Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
PDarbad0os



ESTABLISHED 1895





OKRA BLOOD

By ROBERT N. SCHWARTZ
MILWAUKEE,

Dr. Hiram Benjamin, who

directed development of a

blood plasma substitute
from the garden vegetable
okra, disclosed that he is re-
turning to research into
okra’s effect on ulcers.

The head of the Marquette
University Research team
said that preliminary work
‘on the ulcer project, inter-
rupted by his service in the
Navy, showed great promise.
He had used okra in treat-
ment of ulcers in animals.

His early ulcer research,
Dr, Benjamin said, indicated
okra, like the drugs banthine
and atropine, reduces the
flow of tissue-injuring pep-
sin and acids in the stomach.

But, he added, okra has
the advantage over the drugs
that stimulates formation of
a thick, mucous lining which
also slows the digestive pro-
cess.

The scientist, a member of
the Marquette University
Medical School Faculty,
holds a basic patent for the
blood plasma substitute. He
and two other members of
the research team, Dr. Har-
ry Ihrig and Darwin Kaest-
ner, turned their patent
rights over to the medical
school.

The funds will be used by
M.U’s Medical School to
support basic research in
science.

Dr.

Thrig, vice president
in charge of rescarch, Allis-
Chalmers Manufacturing
Company, and Kaestner,
plant manager for Lakeside
Laboratories hold subsidiary
patents on'refining and puri-
fication of the okra pods.

Other members of the re-
search team were Dr. Walt-
er Zeit, head of the anatomy
department at Marquette,
and Dr. Donald Roth, a
junior medical student.

Dr. Benjamin told LN.S.
that as an investigator in
science he was not interested
in finances. He explained:

“The American Medical
Association’s canon of ethics
stipulates that no physician
may make a profit on a dis-
covery that would help hu-
manity. That's just and
fair and I, for one, wouldn’t
want it any other way.

“We became physicians
and scientists because we
are interested
humanity.”

With patent rights for the
blood plasma substitute
vested in the University,
Dr. Benjamin noted, there
will be rigid control over its
quality and distribution.

In addition, he added,
royalties will be very low so
as to keep the price of the
okra blood substitute low
enough to make it available
to_all who need it.

Dr. Benjamin explained
that ulcers are exacerbated
by the flow of digestive
juices. Once the ulcer lesion
has appeared, the juices lit-
erally “digest” the stomach
lining. Slowing of the diges-
tive processes would give
the ulcer an opportunity to
heal. :

He emphasized that the j
ulcer work is preliminary
and has not been tested on
humans yet.

He said the okra blood
substitute is a chemical
known as a polysachride, a
complex sugar molecule.

With techniques developed
by the five-man Marquette

a at erent ce AR AS A ANT,

in helping



simplifying the whole prob-
needed to meet such emer-

When a_ salt solution is
any climate without refrig-
eral things plasma does not

0.

Most important is that it
to recipient of the plasma.
School, has announced that
plasma substitute can be
ern climates and is a food
tions of the U.S.

be held in

{ —LN.S.
Pose New Threat

Heavy snowfalls in Carinthia
Valley a local train was com-
forwards. :
reported piled up more than three
towns in Western Carinthia were

The Lechach Valley with its
sleighs cannot reach it.

Salz-

temperatures in some areas

team it can be refined down
lem of storage of tremendous
gencies as a mass air attack
added to the powder, which
eration, it does all the things
d
will not, like human plasma,
Dr. John Hirschboeck,
made from Okra, which
Washington in the near
of the federal pure food and
Nafional Research Council
tion of the life-saving plas-
to-day brought the danger of
pletely marooned by snow and
In the village where British
feet on rooftops.
said to be like “valleys between
big population of 10,000 has been
Weather ‘reports from
provinee had br the

to a powder, enormously
amounts of blood plasma
on the United States.
can be kept indefinitely in
blood plasma does—and sev-
transmit viruses from donor
Dean of Marquette’s Medical
unlimited quantities of the
grows like a weed in south-
staple in the southern por-
Dr. Hirschboeck said con-
ferences will
future with representatives
drug administration and the
regarding quantity produc-
ma substitute.
Heavy Snowfalls
VIENNA, Feb. 5,
more avalanches. In the Gail
was unable.to move backwards or
troops are quartered, snow was
Roads between all villages and
huge mountains of snow”.
cut off since yesterday and even
burg said comparatively
danger

of the




ught
of
~~Reuter



avalanches there too | only 190

American

Taxes Up

WASHINGTON, Feb. 5.

Americans will pay higher in-
come taxes, and more for petrol,
cigarettes, whisky and beer under
new taxes proposed to-day.

John Snyder, Secretary of the
Treasury, asked the House Ways
and Means Committee which
handles tax legislation, for vastly
bigger (sales) taxes including lev-
jes of 20 percent on cars and 25
percent on television sets, radiv
and refrigerators.

He outlined the proposals as
part of the Truman Administra-
tion’s first instalment of a $10,000,-
000,000 tax increase.

The programme ¢alls for a four
percent increase in individual in-
come tax rates.

Other basic proposals made by
Snyder were :

A boost from flat 25 percent to
37% percent in capital gains tax.

There will be an increase of 8
per cent. in the normal income tax
for corporations, Corporations
with profits in “excess” class
would continue to pay an extra
30 percent on the amount deemed
“excess”.

The programme has still to be
approved by Congress.

Truman told Congress last Fri-
day that the first round of tax
increases would be followed by an-
other request for about $6,500,-
000,000 later this year.—Reuter,



Arabs Denounce

French In Moroceo

CAIRO, Feb., 5.

The Arab League has passed
a resolution denouncing “French
intervention” in Morocco, a League
spokesman said here today, He,
added that General Alphonse
Juin, resident General in Morocco
had threatened to depose Sultan
Mohamed the Fifth.

The spokesman said that the
League’s Secretary General would
confer with French Ambassador
in Egypt Maurice Couve De
Murville to inform him of the
resolution. :

The League has received ap
peals from various Moroccan
sources for immediate interven-
tion by Middle East Arab states.
They confirm that General Juin
has given an ultimatum to tie
Sultan, he said.

The Sultan of Morocco, a
French Beaeeiorete, has had
talks in Paris. France was re-

ported to have urged political
reforms aimed at decentralisin
feudal power but the Sul
wanted “complete revision of ti
protectorate treaty. of 1912”, ac-
cording to his aide,

The main purpose of the visit
was said to be to urge France
to grant political, economic and
financial autonomy to his coun-
try. —Reuter.

3 More Executed
For Virginia Rape

RICHMOND, Virginia. Feb. 5.

Three more negroes—last of the
“Martinsville Seven”—were ex-
ecuted here to-day for mass rape
of a 32-year-old white woman in
Virginia.

The first four of “the Martins-
ville Seven”, were executed last
Friday in the biggest mass exe-
cution in the history of Virginia,

Various groups in the United
States staged big demonstrations
against the executions and 10,000
letters of protest came from
abroad mostly from Communist-
sponsored groups. Demonstrators
included Leftwing Organisations,
students, trade union leaders and
church groups. The main coloured
organisations diq not protest but
maintained it was unfair to sen-
tence negroes to death for a
crime for which no white man has
ever been executed in Virginia.
Four appeals were made agsinst
the sentence but the United
States Chief Justice Fred Vinson,
refused to intervene.—Reuter.





Colony Report
Published In U.K.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 5.

Barbados in 1949 experienced
a slight decrease in the cost of
living. This was due mainly to
reduction in the cost of clothing.
But at that time the effect of
devaluation had not begun to be
felt seriously. So says the
Colonial annual report for the
cclony ublished in London
to-day (Tuesday).

The report also reveals that
since 1939 number of savings
depositors has been more than
doubled and that in the year
under review 1,724 new accounts
were opened.

Tories Have Good
Chance To Win Now

LONDON, Feb. 5.

Winston Churchill’s Conserva-
tive Party would sweep back to
power with a big majority if a
General Election was held here
now, according to the latest public
opinion poll figures.

The cost of living leaping up
week by week has caused the
prestige of the Labour Govern-
ment to sink to its lowest level
since 1945, statistics indicate

The latest figures published
to-day by one of the biggest and
usually most accurate’ polis
showed a slump in Government
popularity and a corresponding
rise in’support for Conservatives

Conservative statisticans using
poll percentages as their basis









high | estimated to-night that the Party

Parli

would

returned with at least
420 ‘ ;

on



ry





j



ae

























: ‘Carnival



een a!

SIR OTTO LUND, Commissioner-in-Chief of the St. John Ambulance
H. E. Skeete and Capt. E. B. Williams, inspecting vhe Nursing Di

Queen’ Picked

—FOR GRENADA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGES, Feb. 3.

Miss Sheila Cameron, clerk of
Messrs W. E. Julien & Co., Ltd.,
will hold sway as “Queen of Car-
nival 1951" here.

Judges acclaimed her the win-
ner of a contest of “Queens” held
last Wednesday night at the Em-
pire Theatre during the presenta-
tion of “Carib Symphony” by the
Pygmalion Glee Club. She was
“Miss Rovers Club.”

Sponsored by the Grenada So-
ciety of Arts, the contest was
among eight candidates, the others
being Misses Eileen Moore (“Miss
Carib Cigarettes’), Sheila Mc-
Neilly (“Miss T, R. Evans’), who
were runners up, Barbara Fer-
nandes (“Miss Archers Club”),
Hermione Greasley (“Miss Supply
Stores”), Louise Comissiong
(“Miss Grenada Hotels’), Mable
Smith (“Miss Pygmalion Club”)
and Mable McNeilly (“Miss Gren-
ada Society of Arts”).

The judges were Mr. A. Norris
Hughes, Mr. Denis Henry and Mrs.
Lyle Hosten.

During a wild finale, with a
crowded stage representing a Car-
nival dawn street scene (Jour
Ouvert), Miss Cameron stood
among the révellers who proposed
her health as “Queen of Carnival’.

Lady Baden-Powell attended the
performance with His Excellency
the Acting Governor and Mrs.
Green.

On Monday next, the Grenada
Society of Arts will stage its big
annual Carnival Pageant at
Queen’s Park, with Miss Cameron
riding a float in a procession from
the Market Square and later tak-
ing a throne for the various items
to be presented.

Grenada, too, will have its
quota of continental guests who
will pay $2 for box seats at the
Pageant.



“Sunday Express”
Backs Forming Of
W.I. Customs Union

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 5.
The Empire crusading Sunday
Express to-day gives whole—
hearted backing to proposals for
the formation of a West Indies
Customs Union. It is described
as “nothing less than Empire
free trade in miniature’—a small
scale model of a principle of

Lord Beaverbrook’s policy, and
the cardinal error was made of
building a tariff wall around
Britain and not around the
Empire.

Now from the West Indies

comes a message of hope that at
long last wiser counsels are to
prevail” it concludes.

Russia Fails Again

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 5.
The Soviet Union failed today
in another attempt to have the
Chinese Communist delegate seat-
ed in the United Nations body.
The Technical Assistance Com-
mittee of the Economic and Social
Council voted 11 to 2 to uphold
the ruling of its Chairman.
Only Poland joined the Soviet
Union in objection to the Chair-
man’s ruling. —Reuter.





GUIDED MISSILES

WASHINGTON, Feb., 5.
General Collings, United States
Army Chief of Staff, said today
that the American army would
have some guided missiles “within

their target.—Reuter.



WASHINGTON, Feb. 5.

Secretary of State Dean
Acheson in a letter to Robert
Sehuman- French Foreign Min-
ister, gave his whole hearted
endorsement to the French pro-
posal for the creation og an in-
tegrated European Army.

The State Department released
to-day the text of a letter sent
last week. Acheson’s letter als
reiterated American support for

Schuman



pian to pgo



igade, accompanied by Major
yesterday.

LUND BRINGS MESSAGE
FROM GLOUCESTER

AN organisation like th

a voluntary one, can only reall

Lieut-General Sir Otto Lu

e St. John Ambulance Brigade,
thrive if it appeals to youth
)} Commissioner in Chief of

the St. John Ambulance Brigatte told members-of the Press
at a Conference at Government House yesterday afternoon.

He said that they were ¥ery keen to get their own
gadets, or if they were sufficient other organisations for
young people to make use of them, they wanted them to

learn the preliminaries of first aid.

ON THE
° SPOT

REIGATE,

Members of the Reigate
Council are tired of seeing
the local parks and streets
littered with ice cream car-
tons during the summer.
months, So the Council is
recommending that manu-
facturers make edible car-
tons.
| Said. park superintendent
Frank Cook:

“Manufacturers could
make the cartons of edible
rice paper or other edible
substances,”

But ice cream manufac-
turers are doubtful. Said
one firm:

“If we make edible wrap-
pers we shall have to make
another wrapper to wrap
the edible one.in to conform
with hygiene regulations.”

{ —LN.S.



Storms Hit Britain

LONDON, Feb. 5

Gales up to 70 miles an hour,
snow and floods swept Britain
to-day after 24 hours of violent
Storms, There was widespread
flooding in South England and
firemen had to remove fallen trees
from roads. Storms may con-
tinue all day.

A 3,000-ton naval landing craft
has broken away in west Scotland
in the area’s worst storm of the
year.

A south coast lifeboat has been
searching in vain in raging seas
for three fishermen in a smal] boat
missing since yesterday.

At one place in Scotland, the
main road north was blocked by
snow. Ice made roads danger-
ous elsewhere—Reuter,



Oil For Argentina

SWANSEA, Feb., 5.
Tanker General San Martin
9,500 tons left Swansea to-day
with 17,000 tons of oil for Bueno:
Aires. This is believed to be the
largest singke shipment ot oil
from Swansea,

General San Martin is the new’

Argentine tanker and is on her
maiden voyage. She is the first
of eight new tankers being built
for Argentine, —Reuter.

_—
PRIEST KILLED
PISA, Italy, Feb. 5.
Three masked men broke into
the vicarage of Cevoli near here
and shot dead the parish priest
Ugo Bardotti early today. Per-
sonal vengeance or politics were
thought to have been the motive.
The police held three villagers
who were found to have a sub-
machine rifle and a pistol.
—Reuter,

FROZEN
WASHINGTON, Feb. 5.
The American Government to-
day froze until March 15 all sales
and deliveries of cattle hides, calf;
skins and kips (hides of young
steers) pending the establishment

18 months” which could seek outlof government controls to assure

* military supplies.—Reuter,

Acheson Suppo rts

European coal and steel.
The letter said in part “I do
not need to remind you of the

attitude which the Government
of the United States has dis
played on innumerable occasions
and in many forms toward
European integration.”

“My government strongly
favours it.”





added



The le

practical manner

| Sir Otto arrived
festerday morning by B.W.LA.

om Antigua. He was accom-
Bock by the Countess of Breck-

in Barbados









ock, Assistant Superintendent-
n-Chief of the Overseas Units of
the St. John Ambulance Brigade.
They have come to imspect the
units here and are guests at Gov-
ernment House,

They have already visited Ber-
muda and Jamaica and will be
leaying Barbatlos this afternoon
for Trinidad after which they will
go on to British Guiana,

He gaid that they have brought
oe sive Bt sopn
t , ein thados.

S roe RH. the Duke

of Gloucester, Grand Prior of the
Order of St. John which reads:

“IT am glad to know that the
Commissioner-in-Chief is paying
a visit of inspection to units of
the St. John Ambulance Brigade in
the West Indies, which will serve
to emphasise the interest which
the Order of St. John takes in ex-
tending its work in the colonies.

“I take this opportunity of send-
ing my greetings to all members
of the Brigade in the West Indies,
wishing them at the same time
continued success in their activi-
ties.”

Hopes To Come

The next message came from
Lady Mountbatten, Superintend-
ent-in-Chief of the Overseas Units.
She has sent greetings to all well-
wishers of the work of the Bri-
gade and hopes to be able to come
to Barbados soon to see the mem-
bers *{ the Brigade.

Sir James Sleeman, head of the
Overseas Units of the Brigade has
also Sent greetings to all those
people he knows in the island.

Sir Otto said that he had met
Mr. and Mrs, E. B. Williams and
Dr. H. E. Skeete who were run-
ning the local Brigade and added
that it was entirely due to their
energies that it had given such a
good account of itself.

They had not been to Barba-
dos before because it was only last
June that the Brigade Overseas

and Brigade at ome amalga-
mated,
He said that there were some

things he would like the people
here to know and one was about
the need for growth of the Bri-
gade. He believed there was a
feeling in many places in the
Commonwealth, and perhaps it
was also true in Barbados, that
some of the people felt that the
work of the St. John Ambulance
was confined to the war and em-
ergency, but that was not so.
People all over the world could
really make the Brigade efficient
by taking first aid and home nurs-
ing services with the object of
serving in peace,

Plenty To Do

Quite apart from that, there was
a lot more to be done. With the
good start made here at the centre
in Barbados, they wanted to ex-
tend their work to other parts of
the island. In fact, he said that
he was made to understand that
that had already been done.

He was glad to hear that there
was nursing for girl cadets in ex-
istence in the island, The girl
guide movement, for instance, was
a thriving one and he was sure
that the guides could take the first
aid certificates and wear the St
John Ambulance Badge.

With regard to the boys, it was
just as important that there were
other enterprises. He imagined
that in some parts of the world,

@ On Page 3

ould be laid upon which mili-
tafy and econemic strength can







»@ built
“A rallying point will be
@ated around which a free and
vilised Europe can muster its
energies for successful defence
ats beliefs and traditions of its
hisgory,”
After welcomir the Frenct
overnn I



g a covference in P on the



|



|
|

French Plan



Replies

MOSCOW, Feb., 5.
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Vyshinsky today gave three west-
ern envoys a Soviet reply to their
notes last month on Soviet pro-
posals for a “Big Four” Confer-
ence,

He called envoys of Britain,
France and the United States to
the Soviet Foreign Office to re-
eeive replies,

All three embassies declined to
comment on the replies which
were being translated for trans-
mission to their respective capi-
tals.

It was expected here that the
Soviet reply would be published
tomorrow or Wednesday,

The Three Powers’ representa-
tives were received separately.
French Ambassador Yves Chataig-
neau went to the Ministry first at

three o'oclock this afternoon. A
quarter of an hour later John
Nichols, the British Minister in

Moscow was received at the Min-
istry, United States Minister Wal-
orth Barbour called at half past
three.—-Reuter.



Raw Turns Down
U.N. Invitation

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 5.

Sir Benegal Rau of India has
informed Nasrollah Entezam,
President of the United Nations

General Assembly, that he is
unable to accept Entezam’s invi-
tation to serve on the United
Nations Good Offices Committee
to negotiate a possible settlement
with Chinese Communists over
Korea, it was learned here
to-day.

Sir Benegal’s refusal followed
instructions from his Govern-
ment. He was a member of the
original United Nations Cease-
fire Committee with Entezam and
Lester Pearson, Canadian Foreign
Minister.

He was invited to join the new
committee last week after the
General Assembly passed a rese-
lution condemning Communist
China as an aggressor in Korea

—Reuter.

Board Deadlocked

NEW YORK, Feb. 5.
The National Mediation Board
was “hopelessly deadlocked" after
talks on the strike by 12,000 raii-
shunters, a Board member said

to-day. :
The Board met representatives
of four Railway Unions and rail-
ways separately in its latest effort
to end the dispute now in its sev-
enth da
The strike which has held up
ammunitions for Korea resulted in
109,000 workers in other industries
being temporarily laid off and the

disruption of communications,

—Reute.

Ike Not Definite

WASHINGTON, Feb. 5

Republican Party’s policy chief
Senator Robert Taft, has demand-
ed that President Truman submit
to Congress any agreement he
makers to send American troops
to Atlantic Pact countries. He said
in an interview that General
Eisenhower in his recent report to
Congress had made a “good im-
pression” but was not definite
enough.







—Reuter.

U.S. Deny Report

WASHINGTON, Feb. 5.

American and British sources
here today denied the report that
the United States had initiated a
series of conferences with other
western powers on the “threat” to
Yugoslavia.

The report said the threat had
been caused by a military build-up
in the surrounding “iron curtain”
satellites,



—Reuter.

3 START TALKS

WASHINGTON, Feb, 5

Britain, France and the United
States began preliminary talks
here last week about a possible
meeting with Russia, diplomatic
sources said today.

The talks were interrupted over
the week-end when Sir Oliver
Franks, British Ambassador, left
for a speaking tour of New Eng-
latd states —Reuter,



Army, Acheson said: “If your
Government in close consultation
with the German and other
Europear Government who
wish to participate can evolve
main outlines binding the
free nations of Europe mot
clogely together in a spirit so
ij represented by the Schuman
plan, we ¢

for





an reasonably Aope fo
1 long terrr luticn to many of
ir proble be

they political |
"Reuter |

To West |

















ae

Chinese Driven
Back Into Seoul



PRICE: FIVE CENTS



TOKYO, Feb. 5.

CHINESE YORCES were reported fleeing nortn-

ward through the

southeru capital, to-night before the bi
Nations armoured drive since the

began.

hills towards Seoul, the
est United
rean War

Three powerful tank columns plunging boldly
through stiff but lightly armed opposition, advanced
to within seven miles of the Han River, south of the

capital, inflicting as much damage as possible.

.¢ o
Britain Bans
e
Diplomats
LONDON, Feb. 5.
Britain to-day banned Hun,
garian diplomats from going more

than 18 miles outside London and
warned that similar action would

be taken against Russian diplo-
mats if the position of the British
Embassy stalf in Moscow

worsened.

Action against Hungarians: is
the reprisal for a similar ban on
British diplomats in Budapest

Questioned about this in the
House of Common to-day Kenneth
Younger, Minister of State for
Foreign Affairs, said the Hunh-
garian Minister, Elec Bolgar had
been informed that he and his
staff would not be permitted to
travel more than 18 miles from
Hyde Park Corner to London
without obtaining written per-

mission from the Foreign Office

Earlier Younger had _ stated
that Britain is prepared — to
restrict her movements to Soviet
diplomats, if there is any further
deterioration in the facilities
offered to British Embassy
officials in Moscow,

—Keuler,



To Stage Strike

LONDON, Feb, 5,

British Trade Union leaders to-
night had a mujority of the na-
tion's 90,000 woekworkers on their
side in rejecting the Communist
eall to immobile ports.

But the key ports of Liverpool
Birkenhead and Manchester were

Reject Red Bid |

already almost at a_ standstill
while sporadic stoppages were ex
pected in great London docks

tomorrow,

Unofficial strikers denounced py
Union

Headquarters ag “sabo-
teurs” toured dockside meeting
places trying to bring dockers
out in defiance of Union Execu-

Lives

But only one in every ten dock
erg joined the stoppage which i
aimed at getting more pay for
nearly all strikers who were con-
centrated in the North

The London port worked nor-
mally, but tonight more than half
of the 1,500 men at one group of
docks refused to support the stop-
page,

—Keuter.

4
SPO PLE EPL LPP PES
.
5
.
%,
e

CLOVER

: £5,556654
PLL PEE EEO EE EEE LIE EEE

3,

>

A’ QUALITY

6343654 > c < . S £6,656%
LALO OO OE POE POPE PEEP EPSP EO

84640

AAP PPP EY

HERE AGAIN



COOKING BUTTER

THE HOUSEWIVES’
FAVOURITE

A heavy artillery barrage from
the United Nations line kept the
Chinese tightly dug in in their
fexholes in the hills as tanks
moved forward from Suwon cap-
turing Anyangni en route and
inflicting 2,000 casualties.

The American infantry took to
the hills on either side to secure
the highway behind the hard hit-
ting armour.

Anyangni, nine miles from the
Han River, and the last big town
below Seoul, was deserted when
they entered this morning.

But five miles to the west North
Koreans using the heaviest con-
centration of mortar fire experi-
enced in the 12-day offensive,
put up a tough fight,

One tank column withdrew after
advancing two miles to avoid a
surprise counter-attack by big
enemy forces, Light reconnais-
sance planes swooping low ahead
dropped a warning message—
“Enemy just around corner”,

Tankmen who led a drive into
Anyangni said their main obstacle
was land mines, but “they were
not much troubled because they
were so badly laid.”

Mines in many cases could be
seen jutting above the surface and
it was necessary to halt to deton<
ate them. Almost no Communist
armour was met, A

“The approach of our tank col-
umn to Seoul should be regarded
as of no particular significance at
this time”, an official memoran-
dum said.

Communists attempting
adic counter-attacks elsewhere
across the Korean “waist” met
concentrated fire from allied guns,

Warplanes wheeled overhead in
a clear sky to break attempts to
stem and push them back to the
38th parallel,

spor-

North of Hoengsong almost in
the middle of the peninsula,
United Nations units were moving
forward briskly at a mile an hour
and the Fifth North Korean Corps
was reported poised for an attack
down in the snow covered central
mountains Other units were in
action further east,

General Mac Arthur's Head-
quarters estimated to-day that
Communists suffered 8,365 casual-
ties on all sectors in fierce ground
fighting on Sunday.—Reuter,

ne eeuuemnmemned

TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT

——r



yt,
PPO EPP E IT

oF SRS $C

oat

QUEEN

4

LOOP LVEPEE EMMA ARLPDPLAPAOLAS

*
S
-
,

PREWAR
BRAND
PRODUCT

4 OCOCSCOCS OCS OBS

LP LLPE PP LEOLPLP PT EEE LL

PLL LLLF FFF FOO







PAGE TWO





“Panib Calli



PICTURED ‘shortly after they arrived at Seawell yesterday are
Countess of-Brecknock, Asst. Lady Superintendent-in-Chief (Over-
seas) and Lt. Gen. Sir Otto Lund, Commissioner-in-Chief of the St.

John Ambulance Brigade,

They are due to leave for Trinidad to-day.

T. GEN. “SIR OTTO LUND,

Commissiéner in Chief of the
St. John Ambulance Brigade and
the Countess of Brecknock, Assist-
ant Lady perintendent-in-Chief
(Overseas), ‘arrived here yesterday
morning by B.W.1A.

They were met at Seawell by
Dr. Harold Skeete. Commander in
the Order of the Grand Priory of
the Venerable Order of the Hos-
pital of St. John of Jerusalem,
Capt. and Mrs. E. B. Williams and
Maj. Dennis Vaughan the Govern-
or’s A.D.C.

Yesterday afternoon Capt. Wil-
liams was made a Commander in
the Order and Sir Edward Cunard
a Brother at the Parade at the
Central Staticn.

Otte and the Countess of
Bretknock*are due to leave Sea-
well this afternoon tor Trinidad.

Beaten Golfers
EVEN members of the defeated
Rockley Golf team returned to
Barbados “over the week-end.
There were, Mr. Jack Egan, Mr.
David Innigs, Mr. Michael Timp-
son, Mr. Bayley, Mr. Bryan
Wybrew, lan Christie and Mr.
Raymond ‘Norris. . and Mrs.
Jim O'Neal arrived yesterday
morning BY B.W.1.A.
Mrs. Christie and Mrs. Bayley
who accompanied the team re-
turned. on Sunday. '

Off To Triniaad
M*s; GLADYS CUMMINS,
wife ef Dr. H. G. Cummins,
M.C.P,, of @Gothmare,” Bank Hall,
left for Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.I.A. on a:short holiday. Her

peenent. Ws at Seawell to see her
off, ="

Is . Carnival
ONY five passengers came in
on twe flights from Trinidad
yesterday Dy B.W.1.A. They were,
two missignaries, a member of the
Barbados golf team, his wife, and
an _Ameriéan. businessman.

On the* other hand the two
flights to Trinidad were both al-
most full.”

Reason: It’s Carnival in Trini-
dad and éveryone that can is go-

ing.
With Coca Cola

M® EARL HEIMPEL who was

‘ Per ce a short visit
return trinidad yesterday by
B.W.LA. Mr. Heimpel is a repre-
sentative of Coca Cola, stationed
in Trinidad.

- BY THE WAY |

RORAN Chemists, it says,
have discovered a method
of produging “pure white of ceg
from fishj’teand of course. “It is
claimed to be better than natural
white of gg’

It is oposed to incorporate
dried white of egg in ice-cream
and puddings and cakes, to give
them a vour of cod. All we
want now is pure fish-tails pro-
duced frgdm the yolks of eggs as
flavouring: matter for the new
meat made from untanned hides,
(ENTER Ywo gourmets fighting

over an egg-cup filled with

hake-extract.)

Murder at Muckhufst (VII)

ADY GIGGLESWORTH'’S

face- was ghastly. Mark you
it was fothing to write home
about whtn it was at its best,
but an author who stops in the
middle ofa story to pass churlish
remarks about a woman's face is





3 x 2 yds. w.-..

(Felt-Base)

SWHITFIELDS

mYOUR SHOE STORES

Jamaica
They are here on a short visit,
staying at the Marine Hotel. They
are touring the West Indies and
“— then visit the U.S. and Can-
ada.

rector
Ltd., of London, manufacturers of
Robbialac paints.

ents of
Church in this area, were, Rev.
R. G. Flexon, Secretary of their

Dean Felker,
Superintendent, Rev. Edward E.
Phillippe of the Antigua District,
Miss Marcella Dean also of An-



3x3 yds_..-----..-$10.?
FLOOR-COVERING per yd---------$1.3°..._.6 ft wide

Touring W.I.
R.- and Mrs. Bernard Nichol-
son arrived from England via
yesterday by sb.W.LA.

Mr. Nicholson is Managing Di-
of Jenson and Nicholson

Missionary Meeting

RRIVING yesterday for a
meeting of the Superintend-
the Pilgrim Holiness

Foreign Mission in the U.S., Rev.
Trinidad District

tigua, Rev. Ray Chamberlain, Dis-

trict Superintendent in Jamaica.
Rev, Clifton Berg, District Super-
intendent in B.G. is expected to

arrive in a day or so.
were met at Seawell by

Rev. L. L, Miller, Field Superin-

tendent, Caribbean Area.

T.C.A. Arrivals
R. and Mrs. Claude Villiers
arrived from Canada over

the week-end by: T.C.A. to spend
a month’s
They
View Hotel.
lumber merchant in Montreal,

holiday in Barbados,
are staying at the Ocean
Mr, Villiers is a

Dr. and Mrs. Claudie Jamieson

from Edmonton are also down for
a month, coming in on the same

plane. They are staying at the
1i_tel Windsor,

Chemical Engineer
R. VICTOR CATHCART,
Chemical Engineer with
Canada Dry in New York arrived
from the U.S. via Trinidad yester-
day morning by B.W.LA. He has
come down to open and for the
opening of the Canada Dry Co.,
of Barbados which expects to open
shortly here. He was met at Sea-
well by Mr. Don Clairmonte one
of the Directors of the Co. He is

a guest at the Marine Hotel.

Intransit
NTRANSIT to Trinidad yester-
day on B.W.1A.’s flight from
Jamaica to Trinidad was Mr,
Maurice Lucte-Smith.

not only a cad, but a bad story-
teller, The reader imagines that
the digressions are shoved in to
fill up space, or because the au-
thor doesn’t know how to go on
with the story. So let us leave
it at that. Her face was ghastly,
not with its normal ugliness,
which was her misfortune rather
than her fault, but with an emvu-
tion which a child would have
recognised as terfor, nay, starx
terror, as the phrase goes. The
lynx eye of Malpractice did not
overlook her plight. Why, ne
asked himself, should the mention

is as _ follows,



Former B.W.1.A. Hostess
ISS JUNE BIRCH, former
B.W.1.A. hostess who had
been spending a holiday in Bar-
bados, staying at Stafford House,
returned to Trinidad yesterday by

B.W.LA.
Short Visit

R. LIONEL GITTENS was
5 among the passengers leav—
ing for St. Lucia on Saturday by-
B.W.I. to spend a week’s
holiday staying with Mr, Herman
Boxill, Inspector of Schools in St.
Lucia, :

Area Engineer
RAR. “BOB” GREENE, Area
Engineer of International
Aeradio Ltd. in the Caribbean,
arrived from Trinidad over the
week-end. He will be here for
ene veek, before leaving for An-

tigua. ,

With Barclay’s Bank

WAR. BRIGGS WILLIAMS, son
of Mr. and Mrs, B. Williams
of “Floris Dale”, St. John returned
to St. Lucia on Saturday by
B.W.1A. after spending a short
holiday wit) nis parents. Briggs
is with Barclays Bank in Castries.

Cleveland Lawyer

R. AND MRS. L. ;

WYKOFF who visited Bar-
bados last year were on_ the
T.C.A. flight which arrived from
Canada on Saturday.

This time however they are
only here for five days. Their
next stop is Grenada. Mr. Wykoff
is a lawyer in Cleveland.

Fourth Visit



(By DOROTHY BARLEY)
LONDON.

London designers work on the
assumption that the majority of
women have average, not model,
figures and that only a very few
have figures resembling that per—
fection of proportion
seeing in Paris.
remember those few extra inches,

ADVOCATE

BARBADOS.

First Thoughts: On The Couture Collections.

of all spring flowers, and filled suit. .

yoke of a dinner gown.
Wicker work has often been used
successfully for hats, but Digby
Merton showed ingenuity by
making the strapless top of an
informal party dress of plaited
raffia. Its bodice was edged all
the way round with grape hya-
cinths, violets and ivy --a flower

. pockets on evening dress
sequin embroidered. . coat
linings matching gloves and dress,
in particular a black coat lined
with pink. -hat and blouse
made of the same material.
narrow black velvet choker worn
with velvet belt on lime green
evening dress.

we recall
Couturiers here

and. design accordingly. ‘They basket effect. ‘ B.B.C. Radio Programme
TH realise, too, that women nee Originalit _.. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1951
M* go elgg jg Clothes that will carry them pockets ive ae London. °30—18.00. 19.76 m,
Sault Ste Marie Ontario, arrived through with ease from 9 to 6— designers scope for originality. 6,30 a.m. Forces Favourites, 7 a.m. The
eee Canada on Saturday by TCA, the shopping and the travelling. WATTLI introduced an unusual News, 7.10 a.ni, News Analysis, 7.15 a.m.

They are here for two months,
staying at the Windsor Hotel.
Mr. Ross is a_ retired Civil
Engineer. This is their fourth
visit to Barbados. They were here
in 1934, 1935 and last year.

And, whatever Paris
they like to have clothes which
enable them to do it all in com-
fort, as well as style.

This year, therefore the skirts
in the spring collections, although
they are neat and straight, are not

may say, From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m. Programme
Parade, 7.30 a.m, Personal Impressions of
Africa, 7.45 a.m. Think on these Things,
8 a.m. Souvenirs of Music, 8.45 a.m. Let-
ter from America, 9 a.m, The News, 9.19
a.m. Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m.
Close Down, 11.15 am. Programme
Parade, 11.25 a.m. Australia vs, England,

11.45 a.m. Report from Britain, 12 (noon)

‘gun-holster’ pocket; the material
was doubled back to stand out
stifflYy on either side of the
jacket front.

PETER RUSSELL showed a4
number of three-piece ensembles

* her pencil-slim. Designers have in angora wool. He calls hiS The News, 12.10 p.m, News Analysis,
Music Byrn Music tried to give ease for walking and colours wisteria, lichen green and 12.15 p.m. Close Down,
Ms rs Sen ss of prennet freedom of movement by pro— young carrot. The dresses have 4:!5—000 25.53 m.
eacher of B.G.

Staying With Cousin
ISS ALICE LONG of Hands-
worth, Birmingham, who ar-
rived here: a few days ago is
spending two months’ holiday with

viding skirts with groups of pleats

from Ronald Paterson’s collection
In particular we noticed the fin
skirt which also put in an appear-
ance at the collections of Charles
Creed and Hardy e
at the back were made to stand

tailored jackets to match with

a
415 p.m. Music

‘ tas ; f Grand Hotel,
in Barbados visiting her rn and flying panels. topcoat matching but generally 5 p.m. Australia vs. England, 5.15. p.m.
Mr. T. A. Wason, eg ivi Skirts of heavier material. Skirts were Welsh Magazine, 5.45 p.m. Music
Servant of B.G. who lives here. Sketched here are skirt deta'ls Mostly straight, jackets tailored Mesazine.

600—7.15 31.32 m. & 48.43 m.

wyh long sleeves, and some were
of the battle-dress variety — he
politely called them lumber—
jackets. For evening wear, he has
favoured the double decker, aind
this line was seen at several col-

6 p.m, New Records, 645 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10
p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. West Indian
Guest Night.

Amies leats 2.45—11.00 p.m. 31.32 m. & 48.43 m’
RT





her cousin Mrs. Harold Newsam 6.4 jixe the fins of a fish. lections — the skirt fall from a .745 pm, Personal Impressions of
at “Ferndale”, Hastings. The long Michael of Lachasse—w ho re fitted bodice in two tiers. aoe 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m.
journey was made by air. Miss tioces Molyneux among the Details from the collections: SEARAWORE Pie ant ee Be
Long works with a Bank in Bir- ¢ycjusive ten of the Incorporated gloves made of the same material 9.15 p.m. Ray Martin and his Orchestra,
mingham. Society of London Fashion as the suit. white gloves '¢-p.m, The News, 10.10 p.m. From the

Steel President
RRIVING from Cleveland yes-
fA terday via Puerto Rico by
B.W.LA. were Mr. and Mrs.
Charles J. Paterson. They were
accompanied by their daughter

Sketch Book—28

Mrs. Anne Eaton. is sti he first as —
Mr. Paterson is President of — ee S f

Paterson Leitch Co., of Cleveland. “Remembering that London
This company makes steel girders designers can, and do, stoop to
and other fittings for buildings qaitery, we find that lines o
constructed with steel. They are jackets, such as the buttoned
staying at the Ocean View Hotel. j,,;que’ illustrated here, compli-

Past vs Present

NY Old Harrisonian who can Jackets
take the half day off from The sketches here show the
work to-morrow afternoon, will general lines of CHARLES

have an interesting afterneon’s
fun if he looks in at Harrison
College shortly after 1 p.m.

The Past vs. Present cricket
match begins at 1 p.m. on the
College grounds. The Past team
Kenneth Mason
(Capt.), Mr. Teddy Hoad, Snr.,
Mr. G\ H. Adams, M.C.P., Mr,
Jim “Puss” Parris, Mr. Garnett
Mayers, Mr. John Goddard, Mr.
Clyde Walcott, Mr. Ian Clarke,
Mr. Clarence Skinner, Dr. A, L,
Stuart and Mr. E. W. Cumber-
batch.

A few days ago the Advocate
published a photograph of Mr.
Adams shaping up for a cover

ri . gerine colours launched last
en Road pleping Held. it this year have been sent to the laundry
is an indication of the tyre of and have come back faded.
strokes we shall see to-morrow Tones are muted, with wisteria
afternoon, it should be entertain- ae sandstong prominent in all
ing cricket. collections. 3
hea will be served to Old Har- The most striking of new Simple ay
risonians attending the game at Materiais we have noticed was y

4.15, After the match there will
be a cocktail party given by the
Old Harrisonian Society from 5,30
p.m, to 7 p.m.

dinner gown, which was worn Do this 3 times a day for 14 days.
with a multi-coloured chiffon Crh cleansing raped brings
stole. your skin Palmolive’s full

By Beachcomber

the Everyman selection of Robert

Lynd’s writings comes oppol- Magnificent crinolines sparkled
tunely, for it includes that little with embroidery. One called
masterpiece, “Dr, Johnson and “Harlequinade”’ was of pastel- =

Company.” Here is Lynd’s con-
cise and just explanation of
Boswell’s rather tiresome slavish-
ness in the presence of his hero:
“A dinner at Mrs, Thrale’s was
not merely a momentary enter-
tainment at which good manners

Designers—showed an interesting
variation on the
Instead of cutting the
the back in one with the skirt, he
had a separate panel which swung
out attractively.

But for country wear the skirt

ment the waist, even if it is not
already there.

CREED'S collection.
have long revers, often reaching
down as far as the one button at
the waist; several suits had gilet-
front jackets, cut like waistcoats.
One of his suits,
silk,
spotted on one side, and checked
on the reverse.

Navy blue and white still hold
the first place in choice of colours

for the spring.
* new shade of grey, called “thunder
grey”,
than
There are no violent colours: as
Hardy Amies put

fringed silk which has been used
by several designers. The fringe
is half an inch in depth and Digby
Morton made it into an elegant

As
at NOMAN HARTNELL’S
lection was his evening dresses.

coloured organza squares divided
by bead embroidery.
mannequin had difficulty in keep--
ing
imaginable—under control in the
crowded salon, He showed a friv—
olous evening hat made to look

Exjitorials, 10.15 p.m. How to Blow Your
Own Trumpet, 10.45 p.m, Getting Ready
for the Festival of Britain, 11 p.m, BBC
Symphony Orchestra.

piped with navy worn with navy
and white checked suit. . . large

straight skirt.
ae, black rose on lapel of blue linen

pleats at



| Rupert and the









Suit jackets

and the driver hold her firmly.
When they reach him, Constable
Growler fetches Rosalie’s parasol and
her box of candied fruits. {
ou've found her, Rupert,’’ he says.
*You've been a long time. Why

The rain stops before the van
teaches Nutwood and they pull up
in sunshine, As they get down the

| first person they see is Constable
Growler. standing outside his police
station At the sight of him Rosalie did she run away from me?" But
tries to fun away again, but Rupert Rosalie won't say a word,
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

in navy blue

was entirely reversible,

But there is a





much warmer?
previously.

which is
shades seen

it, “the tan-






4 Wash your face with Palmolive Soap

Then, for 60 seconds, massage with
Palmolive’s soft, lovely lather, Rinse!

Evening Dresses beautifying effect!
always, the main feature

col-

“in keep JANETTA DRESS SHOP
UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAWM’S, Lower Broad St,

the crinoline—the largest



were all-important, but a potential like a white mask with a long READY MADE DRESSES of all types
scene in a masterpiece, demand- trail of feathers down beside the WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Local dicraft
ing the mannerless application of face. Han

an artist.”

of a circus horse upset her so Marginal Note

much?

all this to do with anything?

And what the devil was

SEEM to hear sardonic laugh. (strawberres or
flower

decoration.

ter trom the people wh¢

Aha! I, who am in the secret, am were turned out of their home’
not asking myself any such ques- % provide a runway) for the

tion. Paciencia, pulgas. ...

Robert Lynd on Boswell
R. JOHNSON





vee $8"
3x4

SEER RB BRR eeeeee|s
CONGOLEUM SQUARES

3X82 ydsrewecsuen $12

£12,000,000 Brabazon. Perhaps
a bigger plane, for £30,000,000
would be more likely to be ‘Te-

i and Boswell jected quickly enough to make
being very much in the news,

evictions unnecessary,



dina toe
a

Ce ee ete ete ee na ee em ee So ce ee Sd RN A Cee ce men

EVENING HANDBAGS

One of a Kind at WHITFIELD'S only :—
BLACK HEAVY CORDED FABRIC from $14.75
BLACK & TINSEL BROCADE from
NYLONS—New Range, Popular Shades ....

12.53
1.95

|
3
|
i
l
I
I
|
i
{
I
j
{
I
I

VICTOR STIEBEL introduced
starched linen
of various shapes, some with fruit

also used flowers for
mimosa seems the most popular

— ——
he — »





EVENING MITTENS—in Pastel Shades and Black
READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty’s of London.

HOURS: Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30

NEGLECTED, MAY LEAD TO
SERIOUS OPERATION

Many people suffer in silence untold
Agonies, constant brain-wearying irritation
and pain caused by piles, simply because
they have never discussed this trouble with
even such a confidant as their chemist. If
you are a sufferer, make up your mind to

collars and cuffs
apples) or
(carnation or mimosa)
DIGBY MORTON
decoration:





ENAMELWARE

A wide range to select from...



CUPS and PLATES BASINS

ri ask your chemist about the wonderful

DINNER CARRIERS GHAMBERS preparation Man Zan. This clean, simple-
JUGS TOILET SETS to-use remedy is just marvellous in the
quick way it stops the maddening irritation,

SAUCEPANS SOAP DISHES allays inflammation and, persevered with,

banishes the most serious form of this
agonising trouble.
Man Zan Pile Remedy is no ordinary

KITCHEN SINKS TABLE TOPS

Stocked by our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

Telephone No, 2039 for those with pile trouble. It is prepared

in a special nozzle applicator tube, making
it simple and clean to use. Sold by

chemists everywhere.
THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE |

COTTON FACTORY LTD. | Ma nh Zan
;\PILE REMEDY

( 4



|









ie i i i a i a i

ointment, but a special preparation solely | '

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1951

>
’

6 $OS609
SLL FOOSE COO GOS FOODS SOGO98S

GLOBE

Last Showing TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M.

-- SUMMER-STOCK ~

LFF

OPPS SSPE PPPS FOP OT

Gene — JUDY — Eddie
Kelly GARLAND Bracken NG
%,
TO-MORROW & THURSDAY 4.45 & 8.30 %
HOLIDAY IN MEXICO (Jose Iturbi) ¥
AND 2
“CRISIS” x
~
39S SOC GOO SS 9GES SSO G9CGE IOVS POSSE





AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA
TO-NIGHT and TO-MORROW NIGHT
MATINEE: To-MORROW at 5 p.m.



AT &.

Maureen O'HARA—Dick HAYMES-—Harry JAMES
in “DO YOU LOVE ME” in Technicolor
A 220th Century-Fox Picture.

MATINEE: THURSDAY at 5 p.m.
THURSDAY NIGHT at 8,30
Tyrone POWER—Jean PETERS
t

in “CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE,” in Technicolour.
A 20th Century-Fox Picture.












PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45



and 8.30 p.m.

CHAIN. LIGHTNING”

(R.K.O. Double)

Humphrey
BOGART

Eleanor
» PARKER in

Thurs. 1.30 p.m,
Ci

RIMINAL COURT

, Tom Conway — Martha O'Driscoll
DAUGHTER OF ROSIE O'GRADY ‘and i

Starring :
June HAVER—Gordon McRAE

Look for the Silver Lining Sweetheart

Zane Grey's
THUNDER MOUNTAIN

Wed. and Thurs. 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Warner's Technicolor Musical!
with Tim HOLT









PLAZA Theatre=O)STIN (DIAL 8404)

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p.m, (Warner's Double)
“JUNE BRIDE” & “BULLET SCARS”

with Bette DAVIS with Regis TOOMEY
Wednesday 5 and 8.30 p.m. (only) | Thursday 5 and 8.30 p.m. (only)



Leo GORCEY and Bowery Boys in
Pobert MITCHUM “and others, and|| DOCKS OF NEW YORK and
DARK ALIBI
Sydney TOLER as Charlie CHAN

and

DON'T GAMBLE WITH STRANGERS
Kane RICHMOND--Gloria WARREN



Midnite Sat. 10,

LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT and RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL





=:

GATETWY—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE 8.30—(R.K.O. Double)

George O’Brien (in both)
“BORDER G MAN” & “TIMBER STAMPEDE”



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 8.30 p.m, (R.K.O, Double)
Zane GREY'S

WANDERER of the WASTELAND & BROTHERS in the SADDLE

James WARREN with Tim HOLT

MIDNITE SAT. FEB, 10th (2 New Features)
RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL and DEATH VALLEY RANGERS
———<——



ROYAL

To-day and To-morrow 4.30
j and 8.30



EMPIRE

To-day To Thursday 4,45

and 8.30 United Artists Double

Columbia Pictures Presents

“ FAUST

Pat O'BRIEN and Wayne
MORRIS in

« JOHNNY
ONE-EYE”’
and
“‘ BREAKFAST
IN

AND
THE
DEVIL ”

Ging, MATIERA | Last Two Shows To-day

| 4.30 and 8.15



20th Century Fox Double

ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day
445 and 8.15 p.m,

| Wallace BEERY and
| Barbara STANWYCK in

“A MESSAGE
TO
GARCIA ”

and

Universal Pictures Presents

Maureen O’HARA —
Macdonald CAREY in

** COMANCHE
TERRITORY ”

with

“THE FOXES
OF
HARROW”
Starring

Rex HARRISON and
Maureen O'HARA

Will GEER and Charles \
DRAKE



SELECT
YOURS EARLY

St

PONT hi 93
HOLLYWOO
\ Starring with
Tom BRENMAN and Andy
Italo TAJO and Nelly RUSSELL
CORRADI with OLYMPI Cc



Bathroom Requisites

Porcelain Basins in White, Pink, Ivory and Green

Low Down Toilet Suites in White, Pink, Ivory and Green.

Chromium Soap Dishes, Tooth Brush and Tumbler Holders,

' Toilet Paper Holders,-Curtain Rings.

Brass Wove Wire, 2 ft. wide in the following meshes:—
e 120/120, 100/100, 90/90, 40/40





|

| PLANTATIONS LTD.
}





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6

. 1951

Strikes Disrupt Work Trinidad Lund Brings

On 3 Grenada Estates

From Our Own Correspondent

Wild-cat strikes have disrupted work on three estates
here this week, one lasting a day and the others three days.
The managements of the estates involved have not
received any demands either from the workers or those

claiming to represent them.

Adult Suffrage
Suggested
For B.G.

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 3.

A suggestion that a United
Kingdom Commission for the Con-
stitution Reform in British Gui-
ana should not carry out the
duties assigned to them im their
terms of reference, but should in-
stead recommend a Constitution
elected on universal adult suffrage
to be entrusted with the drafting
of a constitution for this country
‘was made to the Commission by
the People’s Progressive Party.

The Chairman of the Three-man
Commission Sir John Waddington,
disclosed this last evening. When
the Commission recefved oral evi-
denge from a five-man delegation
the Party who despite the fact
that they had picketed the arrival
of the Commission did not decline
the latter’s request to give evi-
dence, "



This was the largest attended
and most lively of many sessions
held by the Commission in vari-
ous parts of the country and in
whieh they have had constitutions
suggested to them ranging from
little change to complete self-
government. Vice-Chairman of
the Party the Hon. Dr. Cheddi B.
Jagan, stressed that the Commis-
sion had been given evidence from
one extreme to another and not
knawing particularly what. public
opinion was in this country and
not being able to evaluate what
public opinion concerning certain
persons or organizations might
represent, it would be difficult for
them to write a constitution for
this country, whereas if they re-
commended a constituent Assem-
bly this would be the basis of de-
termining what everyone wanted:
But Sir John affirmed that such a
proposal was of course not within
the Commission’s terms of refer-
ence and the meeting proceeded
to deal with the suggestions in the
Party’s Memorandum for a change
in Constitution.

The party advocated complete
self-Government with a Uni-
cameral Legislature.

The Commission with Professor
Vineent Harlow and Dr. Rita
Hinden as members expect to
leave British Guiana on February

13 on the first stage of their jour- tice Day declareq himself the only sugar to the Ministry of Food ex-

ney back to England, They arriv-
ed in British Guiana, on December
15 last.
| —C.P,



Hongkong At
The Museum

Dr. FRANK GREAVES gave an
interesting talk on Hongkong to
members of the Barbados Museum
and Historic Society when the
Society held its annual General
Meeting at its Headquarters yes-
terday.

At the end of his talk, Dr.
Greaves showed pictures illus-
trating the life of the people of
Hongkong and some of the build-
ings. He has been a prisoner of
war there,

He said that before he went to
Hongkong his knowledge of the
place was nil, It is about 52
square miles and was very vari-~
able around the sea coast. He
talked of the beauty of the har-
bour and the density of the
population. He said that it is
much more thickly populated than
Barbados.

It has one city, Victoria and
in the lowland the temperature
is usually about 92 degrees and
then one goes up to higher land
which is called the Peak and
which is much cooler. He said
that all of a type of business is in



LOWEST fare
to MONTREAL
$259." awi

Call your Pan American 6ffice
and ask for this low-fare routing:

BARBADOS San Juan
vie
British West Indian Airways

Total

259."

Colonial or Trans-Canada Airlines
Stop over in New York — for shopping or sightseeing!

PAN AMERICAN
WORLD AIRHAYS

PASSENGERS * MAIL * CLIPPER" CARGO

Da Costa & Co., Ltd. Broad St.
Phone 2122 (after business hours 2303)

rm, REG. PAA, INC.

Pan American World Airways
New York — MONTREAL

@ From Page 1
boy scouts took the St. John Am-
bulance examination and wore
ee hedge.
ere im Barbados, there were
o youth movements amd church lad
ISAPPOINTING CROP afid girl brigades who might be
(From Our Own Correspondent) able to take their examinations
The twenty-eighth annual ordin- 4nd do first. aid.
ary general meeting of Trinidad Otto said that it was hardly
Sugar Estates, Ltd., was held in Mecessary to point out that first
London in January. Mr, E. Cassle~ 244 and the rudiments of home
Chairman, presided, Vursing must be useful if people
The following is an extract from got foterested in thers when young
his circulated speech : P that that interest would con-
_“The crop for the year was very ie we ve baad ;
ppointing as, alt the e ua that the public
taihieee of re al should realise that the efficiency

i ; the and u ~
All that is known is that Mr. same as in the previous year, we ae og eer, -

M. Gairy, a 30-year-old obtained 1,300 tons sugar,
“ ; less of
i eget ewe sy Ave who due to the abnormally wet weati- still oe: wae aave ae * ne
oad y . lares aan awa: oie a oe during the grind- pate pee for their éxaminations
E ; . y and make sure that the le
presented himself in turn at the “The average price realised for were fed and well } pone
estates and at his behest the sugar, including by-products, after When hurt or sick. sateen db in:
strikes were on. deducting the levies of £2. 18s. per _ He said that the Order of St,
It was Mr. Gairy’s Manual and ton under the Trinidad Sugar In- John Eye Fund which was started
Mental \Workers’ Union which dustry Special Funds Ordinance, bY Lady Bushe was not as big as
staged the strikes in the island’s 1948, was £30. 6s., compared with it was. Its purpose was to assist
southern cane~belt quring last £27. 1s. Id. last year, but the cost peruse. to obtain glasses and the
year, eventually resulting in the of production rose to £26. 19s, 8d, St, John Brigade was so inter-
holding of an Arbitration over per ton, against £22. 3s. 9d. so that @Sted in anything to do with the
which Sir Clement Maione pre— the profit per ton of sugar was ri: ie it soon started a Hospi-
sided, assisted by Mr. Quintin £3. 6s, 4d. against £4. 17s. 4d. in “tyre Rope Chan ;
O’Connor and Hon. H. A. Cuke. 1949. As a result of this and the fy i silence: is the

Sugar
Estates

ST, GEORGE'S, Feb. 3.

The affected estates were Bel-
mont, St. Patrick’s, owned by Mr.
Norbert Nyack, where the work-—
ers were out on Monday, and La
Sagesse, St. David’s, owned by
Mr. Louis Strauss, and Hope, St.
Andrew’s, where the walk-out
continued to Wednesday.





Conn Secretary and Treasur
This tribunal awarded cane work- smaller crop, the profit in Trini- of thie zon eee
ers a higher rate of pay than dad fell by £23,439 and the net Sire aan cine ariaete
agricultural workers on cocoa and Profit from £47,891 to £24,695. and he was therefore making an
nutmeg estates in view of the ab- £16,462 in Taxes appeal in that direction.
sence of certain privileges which Out of the net profit for the ir Otto said that the Countess
accrued to the latter, such as free year of £24,695 we have to put Of Brecknock would be remaining
fuel, cheap provisions, and easy aside as much as £16,462 for taxa- in the West Indies at the conclu-
gardening facilities, tion. This high proportion is:due Sion of their joint tour to visit
Agree on Bonus primarily to the fact that it has the Leeward and Windward
Before the Arbitration, the always been our policy to provide Frage fart Peal ach oo rare
: ° e
Trades Union Council, of ‘which a ef buldttien thane Sepreci= smaller islands in the West Indies
e M.M.W.U.has scorned mem— , while he would be returning home.
bership, entered an agreement Chinery, etc., so that we can have ;
with the Agricultural Employers’ the funds available for capital re~
Society on behalf of non-cane ene when needed. Also, Must P. ay £5 For
workers to accept 4 bonus above WRGCT eco eee i aw eee Steali Ss
the gtatutory, minimum wage, for income-tax purchase on plant Stealing, Stock Feed)
of the price of cocda. This agree- “74 machinery, the cost of which Livingston Bourne of Kensington
ment has workéd satisfactorily, '%,reimbursed out of the rehabili- New Road, St. Michael was yes-
but is reviewable quarterly, and ‘#tion account. The amount pro- terday found guilty by His Wor-
au wy, 2 ided in th its for di i- shi i
an impression created is that the ¥ in the accounts for depreci~ ship Mr. H. A. Talam, Police Mag.
current quarter’s borias having ation is therefore considerably istrate of District “A” of stealing
recently anobped balow ie last eee ped perpe Pes med for o bag. Fre feed ae at
bie ae a docking of pay. — The financial position of the Tudor. eee
_The M.M.W.U. is now begin— company continues to be sound, He was ordered to pay a fine
ning to invade the cocoa-nutmeg the surplus of current assets ovet of £5 by monthly instalments of
estate worker arena and, more- cyrrent liabilities and provisions £1 or in default two months’ im-
over, Mr. Gairy is also President peing £146,450, compared with prisonment with hard labour. The
of a companion Grenada People’s ¢149,122 last year. offence was committed on January
Party, which he claims is out to Satisfactory Crop Expected 20.
capture every elected seat at the So far as the prospects for the a se
next general election for th€ coming crop are concerned, the £5 FOR WOUNDING
Legislative Council. His visit to manager reports that the cultiva- Salome Herbert of Spooners
Trinidad was to see Hon. T.U-B-. tions are in good order and the Hill, St. Michael was yesterday
Butler, who has promised to come tonnage of canes to be reaped wiil ordered to pay a fine of £5 by
over shortly on “very serious pe approximately the same as last Mr. H, A. Talma in monthly in-
business”, year. Provided that the juice is stalments or in default two months’
This is along march from hormal and we are able to reap imprisonment with hard labour,
strikes, but it backgrounds the the whole of the canes, I hope that for wounding Elaine Beckles on
future. In recent months, Gairy we shall have a satisfactory crop hs
has more or less dominated local for the year. Mr. H. A. Talma, before whom
platforming and s a nae The present arrangement for the ee, einai ean ~~ adewecs
Square demonstraticn on Armis- sale of the whole of our export thing to do to a person ahd if
shé praia appéar again she would
be_in for ‘ ” trouble.

leader of the workers in Grenada pirés in 1952, and last summer
and first politician, not even negotiations took place bétweén
second to Marryshow who was the United Kingdom Government
then in Englang attending the and the Dominion and Cotonial
Commonwealth Parliamentary producers for a long-term agree-
Association Conference. = after ee a a a ha —
ince then at a public meeting the United Kingdom Governmen i

ou of Dr. i . B. Morgan, have agreed to purchase from 1953 STOLE POSTS: FINED 10]-
Grenada-born M.P., Hon. T, A. to 195%, inclusive, 670,000 tons of — A:fine of 30/- to’be paid in 28
Marryshow has dared any man or Sugar from the B.W.I. Colonies at days or in default one month’s
any combination of forces to un- & reasonable price to be negotiated imprisonment with hard labour
seat him in the constituency he each year, based on efficient pro- Was imposed on 40-year-old
has held for 25 years. “I am not duction, and the remainder of tne bangs James Wiltshire of Bank
so craven, sa spent, go degenerate export quota of 230,000 tons allot- Hall, St. ae, i a A

tt said Marryshow, that I will ted to the B.W.1. will have to be od latte tee. Weve SS:
7 t rinciplés. to get the sold at the world price ruling at aune ait a charge of larceny.

= ca at ne who I fee] the time. The prosperity of the tsh: a a quantity of
support of | allyone Wn? nada sugar industry id he B.W.1. is Ween poste belonging to. Jobn
SEs Oe eae We ” essential for the welfare of these Fletcher which were on the Pier
and for the West Indies.” Earlier loniés, which are mainly depen- Head sometime on February 5.
there had been rumours that Gace on: omer The posts are valued at 4/6.
Gairy would not oppose Marry— be : ae eee

show out of sympathy for his past ‘ J WANT MORE FLOUR
t ur indent)
wate: Britons Wanted waa Ss ee)
‘ As demand for flour becomes
In South Africa heavier in Jamaica, the Trade
JOHANNESBURG, Control authoritiés Have under
South African firms ure having consideration an application for

Bee! that in a dispute
Herbert bit her on her lip. The
offenee was committed on January
26.







BIG WIND
MOOSEHORN, Man.
The wind here was so strong
that a section gang’s jigger was

the tracks. ;
wt i 20 tone gang caught They see thousands emigrating Wheat Agreement for the cur-

i e after an eight-mile to Australia, Canada and New rent wheat year which expires
chase bar reckerage 2 Zealand and are having to take around the end of July,
Germans instead, At present the island's con-

In 1947-8 it was estimated that sumption of flour is around 1,250,-

from Britain.





the same street.

Peak, he said. Up there they just Scores of thousands did. Then Dr. lowed a year ago.
drop to pieces. Some fishermen Malan’s Government discouraged
of Hongkong never touch land in
their life. They always live in, a trickle.
'their ‘boats in the sea.

—L.E.S. ber, last year.

hee)



Free breathing is restored just by
breathing the‘ Mentholatum’ vapours.
Also rub ‘Mentholatum’ liberally on
your throat and chest. This breaks

vapours up congesti bio _ se the
~ open most obstinate Catarrh. Quick—get
San Juan — New York & jar or tin of ‘Mentholatum’ to-day.

via

via



ASK FOR REAL
MEN-THO-LAY-TUM

Only 7
The Menthalatum Co. Ltd.,
(Est. 1889) Slough, England.




















1 a million people in Britain, wantec 000 bags counter and baking flour.
One cannot keep books on the to emigrate to South Africa. An increased allocation was al-

This move ts considered neces-
immigration and the figures fell tu sary owing to emergency releases
following the flood rains of Octo-

* BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Police Give

Lorry Drivers

ORRY DRIVERS are now be-

ing given leaflets by the
Police Force.

The Commissioner of Police told
the Advocate yesterday that they
have started an intensive cam-
paign checking on lorries con-
nected with the sugar industry.

Extra Police patrols are on the
roads

drive

any driver who does not

with due care and regard

for the ‘safety of others will be
brought before the Courts.

“We hope that these drivers
realise the old saying: “Haste
makes Waste”. It is better to
drive slowly and do less trips than
to drive furiously and be brought
before the Courts,” the Commis-

sioner said.

HIEVES are cycle

owners much worry. Some
cyclists told the Advecate yester-
day that they find it impossible
to leave their cycles unattended
for a few minutes. When they
return some part is missing.

On the other hand a Policeman
said that it is extremely hard to
cope with petty thefts such as the
taking off of head lamps, genera-
tors or even
removing of

causing

in some cases the

saddle. One thing
is certain, 9 €yclists can prevent
their cycles from being stolen by
placing locks on them or leaving
them in ,a safe place.

While Robert Braemar of White
Park Road was at the Empire
Theatre on Sunday the generator
of his cycle was stolen. On Fri-
day night while two men were
watching a double at the Royal
Theatre their generators were also
taken off.

A cycle owned by Blair Forde of
Beckles Hill, St
stolen while Forde attended the
Olympic Theatre on Saturday.
The cycle was left at the Theatre.

Another cycle, owned by Syd-
ney Goddard of Fairchild Street,
St. Michael was stolen from the
Zanzibar Club on Sunday,

ARION BUTCHER of Man-
sion Road, Bank Hall report-
ed that her home was broken and
entered between 11.00
Friday and 5.30 a.m. on Satur-
day and a quantity of articles,
total value $39.88, stolen. So far
$22 worth have been recovered,
The restaurant of Cardinal
Trotman of Fairchild Street was
also broken and entered on Sat-
urday. A quantity of cigarettes
and whiskey, valued $31.50, was
stolen,

T WAS Carnival

yesterday and at
Barbadian dressed up.
a woman. She passed through
Broad Street around mid-day
dressed in slacks and wearing a
hat nearly two feet long. The hat
was decorated with bits of paper
of many colours,

IXTY-YEAR OLD ADA

DEANE of Bay Street left
homeé on Saturday and has not yet
returned. The Police are making
investigations,

Michael, was

p.m, on

in Trinidad
least one
This was

DEACONS PLAYGROUND

and pavilion, opened on Fri-

day afternoon, have a neat and at-
tractive appearance.

The cost of the pavilion was only
$700 owing to the limited financial
resources of the Housing Board
and to the fact that everyone in-
terested in the movement gave
some help and asked for no pay-
ment.

CLARKE’S “BLOO

Cleanse the
impurities ;

system
many

neuritis, pimples,










Leaflets To





light sure steering gives complete control and reduces driving fatigue. In
addition to all these features there is, of course, the traditional MORRIS
, ctaftemanship which means reliability, long life aud low upkeep costs,

Vee Shirts
Hath

Ladies”

Suits

Shoris

Brassieres

Stockings

Scarves

Sun Dresses

Hlouses

Skirts

Coats

Blankets

Slippers

Zipps

Cosmetic Bags

Parasols

House Coats

Children’s
Sandals

Children’s
Anklets

Rain Coats

Habies” Diapers

Helis

Plastic Aprons

Plastic Head

Ties
“Toa

THE MODERN
Dress Shoppe

BROAD STREET





MIXTURE”

from blood
sufferers
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
boils,
minor skin ailments, can derive great
benefit from this well-known medicine.

from

sores and

In LIQUID or TABLET FORM

Fowered, } von PERFORMANCE...

S%yled, con COMFORT..,
Losigned FOR SAFETY

The New MORRIS Six is @ car with a brilliant performance . . . due to its
powerful overhead cumshaft six-cylinder engine. It is a car of beautifal
comfort ... all seats are within the wheelbase and the deep upholstery
is resiliently sprung, It is a safe car... independent front suspension
means excellent road-holding. Lockheed hydraulic brakes give positive
smooth stopping, wide clear vision gives full views of road and traflic, and

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phorie 2385

Sole Distributors

Phone 4504





“

i





PAGE THREE







B Pour some
“Windolene'on a
soft tag

Sparkling glass

For twice the shine in;













SD Polish tightly
that’s alt

2 Spread it over
the glass and
give it a moment

om sy |
“iy Gl
Wi=

half the time, jast use
Windotene, Grease,
dirt and fly marks go
in a flash and leave
yourglass sparkling
and spotlessly clean.



oY

Windolene

cleans Ylass easily é quickly ha =

EXPECTANT MOTHERS/

Make baby strong—so he can be
an important future citizen
You need more A&D Vitamins now

to help

re bebe sea bones and @ —~ toayetad
elp our own stamina and energy.

