

presence,
Flowers, grass and bougain-
villea which have been planted

to the front by the Civic Circle
add a touch of beauty to the
building. Two palms are also
growing up in front of the. build-
ing. H



Newspaper Selling
Is A Paying Business

THE fast going newspaper
sellers about the City take well
to the idea that instead of just
saying “paper? *paper?” to the
passerby they might shout a few
of the headlines or just suffic ent
of an article to get the people
interested.

A newspaper seller told the
Advocate yesterday that he
thinks he will in future tell the
public such things as, “Twenty
thousand soldiers for Korea,” or
“Read of the old fisherman
whose boat overturned when he
was 30 miles out to sea!”

For some people in Barbados
newspaper selling is a paying
concern. The agents who sell the
most papers are usually men
with other jobs who live in a
district where the people are of
a reading turn of mind. A man
may be a_ Civil Servant for
instance and be able to make
more money through newspaper
selling than he gets as a salary.

There are paper agents all over
the island. At an early hour the
Advocate’s delivery van is on the
in §St
@ On Page 7



PAGE FIVE



Cadets

Inspect

H.M.S. Devonshire

The Government, water boat Ida took off 124 eadets from
Harrison College and Lodge {chool yesterday evening to
spend two hours sightseeing aboard the Devonshir2. ;

Sixty-four of the cacets wader the sweet smell of food struck

wecond Lt. Rudder were from
farrison College while the other

0 under Capt. McComie were
rom Lodge School,
As soon as the boys were

board, they were met by cadets
f the ship who conducted them
o all the principal parts of the
lip, all the whiie explaining the
urpose of each part,

The school cadets were

split up
1 small groups. While one group
vas taking a look at the 4-inch
runs, and another at the engine
Som, other groups were in the
cadets’ Chart Room, or the
o’c'sle where the Ship’s biggest
suns—f in. guns—sre mounted,
m the codets’ bridge, the ship's
widge or in the mess room where

SERRE REE ee eee
FRESH SUPPLY OF

their noses.
Good Exereise
The school cadets were com

tainly getting a good “exer iG
pulling themselves up and dowh
the steep and narrow iron steps
which led from one deck to an-

_ other,

&

At one point during the visit,
everyone of them was still. it
was when the buglers soun‘ed
“Sunset”. The school cadets
along with those of the ship's
compliment on board were at
“attention” and facing aft.-Some
gave the salute, -

Shortly after, most of the cadets
were again on the “J@a heading
for the Baggage Warehouse, The
others followed by a Jeunch,

= PURINA HEN CHOW £

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

at JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—~Distributors .
SER BEER REGRESS ee

Thrice
Armed eeese

Defy time with
Elizabeth Arden’s
triple beauty plan

CLEANSE with Ardena

Cleansing Cream

TONE with Ardena Skin
Tonic

NOURISH with Orange Skin

Food for the dry or average
skin,

Velva Cream for the young
or sensitive skin,

Begin to-day to find
beauty!

new



PHOENIX

KNIGHT'S

& CITY




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PHARMACIES.

GOP LPLELLAOL ALPE PPL PPL.



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and powder _—
im one! ay



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is foundation and powder all in one,
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EW! Stays on longer than powder !

The special “cling” ingredient fused into “Angel Face’ makes it
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Choose from five angelic shades: Blonde Angel, Ivory Angel, Pink

Angel, Tawny Ansel, Bronze Angel, At all the best beauty: counters.




























No wet sponge,

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Thinking of Travelling ?

Chester Barrie

Creator of Fashion in Coats and Suits

Coats

GEORGIAN COVERT Cloth
in plain shades, long and
short

PASHM cloth in plain
shades, long and short

CHECK TWEED COATS in
long and short styles



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street

The Answer is

Suits



In CHECK TWEED excel-
leat for those who plan to
travel to colder climates.

Pliin NAVY BLUE SUITS,

very smart in a lighter

material.
Se BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1951
iinet par,’ !

HENRY BR eRSON eee

Se cee ee ee ee


















IF YOU—
_ FEEL LIKE

THIS —
TAKE

WINCARNIS

TONIC WINE

AND FEEL COUGH
LIKE THIS! LOZENGES

the makers of the famous Subies Cough /Aixtore

BE HEALTHY «= |=]

says

& HAPPY. eaahipangaad

ooking it is
80 EASY
1 can Cook Perfectly with it

a ete a



What can | do?
My throat is sore with this cough, cough,
cough, all the time...





THERE ARE TIMES WHEN 1 FEEL &
LITTLE OUT OF PLACE... OUT

HERE IN THE -
SUNGLE !



What a difference!
Zubes eased my cough and scothed
my throat in no time!

: S
ss fb
Cael
eP
= Rien
© fe

WE HAVE MARMALADE
TOO.-- OR YOU CAN HAVE
STRAWBERRY OP
RASPBERRY JAM









Ne anne ea acca cnnn cnc a SS J








Our Valentine to you

Good Foods

SPECIAL Pkgs. POTATO CRISPIES 6%. per Pkg.

p

YOU WEAR THESE CLOTHES AND THE
MASK, RIDE SILVER. LET THE LAW
JAILYOU SO I'LL BE FREE TO ACT!
| HAVE A PLAN/





































































Pickles & Sauces Cereals
Morton’s Mi
ortan’s a $ 56 Quaker Corn Flakes .29
3 » Chow Chow 53 Quaker Puffed
3 Wheat .37
» Picealilli ....... 53 :
“a Heinz Stuffed ~ | Shredded Wheat .... .39
ee Olives 1.66 ee "
= , Z elloggs Corn
a » Plain Olives 1.00
; BY GEORGE MC. MANUS Tomato Ketchup ="
~ —51, 42, 45, Quaker Oats ............ woe
; : - - C.&B.Salad Cream, 43 isabel Sve ss. 47
: Serene se, | eae aes Lea & Perrins Wer. é
TURN ON THE WESTERN! IF WESTERN SERIAL YOU SLAPPED ME Sauce .77 .47 Breakfast Food ..... .86
MGS Faso cast | eee, naam 8 f
“y xtracts
Condiments

Bovril ........ $1.60; .60 .49

Bonox (Beef Ex-
tract) .70, .40
Marmite........ -97, 60, .32





Morton’s Curry ........ AT
Morton’s Ground
| Spice .41
Madras Curry .......... 16
Bisto (for Gravies) .33
SS
Seto Blk. Pepper (Gnd.)
ri ev a Per OZ occ 27
Alu seeking cure
WIFREO SD Household
ee ema, ae
Prone - Requisites :
Limacol ..0.cccccesscseesee 81 Ovaltine &
Phillips Magnesia Milk Foods
| —.90; 46

























Eno’s Fruit Salts Ovaltine .......... $1.24 .73
2 1 = $1.00 .58 OUD | iivecmisisibansananias 2.21
al S ess Life Guard (Inseeti- Vitacup oo. cccccccn 13
PD hE ed a). ccc 72 42 Bair i a.
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES OP to sone Ie MAO Seren se $1.07 .62
HATE eo WANT T. a Mh RIB VOA HERE





GET RID OF ME+* LET HER KNOW YET« + Food).......$1.24 .69

3-in-one Qil .............. 28


















Liqueurs, Wines














MEAT DEPT. Ete
PRIME AUST. BEEF In Drambuie seseenie mn
ROAST, STEAK, STEW, |. Grand Marnier... 7.50
CANADIAN SALMON : |:: .: Chambertin (1943) 4.00
pacen ri Chateauneuf Du cai
SALAMI SAUSAGE FARE. secs a
—per Ib $1.00 Sparkling Bur-
APPLES gundy 4.00
—per case $10.00 Graves’ White Wine
| —per Ib 30c. (1943) 2.88
THE THREE WHO ESCAPED WITH Sanernys ay Sic

DIANA ARE ALL 'LIFERG's PART OF ; 3 | é “ , ‘
‘THE GRAY GANG. THEY ROBBED A cS Ls eee é
BANK OF THREE MILLION+«




THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.|Newspaper

TELEPHONE 2508

FOR SALE FOR RENT

BARBADOS, ADVOCATE

HOLLOWED OUT HEELS USED
oe a

PAGE SEVEN













BY SMUGGLER.

‘SHIPPING NOTICES -

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW}}
| ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED |
(M.A.N.Z. LINE) |
















Selling abby hes

zg Cargo & Pas



From page 5. “"TONGARIRO” is me gers. al









nn ee ee


















































es scheduled t e : =
ydels e waar 24th for Do Anti 3, Montser-
AUTOMOTIVE HOUSES aieer mer gare a, Deer before arun. Semel hese rot, Nevis & St. Kilts, Sailing
: HOUSES — “Ha = _ n St. Michael. Setbuary Wied, Art Saturday 10th i
CAR—Studebaker 1947 Model, in ex- ‘Harmony Cottage”, St.
Suet gonetien panics, $2:650,06 Appiy Se ; me. Gate ee Fewest In St. Andrew Seeil tine oe . The M.V. “Daevwood wilh at- ~
Racer eae ee 2251—4n,|_. The most papers are sold int |¥rozen and General ez cept Cargo and Passengers for St. 4
ee —s+—— | STEWARTVNLE-S bedrooms” Deaw a. Michaet andthe least in St 1 Gare? accepted Bills of Lucia, Grenada, & Anibe sod Bas- i
—& Cylinder, 1949 Vauxhall (Velox) | ing and Dining R rooms, Draw-| Andrew. Christ Church and St. for British Guiar Windwar iS goat een 3
in excellent condition. Dia! 2000 or 4730. =: Serveank’ Hicomn, ieutie’ Gace Philip come after St, Michael, ek Seward Islands. sie kde ’ x 4
-2.51—3n. | Phone 3904. * g2s51-an| followed by St. John. In St dias Ville Mabdions B.W.I_ SCHOONER OWN- ‘
ELECTRICAL Lucy much more are not sold FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD. __ and ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc. 4
PUBLIC than in St. Andrew. | " “Da COSTA & CO. LTD., Telephone: 46 . ‘ 3
ELECTRIC STOVE—In perfect order SALES For many sellers, newspaper Trinidad, Barbados, elephone: 4047 ;
Phone 8122. C25t a | | Selling is a side issue, but for at BW 4
~caatnsid ales iibeiet ‘ CT some it is an all day job. One ii
PRESS wee ae DRILL ihe hiss of the oldest sellers in the busi- — oi pene cai 3
Aer MK a ee ee ee prill offer for sale on FRIDAY oth. | Hess is Mary Mayers, the only a }
Geddes Grant Ltd. 1.2.51—6n. | Garage ‘FORD vib STATION WAGOGN 1995 st td ar Pfaonse yp onee — , / ;
‘- ————-.— | recently reconditioned. New 7 she used to sell along with 4
with Tower, As peak te eee plete | TERMS CASH. yFes-}a man called James Cozier, 4
Cole's Galeus. Pimieane. 63 Apoly ois eet ARCHER McKENZIE, known to race ticket sellers ana
: . 4.2.51—4n. men about town as “Wicked”. | Inc. Shae
ince 1934 when Cozier died, she; . :
FURAN LURE REAL ESTATE launched out on her own. She | Be ae giraia NEW YORK SERVICE a
renner ngs i ; * * sails 1€¢ Jan —-ertriv cen
Soe Cd has grey hair but is as active as $ ss. “ ” Sik aeaneees errives Barbados 4th February’
Pe sa ec ge ly ae Mev Bedroomed tee Bathsheba — Three (3)|ever. She is a short laughing! aa : 26. _Bytiord™ sails Sha February; — , Mth {
crawers, Book Shelf, used set of Clubs | Sq. Feet ungalow, standing on 14,919 Ss ito { ; a . F A " ¥ “ie ~
and several miscellaneous | Household Offer of stling fe . a week ~ eens meen hg . Y
articles also Kid Toys. in lor the same, a week at newspaper selling. . ve . anes a ~
es $351—In Lyahner tae C. FIELD C/o — rr Mary boasts she can fee up with u ED STATES ORNEY FRANK J, PARKER indicates the hollowed out heels with which ser A Steamer sails wk eee Basen to 2nd = “Sef
tile Ltd. up to 4 p.m, 28th | any man now in the business and Weitman (Right) sought to smuggle into the United States more than 250 industrial diamonds worth ” ” ‘. lst February — a i 16th Se
POULTRY 8.2,51—6n | the men respect her $280,000 in the open market and $500,000 in the Black Market. Assistant Attorney George W. Percy, Jnr., NE See a ra ;
HOUSE—One Th , looks on. Weitman was suspected by customs officials as a result of his “sort of glassy eyes” and “shift- CANADIAN SERVICE . *
house Te one new, Board and shingle @ man who has been selling f his head” SOUTHBOUND = fm
aor Pere eae breeding con- | easy to ade x aa nee with serews,|mnewspapers longest is Arthur ing ©: e Express. 5 ae
Thorpen, M6. derek Le ake es La Be thie, ehae ae Seaare bias sells in ‘Trafalgar me ue Name of Ship Sats Arrives “Wal, TY
he ‘ciation nie nipie nc uare an eeps his papers on sf ° - “Ate ‘ Halifax Rarbades ~~ «>
HOUSE—(1) 8 x 14. In good condi bo: . Prince. Al $e CALCOA ESLGRIN™ Januany * 26th, : i
" ition. |@ box. Connell knew Ss tce “ALO ” eral Febrviareain
LIVES10CK relbeaen a Hew Go maemae [old “aays when there were’ no] LOC e€ arhpour LOS | ts :ce wee on tomer SOE



Pebruary 23r.



reesei ation E March “ties
CALVES—Ten - day old Heller Calves. 6.2.51—%m. | agents all over the island. Then, ~ 5

Playfield In Touch With Barbados








































































Cherries $1,32 Ib,, Metz Fruits $2.40 box,
Glove Boxes
KNIGHT'S LTD,

Alb purposes)



e : e
Apply: Bulkeley Ltd., , “DU r instead of his i 5 t. I , > a, |
“od Pan: sa51—00. Oe ais ROAD. ‘sr, MICHAEL. | a day as he acne is ee to ure 9 irm @ From page 5 Cab! Coas tal Station Cee semeeememmetony ce “|
lence lately occupied by Mrs. | sell about 200, f 1 ‘able and Wireless (West Indies\ Ltd ROB :
W. 0. Collymore. . ut 200, for everybody who would take years before that ficld *lVise that they can now o = ERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Servic .
MISCELLANEOUS The house stands in well kept gardens | W@nted papers used to come to LONDON, Feb.7. | could) be “made as shady as Wit the following shina. ‘avon ehare Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Canadian ¥.. ae t
oes and grounds (2 acres 37 perches). town to get them. Then there/ With operators awaiting the! O.Wcen’s Park is Barhados Coast Station: te Re |
canes, vegetable ands Gomer Gavtens $00 ing and. date oe 3 aaaeeians iplgl altel ap osric Ti cia suet items wi paalnens on| “Where the Band is concerned, 88. auree s. SG af Fe — i a
per lb. from H. Keith Archer's Drug| With marble bath, 2° showers, 2 lava- alisation, business in} the workers again expressed the Gounares, S'S. Makiki, $8. Dolores, ‘89, |) > >> == een
E i a. Fe 4 a SS re : ~ Mi i, S.S.. Dolores, S.S :
Store, Coleridge Street. Phone 2000, | lorles, convenient kitchen and pantry, Waiting For The Train wrote a irae Byc sion Uap view that Queen’s Park was more fom ites gS S. Lady eae ee coe
Jaieceeicee htt aes : ae s : a > &.8. egon - = r
Gas wee Gon alee ened oe garage for 2 cars,|_ Connell remembers waiting for | };"late, Nevertheless, quiet firm- suitable for the luncheon park Stove, MV. Bresle, SS, Einwress nt Sane PASSAGES TO EUROPE i.
shipment in bulk. Get yours now 1/6] Water supply for garden and grounds the men who had just come off ness wee Patel rhe ; idea. Even the’ band stand is land, 8.S, Alcoa Clipper, $8 Cheat, wr
per lb. Knight's Ltd., all Branches. from ©, well with mill: water service in {the train and getting many sales. is was fairly widespread. already there, Matars $. Luganu, SS. Maure- . eit h
-2.51—2n. | hou 1 and. alan servants rooms (shower In those Gays all his papers would) pritisn Government Funds im Two sellers of light refresh- { coune, $8 Mormacdove, Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia,, for sail- {- 4
‘ is S - iat _narta na ale aia’ @ « . btus, §.S .
wee In Porcelain Enamel, in{ The residence completely wired and sold by 10 o'clock. Now that proved 1/16 to % and there were ments in carts were also inter- 8.8, Rio Orinoco, $.8, Ciudad De ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or... |) ~ .»

. n, Primrose with matching} furnished with electric lighting from more people share in the gains, i eee tats tri viewed. They had no particular 5.5. Francesco Morosini, 8.8. Loide Rotterd. Singh ‘ y “ts
units to complete colour suites. Top| the company's mains, he takes much longer to sell out.}™@ny small gains in indus rials. | ideas for or against the idea. Their “8: Fort Amherst, SS. Alcoa Co am, Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. »« .}h» grade. A. & Co., Ltd, House convertible into flats and out-| He can sell more Evening], Textiles were hesitant while! view was the business point of Spichael, SS. Monte Everest ea
eile ek Lae 26.1.51—t.f.n. ed ee ae ints a cottage;papers than Daily He thinks irons and steels remained steady. view. If the idea was wer into aoe Snietae Tomoge a : ‘

ee 5 . : ? = 4 : 2 o Me - § S oO O sc m a v7
{CHILDREN'S WARM CARDIGANS—| ment or kitchen uitaple _ for develop-|that this is accounted for by the Dullness in international ror! practice and people caught on to Tacitio, SS Fredrika, #e QESSSTSSSSSSSSSSSSGGSSS, wi
od Fang colours aio White $1.67 each.| The | undersigned will offer _ the | Sense of “Hot news,” the Evening| reflected overnight Wall Street ad-! jt and began to frequent the Reef S. Tartar, $.S, Perla, 8.8, Rio | X ‘4 % te ea ae Tee . ;
: et Rete Oho Nee er ei gunue auction at | creates. Mr. Husbands of the| Vices and there was a lower trend! Grounds for the luncheon purpose, gona JTree, 8.8. Fiador % NOTICE a [0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH }
DRESS FORM—One (1) Adjustable] town, on’ Friday’ the ‘gar’ Qid#e; | Advocate Circulation Department to oil shares. Burmese, however,} naturally the sellers of light re- dam, Emilia, Ce bee $
Dress Form. Size A. (small), — Apply| February 1951 at 2 p.m, ay flcaid that the Evening paper is| were resistant, following favour-! freshments would go down in Amu, SS. Gervais, Monte Altube WEST INDIAN KNITTING %} apes *
Hamilton, Merry Hill, Welches, | St-| | Inspection on Tuesdays and Thurs- | growing steadily in the public’s} able press reference. force, 8.8, Elise, S.S, S. Velino, SS. Wallowa, x MILLS LTD S|
6.2.51—8n/ days only between 3 and § p.m. favour.” ¥ iki ree ee > a ; 2/8) HAIR CLIPPING we }
; r particulars ly t eace treaty hopes r s - | ;
a Pay SRE Tg] COMME, ERRORS AMCO."" aera aso" sell race tiekets, Fo] sible for the useful ‘advances in MAIL NOTICES. |% * wnavvina’twist” § mee A wed
Apricots $2.16 Ib., Green Gages $2.16 lb., “0251 —-i0n. be out and out sellers,” they said, |Japanese bonds and there was Nos: 0; 00; 009 > iy
$

TRAIN CRASH
asstd. Fruit Unlike most of the other sellers,|Some speculative support for Ger-| * " Also —

$2.76 box. Mails for St. Lucia by the M.V. Lady

man potash loans. @ From Page 1 Joy will be closed at the General Post Orders for 1951 Require-

LAMP SHADE PLASTIC















The undersigned will offer f
8.2.51—2n. | public competition at hair bon, = bythe olé man in the job, Connell,







Â¥
on y : Office as under:~— its will be epted B
larson High Street, on Thursday th does not think that shouting the . b 4 5 P. ments Ww ageep up y the Yard
GALVANISED PIPE in the foll y the 8th day} ( : ; a bounce and then there was a ter- arcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered M
sizes: %in., Yain., % in, Ting 1 ins, ae Ee 1951, at 2 p.m, the dwelling.| “On the spot news” will get the} Early falls in minings on re) i¥)6 noise.” ond Ordinary Mail ‘at i218 pm on the R We SO Pevensey, S00). at

2ins., 2% ins., 3ins. and 4 ins. Also fit-

newed profit-taking attracted fresh
tings. Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

support. Many losses were re-
covered and the section closed
slenderly firm,.—Reuter,

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

paper sold any better. He thinks

bi with 7,444 square feet of that a buyer comes to town quite

afalgar Street, Phone 2096.) '| St The ‘arisen, containing pind situate! decided whether or not he will

2 public rooms, 2 bedrooms, toilet, bath,| buy a paper. :

LADIES' TEE SHIRTS — In_ white kitchen, etc. Garage, servants rooms and
and assorted colours $1.42 each, Mo- [enclosed garden.

aern Dress Shoppe. 3.2.51—6n. | The sale may be made with or with-

out the furniture,
LADIES’ PLASTIC APRONS 87c. each | Vacant possession will be given.
Modern Dress Shoppe. 3.2.51.

—6n. Further particulars from
LADIES’ and Children’s Handker-

Mh February 195}, %,

THE BOWER Irving E. Teeple, a New Jersey
lawyer said the driver had tried
to “hold the train down”.

