Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Barbados



ESTABLISHED 1895



U.N. Forces 15
Miles From Seoul

TOKYO, Jan. 29. _

"THE full weight of a Chinese army 30,000 strong

now stands solidly in the way of General Mac-
Arthur’s sea, air and ground onslaught on the
Korean west coast sector, Eighth Army Headquar-
ters announced tonight.
United Nations ground battle positions tonight
were placed at 15 miles from Seoul.
Communist soldiers died in their frozen foxholes
as United Nations men threw back counter-attacks
and flushed their opponents out of the hills with

rifle fire and grenades.
- Allied warships
Inchon where MacArthur made

. “ill t his amphibious landing last sum-
ypam 1 oO mer, silenced shore artillery, bat-



standing off

bombs, rockets and napalm (jel-
Britain has not changed her view | the whole areaasea of flames.

M k l . teries and warplanes, swarmed
lied petrol).

Mustangs alone dropped 8,000

that. closer relations with Spain}Then they shot 240 rockets and

would not strengthen the collabor- | 70,000 rounds of heavy machine-

over the western sector, ham-
§ pokes of napalm near the west
ation of Atlantic Pact countries in| gun fire into more than 26 blazing

mering the Communists with
LONDON, Jan. 29. coast, northeast of Suwon leaving
defence of western Europe, Foreign | towns and villages where there

Under-Secretary Ernest Davies|were Communist concentrations.
told Parliament today. Officially it was estimated that
Peter Smithers, Conservative,|the presence of the 50th Chinese

has asked whether in view of the}Army in the west coast sector
need for active defence measures | indicated hostile forces of 30,000
it was the Secretary’s policy to|Chinese soldiers.
work for the incorporation of Spain
in the system of western European
defence, or to arrive at an agree-
ment with the Spanish Govern-
ment aimed at the strategic inter-
est of the Western powers,
‘ After Davies had qnewerse,
Smithers asked whether the reply uary 4.
meant that “no diplomatic pre- “ne Communists surrendered
parations have been made for joint|in the face of the powerful dis-
defence with Spain inthe case of | play of firepower, and 130 of
the outbreak of war? If so, was the them made “a last bid of resist-
Government not leaving thes€)anee” on the flank before they
arrangements rather late in view | were 'illed.
of the vital British interest in-
volved?” ‘ Before to-dav’s assault got un-
Davies said he was unaware of| der way, formidable Chinese night
any such arrangements being made.}counterattacks near Kumyang-
The argument that on practical;jangni, midway between Osan
grounds Spain would be useful at|and Suwon petered out after
the present time was open to| United Nations men had captured
auestion, he added, and it would|two important. hills: Artillery
be. foolish. to. -—previde..arms. for|and fighter bombers. cut Chinese
Spain before the western powers ers to pieces. But as Mac-
were themselves fully equipped. r’s troops forged their way
—Reuter. |forward to-day the Chinese threw

in more and more troops in
TWO FIRES: NOT,

MacArthur’s patrols were even
further forward than the main
body of advance but “tremendous
resistance” was reported from the
flaming Suwon area, south of
Seoul, the South Korean capital
abandoned by the United Nations






tempts to bar their way.

Firing from é pone At
1 , Inchon—port of Seoul — British
SABOTAGE and American warships for the

second day saturated the ground
BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 29. |with shells from their big guns
Police investigating fires which|and warplanes again harassed

BRITAIN CAL

TUESDAY, J





> VARY 30, 1952



RESERV

Attlee Outlines £4,700m

Truman, Pleven
Exchange Views |

WASHINGTON, Jan
President Truman and the|
French Prime Minister, Pleven,!
to. day announced a “fundamental
identity of policy” between their
government on the problems
Korea and Indo China
At the conclusion of the opening
session the two leaders authorised

29

ot



SWEDISH TRAINING SHIP “SUNBBAM” moves boautifiadly under mov® than 1,000 square ‘yards of

sail, She catches a good breeze off

Paradise Beach. Inset is a Swedish



“| Arabs Amend

Resolution

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 29.
The Arab and Asian group of 12

broke out in less than 24 hours} Communist troops using villages |naticns today amended its resolu-

in installations of the Philips as_bivouac camps.

Argentina branch of the well- eeont ine a —
known’ Dutch electrical concern, Sectors © e fron ere: a
were understood to have discount- -Central Armoured _ patrols

raed based on Wonju, went four miles
ed the possibility of sabotage, ; H song before. they
The first Are which broke out on|PEÂ¥Ond , Hoengsong | beto ;

; returned. Patrols also fanned out
Saturday morning razed

building in which Philips had its! pyongehang,
main Buenos Aires office. The! Wonju.
second fire oorunney early op
Sunday morning in Philips’. offices
in the outskirts of, Buenos Aires,
but firemen were able to confine
4s to the tin roofed shed where contact or with very little oppo-
it started. 4 sition. Sixty thousand Chinese
Several hundred demijohns of|were reported to be massed be-
nitric and suphuric acid packed in|tween the Han River and the
sawdust had been stored in. the| western front.
shed and it was believed that the} South—United Nations troops
intense heat on Saturday beating |surrounded a large force of North
down on the tin roof may have| Korean guerillas which had penc-
been responsible for this fire. trated to within 50 miles of Taegu,
One peculiarity of the con- Allied headquarters in the south-
flagration which destroyed the | east.—Reuter
concerns Buenos Aires office was
that it occurred close to the
printing plant of the Independent
newspaper La Prensa which has
been unable to come out since
‘Thursday, due to a boycott organ-
ised by Government controlled
Labour organisations. —Retter.

NO HOPE, SAYS RAU
LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 29.
Sir Benegal Rau, for India, told |

other

20 miles cast

On the eastern flank of the west
coast sector United Nations patrols
roamed at will for miles along the
upper Han River without making



Optimistic Report

WASHINGTON, Jan 29.
General Omar Bradley, Chair
man of America’s joint Chiefs of
Staff gave Congressional leaders
today what they termed ‘“optimis-
tic report’ on the Korea fighting
He reviews the situation tor
them at their weekly White House
the Political Committee that India| meeting with President Tryman
had been informed on the highest} They said Bradley saw the situa-
authority. that if the Chinese|tion as becoming “progressively
Communist Government wes con~ |favourable” “I was well pleased





demned as an aggressor in Korea,'Senate Democratic leader
“there will be no hope of a peace- | McFarland said,
ful settlement,”.—Reuter. —Reuter.



V.W.C.A.



LADY SAVAGE addressing the Y.W.C.A.’s Committee and the gathering outside the Y.W.0.A

ters yesterday evening,



the/through the mountains towards | mittee in:

|

|



|
|



FUNCTION

tion calling for a preliminary con-
ference with Communist China on
Kcerea and Far Eastern questions.

The group in answer to criticism
made about the resolution in the
General Assembly's Pclitical Com-
rted a clause to provide





of lfor a cease-fire agreement to be the

first business at the proposed con-
ference.

The amendment followed nego-
tiations during the week-end It
was circulated among other dele-

gations just before the Political
Committee resumed its debate
today.

The Arab Asian grcup hoped the
amendment would attract more
support from “middle of the road”
delegations which had generally
agreed on the advantages of hold-
ing the conference but had felt that
the 12-nation resolution was too
broad and should include a spec fi<
reference to a cease-fire.

—Reuter.

Bevin Had A
Good Night



LONDON, Jan. 29
- Foreigr Secretary Ernest Bevin
ili with pneumenia had a good

iight and his condition is sSatis-
factory his doctor .Sir

Alexander
Me Call said to-day.

A Foreign

Office spekesman said later that
normal this morning and he had
|



Bevin’s temperature was again
maintained yesterday’s improve-

ment.—Reuter.



Headquar





| Norwegian loan w

cameraman shooting films,

“Sunbeam” Leaves

After 14 Days

WITH its 1,800 square yards of sail madly flapping in
the gusty northeast wind, the Swedish Training Ship’ Sun-

beam sailed out of Carlisle
after spending 14 days here,

Bay for Martinique yesterday

In another two days the ship is expected to drop anchor at
Fort de France. It is not expected to be back in Sweden

before May 4.



HOOT IN LONDON

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan

29

Twenty four hours after his re-j

turn from Nigeria yesterday, Six
Hugh Foot, Governor-designate
of Jamaica was today conferring



with Colonial Office officials on
matters affecting West Africa. He
has a number of commissions to
dispose of from the Governor oi
Nigeria and will be engaged on
these for the next week or ter
ouys.

Before leaving for Jamaica by



the Cavina cn Marcy 23, he and
nis wife will have a week's holi-
y in Italy where their ycungest
ild Benjamin is ying with his
zyandmother. “I regret that such a
long time v have elapsed bhe-
tween the news of my appointment
ond the time I take up office”, Sir
Hugh said today ‘‘My main feeling
now is of impatience to return to
Jamaica and start work as soon
as possible”

Sir Hugh has been observing
carefully the situation in Jamaica
hy means of newspapers
has airmailed to him. am a bit
depressed by what I see’, he said

“But I am not going to attempt to
form any judgment on the con
ditions as I knew them three years
ogo, For that reason I want to ge
back @s soon as possible, meer my
old friends and then get around
to different parts of the island
and see for myself what is hap
pening”.











Before he leaves he will have
further consultations with West
Indian officials at the Colonial
Office and also with the West

Iudia Ccmmittee and the Coloniat
Development Ccrporation

£5,000,000 Loan.
For Norway



‘at Paradise

which he |

While the Sunbeam was skirt-
| ing the coast from the harbour to
Paradise Beach Club, a Swedish |
film party was weathering the |
choppyw’seas in a local launch
shooting films of the ship under|
cail and the men at work on the}

deck, The Advocate’s cameraman ;
accompanied the party in the}
launch and took an oceasional !
snap.

The launch was being tossed
from side to side by the waves

Occasionally
Paradise

on the
Club, a

way
Beach

the water; it was the flying fish.
This was a novelty for the Swedes
and they were hilarious whenever
they saw it,

In spite of the adverse weather,
they got the shots they wanted
at sea and the filming party landed
Beach. While they
were landing, the Sunbeam went
away down into the West before
turning back to take them on to
Martinique,

The filming party was composed
jof a

director, a soundman, two
|

cameramen and two actors, who
; are working for the Kinscentrahen
Filming Company of Sweden, The
films will be first shown in Scan-
dinavia mainly for educating the
natives there

The story that they were making
in Barbados was based on a young
seaman whose mind was turned
| frcm going to sea, or rather, sail-
ing any lor
cause he
stclen some
the ship,




accused of having
iluable article from

He bore punishment from his
shipfcllows until his ship—the
| Sunbeam plays this par:—

enchored in Barbados, where he
fs good bis escape,

The young scaman was left in
Barbados and his ship went on to

|'membership

All that is definitely known so
far is that the purge which started
and water broke aboard time and |jast summer has been carried out
trouble in shooting their tilms and/town and village, in all Govern-
a“ good wetting”.
er with his ship be-}

a statement by Truman’s press
secretary, Joseph Short, . which
said: “President Truman and the
French Prime Minister had a
comprehensive exchange of views
jon the situation in the Far East
with particular reference to the
Paronie in Korea and_ Indo
China,



—Reuter.



De Gasperi And
Pleven To Meet

ROME, Jan, 29
Minister Count Sforza
that the Italian Pre
Gasperi and French
Pleven would meet on
the Italian Riviera in mid Febru
ary, soon after the scheduled
Paris conference on a European
Army. The Premiers and their
Foreign Ministers will hold the
conference, it was understood,
to speed the creation of a united
Eurcpe, strengthen French Italian
military co-ordination in the
Atlantic Pact, agree on the inte-
gration of Western Germany into
the European community, and
tighten their economic co-opera-
tion ,.—Reuter.

Foreign
Baid today
mier De
Premier



Italian Communi
Deputies Resign

ROME, Jan, 29
A flood of defection among Com-
munist intellectuals was forecast
by centre and right-wing press





pened iar cereals

Defence

isTS






“e/PRICE: FEVE CENTS

e Plan

LONDON, Jan. 29.

RRITAIN is to call up 235,000 reservists for 15

days training with

the forces this summer,

Prime Minister Clement Attlee announced today.
He was giving long awaited details of the nation’s
new defensive programme to a crowded House of

Commons.

Attlee also said that Britain would

have quadrupled her output of tanks and aircraft
by 1953—54. The total strength of the Armed
forces by April 1 next would reach 800,000 men
instead of the previously estimated figure of

682,000.

The total defence budget for the
next three years covering all pre
parations except the stockpile pro-
gramme might be as much as
£4,700,000,000

This year alone expenditure over

the whole field of military and
civil defence preparations, again
excluding the stockpiling pro
gramme, would te about

£ 1,300,000,000,

The Prime Ministers announce-
ment about the 15 days mobilisa-
tion of the reservists came as a
relief to Brijain’s 4,000,000 “Z"
class men—servicemen cf the last
war—who had feared they were
about to be uprooted from their
civilian lives for a longer period

A total of 80,000 of the 235,000
will do their training in terri-
torial army units (a comb nation
of spare time volunteers and
young conscripts) and formations
with which they would actually
serve if war broke out.

Forty thousand reserves will be
similarly called up for training
in enti-aireraft command, About
115,000 ~will be called up for
training in active armed forma-
tiéns in Britain and in the vari-
ous technical administrations and
fighting units which would be re-
quired in the event of war to
support forces overs@€as and at
home

In addition ths Royal Air Force



here today as the result of the/wili recall for 15 days training
resignation from the party ofjabout 10,000 officers and men
two Communist Parliamentary! required to man and control
deputies, reporting organisations in an
Two deputies were widely re—)emergency,
ported to have revolted against} The Royal Navy will call up
the ‘Italian Communist Party’s{@bout 6,000 men and 600 officers
submission to Russian directives.}{"om the Royal Fleet reserve foi
The Italian Communist head-|18 months of the service,

quarters maintained g tight lipped
silence on the resignations, al
though it was reported that a
communique was being prepared
The deputies themselves did
not comment on the reasons which
caused them to resign.—Reuter.



Purge Ends

PRAGUE, Jan. 29.

The six-month purge of the
Czecnoslovak Communist Party
has ended and new party cards are
being issued to remaining mem-
bers. The number actually ex-
pelled, struck off, or reduced from
full membership to candidates’
grade has not been revealed

Before the purge the Czech and
Slovak parties had a combined
of 2,000,000 from a
of 12,500,000,
Membership now may have drop-
ped by an estimated 300,000 or
even more

tejal population

again giving the cameramen mucn|with great thoroughness in every

ment offices, in railways and all

to lother state enterprises, civil admin-
bright Jistration, all nationalized business
ob*ect could be seen skitting over|ecrporations, and in hundreds of

cther institutions,.—(CP)

Will Refer Question

CAIRO, Jan. 29.
The Arab League Council
decided tonight to refer to its
Political Committee the question
of the Arab attitude to the con-
flict between the and
Western powers. The Egyptian
Prime Minister Mustapha El
Nahas Pasha opening the Council
meeting had urged the league to
join in efforts to save world peace,
Referring to the “critical period
through which the world is pass-
ing,” he said it was most impor-
tant the Arab League should ex-
change views and act in concert.

. —Reuter,

Eastern



JOHN WILL PLAY
IN ST. LUCIA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST, LUCIA, Jan, 29.
A cricket team captained by
John Goddard will engage a team
captained by His Honour J. M.
Stow, Administrator, on Tuesday,
at Victoria Park
Mr. Stow is President of the St
Lucia Cricket Association and also









Martinique. The third officer of|led an island team in the 1948;
LONDON, Jan. 29 the ship had all the while taken| Windward tournament to Dom-j
Arrangements are being com-|} the part of the seaman. He did not] inica |
pleted in London for, a loan of| believe that he had stolen the re |
£ 5,000,000 te the Norwegian Gov-| valuable article, but he alone was|
ernment to build merchant ships|on the seaman’s side MANNERHEIM WILL
President of Haribaros Basle an:| iq While, the ship was on its way! GET STATE FUNERAL



nounced here
for a small |

He

said ‘that exc
to Iceland



th



loan outside the ste
War

A statement issued by
os Bank said that the |



ig area

Hambu
an would





€ comed as ‘“e

fast resumir



we Retitey

the first major!

hing the |

|to Martinique, the skipper of the









{ship found the ticle which he| HELSINKE Jan. 29 |
j had aceused the seaman of steal-| The Finnish Government to-~ |
jing Luckily for the seaman, he} da decided to give Marshal

as taken on to Martinique by a I 1erheim, former Cor ander
ishing boat. and was taken back] in- ef and Presiden a” State |
cn th lip. He felt alife was | iuneral He died in Lausar |

the best thing for him jon Saturday He will be buri¢

The tor portrayin g| ir Sand Point” Cemetery, Con

; wag ‘brine ing! esting place F

e B The cle from het

‘ty i? 939 1 143

@ On Page 3 Reuter, |

About 2,300 offcers and men of
the Royal Air Force (spare time
volunteers) would be called ur
for three months’ continuous
training.

About 1,000 air crew reserves
would, also be needed for three
menths’ refresher training

. Regular servicemen would con-
Unue to be retired after the normal

expiry of their service period,
Lut any extra time they wouk
be called on to serve would not
exceed 18 months in the Navy,

12 to 18 months in the Army and
12 months in the Air Foree

lust five years lived
their stocks

‘Tf our plan is fully achieved,
preduction for the services -in
1951-52 will be more than double
| that for the current year, and. by
11953-54 more than four times as

great,” he said

largely on

The Prime Minister said that the
Government wanted to speed up
us fast as possible, measures for

accumulating stocks of food and

[ec materials.

The limiting factor in the pro-
duction programme was not
money, but the availability ef sup-
plies, particularly raw materials.

Attlee prefaced his speech by
saying that they did not believe

war was inevitable but believed
peace could not be ensured unléss
the defences of the free world
were made strong enough to detei
aggressors

Acceleration of defence prepar-
ations would involve a cut in the
standard of living and the Prime
Minister foreshadowed “substan-
tial measures to cheek civilian de-
mands for goods,”

In addition, civilian building
would have to be reduced,

Winston Churchill said that the
Opposition would examine all
these proposals with “candeur and
goodwill",

‘We shall speak our minds upon
them with no other thought bur
what is the best method of secur-
ing the endangered safety of our

country,” —Reuter,

ELIZABETH DIVORCED



LOS ANGELES, Jan. 29.
The brief marriage of English
Elizabeth Taylor,

to-day after
that her hus~
abusive

bern. actress
ended in
told a
Dick

divorce
judge
Hilton was
neglectful She said that
on their honeymoon in Europe
he spent the evenings until 5 or 6
and
return

she
band
and

casinos
their

a.m at gambling
this continued after
to America .—Reuter.

CFFER DECLINED

PARIS, Jan, 29.
Britain has dec’ined tae ‘orfér
of French Becf on price grounds,
The French Ministry for Agricul

ture spokesman said here today.
He emphasised however that
negotiations had not been broken



Attlee said no reservists would off and were continuing.
be recalled who would be needed —Reuter. -
for industry, in the event of a
general mobilisation

The nation’s increased produc TELL THE ADVOCATE
tion effcrt would be concentrated THE News
mainly on increasing the fighting RING 3113
strength of the forces, which a | DAY OR NIGHT
regards equipment had for the

The Consummation





of Refined Dining



K.W.V.

PAARL

TAWNY

(Superior)

Bottled by

THE K.W.V.

— A very popular tawny port wine of medium strength

and sweetness (Beaume 3.0)

Port is pre-eminently

an after-dinner wine and

savoury Sweetmeats such as Walnuts, Almonds, Olives,

Unsweetened Discuits and ¢
it.
texture requires that, with ¢

It is a leisurely wine anc

theese go very happily with
| the extréme delicacy of its
in outstanding port, such as

K. W. V. PAARL TAWNY, one foregocs the dubious

luxury of’a cigarette or cigar, as smoking may dull the

sensibility of the palate an
bouquet.

It is a highly pleasurabl

| stultify the charm of the

e stimulant in cool weather,

now prevailing in Sunny Barbados and a glass of JEW. V.

Paarl ‘Tawny may be taken

or When uncommon physical

“When old and of good

“wholesome of vinous

“museular system, assist

“erates the cirenlation,
{ “sharpens the mental er
i
i)
0?
ul
ww iaciminineninars
Sa fee sok

with advantage after dinner

exertion is called for.

quality, it is one of the most

liquors, it strehgthens the
s the digestive power,. accel-
exhilarates the spirifs and
1ergies.”

Professor Brande.





PAGE TWO



Carub Calling

M: GRIMM PROVENCE,
Trade Commissioner from
the French Embassy in Caracas,
arrived by the Colombie yesterday
afternoon for about six days’
holiday. He was accompanied by
his wife and they are staying at
the Marine Hotel.
On Holiday
AR. and.MRS. FENN FRED-
RICKSON of Sweden who
were living in Venezuela for the
past two years are now in Bar-
badcs for a holiday. They arrived
yesterday by the Colombie
accompanied by their two children
‘and are staying at the Hotel Royal
“Mr. Fredrickson is employed
with Compania Riego, an irriga-
tion company. He said that that
company is also engaged in the
construction of highways. He
will be here for one week, while
his family will be remaining for
about six months.
Intransit
EV. AND MRS. DAVE
MITCHELL, Rev. James S.
ulton, Rev. Norman W. Har-
m, Rev. E. Mural, Rev. Vivian
Commissiong, Sister Marjorie
7. Mr. George Marshall
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. to join the
i y which left last night
for St. Vincent.
They have gone to attend the
Annual Methodist Synod held
this year in St. Vincent.

Short Visit

AJ. ERIC HIRST, Assistant

Operations Engineer of Shelj
Leaseholds Distributing Co., Ltd.,
wWho was in Antigua on a short
visit arrived here on Sunday
xafterncon by B.W.I.A. He is
here for about two days and is
staying at the Aquatic Club.

With Singer Sewing Co.
R. AND MRS. VICTOR
WARD, who had been holi-
sore in Barbados returned to
Trinidad on Sunday by B.W.LA.
Mr. Ward is with the Singer Sew-
ing Machine Co., in Trinidad.

to England

’ RS. EPHANIE WARD, wife

of Dr. Louis Ward, P.M.O.
Christ Church, and their younger
‘son Robert were among the
passengers leaving for England
yesterday by the Colombie She
will be spending four montns
hcliday with relatives in England.

Left for Dominican

Republic
es for Ciudad Trujillo,
Dominican Republic yes-
terday morning by B.W.1.A.
were Mr. and Mrs. Mike Foster
ahd their three children, Michael,
Kaye and Denis. Mr. Foster has
gone to join the Ozama Sugar Co.
a$ an overseer .
Mike “is well known in sporting
circles in Barbados. 2
-For Methodist Synod
E Barbados delegates who
t left last night by the Lady
Rodney for St. Vincent to attend
the ual Methodist Synod were
Rev. E. Griffin, Rev. F. Lawrence,
Rev. R. McCullough, Rev. B.
Crosby, . J. B. Broomes, Hon.
. Av Guke, M.L.C., Mr. H.
rd, Mr, D. A. Seott and Mr.
G.._ Brewster.
Mrs. Cuke, Mrs. Scott and Mrs.
Ward aecompanied their husbands.

For Nursing Course

UITE a number of relatives
and friends were at the Bag-
gage Warehouse yesterday evening
say goodbye to Miss Stella
ler a former nurse of the Bar-
bados General Hospital. She left
m the Colombie for the United
| to take a nursing course,
ss Miller is the daughter of
Mrs. A. A. Miller of Prospect, St.
James and the late Mr. Miller,

Druggist of Nelson Street.

—_—_——

E'S HEADLINE
i






On
st
just thin’

ntary

come on Bertha—the
fetter of the alpnabet
of a coming par
storm around a
allup plan’
a

From Minnesota

R. and MRS. STEPHENS
LANGE of Minnesota,
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
by B.W.I.A. Mr. Lange is with
the Owatonna Canning Co., of
Minnesota. Among the countries
they have visited since they left
home are Jamaica, Venezuela and
Trinidad. They expect to be in
Barbados for five or six days and
are staying at the Marine Hote!

Petroleum Engineer
R. and MRS. GEOFFREY
LUCIE-SMITH arrived from
Venezuela yesterday via Trinidad
by B.W.1.A. to spend a holiday
in Barbados. Mr. Lucie-Smith
is a Petroleum Engineer with the
ee Vacuum Oi} Co., in Vene-
zuela.

To Form Bolivarian Society
R. JULIO ARANGO, Consul
for Panama in Trinidad and

Mr, Albert Pierre, Secretary of

the Bolivarian Society in Trinidad

arrived yesterday by B.W.LA..
from Trinidad on a short visit.

They are guests at the Aquatic

Club,

Chief purpose of their visit is
to form a Bolivarian Society in
Barbados. This society jis an
association of goodwill embodying
the ideals of Simon Bolivar the
liberator of Venezuela. It is a non-
political non-religious organisa-
tion. .

Mr. Arango is one of the execu-
tive committee of the Bolivarian
Society in Trinidad,

On Honeymoon
Ane yesterday morning

from Trinidad by B.W.1.A.
to spend their honeymoon in. Bar-
bados were Mr. and Mrs Harold
Stauble. They are staying at
the Crane Hotel. Mr. Stauble ir
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Stauble of San Fernando, Mrs.
Stauble is the former clare Farfan
‘They were married in Trinidad
on Sunday.

Touring W.I.
R. PETER BELBIN, Educa-
tional Manager of Thomas
Nelson, of Edinburgh, Publishers
arrived here on Sunday afternoon
by B.W.LA., from Jamaica, He
is touring the West Indies. Herve
for about five days he is a guest

at the Ocean View Hotel.

For Trinidad Holiday

RS. H. A. BOVELL of “Hill

Crest”, Britton’s Hill, left
on Sunday by B.W.1.A. for Trini-
dad to spend six weeks’ holiday
with her sister-in-law,



a BY THE WAY....

"â„¢ UNDERSTAND that the case
of the old sailor who painted
“a_little ship on his dog-kennel
hout permission of the Snedley
Town Council, the Wilberwick
Civic Dormitory Planning Devel-
mie Board, the Regional
ealth Bureau, and the Local
prcogatigns Committee will short-
ly come before Mr. Justice Cock'e-
carrot in the Court of Common
Jurisdiction. '

The prosecution will seek to
piuve breach of eet disa-
ility, misfeasance, fau ty repre-
sentation, infraction, gossage,
misapplication, and malinterpre-
tation. The defence may plead
justification sui generis and coram

lo, The intervention of a
ts, Hound, who supplied the
poent through the agency of a

. Farfagut, is likely to com-
licate ee case. The accused
as so confined his remarks
to a half-dozen rautical oaths of
considerable crudity.

Who would have thought it?

Pr tale of the two elephants

who jsat down in a Birming-
ham reminded me of what
ha at Pinner recently. An
Indian udent in love with a
Pinner brought her an ele-

fae asia token of his admira-
f

in. Her father, an ironmon er,
id. Pi eent standing in enis
len. hen he questioned his
iter, she hung her head and
|The student was re-

to remove the elephant.
when he next called the girl
‘Dad refuses to let me have
elephant.” So the student

a INFANT’S
SHOES
2 by

a

a




Clark

in
@ RED, WHITE, TAN
P from

» $3°°

Mat YOUR SHOE STORE

took the girl, and left the ele-
en with a note saying, “Dear

r. Renwick, I’m sorry you
wouldn’t let Mabel have this
animal, but we can get on with-
out it. Please see to its food and
aye some kind of a shelter for

Horses by candlelight

HE holding of a bloodstock

sale by candlelight was prob-
ably an attempt to acti “glamour”
to the affair, By holding a candle
behind a horse its faulty complex-
ion would be softened. My
account says that when the can-
dies gave out, matches were
struck, There must have been a
good deal of fumbling. I hear that





ry

Rupert and the





Rosalie at length dries her eyes,
and when ihe train stops she gets
out and stands with Rupert, looking
bewildered at the crowds around
them. “I don’t know what's going
to happen to us or how we're going
to get back,’’ says. the little bear.
“Let's go and ask the ticket.
collector what we had better do.” So

oe

En Route To Nevis

RS. MILLARY MALONEY of

Nevis who was spending #
holiday with her son and daughter-
in-law, Mr, and Mrs, Roy Maioney
left for Antigua yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.LA., intransit to St.
Kitts and Nevis.

Leaves on Thursday

R. S. A. HAMMOND, Chief

Adviser, Colonial Bevelop-
ment and Welfare is expected tc
leave for Antigua on Thursday tc
investigate the organisation and
salaries of the Civil Service, both
Federal and Presidential in the
Leeward Islands. He will be
accompanied by his wife.

Roya! Banks Accountant
R. JOHN PATTERSON,
Accountant of the Royal

Bank of Canada in San Juan left
yesterday for Puerto Rico by
B.W.LA., after spending a holiday
with relatives. Mrs. Patterson ts
remaining on for a longer stay.

For Trinidad Holiday
ISS HAZEL CARRINGTON
and her sister Thora were

among the passengers leaving for
Trinidad over the week-end by
B.W.1.A,. They will be away for
about two or three weeks and will
be in Trinidad over Carnival.
They are staying with
Shepherds in Port-of-Spain,

Back from Grenada

R. AND MRS. HUGH

WALCOTT who spent a
short holiday in Grenada returned
home on Saturday by B.W.1.A.

T.C.A. Reservation Dept.

ISS DORIS TIDY who works

in T.C.A.’s Reservation De-
partment in Toronto, arrived from
Bermuda on Saturday morning by
T.C.A., to spend about five days
in Barbados. She is staying at the
Enmore Hotel.

With Royal Bank

R. AND MRS. V. MARTIN

arrived from Grenada over
the week-end to spend a couple
of weeks’ holiday with friends
here. Mr. Martin is with the Royal
Bank of Canada in British Guiana.

For Post Graduate Course
D*: HAROLD FORDE, 1935
Barbados Scholar who is now
Government Medical Officer of
Health in British Honduras, ar-
rived here yesterday on the Colom-
bie from Jamaica. He was accom-
panied by his wife and little
daughter Stella who will be re-
maining in Barbados for about
ten weeks, staying with his rela-
tives Mr. and Mrs. William Forde
a. “Myrtice Villa”, River Road.
Dr, Forde, who was intransit,
left later in the evening for the
United Kingdom where he will
take a post graduate course in
Medicine.

Here for Two Months
RS. G. SEBASTIANI, wife of
Mr. G. Sebastiani, Town
Councillor of Demerara is in Bar-
bados for two months’ hgliday.;
She is a guest at Maristow-on-Sea,
Maxwells,

Among the Debutantes
MONG debutantes in England
who will be visiting dress-
makers in the next few weeks to
choose outfits for the Bucking-
ham Palace presentation parties
to be held in March, is 17-year-
old Cherry, daughter of formes
Jamaican Governor, Sir John
Huggins and Lady H ns.
Cherry is a student at the Royal
Academy of Dramatie Art.

the

e © e e By Beachcomber

on a similar occasion two weeks
ago a buyer’s ear was singed,
and another found himself talking
volubly to a horse in a corner. A
dealer whose hat was blown off
by a hard-breathing bit of blood-
stock turned and punched a col-
league on the jaw. The hat was
retrieved in momentary darkness
and placed on the head of a
woman who had just been kicked
hy her purchase.

Nothing to do with me

DISTRIBUTION of Czech

sausages, brought in by air
from Portugal, to licewomen,
“to give them self-respect,” is a
devilish good idea. But, for the
moment, I forget why.







Sketch Book—22

I




they follow the other people, Just
as they reach the barrier Rosalie

breaks away and scuttles down the
platform. ‘‘ What can be the matter
win her?" thinks Rupert. *
‘snow what it is. The collector's
dressed in dark blue. She must
have thought that he's another
policeman !""

Children’s ‘Comfort’ Shoes m

A broad-fitting flexible, al’eather lace-up shoe

of exceptional quality for price

11’s—1’s.....5:60

i
I
|
i

Evans

————

4

“TRUFORM” Sandals 7's—2’s

and

Whitfields

(ec La re ih hn gy di it ssn ith sem nil

from 4.33

Dial 4606
Dial §4220

ON et ee NN

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Judy Garland’s Story }4(. Radio Projranne

By Judy



Garland

As Told To Michael Drury

I adored my father, and he had
a special kind of love for me. He
lived to know that I had signed a
contract with Metro - Goldwyn-
Mayer, but not long enough tg
see any of my pictures.

.

Being the daughters of show
people, Sue and Jinny were al-
ready a song — and — dance team
for all community affairs, and f
was full of infant fury at being
left out,

At Christmas, mother and dad
did some of their old numbers, so
the whole family went to the the-
atre. The first two Christmases, [f
slept in a dressing room, but when
the third one came, I was all eyes
and ears. They told me to sit qui-
etly on a box—they should have
known better.

I marched out in the middle of
my sisters’ performance and
launched into “Jingle Bells” at
the top of my voice. After that,
there were three Glum sisters jn
the act instead of two

No Music Lessons

NOBODY ever taught me what
to do on a stage. I have never
had a dancing lesson or a singing
lesson in my life, and I still can’t
read music.

In those days (her childhood),
that wasn’t so unusual; vaudeville
was full of people who taught
themselves to dance and sing,
made up their own routines, and
even sewed their own costumes.

You could either do it or you
couldn't. It was as simple as
that. But to-day it sometimes
gives me the rocky feeling that I
don't know what I’m doing. I'm
never sure how I've done till I

see the final pictures—and I do “"'

see them.

Seeing your own movies along
with an audience is the only satis-
faction you get it’s the only way
to tell whether you've “sent” just
yourself or whether you've let the
audience in on it.

In 1927, dad sold the theatre (in
Grand Rapids, Minnesota) and
bought another in Lancaster, a
little town in California, on the
edge of the Mojave Desert.

We lived there for nine years,
and I wasn't happy any of that
time. It wasn’t anybody's fault.
Life in those desert towns can be
rough; the land is barren, red-
brown and harsh, and the people
come to be a lot like it.

On Tour

We were away a lot, because by
that time we had started to tour,
and the work, as_ always,
meaning for me. Mother played
the piano and chaperoned, while
dad stayed home and ran the
theatre.

I think he and mom were as
happy as most couples, but she
was part of an era that was hard
on women.

As a family we were never
poor, but as a vaudeville act we
were frequently broke. There
was always a manager who
couldn’t pay us, or a downright
cheat who wouldn't, but mother
never wrote home to dad for
money.

Once, in Chicago, we found our-
selves working for a mob of real
gangsters, and when, after six
weeks, mother tried to collect
what was owed us, they told her
to shut up and stay healthy.

It was in Chicago, too, at ihe
Oriental Theatre, that we were
billed on the marquee as “The
Glum Sisters.” We protested to
the master of ceremonies, whose
name was George Jessel, and he
said bluntly that Gumm wasn’t
much better.

“It rhysues with crumb and
bum,” he said, “and in this busi-





HOURS :

ACT

had q

TTA DRESS SHOP

UPSTAIRS OVER NEWS:

READY MADE DRESSES of all types

WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Lo¢al Handicraft

EVENING MITTENS—in Pastel Shades and Black
READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty's of London.

Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30.
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30



ness that isn’t good. Why don’t

you change it?”
The Name

He-suggested we call ‘ourselves
Garland after a friend of his,
Robert Garland, then the drama
critie of the New York World-
Telegram and now with the
Journal-American, I doubt if we
knew What the World-Telegram
was, but drama critics were all
right when they were on your
side, and we adopted the name.

About the same time, I acquired
“Judy” from a Hoagy Carmich-
ael song. At first my family con-
tinued to call me Baby, my name
since infancy, but I

answer until they said Judy, and
in about three weeks they gave
up. 4

Inside of a year, people in

Hollywood were even addressing
my mother as Mrs. Garland.

We went home to see dad and
then got a call for a season’s work
from a man we knew, named
Bones. Revers. He ran the Cal-
Neva Lodge at Lake Tahoe. We
had been lukewarm about going.

; Tf was glad to be with dad, and

Suzy and Jinny had discovered
the opposite sex, But Bones al-
ways paid us,so we TSok the job.

