Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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- :
ph av.

ESTABLISHED 1895



Truman And
Pleven Agree

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.

PRESIDENT TRUMAN and the French Premier, |

M. Pleven, in a joint statement today said that
the United States and France would never neglect
any genuine opportunity to settle international
problems by negotiation.

“Discussions between the President and the Prime
Minister have shown again that no menace or
manoeuvre will succeed in breaking our fundamen-
tal unity,’’ the statement said.

In Washington, in a 1,500 word communique issued seven
hours after their final meeting ended, the leaders announced

they had agreed that aggréssion must not be rewarded, or
the menace of aggression appeased.

Lady Astor
Protests | Bast in their efforts to maintain
their security and the assurance

: LONDON, |of their independence.
_ American-born Lady They agreed that every effort
Nancy Astor scornfully criti- must be exerted to bring about
cised claims by Britain’s [jan honourable solution in Korea.
Socialist Government that Both countries would support
more women than ever are action toward deterring aggres-
employed in industry. sion and preventing the spread of
Speaking at a meeting of || hostilities beyond Korea.
the National Society for the Truman promised Pleven that
pee = Ninna to American aid for French Union
c ee n, Lady stor said. }forces and the national armies of
ere children are con-
cerned I have no politics. ft
see the Government are
boasting about the number
of women in industry,



The Communique made the
following points,
; Far East—The President and

the Prime Minister were “in com-
plete agreement” as to the neces-
sity for resisting aggression and
|assisting free nations in the Far

China would be continued
increased quantities of
material would be expedited.

and
war





Progress On
Atom Weapons



the Associated States of Indo-|*%¢ preparations for more full

} active isotopes were produced at

“It is horrifying’ that Europe’s Importance —
women with children should _ 1. They recognised the vital!
be [in industry. If we are importance of Europe to the!

defence of the entire free world

2. The President and the
Prime Minister were “in fun-
damental agreement” that the
cause of peace in Europe
the world, would be furthered
by the progressively closer in-
tegration in every aspect
democratic Germany into
vigorous western
community .

3. Truman expressed
hope that thé Schuman

in a mess why don’t the men
work six days a week and
give shorter hours to
women?

“IT see this Welfare State
rocking. No Government
has talked more about wel-
fare for women and children,
and no Government has let
them down more.

“The former Minister of
Health, Aneurin Bevan, said
there would be a revolution
in this country unless more
houses were built.

“Well, there nas been no
revolution and there have
been very few houses,

|
But if the Tories had been

Plan
factory forra at the
possible moment.”

4. Truman also welcomed a
conference scheduled for Feb-
ruary 6 in Paris to consider the
formation of a European army
expressing his hope for its
success. He accepted the invi-
tation to send an observer and

in power for five years and
no houses were built there
might have been a_revolu-
tion and Bevan would have
tried to make it,



Maxwell David Bruce
“I hope the: British have said L

not lost thats: Hamar, OF: bere pet ” Gereec. plans—The

testing, for protesting against ee a I re

what is’ wrong: made us ~ President and rime | Minister

great,”’—I.N.S. reaffirmed the r conviction that

SO ante: German participation in the com-

mon defence effort would

e 7 strengthen the security of Europe

without altering the purely

Canadian Bridge defensive character of the North



ion.
state—
had

Atlantic Treaty organ
Economic Problem

ent said the two leaders
THREE RIVERS, Quebec, Jan, 31. clarified procedures so that

Three erches of the Duplessis, American assistance would make
Bridge crashed into the St. Law- the most effective contribution to
rence River early today, carrying|the French defence effort.
at least two cars into the water. They agreed that the solution

Four of the injured people were!of raw material problems should
rescued by police, but others were | be the aim not only of na yal
feared to be drowned, ‘action but also of international

The collapse tore down fele-| action, undertaken with the
phone lines. utmost speed and vigour.

Three people were admitted to} They recognised the

Falls Into River







import-



hospital. —Reuter. [ance of dealing with inflation and
rising prices and agreed thai
national and interna-

tenet

® i: . tional measures be taken.
A Drink For Stalin : The, President and the Prime
Minister said they had touched
NCTTINGHAM, |on all questions of common in-
Dr. A. C. Wood, history lecturer |terests to the’'r countries and had
at Nottingham University, believes | found once again, that there was
he has found a way that might/a fundamental identity of views
halt the Soviet cold war against] between them.
the Western. powers. They reaffirmed their belief
Wood thinks it would-be a g00d that the principle of collective
idea _to send Marshal Stalin al sqray:ty embodied in the United
barrel of English ale. He said | Nations Charter was the chief
that the Russian Emperor Peter | bulwark of world peace and of
and his wife Catherine, liked “this the independence of free society
sparkling beverage’. in the world.
“IT wonder if a barrel of ale Full Scale Alliances
delivered at the Kremlin ‘see aT eile) ednors
Wood, “might not do something a a0 vese

io assuage the cold war”. —INS. 3 =
FAMILY

that

PRINCESS ELIZABETH







eis:






ie oy

cw A 0 a F ;
“A NEW PICTURE released from Clarence Hous
beth, Prince Philip and their two children Prince Charles and Princess
Anne. Princess Elizabeth, recently returned from Malta, plans to
return there after the Mediterranean Fleet, in which her husband com-
gmands the 1,430 ton frigate Magpie, finishes its Spring cruise at the

end of March. Express,



of|

European}

the} began in 1946.

Treaty be concluded in a “‘satis-| United States institutions and 175



|
|

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.
America reported “continued
progress” on atom weapons today .





THURSDAY, F®BRUARY

LORD'S CAKE



WEDDING CAKE made for Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Walcott by Miss Viola De Gazon, a replica of the scene
at Lord’s when Clyde Walcott scored 168 not out in the Second West Indies—England Test Match.

TWENTY-ONE ESCAPE
THE GALLOWS

AMERICAN. AUTHORITIES today freed Alfred





Its Atomic Energy Commission ‘
restored his property. They

in
the

scale weapon tests continued
close co-ordination with
American armed forces.

The report disclosed that more
than 6,000 shipments of radio

Oakridge National laboratory.
These isotopes are of great value

in medical , biological and other

research and are also used for

ON THE
© SPOT

{ treating cancer and other diseases.
and! This

one of the
pre-war activities.

production is
Commission’s

| This year’s production amounted NEW YORK ;
to more than 40 per cent of the A group of Columbia Unis,
total of 15,000 shipments made versity under - graduates
since the isotope programme have proved that you don’t



; F They were being need « high schoo! educa-
used in 939 departments of 485 tion to get your college
MPEG ; degree. . é ;
earliest! institittions in 29 nations abroad. The university is just

The Commission reported new
supply sources for atomic ores
construction,” additional faciliites
at Oakridge and additional pluto-

winding up its first semester
with a special group of 51
“older” students who never
received high school diplo-

nium production facilities at mas: :
Hanford, Washington State. Columbia, | for the aoe
An experimental reactor for time in its 197-year-old his

tory, allowed the group to

testing the feasibility of creating enter

new nuclear fuel faster than it is last September and

work towards a bachelor of

consumed Was being completed
at a testing station at Idaho. arte carer:
—Reuter The average age of the
E group is 3l—with a few
es pushing 60 —- and the only
educational pre-requisite

was an aptitude exam.
University authorities, go-
ing on the theory you're
never too old to learn, say
they’re more than gratified
by the results of the experi-
ment.—I.N.S, .

Krupp, last owner of the giant arms firm from prison and

out of 28 other war criminals.

But the rest must die, it wag announced.

The original confiscation order made against Krupp who is

44, by the Nuremberg War€rimes Tribunal which in 1948

sentenced him to 12 years imprisonment, was revoked.
Saeenpemnettrobinascaotnnieninaiapbt sical aia

|



CHARLES COCHRAN

Cochrar Dies At 79

LONDON, Jan. 31.
Britain’s greatest showman, Sir
Charles B, Cochran, died here to-
day aged 79 after he was severely
scalded in his bath last week,
Sir Charles launched hundreds
of stars through his long career.
He promoted every type of en-




tertainment—roller skating, box-
ing, circu wrestling and
reviews, His shows became
famous fer his “young ladies”
selected by him personally. for
chorus,

In 1924 he became bankrupt.

He recovered, succeeded and re-
tired in 1934,

He came back when he was 74
years of age with the musical play
“Bless The Bride” and ‘halfway
through its two year run in 1948,
was knighted for his services to
the thé&tre.

Cochran ‘became Chevalier of
the French Legion of Honour in
1950 for his services in introduc-
ing French art to the English
stage.

He has produced 119 plays aid
revues in London, His publica-
tions incluc ‘The Secrets of a
Showman,”
gotten,” Jock-a-doodle—-do”
“A Showman J.ooks On’.

—Reuter,








and



U.S. Industry



| Reaches Peak

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.
American industrial production

| has reached its highest peak since

, the end of the war, the Govern-

ment disclosed here.

| The Federal Reserve Board esti-



Republicans Will
Try To Boycott
Red Countries

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31

The Republicans in the United
States House of Representatives
have decided they will try to bat
Russia, Communist China and
other iron curtain countries” from
benefits and tariff cuts the United
States may make as a result of
agreements with free nations,

At a party meeting they agreed
to support an amendment on that
line when the House votes to-
morrow on the Bill to extend the
Reciprocal Trade Law for three
more years,

In practice, cutting the duty on
imports from one nation means
a cut in duty on similar imports
from all countries, This is be-
cause America has so-called
“most favoured nation’ under-
standings with most of the world.
That is a promise that no other
nation will be favoured over the
country with which America has

such an undertaking, Repub-
licans want to rule out that
principle so far as iron curtain

countries are concerned, —Reuter,



Dewey Wanls

An Alliance
WITH SPAIN

ALBANY, New York, Jan, 31.
Governor Thomas Dewey indi-
cated that he vowed alliance with
Spain in a speech here last night.
The Gcvernor said: “When my
country is in danger I want

“! Had Almost For- | #llies. I will take Spain, I will

tuke Tito, [ will take Turks, and
I will take Chiang Kai Shek who
stood with us during the last
war.”

The twice defeated Republican
vresidential candidate reiterated
that the United States “should
not withdraw into our cowardly
shell,” —Reuter

MacArthur
Confident

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan, 31.
General MacArthur reported to



mated ihe nation’s output from|the United Nations today that it

factories and mines reached 1he|was within the capabilities of his

highest peak this month since|‘ oops “to continue to inflict stag-
{June, 1945 gering losses” upon Chinese Com-
The official index was 220 or 20|munist forces in Korea

} per cent. above the 1935-39 aver-| statement was made in one of his
wze and reflected a gain of one-|periodic reports to the United











j tenth since the outbreak of the|Nations Headquarters covering
| Korean war t June. jthe operations of the United Na-
\ The high index was 247 in|tions Command for the period
| October and November, 1943 December 1 to January 15

. —Reuter, |J8 oBs . —Reuter,

1, 1951

, J
» s
ane wee Patis

(as

a a

FRANKFURT, Jan. 31.
Von

reprieved from the gallows 21

“He is to be freed instantly and
his goods are to be returned to
hin.
American High Commissioner
John J. MeCloy announced 10 of
the reprieves from death sentences
—the men will stay in prison—
and General, Thomas T. Handy,



Commander - in - Chief of the on of a minimum of £10
United States forces in Europe Applicants must also sign an un-
@anounced the other 11. LAKE SUCCESS, Jan, 31 dertaking to repay the Canadian
The Security Council unan—| Government at the rate of not

i imously decided today to delete less than $10 (£8 6s. 8d) a month
eral years not knowing whether|the Korean question from its} Until the loan has been paid off, |
m ae on agenda Canaaa’s drive comes at a time
Cloy said the is decisions reas K anaga's | a ¢ bs at at »
which ae Rest ee eeeons, | Britain proposed the deletion.} when immigration . figures have
a “large measure” on the United The Soviet Union quickly been falling steadily, From 1946
State. “Advisory Board for War| ®8reed and all eleven members} when Canada admitted over
Criminals. ’ “held up their hands when the{§0,000 British migrants, the figure
In the case of Alfred Krupp| President called for the vote, dropped to just under 7,000 in the

MeCloy said: “Even those guilty| Antonio Quevedo of Ecuador,}first six months of last yenr.

of personal participation in . the

here
the Nevada
be withhela
finding out about them
Dean used the term ;
bomb” in referring to the blasts,







CENTS

PRICE: FIVE





United Nations ‘Troops

r a ‘
Nevada Atom
e
Tests Will
Be Secret
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31
Gordon Dean, Chairman of the
Atomic Energy Commission said
that all information about

test explosions will
to stop Russians

“atomic

two of which were set off lasi
week-end, but later said that was
not exactly what he meant.

“They are essentially experi-
mental nuclear detonations” he
told a news conference adding
that this description was cumber-
some but necessary
correct idea.

There has been speculation that
the Nevada blasts are small scale
atomic explosions. which may
find military application in such
weapons as guided missiles,

Dean said the Commission
would not comment on any such
speculation,

to give the

MoveForwardIin Korea

TOKYO, Jan. 31.

UNITED NATIONS forces intensified their ad-

vance along the central and western fronts at
dawn today. Troops sweeping forward on the cen-
tral front had so far met no resistance.
Vicious hand-to-hand fighting and artillery duels
kept the advance along the 40-mile western front
at a steady rate as troops struck the main Commu-
nist lines of resistance north of Suwon.



7 | United Nations naval guns, rock
Cc «‘ ets and planes battered North
aha a Korean communications centres

for the second day running.
Target for today’s pounding by
Asks For the American Naval Task Foree
KR was the town of Kosong, import-
ra ant road and rail centre on the
east coast 15 miles south of the

W orkers 38th parallel.

A force of warships and rocket
Ships led by the Missouri the
world’s largest battleship poured
rockets and shells on new
objectives Carrier based planes
flew overhead in a co-ordinated
assault.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan, 31
Canada to-morrow (February 1)
starts an all out drive to attract
more workers to her shores
Facilitating this drive is a new
assisted Passage Scheme whereby

its

Over on the west coast Allied

the | Canadian Government will artillery fire directed by flares
make advances to help persons thundered throughout the night
seeking igrate to Canada. Teas
eeking to migrate Canada into positions held by. tenacious

Loans to the value of approxi-

Communist troops

$ ; mately £60 (equivalent to 180
"e 33 ‘

Neither would it announce Canadian dollars) will be made Allied fighters -had« also - ised

future explosions in advance nor| ; ae ae f rarre ' ¢ ct b 5 Nag Bis is
7 in the form of a warrant*to a flares tc seek ‘ +e
2 a a Q “s3 ‘ . ares bro out » Communists

tell anything about them after-| pecogni: 2d transportatio Ormn- P|

; recognizec transportation “com= | «oie : : :

rorde o Claaions amid’ 5 Lun cee 1oled up” in caves throughout the
wards the Chairman said adding:| pany to cover ocean passage and hilly country northwest of Suasa
“We do not want Russian ob-j rail fares, Berths and meals in|" Panutane ik Tate oe Pri ba
servers, official or unofficial, at}/Canada of workers required in istics i aa lish Aloia se avtillery perrage
these tests. And we do not went; Canada’s expansion programme. wae bellaved to have scattore®
the nature of the tests or their) Among, trades, skills and occu- forces preparing for a countey

Success or lack of success known
to the Russians,’’—Reuter,



Korea Off U.N.
Council Agenda |

President, remarked “I am glad





pations the most urgently needed
are auto mechanics, bricklayers,
carpenters, draughtsmen, engin-
eers, foundry workers, pipe fitters,
painters, sheet metal workers,
textile workers and wood workers.
The suce ul applicants for

5 sage must be in the








Comparable immigration figures

Mm ost, crimes have not gufs}that at this meeting at last we cae

Reed § cation of their popes five achieved unanimity.” te oo ES: Sy ae
and I am disposed to feel that} Britain took this action because| °. Hut Cahads ie Hot sreparedta
confiscation in this Single case}the General Assembly — canriot go to the ‘aie entatha "a Aus-
constitutes discrimination against] make a recommendation on any] tralia i uest of new “settlers
this defendant unjustified by any rala in quest of new settlers

consideration attaching to him.

Property Contiscation
“General confiscation of pro-
perty is not a ‘sual element in our
judicial system
repugnant
of justice.”
He added,



and is generally

to American concepts

question being. dealt with by the
Security Council, The deletion
of the Korean question from the
Council’s agenda would allow the
Assembly to ratify the Resolution
passed by its Political Committee
last night condemning Communist
China as aggressor.

however, that the Sir Gladwyn Jebb, Britain
ag cl of the Krupp concern will told the . Council it might be
be subject to the Allied High] argued that the Council in fac
Commission’s Decartelisa.ion law] 184 as eects eee gee

on the reorganisation of German
coal, iron and steel industries.
The High Commissioner's state-
ment added: “Where sentences
have been substantially reduced,
it has been the result more of de-
tached responsibility and other
extenuating circumstances brought
out mainly since the trials.
(General Handy in his statement
affecting 13 war criminals under
his jurisdiction said he had com-
muted 11 death sentences to life

All the men are in z
Prison where they have spent

centration Camp, near Dachau,
who extracted gold teeth from the |
bodies of prisoners who had died
from beatings he personally ad-
ninistered, and Hans Schmidt,
Adjutant at Buchenwald Concen-
tration Camp for three years.
During Schmidt’s regime ‘about
500 prisoners died each month be-
cause of camp conditions and
cruelties inflicted on them by the

—Reuter.



India Refuses Seat
On U.N. Committee

NEW DELHI, Jan. 31,

India would not accept a seat
on the Good Offices Committee
envisaged in the United Nations’
esolution branding China as an
geressor in Korea, usually rel
liable sources here’ said today.

Reperts from Lake Success had
said that the General Assembiy
President, Nasrullah Entezam, was
anxious that India’s chief delegate
Sir Benegal Rau should serve 6n
the Committee,

Authoritative Indian quarters in
New Delhi described the Politica!
Committee's vote in favour of the
United States resolution as an
“unfortunate decision” impairing
the chances of a negotiated settle-
ment of the Korean war and other
Far astern problems. India voted
against the resolution—Reuter.

had not been exercising its fune
fion in respect to the Korean
issue because of the Soviet veto

The formal removal of the item
from the agenda would remove
any technical grounds he said, Sir
Gladwyn added that the thire
action in Britain's view would not
invalidate in any way action
already taken on Korea by the
Council, nor would it prevent the
Council from taking up the matter

imprisonment and’ upheld two|@8@in if it decided to do so by
death sentences. simple procedural vote,

These two were George Schal- Semyon Tharapkun of the
ferinail, guard at Muehldorf Con-j|Sceviet Union reiterated the

Russian argument that the Korean
question had only been put or
the Council’s agenda in an illegal
manner in any case. He woulc
vote therefore in favour of ite
deletion, After a unanimous
vote, the Council adjourned with
out fixing a date for its next meet
ing. —Reuter,

Eight Killed In
Belfast

BELFAST, Jan, 31,

At least eight men were killed
when a gangway leading fron ar
Argentine whaling factory ship
Suan Peron collapsed and hurle:
them on to the dockside and into
the water here today,

Seventy men were crowding
ashore at the end of the day’s
work when the gangway collapsed
hurling them 50 feet to the dock-
side, Others fell into the wate
eight bodies were later recovere:
end 20 men were taken to hospital
Juan Peron, 32,000 tons, is the
largest whale factory ship in the
world, She was drawn up to the
wharf in Belfast shipyards,

It was believed that more men
were killed. The ship was launchec
last April and was to have been
delivered soon to Compania Aren-
gina de Pesca, Buenos Aires,

: —Reuter,





EARTHQUAKE SHAKES

wy

THREE

LONDON Jan. 31.

Earth tremors were felt i:

three countries early today: Egypt, |
Pakistan and Israel, No

People
beds while

tumbled out of
windows rattled

their
and

The | the ground rumbled but no dam-/ the streets

| age was reported.

CITIES

| stronger each time, came at half
| hour intervals.



This scheme is open to any Euro-
peans, “But we have not made
available any free passages as the
Australian Government have
done” said Mr. L. G. Cumming,
Superintendent of Canadian Im-
migration Services at the Press
Conference in London to-day,
“We feel that free passages might

attack in the area Reuter,



Bustamante On
Five Charges

Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jan, 31,
Hon, W. A. Bustamante, Jamai-

ca’s Prime. Minister, has been

summoned on five counts to
appear before the Resident Mag-
strate’s Court on breaches of the
constabulary law on a_ similar
summons as that on which P.N,P’s.

(From

third Vice President Wills Isaacs
was recently bound over in the
sum of £1,000, Bustamante’s
trial has been set for Spanish

Town, February 9th,

The proseeutiow arines out of 9
speech Bustamante made at Wor
thy Park during the height of the
recent unrest on that estate and is
charged with actions to induce
disaffection in the discipline of
the police constables with offen
sive abuse to Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Skelton with the
use of offensive calumnious lan
guage and as a disturber of the
Peace on which the latter charged



Wills Isaacs, The Attorney Gen
eral’s office is acting on behalf of
the prosecution and Sustamante
is represented by D, B. Sangster
Minister of Social Welfare, Deputy
Leader of the. J.C.P. and
Solicitor,



attract undesirable people and
that we want to avoid.”



REALLY FRESH
KARACHI,

Fresh beef in Pakistan costs 12
ents per pound, The freshness is
protected by government law





TELL THE ADVOCATE











which demands the sale of meat THE NEWS
cn the day the cattle is slaugh- RING 3113
ered, ag DAY OR NIGHT
j ‘3

|

|

|

| NOTICE



Readers and Subscribers to the

“ ADVOCATE”

and

asked

Newspaper in Horse Hill

surrounding districts are

to note that we have appointed |

MR. S. A. DURANT our Dis-

| tributing Agent as from Sunday,
|

February 13th, 1951. |



Please contact Mr. Durant, Horse |



| Hill, St. Joseph, who will see
| after the delivery of your Daily

Paper.

damage was reported and
officials described the earthquake
jas “very mild”.

| Tel-Aviv: People who ran inte
here thought the city
g bombed.



| was be

| News came from Reuter Cor- In Jerusalem a tremor rattled
respondents in these cities:| windows and knoéked books off
Karachi—People rushed into the] shelves but no damage was ré
| Street here when three tremors | ported

shook the city The first was| Cairo: The tremor felt here was
(felt just after midnight, Others, | described as “slight’’. —Reuter.



ADVOCATE

|

ETT

Circulation Dept.

co., LTD.,

Dial 2823. |



_—





PAGE TWO





Carub Calling

LYDE WALCOTT, West Indies

4 and Spartan wicket-keeper
batsman, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Walcott of “Clarendon”
Black Rock was

te Miss Muriel Ashby,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs
Ashby of “Plumgrove”
Church,

The bride presented a beautiful
picture in a dress of white
embroidered organza with a yoke
of illusion net. The skirt was a
three-flounced skirt that ended in
a train.

Her head-dress was a Juliet cap
of seed pearls and she wore a
fingertip vei] of illusion net.

She carried a bouquet of white
roses with orchids intertwined
with seed pearls.

The Misses Barbara Ashby and
Pamela Ashby were the two
beautiful attendants of the bride.
‘They wore dresses of jonquil
yellow and blush lavender organza
respectively. They carried bou-
quets of violets and orchids, and
tiaras of flowers adorned their

ir.

Mr. Keith Walcott, intercolonial
cricketer and footballer, brother
of the bridegroom was bestman.
Messrs, “Derf” Odie, Clifford Skin-
ner, Frank and Cecil Clarke were
the ushers.

The
cfficiated.

The bridegroom's cake was one
of the most original seen in years.

It was made to represent the

cricket field at Lord’s where Clyde

Walcott made 168 not out in the

Second England-West Indies Test
at Lord’s last year.

The bride’s cake was in the
shape of two hearts pierced by a
Cupid’s bow.

These were the creation of Miss
V. De Gazon who won the first
prize in the Icing Division with
the ingenious copy of a hat at last
year’s Agricultural] Industrial
Exhibition.

The honeymoon is being spent
at Bathsheba. Mr. and Mrs.
Walcott leave for England next
month.

‘
Hunting Patterns
â„¢AEMBERS of the Barbados
Dramatic Club playing in

Has Been Arranged,”
stage at the Empire
Theatre towards the middle of
next month are busy hunting for
patterns of the dresses of notable
people in past history, such as
Mary Queen of Scots, Henry of
Navarre, and Katherine of Russia.
: The play, although modern and
in modern costume for the most
part, gives a flash back to the
fabulous days of Queen Elizabeth
and the Italian Nobility.

It’s.a long time since a costume
play has been performed locally
and I understand every detail is
b@ing studied even down to the
correct wigs.

Le Misanthrope
i ae monthly meeting of Le

Circle Francaise will take
place at the British Council head-

quarters, Wakefield, at 8.15
tonight. It is proposed to read
“Le... Misanthrope”, a by

play b:
Moliere, and those having copies
are asked to bring them along.
I understand that the last meet-
ing of the Circle was a great
Success, though a few of the mem-
bers were found furtively con-
versing in English.

En Route to England -

FTER spending six weeks’
i holiday in Grenada with their
uncle Mr, George Joseph, a mer-
chant of St. George’s, the Misses
Joy and Peggy Joseph returned to
England on Monday evening by
the French s,s. Colombie.

They flew over to Barbados
from Grenada by B.W.1A., to join
the boat and during their short
visit, were staying at the Hotei
Royal.

Summer Resort

R. H. BEVERLEY ROBINSON

who lives at St, Andrews-by—
the-Sea, a summer resort in New
Brunswick arrived by the T.C.A.
Special from Canada yesterday.
He is a Bond and Stock Broker,
and is here for a month's holiday.
It’s pretty cold in Canada now and
he prefers the summer resort of
the West Indies,

yesterday
married at James Street Church
eldest
Vere
Christ

Reverend Hugh Payne



MR. AND MRS, CLYDE WALCOTT
T.C.A. Pilot

R. and Mrs. Irving K. Davis
arrived on the T.C.A. ‘plane
yesterday from Canada, Here for

Family Re-union

RS. JOYCE McKENZIE, wife
of Mr, Ross McKenzie, T.C.A.,
engineer who is stationed here,

two weeks’ holiday they are stay- and their two daughters Heather

ing at the Hastings Hotel. Mr.
Davis is a T.C.A, pilot.

home is in Montreal.

Customs Official

RRIVING from Canada yes-
terday on the T.C.A, Special
Flight was Mr. Frank J. Quinn
who is Chief Appraiser of Customs
in Hamilton, Ontario. He is here
for about six weeks and is a guest
at the Hotel Royal,

Not Even Carnival

ISS CAROL MALEC who

was in Barbados in Decem-
ber 1949 for a week's holiday.
couldn’t resist the opportunity of
coming down again, Even the
knowledge of Carnival in Trini-
dad couldn’t tempt her to by-pass

Barbados. She arrived yesterday Ontario
by T.C.A. on their special flight. .

She hopes to be here for a week,
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.
Carol works with T.C.A.
Montreal.

For Carnival

R, and Mrs. Julian’ Atwell

and their son Michael left

for Trinidad on Tuesday afternoon

by B.W.I.A. to spend Carnival
in Trinidad,

Mr. Atwell is
Garage here.

To Study Law

with Dear’s

RRIVING in Barbados on
Wonday evening the

Colombie from Trinidad was Mrs.
E. Brassington of ihe Secretariat of
the Caribbean Commission, She is
Kingdom where
study law.

she hopes to



BY THE WAY...

E President of the Royal

Society, of which Iam a
founder member (in on_ the
ground floor through the influ-
ence of an aunt who invented fly-
paper overcoats for cows), has
complained that science has in-
vented so many queer languages

that scientists can no _ longer
understand one another.
Good! This will add to the

gaiety of nations, and encourage
the lighter-hearted among them
to babble without restraint. At
the Wanscote Experimental Sta-

tion they tell. the story of a
professor who said mulvicules,
when he meant bulvicules. The

interpreter translated the wrong
word, and a Portuguese colleague
found he had made a strong solu-
tion of oxohydrodimetholyxtrol
instead of chlorophosphocortobizo-
lene. As al! four words were
invented by Pulp of Leipzig, no-



_



bedy was any the worse; or
better.

the

Twenty Years of Uproar

. VOICE of great power”

writes a musical _ critic,
Never would he write, “A very
loud voice.” It is said that, when
singing Falerina in “Rinaldo,”
Rustiguzzi blew a small child out
of the front row of the stalls as
easily as you or I would blow out
a candle. And Angélique
Adénoide, taking the part of Mor-
gana inthe same opera, uttered
a shout (‘a cry,” says the musical
critic) which whisked the bow
out of the hand of the first fiddle
(‘violin” says the musical critic),
and made the conductor’s whis-
kers tremble like those of the
old sailor at Weymouth when the
impudent little boys ask him to
say “fifty-five.”

Their

and Gail arrived from Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. They will stay
for a few days at an hotel before
moving into their new home,
“Atlantic View”, Enterprise Road,
Christ Church,
Firet Visit

RS. E. SOPER of South Hull

P.Q., was met at Seawell
yesterday by her friend Mrs.
Irving who is also spending a
holiday in Barbados. Mrs, Soper
is down for a month and is staying
at the Marine Hotel. She came

in on the T.C.A. Special flight.
This is her first visit to Barbados.

Canadian Solicitor

R. JAMES M. FORGIE, a
Solicitor of Pembroke,
arrived from Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. to spend two
months in Barbados. He was ac-
companied by his wife and they
are staying at Sam Lord’s.

Was Here Last Year
RS, CLIVE SNYDER whose
home is in Kitchener, Ontario

arrived from Canada by the
T.C,A. Special yesterday. She
is here for a month’s holiday,
staying at the Abbeville Guest
House, then she plans to visit

Grenada and Tobago.
Mrs. Snyder was in Barbados

in March last year.
week

T.V. Dancer
N
1 television-viewers in England

‘Kaleidoseope’ last
saw for the third time West Indian

dancer Boscoe Holder and
usual sketch. “These are thd
days.”

by Beachcomber

Words of Comfort

SCIENTIST, wishing to re-

assure an anxious world,
uttered (without a smile) this
monumental sentence: “The
seale of atomic attack necessary
to destroy the whole surface of
the globe is much larger than
people realise.”

In Passing

“WHE report published by the
dealing with the island of
Helena recalled to my mind a
curious — fact. When Napoleon
was a schoolboy he kept a note-
book in which he jotted dowr
points from his studies. There
was an entry in the section de-
voted to geography: Ste Heléne,
petite ile... Those four words,
and no more,



Wise Buys—
BARGAINS today,
Prices will rise.

So don't delay

Flowered CRETONNE
at EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606

56" STRIPE
DOMESTIC 38¢

nets ee

LINENS dept. lines

Yd.
27" Print CRETONNE 64¢ Pillows 2°7
36" CHEESE CLOTH 42¢ Pillow-cases-
TICK

DIAL 4220

1.19
& 55¢

94¢ & 97¢

See

|
|
{
i
!
|
i
I
i
|
i
i
I
|
i

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Women
Don’t Give
A Hang

LONDON.
British males complained today
that British women were becoming

“ruder, more sarcastic and more

aggressive than ever before.”

The mild-mannered, slow-mov-
ing Englishman, who likes to
think he is lord of the manor, is
getting his dander up over the
“shocking” behaviour of Britain's
woman-in-the-street.

He is quick to admit that years
of queueing, austerity and strug-
gling to make ends meet is enough
to make any woman mad on
cecasions but considers it no ex-
cuse for venting the spleen con-
sistently as a matter of policy.

Said_ butcher Frank Bellamy:
“Woméh were rude and sarcastic
enough before the meat ration
sank to an all-time low recently
but now they seem to be delib-
erately rude whenever they can.
They jump queues, snap at each
other, and nearly take my head
off because I can’t provide the
cut they want. I just can’t sym-
pathize with them any more.”

Department store detective
Ralph Curry is thankful his shop's
January sales are over.

“Never have I seen such dis-
graceful scenes,” he claimed.’
“Why the women went wild,
pushing, shoving; grabbing and at
times what language! They
snatched hats out of each other's
hands, held tugs—of-war over

‘dresses and I separated more than

a few squabbling so-called ladies”.
Salesman Edward Poole charged
that men couldn’t walk the streets
cf London anymore’ without
cant assaulted by umbrellas,
high heels, shopping bags or big
parcels. ,
“Women don’t seem to give a
hang these-days. They just charge
along without looking what they
are doing or where they are going.
And the best you get after being
eracked over the shins with an
umbrella is a sharp ‘sorry’. Most
women don’t say a word but just
look daggers at you as if it is all
your fault”. ,
Said actor Rupert Kent: “Ladies
aren't ladies any more except, it
seems, on special occasions when
it suite their purpose. In every-
day life they appear to drop the
mask of feminine charm—and
women can be delightfully charm-
ing—and become rude, saucy, ill-
tempered females”’. 1

Judy Garland’s ©

Story

Hy Judy

Because of my photographic
memory, I was known on the lot
as a one-take girl—two at the most.
Nobody directed me very much; I
just went out there and did what
came naturally.

So I hadn’t reckoned on Vincente
Minnelli. We had met before,
but I had never seen him at work
er worked under him.

He made me do that first scene
in “Meet Me in St. Louis” twenty-
five times, I couldn’t believe my
ears. I was baffled and scared
cross-eyed. When I went to my
dressing room for lunch, I told my
maid something dreadful had hap-
pened between my last picture and
this one; I’d lost all my talent.

I cried all over my make-up,
and she almost had to push me
back on that set. But then on
the first try, it went off smooth
as cream.

Suddenly I knew
wanted all along. I saw that if
I was ever going to be any good,
I had to let go of myself and be
whatever character I was por-
traying.

Vincente drove the whole cast,
and in the end, I was more pleased
with “Meet Me In St. Louis
than with anything else I had
done up till that time.

I was to recetve still another
lesson in acting two or three years
after that when I went to see
“The Glass Menagerie” on Broad-
way. To be sure I’d have tickets,
I wrote ahead for them before !
left the coast.

When I got to New York and
picked up the tickets at the box
office, a little note from Laurette
Taylor, the play’s star, was
enelosed, asking me to visit back-
stage. I was touched and sur-
prised, because we'd never met,
and of course I went, my face still
streaked with tears after her ex-
quisite performance.

In general, visiting actors back~
stage is unsatisfactory. They re
tired and hungry, or there’s a

what he had

S. brawl, with too many people. But



B.B.C. Radio Programme

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1951
6.30-9.00 am, 19.36 M.
——————$__——_—_—__——

7 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m. News
pales, 7,15 a.m. From the Editorials,

a.m. Programme Parade, 7,30
a.m. Generally Speaking, 7.45 a.m.
Listeners’ Choice, @ a.m, Land and

Livestock, 8.30 a.m. Edward Lincoln,
845 am. Your Body and its Enemies,
9 am. The News, 9.10 a.m, Home News
from Britain, 9.15 a.m, Close Down, 11.15
am. Programme Parade, 11.30 a.m.
Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 a.m, Special
Dispatch, 12 (noon) the News, 12,10 p.m.
News Analysis, 12,15 p,m, Close Down.
5.006.080 25.53 M..



5 p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15
p.m. Scottish Magazine, 5.45 p.m. Pipes

Rupert and the
sh eaem NT

ta@nak
gy







Pressing on in the direction that
Rosalie has gone, Rupert reaches
another side road. ‘' Now | don't
know which way to go,”’ he mur-
murs. Then he brightens as he
spies a tall figure in the side road.
“That's another iceman," he
says. ‘' She would never go near

6.00—7.15 31.32 M & 48.43 M.



6.20 p.m. Light Orchestral Music,
645 p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m.
Tie News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis,
7.15 p.m. We see Britain.

TAG—-1L.00 SLae MM. & 48.43 M.
ee

8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m,
Sir John Macegill's Last Journey,
8.45 p.m, Composer of the Week,
9 p.m, Special Dispatch, 9.15 p.m.

Have a Go, 9.45 p.m, Do Your Remember,

“16 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. From the
Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Take it from Here
1045 p.m. Moray McClaren Talking,
Jl p.m. The Music of Sid Phillips and
lis Band.

Sketch Book—24




Tas \L\

him after what has happened. She
mustrhave kept straight on.”” And
in spite of the rain he runs ahead.
The road bends and gradually the
houses get fewer and the town
comes to an end, “ This is awfu!.
1 must ask someone to help,”” he
thinks.

YOU'VE NEVER SEEN ANYTHING LIKE IT ON THE
SCREEN BEFORE ... IT’S FASTER THAN SOUND!
now on her way to the United Desmond Walter-Ellis, doing their 71'S GOT EVERYTHING : THRILLS .. ADVENTURE .. ROMANCE!

OPENING TO-MORROW (Friday)

2.30 and









ACT



AGRICULTURAL FORKS
40 §Facn

THE BRARKADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY

ONLY

$4



COTTON

"RAYMOND MASSEY - RICHARD WHORE STUART HEISLER
Colonial, Ofice the other day Also the Short: “SO YOU WANT TO BE IN PICTURES”

Plus Latest “WORLD NEWS”
(Presented by Warner Pathe News)

PLAZA Theatre BRIDGETOWN Dial 2310

THEY'RE
MOVING FAST !!

A Small Shipment

6.30 p.m.

DORCEN PLAY BY LAA O'DAIEDN AND WNC ERT ~
SUOSESTED OF A SPORT EY 2 MOMOND Fara

QUICKLY !!

of





LTD.

Hardware and Lronmongery Department Telephone No. 2039

ee ef

l



As Told.To Michael Drury





Garland

Miss Taylor weleomed me as if
into a aening room. She. washed
her face and put on an old cotton
robe, and then talked to me fos
two ours. Ty ie

T sat with her, drinking in her
words, learning more about my
own profession from her, per
haps, than from all the rest of
my experiences, put together.

I can’t put into words what she
conveyed, but I came away feel-
ing as if my head were full of
stars and I could do anything.

Some moenhe ge L eens with

that she was dead.

—. day, years before “Meet
Me In St. Louis” and my visit
with Laurette Taylor, Mr, Mayer
called me into his office and told
me Mervyn Leroy was going to
produce“ “The Wizard of Oz” and
wanted me to play Dorothy.

It was my first big break. I got
a special Academy Award for that
film, and 1 wheeled my mother
into letting me wear long white
gloves to the reception, and a little
white-ermine cape I still have and
still wear,

Later, when Mickey Rooney and
I made “Babes In Arms”, I got my
first long dress, white and bout-
fant. .

Other girls get their first eve-
ning dress for proms; IT got mine
so I’d look right when I put my
feet in the wet cement at Grau-
man's Chinese Theatre.

People more astute than I have
tried to understand the relation-
ship between movie stars and fans.
An actress not only holds a cer-
tain job but in a sense she is thal
job; the fans like her and resent
her job, if that makes sense.

V’ll never forget the first time I
found myself in a mob of any size.
Mickey and I went to New York
for the opening of an Andy Hardy
film, and there were about five
thousand people in Grand Central
Station to meet us.

I was terrified, It’s one thing to
be part of a happy mob like that,
but it’s something else to be its
focal point. With the best inten-
tions in the world, such a mob
could kill you.

One of the most amazing things
about all the trouble I’ve haa
lately is that people no longer
want to paw me. People I see on
the street, total strangers, look at
me differently—as though they
realise almost with amazement
that I, tego, have feelings.

(To-morrow: Judy’s marriages;
she starts psychoanalytical treat-
ments in effort tr be better wile
and mother ),

CROSSWORD

i





Across
1 and 6 Down. Gad! Mere poe

is what we get from him. (3, 2,
bs 7. Intention, (7)
1. Swallowed in a date box. (3).
2. Oven, (4)
8. Somebody's son. (3)
4. Tatter from the barrage, (3)
5. Nymph. (5)
6. Te have done 11 you must. (4)
7, ¥ » (4)
{

. in a creche. (8)
. Time. (4)
. I sat to drink it,
. Letter symbol
R.A.C, car. (9)
Down

This will cover expenses, (6)
Hounds, of courses (4)
Obviously a ghost. (6)
One who should succeed, (4)
See 1 Across.
Sufficient rope for the artist, (7)
. Familiar inn, (3)

This blue ig heavenly, (3)
. Obtrusively loud. (7)
. Request. (4)

(4)
to show the

SSeenooeey

ee

19. You'll find this health “resort in

this part of Europe. (3).
20. It’s’ annoying, (4)
ah Expresses disgust,
& great canal, (3)
23. Courtesy tltle. (3)

Solution of vesterday’s puzzle.—Alross:



1, Ultra; 5 and wn. ramophone;
Â¥, Nudist: 10,G.P0.; 11. Gib; 12, Strap:
15 Dot; 17. 8. See 2 Dewn; 20)
Pourteen; 22, il; 25, Rosie; 25,
Slain; 26. Alb: 27 COhildlike. Down:
1 tnde: 2 and 18 cross,
Lugubrious; ib; 4, pace; 7, See S Across: 9, id; 15,
Teuton; 14. Rase id: 19. Roll:

: 16, Torrid:
0, Fish (Anaiessanagram of angel):

2
ral; 24 a,



that different brands of
Bay Rum come, and they
go, but - - -

BORNN'S
BAY RUM

will go on forever
WHY ?

QUALITY

That’s Why







Mellow
and distinctive flavour,

For Smoothness

There is no rum that com-

pares with . . oe
S&S
STUART & SAMPSON
LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.









| “SEALED VERDICT”





PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) |

| James Warren and
| BROTHERS in the SADDLE
























(3)
2. Childish thanks to this provides












S65 ¢« ~~

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1951







at 8.30

od, Florence Mar;

M

?
| AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

ohn Hoyt,






c John Ridgely








= F i Douglas, Linda Darnell
in “EVERYBODY DOES IT”
20th Century-Fox Picture

Last 2 SHOWS TODAY 445 & 8.30 p.m.

Mita

Arlene George Alan

DAHL O'BRIEN HALE in

“MY WILD IRISH ROSE”

MAT: FRIDAY 4.45 P.M. (Only)
“BELOW THE DEADLINE”
with Warren Douglas and

“LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT”

Johnny Mack Brown



Special Matinee TODAY at 1.30

p.m
“THE GUILTY” Don Castle &
“DYNAMITE
Tom

CANYON"
Keene



with



Opening FRED, 2.20 & $30 p.m. “CHAIN LIGHTNING”



———





PLAZA Theatre=0OI/STIN (DIAL 8404)

Last 2 Shows TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m FRID,, SAT. & SUN. 5 & 8.30 p.m.
RKO Radio presents The Biggest of the Bia Ones
Zane Grey's from Warner Bros.

“WANDERER OF THE “TASK FORCE”

WASTELAND"
Starring

Gary Cooper, Jane Wyatt, Wayne

with Tim HOLT Morris, Walter Brennan



(Monogtam Double)
“DYNAMITE CANYON”
Ken Maynard, Hoot Gibson Tom KEENE
eS
ee

MIDNITE SAT. FEB, 3rd

“DEATH VALLEY RANGERS” a











GAPETWY—(rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

Last Show TONITE 8.30 FRID., SAT., SUN. 8.30
Warner's Double MAT: SUN. 5 Be eis
Edw. G. Robinson in A MOSEANNA nec ."

« eCO
LARCENY ENC, Farley Granger, Joan Evans
and and George O’Brien in
“WINGS FOR THE EAGLE” MARSHAL OF MESA CITY
Dennis Morgan, Ann Sheridan It's Action all the way



MIDNITE SHOW SAT. 3rd
“BELOW the EADLINE”
Warren Douglas

~ Another Action Packed Wallop

“RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL”
Tom Keene

WIGS SSTSES PPP APPEL PLP LE LEA LEP PASy

: GLOBE

oats

x TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.30 LAST SHOWING

. “FLAMING FRONTIER”

WHOLE SERIAL

OPENING FRIDAY 2nd 5 & 8.30 ,
Judy GARLAND & Gene KELLY

os
5 SUMMER STOCK

Pius LOCAL TALENT at 8.30
SOG GOLDS SLEDS SSP SSP DPD PEALE

ROYAL
FLASH !

TO-DAY at 445 Only
The First ALL INDIAN FILM 'rO BE SHOWN IN BARBADOS



in

Tccsunssiepspseeslbepidenesesinta=ciaineahieciecaeniaaeacy



PRICES:— 60c, Pit, House, Balcony, Boxes



TO-NIGHT at 8.30 Only
Big Double .

Esther WILLIAMS and Peter LAWFORD in

“ON AN ISLAND WitH You’
AND
“TARZAN NEW YORK
ADVENTURE

Starring
Johnny WEISSMULLER and Maureen O’SULLAVAN

OLYMPIC

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15

M-G-M

EMPIRE

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30

20th Century Fox Presents

“TLLGET RY”

Color by Technicolor

Starring June HAVER
William LUNDIGAN
With Gloria De HAVEN
and Dennis DAY

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.15
Final Instalment
Columbia Serial
TEN GRANGER
Starring
Robert KELLARD
Peggy STEWART
with
Buzz HENRY &
Smith BALLEW

Universal Smashing Double

Barry FITZ GERALD in

“NAKED
CITY ”’

AND
**PIRATES OF
MONTEREY ”’
Starring

Rod CAMERON &
Maria MONTEZ








CUTLERY and
PLATED WARE

| Small Canteens of 6 Knives
Forks and Spoons



Stainless Steel Carver Sets
Sets of Spoons
Cake Forks








Cake Baskets ry





also
LARGE THERMOS
FLASKS

PLANTATIONS LTD.







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

Count Those
$ Bills With
“Electric Eye”

By ROBERT CLARK

WASHINGTON,

An economy-minded Treasury
has come up with a new twist ia
labour-saving devices—a machine
to count old dollar’bills,

Secretary Snyder has announced
the development of an “Electric
Eye” counter to thumb through
the five million torn and tattered
paper dollars. that have to be
retired daily,

The Treasury will install 25 ot
the machines to replace—at an
annual saving of $250,000—80 em-
oe who now do the job by

and,

The machines each count more
than 500 dollars a minute, eight
times as fast as the average em-
ployee. And they don’t mind the
smell, either.

The Electric Eyes will take over
the job of checking the silver
certificates that come into the
Treasury for redemption after
banks decide they’ve outlived their
usefulness. Federal Reserve Banks
bind the old bills in bundles of
100 and cut them in half, but the
Treasury rechecks the count just
té make sure,

The new machines, developed by
the Bureau of Standards, reject
packages that don’t contain exact-
ly 100 bills after counting them by
means of a light beam that actuates
a photo-electric system.

New money has been machine-
counted for years, but until now
no mechanical device had been
able to keep an accurate count of
bills that were wrinkled and dog-
eared,

The average life of a dollar ‘is
about nine months—and with more
than a billion in circulation just
oe the old ones is a big
Job,

Last year alone, 1,138,588,540
dollar bills were sent in for Te-
demption — nearly 25 million
pounds in all.

Coins, fortunately, have a much
longer life span. The average life
of the nearly one and a half billion
dollars worth of coins of all types
currently held by the public is 25
to 30 years.

Total currency and coins in cir-
eulation, in case you would like to
knew whether you've got your
share, is about 27 billion dollars—-
$180 for every man, woman and
child in the country.

—LN.S.

U.S. INCOME UP

WASHINGTON.

The government has reported
that U.S. national income hit an
all-time quarterly high in the first
three months after the start of the
Korean war.

Income for the period was reck-
oned by the Commerce Depart-
ment at the rate of 244 billion dol-
pr a yet The oS puuarterly

1g) ar a ee
monthe of 1548 ae at the rate
of 231 billion dollars a year.

Wages and salaries made up the
biggest part of the increase, which
was seven per cent higher than the
previous 1950 quarter. The re-
muneration for work alone hit the
annual rate of 155 billion dollars.

Corporation profits also ad-
vaneed sharply amounting to 11
and one-half billion dollars be-
fore taxes for the quarter— a 25
percent increase over the previous
three months,



Profits after taxes were 6,4 bil-
lion dollars, a 1.2 billion dollar
increase over the previous quar-
ter despite the new excess profits
tax which was made retroactive
to July 1.

The government pointed out
that profits grew faster than
sales during the period, with an
inerease in the profits-sale ratio
from nine te 9.8 per cent.

Profits increased most sharply—
nearly 40 per cent—on non-durable
goods, where heavy demand re-
sulted in “relatively large” price
increases, i

—LN.S,

Anti-Red Policy
Change Considered

WASHINGTON, Jan, 31.

American officials are giving
serious consideration to a change
of policy that would involve assist-
ing Anti-Communist guerillas on
the Chinese mainland, usually
reliable sources said here today.

This would be one means of
diverting Communist strength
which might otherwise be em-
ployed against Korea or Indo-
China these officials believe,

Three questions have to be
answered before any final decision
can be reached it was said,
These were: —

How effective and determined
are the guerilla forces?

Would ams and equipment
furnished to them not be allowed
to fall into enemy hands ? Officials
at present see two primary
military requ’rements regarding
China. One is to continue to
strenghten, Formosa’s defences
against the day when Chinese
Communists try to carry out their
threat to conquer the island. The
other is to use any reasonable
means to divert Communist

oe —Reuter.





1, 1951

ne





aos =

OIN
a euE
ARMY —





Stikker May Form

New Government

THE HAGUE, Jan. 29.

Dr. D. Stikker, Foreign Minis-
ter in the Dutch Coalition Cabinet
which resigned last week, was
to-day sounding party leaders
seeking to form a new Govern-
ment.

Queen Juliana asked him
shortly before midnight last night
“to investigate the possibilities of
forming a new Cabinet” though
this was not a mandate to form
an Admistration. Observers expec -
ted Stikker would be able to
report to the Queen in a day or
two that he could form a worka-
ble Cabinet,

The old Government fell after
critics objected to compromise
proposals in the Dutch-Indonesian
tug-of-war for sovereignty over
western New Guinea,

—Reuter,

Grenade Thrown

Among Dancers

SINGAPORE, Jan. 29.

A hand grenade thrown into «
dance hall wounded British sol-
diers, the dance hostess and civil-
ians.

There were 25 casualties.

The incident occurred last night.
The grenade was lobbed into tie
centre of the dance floor soon afte,
the music started for a waltz.

One British soldier and an Erro-
sian woman were reported to b2
in a serious condition,





Russia Fights "Flu

LONDON, Jan. 29.

Soviet Health organisations are
taking special measures to fight the
influenza epidemic in Russia, Mos-
cow radio said today.

In a broadcast appeal to home
listeners to take precautions a
senior doctor said they were ex-
perimenting with new vaccines.
He warned people against shaking
hands, kissing children and allow-
ing them to ride in buses, tubes
or trains except in emergencies.

’Flu suspects should call a doctor
rather than visit clinics he said,
Children in nurseries suspected of
having influenza were being
promptly isolated.

Describing sulphur drugs as
dangerous, he said, “the body gets
used to them only too easily and
they therefore prove useless as
the patient develops pneumonia.”

—Reuter,

REDS CAN BE STOPPED
Dean Rusk

WASHINGTON.

Dean Rusk, Assistant Secretary
of State said here that American
troops were staying in Korea iv
show that Communist aggression
could be stopped.

Rusk in charge of Far Eastern
affairs said on a television pro-
gramme: “We cannot afford to
leave Red China and its neigh-
bours under the impression that
the forces of Peking are irresisi-
able and that Red China’s neigh-
bours must now come to terms
with the Communists at the cost
of their freedom.

Rusk said that United States
ability to meet the world-wide
threat of Communism was im-
proving steadily. ;

—Reuter.



CHARLES MeENEARNEY & CO. LTD.

Farmers See
Mobile Farm

A mobile exhibit is showing the
latest developments in farm and
home research to farmers of a
large agricultural area in the Uni-
ted States. The “Family Farming”
exhibit, as it is called, is being
displayed in 39 counties (districts)
in the State of South Dakota,

The display shows 11 important
phases of farm and farm-home
activity The Daily Argus-Leader
of Sioux Falls, in the State of
South Dakota, reports. These in-
elude soil improvement, proper
feeding of chickens, production
of better milk, and landscaping
and improving the farm home.
Models, charts, bulletins, and dis-
plays help illustrate discussions
that are led by local agriculture
experts,

The exhibit was constructed by
farm, civic, and commercial
groups interested in promoting
more stable and prosperous farm-
ing in their communities. No ad-
mission is charged, and in some
communities free eoffee and
doughnuts are served by local
groups. A similar display in 1949
was seen by 18,000 persons in 26
communities,

In All Forms

The increasing use of various
forms of fertilizers on United
States farms has caused fertilizer
equipment to become the most
diversified of any type of farm
machinery. This is reported by
the United States Department of
Agriculture.

Fertilizer equipment
from small,



ranges
hand-operated de-
viees to tractor units, self-
unloading trucks, and aircraft
with spreading attachments. The
equipment applies fertilizers in
the form of igases, liquids, ecrys-
tals, granules, and finely divided
particles.

Fertilizer machinery is often
used in conjunction with other
implements designed to do other
farm jobs. It can be used with
interchangeable parts that plant,
seed, drill, and cultivate. Some
machines apply fertilizer while
they plow, plant, and drill vege-
table seed.

One device not only spreads
fertilizers, but also places it in
bands at different depths and
spacings in either tilled or pasture
land. It also can place fertilizer
as a side dressing along crop rows
of all normal spacings. With a
seeder added, the machine can
open the furrow, drill grass or
grain seed, and apply the fer.
tilizer,



SHIP DRIFTING

MADRID, Jan. 29
‘The two halves of the 9,720 ton
Panamanian tanker, Janko which
broke in heavy seas yesterday near
Cape Finisterre, Northwestern
Spain were to-day seen drifting
south with sailors still aboard,
aecording to a report from La
Coruna, Nine men were in the
aft section and seven in the fore-
part. Various ships were stand-
ing by. Yesterday two ships took
off 23 sailors.
—Reuter.

Wa rs A MAN'S |
FE /

I guarantee my pills, gentlemen, to make you very, very ill for your medicals.”