“He was trying to stop her” he
said, “I heard him throw the
air brakes three times, as
came down the grading and
to the temporary tracks,” i,

A Pennsylvanian detective said s 5. Defeaner: ir ta eee iy the
the train was moving at top speed, General Post Office as underi—

Some passengers on board . also eee at at 12 (noon), Registered
said that the train was going faster }(3)' °t |.) Ram. and Ordinary Mail at

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
AND HARDWARE,

Communicate P.O. Box 231

he Py
Mails for Dominica, Antigu: ~| 8
ntigua, Mont- | ¥ or call 3679

arorat Nevis and St. Kitts by the M.v.|%
Caribbee will be closed at the Geners ,
Post Office as under:— ae
Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Registered
she Mail at 3 p.m, and Ordinary Mail at
on 4 Pm. on the Sth February. 191,












%
»
> |
%
Â¥!
y
\

X |
%|
|
x!
9 |
4
oe

STOPPING THE TIDE

True old saying, “YOU cant
stop the tide,” however good»
your intention, WE find that
as much as we would Tike to









COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.

ebiefs 17c. each. Modern Dress Shoppe. he ee eee
3.2.51—6n, The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office No. 17 High Street, Bridge-

INVITATION FOR TENDER
Department of Highways and Transport

FOR SALE

OFFERS will be received




























‘LADIES’ COATS for the cool eve- | town, on Friday the 16th February 1951 at SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Colonial Secretary’s | than the driver estimated. An in- 2.30 pm. POWAY, eth Mebruany 195t; by the undersigned up to the keep our prices stapieag a
an ae on re ethene cls en cena dwelling house | Office up to noon on the 28th February, 1951, for the supply of Bar-.| vestigation has been ordered, Mails for St. Lucia, Donsinica, Mont- 16th day of February for the he ih inc verte f eee "
Shoppe, | formerly, nown 25 rullyera now call | bados Limestone, Marl Filling and Earth Filling to the Department of Reuter. Sinton ang, John MB. be the Raemi fh Cee als buildings, Cand not . aviee somes at ae ntace: 4h
—WIPPLES—We have a fresh supply of bias Page cin by estimation 1a, e Highways and Transport for a period of twelve (12) months from the BIG 4 MAY MEET Lady Rodney’ iwi be “closed ae included, wee pone oe sider: Se
Davol Anticolic Nipples in stock. price ville Avenue, Worthing, Christ Chureh,| 1st April, 1951, ~ Pesuel fail at's tm. ontath oth Streets and Bolton Lane, Supr. bay Rum still .
tro Matias | tastucn lene ee ence nas 2, A separate tender for each division tendered for should be IN PARIS February (1051. Registered Matt and |}J sections of which are at pres- No. 3 bay Rum still .
between 4 and 8 pm on application to | submitted in respect of each or any of the following divisions: ~ PARIS, Feb. 7. Degiasey Fest Sh 10-20) ain em Sem, goth ent occupied by W. A. Med- Limolene Highergrad

—
PRETTY WHITE VELVET EVENING | Mrs, Talma on the premises,

ivision—-Parishes of St. Lucy and St, Peter.| Deputies of the Big Four For- ee ford & Co,,.The Manhattan Menthola
Shoppe eee sien. foes tb) ethics Danimadentae ot cri Church. St. Philip | ei# Ministers will pro ably meet . Mails for St. Lacia, Martinique, Guade-|j) Club, and Until quite recent- yey So Mou g
dn sin leanne fF OTTLE, , Ch) Ronyharn: Data r rl shoftly in Paris to discuss the eupey A mtiguay United) Kingdom vane ly» by the Bridgetown Jce yr cen i
RAZOR — SHAVE IN COMFORT by yO aon, : and St. John Agenda for. the’ meeting of the Zane? RY int® dehoral part ome as |{} Company, Purchaser to de- i
Baeeae eae bet athe aot COLLINS D 8.251—12n.) (c) Eastern Division—Parishes of St. Andrew and St, Joseph | Foreign Ministry of Russia, France, under: : ' molish the buildings and Pinealana Goes 2 cs

clear the land within sixty
days from date of purchase,

EVELYN ROACH & CO,,

(d) Western Division—Parishes of St. Michael, St. George,
St. Thomas and St. James.
3. A tenderer under paragraph 2 may also submit a separate

Parcel Mail &t 3 p.m, on the 15th
February 1951. Registered Mail at 1.30
p.m, and Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m, on
the 16th February 1951.

Great Britain and the United
States, a spokesman of the French
Foreign Office said here today.

8.2.51—2n 3 3 oz
Cologne 3 oz. ..

In-spite of the increases-our--

acai rset tec eteiaerentieine
DRUG STORE. BAGATI RENT, SALE OR LEASE

TELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-

SHEET TIN—Just received heavy. {stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din-

Quality Size 28 x 20. JOHN D. TAYLOR | ing room, Breakfast room and Kitchen-

vaeed ve ’
«94,













& SONS Ltd. 8.2.51—2n | ette $ bedrooms running water in each,| tender for any combination of Divisions tendered for under paragraph 4 LTD, he oa are still best value
Salers Linivncoora eee Closee | > on the basis of paragraph 6, except that for the final words “on spot a PRS Rickett Street, o-day. te
PUBLIC NOTICES ge er ae anes me and | anywhere within the Division” read “on spot anywhere within the Resto re Yo uthful Vi our 3.2.51—t.f.n, On sale at all good staves.
. ec! 8! an ‘elephone. | _,, * Hato ” |
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation, combined Division. ¢ = \
St, Thomas Dial 2221. arate ‘









“ 21.1,51.—6n. 4. Samples of limestone of the quality required may be seen, and
£25 order for private Christmas Cards} MARWIN—Maxwell’s Road. Modern particulars of quantity and size likely to be required, may be obtained,
from your friends. 5 peeve Bee phoa A Bungalow, 3 Bedrooms,|on application at the Department of Highways and Transport.

ence necessary. r ‘awing and Dini Room Breakfast i

beautiful free sample Book to Britain's} Room and Kitchenette, Toilet and ‘Bath, 5. Tenders are to be made on forms which can be obtained at the
leresat and foremost SuTaisinee: ae Servants’ Room, Garage in ward, Water | Colonial Secretary’s Office on payment of a deposit of Five Dollars
commission; marvellous mo 8} and ectric Light installed. A - i

opportunity, Jones, Williams & Co.,|imately 14,000 ta tt. of land. Apply: | (9-00). After a contract has been entered into, those persons who
Devt, a Victoria’ Works, Preston,|—, H. Farmer, Andrews Plantation or|may have submitted bona fide tenders will have their deposits re-
eis 25.1.51—18n ae See 4.2.51—6n. | funded; but no person or persons who may refuse to enter into a con-

-. -d. easily earned by obtaining

We have -- ;
CHARCOAL HOX IRONS DELUX!

Call and see them,

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

To Glands in 24 Hours

New Discovery Brings Pleasures
of Life to Men Who Feel Old
Before Their Time © "%,;







NT

ENTERPRISE—An adjoining Property | tract when so called upon shall have the deposits made by them re-
nor, crane eee eles funded, and these shall be forfeited and paid into the Treasury.
with nice Mahogany trees to be sold 6. The prices tendered must be based on the payment of wages
to ony one who, has, relatives;o ‘g|at current standard rates in the trade, and shall be the flat rates per
desirous of ‘buying for cash. To be sold] cubic yard at which the tenderer would contract to supply materials
in the U.S. America, ithin the Divisi

Apply to G. Holder, Enterprise, Christ | OM spot anywhere within the Division.

Church Gap, Attorney for the Estate
for full information, €.2.51—6n.

ne EEEEEERnE

NOTICE
Re ESTATE OF

SAMUEL HENRY HOWARD STREAT
Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all per-




7.2,.50—2n.







Do you feel older than you are? Are you
lacking in youthful animation? Do you
enjoy the eeeey, of beautiful women? Do
you suffer from loss of vigour, weak mem-
ory and body, nervousness, impure blood,
sickly skin, depression and poor sleep? In
other words, are You only half a man?

our body is itallzed and exhaust-
ed re is no need for you to suffer an-
other ony from such physical snterigrity.
because the discovery of an eminent physi-
clan now makes it possible for you to re-
store your youthful vigour and animation.





CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.— Proprietors,
Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets,








“WORTHY DOWN" — Situated at Top $ ye

| JOHN M. BLADON
|
























outht
endously active glands. body, Yvery one needs @ treatment such
as Vi-Tabs at some time in his life, some
sooner than others—but no one will make
test when In need o help to teed yopihe
ful animation.” 27 ere

——
$12.00 per case of
48x14 oz. tins

Milk-Condensed sessors of tre

‘An eminent physician, with more than
30 years of experience, has at last
fected a combination of ingredients
work with amazing speed to build
rich red blood, strengthen the nerves, and

REAL ESTATE AGENT -—- AUCTIONEER — SURVEYOR...
’Phone 4640 — Plantations’ Building. WS Aas

the 28th day of March 1961, after which | further’ particulars etc. Ring ae
ae in



sont paving ny y Gebt or glam upon oF mick cokauiae 13 beaieees wie. acme Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend~- Youthful Vigor Restored A AFS, F.V.A.
Howard Streat, late of Bloomsbury | necting toilets and showers, large lounge, | ment) Order, 1951, No, 3 which will be published in the Official Ga- rene, Depaltieg of advancing S Bow be she Youthful
plantation in the parish of Sait’ ‘jun day | front’ belooky, and Breakfast balcony, |2ette of Thursday 8th February. 1951. traed nod pounbtul ot? circuses mae | ee nt FOR
who in s and on ron » @ ‘ei a. y* " = ‘ ion restore o yo 0!
of January 1951 are hereby required to] 2-car garage, 2 servants’ rooms with 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling | new gland discovery, es ”
send in particulars of their claims, duly | tcilet and showers also laundry, The 4 “Milk Cond a” s follows :— Doctors throw hous the were how say aplival e
attested, to the oot ie srounds a ae rire ee tis gar- | prices of ilk-Condense! are a y tha She peat ot i Pe ere ot pu es wees ne |
Oswald Hamilton Harding, Oswa -| dens well laid out etc. Vi on { mi ho have ‘omen '
ard Streat and Milton Seale, the quali-| Murch Iet, 100 structed WHOLESALE PRICE| RETAIL PRICE been Roted for strength, enduraniet, bray A
w e dectas- above property is well construc in-power, and accom ment,
oe" tent or Cottle Catford & Co., No-| in ia-ineh aenk, with an Everite roof. ARTICLE (not more than) (not more than) ou ae arean: Caesar, STore Anthony, onresing. the glands, and thus tenas to re- |
17 High Street, Bridgetown, on or 42fore | Best offer above £4,000 will be accepted, rece ek, and Victor Hugo, were the fortunate pos- | store vigour and vitality to the |

date we shall proceed to distribute the 27Cc, per 14 oz. tin
assets’ of the said estate among the par-
ties entitled thereto, having regard to
the debts and claims only of which xi

er~
hat
new



a mistake in puttin



ee EIR REE menace” ang

7th February, 1951. 8.2.51.—2n.



OPED



PPP PPLE PEPL ASS

LOosT



h notice, most important of all, to activate, stimu- a = Wt: x
a oetaiail aot Ue jhable Sia 5 GI no acaenepeilieanietennatinath late, ssh fortify the’ glands. This great 24-Hour Results **’ 4
distributed to any person of whose debt] “TEATHER WALLET—Stamped R. J.P ITAL prescription, therefore, acts in a nett) era ee act directly: Unen id at aulate ,
= . u 0) "

or claim we shall not have had notice! incide, Reward. Phone Pearson — 2759. BARBADOS GENERAL HOSP. ee to men ‘whose weands have grown | the glands, there a ae lone wening: ne %&
at the time of such distribution. 7.2.51—1n, old too soon. This discovery, known ag) results, Within 24 hours most men report 8

‘And all persons indebted to the said} 20 MAKING OF NURSES’ UNIFORMS Vi-Tabs, is in pleasant, easy-to-take, tab- | u surprising increase in vitality, and with. | %&
estate are requested to settle their ac- SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—Series Q.6607 let form, and may be used secretly if you in one week's time most users find that .

Sealed tenders will be received at the Hospital up to 12 o'clock
noon on Wednesday, 14th February, 1951, for making 90 Uniforms
for Nurses within a period of 2 months from the date of acceptance

they feel and look ten years younger, The Ke

counts without delay. change ip some men is alin

Dated the 28rd day of January 1951.
Gordon /Oswald Hamilton Harding,
Oswald Howard Streat,

and 6608. Finder please return same to
E. O. Savoury, St, Barnabas, St. Michael.
Reward offered. 7.2.51—In.

ire, so that you can amaze your
$riends in @ short time with the restora-
fion of your vigour and vitality

Doctor Praises Vi-Tabs

miraculous.
Results Guaranteed ~ %




































Bo outstanding have been the results > \ \ Oe
Hilton Seale ONE (1) “EBORA” TRAVELLING | of tender Dr. N. G. Giannini, well-known surgeon | produced ie for weak and pre- | {s ABS
lifed execttors of the will of Samuel] clock, Square Brown Leather Case. : : ‘Fecal ysi- | maturely old men in all be wo ‘ \
Beary Howard Streat, d Shae Either at Hospital or eee ee Persons tendering may offer to make the whole or part of the clan, ‘recontly. ated that iit Is how offered nder ‘tn he World % ISS \
jo Bo DEES * . ie . iti ij e scien * Bi AO! nm \)
tihinds ee eee ie 8.2.51—2n quantities of garments required, and contracts may be awarded to pe eaeamnase> the "opinion that the fost. Under this written arentes ot Vie x , Nh
rn. persons tendering for making the whole or part of the quantities of Gry) true secret of youthful | Tabs from your chemis' today. ee for ,
A Dy 4 eens and vitality lies | yourself the new strength and vitality that % N
° oe al § le WANTED garments for which they tender. ti the glands, Bases on will be coursing through your body. Bee % f
Public Offici aie Persons tendering must have the statement on the tender form Py perience, , at dy" and | of lie and how Youu are able to enjoy them x ; :
j i i f iri ice, - » At r any ri
(The Provost Marshal's Act 1004 signed by two other persons known to possess property, expressing on that, the medical | do not agree that Vi-Tobs is easily worth | St a a
(1904-6) § 30). ees HELP their willingness to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of fonmile known, 85 ie | ten one e he small cost, merely return |X \
On Friday the 28 Phe k in the the contract. most modern and scien- | price will be refunded without question or - t ae
1951 at the hour of 2 o'cloc MAID—Reliable resident Maid or ‘ : tific internal method of | argument. Get Vi-Tabs from your chemist > f
afternoon will be ig _ at my Lr couple. References Phone Ibberson 3566 Specimens of the garments may be seen, and tender forms will tiimuluting and invig-\togay. The guarautee protects you. % By
ivi sd rage between 8.90 aim. and4pm. | | be supplied, on application to the Secretary, and tenders will not abe ~ Guaranfe ed » To Restore ¥
“All that certain of Land con- _ be entertained except they are on the forms supplied by the Hospital. Rif cae Manhood, Vitality | >
tanning about tw situate r “ one wvadll, *
in the Parish of Saint 1, butting ‘MISCELLANEOUS 7.2,51.—3n, ” x rt
and bounding on lands late of Fred xg
but now O. Emtage & Co. ; $
tid. late of Cl TAdotphas, Forde || TRAVEL FACILITIES TO THE UNITED KINGDOM Bre WISE... $
but now me = oe ge A a iia oe eae cleaning ot y torisas The Secretary of State for the Colonies has reported that there og ; >
Poad, appraised as follows:— CMA retion of off Seiatings valuation for in |is a possibility of arrangements being made whereby the Australian LA We re Not Magicians, 2.
Right enarea aad porty “Six dollars | Upper Bay’ St. 22.51.-7n,| Emigrant ship “ASTURIAS”, may call for passengers at Jamaica and A DVERTISE s-"
(go48.00)." Attached | from Coleridge | “we BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and | Trinidad in May on her way to the United Kingdom. Such a service) * * ° For Mellow Smoothness butsasn %
Beresfor eld for an | silver jewellery, coins, dentures, ete ,| will only be possible if a sufficiently large number of persons from <= Se ~~
fection, &c. . ite, call Dial ORRINGES, ; oh 4d pe ‘eg our, Tee
“TB -25% Deposit to be paid on day| Antique Shop, adjoining Royal GES: |the West Indies signify their willingness to take advantage of the ORIENT AL and distinctive flavour, . . with the vast resources of Ford of Dagenham x
. * oa A ; : ashe ‘
ef purchase. 7. HEADLEY, Club. 3.2.51.—7n. | opportunity, which is intended to provide travel facilities to the United s There is no rum that com- behind us, we can produce most Genuine Ford %
Provost Marshal, “WE BUY FOR CASH-—Clocks, watches | Kingdom for bona fide visitors, and not for persons seeking employ- Goon :
3.2.51—3n.| and musical boxes in any condition ; r . t spares either on the spot or at very short notice.
Write, call or dial 4429, GORRINGES An-| nent there. pares with... *. . : : 4
fique’Shop, Upper Bay Street, | 2. Tentative fares proposed are £70—2£80 from Jamaica and From eer CHIN. What's more, these spares arc available to you ;
R oh | £65—£70 from Trinidad. i : S S 5 ‘ ‘ ed, Th ~~ -4
E SONAL INES—Trw i . : | 8 at low fixed prices and are fully guaranteed. ie Dmg
P ond Police Magazines Spring ‘we end 8. It is empheaized that no. updestating ‘whatever gan be given eel pe I ee, Toat= & 3 finest Service Facilities in this district are at your =|. % 4
whatever yor eave. to Stanway store: that return passages to the West Indies will be.available later in the Lt sys? ve aah, Soest Per- x winmagh ities ; e S a ;
vacas Street. le }.2.51—3n. ood ’ te
The public are hereby warned against 6.2-51—3n. | year. As an early reply must be sent to the Secretary of State, per- duane, Barbados Scarves in STUART & SAMPSON x Pia i ry
giving | Set ee wuss ree ee Rin ee! Seen, nike, sons who, bearing in mind that they may find considerable difficulty Pure Silk, Etc., Etc., Ete. 1% 2 “Mend
not hold myself responsible for her oF | houcekeeping. ‘Phone Tbbersen 3568 from {iN Securing passages back to the West Indies in the Autumn, are de- The Souvenir Headquarters LTD \% a ;
anyone else contracting any or] 8.30 am. to 4 p.m, 8.2.51—1 i ili i i j i o y ‘
arene, ee eaereee oe talon 0 n- | sirous of availing themselves of this opportunity are invited to com THANI Kiros. . | $ 1 ‘ 1 LED 4
order signed by me. WANTED TO LEASE municate on or before February 17th wit hthe Acting Harbour & KASHMERE 1% j | ¢ Vi j e i . .
NATHAN YEARWOOD, , HOUSE-Easy reach Bridgetown, elec-| Shipping Master from whom turther details may be obtained Pr, Wm. Henry St.—Dial 5466 Headquarters for Best Rum. ||| % : na Be 3
King Street. | tricity, some land or large garden.; $ . : : Ls ma
8.2.51—% | Phone 3249. 8,2.51—2n j 4.2.51.—2n. Na Vesely tp PLEO EEA APPA









rene Sl maces a
a
a

this week.

PAGE EIGHT

Van Dam Spies Present Boys
Out The Land Beat Past

champion of Holland, and favour- AT CRICKET

ite for the job of fighting Randolph THE Present Xi won the
Turpin for the European title at annual Harrison Cdéllege Old
Harringay on February 27, is here Boys Cricket Match at College
¢ a “secret” spy-out-the-land yesterday. This was ae to to pee

i i illi-

bs him is Mrs. Suzie van
Dam, who combines the triple was
functions of wife, manager and \icket-keeper . 40.
promoter to her husband. They enabled the Present to score
Ostensibly they are hete to 129° rane for. the loss of six
see their English relatives. But in reply to the Old Boys
to-night_they visit Birmingham acore bf ae

LUC VAN DAM, middle-weight

to see wor meet bn ja
champion, ous M. Clarké topscored with 26
Lopez, who, at the weigh-in 45, the Old Boys while G. Mayers

and West Indian captain John
Goddard knocked up. 25 each.
. King the College slow right
arm bowler took four wickets for
16 runs and Dash three for five

Bile rivals. tad the tithe shot

again Turpi sige oe, the Old Boys, W.I.
Dam, -_ and another © eal claimed three
Frenchman Claude Ritter, are the Present wieeets gy Fee 4
three middle-weights being con- iy “and i a ne Spee |
sidered for the championship fight i rune ches Bonltns ef Sut overs,
a ee tain an tan Mason bowled
“Ihave never seen Turpin cob overs for four runs.

box,.but I would like to fight Winning the toss the Pree
him,” the 30-year-old Van Dam sent in the Old Boys on a wicke
told me. to-day that was taking a bit of turn.
valle am Aghting the French Skinner and Stuart opened for
et Lucien Corenthin, the Old Boys and the first ball of

at ihe. on February 6, but the first over bowled by a. Loe

that would leave me plenty of time ~ Stuart cocked to silly mid

to get ready for Turpin.” to give King an easy catch.
_LES. Clarke joined Skinner and béth
started to settle down. Skinner
struck his first four by nicely
pulling a bal! from Simmonds to
the leg bouncary. When the —

Farquharson Beats
had reached 39 Sk ine was. dis-
missed ‘for 15, off

Hanzia In Montego
The gam matty Conk up when West

.

Lawn Tennis Games Indian captain Goddard was asso-
ciated with Mayers at the wicket.
KINGSTON, Ja., Feb. 6. They both hit the ball. A big cheer
On the second day of the Carib- went up for Adams when he left
bean Lawn Tennis Championships the pavilion on his way to the
at Montego Bay this afternoon, wicket. though a short time at
there was a big upset when Jimmy the wicket he thrilled the specta-
Farquharson, Jamaica, beat Philip tors when he opened his scoring
Hanna, New York. with a powerful straight drive
Carlton Rood, New York, beat which yielded him two runs. After
G, Hew, Jamaica 6—2, 6—2. scoring another run to bring his
‘Clarke, U.S.A., beat Frank total to three he fell a victim to
Quernsey 6—4, 75, slow bowler King when he played

Hi Burrows beat Carlton Rood over a yorker.

ye afternoon, was llst. 4%

Ys Ib, lighter than Turpin. To-

Morrow they will be at_ the

Albert Hall to watch Alex Bux-

os fight the French champion,
arcel—who is one of Van



6—2, 6—0.

emmy, abe, Jamaica, wien exits eh - an toe rae

oon. a anna, America, 8—6, lunch The, Pre ent opening a ¢ pair
Women’s Singles: Mrs. Helen ne started acorin

Ribbary, U.S., beat Mrs. Gover hoe but Hope # was dismissed when ’

Ramsay, Jamaican c ampion, 6—2

6—1. Mrs. Beverley Baker, U.S.
pt ape ers Davidson, Jamaica Skippe: "Williams were together
Men’s Doubles : Burrowes and Tey Punished oe ne nope 7
oak ene % be beat C. Langford In the fields, but a good piece of
F oT irkaldy, Jamaica stumping by _ ex-intercolonial
. player Adams who was keeping

All the Americans are in the

quarter finals starting tomaeeg. wicket im Oh ie Sage Hane

Smith of the chance of reaching



his fifty. ith at 40 while

stem ths ¥ ane “= pitched

Devonshire Play a aid Before, he goal get
Wa P, i nas Ww) s
ater lo Te ay ,, ai tak six * wks i 129 hike

THIS afternoon at the Barbados te r
two Water Polo of iW ae

Aquatie Club,
matches will be played. Play be-
gins at-6 o'clock. As the Aquatic
Club ot are unable to field a

sere

cadets

nately had to be cancelled, In-~
stead qa water polo team from
Harrison College will play a Cadet
team from H.M.S. Devonshire.

he other match will be between
a Barbados Men’s team and a
team from H.M.S. Devonshire.

Harrison College er F. wae
ning, B. Manning, RD
Jordan, C. Evelyn, we
head, A. Taylor, E. Jonnson.

nepsne a



r 0, 2 for 39, 3 for
for 62, 7 for 108,

BOWLING ANALYSIS

Fall ‘ick fi
2. 4a, 4 tr Bt, Stor 9,






Reserves. Keith Armstrong and oOo M R WwW
Rolf Feldman. ees Pe yee
team. P. Foster, M. x. 9 t @ 4

nue MacLean, M. Jor- ¢. ‘— a
dan, K. Ince, B, Patterson (Capt). 3 Rope Fi eae
and G. Foster. eae ae he
Reserves. vor Yearwood and oy ee. ae
Owen Johnson, seine ee SE eae
i 7 = INNINGS se

E. Hope o Wale b charg 2)" 3

Plan To Play For © Seah tad ‘tue samen w %
W. Churchill Cup i. Seutes 2"Geak om



LONDON, Feb. 7.

