Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895



FRIDAY, F



U.N. BRAND

‘No Alternative
For American

Aid In W. Europe”

Says Eisenhower

WASHINGTON, Feb. 1.
GENERAL DWIGHT EISENHOWER, the
North Atlantic Army’s Supreme Commander,
today reported to Congress on the state of Western
Europe’s defences.
Addressing a meeting of Congress, Generai Eisen-
hower said the decisions they must make would be

far-reaching and might determine the course of,

western civilization. :
Soils cinsieninedp ution - General Eisenhower said: “We
are concerned only with one thing.
In a world in which the power of

military might is much respected

Place Jettisons
4) Gallons Petrol

LONDON, Feb. 1.

A British airliner carrying 16
passengers to Rio De Janeiro had
to jettison 400 gallons of petrol
and return to London airport to-
day when one of its four engines
went out of action.

The plane, an Argonaut of
British Overseas Airways Corpor-
ation had been in the air half an
hour when the trouble started.

The petrol was jettisoned to
bring the plane’s weight down so
thiat it could land in safety.

After the engine had been re-
paired, it took off again.

a wall of peace and security,

What we are trying to do
cannot honestly be considered
by any other nation as a threat
to its security If any
charge is made it is for a nefa-
rious purpose.”

Eisenhower said the greatest
pool of skilled labour existed in
western Europe, and its indus-
trial fabric was second only to
that of the United States.

Must Stand With U.S.
If western Europe were driven
from America’s side to the other
side, the military balance of power



—Reuter would be shifted so drastically
that American safety would be
imperilled, It was impossible to

British Observer imagine the fall of western Eu-

rope to Communism, without the
simultaneous fall of other areas
associated with western Europe.

We would be cut off from areas
from which we draw materials
absolutely essential to our exist-
ence, he said, No matter how
strong we would be in keeping
open our communications, clearly
we must keep open these areas
and keep them friendly to us.
Eisenhower asked how the United

Paris Talks

’

For
LONDON, Feb. 1.

Britain had told France she will
send an observer to the Périg
conterence to study the organisa
tion of the European army, the
Fereign Office said today.

She had been invited to attend
as a full member.

The British Ambassador in Paris







hias been nominated as British|States could possibly think of
cverseer at the conference. existing without such vital sup-
. —Reuter plies from ~-broad as magnesium,

copper and uranium, He said such

h supplies were tied up with

y United States concern with the

Cut Off By Snow western European complex and

the United States
to defend it.

He said the reason for assist-
ance to Europe was not only
because the United States
would suffer economic atrophy
and eventually collapse, but be-

LONDON, Feb. 1, determination

The Spanish Village. Santiago
De La Espalda cut off by snow has
appealed urgently to the Govern-
ment of Jaen Province for aid,
Madrid Radio reported.

Since November 11, only three

" cause the United States could

village of food have reached* tne de the-4ob.
eee Europe and North America
—Reuter. between them had 350,000,000

people representing the highest
culture upon earth,

He said western Europe and
the United States together
possessed great reservoirs of!



Egypt Bans Bulletin

CAIRO, Feb. 1.

- e : leadership that had not yet been

e rptia I stry of the 3
tnedieent naan. poets: a press touched and they had the great-
bulletin issued by the Soviet est productive capacity and the

raw materials which they need-

ed,

Eisenhower said he did not in-
tend to report on his conversations
in Germany because “there has te
be a political understanding
achieved.” “I want no unwilling
contingents”, he added.

Eisenhower said there was
acceptable alternative”
can help in the
western Europe.

Will To Resist

The General said he found
throughout his tour of Atlantic
Pact countries a rejuvenated spirit
of resistance and determination

to live as free men, and to do their

PORT-OF-SPAIN Feb. 1, | part and take the risk,
A motor launch left here tonight)" One example of this spirit, he
to pick up 20 passengers from th®)/saiq) he found in France where

Legation in Cairo.

The latest number of this bul-
jetin which is issued in French
and Arabic contained a_ supple-
ment on the Warsaw Peace Con—
gress. ‘

The Ministry of the Interior
requested the Ministry for Foreign
Affairs to inform the Soviet Lega-
tion of the decision.

Recently, one Egyptian news-
paper complained it was being
“flooded” with propaganda mate-
rial issued by the Rumanian
Legation here.—Reuter



“no
to Ameri-
rearmament of

SHIP- IN TROUBLE



Dutch passenger freighter) tha ‘conscription law had been
Keningin Emma, 535 tons, re-| tightened to a point when it per-

almost no exceptions

ported in difficulty off north Vene | mitted
“They are determined to face up

zucla. Koningin Emma owned by

we are going to build for ourselves}

such |

Greece
Gets New
Cabinet —

ATHENS, Feb. }.
Venizelos’ reshuffled Cabinet
reduced to only 15 members was
sworn in tonight. The number of
ministers was reduced in accord-
ance with a resolution adopted by
a Special Committee directing 4
nation-wide drive for economy and

co-ordir on in administration,
King Paul of Greece returned
from his three-week tour of the
northeastern areas to, receive the
oath of the new inisters of all
Liberals of Democratic Socialists,
The number: cf ministers has
been reduced frem 29 to only 15
with four under--secretaryships.

—Reuter.

Connally
| Encouraged

WASHINGTON, Feb, 1.
Senator Tom Connally, Chair-
man of the United States Senate
{Foreign Relations Committee, said

today, General Eisenhower's re-
|

|
|
|








port to Congress “gave me real
encouragement about the attitude
of the Nations of Western Europe.”

If they enthusiastically rearm
and rebuild their strength, there
will be complete success, he added.

Senator Kenneth Wherry, Re-
publican Senator, said the report
“indicates that plans already have





gone ahead for us to do every-
thing cept carry out appropri-
ations,

—Reuter.

Manley Welcomes

Customs Union

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 1.

Mr. Norman Manley, Leader of
the Opposition Party in Jamaica,
eommenting to-day on proposals
for the West Indies Customs
Union said “I welcome the pro-
posals 100 per cent. They have
been long overdue.”

He said the Customs Union
should not wait upon federation.
Federation might take time and
the Customs Union should be set
up as quickly as possible.

“Once people see the obvious
advantages of a Customs Union,
it may be another stepping stone
in the functional approach io
federation”, He said “these func-
tional approaches may eventually

mean federation becomes inevit-
able and if that is the way in
which it is to come, let us wel-
some it’.

Ike Wants Farty
Divisions By 1952



WASHINGTON, Feb. 1.
Gen, Dwight Eisenhower was
reported to have told senators
oday that he was aiming at a
Sur an Defence Force of 40,
livisions by the end of 1952
Testifyi in a closed session of




he Senate
armed Serv
Zisenhower
avoided any

the proposed
ments to such

‘oreign Relations and
ices Committees, Gen-
Was said to have
direct statement on
American commit-
a force,
—Reuter.

Griffin Is Il

LONDON, Feb



L;

Roman Catholic officials called
for prayers totiay for Cardinal

Bernard Griffin, 51-year-old Arch.
bishop of Westminster because of
a deterioration in his health.

In 1949 the Cardinal spent three

months in hospital for nervous
exhaustion
Dectors advised him to take

a complete rest when he arrived

the Surinam Navigation Company) to the threat of Communism both| in Rome last October for the
developed engine trouble on _thel internally and externally,” he|Preclamaticn — cf the Bodily
way to Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana) cajiq Assumption. of the Virgin Mary
from Curacao, Dutch West Indies He found the same spirit of He had a long holiday in_th<
She will be towed to Port-of-Spaia) ;esolution in Belgium, Holland,} ccuntry after he returned to Eng-

by another vessel for repairs,

—Keuter. @ On Page 3

SMASH UP

land on November 3
—Reuter



MOTOR CAR X-448 was extonsively damaged after be













St. Stephen's School. about 11.35 o’clock on Wed: zht. It is owned by Hugh Garnes of St.
! nd was being driven by Mowbrey ved was National "bus M.174, driven by
Claude Payne of Paynes Bay, St. James. Pic Thursday morning





{

|



}

|

; to

\‘killing all

COMMUNIST

WILL BE
aha 4



MARRED D



EVERTON WEEKES just returned from Grenada was met at Sea-
well yesterday by his fiancee Miss Joan. Manning. They are to be

married to-morrow afternoon at St. Michael's Cathedral.

|
U.S. RESOLUTION IS BEST
HOPE FOR SETTLEMENT

Attlee Tells Commons

Prime Minister Attlee said t

States resolution on Korea before #he United Nations, offerec
the best hope in the existing cir
negotiated settlement with Chi

Britain, Awstralia
Arrange Meat Pact
LONDON, Feb, 1.

senior officials of the Bri-
Food Ministry will arrive in

Two
lish
negotiations
agreement
Australia,

A Focd

said

15 year
Byitain

on a
between and
Ministry

the two officials
discuss adjustments to other
contracts covering supplies of
dairy products to Britain,

The 15-year plan when finally
agreed to designed to make
Australia one of the most impor-
tant and largest meat producing
areas in the world

It involves the expenditure of
ebout £5,000,000 on capital de-
velopment to open up large areas
of Northern Australia for cattle
ferming.—Reuter,

Bevin. Making
Good Recovery

LONDON, Feb. 1
Foreign Secretary Ernest
Revin’s recovery from pneumonia
is so good that his doctor thinks it
unnec?ssary to issue further bul-
leti the Foreign Office said to
day. —Reuter

Jackson Named C.J.

(From Our

spokesman
were going

is







Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Feb. 1,

His Majesty has approved the
appointment of His Honour D. E
Jackson as the Chief Justice
the Windward and Leeward
Islands. Mr. Jackson came to the
Leewards as Puisne Judge in
October 1949.

Two Still Missing

BELFAST, Northern Ireland,
Feb, 1,

Two men were still believed
missing today after a 20 yards
high gangway alongside the giant
Argentine whale factory ship Juan
Peron crashed here last night kill-
ing 16 men.

About 100 men plunced to the
ground and into the water between
the ships’ sige and the quay, an‘4
35 were to-day in hospital, six of
them very ill, None of the Argen-
tine engineers were involved.
Builders of the 32,000 ton Juan
Peron are *o investigate the causes
of the accident.

The ship was. moved from
quay to help in the search for the
missing men, —heuter.

f
of







nh eo . .
I'weiity Missing
REYKIAVIK, Iceland, Feb. 1.
Aircraft, skiers, and mountain-
Pers combined in a great search
to-day for a Douglas Dakota, with
20 Icelanders aboard, believed to
have crashed near Reykiavik late
last night—Feuter

14 KILLED IN CRASH





LIBSON, Feb. 1,

The Portuguese military Sky

master plane from the Azore
‘crashed into the sea last

14 people aboard



believed to have bee
caused by an explosion occurr¢
four miles cast of Victoria
Tercejra island in the Azore
—Reuter

| crash,

ea

Australia later this month for final |
meat |



LONDON, Feb. 1.
oday that the amended United

tances of obtaining
na.
Attlee speaking in th
Breed whe becaus® th
ment felt it offered this
ihat Sir Gladwyn Jebb, Britis
representative at Lake Success
was instructed to vote in favow
of it.

The Prime Minister said he
wanted specially to call the atten
tion of Parliament to the fina
paragraph in the resolution af
firming: “That it continues to be
the policy of the United Nation:
to bring about a cessation of hos-
tilities in Korea,—Reuter,



DS.
vern
hope



Pole Escapes
} “s .
From Russians

STOCK,HOLM, Feb, 1

A 48-year-old Pole from Londor
|; who jumped from a Russian shi
here last night has asked fo
asylum in Sweden as a_ political
refugee, police said today
He escaped from pursuing Ru

n sé en after a scuffle in one
of Stockholm's bus'est squares

The ship, the Belostrov, lef!
London on Monday for Leningrad







The Pole said he was granted free
passage when he _ promised te
return to Poland but he changed
his mind when the ship reached

Stockholm

After walking up and down the
hip’s deck, he jumped over the
ide and raced through customs
sheds chased by the second mate
of the Belostrov and seamen with
sticks.

He passed through streets shout-
ing at passing motorists to stop
One car stopped and the driver
aid in English “jurmp in”.

A second motorist stopped
houting to the first: “Drive on, I
will follow you.” He pushed off
the Russians as they tried to jump
n his running board.

The first motorist, a motor-car

esman, said: “I drove the Pole
to the Police. In broken English
he said he had left London legally
and he showed me his passport

‘When I told him he was safe
he kissed my cheek and hands.”

—Reuter

Jamaica Will
Drop £Yam

KINGSTON, Feb. |
Frée trade between the British
Caribbean colonies will, if carried
t











ut, cost Jamaica an estimatei
£500,000 Ie in customs revenue
aceordin to official figures re-
leasect Jamaica imports far
more 1 the ‘other islands,
principally oil from Trinidad, than
he exports to them. —CP,

IN THE.

LONDON, Feb. 1
The British Government funds
yeak on the London stock
ange today. Falls of up to
followed sales by
institutions ang small trusts who
were reinvesting proceeds in
tee! shares, Smaller investors,





ialf q point





Tomorrow |
































r







FIVE CENTS

k

HINA

PRICE:



BY 44 VOTESTO 7

Socialists
Survive
BY 11 VOTES

LONDON, Feb
Labour
survived
to unseat

1
Government
oppositior
over its
handling of the coal supplies,
By 300 votes to 289 they defeat
a motion to that effect
the Conservative party,
This deplored the “contrast
tween ministerial promises

Britain's
tonight
attempt

an
it

ed

The House of Commons
during the debate that
must carry on until the winter
ends with 15 per cent, less coal
than it needs for full production

—Reuter,

heard
industry

Labour M.Ps
Stage Revolt
AGAINST CHINA POLICY

LONDON, Feb. 1
A number of left-wing Labour
members staged a minor revolt :n
Commens today
ernment’s
China.
Atte ra statement by the Prime
Minister they rose in succession to
criticise Britain's support of the
United States Resolution at the
United Nations branding China an
aggressor They cried “answer,
answer” when Attlee showed some
reluctance to reaffirm that Britain
still wanted to encourage the
admission of Chinese Communists
‘o the Security Council
After hesitating the Prime Min-
ster replied “our position has been
nade perfectly plain. Perhaps it
8 not very helpful to have further
questions on
natter."”
This evasion set some political

against the Gov-

policy on Communist

this rather delicate

i
from
be
and
the present shortages which have
inflicted great hardships in the
home and. widespreaq industrial
dislocation and stoppages”,
All nine Liberal members ab
stained from voting.

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. i.
"THE United Nations General Assembly today
approved the United States resolution con-
demning Communist China as the aggressor im
Korea.
he voting was 44 to 7 with nine abstentions.
Earlier, against. Soviet opposition, the Assembly
had decided against holding a \ebate on the resolu-
tion. Immediately the Assemuly met to ratify the
resolution passed by its Political Committee on
Tuesday, President Nasrollah Entezam called for
a vote as to whether the issue should he debated.




















rhe Assembly voted 32 to five
ny to dispense with discussion. Oniy
A A E the Soviet group voted for the de-
bate. Many of the other 60-mem-
ber nations did not cast a vote
B \ TTI K The ter of tl resolution
1 uready adopted by th Political
4 1 1ich declared China
AS sressor, provided f a
neti and
of a Good
three to put
out peace feelers. Opposed to
NEAR INCHON the resolution were the Soviet
B JULIAN BATE group of five and India and
ay SUMEAS ES Burma Abstentions were Af-
at rOKYO, Feb I ghanistan Egypt, Indonesia
Fierce hand to hand fighting} pakistan. Saudi-Arabia den,
rallied in West Korea today | Syria, Yemen and ¥i
General MacArthur’s men resisted Although there wa i
he first major Communist counter lelegates were permitted to
blow since the United Nations’ ol an mate . ; rm ’
‘Iimite fensive” beg a week | Plain vote
aa offensive” began a-weeK |" "Ganoral Carlos Romulo: @t
’ : Oe, he *hy i) rir
It is estimated that two regi-!Pounced that the Philippi
ments of Chinese and North{ Would vote for the resolution ar
Koreans mounted a counter attack} Said his country was more cé
north of Inchon, 24 miles to the; Vineed than ever that it
cutheast of Seoul, the former|Sure way to peace
South Korean capital. From dawn Semyon Tsarpkin he Se
to afternoon the battle raged] Union said that the United St
savagely had, “finally unmasked itself ¢
An Eighth Army communique] the opponent of a peaceful settle
said bad weather had hampered

ment of the Korean and other Far
tern questions,’

Sir Gladwyn Jebb, for Britain,
gave a “short explanation of the
understanding which ha
me to vote in favour of the Unit
States resolution.” the

close support during the fitst pours
of the counter attack, but Ameri-
ean and Turkish troops moved
into the assault with equally fierce
opposition Then Communists
threatened to encircle them
General MacArthur's



enabled
>t



men He said
called up reinforcement, but they| British Government hoped that
in turn ran into fresh Communist] the Good Offices Committee would
troops fighting bitterly Flying| start work forthwith My Gov
“box-cars" dropped 42 tons of;erniment hopes the first task will
ammunition to aid the United|/ pe to study the verious com-"

Nations troops.
Due west and seven miles to.the
northwest of Suwon, an unknown

munications from Peking received
by. one channe). or avother and
decide what further clarifications

a " number of Communists ‘opened 2 Kina sa >

»bservers wondering if any switch army fire on Turkish troops soon are required. 1S St ag
in British policy was imminent after mid-day, the Eighth Army Faris Bey El Khoury of Syria
3ut a Foreign Office spokesman reported. ; —-Reuter. said that the United States resolu-

told Reuter later there hed beer

10 change. Britain still believed
that the Peking Governmem
should represent China at Lake
Success. —Reuter.



Another Communist
Resigns From Party

ROME, Feb, 1

The Conservative 1! Tempo re
ported today that Communisi
Vincenzo Perfetto had resigned a:
Secretary of the Workers Council
in a Pescara Dyeworks as a pro
test against undemocratic’
political strike

Communist. chiefs gathered ai
the party headquarters in Rome
yesterday and were reported t
be examining ‘deviations’ 0;
deputies,

A communique issued by a body
calling itself the “revolutionary
Communist group” Said today
“This ferment of opposition to the
bureaucracy of the Communis
Party and to the Soviet Union ex
presses the progressive tendencie
of the working class”

The group predicted the birt!
of a “revolutionary party of
Italian proletariat in line with
similar development in othe

countries,’’——Reuter,

Fourteen Arrested

CAIRO, Feb. 1.
Egyptian police arrested 14
vorkers shouting for food and
lothing today in an_ industrial
entre near Cairo. They accused
hem ef “provoking labour un-

est

The workers were recently dis

harged from textile factorics as
heing redundant

One of them was said to be
carrying a circular signed by the





Lief of the “Unemployment
Struggle Committee” threateniny
1 march on Parliament if workers
were not given consideration
—RKeuter.



TROOPS MUST STOP
AT 38TH PARALLEL

WASHINGTON, Feb. 1,
High American officials are
reported to have decided that

at the 38th Parallel if they cat
drive as far north in Korea
—Reuter



STOCK MARKET

Interest elsewhere wa
selective. Oils were occasionally
higher with Mexican eagle
strong on revival of rumour
cash settlement of outstanding
compensation payments.

In the foreign ecti
Australian drawn bond

¢
of

on

at three



however, re elling steels and—a-half were next to Italian
| ag reinvestin in indus- arrears payments
| trials particularly textiles which Overseas support~for German
ho , leng list advances.” potash, issues wa reporte
{} Ss ing lso were in demand Profit-taking depressed
| and there ‘ ai ] but kaffir dividend paye
|} engineerin comy ni¢ prov Par buyin

chedule

—Reuter

United Nations troops should stop

tion was most likely to extend the
Korean conflict. The United
Nations would be faced with about
800,000,000 of the world’s popula -

Turkish Woman



, , tion aguinst the resolution
In Korea War Speaking just before the vote,
Sir Benegal Ran, leader of 12
' ANKARA, Feb, 1 Asian powers which unsuecess
Madame Sabisa Gokcen of Tur- | fully re-proposed the Seven
key, who is going to Korea in al Power Conference with Commu-
ew days time to serve as a pilot} nist China rather than con-
with the United Nations air forces, | d2mnation, spoke for India.
alled last night on the Turkish He said the United States Reso-

‘restdent, Cellar Bayar lution did not end hostilities, nor
The President congratulated her; did it hold any reasonable pros-

@ the “courage and seriousness” | pect of olving any of the other
f her decision problem:

Madame Gokcen, who is 36, ON eaze, 7
sraduated as a regular Turkish | ———_—_—_m ——-

\ir Force pilot in 1935 and took




art in the , campaign against} TELL THE ADVOCATE
ebels in Eastern Turkey THE NEWS
She has also served as an RING S1i3 Me
nstructress ja the civil air force DAY OR NIGHT

— Reuter



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PAGE

ON, AND MRS, H. A. CUKE

left for St. Vincent yester-
day afternoon by B.G. Airways
to attend the Annual Meeting of
the Methodist Synod, being held
this year in St. Vincent. They
expect to be away for one week,

Deluxe Programme

M.S. Devonshire is due to

arrive in Barbados to-mor-
row. The entertainment com-
mittee, who have organised the
programme of entertainment dur-
ing her visit, have done a fine job.
On the night of her arrival there
is to be a dance at the Royal Bar-
bados Yacht Club in honour of
the Captain, Officers and Cadets,
There are to be dances on Mon-
day, Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday next week at the Bar-
bados Aquatic Club for the Chief
Petty Officers, Petty Officers and
Men of H.M.S. Devonshire, Two
of these dances are being given
by the Royal and Merchant Navy
Welfare League and two by the
Port Welfare Committee.

There is a picnic arranged by
the Royal and Merchant Navy
Welfare League on Sunday for
Chief Petty Officers, Petty Officers
and Men. Destination is the Crane
hotel.

Devonshire will play games of
Football, Cricket, Water Polo,
Lawn Tennis, Table Tennis, Vol-
ley Ball, Basket Ball against local
teams and I understand that a
Ladies’ Water Polo Team is to
play a match against the Cadets.
This I must see.

Operations Engineer

AJ, ERIC HIRST, Asst. Oper-
ations Engineer of Shell
Leaseholds Distributing Co., Ltd.,
who arrived from Antigua on
Sunday evening left on Wednes-
day for Trinidad by B.W.1I.A. He
Was a guest at the Aquatic Club.

For Carniva!

R, CHARLES HITT who

arrived here on January 13th
accompanied by his wife and fam-
ily, has gone to Trinidad for Car-
nival. Mr. Hitt is Flight Supt., of
Pan American Airways stationed
in Puerto Rico, He was once
stationed in Trinidad,

Back to the U.S.

EV. DUDLEY COBHAM,
Chaplain to the United
Parishes of the Barbados Charity
Group in New York, who had
been holidaying in Barbados since
January 4th, returned to the U.S.
over the week-end. His stay here
was spent with his aunts in Bush
Hall, He is also Curate and Di-
rector of Youth Work at St.
Philip’s Church in New York City.

Rev. Cobham is a Barbadian.

Down for the Winter
AJ. GEN. AND MRS. D. J.
MACDONALD are at present

holidaying in Barbados, staying at
the Marine Hotel, They are down
for the Winter. They arrived
from Toronto about two weeks
ago and are here until March 17th.
They spent a few days in Bar-
bados abcut three years, ago. This
is their first real stay here,

oOSSW ORD





Across

. Bird, diva or poet? (8)
. Teem, (4)
Tropical grass, including rice. (5)
Expressed in few words, (7)
. Urn. (4)
. Sort of dog that is nursed, (3)
- oo Ly pale Opts, (4)
Sland ot the 3 Down group, (6
Before, (3) oA ofF
Bathing belie’s objective ? (4)
- Lo us this is the yew, (8)

uite audible, (4)
vase in point, on the contrary,
(4) 26, Diminution. (9)

Down

Out at Inst as the shoot sata
when it broke the ground. (6)
Waterless watercourse. (6)
Companionship. (7)
Move circuiarly, (5)
To save one's this is to escape.
af) 8. Type of tastener. (3)
xpert at last so easily bent. (7)
Comedy guve her a double nega-
aire. ip
16's obviousiy German,
17. Single entry. (4) m_ae
if you don’t like the passage this
may get_you out. (4)
And in Germany, (3)
Not quite sixty seconds but it
belongs to us. (3)

Solution of vesterday’s puzzle,—Across:
and 6 Down, Dow-in-the-Manger: 7,
Purpose; 11, Ate; 12, Kiln; 15, Bov; 14)
Rag: 15. Naiad: 16, Bite; ‘17, Type; 19,
Spar, 21, Playpens: 24, Aeon; 25, Asti!
Sracter. Down: 2, Outlay: 3, Grey;

vi 5, Heir; 6, .
Painter: 8. Pub: 3. 3k}: 48. Tbintanes

bed 19, Spa; 20 Pest: 21. Pah: 22)

JANETTA





Phone

READY MADE DRESSES of all types

WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Local Handicraft

EVENING MITTENS— in Pastel Shades and Black
READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty’s of London.

Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30

HOURS:

Flowered CRETONNE

at EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Wise Buys
BARGAINS today,
Prices will rise.

So don't delay -



Blatant:'18; |

UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad St.




Mr. E. J. PETRIE—
transferred

Transferred to Kenya

R._E, J. PETRIE, Financial
Secretary who left Barbados
on December 7th 1950 on six
months’ holiday has been appoint-
ed Accountant General in Kenya,
He sails today from the U.K. to
take up his new appointment,
Prior to his transfer here in
1948, Mr. Petrie was serving in
Kenya as Assistant Financial Sec-
retary.

Paseenger Supt.

R. RAY LEGGE, Passenger

Supt, of B.W.LA. in Trinidad
who arrived here on January 27th,
returned to Trinidad by B.W.I.A.
on Wednesday afternoon, He was
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.

Air Survey

APT, MIKE YOUNG and Mr.
, Eric Ward, pilot and co-pilot,
respectively of the Air Survey Co.,
Ltd’s DC-3 which has been mak-
ing an aerial survey of Barbados
and the neighbouring islands left
yesterday for Trinidad in their
aircraft. The remainder of the
crew will continue to be based
here. Trinidad is the next island
to be surveyed, The aircraft will
make the survey and remain in
Trinidad. The film will be sent
here to be processed,

Shoré Visit
EV. SETH WHITE, Seventh

Day Adventist Minister here,
left yesterday for Antigua by
B.W.I.A. He will also visit St.

Kitts before returning to Barba-
dos. He will be away one week.

No Harm, Trying

R, L, C. TRENT of Loveland,

Ohio, has asked ~Councillor

§. R. Evans, Mayor of Winchester,

England, to find him an English

wife because the average Ameri-

can girl is “so spoilt and requires
so much,”

The Bride must be between 19
and 35, have at least a high school
education, be attractive and ‘able
to wear good looking clothes, and
weigh not more than 130 lbs.

Trent said in his letter to the
Mayor that he could offer a lux-
ury home, two cars, an aeroplane
and a “fair” income, He also
said he had been married and had
ason aged 13.

Trent told the Mayor that he
could probably find a dozen girls
in America who would be glad to
marry him but “the average
American is so spoiled and re-
quires so much that if it is possible
I wouid like to have one from
your country.”

I do not know if the offer is
open to Barbadian girls, but
there’s no harm in trying.



ert

There 1s no one in sight so Rupert
hurries towards a van that is stand-
ng on the roadside, and ashe reaches
t the driver comes striding out of a
zateway. This time the little bear
loesn’: try to des *. He
opens his sketch t
sketch of her, ‘I'm










2684

DIAL 4606

[ee ce Oe cee een eee See cen te a Sa See SN oe We

A een

alling



“
1 ‘ i
i LINENS dept. lines
: Yd, i
i 27" Print CRETONNE 64¢ Willows 2° |
J
1 36" CHEESE CLOTH 42¢ | Pillow-cases- :
1 S56"STRIPE TICK 1.19 94¢ & 97% 1
1 DOMESTIC 38¢ & 55¢ i
5

Returned To Barbados
R. C. GROSSMITH, Admin-
igtrative Secretary C.D. and

W., and Mr. C. C. Skeete, Director
of Agriculture, who attended the
Meteorological Conference in
Port-of-Spain returned to Barba-—
dos on Wednesday by B.W.1A.

Mr. Grossmith was Chairman
at the meeting. and Mr. Skeete
represented Barbados. Members
from the other W.1. territories

attended the meeting.

It was unanimously decided to
take over the meteorological sta-
tions established in the area ‘by
the R.A.F. Transport Command
during the war. It is not yet
known what each territory will
pay for operating the unified Brit-
ish Caribbean ‘Met’ Service. Mr.
Grossmith has handed proposals
made at the meeting to Sir George
Seel, Head of Development and
Welfare who will transmit them
to the Secretary of State for the

; Colonies and to the various Gov-

ernors.

With Trinidad
Telephone Co.,

R. “ASH” GREENLAND,

formerly Dial Office Engineer
at the Barbados Telephone Co.,
who is now with the Trinidad
Telephone Co., arrived here on
oreny by B.W.1A. on a short
visit.

Mr. Greenland has just return-
ed from four months in England
and was an intransit passenger
through Barbados last week by
the Bonaire .

New Dancing Teacher

ISS JOAN RANSOME arrived

from England on Wednesday

via Jamaica and Trinidad, She

came in on B.W.1.A.’s afternoon
flight from Trinidad.

Miss Ransome will take over
the Madame Bromova Dancing
School which is now a _ limited
liability company from Molly
Radcliffe.

She is staying at Graystone
Flats, Marine Gardens,

From Trinidad
R. SYDNEY SILVERA, Ex-
port Manager of Brandram
Henderson Ltd., Paint Makers
arrived yesterday from Trinidad
by B.W.1.A. He is here on a
short visit.

Staying With Friends
RS. MARGARET M, DUN.
HAM arrived from Trin-
idad yesterday morning by
B.W.I.A. to spend a short holi-
day in Barbados staying with
friends. Mrs Dunham used to be
Treasurer of the Seventh Day
Adventist Mission here before she
went to Trinidad,

Three Weeks’ Holiday

Rh. AND MRS. SYDNEY

GNAPP and their daughter
Susan arrived from Venezuela via
Trinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. to spend three weeks’
holiday in Barbados. They are
staying at Coral Sands, Worthing.
Mr. Gnapp is with Shell Caribbean
Petroleum Co., in Maracaibo.



FOR JUNIOR

CHICAGO

A device aimed at eliminating
maternal gray hairs when baby
gets locked in the bathroom went
on display in Chicago,

Among the features at the
National Association of Home
Builders Exposition which opened
a five-day run is a safety hinge
for doors.

When junior
the bathroom,

locks himself in

a hard shove on

the hinge side of the door causes
the hinges to part and opens the
door.—I.N.S,




taking care of her," he says.
“She's run away. Please tell me
if you've seen her."* “Why, yes,”’
smiles the man, who seems to be
amused at something. ‘She came
past here only three minutes ago.
You're on the right road. She can’t

be very far away."



p FEET on rut













DIAL 4220



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Judy Garland’s

Story



Hy Judy Garland

As Told To.

When I was nineteen, Dave

‘Michael Drury

aughter. I’m glad for him.

Rose and I eloped to Las Vegas,! We’re each kind of content about

if you call it eloping when your, the other.

mother goes along.

To feel no ill will
oward a person you .once were

I don’t know how to explain that married to is a special king of

marriage; there wasn’t any real
reason for it. I was much too
young. probably nobody should
be married at nineteen; but you
couldn’t have made me believe it
then.

Mom tried to tell me; so did
several other people. I thought my
superficial knowledge of the world
was all there was to know.

I was in a cocoon emotionally,
and Dave needed a certain kind of
a girl that I wasn’t. He’s a talented
man with an inner strength that
makes him live a little apart,

He enlisted in the army without
telling me till afterward, He didn’t
do it to be mean; he was just
accustomed to fighting his own
battles and making his own de-
cisions. ‘

He and I were among the first
entertainers to go into army camps
and put on shows. He worked
hard at it, and we made records
together, but music wasn’t enough,
And I was awfully young. It was
something only time could do
anything about.

I ran into Dave on the street not
long ago. He’s married to a love—
ly girl, and they have a baby

blessedness, and I’m grateful for
it.

During the time our marriage
was running out, though, I was
despondent. I didn’t want to
make a botch of my relationships
with people. Nobody wants that,
really, not I nor anybody else.
he only thing I did well, it
seemed, was work. That is not
always a blessing.

Paul Gallico had written a story
especially for me, and Robert
Nathan adapted it into q screen
play called “The Clock”, It was
my first and only crack at a com-
letely nonmusical movie, and I
oved that story.

t was a delicately balanced

about a soldier and a girl

who met in wartime under the
ck in Pennsylvania station.
nee got separated in a crowd and
didn’t even know each other's
names so they went back to the
clock and found each other again.
They were married in an ugly
civil ceremony, with an elevated
train drowning out the words.
But they went into a church later
and made their own service and



GLOBE THEATRE

Opening TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 and continuing

SUMMER STOCK

Gene KELLY — Judy GARLAND — Eddie BRACKEN

ToNite 8.30 ToNite

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

Perey Welch—“San Fernando Valley”
Arthur Moore—“Love Somebody”
Dorian Thompson—*“Our Very Own”
Byron Ross—“It’s Wonderful”
Carlton Best—‘Near You”

Frank Greaves—‘Roomful of Roses”

Judges: Mrs. Grantley Adams; Mrs. N. Evelyn

and Mr.

Hutchinson

Music by Clevie Gittens and his Orchestra

PRICES: Pit 16; House 30; Balcony 40; Box 54

N.B.—“SUMMER STOCK” will be shown after

LOCAL

TALENT

SHOW STARTS 8.30 P.M.





AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Oniy)

MATINEES : TODAY & TOMORROW at 5 p.m,
TONIGHT to SUNDAY NIGHT at 8.30
Paul Douglas, Linda Darnell, Celeste Holm, Charles Coburn in
“EVERYBODY DOES IT”
A 20th Century-Fox Picture





MONDAY & TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30
MATINEE : TUESDAY at 5 p.m,
Dick Haymes, Maureen O'Hara, Harry James in

“DO YOU

LOVE ME”

in Technicolor
A 20th Century-Fox Picture





MATINEE ; WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
Tyrone Power, Jean Peters

“CAPTAIN OF CASTILE”

in Technicolor
A 20th Century-Fox Picture





in

CLEAR THE WAY!

BOGART’S MOVING FASTER THAN ANY MAN EVER MOVED

BEFORE!

TO-DAY 2.30

SATURDAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

ME'S A TEST PLOT POR JET



{ RAI AD LESLIE LOOT IO KIT BME | NEE,

van omecien By
‘RAYMOND MASSEY - RICKARD WHORF STUART HEISLER

and 6.30 p.m.

and continuing until TUESDAY
DLANES! WHAT A ROLE! —-
, } a 3 a





WOE SADR Hein MASINI Ee

SCREEN PLAY BY LIAM O°DAIEN AND VINGENT ~
SUROLSTED BF A STORY BY 4 ACDHOND HmOR

Also the Short: “SOQ YOU WANT TO BE IN PICTURES”

Plus Latest “WORLD NEWS”
(Presented by Warner Pathe News)

PLAZA Theatre BRIDGETOWN (Dial 2310)







CUPS and PLATES
DINNER CARRIERS
JUGS

SAUCEPANS
KITCHEN SINKS





ENAMELWARE

~ A wide range to select from...

BASINS
CHAMBERS
TOILET SETS
SOAP DISHES
TABLE TOPS

Stocked by our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT
Telephone No, 2039



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON

FACTORY

LTD.

Hardware and Ironmongery Department Telephone No. 2039

ee



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1951
ad SS SSSOPC SS VSTOP OS OPS FT

+o,





thei ‘i 40 SSS SOSSCPSSPO FICS SOO FOS OFS fs
eir own beauty, an the next, ¢ .
morning a soldier had to go away % SpPeE!IG HTSTO WN : R
to war. ~ R_ E TIME 8.30
5 5 % .
It had to be done just right.) ¥ place T H E AT
Robert Walker played opposite FRIDAY — SUN S FRIDAY SUN.
“me, and he’s wonderful, but some- Jonn EISSMULLER .
» at \ * ! Jonn 3S) g ons seC i ES”
how it didn’t go together. After | "Jungle. Ji T (2) “THE SECRET OF ST. IV
a while the studio shelved it 1.) “CAPTIVE GIRL” With Richard NEY,
I wasn’t happy about that, and with. Buster-CRABPE a
I kept going over it in my mind. nila Ugom Pack iti Oo Vanessa BROWN
One day I went to the studio Thrills Excitement!" AbticnsY Aaventaeel
officials and told them I knew Mat: 4.90, Sat, ist Tart Wild West RR
what the picture needed—Vin- | Days Don't Miss this Double
ae anh BOAO OLAS ELLIS SSL LAR

“That man?” they exclaimed.
“Are you crazy? He’s the guy you
were always getting so mad at.’ |

“Yes, I know,” I said, “but he







PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

" he b work + , I've First story of the Jet Planes! It couldn't be told ‘til now!
pl oe nt eae hell TODAY 2.30 & 8.20 p.m. SAT, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. & continuing ‘til TUESDAY
‘shia ‘atney. Humphrey Eleanor ‘ ”
understand this story.” BOGART PARKER in ‘CHAIN LIGHTNING

I got him, and we did the pic-
ture. It just missed being great
The critics said it proved I could
hold up my end without a forty-
piece band, and that was gratify-
ing.

From my personal point of
view, it was a triumph because it
was during “the clock” that |
lecked at Vincente one day and
something hit me, I thought
here was a man I could know for
years and still find fresh interest
in, We started going out together,
and about six months after m»
divorce was final, we were mar-
ried in my mother’s house.

We took three months off for a
honeymoon in New York and then
went to Boston for the opening
of one of Vincente’s pictures, It
was the first time in more years
than I could remember that I
just relaxed and had fun and lei
somebody else take care of me.

By the time we got back to
Hollywood, I knew the baby was
coming and I felt happy and
loved.

We were wild over Liza from
the first moment we laid eyes on
her, but I fretted over not having
the calm and serenity 1-thought 1}{
ought to have.

I “wanted deeply to be a good

Also “SO YOU WANT TO BE IN PICTURES" & latest ‘WORLD NEWS"



SAT. 9,30 a.m, & 1,30 p.m,
“RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH”
with Johnny Mack Brown and

“RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL"
with Jimmy Wakely

MAT. TODAY 4.45 p.m. (only)

“BELOW THE DEADLINE”
with Warren Douglas and

“LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT”
| Johnny Mack Brown





——_— ——

PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

The Biggest of the Big Ones From Warner Bros. !

“TASK FORCE” IN COLOR

by Technicolor
Starring Gary Cooper, Jane Wyatt, Wayne Morris














MIDNITE SHOW SAT.

“DEATH VALLEY RANGERS” &
Ken Maynard, Hoot Gibson

(Tomorrow) 3rd

“DYNAMITE CANYON”

Tom







GALETWY—(rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

The all-the-way Action Double from RKO!
TODAY to SUNDAY 8.30 MAT. SUN, 5 p.m.

| “ROSEANNA McCOY”





Farley Granger, Joan Evans and
“MARSHAL OF MESA CITY”
George O'Brien

MIDNITE TOMORROW

“BELOW the DEADLINE”
Warren Douglas

(SAT.) the Action-packed Double!

& “RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL”
Tom Keene

ROYAL

TO-DAY Only 4.30 and 8.30

wife and mother, and I was a
little seared.

In an effort to learn why I had
never been able to get closer to
people, I took a series of psycho-
analytical treatments, and I have
never regretted anything more.
TY’m_sure_ psychoanalysis has
helped a great many people, but
for me it was like taking strong
medicine for a disease I didn’t
have. It just tore me apart.

I went back to work and lashed
myself as I always had. The
friction of personalities in the |
movie business is something fairly



aS
ESP iRE

TO-DAY 2.30 and 8.30
& Continuing to Tuesday



M-G-M Big Double

| Columbia Pictures presents

Spencer TRACY &

Van JOHNSON
in

MILLAND

Ray
Resalind RUSSELL

cent ie Pe Self “THIRTY
7 “A WOMAN OF SECONDS
DISTINCTION” | OVER TOKYO”

times by money, by fame, by the
with AND

lopsided idea that only movies
Edmund GWENN & “THE ARNELO

I don’t want to hurt anyone, and
ebviously I won't name names
but there have been people it
Hollywood who sometimes make
it extremely hard for me to do
what I was so desperately trying
to do — find myself. At least I
felt that way. —-(I.N.S.)

matter.
Janis CARTER



Ԥ i Shi. .
imax, Attempted Sule and AFFAIR”
t Renewe ope.)
} R ox Y Starring

John HODIAK &
George MURPHY

BBC. Radio Programme

FRIDAY, Feb. 2,

TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15 Only
1951,





630—12 a.m, 19.76 m.
—--- —— Columbia Big Double ...
7 am. The News, 7.10 am, News OLYMPIC
Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials, SOR
725 a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m Glenn FORD & . >
Freedom under the law, 7.50 a.m. In- Terry MOORE
terlude, 8 a.m. Listeners’ Choice, 8.45 TO-DAY io SUNDAY
a.m. Good films and bad films, 9 a.m.

The News, 9.10 am, Home News from in 4.50 and 5.48
Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m.

Programme Parade, 11.25 a.m, Australia 20th Century-Fox Smashing





vs England, 11.45 aim. World Affairs, 4 p ’
12 noon the ‘News 310 pm News| || “THE RETURN eee
Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down. a James STEWART &
4.15—6 p.m, 25.53 m, ny Debra PAGET
OF OCTOBER”
4. 15 p.m. BBC Scottish Orchestra,
5 p.m. Australia vs England, 5.15 p.m,

Let's make music.

** BROKEN
ARROW”

AND

“NIGHT AND
THE CITY”

Starring
Richard WIDMARK &
Gene TIERNEY

AND
“‘ BLONDIE'S
SECRET ”

Starring

6—7.15 p.m. 31.32 m. & 48.48 m,

_—

6 p.m. Merchant Navy Newsletter,
6.15 p.m, Freedom under the law, 6.25
p.m. Interlude, 6.45 p.m, Programme
Parade, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m.
News Analysis, 7.15 pan. West Indian
Diary, 7.37 p.m. Interlude. |
745—11 pom. 31.32 m. & 18.43 m,

7.45 Th th

45 p.m, ink on these things, 8 p.m.
Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. English Maine
zine, 8.45 p.m. Composer of the week, 9
p.m. World Affairs, 9.15 p.m. Let's make

» 10 pm. The News, 10,10 p.m.
From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Commu-
nism in practice, 10.30 p.m. Spa Orches-
tra, 10.45 p.m. The debate :
1l1_p.m. Ring up the curtain,

ete

Penny SINGLETON &
Arthur LAKE

continues,





Beauty and Reliability Combined



18)

THAT’S THE STANDARD
SET BY EVERY

TEMCO}

ELECTRIC

A

3
rf
=
=
i
:
=
Hi
is
i:

(



|



“TIME MARCHES 0
BUT -TEMCO” KEEPS

GOOR TIME



AT
STORE

ON SHOW

THE CORNER









FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1951

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Lutherans
Plan Big
Programme

NEW YORK, Feb. 1.

A co-operative Latin-American
missionary programme the
broadest united effort of its kind
in American Lutheran‘sm — was
drawn up at an annual convention
ef the National Luthéran Church.

The programme, embracing mis-
sion activity in Mexico and Central
and South America would be the
first joint foreign m!ssion venture
ever undertaken by the eight
Lutheran bodies represented in
the Convention Council.

“It marks a very important step
forward in Lutheran co-operation,’
said the Council Executive Direc-
tor yesterday.

Tne plan drawn up in consulta-
tion among the Council’s member
bodies and still subject to their
final approval, would begin func-
tioning next October with an
initial “core budget” of $51,250.

Among benefits to be derived
from the programme, the Council’s
report said, were: “preservation to
the faith of several thousand Luth-
eran settlers in isolfted areas” and
the organisation “of new congre-
gations in important centres as }
nuclei for expanded future work”. t

The Commission authorised to
bring preliminary work immedi-
ately was set up pending the
formation of a permanent “divis-
ion on Lutheran co-operation in
Latin America’.



Moré vottis in sarrapos jurp
EASILY MEAN DOLLARS ANID EMPLOY-
MENT FOR MAKY, IICLUDING TUESE e





There now are six autonomus
Lutheran churches of German
background with a total of nearly
500,000 members in Brazil and
Chile, the Council report said.

The new programme provides
that separate bodies may, if they
wish, transfer their Latin Ameri-
can mission programmes to a joint
undertaking.

Eight bodies in the Council have
a total of about 4,000,000 members
or about two-thirds of all Ameri-
can Lutherans.

Mystery Plane
Flies Sideways

: KANSAS CITY.
AiR FORCE OFFICERS have questicned a Mid-Continent

Air Lines pilot who reported seeing a speedy mystery plane

that he said can fly sideways and apparently reverse its
direction without turning around,

—Reuter.

No Alternative

From Page t
Denmark and other countries.

They had decided that they
would never again be occupied.
They would resist to the point of
destruction he added, In Rome
there was the resolve to make a
limited military force as efficient
as possible he said.

Eisenhower declared that Eu-
rope’s greatest need was not for
American troops but for equip-
ment which must be delivered
“jn quantity and quickly.”

He said that American troops
should be sent to Europe in pro-
portion to what European nations
themselves provided. The’ Gen-
eral disclosed that France had
promised 25 battle worthy divis-
ions by the end of 1952,

—Reuter

CQAL WANTED



“Tliterates”
Want Right To
Vote In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN.

SIX representatives of “the illit-
erate” as they described them-
selves, appeared before the
Constitution Commission now in
session in Berbice County and
appealed for their right to vote
under any new Constitution. The
six-man deputation emphasised
that though they could not read
nor write they nevertheless were
able to differentiate between good
and evil. The illiterate also asked
for equal rights to vote for women
and that it should be compulsory
for Legislators to attend a mini-
mum of 75 per cent of Council



The pilot, Capt. Larry
Vinther, of Mission, Kan,, spotted
the mysterious aircraft over the
Sioux City, Ila., airport on Satur-
day night, January 20th,

His story was confirmed by his
co-pilot, J. F. Bachmeier, of
Kansas City, Kas., and an un-|
identified civilian employee of the
Air Force of Omaha, Neb., who
also saw the strange craft.

Capt. Vinther told of seeing a
mysterious light west of the
Sioux City Airport after taking
off. He said the control tower
asked him to investigate the light.
He continued:

“At about eight thousand~feet
we could see a red light circling
the field to the left. The light
started to blink.

“I spoke into my radio, saying
that if the plane was in com-
munication, we would like to have
the pilot blink his light again.
Shortly afterwards, the light did

blink,
Light Changed



GENEVA, Feb. 1. meetings. S 4
Coal-short countries in Western] A delegation from the Berbice It began approaching us and
Europe have asked the United|Ministers Fraternal also gave|it changed to q brilliant white
States for 3,500,000 tons of |levidence and asked for a one- light, similar to a landing light
coal it was learned here to-|Chamber Legislature and fran-|but without glare. It came with-
day. Difficulties of these coun-|chise at 21 without literacy. The]in two hundred feet of us and we

tries will be discussed next week] Ministers asked for an all elected|could see the silhouette of tne














when the coal sub-committee of

the United Nations Economic
Commission for Europe meets
here. It is hoped that countries

with coal to spare will extend till
June their “gentlemen’s” agree-
ment not to cut off exports and
enable Europe’s problems to be

solved.
—Reuter

C. J. Threatened

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 30,
A letter containing threats
against the person, of Sir Cecil
Furnness-Smith, the Chief Justice
was received by the Police a few

°



days before judgment in the
“Floating Corpse” case was

delivered, a letter from the Com-
missioner of Police said.

The Commissioner refuted
statements in the Press that the
Chief Justice had asked for Police
protection. Since the squashing oi
the conviction it was understood
high officials have sought Police
protection.

162,000 TONS OF
SUGAR EXPECTED
“BORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 30,

Trinidad’s sugar crop is expected
to hit a record this year with a



production of 162,000 tons. This|

however, depends to a_ large
extent on weather conditions, Last
year’s crop was 146,508 tons.

A reliable source disclosed that
all factories are in operation. ex-

Legislature of 25 members, Ber-
bice to have six seats instead .of
three as at present. The Legisla—
ture should be presided over by
a Speaker who would not take
part in the proceedings but to have
only a casting vote. The Speaker
is to be elected from outside the
House membership. They also
suggested 11 ministerial posts, with
a senior member in each depart-
ment named as a _ Permanent
Under-Secretary as advisor to the
Minister. There should be an
Advisory Council of 10 wholly
nominated members, the Governor
presiding, Colonial Secretary, Fin-
ancial Secretary, Attorney Gen-
eral and six others nominated by
Government from a panel of 12
named by the elected members.
The 1946 census gave British
Guiana a total population of
875,701 of which 57,736 were de-
elared illiterates not including the
Amerindian population of 16,322.

MOVE WIRELESS

ST. JOHN’S Nfld.
Removal of the large wireless
station of the transport depart-
ment from the top of Table
Mountain of Newfoundland’s
west coast to another site is
planned. The station installed by
the military in the Second World
War is to be placed near the

main line of the local railway,

--(C.P.)

IT’S A HABIT
GILLINGHAM, Norfolk, England.
Since November, 1949, Her-
bert Finey has won three first
prizes in sixpenny raffles. All
three were television sets —

ship against the moonlit sky.

“As it reached our left wing we
could see the plane had a fuselage
like a B-29 but about one and
one-half times as large. The
wings were straight and there
were no engine nacelles (hous-
ings).

“We were doing 120 miles an
hour, but instead of the plane
passing us, it stopped opposite our
wing and then began going in our
direction, apparently without ever
turning. We tried to follow it
but lost sight of the plane.”

Co-pilot Bachmeier, who was
in control of the ship at the time
confirmed Vinther’s story and
added:

“The plane had a cigar shaped
fuselage and the wing appeared
to be a flattened cigar strongly
resembling gq glider wing. The
wing was forward of the centre
of the fuselage.” Bachmeier
continued:






















Manoeuvrability

“The plane had extreme
manoeuvrability. It appeared to
be able to do anything almost at
will.

“We saw no engine, no tail
surface, no evidence of exhaust,

“Outlined against the sky, it
appeared like a giant cigar. It
was uplighted as it came towards
us sideways and there were no
portholes.”

Col. Matthew Thompson, of
Offut Air Force Base, Omaha, one
of the passengers on the flight,
said he is investigating “Flying
Saucers” but, ironically, was
















SINGAPORE

» e NO GOTEL ACOMODATION MEANS
LESS FOREIGN CURRENCY FOR BAR
BADOS © CONVERT IND DOLLARS




ePOR EL AMOR
Spas !2( FOR THE

OVE oF GOD!F)

PREPARES

WASHINGTON.

SINGAPORE, “City of the Lion,” fabled halfway house of
werld commerce, is grimly facing the prospect of again
becoming the defensive pivot for the riches of Southeast

Asia.

As Communist armies overrun
much of Korea, invade Tibet and
carry war into Indo-China, Sing-
apore is reported again preparing
for all-out defense against possible
assault. The lightning land-
launched conquest of the city in
February, 1942, by the Japanese
was a bitter lesson not soon to be
forgotten.

An island seaport which tips
the south—pointing Malay Penin-
sula, thumb of continental Asia,
Singapore has been Great Britain’s
gateway to the East for a century
and a quarter, the National Geo-
graphic Society points out. As

Singapore goes, so goes the world’s

busiest trading post in rubber, tin
and quinine, and one of the Far
East's greatest naval bases,
Malaya Invaded

Many times before in history
and pre-history has Malaya been
invaded. Ages ago the ancestors
of today’s Australian aborigines
and Polynesian islanders swarmed
down the peninsula’s length and
used it as a bridge from continen-
tal Asia to then unpeopled lands
below the Equator. There followed
countless migrant bands enroute
to Sumatra, Java and beyond.

Ancient civilizations overflowing
from India were next to come, A
Buddhist empire, Sri Vijaya,
gained a foothold on the Strait of
Malacca, which to modern times
has funneled Far Eastern sea trade
between Indian Ocean and China

Sea. Merchant-traders from India

built a city called Singapura
City of the Singh, or Lion—in the
place which earlier Malays had
named Tumasik—-Sea Town.

But Javanese warriors, broad~
ening a Hindu empire, sacked this
first Singapore about 1377 A.D.
Theréafter, Malays avoided the
island, believing its red_ soil
cursed by the blood spilled there.

Malaya Market Conquered

In 1511 Portugal conquered the
Malaya market, taking the port of
Malacca which had been founded
on the peninsula’s southwest coast
by a fugitive prince from Sing-
apura. Malacca fell again in 1641
to the Dutch. Then, in 1819,
Britain’s Sir Thomas Stamford
Raffles bought from native sultans
a small, swampy island at Malaya’s
tip. The modern port of Singapore
grew on Raffles’ mangrove swamp.

Malayan tin, then rubber, made
it rich. Singapore’s population
grew until today it is close to a

million, It is a melting pot of
Chinese, Malays, Indians, Arabs,
Javanese, Burmese, Tibetans,

Japanese, English and Americans.
A large majority are Chinese.
At the time World War II
erupted in the Pacific, Singapore
with its great naval base was con-



dozing when the plane took off
from Sioux City.
He and another officer question-
ed the crew in Kansas City,
—I.N.S,

cept Forres Park, which will start
early next month,

We'll

own, (C.P.)





S500 ‘G that better

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5; y






with
ae

Children’s accidents quickly Te-
spond to the soothing and healing
properties of Germolene which
draws out the dirt and stimulates
the growth of new skin over
the damaged area. Keep atin
handy for family use.

FOR
SPOTS, BRUISES,
RASHES,
ABRASIONS, Etc.

GERMOLENE soothes at a touch—heals in record time.

ne




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sidered an impregnable bastion.
Coastal fortifications bristled with
guns emplaced to repel a sea
attack,
No Major Obstacle

Japan struck swiftly by land
and through the air instead. The
mile-wide moat of Johore Strait
between the city and the mainland
failed to prove a major obstacle
for the Japanese forces swarming
jdown from beachheads on the
Malayan causeway. The fall of
Singapore in the opening weeks
of the war was a disastrous blow.

This time there is little talk of
“impregnable fortress”. Another
overland attack could be stopped,
Singapore’s defenders believe, if
enough troops are available to seal
off the Malay Peninsula’s narrow
neck to the north. The naval base
has been completely rebuilt, and
jet planes are reported now based
at the “City of the Lion,”
/ —INS.

French Inflict

“Severe Losses”

SAIGON, Feb. 1.

French Union forces prevented
Sabotage and inflicted “severe
losses’ yesterday on Communist-
led Vietnam rebels trying to push
across the Hanoi-Haiphong rail-
way, an army communique re-
ported today.

They were engaged in a wide-
spread series of patrols and am-
bushes in North Vietnam. The
French Air Force made “massive”
attacks against rebel concentra-
tions north of Bacnih Aboq—about
24 miles to the northeast of Hanoi,

General Jean De Lattre De
Tassignay, French Commander-
in-Chief in Indo China, left here
today for Tonking after a ten days’
stay,—Reuter.