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ndon Express Service

MOTH-PROOF

New methods of protecting
woollen goods, synthetic textiles,
and other materials from moths
are being developed by scientists
of the United States Department
of Agriculture. This work is being
done in laboratories in Savannah,
in the State of Georgia, that are
specially equipped to test the
efforts of many kinds of insects
on the fabrics,

The moth-proofing research has
been going on for the past three
years. In their experiments the
scientists have used 5,000 yards
of woollen goods and 1,200 pairs
of army trousers,

The material was sprayed or
impregnated with chemical solu-
tions and then stacked in storage
rooms with thousands of insects,
In some cases the rooms were
also sprayed with the chemicals.
The most effective solution was a
mixture of DDT and chlordane,

After a year of testing, the
scientists found that most of the
woollen goods were not damaged.
The material was then used in the
manufacture of uniforms. The
uniforms were hung in sealea
closets and exposed to insects for
two years. When inspected they
showed no signs of damage.

The laboratory plant includes
testing rooms, a laundry unit, stor-
age facilities, machines for making
special equipment, and a room
where 1,000,000 common pests and
insects are reared under special
room temperature and humidity.
The laboratory has its own elec-
trically operated laundry unit
which is used to determine how
many washings the moth-proofed
material can withstand without
losing its special characteristics,

The scientists also use the labor-
atory in developing ways to pro-
tect flour bags and other food
packages from insects while keep-
ing their contents nonpoisonous
for human use. In addition, they
are developing a technique for
protecting naval gun-cleaning
brushes from damage by carpet

beetles, and a means of making
synthetic fibres made of peanut,
corn, and soyabean oils resistent to
insects,







e

when you use Rinso. Its rich

out, leaving whites so much
whiter, and coloureds so much
brighter, For better, easier
washing, always use thorough,
gentle Rinso.

RINSO for all
your wash!

X-R 24..-600-E6



RINSO washes\
WHITER—

PAGE THREE














U.S.A. Produces
More Petroleum

World output of petroleum is
now about i0.200,000 barrels a
day. The United States produces
more than half of this, or about
5,900,000 barrels, the New York
Herald Tribune reports on the
basis of a survey of petroleum
production in the free world com—
pared to that of the Soviet Union
and its satellite countries.

“On the basis of the latest
available figures,” the newspaper
says, “Russian and Eastern Euro-
pean production of crude petro-
leum is about 885,000 barrels a
day.” U.S. figures are estimates
made by the American Petroleum

VAKER OATS

ut belt

bargain!




THE MODERN
Dress Shoppe



}

water: Add sale;
When boiling;

Institute, a private trade organi- add 2 cup of
zation. eaer ae BRO
CS tis
The superiority “enjoyed by the ring, f i ou ( AD STREET)
United States and friendly coun— minutes) t's *

tries sharing ‘the responsibility ally *
for maintaining peace is not
merely the advantage of greater
supplies,” the Tribune says. It
comprises the ability to produce
in quantity specialized products
and to maintain peak operations
for required expansion in other
major industries.” It means alsc
the ability to insure “the delivery
of all kinds of products when anc
where needed.”’

The present record U.S, pro-
duction is the result of an unpre-
cedenteg growth during the past
five years. Petroleum companies :
have “worked diligently to mod- Corner
ernize and expand, and to increase
raw material reserves in order to i
insure eapacity to serve an ex-
panding economy,” the Tribune
states. “During these and previous
years efforts have been unremit-
ting to improve the quality of
products and to develop new
products, uses, and processes,”

Domestic capacity to produce
crude petroleum has been in-
creased by 35 per cent, while
refining capacity has been ex-
panded by 25 to 30 per cent. In









‘MORE CARBOHYORATES
‘Moke VITAMINS (8, & B,).... turn food inte “body-fuel’*





Beware this S-bend. It can
cause offence if not kept
scrupulously clean, Sprinkle non
in some ‘ Harpic,’ leave as long-as-possible—then fash.
‘Harpic’s’ thorough action will clean, disinfect and deodosise

SPECIAL
OFFERS In
LADIES’







addition, large systems of pipe] the whole pan even-where no brush can-reach. COTTON

lines have been laid, tanker D ia s

fleets. have been enlarged and ¥ RESSES

modernized, and consumer out-

lets expanded and improved. H A R Pi Sf} Po Washable Lovely Patterns
Despite the record U.S. pro- an $6.00 each

duction of petroleum, the Nation *

is not yet using its refineries to THE SPECIAL LAVATORY ChEBQICER LADIES

full capacity, says the Tribune.
It is estimateq that from 750,000
to 1,000,000 additional barrels
could be produced, if they are



African Cotton Prints
$3.98 each














needed, without damaging the
lifespan of the wells. LADIES"

7 ; TAILORED
A’ Real Swot || DON'T GET Sao

(By HOWARD BERRY)
LONDON.
FORTYFIVE-YEAR-OLD Sid-

In a Fine Assortment of
Colours $6.00 each

NERVOUS ABOUT

ney Richard Daly, chief sanitary KAYSER

inspector of Ilford, Essex County,

makes a hobby of winning aca- NYLON :

demic distinctions. sT OCKIN GS
His latest and seventeenth suc-

cess Was Winning a law examin- 51 Gauge 15 Denier

ation which qualified him to $2.14 per pr.

practise as an attorney if he

wishes.

Claiming to have a photographie
memory and never to forget,
Daly studies at night and week-
ends. For years he has been
getting through at least one 700
page text book weekly and he
never takes a note,

Daly has become a B.Sc., has
won three Liverpool University
diplomas in hygiene, a London
University diploma in Public Ad-
ministration, and a number of
awards in town-planning, real
estate management and meat
trade technique.

“Some people think I am crazy
to go on collecting degrees at my
age,” said Daly, “but I prefer to
learn rather than lumber up my
mind with books that are not
really entertaining.”

Daly studies with Bach or Beet-
hoven playing on the radio, “I
find I need good classical music,”
he said. “I swot better with
the radio on.”

Now Daly is toying with the
idea of studying for a B.A. degree
in French and Norwegian,

But there is at least two blind
spots in Daly’s remarkable powers
of memory. He forgets names.
“T often have to apologize to peo~
ple for that.” he said. And his
16-year-old daughter, Olga, said
“Daddy often forgets my pocket-
money.” .



KEEP FIT ON

BOVRIL

YEAR BOOK 1951

The Advocate Co Ltd: will publish a Year Book of Barbados
in 1951.

THE MODERN
Dress Shoppe

BROAD STREET







































The Year Book will contain three parts:—

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know about
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.

—LN:S.



(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
etc.

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr, George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr, Trevor Gale.
Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies.
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisca-
tions immediately or not later than April 15th 1951.

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951. :
Advertisers are asked to get in touch with

Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager,
Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no éne interested in Barbados can afford to be
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)

eS SSS SSS





. PAGE FOUR



IRBAD ADVOGATE

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd,, Broad St., Bridgetown.



Thursday, February, 1, 1951

FACING ISSUES

\ DURING the debate in the Legislative
Council on the bill to provide for the
Registration of voters Hon. Dr. Cato in a
maiden speech pointed out a_ situation
which will inevitably arise and which will

’ have to be remedied under the Represen-
tation of the People Act. He said that it
was not fair to retain a system under

which a few people in a district had the
right to elect a similar number of repre-
sentatives as a district with a large number
of voters.



| The question of proportional represen-
tation is one which must be considered in
view of the changes which will arise in

future. The passing of the adult suffrage
bill has already given rise to many compli-
cated issues which come with the changing
of any electoral machinery.

It has already been suggested that the
representation in the House of Assembly
be changed by means of a re-allocation of
seats. It was then argued that if parishes
like St. Joseph and St. James had the right
to return two members to the General
Assembly, it was, only fair that parishes
like St. Michael and Christ Church should
be allowed a greater number.

The answer given to this was the sug-
gestion of single member constituencies.
By this means the parishes would be divid-
ed into wards each entitled to return one
member. If this had been carried out it
might have been possible to have ‘divided
the larger parishes into a greater number of
wards so that they would have returned
more members to the House than the
smaller parishes.

| Dr. Cato now comes to the point and re-
minds the Government that sooner or later
the issue will have to be faced and propor-
tional representation given.

‘ It may be that in the’next amendment
to the Representation of the People Act
provision could be made for an increase of
the membership of the House from 24 to
30 members so that the additional seats
could be allocated to those constituencies
with high population figures.

| Asan alternative it might be possible to
use the figures now being collected for
registration purposes, so that a specified
number of areas of 450 voters each could
be used as a unit for representation.

‘ Consideration should be given now to
the matter so that the issue can be faced
at the earliest opportunity.



WATER

| THE question of the necessity for one or
two rigs for the Waterworks Department
was raised by Hon. F. C. Hutson during
the debate in the Legislative Council on
a resolution to provide the necessary funds.
' In this island the matters affecting the
improvement of the water system have
been entrusted to a Board of which Mr.
Hutson is a member and: his point now
leaves the public wondering what the dis-
cussion is about.

While it is recognised that the detailed
expert engineering knowledge necessary
for dealing with the island’s water supply
cannot be expected from the average voler,
it is surprising that in an island where
water is the prime mover in agriculture
that the public knows so little about water
improvements intended.

‘!€an it be that too little use is made of
the public Press to disseminate knowledge
affecting agriculture?



Our Readers Say
A Possible



|

Moreover, in 1917-18
government renounced all Russian
privileges and investments abroad.
These investments, it is true, were
rather sparse and were confined to
the Near and Far East; Russian
banks in Iran and China oil
concessions, and indemnities were
sclemnly “returned” to the respec-
tive nations or cancelled. Lenin
and his party did not attempt to
nationalize these properties in
favour of the Soviet state and to
cperate them as external assets
in favour of “the first Socialist
state”. Later the Chinese East-
ern Railway became the first
exception to this rule, and for a
long time remained the only
important one.

The reversal wiich has taken
place in the last half-dozen years
has a Significance not lost on
leading people in Moscow. How
clearly they understand the
ehange is obvious from the fact
that silence and secrecy have
surrounded: Russia's new role as
2 capital’ investor, The Soviet
press never mentions it; the
MVT (the former NKVT) does not
mention it in Fereign Trade, its
periodical, whose editors and
writers without exception have
been required to study Lenin's
theory of imperialism: they
would not have passed their
examinations had they failed to
memorize the principle that pos-

session of productive forces
abroad means exploitation of
foreign labour and is the “most
important symptom of modern
imperialism.”

Along with its acquisition of

foreign material investments, the
Séviet Union has had to speed
up the creation of a new class
of colonial administrators, who
have been selected and given a
rapid preparation under the aus-
pices of the Party's Central Com-
mittee. The number of these
administrators is a secret, but it
is vast—far greater than, for in-
stance, that of the British colonial
service in its heyday. Little
Albania alone has had to invite
and maintain more than 3,000
Russian advisers and officials.
Throughout Eastern Europe, Ger-
many, and the Far East, more
than 100,000 are necessary to
organize #eneral staffs and check
on newly-created . armies, police
force, and mushrooming secret
police; to create planning com-
missions in the Soviet orbit; to
teach collectivization of agricul-
ture: to give directions for
nationalized foreign trade; to
operate numerous “mixed com-
panies” for the Soviet govern-
ment; to cope with the tasks of
occupation where occupation 15
still in force; and to perform a
multitude of other functions.

Russian advisers are a kind of
aristocracy, measured in terms of
the social standards of their own
country or of the country in which
they are stationed. Living abroad
js in itself a considerable privi-
jege. Although closely observed
by agents of the MGB (heir to the
GPU and NKVD), and often pro-
hibited contact with the local
population, they greatly enjoy
their role of “Soviet colonizers
in’ countries which to them are
the “West.” Their salaries are
higher than those of their, col-
leagues from among the “natives”;
often higher than those of minis-
ters. The Yugoslavs have dis-
closed, for example, the salaries
paid to Russian managers and
engineers: the Soviet manager 1n
charge of a_ bridge construction
job near Belgrade received 50,000
dinars a month; a Russian chief
engineer 45,000 dinars, and his
deputy 26,000; a director of sup-
plies received 25,000, a chief
mechanic 22,000, a department
chief 22,000. (A Yugoslav rninis-
ter’s salary was 12,000 dinars a
month.) In addition, the Russian
officials were given furnished
villas or flats with radio, tele-
phene, heat, and light; cars, serv-
ants, and a bonus of a month's
salary for each year's work. In
1948 Soviet advisers of the rank
of colonel or general were recely~
ing 31,000 to 40,000 dinars a month
from the Yugoslav government,
while a general in the Yugoslav
army received 9,000 to 11,000
dinars a month.

in only a few instances are sal-
aries paid out of the Soviet trea-
sury; usually the “fnviting” coun-
try or the “mixed company to
which they are assigned foots the
pill. The high salaries therefore
are no burden to Russia. | Despite
the Secrecy that is maintained, the
local population is aware of this

state of affairs. i
corporations

The industrial ore
have been the most striking form
of Soviet economic expansion

ince the war, but many other
methods, some trivial and old,
have algp been applied.

First, the practice of collecting
“war booty” has been extended to
embrace factories and ships as
well as food, cattle, rolling stock,

_— SF err
i a SRN



Russia‘’s

JAMES BRIDIE«. 6. 10. Mayor Lde7 ADSI

BARBADOS

By DAVID J. DALLIN

Contributing Editor of the New
Leader

— From —

THE YALE REVIEW

September 1950.

and raw materials. War booty
was taken not only in the coun-
tries of the enemy but also in
Poland and Yugoslavia; all “Ger-
man property” had to fall to
Russia, not to its small allies.
Removal of war booty, organized
by the NKVT in collaboration
with the army, necessitated long
lines of freight trains from all
occupied countries in Europe, and,
in the fall of 1945, from Korea
and Manchuria. No figures—not
even estimates —- have been pub-
lished of the total value of the
booty, but the Manchurian total
was estimated by an American
commission at over $800,000,000,

Second, the armies of occupa-
tion—an occupation now in its
year—are billeted and fed at tha
fifth and, in some places, its sixth
cost of the occupied country.

The third method of economic
expansion has been the collection
of reparations—which, from four
nations, have aggregated $900,-
000,000. Most of the reparations
treaties have provided for caleu-
lations to be made on the basis
of 1938 prices. Prices in the
meantime have almost doubled, so
that the $900,000,000 grew to a
considerably larger sum. In the
case of Rumania, for instance, it
was estimated that up to Septem-
ber, 1946, that country — which
was obliged to pay $300,000,000 in
reparations—had paid $17A4,000,-
000 for “restitutions,” $430,000,000
for ‘“confiscations,” $300,000,000
for the maintenance of Soviet
troops, and $105,000,000 as the
first instalments of the reparations
bill. General Nicholas Radescu,
former Rumanian premier, has
stated that up to July, 1948, Ru-
mania had paid to the, Soviet
Union $1,785,000,000. A German
memorandum published in July,
1950, estimates that reparation
payments have amounted to sixty
billion dollars; this may be ex-
aggerated, however.

Fourth, new crade agreements
between Russia and the satellites
have usually been based on the
American dollar as the stable cur-
rency. The process of translating
the inflated currencies into dollars
provides wide opportunities for
“combinations” and sleight of
hand. In Hungary, for instance,
the dollar is valued sometimes at
11.60 filler and sometimes at 25.00,
depending on which amount hap-
pens to be more advantageous,

Fifth, the MVT has sometimes
bought products from the satel-
lites at a low price and resold
tiem to another country at a large
profit; in this way Moscow sold
German fertilizers to Finland and
Polish coal to Sweden. Rumanian
oil was delivered to the other
satellites through an arrangement
with the MVT in Moscow. The
most striking instance of such

‘trade practices was the sale to

Czechoslovakia of Bulgarian zine
concentrate; Bulgaria tried to ne-
gotiate the sale herself, offering a
price of $144 a ton; Moscow step-
ped in and undersold Bulgaria in
zine concentrates bought from
Bulgaria at a low price. Such
transactions obviously yield a
large profit to the middleman.

Sixth, new trade agreements
have been included, and a few
details have become available to
illuminate their nature. Prices
agreed to have. often been
favourable to the Soviet side and
unfavourable to the satellite. Po-
land, for example, has been sell-
iig coal to Russia and buying cot-
ton from her; in these transactions
the price of coal has been lower
and the price of cotton higher
than on the world markets. In
1948, when the world price of coal
was between $14 and $20 a ton,
Poland sold 600,000 tons of coal
to the Soviet Union for $1.20 a
ton, thus making the Soviet net
gain in this one transaction about
$10,000,000. Bulgarian rose oil
has been resold by Moscow at a
1,000 per cent. profit, Rumanian
aviation oll has been delivered to
Russia at a price of seven cents a
gallon; for mediocre Soviet Zis
trucks Rurnania has paid $2,900
each, In Manchuria and China
it was noticed that in exchange
for scores of trainloads of soy-
beans, vig bristles, tin, and tung-
sten, only a few Soviet automo-
biles and modest cargoes of wine
and chocolate appeared in Peking
and Tientsin,

Seventh, interest on Soviet
loans has often been higher than
the rate considered normal be-
tween governments. For the loan
to Czechoslovakia, for instance,
3,5 percent was charged, whereas
the Export-Import Bank rate was
2.5 percent,





ADVOCATE

New Empire 35



The eighth type of economic
expansion—the newest chapter in
this history—was manifest in the
Soviet request that Bulgaria pay
for the Comintern’s “help” during
three decades. Moscow has de
manded $10,000,000 as repayment
for financial assistance to the
Bulgarian’ Communist party and
for assistance to its leaders during
their stay in Russia; having
achieved its goal, state power, the
Bulgarian Communist party must
pay its debt. No documents
have been published to disclose
how the sum of $10,000,000 has
been arrived at for Bulgaria. If
the other European satellites, in-
cluding Germany, pay on the
same basis, their Comintern debts
tc. Russia may make a sizable total.
In addition, the new Far Eastern
satellites will be presented with
similar bills. Vistas are opening.

Russia’s economic recovery
since the end of the war has been
considerable. When the Soviet
government claims that its
economy has approximately
reached its prewar level, it is
making no empty. boast. Living
conditions have also improved
since 1945, That this could
happen while three million men
are kept in the army and a large
part of Russian industry is stlii
busy with military production has
been due to these eight methods
of obtaining foreign assistance (in
addition to UNRRA and Lend-
lease) which were put into opera—
tion during the early postwar
period. The total value of
“political” imports into Russia
may have reached $30 billion; a
great part of these consisted of
consumer goods, of which the city
of Moscow received the largest
share. This is why Moscow, the
dressed window of the great store,
sometimes gives the impression
that the Soviet has almost attained
economic normality. For the very
poor land of Russia $30 billion of
“free” imports within a period of

a few years means a great deal.
Some of these _ ingenious
methods of acquiring foreign

wealth—namely, pure war booty
and grabbing by force—will have
to be relinquished soon, Repara-
tions payments will end, too.
What will remain are, first, Soviet
vested interests in other countries
est capital Sum ‘the value of
which cannot even” be estimated;
second, Moscow’s role as a com-
mercial center—as a broker be-
tween East and West; and third,
the ability to exert pressure to
raise prices on its products and
to lower the prices on its pur-
chases.

If imperialism is really what
Lenin defined it to be—if its main
traits are interests abroad, capital
investments, profits on a large
scale, and political control of
foreign nations to secure their
economic exploitation — then the
newest pattern of Soviet relation-
ship with the nations of its orbit
clearly falls within this definition
But the process of “partition of
the world” among the other
powers has been reversed in the
forty years since _ this theory
emerged. While Western im-
perialism has relinquished more
than three-quarters of its terri-
tory, the Soviet state has grown
vastly to become the mainstay of
expanding imperialism—ip Lenin’s
sense.

The basic difference between
Western and Eastern imperialism
has been the methods employed in
economic empire-building. In the
West they consisted in a steadily
growing export of goods and in
investments; capital abroad was
accumulated in the course of years
and decades. The Soviet govern-
ment, on the other hand, has not
been busy with foreign investment
of its capital; what it acquired
from abroad was seized in one
historic moment as a part of
victory in a war. What economic
activity accomplished for the West
was achieved by Moscow through
sheer military force and political
power,

History has seen many different
types of empires and different
methods of empire-building, Re-
cently we have seen a Japanese
imperial system, quite different
from the German-Nazi type; both
of them differed from the British
imperial structure. The Soviet
empire is a real empire, one in
the row of great supernational
buildings. It, too, has its special
traits; it uses its own methods
both in the political and in the
economic field. The political
methods of its empire-building
have not been entirely successful,
but its methods of economic im-
perialism have worked better and
have been a key factor in the post-
war strengthening of the Soviet

Union,
END, =







































Bernard Shaw died of course ““Daphne Laureola” manship has become the leading
To The Editor, The Advocate, paar ig Wes ‘James Bridie” | roused controversy among the “repertory” theatre in Britain. To
Sr seem Gent ine OPDOE- who took his place as the most dis- critics when it appeared in 1949. this he gave unstinted time,

tunity to make a suggestion with
regard to the forthcoming Inter-
colonial cricket tournament.

Judging from the number of
bowlers invited to practice, one
immediately realises that the
selectors have grown conscious of
the dreadful dearth of bowling
talent in the island. The two
completed practice matches have
shown most of the bowlers to be
equally innocuous, Our slow bowl-
ing department is undoubtedly
very weak for Hoad, the best of
the lot, is indeed a problem.

An Empire team is presently
touring Grenada and with it is A.
Holder a slow left arm spinner—
one who really spins the ball—
who is spreading havoc amongst
the Grenada batsmen, Having
joined Empire only recently,
Holder has not had the opportun-
ity of playing for the Bank Hall
team but the mere fact that he
has been selected on performance
in the nets alone speaks well for
his bowling ability.

As C. Hunte has turned out to
be our most recent batting find,
so it is possible that Holder could
be the answer to our headaches
for a spin bowler. In the interest
of the game it would be a good
idea if some provision be made
so that he could be included in
the next trial match and given an
cpportunity to prove his wortn,

SPECTATOR.

30.1.51,

tinguished dramatist working in
Britain. His death at 60 with his
powers at their full, is a sore loss
to’ English letters and to the
theatre. ai

Osborne Henry Mavor, C.B.E.,
L.L.D., M.D., was the son of an
outstanding Glasgow engineer. He
qualified as a doctoy, and during
his time as a student was one of
a group (including his lifelong
friend the Rt. Hon. Walter Elliot,
M.P.) who made the Glasgow
University Magazine remarkable
among undergraduate periodicals.
(incidentally the drawings he
contributed showed that he would
have won distinction as a car-
toonist.) He served in the
R.A.M.C. in both Great wars and
worked successfully in Glasgow
beth as a general practitioner and
as a consulting physician.

But even as a student he was
an enthusiast for the theatre, and
finally he devoted all his time to
writing. “The Anatomist”, starring
the late Henry Ainsley and giving
Miss Flora Robson her big
chance, was his first success in
London. Then followed “A Sleep-
ing Clergyman” with Mr. Robert



Donat (whieh London found
stimulating and provocative, and
which firmly established Bridie’s
position on the West End Stage)
and the lovely “Tobias and ths
Angel”. “Dr. Bolfry” is regarded
by some as his finest play; and

But the public had no doubt about
it, or about Dame Edith Evans’
brilliant creation of “Daphne” and
it was an immediate success, run-
ning for one year to full houses.
Many discerning people, including
professional critics, believe that
some of his finest writing is to
be found in plays not yet seen in
London—of “John Knox” (pro-
duced in Glasgow) and “The
Queen’s Comedy”. The final epi-
sode in the latter play, which was
given at the 1950 Edinburgh Festi-
val, is remarkable for its inten-
sity of feeling, its humanity, and
its craftsmanship. One reason
why Bridie’s death is so untimely,
is that even at his age he was
still growing intellectually and
increasing in technical power as a
playwright. It is impossible to fore-
cast what his position will finally
be, but two things may be noted,
The first is that his plays—not the
big London successes only, but
numbers of others less well
known—have a sure place in the
programmes of the non-commer-
cial theatres all over the country.
The second is that more and more
people are discovering how well
his plays read—for Bridie was 1
literary artist as well as a stage
craftsman.

He thought that London's dom-
ination of the theatre in Britain

was unhealthy, and some eight
years ago he took the lead in
founding the Glasgow Citizens’
Theatre, which under his chair«

thought and work, and generous
financial support; and he used it
for the encouragement of young
writers and players. Not a few of
these will always thank Bridie for
h’s kindly and wise advice and
criticism and for “Citizens” he
wrote “The Forrigan Reel” and
other light pieces which give rein
to that humour which shines out
in his autobiography “One Way
of Living” and in “Mr, Bridie’s
Alphabet for Little “ Glasgow
Highbrows” and “Tedious and
Brief”.

It is dificult for one who
enjoyed his friendship to write
moderately of his pers 1 quali-
ties. He was the kindliest and
most generous of men, and the
best of good company with a salty
wit, an unpredictable and irresis-
tible sense of fun and of the incon-
gruous—this gives savour to even
his most serious plays—and that
basic simplicity and delight in
simple things which so often
marks the really fine mind: His
passing is an irreparable loss to
a host of friends in all walks of
life, and of course particularly in
the theatre and the world of
letters. I believe that “Tobias and
the Angel” resulted from advice
that he should write a play
about "a really lovable character”
—and in the Apochrypha he
found old Tobit. That phrase
applied with complete truth to
Obsorne Mavor.

N.W.D.



Will Take Canadian
Plays To Bermuda

By JOHN PATERSON

TORONTO,

It’s a bit. complicated, but an adventurous
Australian and a foot-loose Irishman are
taking a series of plays to Bermuda in order
to put acting in Canada on a year-round
paying basis. :

Bruce Yorke, formerly of Sydney, N.S.W.,
and partner Michael Sadlier of Dublin, have
contracted for a nine-month series of plays
in the newly-completed theatre at the luxuri-
!ous Bermudiana Hotel, Hamilton, Bermuda.
They will use Canadian actors and _tech-
nicians.

The venture, an outgrowth of several
years’ effort to put Canadian acting on a
profitable basis, is part of a comprehensive

Pan which includes summer stock in two
cities and a winter subscription series of
plays in 25 Ontario towns and cities.

A yen for travel took Yorke to Shanghai
where he landed with $25 and no return
ticket shortly before the outbreak of the
Second World War. After a brief fling at
selling tobacco in troubled North China he
joined the Intelligence Corps of the Indian
Army as an interrogation officer of Japanese
prisoners. ;

A post-war holiday in New York resulted
in his meeting Canadian producer Brian
Doherty and getting a job with him. He was
advance agent for two cross-Canada tours
with “The Drunkard” and “Arsenic and Old
Lace.” Later, he started a summer theatre
at Niagara Falls, Ont.

Sadlier’s wanderings, meanwhile, had
landed him in Peterborough, Ont. He had
left Dublin for school in England. He was
in a few English films and stage plays when
the Second World War broke out. He joined
the R.A.F. and, transferred to Canada, switch-
ed to the R.C.A.F. After discharge he
studied acting in New York. Then followed
a United States tour with Cornelia Otis
Skinner.

Last summer the two combined their sum-
mer theatres at Niagara Falls and Peterbor-
jough, The companies alternated, playing
week about in the two Ontario cities.

Yorke, anxious to put the business on a
steady basis, visited 150 towns and cities in
southern Ontario in an effort to sell them a
plan for a winter subscription series of plays.

“We got a good reception and eventually
signed up 25 centres,” he said. “In many
we found there hadn’t been ‘live’ professional
theatre for 25 or 30 years.”

The Ontario season opens in Cornwall in
mid-February. Bermuda starts in April. The
three companies will be rotated, each spend-
ing three months in Bermuda. It will be a
sort of holiday with pay for them,

Yorke was enthusiastic about what he
called a “showcase for Canadian talent, pre-
senting them before visitors from the United
States and Europe.”—(C.P.)

Conscription And Control
Of Prices Issues In Canada

OTTAWA,

The new Parliamentary session coming
into being at the end of January will show
early effects of some high-powered, strategic
lobbying.

Two main fronts will bear the brunt of
the lobbying, and both are necessarily em-
barrassing to the government. One is con-
scription, the other price controls,

Government policy has been to avoid tact-
fully either of these, but indications are that
it will be more difficult this session.

Already in January, the Canadian Legion
has come out four-square for conscription,
and called on its branches from coast to
coast to petition their members of parliament
on the subject. In addition, the Conference
of Defence Associations—eonsisting of form-
er army officers in 12 military associations—
renewed a demand it has been making annu-
ally since the war. It adopted unanimously
a resolution calling for a policy of selective
service in the reserve force.

The head of Canadian army forces over-
seas in the Second World War—Gen. H. D. G.
Crerar—has been saying strong things about
compulsory training for several years.

On the prices front, the government is
faced with resolutions from various organ-
izations which have expressed alarm at the
rising cost of living.

The bulk of Canadian organized labor has
thrown its weight into the price fight. Four
major labor organizations, representing more
than 1,000,000 workers, have prepared a brief
for presentation to the cabinet early in the
new session—probably next month. The or-
ganizations are the Canadian Congress of
Labor, the Trades and Labor Congress, the
Canadian and Catholic Confederation of
Labor and the Dominion Joint Legislative
Committee of the Railway Transportation
Brotherhoods, ;

In addition, the executive of the Canadian
Association of Consumers—an organization
assisted by the government to survive after
helping in maintaining prices during the
| Second World War—has called for some form
\ of rent control,.at least.—(C.P.)



a

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY



1, 1951

Lady Savage Visits |

St. Margaret’s |
Baby Welfare Clinic

Lady Savage, wife of His Excellency the Governor, accom-
panied by their daughter, Miss Pat Savage and by Miss
Arne, Social Welfare Officer, paid a visit to the St. Mar-

garet’s Branch of the St. John’s Baby Welfare Clinic yester-| white.

day evening.

150 Baptised

NE HUNDRED AND FIFTY

converts were baptised when
the New Testament Church of
God held their second Baptismal
Ceremony yesterday. At the first
which was held at Brandon’s
Beach on Sunday morning over
300 were baptised. This second
one was held at the back of Rev.



Winter’s home, “Winslow”, Fon-
tabelle.
The ceremony began at 8

o'clock, but from early in the
morning people began to gather.
They came from all over the
island. Rev. James B, Reesor, the
faith healer, was one of the bap-
tists.

On Sunday night 168 people
were received into the Church of
God and on Tuesday night over
100. Approximately 2,800 people
nave been converted throughout
the Convention and many more
hundreds, who could not get into
the Queen’s Park Shed, raised
their hands signifying their inten-
tion to live for Christ,

Rev. Reesor, after about two
weeks in the island, left this
morning for San Juan, Puerto
Rico.

ARGE QUANTITIES of flying

fish and dolphin are definite-

ly on the western coast of the

island just waiting to be caught,

Mr. D. W. Wiles, Fisheries Officer
told the Advocate yesterday,

On Tuesday 3,800 pounds of
flying fish and 535 pounds of dol- {|
phin passed through the Public,
Market and fairly good catches;
were brought in along the Paynes |
Bay coast,

During last week one fishing
boat brought in 48 dolphins at
Oistins. On ‘Tuesday night
another boat caught and
brought them to the Careenage.

IX AND A HALF acres of first
crop ripe canes were burnt
when a fire broke out at Lowthers
Plantation, Christ Church over
the week-end, The canes are
owned by W. T. Watson and were
insured.

Another week-end fire at Step-;|
ney Plantation, St. George des-
troyed a quantity of second erop

ripe canes which were also in-
sured, They belong to Bulkeley
Ltd.

On Tuesday night a fire at Man-
grove Plantation burnt three and
a half acres of first crop ripe
canes. They are owned by Car-
rington Ltd, and were insured.

A FILM SHOW will be given at
the monthly reunion of the
Combermere School Old Boys’
Association on Friday, February 2
at 8 p.m. It is as follows :— Brit-
ish News, Sheep Dog, Our College
and Cricket.

There will be a discussion after
the film show, It is expected to
see a large turn out of old boys.

NEWS ITEM reached the

Advocate yesterday from
London which said that a Rhode
Island (red) hen belonging to
Miss Ellen Jones of Bailey Farm,
Bodorgan, Anglesey, Wales laid an
egg weighing six and a_ half
ounces.

Perhaps Miss Jones is feeding
her fowls on Barbados feed but
still a local New Hampshire has
beaten her Rhode Island by an
ounce and a half, This New
Hampshire laid an egg weighing
8 ounces, It is owned by Gordon
Matthews of Constitution Road.

T DISTRICT “B” on Monday
a jury returned an “open
verdict” when an enquiry into the
circumstances surrounding the
death of Edward Blackman was
held. Blackman’s body was dis-
covered at Silver Sands by Lionel
Ross on Friday, December 29
when he reported the matter to
the Police.

The body was removed to the
Christ Church Almshouse Mor-
tuary where Dr, Charles Manning
performed an autopsy.

Bus Overloaded

Vincent Brandford of St, John
was found guilty yesterday of
overloading the motor bus J-277
ce Fair Field Road on December
20.

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
before whom the case was heard
ordered Brandford to pay a fine
of 15/- and 1/- costs in 28 days
or in default one month’s impris-
onment with hard labour.



a re

FAULTY BRAKES

After pleading guilty of driving
motor car M-2294 with inefficient
brakes on Waterford Road, Mac
Donald Garner of Jackman, St.
Michael was fined £3 to be paid
by mdnthly instalments or in
default two months’ imprisonment,
by His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
yesterday .

The offence was committed on
December 22 and the case was
brought by the Police as a result
of an accident on Waterford Road.



Court For Divorce And
Matrimonial Causes

In the Court for Divorce and
Matrimonial Causes yesterday His
Honour the Acting Chief Judge
Mr. J. W. B. Chenery, pronounced
decree absolute in the suit of
E. W. Storey (Petitioner) and
D. M. K. Storey (Respondent).
There was no order as to costs.

Petitioner was represented by
Mr. J.S. B. Dear instructed by
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfield.

IN the report on the Public Utilities
Lili in the House of Assembiy on Tue:
day, Mr. E. D. Mottley was reported as
saying that he could see the Board's ex-







penses borne by the uti companies
would be a great burden the compan
jes. This should have on the



“Consumer.”


























All thrve wrote complimentarily
in the Visitors’ Book at the end of
the visit.

This Branch of the Clinic. has
45 children on the roll, About two
dezen were there yesterday, some
accompanied -by their parents, and
some by their small brothers or
sisters, as is the habit in the
country parishes where many
parents have to be out working all

day.
The clinic is always open on
Wednesday evenings, so Lady

Savage was in time to see the
work that is done by the regular
helpers. One helper was distribut-
ing milk and other items of food.
Another was weighing babies, and
a third was recording the weights
on forms prepared for the purpose,
A fourth helper—a trained nurse
—was checking up on the babies’
condition, fixing navel bands, giv-
ing advice about feeding, etc.

Lady Savage looked on with
interest at this form of Social
Welfare Work that is aimed at
helping the people of the area to
raise sturdier children, _ rather
than to follow their own methods
which may be described as a
cateh-as-catch-can wrestle with
infant mortality.

The Clinic was founded by
Madame Ifill on June 28 last year.

Visitors’ Impressions

Lady Savage wrote in the Vis-
itors Book: “Visited the clinic with
Miss Arne. T am most favourably
impressed, and do congratulate
the ladies on the splendid work
they are doing. This clinic is very
well organised. Mothers and chil.
dren were happy, and I think they
appreciate the work being done
I wish the clinie every success.”

Miss Savage wrote: “This is a
very well organised and well run
clinic.”

Miss Arne’s contribution was:
“Visited today with Lady Savage
I was much impressed by the
quiet, businesslike atmosphere
and the quiet competence of the
regular helpers. The babies on the
whole seemed fitter than others }
have seen elsewhere.”

Lady Savage was presented with
a bouquet at the end of her visit

Among those present ‘were



| Revd. A. Mellor Vicar of St. Mar-

garet’s and Mrs. Mellor; Madame
Ifill; Mrs. D, Simpson; Mrs. W
Payne; Mrs, K. Newsam: Mrs. C

Mayers; Mrs. C. Pinder; Mr. Cc, D.
Ramsay.



Painter Remanded
Without Bail

DAVID VAN PUTTIN a 23.
year-old painter of Martindales
Road, St. Michael was remanded
without bail by His Worship Mr,
H. A, Talma Police Magistrate of
District “A” until ‘February © 7
when he appeared before him
yesterday on a charge of demand-
ing the sum of $6,000 from Au-
brey Birch Director of the Pro
gressive Motor Bus Co. Dayrells
Road, without a reasonable cause
and using threats against him,

The offence was alleged to have
been committed on January 25
Mr, E. Barrow is appearing on
behalf of Puttin whilé Capt. BE,
Grant is prosecuting, from infor-
mation received, for the Police.

Yesterday when the prelimin-
ary evidence was started the
Frosecution called on two wit-
nesses,

Before Mr. Talma
Puttin there was a
whether bail should be granted
or not. Mr. Barrow submitted
that he saw no reason why. bail
should not be granted ws his cli-
ent was not what he would term
a violent person. Capt. Grant
stressed the point that if bail
were granted a substantial
amount should be: cffered.

Mr. Talma told them that the
offence was a serious and rare
one and he felt within himself
that if the person to whom the
threats were made was anxious
about his safety then he saw no
need for bail. ,

remanded
question



Miners Defy
Government

SYDNEY, Jan. 31,
The Australian Miners Centra!
Council decided today to defy the
Government's strike ban and hold
stoppages one day per week in the
coal mines,

This step which follows a
similar decision by miners at mass
meetings is a protest against con-
ditions attached to the recent pay
award,

The miners are liable to six
months imprisonment or £100 fine
for ignoring the ban.

The Council also decided to seek
support for miners in ‘all largé
cities.

A coal industry. tribunal had
Gecided to make the wage in-
creases of up to two Australian
pounds sterling conditional on the
miners’ working 10 full days per
fortnight. The Government hss
threatened to use troops if miners
cefied the strike ban.

More than 150,000 workers are
already idle in Sydney because of
acute coal shortages and indus-
tries are rationed.

Miners protests are part of the
mounting industrial crisis in
Australia. Railwaymen, dissatis-
fied with wage rates have placed
a ban on overtime and dockers
are due to begin a similar ban on
February 2.

—Reuter.

“36 SURPRISED”
a Reuter
















I Won The

$5.00
By Paul Foster

THE point in the “Your Guess”

3 ent in Moenday’s Evening

dvocate was that the Coca Colas
at Canada Dry Ginger Ales
shown, in the picture were bottlea
in Montreal. The clue was that the
bottle caps of the coca colas were
Cokes bottled in Barbados
have pink caps.No one guessec
the correct answer. It was the
Hardest guess picture that has
been published to date,

The “Your Guess” competition
started in the Evening Advocate
on Monday 30th October, 1950, I
was a popular feature from the
Start. And no wonder, for five
dollars was paid to the persor
who guessed correctly what thc
picture was all about.

Every Monday a “Your Guess’
picture appears, and the public
is asked to guess, “What is this,’



“Where is this,” “What is the
point of this picture’, “What i
the picture all about”, etc, jus

depending on the picture.

Every Wednesday at 10 o’cloc?
the Editor opens the envelopes onc
by one until the first correct
answer is opened.

About a month after the
Guess” competition started, th:
Editor told me, “Why don’t yo:
give us a picture that no one car
guess.” “Tell you what I'll do’
he said “You take a picture tha
no one can guess the correct
answer to, and you can have the
five dollars,

So this week,
goes to me.

Several Guesses

Although no one guessed cor-
rectly, there was no shortage of
answers when the Editor began
opening these at 10 a.m. yester-
day.

Here are a few of some of the
guesses, “The Rum Refinery ”
“A Refreshing time,” “Party at
the Marine Hotel in honour of the
Cricketers,” “South Point,’ “The
point of this picture is a ver:
tasty heveragfe,” “Some has covers
some hasn’t,” ete.

This week’s guess victure was
taken at Seawell. Part of the
crew of the T.C.A. ‘planes which
called here every Saturday change

“You

the five dollars





over at Barbados. Each ’plane
has a bar. which is run bv the
nurser. When he remains in Rar-

bados his drinks remain with him
Picture in Monday’s Evening
Advocate showed some of these
srinks just hefore they went on
hoard the ’plane on Saturday,





Britain May
Buy West
German Meat

LONDON Jan, 31.

Britain may buy meat from
West Germany, Food Minister
Maurice Webb indicated in the
House of Commons today. He
said he was looking into the
possibility, but before there could
be any negotiations the Govern—
ment would have to be satisfied
that meat could be imported from
Germany without danger to
animal health in Britain,

It would also have to be satis—
fied that methods of inspection
and slaughtering were up _ to
standards required here.

Webb's statement was made in
reply to a question by a Con-—
servative Member who asked
whether negotiations had yet been
completed with West German
Government for sending mutton
to Britain —Reuter.



Meat Negotiations

CANBERKA, Jan, 31.

Negotiations between Britain
and Ausiralia for a 15-year meat
contract are at an advanced siage
John Me Wen, Australian Trade
Minister said today.
deadlock in negotiations for price!
variations on butter, cheese, lamb
and mutton under existing long-
term contracts he added. Senior
British, Food Ministry Officials
would arrive in Australia in
February to discuss price adjust-
ments,

They would examine Australia’s
duction”

because that was the







The above = eéquip-
ment is ‘available for,
early delivery from

the

COURTESY
|

U.K.

GARAGE

ROBERT THOM Ltd.



There was q| the pointed end of the peanut is



“cost of reasonably efficient pro-|







BARBADOS ADVOCATE ~~~

His Razor “Tames’ Them|

Twenty years ago you could have gene in Maiden’s Lane!
and could have got a haircut for eight cents from the way-
side barber, Fitz Griffith. Today Fitz charges one shilling
and he cuts behind the Advocate at the corner of }

© ~ treet. ;

g

Me Gregor ;





In The Park
Yesterday

A shilling is the wayside hair-
Joutting price, but if you do not
like out-of-doors haircutting you
will have to pay 36 cents and
sometimes 2s

Wayside barbers get work, not
so much by their skill, for as

ANYONE walking through! Fitz told the Advocate yesterday
Queen’s Park yesterday woulti) there is not much difference in
have noticed how the pavements| the skill of the wayside barbers
along the main thoroughfare are} |of Bridgetown who have all been
crumbling quickly, Some of the|in the business for many years.
gutters also are in great need of|They are all handy with the
repair and yesterday the gutters) Scissors. But they get more work
were littered with paper andjif they are of a friendly disposi-
cigarette ends. tion and if, as Fitz will tell you,

In great contrast to this wera! “Mey have “the gift of gab.” Of
the gardens which were clean and|COUrse Fitz can keep up a run-
the grass around the flower beds}"!Mg talk on any topic that is in
were well trimmed, The steel shed| the news.
was being cleaned. ~ .

Some of the wooden cribs were Cut Hair For Nothing
being carried out of the shed.

There was a placard pinned up|. Fitz has been a haircutter now

qutside the Park House which read; for over 20 years, Before that
‘Free Vaccination Centre” but) time when he used to live in
the few ladies who were inside the} Hindsbury Road, he would cut

building handling the needles aiid] School boys’ hair and charge them

arranging the boxes of cotton wool |P°thing. Cutting school __ boys’

vere having a quiet time. hair was by way of practice.
Hawkers’ trays packed with}. At the time when Fitz used to

Shee 3 . practise on the boys’ heads, the
v‘" s swee seen
cane ba ae ae Sans olher boys who could afford to

LDDs —lazed| #9 to established barbers used to
(round on the partly rotten eribs| ugh at them and tell them they
vaiting for something to turn up, could get justice if they sought a
At the other end of the park near) SOurt of law, inferring that: Fitz

used to make a hack of the job
the Governor's Gate there, was 4) Ft rite did not mind.

very large heap of rotten leaves
which seemed to have been de-} after years of practice, he
posited there for some time. went into Maiden’s Lane and

The artificial lake was empty
and here and there at the bottom
were green patches of moss.

Cook With
Newspaper

WASHINGTON
Service wives have a few in-
teresting answers to the problems
of cooking without electricity, gas At
Seer in a national or local cutter, He said that continuous
Boma of their helpful hints, drilling racked his body and kept

hi AN. £ e did not like to

gathered during the process of|he lean. When he said. this he
making the best of bad conditions| jooked at himself, implying that
in remote outposts, are included] one could see that he is a fairly
in the New Jango (JUNIOR]sleck man now.
ARMY NAVY GUILD ORGAN-
IZATION) cookbook,

When deprived of electricity,| 4
gas and firewood, they recommend] c&"'s.
that several sheets of newspaper | b@rd

hour to cut it.
be gathered. The newspapers |®" Ss echaaad her side
should be opened and cut into Other wayside barbers besi

' Fitz carry on their trade in the
strips or used whole as evpears Lower Green, Hincks Street and
to best suit the need. on the upper Wharf.

The papers ought to be rolled It is interesting to
into une piece’ then, Before} barber shaving a man.
reaching the end of the roll, ac-]about 11 o'clock Fitz yas shaving
cording to the service wives,|one and the man sat Wicoping on
another piece of newspaper should; a two-foot high bench with his
be added, back arched and his neck eraned.

They recommend that you then|Fitz said when you are being
continue rolling tightly until you] shaved, you get the feeling that
have a tight, thick roll, This} you would sleep. It is just like
should be tied with a string and

when you play music to a wild
dipped into a quantity of paraffin,| animal and ee him for the

An alternative is to melt candles| While, he said
onto the roll until it is thoroughly
saturated.

When rolled, the
should fit a number one size ean
with the lid removed. The roll
should be inserted in the can and
again saturated with paraffin

They then recommend that aj
number two-and-a-half size aisle A ‘
we punctured on the side o#|it is predicted that a ;
the lid with a can opener and between the United States and
another hole be punched into the France announced by Truman and
opnosite side at the bottom. Pleven will greatly influence the

stayed there about five years. He
then moved to Greens Lane and
afterwards to the Lower Green.
He has been cutting hair behind
the Advocate for nearly 10 years.



Haireutting is not the only
trade which Fitz learnt. He had
a two-year spell at shoe-making.
Fitz thought that shoe-making
entailed too much sitting down.
He prefers ctanding and that is
why he likes hair-cutting better.

Hated To Be Lean

one time Fitz was a_ stone

Twenty-five vears ago to cut
four—foot block stone cost 10
When you came across a
stone it would take about

watch a
Yesterday



newspapers

TRUMAN AND
PLEVEN AGREE

@ From Page t

The small can is to be placed, foreign policy of all North
beneath the larger one and the|Atlantic powers. ; +
paraffin is to be lighted The In more formal times hey
larger can serves as the stove,| Would have been described as

‘| full scale alliances.

This method of cooking was used
by service wives at Pearl Harbour
a the bombing in December,
1

The seryice wives also recom-
mend that in case of a stoppage in
electric current a peanut may be

The statement issued after the
Two-Day Conference between
the President and the French
Prime Minister goes far beyond
the predictions and broadly word -
{ed statements of common objec -



used for illumination, i tives usually made after such
The peanut te to be pigewed inte eras diplomats here believed

a soft object, such as fruit, and].

it gives a clearer picture of the
views and intentions of the two
statesmen, than either had given
separately in recent months.

Some diplomats think oa
appears to be assuming a type
cle partnership with the United
States, hitherto reserved to Eng-
lish speaking countries.

Tt is noted that the communique



to be lighted with a match. This
is said to make an
emergency eandle,

excellent



—LN.S. |

eeeieeineniielipneinas

RECTOR OF ST. JOHN



Rev. A. E. Simmons, Rector] contains no hint of disagreement
of St. Lucy, has been appointed over Far Eastern policy aes ‘
Rector of St. John. This was] communique issued after talks las'

decided at a meeting of the Board{month between President Truman





basis of price review formula; of Appointment held in the lobby|and British Prime Minister

Mc Wen said. of the House of Assembly yester-| Attlee. sie
—Reuter. | day at 12.30 p.m. —Reu

— FPF re EELS,







MASSEY-HARRIS |
EQUIPMENT

Enquiries cordially invited for the

supply of the following—

42 BHP. 6 cyl. DIESEL WHEEL

TRACTORS

(Steel Wheels also available for

Plough)
GRASS CUTTERS = 5 & 6ft
MANURE SPREADERS
SIDE
FEED MILLS

FERTILIZIN




DRILLS

agreements |}

DELIVERY RAKES i

'|| CAVE SHEPHERD & CO,, LTD.



Buy British —
| Antiques

| LONDON.
} American antique dealer Fred-
| erick P. Victoria said that Britain
is running dry of old treasures.
Victoria’ had been touring
| Europe for over a month and
found it dificult to find anything
really exciting.

Said Victoria:

“Things are hard to find in
England and France. Somehow
the world is running dry. Dealers
will soon have to come to America
if they want to buy British
antiques.”

Victoria flew back to the “reas |
States with a few priceless treas-
ures, anyway—including Marie | ll
Antoinette’s stepchair, a Louis XV
deskvhair, and two rare Nubian
dolls made entirely of tiny shells,

—INS.

GOES UP JUST THE SAME |i

LONDON,
Nationalized road transport in
Britain will cost 10 per
more from’ January 29.
The Road Haulage Coe
said the increase in general haul-
ge and parcels rates was neces-
sary to
increases in costs,
tires, wages and fuel.
This is the second increase
since the industry was taken
ever in February 1948. Haulage
and pareels rates went up by 74
—LN.S,





cent

meet the recent heavy
particularly

per cent in 1949,







ital Science Reveals

PROO# THAT BRUSHING TEETH
RIGHT AFTER EATING IS THE
SAE, EFFECTIVE WAY 70

SELP STOP
‘OOTH DECAY

NiTH COLGAT!
DENTAL CREAN

* y
ures Le



25e Ase 75¢



“FRESH ARRIVALS |

AT

WEATHERHEAD 'S

EVERY BITE A DELIGHT!



Fry’s “Hazel, Nut” Choc's:

2/-, 3/9 and $1.79 Box
8/- per 1-Ib. Tin,
Fry’s “Princess” Choe's:

94ce, and $1.69 Box
Cadbury's “Red Rose” Choc's

98c. and $1.80 Box
FRY’'S “Seorched Almonds”

2/- Box.

$2.02 per 1-lb. Tin

Cadbury’s “Milk Tray”
Choe’s:
{ 90c. and $1.48 tin

| Cadbury's ‘Roses’ Choe’s
and $1.48 tin

Biscuits

0c.
Cadbury’ s Choc.
5/- and 5/3 tin
Meltis Coffee Choc: Mint
Creams $1.23 box
Nestle’s Asst. Choc:
$1.19 and $2.12 box

Black Magic Choe: $4.06 box
Salted Peanuts ..., 64c. tin
Jacob’s Cream Crackers —
6/- tin
Jacob's “Selected”
$2.06 tin
Jacob's “Asst. Creams” Bis-
cuits $1.51 tin
Jacob's “Family Asst.” Bis-
cuits $1.47 tin
Meltis Favourite Candies —
$1.02 and $1,85 box
Carr's “Club® Cheese” Bis-
cuits $1.00 tin
Glucose Barley Sugar —
60c. and $1.02 tin
Sharp's Toffee —
60c., 78c. & $1.02
Collard '& Bowses “Nougaty
34c. and 70e.
Collard & Bowses
scotch” ...,
Ovaltine Biscuits .
Blue Bird Toffee.

Biscuits

“Butter-
2le. & 45c.
. 43c. Box
-42¢. tin



BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Street







Gents’ white cotton Pyjama
Girdles.

PAC ob cua

Gents’ pure Silk Handker-
chiefs, white, blue, grey.
|

Each_____.._...$1.88

White Viyella Anklets with

turn-over tops. Size 10—11¥%,

Pair... _---.61.56

Boys’ Ties with hand painted
designs, assorted colours.

|
| EGGha.:ineciaane?





TRTTPUPT TIPE, SEER oe ee ee —

laeeereenscee

Be Die Gea Mlias Wisk Ad While You Sleep in
Sea Island Cotton











Follow this
%, Simple Beauty Plan

Awash your face with Palmolive Soap

Brthen, for 60 seconds, massage with
Palmotive’s soft, lovely lather, Rinse!

CDo this 3 times a day for 14 days.
This cleansing massage brings
zens skin Palmolive'’s full

utifying effect!



(SCRATCH

AT LAST !!
AT LAST!!

You can rid your tables

and Safes of ANTS with

Dr. NEDD’S

Effective.

Obtainable at:—

BOOKER'S (B'DOs)

RIAD RR RRR RII

ENJOY A

GOOD SMOKE
WHILE YOU
"AN.

en

TURKISH and
EGYPTIAN



GOCE

%

New Loveliness For You

wit PALMOLIVE SOAP

Gent SR ERE REE EO
FRESH SUPPLY OF

= PURINA HEN CHOW 5 :

a ut. JASON JONES & CO., ie aed
SEB EBEEESECRESS

Easy
Just Tie it on.



PAGE FIVE









GRAIN)

ANT TAPE

to use. Safe.

DRUG STORES LID.

Broad Street, and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings,



POET Oe,

PREPS

a4

9%

9
CIGARETTES $
ABDULLA CIGARETTES No. 11 — 50’s .......005 o» $1.61
ip i No, 11 — 20's .4....... oa bags, «OS
is id No. 14 — 50's .... cece een $1.62
ee . No. 14 80 cs caueks 66
a i No. 16 — 50'S wi. cs ede e es Qh
‘i 1 No. 16 — 20's weit 4 . 60

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

OOO OD OCANE SOUS

oo NG SEALE EAA GD



USE A

“RIPPINGILLES ©

BLUE - FLAME
STOVE

FOR EASY



& CLEAN

COO K ING
A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (B08) LTD.

_ AGENTS, ©







Woven Cotton Pyjamas,
striped designs. Size 38 to 44.

Suit______....$8.48

ELITE Long Sleeve Sport
Shirts in shades of cream,
blue, green, gray, rust, brown.

Sizes S to large $5, 92

em mm n nm

Sea Island Cotton Pyjamas in
grey, blue & cream, Sizes 58
to 44.

Suit. __........615.96

Gents’ Cotton Gloves
Size 0.8, Men

94¢
96¢

ee me

ee

» Ex. 08.