It wasn’t véry eventful, and
vhen,_ fall came, we left with mom
driying the old car, which was
packed to the eaves. We had got
about, two miles down the moun-
tai When Jinny let out a yelp—
she'd forgotten a big hatbox with
all our headgear in it. We had
to go back

Sang ‘Dinah’

I ran into the dining room to
the box. Bones and some
her men were in there, sitting





table. Bones asked me

sing for

r his frierfds. I told him
rny mother was waiting with the
motor running, and anyhow, there
weren't any musicians. One of
the men stood up and said he
could play a little piano. What
would I like?

In my earnest way of trying to

tio what was requested of me, I
said, “well, I guess it’s okay. Can
you play ‘Dinah’?”
*. He grinned. “I can manage. I
vrote it.” He was Harry Akst.
1 was fiabbergasted, but I sang,
and when I got back to the car,
I caught a scolding for taking so
long to get the hatbox.

I've heard about twenty vér-
sions of what happened next,
some of them pretty wild.

One story has it that M-G-M

signed me without making a
screen or sound test. Nothing
could be farther from the truth.
We went home to a house we'd

taken in Los Angeles, and a few

ays later Lew Brown, the song
writer, who was also an Executive
at Columbia Pictures, called up
and asked my mother to bring me
to the studio. He'd been at
Bones's table with Harry Akst,



Not Impressed

~@ Of, course we went and Isang

for somé people there, but nobody
was impressed. Lew Brown told
an agent named Al Rosen about
me, and Al towed me all over
Southern California.

I think I had an audition at
every major studio, but everyone
kept saying, “She isn’t any age
She isn't a child wonder, and she
isn’t grown up.” ,

By a process of elimination we
arrived at Metro where Jack Rob-
bins agreed to hear me and got
Louis B, Mayer to come in, too.
When they told me, I asked,
“Who's Mr. Mayer?” I guess they
nearly dropped their teeth.

Nobody said a word, but he
couldn't have been mad because
three days later my mother
phoned me at school and said
Metro wanted to put me on the

pay roll.
—LN.3.

(TO-MORROW : Judy’s start

toward movie stardom).



w'S, Lower Broad St,
2684





QUICKLY !!

THEY'RE
MOVING FAST !?

A - Small Shipment of

AGRICULTURAL FORKS

ONLY $4,

40 racn



THE BARKADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Hardware and Ironmongery Department Telephone No. 2039

a

wouldn't ©







TUESDAY, Jan. 3th. 1951

6.50 am. Forces Favourites, 6,30-—-9
a.m. Frequency of 15.18 Me wave length
19.76m., 7 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials,
725 a.m, Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m.
re rsonaf Impressions of Africa, 7.45 a.m
Think on these things, 8 a.m. Souvenirs
of Music, 8.45 a.m. Letter from America,
% am, The News, 9.10 a.m. Home News
from Britain, 9.15 a.m, Close Down,
34.15 am. Programme Parade, 11.30 a.m
Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 a.m, Report from
Britain, 12 noon The News, 12.10 p.m.
News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down,
4.15 p.m. Music from Grand Hotel, 4.15
~ 6 pm. Frequency of 11.75 Mc, wave
length 25,53 m, 5 p.m. Composer of tne
week, 5.15 p.m. Welsh Magazine, 5.45
rm, Programme Parade, 6 p.m, New Re-
cords, 6 — 7.15 pm. Frequency of 9.58
Mc. Wavelength 31.32 m. 6—7.15_ p.m.
6.105 Me wavelength 49.43 m. 645 p.m.
Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The News,
7410 p.m, News Analysis, 7.15 p.m, West
Indian Guest Night, 7.45 p.m. Personai
impressions, 745 — 9 p.m. Frequency ot
°58 Mec. wavelength of 31.12 m.
745—9 p.m. 6.195 Mec, wavelength of
48.43m., 8.15

from Britain, 9. . Ray Martin and
his Orchestra, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10
p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. King
and Queen, 10.45 p.m. Getting ready
for the Festival of Britain, 11 p.m, BBC
Scottish Orchestra.

Across
Babies or market gardeners? (7)
Church music, (4
A Scandinavian
May be another . 43)
A press shows up old-fashioned

tor Casts

5)

rl
weapons. (6)

Mere habituation. (4)

He’s on your side. (4)
Something well-grounded. (5)
You're snookered if you're left
with one. (5)

Careful. it’s a trap. (3)
Originated. (4)

Big? Oh, much bigger! (6)
May be a store of good th:

PMB Kee —e
ONHKS IOee

Down
Marching in a nice way. (8)
. Gives * oorwage room for exer-
cise.
Tones at the start. (5)
Cherished possession as pictured
to David by Nathan. (3-4)
. Positively. (6)
nm this you are at nome, (9)
. It's purely fictitious, (4)
Pive different pains in one horse
disease. (5

.
To a small advertisement you’d
make it a nymph, (3)
last.
- (4)

ee

CLEA we

. Game needs nothing to the

- Rotate
I get the stalk. (4)

. It's in my eye, (4)

Solution of terday’: eae lem
Nearctic: an “Altitud A . Beiegon tt.

Vomer. 12, Bel; 15. Accent: 17, ib; 19,

‘ 20. : 21 Crunch: 22. Base:

3 Down: 1. Narrate; 2 Bevator.

Reel Be Been: adem, 6 Oeauae 8

Nut; 16. Bales; «8, Bona.” pie:

eS

Round The Town

in the heart of the City amongst
POPULAR BEAUTY AND
HAIRDRESSING PARLOURS
you will find:—

The Eleanor Hairdressing Parlour

2nd Floor, Goddard's Building.

The Marie Beauty Parlour,

2nd Floor, Alex. Bayley’s Building.

both with G.A.Service to assist in

maintaining comfort and speed.







| FLAVOUR

For Mellow Smoothness
and distinctive flavour,



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pares with . . A

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LID.

Headquarters for Best Rum.



OBSERVE

that different brands of
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go, but - - -

BORNN'S
BAY RUM

will go on forever
WHY ?
QUALITY
That’s Why











Tins GUAVAS
‘Tins SWEET CORN
it) Tins C & E MORTON’S

INCE & Co., Ltd.

&, 1, 8 & 9 Roebuck Street.















JANUARY 30,

TUESDAY, 1951

Only)



MATINEE : TODAY at 5 p.m
TONIGHT at 8.30





Paramount presents
Phgllis Calvert,

“MY OWN TRUE LOVE”

with Wanda Hendrix, Philip Friend, Binnie Barnes



Melvyn Douglas







MATINEE : WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
Ray Milland, Florence Marly
“SEALED VERDICT”
with Broderick Crawford, John Hoyt
A Paramount Picture






in















ZA

SHOWING TODAY
Warner's Technicolor Comedy Hit !

pamyKavein “The Inspector General”

Also: The Color Carton: “KIT FOR CAT”
And Latest WORLD NEWS (By WARNER-PATHE NEWS)

eatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

4.45 & 8.30 p.m.







MAT: FRIDAY 4.45 P.M. (Only)
“BELOW THE DEADLINE”
with Warren. Douglas and

“LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT

Johnny Mack Brown






“THE GUILTY" Don Castle &

“DYNAMITE CANYON”
with Tom Keene




Special Matinee Thursday 1.30 ie







PLAZA Theatre=O)STIN (DIAL 8404)

Last 2? Shows TODAY 5 & %.30 p.m. (RKO Radio)
eorge Ojrien (in both)
,

G
“BORDER G-MAN * & “PAINTED DESERT”

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. (RKO Radio)
Zane Grey's

' “WANDERER OF THE WASTELAND” &

a “BROTHERS IN THE SADDLE”
Tim Holt, Richard Martin









James Warren




IDNITE SATURDAY, FEB. 3rd (Monogram Double)
VALLEY RIDERS” & “DYNAMITE CANYON”




M
“DEATH







GAMETY—(tHe GARDEN) ST. JAMES

Last Show Tonite 8.30 (Warner’s Double)

Ed, G. Robinson & Humphrey Bogart

“AMAZING DR. CLITTERHOUSE” &

“GEO. WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE”
Jack Berry







WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 8.30 p.m, (Warner’s Double)

“LARCENY INC.” & “WINGS FOR THE EAGLE”
Ed, G. Robinson & Jane Wyman, Dennis Morgan, Ann Sheridan

SP POPOSSOOSO SPOS SIDS OOP PII PPPS 0 SPO PPPOA

GLOBE

TODAY 5 and 8.30 LAST SHOWS
ABBOTT and COSTELLO in


TOMORROW and THURSDAY 4.30 and 8.30
THE WHOLE SERIAL

FLAMING FRONTIER”































ROYAL

TO-DAY LAST TWO
SHOWS 4.30 and 8,30

M-G-M Big Double...

Nelson EDDY &
Jeannette McDONALD

EMPIRE

TO-DAY to THURSDAY
4.45 and 8.30

20th Century Fox Presents

“I'LL GET oie cakes
BY” ‘ROSE Mae

Color by Technicolor

Starring June HAVER
William LUNDIGAN
With Gloria De HAVEN
and Dennis DAY

‘‘THE KILLER
Me COY”

Starring

Mickey ROONEY &
Brian DONLVEY





ROXY

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15



FLASH!

FIRST ALL INDIAN FILM
TO BE SHOWN IN
BARBADOS

“‘ BODHAT”’

AT ROYAL THEATRE

Golumbia Double Attraction
“THE SECRET
OF
ST. IVES”

With Richard NEY,
Vanessa BROWN

Thursday Afternoon at
4.45 p.m.

Indian Actor
Dialogue and Music

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY LAST TWO
SHOWS 4.45 and 8.15

FINAL INSTALMENT
Universal Serial . . .

John Mack BROWN
and George SHELLEY in

“WILD WEST
DAYS”

with Lynn GILBERT
and Frank YAGONELLI










AND






Johnny WEISSMULLER
as Jungle Jim in. . .

“CAPTIVE
GIRL ”

with Buster CRABBE
and Anita LHOEST





























CUTLERY and
PLATED WARE



Small Canteens of 6 Knives
Forks and Spodns
Stainless Steel Carver Sets






Sets of Spoons
Cake Forks
Cake Baskets











also
LARGE THERMOS
FLASKS








TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1951

Jamaican Sculptor
Joins The “Seven
Dials ”’

(From Our Own Correspondent)

‘ LONDON.
_ Jamaigan-born Ronald Moody
is the only Colonial member of
the “Seven Dials Group”, a new-
ly-formed painters’ and sculptors
club in London.

The membership of the club is
limited to seven—five painters and
two sculptors, and the idea of it
belatae to painter Archibald Zieg-
er.

What does “Seven Dials” mean?
“It cam mean so many things,”
says Moody. The club aims to
hold two exhibitions a year in
London. The first is open from
8th—17th January at the Galerie
Apollinaire. The exhibits will in-
clude six sculptures—the work of
Moody.

Ronald Moody is a silent and
sensitive artist, who speaks with
= modesty about his work.

ndon newspapers have recently
carried favourable comment on hic
ability as a sculptor. He is now
recognised as one of the few ac-
complished coloured sculptors.

The Ministry of Works have re-
tently bought a woodcarving of!
a male figure completed by Moody
in his Paris studio just before the
German invasion. It is to be placed
in the library of the new Colonial
office when that is built—on the
site of the old Westminster Hos-
pital.

The figure is in palisander— a
darkish wood with violet, red, and
yellow lights in it.

Moody tells me he did not have
a mode! for the statue.“ “It came
entirely from my imagination: it
is symbolic of many things.”

When I called at his Knights-
bridge studio this week, he was
busy on a sculpture which he
hopes to include in a projected
one-man exhibition in 1952.

His success may be attributed
partly to his self-imposed rule:
“Whenever I feel tired I stop
woe ane. tape rest.”” That way,

e feels, he produces nothin
than his best oe



To Spend
$2,307,732 On
Development

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan 26.
The Government proposes
spending this year some $2,307,-
732 on a number of development
schemes which are already in pro-~
gress. Largest allocation — is
$1,508,340 which is required to
be spent on the San Fernando
Hospital while $140,663 will be
spent on the Tuberculosis Sana-
torium and $75,875 on hospital
buildings in Port*of-Spain. On
the St. Ann’s Mental Hospital
some $6,720 will be spent.

As regards water supplies for
Tobago a sum of $280,000 is re-
quired and under the Land
Acauisition Scheme some $100,-
248 will be spent in roads while
another $195,883 will be required
for general purposes.



SAME OFFENCE

THE Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal Mr, G. L. Taylor
and Mr H. A, Vaughn yesterday
decided that Everil Greaves should
not be convicted twice for the
same offence. Everil Greaves and
Muriel Greaves had each been
fined 10/- after they had been
arrested by Sgt. Julian Henry for
making a disturbance in the court-
yard on October 23, last year.

Police Magistrate Mr, E. A.
McLeod subsequently fined both
Greaves 10/- after he found them
guilty of assaulting and beating
Olive Peterkin, The offence for
assaulting and beating was com-
mitted at the same time as the

disturbance.
Mr. Adams who defended tlie
Greaves, pointed out that they

could not be convicted twice for
the same offence, The Police had
won a case against them so
Peterkin could not then bring one
Notice of appeal had not been
given by Muriel Greaves, and Wwe
Police Magistrate’s decision
against her remained in force,

Flees To The West

BERLIN, Jan, 29

Walter Oelkers, President of the
East German Railway Administra-
tion at Halle, Saxony has fled to
West Germany, the anti-Commu-
nist Information Bureau reported
here to-day. He had been criti-
cised by East German Socialist
Unity Party of which he was a
member, the Bureau said.—Reuter.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BACK TO WORK — Moody entering his studio.



Passenger Facilities
More Important
Than Cargo

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan. 29.
Improvements in passenger
iacilities between Britain and the
West Indies is more essential at

present than additional cargo
services. These are the views of
Mr. A. E, V. Barton, Secretary

of the West India Committee and
Mr, Martin Hill, Secretary of the
Liverpool Steamship Owners’
Association and are expressed
today in correspondence to the
Manchester Guardian.

Their letters follow publication
last week of the Manchester
Guardian’s leading article in
which it was suggested. that
improvements were necessary in
freight services between the
United Kingdom and the West
Indies and -that the C.D.C.’s
assistance might be enlisted to
bring about such improvements.

Mr. Barton points out that no
failure on the part of present
shipowners is responsible for the
present complaints which have to
do exclusively with lack of pas-
senger accommodation whereby
with few exceptions British sub-
jects are unable to travel to and
from the British colonies of the
eastern Caribbean in British ships.

He adds, “the problem will re-
main until the British Govern-
ment faces the necessity of pro-
viding some form of subsidy and
reconciles itself to the possibility
that the subsidy may have to be
substantial.”

Mr, Martin Hill carries a re-
minder in his letter that the Com-
monwealth Shipping Committee
in 1947-48 found freight services
from the United Kingdom to the
British West Indies to be adequate,
but recommended government
action in regard to additional pas-
senger services. » He says : “Since
then, cargo services have not dim-
inished in relation to the volume of
traffic to be carried. On the con-
trary several cargo vessels are
dispatched every month from the
east and west coasts of the United
Kingdom to these (Trinidad, Bar-
bados, British Guiana) destina-
tions by regular services of Brit-
ish liner companies and only
a negligible quantity of this
country’s large exports to the
West Indies is routed by foreign
shipping.

In a footnote to these letters
the Editor of the Manchester
Guardian expressed agreement
with the points raised but criti-
cises the need for frequent tran-
shipment of goods.

He says : “Of course there are
cargo services but transhipment is
too frequently required at Trini-
dad, and better services—includ-
ing inter-Island services—will
certainly be needed if West In-
dian economy is to develop
healthily.”





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4 LEVER reoovcr——-

33 Religions
e "
Registered
If the number of religious de-
nominations in a country were,
when viewed in relation to the
size of the country, taken as an
index of the people’s goodness,
Barbados would have to be put
high on the scale, In this small
island there are no less than 33
denominations registered in the

Registrar’s Office, and there are
quite a few that are not registered.

Those registered are the
churches where weddings and
baptisms are performed. Some

have short and simple names and
others the contrary. Everyone
knows the Anglican Church, the
Roman Catholic, the Methodist,
the Moravian Churches and the
Salvation Army, All of the above,
with the exception of the Roman
Catholic and the Moravian, have
branches all over the island.

The Roman Catholic parish
church is in Jemmotts Lane, and
there is a chapel at the Ursuline
Convent, Collymore Rock and an-
other in St. John.

The Pilgrim. Holiness Church
has a large following and many
places of worship. There is also
jhe Church of God, the Evangeli-
eal Church of God, and the United
Pentecostal Faith of God, Then
there is the African Methodist
Episcopal Church, familiarly
known by the initials “A.M.E.”,
the Church of the New Testament,
the Free Baptist, the Baptist, the
Bethel Baptist, St. Thereza Firs
Baptist, the National Baptist an
the Northern Baptist Convention,

The Episcopal Orthodox
Church which was once _repre-
sented only by St. McGinley’s
Cathedral in Country Road now
has about two other chapels. Its
destiny is presided over by Arch-
bishop Jack.

Pentecostal

Coming back to those whose
names contain the word “Pente-
costal”, there is the United Pente-
costal Assembly of God, the Pen-
tecostal Assembly of Canada, the
Pentecostal Faith Chureh and the
Pentecostal Assembly of the
World,

The Christian Mission is an-
other religion with a large fol-
lowing. Then there is also the
Church of the Nazarene and the
Nazareth Holiness. Also scatter-
ed over the island are places of
worship of the Gospel Hall Re-
ligion and the United Christian
Brethren.

The Seventh Day Adventists are
going from strength to strength.
The Watch Tower Society which
claims not to be a religion, and
which hits out at the Roman

Catholic faith more than at any
other, has its chief place of wor-



“SUNBEAM”
LEAVES

@ From Page 1
‘was photographed, watching his
ship leaving him behind in exile.

Alex Jute, the Durector, said
that he had taken shots of the har-
bour and coast line of Barbados,
He thought yesterday a lovely day
for filming as six steamships
stretched across the harbour and
shipping activities were most in-
teresting. He also took shots of the
local steel band.

About 5.15 p.m. the filming
party were taking their last shot
in Barbados. They took a launch
to get off to the Sunbeam which
had anchored for them. The Sun-
beam soon after faded away in
the West.

While the ship glided beauti-
fully along, “Littleman”, the
Cocker Spaniel, could be spen
making his usual rounds from
cabin to cabin and making his way
from one end of the deck to the
other between the legs of his
Swede companions who were too
busy to notice him.

Frank Dalein, a Swedish Jour-
nalist, is with the crew of the
Sunbeam, Apart from _ getting
some dope for his Swedish paper,
he is making some “dough” as-
sisting the filming party.

THANKS B.W.LA.

BRITISH West Indian Airways
Ltd., have received a letter fram
the Governor of Barbados thank-
ing the Company on behalf of tne
Government of that Island for the
efficient service they maintained
during the construction of the new
runway at Seawell Airport, and
particularly when the pilots had
only 4,00C feet of runway on
which to land their aircraft,

The communication from the
Government of Barbados went oi
to say: “A special measure of
praise is due to your airmen, who
through their skill and sense of
patient duty brought their planes
to safe landings, and so upheld the
high reputation for safety whi ch
characterises your service,”

Barbados expressed the hope
that B.W.LA., would be able to
make full use in the future of the
improved facilities at Seawell,

PROMOTED
Mr. J. L. Parris, Control Officer
at Seawell, has been appointed
Assistant Manager and Control
Officer of the Airport with effect
from February 1, 1951.





ey
ship a stone’s throw from the
Roman Catholic Church,

Other churches not so well
known are St. Maria OS., the
Antioch Church, S.P. Religious
Science and Mt. Sinai Holy
Church, © ut



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A New School
Geometry With
Trigonometry

By ANDREW G. J. CAMACHO,
B.A. (Lond.)

Mr. CAMACHO has taught at
St. Stanislaus’ College, B.G. and
is now teaching as Mathematics
Master at St. Mary’s College,
Trinidad.

He is also Mathematics Tutor
to the Board of Industrial Train-
ing and the Extra—Mural Dept.
(in Trinidad) of the University
College of the West Indies.

With the publication of volume
II, it is possible to review the
book as a whoie. I have already

reviewed volume I (April 19,
1950). The book provides an
excellent Geometry course. The

ground for a_ school certificate
course or for the ordinary level
of the new general certificate
being thoroughly covered.

‘The book is neatly laid out
with essentials clearly picked out
in dark print. Plenty of space
makes it easy to read, When
formal theorems are started, each
is given a separate page, Diagrams
are bold and clearly marked.
There is a wealth of worked ex-
amples, in fact in volume II a
whole chapter is devoted to mis-
cellaneous worked examples. The
book should be particularly useful
to anyone studying on his own
and also as a revision course.

Volumn II consists of three
parts. Part 4 deals with the
circle, part 5 with ratio and pro-
portion and part 6 with trigonom-
etry. I have only one criticism
to make of the Geometry sections.
The author introduces equiangular
triangles and uses them for a
couple of chapters before calling
them similar triangles. The
author has been very thorough
and waited to introduce similar
triangles as a special case of
Similar figures. Though this is
undoubtedly a gain as far as those
Students who are going to con-
tinue the subject are concerned,
I doubt whether it justifies the
delay.

I am not quite so happy as far
as the trigonometry section is con—
cerned. I feel the subject is in-
troduced too fast. It is becoming
more necessary to teach some
trigonometry to fairly young boys,
and I should like to see the sub-—
ject introduced slowly, and the
first chapter of this section could
be improved by being broken up
into small sections.

I was particularly glad to see a
chapter on 3 dimensions, so neces—
sary and yet so often neglected
in textbooks. In this connection,
on page 255 several questions
require the distance between two
points. In fact, the distance re—
quired is along the parallel of
latitude, but there is nothing to
indicate that q great circle route
is not required and indeed it
would be an excellent exercise to
find the distance both ways.

No book can please everyone or
be entirely free of criticism, but
I do feel that Mr. Camacho has
done an excellent job and ig to be
very much congratulated.

E. C. QUEREE.



RATES OF EXCHANGE

January 29 1951.

CANADA
63,.8/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 61 8/10% pr.
bspoudesgs ‘ mand
Drafts 61.65% pr.
Yurperry! rv gignt Drafts 615/10% pr.
63.8/10%pr. Cable
623/10% pr. Currency 60 3/10% pr.
dod bseaee-ukaw é Cou ene 69 6/10% pr.
ver oe evens



FINE VARIED

A FINE of £3 in 14 days with an
alternative of two months’ im:
prisonment, which was
by City Police Magistrate
C. L. Walwyn on Daphne Jones vo!
Windsor Tenantry, St. George
was yesterday varied by The
Honours Mr. G. L, Taylor and Mr.
H. A, Vaughan, Judges of the

must pay £2 in 14 days or undergo
one month’s imprisonment,

Daphne Jones was charged with
unlawfully and maliciously
wounding her husband Ulrick
Jones of Brighton, St. George, on
his nose with a bottle on Septem-
ber 14, 1950.

The husband in his evidence
said that he was separated from
his wife on February 5, last year
On that day she went to his home
and Dderan to move her furniture
into his house, +, «ber

He removed them outside the
house and later told her that he
had no intention of going back
with her. She struck him with a
bottle on his nose and he fell
When he was getting up from the
ground she struck him with two
stones in his back and then ran
away.

He was treated by Dr. Kerr
and alterwards spent 14 days m
the General Hospital. His nose
bled for four days.

Cameron Franklyn of Welches,
St. Philip, who was in the vicinity
at the time of the incident, cor-
roborated this story. He said that
he was at Ulrick Jones’ home at
the time of the incident. Jones had
called him for some fruit,

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

Seh. Mary M. Lewis, Sch,
Cc. Gordon, Sch, Burma D,, M.V



Emmanuel
Sedge

Held, Sch. Belqueen, Sch, Enterprise 5S
Sch. Molly N. Jones, Sch, Lucille M
Smith, Yacht Juanita and Seh, United
Pilgrim 5

ARRIVALS

M.V. Daerwood, % tons net, Capt
Mulzac, from Aruba via St, Lucia

SS. Lady Rodney, 4,907 tons net
Capt. LeBlanc, from Halifax via St
Lucia

Sch. Harriet Whittaker, 50 tons net
Capt. Caesar, from Martinique

S.S. P. & T. Pathfinder, 4,671 tons net
Capt. Horen, from Vancouver via San
Juan

tons net
Capt. Gooding from Martinique
5.8. Laurentian Forest, 4,42 tons
Capt. Rodger, from London,
DEPARTURES
Swedish Training Ship “Sunbeam”
257 tons net, Capt. Baecklund, for Mar-
tinique

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

net



Cable and Wireless (W.L) Ltd advise
that they can now communicate with
the following ships through thelr Bar-
bados Coast Station:

8.8. Missionany Ridge, g.9. Elizabeth

Flanigan, s.6, Streatham Hill, 5.8. Brasil,
#6. Brazil, s.s. Gundine, Mormac-~
penn, s.s. Uruguay, ss Empress ot
Scotland, s.s. S. Brodin, s.s. Alcoa Cava-
lier, ss. Themisto, s.s. Nieuw Amster-
dam, s.s. Colombie, s,s. Atlantic Mariner
a8 so Concord, 8.8. Britannic, 5.8, Bel-
betty, ss. Pedro Il, 8.5. Cristobal, 2.6, Fort
Amherst, s,s. Gerona, 5.8, Aleo, Cointer,

aa.



«s. Imperial Toronto, s.s. Silver Wainut,
ss. Vernicos Nicolaos, 6.8, Gulfkey, 5.5.
French Creek, s.8. Kaposia, s.s, Ageroen,
ss. Southern Countries, 3.8, Dolores, 5.5,
Hyalina, s.s. Atlantic Ocean, 8.4, Helicon,



MAIL NOTICES

Mails for St, Lucia, St. Vincent, Gren-
ada and Aruba by the M.V. Daerwood
will be closed at the General Post Office
as under:—

Parcel mail at 12 noon, Registered
mail at I p.m., Ordinary mail at 2.30
p.m, on the 3ist January 1951,

Mails for British Guiana byethe Sch
Frances W. Smith will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:—

Parcel mail at 12 noon, Registeres
niail at 1 p.m., Ordinary mail at 2.30 p.m,
on the 3ist January 1951,



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PAGE FOUR

ADVOGATE



Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.

Tuesday,



MARKET GARDENS

THERE is a current saying in this island
that every available cultivable square foot
of land is under crops of one kind or anoth-
er. Close examination to-day will prove

that this is no longer true.

It may have been true that the cultiva-
tion of plantations was more intensive with

January 30,

1951

v

regard to Barbados’ size than that in other

West Indian islands because most of the

65,000 arable acres were under crops. But
during the years there has been a system of

fragmentation -and this has
lots going uncultivated.

led to small

The necessity for more intensive and ex-
tensive cultivation of the total area is
indicated by the international situation It

should be apparent to everyone that greater
effort should be made to utilise the small

plots now covered in grass or

in order to supply more vegetables.

useless plants
Care-

ful investigation will show that thousands
of dollars worth of garden vegetables are

imported from St. Lucia, Dominica,

St.

Vincent and other places. This amount

would, if produced locally,

supplement

the earnings of the small land holder and
at the same time would tend to raise the
nutritional standard, by affording a more

balanced diet.

During the last war, the planters did a
fine job in supplying home grown food to
an extent almost unbelievable. The peas-
ant holder can now fill the breach by
utilising every available stitch of land in

his possession.

In Barbados there are very few areas
where water is not available for garden

purposes by means of shallow wells.

And

there is the added advantage of getting
assistance from the Government through
the Peasants Loan Bank. Here it is possible
to get equipment for irrigating plots of land
of any size. The equipment is available at
half the price to land owners and in order

that this job might be done

properly the

Government recently appointed an irriga-
tion officer attached to the Department of

Agriculture.

‘All this information is already known
and it is for those who are in possession of
land to make use of the services offered.

It is however necessary to appeal-to those

who can to get on with market gardening.
These small plots when counted together

add up to a sizeable area.

They can be

made to produce more vegetables and
benefit the owners and the entire com-

munity at the same time.



On With The Clock

DURING the years of the last war local

clocks were put forward one

hour. After

the practice had been tried two years, ob-
jection was made and it was abandoned.
The advantage of working in the early

hours when the heat of the

sun does not

make such inroads oa one’s energy is a

real advantage and there is the increase
in the hours available for recreation.

It

does not interfere with the length of the
day’s work and keeps the worker in better
health if there is opportunity for games of

one kind or another.

In the past the objections to putting the
clock forward were mainly personal and it
would be worth while to hear what other
objections can now be registered against

what seems to be a desirable



SHEET STEEL SHORTAGE

practice.

A SHORTAGE of sheet steel poses~a
serious obstacle to Britain’s industrial re-
covery. First effects are expected to fall
on the automotive industry with plants

working shorter schedules.

| Some plants will work a four-day week
while others will work three weeks a
month. Output may be reduced by about
15 to 20 percent according to spokesmen for
the Society of Motor Manufacturers.

Although the automobile

industry will

be the first and hardest hit, other light in-

dustry, especially radio and television, are

expected to feel the pinch.

Reasons for the cut are that the British
Government has switched supplies of steel

to the rearmament programme, and the
United States is not exporting such large
quantities because of the American stock-

piling project.

Heavy demand for foreign scrap metal

hes further aggravated the raw-materials

shortage. British imports of German scrap
have been cut from 2,000,000 to 1,900,000 a

year.

Industrialists also fear that Britain’s
steel industry which faces nationalization
on February 15 will be forced to slash out-
put in the next few months because of the

present coal crisis.

, “These sources claim there are two

reasons for this:

1. A cut in iron ore imports because of a
million tons of shipping being diverted to

import coal.

2. Limited coke supplies for making pig

iron.

Britain’s steel industry has revealed its
output during 1950 totalled 16,293,000 tons

—a record.—INS,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE ~~



Russia's New Empire=I The Festival

NTIL the late 1930’s the Soviet

state could not be called an
empire. Absorbed in its internal
affairs, it showed no evidence of
a drive towards empire-building,
though its theory contained the
elements of future drives. Since
1939, however, and _ especially
since 1944, the Soviet Union has
been on the road to becoming the
new empire of the East, and its
leaders have had to develop meth-
ods for dealing with the problems,
both political and economic, which
an empire faces.

An examination of the way in
whieh it has dealt with its politi-
cal problems must begin with the
fact that the Soviet Union em-
erged as the Soviet Empire at a
time when anti-imperialist senti-
ment was the outstanding feature
of the international situation.
Other imperial structures—those
of Germany, Japan, Italy, Britain,
France, and the Netherlands—
were disintegrating; at an earlier
stage in its history the Soviet state
itself had been a powerful force
in fostering this anti-imperial
sentiment; it had been instru-
mental in destroying empires and
had conducted a drive against im-
perialism more powerful than that
of any other government. Anti-
imperialism remained a powerful
weapon in its arsenal of propa-
ganda, Now, “when events took a
new turn and imperial roads
opened up, Stalin’s regime could
not simply resume the drive inter-
rupted in 1917. It could not use
the old ways of Russian expansion.
It had to find a way to reconcile
taking advantage of its imperial
opportunities with its own anti-
imperial protestations and the
anti-imperial sen*.:ment of the rest
of the world.

The aim of traditional imperial-
ism was frank; the extension of
the realm of the state. Its ultim-
ate goal was the greatness of the
imperial structure, and its personi-
fication was the majestic figure of
the king, tsar, or emperor. That
military victory leads to the acqui-
sition of new areas was axiomatic;
annexation of foreign lands was
the obvious, undisputed right of
the victor. But nothing of this
kind was possible in a Russia that
had made a creed of anti-imperiai-
ism, that had won adherents all
over the world for its “struggle
against ‘imperialist exploitation,’ ”
that had avocated liberation of
colonies and freedom for all na-
tions from oppression by the levia-
thans of the political oceans, that
had tried to teach the world a
moral lesson by renouncing im-
perial Russian privileges abroad,
particularly in Persia and China.
Consequently, when the drive to
the east, south, and west which
had animated Russian conquerors
through the centuries became evi-
dent again at the end of World
War II, the new expansionism was
different from the old.

There were *‘andamental differ-
ences in scope and technique. The
scope of imperial ambitions in-
creased enormously. Old Russia
had always aimed at limited ob-
jectivés: an area in Turkey, a
slice of Poland, a region in China.
The new goal was the encompass-
ment of the entire globe. Old
Russia was thus easier to satisfy,
ana peace with her easier to
achieve than with her successor.

The changes in technique were
equally revolutionary. or one
thing, traditional empire-building
was carried out by armies sta-
tioned in the conquered and an-
nexed areas. The new empire-
builders planned to repla the
armies with popular movements;
what we call “fifth columns” have
been, in theory, the Communist
substitute for occupation by armed
forces, and they have been proudly
regarded as superior to the obso-
lete military instruments of im-
perialism,

The other great innovation in
technique was the. decision of the
Soviet government to refrain from
officially incorporating the terri-
tories of its satellites into Russia.
It has maintained the fiction of
their sovereignty and has denied
any intention of exploiting them
economically.

How much easier it had been
before! When, in 1815, a great
war ended for Russia, there were
no scruples against territorial ac-
quisitions. Tsar Alexander hardly
needed the present-day excuses of
“security” or “anti-cordon sani-
taire” when he annexed the whole
of Finland, the greater part of
Poland, and Bessarabia. Similarly,
Russia’s programme in 1914-16
openly and unabashedly aimed at
the creation, after victory, of a
Russian sphere in Europe incor-
porating, in one way or another,
Poland, Czechoslovakia, Serbia,
Hungary, Rumania, and part of
East Prussia. Most of these lands
were to have Russian governors or
viceroys and Russian troops to put
down uprisings.

Today the Russian orbit in Eu-
rope actually includes the terri-
tories envisioned by the tsarist
planners of 1914-16 oe t of the
Russian Empire; yet Stalin must
pretend to be anti-annexationist
and must act. as if, he wants his
satellites to maintain real inde-
pendence, In our present violent-
'y anti-imperialist world no other
course has seemed possible, even
to the Kremlin.

How well have the new tech-
niques of expansionism worked?
The five postwar years, on the
surface highly successful ones for
Moscow, have at the same time
marked a grave crisis in Soviet
empire-building—a crisis caused
by the shortcomings of these very
techniques.

The example of Yugoslavia is
instructive, for that country was
to become the first experimental
area in Europé for the new sort of
empire-building. Accordingly, at
the end of the war, Soviet troops
were first withdrawn from Yugo-
slavia, and Yugoslav leaders were
left to demonstrate’the exemplary
behavior of a Communist party in
power. They would, it was
thought, recognize the authority in
the Kremlin as superior; if Yugo-
slavia’s particular interests clashed
with those of the Soviet Union, the
former would be subordinated by
the latter; Yugoslavia would glad-
ly make sacrifices to help rebuild
the mother of all Communist
nations.

What actually happened is well
known. No sooner had the Soviet
troops left the country than the
fatal conflict began. During 1946
it became grave; in 1947 the rift
was so deep that a Cominform was
created to arouse the fury of the
International against Tito. In 1948
the Yugoslavs were excluded from
the. Soviet family, ant soon all
Soviet economic and military

By DAVID J. DALLIN

missions had to leave the land of
the infidel satellite. The Soviet
Empire lost a great country; its
sphere of influence, which had
stretched as far west as the Italian
border, shrank considerably. The
Soviet
stopped, at least in the south.

If Russian troops had been sta-
tioned in Yugoslavia according to
the old pattern, no rebellion would
have been possible; had one
broken out it would have been
put down like the Polish uprisings
of 1831 and 1863. But now, in
1949, it was too late; the Kremlin
was reluctant to try ‘to reconquer
Belgrade by force of arms.

What happened in Yugoslavia
served as a lesson; measures must
be taken to secure the fidelity of
the other satellites. These meas-
ures meant a reversion to the old
ways of armed occupation.