One Way Traffic

IPSWICH, England.
H. Adams, a builder, waited a
month to get delivery of some
glass bricks from Bury St, Ed.
munds, 27 miles distant. The
transport company which hand-
led the shipment explained they
don't run a service .from Bury
to Ipswich — only from Ipswich

to Bury. (C.P.)





PAGE THREE

Index Steady
While Prices Rise

By FRED DOERFLINGER



SF



>

| DRESS
| FOR
| ASS

THE MODERN }
Dress Shoppe

(BROAD STREET)

.

LONDON.

More and more Britons—especially housewives—- are toda)
grumbling about soaring prices and attacking the Labow
Government’s “Alice-in-Wonderland” cost of living
statistics,

Mr. and Mrs. John Bull complain that the cost of living ha:
been going up steadily for many months and that thei:
money is buying less and less in the shops.

The Board of Trade’s official, The 100,000 - strong Iron anc
index figure, however, asserts that [steel Trades Confederation re
between November 14 and Decem-| cently termed it “statistical hocu:
ber 12, 1950, retail prices remained | pocus”,
steady. “For some, no doubt, this sor

Yet Government departments in| ef thing has its humorous side
the month ending December 12]Lut the man whose wages are re:
announced increases in the prices]cuced by these Alice-in—Wonder
of such important items as coal,|land statistics can be forgiven ii
blankets, sheets, household linen,|he cannot see it,” said the union's
raincoats and boots. cfficial journal,

Britons are frankly annoyed
and shocked by this “magic” index Late tast year Ministor of
which ean remain steady and even| Labour George Isaacs promisec
fall, as it did last August, while|the House of Commons that a:
prices rise, soon as conditions were considerec

The index is the only official}@ppropriate he would take the
“barometer” of household expen-|first steps towards introducing a
diture. It not only automatically |mew cost of living index. |

varies some wages, but inevitably He agreed that there was ¢
enters into all onfmeed for a new index adding:
wages.
“Retail Prices” Index
Although still popularly

discussions

“The patterns of living of our
people have changed. Things re

the “cost of living index” the fig-

ure is strictly the “index of retail tod

prices”. It shows the cost of an
imaginary working - class house-
hold budget if it wishes to live in
exactly the same way as it did in
1938.

What this imaginary house-
hold spent on these things in 1947
was called “100”, Today, accord-
ing to the latest figures, it would
have to spend 116 to get the same
things in the same qualities.

called] garded in the old days in the work

ing man’s family as luxuries are
ay absolute essentials.”

But it will probably be several!
years before a new index is it
operation, A new survey of fam
ily budgets will first have to be
made and the Ministry of Labour
has, as yet, made no plans for
this survey.-—-I. N.S.



SPECIAL
OFFERS In
LADIES”



The old cost of living index was
introduced in 1914, based con sur-
vey in 1904, But by 1947 it had
become so unreal for various rea-
sons that the

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

COTTON
DRESSES

Government de- Sch, Emmanuel C. G si
. " . 2 c jordon, Sch. Bel-]})
cided to start it all over again,| aueen, M.V, Sedgefield, Sch. Foter- Washable Lovely Patterns
working from a 1988 survey of| Prise S. Sch. bucitle M, Smith, Yacht $6,00 each
10,000 households , Juanita, Seh. United Pilgrim 8.

. : as. ARRIVALS L ADDIE. .*
a it the old index stood at] Sch, Marea Henrietta, 43 tons net, ads wk

0, prices just before the war Capt, Selby, from St. Lucia ‘a a y
being 100, The 180 was. suddenly hee! Want i eeeweL See, ee SKIRTS
made 100 again for the new “in-| M.V. Jenkins Roberts, 204 tons net,

African Cotton Prints
$3.98 each

LADIES”
TAILORED
SKIRTS

In a Fine Assortment of
Colours $6.00 each

dex of retail prices”, so that it is] Capt
now impossible, from the new
index, to tell exactly how the cost
of living compares with pre-war,

New Index Out Of Date

The new index, based on the

Watson, from Grenada



=

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

1938 survey, 3 CABLE and Wireless (WI) Ltd
urvey, chose new items to advise that they can now communicate

muake the household budget. But] with the following ships through their
as the spending pattern had great-| Barbados Coast Station:;—

ly changed during the war, from 8.8, Stockholm, s.s, Hacehus, 4, Re-

ah 5 gent Lion, $58 Canadian Challenger,

one point of view, the new index] ¢s Kettleman Hills, ss. Planter, ss. KRAYSER

was out of date before it started, { Brazil, ss. Dioni, «5, Trum; #«, Em- r r
For eae. arnang the goods ire ee a Teten aia NYLON

assessed each month to indicate, St yo" ee gee nee a! an eee ya NGS
7 tt : . Reuador, ss. Grasse, 5.8, Cera-

price Wariniiena in the new. index 8.8 “Muader, sa. De rasse s, Cera a TOCKINGS

mic, Nieuw Amsterdam, s.s, Pedro
2, s.s, San Mateo. s.s. Empress of Scot-
Jand, ss. Uruguay, s.s. 8. Rosa, #.8

8.
are an iron bedstead and a tin
kettle. Iron bedsteads disappear-

ing rece. ane Lago Azul, ss. Lady Rodney, ss. Jolf-
ed from most shops years ago and ereek, 4.5. Tiberius, s.5. Fort Amherst,
tin kettles have been largely re-;s.s. P and T Pathfinder, 8.8. Olimpia,
placed by aluminum or enamelled (#*-P and T Trader. 6.5, Sundaie, ss
kettles. Another obsolete item in 8. Cirillo, M.T Avanti, as. Cinch Knot,

51 Gauge 15 Denier
$2.14 per pr.

THE MODERN







+ Pmcoer a shopping list is a hair RATES OF EXCHANGE

Another thing that makes it un- February 1, 1961
real in terms of actual shopping F :
is that the household concerned | 4, 4 9, CANADA
is “imaginary”. It consists of 3% | VIO OE Boao ak eon ie Tess 0 é
persons of whom 1% are wagdq,... Demand ei aie
earners and only one child is reste W070 pr, iS
under 14. This may be satisfac- 763 8/i0% ‘pr. SleRy eens 61 8/10% pr. BROAD STREET
tory to statisticians but makes fon | 62 3/10% Currency 60 8/10% pr.
complications when applied tof spigot bide ic ete ph
calculations in real life. vere eh Pe oe

The index does not take into

consideration the question of in
come tax or other direct taxation
-——very much part of the cost of
living.

The index, however, is painstak-
ingly compiled, It was neyer in-
tended to be taken literally and
does not apply to households
spending more than $19,60 a week

Guide To Prices

With all its faults it remains
some guide to prices but certain-
ly does not reflect the actual cost
of living.

The index has been roundly at-
tacked by all sections of the com-
munity, particularly the working
man and the housewife.



KLIM is excetient for growing
children

“KLIM adds nourishment to
cooked dish

KLIM is recommended for

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A dull leams
KLIM is produced under strict- when bind wih o ab of

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and prevents clouding’

KLIM MILK, you
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Iways the same uniform
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is needed for

oD

CHEMICO is the COMPLETE Household Cleanser — it
cleans, polishes and protects kitchen utensils, porcelain, tiles,
etc. Its highly efficient S-M-O-O-T-H paste action removes
grease, grime and surface rust without harsh scouring or scratch-
ing and its fragrant glycerine content prevents “ clouding ”
on polished surfaces and helps ward off corrosion on metals.
Save while you make everything about your home shine — with
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i THE GOWNTY GHEMICAL CO, LTD., SHIRLEY, BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND



!
t



Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid.. Broad St., Bridgetown.
ee

PAGE FOUR



om ej
Friday, February 2, 1951

QUESTION OF LAW

THE Legislative Council postponed the
bill to allow the Vestry of St. Michael to
raise the sum of ten thousand pounds to
grant retrospective pay to all the parochial
employees, The postponement was due to
strong opposition by Hon. Mr. Cuke who
pointed out that if it was illegal to budget
for sums of money to pay for the years al-
ready expired it was wrong in principle
to burden ratepayers for the next twenty
years to pay retrospectively for parochial
commitments.

The objections to the bill were voiced
by several members who intimated their
intentions to vote against the bill and Hon,
Mr. Challenor who took charge of the mea-
sure asked for leave to postpone it until
more information could be supplied the
Council.

The matter had already been the sub-
ject of much controversy at the meetings
of the Vestry. It had been brought for-
ward early in the year 1949 and after
lengthy discussion the motion was reject-
ed. Contrary to expectations on what was
regarded as a general rule the matter was
brought up later in the year when several
members of the Vestry were absent for
various reasons. It was then passed. The
1951 vestry ratified the action of the last
meeting and the matter was referred to
the Legislature and passed by the House
of Assembly. It has now come before the
Council.

The question as to the correctness of the
award is not without its difficulties. There
is a strong body of opinion which favours
the payment of back pay to these parochial
servants because of the rise in the cost ot
living and the fact that the Government
had given back pay to the members of the
Civil Service during the same period. But
there is an opposing section supported by
the law that the vestry cannot budget for
commitments in the year which has passed.
It was sought to overcome this difficulty
by asking for permission to raise a loan the
repayment of which would be spread over
a period of twenty years.

Already the parochial employees have
voiced their feeling that they are entitled
‘to consideration in this matter and that
they had been promised some relief.

The original question arose when the
scavengers applied for an increase of pay
and back pay in the same manner as the:
Civil Servants. When the matter came
before the Vestry it was felt that the
singling out of scavengers would give rise
to dissatisfaction and a motion was carried
that all parochial employees be included.

The question for the Council now to de-
cide is not the equity of the payment of the
money but whether under the provisions
of the Act it can be done,

CUSTOMS UNION

_THE long awaited report of the Com-
mission on the establishment of a Customs
Union in the British Caribbean Area was
published yesterday.

The Commission was appointed as a re-
sult of a recommendation by the Montego
Bay Conference on Closer Association of
the British West Indies. It was under
Chairmanship of Mr. J. Me Lagan, O.B.E.
an expert in Customs matters, and includ-
ed representatives of Barbados, Jamaica,
Trinidad, British Guiana, British Honduras
and the Leeward and Windward Islands.
Its terms of reference were to examine the
question of establishing a Customs Union
between these territories and to make re-
commendations,

The principal conclusions are :—-

(1) That this Customs Union is econo-
mically desirable and practicable, whether
or not political federation comes about, and
that it can be implemented immediately
without any transitional stage. A Customs
Union Advisory Board of representatives
from territories should be appointed to
ensure due implementation of the aims of
union;

. (2) There should be free trade be-
tween the union territories, but every ter-
ritory would retain the right in specified
circumstances to impose excise duty for
revenue purposes on any goods imported
from any other union territory. Eventually
it is to be ree that unification of excise
duties would be achieved;

(3) Union territories should adopt a
common external tariff, involving the revo-
cation of minor imposts such as surtaxes
and package tax, but territories would con-
tinue to impose duty at such rate as they
please on certain reserved items, in par-
ticular wines, = gum tobacco and petroleum
products, which are of special importance
for revenue purposes;

(4) There should be no change at
present in the buying of export duties;

(5) Union territories should adopt a
Common Customs Law and. Regulations,
leading to unification of procedure, and
should as far as possible follow a commen
policy in external policy and agreements
affecting trade;

(6) Union territories should follow a
uniform method of classifying goods and a
uniform method of presenting and publish-
ing trade returns;

(7) Each customs department should
remain under control of the Government of
its territory, and customs and excise reve-
nue should continue to accrue to the
revenue of the territory in which it is
levied. ;

The Report was signed from the head-
quarters of the Development and Welfare
Organisation in the West Indies, which
provided office accommodation and secre-
tarial services for the Commission, and was
= in Barbados by the Advocate Co.,

td. It is impossible to exaggerate its im-
portance with regard to trade in the Brit-
ish Caribbean area and its contents must
receive the prompt attention of the Goy-
ernment of Barbados,





Cracks Behind The

IN a Budapest schoolroom little
Janos, the brightest boy in the
cl is asked to give an example
of a dependent clause. “Our cat
has a litter of ten kittens,” says
Janos, “all of which are good
Communists”. The teacher is de-
lighted with his grasp of both
grammar and the Party Line, and
urges him to do as well when the
government inspector comes to
pay his annual visit.

The inspector duly
the teacher calls



arrives and
confidently on
Janos to answer the same ques-
tion. “Our cat”, replies Janos,
“has ten kittens, all of which are
Western Democrats.” The teacher
is horrified. “Why, Janos! That’s

not what you said ten days ago.

Your kittens were all good Com-
munists then
“Yes,” says Janos, “But now
their eyes are open, "
Not a very good joke? A little
Perhaps.
3ut behind the: Iron Curtain to-

ed on the sly in half a dozen lan-
guages at the risk of prison, forced

camp

e) ”
” i‘
crude and elementary ?
day such jokes are being circulat-

labour and the concentration
On the streets of Sofia, in
the workshops of Warsaw, in
Rumanian towns and East Ger-
man hamlets, as well as inside the
Soviet Union itself — wherever
Moscow’s heel is felt—people are
wielding the only weapon of pro-
test that no police state has ever
been able to deprive them of: the
political joke, the gag as a coun-
ter-irritant to tyranny.

In Prague they ask each other,
“Did you hear the one about the
two Communist officials ., . .?” It
seems that two high Party execu-
tives were staring moodily across
St. Wenceslaus Square at the end
of a trying day of carrying out di-
rectives from Moscow. “What do
you tnink of the future of our
beloved country under Com-
munism one of them asked.

“The same as you do,” replied
the other.

“Oh, you do?” said the first. “In
that case, Comrade, I shall have
to report you immediately to the
State Police !”

In a true democracy a joke lives
or dies by the quality of its hum-~-
our. In’ a “People’s democracy”
a joke achieves circulation be-
cause of its political content. If
its point jabs deeply enough into
the flesh of a ruling Commissar,
or if the punch-line delivers a

av

| sufficient wallop against the pre-

en a atalino

pe. eS ee ae See Ale

vailing system, neither novelty,
subtlety nor brilliance is demand-
ed. It will spread by grapevine
from country to country, regard-
less of language. Repeated by
refugees slipping into free terri-
tory, it will leap the ocean and
turn up in foreign-language news-
papers in New York and Chicago,
sowing its seed of mockery and
derision all along the way, No
secret police, however vigilant
and ruthless, will be able to arrest
or suppress it,

In faet, the Secret Police itself
is often the target of underground
humour. There is, for example,
the story of the unhappy Ruman-
ian shuffling down a Bucharest

street and muttering ‘to himself;

“Those ‘dirty, rotten, low-down,
no-good so-and-sos.” A heavy
hand falls on his shoulder and a
minion of the Secret Police stops
him. “Come along,” says the
policeman. “You're under arrest
for treasonable utterances against
the authorities.”

The citizen is indignant. “The
authorities!” he cries. “Why, I
never even mentioned them!”

“No,” says the policeman, “But
you described them perfectly.”

LONDON.

A plan to disperse part of Bri-
tain’s population and_ essential
armament industries through
Commonwealth territories that are
relatively safe from atomic attack
is proposed by Sir Clifford Heath-
eote-Smith, deputy chairman of
the Council for the New Era of
Emigration.

Sir Clifford in a letter to The
Times describes the problem as
one of the gravest and most urgent
for the Commonwealth to decide.

The Council contends that the
strength or even the survival of
the British Commonwealth may
depend on swift action in trans-
ferring the nation’s industrial
strength from target areas to the
chief European-settled countries
of the Commonwealth.

“This is far from being a crisis

OUR READERSSAY



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

1 ee
Curtain
By RICHARD HANSER

(With acknowledgement to the Freeman)

When anthropologists unearth-
ed an ancient mummy in a remote
section of Hungary, urgent word
came from the Kremlin: “Make
every effort to prove that this is
the mummy of Genghis Khan.
Such a discovery will add greatly
to the prestige of Soviet science.”

A week later the Hungarian In-
stitute of Anthropology reported
triumphantly to Moscow that the
mummy was indeed that of Geng-
his Khan.

“How did you prove it?” asked
the powers.

“It was easy. We turned the
case over to the Secret Police and
the mummy confessed.”

The vanity of the newly-fledged
Communist rulers and their ten-
dency to wallow in the power
which the Kremlin has placed in
their hands, provide a_ steady
source of fuel for the folk-wits
of the satellite countries. The
Postmistress of Bulgaria, for ex-
ample, was said to have been
given a furious dressing-down by
the country’s made-in-Moscow
dictator, Vulko Chervenkov, be-
cause an issue of stamps bearing
his portrait was not in circulation.
The embarrassment of the Post-
mistress was acute as she tried to
explain that the issue had indeed
been printed but was not in gen-
eral use because the stamps didn’t
stick. Chervenkov seized a sheet
of the stamps, tore one off, wet
it and pasted it on an envelope.
“Look. They stick perfectly. Why
aren’t they being circulated?”

“Well, Comrade,” said the Post-
mistress, ‘you might as well know
the truth. The public keeps spit-
ting on the wrong side,”

Though Yugoslavia is currently
snarling and snapping at the
Soviet Union, and vice versa,
Tito’s regime is hardly less op-
pressive than Stalin’s and _ the
jokesters know it. A Belgrade
court recently sentenced six men
to long prison terms on the catch-
all charge of “reactionary opposi-
tion,” which included telling anti-
Tito jokes.

One of the gags for which an
unwary Yugoslav can be bundled
into the clink reflects the wistful
hope of thousands behind the Cur-
tain that some day, in some way,
the United States will act to lift
the Communist yoke off their
necks. The story involves a hap-
less citizen of Zagreb who decided
to end it all but had trouble find-
ing the means to dispose of him-
self, There wasn’t a decent piece

of rope in the house. He had no
money to buy poison. There
wasn't a knife available sharp

enough to do the job. So he con-
cocted a scheme to have somebody
do it for him.

He stood before Tito’s palace
and began to shout: “Down with
Tito! Kill Tito, the oppressor of
the people! He kept this up, con-
fident that the guards would
promptly appear and mow him
down. The guards came running
toward him, all right, but instead
of shooting they threw away their
guns and embraced him. “Com-
rade!” they cried jubilantly, “are
the Americans here already?”

The cracks behind the Curtain
do not spare the sacred person ot
Stalin himself, despite round-the-
clock efforts by Communist propa-

measure,” he writes. “A better
custripution of industry and popu-
lation would strengthen Britain
and all Commonwealth nations,
both economically and as a matter
of defence.”

With migrants from Britain, he
adds, should go some of the many
refugees and displaced persons at
present scattered throughout
Western Europe. In the younger
countries overseas, they would be-
come an incalculable asset to the
whole free world,

Has Opponents

Brinley Thomas, Professor of
Economics at University College,
Cardiff, described Sir Clifford's
proposal as “unconvincing and
unrealistic.”

“This is an extraordinary policy
to recommend at the very moment
when everything depends on a





























gandists to churn up abject adula-
tien of the Big Boss. A cool and
sardonic estimate of Stalin’s
proper place in the scheme of
things is conveyed in a story that
has spread throughout the East-
ern-Bloc countries.

A Russian worshipper makes
Stalin a birthday present of a
bolt of fine cloth. Stalin's tailor
notifies him that there is barely
enough for a pair of pants. This
seems rather skimpy to Stalin,
who sends the stuff to a Warsaw
tailor for an appraisal. This one
reports that he can manage a
complete suit out of the material.
Still not satisfied, Stalin consults
a Parisian clothier, who judges
that perhaps the cloth will serve
for a coat, vest and two pairs of
pants. By this time Stalin is sus-
picious of the answers he is get-
ting, and goes all the way to Lon-
don for the opinion of a real ex-
pert in the West End. There he
is told that the cloth is easily suffi-
cient to provide a coat, vest, two
pairs of pants, sports jacket and
uvercoat, with enough left over
for a skirt for Mrs, Stalin. Stalin
is amazed and asks the reason for
the huge spread in the various
tailor’s estimates. “Oh, that’s
simple to explain, sir,” says the

Englishman. “The farther you go
from Moscow, the smaller you
get.”

Inside the Russian borders there
are unregenerate souls who daily
defy Siberia by circulating quips
which badly blur the propaganda
picture of the Soviet Union as the
Workers’ Paradise. A favourite
Moscow joke during the last elec-
tions was the disenchanted query
that went: “Have we achieved
full socialism yet—or are things
going to get still worse?” And to
the casual greeting, “How are
things?” a common answer is:
“Much better. Worse than yes-
terday, of course, but much better
than to-morrow,”

The same sour cynicism is the
basis for the story about the Com-
munist census official who asks a
grizzled villager how old he is.
“I’m 35,” is the reply. This is
obviously so inacturate that the
census taker expresses doubt.
“Well,” says the old timer, “I’m
really 65, but these last 30 years
—you don’t call that living, do
you?”

Nobody believes that the pre-
valence of such heretical humour
within the Russian orbit means
counter-revolution will break out
to-morrow. It iis, however, an
accurate index to the true feelings
of mute millions behind the facade
of solidarity created by the con-
trolled press, the captive radio and
the staged demonstration. For all
their crudeness, the jokes express
deep-seated mass altitudes and de-
sires which have no other means
of outlet. There is no mistaking
the wish implicit in the following
ancedote which has reaped its
harvest of grim chuckles. When
the time comes, its punch-line will
be echoed by millions :

An American and a_ Russian
sentry are standing guard across
a German zonal border in the
small hours of the night. The
American looks at his watch
“Only fifteen minutes until I’m
relieved,” he says. “Thank God!”

The Russian looks at his watch.
“Only a quarter of an hour and
I'll be relieved, too, he says.
“Thank Stalin!”

The American is __ startled.
“That's a funny thing to say.
What would you say if Stalin was
dead ?”

“Thank God!” says the Russian.



Plan To Avoid Bombs

situation of strength being rapidly
built up in Western Europe,” he
said. “In other words, our par-
ticular contribution to the defence
of the free world would be to
stage a gigantic Dunkerque.”

“Imagine the effects on the
United States and the nations of
Western Europe,” said Prof.
Thomas. ‘Does anyone seriously
think that the rulers of Russia
would hold back because the Brit-
ish Commonwealth was redistri-
buting its population?”

Britain’s destiny, he insisted,
was bound up with the world-
wide group of free nations, of
which the United States was the
corner-stone. Any plan treating
Britain’s security as a mere Com-
monwealth problem would be
“unconvincing and completely un-
realistic.”—(CP)





Coloured Folk In Birmingham

Co-operation in Ambitious
Schemes

By §& B. TIMOTHY

LONDON, Jan. 22.
Church, social and welfare organisations
in Birmingham have co-operated during the
past nine months to grapple with the prob-
lem of the welfare of the coloured people
working and living in the city, and have de-
cided on ambitious schemes.

A co-ordinating committee for overseas
visitors was formed in March last year, re-
oresenting the Free Church Federal Council, | %
che Christian Social Council, the Selly Oak}%
Colleges, the Y.M.C.A., the Rotary Club and}%
he Ministry of Labour.

This committee decided that many of the
‘hree to four thousand coloured folk in the
tity have not been seeing the best of English | %
ife, and that those who returned to their own \%
‘ountries would not carry back a good im-|
oression of Christian society.

The Archdeacon of Birmingham, the Ven.
5. Harvie Clark, who is the chairman of the
committee, explained to me to-day that mis-
sionaries were concerned for their people] %
who came to this country, many of whom|‘
have been educated in missionary schools.
“It is important that they should not go back
to their own countries with a bad impression
of the welcome that we gave them”, he said.

The committee feel the overseas students|'
in the city are already catered for. It is the
working men and the few girls in the hospi-
tals and domestic work, about whom they are
most concerned, Many have come to this}
country to gain experience for a period, and
others to stay permanently. At present, there
are few unemployed in Birmingham.

With this in mind, the committee have ask-
ed the Education Department, which is great-
ly interested in the work and represented on

the committee, to form an Evening Insti-
tute for these people.

It is to be started this month in a day school
in Balsall Heath, a district where many of
the coloured folk live. It will be opened at
first for West Africans and West Indians, and
will include most of the educational, social
and recreational activities that are provided
at the normal centres. It is hoped to form a

students’ council to advise on the social or-
ganisation,

As a long-term policy, it is planned to build
up specialist clubs, and such groups as sports
teams and dramatic societies, which will mix
with their equivalents in the ordinary insti-
tutes and so establish relations between the
coloured and the European people.

Teachers in the institute, will, for the most
part, be the same as those in the normal
institutes, and chosen for their special inter-
est in the work. An English language class
is being aryanged thet will include some
teaching of English habits and attitudes.

One of the most important provisions of
the centre will be the advisory service, which
will aim at placing the coloured people in}
contact with the authorities best able to deal
with their problems; and it is intended also

to establish a more personal advisory section
in the Institute itself,

Meanwhile the churches in Birmingham
are going to do their part. The Dudley Road
Methodist Church, for example, has already
formed a club where coloured people meet
each week in the schoolroom. The Central

Hall, too, is planning activities among colour-
ed people.

_

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1951 :








































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Garden Boys

To The Editor, The Advocate

Sir,—Your correspondent F-.Y.
on “Child Labour” on the 20th
apparently is suffering from an
overdose of superiority complex
when he criticises private employ-
ers for employing boy gardeners.

The actual fact is that these
boys are very useful to their em-
ployers, and to themselves. In
large countries thousands of boys
who have the intelligence and in-
terest in themselves, use their
spare time to earn something extra
to buy clothes and help them-
selves,

Most of the boys I have seen
working in gardens for a few
hours a day in their spare time
are at least well dressed, .clean,
and healthy—not like the young
hooligans who are supposed ‘to go
to school and don’t employ them-
selves to any useful purpose.

I had one of these garden boys
working for a few weeks (a splen-
did little fellow too) and he left a
week or so ago to return to school.

Your correspondent evidently
wishes politics and mathematics
only for all of the race. What
does he do, and what grievance
has he got against honest healthy
work? If educated men (not boys)
of his type only were employed as
gardeners, their charge would be
toe high, and their work would be
negligent, as their early days
would have been spent in schools
and they would know nothing
about gardens

If there were no one to work in
gardens, there would be no gar-

ns, and no flowers, food, &c.—
er what

KILROY
Jan, 31, 1951,

U.S.A. Writes India Off

By PIERRE J. HUSS
LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y.

The United States has quietly
written India off the list of those
nations in U.N. which can be
cecunted on to fight aggression
with anything but moral sanc-
tions,

The long, hard battle to pin
the label of aggressor on Red
China in U.N. demonstrated that
regardless of the clarity of guilt
of any aggressor, the followers of
the late Mahatma Ghandi are
inbred pacifists and will not
unsheath the sword except in the
expansion of their own borders.

A leading Western Delegate
said:

“Pandit Nehru didn’t waste time
or worry about high principles
when he saw his chance to grab
Hyderabad province or Kashmir.
He even flew an armoured unit
of the Indian army across the
Himalayas. In the past three
years he has rejected every effort
to settle the Kashmir issue by
negotiation with Pakistan

“It would be better for all
roncerned if Nehru set his own

“house in order by pacifist means

instead of exercising his policy of
force on Kashmir and practising
appeasement at Western expense
en the issue of Communist China,”




The role of the Arabs in the
same struggle also has irked
American officlals. The prevailing
opinion is that the Arabs, with
little exception, followed a policy
of retaliation against U.N, for
the disciplining they sustained in
their conflict with the fledgling
State of Israel While it is
recognized at Lake Success that
the Arabs, li ers, have tha
right to nurse their own grudges

against U.N., it is another mat-
ter play fast and lose with
revengé politics when the peace
of the a is at stake.

Extensive misgivings cropped
up also over British and Canadian

hesitaney to join in a stern
punitive policy against Red
China.

Seasoned diplomatic observers
who went through the mill of
Geneva, when Hitler and Musso-
lini wefe rattling the sword and
swinging the club over small
nations are keenly conscious
to-day of the fact that there is
a parallel in the 1951 situation
with that of 1938. In those days,
Poland Was the leading voice--
aside from the British and
French—counselling a “go slow”
policy. The Polish diplomats were
dead set against the challenging
or annoying Hitler, since he was
right on their border.

But Re, “go slow” and “appease-
ment” of Hitler by the Poles
reaped the dragon’s teeth of the
1939 Jblitz, which wiped out
Polan splitting it between
Russia ‘and Germany. The Geneva
cld-timers see a parallel in the
position at U.N. to-day of India,
which keeps on saying that there
must be no hasty action against
Red China, Beneath the surface,
India has the backing of Britain
and some Commonwealth coun-
tries
Nehru’s insistence despite the
Peiping invasion of Tibet and
Korea that e¢verything can be
settled by peaceful nego‘iation led
one observer at U.N. to remark

“Nehru will still be sendins
messages to U.N. that there is
cause for optimism and hope fc

a peaceful settlement when the

Chinese Reds and the Russians
are marching into New Delhi.
Stalin must be having a good
laugh every time he hears from
Nehru.”

A drawback to speedy U.N.
condemnation of Red China, in
the opinion of many delegates.
was the constant necessity on the
part of the American delegation
to avoid “pressure” on baulking
nations. Although the American
delegation itself was under the
heaviest pressure from Congres -
sional and public indignation, the
team of diplomats under Warren
Austin’s direction had to step
warily.

A prominent member of that
team, Minister John C. Ross, put
it this way:

“Basically, the American peo-
ple fully understand the impor-
tance of taking into account
everybody's viewpoint before any
nation is expected to commit
itself to a major policy decision.”

In leaning backwards to give
time for careful consideration by
foreign governments, the Ameri-
can delegation has come under
fire for what is called indecision
and flinching. This has been
strongly denied by Austin and
other members of the U.S. team
who point out that there is
something in what Britain’s Sir
Gladwyn Jebb sa'd to the Politi-
cal Committee.

With the possibility of eventua)
sanctions against Red China
ebviously in mind, Jebb declared:

“It is wisdom in International
politics to look well before you
leap. But it is an axiom too, to
leap together when we do leap.

On that point, the U.S. and
others agree, —I,.N.S,



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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2,

Council



1951

Will Get

Report Of Vestry

On Back Pay Proceedings

THE VESTRY of St. Michael will circulate to members

of the Legislative Council,

the proceédings which took

a at the Vestry meetings, dealing with the matter of
ack pay to their employees.

This was decided at t

heir meeting yesterday, after

discussion on remarks reported in the Press to have been

made by Hon. H. A. Cuke

Tuesday.

It was on the occasion when the
Council was considering a Bill to
authorise the Vestry to borrow a
sum not exceeding £10,000 to pay
retrospective pay to all parochial
employees,

_Mr. E. D. Mottley who had
piloted the Bill through the House
of Assembly, drew the attention
of the members of the Vestry
yesterday to the remarks of Mr,
Cuke. Mr. Cuke, he said, was a
man known for his justice and
fairplay and he believed that the
remarks he had made had been
made in good faith. He was claim-
ing the right to get further infor-
mation on the Bill and he thought
he should have it. There were
certain statements, however, that
he (Mr, Mottley) was prepared to
refute.

It was not correct to say that
the matter was not discussed pre-
ceding the 1950 Vestry election,
It was

v certainly the subject
of discussion at the hustings and
at meetings, and it was true

1> say that members had differed
in their opinions on it.

The motion of Mr. McD. Sym-
monds on which the Vestry made
their decision to give back pay to
the employees, had been on’ the
Vestry’s Agenda for some time
before it had been dealt with, so
that members were fully aware
of it. No attempt had been made
to discuss it in the*absence of
some members or to railroad it
through the Vestry and he regret-
ted very much that that impres-
sion shouid have been given. He
was sure that no member of the
Vestry could honestly say that he
was not allowed an opportunity
toe discuss it.

Hon. V. C. Gale said that he had
gone into this matter very care-
fully. If Mr, Cuke had been mis-
informed, the Vestry’s records
were there to show what had
taken place. The matter of back
pay had been brought up a num-
ber of times and had been turned
down. The last time it was
brought up it was passed, the
only people voting against it being
Mr. Trevor Bowring and himself.
Nine members were present in-
cluding the Chairman and 6 had
voted in favour “and 2 against,

When the Bill was to be brougnt
before the Legislative Council
he had asked the Clerk to let him
-have the facts of the case. He had
told him, Mr, Mottley and the
Churchwarden as well, that he
could not introduce the Measure
in the Council because he had
been opposed To it in ‘the Vestry
and had not changed his mind.
He said that they would have to
get somebody else to do so but
gave his promise that he would
take no part in the debate on it,
as it was the wish of the Vestry
that it should be passed, When
the matter was brought up in the
Council he left tie Chamber un-
til the discussion ended,

Mr. Mottley asked members to
say whether the question of re-
trospective pay had not been
raised at the elections in 1950.
The question was raised then, he
said.

At the time that the retrospec-
tive pay for parochial employees
was passed, Mr. Chase ang Mr.
Miller were not at the Vestry. Mr.
Miller was in Trinidad and Mr.
Chase could not attend because
of some illness. Both of those
Vestrymen had by their previously
expressed views indicated that if
they had been at the Vestry meet—
ing they would have voted for
the retrospective pay. .

Therefore to say that it had
been passed when members were
absent was no point, when some
members who were absent would
have voted for it.

Nor could it be said that there
was a sudden meeting which
aimed at getting it passed. Before
the meeting at which it was pass—
ed, there had been two abortive
meetings and the retrospective
pay motion had been on those
agendas. So when the meeting was
summoned two days after notice
vas given, it only meant that the



same agenda was sent out to
Vestrymen,
Mr. Bowring said that it had

been advised that as many mem-
bers should ae present at the
ing as possible,
ae © Mottley said that they
should, write to Mr. Cuke and let
him know the truth of the matter.
Someone was using subservient
methods with Mr, Cuke and who-
ever it was, was,not doing the
island any good. Mr. Cuke had
not been at the meeting so some-
one must have been telling him

ings.
wi 9 Symmonds said that the
thought that certain members

got together behind the backs of
others and railroad the passing of
back pay could only come through
misinformation.

He had asked the churchwarden
about summoning a meeting to get
the settlement of the back pay
motion before the Vestry died and
the churchwarden said he was not
summoning a meeting. He had
managed to get a meeting called,
but it was unfair to suggest that
the motion had been hurried over
behind other members’ backs.

Mr. Miller said that on any
board the majerity decision would
aiways stand and he did net see
why the majority decision of the
Vestry should be questicned.

Before the motion was passes,
he had heard it stated by the
public and by members of the
Vestry that the Churchwarden did
not intend summoning a meetins
because he was against beck pay.

Mr. Mottley said that, had it not

been for Mr. Weatherhead n
parochial employee would ever
have got retrospéctive pay. Mr.

Weatherhead had given a_casting
vote to a request of the Commis
sioners of Health for back pay for
their day labourers so at one t >
this had been solely

Mr. Victor Chase
was one of the members







A



in the Legislative Coicil on

not attended the meeting the day
it was passed, but had only been
absent through unforeseen cir-
cumstances, Had he been present,
however, he certainly would have
voted in favour of the motion, for
that was his intention.

He was satisfied that there was
no suggestion as might be inferred
from an article in a section of the
Press, of railroading this back pay
issue, for members had discussed
it with him for some time before.

Mr. D. G. Leacock Jnr. said
that he happened to be out of the
island when the motion was
passed.



He did not often agree with Mr.
Miller but he had made a state-
ment about the matter of a
quorum with which he was in
entire agreement. If anyone was
not prepared to accept the de-
cision of a majority of the Vestry
however slim and put it into exes
cution, he saw no possible chance
of anything emerging but chaos
and frustration. Once there was
a legally constituted quorum-the
decision of the majority had to be
accepted, and if this was not te
be done then they would get no-
thing done. It would only mean
reversing the decision at a meet-
ing of the previous one, on the
grounds that. there were not
enough members present at that
meeting.

He did nor. wait. anypody to
assume that.if he were present at
the meeting he would have voted
one way or the other. He would
have come to the meeting with an
open mind.

He took it that true reports of
the meetings had been recorded
in the Minutes and it should not
be impossible to give a copy with
the necessary information to each
member of the Legislative Council.
These members had to exercise
their judgment and were fully
entitled to their opinion. It should
be seen too that they got all the
information they wanted

Mr. Leacock then made a mo-
tion to that effect. Mr. Symmonds
seconded, On the suggestion of
Nr. Mottley a small committee
Was appointed to do this.

Mr. T. W, Miller said that the
motion about the back pay was
that it was for all parochial em-
ployees, Was this to be interpreted
as implied?

It was pointed out
could only apnly to
were entitled to it. ‘

A letter from the Acting Finan-
cial Secretary to the Vestry stated
that the “Govertior-in+Executive
Committee had agreed to the re-
lease of a further. amount of
$1,318 to be expended on the Prin-
cess Alice Playing Field.

It was also stated that the Gov-
ernor-in—Executive Committee had
not reached a decision concerning
the inquiry, into the past expendi-
ture of the amount of $15,590, pre-
viously released from the Labour
Welfare Fund and that the matter
was still under consideration.

that
those

this
who



Can Barbadians
Win U.S. $500?

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 29.

Five hundred dollars U.S., will
be given as prize money in a
Poster Competition being run by
the Caribbean Interim Tourism
Committee.

The poster should be designed
to promote tourism in the Carib-
bean, says Mr. Louis S. Law,
Executive Secretary of the CITC,
and should bear a short slogan of
two or three words in English,
e.g. “Caribbean Calling’, with
perhaps a sub-slogan in smaller
letters at the foot, such as “Come
to the Temperate Tropics”.

The size of the slogan should
be 38” x 25” but designs need not
be submitted in the above size,
but can be produced to fit those
proportions when enlarged, and
they must be in colour.

Territories will form their-own
panel of judges, Mr, Law stated
and will receive all local entries
which must be accompanied by
the name of the~entrant in a
sealed envelope, The winning
design chosen in each territory
will be forwarded to the Executive
Secretary._of . the. CITC,-Kent
House Port-of-Spain to reach him
not later than 15th April, 195).
Final ‘selections ‘will be made. ft
the Third Annual General Meeting
of the CITC in May, "el

Mr. Law has made ‘the™tenta-
tive suggestion that the prize
money should be divided as
follows: $360 U:S. for the first:
$100 U.S. for the second and $50
tor the third. All three prize-
winning designs will be the
breperty of the Caribbean Interim

m Committee,










STOCK UP
TO-DAY






PODDDOOSOO DP OGSFODO PPO PTFIOD ‘

PEAK FREANS PLAYBOX: BISCUITS—vper
COCKTAIL CHERRIES — yer bottle
HEINZ COCKTAIL ONIONS—per bottle
HEINZ STEM GINGER—per bottle... .. ; $1.12



REV. JAMES REESOR, the Faith
Healer, left yesterday for Puerto
Rico by B.W.LA:

Two Awarded

Loan Contracts
THE Christ Church



Vestry at



their meeting vesterday awarded
to Mr. G. B. Evelyn and Mrs
A. N. Inniss, a contract for the

loan of £1,950 to the parish.

The purpose of raising this loan
is for the purchase of an addi-
tional refuse collector of an en-
closed type which in the opinion
of the Commissioners of Health,
is amore sanitary means of col-
lecting garbage in the patish than
the old open. type of lorry. This
will also assist in controlling the
spread of disease.

Provision is also included in the
loan for the erection of concrete
platforms and. enclosures for eight
additional standposts in various
districts of the parish. This is part
of a scheme which the Commis-
sioners have for erecting 64 addi-
tional standposts throughout the
parish

The Vestry considered a. lette:
from the Vestry of St. Michacl
in whieh they agreed in principle
to the payment of a proportional
share of the pension of Mr. H. C,
Griffith, Chief Sanitary Inspector
ot Christ Church, in consideration
of his eight years’ service with
St. Michael before being appointed
to Christ Church.

The St, Michael Vestry however
Yelt that any legislation necessary
in connection with the matter
should be introduced by the Christ
Church Vestry

The C! told the Vestry that
he had communicated with Messrs
Yearwood and Boyce, the Vestry’s
Solicitors who said that they did
net’ think’ the Vestry of Christ
Church could introduce legislation,
the effect of which would be
charge on the rates of another
parish, f

The Vestry therefore instructed
the Clerk to reply to the Vestry
of St. Michael along those lines.

The estry authorised the
Churchwarden to effect certain
minor repairs at the Rectory which
had not been foreseen at the time
of the laying of the Estimates.

The Vestry appointed a Com-
mittee comprising the Chairman
the Churchwarden and Mrs. H. A.
Talma to collaborate with Miss
Nell Manning, Honorary Secretary
of the Civic Circle with a view to
starting a branch of the Civic
Circle in the parish.










Members present were: Rev.
A. F.. Mandeville (Chairman),
Mr, H. St.G. Ward (Chureh-
warden), Mr. G. C. Ward, Mrs
Hl. A. Talma, Mr. J. E. Webster,
Mr... C. S. MacKenzie, Mr. A, C

Gittens, Mr. C. Ifill, Mr. G. C
Ashby, Mr. T. N. Peirce and Mr,
M; E. R. Bourne,





Labourer Fined 40!-

Martimer Walcott a labourer of
Carrington’s Village, St. Michael
Vv yesterday found guilty of re-
sisting @ policeman while in the
execution of his duty and working
a galled mule on January a.

His Worship Mr. C. L, Walwyn
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict ‘A’ before whom both ¢
were heard ordered Walcott
pay a fine of 30/-
and 10/- for
mule, ;

The 30/- fine is to be paid in 28
days or in default one month's
imprisonment with hard labour
and the 10/- is to be paid in 14
days or in default 14 *impris-
onment with hard labour.

Sgt. Murrell prosecuted for the
police in both cases.





tin.. $1.20
— large 31.21 Small 54c.
Bees cae 79¢.

OEOSOOOCOSO SO SOSOSSSESESES

vases
to!

for ae hel
he cruelty to the
th € } a

BARBADOS.

Thieves Make
Big Haul At
Four Roads

HIEVES MADE a large haul
from the Gasoline Station at
Four Roads, St. John, during the

early hours of yesterday morning,

While P.C. Shepherq of the
Four Roads Police Station was on
patrol duty he noticed that the
door of the Gasoline Station was
broken,

Further investigations showed
that the Station was also entered
An H.M¢‘V. Radiogram,
motor car tyres, an H.M.V
Racio and 21 quart tins of Shell
Oil, _total value $594.50, were
missing,

The Station y E
P. A. Clarke. sessed

NID SELMAN of Queen Mary

Road, Bank Hall, also report—
ed that her home was broken and
entered between 10 p.m. on Tues-
day and 5.30 a.m. on Wednesday
and a quantity of clothing stolen,
The Police are investigating both
incidents, .

N WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Josephine Forde of Gills
Gap, Eagle Hall, St. Michae}l, a
pedestrian, was taken to the
General Hospital and detained,

Forde was involved in an
accident along Tudor Bridge with
a bicyele, owned and ridden by
Lionel Wood of Codrington Hill,
St. Michael

SAANEN GOAT belonging to
Ashton Asgard - of: Queen
Mary Road. Rank Hall, gave birth
to five kids, which included
three bucks, on Wednesday

On two other occasions
given birth to four kids,
said,

HE STUDENTS of the St.

Joseph's Church Boys’ School
were given a half holiday every
day during the week, This is
because a new water toilet is to
be erected.

Before erecting the new one, the
old one was taken down, It is
understood that they will be
getting a half holiday until they
get a toilet to use.

O* A SMALi. pasiure opposite

the St. Joseph's Church
3oys’ School stands a half com-
pleted building. Nothing has
been done to this building for a
very long time.

The Advocate was told that this
building was to have been used
as a carpentry shop but joiners
have been seen working there on
more than one occasion,

The building is a bit confusing
but perhaps the joiners know
what they are about.

AIN FELL ON Wednesday all
over the island. The heaviest
rainfall was in St. George where
72 were recorded, The

is owned

it has
Agard



72 parts
other parishes recorded below 50

parts,

The returns were:— City 47
parts, Station Hill District 72
parts, St. Philip 17 parts, St.
Thomas 27 parts, St. Peter 39
parts, St. Joseph 20 parts, St

James 34 parts, St. Lucy.10 parts,
St. Andrew 14 parts and St. John
34 parts.

It was again gloomy in the Citv
yesterday and moist winds could
he felt. This kent the tempera
ture slightly below 80 degrees
Fahrenheit at mid-day,

HE POLICE REPORTS yes-

terday disclosed that 22
motorists and cyclists were re
ported on Wednesday for traffi
offences. Of these four were re
ported for
limit.

ANY PEOPLE in St. Joseph

do not know where to find
their local Post Office which is
situated at lower Horse Hill, op
posite the Almshouse Gap.

A number of people occasionally
go to the St. Jospeh’s Dispensary
thinking that the Post Office is on
that site.

FILM

exceeding the speed

SHOW will be given
for adults at the British
Council, “Wakefield” tonight at
8.30 o’clock. The programme i
as follows: “British News”, “Julius
Caesar’, “Making The Ball” and
“Your Children’s Eyes”. It is not
necessary to enter by tickets.

WHEN speaking in the debate in the
Legislative Council on the provision of
rigs for the Waterworks Department
on Tuesday Hon. F. C. Hutson was ex
pressing a personal opinion,

The Interim Board of which Hon
Hutson was

Mr
a member ceased to fune-

‘ion after the time of the appointment
f the Engineer Mr. Roddam in De-
ember 1049,

two Hill.

ADVOCATE ~*~



Government Hiil



GOVERNMENT HILL, a road
half a mile long and at t a mile
from Bridgetown got its name
from the circumstance that all te
the right of it,. going up, the
Government House grounds
stretch. .

A wall encloses Government
House and goes right up to the

top of the hill. Big tamarind
mahogany and other treés grow
on the Government House grounds
and many branches overhang th
road, When the sun is hot, half
the road is usually shaded,

The hill actually bégins at the
corner of the Ivy Road thouga
higher up is called Government
Tne first building on the
right is an old, weather beaten
joiners shop. Almost at any time
of the day the tall slim joiner of
the shop can be seen slouching
over the furniture he may be
polishing, repairing or making.

After the old joiner’s shop
there is a half completed bunga-
low. No workman can b® ever seep
about it, The unplastered walls
too have begun to gather moss,

A sign board will tell the
passerby that a miliner lives at
the house after the unfinished
bungalow and at the following
house there is a woman in the
hairdressing business,

The queerest house of the road
is to the right of the hairdresser’s
It is a fairly big house about
a dozen yards away from the road
and is always shut. There are trees
around it and gardens to the front,
It seems that the hobby of the
woman of this house is music for
the soft sounds of a piano are
frequently heard,

Gittens Road

One then comes to Gittens Road
which branches across on the right
and just below there is the biggest
erocery shop of the district,

On the top of a high embank-
ment after the shop there is a
small shoemaker’s shop and withic
stitching away .on leather without
the least attempt at hurry is a
giant of a man, One wonders how
he mamages to turn about in the
small space.

The one public pipe which !:
in Government Hill is in front of
the giant shoemaker’s shop.

Further down the hill a soap
factory stands. This factory pro-
vides work for many men, Eleveo
to 12 is the breakfast hour and at
that time the men hurry out to
keep the bread and fish woman
nearby busy when from every
angle she can hear the cry for
bread and fish,

The man who founded the soap
factory, Mr. J, C, Roberts, is a
bird fancier and to the front of
the house below the soap factory
in which he lives there are many
cages with a variety of birds, Mr.
Roberts is a grey bearaed man
now and you will see him with
his stick walking around the cages
looking at the birds as they eat.

There are only two other houses
on the right at the side of the hi ’
and it ends up, branching in twe
directions, towards Tweedside
Road and towards Belmont Road,
both of which lead to the city.

Concert At ‘Rocks’

The Police Band under Capt.
C. BE, Raison will give a band
concert at the Rocks, Hastings,

tonight at 8 o’clock.
Following is the
Grand March — Cleopatra

programme:
Manehille

Tragic :
Overture Phedre Massenet
Operatic La Traviata Verdi

Verdi died on the 27th January 1901,
the 50th anniversary
his remains were re-
interred in the home which he
founded for impoverished musi ns
Entracte The Birthday Serer p

and to mark
of his death





Lincke
Memories of
Selected

Potpourri Viennese

Franz Lehar :
Ballards

Two Favourite Somewhere
» voice is calling Tate
Until Sandersar

hare stie On the Dover Coach
Characteristic 5 te
English Airs The Rose Myddleton
Foxtrot Mona Lita Murrell
Finale Yfiuymn, O God Our Help it

Ages Past (By special request)

LARCENY CASE
ADJOURNED

A case brought by the Police
charging 26-year-old Marjorie
Browne of no fixed place of abode
with the larceny of £1 7s. belong
ing to Lorraine Parris, of Gittens
Road, St. Michael, was yesterday
adjourned until February 12 by
His Worship Mr. C. L: Walwyn
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”.

Browne ws arrested by Police
Censtable 486 Skeete for the
offence which was alleged to have

been committed sometime or
January 31 ;
Set. F. H. Bancroft is prose-

cuting on behalf of the Police
Browne is on a personal bond ot
£5, sad@t

FRESH SUPPLY OF

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(SCRATCH GRAIN)

aH. JASON JONES &
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OF OFF Fe
on SeeSeueer PSPC
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CHERRY HEERING—per bottle:....,.. $5.00
HENESSEY’S X.O. BRANDY—wper bottle, $13.00
PEAK FREANS CHEESE & TOMATO SALAD 1
STICKS—per tin Saearakebivig $1.10 Big j HT S
5 1%
3 HEINZ & AYLMERS BABY FOODS % |%
1% 8c, per tin or 90¢. per dozen % %
§ By
x al is ‘ 4 P z ; 2 1%
% PERLSTEIN BEER—1i8c. per bottle or $4.00 per carton % Is PHOENIX SODA
x UNE ‘ 219
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VOD PSOOOOOS
SOC PESFOOPEED SOC COLO SSS Se

Wants Govt.
To Purchase
Playing Field

On the suggestion of Mr. D. G.
Leacock jnr., the Vestry yesterday
declared their willingness to asx
Government to consider the im-
mediate purchase of the Carring-
ton’s Village playing field. This
was one of the sites recommended
by the Playing Fields Committee .

Mr. Leacock pointed out that 1
was a playing field for over 20
years and was in reasonably good
condition, It was in a crowded
area and would continue to serve
the large number of people there
Besides, the Barbados Co-opera-
tive Bank had offered it to the
Government at a very reasonable
price. He thought the Govern-
ment should purchase it before the
Bank carried out its intention to
cut it up into house spots.

The matter was raised when the
Vestry were cons'dering a lette:
from the Colonial Secretary ask-
ing them to reconsider their deci-
sion to assist in the acquisition
and conversion of sites for play-
ing fields,

He also inquired if it were
still the desire that the proposai
about the Friendship playing field
should be attended to as the next
priority after the Princess Alice's
er whether prior attention shoulo
be given to any other,



Mr. Leagock pointed out that
though !the Friendship playing
field should certainly be acquired,
it was more desirable that the
Carrington's Village playing field
should be given priority.

He expressed annoyance that
after all the trouble the com-
mittee had taken in selecting and
recommending the sites, the
Vestry and the committee inci
dentally, should have been treated
as they had been, There was
no doubt at all, he said, that
wheever occupied the position of
Social Welfare Officer, was not
in @ position to examine detailed
estimates of building and con-
struction costs, This was a mat
ter he thought that should be
left in the hands of someone from
the Public Works.

Mr. Victor Chase seconded Mr
Leacock’s mation and said that
the Carrington’s Village playing
field was almost fully developed
while the Friendship playing fiela
would have now to be hammerec

into shape.
The Vestry finally decided to
reply to the Colonial Secretary

agreeing to carry out his request,
provided thht the Social Welfare

Cfficer had nothing further to do
with the playing fields. They
also suggested that they should

work with someone ‘from the
Public Works Department who
knew about building construction
It was decided to include in the
reply, the suggestion about the
Carrington’s Village playing field



oe
SEE
SS



FRESH ARRIVALS

AT

WEATHERHEAD'S

EVERY BITE A DELIGHT!

Fry's “Hazel, Nut” Choc’s:
2/-, 3/9 and $1.79 Box
8/- per 1-lb. Tin,

Fry’s “Princess” Choc’s:
94c, and $1,69 Box
Cadbury's “Red Rose” Choc’s
98c. and $1.80 Box
FRY'S “Scorched Almonds”

2/- Box,
$2.02 per 1-lb, Tin

Cadbury's “Milk Tray”
Choe's:

' 90c. and $1.48 tin

Cadbury's “Roses” Choe’s:


























90c. and $1.48 tin
Cadbury's Choc, Biscuits
5/- and 5/3 tin
Meltis Coffee Choe:
Creams $1.23 box
Nestle’s Asst, Choc:
$1.19 and $2.12 box
Black Magic Choc: $4.06 box
Salted Peanuts ,... 64c. tin
Jacob's Cream Crackers
6/- tin
Jacob's “Selected”
$2.06 tin
Jacob's “Asst, Creams” Bis-

Mint

Biscuits

QUE bd Ges se $1.51 tin
Jacob's “Family Asst.” Bis-
WORLTOIE dhs cache se $1.47 tin

Meltis Favourite Candies —
$1.02 and $1.85 box
Carr’s “Club Cheese” Bis-

cuits $1.00 tin
Glucose Barley Sugar —
60c. and $1.02 tin
Sharp's Toffee —-
), 60c,, 78c. & $1.02
Collard & Bowses “Nougat”
34c. and 70c.
Collard & Bowses ‘“Butter-
scotch” ..,. 2le. & 45c.
Ovaltine Biscuits .. 43c. Box
Blue Bird Toffee... .42c¢. tin





_

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Street









cannot be repeated.
Buy
NOw

In Black only. Per Pair

St. Thomas Vestry

PAGE FIVE

Will Ask



Govt. For Playing Field

The St. Thomas Vestry decided at their meeting yesterday
to ask the Government to take steps in providing a playing
field or playing fields for the parish. _

Mr. K. Sandiford made the
motion and he was seconded by
Mr. W. T. Gooding. There was

an equal division of the Vestry
and the Chairman, Rev. Shepherd,
gave his vote in favour of Mr
sandiford’s motion

The Ves.ry was at the time dis-
cussing the appointment of a
“Playing Fields” Committee,

Mr. Sandiford said that
“Playing Fields" Committee of
1950 did not succeed in getting
playing fields for the parish be-
cause the estimate they made was
too high.

He thought it best in the inter-
est of the parish that that Com
mittee be changed and so he was
proposing Mr. Reeves, Mr. Collins
and Mr. Watson.

Mr. V. E. Reeves said that it
was not wise for the Vestry to
appoint a Playing Fields Commit-
tee.

the



36 ins. wide

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House Repairs
He said that the money the
Government was being asked to
spend on providing playing fields
should pe spent on repairs to the
homes of poor people of the par-
ish.

Mr. M. Collins agreed with Mr.
Reeves. He said that the parish
had no need for playing fields.

Mr. Sandiford moved that the
Vestry write the Government in-
forming them that no member of
the Vestry was prepared to serve
on the Playing Fields Committee
in view of the fact that estimates
prepared by the “Playing Fields”
Committee and submitted to the
Government was not favourably
considered. It was therefore the
feeling ef that Vestry that the
Government should take steps to
provide a playing field or playing

@ On Page 7
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PAGE SIX BARBADOS, ADVOCATE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1951
(exes nner seneneteeneenenees











a
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~ @ Gets skin really clean se ted
© Banishes perspiration odour Tak: this opportunity of obtaining your req

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Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that
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daily baths. dex is ideal for family use.