10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street















J AY JARY 1, 1951
PAGE SIX BARBADOS. ADVOCATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5

SS es ee ee ee ee | aa agen! todo .
| rOR THE BEST






HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

peer neetre 1

|







a yi ba) Tick oe
adidas





good feod and drink?

| Try All 2eltzer and see how much

\ better you feel. Alka-Seltzer soothes

& | headache, neutralizes exeess gastric
aridity sets you right again”!

} Keep a supply of Alka-

AE EI, hy = :

fe Fen i ec a Maat cae ‘ ee eS
en SPR OPTS RE FS

INSIST ON

Ss Seltzer handy — always.




|

R\ [S000 Luck, OLD MAN! 1 HOPE YoU GS
THERE BEFORE THE BITE OF THE
TZIG-TZAG KILLS YOu! 2



I} ont this

it's getting me down,
t this irritating throat uckle all day long



Y
y
ant these 2ubes!

Relief at once!
My throat’s soothed and that wretched
cough eased in no time.






BLONDIE











Hilt vite] AN HUSH} ‘
oer OH, MY GOODNESS,
. YS SAY ,
A HUSBAND ISN'T EN ae cores
RRS A em UNTIL COAT
> N

STOCKED BY ALL LEADING id

STORES COUGH
cinemmmeneecnemes LOZENGES

CONFECTIONERY

on YOUR









So








HE CANT HITUS AT) 1 : RY THIS ONE ISALIVE B
Ts DISTANCE CHANCE RIOUSLY
>> 7 p

| Vie ¥ Q }

0 me aD



BONBONS (Liqueur Chocolate) box §2.54




MELTIS FAVOURITE CANDIES, box §1.02, $1.05
« GLAMOUR CHOLOLATES, box SOc.






HELLO-IS THIS THE

WEGOTTA TELEVISION

COMPANY P THIS 1S MR

JIGGS - SEND _ME OVER
TWO MORE

TELEVISION SETS!

We





ape ea

(T WOULD BE
FUL

IF THEY’D ONLY

SPEND A MONTH!



» MELTIS COFFEE
CHOCOLATE, MINT CREAMS, box de

er ee




FRY'S
CHOCOLATE, HAZEL NUTS, Tin __ $e.0e

BLACK MAGIC CHOCOLATES, tb. 52.14
PASCALL GLUCOSE BARLEY SUGAR, Tin __ 98e. Sbe’



Canned Vegetables Juices and












Liqueurs, Wines Canned Fish
Dutch Sauerkraut. $ 28 Squashes Ete :
— 85 Dewiaiea Orange Dutch Kummel ........ $4.25 Kraft Fish Supreme. $ .34
cea aa” MICE nee rnseennnne $481 Green Chartreuse .... 7.50 21
ey 5g Bahama Pineapple Ma a
; oer x bet ~ filemon: 53 Dani T woke don: ae Mackerel .............0+. -36
- a rea i: Letona Tomato Juice .34 Findlaters Mitre Chum Salmon (Tolls) .51
. Ganon : = iakeandanaies Bieavh 33 e Chum Salmon (Â¥2).... -28
(Whole) ............ 54 Orange and Grape- Fillets of Anchovies .30
» Sliced Beans... .45 fruit Juice ............ 28
« Petits Pois (Tris Grapefruit Juice ...... 24
Fin) oo... 50 Clayton's Orange
Squagh ........ ccs #
MIAMI! IN TWENTY MINUTES... “ee a MEAT DEPARTMENT
THESE BAGS ARE SURE HEAVY! ) ‘Nor HERE ON Clayton’s Lemon
; BUSINGSS...T/M Squash ooo. 93

GOING TO HAVE PUN !



| Syrups &
Marmalade

Prime Australian Beef including

Lyle’s Golden Canned Meat ROAST — STEAK — STEW








Syrup ....... $ .42$ .23 Genuine Strasbourg
Brechin Castl Pate de Foi Gras in
"Golden ‘tee ie oe Wane Salata CANADIAN SALMON
PYG (Sealed) $12.51 — $6.84
ek. eee i ies BACON & HAM SLICED
Ag Silver Shred Corned Beef with
by sory commer neers Marmalade .......... 47 Cereal ........:.ccee 31 Salami Sausages per lb $1.09
C & B Breaktast
LK & RAY MOORES lie”. Pec, 40
— a ; a a i ee see Apples, per case $10.00, per lb__30c.

= ere Swifts Potted Meat... .23
NOW~CAN | PASS FOR YOU? YOU

SAID THEY NEVER SAW YOU BEFORE
TODAY +-AND THEN ONLY FOR A

Siedcies thettane See
\ALA/ VAL

i iN A _



|
|

|























THURSDAY, FEBRUA

CLASSIFIED ADS.

RY 1, 1951

TELEPHONE 2508



IN MEMCRIAM



ROWARD—In never fading memory of
our dear som and brother Cuthbert
Lisle Howard, who was called to
higher service on February 1, 1960.

Leng days, long nights he bore his
pain

Waited for cure but all in vain

Until God -himself saw” what was
best

And took dear Lisle with him to rest.

The Howard family, Bayfield, % Fale,

1.2,51—I1n.



JEFFERS—In cherished memory of 4
dear son and brother who fell asieep
in Jesus on February 2nd 1949.

© ssie our dearest boy, On this

S$ econd Anniversary § ince you

§ ilent!y departed to S weet bliss

J n Heaven's Home—rest on Jn Jesu's

E verilacting Arms, OSSIE, §— ver loved
By your devoted parents, sisters and
brothers.

The Jeffers family
Constitution Road.

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

_—_—_——
CAR—Hillman 1948, excellent condition,
always owner driven. Telephone 2672.

“Valambrosa”
1.2.51—1n,









1.2.51—2n.
CAR—Humber Snipe 1938. Mileage
33,000 in good running order. Can be
s¢en at DUNSINANE, COUNTRY
ROAD, by arrangement with Mrs.
Greaves. Phone 95249. 1.2.51—8n.

—_—

CAR — One 5 passenger Sedan Terro-
plane recently overhauled and in perfect
working order price $400, Ring 91-24,
Lighthouse, St, Lucy. 27.1.51—Tn.

TRACTOR — Catapillar Diesel D 4.
Tractor. Excellent condition, Phone 4629.
1.2.51—2n,

a

ELECTRICAL

ELECTRIC MOTOR. and Pump
single phase,
for water well,
refused. Dial 3919. 31,1.51-—2n.

_—_
ONE TURNER WALKER DRILL





No

PRESS, electrically driven, new,
Apply: Mr. R, de Souza, C/o T.
Geddes Grant Ltd. 1.2.51—6n.

—_—_———_

PHILIPS ELECTRIC RAZOR, as new.
Magnet Electric Cooker in good condi-
tion, Apply: Emtage Blectrical Company.



31.1,51—3n,

uw ‘
MECHANICAL

BICYCLE—One Gents 4 Speed Blue

Raleigh in perfect condition, for further
information phone the Marine Hotel







Store-keeper. 30.1.51—3n.
MISCELLANEOUS
ACTUMUS—The new Fertiliser for

crnes—vegetable and flower gardens $3.6"
per lb. from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store, Coleridge Street. Phone 2999.



BUY IGLODINE EMBROCATION for
Rheumatism, Backache, Lumbago and

Sprains 7c. per bottle. Get from your
Chemist to-day. THE STANDARD
AGENCY (B'DOS) CO., Agents.

1.2.51—3n.
ny
BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top

grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.
26.1.51—t.f.n.

——$ —

INFANT'S PORTABLE TREASURE
COT with fibre mattress—practically new.
Ring 4729. 1,2,51—6n.





LISBON YAMS at “Francia’’,











— St.
George. Dial 3226. 1.2,51—3n.
PLANTS—Limited quantity of Canna
Lily Plants. Phone 2382, 1.2.51—3n.
SCHOOL BOOKS—English, French,
Latin, Spanish, Mathematics, History
ete. Phone 2382. 1,2.51—3n.



-—

WHITE SHEETS—Stock up now best
quality white sheets 80” x 10077 at $5.54
each, cannot be repeated. Broadway
Dress Shop. 31.1,51—2n,



YAMS—Bottle neck Lisbon delicious
for eating, delivered in city and suburbs





at $3.00 per 100 lbs, Dial 3485, Upton

Plantation. 1,2,51—4n.

LOsT & FOUND
LOST :



WALLET—Wiil the finder of a wallet
between Swan and James Street please
keep wallet and money but return
papers to this office. 1.2.51—In.

| FOUND

PURSE — On Linton’s Drug Store
counter, 14 High Street, one purse with
valuable contents, Owner must identity
same as soon as possible and pay expense
ot Ad.







WANTED

—





A Vacency exists with the Nationa?
Cash Register Company's Agents for an
Apprentice Mechanic. Applications are
invited from individuals between the ages
of 19 and 22, who possess the following
attributes: Education to School Certifi-
eate Standard; mechanical aptitude;
initiative personality. The successful
applicant will be required to undergo a
three to six months probationary period
in Barbados, followed by a similar
period of training in Trinidad. Salary
during the periods of probation and
training will be between $45.00 and
$7.00 per month depending on the age
and experience of the individual. Appli-
eotants must be of European Origin.
Apply in writing only giving full par-
ticulars, and submitting a passport
photograph to The National Cash Register
Cce's., Agents, c/o T. Geddes Grant, Ltd.
Bolton Lane. 1,2.51—3n

~

MISCELLANEO!

WANTED TO PURCHASE
ONE LARGE TRAVELLING TRUNK,
Phone 8477. 1.2.51—1n.

WANTED URGENTLY
HOSPITAL BED—To rent, buy, or
borrow, one Hospital Bed. Phone 8162.







Kenneth Taylor. 31,1.51—3n.
—_—"
FOWLS for eating, apply: Geoffrey

Jones Gum Dragon, Chinese Restaurant,
Broad’ Street. 1,2,.51—t.f.n.

ere

WE BUY FOR CASH — Clocks, watches
and musical boxes in any condition.
Write, call or dial 4420,.GORRINGES An-

Street.
tique shop, Upper Bay 35.1.51~2n.

Y FOR CASH — Seo and
Silver jewellery, coins, dentures, .
write, call or Dial 4429. GORRINGES

ining Royal Yacht
Ee Te aa

ceed iia at CA
h

GORRINGES undertake expert wate
end clock repairs, cleaning and resto-
ration of of] paintings, valuations for in-
surance and _ probate, GORRINGES,
upper Bay St. 25.1.51—7n.

WE BU



MRS. STUART
begs to remind the pupils
of her Dancing School that
the school will be re-opened
on 15th February.

For
Dial Miss Evelyn—3108,

further information

1.2.51—3n.

‘
IESCSCSOSOOO 9 IO SS FSOOORE



M.| £1,000 at a rate of interest not to ex-

“4 hip. a
Excellent condition, suitable one and shingle

reasonable offer, wichael,






















































FOR RENT
HOUSES














ning water.
Dial 2854.

Available February

30,1.51-—-3n

Coast, fully furnished including Refrig-
erator and Telephone, for March, June,
July, for further information dial 225¢





at and Warehouses. Apply K. R-
unte
COTTAGE—St. James Coast.

er 8476. 1.2.51-—1n.
STORAGE SPACE suitable for making
& Co. Ltd. Dial 4611,
1,2.51-—6n.
TRINITY
Pully furnished containing 3 bedrooms
Available for months of Februany to May




and August to December 1951. Phone
2959. 21,1.51—2n.
—_-—



PUBLIC NOTICES

“£25: ~. -d. easily earned by obtaining

order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi-
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest





commission; marvellous money making
opportunity. Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
England.”
25.1.51—18n
NOTICE

THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW

Tenders are invited for a loan of

ceed 4% per Annum under the St, An-

drew Parish Church Loan Act. And

will be received by the undersigned up
to February 3rd 1951.

Signed C, A. SKINNER,

Vestry Clerk,
St. Andrew,
24.1.51—6n.

————
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of St. Clair Daniel of
Nelson Street, B'town for permission to
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c,, at a
shop with shedroof
at 6th Ave. New Orleans, St.

Dated this 3lst day of January 1951.
To:—E, A. Mc LEOD,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.

Sed. C, DANIEL,
4 Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consi-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held
ay Police Court, Distret "A" on Monday
the 12th day of February 1951, at 11
c'clock, a.m,

tached

E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A
1,2,51—1n.

PUHLIC SALES
REAL ESTATE

PROPERTY—At 69 Roebuck Street
“~ two storey Wall Building on 4.362
sa. ft. of land. Downstairs, Store,
Store Rooms and Garage. Upstairs, 4
Bediooms, Drawing and Dining rooms
etc. Electric Light and Power. Price
£4000, nearest offer treated con-
fidentially. Apply to M. Abbadi or
phone 2297. 1.2.51—4n.







The undersigned will offer for sale by
public competition at their office, No. 17,
High Street, on Thursday the 8th day
of February, 1951, at 2 p.m, the dwelling-

house called
THE BOWER
with 7,444 square feet of land situate
at The Garrison, containing 2 verandahs,
2 public rooms, 2 bedrooms, toilet, bath,
kitchen, etc. Garage, servants rooms and
enclosed garden.
The sale may be made with or with-
out the furniture.
Vacant possession will be given.
Further particulars from
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
30.1.51—8n.

fOR RENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din~-
ing room, Breakfast room and Kitchen-
cette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS’ Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and ‘Telephone,
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1,51,—én.

CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATION
We will set up for sale by Public
Competition at our Office James Street,
on Friday 2nd February 1951, at 2 p.m.
CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS
situate in St. Lucy and containing by
estimation 82 acres 3 roods 23 perches
of which about 48 acres are arabie.
The acreage is made up as follows:
25% acres ist crop canes ready for
reaping.
14 acres young canes,
34 acres sour grass,
9 acres 23 perches in preparation,
roads, yards etc,
In. ion on application to Mr.
Ormond Knight on the premises.
YEARW9OD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.
18,1.51—6n.









The undersigned will offer for sale by

$1.1.51—2n. | public competition at their office, No. 17,

High Street, Bridgetown, on Thursday
Ist February at 2 p.m, the freehold
dwellinghouse called

RICHELIEU

in excellent order and recently renovated,
in llth Avenue, Belleville, with 9,859
square feet of land. Drawing, dining
and breakfast rooms, 4 bedrooms, bath
and toilet and kitchen. Dovble garage
and servants rooms.

Inspection by appointment only, Dial

2210.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
21.1,51—6n.



——_——————

AT TOP ROCK—Delightful residence
having 3 Bedrooms, large Lounge, sepa-
rate Dining Room, 2 fully Tiled Toilets
and Bath, modern Kitchen, built in %
Car Garege 2 Servants Quarters, standing
on nearly half an acre, Price £4,500
nearest offer. For viewing apply Ralph
A. Beard, Hardwood Alley or Phone
26,1.51—6n.



—

That HENRY HEIDE INCORPORAT_
ED, a Corporation organized under the
laws of the State of New York in the
United States of America, whose trade or
business address is No, 313 Hudson Street,
City and State of New York, United
States of America, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part A
of Register in respect of candies of ali
kinds, candied nut products, namely,
chocolate covered nuts, chocolate roast-
ed almonds, chocolate and icing, and
will be entitled to register the same

one month from the 20th day
cf January 1951 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my

office.
h day of January, 1951.
Dated this 29t oo at ealis

istrar of Trade Marks.
= 20.1. 51—3n.



T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Overt 100 expernve rovels
selling off at

2 for $1.00
The space is needed for new

stock. Select your Book Bargain
now.

We have just opened SHEET
PLASTIC in different colours for
Lamp Shades.

AT
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY |
and }

__

COOL GARDIE — Worthing. Drawing
end dining rooms, 3 bedrooms with run-
Ist.

SEA-GAZE — On-the-sea, Maxwells




| TAKE NOTICE

|





That J. & B ATKINSON LIMITED a
Company incorpoarted undew the Eng-
lish Companies Act, Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is 24.
Old Bond Street, London, W.I., Englend
has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of perfumes, toilet preparations
essential oils, cosmetics, hair lotions,
dentifrices and soaps, and will be en-
titled to register the same after one
month from the 30th day of Janu-
ary 1951 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 28th day of January, 1951

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
30 1.51-—3n,

TAKE NOTICE —
QUIX





That JOSEPH WATSON & SONS
LIMITED, a Company incorporated
under the English Companies Act.

Manufacturers, whose trade or busines*
address is. Whitehall Soap Works, White-
hall Road, Leeds, England has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A“ of Register in respect of
common soap, detergents, cleaning,
polishing, scouring and abrasive pre-
parations of all kinds, and will be enti-
tled to register the same after one month
from the 30th day of January 1951,
unless some person shail in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office,

Dated this 29th day of January, 1951
H. WULLLAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks

30.1.51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE



That THE IMPERIAL VARNISH &
COLOR, COMPANY LIMITED, a Com-
peny registered under the laws of On-
tario, a Province of the Dominion of
Canada, whose trade or business address
is 2-20 Morse Street, Toronto 8, Onta_
rio, Canada, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” cf
Register in respect of enamels, paints,
varnishes and lacquers, and
be entitled to register the same after
ene month from the 30th day of
January 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in dupli-
cate to me at my office of opposition of
such registration. The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 29th day of January, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
30.1 51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE
PIN-UP

That PIN-UP COLD PERM-WAVE
LIMITED a Company incorporated under
the English Companies Act, Manufactur-
ers, whose trade or business address is
59-61, Park Royal Road, London, N.W. 10,
England, bas applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of preparations for waving
the hair, sachets for use in waving the
hair, toilet preparations, hair lotions,
hair fasteners and haw supports, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 30th day
of January 1961 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in dupli-
cate to me at my office of opposition
of such registration, The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 29th day of January, 1961.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
30.1 51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE





24 FLOWERS
EAU DE
COLOGNE



That J, & E, ATKINSON LIMITED, 4
Compary incorporated under the Eng-
lish Companies Act, Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is 24,
Old Bond Street, London, W.1., Eng-
land, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
with respect of perfumes, tollet prepara.
tions, essential oils, cosmetics, hair lo-
tions, dentifrices and soaps, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 30th day of January,
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to m*
at my office of opposition of such reg,
istration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office.

Dated this 29th day of January, 1951.



H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
30.1 51—3n,
P| LE Don’t suffer an
longer. For quic!

relief—treat painful piles with
medicated Dr. Chase’s Ointment,
Soothes as it heals. A safe home
treatment for over 50 years. 33

DR: CHASE’S
Antiseptic OINTMENT

Don’t Miss The
— at —

RALPH BEARD'S

FURNISHING SHOW
ROOMS

In Hardwood Alley

Mahogany, upright chairs $17.00
per pr. Tub Chairs $32.00 per pr.
Rockers $36.00 per pr. Streamlined
Morris Chairs $28.00 each; Cock-
teil tables $8.00 each, Morris
Sprung cushions $8.00 each. Un-
sprung cushions $6.00 each also
in all mahogany 3 ft. 6 bedends
$35.00 per pr. Vono Springs $16.00
cach, Complete Simmons type bed-
Steads 3 ft. 6G. $16.00 each, 3 ft
$14.00 each. Unpainted rush bot-
tom chairs $3.50 each, with arms
4.50 each, rockers $5.00 each
Aiso a numerous variety of good
tlass second hand furnture. Open
trom 8 a.m, te 4 p.m. each day
Phone 4683





Bargains





neg,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
MONKEY BABY





a a ne

i

A NICE PIECE of sleight of hand with a nappy. Mrs. Oulshaw—-
she has always been interested inthe development of babies to adult
life; she has studied the evolution of apes and monkeys—makes Peter
much more comfortable, thank ycv

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay



In Touch With Barbados

. .
Coastal Station
CABLE and Wireless (W.L) Ltd advise
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through their Bar-
bados Coast Station:—
M.S. Oranjestad,

Sch. Mary M, Lewis, Sch, Emmanuel] | M.T. Skandinavia,
C. Gordon, Sch. D’Ortac, M.V. Sedge s. Canadian Challenger, 4.5. Southern
field, Sch, Enterprise S., Sch. Molly Nh.) Counties, ss. Colombie, s,s, Uruguay;
Jones, Sch. Lucille M. Smith, Yacht) $-*- Defender. ss. Silver Walnut, 8.»
Juanita, Sch, United Pilgrim S Nigaristan, s.s. Monareh of the Sea, ss

ARRIVALS r Kettleman Hills, s.s. Nieuw Amsterdam

Sch. Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt. King s. Mauretania, «.s. Empress of Scot

for St. Vincent. ' ind; ss, Willemstad, ss, Mardene, ss.
DEPARTURES Alcoa Pegasus, 6.2. Hat Creek, ss. Kapo-

M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt ia, $8. London Mariner, s.s. Mormacsea

Gumbs, for Dominica,

RATES OF EXCHANGE

January 31, 1961



CANADA
MAIL NOTICES 62 8/10% pr, Cheques on
Bankers 61 8/10% pr
aie bs Demand
MAILS for St. Vincent by the Sch Drafts § 61,65% pr.
Belqueen will be closed at the General (ae 4 Sight Drafts 615/10% pr.
Post Office as under:— 63 8/10% pr Cable
Parcel mail at 12 noon, Registered mail] 42 3/16% pr Currency 00 3/10% pr
at 1.30 p.m., Ordinary mail at 2.30 p.m a Coupons 696/10% pr.
on the 2nd February 1951. sue pr. Silver 20% pr.

GOVERNMENT NOTICE



TOKEN IMPORT SCHEME ON CANADA AND U5S.A,
>

Importers of approved commodities under the Token Import
Scheme from Canada and the U.S.A. are hereby notified that vouch-
ers issued to Canadian Exporters and importers’ quotas established on
the U.S.A, under the scheme may be transferred from the commodity
for which they were established to some other commodity within the
same group, provided the amount allocated is not increased,

Vouchers or quotas cannot be transferred from one exporter or
importer to another.

Controller of Supplies.
1.2.51—2n



SS

Round The Town

will find



Send US Your Orders for . .

you

The Sunshine Parlour

3rd Floor Alex Bayley's Building

Where many city workers enjoy A
their lunch in a cheery
atmosphere

Broad Street



You can always







STEAM PIPE AND FITTINGS
ime =6'To-day's Prices ssuva repeated in a hurcy

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

——

PAGE SEVEN



Psychology SHIPPING NOTICES

—And Peter
The Chimp

MRS, CULSHAW’S EXPERI.
MENT IN MOTHER LOVE

_ EIGHT-MONTH-OLD Peter
Culshaw slipped from his foster-
mother’s arms into a blue-paint-
ed playpen . and crawled for
the first time.

He was proud of his achieve-
ment. Peter sat in the middle of
the pen and grinned—far wider
than most babies of his age.

Banged with delight

Then he seized two rattles and
banged them on the floor with
delight. There should have been
nothing remarkable in this _pic-
ture of a proud mother with her
baby Except that Peter is
an African chimpanzee,

Apart from a short while after
his birth he is now enjoying the
full delights of maternal affec-
tion,

He is the latest experiment in
juvenile psychology by State Reg-
istered Nurse and Midwife Mrs,
Doris Culshaw.

Peter lives in a comfortabie
well-furnished Victorian house
in a high-class residential “Gis-
trict in Southport, Lancs,

Blowing bubbles

“I've had him for five weeks,
said Mrs. Culshaw. “I bought
him from people in Nigeria, 1
intend to bring him up exactly
like a_ baby boy.”

Deftly she changed Petor’s
nappies (“He cries like a human
if I don’t’). Then she dressed
him for bed, He clapped his

hands when his milk was brought
in. For a minute he drank it
like a model baby. Then he blew
bubbles in the cup.

Daily routine is kept, strictly to
a time-table. Peter never wakes
at night. Just now he is cutting
his wisdom teeth, It makes him
fretful. So he bites a bone ring
for relief,

“It's astonishing how. he Te-
sponds to human affections,” saa
Mrs, Culshaw. “He is not treated

as a freak, He wears a vest,
petticoat, jumper, and long
rompers, and has a bath every
day.
Play-pals
“His future depends on his

mental development, but I do not
think he will ever talk, His own
mother was shot by natives, and
1 am really the first mother he
has ever had.”

Modern-age-minded Mrs, Cul-
shaw believes in play-pals for
Peter. He spends
three French poodles.
enjoy it.

lay time with
All four














The M.V. “Caribbee" will be
arriving here on the 8th, and will
be accepting Cargo & Passengers
for Dominica, Antigua, Montser~
rol) Nevis de St, Kitte. Sailing
Saturday 10th,

The M.V. “Daerwood will ac-
cept Cargo and Passengers for. St.
Lucia, Grenada, & Aruba and Pas-
sengers only for St. Vineent, Date
cf departure to be notified,

B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc,
Telephone: 4047

and Pier Head







depend

on the natural creamy.

flavour of
@O A K Brena Powdéled Milk

Users have marvelled at the consistent
creamy flavour of “Oak” brand powdered
milk. “How is it” they ask, “that through-
out the year “Oak” milk powder can be
distinguished by the same delightful fla~-
vour?” The secret is simple. The cows
producing the milk from which “Oak”
brand milk is prepared are fed all the
year round on the rich sunny grasslands
of Hunter Valley, Australia. This ensures
healthy cows yielding rich ik and of
a consistent flavour throughout the year.
This rich, wholesome milk is packed under
the most hygienic conditions so that all
the natural vitamins and creamy flavour
are retained. “Oak” dissolves readily in
water and is ideal for drinkimg, Coffee,
Cocoa, Etc.

Don’t worry over mounting milk bills.

. “Oak” brand milk powder with its excele
lent price value allows you and your family
to drink milk freely

12-0z. Tin 71c. 3-lb Tim $2.50





Ww.aA
Alleyne
Stuart

Medford

Arthur (Gré &
& Sampson Lid
Jas. A. Tudor

J. 0. Tudor

John D. Taylor

Prov.)









Ashby & Medford Ltd
8. E. Cole & Co., Ltd
Knights Ltd., City Pharmac
Knights Ltd., Phoe Pr macy
B. M. Fergussor
Jonnson & a
A. A. Brow
‘ Harold Proverbs |

SR
®

————— = NOW OBTAINABLE AT

(fos) Z
ae,
ele

/

=

W. M. Ford

Bookers Drug Stores Ltd
Aipha Pharmacy
Gittens Crone,





N. 8. Sainsbury
Successor to
Sam Gibbs
H. L. Hutson
c. C. King
Nelson Pharma
Empire Pharma
I Vv. Seott

nepelitan Pharmacy
Noe Roach & Cc











_
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW; ROYAL NETHERLANDS
ZEALAND. LINE, LIMITED STEAMSHIP CO,
. : Sailing from Amsterdam, Dover attd
‘ot : mo A.N.Z. LINE Madeira “Cottica’ 2nd, 3rd, 9h
LS TONGARIRIO” is scheduled to | February, 1 MS. ‘Bonaire’ 9th,
sail Adelaide January 24th, Melbourne | 10th. !6th Mareh 195)
February 9th, Sydney Pebruary 17th, Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam-—
Erisbane February 23rd, Arriving at|ms. “Helena” 12th, lth, February 1982,
Barbados 22nd March, 1961 ms. “Willemstad §th, 5th, Februaty

This vessel has ample space for
Frozen and General cargo.
Cargo accepted on through Bills

Hard | 1951, m.s, “Oranjestad” 8th, 15th March

issr.
Sailing, to Trinidad

ot

Paramaribo and

Lading with transhipment at Trin‘dad | Georgetown—m.s, “Bonaire” 27th Janu.
for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward! ary 1951; m.s, “Cottica” 20th, February
and Leeward Islands, 1951; m.s. “Helena” 3rd March 1951.

For further particulars apply;—
FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD.,
TRINIDAD,

B.W.I.
DA COSTA & CO. LTD,

BARBADOS,
B.W.I.

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guiara, Cura-
cao etem.s. “Oranjestad” ist February
1951
| Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp, Amster-
dem—m.s. “Oranjestad” 23rd March 1951,

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO,, LTD.,

Agents.







Albvaa. Shere Co.

NEW YORK SERVICE

S.S. “Essi”. sails 1€th January srrives Barb
S.S. “Byfjord” sails 2nd February e arbados

NEW ORLEANS
18th . January
Ist February

eee

4th
l4th

SERVICE

February







—

Steamer sails

A 2nd *
“ 15th



CANAD/AN SERVICE
OUTBBOUND

Name of Ship

“ALCOA PILGRIM”
“ALCOA PENNANT”
ALCOA POLARIS”

Sails
Halifax
January 26th
February 9th
February 23r.

Arrives
Barbados
February Sth
February 20th.
March 6th
5 a Pern eae

Them vessels have limited passenger accommodation.

3.8
5.8.
s.



ROBERT THOM LTD.—Noew York and Gulf Service.
Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Canadian Service,

% 4,4, ~
Leeos PLPC PEL PEPE LLLP PEEL ALLELE,

NOTICE
“ISLANDSID

—~

Sailing for London direct on or about 15th February
1951—accepting passengers—Fare £77 and Cargo.

ROBERT THOM LIMITED,
(Agents)

Telephone 4228.
PVR EG GOOG LS POD SIO





oe



yee
4

8. 8.



PLPEELELIE OE ES AEE AES

G






| PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia., for sail-

ing to Europe.

The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam.

Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.





THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LIMITED.

NOTICE

Due to the large increase in the price of



Fuel Oil the Company are now forced to
advance the present Surcharge from 20% to
27%,

The new Surcharge will take effect on all
bills rendered for the month of February and

onwards,
V. SMITH,

General Manager.







Tro



Pee

THE ROYAL
STORE

Announces

yOoU!!

As from lst Fehruary our
0} peaoulel oq [IM sseuTsNg

No. 12 HIGH STREET

To mark the event we will
open attractive new stocks
and will be delighted to
welcome our old friends
in the new premises.





1
'



PAGE EIGHT





CLYDE WALCOTT AN
ALL-ROUND ATHLETE
By BM.

THE NAME Clyde Walcott,

now familiar wherever the

great game of cricket is played once rang to the echo within

the walls of the old school,

just a stone’s throw from the

} “ancient city church of St. Mary’s.



M.C.C. Defeat
S. Australia



Wy

“a

ya
aero

London Frvress Service
(From Our Own Correspondent)
ADELAIDE, Jan. 31.

The M.C.C. touring side (211
and 220) beat South Australia
(126 and 153) here to-day by 152
runs. This was their fourth suc-
cessive win and their sixth vic-
tory of the tour including four
successes in first class cricket
matches,

It was also their second win
against South Australia who pro-
vided the tourists with their first
First Class win last October.

The victory should put the team
in good heart for the Fourth Test
which opens on this same Ade-
Jaide ground on Friday.

In a comparatively low scoring
#ame the MCC held the initiative
throughout and the State. still

needing 186 to save defeat at the ®tmosphere where cricket was not Glass No. Yacht

For it was at this little walled
school on Mason Hall Street, with
its tiny play ground, that Clyde
first played “bat and ball,” a mod-
est beginning. for one whpse
doughty deeds with the bat, and
behind the stumps have thrilled
thousands, at points as far apart
as Bridgetown and Calcutta, Lon-
don and Kingston,

But Clyde is nei only a crick-
eter. He is also a footballer -of
outstanding ability, and has rep-
resented the colony on more than
one occasion, And he is versatile
too. He is as much at home in the
full back line where his powerful
kick means so much to the de-
fence, as he is in the front line
dribbling his way towards the
goal from the right wing. Speed
and accuracy are his two main
virtues and-what else can be re-
quired of a first class feotballer?

Just 25

But to return to the lad, Clyde,
and his early activities. He was
25 years old a fortnight ago as he
was born on January 17, 1926,
almost at the moment the M.C.C.
cricketers under Hon, F. G. Cal-
thorpe were trying conclusions
with our boys at Kensington. His
father Frank Walcott, engineer of
the Advocate Printing Plant, was
a bit of a cricketer himself. Frank
was a regulary member of the Em-
pire Ist XI for some years and a
colleague of players like H. C.
Griffith, who captained the team,
E. A. Martindale, C. D. Spooner
and E. A Vv. Williams—all
household names in cricket cir-
cles in and beyond the West
Indies,

Big Brother
So Clyde started, at least in an



B





WOMAN BEATS JUNGLE
WOUNDED HUNTER

ARBADOS, ADVOCATE



From a spot i

Paiace comes

From HAROLD DALE

SYDNEY,

{OM a sweltering, rain-soaked jungle of Australia the
story of a woman’s heroism seeped 10,000 miles across

the world until it reached the King at Buckingham Palace.
The story began with Ted Foster, a crocodile hunter, hack-
ing his way through the jungle towards the Wearyan River

in the Northern Territory.

__ He stooped to squirm through an entangling vine, and
his loaded rifle went off. He was badly wounded,
Foster’s black tracker made him comfortable—and be-

gan to run.

In a deck-chair on the veranda of her home, 60 miles
away, sat Mrs. Ruth Heathcock, fingering some sewing.

Her mounted
band was away
the monsoon
ering,

policeman hus-
on patrol,
clouds
Around her the

stumbling and gasping up the

Regatta On
Saturday

_. The third regatta of the 1951
Yachting Season takes place on
Saturday under the auspices of
the Royal Barbados Yacht Club.

Handicaps and starting times
are as follows:—





Start at Flag





















beginning of play this morning U2Known, and right from the F 10. Wizard a
with six wickets in hand never ‘tart his most serious rival was R 13 Ranger 2.30 Red.
looked like getting them and were D5 elder brother Keith, Whether * 482 Circe
all out 153 runs short of victory, 0 the lawn, or at school, Keith, 5 Mae ee en
The scores :— bigger and stronger was always 7 6 Peter Pan 2.31 Yellow
MCC, ist Innings 211 Clyde’s most serious opponent. © 10 Van Thorndyke
ae ous Senltge pe = But Clyde was never loath to try > a ake —e
S. Australia 2nd Tadinge: *° conclusions with “him whenever . = Aes
Duldig i.b.w. Wright a5 the opportunity offered, I ® Skippy 2.33 Yellow.
a ¢ Hutton, b Wright 42 From St. Mary’s elementary Shee _
Inch c & b Wright r ) sec , > x auntiess
Hele b Wright gz School they went on to Comber- ; 12. Dawn 2.95 Red
Ridings ¢ Close b Wright mere, and finally to Harrison p 4 Seabird
Michael i.b.w. Statham. 12 College where both bo¥s shone in ee ee ansstula
Smart b Brown ......... 6 athletics. Keith na B 6 Flirt
Bowley b Tattersall 3 prs sprint record wets the Se L 6 Eagle
Noblet stpd. McIntyre b Hollies 14 ae ee : ia) gE gy 9 Olive Blossom 2.36 Yellow
McLean c Sheppard b Hollies 3 School days were over and gained Db 12 Rainbow
Wilson not out . 1 a reputation as a hard hitting ——— ee
Extras (1 bye, 2 legs, 4 no balls) 7 batsman which has hardly dimin- 3 Rascal ;
- ished B 461 Fantasy
Total . 152 r e 1 2 Invader 2.37 Red
Ste It was Clyde’s style, however, 1 7 Mohawk
Pall of wickets: 1 for 62, 2 for 90, 3 which attracted attention, Of a — 3 War Cl si
for 90, 4 for 104. 5 for 123, 6 for 125, 7 somewhat slimmer build than I ee

for 141, 8 for 147, 9 for 152.



Reen 2.38 Yellow.







BOWLING ANALYSIS Keith, Clyde adopted a more up- —. sesideba duis tan sides
aes 9 M ¥ hog eee the wicket, and ‘ Fo morenattn yar
Am $ is enhanced his naturally lon 7 -
pela s . a -? veach. Today he stands over 6 tte Bia Siren cas
Wright 5 12 i ov 5 and still there is no evidence of a K 35 Edril
Meilies 4 © $8 2 crouch in his batting style. 1 Gnat
Me cennotsets Bk SOR de At College Keith started the ) Se ia 46k: RORY
land ae ee ct century making habit, and Clyde —. 7° wa
aren SOLE was oo slow in following his ex- » 26 Comet
- ample, c 1 Missbehave 242 Red.
Ss e 3 Madness
LONDON, Jan, 31, een aee B 7 Moyra Bidir
Four British boxing champions I well remember the occasion 6 9 Okapi
— Jack Gardner, heavyweight; when the Garrison Sports Club— Cc 8 Peggy Nan 2.43 Yellow
Don Cockell, light-heavyweight; Volunteers of former days—came © ei riba eres
Eddie Thomas, welterweight; and in for a drubbing at the hands of p 5 Mischief ne
Bill W. Thompson, lightweight— the College team which included C Seamp 244 Red,
arrived at London airport today the Walcott brothers, “Boogles” © pti dake
from Johannesburg. They were C. B. Williams, and Bunny § 1 Gipsy
aecompanied by Les Allen, mid- Smith, kK 28 Thunder
dleweight from Benworth, War- “Puss” Parris and I formed the * 40 Vamoose 245 Yellow.
wickshire,—Reuter, mainstay of the Army attack, but “_ ™ SERRA scbienpacmeenare
the boys showed scant courtesy to Kk 29 Cyclone 246 Red.
Ti Ff F C nasta us. Clyde hit fast bowler Harold —— Te senate coe pee
andar r; | Blackman straight overhead for in Gannes te aaa

DISCARDING TO A
FROZEN PILE
By M. HARRISON-GRAY

HERE is a marked diver-
gence of Opinion on this
Py subject One schoo! holds
that your partner, if he has
deliberately {frozen the pack
must have the expectation o
eventually wgepting tt You
should therefore co-orwrate
by doing all in your power to
avoid giving iC away, even
with no expectancy of being
able to take it yourself, going
to the
in any
cards
The other school maintains
that when your = pariwver
freezes the pack, he cannot
have any idea of how you are
Placed. [f all your cards are
@angerous, it its foolish to
‘fight the pack by throv-
ing into it wild cards if after-
wards you have to give it
away. as your opponents will
then get the benefit of any
wild cards with which you
haye fed it
In practice, the sanest view
is probably a middle course
As ever, no hard and fast rule
Can be Iaid down. Each situ
ation must be judged on its
merits. espectally in relation
to the number of cards held
by your side and by the
opposition
21@ more cards you hola
and the more evenly they are
distributed between you and
your partacr, the more ch
you will have of eventy
taking the pack It Js
these ocenstons that you must
discard wi cards in prefer
ence to breoking up pairr or
discarding odd cards ‘

lengths of throwing
or all of your wild







London Exoress Service



PIULLDOZE, THE NOISY NEIGHBOR,
UPSTAIRS, KNOWS HIS RIGHTS NOBODY
CAN TELL HIM WHERE TO GET OFF.






7 LOOK, FAL*



Y To BE A CRAB, <)
BUT IT’S 3AM.
AND WE'RE RIGHT
UNDER YOU» 1










=f LISTEN, BLUENOSE-
I DON'T WANT WHEN I WANT To

KNOW WHAT TIME
ITIS, I'LL ASK you!
NOW MAKE LIKE
A BREEZE AN’

six, time and again, and revelled

in making 185. “Boogles” got 100,

‘and altogether the school ended
up close to 400, with wickets in
hand. This was about 1942 and
Clyde has not yet lost the habit of
hitting sixes off any kind of
bowling, :

Island Player

He also stuck 180 on the Wan-
derers score board at the Bay, and
had his first call to do duty for the
island in 1942 while still at school,

I accompanied that team, led by
T. N. Peirce to Trinidad and one
of the things I well remember
about Clyde was his nervousness,
as he went in to bat, It was his
birthday, and we had all wished
him luck at the hotel, and before
the game started. But it was Lance
Pierre who gave him his first
present—an egg. He clean bowled
the youngster before he could
start, and then later, apologised in
a way, for doing it, But it was
all good fun, Three years later
Clyde got 314 against Trinidad
and against the same Pierre. All
in the game, boys, all in the
game. He played for the W.I. in
1948, and got 100 in his first game
against the M.C.C, And then on
to India.

He has scored, centuries and
double centuries with ease and
grace, and today he is brecketed
with Don Tallon, the great Aus-

Registered U.S Pulant Oftew














BOUNCING








parry



CAN'T A MAN SLEEP A LITTLE
LATE ONE MORNING WITHOUT
YOUR KIDS BANGING ON PLATES,

RAISING A RUCTION? I’M
» WARNING YOU I'LL.
CALL THE COPS! |



N.B.—The 4th Pegatta will be held on
Saturday 10th February 1051.
H. BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter,





tralian, as one of the finest wicket
keeper-batsmen in the world,

Retiring

Still he is somewhat shy and
retiring, and there was some lift-
ing of eyebrows in the circle of
his family and friends when a
newspaper report from India
showed Clyde addressing a Synod.

In private life Clyde is in the
Insurance business, but in a few
months will go up to England to
play the game he loves so well,
for his living.

He has been engaged by one of
the Lancashire League Clubs, and
will therefore join a band of Bar-
badian and West Indian cricketers

which include Frank Worrell
Everton Weekes, George Headley,
E. A. Martindale, and several
Australians and Indiens,

He will take with nim tne best
wishes of every lover of the game
in these parts, who like myself
look forward to great things by

this big, big-hearted crickete:
against the Australians in Austra-
lia, and later against the Indians
at Kensington,

B

an y Jimm Hatlo

They'll Do It Every Time :





Eyur Give A LISTEN ON THE DAY
AFTER ONE OF HIS ALL-NIGHT
BOUTS WHEN HE WANTS SHUT-EYE «+





T77,

A¢






BALLS AND



}



and trail,
were gath- At once Mrs. Heathcock contacted

2 jungle. a Flying Woctor service on her
Suddenly Foster's tracker came



He fell at her feet, panting

portable radio transmitter.

A Flying Doctor replied: “I'll

African Football
Has Magic Elixir
With Witch Doctor

DURBAN, South Africa,
The most important member of
Durban’s 12-man African football
team never kicks the ball, He is
a witch-doctor or ‘“Unyanga,’

upon whose “mtakati” (magic)
depends the outcome of every
match,

The witch-doctor is paid a re-
taining fee of £10 to £12 a month,
and if you watch a footbali field
on a dark night before an im-
portant league match you will see!
him earning his keep with the
surreptitious making cf the
mtakati,

From a cow’s horn carried at his
belt, he smears the goal-posts and
crossbar with “umuti” (medicine)
before creeping across the field to
distribute strange articles.

He has already smeared the
boots and togs of the players with
umuti, and on the day of the
match he will treat the legs of
each member of the team,

Ball Gets It Too

By some means he will manage
to have the ball in his possession
before the game—long enough *9
practise his sorcery,

On the day of the match sup-
porters of the opposing teams take
their seats, keeping well clear of
rival supporters for fear of a spell
being cast on them to make their
team lose.

The first team
field anxiously watching the
ground for evidence vl mtakati

The opposing team enters from

another point, taking care not to!
tread on the ground over which)

their rivals have walked, They
might be contaminated by witeh-
craft, which will cause their skill
to deteriorate.

The star player of the home
team makes a valiant sally to the
visitors’ goal but misses by a bare
inch, “Mtakati,” the home sup-
porters howl despondently.

And when the game is lost, it
is not the skill of the team that is
at fault. It is the mtakati of the
visitors’ Unyanga that won them
the game.—P)





PUBLIC NOTICE

THE PUBLIC are asked to note that the business
formerly carried on by RADIO DISTRIBUTION
(BARBADOS) LTD. will from the date of this

Notice be

BARBADOS REDIFFUSION SERVICE LID.

There will be no change in the Office of the Company

which also continues under the same Management.



START

Bb &

10,000 miles from Buckingham

heroism—and its reward



runs on to the

THEM OFF






n the Empire

this story of

need a landing ground cut in the
jungle.” And at that moment the
cut the stery of Foster's accident.
monsoon broke with a roar.

Mrs. Heathcock did not hesi-
tate. She was alone except for
two black boys and their primi-
tive canoe—a hollowed tree trunk
—but in this craft she set out
with them down the McArthur
River, boiling and flooding under
the impact of the tropical rain.

The log canoe shot bobbing and
swaying from the river’s mouth
into the stormy waters of the
Gulf of Carpentaria, and for the

Ext three days and, three nights

two blacks and the white
woman, soaked and battered by
sea and weather, paddled and
baled their tree trunk to the
Wearyan River,

FOOTBALL
IN U.K.

LONDON, Jan, 31,
The results of the F.A.C, fourth
round replay were as follows:—

Manstield Town 2, Sheffield
Enited 1, after extra time. Mans-
field are now away to Blackpool,
end Chelsea at home to Fulham
in the fifth round on February 10.

The results of League
Southern, were:—

ihree,

Bristol Rovers 1, Torquay United

; Southern United 1, Bristol City

League Three Northern:—
Stockport. County 5, Gateshead
2.—Reutes.

STANDARD: BRIDGE

By M. Harrison-Gray

Dealer : South
North-South game



2
Dp

|

‘ _ Failure to observe a stan- >
card one led to disaster 2
* on this deal. South bie One $
§ Heart. North One Spade. §
and South Two Diamonds. '
North
the possibility of a misfit and
a pass would be a wise move
since Two Diamonds looked
ike a tolerabie contract
But he felt that “a six-card
suit must be rebid.” and his

¢ sensed
?
Two Spades was doubled by
>
>

should nave

East hen this came reund
to North he tried to escape
into Three Diamonds. which
} Was doubled by West
Rejecting the lead of @ J, <
as his trumps were no good’ )
for over-ruffing purposes.
West led @ 2 in order to pro-
tect

his Heart holding
Three

uick rounds of
trumps held South to. six
tricks for a quite unneces-
sary penalty of 800



CARR AAR

ee
London Express Service



carried on by



ot

ee

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, - 1951

No Red Rats



Means Peace

LONDON. In 1938, the Skolts said there
Robert Crottet, explorer and would be war the folfowing year
writer, has just returned from a because the reindeer was shedding

four-menth stay with the Skolt
Lapps in the Arctic Circle with
good news for the superstitious.

its coat in the wrong season.

Said Crottet:

“Their predictions are more re-
liable than those of some news—

The Skolts told hiin that there papers.
will be peace in Europe for three “Their prediction for ihree
generations, though there will be generations of peace, they said,

wars “far away.’ They said they
knew this because of the signs of

was based on the fact that there
was a marked absence of red



AILY

nature. rats.” —I.N.S,

TO AID



At the river
Once at the river, Mrs. Heath-
cock, fainting with exhaustion
urged her two boys to the task
of battling through the jungle
growth for ten terrible miles to
where Foster lay,

=,
si
=
Ce

Baby
Pawd

They reached him on the sixth
day after the accident. The tough
hunter was still alive. With their
last strength the woman and the
two boys began to hack a clearing
for the Flying Doctor’s plane.
The plane came, as promised, but
even as they heard its engine
Foster died.









oe nom
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB

(Local and Visiting Mem-

MEMBERS of the St. Lucy's
“First Aid Class" are planning for
a Gala Time for their dance which
comes off on Saturday night 3rd

Mrs. Heathcock’s story has be-
come an epic in the “out-back.”
It happened nine yeas ago. So

” Feb. 1951 at Barrows House, St.
«why tell it now? Ecce, Dake dale)
* This dance which is in Aid of — ON —
Two Fridays back Mrs. Heath- “The Girl's First Aid Class” is SATURDAY, FEBRUARY
cock received a silver gilt medal} )}) under the patronage of Dr. A. C. Srd,. 9 m
KIRTON, P.M.O, , P.

—making her a new MBE. for |!
her gallantry.—L.E.S. ’

Lap-Dog Killer
DUNDEE, South Africa.

F. Wellman told a meeting of
farmers here that a Pekinese has
E known to kill a sheep. “The
|

Musie by HARRY BANNIS-
ter and his Orchestra.
Admission to Ballroom 2/-
1.2.51,—3ns,

Barrows, St. Lucy.

Musie by C. Gitten’s Orchestra.
Admission 3/-.

Refreshments on Sale.

S|

—







so-called lap-dog attacks like a
jackal, worrying and harrying a
sheep, not like a dog; which jumps
and bites’, he said. —C.P.











The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 6.16 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.00 p.m.
Moon (New) February 6
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Water: 11.09 a.m.

YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington) .21 in.

Total for Month to Yester-

| day: 2.67 ins.

Temperature (Max.) 81.5° F.

Temperature (Min.) 73.5° F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E;
3 p.m. E.N.E,

Wind Velocity: 12 miles pes
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.971;
(3 p.m.) 29.912.

a



Crease
light Sports
28° ins.

A Special
excellent
or Smart





Wear

wide

for
Suits.



a tat et fae ta tae

Per Yd.

What's on Today

Fela De Kuh’s Exhibition of
oil paintings and pencil
sketches at “The Pavilion”
Hastings, 10.00 a.m.

Advocate’s Photo Exhibition
at Barbados Museum 10
a.m.

R. J. MacLeod’s Exhibition
of oil paintings at Barba-
dos Museum 10 a.m.

Meeting cf St. Michael's
Vestry, Parochial Build-
ings 2 p.m.

|
{
Mobile Cinema at Warners’



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad St.

Moygashel



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Rose”





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Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE an BARBADOS ADVOCATF. HENRY / [OB•SOCCNCSS SAKF tCX7>TVMAT l*J TV T B 6PO P MAOOC MWTN TO •UTS OOS7A AMD SOU W-WTSV TO * %  HIMI -**( %  • %  10 : B0U6"T £* %  0B B*CM *3w U. M *L T-o St** P y_ T^ PuiTLite GiT THMFffD 1OrtJO TMH BCWPEC PECQCS M0M3MTL *TfJ • DE Aff UwCLE A-OAUHT TENM* AHB COM"'** TO •IP%KID WOUTH WITH UC--.S*J'TtT u it *Ou -*ftt. *THarVDt>*.v *LL TWBVOC •B HO-i-O-rS TVt TMB >V**OTTA TEl_e\-i COstP-^-'TV**... T*C UQBE J TffuEv".60W'J£T<,'p THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 1. IMI Her* is what to do rOR THE BEST QUALITY & SHADES %  rs-.'-iV *,-.-. INSIST ON OVSH-INDUlOfHCf Too mw!i good toon ami dunk' bat:* v* tfow". **r it'OM 1 too:fi* "4 lint wwtt-ht. couf r> rwd m no dm*. COUGH LOZENGES CONFECTIONERY TOUTOIIIl %  „•",' BONBON'S (Liqueur Chornlalp) box 5 MKLTIS FAVOURITE CANNES, hnx 51.02. S1.BS ''^GLAMOUR CHOCOLATES, hnx ....... HOc. MELTIS COFFEE CHOCOLATE. MINT CREAMS, hnx. FRY'S CHOCOLATE HAZEL NUTS, Tin BLACK MAGIC CHOCOLATES, lb. .S1.32 52.02 52.14 PASCAL!. GLUCOSE BARELY SUGAR. Tin Mr.. 56c' Canned Vegetables Dutch Sauerkraut S .28 .1 Asparagus Tip. 85 Pants Pots (Extra Fins) 58 ,. Gardtn Peas .38 .. Young Carrots .35 .. Cauliflower (Whole) 54 .. Sliced Bean. .45 .. Pauls Pols (Tcl Fins) 50 Syrups & Marmalade Lyle's Golden Syrup 5 .42 S .23 Brechln Castle Golden Syrup .69 Golden Shred Marmalade 47 Silver Shred Marmalade 47 Hartley's Marmalade .38 S.A. Marmalade (2 lb) 46 Trinidad Marmalade .36 Juices and Squashes Dominica Orange Juice. $ .31 Bahama Pineapple Juice 53 Letona Tomato Juice .34 Trinidad Orange Juice 39 Orange and Grapefruit Juice 28 Grape fruit Juice 24 Clayton's Orange Squash 96 Clayton's Lemon Squash 93 Canned Meat Genuine Strasbourg Pate de Fol Gras in Ware Containers (Sealed) $12.51 — $6.84 Lambs'Tongues .. .70 Corned Reel with Cereal C S B Brealdast Rolls Swirls Ox Tongues Swihs Potted Meat Liqueurs, Wines Etc. Dutch Xummel Green Chartreuse Anisette Paarl Tawny Port. I'indlaters Mitre Part Madeira MoBcatel $4.25 7.50 5.00 2.16 4.00 3.60 2.88 Canned Fish Krart Fish Supreme $ .34 Pilchards $ .36 .21 Mackerel 36 Chum Salmon (Tolls) .51 Chum Salmon (' %  ) .28 Fillets ol Anchovies .30 .31 .40 3.20 .23 MEAT IHI'AHIMI VI Prime Australian Beef including ROAST STEAK STEW CANADIAN SALMON BACON & HAM SLICED Salami Sausages per lb $109 Apples, per case $10.00, per lb_30c




- :
ph av.

ESTABLISHED 1895



Truman And
Pleven Agree

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.

PRESIDENT TRUMAN and the French Premier, |

M. Pleven, in a joint statement today said that
the United States and France would never neglect
any genuine opportunity to settle international
problems by negotiation.

“Discussions between the President and the Prime
Minister have shown again that no menace or
manoeuvre will succeed in breaking our fundamen-
tal unity,’’ the statement said.

In Washington, in a 1,500 word communique issued seven
hours after their final meeting ended, the leaders announced

they had agreed that aggréssion must not be rewarded, or
the menace of aggression appeased.

Lady Astor
Protests | Bast in their efforts to maintain
their security and the assurance

: LONDON, |of their independence.
_ American-born Lady They agreed that every effort
Nancy Astor scornfully criti- must be exerted to bring about
cised claims by Britain’s [jan honourable solution in Korea.
Socialist Government that Both countries would support
more women than ever are action toward deterring aggres-
employed in industry. sion and preventing the spread of
Speaking at a meeting of || hostilities beyond Korea.
the National Society for the Truman promised Pleven that
pee = Ninna to American aid for French Union
c ee n, Lady stor said. }forces and the national armies of
ere children are con-
cerned I have no politics. ft
see the Government are
boasting about the number
of women in industry,



The Communique made the
following points,
; Far East—The President and

the Prime Minister were “in com-
plete agreement” as to the neces-
sity for resisting aggression and
|assisting free nations in the Far

China would be continued
increased quantities of
material would be expedited.

and
war





Progress On
Atom Weapons



the Associated States of Indo-|*%¢ preparations for more full

} active isotopes were produced at

“It is horrifying’ that Europe’s Importance —
women with children should _ 1. They recognised the vital!
be [in industry. If we are importance of Europe to the!

defence of the entire free world

2. The President and the
Prime Minister were “in fun-
damental agreement” that the
cause of peace in Europe
the world, would be furthered
by the progressively closer in-
tegration in every aspect
democratic Germany into
vigorous western
community .