Poland, where anti-Soviet
trends seemed to be particularly
strong, was the first nation to feel
the effects of the organic trans-
formation of Soviet imperialism.
Before 1917, the greater part of
Poland belonged to the old em-
pire and was governed by a Rus-
sian governor-general, a number



“THAT'S FUNNY. I ALWAYS
THOUGHT C. SHARP MINOR
WAS THE NAME OF A

SCHOOL Boy \!"




|



<

aiiakeetobcua ip es
of Russian provincial governors,
and a Russian officialdom; a Rus-
sian army was stationed there.
After the Tito rebellion in Yugo-
slavia the Soviet government sub-
jected Poland to a series of new
measures which resembled those
of the prerevolutionary period.

In November, 1949, Soviet Mar-
shal Konstantin Rokossovsky was
appointed to serve in Poland. Al-
though he retained his Soviet citi-
zenship and membership in the
Soviet Communist Party, Rokos-
sovsky was made Poland’s Min-
ister of Defense and member of
the State Council, the highest gov-
erning body in Poland, which has
wide powers in proclaiming laws
and making appropriations. He
was also included in the Central
Committee of Poland’s Commun-
ist party (“United Workers Par-
ty”) and was immediately, al-
though at first unofficially, includ-
ed in the Polish Politburo. Among
the eleven members of this body
he has obviously been wielding
supreme power.

Even before Rokossovsky’s ap-
pointment almost all the leading
posts in thé Polish army had been
entrusted to Soviet generals whose
names were changed to sound
Polish. About six hundred high-
ranking Soviet military men be-
came actual commanders in the
Polish army. Simultaneously
with the announcement of Rokos-
sovsky's appointment all Polish
Communist leaders suspected of
opposing close ties with the Soviet
Union were purged from the gov-
ernment and the army, the first
among them being the potential
Tito of Poland—Wladyslaw Gom-
ulko, General Secretary of the
Polish Communist Party during
and after the war.

' The new administrative ar-
rangement thus became very simi-
lar to the old imperial one, though
Stalin still preferred to cbhserve
the new principie of non-incor-
poration of satellites. The eleva-
tion of Marshal Rokossovsky
therefore had to be presented as
an exception, a unique act of
purely personal nature; Poland’s
President Bierut had “requested”
the Soviet government “if poss-
ible” to place the marshal “at the
disposal of Poland”—and the
Soviet government “in view of the
friendly relations” between the
two nations agreed to comply. The
Kremlin did not proclaim its per-
manent right to run the country
or to appoint Polish military lead-
ers, Should Rokossovsky die or
change his allegiance or be
purged, there were no legal means
provided for a Russian emissary to
succeed him as dictator of Poland.

So even this partial adherence
to the new techniques of empire-
building has significant shortecom-
ings from the Soviet point of view.
To relinquish Poland to the Poles
is out of the question. Poland is
Russia’s main road to the West, to
Germany andebeyond; any Russian
government which intends to
operate in the West must control
Poland. For the right to use this
road Lenin fought a war in 1920;
along with German generals he
plotted a new war in 1922. In 1939,
when Hitler was about to upset
the balance of Europe, Stalin's
first thought was of Poland, and
his first invasion was made into
that country. In ‘1944-45, when
Stalin decided to set up his own
government in Poland, the first
serious cleavage between him and
his allies became inevitable. To-
day, too, Stalin's strength in Eu-
rope hinges on his dominance over
Poland, and he would risk a war
rather than restore Polish inde-

endence. As a matter of fact,

talin«the-Rmperor exercises more
power over Poland than any of
his predecessors on the Russian
throne exercised; yet Stalin-the-
Communist must disclaim any

rights over Poland, thus making it /

difficult for the emperor to rule.
his empire. : ‘

Elsewhere the Soviet’s inability
to follow her policy of dispensing
with an army of occupation as an
instrument of empire appears with
equal force. Obviously she is
afraid of losing Hungary and
Rumania when the Soviet oceupa-
tion forces get out of those two
countries. According to the Mos-
cow Agreement of 1948, Soviet
troops may remain there only so
long as oceupation forces remain
in Austria, and for this reason the
Soviet has broken off four-power
negotiations concerning Austria
and rejected attractive offers,

march on Europe was




True, hundreds of plain-clothes
men, army officers, and _ all
kinds of “advisers” Would stay on
indefinitely in both Hungary and
Rumania, but their*forces would
be insufficient a ainst a popular
rebellion. Mosebee. has withdrawn
its army only from the smallest
and least im unt satellites—
Bulgaria and North Korea. The
tremendous area of*military occu-
pation has not essentially dimin-
ished since 1946,

Indeed, experience is demon-
strating that the two new tech-
niques of empire-building are im-
practical. Armies of occupatior
are more important than ever if
the newly acquired territories are
not incorporated into the conquer-
ing nation.

But the principle of non-annex-
ation must be maintained, partly
because of considerations of pro-
paganda, partly because annex-
ation implies permanency, ‘a set-
tlement with the West, and Stalin
sees a settlement as a calamity,
Global stability would mean the
“stabilization of capitalism” and
the strengthening of anti-Com-
munist tendencies. Stalin's Com-
munism therefore blocks the road
to the stability of his own empire
as a price that must be paid for
blocking world stability. Stalin
acquired a sphere in Korea but
has not permitted normal relations
with South Korea; the North has
served him only as an initial stage
for a further expansion. He is
master of the continental Far East
but blocks the road to a_ peace
with Japan. He holds Eastern
Germany but refuses to keep out
of the German West. In an ava-
lanche of wishful predictions his
press and his social scientists ob-
serve everywhere and continuous-
ly “indisputable symptoms” of
crises, catastrophes, rebellions,
misery, and decay.

How the Communist necessity
for non-annexation gets in the way
of empire-building is dramatically
illustrated in Germany. As an
empire-builder, Stalin has stood
for the division of Germany since
1943, but as a Communist he must

| appear as the champion of Ger-

man unity. Molotov told the
Czechoslovak President Benes in
1943, “Germany must be divided,
but at present We must not reveal
our intentions because we would
only be assisting Hitler.” Maxim
Litvinov told Harry Hopkins in
March of the same year that his
government “would like to see
Germany dismembered.” At the
Teheran Conference, when Presi-
dent Roosevelt and Prime Minister
Churchill proposed certain meas-
ures for keeping Germany weak in
the future, “Stalin appeared to
regard all measures proposed for
the subjugation and for the con-
trol of Germany as inadequate. . .
He appeared to have no faith in
the possibility of the reform of the
German people.” At Yalta “dis-
memberment” was discussed at
length by Churchill, Roosevelt,
and Stalin, as wel as by their
foreign ministers, Eden, Molotov,
and Stettinius. The details have
now been made public by Stet-
tinius; Roosevelt was somewhat
hesitant, but was finally prepared
to accept the formula of dismem-
berment. Churchill was more re-
luctant than Roosevelt, and Eden
still more so., But Stalin refused
to give in. He insisted not only on
an immediate decision but also on
inclusion of “dismemberment” in
the terms of the surrender.
ported chiefly by Roosevelt, he
succeeded in getting his views
adopted.
included dismemberment of Ger-
many as a “requisite for future
peace and security.” The pub-
lished communique on the Yalta
Conference did not mention dis-
memberment or. Germany only
“because it was felt that mention
of it might increase enemy resist-
ance,” but the decision to dismem-
ber it was in force.

Yet only three months after the
Yalta Conference Stalin, now in
possession of Eastern Germany,
Said in a public statement which
was contrary to his speeches in
camera, “The Soviet Union does
not intend to dismember Ger-
many.” Today we are repeatedly
told that the Soviet government is
a champion of “German unity.” A
statement repeated over and over
begins to make an impression;
repeated often enough it
becomes an “indisputable fact.)
Actually the Soviet programme
since 1943 has been a campaign
for the dismemberment of Ger-
many. j

But when the war ended, the
slogan of a united Germany re-
placed the modest goal of a sep-
arated German province. To Stalin,
as Communist commander-in-
chief, acquisition of a zone in Ger-
many did not mean an end of the
expansionist drive; to the leader
of world Communism, East Ger-
many must serve as a bridgehead
for a move into Western Germany.
A bit farther to the west, the large
party of French Communism was
waiting; beyond France, the proud
fifth column in Italy stood at at-
tention. The limitations of tradi-
tional empire-building no longer
suited Stalin’s stature. The out-
look was too vast and exciting.
Enc the /end of {the ¢var the

remlin has consistently paraded
as a great leader in the fight
against those who sought to dis-
member the German state.

The same ambiguity between
the course of Soviet action on the
one hand and the basic Communist
philosophy and propaganda on the

other is inherent in Russia’s for-
eign economic activities,

Theories and concepts of “im-
perialism,” produced for political
purposes, were born near the end
of the 1815—1914 era cf world




mongers” of the West are based
this theory of imperialism; tie
phalanx of Soviet social scientists
has not been able to add any new
ideas to Lenin’s legacy. Therefore
concepts and theories advanced
today to justify Soviet foreign
policy are based on the facts of
another time, on a world situation
that has ceased to exist,

The formulas of Yalta | Britain”



TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1951

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS



D. V. SCOTT
&CO,LID. | at THE COLONNADE
Of Britain —_—
ritain Usually Now
i i *ntment ||} Bottles COX APPLE JUICE................ 50 44
Colonial Disappointment Bottles COX APPLE JUICE.
ee Tins LETONA PEACH JAM (15 1b) 52 48
In Festival Programme Tins MY LADY PEA SOUP... 29 26



By E. B. TIMOTHY





















LONDON.
In May this year, crowds will flock to the
South Bank of the Thames in London to see
the latest scientific marvels, to see the Dome
of Discovery, to hear magnificent music in a
great Concert Hall. All this—and more—they
can see and hear this summer at the Festival
of Britain. The best brains of the country
are combining in this effort to tell the story
of to-day.
Away from the crowds on the South Bank,
there will be other special exhibitions to at-
tend—in Museums, Centres and Institutes.—
There in a quieter way, Britain’s treasures
will be on display to the world. They will
not be restricted to British exhibits. The
British Museum, for example, will feature
Colonial exhibits in its ‘Festival’ display.

We Have...

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Benin (Nigeria.) will be represented by
specimens from the collection of bronzes and
ivories in the museum. Wood carving of the
llbe, Yoruba and Hausa peoples will be shown
The art of applying gold leaf to wood carv-
ing, almost exclusive to Ashanti (Gold Coast)
will be revealed. Ancient Jamaica will be

“INTERNATIONAL”

ONE OF THE GREATEST NAMES



represented by a wooden idol discovered in
a cave in Carpenter’s mountain in 1792. Ara-
wak carvings from the West Indies, chiefly
Trinidad, will be shown. Traditional crafts
of the Commonwealth will be demonstrated
in such examples as that from the British
Solomon Islands and in the bark cloth beat-
ers from Uganda and Kenya (Fast Africa).




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But is this really a “Festival of Britain. ?”
The programme might make one wonder.
From May to June, two hundred end fifty
musical events will take place in London.
Let us look at the list of Orchestral Concerts.
During the first week of the ‘Festival’, we
find, Arturo Toscanini, an Italian, conducts
three concerts at the Royal Festival Hall. A
conductor, Eduard Van Beinum, will conduct
the London Philharmonic Orchestra; Rafael
Kubelik, a Czech, will conduct the Philhar-
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Schwarz, will conduct the Bournemouth
Municipal Orchestra.





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field of visual arts. Sculptors like Karen
Jonzen, E. Paolozzi. and Uli Nimpsch have
been commissioned by the Arts Council of
Great Britain to prepare sculptures for the
Festival.

And at Battersea Park, Indonesian ballet

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Sup- | dancers will display their terpsichorean skill.

Granted that the idea of the “Festival of “International” Quick Drying Enamel.

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to-day, the participation of foreign artists and
musicians in the festival programme is
understandable and legitimate. In the day-
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Foreign artists are prominent, too, in the

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The Rev. R. W. Sorensen, M.P., Mr. Fen-
ner Brockway, M.P., and Fabian Colonial
Bureau are approaching the Lord President
of the Council, Mr. Herbert Morrison, M.P.,
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Colonials are asking why their kinsmen
like Fela Sowande, from Nigeria, regarded
as one of the distinguished organists in Eng-
land; Rudolph Dunbar, from British Guiana,
who has conducted famous orchestras in Lon-
don, Berlin, Paris and Hollywood, and
Ronald Moody from Jamaica, who has

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achieved fame as a sculptor, have not been PH GODD DS sii
commissioned for the Festival,
mar ar re ry iT
r ¥ *
The Press Officer of the body responsible r
for the arts side of the Festival, the Arts "
Council, tells me that the Council empanel- = r f



led small groups of distinguished. persons

under various headings such as poetry, sculp- FOR... SELLIED TURKEY.

ture, music ete. Each group had a chairman A tisi: ANCHOVIES MACKERAL

at its head who was also a member of the ih Sigh —

Arts Council. Names of musicians, artists, Breaktasts DATES. Figs

etc., were proposed by members of the groups
for approval or rejection. But a different
method was adopted: in commissioning the
conductors of orchestras. The orchestras
were empowered by the Arts Council to
choose their own conductors,

Is it too late to inelude one of, these men

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petent in their field of work, they should weleame ) inc







TUESDAY, JANUARY

*
ov,

1951



Dogs And Whistling Are! Lady Savage

Banned In The Market i

PEOPLE who go into the Public Market below the wharf |
to buy meat cannot whistle nor can dogs walk about the

market yard or slaughterh

board in the market says so,

yesterday about noon, you

Opens
| YWCA,



THE Y.W.C.A. movement in
Barbados was revived when Lady

An order painted on a . mote
but if you were in the market , 3°V88e officially opened the new
Â¥ e |Y.W.C.A. Headquarters at Pin-

would have heard the shrill; ¢oiq Street yesterday evening. It

ouse,

whistle of a man as he sat relaxed on the market wall. You | is situated
f s only a few yards aw
would have seen, too, a well fed dog strolling about the {from the Y.M.C.A. hoe

yard.

Y.W.C.A. OPENED

Wie the ADVOCATE visited
the Y.W.C.A. Headquarters
at Pinfold Street ‘at midday yes-
terday a number cf ladies were
making preparations for the!
cpening function later in the day.

indows were being cleaned,
the front room decorated with
flowers and the surroundings
looked “spick and span”, Mrs.
D. H. L. Ward, Secretary of the
Y.W.C.A., was supervising the
work.

The Y.W.C.A, has very little
yard and no playing field. At the
beginning only tea will be served
Members can start enlisting from
today. They have only to get a
iorm from Headquarters.

There are three spacious rooms
on the second floor. Two will be
used by boarders while the other
goes to the person in charge. The
kitchen is in a very sanitary con-
aition and equipped with an oil
stove,

Some of the furniture is old
fashioned, but this adds to the
beautiful surroundings.

N ACCIDENT occurred at
Queen’s Park on Sunday
night while the Church cf God
meeting was taking place. It was
however only slight.. The front
wheel of a bicycle, owned by
Jsmes Beckles of Richmond Gap,
St. Michael, was damaged, Also
involved was motor car E, 175,

HARLES BROWNE of Ban-

4 croft Land, Carrington Village,
fell from a bus at Arthur Hill cn
Saturday night and was injured.
He was treated at the Hospital and
sent home.

Browne was a passenger on the
bus. He was getting off when the
incident occurred. The bus _ is
owned by the My Lord’s Hill Bus
Company and was being — driver.
by Benjamin Agard of Britton:
Hill, St, Michael.

N ACCIDENT occurred at the
junction of Rickett and Tra-
falgar Streets cn Sunday morning
between a motor car owned and
driven by Ashten Gibbs of “Croy-
don”, Hastings and a motor cycle.

The rider of the motor cycle
was injured. He was taken to the
General Hospital where he was
tweated and discharged.

*PHE TAILORS DIVISION at

their general meeting at the
Union Headquarters elected Mr.
G. Bascombe President, Mr. L.
Austin Vice President and = Mr.
T. Ishmael Secretary .

General members of the Com-
mittee appointed were Messrs. H.
C, Clarke, S. Carew, E. Padmore,
LE. Carrington and C.. Robinson



E EVERTON CLUB held its
Annual General Meeting on

Sunday last and the following
were elected:— Messrs C. A.
Nourse, President, R. Culpepper,
Vice President, S. Williams, Trea-
surer, L, Jones and K, Harding,
Trustees, F. L. Walcott, Hony.
Secretary, with Messrs N. Gill, G.
Blades, -D. Olton, and R. Leslie as
members of the Committee of
Management.

Ist Division Football Captain—
E. Reece.

2nd Division Football Cagtain—
C. Archer,

3rd Division Football Captain—
R. Leslie.

Ist Division Table Tennis Cap-
tain—N, Gill.

2nd Division Table Tennis Cap-
tain—R. Leslie.

B.A.F.A. Council
tive:—F. L. Walcott,

T.T.A. Council Representative:
N. Gill.

Association of Cultural Societies
Representatives:—F. L. Walcott
and S. Williams.

Representa-



Whole Day Service

It seems unrealistic for anyona
jto be on the spot where a divine
service is to be held, eight hours
before the start, but that is what
happened at the shed in Queen’s
Park yesterday.

The service began at 7.15 p.m.
but from 11 a.m, the lame, deaf,
dumb and blind were trudging in,
supported by some friend or
relative.

Soon the preacher’s platform
and the tront benches as well,
began to fill up with these seekers
after healing. The wait was a
long one but their patience was
admirable.

It was the last day but one
that Rev. James B. Reesor who
had been instrumental in healing
scores of people through faith in
God, was to he heard in the Park
preaching and asking God to
heal the afflicted.

These people being aware of the
difficulty of gaining entry to the
building in the afternoon, were
taking no chances. As the hours
went by more and more people
‘turned up and when 4 o'clock in
the afternoon the building was
almest filled. Singing
and continued until the





















Any woman will be able to join,
The building in» whieh the|regardless of her standing in life
butchers sell their meat is about|or her particular religious denom-
60 yards long by 25 yaras wide,;ination. Already many have ex-
Butchers rent stalls tne price of} Pressed their wish to become
which vary according to the size. }|members.
Some stalls are $15 a month, some| Lady Savage arrived
$10 and others $5. panied by His Excellency the
The stalls were only built six|Governcr and Major Denis
years ago, but the slaughter-| Vaughan. After she clipped the
house is the sane old slaughter-|ribbon the Association was bless-
house for many years ago. One|/ed by Dean Mandeville.
of the oldest butchers of the M
market, ‘Fitzgerald Springer who] ., rs. A. A. Gibbons, President
has been killing animals there|° te ¥.W.C.A., after weicom-
now’ for 25 years, tolq the ing His Excellency and Laay
Advocate that the siaughter house | °#V@8* thanked Lady Savage tor
was there before he was born, 51| P¢tforming the opening ceremony.
years ago. The slaughterhouse | +2¢y Were also,very pleased w
which is about the same size as al] | ¥¢lcome Mrs. Frederick Koss,
the stalls, is.an old wooden and] Who is a member of the Nationai
galvanise building. Board of the Y.W.C?A, ot
it--is always kept clean and] Canada,
hanging about it can be seen the| She said that Barbados had a
pieces of rope which are used to| ¥.W.C.A. before 1910 which was
fasten the animals ang the hooks| Started by Miss Edith Triming-
to which the meat is attached. | ham, but unfortunately it was
There is always a smell of blood| closed in 1921.

and the buzz .of flies about the
. n é
ieatinh.. OG aitiny Iles yesteeelinr In June last year a letter ap-
ie : peared in the Auvucate asking ivr
much business was not _ being sumeone to torm a ¥.W.c.A
oe E pred en “a rt Knowing wnat good work 1s qoue
ay é pu ” by an institution of this kind aii

kept busy
busy. ‘ the world over, and wnat a uselui
It is a regular thing to hear f rs
é 8 § piace it nils in any community,

in the market, a woman com- “i

plaining about too much fat being cat ee a pis 10a eee

on the meat she is offered. The} ‘78! she would help if a Com-

reply the butcher always gives is pays He oe nes join ner
ha in ie r in starting a Y.W.C.A.

that he did not make the meat Tne foudwites jedies dre.

and he also bousht the fat. Frank Bishop, Vice Fresident, .wirs,

Meat From Australia Deighton Ward, Secretary, Mrs.
Twenty-five years ago most of P. A. Clarke, Treasurer, .wirs,
the meat that used to be sold at|Fred Goddard, Mrs, H. A. Talme,
the market came from local oxen|Mrs. A. W. Scott, Mrs. Donaia
and the remainder from Vene-| Wiles, Mrs. Herbert Greaves, Miss
zuela. ‘Those were in the days| Edna Fields, Miss Jean Wilkinson,
when oxen were used to a large/Miss E. Bourne, Miss A. Bourne,
extent on plantations. Meat from|Miss Betty Arne, Mrs. S. Taylox
Venezuela stopped coming to Bar-|and Mrs, D. Woode, kindly ofter—
bados 17 years ago, Springer said. |ed their assistance and a Commit-
Most meat now come from Aus-|tee was formed. Rev. Derek
tralia. Woode has kindly consented to be
In the days when oxen used to]their Chaplain
be brought to the market, some
would often escape and injure ain
people. Then, pork used to be 12
cents a pound.

accom-

She said that to date they had
hand $1,570.45. This had
been given by subscribers, (nov

The butchers all think that the |©P/y in Barbados) some anony-
market should be removed to a}â„¢ously. To these they were
residential area, grateful. Mrs. Herbert Greaves

Behind the meat market there is} With helpers ran a most success-
a shed alongside the beach and|ful Cake Sale making $142.33
small boats are hauled up there.|Mrs. A. W. Scott held a very suc-
The shed is shady and fishermen | cessful fair and donated $473.56,
usually sit around there to mend j part of fhe proceeds.
their nets. They were also grateful to the

A rule of the fish market which ; 4 :
is abowe this shed is titat one Ladies Canadian Clyb for. their

, ati }
must not throw cane peelings) 8¢nerous donation and to al
about it. Since the crop ‘ean sant others who had helped in any way
ed, however, and lorries bring} They had to thank too Mr. H. O.

sugar to the bond house near the|Emtage for renting them _ the
market, the men who work-on the } building at a nominal rate, With-
lorries bring along cane with]out a house they could not have
them and after ‘a fill of cane juice, | made a start.

the market is léft full of peelings. '
After getting the house they

then had some difficulty in getting
a Matron, but this was finally
overcome and Miss Rogers ha:
been appointed.

She said that Captain Herber
Williams, Secretary of the

Discussed At
Y.M.C.A., had been a tower ol

rf
L.A.O. Conference strength and to him they were

SEVERAL topics were discussed} most grateful. They had helc
and important recommendations their meetings at the Y.M.C.A
agreed on at the Food and Agri-/and the Y.M.C.A. Committee had
culture Organisation Conference] allowed Captain Williams to tend
held in Trinidad, with respect to}them furniture which at present
the development of co-operatives; they were not able to provide.
in the Caribbean area, Mr. C. A. She thanked Mrs. Ward, their
E, Beckles told the Advocate] Secretary, for all her help and
yesterday. hard work so willingly given and

Mr. Beckles who is Senior} also the Committee.

Peasant Agricultural _ Instructor “It is going to cost us quite ¢
at the Department of Science and|jarge sum each month to run
Agriculture, was the Barbados} this institution involving as_ it
representative at the conference. does rent, light, water rates

The conference — a technical| tajanhone, staff and running ex-
cne on co-operatives in br eg se penses,. ahd without help thir
bean was sponsored joint y thet ee nab a :

r.A.o. oe the United "Nations cannot be done”, she said.

and the Caribbean Commission. Lady Savage, after thanking
It took place at ‘Kent House”,} Mrs. Gibbons, said, “It is not
Maraval, the Headquarters of the necessary for me to explain the
Commission, and lasted from Jan- purpose and objects of the
uary 22 to January 27. Y.W.C.A. The need for such a



Co-operatives

There were forty people takin&| fellowship of service is ever
part, including delegates anc! present and ever increasing, ana
observers, said Mr, Beckles.| preat credit is due to Mrs. Pearl

There were representatives fToM) Cipbons and her Committee for
the Dominican Republic, France, the work they have done in re-

. ‘ t
Oe et ine United aiaton ne establishing this organisation,
C . Ss o

“I hope that the principles of
It was arranged mainly to pro- t D
vide for an exchange of informa- sees ce ae ‘
tion and experience on co-opera- :
tive problems and developments] @ great extent on the goodwill ana
throughout the Caribbean, This| #ssistance of the general public
was done with a view, he said,| I, therefore, appeal to you all for
to providing guidance to the ter- your support. :
ritories represented, and obtain- ‘And so today, it has been an
ing advice on how, as part otf honour to open this Y.W.C.A
their normal activities, -F.A.O.| Headquarters, which I trust will
and the Caribbean Commission] grow in the years ahead to a full
could be of service in the develop-| scale branch of the international

mentrof co-operatives inythe area:) organisation, and provide facilities

for the social intellectual welfare
Comprehensive Report of young women irrespective of
To accomplish this purpose the|raee, colour and creed, with a
conference made.a detailed study] dominant spiritual background of
of a very comprehensive “report! christian faith and practice. 1
on “Co-cperatives in the Carib-] wish the Association every suc-
bean”, prepared by Dr. D, Bros] pegs.”
sard of F.A.O. Mrs. Frank Bishop, who moved
An intensive programme W@5), vote of thanks, said that she

started | arranged and provision was made hoped Lady Savage would visit
long- for two sessions daily. Topics were

the Association in the future, On

looked-for-preacher put in his aiscussed under the — general behalf of the Committee she con-
appearance. | Heads: “Co-operatives in he gratulated His Excellency and
By this time there were a5/ separate territories”, Main obsta- Lady Savage.

usual, crowds around the building,
and the service went on.

Those who waited were
jrewarded for their
for Rev. Reesor again preached

well

and healed. ‘sig
fied their intention to be christians

patience }| tion.”

Many people signi- | «Primary

cles and problems”, “Requirements

for the development of co-opera-| _ Among those present were: Sir

George and Lady Seel. Mr. ant

” ctinch nies a a.
tives,” and “Technical cc-oper Mrs R. N Turner, Mr. J. W. 3.

jects dealt with included} Chenery, Mr. and Mrs. H. A

ot marge ona wEnetlit soci-| Vaughan, Mr. H. A, Talma, Mr

eties,” “Marketing”, “Consumers|O. T. Allder, Mr. F. Miller, Mr

and there was a general rejoicing. | nd supply,” “Fisheries,” “Health,| A. Nyren, Mr. D. A. Wiles, Mr
ane

The Advocate learnt yesterday | +}Housing,” “Sehool Co-operatives,” | and Mrs. Glindon Reed, Mr.

that over 2,000 people had
declared their intention to be fol-

“Apex or central banks based on} Mrs. F. J. Ross. Mrs. HW. A. Cuke
primary thrift and credit soci-}Mr, John Beckles, Miss Norah

lowers of Christ, at these services | ¢ties.* “Co-operative unions and| Burton, Rev. and Mrs. Tudor, Mr
‘which have been going on iM} federations,” “The lack of trained] onq Mrs. F. C. Goddard, Mr

the Park.

PORT: ENQUIRY MEETING

The Port Enquiry Committee
held its third meeting yesterday
and discussed with representa-
tives of Messrs. DaCosta & Co.
Ltd., and Messrs. S. P. Musson,
Son & Co. Ltd. certain points
arising out of the memoranda
submitted by these firms.

The next meeting of the Com-
mittee will be held on Monday
next at the Labour
when the Committee will meet
representatives of certain firms to
discuss the regrouping cf cranes
on the waterfront,



Department |

and|H. A. Tudor. Colonel and Mrs

personnel for co-operatives
A. Gib-

co-operative services,” “Require-;R. T. Michelin. Dr. A

ments in respect to promotion andj pons, Cant. H. H. Williams, Mr
registration of co-operative | pudlev Wiles, Madame Ifill and
sceieties,” “Training of officers of} Mrs. Olga Symmonds

sccieties, and Government per-





sennel.””

ence. the fine arrangements made
by the Caribbean Commission for
the conduct of the meeting

Pleasurable Experience
Mr. Beckles said that. despite!

and










the heavy nature of the _ _PFO-! the convenience of tha represen-
gramme and the con iderable tatives. and above all, he said. the
amount of work involved, the] ,,,onificent heln given the mect
experiénce was most stir atin fling by Dt. H. Belsh Nirector |
j end pleasurable. He spoke } hly | of Rural Welfare Divisi

f the general attitude of cc-oper | The report of. the e



tion and enthusiz

oi -whe- took part



pl

1a : ea be presented t
in-the conter-+

governments in d



BARBADOS

ADVOCATE
CHATTING



}
|
|
|
'

|

|



LADY SAVAGE (right) is seen chatting with Mrs. Pearl Gibbons, |
President of the Y.W.C.A., in the verandah of the Y.W.C.A.











*

Miss M. J. Bowman
MARY JULIA BOWMAN was born in Jersey, Channel
Islands, where her family had for generations owned a
house in Beaumont with a magnificent view overlooking
the harbour of St. Helier, the capital of Jersey, During the:
early part of her life, she was educated in Germany; after-|
wards, in 1894, on being awarded a Founder's Scholarship!
in Modern Languages, she entered the Royal Holloway
College, University of London. She subsequently proceeded
to Oxtord and gained Honours in English at that University.



At the bexinning of the pre-} pare for a London degree
sent century Miss Bowman ac- With the object of providing an
cepted a post as Assistant Mistress| Opportunity for Queen‘s College
‘6 teach Modern Languages—| girls to benefit from a veut |
French and German—at Queen’s} Waining in the United Kingdom,
College, Barbados. Although her}she tried her utmost to increase
first acquaintance with Queen's] the Scholarship Fund started by
College was comparatively short,! Miss Noble for the same purpose
her pupils, colleagues and friends}It was during Mi: Bowman’s
remember her then as a beautiful] term of office that a Commercial
and dignified young woman who] Class waS begun in 1928 at
won their affection and respect. | Queen’s Coiiege, thus enabling the
She also showed that she already | pupils to be trained for the Lon-
possessed the qualities of charac-}don Chamber cf Commerce
ter and personality suited to one| Examination. The Library too
who was later to fill with distinc-] vas renovated and new books
‘ion a position of influence and of] Were Hdded. She realised the im-
the highest responsibility in this] portance of Science on the cur-
islands riculum of a scnool and with the

Between the years of her first] help of her friend Miss Skues did





and second appointments at]. great deal to raise the standard
Queen’s College, Miss Bowman] of the Science teaching and to
held teaching posts in various} improve the laboratory and equip
parts of the world. She returned| ment at the school, Her interest
to the island in 1926 as Headmis-}in Art prompted her to obtain
tress of Queen’s College. Barba-| more pictures, statues, and models
los was indeed fortunate to regain| of animals for the Art Studio
he s@rvices of a woman who dis-| Music too had its place in Miss

Powman's plans for Queen's Col-
‘nd devotion to her work as Miss | iege, for in 1928 a new piano was
Bowman did. While each former] purchased for the use of the
headmistress of Queen’s College} school. Her Speech Days, which
had played her part in the devel-|tock place annually, are worthy
opment of the school into the lead-| of mention, not only because they
ing girls’ school in the island, to] revealed a h+gh standard of sing-
Miss Bowman must be accorded] ing and dramatics but also because
the chief credit for this achieve-|they were so fully appreciated by
meat. She had certain principles parents and children alike. Miss
ynd she was not afraid to abide] Bowman herself assisted in the
by them. production of the plays, especially
the French plays, With advice and
encouragement when necessary

played such a keen sense’ of duty

Possessed of the pioneer spirit,
she made it her mission here to
further educational opportunities
for girls, especially for those who
showed promise intellectually
Some of these pupil: of the senior
classes were granted the privi-
lege of studying in the quiet
atmosphere of Miss Bowman's
nouse, often with her text books
it their disposal. By allowing
them to act on the staff as “stu-
dent mistresses”, Miss Bowman
encouragéd them not only to ac

Externally also the school reaped
the fruits of a culture which origi-
vated from an innate love of beau
ty and had been fostered by wide
ivavel. The swamp was filled in,
new playing fields were acquired,
tennis lawns were established, and
numerous flowering trees and
shrubs were planted

Under the auspices of Miss Bow
man, the Old Girls’ Association
tock on a new lease of life and



quire experience in teaching but} her “At Homes” were always a
also to serve their old school.| Scurce of delight to all who at-
Later, when the External Inter-| tended them. In most of her plans

for the welfare of the school Miss
Bowman was staunchly supported
Sy the old girls who gave her
willing and ready co-operation.

mediate Examination of London
University in Arts was introduced
locally, “student mistresses” as
well as pupils were able to pre-

CLARKE’S “BLOOD MIXTURE” +7












Cleanse the system from blood
impurities ; many sufferers from
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and
minor skin ailments, can derive great
benefit from this well-known medicine.

In LIQUID or TABLET FORM




Just in Case

Doing HMome-Baking

ou're
gy





TURBAN DATES ..... eh per pkt. 30c.

SPRINGBOK TABLE RAISINS Peta set. ot Oe
% MIXED FRUIT for Cakes Js Ratna tg args >All,
% CURRANTS for Cakes y inne 39c. X|
% SULTANAS for Cakes BL, Se a ele

CRAWFORDS CREAM CRACKERS per tin $1.37
% MELTIS NEW BERRY FRUITS $1.32 & 75e. &
§§ PALM TOFFEES per tin 67e. & 46c. }|
& CARNIVAL Asst, BISCUITS per tin $1.24 |
4 +
: g
* ~y %
$ STANSFELD SCOTT & Co.. Ltd. %
103660600605006 9660600656 0000 000000 HOD O4O,

ja resident of Watk'ns Alley, was
j charged with the larceny of a vest

ae ee

PAGE FIVE

Deep Water |\auuuse eRe anes
Harbour FRESH SUPPLY OF %

ee .; "PURINA HEN CHOW



chant, told the Advocate yesterday

| dee win a Deep Water Harbour 2 (SCRATCH GRAIN)
} Mr ‘eldman had just. returned
“ES Sly | gall. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributore

the deep water harbour facilitieg



he had found in Jamaica and a a w@ @ B au Bw a | ww B B a @ B
othe. countries included in the VOSS FF99 999998595 OO a a ee a a
cruise : ‘
He said that Jamaica looked
: — r
very progressive He described EWIOY A

the whole trip as a wonderful one.

Also returning to Barbados on
the Coembie yesterday was Mr
L. Spira another City merchant.
He too, wefit on a ten-day cruise
and was enthused over the beau-

wr
GOOD SMOKE G
WHILE You \- KZ. f
ties cf Caracas.
M Pe? |

* CAN AN /
>. Kreindler who; =
travelled to Curacao on holiday x ‘ \ }
by B2W.I1.A. returned on the % ‘, /
He said that | & \

44
SLEEP APSE *







bent pear ge 3 days on ¢ TU RKISH and
EGYPTIAN

the ship, he had enjoyed every ‘
moment of the voyage back home. } ¢

15/- For Indecent
Language



a

65 PPOODOL EL GEESE EEL

&
.
% CIGARETTES
x ABDULLA CIGARETTES No. 11 — 50's ...... ec e055 $1.61
rue webs ae x » ” Dt: 208 ii ak . 68
i SAR-OL eotta | \ * a ie OBA 3
Jemmott of Hawkins Gap, West-|% ig ee Pitted, ge 29 <4 x
bury Road, was yesterday fined < Ks c No, 14 =, 30'8.... -66 x
15s. in 28 days with an alternative | \ ” ” No. 16 —°50’s ... $1.45 *
of one month’s imprisonment when $ ” Py No. 16 — 20's CUR oses 60 6
City Pol'ce Magistrate Mr. H. A. ; *
Talma found her guilty of using | & .
indecent language on Baxter’s|? x
Road on Sunday. xg *
For causing an obstruction on x s

Busbey Alley
parking a donkey drawn cart,
33-year-old Nathaniel Evelyn, a
hawker of Hall’s Road, St. Michael,
was yesterday fined 10s. in 14 days
with an alternative of 14 days’ im-

4,

on Saturday by

<4, 34,
POEL PALL A LLL LIEK Oe.