Scott's akiteion regularly. See how SASS

you feel all during expectancy.

FOR WINDOWS, MIRRORS,
BATHS, REFRIGERATORS— :
tM FACT ANY GLAZED ve ;
















more than just a tonie~
it's POWERFUL NOURISHMENT

Scott's Emulsion is a scientific
tonic, rich in natural A&D
Vitamins, a wonderful help when
you need it, It's economical, good-
tasting.

: - Lh aa
PTL

WIGH ENERGY FOOD TONIC













FREIGHT
SERVICES
lo and from



———

ae VW~ -

Regular Services
Save Time



BERMUDA
LISBON
LONDON

Also Connecting Services to the whole World, p

12.15
24.45
29.00 hrs.

ote

w

ITS’ FASTER BY FAR BY SPEEDBIRD,
Book through your local
BO.A.C, Forwarding Agent

who makes no charge for

advice, information or book~

ings by “Speedbird” to all "Hue:
siz continents,
-- -









BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS

BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED
Airways House, Bridgetown

CHECK YOUR

FACTORY
SUPPLIES —

and Phone early
for the following

DUNLOP TRANSMISSION BELTING 3%” x 4 Ply ;
DUNLOP RUBBER INSERTION %/ & 1-16" t ‘ ;
DICK’S PACKINGS all Types oe oe ’
BELT FASTENERS y
BELT DRESSING

FLAKE GRAPHITE
STENCIL INK

COTTON WASTE

BASS BROOMS

STEEL WIRE BRUSHES
EMERY & SANDPAPER
FILES All Types

TAPS & DIES ie
HACKSAWS & HACKSAW BLADES 5 x
ENGINEER’S HAMMERS — ¥

OPEN END & BOX SPANNERS

TAPER & STRAIGHT SHANK HIGH SPEED DRILLS

oe

4-lb., 4-Ib., 14-lb., 19-lb., 24%-Ib., 3-Ib. i’
STILLSON TYPE WRENCHES 8”, 10”, 14”, 18”, 24”,
CHAIN PIPE WRENCHES %4”—4” we
4
3 : yy

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET PIAL 4268





PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS 9 ADVOGATE |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid, Broad 8t., Bridgetown.
angen

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

‘Operation Friendship”

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1951









Record Yield From
Borneo Oilfield



D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS

LONDON. at THE COLONNADE



By HA .
Tuesday, February 6, 1951 oN te P . ZEL MAY furnishing. Centrally-heated mod- {
‘ Most pressing problem for in- r z - ’ - k burbs j
tending Festival of Britain visi- weekly, and another cottage beirig Ct flats im blocks in the su . -

tors this an id where to siny advertised in Sussex some dis- tun to 15 and 16 guineas weekly. (From Our London Correspondent)
FIN ANCE People from the Colonies with no @nee away from a railway line is Put in the East End suburb of LONDON. . Usually NOW |

Aw ams relations in this country are be- ©9438 for four and a half guineas; Bromley-by-Bow, a four-roomed ; . : 4 .
; ioc’ ‘otead It is also cheaper to take a house “2t wili only cost eight or nine] Qil production from Seria in Brunei, Tins BROOKS PEARS 55

ginning to wonder whether their
leave is going to be altogether tco
costly this year, with the rumour-
ed high prices of accommodation
during the Festival.

This week I set out to get some
facts and figures on the situation, ®
lL interviewed house agents in Lon-

in those counties that are not with- suineas a week. x y * 7
in such convenient distance of . London agents claim that the Nerth Borneo, has now reached a record rate

London. There are \good houses ices quoted on their books os of 100,000 barrels per day — nearly five

to be had in Somerset and Dorset no higher ‘than last year, but); i

in summer for six, even and eight “though thts would seem to be times that of the best pre-war days.

uineas weekly, tree of the more expensive flats} Seria, already the most productive field
in the British Commonwealth, has reached

THE transfer of the Financial Secretary
of this island to the post of Accountant
General in Kenya serves to focus attention
on the necessity for change in the offices
dealing with finance.

Tins BATCHELOR PEAS 24
Bottles COCKTAIL CHERRIES 55



A» Kenya man who wrote to cealt with by such firms, it —
i ° ry, Britain for a house agent’s list was evident that.there has been a sharp | * . _ | Z0SSSS9S9S99595995995595559955905
Fate tie ce et i appalled to find a house near Bog- tise in the more ordinary private-|its peak despite the havoc of war damage;

i i iv. isi nor quoted at 40 guineas a week. Jy-let type of flat, for Festival | ; ‘ : iid i im-
found thal country” -accommoda- Hamptons, who a agents for year. It was not impossible to get it was twice demolished first in 1941, im
i

tion is no

For some time now there has been a
vacancy in the post of Colonial Treasurer

a aan wena haw eee

*

and more recently that of Auditor General.
It had been suggested in the past that the

any other year, but London prices ™e¢ that this could not be said to
are up a little — yet there are still be “typical.”

ways to get round that, London

“This. type of residence is in-

lest year fer round about the four-
guinea—a—week mark. Today there
are few under seven.

fferent in price from, â„¢any country properties, assured 2 moderately-sized flat in London| mediately before the Japanese invaders ar-

rived, and secondly in 1945, when Austra-
lian reoccupation forces were approaching.

‘ We Have...

GALVANISE DOWN PIPES

posts of Financial Secretary and Treasurer | ectate agents may quote you prices tended for wealthy families who Best hope, for visitors wanting 7 : ars |% i WATER HEADS y
be amalgamated but the public has hot | that make you reel, but the Brit- like to take a house combining reasonably-priced ate ennea Discovered by Shell oe 1929 ag ye 2 RIDGE CAPS
béén told whether this suggestion had been | ish Travel and Holidays Associa- the advantages of countty Sie ees in London is to contact the British |of painstaking exploration in the region, BARBED WIRE
68 tion caters for the modest pocket, and entertain large house-parties Travel and, Holidays Association, this oilfield was producing at the rate of ” %

accepted. and can suggest some comfortable throughout the season,” a member which has a hard-working depart-| 11S Ol ee 8 ” MESH WIRE : 3 :
and moderately-priced alterna- of their staff ben see ee a a 4 _ — i taen ever one million tons per annum by 1940; a”, 16, 144”, 1% ’

ives. house would proba include a pected to be the mammo hy : ,

Another suggestion made in the Legisla- “\Kirst I. examined the position well-laid-out Firden and its own lem of festival accommodation, | at that time nearly 150 wells had been s er Geuae ,
ture was that the office of Financial | with regard to furnished houses private beach. There is a demand Actually the demand for accom-| drilled, some of them off-shore. The Japa- ears veUg ae
. : ; in the southern counties within for this type of property in well- modation has fallen far short of anus attecnte % work the ares wane’ feb “i WOVE WIRE — 24” and 36 ’
Treasurer be head of the financial depart- easy reach of London, likely to known holiday areas like Bognor the supply. P r CHAIN 4%”, 3-16”, 44”, & 5-16” %

ment with a chartered accountant as, head
of the accounting department.

It will be realised that in those. colonies
where the financial departments have been
kept together the post of Treasurer and
that of Auditor have not been abandoned
but were kept as junior offices.

The comment has been made that the
post of Financial Secretary was unneces-
sary in a place like Barbados where the
pre-audit system had been adopted for so
many years. One Governor in an address
at the opening of the Legislative Session
pointed out that the time had come when
there should be a financial expert to advise
the Government in the policy of spending
and that he would not be responsible for
the handling of the complicated matters
of finance.

When Mr. H. S. Jemmott retired from
the post of Auditor General it was known
that if Mr. Newsam succeeded him he too
would retire in a short time. Both these
events have come to pass and now the
Office of Financial Secretary has become
vacant. If there is to be an amalgamation
of any two or all of these offices it might
well be discussed now by the Legislature
and a decision taken.

The old methods of handling the admin-
istration of these departments are not now
conducive to efficiency. The office of Col-
onial Treasurer has been maintained
separately and outside the Civil Establish-
ment because of the fallacious belief that
the House of Assembly could by this
means control the purse strings of the
colony. The truth of the situation was that
the actual financial control has always
been exercised by the Auditor General
who under the statute could refuse to sign
any voucher for funds from the Treasury
unless he was satisfied that it was in order.
And the Treasurer, except in the case of
warrants by the Governor in Executive
Committee, could not disburse any funds
except the payment was certified by the
Auditor General.

The time is suitable for a review of the
position in view of the fact that all three
of these offices are now vacant.



Playing Fields

attract Colonials with families on in the season.

A good average

long leave. I found that houses in house should not cost more than
Sussex, Bucks, Surrey and Herts 20 to 25 guineas weekly in the
were more expensive than those reason, or 15 guineas out of season.
in Kent and Essex, which are not Two or three miles from the sea

on the electric line with its fre-
quent train services to Town, It
is easier to get a fair-sized house
—say four or five bedrooms—than
it is to get a two-roomed cottage.
The latter are seldom on an
agent’s books for short-term let-
ting, as they are snapped up as
permanent residences by tax-
stricken Britishers whenever they
are on the market.

Another point is that visitors
who rent a house for a_ short
period — four to six months for
example — suffer financially as
they pay a higher rent than people
who take a house for nine months
to a year. In the latter case an
agent will quote much more rea-
sonable terms, So if a number of
people following one another on
leave can arrange to occupy the
same house over a longer period,
they are likely to benefit consid-
erably.

A furnished house in the Home
Counties with four to five bed-
rooms will cost you eight to ten
guineas out of season, but any-
thing up to 30 guineas in season,
the average being about twenty
guineas, But I was assured this
sharp rise in the summer is not
particular to Festival year, On
the other hand, rents in Kent and
Essex and the more inaccessible
parts of the Home counties ard
considerably lower. It is possible
to get a very nice bungalow or
small double-storied house here
for three to four guineas, with a
maximum of five, Nor are these
properties so likely to rocket in
the season. They would be only
a little higher in price, One agent
had a very nice small house in
Essex going for three guineas

houses would be very much
cheaper than that.”

He added a warning to be borne
in mind by other holiday-makers
locking for “a niece country cot-
tage in Surrey or Sussex.” Don’t
look for a period cottage unless
you are prepared to pay well for
the privilege of antiquity,” he
advises. “These are the most ex-
pensive cottages on the market
feo every rich tourist from
the States looks for something at
least three centuries old.” .

South coast agents reported no
inerease in bookings because of
the Festival. Their prices were no
different from last year’s. You
ean take your family to the sea-
side for as little as three to five
suineas for a _ three-bedroomed
rouse if you are content with one
of the back roads in a resort town,
but a view of the sea will cost you
ten guineas, or even twenty in the
height of the season,

What is the position in London?
Trevor & Sons, leading London
estate agent, quoted modern West
End flats on his books at 20 to 25
guineas weekly—“high prices be-
cause of all the service given in
such. apartments’”—and houses in
the West End ranging from 15
guineas weekly for a two-bed-
roomed housé, to 20 to 30 guineas
weekly for. a. three-bedroomed
house,

Suburban flats are not plentiful.
Self-contained two-room flats ara
hardest of all to find. The ‘con-
verted” type in a private house
vary between five, eight and
twelve guineas for two or. three
bedroomed-flats, according to the
neighbourhood and standard of



Here a small staff has been
working feverishly for weeks in
rocms where the telephones sel-
dom stop ringing, and office tables
sug under the weight of corre-
spendence—all offering rooms and
flats to»Festival visitors, Enormous
lists and a complicated filing sys-
fem have been evolved, and every
entry filed’ away under separate
headings. Gfeat paigs are being
taken to ensure that visitors will
be happy where they are ‘billeted.’

At. first ‘this looked like a
straightforward job of listing
rooms acedording to prices, but
now it has developed on the lines
of a sort’ of “Operation Friend-
ship.”

The profit motive, say the ac-
commodation specialists, is not
operative here. The people who
are throwing open their homes
to strangers are not out to get
their dollars. They just want to
make friends with people from
Commonwealth lands, from Amer.
ica or from the Continent—in that
order.

“Most of them are middle-aged
people living in comfortable sub-
urban homes’; a member of the
statf told me yesterday. “Now
their families have grown up
and moved away, Mum and Dad
find: the ‘house is a bit big
for them. . Life gets a bit empty
then, so they think how nice it
would be to have some overseas
visitors — a fresh point of view,
scmeone who will perhaps bring
a new chain of friendships. with
them, and someone to take round.

Now the Association's main
headache is whether the expect-
ed visitors will come to the Fes-
tival. They have accommodation
for some 10,000° people at any
time during the Festival, but so
far enquiries are still in the hun-
dreds, ;

British West Indian Free

(By a Special Correspondent.)

There are few people, if any,
of those living in, or having deal-
ings with the British West Indies,
who would oppose the conception,
of the proposed Customs Union,
with free trade between the sev-
eral territories and uniform duties
on goods imported from outside,
The annoyances and anomalies
created by the diverse customs
arrangements of the territories
concerned are well known and
often criticised. A woman who has
been away on holiday returns to
Barbados from Trinidad with the
new hat she was so delighted to
find there—and finds herself asked
to pay a duty of 10 per cent of its
cost. The Canadian exporter who
sends down consignments of paper
by C.N.S. steamer to the islands
of the Eastern Caribbean finds
himself searching nine different
customs schedules and providing

| Trade :

led the Commission. to describe
customs union as “both practicable
and economically desirable.”

One of the main objects of union
is to encourage local industry by
providing a wide area for whieh
production can, be planned with-
cut the hindrances of tariff bar~-
riers and.cther restrictions. Al
most all industrial countries have
in the early stages built up thei:
industries on the foundation of a
large home market, and if the
British West Indies are to be in-
dustrialised a similar foundation
is required. Such industries as
cement in Jamaica, hardware in
Trinidad, soap and margarine in
Barbados, are going to have far
better chances of success with a
home market of three million
persons than with a market of a

Ho by ”

art Webs
measure liké customs union there
are bound to be some elements

too successful, although they did renew pro-
duction on a small scale. ;

By the end of 1945 Shell technicians had
started re-drilling, and in March, 1946, the
first post-war cargo of crude oil was shipped
for refining in Australia.. On Christmas Day,

1946, Lutong Refinery in Borneo itself, and $

only some 30 miles by pipeline from Seria,
came back into operation, and since that
date progress has been rapid. The greater
part of the new equipment on the oilfield
has been obtained from sterling sources.

Included in-the restoration work was the
construction of two new submarine oil load-
ing lines, or “Sealines”, each three miles
long, and used to load tankers which are
prevented by shallow water from going
closer inshore. A third line is due to come
into operation this year.

A modern township, including a school,
hospital and social and sports club, is being
built for the staff and labour, numbering
almost 5,000 on the narrow coastal strip bor-
dering the South China Sea, only five. miles
from the jungle.

Geographically, Seria is of vital impor-
tance, being one of the principal producing
fields of the East Indies, the only region of
the Far East producing crude oil in any
quantity. Australia, New Zealand and
Malaya, to name only three countries, rely
to a large extent on the East Indies for their
supplies of liquid fuels.



| “Mutual Exclusiveness”

In Mauritius

Sir Hilary’s Island
(From. Our London Correspondent)

A budget surplus, a record sugar crop, a

which will be, or will appear ta| Yar free of cyclones, success in sight in the
be, in some degree prejudicial to] campaign to eradicate malaria, better social

some individual interest or other,

Secondly there is the idea that}Services — all these material blessings fell

regional free trade must adversely}tg Mauritius in 1949.
j Governor of Mauritius.

affect the local revenue of each
territory. This is true in the sense

Sir Hilary Blood is
The Colony’s an-

that certain sources of revenue|nual report, published this week, tells the

will be cut off—Barbados, for

example, will lose its import} Story.

duties on rice, matches and copra
which are all regional products
Put the Commission makes pro-

Politically, however, the Island has not
settled down to the conditions created by

posals for countervailing excise}the grant of a new Constitution and “that

Cuties which should serve to min 4

imise the loss of revenue on
petroleum, the most important
regional product, and certain other
items of regional trade. Apart
from that, the tariff recommended
by the Commission is specially
designed ta; provide more or less
the same net revenue as is now
collected. What is lost on regional

mutual exclusiveness which is a marked
feature of Mauritian social life continued
to act as a brake on progress”, says the report.

The first session of the new Legislative
Council, described in the report as an “en-
durance record”, lasted from September



WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd. .

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

» Phones — 4472, 4687,



NOW'S THE TIME
TO SELECT

DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — Acents.

YOURS.





oF A a a

YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO BUY

ALL WQOL

BLANKETS

AT BELOW PRESENT DAY COST

: WE OFFER :

WHITNEY ALL WOOL

BLANKETS

THE general public and especi for duty at nine different rates, 10 few hundred thousands. In turn, Products will be regained on im- 1948 to December 1949! The Council met ' "

ick 8 P : expecially the say nothing of surtaxes and pack: successful local industries soon. ports from outside the region. We| on 79 occasions, disposed of 70 bills, and 22 coeen ey to, ee ee
eric et enthusiast _ will welcome the age taxes, and then has to com~ Jead to cheaper products and to a Must at this point observe how ; ay A ; Sizes 72" x 90" at $10.22
decision of the Government to purchase | Plete nine quite different import higher standard of living for the unfortunate it is that the Com: private members’ motions. The Govern- Sizes 80" x 96" at $12.62

the Carrington’s Village plot of land for a
playingfield.

This field has been in use for many years
as an unofficial cricket ground but since the
Welches property changed hands the fate
of the ground was uncertain. Members of
the teams who had been playing there for
many years signed a petition and sought





ane neoaatseanainetshgapeiptanise cements) tien i naar

entry forms, maybe followed by
nine different forms of claim for
abatement of duty. And so on all
round. This sort of thing is not
only vexatious but also costly and
bad for trade.

Similarly, everyone probably
sees the benefits of inter-island
free trade. Under it Barbados and
Trinidad merchants will be able
io develop their sales to visitors



common man.

The other eventual advantage
of establishing a large free trading
region is in the long run more
important still—it is the bargain-
ing power created. by such a re-
gion. No exporting country is
likely to go out of its way to make
trade concessions to a single small
island, but many may wish to do
so whem a market of three million



mission drafted its trade classifi-
eation and tariff structure at a
time when the best available
model was the League of Nations
Uist of 1938. Since the Commis-
sion’s work was finished, an im-
proved classification hag been
issued, for general and interna-
tional use under the auspices of
the United Nations; the 1938 classi-
fication is now superseded, and
the work of the Commission will



ment faced some 400 parliamentary quec-
tions and 100 divisions were taken.
King-cane, a new sugar plant, has been
mainly responsible for producing three
record yearly crops since 1947. The 1949
yield of 416,000 tons, valued at £ 11,926,263,
topped the previous year by 24,000 tons.
King-cane grows on land hitherto covered





:

»y

SECURE YOURS NOW FROM
DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

we



SLO OIF PPO

*,
x
.
x

4,

PDDODOSSF SSS DOSS SSO SSG ISIS SSS SS OSSOS SOS SS OSS SPSS SSS SO SSSSSSSSSS

interviews with those whose duty i and buyers from other islands, consumers, is involved. By cus- in this matter have to be revised,| in scru
ene ty. it was | White the producers of fruit and toms union the strength of all the On the othér hand it is no doubt 7 b and regarded as unprofitable for OPP PSS SSS SOOO S DOOD ODS P ODODE VOP DEP DPPOOOPE
ecide the fate of the ground. vegetables in those islands will be twelve participating territories to the good that most’ West Indian planting. Two more new varieties of cane x j z ;
Despite the uncertainty they continued } £ ble to develop their shipments, accrues to each one of them, and territories have not already adopt-|} have had preliminary tests which su ts} s %
to keep the ground in orde d th free from burdensome formalities their voice will be increasingly ed the outmoded classification, h : , ggests |X & i
& order an e new and exactions, to the benefit of felt in relation to international and will therefore have to change that they are superior to King-cane, adds the * x ;
owners continued to allow them to use it. ie baa in Barbados and trade agreements, their arrangements twice. Report. . % %
. . . @
Their perseverance has been rewarded. ee Roe boii a at these immediate and ‘The thirds reason why customs} Malaria, an old enemy of the Colony, was|% S
: tat ose are the types of immedi- prospective advantages in view, union has béen delay a} >
ee. they will have the playfield establish ate advantages to be expected then, why was a customs union cimply inertia, cane tg Diy reduced to a low level of incidence as a >
ed and put in proper order. from customs union, but it was not formed long ago? We suppose Bay Conference took place there result of an intensive campaign directed by | % :
This is evidence of the need for those prospective advantages of a much there are really three reasons. was no regional meeting of sim- the Colonial Insecticid c ‘ x
ho would ask for help to fi hel broader and more far-reaching First there is a natural reluctance jlar standing and it was nobody’s js ACIGES ommittee ap- x |
Ww s r help to first help them- nature which led the distinguished of a legislature to divest itself of business to promote this obvious pointed in November 1948. > 2
selves and an indication of the Govern- West Indians who formed the fis: any part, however small, of its measure, of which it has been On the t d i x
ment’s titantion’ 6 SabRt tavinofelde 3 cal Sub-Committee at the Montes» powers. or to promote measures ctated, with what seems good e tea production front, a feature of 3
rake pply playingfelds in Bay Conference to urge the ap- other . than those designed reason, that “probably no other the year were trial consignments sold to the} $ =
order that those who want them can have pointment of the Customs Union directly ‘to benefit its own single reform would “bring. such Ministr f Food ie x
opportunity for clean, healthy sport fn heen lished we hich Scat at ith notaries ceeee’. ae ee ke ce a, es S
, nN ‘ jus n published, and which denied that in a_ far-reaching cerned.” ig: {| market. x
mater is ne > ; : .
ee % * . TS :
Our Readers Say: Daylight Saving es 3
4 ” . WASHINGTON : ° 7 be
AW EAE , : “i! Maracaibo ha r f > g
ening deaminose: Tact ; oe Venezutela’s name‘and fortune . Vi l J, I V ; Re ao ee aes .
: Cricket Broadcast SIR. a . ce een dis both stem from terrid Lake Mar; enesuela he ul e enice er oe, ~S eit Be —— . 3
6 the Edi , leader writer awicte the Tacaibo, southern extension’ of tha : By iy clicmiiaan tenia aecmnmea tie *
TMD Guirasur save that unless can Seaver ieee Geet income Bay of Venezuela’ which deeply ‘M¢,modern Republic got its name. water area of six or more times ee ie erat tb Repu: x
the Governor, who I understand, what was, (apart from _ petrol ar c tN Ga fotahe al ye cdasnenioch waue ee tiie pics revenue shakin it the ome Laat DDARDS RESTAURANT :
sac i Aaestry Paddy ha most coast. ar acalbos watets. Sour i ica: te ;
has the power «to grant a license, rationing) the most unpopular me eae oe wae aS centuries before the Machine Age Oil derricks are thickest in a American nation completely free} x
ee — a no eee of war ee measure * Barbados. I} yegion's profile along eth that of it meant little, however, so rey ae ake along the lake's eran debt. >
a Ball by Ba ommentary on remernber universal satisfaction | that of nove Far cant tre east sho: ome cluster in the e shallowness of th 4 . *
the patbcoming Geisieet matches hen the scheme was abandoned Shee heen on oot such ma boid and ae Not until lar oe etal ee miles ** on which the port lies, tues DELIGHTFUL ‘MENU DAILY 3
being broadcast to the other West from high and low alike. ~ 1913--was. the ion’s fi - » While others pump e made it mecessary from the start >
Indian Colonies. If the license is Take the point of view of the ae Sane : mercial oil wall stu. Still anOmNen black crude from w as far to ship Maracaibo crude in shal- DANISH BEER SPECIAL‘ %
5 : Issued wel] after the 450th anni- SsunK. a * inland, “The Maracaibo Basin still 1 ; ai *
not granted, Barbados will be servant, of whom there are 35,000 ny th eaate decade passed before large-scale , ow—draft tankers to deep-water <
placed in a unique position, and She still had to be at work at lew chnee se f en be operations ‘began on what is “now Venn re a: Droduction ever ands ae Cet ne Daten eee COCKTAILS made with %
it will prove a most unpopular 7 a.m, But instead of dinner being! mail use Scan a likeness o¢ Known to be one of the world’s with tha we joel production, even islands of Curacao and Aruba. ENGLISH BEE 2
decision creating great dissatis- served at 7.30 p.m., it was usual- | Alonza de Ojeda and thal dates major deposits of crude péetroleim. new Welle far to the wear conte There it is processed in two of * “GOLD BRAID” ¥
f n throughout the West In- ly 8.30 as it was impossible io get} 1499—1949. It was in October, .,Catibbean tidewater flows and la is the world’s second largest ON eects. LER Mest "TOARGTIOT TR peeniinilininintiesintibinianiatine = eS
dies. id ae the men home earlier. 1499—seven years efter Columbus ©PbS, along the shallow, narrow exporter of oil, after the. United eiaeces onto big ccean-going — x
‘If all the other Colonies includ- Then it was impossible to get|found the New World—that de strait om which the booming port States, New wells aré beimg con- — ‘ STEAKS d 3
ing Grenada, St. Kitts, and St. the young children to sleep in day-|Ojeda found and explored Lako nS Maracaibo is located. It stantly added to its fields. In the past few. years, Mara- sai 8
Wimcent, can broadcast these light, and they were weary and|Maracaibo, notes the National eusere., the northern part of the : caibo port has been expanded. Old SANDWICHES FRENCH ICE 2
matches, even using Commentary fractious at such a long day. | Geographic Society. Leena lake, making’ it | Lake Maracaibo and its “larger docks have been widened, new >
Stations without let or hindrance, “The game players found the! No forests of oil derricks greeted aes ash, the southern half, fed tributaries comprise a Venezuelan plore “have “been added, aahd. the Our Specialt CREAM Fl S
surely, the state owned Cable & mat at 3 p.m. very. trying andj|the Spanish seafarers, but Indian Sime Teena 8, stays fresh : inland waterway second only to een dredged to open. the port} x 7 ~— an sah $
Wireless Ltd. should be given a vere often too tired to play long ; villages of primitive grass huts widest lente at S arenian = pd oramell Secs an eae ait tee ovaihins acl cok mma $
similar permission to do so ¢s- beiore the light was gone. built on stilts projected from the nat larg eS wet pee St, sone a Spall hoats, ferries, and call for eventual deepenirty to 38 ! x
pecially as this can be the most So do let a housewife appeal to|lake’s shores then as now. Each en eetares rsh weet ae tankers ply ite, length and breadth, feet—enough to handle big ocean = r oo 7 aw a
we have to assist. you not to revive this unponulat|was a Venezuela (little Venice), Basi Hanne en aces alge and make Maracaibo an important tankers and enable the country’s} % For RESERVA TIONS—Call 13135 &
CRICKETER. custom. HOUSEWIFE. some of the crew commented, Thus Sti oom ale ta a = for come 2.7 Sere oe a ee x $
nae . or) and-and-s . + + eGRKn!e domestically —_I.N.S. ef) OA PPA AAA DAA LG ADDL ADL ELLA 64 AD AOA AAG BA ow

AIR RMON RRR ARITR A AER

Lg AE ea RIE

sn On go ate



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6,

1951

BARBADOS MUSEUM AND Mission Case
HISTORICAL SOCIETY

AT the beginning of 1950, states the Annuai Report of

the Barbados Museum and

Historical Society, there were

241 members on the roll and at the end of the year there

were 284 members comprising:

Founders 4, Honorary

Members 4, Life Members 25, Annual Members 176, and,

Associate Members 75.

The following additions toe
Membership were made during
the year:

LIFE MEMBERS
Alan Godsall, R. DeC. O’Neale
Ronald Tree.
Annual Members
Cc. R. Armstrong; H. H.
Inniss; Dr. J. H. Bennet, jnr.;
E. C. Jackman; C. ¥. Carstairs,

C.M.G., Dr. J. A. Kernahan;
F. J. Cole; A. G.. Leacock,
M.Ch., F.R.C.S.; Mrs. E. G.
Connell; E. A. Newsam; H. C.
Connell; J. L. Nicol; F. A.
Davis; Miss E. L. Nurse; Mrs.
F. W. Floyd; Mrs. E. M.
Queree; J. H. C. Grannum;
E. C. Redman; Mrs. A. L. Gill;
Miss R. Sainsbury; 8. L.

Greaves; A. A. Seale; K. de L.
Grogan; Miss E. G. Seale; Dr.
J. W.. PF. .Harkness.. C.M.G.,
O.B.E.; Mrs. E, L. Simpson;
Rev. H. F. Hart; C. A. Skinner;

J. B. Hobson; R. V. Taylor;
G. R. Hutson; J. S: Yearwood;
Mrs, M. Yearwood.
Associaies
K. R. Broodhagen; G. A.
Leach; Miss M. I. J. Carrington;
R. J. MacLeod; Miss A. I,
Fleming; R. B. McKenzie; Mrs.
C. E. Gooding; Miss’ D. K. R.
Mahon; Miss K. C. Hawkins;

Miss P. E, Mould; Miss E. M.
Heath; Miss M. G. Payne; Mrs.
G. W. Hunt; E. C. Queree; Miss
H..A. Kellman; A. T. L. Rob—
erts;; Mrs._S. J. Kellman; Miss
D. G. Sainsbury; Miss M. La-
borde; Mrs. C. M. W. Stoute.

The Council is anxious to
increase the roll of Membership
to at least 500. Members are
asked to encourage their friends
to join the Society.

Society’s Headquarters -

During the year the row of
cells to the East of the Quad-—
rangle known as ‘Annex 8B’
adjoining the Children’s Museum,
was converted into an Art Gal-
lery to house the Wortheim
Collection of watercolours and
drawings, and for the display of
larger exhibitions than the Exhi-
bition Gallery can aecommodate,
The work was carried out under
the. supervision of Mr. Miles
Cecil of Messrs. D. M. Simpson
& Co., who kindly gave his
services without charge. The
Society is deeply indebted to Mr.
Cecil for his generous help. The
Art Gallery was opened by H's
Excellency the Governor on 10th
July, and a Loan Collection of
West Indian prints was displayed
on exhibition.

The roof of the Curator’s lodg-
ings was treated for wood anis
and wood worm by the Depart-
ment of Agriculture

Museum and Library
The Museum an@ tibrary re-
ceived a number of gifts during
the year of which the most out-
standing were : a collection of
coins of Barbados and the West

Indies by Count Alexandre
Orlowski; a holograph letter of
Governor Pinfold of Bafbados

and the draft reply of Sir George
Smith together with historical
works om Barbados by Mr, C. J
Patterson; a collection of early
spectacles by Dr. H. Harcourt
Carter; and, a collection of china
and pottery by Mr. W. Leonard
McKinstry. Three showcases were
donated by Dr, H. Harcourt Car-
ter, Messrs. Da Costa & Co, Ltd.,
and Mr. W. Leonard McKinstly
respectively. The shortage of
showeases is one of the Museum’s
most pressing needs,

During the year the Entrance
Gallery was re-arranged and re-
labelled and a_ showcase built
into one of its windows.
labelling of the Fish Gallery was
completed and a showcase with
a cupboard below was_ installed
in this Gallery. The Hall Gal-
lery was re-arranged with the
Society’s Ethnograpnical collec-
tion, much of which had not pre-
viously been exhibited, and the
labelling of this collection is now
i rogress. :
"the practice of placing a
museum object on special exhibi-
tion and the holding of a month-
ly exhibition created much inter-
est in the Museum.

The Society received a subven-
tion of £100. from the British
Council, a

The wrought iron railings pre-
sented in 1949 to the Society by
the Governor-in-Executive-Com—
mittee, have not yet been erected
in front of the Museum owing
to lack of funds.

Exhibitions And Lectures

During the year the following
artists held exhibitions of their
work at the feum: John Har-
rison, Art & Exhibitions Officer of
the British Council; Arnold Prince
and Garner Francis of Antigua;
Geoffrey Holder of, Trinidad; and,
William van Yperen, a visiting
Dutch artist. Exhibitions were
also held of a selection of draw-
ings and water colours from the
Lucy Carring Wertheim gift to the
Museum; French Colour. Prints,

indly loaned by Monsieur Le-
poet 8 French Consul-General,

ebe.
rinidad;

a. Loan Collection of



SHREDDED WHEAT
KELLOGS CORN FLAKES .

ib ALL BRAN
ENFA ROLLED OATS
QUAKER PUFFED RICE

% NESTLES THICK CREAM
DANISH THICK CREAM



COCKADE

The Te--

— WE OFFER TO-DAY —

REPO DEALS PAIRS an sds uke ees et eca seen ehoes

EAST PACK CANNED BEEF ..........-.02-eee8 eee

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Lid.

~ ,
FODSSCOSCSSOOOS SSS GE SOOO SEO GOS PE SOOO POOF FOO OSC OOH

West Indian Prints; The Barbados
Arts & Crafts Pottery Exhibition,
which included Sculpture by K. R.
Broodhagen; Caro Gill Memorial
Exhibition; Fine Printing; Picasso
to 1949, being part of the UNESCO
Travelling Print Exhibition, and,
Photographs submitted for The
Barbados Advocate Photographic
Competition.

Lectures were given at Meetings
of the Society by Mr. H. Risley
Tucker, M.A., on “Turkey,” by Mr.
C. Y, Carstairs, C.M.G., on “Fed-
eration”, by Brigadier H. A. Cour-
tenay on “Transportation”, by Mr.
Cc. C. Skeete, B.A. on “Hurri-
canes”, and by Mr. H. A. Vaughan
on “The Regime of Governor Reed
1846-1848". Courses of lectures
were also given at the Museum on
“The History of European Paint-
ing” by the Director, and on
“Architecture” by Mr. Ralph
Crowe, A.R.1.B.A., under the aus-
pices of the Extra Mural Depart-
ment of University College, West
Indies.

Other Activities

The Barbados Philatelic Society
and the Advisory Committee of
the Extra Mural Department ° of
University College, West Indies,
continue to hold meetings in the
Library. The Council was glad to
place the Library at the disposal
of visiting tutors from University
College for the purpose of inter-
viewing prospective candidates.

Future Policy

The policy of placing@ museum
oer on special exhibition and of
holding monthly exhibitions is to
continue during 1951. The label-
ling of the Ethnographical exhi-
bits in the Hall Gallery is to be
completed, and exhibits in the
Jubilee .Gallery are to be ré-
labelled. The sereen in the Li-
brary is to continue to present,
photographs and other material re-
lating to the British Common-
wealth.

During 1950, 8,490 persons vis-
ited the Museum as compared with
2,491 visitors during 1949, an in-
erease of 5,999 visitors,

Children’s Museum

The Children’s Museum had a
busy and successful year during
1950. Groups from eight schools
sent pupils regularly 4 times a
term throughout the year. During
the Easter and Summer terms
classes on “The growth of the
Map of the World” continued.
Maps were drawn by the children
and voyages of discovery marked
thereon, During the Christmas
term classes were given on “Life
Through the Ages”’—which dealt
briefly with prehistory up to the
Stone Age. Children collected
specimens of coral reel fossils.
Objects from the Museum, models
and an epidiascope were used at
the demonstrations, and showcases
in the Museum were visited to in-
spect relevant objects.

An application has been made
or a further extension of the
grant to the Children’s Museum.

Journal

The Quarterly number of the
Journal for May 1950 is the latest
to be published, consequently the
publication is still as much in ar-
rears.as it ‘was during 1949. It is
hoped to bring the Journal up to
date early in 1951.

Barbados Has
1,300 Hydrants

A HOUSE in St. Joseph or St.
Lucy would have to burn flat if
it catches afire and a tank is not
nearby. There are no hydrants in
those parishes. In Barbados there
are 1,300 hydrants, 1,001 of which
are in St. Michael.

There are 18 in St. George, 246
in Christ Church, 24 in Speights—
town, six in St. Philip and four in
St. James. The other parishes
jo not have any hydrants.

Parts of St. Michael too, where
there are many houses have no
hydrants. A house would have to
burn flat in Howells Cross Road,
the avenues in Bank Hall, New
Orleans and some other places.

Wherever a main pipe ends
there is a hydrant so sometimes
there may be two hydrants near
each other if one had been at a
spot before a main had been laid
to end near it. °

Between the Reef anda Trafal—
gar Square, putting aside alleys
there are 12 hydrants. f

The members of the Fire Brigade
have to keep the 1,300 hydrants
all over the island always clean
so that when there is a fire about
the district, there would mot be
any trouble in opening them.

niente *

$5 In The Shade

Bridgetown experienced its hot-
test day in weeks yesterday. After
a cool spell-for= the past week,
yesterday's temperattire in Bridge-
town was 85° F. in the shade.

There was scarcely any wind
‘and electric fans ae whirring
steadily in all city offices. :

Bridgetown had ond following
temperatures last week:—

ea 73.5, Saturday 82.5,
Friday 73.5, Thursday 73.5.



FINE RUM



Adjourned

THE Court of Chancery case by
which is to be decided who is the
the legally appointed representa-
tive of the local Christian Mission
Church was again adjourned yes-
terday. Next date of hearing is
Monday February 19.

The case was to have been start-
ed yesterday before His Honour
the Acting Vice-Chancellor, Mr. J.
W B. Chenery. It is expected to
be a long case, and Mr, Chenery

will shortly cease to be acting ———————

Vice-Chancellor when His Honour
the Vice-Chancellor, Sir Allan
Collymore, returns to duty.

Tf the case is started by Mr.
Chenery and is not finished by the
time that the Chief Justice re-
sumes, the latter will have to
start it all over again. In the two.
week interval before the next date
of hearing, the parties are to try
for an amicable settlement.

Parties te the suit are F. H.
Larrier and others as plaintiffs,
and D. H. Hoyte and others as de-
fendants. The plaintiffs are re-
presented by Mr. W. W. Reece,
K.C., associated with Mr. J. S. B.
Dear and instructed by Messrs,
Hutchinson & Banfield: Counsel
for the defendants is Mr. G.
Adams associated with Mr. D. H.
L. Ward and instructed by Messrs,
Carrington & Sealy.

Senior Counsel for the plaintiffs
was originally Mr. E. K. Walcott,
K.C., but Mr. Walcott is ill.

“I take it that this case appears
as if it will last a considerable
time,” said His Honour the Acting
Vice-Chancellor, as the Court
opened yesterday morning.

“That depends on the attitude
of the plaintiffs,” Mr. Adams’ re-
plied. “It is possible from a legal
point of view that it should not
last more than half an hour, but
if the attitude of the plaintiffs is
that it will develop into a long
case, it is conceivable that it will
last a considerable time, that is,
if they lead evidence and argue
on points of law.”

The Acting Vice-Chancellor :
“Is that not the normal course of
litigation?”

Mr. Adams: “Not always. It
is quite conceivable on reading
the pleadings that the Court may
take the point of view that there
is nothing whatever in this case.
I do not say that Your Honour
can take that point of view with-
out hearing evidence. My Learn-
ed Friend would have to lead evi-
dence to show what has happened
for the last three or four years.

“As soon as he has lead that evi-
dence he may agree from a legal
point of view that the case should

end.
Regrettable

“It is very regrettable that a
case of this sort should reach the
Law Courts. It not only coneerns
a religous body, but one which it
is agreed, has done some extra-
ordinarily good work in this is-
land. It seems a great pity that
the differences which have arisen
between the members of this con-
gregation should not have been
settled outside the Court.

“T do not at all retreat from the

.legal position which I am instruct-

ed is that the defendant Mr, Hoyte
is the legally appointed Superin-
tendent:of this Mission, F am pre«
pared to fight on that to the end
if I am forced to do so.

“On the other hand, I am per-
fectly willing if the other side
shows any desire to discuss the
matter in a friendly way and come
to some amicable arrangement, to
do so, so as to prevent what can
be described as the scandal of a
Christian Body fighting in the Law
Court.

Counsel and endeavour for the
sake of religion, if I may put it as
broad as that, to arrive at a settle-
ment without having to fight it out
in this building”.

The Acting Vice-Chancellor :
“T agree that it is deplorable that
a matter of this sort should reach
the Court, although it also must
be remembered that one of the
great justifications for the exist-
ence of the Court is that even a
matter of this kind can be settled
in Court in a way that perhaps it
could not be settled anywhere else.
Obviously. however, it is only a
last resort when other methods
have failed.

Hopes For Agreement

“If efforts at a settlement are
not successful, it strikes me that
the case will take a long time. Still
I do hope that it will be possible
for Counsel on both sides to per-
suade their respective clients in
the interest of the Church which
they are all, I am sure, anxious to
serve, that they try their best to
reach an agreement.

“T certainly feel that tempers
on both sides will be probably
even more exasperated if the case
is started, and then, owing to
changes in the judicial offices it
has to be begun all over again.”

Mr, Adams suggested that if a
temporary adjournment was
agreed upon it was possible that
Counsel would be able to get to-
gether and see if there was any-
thing that could be done in re-
spect of an agreement. :

Mr. Reece: “May it please
Your Honour, I, like my Learned
Friend, am not retreating from the



oon go when
pee take this!

it soothes the throat
and chest — an

d tastes
so nice



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Social Security

Scheme



Wanted

—Crawford

Mr. W. A. CRAWFORD M.C-P., wants to know if Gov-

ernment would take steps to initiate a contributory

Insur-

ance and Pension Scheme to provide compensation for
benefits payable to sugar industry workers in all phases
(field, factory and waterfront) during sickness, disability

and superannuation.

Nine Factories
Making Sugar

THERE are about nine sugar
factories in operation now, and
others will follow suit this week.
In many diStricts people with no
clocks will know the time by the
factories’ whistles, and the air
will be sweet with the smell of
the juice that is being processed
into the product that keeps the

- island from going bankrupt.

It is not only in the country
districts—where most of the fac-
tories are situated—that people

e busy when crop time comes.
In Roebuck Street, principally,
and in others too, lorries queue
up hour after hour, day after day,
waiting to off load bags of sugar
at the various bondhouses,

As the lorries reverse into the
bonds, there is a man ready with

scoop which he plunges into
one of the bags. It comes back
out with a sample of the sugar
which that particular lorry has
brought. The bags are then lifted
off the platform of the truck and
added to the pile of bags already
there. In a short time the pile
will be nearly ceiling high.

Stamina

It is a job that calls for stamina,
and there are some really hefty
men working in these bonds, men
who will perhaps be “out-heftied”
only by the lightermen who will
take those same bags of sugar
to the ships waiting in Carlisie
Bay. .

As soon as a lorry has delivered
a load, the driver gets it back to
the factory as soon as possible for
another load. The more trips a
driver makes a week, the larger
will be his pay packet.

There was a time when most of
the transportation work was done

y lorries owned by various
garages, But nowadays more and
more factories are using their
qwn lorries.

_Most of the bond houses in the
city are owned by H. O. Emptage,
Da Costa & Co. Ltd. and S. P.
Musson, Son & Co, Ltd.

Factories now working are
Haggatts, Springvale, Fairfield,
Searles, Sandy Lane, Carrington,
a Warren and Spring

all.



Lund Inspects
Brigade

THE !ocal branch of the St.
John Ambulance Brigade was
inspected at 5 o'clock yesterday
afternoon by Lt. General Sir Otto
Lund, 'Commissioner-in-Chief of
the Brigade and the Countess of
Brecknock, Assistant Lady Super-
intendent-in-Chief (Overseas).
The inspection took place on the
Barrack Square of the Central
Police Station.

The parade was under the
command of Major H. E. Skeete.
On arrival, Sir Otto Lund and

After taking, the General Salute
they inspected the Brigade. On
the tour of inspection the Commis-
Sioner-in-—Chief was accompanied
by Captain E. B. Williams and
Major H. E. Skeete. Mrs. E. B.

Williams accompanied Lady
Brecknock,
At the conclusion of the

parade Sir Otto Lund presented
the - insignia of the Venerable
Order of the Hospital of St. John
and Jerusalem in the British
realm, to Captain E. B, Williams
and Sir Edward Cunard. He con—
gratulated them,

He said that he was delignted
to see the Nursing Cadets on
parade. This was their first parade
and they are all from St. Michael's
Girls’ School.



legal position which we have
taken up. I quite agree that even
a bad compromise is better than a
law suit in a matter of this sort,

“I am perfectly willing to await
the instructions of my solicitors
and his-clients on the point. Un-
like my Learned Friend, I have
only now been brought into the
case, and I am not as fully cogniz-
ant with the facts and circum-
stances as he is. although I did
confer with my clients on Satur+
day.

y will assure the Court that as
soon as I have heard from my sol-
icitors and my clients, I too will
be willing, if they so instruct me
to discuss the matter with the
other side. But I am not author-
ised to retreat from the legal posi-
tion set-up in the pleadings.”

The matter was adjourned.

He also want to know if Goy-
ernment would take steps. to
initiate a programme of economic
security in the sugar industry
under which workers in all
its phases shall be entitled for a
minimum period to unemploy-
ment compensation benefits?

Notice of these questions was
given in the House of Assembly
a short while ago.

Mr, Crawford told the Advocate
yesterday.

“What is needed of course, is a
complete Social Security Scheme
to cover every man, woman and
child in the colony. For quite a
few years I have been urging in
the House of Assembly that the
Government obtain the services
of a qualified official who has had
practical experience with the
operation of the British National
Insurance Scheme to assist us in
setting it up.

“The least that any Govern-
ment which has the true interests
of the people at heart should do,
would be to initiate a scheme un-
der which workers in well-estab—
lished, industries should be enti-

tled to unemployment and
sickness benefits.
Repeal

“What is also needed immedi.
ately is the repeal of the present
Workmen's Compensation Act,
This can be substituted by legis-
lation to provide a system of
insurance against personal injury
caused by accident, arising out of
and during the course of a per-
son’s employment, and against
prescribed industrial diseases and
injuries, The present Workmen’s
Compensation Act is antiquated
and cumbersome. It involves the
injured worker in considerable
legal expense and more often
than not, in recourse to the law
courts with their technical pro-
cedure, annoyance and delay, The
Act possesses all the complexity
of the old British Act which was
So complicated, that at one time
it was the only piece of legislation
that had given birth to a complete
new series of law reports of cases
upon it.

“With regard to the specific pro-
posals contained in my questions
in the House, they should be
regarded in the nature of a tem-
porary expedient. It is a most
easy matter to extend these bene-
fits to workers in given industries.
Since sugar is our largest and
most important industry, it is
reasonable that we should com-
mence with that. The scheme is
so simple that it could be set up
overnight. It would operate on a
contributory basis with funds
provided by employers, Govern-
ment and employees,

Superannuation

“The question of superannuation
is of paramount importance. 1
am of opinion that the qualifying
age should be 60—the same age at
which public employees are now
entitled to q retirement pension,
Our old age pension is effective
at the age of 68 and recipients are

_ only entitled to 5s. per week. If

the public service worker be
permitted to retire on pension at
60, similar benefits should be
available for the worker in the
employment of “private enter-
prise.” Incidentally, with regard
to the Old Age Pension, the
Means Test should be abolished
at once, An income
week is manifestly inadequate to
enable the superannuated worker
to keep body and sqgul together.

“The part of the questions
which proposes unemployment
compensation for g minimum

period is designed to assist work-
ers during what is known as the
“hard time” in the sugar industry,
During this period, agricultural
and factory workers for the
greater part, get little or no em-

item for discussion on the Agende
of an All-island
Confererpe in which I wag invit-
ed to participate during ag visit tc
San Juan, Puerto Rico, five years
ago.

New Legislation

“A few days later in a discussion y
had with Senor Luis},
Munoz Marin, then leader of the] =

which I

Majority, Party and the Legisla-
ture and now Governor of the
colony, he told me that his Party
proposed introducing legislatior
to deal with the matter. Not very
long after, the Legislature of
Puerto Rico approved a law
granting assistance to sugar work-
ers during the period which they
call the “dead season.” Under its



’ Cussons

. TALCUM
POWDER .



Ud

a PURI

SESBEER ES EE 828
FRESH SUPPLY OF

NA HEN CHOW

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

aH. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distibutors
‘GRE BSSERERBRBERESBREEe

of 5s, per ~

Condensed Milk
Arrives Here

she S.S. Besseggen landed
shipment of 1,425 erates and 15(
bales of potatoes, 31,000 carton
of full cream sweetened con
densed milk and 550 crates

o

eniens for Barbados yesterday.
She called from Rotterdam,
Amsterdam and Hamburg am
sailed on for Trinidad last night
Supplies of hams, mal
extracts, smoked herrings, pear

barley, Dutch beer, cognac, Gen

ever gin, nutrogen, wrapping
paper, rolled oats and canar,
seed were included in thi

Besseggen's cargo for Barbados.
Messrs S. . Musson, Son
Co., Ltd,, are the ship's Agents.

PORT ENQUIRY

The Port Enquiry Committe
held its fourth meeting yester
day, and discussed with represen
tatives of Messrs Jason Jones ar
Company Limited, Da Costa an:
Company Limited, Robert Thom
Limited and S. P. Musson an
Company Limited the question o
re-grouping of cranes on th
Waterfront.

Agreement was reached wit!
regard to the re-grouping anc
removal of cranes owned by th+
above firms but it will be neces
sary for the Committee to mee
representatives of another firm tc
finalise the matter,

The next meeting of the Com
mittee will be held at 10 a.m, o
Monday 12th February, at ihe
Labour Department,

ORANGES COME

SCHOONER Eastern Eel, which
arrived at Barbados on Sunday
night, brought a supply of orange:
from Trinidad for local fruit
sellers.

Many of them were spoilt
however, and instead of being
removed by carts to be later dis-
played in trays along the road
side, they were dumped into thc
Careenage.

In making stops at Grenada
Carriacou and St. Lucia, it tool
the Eastern Eel seven days tc
reach Barbados. The fruit were
stored in crates and barrels and
then under cover in hatches,

Cyclist Fined 45/-

His Worship Mr. ii. A. Talma
Police Magistrate of District “A’
imposed a fine of 5/- on Ophnieal
Seale of Ruby, St. Philip for rid-
ing a bicycle without a lighted
lamp on the night of February
3.

Seale was also fined 40/. for
riding an unlicensed bicycle or
the same date.

Fined 20/-

&







PATRICK HAREWOOD © of
Belleplaine, St. Andrew was
yesterday fined 20/— by the

judges of the Assistant Court of
Appeal, Their Honours Mr, G, L.
Taylor and Mr. H, A. Vaughn.
The judges found him guilty of
failing to keep his motor cycle
A—1886 to the left side of Marley
Vale Road on December 15 last
year when he was riding along
there,

In making the fine, the judges
varied a decision of Police Mag-
istrate Mr. G. B. Griffith who
had fined him 10/-.

15/- FOR GAMBLING

NOEL MERRITT of Ivy Land,
St. Michael was yesterday fined
15/- by His Worship Mr, H ;
Talma for gambling on Ivy Land
on February 3. The fine is to be
paid in 28 days or in default one
month’s imprisonment with hard
labour.



Ws

There were 13 notifications o!
Infectious Diseases for the month
of January the Advocate learnt
from the Department of Medica)
Services,

These are:—Diphtheria 1, en-
teric fever 6, and tuberculosis 6

agricultural workers
are entitled to $3 per week ana
factory workers to $5, The pay-
ments are made for a period
nine weeks. Employers are com-
pelled by law to contribute to the
fund. :
“These are matters with which,
in order the more to justify its
existence, our Social
Department might well,
time being, concern itself,

provisions,

also assist.



Alka-Seltzer’s pleasant taste
and sparkling effervescence
assures gentle efficiency.
Drop one or two tablets into
a glass of water, watch it fizz,
then drink it. Keep a

supply handy always!

Alka-Seltzer










Weifare
for the
Al-
ployment. It was a matter which though admittedly it is unlikely
had agitated my mind for some, to do so unless requested by the
time, and I was delighted to note] Government, In the absence of a
that it was marked down as an| proper Department to deal with
the question, the Department of
Trade Union| Labour could



PAGE FIVE





9t's a |
Fact....

when

)
\

your Doctor pre-
seribes for you he
realises you need the
REST ....

PROMPTLY

ee

so Ff

H's a
Facd....

when we compound your
prescription we only offer
the BEST in Drugs and
the BEST in Service . .

SEND US YOUR NEXT
PRESCRIPTION









fk i gee

THE TALK OF THE TOWN!

36 ins. wide

in

SPSSPOP FS FF FFF

SOSOSOE POSS OO GOSS

POWDER
S341 yd

ad

Lv

re

=!

materi |



Knight's



TOOTAL
INEN

Branded TEBILIZED
forested crease-resistance

SFIS FF EFF PaaS





















DIAL 2664.

































CONGOLEUM

Rugs 9 ft. 10% it. Each
9 ft. square

9 ft. 72 ft.
: Lengths 9 ft. wide. Per Yard .
6 ft. wide. ,,

”

3 ft. wide.

”

LINOLEUM

”

Per Yd.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street

HARRISONS—BROAD ST.

VLE SCOPE LLL LLL LOLOL

DRINK |
CLAYTON’S

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.








In Green and Biue Marble. 6 ft. wide.





















BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1951
na a aes sa niin tL CL A

BY CARL ANDERSON Is BACKACHE

ea
JUST A SIGN

OF AGE?

Many people suffer an aching back
needlessiy—believing you must expect
a lew aches and pains when you're
“getting on” in years!

But backache is often caused by the
faulty action of kidneys and_ liver.
See how much better you feel after
taking Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills,
and your kidneys and liver both filter
out impurities from your bloodstream.
That's because this time-proven Dr.
Chase remedy treats two conditions at
once—contains special remedial ingre-
dients for both the kidney and liver
disorders which often cause backache.

If you're feeling worn-out, tired,
headachy—with painful joints and
aching back—look to your kidneys and
liver Try Dr. Chase’s Kidney-Liver
Pilis tonight. At all drug counters 16



SWEDEN'S BEST MATCH
“THREE STARS”

ON SALE EVERYWHERE




.. JEFFREY! ALL THESE LIONS LOOK

KIND OF HUNGRY A\ Trench Mouth

in 24 Hours

Bleeding gums, sore mouth, or loose
teeth mean that you are a victim of Pyor-
rhea or Trench Mouth, or some bad disease
that will eventually cause you to lose alt
your teeth and have to wear false teeth
before your time. Since the great World

‘ar these mouth diseases have spread
throughout the world so that now scien-
tists say that four out of every five people
are sufferers sooner or later. y aeraee in
time and stop these diseases before it is
too late, because they often cause not only
the loss of teeth, but also chronic rheumta~
tism and heart trouble,

New Discovery Saves Teeth

Amosan, the discovery of an American
scientist, fights these troubles in a new
and quick way. It_penetrates right to the
root-of the trouble, stops gums from bleed-





Amosan users get: ‘I suffered from Trench
Mouth and Pyorrhea for ten years. My
furs, were sore and bleeding and > had
a

BLON














hh Tl TIT T TIMI TT TTT TT * st sens, teeth, Sos fe Se =
ip | th | TUE Beas ‘ . . were nj ser a e time. rie
sed \ ee eee a = “ ry p Aeron, many thin : and Sheth gard oF sbi8 pew
if . "LL WATCH, POP DARLING, YOUR “> Amoson’ ny guini had. stopped. biceding.
. THE Ae PAVED ABOUT MAYBE IL CAN. DREAM BOY IS HOME ‘The soreness in my mouth Bisa peared &
NAY THE HERO KISSED RN SOME z SB Me. ’ e
HIS WIFE IN THE MOVIES © LEARN SOMETHING eas A. ches. Gays ang in ven wea ung cae
MOM os as A m ose teeth were much iter an ‘a
LASTPNIGHT-- WAITLL 7 eae a S39 Ttould eat the hardest of food.”
mw SHE. SEES THIS = ee "s

Guaranteed

Amosan works so fast and so ceram
that it is guarnnteed to stop your aoe
from bleeding, end sore mouth and tighten.
your teeth to your complete satisfaction or
Money back on return of empty package.
Don’t take &chance on osing your teeth or
suffering the dangers from rheumatism
and heart trotitble. Get Amosan from your
chemist todey under this noes, guaran-

ou tis

tee,
A nothing as the
MoOsAaMe os
cts you.
For Pyorrhea--Trench Mouth
8999$$959SS99990SSS99SSS9

rs

OBSERVE












START THEM OFF DAILY WITH

that different brands of
Bay Rum come, and they

IX THE MASKED MAW! HE'S
WANTED FOR MUR) !
GET HIM! pA

| BORNN'S
: BAY RUM

will go on forever
WHY ?
QUALITY
That's Why

SOSSSSSOSSSSSSS8S99S5

oF

YEAR BOOK 1951

The Advocate Co Ltd:, will publish a Year Book of Barbados
in 1951.



GES OOSES PES

Se,













T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

* ROYAL READERS” and
“STEP BY STEP” Now

BRINGING UP FATHER

———







The Year Book will contain three parts:—






















cago" eos : ws ge : : Opened b:
7. (anaes uct .v- oceans on (1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on JOHNSON’S ST. :
APRS | ee ergicreo ve TO | | Me Nicos -waxe Tue BORDER BY MOKIGUT a — variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance, ae
J AIIE Up? IT’ EXACTLY = in ustri : : : ‘or the Windows and Doors
- en lyie abaeas ve FIVE O'CLOCK / 1 HOPE THE SHERIFF ies, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport, ef hae tow Beek

WAKE UP //












art, literature and all the things we want to know about
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.

1S GOING DOWN TO

GLASS —
HIS OFFICE TO woRK!!

Cut to order by
JOHNSON’S HARDWARE



i, SSSSDSSSSSSISIOSSSSIOSG

(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar, FREE / ooK

soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
re ‘GOD'S WAY 0
¢ , F
(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should x;now about. SALVATION
A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale PLAIN”

MLL.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assisiani Editor of the Barbados: Advocate, Mr. Neville

8 Please write for one io %













Service,
THEN WO OF OUR MEN ARE ‘ wah
C amercarcn | aissaby ov a'r To Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale, sor N. Ireland.”
een ee as | 4 ener aras. Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respor- $9008



BUT ITLL BET THEY NAB

» TURN HIM IN FOR.
\ CUTTLE BEFORE you Do!

sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations

Barbados Advocate,

i Lb Tins C & E MORTON'S
34 Broad Street. !

PEARL BARLEY



_. This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be

without the Year Book of Barbados 1951. CE & Co., Ltd

6, 7, 8 & 9 Roebuck Street.
Dial 2234

of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisa-
tions immediately or not later than April 15th 1951.
Year Book, i hoved ina
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate, following :
34 Broad Street. Tins PEANUT BUTTER
: Bots. SALTED PEANUTS
_.. Names and addresses of all those to be considered for Packages DATES
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed. | re: eee ee,
MACARONI
Advertisements close April 30th 1951. er
Advertisers are asked to get in touch with M1 & ot Tins” _s
Mr. Trevor Gale, | ms Guavas
Advertising Manager, Tins SWEET CORN
|
|

(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)

oe

a te a eNO NN
EI ES =. =













TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6



, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508 .



DIED

———
CARMICHAEL — CHARLOTTE AUGUS-
TA. At her residence “Sea Grove”
Worthing, Christ Church. The fu-
neral will leave her late residence

at 4.50 this afternoon for the West-
bury Cemetery. Friends are invited.

Cc. E. Carmichael, E. B. Carmichael,
Otga Collins. 6.1.51—1n.

GITTENS—Yesterday at her residence
Saint Matthias Road, Christ Church,
ANNIE LOUISE. The funeral leaves
her late residence at 4.15 o'clock this
evening for Saint Matthias Chureh and
thence to the Westbury Cemetery.
Friends are invited.

Beatrice Martin. Eustace and Muriel
Crichlow, Cynthia Pinder, Joyce
Green, Violet Linch. 6.2.51—In.

MORRIS — MANOAH, Last night at
his residence Passage Road, His
funeral will leave his late residence
at 4.30 p.m. this afternoon for the
Westbury Cemetery, Friends are in-
vited.

Gertrude Green Amy Morris (daugh-
ters), Mortie Morris, 6.1,51—In,



SHANKS



KRAYNES—The undersigned gratefully
return thanks to all who attended the
funeral, sent wreaths or in any other
way expressed sympathy in our recent
bereavement occasioned by the passing
of Mr. Clement Alonza Haynes.





—————————

CHANCERYLANE HOUSE — Christ
Church. Apply: Dan Springer, Waveli
Avenue. Dial 3630. 6.2.$1—-2n.

HOUSES — “Harmony Cottage” -
George and “CANAAN”. Bathshene
apply to Mrs. Gibbons. Phone 2617.

3,.2,.51.—4n,



“KEN-ERME”, sea-side
Fathsheba, approved
and cutlery optional.

«nward. Por particulars diai

2550
Gay except Sunday. rn

10.1.51—t.f.n,
PREMISES—No. 6 Swan Street,

Factory, ts
Bentitg. Souci: safer
ros. or Dial 3466,



P 2.2.51—

STORAGE SPACE suitable for making
Bonds and Warehouses. Apply K. x
Fate & Co. Ltd. Dial 4611.

1.2.51—6n,

(1) Board and Shingled
Shop and shedroof. Situated at 4th
Avenue, Alleyne Land. Apply E.
Alleyne, Bush Hall. 6.2.51—4n

COTTAGE-—St. Jamés Coast.
Fully furnished containing 3 bedrooms.
Available for months of February to May





SHOP—One

Mrs. J hi H e: iwife), N dad August Dece:

Sybil Haynes (daughter), Athelstan | 2908, ".. ‘® December 1951, Phone

(son). 6.2.51—1N, | ene
ren & PURLIC SALES

UNDER THE SILVER

AUTOMOTIVE ae HAMMER

————— nm ‘ednesday 7th by order of Mrs,

CAR—1950 Morris Minor 8 H.P. Black} S. H.

Sedan, sudatient . condition. He at “Blosmebuee me Pravin ee

leaving Colony. Apply Hamilton, Merry
Hill, Welches, St. Michael. Phone 3951.
6.2.51—3n

CAR—Model A-Ford, In good condi-
tion (A—110). Apply to Arthur Dixon,
Greenland, St. Andrew. 6.2.51—1n

CAR—Studebaker 1947 Model, in ex-
cellent condition Price $2,650.00. Apply
B’dos Agencies, Ring Evelyn 4908, B’ +
Agencies Ltd. 3.2.51.—6n,

CAR—6 Cylinder, 1949 Vauxhall (Velox)
in excellent condition, Dial 2900 or 4739.
6.2.51—3n.

ELECTRICAL

ELECTRIC STOVE—In perfect order.





Phone 8122. - €.2.51—2n.

ONE TURNER WALKER DRILL
PRESS, electrically driven, new.
Apply: Mr. R. de Souza, C/o T.
Geddes Grant Ltd. 1.2.51—6n.

RADIO—Phillips 5 Tube Radio 1950
Model, perfect condition. Telephone 8173.
Reasonable Price. 6,2.51—In

FURNITURE

MAHOGANY CHEST of Drawers, Book
Case, Child’s Tricycle, Set Used Golf
Clubs, Child’s Seasaw. Phone 8477.

6.2.51—In

MISCELLANEOUS

ACTUMUS—The new Fertiliser
ccnes—vegetable and flower gardens $3.60
per ib. from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store, Coleridge Street. Phone 2999,

‘

““BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top









for |.

— which includes — t
Dining Table, Waggons, Tea , Trolley,
Upright, Corner and Arm Chairs, Rockers,
Settees (modern) Couches, Ornament
Tables, Desk, Writing Table, very Hand-
some Hand-painted and Mir'd Screen:
all in Mahogany: Glass ware, Dinner and
Tea Service, Ornaments ‘and Vases,
Spoons, Forks and Cutlery, Pictures and
Paintings, Congoleum, Chiming and
Striking Clocks; Mir’d Hatstand Stump
Bedstead, Press, Dressing Table, M.'.
Washstand all in Mohogany Single Iron
Bedsteads, Washstands, Screens, a Prac-
tically new GEC, Electric Magnet
Stove with 2 Hot Plates; Larders, Kitchen
Utensils, Kitchen Tables, Books, Ferns,
a 5 - Seater Vauxhall Sedan 25 H.P. in
geod running order and many other

Sale 11,30 o'clock, ‘Terms CASH.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
Auctioneers.
4.2.51—2n

REAL ESTATE



abhi

ENTERPRISE—An_ ajoining | Property
with 7 acres of land and stone building,
3% acres of arable, 4 acres of pasture
with nice Mahogany trees to be sold
to any one who have relatives, or
friends in the U.S. America, who is
dé€sirous of buying for cash. To be sold
in the U.S. America.

Apply to G. Holder, Enterprise, Christ
Church Gap, Attorney for the Estate
dor full information. 6.2.51—6n.

———
HOUSE—(1) 8 x 14, In good condition,
To be seen at “Heswall’ 8th Avenue,
Belleville, 6.2,51—In,
aE nemne
“DUNSINANE”
COUNTRY, ROAD, ST. MICHAEL.
The residence lately occupied by Mrs.
W. O. Collymore.






BARBADOS, ADVOCATE



APEX (TRINIDAD)
OILFIELDS LIMITED.

The thirty-first Annual General
Meeting of Apex (Trinidad) Oil-
fields Limited, was held at Win-
chester House, Old Broad Street,
London, E.C., in January.

Mr. Malcolm Maclachlan, chair-
man and joint managing director,
said:—

The balance-sheet shows that

of wells drilled during the year,
and the wells which have yielded
the production for the year stand
in the balance-sheet at the modest
figure of £138,000,

During the year under review
our capital expenditure on fixed
assets other than wells exceeded
the amount written off in respect

i. the capital of £550,000 and the of depreciation by £47,000. This
tenants, Linen | Capital reserve of £230,000 remain is amply covered by the appro- j,
Available February } Unchanged. General reserve has priation of £450,000 from
| been increased by £450,000 out of

the
profits of the year to general re-

the profits for the year, and now serve, bringing it, as I have stated,

Up-| stands at £1,200,000. Develop- to the sum of £1,200,
sttire, Premises, very spacious and cool) ment and contingencies reserve During
cag amounts to £800,000 and unap- 82,371 ft.
4.2.51—2n, | Propriated profit is £223,000. Our programme

revenue reserves thus total the and to extend the tested areas of

very substantial sum of £2,223,-
000. The reserve for future taxa-
tion is £1,096,000, while current
liabilities including current taxa-
tion and the proposed final divi-
derd, total £642,000.