The British Ice Hockey Asso- eae fn
ciation announced plans for an Total (for 6 wkts.) ........ 120
international tournament here for
a ‘new trophy, the Winston BOWLING ANALYSIS
Churchill Cup. Countries com- « waicott ..
peting this year will be: Canada, ¥- Clarke ..
the United States and England, K. Mason .
Lethbridge, Maple Leafs and the 4 3. aidan
American Bates team, : amet >:

Respective representatives of c Cumberbateh «2. —

their countries in the forthcoming
Even Dripping

world tournament in Paris will
LONDON.

in the first game of the
Prices are going up on a good



Fi



‘meet

Churchill tournament here on
arch 21. The second, Canada

vs. England, will be played on

March 22, and the third U.S. vs.

= on a date yet to be de- many things in Britain, and now

The English oon will be select-
ed fi rs of %

re oo foe. ‘
ipping is the British word for
e ee Earls wet shortening. The Food Ministry an-
Wanvhy ad fae ae and nounced the price is being increas-
All these clubs are made up “al- ar Pe Oe eee
most entirely of Canadian ims | ~INS.

rom



Regieiored V. , Serene Ofiee







OLD STAGERS’

Picture aoe shows:
H. ADAMS leaving the



BARBADOS ADVOCATE
PARADE

Pavilion on his way to the wicket

8 Harrison se Old Boys’ Match. Going at No, 6 in

a
the reer order he
e left is

. ©. S Sxiwnirne who received a “big hand” from

the crowd after he scored 15 for the Old Boys,



Australia In Sight
Of Fourth Test Win

England 114 Far 3

(From W. J.

O'REILLY)
ADELAIDE, Feb., 7.

When England batted the second time, Hutton and
Washbrook put together the best opening partnership. of
the series. Their effort came to a finish when Loxton,

substituting for the injured
handed catch high above his

Waglt bit p hit pull shot from Hutton.

Loxton fielding in the

oe position at short leg,
Bill Johnston, grabbed the
tech which gave Denis Comp-

At 44 Roach’ton his third blob of the series,

It was an identi¢al catch to the
Same bowler too, with which he
caught Compton at Brisbane.

They were two remarkably good
efforts for a man who was sub-
stituting for Iverson who would
undoubtedly have either one of
them inscribed in his family
archives had he been the fields-
man.

I imagine nevertheless that
there was a point of rules which
was involved in Loxton taking

; that important position at short

leg for Compton, I believe that
Compton, the de faeto Captain
of the team at the time, should
have protested as soon as Hassett
inviteq Loxton to take the posi—
tion. Compton would have been
well =e his rights to ask Has—
Sett to let Loxton do his subbing
in a less specialised position,

This Test has brushed aside any
illusions our selectors have had
about our attack. Some rapid
rearrangement of it must be done
before our next visitors, the West
Indies arrive. Without a _ leg
break bowler we cannot expect
to go on winning.

Don’t Cover Pitches

The chief point arising out of
this fourth Test now that it is to
all intents over and done with, is
the bearing it will have upon the
deliberations whith are certain
to come soon as to the advisabil-
ity of covering Test pitches,

After the first Test played at
Brisbane, there was a general out-—
cry from Australian officials that
pitches must be covered so that
Test cricket could carry on as a
paying concern.

That game was definitely ruined
by rain from England's playing
point of view, and from the profit
making side. But having sat out
this match in blazing sunshine,
nothing seems more utterly
ridiculous than a suggestion that
all Test pitches should be pro-

. tected from rain,

It is a retrograde step just as
surely as the step to limit the
number of overs for the use of
the ball was, Before English
officialdom agrees to any sugges~
tion towards this end, they must
think deeply.

If Brisbane is a risk in Novem-
ber then let the match be played
later when the weather becomes
settled, or allow for local rules to
apply there. It is absurd to legis—
late for all Test grounds just be—
cause Brisbane generally goes
contrary.

James Burke, our latest colt,
joined the band of first appear—
ance century makers. He batted
confidently and attractively. When.
he had reached 97, Compton

By: Timmy Hatlo

READY TO BREAK DOWN
AND CRY =. THEY/LL
DO IT EVERY TIME «=

Tame TO MANY Doctors
AND DENTISTS ++

Iverson, took a brilliant one-
head off a mistimed but fairly

bowled him a no-ball unintention-
ally, and he banged a four for
the coveted honour. That no-ball
must have been the most grate—

fully accepted no-ball in the
history of Test cricket.

The Scores:—

AUSTRALIA ist Innings ..,....... 371

ENGLAND Ist Innings .............. 212



AUSTRA: 2nd INNINGS |
Areher ec Bedser b Tattersall ,
Morris run out . a ; 2
Hassett I.b.w. e “Wright Awiaes » &
Harvey b Brown ........ sicctece &
Miller hit wicket b Wright ... 9
Burke mot Out ....6.eecse essences 102
Zan Johnson c Evans b Warr . 3
Lindwall run out ,..... vee . &
Tallon c Hutton b Compton ... 5
Bill Johnston not out ....... Te
Extras (7 byes, l leg.) .......... 8
Totat (for 8 wkts. decid.) ,

403
Fall of wickets: 1 for 26, 2 for 79, 3 for
95, 4 for 194, 5 for 281, 6 for 297, 7 for

367, 8 for 378.
BOWLING eae

me OR
Bedser 5. ..6eceecdees 23 6 62
Warr 21 3 6
Wright 2 82 «100
T: a 2 2 116
Brown 3 1 14
Compton 46 0 18



6

ENGLAND 2nd TNNINGS
Hutton ec Sub b Bill Johnston ......
Washbrook Lb.w. b Bill Johnston
Simpron not out . pied
Compton e Sub b Bill Johnston” os eke
Sheppard not out ease

xtras (6 byes, 3 no Balls) ....

* “
SacBSS nw cF

Total (for 3 wkts.) ........ 11#

Pall of. wickets: 1 for 74, 2 for 9,



3 for 90.
BOWLING ANALYSIS

G @& Rk W,
Limdwall 2.2.0... 0006 5 1 19 o
EGE ene n ss oe 7 1 17 a
Bili Johnston . 13 2 20 3
lan Johnson ... “4 4 32.0 («8
TPES woe eee eye dee 3 1 q 0























TAKING THE
DISCARD PILE
By M. HARRISON-GRAY
aN
Wee Sanne Seca pi
meld a rule whieh

aati a be taken into
a player's hand until tne, legal
pee be plet ered.

ras o
is
romalnien of the aon

yee © point is BRD oe
for the to following ri
A, A, 10, 10, 10, 7. 2, 5, 2, 2,
Yo right-hai
has 1 a even, ena.
aa ay part you ae att
eure Bortect m id

frou - normally fol-



13
This leaves yo
wild cards tn wan mate Net











ur natural

eee oa ieee ea

To this voit 4

ia y
remaining car necorde
ing t to whether 4 there

Seve:
























he same,
ot

t
& a layer a Low
a
stowed

Pite before ine ha”



the auspices of the
dos Yacht Club,



Regatta On
Saturday

“THE fourth re

of the at

yachting sédson Will be sailed i
Carlisle Bay on "ager
Barba-

Starting = and handicaps

are as fo!

Class Me. Yacht Start at at Flag |
B 4 Hi Ho iat
B % sean 220 «Red
D @ Peter Pan
7
B10 Van Phomdyke $81 Yellow
B 18 Ranger 2.92
ee
I 6 Eagie 253 Yéllow
tT. oe
12 Dawn 2% Red

nt oe OF tee,
oof
g }

co















B 6 Flirt 2.36 Red
BR @ Rascal
I tL Reen 2.37 Yellow
D 8 Olive Blossom
3 War Cloud 238 8 86Red
D 7 Sinbad 2.39 Yellow
1 18 Glytie % aif
D 2 Imp 2.40 Rea
q ot 2a = Yell
T 1 ‘ellow
1 4 Cornetta .
‘¢ & Folly
* 3S «Edril 2.42 Red f
"C7 Miss Behave
Cc 2 Seamp ~ 243 Yellow
K XS Comet 3
c¢ 8F Nan
c i in 24 Red
B 1 Gipsy
B 5 Mischiet 2.45 Yellow
B 7 Moyra Blair d
“K 38 Thunder
K 40 Vamoose 2.46 Red
K 42 Breakawaiy i
“K 29 Cyclone 247 © Yellow
€ 7 Rogue
Cc 10 Gannet 250 Red

N.B. The 5th Regatta will be held on
Saturday 17th March, 1951.
H. BLAIR

Starter.



FootballProgramme
Needs Pruning

By HAROLD PALMER
THE Football Association may
have to revise their ideas about
the Festival of Britain matches,
The plain truth is that too many
ames are being arranged. Some-

y must lose a iot of money.
Home clubs are determined it will
not be them. Will our foreign
visitors foot the bill?

Visiting clubs have to pay their

own travel expenses and trust to
getting them back through a 50-50

share from

What chance have the Turkish

_ Gaskin (Capt.), R.

, batsman at the Board’s expense

Air Races Por|
Festival |

LONDON. |
Special Festival of Britain air)
races will be held June 23 at Hat-
field Aerodrome, Hertfordshire.
Thrée of the races will be inter-
national events and invitations to
compete are being sent to flying
clubs all over the world. Thou-
sands of dollars and nine trophies
will be given as prices,

In addition to the international
races—which will be flown over
a 105-mile course—there will be
the annual King’s Cup Air Race
which is confined to British —





B.G. Selects Team

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 7.
The following were selected
to-day to represent British Guiana
in Jamaica in March: B. McG.
J. Christiani,
$i; A. McWatt, L. Wight, P.
ight, H. P. Bailey, J. L. Thomas;

Thomas, John Trim, A, B.
Saitox: G. Persaud, Jack Allen,
B. Patoir.

The Board decided to take L.
Jackman, useful on the side as a

for the sake of experience.

What's on Today

E m of Sculpture and
tings by K. R. Brood-
sclate te ike va, water
arj Sine
and water
a ao at Barba-
dos Museum ....... 10.
Sale of Land 6 at “Rockfield”,
St. Lucy by Seifert R.
Howard, Government
Auctioneer ......... 1,00
hare Beat at
at No, &
Sheet by Mi Cottle,
Catford & Co,



Committee of the Cham-
‘ ber of Commerce and all
hotels and firms interested
in tourist trade, at offices
of Chamber of Commerce,
Lucas Street ....... 2.00
Guide bg at “Pax Hill” in
honour of Lady Baden-
Powell with Police Band
in attendance 4.30
H.M.S. Devonshire vs, Carl-
ton at football at Carl-
i. hina e ainataah scade, $ 45
HMLS. Devonshire vs, Island
team at Water Polo and
Ship’s Cadets vs. Harrison
Serr at Aquatic Club

00
nik Devonshire vs. Har-
College at Boahet
H.MS. Devonshire vs. Island
at Table Tennis at
WME. Gis ic. cesss 5.00
Dance by Port Welfare Com-

clubs on this basis? There are mittee in honour of C.P.O’s
supposed to be three of them com— and P.O’s of H.M.S. Dev-
ing, Galatasaray, Besiktas and onshire at ores
Fenerbahee. - # — fj _ Cham .........-.-+5+

They will come by air, which

Club
Mobile Cinema gives ‘lew
Newcastle Plantation Yard

is not only quicker but cheaper St. John ........... 30
than the seven days’ journey by CINEMA <
sea. Cost is £106 each. Then | Slene — "Moldy in, Oe sto
hotels here can be expected to Plazgc-( rigetey™) “Daughter of
cost about £3 a day. So for a , « ;

party of about 20, here for 16 | “Yor! a Dark Alibe' 500 @ #30

days, the tour must cost about

A

When Galatasaray visited
Queen’s Park Rangers in Septem-
ber the attendance was about
8,000 The Turkish side took £300
I think | _
the attendance would be smaller *
in May, when most people have

as their share of the gate.

had enough football.
Spurs’ View

Then I question whether they
will draw bigger crowds at
Coventry or Barnsley, so there
must be a big deficit at the end of
the tour—and the Turks will not
take the chance.

Clubs coming from this side of

the Continent will not incur any-
thing like the same expenses, but

what sort of an attraction are

“Holland 3” going to be playing
Leyton Orient. Walsall and Bristol
Rovers.

There is going to be tco much
competition, especially for the
time of the year. The pro-
gramme must be pruned — at
once. Clubs involved must have
a meeting with the F.A. Only
the attractive sides should come,

Spurs even reject tne idea of

having a first-class side here at
the height of the season,
English public have not learnt to
appreciate foreign club sides,’ says
their manager, Arthur Rowe.

“The

Gates are on the decline this

os Explain that how you
wit,
like, but the end of an _ eight
months’ season is no time for this
sort of venture.

Shortage of money, if you

Galiety—(St. James) * “Wanderers of

the Wasteland” & rareneee
Empire— ‘Faust And The The
Devil - 445 & 8.30

Roxy— “Desir? | Rides an «
hep. Done It” .....- & 8.15
Olymp' e— ‘Centennial Summer" &
“Mine Own eee eras th até







The Weather

TO-DAY
Sun Rises: 6.20 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.02 p.m
io ae Quarter) Feb-
Lighting : 6.30
High Water : 5.30 ‘J: 5.32
p.m,

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) .28 in.
Th for —- to Yester-
wesapavoauine (Max.) 83.0 ° F
Temperature (Min.) 75.0 °F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
' E.N.E. (3 p.m.) E.N.E.
Wind Velocity 8 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.990
(3 p.m.) 29.895













AFTER-DINNER
Me) od


















START THEM OFF DAILY WITH

ENRICHED BREAD
The Vitamin Loaf

I &





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1951

WEW! mPROVED
ODEX SOAP

@ Gets skin really clean
@ Banishes perspiration odour
© Leaves body sweet and dainty

Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that
is mild and tle for face, hands and
daily baths. ex is ideal for family use.



King “Smiler” orders thé world-wide use
of Cow and Gate Milk Food.

And we are trying hard to carry out the wishes of this

wise and beneficent Ruler for we know the World’s

Babies are waiting for Cow and Gate. Something a

little better, something a little different, have made

Cow and Gate pre-eminent.

That is why Mothers say“ There is nothing quite like it
nothing so good when natural feeding fails.”



J.B. LESLIE & CO., LTD.—AGENTS

om LINEN

Better buy now while



































these prices last.

PURE IRISH LINEN DAMASK TABLE CLOTHS

72 x 108 Each ........,...... aa geese Sheek

ee ORs ye! Viera eoraeeryere: |

GO AO. os oN bigs bos 0] Popes bhur an. oecee eee

DR BOR abated AB caieeie Oe yaa ie Oe
LINEN DAMASK NAPKINS to match

Be © TA MO er ee She
COTTON DAMASK TABLE CLOTHS

54 x 70 Each ......... ciiakkdceecen +eeee$ 3.74

COTTON DAMASK NAPKINS
18 x 18 Each

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

An ‘Economical Decoration for Walls & Ceilings

Siscolin Distemper

Supplied in Powder form.in WHITE, B CREAM,
GREEN, BLUE and SUNSHINE

Made ready for use by mixing 2% pints Water
with 5 Ibs. Powder.

5-Ib PACKAGES at 95 Cents each

ee

For Interior & Exterior Woodwork use

Red Hand White ‘S’ Paint

Dries with a Hard Gloss equalling Enamel Finish,
Does not turn yellow.

$9.72 per gin. — $2.55 per 2-pt. tin
Phone 4456 —

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid.

AGENTS.






PAGE 1

Ml E SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE Till RSUAY. FEBRUARY 8. 1S1 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY IF YOUFEEL LIKE THISTAKE WINCARNIS TONIC WINE AND FEEL LIKE THIS! BE HEALTHY & HAPPY. Our Volentine^ to you Good Foods; SPECIAL Pkgs. POTATO CRISPIES 6* per Pkq. Cereals Quaker Corn Flake* .29 Pickles & Sauces Morion's Mixed Tickles i ..'!. „ Chow Chow .33 „ Piccalilli .53 i|ii.,l,.-i Pulled Wheat .37 Shredded Wheat .... .3* Kellnggs Corn Flakes JS Quaker Oats .32 Farex .47 Breakfast Fond .80 Canned Fruit Apples .75 M n:;,, Slices .2* Pears lit Peaches .59 .37 Grapes .33 Cauvas .57 Primes .711