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from }4 in. upwards

MILD STEEL
————— Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes

CAN EPILEPSY BE CURED? BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes

What is epilepsy? We only know that ment has been found that relieves at-
since time began it has attacked rich _ tacks in most cases. This remarkable








and poor alike, great and humble, Julius —_ medicine is described in an interesting TER CLOT H~— i tton Twill
; Caesar, Napoleon and Byron were vic- booklet entitled “Can Epilepsy be FIL 0 White Co
tims. Epilepsy has always interested Cured?" This booklet is giyen away free At PRICES that cannot be repeated.
+ ‘men of science and at last their efforts to epileptics. Anyone suffering from
[... THEY NEVER RECOVER FROM THE Dante ted mere ener eens» Note, (hs Slanene Ghats EUS PLONE. |
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< wi Z = lease send me a copy of the free booklet entitied "Can Epilepsy be Cured?” The BARBADOS tell
+ 2 ' BR cine cinies ' - :
1 Pte Reenter eee ifar sittin: teats ae hte eer rere e ee 1 WHITE PARK ROAD. ST, MICHAEL

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hie



The Advocate Co’ Ltd’, will publish a Year Book of Barbados
ates in 1951,

The Year Book will contain three parts:—

| were stu \/ ‘\ DO YOU RECOGNIZE
/ ned THIS MAN @



(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know ut
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.

(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar, e
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels asé ne;

A TOUPEE ON
. -PRIDAY |
\se?9





(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisc-
tions immediately or not later than April 15th 1951.

etc. HAI QR |
TONIC /Baes/

VASELINE is the registeres trad+ taark of
Chesebrough Manufacturing Co., Cons’ 1 ee










THE PHANTOM

LU We GOT OUR \\. AND WE CAN'T GET OFF
RG) MOTORCYCLES") \ THE GROUNDS
WE'LL SPLIT UP«

HIM. s<———(CAND MEET IN TOWN J gp
bay eerie
\e . | “ioe
Kor ahs














> :

See Us for the
following :-—
Tins PEANUT BUTTER
Bots. SALTED PEANUTS
Packages DATES
Tins KRAFT CHEESE &

MACARONI
Bots. KRAFT

MAYONNAISE
1 & 2lb Tins HAMS

Tins RABBIT

Tins GUAVAS

Tins SWEET CORN

1b Tins C & E MORTON’S
PEARL BARLEY

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951.
Advertisers are asked to get in touch with












I'M WITHYOU, PETE. JEFF
GOIN’ SOFT FER THE DAME.
T MEANS TROUBLE. AH



EFF, SHE MIGHT GET AWAY ANY
..CTiME 2 HAVE TO WATCH HER ate)





Â¥2

| SAY TAKE HER WITH US.

NOBODY LLSHOOT AT US

IF SHE'S ALONG: ee
oJ

Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager,
Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to

SSNS 8 ESS



ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be INCE & Co., Ltd.
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951. 6, 7, 8 & 9 Roebuck Street,
(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION) Dial 2238 i

————— ee

{
‘ it
————————————— SS SS aaa}

Sao ~——~ eee







} t







FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2,

CLASSIFIED ADS.|\Mr. Griffiths Comments’

1951

TELEPHONE 2508



DIED



GREAVES — HENPIETTA, Age 96. On
Feb. Ist 1951 at Geneva, Garrison. Fu-
neral took place at Westbury Cemetery
on the sime afternoon

2.2.51—In.
Siaasinaiashghatalainainiealigadinmcaciuiniiniatidiitepamrindeoiedan
MORRIS — Exired Neilson Late of
R.A.F. On 31st Jan. 1951 at St. Pancras
Hospital, London, England. Son of Mr.
& Mrs. D. D. Morris, Station Hill, St.
Michael 2.2.51—1n.



IN MEMORIAM



HUNTE—In loving memory of our: dear
mother Mrs. Rachael Hunte who was
called to rest on 2nd February 1949.

How often we have trod the path,

That leads us to the grave,

Where lies the one we love so well,

But whom we could not «save,

At night when all is silent,

And sleep forsakes our eyes,

Our thoughts are on the lonely grave,

Where our dear mother lies,

Ever to be remembered by
children and grand-children

The Hunte Family, Culloden Road.

2.2.51-—1n.

her



eee eaeenenreseresenanscsinseamena apace
PARRIS—In lovng memory of our dear
husband and father Gerald Parris who
was laid to rest on the 2nd of February
1948.
“If love and care could death prevent
But God alone knew what was best

When he took dear Dad, home to

rest."

Ever to be remembered by the
Family, (U.S.A. Papers please copy).

2.2.51—In,

—————

SEALY—In loving memory of my beloved

daughter Gwendolyn Sealy who fell
asleep on February 2nd 1950.

My sorrow and heartache no one can

heal

My memory a keep sake no one
can steal

My dear one has gone though not

far away

For we'll meet in the garden of

memories each day
Ever to be remembered by her dear
mother, Beryl Layne.
2.2.51—In.

FOR SALE
____ AUTOMOTIVE _





CAR—Standard 14 hp. Saloon in
excellent condition, ‘always owner
driven. an be seen at Chelsea Garage

(1950) Ltd., Pinfold Street.
2.2,.51—3n,

ee
CAR—Hillman 1948, excellent condition,

always owner driven. Telephone 2672.
1,2,51—2n,

CAR—Humber Snipe 1938. Mileage
33,000 in good running order. Can be
peen at DUNSINANE, COUNTRY
ROAD, by arrangement with Mrs, M.
Gieaves. Phone 95249. 1.2.51—3n.

eee
CAR — One 5 passenger Sedan Terro-
plane recently overhauled and in perfect
working order price $400, Ring 91-24,.
Lighthouse, St, Lucey. 27.1,51—?n.

PICK- UP-TRUCKS — New Vanguard |
Pick-up Trucks and Delivery Van.
Special Low prices, Phone 4264 for
demonstration, Chelsea Garage (1950)
Ltd., Pinfold Street. 2.2.51—3n

TRACTOR - Catapillar Diesel D 4.
Tractor, Excellent condition. Phone 4629,
1.2.51—2n.

ELECTRICAL

a
PHILIPS ELECTRIC RAZOR, as new.
Magnet Electric Cooker in good condi-
tion. Apply: Emtage Electrical Company.
31.1,.51—8n. |

MISCELLANEOUS

—_————
BUY IGLODINE EMBROCATION for
Rheumatism, Backache, Lumbago and
Sprains Ce. per bottle. Get from your
Chemist to-day, THE STANDARD

AGENCY (B'DOS) CO., Agents.
1.2.51—8n.

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade, A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n.

———————_—______
INFANT'S PORTABLE TREASURE
COT with fibre mattress—practically new.











Ring 4729. 1,2.51—€n.
LISBON YAMS at “Francia”, — St.
George, Dial 3226. 1,2.51—3n.



YAMS—Bottle neck Lisbon delicious

foy eating, delivered in city and suburbs
at $3.00 per 100 lbs. Dial 3485, Upton
Plantation. 1.2.51—4n,



WANTED

_



A Vaeancy exists with the Nationa!
Cash Register Company's Agents for an
Apprentice Mechanic. Applications are
invited from individuals between the ages
of 19 and 22, who possess the following

attributes: Education to School Certifi-
cate Standard; mechanical aytitude;
initiative personality. The successful

applicant will be required to undergo a
three to six months probationary period
in Barbados, followed by a similar
period of training in Trinidad. Salary
during the periods of probation and
training will be between $45.00 and
$76.00 per month depending on the age
and experience of the individual. Appli-
cotants must be of European Origin.
Apply in writing only giving full par-
ticulars, and submitting a passport
photograph to The National Cash Register
Co’s., Agents, c/o T. Geddes Grant, Ltd,
Bolton Lane. 1.2,51—3n

~ —
FOWLS for eating. apply: Geoffrey

Jones Green Dragon, Chinese Restaurant,
Broad Street. 1.2,51—t.f.n.

‘LOST & FOUND

i LOST

WALLET—Will the finder of a wallet
between Swan and James Street please
keep wallet and money but return
papers to this office. 2.2.51—In.

GOLD WRIST CHAIN — Somewhere
between “Arundel”, St. Lawrence, a
gcld wrist chain with half sovereign
pendant and gold padlock clasp, Finder
please notify ‘Advocate’. Good reward
paid. 2.2.51—1n,













FOR RENT
HOUSES





BELLA VISTA,
March Ist. Fully
levge Refrigerator,
water, electric
Double Garage

Bathsheba, fror
furnished, Including
3 bedrooms, running
light and telephone.
and 4 servants’ rooms.
Apply 96221, Mrs. J. W. Chandler,
Todds Estate, 2.2.51—3n.
—_—

FURNISHED HOUSE, STEWART

VILLE-—Hastings on seaside. Tel. 2904
2.1.51—2n

BUNGALOW — Newly constructed

concrete Bungalow at Enterprise Road,
Christ Church. Modern new furniture,
Phone 3535. 28.1.51.—3n,

eer tesnaeenienin ontene—
STORAGE SPACE suitable for making
Bonds and Warehouses.. Apply K. R.
Tkunte & Co, Ltd. Dial 4611,
1,2.51—6n.
“SWANSEA” — A comfortable fully
furnished Bungelow at Worthing, 4 Bed-
ooms, Fridge, Telephone, Radio, Garage
und available immediately. Dial 3578 or
2490. 2.2,51—3n



sensei reeeretnesinhacienesnineeahehetghistnenieres

TRINITY COTTAGE—St. James Coast.
Fully furnished containing 3 bedrooms
Available for months of February to May
and August to December 1951. Phone
2959. 21.1.51—2n,



PUBLIC NOTICES

“£25° -. -d, easily earned by obtaining

order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making
opportunity. Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
England.”







25.1.51—18n

NOTICE

The sale of ‘Roaches’ Plantation has
been withdrawn. The sale of “THE
CAVE” Plantation will contirue and the
Cave Plantation will be set_up at Public
Action to-morrow 2nd Febouary instant
at 2 p.m. at our Office, James Street
The area of the Cave





ntation is 40
neres 3 reods made up follows: 20
acres arable, 20 acres 3 roods curtilage

frass land and roads
YEARWOOD & ROYCE,





Soliettors:
51- in
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
REMOVAL

The application of Posalie Scott of
Hillaby, St. Andrew, granted in respect
ef a board and galvanize shop with
shedroof attached at Hillaby, St. Andrew
for permission to remove said license tc
a board and galvanize shop attached to
house at Hillaby, St. Andrew.

Dated this 30th day of January 1951.
To J. R. EDWARDS, Eszq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. fi

Signed SEYMOUR, GILL,
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “F", on Friday,
{the 9th day of February, 1951, at
11 o'clock, a.m,





J. R, EDWARDS,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “F".
2,2.51—1n.

PUBLIC SALES
REAL ESTATE

PROPERTY—At 69 Roebuck Street
A two storey Wall Building on 4.362







sa. ft. of land. Downstairs, Store,
Store Rooms and Garage. Upstairs, 4
Bediooms, Drawing and Dining rooms
ete. Electric Light and Power. Price
£4000, nearest offer treated “eon-
fidentially. Apply to M. Abbadi or
phonb 2297. 1,2,51—4n,





SPRINGHAM—The dwelling house at
Springham, White Park Road. Building
to be removed, Apply D. V. Scott &
Co, Ltd. 12.1,51—t.f.n.

MARSHVILLE Bank Hall main road
standing on 5,445 square feet of land,
Dwelling house comprises closed ver-
andah, drawing and dining ‘rooms,
three bedrooms, breakfast room toilet
and bath, Government water and elec-
tricity installed. This property will be
offered for sale to public competition
at our office James Street, on Friday,
2nd February, 1951 a 2 p.m.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to Hutchinson & Banfield,
James Street.

17.1.5!—6n.

The undersigned will offer for sale by
public competition at their office, No. 17,
High Street, on Thursday the 8th day
of February, 1951, at 2 p.m, the dwelling-
house called

THE BOWER
with 7,444 square feet of land situate
at The Garrison, containing 2 verandahs,
2 public rooms, 2 bedrooms, toilet, bath,
kitchen, etc. Garage, servants rooms and
enclosed garden,

The sale may be made with or with-
out the furniture,

Vacant possession will be given.

Further particulars from

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
30.1.61—9n.







fOR KENT, SALE OR LEASB

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din
ing room, Breakfast room and Kitchen-
ette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone.
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1,51,—6n.

AT TOP ROCK—Delightful ‘residence
having 3 Bedrooms, large Lounge, sepa-
rate Dining Room, 2 fully Tiled Toilets
and Bath, modern Kitchen, built in &
Car Garege 2 Servants Quarters, standing
on nearby half an sero, Price £4,500
nearest offer. For viewing apply Ralph
A. Beard, Hardwood Alicy or Phone







4683. 26.1.51—én
MAIL NOTICES

Mails for St. Vincent, Martinique,

Antigua, St. Kitts, St. Thomas, V.L,

New York by the s,s. Fort Amherst will
be closed at the General Post Office
ag under:—

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered

Mail at 1 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30
p.m, on areata 7th February, 1951

WISE...
- ADVERTISE





GOVERNMENT NOTICES



BARBADOS GOVERNMENT SAVINGS BANK.

IT IS notified for the information of the General Public that with
effect from the 5th of February, 1951, the Government Savings Bank
will be removed to the opposite wing of the Public Buildings in the
premises recently vacated by the Parcel Post Branch of the General

Post Office.

2.2.51—2n



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ST. MATTHIAS’ GIRLS’ SCHOOL—CHRIST CHURCH. _
Applications are invited for the Headship of the St. Matthias

Girls’ School from teachers (women) with at least 10 years’ teach-

ing experience.

The minimum professiqnal qualification required is

the Certificate A of the Department or exemption therefrom.

Salary will be in

accordance with the Government Scale for

Head Teachers in Grade II Elementary Schools.

Candidates who

have already

submitted application forms in

respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, accom- |

panied by a recent testimonial.

All other candidates should make

application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the |

Department of Education

lopes marked “Appointments Board”
must reach the Department of Educat
1951.

30th January, 1951.

in the top left hand corner
Saturday, 10th

ton by

_r

2.91—3dr



BARBADOS Oe

On Customs Union

MR. JAMES GRIFFITHS in a
letter to the Governor cf Barbados
dated 22nd Dec., 1950, from
Church House, London, makes
the following comments on the
Report of the Commission on the
Establishment of a Customs Union
in the British Caribbean area.

“This Report,” he writes, “which
is a Worthy companion to those
of the Standing Closer Association
Committee and the Commission
on the Unification of the Public
Services, merits the most careful
and serious consideration, For it
will be recalled that, in paragraph
10 of the Memorandum on Closer
Association of the British West
Indian Colonies, which formed an
enclosure to my predecessor's cir-
cular despatch of the 14th Febru-
ary, 1947 (Cmd, 7120), it was
stated that ‘probably no other
single reform would bring such
benefit to the colonies concerned
as the establishment of a full cus-
toms union, or at any rate a com-
mon customs tariff’. Furthermore,
the Standing Closer Association
Committee expressed the view
that a customs union is ‘the foun-
dation of a _ federal structure’
(paragraph 30 of the Committee's
Report).

“The fiscal Sub-Committee ap-
pointed at the Montego Bay Con-
ference in 1947 to submit proposals
on the question of customs union
recorded, in paragraph 12 of its
Report, that the establishment of
a customs union would result
in: —

(a) the encouragement of inter-
colonial trade, which would
naturally be duty-free
within the union;
the establishment of uni-
formity in tariff rates and
customs administration;
increased efficiency in the
collection of revenue;
the strengthening of the
position of the British
Caribbean territories as far
as bargaining power is con-
cerned in relation to inter-
national trade agreements;
the encouragement of local
industries.

“The Commission readily sub-
scribes to the Fiscal Sub-Commit-
tee’s views, observing that ‘Freer
commercial exchange between the
British Caribbean territories
would undoubtedly foster a more
varied economy through the area’.
It also expressed the view that
the establishment of a customs
union is not dependent on politi-
eal federation but that it would
‘inevitably tend towards creating
conditions inviting closer political
unity’ (paragraphs 11, 12 and 63
of the Report).

“Although the Commission indi-
cates a method by which a cus-
toms union might be achieved in
stages, it feels that since the
obstacles to be overcome in its
establishment are so few and the
desire for an early measure of
fiscal and economic unity so gen-
eral, anything in the nature of a
transitional period is neither
necessary nor expedient, It
recommends, therefore, the estab-
lishment at the earliest opportun-
ity of a customs union embracing
all the British Caribbean territor-
ies, with the exception, for the
time being, of the British Virgin
Islands and the Jamaican Depen-
dencies of the Cayman and the
Turks and Caicos Islands (para~
graphs 71 and 136—140).

“One of the most valuable of
the Commission’s achievements
has been the preparation of a
common tariff structure and a
common classification for trade
statistics (paragraphs 32—43), In
this connection, however, I must
draw your attention to the follow-
ing points. The Commission took
as the framework for its tariff
structure and statistical classifica-
tion (Part I of the First Schedule
to the Draft Ordinance at Appen-
dix B), the Minimum List of
Commodities for International
Trade Statistics published by the
League of Nations in 1938, antici-
pating that the revised version of
it, on which the United Nations
Statistical Commission was engag-
ed when the Commission was at

(b)

(ce)
(d)

(e)

work, would emerge with com-
paratively few changes, thus
making it a_ relatively simple

matter to align the Commission's
recommendations with the United
Nations List when it was publish-
ed. The United Nations Statistical
Commission has now completed
its labours, and its list, which is
called the ‘Standard International
Trade Classification’, was approv-
ed by the Economic and Social
Council in July, Unfortunately
it represents rather more of a
departure from the League of
Nations ‘Minimum List’ than the
Commission had any reason to
expect. His Majesty’s Govern-
ment have not yet made known
their views regarding a_ possible
change-over from the present
classification used in the United
Kingdom for primary statistical
purposes to the new ‘Standard
International Trade Classification’.
(I might mention here that the
Colonial Government Statisticians,
at their conference in March,
were not able to conside? the final
draft of the United Nations Clas-
sification as it was not available
to them at that time; they did,
however, express the view that
the extent to which such a classi-
fication was used by the United
Kingdom would influence colonial
territories — see paragraph 24 of
the Report on the Conference, en-
closed with my circular despatch
of the 3lst August, 1950.) I am
hopeful that a decision by His
Majesty's Government will not be
long delayed, and I will communi-
cate it to you with my comments
as soon as possible. Meanwhile,
I am unable to give you any

idance other than that His

ajesty’s Government would not
favour the adoption at this date
of the old “Minimum List’ for
tariff or statistical purposes.

“The Commission's proposals for
a common tariff (paragraphs 73
to 89), particularly those relating
to margins of preference, repre-
sent, in my opinion, a reasonable
balance in general conformity with
the spirit of the General Agree-
ment on Tariffs and Trade. But
you will be aware that, under
Article XXIV (7) of that Agree-
ment (as amended—see page 34 of
Cmd. 8048 ‘Provisional Consoli-
dated.-Text of the General Agree-
ment on Tariffs and -Trade and
Texts of Related Documents’.
copies of which were -transmitted



All applications must be enclosed in enve- ja Customs Union to the Contract-
and

February,

to Coionial Governments under
feover of my circular savingram

cf the 24th November, 1950), it is
| necessary to submit any plan

dopted for the establishment of
ing Parties for their approval; anc
there is always the p ility that



iy ask for modi
Pari igraphs 17
1 | Report deal with

(

ation

oat te





the



the quest o1

free trade and its effect on
revenues. This aspect of customs
unicn will need to receive very
clese attention since the estab-
lishment of a free trade area
would result in a loss of revenue
te each colony in respect of the
duties hitherto collected on duti-
able goods ‘mported from © or
exported to other member col-
onies. It is however, to be noted
that the Commission consider
that, while the loss could to some
extent be reduced by the levying
of excise duties on the lines pro-
posed in Chapter V of the Report,
and to a lesser extent by reserv-
ing to member colonies the right
to continue to levy export duties
as indieated in Chapter Vi, it
would prebably, in the main, be
mere than met by the operation
of a scientifically balanced com-
mon external tariff,

“I do not propose at this stage
to comment in any detail on the
Draft Model Customs Ordinance
er the Draft Customs Regulations
which form Appendices B and C
to the Report. There are, how-
éver, various points in them which
would require consideration, anc
I should, therefore, wish to b«
given an opportunity of studying
in draft any legislation whict
might be contemplated.

“In paragraphs 44 to 49 thc

Commission make various pro-
pesals for the mechanical anc
centralised compilation of trad

and revenue statistics, the adop-
tion of which should effect con
siderable improvement on existin;
precedure. Recent developments
however, bring a new possibility
into consideration—that work or
centralised mechanical tabula-
tions could be shaved betweer
Jamaica and Trinidad. As regard:
the statement in paragraph 4
that “in regard to the form it
which statistical material wher
abstracted can best be presented
the Commission understands thai
the question is at present receiv-
ing consideration by the Colonia
Office”, it will be recalled tha
at the above-mentioned Confer-
ence of Colonial Governmen
Statisticians, it was agreed ‘tha
a uniform layout of Trade
Accounts was not essential at the
present time, although some
degree of regional uniformity
was desirable” (paragraph 26 oi
the Revert of the Conference).

“The Report is now to be con-
sidered by the Legislatures. ]
realise, of course, the very sub-
stantial task they already have
in hand in their examination of
the two other Reports mentioned
in paragraph 2 above: but I hope
that it will be possible for them

to address themselves to the
study of this Report in the near
future, and I shall await the
outcome of their deliberations

The decision
or not a customs

with great interest.
as to whether

union shall be established rests
primarily with them; and His
Majesty's Government does not
wish to prejudge or influence

their decision. The Legislatures
may find it convenient to confine
themselves for the time being to
the consideration of the main
issue, namely, the desirability
and practicability of establishing
a Customs Union in the light of
fhe arguments and factors set
out in the Report. If, as I hope
may be the case, they all agree to
the establishment of such an
Union, I would suggest that the
details might be worked out by
a committee containing repre-
sentatives of the various terri-
tories, possibly the proposed
regional economic committee,
referred to in my despatch No. 105
of the 17th November, 1950, if
it
body.
assistance which I can render
governments in this matter
way of advice or in any other
form,
give it.”

St. Thomas Vestry

From page 5.
fields in that parish for the use
of the people.

Mr. Gooding said that he was
seconding the motion because the
Government could not take money
allocated for one purpose and
spend it on another.

“Glendale House”

Coming up again for discussion
was the repairing of “Glendale
House”

A motion made by Mr. Reeves
and seconded by Hon. G. Mahon,
that the entire Vestry visit “Glen-
dale House” before making repairs
to it was carried.

The following appointments
were made: —

Building Committee: Mr. W.
Gooding, Mr. J. Thorne, Mr. I.
Collins, Mr. K. Sandiford and Mr.
V. Reeves.

Old Age Pensions Claims Com-

Meanwhile, if there is any
to



mittee: Mr. W. Gooding and Mr.
V. Reeves.
Present at the meeting were

Rev, H. C. Shepherd (Chairman),
Mr. W. T. Gooding (Churchwar-
den), Hon. G. Mahon, Mr. K.
Sandiford, Mr. L. D. Gill, Mr.

E. Reeves, Mr. M. Collins and
Mir A. Cave,

U.N. Brand
Communist China

@ From Page 1

In Britain, Clement Attlee,
speaking in the House of Com-
mons said: “From the close and
constant contact which we have
maintained with many Govern-
ments supporting the resolution,
it is clear they share our view of
the importance and urgency of the
taak entrusted to the Good Offices
Committee and wish to see it
begin its work as soon as the
resolution has been approved by a
plenary meeting of the General
Assembly.”

“It is my earnest hope, that the
Central People’s Government of
China will respond to any efforts
which may be made by the Good
Offices Committee to bring about
a cease-fire and a negotiated
settlement in the Far East”,

Winston Churchill leader of the
Conservatives said: “We are par-
ticularly relieved to feel that no
breach between Britain and the
United States could occur at such
a grave juncture of their fortunes”

Attlee did not answer when left |
wing Labour member, Ian Mik-}

is decided to establish that!

by |

I shall be most willing el










|
|
|
|
|

ardo said that the passage of the |
resolution at this time must make |
task of the Good Offices Cor
ttee more difficult than



ld otherwise be—Reuter



Fes






















ly situated and suitable far con+

”
CAROL version into flats or boarding





PAGE SEVEN





































SS SSS SSS GO OPPOSES ODO DOTIOOT 9 |
Â¥
N NESS FOR %
THANK GOCD ‘oO s w ANTE D S|
G AS ° é 4 > | a a a
é S bars tities Local %| ROYAL NETHERLANDS . ee
os iS Large Quantities Local § S 4
: | STEAMSHIP CO, uae ae
| Starch y Sailing from Amsterdam, Dover and ae as M4 . he oe a wil
. s gn aed ve accepting Carg assenge
; Required by . . . Di eeriaty. 1051. M.S. “Bonaire” Sth, | 1] for Dominica, Antigua, Monteer-
who has to get the children Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdain- he ~~
off to school early WEST INDIAN KNITTING m.s. “Helena’ ), 18th, February 1953, Saceesay 25m
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at

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advance the present Surcharge from 20% to

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onwards,

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General Manager.

Readers and Subscribers to the

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in Horse

to note that we have appointed
MR. S. A. DURANT our Dis-
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Please contact Mr. Durant, Horse
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PAGE

Land Police Defeat
‘The Rest’ By 28 Runs

Cup Presented To Skipper Byer

EIGHT



THE annual three day cricket fixture between Land Police
and The Rest ended yesterday in a win by 23 runs for Land
Police XI which was skippered by J. Byer at Queen’s Park.





After play a Cup was presented
by Mr. J. -W. B. Chenery to! J.
Byer captain of the winning team

. + q
Empire Team
Before the presentation Major R.

Baek Home A . Stoute thanked Mr. Chenery

attending and taking such
interest in the annual game

MR. J. SE. 7,

M.C.\P., Manager of the Empire

Club Sports team which has jus

toured Grenada playing

BRANCKER Befcre presenting the Cup Mi

. Chenery said that he thoroughly
enjoyed the game and was pleased
cricket footâ„¢=all a aeriFs of by the efforts of both sides. He
ey eee and = tennis cid that it gave him great pleasure
matches and eigiit members of the j,¢ present the Cup and was looking
team reiurned from Grenada yes- ¢orward’ to reeing Mullins | or

terday by B.W.I.A. Members ©. Bradshaw represent the island in

the team mao: rrived were Everton the forthcoming cricket tourna-

Weekes, Maurice Jones, O. M_ ment with ‘Trinidad at the Oval

Robinson, Eric Amory, Adzi

Holder, Sydney Rudder, Winston On the’ first day of play The

Grant ard Milton, Crichlow Rest won the toss and sent in

Land Police to bat and they scored

C. G. Alleyne, Captain and the 71 runs in their first turn at the

remaining members of the team wicket °

ere expected to return tomorrow mi

The team left here on January 15 C. Griffith topscored wth 16
Chief interest locaily in th> while C. Neblett took three

wickets for nine runs bowling for
The Rest. A patient 26 by Chel-
tenham helped The Rest to gain ¢
first innings lead over Land Police
when they replied with 120 runs

Empire—Grenada tour is the per-
formance of voung Adzil Holder

Old Combermerian and find on
the Empire team. With the fortn-
comin® visit of a Trinidad team
te Brrbados later this month, and The Land Police at their second
a noticeable dearth of good slow turn at the w:cket knocked up 21}
bowlers here, news of Holdet’s ) ne for the loss of seven wickets
performance is of special interest. qoclared, Skipper Byer playing a
Everton Weekes, International skipper’s innings by knocking up
Barbados all-rounder when asked 3 preezy 87 :

ana

what he thought of Holder's ver-

formance in Grenada had this to With 167 runs to score for
say, “I think he should be given victory Marshall and B. Brewster
a ehance in one of the trials right ned again for The Rest but



farshall and Cheltenham were the
only two batsmen that showed any
resistance to the steady bowling of



away. He can certainly spin the
ball, He may not get selected but
it would be a great experience for



him, He deserves it.” Sealy and Callender, Cheltenham
scored 46 and Marshall 40 out of
Holder is the s'ow ieft arm the 143 runs that The Rest made
spinner of the Empire team, and jin their second innings.
a newcomer to big cricket. He Sealy took three wickets for 14
performed the hat trick in
Grenada, ‘
7 .
Weekes thought the bowler on Windwards Hit

the Grenada team who showed the
most promise was Rolle, a Domi-
nican, He is a left-arm fast bowler

Weekes is to. be married to-
morrow afternoon Miss Joan
Manning at Michael's
Cathedral.

Mr. Brancker agreed with
Weekes about Holder's good per-
formance, “The first time w:
noticed his spin,” Mr, Brancker
said, was during a Sunday mateb>
at “Retreat” St. Joseph before we
went to Grenada.

89 For 5 Wkts.
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

ST. LUCIA, Feb. 1.

Heavy showers on Wednes y

and early to-day delayed the start

of the second Test here between
Windwards and Leewards.

to
St.



Windwards won the toss and
batted all afternoon on a wicket
taking turn, The batsmen were
subdued by steady bowling
throughout and Livingstone had

a splendid spell.

His analysis was 15/4/22,3
Runs were limited due to the very
heavy outfield. The fielding was
not good owing to the condition of
the ground,

Qne of the best batsmen on the
Grenada team, Mr. Brancker said,
was Willie Rapier, one-time stu
dent at Lodge School. He said
that they had had a very success-
ful tour and everyone in Grenada
had gone out of their way to give
the team an enjoyable time



Four changes were made in thre
Windwards team and one in the
Leewards,

WINDWARDS FIFST INNINGS

Crick c. Livingstone, b, Kirnon
Daisley c. wkpr, Thompson, b

Neil Franklin Will
Play For Hull City

, HULL, Feb, 1. OAInth b. Livingstone i

Neil Franklin, Stoke City and ‘thomas ¢. and b. Livingstone
England centre-half. “who was Deterville not ve 0
suspended by the Football * eeu ens tien 4
Association for playing in Bogota, .
South America, today signed for Total for 5 wickets 89
Hull City, Second Division Club. — yan of wickets: 1-2, 2-32, 3-58, 4—~

The transfer fee of £22,500 71, 5—%6. FO a
is a record for the Hull ten inet ouigston S for 22.

club, for whom Franklin will play

against Blackburn’ Rovers’ oa SEE
Saturday. He has not played in

STE

BARBADOS

LAND

MR. J. W. PB. CHENERY
defeated The Rest by



By Pad

If you want an inkling of the vast sums that the
public spends annually on sports you have only to take a
look at the Madison Square Garden receipts.

The
existence
time its
features
of which

New

25

Garden
years

gross

been in
and in that
gates from ail
run sround $200,000,000
about .90 per cent was
drawn by sports events,

The Garden, of course,
mecea for all athletes, because t
win a title in any sport there
means not only national acclaini
but, in the case of the profes-
sionals, the title can be converted
into a fortune.

Probably more titles have
changed hands in more sports iu
the Garden than in any other arena
the world has ever known,

It has staged all the major sports

has

is tue

events that can be held indoors
Fights, wrestling—when wrestling
was considered a sport—hockey,

tennis, basketball, track and field,
ice skating, rodeos, six-day bike
grinds and horseshoes,

The sports temple has rocked to

the roars of crowds cheering
everybody who was anybody in
the last quarter century in the
sports wor!ld.

It would be ridiculous to
attempt to say which individual

the greatest thrills
for the fans, because where one
sports lover will respond to the
nile relay in a track meet, another
wets his greatest kick out of a
knockout or a great goal scored 14
hockey.

But there is no doubt about the
greatest great attractions the gar-
den has had. No doubt whatever,
because the cold figures tell the

has supplied

These prize magnevs for the elu-
sive dollar have been Sonja Henie
and Beau Jack. The little Ice
Queen has drawn as much as
$200,000 in a few nights and the
coloured welterweight tops even



English football since the end of
the last season, His suspension
ended at midnight last night.
Franklin was England’s regular
international centre half until his
suspension, and has played in 40
representatives games, including a
number of wartime internationals,
—Reuter.



Britair. Expects

Less Tourists

LONDON. ,

Sir Alexander Maxwell, Chair-
man of the British Travel ana
Holidays Association, predicted
that Britain would not reach it
1951 target of 700,000 foreign
visitors.

Sir Alexander told the associa-
tion’s council that the nation
would be lucky if it equalled thr
1950 figure of 600,000 because of
these “uncertain times.”

He said that “in the light of
the worsening international situa~
tion” the association’s widespread
and aggressive publicity campaiss
had been “scaled down,” particu -
larly in the United States and
Canada,

Instead





of urging tourists to
come to Britain merely for
“pleasure” the association has als»
switched the theme of its publicity
to “business with recreation.’



=O

zi would be one down only.








Sy M. Harriso:. Gray

Dealer: South
Game all
N.
a& 102
V9 I5
SA Wwoas
ais ie
6 Q955
VAQETS Ztoee "
2 542 @AB8B
K5 ‘ &372
AIS
VK 94
@KQ109
86
This hand should have

been played quietly for a
part-score after One Dia-
mond by South, Two Clubs
by North, and a neutral Two
Diamonds by South. Instead
of passing. North bid Three
Clubs. and South tried Three
No-Trumps.

West led ¥ 7 to Dummy's
Â¥ J. East gave South a tem-
pants reprieve by playin
ow when @ 6 was led. ‘and
& 6 followed.
West should play & K to
interrupt the run of the
suit, but in this case he did
well to play low. & 9 was
finessed in the forlorn hope
that West held both missing
Club honours, but a Heart
return from East put the
contract two. down. Had
West played & K at trick 3
he would be allowed to hold
the trick; unless he found
a Diamond switch. South

Normally,







cn MIGHT AS
WELL GO OUT
OF BUSINESS



FOR, HIM TO
ACCUMULATE
THAT PLASTER
FILING SYSTEM






Ui
IM NOT AS
/ SORRY FOR. DAP
AS LAM FOR
IT TOOK YEARS THE POOR BOOKIES
WHO ARE PINING
AWAY, WAITING
FOR HIM TO

3 Joe Louis, $1,500,000 to $1,200,000,
for his Garden bouts.
Incidentally, in the last 25 years
the Garden bouts have drawn
around $27,000,000, with the 1946
indoor season tops at $2,315,000.
We won't bore you with more

figures but let us take a look at
some of the athletes and teams
who have drawn capacity houses,

not once but repeatedly.

Jim Londos when he ruled the

mat used to have them hanging
the rafters. Louis, Beau
who by the way is now

So did
Sonja and She still does.
Canzoneri and

Tony Jimmy

McLarnin, who most of the boys
in the fight racket agree, staged
the most sensational fight the

Garden ever saw,
tling each other and others.
story,

packed it bat-
Both

from
Jack,
broke, jammed the arena



Belleville Tennis

THE results of the tennis tour
nament at the Belleville Club
yesterday were as follows:

MEN'S DOUBLES

Taylor and Dr. C, G

cs follows:
Miss L. Branch and W
Crichlow vs. Mrs. A. A
be _ i A. O'N Skinner
Taylor and
A. F

A. S
Gib.
Ree hry: ee

Jemmuott ae

Manining vs
Kinch





~ __ By



Jimmy § Hatlo oO |











BODY’D CLEAN OFF
THE TOP OF HIS
DESK»: MAYBE
WE'D FIND THE
STONE OF SCONE”




L-WiSH SOME-




















H& HAD
SOME. GALS’
PHONE. NUMBERS

ON THERE SO LONG
THEYRE GRAND-

sanning beat H. L. Toppin andi
Lawless 6—4, 6—1. |
ms games fcr today will be



presenting the Cup to J. Byer,



ADVOCATE

POLICE WEN

Robinsorw

were sure-fire gate attractions. both at Amsterdam and Henley Area—5.00 p.m.

Bill Tilden turned them away beating the British Olympic cham- Mobile Cinema gives show
in tennis. Howie Morenz, the pion, R. D. Burnell and B. H, T. at Chance Hall Plantation
‘cok Brothers, Bun and Bill and Bushnell, each time, Yard, St. Luey—7.30 p.m.
Eddie Shore drew them in for Now Parsner tells me they wiil Police Band plays at Hast-
hockey Glen Curmingham and ~ not race in the double this ings Rocks—8.00 p.m.
Paavo Nurmi meant packed season, but will keep in practice Monthly Reunion at Com-
houses in track. Reggie McNam- for the Olympies of 1952, when bermere Schoo!—8.00 p.m.
ara anda little Italian named they hope to compensate for Film Show at British Coun-
Brocco jammed the joint for six- losing to the British pair in 1948. cil—8.30 p.m.
day grinds. Tte Danes, who won _ the Globe, “Summer Stack” 5 & 8.30

2S yarde as ¢ : Gaiety (St ames) “Roseanna
Pas ag pr di Renda eve ae fours at Henley last McCo/" & “Marshal of Mesa
July, have split up, but another City 8.30
the next 25 will be as good. Danish crew, which beat them al Plaza (Bridgetown) Chain Light-
—I.N.S. home, and then won the Europear: petetic watt. S08 8:90
~ * ‘ ° quatic Club Everybody Does
title in Milan, are to come here} It” 8,30

this summer. Pleza (Oistin) ‘Task Force”
5 & 0,30

|











skipper of the Land Police XI after they
23 runs when their annua! match ended at Queen’s Park yesterday.

Enters For
‘‘Diamonds’’

By HYLTON CLEAVER

AN entry for the
Sculls from Erik Larsen,
sculling champion, leads a
able Danish invasion here,

Larsen partnered

NEW YORK.
American





Financiai Problems

For many years it
great hope in
are an eight. for
pack

MPHER E times

frozen



50 large that the
would practic
one hand i
were
problem

kc this; the Danes have



be !
¢ opponent
to get hold of it The
of discarding the:
becomes most acute

at this stage
bulk of the safe di
fand therefore one or
Natural Canastas) are ¢
in the discard pile You have

'
'
;
;
t
Alrenay
ho black Three and have t&



the
Parsner toinks
able to enter,
representative
which, judging
Championships,
the Italians.

Normally



ae of
by
is

Danish



discard from sets of three or
more cards that have not yet
been shown

conditions, it

Under

is

hese



before the Olympic



throw from where you E ie Paw * invi
s inglish crews are being invited to
nrost in Fos
For example, the pack is Copenhagen in the middle of Cee cient aac. .
trozen and three-quarter way July, 1952. Here they are promised iach at aria cege ea
through 1 hand no one ha . cap Temperature (min.) 13.5° F
yet melded You hold cheap accommodation néar the| : 7 ' '
A u

A. K. K. K. 10
10, 8, 2
If you fati

10 10

to draw a « takes place,













card—ie. one of a kind This invitation might interest Wind Velocity: 19 miles per
: cook nS our O:ympic selectors: it is, hour ; a
expected that England crews willl Baremetor G a.m.) 30.023;
aa be selected in 1952 before Henley (3 pm.) 29.932.
L ‘ ; _— will not take part in he ete aL ee el tee
requisite count tn cast egatta; continental experience} j= = =,
ou are giv chanee > r » £ © re <
taeink tok might therefore be an advantage. Helin Bervboay!
©)—The chances are that. the Another challenger for the Y are } thd at
“more of a kind you hold Diamonds has emerged in ou are invited to attend
the jess. Wkely a your Canada in Jack Guest, junior 1 1 ’
left-hand pppone ‘ ’ ’
hold a pair of thi ‘et a whose father woa in 1930, A GRAND DANCE
Qo the Ten proves sate As he is as yet only 17 __ the ives! try
you now have a reia srodigy’s arrival may be delayed '
tively safe — disc: ‘ peo ays : ms A Mr. DAVID ROW
threa'more founds oo. until 1952, but at the Canadian (better coburn or BERGUE)
neu should on no account Hanley he has just won two events . as AEs
thro t igt C ty 5 ay > Tj | - ? oer
Bash” esen: ae the ‘poeiinit in one day, the High Schoo!) QurEN’'s PARK HOUSE
of your Opponent havina a championship, over a _ mile, in aig ype Ce
air of the s so muct hi tN neceimell. 6 f a
create ae Pe aie eee Oh ee &0)) Saturday Night 3rd Feb, 1951
w—Lks. {| ADMISSION — 2/-

STORE

Announces

As from list February our
business will be removed to

STREET

To mark the event we will
open attractive new stocks
and will be delighted to
welcome our old friends
in the new premises.



Diamond
European
prob-

Ebbe Parsner
when they won the Double Sculls

has been ¢
Denmark to enter
the Grand Challenge
Cup. Expense alone has preventej
the sam: .
financial problems es we} this year| TODAY
one club will be
and will be properiy
rowing}
the European
second only to

The Danes have been invited tu

Finland to try the Olympic course
Regatta, and)

lake on which the Danish meeting;

The Garden Collects rik Larsen
$200,000, 000

Postponed |

A wet wicket and a very sodden
outfield prevented any play |
yesterday the first day in the
third cricket trial match—in }
preparation for the forthcoming
intercclonial tournament at Ken-
sington Oval






















Tne Advocate
the . groundsmen
wicket which was well under
water. Large pools of water had
alsc formed on the boundary and}
the uncovered
soaked.
is on Saturday.

The teams for the match are as
follow:—

saw some
mopping the

of

seats were well

J. D. GODDARD'S XI

J. D. Goddard, G.
Marshall, A. Tayloi,

Wood, R.
E. Atkinson

D. Bradshaw, K. Branker, E.
Millington, G. Proverbs, W.
Greenidge, C. Atkins, and K.
Bowen.

KEITH WALCOTT'S XI

K. Walcott, C. Smith, C. Hunte,
N. Marshall, C Mullins, J.
Williams, E. Hoad, Jnr. H. King;
N. Jucas; D. Atkinson, E. Cave;
and C. Alleyne,

Play begins punctually at 1.30
on Saturday.



What's on Today

Mrs. Fela De Kuh’s Exhibi-
tions of oil paintings and
pencil sketches at the
“Pavilion’—9.00 a.m.

Courts of Appeal—1L0.00 a.m.

Court ef Ordinsey—11.09
a.m.

Sale of Cave and Roach’s
Plantation at the offices of
Messrs. Yearwood and
Boyce, James S*‘eet—2.00
p.m.

Opening of Playing Field at
Deacon’s Road Housing







The Weather

Trial Match | 3

The second day of play

x
Â¥



Sun Rises: 6.16 a.m. |

Sun Sets: 6.00 p.m.

Moon (New) February 6.

Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Water: 12.34 a.m; 12.11
p.m.

YESTERDAY

Wind Direction: (9 a.m.)
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Full Text

PAGE 1

1'RHIAY. IKBRIARV 2. 1951 ItARH.MXJS ADVOCATK PACK SI VI \ CLASSIFIED ADS. Mr. Griffiths Comments On Customs Union DIED i l M-irrrA. Age . I IMI al Geneva. Uarriaon ***t place at Weatbury Cmidiri 2 i' il In A i 'Wi Jl.i Jar IMI al 81. Hutpiui. I,, .Ion. IVgland Sol ft Ml D n Morr... StMioai INMEMCRIAM H-r l,j,l II, „,„, k on Ind FWrniary lk*M. we have trod tinpan ,"i a*j A i.O Meep roraakn i (midM v. h.>ne. i.ubUGiian' and 4 t.-rrt. II r J.I low il r (mill-* Kind. irnt Chu'rh. Modern new PHMM BflnV Ml SI -In UTORAGE SPACr i.ut.bte i., MkBi ..nd WaifHaiiir; App'v T.1 Dial al|| -9WAKUAA comfortable full: l-nMMd BVnSOlow at Worthing. 4 Bed ma. Frtdae. Telephone. Radio. Oarage IS %  lanmedlalrh Dial JOTS 01 2 1JJI-3.. r\ris-i, %  •• 1.1*1 i ovng nen-Ory of fir dear I fj.ih.-r Herald P.m. wt*. r*A on the Jrul ol Felamir%  Bui Ood tlone knew whai HI IWl-en he took dMr Dad. home ti -I \1 l In immi memory of mv laelova daughter Gwendolyn Sealy who lr eilrep on I)FM..IV Ind ISM Mv Mcrow and heartache no one ca %  Ml My memory a keep aakno on Mv dej. i ru< gone I ho ugh %  •membcred Li her door rvl Uayno x II—In FOR SAM: AUTOMOTIVE Saloon it. E • %  gag CArl-Hlltm.-i.. I-Ma. excel*,,! condition, a.vvaya owner driven Telephone n CAB%  'Pt IBM. Mileage n.d running nWi Can he %  ( > arrangement, with Mr*. M "*"**• *** &f *. 1 : v. M CAB One .1 pa>ngr Sedan Ttttopiano recently ovarhaulod and in pail*-; working order prtra 1400. Ring •).•. LigMtvmae. St Lory. 27 1 II ':•. IWHITY COTTAGE—St Ja-naa Coa.i Fully turnlahed containing J bedroom* Available fot month. "1 -eli • lo l*rc>arnber )MI ""none MMJ i'V tills AM I M K\ FOR -1aaallv earned by obtaining order tor prlv.'t? Cnilatmaa Card. Irom your friend*. No P'eviooa export *SMg "rere-ar. Write today IV" %  naiitinu trtr umpla Book lo DrHaln'* larftoat and torvmoat I'uDliahan. hUfiioal comt.iili.ii. nianolknia monty Ruilnf OKportunitv. Jonc<. Wllhama A C.rcii 6 Victoria Wo".. pt*.ton. I'lUnd." 19.1.SI—Iftn NOTICE Of 'RoarhaV Plantation haa l<*n withdrawn Th u of "TMaT CAVK" Planutlo., will co %  iinn will bo wt up „, publir Aciawi to-mi>ii->w 2IHI %  >* M r pin. .,1 ,u,r Offlri*. Jan Ttw -i*.i m em 3 iond< modai acroo rabk>. M acre. 3 pun %  Trot* land ., %  YKAKWOOD f. •1111 In Iriimily in tariff ratrs and cusioms admlnisIiMtlnir, • MSVII t-fllcicncy in tho collection of revenm'. (ill thf sttcn^tliciiinj; of Iho position o( the Brittafa Caribbean tcriiloiics ai far as bariainins power Is conMrDM IUUMWI Irsdfl agracmeoU; I.IQI'OR LICENSE NOTICE IT. H i % %  THl'CKS — N„ nan ,i-> ip. i.. %  % %  ,.• THAtTOH Calnpllla. Dlrarl D 4 yr.Mior Excvllrni condition. I'honr 4*011 %  I ELECTRIC AI. HUPS rj/rlhlc KA7.UK. ... m i>r( rnarlrlr rnobr In good con Apply; Emtaar BlortTlc.il Compa 31. l.M— MISCELLANEOUS firv MLODOCT E-MIIRUCATION lor '"i.i to-day. nir; STANDAHD rKKCV iBDoS' ca. Aemt1.131 -In BATHS — In Porv-rialii WMI*. Crton. Prlmroaa uaHi to complete colour %  Trade. A. HARXR1 g, Co., V .iLtd. ft. .l ll-t lr INFANTS COT with flbr R.ir 472. PORTABLE TREASURE inatitt-M—pi. nil an 1.131—an. %  U>bon %  jbuaftw 343. Upton 1151—4n. WAJVTED HEIJA VJCIIMV e*\.U wilh the Nation.' C.Ui Rei>Trr Compony'a Aunl> t.>r „n / %  (inrenlli • %  Urrhonle AppUcalMl'" • %  • tMitad from indivuli.t.li belween the am ol It and M. who poiecu the lalairairal %  Itrihute*: Educjition to Sernml (Vrin.. c.ilr Standard: mrrh.-inical aiiludr 1-vraDiiality The %  uccoaaful applicant will be nmi.ired to uuUerco throe to ttx rnnnth* pronollonnry ponoi in Barti.idoa. followed by a aimlla pecmd ol trninina in Trinidad Solan duriiujt the period* o( probation am tralnlna; will bo between Ml 00 an. I7.V00 per month dependina on the af, and esperlance of the Individual Applli.-tanta muM be of European Oriain. Apply in writing only aUing full parIcuUn. and %  ubinltll'ui a paaapofl i>hoto(raph to The Nadonal Caofl Rofi'ter & %  A(i*r.tr. c'o T. OreMaa Oran'. Lid. Bollon L-ne l. MISCELLANEOUS LOST MM \H wAiixr-w.ii tr. i twaffj Sana, R T koop walhn and mpera t.. ll,i. ..fl.c. 11.31— li GOLD WRIST CltAIN Aomow hHwen. Aninder*. St lowronea %  Id wrta* chain with hall wnereiaT" p.ndanf and amid padlock rlaap. Findi U'lir notify 'Advocate" flood reward i-:d. 1131— ... •OOVAl. The applicattor' ~f IlillaOv. St Audi ff a board and ealvaaUr* ahop wl... •hodroof attached at lllllabi St Andi Iperma>n to remove taut km* p. a hoard and aalvanlao ihop -ti.iched lt> houte at II Djlra (in30th dn, of Jm-.uary IMI. To J R. EDWART3S, EDQ .. I'ohrr Miflili.iC. D.-' P" %  ssaal --KVMOUH OIIJ. lor ApnlKaiil, N.n-ThU application Kill IM0ri.dered nt %  Lenjln Court to be held al Police Court. Dlatrlrt F \ on FHda>. the Pth day or Febi.iat". IMI. It II O'clock, am. .' R. FDWAKDS. I siUftl MM0BMH, Hit t nto innWdcratiiiii—thai rcnlraliitfrri me, li.inu;.i uVI be sharv.1 Had Trinlilaii A the statement in paragraph ir-r*l tu UM hlch statistical malcrinl u her i can br-rt InprrvntM tlie Commi.s.-ion uiKlerstanrl-, tha. I be question is at present receiv(c) the enronrapcmeiit n( locnl '" considerntion by the ("indti-'tii Orn.o". it w.W !• r*csUed tha The CnmmlftSaori r*adUy *nb*i the tbov< ia>wtonsd CrDne scrilies to the Fiscal Sub-Commit nee ( Colniuai Oovi lee* views, observing that 'Freer SutWodaini i! as atfieed "Ihn nmiinirri.l ix.h.-nnc i^iween lite a uniform layout of Trade British Caribbean territories Accounts was not essential at th would undoubtedly foster u more present time, although somt varied economy through the area*, degree of regional uniformitIt also expressed UM view that v.as desiiable" (paragraph 26 possible for there address themselves to the toms I'lHIK SAIIN MAE ESTATE looina and Oarage. Upttalr*. i'. Drawing ,n.J I). B roOH nrto l-hl and Power. Put 'ifer Ire.iled orn lo M Abbadl r S7. 1.3 SI 4l stages, il reels Uial since me „uiriv of this Itrnort m tha* obstacles to be overcome in its SS^S I shall aw establishment are so few and the ,l desiiv for an early nv fiscal and economic unity so general, anything in the natine of a :i;.n>iiiiin.il PSriOfl is neither noi expedient. It SPHJNC1HAMThe .lv %  t ho.i-e ,t %  SriaMftMH Whlto PsrK Road. Build It o be rn %  M i Appti. n V Co. Ltd. i51-1 MARSIIVILLE Rank Hall main road %  tandlne on 1.44S -qu-re (ert o( land Dwelling hnu-e compriaei cloaod verandah, drawing and dining loom-, three bodrooma. breakfait room toilet and bath, Government water and electricity i natal led Thla property will be offered lor aale to pubJc competition M our offWe jamra Str.ci. on Friday. 2nd February. 1911 a 1 p m For further particular* and condition* of aale apply to HuHhirxon •) Banfleld .'a meSt root. %  r raflkro. No 17 v the Mh day t, the dwcllmgThe i ndrr-iuned w public competition al Hlarh Street, on Thuradav ol Fabruar". IMI. at 3 p.m. house rilled .III IUIV.I r with 1,444 aquarc foot of land ntuaio .it The fl.iin-11. lontalnlng 11 vetaiMlah*. 3 public room*. I bedroomi The aale may be mode will. i srNaV ut the fun.ltuie Vacant pnaaoaaaon will be given. Further particular* Irom COTTU6, CATFORO CO. 30 LSI—n 'OB RENT. SALE OR LEASB BAGATEI.1J: HOUSE. St Thoma* Up%  talra Cloaed Gallery, Drawing and Din Irg room. Breakfaat room and Kitcheneiu 3 bodrooma running water In eacn. Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTA1HH Cloard Gallery. Living-room. Breakfait room Hag Kitchenette, 1 BedroomToilet and Bath. Electric Light and Telephone Apply Manager of B.ifiitr.lc Plantation St. Tbomao Dial 3331. 11 1.51—Sri. AT TOP HOCK-Deligritliil rotldonohovlng I Bedrooma. large l>tunf. •eparate Dining Room. 1 fullv Tiled Toilet* and Bath, modem Kllcher Car Gir.-ge 3 Mltrauili t; UUPM. Handing on nearly hair an -ci %  Price *4i00 neare" "fTer For viewing apply Ralph A. Beard. HardwooJ Aloy or Phone 4SS3 M 1 91 n MAIL NOTICES Igtia. St KillSI Tl-i r York by the •%  Forl Amherat will cloaed at the Oenei.il Pnat Office Parcel Mall at 13 • I Mall al 1 pm. Ordinary Mail at J.JO BV WISE. . IWMi/MM *f.ovi:n\M. \ I VOIIMS BARBADOS GOVERNMENT SAVINGS BANK IT IS notified for the information of tne General Public that effect from the Mh of February. 1951. the Government Ssvlngs Bank will be removed to the opposite wing of the Public Buildings in the premises recently vacated by the Parcel Post Branch of the General Post OflUe 2 2.M-2C DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ST. MATTHIAS GIRLS' SCHOOL—CHRIST CHURCH Applications are Im hip of the St. Matthias' Girls' School from teachers (women) with nt least 10 years' teaching experience. The minimum professional qualification required i the Certificate A if the Department or exemption therefrom. Salary will be in accordance with the Government Scale for Head Teachers in Grade II Elementary Schools. Candidates who have already submitted application forms in respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, accompanied hv a recent testimonial. All other candidates should make application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the Department of Education All applications must be enclosed in envelopes marked "Appoinrnnnrt Board" in the top left hand 00 must reach the Department of Education bv Saturday. 10th February. 1951. 30th January, 1851. 2.2 51—Sn I MR. JAMES GRIFFITH* U letter to the Governor e* Barbados 0. from Church House, London, makes the lollumnc. comments on the Report of the Commission on the I %  • h able goods mpcrfced U ^ W e. nh -.. CO ni P n, a T** "Ported lo olher of the Standing Closer Association UM and the Commission nn the I'nlflcation of the Public merits the most careful and serious consideration. For it will be recalled that, in paragraph frSd) li Je and |*j Bats I customs link ii will need to re. atnet* the establishment of a free trade srei •ult in a loss of I'vfnm in dtitifiwn \ber colbj however, to be nolct that the Commission consldei that, while the logs could in snim extent be reduced by U of excisa .tut M on the tines pro10 of the Memorandum "on Closer f?? In Chapter V of the Report. Association of the British West and to a lesser extent t %  reaervIndian Colonies, which formed an !1 8 '" member colonies llie i.gln enrlosure to mv predecessors cir'" continue to levy export duUe cular despatch of the H' I Fi nested in Chapter VI. ar>, 1947 (Cmtl. 7120). it was would probably. In the main, be staled that -probably no other "l r "" 'ban met by the operation single reform would bring such at sclent ilically balanced combeiiefit to the colonie. concerned mon external tariff. as the establishment of a full cus"I do not propose at this stag; toms union, or .it my rate a CO ' % %  'in any detail on the mon customs tann". Furthermnre. Draft Model Customs Ol the Standing Closer Association Or the Draft Customs ReKiil.A hi. I ference in 1947 lo submit proposals might be contemplated. the question of customs union -i,, paragraphs 44 to 49 th recorded in paragraph 11 of its Commission make various proReport, that the establishment of pcsa i s f0) „„. mechanics! an a customs union would result centralised compilation of tradt ~ ,. %  and revenue statistics. \h<) the encouragement of mi. -> i|(| <.--'.','-*-*','--. ','J naturally be vMthin the union; (b) the establishment of unimethod by which light be achieved i the outcome of their deliberations with great interest. Thl Bl to whether or not a customs union shall be established rests primarily with them; and H re^rnrnVnds thereforTthc ostab**{*?* Covernmcn, dues lishment at the SSrUssI oj.poHun*S" to P"-J'"1e [ J ity of a customs union embracing their decision The LegUlalures all the British Caribbean tcrriloiJW "" it convenient to confine |SJ srtUi (he ex.epnon, for the themselves for the time bc'ng to tlrac bf-iiig. <>( Ins BritUfa Virgin the coviairMrsllon o( tha main [alandi and the Jamaican Depen•ssuo. namely, the dsstrabllity Of the Cayman and the -">nd practicability of cstablishinif Turks and Calcoa WMMII (para•'' CustorM Union in the light of graphs 71 and ISn—140) n.e iiigumenU and factors set "One of the most valuable of out in the Report. If. as I hope the Commission's achievements may be lb* MSB, th. v all BgTM to has been the preparation of a the esiablishmcnl of suoh an common tarill structure and a Union. I would -iiggest tl'.it the common classification (or trade details might be worked out 0} statistics (paragraphs 32—43). In a committee cnnt.uning reprethis coimechoii. however. I must scntatives of the various tcrtidrow your attention to the followtones, possibly the proposed lng poinrs The Commission look regional economic committee. the Iramework for its tariff leferreti to in mv despatch No. 105 structure and statistical classifiesr.f the 17th November. 1950. it ion (Part I of the Firsl Schedule |, | s decided to estal41 lo the Draft Ordinance at Appcnhoriv Menin'-lille. if there Is any Commodities for International gcvernmems In this mattoi b) Trade Statistics published by the WJ1V ,, r advice or in am OOH I League of NaUona in 193H. antici, fr ; n< ] s(ia n w moM willing tpatmg that the revised version ot -,i.. it •• il, on which the United Nations Stalistlcnl Commission was engag^ __ ed when the Commission was at ^J. 1 hoIIIUH \ I'HII'V work, would emerge with comparatively few changes, thus making it l relatively simple matter to align the Commission* ro-DArs mn RASH R.TVAI. ItBLAnSKB'anal H i.o r. BffBM BBS Opened by JOIINSON'K ftTATMNIBT For tha Window, and Doora of Y. CLASS Cut to n.doc bv JOHNSON'S II YKim Mil $ H AMI II 1 larjf Viianlilifs Lwal J Slarrh £ Itequired b> . \ I INDIAN KNITTING S Mll.l* LTD \ ^ Suppliers please call \ \; •---%-v<--'* '.:•*'. •* 'ssss*;; %  ', SHIPPING NOTICES I BaiajSjBMMX--V>-,-,',-. ','-','.',*, ','-' v \oTiti. WEST INDIAN KNITTIN'" \ MILLSITIl ^ ACCRPTIM; ORDERS FOB J* WRAPPING TWINE \ I Older, lor 113. i.r-quirr \ menu will I t Ufa Ichn All DaaaVM -iiepted up 0 >. 1951 ; uyo Box ni \ 379 N MIIOOI HOOKS I III! SMI %  BALUET SHIMS B> Slrealfield "A ( IIRISTMAS CAKOI By Htkaaa "WF.STHAliD HO" By Charlaa Uatslaj 'TIIF.ASl'ltl: ISI.AMI' By R. i.. Maraaaaa al Advoralr Slaliuiirn REAL ESTATE JOHN M. HI 1HOS A.r.s.. r.T.A. lornrrlT Hin a Bl>4aa FOR SALE "BETMAttMat Modern atone Ininil.'l. IM roof, delachod garage and ani inH qtiarfeia mi n\*i MOOn aq II of land. There are 3 large rOi.pllon room*, 1 .-rrai.iUK*. S bedronnu. I I—iiinIM l*n> *eml. u.i.,il.e.l huuaea at little coat on applarat.., "> <• ** *'•> '%  M mutable foi r-ifi other llian a garage grool naiha ii> general rondtllon u eaaolkMt -II t iam\ Cheapude 1 landing i^ appfK. 1*4 aeie* ilanird -nn (out li er lai ar oreptTOn. bodroom*. I gallenea. I ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. m Amaterdam. Dover a>>l Ud. vir %  Monrti IMI i> and A meMrdan Ml in. OfieaJfth. fuornar, m. Helena' Jrd M.rck ISM IC ma Oraiijeatad n.g lo Plvmo'ih. Aaitvri %  0M A CO. LTD. loth. %  %  i %  to bo nouaid. BWI MIIOOM.lt OWNE1S ASSOCIATION, |nc Irlephoue; IUH Canadian National Stcamsliins aaaa*veavahan*aa H'TB BOUND -LADY NELSON-CAN rilAIJXNOF-B' "I.AIJY KODNKY" -i Any HI "CAN CHALIKMiKK" LADY It.in.M.i HMBSMI R t4SJ .*: r It A, I 13 Fel. ;> r il H 30 M.u IS Mar. •.. %  Hi ti in. i NB I;., t. 81. John and I ndiiig said that he STB v amZZSVSZS z^zz^z^^: ConmiaSaori has npleted its labours, and its list, whirh is ,, called the Standard International s i* Ciia '''! Trade Classification', was gM rOVed by Ihe Economic and Social Glendale House" Coming up again fur discussion Council In July. Unfortunately was the repairing of "Glendale repre s ents ralher more of a House" departure from the League of A motion made by Mr. Reeves Nations 'Minimum List' than the and seconded bv Hon G. Mahtm. Commission had any reason to 'hat the entire Vestry VIMI expect His Majesty's Govern I ,:, LOnillllirllSl I JllIKl hopeful that a decision by His 'l Government will not be long delayed, and I will communicate It to you with my as soon as possible. Meanwhile, I am unable to give i S ldnme other than that Mis %  /Ould not favour the adoption at this date of the old Minimum List' for tariff or statistical purposes. :nmission's proposals for NOTICE a> From Pase 1 h I'.nOun. Clement Atllee, %  peaking in tin Housa of Commons said: "From the close and consUnt contact which we have maintained with many Governments supporting the resolution. i 1 i dtai 'hey share our view of the importance and urgency of the -rn* Commission's proposals for l '" k ^ntru'tcd lo the Good Office a common tariff Oparngraphs 73 c^mrni'tee and wish to see U to 89). particularly ihcse rclatins D** !" its work as soon to margins of prefeienre. repre. resolution has been approved by a sent, in my opinion, a reasona'ile P^nary meeting of Ihe General balance in grneral conformity with Assembly the spirit of the General Agree"It is my earnest hope, that the nient DB Tor.ffs .nd Tr-tle Bu'. Central People'! Government of you will be aware fhat. under China will respond io anv effort* Article XXIV (7) of that Agreewhich may be made by the C;<.-.-l ment fas amended—see page 34 of Offices Committee to bring about Cmd. ft048 Provisional Consolia cease-fire and a naanUatid dated Text of the General A*re*settlement in the Pi ment on Tariffs and Trade and w.nslon Churchill leader of the TC V* £ •* %  <* Documenu. Conservatives said: We are parcopies of which were .ransm.ttro ti ,. ularlv nhtV v4 to feel that Do to CosonUI GovcrnmenU under bMf cn &i mn Britain and the TXL *MY?L2££Z in i r ,t H a ? U"^ s,at * couW occur at such adopted for the establi A *| ^ nM "* •" i| I-ibotir member. Ian Miking Paities for their approval; and "'' itut milk,' task of the Good Ofii ,-phs 1"—in ore dlfhcult than it iRsport deal with the question of would otherwise ba—ateat-r Due to the lar^e increase in UM price nt Fiu'l Oil ihe Company are now forced to advance Ihe preseni Surcliarne frOltl Wl tn 17%. The new Snrcharn.o will Uikr effect on all hills rendered fur the month of I'Vlminy rtml onwards. V. SMITH, General Manager. NOTICE LAny imnsr-.v LAUV NEUlON" %  IAOY BODNKY %  -LAOY NELSON 1AI1Y t., 10 Feb. mn IM, ?l ret. %  lil. — K.o. SI %  .!. %  Mar. I M.r — 11 Ma. M Mar. S Apr 1 Apr II Aur. 14, AmS3 Apr X Awr, 10 M., II Mv. It Mai. — Ma). B—Subject to change uho.t %  MtMS All .eo.u g tt# d. W|U , beta eaaaenger lareo and Iraight latca oi, appiii-. M aataaa • GARDINER AUSTIN & CO^ LTDAgents. -'•-,•.-.-.-•,-,•,*.•,,-,-,*.-.-,'.-,*,',',-,', NOTICE S. S. IM.A.\IISIIII" Sailinu fur Lnnrl.ui ilir.-.l on or ahoul ISlli IVI.ruurv la*.arraadai paaaaagaia umi Caro—Fan *:'' %  toman IBPM IIMITI D (Aiiriils l %  alapl *> 122s. ••_••• %  •.•.•.•.•.y.w.'^.v.-^.v^..,.........,.................................... J CDs, ti r:. iiinsiiMMuii! (French Unc) S.S QASCOaNI S..I, „l. BriU,h Cul%  %  nl "' i''ii"i CJuitni F.-brn.-iry 8lh. SS. OASCOaW Plymoulb and 1^. H.v,,. via SI Marlinlquc. Ouadaloupc fPointe a '" %  ""' *"""" %  " R. M. JONES & CO.. LTD.-Agents. SAGUENAY TERMINALS LTD. I uii-L'u"''; '" : ROTTSrlDAJJ ANTv WMil' lo BAHliADOS, TRINIDAD and DEMERARA fi ' the month ,.( -I in h, i i 5 Wr Imilu'i |,.ullclihii PHONBi ITN |: 1'itvt \iiow s.i>si i % %  • —% u s \w.v^.-.y.-.-.-...-......,.....................................,.....,, ..............^ PASSAGES TO EUROPE Conui.l Anllllo, Producli, Umllad, Rowau. Domlnla,. [or sailmg m Europe. Tho uwal „„„. l( roU „„ ,„ |1)H „ u Kolterdam. Sn.jl. far, £70; u u „i r ,diirllona for children. Bend 1 B lour ord, STEAM PIPE AND FITTINGS MIH : %  TToday's I'rlrr, raunol lie rrpralrd in .1 liu-. \ r:\11iAi. IOIMIIIY I.TII. Headers uiid Subscribi-rs to the "ADVOCATE" Netrapsper in Horse Hill and surrounding districts BBS uskcil to note that we liuv