On the other side of the balance-
sheet the fixed assets stand at
£927,000, which represents the
capital) expended upon the pro-
perty and its equipment and de-
velopment after amortization and
depreciation of over £4,000,000.
Current assets comprise stores on

'hand and intransit and oil in stor-

age £449,000, debtors for oil sold
and sundry debtors £450,000,
British and Trinidad Government
securities, tax reserve certificates,
and cash at bankers, which to-
gether amount to £2,914,000. The
surplus of current assets over cur-
rent liabilities and future taxation,
is £2,076,000.

Oil Revenue

The profit and loss account
shows that oil revenue, after pro-
vision for development and con-
tingencies, and after depreciation
of fixed assets, amounted to
£ 1,704,000. This included
£408,000 in final settlement for
oil delivered in prior years. In
future each year will reflect the
revenue from the oil delivered
during that year.

London and New York expen-
diture and directors’ emolumenis,
less interest and sundry receipts,
amount to £10,000, and after
providing £1,025,000 for taxation
in Trinidad and the United King-

000,

the year we drilled

in continuance of our
to obtain production

the property. Eleven wells were
completed in the Main Field and
seven in the South Quarry area.

Interesting developments con-
tinue in the Synclinal zone. Well
No. 481, where at the time of our
last meeting only the lowest sand
had ,been tested, is now giving
go production from the main
sand.

Three further wells have since
been completed. Well 496 gave
no production, although it may
be deepened at some future date.
Well 504 is giving excellent pro-
duction from the largest sand
body so far encountered, and is
the outstanding development of
the year. Well 511 has been
tested during the last few days
but is not a commercial producer.

The production which has been
developed in the Synclinal zone
during the past few years is con-
tributing a welcome offset to the
natural decline of our other areas,
and now constitutes over 20 per
cent. of our total production.

Effects Of Devaluation

We continue to operate under
our sales agreements with Trini-

we sell our oi] and casinghead
we have

increased realizations in terms of

ing costs in cumulative, and in

dom, the net profit for the year the case of materials was some-

is £669,000.

The unappropri- what sharply accentuated towards

ated profit brought forward from the close of the year.

the previous year is £196,000,

As our balance-sheet shows,

making a total to be dealt with our financial position is one of

of £865,000.

Interim dividend great strength, which is necessi-

No. 60, paid in July last, amount- tated partly by the very consid-
ed to £55,000, and £450,000 has ‘erable decrease in the purchasing
been transferred to general re- power of sterling, particularly as

serve.

regards drilling and other oil
We now recommend the pay- equipment

purchased in the

ment of a final dividend of 1s. 34., United States, An equally impor-
free of income-tax, per 5s, unit tant factor is the continually in=

of stock, making a total dividend
for the year of ls, 9d.,
income-tax, per unit of stock.
The unappropriated profit to be

creasing cost of developing oil

free of Production in Trinidad by reason

not only of general rises in costs

but of the increased depth at

in our control to avoid building
up a high cost structure during a
period of high revenue, in view
of the comsequent burden which
would be placed upon the indus-
try in the event of a recession in
oil prices.

I @m sure you will agree that
the proft for the year is most sat-
isfactory. At the same time the
division of that profit provides a
striking illustration of the benefit
derived from the success of our
enterprise by the Government and
people of Trinidad.

Mederate Dividend Increase
We have felt justified in recom-
ending a moderate increase in
dividend, with the result that the
owners of the business, who have
provided the capital and bear the
risk, will draw in dividends the
sum of £192,000. At the same
time the Government of Trinidad
will draw over £884,000 in royal-
ties and direct taxation, and, in
addition, the United Kingdom
Government will take a further
£250,000. If I may put it another
way, for every £1 drawn by the
owners of the business approxi-
mately £5. 17s. 10d. is taken by
the two Governments.

Moreover, it is primarily in the
interest of those to whom the
business gives employment and
Government, which draws so
largely upon its results, that the
continued development of the
business should be sustained by
the sums which have been set
aside to strengthen its reserves.

importance of the contri-
bution of the oil industry to the
revenue of Trinidad is further
illustrated by the fact that the
direct contribution of the industry
to the total revenue of the island
is of the order of 35 per cent. In
our own case the payments to the
Trinidad Government for royal-
ties and income-tax are, respec-
tively, more than eight times and
18 times those for the year 1939,

It is worth recalling that the
search for oil in Trinidad was
arduous and costly and that of
those who took the considerable

dad Leaseholds and United Bri- Tisks only a handful have achiev—
tish Oilfields of Trinidad. Since €d success, It is also essential to

appreciate that the continued suc-

gasolene on a basis related to cess of the industry, upon which
United States prices,
benefited during the year from directly depends, has to be main-

the welfare of Trinidad so

tained in the face of exception-

sterling. At the same time, where- ally difficult geological conditions,
as the benefit of devaluation has Jow output
been fully operative during the
year, the consequent rise in work-

per well, and the
greatly increased cost of drilling
at continually increasing depth.
~ Moreover, it is not enough to
produce the oil, it has to be sold,
and in the markets of the world
the status of Trinidad is that of
the supplier of less than 1 per
cent. of the world production:
Risk, Boldness and Enterprise
The tradition of the oil indus-
‘ry has always been one of risk,
boldness, and enterprise, and the
main concern of those of us who
work in the industry has been te
get on with the job. It has not
been our practice to lay public
stress on the difficulties, nor have
we had any doubt that the enrich
ment of a community by the build-



Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

|
Sedge- |





Sch. Emanuel C. Gordon, M.V
held, Sch. Mare» Henrietta, Sch. C. M. W
ana, M.V. Jenkins Roberts, Sch. Philip |
H.M, 8. Devonshire j
ARAAVALS j
S.S. Besseggen, 1,102 tons net, cant. |
Henniksem, fromm Amsterdam,
Schooner Eastern Bei, 35 tons net, Capt.
David, from St. Lucia,
Sch. Adalina, 80 tons net, Capt. Flem-
ining, fom St. Lucia,
M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt.
Parsons, from St. Laicia,

DEPARTURES
Schooner Lucite M, Smith, 74 tons net,
Capt, Hassell, for British Guiana,
Schooner United Pilgrim 8&.,
met, Capt. Stewart, for St. Lucia,

47 tons

ROAD TO BRAZIL

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 3.

The plan to build a highway
irom Paramaribo, the capital of
Vutch Guiana, to Brazil is, accord
img to Carlos Thomas who is on
a visit to British Guiana, going
forward .

The principal of the Brazilette
Co. of Paramaribo which has. a
contract to supply rice to Ger-
many, Mr. Thomas, states that
negotiations are underway and
ome documents concerning the
vegal side of the project, to be
financed by a group of Holland

sy

Active KIDNEYS |
KEEP You WELL

Nature’s filters may need help
I IS OFTEN SURPRISING
how quickly backache, lumbago,
rheumatic pains, stiff, aching joints
and the common urinary
disorders due to sluggish kidney
= — c kidneys safeguard
t » active ‘
geerhotin by ining excess uric
acid and taaei wentes out of the
system, When kidney action is
blond renee Pos and aeeoer,
prop
fort frequently’ result. ° |

Gd
aa” Sans
Signe Bere

1
Cure DOAN’S if





THANK GOODNESS FOR
GAS
says

The Man In The Street

When I am going home late
I can feel safe with the
STREETS LIGHTED BY











businessmen, have already been GAS.
received from Holland.--C.P, — _'
ee
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW ;! a
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
The M.V. “Caribbee” will be

{M.A.N.Z, LINE)

M.S. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to
sail Adelaide January 24th, Melbourne
February §th, Sydney February 17th,
Brisbane Februery 23rd, Arriving at

Barbados end of March, 1951.

This vessel has ample space for Hard
Yrozen and General cargo

Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad
tor British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
wid Leeward Islands,

For further particulars apply ——
FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD., and
Da COSTA & CO. LTD,,

Trinidad, Barbados,



















arriving here on the 8th. and will
be accepting Cargo & Passengers
for Dominica, Antigua, Montser-
rai, Nevis & St, Kitts, Shiling
Saturday 10th,

The M.V. "“Daevwood will ac-
cept Cargo and Passengers for St.
Lucia, Grenada, & Aruba and Pas-
cengers only for St. Vincent, Date
of departure to be e¢tified.

B.W.I_ SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, Ino,
Telephone: 4047











BW. B.W.I
steamship (1
9nc.
; NEW YORK SERVICE
‘Essi” sails 1th January -— arrives Barbados 4th February
“Byfjord” sails 2nd Febr ry — ve l4th ”
NEW ORLEANS SE
A Steamer sails 18th January — ‘s RVICE 2nd “
” ” Ist February — * +. 15th ”
nt ee
CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship Salls Arrives
r i Halifax Barbados
8.8. “ALCOA PILGRIM” Januany 26th, February Sth,
8.8. “ALLOA PENNANT" Pebruary 91h February 20th,
ss. “ALCOA POLARIS” February 28r, March 6th,







| From INDIA, CHINA,

Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak-
wood, Sandals, French Per-
fumes, Barbados Scarves in
Pure Silk, Ete., Ete., Ete. -

BK WISE...













Yor Mellow
and distinctive flavour,
There is no rum that com-

) S&S =
STUART & SAMPSON
mS

Headquarters for Best

RIVERSIDE CLUB

CARNIVAL DANCE ~
TO-NIGHT__

Dancing from 9 p.m,
ADMISSION: 3/-
Music by P. Green's
Orchestra

\ Judging of Costumes .at
1 PM. {



WEST INDIAN KNITTING §
MILLS LTD. - ms ‘

ACCEPTING ORDERS FOR 4
WRAPPING TWINE_...%
All purposes) oT
Orders for 1951 Require-- ¥
ments will be aceepted up”
to 15th February, 1951.5.















Communicate P.O. Box 23t-
or call 3679 Se

55SS6SO6600C60%"%




a ~ aaron,

ORIENTAL.
Goons

EGYPT ! i
Curios, Brassware,

Silk,

The Souvenir Headquarters >>

THANI Hros.

KASHMERE
Pr. Wm, Henry St.—Dial 5468. |



.. . ADVERTISE”
a




grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.
26.1,51—t.f.n.

CHILDREN’S WARM CARDIGANS—
In many colours also White $1.67 each.

which it is necessary to drill, For
example, the new production
which we have developed in re-
cent years in the Synclinal zone

Them vesscis have Itmited paxgenger accommodation,

ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service.
Apply: DA COSTA & OO., LTD.—Canadian Service.

The house stands in well kept gardens
and grounds (2 acres 37 perches)..”

The whole comprises verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 5 bedrooms, one

earried forward will amount to
£ 223,000.

Production

ing up of a prosperous industry
can be regafded by any reason-
able body of opinion as other than







Modern Dress Shoppe. 3.2.51.—6n.

DRESS FORM—One (1) Adjustable
Dress Form Size A. (small), Apply
Hamilton, Merry Hill, Welches, St.
Michael. _ 4 6.2.51—3n

—_—$———
GALVANISED PIPE in the following
sizes: “in., “%in., “%in., lin. 1% ins,
2ins., 2% ins., 3ins. and 4 ins. Also fit-
tings. Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

Trafalgar Street, Phone 2696.
3.2.51.—t.f.n.

———

INFANT'S PORTABLE TREASURE
COT with fibre mattress—practically new.
Ring 4729. 1.2.51—6n.

MKOSSOLIAN MINERAL—We have in
stock Kossolian Mineral with Vit. D. for
Cattle and Poultry 1/- lb. also Kossolian
Poultry Spice for improving egg pro-
duction 3/- Ib, KNIGHT'S LTD.



4,2,51—2n.

LADIES’ TEE SHIRTS — In white
nnd assorted colours $1.42 each. Mo-
cern Dress Shoppe. 3.2.51—6n.

—
LADIES’ PLASTIC APRONS 87c. each

Modern Dress Shoppe. 3.2.51.—6n.
LADIES’ and Children’s Handker-

ebiefs 17c. each. Modern Dress Shoppe.
3.2,51—6n.

LADIES' COATS for the cool eve-
nings — in wine, fawn, beige and grey
$28.50 each. Modern Dress Shoppe,

3.2,51—6n.

enh inn tiaieneaisceeniaietee

PRETTY WHITE VELVET EVENING
CAPES — $18.00 each. Modern Dress
Saoppe, 3.2.51—€n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

“£25: -. -d. easily earned by obtaining
order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi:
ence necessary, Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
comnission; marvellous money making
opportunity. Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
4."
7 25.1.51—18n











NOTICE

This is to inform my friends, custom-

ers and the general public that I am no

longer employed at the firm of P. C. S.

Maffel & Co., I can now be found at
No. 20 Tudor Street,

Your patronage solicited.

H. HEWI

Tailor.
3.2.51.—3n,





NOTICE
All owners of Dogs are reminded that
they must be Licensed during the
month of February, according to law.
N.B.—All Taxes due to the Parish will
also now be collectetl, according to law.
Signed A. A. B. GILL,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Joseph.
4.2,51—3n.

NOTICE
BARRADOS CHORAL SOCIETY
The Annual General Meeting will be
held at the Cathedral Church House on
Tuesday, 6th February, 1951 at eer

oe

Estate of
WILLIAM JORDON

Deceased
Notice is hereby given that all persons
having any debt or claim upon or affect-
ing the estate of Wiliam Jordon late of
Upper Carlton in the parish of Saint
James who died in this Island on the
fth day of July 1941, are hereby re-
quired to send in particulars of their
claims duly attested to me Edgor Briggs
Jordon c/o Messrs. Hutchinson & Ban-
field, Solicitors, James Street, Bridge-
town on or before the 15th day of April
1951, after which date I shall proceed
1o distribute the assets of the said estate

with marble bath, 2 showers, 2 lava-
tories, convenient kitchen and pantry,
reoms for 5 servants, garage for 2 cars,
and stables,

Water supply for garden and grounds
from a well with mill; water service in
house and also servants rooms (shower
and lavatory).

The residence completely wired and
furnished with electric lighting from
the company’s mains.

House convertible into flats and out-
buildings convertible into a cottage

The land is suitable for develop-
ment or kitchen gardens.

The undersigned will offer the
premises for sale by public auction at
their office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 23rd day of
February 1951 at 2 p.m,

Inspection on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days only between 3 and 5 p.m.

For further particulars apply to

Cc » CATFORD & CO.,





Solicitors.
4.2.51—10n.

~ eticinenentiana
MARWIN—Maxwell's Road. Modern

stone-built Bungalow, 3 Bedrooms,
Drawing and Dining Room Breakfast
Room and Kitchenette, Toilet and Bath,
Servants’ Room, Garage in ward, Water
and Electric Light installed. Approx-
imately 14.000 sq. ft. of land. Apply:
E. H. Farmer, Andrews Plantation or
Dial 95267. 4.2.51—6n,

FOR KENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din-
ing room, Breakfast room and Kitchen-
ette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St, Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1.51.—6n.

The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office No. 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 16th February 1951 at
2 p.m, The messuage or dwelling house
formerly known as Tullyera now call-
ed “CRYSTAL WATERS” with the land
thereto containing by estimation 12,087
square feet situated on the sea at Car-
ville Avenue, Worthing, Christ Church,
at present used as a boarding house.

Inspection any day except Sundays
between 4 and 6 p.m. on application to
Mrs. Talma on the premises.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD, & Co.,
Solicitors,
3.2,51—12n.

a

The undersigned will offer for sale by
public competition at their office, No. 17,
High Street, on Thursday the 8th day
of February, 1951, at 2 p.m. the dwelling-
house called

THE BOWER

with 17,444 square feet of land situate
at The Garrison, containing 2 verandahs,
2 public rooms, 2 bedrocms, toilet, bath,
kitchen, etc. Garage, servants rooms and
enclosed garden.
» The sale may be made with or with-
out the furniture.

Vaeant vomseemae ue be given.

Further particulars from

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.



WANTED
MISCELLANEOUS

ara

GORRINGES undertake expert watch
and clock repairs, cleaning and _ resto-
retion of oil paintings, watuation for in-
surance and_ probate. GORRINGES,
Upper Bay St. 2.2.61.—Tn.

——$—$—<— — ——
WE BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and

Silver jewellery, coins, dentures, etc ,
write, call or Dial 4429. “ORRINGES.
Antique Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht
Club, 3.2.51.—7n.

———
WE BUY FOR CASH—Clocks, watches
and musical boxes in any _ condition.
Write, call or dia} 4429, GORRINGES An-

tique Shop, Upper Bay ida OE 7.
.2.51.—Tn.





















The production for the year
amounted to 2,833,000 barrels of

is found at depths between seven

and eight thousand feet, or ap-

crude oil and 3,549,000 gallons of proximately double our average
casinghead gasolene; deliveries of depth in pre-war years. Moreover,

approximately . .these. amounts. this is-a relatively favourable ex=»eentation

were made to the refineries.
We have continued to charge
oil revenue with the whole cost







LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Reginald Knight,
holder of Liquor License No. 983 of 1951,
granted to Reginald Knight and Augusta
Hutson in respect of a wall building
opposite Sobers Lane, St. Michael, for
permission to use said Liquor License,
&ec., at said premises, Sobers Lane, St.
Michael.

Dated this 2nd day of February, 1951,
To E. A. McLBOD, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. A’.

Signed REGINALD KNIGHT,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District ‘A’ on Monday,

the 12th day of February, 1951, at
ll o'clock, a.m,
E, A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”.
6.2.51--In,

perience, since in the search for
new oil in Trinidad drilling to
depths of over 12,000 feet is not
now unusual. This entails the use
ef heavier drilling equipment,
and results in very substantially
increased expenditure. It is clear
that this is a factor which must
enter increasingly into our caleu-
lations.

In the circumstances, I think it
will be agreed that we have been
fortunate in recent years in
achieving results which have en-
abled us to build up a strong fin-
ancial position, and that we shall
be prudent to maintain it,

Once again I desire to stress the
importance that those of us who
manage the business, Govern-
ment and leaders of organized
labour, should do everything with-



GOVERNMENT

NOTICES



MAKING OF NURSES’

UNIFORMS

Sealed tenders will be received at the Hospital up to 12 o’clock
noon on Wednesday, 14th February, 1951, for making 90 Uniforms
for Nurses within a period of 2 months from the date of acceptance

of tender.

Persons tendering may offer to make the whole or part of the
quantities of garments required, and contracts may be awarded to
persons tendering for making the whole or part of the quantities of

garments for which they tender.

Persons tendering must have the statement on the tender form
signed by two other persons known to possess property, expressing
their willingness to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of

the contract.

Specimens of the garments may be seen, and tender forms will
be supplied, on application to the Secretary, and tenders will not
be entertained except they are on the forms suvplied by the Hospital.

7.2.51.—3n,

Postmistress, St. Philip.

of February, 1951.





POSTMASTER — PARISH OF ST. PHILIP

Applications are invited for the vacant office of Postmaster/

Appointment will be made subject to the selected candidate
being passed as medically fit for employment in the Public Service,
and will be on one year’s probation.
ard which will be accepted is a pass in the Cambridge Local School
Certificate or a similar examination of equivalent standard. Appli-
-|cants should preferably be between the age of 21 and 30 years.

The salary attached to the Post is at the rate of $1,056 by $72
to $1,776 (E.B.) by $96 to $2,160 per annum.
be obtained from the Colonial Postmaster.

Applications should be made on Forms obtainable from the Colo-
nial Secretary's Office and must be returned not later than the 14th

The minimum educational stand-

Further particulars may

6.2,51.—2n,



NOTICE TO FISHERMEN AND BOAT-OWNERS
Fishermen and boat-owners who contemplate the building of new
fishing boats, for which assistance by loan from the Government may
be required, are advised to discuss their problem with the Fishery
Officer before expending any’ money towards such construction.

CHANCERY SALE

fortunate and beneficial,

It may be that, as a result, too
clear g field has been available
to those who trade in misrepre-
for political purposes.
I believe, however, that this phase
is passing and that the general
public in Trinidad is gaining a
better appreciation of the contri-
bution which, despite its difficul-
ties, an efficient oil industry has
made, and I trust will continue to
make, to the welfare and pros-
perity of the colony.

During the year the first gen-
eral election was held in Trinidad
under universal adult suffrage and
the new constitution, which places
the island as the most politically
advanced of the West Indian col-
onies. New legislative and execu-
tive councils have been elected
and ministerial appointments have
been made. I believe we shall find
in the people of Trinidad a grow-
ing appreciation that upon the
sense of responsibility of their
elected representatives depends
not only the interests of commerce
but the welfare of the whole com-
munity of Trinidad.

High Standard Of Housing
And Welfare

In addition to our contribution
to the welfare of the community
as a whole, we have continued to
maintain and extend our own high
standard of housing and welfare
arrangements. These include free
medical attention for employees
and their dependants and excel-
lent educational and recreational
facilities. :

The agreement between the Oil-
fields Employers’ Association of
Trinidad and the Oilfields Work-
ers’ Trade Union, which had been
satisfactorily observed, terminated
during the year. A new agreement,
which provides a general wage in-
crease to all classes of workers,
has been made for a minimum
period of two years and three,
months,

During the year Mr, Cottell vis-
ited Trinidad and discussed our
operational and administrative
problems with the management
there. Mr. Bushe, our general
manager in Trinidad, subsequently
paid us a visit in London, We were
pleased to receive his report of
the loyal and efficient service given
by our management, staff, and
field workers in Trinidad, to whom
1 am sure it will be your wish that
we express our appreciation, and
that this be also extended to our
staff in London.

The resolutions before the meet-
ing were carried, and a vote of
thanks Was expressed to the direc-
tors and staff in London and
Trinidad. n



For Fishermen

LONDON
Fishermen caught poaching in
the rivers and ponds of Scotland
will be liable to a $28 fine but they
can keep their rod and line,








ing to Europe. The usual ports




You will be







THE

ZOCOSSSO6S6S ,OGO60

GOts

Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual reductions for children,

delighted with the designs of
Our Recent Shipment of

TABLE OIL CLOTH AND FLOOR RUGS
CENTRAL EMPORIUM

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.— Proprietcrs.
Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets,

OCC SLOP ETO SAO) SDEOD COLOSSAL SOF

POIPOP ORION OTT TON T UT TT e Te

PASSAGES TO EUROPE |

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominiau, for sail-

of call are Dublin, London, or |

sins eooessaicereaeeecneaa nae ease eoaiae

rns ee rntmang

THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK .

¢

WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,

and Associations to make the compilation of information in
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities:
religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports,
radio, agricultural, eic., are asked to have the form printed
below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to :

THE EDITOR,
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street.

FORM

Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Etc, .....:.:cccccsssesessessneesseseonsnvens >

FAPEREEEEE TES SEREENESETNE SEEN BECHEEEESOS EEE SEOEESEES OSES ET ESER ERAS SIDES URES ED ESTEEESESOEER ESTER SS UOEHERETEE EOE ERE® ,

FOR SALE

OFFERS oe = ae
by the undersigned up to the
Lath day of February*forthe ~
block of buildings, (land not
included), situated on Prifice®”
William Henry and Victoria -
Streets and Bolton Lane,
sections of which are at pres-, .
ent occupied by W. A, Med~ ~
ford & Co,, The Man
Club, and until quite ae
ly by the _Bridgetown~ ice~





Company. rchaser to’ de-[/"S

molish ‘the buildings and }f-«

clear the land within sixty Laat
days from date of purchase.

EVELYN ROACH & COqâ„¢ |}ex

LID... *. [Sens

Rickett Streets fp}

- ‘ 3.2.51—tf.n. =

—

—

=

god



+

%

7

















among the parties entitled thereto i t t aanhe is
to the debts and claims} MAGAZINES—True Story Detective , i A new B Oo stop poaching
pe gid ee I shall then have has aaa Police sagasines. Bring see Bekie. Seldon Boe ce Saket ot tee ihe cote ane. Scotland has just been passed by President or CRP 6 oh cdodenaces aeosissdi daniel on uae
i shall r yi nway Store, * 7. O1 2
the’ ane eat ta ane sane Jasas Seeeon. Dial 4910, 6.2.51—3n. | ate specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding Friday {the House of Commons, and the
of whose debt I shall not have had | —————-————_________. Gk same place and during the same hours until sold: Full particulars on app!!- ticnottiest problem that the parlia— :
of whoes debs 1 shall not netmutios | FOR CASH, old Bicycle Beddies with | cation to me. a: mentarians had to decide was —|% Council or Committee Member.............:.ccsssscsssesessesssesssssecssnseesensecenanes
And all persons indebted to the said| or without Saddle Tops. Chandler's CYRIL BRUCE BROOKS—laintiff should « h be liable to have |&
estate are requested to settle their) Hardware and Bicycles Accessories, vs. shou da poacher be li e to ve 2
accounts without delay. Reed and Tudor Streets. 6.2.51—Iin ELEANOR PARK BAKER—Defendant his rod and line confiscated in|
Dated this 5th day of February, 1951. Seah an | PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Pinfold street ;addition to paying g fine. % socevaedbepeerededcrevsedasseesarsveccsadurscdeddeebpeaesadhoscudiesapsscocesdususctsceceshdeneaseestics veecegecnecseene <â„¢
. woe B. a eas a PERSONAL in the City of Bridgetown in this Island containing by admeasurement Two There were such strong views %
Qualified Administrator of he thousand one hundred and fourteen square feet or thereabouts butting and b his that 2 vote s taken
of William Jordon, deceased. bound! 1 T. E. Went lands of Mrs. E. G. De R lands of |? out this that 2 vote was tz nie T
7.251—4n.| The public are hereby warned against ounding on lands of T. E, Went on lands of Mrs, : loys on lands of | | yhether to put the extral¢? reasurer.......... Wateevs Wsvnessdae oseavanes Secretary ervevcscessdceceheuectosceseconeseascesusess
cm giving credit to my wife CLARA BELLE Horace Savoury on lands of Mr. Cozier. on lands of Violet L. Barrow and on | on whether F e aly . seeveeeesees 5s
‘nee Murtel) as I do not hold myself Pinfold Street aforesaid or however else the same may butt and bound ‘Together ;penalty—confiscation of rod and %
: re a i es elli hereon called “Kenworth” and ai! |}; : a 5 M4
* responsible for her or anyone else con- with the messuage or dwelling house t ; n line—into the new bill. q - a i
LOST tracting any debt or debts in ay, name anette Aan both freehold and chattel thereon erected Wis House ae nip $ Short historical account of the origin, functions and current .
nt r s by yritten order signed by me. . i ~ - * ¥
“ONE SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series oo Signed GEORGE F. PELLE. Date of Sale: 23rd Februany, 1951. : u reprieve for the poachers by 198] 3 activities : B.
Q, No. 9745. Finder kindly return same Thorpe Cottage, ' Sein natoesy to 190 against confiscation Re %
s Sears. Williams. ere St. ee in wth January, 195!.) I N.S, SOSOOCOCOCCOOO COO OOOO SOOOCOOOL ILOCOS ORE OCC OOOO SESS SSO CCSeee
Christ wurek 2,51—1n 2 2







j
j
:
‘
'
“a
4
?
’
;
>
|
'
}
;
‘





PAGE EIGHT

Iverson Or Johnson
Must Go: Hutton Shows

} (From W. J,

O'REILLY)
ADELAIDE, Feb. 5,

With a magnificent lone hand effort which took him

through the innings unconqu

ered, Hutton busted wide open

_ the inherent weakness of the Australian spin attack. Since
. the Australian team was chosen for the first Test, know-

- ledgeable critics have been

well aware that Austyalia has

~ taken a terrific gamble in including two off-spinners to the

exclusion of a leg-breaker in



3

LEN HUTTON
U.S. Play Jamaica
At Lawn Tennis
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb. 4.
American lawn tennis invaders

completed exhibition matches in
King: on to-day. They start

playing at} Montego Bay to-mor-— ;

row for Caribbean championships.
Yesterday Althea Gibson, Amer-
ican coloured star,
.played Mrs. Cover
amaican Chempion.

Ramsay,

Results of play Saturday
Women’s Singles: Althea Gibson
(U.S.A.) beat Ivy Cover Ram-
say (J) 6—2; 6—3. Baba Madden
Lewis (U.$.A.) beat Betty
Rosenquest C78 2-2 6—3; 9—7.
Joy Mott-Trille (J) v. Edith and
Sullivan (U.S.A) 6—3; 1—6.

Unfinished: Men's _ Singles:
Carlton Rood (U.S.A.) ‘beat
J. H. D. Bonito (J) 6—3; 6—3.
— Grigry (U.S.A.) vs. E.

tis: (J) 7—9; 6—2.

Unfinished Mixed Doubles:
R. G. Sturdy (J) and Barbara
cofield=(U.S.A.) Phil Hanna
nd Helen P. Risbany (U.S.A.)
6—1; 6=2. —«CP)

Lady Champion
Defeated
INGSTON, Feb. 3
Althea Gibson, U.S, National
Coloured Women’s Champion, beat
Jamaica’s Women’s Singles

Champion Ivy Cover Ramsay 6—2,
6—3 as the Caribbean ennis



Championship opened at Sabina —

Park at Kingston today.

The game was fast as both
women pulled out trick shots from
the bag but the American used
short fore-arm shots to take much
out from ‘the Jamaican.

Today’s games which included
plays between Jamaicans, United
States and Canadian players were
exhibition matches. Preliminaries
to the Tournament will begin at
the tourist famed Montego Bay,
Fairfield Hotel grounds on Mon-
day.

Water Polo Today

This afternoon at the Barbados
Aquatic Club at 5 o'clock, a Cadet



easily out- 7

their attack.

Until to-day, Iverson and John-
son have been equal to every de-
mand placed upon them. But
Hiutton’s great effort ona pitch
that was taking spin proved be-
yond doubt that—we must gamble
no longer.

Iverson or Johnson will have to
make room for a_ leg-spinner.
Although it was a_ spinner’s
wicket, not one Englishman lost
his wicket through the effect of
spin.

Compton paid the penalty. of
carelessness in going for a single
to fine leg off Lindwall. He played
the glance in a lackadaisical man-
ner and paid the price.

Sheppard lost concentration
after defending stoutly for an
hour. He swung hard at an over
ngs ball which should have

een hit hard but he missed.

Brown went leg before to a

yorker which trickled off his
legs into the stumps for a bowled

decision,

Evans suicided after making
some attractive shots.

Bedser played a half cocked

shot at a‘ good length ball and
missed it.
Tattersall stage-struck badly,
pooned a catch at silly leg. But
wler Wright arrived to take all
ints—for second place to Hut-
on as batsman of the day.
' It was the Hutton-Wright part-
nership which showed up _ the
Australian spin attack in all its
impotency.
Hutton’s Chance
Hutton had one slice of luck
however with Johnson, In danc-

ing down to make the half-volley |

osition, he snicked one to Tallon
Who had set himself for the
umping. The fine tickle which

ned the stumping into a catch- .

ing chance was too much for

‘allon who fumbled the ball and
Hutton stumbled home,

Although Hutton adopted the
policy of letting runs come in-
stead of looking for them he
mastered each member of the
attack in turn. No bowler was

ven an inkling of hope. He

ould have batted through to

Doomsday had there been batting
partners for him. Which all em-
Phasises the calamity it was when
Compton went early, But Wright
may still take a big part in this
match. In his few overs in Aus-
tralia’s second innings he spun
the ball sufficiently to leave
Archer stranded several times.

I inspected the pitch’ after close

of play and believe that Wright
will be able to exploit a wearing
patch at the river e It is just
We ioe, the line of stumps on
the legside and on the good length
mark,
If Wright can hit this patch
England still has a show. There
are no marks on the offside at
either end.

Neither Washbrook nor Simp-
Ca lost their wickets to spinners,

ashbrook took liberties in push-
ing a rising ball from Lindwall
away off his hip to square leg.

Perhaps the knowledge that the
somewhat immobile Iverson
guarded that position made him
careless. He pushed one high and
fast above the big fellow’s head,
and Iverson extended his right
hand like a straphanger in the
rush hour and the ball stuck fast.
Every man on the field was great-
ly surprised but Iverson especially
80,

Deserve To Win

Simpson was beaten and bowled

team from H.M.S. Devonshire with Johnston’s late inswing, So

1 pley a Water Polo match
against a Ladies team from the
Barbados Aquatic Club,

The Ladies team is: A. Eckstein,
T. Browne, G. Gale, F. Carmi-
chael, P. Chandler, J, Chandler
(Capt); and R. Vidmer.

Reserves: G, Reed and H. Me-
Kinnon. ~

After-this game a Barbados
men’s team will play a team from
H.M.S. Deyonshire.

The bados team is: —

A. Wet need, F. Manning,
Tim “Yearwood, H. Weathers
head, K. Ince (Capt.), O. John-
son and C. Evelyn.

Reserves: G. MacLean, B. Pat-
terson. Teams are asked to be
ready by 4.45..

There is another match sched-
uled for Thursday. The Barbados
team to play on that afternoon is
as follows:—M. Foster, M. Fitz-
Gerald, G. MacLean, M. Jordan,
B,. Patterson (Capt.) K. Ince,
G. Foster. Reserves: Trevor Year-
wood, Owen Johnson.

‘They'll Do lt Ever

HAVE TIME TO GET
A PAPER »+> GIMME
PART OF you

here has been no cause yet to
fear the spinners. But the Aus-
tralians succumbed to spin rather
pathetically. r

Wright bowled beautifully. His
leg breaks turned nicely and the
googly stood up rather steeply,

Tattersall made a splendid de-
but,

What a strange manoeuvre was
responsible for him’ missing the
bus in the original selection. His
ability to plod along economically
and to pick up valuable wickets
has strengthened the attack im-
mensely.

England's bowlers have again
given their batsmen the opening.
From a comparatively hopeless
position on the first day when
three wickets only were down for
254 they set to and swung it com-
pletely with a grand effort which
netted them 7 wickets for 117
runs on the second day.

This deserves victory.

Lindwall Outstanding
Lindwall was the outstanding
Australian bowler. He ‘maintain-

eee

N
‘S NOTH.
HIM TRY



BARBADOS. ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1951

Bright Batting In Will Freebooter Win





chance of another victory is by no
means forlorn.
May Not Start

Devonshire Beat
Island 2—0

, e 9 The French chaser, Boomasets

nshi . fi n vyho has been automatically given

cummins” dititied the. tase , : 195 1 G d N t l to weight with Freebooter because

Pe Ror d Ons Pe wae inal T; ta ame ra a iona . nh nar not run in Britain =

2—0 yesterday at the Garrison : f c jhas fun in Britain will
Savannah in a football match, By VERNON MORGAN probably not ta i

would have to be a very excep-
tional horse to win with this
burden at this first sight of the
monster Aintree fences. Next in
the handicap, the Irish crack
Cottage Rake, who is allotted 12
stone 5, is also an almost certain
non-—starter.

The other famous Irish chaser
Shagreen, owned by the British

Both goalg which were scored in
the sevond half of play were
kicked in by right winger Tollis
and centre forward Tayack.
The game started off fast with
jthe island “defending from the
barracks end. Both teams press-
ed each other severely and much
lobbing was witnessed in the goal

Atkinson Scores Fine Century

Mr. John Goddard’s XI.....
Mr. Keith Walcott’s XI.....
(for 8 wkts.) 406

Making his runs all round the
wicket, Dennis Atkinson of Wan-
derers played an unblemished

LONDON, Feb. 3.
Freebooter, the winner of last year’s Grand National, will
go down to history as one of the greatest steeplechasers of
all time, should he win the race again this year.
It would not be so much that
he had won the race in successive
years, though few enough horses

194 om

in giving him
weight possible.

the maximum
It was a fore-
gone conclusion that he would 2¢et



106 retired for nei |




;
|
: have ever done this, but he would top weight, but many thought he ;
area but on each occasion the innings of be winning again with 12 stone, would’not be asked oS carry more preratnan | Jamies FO nade i
keepers were there in position to Keith Walcott’s XI at Kensington 7 pounds in the saddle than 12 stone, 5 pounds. Some given ‘Sen mind’ teoat” oe
pans “ ball back into play. on en oo. final day of play™ Only four horses in the 114 felt that the trainer Bobby Renton ee Though he fell last time in
ae Bert contre forperd pf ~ ne — a Pe eater years’ history of this worla— might not run last year’s winter the National he must now carry
a in the aeer’ half + one fa Stieenaraiet Sane ae eee famous steeplechase have ever if asked to carry such an impost, eight pounds more than last year.
too slow in getting to the bail - Aikinson got his century In 85 won under this weight, Cloister but, Renton though rather dis- Freebooter carries 10 pounds
In the second half the Devon-. minutes. In this aggressive knock (1893), “Manifesto (1899), Jerry appointed that his horse had not more than last year.
shire changed their tactics and he got 18 fours,, He featured in (1912) and Poethlyn (1919). Of been given a few pounds less, Recently in the Grand National
concentrated on low hard passes the day’s best partnership of 141 this quartet the only horse to win said that none-the-less Freebooter chase at Aintree run over part of
which found their way towards the with Norman Marshall, who also the race twice successively was would take his chance. the National course, Shagreen beat
island goal area " "gave a lovely display of batting Poethlyn and in his case the first If Mr. Sheppard has been hard Freebooter by six lengths but the
About 15 minutes after play in for 64 retired. , of the two was a wartime sub- on Frecbooter he has also been Grand National winner was con-
the second half Tayack ‘at centre The wicket however was a bats- stitute race run oyer the smaller somewhat severe on most of his ceding him 10 pounds. R
forward drew first blood when on man’s paradise, giving little or no fences of Gatwick. _ , leading rivals ang the champion’s —Reuter.
receiving a low pass outran Taylor help to the bowlers. This largely | Thus if Freebooter won this SS. —————————————
and finding himself slone on the contributed to Mr. Keith Walcott's year’s race he should rightly stake ' ,
ball with only goal keeper Smith Eleven piling up 406 for 8 on the a claim to a place in the national
to beat, kicked hard and low into tins. On Saturday, Mr. Walcott’s weights. ?
the right hand corner of the nets team had scored 63 for 1 and they Top Weight
to put. Devonshire one up. went on to add 343 to their score DENIS ATKINSON Mr, David’ Sheppard who an- oe
Smith made a great effort to yesterday. Mr. John Goddard’s nounced his weights for this year’s For Busy Businessmen —- |
save but the “ball was well placed, team which took first turn at the race this week may be said to have y 7 Nea

wicket on Saturday, made 194,

' Norman Marshall after batting
was called to bowl against his
team mates and he took 3 wickets
for 26 runs in 7 overs—one of
which was a maiden. His brother
Roy, who took 1 for 31 runs in 5
overs, was the only other bowler
to capture a wicket on Sunday.

got his hands to it but could not
hold it.
The interval was taken with the

With one goal up against them
the island renewed their efforts
to score but goal keeper Noakes
proved a strong opponent for the
forwards. Ten minutes after the
first goal Tollis at right wing re-
ceived a pass from Plumber at
inside left and finding himself
unmarked cut in and scored the

been rather harsh on Freebooter

scoreboard reading 263
Marshall 64 not out and
27 not out.

Marshall retired at 64 and Skip-
per Walcott took out Charlie Tay-
lor with him to resume the in-
nings. ,

‘or «3,
alcott



What's on Today

Exhibition of Sculpture and
paintings by K. R. Brood-

POPLIN SUITING

D Eric Atkinson was very impressive . John Goddard did not take the hagen, paintings and In Fawn, Cream
second goal the ball passing well although he failed. iS Aibexias ? field after lunch as he sat on the water colours by Mar- Beige, and Grey ;

tee ent who had come batsman. Selection Committee. Roy Mar- jorie Broodhagen and :

out of the bars.

Excellent for
Working Suits
54” wide

Per Yard . $2.60

shall deputised for him and used
Norman Marshall in his place,

The new ball was taken on re-
sumption, Eric Atkinson bowled
the first over from the screen end
and Millington came on from the
pavilion end.

The spectators saw Wood, Tay-
jor and Hunte keep wicket on Sun-
day. Wood made two stumps and
brought off a catch. The fielding
on the other hand was not of a
very good standard,

C. Hunte, 40 and D. Atkinson,

paintings and water col-
oO by John Harrison at
‘ os Museum 10.00.

House of Assembly meets
3.00.

With the second goai scored the
Devonshire boys did not slacken
up and about two minutes before
play ended, they tested Smith
completely with low and high
shots. When the final blast of the

whistle sounded most of the play 5, the night watchmen, were Both Walcott and Taylor started | Dr. Cummins is expected to
was still going on in the island’s walking through the pavilions CUtiously while Atkinson and pilot through the second
a area. gate at 1.40 p.m. to carry on a asia | got a lot of swing out reading and the remaining
teams were: *s rerni of tine . stagés, a bill to amend the
Plat: Ges, my eoiemiie coke from Walcott’s XI, overnight ide Mivahed de nih onion snes a bill e

score of 63 for 1.
Skipper Goddard opened his at-

WHITE DRILLS

second ri of the Work-
bons; Gittens, Cadogan, Ishmael; and again beaten. The rate of iene Cotetpention Act,

Taylor, C, Ramsay, Johnson, tack with left arm medium pacer 5COring (was considerably de- 28” wide.
Daniel. E. Millington from the pavilion Cre@sed, the batsmen seldom get- Mr. Adams will take charge ‘
Eevonshire: Noakes; Sleman, end who immediately found a “9g the pacers to the boundary. of a bill to amend the Per Yard :

Nevitt; Searls, Larkin, Plumber;
Box, Tayack; Alltimes, Brimik-
ham, Tollis.

Cricket Tea
Fourteen were selected Sun-
day to represent the island of
Barbados in the Intercolonia!
Tournament with Trinidad sched-
uled to begin on Thursday,

February 15.
They are John Goddard (Capt.)

Taylor had a narrow escape at
17. He edged an outswinger from
Atkinson to Proyerbs at third
slips, who apparently caught the
ball on to the ground,

The pair soon got accustomed
to the new ball and again runs
were coming quickly.

Walcott got 50 runs when he had
been batting for about 30 minutes.

Walcott and Taylor sent up 300
in 225 minutes. :

Walcott went on to make 85 be—
fore he was nicely stumped by
wicket-keeper Wood off Norman
Marshall. He moved down to
drive a good length ball outside

length and sent down a maiden to
Atkinson. -

The other end of attack was in
the hands of Roy Marshall and
Hunte was taking him. unte
pleased the ‘spectators with a
beautiful cover drive for four off
Marshall's fourth ball and the
next ball he late cut past second
slip for another four.

His innings ended the follow-
ing ball when Marshall clean
bowled him, leaving him shaped
for a cover drive.

Commissions of enquiry
Act while Mr. M. E. Cox
is expected to move the
passing of a bill to amend
the Trade Act.

Lady Baden Powell will
attend the Guiders Meet-
ing at St. Michael’s Girls’

' School 5.00.

A team from the H.MS.
“Devonshire” will meet a
Barbados Regiment team
in a football match at
Garrison 5.00.

Mobile Cinema gives show

89¢, $1.01, $1.11







Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

Hunte made 48 and the score
was 71 for 2 Atkinson 5 not out.
Norman Marshall replaced



ek the off-stump and failed to con- at Shrewsbury School CUTEX NAIL BRILLIANOE with a
Eric Atkinson, Dennis Atkinson, bg Sian tected nect. Walcott’s innings included Yard, St. Philip 7.30. Cuticle Spatula in the following lovely
E.L.G Hoad, Jnr. C. Hunte, Roy on Ooe Marshall while Millington 16 fours. Dance at Barbados Aquatic shades: —
Marshall, Norman Marshall, &. still kept up the attack from thd Wickets started to tumble. | Club for personnel of Deep Rose Young Red, Pink Cameo,
Millington, C. Mullins, A, M. vilion at Marshall, all within an over, | BMS. “Devonshire” 8.00 Cotton Candy, Colourless Natural, Sheer
Taylor, Clyde Walcott, Keith PPE OT Gerers pair were by $iaimed the wickets of Walcott, | Ladies team from Barbados Rite meig ee ee eee
Walcott, Everton Weekes and G. this time well settled sparing N.S. Lucas and E. Cave. | Aquatic Club plays a :
Loh nothing short or loose. ‘They sent ,,Wijiiams’ was the eighth wickes | | Water Polo match against that does not damage your Nala,
up the 100 on the tins in 85 min- iP fall. Branker, wha was a Cadet team from H.M.S. ‘4 The following are also CUTEX }}
° ; eo. | tes. rought back from the screen end, “Devonshire,” i LINES:-— 5
Belleville Tennis Pacer Bradshaw relieved Mil- @nticed him to go down the wicket, | A Barbados Men’s team nailed: cheiaes
lington but this did not change Geceived him with a leg break plays a match against = : Bpoeono. GRR
Results of the games played the complexion of the game. and left the rest to Wood who HLM.S. “Devonsh‘re” at 3 CUTEX HAND CREAM
yesterday are as follows: tkinson, especially, was getting Made no mistake in stumping. | Aquatic Club 5.00. CUTEX LIPSTICKS AND REFILLS.

runs quickly. He made powerful Williams made one and the seore

. CINEMAS y buy 2 Jus y fill £
‘ED DOUBLES ( ANDICAP) off, back and cover drives and was 369 for 8. Aquatic Club, wont eu ne Lipsticn Dut inate
iss L. Branch & W. A. Crich~ y4cod on to his 50 after he was _ E. L. G. Hoad partnered Taylor nee eaeve Me” .... 8.20 always on CUTEX PREPARATIONS,

low beat Mrs. A. A. Gibbons yt the wicket for about 40 min- At 46, Taylor was given a chance EGhein Ligeia 4.30 & 8.30 Obtainable at Messrs Booker's (B'dos)

. H. A. Skinner 4—6, 6—3, utes. Marshall was then 16 not by Sportage fielding at mid-on Pitza {Otbtin) , Drug Stores Litd., Broad Street, and
. out. off the bowling of Millington. “Sune Pride’ and Alpha Pharmacy, Hastings.

Mrs. R. Bancroft & P. M. With the scoreboard reading 150 The ball went on to the tobnd: olane: a Maes ft Be Oa *“* BOOKER’S ”’

Patterson vs Miss Ramsay and for 2, made in 113 minutes, spinner ary to make Taylor 50. “Summer-stock” .... 5 && 8.30

Mrs. Benjamin. Unfinished . W. Greenidge was brought on Taylor got another chance at Olympic:

from the pavilion end and later.
Branker from the screen end.
Spinner or pacer, all were treat-

“A Message To Garcia”
and “The Foxes of
Harrow”

65 when he gaye a hot return to
Millington, chest high.
The pair played out time with

TODAY’S FIXTURES
Men's Doubles (Finals)

-_ IO
i TE, ce



P. M. Patterson and G. H. a alike by Atkinson and Taylor not out 70, and Hoad not
> WY P Marshall. From off the back foot, out 13. At the clo.
seenrane Ve BF, Thy ane it was four runs to the mid-on le close of play the





score was 406 for 8.
Dr. C. Manning. SpUpeary on to the fence behind a F Th
Mixed Doubles (Handicap) the bowler. Another time they ik. K. WALCOTT’s XI W ;
Miss Branch and W. A. Crich- Were down the wicket while the C. Hunte b R Maranon Sate 48 od eather
low vs Mrs, Legge and C, A. ball fetched the boundary. Crisp cw. smith Lb.w. EB. Millington.. 18 Sun Rises: 6.18 a.m.
Patt cuts, powerful hooks and fino D. Atkinson retired ......... see 106 Sun Sets: 6.00
SE OOERTD » eran “es he N. Marshall retired 0.03) ga 5 SY In.
glances came from the bats of the XN: Marsha stad Menta anand Moon (First Quarter) Feb-
peir. Pi? Mareholl +. ies oy check tela fruary 13
‘HEAP » \ They sent up 200 after 135 A. M. Taylor not out |...) ' ee | - 8
CHEAP DAIRY PRODUCTS minutes of play, Norman Marshall N. 8. Lueas © (wkpr: Wood) b. N. pais: 6.30 p.m.
WELLINGTON, N.Z. getting 50. ce is oe saa Rage ee ee, oe
No country in the world can Three overs after, with a J, Williams stpd. (wkpr. Wood) b .
supply food of animal origin more flash of his bat, Atkinson sent | Branker 2.0.0.0. 06000..cccceee ee 1 YESTERDAY
cheaply than New ~ Zealandya ball from Branker through the © feet Not OUL ..... ss... 4 Rainfall (Codrington) .30 in.
according to E. Bruce Levy, noted] covers for four, to give himself maven See at Tétal Fer Month to Yester-
grassland farming expert who has|a century. He added five more Total (for 8 wickets) ........ 400 day: .38 ins.
Just completed a world tour on}yuns to his score before retiring. Bes gt sacle: vitae ae Temperature (Max.) 81.5 °F
behalf of the government. —CP).|" “With the score at 217 for 3, 4 Ty of juekets: JS. 3-71 39-217.) | mPemperature (Min.) 71.5 °F
Keith Walcott joined Marshall. -' “BOWLING ANALYSIS Wind rection: (9 a.m.)
Walcott was quickly off the mark Oo. k



S.F. (3 p.m.) N.E.



M. R. WwW.

ed his pace and delved in with] @nd with Marshall, kept up the eo Res re | x 3 Wind Velocity: 5 miles per
enthusiasm but Hassett used him fost rae of are set by the At- K. sBranker i } m 9 ut 9 hour.
sparingly, No other Australian | *!nson—Marshail pair, yt : Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.963, . -_ : .

ms : Walcott got a chance when he B® Marshan .... Sera 1
bowler with the exception of BE. K. Bowen ...... oe. 8 23 (3 p.m.) 29.911.

tao Ho was 17. He pulled one from wy Tie ier e f
Sennen arias bie Se ee Branker to mid-wicket, Proverbs N. mie we 8. Ye $ he SMART and DURABLE or







Wright to hit the worn patch
often enough to get the Austra-
lians out cheaply enough to allow
for victory. But with Bedser and
Tattersall in support, the oppor-
tunity is definitely there.



















TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS

New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White

. MASSEY-HARRIS

Sizes: 6—11
1 believe that this match is
bound to provide an extremely E UIP ENT 4 1 60
interesting finish, : Ls PRICE: e

By Jimmy Harlo
7 vSED To Ear ||
Jiseeaccast in

THE DEPOT, TLL
HE INVITED HiM=

Enquiries cordially invited for

supply of the following—

the

have New Stocks of...

Unitex Insulating Wallboard

TERMITE-PROOF, } ins. thick



_ 42 BLELP. 6 cyl. DIESEL WHEEL
TRACTORS

(Steel Wheels also available for
Plough)

GRASS CUTTERS = 3



4 ft. wide by 8ft. 9 ft; 10 ft; 12 ft. long

Standard Hardboard

14 ins. thick; 4 ft. x Sfi; 8 ft. 10 ft.
3/16 ims. thick 4 ft. x 8 ft.

Tileboard

Cream, White and Green
4 ft. x 6 ft. and 4 ft. x 8 ft.

@
PHONE 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid.

The

above

equip-
available for

ment is & Git

early delivery from

U. K.

COURTESY
GARAGE

(YW ROBERT THOM Ltd.

. MANURE SPREADERS
the

SIDE DELIVERY RAKES

Germs A CHARACTER
ANALYSIS OF THE FREE-

FEER MILLS
LOADING COMMUTER =:

‘THANX To
MICHAEL. T. DI ROMA;

29 POMEROY TER.
NORTHAMPTON , MASS,

FERTILIZING DRILLS



418





Full Text
PDarbad0os



ESTABLISHED 1895





OKRA BLOOD

By ROBERT N. SCHWARTZ
MILWAUKEE,

Dr. Hiram Benjamin, who

directed development of a

blood plasma substitute
from the garden vegetable
okra, disclosed that he is re-
turning to research into
okra’s effect on ulcers.

The head of the Marquette
University Research team
said that preliminary work
‘on the ulcer project, inter-
rupted by his service in the
Navy, showed great promise.
He had used okra in treat-
ment of ulcers in animals.

His early ulcer research,
Dr, Benjamin said, indicated
okra, like the drugs banthine
and atropine, reduces the
flow of tissue-injuring pep-
sin and acids in the stomach.

But, he added, okra has
the advantage over the drugs
that stimulates formation of
a thick, mucous lining which
also slows the digestive pro-
cess.

The scientist, a member of
the Marquette University
Medical School Faculty,
holds a basic patent for the
blood plasma substitute. He
and two other members of
the research team, Dr. Har-
ry Ihrig and Darwin Kaest-
ner, turned their patent
rights over to the medical
school.

The funds will be used by
M.U’s Medical School to
support basic research in
science.

Dr.

Thrig, vice president
in charge of rescarch, Allis-
Chalmers Manufacturing
Company, and Kaestner,
plant manager for Lakeside
Laboratories hold subsidiary
patents on'refining and puri-
fication of the okra pods.

Other members of the re-
search team were Dr. Walt-
er Zeit, head of the anatomy
department at Marquette,
and Dr. Donald Roth, a
junior medical student.

Dr. Benjamin told LN.S.
that as an investigator in
science he was not interested
in finances. He explained:

“The American Medical
Association’s canon of ethics
stipulates that no physician
may make a profit on a dis-
covery that would help hu-
manity. That's just and
fair and I, for one, wouldn’t
want it any other way.

“We became physicians
and scientists because we
are interested
humanity.”

With patent rights for the
blood plasma substitute
vested in the University,
Dr. Benjamin noted, there
will be rigid control over its
quality and distribution.

In addition, he added,
royalties will be very low so
as to keep the price of the
okra blood substitute low
enough to make it available
to_all who need it.

Dr. Benjamin explained
that ulcers are exacerbated
by the flow of digestive
juices. Once the ulcer lesion
has appeared, the juices lit-
erally “digest” the stomach
lining. Slowing of the diges-
tive processes would give
the ulcer an opportunity to
heal. :

He emphasized that the j
ulcer work is preliminary
and has not been tested on
humans yet.

He said the okra blood
substitute is a chemical
known as a polysachride, a
complex sugar molecule.

With techniques developed
by the five-man Marquette

a at erent ce AR AS A ANT,

in helping



simplifying the whole prob-
needed to meet such emer-

When a_ salt solution is
any climate without refrig-
eral things plasma does not

0.

Most important is that it
to recipient of the plasma.
School, has announced that
plasma substitute can be
ern climates and is a food
tions of the U.S.

be held in

{ —LN.S.
Pose New Threat

Heavy snowfalls in Carinthia
Valley a local train was com-
forwards. :
reported piled up more than three
towns in Western Carinthia were

The Lechach Valley with its
sleighs cannot reach it.

Salz-

temperatures in some areas

team it can be refined down
lem of storage of tremendous
gencies as a mass air attack
added to the powder, which
eration, it does all the things
d
will not, like human plasma,
Dr. John Hirschboeck,
made from Okra, which
Washington in the near
of the federal pure food and
Nafional Research Council
tion of the life-saving plas-
to-day brought the danger of
pletely marooned by snow and
In the village where British
feet on rooftops.
said to be like “valleys between
big population of 10,000 has been
Weather ‘reports from
provinee had br the

to a powder, enormously
amounts of blood plasma
on the United States.
can be kept indefinitely in
blood plasma does—and sev-
transmit viruses from donor
Dean of Marquette’s Medical
unlimited quantities of the
grows like a weed in south-
staple in the southern por-
Dr. Hirschboeck said con-
ferences will
future with representatives
drug administration and the
regarding quantity produc-
ma substitute.
Heavy Snowfalls
VIENNA, Feb. 5,
more avalanches. In the Gail
was unable.to move backwards or
troops are quartered, snow was
Roads between all villages and
huge mountains of snow”.
cut off since yesterday and even
burg said comparatively
danger

of the




ught
of
~~Reuter



avalanches there too | only 190

American

Taxes Up

WASHINGTON, Feb. 5.

Americans will pay higher in-
come taxes, and more for petrol,
cigarettes, whisky and beer under
new taxes proposed to-day.

John Snyder, Secretary of the
Treasury, asked the House Ways
and Means Committee which
handles tax legislation, for vastly
bigger (sales) taxes including lev-
jes of 20 percent on cars and 25
percent on television sets, radiv
and refrigerators.

He outlined the proposals as
part of the Truman Administra-
tion’s first instalment of a $10,000,-
000,000 tax increase.

The programme ¢alls for a four
percent increase in individual in-
come tax rates.

Other basic proposals made by
Snyder were :

A boost from flat 25 percent to
37% percent in capital gains tax.

There will be an increase of 8
per cent. in the normal income tax
for corporations, Corporations
with profits in “excess” class
would continue to pay an extra
30 percent on the amount deemed
“excess”.

The programme has still to be
approved by Congress.

Truman told Congress last Fri-
day that the first round of tax
increases would be followed by an-
other request for about $6,500,-
000,000 later this year.—Reuter,



Arabs Denounce

French In Moroceo

CAIRO, Feb., 5.

The Arab League has passed
a resolution denouncing “French
intervention” in Morocco, a League
spokesman said here today, He,
added that General Alphonse
Juin, resident General in Morocco
had threatened to depose Sultan
Mohamed the Fifth.

The spokesman said that the
League’s Secretary General would
confer with French Ambassador
in Egypt Maurice Couve De
Murville to inform him of the
resolution. :

The League has received ap
peals from various Moroccan
sources for immediate interven-
tion by Middle East Arab states.
They confirm that General Juin
has given an ultimatum to tie
Sultan, he said.

The Sultan of Morocco, a
French Beaeeiorete, has had
talks in Paris. France was re-

ported to have urged political
reforms aimed at decentralisin
feudal power but the Sul
wanted “complete revision of ti
protectorate treaty. of 1912”, ac-
cording to his aide,

The main purpose of the visit
was said to be to urge France
to grant political, economic and
financial autonomy to his coun-
try. —Reuter.

3 More Executed
For Virginia Rape

RICHMOND, Virginia. Feb. 5.

Three more negroes—last of the
“Martinsville Seven”—were ex-
ecuted here to-day for mass rape
of a 32-year-old white woman in
Virginia.

The first four of “the Martins-
ville Seven”, were executed last
Friday in the biggest mass exe-
cution in the history of Virginia,

Various groups in the United
States staged big demonstrations
against the executions and 10,000
letters of protest came from
abroad mostly from Communist-
sponsored groups. Demonstrators
included Leftwing Organisations,
students, trade union leaders and
church groups. The main coloured
organisations diq not protest but
maintained it was unfair to sen-
tence negroes to death for a
crime for which no white man has
ever been executed in Virginia.
Four appeals were made agsinst
the sentence but the United
States Chief Justice Fred Vinson,
refused to intervene.—Reuter.





Colony Report
Published In U.K.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 5.

Barbados in 1949 experienced
a slight decrease in the cost of
living. This was due mainly to
reduction in the cost of clothing.
But at that time the effect of
devaluation had not begun to be
felt seriously. So says the
Colonial annual report for the
cclony ublished in London
to-day (Tuesday).

The report also reveals that
since 1939 number of savings
depositors has been more than
doubled and that in the year
under review 1,724 new accounts
were opened.

Tories Have Good
Chance To Win Now

LONDON, Feb. 5.

Winston Churchill’s Conserva-
tive Party would sweep back to
power with a big majority if a
General Election was held here
now, according to the latest public
opinion poll figures.

The cost of living leaping up
week by week has caused the
prestige of the Labour Govern-
ment to sink to its lowest level
since 1945, statistics indicate

The latest figures published
to-day by one of the biggest and
usually most accurate’ polis
showed a slump in Government
popularity and a corresponding
rise in’support for Conservatives

Conservative statisticans using
poll percentages as their basis









high | estimated to-night that the Party

Parli

would

returned with at least
420 ‘ ;

on



ry





j



ae

























: ‘Carnival



een a!

SIR OTTO LUND, Commissioner-in-Chief of the St. John Ambulance
H. E. Skeete and Capt. E. B. Williams, inspecting vhe Nursing Di

Queen’ Picked

—FOR GRENADA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGES, Feb. 3.

Miss Sheila Cameron, clerk of
Messrs W. E. Julien & Co., Ltd.,
will hold sway as “Queen of Car-
nival 1951" here.

Judges acclaimed her the win-
ner of a contest of “Queens” held
last Wednesday night at the Em-
pire Theatre during the presenta-
tion of “Carib Symphony” by the
Pygmalion Glee Club. She was
“Miss Rovers Club.”

Sponsored by the Grenada So-
ciety of Arts, the contest was
among eight candidates, the others
being Misses Eileen Moore (“Miss
Carib Cigarettes’), Sheila Mc-
Neilly (“Miss T, R. Evans’), who
were runners up, Barbara Fer-
nandes (“Miss Archers Club”),
Hermione Greasley (“Miss Supply
Stores”), Louise Comissiong
(“Miss Grenada Hotels’), Mable
Smith (“Miss Pygmalion Club”)
and Mable McNeilly (“Miss Gren-
ada Society of Arts”).

The judges were Mr. A. Norris
Hughes, Mr. Denis Henry and Mrs.
Lyle Hosten.

During a wild finale, with a
crowded stage representing a Car-
nival dawn street scene (Jour
Ouvert), Miss Cameron stood
among the révellers who proposed
her health as “Queen of Carnival’.

Lady Baden-Powell attended the
performance with His Excellency
the Acting Governor and Mrs.
Green.

On Monday next, the Grenada
Society of Arts will stage its big
annual Carnival Pageant at
Queen’s Park, with Miss Cameron
riding a float in a procession from
the Market Square and later tak-
ing a throne for the various items
to be presented.

Grenada, too, will have its
quota of continental guests who
will pay $2 for box seats at the
Pageant.



“Sunday Express”
Backs Forming Of
W.I. Customs Union

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 5.
The Empire crusading Sunday
Express to-day gives whole—
hearted backing to proposals for
the formation of a West Indies
Customs Union. It is described
as “nothing less than Empire
free trade in miniature’—a small
scale model of a principle of

Lord Beaverbrook’s policy, and
the cardinal error was made of
building a tariff wall around
Britain and not around the
Empire.

Now from the West Indies

comes a message of hope that at
long last wiser counsels are to
prevail” it concludes.

Russia Fails Again

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 5.
The Soviet Union failed today
in another attempt to have the
Chinese Communist delegate seat-
ed in the United Nations body.
The Technical Assistance Com-
mittee of the Economic and Social
Council voted 11 to 2 to uphold
the ruling of its Chairman.
Only Poland joined the Soviet
Union in objection to the Chair-
man’s ruling. —Reuter.





GUIDED MISSILES

WASHINGTON, Feb., 5.
General Collings, United States
Army Chief of Staff, said today
that the American army would
have some guided missiles “within

their target.—Reuter.



WASHINGTON, Feb. 5.

Secretary of State Dean
Acheson in a letter to Robert
Sehuman- French Foreign Min-
ister, gave his whole hearted
endorsement to the French pro-
posal for the creation og an in-
tegrated European Army.

The State Department released
to-day the text of a letter sent
last week. Acheson’s letter als
reiterated American support for

Schuman



pian to pgo



igade, accompanied by Major
yesterday.

LUND BRINGS MESSAGE
FROM GLOUCESTER

AN organisation like th

a voluntary one, can only reall

Lieut-General Sir Otto Lu

e St. John Ambulance Brigade,
thrive if it appeals to youth
)} Commissioner in Chief of

the St. John Ambulance Brigatte told members-of the Press
at a Conference at Government House yesterday afternoon.

He said that they were ¥ery keen to get their own
gadets, or if they were sufficient other organisations for
young people to make use of them, they wanted them to

learn the preliminaries of first aid.

ON THE
° SPOT

REIGATE,

Members of the Reigate
Council are tired of seeing
the local parks and streets
littered with ice cream car-
tons during the summer.
months, So the Council is
recommending that manu-
facturers make edible car-
tons.
| Said. park superintendent
Frank Cook:

“Manufacturers could
make the cartons of edible
rice paper or other edible
substances,”

But ice cream manufac-
turers are doubtful. Said
one firm:

“If we make edible wrap-
pers we shall have to make
another wrapper to wrap
the edible one.in to conform
with hygiene regulations.”

{ —LN.S.



Storms Hit Britain

LONDON, Feb. 5

Gales up to 70 miles an hour,
snow and floods swept Britain
to-day after 24 hours of violent
Storms, There was widespread
flooding in South England and
firemen had to remove fallen trees
from roads. Storms may con-
tinue all day.

A 3,000-ton naval landing craft
has broken away in west Scotland
in the area’s worst storm of the
year.

A south coast lifeboat has been
searching in vain in raging seas
for three fishermen in a smal] boat
missing since yesterday.

At one place in Scotland, the
main road north was blocked by
snow. Ice made roads danger-
ous elsewhere—Reuter,



Oil For Argentina

SWANSEA, Feb., 5.
Tanker General San Martin
9,500 tons left Swansea to-day
with 17,000 tons of oil for Bueno:
Aires. This is believed to be the
largest singke shipment ot oil
from Swansea,

General San Martin is the new’

Argentine tanker and is on her
maiden voyage. She is the first
of eight new tankers being built
for Argentine, —Reuter.

_—
PRIEST KILLED
PISA, Italy, Feb. 5.
Three masked men broke into
the vicarage of Cevoli near here
and shot dead the parish priest
Ugo Bardotti early today. Per-
sonal vengeance or politics were
thought to have been the motive.
The police held three villagers
who were found to have a sub-
machine rifle and a pistol.
—Reuter,

FROZEN
WASHINGTON, Feb. 5.
The American Government to-
day froze until March 15 all sales
and deliveries of cattle hides, calf;
skins and kips (hides of young
steers) pending the establishment

18 months” which could seek outlof government controls to assure

* military supplies.—Reuter,

Acheson Suppo rts

European coal and steel.
The letter said in part “I do
not need to remind you of the

attitude which the Government
of the United States has dis
played on innumerable occasions
and in many forms toward
European integration.”

“My government strongly
favours it.”





added



The le

practical manner

| Sir Otto arrived
festerday morning by B.W.LA.

om Antigua. He was accom-
Bock by the Countess of Breck-

in Barbados









ock, Assistant Superintendent-
n-Chief of the Overseas Units of
the St. John Ambulance Brigade.
They have come to imspect the
units here and are guests at Gov-
ernment House,

They have already visited Ber-
muda and Jamaica and will be
leaying Barbatlos this afternoon
for Trinidad after which they will
go on to British Guiana,

He gaid that they have brought
oe sive Bt sopn
t , ein thados.