PAGE 1

THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 8. 1M BARBADOS ADVOCATE 7/ Was The Animal Flower Cave WINNER of Monday E\eninu Advorme's Tear Bum" competition was Cecelia Thomas, of "Marine Villa," St James She jjuessed correctly that the picture was taken in Animal Flower Cave. St. Lucy. Slauen i( Ihr two hundirO luhrr -nlranls guessed nfhl but Cecelia Thomas was the luckv PACE FIVE MARINES PARADE Eighty marines from the H MS Drvsrvhire accompanied by Ihe ship's band conducted by Bandmaster C. Fairall. staged a drill parade at the Regimental barrack* square, Garrison, yesterday morn. Inf. The parade was under the command of Capt. C. E. J. Eagle* pnd lasted for about one hour and a half. The marines, dressed in open neck khaki shirts and long pants with rifles on their shoulders, inarched up and dawn the M,uare lo the crisp commands of their drill instructor. About 200 people witnessed tho display of the marines whose timing in ordering and sloping armi was faultless. After the parade. the marine* marched down to the Aquatic Club where a launch took them to the ship. Capt. Eagles told the Advscste yesterday that the display waa not intended to be an exhibition hut stilctly -routine %  He said 'hat the space on the ship would not be enough for a full drill parade and that was why they resorted to ff.e Regimental barrack.* square. C.C. Addresses Headmistresses LADY BADEN-POWELL, Chief Guide of the World, gave a very Interesting world picture of guiding whan she addressed about '•0 headmistresses both secondary and elementarv at Queen's College yesterda> evening. She told them of the good lh<* guide movement was doing to Kills of every nation, even In places Ike India and Egypt where girls' lives were restricted. She said that the educational authorities in the civilised countries of the world gave their support to the movement, also the church, civic and government authorities, as they saw in It. the value that it ^ could be for the rising generations in building a better citizenhood for the future. Lady Baden-Powell appealed to the headm stresses whether they had culdo companies or not to do their best to forward the guide movement. There was a general discussion about the difficulty of getting euide leaders, and the Chief Guide and other speakers offered some valued suggestions. Thomas was the lucky person Hers was Ihe first correct answer to be pulled out ol the box There were three major clues to the picture. Light coming from 'ne direction, the smooth round stones in the foreground of the picture and part of the pool In the cave with rocks reflect ng on the surface of the still water. Some people who may know the Caves well may remember the rock on which the man is standing Other.. may even remember standing on the same rock to see more cleanly out of the 'window" <>f the e0 ook. It Is the scenery of Jesur: in the Wilderness of Jtidea Photographs in the Advocate's "Your Cucss" are not taken from the Bible or anv other book. They are taken locally. Many guessers placed the picture in almost every parish, "Christ Church". "Cole's Cave. St. Thomas," "River Beach. St. Lucv," "at Tiiop.ith. St Andrew". "Cuttle wash, St. Joseph." "Crane Beach, St. Philip." and "St John's Church. St. John." Other guessers thought It was taken either in St. l'.i'.ttk'. Church, Jcmmott's Lane or in the Ursulinc Convent, behind the kitchen or St. Michael's Cathedral. The last four guesses to be opened were "I--ind7cn", presumably lands End. "Pelican Island Beach". "The Olympic Theatre", and the "Empire Thoatre". during tho Him "Song of Bernitdetle". .i Ait ii w or TM; MAS SHIT S CADET a visit to H.MS LAST "iDosrs a group of Lodge School Cadet* how the i inch Devoimhiro" yesterday mi works. The cadet* paid Carrington's Playing Field Not Affected BY RAIN Chief Guide Tells Of World Guide Movement I.ady Baden-Powell. Chief Guide, who is at present on a week's visit to Barbados, told a Press Conference nt Government House yesterday that her chief ambition in life is to help, in any way she could to foster the growth and standard of work of the Scout and Guide Movement which her husband had invented. 1 It is not always known, she said, that he invented the iSmde Mi Alley With No Name A N ALLEY AT ROEBUCK STREET, beside Messrs Carlton Browne. Druggists, has no name. A few weeks ago an accinent occurred in this alley and the Police Constable, when taking a statement, was at a loss as to what name he would call this alley. ft leads to Church Village; o a bystander bravely suggested that it should be called Church Village Alley. The Constable did not wait lor another suggestion but Quickly Jotted this down in hla notebook. He afterwards said that it would be much easier for him II the alley was "christened" and the name placed on a sign board where he could see it. S OME DOMINO CLUBS have been formed and many people ore taking an interest in ihis game. This evening a match will be played between Eagles mid Emmerton at the Sunnyside Club room. Suttle Street. H EAVY RAINS in St. Andrew earlier this week prevented lorries Irom drawing canes from jhe fields. Some lorries that were nlready loaded could not move out of the fields and had lo be towed by tractors, rpwo FACTORIES—Bruce Vale X and Haggatts — are now rrindmg canes in St Andrew jlruce Vale began on Monday. The ther factory which will soon -tart to work is Swaitf Haggatts sufietM Jt first setback when a hreaVdown occurred on Friday. This wa* however repaired ever the week-end and work resumed. R AI.MI ALLEYNE. n mason Haggntt Hall. St. Michael. was injured yesterday morning when a wall fell on him. He working at Rickett Street. AHevne was taken to the General Hospital and detained for treatment. S HORTLY AFTER 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon the Pol van picked up' a man along Trafalgar Square. He waa taken to Ihe General Hospital and detained On arrival at the Hospital the man was still in a semi-conscious condition and did not know his name. He later said that it was **or"'* Or.vniH*e of Rush Hall. L ADY BADFV-FOWELL. Chief Guide of th World, will broadcast over nediffuslon and by cable & Wireless transmitter over 7NX31 on a frequency of T33 K'es. a wavelength of 40 73 metres, at 8.15 o'clock tonight. ment although it was well known that he had started the Scout Movement. The lives of millions and millions of girls and boys had been influenced by the ideals for which the movement stood and so in that iy the scout and guide movement constituted a very big force for good. They stood for the promotion of goodwill and understand inn between peoples, a useful active service to the community and the development of high qualities of character that would help h individual to live a richer, fuller life. On her way here. lady BadenPowell said, she had visited the French islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe. She was immensely impressed wl/", the work she saw there being done by the French scouts and guides. The movement in Trinidad had ilwaya been on a good footing and she found it healthy and flourishing still, both in Trinidad %  m! Tobago. During her thrc> days' * %  ]>* .„ Grenada she had found the movement there definitely on tha upgrade She was glad to be back andwas extremely proud to find that the guides her? had acquired their own headquarters It WRI obvious ^Jhal this had rr .-ant a great deal of effort and hard work and energy on those responsible for making the headquarters a reality. In her tour of Europe and Africa last year she had been surprised to see the popularity and strength of the movement there. Twenty thousand strong, they constituted one of the finest branches of guiding. In Cyprus there were Cypnot and Turkish Guides The movement was strong in the Sudan and Uganda, the last mentioned of which had a long Guide "history and was one of the first to take up guiding. The movement was strongly supported in the schools and "The Kaboka" of Uganda was very interested and gave it his strong support. The movement was also growing very fast tn Tanganyika and Zanzibar as well as in Northern Rhodesia, Belgium, French Equatorial Africa, the GoW Coast and Sierra Leone The movement was strong in Finland and she had found the Finns courageous, interested and unafraid. Switzerland which had provided a meeting place lor scouts and guides of all nations for the pat uvei;i\ years was still doing so and the movement was as strong as ever there The movement now numbered five million scouts and two and half million guides. Lady BadenPor-41 said in conclusion. ALTHOUGH yesterday the roads in the Carrington's Village district showed all the evidence of the showers "which had fallen in the early morning and during the preceding night, the playing field there was not affected. It is one of the playing fields that Government has decided to acquire, and In due course the residents of the district may get on opportunity to welcome the erection of a long-desired pavilion as has lust taken place in the Deacon's Hoad Housing Scheme area. Cricket, football, tennis and other games have been played there for over twenty years, during which time the playing field, a comparatively small area, has been steadily built up by the men of the district. On the south-western side not far away from the cricket pitch, what was once a drop of several feet, has been filled up over tho years with refuse. In recent yean the Scavenging Department ha? done much to accomplish this and now keeps a man there to spread the stuff and do any other scavenging that might be necessary on the spot A fairly large area has therefore been reclaimed and will In duo time serve In the expansion of the present Held. On the northwestern side some reclaiming ha* been done but not to the extent as on the other side. This is, supposedly, because of the nearby waterway. It would appear, however, that some expansion can still bo made there and will very likely I*' when the Government buys the site ami arrangements are made to develop It fully for the purpose intended. At this and stands three small houses and on the north-eastern side of the field there are no less than four. How long these may be permitted lo interfere to any extent with the progress of a cricket or football match is-lcft to be seen. Many residents of the district expressed their delight to the Advocate yesterday that the Government had decided lo buy the playing field. Some confessed that they were amazed when they heard it was to be cut up Into house spots. These believed that however a change had come about in the ownership of the district somehow or other, the playing field would remain a playing field. When the Advocate visited ihe •lie yesterday, many children were playing there. Govt. May Ren I Land At Seawell To Farmers ON TUESDAY when the House of Assembly wore discussing Bonus, a matter raised by Mr. D. D. Garner concerning; Christmas bonus for sugar workers at Dodds. Mr. W. W. Reece (E> said that he was glad to hear the remarks of the senior member for St. Joseph abcut the intention of Government to consider letting plots of land at Seawell to farmers on a co-operative basis. Only that week he had been approached by some peasants from that district who would be willing to lease parts' of Seawell or to work land there o n a co-operative basis. Now that Seawell only com\T %  a rf-v • prised 30 acres, it had ceased lo be Vegetables Of Every Kind Fifty-five-year-old Mr. Sam Marshall Is extremely interested in vegetable gardens. He has seven and a half acres nf land at Deacons Hoad and Ecksiein Village. Eagle Hall, and has planted eveiy type or kitchen garden produce. He also has a quantlt) of banana, plantain, oranges, grapefruit, limes and lemon trees planted. Mr. Marshall \g a teetotaler. He stopped drinking aloohollc beverages and smoking in 1920. He stopped eating ilsh, fowl, and meat in 1B29 At present his diet is made up of greens and occasionally the yolk of an egg. His father used to take an interest in gardening and dining that time Mr. Marshall did woodwork. When he found ibis boring he deckled to do both woodwork and gardening. The family gardening career started in 1902 and by 1929 thev had 70 square feet of land Mr Marshall's father became ill in 1941 and retired. At that time they were renting the land. Mr. Marshall then took over the management and now owns the lands. He extends his gardens yearly. His customers a:c mainly huck filers and they average about two dozen per day. When there is a shortage of carrots or beets, in the City, over a hundred hucksters flock around Mr. Marshall'* storeroom trying to make a l 1 1 "%  hase. Mrs. Irene Lrnnch takes care ot selling, paying luboun | taking on labourers. Should Princess Alice Playing Field Be A Park? Headquarters There is aiso Mr. Marshal headquarters which is equips with office, storeroom for produce and storeroom for machines. the last mentioned he kaapa bli spraying equipment. a grinding machine, rotary hose and also tractor which he bought when there was a shortage of labour This tractor can plant three rows at a time. It will cut, drop tne seeds, cover and press them foi germination all in one operation Should the Pnneers Alice PlayAll his land is irrigated by an ing Field be turned into a park automatic overhead irrigation where as is the custom in England 'System which is worked by id elsewhere city workers could electric pump. The pump Is inandlside a well 49 feel deep. It is fifteen feet from the bottom of take their lunch, and rel; eat it in beautiful surroundings !" L tg %  suMP'tien which an AdI lh e well and can pump 100 gollon* locale reporter discussed with of waU r a mirill ^ various people yesterday, but did not find much favour. During World War I Mr Ma shall was stationed in Dubt One of the leading mercantile [Ireland with the Third Royal men in town raid in his opinion I Berkshire Regiment lb v. Princess Alice Playing Field factory guard. When the < -houlri remain a playing field, I broke out he was in B thOFe centres of recreation are so badly needed. He said that children everywhere were hungry for places to play games. and so they often played them on the road to the discomfort of and pedestrians too. On the other hand, when workers got their hour luncheon period, they looked for a cafe or restaurant, or went home, if homo was not too far away. Pan of the suggestion was 1*11 the Police Band might play on the Reef Grounds during "t h luncheon period or occasionally. and the merchant said he saw no harm in having the band play there on some occasions There was no need, however, to scrap lhe playing Held idea at the Reef Grounds. Getting into conversation With two city workers, the Advseate put the suggestion to them. They both agreed thai if many people wanted to eat their lunch in -. pai k or relax in one during thi luncheon period. Queen's Park would do just as we'l Queen's Park was more central. it was more roomy, and there were already benches there, along with trees and garden* there giving a welcome snade. Princess Ah.. Playlag Field could be supplied with benches too. and gar dens could be planted But it ft On Tag* t U.S.A. and enlisted there A few doys ago certain vegetable seeds were scarce. On Tuesday a boat which was overd ived with a full supply and the Seed section of the Agricultural Department again have all the varieties the planters demand SCRAP IRON LEAVES TO-DAY TWO HUNDRED tons of scrap iron is expected to leave Baioados to-day for Trinidad by the Norwegian S S. Esd. The scrap iron will finally be shipped to N< York. The EssI spent two days he taking the load, which Included seven-ton factory roller. INJURED Ralph Alleyne of Roberts Ten. entry, St. Michael, was detained at the General Hospital yesterday with a laceration to his left arm, and Injuries to his spine and head Alleyinwas working at a building at Bleketi Street. Ci'v. .(.her. a portion of the roof fell in on him Th# B4 John Ambulance Rncadr In ihn uland waa fu.ii.dv4 by C*pt and Vn Arthur Jon** and durlna h*' atav in ihU itlaod tad; Buthf Sav* u htf support. economic plantation entity and the Government should seriously consider letting it to farmers as Indicated so long as Its productivity was not diminished. Only a few days Ifo he had re.td in a labour paper p*nl to him by a friend In England lhal bonus was only deferred wages and was an Iniquitous form of payment. The writer suggested that the workers should be paid thi dustry could afford ferred wage. Sound Argument That argument, he said, was sound, particularly for industrial countries. In Barbados, conditions were different and no one could tell before hand what tonnage a i>p would yield or what condims would prevnll Perhaps, the lionus system was the l>cst for Barbados, all circumstances consider ad. As far as Christmas bonus was concerned, it was really a gift from the planter to the worker and did not come under the argument between the sugar producers and the union as did the percentigc payable al the end of the crop He s;iiiebale. but he hoped Hi it th > suggestion had not been mnd" that there should be any reduction during the year In the wages of which should accrue to workers us a result of the price of sugar, in order to give them a bonus at Christmas time. A Christmas bonus was a special gift, a goodwill gesture which most reasonable private empl made to their employees at the end of the year and had nothing to do with the actual wages which an industry could afford. Within the pust few years, the practice had grown up to c workers an increased wage, out any increase in the price of sugar, ond then at the end of the crop, a bonus based on the actual sugar C Kluction. It was claimed that workers liked that money at the end of the crop. He wus not sure that was correct. The practice lent itself to a number ol evils and be thought H was belter if the workers were given the full wages to which they were enliUed during the crop. For one thing, many worked at more than one place during crop and in many instar ces, got no bonus from any pint e InrrcuM Unpaid He was surprised that a Government plantation did not even pay the 124% and the 7','i increases to its employees last year, especially as those figures did not really represent the total increase in wages which the worker should have received out of the price for sugar. The 5^ which the sugar workers had been clamouring for all over the island at the end of last year was not any Christmas bonus liicv were demanding, but the remainder of the wage which they knew was due to them for last year in consequence of the price of sugar. They were still owed that money. The motion was eventually withdrawn. A Look lt> AI TinGorl. Spirit Bond On his way down Cast I kcly that ones will be attracted by u formidabh f* ade to be found on the left un inset from Uie road. There standthe Government Spun Bond. On entering tli. bond he seefirst :i number of posters telliui him 'no entry without i-ermis tion" nod then the strong smel of rum Only seven years ugi he would have been induced t enter by a butcher, or vegetable and fruit seller who were the 'bettered in the Public Market No exterior change have bee made lo the Spirit Bond Oi the inside, wire partitions havi been put up everywhere, divulin the extensive building into quit' a number of compartments II Is in these compartment that im-st of the rum for export is being bottled The process o bottling is done by employees o4 various firms in the Island, bu* all under the supervision of th Government. Holding compartments in th. bond are J. N Goddard ft Sons Ltd Martin Doorly & Co., Ltd. Mount Gay Distilleries. I> V Scott & Co.. Ltd., Stansfel.l ScflU ft Co.. Ltd H B Kin.!. Re nown Manufacturing Co Ltd Hnnsehell Urvn ft Co Ltd Barbados Import ft Export Co Ltd.. The C. H. Kinch Ci> Ltd and Alleyne Arthur ft Co., Ltd /It Work Wijen the Advocate visited the bond yesterday, only four of th. compartments were ;t work While women were washing t>ot ties, labelling ready filled bol ties and parking them into >.n tons, men were busy lilhnu mi the bottles The bottles were filled fron vats, lhe rum having first to pas through a tiller machine wind takes out the sediments and the' through a filling machine The bond is very conilstcd 1' aceommodales 35 vats, whoa* rapacities range between 1.S4M gallons and 10.000 gallons; 2,301 casks of rum and quite a numhe> of cartons filled with bottttt rum. In case the industry ex pandx. more room wi'l have l be provided. Some of the casks of rum have been lying in lhe bond Over Uim years. The thickness of lhe du that has gathered on them is evl (fence to this Clerks working on the bom complain of hent ami the absenct of adequate light They have to endure this from 8 o'clock In the morning until 4 o'clock in ._ the evening — with an nOur*l wage the in-1 breakfast — except on Saturday* ind not a de-1 when they work from B until Heat Attracted The galvanised lop of the building supported by *tevl prop* and girdles contribute to thi heat experienced by those who work within It* walls. The bond carries Am laTfJI gables. In the middle gabta, are let in rectangular pp K is* which are used for i.lt roUfSa sunlight The other gables once carried similar piece of glass but these hu\ placed by asbestos. Th removed because it out that more hoot w trated in the building presence. Flowers, grass and l>ougalnvlllea which have bMn planted to the front by the Civic Circle add a touch of Iteauly lo the building. Two palms are alao growing up in front ol the building. Cadets Inspect H.M.S. Devonshire TinGovdnunenl water ial parts of the which led from one deck to an"p. all the wiiiosdcpastnini the other. i'"' At one point during the visit, --,, i-veryone of them was still U ,V'.? h *pb< up was when the buglers soun i small group. While one group .-Sunset". The school cadets %  '" %  %  %  uwn along] u^, n. ..th, .„. ;uns, and another al tho engine compliment on board we.S i group* p/era in inc "attention" ami facing qfL Some or Ihe mve the salute. %  '"' %  %  d war* again on thHa tn Hie .ship', for the Baggage WQrehO Tlflgp folk* • I -1. neh. II FRESH SUPPLY Or PURINA HEN CHOW I (SCRATCH GRAIN) |H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-Di.wbuio„ '.V,'.MV.V.V.V,V,V.W,V.W.V/,W.V.-/.V,VA-.-, 4? W'hr •*•• ll 111,4/ .... nn% ting wttta ath Arden's tr pic beauty plan tl.KANSK with Ardena < laamtni cream TONE with Ardena Skin Torn. NOURISH with Orange Skin Footl for the dry or average Ve|v;i Crenm for the young or sensitive skin Bagln to to find new I iMuly! K.XKKHTS PIIOi:\l\ ,V (IT) PltAMBtACISS. %  dai Newspaper Selling Is A Paying Business THE fast going newspaper sellers about ihe City take vml to the idea that in-dead of )Ult saying "paper? %  iaper?" to the passerby they might shout a few of the headline* or juM Of an article to get the ptOfltl Interested A newspaper seller told thi Ad vacate yesterday that hi thinks he will in future t.-ll the public such thing;i an. "Twenty thousand soldiers for Korea," or "Read of the old fisherman whose boat overturned when he was SO miles out to sea!" For some people in Barbados newspaper selling is a paying concern The agents who sell the most papers are usually m with other Jobs who live In district where the people are of a reading turn of mind A man may lie a Civil Servant fo' instance and be able to mak" more money through newspaper selling than he gets as a salary There are paper ajgntl all over the Hard At an early hour the AJvorate'a delivery van 1* on the road and some people in St at On Page 1 Sensational New Make-up i„u,„u ii ml /IIIII il fill! tun: m P -^^as^sdr NEW! Nt a cake make-up, not a f reaay foundation! "Ansi raw„ [oungaUaq an* pawast all in out. No w %  pew, Jin trmv ttn'tillpi. Ana*I Fawe" POM on ri.IlT ld %  monthly Wllli ii.


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PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATP Tilt Ksmv HUM UiY 8. 1931 BARBADOS a,. T-— l*tUUe kr l^a A4T.-.1. ADVQGTCE lhnr.il.i-. Frhruary X. IS3I AVSWIll TIIE Hwlel Industry in Barbados has been very approximately estimated la have been worth three million dollars to Barbados in 1950. Actual statistics exist to prove that from Venezuelan sources alone, Barbados gained no less than three quarters of a million United States' dollars. The domestic exports of Barbados in IMS have been estimated at $13,311,000. Of these. Sugar products account for $12,621,000. It is an old saying worthy of repetition that 'Barbados has far too long packed all her eggs in one basket* — A Sugar Basket. Economists, theoreticians, businessmen, politicians, Government Officials, and amateurs of all kinds, have for years now been arguing the toss whether or no Barbados can look to anything other than sugar to expand her economy. Facts exist to prove that the tourist industry does provide a valuable source of revenue, and is capable of being quadrupled, if only a constructive and far-sighted policy is adopted by the Government of Barbados. One does not need to be a financial expert to note that the tourist industry of Barbados in 1950 earned, according to available information from well-informed sources, almost one quarter nf the value of exported sugar products in 1948. For more than a year, high officials of Trans-Canada Airlines have been telling Barbados that because of shortage of the only kind of hotel accommodation that will attract Canadian visitors, the island was losing hundreds of potential tourists from Canada in the winter and summer months. As far back as the 24th June, 1950, a memorandum was presented to His Excellency the Governor by the Barbados Chamber of Commerce. That memorandum absolves the Barbados Chamber of Commerce from any charge of failing to realise the importance of tourism to the economy of this island. In its opening paragraph it reads: "The low standard of living and the heavy and increasing population make it essential that additional sources of income and employment be sought. After the main industry of the island, namely sugar and its by-products, the tourist industry appears, apart from emigration, to offer the best prospects of assistance in maintaining the ataodautl oi Living, l&mploymenl. both direct ann indirect, afforded by this industry, benefits all sections of the community and in addition brings in much needed revenue which is mostly hard currency." The Memorandum draws to the attention of the Governor that as far back as 1946, a resolution from the Chamber of Commerce was sent to Government urginj; assistance to the Hotel Industry. Tbe first item of that resolution passed on 9th January, 1946, reads that "every effort lie made to encourage private enterprise in the construction of Hotels on a modern basis." Those responsible for the maintenance of living standards, steadily won for Barbados by hard work and enterprise, are today faced with a challenge of no mean order. All around them in the West Indies, territories are competing with one another for a high position in the race to attract capital investment. The near-by island of Trinidad gallops past all British West Indian territories with domestic exports valued in 1948 at 3127.105,000. Jamaica for the same year has been estimated lo have exported commodities valued at $53,560,000. British Guiana is third on the list with an estimated value of $36,627,000 in export commodities. Barbados was fourth with $13,311,000. The question to be answered by the Government of Barbados is — "CAN BARBADOS maintain its present high position and draw nearer to those who lead in the race, or is it steadily to deteriorate, because those guiding its destinies allow their vision to be impaired by secondary issues based on prejudice and ignorance?" The answer to that question is n vital one for every voter. Cardinal Mindszenty l>oran>l> • %  IBMmtiu-ii < mil Cardinal W.nHionii ••# •I J.pa e>rai>l Mta*MMr i... >* er: l"CM f RBBB* Jal rBll>B*B • Nwsvaaaii i KB ma Ca. 1*1* TYPING is one of many course*, given at an Amercan 'Chool for the blind I thtlr life ahead. Their blindness doca not necessarily linu: their acbl The Blind Are JYot Helpless At Hit American School for the Itlincl at Rali-ig.i. capital of llM east coast State of North Carolina, %  1ST hoys and girl* handipped by blindness or nr-nrblindness Bui they are not feeling sorry for themstives: neither they rcnienod to their affliction. These children simply have too much to do and to learn to sit and brood about their lack of eyesight. For. contrary to the prevailing idc.-i. the blind are not helpless; not unable totake care of themselves, and do not want anyone to pity them. They simply need a little encouragement like nvone due. That is what they are gcttuiR at UM School for the Blind. The school is identical with any other st.i'public school |n curriculum and lext with the exception that aids to the blind and vocational nd musical emphasis nre added, And the children at the school are the same as those in any state S ublic school except for their UndtMM A visitor to the school camput it surprised to find boys and girls kattUgi tilling bicycles, and rnrrvlng on the everyday functions of growing up. but without the use of MI. lit Nobody stands on the sidelines at the school The bcinglefi-oul of-things: complex Is one of the most devastating for any h;ii!-iii i|i|ic(l pSftQBa and the atari of the school stresses the Idea that %  veryone takes part in everything. The school presents a programme from kindergarten lo the 12th grade, and as long as a student continue* to progress as he would in at regular public school, he ndvancea from class U elasl What happens when a student gradual— from the school's secondary school'' That is one of the aina/iiig things about the institution. As of last year over 5 percent nf its graduates were going on to college The Stale of North C;iiolma aids those who ,m eollege-mlndcd by providing the funds to cover nil their expenses including reader service, under which someone is paid U> fMd necessary lexts to the student. Admittance to the school is granted to any blind child with a visual acuity of 20-200 or less. No feel are charged, and are required only lo clothe the children and transport them to and from Kaleigh. The school operates from September to June with the pupils returning to their homes during the summer months. Students also enjoy the usual ('hnstrnu and Easter holidays and ay go home for week ends tlnoughout the year. %  flBM alma ban • ml. team U li.a -ml ba % •B". aaaplla tfcdr bai .1. tag* By BILLY CARMICHAEL From "Tftf* State" The school, which was founded In 1844. follows the regular course of study for public schools in North Carolina with reading, writing, and arithmetic leading the way as always. But the blind children, needing a little more, get it. Learning to read and write In Braille is. of course, essential to all students. They are taught to write Braille by hand wiih the use of a small aid and later the students learn the operation of the Braille typewriter which allows much mure speed. The reading of Braille books opens the Held of literature to all students. Before the Introduction of Braille, books with raised lettering were used, but reading in this manner was slow and tedious. To-day, some of the students at -i| can read a hook In Braille as fast as a pair of eyes Can scon any regular book. Books on the phonograph records are available In the extensive school library, but this Is considered the lazy man's way. and the use of the discs is discoursed. Music Is taught with great ema i it the school with six of the teachers on the stall devoted to this study, a much higher pereantaM than found in the public schools. Since the blind children cannot enjoy the beauties of life, the school tries lo give the students a concept of some of the finer things through their ear* All •indents of •);, cm i ( uli i to take piano (raining Tor sever.il years. After that, students who show little or no musical ability are allowed to iliwonUnue the study, but those with average or belter than average ability will continue as limn as they stay al the school. Some duds to other instrument btstdsf the I n.nny of them study VOXM : very important part of the training of the sr-hool is done in vocational subjects and Ii-rnliwork. A boy begins instruction In Chair cniilng al the age of ten and requires about three to four years to master the art. Then he is advanced to maltress making. Which calls for about three years nf experience Those with .nuslcal ability are taught piano tuning, probably the most profitable of all the major occupations of Ihe blind. The Kills, mtanwhlla, ara taught home economics and handicrafts, beginning in the third grade and continuing through iKondll i school. They learn cooking, sewing, and dressmaking. In craft classes the girls master crocheting, learn to make baskets, to cane and repair chairs, to weave rugs, and make other articles Phvsieal education is required of all students In the Interest Of building strong and healthy bodies not re' irded by the lack of eyesight. The Knoot has track and wrestling which comptta -main*! lighted teams with 4 results. A pool is located on the campus where students mav swim ll.c year round. The school's biggest problem is teaching nnimnlcy, to show the student llint hi bhndnrv.ti-t i.mmalcy. Not many years and girls in Ul related at all times hctbe belief that two blind hculd not marry. Nowadays many such marriages turn out vary successfully. With happy and contented students, al unrest rk'.rrl by the school as by then* lack of eyesight attending motion pictures, football games, and other supposedly eye-filling attractions with the maximum of enjoyment—tho State School for the Blind is an tiutstanding example nf (he prouctivv and progressive methods North Carolina is using to make Its handles p|>cd citizens happy, capable, and sclf-sufhciont. D. V. SCOTT &s CO., LTD. TO-DAY'S SPECIALS •I THE COLONNADE Tins BROOKS PEARS Tins BATCHELOR PEAS Bottles COCKTAIL CHERRIES Usually NOW ... 5 35 24 ... 5* SS Hit* Lake Fleet Develops From Single Vessel TORONTO. Capt. R. Scott Misener. 71. President and (ieneral Manager of the Urges! individually-owned fleet of Canadian freighters on the Great Lakes, can count his success from the day he and his chief engineer. John O. McKellar. bought a small and not very itaunch freighter. But the vessel took S* I the Iwo men possessed—or could borrow. Their venture depended their skill in guiding her from port to port and In keeping her hold crommed with good-paying rargo. That was in HUG. when Canada was busy meeting the strains and demands of the First World War The two lake sailors made Ihe operation of their little freighter pay and in two years they sold her and bought a bigger and batter ship that was the foundation of .1 new shipping concern named Snrnln Steamships Ltd. As the Company prospered, they bought other ships until they hud a fairly big fleet on their own. Then Capt. Miscncr .and Mr. McKellar took over the venerable Matthews Line, renaming it Colonial Steamships Ltd.. and their fleets continued to grov and prosper. Sailed as a Boy John O. McKellar is retired now. Scott Misener owns a big combined fleet and a growing business. He still has the love for the lakes that led him to stl Iks fruni his birthplace on Maniloulin Island before he was 17 and ship out as boy-before-the mast on a t-aft lumber hooker at SIS a month, a wage later advanced to *23 when he gal status of n regular hand. From Ihe lumber hooker, he wcnl on to a wheelsman's berth in a Steam barge. During the years when sail gave way lo sieam on ihe lakes and the wooden ships were replaced by steel, he climbed through the certified ratings of second mate and first mate to a master's ticket. After that, lo become a ship frag for him but a single step. The big fleets of passenger and cargo ships, ore and grain carriers. tankers and other types that ply the five Great Lakes go into winter harbour tale in December when I R| freeze up. But in the season thev carry tremendous iraflle. Through the Sault Ste. Marie i inalg between Lake Superior and the lower lakes passes a larger traffic than through any other canal In Ihe world, including the Suej Canal, despite Ihe shorter season. Our Header* Smyi Thank* To Ihe Editor. Tin Advocate, SIR,—On behalf of my Commitie thank Dr. and Mrs. Messiah for the loan "t their house and the kind Criendi who donated prize--, rood, nd drinks. I am pleased to announce that the proceeds amounted lo $28133. Yours truly, HILDA WILKINSON on behalf of ORGANIZING COMMITTF.F. "Lockerbie House." Million's Cross Roads, .St Michael. 7.2.M. FinTo lk$ Kdiior. The Advocate. Sift.— In of today there is a paragraph stating that thenore 1400 Fire Hydrants in the Island, of which 1.001 are m St Michael and 2iG in the parish U Christ Church. It may be Interesting to not that Ihe mains in the City are fiom 10 to 14 inches and are in | duplicate system ruanlU parallel to each other, those Ih Hi.tutyurbs are from 4 to 0 niches The Fire Hydrants in the City are Stl yards apart and those beyond the Clly are 100 yai I .o In the laying of Mains in anv new tenantries such as the Navy Gardens, Graeme Hall L and the Cot arcu, the Waterworks Department have insisted that tho -il be provided with Hy drants at the expense of tho Tenantry i <. %  :ici ., ,ei, ,., e >•• t on the part of Government For* some reason this provision has been abandoned In the nine Wate**, the Garden m Worthing View where no Hydrants are provided Under th i Fire Brigade Ad the Vestry of St Michael is i e. (Hired Ibutc two-thlrt > %  Brigade and to reimburse themselves by laying • rate In respect of the City end half mile beyond the former fele to be twice that of the latter. There %  n.i provision in the Fue liug.ule Act to call on any parish lo contribute TAXPAYER. fl?r;i Rvfuttftvmnritt To the Editor, The AdoOQtU. %  wish in n ike a fi remarks re ihe dimenlUeg en countered by the housewife .through the removal I oil. I ., I Some years ago the servants started to work at 7 o'clock in the, morning and the scavenging certs came around to collect reft., between the houi <,i a.00 a.m. aud ii uo a.m. Changes have now usualh %  woak at 8 o'clock In the morning wlule the scavenging earta come grout refuse at g 00 a.m When they pass a district once thev do net ictum The Sanitary Department ha%  such refuse must be put out in a box l>: some other umian.e: but not dumped alongside tK rtreels. The obvious th.ng to %  put out the refuse before they leave Work (hiring the evening but it ha:, been discovered that the containers have a funny way earing during the night. TAXPAYER rwaW Meet lawssi inr TrinitUul To [he Edilor. Tie ytdeocale — SU( Following the defeat of our Culf Team in Trinidad. 1 would suggest we should try and regain some of our repir skill in Sport by sending a Poker lo compete against those neighbours who have beaten us In Tennis and Golf. There are some very gifted players who regularly on certain or the week, and after iv In everp poaiT! and moon, ihouid, I am sure now be able to give a good aci Yours truly, FIVE ACES IN ONE. Perhaps no other event in recent years has aroused such a world wide interest and general indignation as the arrest and the life condemnation of Cardinal Mindszenty. The documents published by the Budapest government controlled exclusively by the Communists and the authorized white book of the Cardinal will make the tragic case clear, though Its details will probably always remain hidden by the tactics of the Bolsheviks who destroy disagreeable documents and falsify them according to the expediency of a given situation. What is a territic vision in the prophetic novel of George Orwell, is a long established aspect of daily life in the region behind the curtain: where dictatorial power, called peoples democracy, has made an end to history. Not only the present, but also the past and the future is shaped by terror and propaganda. After the crushing or some independent leaders of the opposition by the Bolsheviks the Cardinal remained as the only upright and unbroken man in Hungary, both as a Catholic and as a patriot. He has opposed with the same determination both Nazism and Bolshevism and was put by both into prison. Soon he was attacked with the charges of treason, espionage, crimes directed at the overthrow of the Republic, and foreign exchange speculation. All the necessary documents had been produced by the means of the classic Russian purges which led finally to the inevitable "confession." written confession of Mindszenty. Enough to compare a picture of the Catdinal before the trial with that taken after the trial to be convinced that by criminal methods his entire mental life has been undermined. No sane man will believe, after having read the writings, sermons and pastoral letters of Mindszenty collected in the authorized white book, that a man with his acuteness of vision and strong feeling for reality would have committed crimes against the Kepublic at a time when the Bolshevik dictatorship thoroughly excluded even the possibility of such acts. What he really did was to arouse the national and Christian public opinion of the country not by political means, but by showing the tyrannical nature of the new system. Already in his first pastoral letter (October 18, 1948), at the very beginning of the "liberation" by the Russian army, he realized that the Communists under UM military and diplomatic preponderance of Soviet Russia were driving not towards the popular democracy which they pretended and solemnly promised to establish with a coalition of democratic parties, but towards a dictatorship of the Russian type. Against this ever growing tendency he drew attention to the dangers of a perverted democracy and the real meaning of true democracy, asserting: "The cornerstone of a (rug d*HMe< rtien is the recognition of the fact that all natural mjli/x are inviolable and that no human power can alter or invalidate them... True democracy inscribes upon its banner: freedom of conscience, the right of parents to educate their children, the right of the worker to develop his abilities according to his own choice and inclination. What is more, true democracy puts an end to slave labour." (p. 60) This has remained his fundamental point of view from which he criticized the deeds of the new system. His voice became stronger and more articulate when the real aims of the system: the suppression of individual freedom, the dictatorship of a small group trained and pulled by Moscow, the growing terrorism and propaganda exasperated all groups of the nation, even the more intelligent elements of the privileged proletariat. As the democratic coalition was cowed or corrupted into the acceptance of the secret aims of the Communists. Mindszenty became the symbol of Hungarian inde|K>ndence and religious and political freedo: In spite of the vicious and brutal electoral practices, two subsequent general elections had demonstrated that the overwhelming majority of the country understood the teaching of Mindszenty and a few intact leaders of the opposition and rejected Bolshevik rule and dictatorship. And when all serious opposition was liquidated, all .eHgious and political protest silenced, national despair and humiliation found its ultimate expression in the strong personality of Mindszenty. The press of the government (practically all other organs of public opinion were suppressed) began a calumniatory campaign against Mindszenty, denouncing him as a Fascist, as an advocate of the expropriated big landed interests. And when all these manoeuvres could not discredit him. on the contrary they only increased the prestige of his name and the driving force of his message. RAkosi and his colleagues realized that the,Mindszenty symbol must be demolished. Otherwise the final aims of the dictatorship could not be achieved. The careful preparation o[ ihe Mindszenty trial and its final or.rcome eliminated the last obstacles of the Russian system. Even some noted foreign correspondents became the victims of the enormous Bolshevik propaganda. Fortunately the dictators themselves had revealed their real aims and methods. The chief political theorist of in Communism, presently Minister Of People's Culture. Joseph RAvia explained in a speech to the party leaders with shameless Machiavellism how the Hungarian dictltonfdp was established and how it was conceived from the very beginning of the liberation. The picture given bv Ravia supports in all essential poinls the judgment. the admonitions and the fears of Cardinal Mindszenty Oftcrfia C OSCAR JASH 4 % ooooooooooo** FOR YOUR BATHROOM Corner BASINS uilh Pcilrst.il 25-X18) 22-xW BASINS I'h rithmi! Pe