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PAGE T JP' ESTABLISHED 1895 S U.N. BRAND COMMUNIST CHINA 11 "No Alternative For American A id In W. Eu rope Says Eisenhower WASHINGTON, Feb. 1. QENERAL DWIGHT EISENHOWER, the North Atlantic Army's Supreme Commander, today reported to Congress on the state of Western Europe's defences. Addressing a meeting of Congress, General Eisen hower said the decisions they must make would be far reaching and might determine the course of western civilisation. Plaiu Jettisons 100 Gallons Petrol LONDON. Feb. I. A Biitish airliner can [ %  oucrten to Kio De Janeiro bad nri return to London airport V>, I iis Tour e ngin e! %  H Ian* "u Argonaut of %  iveroeaa Airways Corporation had been in the air half an lour when the uouble started. %  I ring the plane's weight down so ttjat n could land In %  A(U'. the engine had been re1 it took off again. —Reulrr ltd : "Wc : tied only with one thing, [In n world m which thf pOWff "' Imilltary aught .—p are going to build for ourselves wall of peace and security. What we an < • > cannot honestly lie en I a threat to its eoc u riry. w any such charge la made li is to m I i pose." Eisenhower laM |hC killed labour ml Europe, anil II trial fabric was second OQl) 10 thai of the I Brilish Observer For Paris Talk:* LONDON, rah Britain bad b Id Fiance she will f end an observer to tonlerence to >tudy the organiea1 OH Ol the BurOMan army. the Office said today. She had Dean invited to attend as a full member. Tin Briuah Arnbaaaador m I'ari* nominated as British | thi conference. — R enter Cut Off By Snow I.ONDON. Feb. I. The Bpa i. Bapalda cut off bj pp—led urgently to the Ooei 11 ; Joan Province for aid. Madrid Radio reported. Bar 11. only three lorries of food have reached* tm village. —Kruter Egypt Bans Bull-liif CAIRO. Feb 1 The Egyptian Ministry of the Interior b 'd a press bulletin Issued by the Soviet location in Cairo. iteat numher of this bulletin which is issued In French and Arabic contained a supplethC Warsaw Pcaie COOgraaj or the Intern requested the Ministry fer Foreign Allans to Inform the Soviet Lega tion of the ili-i I Raeenl Eta pUan snplalned it wai "flooded," with propagandi rial issued by the Rumanian %  aider SHIP tN TROUBLE PORT-OF-SPAIN Feb. 1. A motor launch left here tonight in pick up 20 passengers from t" 1 Datcfj i> •' s s e nge r frc-niit T K< nincin I nuii.i ported in dlflkultt off north Vonv /m la KonliiKin tmma owned by Mm Navigation,Conapany %  way In P from ruracao. Dutch West Indi She will be towed lo Porl-of-Sp.o.. by another vessel for repairs. —Kruter Musi Sia.nl With U.S. if western Europe ware driven from America's side to the other side, the ml %  t power %  hlfted so drastically %  i It was impossible to las it Europe ui Communism, without the imullaneous full of other areas K u rope. We would be cut off from area* from which we draw i i Mia) to our existNo matter bow strong wc* would le m keeping open our communications, clearly %  tneea areas and keep them friendly to in Elsenhower asked how the United; States could possibly think of existing without such vital sup* plies fsosr -broad as mgn.rlum copper nixl uranium He soid such %  uppuaa wen laid up with United Stales concern with the weal em European complex and the Unit* rnunation to defend it. He said thi %  not only or B lUlt th would suffer economic atrophj and eventually lollap-e. hut because the United St..' do the job Europe and North between them had 3aO.000.OOC people rep res en t ing the highest C'ullUic Upon earth He m tarn Europe and the United Suites togethei i„ lip that had not touched and they had the greatto and thr which they needed. Eleonhowei %  aid he i tend to report on I in Germany because "there has tc be a political undai achieved" "I want no conlingents". be iwer said mare I acceptable alternative" tn Amerlnews[can help i untm of being'western Europe. m T. ii.s;-. The General said ha (Mind throughout his lour of Atlanl Pact countries a rejuvenated spirit nilnatiou liee men. nnd to do their etherise sample of this spirit, he said, he found ui Pt am the conscription law hud been ohit when it peralmost no ea "They nre determined to face up to the thi inlsm both and externally." Greece Gets INew Cabinet ATHENS, Feb 1. i educed lo only 15 members 'cs tonight The numbi %  %  i a Special COirtmll %  %  '.ration. Greece returned three-week tour of the to receive th* • •ath of the new eUnlab i Liberals of Demo •nber cf ministers has only la %  —Kruter Connolly Encooraged WASHINGTON. Feb. I ,iv. chairman of rb United •brie Ben Ma Coma Oeneral Ettenfaowi %  i* to CdUajrcsa "nave me real i lent abOUl the altitude %  r ns of Western Europe" i •),. v m tn %  la I iren nd rebuild their strength, there will be complete siiecem. hi h d Senator Kenneth Whet Senator suld II that plans nln I. tM ahead ft i ut to i thing except carry out approurllee-tar. .Mauley \\ elertmes Customs Union %  l-rcm Oat Own CimSBJjai.1011 I.O.NDON. Feb. I. Ml Norman Rfoakr/, lender of I i i .1.iiiian.. rommentina lo-das on proposals for the West Indies Customs I Id "I welcome the proposals 100 per cent. TtaeB nave been limn overdue 4TM Union should not wall upon federation Federation might take time and the Customs Union should be set ilile. "Once people me the obvious advantages of a Customs Union, II may %  ping stone In the functional approach lo He Sfiid "th. Una*! ii'i hes may eventually mean federation beeoiin if that is the wsy in which i; is to come, let us welcome it". W'll.l i \nn i i> iOMoiiium BY 44 VOTES TO 7 EVEItTON WRKKF8 la ws met at 8*i UUuuaR. They are to he -t.-i'i C-n'i.'l || wtll yntorday by til* B*a Aa>(.Tnited Na too t< i th( best hope in the existing Ci:prsi.mc< negutiatexl settlement with Chi i AUkC %  pc.ihlt'g in tli..fj B jmoi t t. %  *•* was beou<* t'ltWirt'rrn hi i i • !. %  I %  live at Lake was instructed :<> vote In mvoui of it. The Pi mv Minister said hi wanted apacialb to call the jitten "il Peril men! lo the Una meatj pnraRraph In the reaolu UblC (hi th • .. i Duleh Guiann He found the same resolution in flc!giun\ gf On Psr,e 3 lk<> Wants Forty Divisions By 1952 i WASHINGTON, Feb l Dwlgbl Ebenhowei \> lo have told senator.' • t he was aiming ut a DJafi %  .in until U i ends • lib la i er eaarl thnn it needs for full production —Reulrr. Labour /If.Ps Stage Revolt AGAINST CHINA POLICY LONDON. Feb 1 A number ol loft-win meniU-is staged .> minor revotl JI LAKE SUCCESS, Peb. 1. TTHE United Nations Oeneral Assembly fa approved the United St Ate* resolution condemning Communist China as the aggressor in Korea. The voting was 44 to 7 wi'h nine absteiivons. Earlier, against. Soviet opposition, the Assembly had decided against holding a \obate on tl tion. Immediately the Assemuly met to ratifv lUe rasolution passed by its Political Committee on Tuesday, President Nasrollah Entezam called for a vote as to whether the issue should l*> debated. iha ii"v%  Australia A Food Ministry spokesman said tba two onViah wvra going to olher COVei ill)' HI] ; dairy products to Britain. The 15-year plan when Snail) I" make niie ef the mo lant and largest meat producing areas In the world. it involt %  .-bout £5.000,000 on capital da.i-ii v>iii"iii i" i pan up . of Northern Australia for cuttle firming—Renter. Hovin Making 1 •<><>(! Reco very LONDON, Feb. l 1 i : n e l Rcvtn's recovery from i'i % %  • • i think* it ... .further bu %  day. Reot*r Jucknon Nairn-d CJ. ArtTIOUA, Kb i N I I %  Jackson si the Windward Islands. M ime tn the I rts I'ui-nr J Octobtl 194b. liimuiK "That it contini • i %  %  ,, Nation %  i,i' in K> rea, Rmler Two Still Missing DELFAST. Norther,, lieli.nd. Fab. I, Two men wai missing todaj altar i 2(1 yardi high gangway al> B ahale tM lory ship Jstsn Peru, crae) ught killing 16 men. ed to the I intii the Water between the ship*' side and the q 35 wart to-da) In I oapital, six %  ham ragy I '^e Arg. lavolt I 12,000 ton Juan prron ... -I of the a in" 1 on his runn'ng t 1 1 I %  1 I II, English h< eaid hi %  1 hi pel i"iI •When I tnlil 1 %  he Kissed m> hi eft and hands —reulrr Tweilty Missing HEYKIAVIK. lo %  ers combined In a great search c-dy for a DoiiglaH Dak. I 't leelanderi aboard, in'iieved to sve crashed near ReyU 1 .' |.:nnl Peuter MOTOR CAR X lis wa* eitcniivel*/ datmic-'t after being involved In an accident sleog BlacV Ro> k Ro.-.d, near t. StcphrnBchool. about It.35 o'clock n Wednesday night. It la owned by Hugh Oim' o( St. l.iwrenefl sod waj being driven by Mobrey An-tiii. Also Involved wa National 'bos M.174. driven by Claude Payne or P;yn* Bay. St. Jame* Pletors *ss taken Thursday morning. 14 KILLED IN CRASH UBaXN Tiu PortUguaae military Sk) into the -J';i l. %  crash, believed to have bee; caused l.y an explosion occurTr i.no beaii Tercelra island In the Azores —Kruter Jamaica Will Drop C J4m KINOBTTON, Fab 1 I trad %  %  %  tl < iudbbei n coli niea will, %  %  .1 1 ji : n :• ,t an I Lime* re%  thai oil || I : 11 %  rta to thrm. —C i' 1 ei rm Chli %  M 1 iti %  enl bj the ft I na eurustei Ihoy rose In sue 1 ontidae Britain*! iiipMrl <>r Iha itce Reeolutia 1 lion* branding %  Thej mi'%  "' %  "* %  vi nan Attlei reluctance to reorrlrm that Britain .•UM wiintetl In eiunuune Ihe 1 d the Bat urtt> Council ArTer haaltaUng the Prime Mlnth 1 repDad 'um a N*4on I teeth plain Pi helpfu] i" ba lurthei on th-.a rather delicate nalrei urion set some poUUeal I". IM wi n\ Mai \ i %  allepS SOOI nh Armj raporh I rtrulrr Turkish II oman In Korea War ANKAKA. Ft Q 1 Q ol I'm 1 1 de time tn : p lot %  vith ihe United Natloi ailed Ural nlghl '"; ''' tul lied her I I.I III %  %  regulai Turkisi m IW3. I ll 1 i-.iern Turkey. . 1 .11 fare — rlfutcr 1 %  I %  %  %  rd Inr a %  ;i Good %  %  ipoeaad to rare the Soviet group Of Burma Abate) %  delegates war nulo an%  %  11 1 %  the men! of On I other Par Eastern qw %  %  lutlon." Hi I I %  rortbwitli. ludv the by ine riv are req ill %  1 K %  %  1 I of II 1 ;i h "insueccssIII %  il Bill n %  1 % %  •' fOl ll I %  living any <>' U <.. r in 1 1111 UlVOt VII %  in NV.WS iti\ Obit lollowcd sale* by %  tiiista who • %  teel nharen. Smaller investor*. selling steels ll indusei which and thr1 %  %  : companies not scheduled for nationolliatlon. alsewbei %  %  higher nours of compensation payments. In thi cctlon, Australian drawn bond %  and-a-h.ir were next to 1 I>M i.i.isupport f*>i potash. isf*uex %  but k.'ii' Paris buying. —Renter llhiainalili PURITY GUARANTEED QUALITY MAINTAINED FLAVOURS DELIGHTFUL .SAVE Mate SAVE won 11 v SAVE IMM\SI smni 01:1111: it i c o On sale Day or Night al Soda Fountains. Parlours and Restaurants or direct from Barbados Ice Co., Ltd.—Bay Street.



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS. ADVOCATE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2. 1951 HENRY ODEX SOAP O Gets skin really cltifl Binishn perspirition oatur • LM.lt Ml rnttt mi dainty (klrx make* a deep t leaiuinft Uibrr thai i. mild and %  enile ft* fare, hand, and daily l< li.. Odea i* ideal tor family use. AVOID OFFENDING-USE ODEX CAN EPILEPSY BE CURED? men, hat bten lovnd thai ralma* •(• tacki M tncil cam Trtii ranwkabla nrJicmt 11 dciciaMd m an mlttlin| booklet entitled "Can Cpilt-fliy fit Curtd?" Ini booklet n |i ( cfl awa* t're to tpilept-cj Anyone iuffenn| lion. Jtajre^ceni wccet>'ul MCMM a litjj_ Hi \ MUM ^lould request %  (ire copy Vl7oCw7^t".~Si~*Tii "B""l07 ~ *~ IM toaanTvTJ#7ie7c. !" ~U S. !" J 1 fn*w Mid %  # a (oay ol in* in* mun MM.*-] Can tpUeMr kt Omjar' I ATTEM10IVU FACTORY MAKACERK Tfc Ikta %  tpwlBBNi at okUlBlos roar rrqnlrrmt-nU In IGALVANISED & STEAM PIPE luilv from ', In. %  pwordl MILD STEEL 11.L-. Rounds, Squares In -II SISSS BOLTS & NUTSAll Sizes FILTER CLOTH-While Cotton Twill At raiCIS Uul csnnot bo I < Thm MIAMI AltOS I HI Mill V Lid. WHITE FAEK tOAO ST. MR HAH "PEEK FREAN IIUIM \l\ S BEST HIM I 'ITS, AT ALL LEADING STORES TRY THESE FAMOUS PARTY AIDS CHEESELETS MARTINI CRACKERS PLAY BOX TWIGLETS Etc. Etc. DELICIOUS & APPETISING V) YEAR BOOK 1951 THE PHANTOM WE DON T NEED)LEAVE HERHERE THE GIRL NO \SO SHE CAN RUN MOW-6HEUBE \BACK AND TELL INCXJRWW.WE . Ltd.. Vice President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate. Mr. Neville Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale, Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be responsible for the publication. The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that tho Year Book is representative of all aspects of lifo in Barbados and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies. Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisations immediately or not later than April 15th 1951. Year Book, C/o Editor. Barbados Advocate. 34 Broad Street. Names and addresses of all those to be considered for inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed. Advertisements close April 30th 1951. Advertisers are asked to get in touch with Mr. Trevor Gale, Advertising Manager, Barbados Advocate, 34 Broad Street. This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to bewithout the Year Book of Barbados 1951. (AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION I DO YOU KNOW? i HM r* t cat #*> ANDREWS LIVER SALT Digestive Upsets The distress and di vornfort of Aalnlcace, heartburn, indigestion and many othrr %  ytn-p to m* arising Iron hyperacidity, can be tvoothed. r the* ad an gotten arotd'd by taking a done nf UP Witts Antactd Powder. Hyperacidity sirwply tneana the formation of excess acid in the stomach and De Witt'a Antacid Powder neutralises Una quickly and effectively. At the tame fame, the wellbalanced formula give* relief ever a lona; period by pro; the delicate stomach ANTACID POWDER Nsut/eltlei Acid Stomach iy from home— Carry • NawMiH*..! DeWITT • Pranat railtf • Catty carrtae • CeO-ieatea TAB from home— I Carry a taw I DeWITT'S I ANTACID I TABLETS! LOOK yoiiR BEST JSt\ i/aseline^ HAIR m See Us for the following :— Tina PEANUT BCTTER Bola. SALTED PEANUTS Pat k.n-r, DATES Tina KRAFT CHEESE & MACARONI Bola KRAFT MAYONNAISE 1 A 2!b Tin* HAMS Tina RABBIT Tins Gl'AVAS Tins SWEET CORN lib Tina C A E MORTON S H wtr BAKU I INCE & Co., Ud. . 1 US Rorhurk MfMi Dial 1231 SLC l^, .a. .^=-5^^:



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l-Rin.VY. FEBRUARY 2. l;i:,l BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE TIIRKE Lutherans Plan Big Programme \T.W YORK. Feb. I. A ro-operalive Latin-American % %  .. %  broadest of its kind m — was drawn up si an annual convention of ft* Nntmn.il Lutheran Church The pr Mexico and Central and South America would h* thf llul joint ff.ivigji m s-toii VMtUM I utheinn bOftfBI npit %  the Convention I "It marks a very unpoti forward in Lutheran CO— •ai-1 tha Council Executive Director y—Urdaj Tur plan drawn up in consultation among the Council's member bodies and still subject to their final approval, would lx.'2m fuiutipping next October wttB an Initial "core budget" of Among benefits to bt from the programme the Council's report %  nd wen"praaenraUon to the faith DC several thousand Lutheran settlers in isolated areas" and the organisation "of new congregations m important centres at nuclei for expanded future work". T>Commission authorised to bring preliminary work Immediately mi set up pending the formation of ; permanent "division OH Lutheran co-operation in Latin America". There now are six au'onomus Lutheran churches of German background with a total of MM lv r.OO.OOO members in Brazil and Chile, the Council report said. The new programme provider that separate bodies miiv. if they wish, transfer their Latin American mission programmes to a join* undertaking. Eight bodies in the Council have n total of almut 4.000,000 memiors cr about two-Uvrds of nil American Lutherans. —neuter. M lORE HOTELS IN BARBADOS (OULD EASILY MEAW DOLLARS AMD EMPLOVMEwf rOft MAMV. IWCLUDIW61fa*£ • o^ g^,VJ . NOHOftL AfiOOMOOAliON MtAV/^ Lt^s f-OREitjiu cui-'^ewey roc BAR HAIX)S ) (OMV/ERf \K><0 DOLLARS No Alternative •) From i i • %  t Denmark and other countries. They had decided that they would never again be occupied. They would resist to the point of destruction he added. In Rome there Ml the resolve to make n limited military force H afrarlanl as possible he laid Eisenhower declared that Europe's greatest need was not for American troops but for equipment which must be delivered "in quantity and quickly." He said that American troops should be sent to Europe in proportion lo what European nations themselves provided. The General disclosed Uiui France had pffomsMd 75 battle worthy divisions to the end of 1952, —Itcuter COAL WANTED CENEVA. lab 1 Coal-short countries in Western ftirope, lutva nuked the Untied States for 3.500,000 tuns of cool It was learned here day. Difficulties of these countries will be discussed next week when the cool sub-committee of the United Nations Economii Commission for Europe meets here. It is hoped that countries with coal to spare will extend till June then "ssjallanaaoV 1 agreement not to cut off exports and enable Europe's problems to be solved. —IteuUr Mystery Plane Flies Sideways KANSAS CITY. AiR FORCE OFFICERS have questioned a Mid-Cnnlin.nl Air Lines pilot who reported seeing a speedy mystery plane that he said can fly sideways and apparently reverse its direction without turning around. — The pilot, Capt. Larry W "Illiterates" Want Right To Vote In E.G. C. J. Threatened (Vram Oar Own I arr**pand*nD PORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. 30. A letter containing threat against the person, of Sir Cecil Furnness-Smith. the Chief Justice was received by the Police a few dan IK fore judgment in the "Floating Corpse" case wai • i live rod, n letter from the Com0 :.'. <>f Police said. The Commissioner refutes statement* in the Press that th Chief Justice ball asaaad 'or Polier protection. Since the squashing oi the conviction it was understood high officials have sought Polica protection. 162,000 TONS OF SUGAR EXPECTED il'i-i" Oar Own tl PORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. 30. Trinidad's sugar crop is expected to hit a record this year with a production of 162.000 ton*. This however, depends to a large extent on weather condition*. Lost year's crop was 146.50* tons. A reliable source disc: etorlM ;>rc in operation ex• opt Forres Park, which will start early next month. t in Oat Own l ITI first AH Vintner, of Mission. Kan.. the mysterious aircraft Sioux City. la., airport day night. January 20th. His story was confirmed by hi** co-pilot. J. F. li.t.i. Kansas City. Kas and an unidentified civilian employee of the Air Force of Omaha. Neb., who also saw the strange craft. Capt. Vinther told of seeing a mysterious light west of the Sioux City Airport after taking He said the control tower asked him to investigate the light. He continued: about eight thousand-feet Id see a red light circling the field to the left. The light started to blink. "I spoke into my radio, saying that if the plane was in comunicotlon. we would like to have the pilot blink his light again. Shortly afterwards, the light did blink. I i..hi Changed "It began approaching us and it changed to B brilliant white light, similar to a landing light but without glare It ctflW with In two hundred feet of us and we could see the silhouette of tne ship against the moonlit sky. "As it reached our left win* we could gee the plane had a fuselage like a B-ZB but about am % %  ad one-half times as large Th< wings were straight and there were no engine nacelles (nous ings). "We were doing 120 miles ai hour, but instead of the plane passing us, it stopped opposite our wing and then began going in our direction, apparently without aval turning. We tried to follow H but lost sight of the plane." Co-pilot Rachmeier. who was in control of the ship at the time confirmed Vintner's story and added: "The plane had a eigar shaped fuselage and the wing appeared to be a flattened cigar strongly .bllng a gilder wing. Th. ng was forward of the centre the fuselage." Bachmeier continued: Manoeuvrability The plane had extreme manoeuvrability. It appeared to be able to do anything ulmosl at in. "We saw no engine, no tail surface, no evidence of i i Outlined against ihe sky, it appeared like a giant cigar. It was upllghted as it came towards us sideways and there were no portholes." Col. Matthew Thompson, of Offut Air Force Base. Omaha, one of the passengers on the flight, said he is investigating "Flying Saucer 1 ." but. irunicall SINGAPORE PREPARES WASHINGTON. SINGAPORE, "City of the Lion," fabled halfway house of wrld commerce, is grimly facing the prospect of again becoming the defensive pivot fur the riches of Southeast Asia. As Communist armies overrun sidered an impregnable bastion much "f Korea, inv.-.de Tibet and Coastal fortitl cat ions bristled with carry war into Indo-China. Singgum cmplaceU to repel a sea apore is reported again preparing attack. for nil -nut defense against pos*ibK' No Major Obstacle assault. The lightning landJapan struck swiftly by land launched conquest of the city in Bn d through the ,iir instead The February, 1912. by the Japanese mile-wide moot of Joliore Strait was n bitter les-mi not soon to bo between the city and the mainland forgotten. f liled to prove a major obstacle An island seaport which tip: / 1Jr the Japanese forces kwaimmg !. (he south-pointing Malay IN-nin,|own from beachheads on lhc|,, sula, thumb of continental Asia. Malayan causeway. The fall of Singapore hag been Great Britain': Singapore in the "opening weekgateway to the East for a century of the war was a disastrous blow and a quarter, the National GeoThis time there is little talk of graphic Society points out. As -'impregnable fortresa". Another Singapore goes, so goes the world's overland attack could be stopped, busiest trading post in rubber, tin Singapore's defenders believe, if and quinine, and one of the Far trough troops are available to seal Cast's greatest naval bases. ofT the Malay Peninsula's narrow Malaya Invaded neck to the north The naval base Many times before in history has been completely rebuilt, and nd pro-history has Malaya been )* %  : planes or e reported now based Index Steady While Prices Rise By PUD DOERI l.lNf.KK LONDON and more Britons—especially hou-. grumbling about %  otfjnfj prkot and attacking tha Laboui Qovarnment'a "Alice-in-Wond*rlnd" cost *>f Uvlnj statist ics. Mr. and afn, John Bull complain that the cost uf living hfc been going up steadily for many months and lhat Ukafa money is buying less and Lafsj m tin shops. 1 i Trade's omei.il The 100,000 tr< ng Iron ant nowevar, aasarti inattBtael Trades confederation re MOW nbai 14 and Decent Untl> termed it "statistical liocu. J so retail prices remained 11 oa*as" I i:me, no doubt, this sorTtt Government departments la f hOU—hpi Utnre It not only auli r wagaa, but Inevitable I'nters inlo all discussiom on i the -City of the Lio —INS French Inflict "Severe Lassos" invaded Ages ago the aneeitoof today's Australian aborigine: and POlynailan islanders swarmed down the peninsula's length and id it as a bridge from contincnnl Ai.i lo then unpeopled lands below the Equator. There followed tless migrant bands enroutc to Sumatra, Java and beyond. Ancient civilizations overflowing __ .... SAIGON, Feb. t. from India were next to cume. A £*" Union forces prevented Buddhist empire. Sri Vijaya. w**ge and indicted "severe gained a foothold on the Strait of OB *? yesterday on CommunistMalacca, which to modern times '* Vietnam rcbes trying to push has funneled Far Eastern sea trade acrfW ,ne Hanoi-Haiphong railbetween Indian Ocean and China *2&*P """y communique reSea Merchant-traders from India P !" toU *ybuilt ;. ntv eallad Slngnpura— They were engaged in a wideCity Of the Hngh, or Uon—in th ^ T T* a series of patrolplace which earlier Malays had named Tumasik-Sea Town. bushes in French A: and North Vietnam The Force made "massr But Javanese warriors, broad"**B "gainst rebelI concentraening n Hindu empire, socked thii ''.""n ?I '"""'i' AlxK ;? bo1 first Singapore about 1377 A I) 2* miles to the norMieast of Hanoi There-after. Malays avoided the_ n ,aI J „ c; "' "X> l^ttre I>e island, believing its red soil Ta.vMK.,ay. French Commandercursed by the blood spilled there. 2S2K '" l do Chm "' J* hcri : today for Tonking alter a ten days' Malaya Marked Conquered -"'>' -Ke uter. In 1511 Portugal conquered the We'll soon have lhat better Malaya market, taking the port of Malacca which had been founded n tlic peillnillll'l southwest coast by a fuKitivc prinea from Slngapuru. Malacca fell attain in 1641 t %  [ha lurch Then, in 1819. Britain"'; Sir Thomas Stamford i ilil from native sultans small, swampy island at Malaya*? tip. The modern port of Singapore flaw on Halfies' mangrove swamp. Malayan tin. then rubber, made it ri'h SinKiinorc's population grew until loday it is close to a million. It is n melting pot of Chinese, Malays, Indians. Arabs. Javanese. Burmese, Tibetans, Japanese, English and Arm A large majority nrc Chinee At the lima World War II erupted in the Pacific, Singapore with its great naval base was conOne Way Traffic II>SW,K'H, England. H. Adams, a builder, watted I month to get delivery of some fciav. bricks from Bury St. Ed. mundf i>7 miles distant. The t ansport company which handled the shipment explained they don't run a service .from Bury to Ipswich — only Ironi Ipswich t-j Bury. IC.P.) wages "Retail Prices*' Index Although stiii popularlj oaUad the "cost of living index 1 the ftg. ore is strictly the "Index of retail prfessT, Ii .hows the cost of an imaginary working class household budget if it wishes t.i live in exactly thr same wav as it did in 11(38 What tills imaginary household ipanl on these thing* in IMT •lied IIMI* Today, accoroII. i lo the latest ilnures, it would to spend 116 to get the same things in the same qualituThe old cost of living index was fl in KH4. based en sur vey in 1904. But by 1947 ii h..l become so anreal for various sons that the Government dc%  ided to start it all over ggaj forking frmn | 1!38 survey of 10.00" householdIn 1H47 the old indeg %  10, prices lust before the 100 The 180 was suddenly maiif I0O .n;;iin for the now 'index 0l iet.nl pine/ n that it is now impossible, from the new lad> c, la u II exactly na il"' OOBt uf livniK compares with pre war New Index Out Of Dale The new index, based on tne, IP38 lUrvty, chose new items to lake the liuusoh< Id budget But n* the apending p-ittern had greatly t'hanged durlnn the war, from We point of view, the new Indag is out of date beforo it started For example, among the good* assessed each month to indicate price variations in the new miles Iran badMaad and .< tin l.eltlo. Iron bedsit.m. ed from most Bnops >eais ,iki> and in kettle* hove been largely reilaced by aluminum or enamelled lettlea. Another obsolete Item in the official EboppinK li-t ^ -i iaii laaHjaaa, Another thing that mgki W real in tenns of actual shopping that the household concerned Is "imaginary". It consists of 3 X i person* of whom l*i are wagt) and only one child |g unurr 14 This may he satisfactory to atatistieians DUl maki I I %  omplieatloiis when RppUad t" calculations in real life The index does not lake into ."iKideiatleii Uta question of in come tax or other direct taxation \. rini.ii part of the cost of living. The Index, however, is painslak.ngly compiled. It was never intended to b taken literally and does not apply to ho use holds spending more than |I9.6P .. sraafe (iuide To Prices With all its faults it remains fomo Kulde to prices but certainly does not reflect the actual cosl of living The index has bean roundly atlaahad by all sections of the community, particularly the working man nnd the housewife. *Lale lasi year M. Labour Oi promisee tna Rouaa M Oassunona that ai jon as conditions were considered I*, M would take da first stepa towarda Introducing i r.ew cost of Irrtnsj index H read thai there was • eel d a new index adding; "The patterns of living of ou people have changed. Things re %  ardad IB the old days lii the work nix man's f.tnuly as luxurn-s i.-da. ubaoltlte easentlals." But it will prohaMy i % % %  ars before a new iiulex is 1 i. A new survey of fan will first have to t %  tha Ifinsatq %  > Laboui i. made no plai D i survey.—I N I Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay LESS AT THE MODERN Dress Shoppe (BROAD STREET) SPECIAL OFFERS In WWBBWBS iv I-JI .p-1. i^vri. pom i. timesSKMMtTS Ii 98 I I.IIMCS' I IIIMIII It SKIHT.S line \.-"riiiiii Olouri sti 00 < MAYsem XV I.ox sriHKixi.s 51 Gauge 15 Denier ge.M per pr. THE MODERN Dress Shoppe STREET dozing when the plane look off from Sioux City. Ha and anothar officer questioned the crew in Kanga* City. —1 S S. AS6PTIC OINTMENT Children's accidents quickly respond to the soothing and healing properties of Gercnolcne which rs out the dm sad stimulates ihc growth of new skin over the damaged jrea. Keep 100 handy for family use. FOR SPOTS, BRUISES, R&SHES, ABRASIONS, Etc. in n*jrd time. See us for • BRC FABRIC EXPANDED METAL TEMPERED HARD BOARD OIL STOVES & OVENS Phone 43M T. HERBERT Ltd. 10 & M Roebuck St.. & Magazine Lane. I Phone 4267 "I think I'd like a White Horse better than anything' WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky KLIM QUALITY IS ALWAYS UNIFORM •t-aHM-jaiEiSiSWr! %  ~ %  l ...fc • %  '•*" "" • • • ONLY ONI SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN THIS EXCITING FRAGRANCE I ^ Your skin will ba coolr.swtltr...T desirably dainty from head-io-lo* r if yau batha with fragrant Cathmora Booquel laoufy Soap. /*MVKLIM Is eicelkiat far rawlf aMMnsa KUM-.-o.rl KLIMl.r..s..Mhr lafaat fMdlaq KLIM ii iofe la the IIMCIS'W KLIM I. |treJaced aadar lfrlct%  1* Ul.ii 1 Ci "A pleasure to remember, a joy to And again M Sola DUtrihimn t W%AXm B. ARSSSTtuMC LTD, fwn-tut* MILK FUST IN FRIFIIINCI THI WORLD OVER profess SMOOTH SURFACES andprwenta 'cloudituf and' c&rfoaum Clir.MICO is Ihe COMPLETI* Houwhold Cleanwr — It clcam, puhthes and niolecis kilthcn uiennli. porcelain, tOSS, M, Us highly crhcieni S-M-O-O-TH pmit aciion icrrnne* grcaie, K'imc ami turface IUI without hauUi vonrtng or HUIII" ins — nod Hi Iragrant fl>crrirrc content r>rc*em* "*loodiog" on polished lurlace* and helps *4id oil turroaion on mtuk Saw while you make c*er>ihing about your home -thine srMb CHI'MICO, (he mow aaWaai arnl (xonomt(.al of clcarnen. Ami remember CHIMKO it to kind loyour hands / %  HAVE TOU TR'ED I.i'. KNOT Till? I ilull prnnv ultam whm fH fxV.f aM a dab of CUt Ml' U —'Miningproof ^CULM/COitJftcitK, EVELYN ROACH CO., LTD Rrldgrlaun. It.rl.nl.,. TMB OUNTT CMINIC*!. CO. ITO.. SWIS






ESTABLISHED 1895



FRIDAY, F



U.N. BRAND

‘No Alternative
For American

Aid In W. Europe”

Says Eisenhower

WASHINGTON, Feb. 1.
GENERAL DWIGHT EISENHOWER, the
North Atlantic Army’s Supreme Commander,
today reported to Congress on the state of Western
Europe’s defences.
Addressing a meeting of Congress, Generai Eisen-
hower said the decisions they must make would be

far-reaching and might determine the course of,

western civilization. :
Soils cinsieninedp ution - General Eisenhower said: “We
are concerned only with one thing.
In a world in which the power of

military might is much respected

Place Jettisons
4) Gallons Petrol

LONDON, Feb. 1.

A British airliner carrying 16
passengers to Rio De Janeiro had
to jettison 400 gallons of petrol
and return to London airport to-
day when one of its four engines
went out of action.

The plane, an Argonaut of
British Overseas Airways Corpor-
ation had been in the air half an
hour when the trouble started.

The petrol was jettisoned to
bring the plane’s weight down so
thiat it could land in safety.

After the engine had been re-
paired, it took off again.

a wall of peace and security,

What we are trying to do
cannot honestly be considered
by any other nation as a threat
to its security If any
charge is made it is for a nefa-
rious purpose.”

Eisenhower said the greatest
pool of skilled labour existed in
western Europe, and its indus-
trial fabric was second only to
that of the United States.

Must Stand With U.S.
If western Europe were driven
from America’s side to the other
side, the military balance of power



—Reuter would be shifted so drastically
that American safety would be
imperilled, It was impossible to

British Observer imagine the fall of western Eu-

rope to Communism, without the
simultaneous fall of other areas
associated with western Europe.

We would be cut off from areas
from which we draw materials
absolutely essential to our exist-
ence, he said, No matter how
strong we would be in keeping
open our communications, clearly
we must keep open these areas
and keep them friendly to us.
Eisenhower asked how the United

Paris Talks

’

For
LONDON, Feb. 1.

Britain had told France she will
send an observer to the Périg
conterence to study the organisa
tion of the European army, the
Fereign Office said today.

She had been invited to attend
as a full member.

The British Ambassador in Paris







hias been nominated as British|States could possibly think of
cverseer at the conference. existing without such vital sup-
. —Reuter plies from ~-broad as magnesium,

copper and uranium, He said such

h supplies were tied up with

y United States concern with the

Cut Off By Snow western European complex and

the United States
to defend it.

He said the reason for assist-
ance to Europe was not only
because the United States
would suffer economic atrophy
and eventually collapse, but be-

LONDON, Feb. 1, determination

The Spanish Village. Santiago
De La Espalda cut off by snow has
appealed urgently to the Govern-
ment of Jaen Province for aid,
Madrid Radio reported.

Since November 11, only three

" cause the United States could

village of food have reached* tne de the-4ob.
eee Europe and North America
—Reuter. between them had 350,000,000

people representing the highest
culture upon earth,

He said western Europe and
the United States together
possessed great reservoirs of!



Egypt Bans Bulletin

CAIRO, Feb. 1.

- e : leadership that had not yet been

e rptia I stry of the 3
tnedieent naan. poets: a press touched and they had the great-
bulletin issued by the Soviet est productive capacity and the

raw materials which they need-

ed,

Eisenhower said he did not in-
tend to report on his conversations
in Germany because “there has te
be a political understanding
achieved.” “I want no unwilling
contingents”, he added.

Eisenhower said there was
acceptable alternative”
can help in the
western Europe.

Will To Resist

The General said he found
throughout his tour of Atlantic
Pact countries a rejuvenated spirit
of resistance and determination

to live as free men, and to do their

PORT-OF-SPAIN Feb. 1, | part and take the risk,
A motor launch left here tonight)" One example of this spirit, he
to pick up 20 passengers from th®)/saiq) he found in France where

Legation in Cairo.

The latest number of this bul-
jetin which is issued in French
and Arabic contained a_ supple-
ment on the Warsaw Peace Con—
gress. ‘

The Ministry of the Interior
requested the Ministry for Foreign
Affairs to inform the Soviet Lega-
tion of the decision.

Recently, one Egyptian news-
paper complained it was being
“flooded” with propaganda mate-
rial issued by the Rumanian
Legation here.—Reuter



“no
to Ameri-
rearmament of

SHIP- IN TROUBLE



Dutch passenger freighter) tha ‘conscription law had been
Keningin Emma, 535 tons, re-| tightened to a point when it per-

almost no exceptions

ported in difficulty off north Vene | mitted
“They are determined to face up

zucla. Koningin Emma owned by

we are going to build for ourselves}

such |

Greece
Gets New
Cabinet —

ATHENS, Feb. }.
Venizelos’ reshuffled Cabinet
reduced to only 15 members was
sworn in tonight. The number of
ministers was reduced in accord-
ance with a resolution adopted by
a Special Committee directing 4
nation-wide drive for economy and

co-ordir on in administration,
King Paul of Greece returned
from his three-week tour of the
northeastern areas to, receive the
oath of the new inisters of all
Liberals of Democratic Socialists,
The number: cf ministers has
been reduced frem 29 to only 15
with four under--secretaryships.

—Reuter.

Connally
| Encouraged

WASHINGTON, Feb, 1.
Senator Tom Connally, Chair-
man of the United States Senate
{Foreign Relations Committee, said

today, General Eisenhower's re-
|

|
|
|








port to Congress “gave me real
encouragement about the attitude
of the Nations of Western Europe.”

If they enthusiastically rearm
and rebuild their strength, there
will be complete success, he added.

Senator Kenneth Wherry, Re-
publican Senator, said the report
“indicates that plans already have





gone ahead for us to do every-
thing cept carry out appropri-
ations,

—Reuter.

Manley Welcomes

Customs Union

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 1.

Mr. Norman Manley, Leader of
the Opposition Party in Jamaica,
eommenting to-day on proposals
for the West Indies Customs
Union said “I welcome the pro-
posals 100 per cent. They have
been long overdue.”

He said the Customs Union
should not wait upon federation.
Federation might take time and
the Customs Union should be set
up as quickly as possible.

“Once people see the obvious
advantages of a Customs Union,
it may be another stepping stone
in the functional approach io
federation”, He said “these func-
tional approaches may eventually

mean federation becomes inevit-
able and if that is the way in
which it is to come, let us wel-
some it’.

Ike Wants Farty
Divisions By 1952



WASHINGTON, Feb. 1.
Gen, Dwight Eisenhower was
reported to have told senators
oday that he was aiming at a
Sur an Defence Force of 40,
livisions by the end of 1952
Testifyi in a closed session of




he Senate
armed Serv
Zisenhower
avoided any

the proposed
ments to such

‘oreign Relations and
ices Committees, Gen-
Was said to have
direct statement on
American commit-
a force,
—Reuter.

Griffin Is Il

LONDON, Feb



L;

Roman Catholic officials called
for prayers totiay for Cardinal

Bernard Griffin, 51-year-old Arch.
bishop of Westminster because of
a deterioration in his health.

In 1949 the Cardinal spent three

months in hospital for nervous
exhaustion
Dectors advised him to take

a complete rest when he arrived

the Surinam Navigation Company) to the threat of Communism both| in Rome last October for the
developed engine trouble on _thel internally and externally,” he|Preclamaticn — cf the Bodily
way to Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana) cajiq Assumption. of the Virgin Mary
from Curacao, Dutch West Indies He found the same spirit of He had a long holiday in_th<
She will be towed to Port-of-Spaia) ;esolution in Belgium, Holland,} ccuntry after he returned to Eng-

by another vessel for repairs,

—Keuter. @ On Page 3

SMASH UP

land on November 3
—Reuter



MOTOR CAR X-448 was extonsively damaged after be













St. Stephen's School. about 11.35 o’clock on Wed: zht. It is owned by Hugh Garnes of St.
! nd was being driven by Mowbrey ved was National "bus M.174, driven by
Claude Payne of Paynes Bay, St. James. Pic Thursday morning





{

|



}

|

; to

\‘killing all

COMMUNIST

WILL BE
aha 4



MARRED D



EVERTON WEEKES just returned from Grenada was met at Sea-
well yesterday by his fiancee Miss Joan. Manning. They are to be

married to-morrow afternoon at St. Michael's Cathedral.

|
U.S. RESOLUTION IS BEST
HOPE FOR SETTLEMENT

Attlee Tells Commons

Prime Minister Attlee said t

States resolution on Korea before #he United Nations, offerec
the best hope in the existing cir
negotiated settlement with Chi

Britain, Awstralia
Arrange Meat Pact
LONDON, Feb, 1.

senior officials of the Bri-
Food Ministry will arrive in

Two
lish
negotiations
agreement
Australia,

A Focd

said

15 year
Byitain

on a
between and
Ministry

the two officials
discuss adjustments to other
contracts covering supplies of
dairy products to Britain,

The 15-year plan when finally
agreed to designed to make
Australia one of the most impor-
tant and largest meat producing
areas in the world

It involves the expenditure of
ebout £5,000,000 on capital de-
velopment to open up large areas
of Northern Australia for cattle
ferming.—Reuter,

Bevin. Making
Good Recovery

LONDON, Feb. 1
Foreign Secretary Ernest
Revin’s recovery from pneumonia
is so good that his doctor thinks it
unnec?ssary to issue further bul-
leti the Foreign Office said to
day. —Reuter

Jackson Named C.J.

(From Our

spokesman
were going

is







Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Feb. 1,

His Majesty has approved the
appointment of His Honour D. E
Jackson as the Chief Justice
the Windward and Leeward
Islands. Mr. Jackson came to the
Leewards as Puisne Judge in
October 1949.

Two Still Missing

BELFAST, Northern Ireland,
Feb, 1,

Two men were still believed
missing today after a 20 yards
high gangway alongside the giant
Argentine whale factory ship Juan
Peron crashed here last night kill-
ing 16 men.

About 100 men plunced to the
ground and into the water between
the ships’ sige and the quay, an‘4
35 were to-day in hospital, six of
them very ill, None of the Argen-
tine engineers were involved.
Builders of the 32,000 ton Juan
Peron are *o investigate the causes
of the accident.

The ship was. moved from
quay to help in the search for the
missing men, —heuter.

f
of







nh eo . .
I'weiity Missing
REYKIAVIK, Iceland, Feb. 1.
Aircraft, skiers, and mountain-
Pers combined in a great search
to-day for a Douglas Dakota, with
20 Icelanders aboard, believed to
have crashed near Reykiavik late
last night—Feuter

14 KILLED IN CRASH





LIBSON, Feb. 1,

The Portuguese military Sky

master plane from the Azore
‘crashed into the sea last

14 people aboard



believed to have bee
caused by an explosion occurr¢
four miles cast of Victoria
Tercejra island in the Azore
—Reuter

| crash,

ea

Australia later this month for final |
meat |



LONDON, Feb. 1.
oday that the amended United

tances of obtaining
na.
Attlee speaking in th
Breed whe becaus® th
ment felt it offered this
ihat Sir Gladwyn Jebb, Britis
representative at Lake Success
was instructed to vote in favow
of it.