3. Truman expressed
hope that thé Schuman

in a mess why don’t the men
work six days a week and
give shorter hours to
women?

“IT see this Welfare State
rocking. No Government
has talked more about wel-
fare for women and children,
and no Government has let
them down more.

“The former Minister of
Health, Aneurin Bevan, said
there would be a revolution
in this country unless more
houses were built.

“Well, there nas been no
revolution and there have
been very few houses,

|
But if the Tories had been

Plan
factory forra at the
possible moment.”

4. Truman also welcomed a
conference scheduled for Feb-
ruary 6 in Paris to consider the
formation of a European army
expressing his hope for its
success. He accepted the invi-
tation to send an observer and

in power for five years and
no houses were built there
might have been a_revolu-
tion and Bevan would have
tried to make it,



Maxwell David Bruce
“I hope the: British have said L

not lost thats: Hamar, OF: bere pet ” Gereec. plans—The

testing, for protesting against ee a I re

what is’ wrong: made us ~ President and rime | Minister

great,”’—I.N.S. reaffirmed the r conviction that

SO ante: German participation in the com-

mon defence effort would

e 7 strengthen the security of Europe

without altering the purely

Canadian Bridge defensive character of the North



ion.
state—
had

Atlantic Treaty organ
Economic Problem

ent said the two leaders
THREE RIVERS, Quebec, Jan, 31. clarified procedures so that

Three erches of the Duplessis, American assistance would make
Bridge crashed into the St. Law- the most effective contribution to
rence River early today, carrying|the French defence effort.
at least two cars into the water. They agreed that the solution

Four of the injured people were!of raw material problems should
rescued by police, but others were | be the aim not only of na yal
feared to be drowned, ‘action but also of international

The collapse tore down fele-| action, undertaken with the
phone lines. utmost speed and vigour.

Three people were admitted to} They recognised the

Falls Into River







import-



hospital. —Reuter. [ance of dealing with inflation and
rising prices and agreed thai
national and interna-

tenet

® i: . tional measures be taken.
A Drink For Stalin : The, President and the Prime
Minister said they had touched
NCTTINGHAM, |on all questions of common in-
Dr. A. C. Wood, history lecturer |terests to the’'r countries and had
at Nottingham University, believes | found once again, that there was
he has found a way that might/a fundamental identity of views
halt the Soviet cold war against] between them.
the Western. powers. They reaffirmed their belief
Wood thinks it would-be a g00d that the principle of collective
idea _to send Marshal Stalin al sqray:ty embodied in the United
barrel of English ale. He said | Nations Charter was the chief
that the Russian Emperor Peter | bulwark of world peace and of
and his wife Catherine, liked “this the independence of free society
sparkling beverage’. in the world.
“IT wonder if a barrel of ale Full Scale Alliances
delivered at the Kremlin ‘see aT eile) ednors
Wood, “might not do something a a0 vese

io assuage the cold war”. —INS. 3 =
FAMILY

that

PRINCESS ELIZABETH







eis:






ie oy

cw A 0 a F ;
“A NEW PICTURE released from Clarence Hous
beth, Prince Philip and their two children Prince Charles and Princess
Anne. Princess Elizabeth, recently returned from Malta, plans to
return there after the Mediterranean Fleet, in which her husband com-
gmands the 1,430 ton frigate Magpie, finishes its Spring cruise at the

end of March. Express,



of|

European}

the} began in 1946.

Treaty be concluded in a “‘satis-| United States institutions and 175



|
|

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.
America reported “continued
progress” on atom weapons today .





THURSDAY, F®BRUARY

LORD'S CAKE



WEDDING CAKE made for Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Walcott by Miss Viola De Gazon, a replica of the scene
at Lord’s when Clyde Walcott scored 168 not out in the Second West Indies—England Test Match.

TWENTY-ONE ESCAPE
THE GALLOWS

AMERICAN. AUTHORITIES today freed Alfred





Its Atomic Energy Commission ‘
restored his property. They

in
the

scale weapon tests continued
close co-ordination with
American armed forces.

The report disclosed that more
than 6,000 shipments of radio

Oakridge National laboratory.
These isotopes are of great value

in medical , biological and other

research and are also used for

ON THE
© SPOT

{ treating cancer and other diseases.
and! This

one of the
pre-war activities.

production is
Commission’s

| This year’s production amounted NEW YORK ;
to more than 40 per cent of the A group of Columbia Unis,
total of 15,000 shipments made versity under - graduates
since the isotope programme have proved that you don’t



; F They were being need « high schoo! educa-
used in 939 departments of 485 tion to get your college
MPEG ; degree. . é ;
earliest! institittions in 29 nations abroad. The university is just

The Commission reported new
supply sources for atomic ores
construction,” additional faciliites
at Oakridge and additional pluto-

winding up its first semester
with a special group of 51
“older” students who never
received high school diplo-

nium production facilities at mas: :
Hanford, Washington State. Columbia, | for the aoe
An experimental reactor for time in its 197-year-old his

tory, allowed the group to

testing the feasibility of creating enter

new nuclear fuel faster than it is last September and

work towards a bachelor of

consumed Was being completed
at a testing station at Idaho. arte carer:
—Reuter The average age of the
E group is 3l—with a few
es pushing 60 —- and the only
educational pre-requisite

was an aptitude exam.
University authorities, go-
ing on the theory you're
never too old to learn, say
they’re more than gratified
by the results of the experi-
ment.—I.N.S, .

Krupp, last owner of the giant arms firm from prison and

out of 28 other war criminals.

But the rest must die, it wag announced.

The original confiscation order made against Krupp who is

44, by the Nuremberg War€rimes Tribunal which in 1948

sentenced him to 12 years imprisonment, was revoked.
Saeenpemnettrobinascaotnnieninaiapbt sical aia

|



CHARLES COCHRAN

Cochrar Dies At 79

LONDON, Jan. 31.
Britain’s greatest showman, Sir
Charles B, Cochran, died here to-
day aged 79 after he was severely
scalded in his bath last week,
Sir Charles launched hundreds
of stars through his long career.
He promoted every type of en-




tertainment—roller skating, box-
ing, circu wrestling and
reviews, His shows became
famous fer his “young ladies”
selected by him personally. for
chorus,

In 1924 he became bankrupt.

He recovered, succeeded and re-
tired in 1934,

He came back when he was 74
years of age with the musical play
“Bless The Bride” and ‘halfway
through its two year run in 1948,
was knighted for his services to
the thé&tre.

Cochran ‘became Chevalier of
the French Legion of Honour in
1950 for his services in introduc-
ing French art to the English
stage.

He has produced 119 plays aid
revues in London, His publica-
tions incluc ‘The Secrets of a
Showman,”
gotten,” Jock-a-doodle—-do”
“A Showman J.ooks On’.

—Reuter,








and



U.S. Industry



| Reaches Peak

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.
American industrial production

| has reached its highest peak since

, the end of the war, the Govern-

ment disclosed here.

| The Federal Reserve Board esti-



Republicans Will
Try To Boycott
Red Countries

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31

The Republicans in the United
States House of Representatives
have decided they will try to bat
Russia, Communist China and
other iron curtain countries” from
benefits and tariff cuts the United
States may make as a result of
agreements with free nations,

At a party meeting they agreed
to support an amendment on that
line when the House votes to-
morrow on the Bill to extend the
Reciprocal Trade Law for three
more years,

In practice, cutting the duty on
imports from one nation means
a cut in duty on similar imports
from all countries, This is be-
cause America has so-called
“most favoured nation’ under-
standings with most of the world.
That is a promise that no other
nation will be favoured over the
country with which America has

such an undertaking, Repub-
licans want to rule out that
principle so far as iron curtain

countries are concerned, —Reuter,



Dewey Wanls

An Alliance
WITH SPAIN

ALBANY, New York, Jan, 31.
Governor Thomas Dewey indi-
cated that he vowed alliance with
Spain in a speech here last night.
The Gcvernor said: “When my
country is in danger I want

“! Had Almost For- | #llies. I will take Spain, I will

tuke Tito, [ will take Turks, and
I will take Chiang Kai Shek who
stood with us during the last
war.”

The twice defeated Republican
vresidential candidate reiterated
that the United States “should
not withdraw into our cowardly
shell,” —Reuter

MacArthur
Confident

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan, 31.
General MacArthur reported to



mated ihe nation’s output from|the United Nations today that it

factories and mines reached 1he|was within the capabilities of his

highest peak this month since|‘ oops “to continue to inflict stag-
{June, 1945 gering losses” upon Chinese Com-
The official index was 220 or 20|munist forces in Korea

} per cent. above the 1935-39 aver-| statement was made in one of his
wze and reflected a gain of one-|periodic reports to the United











j tenth since the outbreak of the|Nations Headquarters covering
| Korean war t June. jthe operations of the United Na-
\ The high index was 247 in|tions Command for the period
| October and November, 1943 December 1 to January 15

. —Reuter, |J8 oBs . —Reuter,

1, 1951

, J
» s
ane wee Patis

(as

a a

FRANKFURT, Jan. 31.
Von

reprieved from the gallows 21

“He is to be freed instantly and
his goods are to be returned to
hin.
American High Commissioner
John J. MeCloy announced 10 of
the reprieves from death sentences
—the men will stay in prison—
and General, Thomas T. Handy,



Commander - in - Chief of the on of a minimum of £10
United States forces in Europe Applicants must also sign an un-
@anounced the other 11. LAKE SUCCESS, Jan, 31 dertaking to repay the Canadian
The Security Council unan—| Government at the rate of not

i imously decided today to delete less than $10 (£8 6s. 8d) a month
eral years not knowing whether|the Korean question from its} Until the loan has been paid off, |
m ae on agenda Canaaa’s drive comes at a time
Cloy said the is decisions reas K anaga's | a ¢ bs at at »
which ae Rest ee eeeons, | Britain proposed the deletion.} when immigration . figures have
a “large measure” on the United The Soviet Union quickly been falling steadily, From 1946
State. “Advisory Board for War| ®8reed and all eleven members} when Canada admitted over
Criminals. ’ “held up their hands when the{§0,000 British migrants, the figure
In the case of Alfred Krupp| President called for the vote, dropped to just under 7,000 in the

MeCloy said: “Even those guilty| Antonio Quevedo of Ecuador,}first six months of last yenr.

of personal participation in . the

here
the Nevada
be withhela
finding out about them
Dean used the term ;
bomb” in referring to the blasts,







CENTS

PRICE: FIVE





United Nations ‘Troops

r a ‘
Nevada Atom
e
Tests Will
Be Secret
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31
Gordon Dean, Chairman of the
Atomic Energy Commission said
that all information about

test explosions will
to stop Russians

“atomic

two of which were set off lasi
week-end, but later said that was
not exactly what he meant.

“They are essentially experi-
mental nuclear detonations” he
told a news conference adding
that this description was cumber-
some but necessary
correct idea.

There has been speculation that
the Nevada blasts are small scale
atomic explosions. which may
find military application in such
weapons as guided missiles,

Dean said the Commission
would not comment on any such
speculation,

to give the

MoveForwardIin Korea

TOKYO, Jan. 31.

UNITED NATIONS forces intensified their ad-

vance along the central and western fronts at
dawn today. Troops sweeping forward on the cen-
tral front had so far met no resistance.
Vicious hand-to-hand fighting and artillery duels
kept the advance along the 40-mile western front
at a steady rate as troops struck the main Commu-
nist lines of resistance north of Suwon.



7 | United Nations naval guns, rock
Cc «‘ ets and planes battered North
aha a Korean communications centres

for the second day running.
Target for today’s pounding by
Asks For the American Naval Task Foree
KR was the town of Kosong, import-
ra ant road and rail centre on the
east coast 15 miles south of the

W orkers 38th parallel.

A force of warships and rocket
Ships led by the Missouri the
world’s largest battleship poured
rockets and shells on new
objectives Carrier based planes
flew overhead in a co-ordinated
assault.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan, 31
Canada to-morrow (February 1)
starts an all out drive to attract
more workers to her shores
Facilitating this drive is a new
assisted Passage Scheme whereby

its

Over on the west coast Allied

the | Canadian Government will artillery fire directed by flares
make advances to help persons thundered throughout the night
seeking igrate to Canada. Teas
eeking to migrate Canada into positions held by. tenacious

Loans to the value of approxi-

Communist troops

$ ; mately £60 (equivalent to 180
"e 33 ‘

Neither would it announce Canadian dollars) will be made Allied fighters -had« also - ised

future explosions in advance nor| ; ae ae f rarre ' ¢ ct b 5 Nag Bis is
7 in the form of a warrant*to a flares tc seek ‘ +e
2 a a Q “s3 ‘ . ares bro out » Communists

tell anything about them after-| pecogni: 2d transportatio Ormn- P|

; recognizec transportation “com= | «oie : : :

rorde o Claaions amid’ 5 Lun cee 1oled up” in caves throughout the
wards the Chairman said adding:| pany to cover ocean passage and hilly country northwest of Suasa
“We do not want Russian ob-j rail fares, Berths and meals in|" Panutane ik Tate oe Pri ba
servers, official or unofficial, at}/Canada of workers required in istics i aa lish Aloia se avtillery perrage
these tests. And we do not went; Canada’s expansion programme. wae bellaved to have scattore®
the nature of the tests or their) Among, trades, skills and occu- forces preparing for a countey

Success or lack of success known
to the Russians,’’—Reuter,



Korea Off U.N.
Council Agenda |

President, remarked “I am glad





pations the most urgently needed
are auto mechanics, bricklayers,
carpenters, draughtsmen, engin-
eers, foundry workers, pipe fitters,
painters, sheet metal workers,
textile workers and wood workers.
The suce ul applicants for

5 sage must be in the








Comparable immigration figures

Mm ost, crimes have not gufs}that at this meeting at last we cae

Reed § cation of their popes five achieved unanimity.” te oo ES: Sy ae
and I am disposed to feel that} Britain took this action because| °. Hut Cahads ie Hot sreparedta
confiscation in this Single case}the General Assembly — canriot go to the ‘aie entatha "a Aus-
constitutes discrimination against] make a recommendation on any] tralia i uest of new “settlers
this defendant unjustified by any rala in quest of new settlers

consideration attaching to him.

Property Contiscation
“General confiscation of pro-
perty is not a ‘sual element in our
judicial system
repugnant
of justice.”
He added,



and is generally

to American concepts

question being. dealt with by the
Security Council, The deletion
of the Korean question from the
Council’s agenda would allow the
Assembly to ratify the Resolution
passed by its Political Committee
last night condemning Communist
China as aggressor.

however, that the Sir Gladwyn Jebb, Britain
ag cl of the Krupp concern will told the . Council it might be
be subject to the Allied High] argued that the Council in fac
Commission’s Decartelisa.ion law] 184 as eects eee gee

on the reorganisation of German
coal, iron and steel industries.
The High Commissioner's state-
ment added: “Where sentences
have been substantially reduced,
it has been the result more of de-
tached responsibility and other
extenuating circumstances brought
out mainly since the trials.
(General Handy in his statement
affecting 13 war criminals under
his jurisdiction said he had com-
muted 11 death sentences to life

All the men are in z
Prison where they have spent

centration Camp, near Dachau,
who extracted gold teeth from the |
bodies of prisoners who had died
from beatings he personally ad-
ninistered, and Hans Schmidt,
Adjutant at Buchenwald Concen-
tration Camp for three years.
During Schmidt’s regime ‘about
500 prisoners died each month be-
cause of camp conditions and
cruelties inflicted on them by the

—Reuter.



India Refuses Seat
On U.N. Committee

NEW DELHI, Jan. 31,

India would not accept a seat
on the Good Offices Committee
envisaged in the United Nations’
esolution branding China as an
geressor in Korea, usually rel
liable sources here’ said today.

Reperts from Lake Success had
said that the General Assembiy
President, Nasrullah Entezam, was
anxious that India’s chief delegate
Sir Benegal Rau should serve 6n
the Committee,

Authoritative Indian quarters in
New Delhi described the Politica!
Committee's vote in favour of the
United States resolution as an
“unfortunate decision” impairing
the chances of a negotiated settle-
ment of the Korean war and other
Far astern problems. India voted
against the resolution—Reuter.

had not been exercising its fune
fion in respect to the Korean
issue because of the Soviet veto

The formal removal of the item
from the agenda would remove
any technical grounds he said, Sir
Gladwyn added that the thire
action in Britain's view would not
invalidate in any way action
already taken on Korea by the
Council, nor would it prevent the
Council from taking up the matter

imprisonment and’ upheld two|@8@in if it decided to do so by
death sentences. simple procedural vote,

These two were George Schal- Semyon Tharapkun of the
ferinail, guard at Muehldorf Con-j|Sceviet Union reiterated the

Russian argument that the Korean
question had only been put or
the Council’s agenda in an illegal
manner in any case. He woulc
vote therefore in favour of ite
deletion, After a unanimous
vote, the Council adjourned with
out fixing a date for its next meet
ing. —Reuter,

Eight Killed In
Belfast

BELFAST, Jan, 31,

At least eight men were killed
when a gangway leading fron ar
Argentine whaling factory ship
Suan Peron collapsed and hurle:
them on to the dockside and into
the water here today,

Seventy men were crowding
ashore at the end of the day’s
work when the gangway collapsed
hurling them 50 feet to the dock-
side, Others fell into the wate
eight bodies were later recovere:
end 20 men were taken to hospital
Juan Peron, 32,000 tons, is the
largest whale factory ship in the
world, She was drawn up to the
wharf in Belfast shipyards,

It was believed that more men
were killed. The ship was launchec
last April and was to have been
delivered soon to Compania Aren-
gina de Pesca, Buenos Aires,

: —Reuter,





EARTHQUAKE SHAKES

wy

THREE

LONDON Jan. 31.

Earth tremors were felt i:

three countries early today: Egypt, |
Pakistan and Israel, No

People
beds while

tumbled out of
windows rattled

their
and

The | the ground rumbled but no dam-/ the streets

| age was reported.

CITIES

| stronger each time, came at half
| hour intervals.



This scheme is open to any Euro-
peans, “But we have not made
available any free passages as the
Australian Government have
done” said Mr. L. G. Cumming,
Superintendent of Canadian Im-
migration Services at the Press
Conference in London to-day,
“We feel that free passages might

attack in the area Reuter,



Bustamante On
Five Charges

Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jan, 31,
Hon, W. A. Bustamante, Jamai-

ca’s Prime. Minister, has been

summoned on five counts to
appear before the Resident Mag-
strate’s Court on breaches of the
constabulary law on a_ similar
summons as that on which P.N,P’s.

(From

third Vice President Wills Isaacs
was recently bound over in the
sum of £1,000, Bustamante’s
trial has been set for Spanish

Town, February 9th,

The proseeutiow arines out of 9
speech Bustamante made at Wor
thy Park during the height of the
recent unrest on that estate and is
charged with actions to induce
disaffection in the discipline of
the police constables with offen
sive abuse to Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Skelton with the
use of offensive calumnious lan
guage and as a disturber of the
Peace on which the latter charged



Wills Isaacs, The Attorney Gen
eral’s office is acting on behalf of
the prosecution and Sustamante
is represented by D, B. Sangster
Minister of Social Welfare, Deputy
Leader of the. J.C.P. and
Solicitor,



attract undesirable people and
that we want to avoid.”



REALLY FRESH
KARACHI,

Fresh beef in Pakistan costs 12
ents per pound, The freshness is
protected by government law





TELL THE ADVOCATE











which demands the sale of meat THE NEWS
cn the day the cattle is slaugh- RING 3113
ered, ag DAY OR NIGHT
j ‘3

|

|

|

| NOTICE



Readers and Subscribers to the

“ ADVOCATE”

and

asked

Newspaper in Horse Hill

surrounding districts are

to note that we have appointed |

MR. S. A. DURANT our Dis-

| tributing Agent as from Sunday,
|

February 13th, 1951. |



Please contact Mr. Durant, Horse |



| Hill, St. Joseph, who will see
| after the delivery of your Daily

Paper.

damage was reported and
officials described the earthquake
jas “very mild”.

| Tel-Aviv: People who ran inte
here thought the city
g bombed.



| was be

| News came from Reuter Cor- In Jerusalem a tremor rattled
respondents in these cities:| windows and knoéked books off
Karachi—People rushed into the] shelves but no damage was ré
| Street here when three tremors | ported

shook the city The first was| Cairo: The tremor felt here was
(felt just after midnight, Others, | described as “slight’’. —Reuter.



ADVOCATE

|

ETT

Circulation Dept.

co., LTD.,

Dial 2823. |



_—


PAGE TWO





Carub Calling

LYDE WALCOTT, West Indies

4 and Spartan wicket-keeper
batsman, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Walcott of “Clarendon”
Black Rock was

te Miss Muriel Ashby,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs
Ashby of “Plumgrove”
Church,

The bride presented a beautiful
picture in a dress of white
embroidered organza with a yoke
of illusion net. The skirt was a
three-flounced skirt that ended in
a train.

Her head-dress was a Juliet cap
of seed pearls and she wore a
fingertip vei] of illusion net.

She carried a bouquet of white
roses with orchids intertwined
with seed pearls.

The Misses Barbara Ashby and
Pamela Ashby were the two
beautiful attendants of the bride.
‘They wore dresses of jonquil
yellow and blush lavender organza
respectively. They carried bou-
quets of violets and orchids, and
tiaras of flowers adorned their

ir.

Mr. Keith Walcott, intercolonial
cricketer and footballer, brother
of the bridegroom was bestman.
Messrs, “Derf” Odie, Clifford Skin-
ner, Frank and Cecil Clarke were
the ushers.

The
cfficiated.

The bridegroom's cake was one
of the most original seen in years.

It was made to represent the

cricket field at Lord’s where Clyde

Walcott made 168 not out in the

Second England-West Indies Test
at Lord’s last year.

The bride’s cake was in the
shape of two hearts pierced by a
Cupid’s bow.

These were the creation of Miss
V. De Gazon who won the first
prize in the Icing Division with
the ingenious copy of a hat at last
year’s Agricultural] Industrial
Exhibition.

The honeymoon is being spent
at Bathsheba. Mr. and Mrs.
Walcott leave for England next
month.

‘
Hunting Patterns
â„¢AEMBERS of the Barbados
Dramatic Club playing in

Has Been Arranged,”
stage at the Empire
Theatre towards the middle of
next month are busy hunting for
patterns of the dresses of notable
people in past history, such as
Mary Queen of Scots, Henry of
Navarre, and Katherine of Russia.
: The play, although modern and
in modern costume for the most
part, gives a flash back to the
fabulous days of Queen Elizabeth
and the Italian Nobility.

It’s.a long time since a costume
play has been performed locally
and I understand every detail is
b@ing studied even down to the
correct wigs.

Le Misanthrope
i ae monthly meeting of Le

Circle Francaise will take
place at the British Council head-

quarters, Wakefield, at 8.15
tonight. It is proposed to read
“Le... Misanthrope”, a by

play b:
Moliere, and those having copies
are asked to bring them along.
I understand that the last meet-
ing of the Circle was a great
Success, though a few of the mem-
bers were found furtively con-
versing in English.

En Route to England -

FTER spending six weeks’
i holiday in Grenada with their
uncle Mr, George Joseph, a mer-
chant of St. George’s, the Misses
Joy and Peggy Joseph returned to
England on Monday evening by
the French s,s. Colombie.

They flew over to Barbados
from Grenada by B.W.1A., to join
the boat and during their short
visit, were staying at the Hotei
Royal.

Summer Resort

R. H. BEVERLEY ROBINSON

who lives at St, Andrews-by—
the-Sea, a summer resort in New
Brunswick arrived by the T.C.A.
Special from Canada yesterday.
He is a Bond and Stock Broker,
and is here for a month's holiday.
It’s pretty cold in Canada now and
he prefers the summer resort of
the West Indies,

yesterday
married at James Street Church
eldest
Vere
Christ

Reverend Hugh Payne



MR. AND MRS, CLYDE WALCOTT
T.C.A. Pilot

R. and Mrs. Irving K. Davis
arrived on the T.C.A. ‘plane
yesterday from Canada, Here for

Family Re-union

RS. JOYCE McKENZIE, wife
of Mr, Ross McKenzie, T.C.A.,
engineer who is stationed here,

two weeks’ holiday they are stay- and their two daughters Heather

ing at the Hastings Hotel. Mr.
Davis is a T.C.A, pilot.

home is in Montreal.

Customs Official

RRIVING from Canada yes-
terday on the T.C.A, Special
Flight was Mr. Frank J. Quinn
who is Chief Appraiser of Customs
in Hamilton, Ontario. He is here
for about six weeks and is a guest
at the Hotel Royal,

Not Even Carnival

ISS CAROL MALEC who

was in Barbados in Decem-
ber 1949 for a week's holiday.
couldn’t resist the opportunity of
coming down again, Even the
knowledge of Carnival in Trini-
dad couldn’t tempt her to by-pass

Barbados. She arrived yesterday Ontario
by T.C.A. on their special flight. .

She hopes to be here for a week,
staying at the Ocean View Hotel.
Carol works with T.C.A.
Montreal.

For Carnival

R, and Mrs. Julian’ Atwell

and their son Michael left

for Trinidad on Tuesday afternoon

by B.W.I.A. to spend Carnival
in Trinidad,

Mr. Atwell is
Garage here.

To Study Law

with Dear’s

RRIVING in Barbados on
Wonday evening the

Colombie from Trinidad was Mrs.
E. Brassington of ihe Secretariat of
the Caribbean Commission, She is
Kingdom where
study law.

she hopes to



BY THE WAY...

E President of the Royal

Society, of which Iam a
founder member (in on_ the
ground floor through the influ-
ence of an aunt who invented fly-
paper overcoats for cows), has
complained that science has in-
vented so many queer languages

that scientists can no _ longer
understand one another.
Good! This will add to the

gaiety of nations, and encourage
the lighter-hearted among them
to babble without restraint. At
the Wanscote Experimental Sta-

tion they tell. the story of a
professor who said mulvicules,
when he meant bulvicules. The

interpreter translated the wrong
word, and a Portuguese colleague
found he had made a strong solu-
tion of oxohydrodimetholyxtrol
instead of chlorophosphocortobizo-
lene. As al! four words were
invented by Pulp of Leipzig, no-



_



bedy was any the worse; or
better.

the

Twenty Years of Uproar

. VOICE of great power”

writes a musical _ critic,
Never would he write, “A very
loud voice.” It is said that, when
singing Falerina in “Rinaldo,”
Rustiguzzi blew a small child out
of the front row of the stalls as
easily as you or I would blow out
a candle. And Angélique
Adénoide, taking the part of Mor-
gana inthe same opera, uttered
a shout (‘a cry,” says the musical
critic) which whisked the bow
out of the hand of the first fiddle
(‘violin” says the musical critic),
and made the conductor’s whis-
kers tremble like those of the
old sailor at Weymouth when the
impudent little boys ask him to
say “fifty-five.”

Their

and Gail arrived from Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. They will stay
for a few days at an hotel before
moving into their new home,
“Atlantic View”, Enterprise Road,
Christ Church,
Firet Visit

RS. E. SOPER of South Hull

P.Q., was met at Seawell
yesterday by her friend Mrs.
Irving who is also spending a
holiday in Barbados. Mrs, Soper
is down for a month and is staying
at the Marine Hotel. She came

in on the T.C.A. Special flight.
This is her first visit to Barbados.

Canadian Solicitor

R. JAMES M. FORGIE, a
Solicitor of Pembroke,
arrived from Canada
yesterday by T.C.A. to spend two
months in Barbados. He was ac-
companied by his wife and they
are staying at Sam Lord’s.

Was Here Last Year
RS, CLIVE SNYDER whose
home is in Kitchener, Ontario

arrived from Canada by the
T.C,A. Special yesterday. She
is here for a month’s holiday,
staying at the Abbeville Guest
House, then she plans to visit

Grenada and Tobago.
Mrs. Snyder was in Barbados

in March last year.
week

T.V. Dancer
N
1 television-viewers in England

‘Kaleidoseope’ last
saw for the third time West Indian

dancer Boscoe Holder and
usual sketch. “These are thd
days.”

by Beachcomber

Words of Comfort

SCIENTIST, wishing to re-

assure an anxious world,
uttered (without a smile) this
monumental sentence: “The
seale of atomic attack necessary
to destroy the whole surface of
the globe is much larger than
people realise.”

In Passing

“WHE report published by the
dealing with the island of
Helena recalled to my mind a
curious — fact. When Napoleon
was a schoolboy he kept a note-
book in which he jotted dowr
points from his studies. There
was an entry in the section de-
voted to geography: Ste Heléne,
petite ile... Those four words,
and no more,



Wise Buys—
BARGAINS today,
Prices will rise.

So don't delay

Flowered CRETONNE
at EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606

56" STRIPE
DOMESTIC 38¢

nets ee

LINENS dept. lines

Yd.
27" Print CRETONNE 64¢ Pillows 2°7
36" CHEESE CLOTH 42¢ Pillow-cases-
TICK

DIAL 4220

1.19
& 55¢

94¢ & 97¢

See

|
|
{
i
!
|
i
I
i
|
i
i
I
|
i

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Women
Don’t Give
A Hang

LONDON.
British males complained today
that British women were becoming

“ruder, more sarcastic and more

aggressive than ever before.”

The mild-mannered, slow-mov-
ing Englishman, who likes to
think he is lord of the manor, is
getting his dander up over the
“shocking” behaviour of Britain's
woman-in-the-street.

He is quick to admit that years
of queueing, austerity and strug-
gling to make ends meet is enough
to make any woman mad on
cecasions but considers it no ex-
cuse for venting the spleen con-
sistently as a matter of policy.

Said_ butcher Frank Bellamy:
“Woméh were rude and sarcastic
enough before the meat ration
sank to an all-time low recently
but now they seem to be delib-
erately rude whenever they can.
They jump queues, snap at each
other, and nearly take my head
off because I can’t provide the
cut they want. I just can’t sym-
pathize with them any more.”

Department store detective
Ralph Curry is thankful his shop's
January sales are over.

“Never have I seen such dis-
graceful scenes,” he claimed.’
“Why the women went wild,
pushing, shoving; grabbing and at
times what language! They
snatched hats out of each other's
hands, held tugs—of-war over

‘dresses and I separated more than

a few squabbling so-called ladies”.
Salesman Edward Poole charged
that men couldn’t walk the streets
cf London anymore’ without
cant assaulted by umbrellas,
high heels, shopping bags or big
parcels. ,
“Women don’t seem to give a
hang these-days. They just charge
along without looking what they
are doing or where they are going.
And the best you get after being
eracked over the shins with an
umbrella is a sharp ‘sorry’. Most
women don’t say a word but just
look daggers at you as if it is all
your fault”. ,
Said actor Rupert Kent: “Ladies
aren't ladies any more except, it
seems, on special occasions when
it suite their purpose. In every-
day life they appear to drop the
mask of feminine charm—and
women can be delightfully charm-
ing—and become rude, saucy, ill-
tempered females”’. 1

Judy Garland’s ©

Story

Hy Judy

Because of my photographic
memory, I was known on the lot
as a one-take girl—two at the most.
Nobody directed me very much; I
just went out there and did what
came naturally.

So I hadn’t reckoned on Vincente
Minnelli. We had met before,
but I had never seen him at work
er worked under him.

He made me do that first scene
in “Meet Me in St. Louis” twenty-
five times, I couldn’t believe my
ears. I was baffled and scared
cross-eyed. When I went to my
dressing room for lunch, I told my
maid something dreadful had hap-
pened between my last picture and
this one; I’d lost all my talent.

I cried all over my make-up,
and she almost had to push me
back on that set. But then on
the first try, it went off smooth
as cream.

Suddenly I knew
wanted all along. I saw that if
I was ever going to be any good,
I had to let go of myself and be
whatever character I was por-
traying.

Vincente drove the whole cast,
and in the end, I was more pleased
with “Meet Me In St. Louis
than with anything else I had
done up till that time.

I was to recetve still another
lesson in acting two or three years
after that when I went to see
“The Glass Menagerie” on Broad-
way. To be sure I’d have tickets,
I wrote ahead for them before !
left the coast.

When I got to New York and
picked up the tickets at the box
office, a little note from Laurette
Taylor, the play’s star, was
enelosed, asking me to visit back-
stage. I was touched and sur-
prised, because we'd never met,
and of course I went, my face still
streaked with tears after her ex-
quisite performance.

In general, visiting actors back~
stage is unsatisfactory. They re
tired and hungry, or there’s a

what he had

S. brawl, with too many people. But



B.B.C. Radio Programme

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1951
6.30-9.00 am, 19.36 M.
——————$__——_—_—__——

7 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m. News
pales, 7,15 a.m. From the Editorials,

a.m. Programme Parade, 7,30
a.m. Generally Speaking, 7.45 a.m.
Listeners’ Choice, @ a.m, Land and

Livestock, 8.30 a.m. Edward Lincoln,
845 am. Your Body and its Enemies,
9 am. The News, 9.10 a.m, Home News
from Britain, 9.15 a.m, Close Down, 11.15
am. Programme Parade, 11.30 a.m.
Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 a.m, Special
Dispatch, 12 (noon) the News, 12,10 p.m.
News Analysis, 12,15 p,m, Close Down.
5.006.080 25.53 M..



5 p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15
p.m. Scottish Magazine, 5.45 p.m. Pipes

Rupert and the
sh eaem NT

ta@nak
gy







Pressing on in the direction that
Rosalie has gone, Rupert reaches
another side road. ‘' Now | don't
know which way to go,”’ he mur-
murs. Then he brightens as he
spies a tall figure in the side road.
“That's another iceman," he
says. ‘' She would never go near

6.00—7.15 31.32 M & 48.43 M.



6.20 p.m. Light Orchestral Music,
645 p.m. Programme Parade, 7 p.m.
Tie News, 7.10 p.m. News Analysis,
7.15 p.m. We see Britain.

TAG—-1L.00 SLae MM. & 48.43 M.
ee

8 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.15 p.m,
Sir John Macegill's Last Journey,
8.45 p.m, Composer of the Week,
9 p.m, Special Dispatch, 9.15 p.m.

Have a Go, 9.45 p.m, Do Your Remember,

“16 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. From the
Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Take it from Here
1045 p.m. Moray McClaren Talking,
Jl p.m. The Music of Sid Phillips and
lis Band.

Sketch Book—24




Tas \L\

him after what has happened. She
mustrhave kept straight on.”” And
in spite of the rain he runs ahead.
The road bends and gradually the
houses get fewer and the town
comes to an end, “ This is awfu!.
1 must ask someone to help,”” he
thinks.

YOU'VE NEVER SEEN ANYTHING LIKE IT ON THE
SCREEN BEFORE ... IT’S FASTER THAN SOUND!
now on her way to the United Desmond Walter-Ellis, doing their 71'S GOT EVERYTHING : THRILLS .. ADVENTURE .. ROMANCE!

OPENING TO-MORROW (Friday)

2.30 and









ACT



AGRICULTURAL FORKS
40 §Facn

THE BRARKADOS CO-OPERATIVE
FACTORY

ONLY

$4



COTTON

"RAYMOND MASSEY - RICHARD WHORE STUART HEISLER
Colonial, Ofice the other day Also the Short: “SO YOU WANT TO BE IN PICTURES”

Plus Latest “WORLD NEWS”
(Presented by Warner Pathe News)

PLAZA Theatre BRIDGETOWN Dial 2310

THEY'RE
MOVING FAST !!

A Small Shipment

6.30 p.m.

DORCEN PLAY BY LAA O'DAIEDN AND WNC ERT ~
SUOSESTED OF A SPORT EY 2 MOMOND Fara

QUICKLY !!

of





LTD.

Hardware and Lronmongery Department Telephone No. 2039

ee ef

l



As Told.To Michael Drury





Garland

Miss Taylor weleomed me as if
into a aening room. She. washed
her face and put on an old cotton
robe, and then talked to me fos
two ours. Ty ie

T sat with her, drinking in her
words, learning more about my
own profession from her, per
haps, than from all the rest of
my experiences, put together.

I can’t put into words what she
conveyed, but I came away feel-
ing as if my head were full of
stars and I could do anything.

Some moenhe ge L eens with

that she was dead.

—. day, years before “Meet
Me In St. Louis” and my visit
with Laurette Taylor, Mr, Mayer
called me into his office and told
me Mervyn Leroy was going to
produce“ “The Wizard of Oz” and
wanted me to play Dorothy.

It was my first big break. I got
a special Academy Award for that
film, and 1 wheeled my mother
into letting me wear long white
gloves to the reception, and a little
white-ermine cape I still have and
still wear,

Later, when Mickey Rooney and
I made “Babes In Arms”, I got my
first long dress, white and bout-
fant. .

Other girls get their first eve-
ning dress for proms; IT got mine
so I’d look right when I put my
feet in the wet cement at Grau-
man's Chinese Theatre.

People more astute than I have
tried to understand the relation-
ship between movie stars and fans.
An actress not only holds a cer-
tain job but in a sense she is thal
job; the fans like her and resent
her job, if that makes sense.

V’ll never forget the first time I
found myself in a mob of any size.
Mickey and I went to New York
for the opening of an Andy Hardy
film, and there were about five
thousand people in Grand Central
Station to meet us.

I was terrified, It’s one thing to
be part of a happy mob like that,
but it’s something else to be its
focal point. With the best inten-
tions in the world, such a mob
could kill you.

One of the most amazing things
about all the trouble I’ve haa
lately is that people no longer
want to paw me. People I see on
the street, total strangers, look at
me differently—as though they
realise almost with amazement
that I, tego, have feelings.

(To-morrow: Judy’s marriages;
she starts psychoanalytical treat-
ments in effort tr be better wile
and mother ),

CROSSWORD

i





Across
1 and 6 Down. Gad! Mere poe

is what we get from him. (3, 2,
bs 7. Intention, (7)
1. Swallowed in a date box. (3).
2. Oven, (4)
8. Somebody's son. (3)
4. Tatter from the barrage, (3)
5. Nymph. (5)
6. Te have done 11 you must. (4)
7, ¥ » (4)
{

. in a creche. (8)
. Time. (4)
. I sat to drink it,
. Letter symbol
R.A.C, car. (9)
Down

This will cover expenses, (6)
Hounds, of courses (4)
Obviously a ghost. (6)
One who should succeed, (4)
See 1 Across.
Sufficient rope for the artist, (7)
. Familiar inn, (3)

This blue ig heavenly, (3)
. Obtrusively loud. (7)
. Request. (4)

(4)
to show the

SSeenooeey

ee

19. You'll find this health “resort in

this part of Europe. (3).
20. It’s’ annoying, (4)
ah Expresses disgust,
& great canal, (3)
23. Courtesy tltle. (3)

Solution of vesterday’s puzzle.—Alross:



1, Ultra; 5 and wn. ramophone;
Â¥, Nudist: 10,G.P0.; 11. Gib; 12, Strap:
15 Dot; 17. 8. See 2 Dewn; 20)
Pourteen; 22, il; 25, Rosie; 25,
Slain; 26. Alb: 27 COhildlike. Down:
1 tnde: 2 and 18 cross,
Lugubrious; ib; 4, pace; 7, See S Across: 9, id; 15,
Teuton; 14. Rase id: 19. Roll:

: 16, Torrid:
0, Fish (Anaiessanagram of angel):

2
ral; 24 a,



that different brands of
Bay Rum come, and they
go, but - - -

BORNN'S
BAY RUM

will go on forever
WHY ?

QUALITY

That’s Why







Mellow
and distinctive flavour,

For Smoothness

There is no rum that com-

pares with . . oe
S&S
STUART & SAMPSON
LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.









| “SEALED VERDICT”





PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) |

| James Warren and
| BROTHERS in the SADDLE
























(3)
2. Childish thanks to this provides












S65 ¢« ~~

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1951







at 8.30

od, Florence Mar;

M

?
| AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only)

ohn Hoyt,






c John Ridgely








= F i Douglas, Linda Darnell
in “EVERYBODY DOES IT”
20th Century-Fox Picture

Last 2 SHOWS TODAY 445 & 8.30 p.m.

Mita

Arlene George Alan

DAHL O'BRIEN HALE in

“MY WILD IRISH ROSE”

MAT: FRIDAY 4.45 P.M. (Only)
“BELOW THE DEADLINE”
with Warren Douglas and

“LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT”

Johnny Mack Brown



Special Matinee TODAY at 1.30

p.m
“THE GUILTY” Don Castle &
“DYNAMITE
Tom

CANYON"
Keene



with



Opening FRED, 2.20 & $30 p.m. “CHAIN LIGHTNING”



———





PLAZA Theatre=0OI/STIN (DIAL 8404)

Last 2 Shows TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m FRID,, SAT. & SUN. 5 & 8.30 p.m.
RKO Radio presents The Biggest of the Bia Ones
Zane Grey's from Warner Bros.

“WANDERER OF THE “TASK FORCE”

WASTELAND"
Starring

Gary Cooper, Jane Wyatt, Wayne

with Tim HOLT Morris, Walter Brennan



(Monogtam Double)
“DYNAMITE CANYON”
Ken Maynard, Hoot Gibson Tom KEENE
eS
ee

MIDNITE SAT. FEB, 3rd

“DEATH VALLEY RANGERS” a











GAPETWY—(rHE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

Last Show TONITE 8.30 FRID., SAT., SUN. 8.30
Warner's Double MAT: SUN. 5 Be eis
Edw. G. Robinson in A MOSEANNA nec ."

« eCO
LARCENY ENC, Farley Granger, Joan Evans
and and George O’Brien in
“WINGS FOR THE EAGLE” MARSHAL OF MESA CITY
Dennis Morgan, Ann Sheridan It's Action all the way



MIDNITE SHOW SAT. 3rd
“BELOW the EADLINE”
Warren Douglas

~ Another Action Packed Wallop

“RIDING THE SUNSET TRAIL”
Tom Keene

WIGS SSTSES PPP APPEL PLP LE LEA LEP PASy

: GLOBE

oats

x TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.30 LAST SHOWING

. “FLAMING FRONTIER”

WHOLE SERIAL

OPENING FRIDAY 2nd 5 & 8.30 ,
Judy GARLAND & Gene KELLY

os
5 SUMMER STOCK

Pius LOCAL TALENT at 8.30
SOG GOLDS SLEDS SSP SSP DPD PEALE

ROYAL
FLASH !

TO-DAY at 445 Only
The First ALL INDIAN FILM 'rO BE SHOWN IN BARBADOS



in

Tccsunssiepspseeslbepidenesesinta=ciaineahieciecaeniaaeacy



PRICES:— 60c, Pit, House, Balcony, Boxes



TO-NIGHT at 8.30 Only
Big Double .

Esther WILLIAMS and Peter LAWFORD in

“ON AN ISLAND WitH You’
AND
“TARZAN NEW YORK
ADVENTURE

Starring
Johnny WEISSMULLER and Maureen O’SULLAVAN

OLYMPIC

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 and 8.15

M-G-M

EMPIRE

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30

20th Century Fox Presents

“TLLGET RY”

Color by Technicolor

Starring June HAVER
William LUNDIGAN
With Gloria De HAVEN
and Dennis DAY

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.15
Final Instalment
Columbia Serial
TEN GRANGER
Starring
Robert KELLARD
Peggy STEWART
with
Buzz HENRY &
Smith BALLEW

Universal Smashing Double

Barry FITZ GERALD in

“NAKED
CITY ”’

AND
**PIRATES OF
MONTEREY ”’
Starring

Rod CAMERON &
Maria MONTEZ








CUTLERY and
PLATED WARE

| Small Canteens of 6 Knives
Forks and Spoons



Stainless Steel Carver Sets
Sets of Spoons
Cake Forks








Cake Baskets ry





also
LARGE THERMOS
FLASKS

PLANTATIONS LTD.




THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

Count Those
$ Bills With
“Electric Eye”

By ROBERT CLARK

WASHINGTON,

An economy-minded Treasury
has come up with a new twist ia
labour-saving devices—a machine
to count old dollar’bills,

Secretary Snyder has announced
the development of an “Electric
Eye” counter to thumb through
the five million torn and tattered
paper dollars. that have to be
retired daily,

The Treasury will install 25 ot
the machines to replace—at an
annual saving of $250,000—80 em-
oe who now do the job by

and,

The machines each count more
than 500 dollars a minute, eight
times as fast as the average em-
ployee. And they don’t mind the
smell, either.

The Electric Eyes will take over
the job of checking the silver
certificates that come into the
Treasury for redemption after
banks decide they’ve outlived their
usefulness. Federal Reserve Banks
bind the old bills in bundles of
100 and cut them in half, but the
Treasury rechecks the count just
té make sure,

The new machines, developed by
the Bureau of Standards, reject
packages that don’t contain exact-
ly 100 bills after counting them by
means of a light beam that actuates
a photo-electric system.

New money has been machine-
counted for years, but until now
no mechanical device had been
able to keep an accurate count of
bills that were wrinkled and dog-
eared,

The average life of a dollar ‘is
about nine months—and with more
than a billion in circulation just
oe the old ones is a big
Job,

Last year alone, 1,138,588,540
dollar bills were sent in for Te-
demption — nearly 25 million
pounds in all.

Coins, fortunately, have a much
longer life span. The average life
of the nearly one and a half billion
dollars worth of coins of all types
currently held by the public is 25
to 30 years.

Total currency and coins in cir-
eulation, in case you would like to
knew whether you've got your
share, is about 27 billion dollars—-
$180 for every man, woman and
child in the country.

—LN.S.

U.S. INCOME UP

WASHINGTON.

The government has reported
that U.S. national income hit an
all-time quarterly high in the first
three months after the start of the
Korean war.

Income for the period was reck-
oned by the Commerce Depart-
ment at the rate of 244 billion dol-
pr a yet The oS puuarterly

1g) ar a ee
monthe of 1548 ae at the rate
of 231 billion dollars a year.

Wages and salaries made up the
biggest part of the increase, which
was seven per cent higher than the
previous 1950 quarter. The re-
muneration for work alone hit the
annual rate of 155 billion dollars.

Corporation profits also ad-
vaneed sharply amounting to 11
and one-half billion dollars be-
fore taxes for the quarter— a 25
percent increase over the previous
three months,



Profits after taxes were 6,4 bil-
lion dollars, a 1.2 billion dollar
increase over the previous quar-
ter despite the new excess profits
tax which was made retroactive
to July 1.

The government pointed out
that profits grew faster than
sales during the period, with an
inerease in the profits-sale ratio
from nine te 9.8 per cent.

Profits increased most sharply—
nearly 40 per cent—on non-durable
goods, where heavy demand re-
sulted in “relatively large” price
increases, i

—LN.S,

Anti-Red Policy
Change Considered

WASHINGTON, Jan, 31.

American officials are giving
serious consideration to a change
of policy that would involve assist-
ing Anti-Communist guerillas on
the Chinese mainland, usually
reliable sources said here today.

This would be one means of
diverting Communist strength
which might otherwise be em-
ployed against Korea or Indo-
China these officials believe,

Three questions have to be
answered before any final decision
can be reached it was said,
These were: —

How effective and determined
are the guerilla forces?

Would ams and equipment
furnished to them not be allowed
to fall into enemy hands ? Officials
at present see two primary
military requ’rements regarding
China. One is to continue to
strenghten, Formosa’s defences
against the day when Chinese
Communists try to carry out their
threat to conquer the island. The
other is to use any reasonable
means to divert Communist

oe —Reuter.





1, 1951

ne





aos =

OIN
a euE
ARMY —





Stikker May Form

New Government

THE HAGUE, Jan. 29.

Dr. D. Stikker, Foreign Minis-
ter in the Dutch Coalition Cabinet
which resigned last week, was
to-day sounding party leaders
seeking to form a new Govern-
ment.

Queen Juliana asked him
shortly before midnight last night
“to investigate the possibilities of
forming a new Cabinet” though
this was not a mandate to form
an Admistration. Observers expec -
ted Stikker would be able to
report to the Queen in a day or
two that he could form a worka-
ble Cabinet,

The old Government fell after
critics objected to compromise
proposals in the Dutch-Indonesian
tug-of-war for sovereignty over
western New Guinea,

—Reuter,

Grenade Thrown

Among Dancers

SINGAPORE, Jan. 29.

A hand grenade thrown into «
dance hall wounded British sol-
diers, the dance hostess and civil-
ians.

There were 25 casualties.

The incident occurred last night.
The grenade was lobbed into tie
centre of the dance floor soon afte,
the music started for a waltz.

One British soldier and an Erro-
sian woman were reported to b2
in a serious condition,





Russia Fights "Flu

LONDON, Jan. 29.

Soviet Health organisations are
taking special measures to fight the
influenza epidemic in Russia, Mos-
cow radio said today.

In a broadcast appeal to home
listeners to take precautions a
senior doctor said they were ex-
perimenting with new vaccines.
He warned people against shaking
hands, kissing children and allow-
ing them to ride in buses, tubes
or trains except in emergencies.

’Flu suspects should call a doctor
rather than visit clinics he said,
Children in nurseries suspected of
having influenza were being
promptly isolated.

Describing sulphur drugs as
dangerous, he said, “the body gets
used to them only too easily and
they therefore prove useless as
the patient develops pneumonia.”

—Reuter,

REDS CAN BE STOPPED
Dean Rusk

WASHINGTON.

Dean Rusk, Assistant Secretary
of State said here that American
troops were staying in Korea iv
show that Communist aggression
could be stopped.

Rusk in charge of Far Eastern
affairs said on a television pro-
gramme: “We cannot afford to
leave Red China and its neigh-
bours under the impression that
the forces of Peking are irresisi-
able and that Red China’s neigh-
bours must now come to terms
with the Communists at the cost
of their freedom.

Rusk said that United States
ability to meet the world-wide
threat of Communism was im-
proving steadily. ;

—Reuter.



CHARLES MeENEARNEY & CO. LTD.

Farmers See
Mobile Farm

A mobile exhibit is showing the
latest developments in farm and
home research to farmers of a
large agricultural area in the Uni-
ted States. The “Family Farming”
exhibit, as it is called, is being
displayed in 39 counties (districts)
in the State of South Dakota,

The display shows 11 important
phases of farm and farm-home
activity The Daily Argus-Leader
of Sioux Falls, in the State of
South Dakota, reports. These in-
elude soil improvement, proper
feeding of chickens, production
of better milk, and landscaping
and improving the farm home.
Models, charts, bulletins, and dis-
plays help illustrate discussions
that are led by local agriculture
experts,

The exhibit was constructed by
farm, civic, and commercial
groups interested in promoting
more stable and prosperous farm-
ing in their communities. No ad-
mission is charged, and in some
communities free eoffee and
doughnuts are served by local
groups. A similar display in 1949
was seen by 18,000 persons in 26
communities,

In All Forms

The increasing use of various
forms of fertilizers on United
States farms has caused fertilizer
equipment to become the most
diversified of any type of farm
machinery. This is reported by
the United States Department of
Agriculture.

Fertilizer equipment
from small,



ranges
hand-operated de-
viees to tractor units, self-
unloading trucks, and aircraft
with spreading attachments. The
equipment applies fertilizers in
the form of igases, liquids, ecrys-
tals, granules, and finely divided
particles.

Fertilizer machinery is often
used in conjunction with other
implements designed to do other
farm jobs. It can be used with
interchangeable parts that plant,
seed, drill, and cultivate. Some
machines apply fertilizer while
they plow, plant, and drill vege-
table seed.

One device not only spreads
fertilizers, but also places it in
bands at different depths and
spacings in either tilled or pasture
land. It also can place fertilizer
as a side dressing along crop rows
of all normal spacings. With a
seeder added, the machine can
open the furrow, drill grass or
grain seed, and apply the fer.
tilizer,



SHIP DRIFTING

MADRID, Jan. 29
‘The two halves of the 9,720 ton
Panamanian tanker, Janko which
broke in heavy seas yesterday near
Cape Finisterre, Northwestern
Spain were to-day seen drifting
south with sailors still aboard,
aecording to a report from La
Coruna, Nine men were in the
aft section and seven in the fore-
part. Various ships were stand-
ing by. Yesterday two ships took
off 23 sailors.
—Reuter.

Wa rs A MAN'S |
FE /

I guarantee my pills, gentlemen, to make you very, very ill for your medicals.”

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ndon Express Service

MOTH-PROOF

New methods of protecting
woollen goods, synthetic textiles,
and other materials from moths
are being developed by scientists
of the United States Department
of Agriculture. This work is being
done in laboratories in Savannah,
in the State of Georgia, that are
specially equipped to test the
efforts of many kinds of insects
on the fabrics,

The moth-proofing research has
been going on for the past three
years. In their experiments the
scientists have used 5,000 yards
of woollen goods and 1,200 pairs
of army trousers,

The material was sprayed or
impregnated with chemical solu-
tions and then stacked in storage
rooms with thousands of insects,
In some cases the rooms were
also sprayed with the chemicals.
The most effective solution was a
mixture of DDT and chlordane,

After a year of testing, the
scientists found that most of the
woollen goods were not damaged.
The material was then used in the
manufacture of uniforms. The
uniforms were hung in sealea
closets and exposed to insects for
two years. When inspected they
showed no signs of damage.

The laboratory plant includes
testing rooms, a laundry unit, stor-
age facilities, machines for making
special equipment, and a room
where 1,000,000 common pests and
insects are reared under special
room temperature and humidity.
The laboratory has its own elec-
trically operated laundry unit
which is used to determine how
many washings the moth-proofed
material can withstand without
losing its special characteristics,

The scientists also use the labor-
atory in developing ways to pro-
tect flour bags and other food
packages from insects while keep-
ing their contents nonpoisonous
for human use. In addition, they
are developing a technique for
protecting naval gun-cleaning
brushes from damage by carpet

beetles, and a means of making
synthetic fibres made of peanut,
corn, and soyabean oils resistent to
insects,







e

when you use Rinso. Its rich

out, leaving whites so much
whiter, and coloureds so much
brighter, For better, easier
washing, always use thorough,
gentle Rinso.