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Till HSDAY, FEBRUARY K, 1K1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SI M N CLASSIFIED ADS. FOR UU AUTOMOTIVE CAR—Stud*b*Jr.*r IMI c*ll*ni condition Price I Bdo. Agoncl**. Ring Cv Agenci*-. Ltd $25 ELECTRICAL ONE TVRNUt WALKER MUX PRE**, electrical! r driven, ncv Apply : Mr. R • Sous*. Co 1 O.Mr. Giant lid 1 1.51Ci U'IN'DCMAIUIFh v ill. T..wrr An I (. ol* UiiMPh> FUBNll'UEE H'liNITfRE— A M.-sho*janr Ch* ot Ii-iw... Bonk Shell. uM set of Club* .-nd v*ral mi*llan*ou. Household onk-l** al-o Kid Toy* Phone B4TJ %  1.91—In POULTRY C;nrV r.ANDFR -Prim 1116*1. 1 "Itl Old. r.pe* 51. James. LIVEwiOCK MISCELLANEOUS AtTUMUS—The < % %  vegetable .ltd rlo> orr lb. from 11 Keith Store. Coleridge Street. %  %  %  garden. *J SO Ai.'iri" Drug Phone Wet SEED Juit received a Ire* it in bulk. Cet your* now II Krilghf. Ltd all Branches. • B.S1—In. RATHS — In Porcelain Enamel. In Whit*. Oreen. Primrose with matchlni unit* lo complete colour mite*. Top grade A. BARNES ft Co. Ltd. M 1.51-tfn. I IIIIIIHtVS WARM CAR1H(I*NH— In many colours also White el.67 **rb Modem Draw aThlBtrl USI.-IB. I>RESS FORM-Ont 111 Adjustable Dre*. Form Rile A. iimall'. Apply Hamilton. Merry Hill. Welch**. 81. Michael. fl.ll-3n KMUIT Snarwood's Cry*t*lhi*d Truit .% %  id x lb. bus. M BOB or S> It lb A (l ncol* I6 lb, Green Olfn UU lb merries 11.33 lb., Met* Fruits Uo bo*. Glove Boxr* asstd. Fruit RtTP box KNIGHTS LTD. (1.S1—* GALVANISED PIPE In lb* foll.mlng MM: •*m, *ln.. ..n.. int., I'.in*. 1 in. li. In. 3 in. and 4 in*. Also Stung*. Enquire Aulo Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street, Phone MM. MSI.—tf-n. I OIK l.E.XT HOUSES NOUSES -Harmony Collage St George and 'CANAAN', B*th."eba -PP'y to Mr* Gibbon. Phone MIT taw pa •ttWAHnnU-l bedroom, Drawing and Dining Room PWilr 1 aWvanl* Room. faNiMde. hWtmg. Pfc-n* MM. MH-4P Pl'HLIC SHIN AUCTION will offer lor sal* TERMS CASH i FBJDAi M %  %  • "ii Mc En**rn*yFORE. V-i STATION WAUOOS reconditioned. Nr. Tyre* ARCHER MrKENZIE REAL ESTATE GRAmiVTEW BalheJwb*, Tfcr* aw s,. %  • •" S2 HOUSE—On* new hoard ana] shingle J** * %  "'" Applv to Sherlock Fli >oul Bay. St. Philip 8JSIaMHrellll JJ)I' Dl MMNANF. COUNTRY. ROAD. ST. M1CHAEI.. u. *. '*•'*"** "IV occupied by Mr. %  Collymor*. The house stand. In well kept Harden. &S2& '* • cre M "•"*•>. ._I^ W rf* %  "P"* 1 verandah, drawing and dmlng room*. 3 badroom.. on* with marble bath. a ihow*ri. 2 i*vlofl**, convenient kitchen and pantry. r"m* lor S servant*, garag* (or 2 cars, and itablei. Water supply lor garden and rroundi Iron. ., well with mill; water aervlc* In h<.ii*e and alo nervnnla rooini iinawer knd l.i valor y. Th* rnldcnce completely wired ana lurnuhed with electric li.Mmic Iron, the iomp.ua main*. Hou** convertlbl* Into flata and outDuiminc* ronv*rtlbt* Into a colta** Th* land I* uiubl* lor davalopmen I or kitchen garden*. Th* underlined will offer the oremlaei lor ule by public suction at tl-*lr office. No. IT. rtl-h Street. Btldfrlowti, on Friday the Etrd day ol February iui at 1 pm. Inspeclloii on Tueedayi and Trmnday* onl/ between 3 and 1 pm. For lurther partlruUra apply to COTTLF. CATFORD v CO. IAIIIKS TEE SHIRTS — lour* fi.U i Shoppe. INDIES' and Children'* Handkerrhlef* lie. each. Modern Drei* Shoppe. 3.SJ1—n. The under*lned will offer lor *ale by public competition at their office. No. IT. Hl(h Street, on Thursday th* *th day of February. 1611. al 1 p.m. th* d*lllnihou*c i.lKd Till BOWER with 7.M4 aquar* feet ol land lltuato at The Oarriaon. containing; 3 verandah*. 3 public room*. I bedroom*, toilet, bath, kitchen, etc Oarage, servant* room* and t ncl oMd garden. Th* tale may be made with or without th* furnltur*. Vacant poaaeuton will b* given Further particular* from COTTLE, CATFORO CO. 80151—>n. Newspaper Selling M From P*EC 5. Andrew my read a paper befoi norrw in St. Michael Fewesi In Si. Andrew The most papers air sold 'n SI Michael anri lcat In St Andrew. Christ Church and Si. Philip come afler St Michael. followed by S'. John. In St Lucy much more are not soM than in St. Andrew. For many seller*, newspaper selling is a side Issue, but for some It is an all day job. One of the oldest sellers In the business is Mary Mayers, the only woman on the heat. From ab*Hit 1OT5 she used to sell along with a man called James Cozier, known lo race ticket sellers ant." men about town as "Wicked" I Since 1934 when Cozier died, she} launched out on her own. Shej has iirey hair but i as active a*, ever She is a short, laughing; woman. She can easily make $11' a week at newspaper selling. Mary boasts she can keep up with any man now In the business and the men respect her. The man who hits been selling newspapers longest IsArthur Connell who sells in Trafalga Square and keeps his papers 01 a box. Connell knew the good old days when there were M agents all over the island. Then, Instead of his selling about 7.) a day as he does now. he used lo sell about 200. for everybody who wanted papers used to come to town to get them. Then there were no vans to deliver papers. Waiting For The Train Connell remembers waiting for the men who had just come on* the train and getting many sales. those days all his papers wMlM sold by 10 o'clock. Now that re people share in the gains, he take** much longer lo sell out He can rell more Evening papers than Daily He thinks that this is accounted for by the e of "Hot news." the Evening tea. Mr. Husbands of the Advocate Circulation Department said that the Evening paper is % %  growing steadily in the public's favour." Most of the men who |aU M*n>papers also sell race tickets, "To be out and out sellers." ihcy said Unlike most of the other sellers, the olC man in the Job, Connell, does not think that shouting the •On the spot news" will gel the paper sold any better He think* that a buyer conies to town quite decided whether or not he will buy a paper. liOIIIIHIII I ADIEU' COATR Mii* In wine, fa *J each. Modern beige and grey ire.* Shopu*. NU'PIJS-W* have a Divol AntlcolkNipple* ISc each. Obtainable LTD. Ireah nipplv of In Mock, price %  t KNIGHTS |*J| In PHETTV WHITE VELVET EVENINO CAPER — SIS.M *ach. Modem Dr*" Shoppe. 3.1.91-tn. RAZOR SHAVE IN COMJ-ORT bv IIting a Durham Duplex R..rnr with the Aalelv gn.ro. obtainable Dt COUJNS PRUO STORE. 11. SI—th SHEET TTN Ju-t received heaw Quality SI** 3B 30 JOHN D TAYLOR A SONS Ud •.Ml—EA PI -III.If XllTIf i-:s obtaining naa Card* from your frnda. No prevtoua expeii ,r.tr nteaasary. Writ* today foi beautiful fro* (ample Book to BrltaUYi 1 ai|111 and foremen Publisher*; hlg*vet comr.iiMlr.ni marvelloui money making opportunity. Jonei, William* & Co.. D*pt. • Victoria Work*. Proaton. t tlUtd -" M-lil-1-t, NOTICE Re ESTATE OF SAMUEL. HENRY HOWARD STREAT Deceased. ill P*eNOTICE I* hereby given that %  on* having any debt or claim effecting th* **tat* of Howaril Slreat. late plantation In th* pariah i who died In thi* Wt"d undersigned will off*r for sal* at Ihelr orTke No 17 High Street. Brldgei. on Friday the ltti February IMI al n. Th* meuuaoe or d-d ling houe .TI v known a* Tallyrra now called -CKYSTAI. WATERHwith the land thereto containing bv eitlmatlon 13. ;uar* fret allualed on the tea al Carvtlle Avenue. Worthing. Chrl.t Churc presenl used a* a boarding houve. Inspection any day except Sunday 'tween 4 and 6 p.m. on application to r*. Talma on th* premise*. For further particular* and condltli sal* apply to — COTTLE. CATFORD. a.Co FOR HINT SALS OR LIASB BAOATO.U; HOUSE. St. Thomai Upalr* Closed Gallery. Drawing and Dm ig room, Broakfaet room and Kite :t 3 bedroom* running water in • Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed Gallery. Living-room. Breakfast room nod Kitchenette. 1 Bedroomr. Toilet and Bath. Electric Ught and Telephon*. Apply Ma-agcr of Bngntrll* Plantation. St. Thomai Dial 3331. 11 111. MARWrN-Miixweir* Road Model *ton*-built Bungalow. 3 Bedroom Drawing and Dining Room Breaklait Room and Kitchenette. Toilet and Bath. Servant*' Room. Garage In Mt Wale and Electric Light InMailed Approximately 1*000 *q ft. of land Apply: E. H Farmer. Andrew* Plantation ol Dial M9CT. aj.Jl—pn. SHIPPING NOTICES MtlNTRIM. \1MK\il\ NEH /I \IVMI LINI I l.wlll.II 'eduled l > %  lahl-I ..rv l"l" Pebruacv Sard, Amving ~< -,h, IMI .r,.pmenl at Trtnl %  PVRNEffaL WITHV A CO LTD. and |i. COST ^ %  I.I i.TD Tih.Mtad. M.i.i.. M W I II W I Tt-.* HV Cal MPta' •* %  *• %  *• —+ • %  %  rat, ?••.. •" KPJOS aMNBof taturday 10th. ThMV -Dae. wood wilt,*ee*n r."*.. and P**s***g' : %  Ol departure to he RWI SCHOONER OWNERS ASSOCIATION, Inc Tclepboue: 4011 1 5 tTpTITEt) SYATE8^TTO*T.NEY" FRANK J "PARKERTindlcaies tfl* hollowad otlt Infli with 1 Weltman tRl'liti sought to smuggle into th* United States more tlian 2M> lndiutrtal diamonds worth r2H0.ooii in the open market and if> In the Black Market. A**i*tsnt Attorney Oeoige W. Percy. Jnr. looks on. Weitman was inspected by customs officials aa a result of hi* "sort of glassy eyes" and "shift lug of his head".—Express. Princess Alice Playfield • Front page 5 would lake years befoi.H could be made as shady u gtieen's Park is. Where the Band b com-en'cd. I>i Ai*rs*a, the workers again expressed th -.. thai Queen's Park was more uSSKF'iL*^}??*,""' suitable for the lumheon park I ajfs/* ££&*. SSJ idea. Evon the band stand U '""'. *. Ak-oa Clipper. s.s i-^ptam j aliv., 1 iy then i;!!u^ %  -l f i" %  *. St, %  % %  s : Two sellers of light refreshjj^ V*i„ as*Tnfu*!. B T n n" v ments in carts were also inlt i viewed. They had no particular 1 R.J rrancowu Ideas for or against the idea. Their ; %  ; J. %  ._ Atrog c. Stock Market Quiet, Firm LONDON. Fab. 1. With operators awaiting the crucial parliamentary division on steel nationalisation, business in the London Stock Exchange today was on a much smaller scale than of late. Nevertheless, quiet firmness was fairly widespread. British Government Funds improved 1/16 to \% and thtir wan many small gains in industrials. Textiles were hesitant while Irons and steels remained steady. Dullness in international storks n'lUiU-d overnight Wall Street adn rices and there was a lower trend %  Gr< unds for the luncheon purpose, lo oil shares. Burmese, however,, naturally the PtUan ol Q were resistant, following favourfrrshments would go down in j.bUpress reference. kaTC** Peace treaty hopes were responible for the useful advances in Japanese bonds and there was some speculative support for German ooiash loans. tam falls in minings on renewed' prodt-taking attracted freih support. Many losses were reered and the section closed slenderly Arm.—Heater. Harbour Log In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station Cblc %  .,.! Wirelea, ,Wct Indies' Lid •"R "-a" lh*y can now £.b.doT CatWaViaS 0, """ ,n """ Ak-o* PlUnn MV Ps.hflnder. Makikl. SM. Dolores. M f 9nc. NEW YORK "Eaal'salt* nth January — nr %  Hyijord" *ail* Snd February SEKVK K ii., m NgtW ORLEANS SERVICE 1st February — • UITMBOI'N* l* "AIX-OA PILGRIM' . "AlarOA PENNANT" *.*. "AIAX1A l^HJMtU*' CANAD.AW SEKVICX •"" %  an Th*a> TXBSIS haia lualMJ Baae*ag*r a****a*aagaltaa. ROBERT TIIOM LTD. New York sad Onlf Sorrlcar Apply; DAC08TA 00, LTD.-Canadian. Serrlca. \ view. If the idea practice and people it ;ind began to freqi as put into ss Daavhs, ss ru raught on to nra.ii. ..„, ,| |{, H .f Hulke., 1 I' M .-,. S h -. I"-H. S-, Krr.l,..., vs TarUr. SS IV.i ^ -r, S S Joshua Tree, an tladui S3 Nklardal. S S Kaklw Am.u, tS Emilia. SS RuckdAI. SS HS Genal*. 8 S. Monle All.,be. HSR 8.R. S Velluo. IS Wdllowa GOVERNMENT NOTICES rN'TEllPKIMB An ndiolnlng Properly with 1 acre* of land and iW building. 3 acres of arable. acre* of pasture with nice Uahoganv trees lo be sold who I...-. (rlandi In th* US. America, who %  dcslrou* ol buying lor cash. To be sold In th* U.S. America. Apply to O. Holder. Enterprise. Christ Church Gap. Attorney lor thi %  or lull Information. C Eststa INVITATION FOR TENDER Department of Highway, and Transport SEALED TENDERS will be received el llie Colonlnl Sccreury'l omce up lo noon on the 28m February, 151. lor the wpply of Bnrbdo. Limestone. Marl Flllln. and Earth Filling lo the Department of Highways and Transport for a period of twelve (12) months from th. 1st April. 1951. d J. A separate tender for each division tendered tor should be submitted In respect of each or any of Ihe following divisions: — (a) Northern Division—Parishes of St. Lucy and St. Peter (b) Southern Division—Parishes of Chriitl Churoh.. St PMlIp and SI. John (cl Eastern Division—Parishes of St. Andrew and St. Joseph l ^* l % und *r Some passengers on board also said that the train was going faster than the driver estimatedAn investigation has been ordered. Heuler. 1 Febu M-il. for immune. Anligua. Monl**mrL N.M. ..ud St Kill, bt th* MV Ciutser will I, ekSSMl at the G.-n.l.il Port OfMce a* undi ." %  reel Mall at II inoon). R.m*ter*d p HI and Oidin.rv Mail al the *th February IMI Ih* R.'gl.leivd ,1 TO-DAV. 1th rs-brug BIG 4 MAY MEET IN PARIS PARIS. Fab, 7, Deputies of the Bin Fom foreign Ministers will probably meet shortly in Paris to dlBeirss the -1 Agenda for the meeting of Ihe Foreign M Franca, Great Britain and the United States, a spokesman of the French Foreign Ofllcc said here today Mall* fof St Uicia. Ilomlnlra. MontMTI 1 Antigua, at KltH I 1 .1 st Ji.rin N 11 liv Hili M **. Last) i(..ilnr. HIII he efoH Oananl Past one* %  -n.i. Parci Mail at 1 p.n. on live Wr. "•• n IMI Resllt.-rnl Mall and Oidtuary Mall at 10 14 am. on th* imli Fsbeuarv IPM. Malls lor SI Lucia, 1 I'.i-* Ntngdosa m the SM Oassognc win he General Poet OfRc* Parcel Mall Dt S f •<• February Itftl Regi.icM li" ••> M.il PM ISIh FH.r.ry 1SSI vwrw* nuel H*nry Rloomibury lint Thoma*. th* Pth dav ol Jai y required to %  claf .. u ..1 particular* ^attested, to the undersigned i por don Oswald Hamilton Harding. Oswald Howmet SO**! and ItiUon Scale, the quailfW ..ccutors ol th* will of th* dtccaaed In car* of Cottl* Catford a Co., Ho 17 High Street Rrldgetown. on or +*><** he h day of March 1S9I after which date c rtall p.oc**d to dtHr.bute the Oiarti'of the said estate among Ihe parti*, •milled lh*r*to. having .egard M th* debts and claim* only o( smu then •hall have had notice, ai ih.t wc irii.ll not be liable tor JufilTTl" lo any pc—i -I who-* o*ht or claim w* ihall not have had at the urn* of ^h d..trlbutln. And a" p..r mdl^t*-* t Ua-l* estate ar* r*qu**t*d 10 •nil* th*tr .. ,..,,111. without delay. Dated the rd day of January lWt. Gordon Oswald Hamilton Harding. Oswald Ho*— 'WORTHY DOWN" — Bltuatad at Top Rock, ionil.tlna: ol 3 bedroom* with con. 'ting toilet* and shower*, large lounge, rtlnlng room, ultra modem kltch*n. large front batconv. and brrakf.it balcony. 1-cnr garag*. 1 **rvaJit*' room* with IcluH and shower* nt*o laundry The giout'd* are lully enclosed and Ihe g.rd*n* well laid out ate. Available on VAII 1*1. IMI. The above property I* well ronrtrucied 111 .••Inch alon*. with an Bv*Ht* roof B**t offer above £4.000 will be arcrpted rurthar particular* etc. Ring MM. Ilna %  rd Strrat. SS aafafi of Ih* will of Rajnui ****** *^&M+ Attention Is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amendment) Order. 19S1. No 3 which will be published in the Official Ga7.elte of Thursday Rth February. 1951. 1. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling prices of "Milk-Condensed" are as follows :— ARTICLE Milk-Condensed WHOLESALE PRICE (not more than) $12.00 per case of 48x14 oz. tins RETAIL PRICE (not more than) 27c. per 14 or. lii LOST LKATIIER WALLET.Stamped R J P riltde. Reward Phon* -"Varson Til* 13 51-In %  WRR W TAKE T1CKFTS rV.le.QOOOl and 6M8 Finder pleas* return Mine to E O. Savoury. St. Barnabas, si Mirhael Howard oflarad. 131*1—In ONK CLOCK Fither i Rock ley. I. -CHORA* TRAVIS JJNG Square Brown Leather C Hospital or outside "Aei Reward ottered. Phone I Public Official Sale iTh* i"r*-*i %  MtaaT*. ,IM-„I | Ml ]3rd day Art I On Frldav • MI at th* nour -as • -—— u.-,,.,,! will be sold at my ii* high**! bidder f-.an> iiider th* appraised *rasu*. AU Ih.t <* n ^ t *2£*l? t t unlng about iwenjr^vw^paec 1 ..1 Saint MieKiel. n nd bounding M.ilonev Ltd.. lati UtiiaU butting rf Pred ol H. O. Emtaae a Co rieopha* Adoipha rord. Mght Hundred and Fortv dollar%  t, t no i Altached from Cowndgi EVresford Field for and toward, -ti. (^Ilon. *<. S B -'. D*PO*it 10 b* poid pn da. P u "*"T T .QtADlaW. WAIN'TEU HFXP Restore Youthful Vigour To Glands in 24 Hours New Discovery Brings Pleasures of Lit* to Man Who Feel Old Before Their Tim* al PASSAGES TO EUROPE %  Contact AntillesProducts. Limited, Roseau, Domini*., for sailing to Europe. The usual ports of call ura Dublin, London, or Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. Ik H V////.V WEST INDIAN KNITTINU J MILIJ4 LTD. 1 ACCEPTING ORDERS FOR 0 WRAPPING TWINE \ All purposes) Orders for I9&1 Krquli iiii'nu will be accepted to I5lh February, IMI. ate P.O. Bos II 3079 i **SSBBBBSBSSB.^^|J*BI lO-DAlTS NEWS HASH HAIR I II, IIN'. M vi H:M -• •', ••: OH Also — l.SMF SHAUK PLASTIC B> Uu I ..r,l .t JOHNSON'S STATIONERY AMI HAKim Mil roil s \I.I OFFERS will be received bv lha uiulersigned up to the Irtth dav of Febru;uy for the b1 in eiha'j word*, are jou onl. half a mail II your Nody I. d-vit*ll.ed and s.haurt td. thtr* I* no nrrd lor juu to auntr an otbgff day f.-oui inch ul.jM'ai inWrioriir, bcas* lli' dlscorrry at ri rmln-nl phytl(ls n no* ms.e. It i>Mibl for you to raior* jour youiuful ngour and aniinalleu. Youthful Vigor Restored Th* penallle* of advancing st* and th* f.ult. ol over iudulgri.'e limy now be rei.rdrd sr.d vouthlul ap*rt watch and chock repairs, cleaning and -eator.-lfn ol o|l painting*, valuation for insurance and pr .batc. GOSitiNt.i:-. Upper Bay St. M-Bl. PI nsowi QM ,. 1,1 **kf Dial 44JS. '.0RRINC.tV i Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht 3 t SI —Tit. • I Bt'T rOR C*aR—Clock... watches and muilcal bos** In any condition Write, call or dial MM. OOBRINnr" AntMfM Shop, l'pp*r May Street Js.II —Tn i th* world now ** fore* ol ill', yoiiin. Mir gland* It (i now rugin. sr.aurao**, %  • %  •and accoraplWUMBi. Caaiar. Mai" aaupnr. lugo.Vrr* th* tortaaaMBaa. of |ri-ir.rod.il %  ! artire gland*. An eminent pi.ii.nui, with asara UuH* sears of espetirnc*. ha* at Isal (wrIccUd a combination of Ingrrdlrnl. Ilia work wt rich pad taOM uapanam UU, and fortllY th. prcscrlpnon. tnrfo.-. —— ... manlier to rratort tlgour and Touthlu, • Italllr to roan %  ho* glands has* grown old loo *ocn. Thi. du-ovcrr. fi^*n Id form, and war b* uied ae-fll) II >< % %  VZ£''n *Tah^ViA lUbUi "slot* i..u ol jour vigour ao vualilr Doctor Fraises Vl-Tabs a. OUnnlnl. JOHN M. BLADON A.F.S., F.V.A. %  Ilh aiD**ir.g .peed to nuiio %  lbtoo4, atrnigtii.-ii the nMir. n "" t ol all. to actHa"*, atln Kara *Outhful rigour and vitality to bodr. Bverr on* nda a trr*tu,*rit I an Vl-Taft* at •on* time In hi* lift, t aoon-r than other*— hut no nnc will n a inl.tak. In puttlii* llila tr-.tm.r.l to ina fit when In nerd of Ualu to ugalu )oullilul salmiWD-" 34-Hour .M,lh"*^* B'rau** VI-Tabs ar* srimtiflcatlr preparedlo^act ^dir-ftli uptui i REAL ESTATE RSAL ESTATE AGENT — AUCTIONEER — SURVEYOR 'Phone 4o*0 — Plantations' Uuildlng. •Jtt sun iaa* in vitality, and wit. coaog* ia SOOM a**D is Results Oil %  aa i atl ouiatkUou*. lead •nd European phyaiIlan. Tseently stalrd th* oplowa thai th* true aacrrt of youthlnl sigovr and vitality n*t toirsrir the In Ihf gland*. Based on —" *-* ra* many year, of nprflanc*. atudy aid i.r.ciKr. It la my opinion thai th* medical formula mown a* VIB^rsf. S title internal *srthod al •UBiulaling ai.d liivig. Cuaranfeed andinabava been n. ... prodn'cd by VI-Taws for weak and prenuluiely old men In all i>*rtt of the World that It la how oRet'd un1r an abiolut* guarantee of c'l Under 1I.I. wtitten guararlee grt Vl< TJ^ f,... >.,r .HniJ today. Be* for and vitality that ill b* coursing through tour body *>nosyou take an Inter.*! In th* pleasure* ol III* and how you ar* able to *ajo* then a* never befoi*. And II fur any r-.son you do not agrre that Vl-Tabs 1* es.ily worth ten time. Ih* .mall coit, merely return lb* empty packsge and Ihe lull purchas* price sill !>• refunded will,out a seat km or ,. V, Tnk, lojaj. Th* guaiauua_ptoUCU yoit. To Rassoro NaashooaT, VMaffly Th* public ar* hereby warned against giving credit *_">! %  "> lCA \BARWOOD •!• WHlTTAKBRi a* not hold myself responHble to* h*r or anyon* *la* contracting aeiv o**ri or debts in mv urn* un**ssi b a wrltier. "%  *Si !" .WOOD.. King Sns*M SISI—rn MAGAZINES True Story Detective ind Police atagaain** Bring or send u have to Slanway Store. Street Dial M10 fcXSl 3n. PTASOH to *ha** aeasld* house -otterat* term*. In return for help will ,..'ekeepmg Phon* Ib b *.!* %  MS* fron I JO am to pm. aSI-ln WANTED TO ISASS HOUSE -Easy roach Bridgetown, electricity. n TRAVEL FACILITIES TO THE UNITED KINf.lMlM The Secretary of Sute for the Colonies has reported that there Is a possibility of arrangement* being made whereby the Australian' Emigrant ship "ASTURIAS". may call for passengers at Jamaica and Trinidad in May on her way to the United Kingdom. Such a service] • • will only be possible if a sufficiently large number of parsons from, js^AT. the West Indies signify their willingness to take advantage of the| opportunity, which is intended to provide travel facilities lo the United; Kingdom for bona fide visitors, and not for persons seeking employ-1 mem there. 2. Tentative fares proposed are £70—£80 from Jamaica and £65—£70 from Trinidad. 3. It is emphasized that no undertaking whatever can be given thai return passages to the West Indies will bo_available later In the year. As an early reply must be sent to th* Secretary of Stale, persons who, bearing in mind that they may find considerable difficulty in securing passages back to the West Indies in the Autumn, are desirous of availing themselves of this opportunity are invited to communicate on or before February 17th wit rathe Acting Harbour a Shipping Master from whom lurther details may be obtained 4 2.51—2n aVatr WISE. ABWXMTW8E MUEOTAL MMMIN From INDIA. CHIN EGYPT! silk Carlos. Brax^ware. Jewel*. Linens. Ivory. Teakwood. Sandals. French I'erfomes, Barbados Hcarvea In Pare Silk. Etc., Ele. Eie. The fleaitalr Hesdy sarl.rt III AM Urns. KASIIMIRK FLAVOUR For M-lL.ii Smoothnesa and dUUartlve ffavor. There la no ram thai compares with . s & s STUAIT & SAMPSON LTD. Headquarters for Best Rum. L 1 We're Not Magicians, but..." ... with Ih. van resources of Ford of Dsgriuum behind |, wc M produce moil Genuine Ira spues diDtr on the .pol or very >non notice. t "tad more, these ip.ee. e .vsiUWe lo you al lo fised prices snd sre fully nuruitecd. Th. linen Service MBS* in this dinrlct sre si your di.po-l. . • (HAS. Mf ENEARNEY & CO. LTD. ? ( WM *Wry/W/*W-W/.VW.v/.v.v