The Prime Minister said he
wanted specially to call the atten
tion of Parliament to the fina
paragraph in the resolution af
firming: “That it continues to be
the policy of the United Nation:
to bring about a cessation of hos-
tilities in Korea,—Reuter,



DS.
vern
hope



Pole Escapes
} “s .
From Russians

STOCK,HOLM, Feb, 1

A 48-year-old Pole from Londor
|; who jumped from a Russian shi
here last night has asked fo
asylum in Sweden as a_ political
refugee, police said today
He escaped from pursuing Ru

n sé en after a scuffle in one
of Stockholm's bus'est squares

The ship, the Belostrov, lef!
London on Monday for Leningrad







The Pole said he was granted free
passage when he _ promised te
return to Poland but he changed
his mind when the ship reached

Stockholm

After walking up and down the
hip’s deck, he jumped over the
ide and raced through customs
sheds chased by the second mate
of the Belostrov and seamen with
sticks.

He passed through streets shout-
ing at passing motorists to stop
One car stopped and the driver
aid in English “jurmp in”.

A second motorist stopped
houting to the first: “Drive on, I
will follow you.” He pushed off
the Russians as they tried to jump
n his running board.

The first motorist, a motor-car

esman, said: “I drove the Pole
to the Police. In broken English
he said he had left London legally
and he showed me his passport

‘When I told him he was safe
he kissed my cheek and hands.”

—Reuter

Jamaica Will
Drop £Yam

KINGSTON, Feb. |
Frée trade between the British
Caribbean colonies will, if carried
t











ut, cost Jamaica an estimatei
£500,000 Ie in customs revenue
aceordin to official figures re-
leasect Jamaica imports far
more 1 the ‘other islands,
principally oil from Trinidad, than
he exports to them. —CP,

IN THE.

LONDON, Feb. 1
The British Government funds
yeak on the London stock
ange today. Falls of up to
followed sales by
institutions ang small trusts who
were reinvesting proceeds in
tee! shares, Smaller investors,





ialf q point





Tomorrow |
































r







FIVE CENTS

k

HINA

PRICE:



BY 44 VOTESTO 7

Socialists
Survive
BY 11 VOTES

LONDON, Feb
Labour
survived
to unseat

1
Government
oppositior
over its
handling of the coal supplies,
By 300 votes to 289 they defeat
a motion to that effect
the Conservative party,
This deplored the “contrast
tween ministerial promises

Britain's
tonight
attempt

an
it

ed

The House of Commons
during the debate that
must carry on until the winter
ends with 15 per cent, less coal
than it needs for full production

—Reuter,

heard
industry

Labour M.Ps
Stage Revolt
AGAINST CHINA POLICY

LONDON, Feb. 1
A number of left-wing Labour
members staged a minor revolt :n
Commens today
ernment’s
China.
Atte ra statement by the Prime
Minister they rose in succession to
criticise Britain's support of the
United States Resolution at the
United Nations branding China an
aggressor They cried “answer,
answer” when Attlee showed some
reluctance to reaffirm that Britain
still wanted to encourage the
admission of Chinese Communists
‘o the Security Council
After hesitating the Prime Min-
ster replied “our position has been
nade perfectly plain. Perhaps it
8 not very helpful to have further
questions on
natter."”
This evasion set some political

against the Gov-

policy on Communist

this rather delicate

i
from
be
and
the present shortages which have
inflicted great hardships in the
home and. widespreaq industrial
dislocation and stoppages”,
All nine Liberal members ab
stained from voting.

LAKE SUCCESS, Feb. i.
"THE United Nations General Assembly today
approved the United States resolution con-
demning Communist China as the aggressor im
Korea.
he voting was 44 to 7 with nine abstentions.
Earlier, against. Soviet opposition, the Assembly
had decided against holding a \ebate on the resolu-
tion. Immediately the Assemuly met to ratify the
resolution passed by its Political Committee on
Tuesday, President Nasrollah Entezam called for
a vote as to whether the issue should he debated.




















rhe Assembly voted 32 to five
ny to dispense with discussion. Oniy
A A E the Soviet group voted for the de-
bate. Many of the other 60-mem-
ber nations did not cast a vote
B \ TTI K The ter of tl resolution
1 uready adopted by th Political
4 1 1ich declared China
AS sressor, provided f a
neti and
of a Good
three to put
out peace feelers. Opposed to
NEAR INCHON the resolution were the Soviet
B JULIAN BATE group of five and India and
ay SUMEAS ES Burma Abstentions were Af-
at rOKYO, Feb I ghanistan Egypt, Indonesia
Fierce hand to hand fighting} pakistan. Saudi-Arabia den,
rallied in West Korea today | Syria, Yemen and ¥i
General MacArthur’s men resisted Although there wa i
he first major Communist counter lelegates were permitted to
blow since the United Nations’ ol an mate . ; rm ’
‘Iimite fensive” beg a week | Plain vote
aa offensive” began a-weeK |" "Ganoral Carlos Romulo: @t
’ : Oe, he *hy i) rir
It is estimated that two regi-!Pounced that the Philippi
ments of Chinese and North{ Would vote for the resolution ar
Koreans mounted a counter attack} Said his country was more cé
north of Inchon, 24 miles to the; Vineed than ever that it
cutheast of Seoul, the former|Sure way to peace
South Korean capital. From dawn Semyon Tsarpkin he Se
to afternoon the battle raged] Union said that the United St
savagely had, “finally unmasked itself ¢
An Eighth Army communique] the opponent of a peaceful settle
said bad weather had hampered

ment of the Korean and other Far
tern questions,’

Sir Gladwyn Jebb, for Britain,
gave a “short explanation of the
understanding which ha
me to vote in favour of the Unit
States resolution.” the

close support during the fitst pours
of the counter attack, but Ameri-
ean and Turkish troops moved
into the assault with equally fierce
opposition Then Communists
threatened to encircle them
General MacArthur's



enabled
>t



men He said
called up reinforcement, but they| British Government hoped that
in turn ran into fresh Communist] the Good Offices Committee would
troops fighting bitterly Flying| start work forthwith My Gov
“box-cars" dropped 42 tons of;erniment hopes the first task will
ammunition to aid the United|/ pe to study the verious com-"

Nations troops.
Due west and seven miles to.the
northwest of Suwon, an unknown

munications from Peking received
by. one channe). or avother and
decide what further clarifications

a " number of Communists ‘opened 2 Kina sa >

»bservers wondering if any switch army fire on Turkish troops soon are required. 1S St ag
in British policy was imminent after mid-day, the Eighth Army Faris Bey El Khoury of Syria
3ut a Foreign Office spokesman reported. ; —-Reuter. said that the United States resolu-

told Reuter later there hed beer

10 change. Britain still believed
that the Peking Governmem
should represent China at Lake
Success. —Reuter.



Another Communist
Resigns From Party

ROME, Feb, 1

The Conservative 1! Tempo re
ported today that Communisi
Vincenzo Perfetto had resigned a:
Secretary of the Workers Council
in a Pescara Dyeworks as a pro
test against undemocratic’
political strike

Communist. chiefs gathered ai
the party headquarters in Rome
yesterday and were reported t
be examining ‘deviations’ 0;
deputies,

A communique issued by a body
calling itself the “revolutionary
Communist group” Said today
“This ferment of opposition to the
bureaucracy of the Communis
Party and to the Soviet Union ex
presses the progressive tendencie
of the working class”

The group predicted the birt!
of a “revolutionary party of
Italian proletariat in line with
similar development in othe

countries,’’——Reuter,

Fourteen Arrested

CAIRO, Feb. 1.
Egyptian police arrested 14
vorkers shouting for food and
lothing today in an_ industrial
entre near Cairo. They accused
hem ef “provoking labour un-

est

The workers were recently dis

harged from textile factorics as
heing redundant

One of them was said to be
carrying a circular signed by the





Lief of the “Unemployment
Struggle Committee” threateniny
1 march on Parliament if workers
were not given consideration
—RKeuter.



TROOPS MUST STOP
AT 38TH PARALLEL

WASHINGTON, Feb. 1,
High American officials are
reported to have decided that

at the 38th Parallel if they cat
drive as far north in Korea
—Reuter



STOCK MARKET

Interest elsewhere wa
selective. Oils were occasionally
higher with Mexican eagle
strong on revival of rumour
cash settlement of outstanding
compensation payments.

In the foreign ecti
Australian drawn bond

¢
of

on

at three



however, re elling steels and—a-half were next to Italian
| ag reinvestin in indus- arrears payments
| trials particularly textiles which Overseas support~for German
ho , leng list advances.” potash, issues wa reporte
{} Ss ing lso were in demand Profit-taking depressed
| and there ‘ ai ] but kaffir dividend paye
|} engineerin comy ni¢ prov Par buyin

chedule

—Reuter

United Nations troops should stop

tion was most likely to extend the
Korean conflict. The United
Nations would be faced with about
800,000,000 of the world’s popula -

Turkish Woman



, , tion aguinst the resolution
In Korea War Speaking just before the vote,
Sir Benegal Ran, leader of 12
' ANKARA, Feb, 1 Asian powers which unsuecess
Madame Sabisa Gokcen of Tur- | fully re-proposed the Seven
key, who is going to Korea in al Power Conference with Commu-
ew days time to serve as a pilot} nist China rather than con-
with the United Nations air forces, | d2mnation, spoke for India.
alled last night on the Turkish He said the United States Reso-

‘restdent, Cellar Bayar lution did not end hostilities, nor
The President congratulated her; did it hold any reasonable pros-

@ the “courage and seriousness” | pect of olving any of the other
f her decision problem:

Madame Gokcen, who is 36, ON eaze, 7
sraduated as a regular Turkish | ———_—_—_m ——-

\ir Force pilot in 1935 and took




art in the , campaign against} TELL THE ADVOCATE
ebels in Eastern Turkey THE NEWS
She has also served as an RING S1i3 Me
nstructress ja the civil air force DAY OR NIGHT

— Reuter



Ice (Cream Obtainable



® PURITY GUARANTEED
® QUALITY MAINTAINED |
n

FLAVOURS
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE ExXrense

SIMPLY ORDER

Bieo

On sale Day or Night at Soda Fountains,

DELIGHTFUL

TIME
WORRY

Parlours and Restaurants or direct from
Barbados Ice Co., Ltd.—Bay Street.


PAGE

ON, AND MRS, H. A. CUKE

left for St. Vincent yester-
day afternoon by B.G. Airways
to attend the Annual Meeting of
the Methodist Synod, being held
this year in St. Vincent. They
expect to be away for one week,

Deluxe Programme

M.S. Devonshire is due to

arrive in Barbados to-mor-
row. The entertainment com-
mittee, who have organised the
programme of entertainment dur-
ing her visit, have done a fine job.
On the night of her arrival there
is to be a dance at the Royal Bar-
bados Yacht Club in honour of
the Captain, Officers and Cadets,
There are to be dances on Mon-
day, Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday next week at the Bar-
bados Aquatic Club for the Chief
Petty Officers, Petty Officers and
Men of H.M.S. Devonshire, Two
of these dances are being given
by the Royal and Merchant Navy
Welfare League and two by the
Port Welfare Committee.

There is a picnic arranged by
the Royal and Merchant Navy
Welfare League on Sunday for
Chief Petty Officers, Petty Officers
and Men. Destination is the Crane
hotel.

Devonshire will play games of
Football, Cricket, Water Polo,
Lawn Tennis, Table Tennis, Vol-
ley Ball, Basket Ball against local
teams and I understand that a
Ladies’ Water Polo Team is to
play a match against the Cadets.
This I must see.

Operations Engineer

AJ, ERIC HIRST, Asst. Oper-
ations Engineer of Shell
Leaseholds Distributing Co., Ltd.,
who arrived from Antigua on
Sunday evening left on Wednes-
day for Trinidad by B.W.1I.A. He
Was a guest at the Aquatic Club.

For Carniva!

R, CHARLES HITT who

arrived here on January 13th
accompanied by his wife and fam-
ily, has gone to Trinidad for Car-
nival. Mr. Hitt is Flight Supt., of
Pan American Airways stationed
in Puerto Rico, He was once
stationed in Trinidad,

Back to the U.S.

EV. DUDLEY COBHAM,
Chaplain to the United
Parishes of the Barbados Charity
Group in New York, who had
been holidaying in Barbados since
January 4th, returned to the U.S.
over the week-end. His stay here
was spent with his aunts in Bush
Hall, He is also Curate and Di-
rector of Youth Work at St.
Philip’s Church in New York City.

Rev. Cobham is a Barbadian.

Down for the Winter
AJ. GEN. AND MRS. D. J.
MACDONALD are at present

holidaying in Barbados, staying at
the Marine Hotel, They are down
for the Winter. They arrived
from Toronto about two weeks
ago and are here until March 17th.
They spent a few days in Bar-
bados abcut three years, ago. This
is their first real stay here,

oOSSW ORD





Across

. Bird, diva or poet? (8)
. Teem, (4)
Tropical grass, including rice. (5)
Expressed in few words, (7)
. Urn. (4)
. Sort of dog that is nursed, (3)
- oo Ly pale Opts, (4)
Sland ot the 3 Down group, (6
Before, (3) oA ofF
Bathing belie’s objective ? (4)
- Lo us this is the yew, (8)

uite audible, (4)
vase in point, on the contrary,
(4) 26, Diminution. (9)

Down

Out at Inst as the shoot sata
when it broke the ground. (6)
Waterless watercourse. (6)
Companionship. (7)
Move circuiarly, (5)
To save one's this is to escape.
af) 8. Type of tastener. (3)
xpert at last so easily bent. (7)
Comedy guve her a double nega-
aire. ip
16's obviousiy German,
17. Single entry. (4) m_ae
if you don’t like the passage this
may get_you out. (4)
And in Germany, (3)
Not quite sixty seconds but it
belongs to us. (3)

Solution of vesterday’s puzzle,—Across:
and 6 Down, Dow-in-the-Manger: 7,
Purpose; 11, Ate; 12, Kiln; 15, Bov; 14)
Rag: 15. Naiad: 16, Bite; ‘17, Type; 19,
Spar, 21, Playpens: 24, Aeon; 25, Asti!
Sracter. Down: 2, Outlay: 3, Grey;

vi 5, Heir; 6, .
Painter: 8. Pub: 3. 3k}: 48. Tbintanes

bed 19, Spa; 20 Pest: 21. Pah: 22)

JANETTA





Phone

READY MADE DRESSES of all types

WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Local Handicraft

EVENING MITTENS— in Pastel Shades and Black
READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty’s of London.

Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30

HOURS:

Flowered CRETONNE

at EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Wise Buys
BARGAINS today,
Prices will rise.

So don't delay -



Blatant:'18; |

UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAM’S, Lower Broad St.




Mr. E. J. PETRIE—
transferred

Transferred to Kenya

R._E, J. PETRIE, Financial
Secretary who left Barbados
on December 7th 1950 on six
months’ holiday has been appoint-
ed Accountant General in Kenya,
He sails today from the U.K. to
take up his new appointment,
Prior to his transfer here in
1948, Mr. Petrie was serving in
Kenya as Assistant Financial Sec-
retary.

Paseenger Supt.

R. RAY LEGGE, Passenger

Supt, of B.W.LA. in Trinidad
who arrived here on January 27th,
returned to Trinidad by B.W.I.A.
on Wednesday afternoon, He was
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.

Air Survey

APT, MIKE YOUNG and Mr.
, Eric Ward, pilot and co-pilot,
respectively of the Air Survey Co.,
Ltd’s DC-3 which has been mak-
ing an aerial survey of Barbados
and the neighbouring islands left
yesterday for Trinidad in their
aircraft. The remainder of the
crew will continue to be based
here. Trinidad is the next island
to be surveyed, The aircraft will
make the survey and remain in
Trinidad. The film will be sent
here to be processed,

Shoré Visit
EV. SETH WHITE, Seventh

Day Adventist Minister here,
left yesterday for Antigua by
B.W.I.A. He will also visit St.

Kitts before returning to Barba-
dos. He will be away one week.

No Harm, Trying

R, L, C. TRENT of Loveland,

Ohio, has asked ~Councillor

§. R. Evans, Mayor of Winchester,

England, to find him an English

wife because the average Ameri-

can girl is “so spoilt and requires
so much,”

The Bride must be between 19
and 35, have at least a high school
education, be attractive and ‘able
to wear good looking clothes, and
weigh not more than 130 lbs.

Trent said in his letter to the
Mayor that he could offer a lux-
ury home, two cars, an aeroplane
and a “fair” income, He also
said he had been married and had
ason aged 13.

Trent told the Mayor that he
could probably find a dozen girls
in America who would be glad to
marry him but “the average
American is so spoiled and re-
quires so much that if it is possible
I wouid like to have one from
your country.”

I do not know if the offer is
open to Barbadian girls, but
there’s no harm in trying.



ert

There 1s no one in sight so Rupert
hurries towards a van that is stand-
ng on the roadside, and ashe reaches
t the driver comes striding out of a
zateway. This time the little bear
loesn’: try to des *. He
opens his sketch t
sketch of her, ‘I'm










2684

DIAL 4606

[ee ce Oe cee een eee See cen te a Sa See SN oe We

A een

alling



“
1 ‘ i
i LINENS dept. lines
: Yd, i
i 27" Print CRETONNE 64¢ Willows 2° |
J
1 36" CHEESE CLOTH 42¢ | Pillow-cases- :
1 S56"STRIPE TICK 1.19 94¢ & 97% 1
1 DOMESTIC 38¢ & 55¢ i
5

Returned To Barbados
R. C. GROSSMITH, Admin-
igtrative Secretary C.D. and

W., and Mr. C. C. Skeete, Director
of Agriculture, who attended the
Meteorological Conference in
Port-of-Spain returned to Barba-—
dos on Wednesday by B.W.1A.

Mr. Grossmith was Chairman
at the meeting. and Mr. Skeete
represented Barbados. Members
from the other W.1. territories

attended the meeting.

It was unanimously decided to
take over the meteorological sta-
tions established in the area ‘by
the R.A.F. Transport Command
during the war. It is not yet
known what each territory will
pay for operating the unified Brit-
ish Caribbean ‘Met’ Service. Mr.
Grossmith has handed proposals
made at the meeting to Sir George
Seel, Head of Development and
Welfare who will transmit them
to the Secretary of State for the

; Colonies and to the various Gov-

ernors.

With Trinidad
Telephone Co.,

R. “ASH” GREENLAND,

formerly Dial Office Engineer
at the Barbados Telephone Co.,
who is now with the Trinidad
Telephone Co., arrived here on
oreny by B.W.1A. on a short
visit.

Mr. Greenland has just return-
ed from four months in England
and was an intransit passenger
through Barbados last week by
the Bonaire .

New Dancing Teacher

ISS JOAN RANSOME arrived

from England on Wednesday

via Jamaica and Trinidad, She

came in on B.W.1.A.’s afternoon
flight from Trinidad.

Miss Ransome will take over
the Madame Bromova Dancing
School which is now a _ limited
liability company from Molly
Radcliffe.

She is staying at Graystone
Flats, Marine Gardens,

From Trinidad
R. SYDNEY SILVERA, Ex-
port Manager of Brandram
Henderson Ltd., Paint Makers
arrived yesterday from Trinidad
by B.W.1.A. He is here on a
short visit.

Staying With Friends
RS. MARGARET M, DUN.
HAM arrived from Trin-
idad yesterday morning by
B.W.I.A. to spend a short holi-
day in Barbados staying with
friends. Mrs Dunham used to be
Treasurer of the Seventh Day
Adventist Mission here before she
went to Trinidad,

Three Weeks’ Holiday

Rh. AND MRS. SYDNEY

GNAPP and their daughter
Susan arrived from Venezuela via
Trinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. to spend three weeks’
holiday in Barbados. They are
staying at Coral Sands, Worthing.
Mr. Gnapp is with Shell Caribbean
Petroleum Co., in Maracaibo.



FOR JUNIOR

CHICAGO

A device aimed at eliminating
maternal gray hairs when baby
gets locked in the bathroom went
on display in Chicago,

Among the features at the
National Association of Home
Builders Exposition which opened
a five-day run is a safety hinge
for doors.

When junior
the bathroom,

locks himself in

a hard shove on

the hinge side of the door causes
the hinges to part and opens the
door.—I.N.S,




taking care of her," he says.
“She's run away. Please tell me
if you've seen her."* “Why, yes,”’
smiles the man, who seems to be
amused at something. ‘She came
past here only three minutes ago.
You're on the right road. She can’t

be very far away."



p FEET on rut













DIAL 4220



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Judy Garland’s

Story



Hy Judy Garland

As Told To.

When I was nineteen, Dave

‘Michael Drury

aughter. I’m glad for him.

Rose and I eloped to Las Vegas,! We’re each kind of content about

if you call it eloping when your, the other.

mother goes along.

To feel no ill will
oward a person you .once were

I don’t know how to explain that married to is a special king of

marriage; there wasn’t any real
reason for it. I was much too
young. probably nobody should
be married at nineteen; but you
couldn’t have made me believe it
then.

Mom tried to tell me; so did
several other people. I thought my
superficial knowledge of the world
was all there was to know.

I was in a cocoon emotionally,
and Dave needed a certain kind of
a girl that I wasn’t. He’s a talented
man with an inner strength that
makes him live a little apart,

He enlisted in the army without
telling me till afterward, He didn’t
do it to be mean; he was just
accustomed to fighting his own
battles and making his own de-
cisions. ‘

He and I were among the first
entertainers to go into army camps
and put on shows. He worked
hard at it, and we made records
together, but music wasn’t enough,
And I was awfully young. It was
something only time could do
anything about.

I ran into Dave on the street not
long ago. He’s married to a love—
ly girl, and they have a baby

blessedness, and I’m grateful for
it.

During the time our marriage
was running out, though, I was
despondent. I didn’t want to
make a botch of my relationships
with people. Nobody wants that,
really, not I nor anybody else.
he only thing I did well, it
seemed, was work. That is not
always a blessing.

Paul Gallico had written a story
especially for me, and Robert
Nathan adapted it into q screen
play called “The Clock”, It was
my first and only crack at a com-
letely nonmusical movie, and I
oved that story.

t was a delicately balanced

about a soldier and a girl

who met in wartime under the
ck in Pennsylvania station.
nee got separated in a crowd and
didn’t even know each other's
names so they went back to the
clock and found each other again.
They were married in an ugly
civil ceremony, with an elevated
train drowning out the words.
But they went into a church later
and made their own service and



GLOBE THEATRE

Opening TO-DAY 5 and 8.30 and continuing

SUMMER STOCK

Gene KELLY — Judy GARLAND — Eddie BRACKEN

ToNite 8.30 ToNite

LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE

Perey Welch—“San Fernando Valley”
Arthur Moore—“Love Somebody”
Dorian Thompson—*“Our Very Own”
Byron Ross—“It’s Wonderful”
Carlton Best—‘Near You”

Frank Greaves—‘Roomful of Roses”

Judges: Mrs. Grantley Adams; Mrs. N. Evelyn

and Mr.

Hutchinson

Music by Clevie Gittens and his Orchestra

PRICES: Pit 16; House 30; Balcony 40; Box 54

N.B.—“SUMMER STOCK” will be shown after

LOCAL

TALENT

SHOW STARTS 8.30 P.M.





AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Oniy)

MATINEES : TODAY & TOMORROW at 5 p.m,
TONIGHT to SUNDAY NIGHT at 8.30
Paul Douglas, Linda Darnell, Celeste Holm, Charles Coburn in
“EVERYBODY DOES IT”
A 20th Century-Fox Picture





MONDAY & TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30
MATINEE : TUESDAY at 5 p.m,
Dick Haymes, Maureen O'Hara, Harry James in

“DO YOU

LOVE ME”

in Technicolor
A 20th Century-Fox Picture





MATINEE ; WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
Tyrone Power, Jean Peters

“CAPTAIN OF CASTILE”

in Technicolor
A 20th Century-Fox Picture





in

CLEAR THE WAY!

BOGART’S MOVING FASTER THAN ANY MAN EVER MOVED

BEFORE!

TO-DAY 2.30

SATURDAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

ME'S A TEST PLOT POR JET



{ RAI AD LESLIE LOOT IO KIT BME | NEE,

van omecien By
‘RAYMOND MASSEY - RICKARD WHORF STUART HEISLER

and 6.30 p.m.

and continuing until TUESDAY
DLANES! WHAT A ROLE! —-
, } a 3 a





WOE SADR Hein MASINI Ee

SCREEN PLAY BY LIAM O°DAIEN AND VINGENT ~
SUROLSTED BF A STORY BY 4 ACDHOND HmOR

Also the Short: “SOQ YOU WANT TO BE IN PICTURES”

Plus Latest “WORLD NEWS”
(Presented by Warner Pathe News)

PLAZA Theatre BRIDGETOWN (Dial 2310)







CUPS and PLATES
DINNER CARRIERS
JUGS

SAUCEPANS
KITCHEN SINKS





ENAMELWARE

~ A wide range to select from...

BASINS
CHAMBERS
TOILET SETS
SOAP DISHES
TABLE TOPS

Stocked by our HARDWARE DEPARTMENT
Telephone No, 2039



THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE

COTTON

FACTORY

LTD.

Hardware and Ironmongery Department Telephone No. 2039

ee



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1951
ad SS SSSOPC SS VSTOP OS OPS FT

+o,





thei ‘i 40 SSS SOSSCPSSPO FICS SOO FOS OFS fs
eir own beauty, an the next, ¢ .
morning a soldier had to go away % SpPeE!IG HTSTO WN : R
to war. ~ R_ E TIME 8.30
5 5 % .
It had to be done just right.) ¥ place T H E AT
Robert Walker played opposite FRIDAY — SUN S FRIDAY SUN.
“me, and he’s wonderful, but some- Jonn EISSMULLER .
» at \ * ! Jonn 3S) g ons seC i ES”
how it didn’t go together. After | "Jungle. Ji T (2) “THE SECRET OF ST. IV
a while the studio shelved it 1.) “CAPTIVE GIRL” With Richard NEY,
I wasn’t happy about that, and with. Buster-CRABPE a
I kept going over it in my mind. nila Ugom Pack iti Oo Vanessa BROWN
One day I went to the studio Thrills Excitement!" AbticnsY Aaventaeel
officials and told them I knew Mat: 4.90, Sat, ist Tart Wild West RR
what the picture needed—Vin- | Days Don't Miss this Double
ae anh BOAO OLAS ELLIS SSL LAR

“That man?” they exclaimed.
“Are you crazy? He’s the guy you
were always getting so mad at.’ |

“Yes, I know,” I said, “but he







PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

" he b work + , I've First story of the Jet Planes! It couldn't be told ‘til now!
pl oe nt eae hell TODAY 2.30 & 8.20 p.m. SAT, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. & continuing ‘til TUESDAY
‘shia ‘atney. Humphrey Eleanor ‘ ”
understand this story.” BOGART PARKER in ‘CHAIN LIGHTNING

I got him, and we did the pic-
ture. It just missed being great
The critics said it proved I could
hold up my end without a forty-
piece band, and that was gratify-
ing.

From my personal point of
view, it was a triumph because it
was during “the clock” that |
lecked at Vincente one day and
something hit me, I thought
here was a man I could know for
years and still find fresh interest
in, We started going out together,
and about six months after m»
divorce was final, we were mar-
ried in my mother’s house.

We took three months off for a
honeymoon in New York and then
went to Boston for the opening
of one of Vincente’s pictures, It
was the first time in more years
than I could remember that I
just relaxed and had fun and lei
somebody else take care of me.

By the time we got back to
Hollywood, I knew the baby was
coming and I felt happy and
loved.

We were wild over Liza from
the first moment we laid eyes on
her, but I fretted over not having
the calm and serenity 1-thought 1}{
ought to have.

I “wanted deeply to be a good

Also “SO YOU WANT TO BE IN PICTURES" & latest ‘WORLD NEWS"



SAT. 9,30 a.m, & 1,30 p.m,
“RAIDERS OF THE SOUTH”
with Johnny Mack Brown and

“RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL"
with Jimmy Wakely

MAT. TODAY 4.45 p.m. (only)

“BELOW THE DEADLINE”
with Warren Douglas and

“LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT”
| Johnny Mack Brown





——_— ——

PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)

The Biggest of the Big Ones From Warner Bros. !

“TASK FORCE” IN COLOR

by Technicolor
Starring Gary Cooper, Jane Wyatt, Wayne Morris














MIDNITE SHOW SAT.

“DEATH VALLEY RANGERS” &
Ken Maynard, Hoot Gibson

(Tomorrow) 3rd

“DYNAMITE CANYON”

Tom







GALETWY—(rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

The all-the-way Action Double from RKO!
TODAY to SUNDAY 8.30 MAT. SUN, 5 p.m.

| “ROSEANNA McCOY”





Farley Granger, Joan Evans and
“MARSHAL OF MESA CITY”
George O'Brien

MIDNITE TOMORROW

“BELOW the DEADLINE”
Warren Douglas

(SAT.) the Action-packed Double!

& “RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL”
Tom Keene

ROYAL

TO-DAY Only 4.30 and 8.30

wife and mother, and I was a
little seared.

In an effort to learn why I had
never been able to get closer to
people, I took a series of psycho-
analytical treatments, and I have
never regretted anything more.
TY’m_sure_ psychoanalysis has
helped a great many people, but
for me it was like taking strong
medicine for a disease I didn’t
have. It just tore me apart.

I went back to work and lashed
myself as I always had. The
friction of personalities in the |
movie business is something fairly



aS
ESP iRE

TO-DAY 2.30 and 8.30
& Continuing to Tuesday



M-G-M Big Double

| Columbia Pictures presents

Spencer TRACY &

Van JOHNSON
in

MILLAND

Ray
Resalind RUSSELL

cent ie Pe Self “THIRTY
7 “A WOMAN OF SECONDS
DISTINCTION” | OVER TOKYO”

times by money, by fame, by the
with AND

lopsided idea that only movies
Edmund GWENN & “THE ARNELO

I don’t want to hurt anyone, and
ebviously I won't name names
but there have been people it
Hollywood who sometimes make
it extremely hard for me to do
what I was so desperately trying
to do — find myself. At least I
felt that way. —-(I.N.S.)

matter.
Janis CARTER



Ԥ i Shi. .
imax, Attempted Sule and AFFAIR”
t Renewe ope.)
} R ox Y Starring

John HODIAK &
George MURPHY

BBC. Radio Programme

FRIDAY, Feb. 2,

TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15 Only
1951,





630—12 a.m, 19.76 m.
—--- —— Columbia Big Double ...
7 am. The News, 7.10 am, News OLYMPIC
Analysis, 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials, SOR
725 a.m. Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m Glenn FORD & . >
Freedom under the law, 7.50 a.m. In- Terry MOORE
terlude, 8 a.m. Listeners’ Choice, 8.45 TO-DAY io SUNDAY
a.m. Good films and bad films, 9 a.m.

The News, 9.10 am, Home News from in 4.50 and 5.48
Britain, 9.15 a.m. Close Down, 11.15 a.m.

Programme Parade, 11.25 a.m, Australia 20th Century-Fox Smashing





vs England, 11.45 aim. World Affairs, 4 p ’
12 noon the ‘News 310 pm News| || “THE RETURN eee
Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down. a James STEWART &
4.15—6 p.m, 25.53 m, ny Debra PAGET
OF OCTOBER”
4. 15 p.m. BBC Scottish Orchestra,
5 p.m. Australia vs England, 5.15 p.m,

Let's make music.

** BROKEN
ARROW”

AND

“NIGHT AND
THE CITY”

Starring
Richard WIDMARK &
Gene TIERNEY

AND
“‘ BLONDIE'S
SECRET ”

Starring

6—7.15 p.m. 31.32 m. & 48.48 m,

_—

6 p.m. Merchant Navy Newsletter,
6.15 p.m, Freedom under the law, 6.25
p.m. Interlude, 6.45 p.m, Programme
Parade, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m.
News Analysis, 7.15 pan. West Indian
Diary, 7.37 p.m. Interlude. |
745—11 pom. 31.32 m. & 18.43 m,

7.45 Th th

45 p.m, ink on these things, 8 p.m.
Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m. English Maine
zine, 8.45 p.m. Composer of the week, 9
p.m. World Affairs, 9.15 p.m. Let's make

» 10 pm. The News, 10,10 p.m.
From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Commu-
nism in practice, 10.30 p.m. Spa Orches-
tra, 10.45 p.m. The debate :
1l1_p.m. Ring up the curtain,

ete

Penny SINGLETON &
Arthur LAKE

continues,





Beauty and Reliability Combined



18)

THAT’S THE STANDARD
SET BY EVERY

TEMCO}

ELECTRIC

A

3
rf
=
=
i
:
=
Hi
is
i:

(



|



“TIME MARCHES 0
BUT -TEMCO” KEEPS

GOOR TIME



AT
STORE

ON SHOW

THE CORNER






FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1951

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Lutherans
Plan Big
Programme

NEW YORK, Feb. 1.

A co-operative Latin-American
missionary programme the
broadest united effort of its kind
in American Lutheran‘sm — was
drawn up at an annual convention
ef the National Luthéran Church.

The programme, embracing mis-
sion activity in Mexico and Central
and South America would be the
first joint foreign m!ssion venture
ever undertaken by the eight
Lutheran bodies represented in
the Convention Council.

“It marks a very important step
forward in Lutheran co-operation,’
said the Council Executive Direc-
tor yesterday.

Tne plan drawn up in consulta-
tion among the Council’s member
bodies and still subject to their
final approval, would begin func-
tioning next October with an
initial “core budget” of $51,250.

Among benefits to be derived
from the programme, the Council’s
report said, were: “preservation to
the faith of several thousand Luth-
eran settlers in isolfted areas” and
the organisation “of new congre-
gations in important centres as }
nuclei for expanded future work”. t

The Commission authorised to
bring preliminary work immedi-
ately was set up pending the
formation of a permanent “divis-
ion on Lutheran co-operation in
Latin America’.



Moré vottis in sarrapos jurp
EASILY MEAN DOLLARS ANID EMPLOY-
MENT FOR MAKY, IICLUDING TUESE e





There now are six autonomus
Lutheran churches of German
background with a total of nearly
500,000 members in Brazil and
Chile, the Council report said.

The new programme provides
that separate bodies may, if they
wish, transfer their Latin Ameri-
can mission programmes to a joint
undertaking.

Eight bodies in the Council have
a total of about 4,000,000 members
or about two-thirds of all Ameri-
can Lutherans.

Mystery Plane
Flies Sideways

: KANSAS CITY.
AiR FORCE OFFICERS have questicned a Mid-Continent

Air Lines pilot who reported seeing a speedy mystery plane

that he said can fly sideways and apparently reverse its
direction without turning around,

—Reuter.

No Alternative

From Page t
Denmark and other countries.

They had decided that they
would never again be occupied.
They would resist to the point of
destruction he added, In Rome
there was the resolve to make a
limited military force as efficient
as possible he said.

Eisenhower declared that Eu-
rope’s greatest need was not for
American troops but for equip-
ment which must be delivered
“jn quantity and quickly.”

He said that American troops
should be sent to Europe in pro-
portion to what European nations
themselves provided. The’ Gen-
eral disclosed that France had
promised 25 battle worthy divis-
ions by the end of 1952,

—Reuter

CQAL WANTED



“Tliterates”
Want Right To
Vote In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN.

SIX representatives of “the illit-
erate” as they described them-
selves, appeared before the
Constitution Commission now in
session in Berbice County and
appealed for their right to vote
under any new Constitution. The
six-man deputation emphasised
that though they could not read
nor write they nevertheless were
able to differentiate between good
and evil. The illiterate also asked
for equal rights to vote for women
and that it should be compulsory
for Legislators to attend a mini-
mum of 75 per cent of Council



The pilot, Capt. Larry
Vinther, of Mission, Kan,, spotted
the mysterious aircraft over the
Sioux City, Ila., airport on Satur-
day night, January 20th,

His story was confirmed by his
co-pilot, J. F. Bachmeier, of
Kansas City, Kas., and an un-|
identified civilian employee of the
Air Force of Omaha, Neb., who
also saw the strange craft.

Capt. Vinther told of seeing a
mysterious light west of the
Sioux City Airport after taking
off. He said the control tower
asked him to investigate the light.
He continued:

“At about eight thousand~feet
we could see a red light circling
the field to the left. The light
started to blink.

“I spoke into my radio, saying
that if the plane was in com-
munication, we would like to have
the pilot blink his light again.
Shortly afterwards, the light did

blink,
Light Changed



GENEVA, Feb. 1. meetings. S 4
Coal-short countries in Western] A delegation from the Berbice It began approaching us and
Europe have asked the United|Ministers Fraternal also gave|it changed to q brilliant white
States for 3,500,000 tons of |levidence and asked for a one- light, similar to a landing light
coal it was learned here to-|Chamber Legislature and fran-|but without glare. It came with-
day. Difficulties of these coun-|chise at 21 without literacy. The]in two hundred feet of us and we

tries will be discussed next week] Ministers asked for an all elected|could see the silhouette of tne














when the coal sub-committee of

the United Nations Economic
Commission for Europe meets
here. It is hoped that countries

with coal to spare will extend till
June their “gentlemen’s” agree-
ment not to cut off exports and
enable Europe’s problems to be

solved.
—Reuter

C. J. Threatened

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 30,
A letter containing threats
against the person, of Sir Cecil
Furnness-Smith, the Chief Justice
was received by the Police a few

°



days before judgment in the
“Floating Corpse” case was

delivered, a letter from the Com-
missioner of Police said.

The Commissioner refuted
statements in the Press that the
Chief Justice had asked for Police
protection. Since the squashing oi
the conviction it was understood
high officials have sought Police
protection.

162,000 TONS OF
SUGAR EXPECTED
“BORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 30,

Trinidad’s sugar crop is expected
to hit a record this year with a



production of 162,000 tons. This|

however, depends to a_ large
extent on weather conditions, Last
year’s crop was 146,508 tons.

A reliable source disclosed that
all factories are in operation. ex-

Legislature of 25 members, Ber-
bice to have six seats instead .of
three as at present. The Legisla—
ture should be presided over by
a Speaker who would not take
part in the proceedings but to have
only a casting vote. The Speaker
is to be elected from outside the
House membership. They also
suggested 11 ministerial posts, with
a senior member in each depart-
ment named as a _ Permanent
Under-Secretary as advisor to the
Minister. There should be an
Advisory Council of 10 wholly
nominated members, the Governor
presiding, Colonial Secretary, Fin-
ancial Secretary, Attorney Gen-
eral and six others nominated by
Government from a panel of 12
named by the elected members.
The 1946 census gave British
Guiana a total population of
875,701 of which 57,736 were de-
elared illiterates not including the
Amerindian population of 16,322.

MOVE WIRELESS

ST. JOHN’S Nfld.
Removal of the large wireless
station of the transport depart-
ment from the top of Table
Mountain of Newfoundland’s
west coast to another site is
planned. The station installed by
the military in the Second World
War is to be placed near the

main line of the local railway,

--(C.P.)

IT’S A HABIT
GILLINGHAM, Norfolk, England.
Since November, 1949, Her-
bert Finey has won three first
prizes in sixpenny raffles. All
three were television sets —

ship against the moonlit sky.

“As it reached our left wing we
could see the plane had a fuselage
like a B-29 but about one and
one-half times as large. The
wings were straight and there
were no engine nacelles (hous-
ings).

“We were doing 120 miles an
hour, but instead of the plane
passing us, it stopped opposite our
wing and then began going in our
direction, apparently without ever
turning. We tried to follow it
but lost sight of the plane.”

Co-pilot Bachmeier, who was
in control of the ship at the time
confirmed Vinther’s story and
added:

“The plane had a cigar shaped
fuselage and the wing appeared
to be a flattened cigar strongly
resembling gq glider wing. The
wing was forward of the centre
of the fuselage.” Bachmeier
continued:






















Manoeuvrability

“The plane had extreme
manoeuvrability. It appeared to
be able to do anything almost at
will.

“We saw no engine, no tail
surface, no evidence of exhaust,

“Outlined against the sky, it
appeared like a giant cigar. It
was uplighted as it came towards
us sideways and there were no
portholes.”

Col. Matthew Thompson, of
Offut Air Force Base, Omaha, one
of the passengers on the flight,
said he is investigating “Flying
Saucers” but, ironically, was
















SINGAPORE

» e NO GOTEL ACOMODATION MEANS
LESS FOREIGN CURRENCY FOR BAR
BADOS © CONVERT IND DOLLARS




ePOR EL AMOR
Spas !2( FOR THE

OVE oF GOD!F)

PREPARES

WASHINGTON.

SINGAPORE, “City of the Lion,” fabled halfway house of
werld commerce, is grimly facing the prospect of again
becoming the defensive pivot for the riches of Southeast

Asia.

As Communist armies overrun
much of Korea, invade Tibet and
carry war into Indo-China, Sing-
apore is reported again preparing
for all-out defense against possible
assault. The lightning land-
launched conquest of the city in
February, 1942, by the Japanese
was a bitter lesson not soon to be
forgotten.

An island seaport which tips
the south—pointing Malay Penin-
sula, thumb of continental Asia,
Singapore has been Great Britain’s
gateway to the East for a century
and a quarter, the National Geo-
graphic Society points out. As

Singapore goes, so goes the world’s

busiest trading post in rubber, tin
and quinine, and one of the Far
East's greatest naval bases,
Malaya Invaded

Many times before in history
and pre-history has Malaya been
invaded. Ages ago the ancestors
of today’s Australian aborigines
and Polynesian islanders swarmed
down the peninsula’s length and
used it as a bridge from continen-
tal Asia to then unpeopled lands
below the Equator. There followed
countless migrant bands enroute
to Sumatra, Java and beyond.

Ancient civilizations overflowing
from India were next to come, A
Buddhist empire, Sri Vijaya,
gained a foothold on the Strait of
Malacca, which to modern times
has funneled Far Eastern sea trade
between Indian Ocean and China

Sea. Merchant-traders from India

built a city called Singapura
City of the Singh, or Lion—in the
place which earlier Malays had
named Tumasik—-Sea Town.

But Javanese warriors, broad~
ening a Hindu empire, sacked this
first Singapore about 1377 A.D.
Theréafter, Malays avoided the
island, believing its red_ soil
cursed by the blood spilled there.

Malaya Market Conquered

In 1511 Portugal conquered the
Malaya market, taking the port of
Malacca which had been founded
on the peninsula’s southwest coast
by a fugitive prince from Sing-
apura. Malacca fell again in 1641
to the Dutch. Then, in 1819,
Britain’s Sir Thomas Stamford
Raffles bought from native sultans
a small, swampy island at Malaya’s
tip. The modern port of Singapore
grew on Raffles’ mangrove swamp.

Malayan tin, then rubber, made
it rich. Singapore’s population
grew until today it is close to a

million, It is a melting pot of
Chinese, Malays, Indians, Arabs,
Javanese, Burmese, Tibetans,

Japanese, English and Americans.
A large majority are Chinese.
At the time World War II
erupted in the Pacific, Singapore
with its great naval base was con-



dozing when the plane took off
from Sioux City.
He and another officer question-
ed the crew in Kansas City,
—I.N.S,

cept Forres Park, which will start
early next month,

We'll

own, (C.P.)





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sidered an impregnable bastion.
Coastal fortifications bristled with
guns emplaced to repel a sea
attack,
No Major Obstacle

Japan struck swiftly by land
and through the air instead. The
mile-wide moat of Johore Strait
between the city and the mainland
failed to prove a major obstacle
for the Japanese forces swarming
jdown from beachheads on the
Malayan causeway. The fall of
Singapore in the opening weeks
of the war was a disastrous blow.

This time there is little talk of
“impregnable fortress”. Another
overland attack could be stopped,
Singapore’s defenders believe, if
enough troops are available to seal
off the Malay Peninsula’s narrow
neck to the north. The naval base
has been completely rebuilt, and
jet planes are reported now based
at the “City of the Lion,”
/ —INS.

French Inflict

“Severe Losses”

SAIGON, Feb. 1.

French Union forces prevented
Sabotage and inflicted “severe
losses’ yesterday on Communist-
led Vietnam rebels trying to push
across the Hanoi-Haiphong rail-
way, an army communique re-
ported today.

They were engaged in a wide-
spread series of patrols and am-
bushes in North Vietnam. The
French Air Force made “massive”
attacks against rebel concentra-
tions north of Bacnih Aboq—about
24 miles to the northeast of Hanoi,

General Jean De Lattre De
Tassignay, French Commander-
in-Chief in Indo China, left here
today for Tonking after a ten days’
stay,—Reuter.

One Way Traffic

IPSWICH, England.
H. Adams, a builder, waited a
month to get delivery of some
glass bricks from Bury St, Ed.
munds, 27 miles distant. The
transport company which hand-
led the shipment explained they
don't run a service .from Bury
to Ipswich — only from Ipswich

to Bury. (C.P.)





PAGE THREE

Index Steady
While Prices Rise

By FRED DOERFLINGER



SF



>

| DRESS
| FOR
| ASS

THE MODERN }
Dress Shoppe

(BROAD STREET)

.

LONDON.

More and more Britons—especially housewives—- are toda)
grumbling about soaring prices and attacking the Labow
Government’s “Alice-in-Wonderland” cost of living
statistics,

Mr. and Mrs. John Bull complain that the cost of living ha:
been going up steadily for many months and that thei:
money is buying less and less in the shops.

The Board of Trade’s official, The 100,000 - strong Iron anc
index figure, however, asserts that [steel Trades Confederation re
between November 14 and Decem-| cently termed it “statistical hocu:
ber 12, 1950, retail prices remained | pocus”,
steady. “For some, no doubt, this sor

Yet Government departments in| ef thing has its humorous side
the month ending December 12]Lut the man whose wages are re:
announced increases in the prices]cuced by these Alice-in—Wonder
of such important items as coal,|land statistics can be forgiven ii
blankets, sheets, household linen,|he cannot see it,” said the union's
raincoats and boots. cfficial journal,

Britons are frankly annoyed
and shocked by this “magic” index Late tast year Ministor of
which ean remain steady and even| Labour George Isaacs promisec
fall, as it did last August, while|the House of Commons that a:
prices rise, soon as conditions were considerec

The index is the only official}@ppropriate he would take the
“barometer” of household expen-|first steps towards introducing a
diture. It not only automatically |mew cost of living index. |

varies some wages, but inevitably He agreed that there was ¢
enters into all onfmeed for a new index adding:
wages.
“Retail Prices” Index
Although still popularly

discussions

“The patterns of living of our
people have changed. Things re

the “cost of living index” the fig-

ure is strictly the “index of retail tod

prices”. It shows the cost of an
imaginary working - class house-
hold budget if it wishes to live in
exactly the same way as it did in
1938.

What this imaginary house-
hold spent on these things in 1947
was called “100”, Today, accord-
ing to the latest figures, it would
have to spend 116 to get the same
things in the same qualities.

called] garded in the old days in the work

ing man’s family as luxuries are
ay absolute essentials.”

But it will probably be several!
years before a new index is it
operation, A new survey of fam
ily budgets will first have to be
made and the Ministry of Labour
has, as yet, made no plans for
this survey.-—-I. N.S.



SPECIAL
OFFERS In
LADIES”



The old cost of living index was
introduced in 1914, based con sur-
vey in 1904, But by 1947 it had
become so unreal for various rea-
sons that the

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

COTTON
DRESSES

Government de- Sch, Emmanuel C. G si
. " . 2 c jordon, Sch. Bel-]})
cided to start it all over again,| aueen, M.V, Sedgefield, Sch. Foter- Washable Lovely Patterns
working from a 1988 survey of| Prise S. Sch. bucitle M, Smith, Yacht $6,00 each
10,000 households , Juanita, Seh. United Pilgrim 8.

. : as. ARRIVALS L ADDIE. .*
a it the old index stood at] Sch, Marea Henrietta, 43 tons net, ads wk

0, prices just before the war Capt, Selby, from St. Lucia ‘a a y
being 100, The 180 was. suddenly hee! Want i eeeweL See, ee SKIRTS
made 100 again for the new “in-| M.V. Jenkins Roberts, 204 tons net,

African Cotton Prints
$3.98 each

LADIES”
TAILORED
SKIRTS

In a Fine Assortment of
Colours $6.00 each

dex of retail prices”, so that it is] Capt
now impossible, from the new
index, to tell exactly how the cost
of living compares with pre-war,

New Index Out Of Date

The new index, based on the

Watson, from Grenada



=

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

1938 survey, 3 CABLE and Wireless (WI) Ltd
urvey, chose new items to advise that they can now communicate

muake the household budget. But] with the following ships through their
as the spending pattern had great-| Barbados Coast Station:;—

ly changed during the war, from 8.8, Stockholm, s.s, Hacehus, 4, Re-

ah 5 gent Lion, $58 Canadian Challenger,

one point of view, the new index] ¢s Kettleman Hills, ss. Planter, ss. KRAYSER

was out of date before it started, { Brazil, ss. Dioni, «5, Trum; #«, Em- r r
For eae. arnang the goods ire ee a Teten aia NYLON

assessed each month to indicate, St yo" ee gee nee a! an eee ya NGS
7 tt : . Reuador, ss. Grasse, 5.8, Cera-

price Wariniiena in the new. index 8.8 “Muader, sa. De rasse s, Cera a TOCKINGS

mic, Nieuw Amsterdam, s.s, Pedro
2, s.s, San Mateo. s.s. Empress of Scot-
Jand, ss. Uruguay, s.s. 8. Rosa, #.8

8.
are an iron bedstead and a tin
kettle. Iron bedsteads disappear-

ing rece. ane Lago Azul, ss. Lady Rodney, ss. Jolf-
ed from most shops years ago and ereek, 4.5. Tiberius, s.5. Fort Amherst,
tin kettles have been largely re-;s.s. P and T Pathfinder, 8.8. Olimpia,
placed by aluminum or enamelled (#*-P and T Trader. 6.5, Sundaie, ss
kettles. Another obsolete item in 8. Cirillo, M.T Avanti, as. Cinch Knot,

51 Gauge 15 Denier
$2.14 per pr.

THE MODERN







+ Pmcoer a shopping list is a hair RATES OF EXCHANGE

Another thing that makes it un- February 1, 1961
real in terms of actual shopping F :
is that the household concerned | 4, 4 9, CANADA
is “imaginary”. It consists of 3% | VIO OE Boao ak eon ie Tess 0 é
persons of whom 1% are wagdq,... Demand ei aie
earners and only one child is reste W070 pr, iS
under 14. This may be satisfac- 763 8/i0% ‘pr. SleRy eens 61 8/10% pr. BROAD STREET
tory to statisticians but makes fon | 62 3/10% Currency 60 8/10% pr.
complications when applied tof spigot bide ic ete ph
calculations in real life. vere eh Pe oe

The index does not take into

consideration the question of in
come tax or other direct taxation
-——very much part of the cost of
living.

The index, however, is painstak-
ingly compiled, It was neyer in-
tended to be taken literally and
does not apply to households
spending more than $19,60 a week

Guide To Prices

With all its faults it remains
some guide to prices but certain-
ly does not reflect the actual cost
of living.

The index has been roundly at-
tacked by all sections of the com-
munity, particularly the working
man and the housewife.



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ee

PAGE FOUR



om ej
Friday, February 2, 1951

QUESTION OF LAW

THE Legislative Council postponed the
bill to allow the Vestry of St. Michael to
raise the sum of ten thousand pounds to
grant retrospective pay to all the parochial
employees, The postponement was due to
strong opposition by Hon. Mr. Cuke who
pointed out that if it was illegal to budget
for sums of money to pay for the years al-
ready expired it was wrong in principle
to burden ratepayers for the next twenty
years to pay retrospectively for parochial
commitments.

The objections to the bill were voiced
by several members who intimated their
intentions to vote against the bill and Hon,
Mr. Challenor who took charge of the mea-
sure asked for leave to postpone it until
more information could be supplied the
Council.

The matter had already been the sub-
ject of much controversy at the meetings
of the Vestry. It had been brought for-
ward early in the year 1949 and after
lengthy discussion the motion was reject-
ed. Contrary to expectations on what was
regarded as a general rule the matter was
brought up later in the year when several
members of the Vestry were absent for
various reasons. It was then passed. The
1951 vestry ratified the action of the last
meeting and the matter was referred to
the Legislature and passed by the House
of Assembly. It has now come before the
Council.

The question as to the correctness of the
award is not without its difficulties. There
is a strong body of opinion which favours
the payment of back pay to these parochial
servants because of the rise in the cost ot
living and the fact that the Government
had given back pay to the members of the
Civil Service during the same period. But
there is an opposing section supported by
the law that the vestry cannot budget for
commitments in the year which has passed.
It was sought to overcome this difficulty
by asking for permission to raise a loan the
repayment of which would be spread over
a period of twenty years.

Already the parochial employees have
voiced their feeling that they are entitled
‘to consideration in this matter and that
they had been promised some relief.

The original question arose when the
scavengers applied for an increase of pay
and back pay in the same manner as the:
Civil Servants. When the matter came
before the Vestry it was felt that the
singling out of scavengers would give rise
to dissatisfaction and a motion was carried
that all parochial employees be included.

The question for the Council now to de-
cide is not the equity of the payment of the
money but whether under the provisions
of the Act it can be done,

CUSTOMS UNION

_THE long awaited report of the Com-
mission on the establishment of a Customs
Union in the British Caribbean Area was
published yesterday.

The Commission was appointed as a re-
sult of a recommendation by the Montego
Bay Conference on Closer Association of
the British West Indies. It was under
Chairmanship of Mr. J. Me Lagan, O.B.E.
an expert in Customs matters, and includ-
ed representatives of Barbados, Jamaica,
Trinidad, British Guiana, British Honduras
and the Leeward and Windward Islands.
Its terms of reference were to examine the
question of establishing a Customs Union
between these territories and to make re-
commendations,

The principal conclusions are :—-

(1) That this Customs Union is econo-
mically desirable and practicable, whether
or not political federation comes about, and
that it can be implemented immediately
without any transitional stage. A Customs
Union Advisory Board of representatives
from territories should be appointed to
ensure due implementation of the aims of
union;

. (2) There should be free trade be-
tween the union territories, but every ter-
ritory would retain the right in specified
circumstances to impose excise duty for
revenue purposes on any goods imported
from any other union territory. Eventually
it is to be ree that unification of excise
duties would be achieved;

(3) Union territories should adopt a
common external tariff, involving the revo-
cation of minor imposts such as surtaxes
and package tax, but territories would con-
tinue to impose duty at such rate as they
please on certain reserved items, in par-
ticular wines, = gum tobacco and petroleum
products, which are of special importance
for revenue purposes;

(4) There should be no change at
present in the buying of export duties;

(5) Union territories should adopt a
Common Customs Law and. Regulations,
leading to unification of procedure, and
should as far as possible follow a commen
policy in external policy and agreements
affecting trade;

(6) Union territories should follow a
uniform method of classifying goods and a
uniform method of presenting and publish-
ing trade returns;

(7) Each customs department should
remain under control of the Government of
its territory, and customs and excise reve-
nue should continue to accrue to the
revenue of the territory in which it is
levied. ;

The Report was signed from the head-
quarters of the Development and Welfare
Organisation in the West Indies, which
provided office accommodation and secre-
tarial services for the Commission, and was
= in Barbados by the Advocate Co.,

td. It is impossible to exaggerate its im-
portance with regard to trade in the Brit-
ish Caribbean area and its contents must
receive the prompt attention of the Goy-
ernment of Barbados,





Cracks Behind The

IN a Budapest schoolroom little
Janos, the brightest boy in the
cl is asked to give an example
of a dependent clause. “Our cat
has a litter of ten kittens,” says
Janos, “all of which are good
Communists”. The teacher is de-
lighted with his grasp of both
grammar and the Party Line, and
urges him to do as well when the
government inspector comes to
pay his annual visit.