SPECIFY

“EVERITE”

ASBESTOS-CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

“TURNALL” —

ASBESTOS E





pr.sonment by Mr. H. A. Talma.
A case against Gilbert Burnett,
alias “Browne,” a _ 16-year-old

lighter boy, was dismissed without
prejudice by Mr. Talma, Burnett,

shirt belonging to Shurland Cox.



LT TTT

Perhaps the goal cf Miss Bow-
man’s ambitions for Queen's Col-
lege was her sincere desire to see
the school removed to more spa-
cious and suitable surroundings at
Erdiston This desire she was
never fortunate enough to see ful-




gli The memory of Miss Bowman’s
unremitting zeal and devoted ser-
vice to Queen's College for a pe-
riod of over eleven ‘years and to
the cause of education in this
island. Her sometimes apparently
sustere exterior concealed a sensi-
tive and sympathetic nature which
made her exceedingly considerate
and understanding of the special
problems and needs of her pupils,
With her passing Barbados has
lost a true friend, a loyal servant
and an excellent
The vineerity of her regard for
Queen's College and her attach-
ment to Barbados may be appro-
priately expressed in the words
that she herself used in her fare-
well speeches to the school and to
the Old Girls’ Association;-—
all to be true to
Queen's College. Uphold her hon-
sur and her interests in every
way. It is the oldest girls’ school
in Barbados and it is in your hands
te maintain it as the best girls’
school in Barbados, I pray and
trust it may always remain so, .
I have always looked on Barbados
anywhere




Headmistress.

st









“I beg you



CODCOD ESOS PREOOO GOS DOM

HARRISON’ S- 22000 st.

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED
A SHIPMENT OF

| AGRICULTURAL |

more like home than

Ise in the world,'—D.A.G.C,



























ORIENTAL

GooDs

From INDIA, CHINA,
EGYPT !
Silk, Curios, Brasswere,
Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak-
wood, Sandals, French Per-
'| fumes, Barbados Scarves in

diled and it remained the one bit-
ter disappointment of her work in
Barbados.

It is only fitting that the people
ef Barbados should always cher-

|| Pure Silk, Ete., Ete, Ete,
The Souvenir Headquarters } KS
| THANE Hros.
KASHMERE

Pr. Wm. Henry 8t.—Dial 5466

GOOD QUALITY — FULLY STRAPPED.
ONLY $4.70 rEacu.

§ The quantity for dispdsal is small
and future supplies are uncertain.

i The
EAVESTAFF

' The small modern Piano

For a piano of limited
dimensions the “Eavestaft”
reveals a volume of quality
| of tone out of all propor-
tions to its size, convenient
deferred terms available.
Inspection Cordially Invited

JUST CALL—4563

CECIL JEMMOTT

33 Broad St.
Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy
20.1.'51

SEND US YOUR ORDERS
WITHOUT DELAY.



HARDWARE _ DEPT.
TEL. 2364,



aS yeaneven —PPLECEPOOE SOO COCPOOOK%F










a fresh stock of old favourites

Dr. Scholl’s
FAMOUS

Foot Remedies |

Arch Supports, Foot Easers, Zino Pads for Bunions





and other items Foot Powder.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID.

,10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

and Callouses. Foo! Balm.

for the promotion





of comfort of the

foot,





{



1951

BARBADOS TUESDAY, JANUARY 30,



ADVOCATE

BY CARL ANDERSON



and Heart

bleeding the first day, ends sore

and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
. Amosan must make your

mouth well and save your teeth or

money back on return of empty pack-

age. Get Amosan from your chemist

t

ay. e guar-
antee protects
you.
for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth





"Dear, it's time you knew.

POSSIBLY

THE TRIGE )
UST ONE! E

THAT MAY
SAVE YOU FROM THE BITE OF THE
TZIG=TZAG FLY LIVES THERE... BUT
NO ONE WOULD DARE TAKE YOU :

WAIT A MINUTE!

fe
TRADING ¢
GSTABLISNMENT

00D |
oF



as <= Wise Morners advise their ~

daughters fo take Paradol, and
thus save needless suffering due to
periodic pains. Scientifically com-
pounded from 4 ingredients, Paradol
helps relieve pain quickly—with no
disagreeable after-effects. Excellent
for headaches, too. The name “Dr,
Chase’ is your assurance,

aN:

TEA.

“ye oo00d tea |
.










a\-4 WOMEN
ARE ALL
» ALIKE

STANDS

SUPREME





Deliveries can be arranged in
the U.K. for the popular - -

VAUXHALL CARS

Full details will be gladly given on application to - - - -

ROBERT THOM LTD.

Whitepark (COURTESY GARAGE)

| U.K. ?
|
|








THE LONE RANGER

ALOT OF ROB NEE UO BEEN

_ [LIKE A WELL ORGANIED GANG? LOOKS
hb =

TELL MEALL YOU
KNOW ABOUT

Dial 4616

MM News OF ANOTHER ROBBERY IS
] L COMIN’ THROUGH RIGHT Now!

{iii 4 i]

1)

7 Hi

|||











The Advocate Co Ltd:, will publish a Year Book of Barbados

1
n
rn
ry
a
i.
a
F in 1951.



an...
BRINGING UP FATHER

BY GEORGE MC.MANUS The Year Book will contain three parts:—

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know about
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.

* #") THINK THOSE
RUSTLERS WILL GIT
THAT HERD OVER TH’

| BORDER BY MIDNIGHT ?

AND NOW LISTEN AND
LOOK TOMOR
WILL. THE RUS6ETLERS
GET THE HERD OVER
( THE BORDER BY
MIDNIGHT ?

emergence
IT WAS RADIO STATION
“K-N-+G-THEY SAID BY
NOT BEING HOME YOU
LOGE THE GRAND PRIZE
OF A POTATO PEELE
AND TEN DOLLARS /

(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
etc.

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Director of the Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisa-
tions immediately or not later than April 15th 1951.

Year Book, ’
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951.
Advertisers are asked to get in touch with

Mr, Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager,
Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

_ This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)

I ONE one
‘AN OLD AND TRUSTED
EMPLOYEE...WILFREO CUTTLE!

Oe

HOW DO | LOOK, DEVIL? LIKE A PILOT,
READY TO FLY AGANG OF KILLERS
| TOTHEIR HIDDEN THREE

MILLION DOLLARS? * :
Pama YES, \}\.
ORM) OR NO, >|"
nt OR MAYBE.



DR. CHASE'S
PARADOL

rams Quick Relief from Pain ===

FR
which makes
* GOD’S WAY OF
SALVATIO!
PLAIN”
Please write
Samuel Roberts,

Book and Tract Service, %
30, Central Avenue, Ban- ¢%
gor N, Ireland.” ¥,

offers
CLIPPER *
CV-240

SERVICE

between

SAN JUAN
ST. THOMAS
ST. -CROIX
GUADELOUPE
MARTINIQUE
ST. JOHNS

ST. LUCIA ~~
PORT OF SPAIN
*

The Clipper CV-240 is
acknowledged to be the
most advanced type airplane
of its kind. Its extra large
picture windows, wide aisles”
and its 40 roomy, recline-to-
your-comfort seats, assure
passengers the utmost in
comfort and luxury in flight. |

By providing this most mod-
ern, fost, dependable Clipper
on this route, PAA is cons
tributing to the advancement
ofthe rapidly growing touris?
area in the islands between
Puerto Rico and Trinidad.

For full information ond
reservations, consult your
wavelagentor =

G *T.M. Reg.

PAN AMERICAN
Horto AIRWAYS



DaCOSTA & Co., Lid.
Broad St.

for one % $ ©
Gospel ¥



TUESDAY, JANUARY 30,

CLASSIFIED ADS.





1951







today










PUBLIC SALES
tanaennaseneeseencntreseensensems
AUCTION












































TAKE NOTICE

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

TAKE NOTICE
PIN-UP





QUIX



















ROYAL NETHERLANDS.

PAGE SEVEN



take NoTicE | SHXPPING NOTI































sin ee S32 noon at AL- That PIN-UP COLD prFmevanl STEA
rbarees Hill. . PERM-WAVF 4 MS Co. ‘
DIED FeR RENT 12 % x 38 &. covered wir Ahm Linat Josern WATSON & song| LIMITED a Company incorporated weder Jie 7c es. HIP « The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will
£DWARDS — EDWARD OWEN Hi Sheets. Good Wallaba Posts uprights - &_ Company incorporated | ‘"¢ English Companies Act, Manufactur- > Sailing from Amsterdam. Dover and accept Cargo and Passengets for
funeral will leat 5 is Terms Cash. To be removed ai we? under the English Com anié ers, whose trade or business address is Madeira—s.s, “Cottica™ 2nd, ard, 9th St. Lutia, Grenada, and Aruba, and
“Hentstead” ee mee HOUSES R. Archer McKenzie, Aucioneeke MAT. | Manufacturers, whose trade or busince 5@-61, Park Reval Road, London, N.W. 10, PAINT February, 1951. M.S. “Bonaire” 9th, Passengers only for St. Vincent,
o'clock this afternoon for St. Suen 26.1.51—4n, hall Ross eee Soap Works, White- a} cau es ee TAS te Ree iis Msoiline t ke ee ees eee
. . - eeneeneeentnneeeeniintomenren eos d, Leeds, c rade mork in P: a s ard’s Church, 30,1,51—1n. ae GARDIE — Worthing. Drawing Und for the registration oft teane wpptied in respect of ataleeieias i oe 5 ms, “Helena” 13th. igh, ‘Febroary: 1951, Th v “Cari ” i
—— 1. dining rooms, 3 bedrooms with run- r The Sterling Hammer ‘art “A” of Register in re: t "| the hair, sachets for use in waving the ms. “Willemstad” 9th, 15th, February obtet ena oO ie cenan ees ad
ning water. Available February Ist sy «ind permission I will selon Tues- |C°@MON soapy. detergents, oy ©! | hair, toilet preparations, hair lotions 1951, m.s. “Oranjestad” 9th, Sth Mareh Se ae tee =
PAYNE_We the undersigned beg through | 2! 28 O.L.81—Sn, | gay" 3th, tthe Avillon: Sports Chas, | Ballshing, “Scouring “sna rashes: | Nt” fagteners "and Rasy supports, and 151 canes Stl ea
this medi — range Street, Speightstown, ia » | Perations of all ki a entitled to register the same Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and abe ‘
a, seen to thank all those Sta-"ide residence ae Clarks). 1 Radio, ? Gremnee = to register Se mnie eee ee ater one wpa from the 30th day Georgetown—m.s, “Bonaire” 37th Janu- departure to be notified.
any way condoled with us in oar recent}and cutlery optional bs Snes Pees r Hand Machine, Gents and {7m the 30th day of January tanr Pe ree tame Some person. shall THE Sty 1961; ms. “Cottica” 20th, February SCHOONE WN
loss occasioned by the death of Kenneth | onward. For particulars ant eae aTy Goal Staves Conct e ey ote aes time ght eereon ahah in the mean- ie to ae ate wemet’ er ppitttion COLOR COMPANY Una # | Gduing to Teiedad Poon < a ee
£ . ave in AY oO ion a “at ot r Lo Trinidad, La uiara, C a-
Rudora (mother), Alfred (father), Marion a ee pete sali 10.1.51—t-t.n. }0F re kee 30. Terms CASH. at my office of Cepouttion of eich a bs of such registration, The trade mark can | P©MY registered under the aes * te cao ete—m.s. “Oranjestad” ist February ERS ASSOCIAMIOM, Ine.
(sister), Ivan, Aean (brothers). © SANDY GREST—Cattlewash 1 LAND ARDS, tration. The trade mark can be oan aes be teen on application at my office tario, a Province of the Dominion of | 1951. 4 Telephone: 4047
30.1.51—1n, | March, June. October Se ae Feb.. mine application at my office. Dated this 29th day of January, 1951,] Canada, whose trade or business address Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp, Amster-
cates in atone tea vem 1951. trie Dated this 29th day of January, 1951 H. WILLIAMS, is 2-20 Morse Street, Toronto 8 Onta, | 4&m-—m.s, “Oranjestad” 23rd Mareh 1951.
MEMO: : » a Peak. UNDER : . Registrar of Trade Marks. | 7, Canada, has applied for the regis- 8S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD., =
DaCOsTA—In RIAM soesialiapne sites SO THE SILVER Registrar of Trade Marks 30.1 $1--3n,| Wetion of a trade mark in Part “A” of Agents
ever tender memony of r “ Register in respect of enamels, paints.
our darling TWO ROOMS—At Vesper Cot, Pinfold 30.1.$1—3n. . paints,
1 ae younger son Patrick, Lt. | crest Aas Sie Ane nfo HAMMER Se ee senienneeucieee cee” varnishes and laequers, and will
st Ansio op January’ oem 18st, Ore, ‘si—in.|, Mrs. S. H. Street’ TAKE NOTICE one marathi alee, eee >
oie uary 30th 1944. RIP. he. Wika: s Sale will TAKE NOTI ene month from the 30th day of 0.
ever sorrowing Father and Mother. AGE—8t d, ednesday 7th February at January 1951 unless some person shall eo
30.1.51—In. lames Coast. Bloomsbury, St, Thomas ° in the meantime give notice in dupli-
BRAN : cate to me at my office of iti r
ee loving anne, of my KER, So & CO. such registration. The trade mark can Inc.
adopted . Dorot ristina a uc ionee: " be seen on application at my office,
of Buckingham Road, Bank Hall, who . 21,1,51—2n. 30 Dated this 29th day of January 1951 NE
fell asleep in Jesus, 29th Jan 1 Se ern eS 30.1,51—1n : W YORK SERVICE
“Her smiles ‘still iin juary 1949. UPSTAIRS PREMISES—At No. 6 Swan . _. H. WILLIAMS, SS. “Essi” saile ith January arrives Barbados 4th February
be Street. Cool and airy—very spacious. REAL ESTATE pany. $ — ant SS. “Byfjord” sails Ind February — —,, ae 14th “as
Saviour" . Dentists, Solicitors Siiindean in : ni _ — -— tase
Lost Rot, fereotten by Ste, To approved tenants. ‘Apply. im- Whee a Bungalow at Redman> hie eee NEW
uise Newto: therine 5 diately THANI BROS. Phone 3466. s je, St. iomas, conta. 5 SE ANS Y
nee, Qeoree Blackman eels 30.1,.51—1n acne Aeeing room we ee aewine. That HENRY HEIDE INCORPORAT LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE} 4 stesmer satis roth Ree m ore 2na
SA. .151—1n. | +» On perches of | . | ED, a Corporation organized un he “ ” ist February — St
Cita isneiiie tag eee WENDAL, — Three bedroom house. ween te Rec same may Raa Gn State ‘ad See York 4 an The application of Marie E. Yearwood | n-___s_«_. ary 15th
FORDE—In lov with every convenience, on man on premises, Ho on 5 | United Si holder of Liquor License No, 975 of 1951
ing memory of our dear Rockley House 25 ft. by 14 x 10 ed States of America, whose trade or CANADIAN SERV
father George Ford who died January | ain road. Garage, two servant rooms, | COMtaining 2 bedrooms, drawinu reow | business address is No. 313 Hudson Street, granted to ‘Her ih. respect of bottom u UND ’ ani
9th 1943 and our darling mother who| S¢tvant’s toilet and bath. For reat un-| Ste» sitliated at Westmoreland, St J City and State of New York, United floor of 2 two storey wall butiding in| OUTHBO
died January $tth 1948, ; furnished, or for sale. Available from| ie same is put” together” oe Sane Season 6t-donarica, has applied fon ths Church Village, St, Michael for permis-
Deep in our hearts lies a picture March Ist. Dial 4476, 2€.1.61—t.f.n, | Suitable for club or meeting Geer registration of a trade mark in Part “A” tard aed Genie. chee ain den ere Halifax seoccae
Pate, pewcious than silver or gold ——_— ecae aney ° — by getting permission | Of Register in respect of candies of all attached at Engle Halil, St, Michael, “ALCOA PILGRIM” Gab January 26th, February ah
s that of our dathng parents PUBRLI Sor tery rathwaite on premises, |*inds, candied nut products, namely. Dated this 29th day of January 1951. “ALCOA PENNANT” ys Pebruary 9th February 20th
Whose memories will never grow old Cc NOTICES Fitts Vv’ 8 of sale apply: Gilbert Millar, | Chocolate covered nuts, chocalate roast- To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq ss. “ALCOA POLARIS" vrs Pebruary 23r. March 6th s
Looking back with tenderness s Village, St. James. 90.1.51—1n, }€4 almonds, chocolate and icing, and Police Magistrate, Dtst, “A” deeuat teiadianal
oon eae tare a a ———L — The undersigned will offer f 1 atehee Sena eran Noe vane ae ae eee : ;
i had them “ ae 7 vill offer for sale by | one mon from the lay Applicant. These vesseis have limited passenger .
Timethy leave the rest with God. £25: -: -3- ty monies by obtaining Bah seep ttition st their office, No, 17,]¢f January 1951 unless some person (N.B.—This application will be con- Y ; poe
a Y (son), Rhodg, .Ivie, Ruth tréoa ante oh pri = Christmas Cards of Februany’ 1a ursday the &th day | Shall in the meantime give notice That J. & E. ATKINSON LIMITED 4| ‘idered at a Licensing Court to be held
(daughters). 30,1,51—in, iriends. No previous experi-| house called’ St ® Pm. the dwelling- | duplicate to me at my office of opposi- | Company incorpoarted under the Eng-| *\ Police Court, Dist. “A” on ‘Thursday

HARPER—In lov: memory
father Archibald Harper

‘ a i Old Bond Street, London, W.L, Engl. EB. A. MeLEOD, | __
the 28th January 1960.,, © - f. | r in; marvellous money making | 2t The Garrison, containing 2 verandahs. Dated this 29th day of January, 195). |} has applied F wintratt gland Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”,
Erno and Patsy Harper (daughters), g ity. Jones, Williams & Co., oa rooms, 2 bedrooms, toilet, bath, H. WILLIAMS, trade a hen “AP eee S 90.1.50—1n :
oa ivan, Archia, Thomas and David England Victoria Works, Preston, ans ee nTee servants rooms and Registrar of Trade Marks. | respect of perfumes, toilet preparations, $$9S99699000595995990095
sons), .1.51—1n., ™ . 51—3n. 5 ‘
25,1.51—18n The sale may be made with or wits 30 1.51—3n. | essential olls, cosmetics, hair lotions,

JORDAN—In loving memory of our dear

ory of our dear beautiful free sample Book
who died on | [armest a







to Britain's
ind foremost Publishers; highest | With 7.444



THE BOWER
Square feet of land | situate

out the furniture.

tion of such registration.
mark can be seen on application at my
office.



The trade the 8th day of February 1951 at 11 o'clock

lish Companies Act, Manufacturers, | (yy,

| Whose trade or business address is 24.




dentifrices and soaps, and will be en-



! , we ——— | titled to register the same aft N 0 i] « E

Va : i 8 after one A

See on soa * Sen vege cae NOTICE Inspection by eppate eg even: with EE ae ight wot Say. Of . Janus ' s
The i was great, the blow severe tie present tenant, Mrs. Adams. WANTED SRE Theahrtie etre ng et Spall. in are

We never thought that death was near
Only those who loved him can tell
The pain of parting without farewell.
Ever to be remembered by—
Gertrude — Jordan (daughter-in-law)
Doreen, Ruby, Syrena, Marjorie (grand-



THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW
Tenders are invited for a loan of
£1,000 at a rate of interest not to ex-
ceed 4% per Annum under the St. An-
drew Parish Church Loan Act. And
will be received by the undersigned up





Further particulars from
COTTLE, CATFOPD & Co.
. 30.1.51—9n,

FOR KENT, SALE OR LEASE
BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-





a ee









the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen On application at my office.
Dated this 29th day of January, 1951
H. WYLLIAMS,



GIRLS’ FRIENDLY SOCIETY

ANNUAL SALE







ROBERT THOM LTD.-—-New York and Gulf Service.
Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Canadian Service.





CANADIAN SERVICE

From Montreal, Halifax,

N.S., St. John, NLRB,

To Barbados, Trinidad, Demerara, B.G.

———
LOADING DATES










Expected
nr es Registrar of Trade Marks. (under the distinguished pat ake }
SS | Pe alta. a, exconenn, | 2 Ton, Braskias’ ‘soca so8 habe: | ARE ™REEN GRD, DRRSEMAKERS | Goi sean |B oF Mie Excelleney “the. Govwrner | Maucax | st. ann | “rtgeetown
we LA, * - | Wee > pply: roadway ess OP. | ~ ' and Lady Savage he yorest"
Boy peg Venger | Saher bears *ynsing water in sah, mista | will be Open'Be Led) Ravage on BYP Sz afateeret” | sah gun. | 260m gan.] aan wep
moe ae ee 24.1 51—6n. and. Kiiehenette s whaeee a 0m} SECRETARY for ROCKLEY GOLF TAKE NOTICE SATURDAY 28TH APRIL Sere +1 20h Feb. ! agra rep. | rat” Maris
. . is Toilet an .» Salary $100.00 r month to_ ,
Ever to be remembered by— ° " ety Speones Light and Telephone. | yether with free rans: in flat over Full particulars later UK. SERVICE
John’ Leslie (husband) and children: Caribbean Bottlin SP Maneger of Bagatelle Plantation, |Ciub House, containing two. bedrooms, | N
.1.51—1n. 0. h mas Dial 2221, 21.1,51.—6n. | living room, is, alee Police Band in attendarice, LOADING Expetea
Pa popper ~ —__.. | free light, Water and taxes. Knowled, Arrival Dat
SFALY—In loving memory of my dear Limited cave oft ROACHES PLANTATIONS ! of Goif an advantage. ge $$$$$$559569O6$6565SS0L oi tibapala’ hash ie
beloved daughter. Bvangeline Nadella ic e a set up for sale by Public Apply by letter only, forwarding re- FOS SOOSSOY 88. “Oak Hine © 25th + Jan,
Sealy who was laid to rest on 2th ‘ompetition at our Office James Street, ) ferences, to—The Secretary, Golf Club NAL Eee eecamer
Jaaiacy 160), Sasnpuinel noes on Friday 2nd February 1951, at 2 p.m. | Rockley 20.1.51—1.f.n. NOTICE M'pook Ginsgow “~ “tnd March
In tears we saw her sinking NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN|CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS ‘ ” t Z
And watch her fade away in pursuance of Section 183 of the situate in St. Luey and containing by eae -LANTATIONS LIMITED—4 it:
God know how much we missed her Compani Act 191 estimation 82 acres 3 ‘roods 23 perches US onnbenron , gents
As it dawns four years to-day panies Ac 0 that a gen-}of which about 48 acres are arabie. The general public is hereby

We often stand beside her grave

eral meeting of the abovenamed

acreage is made up as follows:



warned against contracting any

Phone 4703














a
WE BUY FOR CASH — Clocks, watches

with ‘hearts still ead and sore company will be held at the office and musical boxes in any condition.

Ard think we hear those loving] of Messrs. Bovell & Skeete, Lucas





25% acres Ist crop canes ready for

debt or debts with any person
reaping.

or persons on production of the

14 acres youn; es, Write, call or dial 4429.GORRINGES An- piot and other documents for land

Not dead just gone to rest Street, Bridgetown, _on Monday, 34 acres aes. grass. tique shop, Upper Bay Street. 24 FLOWERS owned by me at Sealy Hall, Mer-
Anice. (mother), George (father) and the fifth day of March, 1951, at 9 acres 23 perches in preparation, 25.1.51—Tn. EAU DE ricks, St, Philip, as I have not
f:mily. 30.1.51—1n. 2.30 o’clock in the afternoon for roads, yards etc COLOGNE authorised such business transac-

—_—_—_—__
WE BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and






Inspection on application to Mr. tions, The plot for the above



the purpose of having an account



























































































; Ormond Knight on the mises. Silver jewellery, coins, dentures, etc. Jand was lost during the month PAO OELDLA OOS, .
OMOEE — [Rec inwaien the windhg'ap'tng| | THANNSOD TRG Set a he Atle acer tone Menta a 1 eae oe
UTOMOTIVE = ; . JULIA HOWARD, le
been conducted 181 én, | Club. 25.1.51—Tn. : aly Hal NX .
CAR—Morris 8, 1948 Model in good] of the cepely aed or Git nee That J, & E. ATKINSON LIMITED, a Merricks, St; Philip NOTICE +
condition. Phone 4255. 30.1,51—I1n. * A The undersigned will offer for b GORRINGES undertake expert watch |COmpany incorporated under the Eng- i, : 4
of hearing any explanation that] pupie competition at thelr office, Ne 17,| 2nd clock repairs, cleaning and resto- | lish Companies Act, — Manufacturers, x x
AC pentition ghd taenoed tt sane, Rated tir doth ae TC: HGH Rtreet. Bridgetown, ‘vn. Thursday | Sotion Of Olt Painting value ee ete | old Bond Wired tongen WL, mre: COS GOGO4 Ss. S. « ISL ANDS rl >
Contact Leon Alleyne at Fort Royall! 195), ee Caen dwabinguouce Sout ran meri Rte ete upper Bay St. ; 25.1.51—Tn. | land, has applied for the registration of =—w_—oeeéee_ Os] ee . * IDE x
Garage about sale of car. Mrs. A. M. J. W. McKINSTRY RICHELIEU a tarde mark in Part “A” of Register " 7 r Me ’ \
we 26.1.51—2n Tn STaquidator, | 18 Silent order and zecentiy renovated, | oo are cageyyy | sions ermenunt ous, commer, hie to: RURNISH TO-DAY S18 saitine ¢ ae %
A * * n venue, ville, with 9,859 ae . > a ¥ > "
2 eee 30.1.51—In | square feet of "Iand. Drawing, ‘aining | APOEwS SEBEC DNS | sons dentition noebe. tnd, will be a eka ste 19S-—ncceptiog raise eet ae, oF shout 16th February %
plana recentin ovighailled and. in.pertast NOTICE se etnan tenn, eenace Bette heres arity Spanish Classes Reguiar Spanish | month from dhe qth day ot, January, THE POPULAR WAY . epling passengers“ Bare 77 and Cargo, y
7 order $400. 91-24, and t . . e@ “Advance: ommercial Course” unless some person sha! n eo % E
mae. tie asnron® wert, of Inspection by appointment only. Dial} Wt be commencing from the First of | meantime give notice in duplicate to m2 POPULAR Mahogany, Cedin > ROBERT THOM LIMITED, %
‘ Pr HUNT 2210, February. at my office of opposition of such reg, and other Vanities, Wardrobe » igs %,
(Deceased) COTTLE, CATFORD & CO All those interested; please be good | istration, The trade mark can be seen Bet'steads, Dresser-robes, Cradles, (Agents) Ny
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that al! . me enough to contact Mrs, Maria Carlotta | on application at my office. + Bed, Bedsteads, Springs, Laths s
BICYCLE—One Gents 4 Speed Blue] persons having any debt or claim upon Solicitors. | Gonsalves, “Santa Clara”, St. Lawrence | Dated this 29th day of January, 1951 ; i \ Teleph 4228, -
Raleigh in perfect condition, for further] or a! the estate of Ashton 21.1.51—On. | Gap, before the above date, for Regis« ‘a? WILLIAMS, mepernyy deen, MOteai Eat ‘ oon : x
teadaeee ct ath saat sn Hoptal’ ta oun oF aor ae ao WESTCLIFFE — Navy Gardens, stand-| **@tlon, — Phone; 8495, Registrar of Trade Marks, DINING, Kitchen, Cocktail a ft OPM: LALLA PLLA ALL ALLE Mat het ?
eran’ —— "| and “Isiand of "Barbados who died in | img on eleven thousand square ‘feet of $3.1.61-—€n 0:1 81-0.) }) Radio, “Sewing and other fancy ee
GINE — pow this Island on the 29th da f and. Built of Stone, Three bedrooms re nal na, :
vote utee pet a Toner ee cane 1948, are hereby required id ae and all modern conveniences. Also large Kitehen Cabinets, i ae PASSAGES T
waar’ For inspection call, at Ralph | particulars of their claim duly | Play room 30 by 14 feet. For particu- NOTI ES Waggons, warders, Tea Trolleys oO EUROPE
Y wood Alley. attested, to me undersigned, in| lars and appointment, Phone Winston OVERNMENT Cc z ine | we
ep a oe rnd care of Messrs. Hutchi: & Banfield,| Johnson at 4311 26.1.51—6n. DRAWING ROOM HITS in Cont A 7
a ea Solicitors, James eet, Bridgetown, - — - T T ona ake eae ese tunes ‘ ee eee Fagpenins nani ag iphea, for sall- {
> amd pholstere 5 5
salom papers: the py BON enh fachine tee eo APPOINTMENT OF ASSISTANT EAR, NOSE AND THROA SR a eeidtes wuacteGourtes; ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
AGRICULTURAL FORKS — (A. small [to distribute the assets of the estate| rate Dining Room, 2 fully Tiled Toilets SURGEON, Settees with low and high backs Rotterdam,
quantity available. $4.70 each. 4222

(or 4843 Branch Store) G, W. Hutchinson
& Co. Ltd. 26.1.51—4n,

CEREALS — Shredded Wheat,
Plakes, All Bran, Oatflakes in Pack and
Loose Barley 16c. per Ib. Linseed 40c
per Ib. W. M. FORD. Dial 3489, 35 Roe-







among the parties entitled thereto,
having regard to the debts and claims
only of which I shall then have
notice and that I




of whose debt or claim I shall not | 468s.

have had notice at the time of such

uaa on nearby
shall not be liable} nearest offer.
Corn | for assets so distributed to amy person| A,

and Bath, modern Kitchen, built in 4
Car Garege 2 Servants ()uarters, standing
half an rere, Price £4,500
Beard, Hardwood Alicy or Phone
26.1.51—6n.



Applications are invited for the part-time appointment of Assis-
For viewing apply Ralph | tant Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeon, General Hospital, which will be-
} come vacant on Ist February, 1951.

The salary attached to the appointment is $240 per annum and



GENERAL HOSPITAL.







MORRIS CUSHIONS, $4.50 up,
DESKS, with Flat or Sloping
top, and Folding leaf with pigeon
holes, $8 up—Bookcases, Book-
racks, Strong Office Chairs



Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. |

We invite you to inspect our assortment of:—

Oe this Offi i itted t k h for the abo ti d ene e aT CEILING FY ’ ‘Fie
buck St. 20.1.51—2n.] AND all indebted to th is cer is permitted to make charges for the above-mentione ihe Ee 'TTINGS, ‘ ‘
uck Bp I cic ie? age PERSONAL SAVING PRICES a ACKET and DESK LAMPS

BULL RINGS—Estate owners nahe



accounts without delay.









services rendered to paying patients in the Hospital.



sure your bulls, ate. secure hy using Further information regarding the appointment may be obtained e Just Opened.
od “strong Bi . We have dif- blic are hereby warned :
Sete uses. Phoeule ‘Phinrmhscy, executrix of the Will of | giving credit ‘to my wile ALBERTHA | 70M the Director of Medical Services, t¢°whom applications should L. S. WILSON

30.1.51—2n.



—————$$S$—$_—_—$
BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in

White, Green, Primrose with matching

units to complete colour suites. Top

grade. 4 BARNES & Co., Ltd

t

SN
CUPS & SAUCERS — Breakfast size
Qarge). Cups and Saucers at 58 cents.

OFFICIAL NOTICE

26,1.51—t.f.n. | BA’



Ashton Winthrop Hunt, deceased.



SMALL (nee Hinds) as I do not hold

9.12.50—4n. | myself responsible for her or anyone else

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT
OF APPEAL










contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed

by me.
Signed OLIVER SMALL,
Hillaby, St. Andrew.
30.1.51—2n.





be forwarded by 31st January, 1951.



[0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH



28.1.50-—2n Trafalgar Street — Dial 4069















Proprietors—Cnr.

NTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

of Broad and Tudor Sts,









(Equitable Jurisdiction) : ‘ {
The public are hereby warned against ( SUPPLY
. BLACKMAN—
Tea Cups and Saucers at, 35 cents, G, | JOSEPH GOSLIN WAneintit | giving credit to my wife RUBY GOD- OViEt 100 expessrve iwovels |: THE B ARB ADOS ELECTRI THIS ITs od. iF {
W. Hutchinson & Co. 26.1.51—4n. DARD (nee Gaskin) 7 I do not Hd selling off at
Lem t ursu: myself responsible for her or anyone else 2 f 1,00 ;
LOTHES HANGERS—Wooden Clothes inthe anaes erties ws ites dee contracting any debt or debts in my name The space id sloded for new
< â„¢ ts each up. Also col-\ day of November 1950, I give notice to| Uriess by a written order signed by me. stock, Select your Book Bargain 4
ourtul Plastic. Ladies" ers_at all persons having any estate, right o: Signed pptaopiy oe now. : i j
cents each, G. W,. ON &l interest in or any lien or incumbrance Zackman's, wh Michael We have just opened SHEET |@'
Co. Ltd 26,1.51—4n. | effecting all that certain piece or parcel St. Michael. PLASTIC in different colours for
ean of land situate at Dr. Gill’s land in the 50,1.81--ain, ‘

ee rwereal
DIVING MASKS — 10/- each obtain-
able in the Toy Dept. at Cave Shepherd

h, LAA, 28.1,51—t.f.n. | fourteen perches putt and bounding| The Annual General Meeting will be

So — ———— — URS Vegetable Tomato, on lands of H. Wutkle ore, L, Miller and | held at the Caspegrel aren ee ay and eae
z 80 vee *}on lands of Clayton Glascow on lands| Tuesday, 6th February, at 7, m,
oxtail, cream of Mushroom, chicken} o¢ Colleton Plantation on a Poot te Pe ARE T ;
soup, Tomato Ketchup and Tomato Puree. | piantation and on a ri ae mae way HARD'
W. M. FORD, Dial 3489, 35 Roebuck St. | however else the cake Dulko ET a ee = sic
St = | et oe gee ees INCOME TAX = ”
of their c! with

LT
HAMS—Cooked Hams 7 Ib. to 9 Ib. 2%
tins, 1 Ib, tins $1 38 each. Bacon $1.17



























parish of Saint John comtaining by ad-
measurement one acre one rood and

witnesses,
documents and vouchers, to be examined








—
BARBADOS CHORAL SOCIETY
















Lamp Shades.

T
JOHNSON’S ey



FAITH HEALING







v7
per Ib. W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck Street. ‘ : ; YoU ee
oe ott 9 premece,, 18 > heteby, given, thahiee oe ea a Due to the large increase in the price of
DES—Protect your a ea House, Income Tax returns are required acs hein & * 38 el Oil the Company are now forced to
onan a by. ing, shades, re, ave, fut ny of Saniusry: ts a ram a8) 2 Pee: Se ee ee eee i the piers § Susctiares from 20% to
openad a’ nice asso 4 1—2n. may ran come .00 per annum or Friendly Society of 47 Swan St., Po
— ba the nature and Priority lover, from every other person takes no Levies nor Assessments 27%. RO y Al
WEET BISCUITS —A Cont ie ford meee Hors, the whose income is $720.00 per from its members; gives better d
in Presentation eal blong , ree, an annum or over and from com- Benefits and Bigger Bonus; takes ‘ ffect ll
Crea See effect on a
pan Ae ene Square Chub ay: Nota property.. claim on or against the | Danies whether incorporated or||| all the family as members trom wine aoe et be Febru ary and
Cabinet Cream Crackers, Special ee Claimants are also notified that they | unincorporated, societi2s, persons} |} years old; allows Loans to |}, Mi TENGETER 10)
Drums Sweet Assorted, Jollity b reich wong gy Moons ye tek Be Wednes engaged in any trade or pro- members; carries on a Savings |]! onwards.
Assorted, Cream, Also a variety of Fev" |io'5 ee ait eT ce thelr said claims|fession, and owners of land or||} Department; and pays anybody V. SMITH,
oe eee a wil) be ranked.

" Street.
LOR & SONS ETD, 28.1.51.—2n.