RINSO for all
your wash!

X-R 24..-600-E6



RINSO washes\
WHITER—

PAGE THREE














U.S.A. Produces
More Petroleum

World output of petroleum is
now about i0.200,000 barrels a
day. The United States produces
more than half of this, or about
5,900,000 barrels, the New York
Herald Tribune reports on the
basis of a survey of petroleum
production in the free world com—
pared to that of the Soviet Union
and its satellite countries.

“On the basis of the latest
available figures,” the newspaper
says, “Russian and Eastern Euro-
pean production of crude petro-
leum is about 885,000 barrels a
day.” U.S. figures are estimates
made by the American Petroleum

VAKER OATS

ut belt

bargain!




THE MODERN
Dress Shoppe



}

water: Add sale;
When boiling;

Institute, a private trade organi- add 2 cup of
zation. eaer ae BRO
CS tis
The superiority “enjoyed by the ring, f i ou ( AD STREET)
United States and friendly coun— minutes) t's *

tries sharing ‘the responsibility ally *
for maintaining peace is not
merely the advantage of greater
supplies,” the Tribune says. It
comprises the ability to produce
in quantity specialized products
and to maintain peak operations
for required expansion in other
major industries.” It means alsc
the ability to insure “the delivery
of all kinds of products when anc
where needed.”’

The present record U.S, pro-
duction is the result of an unpre-
cedenteg growth during the past
five years. Petroleum companies :
have “worked diligently to mod- Corner
ernize and expand, and to increase
raw material reserves in order to i
insure eapacity to serve an ex-
panding economy,” the Tribune
states. “During these and previous
years efforts have been unremit-
ting to improve the quality of
products and to develop new
products, uses, and processes,”

Domestic capacity to produce
crude petroleum has been in-
creased by 35 per cent, while
refining capacity has been ex-
panded by 25 to 30 per cent. In









‘MORE CARBOHYORATES
‘Moke VITAMINS (8, & B,).... turn food inte “body-fuel’*





Beware this S-bend. It can
cause offence if not kept
scrupulously clean, Sprinkle non
in some ‘ Harpic,’ leave as long-as-possible—then fash.
‘Harpic’s’ thorough action will clean, disinfect and deodosise

SPECIAL
OFFERS In
LADIES’







addition, large systems of pipe] the whole pan even-where no brush can-reach. COTTON

lines have been laid, tanker D ia s

fleets. have been enlarged and ¥ RESSES

modernized, and consumer out-

lets expanded and improved. H A R Pi Sf} Po Washable Lovely Patterns
Despite the record U.S. pro- an $6.00 each

duction of petroleum, the Nation *

is not yet using its refineries to THE SPECIAL LAVATORY ChEBQICER LADIES

full capacity, says the Tribune.
It is estimateq that from 750,000
to 1,000,000 additional barrels
could be produced, if they are



African Cotton Prints
$3.98 each














needed, without damaging the
lifespan of the wells. LADIES"

7 ; TAILORED
A’ Real Swot || DON'T GET Sao

(By HOWARD BERRY)
LONDON.
FORTYFIVE-YEAR-OLD Sid-

In a Fine Assortment of
Colours $6.00 each

NERVOUS ABOUT

ney Richard Daly, chief sanitary KAYSER

inspector of Ilford, Essex County,

makes a hobby of winning aca- NYLON :

demic distinctions. sT OCKIN GS
His latest and seventeenth suc-

cess Was Winning a law examin- 51 Gauge 15 Denier

ation which qualified him to $2.14 per pr.

practise as an attorney if he

wishes.

Claiming to have a photographie
memory and never to forget,
Daly studies at night and week-
ends. For years he has been
getting through at least one 700
page text book weekly and he
never takes a note,

Daly has become a B.Sc., has
won three Liverpool University
diplomas in hygiene, a London
University diploma in Public Ad-
ministration, and a number of
awards in town-planning, real
estate management and meat
trade technique.

“Some people think I am crazy
to go on collecting degrees at my
age,” said Daly, “but I prefer to
learn rather than lumber up my
mind with books that are not
really entertaining.”

Daly studies with Bach or Beet-
hoven playing on the radio, “I
find I need good classical music,”
he said. “I swot better with
the radio on.”

Now Daly is toying with the
idea of studying for a B.A. degree
in French and Norwegian,

But there is at least two blind
spots in Daly’s remarkable powers
of memory. He forgets names.
“T often have to apologize to peo~
ple for that.” he said. And his
16-year-old daughter, Olga, said
“Daddy often forgets my pocket-
money.” .



KEEP FIT ON

BOVRIL

YEAR BOOK 1951

The Advocate Co Ltd: will publish a Year Book of Barbados
in 1951.

THE MODERN
Dress Shoppe

BROAD STREET







































The Year Book will contain three parts:—

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know about
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.

—LN:S.



(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
etc.

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr, George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr, Trevor Gale.
Advertising Manager ofthe Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies.
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisca-
tions immediately or not later than April 15th 1951.

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951. :
Advertisers are asked to get in touch with

Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager,
Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no éne interested in Barbados can afford to be
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)

eS SSS SSS


. PAGE FOUR



IRBAD ADVOGATE

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd,, Broad St., Bridgetown.



Thursday, February, 1, 1951

FACING ISSUES

\ DURING the debate in the Legislative
Council on the bill to provide for the
Registration of voters Hon. Dr. Cato in a
maiden speech pointed out a_ situation
which will inevitably arise and which will

’ have to be remedied under the Represen-
tation of the People Act. He said that it
was not fair to retain a system under

which a few people in a district had the
right to elect a similar number of repre-
sentatives as a district with a large number
of voters.



| The question of proportional represen-
tation is one which must be considered in
view of the changes which will arise in

future. The passing of the adult suffrage
bill has already given rise to many compli-
cated issues which come with the changing
of any electoral machinery.

It has already been suggested that the
representation in the House of Assembly
be changed by means of a re-allocation of
seats. It was then argued that if parishes
like St. Joseph and St. James had the right
to return two members to the General
Assembly, it was, only fair that parishes
like St. Michael and Christ Church should
be allowed a greater number.

The answer given to this was the sug-
gestion of single member constituencies.
By this means the parishes would be divid-
ed into wards each entitled to return one
member. If this had been carried out it
might have been possible to have ‘divided
the larger parishes into a greater number of
wards so that they would have returned
more members to the House than the
smaller parishes.

| Dr. Cato now comes to the point and re-
minds the Government that sooner or later
the issue will have to be faced and propor-
tional representation given.

‘ It may be that in the’next amendment
to the Representation of the People Act
provision could be made for an increase of
the membership of the House from 24 to
30 members so that the additional seats
could be allocated to those constituencies
with high population figures.

| Asan alternative it might be possible to
use the figures now being collected for
registration purposes, so that a specified
number of areas of 450 voters each could
be used as a unit for representation.

‘ Consideration should be given now to
the matter so that the issue can be faced
at the earliest opportunity.



WATER

| THE question of the necessity for one or
two rigs for the Waterworks Department
was raised by Hon. F. C. Hutson during
the debate in the Legislative Council on
a resolution to provide the necessary funds.
' In this island the matters affecting the
improvement of the water system have
been entrusted to a Board of which Mr.
Hutson is a member and: his point now
leaves the public wondering what the dis-
cussion is about.

While it is recognised that the detailed
expert engineering knowledge necessary
for dealing with the island’s water supply
cannot be expected from the average voler,
it is surprising that in an island where
water is the prime mover in agriculture
that the public knows so little about water
improvements intended.

‘!€an it be that too little use is made of
the public Press to disseminate knowledge
affecting agriculture?



Our Readers Say
A Possible



|

Moreover, in 1917-18
government renounced all Russian
privileges and investments abroad.
These investments, it is true, were
rather sparse and were confined to
the Near and Far East; Russian
banks in Iran and China oil
concessions, and indemnities were
sclemnly “returned” to the respec-
tive nations or cancelled. Lenin
and his party did not attempt to
nationalize these properties in
favour of the Soviet state and to
cperate them as external assets
in favour of “the first Socialist
state”. Later the Chinese East-
ern Railway became the first
exception to this rule, and for a
long time remained the only
important one.

The reversal wiich has taken
place in the last half-dozen years
has a Significance not lost on
leading people in Moscow. How
clearly they understand the
ehange is obvious from the fact
that silence and secrecy have
surrounded: Russia's new role as
2 capital’ investor, The Soviet
press never mentions it; the
MVT (the former NKVT) does not
mention it in Fereign Trade, its
periodical, whose editors and
writers without exception have
been required to study Lenin's
theory of imperialism: they
would not have passed their
examinations had they failed to
memorize the principle that pos-

session of productive forces
abroad means exploitation of
foreign labour and is the “most
important symptom of modern
imperialism.”

Along with its acquisition of

foreign material investments, the
Séviet Union has had to speed
up the creation of a new class
of colonial administrators, who
have been selected and given a
rapid preparation under the aus-
pices of the Party's Central Com-
mittee. The number of these
administrators is a secret, but it
is vast—far greater than, for in-
stance, that of the British colonial
service in its heyday. Little
Albania alone has had to invite
and maintain more than 3,000
Russian advisers and officials.
Throughout Eastern Europe, Ger-
many, and the Far East, more
than 100,000 are necessary to
organize #eneral staffs and check
on newly-created . armies, police
force, and mushrooming secret
police; to create planning com-
missions in the Soviet orbit; to
teach collectivization of agricul-
ture: to give directions for
nationalized foreign trade; to
operate numerous “mixed com-
panies” for the Soviet govern-
ment; to cope with the tasks of
occupation where occupation 15
still in force; and to perform a
multitude of other functions.

Russian advisers are a kind of
aristocracy, measured in terms of
the social standards of their own
country or of the country in which
they are stationed. Living abroad
js in itself a considerable privi-
jege. Although closely observed
by agents of the MGB (heir to the
GPU and NKVD), and often pro-
hibited contact with the local
population, they greatly enjoy
their role of “Soviet colonizers
in’ countries which to them are
the “West.” Their salaries are
higher than those of their, col-
leagues from among the “natives”;
often higher than those of minis-
ters. The Yugoslavs have dis-
closed, for example, the salaries
paid to Russian managers and
engineers: the Soviet manager 1n
charge of a_ bridge construction
job near Belgrade received 50,000
dinars a month; a Russian chief
engineer 45,000 dinars, and his
deputy 26,000; a director of sup-
plies received 25,000, a chief
mechanic 22,000, a department
chief 22,000. (A Yugoslav rninis-
ter’s salary was 12,000 dinars a
month.) In addition, the Russian
officials were given furnished
villas or flats with radio, tele-
phene, heat, and light; cars, serv-
ants, and a bonus of a month's
salary for each year's work. In
1948 Soviet advisers of the rank
of colonel or general were recely~
ing 31,000 to 40,000 dinars a month
from the Yugoslav government,
while a general in the Yugoslav
army received 9,000 to 11,000
dinars a month.

in only a few instances are sal-
aries paid out of the Soviet trea-
sury; usually the “fnviting” coun-
try or the “mixed company to
which they are assigned foots the
pill. The high salaries therefore
are no burden to Russia. | Despite
the Secrecy that is maintained, the
local population is aware of this

state of affairs. i
corporations

The industrial ore
have been the most striking form
of Soviet economic expansion

ince the war, but many other
methods, some trivial and old,
have algp been applied.

First, the practice of collecting
“war booty” has been extended to
embrace factories and ships as
well as food, cattle, rolling stock,

_— SF err
i a SRN



Russia‘’s

JAMES BRIDIE«. 6. 10. Mayor Lde7 ADSI

BARBADOS

By DAVID J. DALLIN

Contributing Editor of the New
Leader

— From —

THE YALE REVIEW

September 1950.

and raw materials. War booty
was taken not only in the coun-
tries of the enemy but also in
Poland and Yugoslavia; all “Ger-
man property” had to fall to
Russia, not to its small allies.
Removal of war booty, organized
by the NKVT in collaboration
with the army, necessitated long
lines of freight trains from all
occupied countries in Europe, and,
in the fall of 1945, from Korea
and Manchuria. No figures—not
even estimates —- have been pub-
lished of the total value of the
booty, but the Manchurian total
was estimated by an American
commission at over $800,000,000,

Second, the armies of occupa-
tion—an occupation now in its
year—are billeted and fed at tha
fifth and, in some places, its sixth
cost of the occupied country.

The third method of economic
expansion has been the collection
of reparations—which, from four
nations, have aggregated $900,-
000,000. Most of the reparations
treaties have provided for caleu-
lations to be made on the basis
of 1938 prices. Prices in the
meantime have almost doubled, so
that the $900,000,000 grew to a
considerably larger sum. In the
case of Rumania, for instance, it
was estimated that up to Septem-
ber, 1946, that country — which
was obliged to pay $300,000,000 in
reparations—had paid $17A4,000,-
000 for “restitutions,” $430,000,000
for ‘“confiscations,” $300,000,000
for the maintenance of Soviet
troops, and $105,000,000 as the
first instalments of the reparations
bill. General Nicholas Radescu,
former Rumanian premier, has
stated that up to July, 1948, Ru-
mania had paid to the, Soviet
Union $1,785,000,000. A German
memorandum published in July,
1950, estimates that reparation
payments have amounted to sixty
billion dollars; this may be ex-
aggerated, however.

Fourth, new crade agreements
between Russia and the satellites
have usually been based on the
American dollar as the stable cur-
rency. The process of translating
the inflated currencies into dollars
provides wide opportunities for
“combinations” and sleight of
hand. In Hungary, for instance,
the dollar is valued sometimes at
11.60 filler and sometimes at 25.00,
depending on which amount hap-
pens to be more advantageous,

Fifth, the MVT has sometimes
bought products from the satel-
lites at a low price and resold
tiem to another country at a large
profit; in this way Moscow sold
German fertilizers to Finland and
Polish coal to Sweden. Rumanian
oil was delivered to the other
satellites through an arrangement
with the MVT in Moscow. The
most striking instance of such

‘trade practices was the sale to

Czechoslovakia of Bulgarian zine
concentrate; Bulgaria tried to ne-
gotiate the sale herself, offering a
price of $144 a ton; Moscow step-
ped in and undersold Bulgaria in
zine concentrates bought from
Bulgaria at a low price. Such
transactions obviously yield a
large profit to the middleman.

Sixth, new trade agreements
have been included, and a few
details have become available to
illuminate their nature. Prices
agreed to have. often been
favourable to the Soviet side and
unfavourable to the satellite. Po-
land, for example, has been sell-
iig coal to Russia and buying cot-
ton from her; in these transactions
the price of coal has been lower
and the price of cotton higher
than on the world markets. In
1948, when the world price of coal
was between $14 and $20 a ton,
Poland sold 600,000 tons of coal
to the Soviet Union for $1.20 a
ton, thus making the Soviet net
gain in this one transaction about
$10,000,000. Bulgarian rose oil
has been resold by Moscow at a
1,000 per cent. profit, Rumanian
aviation oll has been delivered to
Russia at a price of seven cents a
gallon; for mediocre Soviet Zis
trucks Rurnania has paid $2,900
each, In Manchuria and China
it was noticed that in exchange
for scores of trainloads of soy-
beans, vig bristles, tin, and tung-
sten, only a few Soviet automo-
biles and modest cargoes of wine
and chocolate appeared in Peking
and Tientsin,

Seventh, interest on Soviet
loans has often been higher than
the rate considered normal be-
tween governments. For the loan
to Czechoslovakia, for instance,
3,5 percent was charged, whereas
the Export-Import Bank rate was
2.5 percent,





ADVOCATE

New Empire 35



The eighth type of economic
expansion—the newest chapter in
this history—was manifest in the
Soviet request that Bulgaria pay
for the Comintern’s “help” during
three decades. Moscow has de
manded $10,000,000 as repayment
for financial assistance to the
Bulgarian’ Communist party and
for assistance to its leaders during
their stay in Russia; having
achieved its goal, state power, the
Bulgarian Communist party must
pay its debt. No documents
have been published to disclose
how the sum of $10,000,000 has
been arrived at for Bulgaria. If
the other European satellites, in-
cluding Germany, pay on the
same basis, their Comintern debts
tc. Russia may make a sizable total.
In addition, the new Far Eastern
satellites will be presented with
similar bills. Vistas are opening.

Russia’s economic recovery
since the end of the war has been
considerable. When the Soviet
government claims that its
economy has approximately
reached its prewar level, it is
making no empty. boast. Living
conditions have also improved
since 1945, That this could
happen while three million men
are kept in the army and a large
part of Russian industry is stlii
busy with military production has
been due to these eight methods
of obtaining foreign assistance (in
addition to UNRRA and Lend-
lease) which were put into opera—
tion during the early postwar
period. The total value of
“political” imports into Russia
may have reached $30 billion; a
great part of these consisted of
consumer goods, of which the city
of Moscow received the largest
share. This is why Moscow, the
dressed window of the great store,
sometimes gives the impression
that the Soviet has almost attained
economic normality. For the very
poor land of Russia $30 billion of
“free” imports within a period of

a few years means a great deal.
Some of these _ ingenious
methods of acquiring foreign

wealth—namely, pure war booty
and grabbing by force—will have
to be relinquished soon, Repara-
tions payments will end, too.
What will remain are, first, Soviet
vested interests in other countries
est capital Sum ‘the value of
which cannot even” be estimated;
second, Moscow’s role as a com-
mercial center—as a broker be-
tween East and West; and third,
the ability to exert pressure to
raise prices on its products and
to lower the prices on its pur-
chases.

If imperialism is really what
Lenin defined it to be—if its main
traits are interests abroad, capital
investments, profits on a large
scale, and political control of
foreign nations to secure their
economic exploitation — then the
newest pattern of Soviet relation-
ship with the nations of its orbit
clearly falls within this definition
But the process of “partition of
the world” among the other
powers has been reversed in the
forty years since _ this theory
emerged. While Western im-
perialism has relinquished more
than three-quarters of its terri-
tory, the Soviet state has grown
vastly to become the mainstay of
expanding imperialism—ip Lenin’s
sense.

The basic difference between
Western and Eastern imperialism
has been the methods employed in
economic empire-building. In the
West they consisted in a steadily
growing export of goods and in
investments; capital abroad was
accumulated in the course of years
and decades. The Soviet govern-
ment, on the other hand, has not
been busy with foreign investment
of its capital; what it acquired
from abroad was seized in one
historic moment as a part of
victory in a war. What economic
activity accomplished for the West
was achieved by Moscow through
sheer military force and political
power,

History has seen many different
types of empires and different
methods of empire-building, Re-
cently we have seen a Japanese
imperial system, quite different
from the German-Nazi type; both
of them differed from the British
imperial structure. The Soviet
empire is a real empire, one in
the row of great supernational
buildings. It, too, has its special
traits; it uses its own methods
both in the political and in the
economic field. The political
methods of its empire-building
have not been entirely successful,
but its methods of economic im-
perialism have worked better and
have been a key factor in the post-
war strengthening of the Soviet

Union,
END, =







































Bernard Shaw died of course ““Daphne Laureola” manship has become the leading
To The Editor, The Advocate, paar ig Wes ‘James Bridie” | roused controversy among the “repertory” theatre in Britain. To
Sr seem Gent ine OPDOE- who took his place as the most dis- critics when it appeared in 1949. this he gave unstinted time,

tunity to make a suggestion with
regard to the forthcoming Inter-
colonial cricket tournament.

Judging from the number of
bowlers invited to practice, one
immediately realises that the
selectors have grown conscious of
the dreadful dearth of bowling
talent in the island. The two
completed practice matches have
shown most of the bowlers to be
equally innocuous, Our slow bowl-
ing department is undoubtedly
very weak for Hoad, the best of
the lot, is indeed a problem.

An Empire team is presently
touring Grenada and with it is A.
Holder a slow left arm spinner—
one who really spins the ball—
who is spreading havoc amongst
the Grenada batsmen, Having
joined Empire only recently,
Holder has not had the opportun-
ity of playing for the Bank Hall
team but the mere fact that he
has been selected on performance
in the nets alone speaks well for
his bowling ability.

As C. Hunte has turned out to
be our most recent batting find,
so it is possible that Holder could
be the answer to our headaches
for a spin bowler. In the interest
of the game it would be a good
idea if some provision be made
so that he could be included in
the next trial match and given an
cpportunity to prove his wortn,

SPECTATOR.

30.1.51,

tinguished dramatist working in
Britain. His death at 60 with his
powers at their full, is a sore loss
to’ English letters and to the
theatre. ai

Osborne Henry Mavor, C.B.E.,
L.L.D., M.D., was the son of an
outstanding Glasgow engineer. He
qualified as a doctoy, and during
his time as a student was one of
a group (including his lifelong
friend the Rt. Hon. Walter Elliot,
M.P.) who made the Glasgow
University Magazine remarkable
among undergraduate periodicals.
(incidentally the drawings he
contributed showed that he would
have won distinction as a car-
toonist.) He served in the
R.A.M.C. in both Great wars and
worked successfully in Glasgow
beth as a general practitioner and
as a consulting physician.

But even as a student he was
an enthusiast for the theatre, and
finally he devoted all his time to
writing. “The Anatomist”, starring
the late Henry Ainsley and giving
Miss Flora Robson her big
chance, was his first success in
London. Then followed “A Sleep-
ing Clergyman” with Mr. Robert



Donat (whieh London found
stimulating and provocative, and
which firmly established Bridie’s
position on the West End Stage)
and the lovely “Tobias and ths
Angel”. “Dr. Bolfry” is regarded
by some as his finest play; and

But the public had no doubt about
it, or about Dame Edith Evans’
brilliant creation of “Daphne” and
it was an immediate success, run-
ning for one year to full houses.
Many discerning people, including
professional critics, believe that
some of his finest writing is to
be found in plays not yet seen in
London—of “John Knox” (pro-
duced in Glasgow) and “The
Queen’s Comedy”. The final epi-
sode in the latter play, which was
given at the 1950 Edinburgh Festi-
val, is remarkable for its inten-
sity of feeling, its humanity, and
its craftsmanship. One reason
why Bridie’s death is so untimely,
is that even at his age he was
still growing intellectually and
increasing in technical power as a
playwright. It is impossible to fore-
cast what his position will finally
be, but two things may be noted,
The first is that his plays—not the
big London successes only, but
numbers of others less well
known—have a sure place in the
programmes of the non-commer-
cial theatres all over the country.
The second is that more and more
people are discovering how well
his plays read—for Bridie was 1
literary artist as well as a stage
craftsman.

He thought that London's dom-
ination of the theatre in Britain

was unhealthy, and some eight
years ago he took the lead in
founding the Glasgow Citizens’
Theatre, which under his chair«

thought and work, and generous
financial support; and he used it
for the encouragement of young
writers and players. Not a few of
these will always thank Bridie for
h’s kindly and wise advice and
criticism and for “Citizens” he
wrote “The Forrigan Reel” and
other light pieces which give rein
to that humour which shines out
in his autobiography “One Way
of Living” and in “Mr, Bridie’s
Alphabet for Little “ Glasgow
Highbrows” and “Tedious and
Brief”.

It is dificult for one who
enjoyed his friendship to write
moderately of his pers 1 quali-
ties. He was the kindliest and
most generous of men, and the
best of good company with a salty
wit, an unpredictable and irresis-
tible sense of fun and of the incon-
gruous—this gives savour to even
his most serious plays—and that
basic simplicity and delight in
simple things which so often
marks the really fine mind: His
passing is an irreparable loss to
a host of friends in all walks of
life, and of course particularly in
the theatre and the world of
letters. I believe that “Tobias and
the Angel” resulted from advice
that he should write a play
about "a really lovable character”
—and in the Apochrypha he
found old Tobit. That phrase
applied with complete truth to
Obsorne Mavor.

N.W.D.



Will Take Canadian
Plays To Bermuda

By JOHN PATERSON

TORONTO,

It’s a bit. complicated, but an adventurous
Australian and a foot-loose Irishman are
taking a series of plays to Bermuda in order
to put acting in Canada on a year-round
paying basis. :

Bruce Yorke, formerly of Sydney, N.S.W.,
and partner Michael Sadlier of Dublin, have
contracted for a nine-month series of plays
in the newly-completed theatre at the luxuri-
!ous Bermudiana Hotel, Hamilton, Bermuda.
They will use Canadian actors and _tech-
nicians.

The venture, an outgrowth of several
years’ effort to put Canadian acting on a
profitable basis, is part of a comprehensive

Pan which includes summer stock in two
cities and a winter subscription series of
plays in 25 Ontario towns and cities.

A yen for travel took Yorke to Shanghai
where he landed with $25 and no return
ticket shortly before the outbreak of the
Second World War. After a brief fling at
selling tobacco in troubled North China he
joined the Intelligence Corps of the Indian
Army as an interrogation officer of Japanese
prisoners. ;

A post-war holiday in New York resulted
in his meeting Canadian producer Brian
Doherty and getting a job with him. He was
advance agent for two cross-Canada tours
with “The Drunkard” and “Arsenic and Old
Lace.” Later, he started a summer theatre
at Niagara Falls, Ont.

Sadlier’s wanderings, meanwhile, had
landed him in Peterborough, Ont. He had
left Dublin for school in England. He was
in a few English films and stage plays when
the Second World War broke out. He joined
the R.A.F. and, transferred to Canada, switch-
ed to the R.C.A.F. After discharge he
studied acting in New York. Then followed
a United States tour with Cornelia Otis
Skinner.

Last summer the two combined their sum-
mer theatres at Niagara Falls and Peterbor-
jough, The companies alternated, playing
week about in the two Ontario cities.

Yorke, anxious to put the business on a
steady basis, visited 150 towns and cities in
southern Ontario in an effort to sell them a
plan for a winter subscription series of plays.

“We got a good reception and eventually
signed up 25 centres,” he said. “In many
we found there hadn’t been ‘live’ professional
theatre for 25 or 30 years.”

The Ontario season opens in Cornwall in
mid-February. Bermuda starts in April. The
three companies will be rotated, each spend-
ing three months in Bermuda. It will be a
sort of holiday with pay for them,

Yorke was enthusiastic about what he
called a “showcase for Canadian talent, pre-
senting them before visitors from the United
States and Europe.”—(C.P.)

Conscription And Control
Of Prices Issues In Canada

OTTAWA,

The new Parliamentary session coming
into being at the end of January will show
early effects of some high-powered, strategic
lobbying.

Two main fronts will bear the brunt of
the lobbying, and both are necessarily em-
barrassing to the government. One is con-
scription, the other price controls,

Government policy has been to avoid tact-
fully either of these, but indications are that
it will be more difficult this session.

Already in January, the Canadian Legion
has come out four-square for conscription,
and called on its branches from coast to
coast to petition their members of parliament
on the subject. In addition, the Conference
of Defence Associations—eonsisting of form-
er army officers in 12 military associations—
renewed a demand it has been making annu-
ally since the war. It adopted unanimously
a resolution calling for a policy of selective
service in the reserve force.

The head of Canadian army forces over-
seas in the Second World War—Gen. H. D. G.
Crerar—has been saying strong things about
compulsory training for several years.

On the prices front, the government is
faced with resolutions from various organ-
izations which have expressed alarm at the
rising cost of living.

The bulk of Canadian organized labor has
thrown its weight into the price fight. Four
major labor organizations, representing more
than 1,000,000 workers, have prepared a brief
for presentation to the cabinet early in the
new session—probably next month. The or-
ganizations are the Canadian Congress of
Labor, the Trades and Labor Congress, the
Canadian and Catholic Confederation of
Labor and the Dominion Joint Legislative
Committee of the Railway Transportation
Brotherhoods, ;

In addition, the executive of the Canadian
Association of Consumers—an organization
assisted by the government to survive after
helping in maintaining prices during the
| Second World War—has called for some form
\ of rent control,.at least.—(C.P.)



a

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY



1, 1951

Lady Savage Visits |

St. Margaret’s |
Baby Welfare Clinic

Lady Savage, wife of His Excellency the Governor, accom-
panied by their daughter, Miss Pat Savage and by Miss
Arne, Social Welfare Officer, paid a visit to the St. Mar-

garet’s Branch of the St. John’s Baby Welfare Clinic yester-| white.

day evening.

150 Baptised

NE HUNDRED AND FIFTY

converts were baptised when
the New Testament Church of
God held their second Baptismal
Ceremony yesterday. At the first
which was held at Brandon’s
Beach on Sunday morning over
300 were baptised. This second
one was held at the back of Rev.



Winter’s home, “Winslow”, Fon-
tabelle.
The ceremony began at 8

o'clock, but from early in the
morning people began to gather.
They came from all over the
island. Rev. James B, Reesor, the
faith healer, was one of the bap-
tists.

On Sunday night 168 people
were received into the Church of
God and on Tuesday night over
100. Approximately 2,800 people
nave been converted throughout
the Convention and many more
hundreds, who could not get into
the Queen’s Park Shed, raised
their hands signifying their inten-
tion to live for Christ,

Rev. Reesor, after about two
weeks in the island, left this
morning for San Juan, Puerto
Rico.

ARGE QUANTITIES of flying

fish and dolphin are definite-

ly on the western coast of the

island just waiting to be caught,

Mr. D. W. Wiles, Fisheries Officer
told the Advocate yesterday,

On Tuesday 3,800 pounds of
flying fish and 535 pounds of dol- {|
phin passed through the Public,
Market and fairly good catches;
were brought in along the Paynes |
Bay coast,

During last week one fishing
boat brought in 48 dolphins at
Oistins. On ‘Tuesday night
another boat caught and
brought them to the Careenage.

IX AND A HALF acres of first
crop ripe canes were burnt
when a fire broke out at Lowthers
Plantation, Christ Church over
the week-end, The canes are
owned by W. T. Watson and were
insured.

Another week-end fire at Step-;|
ney Plantation, St. George des-
troyed a quantity of second erop

ripe canes which were also in-
sured, They belong to Bulkeley
Ltd.

On Tuesday night a fire at Man-
grove Plantation burnt three and
a half acres of first crop ripe
canes. They are owned by Car-
rington Ltd, and were insured.

A FILM SHOW will be given at
the monthly reunion of the
Combermere School Old Boys’
Association on Friday, February 2
at 8 p.m. It is as follows :— Brit-
ish News, Sheep Dog, Our College
and Cricket.

There will be a discussion after
the film show, It is expected to
see a large turn out of old boys.

NEWS ITEM reached the

Advocate yesterday from
London which said that a Rhode
Island (red) hen belonging to
Miss Ellen Jones of Bailey Farm,
Bodorgan, Anglesey, Wales laid an
egg weighing six and a_ half
ounces.

Perhaps Miss Jones is feeding
her fowls on Barbados feed but
still a local New Hampshire has
beaten her Rhode Island by an
ounce and a half, This New
Hampshire laid an egg weighing
8 ounces, It is owned by Gordon
Matthews of Constitution Road.

T DISTRICT “B” on Monday
a jury returned an “open
verdict” when an enquiry into the
circumstances surrounding the
death of Edward Blackman was
held. Blackman’s body was dis-
covered at Silver Sands by Lionel
Ross on Friday, December 29
when he reported the matter to
the Police.

The body was removed to the
Christ Church Almshouse Mor-
tuary where Dr, Charles Manning
performed an autopsy.

Bus Overloaded

Vincent Brandford of St, John
was found guilty yesterday of
overloading the motor bus J-277
ce Fair Field Road on December
20.

His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
before whom the case was heard
ordered Brandford to pay a fine
of 15/- and 1/- costs in 28 days
or in default one month’s impris-
onment with hard labour.



a re

FAULTY BRAKES

After pleading guilty of driving
motor car M-2294 with inefficient
brakes on Waterford Road, Mac
Donald Garner of Jackman, St.
Michael was fined £3 to be paid
by mdnthly instalments or in
default two months’ imprisonment,
by His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma
yesterday .

The offence was committed on
December 22 and the case was
brought by the Police as a result
of an accident on Waterford Road.



Court For Divorce And
Matrimonial Causes

In the Court for Divorce and
Matrimonial Causes yesterday His
Honour the Acting Chief Judge
Mr. J. W. B. Chenery, pronounced
decree absolute in the suit of
E. W. Storey (Petitioner) and
D. M. K. Storey (Respondent).
There was no order as to costs.

Petitioner was represented by
Mr. J.S. B. Dear instructed by
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfield.

IN the report on the Public Utilities
Lili in the House of Assembiy on Tue:
day, Mr. E. D. Mottley was reported as
saying that he could see the Board's ex-







penses borne by the uti companies
would be a great burden the compan
jes. This should have on the



“Consumer.”


























All thrve wrote complimentarily
in the Visitors’ Book at the end of
the visit.

This Branch of the Clinic. has
45 children on the roll, About two
dezen were there yesterday, some
accompanied -by their parents, and
some by their small brothers or
sisters, as is the habit in the
country parishes where many
parents have to be out working all

day.
The clinic is always open on
Wednesday evenings, so Lady

Savage was in time to see the
work that is done by the regular
helpers. One helper was distribut-
ing milk and other items of food.
Another was weighing babies, and
a third was recording the weights
on forms prepared for the purpose,
A fourth helper—a trained nurse
—was checking up on the babies’
condition, fixing navel bands, giv-
ing advice about feeding, etc.

Lady Savage looked on with
interest at this form of Social
Welfare Work that is aimed at
helping the people of the area to
raise sturdier children, _ rather
than to follow their own methods
which may be described as a
cateh-as-catch-can wrestle with
infant mortality.

The Clinic was founded by
Madame Ifill on June 28 last year.

Visitors’ Impressions

Lady Savage wrote in the Vis-
itors Book: “Visited the clinic with
Miss Arne. T am most favourably
impressed, and do congratulate
the ladies on the splendid work
they are doing. This clinic is very
well organised. Mothers and chil.
dren were happy, and I think they
appreciate the work being done
I wish the clinie every success.”

Miss Savage wrote: “This is a
very well organised and well run
clinic.”

Miss Arne’s contribution was:
“Visited today with Lady Savage
I was much impressed by the
quiet, businesslike atmosphere
and the quiet competence of the
regular helpers. The babies on the
whole seemed fitter than others }
have seen elsewhere.”

Lady Savage was presented with
a bouquet at the end of her visit

Among those present ‘were



| Revd. A. Mellor Vicar of St. Mar-

garet’s and Mrs. Mellor; Madame
Ifill; Mrs. D, Simpson; Mrs. W
Payne; Mrs, K. Newsam: Mrs. C

Mayers; Mrs. C. Pinder; Mr. Cc, D.
Ramsay.



Painter Remanded
Without Bail

DAVID VAN PUTTIN a 23.
year-old painter of Martindales
Road, St. Michael was remanded
without bail by His Worship Mr,
H. A, Talma Police Magistrate of
District “A” until ‘February © 7
when he appeared before him
yesterday on a charge of demand-
ing the sum of $6,000 from Au-
brey Birch Director of the Pro
gressive Motor Bus Co. Dayrells
Road, without a reasonable cause
and using threats against him,

The offence was alleged to have
been committed on January 25
Mr, E. Barrow is appearing on
behalf of Puttin whilé Capt. BE,
Grant is prosecuting, from infor-
mation received, for the Police.

Yesterday when the prelimin-
ary evidence was started the
Frosecution called on two wit-
nesses,

Before Mr. Talma
Puttin there was a
whether bail should be granted
or not. Mr. Barrow submitted
that he saw no reason why. bail
should not be granted ws his cli-
ent was not what he would term
a violent person. Capt. Grant
stressed the point that if bail
were granted a substantial
amount should be: cffered.

Mr. Talma told them that the
offence was a serious and rare
one and he felt within himself
that if the person to whom the
threats were made was anxious
about his safety then he saw no
need for bail. ,

remanded
question



Miners Defy
Government

SYDNEY, Jan. 31,
The Australian Miners Centra!
Council decided today to defy the
Government's strike ban and hold
stoppages one day per week in the
coal mines,

This step which follows a
similar decision by miners at mass
meetings is a protest against con-
ditions attached to the recent pay
award,

The miners are liable to six
months imprisonment or £100 fine
for ignoring the ban.

The Council also decided to seek
support for miners in ‘all largé
cities.

A coal industry. tribunal had
Gecided to make the wage in-
creases of up to two Australian
pounds sterling conditional on the
miners’ working 10 full days per
fortnight. The Government hss
threatened to use troops if miners
cefied the strike ban.

More than 150,000 workers are
already idle in Sydney because of
acute coal shortages and indus-
tries are rationed.

Miners protests are part of the
mounting industrial crisis in
Australia. Railwaymen, dissatis-
fied with wage rates have placed
a ban on overtime and dockers
are due to begin a similar ban on
February 2.

—Reuter.

“36 SURPRISED”
a Reuter
















I Won The

$5.00
By Paul Foster

THE point in the “Your Guess”

3 ent in Moenday’s Evening

dvocate was that the Coca Colas
at Canada Dry Ginger Ales
shown, in the picture were bottlea
in Montreal. The clue was that the
bottle caps of the coca colas were
Cokes bottled in Barbados
have pink caps.No one guessec
the correct answer. It was the
Hardest guess picture that has
been published to date,

The “Your Guess” competition
started in the Evening Advocate
on Monday 30th October, 1950, I
was a popular feature from the
Start. And no wonder, for five
dollars was paid to the persor
who guessed correctly what thc
picture was all about.

Every Monday a “Your Guess’
picture appears, and the public
is asked to guess, “What is this,’



“Where is this,” “What is the
point of this picture’, “What i
the picture all about”, etc, jus

depending on the picture.

Every Wednesday at 10 o’cloc?
the Editor opens the envelopes onc
by one until the first correct
answer is opened.

About a month after the
Guess” competition started, th:
Editor told me, “Why don’t yo:
give us a picture that no one car
guess.” “Tell you what I'll do’
he said “You take a picture tha
no one can guess the correct
answer to, and you can have the
five dollars,

So this week,
goes to me.

Several Guesses

Although no one guessed cor-
rectly, there was no shortage of
answers when the Editor began
opening these at 10 a.m. yester-
day.

Here are a few of some of the
guesses, “The Rum Refinery ”
“A Refreshing time,” “Party at
the Marine Hotel in honour of the
Cricketers,” “South Point,’ “The
point of this picture is a ver:
tasty heveragfe,” “Some has covers
some hasn’t,” ete.

This week’s guess victure was
taken at Seawell. Part of the
crew of the T.C.A. ‘planes which
called here every Saturday change

“You

the five dollars





over at Barbados. Each ’plane
has a bar. which is run bv the
nurser. When he remains in Rar-

bados his drinks remain with him
Picture in Monday’s Evening
Advocate showed some of these
srinks just hefore they went on
hoard the ’plane on Saturday,





Britain May
Buy West
German Meat

LONDON Jan, 31.

Britain may buy meat from
West Germany, Food Minister
Maurice Webb indicated in the
House of Commons today. He
said he was looking into the
possibility, but before there could
be any negotiations the Govern—
ment would have to be satisfied
that meat could be imported from
Germany without danger to
animal health in Britain,

It would also have to be satis—
fied that methods of inspection
and slaughtering were up _ to
standards required here.

Webb's statement was made in
reply to a question by a Con-—
servative Member who asked
whether negotiations had yet been
completed with West German
Government for sending mutton
to Britain —Reuter.



Meat Negotiations

CANBERKA, Jan, 31.

Negotiations between Britain
and Ausiralia for a 15-year meat
contract are at an advanced siage
John Me Wen, Australian Trade
Minister said today.
deadlock in negotiations for price!
variations on butter, cheese, lamb
and mutton under existing long-
term contracts he added. Senior
British, Food Ministry Officials
would arrive in Australia in
February to discuss price adjust-
ments,

They would examine Australia’s
duction”

because that was the







The above = eéquip-
ment is ‘available for,
early delivery from

the

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BARBADOS ADVOCATE ~~~

His Razor “Tames’ Them|

Twenty years ago you could have gene in Maiden’s Lane!
and could have got a haircut for eight cents from the way-
side barber, Fitz Griffith. Today Fitz charges one shilling
and he cuts behind the Advocate at the corner of }

© ~ treet. ;

g

Me Gregor ;





In The Park
Yesterday

A shilling is the wayside hair-
Joutting price, but if you do not
like out-of-doors haircutting you
will have to pay 36 cents and
sometimes 2s

Wayside barbers get work, not
so much by their skill, for as

ANYONE walking through! Fitz told the Advocate yesterday
Queen’s Park yesterday woulti) there is not much difference in
have noticed how the pavements| the skill of the wayside barbers
along the main thoroughfare are} |of Bridgetown who have all been
crumbling quickly, Some of the|in the business for many years.
gutters also are in great need of|They are all handy with the
repair and yesterday the gutters) Scissors. But they get more work
were littered with paper andjif they are of a friendly disposi-
cigarette ends. tion and if, as Fitz will tell you,

In great contrast to this wera! “Mey have “the gift of gab.” Of
the gardens which were clean and|COUrse Fitz can keep up a run-
the grass around the flower beds}"!Mg talk on any topic that is in
were well trimmed, The steel shed| the news.
was being cleaned. ~ .

Some of the wooden cribs were Cut Hair For Nothing
being carried out of the shed.

There was a placard pinned up|. Fitz has been a haircutter now

qutside the Park House which read; for over 20 years, Before that
‘Free Vaccination Centre” but) time when he used to live in
the few ladies who were inside the} Hindsbury Road, he would cut

building handling the needles aiid] School boys’ hair and charge them

arranging the boxes of cotton wool |P°thing. Cutting school __ boys’

vere having a quiet time. hair was by way of practice.
Hawkers’ trays packed with}. At the time when Fitz used to

Shee 3 . practise on the boys’ heads, the
v‘" s swee seen
cane ba ae ae Sans olher boys who could afford to

LDDs —lazed| #9 to established barbers used to
(round on the partly rotten eribs| ugh at them and tell them they
vaiting for something to turn up, could get justice if they sought a
At the other end of the park near) SOurt of law, inferring that: Fitz

used to make a hack of the job
the Governor's Gate there, was 4) Ft rite did not mind.

very large heap of rotten leaves
which seemed to have been de-} after years of practice, he
posited there for some time. went into Maiden’s Lane and

The artificial lake was empty
and here and there at the bottom
were green patches of moss.

Cook With
Newspaper

WASHINGTON
Service wives have a few in-
teresting answers to the problems
of cooking without electricity, gas At
Seer in a national or local cutter, He said that continuous
Boma of their helpful hints, drilling racked his body and kept

hi AN. £ e did not like to

gathered during the process of|he lean. When he said. this he
making the best of bad conditions| jooked at himself, implying that
in remote outposts, are included] one could see that he is a fairly
in the New Jango (JUNIOR]sleck man now.
ARMY NAVY GUILD ORGAN-
IZATION) cookbook,

When deprived of electricity,| 4
gas and firewood, they recommend] c&"'s.
that several sheets of newspaper | b@rd

hour to cut it.
be gathered. The newspapers |®" Ss echaaad her side
should be opened and cut into Other wayside barbers besi

' Fitz carry on their trade in the
strips or used whole as evpears Lower Green, Hincks Street and
to best suit the need. on the upper Wharf.

The papers ought to be rolled It is interesting to
into une piece’ then, Before} barber shaving a man.
reaching the end of the roll, ac-]about 11 o'clock Fitz yas shaving
cording to the service wives,|one and the man sat Wicoping on
another piece of newspaper should; a two-foot high bench with his
be added, back arched and his neck eraned.

They recommend that you then|Fitz said when you are being
continue rolling tightly until you] shaved, you get the feeling that
have a tight, thick roll, This} you would sleep. It is just like
should be tied with a string and

when you play music to a wild
dipped into a quantity of paraffin,| animal and ee him for the

An alternative is to melt candles| While, he said
onto the roll until it is thoroughly
saturated.

When rolled, the
should fit a number one size ean
with the lid removed. The roll
should be inserted in the can and
again saturated with paraffin

They then recommend that aj
number two-and-a-half size aisle A ‘
we punctured on the side o#|it is predicted that a ;
the lid with a can opener and between the United States and
another hole be punched into the France announced by Truman and
opnosite side at the bottom. Pleven will greatly influence the

stayed there about five years. He
then moved to Greens Lane and
afterwards to the Lower Green.
He has been cutting hair behind
the Advocate for nearly 10 years.



Haireutting is not the only
trade which Fitz learnt. He had
a two-year spell at shoe-making.
Fitz thought that shoe-making
entailed too much sitting down.
He prefers ctanding and that is
why he likes hair-cutting better.

Hated To Be Lean

one time Fitz was a_ stone

Twenty-five vears ago to cut
four—foot block stone cost 10
When you came across a
stone it would take about

watch a
Yesterday



newspapers

TRUMAN AND
PLEVEN AGREE

@ From Page t

The small can is to be placed, foreign policy of all North
beneath the larger one and the|Atlantic powers. ; +
paraffin is to be lighted The In more formal times hey
larger can serves as the stove,| Would have been described as

‘| full scale alliances.

This method of cooking was used
by service wives at Pearl Harbour
a the bombing in December,
1

The seryice wives also recom-
mend that in case of a stoppage in
electric current a peanut may be

The statement issued after the
Two-Day Conference between
the President and the French
Prime Minister goes far beyond
the predictions and broadly word -
{ed statements of common objec -



used for illumination, i tives usually made after such
The peanut te to be pigewed inte eras diplomats here believed

a soft object, such as fruit, and].

it gives a clearer picture of the
views and intentions of the two
statesmen, than either had given
separately in recent months.

Some diplomats think oa
appears to be assuming a type
cle partnership with the United
States, hitherto reserved to Eng-
lish speaking countries.

Tt is noted that the communique



to be lighted with a match. This
is said to make an
emergency eandle,

excellent



—LN.S. |

eeeieeineniielipneinas

RECTOR OF ST. JOHN



Rev. A. E. Simmons, Rector] contains no hint of disagreement
of St. Lucy, has been appointed over Far Eastern policy aes ‘
Rector of St. John. This was] communique issued after talks las'

decided at a meeting of the Board{month between President Truman





basis of price review formula; of Appointment held in the lobby|and British Prime Minister

Mc Wen said. of the House of Assembly yester-| Attlee. sie
—Reuter. | day at 12.30 p.m. —Reu

— FPF re EELS,







MASSEY-HARRIS |
EQUIPMENT

Enquiries cordially invited for the

supply of the following—

42 BHP. 6 cyl. DIESEL WHEEL

TRACTORS

(Steel Wheels also available for

Plough)
GRASS CUTTERS = 5 & 6ft
MANURE SPREADERS
SIDE
FEED MILLS

FERTILIZIN




DRILLS

agreements |}

DELIVERY RAKES i

'|| CAVE SHEPHERD & CO,, LTD.



Buy British —
| Antiques

| LONDON.
} American antique dealer Fred-
| erick P. Victoria said that Britain
is running dry of old treasures.
Victoria’ had been touring
| Europe for over a month and
found it dificult to find anything
really exciting.

Said Victoria:

“Things are hard to find in
England and France. Somehow
the world is running dry. Dealers
will soon have to come to America
if they want to buy British
antiques.”

Victoria flew back to the “reas |
States with a few priceless treas-
ures, anyway—including Marie | ll
Antoinette’s stepchair, a Louis XV
deskvhair, and two rare Nubian
dolls made entirely of tiny shells,

—INS.

GOES UP JUST THE SAME |i

LONDON,
Nationalized road transport in
Britain will cost 10 per
more from’ January 29.
The Road Haulage Coe
said the increase in general haul-
ge and parcels rates was neces-
sary to
increases in costs,
tires, wages and fuel.
This is the second increase
since the industry was taken
ever in February 1948. Haulage
and pareels rates went up by 74
—LN.S,





cent

meet the recent heavy
particularly

per cent in 1949,







ital Science Reveals

PROO# THAT BRUSHING TEETH
RIGHT AFTER EATING IS THE
SAE, EFFECTIVE WAY 70

SELP STOP
‘OOTH DECAY

NiTH COLGAT!
DENTAL CREAN

* y
ures Le



25e Ase 75¢



“FRESH ARRIVALS |

AT

WEATHERHEAD 'S

EVERY BITE A DELIGHT!



Fry’s “Hazel, Nut” Choc's:

2/-, 3/9 and $1.79 Box
8/- per 1-Ib. Tin,
Fry’s “Princess” Choe's:

94ce, and $1.69 Box
Cadbury's “Red Rose” Choc's

98c. and $1.80 Box
FRY’'S “Seorched Almonds”

2/- Box.

$2.02 per 1-lb. Tin

Cadbury’s “Milk Tray”
Choe’s:
{ 90c. and $1.48 tin

| Cadbury's ‘Roses’ Choe’s
and $1.48 tin

Biscuits

0c.
Cadbury’ s Choc.
5/- and 5/3 tin
Meltis Coffee Choc: Mint
Creams $1.23 box
Nestle’s Asst. Choc:
$1.19 and $2.12 box

Black Magic Choe: $4.06 box
Salted Peanuts ..., 64c. tin
Jacob’s Cream Crackers —
6/- tin
Jacob's “Selected”
$2.06 tin
Jacob's “Asst. Creams” Bis-
cuits $1.51 tin
Jacob's “Family Asst.” Bis-
cuits $1.47 tin
Meltis Favourite Candies —
$1.02 and $1,85 box
Carr's “Club® Cheese” Bis-
cuits $1.00 tin
Glucose Barley Sugar —
60c. and $1.02 tin
Sharp's Toffee —
60c., 78c. & $1.02
Collard '& Bowses “Nougaty
34c. and 70e.
Collard & Bowses
scotch” ...,
Ovaltine Biscuits .
Blue Bird Toffee.

Biscuits

“Butter-
2le. & 45c.
. 43c. Box
-42¢. tin



BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

Head of Broad Street







Gents’ white cotton Pyjama
Girdles.

PAC ob cua

Gents’ pure Silk Handker-
chiefs, white, blue, grey.
|

Each_____.._...$1.88

White Viyella Anklets with

turn-over tops. Size 10—11¥%,

Pair... _---.61.56

Boys’ Ties with hand painted
designs, assorted colours.

|
| EGGha.:ineciaane?





TRTTPUPT TIPE, SEER oe ee ee —

laeeereenscee

Be Die Gea Mlias Wisk Ad While You Sleep in
Sea Island Cotton











Follow this
%, Simple Beauty Plan

Awash your face with Palmolive Soap

Brthen, for 60 seconds, massage with
Palmotive’s soft, lovely lather, Rinse!

CDo this 3 times a day for 14 days.
This cleansing massage brings
zens skin Palmolive'’s full

utifying effect!



(SCRATCH

AT LAST !!
AT LAST!!

You can rid your tables

and Safes of ANTS with

Dr. NEDD’S

Effective.

Obtainable at:—

BOOKER'S (B'DOs)

RIAD RR RRR RII

ENJOY A

GOOD SMOKE
WHILE YOU
"AN.

en

TURKISH and
EGYPTIAN



GOCE

%

New Loveliness For You

wit PALMOLIVE SOAP

Gent SR ERE REE EO
FRESH SUPPLY OF

= PURINA HEN CHOW 5 :

a ut. JASON JONES & CO., ie aed
SEB EBEEESECRESS

Easy
Just Tie it on.



PAGE FIVE









GRAIN)

ANT TAPE

to use. Safe.

DRUG STORES LID.

Broad Street, and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings,



POET Oe,

PREPS

a4

9%

9
CIGARETTES $
ABDULLA CIGARETTES No. 11 — 50’s .......005 o» $1.61
ip i No, 11 — 20's .4....... oa bags, «OS
is id No. 14 — 50's .... cece een $1.62
ee . No. 14 80 cs caueks 66
a i No. 16 — 50'S wi. cs ede e es Qh
‘i 1 No. 16 — 20's weit 4 . 60

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

OOO OD OCANE SOUS

oo NG SEALE EAA GD



USE A

“RIPPINGILLES ©

BLUE - FLAME
STOVE

FOR EASY



& CLEAN

COO K ING
A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (B08) LTD.

_ AGENTS, ©







Woven Cotton Pyjamas,
striped designs. Size 38 to 44.

Suit______....$8.48

ELITE Long Sleeve Sport
Shirts in shades of cream,
blue, green, gray, rust, brown.

Sizes S to large $5, 92

em mm n nm

Sea Island Cotton Pyjamas in
grey, blue & cream, Sizes 58
to 44.

Suit. __........615.96

Gents’ Cotton Gloves
Size 0.8, Men

94¢
96¢

ee me

ee

» Ex. 08.



10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street












J AY JARY 1, 1951
PAGE SIX BARBADOS. ADVOCATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5

SS es ee ee ee ee | aa agen! todo .
| rOR THE BEST






HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

peer neetre 1

|







a yi ba) Tick oe
adidas





good feod and drink?

| Try All 2eltzer and see how much

\ better you feel. Alka-Seltzer soothes

& | headache, neutralizes exeess gastric
aridity sets you right again”!

} Keep a supply of Alka-

AE EI, hy = :

fe Fen i ec a Maat cae ‘ ee eS
en SPR OPTS RE FS

INSIST ON

Ss Seltzer handy — always.




|

R\ [S000 Luck, OLD MAN! 1 HOPE YoU GS
THERE BEFORE THE BITE OF THE
TZIG-TZAG KILLS YOu! 2



I} ont this

it's getting me down,
t this irritating throat uckle all day long



Y
y
ant these 2ubes!

Relief at once!
My throat’s soothed and that wretched
cough eased in no time.






BLONDIE











Hilt vite] AN HUSH} ‘
oer OH, MY GOODNESS,
. YS SAY ,
A HUSBAND ISN'T EN ae cores
RRS A em UNTIL COAT
> N

STOCKED BY ALL LEADING id

STORES COUGH
cinemmmeneecnemes LOZENGES

CONFECTIONERY

on YOUR









So








HE CANT HITUS AT) 1 : RY THIS ONE ISALIVE B
Ts DISTANCE CHANCE RIOUSLY
>> 7 p

| Vie ¥ Q }

0 me aD



BONBONS (Liqueur Chocolate) box §2.54




MELTIS FAVOURITE CANDIES, box §1.02, $1.05
« GLAMOUR CHOLOLATES, box SOc.