The inspector duly
the teacher calls



arrives and
confidently on
Janos to answer the same ques-
tion. “Our cat”, replies Janos,
“has ten kittens, all of which are
Western Democrats.” The teacher
is horrified. “Why, Janos! That’s

not what you said ten days ago.

Your kittens were all good Com-
munists then
“Yes,” says Janos, “But now
their eyes are open, "
Not a very good joke? A little
Perhaps.
3ut behind the: Iron Curtain to-

ed on the sly in half a dozen lan-
guages at the risk of prison, forced

camp

e) ”
” i‘
crude and elementary ?
day such jokes are being circulat-

labour and the concentration
On the streets of Sofia, in
the workshops of Warsaw, in
Rumanian towns and East Ger-
man hamlets, as well as inside the
Soviet Union itself — wherever
Moscow’s heel is felt—people are
wielding the only weapon of pro-
test that no police state has ever
been able to deprive them of: the
political joke, the gag as a coun-
ter-irritant to tyranny.

In Prague they ask each other,
“Did you hear the one about the
two Communist officials ., . .?” It
seems that two high Party execu-
tives were staring moodily across
St. Wenceslaus Square at the end
of a trying day of carrying out di-
rectives from Moscow. “What do
you tnink of the future of our
beloved country under Com-
munism one of them asked.

“The same as you do,” replied
the other.

“Oh, you do?” said the first. “In
that case, Comrade, I shall have
to report you immediately to the
State Police !”

In a true democracy a joke lives
or dies by the quality of its hum-~-
our. In’ a “People’s democracy”
a joke achieves circulation be-
cause of its political content. If
its point jabs deeply enough into
the flesh of a ruling Commissar,
or if the punch-line delivers a

av

| sufficient wallop against the pre-

en a atalino

pe. eS ee ae See Ale

vailing system, neither novelty,
subtlety nor brilliance is demand-
ed. It will spread by grapevine
from country to country, regard-
less of language. Repeated by
refugees slipping into free terri-
tory, it will leap the ocean and
turn up in foreign-language news-
papers in New York and Chicago,
sowing its seed of mockery and
derision all along the way, No
secret police, however vigilant
and ruthless, will be able to arrest
or suppress it,

In faet, the Secret Police itself
is often the target of underground
humour. There is, for example,
the story of the unhappy Ruman-
ian shuffling down a Bucharest

street and muttering ‘to himself;

“Those ‘dirty, rotten, low-down,
no-good so-and-sos.” A heavy
hand falls on his shoulder and a
minion of the Secret Police stops
him. “Come along,” says the
policeman. “You're under arrest
for treasonable utterances against
the authorities.”

The citizen is indignant. “The
authorities!” he cries. “Why, I
never even mentioned them!”

“No,” says the policeman, “But
you described them perfectly.”

LONDON.

A plan to disperse part of Bri-
tain’s population and_ essential
armament industries through
Commonwealth territories that are
relatively safe from atomic attack
is proposed by Sir Clifford Heath-
eote-Smith, deputy chairman of
the Council for the New Era of
Emigration.

Sir Clifford in a letter to The
Times describes the problem as
one of the gravest and most urgent
for the Commonwealth to decide.

The Council contends that the
strength or even the survival of
the British Commonwealth may
depend on swift action in trans-
ferring the nation’s industrial
strength from target areas to the
chief European-settled countries
of the Commonwealth.

“This is far from being a crisis

OUR READERSSAY



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

1 ee
Curtain
By RICHARD HANSER

(With acknowledgement to the Freeman)

When anthropologists unearth-
ed an ancient mummy in a remote
section of Hungary, urgent word
came from the Kremlin: “Make
every effort to prove that this is
the mummy of Genghis Khan.
Such a discovery will add greatly
to the prestige of Soviet science.”

A week later the Hungarian In-
stitute of Anthropology reported
triumphantly to Moscow that the
mummy was indeed that of Geng-
his Khan.

“How did you prove it?” asked
the powers.

“It was easy. We turned the
case over to the Secret Police and
the mummy confessed.”

The vanity of the newly-fledged
Communist rulers and their ten-
dency to wallow in the power
which the Kremlin has placed in
their hands, provide a_ steady
source of fuel for the folk-wits
of the satellite countries. The
Postmistress of Bulgaria, for ex-
ample, was said to have been
given a furious dressing-down by
the country’s made-in-Moscow
dictator, Vulko Chervenkov, be-
cause an issue of stamps bearing
his portrait was not in circulation.
The embarrassment of the Post-
mistress was acute as she tried to
explain that the issue had indeed
been printed but was not in gen-
eral use because the stamps didn’t
stick. Chervenkov seized a sheet
of the stamps, tore one off, wet
it and pasted it on an envelope.
“Look. They stick perfectly. Why
aren’t they being circulated?”

“Well, Comrade,” said the Post-
mistress, ‘you might as well know
the truth. The public keeps spit-
ting on the wrong side,”

Though Yugoslavia is currently
snarling and snapping at the
Soviet Union, and vice versa,
Tito’s regime is hardly less op-
pressive than Stalin’s and _ the
jokesters know it. A Belgrade
court recently sentenced six men
to long prison terms on the catch-
all charge of “reactionary opposi-
tion,” which included telling anti-
Tito jokes.

One of the gags for which an
unwary Yugoslav can be bundled
into the clink reflects the wistful
hope of thousands behind the Cur-
tain that some day, in some way,
the United States will act to lift
the Communist yoke off their
necks. The story involves a hap-
less citizen of Zagreb who decided
to end it all but had trouble find-
ing the means to dispose of him-
self, There wasn’t a decent piece

of rope in the house. He had no
money to buy poison. There
wasn't a knife available sharp

enough to do the job. So he con-
cocted a scheme to have somebody
do it for him.

He stood before Tito’s palace
and began to shout: “Down with
Tito! Kill Tito, the oppressor of
the people! He kept this up, con-
fident that the guards would
promptly appear and mow him
down. The guards came running
toward him, all right, but instead
of shooting they threw away their
guns and embraced him. “Com-
rade!” they cried jubilantly, “are
the Americans here already?”

The cracks behind the Curtain
do not spare the sacred person ot
Stalin himself, despite round-the-
clock efforts by Communist propa-

measure,” he writes. “A better
custripution of industry and popu-
lation would strengthen Britain
and all Commonwealth nations,
both economically and as a matter
of defence.”

With migrants from Britain, he
adds, should go some of the many
refugees and displaced persons at
present scattered throughout
Western Europe. In the younger
countries overseas, they would be-
come an incalculable asset to the
whole free world,

Has Opponents

Brinley Thomas, Professor of
Economics at University College,
Cardiff, described Sir Clifford's
proposal as “unconvincing and
unrealistic.”

“This is an extraordinary policy
to recommend at the very moment
when everything depends on a





























gandists to churn up abject adula-
tien of the Big Boss. A cool and
sardonic estimate of Stalin’s
proper place in the scheme of
things is conveyed in a story that
has spread throughout the East-
ern-Bloc countries.

A Russian worshipper makes
Stalin a birthday present of a
bolt of fine cloth. Stalin's tailor
notifies him that there is barely
enough for a pair of pants. This
seems rather skimpy to Stalin,
who sends the stuff to a Warsaw
tailor for an appraisal. This one
reports that he can manage a
complete suit out of the material.
Still not satisfied, Stalin consults
a Parisian clothier, who judges
that perhaps the cloth will serve
for a coat, vest and two pairs of
pants. By this time Stalin is sus-
picious of the answers he is get-
ting, and goes all the way to Lon-
don for the opinion of a real ex-
pert in the West End. There he
is told that the cloth is easily suffi-
cient to provide a coat, vest, two
pairs of pants, sports jacket and
uvercoat, with enough left over
for a skirt for Mrs, Stalin. Stalin
is amazed and asks the reason for
the huge spread in the various
tailor’s estimates. “Oh, that’s
simple to explain, sir,” says the

Englishman. “The farther you go
from Moscow, the smaller you
get.”

Inside the Russian borders there
are unregenerate souls who daily
defy Siberia by circulating quips
which badly blur the propaganda
picture of the Soviet Union as the
Workers’ Paradise. A favourite
Moscow joke during the last elec-
tions was the disenchanted query
that went: “Have we achieved
full socialism yet—or are things
going to get still worse?” And to
the casual greeting, “How are
things?” a common answer is:
“Much better. Worse than yes-
terday, of course, but much better
than to-morrow,”

The same sour cynicism is the
basis for the story about the Com-
munist census official who asks a
grizzled villager how old he is.
“I’m 35,” is the reply. This is
obviously so inacturate that the
census taker expresses doubt.
“Well,” says the old timer, “I’m
really 65, but these last 30 years
—you don’t call that living, do
you?”

Nobody believes that the pre-
valence of such heretical humour
within the Russian orbit means
counter-revolution will break out
to-morrow. It iis, however, an
accurate index to the true feelings
of mute millions behind the facade
of solidarity created by the con-
trolled press, the captive radio and
the staged demonstration. For all
their crudeness, the jokes express
deep-seated mass altitudes and de-
sires which have no other means
of outlet. There is no mistaking
the wish implicit in the following
ancedote which has reaped its
harvest of grim chuckles. When
the time comes, its punch-line will
be echoed by millions :

An American and a_ Russian
sentry are standing guard across
a German zonal border in the
small hours of the night. The
American looks at his watch
“Only fifteen minutes until I’m
relieved,” he says. “Thank God!”

The Russian looks at his watch.
“Only a quarter of an hour and
I'll be relieved, too, he says.
“Thank Stalin!”

The American is __ startled.
“That's a funny thing to say.
What would you say if Stalin was
dead ?”

“Thank God!” says the Russian.



Plan To Avoid Bombs

situation of strength being rapidly
built up in Western Europe,” he
said. “In other words, our par-
ticular contribution to the defence
of the free world would be to
stage a gigantic Dunkerque.”

“Imagine the effects on the
United States and the nations of
Western Europe,” said Prof.
Thomas. ‘Does anyone seriously
think that the rulers of Russia
would hold back because the Brit-
ish Commonwealth was redistri-
buting its population?”

Britain’s destiny, he insisted,
was bound up with the world-
wide group of free nations, of
which the United States was the
corner-stone. Any plan treating
Britain’s security as a mere Com-
monwealth problem would be
“unconvincing and completely un-
realistic.”—(CP)





Coloured Folk In Birmingham

Co-operation in Ambitious
Schemes

By §& B. TIMOTHY

LONDON, Jan. 22.
Church, social and welfare organisations
in Birmingham have co-operated during the
past nine months to grapple with the prob-
lem of the welfare of the coloured people
working and living in the city, and have de-
cided on ambitious schemes.

A co-ordinating committee for overseas
visitors was formed in March last year, re-
oresenting the Free Church Federal Council, | %
che Christian Social Council, the Selly Oak}%
Colleges, the Y.M.C.A., the Rotary Club and}%
he Ministry of Labour.

This committee decided that many of the
‘hree to four thousand coloured folk in the
tity have not been seeing the best of English | %
ife, and that those who returned to their own \%
‘ountries would not carry back a good im-|
oression of Christian society.

The Archdeacon of Birmingham, the Ven.
5. Harvie Clark, who is the chairman of the
committee, explained to me to-day that mis-
sionaries were concerned for their people] %
who came to this country, many of whom|‘
have been educated in missionary schools.
“It is important that they should not go back
to their own countries with a bad impression
of the welcome that we gave them”, he said.

The committee feel the overseas students|'
in the city are already catered for. It is the
working men and the few girls in the hospi-
tals and domestic work, about whom they are
most concerned, Many have come to this}
country to gain experience for a period, and
others to stay permanently. At present, there
are few unemployed in Birmingham.

With this in mind, the committee have ask-
ed the Education Department, which is great-
ly interested in the work and represented on

the committee, to form an Evening Insti-
tute for these people.

It is to be started this month in a day school
in Balsall Heath, a district where many of
the coloured folk live. It will be opened at
first for West Africans and West Indians, and
will include most of the educational, social
and recreational activities that are provided
at the normal centres. It is hoped to form a

students’ council to advise on the social or-
ganisation,

As a long-term policy, it is planned to build
up specialist clubs, and such groups as sports
teams and dramatic societies, which will mix
with their equivalents in the ordinary insti-
tutes and so establish relations between the
coloured and the European people.

Teachers in the institute, will, for the most
part, be the same as those in the normal
institutes, and chosen for their special inter-
est in the work. An English language class
is being aryanged thet will include some
teaching of English habits and attitudes.

One of the most important provisions of
the centre will be the advisory service, which
will aim at placing the coloured people in}
contact with the authorities best able to deal
with their problems; and it is intended also

to establish a more personal advisory section
in the Institute itself,

Meanwhile the churches in Birmingham
are going to do their part. The Dudley Road
Methodist Church, for example, has already
formed a club where coloured people meet
each week in the schoolroom. The Central

Hall, too, is planning activities among colour-
ed people.

_

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1951 :








































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Garden Boys

To The Editor, The Advocate

Sir,—Your correspondent F-.Y.
on “Child Labour” on the 20th
apparently is suffering from an
overdose of superiority complex
when he criticises private employ-
ers for employing boy gardeners.

The actual fact is that these
boys are very useful to their em-
ployers, and to themselves. In
large countries thousands of boys
who have the intelligence and in-
terest in themselves, use their
spare time to earn something extra
to buy clothes and help them-
selves,

Most of the boys I have seen
working in gardens for a few
hours a day in their spare time
are at least well dressed, .clean,
and healthy—not like the young
hooligans who are supposed ‘to go
to school and don’t employ them-
selves to any useful purpose.

I had one of these garden boys
working for a few weeks (a splen-
did little fellow too) and he left a
week or so ago to return to school.

Your correspondent evidently
wishes politics and mathematics
only for all of the race. What
does he do, and what grievance
has he got against honest healthy
work? If educated men (not boys)
of his type only were employed as
gardeners, their charge would be
toe high, and their work would be
negligent, as their early days
would have been spent in schools
and they would know nothing
about gardens

If there were no one to work in
gardens, there would be no gar-

ns, and no flowers, food, &c.—
er what

KILROY
Jan, 31, 1951,

U.S.A. Writes India Off

By PIERRE J. HUSS
LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y.

The United States has quietly
written India off the list of those
nations in U.N. which can be
cecunted on to fight aggression
with anything but moral sanc-
tions,

The long, hard battle to pin
the label of aggressor on Red
China in U.N. demonstrated that
regardless of the clarity of guilt
of any aggressor, the followers of
the late Mahatma Ghandi are
inbred pacifists and will not
unsheath the sword except in the
expansion of their own borders.

A leading Western Delegate
said:

“Pandit Nehru didn’t waste time
or worry about high principles
when he saw his chance to grab
Hyderabad province or Kashmir.
He even flew an armoured unit
of the Indian army across the
Himalayas. In the past three
years he has rejected every effort
to settle the Kashmir issue by
negotiation with Pakistan

“It would be better for all
roncerned if Nehru set his own

“house in order by pacifist means

instead of exercising his policy of
force on Kashmir and practising
appeasement at Western expense
en the issue of Communist China,”




The role of the Arabs in the
same struggle also has irked
American officlals. The prevailing
opinion is that the Arabs, with
little exception, followed a policy
of retaliation against U.N, for
the disciplining they sustained in
their conflict with the fledgling
State of Israel While it is
recognized at Lake Success that
the Arabs, li ers, have tha
right to nurse their own grudges

against U.N., it is another mat-
ter play fast and lose with
revengé politics when the peace
of the a is at stake.

Extensive misgivings cropped
up also over British and Canadian

hesitaney to join in a stern
punitive policy against Red
China.

Seasoned diplomatic observers
who went through the mill of
Geneva, when Hitler and Musso-
lini wefe rattling the sword and
swinging the club over small
nations are keenly conscious
to-day of the fact that there is
a parallel in the 1951 situation
with that of 1938. In those days,
Poland Was the leading voice--
aside from the British and
French—counselling a “go slow”
policy. The Polish diplomats were
dead set against the challenging
or annoying Hitler, since he was
right on their border.

But Re, “go slow” and “appease-
ment” of Hitler by the Poles
reaped the dragon’s teeth of the
1939 Jblitz, which wiped out
Polan splitting it between
Russia ‘and Germany. The Geneva
cld-timers see a parallel in the
position at U.N. to-day of India,
which keeps on saying that there
must be no hasty action against
Red China, Beneath the surface,
India has the backing of Britain
and some Commonwealth coun-
tries
Nehru’s insistence despite the
Peiping invasion of Tibet and
Korea that e¢verything can be
settled by peaceful nego‘iation led
one observer at U.N. to remark

“Nehru will still be sendins
messages to U.N. that there is
cause for optimism and hope fc

a peaceful settlement when the

Chinese Reds and the Russians
are marching into New Delhi.
Stalin must be having a good
laugh every time he hears from
Nehru.”

A drawback to speedy U.N.
condemnation of Red China, in
the opinion of many delegates.
was the constant necessity on the
part of the American delegation
to avoid “pressure” on baulking
nations. Although the American
delegation itself was under the
heaviest pressure from Congres -
sional and public indignation, the
team of diplomats under Warren
Austin’s direction had to step
warily.

A prominent member of that
team, Minister John C. Ross, put
it this way:

“Basically, the American peo-
ple fully understand the impor-
tance of taking into account
everybody's viewpoint before any
nation is expected to commit
itself to a major policy decision.”

In leaning backwards to give
time for careful consideration by
foreign governments, the Ameri-
can delegation has come under
fire for what is called indecision
and flinching. This has been
strongly denied by Austin and
other members of the U.S. team
who point out that there is
something in what Britain’s Sir
Gladwyn Jebb sa'd to the Politi-
cal Committee.

With the possibility of eventua)
sanctions against Red China
ebviously in mind, Jebb declared:

“It is wisdom in International
politics to look well before you
leap. But it is an axiom too, to
leap together when we do leap.

On that point, the U.S. and
others agree, —I,.N.S,



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GODDARD'S

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a
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aa rcreremenrerenceneeanSRAL tS
aa

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2,

Council



1951

Will Get

Report Of Vestry

On Back Pay Proceedings

THE VESTRY of St. Michael will circulate to members

of the Legislative Council,

the proceédings which took

a at the Vestry meetings, dealing with the matter of
ack pay to their employees.

This was decided at t

heir meeting yesterday, after

discussion on remarks reported in the Press to have been

made by Hon. H. A. Cuke

Tuesday.

It was on the occasion when the
Council was considering a Bill to
authorise the Vestry to borrow a
sum not exceeding £10,000 to pay
retrospective pay to all parochial
employees,

_Mr. E. D. Mottley who had
piloted the Bill through the House
of Assembly, drew the attention
of the members of the Vestry
yesterday to the remarks of Mr,
Cuke. Mr. Cuke, he said, was a
man known for his justice and
fairplay and he believed that the
remarks he had made had been
made in good faith. He was claim-
ing the right to get further infor-
mation on the Bill and he thought
he should have it. There were
certain statements, however, that
he (Mr, Mottley) was prepared to
refute.

It was not correct to say that
the matter was not discussed pre-
ceding the 1950 Vestry election,
It was

v certainly the subject
of discussion at the hustings and
at meetings, and it was true

1> say that members had differed
in their opinions on it.

The motion of Mr. McD. Sym-
monds on which the Vestry made
their decision to give back pay to
the employees, had been on’ the
Vestry’s Agenda for some time
before it had been dealt with, so
that members were fully aware
of it. No attempt had been made
to discuss it in the*absence of
some members or to railroad it
through the Vestry and he regret-
ted very much that that impres-
sion shouid have been given. He
was sure that no member of the
Vestry could honestly say that he
was not allowed an opportunity
toe discuss it.

Hon. V. C. Gale said that he had
gone into this matter very care-
fully. If Mr, Cuke had been mis-
informed, the Vestry’s records
were there to show what had
taken place. The matter of back
pay had been brought up a num-
ber of times and had been turned
down. The last time it was
brought up it was passed, the
only people voting against it being
Mr. Trevor Bowring and himself.
Nine members were present in-
cluding the Chairman and 6 had
voted in favour “and 2 against,

When the Bill was to be brougnt
before the Legislative Council
he had asked the Clerk to let him
-have the facts of the case. He had
told him, Mr, Mottley and the
Churchwarden as well, that he
could not introduce the Measure
in the Council because he had
been opposed To it in ‘the Vestry
and had not changed his mind.
He said that they would have to
get somebody else to do so but
gave his promise that he would
take no part in the debate on it,
as it was the wish of the Vestry
that it should be passed, When
the matter was brought up in the
Council he left tie Chamber un-
til the discussion ended,

Mr. Mottley asked members to
say whether the question of re-
trospective pay had not been
raised at the elections in 1950.
The question was raised then, he
said.

At the time that the retrospec-
tive pay for parochial employees
was passed, Mr. Chase ang Mr.
Miller were not at the Vestry. Mr.
Miller was in Trinidad and Mr.
Chase could not attend because
of some illness. Both of those
Vestrymen had by their previously
expressed views indicated that if
they had been at the Vestry meet—
ing they would have voted for
the retrospective pay. .

Therefore to say that it had
been passed when members were
absent was no point, when some
members who were absent would
have voted for it.

Nor could it be said that there
was a sudden meeting which
aimed at getting it passed. Before
the meeting at which it was pass—
ed, there had been two abortive
meetings and the retrospective
pay motion had been on those
agendas. So when the meeting was
summoned two days after notice
vas given, it only meant that the



same agenda was sent out to
Vestrymen,
Mr. Bowring said that it had

been advised that as many mem-
bers should ae present at the
ing as possible,
ae © Mottley said that they
should, write to Mr. Cuke and let
him know the truth of the matter.
Someone was using subservient
methods with Mr, Cuke and who-
ever it was, was,not doing the
island any good. Mr. Cuke had
not been at the meeting so some-
one must have been telling him

ings.
wi 9 Symmonds said that the
thought that certain members

got together behind the backs of
others and railroad the passing of
back pay could only come through
misinformation.

He had asked the churchwarden
about summoning a meeting to get
the settlement of the back pay
motion before the Vestry died and
the churchwarden said he was not
summoning a meeting. He had
managed to get a meeting called,
but it was unfair to suggest that
the motion had been hurried over
behind other members’ backs.

Mr. Miller said that on any
board the majerity decision would
aiways stand and he did net see
why the majority decision of the
Vestry should be questicned.

Before the motion was passes,
he had heard it stated by the
public and by members of the
Vestry that the Churchwarden did
not intend summoning a meetins
because he was against beck pay.

Mr. Mottley said that, had it not

been for Mr. Weatherhead n
parochial employee would ever
have got retrospéctive pay. Mr.

Weatherhead had given a_casting
vote to a request of the Commis
sioners of Health for back pay for
their day labourers so at one t >
this had been solely

Mr. Victor Chase
was one of the members







A



in the Legislative Coicil on

not attended the meeting the day
it was passed, but had only been
absent through unforeseen cir-
cumstances, Had he been present,
however, he certainly would have
voted in favour of the motion, for
that was his intention.

He was satisfied that there was
no suggestion as might be inferred
from an article in a section of the
Press, of railroading this back pay
issue, for members had discussed
it with him for some time before.

Mr. D. G. Leacock Jnr. said
that he happened to be out of the
island when the motion was
passed.



He did not often agree with Mr.
Miller but he had made a state-
ment about the matter of a
quorum with which he was in
entire agreement. If anyone was
not prepared to accept the de-
cision of a majority of the Vestry
however slim and put it into exes
cution, he saw no possible chance
of anything emerging but chaos
and frustration. Once there was
a legally constituted quorum-the
decision of the majority had to be
accepted, and if this was not te
be done then they would get no-
thing done. It would only mean
reversing the decision at a meet-
ing of the previous one, on the
grounds that. there were not
enough members present at that
meeting.

He did nor. wait. anypody to
assume that.if he were present at
the meeting he would have voted
one way or the other. He would
have come to the meeting with an
open mind.

He took it that true reports of
the meetings had been recorded
in the Minutes and it should not
be impossible to give a copy with
the necessary information to each
member of the Legislative Council.
These members had to exercise
their judgment and were fully
entitled to their opinion. It should
be seen too that they got all the
information they wanted

Mr. Leacock then made a mo-
tion to that effect. Mr. Symmonds
seconded, On the suggestion of
Nr. Mottley a small committee
Was appointed to do this.

Mr. T. W, Miller said that the
motion about the back pay was
that it was for all parochial em-
ployees, Was this to be interpreted
as implied?

It was pointed out
could only apnly to
were entitled to it. ‘

A letter from the Acting Finan-
cial Secretary to the Vestry stated
that the “Govertior-in+Executive
Committee had agreed to the re-
lease of a further. amount of
$1,318 to be expended on the Prin-
cess Alice Playing Field.

It was also stated that the Gov-
ernor-in—Executive Committee had
not reached a decision concerning
the inquiry, into the past expendi-
ture of the amount of $15,590, pre-
viously released from the Labour
Welfare Fund and that the matter
was still under consideration.

that
those

this
who



Can Barbadians
Win U.S. $500?

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 29.

Five hundred dollars U.S., will
be given as prize money in a
Poster Competition being run by
the Caribbean Interim Tourism
Committee.

The poster should be designed
to promote tourism in the Carib-
bean, says Mr. Louis S. Law,
Executive Secretary of the CITC,
and should bear a short slogan of
two or three words in English,
e.g. “Caribbean Calling’, with
perhaps a sub-slogan in smaller
letters at the foot, such as “Come
to the Temperate Tropics”.

The size of the slogan should
be 38” x 25” but designs need not
be submitted in the above size,
but can be produced to fit those
proportions when enlarged, and
they must be in colour.

Territories will form their-own
panel of judges, Mr, Law stated
and will receive all local entries
which must be accompanied by
the name of the~entrant in a
sealed envelope, The winning
design chosen in each territory
will be forwarded to the Executive
Secretary._of . the. CITC,-Kent
House Port-of-Spain to reach him
not later than 15th April, 195).
Final ‘selections ‘will be made. ft
the Third Annual General Meeting
of the CITC in May, "el

Mr. Law has made ‘the™tenta-
tive suggestion that the prize
money should be divided as
follows: $360 U:S. for the first:
$100 U.S. for the second and $50
tor the third. All three prize-
winning designs will be the
breperty of the Caribbean Interim

m Committee,










STOCK UP
TO-DAY






PODDDOOSOO DP OGSFODO PPO PTFIOD ‘

PEAK FREANS PLAYBOX: BISCUITS—vper
COCKTAIL CHERRIES — yer bottle
HEINZ COCKTAIL ONIONS—per bottle
HEINZ STEM GINGER—per bottle... .. ; $1.12



REV. JAMES REESOR, the Faith
Healer, left yesterday for Puerto
Rico by B.W.LA:

Two Awarded

Loan Contracts
THE Christ Church



Vestry at



their meeting vesterday awarded
to Mr. G. B. Evelyn and Mrs
A. N. Inniss, a contract for the

loan of £1,950 to the parish.

The purpose of raising this loan
is for the purchase of an addi-
tional refuse collector of an en-
closed type which in the opinion
of the Commissioners of Health,
is amore sanitary means of col-
lecting garbage in the patish than
the old open. type of lorry. This
will also assist in controlling the
spread of disease.

Provision is also included in the
loan for the erection of concrete
platforms and. enclosures for eight
additional standposts in various
districts of the parish. This is part
of a scheme which the Commis-
sioners have for erecting 64 addi-
tional standposts throughout the
parish

The Vestry considered a. lette:
from the Vestry of St. Michacl
in whieh they agreed in principle
to the payment of a proportional
share of the pension of Mr. H. C,
Griffith, Chief Sanitary Inspector
ot Christ Church, in consideration
of his eight years’ service with
St. Michael before being appointed
to Christ Church.

The St, Michael Vestry however
Yelt that any legislation necessary
in connection with the matter
should be introduced by the Christ
Church Vestry

The C! told the Vestry that
he had communicated with Messrs
Yearwood and Boyce, the Vestry’s
Solicitors who said that they did
net’ think’ the Vestry of Christ
Church could introduce legislation,
the effect of which would be
charge on the rates of another
parish, f

The Vestry therefore instructed
the Clerk to reply to the Vestry
of St. Michael along those lines.

The estry authorised the
Churchwarden to effect certain
minor repairs at the Rectory which
had not been foreseen at the time
of the laying of the Estimates.

The Vestry appointed a Com-
mittee comprising the Chairman
the Churchwarden and Mrs. H. A.
Talma to collaborate with Miss
Nell Manning, Honorary Secretary
of the Civic Circle with a view to
starting a branch of the Civic
Circle in the parish.










Members present were: Rev.
A. F.. Mandeville (Chairman),
Mr, H. St.G. Ward (Chureh-
warden), Mr. G. C. Ward, Mrs
Hl. A. Talma, Mr. J. E. Webster,
Mr... C. S. MacKenzie, Mr. A, C

Gittens, Mr. C. Ifill, Mr. G. C
Ashby, Mr. T. N. Peirce and Mr,
M; E. R. Bourne,





Labourer Fined 40!-

Martimer Walcott a labourer of
Carrington’s Village, St. Michael
Vv yesterday found guilty of re-
sisting @ policeman while in the
execution of his duty and working
a galled mule on January a.

His Worship Mr. C. L, Walwyn
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict ‘A’ before whom both ¢
were heard ordered Walcott
pay a fine of 30/-
and 10/- for
mule, ;

The 30/- fine is to be paid in 28
days or in default one month's
imprisonment with hard labour
and the 10/- is to be paid in 14
days or in default 14 *impris-
onment with hard labour.

Sgt. Murrell prosecuted for the
police in both cases.





tin.. $1.20
— large 31.21 Small 54c.
Bees cae 79¢.

OEOSOOOCOSO SO SOSOSSSESESES

vases
to!

for ae hel
he cruelty to the
th € } a

BARBADOS.

Thieves Make
Big Haul At
Four Roads

HIEVES MADE a large haul
from the Gasoline Station at
Four Roads, St. John, during the

early hours of yesterday morning,

While P.C. Shepherq of the
Four Roads Police Station was on
patrol duty he noticed that the
door of the Gasoline Station was
broken,

Further investigations showed
that the Station was also entered
An H.M¢‘V. Radiogram,
motor car tyres, an H.M.V
Racio and 21 quart tins of Shell
Oil, _total value $594.50, were
missing,

The Station y E
P. A. Clarke. sessed

NID SELMAN of Queen Mary

Road, Bank Hall, also report—
ed that her home was broken and
entered between 10 p.m. on Tues-
day and 5.30 a.m. on Wednesday
and a quantity of clothing stolen,
The Police are investigating both
incidents, .

N WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Josephine Forde of Gills
Gap, Eagle Hall, St. Michae}l, a
pedestrian, was taken to the
General Hospital and detained,

Forde was involved in an
accident along Tudor Bridge with
a bicyele, owned and ridden by
Lionel Wood of Codrington Hill,
St. Michael

SAANEN GOAT belonging to
Ashton Asgard - of: Queen
Mary Road. Rank Hall, gave birth
to five kids, which included
three bucks, on Wednesday

On two other occasions
given birth to four kids,
said,

HE STUDENTS of the St.

Joseph's Church Boys’ School
were given a half holiday every
day during the week, This is
because a new water toilet is to
be erected.

Before erecting the new one, the
old one was taken down, It is
understood that they will be
getting a half holiday until they
get a toilet to use.

O* A SMALi. pasiure opposite

the St. Joseph's Church
3oys’ School stands a half com-
pleted building. Nothing has
been done to this building for a
very long time.

The Advocate was told that this
building was to have been used
as a carpentry shop but joiners
have been seen working there on
more than one occasion,

The building is a bit confusing
but perhaps the joiners know
what they are about.

AIN FELL ON Wednesday all
over the island. The heaviest
rainfall was in St. George where
72 were recorded, The

is owned

it has
Agard



72 parts
other parishes recorded below 50

parts,

The returns were:— City 47
parts, Station Hill District 72
parts, St. Philip 17 parts, St.
Thomas 27 parts, St. Peter 39
parts, St. Joseph 20 parts, St

James 34 parts, St. Lucy.10 parts,
St. Andrew 14 parts and St. John
34 parts.

It was again gloomy in the Citv
yesterday and moist winds could
he felt. This kent the tempera
ture slightly below 80 degrees
Fahrenheit at mid-day,

HE POLICE REPORTS yes-

terday disclosed that 22
motorists and cyclists were re
ported on Wednesday for traffi
offences. Of these four were re
ported for
limit.

ANY PEOPLE in St. Joseph

do not know where to find
their local Post Office which is
situated at lower Horse Hill, op
posite the Almshouse Gap.

A number of people occasionally
go to the St. Jospeh’s Dispensary
thinking that the Post Office is on
that site.

FILM

exceeding the speed

SHOW will be given
for adults at the British
Council, “Wakefield” tonight at
8.30 o’clock. The programme i
as follows: “British News”, “Julius
Caesar’, “Making The Ball” and
“Your Children’s Eyes”. It is not
necessary to enter by tickets.

WHEN speaking in the debate in the
Legislative Council on the provision of
rigs for the Waterworks Department
on Tuesday Hon. F. C. Hutson was ex
pressing a personal opinion,

The Interim Board of which Hon
Hutson was

Mr
a member ceased to fune-

‘ion after the time of the appointment
f the Engineer Mr. Roddam in De-
ember 1049,

two Hill.

ADVOCATE ~*~



Government Hiil



GOVERNMENT HILL, a road
half a mile long and at t a mile
from Bridgetown got its name
from the circumstance that all te
the right of it,. going up, the
Government House grounds
stretch. .

A wall encloses Government
House and goes right up to the

top of the hill. Big tamarind
mahogany and other treés grow
on the Government House grounds
and many branches overhang th
road, When the sun is hot, half
the road is usually shaded,

The hill actually bégins at the
corner of the Ivy Road thouga
higher up is called Government
Tne first building on the
right is an old, weather beaten
joiners shop. Almost at any time
of the day the tall slim joiner of
the shop can be seen slouching
over the furniture he may be
polishing, repairing or making.

After the old joiner’s shop
there is a half completed bunga-
low. No workman can b® ever seep
about it, The unplastered walls
too have begun to gather moss,

A sign board will tell the
passerby that a miliner lives at
the house after the unfinished
bungalow and at the following
house there is a woman in the
hairdressing business,

The queerest house of the road
is to the right of the hairdresser’s
It is a fairly big house about
a dozen yards away from the road
and is always shut. There are trees
around it and gardens to the front,
It seems that the hobby of the
woman of this house is music for
the soft sounds of a piano are
frequently heard,

Gittens Road

One then comes to Gittens Road
which branches across on the right
and just below there is the biggest
erocery shop of the district,

On the top of a high embank-
ment after the shop there is a
small shoemaker’s shop and withic
stitching away .on leather without
the least attempt at hurry is a
giant of a man, One wonders how
he mamages to turn about in the
small space.

The one public pipe which !:
in Government Hill is in front of
the giant shoemaker’s shop.

Further down the hill a soap
factory stands. This factory pro-
vides work for many men, Eleveo
to 12 is the breakfast hour and at
that time the men hurry out to
keep the bread and fish woman
nearby busy when from every
angle she can hear the cry for
bread and fish,

The man who founded the soap
factory, Mr. J, C, Roberts, is a
bird fancier and to the front of
the house below the soap factory
in which he lives there are many
cages with a variety of birds, Mr.
Roberts is a grey bearaed man
now and you will see him with
his stick walking around the cages
looking at the birds as they eat.

There are only two other houses
on the right at the side of the hi ’
and it ends up, branching in twe
directions, towards Tweedside
Road and towards Belmont Road,
both of which lead to the city.

Concert At ‘Rocks’

The Police Band under Capt.
C. BE, Raison will give a band
concert at the Rocks, Hastings,

tonight at 8 o’clock.
Following is the
Grand March — Cleopatra

programme:
Manehille

Tragic :
Overture Phedre Massenet
Operatic La Traviata Verdi

Verdi died on the 27th January 1901,
the 50th anniversary
his remains were re-
interred in the home which he
founded for impoverished musi ns
Entracte The Birthday Serer p

and to mark
of his death





Lincke
Memories of
Selected

Potpourri Viennese

Franz Lehar :
Ballards

Two Favourite Somewhere
» voice is calling Tate
Until Sandersar

hare stie On the Dover Coach
Characteristic 5 te
English Airs The Rose Myddleton
Foxtrot Mona Lita Murrell
Finale Yfiuymn, O God Our Help it

Ages Past (By special request)

LARCENY CASE
ADJOURNED

A case brought by the Police
charging 26-year-old Marjorie
Browne of no fixed place of abode
with the larceny of £1 7s. belong
ing to Lorraine Parris, of Gittens
Road, St. Michael, was yesterday
adjourned until February 12 by
His Worship Mr. C. L: Walwyn
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”.

Browne ws arrested by Police
Censtable 486 Skeete for the
offence which was alleged to have

been committed sometime or
January 31 ;
Set. F. H. Bancroft is prose-

cuting on behalf of the Police
Browne is on a personal bond ot
£5, sad@t

FRESH SUPPLY OF

PURINA HEN CHOW

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

aH. JASON JONES &
BUESEEBBEERE BERS

OF OFF Fe
on SeeSeueer PSPC
>

CREAMS

PRUNE

TO-DAY'S
SPECIAL

AT

GROPP POSSS

-

OOS S OOO POPP POT PP OOO



CHERRY HEERING—per bottle:....,.. $5.00
HENESSEY’S X.O. BRANDY—wper bottle, $13.00
PEAK FREANS CHEESE & TOMATO SALAD 1
STICKS—per tin Saearakebivig $1.10 Big j HT S
5 1%
3 HEINZ & AYLMERS BABY FOODS % |%
1% 8c, per tin or 90¢. per dozen % %
§ By
x al is ‘ 4 P z ; 2 1%
% PERLSTEIN BEER—1i8c. per bottle or $4.00 per carton % Is PHOENIX SODA
x UNE ‘ 219
ie %1R
—y 7 4 21
STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Lid. = — FOUNTAIN
%,
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CO., LTD.—-Distributors

~

66,6660 OOOO"
LLY OP PPO FPP PPP Ps

VOD PSOOOOOS
SOC PESFOOPEED SOC COLO SSS Se

Wants Govt.
To Purchase
Playing Field

On the suggestion of Mr. D. G.
Leacock jnr., the Vestry yesterday
declared their willingness to asx
Government to consider the im-
mediate purchase of the Carring-
ton’s Village playing field. This
was one of the sites recommended
by the Playing Fields Committee .

Mr. Leacock pointed out that 1
was a playing field for over 20
years and was in reasonably good
condition, It was in a crowded
area and would continue to serve
the large number of people there
Besides, the Barbados Co-opera-
tive Bank had offered it to the
Government at a very reasonable
price. He thought the Govern-
ment should purchase it before the
Bank carried out its intention to
cut it up into house spots.

The matter was raised when the
Vestry were cons'dering a lette:
from the Colonial Secretary ask-
ing them to reconsider their deci-
sion to assist in the acquisition
and conversion of sites for play-
ing fields,

He also inquired if it were
still the desire that the proposai
about the Friendship playing field
should be attended to as the next
priority after the Princess Alice's
er whether prior attention shoulo
be given to any other,



Mr. Leagock pointed out that
though !the Friendship playing
field should certainly be acquired,
it was more desirable that the
Carrington's Village playing field
should be given priority.

He expressed annoyance that
after all the trouble the com-
mittee had taken in selecting and
recommending the sites, the
Vestry and the committee inci
dentally, should have been treated
as they had been, There was
no doubt at all, he said, that
wheever occupied the position of
Social Welfare Officer, was not
in @ position to examine detailed
estimates of building and con-
struction costs, This was a mat
ter he thought that should be
left in the hands of someone from
the Public Works.

Mr. Victor Chase seconded Mr
Leacock’s mation and said that
the Carrington’s Village playing
field was almost fully developed
while the Friendship playing fiela
would have now to be hammerec

into shape.
The Vestry finally decided to
reply to the Colonial Secretary

agreeing to carry out his request,
provided thht the Social Welfare

Cfficer had nothing further to do
with the playing fields. They
also suggested that they should

work with someone ‘from the
Public Works Department who
knew about building construction
It was decided to include in the
reply, the suggestion about the
Carrington’s Village playing field



oe
SEE
SS



FRESH ARRIVALS

AT

WEATHERHEAD'S

EVERY BITE A DELIGHT!

Fry's “Hazel, Nut” Choc’s:
2/-, 3/9 and $1.79 Box
8/- per 1-lb. Tin,

Fry’s “Princess” Choc’s:
94c, and $1,69 Box
Cadbury's “Red Rose” Choc’s
98c. and $1.80 Box
FRY'S “Scorched Almonds”

2/- Box,
$2.02 per 1-lb, Tin

Cadbury's “Milk Tray”
Choe's:

' 90c. and $1.48 tin

Cadbury's “Roses” Choe’s:


























90c. and $1.48 tin
Cadbury's Choc, Biscuits
5/- and 5/3 tin
Meltis Coffee Choe:
Creams $1.23 box
Nestle’s Asst, Choc:
$1.19 and $2.12 box
Black Magic Choc: $4.06 box
Salted Peanuts ,... 64c. tin
Jacob's Cream Crackers
6/- tin
Jacob's “Selected”
$2.06 tin
Jacob's “Asst, Creams” Bis-

Mint

Biscuits

QUE bd Ges se $1.51 tin
Jacob's “Family Asst.” Bis-
WORLTOIE dhs cache se $1.47 tin

Meltis Favourite Candies —
$1.02 and $1.85 box
Carr’s “Club Cheese” Bis-

cuits $1.00 tin
Glucose Barley Sugar —
60c. and $1.02 tin
Sharp's Toffee —-
), 60c,, 78c. & $1.02
Collard & Bowses “Nougat”
34c. and 70c.
Collard & Bowses ‘“Butter-
scotch” ..,. 2le. & 45c.
Ovaltine Biscuits .. 43c. Box
Blue Bird Toffee... .42c¢. tin





_

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Street









cannot be repeated.
Buy
NOw

In Black only. Per Pair

St. Thomas Vestry

PAGE FIVE

Will Ask



Govt. For Playing Field

The St. Thomas Vestry decided at their meeting yesterday
to ask the Government to take steps in providing a playing
field or playing fields for the parish. _

Mr. K. Sandiford made the
motion and he was seconded by
Mr. W. T. Gooding. There was

an equal division of the Vestry
and the Chairman, Rev. Shepherd,
gave his vote in favour of Mr
sandiford’s motion

The Ves.ry was at the time dis-
cussing the appointment of a
“Playing Fields” Committee,

Mr. Sandiford said that
“Playing Fields" Committee of
1950 did not succeed in getting
playing fields for the parish be-
cause the estimate they made was
too high.

He thought it best in the inter-
est of the parish that that Com
mittee be changed and so he was
proposing Mr. Reeves, Mr. Collins
and Mr. Watson.

Mr. V. E. Reeves said that it
was not wise for the Vestry to
appoint a Playing Fields Commit-
tee.

the



36 ins. wide

% in

: NIL

‘ AQUA

‘ ECRU

\ FLESH

‘ LEMON
WHITE
POWDER
’ $3.41 yd.

3s ——

SOOO

x DIAL

PPE LEP ELOY

'TOOTAL
‘LINENS

: THE TALK OF THE TOWN!
‘ :
x

House Repairs
He said that the money the
Government was being asked to
spend on providing playing fields
should pe spent on repairs to the
homes of poor people of the par-
ish.

Mr. M. Collins agreed with Mr.
Reeves. He said that the parish
had no need for playing fields.

Mr. Sandiford moved that the
Vestry write the Government in-
forming them that no member of
the Vestry was prepared to serve
on the Playing Fields Committee
in view of the fact that estimates
prepared by the “Playing Fields”
Committee and submitted to the
Government was not favourably
considered. It was therefore the
feeling ef that Vestry that the
Government should take steps to
provide a playing field or playing

@ On Page 7
PEE,

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Paes

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for tested crease-resistance

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Says Mr. Leo King:
“YOU CAN

OPINIONS

RE-LION IT

BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT!”

MADE IN UK.
The Perfection of Confection

WALTERS’ ‘PALM’



PRE



TOFFEE LTD.
LONDON,

‘PALM’ WORKS,

w.3





2s

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID. |nemmreSrrns

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street



Football
at prices which
|

With
Sunken

Per Set

Suction Base and




PAGE SIX BARBADOS, ADVOCATE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1951
(exes nner seneneteeneenenees











a
» WEW LMMPROVED, ATTENTION!!!
4 .ODEX{SOAP FACTORY MANAGERS
~ @ Gets skin really clean se ted
© Banishes perspiration odour Tak: this opportunity of obtaining your req

J © Leaves body sweet and dainty
Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that
is mild and oak for face, hands and
daily baths. dex is ideal for family use.

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from }4 in. upwards

MILD STEEL
————— Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes

CAN EPILEPSY BE CURED? BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes

What is epilepsy? We only know that ment has been found that relieves at-
since time began it has attacked rich _ tacks in most cases. This remarkable








and poor alike, great and humble, Julius —_ medicine is described in an interesting TER CLOT H~— i tton Twill
; Caesar, Napoleon and Byron were vic- booklet entitled “Can Epilepsy be FIL 0 White Co
tims. Epilepsy has always interested Cured?" This booklet is giyen away free At PRICES that cannot be repeated.
+ ‘men of science and at last their efforts to epileptics. Anyone suffering from
[... THEY NEVER RECOVER FROM THE Dante ted mere ener eens» Note, (hs Slanene Ghats EUS PLONE. |
BITE OF THE TZIG-TZAG FLY! pee ‘ Hi EDUCATIONAL DIVISION, Dept. B. 107 880 Bergen Ave., Jersey City, N.J., U.S.A. ' GUNDRY L
< wi Z = lease send me a copy of the free booklet entitied "Can Epilepsy be Cured?” The BARBADOS tell
+ 2 ' BR cine cinies ' - :
1 Pte Reenter eee ifar sittin: teats ae hte eer rere e ee 1 WHITE PARK ROAD. ST, MICHAEL

A SS 5 15. svnyieckg base ho Soupbaeabadaasictsinsk sokeaueesaatied as coayoek ! DIAL 4528
1





Nes

nt a ee g mci ek DO YOU KNOW?
| Dimer : om PSs

- a Ke Ta u A
- a ES : 4
fo . 7 i
iy a « ieee |
| em it, Oruntuted ty King Pecturey Sondiate
. = — : 4 . —sere
—_
pss } 6

BLONDIE,
WHERE (S THE

WHY ©0
FLEA POWDER? -
WANTS TO BORROW ;

Pet athens BARE



“PEEK FREAN”

(BRITAIN'S BEST HISCUITS)

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING STORES LIVER SAL

TRY THESE FAMOUS PARTY AIDS
CHEESELETS









Digestive
Upsets

The distress and discom-
fort of flatulence, heartburn,
i ion and many other
symptoms arising from
hyperacidity, can be soothed,
relieved often avoided by
taking a dose of De Witt’s






FT BAD GANG-- MANY
“TRAIN ROBBERIES --G-GOT ME--

oi
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MARTINI CRACKERS
PLAY BOX
TWIGLETS Etc. Ete.

DELICIOUS & APPETISING




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Antacid Powder neutralises
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At the same time, the well-

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over a long period by pro-
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ANTACID
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Neutralises Acid |
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BRINGING UP FATHER @ For use away ee
2 oe DeWITT’S
@ Easily carted © ANTACID

@ Cell-seaed TABLETS


















WELL-ITS ABOUT

TIME FOR THAT

WESTERN SERIAL“
DER IF THOSE

: i WON iF
© | RUSTLERS WILL GIT
“Bo @| TH HERD OVER TH’
Qo

BORDER BY MIDNIGHT!
bss

HELLO-MR. JIGGS - THIS 16
SUSIE-OUR TELEVISION

1S BROKEN --AND 1/D
LIKE TO KNOW - =

DID THOSE RUSTLERS
GET THAT HERD OVER
THE BORDER BEFORE
MIDNIGHT ? cr





















hie



The Advocate Co’ Ltd’, will publish a Year Book of Barbados
ates in 1951,

The Year Book will contain three parts:—

| were stu \/ ‘\ DO YOU RECOGNIZE
/ ned THIS MAN @



(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know ut
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.

(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar, e
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels asé ne;

A TOUPEE ON
. -PRIDAY |
\se?9





(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisc-
tions immediately or not later than April 15th 1951.

etc. HAI QR |
TONIC /Baes/

VASELINE is the registeres trad+ taark of
Chesebrough Manufacturing Co., Cons’ 1 ee










THE PHANTOM

LU We GOT OUR \\. AND WE CAN'T GET OFF
RG) MOTORCYCLES") \ THE GROUNDS
WE'LL SPLIT UP«

HIM. s<———(CAND MEET IN TOWN J gp
bay eerie
\e . | “ioe
Kor ahs














> :

See Us for the
following :-—
Tins PEANUT BUTTER
Bots. SALTED PEANUTS
Packages DATES
Tins KRAFT CHEESE &

MACARONI
Bots. KRAFT

MAYONNAISE
1 & 2lb Tins HAMS

Tins RABBIT

Tins GUAVAS

Tins SWEET CORN

1b Tins C & E MORTON’S
PEARL BARLEY

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951.
Advertisers are asked to get in touch with












I'M WITHYOU, PETE. JEFF
GOIN’ SOFT FER THE DAME.
T MEANS TROUBLE. AH



EFF, SHE MIGHT GET AWAY ANY
..CTiME 2 HAVE TO WATCH HER ate)





Â¥2

| SAY TAKE HER WITH US.

NOBODY LLSHOOT AT US

IF SHE'S ALONG: ee
oJ

Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager,
Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to

SSNS 8 ESS



ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be INCE & Co., Ltd.
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951. 6, 7, 8 & 9 Roebuck Street,
(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION) Dial 2238 i

————— ee

{
‘ it
————————————— SS SS aaa}

Sao ~——~ eee







} t




FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2,

CLASSIFIED ADS.|\Mr. Griffiths Comments’

1951

TELEPHONE 2508



DIED



GREAVES — HENPIETTA, Age 96. On
Feb. Ist 1951 at Geneva, Garrison. Fu-
neral took place at Westbury Cemetery
on the sime afternoon

2.2.51—In.
Siaasinaiashghatalainainiealigadinmcaciuiniiniatidiitepamrindeoiedan
MORRIS — Exired Neilson Late of
R.A.F. On 31st Jan. 1951 at St. Pancras
Hospital, London, England. Son of Mr.
& Mrs. D. D. Morris, Station Hill, St.
Michael 2.2.51—1n.



IN MEMORIAM



HUNTE—In loving memory of our: dear
mother Mrs. Rachael Hunte who was
called to rest on 2nd February 1949.

How often we have trod the path,

That leads us to the grave,

Where lies the one we love so well,

But whom we could not «save,

At night when all is silent,

And sleep forsakes our eyes,

Our thoughts are on the lonely grave,

Where our dear mother lies,

Ever to be remembered by
children and grand-children

The Hunte Family, Culloden Road.

2.2.51-—1n.

her



eee eaeenenreseresenanscsinseamena apace
PARRIS—In lovng memory of our dear
husband and father Gerald Parris who
was laid to rest on the 2nd of February
1948.
“If love and care could death prevent
But God alone knew what was best

When he took dear Dad, home to

rest."

Ever to be remembered by the
Family, (U.S.A. Papers please copy).

2.2.51—In,

—————

SEALY—In loving memory of my beloved

daughter Gwendolyn Sealy who fell
asleep on February 2nd 1950.

My sorrow and heartache no one can

heal

My memory a keep sake no one
can steal

My dear one has gone though not

far away

For we'll meet in the garden of

memories each day
Ever to be remembered by her dear
mother, Beryl Layne.
2.2.51—In.

FOR SALE
____ AUTOMOTIVE _





CAR—Standard 14 hp. Saloon in
excellent condition, ‘always owner
driven. an be seen at Chelsea Garage

(1950) Ltd., Pinfold Street.
2.2,.51—3n,

ee
CAR—Hillman 1948, excellent condition,

always owner driven. Telephone 2672.
1,2,51—2n,

CAR—Humber Snipe 1938. Mileage
33,000 in good running order. Can be
peen at DUNSINANE, COUNTRY
ROAD, by arrangement with Mrs, M.
Gieaves. Phone 95249. 1.2.51—3n.

eee
CAR — One 5 passenger Sedan Terro-
plane recently overhauled and in perfect
working order price $400, Ring 91-24,.
Lighthouse, St, Lucey. 27.1,51—?n.

PICK- UP-TRUCKS — New Vanguard |
Pick-up Trucks and Delivery Van.
Special Low prices, Phone 4264 for
demonstration, Chelsea Garage (1950)
Ltd., Pinfold Street. 2.2.51—3n

TRACTOR - Catapillar Diesel D 4.
Tractor, Excellent condition. Phone 4629,
1.2.51—2n.

ELECTRICAL

a
PHILIPS ELECTRIC RAZOR, as new.
Magnet Electric Cooker in good condi-
tion. Apply: Emtage Electrical Company.
31.1,.51—8n. |

MISCELLANEOUS

—_————
BUY IGLODINE EMBROCATION for
Rheumatism, Backache, Lumbago and
Sprains Ce. per bottle. Get from your
Chemist to-day, THE STANDARD

AGENCY (B'DOS) CO., Agents.
1.2.51—8n.

BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top
grade, A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

26.1.51—t.f.n.

———————_—______
INFANT'S PORTABLE TREASURE
COT with fibre mattress—practically new.











Ring 4729. 1,2.51—€n.
LISBON YAMS at “Francia”, — St.
George, Dial 3226. 1,2.51—3n.



YAMS—Bottle neck Lisbon delicious

foy eating, delivered in city and suburbs
at $3.00 per 100 lbs. Dial 3485, Upton
Plantation. 1.2.51—4n,



WANTED

_



A Vaeancy exists with the Nationa!
Cash Register Company's Agents for an
Apprentice Mechanic. Applications are
invited from individuals between the ages
of 19 and 22, who possess the following

attributes: Education to School Certifi-
cate Standard; mechanical aytitude;
initiative personality. The successful

applicant will be required to undergo a
three to six months probationary period
in Barbados, followed by a similar
period of training in Trinidad. Salary
during the periods of probation and
training will be between $45.00 and
$76.00 per month depending on the age
and experience of the individual. Appli-
cotants must be of European Origin.
Apply in writing only giving full par-
ticulars, and submitting a passport
photograph to The National Cash Register
Co’s., Agents, c/o T. Geddes Grant, Ltd,
Bolton Lane. 1.2,51—3n

~ —
FOWLS for eating. apply: Geoffrey

Jones Green Dragon, Chinese Restaurant,
Broad Street. 1.2,51—t.f.n.

‘LOST & FOUND

i LOST

WALLET—Will the finder of a wallet
between Swan and James Street please
keep wallet and money but return
papers to this office. 2.2.51—In.