Given under my hand this 23rd day of | come has accrued during the past

property whether a taxable in-

(member or not) for making new
members at the rate of Sixty

General Manager.




r ear or not. Cents (G6e,) each, any day.
TINNED FRUIT — Pears, Peaches, Lv. GILKES, ¥' , 5
Grapes, Apricots, Truss nocbuc poet | “ie of Appest.| Forms or Return may be ob-||] The “SELF-HELP & TaRiFT” ||) Yours faithtully, Announces
a , 30.1.51—2n. 28.11.50—3n. | tained from the Income Tax De- SOCIETY, 47 Swan St. (Over














TONS rE oes mace
PA!

Saturda: . Finder
‘0 Mr. A ‘ey, Lynch,

‘iubres

‘When headache, fatigue and upse
stomach ruin your morning, you ce.

OFFICIAL SALE

aedegaes
Pees,

&
r

}















Miller and on lands of Clayton
lands of Colleton Plantation
Pool Plantation and on a

partment AFTER THE 1ST DAY
OF JANUARY, 1951, and the
forms duly filled in must be
delivered to me on or before the
following respective dates:

1. Returns of persons whi
pooks were closed on e
3ist day of December, 1950.
on or before the 31st day
of March, 1951.
westined Gite of, honpaee
prin Pp of business
is not situate in the island
on or before the 30th of
June, 1951.

Returns of all other persons,
on or before the 3ist Jon-
uary 1951.
F. A, C. CLAIRMONTE,
Commissioner of Income Tax
and Death Duties.













Bata’s Shoe Store)
Open Everyday — See Hand-Bills |





THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION, LTD.










As from lst February our

business will be removed to
No. 12 HIGH STREET

To matk the event we will

open attractive new stocks
and will be delighted to

Rpe
28

a
e
i




Note:—Any person failing to
make his return within
the due date will be liable
to-a fine not exceeding
£100 and not less than £2! @

“save the day” with ,

‘Take it on arising,

later in the day. Keep a supply o:
quick acting Alka-Seltze



r however else the same
bound, and if not then sold
will be s€t up for sale
succeeding Friday between the
until the same is sold for a
than £250.



'y





a
H
3

friends




welcome our old
in the new premises.

:
:

:
:



5
i

eS
E
=}
=
|
a
——
i
=
2

Dated ay of November 1950. | ahd will be prosecuted ‘
. V. GILKES, | less a satisfactory rea- %
Ag. Cletk of the Assistant Court | a le ; }

son is given



28.11.50—29. 6.4.61—8n





of onan |







PAGE

EIGHT



Ten-Wicket Victory

For M.C.C.

Cricketers

Over Combined Tasmanian XI

iy

Peter Ditton

LONDON, Jan. 23:

Centuries by Denis Compton (his fourth of the tour) and

Cyril Washbrook (his first)

together with some fine spin

bow ling by Erie Hollies who captured four wickets for seven

runs were the feature of the

MCC's ten wicket victory over

a Combined Tasmanian XI at Launceston, Tasmania.

Another interesting point about
this match was that Alec Bedser
twice more captured Morris's
wicket cheaply, being the sixth
time in nine innings that he. nas
claimed this great left-hander as
his victim

Ih the absence of F. R. Brown,
taking a well carned rest after his
great performance in the Third
Test, Compton captained his side
and again lost the tess The
Tasmanian XI strengthened by the

inclusion of main-land players
Morris, Noblet, Hole and D
Courcey, batted first and scored

289 on the first day

For this total they were mainly

indebted to the young right
hander Hole who compiled his
maiden century in first elass
cricket It was a chanceless
affair, occupying ten minutes
short of three hours with seven
fours including some lovely

specimens of square cut

At one stage, at the tea inter+sl,
it seemed the M.C,C..might dis-
miss their opponents for a much
smaller total than they eventually

obtained Five wickets were
down for 178 runs but after the
tea interval the bowling was
collared and the remaining five
added another 114 runs
Previously Bedser had wiven
the M.C.C, a fine start by
capturing; Morris’s wicket with
only 17 rung on the board. It was

Morris’s 29th birthday, incidental
ly, and Bedser's “present” was in
the nature of an outswinger which
left-hander Morris touched to
Compton in the slips,

Apart from Hole the best
Tasmanian batting came from the
captain Laver who hit left-hander
Berry ior six fours in two overs
and altogether had ten fours in
his 59 obtained in just over 50
minutes,

On the second day the M.C.C
catablished a first innings lead of
93 and Compton. and Washbrook
both hits bundreds, Compton. com-
pleting his thousand rung for the
tour -when he reached 112. They
took part ir a whirlwind partner

ship which realised 200 in just
under two hours
Compton was the dominating

partner and after Sheppard, Dewes
and Close had all been dismissed
cheaply he took corfimand. Usitg
his feet to all the bowlers and
showing no trace of the injury
to his kriee he raced to 50 in 54
minutes and then hit a full toss
trom Shelton over the’ on-side
boundary for the first six of the
day.

The partnership became worth
100 in 55 minutes, Washbrook
having scored only seven of the
last 50,

Comptor reached his individual



NE es TR ATS)

By M. Harrison-Gray 5
Dealer: North, 5
Game alt, . 4
N. 4
ajiKn2 *) $
PI
She)
é §

a’o b otis ”
/ 6 Q
rears FUMES? |
¢ @ 10752 ena ;
oe Qe #J105 (
s. (

5 @Q43
2 ROS $
5 eatiu 2
’ #AADTS é
Tiiis hand from @ sin-tab'e 4

. Individual contest brought a
« food result to four pairs who
» played the Two No-Trump
? Yesponse as _ non- forcing
> North opened One Diamond,
but with a minimum = 12-
point hand he automatically
¢ passed Soutin’s bid of Two

¢ No-Trumps
; West led @ 5. Basi’s @ 10
losing to Sonth's @& Q. After
the lamonds

en 1 @& A. & K ond
¢ South playec / an
gn third Club won by Enst
S "The defence took three tricks

in Spades, but West then had

aww

~~

to lead Hearts and South)
made & tricks <
Ata fifth table South's ¢

> two No-Trumps was forcing.
¢ So North had to bid Three

The last South player tem. >
porised with Two Clubs. ¢
‘ ralsed w Three Clubs by }
North. and again South's :
final call of Three No-
i Trumps was easily defeated ;

London krpress Service.





See

y, i Se

a

44! AND S0,CUB SCOUTS
AND PARENTS =“IT GIVES
ME GREAT PLEASURE TU
INTRODUCE BUFFALO BILL'S
FORMER SCOUT, CHIEF WILD
ARROW, WHO WILL TALK
To YoU ABOUT THE









They'll Do It Every Time
oe:

century in. 88. minutes and = in-
cluded argong his more profitable
strokes wete eleven 4's and one
6

After the tea interva) Cormpton
was lucky not to be caught in the
slips off fast bowler Noblet but
the etcape did not benefit him
much. For as soon as the partner
ship became worth 200 (Wash
brook 59) he tried to hit across
off-spinner Dollery and w
caught at cover

as

After: Compton’s dismissal
Washbrook continued sedately to
his hundred including 58 singles
and seyen 4's made in just over
three hours. Parkhouse after a
shaky ‘start batted fluently for his
44 and W4s out “having a dip” at
whet in any case would ‘have
been thé last ball of the day

Batting the third day after the
M.C.C. declaration at their over
night total the Combined XI found
themselves caught on a_ pitch
taking spin

Bedser. repeated his first innings
performance by getting Morris's
wicket cheaply—this time caught
in the gully by Warr. Afterwarils
Hellies. struck a length and the
Australian batsmen found him
virtually unplayable. Once again
hey showed how extremely inept
they dre at making strokes when
the ball is turning. Even their
efforts to go down the wicket and
put the bowler off a length failed
to work and Evans collected two
victims behind the stumps as the
result of such attempts

A heavy thunderstorm after
lunch caused a temporary hola~up
when the M.C.C. were two runs
behing ‘arid the last Tasmanian
pair Were ‘at the wicket, When
the rain stopped however, nine
balls were sufficient to end the
innings and the M.C,.C, in the
presence of Close and Evans hit
off the necessary rung for victory
from ten balls.



What's on Today

Fela De, Kuh’s Exhibition ot
ol paintings and penci)
sketches at ‘“The Pavilion”,
Hastings— 10.00 a.m.

| Advocate’s «noto Exuibition
at Barbaods Museum —

10.00 a.m.

K. J. MacLeod’s exhibition |
of Oil Paintings at Barba. |
| dos Museum—10.00 am. |
Meeting Legislative Council |
—2.00 p.m,

The Council

|
|
\

| will consider |
supplementary resolutions
in the sums of $64,806, $43,.
509, $32,400 and $69,680.
Amoag other things, these
resolutions will provide’
the funds to meet the costs |
of the destruction of worn!
currency notes, the devel.)
erment of the water re.
sources by drilling inves.
tigations with drilling rigs,
runway lighting at Sea.)
well Airpert and altera-_
tions to and equipment for
sclence laboratories
Harrison College.



at

| Bills to suspend the provi-|
| sloms of the Representa.
| tion of the People Act,
provide for the winding
| Up and dissolution of the,
| Barbados Mutual Aid and
| Assersment Assurance So.
| ¢lety are set down for con-
sideration by the Council.
The House of Assembly)
meets at-—3,00 p.m. |
The House is due to resume)
Committee on the Bill to
provide for the regulation

| of Public Utilities.
| Belleville Tennis Tourna-
ment—4,15 p.m, |
Mobile Cinema gives show
at St. Mark’s School Pas. |
ture, St, Philip—7.30 p.m |

CINEMAS |
Empire, PH Get By" 4.45 & 8.30)
Aquatic Cinb, “My Own

True)
Love" 8.00 |
| Plaza (Bridgetown) “The Inspec
tor General’ 146 & 8.20 |
| Pinga (Oistin) “Border G-Man” & |
| “Painted Desert’ 5 & 8.0 |
| Galety (St, James) “Amazing Dr. |
Cliitterheuse” and “George |
Washington Slept Here’ —8.30 |
445 & 8.20,
4 Seoret of St. Ives’*
‘ond HO RG
West Dave






















*
en.

POOR BUFFALO
BILL «I. OROVE



THE CHIEF OVER IN THE FIR! gf OIG UP THESE
HERE-+-HE& GOT BibT ike AE ODD CHARACTERS ©

ON
HIGHWAY 29 ++
I'VE HEARD
HIM BEFORE
HiS"UGH" HAS
A BROOKLYN
ACCENT +5

“J

O

Kl



HOW DID HE GET
THE CHIEF TITLE 2
HE MUST'VE BEEN







Ra 'TEARING Dow A

=)





HAVE A

BARBADOS
DRINK

ADVOCATE



MEMBERS of the Polo Club take turns in being barman in the

recently erected pavilion, and there

are always comfortable seats for

those who do not care for perpendicular drinking.

SET THE PACE |
AND EXAMPLE

iy Willy

BILLY WRIGHT, the brillian
closes the SOCCER SCHOO!
pers on the way to make the



Wright

t Wolves and England capteif,
, with advice to aspiring skip-
job a success. Says the modest

Wright, hero of 37 internationals: You can never stop learn-

ing about the game.

HELLO classmates. Yes, 1 was
the quiet young fellow at the back.
Neyer miss a soccer lesson, You
can never stop learning about the
game, which, I suppose, is one of
its fascinations.



Watch the youngsters in the
playground, the youths in the
parks, or the young chaps who

kick a small ball around during
the dinner break, You never know
when you might spot something to

make you just that little extra
efficient.
And to those enthusiasts who

have to play on cinder pitches I
say: Do not worry about this spoil-

heap of a ground.in my Shropshire
hometown of Ironbridge

It helped rather than hindered
You had to be smart
the ball, and a few cuts and
bruises speed up the lessons of
balance and that vital art of keep-
ing your feet,

Encourage Them

AS CAPTAIN, I try to encourage
the new boys to think football as
well as just getting their
and feet into action.

But that is only one of the many
jobs of being captain, And whether
you are leader of Much-Kicking-
in-the-Marsh or, as I have had the
privilege to be, captain of England,
the duties the
same,

YOU MUST set the pace and the
example to your team. Be the first
out at training, and follow training
instructions keenly and = with
enthusiasm,

MAKE A POINT of seeing that
your playing gear is clean and in
good order. A badly tied boot, a
weak lace, an irritating hole in
your stocking are small things tha!
ean switch the result of a game.

MAKE SURE you know who '!s
going to take penalty kicks, and
when the back or half-back wilt
take free kicks. Small points, but
they all aid smooth team work.

Spot The Weakness

DURING THE GAME your job
is to set the pace for your side,
spot the weakness and strength of
the opposition and try to plan your

to control

heads

are pretty much



The Weather |

TO.DAY

Sun Rises: 6.15 a.m,
Sun Sets: 5.59 p.m.
Moon (Last Quarter): Janu-
30
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 9.02 a.m., 9.57
p.m.

_——— a ee





ae RR By Jimmy Hatlo |









i WHERE DOES
THAT CUB-MASTER



THE LAST GUY WHO
SHOWED THE KIDS
HOW TO TIE KNOTS

pee §=COULDN'T TIE

HIS NECKTIEs

es)









FOR-FREE GUEST
SPEAKER THEY'LL Do | |
IT EVERY TIME +. |

mH

ing your Soccer future. I served my
football apprenticeship on an as

campaign accordingly

If you have a new player try to
give him every encouragement, Let
him have a feel of the ball early
in the game and try to keen him
in action as much as possible. He
gets confidence and soon Yoses the
empty feeling you get in your first
big game



wJchnstone 2

Football Results

LONDON, January 2
F A. CUP FOURTH ROUND
Arver torthampten Town 2
Biacke 2, Stockport Count Bristol
City 14 Hove 0. Derb?



Cour rmingham City 3 Exeter
City 1 I Hull City 2, Kother-
ham Unitec Luton Town 1, Bristol

Manchester United 4, Leeds

FIRST DIVIBION



Charttor Athietic 1, Liverpool 4%

7 D DIVIssQN
Bu ter ty 0 Doncaster
thwers J, Swanses town 0. Queen's Park

Trngers 4, Brentiord 1}

SOCTTISH CU? FIRST ROUND
Aberdeen 6, Inverness Caledonian 1
Albion Rovers 1, Stenhousernuir 1. Alloa
Athletic 2, Hearts 4. Brechin City 3,
Perwiek Rangers 2. Dumbarton 6, Saint
Dunfermline Athietic J
Cvde: 2.
* "SCOTTISH CUP FIRST ROUND

Morton 2, Cowdenbeath 2. Partick
Thistle 1, Raith Rovers 1 Peterhead 6,
Motherwell 4. Queen's Park 3, Abroath
1) Rangers 2, Queen Of The South 0
Stirling Albion 3. Ayr United 2. Saint
Mirren 1. Hibernian 1, Third Lanark 5,
Forfar Athietic 2.

THIRD DIVISION

Southern Bournemouth 2, Swindon Town
1 Colchester United 1, Aldershot 0
Crystal Palace 1, Nottingham Forest 6.

Reading 3, Port Vale 0. Walsall 2, Ipswich
Town 0. Watford 1. Plymouth Argyle 1
FRIENDLY MATCHES
Purnley |, Blackburne Rovers 1. Car-
diff City 2, Tottenham Hotepur 3. Cov-
entry City 2, Portemouth 2. Everton 3,
Nott's County 2. Leicester City 1, Shef-
field Wednesday 06
Barnsley 1

field 1:

Middlesbrough 2,
Southend Uniied 1, Chester-

—Reuter

I make a rule uf ucv=r shouting
criticism to a player, It rattles the
clayer and can upset the whole
side.

When yeu ge*4 the chance move
cver to the player and suggest a
change in his tactics. If he sue-
ceeds, then is the time to raise
your voice and cal! across your
encouragement.

OFF THE FIELD it is the duty
of the captain to know as much as
possible about his players. Domes-
tic reasons may affect a player.
and a tactful werd may help to
overcome the difficulty.

YOU MUST, when away from
the ground, set the example of
behaviour, I don’t mean being a
spc l-sport, because | realise that a
bunch of fit, healthy lads are not
going to do themselves much good
just moping around.

And make sure the new boy is
not neglected.

In my book, “Captain of Eng-
Jand,” I stress that I shall never
forget the kindness of England
captain Joe Mercer in my first in-
ternational.

He made a point of being help-
ful and friendly, and before the
team trotted out he found time to
come over and say: “Don't forget
I am here to help you. Now, best
of luck and a grand game to you,”
1 shall never forget how I warmed
to such encouragement,

So remember the new chaps and
give them every help. The points
of training and tactics have been
excellently covered in the Soccer
School classes. I suggest you save

the series and study them again |

and again,
—L.E.S.



/i=TH ROUND SOCCER

LONDON, Jan. 29
Draw for the fifth round of: tie
Football Association Cup, to be
played on February 10. was mad¢
here today as fellows: Wolver-
hag_pton Wanderers v. Hudders-
field Town, Exeter or Chels€a v
Fulham, Sunderland v. Norwich,
Blackpool! v. Sheffield United or
Mansfield, Manchester United v
Arsenal, Stoke City v. Newcastle
United, Birmingham City v. Bristos

City, er Rovers v. Hull City
Replays are to be held on o1

before the following Thursday

vane was inspired by fruit and

MORE ABOUT TACTICS

By M. Harrison-Geoy
y 7HEN both sides require
120 forwthe tnt meld,
it is often @ gbod policy to
keep as many pairs of smal}
cards as oe wible ous
hand, providing you
least one Yokes ika a hand
which contains either the
correct count or very ciose
vo_it.

The opponents, who may
well be strugglig to attain
the count, are ‘more tikely to
discard a smal! card than, say,
an Ace or a King. For

instance, your hand ts:
K. K, @, J, » B.

. K 6. 5, 4.
er, Joker.
15 ou can of course meld 120
at any moment, but should
refrain from doing so, as you
should play to take the dis-
card pile with ¢ither a King
or a Nine. When you draw
from the stock and have to
diseard, you should throw
the Queen and the Knave
(unless you draw a matching
one) before your small cards;
for if you draw from the stock
a Four, 4 Five or a Six, you
stan a better chance of
having one of these thrown to
you than if you kept a pair of
eens.

ba the other hand, if
instead of the two Jokers
our hand contained two
wo’s, you would be forced to
keep your high cards in order
to build up the hand to the

requisite count,



London Express Service.

—_~







YACHT CLUB

FLANNEL DANCE

On SATURDAY, 3rd FEB-
RUARY, 1951.
(Por Members and their friends)

In honour of the Captain,
Officers and Cadets of
H.M.S, “Devonshire.”

Dancing 8.00 r.m. to 12,00
Midnight

ADMISSION 3/-

' By order of,
The Committee of Management,

T. BRUCE LEWIS,
Manager & Secretany,
N.B.—Members introducing their
fiiends must enter their names
in the Visitor's Register or give
them a letter of introduction to

the Secretary.









A FRESH ARRIVAL OF SMILES

Here she
Happiness—Cow & Gate, the most famous of all

Infants’ Foods.

comes



with her cargo of Health and

And what a relief! For there is

everything that Baby needs in atin of Cow & Gate
to build firm flesh, strong bones, sound teeth, and to
give that cheerful smile of abounding health and

vitality. Yes! Welcome once again Cow & Gate,

“ COW
MILK2FOOD

%

‘ Chev will be what you want them to be on Cow & Gate”

g& © 7»



J.B. LESLIE & CO. LTD.—Agents



START



THEM OFF

BK I



DAILY

ENRICHED BREAD
The Vitamin Loaf







wiTn

ROYAL BARBADOS











Yes, mothers, your good health and \
that of your children. If you ares
sometimes cross and your children

are not robust, perhaps you and
your family need more A #D
sitamins. Sostart taking Scott's



TUESDAY, JANUARY 30,

The secret of a happy
family is-

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way you and your chil-
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Sectt’s Emulsion has brought
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because ifs more than a tonic,
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straight handles
Each

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1951

HEALTH!






=

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Green, and Red made of cotton with

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BRITAIN CALLS UP RESERVISTS E/.7V. Forces 75 Miles From Seoul TOKYO, Jan. 29. 'J'HE full weight of a Chinese army 30,000 strong now stands solidly in the way of General Mac Arthur's sea, air and ground onslaught on the Korean west coast sector, Eighth Army Headquar ters announced tonight. United Nations ground battle positions tonight were placed at 15 miles from Seoul, Communist soldiers died in their frozen foxholes as United Nations men threw back counter attacks and flushed their opponents out of the hills with IMIIII II I I SAIL rifle fire and grenades. Alii Spain Will Not Make Atlantic Pact Stronger LONDON, Jim. 29 Britain h:is not change.! her view thai cloarr relation* with Spain would not strengthen the collaboration of Atlantic Pact ce defence of western Europe, Foreign Under-Secretary Ernest Davle^ tnlrf parliament today. I*"'..] S.i.ilk.'i-s. ('<.riMTV.it .. lias asked whether in view o( the need for active defence measures M was the Secretary"* policy to work for the Incorporation of Spain *n the system of western European defence, or to arrive at an agreement with the Spanish Government aim-d at UM atn v.. ast of Hie Western powers. After Da vies had anawtvad SntlUssrs asked whether the reply meant that "no diplomatic preparation* have horn made for joint defence with Spain in the case %  ( the outbreak or war' If so, was the Government not leaving these arrangements rather late in view of the vital British interesi involved?" Havies said lie was unaware of an) MM li .lii.infiments being made The argument that on practical grounds Spain would be useful a'. the present time was open to miration, he added, and iV would be foolish to provide arm* for Spain before the western powers were themselves fully equipped —Reutrr. TWO FIRES: NOT SABOTAGE BUENOS AIRES. Jan 29 Police investigating fires which broke out in less than 24 hours in installations of the Philip* Argentina branch of the wellknown Dutch electrical concern, were understood to have discounted the possibility of sabotage. Tftt nrst tire which broke out on Saturday morning razed the building m whuh Philips had Its main Buenos Aires office. The second fire occurred early on Sunday morning, in Philip*' office* in Ihe outskirts of. buenos Aires. but firemen were able to confine it to the tin roofed shed where it started. Several hundred demijohns of ntrlc and suphuric acid packed in sawdust had been stored in the shed and it was believed that Ihe intense heal m Saturday beating down on the tin roof may have been responsible for this fire. One peculiarity of Ihe conflagration which destroyed the Buenos Aires office WM that it occurred close to the printing plant of the Independent newspaper La prenaa which run. been unabl to come out sine Thursday, due to a boycott organised by Government controlled | Labour organisations. —Heater. irships standing off Inchon wnerc MarArthur made his amphibious, landing last summer, silenced shore Bltulery, tMtteries and warnlam-s. swarmed over the western sector, hammering the Communists with bombs, rockets and napalm (jellied petrol). Mustiuigi alone dropped 8.000 gallons of napalm near the west coast, northeast of Suwon leaving the whole area a sea of names Then they shot 2*0 rockets and 70,000 rounds of heavy machinegun Ore into more than 28 blazing towns and villages where there were Communist concentrationOfficially it was estimated that the presence of the 50th Chinese Army In the west coast sectoi idicnted hostile forces of 30.000 Chinese soldier*. MarArthur s patrols were even further forward than Ihe main body of advance bid tremendous resistance" was reported from the flammi BUWOn area. Seoul, the South Korean capital ibandoncd by the United Nntlons on January 4. Few Communists surrender* I in the face of the powerful display of firepower, and 130 of them made "n last bid of resistance" "ii the flank before the> were billed. Before to-daVs nssnult got under way. formidable Chinese night counterattacks near Kumyangjangnl. midway between Osan and Suwon petered out after United Nations men had raptured two important hills. Artillery and lighter bombers cut Chinese %  ngrker-. to pieces But as MicArtriui troops forged their way forward to-day the Chinese threw in more and more troops in attempts to bar their way. Firing from a position off Inchon—port of Seoul — British and American warships for Ihe second day saturated the ground with -hells from their hig guns and warplanes again Communist troops using villages BS bi\ D LSU %  Ifflll Front-II •he front were Central -Armoured patrols Wonju. went four miles beyond Hocngsong before they returned. Patrols also fanned out through the mountains lowaras PvongchaiiE. 20 miles ei 0J Wonju. ^gSsf.*? % % %  V Er> Attlee Outlines £4,700m Defence Plan Tru ma . Pleven I'xchangf \ IVI/.N WAtaiMUTON, Jan. 20 Preaaaasrt Truman . M .\ II French Prime M I |0 da) announced a tUI %  i % %  rween IhaB %  01 n ctiH'lil .Ki UM pTOl Korea and Indo ChUM At thf cc ai ctue t oa of tkv i rwu leaders authorised a statement by Tnnn.ni press Joaaaei Short, wbMli said' "President Truman and 'he Pre I h Imc Mhisth (ompreheesive exchange of views i the situation in the Far East With particular reference to the %  %  —Heater. De (,iisjnri Ami Pletvn To Meet ROME, Jan 211 Foreign Minister Count SfOTgJ. %  aid today that Ihe Italian Pre %  l >i Gasperi and Frcne'i Pleven would meet oil ihi Italian Hiviei.. in mid Fehru %  ary. soon after the scheduled p..i, c.,iMnui' on ,i Buroutan Army Tin I i. nrual ,10,1 thee II 1 I will hold the I it was Ul li 'i'c.1 Ihe i'ie.ill,.n r.l BurtpC, Miengtluu Fren. I I military oo-or4UMUon in Ihe Atlantli Pact, i|m on the western Qermany Into th. Inmpeiin roniinunity. and their • Ion —Heater. LONDON, Jan. 29. |\RITAIN is to call up 235,000 reservists for 15 days training with the forces this summer, Prime Minister Clement Attlee announced today. He was giving long awaited details of the nation's new defensive programme to a crowded House of Commons. Attlee also said that Britain would have quadrupled her output of tanks and aircraft, by 1963 -54. The total strength of the Armed forces by April 1 next would reach 800,000 men instead of the previously estimated figure of 682,000. yaan lived largely on locks If BUT plan ii U lly achieved produetion for the sen 111 hf m-re Ih. that foi the arrant >< %  >-. and b> l)3-M n nines as ii' said. that the i"e.l u\, I.. accumulating do" raw rnatortsl Tinlimiting factor in the production pragcwMM wa* not t ihe avaUabllltj i : %  %  Attlee prefaced his • i Ihey did noi itrlicvi. but beliovfd %  >'ii uiilO*-the delenee ot tlie Iras worlfl ware nuid< next 'in 11 years i weiring all prei Ih pro granuiK might l-e as much as 0.000 Tl ti ... the whnta I aid oi mllil i iv ;i defenci gram me. o u I d I e .i Ii i i' I 3tm.ih HWF.D1811 TBAINIalW K1UP "flUaUaBAM" MSN facantif-.ttly nndr awiV tfc*n 1.000 sqaars yardf. Of %  ail She catch** a good brease off Psradlsc Beach. Inset !• %  Bwodl-h csnu'ramxn nhootlng flimi. Arabs Amend Resolution 1.AKF SUCCCBS, Jan 29 T".o Ai..ii UK) Asian group of 13 %  tion calling for a prelimiTuu | i • cports from other fertiue with t'n.nmunlsl China on 'Ki rea and Far Eastern qu< %  The group in answer socrltlall %  '• made about the resolution In the Csasaral Aaaarobiy'a Pi 111 mittn Inserted, a to provid %  nl tolx> the tun builmaa at the proposed conference. On the •afUrn flank of the west roast sector United Nation* patrols roamed at will for miles nlong the upper Han Rlvtr without making contact or with vtrj imie oppo%  ution Sixty thousand Chinese DTted 10 Iw massed between the Han River and the western front ei^i nearer broad and should include a spec 11? %  : ence to a ceose-flre. _RrulerThe amendment followed negotiations during the week-end II wag circulated among other delegations just before the Political tlee resumed i | today. The Aral) Asian grrtip hoped U*t nl would attract more NO HOPE. SAYS RAU LAKE SUCCESS, Jan 29 Sir Benegal Hau. for India, told the Political Committee that India had been mloimed on the hi auttsBftty that if the Chinese jtlon us becoming Ce-mmunist Government wes con(favourable" damned as an aggressor in Korea, .Senate "these will be no hope of a peace-1 Mc Far land i u tettlarneol Reuter Optimistic Report WASHINGTON. J.in 29. Genaral Omar Bradley, Ch..,. nan of America's Jon.: I Staff gave Congressional leadei today what lhc> termed "optimi! tic report" on the Korea lighiu., He reviews the all •hem at their weekly White Ho.o meeting with Prajidanl They said Bradley saw the sltuC "*uiusjtga1v< i 'li pi' Dr %  %  id. ra lull a v Bevin Had A Good NifU LONDON J-'ol, 11 1 di with pneum nla had .light and la doctor Sir A -,TI> A Forelfl Office spOkl :-ter tin Irvin.temperature was again normul this morning and he nad maintained jreaterday'a improvement.—Renter. V.W.I.A. HMTIOX ^Sunbeam^ Leaves After 14 Days WITH its 1.800 square yarls of sail madly flapping in thf gUBt) IK rtraVMt wind, the Swivlish Trainim* Ship Sunbesua lalnMl nut of CarlUla Boy for nUrtinlque yestUrday i ndlOR 14 Hays hen. in djiduu i two BBtyi Ihsi ihip k enweted to drop tnt-hnr at For* d> Prance, It is not exptctan bo bt back in Sweden before Mav 4. Wblle Hi'IBBBBBI I mg th mjst from the harbour to Beach Club, a BwesUsn Him pan. was stfi Bsharlni th> FOOTWLONDON LONDON. .Ian 29 Twenly four hc-unc af'.t I Hugh Kiot. Governor-designate inferring Mlth Colonial OnVe >mciai< on Bactlng Wee atujafitd on these for the newt wee I Before leaving for Jamaica hy ihe Osvftaa n Harvh U %  MII have a weeh'v holl %  e. iid Benjanui iitaytna s/tth hi i ai I ug'et that such a h :ig Una '.'ill have elapsed between the ttewaol my ai i %  %  now is of impatience to return to Jamaica and start work as soon as possible" Sir Hagh has been observing carefuUy Ibe altuaUon m Jamslcu •>v mean* ol newspapers which h' .led to him I depressed by what 1 "Dut I am not going to a! form any judgment on the co r iltlons as I knew them three ye; ig. r hack rs soon as pos.1ble, mt-ei n'd fi lends end men net arounti lo different partof b* and see f i r myself wh penaagT Before he leaves he will have further conaulUtloni with Weal i ad also with tie Waal and ihe Colonial I ion. hopns/ seas in a h*'*' hum' I thooting Bbna <-i the snip untfei the mi ii at work on tin dl CB". The Advocate' Bccosstpanlad the parts %  ttw launch and took an occasional u Ihe launch was being tossed from sidf to side by U and watM broha aboard time and again giving the cameramen mum ; %  ible in shootlnc i 1 • i nlms and B" good 'etting". i.n the way to Paradise Heath Club, a bright I ting over the water, it was the flying lish. This was a novelty for the BWshaal and they were hllanou.* Ihey saw it. in spite of tha advaraa weather. Hi i iw wanted I ng part/ landed .i Far..di>e lieacn Whil. tl:-. were laftdaig the Swnbeaai went all | Wi : .irk to lake then an b M.irtiinuu*'. The filming party was composed if a director, s %  osjndjgftsn, two e.tmcramen and two act ai WerthsB for the Kiii'. r'limmg Coenpany ol Bwadan The Italiuh < s11111111111~-1 l)*'|Hilis ltVsiarly two CnmmuniM Parliamentary oaouta i Two drputlei were widely jSOraM ) % %  have revolted against the Italian CntronunsM Party' 1 .nrer'ivi-s The llahan < ..mniunlst head. quarter* mautUlnod u tight UPpad on the resignations, although it v.-tit reported that r communlo/ The deputies theinsei-. aof conunont rasfgn — hruter. The i'i %  innount*. %  i nt .I-II! the 18 davs %  tion uf the rtaw i ratief to BrDalna 4.000000 %  /." %  (inlast w ho had feared they were about ti> be uprooted fron ihi It civilian Uvi A t..t;il Of HO.lMlO uf the 235.0H0 Will do Ihetl training in t. 11 i' of upare inue \ %  lunaa young conaciipta) and 1 with which iwq would -' % %  %  •' H v '-" broke out hirt\ thousand reaen % %  similar!) called up fIn %  "ti .,: 1 %  sjboul n.'i.oon will (Kcalled up foi training in a.llv,armed f inn II*IIH m Britain and In U\ liule.il .uli. . films will be first shown in Scanthat reason I want to ge' 1 dinavia mainly for educatinj' >h%  there thai Ihey %  •ere snaking in Barbados was based on a young re-jman whose mind BAM hBTassd fr*m going to aea, or rather, failing sn> longer with his ship because he Win arcucd of having 1 le article fn m the -hip. He bore punishment frcm his shipfillowg until his ship Bk Banbegai plays thi par: nrhored in Barbados, wttan lie :n.dtBOOd I LADY BAVAOE sdBrssslng the TWCA.'s OamnilUs* and the gUhsrlng entalaa th T.WOA. swaeanarUrs ysstsraay svenlng. £5,000,000 Loan For Norway LONDON, Jan 2 Arrangi n sing completed i' loan of I £5,000.1100 t* th. (etnmfnt I I.ant shipb yards. (Jaf Haml %  .. %  I for a Btni '^land th I Brat major irea since : x ros Bank said that the loan would %  centre f Europe —r*t*r Purge Ends PRAOUI Jan 20 The iv-month purge of Ilu irah Communlal Part] has ended and HI •* part} n ing Issued to remaining inomra The nun bi .1 lleil, stmi k off, H i'' 'I front bersh p to 1 andldataa 1 grade has not ixi-n revealed Baton tiie Burgaj UM Cn I Slovak iKtrties had a 1 i> of 2,000,000 froni trial 1 pul itlon ol M. ini-ei siuji now ma) have drop pi 1 bj .ti. BaHmatod 31:0.000 or even more All that > %  • definitely known so far Is that the purge win. last summer ha* been i BI with great thoroughness In nverj 1 •. Ulage, n all < ban Biani Otflosa, In railways and all Ivila Imln. iHii.itnui .iii natli 1 ct rporations. and in hundred;> of other Institution Bld 1 atwBBgi the Ba %  powers. The Kioplt.n : I nlng ihe Count ii meeting had urged the league to |OU1 Hi eftuns to save world ptlBfS. iteferiing lo the "critical i-1 i"-i through which the world is passing," he said it was most important the Arab league should M -hnnge views and set in concert. —Kcutcr. %  Acceiei.t' anee preparIva a i ai In tha %  Hi mi. .in.i the Print* [owed substanheck eh lean da %  nantti for good".." In addition .ivih.in tuuldini: would have to I-reetaead 1 Churchill said that the Wl uld examine all lighting unit, which would Iw iel.iese proposals with candi UZ aim I tupport the event (nice. VI'IMM1o ir^ addition th Rcoral Ab v'<>u<* artli M. .11 (or IS day* training about 10.000 omceis and men i-e'piired t rci-itiiiK orgaruaatlona In an emir*ewv The Rol Nav\ will call up about 6,000 men and 600 oaVat rrosn tha Royal Fleet n 18 monlhi nt the About BJ 1 ,„l men of the Royal An Porce (spare time rnluntaera) srouM he relied u| for thre,. TIH. nth i untinuou Irainlng. AbO* 1,000 an erev 1 uhi. also 1-' naadad 'or three %  1 nan would eanui %  red .1 .hit. 1 MM normal %  %  %  .'i %  1 ma thej srouh m nth in the Army and 13 monlba ip (he A,I Forae. Attlee said no re ervhsfi would '" %  %  Uad who would I 1 %  %  11 .in irv Ml the avei The nations Increase! %  fl %  ainly on enj ih ol 1 • bad lo. ihe goodwlfl 'We shall ipeek our minds upon them win, ighi bu. what Is the •• %  .! method of securlanaered safety of our ci unlis 1., nt, 1 ELIZABETH DIVORCED l.ns ANGfELBB, Jan 20 The brief marrlaRe ol I bon actres. Kli/alM'th Taylor. endid in dleorea to day after ah< told a judge that bet bua> %  Dick Hilton wai abusive %  Iful sinlaid that "ii 111 Europe hi pi ni ihe swenuuja until 3 or b B.m at gambling casinos and 1 .ifti r iheii return ( Antertl -' —Kruier. C'FER DECLINED PARIS. Jan. 29. Bi 1.mi baa d* '.ntd uie otfjtr 1 M unda, The Itaneb Itsnlatn ft 1 Acrleui man %  ild hen He empSSBSlSad however that aavtiatlona had ant bean bBeJtaO ntlUllllll. —Iteuter. TtXL THE AliVtM'ATtl THE SEWS RIKfl 2113 DAY OR N HI ITT MI. an was left in I went on to algrtlnjqua, The thiro %  I II ilu while taken the part of the seaman Hi %  %  %  on the seaman's side. While the *hi|i *.. %  on Its way ti Martimqui ilti 1 skipper of the hip four. srhlcfa he %  li t LueUJy for the seaman, he was taken on 1' nshlng boat and wot t..tne b-M thing for him lot portraying thi ... I • On rate 1 JOHN WILL PLAY IN ST. LUCIA Ittom O.i til rmttr %  fur Hi ST LUCIA, Jon. 2Ji. k h tn captained by John CiOddird will engage JI taaffl C'SptaincH by Hi> Honour J. M Stow. Administrator, on Tuesday. Bt Victoria 1'aik v is President of ihe St Luela Cricket Association nod also led on Island team In Windward tournament I 1 1 rue a MANNERHEIM WILL GET STATE FUNERAL HI UNKl I Tin Vti mem to< %  if-Chlc't lUneral I % %  %  1017, 1939 %  —Reuter. K.W.V. PAARL TAWNY (S'lipt-rior) Bottled by THE K.W.V. — A very popular t.twny port wine of medium strength and sweetness (Beaume 3.0) Port is pIO-aaalawBltLj tD ;.l't.-r -liuiier "1 savoury Bweotnoota iaoh u WaJnnta, Almonda, (Hivta\ l.'llsH ti'lieil IHselljts iltl'l I'll't... fQ \ | r ;. | .p]ilv with tl. It in 11 laaWroly wine aju] Ibi e\ti' 1 >,ry of its ti'xiuie r*qairea that, with u ojlbitaisdins: port, aueh ns K. W. V. PAARL TAWNY, one torofoi • tasl dnWotai luxury ol a Bagorett* I -::<>kinjj may illlll the Bensibility ol the poloto and atultify tha ebauTai of ihe bouquet. It i rrablr stimulanl in oooj weaiher, railing En Runny Barbados and n c;lni K' W V, I'nnrl Tnwny B %  aTteV dtnnor or "inn oneonimon phyaieal rxertlon 1rallBtl For. "When ok! ond of |ood quality, ii 1one of the moat "who l aacane ol vinous liquors, it itrengtrrena the "nniMMilur s.'-t-m. • aaatire power, aeeej. "eratea tin* eirentation, exbiiarntra [ho Iplrl ''sharpens the mental BnorBjMS. H —lVofei