HELLO-IS THIS THE

WEGOTTA TELEVISION

COMPANY P THIS 1S MR

JIGGS - SEND _ME OVER
TWO MORE

TELEVISION SETS!

We





ape ea

(T WOULD BE
FUL

IF THEY’D ONLY

SPEND A MONTH!



» MELTIS COFFEE
CHOCOLATE, MINT CREAMS, box de

er ee




FRY'S
CHOCOLATE, HAZEL NUTS, Tin __ $e.0e

BLACK MAGIC CHOCOLATES, tb. 52.14
PASCALL GLUCOSE BARLEY SUGAR, Tin __ 98e. Sbe’



Canned Vegetables Juices and












Liqueurs, Wines Canned Fish
Dutch Sauerkraut. $ 28 Squashes Ete :
— 85 Dewiaiea Orange Dutch Kummel ........ $4.25 Kraft Fish Supreme. $ .34
cea aa” MICE nee rnseennnne $481 Green Chartreuse .... 7.50 21
ey 5g Bahama Pineapple Ma a
; oer x bet ~ filemon: 53 Dani T woke don: ae Mackerel .............0+. -36
- a rea i: Letona Tomato Juice .34 Findlaters Mitre Chum Salmon (Tolls) .51
. Ganon : = iakeandanaies Bieavh 33 e Chum Salmon (Â¥2).... -28
(Whole) ............ 54 Orange and Grape- Fillets of Anchovies .30
» Sliced Beans... .45 fruit Juice ............ 28
« Petits Pois (Tris Grapefruit Juice ...... 24
Fin) oo... 50 Clayton's Orange
Squagh ........ ccs #
MIAMI! IN TWENTY MINUTES... “ee a MEAT DEPARTMENT
THESE BAGS ARE SURE HEAVY! ) ‘Nor HERE ON Clayton’s Lemon
; BUSINGSS...T/M Squash ooo. 93

GOING TO HAVE PUN !



| Syrups &
Marmalade

Prime Australian Beef including

Lyle’s Golden Canned Meat ROAST — STEAK — STEW








Syrup ....... $ .42$ .23 Genuine Strasbourg
Brechin Castl Pate de Foi Gras in
"Golden ‘tee ie oe Wane Salata CANADIAN SALMON
PYG (Sealed) $12.51 — $6.84
ek. eee i ies BACON & HAM SLICED
Ag Silver Shred Corned Beef with
by sory commer neers Marmalade .......... 47 Cereal ........:.ccee 31 Salami Sausages per lb $1.09
C & B Breaktast
LK & RAY MOORES lie”. Pec, 40
— a ; a a i ee see Apples, per case $10.00, per lb__30c.

= ere Swifts Potted Meat... .23
NOW~CAN | PASS FOR YOU? YOU

SAID THEY NEVER SAW YOU BEFORE
TODAY +-AND THEN ONLY FOR A

Siedcies thettane See
\ALA/ VAL

i iN A _



|
|

|




















THURSDAY, FEBRUA

CLASSIFIED ADS.

RY 1, 1951

TELEPHONE 2508



IN MEMCRIAM



ROWARD—In never fading memory of
our dear som and brother Cuthbert
Lisle Howard, who was called to
higher service on February 1, 1960.

Leng days, long nights he bore his
pain

Waited for cure but all in vain

Until God -himself saw” what was
best

And took dear Lisle with him to rest.

The Howard family, Bayfield, % Fale,

1.2,51—I1n.



JEFFERS—In cherished memory of 4
dear son and brother who fell asieep
in Jesus on February 2nd 1949.

© ssie our dearest boy, On this

S$ econd Anniversary § ince you

§ ilent!y departed to S weet bliss

J n Heaven's Home—rest on Jn Jesu's

E verilacting Arms, OSSIE, §— ver loved
By your devoted parents, sisters and
brothers.

The Jeffers family
Constitution Road.

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

_—_—_——
CAR—Hillman 1948, excellent condition,
always owner driven. Telephone 2672.

“Valambrosa”
1.2.51—1n,









1.2.51—2n.
CAR—Humber Snipe 1938. Mileage
33,000 in good running order. Can be
s¢en at DUNSINANE, COUNTRY
ROAD, by arrangement with Mrs.
Greaves. Phone 95249. 1.2.51—8n.

—_—

CAR — One 5 passenger Sedan Terro-
plane recently overhauled and in perfect
working order price $400, Ring 91-24,
Lighthouse, St, Lucy. 27.1.51—Tn.

TRACTOR — Catapillar Diesel D 4.
Tractor. Excellent condition, Phone 4629.
1.2.51—2n,

a

ELECTRICAL

ELECTRIC MOTOR. and Pump
single phase,
for water well,
refused. Dial 3919. 31,1.51-—2n.

_—_
ONE TURNER WALKER DRILL





No

PRESS, electrically driven, new,
Apply: Mr. R, de Souza, C/o T.
Geddes Grant Ltd. 1.2.51—6n.

—_—_———_

PHILIPS ELECTRIC RAZOR, as new.
Magnet Electric Cooker in good condi-
tion, Apply: Emtage Blectrical Company.



31.1,51—3n,

uw ‘
MECHANICAL

BICYCLE—One Gents 4 Speed Blue

Raleigh in perfect condition, for further
information phone the Marine Hotel







Store-keeper. 30.1.51—3n.
MISCELLANEOUS
ACTUMUS—The new Fertiliser for

crnes—vegetable and flower gardens $3.6"
per lb. from H. Keith Archer's Drug
Store, Coleridge Street. Phone 2999.



BUY IGLODINE EMBROCATION for
Rheumatism, Backache, Lumbago and

Sprains 7c. per bottle. Get from your
Chemist to-day. THE STANDARD
AGENCY (B'DOS) CO., Agents.

1.2.51—3n.
ny
BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in
White, Green, Primrose with matching
units to complete colour suites. Top

grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.
26.1.51—t.f.n.

——$ —

INFANT'S PORTABLE TREASURE
COT with fibre mattress—practically new.
Ring 4729. 1,2,51—6n.





LISBON YAMS at “Francia’’,











— St.
George. Dial 3226. 1.2,51—3n.
PLANTS—Limited quantity of Canna
Lily Plants. Phone 2382, 1.2.51—3n.
SCHOOL BOOKS—English, French,
Latin, Spanish, Mathematics, History
ete. Phone 2382. 1,2.51—3n.



-—

WHITE SHEETS—Stock up now best
quality white sheets 80” x 10077 at $5.54
each, cannot be repeated. Broadway
Dress Shop. 31.1,51—2n,



YAMS—Bottle neck Lisbon delicious
for eating, delivered in city and suburbs





at $3.00 per 100 lbs, Dial 3485, Upton

Plantation. 1,2,51—4n.

LOsT & FOUND
LOST :



WALLET—Wiil the finder of a wallet
between Swan and James Street please
keep wallet and money but return
papers to this office. 1.2.51—In.

| FOUND

PURSE — On Linton’s Drug Store
counter, 14 High Street, one purse with
valuable contents, Owner must identity
same as soon as possible and pay expense
ot Ad.







WANTED

—





A Vacency exists with the Nationa?
Cash Register Company's Agents for an
Apprentice Mechanic. Applications are
invited from individuals between the ages
of 19 and 22, who possess the following
attributes: Education to School Certifi-
eate Standard; mechanical aptitude;
initiative personality. The successful
applicant will be required to undergo a
three to six months probationary period
in Barbados, followed by a similar
period of training in Trinidad. Salary
during the periods of probation and
training will be between $45.00 and
$7.00 per month depending on the age
and experience of the individual. Appli-
eotants must be of European Origin.
Apply in writing only giving full par-
ticulars, and submitting a passport
photograph to The National Cash Register
Cce's., Agents, c/o T. Geddes Grant, Ltd.
Bolton Lane. 1,2.51—3n

~

MISCELLANEO!

WANTED TO PURCHASE
ONE LARGE TRAVELLING TRUNK,
Phone 8477. 1.2.51—1n.

WANTED URGENTLY
HOSPITAL BED—To rent, buy, or
borrow, one Hospital Bed. Phone 8162.







Kenneth Taylor. 31,1.51—3n.
—_—"
FOWLS for eating, apply: Geoffrey

Jones Gum Dragon, Chinese Restaurant,
Broad’ Street. 1,2,.51—t.f.n.

ere

WE BUY FOR CASH — Clocks, watches
and musical boxes in any condition.
Write, call or dial 4420,.GORRINGES An-

Street.
tique shop, Upper Bay 35.1.51~2n.

Y FOR CASH — Seo and
Silver jewellery, coins, dentures, .
write, call or Dial 4429. GORRINGES

ining Royal Yacht
Ee Te aa

ceed iia at CA
h

GORRINGES undertake expert wate
end clock repairs, cleaning and resto-
ration of of] paintings, valuations for in-
surance and _ probate, GORRINGES,
upper Bay St. 25.1.51—7n.

WE BU



MRS. STUART
begs to remind the pupils
of her Dancing School that
the school will be re-opened
on 15th February.

For
Dial Miss Evelyn—3108,

further information

1.2.51—3n.

‘
IESCSCSOSOOO 9 IO SS FSOOORE



M.| £1,000 at a rate of interest not to ex-

“4 hip. a
Excellent condition, suitable one and shingle

reasonable offer, wichael,






















































FOR RENT
HOUSES














ning water.
Dial 2854.

Available February

30,1.51-—-3n

Coast, fully furnished including Refrig-
erator and Telephone, for March, June,
July, for further information dial 225¢





at and Warehouses. Apply K. R-
unte
COTTAGE—St. James Coast.

er 8476. 1.2.51-—1n.
STORAGE SPACE suitable for making
& Co. Ltd. Dial 4611,
1,2.51-—6n.
TRINITY
Pully furnished containing 3 bedrooms
Available for months of Februany to May




and August to December 1951. Phone
2959. 21,1.51—2n.
—_-—



PUBLIC NOTICES

“£25: ~. -d. easily earned by obtaining

order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi-
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest





commission; marvellous money making
opportunity. Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
England.”
25.1.51—18n
NOTICE

THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW

Tenders are invited for a loan of

ceed 4% per Annum under the St, An-

drew Parish Church Loan Act. And

will be received by the undersigned up
to February 3rd 1951.

Signed C, A. SKINNER,

Vestry Clerk,
St. Andrew,
24.1.51—6n.

————
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of St. Clair Daniel of
Nelson Street, B'town for permission to
sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c,, at a
shop with shedroof
at 6th Ave. New Orleans, St.

Dated this 3lst day of January 1951.
To:—E, A. Mc LEOD,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”.

Sed. C, DANIEL,
4 Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be consi-
ered at a Licensing Court to be held
ay Police Court, Distret "A" on Monday
the 12th day of February 1951, at 11
c'clock, a.m,

tached

E. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “A
1,2,51—1n.

PUHLIC SALES
REAL ESTATE

PROPERTY—At 69 Roebuck Street
“~ two storey Wall Building on 4.362
sa. ft. of land. Downstairs, Store,
Store Rooms and Garage. Upstairs, 4
Bediooms, Drawing and Dining rooms
etc. Electric Light and Power. Price
£4000, nearest offer treated con-
fidentially. Apply to M. Abbadi or
phone 2297. 1.2.51—4n.







The undersigned will offer for sale by
public competition at their office, No. 17,
High Street, on Thursday the 8th day
of February, 1951, at 2 p.m, the dwelling-

house called
THE BOWER
with 7,444 square feet of land situate
at The Garrison, containing 2 verandahs,
2 public rooms, 2 bedrooms, toilet, bath,
kitchen, etc. Garage, servants rooms and
enclosed garden.
The sale may be made with or with-
out the furniture.
Vacant possession will be given.
Further particulars from
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
30.1.51—8n.

fOR RENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din~-
ing room, Breakfast room and Kitchen-
cette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS’ Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and ‘Telephone,
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1,51,—én.

CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATION
We will set up for sale by Public
Competition at our Office James Street,
on Friday 2nd February 1951, at 2 p.m.
CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS
situate in St. Lucy and containing by
estimation 82 acres 3 roods 23 perches
of which about 48 acres are arabie.
The acreage is made up as follows:
25% acres ist crop canes ready for
reaping.
14 acres young canes,
34 acres sour grass,
9 acres 23 perches in preparation,
roads, yards etc,
In. ion on application to Mr.
Ormond Knight on the premises.
YEARW9OD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.
18,1.51—6n.









The undersigned will offer for sale by

$1.1.51—2n. | public competition at their office, No. 17,

High Street, Bridgetown, on Thursday
Ist February at 2 p.m, the freehold
dwellinghouse called

RICHELIEU

in excellent order and recently renovated,
in llth Avenue, Belleville, with 9,859
square feet of land. Drawing, dining
and breakfast rooms, 4 bedrooms, bath
and toilet and kitchen. Dovble garage
and servants rooms.

Inspection by appointment only, Dial

2210.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
Solicitors.
21.1,51—6n.



——_——————

AT TOP ROCK—Delightful residence
having 3 Bedrooms, large Lounge, sepa-
rate Dining Room, 2 fully Tiled Toilets
and Bath, modern Kitchen, built in %
Car Garege 2 Servants Quarters, standing
on nearly half an acre, Price £4,500
nearest offer. For viewing apply Ralph
A. Beard, Hardwood Alley or Phone
26,1.51—6n.



—

That HENRY HEIDE INCORPORAT_
ED, a Corporation organized under the
laws of the State of New York in the
United States of America, whose trade or
business address is No, 313 Hudson Street,
City and State of New York, United
States of America, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part A
of Register in respect of candies of ali
kinds, candied nut products, namely,
chocolate covered nuts, chocolate roast-
ed almonds, chocolate and icing, and
will be entitled to register the same

one month from the 20th day
cf January 1951 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my

office.
h day of January, 1951.
Dated this 29t oo at ealis

istrar of Trade Marks.
= 20.1. 51—3n.



T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Overt 100 expernve rovels
selling off at

2 for $1.00
The space is needed for new

stock. Select your Book Bargain
now.

We have just opened SHEET
PLASTIC in different colours for
Lamp Shades.

AT
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY |
and }

__

COOL GARDIE — Worthing. Drawing
end dining rooms, 3 bedrooms with run-
Ist.

SEA-GAZE — On-the-sea, Maxwells




| TAKE NOTICE

|





That J. & B ATKINSON LIMITED a
Company incorpoarted undew the Eng-
lish Companies Act, Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is 24.
Old Bond Street, London, W.I., Englend
has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of perfumes, toilet preparations
essential oils, cosmetics, hair lotions,
dentifrices and soaps, and will be en-
titled to register the same after one
month from the 30th day of Janu-
ary 1951 unless some person shall in
the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be
seen on application at my office.

Dated this 28th day of January, 1951

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
30 1.51-—3n,

TAKE NOTICE —
QUIX





That JOSEPH WATSON & SONS
LIMITED, a Company incorporated
under the English Companies Act.

Manufacturers, whose trade or busines*
address is. Whitehall Soap Works, White-
hall Road, Leeds, England has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A“ of Register in respect of
common soap, detergents, cleaning,
polishing, scouring and abrasive pre-
parations of all kinds, and will be enti-
tled to register the same after one month
from the 30th day of January 1951,
unless some person shail in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office,

Dated this 29th day of January, 1951
H. WULLLAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks

30.1.51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE



That THE IMPERIAL VARNISH &
COLOR, COMPANY LIMITED, a Com-
peny registered under the laws of On-
tario, a Province of the Dominion of
Canada, whose trade or business address
is 2-20 Morse Street, Toronto 8, Onta_
rio, Canada, has applied for the regis-
tration of a trade mark in Part “A” cf
Register in respect of enamels, paints,
varnishes and lacquers, and
be entitled to register the same after
ene month from the 30th day of
January 1951 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in dupli-
cate to me at my office of opposition of
such registration. The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 29th day of January, 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
30.1 51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE
PIN-UP

That PIN-UP COLD PERM-WAVE
LIMITED a Company incorporated under
the English Companies Act, Manufactur-
ers, whose trade or business address is
59-61, Park Royal Road, London, N.W. 10,
England, bas applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of preparations for waving
the hair, sachets for use in waving the
hair, toilet preparations, hair lotions,
hair fasteners and haw supports, and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 30th day
of January 1961 unless some person shall
in the meantime give notice in dupli-
cate to me at my office of opposition
of such registration, The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 29th day of January, 1961.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
30.1 51—3n,

TAKE NOTICE





24 FLOWERS
EAU DE
COLOGNE



That J, & E, ATKINSON LIMITED, 4
Compary incorporated under the Eng-
lish Companies Act, Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is 24,
Old Bond Street, London, W.1., Eng-
land, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
with respect of perfumes, tollet prepara.
tions, essential oils, cosmetics, hair lo-
tions, dentifrices and soaps, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 30th day of January,
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to m*
at my office of opposition of such reg,
istration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office.

Dated this 29th day of January, 1951.



H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
30.1 51—3n,
P| LE Don’t suffer an
longer. For quic!

relief—treat painful piles with
medicated Dr. Chase’s Ointment,
Soothes as it heals. A safe home
treatment for over 50 years. 33

DR: CHASE’S
Antiseptic OINTMENT

Don’t Miss The
— at —

RALPH BEARD'S

FURNISHING SHOW
ROOMS

In Hardwood Alley

Mahogany, upright chairs $17.00
per pr. Tub Chairs $32.00 per pr.
Rockers $36.00 per pr. Streamlined
Morris Chairs $28.00 each; Cock-
teil tables $8.00 each, Morris
Sprung cushions $8.00 each. Un-
sprung cushions $6.00 each also
in all mahogany 3 ft. 6 bedends
$35.00 per pr. Vono Springs $16.00
cach, Complete Simmons type bed-
Steads 3 ft. 6G. $16.00 each, 3 ft
$14.00 each. Unpainted rush bot-
tom chairs $3.50 each, with arms
4.50 each, rockers $5.00 each
Aiso a numerous variety of good
tlass second hand furnture. Open
trom 8 a.m, te 4 p.m. each day
Phone 4683





Bargains





neg,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
MONKEY BABY





a a ne

i

A NICE PIECE of sleight of hand with a nappy. Mrs. Oulshaw—-
she has always been interested inthe development of babies to adult
life; she has studied the evolution of apes and monkeys—makes Peter
much more comfortable, thank ycv

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay



In Touch With Barbados

. .
Coastal Station
CABLE and Wireless (W.L) Ltd advise
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through their Bar-
bados Coast Station:—
M.S. Oranjestad,

Sch. Mary M, Lewis, Sch, Emmanuel] | M.T. Skandinavia,
C. Gordon, Sch. D’Ortac, M.V. Sedge s. Canadian Challenger, 4.5. Southern
field, Sch, Enterprise S., Sch. Molly Nh.) Counties, ss. Colombie, s,s, Uruguay;
Jones, Sch. Lucille M. Smith, Yacht) $-*- Defender. ss. Silver Walnut, 8.»
Juanita, Sch, United Pilgrim S Nigaristan, s.s. Monareh of the Sea, ss

ARRIVALS r Kettleman Hills, s.s. Nieuw Amsterdam

Sch. Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt. King s. Mauretania, «.s. Empress of Scot

for St. Vincent. ' ind; ss, Willemstad, ss, Mardene, ss.
DEPARTURES Alcoa Pegasus, 6.2. Hat Creek, ss. Kapo-

M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt ia, $8. London Mariner, s.s. Mormacsea

Gumbs, for Dominica,

RATES OF EXCHANGE

January 31, 1961



CANADA
MAIL NOTICES 62 8/10% pr, Cheques on
Bankers 61 8/10% pr
aie bs Demand
MAILS for St. Vincent by the Sch Drafts § 61,65% pr.
Belqueen will be closed at the General (ae 4 Sight Drafts 615/10% pr.
Post Office as under:— 63 8/10% pr Cable
Parcel mail at 12 noon, Registered mail] 42 3/16% pr Currency 00 3/10% pr
at 1.30 p.m., Ordinary mail at 2.30 p.m a Coupons 696/10% pr.
on the 2nd February 1951. sue pr. Silver 20% pr.

GOVERNMENT NOTICE



TOKEN IMPORT SCHEME ON CANADA AND U5S.A,
>

Importers of approved commodities under the Token Import
Scheme from Canada and the U.S.A. are hereby notified that vouch-
ers issued to Canadian Exporters and importers’ quotas established on
the U.S.A, under the scheme may be transferred from the commodity
for which they were established to some other commodity within the
same group, provided the amount allocated is not increased,

Vouchers or quotas cannot be transferred from one exporter or
importer to another.

Controller of Supplies.
1.2.51—2n



SS

Round The Town

will find



Send US Your Orders for . .

you

The Sunshine Parlour

3rd Floor Alex Bayley's Building

Where many city workers enjoy A
their lunch in a cheery
atmosphere

Broad Street



You can always







STEAM PIPE AND FITTINGS
ime =6'To-day's Prices ssuva repeated in a hurcy

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

——

PAGE SEVEN



Psychology SHIPPING NOTICES

—And Peter
The Chimp

MRS, CULSHAW’S EXPERI.
MENT IN MOTHER LOVE

_ EIGHT-MONTH-OLD Peter
Culshaw slipped from his foster-
mother’s arms into a blue-paint-
ed playpen . and crawled for
the first time.

He was proud of his achieve-
ment. Peter sat in the middle of
the pen and grinned—far wider
than most babies of his age.

Banged with delight

Then he seized two rattles and
banged them on the floor with
delight. There should have been
nothing remarkable in this _pic-
ture of a proud mother with her
baby Except that Peter is
an African chimpanzee,

Apart from a short while after
his birth he is now enjoying the
full delights of maternal affec-
tion,

He is the latest experiment in
juvenile psychology by State Reg-
istered Nurse and Midwife Mrs,
Doris Culshaw.

Peter lives in a comfortabie
well-furnished Victorian house
in a high-class residential “Gis-
trict in Southport, Lancs,

Blowing bubbles

“I've had him for five weeks,
said Mrs. Culshaw. “I bought
him from people in Nigeria, 1
intend to bring him up exactly
like a_ baby boy.”

Deftly she changed Petor’s
nappies (“He cries like a human
if I don’t’). Then she dressed
him for bed, He clapped his

hands when his milk was brought
in. For a minute he drank it
like a model baby. Then he blew
bubbles in the cup.

Daily routine is kept, strictly to
a time-table. Peter never wakes
at night. Just now he is cutting
his wisdom teeth, It makes him
fretful. So he bites a bone ring
for relief,

“It's astonishing how. he Te-
sponds to human affections,” saa
Mrs, Culshaw. “He is not treated

as a freak, He wears a vest,
petticoat, jumper, and long
rompers, and has a bath every
day.
Play-pals
“His future depends on his

mental development, but I do not
think he will ever talk, His own
mother was shot by natives, and
1 am really the first mother he
has ever had.”

Modern-age-minded Mrs, Cul-
shaw believes in play-pals for
Peter. He spends
three French poodles.
enjoy it.

lay time with
All four














The M.V. “Caribbee" will be
arriving here on the 8th, and will
be accepting Cargo & Passengers
for Dominica, Antigua, Montser~
rol) Nevis de St, Kitte. Sailing
Saturday 10th,

The M.V. “Daerwood will ac-
cept Cargo and Passengers for. St.
Lucia, Grenada, & Aruba and Pas-
sengers only for St. Vineent, Date
cf departure to be notified,

B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc,
Telephone: 4047

and Pier Head







depend

on the natural creamy.

flavour of
@O A K Brena Powdéled Milk

Users have marvelled at the consistent
creamy flavour of “Oak” brand powdered
milk. “How is it” they ask, “that through-
out the year “Oak” milk powder can be
distinguished by the same delightful fla~-
vour?” The secret is simple. The cows
producing the milk from which “Oak”
brand milk is prepared are fed all the
year round on the rich sunny grasslands
of Hunter Valley, Australia. This ensures
healthy cows yielding rich ik and of
a consistent flavour throughout the year.
This rich, wholesome milk is packed under
the most hygienic conditions so that all
the natural vitamins and creamy flavour
are retained. “Oak” dissolves readily in
water and is ideal for drinkimg, Coffee,
Cocoa, Etc.

Don’t worry over mounting milk bills.

. “Oak” brand milk powder with its excele
lent price value allows you and your family
to drink milk freely

12-0z. Tin 71c. 3-lb Tim $2.50





Ww.aA
Alleyne
Stuart

Medford

Arthur (Gré &
& Sampson Lid
Jas. A. Tudor

J. 0. Tudor

John D. Taylor

Prov.)









Ashby & Medford Ltd
8. E. Cole & Co., Ltd
Knights Ltd., City Pharmac
Knights Ltd., Phoe Pr macy
B. M. Fergussor
Jonnson & a
A. A. Brow
‘ Harold Proverbs |

SR
®

————— = NOW OBTAINABLE AT

(fos) Z
ae,
ele

/

=

W. M. Ford

Bookers Drug Stores Ltd
Aipha Pharmacy
Gittens Crone,





N. 8. Sainsbury
Successor to
Sam Gibbs
H. L. Hutson
c. C. King
Nelson Pharma
Empire Pharma
I Vv. Seott

nepelitan Pharmacy
Noe Roach & Cc











_
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW; ROYAL NETHERLANDS
ZEALAND. LINE, LIMITED STEAMSHIP CO,
. : Sailing from Amsterdam, Dover attd
‘ot : mo A.N.Z. LINE Madeira “Cottica’ 2nd, 3rd, 9h
LS TONGARIRIO” is scheduled to | February, 1 MS. ‘Bonaire’ 9th,
sail Adelaide January 24th, Melbourne | 10th. !6th Mareh 195)
February 9th, Sydney Pebruary 17th, Sailing from Antwerp and Amsterdam-—
Erisbane February 23rd, Arriving at|ms. “Helena” 12th, lth, February 1982,
Barbados 22nd March, 1961 ms. “Willemstad §th, 5th, Februaty

This vessel has ample space for
Frozen and General cargo.
Cargo accepted on through Bills

Hard | 1951, m.s, “Oranjestad” 8th, 15th March

issr.
Sailing, to Trinidad

ot

Paramaribo and

Lading with transhipment at Trin‘dad | Georgetown—m.s, “Bonaire” 27th Janu.
for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward! ary 1951; m.s, “Cottica” 20th, February
and Leeward Islands, 1951; m.s. “Helena” 3rd March 1951.

For further particulars apply;—
FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD.,
TRINIDAD,

B.W.I.
DA COSTA & CO. LTD,

BARBADOS,
B.W.I.

Sailing to Trinidad, La Guiara, Cura-
cao etem.s. “Oranjestad” ist February
1951
| Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp, Amster-
dem—m.s. “Oranjestad” 23rd March 1951,

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO,, LTD.,

Agents.







Albvaa. Shere Co.

NEW YORK SERVICE

S.S. “Essi”. sails 1€th January srrives Barb
S.S. “Byfjord” sails 2nd February e arbados

NEW ORLEANS
18th . January
Ist February

eee

4th
l4th

SERVICE

February







—

Steamer sails

A 2nd *
“ 15th



CANAD/AN SERVICE
OUTBBOUND

Name of Ship

“ALCOA PILGRIM”
“ALCOA PENNANT”
ALCOA POLARIS”

Sails
Halifax
January 26th
February 9th
February 23r.

Arrives
Barbados
February Sth
February 20th.
March 6th
5 a Pern eae

Them vessels have limited passenger accommodation.

3.8
5.8.
s.



ROBERT THOM LTD.—Noew York and Gulf Service.
Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Canadian Service,

% 4,4, ~
Leeos PLPC PEL PEPE LLLP PEEL ALLELE,

NOTICE
“ISLANDSID

—~

Sailing for London direct on or about 15th February
1951—accepting passengers—Fare £77 and Cargo.

ROBERT THOM LIMITED,
(Agents)

Telephone 4228.
PVR EG GOOG LS POD SIO





oe



yee
4

8. 8.



PLPEELELIE OE ES AEE AES

G






| PASSAGES TO EUROPE

Contact Antilles Products, Limited, Roseau, Dominia., for sail-

ing to Europe.

The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam.

Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.





THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION LIMITED.

NOTICE

Due to the large increase in the price of



Fuel Oil the Company are now forced to
advance the present Surcharge from 20% to
27%,

The new Surcharge will take effect on all
bills rendered for the month of February and

onwards,
V. SMITH,

General Manager.







Tro



Pee

THE ROYAL
STORE

Announces

yOoU!!

As from lst Fehruary our
0} peaoulel oq [IM sseuTsNg

No. 12 HIGH STREET

To mark the event we will
open attractive new stocks
and will be delighted to
welcome our old friends
in the new premises.


1
'



PAGE EIGHT





CLYDE WALCOTT AN
ALL-ROUND ATHLETE
By BM.

THE NAME Clyde Walcott,

now familiar wherever the

great game of cricket is played once rang to the echo within

the walls of the old school,

just a stone’s throw from the

} “ancient city church of St. Mary’s.



M.C.C. Defeat
S. Australia



Wy

“a

ya
aero

London Frvress Service
(From Our Own Correspondent)
ADELAIDE, Jan. 31.

The M.C.C. touring side (211
and 220) beat South Australia
(126 and 153) here to-day by 152
runs. This was their fourth suc-
cessive win and their sixth vic-
tory of the tour including four
successes in first class cricket
matches,

It was also their second win
against South Australia who pro-
vided the tourists with their first
First Class win last October.

The victory should put the team
in good heart for the Fourth Test
which opens on this same Ade-
Jaide ground on Friday.

In a comparatively low scoring
#ame the MCC held the initiative
throughout and the State. still

needing 186 to save defeat at the ®tmosphere where cricket was not Glass No. Yacht

For it was at this little walled
school on Mason Hall Street, with
its tiny play ground, that Clyde
first played “bat and ball,” a mod-
est beginning. for one whpse
doughty deeds with the bat, and
behind the stumps have thrilled
thousands, at points as far apart
as Bridgetown and Calcutta, Lon-
don and Kingston,

But Clyde is nei only a crick-
eter. He is also a footballer -of
outstanding ability, and has rep-
resented the colony on more than
one occasion, And he is versatile
too. He is as much at home in the
full back line where his powerful
kick means so much to the de-
fence, as he is in the front line
dribbling his way towards the
goal from the right wing. Speed
and accuracy are his two main
virtues and-what else can be re-
quired of a first class feotballer?

Just 25

But to return to the lad, Clyde,
and his early activities. He was
25 years old a fortnight ago as he
was born on January 17, 1926,
almost at the moment the M.C.C.
cricketers under Hon, F. G. Cal-
thorpe were trying conclusions
with our boys at Kensington. His
father Frank Walcott, engineer of
the Advocate Printing Plant, was
a bit of a cricketer himself. Frank
was a regulary member of the Em-
pire Ist XI for some years and a
colleague of players like H. C.
Griffith, who captained the team,
E. A. Martindale, C. D. Spooner
and E. A Vv. Williams—all
household names in cricket cir-
cles in and beyond the West
Indies,

Big Brother
So Clyde started, at least in an



B





WOMAN BEATS JUNGLE
WOUNDED HUNTER

ARBADOS, ADVOCATE



From a spot i

Paiace comes

From HAROLD DALE

SYDNEY,

{OM a sweltering, rain-soaked jungle of Australia the
story of a woman’s heroism seeped 10,000 miles across

the world until it reached the King at Buckingham Palace.
The story began with Ted Foster, a crocodile hunter, hack-
ing his way through the jungle towards the Wearyan River

in the Northern Territory.

__ He stooped to squirm through an entangling vine, and
his loaded rifle went off. He was badly wounded,
Foster’s black tracker made him comfortable—and be-

gan to run.

In a deck-chair on the veranda of her home, 60 miles
away, sat Mrs. Ruth Heathcock, fingering some sewing.

Her mounted
band was away
the monsoon
ering,

policeman hus-
on patrol,
clouds
Around her the

stumbling and gasping up the

Regatta On
Saturday

_. The third regatta of the 1951
Yachting Season takes place on
Saturday under the auspices of
the Royal Barbados Yacht Club.

Handicaps and starting times
are as follows:—





Start at Flag





















beginning of play this morning U2Known, and right from the F 10. Wizard a
with six wickets in hand never ‘tart his most serious rival was R 13 Ranger 2.30 Red.
looked like getting them and were D5 elder brother Keith, Whether * 482 Circe
all out 153 runs short of victory, 0 the lawn, or at school, Keith, 5 Mae ee en
The scores :— bigger and stronger was always 7 6 Peter Pan 2.31 Yellow
MCC, ist Innings 211 Clyde’s most serious opponent. © 10 Van Thorndyke
ae ous Senltge pe = But Clyde was never loath to try > a ake —e
S. Australia 2nd Tadinge: *° conclusions with “him whenever . = Aes
Duldig i.b.w. Wright a5 the opportunity offered, I ® Skippy 2.33 Yellow.
a ¢ Hutton, b Wright 42 From St. Mary’s elementary Shee _
Inch c & b Wright r ) sec , > x auntiess
Hele b Wright gz School they went on to Comber- ; 12. Dawn 2.95 Red
Ridings ¢ Close b Wright mere, and finally to Harrison p 4 Seabird
Michael i.b.w. Statham. 12 College where both bo¥s shone in ee ee ansstula
Smart b Brown ......... 6 athletics. Keith na B 6 Flirt
Bowley b Tattersall 3 prs sprint record wets the Se L 6 Eagle
Noblet stpd. McIntyre b Hollies 14 ae ee : ia) gE gy 9 Olive Blossom 2.36 Yellow
McLean c Sheppard b Hollies 3 School days were over and gained Db 12 Rainbow
Wilson not out . 1 a reputation as a hard hitting ——— ee
Extras (1 bye, 2 legs, 4 no balls) 7 batsman which has hardly dimin- 3 Rascal ;
- ished B 461 Fantasy
Total . 152 r e 1 2 Invader 2.37 Red
Ste It was Clyde’s style, however, 1 7 Mohawk
Pall of wickets: 1 for 62, 2 for 90, 3 which attracted attention, Of a — 3 War Cl si
for 90, 4 for 104. 5 for 123, 6 for 125, 7 somewhat slimmer build than I ee

for 141, 8 for 147, 9 for 152.



Reen 2.38 Yellow.







BOWLING ANALYSIS Keith, Clyde adopted a more up- —. sesideba duis tan sides
aes 9 M ¥ hog eee the wicket, and ‘ Fo morenattn yar
Am $ is enhanced his naturally lon 7 -
pela s . a -? veach. Today he stands over 6 tte Bia Siren cas
Wright 5 12 i ov 5 and still there is no evidence of a K 35 Edril
Meilies 4 © $8 2 crouch in his batting style. 1 Gnat
Me cennotsets Bk SOR de At College Keith started the ) Se ia 46k: RORY
land ae ee ct century making habit, and Clyde —. 7° wa
aren SOLE was oo slow in following his ex- » 26 Comet
- ample, c 1 Missbehave 242 Red.
Ss e 3 Madness
LONDON, Jan, 31, een aee B 7 Moyra Bidir
Four British boxing champions I well remember the occasion 6 9 Okapi
— Jack Gardner, heavyweight; when the Garrison Sports Club— Cc 8 Peggy Nan 2.43 Yellow
Don Cockell, light-heavyweight; Volunteers of former days—came © ei riba eres
Eddie Thomas, welterweight; and in for a drubbing at the hands of p 5 Mischief ne
Bill W. Thompson, lightweight— the College team which included C Seamp 244 Red,
arrived at London airport today the Walcott brothers, “Boogles” © pti dake
from Johannesburg. They were C. B. Williams, and Bunny § 1 Gipsy
aecompanied by Les Allen, mid- Smith, kK 28 Thunder
dleweight from Benworth, War- “Puss” Parris and I formed the * 40 Vamoose 245 Yellow.
wickshire,—Reuter, mainstay of the Army attack, but “_ ™ SERRA scbienpacmeenare
the boys showed scant courtesy to Kk 29 Cyclone 246 Red.
Ti Ff F C nasta us. Clyde hit fast bowler Harold —— Te senate coe pee
andar r; | Blackman straight overhead for in Gannes te aaa

DISCARDING TO A
FROZEN PILE
By M. HARRISON-GRAY

HERE is a marked diver-
gence of Opinion on this
Py subject One schoo! holds
that your partner, if he has
deliberately {frozen the pack
must have the expectation o
eventually wgepting tt You
should therefore co-orwrate
by doing all in your power to
avoid giving iC away, even
with no expectancy of being
able to take it yourself, going
to the
in any
cards
The other school maintains
that when your = pariwver
freezes the pack, he cannot
have any idea of how you are
Placed. [f all your cards are
@angerous, it its foolish to
‘fight the pack by throv-
ing into it wild cards if after-
wards you have to give it
away. as your opponents will
then get the benefit of any
wild cards with which you
haye fed it
In practice, the sanest view
is probably a middle course
As ever, no hard and fast rule
Can be Iaid down. Each situ
ation must be judged on its
merits. espectally in relation
to the number of cards held
by your side and by the
opposition
21@ more cards you hola
and the more evenly they are
distributed between you and
your partacr, the more ch
you will have of eventy
taking the pack It Js
these ocenstons that you must
discard wi cards in prefer
ence to breoking up pairr or
discarding odd cards ‘

lengths of throwing
or all of your wild







London Exoress Service



PIULLDOZE, THE NOISY NEIGHBOR,
UPSTAIRS, KNOWS HIS RIGHTS NOBODY
CAN TELL HIM WHERE TO GET OFF.






7 LOOK, FAL*



Y To BE A CRAB, <)
BUT IT’S 3AM.
AND WE'RE RIGHT
UNDER YOU» 1










=f LISTEN, BLUENOSE-
I DON'T WANT WHEN I WANT To

KNOW WHAT TIME
ITIS, I'LL ASK you!
NOW MAKE LIKE
A BREEZE AN’

six, time and again, and revelled

in making 185. “Boogles” got 100,

‘and altogether the school ended
up close to 400, with wickets in
hand. This was about 1942 and
Clyde has not yet lost the habit of
hitting sixes off any kind of
bowling, :

Island Player

He also stuck 180 on the Wan-
derers score board at the Bay, and
had his first call to do duty for the
island in 1942 while still at school,

I accompanied that team, led by
T. N. Peirce to Trinidad and one
of the things I well remember
about Clyde was his nervousness,
as he went in to bat, It was his
birthday, and we had all wished
him luck at the hotel, and before
the game started. But it was Lance
Pierre who gave him his first
present—an egg. He clean bowled
the youngster before he could
start, and then later, apologised in
a way, for doing it, But it was
all good fun, Three years later
Clyde got 314 against Trinidad
and against the same Pierre. All
in the game, boys, all in the
game. He played for the W.I. in
1948, and got 100 in his first game
against the M.C.C, And then on
to India.

He has scored, centuries and
double centuries with ease and
grace, and today he is brecketed
with Don Tallon, the great Aus-

Registered U.S Pulant Oftew














BOUNCING








parry



CAN'T A MAN SLEEP A LITTLE
LATE ONE MORNING WITHOUT
YOUR KIDS BANGING ON PLATES,

RAISING A RUCTION? I’M
» WARNING YOU I'LL.
CALL THE COPS! |



N.B.—The 4th Pegatta will be held on
Saturday 10th February 1051.
H. BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter,





tralian, as one of the finest wicket
keeper-batsmen in the world,

Retiring

Still he is somewhat shy and
retiring, and there was some lift-
ing of eyebrows in the circle of
his family and friends when a
newspaper report from India
showed Clyde addressing a Synod.

In private life Clyde is in the
Insurance business, but in a few
months will go up to England to
play the game he loves so well,
for his living.

He has been engaged by one of
the Lancashire League Clubs, and
will therefore join a band of Bar-
badian and West Indian cricketers

which include Frank Worrell
Everton Weekes, George Headley,
E. A. Martindale, and several
Australians and Indiens,

He will take with nim tne best
wishes of every lover of the game
in these parts, who like myself
look forward to great things by

this big, big-hearted crickete:
against the Australians in Austra-
lia, and later against the Indians
at Kensington,

B

an y Jimm Hatlo

They'll Do It Every Time :





Eyur Give A LISTEN ON THE DAY
AFTER ONE OF HIS ALL-NIGHT
BOUTS WHEN HE WANTS SHUT-EYE «+





T77,

A¢






BALLS AND



}



and trail,
were gath- At once Mrs. Heathcock contacted

2 jungle. a Flying Woctor service on her
Suddenly Foster's tracker came



He fell at her feet, panting

portable radio transmitter.

A Flying Doctor replied: “I'll

African Football
Has Magic Elixir
With Witch Doctor

DURBAN, South Africa,
The most important member of
Durban’s 12-man African football
team never kicks the ball, He is
a witch-doctor or ‘“Unyanga,’

upon whose “mtakati” (magic)
depends the outcome of every
match,

The witch-doctor is paid a re-
taining fee of £10 to £12 a month,
and if you watch a footbali field
on a dark night before an im-
portant league match you will see!
him earning his keep with the
surreptitious making cf the
mtakati,

From a cow’s horn carried at his
belt, he smears the goal-posts and
crossbar with “umuti” (medicine)
before creeping across the field to
distribute strange articles.

He has already smeared the
boots and togs of the players with
umuti, and on the day of the
match he will treat the legs of
each member of the team,

Ball Gets It Too

By some means he will manage
to have the ball in his possession
before the game—long enough *9
practise his sorcery,

On the day of the match sup-
porters of the opposing teams take
their seats, keeping well clear of
rival supporters for fear of a spell
being cast on them to make their
team lose.

The first team
field anxiously watching the
ground for evidence vl mtakati

The opposing team enters from

another point, taking care not to!
tread on the ground over which)

their rivals have walked, They
might be contaminated by witeh-
craft, which will cause their skill
to deteriorate.

The star player of the home
team makes a valiant sally to the
visitors’ goal but misses by a bare
inch, “Mtakati,” the home sup-
porters howl despondently.

And when the game is lost, it
is not the skill of the team that is
at fault. It is the mtakati of the
visitors’ Unyanga that won them
the game.—P)





PUBLIC NOTICE

THE PUBLIC are asked to note that the business
formerly carried on by RADIO DISTRIBUTION
(BARBADOS) LTD. will from the date of this

Notice be

BARBADOS REDIFFUSION SERVICE LID.

There will be no change in the Office of the Company

which also continues under the same Management.



START

Bb &

10,000 miles from Buckingham

heroism—and its reward



runs on to the

THEM OFF






n the Empire

this story of

need a landing ground cut in the
jungle.” And at that moment the
cut the stery of Foster's accident.
monsoon broke with a roar.

Mrs. Heathcock did not hesi-
tate. She was alone except for
two black boys and their primi-
tive canoe—a hollowed tree trunk
—but in this craft she set out
with them down the McArthur
River, boiling and flooding under
the impact of the tropical rain.

The log canoe shot bobbing and
swaying from the river’s mouth
into the stormy waters of the
Gulf of Carpentaria, and for the

Ext three days and, three nights

two blacks and the white
woman, soaked and battered by
sea and weather, paddled and
baled their tree trunk to the
Wearyan River,

FOOTBALL
IN U.K.

LONDON, Jan, 31,
The results of the F.A.C, fourth
round replay were as follows:—

Manstield Town 2, Sheffield
Enited 1, after extra time. Mans-
field are now away to Blackpool,
end Chelsea at home to Fulham
in the fifth round on February 10.

The results of League
Southern, were:—

ihree,

Bristol Rovers 1, Torquay United

; Southern United 1, Bristol City

League Three Northern:—
Stockport. County 5, Gateshead
2.—Reutes.

STANDARD: BRIDGE

By M. Harrison-Gray

Dealer : South
North-South game



2
Dp

|

‘ _ Failure to observe a stan- >
card one led to disaster 2
* on this deal. South bie One $
§ Heart. North One Spade. §
and South Two Diamonds. '
North
the possibility of a misfit and
a pass would be a wise move
since Two Diamonds looked
ike a tolerabie contract
But he felt that “a six-card
suit must be rebid.” and his

¢ sensed
?
Two Spades was doubled by
>
>

should nave

East hen this came reund
to North he tried to escape
into Three Diamonds. which
} Was doubled by West
Rejecting the lead of @ J, <
as his trumps were no good’ )
for over-ruffing purposes.
West led @ 2 in order to pro-
tect

his Heart holding
Three

uick rounds of
trumps held South to. six
tricks for a quite unneces-
sary penalty of 800



CARR AAR

ee
London Express Service



carried on by



ot

ee

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, - 1951

No Red Rats



Means Peace

LONDON. In 1938, the Skolts said there
Robert Crottet, explorer and would be war the folfowing year
writer, has just returned from a because the reindeer was shedding

four-menth stay with the Skolt
Lapps in the Arctic Circle with
good news for the superstitious.

its coat in the wrong season.

Said Crottet:

“Their predictions are more re-
liable than those of some news—

The Skolts told hiin that there papers.
will be peace in Europe for three “Their prediction for ihree
generations, though there will be generations of peace, they said,

wars “far away.’ They said they
knew this because of the signs of

was based on the fact that there
was a marked absence of red



AILY

nature. rats.” —I.N.S,

TO AID



At the river
Once at the river, Mrs. Heath-
cock, fainting with exhaustion
urged her two boys to the task
of battling through the jungle
growth for ten terrible miles to
where Foster lay,

=,
si
=
Ce

Baby
Pawd

They reached him on the sixth
day after the accident. The tough
hunter was still alive. With their
last strength the woman and the
two boys began to hack a clearing
for the Flying Doctor’s plane.
The plane came, as promised, but
even as they heard its engine
Foster died.









oe nom
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB

(Local and Visiting Mem-

MEMBERS of the St. Lucy's
“First Aid Class" are planning for
a Gala Time for their dance which
comes off on Saturday night 3rd

Mrs. Heathcock’s story has be-
come an epic in the “out-back.”
It happened nine yeas ago. So

” Feb. 1951 at Barrows House, St.
«why tell it now? Ecce, Dake dale)
* This dance which is in Aid of — ON —
Two Fridays back Mrs. Heath- “The Girl's First Aid Class” is SATURDAY, FEBRUARY
cock received a silver gilt medal} )}) under the patronage of Dr. A. C. Srd,. 9 m
KIRTON, P.M.O, , P.

—making her a new MBE. for |!
her gallantry.—L.E.S. ’

Lap-Dog Killer
DUNDEE, South Africa.

F. Wellman told a meeting of
farmers here that a Pekinese has
E known to kill a sheep. “The
|

Musie by HARRY BANNIS-
ter and his Orchestra.
Admission to Ballroom 2/-
1.2.51,—3ns,

Barrows, St. Lucy.

Musie by C. Gitten’s Orchestra.
Admission 3/-.

Refreshments on Sale.

S|

—







so-called lap-dog attacks like a
jackal, worrying and harrying a
sheep, not like a dog; which jumps
and bites’, he said. —C.P.











The Weather

TO-DAY

Sun Rises: 6.16 a.m.
Sun Sets: 6.00 p.m.
Moon (New) February 6
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Water: 11.09 a.m.

YESTERDAY

Rainfall (Codrington) .21 in.

Total for Month to Yester-

| day: 2.67 ins.

Temperature (Max.) 81.5° F.

Temperature (Min.) 73.5° F.

Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E;
3 p.m. E.N.E,

Wind Velocity: 12 miles pes
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.971;
(3 p.m.) 29.912.

a



Crease
light Sports
28° ins.

A Special
excellent
or Smart





Wear

wide

for
Suits.



a tat et fae ta tae

Per Yd.

What's on Today

Fela De Kuh’s Exhibition of
oil paintings and pencil
sketches at “The Pavilion”
Hastings, 10.00 a.m.

Advocate’s Photo Exhibition
at Barbados Museum 10
a.m.

R. J. MacLeod’s Exhibition
of oil paintings at Barba-
dos Museum 10 a.m.

Meeting cf St. Michael's
Vestry, Parochial Build-
ings 2 p.m.

|
{
Mobile Cinema at Warners’



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad St.

Moygashel



—
eC DDPP PPDPLL CD

CHECK YOUR
FACTORY
SUPPLIES

aud Phone early





Pasture, Christ Church, 8

p.m.

“Flaming Frontier” Globe
Theatre.

“Tl Get By” Empire The-
atre.

“My Wild Irish
Bridgetown Plaza.

Rose”





for the following

DUNLOP TRANSMISSION BELTING 314”
DUNLOP RUBBER INSERTION \%” & 1-16"
DICK’S PACKINGS all Types

BELT FASTENERS

BELT DRESSING

FLAKE GRAPHITE

STENCIL INK

COTTON WASTE

BASS BROOMS

STEEL WIRE BRUSHES

EMERY & SANDPAPER

% FILES All Types
| TAPS & DIES
| HACKSAWS & HACKSAW BLADES

‘ ENGINEER'S HAMMERS —
OPEN END & BOX SPANNERS

TAPER & STRAIGHT SHANK HIGH SPEED DRILLS

4-Ib., 2-Ib., 1}-lb., 19-lb., 2%-lb., 3-lb.

STILLSON TYPE WRENCHES 8”, 10”, 14”, 18”, 24”, 36”
CHAIN PIPE WRENCHES %”—4”

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

x « Ply






We have New Stocks of...

Unitex Insulating Wallboard
TERMITE-PROOF, 4 ins. thick

4 ft. wide by Sft. 9. ft 10 ft; 12 ft. long

Standard Hardboard

14 ins. thick; 4 ft. x 6ft; 8 ft. 10 ft.
3/16 ims. thick 4 ft, x 8 ft.

Tileboard

Cream, White and Green
4 ft.’x 6 ft. and 4 ft. x 8 ft.