S roe RH. the Duke

of Gloucester, Grand Prior of the
Order of St. John which reads:

“IT am glad to know that the
Commissioner-in-Chief is paying
a visit of inspection to units of
the St. John Ambulance Brigade in
the West Indies, which will serve
to emphasise the interest which
the Order of St. John takes in ex-
tending its work in the colonies.

“I take this opportunity of send-
ing my greetings to all members
of the Brigade in the West Indies,
wishing them at the same time
continued success in their activi-
ties.”

Hopes To Come

The next message came from
Lady Mountbatten, Superintend-
ent-in-Chief of the Overseas Units.
She has sent greetings to all well-
wishers of the work of the Bri-
gade and hopes to be able to come
to Barbados soon to see the mem-
bers *{ the Brigade.

Sir James Sleeman, head of the
Overseas Units of the Brigade has
also Sent greetings to all those
people he knows in the island.

Sir Otto said that he had met
Mr. and Mrs, E. B. Williams and
Dr. H. E. Skeete who were run-
ning the local Brigade and added
that it was entirely due to their
energies that it had given such a
good account of itself.

They had not been to Barba-
dos before because it was only last
June that the Brigade Overseas

and Brigade at ome amalga-
mated,
He said that there were some

things he would like the people
here to know and one was about
the need for growth of the Bri-
gade. He believed there was a
feeling in many places in the
Commonwealth, and perhaps it
was also true in Barbados, that
some of the people felt that the
work of the St. John Ambulance
was confined to the war and em-
ergency, but that was not so.
People all over the world could
really make the Brigade efficient
by taking first aid and home nurs-
ing services with the object of
serving in peace,

Plenty To Do

Quite apart from that, there was
a lot more to be done. With the
good start made here at the centre
in Barbados, they wanted to ex-
tend their work to other parts of
the island. In fact, he said that
he was made to understand that
that had already been done.

He was glad to hear that there
was nursing for girl cadets in ex-
istence in the island, The girl
guide movement, for instance, was
a thriving one and he was sure
that the guides could take the first
aid certificates and wear the St
John Ambulance Badge.

With regard to the boys, it was
just as important that there were
other enterprises. He imagined
that in some parts of the world,

@ On Page 3

ould be laid upon which mili-
tafy and econemic strength can







»@ built
“A rallying point will be
@ated around which a free and
vilised Europe can muster its
energies for successful defence
ats beliefs and traditions of its
hisgory,”
After welcomir the Frenct
overnn I



g a covference in P on the



|



|
|

French Plan



Replies

MOSCOW, Feb., 5.
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Vyshinsky today gave three west-
ern envoys a Soviet reply to their
notes last month on Soviet pro-
posals for a “Big Four” Confer-
ence,

He called envoys of Britain,
France and the United States to
the Soviet Foreign Office to re-
eeive replies,

All three embassies declined to
comment on the replies which
were being translated for trans-
mission to their respective capi-
tals.

It was expected here that the
Soviet reply would be published
tomorrow or Wednesday,

The Three Powers’ representa-
tives were received separately.
French Ambassador Yves Chataig-
neau went to the Ministry first at

three o'oclock this afternoon. A
quarter of an hour later John
Nichols, the British Minister in

Moscow was received at the Min-
istry, United States Minister Wal-
orth Barbour called at half past
three.—-Reuter.



Raw Turns Down
U.N. Invitation

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. 5.

Sir Benegal Rau of India has
informed Nasrollah Entezam,
President of the United Nations

General Assembly, that he is
unable to accept Entezam’s invi-
tation to serve on the United
Nations Good Offices Committee
to negotiate a possible settlement
with Chinese Communists over
Korea, it was learned here
to-day.

Sir Benegal’s refusal followed
instructions from his Govern-
ment. He was a member of the
original United Nations Cease-
fire Committee with Entezam and
Lester Pearson, Canadian Foreign
Minister.

He was invited to join the new
committee last week after the
General Assembly passed a rese-
lution condemning Communist
China as an aggressor in Korea

—Reuter.

Board Deadlocked

NEW YORK, Feb. 5.
The National Mediation Board
was “hopelessly deadlocked" after
talks on the strike by 12,000 raii-
shunters, a Board member said

to-day. :
The Board met representatives
of four Railway Unions and rail-
ways separately in its latest effort
to end the dispute now in its sev-
enth da
The strike which has held up
ammunitions for Korea resulted in
109,000 workers in other industries
being temporarily laid off and the

disruption of communications,

—Reute.

Ike Not Definite

WASHINGTON, Feb. 5

Republican Party’s policy chief
Senator Robert Taft, has demand-
ed that President Truman submit
to Congress any agreement he
makers to send American troops
to Atlantic Pact countries. He said
in an interview that General
Eisenhower in his recent report to
Congress had made a “good im-
pression” but was not definite
enough.







—Reuter.

U.S. Deny Report

WASHINGTON, Feb. 5.

American and British sources
here today denied the report that
the United States had initiated a
series of conferences with other
western powers on the “threat” to
Yugoslavia.

The report said the threat had
been caused by a military build-up
in the surrounding “iron curtain”
satellites,



—Reuter.

3 START TALKS

WASHINGTON, Feb, 5

Britain, France and the United
States began preliminary talks
here last week about a possible
meeting with Russia, diplomatic
sources said today.

The talks were interrupted over
the week-end when Sir Oliver
Franks, British Ambassador, left
for a speaking tour of New Eng-
latd states —Reuter,



Army, Acheson said: “If your
Government in close consultation
with the German and other
Europear Government who
wish to participate can evolve
main outlines binding the
free nations of Europe mot
clogely together in a spirit so
ij represented by the Schuman
plan, we ¢

for





an reasonably Aope fo
1 long terrr luticn to many of
ir proble be

they political |
"Reuter |

To West |

















ae

Chinese Driven
Back Into Seoul



PRICE: FIVE CENTS



TOKYO, Feb. 5.

CHINESE YORCES were reported fleeing nortn-

ward through the

southeru capital, to-night before the bi
Nations armoured drive since the

began.

hills towards Seoul, the
est United
rean War

Three powerful tank columns plunging boldly
through stiff but lightly armed opposition, advanced
to within seven miles of the Han River, south of the

capital, inflicting as much damage as possible.

.¢ o
Britain Bans
e
Diplomats
LONDON, Feb. 5.
Britain to-day banned Hun,
garian diplomats from going more

than 18 miles outside London and
warned that similar action would

be taken against Russian diplo-
mats if the position of the British
Embassy stalf in Moscow

worsened.

Action against Hungarians: is
the reprisal for a similar ban on
British diplomats in Budapest

Questioned about this in the
House of Common to-day Kenneth
Younger, Minister of State for
Foreign Affairs, said the Hunh-
garian Minister, Elec Bolgar had
been informed that he and his
staff would not be permitted to
travel more than 18 miles from
Hyde Park Corner to London
without obtaining written per-

mission from the Foreign Office

Earlier Younger had _ stated
that Britain is prepared — to
restrict her movements to Soviet
diplomats, if there is any further
deterioration in the facilities
offered to British Embassy
officials in Moscow,

—Keuler,



To Stage Strike

LONDON, Feb, 5,

British Trade Union leaders to-
night had a mujority of the na-
tion's 90,000 woekworkers on their
side in rejecting the Communist
eall to immobile ports.

But the key ports of Liverpool
Birkenhead and Manchester were

Reject Red Bid |

already almost at a_ standstill
while sporadic stoppages were ex
pected in great London docks

tomorrow,

Unofficial strikers denounced py
Union

Headquarters ag “sabo-
teurs” toured dockside meeting
places trying to bring dockers
out in defiance of Union Execu-

Lives

But only one in every ten dock
erg joined the stoppage which i
aimed at getting more pay for
nearly all strikers who were con-
centrated in the North

The London port worked nor-
mally, but tonight more than half
of the 1,500 men at one group of
docks refused to support the stop-
page,

—Keuter.

4
SPO PLE EPL LPP PES
.
5
.
%,
e

CLOVER

: £5,556654
PLL PEE EEO EE EEE LIE EEE

3,

>

A’ QUALITY

6343654 > c < . S £6,656%
LALO OO OE POE POPE PEEP EPSP EO

84640

AAP PPP EY

HERE AGAIN



COOKING BUTTER

THE HOUSEWIVES’
FAVOURITE

A heavy artillery barrage from
the United Nations line kept the
Chinese tightly dug in in their
fexholes in the hills as tanks
moved forward from Suwon cap-
turing Anyangni en route and
inflicting 2,000 casualties.

The American infantry took to
the hills on either side to secure
the highway behind the hard hit-
ting armour.

Anyangni, nine miles from the
Han River, and the last big town
below Seoul, was deserted when
they entered this morning.

But five miles to the west North
Koreans using the heaviest con-
centration of mortar fire experi-
enced in the 12-day offensive,
put up a tough fight,

One tank column withdrew after
advancing two miles to avoid a
surprise counter-attack by big
enemy forces, Light reconnais-
sance planes swooping low ahead
dropped a warning message—
“Enemy just around corner”,

Tankmen who led a drive into
Anyangni said their main obstacle
was land mines, but “they were
not much troubled because they
were so badly laid.”

Mines in many cases could be
seen jutting above the surface and
it was necessary to halt to deton<
ate them. Almost no Communist
armour was met, A

“The approach of our tank col-
umn to Seoul should be regarded
as of no particular significance at
this time”, an official memoran-
dum said.

Communists attempting
adic counter-attacks elsewhere
across the Korean “waist” met
concentrated fire from allied guns,

Warplanes wheeled overhead in
a clear sky to break attempts to
stem and push them back to the
38th parallel,

spor-

North of Hoengsong almost in
the middle of the peninsula,
United Nations units were moving
forward briskly at a mile an hour
and the Fifth North Korean Corps
was reported poised for an attack
down in the snow covered central
mountains Other units were in
action further east,

General Mac Arthur's Head-
quarters estimated to-day that
Communists suffered 8,365 casual-
ties on all sectors in fierce ground
fighting on Sunday.—Reuter,

ne eeuuemnmemned

TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT

——r



yt,
PPO EPP E IT

oF SRS $C

oat

QUEEN

4

LOOP LVEPEE EMMA ARLPDPLAPAOLAS

*
S
-
,

PREWAR
BRAND
PRODUCT

4 OCOCSCOCS OCS OBS

LP LLPE PP LEOLPLP PT EEE LL

PLL LLLF FFF FOO




PAGE TWO





“Panib Calli



PICTURED ‘shortly after they arrived at Seawell yesterday are
Countess of-Brecknock, Asst. Lady Superintendent-in-Chief (Over-
seas) and Lt. Gen. Sir Otto Lund, Commissioner-in-Chief of the St.

John Ambulance Brigade,

They are due to leave for Trinidad to-day.

T. GEN. “SIR OTTO LUND,

Commissiéner in Chief of the
St. John Ambulance Brigade and
the Countess of Brecknock, Assist-
ant Lady perintendent-in-Chief
(Overseas), ‘arrived here yesterday
morning by B.W.1A.

They were met at Seawell by
Dr. Harold Skeete. Commander in
the Order of the Grand Priory of
the Venerable Order of the Hos-
pital of St. John of Jerusalem,
Capt. and Mrs. E. B. Williams and
Maj. Dennis Vaughan the Govern-
or’s A.D.C.

Yesterday afternoon Capt. Wil-
liams was made a Commander in
the Order and Sir Edward Cunard
a Brother at the Parade at the
Central Staticn.

Otte and the Countess of
Bretknock*are due to leave Sea-
well this afternoon tor Trinidad.

Beaten Golfers
EVEN members of the defeated
Rockley Golf team returned to
Barbados “over the week-end.
There were, Mr. Jack Egan, Mr.
David Innigs, Mr. Michael Timp-
son, Mr. Bayley, Mr. Bryan
Wybrew, lan Christie and Mr.
Raymond ‘Norris. . and Mrs.
Jim O'Neal arrived yesterday
morning BY B.W.1.A.
Mrs. Christie and Mrs. Bayley
who accompanied the team re-
turned. on Sunday. '

Off To Triniaad
M*s; GLADYS CUMMINS,
wife ef Dr. H. G. Cummins,
M.C.P,, of @Gothmare,” Bank Hall,
left for Trinidad yesterday by
B.W.I.A. on a:short holiday. Her

peenent. Ws at Seawell to see her
off, ="

Is . Carnival
ONY five passengers came in
on twe flights from Trinidad
yesterday Dy B.W.1.A. They were,
two missignaries, a member of the
Barbados golf team, his wife, and
an _Ameriéan. businessman.

On the* other hand the two
flights to Trinidad were both al-
most full.”

Reason: It’s Carnival in Trini-
dad and éveryone that can is go-

ing.
With Coca Cola

M® EARL HEIMPEL who was

‘ Per ce a short visit
return trinidad yesterday by
B.W.LA. Mr. Heimpel is a repre-
sentative of Coca Cola, stationed
in Trinidad.

- BY THE WAY |

RORAN Chemists, it says,
have discovered a method
of produging “pure white of ceg
from fishj’teand of course. “It is
claimed to be better than natural
white of gg’

It is oposed to incorporate
dried white of egg in ice-cream
and puddings and cakes, to give
them a vour of cod. All we
want now is pure fish-tails pro-
duced frgdm the yolks of eggs as
flavouring: matter for the new
meat made from untanned hides,
(ENTER Ywo gourmets fighting

over an egg-cup filled with

hake-extract.)

Murder at Muckhufst (VII)

ADY GIGGLESWORTH'’S

face- was ghastly. Mark you
it was fothing to write home
about whtn it was at its best,
but an author who stops in the
middle ofa story to pass churlish
remarks about a woman's face is





3 x 2 yds. w.-..

(Felt-Base)

SWHITFIELDS

mYOUR SHOE STORES

Jamaica
They are here on a short visit,
staying at the Marine Hotel. They
are touring the West Indies and
“— then visit the U.S. and Can-
ada.

rector
Ltd., of London, manufacturers of
Robbialac paints.

ents of
Church in this area, were, Rev.
R. G. Flexon, Secretary of their

Dean Felker,
Superintendent, Rev. Edward E.
Phillippe of the Antigua District,
Miss Marcella Dean also of An-



3x3 yds_..-----..-$10.?
FLOOR-COVERING per yd---------$1.3°..._.6 ft wide

Touring W.I.
R.- and Mrs. Bernard Nichol-
son arrived from England via
yesterday by sb.W.LA.

Mr. Nicholson is Managing Di-
of Jenson and Nicholson

Missionary Meeting

RRIVING yesterday for a
meeting of the Superintend-
the Pilgrim Holiness

Foreign Mission in the U.S., Rev.
Trinidad District

tigua, Rev. Ray Chamberlain, Dis-

trict Superintendent in Jamaica.
Rev, Clifton Berg, District Super-
intendent in B.G. is expected to

arrive in a day or so.
were met at Seawell by

Rev. L. L, Miller, Field Superin-

tendent, Caribbean Area.

T.C.A. Arrivals
R. and Mrs. Claude Villiers
arrived from Canada over

the week-end by: T.C.A. to spend
a month’s
They
View Hotel.
lumber merchant in Montreal,

holiday in Barbados,
are staying at the Ocean
Mr, Villiers is a

Dr. and Mrs. Claudie Jamieson

from Edmonton are also down for
a month, coming in on the same

plane. They are staying at the
1i_tel Windsor,

Chemical Engineer
R. VICTOR CATHCART,
Chemical Engineer with
Canada Dry in New York arrived
from the U.S. via Trinidad yester-
day morning by B.W.LA. He has
come down to open and for the
opening of the Canada Dry Co.,
of Barbados which expects to open
shortly here. He was met at Sea-
well by Mr. Don Clairmonte one
of the Directors of the Co. He is

a guest at the Marine Hotel.

Intransit
NTRANSIT to Trinidad yester-
day on B.W.1A.’s flight from
Jamaica to Trinidad was Mr,
Maurice Lucte-Smith.

not only a cad, but a bad story-
teller, The reader imagines that
the digressions are shoved in to
fill up space, or because the au-
thor doesn’t know how to go on
with the story. So let us leave
it at that. Her face was ghastly,
not with its normal ugliness,
which was her misfortune rather
than her fault, but with an emvu-
tion which a child would have
recognised as terfor, nay, starx
terror, as the phrase goes. The
lynx eye of Malpractice did not
overlook her plight. Why, ne
asked himself, should the mention

is as _ follows,



Former B.W.1.A. Hostess
ISS JUNE BIRCH, former
B.W.1.A. hostess who had
been spending a holiday in Bar-
bados, staying at Stafford House,
returned to Trinidad yesterday by

B.W.LA.
Short Visit

R. LIONEL GITTENS was
5 among the passengers leav—
ing for St. Lucia on Saturday by-
B.W.I. to spend a week’s
holiday staying with Mr, Herman
Boxill, Inspector of Schools in St.
Lucia, :

Area Engineer
RAR. “BOB” GREENE, Area
Engineer of International
Aeradio Ltd. in the Caribbean,
arrived from Trinidad over the
week-end. He will be here for
ene veek, before leaving for An-

tigua. ,

With Barclay’s Bank

WAR. BRIGGS WILLIAMS, son
of Mr. and Mrs, B. Williams
of “Floris Dale”, St. John returned
to St. Lucia on Saturday by
B.W.1A. after spending a short
holiday wit) nis parents. Briggs
is with Barclays Bank in Castries.

Cleveland Lawyer

R. AND MRS. L. ;

WYKOFF who visited Bar-
bados last year were on_ the
T.C.A. flight which arrived from
Canada on Saturday.

This time however they are
only here for five days. Their
next stop is Grenada. Mr. Wykoff
is a lawyer in Cleveland.

Fourth Visit



(By DOROTHY BARLEY)
LONDON.

London designers work on the
assumption that the majority of
women have average, not model,
figures and that only a very few
have figures resembling that per—
fection of proportion
seeing in Paris.
remember those few extra inches,

ADVOCATE

BARBADOS.

First Thoughts: On The Couture Collections.

of all spring flowers, and filled suit. .

yoke of a dinner gown.
Wicker work has often been used
successfully for hats, but Digby
Merton showed ingenuity by
making the strapless top of an
informal party dress of plaited
raffia. Its bodice was edged all
the way round with grape hya-
cinths, violets and ivy --a flower

. pockets on evening dress
sequin embroidered. . coat
linings matching gloves and dress,
in particular a black coat lined
with pink. -hat and blouse
made of the same material.
narrow black velvet choker worn
with velvet belt on lime green
evening dress.

we recall
Couturiers here

and. design accordingly. ‘They basket effect. ‘ B.B.C. Radio Programme
TH realise, too, that women nee Originalit _.. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1951
M* go elgg jg Clothes that will carry them pockets ive ae London. °30—18.00. 19.76 m,
Sault Ste Marie Ontario, arrived through with ease from 9 to 6— designers scope for originality. 6,30 a.m. Forces Favourites, 7 a.m. The
eee Canada on Saturday by TCA, the shopping and the travelling. WATTLI introduced an unusual News, 7.10 a.ni, News Analysis, 7.15 a.m.

They are here for two months,
staying at the Windsor Hotel.
Mr. Ross is a_ retired Civil
Engineer. This is their fourth
visit to Barbados. They were here
in 1934, 1935 and last year.

And, whatever Paris
they like to have clothes which
enable them to do it all in com-
fort, as well as style.

This year, therefore the skirts
in the spring collections, although
they are neat and straight, are not

may say, From the Editorials, 7.25 a.m. Programme
Parade, 7.30 a.m, Personal Impressions of
Africa, 7.45 a.m. Think on these Things,
8 a.m. Souvenirs of Music, 8.45 a.m. Let-
ter from America, 9 a.m, The News, 9.19
a.m. Home News from Britain, 9.15 a.m.
Close Down, 11.15 am. Programme
Parade, 11.25 a.m. Australia vs, England,

11.45 a.m. Report from Britain, 12 (noon)

‘gun-holster’ pocket; the material
was doubled back to stand out
stifflYy on either side of the
jacket front.

PETER RUSSELL showed a4
number of three-piece ensembles

* her pencil-slim. Designers have in angora wool. He calls hiS The News, 12.10 p.m, News Analysis,
Music Byrn Music tried to give ease for walking and colours wisteria, lichen green and 12.15 p.m. Close Down,
Ms rs Sen ss of prennet freedom of movement by pro— young carrot. The dresses have 4:!5—000 25.53 m.
eacher of B.G.

Staying With Cousin
ISS ALICE LONG of Hands-
worth, Birmingham, who ar-
rived here: a few days ago is
spending two months’ holiday with

viding skirts with groups of pleats

from Ronald Paterson’s collection
In particular we noticed the fin
skirt which also put in an appear-
ance at the collections of Charles
Creed and Hardy e
at the back were made to stand

tailored jackets to match with

a
415 p.m. Music

‘ tas ; f Grand Hotel,
in Barbados visiting her rn and flying panels. topcoat matching but generally 5 p.m. Australia vs. England, 5.15. p.m.
Mr. T. A. Wason, eg ivi Skirts of heavier material. Skirts were Welsh Magazine, 5.45 p.m. Music
Servant of B.G. who lives here. Sketched here are skirt deta'ls Mostly straight, jackets tailored Mesazine.

600—7.15 31.32 m. & 48.43 m.

wyh long sleeves, and some were
of the battle-dress variety — he
politely called them lumber—
jackets. For evening wear, he has
favoured the double decker, aind
this line was seen at several col-

6 p.m, New Records, 645 p.m. Pro-
gramme Parade, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10
p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. West Indian
Guest Night.

Amies leats 2.45—11.00 p.m. 31.32 m. & 48.43 m’
RT





her cousin Mrs. Harold Newsam 6.4 jixe the fins of a fish. lections — the skirt fall from a .745 pm, Personal Impressions of
at “Ferndale”, Hastings. The long Michael of Lachasse—w ho re fitted bodice in two tiers. aoe 8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m.
journey was made by air. Miss tioces Molyneux among the Details from the collections: SEARAWORE Pie ant ee Be
Long works with a Bank in Bir- ¢ycjusive ten of the Incorporated gloves made of the same material 9.15 p.m. Ray Martin and his Orchestra,
mingham. Society of London Fashion as the suit. white gloves '¢-p.m, The News, 10.10 p.m. From the

Steel President
RRIVING from Cleveland yes-
fA terday via Puerto Rico by
B.W.LA. were Mr. and Mrs.
Charles J. Paterson. They were
accompanied by their daughter

Sketch Book—28

Mrs. Anne Eaton. is sti he first as —
Mr. Paterson is President of — ee S f

Paterson Leitch Co., of Cleveland. “Remembering that London
This company makes steel girders designers can, and do, stoop to
and other fittings for buildings qaitery, we find that lines o
constructed with steel. They are jackets, such as the buttoned
staying at the Ocean View Hotel. j,,;que’ illustrated here, compli-

Past vs Present

NY Old Harrisonian who can Jackets
take the half day off from The sketches here show the
work to-morrow afternoon, will general lines of CHARLES

have an interesting afterneon’s
fun if he looks in at Harrison
College shortly after 1 p.m.

The Past vs. Present cricket
match begins at 1 p.m. on the
College grounds. The Past team
Kenneth Mason
(Capt.), Mr. Teddy Hoad, Snr.,
Mr. G\ H. Adams, M.C.P., Mr,
Jim “Puss” Parris, Mr. Garnett
Mayers, Mr. John Goddard, Mr.
Clyde Walcott, Mr. Ian Clarke,
Mr. Clarence Skinner, Dr. A, L,
Stuart and Mr. E. W. Cumber-
batch.

A few days ago the Advocate
published a photograph of Mr.
Adams shaping up for a cover

ri . gerine colours launched last
en Road pleping Held. it this year have been sent to the laundry
is an indication of the tyre of and have come back faded.
strokes we shall see to-morrow Tones are muted, with wisteria
afternoon, it should be entertain- ae sandstong prominent in all
ing cricket. collections. 3
hea will be served to Old Har- The most striking of new Simple ay
risonians attending the game at Materiais we have noticed was y

4.15, After the match there will
be a cocktail party given by the
Old Harrisonian Society from 5,30
p.m, to 7 p.m.

dinner gown, which was worn Do this 3 times a day for 14 days.
with a multi-coloured chiffon Crh cleansing raped brings
stole. your skin Palmolive’s full

By Beachcomber

the Everyman selection of Robert

Lynd’s writings comes oppol- Magnificent crinolines sparkled
tunely, for it includes that little with embroidery. One called
masterpiece, “Dr, Johnson and “Harlequinade”’ was of pastel- =

Company.” Here is Lynd’s con-
cise and just explanation of
Boswell’s rather tiresome slavish-
ness in the presence of his hero:
“A dinner at Mrs, Thrale’s was
not merely a momentary enter-
tainment at which good manners

Designers—showed an interesting
variation on the
Instead of cutting the
the back in one with the skirt, he
had a separate panel which swung
out attractively.

But for country wear the skirt

ment the waist, even if it is not
already there.

CREED'S collection.
have long revers, often reaching
down as far as the one button at
the waist; several suits had gilet-
front jackets, cut like waistcoats.
One of his suits,
silk,
spotted on one side, and checked
on the reverse.

Navy blue and white still hold
the first place in choice of colours

for the spring.
* new shade of grey, called “thunder
grey”,
than
There are no violent colours: as
Hardy Amies put

fringed silk which has been used
by several designers. The fringe
is half an inch in depth and Digby
Morton made it into an elegant

As
at NOMAN HARTNELL’S
lection was his evening dresses.

coloured organza squares divided
by bead embroidery.
mannequin had difficulty in keep--
ing
imaginable—under control in the
crowded salon, He showed a friv—
olous evening hat made to look

Exjitorials, 10.15 p.m. How to Blow Your
Own Trumpet, 10.45 p.m, Getting Ready
for the Festival of Britain, 11 p.m, BBC
Symphony Orchestra.

piped with navy worn with navy
and white checked suit. . . large

straight skirt.
ae, black rose on lapel of blue linen

pleats at



| Rupert and the









Suit jackets

and the driver hold her firmly.
When they reach him, Constable
Growler fetches Rosalie’s parasol and
her box of candied fruits. {
ou've found her, Rupert,’’ he says.
*You've been a long time. Why

The rain stops before the van
teaches Nutwood and they pull up
in sunshine, As they get down the

| first person they see is Constable
Growler. standing outside his police
station At the sight of him Rosalie did she run away from me?" But
tries to fun away again, but Rupert Rosalie won't say a word,
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

in navy blue

was entirely reversible,

But there is a





much warmer?
previously.

which is
shades seen

it, “the tan-






4 Wash your face with Palmolive Soap

Then, for 60 seconds, massage with
Palmolive’s soft, lovely lather, Rinse!

Evening Dresses beautifying effect!
always, the main feature

col-

“in keep JANETTA DRESS SHOP
UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAWM’S, Lower Broad St,

the crinoline—the largest



were all-important, but a potential like a white mask with a long READY MADE DRESSES of all types
scene in a masterpiece, demand- trail of feathers down beside the WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Local dicraft
ing the mannerless application of face. Han

an artist.”

of a circus horse upset her so Marginal Note

much?

all this to do with anything?

And what the devil was

SEEM to hear sardonic laugh. (strawberres or
flower

decoration.

ter trom the people wh¢

Aha! I, who am in the secret, am were turned out of their home’
not asking myself any such ques- % provide a runway) for the

tion. Paciencia, pulgas. ...

Robert Lynd on Boswell
R. JOHNSON





vee $8"
3x4

SEER RB BRR eeeeee|s
CONGOLEUM SQUARES

3X82 ydsrewecsuen $12

£12,000,000 Brabazon. Perhaps
a bigger plane, for £30,000,000
would be more likely to be ‘Te-

i and Boswell jected quickly enough to make
being very much in the news,

evictions unnecessary,



dina toe
a

Ce ee ete ete ee na ee em ee So ce ee Sd RN A Cee ce men

EVENING HANDBAGS

One of a Kind at WHITFIELD'S only :—
BLACK HEAVY CORDED FABRIC from $14.75
BLACK & TINSEL BROCADE from
NYLONS—New Range, Popular Shades ....

12.53
1.95

|
3
|
i
l
I
I
|
i
{
I
j
{
I
I

VICTOR STIEBEL introduced
starched linen
of various shapes, some with fruit

also used flowers for
mimosa seems the most popular

— ——
he — »





EVENING MITTENS—in Pastel Shades and Black
READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty’s of London.

HOURS: Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30

NEGLECTED, MAY LEAD TO
SERIOUS OPERATION

Many people suffer in silence untold
Agonies, constant brain-wearying irritation
and pain caused by piles, simply because
they have never discussed this trouble with
even such a confidant as their chemist. If
you are a sufferer, make up your mind to

collars and cuffs
apples) or
(carnation or mimosa)
DIGBY MORTON
decoration:





ENAMELWARE

A wide range to select from...



CUPS and PLATES BASINS

ri ask your chemist about the wonderful

DINNER CARRIERS GHAMBERS preparation Man Zan. This clean, simple-
JUGS TOILET SETS to-use remedy is just marvellous in the
quick way it stops the maddening irritation,

SAUCEPANS SOAP DISHES allays inflammation and, persevered with,

banishes the most serious form of this
agonising trouble.
Man Zan Pile Remedy is no ordinary

KITCHEN SINKS TABLE TOPS

Stocked by our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

Telephone No, 2039 for those with pile trouble. It is prepared

in a special nozzle applicator tube, making
it simple and clean to use. Sold by

chemists everywhere.
THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE |

COTTON FACTORY LTD. | Ma nh Zan
;\PILE REMEDY

( 4



|









ie i i i a i a i

ointment, but a special preparation solely | '

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1951

>
’

6 $OS609
SLL FOOSE COO GOS FOODS SOGO98S

GLOBE

Last Showing TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M.

-- SUMMER-STOCK ~

LFF

OPPS SSPE PPPS FOP OT

Gene — JUDY — Eddie
Kelly GARLAND Bracken NG
%,
TO-MORROW & THURSDAY 4.45 & 8.30 %
HOLIDAY IN MEXICO (Jose Iturbi) ¥
AND 2
“CRISIS” x
~
39S SOC GOO SS 9GES SSO G9CGE IOVS POSSE





AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA
TO-NIGHT and TO-MORROW NIGHT
MATINEE: To-MORROW at 5 p.m.



AT &.

Maureen O'HARA—Dick HAYMES-—Harry JAMES
in “DO YOU LOVE ME” in Technicolor
A 220th Century-Fox Picture.

MATINEE: THURSDAY at 5 p.m.
THURSDAY NIGHT at 8,30
Tyrone POWER—Jean PETERS
t

in “CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE,” in Technicolour.
A 20th Century-Fox Picture.












PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45



and 8.30 p.m.

CHAIN. LIGHTNING”

(R.K.O. Double)

Humphrey
BOGART

Eleanor
» PARKER in

Thurs. 1.30 p.m,
Ci

RIMINAL COURT

, Tom Conway — Martha O'Driscoll
DAUGHTER OF ROSIE O'GRADY ‘and i

Starring :
June HAVER—Gordon McRAE

Look for the Silver Lining Sweetheart

Zane Grey's
THUNDER MOUNTAIN

Wed. and Thurs. 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Warner's Technicolor Musical!
with Tim HOLT









PLAZA Theatre=O)STIN (DIAL 8404)

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 p.m, (Warner's Double)
“JUNE BRIDE” & “BULLET SCARS”

with Bette DAVIS with Regis TOOMEY
Wednesday 5 and 8.30 p.m. (only) | Thursday 5 and 8.30 p.m. (only)



Leo GORCEY and Bowery Boys in
Pobert MITCHUM “and others, and|| DOCKS OF NEW YORK and
DARK ALIBI
Sydney TOLER as Charlie CHAN

and

DON'T GAMBLE WITH STRANGERS
Kane RICHMOND--Gloria WARREN



Midnite Sat. 10,

LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT and RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL





=:

GATETWY—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

LAST SHOW TONITE 8.30—(R.K.O. Double)

George O’Brien (in both)
“BORDER G MAN” & “TIMBER STAMPEDE”



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 8.30 p.m, (R.K.O, Double)
Zane GREY'S

WANDERER of the WASTELAND & BROTHERS in the SADDLE

James WARREN with Tim HOLT

MIDNITE SAT. FEB, 10th (2 New Features)
RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL and DEATH VALLEY RANGERS
———<——



ROYAL

To-day and To-morrow 4.30
j and 8.30



EMPIRE

To-day To Thursday 4,45

and 8.30 United Artists Double

Columbia Pictures Presents

“ FAUST

Pat O'BRIEN and Wayne
MORRIS in

« JOHNNY
ONE-EYE”’
and
“‘ BREAKFAST
IN

AND
THE
DEVIL ”

Ging, MATIERA | Last Two Shows To-day

| 4.30 and 8.15



20th Century Fox Double

ROXY

Last Two Shows To-day
445 and 8.15 p.m,

| Wallace BEERY and
| Barbara STANWYCK in

“A MESSAGE
TO
GARCIA ”

and

Universal Pictures Presents

Maureen O’HARA —
Macdonald CAREY in

** COMANCHE
TERRITORY ”

with

“THE FOXES
OF
HARROW”
Starring

Rex HARRISON and
Maureen O'HARA

Will GEER and Charles \
DRAKE



SELECT
YOURS EARLY

St

PONT hi 93
HOLLYWOO
\ Starring with
Tom BRENMAN and Andy
Italo TAJO and Nelly RUSSELL
CORRADI with OLYMPI Cc



Bathroom Requisites

Porcelain Basins in White, Pink, Ivory and Green

Low Down Toilet Suites in White, Pink, Ivory and Green.

Chromium Soap Dishes, Tooth Brush and Tumbler Holders,

' Toilet Paper Holders,-Curtain Rings.

Brass Wove Wire, 2 ft. wide in the following meshes:—
e 120/120, 100/100, 90/90, 40/40





|

| PLANTATIONS LTD.
}


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6

. 1951

Strikes Disrupt Work Trinidad Lund Brings

On 3 Grenada Estates

From Our Own Correspondent

Wild-cat strikes have disrupted work on three estates
here this week, one lasting a day and the others three days.
The managements of the estates involved have not
received any demands either from the workers or those

claiming to represent them.

Adult Suffrage
Suggested
For B.G.

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 3.

A suggestion that a United
Kingdom Commission for the Con-
stitution Reform in British Gui-
ana should not carry out the
duties assigned to them im their
terms of reference, but should in-
stead recommend a Constitution
elected on universal adult suffrage
to be entrusted with the drafting
of a constitution for this country
‘was made to the Commission by
the People’s Progressive Party.

The Chairman of the Three-man
Commission Sir John Waddington,
disclosed this last evening. When
the Commission recefved oral evi-
denge from a five-man delegation
the Party who despite the fact
that they had picketed the arrival
of the Commission did not decline
the latter’s request to give evi-
dence, "



This was the largest attended
and most lively of many sessions
held by the Commission in vari-
ous parts of the country and in
whieh they have had constitutions
suggested to them ranging from
little change to complete self-
government. Vice-Chairman of
the Party the Hon. Dr. Cheddi B.
Jagan, stressed that the Commis-
sion had been given evidence from
one extreme to another and not
knawing particularly what. public
opinion was in this country and
not being able to evaluate what
public opinion concerning certain
persons or organizations might
represent, it would be difficult for
them to write a constitution for
this country, whereas if they re-
commended a constituent Assem-
bly this would be the basis of de-
termining what everyone wanted:
But Sir John affirmed that such a
proposal was of course not within
the Commission’s terms of refer-
ence and the meeting proceeded
to deal with the suggestions in the
Party’s Memorandum for a change
in Constitution.

The party advocated complete
self-Government with a Uni-
cameral Legislature.

The Commission with Professor
Vineent Harlow and Dr. Rita
Hinden as members expect to
leave British Guiana on February

13 on the first stage of their jour- tice Day declareq himself the only sugar to the Ministry of Food ex-

ney back to England, They arriv-
ed in British Guiana, on December
15 last.
| —C.P,



Hongkong At
The Museum

Dr. FRANK GREAVES gave an
interesting talk on Hongkong to
members of the Barbados Museum
and Historic Society when the
Society held its annual General
Meeting at its Headquarters yes-
terday.

At the end of his talk, Dr.
Greaves showed pictures illus-
trating the life of the people of
Hongkong and some of the build-
ings. He has been a prisoner of
war there,

He said that before he went to
Hongkong his knowledge of the
place was nil, It is about 52
square miles and was very vari-~
able around the sea coast. He
talked of the beauty of the har-
bour and the density of the
population. He said that it is
much more thickly populated than
Barbados.

It has one city, Victoria and
in the lowland the temperature
is usually about 92 degrees and
then one goes up to higher land
which is called the Peak and
which is much cooler. He said
that all of a type of business is in



LOWEST fare
to MONTREAL
$259." awi

Call your Pan American 6ffice
and ask for this low-fare routing:

BARBADOS San Juan
vie
British West Indian Airways

Total

259."

Colonial or Trans-Canada Airlines
Stop over in New York — for shopping or sightseeing!

PAN AMERICAN
WORLD AIRHAYS

PASSENGERS * MAIL * CLIPPER" CARGO

Da Costa & Co., Ltd. Broad St.
Phone 2122 (after business hours 2303)

rm, REG. PAA, INC.

Pan American World Airways
New York — MONTREAL

@ From Page 1
boy scouts took the St. John Am-
bulance examination and wore
ee hedge.
ere im Barbados, there were
o youth movements amd church lad
ISAPPOINTING CROP afid girl brigades who might be
(From Our Own Correspondent) able to take their examinations
The twenty-eighth annual ordin- 4nd do first. aid.
ary general meeting of Trinidad Otto said that it was hardly
Sugar Estates, Ltd., was held in Mecessary to point out that first
London in January. Mr, E. Cassle~ 244 and the rudiments of home
Chairman, presided, Vursing must be useful if people
The following is an extract from got foterested in thers when young
his circulated speech : P that that interest would con-
_“The crop for the year was very ie we ve baad ;
ppointing as, alt the e ua that the public
taihieee of re al should realise that the efficiency

i ; the and u ~
All that is known is that Mr. same as in the previous year, we ae og eer, -

M. Gairy, a 30-year-old obtained 1,300 tons sugar,
“ ; less of
i eget ewe sy Ave who due to the abnormally wet weati- still oe: wae aave ae * ne
oad y . lares aan awa: oie a oe during the grind- pate pee for their éxaminations
E ; . y and make sure that the le
presented himself in turn at the “The average price realised for were fed and well } pone
estates and at his behest the sugar, including by-products, after When hurt or sick. sateen db in:
strikes were on. deducting the levies of £2. 18s. per _ He said that the Order of St,
It was Mr. Gairy’s Manual and ton under the Trinidad Sugar In- John Eye Fund which was started
Mental \Workers’ Union which dustry Special Funds Ordinance, bY Lady Bushe was not as big as
staged the strikes in the island’s 1948, was £30. 6s., compared with it was. Its purpose was to assist
southern cane~belt quring last £27. 1s. Id. last year, but the cost peruse. to obtain glasses and the
year, eventually resulting in the of production rose to £26. 19s, 8d, St, John Brigade was so inter-
holding of an Arbitration over per ton, against £22. 3s. 9d. so that @Sted in anything to do with the
which Sir Clement Maione pre— the profit per ton of sugar was ri: ie it soon started a Hospi-
sided, assisted by Mr. Quintin £3. 6s, 4d. against £4. 17s. 4d. in “tyre Rope Chan ;
O’Connor and Hon. H. A. Cuke. 1949. As a result of this and the fy i silence: is the

Sugar
Estates

ST, GEORGE'S, Feb. 3.

The affected estates were Bel-
mont, St. Patrick’s, owned by Mr.
Norbert Nyack, where the work-—
ers were out on Monday, and La
Sagesse, St. David’s, owned by
Mr. Louis Strauss, and Hope, St.
Andrew’s, where the walk-out
continued to Wednesday.





Conn Secretary and Treasur
This tribunal awarded cane work- smaller crop, the profit in Trini- of thie zon eee
ers a higher rate of pay than dad fell by £23,439 and the net Sire aan cine ariaete
agricultural workers on cocoa and Profit from £47,891 to £24,695. and he was therefore making an
nutmeg estates in view of the ab- £16,462 in Taxes appeal in that direction.
sence of certain privileges which Out of the net profit for the ir Otto said that the Countess
accrued to the latter, such as free year of £24,695 we have to put Of Brecknock would be remaining
fuel, cheap provisions, and easy aside as much as £16,462 for taxa- in the West Indies at the conclu-
gardening facilities, tion. This high proportion is:due Sion of their joint tour to visit
Agree on Bonus primarily to the fact that it has the Leeward and Windward
Before the Arbitration, the always been our policy to provide Frage fart Peal ach oo rare
: ° e
Trades Union Council, of ‘which a ef buldttien thane Sepreci= smaller islands in the West Indies
e M.M.W.U.has scorned mem— , while he would be returning home.
bership, entered an agreement Chinery, etc., so that we can have ;
with the Agricultural Employers’ the funds available for capital re~
Society on behalf of non-cane ene when needed. Also, Must P. ay £5 For
workers to accept 4 bonus above WRGCT eco eee i aw eee Steali Ss
the gtatutory, minimum wage, for income-tax purchase on plant Stealing, Stock Feed)
of the price of cocda. This agree- “74 machinery, the cost of which Livingston Bourne of Kensington
ment has workéd satisfactorily, '%,reimbursed out of the rehabili- New Road, St. Michael was yes-
but is reviewable quarterly, and ‘#tion account. The amount pro- terday found guilty by His Wor-
au wy, 2 ided in th its for di i- shi i
an impression created is that the ¥ in the accounts for depreci~ ship Mr. H. A. Talam, Police Mag.
current quarter’s borias having ation is therefore considerably istrate of District “A” of stealing
recently anobped balow ie last eee ped perpe Pes med for o bag. Fre feed ae at
bie ae a docking of pay. — The financial position of the Tudor. eee
_The M.M.W.U. is now begin— company continues to be sound, He was ordered to pay a fine
ning to invade the cocoa-nutmeg the surplus of current assets ovet of £5 by monthly instalments of
estate worker arena and, more- cyrrent liabilities and provisions £1 or in default two months’ im-
over, Mr. Gairy is also President peing £146,450, compared with prisonment with hard labour. The
of a companion Grenada People’s ¢149,122 last year. offence was committed on January
Party, which he claims is out to Satisfactory Crop Expected 20.
capture every elected seat at the So far as the prospects for the a se
next general election for th€ coming crop are concerned, the £5 FOR WOUNDING
Legislative Council. His visit to manager reports that the cultiva- Salome Herbert of Spooners
Trinidad was to see Hon. T.U-B-. tions are in good order and the Hill, St. Michael was yesterday
Butler, who has promised to come tonnage of canes to be reaped wiil ordered to pay a fine of £5 by
over shortly on “very serious pe approximately the same as last Mr. H, A. Talma in monthly in-
business”, year. Provided that the juice is stalments or in default two months’
This is along march from hormal and we are able to reap imprisonment with hard labour,
strikes, but it backgrounds the the whole of the canes, I hope that for wounding Elaine Beckles on
future. In recent months, Gairy we shall have a satisfactory crop hs
has more or less dominated local for the year. Mr. H. A. Talma, before whom
platforming and s a nae The present arrangement for the ee, einai ean ~~ adewecs
Square demonstraticn on Armis- sale of the whole of our export thing to do to a person ahd if
shé praia appéar again she would
be_in for ‘ ” trouble.

leader of the workers in Grenada pirés in 1952, and last summer
and first politician, not even negotiations took place bétweén
second to Marryshow who was the United Kingdom Government
then in Englang attending the and the Dominion and Cotonial
Commonwealth Parliamentary producers for a long-term agree-
Association Conference. = after ee a a a ha —
ince then at a public meeting the United Kingdom Governmen i

ou of Dr. i . B. Morgan, have agreed to purchase from 1953 STOLE POSTS: FINED 10]-
Grenada-born M.P., Hon. T, A. to 195%, inclusive, 670,000 tons of — A:fine of 30/- to’be paid in 28
Marryshow has dared any man or Sugar from the B.W.I. Colonies at days or in default one month’s
any combination of forces to un- & reasonable price to be negotiated imprisonment with hard labour
seat him in the constituency he each year, based on efficient pro- Was imposed on 40-year-old
has held for 25 years. “I am not duction, and the remainder of tne bangs James Wiltshire of Bank
so craven, sa spent, go degenerate export quota of 230,000 tons allot- Hall, St. ae, i a A

tt said Marryshow, that I will ted to the B.W.1. will have to be od latte tee. Weve SS:
7 t rinciplés. to get the sold at the world price ruling at aune ait a charge of larceny.

= ca at ne who I fee] the time. The prosperity of the tsh: a a quantity of
support of | allyone Wn? nada sugar industry id he B.W.1. is Ween poste belonging to. Jobn
SEs Oe eae We ” essential for the welfare of these Fletcher which were on the Pier
and for the West Indies.” Earlier loniés, which are mainly depen- Head sometime on February 5.
there had been rumours that Gace on: omer The posts are valued at 4/6.
Gairy would not oppose Marry— be : ae eee

show out of sympathy for his past ‘ J WANT MORE FLOUR
t ur indent)
wate: Britons Wanted waa Ss ee)
‘ As demand for flour becomes
In South Africa heavier in Jamaica, the Trade
JOHANNESBURG, Control authoritiés Have under
South African firms ure having consideration an application for

Bee! that in a dispute
Herbert bit her on her lip. The
offenee was committed on January
26.







BIG WIND
MOOSEHORN, Man.
The wind here was so strong
that a section gang’s jigger was

the tracks. ;
wt i 20 tone gang caught They see thousands emigrating Wheat Agreement for the cur-

i e after an eight-mile to Australia, Canada and New rent wheat year which expires
chase bar reckerage 2 Zealand and are having to take around the end of July,
Germans instead, At present the island's con-

In 1947-8 it was estimated that sumption of flour is around 1,250,-

from Britain.





the same street.

Peak, he said. Up there they just Scores of thousands did. Then Dr. lowed a year ago.
drop to pieces. Some fishermen Malan’s Government discouraged
of Hongkong never touch land in
their life. They always live in, a trickle.
'their ‘boats in the sea.

—L.E.S. ber, last year.

hee)



Free breathing is restored just by
breathing the‘ Mentholatum’ vapours.
Also rub ‘Mentholatum’ liberally on
your throat and chest. This breaks

vapours up congesti bio _ se the
~ open most obstinate Catarrh. Quick—get
San Juan — New York & jar or tin of ‘Mentholatum’ to-day.

via

via



ASK FOR REAL
MEN-THO-LAY-TUM

Only 7
The Menthalatum Co. Ltd.,
(Est. 1889) Slough, England.




















1 a million people in Britain, wantec 000 bags counter and baking flour.
One cannot keep books on the to emigrate to South Africa. An increased allocation was al-

This move ts considered neces-
immigration and the figures fell tu sary owing to emergency releases
following the flood rains of Octo-

* BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Police Give

Lorry Drivers

ORRY DRIVERS are now be-

ing given leaflets by the
Police Force.

The Commissioner of Police told
the Advocate yesterday that they
have started an intensive cam-
paign checking on lorries con-
nected with the sugar industry.

Extra Police patrols are on the
roads

drive

any driver who does not

with due care and regard

for the ‘safety of others will be
brought before the Courts.

“We hope that these drivers
realise the old saying: “Haste
makes Waste”. It is better to
drive slowly and do less trips than
to drive furiously and be brought
before the Courts,” the Commis-

sioner said.

HIEVES are cycle

owners much worry. Some
cyclists told the Advecate yester-
day that they find it impossible
to leave their cycles unattended
for a few minutes. When they
return some part is missing.

On the other hand a Policeman
said that it is extremely hard to
cope with petty thefts such as the
taking off of head lamps, genera-
tors or even
removing of

causing

in some cases the

saddle. One thing
is certain, 9 €yclists can prevent
their cycles from being stolen by
placing locks on them or leaving
them in ,a safe place.

While Robert Braemar of White
Park Road was at the Empire
Theatre on Sunday the generator
of his cycle was stolen. On Fri-
day night while two men were
watching a double at the Royal
Theatre their generators were also
taken off.

A cycle owned by Blair Forde of
Beckles Hill, St
stolen while Forde attended the
Olympic Theatre on Saturday.
The cycle was left at the Theatre.

Another cycle, owned by Syd-
ney Goddard of Fairchild Street,
St. Michael was stolen from the
Zanzibar Club on Sunday,

ARION BUTCHER of Man-
sion Road, Bank Hall report-
ed that her home was broken and
entered between 11.00
Friday and 5.30 a.m. on Satur-
day and a quantity of articles,
total value $39.88, stolen. So far
$22 worth have been recovered,
The restaurant of Cardinal
Trotman of Fairchild Street was
also broken and entered on Sat-
urday. A quantity of cigarettes
and whiskey, valued $31.50, was
stolen,

T WAS Carnival

yesterday and at
Barbadian dressed up.
a woman. She passed through
Broad Street around mid-day
dressed in slacks and wearing a
hat nearly two feet long. The hat
was decorated with bits of paper
of many colours,

IXTY-YEAR OLD ADA

DEANE of Bay Street left
homeé on Saturday and has not yet
returned. The Police are making
investigations,

Michael, was

p.m, on

in Trinidad
least one
This was

DEACONS PLAYGROUND

and pavilion, opened on Fri-

day afternoon, have a neat and at-
tractive appearance.

The cost of the pavilion was only
$700 owing to the limited financial
resources of the Housing Board
and to the fact that everyone in-
terested in the movement gave
some help and asked for no pay-
ment.

CLARKE’S “BLOO

Cleanse the
impurities ;

system
many

neuritis, pimples,










Leaflets To





light sure steering gives complete control and reduces driving fatigue. In
addition to all these features there is, of course, the traditional MORRIS
, ctaftemanship which means reliability, long life aud low upkeep costs,

Vee Shirts
Hath

Ladies”

Suits

Shoris

Brassieres

Stockings

Scarves

Sun Dresses

Hlouses

Skirts

Coats

Blankets

Slippers

Zipps

Cosmetic Bags

Parasols

House Coats

Children’s
Sandals

Children’s
Anklets

Rain Coats

Habies” Diapers

Helis

Plastic Aprons

Plastic Head

Ties
“Toa

THE MODERN
Dress Shoppe

BROAD STREET





MIXTURE”

from blood
sufferers
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
boils,
minor skin ailments, can derive great
benefit from this well-known medicine.

from

sores and

In LIQUID or TABLET FORM

Fowered, } von PERFORMANCE...

S%yled, con COMFORT..,
Losigned FOR SAFETY

The New MORRIS Six is @ car with a brilliant performance . . . due to its
powerful overhead cumshaft six-cylinder engine. It is a car of beautifal
comfort ... all seats are within the wheelbase and the deep upholstery
is resiliently sprung, It is a safe car... independent front suspension
means excellent road-holding. Lockheed hydraulic brakes give positive
smooth stopping, wide clear vision gives full views of road and traflic, and

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phorie 2385

Sole Distributors

Phone 4504





“

i





PAGE THREE







B Pour some
“Windolene'on a
soft tag

Sparkling glass

For twice the shine in;













SD Polish tightly
that’s alt

2 Spread it over
the glass and
give it a moment

om sy |
“iy Gl
Wi=

half the time, jast use
Windotene, Grease,
dirt and fly marks go
in a flash and leave
yourglass sparkling
and spotlessly clean.



oY

Windolene

cleans Ylass easily é quickly ha =

EXPECTANT MOTHERS/

Make baby strong—so he can be
an important future citizen
You need more A&D Vitamins now

to help

re bebe sea bones and @ —~ toayetad
elp our own stamina and energy.

Scott's akiteion regularly. See how SASS

you feel all during expectancy.

FOR WINDOWS, MIRRORS,
BATHS, REFRIGERATORS— :
tM FACT ANY GLAZED ve ;
















more than just a tonie~
it's POWERFUL NOURISHMENT

Scott's Emulsion is a scientific
tonic, rich in natural A&D
Vitamins, a wonderful help when
you need it, It's economical, good-
tasting.

: - Lh aa
PTL

WIGH ENERGY FOOD TONIC













FREIGHT
SERVICES
lo and from



———

ae VW~ -

Regular Services
Save Time



BERMUDA
LISBON
LONDON

Also Connecting Services to the whole World, p

12.15
24.45
29.00 hrs.

ote

w

ITS’ FASTER BY FAR BY SPEEDBIRD,
Book through your local
BO.A.C, Forwarding Agent

who makes no charge for

advice, information or book~

ings by “Speedbird” to all "Hue:
siz continents,
-- -









BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS

BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED
Airways House, Bridgetown

CHECK YOUR

FACTORY
SUPPLIES —

and Phone early
for the following

DUNLOP TRANSMISSION BELTING 3%” x 4 Ply ;
DUNLOP RUBBER INSERTION %/ & 1-16" t ‘ ;
DICK’S PACKINGS all Types oe oe ’
BELT FASTENERS y
BELT DRESSING

FLAKE GRAPHITE
STENCIL INK

COTTON WASTE

BASS BROOMS

STEEL WIRE BRUSHES
EMERY & SANDPAPER
FILES All Types

TAPS & DIES ie
HACKSAWS & HACKSAW BLADES 5 x
ENGINEER’S HAMMERS — ¥

OPEN END & BOX SPANNERS

TAPER & STRAIGHT SHANK HIGH SPEED DRILLS

oe

4-lb., 4-Ib., 14-lb., 19-lb., 24%-Ib., 3-Ib. i’
STILLSON TYPE WRENCHES 8”, 10”, 14”, 18”, 24”,
CHAIN PIPE WRENCHES %4”—4” we
4
3 : yy

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET PIAL 4268


PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS 9 ADVOGATE |

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid, Broad 8t., Bridgetown.
angen

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

‘Operation Friendship”

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1951









Record Yield From
Borneo Oilfield



D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD.

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS

LONDON. at THE COLONNADE



By HA .
Tuesday, February 6, 1951 oN te P . ZEL MAY furnishing. Centrally-heated mod- {
‘ Most pressing problem for in- r z - ’ - k burbs j
tending Festival of Britain visi- weekly, and another cottage beirig Ct flats im blocks in the su . -

tors this an id where to siny advertised in Sussex some dis- tun to 15 and 16 guineas weekly. (From Our London Correspondent)
FIN ANCE People from the Colonies with no @nee away from a railway line is Put in the East End suburb of LONDON. . Usually NOW |

Aw ams relations in this country are be- ©9438 for four and a half guineas; Bromley-by-Bow, a four-roomed ; . : 4 .
; ioc’ ‘otead It is also cheaper to take a house “2t wili only cost eight or nine] Qil production from Seria in Brunei, Tins BROOKS PEARS 55

ginning to wonder whether their
leave is going to be altogether tco
costly this year, with the rumour-
ed high prices of accommodation
during the Festival.

This week I set out to get some
facts and figures on the situation, ®
lL interviewed house agents in Lon-

in those counties that are not with- suineas a week. x y * 7
in such convenient distance of . London agents claim that the Nerth Borneo, has now reached a record rate

London. There are \good houses ices quoted on their books os of 100,000 barrels per day — nearly five

to be had in Somerset and Dorset no higher ‘than last year, but); i

in summer for six, even and eight “though thts would seem to be times that of the best pre-war days.

uineas weekly, tree of the more expensive flats} Seria, already the most productive field
in the British Commonwealth, has reached

THE transfer of the Financial Secretary
of this island to the post of Accountant
General in Kenya serves to focus attention
on the necessity for change in the offices
dealing with finance.

Tins BATCHELOR PEAS 24
Bottles COCKTAIL CHERRIES 55



A» Kenya man who wrote to cealt with by such firms, it —
i ° ry, Britain for a house agent’s list was evident that.there has been a sharp | * . _ | Z0SSSS9S9S99595995995595559955905
Fate tie ce et i appalled to find a house near Bog- tise in the more ordinary private-|its peak despite the havoc of war damage;

i i iv. isi nor quoted at 40 guineas a week. Jy-let type of flat, for Festival | ; ‘ : iid i im-
found thal country” -accommoda- Hamptons, who a agents for year. It was not impossible to get it was twice demolished first in 1941, im
i

tion is no

For some time now there has been a
vacancy in the post of Colonial Treasurer

a aan wena haw eee

*

and more recently that of Auditor General.
It had been suggested in the past that the

any other year, but London prices ™e¢ that this could not be said to
are up a little — yet there are still be “typical.”

ways to get round that, London

“This. type of residence is in-

lest year fer round about the four-
guinea—a—week mark. Today there
are few under seven.

fferent in price from, â„¢any country properties, assured 2 moderately-sized flat in London| mediately before the Japanese invaders ar-

rived, and secondly in 1945, when Austra-
lian reoccupation forces were approaching.

‘ We Have...

GALVANISE DOWN PIPES

posts of Financial Secretary and Treasurer | ectate agents may quote you prices tended for wealthy families who Best hope, for visitors wanting 7 : ars |% i WATER HEADS y
be amalgamated but the public has hot | that make you reel, but the Brit- like to take a house combining reasonably-priced ate ennea Discovered by Shell oe 1929 ag ye 2 RIDGE CAPS
béén told whether this suggestion had been | ish Travel and Holidays Associa- the advantages of countty Sie ees in London is to contact the British |of painstaking exploration in the region, BARBED WIRE
68 tion caters for the modest pocket, and entertain large house-parties Travel and, Holidays Association, this oilfield was producing at the rate of ” %

accepted. and can suggest some comfortable throughout the season,” a member which has a hard-working depart-| 11S Ol ee 8 ” MESH WIRE : 3 :
and moderately-priced alterna- of their staff ben see ee a a 4 _ — i taen ever one million tons per annum by 1940; a”, 16, 144”, 1% ’

ives. house would proba include a pected to be the mammo hy : ,

Another suggestion made in the Legisla- “\Kirst I. examined the position well-laid-out Firden and its own lem of festival accommodation, | at that time nearly 150 wells had been s er Geuae ,
ture was that the office of Financial | with regard to furnished houses private beach. There is a demand Actually the demand for accom-| drilled, some of them off-shore. The Japa- ears veUg ae
. : ; in the southern counties within for this type of property in well- modation has fallen far short of anus attecnte % work the ares wane’ feb “i WOVE WIRE — 24” and 36 ’
Treasurer be head of the financial depart- easy reach of London, likely to known holiday areas like Bognor the supply. P r CHAIN 4%”, 3-16”, 44”, & 5-16” %

ment with a chartered accountant as, head
of the accounting department.

It will be realised that in those. colonies
where the financial departments have been
kept together the post of Treasurer and
that of Auditor have not been abandoned
but were kept as junior offices.

The comment has been made that the
post of Financial Secretary was unneces-
sary in a place like Barbados where the
pre-audit system had been adopted for so
many years. One Governor in an address
at the opening of the Legislative Session
pointed out that the time had come when
there should be a financial expert to advise
the Government in the policy of spending
and that he would not be responsible for
the handling of the complicated matters
of finance.

When Mr. H. S. Jemmott retired from
the post of Auditor General it was known
that if Mr. Newsam succeeded him he too
would retire in a short time. Both these
events have come to pass and now the
Office of Financial Secretary has become
vacant. If there is to be an amalgamation
of any two or all of these offices it might
well be discussed now by the Legislature
and a decision taken.

The old methods of handling the admin-
istration of these departments are not now
conducive to efficiency. The office of Col-
onial Treasurer has been maintained
separately and outside the Civil Establish-
ment because of the fallacious belief that
the House of Assembly could by this
means control the purse strings of the
colony. The truth of the situation was that
the actual financial control has always
been exercised by the Auditor General
who under the statute could refuse to sign
any voucher for funds from the Treasury
unless he was satisfied that it was in order.
And the Treasurer, except in the case of
warrants by the Governor in Executive
Committee, could not disburse any funds
except the payment was certified by the
Auditor General.

The time is suitable for a review of the
position in view of the fact that all three
of these offices are now vacant.



Playing Fields

attract Colonials with families on in the season.

A good average

long leave. I found that houses in house should not cost more than
Sussex, Bucks, Surrey and Herts 20 to 25 guineas weekly in the
were more expensive than those reason, or 15 guineas out of season.
in Kent and Essex, which are not Two or three miles from the sea

on the electric line with its fre-
quent train services to Town, It
is easier to get a fair-sized house
—say four or five bedrooms—than
it is to get a two-roomed cottage.
The latter are seldom on an
agent’s books for short-term let-
ting, as they are snapped up as
permanent residences by tax-
stricken Britishers whenever they
are on the market.

Another point is that visitors
who rent a house for a_ short
period — four to six months for
example — suffer financially as
they pay a higher rent than people
who take a house for nine months
to a year. In the latter case an
agent will quote much more rea-
sonable terms, So if a number of
people following one another on
leave can arrange to occupy the
same house over a longer period,
they are likely to benefit consid-
erably.

A furnished house in the Home
Counties with four to five bed-
rooms will cost you eight to ten
guineas out of season, but any-
thing up to 30 guineas in season,
the average being about twenty
guineas, But I was assured this
sharp rise in the summer is not
particular to Festival year, On
the other hand, rents in Kent and
Essex and the more inaccessible
parts of the Home counties ard
considerably lower. It is possible
to get a very nice bungalow or
small double-storied house here
for three to four guineas, with a
maximum of five, Nor are these
properties so likely to rocket in
the season. They would be only
a little higher in price, One agent
had a very nice small house in
Essex going for three guineas

houses would be very much
cheaper than that.”

He added a warning to be borne
in mind by other holiday-makers
locking for “a niece country cot-
tage in Surrey or Sussex.” Don’t
look for a period cottage unless
you are prepared to pay well for
the privilege of antiquity,” he
advises. “These are the most ex-
pensive cottages on the market
feo every rich tourist from
the States looks for something at
least three centuries old.” .

South coast agents reported no
inerease in bookings because of
the Festival. Their prices were no
different from last year’s. You
ean take your family to the sea-
side for as little as three to five
suineas for a _ three-bedroomed
rouse if you are content with one
of the back roads in a resort town,
but a view of the sea will cost you
ten guineas, or even twenty in the
height of the season,

What is the position in London?
Trevor & Sons, leading London
estate agent, quoted modern West
End flats on his books at 20 to 25
guineas weekly—“high prices be-
cause of all the service given in
such. apartments’”—and houses in
the West End ranging from 15
guineas weekly for a two-bed-
roomed housé, to 20 to 30 guineas
weekly for. a. three-bedroomed
house,

Suburban flats are not plentiful.
Self-contained two-room flats ara
hardest of all to find. The ‘con-
verted” type in a private house
vary between five, eight and
twelve guineas for two or. three
bedroomed-flats, according to the
neighbourhood and standard of



Here a small staff has been
working feverishly for weeks in
rocms where the telephones sel-
dom stop ringing, and office tables
sug under the weight of corre-
spendence—all offering rooms and
flats to»Festival visitors, Enormous
lists and a complicated filing sys-
fem have been evolved, and every
entry filed’ away under separate
headings. Gfeat paigs are being
taken to ensure that visitors will
be happy where they are ‘billeted.’

At. first ‘this looked like a
straightforward job of listing
rooms acedording to prices, but
now it has developed on the lines
of a sort’ of “Operation Friend-
ship.”

The profit motive, say the ac-
commodation specialists, is not
operative here. The people who
are throwing open their homes
to strangers are not out to get
their dollars. They just want to
make friends with people from
Commonwealth lands, from Amer.
ica or from the Continent—in that
order.

“Most of them are middle-aged
people living in comfortable sub-
urban homes’; a member of the
statf told me yesterday. “Now
their families have grown up
and moved away, Mum and Dad
find: the ‘house is a bit big
for them. . Life gets a bit empty
then, so they think how nice it
would be to have some overseas
visitors — a fresh point of view,
scmeone who will perhaps bring
a new chain of friendships. with
them, and someone to take round.

Now the Association's main
headache is whether the expect-
ed visitors will come to the Fes-
tival. They have accommodation
for some 10,000° people at any
time during the Festival, but so
far enquiries are still in the hun-
dreds, ;

British West Indian Free

(By a Special Correspondent.)

There are few people, if any,
of those living in, or having deal-
ings with the British West Indies,
who would oppose the conception,
of the proposed Customs Union,
with free trade between the sev-
eral territories and uniform duties
on goods imported from outside,
The annoyances and anomalies
created by the diverse customs
arrangements of the territories
concerned are well known and
often criticised. A woman who has
been away on holiday returns to
Barbados from Trinidad with the
new hat she was so delighted to
find there—and finds herself asked
to pay a duty of 10 per cent of its
cost. The Canadian exporter who
sends down consignments of paper
by C.N.S. steamer to the islands
of the Eastern Caribbean finds
himself searching nine different
customs schedules and providing

| Trade :

led the Commission. to describe
customs union as “both practicable
and economically desirable.”

One of the main objects of union
is to encourage local industry by
providing a wide area for whieh
production can, be planned with-
cut the hindrances of tariff bar~-
riers and.cther restrictions. Al
most all industrial countries have
in the early stages built up thei:
industries on the foundation of a
large home market, and if the
British West Indies are to be in-
dustrialised a similar foundation
is required. Such industries as
cement in Jamaica, hardware in
Trinidad, soap and margarine in
Barbados, are going to have far
better chances of success with a
home market of three million
persons than with a market of a

Ho by ”

art Webs
measure liké customs union there
are bound to be some elements

too successful, although they did renew pro-
duction on a small scale. ;

By the end of 1945 Shell technicians had
started re-drilling, and in March, 1946, the
first post-war cargo of crude oil was shipped
for refining in Australia.. On Christmas Day,

1946, Lutong Refinery in Borneo itself, and $

only some 30 miles by pipeline from Seria,
came back into operation, and since that
date progress has been rapid. The greater
part of the new equipment on the oilfield
has been obtained from sterling sources.

Included in-the restoration work was the
construction of two new submarine oil load-
ing lines, or “Sealines”, each three miles
long, and used to load tankers which are
prevented by shallow water from going
closer inshore. A third line is due to come
into operation this year.

A modern township, including a school,
hospital and social and sports club, is being
built for the staff and labour, numbering
almost 5,000 on the narrow coastal strip bor-
dering the South China Sea, only five. miles
from the jungle.