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PAGE SIX IIAKIIAUUS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. JANUARY M.IM1 HENRY FOR QUALITY & FLAVOUR STANDS SUPREME Sore Mouth LOOM Bloody Tooth ISOMV bot "n" rMun* of •<".** pock. IH *".•*** Iroiti ic.r cb.mlil r.r J-,.,,1.. -Treat! Mk VMO *4 //•* >>. kitm about \ParaM* WliB MOTHUI advinr their daughter* in take Parado). and thu save Nf*tf(M suffering due to puM Viemihrally comrx-.urid.-d from 4 ingwdienu, Paradol helps ijkwi (win ei.r*.V-wit h no ,u.riter-effects. RxcclWit i tehoa, too. Tlnnm. "Dr. Chan" it your .ujHiranc*. %  DR. CHASE'S PARADOL — Ot/ict R.li.( from Pain —i TUfrGAMBOLS •frOOOt. I'VfcTHOOW OUT A teVW 'JV^Tk-M f 0**\V OWM wHATl. JO VQ^I TWMK Of|T7 OTANl)'. *..£_ CHANClOf-*-*. H



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TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, l'l.M HARBAItOS ADVOCYTt I'M.! -IAIN CLASSIFIED ADS. mmtoM UM DIED *** %  •• *TA*D own funeral ,tl leave hi* lair !l.nt.1.*d' Hindebm, Road n. -nek thi, afternoon for A* ord'. Church *e>jjj %  •* HIH SALES AUCTION THANKS PATNB-Wr the undented beg lhr thk. medium to ihut .11 tho %  ^n* card. wreath, and letter, oi any war condoled with u. in oar r* toa MUMtnM b> (he death ol K'm FUdora •the*.. father i. Mar. %  > INMEMORIAM emoroi irk>k. Li in >dii>" •4 RIP I Mother I LSI—In Rl AIRMAN-In Mini memory of ,V, adopted mother Mr* ryrwothy Cnnum,, •C Bueamrham Road. Rank Hall. who fell aeleep |p Jr.,,. *,„ J„, U ary lt4| "Ha* *mil* ma linger* Got* to to with her Lord and But not forgotten by— LouUe Newton. Katherlnr Hrarlri D Barrow. George Dl*-km>n • liu.fMMti 3*3 .10 1 SI FM KK\T TtMROAV. JOth at u --- BUN LODor. Bart^,^, „,„" HOUSES COOI_ OAF and dining t rung water Dial M04 .X": 1 ** 1 ** "• %  *** ree.dene' "—* %  %  • * •""• tenant* Linen awd cutlery optional Av.iL.bla Februa are. For particular* dial MM ai day nrrpt gundov. 10 1 SI— II RANDY CIUST -Caiilaw*.h (P1 y, b arch. JajM, October November 1*11 PPly: H Atwell. Bank Hall ItnM MiJi-sn Lwltr TW SttrliiHi Hainan -'^VA^tA-Mn^^" Auctioneer —_^_^____ 1 il in TRINITY COTTAGE—St Jam.* C oa.t MIIT furnianed eontainmt ) bedroom•nth. oi February 1o Ma> December 1H| Pbnnr II Ul-Ji. UPSTAIR* PftXMTSEF AI No c *„,, •Mreot. COol and air,— ve>v tnaclout. Suitable for Agenti. DentKU. Sollotnr. rte. To approved tenant*. Apply immediately THANI BROS phonr MM Ml 1I-1-, UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER i~ !" i.1„ s SliWi Salt g" "*?"""> "li Frbruarv 2^? !" ^Si Thomat. "i. i\ h i K r.OTMAN a CO. AU.-II.M. 30 1.51 —|n SSAE ESTATE roam i n loving memory of our d* father George Ford who died Jnnua Mh 1M3 —i our darl.ng mother w •tied January STlh 104* Deep in our haai-ta Ike* a piclurr laocr pracloua lhan ijlvaior cold lr thai of our dathnB partoK Wnofa mrmoriaa will r*v now Q\ Umhlni bach with tandamaai Aio.j ihr path >p'v r trod, Wa hlMi ihr vvort wr had Him And laavv thr raat with Ood. TimMm •mm, BJVKU. .lv\e. Ru Kj.uaM.-ri 10 LSI—In n\mrrit i„ i„ V ina iwajntn .,( mr tt-ai f..thrr A ihlbaM ii.n-, -.!_. dlrd %  lh IfAh 1H0. P.UV dauffhlrni l. Arch Harpor ... %  ), JU .M-ln. JORDAN-In lovinB Mmoir of our drar %  >and(„ti-r Albrrt T. Jordan who l>li aatMp on January 30th iM Th* *hOCL WU KTMt. thr blow Wr nrvrr (nought that death w On I' ihoar who lovrd him < %  Thr pain of partirur wlihon k>-ar to br patrmnbarad b'. nrrtrudr Jordan ida^thlrr-ln-ldwi I>or*an. Ruby. Syrana. Mar|o>ir ipandrhiklrani 30.1.M— Ir "il In lovinc mrmotv o( our daar batovad mMhar lathat FJ.iabath LMIIP -•ho drpirtrd thli lift; on Jimun 30th 1PM. %  var to ba ramambrrad by— John l*lir ihuabandi and rhildrm 3D.IAI—In. fAI-VIn tov ba lovrd daughtar JdvanaUna Nad* 11. Saoly who wa. Uld to rau on 3lh January ltT. In tear* wa aaw hrr Mnklni And walrh har (ad* away Ood know how much wa mlaaad har A* tt dawn lour >r.ra to-day Wa oi'm •land br.idc har grave With ha.ru dill *d and aorr And ihn.k M hrar ihoi* lovinc word* Not daad |aja| aona to rart Aiiiao. ">: %  "* un.lrr.ined uu to Fabruaiy 3rd INl. Sfcyr-ad C. A. SKINN-TH Vaafry Cleik. SL Andrew. %  4 1 11-a.n. Caribbean Bottling Co. LiiiN. FOR SALE AUTOMOTIVE Phone 42M. CAM — X M. Dodfa 1 Pawenger In A 1 cordi!ion and Uranaad till June. Contact Leon AlMyn* ai Fort Royal Oarago about aaW of car. Mra. A M. Arthur, Yorkshire. M. 1.11-On. CA — One ( paaaangae Vdan Tarropluia recently overhauled and in perfect working order prlco far*). lUna I1-7* Uahthouw. -t. Locy. 1 11 -In MECHANICAL mcYCLa>-Ora. Qenta 4 Speed Blur Raleigh In perfect condition, lor further information phone the Marino Hotel Slot e-keeper. 30.1.91—JR. DUIIL IStilSK — 1 norae power vertical, .hop uiiled, na\"er bean uaad DOOen. For Inapartlon c.ll at Ralph pajird'. ahow room Hardwood Alley. IT .LSI-In. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuance? of Section 183 of ihc Companies Act 1910 that a general meeting of the obovrnamerl company will be held at the office of Messrs. Bovell Skeele. Lucas Street. Bridgetown, on Monday, the fifth day of March, 19S|, ni 2.30 o'clock in the afternoon for the purpose of having; an account laid before them showing the manner in which the winding-up has been conducted and the property of the company disposed of and of hearing any explanation thai may be given by the liquidator. Dated this 29th day of January. J W. McKINSTRY. Liquidator. 30.1.51—In MISCELLANEOUS AORrci'l-Tl-RAL. FORKS A a t %  aMlty available B4.70 each. DU1 4H> iur 4S4J Bunch Store' O. W. Hutchlnwin ft Co. Ud. M.1^1—4n. ODtXALR ShreoMrd Whea*. Corn li.'i All Bran, Oatfleke. in Pack and Loow Barlev lac. per lb. Unwed 40r pr. lb W. M. rORD. Dial 3*f. 3S Roe buck St. Jii 1 jl In HULL, RDtOS— BMate ownara .ura your bull* ara aecura by ua good atrong Bull BMng. W. hav frent Uret PhoenUt Pharmacy. BATHS — In Porcalain Snamel, m White. Oreen. prunroaa wHh matching unit* to completa colour auttaa. Top KT.de V BARW ft CO.. Ltd CUP" ft SAUCXHS — %  raakfaat ^t Uatgei Cut** and Saucaea at H cant' Tea Cupand Saucer* at 36 orata. ( W. Hutehlnmn ft Co. Ud. ^ CLOTHES HANGERS—Wooden Clothe* hangwrt from I cent, each up, Abio col .i ii ful I'lattk Ladiea' Hangar* ai conu each. a. W. HUTCHINSOH Co. Ltd. 1 Bl— 4n. DtVTNO MASKS — 10 able In the Toy Dept. at tCo. Ud. each obUIn, a.e Shepherd 10.1,11—f HJUNZ ROUHS — Vegetable Tomato o.lail. cream ol Muahroom. chlrkar •oiip. Tomato Ketchup and Tomato Puree W. M. FORD, Dial 3400. B R.whutk Si HAMS-Coobed Kama I lb to • ttt. IJ Una, 1 lb. tin" H 11 each. Bacon 01 I rer lb. W. M. rord. IB Roebuck si.ee HADIC--Pro1ect your aiaa from Store. a *|J| Crawford Oblona' Aaaonad Cream. OWooaCUib Cheew Straw.. Sua-e Club Chaja. Cabinet Cram Cracker,. Sfwctal •tfJlit • Round. Almond Shortbrrad r^mOy Drum* Swee. A->rtad. JoUlty Aborted. A^mned Cream. Ateo a variety of Flav ovir. in ', lb. Parkagva—JOHN D. TA\ LOR ft SONS LTD.. ,tortuc,, f 5^ t ^ tr|i NOTICE He EMata of A1RTOK KINTMMOr OH-yT None* IS HERESY QiVEN Id : all peraona having any debt or claim upon affecting the aitale of Aahton nthrop Hunt, late of the YM.CA, Hoatal In the parMh of Ha:nt Michael and I.land of Bart* do. who died In thia laland on the Witt day of July ara hereby required to eand |n partlcuUr* of Uaj.r claim d'Hattaetad. to mo the under-igned, In rare of aaaaara. Hutchmaon ft BaoSeld. Solicitor*, Jama* Straw*, nnila.ain.il. >r before the 15th day of February i*6l. attar which data I >hall pmreed -o dUUibute the aaaata of the e*tate imong the partiaa rntu.ed thereto, taring regard to the debts and claim' only of which I anall then hav* bad notice and that I Mall not be liable aaaata eo distributed to ;m paraon whoae debt or claim I anall not have had not tee at the time of *uch Oi.trlbuUon AND all peraon* Indebted to the . id eaUla ara raquaeted to Mttle their count, without delay Dated thit th da* of December 1000 SYBIL PAULINE DeCOUrlCCY HINDS. Quallnrd aiecutlll nf lha Will of Aahton Wtnthrop Hunt, decreoed. 0.11.00— An TTKNTD FRUIT Pear., Peachaa. Qraana, Aprlcoti. Fruit Salad and Pruitaa In .yrup W. M. Ford. IS Roebuck Street Dial 340O. OFFICIAL NOTICE BARBADOS. IN III* ASSISTANT ( in NT OF APPEAL (Equitable JurladKUoni JOSEPH OOSLIN DLACKMAN -Pl.i.nt.fl JAMES ELBXRTON BRATHWAITT. —Defendant IN puiruanca of an Order in thi> Court In the above action made on the 23rd lay of November 10SO. f give nolle* to II peraona having any aalata, right o.' ulereat In or w>y lian or Ineumbrance fleeting all that certain piece or parcrl f land altuate at Dr. Olll'. land In the parlih of Saint John roi^talnlng by adnaamirrment one acre one rood and f'i rtt-en perihet Putting and bounding land, of H. Wllkie of C. L Millc, and land, of Clayton Olaaeow on land, ol Colletim Planution on land, of Pool PlonUAIon and on a right of way or ta may butt or bound to bring betore me an account clalme with their wlineeer*. documentand voucher., to be examined by ma on any Tueadas. or Friday between the hour, of U inooni and 3 o'clock In the afternoon, at the Office Clerk of the AeaWtant Cbui louae, Bridart f January 1M1 claune may be rank %  nature and priority reaper lively: otnaewtaa will be precluded frn ftanaSt of the eaJd Oacree. a deprived of all claim on or agai' raid property. Claimant* are alao notified that lhe> mu>t attend the aatd Court on Wnln tfar, the im far of January 1HI. 10 o'clock a-m. when thnr uid cluim* will be ranked Olven under my hand thla 33rd day Ol "•"-"-• %  V OILK. Ag. Clerk of the AaaUtant Court •** % %  "" XI perehoa ol iail w •by aa>it„n 6 h, I>^„r; "hurl grK.' s •smsff.^f-^ % %  vm.v,r1 .r:-•£ TAKE NOTICE QUIX > M..I..H ..IJ ROM rae-jtratton ol a ^^ JSuZ* • %  deterrent, rwanln[rtngand a*...,v, .,. the atatgj aJtec One moatli I "> ..f Januar> | M * %  I" the mao, dupllc.tr to n TAKE NOTICE PIN-UP £2L.~ rDiVP tolD PSJIMWA'F. i • a Company barorpo. iiw riMilian Companir. Act Maimf.ctur%  MlPart Rm.l Kud l.on* Snluinal baa appl M l.w the ||g "i "•*; "T 11 2 "•-" "A" aflSl-ie; >a i^taaei i preparotton. tor wa\mg tke h..,r. eaebat. to. uaa ... ..um th. Mil mm pteMratto,,. K, lr ll>lhwi raajtener. UH | hau tuppeeta. and x ; I he > Januar ia the meonlkaie lvr not ire In dnpl, eat. to ma at n, aaWre of e-pa.to uf M.cb ragletralion. The trade mar* be .-en an applmtton at my ofRre Skh day of Jami-nrv | H WriJJAMS Reimrar ..f Trade M. TAKE NOTICE SHIPPING NOTICES ...TTlLt*? 'afPEJUAl \ARNUU( COLOR COMPANY LUiTBD. the Uea. Canoda. whoae"Trade" or _^ 1-10 Morae Street. Toronto • Caned*, haa applied for I mark tn Part • Heairtri ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Sil %  ..• tin%  r 1 tfraat, %  '". IfC letk Har Helena' inn. 1 *". %  agaatja Trinidad. Paaom..ibo and lh Janu. '-Cotlica" 7h Frbruar/ Helena3rd March 1001 Trinidad. la Gmara. Curei. -Oranteatod i.t Falaimm IMI Sailing In Plytnmith. AntweL %  S P. MIJSSOM. SON ft CO LTD.. The U V. DAntWOOD" teal acerpt Ctcgo and Pw^neet* lor %  Parl li fkkilma: on Wadne*day SMI The MV -caiibhawwill aceopt Carao and Paaeangera in Don-In lr. Antigua. gfi Nerta and St kitto Date ol departuie to be notified. M.W I SI IIIMINLR OWNEES A5SOC1ATIOV. |DC. Telepbptte: d4? W/fea St*at*hip CThe undermined will Riibli, competition at tl lllgh Street, on Thur. of Februar/. I0S1 Mi i | Ti.. TUE ..".. l.jaa -quarc feet of Land Uuau Carriaoit^contaltilruj I verandah* tx^z^rzssmi-mEra enctoTed wrdlr!'**' w^v.„ U room, and The M ie may bo made w.U nut the furniture VSaanl poaaaa a ion will be 0 ... m ? ,,l ." t 1 > appolnlmenl only with COTTIX, CATHJI'1) A FOR RENT OALg OR LCAMB BAOATTJ iy. HOUSE. sT TrW,". UpM.I.. Clo-jl Caller-. Dr.wm, a, ld D ln cH* Tbodr^*" r ra "" d K ch • r, Tollet a:id Bath. DOWNSTAtRS Cla Oallery. Living-room. Breafcf-.i K "nd Kitchenette. I Bedroom. To(l L Bath. Uertrtc Light and Telepho,* er of Bagatelle Plant HIUHA. Dial ttii. u ui^ CAVE a lOACRID PI-^NTATIOKS *e win art up for aale by Public Competilion at our OmCe J.mr. Street, on Fridoe tnd February 100). at I p m CAVE ft ROACHES* PtANTATIONS .uuaie In St Luey and con-aintng by aerei 1 rood. I) perche. Of which about *0 acre, are aiabie The acreage la made up 00 follow.: SaH acre, let crop cane, ready for iplng. M ajrafl | rrparatloi> t acraa 13 perehe roada. yarda iInapeetio'i nn application to Ml Ormond Kniiht on the pramiati. YEAKWQOD ft BOYCE. SeiiciTor.. 11.1.lithe freehold The underaigned will ofl public competition at then High P treat. Btldgrtawp. Februarr at I p.m. dwalLngh^,^ called in. in i in n ancellent order and recently renovated. n llth Avenue, Belleville, with O.OM quare feet of land. Drawing, dining nd breakfaat room., 4 bodiooma. bath nd toilet and kitchen. Double garage nd aervant. rooma. In*pect ton by appolnlmenl only, plat MID COTTUE. CATFORD ft CO.. Solicitor*. II III—On WEBniUFTX — Navy Oardeni. etand on elavati Ihouund aquare fee* of nd. Built of Stone. Three bedroom. id all modern convenience*. Alto large play mom 30 b 14 feet For partHulara and appointment, Phone WintlnJohnaon at 4111. U.IJI—gn. AT TOP ROCK — Deliah having 3 Bedroom., large ate Dining Bonn. nd Bath, modern Kltche "ar G... at 1 serv.nu t;.ia m nearly half an ~ci>. leareti offer For vlrwlni I. Beard. Ilardwoot Ain 4M3. •eUdeneTiled Toilet' i. built In MrS • landing lllce £4Je apply Ralph WR BUY FOR CAS* OM Gold and Silver Jewellery, eolna. denture., etc. write, call or Dial * %  cuskiitii:* Antique .hop. adiolning Royal Yacht Club. M.Ill-Tn. C.ORRINOEB undertake expert watch and clorb rrp-lra, rlr.nina and rerforoUon of oil painting*, valuation, for Inaurance and probate, (.n-pivni. ~ f St. M.I 11—Tn. Spanish Tuition Now Rpanlih Claiar* Regular Spanl.h and the "Advanced Commercial Courte" will he commencing fmm thr Fir** of February. All Ihoce mteraatad: pleaae he aood eiAugh to contact Mr*. Maria Carloltw Oonaalvea. "Santa Clara". St La*rrene Gap. before the above date, for Raglatratton. — Phone: 04JO Ml ll-tm Thai J, ft E. ATKIN Compai v inrnrpornled luh Companle. Act. whoae trade or buM Old Bond Street. I ... •' % %  land. ha. avplled for larde mark In Part "A" of RegMrr Hith leaprct of perfume., toilet prepaia in--, hair i"^>ai. and will be niUtled to regular the *ame after one month from aha 30th day ol January. IMI unleea urnie peraon .h.ll „, the i.ieantlmo give notice in duplicate 00 m* M ir.. offlee of oppoution of uch reg. (.tratlnn. The trade mart can be aeen an application al my office Dated Ihlf SMh dnv of January. IMI II WBX1AMS. negUtrar of Trade Marks 10 I M :i i GOVERNMENT NOTICES PERSONAL n.e hereby wan rd I to m> wile AJJIEJITH/ SMALL Miee Hlud.i aa 1 do no aalf re.non.il.ltf.ir har or anyoi contracting any debt or debU h> a written order APPOINTMENT OF ASSISTANT EAR, NOSE AND THROAT BUROEOH, GENERAL HOSPITAL. Applications are invited for the pari-tlmr appointment of Assistanl Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeon, General Hospital, which will bejcome vacant on 1st February, 1951. The salary attached to the appointment Is $240 per this Officer is permitted to make chorges for the above-mentioned services rendered to paying patient.* in irtgj Hospital. Further information regarding; the npfjolntment may be obtained from the Director of Medical Services, to" whom applications ihould be forwarded by 31st January, 1951. 28 I S0-2ii by i Signed OLIVER SMALL. Illllaby, St Andrew Mill in The public ul.me .mlii DARD mar Oaahtr.i ,il,l. : I do r her o rartina an debt or debt. In mv raa by a written order .lined b Signed ALBXIET t^UlPARD. #,w;kman'.. Payne. Oap. St. Michael 30 I II—k RARHAIH1S < Mult \l S(K IETY INCOME TAX NOTICE M.I 1 WATER Fl'MP 4' Inch .BKtton M.MO gall., an hour completa with .haftM and bed 0M0O In Ralph Beard. thaw room. Hardwood Allay. LOST FMTttD LOOT PAaR. TURTL* FBAME OUASM9I at Queep'l part on Saturday night Finder pleaae return to Mr. Aubro/ Lynch Carneti Street, near Queen'. Park. Whan head ache, fatigue and upte atamarh ruin your morning, ycu r •aff*f lha day" with A>k..Seltre, Yaka it on ariaing. agaen if r*rde< -Utar in the day. Keep a e,ppl, o quack acting Alka-8*>ltu ffJpQ handy -ejwer.' OFHCIAL SALE BARBADOS. EN TE AklMTANT COrST Of APPEAL {Equitable Jurixtirt 'OP i JOeHPH OOflLIN Bl ACKMA.N V.^.I <." JAMES aXBRStTON BKATHWAITE —Defendant NOTICE i, hereby given that by virtue f an Order of the Aanatani Court ol Apgaaal dated lha 23rd day of November ISM. there will be art p far aale -o the higheat bidder at the Offler of thCarrk of the Aaiirtam Court of Ap Court laouae. Bridgetown. i the II FURNISH TO-DAY THE POPULAR WAY Pjgafllfa Kiirhetv Cocktail Sadto. SewinO ind other lancv Table* China. Bedroom and Kitchen Cabinet. Bkgiboa r tli. IVagion. HJTS ID Alkd -Seltzer 1 o'clock in the afternoon on Friday, the tnd day of Febewary iM!. all tna' certain place or parrel of aaatd aitoaae at Dr. OlU'. land to the pariah of SairJohn rontainuig br.admeoiuremrnt ofit acre one rood and fourteen perrhe-i but tinand bounding on lana. of H WIIHK ol C. L MUlar and on land, of Clayton Olaaeow on land, of Collelon Plantalior. eat land, of Pool Plantation and on a right of way or however eleo the earn* re-W butt or bound, and l( Ml than aoM the aoM property will be >*t up for aale MI every rarcaagag Itkby between the .urn not laea than EMO*. Dated tkM SSrd day of November IMO t v orutjas At. Oof* Of UM OM g g n t OOUIt of Appaa; Mil Notice is hereby given that Incoire Tax returns are required from every married man whose income is 91,200.00 per annum or over, from every othar ptuooo whose Income is $720.00 per annum or over and from companies whether incorporated unincorporated, societm, persons engaged in any trade or profession, and owners of land or property whether a taxable income has accrued during the past year or not. Forms or Return may be obtained from the income Tax Department AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY. 1951, and the forms duly filled in must be delivered to me on or before the following respective dates: 1. Returns of persons whose books were closed on the 31st day of December. 1950 H on or before the 31st dy of March. 1951. 2. Returns of persons whose principal place of business Is not situate In the island on or before the 30th of June. IBS I. 3. Returns of all other neon on or before the 31st January 1951. F A. C CLAIRMONTE. Commissioner of Income Tax and Death Duties. Note:—Any person failing t make his return within the due date will be liable to a fine not exceeding f 100 and not less than ti and will be prosecutsd unless a satisfactory reason is given. • ..tl-4*> Suil,i,i: f*77 nnd Cassjo. KOHIHT THOM LIMITED. $ (Arrenls) ^ Telrphonr 122S. PASSAGES TO EUROPE CaaUct AnllUc, PTOAKU, UmlUd, Roseau, nnniliiUj, for ullm, lo Furop.. Thr u.uil pnni ,,f cull ,„ Dublin, London, or Roiwrd.m. .Su.He l, 0 i:70; IUUO nductioni (or children.


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Barbados



ESTABLISHED 1895



U.N. Forces 15
Miles From Seoul

TOKYO, Jan. 29. _

"THE full weight of a Chinese army 30,000 strong

now stands solidly in the way of General Mac-
Arthur’s sea, air and ground onslaught on the
Korean west coast sector, Eighth Army Headquar-
ters announced tonight.
United Nations ground battle positions tonight
were placed at 15 miles from Seoul.
Communist soldiers died in their frozen foxholes
as United Nations men threw back counter-attacks
and flushed their opponents out of the hills with

rifle fire and grenades.
- Allied warships
Inchon where MacArthur made

. “ill t his amphibious landing last sum-
ypam 1 oO mer, silenced shore artillery, bat-



standing off

bombs, rockets and napalm (jel-
Britain has not changed her view | the whole areaasea of flames.

M k l . teries and warplanes, swarmed
lied petrol).

Mustangs alone dropped 8,000

that. closer relations with Spain}Then they shot 240 rockets and

would not strengthen the collabor- | 70,000 rounds of heavy machine-

over the western sector, ham-
§ pokes of napalm near the west
ation of Atlantic Pact countries in| gun fire into more than 26 blazing

mering the Communists with
LONDON, Jan. 29. coast, northeast of Suwon leaving
defence of western Europe, Foreign | towns and villages where there

Under-Secretary Ernest Davies|were Communist concentrations.
told Parliament today. Officially it was estimated that
Peter Smithers, Conservative,|the presence of the 50th Chinese

has asked whether in view of the}Army in the west coast sector
need for active defence measures | indicated hostile forces of 30,000
it was the Secretary’s policy to|Chinese soldiers.
work for the incorporation of Spain
in the system of western European
defence, or to arrive at an agree-
ment with the Spanish Govern-
ment aimed at the strategic inter-
est of the Western powers,
‘ After Davies had qnewerse,
Smithers asked whether the reply uary 4.
meant that “no diplomatic pre- “ne Communists surrendered
parations have been made for joint|in the face of the powerful dis-
defence with Spain inthe case of | play of firepower, and 130 of
the outbreak of war? If so, was the them made “a last bid of resist-
Government not leaving thes€)anee” on the flank before they
arrangements rather late in view | were 'illed.
of the vital British interest in-
volved?” ‘ Before to-dav’s assault got un-
Davies said he was unaware of| der way, formidable Chinese night
any such arrangements being made.}counterattacks near Kumyang-
The argument that on practical;jangni, midway between Osan
grounds Spain would be useful at|and Suwon petered out after
the present time was open to| United Nations men had captured
auestion, he added, and it would|two important. hills: Artillery
be. foolish. to. -—previde..arms. for|and fighter bombers. cut Chinese
Spain before the western powers ers to pieces. But as Mac-
were themselves fully equipped. r’s troops forged their way
—Reuter. |forward to-day the Chinese threw

in more and more troops in
TWO FIRES: NOT,

MacArthur’s patrols were even
further forward than the main
body of advance but “tremendous
resistance” was reported from the
flaming Suwon area, south of
Seoul, the South Korean capital
abandoned by the United Nations






tempts to bar their way.

Firing from é pone At
1 , Inchon—port of Seoul — British
SABOTAGE and American warships for the

second day saturated the ground
BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 29. |with shells from their big guns
Police investigating fires which|and warplanes again harassed

BRITAIN CAL

TUESDAY, J





> VARY 30, 1952



RESERV

Attlee Outlines £4,700m

Truman, Pleven
Exchange Views |

WASHINGTON, Jan
President Truman and the|
French Prime Minister, Pleven,!
to. day announced a “fundamental
identity of policy” between their
government on the problems
Korea and Indo China
At the conclusion of the opening
session the two leaders authorised

29

ot



SWEDISH TRAINING SHIP “SUNBBAM” moves boautifiadly under mov® than 1,000 square ‘yards of

sail, She catches a good breeze off

Paradise Beach. Inset is a Swedish



“| Arabs Amend

Resolution

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 29.
The Arab and Asian group of 12

broke out in less than 24 hours} Communist troops using villages |naticns today amended its resolu-

in installations of the Philips as_bivouac camps.

Argentina branch of the well- eeont ine a —
known’ Dutch electrical concern, Sectors © e fron ere: a
were understood to have discount- -Central Armoured _ patrols

raed based on Wonju, went four miles
ed the possibility of sabotage, ; H song before. they
The first Are which broke out on|PEÂ¥Ond , Hoengsong | beto ;

; returned. Patrols also fanned out
Saturday morning razed

building in which Philips had its! pyongehang,
main Buenos Aires office. The! Wonju.
second fire oorunney early op
Sunday morning in Philips’. offices
in the outskirts of, Buenos Aires,
but firemen were able to confine
4s to the tin roofed shed where contact or with very little oppo-
it started. 4 sition. Sixty thousand Chinese
Several hundred demijohns of|were reported to be massed be-
nitric and suphuric acid packed in|tween the Han River and the
sawdust had been stored in. the| western front.
shed and it was believed that the} South—United Nations troops
intense heat on Saturday beating |surrounded a large force of North
down on the tin roof may have| Korean guerillas which had penc-
been responsible for this fire. trated to within 50 miles of Taegu,
One peculiarity of the con- Allied headquarters in the south-
flagration which destroyed the | east.—Reuter
concerns Buenos Aires office was
that it occurred close to the
printing plant of the Independent
newspaper La Prensa which has
been unable to come out since
‘Thursday, due to a boycott organ-
ised by Government controlled
Labour organisations. —Retter.

NO HOPE, SAYS RAU
LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 29.
Sir Benegal Rau, for India, told |

other

20 miles cast

On the eastern flank of the west
coast sector United Nations patrols
roamed at will for miles along the
upper Han River without making



Optimistic Report

WASHINGTON, Jan 29.
General Omar Bradley, Chair
man of America’s joint Chiefs of
Staff gave Congressional leaders
today what they termed ‘“optimis-
tic report’ on the Korea fighting
He reviews the situation tor
them at their weekly White House
the Political Committee that India| meeting with President Tryman
had been informed on the highest} They said Bradley saw the situa-
authority. that if the Chinese|tion as becoming “progressively
Communist Government wes con~ |favourable” “I was well pleased





demned as an aggressor in Korea,'Senate Democratic leader
“there will be no hope of a peace- | McFarland said,
ful settlement,”.—Reuter. —Reuter.



V.W.C.A.



LADY SAVAGE addressing the Y.W.C.A.’s Committee and the gathering outside the Y.W.0.A

ters yesterday evening,



the/through the mountains towards | mittee in:

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FUNCTION

tion calling for a preliminary con-
ference with Communist China on
Kcerea and Far Eastern questions.

The group in answer to criticism
made about the resolution in the
General Assembly's Pclitical Com-
rted a clause to provide





of lfor a cease-fire agreement to be the

first business at the proposed con-
ference.

The amendment followed nego-
tiations during the week-end It
was circulated among other dele-

gations just before the Political
Committee resumed its debate
today.

The Arab Asian grcup hoped the
amendment would attract more
support from “middle of the road”
delegations which had generally
agreed on the advantages of hold-
ing the conference but had felt that
the 12-nation resolution was too
broad and should include a spec fi<
reference to a cease-fire.

—Reuter.

Bevin Had A
Good Night



LONDON, Jan. 29
- Foreigr Secretary Ernest Bevin
ili with pneumenia had a good

iight and his condition is sSatis-
factory his doctor .Sir

Alexander
Me Call said to-day.

A Foreign

Office spekesman said later that
normal this morning and he had
|



Bevin’s temperature was again
maintained yesterday’s improve-

ment.—Reuter.



Headquar





| Norwegian loan w

cameraman shooting films,

“Sunbeam” Leaves

After 14 Days

WITH its 1,800 square yards of sail madly flapping in
the gusty northeast wind, the Swedish Training Ship’ Sun-

beam sailed out of Carlisle
after spending 14 days here,

Bay for Martinique yesterday

In another two days the ship is expected to drop anchor at
Fort de France. It is not expected to be back in Sweden

before May 4.



HOOT IN LONDON

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan

29

Twenty four hours after his re-j

turn from Nigeria yesterday, Six
Hugh Foot, Governor-designate
of Jamaica was today conferring



with Colonial Office officials on
matters affecting West Africa. He
has a number of commissions to
dispose of from the Governor oi
Nigeria and will be engaged on
these for the next week or ter
ouys.

Before leaving for Jamaica by



the Cavina cn Marcy 23, he and
nis wife will have a week's holi-
y in Italy where their ycungest
ild Benjamin is ying with his
zyandmother. “I regret that such a
long time v have elapsed bhe-
tween the news of my appointment
ond the time I take up office”, Sir
Hugh said today ‘‘My main feeling
now is of impatience to return to
Jamaica and start work as soon
as possible”

Sir Hugh has been observing
carefully the situation in Jamaica
hy means of newspapers
has airmailed to him. am a bit
depressed by what I see’, he said

“But I am not going to attempt to
form any judgment on the con
ditions as I knew them three years
ogo, For that reason I want to ge
back @s soon as possible, meer my
old friends and then get around
to different parts of the island
and see for myself what is hap
pening”.











Before he leaves he will have
further consultations with West
Indian officials at the Colonial
Office and also with the West

Iudia Ccmmittee and the Coloniat
Development Ccrporation

£5,000,000 Loan.
For Norway



‘at Paradise

which he |

While the Sunbeam was skirt-
| ing the coast from the harbour to
Paradise Beach Club, a Swedish |
film party was weathering the |
choppyw’seas in a local launch
shooting films of the ship under|
cail and the men at work on the}

deck, The Advocate’s cameraman ;
accompanied the party in the}
launch and took an oceasional !
snap.