GOLD WRIST CHAIN — Somewhere
between “Arundel”, St. Lawrence, a
gcld wrist chain with half sovereign
pendant and gold padlock clasp, Finder
please notify ‘Advocate’. Good reward
paid. 2.2.51—1n,













FOR RENT
HOUSES





BELLA VISTA,
March Ist. Fully
levge Refrigerator,
water, electric
Double Garage

Bathsheba, fror
furnished, Including
3 bedrooms, running
light and telephone.
and 4 servants’ rooms.
Apply 96221, Mrs. J. W. Chandler,
Todds Estate, 2.2.51—3n.
—_—

FURNISHED HOUSE, STEWART

VILLE-—Hastings on seaside. Tel. 2904
2.1.51—2n

BUNGALOW — Newly constructed

concrete Bungalow at Enterprise Road,
Christ Church. Modern new furniture,
Phone 3535. 28.1.51.—3n,

eer tesnaeenienin ontene—
STORAGE SPACE suitable for making
Bonds and Warehouses.. Apply K. R.
Tkunte & Co, Ltd. Dial 4611,
1,2.51—6n.
“SWANSEA” — A comfortable fully
furnished Bungelow at Worthing, 4 Bed-
ooms, Fridge, Telephone, Radio, Garage
und available immediately. Dial 3578 or
2490. 2.2,51—3n



sensei reeeretnesinhacienesnineeahehetghistnenieres

TRINITY COTTAGE—St. James Coast.
Fully furnished containing 3 bedrooms
Available for months of February to May
and August to December 1951. Phone
2959. 21.1.51—2n,



PUBLIC NOTICES

“£25° -. -d, easily earned by obtaining

order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making
opportunity. Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
England.”







25.1.51—18n

NOTICE

The sale of ‘Roaches’ Plantation has
been withdrawn. The sale of “THE
CAVE” Plantation will contirue and the
Cave Plantation will be set_up at Public
Action to-morrow 2nd Febouary instant
at 2 p.m. at our Office, James Street
The area of the Cave





ntation is 40
neres 3 reods made up follows: 20
acres arable, 20 acres 3 roods curtilage

frass land and roads
YEARWOOD & ROYCE,





Soliettors:
51- in
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
REMOVAL

The application of Posalie Scott of
Hillaby, St. Andrew, granted in respect
ef a board and galvanize shop with
shedroof attached at Hillaby, St. Andrew
for permission to remove said license tc
a board and galvanize shop attached to
house at Hillaby, St. Andrew.

Dated this 30th day of January 1951.
To J. R. EDWARDS, Eszq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. fi

Signed SEYMOUR, GILL,
for Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “F", on Friday,
{the 9th day of February, 1951, at
11 o'clock, a.m,





J. R, EDWARDS,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “F".
2,2.51—1n.

PUBLIC SALES
REAL ESTATE

PROPERTY—At 69 Roebuck Street
A two storey Wall Building on 4.362







sa. ft. of land. Downstairs, Store,
Store Rooms and Garage. Upstairs, 4
Bediooms, Drawing and Dining rooms
ete. Electric Light and Power. Price
£4000, nearest offer treated “eon-
fidentially. Apply to M. Abbadi or
phonb 2297. 1,2,51—4n,





SPRINGHAM—The dwelling house at
Springham, White Park Road. Building
to be removed, Apply D. V. Scott &
Co, Ltd. 12.1,51—t.f.n.

MARSHVILLE Bank Hall main road
standing on 5,445 square feet of land,
Dwelling house comprises closed ver-
andah, drawing and dining ‘rooms,
three bedrooms, breakfast room toilet
and bath, Government water and elec-
tricity installed. This property will be
offered for sale to public competition
at our office James Street, on Friday,
2nd February, 1951 a 2 p.m.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to Hutchinson & Banfield,
James Street.

17.1.5!—6n.

The undersigned will offer for sale by
public competition at their office, No. 17,
High Street, on Thursday the 8th day
of February, 1951, at 2 p.m, the dwelling-
house called

THE BOWER
with 7,444 square feet of land situate
at The Garrison, containing 2 verandahs,
2 public rooms, 2 bedrooms, toilet, bath,
kitchen, etc. Garage, servants rooms and
enclosed garden,

The sale may be made with or with-
out the furniture,

Vacant possession will be given.

Further particulars from

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
30.1.61—9n.







fOR KENT, SALE OR LEASB

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din
ing room, Breakfast room and Kitchen-
ette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone.
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1,51,—6n.

AT TOP ROCK—Delightful ‘residence
having 3 Bedrooms, large Lounge, sepa-
rate Dining Room, 2 fully Tiled Toilets
and Bath, modern Kitchen, built in &
Car Garege 2 Servants Quarters, standing
on nearby half an sero, Price £4,500
nearest offer. For viewing apply Ralph
A. Beard, Hardwood Alicy or Phone







4683. 26.1.51—én
MAIL NOTICES

Mails for St. Vincent, Martinique,

Antigua, St. Kitts, St. Thomas, V.L,

New York by the s,s. Fort Amherst will
be closed at the General Post Office
ag under:—

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered

Mail at 1 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30
p.m, on areata 7th February, 1951

WISE...
- ADVERTISE





GOVERNMENT NOTICES



BARBADOS GOVERNMENT SAVINGS BANK.

IT IS notified for the information of the General Public that with
effect from the 5th of February, 1951, the Government Savings Bank
will be removed to the opposite wing of the Public Buildings in the
premises recently vacated by the Parcel Post Branch of the General

Post Office.

2.2.51—2n



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ST. MATTHIAS’ GIRLS’ SCHOOL—CHRIST CHURCH. _
Applications are invited for the Headship of the St. Matthias

Girls’ School from teachers (women) with at least 10 years’ teach-

ing experience.

The minimum professiqnal qualification required is

the Certificate A of the Department or exemption therefrom.

Salary will be in

accordance with the Government Scale for

Head Teachers in Grade II Elementary Schools.

Candidates who

have already

submitted application forms in

respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply by letter, accom- |

panied by a recent testimonial.

All other candidates should make

application on the appropriate form which may be obtained from the |

Department of Education

lopes marked “Appointments Board”
must reach the Department of Educat
1951.

30th January, 1951.

in the top left hand corner
Saturday, 10th

ton by

_r

2.91—3dr



BARBADOS Oe

On Customs Union

MR. JAMES GRIFFITHS in a
letter to the Governor cf Barbados
dated 22nd Dec., 1950, from
Church House, London, makes
the following comments on the
Report of the Commission on the
Establishment of a Customs Union
in the British Caribbean area.

“This Report,” he writes, “which
is a Worthy companion to those
of the Standing Closer Association
Committee and the Commission
on the Unification of the Public
Services, merits the most careful
and serious consideration, For it
will be recalled that, in paragraph
10 of the Memorandum on Closer
Association of the British West
Indian Colonies, which formed an
enclosure to my predecessor's cir-
cular despatch of the 14th Febru-
ary, 1947 (Cmd, 7120), it was
stated that ‘probably no other
single reform would bring such
benefit to the colonies concerned
as the establishment of a full cus-
toms union, or at any rate a com-
mon customs tariff’. Furthermore,
the Standing Closer Association
Committee expressed the view
that a customs union is ‘the foun-
dation of a _ federal structure’
(paragraph 30 of the Committee's
Report).

“The fiscal Sub-Committee ap-
pointed at the Montego Bay Con-
ference in 1947 to submit proposals
on the question of customs union
recorded, in paragraph 12 of its
Report, that the establishment of
a customs union would result
in: —

(a) the encouragement of inter-
colonial trade, which would
naturally be duty-free
within the union;
the establishment of uni-
formity in tariff rates and
customs administration;
increased efficiency in the
collection of revenue;
the strengthening of the
position of the British
Caribbean territories as far
as bargaining power is con-
cerned in relation to inter-
national trade agreements;
the encouragement of local
industries.

“The Commission readily sub-
scribes to the Fiscal Sub-Commit-
tee’s views, observing that ‘Freer
commercial exchange between the
British Caribbean territories
would undoubtedly foster a more
varied economy through the area’.
It also expressed the view that
the establishment of a customs
union is not dependent on politi-
eal federation but that it would
‘inevitably tend towards creating
conditions inviting closer political
unity’ (paragraphs 11, 12 and 63
of the Report).

“Although the Commission indi-
cates a method by which a cus-
toms union might be achieved in
stages, it feels that since the
obstacles to be overcome in its
establishment are so few and the
desire for an early measure of
fiscal and economic unity so gen-
eral, anything in the nature of a
transitional period is neither
necessary nor expedient, It
recommends, therefore, the estab-
lishment at the earliest opportun-
ity of a customs union embracing
all the British Caribbean territor-
ies, with the exception, for the
time being, of the British Virgin
Islands and the Jamaican Depen-
dencies of the Cayman and the
Turks and Caicos Islands (para~
graphs 71 and 136—140).

“One of the most valuable of
the Commission’s achievements
has been the preparation of a
common tariff structure and a
common classification for trade
statistics (paragraphs 32—43), In
this connection, however, I must
draw your attention to the follow-
ing points. The Commission took
as the framework for its tariff
structure and statistical classifica-
tion (Part I of the First Schedule
to the Draft Ordinance at Appen-
dix B), the Minimum List of
Commodities for International
Trade Statistics published by the
League of Nations in 1938, antici-
pating that the revised version of
it, on which the United Nations
Statistical Commission was engag-
ed when the Commission was at

(b)

(ce)
(d)

(e)

work, would emerge with com-
paratively few changes, thus
making it a_ relatively simple

matter to align the Commission's
recommendations with the United
Nations List when it was publish-
ed. The United Nations Statistical
Commission has now completed
its labours, and its list, which is
called the ‘Standard International
Trade Classification’, was approv-
ed by the Economic and Social
Council in July, Unfortunately
it represents rather more of a
departure from the League of
Nations ‘Minimum List’ than the
Commission had any reason to
expect. His Majesty’s Govern-
ment have not yet made known
their views regarding a_ possible
change-over from the present
classification used in the United
Kingdom for primary statistical
purposes to the new ‘Standard
International Trade Classification’.
(I might mention here that the
Colonial Government Statisticians,
at their conference in March,
were not able to conside? the final
draft of the United Nations Clas-
sification as it was not available
to them at that time; they did,
however, express the view that
the extent to which such a classi-
fication was used by the United
Kingdom would influence colonial
territories — see paragraph 24 of
the Report on the Conference, en-
closed with my circular despatch
of the 3lst August, 1950.) I am
hopeful that a decision by His
Majesty's Government will not be
long delayed, and I will communi-
cate it to you with my comments
as soon as possible. Meanwhile,
I am unable to give you any

idance other than that His

ajesty’s Government would not
favour the adoption at this date
of the old “Minimum List’ for
tariff or statistical purposes.

“The Commission's proposals for
a common tariff (paragraphs 73
to 89), particularly those relating
to margins of preference, repre-
sent, in my opinion, a reasonable
balance in general conformity with
the spirit of the General Agree-
ment on Tariffs and Trade. But
you will be aware that, under
Article XXIV (7) of that Agree-
ment (as amended—see page 34 of
Cmd. 8048 ‘Provisional Consoli-
dated.-Text of the General Agree-
ment on Tariffs and -Trade and
Texts of Related Documents’.
copies of which were -transmitted



All applications must be enclosed in enve- ja Customs Union to the Contract-
and

February,

to Coionial Governments under
feover of my circular savingram

cf the 24th November, 1950), it is
| necessary to submit any plan

dopted for the establishment of
ing Parties for their approval; anc
there is always the p ility that



iy ask for modi
Pari igraphs 17
1 | Report deal with

(

ation

oat te





the



the quest o1

free trade and its effect on
revenues. This aspect of customs
unicn will need to receive very
clese attention since the estab-
lishment of a free trade area
would result in a loss of revenue
te each colony in respect of the
duties hitherto collected on duti-
able goods ‘mported from © or
exported to other member col-
onies. It is however, to be noted
that the Commission consider
that, while the loss could to some
extent be reduced by the levying
of excise duties on the lines pro-
posed in Chapter V of the Report,
and to a lesser extent by reserv-
ing to member colonies the right
to continue to levy export duties
as indieated in Chapter Vi, it
would prebably, in the main, be
mere than met by the operation
of a scientifically balanced com-
mon external tariff,

“I do not propose at this stage
to comment in any detail on the
Draft Model Customs Ordinance
er the Draft Customs Regulations
which form Appendices B and C
to the Report. There are, how-
éver, various points in them which
would require consideration, anc
I should, therefore, wish to b«
given an opportunity of studying
in draft any legislation whict
might be contemplated.

“In paragraphs 44 to 49 thc

Commission make various pro-
pesals for the mechanical anc
centralised compilation of trad

and revenue statistics, the adop-
tion of which should effect con
siderable improvement on existin;
precedure. Recent developments
however, bring a new possibility
into consideration—that work or
centralised mechanical tabula-
tions could be shaved betweer
Jamaica and Trinidad. As regard:
the statement in paragraph 4
that “in regard to the form it
which statistical material wher
abstracted can best be presented
the Commission understands thai
the question is at present receiv-
ing consideration by the Colonia
Office”, it will be recalled tha
at the above-mentioned Confer-
ence of Colonial Governmen
Statisticians, it was agreed ‘tha
a uniform layout of Trade
Accounts was not essential at the
present time, although some
degree of regional uniformity
was desirable” (paragraph 26 oi
the Revert of the Conference).

“The Report is now to be con-
sidered by the Legislatures. ]
realise, of course, the very sub-
stantial task they already have
in hand in their examination of
the two other Reports mentioned
in paragraph 2 above: but I hope
that it will be possible for them

to address themselves to the
study of this Report in the near
future, and I shall await the
outcome of their deliberations

The decision
or not a customs

with great interest.
as to whether

union shall be established rests
primarily with them; and His
Majesty's Government does not
wish to prejudge or influence

their decision. The Legislatures
may find it convenient to confine
themselves for the time being to
the consideration of the main
issue, namely, the desirability
and practicability of establishing
a Customs Union in the light of
fhe arguments and factors set
out in the Report. If, as I hope
may be the case, they all agree to
the establishment of such an
Union, I would suggest that the
details might be worked out by
a committee containing repre-
sentatives of the various terri-
tories, possibly the proposed
regional economic committee,
referred to in my despatch No. 105
of the 17th November, 1950, if
it
body.
assistance which I can render
governments in this matter
way of advice or in any other
form,
give it.”

St. Thomas Vestry

From page 5.
fields in that parish for the use
of the people.

Mr. Gooding said that he was
seconding the motion because the
Government could not take money
allocated for one purpose and
spend it on another.

“Glendale House”

Coming up again for discussion
was the repairing of “Glendale
House”

A motion made by Mr. Reeves
and seconded by Hon. G. Mahon,
that the entire Vestry visit “Glen-
dale House” before making repairs
to it was carried.

The following appointments
were made: —

Building Committee: Mr. W.
Gooding, Mr. J. Thorne, Mr. I.
Collins, Mr. K. Sandiford and Mr.
V. Reeves.

Old Age Pensions Claims Com-

Meanwhile, if there is any
to



mittee: Mr. W. Gooding and Mr.
V. Reeves.
Present at the meeting were

Rev, H. C. Shepherd (Chairman),
Mr. W. T. Gooding (Churchwar-
den), Hon. G. Mahon, Mr. K.
Sandiford, Mr. L. D. Gill, Mr.

E. Reeves, Mr. M. Collins and
Mir A. Cave,

U.N. Brand
Communist China

@ From Page 1

In Britain, Clement Attlee,
speaking in the House of Com-
mons said: “From the close and
constant contact which we have
maintained with many Govern-
ments supporting the resolution,
it is clear they share our view of
the importance and urgency of the
taak entrusted to the Good Offices
Committee and wish to see it
begin its work as soon as the
resolution has been approved by a
plenary meeting of the General
Assembly.”

“It is my earnest hope, that the
Central People’s Government of
China will respond to any efforts
which may be made by the Good
Offices Committee to bring about
a cease-fire and a negotiated
settlement in the Far East”,

Winston Churchill leader of the
Conservatives said: “We are par-
ticularly relieved to feel that no
breach between Britain and the
United States could occur at such
a grave juncture of their fortunes”

Attlee did not answer when left |
wing Labour member, Ian Mik-}

is decided to establish that!

by |

I shall be most willing el










|
|
|
|
|

ardo said that the passage of the |
resolution at this time must make |
task of the Good Offices Cor
ttee more difficult than



ld otherwise be—Reuter



Fes






















ly situated and suitable far con+

”
CAROL version into flats or boarding





PAGE SEVEN





































SS SSS SSS GO OPPOSES ODO DOTIOOT 9 |
Â¥
N NESS FOR %
THANK GOCD ‘oO s w ANTE D S|
G AS ° é 4 > | a a a
é S bars tities Local %| ROYAL NETHERLANDS . ee
os iS Large Quantities Local § S 4
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| Starch y Sailing from Amsterdam, Dover and ae as M4 . he oe a wil
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; Required by . . . Di eeriaty. 1051. M.S. “Bonaire” Sth, | 1] for Dominica, Antigua, Monteer-
who has to get the children Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdain- he ~~
off to school early WEST INDIAN KNITTING m.s. “Helena’ ), 18th, February 1953, Saceesay 25m
ms. “Willemsted” 9th, 15th, Februars E MV aaa Me eas
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[0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH Suppliers please call ary 1981; ms. “Cottica” 20th, Februar ee :
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( L, b () \ ; on application, xX
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“BALL ET SHOES” notice and possesses great charm Telephone 4228. x
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and there is spacious accommoda- EECA GOO EE PORE
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RENTALS



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REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

By R. L. Stevenson
at

Advocate Stationery

PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640

NOTICE

Due to the large increase in the price of



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advance the present Surcharge from 20% to

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The new Surcharge will take effect on all
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onwards,

V. SMITH,

General Manager.

Readers and Subscribers to the

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in Horse

to note that we have appointed
MR. S. A. DURANT our Dis-
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Please contact Mr. Durant, Horse
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Sailing to Plymouth and Le Havre via St.
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PAGE

Land Police Defeat
‘The Rest’ By 28 Runs

Cup Presented To Skipper Byer

EIGHT



THE annual three day cricket fixture between Land Police
and The Rest ended yesterday in a win by 23 runs for Land
Police XI which was skippered by J. Byer at Queen’s Park.





After play a Cup was presented
by Mr. J. -W. B. Chenery to! J.
Byer captain of the winning team

. + q
Empire Team
Before the presentation Major R.

Baek Home A . Stoute thanked Mr. Chenery

attending and taking such
interest in the annual game

MR. J. SE. 7,

M.C.\P., Manager of the Empire

Club Sports team which has jus

toured Grenada playing

BRANCKER Befcre presenting the Cup Mi

. Chenery said that he thoroughly
enjoyed the game and was pleased
cricket footâ„¢=all a aeriFs of by the efforts of both sides. He
ey eee and = tennis cid that it gave him great pleasure
matches and eigiit members of the j,¢ present the Cup and was looking
team reiurned from Grenada yes- ¢orward’ to reeing Mullins | or

terday by B.W.I.A. Members ©. Bradshaw represent the island in

the team mao: rrived were Everton the forthcoming cricket tourna-

Weekes, Maurice Jones, O. M_ ment with ‘Trinidad at the Oval

Robinson, Eric Amory, Adzi

Holder, Sydney Rudder, Winston On the’ first day of play The

Grant ard Milton, Crichlow Rest won the toss and sent in

Land Police to bat and they scored

C. G. Alleyne, Captain and the 71 runs in their first turn at the

remaining members of the team wicket °

ere expected to return tomorrow mi

The team left here on January 15 C. Griffith topscored wth 16
Chief interest locaily in th> while C. Neblett took three

wickets for nine runs bowling for
The Rest. A patient 26 by Chel-
tenham helped The Rest to gain ¢
first innings lead over Land Police
when they replied with 120 runs

Empire—Grenada tour is the per-
formance of voung Adzil Holder

Old Combermerian and find on
the Empire team. With the fortn-
comin® visit of a Trinidad team
te Brrbados later this month, and The Land Police at their second
a noticeable dearth of good slow turn at the w:cket knocked up 21}
bowlers here, news of Holdet’s ) ne for the loss of seven wickets
performance is of special interest. qoclared, Skipper Byer playing a
Everton Weekes, International skipper’s innings by knocking up
Barbados all-rounder when asked 3 preezy 87 :

ana

what he thought of Holder's ver-

formance in Grenada had this to With 167 runs to score for
say, “I think he should be given victory Marshall and B. Brewster
a ehance in one of the trials right ned again for The Rest but



farshall and Cheltenham were the
only two batsmen that showed any
resistance to the steady bowling of



away. He can certainly spin the
ball, He may not get selected but
it would be a great experience for



him, He deserves it.” Sealy and Callender, Cheltenham
scored 46 and Marshall 40 out of
Holder is the s'ow ieft arm the 143 runs that The Rest made
spinner of the Empire team, and jin their second innings.
a newcomer to big cricket. He Sealy took three wickets for 14
performed the hat trick in
Grenada, ‘
7 .
Weekes thought the bowler on Windwards Hit

the Grenada team who showed the
most promise was Rolle, a Domi-
nican, He is a left-arm fast bowler

Weekes is to. be married to-
morrow afternoon Miss Joan
Manning at Michael's
Cathedral.

Mr. Brancker agreed with
Weekes about Holder's good per-
formance, “The first time w:
noticed his spin,” Mr, Brancker
said, was during a Sunday mateb>
at “Retreat” St. Joseph before we
went to Grenada.

89 For 5 Wkts.
(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)

ST. LUCIA, Feb. 1.

Heavy showers on Wednes y

and early to-day delayed the start

of the second Test here between
Windwards and Leewards.

to
St.



Windwards won the toss and
batted all afternoon on a wicket
taking turn, The batsmen were
subdued by steady bowling
throughout and Livingstone had

a splendid spell.

His analysis was 15/4/22,3
Runs were limited due to the very
heavy outfield. The fielding was
not good owing to the condition of
the ground,

Qne of the best batsmen on the
Grenada team, Mr. Brancker said,
was Willie Rapier, one-time stu
dent at Lodge School. He said
that they had had a very success-
ful tour and everyone in Grenada
had gone out of their way to give
the team an enjoyable time



Four changes were made in thre
Windwards team and one in the
Leewards,

WINDWARDS FIFST INNINGS

Crick c. Livingstone, b, Kirnon
Daisley c. wkpr, Thompson, b

Neil Franklin Will
Play For Hull City

, HULL, Feb, 1. OAInth b. Livingstone i

Neil Franklin, Stoke City and ‘thomas ¢. and b. Livingstone
England centre-half. “who was Deterville not ve 0
suspended by the Football * eeu ens tien 4
Association for playing in Bogota, .
South America, today signed for Total for 5 wickets 89
Hull City, Second Division Club. — yan of wickets: 1-2, 2-32, 3-58, 4—~

The transfer fee of £22,500 71, 5—%6. FO a
is a record for the Hull ten inet ouigston S for 22.

club, for whom Franklin will play

against Blackburn’ Rovers’ oa SEE
Saturday. He has not played in

STE

BARBADOS

LAND

MR. J. W. PB. CHENERY
defeated The Rest by



By Pad

If you want an inkling of the vast sums that the
public spends annually on sports you have only to take a
look at the Madison Square Garden receipts.

The
existence
time its
features
of which

New

25

Garden
years

gross

been in
and in that
gates from ail
run sround $200,000,000
about .90 per cent was
drawn by sports events,

The Garden, of course,
mecea for all athletes, because t
win a title in any sport there
means not only national acclaini
but, in the case of the profes-
sionals, the title can be converted
into a fortune.

Probably more titles have
changed hands in more sports iu
the Garden than in any other arena
the world has ever known,

It has staged all the major sports

has

is tue

events that can be held indoors
Fights, wrestling—when wrestling
was considered a sport—hockey,

tennis, basketball, track and field,
ice skating, rodeos, six-day bike
grinds and horseshoes,

The sports temple has rocked to

the roars of crowds cheering
everybody who was anybody in
the last quarter century in the
sports wor!ld.

It would be ridiculous to
attempt to say which individual

the greatest thrills
for the fans, because where one
sports lover will respond to the
nile relay in a track meet, another
wets his greatest kick out of a
knockout or a great goal scored 14
hockey.

But there is no doubt about the
greatest great attractions the gar-
den has had. No doubt whatever,
because the cold figures tell the

has supplied

These prize magnevs for the elu-
sive dollar have been Sonja Henie
and Beau Jack. The little Ice
Queen has drawn as much as
$200,000 in a few nights and the
coloured welterweight tops even



English football since the end of
the last season, His suspension
ended at midnight last night.
Franklin was England’s regular
international centre half until his
suspension, and has played in 40
representatives games, including a
number of wartime internationals,
—Reuter.



Britair. Expects

Less Tourists

LONDON. ,

Sir Alexander Maxwell, Chair-
man of the British Travel ana
Holidays Association, predicted
that Britain would not reach it
1951 target of 700,000 foreign
visitors.

Sir Alexander told the associa-
tion’s council that the nation
would be lucky if it equalled thr
1950 figure of 600,000 because of
these “uncertain times.”

He said that “in the light of
the worsening international situa~
tion” the association’s widespread
and aggressive publicity campaiss
had been “scaled down,” particu -
larly in the United States and
Canada,

Instead





of urging tourists to
come to Britain merely for
“pleasure” the association has als»
switched the theme of its publicity
to “business with recreation.’



=O

zi would be one down only.








Sy M. Harriso:. Gray

Dealer: South
Game all
N.
a& 102
V9 I5
SA Wwoas
ais ie
6 Q955
VAQETS Ztoee "
2 542 @AB8B
K5 ‘ &372
AIS
VK 94
@KQ109
86
This hand should have

been played quietly for a
part-score after One Dia-
mond by South, Two Clubs
by North, and a neutral Two
Diamonds by South. Instead
of passing. North bid Three
Clubs. and South tried Three
No-Trumps.

West led ¥ 7 to Dummy's
Â¥ J. East gave South a tem-
pants reprieve by playin
ow when @ 6 was led. ‘and
& 6 followed.
West should play & K to
interrupt the run of the
suit, but in this case he did
well to play low. & 9 was
finessed in the forlorn hope
that West held both missing
Club honours, but a Heart
return from East put the
contract two. down. Had
West played & K at trick 3
he would be allowed to hold
the trick; unless he found
a Diamond switch. South

Normally,







cn MIGHT AS
WELL GO OUT
OF BUSINESS



FOR, HIM TO
ACCUMULATE
THAT PLASTER
FILING SYSTEM






Ui
IM NOT AS
/ SORRY FOR. DAP
AS LAM FOR
IT TOOK YEARS THE POOR BOOKIES
WHO ARE PINING
AWAY, WAITING
FOR HIM TO

3 Joe Louis, $1,500,000 to $1,200,000,
for his Garden bouts.
Incidentally, in the last 25 years
the Garden bouts have drawn
around $27,000,000, with the 1946
indoor season tops at $2,315,000.
We won't bore you with more

figures but let us take a look at
some of the athletes and teams
who have drawn capacity houses,

not once but repeatedly.

Jim Londos when he ruled the

mat used to have them hanging
the rafters. Louis, Beau
who by the way is now

So did
Sonja and She still does.
Canzoneri and

Tony Jimmy

McLarnin, who most of the boys
in the fight racket agree, staged
the most sensational fight the

Garden ever saw,
tling each other and others.
story,

packed it bat-
Both

from
Jack,
broke, jammed the arena



Belleville Tennis

THE results of the tennis tour
nament at the Belleville Club
yesterday were as follows:

MEN'S DOUBLES

Taylor and Dr. C, G

cs follows:
Miss L. Branch and W
Crichlow vs. Mrs. A. A
be _ i A. O'N Skinner
Taylor and
A. F

A. S
Gib.
Ree hry: ee

Jemmuott ae

Manining vs
Kinch





~ __ By



Jimmy § Hatlo oO |











BODY’D CLEAN OFF
THE TOP OF HIS
DESK»: MAYBE
WE'D FIND THE
STONE OF SCONE”




L-WiSH SOME-




















H& HAD
SOME. GALS’
PHONE. NUMBERS

ON THERE SO LONG
THEYRE GRAND-

sanning beat H. L. Toppin andi
Lawless 6—4, 6—1. |
ms games fcr today will be



presenting the Cup to J. Byer,



ADVOCATE

POLICE WEN

Robinsorw

were sure-fire gate attractions. both at Amsterdam and Henley Area—5.00 p.m.

Bill Tilden turned them away beating the British Olympic cham- Mobile Cinema gives show
in tennis. Howie Morenz, the pion, R. D. Burnell and B. H, T. at Chance Hall Plantation
‘cok Brothers, Bun and Bill and Bushnell, each time, Yard, St. Luey—7.30 p.m.
Eddie Shore drew them in for Now Parsner tells me they wiil Police Band plays at Hast-
hockey Glen Curmingham and ~ not race in the double this ings Rocks—8.00 p.m.
Paavo Nurmi meant packed season, but will keep in practice Monthly Reunion at Com-
houses in track. Reggie McNam- for the Olympies of 1952, when bermere Schoo!—8.00 p.m.
ara anda little Italian named they hope to compensate for Film Show at British Coun-
Brocco jammed the joint for six- losing to the British pair in 1948. cil—8.30 p.m.
day grinds. Tte Danes, who won _ the Globe, “Summer Stack” 5 & 8.30

2S yarde as ¢ : Gaiety (St ames) “Roseanna
Pas ag pr di Renda eve ae fours at Henley last McCo/" & “Marshal of Mesa
July, have split up, but another City 8.30
the next 25 will be as good. Danish crew, which beat them al Plaza (Bridgetown) Chain Light-
—I.N.S. home, and then won the Europear: petetic watt. S08 8:90
~ * ‘ ° quatic Club Everybody Does
title in Milan, are to come here} It” 8,30

this summer. Pleza (Oistin) ‘Task Force”
5 & 0,30

|











skipper of the Land Police XI after they
23 runs when their annua! match ended at Queen’s Park yesterday.

Enters For
‘‘Diamonds’’

By HYLTON CLEAVER

AN entry for the
Sculls from Erik Larsen,
sculling champion, leads a
able Danish invasion here,

Larsen partnered

NEW YORK.
American





Financiai Problems

For many years it
great hope in
are an eight. for
pack

MPHER E times

frozen



50 large that the
would practic
one hand i
were
problem

kc this; the Danes have



be !
¢ opponent
to get hold of it The
of discarding the:
becomes most acute

at this stage
bulk of the safe di
fand therefore one or
Natural Canastas) are ¢
in the discard pile You have

'
'
;
;
t
Alrenay
ho black Three and have t&



the
Parsner toinks
able to enter,
representative
which, judging
Championships,
the Italians.

Normally



ae of
by
is

Danish



discard from sets of three or
more cards that have not yet
been shown

conditions, it

Under

is

hese



before the Olympic



throw from where you E ie Paw * invi
s inglish crews are being invited to
nrost in Fos
For example, the pack is Copenhagen in the middle of Cee cient aac. .
trozen and three-quarter way July, 1952. Here they are promised iach at aria cege ea
through 1 hand no one ha . cap Temperature (min.) 13.5° F
yet melded You hold cheap accommodation néar the| : 7 ' '
A u

A. K. K. K. 10
10, 8, 2
If you fati

10 10

to draw a « takes place,













card—ie. one of a kind This invitation might interest Wind Velocity: 19 miles per
: cook nS our O:ympic selectors: it is, hour ; a
expected that England crews willl Baremetor G a.m.) 30.023;
aa be selected in 1952 before Henley (3 pm.) 29.932.
L ‘ ; _— will not take part in he ete aL ee el tee
requisite count tn cast egatta; continental experience} j= = =,
ou are giv chanee > r » £ © re <
taeink tok might therefore be an advantage. Helin Bervboay!
©)—The chances are that. the Another challenger for the Y are } thd at
“more of a kind you hold Diamonds has emerged in ou are invited to attend
the jess. Wkely a your Canada in Jack Guest, junior 1 1 ’
left-hand pppone ‘ ’ ’
hold a pair of thi ‘et a whose father woa in 1930, A GRAND DANCE
Qo the Ten proves sate As he is as yet only 17 __ the ives! try
you now have a reia srodigy’s arrival may be delayed '
tively safe — disc: ‘ peo ays : ms A Mr. DAVID ROW
threa'more founds oo. until 1952, but at the Canadian (better coburn or BERGUE)
neu should on no account Hanley he has just won two events . as AEs
thro t igt C ty 5 ay > Tj | - ? oer
Bash” esen: ae the ‘poeiinit in one day, the High Schoo!) QurEN’'s PARK HOUSE
of your Opponent havina a championship, over a _ mile, in aig ype Ce
air of the s so muct hi tN neceimell. 6 f a
create ae Pe aie eee Oh ee &0)) Saturday Night 3rd Feb, 1951
w—Lks. {| ADMISSION — 2/-

STORE

Announces

As from list February our
business will be removed to

STREET

To mark the event we will
open attractive new stocks
and will be delighted to
welcome our old friends
in the new premises.



Diamond
European
prob-

Ebbe Parsner
when they won the Double Sculls

has been ¢
Denmark to enter
the Grand Challenge
Cup. Expense alone has preventej
the sam: .
financial problems es we} this year| TODAY
one club will be
and will be properiy
rowing}
the European
second only to

The Danes have been invited tu

Finland to try the Olympic course
Regatta, and)

lake on which the Danish meeting;

The Garden Collects rik Larsen
$200,000, 000

Postponed |

A wet wicket and a very sodden
outfield prevented any play |
yesterday the first day in the
third cricket trial match—in }
preparation for the forthcoming
intercclonial tournament at Ken-
sington Oval






















Tne Advocate
the . groundsmen
wicket which was well under
water. Large pools of water had
alsc formed on the boundary and}
the uncovered
soaked.
is on Saturday.

The teams for the match are as
follow:—

saw some
mopping the

of

seats were well

J. D. GODDARD'S XI

J. D. Goddard, G.
Marshall, A. Tayloi,

Wood, R.
E. Atkinson

D. Bradshaw, K. Branker, E.
Millington, G. Proverbs, W.
Greenidge, C. Atkins, and K.
Bowen.

KEITH WALCOTT'S XI

K. Walcott, C. Smith, C. Hunte,
N. Marshall, C Mullins, J.
Williams, E. Hoad, Jnr. H. King;
N. Jucas; D. Atkinson, E. Cave;
and C. Alleyne,

Play begins punctually at 1.30
on Saturday.



What's on Today

Mrs. Fela De Kuh’s Exhibi-
tions of oil paintings and
pencil sketches at the
“Pavilion’—9.00 a.m.

Courts of Appeal—1L0.00 a.m.

Court ef Ordinsey—11.09
a.m.

Sale of Cave and Roach’s
Plantation at the offices of
Messrs. Yearwood and
Boyce, James S*‘eet—2.00
p.m.

Opening of Playing Field at
Deacon’s Road Housing







The Weather

Trial Match | 3

The second day of play

x
Â¥



Sun Rises: 6.16 a.m. |

Sun Sets: 6.00 p.m.

Moon (New) February 6.

Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Water: 12.34 a.m; 12.11
p.m.

YESTERDAY

Wind Direction: (9 a.m.)
( E.N.E; (3 p.m.) E.
















» PP SLD HOP DOPYODIOIIIOY

FEBRUARY 2, 1951

FRIDAY,





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Ruled 100 sheeis—each
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Music by Mr. C. B. Browne's Ork
BAR SOLID













DANCE

neac St aes
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
(Local and Visiting Mem-
bers only)
ae CHM tak
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY
3rd, 9 p.m.

Music by HARRY BANNIS-
TER and his Orches*‘‘a.
Admission to Ballroom 2/-

1.2.51,—8ns,





ROYAL BARDPADOS
YACHT CLUB

FLANNEL DANCE

On SATURDAY, 3rd FEB-
RUARY, 1951.

(For Members and their friends)
In honour of the Captain,
Officers and Cadets of
H.M.S. “Devonshire.”
Dancing 8.00 p.m. to 12,00

Midnight
ADMISSION

3/-
By order of,

The Committee of Management,

T. BRUCE LEWISs,

Manager, & Secretary.
~Members introducing their

must enter

)

N.B,
friends their names
in the Visitor's Register or give
them a letter
the Sceretary.

of introduction to





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PAGE 1

PACE Forn BARBADOS ADVOC'ATF. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 2. 151 | BARBADOS fiJjADV'CMTE . 1 —-*--— f 1 r-i.in t>. ik. %  *. <.<•<• | Br ... IrUwIW 2. 1951 oi I si lo\ OF LAW TMK Legislative Council postponed the bill lo aHow the Vestry of St. Michael to raise the sum of ten thousand pounds to grant retrospective pay to all the ptu employees. The postponement was due to strong opposition by Hon. Mr. Cuke who pointed out that if it was illegal to budyet for sums of money to pay for the years already expired it was Wrong in principle to burden ratepayers for the next twenty years to pay retrospectively for parochial commitments. The objections to the bill Van VOfe I by several members who intiman intentions to vote against the Ml and Hon. Mr. Challenor who took charge of the nunsure asked for leave to postpone it until more information could be supplied tinCouncil. The matter had already been the subject of much controversy at the meetings of the Vestry. It had been-brought forward early in the year 1949 and after lengthy discussion the motion was rejected. Contrary to expectations on what WU regarded as a general rule the matter was broiifiht up later in the year wlui. members of the Vestry wore absent for various reasons. It was then passed. The 1951 vestry ratified the action of the last meeting and the matter was referred lo the Legislature and passed by the HoUM of Assembly. It has now come before the Council. The question as to the correctness of the award is not without its difficultiesThere is a strong body of opinion which favours the payment of back pay lo these par n-hial servants because of the rise in the cost Ot living and the fact that the Government had given back pay to the members of the Civil Service during the same period. But there is an opposing section supported by the law that the vestry cannot budget for Commitments in the year which has passed. It was sought to overcome this difficulty by asking for permission to raise a loan the repayment of which would be BpfMd ovtJ a period of twenty years. Already the parochial employees have voiced their feeling that they are entitled to consideration in this matttr and that they had been promised some relief. The original question arose when the scavengers applied for an increase of pay and back pay in the same manner as the Civil Servants. When the matter came before the Vestry it was felt that the singling out of scavengers would give rise to dissatisfaction and a motion was carried that all parochial employees be included. The question for the Council now to decide is not the equity of the payment of the money but whether under the provisions of the Act it can be done, Crarks Behind The [Coloured Folk In Birmingham Curtain By RICHARD HANSER hoom Jiinos, On brighten boy m the %  %  . .... lighted Kith hi* grasp of both '""" — % % %  •* %  • I i %  i grammar and the Party Line, ami urges hun lo do as w.il When onthroi>olojtn!s unearlhlovernmcnt inspector romes to cd an ancient inummv in %  remote pay hi* annual of Hungary urgen word ** %  • him thai mm tt barely The Inapeelo. duly arrive and came from the Kremlin: "Make • oou h ,or D !" ol P !" 1 *!" 1 !>er cells eonfldently en ...-. \£n — %  „ • ..• ah %  Your kitl ten days ago. triumphantly to Moscow that the %  %  < i e open. all good Commummj "Put hi. Khai ndert .h.l of G*„?£\*Z£ i churn ii.) abject adulation of the Big Bos. A cool an-i .1. of Stalin's proper place in the scheme of things it conveyed in a story that has spread throughout the Eastern-Hit* countries. A Russian worshipper makes Stahn a birthday present of a bolt of fine cloth Stalin's tailor notifies him that there is barely This ttui skimpy to Stalin. who sends the stuff to a Warsaw tailor for an appraisal. This one reports that he can manage a %  umplete suit out of the material. Stalin eontulta lothler, who judges thai perhaps the cloth will serve How did you prove it?" asked p nl5 est anj two pain By this time Stalin I Ot i Joke? A little Bui hehinti the Iron Curtain to%  .iii ul.itthe powers % %  It rase the mummy piclous of the i ind goes all the easv WP ium#d thai Un *und oes *" "'" nv .>,mi4 •• P^'t > n I he West End I.Vr.l he is get way to Lonreal exper| in the West End. There he is told that the cloth is easily sufnetfsat to gee pelfl ot pegrtRi sports jacket nd overcoat, with enough left for a skirt for Mm. Stalin. Stalin is amazed and asks the reason for the workshop* of Warsaw, in source of fuel for the folk-wits lne nu *'' spread in the vanou* Rumanian town I %  Or„( the satellite countries. The tailor's estimates. "Oh. that' inside the Postmistress or Bulgaria, for exsimple to explain, sir," sy th. (Sell wnerevei ample, was said to have been KnRlishman. "Th* farther you go %  people are given a furious dressing-down bv '""orn Moscow, the Miialler you wielding : prothe country's made-Yn-Moscow %  1 •' dictator, Vulko Chervetikov, bebeen uble to deprive them of : the cause un issue of stamps bearing The vanity of the newlv-ffedged * on "" i %  ruten u I bW tenguages at the rrk callow in the power which the Kremlin has placed in Ihcir hands provide a steady the concentration • i'i ito streets of Sona get.' a courtIns poi trail was not in circulat Ths en barrssssmanl ol tin i wi tried t.. explain that the issue had indeed explain iiuit %  b0U ,-^5 been printed %  vnms i \n>\ THE long awaited report of the Commission on the establishment of a Customs Union in the British Caribbean Area was published yesterday. The Commission was appointed as a result of a recommendation by the Monlego Bay Conference on Closer As-u.ctaimn c achieved; (3) Union territories should adopt a common external tariff, involving the it-vocation of minor imposts such as surtaxes and package tax, but territories would continue to impose duty at such rate as they please on certain reserved items, in particular 'vines, spirits, tobacco and petroleum products, which are of special importance for revenue purposes; (4) There should be no change at present in the buying of export duties; (5) Union territories should adopt a Common Customs Law and Regulations. leading to unification of procedure, and should as far as possible follow a common policy in external policy and agreements affecting trade; <6) Union territories should follow a uniform method of classifying fjoods and a uniform method of presenting and publishing trade returns; (7) Each customs department should remain under control of the Government of its territory, and customs and excise revenue should continue to accrue to the revenue of the territory in which it is levied. The Report was signed from th( quarters of the Development and Welfare Organisation in the west Indies, which provided office accommodation and secretarial eervicea for the Commission, and was E Tinted in Barbados by the Advocate Co.. td. It is impossible w exaggerate Its importance with regard to trade in the Britlsh Caribbean area and its contents must (lie prompt attention of the Government of Barbados. %  Kb othei !) %  mist officials seems that pjro h I 81 Win..BIH Squor* al the end 01 OUt diom Moscow "Wh.it do you (Bank of the future of our %  I under Comcme of them asked. %  me as you do," replied the truth the other. |gnj ,„, \ n0 W rohg side." do? said the first. "In Though Yugoslavia is currently < ido, I shall have Martina ind pnarping at the irou immediately to the Soviet Union, and vice Inside the Russian borders there are unregenerate touts who dully defy Siberia by lirvulatinR quips whirh badly blur the propagand; picture •>( the Soviet Union as Ihe •n Work,,rs Paradise. A favourite eral use bSoau th.Mtmpa didn'i "7* '"^ du r,n ,he ,!"* tl9C atick. <> .1., sheet '!"".-^.thrhM-nehanlcd_quer: 1 the %  tempi. ton one %  %  T i wet ii ud [wilted it on an envelope, _„, "Look They slick perfectly. Why mn8 to rI aren't they being circulated?" that went : "Have we achieved full socialism yet—or are things orse"" Ai d U the casual greeting. "How ar things?" a common answer is Well. Comrade." said the Post"Much belter. Worse than yes mistress, "you might as well know terduy. of course, but much better The public keeps spitlil *"> tomorrow.' The same sour cynicism is th basis for ihc story about the Communist census official who asks o Co-operation in Ambitious Schemes By E B TIMOTHY LONDON. Jan 22. Church, social and welfare organisations n Birmingham have co-operated during the past nine months to grapple with the problem of the welfare of the coloured people working and living in the city, and have derided on ambitious schemes. A co-ordinating committee for overseas visitors was formed in March last year, re>resenting the Free Church Federal Council. he Christian Social Council, the Selly Oak Alleges, the Y MC A. the Rotary Club and he Ministry of Labour. This committee decided that many of the hree to four thousand coloured folk in the ity have not been seeing the best of English lie. end that those who returned to their own ountries would not carry back a good imiressmn of Christian society. The Archdeacon of Birmingham, the Ven. 3. Harvie Clark, who is the chairman of the committee, explained to me to-day that missionaries were concerned for their people who came to this country, many of whom have been educated in missionary schools. "It is important that they should not go back to their own countries with a bad impression t.t the welcome that we gave them", he said. D. V. SCOTT & CO., LTD. TO-DAY'S SPECIALS at THE COLONNADE Usually NOW Tin* SPAGHETTI IN TOMATO SAUCE WITH CHEESE TinaOVALTINE (Medium) Bottles ALLSOPP'S BEER $ .IS .73 M $ .17 .66 .20 Tito's regime is hardly less ops r 'l*d villager how old he Is. :n .i i me democracy a )oke lives preasive than Stalin's .ind the { m M /' '" ',"* iei>i ? This is dies bv the qeallts <•! Its humjokesters know it. A Belgrade ob viously so maturate that Ihe our. Iti n % %  IVoplc'a democracy" court recently sentenced six men f^HJl ,ahor expresses doubt ioke achieves circulation belo long prison terms OB the catchw ?,".**>'* ,h oId lim er, "I m Ol its political content. It all charge oi "reactionary opposi,e "' u > 6 pbut h C! lnst 30 *• its point )abs deeply enough into lion." which included telling anil"~ y u oni ca lhal "ving. do Ihe flesh ol a ruling Commissar. Tito jokes yo iV,. ... or it the pUDCb-llM delivers a Nobody believes that the prelop against the pre np ,ne ft 8 ** f or which an valence of such heretical humour va jjl n ,, i noveltv. unwary Yugoslav can be bundled within the Russian orbit means subtlety nor orilliance is demand,n ' the cl"k reflects the wistful counter-revolution will break out td It Will %  -piead lv grapevine hope of thousands behind the Curto-morrow It s*, howeve from countrv to counirv, regaid'"' 'hat some day. in some way. accurate index to the true feelings | language Repeated by ,hp Umt^d BUtM will set lo lift of mute millions behind the facade refugees slipping into free tern,hc Communist yoke on" their of solidarity created by the eontory. it will leap Ihe ocean and necks. The story involves a haptrolled press, the captive radio and lurn up In forelan-larigusee news|,,s cltisen ><1 Zagreb who decided the staged demonstration. For all papers in Ne.v York and ChtCSfl* '" ""' "" bUI had trouble findtheir crudeness. Ihe jokes express .. %  trf mocken gnd '" the means to dispose of himdeep-seated mass altitudes and de.,11 along the way. No Kl1 There wasn't %  decent piece sires which have no other means • vi vigilan' ' ,n P*" '" Ihe house. He had no of outlet. There is no mistaking Kbit to arrest n nn *\y to buy poison There the wish Implicit in Ihe following wasn't a knife available sharp ancedote which has reaped enough to do the |ob. So he eonharvest of grim chuckles Whi In f.ic'.. the Secret Police itself tooted a scheme lo have somebody the time comes. Its punch-line will the targtl <>' uinlerground do it for him. be echoed by millions humour There kt, for example. the stoiv of Ihe unhappy Human *tood before Titus palate An Ameruan and a Russian lan shuffling down a Bucharest wwl began to shout; "llown with seniry arc standing guard acroa street and muttering to himself. Tito l Kill Tito, the oppressor of a C.erman zonal border In th* "Those dirU rotten, lew-down, Jpe pe-i.le H< -kept this up. consmall hours of the night. Th !.:-sos." A heavy "dent that the utiards would American looks at his watch t ,11s on his shoulder and a promptly appeal and mow hun 'Only fifteen minutes until I'm ..f the Secret Bolios stops dos/n rhe guardl came running relieved." he says. "Thank God him "Come along," says the toward him. all right, hut instead The Russian looks at his watch policeman, "You're under arrest of shoolmn the) threw SWS> their "Only a quarter of an hour and foi Irresonshls utterances sealnst u,l! nd embraced him. "Com111 be relieved, too, he sayi the aulhcM' rade'" they cried lubiUntly, "are Thank Stalin!" The • gnsnt "The 'he Arnerlcens henalready?" The American is startled. M ems Why. I The cracks behind the Curtain "That's a funny thing to say MB themselves. In i countries thousands of boy* %  | intelliKenie and interact in themselves, use their tune to earn something Vgtni in Ml) clothe! and help theinlelvea. ihe boys I have een WOrkme In pnr.lens tor hours %  o.x in their Spare time nre a! least well dnsnad, elenn. and he th] not Ilka UM young hooli. tosed to go i •k.n'l employ themuseful purpose. i i one ol these garden boys working for a few weeks (a splendl I little fellow tool and he left I to t*. return to school. Your cOfTOf pondent evidently mathematics only foi ill of the race. What does he do. and what ntOVSflCt has he got agatnai honest healthy war) n (not b "f his typo only ware employed a irfa would bt too high, and their work would he |y days %  chooli l ould know nothins about i i If there were DO on*' to work in lil he no garflowers, food, &&— KILROY. Jan 31, 1051. U.S.A. Writes India Off it> i intKi i IN *-. I.AKI Si i i I SN N Y The United States has quietly written India oft the list of those nations m UN. which can be ecunted on to light with anything Inn moral sane* The long, hard battle to pin (ha label of aggressor on Red China In V K demonstrated that regardless of the elanty of guilt ifareeaor, the follower, of the late Mahatma Chandl are i'.iclflsts and w.u n..' unsheaUi the IWI rd except in the agpanelon Of their own borders. A leading Western Delegate said: : Nehru dkhVl waste time at weary about h h principles wh< ii ha saw his chance to grab id province or Kashmir armours | n n ,: of the Indian army M Himalayas in the past three hi 1: • %  ('..< i very clfort lo settle the Kashmir issue by tloo nth Pakistan it would be batfei : %  R i I if Nehru set his own %  order bv Daeirun mean; • am :> iMitg ins policy of !-. : %  ent at Waatern expo u i tn the issue of Communlat Chin i %  %  %  iruade also I The prevailing %  I' %  B %  pOtll • %  %  %  he dieelnUn ng they sustained lr nfllcl with the fledglii'H 9 ed at Ijike Su s. like others right to nurse their own grudges against U N.. It is another matter to I play fast and lose with revengfl politics when v world Is at stake. Menatvi cropped up alxo over British and Ctnaman lo join In a stem punitive policy against Red China Seasoned diplomatic observer • HI through the mill or Oaoet when Hitler and Mussolini were rattling the ti swinging the club over small nation nre keenly ronsclou* to-da> of tlie fact that ,i. ;i p.u llel In the 1951 sluatlun with that of 193S. In those days. Potarn was the leading voice— aside fmii the British and Frei.e! —coiinselli'ii* n "gjo tUCftt" % %  PoUsh diplc.mnts were against the challenging B| Huler, nice he wai i Uieir border. rut Un"to slow" and "appea emenfSfef Huler bv the Poles reaped the diagon's teeth of the I %  which wiped ernt splitUng it hetwern RusslaTnd Germanv. T 1 %  i .. T %  :. i! at U N to-day of India, which Keeps on saying that there must 14* no hasty act-. Rod C ana, Beneath the surface, India has the becMn| i and a ne commonwealth COUPtrk Insistence clesp le the invasion of Tils-i ;ir.,' that everything an be settled b> i ation led ver ai U N b to f N that there Is cause for opt'mism and hope fo n peaceful settlement when Uw Chinese Reds and the Russian? are marcMnf into New Delhi. Stalin must bo having a good laugh every time ha hears from Nehru A drawback to speedy U N. ecndemnaUon of Red China, m the opinion of many delegates was Ihf constant necessity on th#> part of Ihe American delegation to avoid "pressure" on baulking naUons. Although the American delegation itself was under Its* heaviest pressure from Congrcs. sional and public indignation, th team of diplomats under Warren Austin's direction had to step warily. A prominent member of that team. Minister John C. Ross, put sray: "Basically, the American people ftillv understand the Importance of taking into account everybody's viewpoint before any nation is expected to commit itself to a major policy decision In leaning backwards to give time for careful consideration b> foreign governments, the American delegation has come underlie for what Is called tl and flinching. This has been strongly denied bv Austin and other members of Ihe U.S. team who point out that there Ii something in what Britain's Siv Oladwyn Jebb sad to the PoliUi.ittee. With the po.-sibility of eventual sanctions against Red China bvloualy In mind. Jebb declared'''i national JOOK well before you leap But il Is an axiom too. to leap together when we do leap. On that point, the U.S. and ethers agree. —I.N.S, y/,r/,'-v//.'.v-v/.'/.v-'.''-//////.--v////.. We Have ... GALVANISE DOWN PIPES „ WATER HEADS RIDGE CAPS BARBED WIRE MESH WIRE r, W, l 1 *", l'A" LASHING WIRE 16, 14, 12 and 10 Gauge WOVE WIRE — 24' and 36" CHAIN %  ", 3-16", 'ii", & 5-16" WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd. Successors To C.S. PITCHER & CO. l'honc! — 1172, 4687, INTERNATIONAL ONE OF THE GREATEST NAMES IN THE PAINT INDUSTRY. As Agents of International Paints, Ltd, wc can offer you a wide range of the famous "International" brands, namely:— RID ROOFING PAINTS "Danbollne" Anti-corrosive Paint (for galvanized iron). "Propeller" Ready Mixed Oil Paint (for wooden shingle, asbestos cement, and aluminium). WALL PAINTS "Propeller" Dry Distemper (for exterior walls). "Lagomatt" Flat Oil Paint (for interior walls). PAINTS FOR FXTERIOR AND INTERIOR WOODWORK AND MFTALWORK "Lagollne" Undercoating. and "I.agoline" Knamel. PAINT FOR FURNITURE AND GENERAL HOUSEHOLD PURPOSES "International" Quick Drying Enamel. ALUMINIUM PAINT "Danbollne-Silverelte" Aluminium Paint. BITUMINOUS PAINT "Bituguard" Black Bituminous Paint. MOMSSfS TANK PAINT "International" Molasses Tank Paint (for the Interior of molasses storage tanks). YACHT PAINTS & VARNISHES For underwater surfaces, topsides, honttoppings, decks, superstructures, masts, spars, and general purposes. Try these Surperb Paints, and be Convinced 1 DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. AGENTS Crummvtl with l*mii>ins — FOR — Hill Akl AST FKKS and Bacon Sliced Ham Sausages Kippers J I It Bread Anchor Butter Queens Prunes Empire Coffee nisnvftn Chickens Ducks Rabbi is Pork Lamb Legs Lamb for Curry ROYAI. PUDDINGS Caramel. \ anilla. Chocolate Served i', the ReAtaiir;u>: FRENCH ICE CREAM 3 Flavours 11 IBM iiiox Sweet Mrcnd* i Trine Veal Kidneys B liani Grapes Apok I I %  TuboiK Boer SIMt l\l 2!h Ti-i Sho-lrnkc Bun lit? — 1 80 per Ha Ufa Tie vto B i i Bteutti — I .so per tin Ripe Tomatoes 24c. per lb. SiruiK Bc.in.x 20c. per lb. PHONE TO-DAY — WE DELIVER GO on \ iin*s