Geographically, Seria is of vital impor-
tance, being one of the principal producing
fields of the East Indies, the only region of
the Far East producing crude oil in any
quantity. Australia, New Zealand and
Malaya, to name only three countries, rely
to a large extent on the East Indies for their
supplies of liquid fuels.



| “Mutual Exclusiveness”

In Mauritius

Sir Hilary’s Island
(From. Our London Correspondent)

A budget surplus, a record sugar crop, a

which will be, or will appear ta| Yar free of cyclones, success in sight in the
be, in some degree prejudicial to] campaign to eradicate malaria, better social

some individual interest or other,

Secondly there is the idea that}Services — all these material blessings fell

regional free trade must adversely}tg Mauritius in 1949.
j Governor of Mauritius.

affect the local revenue of each
territory. This is true in the sense

Sir Hilary Blood is
The Colony’s an-

that certain sources of revenue|nual report, published this week, tells the

will be cut off—Barbados, for

example, will lose its import} Story.

duties on rice, matches and copra
which are all regional products
Put the Commission makes pro-

Politically, however, the Island has not
settled down to the conditions created by

posals for countervailing excise}the grant of a new Constitution and “that

Cuties which should serve to min 4

imise the loss of revenue on
petroleum, the most important
regional product, and certain other
items of regional trade. Apart
from that, the tariff recommended
by the Commission is specially
designed ta; provide more or less
the same net revenue as is now
collected. What is lost on regional

mutual exclusiveness which is a marked
feature of Mauritian social life continued
to act as a brake on progress”, says the report.

The first session of the new Legislative
Council, described in the report as an “en-
durance record”, lasted from September



WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd. .

Successors To

C.S. PITCHER & CO.

» Phones — 4472, 4687,



NOW'S THE TIME
TO SELECT

DA COSTA & CO., LTD. — Acents.

YOURS.





oF A a a

YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO BUY

ALL WQOL

BLANKETS

AT BELOW PRESENT DAY COST

: WE OFFER :

WHITNEY ALL WOOL

BLANKETS

THE general public and especi for duty at nine different rates, 10 few hundred thousands. In turn, Products will be regained on im- 1948 to December 1949! The Council met ' "

ick 8 P : expecially the say nothing of surtaxes and pack: successful local industries soon. ports from outside the region. We| on 79 occasions, disposed of 70 bills, and 22 coeen ey to, ee ee
eric et enthusiast _ will welcome the age taxes, and then has to com~ Jead to cheaper products and to a Must at this point observe how ; ay A ; Sizes 72" x 90" at $10.22
decision of the Government to purchase | Plete nine quite different import higher standard of living for the unfortunate it is that the Com: private members’ motions. The Govern- Sizes 80" x 96" at $12.62

the Carrington’s Village plot of land for a
playingfield.

This field has been in use for many years
as an unofficial cricket ground but since the
Welches property changed hands the fate
of the ground was uncertain. Members of
the teams who had been playing there for
many years signed a petition and sought





ane neoaatseanainetshgapeiptanise cements) tien i naar

entry forms, maybe followed by
nine different forms of claim for
abatement of duty. And so on all
round. This sort of thing is not
only vexatious but also costly and
bad for trade.

Similarly, everyone probably
sees the benefits of inter-island
free trade. Under it Barbados and
Trinidad merchants will be able
io develop their sales to visitors



common man.

The other eventual advantage
of establishing a large free trading
region is in the long run more
important still—it is the bargain-
ing power created. by such a re-
gion. No exporting country is
likely to go out of its way to make
trade concessions to a single small
island, but many may wish to do
so whem a market of three million



mission drafted its trade classifi-
eation and tariff structure at a
time when the best available
model was the League of Nations
Uist of 1938. Since the Commis-
sion’s work was finished, an im-
proved classification hag been
issued, for general and interna-
tional use under the auspices of
the United Nations; the 1938 classi-
fication is now superseded, and
the work of the Commission will



ment faced some 400 parliamentary quec-
tions and 100 divisions were taken.
King-cane, a new sugar plant, has been
mainly responsible for producing three
record yearly crops since 1947. The 1949
yield of 416,000 tons, valued at £ 11,926,263,
topped the previous year by 24,000 tons.
King-cane grows on land hitherto covered





:

»y

SECURE YOURS NOW FROM
DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT

we



SLO OIF PPO

*,
x
.
x

4,

PDDODOSSF SSS DOSS SSO SSG ISIS SSS SS OSSOS SOS SS OSS SPSS SSS SO SSSSSSSSSS

interviews with those whose duty i and buyers from other islands, consumers, is involved. By cus- in this matter have to be revised,| in scru
ene ty. it was | White the producers of fruit and toms union the strength of all the On the othér hand it is no doubt 7 b and regarded as unprofitable for OPP PSS SSS SOOO S DOOD ODS P ODODE VOP DEP DPPOOOPE
ecide the fate of the ground. vegetables in those islands will be twelve participating territories to the good that most’ West Indian planting. Two more new varieties of cane x j z ;
Despite the uncertainty they continued } £ ble to develop their shipments, accrues to each one of them, and territories have not already adopt-|} have had preliminary tests which su ts} s %
to keep the ground in orde d th free from burdensome formalities their voice will be increasingly ed the outmoded classification, h : , ggests |X & i
& order an e new and exactions, to the benefit of felt in relation to international and will therefore have to change that they are superior to King-cane, adds the * x ;
owners continued to allow them to use it. ie baa in Barbados and trade agreements, their arrangements twice. Report. . % %
. . . @
Their perseverance has been rewarded. ee Roe boii a at these immediate and ‘The thirds reason why customs} Malaria, an old enemy of the Colony, was|% S
: tat ose are the types of immedi- prospective advantages in view, union has béen delay a} >
ee. they will have the playfield establish ate advantages to be expected then, why was a customs union cimply inertia, cane tg Diy reduced to a low level of incidence as a >
ed and put in proper order. from customs union, but it was not formed long ago? We suppose Bay Conference took place there result of an intensive campaign directed by | % :
This is evidence of the need for those prospective advantages of a much there are really three reasons. was no regional meeting of sim- the Colonial Insecticid c ‘ x
ho would ask for help to fi hel broader and more far-reaching First there is a natural reluctance jlar standing and it was nobody’s js ACIGES ommittee ap- x |
Ww s r help to first help them- nature which led the distinguished of a legislature to divest itself of business to promote this obvious pointed in November 1948. > 2
selves and an indication of the Govern- West Indians who formed the fis: any part, however small, of its measure, of which it has been On the t d i x
ment’s titantion’ 6 SabRt tavinofelde 3 cal Sub-Committee at the Montes» powers. or to promote measures ctated, with what seems good e tea production front, a feature of 3
rake pply playingfelds in Bay Conference to urge the ap- other . than those designed reason, that “probably no other the year were trial consignments sold to the} $ =
order that those who want them can have pointment of the Customs Union directly ‘to benefit its own single reform would “bring. such Ministr f Food ie x
opportunity for clean, healthy sport fn heen lished we hich Scat at ith notaries ceeee’. ae ee ke ce a, es S
, nN ‘ jus n published, and which denied that in a_ far-reaching cerned.” ig: {| market. x
mater is ne > ; : .
ee % * . TS :
Our Readers Say: Daylight Saving es 3
4 ” . WASHINGTON : ° 7 be
AW EAE , : “i! Maracaibo ha r f > g
ening deaminose: Tact ; oe Venezutela’s name‘and fortune . Vi l J, I V ; Re ao ee aes .
: Cricket Broadcast SIR. a . ce een dis both stem from terrid Lake Mar; enesuela he ul e enice er oe, ~S eit Be —— . 3
6 the Edi , leader writer awicte the Tacaibo, southern extension’ of tha : By iy clicmiiaan tenia aecmnmea tie *
TMD Guirasur save that unless can Seaver ieee Geet income Bay of Venezuela’ which deeply ‘M¢,modern Republic got its name. water area of six or more times ee ie erat tb Repu: x
the Governor, who I understand, what was, (apart from _ petrol ar c tN Ga fotahe al ye cdasnenioch waue ee tiie pics revenue shakin it the ome Laat DDARDS RESTAURANT :
sac i Aaestry Paddy ha most coast. ar acalbos watets. Sour i ica: te ;
has the power «to grant a license, rationing) the most unpopular me eae oe wae aS centuries before the Machine Age Oil derricks are thickest in a American nation completely free} x
ee — a no eee of war ee measure * Barbados. I} yegion's profile along eth that of it meant little, however, so rey ae ake along the lake's eran debt. >
a Ball by Ba ommentary on remernber universal satisfaction | that of nove Far cant tre east sho: ome cluster in the e shallowness of th 4 . *
the patbcoming Geisieet matches hen the scheme was abandoned Shee heen on oot such ma boid and ae Not until lar oe etal ee miles ** on which the port lies, tues DELIGHTFUL ‘MENU DAILY 3
being broadcast to the other West from high and low alike. ~ 1913--was. the ion’s fi - » While others pump e made it mecessary from the start >
Indian Colonies. If the license is Take the point of view of the ae Sane : mercial oil wall stu. Still anOmNen black crude from w as far to ship Maracaibo crude in shal- DANISH BEER SPECIAL‘ %
5 : Issued wel] after the 450th anni- SsunK. a * inland, “The Maracaibo Basin still 1 ; ai *
not granted, Barbados will be servant, of whom there are 35,000 ny th eaate decade passed before large-scale , ow—draft tankers to deep-water <
placed in a unique position, and She still had to be at work at lew chnee se f en be operations ‘began on what is “now Venn re a: Droduction ever ands ae Cet ne Daten eee COCKTAILS made with %
it will prove a most unpopular 7 a.m, But instead of dinner being! mail use Scan a likeness o¢ Known to be one of the world’s with tha we joel production, even islands of Curacao and Aruba. ENGLISH BEE 2
decision creating great dissatis- served at 7.30 p.m., it was usual- | Alonza de Ojeda and thal dates major deposits of crude péetroleim. new Welle far to the wear conte There it is processed in two of * “GOLD BRAID” ¥
f n throughout the West In- ly 8.30 as it was impossible io get} 1499—1949. It was in October, .,Catibbean tidewater flows and la is the world’s second largest ON eects. LER Mest "TOARGTIOT TR peeniinilininintiesintibinianiatine = eS
dies. id ae the men home earlier. 1499—seven years efter Columbus ©PbS, along the shallow, narrow exporter of oil, after the. United eiaeces onto big ccean-going — x
‘If all the other Colonies includ- Then it was impossible to get|found the New World—that de strait om which the booming port States, New wells aré beimg con- — ‘ STEAKS d 3
ing Grenada, St. Kitts, and St. the young children to sleep in day-|Ojeda found and explored Lako nS Maracaibo is located. It stantly added to its fields. In the past few. years, Mara- sai 8
Wimcent, can broadcast these light, and they were weary and|Maracaibo, notes the National eusere., the northern part of the : caibo port has been expanded. Old SANDWICHES FRENCH ICE 2
matches, even using Commentary fractious at such a long day. | Geographic Society. Leena lake, making’ it | Lake Maracaibo and its “larger docks have been widened, new >
Stations without let or hindrance, “The game players found the! No forests of oil derricks greeted aes ash, the southern half, fed tributaries comprise a Venezuelan plore “have “been added, aahd. the Our Specialt CREAM Fl S
surely, the state owned Cable & mat at 3 p.m. very. trying andj|the Spanish seafarers, but Indian Sime Teena 8, stays fresh : inland waterway second only to een dredged to open. the port} x 7 ~— an sah $
Wireless Ltd. should be given a vere often too tired to play long ; villages of primitive grass huts widest lente at S arenian = pd oramell Secs an eae ait tee ovaihins acl cok mma $
similar permission to do so ¢s- beiore the light was gone. built on stilts projected from the nat larg eS wet pee St, sone a Spall hoats, ferries, and call for eventual deepenirty to 38 ! x
pecially as this can be the most So do let a housewife appeal to|lake’s shores then as now. Each en eetares rsh weet ae tankers ply ite, length and breadth, feet—enough to handle big ocean = r oo 7 aw a
we have to assist. you not to revive this unponulat|was a Venezuela (little Venice), Basi Hanne en aces alge and make Maracaibo an important tankers and enable the country’s} % For RESERVA TIONS—Call 13135 &
CRICKETER. custom. HOUSEWIFE. some of the crew commented, Thus Sti oom ale ta a = for come 2.7 Sere oe a ee x $
nae . or) and-and-s . + + eGRKn!e domestically —_I.N.S. ef) OA PPA AAA DAA LG ADDL ADL ELLA 64 AD AOA AAG BA ow

AIR RMON RRR ARITR A AER

Lg AE ea RIE

sn On go ate
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6,

1951

BARBADOS MUSEUM AND Mission Case
HISTORICAL SOCIETY

AT the beginning of 1950, states the Annuai Report of

the Barbados Museum and

Historical Society, there were

241 members on the roll and at the end of the year there

were 284 members comprising:

Founders 4, Honorary

Members 4, Life Members 25, Annual Members 176, and,

Associate Members 75.

The following additions toe
Membership were made during
the year:

LIFE MEMBERS
Alan Godsall, R. DeC. O’Neale
Ronald Tree.
Annual Members
Cc. R. Armstrong; H. H.
Inniss; Dr. J. H. Bennet, jnr.;
E. C. Jackman; C. ¥. Carstairs,

C.M.G., Dr. J. A. Kernahan;
F. J. Cole; A. G.. Leacock,
M.Ch., F.R.C.S.; Mrs. E. G.
Connell; E. A. Newsam; H. C.
Connell; J. L. Nicol; F. A.
Davis; Miss E. L. Nurse; Mrs.
F. W. Floyd; Mrs. E. M.
Queree; J. H. C. Grannum;
E. C. Redman; Mrs. A. L. Gill;
Miss R. Sainsbury; 8. L.

Greaves; A. A. Seale; K. de L.
Grogan; Miss E. G. Seale; Dr.
J. W.. PF. .Harkness.. C.M.G.,
O.B.E.; Mrs. E, L. Simpson;
Rev. H. F. Hart; C. A. Skinner;

J. B. Hobson; R. V. Taylor;
G. R. Hutson; J. S: Yearwood;
Mrs, M. Yearwood.
Associaies
K. R. Broodhagen; G. A.
Leach; Miss M. I. J. Carrington;
R. J. MacLeod; Miss A. I,
Fleming; R. B. McKenzie; Mrs.
C. E. Gooding; Miss’ D. K. R.
Mahon; Miss K. C. Hawkins;

Miss P. E, Mould; Miss E. M.
Heath; Miss M. G. Payne; Mrs.
G. W. Hunt; E. C. Queree; Miss
H..A. Kellman; A. T. L. Rob—
erts;; Mrs._S. J. Kellman; Miss
D. G. Sainsbury; Miss M. La-
borde; Mrs. C. M. W. Stoute.

The Council is anxious to
increase the roll of Membership
to at least 500. Members are
asked to encourage their friends
to join the Society.

Society’s Headquarters -

During the year the row of
cells to the East of the Quad-—
rangle known as ‘Annex 8B’
adjoining the Children’s Museum,
was converted into an Art Gal-
lery to house the Wortheim
Collection of watercolours and
drawings, and for the display of
larger exhibitions than the Exhi-
bition Gallery can aecommodate,
The work was carried out under
the. supervision of Mr. Miles
Cecil of Messrs. D. M. Simpson
& Co., who kindly gave his
services without charge. The
Society is deeply indebted to Mr.
Cecil for his generous help. The
Art Gallery was opened by H's
Excellency the Governor on 10th
July, and a Loan Collection of
West Indian prints was displayed
on exhibition.

The roof of the Curator’s lodg-
ings was treated for wood anis
and wood worm by the Depart-
ment of Agriculture

Museum and Library
The Museum an@ tibrary re-
ceived a number of gifts during
the year of which the most out-
standing were : a collection of
coins of Barbados and the West

Indies by Count Alexandre
Orlowski; a holograph letter of
Governor Pinfold of Bafbados

and the draft reply of Sir George
Smith together with historical
works om Barbados by Mr, C. J
Patterson; a collection of early
spectacles by Dr. H. Harcourt
Carter; and, a collection of china
and pottery by Mr. W. Leonard
McKinstry. Three showcases were
donated by Dr, H. Harcourt Car-
ter, Messrs. Da Costa & Co, Ltd.,
and Mr. W. Leonard McKinstly
respectively. The shortage of
showeases is one of the Museum’s
most pressing needs,

During the year the Entrance
Gallery was re-arranged and re-
labelled and a_ showcase built
into one of its windows.
labelling of the Fish Gallery was
completed and a showcase with
a cupboard below was_ installed
in this Gallery. The Hall Gal-
lery was re-arranged with the
Society’s Ethnograpnical collec-
tion, much of which had not pre-
viously been exhibited, and the
labelling of this collection is now
i rogress. :
"the practice of placing a
museum object on special exhibi-
tion and the holding of a month-
ly exhibition created much inter-
est in the Museum.

The Society received a subven-
tion of £100. from the British
Council, a

The wrought iron railings pre-
sented in 1949 to the Society by
the Governor-in-Executive-Com—
mittee, have not yet been erected
in front of the Museum owing
to lack of funds.

Exhibitions And Lectures

During the year the following
artists held exhibitions of their
work at the feum: John Har-
rison, Art & Exhibitions Officer of
the British Council; Arnold Prince
and Garner Francis of Antigua;
Geoffrey Holder of, Trinidad; and,
William van Yperen, a visiting
Dutch artist. Exhibitions were
also held of a selection of draw-
ings and water colours from the
Lucy Carring Wertheim gift to the
Museum; French Colour. Prints,

indly loaned by Monsieur Le-
poet 8 French Consul-General,

ebe.
rinidad;

a. Loan Collection of



SHREDDED WHEAT
KELLOGS CORN FLAKES .

ib ALL BRAN
ENFA ROLLED OATS
QUAKER PUFFED RICE

% NESTLES THICK CREAM
DANISH THICK CREAM



COCKADE

The Te--

— WE OFFER TO-DAY —

REPO DEALS PAIRS an sds uke ees et eca seen ehoes

EAST PACK CANNED BEEF ..........-.02-eee8 eee

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Lid.

~ ,
FODSSCOSCSSOOOS SSS GE SOOO SEO GOS PE SOOO POOF FOO OSC OOH

West Indian Prints; The Barbados
Arts & Crafts Pottery Exhibition,
which included Sculpture by K. R.
Broodhagen; Caro Gill Memorial
Exhibition; Fine Printing; Picasso
to 1949, being part of the UNESCO
Travelling Print Exhibition, and,
Photographs submitted for The
Barbados Advocate Photographic
Competition.

Lectures were given at Meetings
of the Society by Mr. H. Risley
Tucker, M.A., on “Turkey,” by Mr.
C. Y, Carstairs, C.M.G., on “Fed-
eration”, by Brigadier H. A. Cour-
tenay on “Transportation”, by Mr.
Cc. C. Skeete, B.A. on “Hurri-
canes”, and by Mr. H. A. Vaughan
on “The Regime of Governor Reed
1846-1848". Courses of lectures
were also given at the Museum on
“The History of European Paint-
ing” by the Director, and on
“Architecture” by Mr. Ralph
Crowe, A.R.1.B.A., under the aus-
pices of the Extra Mural Depart-
ment of University College, West
Indies.

Other Activities

The Barbados Philatelic Society
and the Advisory Committee of
the Extra Mural Department ° of
University College, West Indies,
continue to hold meetings in the
Library. The Council was glad to
place the Library at the disposal
of visiting tutors from University
College for the purpose of inter-
viewing prospective candidates.

Future Policy

The policy of placing@ museum
oer on special exhibition and of
holding monthly exhibitions is to
continue during 1951. The label-
ling of the Ethnographical exhi-
bits in the Hall Gallery is to be
completed, and exhibits in the
Jubilee .Gallery are to be ré-
labelled. The sereen in the Li-
brary is to continue to present,
photographs and other material re-
lating to the British Common-
wealth.

During 1950, 8,490 persons vis-
ited the Museum as compared with
2,491 visitors during 1949, an in-
erease of 5,999 visitors,

Children’s Museum

The Children’s Museum had a
busy and successful year during
1950. Groups from eight schools
sent pupils regularly 4 times a
term throughout the year. During
the Easter and Summer terms
classes on “The growth of the
Map of the World” continued.
Maps were drawn by the children
and voyages of discovery marked
thereon, During the Christmas
term classes were given on “Life
Through the Ages”’—which dealt
briefly with prehistory up to the
Stone Age. Children collected
specimens of coral reel fossils.
Objects from the Museum, models
and an epidiascope were used at
the demonstrations, and showcases
in the Museum were visited to in-
spect relevant objects.

An application has been made
or a further extension of the
grant to the Children’s Museum.

Journal

The Quarterly number of the
Journal for May 1950 is the latest
to be published, consequently the
publication is still as much in ar-
rears.as it ‘was during 1949. It is
hoped to bring the Journal up to
date early in 1951.

Barbados Has
1,300 Hydrants

A HOUSE in St. Joseph or St.
Lucy would have to burn flat if
it catches afire and a tank is not
nearby. There are no hydrants in
those parishes. In Barbados there
are 1,300 hydrants, 1,001 of which
are in St. Michael.

There are 18 in St. George, 246
in Christ Church, 24 in Speights—
town, six in St. Philip and four in
St. James. The other parishes
jo not have any hydrants.

Parts of St. Michael too, where
there are many houses have no
hydrants. A house would have to
burn flat in Howells Cross Road,
the avenues in Bank Hall, New
Orleans and some other places.

Wherever a main pipe ends
there is a hydrant so sometimes
there may be two hydrants near
each other if one had been at a
spot before a main had been laid
to end near it. °

Between the Reef anda Trafal—
gar Square, putting aside alleys
there are 12 hydrants. f

The members of the Fire Brigade
have to keep the 1,300 hydrants
all over the island always clean
so that when there is a fire about
the district, there would mot be
any trouble in opening them.

niente *

$5 In The Shade

Bridgetown experienced its hot-
test day in weeks yesterday. After
a cool spell-for= the past week,
yesterday's temperattire in Bridge-
town was 85° F. in the shade.

There was scarcely any wind
‘and electric fans ae whirring
steadily in all city offices. :

Bridgetown had ond following
temperatures last week:—

ea 73.5, Saturday 82.5,
Friday 73.5, Thursday 73.5.



FINE RUM



Adjourned

THE Court of Chancery case by
which is to be decided who is the
the legally appointed representa-
tive of the local Christian Mission
Church was again adjourned yes-
terday. Next date of hearing is
Monday February 19.

The case was to have been start-
ed yesterday before His Honour
the Acting Vice-Chancellor, Mr. J.
W B. Chenery. It is expected to
be a long case, and Mr, Chenery

will shortly cease to be acting ———————

Vice-Chancellor when His Honour
the Vice-Chancellor, Sir Allan
Collymore, returns to duty.

Tf the case is started by Mr.
Chenery and is not finished by the
time that the Chief Justice re-
sumes, the latter will have to
start it all over again. In the two.
week interval before the next date
of hearing, the parties are to try
for an amicable settlement.

Parties te the suit are F. H.
Larrier and others as plaintiffs,
and D. H. Hoyte and others as de-
fendants. The plaintiffs are re-
presented by Mr. W. W. Reece,
K.C., associated with Mr. J. S. B.
Dear and instructed by Messrs,
Hutchinson & Banfield: Counsel
for the defendants is Mr. G.
Adams associated with Mr. D. H.
L. Ward and instructed by Messrs,
Carrington & Sealy.

Senior Counsel for the plaintiffs
was originally Mr. E. K. Walcott,
K.C., but Mr. Walcott is ill.

“I take it that this case appears
as if it will last a considerable
time,” said His Honour the Acting
Vice-Chancellor, as the Court
opened yesterday morning.

“That depends on the attitude
of the plaintiffs,” Mr. Adams’ re-
plied. “It is possible from a legal
point of view that it should not
last more than half an hour, but
if the attitude of the plaintiffs is
that it will develop into a long
case, it is conceivable that it will
last a considerable time, that is,
if they lead evidence and argue
on points of law.”

The Acting Vice-Chancellor :
“Is that not the normal course of
litigation?”

Mr. Adams: “Not always. It
is quite conceivable on reading
the pleadings that the Court may
take the point of view that there
is nothing whatever in this case.
I do not say that Your Honour
can take that point of view with-
out hearing evidence. My Learn-
ed Friend would have to lead evi-
dence to show what has happened
for the last three or four years.

“As soon as he has lead that evi-
dence he may agree from a legal
point of view that the case should

end.
Regrettable

“It is very regrettable that a
case of this sort should reach the
Law Courts. It not only coneerns
a religous body, but one which it
is agreed, has done some extra-
ordinarily good work in this is-
land. It seems a great pity that
the differences which have arisen
between the members of this con-
gregation should not have been
settled outside the Court.

“T do not at all retreat from the

.legal position which I am instruct-

ed is that the defendant Mr, Hoyte
is the legally appointed Superin-
tendent:of this Mission, F am pre«
pared to fight on that to the end
if I am forced to do so.

“On the other hand, I am per-
fectly willing if the other side
shows any desire to discuss the
matter in a friendly way and come
to some amicable arrangement, to
do so, so as to prevent what can
be described as the scandal of a
Christian Body fighting in the Law
Court.

Counsel and endeavour for the
sake of religion, if I may put it as
broad as that, to arrive at a settle-
ment without having to fight it out
in this building”.

The Acting Vice-Chancellor :
“T agree that it is deplorable that
a matter of this sort should reach
the Court, although it also must
be remembered that one of the
great justifications for the exist-
ence of the Court is that even a
matter of this kind can be settled
in Court in a way that perhaps it
could not be settled anywhere else.
Obviously. however, it is only a
last resort when other methods
have failed.

Hopes For Agreement

“If efforts at a settlement are
not successful, it strikes me that
the case will take a long time. Still
I do hope that it will be possible
for Counsel on both sides to per-
suade their respective clients in
the interest of the Church which
they are all, I am sure, anxious to
serve, that they try their best to
reach an agreement.

“T certainly feel that tempers
on both sides will be probably
even more exasperated if the case
is started, and then, owing to
changes in the judicial offices it
has to be begun all over again.”

Mr, Adams suggested that if a
temporary adjournment was
agreed upon it was possible that
Counsel would be able to get to-
gether and see if there was any-
thing that could be done in re-
spect of an agreement. :

Mr. Reece: “May it please
Your Honour, I, like my Learned
Friend, am not retreating from the



oon go when
pee take this!

it soothes the throat
and chest — an

d tastes
so nice



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Social Security

Scheme



Wanted

—Crawford

Mr. W. A. CRAWFORD M.C-P., wants to know if Gov-

ernment would take steps to initiate a contributory

Insur-

ance and Pension Scheme to provide compensation for
benefits payable to sugar industry workers in all phases
(field, factory and waterfront) during sickness, disability

and superannuation.

Nine Factories
Making Sugar

THERE are about nine sugar
factories in operation now, and
others will follow suit this week.
In many diStricts people with no
clocks will know the time by the
factories’ whistles, and the air
will be sweet with the smell of
the juice that is being processed
into the product that keeps the

- island from going bankrupt.

It is not only in the country
districts—where most of the fac-
tories are situated—that people

e busy when crop time comes.
In Roebuck Street, principally,
and in others too, lorries queue
up hour after hour, day after day,
waiting to off load bags of sugar
at the various bondhouses,

As the lorries reverse into the
bonds, there is a man ready with

scoop which he plunges into
one of the bags. It comes back
out with a sample of the sugar
which that particular lorry has
brought. The bags are then lifted
off the platform of the truck and
added to the pile of bags already
there. In a short time the pile
will be nearly ceiling high.

Stamina

It is a job that calls for stamina,
and there are some really hefty
men working in these bonds, men
who will perhaps be “out-heftied”
only by the lightermen who will
take those same bags of sugar
to the ships waiting in Carlisie
Bay. .

As soon as a lorry has delivered
a load, the driver gets it back to
the factory as soon as possible for
another load. The more trips a
driver makes a week, the larger
will be his pay packet.

There was a time when most of
the transportation work was done

y lorries owned by various
garages, But nowadays more and
more factories are using their
qwn lorries.

_Most of the bond houses in the
city are owned by H. O. Emptage,
Da Costa & Co. Ltd. and S. P.
Musson, Son & Co, Ltd.

Factories now working are
Haggatts, Springvale, Fairfield,
Searles, Sandy Lane, Carrington,
a Warren and Spring

all.



Lund Inspects
Brigade

THE !ocal branch of the St.
John Ambulance Brigade was
inspected at 5 o'clock yesterday
afternoon by Lt. General Sir Otto
Lund, 'Commissioner-in-Chief of
the Brigade and the Countess of
Brecknock, Assistant Lady Super-
intendent-in-Chief (Overseas).
The inspection took place on the
Barrack Square of the Central
Police Station.

The parade was under the
command of Major H. E. Skeete.
On arrival, Sir Otto Lund and

After taking, the General Salute
they inspected the Brigade. On
the tour of inspection the Commis-
Sioner-in-—Chief was accompanied
by Captain E. B. Williams and
Major H. E. Skeete. Mrs. E. B.

Williams accompanied Lady
Brecknock,
At the conclusion of the

parade Sir Otto Lund presented
the - insignia of the Venerable
Order of the Hospital of St. John
and Jerusalem in the British
realm, to Captain E. B, Williams
and Sir Edward Cunard. He con—
gratulated them,

He said that he was delignted
to see the Nursing Cadets on
parade. This was their first parade
and they are all from St. Michael's
Girls’ School.



legal position which we have
taken up. I quite agree that even
a bad compromise is better than a
law suit in a matter of this sort,

“I am perfectly willing to await
the instructions of my solicitors
and his-clients on the point. Un-
like my Learned Friend, I have
only now been brought into the
case, and I am not as fully cogniz-
ant with the facts and circum-
stances as he is. although I did
confer with my clients on Satur+
day.

y will assure the Court that as
soon as I have heard from my sol-
icitors and my clients, I too will
be willing, if they so instruct me
to discuss the matter with the
other side. But I am not author-
ised to retreat from the legal posi-
tion set-up in the pleadings.”

The matter was adjourned.

He also want to know if Goy-
ernment would take steps. to
initiate a programme of economic
security in the sugar industry
under which workers in all
its phases shall be entitled for a
minimum period to unemploy-
ment compensation benefits?

Notice of these questions was
given in the House of Assembly
a short while ago.

Mr, Crawford told the Advocate
yesterday.

“What is needed of course, is a
complete Social Security Scheme
to cover every man, woman and
child in the colony. For quite a
few years I have been urging in
the House of Assembly that the
Government obtain the services
of a qualified official who has had
practical experience with the
operation of the British National
Insurance Scheme to assist us in
setting it up.

“The least that any Govern-
ment which has the true interests
of the people at heart should do,
would be to initiate a scheme un-
der which workers in well-estab—
lished, industries should be enti-

tled to unemployment and
sickness benefits.
Repeal

“What is also needed immedi.
ately is the repeal of the present
Workmen's Compensation Act,
This can be substituted by legis-
lation to provide a system of
insurance against personal injury
caused by accident, arising out of
and during the course of a per-
son’s employment, and against
prescribed industrial diseases and
injuries, The present Workmen’s
Compensation Act is antiquated
and cumbersome. It involves the
injured worker in considerable
legal expense and more often
than not, in recourse to the law
courts with their technical pro-
cedure, annoyance and delay, The
Act possesses all the complexity
of the old British Act which was
So complicated, that at one time
it was the only piece of legislation
that had given birth to a complete
new series of law reports of cases
upon it.

“With regard to the specific pro-
posals contained in my questions
in the House, they should be
regarded in the nature of a tem-
porary expedient. It is a most
easy matter to extend these bene-
fits to workers in given industries.
Since sugar is our largest and
most important industry, it is
reasonable that we should com-
mence with that. The scheme is
so simple that it could be set up
overnight. It would operate on a
contributory basis with funds
provided by employers, Govern-
ment and employees,

Superannuation

“The question of superannuation
is of paramount importance. 1
am of opinion that the qualifying
age should be 60—the same age at
which public employees are now
entitled to q retirement pension,
Our old age pension is effective
at the age of 68 and recipients are

_ only entitled to 5s. per week. If

the public service worker be
permitted to retire on pension at
60, similar benefits should be
available for the worker in the
employment of “private enter-
prise.” Incidentally, with regard
to the Old Age Pension, the
Means Test should be abolished
at once, An income
week is manifestly inadequate to
enable the superannuated worker
to keep body and sqgul together.

“The part of the questions
which proposes unemployment
compensation for g minimum

period is designed to assist work-
ers during what is known as the
“hard time” in the sugar industry,
During this period, agricultural
and factory workers for the
greater part, get little or no em-

item for discussion on the Agende
of an All-island
Confererpe in which I wag invit-
ed to participate during ag visit tc
San Juan, Puerto Rico, five years
ago.

New Legislation

“A few days later in a discussion y
had with Senor Luis},
Munoz Marin, then leader of the] =

which I

Majority, Party and the Legisla-
ture and now Governor of the
colony, he told me that his Party
proposed introducing legislatior
to deal with the matter. Not very
long after, the Legislature of
Puerto Rico approved a law
granting assistance to sugar work-
ers during the period which they
call the “dead season.” Under its



’ Cussons

. TALCUM
POWDER .



Ud

a PURI

SESBEER ES EE 828
FRESH SUPPLY OF

NA HEN CHOW

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

aH. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distibutors
‘GRE BSSERERBRBERESBREEe

of 5s, per ~

Condensed Milk
Arrives Here

she S.S. Besseggen landed
shipment of 1,425 erates and 15(
bales of potatoes, 31,000 carton
of full cream sweetened con
densed milk and 550 crates

o

eniens for Barbados yesterday.
She called from Rotterdam,
Amsterdam and Hamburg am
sailed on for Trinidad last night
Supplies of hams, mal
extracts, smoked herrings, pear

barley, Dutch beer, cognac, Gen

ever gin, nutrogen, wrapping
paper, rolled oats and canar,
seed were included in thi

Besseggen's cargo for Barbados.
Messrs S. . Musson, Son
Co., Ltd,, are the ship's Agents.

PORT ENQUIRY

The Port Enquiry Committe
held its fourth meeting yester
day, and discussed with represen
tatives of Messrs Jason Jones ar
Company Limited, Da Costa an:
Company Limited, Robert Thom
Limited and S. P. Musson an
Company Limited the question o
re-grouping of cranes on th
Waterfront.

Agreement was reached wit!
regard to the re-grouping anc
removal of cranes owned by th+
above firms but it will be neces
sary for the Committee to mee
representatives of another firm tc
finalise the matter,

The next meeting of the Com
mittee will be held at 10 a.m, o
Monday 12th February, at ihe
Labour Department,

ORANGES COME

SCHOONER Eastern Eel, which
arrived at Barbados on Sunday
night, brought a supply of orange:
from Trinidad for local fruit
sellers.

Many of them were spoilt
however, and instead of being
removed by carts to be later dis-
played in trays along the road
side, they were dumped into thc
Careenage.

In making stops at Grenada
Carriacou and St. Lucia, it tool
the Eastern Eel seven days tc
reach Barbados. The fruit were
stored in crates and barrels and
then under cover in hatches,

Cyclist Fined 45/-

His Worship Mr. ii. A. Talma
Police Magistrate of District “A’
imposed a fine of 5/- on Ophnieal
Seale of Ruby, St. Philip for rid-
ing a bicycle without a lighted
lamp on the night of February
3.

Seale was also fined 40/. for
riding an unlicensed bicycle or
the same date.

Fined 20/-

&







PATRICK HAREWOOD © of
Belleplaine, St. Andrew was
yesterday fined 20/— by the

judges of the Assistant Court of
Appeal, Their Honours Mr, G, L.
Taylor and Mr. H, A. Vaughn.
The judges found him guilty of
failing to keep his motor cycle
A—1886 to the left side of Marley
Vale Road on December 15 last
year when he was riding along
there,

In making the fine, the judges
varied a decision of Police Mag-
istrate Mr. G. B. Griffith who
had fined him 10/-.

15/- FOR GAMBLING

NOEL MERRITT of Ivy Land,
St. Michael was yesterday fined
15/- by His Worship Mr, H ;
Talma for gambling on Ivy Land
on February 3. The fine is to be
paid in 28 days or in default one
month’s imprisonment with hard
labour.



Ws

There were 13 notifications o!
Infectious Diseases for the month
of January the Advocate learnt
from the Department of Medica)
Services,

These are:—Diphtheria 1, en-
teric fever 6, and tuberculosis 6

agricultural workers
are entitled to $3 per week ana
factory workers to $5, The pay-
ments are made for a period
nine weeks. Employers are com-
pelled by law to contribute to the
fund. :
“These are matters with which,
in order the more to justify its
existence, our Social
Department might well,
time being, concern itself,

provisions,

also assist.



Alka-Seltzer’s pleasant taste
and sparkling effervescence
assures gentle efficiency.
Drop one or two tablets into
a glass of water, watch it fizz,
then drink it. Keep a

supply handy always!

Alka-Seltzer










Weifare
for the
Al-
ployment. It was a matter which though admittedly it is unlikely
had agitated my mind for some, to do so unless requested by the
time, and I was delighted to note] Government, In the absence of a
that it was marked down as an| proper Department to deal with
the question, the Department of
Trade Union| Labour could



PAGE FIVE





9t's a |
Fact....

when

)
\

your Doctor pre-
seribes for you he
realises you need the
REST ....

PROMPTLY

ee

so Ff

H's a
Facd....

when we compound your
prescription we only offer
the BEST in Drugs and
the BEST in Service . .

SEND US YOUR NEXT
PRESCRIPTION









fk i gee

THE TALK OF THE TOWN!

36 ins. wide

in

SPSSPOP FS FF FFF

SOSOSOE POSS OO GOSS

POWDER
S341 yd

ad

Lv

re

=!

materi |



Knight's



TOOTAL
INEN

Branded TEBILIZED
forested crease-resistance

SFIS FF EFF PaaS





















DIAL 2664.

































CONGOLEUM

Rugs 9 ft. 10% it. Each
9 ft. square

9 ft. 72 ft.
: Lengths 9 ft. wide. Per Yard .
6 ft. wide. ,,

”

3 ft. wide.

”

LINOLEUM

”

Per Yd.

10, 11, 12, & 13 Broad Street

HARRISONS—BROAD ST.

VLE SCOPE LLL LLL LOLOL

DRINK |
CLAYTON’S

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LID.








In Green and Biue Marble. 6 ft. wide.


















BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1951
na a aes sa niin tL CL A

BY CARL ANDERSON Is BACKACHE

ea
JUST A SIGN

OF AGE?

Many people suffer an aching back
needlessiy—believing you must expect
a lew aches and pains when you're
“getting on” in years!

But backache is often caused by the
faulty action of kidneys and_ liver.
See how much better you feel after
taking Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills,
and your kidneys and liver both filter
out impurities from your bloodstream.
That's because this time-proven Dr.
Chase remedy treats two conditions at
once—contains special remedial ingre-
dients for both the kidney and liver
disorders which often cause backache.

If you're feeling worn-out, tired,
headachy—with painful joints and
aching back—look to your kidneys and
liver Try Dr. Chase’s Kidney-Liver
Pilis tonight. At all drug counters 16



SWEDEN'S BEST MATCH
“THREE STARS”

ON SALE EVERYWHERE




.. JEFFREY! ALL THESE LIONS LOOK

KIND OF HUNGRY A\ Trench Mouth

in 24 Hours

Bleeding gums, sore mouth, or loose
teeth mean that you are a victim of Pyor-
rhea or Trench Mouth, or some bad disease
that will eventually cause you to lose alt
your teeth and have to wear false teeth
before your time. Since the great World

‘ar these mouth diseases have spread
throughout the world so that now scien-
tists say that four out of every five people
are sufferers sooner or later. y aeraee in
time and stop these diseases before it is
too late, because they often cause not only
the loss of teeth, but also chronic rheumta~
tism and heart trouble,

New Discovery Saves Teeth

Amosan, the discovery of an American
scientist, fights these troubles in a new
and quick way. It_penetrates right to the
root-of the trouble, stops gums from bleed-





Amosan users get: ‘I suffered from Trench
Mouth and Pyorrhea for ten years. My
furs, were sore and bleeding and > had
a

BLON














hh Tl TIT T TIMI TT TTT TT * st sens, teeth, Sos fe Se =
ip | th | TUE Beas ‘ . . were nj ser a e time. rie
sed \ ee eee a = “ ry p Aeron, many thin : and Sheth gard oF sbi8 pew
if . "LL WATCH, POP DARLING, YOUR “> Amoson’ ny guini had. stopped. biceding.
. THE Ae PAVED ABOUT MAYBE IL CAN. DREAM BOY IS HOME ‘The soreness in my mouth Bisa peared &
NAY THE HERO KISSED RN SOME z SB Me. ’ e
HIS WIFE IN THE MOVIES © LEARN SOMETHING eas A. ches. Gays ang in ven wea ung cae
MOM os as A m ose teeth were much iter an ‘a
LASTPNIGHT-- WAITLL 7 eae a S39 Ttould eat the hardest of food.”
mw SHE. SEES THIS = ee "s

Guaranteed

Amosan works so fast and so ceram
that it is guarnnteed to stop your aoe
from bleeding, end sore mouth and tighten.
your teeth to your complete satisfaction or
Money back on return of empty package.
Don’t take &chance on osing your teeth or
suffering the dangers from rheumatism
and heart trotitble. Get Amosan from your
chemist todey under this noes, guaran-

ou tis

tee,
A nothing as the
MoOsAaMe os
cts you.
For Pyorrhea--Trench Mouth
8999$$959SS99990SSS99SSS9

rs

OBSERVE












START THEM OFF DAILY WITH

that different brands of
Bay Rum come, and they

IX THE MASKED MAW! HE'S
WANTED FOR MUR) !
GET HIM! pA

| BORNN'S
: BAY RUM

will go on forever
WHY ?
QUALITY
That's Why

SOSSSSSOSSSSSSS8S99S5

oF

YEAR BOOK 1951

The Advocate Co Ltd:, will publish a Year Book of Barbados
in 1951.



GES OOSES PES

Se,













T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

* ROYAL READERS” and
“STEP BY STEP” Now

BRINGING UP FATHER

———







The Year Book will contain three parts:—






















cago" eos : ws ge : : Opened b:
7. (anaes uct .v- oceans on (1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on JOHNSON’S ST. :
APRS | ee ergicreo ve TO | | Me Nicos -waxe Tue BORDER BY MOKIGUT a — variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance, ae
J AIIE Up? IT’ EXACTLY = in ustri : : : ‘or the Windows and Doors
- en lyie abaeas ve FIVE O'CLOCK / 1 HOPE THE SHERIFF ies, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport, ef hae tow Beek

WAKE UP //












art, literature and all the things we want to know about
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.

1S GOING DOWN TO

GLASS —
HIS OFFICE TO woRK!!

Cut to order by
JOHNSON’S HARDWARE



i, SSSSDSSSSSSISIOSSSSIOSG

(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar, FREE / ooK

soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
re ‘GOD'S WAY 0
¢ , F
(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should x;now about. SALVATION
A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale PLAIN”

MLL.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assisiani Editor of the Barbados: Advocate, Mr. Neville

8 Please write for one io %













Service,
THEN WO OF OUR MEN ARE ‘ wah
C amercarcn | aissaby ov a'r To Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale, sor N. Ireland.”
een ee as | 4 ener aras. Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respor- $9008



BUT ITLL BET THEY NAB

» TURN HIM IN FOR.
\ CUTTLE BEFORE you Do!

sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations

Barbados Advocate,

i Lb Tins C & E MORTON'S
34 Broad Street. !

PEARL BARLEY



_. This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be

without the Year Book of Barbados 1951. CE & Co., Ltd

6, 7, 8 & 9 Roebuck Street.
Dial 2234

of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisa-
tions immediately or not later than April 15th 1951.
Year Book, i hoved ina
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate, following :
34 Broad Street. Tins PEANUT BUTTER
: Bots. SALTED PEANUTS
_.. Names and addresses of all those to be considered for Packages DATES
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed. | re: eee ee,
MACARONI
Advertisements close April 30th 1951. er
Advertisers are asked to get in touch with M1 & ot Tins” _s
Mr. Trevor Gale, | ms Guavas
Advertising Manager, Tins SWEET CORN
|
|

(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)

oe

a te a eNO NN
EI ES =. =










TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6



, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508 .



DIED

———
CARMICHAEL — CHARLOTTE AUGUS-
TA. At her residence “Sea Grove”
Worthing, Christ Church. The fu-
neral will leave her late residence

at 4.50 this afternoon for the West-
bury Cemetery. Friends are invited.

Cc. E. Carmichael, E. B. Carmichael,
Otga Collins. 6.1.51—1n.

GITTENS—Yesterday at her residence
Saint Matthias Road, Christ Church,
ANNIE LOUISE. The funeral leaves
her late residence at 4.15 o'clock this
evening for Saint Matthias Chureh and
thence to the Westbury Cemetery.
Friends are invited.

Beatrice Martin. Eustace and Muriel
Crichlow, Cynthia Pinder, Joyce
Green, Violet Linch. 6.2.51—In.

MORRIS — MANOAH, Last night at
his residence Passage Road, His
funeral will leave his late residence
at 4.30 p.m. this afternoon for the
Westbury Cemetery, Friends are in-
vited.

Gertrude Green Amy Morris (daugh-
ters), Mortie Morris, 6.1,51—In,



SHANKS



KRAYNES—The undersigned gratefully
return thanks to all who attended the
funeral, sent wreaths or in any other
way expressed sympathy in our recent
bereavement occasioned by the passing
of Mr. Clement Alonza Haynes.





—————————

CHANCERYLANE HOUSE — Christ
Church. Apply: Dan Springer, Waveli
Avenue. Dial 3630. 6.2.$1—-2n.

HOUSES — “Harmony Cottage” -
George and “CANAAN”. Bathshene
apply to Mrs. Gibbons. Phone 2617.

3,.2,.51.—4n,



“KEN-ERME”, sea-side
Fathsheba, approved
and cutlery optional.

«nward. Por particulars diai

2550
Gay except Sunday. rn

10.1.51—t.f.n,
PREMISES—No. 6 Swan Street,

Factory, ts
Bentitg. Souci: safer
ros. or Dial 3466,



P 2.2.51—

STORAGE SPACE suitable for making
Bonds and Warehouses. Apply K. x
Fate & Co. Ltd. Dial 4611.

1.2.51—6n,

(1) Board and Shingled
Shop and shedroof. Situated at 4th
Avenue, Alleyne Land. Apply E.
Alleyne, Bush Hall. 6.2.51—4n

COTTAGE-—St. Jamés Coast.
Fully furnished containing 3 bedrooms.
Available for months of February to May





SHOP—One

Mrs. J hi H e: iwife), N dad August Dece:

Sybil Haynes (daughter), Athelstan | 2908, ".. ‘® December 1951, Phone

(son). 6.2.51—1N, | ene
ren & PURLIC SALES

UNDER THE SILVER

AUTOMOTIVE ae HAMMER

————— nm ‘ednesday 7th by order of Mrs,

CAR—1950 Morris Minor 8 H.P. Black} S. H.

Sedan, sudatient . condition. He at “Blosmebuee me Pravin ee

leaving Colony. Apply Hamilton, Merry
Hill, Welches, St. Michael. Phone 3951.
6.2.51—3n

CAR—Model A-Ford, In good condi-
tion (A—110). Apply to Arthur Dixon,
Greenland, St. Andrew. 6.2.51—1n

CAR—Studebaker 1947 Model, in ex-
cellent condition Price $2,650.00. Apply
B’dos Agencies, Ring Evelyn 4908, B’ +
Agencies Ltd. 3.2.51.—6n,

CAR—6 Cylinder, 1949 Vauxhall (Velox)
in excellent condition, Dial 2900 or 4739.
6.2.51—3n.

ELECTRICAL

ELECTRIC STOVE—In perfect order.





Phone 8122. - €.2.51—2n.

ONE TURNER WALKER DRILL
PRESS, electrically driven, new.
Apply: Mr. R. de Souza, C/o T.
Geddes Grant Ltd. 1.2.51—6n.

RADIO—Phillips 5 Tube Radio 1950
Model, perfect condition. Telephone 8173.
Reasonable Price. 6,2.51—In

FURNITURE

MAHOGANY CHEST of Drawers, Book
Case, Child’s Tricycle, Set Used Golf
Clubs, Child’s Seasaw. Phone 8477.

6.2.51—In

MISCELLANEOUS

ACTUMUS—The new Fertiliser
ccnes—vegetable and flower gardens $3.60
per ib. from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store, Coleridge Street. Phone 2999,

‘

““BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top









for |.

— which includes — t
Dining Table, Waggons, Tea , Trolley,
Upright, Corner and Arm Chairs, Rockers,
Settees (modern) Couches, Ornament
Tables, Desk, Writing Table, very Hand-
some Hand-painted and Mir'd Screen:
all in Mahogany: Glass ware, Dinner and
Tea Service, Ornaments ‘and Vases,
Spoons, Forks and Cutlery, Pictures and
Paintings, Congoleum, Chiming and
Striking Clocks; Mir’d Hatstand Stump
Bedstead, Press, Dressing Table, M.'.
Washstand all in Mohogany Single Iron
Bedsteads, Washstands, Screens, a Prac-
tically new GEC, Electric Magnet
Stove with 2 Hot Plates; Larders, Kitchen
Utensils, Kitchen Tables, Books, Ferns,
a 5 - Seater Vauxhall Sedan 25 H.P. in
geod running order and many other

Sale 11,30 o'clock, ‘Terms CASH.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
Auctioneers.
4.2.51—2n

REAL ESTATE



abhi

ENTERPRISE—An_ ajoining | Property
with 7 acres of land and stone building,
3% acres of arable, 4 acres of pasture
with nice Mahogany trees to be sold
to any one who have relatives, or
friends in the U.S. America, who is
dé€sirous of buying for cash. To be sold
in the U.S. America.

Apply to G. Holder, Enterprise, Christ
Church Gap, Attorney for the Estate
dor full information. 6.2.51—6n.

———
HOUSE—(1) 8 x 14, In good condition,
To be seen at “Heswall’ 8th Avenue,
Belleville, 6.2,51—In,
aE nemne
“DUNSINANE”
COUNTRY, ROAD, ST. MICHAEL.
The residence lately occupied by Mrs.
W. O. Collymore.






BARBADOS, ADVOCATE



APEX (TRINIDAD)
OILFIELDS LIMITED.

The thirty-first Annual General
Meeting of Apex (Trinidad) Oil-
fields Limited, was held at Win-
chester House, Old Broad Street,
London, E.C., in January.

Mr. Malcolm Maclachlan, chair-
man and joint managing director,
said:—

The balance-sheet shows that

of wells drilled during the year,
and the wells which have yielded
the production for the year stand
in the balance-sheet at the modest
figure of £138,000,

During the year under review
our capital expenditure on fixed
assets other than wells exceeded
the amount written off in respect

i. the capital of £550,000 and the of depreciation by £47,000. This
tenants, Linen | Capital reserve of £230,000 remain is amply covered by the appro- j,
Available February } Unchanged. General reserve has priation of £450,000 from
| been increased by £450,000 out of

the
profits of the year to general re-

the profits for the year, and now serve, bringing it, as I have stated,

Up-| stands at £1,200,000. Develop- to the sum of £1,200,
sttire, Premises, very spacious and cool) ment and contingencies reserve During
cag amounts to £800,000 and unap- 82,371 ft.
4.2.51—2n, | Propriated profit is £223,000. Our programme

revenue reserves thus total the and to extend the tested areas of

very substantial sum of £2,223,-
000. The reserve for future taxa-
tion is £1,096,000, while current
liabilities including current taxa-
tion and the proposed final divi-
derd, total £642,000.

On the other side of the balance-
sheet the fixed assets stand at
£927,000, which represents the
capital) expended upon the pro-
perty and its equipment and de-
velopment after amortization and
depreciation of over £4,000,000.
Current assets comprise stores on

'hand and intransit and oil in stor-

age £449,000, debtors for oil sold
and sundry debtors £450,000,
British and Trinidad Government
securities, tax reserve certificates,
and cash at bankers, which to-
gether amount to £2,914,000. The
surplus of current assets over cur-
rent liabilities and future taxation,
is £2,076,000.

Oil Revenue

The profit and loss account
shows that oil revenue, after pro-
vision for development and con-
tingencies, and after depreciation
of fixed assets, amounted to
£ 1,704,000. This included
£408,000 in final settlement for
oil delivered in prior years. In
future each year will reflect the
revenue from the oil delivered
during that year.

London and New York expen-
diture and directors’ emolumenis,
less interest and sundry receipts,
amount to £10,000, and after
providing £1,025,000 for taxation
in Trinidad and the United King-

000,

the year we drilled

in continuance of our
to obtain production

the property. Eleven wells were
completed in the Main Field and
seven in the South Quarry area.

Interesting developments con-
tinue in the Synclinal zone. Well
No. 481, where at the time of our
last meeting only the lowest sand
had ,been tested, is now giving
go production from the main
sand.

Three further wells have since
been completed. Well 496 gave
no production, although it may
be deepened at some future date.
Well 504 is giving excellent pro-
duction from the largest sand
body so far encountered, and is
the outstanding development of
the year. Well 511 has been
tested during the last few days
but is not a commercial producer.

The production which has been
developed in the Synclinal zone
during the past few years is con-
tributing a welcome offset to the
natural decline of our other areas,
and now constitutes over 20 per
cent. of our total production.

Effects Of Devaluation

We continue to operate under
our sales agreements with Trini-

we sell our oi] and casinghead
we have

increased realizations in terms of

ing costs in cumulative, and in

dom, the net profit for the year the case of materials was some-

is £669,000.

The unappropri- what sharply accentuated towards

ated profit brought forward from the close of the year.

the previous year is £196,000,

As our balance-sheet shows,

making a total to be dealt with our financial position is one of

of £865,000.

Interim dividend great strength, which is necessi-

No. 60, paid in July last, amount- tated partly by the very consid-
ed to £55,000, and £450,000 has ‘erable decrease in the purchasing
been transferred to general re- power of sterling, particularly as

serve.

regards drilling and other oil
We now recommend the pay- equipment

purchased in the

ment of a final dividend of 1s. 34., United States, An equally impor-
free of income-tax, per 5s, unit tant factor is the continually in=

of stock, making a total dividend
for the year of ls, 9d.,
income-tax, per unit of stock.
The unappropriated profit to be

creasing cost of developing oil

free of Production in Trinidad by reason

not only of general rises in costs

but of the increased depth at

in our control to avoid building
up a high cost structure during a
period of high revenue, in view
of the comsequent burden which
would be placed upon the indus-
try in the event of a recession in
oil prices.

I @m sure you will agree that
the proft for the year is most sat-
isfactory. At the same time the
division of that profit provides a
striking illustration of the benefit
derived from the success of our
enterprise by the Government and
people of Trinidad.

Mederate Dividend Increase
We have felt justified in recom-
ending a moderate increase in
dividend, with the result that the
owners of the business, who have
provided the capital and bear the
risk, will draw in dividends the
sum of £192,000. At the same
time the Government of Trinidad
will draw over £884,000 in royal-
ties and direct taxation, and, in
addition, the United Kingdom
Government will take a further
£250,000. If I may put it another
way, for every £1 drawn by the
owners of the business approxi-
mately £5. 17s. 10d. is taken by
the two Governments.

Moreover, it is primarily in the
interest of those to whom the
business gives employment and
Government, which draws so
largely upon its results, that the
continued development of the
business should be sustained by
the sums which have been set
aside to strengthen its reserves.

importance of the contri-
bution of the oil industry to the
revenue of Trinidad is further
illustrated by the fact that the
direct contribution of the industry
to the total revenue of the island
is of the order of 35 per cent. In
our own case the payments to the
Trinidad Government for royal-
ties and income-tax are, respec-
tively, more than eight times and
18 times those for the year 1939,

It is worth recalling that the
search for oil in Trinidad was
arduous and costly and that of
those who took the considerable

dad Leaseholds and United Bri- Tisks only a handful have achiev—
tish Oilfields of Trinidad. Since €d success, It is also essential to

appreciate that the continued suc-

gasolene on a basis related to cess of the industry, upon which
United States prices,
benefited during the year from directly depends, has to be main-

the welfare of Trinidad so

tained in the face of exception-

sterling. At the same time, where- ally difficult geological conditions,
as the benefit of devaluation has Jow output
been fully operative during the
year, the consequent rise in work-

per well, and the
greatly increased cost of drilling
at continually increasing depth.
~ Moreover, it is not enough to
produce the oil, it has to be sold,
and in the markets of the world
the status of Trinidad is that of
the supplier of less than 1 per
cent. of the world production:
Risk, Boldness and Enterprise
The tradition of the oil indus-
‘ry has always been one of risk,
boldness, and enterprise, and the
main concern of those of us who
work in the industry has been te
get on with the job. It has not
been our practice to lay public
stress on the difficulties, nor have
we had any doubt that the enrich
ment of a community by the build-



Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay

|
Sedge- |





Sch. Emanuel C. Gordon, M.V
held, Sch. Mare» Henrietta, Sch. C. M. W
ana, M.V. Jenkins Roberts, Sch. Philip |
H.M, 8. Devonshire j
ARAAVALS j
S.S. Besseggen, 1,102 tons net, cant. |
Henniksem, fromm Amsterdam,
Schooner Eastern Bei, 35 tons net, Capt.
David, from St. Lucia,
Sch. Adalina, 80 tons net, Capt. Flem-
ining, fom St. Lucia,
M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt.
Parsons, from St. Laicia,

DEPARTURES
Schooner Lucite M, Smith, 74 tons net,
Capt, Hassell, for British Guiana,
Schooner United Pilgrim 8&.,
met, Capt. Stewart, for St. Lucia,

47 tons

ROAD TO BRAZIL

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 3.

The plan to build a highway
irom Paramaribo, the capital of
Vutch Guiana, to Brazil is, accord
img to Carlos Thomas who is on
a visit to British Guiana, going
forward .

The principal of the Brazilette
Co. of Paramaribo which has. a
contract to supply rice to Ger-
many, Mr. Thomas, states that
negotiations are underway and
ome documents concerning the
vegal side of the project, to be
financed by a group of Holland

sy

Active KIDNEYS |
KEEP You WELL

Nature’s filters may need help
I IS OFTEN SURPRISING
how quickly backache, lumbago,
rheumatic pains, stiff, aching joints
and the common urinary
disorders due to sluggish kidney
= — c kidneys safeguard
t » active ‘
geerhotin by ining excess uric
acid and taaei wentes out of the
system, When kidney action is
blond renee Pos and aeeoer,
prop
fort frequently’ result. ° |

Gd
aa” Sans
Signe Bere

1
Cure DOAN’S if





THANK GOODNESS FOR
GAS
says

The Man In The Street

When I am going home late
I can feel safe with the
STREETS LIGHTED BY











businessmen, have already been GAS.
received from Holland.--C.P, — _'
ee
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW ;! a
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
The M.V. “Caribbee” will be

{M.A.N.Z, LINE)

M.S. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to
sail Adelaide January 24th, Melbourne
February §th, Sydney February 17th,
Brisbane Februery 23rd, Arriving at

Barbados end of March, 1951.

This vessel has ample space for Hard
Yrozen and General cargo

Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad
tor British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
wid Leeward Islands,

For further particulars apply ——
FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD., and
Da COSTA & CO. LTD,,

Trinidad, Barbados,



















arriving here on the 8th. and will
be accepting Cargo & Passengers
for Dominica, Antigua, Montser-
rai, Nevis & St, Kitts, Shiling
Saturday 10th,

The M.V. "“Daevwood will ac-
cept Cargo and Passengers for St.
Lucia, Grenada, & Aruba and Pas-
cengers only for St. Vincent, Date
of departure to be e¢tified.

B.W.I_ SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, Ino,
Telephone: 4047











BW. B.W.I
steamship (1
9nc.
; NEW YORK SERVICE
‘Essi” sails 1th January -— arrives Barbados 4th February
“Byfjord” sails 2nd Febr ry — ve l4th ”
NEW ORLEANS SE
A Steamer sails 18th January — ‘s RVICE 2nd “
” ” Ist February — * +. 15th ”
nt ee
CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship Salls Arrives
r i Halifax Barbados
8.8. “ALCOA PILGRIM” Januany 26th, February Sth,
8.8. “ALLOA PENNANT" Pebruary 91h February 20th,
ss. “ALCOA POLARIS” February 28r, March 6th,







| From INDIA, CHINA,

Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak-
wood, Sandals, French Per-
fumes, Barbados Scarves in
Pure Silk, Ete., Ete., Ete. -

BK WISE...













Yor Mellow
and distinctive flavour,
There is no rum that com-

) S&S =
STUART & SAMPSON
mS

Headquarters for Best

RIVERSIDE CLUB

CARNIVAL DANCE ~
TO-NIGHT__

Dancing from 9 p.m,
ADMISSION: 3/-
Music by P. Green's
Orchestra

\ Judging of Costumes .at
1 PM. {



WEST INDIAN KNITTING §
MILLS LTD. - ms ‘

ACCEPTING ORDERS FOR 4
WRAPPING TWINE_...%
All purposes) oT
Orders for 1951 Require-- ¥
ments will be aceepted up”
to 15th February, 1951.5.















Communicate P.O. Box 23t-
or call 3679 Se

55SS6SO6600C60%"%




a ~ aaron,

ORIENTAL.
Goons

EGYPT ! i
Curios, Brassware,

Silk,

The Souvenir Headquarters >>

THANI Hros.

KASHMERE
Pr. Wm, Henry St.—Dial 5468. |



.. . ADVERTISE”
a




grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.
26.1,51—t.f.n.

CHILDREN’S WARM CARDIGANS—
In many colours also White $1.67 each.

which it is necessary to drill, For
example, the new production
which we have developed in re-
cent years in the Synclinal zone

Them vesscis have Itmited paxgenger accommodation,

ROBERT THOM LTD.—New York and Gulf Service.
Apply: DA COSTA & OO., LTD.—Canadian Service.

The house stands in well kept gardens
and grounds (2 acres 37 perches)..”

The whole comprises verandah, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 5 bedrooms, one

earried forward will amount to
£ 223,000.

Production

ing up of a prosperous industry
can be regafded by any reason-
able body of opinion as other than







Modern Dress Shoppe. 3.2.51.—6n.

DRESS FORM—One (1) Adjustable
Dress Form Size A. (small), Apply
Hamilton, Merry Hill, Welches, St.
Michael. _ 4 6.2.51—3n

—_—$———
GALVANISED PIPE in the following
sizes: “in., “%in., “%in., lin. 1% ins,
2ins., 2% ins., 3ins. and 4 ins. Also fit-
tings. Enquire Auto Tyre Company,

Trafalgar Street, Phone 2696.
3.2.51.—t.f.n.

———

INFANT'S PORTABLE TREASURE
COT with fibre mattress—practically new.
Ring 4729. 1.2.51—6n.

MKOSSOLIAN MINERAL—We have in
stock Kossolian Mineral with Vit. D. for
Cattle and Poultry 1/- lb. also Kossolian
Poultry Spice for improving egg pro-
duction 3/- Ib, KNIGHT'S LTD.



4,2,51—2n.

LADIES’ TEE SHIRTS — In white
nnd assorted colours $1.42 each. Mo-
cern Dress Shoppe. 3.2.51—6n.

—
LADIES’ PLASTIC APRONS 87c. each

Modern Dress Shoppe. 3.2.51.—6n.
LADIES’ and Children’s Handker-

ebiefs 17c. each. Modern Dress Shoppe.
3.2,51—6n.

LADIES' COATS for the cool eve-
nings — in wine, fawn, beige and grey
$28.50 each. Modern Dress Shoppe,

3.2,51—6n.

enh inn tiaieneaisceeniaietee

PRETTY WHITE VELVET EVENING
CAPES — $18.00 each. Modern Dress
Saoppe, 3.2.51—€n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

“£25: -. -d. easily earned by obtaining
order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi:
ence necessary, Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
comnission; marvellous money making
opportunity. Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
4."
7 25.1.51—18n











NOTICE

This is to inform my friends, custom-

ers and the general public that I am no

longer employed at the firm of P. C. S.

Maffel & Co., I can now be found at
No. 20 Tudor Street,

Your patronage solicited.

H. HEWI

Tailor.
3.2.51.—3n,





NOTICE
All owners of Dogs are reminded that
they must be Licensed during the
month of February, according to law.
N.B.—All Taxes due to the Parish will
also now be collectetl, according to law.
Signed A. A. B. GILL,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Joseph.
4.2,51—3n.

NOTICE
BARRADOS CHORAL SOCIETY
The Annual General Meeting will be
held at the Cathedral Church House on
Tuesday, 6th February, 1951 at eer

oe

Estate of
WILLIAM JORDON

Deceased
Notice is hereby given that all persons
having any debt or claim upon or affect-
ing the estate of Wiliam Jordon late of
Upper Carlton in the parish of Saint
James who died in this Island on the
fth day of July 1941, are hereby re-
quired to send in particulars of their
claims duly attested to me Edgor Briggs
Jordon c/o Messrs. Hutchinson & Ban-
field, Solicitors, James Street, Bridge-
town on or before the 15th day of April
1951, after which date I shall proceed
1o distribute the assets of the said estate

with marble bath, 2 showers, 2 lava-
tories, convenient kitchen and pantry,
reoms for 5 servants, garage for 2 cars,
and stables,

Water supply for garden and grounds
from a well with mill; water service in
house and also servants rooms (shower
and lavatory).

The residence completely wired and
furnished with electric lighting from
the company’s mains.

House convertible into flats and out-
buildings convertible into a cottage

The land is suitable for develop-
ment or kitchen gardens.

The undersigned will offer the
premises for sale by public auction at
their office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 23rd day of
February 1951 at 2 p.m,

Inspection on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days only between 3 and 5 p.m.

For further particulars apply to

Cc » CATFORD & CO.,





Solicitors.
4.2.51—10n.