The launch was being tossed
from side to side by the waves

Occasionally
Paradise

on the
Club, a

way
Beach

the water; it was the flying fish.
This was a novelty for the Swedes
and they were hilarious whenever
they saw it,

In spite of the adverse weather,
they got the shots they wanted
at sea and the filming party landed
Beach. While they
were landing, the Sunbeam went
away down into the West before
turning back to take them on to
Martinique,

The filming party was composed
jof a

director, a soundman, two
|

cameramen and two actors, who
; are working for the Kinscentrahen
Filming Company of Sweden, The
films will be first shown in Scan-
dinavia mainly for educating the
natives there

The story that they were making
in Barbados was based on a young
seaman whose mind was turned
| frcm going to sea, or rather, sail-
ing any lor
cause he
stclen some
the ship,




accused of having
iluable article from

He bore punishment from his
shipfcllows until his ship—the
| Sunbeam plays this par:—

enchored in Barbados, where he
fs good bis escape,

The young scaman was left in
Barbados and his ship went on to

|'membership

All that is definitely known so
far is that the purge which started
and water broke aboard time and |jast summer has been carried out
trouble in shooting their tilms and/town and village, in all Govern-
a“ good wetting”.
er with his ship be-}

a statement by Truman’s press
secretary, Joseph Short, . which
said: “President Truman and the
French Prime Minister had a
comprehensive exchange of views
jon the situation in the Far East
with particular reference to the
Paronie in Korea and_ Indo
China,



—Reuter.



De Gasperi And
Pleven To Meet

ROME, Jan, 29
Minister Count Sforza
that the Italian Pre
Gasperi and French
Pleven would meet on
the Italian Riviera in mid Febru
ary, soon after the scheduled
Paris conference on a European
Army. The Premiers and their
Foreign Ministers will hold the
conference, it was understood,
to speed the creation of a united
Eurcpe, strengthen French Italian
military co-ordination in the
Atlantic Pact, agree on the inte-
gration of Western Germany into
the European community, and
tighten their economic co-opera-
tion ,.—Reuter.

Foreign
Baid today
mier De
Premier



Italian Communi
Deputies Resign

ROME, Jan, 29
A flood of defection among Com-
munist intellectuals was forecast
by centre and right-wing press





pened iar cereals

Defence

isTS






“e/PRICE: FEVE CENTS

e Plan

LONDON, Jan. 29.

RRITAIN is to call up 235,000 reservists for 15

days training with

the forces this summer,

Prime Minister Clement Attlee announced today.
He was giving long awaited details of the nation’s
new defensive programme to a crowded House of

Commons.

Attlee also said that Britain would

have quadrupled her output of tanks and aircraft
by 1953—54. The total strength of the Armed
forces by April 1 next would reach 800,000 men
instead of the previously estimated figure of

682,000.

The total defence budget for the
next three years covering all pre
parations except the stockpile pro-
gramme might be as much as
£4,700,000,000

This year alone expenditure over

the whole field of military and
civil defence preparations, again
excluding the stockpiling pro
gramme, would te about

£ 1,300,000,000,

The Prime Ministers announce-
ment about the 15 days mobilisa-
tion of the reservists came as a
relief to Brijain’s 4,000,000 “Z"
class men—servicemen cf the last
war—who had feared they were
about to be uprooted from their
civilian lives for a longer period

A total of 80,000 of the 235,000
will do their training in terri-
torial army units (a comb nation
of spare time volunteers and
young conscripts) and formations
with which they would actually
serve if war broke out.

Forty thousand reserves will be
similarly called up for training
in enti-aireraft command, About
115,000 ~will be called up for
training in active armed forma-
tiéns in Britain and in the vari-
ous technical administrations and
fighting units which would be re-
quired in the event of war to
support forces overs@€as and at
home

In addition ths Royal Air Force



here today as the result of the/wili recall for 15 days training
resignation from the party ofjabout 10,000 officers and men
two Communist Parliamentary! required to man and control
deputies, reporting organisations in an
Two deputies were widely re—)emergency,
ported to have revolted against} The Royal Navy will call up
the ‘Italian Communist Party’s{@bout 6,000 men and 600 officers
submission to Russian directives.}{"om the Royal Fleet reserve foi
The Italian Communist head-|18 months of the service,

quarters maintained g tight lipped
silence on the resignations, al
though it was reported that a
communique was being prepared
The deputies themselves did
not comment on the reasons which
caused them to resign.—Reuter.



Purge Ends

PRAGUE, Jan. 29.

The six-month purge of the
Czecnoslovak Communist Party
has ended and new party cards are
being issued to remaining mem-
bers. The number actually ex-
pelled, struck off, or reduced from
full membership to candidates’
grade has not been revealed

Before the purge the Czech and
Slovak parties had a combined
of 2,000,000 from a
of 12,500,000,
Membership now may have drop-
ped by an estimated 300,000 or
even more

tejal population

again giving the cameramen mucn|with great thoroughness in every

ment offices, in railways and all

to lother state enterprises, civil admin-
bright Jistration, all nationalized business
ob*ect could be seen skitting over|ecrporations, and in hundreds of

cther institutions,.—(CP)

Will Refer Question

CAIRO, Jan. 29.
The Arab League Council
decided tonight to refer to its
Political Committee the question
of the Arab attitude to the con-
flict between the and
Western powers. The Egyptian
Prime Minister Mustapha El
Nahas Pasha opening the Council
meeting had urged the league to
join in efforts to save world peace,
Referring to the “critical period
through which the world is pass-
ing,” he said it was most impor-
tant the Arab League should ex-
change views and act in concert.

. —Reuter,

Eastern



JOHN WILL PLAY
IN ST. LUCIA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST, LUCIA, Jan, 29.
A cricket team captained by
John Goddard will engage a team
captained by His Honour J. M.
Stow, Administrator, on Tuesday,
at Victoria Park
Mr. Stow is President of the St
Lucia Cricket Association and also









Martinique. The third officer of|led an island team in the 1948;
LONDON, Jan. 29 the ship had all the while taken| Windward tournament to Dom-j
Arrangements are being com-|} the part of the seaman. He did not] inica |
pleted in London for, a loan of| believe that he had stolen the re |
£ 5,000,000 te the Norwegian Gov-| valuable article, but he alone was|
ernment to build merchant ships|on the seaman’s side MANNERHEIM WILL
President of Haribaros Basle an:| iq While, the ship was on its way! GET STATE FUNERAL



nounced here
for a small |

He

said ‘that exc
to Iceland



th



loan outside the ste
War

A statement issued by
os Bank said that the |



ig area

Hambu
an would





€ comed as ‘“e

fast resumir



we Retitey

the first major!

hing the |

|to Martinique, the skipper of the









{ship found the ticle which he| HELSINKE Jan. 29 |
j had aceused the seaman of steal-| The Finnish Government to-~ |
jing Luckily for the seaman, he} da decided to give Marshal

as taken on to Martinique by a I 1erheim, former Cor ander
ishing boat. and was taken back] in- ef and Presiden a” State |
cn th lip. He felt alife was | iuneral He died in Lausar |

the best thing for him jon Saturday He will be buri¢

The tor portrayin g| ir Sand Point” Cemetery, Con

; wag ‘brine ing! esting place F

e B The cle from het

‘ty i? 939 1 143

@ On Page 3 Reuter, |

About 2,300 offcers and men of
the Royal Air Force (spare time
volunteers) would be called ur
for three months’ continuous
training.

About 1,000 air crew reserves
would, also be needed for three
menths’ refresher training

. Regular servicemen would con-
Unue to be retired after the normal

expiry of their service period,
Lut any extra time they wouk
be called on to serve would not
exceed 18 months in the Navy,

12 to 18 months in the Army and
12 months in the Air Foree

lust five years lived
their stocks

‘Tf our plan is fully achieved,
preduction for the services -in
1951-52 will be more than double
| that for the current year, and. by
11953-54 more than four times as

great,” he said

largely on

The Prime Minister said that the
Government wanted to speed up
us fast as possible, measures for

accumulating stocks of food and

[ec materials.

The limiting factor in the pro-
duction programme was not
money, but the availability ef sup-
plies, particularly raw materials.

Attlee prefaced his speech by
saying that they did not believe

war was inevitable but believed
peace could not be ensured unléss
the defences of the free world
were made strong enough to detei
aggressors

Acceleration of defence prepar-
ations would involve a cut in the
standard of living and the Prime
Minister foreshadowed “substan-
tial measures to cheek civilian de-
mands for goods,”

In addition, civilian building
would have to be reduced,

Winston Churchill said that the
Opposition would examine all
these proposals with “candeur and
goodwill",

‘We shall speak our minds upon
them with no other thought bur
what is the best method of secur-
ing the endangered safety of our

country,” —Reuter,

ELIZABETH DIVORCED



LOS ANGELES, Jan. 29.
The brief marriage of English
Elizabeth Taylor,

to-day after
that her hus~
abusive

bern. actress
ended in
told a
Dick

divorce
judge
Hilton was
neglectful She said that
on their honeymoon in Europe
he spent the evenings until 5 or 6
and
return

she
band
and

casinos
their

a.m at gambling
this continued after
to America .—Reuter.

CFFER DECLINED

PARIS, Jan, 29.
Britain has dec’ined tae ‘orfér
of French Becf on price grounds,
The French Ministry for Agricul

ture spokesman said here today.
He emphasised however that
negotiations had not been broken



Attlee said no reservists would off and were continuing.
be recalled who would be needed —Reuter. -
for industry, in the event of a
general mobilisation

The nation’s increased produc TELL THE ADVOCATE
tion effcrt would be concentrated THE News
mainly on increasing the fighting RING 3113
strength of the forces, which a | DAY OR NIGHT
regards equipment had for the

The Consummation





of Refined Dining



K.W.V.

PAARL

TAWNY

(Superior)

Bottled by

THE K.W.V.

— A very popular tawny port wine of medium strength

and sweetness (Beaume 3.0)

Port is pre-eminently

an after-dinner wine and

savoury Sweetmeats such as Walnuts, Almonds, Olives,

Unsweetened Discuits and ¢
it.
texture requires that, with ¢

It is a leisurely wine anc

theese go very happily with
| the extréme delicacy of its
in outstanding port, such as

K. W. V. PAARL TAWNY, one foregocs the dubious

luxury of’a cigarette or cigar, as smoking may dull the

sensibility of the palate an
bouquet.

It is a highly pleasurabl

| stultify the charm of the

e stimulant in cool weather,

now prevailing in Sunny Barbados and a glass of JEW. V.

Paarl ‘Tawny may be taken

or When uncommon physical

“When old and of good

“wholesome of vinous

“museular system, assist

“erates the cirenlation,
{ “sharpens the mental er
i
i)
0?
ul
ww iaciminineninars
Sa fee sok

with advantage after dinner

exertion is called for.

quality, it is one of the most

liquors, it strehgthens the
s the digestive power,. accel-
exhilarates the spirifs and
1ergies.”

Professor Brande.


PAGE TWO



Carub Calling

M: GRIMM PROVENCE,
Trade Commissioner from
the French Embassy in Caracas,
arrived by the Colombie yesterday
afternoon for about six days’
holiday. He was accompanied by
his wife and they are staying at
the Marine Hotel.
On Holiday
AR. and.MRS. FENN FRED-
RICKSON of Sweden who
were living in Venezuela for the
past two years are now in Bar-
badcs for a holiday. They arrived
yesterday by the Colombie
accompanied by their two children
‘and are staying at the Hotel Royal
“Mr. Fredrickson is employed
with Compania Riego, an irriga-
tion company. He said that that
company is also engaged in the
construction of highways. He
will be here for one week, while
his family will be remaining for
about six months.
Intransit
EV. AND MRS. DAVE
MITCHELL, Rev. James S.
ulton, Rev. Norman W. Har-
m, Rev. E. Mural, Rev. Vivian
Commissiong, Sister Marjorie
7. Mr. George Marshall
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. to join the
i y which left last night
for St. Vincent.
They have gone to attend the
Annual Methodist Synod held
this year in St. Vincent.

Short Visit

AJ. ERIC HIRST, Assistant

Operations Engineer of Shelj
Leaseholds Distributing Co., Ltd.,
wWho was in Antigua on a short
visit arrived here on Sunday
xafterncon by B.W.I.A. He is
here for about two days and is
staying at the Aquatic Club.

With Singer Sewing Co.
R. AND MRS. VICTOR
WARD, who had been holi-
sore in Barbados returned to
Trinidad on Sunday by B.W.LA.
Mr. Ward is with the Singer Sew-
ing Machine Co., in Trinidad.

to England

’ RS. EPHANIE WARD, wife

of Dr. Louis Ward, P.M.O.
Christ Church, and their younger
‘son Robert were among the
passengers leaving for England
yesterday by the Colombie She
will be spending four montns
hcliday with relatives in England.

Left for Dominican

Republic
es for Ciudad Trujillo,
Dominican Republic yes-
terday morning by B.W.1.A.
were Mr. and Mrs. Mike Foster
ahd their three children, Michael,
Kaye and Denis. Mr. Foster has
gone to join the Ozama Sugar Co.
a$ an overseer .
Mike “is well known in sporting
circles in Barbados. 2
-For Methodist Synod
E Barbados delegates who
t left last night by the Lady
Rodney for St. Vincent to attend
the ual Methodist Synod were
Rev. E. Griffin, Rev. F. Lawrence,
Rev. R. McCullough, Rev. B.
Crosby, . J. B. Broomes, Hon.
. Av Guke, M.L.C., Mr. H.
rd, Mr, D. A. Seott and Mr.
G.._ Brewster.
Mrs. Cuke, Mrs. Scott and Mrs.
Ward aecompanied their husbands.

For Nursing Course

UITE a number of relatives
and friends were at the Bag-
gage Warehouse yesterday evening
say goodbye to Miss Stella
ler a former nurse of the Bar-
bados General Hospital. She left
m the Colombie for the United
| to take a nursing course,
ss Miller is the daughter of
Mrs. A. A. Miller of Prospect, St.
James and the late Mr. Miller,

Druggist of Nelson Street.

—_—_——

E'S HEADLINE
i






On
st
just thin’

ntary

come on Bertha—the
fetter of the alpnabet
of a coming par
storm around a
allup plan’
a

From Minnesota

R. and MRS. STEPHENS
LANGE of Minnesota,
arrived from Trinidad yesterday
by B.W.I.A. Mr. Lange is with
the Owatonna Canning Co., of
Minnesota. Among the countries
they have visited since they left
home are Jamaica, Venezuela and
Trinidad. They expect to be in
Barbados for five or six days and
are staying at the Marine Hote!

Petroleum Engineer
R. and MRS. GEOFFREY
LUCIE-SMITH arrived from
Venezuela yesterday via Trinidad
by B.W.1.A. to spend a holiday
in Barbados. Mr. Lucie-Smith
is a Petroleum Engineer with the
ee Vacuum Oi} Co., in Vene-
zuela.

To Form Bolivarian Society
R. JULIO ARANGO, Consul
for Panama in Trinidad and

Mr, Albert Pierre, Secretary of

the Bolivarian Society in Trinidad

arrived yesterday by B.W.LA..
from Trinidad on a short visit.

They are guests at the Aquatic

Club,

Chief purpose of their visit is
to form a Bolivarian Society in
Barbados. This society jis an
association of goodwill embodying
the ideals of Simon Bolivar the
liberator of Venezuela. It is a non-
political non-religious organisa-
tion. .

Mr. Arango is one of the execu-
tive committee of the Bolivarian
Society in Trinidad,

On Honeymoon
Ane yesterday morning

from Trinidad by B.W.1.A.
to spend their honeymoon in. Bar-
bados were Mr. and Mrs Harold
Stauble. They are staying at
the Crane Hotel. Mr. Stauble ir
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Stauble of San Fernando, Mrs.
Stauble is the former clare Farfan
‘They were married in Trinidad
on Sunday.

Touring W.I.
R. PETER BELBIN, Educa-
tional Manager of Thomas
Nelson, of Edinburgh, Publishers
arrived here on Sunday afternoon
by B.W.LA., from Jamaica, He
is touring the West Indies. Herve
for about five days he is a guest

at the Ocean View Hotel.

For Trinidad Holiday

RS. H. A. BOVELL of “Hill

Crest”, Britton’s Hill, left
on Sunday by B.W.1.A. for Trini-
dad to spend six weeks’ holiday
with her sister-in-law,



a BY THE WAY....

"â„¢ UNDERSTAND that the case
of the old sailor who painted
“a_little ship on his dog-kennel
hout permission of the Snedley
Town Council, the Wilberwick
Civic Dormitory Planning Devel-
mie Board, the Regional
ealth Bureau, and the Local
prcogatigns Committee will short-
ly come before Mr. Justice Cock'e-
carrot in the Court of Common
Jurisdiction. '

The prosecution will seek to
piuve breach of eet disa-
ility, misfeasance, fau ty repre-
sentation, infraction, gossage,
misapplication, and malinterpre-
tation. The defence may plead
justification sui generis and coram

lo, The intervention of a
ts, Hound, who supplied the
poent through the agency of a

. Farfagut, is likely to com-
licate ee case. The accused
as so confined his remarks
to a half-dozen rautical oaths of
considerable crudity.

Who would have thought it?

Pr tale of the two elephants

who jsat down in a Birming-
ham reminded me of what
ha at Pinner recently. An
Indian udent in love with a
Pinner brought her an ele-

fae asia token of his admira-
f

in. Her father, an ironmon er,
id. Pi eent standing in enis
len. hen he questioned his
iter, she hung her head and
|The student was re-

to remove the elephant.
when he next called the girl
‘Dad refuses to let me have
elephant.” So the student

a INFANT’S
SHOES
2 by

a

a




Clark

in
@ RED, WHITE, TAN
P from

» $3°°

Mat YOUR SHOE STORE

took the girl, and left the ele-
en with a note saying, “Dear

r. Renwick, I’m sorry you
wouldn’t let Mabel have this
animal, but we can get on with-
out it. Please see to its food and
aye some kind of a shelter for

Horses by candlelight

HE holding of a bloodstock

sale by candlelight was prob-
ably an attempt to acti “glamour”
to the affair, By holding a candle
behind a horse its faulty complex-
ion would be softened. My
account says that when the can-
dies gave out, matches were
struck, There must have been a
good deal of fumbling. I hear that





ry

Rupert and the





Rosalie at length dries her eyes,
and when ihe train stops she gets
out and stands with Rupert, looking
bewildered at the crowds around
them. “I don’t know what's going
to happen to us or how we're going
to get back,’’ says. the little bear.
“Let's go and ask the ticket.
collector what we had better do.” So

oe

En Route To Nevis

RS. MILLARY MALONEY of

Nevis who was spending #
holiday with her son and daughter-
in-law, Mr, and Mrs, Roy Maioney
left for Antigua yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.LA., intransit to St.
Kitts and Nevis.

Leaves on Thursday

R. S. A. HAMMOND, Chief

Adviser, Colonial Bevelop-
ment and Welfare is expected tc
leave for Antigua on Thursday tc
investigate the organisation and
salaries of the Civil Service, both
Federal and Presidential in the
Leeward Islands. He will be
accompanied by his wife.

Roya! Banks Accountant
R. JOHN PATTERSON,
Accountant of the Royal

Bank of Canada in San Juan left
yesterday for Puerto Rico by
B.W.LA., after spending a holiday
with relatives. Mrs. Patterson ts
remaining on for a longer stay.

For Trinidad Holiday
ISS HAZEL CARRINGTON
and her sister Thora were

among the passengers leaving for
Trinidad over the week-end by
B.W.1.A,. They will be away for
about two or three weeks and will
be in Trinidad over Carnival.
They are staying with
Shepherds in Port-of-Spain,

Back from Grenada

R. AND MRS. HUGH

WALCOTT who spent a
short holiday in Grenada returned
home on Saturday by B.W.1.A.

T.C.A. Reservation Dept.

ISS DORIS TIDY who works

in T.C.A.’s Reservation De-
partment in Toronto, arrived from
Bermuda on Saturday morning by
T.C.A., to spend about five days
in Barbados. She is staying at the
Enmore Hotel.

With Royal Bank

R. AND MRS. V. MARTIN

arrived from Grenada over
the week-end to spend a couple
of weeks’ holiday with friends
here. Mr. Martin is with the Royal
Bank of Canada in British Guiana.

For Post Graduate Course
D*: HAROLD FORDE, 1935
Barbados Scholar who is now
Government Medical Officer of
Health in British Honduras, ar-
rived here yesterday on the Colom-
bie from Jamaica. He was accom-
panied by his wife and little
daughter Stella who will be re-
maining in Barbados for about
ten weeks, staying with his rela-
tives Mr. and Mrs. William Forde
a. “Myrtice Villa”, River Road.
Dr, Forde, who was intransit,
left later in the evening for the
United Kingdom where he will
take a post graduate course in
Medicine.

Here for Two Months
RS. G. SEBASTIANI, wife of
Mr. G. Sebastiani, Town
Councillor of Demerara is in Bar-
bados for two months’ hgliday.;
She is a guest at Maristow-on-Sea,
Maxwells,

Among the Debutantes
MONG debutantes in England
who will be visiting dress-
makers in the next few weeks to
choose outfits for the Bucking-
ham Palace presentation parties
to be held in March, is 17-year-
old Cherry, daughter of formes
Jamaican Governor, Sir John
Huggins and Lady H ns.
Cherry is a student at the Royal
Academy of Dramatie Art.

the

e © e e By Beachcomber

on a similar occasion two weeks
ago a buyer’s ear was singed,
and another found himself talking
volubly to a horse in a corner. A
dealer whose hat was blown off
by a hard-breathing bit of blood-
stock turned and punched a col-
league on the jaw. The hat was
retrieved in momentary darkness
and placed on the head of a
woman who had just been kicked
hy her purchase.

Nothing to do with me

DISTRIBUTION of Czech

sausages, brought in by air
from Portugal, to licewomen,
“to give them self-respect,” is a
devilish good idea. But, for the
moment, I forget why.







Sketch Book—22

I




they follow the other people, Just
as they reach the barrier Rosalie

breaks away and scuttles down the
platform. ‘‘ What can be the matter
win her?" thinks Rupert. *
‘snow what it is. The collector's
dressed in dark blue. She must
have thought that he's another
policeman !""

Children’s ‘Comfort’ Shoes m

A broad-fitting flexible, al’eather lace-up shoe

of exceptional quality for price

11’s—1’s.....5:60

i
I
|
i

Evans

————

4

“TRUFORM” Sandals 7's—2’s

and

Whitfields

(ec La re ih hn gy di it ssn ith sem nil

from 4.33

Dial 4606
Dial §4220

ON et ee NN

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Judy Garland’s Story }4(. Radio Projranne

By Judy



Garland

As Told To Michael Drury

I adored my father, and he had
a special kind of love for me. He
lived to know that I had signed a
contract with Metro - Goldwyn-
Mayer, but not long enough tg
see any of my pictures.

.

Being the daughters of show
people, Sue and Jinny were al-
ready a song — and — dance team
for all community affairs, and f
was full of infant fury at being
left out,

At Christmas, mother and dad
did some of their old numbers, so
the whole family went to the the-
atre. The first two Christmases, [f
slept in a dressing room, but when
the third one came, I was all eyes
and ears. They told me to sit qui-
etly on a box—they should have
known better.

I marched out in the middle of
my sisters’ performance and
launched into “Jingle Bells” at
the top of my voice. After that,
there were three Glum sisters jn
the act instead of two

No Music Lessons

NOBODY ever taught me what
to do on a stage. I have never
had a dancing lesson or a singing
lesson in my life, and I still can’t
read music.

In those days (her childhood),
that wasn’t so unusual; vaudeville
was full of people who taught
themselves to dance and sing,
made up their own routines, and
even sewed their own costumes.

You could either do it or you
couldn't. It was as simple as
that. But to-day it sometimes
gives me the rocky feeling that I
don't know what I’m doing. I'm
never sure how I've done till I

see the final pictures—and I do “"'

see them.

Seeing your own movies along
with an audience is the only satis-
faction you get it’s the only way
to tell whether you've “sent” just
yourself or whether you've let the
audience in on it.

In 1927, dad sold the theatre (in
Grand Rapids, Minnesota) and
bought another in Lancaster, a
little town in California, on the
edge of the Mojave Desert.

We lived there for nine years,
and I wasn't happy any of that
time. It wasn’t anybody's fault.
Life in those desert towns can be
rough; the land is barren, red-
brown and harsh, and the people
come to be a lot like it.

On Tour

We were away a lot, because by
that time we had started to tour,
and the work, as_ always,
meaning for me. Mother played
the piano and chaperoned, while
dad stayed home and ran the
theatre.

I think he and mom were as
happy as most couples, but she
was part of an era that was hard
on women.

As a family we were never
poor, but as a vaudeville act we
were frequently broke. There
was always a manager who
couldn’t pay us, or a downright
cheat who wouldn't, but mother
never wrote home to dad for
money.

Once, in Chicago, we found our-
selves working for a mob of real
gangsters, and when, after six
weeks, mother tried to collect
what was owed us, they told her
to shut up and stay healthy.

It was in Chicago, too, at ihe
Oriental Theatre, that we were
billed on the marquee as “The
Glum Sisters.” We protested to
the master of ceremonies, whose
name was George Jessel, and he
said bluntly that Gumm wasn’t
much better.

“It rhysues with crumb and
bum,” he said, “and in this busi-





HOURS :

ACT

had q

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WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Lo¢al Handicraft

EVENING MITTENS—in Pastel Shades and Black
READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty's of London.

Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30.
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30



ness that isn’t good. Why don’t

you change it?”
The Name

He-suggested we call ‘ourselves
Garland after a friend of his,
Robert Garland, then the drama
critie of the New York World-
Telegram and now with the
Journal-American, I doubt if we
knew What the World-Telegram
was, but drama critics were all
right when they were on your
side, and we adopted the name.

About the same time, I acquired
“Judy” from a Hoagy Carmich-
ael song. At first my family con-
tinued to call me Baby, my name
since infancy, but I

answer until they said Judy, and
in about three weeks they gave
up. 4

Inside of a year, people in

Hollywood were even addressing
my mother as Mrs. Garland.

We went home to see dad and
then got a call for a season’s work
from a man we knew, named
Bones. Revers. He ran the Cal-
Neva Lodge at Lake Tahoe. We
had been lukewarm about going.

; Tf was glad to be with dad, and

Suzy and Jinny had discovered
the opposite sex, But Bones al-
ways paid us,so we TSok the job.

It wasn’t véry eventful, and
vhen,_ fall came, we left with mom
driying the old car, which was
packed to the eaves. We had got
about, two miles down the moun-
tai When Jinny let out a yelp—
she'd forgotten a big hatbox with
all our headgear in it. We had
to go back

Sang ‘Dinah’

I ran into the dining room to
the box. Bones and some
her men were in there, sitting





table. Bones asked me

sing for

r his frierfds. I told him
rny mother was waiting with the
motor running, and anyhow, there
weren't any musicians. One of
the men stood up and said he
could play a little piano. What
would I like?

In my earnest way of trying to

tio what was requested of me, I
said, “well, I guess it’s okay. Can
you play ‘Dinah’?”
*. He grinned. “I can manage. I
vrote it.” He was Harry Akst.
1 was fiabbergasted, but I sang,
and when I got back to the car,
I caught a scolding for taking so
long to get the hatbox.

I've heard about twenty vér-
sions of what happened next,
some of them pretty wild.

One story has it that M-G-M

signed me without making a
screen or sound test. Nothing
could be farther from the truth.
We went home to a house we'd

taken in Los Angeles, and a few

ays later Lew Brown, the song
writer, who was also an Executive
at Columbia Pictures, called up
and asked my mother to bring me
to the studio. He'd been at
Bones's table with Harry Akst,



Not Impressed

~@ Of, course we went and Isang

for somé people there, but nobody
was impressed. Lew Brown told
an agent named Al Rosen about
me, and Al towed me all over
Southern California.

I think I had an audition at
every major studio, but everyone
kept saying, “She isn’t any age
She isn't a child wonder, and she
isn’t grown up.” ,

By a process of elimination we
arrived at Metro where Jack Rob-
bins agreed to hear me and got
Louis B, Mayer to come in, too.
When they told me, I asked,
“Who's Mr. Mayer?” I guess they
nearly dropped their teeth.

Nobody said a word, but he
couldn't have been mad because
three days later my mother
phoned me at school and said
Metro wanted to put me on the

pay roll.
—LN.3.

(TO-MORROW : Judy’s start

toward movie stardom).



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TUESDAY, Jan. 3th. 1951

6.50 am. Forces Favourites, 6,30-—-9
a.m. Frequency of 15.18 Me wave length
19.76m., 7 a.m. The News, 7.10 a.m. News
Analysis; 7.15 a.m. From the Editorials,
725 a.m, Programme Parade, 7.30 a.m.
re rsonaf Impressions of Africa, 7.45 a.m
Think on these things, 8 a.m. Souvenirs
of Music, 8.45 a.m. Letter from America,
% am, The News, 9.10 a.m. Home News
from Britain, 9.15 a.m, Close Down,
34.15 am. Programme Parade, 11.30 a.m
Listeners’ Choice, 11.45 a.m, Report from
Britain, 12 noon The News, 12.10 p.m.
News Analysis, 12.15 p.m. Close Down,
4.15 p.m. Music from Grand Hotel, 4.15
~ 6 pm. Frequency of 11.75 Mc, wave
length 25,53 m, 5 p.m. Composer of tne
week, 5.15 p.m. Welsh Magazine, 5.45
rm, Programme Parade, 6 p.m, New Re-
cords, 6 — 7.15 pm. Frequency of 9.58
Mc. Wavelength 31.32 m. 6—7.15_ p.m.
6.105 Me wavelength 49.43 m. 645 p.m.
Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The News,
7410 p.m, News Analysis, 7.15 p.m, West
Indian Guest Night, 7.45 p.m. Personai
impressions, 745 — 9 p.m. Frequency ot
°58 Mec. wavelength of 31.12 m.
745—9 p.m. 6.195 Mec, wavelength of
48.43m., 8.15

from Britain, 9. . Ray Martin and
his Orchestra, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10
p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. King
and Queen, 10.45 p.m. Getting ready
for the Festival of Britain, 11 p.m, BBC
Scottish Orchestra.

Across
Babies or market gardeners? (7)
Church music, (4
A Scandinavian
May be another . 43)
A press shows up old-fashioned

tor Casts

5)

rl
weapons. (6)

Mere habituation. (4)

He’s on your side. (4)
Something well-grounded. (5)
You're snookered if you're left
with one. (5)

Careful. it’s a trap. (3)
Originated. (4)

Big? Oh, much bigger! (6)
May be a store of good th:

PMB Kee —e
ONHKS IOee

Down
Marching in a nice way. (8)
. Gives * oorwage room for exer-
cise.
Tones at the start. (5)
Cherished possession as pictured
to David by Nathan. (3-4)
. Positively. (6)
nm this you are at nome, (9)
. It's purely fictitious, (4)
Pive different pains in one horse
disease. (5

.
To a small advertisement you’d
make it a nymph, (3)
last.
- (4)

ee

CLEA we

. Game needs nothing to the

- Rotate
I get the stalk. (4)

. It's in my eye, (4)

Solution of terday’: eae lem
Nearctic: an “Altitud A . Beiegon tt.

Vomer. 12, Bel; 15. Accent: 17, ib; 19,

‘ 20. : 21 Crunch: 22. Base:

3 Down: 1. Narrate; 2 Bevator.

Reel Be Been: adem, 6 Oeauae 8

Nut; 16. Bales; «8, Bona.” pie:

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JANUARY 30,

TUESDAY, 1951

Only)



MATINEE : TODAY at 5 p.m
TONIGHT at 8.30





Paramount presents
Phgllis Calvert,

“MY OWN TRUE LOVE”

with Wanda Hendrix, Philip Friend, Binnie Barnes



Melvyn Douglas







MATINEE : WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHT at 8.30
Ray Milland, Florence Marly
“SEALED VERDICT”
with Broderick Crawford, John Hoyt
A Paramount Picture






in















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SHOWING TODAY
Warner's Technicolor Comedy Hit !

pamyKavein “The Inspector General”

Also: The Color Carton: “KIT FOR CAT”
And Latest WORLD NEWS (By WARNER-PATHE NEWS)

eatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

4.45 & 8.30 p.m.







MAT: FRIDAY 4.45 P.M. (Only)
“BELOW THE DEADLINE”
with Warren. Douglas and

“LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT

Johnny Mack Brown






“THE GUILTY" Don Castle &

“DYNAMITE CANYON”
with Tom Keene




Special Matinee Thursday 1.30 ie







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Last 2? Shows TODAY 5 & %.30 p.m. (RKO Radio)
eorge Ojrien (in both)
,

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“BORDER G-MAN * & “PAINTED DESERT”

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. (RKO Radio)
Zane Grey's

' “WANDERER OF THE WASTELAND” &

a “BROTHERS IN THE SADDLE”
Tim Holt, Richard Martin









James Warren




IDNITE SATURDAY, FEB. 3rd (Monogram Double)
VALLEY RIDERS” & “DYNAMITE CANYON”




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Last Show Tonite 8.30 (Warner’s Double)

Ed, G. Robinson & Humphrey Bogart

“AMAZING DR. CLITTERHOUSE” &

“GEO. WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE”
Jack Berry







WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 8.30 p.m, (Warner’s Double)

“LARCENY INC.” & “WINGS FOR THE EAGLE”
Ed, G. Robinson & Jane Wyman, Dennis Morgan, Ann Sheridan

SP POPOSSOOSO SPOS SIDS OOP PII PPPS 0 SPO PPPOA

GLOBE

TODAY 5 and 8.30 LAST SHOWS
ABBOTT and COSTELLO in


TOMORROW and THURSDAY 4.30 and 8.30
THE WHOLE SERIAL

FLAMING FRONTIER”































ROYAL

TO-DAY LAST TWO
SHOWS 4.30 and 8,30

M-G-M Big Double...

Nelson EDDY &
Jeannette McDONALD

EMPIRE

TO-DAY to THURSDAY
4.45 and 8.30

20th Century Fox Presents

“I'LL GET oie cakes
BY” ‘ROSE Mae

Color by Technicolor

Starring June HAVER
William LUNDIGAN
With Gloria De HAVEN
and Dennis DAY

‘‘THE KILLER
Me COY”

Starring

Mickey ROONEY &
Brian DONLVEY





ROXY

LAST TWO SHOWS
TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15



FLASH!

FIRST ALL INDIAN FILM
TO BE SHOWN IN
BARBADOS

“‘ BODHAT”’

AT ROYAL THEATRE

Golumbia Double Attraction
“THE SECRET
OF
ST. IVES”

With Richard NEY,
Vanessa BROWN

Thursday Afternoon at
4.45 p.m.

Indian Actor
Dialogue and Music

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY LAST TWO
SHOWS 4.45 and 8.15

FINAL INSTALMENT
Universal Serial . . .

John Mack BROWN
and George SHELLEY in

“WILD WEST
DAYS”

with Lynn GILBERT
and Frank YAGONELLI










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Johnny WEISSMULLER
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“CAPTIVE
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with Buster CRABBE
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TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1951

Jamaican Sculptor
Joins The “Seven
Dials ”’

(From Our Own Correspondent)

‘ LONDON.
_ Jamaigan-born Ronald Moody
is the only Colonial member of
the “Seven Dials Group”, a new-
ly-formed painters’ and sculptors
club in London.

The membership of the club is
limited to seven—five painters and
two sculptors, and the idea of it
belatae to painter Archibald Zieg-
er.

What does “Seven Dials” mean?
“It cam mean so many things,”
says Moody. The club aims to
hold two exhibitions a year in
London. The first is open from
8th—17th January at the Galerie
Apollinaire. The exhibits will in-
clude six sculptures—the work of
Moody.

Ronald Moody is a silent and
sensitive artist, who speaks with
= modesty about his work.

ndon newspapers have recently
carried favourable comment on hic
ability as a sculptor. He is now
recognised as one of the few ac-
complished coloured sculptors.