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BARBADOS ADVOCATE I UDAT, I IRH1 AH.V 2. 151 Wu6 Calling H ON. AND MRS. 1! A ( IKK lpf! (or St. Vincent \ 11 waj to attend the Annual Met'.' %  inhodist Synod, beirv >ar in St VUvt < :. Tin fejUMd to bt away for one week. Deluxe Programme H PHiarthl ki Hue to • m Barbados to-mor row. The enlertainiiirnt mlttce. who have ornnird the programme of rntert.'unment duiing ha vudl bav %  On the nigh: of her arriva: I bt a dance nt thf Roj .1 bados Yacht Club in honour uf and Cadet*. There Bra (o be dances on Monand %  %  bados Aquatic Club for (he Chid Pettj I Offlcen and I II H S Devs4u.li.re Two MM dancoa arc brln>: given by the Ro.val M)d UerchaM Navy tfaifara League and two by the ron Waifare Conmltti Theic LS ., pieok irnnwd by the Rnvnl and Merchant Navy Welfare L-eague on Suiulav for Chief Pefly Oilkeers. I and Men. Destination is the Crane Judy Garland's Story As Told To Michael Druty ^Chairman „ Wh "> waa nineteen. Uave Aauxhtcr. Mr Skeele "i 0 *" nd l •*P*' d to Las Vegas.'We're cacl Returned To Barbados M ft C OR068MTTR, AdminW. and Mr i < .Itarc. who attended the Portr $i in* wa. Chairman .JU !" *" "'Ween. Dave Aaujditer I'm glad 'or hinv V. BlMHi 'J 0 ** *• *lope" • lt *P>ni when voui.theother. To feel no ill will 'torn the other tt'l ten .tones !" 'hcr Koes along. toward a person you once were .nended the meeting. 1 don t know how to explain ihat married to is a special kind "' i aimously decided tr marriage; there wwnl any teal blessedness, and I'm grateful for take over the meteorological stareason Tor it. I was much too it rtablished In the area by ycung. probably nobodv rhould During the time our marriage L n P i J rl i C mmand ** marr 5 d Bt "* %  •: b "i JWU was running out. thoinh. I wan I ye couldn't have made me believe u despondent. I didn't want to '" %  make a botch of my relatlonsftlps Morn tried to tell me; so did wlth people. Nobody wants that, all 5 *!^ <\ £' P *? P P ' houthl my rr llv ol nor anybody else. herneetnStoSirTESS "T"*!?'^ knowI tf* ?' *" world Tlie only thlnf dld well, it .d of Development and !" •". ** re *" w know H wemed. was work. That is not L-hft u-.ii tr^„. !" ,u IK— i w In %  cocoon emotionally, nnd Dave needed a certain kind of h territory will then operMiiiu ih rl accustomed to fighlina ... battles and making hio own dc1* "' cUlons. -<1K %  oou, He and I were among the first who met in wartime under th, Co* Jrrlwl nere^n < ,,,rr,uin * lo co * !" v camna •"* : hort Pennsylvania statw h( i^ 1 K. i, Hvf n -E J PF-TIHR. 1 Uevanshlre wdl play games ,f iVI Secretarv whi. lofi ^.i.i A < 1MB. Mr Pe,"e S a-tfhBf I wock b ^th.n about. teams and 1 understand tha Ladies' Water Polo T< K y a natch against the Cadet: i I must see. Operations Engineer M AJ. ERIC HIRST, Asst Operations Engineer of Shell Ken retai v I Assistant Financial SecPaitenger Supt. .Idii Distributing Co., Ltd. VfR. RAY LEOHE. Passenger who arrived from Antigua n We* surveyed. The aircraft will Qroun m New York, who had make J ,hf J V0 >:,' ,nd ,emnln '" been holidaying in Barbados since Tr'mdad^ TnP n]m January 4th. raturnafl to the U.S. herc lo P">cc-sseil over the week-end. His May here was spent with his aunt in Bush nSc^ VYOS^ ? gl:R^ !" WHITE, Seven,,, Philip's Church in NewYork City. *> ''" v Viv. :> %  ..Mi' Rev. Cobham is a Barbadian. ''' yesteiuay ft* Antigua by D W.I.A. He will ;il-.. rlfll St. Kitts before returning to Ilarba%  v-ill be away nne week. New Dancing Teacher M ISS JOAN RANSOME arrived lr..m England on Wedncsd %  ill be sent Short Viait alca :md Trinidad. She HI Ii.W I A.'* afternoon i an Trinidad Miss Ransomc will take over the Madame Hromova Dancing Srhool which is now n limited liability company from Molly II idcilnV Sbj li staying at Orayatsata M rine Gardens. From Trinidad M R. SYDNEY SILVERA. Export Manager af Brandrum -i Ltd.. Pnmt Makers ived yesterday from Timidad II.i; here on ahoai visit Staying With Friendi M RS. MARGARET M. DUN. HAM arrived from Triii idad yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. to spend a short holiday in Barbados staying with Mend Mi Dunham used lo be Treasurer of the Seventh Day Adventist Mission here before she went to Trinidad. I ran into Dave on the stri lti.g ago. He'a married to a firl. and they have a ,-v, -.. — I 1 1 -' vll ceremony, with an elevated *t not train drowning out the words. loveBut thev went Into a church later baby and made their own service and No Harm Trying Down for the Winter M AJ. GEN AND MRS. 1) MACDONALD are at present holidaying in Barbados, staying at the Marine Hotel, They are down for the Wlntei Thvy arrived \f R '' C TRENT of Loveland. front Toronto about two weeks 1Ti Ohio, has asked -Councillor Trinidad ago and are here until Maich ITth. S• Evans. Mayor of Wind i lei B w ( A ^ sp . n d" th They apCtll a lew day*, in Bni!" '. ,|l nd \ ,0 n n0 h,m i,n • J ut'>h hnlidav In Barbados. Thrt.Weeki" Holiday M'r.s bados aUut three years ago. Tint is their first real stay here rife because i girl is ich." tha at t spoilt ind iei|iiire* ANU MBS. SYDNEY APP and their daughter ved from Venezuela via yesterday morning by pend three weeks' The>are CROSSWORD i B • Bfa Trim rj The Bride must l>c between 19 and 35. have at least a high lonool education, be attractive and -able to wear good looking clot weigh not more than 130 lbs. Trent said In his letter lo the Mayor that he could offer a lux' %  and a "fair" Income. Ha ; %  !-<> said he had been married iged 13. staying at Coral Sands. Worthing. Mr. Gnapp is with Shell Caribbean Petroleum Co.. in Maracaibo. FOR JUNIOR rmcACO A device aimed al eliminating aternal gray hairs when baby %  ti locked in the bathroom went display in Chicago, Trent told the Mayor that he Among the features at th. culd pi irla National AaaocieUon ..f Home ,: who would be Had to BuUdara Erpnaltlor which o:>eneo marry him but "the average .,,, ...... ,..,„ u ,.,(,.... i,lnge ad and re.."^ run la fl M ,y n n ivuch thai ii it is possible \Jtr,, mlM ,„,., fclMMl R when junior locks himaell in ;il i 1( ,niitiy' Ihe bathroom, a hard shove on I do not know if the offer i* ,n '' '" 1 '' 'd p r lllp ' 0 <"' ri "'' open to Ilarbadian Kills, but ">** hinge, to part nnd opens the there's no harm lo I door.—I N S. 12. u.... <>i U nur*a. (3) 14. Man to linn* out, (4i i2* I? 1 ?"" ol ,'"• J l) 'n croup. iOi 15. Be rare, ill 11, paioine i,. ... nbn •! %  .[ %  !i! UN irw, tai M. Quit* nurtlble. HI aa OM ui point, mi the eontrar*. I*J la. Uimiiiuiiou. |M| Dan 1. Out at last u uie moot saiq -. i" TO bl "' :v "" %  %  round, to, a. Waiciio-, wui-iooure. io, a. Ci>iiiiiuiii.m'iiiiu. i?* 4. HOTS eircuiarlr. (S) a. To save one's iiu. u to escape. ., '*' %  • Typt or la*uner. |3> f. Jtapert at nut o easily iwni. Hi 11. Coraeay sa*o nr a double ue. 15* 5!'*^ wbviousu Uirmin. (| yi. rtiniir entry m IM. ir >ou uon't Ilka voe paauige UUa may BI-I tuu out i) * %  A.ul ii! |... in. i i | 3d Hot qun* Buti accoaOS but oeibDis to us. (3) BOlulKW. ur !" .till D,,.. Rupert and the Sketch Book-25 %  .%  it 'i>\ Ihfrr i, ,„.. %  Kurnei lowjrdi %  %  t ihe dnvtr come* M ridini uieway. This nan uhin s K ht." h *jy*. BH?I mn *wj V PWttt idl nail you'vr teen hti." "Why. ye." min. who Mtn lo b* ITAUVH ,ii aonwthing. "She cam K M hrir only ihre* ni.n. | '>con ;he ,i*hf road. 5ht fjn't v." JANETTA DRESS SHOP I'PSTAIRS OVER NEWSAM'S. Lower Broad St. Phonf 2684 READY MADE DRESSES of all type* WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Local Handicraft EVENING MITTENS—In Pastel Shades and Rlaik READY-MADE DRESSES In materials by Liberty's of Londai HOURS : Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 lo 3.30 SATTRDAiS 8.30 to 11.30 KEEPFEETDN THtlRTOES! <2 so* a *fei Wise Buys— BARGAINS today. Prices will rise. So don't delay Flowered CRETONNE at EVANS & WHITFIELDS LINENS dept. lines Yd 27" Prim CRKTONNE 64 36" CHEESE CLOTH 42t 56" STRI PK TICK 1.19 DOMESTIC 38? & 55? *> l*illon 2 87 Pillow-cascB94? & 97? in. TO-DAV I nd Ml nd IMlllllN si\i\n:n STOCK C.e ne KELLY Judy GARLAND — Eddie BRACKEN ToJVite 8..W ToJVite LOCAL TALENT ON PARADE Percy Welch—"San Fernando Valley" Arthur Moore—"Love Somebody" Dorian Thompson—"Our Very Own" Byron Ross—"It's Wonderful" Carlton Best—"Near You" Frank Greaves—"Roomful of Roses" Judges: Mrs. Granlley Adams; Mrs. N. Evelyn and Mr. llulrhlnson Music by Clevie Gillvns and his Orchestra PRICES: Pit IB: House Ml Balcony 40: Box 54 N.B.—"SUMMER STOCK" will be shown after LOCAL TALENT SHOW STARTS 8 30 P.M. AQUATIC CHID CINEMA (MambarsOnly) Iheir OTI beauty, and the next mirnlnji a snUin>i had lo (o Bi It had to be Robert V. opposit me. and he's wonderful, but somehow it didn't no togeii %  a while !he studio shelved it I wasn't happy about that, and I kept KO.IIK t'Mi II in M One day I went to the atttdid officials and lolcl them I knew whst the picture needed—Vlncanta Minnelli "That man?" thoy exclaimed. "Are you crazy? Hes the giiv you were always setting BO mad at." "Yea, I know," I said, but ha But the best work out of me Pre ever done and I k: understand this I got Urn, and M ii d lite l>icture It just missed i^ing great The critics said it proved I <-oul'. %  piece band, and that WHS gratifyFrom my personal point of view. It was a triumph because it was during "th< clock" that 1 looked at Vincente wn something hit me. 1 Ihougbl hare was a man I could know foi years and still find fresh interest in. We started going cut togrther. | and about six month* divorce was final, we wi in I in my mothn's liotise We took three months r>IT fur ;i honeymoon In New York and Own went to Boston for the i of one of Vincente'* plctura* I' was the first time In more years than I could remember that 11 just relaxed and had fun and '• % %  somebody else take c;ire of mv By the time we got Iwrk to Hollywood. I knew the baby war coming and I felt happy and loved. We were wild over Liza from the first moment we laid eyes on her, but I fretted over not having the calm and serenity 1 thought 1 ought to have. I 'wanted deeply to l-t> a good wife and mother, and I was a little scored. In an effort to learn why I had never been able to get closer to people. I took a ser'p* of pwrhoanalytical treatments, and I hanrC never regretted anything more. I'm sure psychoanalysis has helped a great many people, but for me it was like taking stron? medicine for a disease I didn't have. It just tore me apart. I went back to work and laahod myself as 1 always bad. The friction of personalities in tlK movie business is something fairly severe I'vi' ncvi r win)' office, but I think [fa like office politics, magnified a htiridrvtnno by money, by fume, by the lopsided idea that only moviema tter I don't want to hurt anyone, and obviously I won't name names but than have been people h Hollywood who %  mnrl" it extremely hard for me to do what I was ao d %  to do — And mvself. At least I felt that way -(IN S.! (TOMORROW: KtnoUoaal max, Attempted Suirldr. and Renewed Hope.) B.B.C. Radio Programmr 1 a.m. The Ni>. T 10 %  in. > Analv.n. 1 |S n.ii. Flam Itlc tknioruil*. TIB a.m. Pmr.iiiui. H.nacir. J ja PlfsMfom mwlrr thr U. 7 50 t in Unhide. • am. U>Wnrf Choke. a.4S a m Oood Hlin* and bod nima. (• The New.. • 10 am Home Ne from Britain. 0 IS a.m. Ooae Down. 11.11 Ptosiamine Parade. 11.8ft am. Amlraha vi Ensland. II m Wn.1.1 Afa 17 noon The Nr. 12 10 pin. New. AnalyaU. it IS p.m. Ci"e Do,, llitMlTwi w/^wwwmwwwj SilGHISIOWN PIACE T H E A T R E TIME 830 rtlDAY BUN. l.l L'l LEU n. < \rri\i t.isi %  I -•"la UIOJ,r. PJ-H VALIJN. Thrllli Mac a> Bat s T O K mi -r in or st ivisam nakai VanMW BHOWN aavaaassdi Donl all.-" ihU Double Vi A/ A Theatre-Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) tint -torv of the Jet P-D" t' i aSa ue lold nl m.-' MBflkaa kasssiaaalM ia TUESDAV CHAIN LIGHTNING" TlTHm laieni WOULD NRWS TODAY I. a 130 pm SAT u. BhMrkSff DOC ART ft To llL IV SAT 9.90 am. A IJB em R\iiua or THE -IM tn MacM lire*'" aft Paul Docla> "KVFRVRODV DOKK IT 1 A *Wh Crnlury-Foi Piciure MONDAY f. TUrPAY NIRHT at B MATINFr TCTSDAY at 5 p.m. Dick llayiik. iBaunBa O'Mam. Harry Jamea "DO YOU LOVE ME" in TeehmcohK A atrlh Cenlun Tix. Picture in >SDAY a THUKaDAY Nil.Hi Tyrona Puwei. J*n Marl "CAJTAIN OF CAKTILE" in V" %  .ii" ini A ?01h Cenlm v-rim PiriiinCLEAR THE HAY UOCAItrs MOVING FASTER THAN ANY MAN EVER MOVER BEFORE! taut 1t.:lO p. m. mil eontlnuini until TUESDAY TO-D. -IV 2-W SATURDAY 4 4a and H.3B p n .-fVSfi TEST NLOT pm m Htmsi IV -a--. Ill WkRMIt Mor tmei Mm mssrr -iam mm s".r ntcsLtii aha Ihc Short: SO YOU WANT TO BK IN PICTURES" Plus Latad "WORLD NEWS" I I'M s.-ni.-.i h> iv ii..i 1'.ill. s,-.. l*Li\'£.i\ Tltvmlrf UOOeSTOWn (Dial2310) r ENAMELWARE A wide range lo sekrt Irom... CL'PS and PLATES DINNER CARRIERS JUGS SAUCEPANS KITCHEN SINKS BASINS CHAMBERS TOILET SETS SOAP DISHES TABLE TOPS Slocked by our HARDWARE: DEPARTMENT Telephone No. 2039 THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON FACTORY LTD. Hardware and IronmongrT? Department Telephone No 2039 LIT— m 31.11 HI. A „ „ m PLAZA Theolre-O/Sr/rV [DIAL 8404) ToDAi lo MTNOAY *. %  Jfl pm Tit" Do U la OL Tom Kwiie I>1 7S pm Thi.,k on i,Radio Nt. IW ( %  is p„, BBta. ^ pm Ci-n|-,r p-m. World Aalrm. 9 li Muilc. 10 p m Th. N'r From Ihe Edltnrlala. IB) In praclKa, 1010 pm Spa Orcheap debai, ir IhiriKi. 8 p.m I %  m. UC. make • *. 10.10 |. ,.. Ran I >5! Mtl lODAY 2.30 and 8 30 A Conlir.niiii; lo Tur>diy rolumbia Plcturca pnaenta ; %  .. %  :,I;I LAND llnd KfSSELL "A WOMAN OF DISTINCTION" Edmund GWENN & Janis CARTER ROW TO DAY 1.30 and 8 15 Only Columbia Itip Dnui.-le . Glenn FOUD A Tarry MOORE "THE RETURN OF OCTOBER" AND "BLONDIE'S SECRET Starring Pennj SINGUtTON & Arthur I.AKF. ROYAL TODAY Only 4 30 ami I !• M-G-M BiG Double . Spencer TRACY & V.n JOHNSON THIRTY SECONDS OVER TOKYO" AND "THE ARNELO AFFAIR" SiaiTing John HODIAK & George MURPHY OLYMPIC TO-DAY io SCSDAY 4.30 and i 15 20ih Century-Fox Smashing Double . Jnme* STEWART & Debra PAGET in •BROKEN ARROW" "NIGHT AND THE CITY" Starring Kit'hard W1DMAHK & Gene TIKRNFY dbauiy and faliaAUtitf fomtuud THAT'S THE STANDARD SET BY EVERY TEMCO ELECTRIC CLOCK "TIME U I II4 III s O.V BIT -TEMCO' KEEPS COOK TMME OX SHOW AT mi (OHM it sTon.r. t



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FRIDAY. FF.BIU ARY 2. 1951 Council Will Get Report Of Vestry On Hack Pay Proceedings THE VESTRY of St Michael will circulaic t< n of the Legislative Council, the proceeding u Inch tool E lace at the Vestry meeting, (lealin^ with %  ck pay to their employ Tim was m not exceeding £ 10.000 to pay cumstanccs. Had t reirospective pay to all parochial huwewr. he certainly would employees voted in favour of ;, j D „ Mo *e> who had tnat wns hi* intent lea piloted the Bill through tho out of the ir.g the right to get further iiiforWand when the motfc matlon on the BUI and he though: Passed. he should have It. There were >, .. %  < rtftJn mtrmen'.s. however, tnat ,. '' "!" '" l ' '! '""7 Ul h Mr he (Mr. Mottlev) was DHMnd to """'' b l '"' ft" '"'" ,r refute p^psn^i io mem aooul Uu Iil:iI sS reIt was certainly the subject bM of discussion at the nUBtlng iind cuti.m. he BB ai meetings, and u was true of anything enlarging but chaos I) say that members had differed and frustration. Once there was in their opinion* on it. a legally constituted qiiorunwffte The motion ol Mr. MeD. Svmdecision of tinmaiorit} rrondJ on which the Vestry mad' 1 %  cceplcd. and if Uua Wai not tn their decision to give back pay to *•** done then Ihej deThieves Make Big Haul At Four Roads Governnwnl Mil •T-IIIKVf. >1 M.I ^ from llic Gasolmr Sut rtoada. St. Ju.11: \\ ants Govt. To Purchase Playing Field Ml C.OVFRNMF.NT HILL, a roaJ half a mile Ions and about a mile from Bridgetown t-t from the CsTcumftanca that ail t' the right of it. going up. the enment House ground* st i %  .mmcnl >n a j. ,,,..,• ,,,, i., the ... during th< „,. of the hill Big tamarind. irly noun* of yesteraay morning, mahogany and other trees grow while p.c 6 the en IheG v e ground* Four Roads I'olirr Station was on and I Brnattg th< patrol duty he not.id 'h:*t the mad When fie >i:n M hot. h.ilf %  %  .ded. The ml ai of the iv> Road lh>nif.i Station was ;,[ er up u. called GovarnnMnl An II M V. Radiogram twi I' 11 The "ii the OOg tyres. a „ MM V '*"' "** n old weather beaten arM anii wnxiM or ., ltlni|) .. I II OjUaii i.n, of Shell Joiners shop Almost at any time ho lBrgc numoor of ,,. Oil. total value |5M M, W ^ of the day the tall slim Joiner O Bttktm, .,„. h llK(1 playing Mtte for the parish t*nuatofl. the S'IOP ran be seen slo... i a Bank had offered ll lo n. cauae th, The Station is owned by Mr y f l \ ,l: %  lu "'"* he mav %  Government at a very leasonable <* high. P A Clarke. polishing, repairing or making. price. He thought th.Oovi the intcrE rTUp stl.MAN of Queen Mary *.*** HST'i Sh< mm h ht l ,,,rr hase it before the <" of Ihe parish that that O Rood F.ank H:.ll ,i... ~.." ,hr! "" St. Thomas Vestry Will Ask Govt. For Playing Field paoaattaa of Mi n Q %  vernment to cons der the lm%  UOge playing t j as one of th ihe PI i The St. Thomas Vestry decided at th of M. Mr L+aear* petnted OUl lhat it ra %  i lajlni ftaM f. i ears and wa It %  bom* %  4L t tfst I stiv.n the apiMiintnient Of B ieas.nably goo.1 "Playlq| IVIds" CORU in a crowded Mr Sandiford said that Ihe "Playing fields" Committee of I9M did not succeed Road, Lank Hall. Od thai bier home was Sl'^fSrt"i "V2 TU ,f*>"""."" br' ere is a half completed buB* ,| out tti liitentn.-, M OuttOO lw changed jiul and a quantity of The Police are in %  ilso reportUlW No workman can l# broken and ^1^,,^ n Th( jnpUttared wall %  i.n to gather moss, ineaday A tien board vU t-n QM f, ill iner lives at |nj tharn |o racoctaklei their d. the untinishe." sion to assist m the BCQjUtall on ttclothing stolen, pa'ssen.v thai 'tikatum both the house cut it up into house spots The matter was raised when th Vestry an %  ng a lette the Colonial Secretary ask"i plaving fields. He aUo ini, nil QM dealt* Iha: ihe proposal aboul Iha Kuciidihip playlni field %  alble chance g^ B w.rA y M O bungaseai and ai the t> N DNESD.\t mm than la .. wosnan m ON Josephine Forde of Gllli huu.lressing business. (Jep. Eavle Hall. St Mirhail The queerest house of the road I Brag take. to Ihe U ihe ritcht of the hairdressei %  Oeoeral Hospital an,i detalnad. it U %  rarrly big house about i Ic was involved In an a dozen yards away from the road should be sttended to a* the nexl %  CCldenl alone Tudor Bridge with aBsl Is always shut. There are trees priority after the I •• owned and ridden by :irour, d it and gardens to the front, cr whether prior alien tun ihmaV %  I Ol COdrington HII —ni 'hat the hobby of the Ngiven to .u woman of this house is music for AAMI'N GOAT ai rina in the soft sounds of a piano ore " %  .*'! icinted out that %  nUj heard. IJM l biblp playlru t.nuns Kmd !" !" '"e'tauily be .'Ith, so the employees hail been Vcalry's Agenda for so '•"fore it had I • that member* were full. of it. No attempt had bet W discu;i it In ihe •. i seme members or to railroad it through the Vestry and he it ted very much thai thai I I slon shouid have been ajvon, \l-was sure that no member of the Vestry could hencatly say that ho was not allowed an opportunity tc discuss it. Hon. V. C. Gale said that he hnrl I dona. It would onl reversing tin ... | | meetmi! of the prevloua one. on the i Uaal tnefa enough mi .i thai •neeiu Two Loon Atrarileit Con I rods A ~\ Unn DMT • i. to A.hlnn A.r.| ofOucin Road. Rank *l.>ll | %  "v*> imlu.Uvi three bucks, nn WcdreHav. en t*o ,,-tu-i oeeMloni it hm -" ul bbttt U. too, ki,K. A. I after the shop there it T HE srintM's of uie St lUahoaa mdwithin Joseph's Cam Icntag away on leather without leaal aMarnpj at hurry is O* then !" ,,,o Often „. ^1^ m I wpreea mce Hurt rocary sho,. -I th,dinnet _,.„ ..„ „.„ .,„..,,,,/,,„. ,^ m •.HIS how th, giant of a man. One %  tun I mall space The one public pipe which i „, Qovernmanl Hiii hi tn n an ol rstnhnatea of building and the giant BhOaBuutari shop struclni. coflbl This was a't.i .ill the trouble th,. mfitac had taken in eelatilng ant recommending Ing aatl \etry and the eonunltlaa in,i d< nt iii>, s II uiti have bean ireeded a.* they had been Than am no doutri at ail. bo laid, thu v.: aval occupied the poaltton of \\> II i NAi n arai rwi position lo examine delaihi t Mi: in.tl THE t %  • the., ,.. | %  during the week. "Thia now water tolli M loan of ii.i.'.ii to ih. i ractad n did ... . i wecting the now one.tttt assume that if hr wci. for ""' I"" 1 0owr [\ |>meeting ha would have > M %  undariiood that they win he —.-;; k m'i, ,:-— L"".Z' —: "V" "T".: other ii,. wou '" lh opinion ^uini; a half hnlida* imtii ihLT ^"' l '* M -i"^n ne hill a soa. tcr hr bought that should b, hmlsaloncri of llealtn. ^t "Lie! to us? ' '' ThiB r ctor -l ,^, "-"' m the hands of some-,,,, nor open mind. A* AiV vides work for many men. Eleven ,,. ,. llb i K Work>> He took If thai true reports of 11 Uu OMI ^U%fSJT ^ ' '....., and .,: the meeting! had been recorded the old Opt V/ fig**' JPh' Church ,h„t lime the nu-n bun> OW ( tfj \ ictar Chase seconded Mr In the Minuu-.. gnd II should not will also u I s.hool stands a half comheap the bread and Data woman Le and said iha* gone Into this mailer very canno Imiwealble to a .nseue. ''"'"'• huiiding. Noth.ng haa nonrbj buay whai trocn avors Uw Village playinj fully. If Mr. Cuke had been misthe rM m itlon to each •" •' %  "•' '" '"'^ Innhi.ng for B angle she can hear ihe CTJ f>'" Bold wai .dm..-i Hilly developed informed, the Vestry's recoids mombarofthe Leglalatlve Council !'"' a the Md and fish. while the srieiidNhip playing helo were there to show what had Those members Had to exercise loan for the erection of roncfltu The Advocate WB1 told that this The man who founded the soap would have now to be hammerc. taken place. The matter of back then judgment and were fully plal eight bulUIng was to have been use,I lactory, Mr. J. C. Roberts., is a Ji'to shape pay had been brought up a num-"ntitied to then-opininn. it should additional standposia in various as %  carpentry shop but lolnari ird foi iha hronl ol raj •••"S 1 "oally decided ber of times and had been turned he pan too lhat thev got all II ,,'n workinr there on e house IK-IOW the soap lactOT) reply lo th. down. The last time it was information ihei brought up It was passed, the Mr. Leaeock thai only people voting against it being ,lon ,0 ,h;,t 0 ^ Tcc, 1 ^'' s : aha) thev are about. I 14 Mr. Trevor Buwrlng and himself. -'*'"'l;d i Nine members were present inV^ afOttlay .. unatl .-wnmitteo eluding the Chairman and 6 had "S %  V W #*WJBSI l I voted in favour and 2 against. Mr T. W. M Her said that the When Ihe Bill was to be brougm ^Sl'T, " U iU n i Colonial Secretary ,.iii.-h the Commlaman thu on, i whldi h. I " '"""''tiL':'", ESSS* %  The hi : %  •". -^ before the Legislative Council he had asked the Clerk to let hu Ii A1N I'FI.I. IN W IX over the island. The hea vl In which th, > agreed la prlnclpl Mr. H. c CrifB'h. Chief Sariftai? Inspeet -have the facts of the case. He had M ft waa 'polnfod OUl thai I iest %  i.infall was in St fjaorge where 72 parts were recorded. The %  %  ,,i re ad parts. The returns were:— CHf tl ; en fttatlon Bill i>> b I parts. St Phllin 17 parts. St Thomas 27 parts. S' PatOT SO been opposed !„ in the Vestry ,f, a "t "the GovCTrior-hi'r!xe.utive felVV %  ..,' parts. St and hafl not changed his mind. Committee had agreed to the reIn conneetl i with the matter %  "• 1 34 P :l^ st %  %  He said that they would have tlease of %  (urtl.. %  1 ..hould be Intro M Andrew 14 pails a: get somebody else to do so but $1,318 to bo expended on the Princ *f "arts. gave his promise that he would eOjl Alice Playing Field The Clerk told the Vestry thai %  •> OgOin gloomy in the Citv take no part in the debate on it If wag alao Itatad that the Qovt he imm "nd moist winds couM as it was the wish of the Vest:.crnor-m Exacutivo Comh i.-lt This ken' th~ tem-vrn thai it should be passed. When not reached a riensi-,ronccrmng solinlois v.ho said that thel I tlv 1-lnK told him. Mr. Mottley and the Churchwarden as well, thai he could not introduce the Measurein the Council because he had ;ou!d only apolv to those who f ' %  rttB vere entitled to it. ippolnted A letter from thi I -to Christ Chureh. Secretary to Ih,V. %  I, itiek walking around the ea %  no mat they sho.il, flking at the birds as they OBI •* w'Jh wnteono from th .,.. Work ncpartmen, wh ,.„ the right at the side ol the hi |?^^^'^^~?V5VS njij up, branohlfl | m iwhnvards Twccdi.ie Hood and towards iielmout Rood, both of whKh had to the city. Concert At 'Rocks' 'ih., Polka Band on ... the nochs. rlaatlngi lock. Following is the programme Cr***! MI '' the matter was brought up in the 'he inquiry, into the past expend!Coun-.-il he left U.e Chamber unture of ihe amount of $15,590. til the discussion ended. SffSr? 'rtv;.*c<\ from the Ubour .,„. .,,„. „, Mr. MoUley BBkad mcml-rs to .^.''^^^"[J^/'^^f i,^' ''' rot' think tin Church could say whether the question of retrospective pay had not been raised at the elections In 1950. The question was raised then, he BBU At the lime lhat the retrospective pay for parochial employees was passed. Mr. Chase and Mr. Miller were not at the i • Miller was in Trinidad and Mr. Chase could not attend becnu of some illness. Both thar 12 t. i i .ml l Can Harbatlians Win L.S. $500? POHT-Or-SPAIN, Jon. 29. Five hurdled dollars U.S., wil be given as prise money In ipetitioti being VB i i &0 I I .hrenhcit at mid day • n *• r ""* Jm. an-l ,,. %  I Veatey thereiete lutructed PrM en Wedneadaj f.,r traffl. i i.iv t.. the Ve .... eSmcee. of theea low mn n IthoaeUnei portc, tor execedum the "i"' 1 ro ^", I., The Veeti %  autho. lied 11' limit. 1 ''" '"' JUT. t! IIIS; %  i %  i tunaleu The Vestry iitee compr r*nm i ,,,, on the nil> J i..Mtnita in %  % %  where to find C hi Office % %  nlch I „, situated at lower Horse Hill, op yng the Chairman |osilc the AlmshousC Gap. T m On ., A .'I .1 I. -I MrddHMM Mun lle-lp da i Idad lo include in ih< i,plv. the suggestion about the Carrington's Village playing Held u of'those Poster Competition be'lng "ii:n"bv tiii-C!.aV,t,C %  % %  >" %  *• A number of people occasionally Vcstrvmcn had by their previously the Caribbean Intern Tourism Talma to collaborate with Miss ro to the %  81 ospch s DJfpanaar] CX^rSed vt?ws indi.ated that if Committee. riktog lhat the Post Oflice is on they had been at the Vestry meet The poster should be designed of the Civl< I An I % %  branch of the i ihe pariah. ^1., i/'thn. it had £ been passed when members we., Wo or hrr p wordg m gf** A p Manoevme (Chalni absent was no point, when BOTM c „_ .-CBI ibbean Calling" wif: Mr II B1 %  were absent wouU m r i nembers who were absent have voted 'or it. Nor could it he said thai thei sudden meeting which pay motii agendas. So .. summoned two days after noti< WM iveit. it only meant thai th same agenda was sent out to Vestrymen. Mr Bowrlnz said that it had been advised thai as many members should le present at the meeting as possible. Mr. Mottley said that they should write to MrCuKO and if' him know the Iruth of the matter Someone was using subservient methods with Mr Cuke and who,(1 U) f perhaps a sub-slogan b Ml ''• C Ward. Mi letter BI the root, Mch it "C mo H \ i %  Hi %  %  WOSWO" o the Temperate Ti.|. Mr C B MacK. %  '.:>. Mr A. C The si/e of ihe ilogan shot M t IfUl III 0 C aimed at getting it passed. Beforbe M" x 25" hut designs need not Ahhy Mr T. N. Peiree BM Ml the meeting at which il was passbe submitted in the above Bbte, Ml 1 od. there had been two abortive but can be produced to lit those meetings and the retrospective proportions when enlarged. had been on those they must bo in colour. ,.. when the meeting was Territories will form theii own I^ulHHlrVi* I' III*' panel of judges. Mr I .., and will receive all local Ofltl er Wai 'i a labourer of which must be accom] i n'a VUlaga. Si Mtennai the nama of the enti The wim m wBtw '" 1lu I | working lad to the Exact %  • *'• Sen: iv r the CITC. Ki r i w Jwyr, Hoiife Fort-of-Spam to re.i, h not later than 15th April. 19M trie) "A" before whom both eases Final :. IceilonaSWl VlrUndWbt were heard onJ'' the Third Annual General J%' { of the CITC in May. M FILM SHOW will I. r\ f. r adulti at ihe Brlttel Council, "Wakeflcld %  tonight n" f! 30 o'clock. The programme i as follows "Itntish News". %  luliuCaesar". "Making The BaH" and "Ycur Children'ftyi It i) to enter hv tirkets. wilt-; ipMkinf i.i iht ,I.I. %  UBWSIIV* UM W.lr.> o,i Tared iv lion C ll.ilwn tvai pifi.Htj a personal •., 1 Board < %  ( h*h lion i litilaon *t %  meNnter craaed In lui II. .i Mr. a| lr..-,i | MRCENY CASE ADJOURNED A case brought by the Police charging "fi-ycc-old Marjonc f no fixed place of abode with th larceny of i'i vbelong Ing to Lorraine Tains, of (.Itteni I Michael, wa^ BdJounv d ui til r< La uarj i^ i" His Worship Mi C L Walwyn Acting f >'.in • %  Maglstmti U D Uicl A" r, rrested by I'ohcc 4IM1 Skeeie fbr the offence which was alleged to have been con January 31 Sgt. F H. Bancroft is prosecuting on behalf of the Police Hrowne is on a personal bond ol fc, I I FRESH SUPPLY Or line of >0/for n imd 10 fi to the — ___ has marie Ihetentamule ever it was. was not doing the t i\, %  ugaeatlon that It) rhf SO'fln* la to be paid in 28 island any good. Mr. Cu*e nad money should U' divided BS days or in default one month's not been at the meeting so somefogwj: $360 U.S. for ih.Di hard labour one must have been telling him jlOC IS for tl ,n and ihe I" ;l n l things. -u^i'T ,hp **fWj A "'roe pri Mr. Symmonds said lhat thelw,, w;l| ht ., .. ,.,baur. thought that oartabo n.er *'; UN" ny of the Caribbean Inier-m Sgt Murrell preaeeuled for the got tOgether_bchmd.he M backs of[ Toi.ym Committee^ pjjca In **** i backs of|Tourlrrn O others and railroad the passing of *0flO*4^,v^.''>V,v back pay could only come through • misinformation. .... He had asked the churchwarden about summoning a meeting lo get the settlement of the back pay motion before the Vestry died and the churchwarden said be ami DA* summoning a meeting. He had managed lo get a meettnp called. but it was unfair to suggest that the motion had been hurried over behind other members' backs. Mr Miller board the inajcntv der. aiwavs stand and he did BJ t tc why the majority oVwIetoa. of the V, %  •! v should be questlcned. Before the motion was passca. he had heard It stated by the public and by members of the Vestry 'hat the Churchwarden did not intend 5ummoning n nvct.v. because he was acairst hick pay. Mr. MoUley Bald thu. had it been for Mr • arochial cmpl l.-ve got retrospective pay. Weetherhead had given a casting vote to irequest Of ahl sioners of Health for DI their day labourers so at one UOM this had been -• M, Victor Chase was one of the members who had I PURINA HEN CHOW. %  (SCRATCH GRAIN) !H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTD.--W*0aaw FRESH ARRIVALS AT WFAIIIKKIIKAirS [VERY BITE A DELIGHT' Fry's "Hazel Nut" Choc's: | |.11 and l.70 Box B/per 1-lb Tin. Fry's "I'rlnceiip" Choc'*: B4c and SI 60 Box Cadbury*i "Rod Roaa" I ho UBc. and SI HO BOX TRY S "Scorched Almonds" 2/. iiox. S2 0] |H-r 1-lb Tin ji Cadbury's "Milk Tray" < ho 00c. and tl 48 tin %  fiin., It.-. % %  ll.. %  80c. and SI 48 tin (adliiuv > t'ho.Itiicuils .". .oal 5 :t tin Ml Iti I Oftoa ChOI Mm' (re.ins |l 23 •>* Aeet Choc gl.lB and $2.12 box I Hack Magic Choi: $4.06 box Bettad Peanuts .. 64c. tl Jacob's Cream Crackers — 8/tin le I" Biscuit $2 oil tin Jacob %  Asst. Creams" Biscuits SI M tin Jacob's "Family Asst." Biscuit* $1 .47 tin Meltls Favourite Candies $1 02 and $1 85 box Carr's "Club Chi • r cults 1 1.00 tin filui ose itarlay sugar — 80c and i M tin i %  '.. He, *i 2 Collard i Boi |4i and "o,Collard Bowaai Bu 2lc. , 4fM Ovaltlne Blaculti 43e. Box Blue Bird Toffee 42c. tin Hill IF. H'EATHERHEAD ITI). nropoung Mi Reeves. Mr. Collln and Mr • Mr v t: ttm was not wise for the \ %  %  appoint ., l'l.ivltv f I Mr M. Collins agreed with M. that the parih had no need for playing fields. i hat the Retime Vestry write the Oonreeaunent informinK them that no member of BhM prepared lo serve .. %  Ids Committee aatbnatca prepared by th,"Playing FieUh %  and submitted to the ant was not favourably considered It was therefore the feeling of that Vestry lhat the i M take steps to held or playing On Page 7 be -----''''*'-•-'•'-•, TOOTAL LINENS THE TALK OF THE TOWN! | 36 ins. wide NIL AQUA ECRU FLESH LEMON WHITE POWDER TOOTAL | L'lNEN $3.4! yd. HARRISONS-BROAD ST. BranJeJ II Bill /If) for icni'J mew r aa lgft jaj c o DIAL 2664. '.',','•'.',"*',',',****'** w.y.v.v/ 1 /.'.--.' ANIMATED OPINIONS ^ww^w-^v-^ STOCK II TO-IIAY rEAK PnEANS PLATO JI.20 COCKTAIL CHERRIES pn bll. bn. 31 '.'I Small Mr. HFIN/. CO. KTAIL ONIONS -i*r bottle 79c. %  '. PEAK FHEAN' SA1AO STICKS—per tin ss oo III 00 PRUNE CREAMS TO-DAYS Sais Mr. Leo Kinf: "VOU CAN UK-LION IT I1F.INO TIIK SWEETEST TREAT!" UCatetf Toffee MADE IN U.K. The Perfection of Confection PALM TOFfEE LTD L0NU0N. WJ HUN.' A. \\\ MSB* B UN i Be. per Un or 9ge. per doicn I'lKI mm RFER—Ue per bottle or $4.00 per firton STA.XSFfCtM sm'IT A #•.. f.fa/. — AT — KNIGHTS PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN '////.'/.•////.'/•.•//. -,-.•.-.-,-,•.-.-.-,•,•,-.-,-.-.-,-,-.-,-.•.-.-.•.-.•.-,-.-.-.-.-.-.•.•-•. i oothali at prices which cannot be repeated. nit' NOW M itintts In Black only Per Pair $8 15 CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, II, 12 & 13 Broad Slrrrl Also ill II III It SI I IIS Will, leetk Bi.o and sunken H'.islii'r Per Set 90?


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r\.i iic.HT HAKIIADOS .\1>VI1( \TI FRIDAY. FEBRL'ARY 1951 Land Police Defeat The Rest* By 28 Runs Cup Pr&emted To Skipper /ty-or THK innui • ket fixture between Land I and TinRe t>>' 28 runs lor l-ind XI which Wtt t kipp fd by .1 Byrr tl Queen's Park. I.A.MH I'Oi.in: i.\ Kmpirc Tram Ba'k Home MR M c p .. I E T %  HtlASCKKU lu %  Cup wi % % %  Byer i-apt.un of the winning teem ttC thanked Mr Chenerv %  i'iin(f and ink inn such in ihc .mnual B) B I* PeoainMlUJ the Cup Ml I i.thoroughly CJublSports team which ho* jus" ,\, w „ pU reured Granada playing < hen nf Ih : From Grenada yesB W.I A Metal %  %  m, o. M Robirsnr. I Holder. Sydney Rudder, Vflmton i Ml I to i Crtchlow 11 id lri.it it nave him meat pl< i the Cup and was lookir ers of the U'.iri %  .. ii ki .if axpevted to retun ,„ l., ( Grtmth topacorad w.th to Chief interest locally in lh ? while C Noblett took tbre< ,. %  nine nmi howUng Cm f of mi Adzll Holdei The * A J* 1 *"" 2 8 ? v ^ h 1,1,1 ( '" 2CSJ the E-m.nr Ul n. With the form Ir *miunas lead o-/ei Land rv.Tir. ranio vuit of a Tri. """"•' w,,h l2,> ru "' < "' l,r :.:-.. (• %  'i<. .;: t)..'n -• ..i nolucaMe dearth of food slaw . knrrke d Up SM •kipper of the Land Police XI after mded at Queen's Park ysaterday %  (.( seven %  perform:. n v.iiat % %  thou I noriormaiK kwd :1ns tt. With Ifl" run I thlnfc ha ahould '* %  % %  %  I >' : %  In one of the u-lala ruth' opened a*ain for The R ry span tn< Mar--iu.li and Chaltaoham v ball Ha %  two that showed any n would b a great experience foi i -distance to the steady bos aaarvei • ll and Caller*** Cnetti ,.,.i AI> and Maiehall 40 out of RoMar is the So* left arm the 143 run* that The Beat made of tnr Empire term, and |n Iheir second a new.-omer to %  "'* thre par IM mad Ihc hi) trich u ^____ The Garden Collects $200,000,000 Erik Larso.n Enters For "Diamonds' Trial Match Post/toned :'l a very sodden Itad any play yesterday the first day In the third cricket trial match—in preparation for the (orU mlal tournament at Ken-innTon Oval Tnr Ad' aaaaa OOdanMBI mopping the irtekal arhgCn was well undo' waier Iair^e pools of water had i OH UM i'Oundary and the uncovered ^eats ware well ..naked The -econd day of play is on Saturday. The teams for the match are ai follow— J 11 <.OIlll\RI>-S XI .1 1) Ooddard ti Wood. R. atanhall, A Tayjoi, I Atkinson n Bradnhaw. K Branker. E. Millmjttcii Q ii. Greenldge. C. Alklns. and K KKITII WAI.COTTS XI K Waleott.C Smith, C Hll-'" N HanhaU, C flulllnj. WillUma, E ftpad, Jnr H Kina -.i D Atkinson I and C AUaj oa Play IM'KI'IK I'unitually at 1 MlUlV t for 14 'line |l h in .-round S200.000.00U of artilch about M par cent ami T< %  ight th io*-ier or. \\ huluards tin **?*" >>> v 1 ] .,d. team who "" '" %  '!;•". M couw. is luc !WI a7flaar "V \\ kls. becnuje U Weekc %  in Inin-it tied t.i. %  > •• ,n •' MisT Joan analyn •'..s IB t HjJ The s|>orts temple has rocked to that they bad had a very successRuns were limited due to ihc verj (h( |0iils iU l> I'ill It4llllllS>l m ... „ B> HYLTON i I i v\ i i: vpuj vAOV AN entry for tne Dtamon M .... ... .UW YOKK. Sculls fro.-, Ki ; Jf >iu want an inklinn nf thfl VI ] Lng chaanpton, ka-i.-. a p robpubUc Bpends BIUIUB] 'you have only to ulkc a %  we Daaiah invasion here. lOOk at Ih* MndulOn SqiUtM Qai ll %  .l^rsen partnered Ebbe. Parsn The Men Qai existentD .i In tt:.. when thev won the Double Scullh ractlon lH, h %  Amsterdam and Henle> PI n turned ihem away beating the British Olympic cham R. D. Burnell and B H. T hen, Bun and mn and m-dwell, each time drew them in for Olen Cunningham and Poavo Nurmi meant track. F Italian named i %  Writing Pads Ruled 100 >htel—each Mc. .. 80 „ Me. 48 ., 2 4c. A.r Mail (Ruled) 42c. (Hie. Pluin—10" sheen. 24c. Envelopes Manilla per pack c; at; 4 15c. While 12c; 15c. Airmail ., ., 18c; & 48c. Window I'aek 12c. •w hope iiiiod. —I N B. Standard Canasta OIFFICULT OiSCA.-LJ S. M Ma,/.:on G'o, I Ml tour and everyone In Orenada heavy outfield. The fielding had gone oul "f theli way to give team in en !fable Ume Neil Franklin W ill Play For Hull Cltj HULL. Peb i Ned Franklin %  rnglami centre-half, who was %  nspc n de d by l'< AUHK-iation f*-r playing Seuth America, Hull Cil). Se< I flub. The liansler fee is a record (OT lha Hull ^J rliih, for whom Franklin will play attains! Blackburn Roven o.i Saturday Ii-has net pUtjrfl I ID Ensllsh football since the end of the last icaaon Mi luapeni tided at midnight IWt night. Franklin was England international centre half until his augnattaton. and bai plaj | i 1 epreaentativea gamea, mciii.tuiK a number of wartime Inti Reuttr. MTll'HU not rood owing to the e !" i.i ion -i |ni| the ground i hinajli were made in Hi. It would l>e ridiculous Windwards team and one in UK attempt to Lea wardi W'NnWAKlH III 1' Crtch UvlaasaMM, B Kirnon kpr Tiiinion. •. r-n •! ai k eai HIMIliaillllla V M. Hjtriso Cray Dealer | Sonili (iame tilt ia z J 5 Hritain Expeett Less Tourists LONDON Sir Alexander Maxwell. Chanman of the British Travel an i Holidays Association, predii hi i that Britain would not react 11 1051 target of TOO.OOO foreign VlSltOK Sir Alexander fold the aJ UoA'g the nation would be lucky if it aquallei luso Bgura <>r tioo.ooo bacauaa ot thce "on" rtaln I He said thut "m the li I.; of ittot i tlon" the aatoelatlon'a a > and aggressu. %  ||i ll had been "waled down." particti it: -no fiuted Slates ami C tnetda. lnsti tourists 1 i-ome to Britain meretj U %  pieubuu the agaoi latlon i %  bad the theme "i its public. %  to "bun! acre itlon.' —i N a. V II ! • I 4T H | fa?." Iff, A 1 g K 9 I • K(|im This i innd should been p'.aved quietly part-score .alter .One have or a D .. ..'hiot ml ri Diamond' bv Houth insirad of pakslna. Norm bid Three Club* and South ir;ed Three No Iruinpj West led v> I to Dummv %  W J. F.i-i save South a ternC .irv reprieve bv plavtni when e \*a* led. ana • %  > I follow ed west should plav a> K lo interrupt Hie run of the -uiL but in ll.l(use he did well to plav lo* I >i" Ilnrv^d in the forlorn hope that West held both Club honour*, but a Heart return Irom East pur the rontrart two down. Had Wan pi lyed g K it tnck a he would br allowed to hold the (rick : unless he found J Diamond ili s>> ,Ul 'Quid be one down only. would loidon ElB'ru if-tif* to which individual has nippl I lor the for.s, because where 0M sports lover will reapond In U* eeLanothe gets his greatest kick knoekout or o great goal scored li hockey. Hut then i in doubt aiKmt the ...'. %  %  %  %  • %  • : den has had N iieciuisc the cold fsfugei tan the %  IftUe lee Queen ha much S200.000 in a few rttfthti and tha %  tops Joe Li 11 '' %  %  %  si.200,000. %  Incidentally, In tha I U the Bardei bOUta have drawn around $2".000.(i('.' I .:< 15.000. w. figure* but le-. ui take i look ai some of U who nav< not once but n i %  Jim Lot mat tux d I from the Jack, who by the broke, jainu :c i lha arena. So did SODja and she till dues Tuny I'. Mil.arnlr who rnoai of the boys in the light racket agr* the most sensational i Garden ever saw. packi tiing eaob %  it %  lirHitillr Tennis TUB reoulti of the t i amen) m x -. in.i :;i i H E P .,.!. %  ...i %  1 ] %  I Lawle s 6—4. 6—1. The gar will be! Mtss L I WAS. I khl> i at) \ A Otb Km and A O'N Sk, E p Taj r and ID I <; Manning vs. A. I Hi* E. Kinth %  peas n n %  one Ii uul II t'.ie Op|K were to e; .. probirni Oj t acute sc H. hum I UUS tha Tai :•. % %  1 utro< tini.:nii ri.iir of tlifni Now Parsncr tells me the. u U i.hie thi •eason. bul will keep In practk f r ihr Olymplea of 1952. whe •i* io itornpei losing lo the British pair in 1941 1*ie Danes, who won tinStewards fowl at Henley latl July, have split up. but anothci %  at them ai I then won the KurouMi, Milan, ari to come hcie this summer. Fitiatlflaf I'rnhleills For many yean II haa been i great hope m Denmark tor ih> Orand Cnauat i I anas alone has proven to ( i thi-. the Danea havi :he aam tin.iTii i il problems I s we' this year Parsncr minks one club will l>e able lo enter, and will be properlj due i i Danish rowing which, judging by U < %  B u nsn e en Champlonshlp r ts iccunci only :> the Italians. The Danes have Lren invited to Finland to lr the Olympic course Lefore the Olympic Regatta, ani English crews are being Invited to Copenhagen In the middle July. 19r 2. Here they are cheap accommodation near UM lake on which the Danish meeting takes place. This l-.vitatio l might interest our (Tympic Beta I II expected that England crews will be selected in 1052 before Henley. and will not take part in The itl continental experience .night ihcivtoie be an advantage. Another challenger tor the Diamonds has emerged in Canada in Jack Guest, junior whose rathe won m i30. As he is as yet only 17 thai-rival may indelaye-.l until 1K32. hut at ihc Canadian H ley ha 1 uat won two evert* i i na d iy, the High Bebooi ihnmpionship. over a mile, i.i trhtah inbroke rejcead, and on rant i Ver 440 yards. —L E S. What's on Today Mr FeU lie Kuh s Fxhili! tlons ol oil palntinai. and penefl sketches at the "Pavilion'—9 te a.m. ( ouils ol Apiieal—10 • a nv t-auit of Ordln;.->—1I3 %  all ol Cave and Roach* Plantation at Hie alllre. ol Meson Year wood and Hoyre. James S'.eet—200 p.m. i imof id.i %  !> % %  Field at Draroi.s Road llouslint Area—5 H pm Mobile Cinema give* show at Chance Hall IManUtlon Yard. St. Luey—1 30 pm nilfl Rand plays al lUsl Inis Rock'—HMO pm Monthly Reunion at Comhermrre Schoal— K U p.m Film Show -I British Council—8 30 p m (Ik** A HOT i....' . M.i,, A "Marshal ol Mm Cave Shepherd & Co., Lid. 10. II. 12 & Ii Broad Slreel BrtdfetMrn HlBfl Aquutu: 01 ChBI" LltMSW* S30 rrylHHl* IMw •30 The Weather TODAY Sun aUBOBi B IB am Sun Sels: 6 00 p.m. Moan (New) Februar* 6. I u: IH ui'. .'ai n tn Hllh Water: 1 \ a.m; U 11 YESTERDAY Rainfall iCtuVingtonl .08 Teniperalure 'max ) HO 5 rempcratuic imtn.) 73 5 Wind Direction: (9 am) F VF; (3 p.m.) E Wind Veloell>: 19 miles pe hour Baremeti." II am) 30.023: (2 im) 29.932 M. %  : Yoi %  Very body! arc invited to attend A GRAND DAMT. Mr DAVID HARROW (better known as UEKGUE) — at — QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE — on — Saturday Sight 3rd Feb. 1951 ADMISSION — 2'E I Mr V B Brn.ne O.K Tileboard They'll Do It Every Time • ,s/l' \ —— By Jimmy ll.itlu ?%$h PAPP6R MISHT AS WEL'_ QO OUT OC BJS'NESSIT TDCK yEARS Fty*. MiVl TO ACCUMULATE WAT PLAS-J^ PlL'Nfl SYSTZtS_M MOT AS SORRy FOR DAP AS 1 AM FOR 1MB WOR &Xi ZS fcO ARE ON NG A1VAV, V/ATlNQ FOR KM TO CALL" f % %  '..Z-i S0MGf 9V3 CEAM 0=r | V "n-E TOP OF HIS / OES<.'.'A'.'aE ; WE'O ;GTDNE oscassGET READY FOtt THK CHICHIKT I TOURNAMENT Let us fit you now with a FINE TROPICAL SUIT BLAZER AND FLANNEL PANTS e P.C.S. IUFFF.I & CO. LTD. j Tcp Scorfltt in Tailoring" J I \ Brraac M'tc Stocks of... \ Unitex Insulating Wallboard TERMITE-PROOF. itvt. thick 4 ft. wide by 8ft 9 ft; 10 H: I? ft. long Standard Hardboard „ |na. thick: 4 ft. x 6ft: 8 ft. 10 ft. 3/16 ins. thick 4 ft. x 8 ft. Cream. White and Green 4 ft. x 6 ft and 4 ft. x 8 fl. PHONE 4267. : WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Lid. THE RiDYAL STORE Announces As from 1st February business will b removed to No. 12 HIGH STREET To mark the event we will open attractive new stocks and will be delighted to old friends new premises. welcome the in From INDIA. (MIS V KC.YPT Silk. rurhM. BrUAU'.rr, Jrwrl%. Llnni*. l\or\. 1>jk "IMHI S.IIIUI., t'rrnrh P.rfamr.. Barbados liailn. MI Parr silk. Elf., hr Kic. •HAM "BVO." KASHMt R| %  m """ a-tai M COMFORT. STYLE. DURABILITY. THESE ARE WHAT YOU SHOULD DEMAND OF GOOD CLOTHES. THESE ARE WHAT YOU GET IN CLOTHES MADE BY C. B. RICE & CO. OF BOLTON LANE i