DESEO SOO OOD OSI

warn

ENRICHED BREAD | § ° :
° ‘ 3 PHONE 4267. §
The Vitamin Loaf |< witxinson & HAYNES Co. Lad. §












PAGE 1

TIIIRSDAY. FEBRIWRV 1, 1951 RARBVIXI* ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE Lady Baby Savage Visits St. Margaret's Welfare Clinic Lady Savage, wife i.f Hi-; Excellency ihe Governo panied by their daughter. Miss Pat Savago and %  Arne. Social Welfare Officer, paid a visit to trje St. Margaret's Branch of the St. John's Baby Wtlfaic Clink day evening. 150 Baptised O NF III NltKH) AND FIFTY converts were baptised the New Testament God held their second Bapf Ceremony yesterday. At the first which was held at Brandon*! Beach on Sunday morning ovei 300 were baptised. This second one was held at the back of Rev. Winter's home, "Winslnw", Fontabelle. The ceremony began at 8 o'clock, but from early In the momlnr people began to gather. They came from all over the island. Rev. James B. Reesor, the faith healer, was one of the baptists. On Sunday night 168 people were received into the Church of God and on Tuesday night over 100. Approximately 2,800 people nave been converted throughout the Convention and many more hundreds, who could not get into the Queen's Park Shed, raised their hands signifying their intention to live for Christ. Rev. Heesor, after nbout two weeks in the island, left (Ml morning for San Juan. Puerto Rico. L ARGE QIWTiTIKS of flying fish and dolphin are definitely on the western coast of the island Just waiting to be caught. Mr. D. W. Wiles, Fisheries Ofllcer told the Advor.il* On Tuesday 3.800 pounds of! the ladies on the iplendld flying flsh and 535 pounds of dol-, thev we doing Tliicl pltin passed through the Public Market and fairly good nalnhai I brought in along QM Paynes AJ1 '.lue .".rule (omphmenCarit? .tors' Book at the end of %  I inch Of the i 15 children on the roll. About tw I accompanied by Iheir parents, and some by their *imll I" %  a is the habit in QM country parishes where many ave to be out working all day. The clinic is always open on i 'Mings, so Lad. "V li.iwork that is done by the regular helpers One help.. big rnilk and other item Another wai weighing I a third WH recording: iln on forms prepared for tfc A fourth helper%  trained nurse —was checking up on the babies' fixing navel bands, giving advice about feeding, etc. Lady Savane looked on with interest at this form of Social Walfara Week thai | %  aimed at helping the iteople of V %  raise sturdier children. ratAef than to follow Iheir own methods which may be described as a cateh.-as-e.ilth-van wi. infant mortality. Th.. Clinic was founded by Madame Iiill on June 18 Visimrs' Impressions La I SeVUa ".rote IN the Vistors Book \ (sited 0 clinic with Miss Arne. I am most | d, end do c< •igratulate Bay coast. During last boat brought i Oistins. On another boat veek one fishing i 48 dolphins Tuesday night ight 42 and wen organiaed, Ifouu i dren were happj work being done. wi'-h tho clinic evei-> -n...-^ \!i %  S ivagc wrOUi "This is | very weU organiaed and well run clinic." MissAr-ie's contribution was: "Visited todav with Lad S IX AND A HALF acres of flrst r %  %  much lrnuresse.t crop ripe canes were burnt ,|U ' : K busmchke atmosphere and the quiet competence of the helpers. The babies on the ivholo seemed fitter than othen 1 1 %  -i elaewhan Lady Savage waa presentci with %  iquet at the end of I Another week-end 11 ie at Step-. Among those Drawn) were ney Plantation. St. George des, Rcvd A. Mellor Vicar of St Martroyed a quantity of second crop naret'sand Mrs Mellor; Madame brought them to the'Careenage. 2IX AND A HALF acres of first crop ripe canes were burnt .vhen a fire broke out at I.\. goes to me. Several Guesses Although no one guessed correctly, then wai no shortage oi answers Ionian the Editor began day, %  r> few of i me of the gliesse*. "The Rum I A Reft% %  i Party at Hotel in honour of 'he Crleketen I nt of Ibis picture I taaty heverafte,** "Seine ha me hasn't," ate. Tins week's | turn wai laMfl at SeaarelL Pan < i Ov p-x nt th' T c A 'plane* which called here everv Saturday change •ear at Rari.ditore him yeaterday on i el %  IIIR the sum of $6,000 I brcy Birch Director of the Pro gressive Motor Bus Co D vreil Road, without a reasonable cause and using threats against him. The offence wai Mleeed to have been commlUed i ii January 23 Mr. V.. Harrow Is uppenhng on behalf of Pultin while Capt. K Orani is proaacuting, from information received, for the Police. Yesterday when th'ary evidence was stan Prosecution called on two witnesses. CANBERI.A. Jan. 31 Before Mr. Talma remanded Negotiations between Britain Puttin there was a queMi Ula fir n 15-year meat rhether bail should be gnntod LONDON Jan. 31. Britain may buy meat from I bad In UM Commons todaj %  aid h(i waa looking hkto the ihera could any neRoliations the Govcrn%  could bo imixirted from Germany without danger to animal health in Britain. It would also have to be :,;itis ed that methods of •" %  nd slai. up t" standards require WebVi %  ., made in reply to a question by a Conservative Member who asked whether n vet bean completed with W* bH mutton Britain, teafcr, His Razor Tames' Them I Buv Bri,i Twcnly years ago you could have |CM la Mai.ltn's Lane .nul COldd have got a haircut for ei^rr. MBit ITOIH I I side barber. TttM Qrlfltth. Today Fix/, charge! one shilling and he cuts behind the Advocate at the corner of Mc Gresor In The Park Yesterday ANYONE walking through A shilling i* tan cutttng pi Will *MV to (MY 3li •ometime* 3s %  b-rliers get work. noL IH> mueli by their *kill. for *s Pitz tcld the Adveeale p Queen's Park yesterday wouta:**ro is not mud Uead how the pavemelll %  h •• s k II Of Hie wayside barber, along the main thoroughfare are, 0 Bridfotown who have all been crumblmR quickly, BOBM of the Jo ''"' bualnaai for many years. %  Ko are in sreal need o( J**9 a "' aU hand. iili the repair and yesterday Ihe gutter fT *f ors Cul ,,lp y 8" "" were Uttered with paper • %  %  lhrv aro of rnendiy ditpoti, lul hon aiKl if. as Fit/ w.'ll tell you. In great contrast to this wei ,h *' H 1 1 Of cob." Of the gardens which were dean BndJ c ? ur ** F,[t tan t 10 *"!' "I* a f^n.he grass around the flower U-.i-""" K '""* "" %  '' ,0 P'C that It in were well trimmed. The steel shed! lhc ne *"' was being cleaned. I Some of the wooden cribs ware] '""t Hair Fr Nolhinc UM hhc-i I There was a phward pinned Upl fd/ lias bean ;i haJreuttei ItOW Mitside the • B arknouae which rai Tree V* Centi % %  :i he used to he few ladies who were msid,the ''."'V':"' KoBd h< 'uld rut ni.tdim; handling the naai %  irranginK the boxes of cotton sroo) vere navuu. -i auii Kawkei ked wRt akes. fruits and sweets were seen ere in the park. Men pparently unemployed—Used iround on the partly rotten cribs .aiting for •etnathing to turn up At the other end of the park nea; the Oovei I very laric heap of rotten leaves which seem'.l t.. Ii;tv ( been dc%  .une. The artificial lake was empty nnd here and there at the boNon ere Rreen patches of moss. Meal Negotiations Hits Overloaded Vincent Brandford of St. John was found guilty ye-Icrday of overloading the motor bus J-27? on Fair Field Itoad on December 20. His Worship Mr II A Talma before whom the case v ordered Brandford to pay n fine of 15/and I costs in 28 days or in default one month's Imprisonment with hard labour not. Mr. Barrow i.it hsaw no reason %  NUld D0< be granted i in w.i. not what ha HPeWld lerni pew n. Capt. Gran* rested the point that If I ,, are granted a substantial nount should be i Mr. Talma told than iii^i tha Offence was a KtiOUl and rare id he Mi within I that if the person to whi threats were made was anxious about his safety then he saw no iced for bail. FAULTY BSAKFS Afler pleading guilty of driving motor car M-2?4 with InefBcieni brakes on Waterford Road. Mac Donald Garner of Jackman. St. Michael was fined £3 to be paid by mqnthly instalments or in default two months'imp< by His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma yesterday. The offence was committed on December 22 and the case was brought by the Police as a result of an accident on Waterford Road. Court For Divorce And Matrimonial Causes In the Court for Divorce and Matrimonial Causi Honour the Acting Chief JudtfS Mr. J. W. B Chcnery. pronounced decree absolute In the suit F. w ner) and D. M K. Storey (Respondent J There was nd order as to costs. Petitioner was repr* % %  Mr JS B Dear insMessrs Hutchlnson & Banfleld contract are si an advai John Mc Wen, Australli %  id today, Tu n deadlock In iiegotlatloni foi 1 WO, lamb and mutton under existing longtertn coMracti L Pi Od Ministry Oflicials rrtee in Australia In too odjust%  They wpuld examine Australia's I i.asonably emcient production" because that basis of pnee review formula Mc Wen said. —Reuter. Cook With Newspaper WASHINGTON wives have a few ln1 n to the problems of ceotdnj withoul electricity, gas or firewood in a national or local emergency. Some of their helpful hints. gathered during the process of making the best of bad condition! %  outposts, are included the New Jango (JUNIOR ARafY NAVY QUn-D ORGANIZATION) cookbook. When deprived of electricily. pas and firewood, they recommend Bveral sheets of newspaper' be gathered. The newspapers should be opened and cut into strip.': or ns,.,| H lo best suit the need. The papers ought to be rolled piece then. Before reaching the end of the roll, ncnrdJng to the service wives. mother piece of newspaper should I-. add) B. They recommend that you then continue rolling tightly until you have a tight, thick roll. This c tied with a string nnd clipped Into a quantity of paraffin. An alternative is to melt candles onto the roll until it is thoroughly When rolled, the m | . should fit a num with Ihe lid removed. The roll should bg inserted in the can and atrnin saturated with pai They tlu n r.commend that a number two-and-a-half sire can *w minel ured on the side i* tha lid with :i can opener snd another hole be punched into the te side at the bottom The small can is lo be pU*vd beneath UM I. rftr I aa and thi paraffin is to be lighted Tu. larger can serves as the stova This method of cooking was used earl Harbour altar the bombing in December, 19*1. The soryice wives also recommend that in case of a stoppage In electric current a i>eanut may bt used for Uhiminatioa, The |x>anut is to be pressed lnl- i s-.ft object, such us fruit, and the pointed end of the peanut n to he lighted with :. match. This to make an excellent mey cmdie. —l .vs. %  nothing Culling achool ho-s' hair was by \v\y of pit At the time when Fitz used to On the boys' fa oner bays \. ii W I and tame him for the whi:e, he said. n! ii I in-In Aniorit'ii LONDON American antique dealer Frederick P Victoria ssid that Britain i-. running dry of old treasures. Victoria had been tounnR Europe for over a month and found it difileult to find anything ccittng. t.-ris: are hard to find in Englind and France. Somehow UM w*.rld i* running dry. Dealers BBsM t.i America if they want to buy rsfaasai antiques l "ew back to the United States with a few priceless treasures, any way—including Marie Antoinette's stepehair, a Louis XV I and two rare Nubian dolli made entirely of tiny sheila, —INS. New Loveliness For You •aa PAL.M0LIVE SOAP Moeai rhis V, Simple Bi-auty Plan vw.i. saacaHM sa> laaasai s.. P sii-, hi. umiiudi) ha iaari *" 1 hi. IniulnS m..-j(t lu. .kin Milk l-SfSSl l-.„i H.ns ,*..|' GOES UP JUSTTHE SAME LONDON. Nationalized road transport in Britain will cost 11) i*-i cant luore from January 29 d ll.uil.ide Executive said tha Increaas lo general haulego nnd parcels ratal was nece*. %  %  %  %  raaani heavy in costs, particularly I n^ %  igta and nat I This l* the second increase since the Industry was taken Ovei in February 148. Haulage ;.nd parcels rater, went up by 71 ; ar ml i 19 t up by 7 -I.NH. TltUMAN AND PLEVEN AGREE RECTOR OF ST. JOHN Rev. A K. Simmons. Rector of St. Lucy, has been appointed : S-. .1, n, This wai 1 at a meeting of the Board or Aprointmenl held in the lobby f-f the House of Assembly yesterday at 12.30 p.m. 0 I %  %  I %  • I i: is pre iietad thai between the United states and France announced by Truman and Pleven will neatly Infl rbntgJI policy of all North i powera. In more formal times they would i fug %  da illiari %  The : '%  i .if'.i-i" UK Two -Duv Conference batwcei, the President and the French Minister goes far beyond i.-lions and brood!v word ed statements of common objec i rtves uniBlly made aftai Men t;.!ks Many diplomats her.bestoved it gives n clearer pletUTO of One : | uilenttons of the tWO statesmen, than etther had pvan ontha %  uilnk Franca ippear* to !" %  anuniuu] %  type Ot tnershlp with tha United States, hitherto reserved to English speeJtlnf coutrti lei It Is noted that the communique .ontolns no hint of dis.i ,ver Far Kactcrn policy like th1 month between President Truman „nd British Prime MinisU Vth %  Reuter Miners Defy Government SYDNEY, Jan. 31, The Australian Mlnw I lunell dc Lo defy Uie rtnvernment": strike ban and hold toppoges one day per week in th' coal mines. This step which follows similar deci ion by miners at mast la a protect against eonditioru a tta ched to the recent paj ward. The miners are liable to si* months imprisonment or £100 fine for ignoring the ban. The Council also decided lo see support for miners in cities A coal industry tribunal had decided to makg 'he wage Increases of up to two A pounds sterling conditioner on the mid ra' working 10 lull days per fortnight. The Government h.i threatened ti use troops if miner* %  than iso.ooo w already idle in Sydney i acute coal shortages and %  'are part of th" mounting bidusb i i Railwayman, dissatisfied with wage rates have placed a ban on overiime and doeke/ are due to begin a similar ban ~'n February 2. — druter. The above equipi T m .!>. Mr n MMtlei HMM rr !" ti • %  vim lhal h* could ec lha Hi ltd t *• IxruM borrr bv ihe Utility rompnl* oiiuld be a fi^iil burd*n on th cempanw-% Th,. iwuM BSts rcd, on lh %  fi-i..r-j r ••as 8VIU*BBUB>" — iimaiiai 5 Rralrf rr<" Itrm in Mir vnloilaVi I -I havo rad "M auseoti". f K.cl l"P """1 Surpfi^H' in 1lM para grroh should aim havt bn Support'. I Th *. n wror in Uu.-mlMoi rr.ent is available for, early delivery from the U. K. COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM Lid. MASM:Y-IIAICICIS I:<^I II>II:M ninqulries cordially invileil lor ihe supply of ihe following— VI II.II. IV 11 rvl. Illl SI I Will I I THAI TOIIS (Sliil Vi li.. Is ..Isi. ... ..il.il.li !'• % %  %  > %  % %  Kli) I.IIASS II ITKIIS .1 A lit, >I\M III SI'lll \IH IIS SHIP III I L\ I U\ IIAKIS H:KU >III IS 'MIIIII/IM. Illlll IS i Sdaai Fcveite !IUI aPUSKING IIITH "iciii IT: HUNG IS THE Mil. UftCTIVi WAT 10 KELP STOP •CJOIH DECAY WITH CPIGAT! UHTAI CREAA 25c 45c 75c j FRESH SUPPLY OF \ PURINA HEN CHOW I (SCRATCH GRAIN) |H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD. -outmrnm ATIJkSTlt AT LAST!! You can rid your tables and Safes of ANTS frith l)i. NEDDS ANT TAPE EiTdtivLIan to UM* Safe. Just Tie It on. I U.t.nu.lde at:— BOOKERS (BDOS) |i|;l(, STORES LTD. Broad Street, and ALPHA IMIAIIMACY. Mailings. t t.oint suohi\ | WIIIII rot^ r.i.v FRESH AIIIMV \l..s AT WEATHERHEADS EVERY BITE A DELIGHT Pry's 'll.uel Nut" Choc's: 2/-, 3/ and $1.79 Box I pi i l-lb Tin. Fl %  R in..-1 Choi 'i 94c. and SI 69 Box Cndhurv's "Red Ro lWr and $180 lUix PR\ s "Seorened AJmonda" 2/Box $2 02 |..M |-lb. Tin Cadbury's "Milk Tray" Hoc. and si 4K im Cadbury'i Rasa Cho 90c and SI AH tin Cadbura i Choc B 5/and 5 S tin Meltls Coffee Choc-: Mini I r> um *i U boa ', %  li, % %  A-' il. $1.19 and $2.12 hox BuKM Manic Choc: $4.0 hox Salted Peanuts 0 4c. tin Jacob's Cream Crackers 6/tin Jacobs "Selected" Biscuits $2.0(1 tin Jacob's "Asst. Creams" Biscuits $1.51 tin Jacob%  Family Asst." Biscuit* $1.47 tin Mcllin Favourite Candies $1.02 and $1 85 DOX Carr's "Club" Cheese" Bis%  i' $1 00 tin i' %  I. %  i flOc. and 51 (fl Im S i> %  TolTee BOe. TH< & $1 OJ Collard & Bnwsei "Nougat.' 34c. and 70c. Collard & Bowses "Butterscotch" lie, & 45c Ovaltlne Biwults . 43c. Box Blue Bird Toflee . 42c. lin MICE HIVrilFRHEAD LTD. of Broad KM § TURKISH and | EGYPTIAN I CIGARETTES 0 AMPULLA CKIAIU'TTKS No II — 50's $ 1.61 £ .. No. M 20's 68 1 ,. No. 14 — SO's $1.1(2 K No. 14 — 20's .66 9 .. „ NO H* — BOH $1.45 5 ,. „ No. 16 — 20's 60 | KNIGHTS DRUG STORES USE A RIPPINGILLES" BLUE-FLAME STOVE FOR EASY & CLEAN COOKING • A.S. BRYDEN & SONS (B IMIS) LTD. AGENTS. Be Comfortable While You Steep in Sea Inland Cotton Woven Cotton Py|aa*. -trlpcd dediiw. Bits :i to **. Gent-" white cotton Pyjama %  Hast. Each. .8? Oents' purt Bilk Handkrrchltf*. whkW, blue, grey. Each $1.88 Whit* ViyelU Anklets with torn-or topn. Bite 10—tl"i Suit_. .S8.48 Pair.. .$1.56 Boys' Ties with hand painted dtslgns, aimorted colours. Each.. .91* ELITE Long Bleeve Sport Shirt*. In ih.iden of crfiim. blue, green, xray. last, brown. %  lass S to lsr| .-.55.92 Sea Inland Cotton Pyjamai i" srey. blue It cream. Bin* 38 to 44. Suit. _$15.96 94* .96? CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street





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PACK TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, I I ItlEI ARK Ccudb Calling C iLYDE WALCOTT. ffM • and Spartan wicket-keeper batam,in. son of Mr. Prank Walcot*. il "C\ Black Rook was yesterday married < *-i Church Aahter. cldost daughter ol Mr, md Mrt Vaga Akhjbv of 'Plumgrovc" Christ Church. The bride prveanted beautiful picture in a dre*s ol while embroidered or*anza with a yoke of illusion net. Tln> Hi three-flounced skin that ended in n train Her head-dress waa %  Juliet cap ct seed pearls and BM WON I fingertip veil of illusion net She cniried a bouquet of wh'U" roses uaith orchid* ll.taHwInail with seed pearls. Tin MHaM Barbara Ashhv and Ml I lH-atitilul attendant* of the bride. They wore dresses of jonquil yellow and blush lavender organza tcspectivcly. They carried bououeta of violets and orchids, and tiaras of flowers adorned their hlr. Mr Keith Waleott. Lntarcoaonial cricketer .md footballer, brother of the bridegroom was bestman. Messrs. IterrOdle. Cliflord Sklnntr. Frank and Cecil Clarke were the ushers. The Reverend Hugh Payne cfflcialed. The bridegroom's cake was one of the DMM original fern in years. It was made to represent tho. Criekc. Held at Lord's where Clyde Wdlcctt muac 168 not out in the Second England-West Indies Test at Lord'* last year. The bride's cake was in the shape of two hearts pierced by n Cupid's bow. These wire the creation of Miss V. Oe Cazon who won the first DfffM ui the Icing Division with ihe Ingenious copy of a hat .it last year's Agricultural Industrial Exhibition. The honeymoon is being spent at Bath.'heha Mr. and Mrs Waleott leave for England next month Hunting Patterns H if EMBERS of the Barbado* Dramatic Club playing in "AUuxuar Has Been Arranged," *o be staged 11 the F.mplre Theatre towards the middle of next month are busy hunting for jjatterns ol the dresses of notable people in past history, such a Mary Queen of Scots. Henry ,f Navarre, and Kuthertne of Russia The play, although modem and AMHand Mrs IrvUfl K In modern costume for the most ITl. arrived on tin I < ** of Mr. Ross McKenzic, T.C.A., l>art. gives a flash back to the yesterday from Can-i<<.< Smfti •nstosssr who is stationed here. fabulous den of (Jueen Elizabelh ". wo weeks* holiday they are stavand their two daughters Heather ami the Italian Nobility. n at u,,. Hatting! I! %  Ml 1 1 Gal > arrived Iron Canada It s a long time since a costume n, v B .* %  T C A nilot Their yesterday by T.C.A. They will stav play has been performed locally hn 1 „ and I understand every detail is being studied even down to the ctrrect wigs. Women Don't Give A Hang LONDON British males complained today thiit British women were becoming "ruder, more sarcastic and more aggressive than ever before." Tli.mild-mannered, slow-moving Englishman. who likes to think he is lord of the manor, Is Judy Garland's Story By Judy Garland As Told To Michael Drury AQI'ATIcrLVH CINEMA (M.mb.n Only] :i MKI1IIT" Because of my photoaraphK Mil %  I abed Taylor ', S^-HS^ VZ&rVdt&CK. me do tha, .* seen. SW K UTteKTj. 1. WomVwere ruie "d „r£^e J. "a*"* " """" "•-•* enough before the meat ration but now thw.... u> %  drtih. fi52SvjTE\irraa m". rr„ s" .is? arir'JS in. times 1 couldn't believe ihy Some months later I heard & rro^eU'Vh-cn 1 ? Jft JTS •"Se"^.." *5L. '" %  • i r ^ i ^e^,: 0 dre.S h ul h.d' d h.T --5iji^ir^ !" —• "^1 me into his office and tolo Mervyn Leroy was going to The Wizard of O*" and I cried all ever my make-up. wanted me U> play Dorothy. and she almost had to push mo n wa my first big break. I got back on that set. But then on a pe C ,al Academy Award for that thje first try, it went off smootn n i mi anu i wheeled my mother as cream. into letting me wear long w, '' c gloves to the reception, and a lltt PLAI£i\ Thralre— Bridgetown (DiAl 2310) l MY WILD IRISH ROSE" %  - •! 1 P iiuTVDOB nassHi ft BTHAann unrojr riUDAV III t*.M. lOttlii (t TI1F M \|.|l--t \; ITnM Dm .. -i' 1 COVIS IO t.i • -I' 11 I Suddenly 1 knew whV hc^had •gg^Jgj,'^ ,„ll have I .il .lorn. 1 s.w th.tLf w r ; „er oln, to be_y £•* %  "'' ' ,r w i.i anted They „. d w |„ ,„ of myM_and^uc f ^^ ..^^ ^ ^ m% ..^ gc m liatever character I white and t*iulMR. AND MRS. CLYDE WALCOTT T.C.A. Pilot ind Mn Family Reunion IIS JOYCE McKENZlE. w SEW SKT^^SS ^^^"mXrp'icrre^ tzr^ *tiT2A*t ES one: N lost U my U.ent. me Mervy, cut they want. I just can't ympathiie with them any more." Department store detective Ralph Curry is thankful his shop':. January tales are over. %  Never have I seen such disgraceful scenes," hje claimed. "Why the women went wild. punhing. shoving; grabbing and at ] times what language! Th •matched hats out of each olhe. ^naievr ti hands, held Uigs-of war over „. a ving. 'o"' dro ** tan and i BsmrajtaiJ inorc Utw vine*) %  >• dnvt tte wiww eaat rant a lew squabbling PO-called lacile-,". „ 1(l in h( erul I was more please. Other girls *ettiir W ^ Salaarnan Edwanl Foole charged uilh -Meet Me In St. Louis' ning dress 'or proms. "' m ^. that men couldn't walk Use streets lh an with anything else I had so I'd look right when I put :m> rf London anymore without iMV up till that time feet in the wet cement at c.rju"bems assaulted by umbre)|. • ,. „ mans Chinese Theatre high heels shopping bags or big I was to receive still anotnei people more astute than I hate parcels *• %  %  lpMon )n QeUnf lW)> or lhreP vpars ^ JJ undcrsland th. "Women don't seem to give a ;jtar that when 1 went to see aftl p between movie rtars a hang trapse dayThey just charge The Glass Menagerie on BrowAn actress not only holds a ceralong without looking what they way. To be WTO I'dJy+j gf Um ,ob but in a sense |h are doing or where they are going, I wrote ahead for them oeiore i Job; |h(f ftnB Hke h ^ r „„ And the best you get alter being left the coast. her : obi lf hal In9 kes sense. crtcke.1 over the shins with an When I got to Njy T* !" y\\ never forget the first time 1 umbrella is a sharp 'sorry' Most picked up the tickets .M the uoj mob of ^ women don't say a word but jus rfflee 1 ttle note '^"^""^ Mickey ind I wont to New York look daggers a. you a. if ,t is all T*>ior £ P^ *J. „ * : for Uie opcnlni[ of an A^. n...d, ^i^clor Rupert Kent: "l-adies ^V^'to^ed and m jreul ladiea any more except. It prised, because wed never EIJ'M^SSS" SHS '''t'^^'r-S actor, buck ^K^J3 women can be delightfully charmstage Is unaatJsfactory. They re focal point mg—and become rude, saucy, illtired and h igrv. %  tempered females". —l.N.d. PLAZA Theatre— OISTIN {DIAL 8404) .•ith too i B.B.C. Radio Programme Montreal Cuatoms Official for a few days at an hotel before moving into their new home, Atlantic View", Enterprise Boiil, Chrht Church. Le Misanthrope ^HE montlily meeting of 1*Circle Prancaise will tako ni bad< A RRIVING from Cmada yesterday on Ihe T.C.A. Spe. lal Flight was Mr. Frank J QullW who Is Chief Appraiser o( custom* in Hamilton. Ontario. He is here Firtt VUit M BS. £ SOPER it South Hull PQ was met at Seawell place at the British Council quarters. Wakefiold. at 8 IS lor about six weeks and U a guest day b "" In n *, t ^' tonight K i. propoaed to read at the Hotel Roval. }* v !" * h l8 ^ nd, B a •Le HlaanUu-ovV. P U%y i.v holiday In Barbado.. Mrs Soper Moliere, and those having copies Not Even Carnival idown for a month a n d is staying asked to bring them along. m "c ( -7„nr ?. ?, I, 1 %  < ""' Mur1 ^ ? She ca me a*;i5S CAROL MAl.H who ,„ 1)n )hr T C A Special flight was in Barbados In DecemThis is her llrst iit to Barbados. tmasDAv. rtMiAiv i IMI s.js—•<• t.m. IS.M N. 1 in Th, N—.. T in % %  • N.W. •Vnsiyili. T IJ in From tinEnitoiuia. t M %  l Progximm* i'arsii -•. T.ss > m (li..rall. Sswaklitg. 1 45 a tu.lrf.er*Choice, t am. Ijii.a and i"ro.k. %  so a m Bdwaid i r.r^ir, I.U <" Your and/ sni. IU r....i.i. t •.m Th Nw S10 am Hour.Saw. /'<-m BViialn. f IS am. Cloa Down. II.IS ..p Praitiinmf Parad. 1130 • m UatmaraChot**. 1145 am. Spatial DiaMich, II . Analfila. It 1% t> IK pin ljhi Orchi-Mial Muu (4S p m. Proti tiT-iin* Parada. 1 p" Tr.a Nawa, T.W pjn Nawa Analyal 1 i p m. Wa <*• Btii.ni. With the best there's a tioru. "in the woi 1 4 any people. But cou |d kill you. One of the most amazing thing* about all the trouble I've hi lately is that people no want to paw me. People I ce tho street, total strangers, look at me dirTarentl>—as though the realise almost with .uu. tMHWM that 1, too. have feaUnfl (To-morro: Judy's marrlagra: she start* psychoanalylieal treatments in effort l he better iie and ni-'tin. -. I.AIETY— [THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES utrrc SM LAKCENV WC VMM,-; PCM i HI l u.l t %  KOStrANNA MeCOV MARSHAL OF MF.SA CtTV %  n\ in, in 1DUKI ,'.;'.',.','.',',',*, %  GLOBE 1<> I1AV 4 30 a. 8.S0 LAST SHOWING •• Wfa I Mt.Xii I/.OA///7. WHOM: srniAL OPLNINO FKHtAY !nd I *. 8 30 last* OAKLAND A Oene KELLY h, SVMMEM STOCK Plas) LOCAL TALLNT at 8 30 Cloaa Dm. ii I understand that the laat Ing of the Circle was M ,: success, though a few of the mem•2? b> ..is— use IIJU ii. a u.u ht. 11 m Radio Nevl. IU nit, SIT John Mar(iH'a l-i" Jiutmr 8 t-1 p.m. CompoMr or lha Waak. t p m. Spacial Dtapntch, S.ll p m Ha.a a On. %  44 p m Do Your PUmt-mbai. lb p.m. Tha N. ISIS p m. from "• %  Stlltonal*, 10 IS pm Taka II liom II.nIC4I pm MoraMcClaran Talkinl II pm The Mum of Sid Phillip* and l.ia Band fin hoi Ida v, bers were found furtivelv versing in English. En Route to England A FTER spending Canadian Solicitor JAMES M FORGIE. o Solicitor of Pembroke, arrived from Canada JifLi' ffiHl ^SS* 1 niKl1 v ^>f"-y I'V T.C.A. to spend two M RS. ho couldn't resist the opportunity of roining down again tvn the knowlclge ol Carnival In Trim\4" dad eculdll'l tempt In i t.. ny-pu.*s 1V1 S^.. BarUidi l SI i terttav Ontario M T.C.A. — "--'weeks' She holiday in Grenada with their staving uncle Mr. George Joseph, a merCarol works with T C.A. chant of St. Georges, the Misjes Montreal. •ray and Peggy Joaaph raturad to m *> EngUuui on Monday evening by FOf Carnival (he Fremh u Colomble They Hew over lo Barbados \f"-'"'I Mrs. Julian At\ from Grenada bj IIWIA, i loin iT and Ihei the boat and during .heir short for Trinidad o. .. visit, were staying at the Hota* by B.W.I.A. to spend C| "' re or a month's holiday, Royal. In Trinidad. staying nt the Abbeville Guest Mr. At well is with Dear's House, then she plans to visit Summer Retort Garage here Grenada and Tobago, ,. Mis. Snyder was in Barbados fcflU II. BEVERLEY ROBINSON To Study Law In March last year. 1TJ. who lives nt St. Andrews-by•..• %  %  the-Sea. a summer resort in New A RRIVINC in Barbados on T.V. Dancer Brunswick arrived by the T.C.A. -* asbslday .veii.nu BJ tha TN Kaleidoscope' last week Speci.ii from Canuda yesterday. Colomble from Pi I .„n-viirt fai England Bond and Stock Broker, E. BiasMiigU.n ... .he s r. \: i > • >d SJIW tor the thud lime Wcsl Imli.-i Rupert and the Sketch Book-24 Mi companled by his wife and they | lag at Sam Lord's. Wub Herr Laat Year 1 HS. CI-1VK SNYHKII whose home is in Kitchener. Ontario lOchaai I.I. •"''"••I %  *'" %  Canada by the ,. T.C A. Special yesterday. She Pr.u." on in ihe diriction thi: Roul'.c hit gont. Rupcir rrschti inothct aide road. "Now I don't know which w* r lo go." he mur%  nun. Then ht brighltni a he .pin i till figurr in the nJ< load. ,r Thn'i anolher Dolictmin." he • '.-. *> % %  • would never go near a alter what hu happened. She muu hive kept airaight on." And i" spue of iae ram he runs ahead. Tt road bend, and gradual! (he hoUMt get feaer and tht tow:i (oim IO an end. Thia il awfV. -vk tomaone te help." he thinka. He and is here for u month's holiday, the Caribbean Commlssmon, She ll dancer Boscoe Hold. It s pretty cold In Canada now and now on her way i i f., ;.,t Deenniui Wnlter-EIlis. doing their he prefers the summer resort .if Kingdom where aha hopag in usual sketch "These are tha the Weet Indies. study law, dan BY THE WAY • •. Ijp Hoarhviimlur YOU'VE NEVER SEEN ANYTHING LIKE IT ON THE SCREEN BEFORE . IT'S FASTER THAN SOUND! IT'S GOT I \ I K V I HIM. : THRILLH . ADVENTI'RE . ROMANCE IH'I.MM. io-\nmnm\ ,l,i,I.,,,, J..IO ami II..IO p.m. HfS A TtST laf MJeTHJMX mm A ass*-any the DM T IE President of th< Society, of which founder member (In around Boot through the Influence of an aunt who Invented flypaper overcoats for cows), h; complained that science has invented so many queer languages Novcr j d ^ WMU can no lunger Lindartftand one onother. ; or tin Tuvniv Ywir* of I /mmi A VOICE Hnrt/s of I* .'KHI furl A SCIENTIST, TP^attffTlg^ Royal bod) i belter. wishing to roan anxious world, uttficd (without a smile) this it powai monumental sentence: "The Uatcal crlUc. scale of ntomic atljick necessary A very to destroy the whole surface of loud voice." It la said that, when the globe Is much larger than singing Falcnn.i in "Uinaldo." people realise." Good! Thii will add lo the Ruiliguz/i blew a unull child out gaiety of nations, and encourage ol the front row of ihe stalb .is #1 / ussi/lar the lighter-hearted among them easily as you or I would blow out m ^^ m to babble without resiraint. At I candle And Angvlique -T^HF report published by the the Wanscote Experimental StuAdinoide. taking tha part of MorColonial Office the other day .\lso the Short: "SO YOU WANT TO BE IN PICTURES" turn Ui.v tell the story of a gana In the same opera, uttered dealing with the Island of St. professor who said mulvlcules. a shout ("a cry." say* the muatcal Helena recalled In mv mind a when he meant bulvicules The critic) which wh^ked Hie bow eWlOUl fact. When Napoleon inlarpreter translated the wrong out of Ihe hand ol the llrst fiddle was a schoolboy he kept %  noteword, and a Portuguese colleague ("violin" says the mmic.il critic), book in which he Jotted dowe found he had made a strong soluand made the conductor's whifpoints from his studies. There Uon of oxohvdrodimetholvxtrol ker.s tremble like those of the w< an entry in the section dein^lead of chlorophosphocortobiioold sailor at Weymouth when the voted to geography. Slv Jivlene, lene As al' four words were impudent little boys' ask him lo priUe He . Those four words. invented by I^ilp o! I^lpiig. nosay "flfty-flvc." BM no more. RAYWDaO MASSEY IHCVAW WHOKF gnjMR HEISLH Plus Latest "WORLD NEWS" (Presented h> Ws.-ner Pathe News) #*#-1 ikf 1 #Yf e-'f-f ##'# BRIDGETOWSDial2310 Wise Buys— BARGAINS today. Prices will rise. So don't delay Flowered CRETONNE at EVANS & WH.TFIELDS DIAL 4606 DIAL 4220 LINENS dept. lines Yd 27' Print CRF.TONNE 64(1 36' CHEESE CLOTH 42* 56'STRIPF. TICK 1.19 F30\1['.STIC 38 1 & iSt l>illow 2" Pillow-cases94? f. 97* ACT QUICKLY!! THEY'RE MOVING FAST!! A Small Shipment of AGRICULTURAL FORKS O.M.Y $4.70 EACal THE BARBADOS CO-OPI IIA I ivi: Mil BO\ I Al TORI LTD. Has-dsrarr and lrwai,ni'r< Drp.rtm.nt T.lrphonr No !39 CROSSWORD Ii H j 'A 1 E | |i I 5 >6 F *t w J ^-. Acraaa 1 and 6 Down. Gad I Mere nothing ia ivn.il uvu goi Irom liim. \.i. J. S. flf 7. Inlcnttou. (7) I. swallowed Iu a dais bos. (3) 'i, Ovui. IS) t. SoiiirboHya aon. 131 I'atUT irom the bsmge, (3) Nymph. I3i s re hn*e oon^ it jcu mutt. (4) 1. You ara looking at II. (a) Kapa In return. <4I gitan teen la a u-eche. (8) Tuna, ill I MI to drlnK it. (i 2<>. Letter symbol to show the lUC. car. (V) l 2. Tula will ci>var nprtv il. Hnunda. ol eouraa. (Ii I Obviously a inoat. (Si 6. One who ahoulti succeed, ti) 0 BM 1 Acroaa. %  ; Mufflcirni r.ipe for in artist. 17) 8 ramlllar mn. (Si II. Tin.* blue ij tL-mr'ilv. 19) 10. uBiruaivelr l(,uu. i7. IB IC0.111--I. (4) IVYou'll and tnia naauut resort in Ihla part ol Europe. (3), 20. It', annum.j (4l 31. Bspressm anguat. ni 23. Clllldlali tnauu W Una ptLlvlilrv a grant canal. (S) 29. Courli-ty illle, (3) fa. W 1. uitf.. 5 a' 1^ DM; 17 Earn Teil.in; 14 Rxu; IP. OBSERVE that different brands of Bay Rum come, and they go, but BORNN'S BAY RUM will go on forever WHY? QUALITY Thais Why IS O W A I, // INK / TO IIAV at 4 Only Hr-1 M.I. INDIAN HIM IO III SHOWS IN rlAXBADOS HA ta,J>tiat f~\ |> p ; ""/ P^^*aaaaBBBBi I'll. House, Haln TO-NHilIT -I 8.30 Only M-G-M Bl| Dmihli. WILLIAMS and IV'ci LAWFORD m "O.v i.v isr i v#* II it II YOV •llls/lV VarVII YORK Starnni; Johnnv WEISSMI'l.I.h R id Maureen OSULLAVAN EMPIRE OLYMPIC LAST TWO SHOWS TO l> \V 1.*:, and H .1(1 20th Century Fox Presents LAST TWO SHOWS TODAY %  !.:;" and 8 15 --#•#.#. QET ttV" Color by Technicolor Starring June HAVER %  %  LUan LUNU1GAN With Gloria Lie HAVKN und Dennis DAY Universal Smashing Double Barry FITZ GERALD in "NAKED CITY" now LAST TWO SHOWS TO DAT 4.45 und K 15 f Columbia Serial TEXGmAXGEm rrlna Hobert KELLARU l*ggy STEWART With Buz/ HENRY & Smith BALLJSW AND "PIRATES OF MONTEREY" Starring Rod CAMERON & Maria MONTEZ CUTLERY and PLATED WARE FLAVOUR For Mellow Smoothness anil distinctive flavour. There la no rum that com pares with . s & s mm & SAMPSON LTD. Ilr.dqu.rtrr. for IV.t Rum. Small Canteens of 6 Knives Fork, and Spoons Stainless Sleel Carver Sets Sets ol Spoons Cake Forks Cake Baskets ,' also LARGE THERMOS FLASKS PLANTATIONS LTD.



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PACE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIIVRRDAV. FEBRIARV 1. 1M1 BAKBADOS M WUmi Priato4 kv • • i li. r>. 1 •ir, i \< l\4. ISM I s I DURING the debate in the Legislative Council on the bill to provide for the Registration of voters Hon. Dr. Cato in a maiden speech pointed out a situation which will inevitably arise and which Will have lo be remedied under the Representation of the People Act. He Hid that II was not fair to retain a system under which a few people in a district had the right to elect a similar number of representatives as a district with a large number of voters. The question of proportional representation is one which must i>c considered in view of the changes which will arise in future. The passing of the adult bill has already given rise to many complicated issues which come with the changing of any electoral machinery. It has already been suggested that the representation in the House of Assembly he changed by means of a re-allocation of seats, ft was then argued that if parishes like St. Joseph and St. James had the right to return two members lo the General Assembly, it was only fair that ptftlfaw like St. Michael and Christ Church should be allowed a greater number. The answer given to this was the suggestion of single member constituencies. By this means the parishes would be divided into wards each entitled IJ return one member. If this had been carried out it might have been possible to have divided the larger parishes into a greater number of wards so that they would have returned more members to the House than the smaller parishes. Dr. Cato now comes to the point and reminds the Government that sooner or later the issue will have to be faced and proportional representation given. It may be that in the next amendment to the Representation of the People Act provision could be made for an increase of the membership of the House from 24 to 30 members so that the additional seats could be allocated to those constituencies with high population figures. As an alternative it might be possible tn use the figures now being collected for registration purposes, so that u specified number of areas of 450 voters each could be used as a unit for representation. Consideration should be given now to the matter so that the issue can be faced at the earliest opportunity. WATER THE question of the necessity for one or two rigs for the Waterworks Department was raised by Hon. F. C. Hutson during the debate in the Legislative Council on a resolution to provide the necessary funds. In this island the mattersaffecting the improvement of the water system have been entrusted to a Board ot which Mr. Hutson is a member and his point now leaves the public wondering what the discussion is about. While it is recognised that the detailed expert engineering knowledge necessary for dealing with the island's water supply cannot be expected from the average voter, it is surprising that in an island where water is the prime mover in agriculture that the public knows so little about water improvements intended, i Can it be that too little use is made of the public Press to disseminate knowledge affecting agriculture? Our llradi is S.i* A Pomibl>To The Editor, Tlie Advocate, SIR.—Please Brant DM Opportunity to make u suggestion willi rejprd to the forthcoming Intercolonial cricket loumanv-nt. Judging from the number of bowlers invited to practice, one immediately realises that the selectors have grown conscious of the dreadful dearth of bowline talent in the Island. The two completed practice matchc* have Shown most of the bowlers to he equally innocuous. Our slow bowling department is undoubtedly very weak for Hoed, the best of the lot. Is indeed a problem. An Empire team is presently touring Gtenada and with it Is A. Holder a slow left arm spinner one who ratilb iptm the ball— who Is spreading havoc amongst the Grenada batsmen. Having joined Empire only recently, Holder has not ha'l the opportunity <-f plying for the Hunk Hall learn but the meic ltd thai h* has been selected on performance in the nets alone speaks well foi his bowling ability. As C. Huntc has tinned out to be our most recent bttUi so it is possible that HobSi i be the answer to our headaches for a spin bowler. In lh< of the game it would be a good Idea if some provision bv so that he could be inclu> the next trial match and giv< opportunity to prove his wortn. SPECTATOR. 30.1.51. Russia's A few Empire—3 Will Take Canadian Plays To Bermuda '917%  %  %  %  %  •* lemnlj i l-enln lit) mil not Sltempt to %  favour ot amis) and lo ope rli By DAVID J DALLIM I i>e of econoi xpanslon—the newest chapter in tnhutiiii MUM <>( the Ntl 1*5 history—was maiU. Leader tor the Comintern's "help" durum — Flam — three decades. Mosciw b Tiir. .Air. Urn niandoH $io,O00,0f"i ir financial assistance to the Bulgarian Communist party and .isststance lo Its leaders during %  | : ly wa ..y on the The ILIUM amldl ,in. 1 i "' sl ,h ''" < oll ,u !" d ">" • h ll-HnS^. . %  " % % %  <• %  "' l M '""" K "" -...y make a stable total. i.urla. No flfurei noi i„ addition, the .re > % %  „ Eastern %  %  ..I".;.satellites will be presented with ,' S, %  I. an Wrieln "!' %  !" lc rv,i, 11... u ,ilT'.iiVu considerable. When iho Soviet lea*-.ocrumUonnow In Its Bvernmcnt claims lhat Its SST^M a" to. !" ^r „ 1approximately lllth and. In some places. It. sixth reached Its prewar level, it |. rptaS country, """i?," no i mfl %  *'*"• U """ The third n...nnrf of er.,n..n,le 2? !" ""' "• nl'o improve.1 1945. That Ihls tould bile thi m v. r ment i NKVT) does not in liir.-isn Trade. II I J 10 uld not %  „ rcparaUons—which, from four "i>(cn while threr million nations, have aggregated $900.are kept In the army and a large ._ 000,000. Most of the reparations part of Russian industry is still ST.'.."-. : SSTL2 .reilta have pr^ldedI tSr ealcue^y with mlllUry produelion ha. ms to l>e made on the basis been due to these eight methods 1838 prices. Prices in the 0 f obtaining foreign assistance (in meantime have almost doubled, so addition lo UNRRA and Lend%  thai tho 4000000000 i/nw to mat the sww.uw.uw grew'to a jeaBo) which were put into operaconsfdembly larger sum. In the .,„„ j.._,— u „...... _r?V„— .._ _„.,,.. ,i ,„ ,. ,.,,.. reparations—na paici •111,000.***•*• i M,i 1 "" *•_ hc ; 000 lor "ntUUUou$430.000.(>0 cOBMmHC no. E„„r Ct !" i. C ml .iven '"' "connie.UoM," 1300.000.000 of Moscow Ihe am'"' "'" maintenance or Soviet share. Thl, !" £, I Com""!" %  • %  ""! ".nDO.0O0 U the dressed wind tolX. The mimbtr o thSe "' instalments of the reparations sometimes nives the imp. !" "~.. '"I Nichola. Il^hsc. „„,, the soviet ha, almost at • , :i '.h^Tu,"i';"i,.h"-"'i'S8 Kir • M T le ST&r r '"• .tance, that o, the Brltl ffi ^, ". ^V-JTMB E '-"' "'.'""'? " >" i mod.. l!;:m„ "„ K ."f„rTn„ar.ce.' n ,, *" d !" T VVr'' K""5 .M, t ,.",o \:.TaSo, %  •" .intain nw .ban 3 0110 ( ,.,„„,.,„.. |i,. lt repsa-mUcm %  s !" "' ">•• ingenious Busslan advisers and orli.lal.. „ avn .,. llls lav ,. amounlad lo sixty methods of aequirmu foreign Throiiehoul Eastern Europe, ceiliU||iin „,,,].„.,. hls ,„.„ ^ ,. x wealth—namely, pine war booty many, and the I amtrated ho.vcvci and grabbing bv (one—will have than 100.000 .re necessary to t0 be relinquished ..,on. Reparaoraanue (seneral slorfs anu check Fourth, new trade agreements tions payments will end. loo. on nei ",• %  £22 'le'wecn Russia and the satellites what will remain are. first. Soviet [Ore*, and mushrooming secrei havc ^.n, bccn b „„ d on Ihe vested Interests in other eol.n're. "" Am,., leu dollar a. the stable cur_, canllll sum a ,„ i Z V rancj. The proeeai of tr.,„slatil „hich ennrlot eve K 2 n ,„l ,ench rattoctlvlimUotl of agrleullhc Inflated currencies into d.>lla,s 1!S TSEaaW. f. ." ^ „„e. to HV. .tiiclion, .. „„. ,„,„„,„„„,„ ,„ r •eeonl ; | !" "*^ rol %  !" n iioii." ..ml .lelght of m0 lnl r 7'"7 hroker beoperate numel hand In Huniary, for instance, tween Cast and West: and third, naliios" for • ned sometimes at ,hr ability to exert pressure to men! to ,"|i-' with tho tasks of || .60 liller and sometimes at 25 00. raise prices nn lb* products and i.. re occupation Is depending on which amount haplo lower Ihe prices on its pu Ltlll In forea; ''Hi to pert' in. %  jiens lo hc more advantageous. chases. multitude ol other function. Fif'.h. the MVT has sometimes If Imperialism Is really what a.a__ .„ kind ot bou 1 Pioilucts from lhc satelI.cnin deflnnl it lo be-if Its mam Russi.. ntcs al a low price and resold trail, are interests abroad, capital •l^nW.meimu^lnl4ir !" oi |i|Cm l0 „„,„ „„„,,„, a targe investments, profits on „ large K | .^.'iS """ %  '" l ll-'ughl-in'arrangement !" £ B-'^ !" •'•" "" „, the Ml.II (heir to Ihe , |h( MVT (n Mlw(nv Thc ship with Ihe nations of its orbit GPU and NKYlli. ami often PromM slnkln0 ln tance of such clearly falls within this definition contact with ihe KJJI |rad( „„,.,!„, wa lhc ,„| c t„ nut the process of "partition 01 population, they "really enyw CMC hoalovaMa of Bulgarian zinc ' world" among the olhei their robot Soviet !" lonlxer concentrate; Bulgaria tried lo nepowers has been rev. rsed In the ,„ countries wl.ich to thim are w (h<^^ Mriir „ „„ cHni lorly year, since this theory Ihe '•West Their •>" !" "* price of U4 a ton: M.c...., .tepemergerl. While Western ,m^ m ,mXhe' n.dlves": l* d <" "'"' '""'••'': 1 D " '" IK-rlallsm I M ,„„„ •* tzsr'W*£& ^„d!„, b b=a!:,m-:, %  I,. Sovtel in.in.''.'" In Sixth, new trade agreements sense. .,,„,,,. i.nistnietion ), avi lH .cn included, and a few The basic. .llfTere-nce Ix-tween mil neat Be** V O^eUlli have Income available to west en. and Bittern imperialism dlpars n month; a Russian chut ,||umin;ite then nature Prices has bean the methods em ployed in engineer 4.">.n00 dlnura. ami his agreed to have often been e-onomlc enijiire-huilding. in thi deputy 16,000; i director of impfavourable to the Soviet side and West they consist.-.! i„ a %  teadllj piles received 25.000, n chief unfavourable to Ihe satellite. I'oirrowinK export of goods and lit ic 22.000. a department ] ;il ,d t f„ r example, has been sellinvestments: capita) abroad wa' Chlf 22.000 ( A VUfOIWV minis, n g mal to Russia nnd buying colaccumulated in the course of vear' iry wai 12.000 dinars a ton from her; in these transactions jtnd decades. The S. .. month.) 1" addJUoO, the Kussmn t |,e price ol coal has been lower ment. on the other hand hat not furiiishecl nnd the price of cotton higher l-een busy with forc-lsr. investment viii i 1 wW" %  l,M "' u ">;<" on UM world Birttto in „r Kg capital; whet it MQulred QKCOI beet, end UM; cere, eenrma, when the world price of coal from abroad was seized In one ;i B bonus ol i nnUj wu between *" wid *20 a ton historic moment as a perl ..t >.ii..y i<" oach yaar %  _work Poland sold 00.0M tons of eoel victory in a war. Wh..t ooomenk liHR Soviet Bdvlaeri of tha renlt to Iha Soviet Union for $120 a neUvilv .u-.-nmpli'^cd for the West nl colonel or genera were rccelyt, m thus making the Soviet ne u ( achieved !>•' NTownw thmuiih („-31.WHMo 40.0H0 dinars a month n | n [n ftlU MM &eMeetl0D nlwut sh err rmlitarv foreeand DoSSS from the Yugoslav government, {io.000.00u. Bulgarian rose oil pow „ """' f '" fl a Po'"cn' dinars a month. aviation oil has lieen delivered lo methods of ftnulre-hmldirii! Be In emit • lew instances are saln„,rta at a price of seven cents a ,..„,,,. ,,.„ h ','.', ."",. „' STSSIS ^S JS&Jttl 1-sher^a^ E^ £1,^^ .„„, the .or. Iml many other considered normal beESuimJSSb e, f el^~ST l,n rnethOOS, some IrtVlJl nnd old. „„„rnmcnt. For the loan wria i.,,?h' ve v. ke^tatie a.^A eoHeetlng %  C,e"ch,,,ovgl„. for Instance. Evcteen"."iteVfacl^in'Tht'peS". hoot.'K been e !" nded S I.I Percent was charged, whereas war strengthening of the Soviet '. %  .'..'"I" ,.J".... .ml shins as the Export-Import Bank rale was Union. END. •war r aibrace factories an. ships as .:. ..it'le. tolling slock. 2.5 percent. i JAMEW BlIIIIIEtHr. O. II. Uaveerj 1887-IJK.I WHEN nernar.l BhlW died recentlv it was "James Bridle" Who teok hi phi rking In Brilein, ii.. deeft I 8 l with bl their fni). Ut -i sore |OM .t letter! and to the theatre. Osborne Kei ear, C B.B-i L.L.D., M.D., was the outstandr • ill during I %  ; .n group %  Robert London found Mimulatm which iirmiv ed nnd lh'> n ; by some as his finest piny; and of coarse "Daphne l-aureola" i controversy ninong the critics when it appeared In i49, nut the public bed no doubt iboul r gboul Den I Edith Evans brilliant ereetlon ot ''Daphne'' end ta wcclM. running for one year to full houses Many diwerning people, mclud ng I believe that some of his finest writing Is to IKfound in playi not yet London—of "John Knox" duced in Glasgow! and "Tho Queen's Comedy". The Snal ept i ttter pley, which wea I99Q BcUnbusWh Fcstiv.ii. i. remeric a bl< for it; IntenMty of feelun.'. Ill humanity, and its crafl why Bridle's death Li .it his ngc ha r^t j II (trowing intellectually and n'tie. stn| ID % %  er as a playwrianl 't i %  Impoaalble to foreceat what hii poeition wu tinally be, but two thutaa maj ii-' noted. not the bt| 11 ti ksn luccaaaea enlv, but numb) la known—have :i inplaee In the %  Ciel theettee eH over the country. more and more Wl I nil plays reed for B 17 Hrtis: ns well as a stage craftsman, He thought ih.it London's domwas unhealthy, and some i i took the If found IOW Citizens' Theatre, which under hm ihair%  nanehip has become tbe leading "i-epcrtory" tlu?atre In Britain To :inha nve uitatlnted time. thought and work, and %  sneroui upport; nnd he used it for the encouragement of young writers and players Not n few of then will llwaya thank llrldie for Ii' kindly and wise advice and criticism and for "Citizens" he rrabt The Forrignn Reel" and Other litfbt pieces which give rein to that humour which shines out in h'l autobiography 'One Way Of LiVine" and in "Mr, Bridie's Alphabet for Little Glasgow Highbrows" and "Tedious and l,i fer It Is difficult for nnc who Ml friendih'p to write moderately of his persOfl qualtUei He was the kindliest .in I i' ions of men. and the host of good company with a salty wit, an unprediclabii' wmtl liresistible sense of fun and of the Incongmous—th's Rive* MWOtUr to even nil most serious plays^—and thai balk simplicity and delight in .simple things which ao often marks the reiilly fine mind. His passing Is an irreparable loss to B host of tnends in all walks of life, and of course parti, iilarly In the theatre and the world of letters. I believe that "Tobias and the Angel" resulted fr. should write a play about "a really lovable < 'laracter" —and in the i\pochr\pha he found old Tobit. That phrase RDpl


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ESTABLISHED 18S5 Truman And Pleven Agree WASHINGTON, Jan. 31. PRESIDENT TRUMAN and the French Premier,! M. Pleven, in a joint statement today said that the United States and France would never neglect' any genuine opportunity to settle international problems by negotiation. "Discussions between the President and the Prime, Minister have shown again that no menace or, manoeuvre will succeed in breaking our fundamen l tal unity," the statement said. In Washington, in a 1.500 word communique issued seven hours after their final meeting ended, the loshdei they had agreed that aggression must not be re w arded, (N the menacr n f aggression ti pprased. Ti mo made Uv %  %  ...: %  %  plcli* agreement" U to n i •-sistinj* aggression and assisting free nation-. In UM Phi East in their afforta to i.iitv and the assurance nf their indeper agreed thai every error: Hunt be exerted to bring about an honourable solution Both countries would support I aggres' ' THURSDAY, V*.'.. i^ PRItF FIVE fENTS i.oiurs Mki Lady A 8tor Protests LONDON. America u-born Lady %  -oiufully < rilicised claims by Britain's Socialist Government that man women than ever. :• %  employed In industry. .Speaking at %  meeting of Atonal Society for the lion of Cruelty to Children. Lady Astor said. "Where children are concerned I have no politics. I UM Government arc boasting about the number of women in industry. "It is horrifying that Woman with children should be in Industry. If we are :n a mess why don't the men work six days a week and give shorter hours 10 women" [hi Welfare State rocking. No Government has talked more about welfare fo, woman and children. 0 Government has let them down more. Ihe former Minister of Health, Aneurln Bevan, said ibne would be a revolution in this country unless more houses were built. Well, there nas been no revolution and there have been very few houses. But If the Tories had been In power for live years and DO houses were liuilt then might have been a revolution and Bevan would have tried to make it. "I hop theBritish have not lost their power of profor protesting against What is wrong made us great."— INS. !. Truman pronvsed Pleven that American aid foe Pranch Union forces and the national dhe Associated Stataa of Indochina would if continued and increased quantities of war material would i" expedited, hurupe's Import'tnee WFDniNQ CAKE made for Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Walcott by Mi-. Viola De Oason. a replies of the entc'iu-ert him to 12 veais t na; ria inment, was revoked He IS to nt|y ;,,„( 1 American Mnjli Cuinmifslonei .i. M %  l 1 of ihe ' In Europe %  i the olhei ll. I %  men are in Landsberg pen) several years not knowing whether the> would he executed. M.f|o> s-nd thai whii ii were final, were ....sc a In on the United S M Advlfory Hoard for War i In ihe ca i of Alfred Krupp Id "Even those guilty '.d participaUon in the i* i -I Jidegm. crime* have not i i i an dlgpoaed to lee) that Ion m thia Ungle case Imlnation agalntl %  d by any i rum United Nations Troops Move Forward I n Korea tliat the Russian Emperor P*^(bulwarh Of world peace and of nd hin wife Catherine, pkecl Ihis tho | n dependea:e of free society ipetfklfauj beverage" "I wonder if a barrel of ale delivered at the Kremlin", aaid Wood, "might not do something to assuage the cold war**, -INS .. the %  Full Scale Alliances Paul BanJdne n m en pace 5 (II \Kl.fS <(>( HRAN fHI\riSS I I l/AIH I II AMI l-AMII/. Cochran Dies At 79 LONDON, Jan. SI. Itritain's greatest showman. Sir : O chran, died hera lo79 after he was severely scalded in his bath last week. tie. launched hundreds of Ktars through his ions < arear noted every type of enUng, hnxUlng and 'hows became %  %  elected by hirn peraoa ehorui In IH2I he became bankrupt. Mo recovered, succeede I '••34. a he waa 74 %  ge with the muU "Bleu ihe Brtde" and II in 1048. : %  the IheV Cochran beoaaw Chevajler 11 h Ix-gion of Honour in i960 for i n Introducing French art to the English stage. i roducrd 110 plays and I publica. -.! %  Tiie Se, .. Hi Umost Forgotten,'' 1 —Kruler "•• -7, —^ rnetTl added: "Where hate been substantially reduced, %  MtO the result more of de-ponsibihtY and Othei extonuaUng i In umi lances brought tut mainly since ihe trials. 1 %  alletuni IS wai crimuials iimtta 11 (urlsdli lion in ii 11 death seiit.i.i i %  la i %  f. unprlsorunent and upheld two i tenets rat Sehai%  uard at Muehldorl Coniitratum (amp. near Dachau, bo asctracti i fold taeth rrom tha • had died r.om heatings he personally ad%  'l. and Hans S.Jm.nil. Adjutant at Burhenwald i iraUon Camp (or three years. During Schmidt MM) prisoners dud tech month because of camp conditions and ueltles inflicted on them by the Rruler Nevada Atom Tests Will Be Secret WA.MliN, rON, J.tii 31 Oordon Dew -non said hera thai all Inl etn it tha Navad tone will be withhi l,i to Slop Ruaaiem* finding out aboir. Dean used the U i", bosab N in uiening to the blast: two of which were set off la* %  %  but late, ta ICUy what he n "They are .ssennalu mental nuclear deton.a told a news eonferenre adding thai this deacrlpUoi aa curnbeav some but necessary to give the correct idea. IHera has been speculation that l.i blasts are small scale atomic aicploalons whkh mas ilnd mill' in m such weapons as rdded missiles. Dean said U • O % %  would not ccimii.eiit on any such speculation. Neither would ft announce future explosions in advance DM tell anvthinic about them after warda the Chairman sau We do not want Russian obl lllclal or unontclol, ot| And we do nol w.ot Dte nature ^i v e leati or th ucce or lack of i act BM known to tinRussians.'"—Reuter TOKYO, Jan. 31. UNITED NATIONS forces intensified their ad vance along the central and western fronts at dawn today. Troops sweeping forward on the central front had so far met no resistance. Vicious hand to hand fighting and artillery duels kept the advance along the 40 mile western front at a steady rate as troops struck tho main Commu His' lines of resistance north of Suwon. Canada Asks For Workers Korea Off V.N. Council Agenda I,AKK SUCCESS, Jan II The Security Council iiti.ui imousiy decided todaj to >'t the K' Ironi agenda. llrllain proposed the delet Tha Soviet Union q u I c k 1 j agreed and all eleven men held up their hands when h %  i called for tha Quevedo ol tt Ltetl i i am i:' %  ulthat lt i lu*; mimity." Britain took this action brraiise the Ceneral AsM'ndd. ,,,,, %  racornrnendauot quaatlon being deali with i>v n Security COUnell. The deletioi if the Korean quaatlon born • Councll'a agenda would allow lha A %  amblj to retltV tin R p.* •< %  < h\ I I'lditti :il (' mniiittee i inmuilis'. China as aiutrcs&or. sn Oladwyn Jabb, Britain told the Council it might in argued that the Council In feel I'ait not i ( Its funein respect to the K roan htaua because of lha Sovlel veto The forma] removal of tiniteir from tinagenda would n mi 11 techm Oladwyn added that the thin action m BrltaJn'a view would nol Invalidate in any wa> i Hot already token on Korea by tin Council, nor WOUM M prevent tio Council rrom taking up the mattei igaln it H dsa lde| lo do a bg imiiie proi adursl \ ola Si'iiivon Thampkun of t h. Sc.viet t' ii i on i. i'. i %  %  iv been put or the council's agenda In an Illegal lbwoulc vote therefore in faVOUl M lit diletiMii After a unaniinout I mad artlh out flxinn a data :or it* m Inn—Reutrr India Iti-fust's Soul On U.NCommittee IndiNBW DSLHI, Jan 31. would not accept a seal t. tha Good ODloea Comrolttaa %  Nntions' %  solution brandlR %  i, %  today Reportsfrom Hi | ia|d that the Gesienl rullah Enl axiom thai tndl Su Isenegal Rau should norvi tn .i Authoritative Indian quarters in New Delhi deecrlbed lha I HI favour of tha 'i as an "unfortun % % % %  i i impalrltia negntlated Battlement of tha Kon > %  rn problems. India a t-'-i ngainn the resolution.—Rruler. Eight Kitted in Belfast I'.KI.KAST. Jgn, 31. Al aaal end,! men were k I ad I mgway leading Iron whaling factory ship Ju4ii I'rron .oil.,p.,i sjad hurlc them on to the , wni nnd occu' urgent!) needed .ire ant-' draughtamei % %  | workers, pl| metal workers. textile workers ami wood workers The suet %  i %  i.. ,i i • %  %  i possession of a minimum of i.io Appiicuit.-. must slao sign an undertaking to repa Qovenunent al tha i ate of not less than 510 | i: :i oiid i %  month until tinlo.m h. ( been pud otr I at a tune hen Immigration titcures nave en faUln Prom iB4fl i Cai D i'-i Itii h n Igranta. the figure §pped to (list under 7.000 in the tnonthi i i %  %  %  %  K centri s %  iy*a pounding by tl %  \ : %  ivn of Kosong. import. %  east coast IS mileM.uth of thj 38th parallel. I % %  i>f warships and lo el n H Mlteutnr! the world's Urgaat %  %  %  aaaeujl • %  % %  i %  Allied Bghters had out I %  1 ...„„. wMUei %  ItrllU-l lion llgures Coraperaoli > Auslrali.i i ,., Bui Canada ll not prepared to goto the aama lengtna as Aus•ettlera pen to any Euro11 i But we have on made available any free passages as tho Ausl i idi. II i Government h ivc 1 % %  %  lid Mr I. 0 Cummlng, Superintendenl or Canadian Im.' I!:, I'M in London to-day 'We feel t h.il f i . 'ittract ul > %  anl lo avoid REALLY FRESH KAItAi 111 Fi%  i. %  ,,. r out', pi-i pound. The trt protected by govenimenl law which den la of meet trig day the cattle is slaughred. —ic.r t Hustamante On Five Charges ilo.il. Off I '•<>'• •pana.enl I [TON, Jan. 31. W \ %  %  %  I %  %  i i loo on -i thai on *hli I nUy hound over In the um of J; 1.000 rial ha bt Spanish > %  hi o.ii > 1Mb %  i ipeech Buatamanta thy Park during the height recent Unreal "ii that r I %  i i pllna of %  omml lonei of Police Bkt Iton ise oT oifensive ealumnl I Peace on i the laltei charged 111 \ %  • || li: oi i %  I ted by D. B Ul -. Laedei ol the J C P. and Solicitor. 11 i i mi UiVOI \ li l ill NKW8 RJNO 3113 |t\V Oil NH.liT NOTICE Readers and Sidwcrlbers l<> 11** "ADVOCATE' Hill Newspaper in Herat surrounding districts axe asked lo note Dial we have appointed MR. s. A. DURANT our DisIrilmliii:'. Agent as from Siuul;o. I'.bniurv 13th, 1951. Please contact Mr. Dnrant, Horse Hill. Si. Joseph, who uill see after the deliver] of your Daih Paper. ADVOCATE CO.. I/I lh. Circiilulioii Dept.. Dial 2112.5.