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Till RSDAY. FKRRCARY 8, U31 BARBADOS ADVOCATK Wtinted: Influenza Menace New Leaders Rnalls C* !" *** Scourge Of 1918 PACE TIIRKK VIIIVM.I FISH Ti. c.uaw untold „n>r7„ • it I doaT or^vernmen, • %  me ^e—a S%itfSB wKSmpVeSrV -"' V: ^L?=P--? <" !" .^"Seprrie-mr, or a pandemic—.. world outbreak OTTAWA. Canadian ai> asking of the men who have no moral right l o cling iu oflke. so that wo ", can then: IM dlBMaaH Ships from overseas carried the •I. Put tne cunl.y -.traiMhl: Ii 1 .. !" * < %  ."•'<*' gUflni the %  tan n Uooailxation and other if' ,, pa,ia>mic anrovi ,c *' "' Canadi ing indu np it* ft* H lh nvi, M <* ** disease. cost of living. lrt;Ui!ieoseconUnued during 1919. 1920 and lfSl. but with £ rt1v "2. Strengihen our defences diminished force. makim %  l To-day no one will claim that "8. Re-establish Britain".. Canada can he isolated, but as a prestige in the world BO that once precaution a close check is being again we can lift up our heads." made on travellers from overseas The Petition reads as follows: Doctors in the federal govern-' Britain ment's quarantine service say that r country a traveller might pass a medlrn) bold and examination on arriving in Canada. A few days later, he might %  nccds ., a h** 1 ^0 1u. The period of iniigour which rubntlon of the flu virus Is 24 to tiding the 72 hours W people believing thai ou urgently M*d able leadership. "Britain's spirit surge rif hopg can come only by THIS ttrange looking 11th was night by the Dsniih -hip "Oa.atW' which recently rilled in at n. Tew., daring hat tw^ysar voyaga sroaad tat world. Th. lab was Isra^^rrWa**! i> ?Xn north of Wain* Bay ofl tat Soutli African eaaat A. yet UHI^SEL it Is h*T fMt during optraUi sieved to bs s form of primitive cod-fl-.li of an present blundering, ending tha s^y ^yeller suffering from in*ho.l..ges which never should l]wnZtl on entering the countrv curbing the wm ^ Xakmt a 0f|Ce w hoeDital and placed in isolation until ho has recovered and can travel again -vithout danger of spreading the infection. hove happened, and rising cost of living "Our foreign policy need, firmer and more brtHUftent direction. N. Zealand Give 18-Year-01d8 Arms Training N. Zealand To Send Meat To Britain WELLINGTON. NI. WELLINGTON. New Zealand, Feb. New Zealand it to Thin Set Greene Writing • . "Our defence needs to be •strengthened againi.1 aggressor* without, la engine that all )iv JON HOPK What were the flnl stories ^ ._ divert to you ever read" Thousands of lS-year-oM New Britain the bulk of S.VOO ton^ <>f Did ..ny one book influence Zealaudera entered camp this meat which it was intended to >' our 'uturc' month to begin iniluary training. *ii thu „.,„ in Canad;. and Fw Graham Greene, a bloorfihe first intake tor the tne \jniitd States it ana -m t ur,u 1 S shocker featuring Dixon Dominion 1 n iun(xd uy^ ay %  Bivll. detective, came first. Then %  The Private Aeroplane, by CapK. J. Hoiyoake Minister i.„ J? 1 G Hf n ,h V t^ ,l " m. But some military authorities **"a "w decision was made beMarjorie Bowra'i The Vioer ..f aro asking whether the country is "use it considered the produce Milan that brought about the — ..__ „-.. training the right men. and would not reach Canadian and crisis. "From (hat moment savs mediately ,„ dteolve PariUequ, ,pd u, idenUfy qmekly any „, M he , change should bo made United Stale, market, at the beat Greene. %  I be,.,, to „ril." £{3" !" )<"". %  nl l . b >' lo "eel the urtenl needs o( tha time, and becaute of the aeeenclaa book, were ftlled with ImltatiSiZl ,TuL^,l ; 1 r C 'u '"SS* ""'•"' """ s ho"e in Britain " !" "' hat he call, "llu. Medical nuthorlties hope that The present scheme is a long"^ Bowena magnilireitt book," precautionary moves coupled range one. Under New Zealand Unfortunately, this quantity In reminiscent mood Greene ..ilh uie use of new drugs devellaw men are not eligible for millwill not In Itself permit any alterrecalls his early literarv life in oped since 1918 will help minlmi/c tary service abroad until they are ation In the meagre British ration The l.oat Childhood—a collection any llu outbreak ,n this country. 21. The llrst of the H-year-olda but it will be a contribution in the %  essays!due March. The 1918 outbreak originated in under the present scheme! began ristht direction Hoiyoake said ITt|, /or clnldr,-,, ultli amMSpeln and quickly spread through their training las; year and henrs Sor ,, u | 0 „„,,„„. (or ,,„„,, ""• '< %  u !" ui up into a biu i.-llcr Europe, hitting both Allied and will not be available for service „ ur H •%  •— 3. Those now "_ V ,, ,, .. ill be available nd ,he Un,,e rf States, and it wa< pondlngly later. hoped to pursue at the next sesSome distinguished New Zca* lon development of a limited land Midlers of the last war are market in America.—Renter. urging that the scheme be changed to Train men who will be immedi——.—__ ately available for an expeditionary force If need arises. The men most suitable for such a force have had no training at all. They aro the men who have become 21 since the war and are now aged 21Jf| 27. These men would be trio iream of any expeditionary force For Pilots Odds On Shawcross %  > riluM.tl c. WATSON -_ LONDON. Aitornc Cmnu 04, Hartley 2J. ^i*""'* r crune, trials, TSLZS: V "I* !" an oddt-on H"! 1 *! >•> succeed the £SJ5~* %  -"" """" s^T'"'' who '* w ' "uiTe,,,2 !" " ' u,noril and government %  mcials consider it ver> unlikely J wiU be able to return to B mT^ X ? ou l ] ?** T ,urntTl *"deet of time under doctor*" core •Joir" oC state, because of a recurrent heart condiltoil and other sporadic lllneea. Prime Minister Clement Attl„ f^Tfc ^ und r P"" 8 *"'" '" both Conservatlvea and l .H..I. Party leaders u, ropiacBrvin. £"!, ^L tta * hM m5,,tod "*~ nny other likely eendidate from ihe lasbour Party ranks. Stmwrrnsw. who has been Attorney General since 1045. is an effective ..peaker and Britons who have seen him in action I.KA forward t> the posslbtllry of Shawcross duelling with th i .itrolic Russian rnreign Mmistei. Andrei Viihinskv. across a barsalning table. The most salable case Shawcross hai> handled in Britain as Husecutor was the trial of Dr. Klaus Fuchs. confessed atomic %  py who uas sentenced to 14 years' imprisonment Ian March for giving A-bomb secrets to Russia. Coloured Peoples Ask 2-Chamber Legislature In B.G. id for five years and *n I'ppef House or legislative Counetl eight memberf. Tour nominated by the (governor end four by the Prime Mini The Prime Minister shall iFiH>m t> i ikn C"-'c>sBondriiii member of the majui/y purty in ...1 HM House "i i.ciireientativea atU GEORGFTOWN. I*eb i. ; ,ll appoint U-n men I A three-man deputation from wrtom two shall be members of the British Guiana branch of the the Legulotlve Co t-oegue of Cotourea p.-uple giv .. iih him in the Exevuii\e ing evidence before the Wadding with ministerial renpoiton ( institution Commission toExcept in matters of external 1e> suggested u two-chamber .ufaits and defence, the Governor Legislature as a detinue step for>lull get In accordance *ith the ward lo more responsible govExecutive Council's advice In the eminent "Whatevci thai step exer^ifeM at BMTCJ picrogallve. forward might be" Hon. Dr J. and in discipline of civil servants*. A. Nicholson seid. It should be he shall be assisted by the adviceich nature thai if British Guiana accept Caribbean Feder we could easily fall within its framework." Failing ihi.t. Nicholson ihould be given ., ,,-r which will lend to n • government. The L C.P was tepresentei' by Nicholson. Dr. Claude Dasdw* and Mr. Lewellyn John. In lh rse of the dlacussion Dentiow told the Commissioners he was confident that the party ulre.ut> in being would cut right across the race question. the Privy CouncilHelp For Dociorg l.FIGHTON HI //.Allli. Kng. Feb. So man* Laighton Buz2aid l-eople IU medical tit-1 M iii n* Him the town's seven in., iota BB i the public I.ii mercy. An advertisement m the local the public •.•(Hics!t fOf evening or i.ight VlatH except m GBtag of exivome urgency'' and to ask for Hits otllS if unable to attend mr%  i:",.;-,. zffsnsgSitst&gn: ^^.PSir&JSrsSi Some Flower irt. w M t-. L S2f D 25L— feportod inCanada" were* found antng Into camp a-mh "n ii '" L U U mon B lhe cre oi an Indian ship will be i,tied with a Flight LogexanUned at the quarantine sta; small machine that draws the i lon on Crosse Isle, in the St. Law. track of gn aircraft on a map so renCe R, ve r below Quebec That the pilot can instantly see where was July 9. 1018. ne ls The bureau of statistics, on the A strip map travels across the basis of reports from the nine screen nnd a small pointer with n provinces, estimated the death toll coloured pen controlled by the at 37.665.—(Oft radio beams traces the aircraft's tid iKhcit rcry young. kept "turn about It j ut he : regular 1 scale so luck his .rack over llu Elcrtrical impulses intervals indicate a tii the pilot can rapidly t'peed over the route'. Test-; have shown that in ..n area covered by the beams which work the Flight I-og the device can be used to navigate craft to within 250 yard end of a runway Th> I .S. Specialists Go To Morocco More Germans Will Work In Coal Mines BERLIN. Feb. 7. Stronger Labour measures to draft more manpower to coal of the mines in East Germany were hinted today by Selbmann. Heavy The PARIS. Feb 7. newspaper Le .Monde i • Man who wrote The Groundnut Affair Alan Wood — new turns from fact to nctioti, calls hi* first novel simply Herbert. Story has been rewritten from draft originally produced when he was convalescing after war wounds. Wood's immediate plans —to stick to book writing. %  Publishers of Burke's Landed Gentry are busy preparing first edition since before the Sho w ,.:. a large proportion of veterans or the Second World War are alt> ot '* , %  ihe first American tries will be about the same numi v HI. past the best age for millspecialists who will undertake the ber as before, reason being that tary operations enlargement of the five chief land ownership is not llumit ,,, _„ airports in Morocco, have arrived qualification. A n interesting Scheme Works Well in Casablanca. Six ships bringing "tough pedisi.c will sutllcc. The New Zealand compulsory material and 260 technicians are • Chagrined ex-Coven! (i ; ,i service scheme was planned at a expected shortly '''"" Market executive H. F. Parthere seemed likely to __ kinoon. At the end of the war Urn Fancy Increased demands made Hundreds .ictors have shocked the natli Pants HHt^^n, S^iHFT^P 1 ^ sfla Visa* sss ked l'he MS ZSS&JZ&lSLtoiS* !" *5 both insl.uctors and remit. The object is by "that time lo wU1 be created at Agadir and right. But'publishers* over here have them sufficiently trained to uerodromoH built near Rabid and have fought shy of it. And Parlerrous metaU market. The manthere ii a good proapect is thought to be aim being attained if there • T,.di„o„al irey llannel -baM" £, In^'slre'n.K"^! "' bAW lrt-.ii happily discarded fur BnllBri *^ iiui A-...I..^ -stvlr •— %  -—— —'* %  **' i . ^ ieii„.i laHIIsslssi I fcober-minded my sporting "fancy power shortage ^ a n l s ^,A n .' 1 ?. ,n ?L. ,w, ar. ? n ^' one reason for reported drastic flcient time >r this sufQuarrel In Church (lice alert the American-style trousers with legs of one colour and cufTg. pocket facings and waistband in basting shade. Blackpool's Harry Black, who An American i MILAN Feb.. 7 Italian monarchists all but car to blows in San Babila Chu Mcji.wnne. however, New Zealand has no troops available for pat ion paper active service abroad. The time here during a Memorial Mass for ... West Berlin to-day wrote "A taken to raise and train a force for King Victor Emmanuel Hi of Italy •*<'. new^labour law is being piepsrcd Korea_ showed^ the djfncultles Inwho died in Egypt in December achieving lived. New Zealand's contingent 1947. The priest appealed lid not reach Korea until the beorder from his pulpit ..... by ,he EaM Gprmo" Labour"Minif m*d,' w^r^h, l7. a "d 851.000 men between is respons'.bie for the Muge .if"si I } h r *" ' 28 and 45 will be ,egginning of January although lorlal recklessness islered for compulsory labour. The prompt start was made in raisins Ift0 'roubl Black 'liftci" the idea from n ? limit for the uranium mines it after the United Nations'call for !" a laid Unson. tiver there, wonders whv. # Enileid-born J. Radford Kvans has been u ear salesman. charity dance organiner, chauffeur (thut lasted a week), teacher farmhand. builder's labourer. And nowHe Is finding fame as the jiuthor of four adventure books for gin-, is under contract ,e to produce two new novels a b year. Main character in his stori-alled Rrondai Dickson and lain, his publisher:.. "Is popularity which may LONDON Covent (iarden, London'* greal flower-selling market, will hold ili own flower show this summer foi the rlnt tune in 300 years. For hundreds of years the historie market has helped other shows, like the famous Chelsea Flower Show and the Hoiiiiulliiral Hall exhibition*, with rare blooms from all over the world, but never held one of its own. Now tourists and other visitor* will be able to savour England's fanest 11 uwers—roses, cariuttions. eh rysan them umi and lome of the orchids which earn Britain $250.000 a year. Covent Oar den. on tho spoi where the monks of Westminster once tilled their garden and buried their brethren, will be turned int.i .i blazing, colourful flowrrland on June 12 and 18. But the Ahjow will not include a "Battle of flowers." One of the Judges. Mrs Violet Stevenson, who lives in Nell Owynn's garret apartment high over the Garden said: "It was decided that the English love flowers so much they would hate to sea them treated that way." -IN.6. I'hilri.lelpbi.i and tvi the Initial reaction. "aznagad" at %  "*! ""' Czech bolder, where ground forces. It comxnted of Theatrical working conditions flog tart ed whe Italian triiblazuned with Die n ,ii fog eventually put her in the cl Frank Ttichards's Tom Merry. Hilly Binder, etc." So go to . someRadford-Evans. Rrenda lookes loured liko lieing a permanent )ol>. bad li.c. mixture of war veterans and men Aimon a Catafukiue standing folk quickly caught on to the idea uePn raised iroin 45 to 55 years who have become 21 since trie war 'he aisle tor tV mass, and since then Black has been tho paper said. and had ns! FOR PERSONAL FRESHSESS ALWAYS LONDON. new Minister of Hilary Marquand. told that ptions had free under the National Health Service in the 12 The police bundled noisy ringmonths ending Nov. 30. IS50. leaders of both sides out of church He said the estimated cost of as the priest mounted the pulpit. these prescriptloni was $13,847.* —Renter. 600—I..N.S. A i miiwu W1 pirscn. .ianan repuonc. Wi* hl ii.„..„ ' %  ,., r 131 Rii.Mi,,, ,,i,z,,i, arc ivglslotcd Calafulqui. """'boo., .lispensnl trt, RATES OF EXCHANGE CANADA •* i lo-:. pr. Clt-quen on nBiihtu 1 I 10pr. •eaawal i>r..f. r.i "iv pr. Hishi Drru el e-is-* pc. M i ia pr. cBae ea s. 10% pr. Curemcy SB %  l*t pr. Cup ) I%  CHECK YOUR FACTORY SUPPLIES and I'humi-iirlfj lor Ihm follotiinff DUNLOP TRANSMISSION BELT1NO •(.• z f PIT BUNLOP RUBBER INSERTION ft" 4 "...• DICK'S PACKINCS all Typoi BELT FASTENERS t BELT DRESSING FLAKE GRAPHITE STENCIL INK COTTON WASTE BASS BROOMS STEEL WIRE BRUSHES EMERY & SANDPAPER FILES All Typas TAPS s, Dlfc S.^£ KS WS HACKSAW BLADES JNglNEERS HAMMERS — OPKN END i BOX SPANNER TAPER L STRAIGHT SHANK HIOII SPEED DRILLS ST1LLSON TYPE UWdifes' \ft#fc. '.^V* CHAIN PIPE WRENCHES *"—4" •"•"•"•" ECKSTEIN BROTHERS %  AT (TBER The above equipment ia available for early delivery from Ihe U. K. COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM Ltdisamammmmmmmm Ha looked forward to the time ut next elections wi hg Britaln'l oldest praetiMunptately elected House of Jtepting docton, resentatives of 21 nieml>ers elect' —1 V . TTOOTAL FABRIC I I A Smart Sun Dress With Bolero See ihe Tm.t.il Label on every Dress Beautiful Patterns Pnlku Dots Pretty Stripe* and I-ovcly AII*Over Patterns A Sun Dress For Your VACATION—118.00 each ."(She ^Modern £>resn Shoppe BROAD STREET, I THE NEW MILK DRINK Maralun %  lit vu HAS MuslTn h purr countr. milk in ill ... rklinH . a wondtrful nw tluum . plenty ofiugar—and! %  '• ddiduudyciukludI ABy*u *'lASM .-IIAIUCIS Enquiries cordially inviled for the supply of ihe following— 42 Mil.I'. B Sffl. IUISI I Hill I I I II VI I OIIS (Slrrl U'lH-f-K altio avullablr for l'l.,„ v t,,„ U ) unxss II in ns .. A uu M\M HI SIMM VIII IIS SIDE Dl I IVI IIV RAKES 11 in >m.i.s iiiiiin/iM. mill is