~ eticinenentiana
MARWIN—Maxwell's Road. Modern

stone-built Bungalow, 3 Bedrooms,
Drawing and Dining Room Breakfast
Room and Kitchenette, Toilet and Bath,
Servants’ Room, Garage in ward, Water
and Electric Light installed. Approx-
imately 14.000 sq. ft. of land. Apply:
E. H. Farmer, Andrews Plantation or
Dial 95267. 4.2.51—6n,

FOR KENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din-
ing room, Breakfast room and Kitchen-
ette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St, Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1.51.—6n.

The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office No. 17 High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the 16th February 1951 at
2 p.m, The messuage or dwelling house
formerly known as Tullyera now call-
ed “CRYSTAL WATERS” with the land
thereto containing by estimation 12,087
square feet situated on the sea at Car-
ville Avenue, Worthing, Christ Church,
at present used as a boarding house.

Inspection any day except Sundays
between 4 and 6 p.m. on application to
Mrs. Talma on the premises.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD, & Co.,
Solicitors,
3.2,51—12n.

a

The undersigned will offer for sale by
public competition at their office, No. 17,
High Street, on Thursday the 8th day
of February, 1951, at 2 p.m. the dwelling-
house called

THE BOWER

with 17,444 square feet of land situate
at The Garrison, containing 2 verandahs,
2 public rooms, 2 bedrocms, toilet, bath,
kitchen, etc. Garage, servants rooms and
enclosed garden.
» The sale may be made with or with-
out the furniture.

Vaeant vomseemae ue be given.

Further particulars from

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.



WANTED
MISCELLANEOUS

ara

GORRINGES undertake expert watch
and clock repairs, cleaning and _ resto-
retion of oil paintings, watuation for in-
surance and_ probate. GORRINGES,
Upper Bay St. 2.2.61.—Tn.

——$—$—<— — ——
WE BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and

Silver jewellery, coins, dentures, etc ,
write, call or Dial 4429. “ORRINGES.
Antique Shop, adjoining Royal Yacht
Club, 3.2.51.—7n.

———
WE BUY FOR CASH—Clocks, watches
and musical boxes in any _ condition.
Write, call or dia} 4429, GORRINGES An-

tique Shop, Upper Bay ida OE 7.
.2.51.—Tn.





















The production for the year
amounted to 2,833,000 barrels of

is found at depths between seven

and eight thousand feet, or ap-

crude oil and 3,549,000 gallons of proximately double our average
casinghead gasolene; deliveries of depth in pre-war years. Moreover,

approximately . .these. amounts. this is-a relatively favourable ex=»eentation

were made to the refineries.
We have continued to charge
oil revenue with the whole cost







LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Reginald Knight,
holder of Liquor License No. 983 of 1951,
granted to Reginald Knight and Augusta
Hutson in respect of a wall building
opposite Sobers Lane, St. Michael, for
permission to use said Liquor License,
&ec., at said premises, Sobers Lane, St.
Michael.

Dated this 2nd day of February, 1951,
To E. A. McLBOD, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. A’.

Signed REGINALD KNIGHT,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District ‘A’ on Monday,

the 12th day of February, 1951, at
ll o'clock, a.m,
E, A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”.
6.2.51--In,

perience, since in the search for
new oil in Trinidad drilling to
depths of over 12,000 feet is not
now unusual. This entails the use
ef heavier drilling equipment,
and results in very substantially
increased expenditure. It is clear
that this is a factor which must
enter increasingly into our caleu-
lations.

In the circumstances, I think it
will be agreed that we have been
fortunate in recent years in
achieving results which have en-
abled us to build up a strong fin-
ancial position, and that we shall
be prudent to maintain it,

Once again I desire to stress the
importance that those of us who
manage the business, Govern-
ment and leaders of organized
labour, should do everything with-



GOVERNMENT

NOTICES



MAKING OF NURSES’

UNIFORMS

Sealed tenders will be received at the Hospital up to 12 o’clock
noon on Wednesday, 14th February, 1951, for making 90 Uniforms
for Nurses within a period of 2 months from the date of acceptance

of tender.

Persons tendering may offer to make the whole or part of the
quantities of garments required, and contracts may be awarded to
persons tendering for making the whole or part of the quantities of

garments for which they tender.

Persons tendering must have the statement on the tender form
signed by two other persons known to possess property, expressing
their willingness to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of

the contract.

Specimens of the garments may be seen, and tender forms will
be supplied, on application to the Secretary, and tenders will not
be entertained except they are on the forms suvplied by the Hospital.

7.2.51.—3n,

Postmistress, St. Philip.

of February, 1951.





POSTMASTER — PARISH OF ST. PHILIP

Applications are invited for the vacant office of Postmaster/

Appointment will be made subject to the selected candidate
being passed as medically fit for employment in the Public Service,
and will be on one year’s probation.
ard which will be accepted is a pass in the Cambridge Local School
Certificate or a similar examination of equivalent standard. Appli-
-|cants should preferably be between the age of 21 and 30 years.

The salary attached to the Post is at the rate of $1,056 by $72
to $1,776 (E.B.) by $96 to $2,160 per annum.
be obtained from the Colonial Postmaster.

Applications should be made on Forms obtainable from the Colo-
nial Secretary's Office and must be returned not later than the 14th

The minimum educational stand-

Further particulars may

6.2,51.—2n,



NOTICE TO FISHERMEN AND BOAT-OWNERS
Fishermen and boat-owners who contemplate the building of new
fishing boats, for which assistance by loan from the Government may
be required, are advised to discuss their problem with the Fishery
Officer before expending any’ money towards such construction.

CHANCERY SALE

fortunate and beneficial,

It may be that, as a result, too
clear g field has been available
to those who trade in misrepre-
for political purposes.
I believe, however, that this phase
is passing and that the general
public in Trinidad is gaining a
better appreciation of the contri-
bution which, despite its difficul-
ties, an efficient oil industry has
made, and I trust will continue to
make, to the welfare and pros-
perity of the colony.

During the year the first gen-
eral election was held in Trinidad
under universal adult suffrage and
the new constitution, which places
the island as the most politically
advanced of the West Indian col-
onies. New legislative and execu-
tive councils have been elected
and ministerial appointments have
been made. I believe we shall find
in the people of Trinidad a grow-
ing appreciation that upon the
sense of responsibility of their
elected representatives depends
not only the interests of commerce
but the welfare of the whole com-
munity of Trinidad.

High Standard Of Housing
And Welfare

In addition to our contribution
to the welfare of the community
as a whole, we have continued to
maintain and extend our own high
standard of housing and welfare
arrangements. These include free
medical attention for employees
and their dependants and excel-
lent educational and recreational
facilities. :

The agreement between the Oil-
fields Employers’ Association of
Trinidad and the Oilfields Work-
ers’ Trade Union, which had been
satisfactorily observed, terminated
during the year. A new agreement,
which provides a general wage in-
crease to all classes of workers,
has been made for a minimum
period of two years and three,
months,

During the year Mr, Cottell vis-
ited Trinidad and discussed our
operational and administrative
problems with the management
there. Mr. Bushe, our general
manager in Trinidad, subsequently
paid us a visit in London, We were
pleased to receive his report of
the loyal and efficient service given
by our management, staff, and
field workers in Trinidad, to whom
1 am sure it will be your wish that
we express our appreciation, and
that this be also extended to our
staff in London.

The resolutions before the meet-
ing were carried, and a vote of
thanks Was expressed to the direc-
tors and staff in London and
Trinidad. n



For Fishermen

LONDON
Fishermen caught poaching in
the rivers and ponds of Scotland
will be liable to a $28 fine but they
can keep their rod and line,








ing to Europe. The usual ports




You will be







THE

ZOCOSSSO6S6S ,OGO60

GOts

Rotterdam, Single fare £70; usual reductions for children,

delighted with the designs of
Our Recent Shipment of

TABLE OIL CLOTH AND FLOOR RUGS
CENTRAL EMPORIUM

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.— Proprietcrs.
Cnr. of Broad and Tudor Streets,

OCC SLOP ETO SAO) SDEOD COLOSSAL SOF

POIPOP ORION OTT TON T UT TT e Te

PASSAGES TO EUROPE |

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominiau, for sail-

of call are Dublin, London, or |

sins eooessaicereaeeecneaa nae ease eoaiae

rns ee rntmang

THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK .

¢

WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs,

and Associations to make the compilation of information in
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as
possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities:
religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports,
radio, agricultural, eic., are asked to have the form printed
below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to :

THE EDITOR,
THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951,
C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street.

FORM

Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Etc, .....:.:cccccsssesessessneesseseonsnvens >

FAPEREEEEE TES SEREENESETNE SEEN BECHEEEESOS EEE SEOEESEES OSES ET ESER ERAS SIDES URES ED ESTEEESESOEER ESTER SS UOEHERETEE EOE ERE® ,

FOR SALE

OFFERS oe = ae
by the undersigned up to the
Lath day of February*forthe ~
block of buildings, (land not
included), situated on Prifice®”
William Henry and Victoria -
Streets and Bolton Lane,
sections of which are at pres-, .
ent occupied by W. A, Med~ ~
ford & Co,, The Man
Club, and until quite ae
ly by the _Bridgetown~ ice~





Company. rchaser to’ de-[/"S

molish ‘the buildings and }f-«

clear the land within sixty Laat
days from date of purchase.

EVELYN ROACH & COqâ„¢ |}ex

LID... *. [Sens

Rickett Streets fp}

- ‘ 3.2.51—tf.n. =

—

—

=

god



+

%

7

















among the parties entitled thereto i t t aanhe is
to the debts and claims} MAGAZINES—True Story Detective , i A new B Oo stop poaching
pe gid ee I shall then have has aaa Police sagasines. Bring see Bekie. Seldon Boe ce Saket ot tee ihe cote ane. Scotland has just been passed by President or CRP 6 oh cdodenaces aeosissdi daniel on uae
i shall r yi nway Store, * 7. O1 2
the’ ane eat ta ane sane Jasas Seeeon. Dial 4910, 6.2.51—3n. | ate specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding Friday {the House of Commons, and the
of whose debt I shall not have had | —————-————_________. Gk same place and during the same hours until sold: Full particulars on app!!- ticnottiest problem that the parlia— :
of whoes debs 1 shall not netmutios | FOR CASH, old Bicycle Beddies with | cation to me. a: mentarians had to decide was —|% Council or Committee Member.............:.ccsssscsssesessesssesssssecssnseesensecenanes
And all persons indebted to the said| or without Saddle Tops. Chandler's CYRIL BRUCE BROOKS—laintiff should « h be liable to have |&
estate are requested to settle their) Hardware and Bicycles Accessories, vs. shou da poacher be li e to ve 2
accounts without delay. Reed and Tudor Streets. 6.2.51—Iin ELEANOR PARK BAKER—Defendant his rod and line confiscated in|
Dated this 5th day of February, 1951. Seah an | PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Pinfold street ;addition to paying g fine. % socevaedbepeerededcrevsedasseesarsveccsadurscdeddeebpeaesadhoscudiesapsscocesdususctsceceshdeneaseestics veecegecnecseene <â„¢
. woe B. a eas a PERSONAL in the City of Bridgetown in this Island containing by admeasurement Two There were such strong views %
Qualified Administrator of he thousand one hundred and fourteen square feet or thereabouts butting and b his that 2 vote s taken
of William Jordon, deceased. bound! 1 T. E. Went lands of Mrs. E. G. De R lands of |? out this that 2 vote was tz nie T
7.251—4n.| The public are hereby warned against ounding on lands of T. E, Went on lands of Mrs, : loys on lands of | | yhether to put the extral¢? reasurer.......... Wateevs Wsvnessdae oseavanes Secretary ervevcscessdceceheuectosceseconeseascesusess
cm giving credit to my wife CLARA BELLE Horace Savoury on lands of Mr. Cozier. on lands of Violet L. Barrow and on | on whether F e aly . seeveeeesees 5s
‘nee Murtel) as I do not hold myself Pinfold Street aforesaid or however else the same may butt and bound ‘Together ;penalty—confiscation of rod and %
: re a i es elli hereon called “Kenworth” and ai! |}; : a 5 M4
* responsible for her or anyone else con- with the messuage or dwelling house t ; n line—into the new bill. q - a i
LOST tracting any debt or debts in ay, name anette Aan both freehold and chattel thereon erected Wis House ae nip $ Short historical account of the origin, functions and current .
nt r s by yritten order signed by me. . i ~ - * ¥
“ONE SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series oo Signed GEORGE F. PELLE. Date of Sale: 23rd Februany, 1951. : u reprieve for the poachers by 198] 3 activities : B.
Q, No. 9745. Finder kindly return same Thorpe Cottage, ' Sein natoesy to 190 against confiscation Re %
s Sears. Williams. ere St. ee in wth January, 195!.) I N.S, SOSOOCOCOCCOOO COO OOOO SOOOCOOOL ILOCOS ORE OCC OOOO SESS SSO CCSeee
Christ wurek 2,51—1n 2 2




j
j
:
‘
'
“a
4
?
’
;
>
|
'
}
;
‘





PAGE EIGHT

Iverson Or Johnson
Must Go: Hutton Shows

} (From W. J,

O'REILLY)
ADELAIDE, Feb. 5,

With a magnificent lone hand effort which took him

through the innings unconqu

ered, Hutton busted wide open

_ the inherent weakness of the Australian spin attack. Since
. the Australian team was chosen for the first Test, know-

- ledgeable critics have been

well aware that Austyalia has

~ taken a terrific gamble in including two off-spinners to the

exclusion of a leg-breaker in



3

LEN HUTTON
U.S. Play Jamaica
At Lawn Tennis
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb. 4.
American lawn tennis invaders

completed exhibition matches in
King: on to-day. They start

playing at} Montego Bay to-mor-— ;

row for Caribbean championships.
Yesterday Althea Gibson, Amer-
ican coloured star,
.played Mrs. Cover
amaican Chempion.

Ramsay,

Results of play Saturday
Women’s Singles: Althea Gibson
(U.S.A.) beat Ivy Cover Ram-
say (J) 6—2; 6—3. Baba Madden
Lewis (U.$.A.) beat Betty
Rosenquest C78 2-2 6—3; 9—7.
Joy Mott-Trille (J) v. Edith and
Sullivan (U.S.A) 6—3; 1—6.

Unfinished: Men's _ Singles:
Carlton Rood (U.S.A.) ‘beat
J. H. D. Bonito (J) 6—3; 6—3.
— Grigry (U.S.A.) vs. E.

tis: (J) 7—9; 6—2.

Unfinished Mixed Doubles:
R. G. Sturdy (J) and Barbara
cofield=(U.S.A.) Phil Hanna
nd Helen P. Risbany (U.S.A.)
6—1; 6=2. —«CP)

Lady Champion
Defeated
INGSTON, Feb. 3
Althea Gibson, U.S, National
Coloured Women’s Champion, beat
Jamaica’s Women’s Singles

Champion Ivy Cover Ramsay 6—2,
6—3 as the Caribbean ennis



Championship opened at Sabina —

Park at Kingston today.

The game was fast as both
women pulled out trick shots from
the bag but the American used
short fore-arm shots to take much
out from ‘the Jamaican.

Today’s games which included
plays between Jamaicans, United
States and Canadian players were
exhibition matches. Preliminaries
to the Tournament will begin at
the tourist famed Montego Bay,
Fairfield Hotel grounds on Mon-
day.

Water Polo Today

This afternoon at the Barbados
Aquatic Club at 5 o'clock, a Cadet



easily out- 7

their attack.

Until to-day, Iverson and John-
son have been equal to every de-
mand placed upon them. But
Hiutton’s great effort ona pitch
that was taking spin proved be-
yond doubt that—we must gamble
no longer.

Iverson or Johnson will have to
make room for a_ leg-spinner.
Although it was a_ spinner’s
wicket, not one Englishman lost
his wicket through the effect of
spin.

Compton paid the penalty. of
carelessness in going for a single
to fine leg off Lindwall. He played
the glance in a lackadaisical man-
ner and paid the price.

Sheppard lost concentration
after defending stoutly for an
hour. He swung hard at an over
ngs ball which should have

een hit hard but he missed.

Brown went leg before to a

yorker which trickled off his
legs into the stumps for a bowled

decision,

Evans suicided after making
some attractive shots.

Bedser played a half cocked

shot at a‘ good length ball and
missed it.
Tattersall stage-struck badly,
pooned a catch at silly leg. But
wler Wright arrived to take all
ints—for second place to Hut-
on as batsman of the day.
' It was the Hutton-Wright part-
nership which showed up _ the
Australian spin attack in all its
impotency.
Hutton’s Chance
Hutton had one slice of luck
however with Johnson, In danc-

ing down to make the half-volley |

osition, he snicked one to Tallon
Who had set himself for the
umping. The fine tickle which

ned the stumping into a catch- .

ing chance was too much for

‘allon who fumbled the ball and
Hutton stumbled home,

Although Hutton adopted the
policy of letting runs come in-
stead of looking for them he
mastered each member of the
attack in turn. No bowler was

ven an inkling of hope. He

ould have batted through to

Doomsday had there been batting
partners for him. Which all em-
Phasises the calamity it was when
Compton went early, But Wright
may still take a big part in this
match. In his few overs in Aus-
tralia’s second innings he spun
the ball sufficiently to leave
Archer stranded several times.

I inspected the pitch’ after close

of play and believe that Wright
will be able to exploit a wearing
patch at the river e It is just
We ioe, the line of stumps on
the legside and on the good length
mark,
If Wright can hit this patch
England still has a show. There
are no marks on the offside at
either end.

Neither Washbrook nor Simp-
Ca lost their wickets to spinners,

ashbrook took liberties in push-
ing a rising ball from Lindwall
away off his hip to square leg.

Perhaps the knowledge that the
somewhat immobile Iverson
guarded that position made him
careless. He pushed one high and
fast above the big fellow’s head,
and Iverson extended his right
hand like a straphanger in the
rush hour and the ball stuck fast.
Every man on the field was great-
ly surprised but Iverson especially
80,

Deserve To Win

Simpson was beaten and bowled

team from H.M.S. Devonshire with Johnston’s late inswing, So

1 pley a Water Polo match
against a Ladies team from the
Barbados Aquatic Club,

The Ladies team is: A. Eckstein,
T. Browne, G. Gale, F. Carmi-
chael, P. Chandler, J, Chandler
(Capt); and R. Vidmer.

Reserves: G, Reed and H. Me-
Kinnon. ~

After-this game a Barbados
men’s team will play a team from
H.M.S. Deyonshire.

The bados team is: —

A. Wet need, F. Manning,
Tim “Yearwood, H. Weathers
head, K. Ince (Capt.), O. John-
son and C. Evelyn.

Reserves: G. MacLean, B. Pat-
terson. Teams are asked to be
ready by 4.45..

There is another match sched-
uled for Thursday. The Barbados
team to play on that afternoon is
as follows:—M. Foster, M. Fitz-
Gerald, G. MacLean, M. Jordan,
B,. Patterson (Capt.) K. Ince,
G. Foster. Reserves: Trevor Year-
wood, Owen Johnson.

‘They'll Do lt Ever

HAVE TIME TO GET
A PAPER »+> GIMME
PART OF you

here has been no cause yet to
fear the spinners. But the Aus-
tralians succumbed to spin rather
pathetically. r

Wright bowled beautifully. His
leg breaks turned nicely and the
googly stood up rather steeply,

Tattersall made a splendid de-
but,

What a strange manoeuvre was
responsible for him’ missing the
bus in the original selection. His
ability to plod along economically
and to pick up valuable wickets
has strengthened the attack im-
mensely.

England's bowlers have again
given their batsmen the opening.
From a comparatively hopeless
position on the first day when
three wickets only were down for
254 they set to and swung it com-
pletely with a grand effort which
netted them 7 wickets for 117
runs on the second day.

This deserves victory.

Lindwall Outstanding
Lindwall was the outstanding
Australian bowler. He ‘maintain-

eee

N
‘S NOTH.
HIM TRY



BARBADOS. ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1951

Bright Batting In Will Freebooter Win





chance of another victory is by no
means forlorn.
May Not Start

Devonshire Beat
Island 2—0

, e 9 The French chaser, Boomasets

nshi . fi n vyho has been automatically given

cummins” dititied the. tase , : 195 1 G d N t l to weight with Freebooter because

Pe Ror d Ons Pe wae inal T; ta ame ra a iona . nh nar not run in Britain =

2—0 yesterday at the Garrison : f c jhas fun in Britain will
Savannah in a football match, By VERNON MORGAN probably not ta i

would have to be a very excep-
tional horse to win with this
burden at this first sight of the
monster Aintree fences. Next in
the handicap, the Irish crack
Cottage Rake, who is allotted 12
stone 5, is also an almost certain
non-—starter.

The other famous Irish chaser
Shagreen, owned by the British

Both goalg which were scored in
the sevond half of play were
kicked in by right winger Tollis
and centre forward Tayack.
The game started off fast with
jthe island “defending from the
barracks end. Both teams press-
ed each other severely and much
lobbing was witnessed in the goal

Atkinson Scores Fine Century

Mr. John Goddard’s XI.....
Mr. Keith Walcott’s XI.....
(for 8 wkts.) 406

Making his runs all round the
wicket, Dennis Atkinson of Wan-
derers played an unblemished

LONDON, Feb. 3.
Freebooter, the winner of last year’s Grand National, will
go down to history as one of the greatest steeplechasers of
all time, should he win the race again this year.
It would not be so much that
he had won the race in successive
years, though few enough horses

194 om

in giving him
weight possible.

the maximum
It was a fore-
gone conclusion that he would 2¢et



106 retired for nei |




;
|
: have ever done this, but he would top weight, but many thought he ;
area but on each occasion the innings of be winning again with 12 stone, would’not be asked oS carry more preratnan | Jamies FO nade i
keepers were there in position to Keith Walcott’s XI at Kensington 7 pounds in the saddle than 12 stone, 5 pounds. Some given ‘Sen mind’ teoat” oe
pans “ ball back into play. on en oo. final day of play™ Only four horses in the 114 felt that the trainer Bobby Renton ee Though he fell last time in
ae Bert contre forperd pf ~ ne — a Pe eater years’ history of this worla— might not run last year’s winter the National he must now carry
a in the aeer’ half + one fa Stieenaraiet Sane ae eee famous steeplechase have ever if asked to carry such an impost, eight pounds more than last year.
too slow in getting to the bail - Aikinson got his century In 85 won under this weight, Cloister but, Renton though rather dis- Freebooter carries 10 pounds
In the second half the Devon-. minutes. In this aggressive knock (1893), “Manifesto (1899), Jerry appointed that his horse had not more than last year.
shire changed their tactics and he got 18 fours,, He featured in (1912) and Poethlyn (1919). Of been given a few pounds less, Recently in the Grand National
concentrated on low hard passes the day’s best partnership of 141 this quartet the only horse to win said that none-the-less Freebooter chase at Aintree run over part of
which found their way towards the with Norman Marshall, who also the race twice successively was would take his chance. the National course, Shagreen beat
island goal area " "gave a lovely display of batting Poethlyn and in his case the first If Mr. Sheppard has been hard Freebooter by six lengths but the
About 15 minutes after play in for 64 retired. , of the two was a wartime sub- on Frecbooter he has also been Grand National winner was con-
the second half Tayack ‘at centre The wicket however was a bats- stitute race run oyer the smaller somewhat severe on most of his ceding him 10 pounds. R
forward drew first blood when on man’s paradise, giving little or no fences of Gatwick. _ , leading rivals ang the champion’s —Reuter.
receiving a low pass outran Taylor help to the bowlers. This largely | Thus if Freebooter won this SS. —————————————
and finding himself slone on the contributed to Mr. Keith Walcott's year’s race he should rightly stake ' ,
ball with only goal keeper Smith Eleven piling up 406 for 8 on the a claim to a place in the national
to beat, kicked hard and low into tins. On Saturday, Mr. Walcott’s weights. ?
the right hand corner of the nets team had scored 63 for 1 and they Top Weight
to put. Devonshire one up. went on to add 343 to their score DENIS ATKINSON Mr, David’ Sheppard who an- oe
Smith made a great effort to yesterday. Mr. John Goddard’s nounced his weights for this year’s For Busy Businessmen —- |
save but the “ball was well placed, team which took first turn at the race this week may be said to have y 7 Nea

wicket on Saturday, made 194,

' Norman Marshall after batting
was called to bowl against his
team mates and he took 3 wickets
for 26 runs in 7 overs—one of
which was a maiden. His brother
Roy, who took 1 for 31 runs in 5
overs, was the only other bowler
to capture a wicket on Sunday.

got his hands to it but could not
hold it.
The interval was taken with the

With one goal up against them
the island renewed their efforts
to score but goal keeper Noakes
proved a strong opponent for the
forwards. Ten minutes after the
first goal Tollis at right wing re-
ceived a pass from Plumber at
inside left and finding himself
unmarked cut in and scored the

been rather harsh on Freebooter

scoreboard reading 263
Marshall 64 not out and
27 not out.

Marshall retired at 64 and Skip-
per Walcott took out Charlie Tay-
lor with him to resume the in-
nings. ,

‘or «3,
alcott



What's on Today

Exhibition of Sculpture and
paintings by K. R. Brood-

POPLIN SUITING

D Eric Atkinson was very impressive . John Goddard did not take the hagen, paintings and In Fawn, Cream
second goal the ball passing well although he failed. iS Aibexias ? field after lunch as he sat on the water colours by Mar- Beige, and Grey ;

tee ent who had come batsman. Selection Committee. Roy Mar- jorie Broodhagen and :

out of the bars.

Excellent for
Working Suits
54” wide

Per Yard . $2.60

shall deputised for him and used
Norman Marshall in his place,

The new ball was taken on re-
sumption, Eric Atkinson bowled
the first over from the screen end
and Millington came on from the
pavilion end.

The spectators saw Wood, Tay-
jor and Hunte keep wicket on Sun-
day. Wood made two stumps and
brought off a catch. The fielding
on the other hand was not of a
very good standard,

C. Hunte, 40 and D. Atkinson,

paintings and water col-
oO by John Harrison at
‘ os Museum 10.00.

House of Assembly meets
3.00.

With the second goai scored the
Devonshire boys did not slacken
up and about two minutes before
play ended, they tested Smith
completely with low and high
shots. When the final blast of the

whistle sounded most of the play 5, the night watchmen, were Both Walcott and Taylor started | Dr. Cummins is expected to
was still going on in the island’s walking through the pavilions CUtiously while Atkinson and pilot through the second
a area. gate at 1.40 p.m. to carry on a asia | got a lot of swing out reading and the remaining
teams were: *s rerni of tine . stagés, a bill to amend the
Plat: Ges, my eoiemiie coke from Walcott’s XI, overnight ide Mivahed de nih onion snes a bill e

score of 63 for 1.
Skipper Goddard opened his at-

WHITE DRILLS

second ri of the Work-
bons; Gittens, Cadogan, Ishmael; and again beaten. The rate of iene Cotetpention Act,

Taylor, C, Ramsay, Johnson, tack with left arm medium pacer 5COring (was considerably de- 28” wide.
Daniel. E. Millington from the pavilion Cre@sed, the batsmen seldom get- Mr. Adams will take charge ‘
Eevonshire: Noakes; Sleman, end who immediately found a “9g the pacers to the boundary. of a bill to amend the Per Yard :

Nevitt; Searls, Larkin, Plumber;
Box, Tayack; Alltimes, Brimik-
ham, Tollis.

Cricket Tea
Fourteen were selected Sun-
day to represent the island of
Barbados in the Intercolonia!
Tournament with Trinidad sched-
uled to begin on Thursday,

February 15.
They are John Goddard (Capt.)

Taylor had a narrow escape at
17. He edged an outswinger from
Atkinson to Proyerbs at third
slips, who apparently caught the
ball on to the ground,

The pair soon got accustomed
to the new ball and again runs
were coming quickly.

Walcott got 50 runs when he had
been batting for about 30 minutes.

Walcott and Taylor sent up 300
in 225 minutes. :

Walcott went on to make 85 be—
fore he was nicely stumped by
wicket-keeper Wood off Norman
Marshall. He moved down to
drive a good length ball outside

length and sent down a maiden to
Atkinson. -

The other end of attack was in
the hands of Roy Marshall and
Hunte was taking him. unte
pleased the ‘spectators with a
beautiful cover drive for four off
Marshall's fourth ball and the
next ball he late cut past second
slip for another four.

His innings ended the follow-
ing ball when Marshall clean
bowled him, leaving him shaped
for a cover drive.

Commissions of enquiry
Act while Mr. M. E. Cox
is expected to move the
passing of a bill to amend
the Trade Act.

Lady Baden Powell will
attend the Guiders Meet-
ing at St. Michael’s Girls’

' School 5.00.

A team from the H.MS.
“Devonshire” will meet a
Barbados Regiment team
in a football match at
Garrison 5.00.

Mobile Cinema gives show

89¢, $1.01, $1.11







Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

Hunte made 48 and the score
was 71 for 2 Atkinson 5 not out.
Norman Marshall replaced



ek the off-stump and failed to con- at Shrewsbury School CUTEX NAIL BRILLIANOE with a
Eric Atkinson, Dennis Atkinson, bg Sian tected nect. Walcott’s innings included Yard, St. Philip 7.30. Cuticle Spatula in the following lovely
E.L.G Hoad, Jnr. C. Hunte, Roy on Ooe Marshall while Millington 16 fours. Dance at Barbados Aquatic shades: —
Marshall, Norman Marshall, &. still kept up the attack from thd Wickets started to tumble. | Club for personnel of Deep Rose Young Red, Pink Cameo,
Millington, C. Mullins, A, M. vilion at Marshall, all within an over, | BMS. “Devonshire” 8.00 Cotton Candy, Colourless Natural, Sheer
Taylor, Clyde Walcott, Keith PPE OT Gerers pair were by $iaimed the wickets of Walcott, | Ladies team from Barbados Rite meig ee ee eee
Walcott, Everton Weekes and G. this time well settled sparing N.S. Lucas and E. Cave. | Aquatic Club plays a :
Loh nothing short or loose. ‘They sent ,,Wijiiams’ was the eighth wickes | | Water Polo match against that does not damage your Nala,
up the 100 on the tins in 85 min- iP fall. Branker, wha was a Cadet team from H.M.S. ‘4 The following are also CUTEX }}
° ; eo. | tes. rought back from the screen end, “Devonshire,” i LINES:-— 5
Belleville Tennis Pacer Bradshaw relieved Mil- @nticed him to go down the wicket, | A Barbados Men’s team nailed: cheiaes
lington but this did not change Geceived him with a leg break plays a match against = : Bpoeono. GRR
Results of the games played the complexion of the game. and left the rest to Wood who HLM.S. “Devonsh‘re” at 3 CUTEX HAND CREAM
yesterday are as follows: tkinson, especially, was getting Made no mistake in stumping. | Aquatic Club 5.00. CUTEX LIPSTICKS AND REFILLS.

runs quickly. He made powerful Williams made one and the seore

. CINEMAS y buy 2 Jus y fill £
‘ED DOUBLES ( ANDICAP) off, back and cover drives and was 369 for 8. Aquatic Club, wont eu ne Lipsticn Dut inate
iss L. Branch & W. A. Crich~ y4cod on to his 50 after he was _ E. L. G. Hoad partnered Taylor nee eaeve Me” .... 8.20 always on CUTEX PREPARATIONS,

low beat Mrs. A. A. Gibbons yt the wicket for about 40 min- At 46, Taylor was given a chance EGhein Ligeia 4.30 & 8.30 Obtainable at Messrs Booker's (B'dos)

. H. A. Skinner 4—6, 6—3, utes. Marshall was then 16 not by Sportage fielding at mid-on Pitza {Otbtin) , Drug Stores Litd., Broad Street, and
. out. off the bowling of Millington. “Sune Pride’ and Alpha Pharmacy, Hastings.

Mrs. R. Bancroft & P. M. With the scoreboard reading 150 The ball went on to the tobnd: olane: a Maes ft Be Oa *“* BOOKER’S ”’

Patterson vs Miss Ramsay and for 2, made in 113 minutes, spinner ary to make Taylor 50. “Summer-stock” .... 5 && 8.30

Mrs. Benjamin. Unfinished . W. Greenidge was brought on Taylor got another chance at Olympic:

from the pavilion end and later.
Branker from the screen end.
Spinner or pacer, all were treat-

“A Message To Garcia”
and “The Foxes of
Harrow”

65 when he gaye a hot return to
Millington, chest high.
The pair played out time with

TODAY’S FIXTURES
Men's Doubles (Finals)

-_ IO
i TE, ce



P. M. Patterson and G. H. a alike by Atkinson and Taylor not out 70, and Hoad not
> WY P Marshall. From off the back foot, out 13. At the clo.
seenrane Ve BF, Thy ane it was four runs to the mid-on le close of play the





score was 406 for 8.
Dr. C. Manning. SpUpeary on to the fence behind a F Th
Mixed Doubles (Handicap) the bowler. Another time they ik. K. WALCOTT’s XI W ;
Miss Branch and W. A. Crich- Were down the wicket while the C. Hunte b R Maranon Sate 48 od eather
low vs Mrs, Legge and C, A. ball fetched the boundary. Crisp cw. smith Lb.w. EB. Millington.. 18 Sun Rises: 6.18 a.m.
Patt cuts, powerful hooks and fino D. Atkinson retired ......... see 106 Sun Sets: 6.00
SE OOERTD » eran “es he N. Marshall retired 0.03) ga 5 SY In.
glances came from the bats of the XN: Marsha stad Menta anand Moon (First Quarter) Feb-
peir. Pi? Mareholl +. ies oy check tela fruary 13
‘HEAP » \ They sent up 200 after 135 A. M. Taylor not out |...) ' ee | - 8
CHEAP DAIRY PRODUCTS minutes of play, Norman Marshall N. 8. Lueas © (wkpr: Wood) b. N. pais: 6.30 p.m.
WELLINGTON, N.Z. getting 50. ce is oe saa Rage ee ee, oe
No country in the world can Three overs after, with a J, Williams stpd. (wkpr. Wood) b .
supply food of animal origin more flash of his bat, Atkinson sent | Branker 2.0.0.0. 06000..cccceee ee 1 YESTERDAY
cheaply than New ~ Zealandya ball from Branker through the © feet Not OUL ..... ss... 4 Rainfall (Codrington) .30 in.
according to E. Bruce Levy, noted] covers for four, to give himself maven See at Tétal Fer Month to Yester-
grassland farming expert who has|a century. He added five more Total (for 8 wickets) ........ 400 day: .38 ins.
Just completed a world tour on}yuns to his score before retiring. Bes gt sacle: vitae ae Temperature (Max.) 81.5 °F
behalf of the government. —CP).|" “With the score at 217 for 3, 4 Ty of juekets: JS. 3-71 39-217.) | mPemperature (Min.) 71.5 °F
Keith Walcott joined Marshall. -' “BOWLING ANALYSIS Wind rection: (9 a.m.)
Walcott was quickly off the mark Oo. k



S.F. (3 p.m.) N.E.



M. R. WwW.

ed his pace and delved in with] @nd with Marshall, kept up the eo Res re | x 3 Wind Velocity: 5 miles per
enthusiasm but Hassett used him fost rae of are set by the At- K. sBranker i } m 9 ut 9 hour.
sparingly, No other Australian | *!nson—Marshail pair, yt : Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.963, . -_ : .

ms : Walcott got a chance when he B® Marshan .... Sera 1
bowler with the exception of BE. K. Bowen ...... oe. 8 23 (3 p.m.) 29.911.

tao Ho was 17. He pulled one from wy Tie ier e f
Sennen arias bie Se ee Branker to mid-wicket, Proverbs N. mie we 8. Ye $ he SMART and DURABLE or







Wright to hit the worn patch
often enough to get the Austra-
lians out cheaply enough to allow
for victory. But with Bedser and
Tattersall in support, the oppor-
tunity is definitely there.



















TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS

New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White

. MASSEY-HARRIS

Sizes: 6—11
1 believe that this match is
bound to provide an extremely E UIP ENT 4 1 60
interesting finish, : Ls PRICE: e

By Jimmy Harlo
7 vSED To Ear ||
Jiseeaccast in

THE DEPOT, TLL
HE INVITED HiM=

Enquiries cordially invited for

supply of the following—

the

have New Stocks of...

Unitex Insulating Wallboard

TERMITE-PROOF, } ins. thick



_ 42 BLELP. 6 cyl. DIESEL WHEEL
TRACTORS

(Steel Wheels also available for
Plough)

GRASS CUTTERS = 3



4 ft. wide by 8ft. 9 ft; 10 ft; 12 ft. long

Standard Hardboard

14 ins. thick; 4 ft. x Sfi; 8 ft. 10 ft.
3/16 ims. thick 4 ft. x 8 ft.

Tileboard

Cream, White and Green
4 ft. x 6 ft. and 4 ft. x 8 ft.

@
PHONE 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid.

The

above

equip-
available for

ment is & Git

early delivery from

U. K.

COURTESY
GARAGE

(YW ROBERT THOM Ltd.

. MANURE SPREADERS
the

SIDE DELIVERY RAKES

Germs A CHARACTER
ANALYSIS OF THE FREE-

FEER MILLS
LOADING COMMUTER =:

‘THANX To
MICHAEL. T. DI ROMA;

29 POMEROY TER.
NORTHAMPTON , MASS,

FERTILIZING DRILLS



418






PAGE 1

PAGE TWO BAHRADOP ADVOCATE TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 6 IK C^^annnnns. -y^aata. ., • '^^ 11 %  A *#M %  ^tfflB PICTURED -liortljr si tor they arrived at Senvel) yesterday are Counts** of Brecknock, Awt. Lady Supenntondent-tn-Cnisf (Over••*) and Lt. Oen. Sir Otto Lund, Commliuloner in Chief of the St. John Ambulance Brigade. They are duo to leave for Trinidad today. Former B.W.I.A. Hostess M ISS JUNK BIRCH, former B.W.I.A. hostess who had been spending a holiday in Barbados, staying at Stafford House, returned to Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A. Short Visit M R. LIONEL GITTENS was among the passengers leaving for St. Lucia on Saturday by I) W I A. to spend a week'* holiday staying with Mr. Herman Boxilt. Inspector of Schools In St Lucia. Area Enjrineer HfR. ROB'' GREENE, Area Sngineer of International Acradio Ltd. in the Caribbean, arrived from Trinidad over the week-end. Ho will be here for -me veek, before leaving for Antigua. With Barclay's Bank T,fR. BRIGGS WILLIAMS, sor* of Mr. ami Mrs. B William* of "Floris Dale", St. John returned to St. Lucia on Saturday by B.W.I.A. after spending a short holiday arll-i nis parents, wiKfts Is with Barclays Bank in Castries. Cleveland Lawyer M f urvvrSS J£< visitor! Bar'"^ nOKtmir BABSLBT) t* oil spring flowers, and filled suit. . pockets on evening dress LsssskBs,tmttven? wm xhv n t^"" •"• the London iT-"tB „u%* M-rii OnSnO Jr^vcM through with ease from 9 to 6defers trope for originality. T V*^! r^Jl !" TsS rtlav bvTCA lho *hPP"K " << %  "avolbng. M ATTU introduced an unusual Ne. T££ n VE^S"two mntiv' And & *V i>;,r !"•>. •! *fi-holstcrpocket; the material 'SSZ^%^T M ^Z^'iT Progr HJ.J \< Z. Windsor Hotel th *>' llkc ' %  • cl n "' vh h wa* doubled back to stand out ^/'7 . K^"!'',^ Mr y B2 fc?s, rSKetl CivM PnablP '^m to do it all in comrtm | v on cilh er side of the ? !" :L**\"n ^V" 2*5' 'X*" TM. *. thatV fourth fort as wel1 ai aXyl iaeket front Eniiineer. This is their """" Tn i s ycar therefore the skirt' Vi "!.. iS? .^ i.ii ,w in the spring collections, although PETER RUSSEl.I, showed they are neat and straight, are not number of three-piece ensemble* First Thoughts On The Couture Collections New* An.l>.l Nicholas .. _nt L*Ii-r rrom Am-rlc*. • %  m The Newi. a.19 i. Home New. from Btll.li>. Ill am. Close Down. II.IB a.m. >n|t.iiimr Ills a.m. Auilralia VB> EngUnd. ..._ _nv Repod from Brlialii. II %  nooni MuaiiTeacher pencil-slim. Designers have m angora wool. He calls his JW N**>*. uia p m. N* Amlnia, .^^ .„ ,Ww M,..lc ""^ 1 alve easo for walking and colours wisteria, lichen green and UM pm. cton Down. ISS W. C. WASON. Music f ^ f movemenl bv pro yn,.^ caiT0 Th,, dresses have •-•. i Teacher - '" %  L T. GEN. SIR OTTO LUND. Commissioner in Chief of the Touring W.I. Si John Ambulance Brigade and *R ;md Mrs. Bernard IhoCWintaaa of Brecknoca, AatlatIVl son arrived from England via a Th.-> witc IBM Seawell bj 1M1X2-?U7W2 ML^S Mr T A ; ^-""t ,T.i h.S s k'* h v r %  "•"" %  I S^rls were w.'* M-— 1),. ItorcU SCMW. 0„nn,.ndrr in U ZS fi^Tlho U s ^?clS S ^""' ' BG """ Skelchert here are skirt del. I. mm* KralfM. Jaekeu tailored *£"• the Order of Ihe Grand Priory of a()o SUving With CoUlin !" m Ronald Palerson'. colleetlc ffu, and lome were rnau. at %  .au Grand ttol.l. I U Mui Jf.i v Tf' l, 'i < i r .' l "i" ih 1" Mr ^if 1 ""'"" '<'> i— . pital i.f SI. John of Jerusalem, rcl t„ r „t A.-nv" %  p,c den "' ehoiee David InntJ.. Mr Mitha.l TimpS.'r eD S n l 'Y. S"L ri 115a':E a,cr,on Lo ch C S "'.Cleveland. KemembeH „ t lh ., London >n Mr. Ojlln Bayley, Mr. Bryan '"'SJJ c "' '" '" %  expeeted to T hi!i company makes .teel girders ^.inn,,, c .„. and do, stoop to ,b.e.lfe. Ian Christie ,„d Mr. %  '^"^"Z!"^ Sea.ell b, "XLOH. fSUKjF 5£!?^S "••>>'. . "" " !'"" !" > n. Pnmiul lmpiailoni of m. Kadko Nrktml. SIS p.m. L&>chanS'. %  4* p.m. Compoarr — !" ...'li • pm ftarporl from Britain exclusive ten of the Incorporated •** made of the same matcria. is pm H-y Matt.., and i.u OtchMt !" Society of London Fashion as the suit. white gloves gjgfcJg*n^tyjy>,tta Designers-showed an interesting 2Jtrt!It?.£!2iLrS ""* b^Z o-ntln ,? P "" GH"^1:: variation on the straight .km. and while checked suit . large to a rwiv.i ai giium. u V c t-l i k i.ivc on lapel of blue linen s : .mi>h..i,y Orrhviira. S EVEN nambars of the RocklaN Golf tea Mrs. h a< i a separate panel which iwung out attractively. But for country wear the skirt pleated all round is still the first hoice This company makes steel girdc: Ian Christie and Mr. —-g %  %  "^ ar.a. ,,->"> other hllings tor build Raymond lrarrti Mt-. ; ,n-l Mrs. Rr T.*V M Mn w SN ST";? 8 V n * !" d wl, j! BtM 1 ;, T*"?; ar T jackets," such as the buttoned Jim O'Neal arrived restard*) *2 u £ f c-,^ n Ania u ^ rln ^y'"' ^ ^ v '* w oW1 basque illuslrat^l ban, cnpl.mfirnnio by H.W.I A. %  ,rfl e, a* Mr. Chftatle and Mrs Bayley T C A j.rriv.1, P,,t v "" ent who veo*pnlod Ihe nun re_ .„ ,,.' .... NY Old llarrisonian who can turned on 0un.l...v. S|l! Ita "u<"o Villlcr. ^ lake Ihe hall day off from OH To Triniaad ,,*;""IS":;,, '.TTI' A""!? .3 work •"-'"""' afternoon, will K^^n^.iSS'iaa : 5! "vu'lfe-r, 0 ?". =• .tTV^JTirtel-. L:'.'.. .' l r Ti-'iMad yesterday hy lumber merchant in Montreal. mat Jh begins at IpjS: on the 0,1 College grounds. The Past team .. %  follows. Kenneth Mason B.W.I.A. on a-short holiday.' Her Dr arid Bin ri.uidieJ husband t3^ :\' Beawell to see her from Edmonton ;ire also down for p "Z month, coming in on the same 1-j f > .1 In*. They ore \v% Carnival i> u-i Wind! O NLY .jvc paascngari came in on lVv-a Ihghts ft.mi Trinidad ment the waist, even if It i .1)rcidv (here. Jnckels hen Knotv Uta aaaaral Unag of CHAHLI-S CREEDS coUacUon Suit jackvti have Ion* ICVCI down as far as the one button at ( he waist; several suits bad giMront jacket*, tut like waistcoats. One of his suits, in narj bav: Rupert and the Sketch Book-28 yesterday Xy B.W.I.A. They wen, %  **!( VICTOR CATIICART. Mr. Clarence Skinner. Dr. A. L. HitBariet, a member of the XTL Chemical Engi Barbados golf team, his wife, and Canada Dry on^AmerUtfin businessman. from the U.S. for the spring. Hut tl A few day, .*j*. "SSTL. Illlhla lo Trini.l:.,! were bolh i.lcome down to open and for Ihe Adams shaping up for a eover "".to %  uul "; "'" ~* '""„" '"" „ "I"'">! "' 'SG !> %  > Co.. drive at the ouenliVl of the DMW-nne colour, launehed last Reason: Its Camiv.,1 In Triadol llarbad.* which eipectl li Optra eons Road plavlnf Held. If Ihi. year have l>eeii senl lo lb. laun.r, dad and everyone that call is soshortly here If.ru met at Seal en indication of the lyre of "nd have come back faded. '"• well hy Mr Don I'l.iirmonuone itrokes we shall see to-morrow Tones are muled, with With Coco Col" of the Directors of Ihe Co. lie i* afternoon, it should be entertain"nd sandstone prominent In all M.VS& EttS: S : '' "'""' "laBir* Wa served lo Oh, H.r^t*>*> new ^^WiS^ I L^fflSrtSatlnS: ^"A..er l |he n?..cn e ,nS^ol ^I^i'^l^f h'ha^! tuS ff^J^^waaa is/V'Si-t ad-tCSnr S o-c,e;,Ton^ss B'i3n?i^inX* T Aii!3r in inmoan. Maurice I.uclc-Sinilli. pm. to 7 p.m. Morton made it into an elegant BY THE WAY dinner gown, which 1 with a multi-coloured chifTt stole. %  Cvening Dresses As eUwwrt, the main faatu at NOMAN HAHTNKU/S coian selection of Robert i cct i on was hk evening dresses H\' Itiurlii-ninhrr ^OHWKJIAN Chemist* it says, not only a cad, bul a bad slorv the Every. taiS-Lri J P L?*A i h r ril ro s on "• hoved in to tunely. for it Includes thai lillic w ( h embroidery One called riil^?iJI ,i c< urs '' ," '-, "'' U P *!"**. w because the aumasterpiece. "Dr. Johnson and ^Hariaqulnado' was of pastel a** better than natural thor doesn't knmv h-w to go on Company" Here Is Lynd's concoloured nrgan/a squares divided the story. S, let us leave cise and Just explanation ol by bead embroidery Even the 'Jin itopi before tht van Michel N^iwood and ihcy put' up in aunahmt. A ihey get down the lint perio.i they see i Cannabic Growler itandmg ourwde his police %  alien V the sight of bin Rowlr ti 'i M hsj J-.VI, isam. I and the driver hold het firmly. When they nwch Mat. Conitable Crotaler Ictthet Rotalie't pirjwl and her boi.of candied (rum. "So you've found her, Rupert." he uyi. '• V^.'oa. ka.aa. I I~ V ' ^ V •You've be: did ihe run Rotaiie *on'i i Rucarra lorg lime. Why y from ire?" But y a Wd, New Loveliness For You !" r .tLHoi.il i : sou* i^ Follow this Simple Beauty Phut i m TOUI race with Palmollte SOTO f D.. thU J -inn. .i intain r.ili.1,1 beauillrlng ft., It IS propr-scd to dneJ white or.itc it at ttwL Her f,tce was ghastlv. Bos well's rather tiresome slavishrrinnncunn had difficulty in keep 1; nut with us in.riii.il ugline^x. ness in the presence of his hero: ing the crinoline—the larsMal nd iiuddjntts and oakea, :.. give v ; hIrn wns ncr mtaloetuiia rather "A dinner at Mrs. Thialc's tvu imaginabh—under control in the them a nuvour of cod All we t an ner f 8 ""but with .in amonot merely a momenlary entei • crowded salon. He showed n frivwant now b pure fish-tails pro,W)n which i child would have talnment -it which good manners oloua evening hat made to look duced Ircjni the yolks of eggs as leeognised us terror, nay. •UKI.. were all-Important, bul a potential like a white mask wUh a Ion* flavouring matter fur the n*a ''" %  "'' phrase fDaa. Tl,r .,.-iie in a umsterpiece. demandtrail of leathern down beside the mrnt made from untanned hi.lc^. l>nit eye of alalpractlca did no-, ma the mannerless application ot fnc f %  IC\Ji:il Svo nourmou (tohrtrtfl overlook her idmht. Why. ha an artist." VICTOR ST1EBEL introduced orer Oft coa-mp filled with asked himseir. should the mention starched linen collars and cuffi holve-eilrflrt ) wf a circus horse upset her so Marginal .\ole * various shapes, some with fruit Murder at UuikhufHt (Mill muchAnd what the devil was §EEM to hear sardonic laugh(alrawhcir cs rr apples) ot wrasrsHjsarinrarai (ran; |( hj rf any-thin..* I t(Vr frnm hB _.__,. whl flower (carnation or mimosat 1 A D V GIOOUMWOtWira Ahal I, who m „, S, ZSZ S t n SfnJd Zt of fff hnm? """"Hon. DIOBV MORI IJ lacerwas ghastlj Mark you n** 1 asking myself any such que'. „ , , „ _, a bigger plane, for £30.000.00. Lut an author who stops in the Kottfrt l.ymt on llonu-ell would be more Ukcly to bc rP middle of a story to pass churl, 'i r\H JOHNSON and Boswell jpcted quickly enough to mak remarks about a woman's face i being very much in the i evictions unnecessary. CONGOLEUM SQUARES 80 53 3x2* yds $8 3x3 yds $10. FLOOR-COVERING {Falt-Base) 3x3* yds. $12. 3x4 yds 414.' 04. per yd — $V 6 ft wide 31, DIOBV olio uaed flowers for decoratt mimosa aeema the most popula P.S. For bath antl showc-r. jet the thrifty Bath \i/,' Ptl DOCTORS PROVED PAlfjIQllVP'S BEAUTY RESULTS JANETTA DRESS SHOP TPSTAIRB OVER NEWSAM'S. Imirr Broad SI. Phone 2684 READV MADE DRES8ES of all lipea HOI.I.EN THIN SETS—Loral Handkrafl EVENING MITTENS—In Pastel Shades and Blatk READY-MADE DRESSES In materials by liberty, of London. Hiil its : Mondays to FRIDAYS ID lo 3.M SATURDAYS 8.S0 to 11 JO Ma : %  .-, GLOBE l,a*t Khowlng TO-DAV S A 8.30 P.M. SI MUI It-S I1H h >,%,',-,',-.',;'*'--. Eddie Bracken TO-MOKROW A THl'RI>4l>AV 4.45 A lt.30 HOLIDAY IN MKXICO 'Jo** lturbl) AND "t'msisivw,*. '.'a.',-,*.*,* .•.WSt^'SSS*', 'SSSSSSS.'SSSSSS.; • %  EVANS and JWHITFIELDS %  YOUR SHOE STORES EVENING HANDBAGS One of a Kind al WIIITFIELD'S only :— 111 \( K IIK.Wy CORDED FABRIC from $14.75 BLACK & TINSEL BROCADE from 12.S3 NYLON?—New Ranuc. Popular Sliatles .. l.W ENAMEIWARE A wide rinp' lo srkrt Irta... CUPS and PLATES DINNER CARRIERS JUGS SAUCEPANS KITCHEN SINKS BASINS CHAMBERS TOILET SETS SOAP DISHES TABLE TOPS Slocked by our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT Telephone No. 2039 I III II VIIMAIM'S O-OI'I HA I l\ I! COTTOX I Al lOIIV LTD. AOU ATlf CLVH CINEMA (Members Only! TO-NIGHT and TO MORROW NIOHT AT t3$ MATIMCl; To-MOHItOW : I S p IT Mmirpf'i OHAJtA Dxk HAYMESlUrrv JAMTA In "DO .in LOVE ME" In Teehnieolor A SSth Ct.li.rv Fit. PtcUir*. MATMBBl TlllR-SDAV HI i i> %  THURSDAY NIGHT .1 i Tyron* POWER—Jr ai PTTTH-S In "CAfTAIN FROM CASTILE." in Terhnlcolour. A SSth Cxnturv-Foi; Plclur*. PLAZA Tifntrr—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310, laAST TWO W*d. •M Tliur. 4S and • JO pm II Wanipt. THhnlcolor MIIIMMI' UAlCttTCK OF BOSIt: OUKAIlVll Mi %  IT i ii c : Jmit HAVER—flixdon MrRAE I PLAZA Theiurt— OISTIN (DIAL 8404) LAST TWO SHOWS T\> :.AV i mti I ;: %  :: %  .. ls..f.'PS M BBM & *SM a.,. :, ..ml Bi, ti in. ion AND SO THKY HI HIMAKHHU p-riiert MITCHVM and olhu*. and OON'T '"I'll WITH STBANOtBrl Kn* l'HIIMONO Glorw WAKRFN GAIETY — (THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES I.AST SHOW TONTTE SJOR K O Double! George O'Brien (in both) "BOKIlKR G MAN" TIMBER STAMPEDE" • K.K.O. DoublKi WEDNSHDAY and THURSDAY 8.X p.n 7^uic GREY S V/ANDtRtR ot lh WASTELAND fit BROTHERS m lh* SADDLE 'urn*, WARREN ** T,m ,, LT IIIUIV). M1DKITK SAT. I'fcH TNI alNUI THAI 1. 1011 ll Ne* %  nd D.MH Fivi.il. \ Mil. %  AMOtRI / EMPIRE To-day To Thuradaj 4.45 and 134 Columbia Pictures Presents FAUST AND THE DEVIL Starring Italo TAJO and Nelly CORRADI wllh Clno MATTER A ROXY Last Two Shows To-dm> 4.45 and S.15 p.m. Universal Piclures Preen: | Maureen O'HARA — Maedonald CAREY in "COMANCHE TERRITORY" Will CEER and Charles nitAKi: ROYAL To-day and Tomorrow 4 30 and 8.30 United Arllsts Double Pal O'BRIEN onri Wayne MORRIS in "JOHNNY ONE-EYE and "BREAKFAST IN HOLLYWOOD" wllh Tom BRENMAN antl Andy RUSSELL OLYMPIC I.aSTTwo Shows To-dsy 4.30 and 8.IS 20th Century Fox Double Wallace BEERY ami Barbara STANWYCK in "A MESSAGE TO GARCIA "THE FOXES OF HARROW" Rex HARRISON and Maureen O'MAKA SELECT YOURS EARLY PILES NEGLECTED, MAY LEAD TO SERIOUS OPERATION Many people suffer in silence untold agonies, constant brain-wearyingirriutioii and pain caused by piles, simply because. they have never discussed this trouble with j even such a confidant as (heir chemist. II. you are a sufferer, make up your mind to I ask your chemist about the wonderful preparation Man Zan This clean, simpleto-uM remedy is just marvellous m the quick way it stops the maddening irntatioa, | allays tnfiammauon and. persevrred with. [ banishes the most serious form of this i agonising trouble. Man Zan Pile R-tnedv i, no ordinary I ointment, but a special preparation solely I (or those with p-l* trouble. It is prepared in a special no/ile apphciior tube, making it simple and clean i 0 ule Sold by i chemists everywhere. ManZan PILE REMEDY' Bathroom Requisites Porcelain Basin* in White. Pink, Ivory and Oreen Low Down Toilet Suites In White. Pink. Ivory and Green. Chromium Soap Dishes. Tooth Brush and Tumbler Holders, Toilet Paper Holders.'Curtain Rings. Brim tVoM U'ir-v 2 ft. wide In the following meshes: — 120/120, IO0/100. 1*0 90. 40'40 PL.vvr.vrioxK LTD. SJLg ,;


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EAON743C2_KR9WSZ INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T14:55:18Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02501
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