PAGE 1

Till fBSDAY, FKIHUWRV 1. 1951 BUiBADOS ADVOCAT1. I'\(.l SEVEN CLASSIFIED ADS. TAKE NOTICE TIUWOMI 2501 IN MKMt KIAM nw-iaB-i.. i-v.i fading mmmmv -f Mir "ear aon and knlMr Culhlm L-.lr Ho-*.i.l. -.'o mm called U higher tervK* on Fa-briar* 1 law* loiit day*, long night* ho Mr* kg mm i l siii JfrftBt-1 iMi-hM M r 01 d*or aon -r.d BrWMi who INI Mllip tn Jnui on r*brvi*ry Ind 1S*S 0 •**• our dear** k* (> g *u 8 iknt • %  dwrM lo 8 WdBI bli 1 ii Mf.vrol Hmiw-tM on 1 n Jau %  £ verla'tlt-g Ar-T • n-t-nr £ ver lov* r d*rot*d parent*, olat*ra ai FOR SAM; AUTOMOTIVE *•* HKNT HOUSES root. OARDB Woiin,w>a Drawing and dining loani. I bedroo— •>' '--•'i Available IVbniwv let Dial MM BTAl H %  CA-GAZC Un-lh*-<--. Co-al fully rurniati*d ln*k-d rrator and Telephone lor M July, roc further information dial *•*•> r~ SBTB. | | si % %  TWAGl SPACE .u.labl. lor mok.Tg |*.>d* and WinHauip Afflt K H nut* Hi CO Lid Dul Mil 1 J l— gn TMNITY COTTAGE—Si Jam** CM* PXillf fumiahad containing S %  —lr—>— At.-liable lor montha o( Fcbr<.*< io Ma* •Hd Aug-i" to Der*fr.h*r |UI. Phone % %  .'I I 51 Jn. MO\Kt1 II till PUBLIC \ri(i:s CAB -Humbw Snip* ISM Mileage ftjM*) -1 ni-NTUNA.lt COUMHS %  0*0 bv cinarnmv.il with Mi. M Qm Phort* MM. i Ml IN Ml Onr % %  Ian* twnilb overhauled ai v or king order prie* Saoa UgMhou**. St. Lucy. cl Ii Pffjfl *. flu. •) -4. :-• 1 '1 -7:. ELKCT1UCAL ELECTfllC MOTOf and Pump |- h.p. .Iigle Phaoo BMcolumt ..edition. •uitable fir wui*. wall No reaaoraabir ortcr rofuapd Dial SBl* SI I Si--*' ONE TUB l-ius-. %  '• Apply L Mr. ftedde* Cit .ii WAI.KFR I lof*. Coleridge Street I'!-.., BUY IGLUDINE EMBROCATION (oi Rhoumallim. Backache, Lumbago am Sprain* Wc per t>. H I CUtmin to-day. THE STANDAHf AOE\<*V -H-DUSCO. Agent. I 7 SI—Jn OATHS In Porcelain Knamol. In White. Oreen. Prlmroo* tilth matching %  inlta lo complete colour null**. Top %  trade A. BARMEB A Co., Ini Bl IJa—ti.l iNrANTB PORTABIf TKIASIMF COT wilh fibre mattrcoa— pra.ltcall* now. Bine 4T I tJI-n. 'CHOOI. BOOK^ri!l..h. PNhCl i...i.lh. Maihomaiict. Hutoi eic. Phono 1S*3. I.a*l-3i Wi:iTr. SHEET*-Stock up now bort Qiiallt/ white aheeta a*x too*. .| |SM e-rh. cannnt bo repealed. Broadway Ilte-a Shop. 31.1.H -art. YAMS—Bottle neck Uaboii deli. im.. I^r tattlnf. delivered In clt* and ibnrb> .• 00 per 100 lbDi.il Jal. Uptot! 1IIV1 A FOI'ttll LOST WAI l-RT-Will the f.ndor Of a walk lxtw.cn Swan and Jamoo Street ple- loop wallet aivd money but relur |..pcilo I-.,omce lJ.il—In FOUND PURSE On Union • fourtter. U lliBh Street, or. valuable contema Owner I %  I Identity f eopeiiae 1.1.51-In WANTED HKLT "fOK -d. ooolly eamod by obUlnln* *****' oroee (or prlvaU ChHitmoi Card, from your friend*. No provwut eaperloneo nocoooary. Write today fo' beautiful fro* aampl* Book to Brttaur. U'ie-1 and foremoal Publlihers; hia^voM •ontr-ilaHon; manriloua money making •pporlunlly. Jonot. WiUiama At Co. r*pt • Victoria Work', Preaton. tt.|land." B. ATKINSON LIMiTTn Cnmpany l uc ttp wm undo* the r.-g liari Componloa Act. M. whooo trad* or buatnex addr*.. i. u Old Bond Slreel. Indon. liaa apolled r,>. ihr .l-ir.,iion ot %  rod* n^ark tn rrt -A"I Bofirie | roopect of perfumea. toilet preparation i*l in hair lolkani ... ., ill be • ino aft' tonth from th* SOtli day of Janur>IW unloaa acme person ihall i* moanUin* give iratK* In duplirau gurtralion Th* Irade mark can n on appllraUon a I mv officr Dated thla BMn day of January II II wn.llA\1 Hogutrar ol Trade Mai NOTICE THE I i II OP T. ANIIRRW Tender, are Invited lor a loon 0* BTI.ODD al %  ral* of Intereet not lo n'-.i p.r Annum under th.. St Anof • % %  ..chert al oth Av. New Orlaait.. st ichael. Dated Urn siat oav ot Jniuan IBtl To.-b A Mr 1J.1I>. Police Magilrnlr IW-t "A" Bad. C. DANin.. Appluant m P Thi. application will be ronaiCc-od at a Uronairul Courl to be held Police Court Dli HAUATtl.LE HOUSE. SI. Thmaa Upalr* Clnacd Oallary, Drawing and Dmi| room. Breakfaal room and KitchenIt* 3 bedroom* running water in each. Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Cioord Oaller.. I.lvlng-mom. Brtaktaat room and Kilchenelt*. 3 Bedroom. Toilet and Bath, Electric Ught and T.l.i.im, ,Apply Ma-tager of BagaUlle Plantation. St. Thomaa Dial 2SSI. 11.It).—on. CAVE KOAt'BEH PIANTATION" W* will : Otnc. by : Compoiitu on Prtdav Jnd F*hi CAVE Jr ROACHES PLANTATIONS UlualO In Si. Lucy and con'-ilnitg by oaiimatlon B3 acre. 3 rood* El perchea of which about 41 acroa are atabi*. The acreage l ir.ade up aa follow* Site cr*i lit crop canoa rtady for reaping 14 acrei young canca. 14 ocroo aour graaa. B acre* 33 parchoa In preparatlni., road*, yard* ate, Inapeeuon on application to Mr. Ormond Knight on the prcmlw. YF.ARWJOD ai BOYCE. flollcHor. IB. LH B tl will offer for aale b' •t llieli ofne*. No II with the Nation i ii.VlOd Horn individual! between Ih* age* ol It and n. who poaaa-aa Ihe following ,,",ii. %  . r-iui-. m. %  WaMl OBBAM rate Standard; mechanical a--Utude; IMRMIvo peraonalily Tt.e aucceaaful • uplk-ani will be required to undergo a three to alx month a probationary period %  < Bgrhodjoa, lot lowed by a %  Imllar ported of training in Trinidad Salary (lu run the pa-rtoda ol probation and li.iniT.c .ll b* between MB 00 and fN.OO per month depending on Ihe ag* • ..perlonco of Ihe Individual AB*Ur tani. Apply be of .•in j only giving full paraubtnlttlng a patauort Irfhotogiaph t.. Th* Naiional Caah Rogutot CcVTAgeW.. C T. Good*. Grant Ltd Ilollon Lfcne %  > •—** MISCELLANEOUS HANTgD io rigiMAM: ONF. l_M'*iE TRAVEtJ-INC. TRUNK Si i"'' n -STIII m.tMi HOSPITAI. BXD—TO font, buy tuVrowT on* Hoapltal B*rt Phone Bl*a hen th Taytor 31 !- %  apply Oeoflre meae II. atanrarv I TilIfsr "' v inst t-n rick-. *'f h and micl bnkoa In ""t 'i"'?,". Wrll* call or dial 44JB.OOBBIN0IS Af> t.aua ahop, Upper Bay "^ ( ft ^ Thundoraii pub Ik* compel High Street. Bridgetown, lal Pebt-uary al 1 p.m. Iho iwehoW dwelllnghoute called i:l HI I HI in eii'cllent order and reemtly renovated. In llth AvoniMr. Belleville, wllh 1JM rquarc feet ol land Drawing, dining and breakfaal room*. 4 bediooi and tollot and kitcben. Doubl. Inipecllon by appolnlment only. DUl COTTLX. CATFOBD ft COILLSI bath AT TOP ROCK-Dellghtful tr*ldi>rhaving 3 "Sedroom.. large ia>unga._ar rate D.nlng Boom. 3 fullTiled To ,nd Bath, modem Klichen, built I >r Oari-ar I Borwanla ((uattora >Uiiding in noorlv half an BSM Price *40 laareat off**. For vl*wlng apply Ralph a. Board, Hardwood Ahy or Phnn* MB *S.lilTAKE NOTICE TAKE NOTICE QUIX Thai JOSEPH WATSON I IMITED. .. Cmpanv incoiporaloi under the Eiigliah Co.np.uii— A-l A'aii-ifeetur-rn-, whoa* trad* or bi.Uno addr-raa la WIHUball Soap Work.. While hall Road, leedEngland ha* appll-for th* rtfMraitort of a irad* mart if Pjil A'' of Regiator ,-v poliihlng. icmiilng aid atk pa-mtiona | *U klnda, and will be amM tied lo iwglaUr Ihe aooie -Rrr on* month from Ihe JOth day of January 1BB1. unlaaa aorn* p T BBr t aha 11 in th* m*antime give nolle* In duplicate to rnal my errii-* ol oppoaalkHi of auch rrgaatralion The trade mark can be aeon on application at my office Dated th.. Srlh day of January, Ifol H. WaTI In MB Regiitrar .'I Tr %  30 1 Sl-3n. Psychology -Anti Petei The Chimp I Mi —And Peter SHIPPING NOTICES TAKE NOTICE Thai THE IMPERIAL VAR.NIJJI & COIOR COMPANY LIMITED, a Com• regntered under Ih* am of On|, a Province of ih* Dominion cl Canoda. whoa* trad* or buainea. addio-3- Morae Street. Toronto 8. Onla. Canada, ha* appUrd lor th* regi*thou of a trad* mark In Part A' tl Reglatri in i*.|>act of enamel, poml*. unlmra and lacqurr* and will I rntilied la legl.lrr th* aame aflei 1* month from th* 10th da. ol ii.uary IB5I unleaa aem* pataon aha'.l Ihe meantime give nolle* In dupn Ito lo m* at my office of apportion of i.li i.gi.traiio.i Th* Irad* mark ran r a*en on appllcotlon al my ofrlc*. Dat*d Uilg BHh day of January, ItBI H WBJJAMS. KcgUtrar of Trade Maik<. N 1 51--Ja TAKE NOTICE PIN-UP Th-I PIN-UP COIJJ PHIM-WA-.'F. LIMITED a Canipmv Incorporated undri Ih* Engllah Companlea Art. Manulaeturrra. who** trade or buainea a addrea* la 5P-SI. Park Roval Road. London. N.W 10. England, ha. apphvd lor in* regla|ratlo.i of a Irade mark In Tart "A" of Regiaier tn r**p*ct of prrparauoni for oavi'g th* hair. aach*l* for uaa in waving Ihr hair, toilet preparation., hair lotlona. kair BBo Hm ra and hair oupporla. aim will be entitled to rrglaler Ih* nina after one month from Ih* 30th das Of Januarv 1961 unleaa .conp in Ihe mvanllm* give nolle* In dup'icat* to me ai n. offlr* ol oppoattlon of auch fcgiairalion. The Had* mark con b* aeon on applanttaon at my offic*. Dated thi* Wth day ol January. 1051 H. A .1 I I ...MV Reglitrar of Trade Mark* 3D 1 il-Jn. TAKE NOTICE j.ca-Nao*! ; t4r towns l Ml Dk v Ol ill.NI A NICE PIECE of slcifht of ha*, d with s nappy. Mm Cnl-haw oho h>a alwiyt boon intercxted In •lie devr*lopiii--nt of babies to adult 111*; he ha* ntndiod the ovoltitlon of apoa and tnonkOYn—rnak** PgUi much tnoic comfottiible. thank y< %  Harbour In Carlisle Bay Seh Mars M 1*WU Kh C Gordon Sen Dim held. Srh Enterprla* S. Brtl U.ilK Jon**. Svh Lucille M Smith. Yachv Ih mrt Pilg-im S AMUVALS Uekiueen. 44 ton* rial lap! King Log Be.1.. 4 f... i.i-purrt i'.,l-imba. lor Dominica MAIL NOTICES MAII.v (. si Vmc*nt by Ih* Sch B*lqiie*n will L* rknard at Ih* G*n*ral i-.. | i %  Parcel mail al 13 noon. Segiftered mail at IW pm Ordinary mall al 3 30 pin and Februar IBil In Touch With Barbadot Coastal Station CABIal -1 Wlreleaa iW.I i I tn aaJTIgg I ..n now cumiinii.icaU with i %  thlpa ihinugh their BarItMtl — -a-Tlad H.T Hkanrtmavia. la Canadian Challenger. .. H..,nhrii l i.l Defend*! %  Bllvoi Walnut. *V Um-iii" Ol ill.Sea %  • :; %  !( lama ii Hill*, aa. NHPUW Am.tardam D( Scot Harden*, a., ...Prgaau. %  II.I >*r.rfc *s Kapo. „.J. ... .!., %  „ RATES OF EXCHANGE I 31. CANADA Choauea on Bukava l B'lO'. pi Diana M Bi'i pr Sight Diali. BIS Ii)'pi Cable 00 3 It)'. pi Coupon* Ml JO", pi MRS. I I I S|| VW . IXI'IKI Mr.NT IN MOTIIFR IOVI i:K;nr-vioNTii-oi.p fjt8( mto a blutr-pklnt•"* Pinypen .. and crswltd tot tlur first lime. Up wgs proud of hi* achieve tn*m Peter sat in the middle or th* p#n and irlnnrxlfar widi than mosi babies of his ag*?. RanRrd uiih tlrli.Ju T'IPI: lie NBJBKI iwo rattlM and ^'ipin on ihe rtoor wiUi ihtHild have been iKilhinu remarkable in ilu< | U turc of a proud mother with heant Except (hat prter a an African chlmpaiuee. Apart from a hort while Bflei hi-t lurth he is now enjoying llri full delights of msternal affec* IlattsM experiment In UVtaUle piychologv bv State Rej. i-leied Nurse nn.l Midwife M [jocli Culshaw PatBi lives in a cumforUibir ell-lurni an ho in a high-clos' residential didtriet in Southptu i, Lanes HII.IVIM.. hiihtMrs I've had him for five wee In! iWw I tMiugflt in-iiple in Nigeria, I briiu] bun up aaactij lik*' .i b.ibs imv Dattl] lit* '.-hanged PeteiM nappies ("He cries like a hum-m ii I 'Urn i'i Ttwn she dressed him lor bed He clapped lm hiinds when hiv milk fftl lnotn*r In. For a miniiie he drank i lagdtrl buby Then he blew bubble-, in Ihe OUD, Daily routine is kepi strictly t a time-table. Petei never wakct at night. Just now he is culling hig wisdom teeth. It makes lnr.i freliul So he hltei n bone rl'i it* rail*! "It's astonishing how he re aponds lo human afTections," JHU Mrs. Culshaw. He it not tteuta-n au (i-eak. \\v we:u petticoat. lumper. ami In"' rompers, and has a bath .-\ day. I'lay-paU II. mture depend*, on nienl.it oin-lopmenl, but 1 do not think he will ever talk. Ills own mother was shot by natives, and 1 am really the flr*l moiliei let has ever had." Modern-a^e-minded Ml ' % %  ahaw believes In play-pals to peter. He pcnd. play time with three French itoodle* All fou tnjoy it. GOVERNMENT NOTICE TOKEN IMPORT SC'IUME ON CANADA AND ISA. Importers of approved commodities under Ihe Token Import Scheme from Canada and the USA. arc hereby notified that vouchers Issued to Canadian Exporter, ami importera' quotas established on LtM ISA under Ihe scheme may be iransferred from the cnmni.iitfor which they a id to some other commodity within the same group, provided Ihe amount allocated is not increased. Vouchers or quotas cannot be transferred from one exporter or importer to anothet Controller of Supplies. 1 2 51— 2n mi-" al Paaa*i-g<> Antigua Moutaei rot. Ne.ia a. Bw. KltU. S-illug Ifiih it ilepiiilure lo be nullfiad .WJ. 1CBOONE* OWNERS ASSOCIATION, Inr Telephone: 4041 Round The Town The Sunshin: Parlour Srd Floor A I*. Boy I* y a Building STEAM PIPE AND FITTINGS MONTREAL. AI'STRALlA. NEW /I tl \Mi L1M. LIMITED MAN 7 I pa %  oil Aoelald* J.....I i Jflir, rVt-ruarr tth. Sj^-v ****, %  ..i. nth, iratOa-t* Pebiiui-, t*J. A arttado* Sand March. IHl Thi. veaaei haa ample ague* lor Hard loaei and U**ial ear** Cargo accepted en tl.i.^gh Bill, ol lading with tranahiptnarii at T.i.iu...| tiah Guia-aa. Uatoadu.. Wu.da.ni -ad Leeward Itl.nd. For fur*or particuiai* Bn BT'RNSM. WITMV to LTD. TBCtlDAD. Ew.i DA COSTA at CO LTD BAriBADOS BWI ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. • ,. raoctiary. '.Ml US Bon>.ra SU> tl March ISBI Sollaraj fi.im Ar.liaeip and Ar>>•****•— Illta. litii F*l.t,a. laSI. ma WII1*,.-*1.. %  SBp, mi. Fcoruor* WgouaaagdT Bin llth Marrk Mt Balling I. Trinidad. Paromanbo and f^ao.ga-low. i;ih JaoS*aiv i-a.1. „, Jgu, noiuaiv otn ."-'.I.I.H m Tbaga T at ear hat. Ilgallad >t'H*ir> aria*ia>agaUaQ. aOBERT TIIOM LTD.—Now York and Ooif Sorvica. Apply; DAOOBTA a CO.. LTD. -CatuvdlaB Borrtot. NOTICE 8. S. ISIWIISIIM Sailinit (or London ilm.i on or about lSili February 1951—acceptinc passengers—Fare K"n und < M ..<• KOBFRT TIIOM IJMITFO. I (Ageals) Telephone 422R. V,*--.*,-.'-','.'. -.*,---,-,'.-,'.'.-,•-*.','.,-.-.-.'.-,•,•,',-.•,*,',•,-,',-,'. •. %  ss.' PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Products. Limited. Hoseaii. Dominlftj. for sailuig to Europe. The usual porls of call are Dublin, London, or Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SIPPLY CORPORATION LIMITED. NOTICE Due Io Ihe Inrgp increase in the price of Fuel Oil the Company ara now iorced to advance the present Surcharge from 20', to 27';. n mv i OR CASH' Old Gold Hd 'SB. StTb^SgbgZ Antique ihOP, adlolfilng Royal J" !" Club. as.l.M-n. GOBBINGCS undellake ekperl %  aatcn in d dork repair.. Bll BBll j g and tMlor..tlon of oil painting*, valuation, fnr in"irspc* -nd probate. QOBBlM.-r* i pper Bay Bl. SS.IJI-TH. That HBNRV HEIDB WCOIU *P"* T ; CD, Corporalloii otaaniicd under inSw. ol IMS.W of New York m th. United Statea of America *no*o ******* BSliilnfr-Hldre•• •• %  31S ,( City and But* of IJ*. Votk. Lil St-.tef Am*rtra. ha* gppltod f"f ih. ragt-tr-t-on ol a trad* mark m Part *A „f Begitur m reapect of .a.idic. o( Bl kind* candled nul pfodurU. nam*lv %  hocolale covorod nula. eligkr^ itwat rd almond*, chocolate •"*> B-ing. ant will be entiUod lo regiator in* aaj !" gjtar on* month from Iho lh da' cf Jan-vat-, ir-l unleaa -am* peno* rf-all in th* meantlmi' gl* " %  '• •' Br can bo aoen on appbcallon at ITV vs MRS. STUART beg* to remind the pupils of her Dancing School that the school will be re-opened on I5th February. For further information Dial Mia* Evelyn—S108. 1 2.51—Sli. *****>! bUMIII IU %  %  • %  "•• That I A F ATKlN-i-; LIMITED. %  i ,,.i-rporald undor ih* Eng* Uak Componloa Act. Manulaetuiri.. Whoa* ln.de SB biialneoa addreaa i M Old Bond Street. Lnndon. Wl. SBBJ land, ha. applied for Ihe regi.tralk.n I a trade mark in Part A" ol negi", wllh r**pecl of pilvui*>. lollal prepoi. Uona. oaarnllal oil*, roamatlc*. hair loHire* and aoap*. and will be entitled to r*gi*t*T the aam* aflcr BBM month from Ih* BHh dav of January. ISal unleaa aom* p-rwm ahall In Uaa moanllmr give notice in duplicate to m a l m-' oeBee of opposition of auch rrg. ti.a trad* mark ran b* aeen on applicallon at mv offtc*. Dat'd Utfei BHh day of January. IM1 II WIIJ JAMS. BMlatrar of Trad* Mark*. JO 1 Jl—In. PILES rO-DAYS NEWS FLASH a for Ii oo %  re H re*, led BthKt your B," We hafo ]uat oponod SHEET rLA-CrfIn rllffa-rrnl coloura fOT Lamp Shade*. AT JOHNSON'S STATIONERY and HARDWARE _JSM an? longer. Fut qukfc relict—treat palalul p.le* with mcinalcu Dr. Cluor'a Umimrnt Soothe. oa it boaU*A fcla ban., timt IUPHI lor oeei* SO ystri. II DR. CHASE'S Antiseptic OINTMENT KALPH BEARD'S FLRNISHINO SHOW ROOMS In Hardwood Alley Ii Tub Chan n %  PBS i" i ason Chair. I till lahlea S|l Spmn-i ruahiun %  In all tnahoganv 1 It %  b*dei*d ISSOn per W VOtiO Spring. (It < %  > %  .irl Complet* Simmon* type b*d%  u.d* a ft e amao *ah. J ft 1.B each UnpaHited ruah bnttu.n rhanra SS M -*rh. -aith arm' M M each, rocken WOO roch A.to a nuinaraiii \arletv of good floaa %  MM hand fumturr Opfii %  rand Powdircd Milk, Users have marvalled at th* corisistdol creamy flavour of "Oak" brand powdered milk. "How is it" they ask, "that throughout the year "Oak" milk powder can bt distinguished by the same delightful flavour ?" The secret is almplr. The cows producing the milk from which "Oak" brand milk is prepared are led all the year round on the rich sunr, graislands of Hunter Vallcv, Australia. This ensures healthy cows yielding rich milk and of a c-oruustenl flavour Ihrouglioul the year. Tin rich, wholesome milk is packed under the moat hygienic condition* so Ojal all the natural vitamins and ctesniy flavour are retained. "Oak" dissolves readily in water and ia Ideal for drlnkfasg. Coffee. Cocoa, Etc. Don't worry i.ver mountir.it milk bills. "Oak" brand milk powder with ilt excellent price value allows jou and your family lo drink milk Irtely 12-oz. Tin 71c. 3-lb Tin $2.50 You can always depend on the iiatviral creamy flavour of OAK DRIED FULL CREAM iWILK Full Cftam Milk Powdr I NOW OBTAINABLE AT W A Medr.Ml Allevne Arthwi iflrD %  PfOV MUIM A Iternpwon Lid Jaa A J O Tudor John 1> Taylor Aahby a Uedford Lid S t r,' r . Co Ltd %  Knight* Ltd A A Hn.."f Marald Ira^eBwl U. M Ford RaMsri DttaJ gsatei I I %  jranac* %  BohSSa-aSrf %  % % %  Bfail '„f 1'-... %  Not I Hooch a Co As from 1st February our oj pOAOUiai sq RLM sseutsnq No. 12 HIGH STREET To mark the event we will open attractive new stocks and will be delighted to welcome our old friends in the new premises. I



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TIUKSDAY, FKMtl-ARY I. IMI BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE Count Those 3 Bills With "Electric Eye" B ROBERT ( I.AltK WASHINGTON An economy-minded Tttuuiv ha* come up with %  new i labour-savin*, devices—a machine io count old dollar'bills. Secretary Snyder has announced The development of ;in Electric Eye" counter to thumb Uiroueti the five million torn and tattered paper dollars that hare to bo retired daily. The Treasury will install 25 cr *ne machines to replace.,annual savins of (230.000—80 amployres who now do the lob by hand. The machines each count moro '.nan 500 dollars a minute, eight nines as (M as the average employee. And they don't mind the smc'l. either. The Electric Eyes will take over inc job of checking the silver *T(iimit,. s that come into the Treasury for redemption alter banks decide they've outlived their usefulness. Federal Reserve Bonks hind KM old bills in bundles of 100 and cut them in hair, but the Treasury rechecks the count lust to make sure. The new machines, developed by the Buremi of Standards, reject packages that don't contain exactly 100 bills after count inn them by means of a light beam that actuates ;i photo-electric system. New money has been machinecounted for years, but until now no mechanical device had been able to keep an accurate count of bills that were wrinkled and doa fired The ..veraae life of %  dollar Is about nine months—and with more than a billion in circulation just replacing the old ones Is a big Job. Lost year alone. 1.138.588,540 dollar bills were sent in for redemption — nearly 25 million pounds ID nil Coins, formiiutt.lv. have a much . g~% — . > longer life span. The average life tlOW IjOVemillCnl \1 fil |1 [ • I' -II III of the nearly one and a half biUlon !" „._,.. a WVU ** %  J III dnllnrq worth ,\1 enin of all rvne*. THE HAGUE. Jan 29. ofwmW S bv tte iuW c te Dr D s,lt,ker foreign MinisA mobile exhibit is showing the tn SO vJiiS ler I* ,he Dutch Coalition Cabinet latest developments In faun and which resigned last week, v.a home research to farmers of a Total currency and coins in cirto-day sounding party leaders large agricultural area in the l'mculalion. in case you would like to seeking to form a new Governted States. The -Family Fanning* know whether you've got your nient. ... exhibit, as it is called, is being share, is about 27 billion dollars— Wusen Juliana asked nun displayed in 3B counties (districts) $180 for every man, woman and horUy ?f or ? m dn '* h V. ,aB t night U i the State of South Dakota, child in the country ,0 "ivestieate the possibilities o, —I.N.8. on "'n* n w Cabinet" though The display shows 1) important this was not a mandate to form phases of farm and farm-home %  <-n Admistration. Observers expecactivity The Daily Argun-Leader ., rt ,,^i.-, fin tcd st,kkor wouW be able to of Sioux Falls, in the State of U.S. IINGOME UP .r^^lTTo !" =-^ 8 ^ "".^ repor,s !" * Stikker May Form Farmers g co MOTHPROOF dav iwo lhat he could form a worksc i ud ~;. ,„,, imp,^ !" ,,,, propcl WASHINGTON. ""Li""Sif„ , ,, ,. feeding of chicken., produrlmi. The sovcrnnunt has reported !" "'IST? !" £" f < ""'" m,lk n '"""S'ap.n, lhal U.S. national Income hit on !" il! iffi r>TaK and lmP">lnS Ihe larm home. alMlmc quarterly hih In the Ural P f, M '„' n "£ 22£l2S^S2 Mod "'. craula, bulletin,, and d, s thr. monthaf.er th. Hart of the '"£'- i %JtZ~ r ' m > 0V plv help ,liu,„.,e ,l, u l !" Korean Income for the period was reckoned by the Commerce Department at the rate of 244 billion dollars a year. The old quarterly high mark came In the last three months of 1948 and was at the rate of 231 billion dollars a year. WajBM and salaries made up Ihe biggest pan of the increase, which was seven per cent higher than tho previous 1930 quarter. —Reuler that are led by expert local agriculture Grenade Thrown Among Dancers The exhibit was constructed bv farm, civic, and commercial groups interested in promoting more stable and prosperous farming; in their corrununities. No admission is charged, and in some communities (ret coffee and doughnuts are served by local SINGAPORE. Jan. 29. A hand grenade thrown into i The redance hall wounded British solrmm muneration for work alone hit the diers. the dance hoMess and civile rou P" A similar display in 194M annual rate or 155 billion dollars, inns. was se n bv 18,000 persons in 20 Corporation profits also oriThere were 25 casualties communities. ranged sharply amounting to 11 The incident occurred last nigh!. and one-half billion dollars beTne gn^ae wa s lobbed Into We fore taxes for the quarter— a 25 „. lrt f h iU EnTmAKr - Ver,hC rCV m,S Semiiic.£^fiJTwX ihree months. 0np BrMlltl Mldi r and nn Ernu 1'roiits after tnxes were 6,4 nil*>an woman were reported to o: Uon dollars, a 1.2 billion dollar *n a serious condition. 1IH reiisc over the previous nuar^_^__^_^__ t i fli.-piT,. the new excess profits tax which was made retroactive !> %  ,1 !" 1?:1.a 'PI.* to July i. Kusia rights rlu The government pointed out that prollts Krtw faster than „ LONDON. Jan. 29. sales during the period, with nn Soviet Health organisations increase in the profits-sale In All Forms The increasing use of various forms of fertilizers on United States farms has caused NrttUsw i quipmci.i to become the most diversified of any type of farm machinery. This is reported by the United States Department of Agriculture. Fertilizer equipment ranges auto taking special measures to fight the f rom arna ||. hand-operated d-from nine to 9.8 per cent. mftuensa epidemic in Russia. Mosvices to tractor units, sclfPront* increased most sharply— cow rad 0 **' d today. unloading trucks, and aircraft m-arh 40 per cent—on non-durable ,,J"„f J* !" ," l ap ^! 1 1 .;,'!,'.!"""' <" %  preadlnu atUchmenU. The equipment npplies fertilisers in broadcast ,-o.Kls. where heavy demand re"*g \* iw X^ atMon suited in -relatively large" price SSSTJSES' JUS ?S increases. the form of igases, liquid %  en perimcnting with new vaccines taIg „.„„!„ an<1 intiy divide major industries" It means a!, the ability to insure "the delivery of all kinds of products when at where needed." The present record VS. pr> duction is the result of an unprecedented growth during the past live years. Petroleum companies have "worked diligently to modernize and expand, and to Increase raw material reserves in order to .nsure capacity to serve an expanding economy," the Tribune fates. "During these and previous years efforts have been unremitting to improve the quality oi products and to develop new products, uses, and processes." Domestic capacity to produce ciude petroleum has been creased by S5 per cent, while lenniiig capacity has been landed by 25 to 30 per cent. In srtdittan. large syMems of pipe lines nave been laid, tankei lloets. have been enlarged a nd Modernized, and consumer outlets expanded and improved. Despite the record U S. production of petroleum, the Nation is not yet using Its refineries to full capacity, taya the Tribune. It Is estimated that from TiO.000 10 1.000.000 additional barrels cdiild be produced, it they are reeded, without damaging the h'espan of the well* A Real Swot (By HOWARD BEftRY) LONDON KORTYFIVE-YEAR-OLI) Sidni i Rirhard Daly, chief anitar> in pec tor ol llford. Essex County, nukes a hobby of winning a aemlc distinctions. His latest and seventeenth s cess was winning a law examination which qualified him practise as an attorney if wished. Claiming Io have a photographic memory and never to forgot, Daly studies at night and weeklies. For years he has been getting through at least one pace text book weekly and ho never takes a note. Daly has become . its-, has won three Liverpool University diplomas in hygiene, a Uindon University diploma in Public Admin istrulion, and a number awards in town-planning, i estate management and meat trade technique. "Some people think I am crazy to go on collecting degrees at my age." said Daly, "but I prefer to learn rather than lumber up my mind with books that are nol really entertaining Daly studies with Bach or Beethoven playing on the radio. "I find I need good classical music,' he said. "I swot better with the radio on." Now Daly is toying with the Idea of studying tor a It A. degree In French and Norwegian. Rut there is at least two blind spots In Daly's remarkable powers of memory He forgets names. "I often have to apologize to people for that." he said And his 16-year-old daughter. Olgs. said "Daddy often forgets my pocketmoney." —I,N.S. of policy that would involve assistthey therefore prove useless as fertilizers, but also places i _ %  *•_ i -* -_ % % 

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i'Al.l IU.I1I IIARBADOS ADVOCATE rHt'RSDAY, IKBRIARV 1. 1H1 CLYDE WALCOTl 4A ALL-ROUND ATHLETE By B.M. TOE KAMB -tt, now faini.i..r wherever 1 >.I cricket is played once rang to the echo within the old school, jus! ;( itom 'in the ancient ntj chunrh of Si M %  Km i\ m ai Ihis little walled 1 en Mnson Hall 9traat, with il' liny pi Mi ''hat and hall."' %  modest beginning tor one li •<• doughty deeds with the bat, and bfhind the Mumps have thrilled la, at poinu as far apai: rtown iind Calrutt.-i. London and Knit Dul Clyde is no, onjy a rrirkWhattar W o,i;sundinti ubiliiy, and hu represented the colony on moie IhM one occasion. And he Is versatile too. He is as much nt home in the full back line where hu powerful kick means so much to the defence, as he is in the front line %  ihrmu-h the jungle towards the Wearynn River in the Northern Territory. HA (looped to aquuTn through an entangling vine, and %  iid rifle went off He was badly wounded. Fosters black tracker made him comfortable -and began to run. At the river %  cock, fainting with exhaustion landing ground cut HI W urged tier two boys lo the task of battling through the jungl. prewth for ten terrible miles to where Foster lay. need .. juiwiit And at that man Oil' the story of Foster•nonsoon broke w n a r0 r Heatiicock did not h"sialone except for wo black boys and their pr %  iched dim on the sixth day after the accident. The tough hunter was still alive. With their —but with Hi vi —a hollowed tree trunk i„n itrcniith the woman and the craft she hem down the McArthur boiling and flooding under The plai two boys began to hack a clcari for the Flying Doctor's pla th<' impact ot thiIronical nun The log canoe shot bobbing and I %  U ': % %  died as promised, but heard its engirt In 1938, the Skulls said theio would be war the following year because the reindeer was shedding its coat in the wrong season. Said Crottet: Their predictions are more reliable than those of some newspapers. "Their prediction bM I of peace, lot was based on the fsct that there was a marked absence of red rata." —I.M.t, In %  deck-chair on the veranda of her home, 60 miles Sffda' !" rJv •way, nt ftfn ltuth He.-uhcock, fingering some xewiru-. Her mounteo j..,ii. IM,.II nuthand was away on patrol, and trail; Me fell at liei Met panting Hi luock contacted erUft> Around her the jungle | Flying Doctor service on her • ibla radio trni i i:asi>ini uu th. Mill-ali. in k\ stor> has become uu epic in the "oat-back." It happened nine >es.- i%a So f.arpmg up nitte. Flying Doctor replied: mouth :Bio the Mormy waters of tbe tSnlf of Carpentaria, and for the .. 1**1 three days and three night* .why tell It Wm two hliicks and the white woman, soaked and battered by Two Fridays back Mr>. Heathsea and weather, paddled and rock received a aMi ei silt medal baled Their tree trunk to the — maklni her J new M B F. for "I II Wearyan River. her gallantry.—L.E.S. Regatta On Saturday In .. camparatlvetj low scoring game the MCC held tr i throughout and the needing IBU to save defeat ol the beginning of play this morning with six wickets in hand never looked like getting them and were all out 153 ruinshort of victor) The :cores :— hCC I-'. Ii.mi.s* BsWJI M.C.C J.n1 InrU'.SS 8 Aii'tr >il,i ill p. Anal ngv— :• | Danrtr Hulton ii w, I*M Ptfeh c fl. b Writ... %  %  rlfr l> Wriglil MKrt.*! IU. 8lMh„i. t Sjrl I) Oiy.i, '-%  h Ti.oNnbHf %  Hollm Uilmi %  *i!n-i>|..ii.l i. Il.,:.i.•1 out Bolrai 11 bvr 1 left, 4 no t—LI. The thinl regatta 's el.-mentaiv school they went on to Comber!" mere, and [inullv to Harrison i^ College where both boys sbOSM m • athletics Keith nabbed the 100 ,J yds. sprint record before his 3 school days were over and gamed t a reputation as a hard hitting T batsman which has hardlv dimin|M ishedIt was Clyde's style, however, I a which attracted attention Of a pnewhal slimmer DUlld thnn Keith. Clyde adopted a more up right stance at the wicket, and this enhanced his naturally long I reach Today he stands over 6 ft., a and still there is no evidence of a i crouch in his batting style 1 At College Keith started tho century making habit, and Clyde was not slow in following his example. Scored IKS III Y>ll. Moans R ''I I .-.: %  truM 141 Y-lU.w 1 %  1 well remember the occasion B when the Garrison Sports Cluti— l Don Cockell. Iight-heavyweight; Volunteers of former days—came c :h\: and In Ear I drubbing at the'hnnds of i< Tilll W. Thompson, lightweight— the CoUega team which included f an London abpori todaj ,v Walcotl brothers, "Boogies" '" from Jthnnneshurg. They wore C B Williams, ami Bunnv ,-. aocompanied by Las Alien, mid Smith. K dleweight from Hen worth. War"PUM" Pan IS and I funned the K %  MJ BaM II Batwia %  — Reutei tandard Canasta DISCARDING TO A FA02EH PILE t r M. HMkliQN C4V %  [ %  I ion on tn .' i. that your pnrtntt u he n l;0>oll me por* ii rvtT.Miit!\ se'tlni II To? %  Iioutri thsrsfors %  By doiiui oil tn i IU i 1 II nai. en-i •HU no able to taa u > %  tlirowim •t all ot lour wi.e BSn* I tliai when roJ lie pa-.-k lie caunwi i -• >ou r. & ind If all i.uii .! PaaaUa *ul be held lurday Itth hbniMv 19*1 it I'IMII BAXNurnai atatts*. tralian, as o %  I of the finest wicket •n m the world. retiring, and there KetirhiR Shll ba is xomewhat ind WHS aoma hftIha i Irela of ilv and friends new.op.ipei it'poit fiom Indm %  bowed Clyda gdrlrnailni ,i Synod. in privata Ufa Clyde is In the Insurance business, but in | (M menthl will K up to England to play the game he lo<'es stt well, for his living. had his first call to do d.ty for the .„, ... bl island in 1942 while slill at school. I accompanied that team, H\1 by T N Peirce to Trinidad and one of the things 1 well remember about Civile wns his nervousness. as he went in lo bat. It was his birthday, and we had all wished him luck at the hotel, and before the game started. Bui it was Lance Pierre who gave him his first H P has been engaged bv one ot l P K C8 *!!!~ i, V" K V p ," bowl S d 'he Lmncaah i ubs, and the youngster before he could wilUhei.-fm.m,n a band of Barsiait. and then later, apologised In badlan and Waal Indian cricketera a way. for doing it Hut it was Ahll ,, ,„. ,„,,,. Kr ink Worrell all g.Hi lun Three years later gverton Vaakaa, Oeorga Headley. Clyde got 314 against rritUded i A kCartrndale, and nti end against the same Pierre. All Auatrallani and Ii in ii;e contaminated by witchcraft, which will cause their skill I to deteriorate. The star player of the home team makaa u valiant sally to th-? visitors' goal but misses by a bare inch. "Mtakati." the home supportem howl despondently. Ami when the game Is lost, it is not the skiM or the team thai la .<: EaulL It %  the mtakati of the) visitors' Unyanga that won the the game.—*•* FOOTBALL IN U.K. LONDON. Jan. 31. The results of the F A. C. fourth iMind replay were as follows— I .Manslield Town 2. Sheffield Cnited I. after extra time Mansfield are now away to Blackpool, and Chelsea at home to Fulham In the fifth round on Februa-y 10. The results of League ihree. Southern, were: — Bristol Rover; 1, Torquay United Southern United 1. Bristol Cilv Leagua Three Northern:— S'.Kikport County 5. Gatcshead 2 i;. m. STANDARD BRIDGE By M. Harrison-Cray Dealer : South NurlliSwulh (Lime t ie a A i, ft w. p. £ *f A K 9 ; s • Kin §11 vi.. J A II • K : QB3 l i i i %  s. II 11 ; W" % oiiscrvc a stani: '. 6n~l and Soutii Two Diamonds Nonh u'iid n.ure sensed IHC oosaib:li:> nl a RUDI and t pa.ts *ouid OP B .V vc nio'i •in.~e ro D:amnncL> loo*ed ike a :d:eraoe .ontrart But lie fs will must be r-ld and l,:v two spade* a> doubled u/ East When this came round to North hr tried to escape into TlireDiamondwhich * doubled uv wiH Re)ecting Mir leaa ol J. gj in" urunipj wars no good tor onr-ruTing purposes Wr-: ra • in order u> I three quicK rou uumps held South to *ix 'rirft* lui K guile unneccsc smrv penally of too Lap-Do Killrr DUNDEE. South Africa F Wellman told a meeting of farmers here that a Pekinese l.;i Leon known to kill a sheep The so-called lap-dog attacks !ik> u jackal, worrying and harrying a Sheep, not like a dog; which jump* and bites", he said.—C.P. The Weather TO-D4.Y Sun Rises: 6 IS a.m. Sun Srts: 6 00 p m Mi 11 n i New I February C Lighting: 6.30 p.m. High Halt.-: 1109 am 1KSTF.RDAY Rainfall (Codrington) Jl in. Trial for Month to Yesterday: 2.67 Ins. Temperature (Max.l SI | F. Temperature Mm • ISA' F. Wind Direction (9 a.m I F: .1 p.in. IM: Hind Velocity: 12 mile* Bar hour Bai'tmeler (9 a in.) 29971: (3 p.m.) 29.912. DANCE — AT — THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CU'B (taeal and w..iMem ben* only I — ON — SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 3rd. 9pm Musle by 1IAHR> BAMesfJ ter and his Orchestra \.!mi-i..n to U.i I In,mm i 1 2 SI.—3ns. r lo proiioidiiig What's on Today Fela De Kuh's Exhibition of oil paintings and pencil sketches at "The Pavilion' Hastings, to 00 am Advocate's l'hoto Exhibition at li.itti.-h-. Museum in a.m. R. J MacLeod's Exhibition of oil paintings at Barbados Museum 10 am Meetini (I SI Ml.hjel'. Vestry, Parochial Buildings 2 p.m Mobile Clnemi at Warnr.-s' Pasture. Chrht Church. B p.m "Flaminx Frontier" Globe Taaeafera •Til Gel By" Empire Theaace. "My Mild Irish Rose" Bridgetown Plasa. i. .. I7or £adies and Qents /Ml Moygashel A Sp.ci.-il Crtaso rtiiiling Linn llanl lor lighl Sports Wear Smart Suill. 28 ins. wide vd__ S3.a &J (a\c Shepherd ^L fo.. lid. 10. II, 12 & 13 Broad Si I'WC They'll Do It Every Time %  —. %  .—.. By Jimmy llatlo "£H)L, i.Doze,-ruE Noisy NBSWBOR UPSTA IRS, KNOWS WS RlSHTS-NOBOOy CM TELL HIM WHERE TO GET OPFLOOK,F34L— \-/LlSTEN,BtUENOSe-) I 0OUT WANT J \ WHE>J I WANT TO*• TO BE A dA8,\V > stow-.. BUT GIVE / LISTEN ON TVIE DAY AFTER ONE OF HIS ^LL-rMlQMT 80JTS WHEN HE WANTS SHUT-EyE • CANT A MAN SLEEP A LITTLE^ / LATE ONE MORNING WITHOUT I I XIR KIDS BANSING ON PLATES, A^'-. BOUNCING BALLS AND ?AIS'NG A RUCTION?^ I WARNING VOU I'LL CALL THE COPS!! PU BLIC NOT ICE THE PUBLIC are asked lo note thai the business formerly carried on by RADIO l)|STKIBi:T10N (BARBADOS) LTD. will from the date of this Notice be carried on by BARBADOS REDIFFUS10N SERVICE ETD. There will be no change in ihe Office ot the Company which iilso ctntinues under the same Management. SllHT llll II OFF IHil.Y WITH ENRICHED BREAD The Vitamin Loaf .1 & It CHECK YOUR FACTORY SUPPLIES and Phone early for ihe foliowina DUNLOP TRANSMISSION BELTING 3Vi" x Tly DUNLOP RUIlHEIt 1NSERTIO.V %" & I-lfl" DICKS PACKINGS all Types UE1.T FASTENERS BELT DRESSING FIJVKK GRAPHITE STENCIL INK COTTON WASTE MASS DROOMS STEEL WIRE BRUSHES EMERY & SANDPAPER FILES All Types TAPS & DIES HACKSAWS & HACKSAW BLADES ENGINEER'S HAMMERS — OPEN END & BOX SPANNERS TAPER St STRAIGHT SHANK HIGH SPEED DRILLS 1-lb., l-lb. 11-lb.. ll-lb, 214-lb, 3-lb. STILLSON TYPE WRENCHES 8", 10", 14", 18", 24" 38" CHAIN PIPE WRENCHES *i"—4" ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BA* SHEET ; %  '-'-.'•'-'.'.'-'-'.'.'.'.'.'.-.-.--'.^--^'^^w'^v,'^-,^^'^','*'*--'*-*','*-,-,'.. S We ham \ir S/or* of... j Unitex Insulating Wallboard TERMITE-PROOF. 1 Ina. thick I n. wtda by ft. f Iti 10 tl: U It. lont ^ Standard Hardboard H Ina. thick: i ft. x 8fl: S u 10 ft. :/l> ui. thick < ft. x i ft 8 I Tileboard Cmtn, \\ bur and t.i. -n J 4 ft. x fl and 4 fl. x I ft PHONE *2tl. L 1LK1NSON & HAYNES Co., Lid. | •^ %  ^^cerOoe pec ioocooo n n m ooeooeacoBooeo' \