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PACE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIURSDAY. FEBBIARY 8, 151 ^ mr ^^ tW Learning good etiquette F IVE members of the Barbados Golf team wtilch played A series of matches again**, the St Andrew's Golf Club or Trinidad ri-furned yesterday afternoon by B W.I.A, from Trinidad. wereCol and Mrs. I'.uk Vidmrr. Mori KB Hunte. M.L.C Mr WUlia.n Alkn-m and Mrs. Brend* Wilson Ttu-y were sjreompaniert by Mrs. Hunte and Mrs Atkinson. Amving by the same piano were Mr. Shirley Atwell, Manager of the CHy Garage and Dr. Barbara Lloyd-Still. Nurse In Caripito M ISS SYLVIA WESTFALL, who is a nurse at Creole Petroleum's hospital in Caripito. arrived from Venezuela via Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A.. to spend ten davs' holiday In Barbadoa. The first pert of her stay will be spent at the St Lawrence Hotel and the latter part at the Paradise Beach Club. THE GAM ftQL< Oil Vice-Pre.ident Return. ^Aff^f SlTTlNG A&OUT X)W6 VOUB POOA .HAVIMG *>u MT. otoeet. #v APVOHA WT HT rtXI MHtLV 40 NiCtLV AS TlttV U4t0 TO Way Above Tk*R. JACOB MILLER, propre.Ivi ir, r D f Miller Harness Co.. In New York is touring: the West Indies. He arrived here yesterday via Miami. Venezuela and Trinidad by H W.I A He was in Venezuela for their Carnival and in Trinidad for Carnival on Monday, and Tuesday The terrific pageantry of the Trinidad Carnival was way above ihe standard of the one in VeneSMtJa. Mr. Miller is staying at the Marine Hotel. He leaves here in %  few days for St. Croix. Back From Trinidad M R. and Mrs Jim Wilson and Mr. Wilson's brother "Bill" who went to Trinidad over the week-end returned yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. Mr. Wilson was away on business and his wife and brother went over to see Carnival. Mr Wilson is the Canadian Government Engineer on loan to the Barbados Government, looklnc after their interests in the construction of the new runway at Seawell. His brother has been In Barbados on holiday for several weeks. In B.C. and Trinidad M R. COLIN WEEKES. Customs Ornccr here, who has been on holiday for the past seven weeks, spent most of his vacation in British Guiana, but irrlved in Trimdad m good time for Carnival. He returned from Trinidad yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. Carnival in Trinidad he told Cai'lb was hard to describe—it was euch a tremendous spectacle. Distant Relative M R. and Mis. Manuel Iturbl arrived tronf Venezuela via Trinidad yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. to spend five days' holiday in Barbados. They ar-staying at the Marine Hotel. Mr. Iturbl hi .1 Civil Engineer In Caracas. Asked if he was any relation to Jose" Iturbl. the famous pianist, Mr. Purbi told Carlb, he was a distant relative of his. On Way Horn; M R. HANS SAENGER an American who for the past two and a half years has been working under contract with the Martin Engineering Co, in Maracaibo, Is on his way home to Los Angeles, California on long leave. He arrived from Venezuela via Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A. accompanied by his wife They plan to spend live days here at the Hastings Hotel before leaving for the US. via Jamaica. She Forgot \ CANADIAN lady bought two hair nets in a shop in Broad Street a few days ago. She gave the girl serving her a dollar and was amazed, when she received a dollar and few cents change. She had forgotten about the exchange on her Canadian dollar. Jamaican Tea Plantation J AMAICA had an Interest in a British television programme en February 2nd. On that date Richard Dimbleby, famous commentator, visited the oldest ten merchants in the world at the sign of the Three Sugar Loaves and Crown In connection with a TV programme called "London Town". The firm was established in 1850 and In their office In th* City they still have n number of very old ledgers and a book with the names and occupations of the slaves who worked on their estate In Jamaica. Journalist Visitors A NUMBER of West Indian journalist students wcro included In the Polytechnic course party which was conducted over the "E%-ening Standard" building last week. This trip, one of i number arranged to London newspapers In connection with the course, greatly impressed the visitors They were particularly aitracted by the rotary presse.-, which, each, produces papers at the rate of between 40,000 anJ 50,000 an hour. In Charge I N the absence of Mr. Charles Mills. Colonial Office Liaison Officer, on leave, Mr. W. A. Richardson is temporarily responsible for West Indian students In Britain. Richardson, who comes from Tiinldud. Is a graduate of King's College, laimioii University. He llnds his temporary Job "very interesting". M R C. W. HAMILTON. VlcePresjdent of the Gulf Oil Corporation in New York. Mrs. Hamilton, Mr Robert Boggs, Manasrr of the Gulf Oil Produc tion in the Western Hemisphere. Mrs. Sherman and Mis* Sherm.n. who arrived here on Sunday by Mene Grand* Oil Company'.-; private plane, returned to Venezuela yesterday. Purpose of Mr Hamilton's visit was to acquaint himself wtih conditions of the Barbados Gulf OH Company. Dr. W Auer. Manager of ths Barbados branch and Mrs. Auer. were at Seawell to see the party off. Returning On February 17 A T present holidaying In Grenada are Mr. and Mrs. Willie Wells and their two children They expect to return on February 17. Mr. Wells Is with T. Geddcs Grant Ltd. Carnival Quean M ISS CHRISTINE GORDON. "Miss Jeffrey's Beer" and Carnival Queen 1951 of Trinidad went to school in Barbados. She is a former student at the Ursullne Convent. With Creole Petroleum A RRIVING from Trinidad yesterday morning en route from Venezuela were Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert Heltman. They are here for five days staying at the Paradise Beach Club. Mr. Heltman k with the Creole Petroleum Corporation in Caracas. They spent the first part of their holiday in Trinidad for Carnival. Assistant Secretary M R. GEORGE SKEETE. Assistant Secretary of B.W I.S.A. stationed in Trinidad was among the passengers arriving from Trinidad yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. Leaving For U.S. M RS. G. I .OWE, of Jackson, St. Michael, will leave tho island on Friday afternoon for tho U.S.A. via Trinidad by plane. She will Join her husband, Mr. P. T. Lowe, who has been there for over a year. Mrs. I.<.we was formerly an elementary school teacher. NEW YORK. Feb. 3. Women (and men too) who arc frankly fal—and admit it—are eligible to shed literally hundreds of pounds in a mutual-help club called "Fatties Anonymous •• Its a three-year oid organization that operates on the theory that over-eaters are as emotionally and physii.. rubject to cure, as o-er-drmkersa, The idea is that id, _, Iie ed heir from fellow sufferers as desperately as do membeiH of "alcoholics, anonarnous." Through grouo therapy, mass confession of off-diet binges, a .locial programme and a ruling that says you must lose at least (We pounds a month, its more than 400 members are doing big things toward conquering bigness. Ruth Douglas, plump but shapely founder and president, shed 60 pounds last year and aim* to drop 25 more by early spring. Others have trimmed off as many as 200 pounds by signing into "FA." and signing off fattening foods. Here's how the operation works .... First, as Mr*. Douglas explains. a prospective member has to be honest and possessed of some will power io join any club with .t •shocker" name like "faith** anonymous." j Thai name, she says, is a meirV ber s first test. Unless he'll ad alt his guilt, he's not in a mental mood to be cured. Too many people blame obesity or glandulai disturbances or heredity. "But it's plain over-eating," snaps Mrs. Douglas, "because jfiencc has proved that glands and family tendencies to fat are over-rated. Anyone can lose weight by eating the right—and nothing but the right—things." Mrs. Douglas decidca :ong age that overweight was more an emotional and psychological problem than a physical one. For that reason she hires psychiatrists and psychothei ^pists to speak to her group alongside the doctors am! nu'-itlonlsts. And on the theory that diets "lake something away' 'from tlit heavyweight but "provide no ubf slitute for the loss," she has in-, stituted several programmes \o give members food-substitutes. For example, each member must read a book n month -md briefly report on it. "That." she says, "is so their mental horizons will broaden while their chassis slim." And there's a "do something different (lay" when each member must see a new play, hear a lee ture, try a new (non-fattening) dish, meet a new friend, etc., and report the activity to fellow members at the next meeting. — 'g *ood et part of the drive to Kf banana 1 split* "A /UJ' pas In etiquette can over-eater Io a wellatOvked pantry!" Mrs. Douglas, who started her nen-proflt organization (dues. $10 ,i year > in IM7. sayshit got the Idea one day when she was reading a newspaper account of BE "alcoholics anonymous" meeting. "It sutideuly clicked.'' -he recalls. "I realized that alcoholism was ii serious social problem. But fat was Just as serious, except that obese people don't hurt anyone but themselves. They just si: m a corner and dig their own graves with their teeth Mrs. Dougla* called on her bridge club to help her use some will-power. She weighed 2*4 pounds, was the smallest member of the group. They called her 'Rosebud." "The first year, it didn't work loo well," ihc says. 'We'd be very siron? for a couple of weeks, and then we'd drop back into our old rtutlnc of serving refreshments at midnight. "I could m ueeued mor^ will-power, and it was then that I got the idea: Emotions seemed to be so much stronger In fat girls than In normal ones. Our inhibitions were as big as we wore. I went out and found a psychologist and convinced him to come work with us. 'We've been going hot—but not so heavy—ever since." By the end of the first year, the crew of 60 In "Fatties Anonymous" had lost an average of 46 pounds each. Of the original group. 80 per cent of the men and women who never considered House* i\<-Guidc PRICES of tomatoes and cabbage when the Adveeate checked yesterday were : Large tema t e.es 24 rent* per Cabbage IS rente per pound B.B.C. Radio Programme THURSDAY P>b 7. ISSI. SSD am Ttw Mudr COM Rnund. 7 am. The N*i. T.IS am Nrwt A.u.l Ma, 7 II am Ffofn the Editoriala "IS am Profrmn Psrada, ",JO a.m. I Wat Thre. 7.41 am Tt* Woman In Bh. SSO am Work and Worihip. a 41 a m Prupi* mid ftaaouiCM. B a.m. The !>>.. 9 1H* %  m Horn* Neva from Britain. IS m ClOM Down. 11 IS a.m. Programma Parade II IS • m. Auitra'U vi btgiand, II 48 am MiUmtm of Account. 11 %  nooni Tae He*; IS 10 p.m. Nwa AnatjitS, U.IS pi. Ooar Down. *.IS—• ;% M m 4 IS p.m. Souvanira ol Hunr. ) p.m. Auitralla v. Eiat>d. SIS p.m. Urn* Scharrer. S.U pin. Fhjihin Rendnvou*. > "•—; IS am. n n a i* H m P-m PWIIIon Playera. 6.IS p.m. Prnm iw> AnalyUi, 7 IS p.m. C.lli.. U. W.I. 1.41 p.m. I .. -.*•—H.aa . n xi.w a 4*.4S M, %  pm ii..di,. Newareel. sir. pm Booki 1> Kead. B.30 p m. Slim Review. StS pm Compoor of i" 1 ""~r*. 9 pm. "•'rrT-T' uf Account. SIS pm Alan Uivoda?. t.S pm Tip Top Tunea. IS p m. The Newi 10 ID pm Prom the Editorial). 10 IS p.m K.ankle Howard. I04S Dm Mid Week Talk. 11 p.m Ktmm Ihc Thud Programme their matrimonial chances a: "likely," have been mair<"d. They've done it, Mrs. Douglas says, by slimming down the invigorating way ... by developing "mental muscles" and supplanting food for living with food for thought. —INS. IO I ATI* M.I' II CIXEItlA (Members Only) MATINBJS: TO DAY al S p.m. TONIOHT AT SJM une POWER o: Jean PTTSSS :o: Cesar ROMERO :o: Jobn BUTTON In "CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE" In Teehnkoler A VXh Cetilury-rDl %  THE SECRET LIFE: OF WALTER MITTY" SUr-m: DANNV KA\f: VIRGINIA MAYO PLAZA Then ire— Bridgetown (DiAL 2310) LAST ) SHOWS TODAY — 4*J S Jo sanae. DAUGHTER! ROSIEO'GRADY CCHNICOLOK MATINEE TODAY 1 p.m. Il Mat. Friday fWMlNAI. f-Ol-RT .RKO D..blr>[| DUIH VAXLCV K.VM.tRX Tom CONJVAY^ Martha. O DKLSCOLI./| Km MAYKARD.-llo-.t OQaOH TMt MM h SOI STAIN with Tim HOLT Taawrraw — l.SS a -i p.m. -'SEABiaC-t'lT" (Colo l'l.A/A Theatre— OISTIN {DIAL 8404) TO-DAY S and 8 SO p.m onl ny Ban BUnty Taler a* (karll* Than In IMMKS OF NEW YORK" & "DARK ALIBI" "RIDING HIGH" iMei ocrm D.,.,ble> 'LAW CONKS TO Cll NSIOHT Johnny Mack BROWN and -RIDISO DOWN i Hi TRAIL" Rupert and the Sketch Book-.29 %  = .\li;TV— (THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES LUt HO TONITF si — 1.1,11 assMal z*m ORXVS Tlm HOLT n WANDERIR of ike WASTELAND & BROTHERS in the SADDLE JAafgS WARFS34 PRIDAY. SAT sl*N. no p.m. Slat. Bun. J p m. iWarnar) GARY COOPER In TASK KKCK M1DNITE SAT. lth .Monogram) DKATH VALLSY RANf.ER K-n MAYNARD llool GIBSON and •OVHAMnt. CANYON" Wllh Tom KBENE lta*.il mil irlutri io WISH I Jny q,:t:ioni, and it kng:h Com: able Growler umka qui.ily. "If. no pjo. "what does this mean?" "I can explain,** mumbled his sagging consort. "It was like this ..." [Any reader leho Is not on tenterhooks may a*k for Ills money back. And a fal chance he Iia of getting if?) A' Dried Cereal* For Bi'Hopa I LIKE the explanation of meateating given by a member of the Fruitarian Society. Meat was "coveted by the masses, because it was the food of bishops and barons." And again. "To-day we know that flesh food cannot be compared for food value with dried cereals." I Imagine that most people can enjoy meat without muttering. "Ha' Now I've got even with those bishops and barons." And as for "food value" those who treat a me?! as a chemical experiment arc .'till in the minority. The nornvil'v cons,ituled man eats what he enjoys eating, and not what someone tells him Is good for him. Tatl-pipce A man sprang up and. triffi his trousers /ailing, nhotited. "Only pMioaoph/Ti should mitt* Mobile Toe* A LECTURER recently told an audience of school-mistresses that children ought to walk barefoot to keep the mobility of their toes. As everyone now admits, it Is the young man with mobile toes who gets the £5.0O0-a-year Job. I know a barefooted Director who can play La Donna • Mobile on the piano with his toes. He ulavs execrably, but all that matters is that his toes should reman mobile. To keep the lingers mobile, children should walk on their hands. One-Way Veil IS your face unlit to be photoiliaphed.' Do your frtends shudder when you say "Good morningDo strange dogs cower or run yelping to their kennels when they see you? Are you plain—ugly— hideous—or Just revolting? Yes? Then order now our impregnable one-way veil. Light and compact, it clips easily to bowler hat or toque, gives complete Immunity to friends and kiddies. A satisfied customer writes: "Since wearing the 'Afay/atr Impregnable Vet! children no longer run screaming from me. In fact, I am actually followed in the lire'. It haa given me a neu> lease of life." Order now to avoid disappointing your friends. • Science And Progreu I NOTE, without any marked Jubilation, that the scientists now nave a bomb so powerful that only an atom bomb could set it off. Il Is described, of course as a deterrent against war. and it would destroy an area of 314 square miles. But there is something even more hopeful. A homo, says the author of a recently-published book of comfort and heartsease, one million times as powerful as the atom bomb would destroy more than 30,000 square miles. And there will always be someone to say. "Aftei nil. it's only like ordinary bombing, but a bit more destructive." Serial Story AS tne rourteen Redskins cut their way through the barrage balloon the glamorous Freda Falkirk (known as Svelte Seeling throughout the Sfort) discardeo her upper garments as she sfelt the whirlpool's drag, and suddenly an amazing thing happened (to be continued). 11. wnai Baba> *ui 12, MIIKP* tiiiiian run •imutiUi IB. i't> iaga atamp" Kept hSTt. %  1*. Ujtideaa ol dMUuction. 4( IS. French King. I3i 17. Doubled tor Mintraiiaii rluD ll>. You've met ttie •tinwt unnmeet tin*. 1O1 £*. Hotel. 131 it. Teat aS. Old-tB*oun 1. IU leavoa turn la .prlng aa i as autumn, 14) 'i Bird-like isi a. Kiarmmtt itvtrom Iturina. i odurea iiixirMneaa rail my pr-r tf Ho \ Arii," 10. Wti* tee.ee, the tnia* ao u IS Apile. IS IU rnre tne tal drieer wan IS. rial. IS) 20. Couldn't be ctowr. 441 31. A very neat alteration. K Made bl (ro-t. 141 J4. fcurteen provide* lite CONGOLEUM SQUARES I 3x2t yds. _$8. 80 3*3* yds. $12. 30 | 3x3 yds $10. 53 3x4 yds 414. 04 FLOOR-CO VERING per yd -$1. 36 6 ft wide (f ell-Base) hi i krtJg, a p.,"-. Damn l a Kftr-ai S Ori Maah"T*i vi "'fniin 1ST taut IS III II11.1X1. HIT OF THE IIILLS OF I III: III. I I GRASS . The Thrill-pounding Story of the "Orphan Horse" who raced te Glory WARHfR BROS mum mm i m DAVID BUTLER %  ••-.-...~.w reo t 2.39 A 8.:iO To-morrau(iFriday) SATURDAY 1 ir, and .M pm. and Oontlunliij Duly #*1T O PENING TO-MORROW — WITH A BANG. Gal who Took me a Ladif... 1^, No M SirmW 1. WIUIAM10WD1SXOSCAU BMOHEY-> h FMOiHICK Bt COBPOVA tn*M b ROBERT ARTHUR A Ui*mulInlnnabwil P.:!,te HERE'8 SOME EXTRA DISHES! TEX BENEKE AND THE OLEN MILLER ORCHESTRA LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE EMPIRE Lasl Two Shorn To-diy . and I.JO Columbia Pictures Present. FAUST AND THE DEVIL Starring Italo TAJO and Nelly CORRADI with Glno MATTEHA BOXY Laat Two Shown To-day 4.J0 and 8.15 Universal Double Marlene Dietrich and James Stewart In "DESTRY RIDES AGAIN" WHO DONE IT" Bud Abbott and Lou Costello ROYAL To-day ..mi To—morrow 430 and 8.SO United Artists Double William Boyd as Hopalonsr Cassldy in "STRANGE GAMBLE" and "MACOMBER AFFAIR Gregory Peck and Joan Bennett OLYMPIC Last Two Shows To-day 4.30 and 8.15 20th Century Fox Double J !" nn ? 9 r in an d Cornel Wilde In "CENTENNIAL SUMMER" snd "MINE OWN EXECUTIONER Starrlnj Burgess Meredith and Kicron Moore %  EVANS and %  WHITFIELDS SjYdUR SHOE STORES EVENING HANDBAGS On* of a Kind at WHITFIELD'S only :— BLACK HEAVY CORDED FABRIC from $14.75 BLACK & TINSEL BROCADE from 12.S3 NYLONS—New Range. Popular Shades .... l.*5 ENAMELWARE A fciilr rangr Io srlrtt Iron CUPS and PLATES DINNER CARRIERS JUGS SAUCEPANS KITCHEN SINKS BASINS CHAMBERS TOILET SETS SOAP DISHES TABLE TOPS Slocked by our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT Telephone No. 2039 THE IIAim \HOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD. 'Havt you heard about A'rlMSVr' SELECT YOURS EARLY^ DON'T MISS Our on a long-pUnned outiag or party . when Psrndol quickly helps to n?n>ve psriodsl pains, without disagTerjblr letdown or7after-effect! Scientifically com pounded from 4 inprdiriite— Parade) is esorllrnt for headaches, too* Get Dr. Chate's I'arad-.l today—the name "Dr. Chase" is your awunnce. u DR. CHASE'S PARADOL — %  Owefc Relief from Pom BBBH Bathroom Requisites Porcelain Basins In White. Pink. Ivory and Green Low Down Toilet Suites in White, Pi ik. Ivory and Green. Chromium Soap Dishes, Tooth Brush and Tumbler Holders, Toilet Paper Holders, Curtain Rings. Braji Wovt WIr. 2 ft. wide in the following meshes; — 120/120. 100/100, 90-90, 40/40 PLANTATIONS LTD. •