TUESDAY, ri RRIARY S 1S3I BARBADOS. ADVOCATF f PACE SI'VI N CLASSIFIED ADS. TtLLPHONl 2901 l MMRRUL CHARLOTTE At tilB TA Al her rralderir*' "Sea Croce' Worthing ChrlW Ch..rrr> The fu neral will iNVt her late itMrrm -i *i0 thi. .ft.coon f... BM ..% %  bury CnnfWn Frlendi *rr invited C. E C*nnlrWI E B. rnmvniri. Oig* Collins g i SI in CITTtK* Ve.trrd*,* at her rrudri.ee Saint Matlhiaa Road. Chrlit Church. AVNir. laOtTaSK The funeral I—**. I.er late reaidencr al 4 IS clock Ihl* evening for Sam: Manila* Church ^n1 IWw. to the Waatbury L>m.Ui Frlenda are invited. Beatrice Martin Eualace and Muriel CtKHIow. CvnlhU Pindar. Joyce GINII. Violet i -net. 61 to —in. Monad MANOAII I^at night St hit residence Pu|t Rsed. funeral will IMI* hia 1 al 4 JO pan Ihia BrflvRvoon (i Weitburv Ometery. Friend. I Lid V .i FOB Hk\T HOUSES CHAM-ERVLANV .hureh Appl> Dar .venue, thai MM BOW -eortt* and ipplv to Mr* Harmony Cottage 91. CANAAN'. RaUwheba. ilbbOna. Phone Mil -KBMBOnr. .a .de nalhehetJ*, to approved tenant, IT optional Available I For paitM-ulara dial 1 pt S.tnda io | award AP£Y (TRINIDAD) OILFIELDS LIMITED 17.* thirty-Am Annual General of wells drilled during ihe year. Meeting of Apex (Trinidad) Oilfields Limited, WM held at Winchostcr House. Old Broad Street, London, EC. in January. Mr. Malcolm Maclachlan. chair man and joint managing director, said:— in our control to avoid bOaMing up J high cost period of high revenue, in v Ol :he consequent bun %  would be placed upon the indu ii v in the event of a recession ou price*. will agree that % %  l the year is most satAt the same time the division of that profit provides a sinking illustration ot the benefit erived from the success ot atf and PHrMIsm No 6 Mwan Street Uplair. PieiTine. vary ipacloui and cool J| table tor Factory. Agent. Other £*" %  solicitor*, or Society Apply %  haul Bra. or Dial MM 1.51 -, %  i??"**?^?*" r A comloriable fully .-ni.hed Buugalow *t Worthing. 4 Bed wm*. l"r,dgc. Telephone. Radio. Oarag. r>d available Immediately. Dial am c i %  UM-Jn %  atjaif TORAQE APACE .ullabla foi id. and Warehouse* App'i Me Co. Lid. Dial 4(11 xl sympathy In our r. I occaatoned by ihc paiang ment Alonaa llaynr. FOR SALE AUTOMOTIVE CAR-1*30 Moir. Minor R IIP. Black Sedan. rtcelleni condition. Owner leaving Colony Apply Hainilion. Merry Hill. Wei. he-. Si. Michael. Phone Ml • 111—an CAR-Model A-Ford. In good rondi. (Ion iA 110). Apply to Arthur Duron, (.reenland. St. Andrew. B1SIIn CAR-SIudebaher IMI Model, in ecelleni condition Price SI.SS* 00 Apply B'dm Agenda*. Ring Evelyn twos. B doAgencle" Ltd. SS.3l.-Sn. Ift4 Van*ball iVelom MI 00 or 4TS axil-SB, ELECTRICAL riJXTRWSTOVE-ln pertec ONE TURNER WAl.KElt DRtt-t PKES. eleetrtcall' driven. new. Apply: Mr. R, de Soura. Co T Geddei Grant Ud. IJ.il—Sn. RADIO Phillip* 5 Tube Radio IMC Model, perfect condition. Telephone 117) Reaaonable Price. ••!—In FURNITURE MAHOGANY CHRBT of Drawer*. Book Cae. Child'a Trtcrle. Ret Uaed Golf Hub*. Child! Seauw. Phone M7I. IU1In MISCELLANEOUS nor—On* Hi Board i [hop arid 'hedrool Slii > venue. Alley ne Land Uleyiw B.. h IU>II • island the wells which have yielded the production for the year stand in the balance-sheet at the modest figure of £ 138.000. During the year under review our CP.U. ependaur. 1 yd SSn-T-fcTo UMU other lhn well, exceeded p^pu ol Trinidad Tne balanceshcel shows that Hie amount written on in respect %  the eapiul of £550.000 and the of depreciation by £47.000. Thicapital reserve of £230.000 remain is amply covered by tne appro, unchanged. General reserve has priation of £450.000 from the i Lecn Increased by £450.000 out of profits of the year to general rcthe profits for the year, and now serve, bringing It. as I have stated, |anos at £1.200.000 Developto the sum of £ 1.100,000. ment and contingencies reserve During the year we drilled amounts to £800.000 and un.p82.371 ft. in continuance of our lime thc~Oov, proprlated .profit Is £223.000. Our programme to obtain production MUcSSw T" — %  % %  ? — .*-- %  %  to extend the tested areas of ,,e, and direct taxation, and. %  SyPJX^lS ." •?. e2a3 ~ ""• Property. Eleven wells were iddition. the limed Ki,.:.. rTtrSoooo"K''"!; completed in the Mam Field and tlovemm^t will lake furlhc, t ,i ?,„ %  V 0, furrent seven in the South Quarry area. £250.000. If I mav put It another liabilities including current taxaInteresting developments eonway, lor ever, £1 drawn by th. tinue in Ihe Synclinal rone. Well ownaffi of the business approxiNo. 481. where at the time of our rnatt4T £5. 17s. lod. Is taken by On the other side of the balance'**' """"s! ""'> the lowest sand •'. %  t wo Governments, sheel the (Ixed assets stand at had bMn !" 1M n0 ""ig Moreover, it is primarily in the £27.00O, which represents the goo i P'oduclion from the man, • %  Iciest of those to whom lha rapital expended upon the pro"*• „ „ r !" '"*." "',"'* '""P" !" "" " TK> % %  —' ". %  — ••'•" %  "rnment, which draws — TRINITY COTTAQEV-Sl J.mr. C.uit riillv lumlUiMl coiilalnuil 3 blin.. "Tallabl. (or montlu of F.bruar' to Ma. ana Auaust lo December ml pnn. %  •a. tnsiP DMLI C SA LES UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER M.r Upright. CorSel Ire T.iblr. On Wedi R. H Streat -e will %  ) at "Bloomabury'' St Thoniaa _. — which Include — Table. Waggoni. Tea Trolley. ind Arm Chair.. Mocker-, (modern' OHM-HC.. Ornament De,k. Wntlng Table, vert HandT" .'••'" %  -O"'""". and Mir'd Screen all In Mahogany Glau ware. Dinner and Tea Scivlce. Ornament, and Va*> spoons. Pbrka and cullery. PKIUTM and laiminga. Coi.gnleum. Chiming and Striking Clock.. Mir d HatMand Stmnb Bedhead. Pma. Dre>!i n g Table. MT Wai.Ui.d all in Mohogany Single Iron Beditead.. Wa.h*nd.. Screem. a Pre.-. neatly new O.Cc. Electric Magnet Wove with 1 Hot Plate.: I-rder., KltLAN A CO„ All' l !' % %  -.< 'I£408.000 in ilnal 'ottloment for oil delivered in prior years. In future each year will reflect the ^ene on a basis related to c-s. of the industry, upon whi< 1 delivered ,,_,„., United States have thiwelfare of Trinidad REAL ESTATE Mahoaniv who with friend. In the Oft. A merle fUuroui of bn.ing fo, c*.h To be aoltj n Ihe U.S. America. Apply to C Holder. IWerpn.*. Chrip Church Gap. Attorney for the IMale lor full information. j si -lei 'oierldge Rlreet. rertilieer lor er garden. V 0* Archer'. Drug UAHIS — In PorceUIn Enamel, In White. Green, Primroae with matching unlU to rn.nplele colour ..ilte.. Top grade. A. HAIC.ES fk Co.. Ud. SB.1.SI—t.fn. iHiLimrN WARM tMamojura— In many eoloura ako White 11 .T each Modern Dreea Shoppe. 1 J.SL—Sn. DMH PORM-One Hi Adjustable Dree. Form Slcp A. . Apply Hamlllon. Merry Hill, Welches. Si Michael amin GALVANISED PIPE In Ihe following %  ireSin., Win., Sin. 1 In.. IS.Ina, I in... 1'. In. 3 in! and 4 In*. Abo (IIi I.K Enquire Auto Tyre Company. Trafalgar Rireet. Phone SSM. 3 2 it ifr PORTABIX TREASURF mattrew—practically new. ini-i" :COSSOI.IAtV MINFJtAI, We have i" rtaeh Kotwllan Mineral llh Vlt D BH L'altle and Poultry )'• lb. al*o Koaaollan Pcullrtf Soice for improving egg prolb. KNIOKTS LTD. 4.S.5I—Sn. INDIESTEE IIIIHT^ r.i.d aaaorted eoloura 1. COATS lor the cool evei wine. fawn, beige and grey h Modem Dree* Shoppe. 3 Ml-dn PRETTY WHITE VELVET IVENINO CAPES — tli.00 e^ch Modern Drea* S.ioppe. >J1—4". IM HI.lt .'.OTIIRS £25, ea.il. ( med by obtaining e Chrlatmai Carda from your friend* No prevloui eperl ence twetaaary. Write today for beautiful free wimple Book to Britain'! larger.! and foramoit PabH-hen. hlg^eal (fiti'ilMlan; marvellous money making opportunity. Jonea. William* a. Co.. : < % % %  • VlctorU Worki, Preaion. Ireland." JSlH-lan HOUSE11 Tn be Been Belleville. in... II "DtNaiNANK" COUNTRY. ROAD. ST. MIC1IAFI.. The reudence lately occupMd by Mr.. W. O Collymore. The liouae itanda In well kept gardev.a aCtf ground! i] acrea Jl perchen. The whole comprloe* verandah, draw%  ng and dining room., S bedrootnii. on* with marble bath. 1 ihowen, 1 lavatorlae, convenient kitchen and pantry, r-oma for S aervanU. garage lor cara. Water auppli lor garden and ground* from a well with null; water acrvice in houre and alao eeryanta roomi nho*.-r and lavatoryl. The residence complete!v wired and elect ric lighting from from the dU L^ n ifdon a uncT a New York exoen^"en 1 11 durln " yMr from d'roctly depends, has to be milnturi. rn.i airejj!wtorrSl.fmEtT. increased realisations in terms of t.uned in the lace of exception!Tntiri; IT }£, H? erl.ng. At the .mo time, wherea || y difficult geological condTtiOOI %  .mouTTn F nwn LH n K "" *• bcnenl ot >-l"atlon has 1(1 ^. outpu, ,,„ well, and the SSX&m^liS'SS'tSl^ *£ /hfcon^^rris^'n'woS! t-'ly iKerea^d .! of drtlllm, n Trinidad and the United Kin*ffcS^S^Stot^.* S l *i£!^ t tV?TL2&* doin. the net profit for the ye..r h( ca5P D f materials was some!" !" \Z: '* ^ ,' .'' K fc „, is £669.000. The unappropr.what sharply accentuated toward. "I 0 ? 1100 .^ "";„', r l^Z oted profit brought forward from the close of the year. "** *£* fffl&ta! .K ^ the previous year Is £196.000. As our balance-sheet show*., \ !" Ulu ' T "^L d thor. I making a total to be dealt with our financial position is one of the "uppl"''" ' !" Of £8G3.00O. Inlertm dividend great strength, which is neccssl"* %  * *J world production: No. 60. paid in July last, amounttated partly by the very considRisk, Boldness uml hnterprise ed to £55.000. and £450.000 has erable decrease in the purchasing The tradition of the oil indiisbeen transferred to general repower of sterling, particularly as try has always been one serve. regards drilling and other oil boldness, and enterpiise. and the We now recommend the pavequipment purchased In the main concern of thus.' ol us who ment of a final dividend of Is. 3d., United States. An equally imporv.*i u bt that the enrlchTh,. unappropriated profit to be b 1 /*' ,he lncreas ' !" P* n _ ment oT g community by the builfienrried forward will amount to ***& %  £ U ,y cl '!*? W -gg 'Jg Ins up of a prosperous InduatT] the %  Uni into flat* and outne into a cottajo %  table lor daveiopHOUBD convertibk building, ronverll The land la at n.cnt or kitchen < The under Ugned ptemlati for ule b; their office, No. IT. 1 town, on Friday Febiuai-y IMI at 2 p m. Impectioii on Tuead.iv* and Thuradayi only between 3 and S pjn. For further particulars apply to COTTLE. CATFORD Sr CO. So lie i ton •151—tOn. MAKW1N MJXW. iione-bullt Bungi Drawing and Dtn Hoom and Kitrhrnette Road. Modern 3 Bedroom.. Room Break fait Toilet and Bath. Room. Garage in vard. Watei ind Electric Light inatalled Apprminiatcly 14.000 aq ft. of land Apply: E. H. Farmer. Andrew. Planlalion oi Dial HSMT 4151-dn POS RENT. SAM OR I.EABS BAOATEl-iJ: HOUSE. St Thomaa Upatairi Cloaed Oallery, Drawing and Din Ing room. Breakleat room and KltclienetU 3 bedroom, running water In aacn, Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Clon-d Gallery. Uvlng-room. Brrakfatt room and Kliehonette, 1 aMdraoa nj Toilet and Bath, Electric Ughl and Telephone Apply Ma-iager of Bagatelle Planlalion. St. Thorn*. Dial Mil II 1 M -tn. Thli I. to I NOTICE itan that I am no n of P. C. fl. be found al er. and the gem lonarr cmploved at OS MarTel at Co., I can No. 30 Tudor Street. Your patronage wlidied II. HEWITT. Tailor. ifB sn NOTICE All owneri of Dog* are reminded thai thev muat be Lirenaed during th" i th of February, according lo law N B All Taxci due to the Parl.h will gl*o now be collectetl. according to law Signed A A R OUJParochlal Treaaurar. NOTICE 1RADOK I HOB VI SOC1FTV Annual Oeneral Meeting will be I the Cathedral Church llouae on v h February. 1*41 at S p.m. • SSI—In NOTICE Ertal WD.LIAM JORDON Mesaaal Notice i. hereby given that all per having any debt or claim upon or if i-ig the rotate of William Jordon lal Lpper Crlton In Ihe pariah of • Jame. who died in th liland on fih day of July 1H1. are. hereby quired to aend In particular. o4 claim, duly atlealed to iruEdgw n-igH! Jordon co Mcean. Hutehinaon a. Ban I.eid. Solicitor*. Jame. Street. Bridgetown on oi before the ISth day ol April I9SI. after which date I anall proceed 10 dlitribute the aaaela of the .aid e.late ...i.oni the partlei entitled thereto Ijvlng regard to the debta and claim* of which ie underatgned will offer lor *ale at r office No. 17 High Street. Brldgev on Friday Ihe IBlh February 1PS1 at m. The meauage or dwelling hmie formerly known a. Tallyrra now call" CRYSTAL WATEaW with the Und thereto containing by ett Una lion 13.0B1 wiu^re feel liluated on lha aea at CarMi:.Avenue. Worthing. ChriM Church, al prraenl uaed ai a boarding houae. Intpectlon any day eacopt Sundayi between 4 and • p.m. on appllcatlo. M't Talma on the preml>*a. For further particuLara and condition! ol lale apply to:— COTTI*. CATFORD. ft Co.. Solicitor!. if fl will iffer for W by ir office. No n. ly the tth day n. the dwelling The under.li BIlMal i-.'ir.pel High Street, on inur of Februarv. 1*11. at houae i .lied TUB BOWER with T.** aquare feet of land muat* at The Garriaon, contairang 3 verandah", 3 public roomi, 3 bedrw m>. toilet, bath, kitchen, etc Garage, aervv.te room* and sS UC lotWd garden The aale may bo made with or without the lumllure. Vacant poaaeeston WlU ba given. Further particular, from COTT1**. CATFORD ft CO. suji m WANTED MISCELLANEOUS CORHLSGES H:.e eatpeet watch . -leaning and rei if oil palnling". yahution foi ind prubaif GORSISI. Upper Bay SI. .!.WE Bl'V FOR CASH — Old Gold Silver jeweller), coin., denture.. Writs, call or Dial 44W .OXRIK..I S Antiqua Shop, adjoi-ung Royal Yacht Club. U*l—Ti itlce and that 1 aril able for the aearte ao dlalrlbuled of whoee dew I Mi. 11 not nave n^a notice at the time of luch distribution And all per* !" Indebted to Ihe aald eitale ore reqoeeted tn aeltle their tceounu without delay Dated thi! Sth d*v of February. ISBl E B JORDON. Qualified Ad mint ate* tor of the Ealale of William Jordon. deceoard LOST ONE SWET-WTAKK TICKET—Soriel Iff. ('ir-dar kindly return asanc to' Bereaford WlUlami, Rolllna Road. Chrin Church. IJl-ln i \-n—< % %  i watel WE BIT FOR and muiical bo-... Write, call or dial 4411. (.OatatlMir 1 An tique Shop. Upper Bay Street Moderate Dividend Increase felt justified in recommending a moderate increase In dividend, with the result that the owners of the business, who have provided the capital and bear the i..sk. will draw in dividends the of £l;t,000. At the same %  ent ol Truudat. £ 884,000 in royaland the proposed final ii. total £642.000. [< 11 v and its equipment and development after amortization and epreciation of over £4,000.000 since been completed Well 496 gave brsst* upon its results, that the y. no production, although it may continued development or the i'urren^t X>tf comunse sCes^v ^ d P*"l at some future fit. *"* •" be sus.ained by \Z^J!7!EL£?*^jrFi2 Well 504 is giving excellent proie sum. which have been set SVsS Tnirlf ?i XT* Auction from the largest sand "ide to strengthen its reserves. .nil An ir^' lK^ eS? ^^ * f r encountered, and U Th importance o. the conlei£450.000. the oullUndlllir jpveiopinent of oulloi. Of the oil industry to th. tho year Well 511 has been "venue or Trinidad is furthei tested during the last few days Hutrated by the fact that the but is not a commercial producer, direct contribution of the industry The production which has been ' h 't*' revenue of the island developed in the Synclinal rone '* of ,h or d>r of 35 per cent In during th*? past few years is conour wn cw the payments to the tributing a welcome offset to the Trinidad Government (Or raj Oil I' natural decline of our other areas, ties and income-tax are, respeci-w. . K v f nu fc and now constitutes over 20 per tnely, more than eight times und me profit and loss accouni ccll t 0 f 0U r total production, 1? limes those for the year 1B39 shows that oil revenue, after proit ls worth recalling that the vision for development and eonEffects Of Devaluation search for oil in Trinidad •ru tingencies. and after depreciation w -.ntinu* t^ nt*rnt^ under •rtluous and costly and that -i £i7w^" w %,is nM ?,Sudr5 !" !" $^^* !" z ih r w ho r k ,i h ft. ton<,dc t.f ble "' dad Leaseholds and United Bntisks only a handful have BCfilSV tish Oilfields of Trinldsd. Since d success. It Is also essentlftl to l| and rasinghcad a, prociate that the contiinuM undry debtors British and Trinidad Government securities, tax reserve certificates. and cash at bankers, which together amount to £2,914.000. The rplus of current assets over current liabilities and future taxation is £2.076.000. example. which the new production have developed in can lie regarded by any reason n TX" d |l,Ta.a'r,.ul.,.oo £ 223.000. Production The production for the year ^ f ourid at depth. amounted to 2.833.000 barrels of and ci( nt thousand feet, or ap. crude oil and 3.548,000 gallons of proximntely double our average clear a Held has been av-ilabh casinghcad gasolene; deliveries of depth in pre-war years. Moreover to those who trade in nnsrepre approximately the>se. unounl. this is a relntively favourable ew .faV an tattoM for political purpose*.. were made to the refineries. perionrc. since In the search for 1 believe, however, that tins phast We have continued to charge new oil in Trinidad drilling to Is passinc and tbnt Oil m -0*1 %  depths of over 12,000 feet ii not public in Trinidad is gaining i now unusual. This entails the use better appreciation of WW Ll tf heavier drilling equipment, but ion which, despite its diUk'ul and results in very substantially .„. S( un cflklcnt oil iiulu'tvy ha Increased expenditure. It is clear mai i 0) an d I trust will continue ti that this is a factor which musmake lo the welfare ami prosoil revenue with the whole cost LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE .Id Knlgh', •S3 of ISM. md A.iii .t i The application of Retfli holder of t-lQiior I^cenwN. in ted to Reginald Kni,:hl H.ilM-i in rr-pect of a oppoiitc Sober* I-tne. Si Mich.nl permli*inn to uae IIKI l.lqi C. at aald prenil'ei, Sober. l-ne, St. Ikhael. Dated thii Ind d:iof Fcbniarv, ISM. To E A. VrlJslll f.-i Police Magi'rfrate. Di>l. "A". Signed RJQUINAI-D KNIGHT. Appllcanl N.B.— Tin. application will be conitdcrcd at a I.K-cmiiig Court to be held •I Police Court, Ih.lrl.t "A" on Mondav, li.e 11th day of February. 1931 a1 II o'clock, am. E. A. McLJEDD. Police Magl.ll.itr. DIM. "A". Kill In. \\ I 111 it • I IfHiai, I" %  •-* aaaaa '• onler Increasingly mlo our calcu^^ o( lhe ,i,„ y GOVERNMENT NOTICES Harbour Log ACTIVE KIDNEYS KEEP You WELL %  •a..-.. VI SS. Be aioggen. l.i'fj tuna net. Capt. %  Ti i l.-ieTi, f., .,, T ..i ,, r i ,., t. DovM, Iroiii Sch. Ada.in Ftetn in rv.i i 14 Liu Mt, Japi. Hauell. lo< ll i. hrhoonei I ROAD TO BRAZIL OaeORorrowN, n c, \ Tne plan to build a LmsaritaO. the capital of OUteh Guiana, to Bnodl Is, secord ing to Carlos Thomas who is un a visit to Bri'iah Guiana, going forward. odpsJ -I U • %  % % % %  Co. of Paramaribo which has a -•ontract lo IVPpcy rtca to Ger; %  %  i. its grs iiniii" lUtasntt concerning tho %  .-g.il suie u[ tlu pco > SCt. lo bo :inanced by a group ii Holland businessnieii. have nliesdj U-en i t'.r NatwVi filttr, mo, new hWa IT IS 01 TI N MHPRISINQ how quickiy batkaefce. lumhoco, ll CIIRMI.C re.m., .tiff, avhing KtHSU %  nd the (ORisnoo uriasry dit..rtlcnv due to aluggiih kidney action can be orercoiric. Strong, active kidney, safeguard your health by t-trsming ruiu uric %  oil sod harviful aitci out of the •>tirtn. When kj.iney actioo IS Inadequate god Cult to biter lbs b:end pn-pcrly. ptun and discrsnfc n frecnieouy result. • Doan'i Bavkacbc Kidney PiQs bring happy rrUci* by helptna to clcante sntf fiiriiai(e the kidney filter. Grateful people e^oywhen tell bow good Doan'i Pill* us. DOAN'S ti: THANK GOODNESS FOR l.AS The Mn In The Street When 1 am going Ii....... last. I can feel safe with the STRUTS LIGHTED BV a \s FLAVOUR and ili.tinrlive ffavdtsr. There Is no racn that taiilDares srtOi . s & s mm & SAMI'SON LTD. Headquarters for Be-d, Kllsu. II m SHIPPING NOTICES MONTREAL. ZEALANH AISTRAI-IA. NEW UM. LIMITED N t. t INF. US TONOARntO % %  arhedulrd ill Ad.-i.irtc January 34th Mu rebniarv flth. "vdn.-, Febr.ait 1 i 33rd, Amvmg !l..rbad. rikl of Maivh, IMI ThU verari rtai ample ... rrsssst BSMl OaBWaJ cargo Targn xcrptcd on Ihro Lading with trai>ahi t >mc,ii *t Trn-M >r Butlah fi.iian.. i:.ifi.,.ii-, Un.du >d tseeward laland* Tar further parUctila .iniiv HICUSS. WITIIV %  .in bTD Da CSTf\ A Cli I n> Tdnldad. Ie accepting C'ai iiigini. at IMI Hai Kitti. Silting The MV. n.ie.wood will accept Cargo and l'.iei.geii fo. 81 I in la. Grenada. If Aiuba and I'aiifirri only for si I ol depailuie u< b.. B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS ASSOCIATION, law. Telephone: 4MT RIVERSIDE CLUB CARNIVAL DANCE TO-.Mf.laT Dancing from %  p.m. \PMlsSION: 3/Muslc b* I" CC SSB VB OrrheaU-s JudKing of Costumes at ll I'M ///.v/.y/M-.v/.w////,; WT4UW StsamAhipCo"sfeyfiargral NEW YORR Hth January — a > 3nd February — • Ol iiir.m M> Hi OA P1LOI CANADIAN SgRVICV Sill. ll.in., nai" ISth Tkest Hr.fi. hare Ihnltaat saagaagar aaeataaaegallan. ROBERT TlltiM LTD.New York and Oulf %  srrtcs. Apply: DAOOSTA A CO., LTD. Canadlau Rsrrlcs. PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles I'roducts. Limited. Ilosea Ing to Europe. The usual port, of call at Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual redu i. IJominlfti. for asll%  Dublin, London, or lions for children. \OIM I WEST INDIAN KNITTING MILI-S LTD. .ACCEPTING ORDERS FOft WRAPPING TWINE All purposes) Order-, for 1951 Keqa^rs. nicnts will be accepted up lo i' Hi February. 1951. Communicate P.O. lVw 211 Of call 3T9 •MEOTAI. I.OOIIS From INDIA. CHINA. KCaVIT : J SUk, Corloa. Krassware, Jewels. Linens. Ivory, Teakwood. Sandals. French Perfumes. Harbadin Scarves in Pure Silk. Etc.. Etc Etc The snjunir %  aadqaartara I HAM llros. KAK1IMLRK Vt. %  Hear, SI—Dial 1.H-S nt; 11 # s/. .. ... MmvwamsM lalions. During the year the first ger In the circumstances. I think it ,.,.,, vWi tmn was held in Trinida.l will be agreed that we have been in dt. r universal adult suffrage and fortunate in recent years in lnc llPW ro nstitution, which place achieving results which have enthe it| a nd as the most poUucaU abled us to build up a strong llnadvanced of the Wssl Indian cofoncial position, and thai we shall onics. New legislative and garscube prudent to maintain It. tive councils hove baon i Once again I desire to stress the and ministerial appointments have importance that those of us who been made. I believe we shall Und manage the business, Governin the people of Trinidad a grow ment and leaders of organized ing appreciation that upw thi labour, should do everything withFense of responsibility of their elected repuMiitallves dependi not only the interests of cojnmerci l,ut the welfare of the whole community of Trinidad. lliprh Standard Of lloiiMnK And Welfare In addition lo our contribution i the welfare of the community as a whole, we have continued to naintain and extend our own high Milliard of housing and welfare %  nt.. These include fTM "edlcal attention for employees .md their dependants and excellent educational and recreational facilities. The agreement between the Oiliclds Employers' Association of Trinidad and the Oilfields Worki rsTrade Union, which had been satisfactorily observed, terminated Hiring the year. A new agri'iiini't, which provides a general wage Increase to sll classes of workers, tins been made for a minimum period of two years and three lonths. During the year Mr. Cottell visited Trinidad and discussed our operational and adimnlsiriitiviproblems with the management Iherc. Mr. Bushe. our general manager In Trinidad, sub. paid us a visit in London. We were pleased to receive his report of the loyal and efficient service given >>y our management, staff, and Held workers in Trinidad, to wl I am sure it will be your wish that *e express our appreciation, that this be also rxt< n b I ti taff in I-ondon. The resolutions before the mcetng were carried, and a vote of :hank* was expressed to Ihe dlrec %  ors and stair In London am Trinldsd Ynti will he dclichlrd with the designs nf Our Keceut Shipment f TAIL! OILCLOTH AND FLOOR RUGS TUB: CENTMAL EMPOMWM MAKING OF NURSES' UNIFORMS Sealed tenders will be received at the Hospital up to 12 o'clock noon on Wednesday, 14th February, 1951, for making 90 Uniforms for Nurses within a period of 2 months from the date of acceptance of tender. Persons tendering may offer to make the whole or part of the quantities of garments required, and contracts may be awarded to parsons tendering for making the whole or part of th.; quantities of garments for which they tender. Persons tendering must have the statement on the tender form signed by two other persons known lo possess property, expressing r willingness lo become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of the contract. Specimens of the garments may be seen, and tender forms will be supplied, on application lo the Secretary, and tenders will not be entertained except they are on the forms suoplied by the Hospital. 7.2.5L—3n. POSTMASTER — PARISH OF ST. PHILIP Applications are invited for the vacant office of Postmaster/ Postmistress. St. Philip. Appointment will be made subject to the selected candidate being passed as medically fit for employment in the Public Service, and will be on one year's probation. The minimum educational standard which will be accepted is a pass in the Cambridge Local School Certificate or a similar examination of equivalent standard. Appliconts should preferably be between the age of 21 and 30 years. The salary attached to the Post is at the rate of SI.056 by $72 to $1,776 IE.B.) by $96 to S2.160 per annum. Further particulars ma] be obtained from the Colonial Postmaster. Applications should be made on Forms obtainable from the Colo nial Secretary's Office and must be returned not later than the 14th of February. 1851. 6.2.51—2n NOTICE TO FISHERMEN AND BOAT-OWNERS Fishermen and boat-owners who contemplate the building of new fishing boats, for which assistance by loan from the Government may be required, are advised to discuss their problem with the Fishery Officer before expending any money towards such construction %  Bring or aend lo SUnwav *!nre. Uasea Street. Dial 4#l fi % 51— 3n. FOR CASH, old Bicycle Saddle* with or without Saddle Top*. Chandler'. Hardware and Bicycle* Acceawnr i Reed and Tudor Street. 6 ) 11 In NIISIIMI The public are hereby warned agairu'. giving credit to tn> He CLARA llj I .nee Murreli a I 4o IXI leaponMOIe for her or anyone else coniraeting ar.y debt or detoti tn my nan-. u-ilaa. by a written -inter ilgned by me. Signed GDOftGE F. DSSsIX. Thi.rise Cut.. % %  at George si.si—m CHANCERY SALE %  *. tJIlf un ^"m *"'' !" * purcha'c. 1VKI.YN HOACII 4. CO,, LTD. Rirkett Btteft 3251-t.fn. 30-.*->'. 'J^^>1900^ W OOO J 090WQ^^09'>0 u I > ap4 - * CHARLES McENEARNEY & CO. LTD. For Fishermen LONDON Fishermen caught [Kwiching In the rivers and ponds of Scotland will be liable to a $28 fine but they ran keep their rod and line. A new Bill to stop poaching i Scotland has Just been passed by the House of Common", and the knottiest problem that U mentarlans had to decide was — %  should a poacher be liable to have his rod and line confiscated In addition to paying „ line. There were such strong views about this that %  votowas taken 'in whether to put the extra %  line—into the now bill Tlic House voted a narrow reprieve for the poach. : 'o 190 against confiscation. —I N I. THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK WITH A VIEW to assisting tho Secretaries ol Societies. Clubs, and Associations to make tho compilation of information in THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as possible, all organisations embracing all lorms ol activities; religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports, radio, agricultural, etc.. are asked to have the iorm printed below filled In and senl in as soon as possible lo : THE EDITOR. THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951. C o Advocate Co. Lid., 34 Broad Street. FORM Title of Sociely, Club. Organisation. Etc President or Chairman Council or Commltteo Members.. Treasurer. ..Secretary.. Short historical account of the origin, functions and current activities: '.*.*.*.'.'.','.'.'.'.'. : .'.'.-,'.-.'.',',-.--.-.'.;;;;;:v.



PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1895 TUESDAY. KEBH 'ARY i, I"-'' OKRA BLOOD By ROBERT N SCHWARTZ MILWAUKEE. Dr. Hiram Benjamin, who directed development of a blood plasma substitute from the garden vegetable okra. disclosed that he is returning to research into okra's effect on ulcers. The head of the Marquette i .'. Research work on the ulcer project, Interrupted by his service in the Navy, showed gnat proini.se. He hail used oars in treatment of ulcers In animals His early ulcer research. Dr. Benjamin said. Indicated okra. like the drugs bsnthmrand atropine. reduces the flow of tissue-injuring pepgln and fields in the stomach. But, he added, okra has' the advantage over the drugs that stimulates formation or a thick, mucous linine which also slows the digestive process The scientist, n member of the Marquette Univei dly Medical School Faculty, holds a basic patent foi the hlood plasma substitute He and two other member 1 of the research team. Dr. Harry Inrig and Darwi i Kaestpatent medical ner. turned theii rights over to the school. The funds will be used by M.U's Medical School to support basic research in science Dr. Ihhg, vice president in charge of research, AllisChaJiiwrg Manufacturing Company, and Kaestner, plant manager for 1 till Sallhl Laboratories hold subsidiary patents on" refining and purification of the okra pods. Other members of the research team were Dr Walter Zed. head of the anatomy department at Marquette. and Dr. Donald Roth, a junior medical student. Dr. Benjamin told I.N.8. that as an investigator In science he was not interested in finances. He explained. "The American Medical Association's canon of ethics stipulates that no physician may make a profit on a discovery that would help humanity That's just and fair and f. for one, wouldn't want it anv other way. "We became physicians and scientists because we are interested in helping humnnitv /• With patent rights for the blood plasma substitute vested in the University. Dr. Benjamin noted, there will be rigid control over its quality and distribution. In addition, he added, royalties will be very low so as to keep the price of the okra blood substitute low enough to make it available to all who need it. Dr. Benjamin explained that ulcers are exacerbated by the flow of digestive Juices. Once the ulcer lesion has appeared, the juices literally "digest" the stomach lining. Slowing of the digestive processes would give the ulcer an opportunity to heal. He emphasized lhat the ulcer work Is preliminary and has not been tested on humans yet. He said the okra blood substitute is a chemical known as a polysachridc, a complex sugar molecule. With techniques developed by the five-man Marquette team It can be refined down to a powder, enormously simplifying the whole problem of storage of tremendous amounts of blood plasma needed to meet such emergencies as n mass air attack nn the United Kate) When a salt solution is added to the powder, which can bo kept Indeflnitcl. Ln any climate without refrigeration, it does all the things blood plasma does—and several things plasma does not do. Most important is that it will nol, like human plasma, transmit viruses from donor to recipient of the plasma. Dr. John Hirschboeck. Dean of Marquette's Medical Behoof, has announced that unlimited quantities of the plasma substitute can be made from Okra. which grows like a weed in southern climates and is a food staple in the southern portions of the US. Dr. Hirschboeck said conferences will be held in Washington in the near future with representatives of the federal pure food and drug administration rind the National Research Council regarding quantity production of the life-saving plasma substitute. —INS American Taxes Up WASHINGTON. Feb. 5. Americans will pay higher income taxes, and more for petrol, cigarettes, whisky and beer under new taxes proposed to-day John Snyder. Secretary of the Treasury, asked the House Ways BOfl Means Committee which handles tax legislation, for vastly bigger (sales) taxes including levies of 20 percent on cars and 25 percent on television sets, radio and refrigerators. He outlined the proposals OS part of the Truman Administration's first instalment of a $10,000,000.000 tax Increase The programme call* for a four percent increase in individual income tax rates. Other basic proposals made bv Snyder were: A boost from flat 21 percent to 371 pel cent in capital gains tax. There will be an increase of It per cent, in the normal Income tax for corporations. Corporations with profits in "excess" class would continue to pay an extra 30 percent on the amount deemed "excess". The programme has still to be approved by Congress. Truman told Congress last Friday that the first round of tax increases would be followed by another request for about $6,500 000.000 later this year —Reuler. Arabs Denounce French In Morocco CAIito, Feb., 5. The Arab I-eaguc has passed a resolution denouncing "French Intervention" in Morocco, a league spokesman said here today. He added that General AlphonsJuin, resident General in Morocco had threatened to depose Sultan Mohamed the Fifth. The spokesman said that tnei League's Secretary General would confer with French Ambassador in Egypt Maurice Couve D*' Murville to inform him of resolution. The League has received appeals from various Moroccm sources for immediate intervention by Middle East Arab states They confirm that General Juin has given an ultimatum to L Sultan, he said. The Sultan of Morocco, French protectorate. has haul talks in Paris. France was reported to have urged political reforms aimed at decent ml: feudal power but the Sultan] wanted "complete revision of tl protectorate treaty of 1912". ac cording to his aide. The main purpose of the visit as said to be to urge France to grant political, economic and financial autonomy to his coun try. —Reuler. 3 More Executed For Virginia Rape RICHMOND. Virginia. Feb 5. Three more negroes—last of th "Mortinsvllle Seven"—were ex ecu ted here to-day for mass rape of a 32-year-old white woman Virginia. The first lour of "the Marlinsville Seven", wore executed lost Friday In the biggest mass execution in tho history of Virginii Various groups in the Ui.itc States staged big demonstrations against the executions and 10,000 letters of protest came from abroad mostly from Communisponsored groups. Demonstrators included Lefving Organisations, students, trade union leaders and church groups. The main coloured organisations did not protest but maintained it was unfair to sentence negroes to death for a crime for which no white man has ever been executed In Virginia. Four appeals were made against the sentence but the United Stales Chief Justice Fred Vln ^on. refused to intervene—Reuler Chinese Driven Back Into Seoul SIR OTTO LUND Comnuwouei i„ Chf of the St John Ambulance %  H. E. tkeete and Cspt. E. B. Williams. Inspecting .'flo Nurung Dlvum <*AB. accompanied by Major, "•Uiday. Heavy Snowfalls Pose New Threat VIENNA. Feb. 5. Heavy snowfalls in Carmthia to-day brought the danger of more" avalanches. In the Gail Vallev a local train was completely marooned by snow and was unable to move backwards or forwards. %  In the villa** where British lioops are quartered, snow was reported piled up more than three feet on rooftop Roads between all villages and .'p Carlnttus were said to be like "valleys between huge mountains of snow". The Lechgch Valley with big population of 10,000 has beer tut off since yesterday and even snnot roach it. Weather reports from Sail* burg said comparatively high temperatures in some in province had brought the new danger of avalanches there too. —Rente Colony Reporl Published In U.K. iriom Our Own Concipondcnti IXJNDON. Feb 5. Barbados in 1949 experienced a slight decrease in the cost of living. This was due mainly to reduction in tho cost of clothing. But at that time the effect of devaluation had not begun to be felt seriously. So says the Colonial annual report for thi c keen to get their own cadets, or if they were sufficient gther organisations for young people to make use of them, they wanted them to learn the prel iminanes of tirst aid. o\ THI: •SPOT UF.IGATE. Members of the Eeiesstt Council are tired of v<*s-iiiK the local parks and streets Uttered with lea cream cartons during the summer, months. So the Council is recommending that manufacturers make edible cartons. Saiu park superintendent Frank Cook: "Manufacturers could make the cartons of edible rice paper or other edible substances But Ice cream manufacturers arc doubtful. Said one firm: "If we make edible wrappers we shall have to make another wrapper to wrap the edible one in to conform with hygiene regulations —INS S Mteiday I %  on Antigua Hi Storms Hit Britain LONDON, Feb. 5 Gales up to 70 miles an hour, snow and floods swept Britain to-day after 24 hours ol storms. There was widespread flooding in South England and firemen had to remove fallen trees from roads. Storms may continue all day. A 3.000-ton naval landing craft i broken away m west Scotland the area's worst storm of the A 'outh coast lifeboat has been searching in vain in raging seas for three fishermen in u small boa) missing since yesterday. t one place in Scotland, the main road north was blocked by snow. Ice made roads dangerel sewhe re. —Ren le r. Tories Have Good Chance To Win Now LONDON. Feb 5. Winston Churchill':. Conservative Party would sweep back to power with a big majority if a General Election was held here now. according to the latest public opinion poll figure*. The cast of living leaping up week by week has caused t:." prestige of the Labour Governits lowest level since IMS. statistics indicate The latest figure' published to-day by one of the biggest and usualiy most accurate polls showed a slump in Government popularity and a com rise In support for ConsJUS using poll percentages as their basis, estimated to-nigh* that the Part' would be returned with at least 420 Parliamentary seats' with only ISO going to the Socialists. —•eater. GUIDED MISSILES WASHINGTON. Feb.. 5. General Collins. United Statei Army Chief of Staff, said toda. that the American army would have some guided missiles "within 18 months" which could seek out their target —Renter .Oil For Argentina SWANSEA. Feb.. 5. Tanker General Han Martin P.M0 tons left Swans.th 17.000 tons of oil for Bueno, Aires. This is believed t.. be the !<11 test single shipment ol from Swansea. General Aan Martin bt the new Argentine tanker and maiden voyage, ana of eight new tankers hgj for Argentine —Reuler. n.irbado< BW.I.A Russia Replies To West MOSCOW l> Soviet Foreign Minister Amlic Vvs-nmsky today gave large) wr .: %  am envoys Soviet reply to th-ii %  month on Soviet ptopoeals for a "Big Fom" Conic am a He i tiled envoys ol B France end the United States b %  %  San %  t lejsjn omce to celve replies. All three embassies fk Comment on the replies which win((ring trssioiatad for trans%  Ms. It was expected here th.it the Soviet repU WOUM be | tomorrow or ffee mo e ds o Tho Three Powers' representabn %  %  ireceived parateh Result AmbessaMan Vv Chatalg oeau went to the Ministry first nl lores o*0clock thfi afft i quarter Of all hour later John the British Minister in Mi received ai the Ministry. United suit.-:. Mini ti H nrtti Bartaour called at half past Hire.Kruler. PRIEST KILLED PISA, Italy, Feb 5. Three masked men broke into the vicarage of Cevoli near here ,ind shot dead the parish priest Ugu Burdotti early today. Personal vengeance or polities were thought to have been the motive. Tne police held three villagers who wen found to have a submachine rifle and a pistol. —Reuler FROZEN WASHINGTON. Fch. 5. Ti.e American Government today froze until March 15 all sales and deliveries of CSttle hides, calfskins and kips 'hides • steers) pending the establishment of government control* %  n ihlnrv supplies.—Renter •anied by the Countess of BrackiOck, Assistant SuperintendcnlIn-Chief of the (lverse the St John AmbulBflCS Thc^ have come 10 n unithere and arc guests at Govsmn -nt n a have) already visited Bcri will be leaving Barbados this ufternoon for Trinidad aer "Inch Ihey will go onteBriti He said that they hove brought out tlifce niesawite-to Hi. h' John Aiitajjjave Bnav .* m TWBBSTTS from ll.K.H. the Duke 01 Qlouceeter, Grand Phot oi the Order of St. John which reads'1 ,nn glad to know that lb Commissioner-in-Chief is paying visit of inspection to units of hn Ambulance Brigade in Hie West Indies, which arifl serve to emphasise the interest which the Order of St John tan tending iti. WOTS) In UM Colonies !• % % % %  ing mv greeting' to all memben I 1 1 the Brigade fit the weal Indlei. wishing them at the same lime piiitlqurd success In their activities-'* Hopes To Come The next message came from Lady Mountba'.len. SupcnntcndtnWlQ-Cbiol of the Overseas Units. She has sent greetings lo all wellwishers of the work of the Brl%  tn llurbados soon to sec the men,DM t h" Brigade. Sir James Sleeman, head of the Overseas Units of tinBrigade has greetings to all loOSS people •>*• knows In the island Sir Otto said thai he h-d met lira, K n wllli D II L Skeete who were running the local Brigade and added thai It was entirely due to their that It had glvai %  ^nt of itself. Tbea 'i" 1 ''" I* !" l Barbados before because i' was ord] last June that the Brigude Overseas did Brigade at Home mated. Ho said that there were some things he would like the |ieople now and one was about th'need for growth of the Itngaic Hifeeling in many places in the Commonwealth, and perhaps it was also true in H.irbados, that .unir of the people fell thai the work of the St. John Ambulance was confined to the war and emessjoory, '"it that was not so People all ovei the world could I'-.iliv make the Brigade efficient bv taking first aid and home pursIng servicewith The ooj t'-rving in peace. Plenty To Do Quite apart ,'ioin that. II %  .i lot more to OS dour With the i"Od start made here at the centre n Barbados, they wsnted to e* : %  id then work to other parts -i 1 h' was made to understand that lhat had already ien doos He was glad to hear thai there .<. is nursing for girl radcts in exIttenae Its the island. The girl kda movement, for instance, was .1 thriving one and he was sure tna| tinguidf. could take the first tn t certificates and wear the St Ji hn Ambulance Badge. with regard to the boys, it was %  •ortant lhat thenwere other enterprises. He Imagined that In some parts of the world. • Oa Page 3 Ran Turns Down U.N. Invitation 1.AKE SUCCESS. Feb. B. 8b llenegnl Nau of India has informed Nasruli.ih I President of the United Nation^ General Assembly, that be •' unable to aCBept Enle/in\ imitation to serve on Ins United Nations Good Offices Committee to negotiate a possible isttlsanenl with t huiese Communists over Korea, it was leanr to-daj Si. Benegal's refusal followed uutrucUoi i : Government He was .i mambsi .f thr original United Nation I Bra Committee with Bntetara and Lester Pearson, Canadian foreign Minister He was tnvite.1 lo join ths new committee Last weait si %  %  tut Km condemnlna communist China aa an aggressor in Korea -Rrwter Buurd LiVudlorkf'fl NEW YOHK, Feb. S. The National Mediation Board was 'hopelessly deadlo< 11 talks on the strike bv IIMO rail ., 111'.UU III'' to-d;.. The Board met reprssentativss of four Railway Union-. ways separately In its lab to end the dispute now in its seventh day. The strike which hns held up aauau'nitiofl rot Kon i i 100,000 workers In other industries being te-mpor.'ii ilv laid nff and the disruption of oommunii sllon Bsafar, TOKYO, Feb 6 (^HINESE I ORCES were reported fleeing northward through the hills towards Seoul, the southern capital, to-night before the biggest United Nations armoured drive since the Korean War began. Three powerful tank columns plunging boldly through stiff but lightly armed opposition, advam ed lo within seven miles of the Han Kiver, Boirfch of the capital, inflicting as much damage as possible A he.iv. ai tiUery ' the I'mled Nations hue kept the i'l> dup bl ,n Britain Bans Diplomats 1 ONDi IN i i banned Hun than IB M i warned that slmtlat action wouli be t.ik.-i the n %  vbrsened \ %  Hun .ii i". .i gimitei 1 ban on British diptomai i. in the House of Co Minister ol foreign v the Hungarian Minister Etei IVdgnr hud been Infoi ,i"i hut stall would nol be travel n Hvtle Par! C< li i ond sdtboul obtaining from the roreifn onir Earlier Younger h.it Ul.l.UN is ired t< %  %  11 here %  in i • > H.il %  h %  M Keiilrr. Rvjevt Rvd Mil To Stage Strike LONDON, y, >< |0 ItJ of the nstion'a an.oiHi iroekworkers on Ihsii -ii n % %  %  ihe i %  call t %  Kon i of mortar Hn enoed m tnc II put up a tough fight. One lank ccdumo with> i advancing two miles lo avoid a %  urpriss counter-attack by Mai enemy forces. Light re* ,i %  ound eornei". Tankmen who led a drive Into tin ohetaclo %  nol much troubled bc-.' I %  %  il' .. i .i many cases < leeo jutting above the surfaee and easery to hit • ite them Alma I %  I of eui t.uik col' nl should be regarded %  particular sigmiicancc at an official naaanoragH %  %  Communlsls attempting sporidu counter-Bltacka elsewhere II .. the Koicuu .-..u met .nni-entrated Are fiom ..Hied gums, sled overhead us tempts to ti m .uid puati hSem back to the 38th pnnillel. North of HosSMSO n sj almost in flumiddle Of UU peninsula, %  i A mile an hour %  nd the Fifth North Kon was reported i down in thi aree central Other ui 1 irther east. General Mac Arthur'i HaeeV i .i stsd to-day thai Coasmunurts suffered B.365 casualties on all sectors in fierce ground UU —Reuler. TUX Tilt: Aitvor.vri: rm; mtava HIM. 1113 IIAV OR NIOIIT HERE AGAIN CJ.0VER QUEEN | SUMAHTEEO PuSClfilSH COOKIWB BtHTril WASHINGTON. Feb 5. European coat and steel. Secretary of StatiIX-an The letter said in part *I do Acheson in a letter to Robert not need to remind you SchumanFrench Foreign Mmattitude which the OoVSfl | Ister. gave his whole hearted of the United Suites hr. posal for thf creation of an inand in many forms tegrated Europea European rntegratlon" ThoSUste faaparlaMro] n My government strongly to-day the text of a letter sent favours ft last week. Acheson's b reilerated American support for countries can work it o the Schuman P**n to pool practical manner, a sour ould be laid upon whitii nsU l iry and cconcr?' ." built %  ill be %  i %  iSrgles for successful defence %  .t* bellef^ and Iradltlo After v i %  overnm', .g a aonfi DSs.Olllty of creating a Eurcpesn l Army. Arhe*on said: If your %  with Ihe German -i who %  free nation-, of Europe move closely by the Schuman a long tei our pro 11' -Heater COOKING BUTTER THE HOUSEWIVES' PBJEWAfi FAVOURITE BRAND A QUALITY PRODUCT 1



PAGE 1

TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 6 U5I BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE TIIRFF Strikes Disrupt Work On 3 Grenada Estates From Our Own Cor respondent ST. GEORGES, Feb. 3. Trinidad Sugar Estates Wild-cat strikes have disrupted work on three estates ("iie,inor-.il-rii<.-.MO %  this week, one lasting a day and the others three days. --'PW//Vi7rVG CROP Lund Brings Message here this week, one lasting a day and the others three days Tinmanagements of the estates involved have not received any demands either from the workers or those claiming to represent them. (Prom Our Own Corrvipondanii The twenty-eighth annual ordmAdult Suffrage Suggested For B.G. From Pace I boy fronts took the St. John An.. bulanve examination and wore their badge. Here in Barbados, there were youth movement* and church lad .itri girl brigade* who might be able to take their examinations and do first aid. Sir Otto said that it wa* hardly h,,% necessary to point out that first >""*" Police Give Leaflets To Lorry Drivers L ORKK IMUVEtS are now being mven leaflet* by the Poii( force imlsskxwr of r the AaVx-Mf ft "hat they arted an intensive camohecking on lorries GEORGETOWN. R.G.. Feb. 3. A suggestion that a I'nited Kingdom Co mm is si o n lor the Constilution Reform in British Guif ana should not nrry out I duties assigned to them in tin terms of reference, but should i Mead recommend a Constltutl*... tonad on universal adull suffrage southern to be entrusted with the draft int. year, ev of a constitution for this country holding The affected estates were BelS" 7 en er 1 meeting of Trinidad mont. St Patrick*., owned by Mr S'^J". Ltd was held hi -SP-TV .£ ^1J£_ '*\ZZ1 necTed anth the sugar industry. Norbert Nyack. where the Sork, ^Sa^^sided *"*' "ur-ffnSS tfffifS S? JS& ^trai-ohec patrol, are on the ers were out on Monday, and La The louo^uVa-^^V^^ !" > oX "erested m them when young !" a %  "*' "">' dnvrr who dow no Sagesse. St. David's, owned by hlg^iiSKed anU?h " lh t lhat im M *%  / conoWro w,th due care and raajard Mr. Louis Strauss, and Hope. St '^V^^f^l^ '~ ,inu xh !" rew up for the Wety of others will be Andrew's, where the walk-out diss^hS. „i im!L*J!? V !s? H ,h u h t t the public brought before the Courts continued to Wednesday lim B n 7n J?" J15* .1. hould real v ,haI lh *Bclncy "We hope that these dr.vrrAU that Is known is that Mr. sSw?. ^ n?Tlr7. %  mM *** of lt *I*o *e deroalaM the old laying: -Haste Id ^T!l mjhe previous year, wo pendent to a large exten* on the makes W ,-!<>•* It la better to ons less of sugir, doctors who were busy men. but drive stewl) and do loss tups than them to preto drive furiously and be brought ucd un a tars* maw followine <~m"^JLH'""" t "" ,, tne nnw !• inem lor ineir examinations before the Courtl the Commisnd at his behest the sugar, including b* -products, after wh *n hurt or sick. --plIKVKs are causing cycle strikes were on deducting the levies of f.2. 18s per He said that the Order of St. 1 owners much uorrs BOOM it was Mr. Gairys Manual and ton under the Trinidad Sugar InJ ohn Eye Fund which was started evebsts li .ut the cost K* p K Iw oo'ain ltJsr %  nd lho for a feu minuter. When thry tually resulting in the of production rose to C26. IBs. 8d. SI -; ohn Brigade was so Interreturn some part is missing. f an Arbitration over per ton, againet £22. 3s. M. so lht ^ ,d .i".". ny „'I 1 } rtu wI th "?• On "> %  other bend e Poflcema Eric M. Oairy, a JO-year-old obtained 'l3( I the past two year. Hawhip„ |„ Trinidad durlnf hc IrmJ „,„. |him or hWt Coiraniwlon Mr John WoddlnBlon. T h lr ibun.l awarded cane workMlltr crop, the profit in Trlni„, %  XE 'iJSSVill&Sit K?'^ dickl thi* last cvrnlne Whrn -r, h ihr .>. „. „„ %%  „ dad Ml hv m iin d ih,. nr i f'.'Vr " rra '".'erpnie, he ld. higher rate ... of pay than dad Ml b; (23,-'"Pgenereo. the nroflt in TrimZ 0t XS* r LE!S. r ^L n i} d T r ra!l "*. r tors or even in KMIM cases the removing ol a saddle. One LfctfJUj is ceriain.gyelisU can pre their cycles liom belni placing locks on th.. mcBS them tn a safe place. While Robert Bracmar of White Park Road w*a at the Kmpn Tnaatta on Buodav the generator of his cyde was stolen. On Friday night while two men wci watching a double at the Ko> Theatre their Reneratoi taken otf A qme 11wnc.1 bv Blatr Pordi Heckles Mill, st Michael, an .stolen while iWda attended ti Olvnipic Theatre on Saturda The cych was left at UM Aiinlh. i i tf(: ( owns This the largest attended of certain privileges which Out of the net profit for the Sir Otto aald that the Ct accrued to the latter, such as free year of 124,695 we have to put f Brecknock would be ren fuel, cheap provisions, and easy aside as much as £16,402 for taxnin ,h West Indies nt lhe coneluganlening facilities. tion. This high proportion is-due >i uri of their joint tour to visit Agree on Bonus primarily to the fact that it has 'h* i-**ward and Windward nr.orc %  Arbitration, the 3=5. been our po.iey...^ giS*^^," "n tSh'e" "The held bv the Commission in vari.. uos parts of the country and in J h M M.W.U has scorned memwhleh they have had constitutions berihlp. entered an agreement •iigge'ited to them ranging from with the Agricultural Employers' "J^ !" little change to complete selfSociety on behalf of %  government. Vice-Chairman of workers to accept a bonus above the Party the Hon. Dr. Cheddl B. the statutory minimum wage, Jagan. stressed that the Commisand dependent on the rise or fall sion had been given evidence from G f the price of cocoa. This agreetion of buddings, plant and machinery, etc., so that we can have liable for capital reMnZSiMB* placements when needed. Also, under the Income Tax Act. 1945. we do not receive wear and War for income-tax purchase on plant id machinery, the cost of which one extreme to another and not smaller islands in the West fnd*_ while he would be returning home Must Pay .£5 For Stealing Stork Feed hgWon Bourne of Kensington knowing particularly what public %  •pinion was in this country and not Ix-ing able to evaluate what sTcr*ar-as5K ".^^ %  "^^-^ tsPEEm&s'xz ^^ but eviewable quarterly, and .._ of Fairchild St tatlon account. The nmount protcrday found guiltv by His WorSt Mid rl was lto*Wl I — In the accounts for depreciship Mr H. A. Talam. Police MagZanzibai Club on Bun u.iun is therefore considerably i*itrate of District "A" of stcalin* public opinion concern!.,* certain !" "'" C" a ^T ,£ ", "'*' %  """' lh "towe "' one ba< ot ,,tock lied va'uw ' IvI A N "' %  •'" % ;l <•' Man,rion., or oriuilMIoo. mlht !" S^', dre ,tJ^r ? ineome-tax purpoie.. £1 11/3 the pepen, o( Jwepl, "*• *" >'-" 1 U "" K • represent, it would be difficult lor ,c P'eeniis %  doeMna of pr. Th, llnaneial poslUon ot the Tudor. r r • %  %  M hn , or homr „,, i,rr*m and them to write a constitution tor /he M.M.W.U. Is now beain^mpany continues to be sound, He was ordered to pay a Ban entered l-tcen II 00 pjn, ..11 this country, whereas If they renina to Invade the cocoa-nutmeg lh rorp | u of current assets over of £S by monthly Instalment! of Friday and 5 30 I n commended a constituent AssemesUte worker arena and. morecurrent liabilities and provisions £ 1 or in default two months'Imd v *hd a quantity of aiticles. bly this would be the basis of deovc, Mr. Galry Is also president being r.H6.4aO. compared with prisonment with hard labour The total value $311 88. stosttl So IJI lerrnlnina what everyone wanted: of a companion Grenada People's ri42,l last year. offence was committed on January S-'2 wo-th have %  Hut Sir John affirmed that such Parly, which he claims is out to s,,.,f.-,„, v frna l'„„|.J 20. pmDOsnl was of course not within capture every elected seat al the t* ,' the projects ferine enee^thT'nVSrtnoeeeSed ','"" """"r-' SfS '" ,""" eoSn^crcV are* ^oncen,^ tta £5 FOR WOUNDING ^wi me m ,?ire..l£nsT!ne Tlf^' 0 ^"^ Hon' Ml" r""""" "* ,rt " h i*" 0 '"' %  "^ nftV SfiST Partv^ Memoi-tndom f^r a ehnnec f r ft laad was to see HOn. I.u t[on are iu good on jer and lhe Hill, St. Michael in Coninl?? •""'" %  ho h P" m lM ' ""' tonnafe of canes to be reaped wi.l ordered to pa, a line of £5 bj over shortly on "very serious be approximately the same as last Mr. H. A. Talma In monthly 1 inThe pnrtv advocated complete business". y ., r provided 'that the Juice is stalrnenls or In default two month solf-Covcrnment with a Um"Us Is a long march from lorm al and we are able to reap imprisonment with hard Ujbou 1 Legislature. strikes, but it background, the ,„, whole of the canes. 1 hope that 'or wounding F.lalne Heckles on The Commission with Protestor future. In recent month!. Galr, we shall have a satisfactory crop •""" %  "ll 28 .___ Vincent Harlow and Dr. Hit, hai more or leaf dominated local for lhe year ." % % %  %  *.T"^ WHt* !" Hlnden as members expect 10 platforming and at a Market The present arrangement for the !";,„*?'',' '""" ,'„'„ .hat nearh two leel long. Tin leave British Guiana on February Square demonstration on Armissale of the whole of our export i-,' ," ,^ L V "oerwn and f %  '•' *•*> '"" l bi ' PPe' 13 on flie llrst stage of their Jourtice Day declared nlrmelf the only sugar to the Ministry of Food ex^JL-V ,^r „lm^."vo\ild < m ">' %  'ours. nejr back to England. Thev arrivleader of lhe workers In Grenada pires In 1HJ2, nnd last summer %  r '_"""•_ .5HJJJP; K„ „ n," CIXTY-IKAK IILD ADA cd in Brllish Guiana, on December and first politician, not even ncfBthitlMa^taak P"ee betwee-i gejj^ TO ld thai In a dlspule >J DEANK of liny Street left The restaurant of Cardinal Trotman <>r Fairchild Street 1 also bgOlaMl and entered %  I e.ixtf."crs urdnv. A quantitv nt 1 %  nil vestenlay •><* *h,skey. valued $31.50, wa, stolen. nidad I T WAS Carnival yesterday and at l Barbadiai drewed up. This wa a womai Si i iiioad Straa. .wound mtoVds dressed In slacks and wagrtng I*. Hongkong At The Museum Dr. FRANK f.RFAVES gov interesting talk on Hongkong to does not mean well for Grenada ""•!".,',," lh ...Ua— ,,r the-. % %  Fletcher which weie on the Pi VrjTETStS* 5S """Id not oppose Marrystt; .rEuiid 0 "-/<•"• -f w*y "* "" %  asi .Meeting at Its Headquarters yesterday. At the end of his talk. Dr. Greaves showed pictures lllustiatlng the Hongkong j,.... ings. He has been a prisoner of work war there. He said that before he went to Hongkong his knowledge of lhe place was nil. It is about 51 square miles and was very variable .-.round the sea coast. He talked of the beauty of the harbour and the density of the population. He said that it is much more thickly populated than Barbados. It has one city. Victoria a mt in the lowland the temporal' is usually about 92 degree then one" goes up to hlghe which is called the Peak •vhich is much cooler. the caw that wounding n person and If she shopld appear again *he would iw in for %  •bigger"' trouble. W 1 second to Marryshow who was the United Kingdom Government w,. tl>erl w. her on her Uo The home on Saturda* and has not Ihen In England attending the and the Dominion and Colonial o(TCTlce was com milted on January raturnad The Police l Commonwealth Parliamentary producers lor u long-term agreeM invtstigntions. Association Conference ment alter that date. As a result, ... ,. — ^ Since then at a public meeting the United Kingdom C.overnment -.-.pne;Tc,CifJcri Ifi. T^ 1 !" ^ * %  %  <• M> in honour of Dr H. B. Morgan, have agreeil lo purchase from 1951 JtKSLC r\J2l 3. riciCU IVr M. ;m.| pavilion, opened on tn rrenadi horn M P Hon T A lo I 95 ". inclusive. t*TO.OO0 tons of A fine of 30/lo be paid in 26 day %  fternmsn, hnvi Marrvhow hai dared any man or "fr from the B.WJ. Colonies at days or in default one months tnctlva appeal : invromhinatian n f forced to un %  reasonable price to be negotintod imprisonment with hard labouThe cost of lhe pavllen was only LS hu^ in the consTiUicncv he f*ch year, based on efflclent prow a Imposed on 0-year-oW $700 uuing to lh limited financial hMil? for M vSr I m not ductlon. and the remau.dcr ot the l***" !" J-""^ Wiltshire of Bank resources of the Housing Board has held for 25 years. I am noi ; nnta M woooo ons a|tol Hall. St. Mehael wl*n he appearand lo )ie f.m lhai cv< I. will have to be *<* before His Worship Mr H. A. tniii nt the world orice ruling Jt Talma on a charge of larceny. „ my prlnelpto to get. ^ ~W ^the^orW^jiee ^l^ng^t „ va.ur> K i.t.K un nuni-i|| M> PI ..-„ n sl +nt to rieBcncrnte export quoin OI ,bers of the Barbados Museum f". iV V\ £Ji-? h _i. ,uv 1 vill '* to the B.W Historic Society when the * %  *" id MarT **!%*,'„ / ', ho sold at the woi .... ,-_,. ^ -~~~* • barter mv principles to get lhe and Historic Society Socletv held its annual General — %  . T.__t.— „ (t ,"' 1 (-= ... „. support of anyone who I feel susar ini{Mrv ,„ ^ „ WI ee*i^ti.il TV.F 1*' Wiltshire stole a quantity woeden posts belonging to John Fletcher which were on the Piei some In ment. Ip Shirts Sllils I .iiliis Sliorls Krnoirrri Slorkiiitts Srarvr* SHU lrr..-i Itluusrs SkirlCaaai lllimkrls SHftpsM Ufpa I its % % %  < %  IM II. Ills "iiriis.ils II I mtls I liiltlrt-n'ss Samliils 1 hililrru's Auklrls lliiin I .mis lltlrf llln|irr-• wiaoowi Hisraai. I 7H<. H|lICIAIf)atWindolene c&tuu f&us unify tfiuciAf EXPECTANT MOTHERS/ Make baby strong-so ha ean be an Important future citizen You M! more AAl) Vii.i-n!m DOW U> hal sfra C ur hb ttiong bnnw snJ a nurdy body—and 10 lp build your owl mruins ud energy. $0 ake Si nil* I -TI..1you feel .11 J.i 1 rcfulauly. See log eirecranry. more ihoa |u>l %  tenle— It %  POWfltFUl NOURISHMfHT S.oir** Emuhioa U a eclcatiilc inaic, rich In naiurel AAl)\ \ i[min", %  ."x!pflul help when • too need it. li'i cuonomicu, goodI (ailing. ^ SCOTTS EMULSION HtGM CNCRGY FtfOD TONIC Britons Wanted dent 011 sugar. WANT MORE FLOUR iFrom Our Own Corrvepondenl %  KINGSTON. Jan. 30. , As demand for flour become: Rir Wl\n n South Africa heavier in Jama.cn, thrTr.nl> uAocr.triPN Msn .JOHANNESBURG. Control authorities have uncle Th*. wlndhSre "Si %  Wrong South African firms are having consideration an application fo thit auction gang? iSgcr was Pent d.fflculty n getting workers an increased flour allocation to tne %  arried away along the trade AC.N.R. railways gang caught lhe machine after an eight-mile chaw by motorcar. —<". the same street. One cannot keep books on the _.ui Peak, h e said. Up there they Just land drop to pieces. Some fishennen and of Hongkong never touch land in He said their life. They always live in that oil of a type of business Is in their boats in the sea. from Britain." island under the International They see thousands emigrating Wheat Agreement for the cur to Australia. Canada and New rent wheat year which expire. Zealand and arc having to take around the end of July. Germans instead. At present the island's conIn HM7-8 II was estimated tha* sumption of floui is around 1.250,a million people in Britain wanted. 000 bags counter and baking flour. to emigrate to South Africa. An Increased allocation was ulScore* of thousands did. Then Dr. lowed a year ago. Malan's Government discouraged This move Is considered Dgeeo immigration and the figures fell to sary owing to emergency release: a trickle. following the flood rains of Octo—LE.8. bcr, last year. CLARKE'S "BLOOD MIXTURE Cleanse the system from blood Impurities ; many sufferers from rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago, neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and minor skin ailments, can derive great benefit from this well-known medicine. fa LIQUID or TABLET FORM /?£# offers LOWEST fare to MONTREAL *259."BWI Total far. 259 B'.V! 11 Call your Pan American offite •nd ask for this low-f ora routing t BARBADOS San Juan via British Wttt Indian Airways San Juan — Maw York via Pan American World Airways N*w York MONTREAL via Colonial or Trans-Canada Airlines Slap aw la Mrm 'art far ifcaaaiaa ar ligatlaaiail Homo /timvArs Do Costa S, Co.,ltd.Broad St. •hono 2122 laft.r kdHii bawr. 33031 / mi &?9 4C/f%M PERFORMANCE... ^ffyl&tils F0R COMFORT.., MeStfytoefy FOR SAFET1. XSJLS^ For quick relief from Nal Catarrh u.* •Meniaolatum' This wonderful breathable balm, when pot op mitde the ao*f, art* HMUntly. Your wry next breath cartie* tooling vapoori right up through the noa: which open up the nasal passages immediately. Irce breathing is reuorcd jutt by taMlhingtlw'MCTthobium* vapours Aho rub 'Meothoiatum" liberally on your throat and cheat This break* op konyeviion and relieves even the most obstinate (buurh. Ouxk —act a jar or tin of 'Meothoiatum' to-dayMENTHOLATUM Th* NtwUiittlliSSiibaMrwitaa WilliMt |*trtWiiwif* . within lh' IMBVHI •hd lh' d*rp niAiJ-l'iv i remil.riUW .pniBj,. Il it a • %  !<• car . iavrlrprn4'nt frrnil • "i-ana n.'llini road-hxltliiig. Ixwkhr^d Itydraiiltr brakr* givf pnaillve %  Kimlh %  i-i]>|>iti;. BfHl rl' ir aWH ,i nl -md itaHti. arid flit aiifr >l'rrui* iif. caMplrtp malrnl anrl rrdni r* diivlng fananr. In dditi. m toaDlaaaB tmtmm lacn -. al MM-, ika HaaMaaal Minim-* ASK FOR REAL MEN-THO-LAY-TUM *f orfo 9nly By Tht M$nthotatnm Co. Lit., (Ut 1999) 9lltth, f Hi/on* IfmUhmMOJUUSSi* FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phoas 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 AIR FRMGHT SI.R VICES to and from Regular Services Save Time tnm Bdos i HI KMI ll\ 1 ISHON 1 IIMHiS u 1 Flylni Tfeaaa IFUghla Heekl>pCllo Ralea 1 12 15 1 1 13 If 1 24 45 £ 1 $4 31 | 29 00 lin | % I 14 92 \l., ( ii ur--. SrrvirrN Ui Ihr whole World. IT9'FA8TEMB\ FAKBl SPIJIWIHI). Hook (hrouor* V""' Ioc0 MO i c Forvormug Agnl who mnkti no rharoe tor adi>tce, Informaiion or booklnyi f'i; *^'need bird" to all atx ronilru'fifi. FLY-BOM BRITISH OVEJ^EAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED HHMMi II. Faoaa 4MB I CHECK YOUR FACTORY SUPPLIES and Phone early tor thm folto$rina DUNLOP TRANSMISSION I1ELTINC. 8H" X Ply DIINLOP KUBUKH INSGI'TION W' 1*1." DICK'S PACKINGS all Type* NKKS BK.LT IJHKSSINO FI-\KK IIHAI'HITE L INK iSTE 11ASS BIIOOMS STEEL WII.C I1IIUS1IE3 LMEHY It SANDI'APEK FILES All Type* TAPS , DIES • WS >, IIAC:KSAW IILADES HAMMERS — OPEN END & BOX SPANNERS TAPEII li STRAIGHT SHANK HIGH SPEED DRILLS l-ll., (-lb.. 11-ib.. I|-lb.. 2V4-lb, 3-lb. BTTLLSON TYPE WRENCHES '. 10", 14-. 18". 24". 3" CHAIN KPI WRENCHES W—*" ECKSTEIN BROTHERS %  %  AT I.TIEET



PAGE 1

SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tl'ESDAY, FEBRUARY . 1S1 HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON %  W"Q WHEN BUYING MATCHES ALWAYS ASK FOR MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY LONDIE • %  i V van*. BY CHIC YOUNG THE L.ONC RANGER I 'i n_/'U Jill. YOU FOR THIS,] SVEN TllOUSM I CNT ty-^ R-" BY FRANK STRIKER HAN6Y0UF0R l9£ETHM:KSGO]N3Tt>lWeCAFE) I TUERTS TME MAN >OU AND m SUOE TUEV HlOW TO f WH T EMfBIFF) THE KILLER/ •RINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS W JidOft VUff H/ve '".'P.'.ffTAN* *J'V '•S .N*>TauC 'Cr' K-3 to Off SUQS 10 A**! -M JPAT IXICLV ri\c rc-^e TO woe.:" p*ffOOM-5iO Mtf .A3GS-WJWCE L*'' IT-* Ex ACTIV CVS O'CLOCK" matt UP T ivOJDCO IF T- BU4-U6C* W;LL on* Thfiu MCK6S ovea j TVsE &OQDGB BV WOJIGHTI "OPE TUB 50*P WILL rOL TWEM f RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND feuca HCAeocee-j TWO <* ft. M£N A*E AUttADY Cfc A HA%£ ID MIAMI ,.16U CAN COJTACT TMW AT THIS AOXESS PUT TXL T TKY M* turn* Htcrt yeu w! i MCP6 TMey w, ) ttCAuse I'M / WCWflBD THAT ^ 1 SOMOOOVKM WILL HAS HW FIIWT! / THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES 6ETSaN6fC0W ABECOMIM& BEHIND ME THOUGHJHEVOICE SOUND. nPFEtENzmees sami fAMILIAR A90UTTHAT6t£MESM£AHee FACCMD %  ftSUBE' NO-ITCANTeE.ti" POBAMOMENf I THOUftWT.. SWEDEN S BEST MATCH "THREE STARS" ON SALE EVERYWHERE IS BACKACHE JUST A SIGN OF AGE? Many people eirfler .in aching back mmmma— believing y"u imW oiprct %  mud paiaa when your* "gilting "n" in year*! Hut backache i* often cauaed by the fault v iiciiun <( kidney* tod liver. See ho* much betier you feel after taking I>r. C luinr'. Kuliu \ Ltver Pint, dam and lrv<-r both filter I ; ; %  %  That'a becauae thia tiinr-prcrvea Dr. Chue remedy Ireala two endm-ma at •we—contain* special remedial ingre:.?.ifs U* both ih' 1 kidney and liver ilac rderi which often cauoe backache. It you're ferling vorn-out. tired, iu\idauli\ —with p.iinful joinu and look youi kidney* ami fn Dr. I %  '• Kamty-Lfvw '.. .loiiijiht. At all drug counter* I* •&m^jf£h sT.tnr mi 11 OFF inu.r WITH ENRICHED BREAD The Vitamin Loaf J&R YEAR BOOK 1951 The Advocate Co Lid. will publish a Year Book ol Barbados in 1951. The Year Book will contain three parts:— (1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on a wide variety ol subjects e.g., agriculture, linancc, industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport, art, literature and all the things we want to know about Barbados but have until now not been able to lind under one cover. (2) Special supplement on Barbados' industries: e.g. sugar, soap, butter, laid, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels etc. (3) A Who's Who ol Barbadians you should know about A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate <-*>. Ltd.. Vice President ol the Barbados Chamber ol Commerce, Mr. George Hunte, Asbiutant Editor oi ihe Barbados-Advocate. Mr. Neville Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale. Advertising Manager olthe Barbados Advocate will be responsible for the publication. The compilers ol the Year Book want to make sure that the Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries ol Societies. Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisations immediately or not later than April 15th 1951. Year Book, C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street. Names and addresses of all those to be considered lor inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed. Advertisements close April 30th 1951. Advertisers are asked to get in touch with Mr. Trevor Gale, Advertising Manager, Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street. This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to bu without the Year Book of Barbados 1951. (AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION ) Gums Bleed, Teeth Loose! r* i MM* .11 Stop Pyorrhea and Trench Mouth in 24 Hours Bit fling lain, ore rtioutti, ot loot te-th nv-in Ihi' TWi or* rhtft or Trendi MQalb. o tint lll vrnitt*Jlf no.. S ir UeU and !) %  •• to wear mawih for* your tiro* gat* (be treat wortq War t).*w moulh dimsr* have, •oread ti.-cnattout ih tror'.d w ttm r.o* *"": "lm" U na*e^'l^ D dlun(-lcrr ll la too lute, beeaama la*T Often cause not or.l thtioMOtUrth.bin BlsocProolc itsatna.uim and neart trowMa. Now Discovery SovaH Tooth ^eKBrAWeAs srr !" *nd quick Ia> It pen-list" rUht W the root ot tfi* ironl>:. Slops fan" frow Wflir.t thvery Itt* day. anirUy aren-K "ut ot your moih, and aeon tihl*na the lth Ttilnllo*T.| l-tt-r Itoii Mr. it. W. D. ahoei ine rs.ulu t..< Aoou'*tiart •imlTfrrdttoni Rancti Moutfi and fjurihm tor tan rear a. My %  utna were lore and Msedina and had fort four t'tlh. while aevftaroihi-r tcttn a —m nil the line I t*i^ then heard ot tills it i. In It ho-jn all-, ur. many % %  a*>at| Amman C ma had atoptied ht-ed-.n*. aiy mouth oi*appeav> eorti so (act and to eer-atn n..ji.l(i i.d %  .!.'; %  .-„_,„/ back on ttlurn e! empty , Don't lakaaeUUMt on oaia* rout laatq auffer.r* Ihe df and he.il trorbl llxmlst soOM) undi nii (rom rhMnailam %  (i Amesao Ir^tn your flrr trrls iton-dad awaraatAmosaiiS'ir For Pyorrlioa—Troncn Motrth OBSERVE that different brands of Boy Rum come, and they v* go, but t BORNN'S BAY RUM will go on forever WHY? QUALITV Thai's Why rO-DAFS NEWS HASH ROYAL, READgKfi. -.j "TTEP BV STEPHm Opened by JOHNSON'S STATIONFRT Tor the Window* and Door* Of Yoiir New House— OlAM — Cut lo order by JOHNSON'S HARDWARE IIUI: HOOK which mukrs GOD'S WAY OF SALVATION PLAIN Pleo*e> u nir for one .<> Samuel Roberta. Gospel Hook and Tract Service!, SO. Central Avenue. BDgor N. Ireland," ^*''*ii^-j'***-"**''**-''*'*-*''**-See Us for the following :— Tin* PF-ASTT BITTER Bolit. SALTED PEANUTS Parfcage* DATES Tin* KRAFT CHEESE A MACARONI Bots KRAFT MAVONWISi: 1 & 2IP Tins HAMS Tins RABBIT Tina. Gt'AVAS Tinn SHEET CORN lift Tim <' E MORTOVS PI:ARL BARLEY CVCE & Co., Ltd. , 7. I 9 Roebuck Street. Dial 238"



PAGE 1

PAGE IK.Ill IIUIIIWIOAOVOC'ATi: IIIMilV I I mil AKV 1. I'JJI Iverson Or Johnson Must Go: Hutton Shows Devonshire Beat Island 2—0 (r'rom W. J. OBF.II.I.V) ADELAIDE, Mr Mr John ..,.l.l-.r,l .XI 111, K. ill, HJII-.II'. XI 11.1 8 wkts ) 406 TEAM from tho H M S ll.viin.hlrr defCJtr-d IhiIsland lay Bt the I Sjvaimah in 11 1 Feb. 5, Hold go.!, wlilcn wore scored In With a magnificent lone hanrTerfort w>uch took him fc^J"^**" fflS through iho inmnRs unconquered, Hullon busied wide open an<1 c( mre orw rd Ttyack the inherent weakness of the Australian spin attack. Since The game started on fast with the Australian team was chosen for the first Test, know(the mland dcfandlnc lro,„ 1 .-„ledeeable rrilirs have been well aware that Australia has > %  ?. %  *. "J* £•"> %  P""MaKin, hi, run aU .-...ken a terrific gamble in .ncluduw two oH-spinne !" to the *•* ^TJSSS itT^ 5SS? 3SSS ^"^'bi'ml^ exclusion Of H lei;-breaker in their attack. area but on cadi occai-on the inning* of 106 retired for Mr. fnti] to-day. Ivemou and Johnkeepers were there in position lo Keith Walcoti's XI at Kensington son have been equal :o ever) >punch the ball back Into pl.v (n Sunday in the final day of play placed upon liiem But Ram say playing at centre forward of DM last trial n.atcli m picparaRutjan'a great ilTn i'"a pnen j, r the Itland nod on.' chance to t.on fr ihe finning lntei..lonlal lal p... i %  provi betoore in Ihe iri .... i ..unient. yor.d duuLi (hat o n : ambl .; ..., %  i,i felt tug to th-ball, Atkinson coi hie century in 85 no lunger In the second hi.ll law Drvanminute: In .hi* an"im,vr knock Iverson or Johnson will beM la uire chnnged their tgetlea tnd l.* got t foon II.iv.mired In make room tor a tog-spinner, concent uted on low haid paaet* lb* day* beat partnership of 141 Although It was a tfllBMr'l which foun* >•' %  Ban Iho aecond half Tayack nt centra %  %  %  however was a baUCornpton paid tlte penalty of fcrunrd drew llr | oVi para d lao, giving 11 T -1• i no mulo reeHvltia a low pass outrun T^vlor *'P '' 'In. largol) t.. tin* leg ofl I.indw..il. He played and nndlng himself alone On the contributed to Mr Keith Walcott'-. the glance in u lackadaisical .nanball with Only goal keeper Smith P* vei | pH ,n B "I 1 ' paid the price t.i beat, kick.. I MM n tj km IT,I l ls On Saturday. Mi f/aJoOCTl sinppard lust concentration the right hand comer of the nets team had ••cored 63 for I nnd they after defandlng rtOuUy for an to put Deraaahlr* One ut> vrm on l atkl 343 l ,tte,r scor hour. He BWling hard :I1 keeper N'>.,k Bright Batting In Wil1 Freebooter Win Final Trial Game 1951 Grand National? Atkinson Scores Fine Century Uv VKKN'ON MORGAN LONDON, Feb. 3. A Free boo icr. the winner of last year's Grand National, will burden at thai first sight of the go down to history as one of the greatest steeplechasers ui all time, should he win the race again this year. c t clwiice of jnolhei \Kto. May Not Surl The French chaser. Roachford, who has been automatically given topweight with Freebooter hecaus.* he has not run in II: probably not take his etUU would have to be a very exceptional horse t' win with tinmonster Aintree fences. Next in the handicap, the Inh enck Cottage Hake, who is allotted 12 stone 5, tf also an almost certain non-starter. The other famous Irish chaser Shagreen, owned by the British sportsman James Rank, has boon given 12 >tone 2. several pounds more than many thought he xuld Though he fell last time la fences of Gatwlck. Trieif Freebooter won Uu i i be should riahtl) staka a claim to a place in the national weights. Top Weight ,., ., .,,..,.., Mr. David Rheppard who anyestcrday Mr. John Goddard* ailltiul all sjOllllla fin llil tueh look first turn at the got his hands to it but could not rare this week mnv be said to have wicket on feturgay. made 194. lu,ld It. been rather harsh mi Freebooter Norman Marshall after ball ma The Interval was. taken with the was called i bowl rrjrainst hi* scoreboard reading 2S3 for It would not be so much that in giving him the moximu he had won the race in successive weight possible, it was a foreyears, though lew enough horses gone conclusion that he would 4. Manifesto (1M. Jerrj •ppetnled that big horse had not more than last year. > %  his case the first if Mr. SI.eppard has been liaiJ Freebooter hy six length-: but the of the two u/aa a wartime tubon Freebooter he has auio been Grand National winner an stitule race run over the smaller somewhat %  evens on most <>| |m ceding him 10 pound) leading ri"als and the ehampion'i: — Reuter. %  ; M ATKINSON MN lll'TTON legs Into the stumps for a bowled Droved a stnuu' ouDonent Dor ihe r,lm rnates and he took 3 wickets Marshall 84 not out and Walcott Ten minute nfier ,ho 'J M rung in 7 overs-one of 27 not out. U.S. I'l.iv JaiiiiiiiM At Lttwu Tcunib' K1NC.STON. Jamaica. Fab. 4. American lawn tennis invader* decision Evans suicided after ttraettw shots Hi dsei | I.LI .1 a half ii>. iV; forwards. Ten minutes after the if first goal Tollis at right wrlOf icc-ived a pass from Plumber ked inside ktfl and rmdiiig hlmatlf row for Caribbean 'championships. VeitenL.y Althea Gibson. American coloured alar, easily outSayed Mrs Corel imaican Ch.'mpion. Aesglts of play Saturday however with Joh.._. Women's SIIIKIVS AHbea Gibson j n down fo m>kc (n (U.S.A. > bent Ivy Cover Rampciiion. he snicked c 2-6-3. ItabaMadde-. ^ h „ had M „,„ beat lletty vlneh was a maiden till brother Marshall retired at 64 and Skiplti\. who look 1 for 31 runs in 5 pet Wnlroti took out Charlie Tayivoa the inly other bowlar l r Wl,n m m i" reauma tna inmot .t KO...I tonga i,au .M ,.„,,„„ „ %  ;;„,v %  • %  „,„ %  %  ,•; %  %  ,;• '; il '^'l^^'"'..^S";,, ''"* 1 Hff** • oco d a !" 1 *• "a" Martin wdl f, 1 ,!; *1 "? ",J,"J!",' TiS?^ Tatw.all stas^strortc badly. m (rom Smilh who had com K',"'"* l '"'"' ,0 dUml t>oon<>d a catch at silly leg. But out o( |h. ban. Diiuman. u?i.i. .i,^r^ a — j .^ Th'' spoclatoTS saw Wood, Tay?3?.Z.^i M n ? *? C ?'" ">' w d m adc two slump, and ;,., %  "?! , l 1 f)' 1 I ""' d Sl r''h on the other hand was not o( a lha complotcly with low and high V i.rv onod ^t-mdai-a S&J'ZS h H lin '" 2fB ' hP H-t^^and D. Atk.nson. vhmUe sounded most of (he play 5i ho night watchmen, were II goinc on in the islands walking through the pavilion* 1.40 p.m. to carry on XI. overnight nership which showed Australian spin attack in nil it Romsay. .mpotency. Hutton ft Chanee llutlon had one slice ol luck Ba' nrea. n. In dancThe teams were ftom Walcoll's %  half-volle> Island: Smith; Symmonds. Gibscore of 63 for I ne to Tallon bons; Gitlens. Cadogan. 1'hmael; Skipper Goddard opened hi 1 Who had set himself for the Taylor, c. Ramsny, Johnson, tack with left arm medium pacer scorin a _ %  • o_l" fumplng. The line fickle which Daniel. E. Mlllintrton from the imviliut. crM "*Psay Hi 6—2 Lewis (USA.) John Goddard did not take the field after lunch as he sat on the Selection Committee. Roy Mar%  ii.ill deputised for him and used Norman Marshall in his place. The new ball was taken on re%  umptson. Eric Atkinson bowled trie brst over from the screen end %  mi Millinglon came on from the pavilion end. Both Walcott and Taylor started %  ;iu!iou-ly while Atkinson and Mil hue ton got a lot of swing out of the ball. They plodded on and were now r-.u again beaten The rate of coring was considerably deWhat's on Today I vinlniii.ii of Seulplure and palntlnas t K. R. Broodhatrn. pointlnrs and water colour* by Mar* jorir BKHKIII.II; rii and palatines and waler rolcirn by John HarrlMn at Barbados Mu*rum iu " A'.'.iiiilili iiiri-l. Sullivan (U.S.A) 6— 9\ 1Hutton stumbled home. Although Hutton adopted the policy of letting runs come instead of looking for them he mastered each member of the attack in turn. No bowler was Unfinished Mixed Doubles gi veri mn „ MinK of h0lK H Scofleld accustomed beautiful cover drive for four oil '" '"' "'* ta '< again runs Marshall's lourth hall and the e' coming quickly. next ball he late cut past second "alcolt got 50 runs when he had slip for another four. L ''' n batting for about 30 minutes. His innings ended the lollow""!''"" ""d Taylor senl up 100 Fourteen were selected Sun. ing ball when Marshall clean '' "a minutes. day lo represent the island of bowled him. leaving him shaped Walcott went on to make 85 beHI Wright Barbados In the lnlcrcoloni.1 for a cover drive. fore he was nicely slumped by Tournament with Trinidad sehed „„„,.' _.j. ,„ „, „„„,„ wicket-keeper Wood of! Norman uled lo begin on Thursday, ,„' "n lr „,"",'' C .,tl "" ,, a „n. c arh.ll. He moved down to February U W ^.'f 2 £&XX$ 5 ^,22a "'" J d ""gth ball outside They are John Goddard (Capt. Eric Atkinson. Dennis Atk: E. L. G Hood. Jnr. C. Hunte. !to v Marshall, Norman Marshall, 2. C Mulllns. A. M. Toylor. Clyde Walcott. Keith Walcott, Evcrton We-k. Wood. was 71 for 2 Atkinson 5 not out. Norman Mar rgjgJJ ST^JSi SJ-,^" £"££ Hunte. Atkinson ngs included and G. Belleville Tennis noct. Walcott's Ini 16 fours. Wickets started to tumble. Maid..ill. all within an over, tlaimed the wickets of Waleuii. N S. Lucas andE. Cove William*' was the eighth wicket to fall. Brankcr. who was brought back from the screen end. was fast as both women pulled out trick shots from the bag but the American _"d ipp 1 M | thefY wickatt out from Today's game* which included play* between Jamaicans. United States and Canadian players were exhibition matches, preliimnaiie to the Tournament will begin a the tourist famed MontcRo Ba> Fairflcld Hotel grounds on Monday. Results of ihe games played Neither Washbrook nor Simpv terd "y re as follows: spinners MIXKI* roi BLt-s tHANDK AP) fag i. Branch & W. A Cricha"" beat Mrs. A. A. Gibbo.is off his hip lo square leg „,„, „ A Sk|(;Mll ,_g 0 3 knowledge that the |_j ,..,„, shots to take much w^^^^^Z'^"HI i tho Jamaican. ,„, ri „„ 8 bnU ,„„, ,_,„„„.„„ jJSBJ Pet haps the mat immobile guarded thai position Iverson Mrs. It i .ii. la -. He pushed nm I fast above the big fellow's head. and Iverson extended hi< righ'. d like a slraphamter In the ,??!! l "l Poltataon Bantr Miss I & P Ranti >> s. Bcnianiin. Unliniihetl TODAYS FIXTIRIS Men a Doubles iFlnsIs) M Patterson and G I P Taylor uish hour and the ball stuck fast Every man on the fleld was greatWater Polo Today v-n****Kmmm*n ui"T!\un, Deserve To Win Simpson rt,is beaten and bowliil H h Johnston's late mswmu. So will ploy a Water Polo match there has been no cause yet to p a 7 1( r '0 ,;' against a Ladles team from tho fear the spinners. Bui the AuiBarbados Aquatic flub. Iraliuns suceumbetl lo spin lathn IKithetieallv. Thr Ladles team U A Eckstein, Wright bowled beaulifullv. II.s T. Browne. (; Gale, F CarmiJ,. E breaks turned nlrc1> and Ihe chad. P. Chandler, .i Chandlei c'^tily *iooil up ratbw iteeply (Cp< i. ajuj II Vldmei Tattenol) made a splenihd debut What p nrange (naaoeuvre was responsible for him nrti bus in the Original selection His BbUlty to plud alone c-ono mi rally mid fo pick up valuable wickets ^_^^_^^^_^^^^__ has stienglbcned the attack jmed his pace and delved in with England's bowlers have again enthusiasm but llasseit used him given their batMiit'ii the "Pf*tT| iparlngly, No other Austi.dian From a comparatively hopelcai bowler with the exception of li.M.iw t; Mael-ean. H Patposition on the first day whe-i Jobnsloi: cau.etl his full weigh! tenon. Teams are asked to bo three wickets Only were down for It may be asking too much of ready by 4.45. 254 they set to and swung it comWright to nit the worn patch There is another match tehedplelely with a grand ellori which often enough to u't Ibt Austmuled for Thursday. The Barbados netted idetn 7 wickets for 117 bans out cheaply enough lo allow team to play on that afternoon L, runs on the second day. for victory Bui with Bedser nnd; as follows:—M. Foster. M. FltzThis deserves victory. Tattcrsall in support, the oppor-i tunny is definitely there. l.indwall Outstandinc I believe lhal this match is Lindwall was the outstanding bound ID provide an extiemeK A.i.tialian bowler He maintaininteresting hnish. This afternoon at the Barbados Aquatic Club at 5 o'clock, a Cadet team from II M S. Devonshire Reservcc: G. Itwd and II Me Kinnon. A'ter thfa ; .in.,.i Barbado) men's team will pla> a team fn H.M.S. Devoiisiiirr The Ntrbadori team Is: — A. Weather hi a. i P. Manning, Tim TgCrwood, II Weatherhead, K inee (Capt I, t) Johnj.on and C. Evelyn. Mixed It I Bill! dUndirapt Miss Branch and W. A I'n h'w ^ i Nil %  Lag -I.in i C CHEAP DAIBY 1'KODUCTS WELLINGTON. N Z. No country in the world can supply food of animal origin more cheaply than New aeeordtng to IE. Bruce Levy, poted iiland (arming oxperi who has lust completed % %  world tour oi bi-hau nt the government. — spinner B K. Bowen brought on for Marshall while Mlllington .'till kept up the attack from tho ; pavilion end. The Wanderers pair were by this time well settled, sparing nothing short or loose. They sent up the 100 en the tins in 85 min1'acer Bra.iShaw relieved Milenticed him to go down the wnket. .ington but this did not change deceived him with a leg break the complexion of the game end loft the rest to Wood who Atkinson, especially, was getting niadc.no mistake In stumping runs quickly. He made powerful Williams made one and the score o(T, back and cover drive* urd was 369 for 8. jaced on t<> his 50 after he was E L G. Hoad partnered Tayl-.r at the wicket for about 40 rnlnAt 46. Taylor was given a chance utes. Marshall was then 16 noi by Greenidge fielding at mid-on out. off the bowling of Millington %  > %  With the scoreboard reading 150 The ball went on lo the boundand for 2. made In 113 minute*, spinner orv lo make Tavlor 50 W. Oreetildge wag brought on Taylor got another chance at Irons the pavilion end and later 65 when he gave a hot return to liranker Irom the screen end Mlllington. ehest hicb Spinner or p_cer. all were tre;.:yj,,, p.,,,. ^n-d out lime with „ ed alike by Atkinson and Taylor not out 70. and Hoad not ami Marshall. From off the back foot, out IS. At the close of play the It was four runs to the mid uti sroro WJS 406 or fl lii.viiul.ii y on 10 the fence behind th,. bowler. Anolliei time they ate a. WAixorrs xi were down the wicket while the r „ .! ..**!E"?f 0 Ull fetched the boundary. Crisp | 2-H.S^WU.fx % % % %  •{ cuts, powerful hooks .md lino n. Aiki.m feiimri i.l.iin.-. I..IH. fiom, the bafs of tho •* %  i5_?*H u I'll"' _. H. Harahall Thi'v senl up 200 aHer I3"> A M minutes tf play, Norman Mai hall N g. Luni amend the Commissions of enquiry Ae| while Mr M E Cox Is expected to move passing of a bill In amend the Trade Act. Lidy Baden Powell will attend lh P C.uldrr* Meeting at St Michael's Girls' School 5 00 A team from the MM 8. "Devansh'ce" will meet a Barbados Reslment team In a football match i Garrtson 5 00 M..i.ile Cinema gives shou of Shrewsbary School Yard. St. Philip 7.30. Dance at Barbados Aquatic Club far personnel of UMH. "Devonthlre" IM Ladles team from Barbados Aquatic Club playa a Water Polo match against a Cadet team from 11 M S. "Devonshire A Barbados Men's team plays a match against ITM.S "DevonshVe" at Aquatic Club fig|. CTNMAS Aquatic Club, "Do You Love Mr" n *o Pi.m 'BMdKflouiM "CKBIII taiCl-Utlrig" 4M A X> Hu lOtMim "nn KM rVju-. 5 Mi I JO Globe: -'aumnrn-itock-'. sasao Olympic "A Meiuse To O^iru and -The Taxes of *wow M 4 4. SIS Gerald. G. Mucl.caii, M. Jordan, B. Patterson (Capt.) K. Inee. G. Foster. Reserves: Trevor Yearwood, Owen Johnson. They'll Do It Every Time % ( %  THAT ""**" By Jimmy H atlo I L-SCO TO CAT BREAKR4ST IN THE DEPOT, TILL WE IKVITED HIMSELF TO JOiN THE PARTY 3 u lE'S THE OU.Y GUY. CAN RE40 AHD / OFF AT THE _/^ SAME TMe-; 'W*RC. WoNi Manhull E C*ve I h I a nr...,Rcf i r t: lltuti r >ui BWtrw Toui ust s aaaaobti .. f i irv i > %  !i si. 1—71, j—a ass. S as* t-JSj 7-lil. %  —3M. llUttl.INt; ANALYSIS O V B. Alkltoon S I M ni*i-iija n 43 Milh niton Mar-nail K II.,-.. Mr*ill* C gpajgj%  The Weather Sun Bites: g lg an, Sun Sets: ti.00 p.m Moan (1'it-i Quarter) Feb ruary 13. Llilitiui: i, ::ii p.m fttlt TMr: I ill a.m. p m YESTERDAY i:.iini.di (CucVbiituii) :. In. Total Pac Month to Yesterday: .: inTemperature (Max ) gift "F Trmperature tllln.) 71^ F Wind Direction: (9 a.m.) gX. (3 p m ) N I Wind Vctoelli: 5 mUes per hour. B^-ometer: ( am I 20.003. (3 p m I 20.911 Ittta ^QETTINIS A CHARACTER S ANALVSIS OF THE FREELOA01NQ CO.lMUTEr? — T***MK TO WfCHACL T. Of (JOUfl, 20 rte*oy TER., _Noan>iA>*TOM, >lASM l-llAIUUS EQUIPMENT Knquiries suppJy of cordially invited for the following— the %  Ml. I'. 6 ryi. IUI:HI:I THACTORS WHEEL The above equip< available for early delivery from ihe V. K. COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM Ltd. (Surl Wheels uKo avaUable tar PaaeajM .H\SS II I riiis ., A IH'l >I\M III Sl'ltl All! Its SMART and DURABLE for TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS Nw Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White Size.: 6—11 PRICE: $1.60 tW,r,MMueKMtur/KW,?/'/'.-.w/A'M'-':. Re have A'-ic Stocks of... Unitex Insulating Wallboard sini iiiiivnn iithis I I i i >III i s lllllll IZIM. IIRIIIS I ~~-r^vrJ' lIKMIll-l'l'.lllll % %  in,, thick 4 II i.i,>r br Ifl t It: %  • ft: 12 ftlane Standard Hardboard i. Has. thick: Ifl r Sfl: I ft. II ft. J.'U Us. thick ft. x I ft Tiieboard t'rrjm. \Vhltr itvsl Gr.rn 4 It. x • ft. and 4 ft. I I ft. • rnoM: 4".'.:. WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid. 1



PAGE 1

MI iiw ranMMftv mi I'. \I(H \IHi-. AltViM \TK PACI FIVE BARBADOS MUSEUM A\D HISTORICAL SOCIETY AT the beginning of 1950. states the Annual Report of the Barbados Museum and Historical Society, there were 241 members on the roll and at the end of the vear there 2H4 members comprising: Founders 4, Honorary Members 4. Life Members 35, Annual Members 176. and, Associate Members 75. The following addition* u West Indibn Print*; The Barbados Membership were made dutlnj; Art* ft Crafts Pott.iv Exhluilion. the year LIFE MEMBERS Alaii Uodsoll. R. DeC. 0'Nea.c Ronald Tree. Annual Member* C. R. Armstrong: I! H. Inniss. Dr. J. H Ben net. inr.; E C. Jackman: C Y. Carstair*. CMC. Dr J. A. Kernahan E J. Cole; A. M.Ch.. F.R.C.S.; Mrs. E G ConDeli; E A Newsam. H. C Connell; J. L. Nicol; F. A Davis; Miss E. L. Nurse; Mrs F. W. Floyd; Mrs. E. M. Queree; J. H. C. Grant) E. C. Redman; Mrs. A. L M %  I! Sainsbury; S. Ofaavaa; A. A. Seale; K. de L. l i; Seale; Dr J. W P. Harknoss, C.M.G.. O.B.E.; Mrs. E. L. Simpson; Rev. H. F. Hart; C A Skinnei; J B. Hobson, R. V. Taylor; G. R. Hut son; J. S. Yearwnnd; Mrs. M. Ycarwood. ihloB included Sculpture bv K. K Broodhauen; Caro GUI Meniorial Exhihitiun; Fin,Puming; Picasso to 194. being part of the UNESCO Travelling Print Exhibition, and. Pbotojir^phs submitted for Tha Barbados Advocate Photographic Competition Lectures were given at Meetings of the Socielv by Mr. H. Rislev Iacacock Tucker. MA. on "Turkey." by Mr C. Y. Carstairs, C.M.U.. on "Federation". by Brigadier II. A. Courtenay on "Transportation", hv Mr. C. C. Skeete. B.A.. on Hurricanes', and by Mr. II. A. Vaughan on "The Regime of Governor Reed Gill; 1846-1848". Courses of lectures were also given at tho Museum on Tog History of European Painting" by the Director, and on "Arclii lecture" by Mr. Ralph Crowe. A.R IB A., under the auspices of the Extra Mural Department of University College, West Indies. Other Activities The Bartodos Philatelic Society and the Advisory Committee of A. the Extra Mural Department of Tniverslty College. West Indies. I. conUnue to hold meetings In the Mrs. Library. The Council was glad to place the Library .it the disposal of visiting tutors from Uo'versity College for the purpose of interviewing prospective candidates. Future Policy The policy of placing a museum object on special exhibition and of holding monthly exhibitions is to continue during 1951. The labelling of the Ethnographical cxhl'the Hall Gallery is to be the reAssociales K R. Broodhagen; Leach; Miss M. I. J Carrington; R J. MacLeod; Miss ,* Fleming; R. B. McKcnzle C. E. Gooding; Miss D. K. R Mabon; Miss K. C Hawkins. Miss P. E. Mould; Miss E. M. Heath; Miss M. G. Payne; Mrs. G W Hunt; E. C. Queree; Miss II. A. Kellman; A. T. L, Robert.-;; Mrs S J. Kellman; Mis* D. G. Sainsbury; Miss M Lahorde; Mrs. C. M. W. Stoute. The Council is anxious lo .... increase the roll of Membership bits to at least 500. Members are completed, and exhibit asked to encourage their friend** Jubilee Gallery are to to join the Society. labelled* The "screen in the LI Society's Headquarters brary is to continue to presentDuring the year the row of photographs and other material recells to the EasI of the Quadlating to the British Commonranglc known as 'Annex B' **alth. adjoining the Children's Museum. During 1950, 8.490 persons viswas converted Into an Ari Goi,l d h Museum as compared with lory to house the Wortheim z 49 visitors during 1949. an lnCollection >.t watertolours and create of 5.999 visitors. drawings, and for the display of Children's Museum larger exhibitions than the ExhlThe Children's Museum had a bition Gallery can accommodate, busy and successful year during The work was carried out under 1950. Groups from eight schools the supervision of Mr. Miles sent pupils regularly 4 times a Cecil of Messrs. D M. Simpson term throughout the year. During ft Co.. who kindly gave his the Easter and Summer terms services without charge. The classes on 'The growth of the Society is deeply indebted to Mr. Map of the World" continued. Cecil for his generous help The Maos were drawn bv the children Art Gallery was opened by H's and voyages of discovery marked Excellency the Governor on loth thereon. During the Christmas July, and a Loan Collection of term classes were given on "Life West Indian prints was displayed Through the Ages"—which dealt Ml exhibition. briefly with prehistory up to the The roof of the Curator's lodgStone Age. Children collected ings was treated for wood anls specimens or coral rOfld UmOM and wood worm by the DepartObjects from the Museum, models ment of Agriculture <" %  < %  an epidiascope were used at the demonstrations, and showcases Mil sell in and Library '" lhc Museum were visited to inThe Museum and Library re•P^' relevant objects, ceived a number of glftj (luring An application has been made the year of which the most outJ'' %  ,urthpr .•* lpn *'" n ot the Standing wore : a collection of mX to ,hp Children %  Museum, coins of Barbados and the Wet: Journal Indus by C o u ri t Alexandre The Quarterly number of the Orlowskl; a holograph letter cf Journal for Mav 1950 is thc latest Governor Pinfold of Bsfbail. s '" ** %  Pi*shed consequently the and the draft reply of Sir Goor* Publication is still as much in nrBmlth together with histor.cal !" J !" * ' *** into one of ,1s windows. The r --"There are 8.'n St George 24d label.,.* of the Fish Gallery was fn STst"?hirch 2 in SpeVts completed and a showcase wilh Qwn ^ (n S[ ph| Dn f) Qm ,„ I cupboard below was inMalleJ s JamcSm The olhcr p tr t jn#n this Gallery. The Hall Gal)() nf> nnv(4 hyri ranis. lery was re-arianged *' *J C Part, of St. Michael too. where Society's Ethnographical rollec, nere BIV manv houscs havr lo lion, much of which had not prenydrantB A house would have to viously been exhibited, and tM )Urn n )t ln Ho wells Cross Rood. labelling of this collection is now tnC avenues m Bank Hall. New In progress. Orleans and some other places. The practice of placing a Wherever a main pipe ends museum object on special exhibilheie is a hydrant so sometimes tion and the holding of a montnu, er) ma y he two hydrants near |y exhibition created much intereacn other if one had l>ecn at a ggi m the Museum. spot before a main had been laid The Society received a subvent 0 cn d near it. tion of £100. from thc Bnti?h Between the Reef an<". TrnfalC,,uncll. gar Square, putting aside alley The wrought iron railinns prethere are 12 hydrants. sented in 1949 to the Society by The members of the Fire BiiganV the Governor-in-Executlve-ComnaV e to keep the 1.300 hydrants mittec, have not yet been crectoi in front Of the Muse'im owini to lack of funds. Exhibitions And Lectures During the year the following artists held exhibitions of their work at the Mufturn: John Harrison, Art ft "Exhibitions Officer or the British Council; Arnold Prince ,,nd Garner Francis of Antigua; Geoffrey Holder of Trinidad; and. William van Yperen. a visiting Dutch artist. Exhibitions were also held of a selection ot drawings and water colours from the Lucy Carring Werthelm gift to thc Museum. French Colour Prints, kindly loaned by Monsieur I-eguebe, French Consul -General, Trinidad; Loan Collection .ill over the' island always clea so that when there is a fire about the district, there would not be any trouble in opening th ejn. 35 In The Shade Bridgeu..vn experienced its hot test day in weeks yesterday. After a cool spell for thc past week. vcfterday's temperature In Bridgetown was 85" F. m the shade. There was scarcely any wind and electric fans were whirrin steadily in all city offices. Bridgetown hud the following temperatures last week — M Sunday .3 5. Saturday 82 5, of Friday 73.5. Thursday 13 5_ Mission Cose Adjourned THE Court of Chancery case by wtiich Is to br decided who is the the legally appointed representaktva ot '.!><' %  men t com pen sa ti on benefl ts ? Notice of these questions was %  hau in the House of Assembly a short while .i*-' 1 Mr. Crawford told the Aivaealr yesterday "What is needed of course, :s .* %  complete Social Security Siii.r. •o cover every man, woman an I %  hild in the colony. For quite a Nine Factories Making Sugar sugar THERE are about i factories in operation others will follow suit this week. In many districts people with no clocks will know the time by tfw factories' whistles, and the an will be sweet with the smell ol the juice that is being procrsscU into the product that keeps the island from going bankrupt It is not only in the cc district*—where most ..f the factories are situated—that peopl are busy_whcn crop f SrJlL^aCT!? '"* "<>*•< %  of Assembly that thc Cowrnment obtain thc service* ra of a qualified official who has had KoeVuck'suwlT urincloajlv Poetical exue-ience wilh the and in others too. loom queue! V pcr *"" £ J 1 B """ h N ""' up hour afu-r hour, day after day. '"f"'"""' Scheme to am u> in waitlnc to off load baa* of bimar "*" "<• %  .. at the .r,ou, bondhoiie.. "P to "' """ ny a ,""'. A* thc lornc, reverac into the "ft" which has the true interestbonds, there is a man readl ith "' '?* P* 0 !"' at heart should ^ -a .A..I.1 1... au M*iska - I % %  il ia men he plunges inu> -fie of the bags Mil ilia would be to initiate a scheme unVSS tack *£•*!* •a*" 1 w sample of the' sugar li h !" d"S>rics should be entiwhich that particular loit% 1, brought. The bags are then lifted oh* the platform of the truck an<< added to the pile of tags already there In a short time the pile will be nearly oeiling high. Stamina It is a )ob that calls for stamina. and there ore some really heft tied t o unemployment n'kr • %  ;-. benefits. Repeal "What is also needed immediately Is the repeal of fie present Workmen's Compensation Act. This can be substituted by legislation to provide a system of i working in these bonds, mei. insurance against personal injury Ci who will perhaps be • out-heftied" only by uM hghtcrmrn who wil take those same bags of sugut to thc ships wailing in Carlisi* Bay. As soon as a lorry has delivered Compciuat a load, thdr.ver gets It bock to and cumbei aused by accident, arising out of and during the course of a person's employment, ard against prescribed industrial di*c %  •<• and injuries. The present Workmen's Act is antiquated %  iiim-iauine. It involves the iZ .,* v "5* s 22 8 P 0 !" "*!* IO >injured worker In considerable another load. Thc more inus %  legal expense and more often n iL I!" 1 "* a W< k ,he %  r tt Ita" "ot. In recourse to the law will be his pay packet , urta w Ih thelr u-chnical prok'hen mo*i of cedure. annoyance and delay. Thc rk was done Act possesses all the complexity various 0 f the old British Act which was Condensed Milk Arrives Here •'he 8 s Rcatftccgen landed of 1,42a ciates and 194 bale* of potatoes, 31.000 canon of full cream %  woatansd eon densed milk and 550 crates o onjgaa for Bajtadoa She called from I AmstSTttan and Hamburg am %  alBad oa for Titaidad ia*t nlgni Supplies of ham*. mal rXtrnct.v 1 %  ever gin. nulrogen, vrraBDIBa paper. rODad o.itv and canar seed were included in th< Beoaeggen's cargo (or Barbados. Messrs S P Musson. Son I Co. Ltd.. are the ship's Agents. PORT ENQUIRY The Port Enquiry Commit te> held Its fourth meeting yesUr day, and discussed with represen tatives of Messrs Jason .nines ash Company Limited. Da Costa air Company Limited. I(..l Limited and S. P. Musson an Company Limited the question o re-grouping of tTatMg on ttw Waterfront. Agr.-einent was i cached wU regard to the re-grouping am removal of cranes nwned bv th%  hova BUM but it will be riece* sory for the Committee to moo represenljlives ot %  no%nai tirm t. finalise the matter The next meeting of thc Co.n %  ntttee will be held at 10 nm. 0 Monday I2lh "February, at ihi LatH.ur Department. ORANGES COME SCHOONER Eastern Eel. ... rii.-l arrived at Barbados on Sunda.* right, brought a supply of orange from Trinidad for local fruit sellers. M.inv of than wars Bon however, and instead of bein* removed by carts to be later displayed in trays along the road side, they were dumped into tin Corecnagc. In making stops at Qti %  rriacou and St. Luela. it tool tlie Eastern Eel seven days t. reach Barbados The fruit werstored in crates and barrels am' then under cover in hatches There was a time the transportation w< SL lorrl ?. ownod J £nuje* But nowadays more and ^ complicated, that at i more factories are Using their own lorries. Moat of the bond houses in the city are owned by II. o. Emptage Da Costa Hi Co Ltd. and S. P Musson. Son A Co. Ltd. U was the only piece of legislation that had given birth to a complete new series of law report* of cases upon it. "With regard to the specific pro]>osals contained In my quetion> Factories now working .re m the llagaMtt-s. Spnngvale. Fairtleld Cyvltet Fined 4."/His Worship Mr ; %  A Talmi. Police Magistrate of District "A' imposed a line of 5 on Ophnieat Seale of Kuuy, St Philip for tiding a bicycle without a lightv. lamp on the night of Februai* Scale was also lined 40.'for riding an unlicensed bicycle OJ the same date. Houa irded in the they should nature of a ternKlifc Sa 'y Lan "?*<*"**" %  porary expedient I, Hall Wa "*n and Sprin,ra sy matter to extend these bei Lund Inspects Brigade to workers in given indus'rics. Since sugar Is our largest and most important industry, it Is reasonable that we should com mence with that. The scheme is so simple that it could be set up overnight It would operate on a St. contributory basis with funds provided by employers. Covernployees. THE local branch of thc John Ambulance Brigade uiapcctctt a t a o'clock yesterday mont olid afternoon by Lt. General Sir Otto Lund. Commissioner-In-Chief of Superannuation the brigade and the Countess of Brecknock, Assistant Lady Superintcndem-in-Chief (Overseas) Fined 20'PATRICK HAHEWOOD of Belleplalne, St Andre* was yesterday fined 20'by the Judges of the Assistant Court ot Appeal. Their Honours Mr. O. L. Taylor and Mr. II A. Vaughn. The Judges found him guilty of fail ng to keep his motor cycle A—1886 to the lefl bide of Marie;Vale Road on December 13 last year when he was riding along Ultra, In making the line, the Judge 1 varied a decision iif Police Magistrate Mi O, li (.ninth wna had lined him 10 Central The inspection took placi Burrock Square of th Police Station. The parade was under the command of Major :i. E. Skeete On arrival. Sir Olio Lund and Lady Brecknock were met bv Captain and'Mrs. E. B. Williams'. After taking the General Salute tlu-y Inspected the Brigade. On the lour of inspection the Commissioner-in-Chief was accompanied by Captain E. \\. Williams und Major HE Skeete. Mrs E B. Williams accompanied Lady Brecknock. At the conclusion of parade Sir Otto Lund presented the insignia of thc Venerable The question of superannuation of paramount importance. of opinion that the qualifying " tnc age should be 80—the same age winch public employees are now entitled to a retirement pension. Our o'd age pension is effective at the age of 68 and recipients are only entitled %  5s. per week II the public service worker be permitted to retire on pension at 60, similar benefits should be available for the worker in the employment of "private enterprise." Incidentally, wilh regard to the Old Age pension, the Means Test should be abolished at once. An income of *s. per week Is manifestly Inadequate to —table the superannuated worker keep body and soul together "The part of the questions Order of the Hospital of SL John ^^ ^employment Z m o'ciXln' E B W Sham -m^^atiorT for a mi-m-um realm, to Captain E.B Williams ^ rlod ^ d „,rneii to assist w orkand Sir Edward Cunord. He con£ ^^ JgJ ^ knowr| J (h( gratulated them. .Ui-isud h r d t,m *" ln ,hp u ' ar n,,u,t,r > r H L."!iJ h 2..^Wa ^. S. f".'.During this ,eriod, agricultural and factory workers for the greater part, get little or M affl ployment. It was a matter which had agitated my mind (or some. lima, Ud l was delighted to not* that it was marked down as ar the Agend.' see the Nursing Cadet parade. This was their first parade and they are all from St. IfJctuh Girls' School. legal position which we have taken up I quite agree that even „ rm |()r j^ i bad t npromise is belter tha of an All-Island Trade Ilmor law suit in a matter of this son. tonferetje in which I was Invll "I am perfectly willing to await ^ ;.,_,„... *..* „.„. .. 15/FOR GAMBLING NOEL MEBRITT of Ivy Land. St. Michael was yesterday lined /. by His Worship Mr II A Talma for gambling on Ivy Land on February 3. The One is to be paid in 28 days or in default one month's imprisonment with haul labour. 13 IDs There were 13 notifications 0 Infectious Diseases for the iimnU, Of January tha Aslvocate learnt from the Department ol Mcdn %  Services. These are: -Diphtheria I, enteric fever 6. and tuberculosis 6 provisions, agricultural workers at'entitled to *3 per week am. factory workers to $5. The payments are made for a ptrlOd nine weeks. Employers are OOtfnpaUad by law to contribute to the fund. "These are matters with which, in order the more to Justify its existence, our Social Welfare Department might well, for the time being, concern itatU. Al though admittedly it Is unlikely I to do so unless requested by the Grvernment. In the absence ol a proper Department li> deal .\it). | |> ,|,i.-tion. the Department ol Labour could idso assist 9t'A a 3>acl uhrn your I in. t.-r pre %  rribes far >ou he traitors you need the "EST . 9?A a 3act when we compound your t rrwrlpllv i c only afle'the BEST In Drug* and the BEST in Srrvlce SEND US YOUR NF.XT PilKSi l.IPTION \ PRESCRIPTIONS PROMPTLY :: FILLED:: 1J a a^^^'-.^*,',',^-,^^',^^^*****,'*'-'---'-*-'.-.--',*.-,'-*-*,'-'--.-,'. Knight's llrilat Sl.il. s TOOTAL LINENS THE TALK OF THE TOWN! 36 ins. wide in NIL AQUA -ECRU FLESH LEMON WHITE POWDER $8.41 yd. XOQ.TAL iJnvJEN ^Branded* tlBltl/tO /iii-J .r,'-% ','. :','s.*s,'.;'s. DRINK CLAYTONS nth my clients on S.itui. | "DOUBLE-UP on ENERGY with CEREALS — WE OFFER TODAY — id to participate durum ,. visit t San Juan, Puerto Rico, five years ago. New l.r.;islUnn 'A few days later in a discussion %  hieh I had with Senor Lui> rln. then leader of the Majority Party and the Leglsla I w.ll assure the Court that a. ,u e "'' u no Gov n ,h C L *ll soon as I have heard from my sol^ny. he told me that his; Pj.rt> .c.tors and my clients. I too will fposed .nlroducng l^l"0' be willing, if they so instruc, me Jo deal with the matter. Not vcr> to discuss thc matter wilh the long after, the Legislature ol other side. But I am not authorPuerto Rico approved a law ised to retreat from the legal POMgranting assistance to .UK-ir worktion set-up in the pleadings." ers during the period which they The matter was adjourned. the Instructions of my solicilo and his clients on the point. Unlike my Learned Friend, I have only now been brought into the Case, and I am not as fully cognizant with the facts and clrcumstances as he Is. although I did „"„" u. cooler u **"' %  "—•• %  •* %  %  •••••i. I*" U "OI ma day call (he "dead season." Under Hi askjbr Cussons, TALCUM POWDER SHREDDED WHEAT % %  3tWr. KELLOGS CORN FLAKES 35cALL BRAN Me. ENFA ROLLED OATS 2c. Ql AKKR PUFFED RICE 37c LEMINE MALTED MILK 67c. NESTLES THICK CREAM .. c. DANISH THICK CREAM 3Sc. EAST PACK CANNED BEEF 40c. COCKADE FINE RUM Tha ploosonl way to quick relief from 1 ACID INDIGESTION 1 Alk-Sllf'ipt n "" ,,# and •patklins •••rww*"** MIUIM tntle effKienry. Drop on* w ,wo ubWl m, K IM ol wt, w.tchlt fus, thmdfinkit.Kaopa^^^ •upplyhsodV alwoy.! \fcif Alka Seltzer d KOLA TONIC FRESH SUPPLY Or PURINA HEN CHOW (SCRATCH GRAIN) H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.-D..ribuio,. ^/,w///.vy//.ww.vv,v///,-.'.w/.v//.y,VA-/.VA FOR YOUR FLOORS CONGO 1. Kl' M Ru 9 It. I"'. It. Each *I2.2.1 S 11. s|liiire 10.47 9 ft. T, ft H.75 Ltnsilhs 9 (I. iviil.-. Par Yard 2.20 G It wide $1.47 l. 3 II. wide .73 LINOLEUM In Grcc-n and B'.ur Marble. 6 It. Hide. Per Yd 7.43 CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10, II. 12, & 13 Broad Street





PAGE 1

PACE FOl'R I! MM! \ \ll\lll Ml III I. v\ li BUI >l:\ BARBADOS Sal AmDCrfTE fcOTi.-_.1 -_-SSil f?UU4 br -•• AflTe*M V.m L-t I t iil St.. BfMiaMsB. Tucsdiiv. February ... 1951 FINANCE THE transfer of the Financial Secretary of this island to the post of Accountant General in Kenya serves to focus attention on the necessity Tor change in the offices dealing with finance. For some time now there has been a vacancy in the post of Colonial Treasurer and more recently that of Auditor (Earn I nt It had been suggested in the past that the posts of Financial Secretary and Treasurer b* amalgamated but the public has not been told whether this suggestion had been accepted. Another suggestion made in the Legislature was that the office of Financial Treasurer be head of the financial department with a chartered accountant as. head of the accounting department. It will be realised that in those colonies where the financial departments have been kpt together the post of Treasurer and that of Auditor have not been abandoned but were kept as junior offices. The comment has been made that the post of Financial Secretary was unnecessary in a place like Barbados where the pre-audit system had been adopted for so many years. One Governor in an address at the opening of the Legislative Session pointed out that the time had come when there should be a linancial expert to advise the Government in the policy of spending and that he would not be responsible for the handling of the complicated matters of finance. When Mr. H. S. Jemmott retired from the post of Auditor General it was known that if Mr. Ncwsam succeeded him he too would retire in a short time. Both these events have come to pass and now the office of Financial Secretary has become vacant. If there is to be an amalgamation of any two or all of these offices it might well be discussed now by ".he Legislature and a decision taken. The old methods of handling the administration of these departments are not now conducive to efficiency. The office of Colonial Treasurer has been maintained separately and outside the Civil Establishment because of the fallacious belief that the House of Assembly could by this means control the purse strings of the colony. The truth of the situation was that the actual financial control has always been exercised by the Auditor General who under the statute could refuse to sign any voucher for funds from the Treasury unless he was satisfied that it was in order. And the Treasurer, except in the case of warrants by the Governor in Executive Committee, could not disburse any funds except the payment was certified by the Auditor General. The time is suitable for a review of the position in view of the fact that all three of these offices are now vacant. Playing; Field* THE general public and especially the cricket enthusiast will welcome the decision of the Government to purchase the Carrington's Village plot of land for a playingficld. This field has been in use for many years as an unofficial cricket ground but since the Welches property changed hands the fate of the ground was uncertain. Members of the teams who had been playing there for many years signed a petition and sought interviews with those whoso duty it was to decide the fate of the ground. Despite the uncertainty they continued to keep the ground in order and the new owners continued to allow them to use it. Their perseverance has been rewarded. Now they will have the play field established and put in proper order. This is evidence of the need for those who would ask for help to first help themselves and an indication of the Government's intention to supply playingfields in order that those who want them can have opportunity for clean, healthy sport. 'Operation Friendship' LONDON. Mi.-si pressing problem for of Brit i Pttopla from the Oolonk. srnTi "<> %  .:.' ginning to wonder whether their iMva is going to be altogether too costly this year, with the rumoured high prices of accommodation during ihe Part This week I set out to get some \ figures on the situation. I intei viewed house agents in London, in the country! and on the South with Festival visitors By HAZEL MAY %  '''• ,.. | '.her cou.-ige btfrtft CHI Rats til Wocta In live PiburM Mid suburb of r n,IM that the London. There are igpod hou i '''" b,x s •" ear. but OUh nta would seem lo, be nltlv % %  IVC lUtB ? M loun.1 thai country *onunoda"""""""• %  " ^JuJTaiiirS -.-I* atort not In London in a noWm i. p !" lm "'^7 >£*;,', Ihc foul ££?&?: %SSV£5 !" ^v.', 1 %  %  TOO., " P ,o rouna .h.t London "Tim typo o< redenre „ in. . otale agents ma) nuota you prices lend.., tor mallhy lamilic wlr. Best ;,;;„^^-y„u-recrh l ;.^'BVii: &£^j*~~2r£ ZEZEHtfZL** .Brt*b Record Yield From Borneo Oilfield (From Our D. V. SCOTT 4, CO., LTD. TO-DAVS SPECIALS %  I THE COLONNADE tutors wanting %  commodatlou Ish'-rravel and Holldaw "Aaaoclatho advantage, of countrj \S5?%f Kol3. Aaax-latlon nd m^tely-p.icod sternagJJ** g ~i£S£ nrst I cxamme.1 the position welMa.d-oul garden and Us own km of fwi,v..l ""^""M. with regard to furnished houses private bMcfc. The,e . | demand Art unite the * n ^!" r •2JfJ in the %  Mrtharn COUBUCJ srllhu. for tnis type of property In well modaUon hafaUtn r..i short of easy reach of London, likely to known holiday areas like Boguor the supply. attract Colonials with families on in the season. A good average n? <• *"****_ ***" "wVTlong leave. I found thai houses to rouse should not cost more than ui rfcirtf ***£* a*^ J? Sussex, Burks. Surrey and Herts 20 U. 25 guineas weekly in the rw ins where the W'^^*?"*"weie more expensive than those -eascn, or 15 gullltas out of season, dom stop ringing, and olllci lames to IhBl and Essex, which are not Two or three miles from ">der the wwjj of wrreon the electnc line with iuiireLoiuei would IKvery mud ] "* cjrj ro quern train services to Town. It cheaper than that Haia t. 1 SSTSS is easier to get a fair-sized house He added a warning to be borne Ma tod n rompl..-t I illin!sys-aay four or live bedrooms—than in mind by -ther holiday-makersMm have been !" *jv*"i.SSJ UU 1 0 get a iwo-roomed cottage, mok.r* for •• nice country coltntry M>y U *ZT, The latter are seldom on an ,,,. | n Surrey or Sussex Ih.n'l h earful*. 0rcaT J^V n J*',,? agenf, books for short-term let, u ok for %  period cottage unles* .aken lo ensure that visitors will ling as thev are snapped up as v OU are prepared to pay well (or ce happy where they are_ oil eie-i ., t ,,-s.dences by tax\ hc p ,ivilege of antiquity." he At nril this looke,! IBce :• i Britishers whenever they ndvtonl These are ihe mont exstraightforward Job or iisong thenu.k.1 n oottages on the market ro.ms according to price*, but Another point is that visitors Lce auw every rich tourtft from now it has developed on the line* who rent a house for a short the-SUtes looks for something at o' a sort of -Operation mern. period — four to six months for \ tm% \ three rentunes old." ship. example — suffer financially as South coast agents reported no The profi: motive say the acthey pay a higher rent than people hwxase In bookings because of comnicdatioi specialists, is no who t.ike a house for nine month. tric r-utival. Their prices were no operative here. The people WIU to a year. In the latter case an different from last vear's. You are throwing open their hom*< agent will quote much more renc „ n nhe your f am i|y to the seato stranger; are not out to ge sonable terms. So it a number of 5lric f 0r U(i |mJi as three to fi-e their dollars They pel n 1.11 itrteke arc i ust want to %  uinevl u-r u thr> l>edroomed make Mdadl wiih people from hnu-e if you are content with one Cnmmonwealth lands, rreoi Amen of the back roads in a resort town, ica or from the Continent—in that but a view of the sea will coM you order. ten guinea*, or even twenty in the "Most of them are middle-aged height of the season. people living in comfortable sunWhat is the position In Ixmdon? urban home>", a memb Trevor Sc Sons, leading London :;,tr told people following one anothi leave can arrange to occupy Uv same house over a longer period, they are likely to benefit considerably. A furnished house m the Home Counties with four to five bedroom, will cost " %  '•"' '" fgg £ "sonTtodln. T-ondon Alt UM %  ".' yesterday "N guineas out of seas !" butin>• w „ t lhclr Iom 1K have grown ..li thing up to SO guineas m acaaon, gj !" !" „^' ms books a 20 to 25 and moved away, Mum and Da.1 particular to Festival year. On -u. li apartments -^.d house* in U- Ihe other hand, rents in Kent and 'he West End ranging from 15 big Life gets a bit empty thev think how nice it ould be to have some overseas is.tcr^ — a fresh point of view, for Essex'and'The' more '.naccMs7bie guineas weekly for a two .bedparts of the Home counties .ird roomed house to 20Jo jWjVUUMi considerably lower. It is possible wevkly to get n verv nice bungalow or house. fTthree^^ Se^'^^edTw^oom'fiaUaro hedarhe is whether lh_ SL.n^^^'Wm^-h,.de,< of all to find The "concd visitor, ... come to th properties so likely to rocket in ve.tcl' f-iKin the season. They would be only v..r> between five. A little higher In price. One agent twelve guineas for meone wtio will perhaps bring thrce-bedroomod I new chain of iriendships wiln them, and som-onc to take round. Suburban flab, are not plentiful. Now the Association's main -_ — %  .* —. L ~__i.....*. t~ r..u^..i^^** it.. -* v oe^'tFesThey hnvc nrcommodation eight und foi some 10.000 people ;it any or three nine during the Festival, but had Iv-!'N going for all house three gnih*" l.u ed roomed -flats, according to tb leiglibourhcod and standard of d enquiries arc still in the hun•dk British Wi's( Indian Irti 1 I I'iltkV (By a Special Corresroiident.l Xban i.i' few people, if any. if noil IIVIIIB in. or having dealings with the British We ID who would oppose the CDnCVpuon af the prowtad Customs Union, with free trade between the itv< iritl Utrritories end unlfnrni dutiei .in goods Imported from outside n B Lira like euakHM union there ;re hound to be some elements \ liicii will be, or will appear t<. be. In some degree prejudicial to led tho Commission to deKrilw M %  UadlvkfcuJ Inieren or other. tinlona both uncUeantfi co ai, there i. x\w idea th:.; and ocononuc.liv dS^rabTfl? reglnnW free trnde must adversely On M Laol Ion "•?* * lo,:.l revenue of each ito eneouraje local Ini I his is true in the sen ,„,which > lain %  urcea of rnvanua 11.g %  naoyaneeg and unoinalies production ciin be pla had '.'li %  u '" a "IT —barbados. created by the diverse customs C ii, ihe himh.nui i %  u un|ne. will lose its import irrensjeinenti >>f the terrltorl* ,. letioiu, AI ttatiea on riat, matchei and copra concerned are well known and most all industrial countries have "hK'h ale all regional product) 1 Often cnuebed. A woman who has | n the early stages built up thci.' ''"' %  ' Commission makes pro. been away on holiday returns lo industries on the foundation of a posals for countervailing excise Barbados from Trinidad with the i r ,. honie iriarket, and if the r'uties which should serve to i new hat she was so delighted to Britla. tra to be inrewnue Und there—and finds herself asked dUftrlaUaed a similar foundation petroleum, the most important to pay a duty of 10 per cent of ib, s required. Su-li IridUttrka 'duct, and certain other cost. The Canadian exporter who cement in Jamaica, hardware in ,lc,m,i * regional trade. Apart send* down consignments of paper Trinidad, so,ip and margarine in fiom that, the tariff recommended l\ C N S steamer lo the islands Barbados, are fining to have far ** %  • "*" Commission is specially of the Eastern Caribbean finds better chances of success with a l e a t g n ed 'u provide more or less himself searching nine different home market of three million lt p s;i 1 '" '' 1 revenue as is now customs schedules and providing persons than with n market of .. collected. What is lost on regional foi duty at nine different rates, to f ow hundred thousands. In turn, product! dl i,e regained on tnv Fay nothing of surtaxes and pack successful local Industries %  eon P ll ani outside Ihe region. W( age taxes, and then has to com| t 0( | i 0 cheiipcr products and to a niust at this point observe how plete nine quite different import higher standard of living for tlu unfortunate It Is that Ihe Com entry forms, maybe followed by common man. mission drafted Us trade clgw. nine different form, of claim for -atIon and tariff structure at i abatement of dutv. And so on all The other eventual advantage lime when the best BVaUabtl round This sort of thing is not of establishing a large free trailing model was tho league of Nation* only vexatious but also costly and rvgion is in the long run more list of 1038. Since the Commls bad for trade. important still—it is the bargain* i0 n"s work was finished, an im ing power created by such a reproved classification has been Similarly, everyone probably giou. No exporting country is issued for general and intema sees the lenetits of inter-island likely to go nut of its way to make tlong] use under the auspices of tree trade. Undoi it Uaibados and n.,de concessions lo a single smull the United Mations; the 1938 cl Trinidad merchants will be able island, but many may wish to do Deflation If. now superseded, and ,o develop their sales to visitors ao when n market of three million the work if the Commission will pnd buyers from other islands, consumers is involved. By cutin tins matter have lo be i .-vised while the producers of fruit and torn* union the strength of all the On the other hand It Is no doubt vegetables in those island* will bo twelve participating territories |„ the auo .i thai most West Indian I bie to develop their shipments accrues to each one of them, and territories have not already adopt free from burdensome formalities iheir voice will be increasingly cd the outmoded classification, mid exactions, to the benefit of felt in relation lo International ,wd will therefore have lo change the housewife in Bnrbados and trade airreements. their arrangements twice. With all these immediate and The third reason why customs Those are the types of immedtpicapcetivc advantages in view, union has been delayed so long is ate advantages to be expected then, why was a customs union rimply inertia. Until the Montcgc from customs union, but it was not formed long ago? We suppose Bay Conference took place there prospective advantages of a much there arc reuq three raeaom. was no regional meeting of sim broader nnd more far-reaching First there Is a natural reluctance ilar standing and it was nobody': nature which led the distinguished of a legislature to divest Itself ol I usinejs to promote this obvious Weal Indians who formed the fls.-.ny part, however small, of its meaaure. >f which ii has been cal Sub-Committee at the Monte^i powers or to promote measures Mated, with what MOTM good Bay Conference to urge the ap other than those designed reason, that "probably no othei pointn.cnt of the Customs Union directly to benefit its own single reform would bring such Commission. whOM report nai electors—and it cnnnol b* benefll to the territories conjust been published, and which denied thai in a lar-reachine, ciiued." f mid. MI ('.irr^pondenO LONDON. Oil production from Seria in Brunei, North Borneo, has now reached a record rate of 100.000 barrels per day — nearly liv..timed lhat of the best pre-war days. Seria, already the most productive field in the British Commonwealth, has reached its peak despite the havoc ol war damage;! it was twine demolished — first in 1941, immediately before the Japanese invaders arrived, and secondly in 1945, when Australian reoccupation forces were approaching. Discovered by Shell in 1929 after years of painstaking exploration in the region, this oilfield was producing at the rate of over one million tons per annum by 1940; at that time nearly 150 wells had been drilled, some of them off-shore. The Japanese attempts to work the area were' none UM> successful, although they did renew production on a small scale. By the end of 1945 Shell technicians had started re-drilling, and in March, 1946. tho first post-war cargo of crude oil was shipped for refining in Australia. On Christmas Day. 1946, I.utong Refinery in Borneo itself, and only some 30 miles by pipeline from Seria, came back into operation, and since that date progress has been rapid. The greater part of the new equipment on the oilfield has been obtained from sterling sources. Included in the restoration work was the construction of two new submarine oil loading lines, or "Sealines", each three miles long, and used to load tankers which are prevented by shallow water from going closer inshore. A ihird line is due to come nto operation this year. A modern township, including a school hospital and social and sports club, is being built for the staff and labour, numbering almost 5.000 on the narrow coastal strip bordering the South China Sea, only five miles from the jungle. Geographically, Seria is of vital importance, being one of the principal producing fields of the East Indies, the only region of the Far East producing crude oil in any quantity. Australia, New Zealand and Malaya, to name only three countries, rely to a large extent on the East Indies for their supplies of liquid fuels. "Mutual Extiusiveness" In Mauritius Sir Hilary's Isl.nnl (From Our London Correspondent) A budget surplus, a record sugar crop, a year free of cyclones, success in sight in the campaign lo eradicate malaria, better social services — all these material blessings fell to Mauritius in 1949. Sir Hilary Blood is Governor of Mauritius. The Colony's annual report, published this week, tells the story. Politically, however, the Island has not settled down to the conditions created by the grant of a new Constitution and "that mutual exclusiveness which is a marked feature of Mauritian social life continued to act as a brake on progress", says the report. The first session of the new Legislative Council, described in the report as an "endurance record", lasted from September 1948 to December 1949! The Council met on 79 occasions, disposed of 70 bills, and 22 private members' motions. The Government faced some 400 parliamentary questions and 100 divisions were taken. King-cane, a new sugar plant, has been mainly responsible for producing three record yearly crops since 1947. The 1949 yield of 416,000 tons, valued at £11.926.263. topped the previous year by 24,000 tons. King-cane grows on land hitherto covered in scrub and regarded as unprofitable fur planting. Two more new varieties of cane have had preliminary tests which suggests that they are superior to King-cane, adds the Report. Malaria, an old enemy of the Colony, was reduced to a low level of incidence as a result of an intensive campaign directed by the Colonial Insecticides Committee appointed in November 1948. On the tea production front, a feature of the year were trial consignments sold to the Ministry of Food and to the South African market. Tins BROOKS PEARS Tins BATCHELOR PEAS Bottles COCKTAIL CIIKRK1KS Usually NOW . 59 55 26 24 ... 59 55 We Have ... GALVANISE DOWN PIPES „ WATER HEADS ,, RIDGE CAPS BARBED WIRE MESH WIRE r, w, iw, iv LASHING WIRE 16, 14, 12 and 10 Gauge WOVE WIRE — 24" and 36" „ CHAIN W, 3-16", 'A", & 5-16" WILKINSON A HAYNES Co., Lid. Successors To C.S. PITCHER & CO. Phones — 4472, 4W, Our Hruclrr* Say: Ihivtii'h) Sarinft Cricket ftroaifrtisf To the editor. The Advocate— SIR.—Who ever wrote th.* Tu the Editor. The Adi*oeot<-— lender writer on daylight saving SIF.— Rumour says thai unlesi ran never have lived through the Governor, who 1 understand, what was. (apart from pt-trol has the power to grant a license, rationing) the most unpopular intervenes, there n no chance of war time measure in nnrhados. 1 a Ball by Ball Commentary oh remember universal saUsfactMf. Ihe fortheom.njT Cricket matches when the scheme was abandoned being broadcast to the other West from high and low alike. Indian Colonies. If the license ii Take the point of view of the not granted. Barbados will be servant, of whom there are 35.000. placed in a unique position, and She still had to be at work at it will prove a most unpopular 7 a.m. But instead of dinner being decision creating great dissalisserved ut 7.30 p in It was u*ualfaction throughout the West Inly 8.30 as It was Impossible Lo gel dies. the men home carlm If all the other Colonies includThen it was Impossible to get ing Grenada. St. Kilts, and St. the young children to sleep in d'.y Vlneent, can broadcast these light, and they were weary and matches, even using Commentary fractious at such a long dny. Stations without let or hlndrani?. The game players found ihc surely, the slate owned Cable A: ,, ;i t JI fi p m very trying and Wireiess Ltd should be given %  ere often too tired to play lonp permission to do so *beicre the light was gone. peolally as this can be the most So do let a housewife appeal to we have to assist, you not to revive this nnponul CRICKETER. custom. HOUSEWIFE WASHINGTON Venemela'i name and fortune loth item from torrid l>.ke Maracalbo. southern extension of tho Bay of Venezuela which deeph indents South America's northern. mod coast, Name and fortune are re—on enough f**r imtimf the ..long with that of Its discoverer and th< discovery m "Y' „, date pn Venezuela's newest post }jjj} ^ M and pearl: Issned wet) alter the 450th am... r-yrcial oU well sunk. Still^anottgr lnUnd The M^racaibo"Basin sim low^drmft Uiilm rsary thoy eommemoniie. the 11 *£!*?,*!?*?£ ^'t K^WtlS f** 00 **' for 'hxec-fourths of ports on the near-by Dute %  stamp, six of them for .lr\SSS^S Z^Vlt *£? £&Z Vi rT' ; s uil P^-cUon. even islands of Curacao and Aruo, mail use. bear the likeness of )? !" 2^ t S£ V jL, !'£,*, im W h Sf. r T*? 1 J* Ma * ma "y There It I, processed in two o /lonu de Ojeria and th< : ;/ f <",'? ^' ^ ." ?** W fi'' far *?}** tM Veneztet, he world'/ largest rennerio U99-U.49 It was In October. ^_" !" n ^ZTS&J 0 *** U > .."" WW'g.eeeond argrst then loaded onto bag oeean-gom. Venezuela —Little Venice the modern Republic got hi name, walei area of six or more limos Tho vltlton doubuen noticed the lake's expanse, oil on Maracakbo's Waters Four centuries before the Machine Age ii meant little, however, to they ed on in reardh ol treeemrca i as gold an l, "'"shore, while others pu 13 was.tne region's Ant ombUch cmdc f „, n W( g 1 Maracaibo has grown Iron jungle town to a city of 14O.Q00 people in 30 ye.irs. It is Venezuela's oil centre and oil provides more than half the Republic'* revenue, making it the one Latin Oil derricks ;ire thickest In a American nation completely fre SO-mlto stretch along the lake's *>' foreign debt. east shore.' Some cluster in the The shallowneas of the strait lake as much as eight miles offon which the port lies, howev shore, while others pump the made it necessary from the start '" black crude from wells as far to ship Maracaibo crude in sha'.deposits of crude petrol' (ini new ,„_. : ,„. „ „„ ,„ v ^lwri ^P""*"" ,lS e I Sff ,,ws ni1 %  I? *he wortd'g second "li .. 1410seven rear* after CuUm.bu* *£l S^nS? & &Zl\£ -ST x P rl,,r r ". "Her the United inkers JgaJSf^tJ .WfiaTV-A&MM SI'. ,'TL \W-mir* lorut lake, making' It I-.ke Maracaibo and its larger docks have been widened, '*' 1 .' 1 .ii i i ''••' %  *exii i %  (ed txfbul la comprise a VetMBueCn i ,UMv "•? I ,| > mHta\ arid ihi inland waterway second onlv to channel dredned to open the port a Indian The lake. 60 mile1 nr.n..c River "s* ahlpe of Z5-foot dralt. Han. villages or primitive grass tni' ;,,„,. Small boats, ferries, and U for evwitual deepening to 38 built on stills proieeted from ih, Uwin Connecticut Thr tankers ply ilH QS then si c; mmrd Maracaibo and make Mara was a Venesect* (little Venicel. Basin, happv hunting graunrl for port f some of the crew commented. Thus oil pro^pcetor*, Is a land-andoil. an Important iankers and en.iliUthe country ell as crude growing army of oil technician i, **.ine dvmestk-ally.—l.N.S. RANSOMES LAWN MOWERS IIVVJ. or withou t Motor H 1VOWV THE TiME TO SELECT YOCRS. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. AGENTS 1 ^ YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO BUY ALL WOOL BLANKETS AT BELOW PRESENT DA Y COST : WE OFFER : WHITNEY ALL WOOL BLANKETS Sizes 60" x 80" at S7.20 Sizes 72" x 90" at SIO.22 Sizes 80" x 96" at 912.62 SECURE YOURS NOW FROM DA COSTA & CO., LTD. ;; DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT i G0DDARDS RESTAURANT DELIGHTFUL MENU DAILY DANISH BEER ? DUTCH BEER ENGLISH BEER ^ STEAKS and C SANDWICHES Our Specially SPECIAL COCKTAILS made wilh "COLD BRAID" RUM •; FRENCH ICE CREAM —3 Flavours | tor % %  misiir i ltdrri T null tats :•