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PACK EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THl'RSUAV. FERRl'ARY 8, 1951 Van Dam Spies Present Boys Out The Land Beat Past UK VAN DAM. middle-weight ^f CRICKET champion t.f Holland, and favourfl* for the jxii <>f righiing Randolph THE Present XI won th* Turpiii for (he European till* at a mu;u Harrison College Old Harringay on Faomary 27 1 hir* &>**• criclwt Hatch at I'oUefc "•eeret spy-out-the-land ytswrday. This wu due to food bv Skipper J. A WllliOl.ll STAI.LKItV I* % IK AIM vis*. With him La Mrs. SiMie van .—-'^f. \a_v .>.*• .uiUu. ifc.% I.UU % % % % % %  'iv Ham. who combine* the triple functions of wife, manaser 1 I. r to bet husi...: Ostensibly ihe\ BT* here to wo their Kmiliah relative*. But to-nlfiht Ihcj visit Birmingham to see Turpin meet the new Spanish champion, Edmiardo Lopez, who. at the This afternoon, * lltt 4 lb.— VAT lb. lighter than Turpin. Tomorrow Ihev will be at the Albert Hal) lo watch Alex Buxtoh light the r'renrh champion, %  '. .reel—who is one of Van Dam's rivals for the tit)* shot not out 41 and C Smith who ~* beautifullv stumped by nd wicket-keeper Aewms for 40. * They enabled the Present to acore )2 runs lor the lose of six wicket* in reply to the Oki Boy:, acore of 114. M Clarke topscored 1 with Z wei*jh-In for y, r OId Boy, while G. Mayers West Indian captain John goddard knocked up 25 each K. King the College -low right arm bowler took four wickew fo. 16 runs and Dash three for five runs Bowling for the Old Boys. W.l. iky""" ,hc EBU n p,r,s &SK %  saSh-aariSsai "! have never seen Turoin ,wo overs for four rung. box! tZ I ""old IK? ,„ n'Jht *<"•' the JOB the Pre.*. him." the 30-vear-old Von Dim !" <" ">< %  Old Boys on wicKrl told me to-day. 'hat win taalna %  Ml ot turn I am AlhW the French Skinner and Stuart opened for crulser-woleM Luc.cn Coreqlhuj, < old Bay •"* •""". *"* ,"*'} %  "' at The lUluc on February . but the llr.t over bowled by JCorRegatta On Saturday Air Races For Festival THE fourth regatta of the ItM vat himg season will be sailed tn Carlisle Bay on Saturday uaa-i the ,iuspic* of the Royal Bart. do* Yacht Club. Starting time* and handicap tre as follows-— that wouW leave me plenty of til to get ready for Turpm." —LJ..S. Farquharoon Beats Hanna In Montrgo Lawn Tennis Games bin. Stuart cocked so ailly mid oil to give King an easy catch. Clarke joined Skinner and born started to settle down Skinner .struck his first four by nicely pulling a bal! from Simmon ds to the leg bounr'ary. When the score had reached 3 Skinner was dismissed for 15 off King 1 West The game livened up Indian captain Ooddard elated with Mayers at the wicket KINGSTON, Ja. Feb. t They both hit the ball A big chec • Cm the second day of the Caribwent up for Adams when he left bean lawn Tennis Championships the pavilion on his way to the at Montego Bay this afternoon, wicket Although a short time n*. there was a big upset when Jimmy the wicket he thrilled the spectaFarquharson, Jamaica, beat Philip tors when he opened his scoring Hanna, New York. with a powerful straight rlriv Carlton Rood, New York, beat which yielded him two runs. Aftei G. Hew, Jamaica 8—2. 6—2 scoring another run to bring his Clarke. U.S.A., beat Frank total to three he fell a victim to Quernsey 6—4. 7—5. slow bowler King when ho played Hi Burrows beat Carlton Rood over a yorker. ^frnm^Farquharson. Jamaica. ** W **.** ** beat Phi, Hanna. America. 8-6. *J~ ^^^^opening £lr, Women's Singles: Mrs. Hale" Roach and Hope, started off Ribbary. US. beat Mrs. C. 6 Boy-sa I g Mi l 1 %  OMggl Picture right shows: MB. Q It. ADAH! leaving the Pavilion on hiway to thr wicket in vtuUrdayH-urnon College Old RoyMatch. Qolng at No. 8 la lb* batUng ordsr o. scored i. On the left is MR. 0 BKINNER wbo received s "big hand" frosn the crowd after ha Mored 15 for the Old Boys. Australia In Sight Of Fourth Test Win England 114 For 3 (From W. J. O'REIM.Y) ADELAIDE, Feb.. 7. When England halted the second time. Hutton and Washbrook put together the best opening partnership of the series. Their effort came to a finish when Loxton, .substituting for the injured Iverson, took a brilliant onehanded catch high above his head off a mistimed but fairly well hit pull shot from Hutton. Later Loxton fielding in the bowled him a no-ball un intern Ion pecialist s position at short leg, ally, and he banged a four for for Bill Johnston. n n n vo Vasaa HI Ho 10 Witard S FMrr Pan SSartai l MM D n 1 BUwBHir 10 Vi TharfMlyka 131 Vattow 11 IS Rineir IN a 1 taat* *a Vll v .' B DaunUaai 11 Dawn 8J4 Had B *si rmur I J Invioer 1 T Mohawk D 11 Kahbow ta YaDoo n • run a.M Rad 1 D r Xaaaal 11 Slran Oiiva BtoawM SJT Yallow S War Cloud tM M D 7 Blnbad *M Yellaa I D ia Ctytla t Imp I lua 1 1 Okaa>l 4 Cornelia a ifass* C D unl tm Bad c X 1 Una Behave 1 flcitna M Cornel Ml Yaltrac o %  Peggy Nan II fclatwin )4t Bad 1 11 i Oipsy T Moyra Blalr *• Yeltow X X X 3* Thunder 40 Vamooae 43 ntrakaa.' 7 4S >.*) Bad K S* Cyrkma YeUaw C 7 ftogua 10 Oannal 1.1* Red N li The Mh K*gana will ke Mid en SaluisUy llin Mint. IBM H BUADt A?*NIsrrsjJI. Smut. LONDON. Special festival of Britain BH races will be held June 23 at rUtiit-ld Aerodrome, llertfordshire Three of the races will be imerrsatioiial events and invitations to comveU' are bemg sent lo Aymt clubs all over the world. Thisands of dollars and nine trophies will be given as price*. In addition to the intemntional races—which will lie down "vci a 105-mile course—there will be the annual King's Cup Air Race which Is confined to British flier. -4MJ rr"" ""' %  % % % %  —j grabbed the the coveted honour. That no-ball % £ ^rVi^ETl! T, ^ Crh V *" h hlCh !"!" DO '"' C0n "•""" h w !*<•" h m " r "" Rmy. Jm.icinohmpion. —J ^-."fjf D !" w V| on „T,hr ,on hl lh d blob "' ,h s "'~ '"">' •'PI *a-IM In I"* -l. Mrs Bevwtey Baker. U.S. *'"' ,h.r,K,lT?, !" SmUh SS "*" '" """'^l W* ' > hiBtory of T^l crirMl. btMM.r,D.vid m .J.n,.ic. Sl^r Wi&" re Toih'S "" '*>wlcr ,.„. „i,h which b. T „ K „. icil7"lv„ljo, A r "y puni.hM the Ion, h„p> ind c 'SJ hl Complon at Hn.h.ne Ara rrnALW L. i !" u m Men i. uouWM BurrowM and pi^ed Ihe ball belwee,, the aaru Th y "' "•<• remarkably good ENOI-MID i k..i-.. ink .America, beat C. Laniford T„ h . ld _,., ^^ „,„" L. efforts for a man who n. subAU8TllAUA.l DU imd Lter Kirk.ldy. J IT. 1„,„ ... ISOSBiB atil..tln. lor l„. !" n ^h„ ...~.M Al,a., game changed when Smith skipper Williams were together. They punished the long hops and ^r wc"!^*? gng S5d?L^*Kk isrs. isssri m .n „ h o ri ... a %  -•%  %  J, m .(c „ umD ,„, by c-lntercolonlal •tutln for Iverson who would jjj [] %  • player Adams who was keeping undoubtedly have either one t Kaatt is. b Wrian' .._.„ ATiertcans are in the wicket for the Old Boys robhed them inscribed In his family v.rv.y b Brown quarter finals Martin, tomorrow Sn,,,,, 0 ,„ e ch ,„ cr „, „„ hll „ archive, had he been th Devonshire Play Water Polo Today THIS ;ifu-rnoon ul the BarbadosAquatic Club, two Water Polo mutches will be played. Plav be sjrns al 6 o'clock. As the Aquatic Club l*lie are nnahl.to field a utam. their match with the %  Th viass h t T eadeu has unfortunately had lo be cancelled. Instead %  writer polo team trom Harrison College will play a Cadet team from If MS. Deverwlilr. The other match will be between :i Barbados Men's team and a team from H M S Devonshire Harrhsan College team. P Manning. B Manning, (Capt).' Q, Jordan, C Evelyn. M Weatherhead. A. Taylor. E. Johnson. Reserve*. Keith Armstrong and Rolf Feldman Bai-bad** learn. P Foster. M. FitzgeraW. O MarLran. M. JOTO. dan, K. lnce. B. Patterson (Capt). nnd G. Poster Reserve*. Trevor Yearwood and Owen Johnson. I wlrkat b Wrlshl Iitirke nol . t r have protested as soon as Hassett *'• '"-JTIT -,.., v v invited Loxton to take the poslBWIJ AMLVIHS R ( tton. Compton would have been Bedasr *a well within his rights to ask Has*•" %  S ia* sett to let Ixotton do his subbing T*tMr-ii When play ended The Presen had lost six wickets for 1J runs .._ in reply to the Old Boys' score r", 0 of 114 thus winning the match. £_ ni n BOYS %  *, rsuntXT *OT out novsr xi i-i iMMrsiw C Kklnnar Blachman b Knv* I>. A I Stuart tKm* b Cofbln M CUrtla b King J 1-a.rrla c Wtm—>t> Kin* C Oimbn-batrh c MadlWd l> William. O H. Adam* B King I, Mavari c W,inm, b D*ah . J. D Oaddaid ID b Dash C L. Walcott c Roarh b Dash K. MakH, not out r Hoad absml 4S 4 (W II, ft fcr I 8 lor 10* B0WMN41 ANAIYSW BLuin J. WIHlaim K Hope Theroa loach Medfoid Dash J I 4 1 S I I — II — [E ,; 1 5 1 XI—let INNING* Plan To Play For W. Churchill Cup LONDON. Feb. i. The British Ice Hockey Association announced plans for an international tournament here for u new trophy, the Winston Churchill Cup Countries com. petinR this year will be Canada, u. curk tbst United States and England. %  M"-" t. Roach Ooddard 1*. Hope c Walcott b Ctark* .. C. SlarMnin c Skinner b OiiBfrd r Smiih Mpd if< Adama> • Watiat. ... .... TEST i. ghsaJBM ma P-.l A4u tUI dor • wku.i .... BOWLtNO ANALYSIS Walcott Ooddard Skinner % %  iiulrtih.iti Ithbridge Maple Leafs and the American Bates team. Respective rcpicsentatives of their countries in the forthcoming world tournament in Paris will meet m the ilrst game of the Churchill tournament here on March 21. The second, Canada vi. England, will be played on LONDON. March 22. and the third U.S. vs. Prices are going up — England on a date y.-t to bo demany things tn Bntaii '"'* od „ _.. ... dripping costs more. Tho Lngluh learn will be selectDripping is the British word foi " m Hafrm ^ h ortenlng. The Food Ministry anEven Dripping In a less specialised position. This Test hs s brushed aside any illusions our selectors have had about our attack. Rome rapid rearrangement of It must before our next visitors, the West Indies arrive Without a le* break bowler we cannot expect to go on winning. Don't Cfiver Pitches The chief point .ulsing out of iris fourth Test now thai it is to all Intents over and dune with, is aAtor the bearing it will have upon the mn JoaBastoa deliberations which .ire cvlaii. '•" J ""*' to come soon as to the advisabIL ity of covering Test pitches. ^—__ After the first Test played at Brisbane, there was a general outcry from Australian officials that pitches must be covered so that Test cricket could carry on as a paying concern. That game was definitely nnne.i by rain from England's playing point of view, and from the profit making side. But having sat out this match in blaring sunshine, nothing seems more utterly Tklicuious than a suggestion that all Test pitches should be protected from rain It is a retrograde step iust as surely as the step to limit the number of overs for the use of the ball was. Before English officialdom agrees to any sugges tlon towards this end, they must think deeply. If Brisbane is a risk In November then let the match be played later when the weather becomes settled, or allow for local rules to n a good apply there. It is absurd to legts-and now Iste for all Test ground* just beiiusc Brisbane generally goes ontrary. .lames Burke, our latest coll. I BrOWn Compton 41 • II %  CN'UAND *id INMNflS Hinton Sub b Rill Johmloe W.i-nbrook I h u n Rill Juhnalm, I .,JohniMti h otal ifor 3 wkL t II I SBBBBBsl l for 14. far I HOWI.INn ANALYSIS i> M. R > Standard Canasta TAKINC THE OISCASD PILE . M. HUtUSOHOHY wJSfhf-t itaTjaTu'," 1 nound Ihe price Is bain, BaM ai JoinM the band of first api>enrmost entirely ports.— ICf) 1 cents. fidently and nttianively. Who; had reached 97. Compton YOU'RE TWE GREATEST POCTOR ttJ THE H WORLO! I OrVE Y4 My LlPE FOR PULUN6 THE KID TWROUQM-*/T'"UH*--ABOUT > It Every Time %  — By Jirnmy Hatlo \y HI:-. 1 .and mat 111 mem there la a i Jf anforcefl Tlic .. is Sim ^jsrfl only mar be" iai>n i i-.i'-U. t: iiiald naa Mm rvnipirned u la onir ftftar thl. th .hi S rcm.iiiio.pr oI nip pi !r „, u D. ',' %  ( '"f,I"""-' %  imaoii.ni. the fulVowini reason, four nnnd n> : A. A 10. 10. 10. 7. 7 1. J. 2 JoKer. ., Tou r '^"''"""l opporient da., dlacarded a se*en rasOiujg rpu to lane in* dthntird SSs*" l lt. nu,kln *" our u>i"ai %  nrld r.upp t --if lull in.l 1 Q g 0 1 ",^ _J^. u .'.... r "! normally be A. A. J.-Krr ... '1 16. io. 10 Total Tors leav.-n ^ wild canl^ :n r-u ii-Jipim i I':-*"... Aces were alnvio* m '"^iS.^-Vol-JSIW %  anil \,P: FootballProgramme Needs Pruning By HAROLD PALMER THE Football Association may have to revise their ideas about the Festival of Britain matches. The plain truth Is that too many n il's are being arranged. Somey must lose a lot of money. Home clubs are determined it will not be them. Will our foreign visitors foot the bill? Visiting clubs have to pay their own travel expenses and trust to getting them back through a 50-50 i .share from gates. Wh.it chance have the Turkish clubs on this basis? There are supposed to be three of them comin/. Oalataaaray, Beaiktas and Fvncrbahc*. They will come by air. which is not only quicker but cheaper than the seven days' journey by sea. Coat Is ft06 each. Then hotels here can be expected to cost about £3 a day. So for a party of about 20, here for 18 days, the tour must cost about L fS.500. When Galatasaray v I a 11 • d Queen's Park Rangers in September the attendance was about 8.000 The Turkish side took 1300 ai their share .,f the gate. I think the attendance would be smaller in May. when most people have hafl enough football. Spars' View Then I question whether they will draw bigger crowds at Coventry or Barnsley, so there must be a big deficit at the end of 'he tour—and the Turks will not take the chance. Clubs coming from this side of the Continent will not incur anything like the same expenses, but what sort of an attraction are "Holland 9going to be playing Leyton Orient. Walsall and Bristol Rovers. There is going to be tea much competition, especially for the time of the year. The programme must be pruned — at once. Clubs Involved must have n meeting with the F.A. Only the attractive sides should come. Spurs even reject tne idea of having a Urst-class side here at the height of the season. '-The F.nglish public have not learnt to appreciate foreign club sides.' says their manager. Arthur Rowe. Gates are on the decline this season. Explain that how you will. Shortage of money. If you like, but the end of an eight months' season is no time for this sort of venture. -ITU. B.C. Selects Team >Prom Our CMk-n Con-eapeederit' GEORGETOWN. Feb 1. The following were 4t"i> lumhirf -( Batle on..... II. a B.ss Plan lOlallni D.rk. af N>* Tark" nark Alibi" %  an a.M na|ir — (SI lanaatl "fartmnrf IBa Waatalaaa" a "B*.Uirr. I % %  tfe* Til* I ..-,.WS* Daaa II" *M If %  ..•— faaUaalal smia The Weather Ki-DM Aon Rises : .t s-m. Sun SeU: €. p.m. Moon (First Qiu.-ter) Feb. ruary 13 Uihtlng : 5 30 p m High Water : 5.3t a.m.. 8 32 %  r.ssj. TESTERDAV Rainfall (CodringMn) .21 in. Total for month to Testerday: .12 In. Temperature (Max.) BS.6 F Temperaturr (Mtn.) 75.0 'F Wind Dlrertlen <9 a.m.) R.N.R. i.: p.m IN t Wind Velocity g miles per hour Barometer (9 a-m.) 29.990 (S p.m > 29 895 J &r Ml E NRICHED BREA E> It!*. II The Vitamin Loaf COUGHING fc ^ OUCH MIXTURE a/gTrV/ IMPROVED ODEX SOAP O Gets akin roll) dun O Banishes perspiration odnur Ltivn My wail IM) Saiaty Odev makm a drvp •rlrannng laihrr that ii mild snd crnile f, Uce. Land* and 'Y7 A dairy hsiha. tklrx \\ ideal for um.tv n*r i li^.lliMilJJJJI.ll'lrHIHsT.M^ (fioc/amafto^/ King Smiler" orders the world-wide use of Cow and Gate Milk Food. And we are trying hard io carry out the uiahea of this wiae and bcn-rfWcnt Ruler for ue know the World'a Babies are waiting fur Cow snd Gale. Something a little heller, •onuihiug a little dlncrcm. have made Cow and G^te preeminent. That ia why Mother! aay—"There ia nothing quite like i( — nothing %o good when natural feeding fails." COW & GATE Wftfi :>, FOOD v ROYAL BABIES J. B. LESLIE & CO., LTD.-AGENTS How's your LINEN Better buy now while these prices last. PURE IRISH LINEN DAMASK TABLE CLOTHS 72 x log Each .$18.71 11* „ $is. M x 81 $11.47 H.M $$.74 I.I NUN DAMASK NAPKINS to match 22 x 22 Each $ 1JJ COTTON DAMASK TABLE CLOTHS 54 x 70 Each $ 3.74 COTTON DAMASK NAPKINS 18 x 18 Each 4$c. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street An Economical Decoration for Walls & Ceiling. Siscolin Distempei* Supplied in Powdtfr lorni in WHITE. BUFr CREAM GREEN. BLUE and SUNSHINE Made ready for use by mixing 2^ pints Water with 5 lbs. Powder. 6 I PACKAGES at SB Oiali eaca For Interior & Exterior Woodwork uie Red Hand White 'S' Paint Dries with a Hard Gloss equalling Enamel Finish. Does not turn yellow. 19.72 per gin. — 6G per 2 pt. tin Phone 4466 — WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid. AOENT8