The Ministry of Works have re-
tently bought a woodcarving of!
a male figure completed by Moody
in his Paris studio just before the
German invasion. It is to be placed
in the library of the new Colonial
office when that is built—on the
site of the old Westminster Hos-
pital.

The figure is in palisander— a
darkish wood with violet, red, and
yellow lights in it.

Moody tells me he did not have
a mode! for the statue.“ “It came
entirely from my imagination: it
is symbolic of many things.”

When I called at his Knights-
bridge studio this week, he was
busy on a sculpture which he
hopes to include in a projected
one-man exhibition in 1952.

His success may be attributed
partly to his self-imposed rule:
“Whenever I feel tired I stop
woe ane. tape rest.”” That way,

e feels, he produces nothin
than his best oe



To Spend
$2,307,732 On
Development

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan 26.
The Government proposes
spending this year some $2,307,-
732 on a number of development
schemes which are already in pro-~
gress. Largest allocation — is
$1,508,340 which is required to
be spent on the San Fernando
Hospital while $140,663 will be
spent on the Tuberculosis Sana-
torium and $75,875 on hospital
buildings in Port*of-Spain. On
the St. Ann’s Mental Hospital
some $6,720 will be spent.

As regards water supplies for
Tobago a sum of $280,000 is re-
quired and under the Land
Acauisition Scheme some $100,-
248 will be spent in roads while
another $195,883 will be required
for general purposes.



SAME OFFENCE

THE Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal Mr, G. L. Taylor
and Mr H. A, Vaughn yesterday
decided that Everil Greaves should
not be convicted twice for the
same offence. Everil Greaves and
Muriel Greaves had each been
fined 10/- after they had been
arrested by Sgt. Julian Henry for
making a disturbance in the court-
yard on October 23, last year.

Police Magistrate Mr, E. A.
McLeod subsequently fined both
Greaves 10/- after he found them
guilty of assaulting and beating
Olive Peterkin, The offence for
assaulting and beating was com-
mitted at the same time as the

disturbance.
Mr. Adams who defended tlie
Greaves, pointed out that they

could not be convicted twice for
the same offence, The Police had
won a case against them so
Peterkin could not then bring one
Notice of appeal had not been
given by Muriel Greaves, and Wwe
Police Magistrate’s decision
against her remained in force,

Flees To The West

BERLIN, Jan, 29

Walter Oelkers, President of the
East German Railway Administra-
tion at Halle, Saxony has fled to
West Germany, the anti-Commu-
nist Information Bureau reported
here to-day. He had been criti-
cised by East German Socialist
Unity Party of which he was a
member, the Bureau said.—Reuter.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BACK TO WORK — Moody entering his studio.



Passenger Facilities
More Important
Than Cargo

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan. 29.
Improvements in passenger
iacilities between Britain and the
West Indies is more essential at

present than additional cargo
services. These are the views of
Mr. A. E, V. Barton, Secretary

of the West India Committee and
Mr, Martin Hill, Secretary of the
Liverpool Steamship Owners’
Association and are expressed
today in correspondence to the
Manchester Guardian.

Their letters follow publication
last week of the Manchester
Guardian’s leading article in
which it was suggested. that
improvements were necessary in
freight services between the
United Kingdom and the West
Indies and -that the C.D.C.’s
assistance might be enlisted to
bring about such improvements.

Mr. Barton points out that no
failure on the part of present
shipowners is responsible for the
present complaints which have to
do exclusively with lack of pas-
senger accommodation whereby
with few exceptions British sub-
jects are unable to travel to and
from the British colonies of the
eastern Caribbean in British ships.

He adds, “the problem will re-
main until the British Govern-
ment faces the necessity of pro-
viding some form of subsidy and
reconciles itself to the possibility
that the subsidy may have to be
substantial.”

Mr, Martin Hill carries a re-
minder in his letter that the Com-
monwealth Shipping Committee
in 1947-48 found freight services
from the United Kingdom to the
British West Indies to be adequate,
but recommended government
action in regard to additional pas-
senger services. » He says : “Since
then, cargo services have not dim-
inished in relation to the volume of
traffic to be carried. On the con-
trary several cargo vessels are
dispatched every month from the
east and west coasts of the United
Kingdom to these (Trinidad, Bar-
bados, British Guiana) destina-
tions by regular services of Brit-
ish liner companies and only
a negligible quantity of this
country’s large exports to the
West Indies is routed by foreign
shipping.

In a footnote to these letters
the Editor of the Manchester
Guardian expressed agreement
with the points raised but criti-
cises the need for frequent tran-
shipment of goods.

He says : “Of course there are
cargo services but transhipment is
too frequently required at Trini-
dad, and better services—includ-
ing inter-Island services—will
certainly be needed if West In-
dian economy is to develop
healthily.”





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FOUN Oetets

4 LEVER reoovcr——-

33 Religions
e "
Registered
If the number of religious de-
nominations in a country were,
when viewed in relation to the
size of the country, taken as an
index of the people’s goodness,
Barbados would have to be put
high on the scale, In this small
island there are no less than 33
denominations registered in the

Registrar’s Office, and there are
quite a few that are not registered.

Those registered are the
churches where weddings and
baptisms are performed. Some

have short and simple names and
others the contrary. Everyone
knows the Anglican Church, the
Roman Catholic, the Methodist,
the Moravian Churches and the
Salvation Army, All of the above,
with the exception of the Roman
Catholic and the Moravian, have
branches all over the island.

The Roman Catholic parish
church is in Jemmotts Lane, and
there is a chapel at the Ursuline
Convent, Collymore Rock and an-
other in St. John.

The Pilgrim. Holiness Church
has a large following and many
places of worship. There is also
jhe Church of God, the Evangeli-
eal Church of God, and the United
Pentecostal Faith of God, Then
there is the African Methodist
Episcopal Church, familiarly
known by the initials “A.M.E.”,
the Church of the New Testament,
the Free Baptist, the Baptist, the
Bethel Baptist, St. Thereza Firs
Baptist, the National Baptist an
the Northern Baptist Convention,

The Episcopal Orthodox
Church which was once _repre-
sented only by St. McGinley’s
Cathedral in Country Road now
has about two other chapels. Its
destiny is presided over by Arch-
bishop Jack.

Pentecostal

Coming back to those whose
names contain the word “Pente-
costal”, there is the United Pente-
costal Assembly of God, the Pen-
tecostal Assembly of Canada, the
Pentecostal Faith Chureh and the
Pentecostal Assembly of the
World,

The Christian Mission is an-
other religion with a large fol-
lowing. Then there is also the
Church of the Nazarene and the
Nazareth Holiness. Also scatter-
ed over the island are places of
worship of the Gospel Hall Re-
ligion and the United Christian
Brethren.

The Seventh Day Adventists are
going from strength to strength.
The Watch Tower Society which
claims not to be a religion, and
which hits out at the Roman

Catholic faith more than at any
other, has its chief place of wor-



“SUNBEAM”
LEAVES

@ From Page 1
‘was photographed, watching his
ship leaving him behind in exile.

Alex Jute, the Durector, said
that he had taken shots of the har-
bour and coast line of Barbados,
He thought yesterday a lovely day
for filming as six steamships
stretched across the harbour and
shipping activities were most in-
teresting. He also took shots of the
local steel band.

About 5.15 p.m. the filming
party were taking their last shot
in Barbados. They took a launch
to get off to the Sunbeam which
had anchored for them. The Sun-
beam soon after faded away in
the West.

While the ship glided beauti-
fully along, “Littleman”, the
Cocker Spaniel, could be spen
making his usual rounds from
cabin to cabin and making his way
from one end of the deck to the
other between the legs of his
Swede companions who were too
busy to notice him.

Frank Dalein, a Swedish Jour-
nalist, is with the crew of the
Sunbeam, Apart from _ getting
some dope for his Swedish paper,
he is making some “dough” as-
sisting the filming party.

THANKS B.W.LA.

BRITISH West Indian Airways
Ltd., have received a letter fram
the Governor of Barbados thank-
ing the Company on behalf of tne
Government of that Island for the
efficient service they maintained
during the construction of the new
runway at Seawell Airport, and
particularly when the pilots had
only 4,00C feet of runway on
which to land their aircraft,

The communication from the
Government of Barbados went oi
to say: “A special measure of
praise is due to your airmen, who
through their skill and sense of
patient duty brought their planes
to safe landings, and so upheld the
high reputation for safety whi ch
characterises your service,”

Barbados expressed the hope
that B.W.LA., would be able to
make full use in the future of the
improved facilities at Seawell,

PROMOTED
Mr. J. L. Parris, Control Officer
at Seawell, has been appointed
Assistant Manager and Control
Officer of the Airport with effect
from February 1, 1951.





ey
ship a stone’s throw from the
Roman Catholic Church,

Other churches not so well
known are St. Maria OS., the
Antioch Church, S.P. Religious
Science and Mt. Sinai Holy
Church, © ut



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Geometry With
Trigonometry

By ANDREW G. J. CAMACHO,
B.A. (Lond.)

Mr. CAMACHO has taught at
St. Stanislaus’ College, B.G. and
is now teaching as Mathematics
Master at St. Mary’s College,
Trinidad.

He is also Mathematics Tutor
to the Board of Industrial Train-
ing and the Extra—Mural Dept.
(in Trinidad) of the University
College of the West Indies.

With the publication of volume
II, it is possible to review the
book as a whoie. I have already

reviewed volume I (April 19,
1950). The book provides an
excellent Geometry course. The

ground for a_ school certificate
course or for the ordinary level
of the new general certificate
being thoroughly covered.

‘The book is neatly laid out
with essentials clearly picked out
in dark print. Plenty of space
makes it easy to read, When
formal theorems are started, each
is given a separate page, Diagrams
are bold and clearly marked.
There is a wealth of worked ex-
amples, in fact in volume II a
whole chapter is devoted to mis-
cellaneous worked examples. The
book should be particularly useful
to anyone studying on his own
and also as a revision course.

Volumn II consists of three
parts. Part 4 deals with the
circle, part 5 with ratio and pro-
portion and part 6 with trigonom-
etry. I have only one criticism
to make of the Geometry sections.
The author introduces equiangular
triangles and uses them for a
couple of chapters before calling
them similar triangles. The
author has been very thorough
and waited to introduce similar
triangles as a special case of
Similar figures. Though this is
undoubtedly a gain as far as those
Students who are going to con-
tinue the subject are concerned,
I doubt whether it justifies the
delay.

I am not quite so happy as far
as the trigonometry section is con—
cerned. I feel the subject is in-
troduced too fast. It is becoming
more necessary to teach some
trigonometry to fairly young boys,
and I should like to see the sub-—
ject introduced slowly, and the
first chapter of this section could
be improved by being broken up
into small sections.

I was particularly glad to see a
chapter on 3 dimensions, so neces—
sary and yet so often neglected
in textbooks. In this connection,
on page 255 several questions
require the distance between two
points. In fact, the distance re—
quired is along the parallel of
latitude, but there is nothing to
indicate that q great circle route
is not required and indeed it
would be an excellent exercise to
find the distance both ways.

No book can please everyone or
be entirely free of criticism, but
I do feel that Mr. Camacho has
done an excellent job and ig to be
very much congratulated.

E. C. QUEREE.



RATES OF EXCHANGE

January 29 1951.

CANADA
63,.8/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 61 8/10% pr.
bspoudesgs ‘ mand
Drafts 61.65% pr.
Yurperry! rv gignt Drafts 615/10% pr.
63.8/10%pr. Cable
623/10% pr. Currency 60 3/10% pr.
dod bseaee-ukaw é Cou ene 69 6/10% pr.
ver oe evens



FINE VARIED

A FINE of £3 in 14 days with an
alternative of two months’ im:
prisonment, which was
by City Police Magistrate
C. L. Walwyn on Daphne Jones vo!
Windsor Tenantry, St. George
was yesterday varied by The
Honours Mr. G. L, Taylor and Mr.
H. A, Vaughan, Judges of the

must pay £2 in 14 days or undergo
one month’s imprisonment,

Daphne Jones was charged with
unlawfully and maliciously
wounding her husband Ulrick
Jones of Brighton, St. George, on
his nose with a bottle on Septem-
ber 14, 1950.

The husband in his evidence
said that he was separated from
his wife on February 5, last year
On that day she went to his home
and Dderan to move her furniture
into his house, +, «ber

He removed them outside the
house and later told her that he
had no intention of going back
with her. She struck him with a
bottle on his nose and he fell
When he was getting up from the
ground she struck him with two
stones in his back and then ran
away.

He was treated by Dr. Kerr
and alterwards spent 14 days m
the General Hospital. His nose
bled for four days.

Cameron Franklyn of Welches,
St. Philip, who was in the vicinity
at the time of the incident, cor-
roborated this story. He said that
he was at Ulrick Jones’ home at
the time of the incident. Jones had
called him for some fruit,

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

Seh. Mary M. Lewis, Sch,
Cc. Gordon, Sch, Burma D,, M.V



Emmanuel
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Held, Sch. Belqueen, Sch, Enterprise 5S
Sch. Molly N. Jones, Sch, Lucille M
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SS. Lady Rodney, 4,907 tons net
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MAIL NOTICES

Mails for St, Lucia, St. Vincent, Gren-
ada and Aruba by the M.V. Daerwood
will be closed at the General Post Office
as under:—

Parcel mail at 12 noon, Registered
mail at I p.m., Ordinary mail at 2.30
p.m, on the 3ist January 1951,

Mails for British Guiana byethe Sch
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Parcel mail at 12 noon, Registeres
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PAGE FOUR

ADVOGATE



Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown.

Tuesday,



MARKET GARDENS

THERE is a current saying in this island
that every available cultivable square foot
of land is under crops of one kind or anoth-
er. Close examination to-day will prove

that this is no longer true.

It may have been true that the cultiva-
tion of plantations was more intensive with

January 30,

1951

v

regard to Barbados’ size than that in other

West Indian islands because most of the

65,000 arable acres were under crops. But
during the years there has been a system of

fragmentation -and this has
lots going uncultivated.

led to small

The necessity for more intensive and ex-
tensive cultivation of the total area is
indicated by the international situation It

should be apparent to everyone that greater
effort should be made to utilise the small

plots now covered in grass or

in order to supply more vegetables.

useless plants
Care-

ful investigation will show that thousands
of dollars worth of garden vegetables are

imported from St. Lucia, Dominica,

St.

Vincent and other places. This amount

would, if produced locally,

supplement

the earnings of the small land holder and
at the same time would tend to raise the
nutritional standard, by affording a more

balanced diet.

During the last war, the planters did a
fine job in supplying home grown food to
an extent almost unbelievable. The peas-
ant holder can now fill the breach by
utilising every available stitch of land in

his possession.

In Barbados there are very few areas
where water is not available for garden

purposes by means of shallow wells.

And

there is the added advantage of getting
assistance from the Government through
the Peasants Loan Bank. Here it is possible
to get equipment for irrigating plots of land
of any size. The equipment is available at
half the price to land owners and in order

that this job might be done

properly the

Government recently appointed an irriga-
tion officer attached to the Department of

Agriculture.

‘All this information is already known
and it is for those who are in possession of
land to make use of the services offered.

It is however necessary to appeal-to those

who can to get on with market gardening.
These small plots when counted together

add up to a sizeable area.

They can be

made to produce more vegetables and
benefit the owners and the entire com-

munity at the same time.



On With The Clock

DURING the years of the last war local

clocks were put forward one

hour. After

the practice had been tried two years, ob-
jection was made and it was abandoned.
The advantage of working in the early

hours when the heat of the

sun does not

make such inroads oa one’s energy is a

real advantage and there is the increase
in the hours available for recreation.

It

does not interfere with the length of the
day’s work and keeps the worker in better
health if there is opportunity for games of

one kind or another.

In the past the objections to putting the
clock forward were mainly personal and it
would be worth while to hear what other
objections can now be registered against

what seems to be a desirable



SHEET STEEL SHORTAGE

practice.

A SHORTAGE of sheet steel poses~a
serious obstacle to Britain’s industrial re-
covery. First effects are expected to fall
on the automotive industry with plants

working shorter schedules.

| Some plants will work a four-day week
while others will work three weeks a
month. Output may be reduced by about
15 to 20 percent according to spokesmen for
the Society of Motor Manufacturers.

Although the automobile

industry will

be the first and hardest hit, other light in-

dustry, especially radio and television, are

expected to feel the pinch.

Reasons for the cut are that the British
Government has switched supplies of steel

to the rearmament programme, and the
United States is not exporting such large
quantities because of the American stock-

piling project.

Heavy demand for foreign scrap metal

hes further aggravated the raw-materials

shortage. British imports of German scrap
have been cut from 2,000,000 to 1,900,000 a

year.

Industrialists also fear that Britain’s
steel industry which faces nationalization
on February 15 will be forced to slash out-
put in the next few months because of the

present coal crisis.

, “These sources claim there are two

reasons for this:

1. A cut in iron ore imports because of a
million tons of shipping being diverted to

import coal.

2. Limited coke supplies for making pig

iron.

Britain’s steel industry has revealed its
output during 1950 totalled 16,293,000 tons

—a record.—INS,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE ~~



Russia's New Empire=I The Festival

NTIL the late 1930’s the Soviet

state could not be called an
empire. Absorbed in its internal
affairs, it showed no evidence of
a drive towards empire-building,
though its theory contained the
elements of future drives. Since
1939, however, and _ especially
since 1944, the Soviet Union has
been on the road to becoming the
new empire of the East, and its
leaders have had to develop meth-
ods for dealing with the problems,
both political and economic, which
an empire faces.

An examination of the way in
whieh it has dealt with its politi-
cal problems must begin with the
fact that the Soviet Union em-
erged as the Soviet Empire at a
time when anti-imperialist senti-
ment was the outstanding feature
of the international situation.
Other imperial structures—those
of Germany, Japan, Italy, Britain,
France, and the Netherlands—
were disintegrating; at an earlier
stage in its history the Soviet state
itself had been a powerful force
in fostering this anti-imperial
sentiment; it had been instru-
mental in destroying empires and
had conducted a drive against im-
perialism more powerful than that
of any other government. Anti-
imperialism remained a powerful
weapon in its arsenal of propa-
ganda, Now, “when events took a
new turn and imperial roads
opened up, Stalin’s regime could
not simply resume the drive inter-
rupted in 1917. It could not use
the old ways of Russian expansion.
It had to find a way to reconcile
taking advantage of its imperial
opportunities with its own anti-
imperial protestations and the
anti-imperial sen*.:ment of the rest
of the world.

The aim of traditional imperial-
ism was frank; the extension of
the realm of the state. Its ultim-
ate goal was the greatness of the
imperial structure, and its personi-
fication was the majestic figure of
the king, tsar, or emperor. That
military victory leads to the acqui-
sition of new areas was axiomatic;
annexation of foreign lands was
the obvious, undisputed right of
the victor. But nothing of this
kind was possible in a Russia that
had made a creed of anti-imperiai-
ism, that had won adherents all
over the world for its “struggle
against ‘imperialist exploitation,’ ”
that had avocated liberation of
colonies and freedom for all na-
tions from oppression by the levia-
thans of the political oceans, that
had tried to teach the world a
moral lesson by renouncing im-
perial Russian privileges abroad,
particularly in Persia and China.
Consequently, when the drive to
the east, south, and west which
had animated Russian conquerors
through the centuries became evi-
dent again at the end of World
War II, the new expansionism was
different from the old.

There were *‘andamental differ-
ences in scope and technique. The
scope of imperial ambitions in-
creased enormously. Old Russia
had always aimed at limited ob-
jectivés: an area in Turkey, a
slice of Poland, a region in China.
The new goal was the encompass-
ment of the entire globe. Old
Russia was thus easier to satisfy,
ana peace with her easier to
achieve than with her successor.

The changes in technique were
equally revolutionary. or one
thing, traditional empire-building
was carried out by armies sta-
tioned in the conquered and an-
nexed areas. The new empire-
builders planned to repla the
armies with popular movements;
what we call “fifth columns” have
been, in theory, the Communist
substitute for occupation by armed
forces, and they have been proudly
regarded as superior to the obso-
lete military instruments of im-
perialism,

The other great innovation in
technique was the. decision of the
Soviet government to refrain from
officially incorporating the terri-
tories of its satellites into Russia.
It has maintained the fiction of
their sovereignty and has denied
any intention of exploiting them
economically.

How much easier it had been
before! When, in 1815, a great
war ended for Russia, there were
no scruples against territorial ac-
quisitions. Tsar Alexander hardly
needed the present-day excuses of
“security” or “anti-cordon sani-
taire” when he annexed the whole
of Finland, the greater part of
Poland, and Bessarabia. Similarly,
Russia’s programme in 1914-16
openly and unabashedly aimed at
the creation, after victory, of a
Russian sphere in Europe incor-
porating, in one way or another,
Poland, Czechoslovakia, Serbia,
Hungary, Rumania, and part of
East Prussia. Most of these lands
were to have Russian governors or
viceroys and Russian troops to put
down uprisings.

Today the Russian orbit in Eu-
rope actually includes the terri-
tories envisioned by the tsarist
planners of 1914-16 oe t of the
Russian Empire; yet Stalin must
pretend to be anti-annexationist
and must act. as if, he wants his
satellites to maintain real inde-
pendence, In our present violent-
'y anti-imperialist world no other
course has seemed possible, even
to the Kremlin.

How well have the new tech-
niques of expansionism worked?
The five postwar years, on the
surface highly successful ones for
Moscow, have at the same time
marked a grave crisis in Soviet
empire-building—a crisis caused
by the shortcomings of these very
techniques.

The example of Yugoslavia is
instructive, for that country was
to become the first experimental
area in Europé for the new sort of
empire-building. Accordingly, at
the end of the war, Soviet troops
were first withdrawn from Yugo-
slavia, and Yugoslav leaders were
left to demonstrate’the exemplary
behavior of a Communist party in
power. They would, it was
thought, recognize the authority in
the Kremlin as superior; if Yugo-
slavia’s particular interests clashed
with those of the Soviet Union, the
former would be subordinated by
the latter; Yugoslavia would glad-
ly make sacrifices to help rebuild
the mother of all Communist
nations.

What actually happened is well
known. No sooner had the Soviet
troops left the country than the
fatal conflict began. During 1946
it became grave; in 1947 the rift
was so deep that a Cominform was
created to arouse the fury of the
International against Tito. In 1948
the Yugoslavs were excluded from
the. Soviet family, ant soon all
Soviet economic and military

By DAVID J. DALLIN

missions had to leave the land of
the infidel satellite. The Soviet
Empire lost a great country; its
sphere of influence, which had
stretched as far west as the Italian
border, shrank considerably. The
Soviet
stopped, at least in the south.

If Russian troops had been sta-
tioned in Yugoslavia according to
the old pattern, no rebellion would
have been possible; had one
broken out it would have been
put down like the Polish uprisings
of 1831 and 1863. But now, in
1949, it was too late; the Kremlin
was reluctant to try ‘to reconquer
Belgrade by force of arms.

What happened in Yugoslavia
served as a lesson; measures must
be taken to secure the fidelity of
the other satellites. These meas-
ures meant a reversion to the old
ways of armed occupation.

Poland, where anti-Soviet
trends seemed to be particularly
strong, was the first nation to feel
the effects of the organic trans-
formation of Soviet imperialism.
Before 1917, the greater part of
Poland belonged to the old em-
pire and was governed by a Rus-
sian governor-general, a number



“THAT'S FUNNY. I ALWAYS
THOUGHT C. SHARP MINOR
WAS THE NAME OF A

SCHOOL Boy \!"




|



<

aiiakeetobcua ip es
of Russian provincial governors,
and a Russian officialdom; a Rus-
sian army was stationed there.
After the Tito rebellion in Yugo-
slavia the Soviet government sub-
jected Poland to a series of new
measures which resembled those
of the prerevolutionary period.

In November, 1949, Soviet Mar-
shal Konstantin Rokossovsky was
appointed to serve in Poland. Al-
though he retained his Soviet citi-
zenship and membership in the
Soviet Communist Party, Rokos-
sovsky was made Poland’s Min-
ister of Defense and member of
the State Council, the highest gov-
erning body in Poland, which has
wide powers in proclaiming laws
and making appropriations. He
was also included in the Central
Committee of Poland’s Commun-
ist party (“United Workers Par-
ty”) and was immediately, al-
though at first unofficially, includ-
ed in the Polish Politburo. Among
the eleven members of this body
he has obviously been wielding
supreme power.

Even before Rokossovsky’s ap-
pointment almost all the leading
posts in thé Polish army had been
entrusted to Soviet generals whose
names were changed to sound
Polish. About six hundred high-
ranking Soviet military men be-
came actual commanders in the
Polish army. Simultaneously
with the announcement of Rokos-
sovsky's appointment all Polish
Communist leaders suspected of
opposing close ties with the Soviet
Union were purged from the gov-
ernment and the army, the first
among them being the potential
Tito of Poland—Wladyslaw Gom-
ulko, General Secretary of the
Polish Communist Party during
and after the war.

' The new administrative ar-
rangement thus became very simi-
lar to the old imperial one, though
Stalin still preferred to cbhserve
the new principie of non-incor-
poration of satellites. The eleva-
tion of Marshal Rokossovsky
therefore had to be presented as
an exception, a unique act of
purely personal nature; Poland’s
President Bierut had “requested”
the Soviet government “if poss-
ible” to place the marshal “at the
disposal of Poland”—and the
Soviet government “in view of the
friendly relations” between the
two nations agreed to comply. The
Kremlin did not proclaim its per-
manent right to run the country
or to appoint Polish military lead-
ers, Should Rokossovsky die or
change his allegiance or be
purged, there were no legal means
provided for a Russian emissary to
succeed him as dictator of Poland.

So even this partial adherence
to the new techniques of empire-
building has significant shortecom-
ings from the Soviet point of view.
To relinquish Poland to the Poles
is out of the question. Poland is
Russia’s main road to the West, to
Germany andebeyond; any Russian
government which intends to
operate in the West must control
Poland. For the right to use this
road Lenin fought a war in 1920;
along with German generals he
plotted a new war in 1922. In 1939,
when Hitler was about to upset
the balance of Europe, Stalin's
first thought was of Poland, and
his first invasion was made into
that country. In ‘1944-45, when
Stalin decided to set up his own
government in Poland, the first
serious cleavage between him and
his allies became inevitable. To-
day, too, Stalin's strength in Eu-
rope hinges on his dominance over
Poland, and he would risk a war
rather than restore Polish inde-

endence. As a matter of fact,

talin«the-Rmperor exercises more
power over Poland than any of
his predecessors on the Russian
throne exercised; yet Stalin-the-
Communist must disclaim any

rights over Poland, thus making it /

difficult for the emperor to rule.
his empire. : ‘

Elsewhere the Soviet’s inability
to follow her policy of dispensing
with an army of occupation as an
instrument of empire appears with
equal force. Obviously she is
afraid of losing Hungary and
Rumania when the Soviet oceupa-
tion forces get out of those two
countries. According to the Mos-
cow Agreement of 1948, Soviet
troops may remain there only so
long as oceupation forces remain
in Austria, and for this reason the
Soviet has broken off four-power
negotiations concerning Austria
and rejected attractive offers,

march on Europe was




True, hundreds of plain-clothes
men, army officers, and _ all
kinds of “advisers” Would stay on
indefinitely in both Hungary and
Rumania, but their*forces would
be insufficient a ainst a popular
rebellion. Mosebee. has withdrawn
its army only from the smallest
and least im unt satellites—
Bulgaria and North Korea. The
tremendous area of*military occu-
pation has not essentially dimin-
ished since 1946,

Indeed, experience is demon-
strating that the two new tech-
niques of empire-building are im-
practical. Armies of occupatior
are more important than ever if
the newly acquired territories are
not incorporated into the conquer-
ing nation.

But the principle of non-annex-
ation must be maintained, partly
because of considerations of pro-
paganda, partly because annex-
ation implies permanency, ‘a set-
tlement with the West, and Stalin
sees a settlement as a calamity,
Global stability would mean the
“stabilization of capitalism” and
the strengthening of anti-Com-
munist tendencies. Stalin's Com-
munism therefore blocks the road
to the stability of his own empire
as a price that must be paid for
blocking world stability. Stalin
acquired a sphere in Korea but
has not permitted normal relations
with South Korea; the North has
served him only as an initial stage
for a further expansion. He is
master of the continental Far East
but blocks the road to a_ peace
with Japan. He holds Eastern
Germany but refuses to keep out
of the German West. In an ava-
lanche of wishful predictions his
press and his social scientists ob-
serve everywhere and continuous-
ly “indisputable symptoms” of
crises, catastrophes, rebellions,
misery, and decay.

How the Communist necessity
for non-annexation gets in the way
of empire-building is dramatically
illustrated in Germany. As an
empire-builder, Stalin has stood
for the division of Germany since
1943, but as a Communist he must

| appear as the champion of Ger-

man unity. Molotov told the
Czechoslovak President Benes in
1943, “Germany must be divided,
but at present We must not reveal
our intentions because we would
only be assisting Hitler.” Maxim
Litvinov told Harry Hopkins in
March of the same year that his
government “would like to see
Germany dismembered.” At the
Teheran Conference, when Presi-
dent Roosevelt and Prime Minister
Churchill proposed certain meas-
ures for keeping Germany weak in
the future, “Stalin appeared to
regard all measures proposed for
the subjugation and for the con-
trol of Germany as inadequate. . .
He appeared to have no faith in
the possibility of the reform of the
German people.” At Yalta “dis-
memberment” was discussed at
length by Churchill, Roosevelt,
and Stalin, as wel as by their
foreign ministers, Eden, Molotov,
and Stettinius. The details have
now been made public by Stet-
tinius; Roosevelt was somewhat
hesitant, but was finally prepared
to accept the formula of dismem-
berment. Churchill was more re-
luctant than Roosevelt, and Eden
still more so., But Stalin refused
to give in. He insisted not only on
an immediate decision but also on
inclusion of “dismemberment” in
the terms of the surrender.
ported chiefly by Roosevelt, he
succeeded in getting his views
adopted.
included dismemberment of Ger-
many as a “requisite for future
peace and security.” The pub-
lished communique on the Yalta
Conference did not mention dis-
memberment or. Germany only
“because it was felt that mention
of it might increase enemy resist-
ance,” but the decision to dismem-
ber it was in force.

Yet only three months after the
Yalta Conference Stalin, now in
possession of Eastern Germany,
Said in a public statement which
was contrary to his speeches in
camera, “The Soviet Union does
not intend to dismember Ger-
many.” Today we are repeatedly
told that the Soviet government is
a champion of “German unity.” A
statement repeated over and over
begins to make an impression;
repeated often enough it
becomes an “indisputable fact.)
Actually the Soviet programme
since 1943 has been a campaign
for the dismemberment of Ger-
many. j

But when the war ended, the
slogan of a united Germany re-
placed the modest goal of a sep-
arated German province. To Stalin,
as Communist commander-in-
chief, acquisition of a zone in Ger-
many did not mean an end of the
expansionist drive; to the leader
of world Communism, East Ger-
many must serve as a bridgehead
for a move into Western Germany.
A bit farther to the west, the large
party of French Communism was
waiting; beyond France, the proud
fifth column in Italy stood at at-
tention. The limitations of tradi-
tional empire-building no longer
suited Stalin’s stature. The out-
look was too vast and exciting.
Enc the /end of {the ¢var the

remlin has consistently paraded
as a great leader in the fight
against those who sought to dis-
member the German state.

The same ambiguity between
the course of Soviet action on the
one hand and the basic Communist
philosophy and propaganda on the

other is inherent in Russia’s for-
eign economic activities,

Theories and concepts of “im-
perialism,” produced for political
purposes, were born near the end
of the 1815—1914 era cf world




mongers” of the West are based
this theory of imperialism; tie
phalanx of Soviet social scientists
has not been able to add any new
ideas to Lenin’s legacy. Therefore
concepts and theories advanced
today to justify Soviet foreign
policy are based on the facts of
another time, on a world situation
that has ceased to exist,

The formulas of Yalta | Britain”



TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1951

TO-DAY’S SPECIALS



D. V. SCOTT
&CO,LID. | at THE COLONNADE
Of Britain —_—
ritain Usually Now
i i *ntment ||} Bottles COX APPLE JUICE................ 50 44
Colonial Disappointment Bottles COX APPLE JUICE.
ee Tins LETONA PEACH JAM (15 1b) 52 48
In Festival Programme Tins MY LADY PEA SOUP... 29 26



By E. B. TIMOTHY





















LONDON.
In May this year, crowds will flock to the
South Bank of the Thames in London to see
the latest scientific marvels, to see the Dome
of Discovery, to hear magnificent music in a
great Concert Hall. All this—and more—they
can see and hear this summer at the Festival
of Britain. The best brains of the country
are combining in this effort to tell the story
of to-day.
Away from the crowds on the South Bank,
there will be other special exhibitions to at-
tend—in Museums, Centres and Institutes.—
There in a quieter way, Britain’s treasures
will be on display to the world. They will
not be restricted to British exhibits. The
British Museum, for example, will feature
Colonial exhibits in its ‘Festival’ display.

We Have...

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BARBED WIRE
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Benin (Nigeria.) will be represented by
specimens from the collection of bronzes and
ivories in the museum. Wood carving of the
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The art of applying gold leaf to wood carv-
ing, almost exclusive to Ashanti (Gold Coast)
will be revealed. Ancient Jamaica will be

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represented by a wooden idol discovered in
a cave in Carpenter’s mountain in 1792. Ara-
wak carvings from the West Indies, chiefly
Trinidad, will be shown. Traditional crafts
of the Commonwealth will be demonstrated
in such examples as that from the British
Solomon Islands and in the bark cloth beat-
ers from Uganda and Kenya (Fast Africa).




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But is this really a “Festival of Britain. ?”
The programme might make one wonder.
From May to June, two hundred end fifty
musical events will take place in London.
Let us look at the list of Orchestral Concerts.
During the first week of the ‘Festival’, we
find, Arturo Toscanini, an Italian, conducts
three concerts at the Royal Festival Hall. A
conductor, Eduard Van Beinum, will conduct
the London Philharmonic Orchestra; Rafael
Kubelik, a Czech, will conduct the Philhar-
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Schwarz, will conduct the Bournemouth
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field of visual arts. Sculptors like Karen
Jonzen, E. Paolozzi. and Uli Nimpsch have
been commissioned by the Arts Council of
Great Britain to prepare sculptures for the
Festival.

And at Battersea Park, Indonesian ballet

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Sup- | dancers will display their terpsichorean skill.

Granted that the idea of the “Festival of “International” Quick Drying Enamel.

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to-day, the participation of foreign artists and
musicians in the festival programme is
understandable and legitimate. In the day-
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Foreign artists are prominent, too, in the

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The Rev. R. W. Sorensen, M.P., Mr. Fen-
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Bureau are approaching the Lord President
of the Council, Mr. Herbert Morrison, M.P.,
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Colonials are asking why their kinsmen
like Fela Sowande, from Nigeria, regarded
as one of the distinguished organists in Eng-
land; Rudolph Dunbar, from British Guiana,
who has conducted famous orchestras in Lon-
don, Berlin, Paris and Hollywood, and
Ronald Moody from Jamaica, who has

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achieved fame as a sculptor, have not been PH GODD DS sii
commissioned for the Festival,
mar ar re ry iT
r ¥ *
The Press Officer of the body responsible r
for the arts side of the Festival, the Arts "
Council, tells me that the Council empanel- = r f



led small groups of distinguished. persons

under various headings such as poetry, sculp- FOR... SELLIED TURKEY.

ture, music ete. Each group had a chairman A tisi: ANCHOVIES MACKERAL

at its head who was also a member of the ih Sigh —

Arts Council. Names of musicians, artists, Breaktasts DATES. Figs

etc., were proposed by members of the groups
for approval or rejection. But a different
method was adopted: in commissioning the
conductors of orchestras. The orchestras
were empowered by the Arts Council to
choose their own conductors,

Is it too late to inelude one of, these men

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; Laue FINE WINES
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SIR,—Recently there “ | rrr
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petent in their field of work, they should weleame ) inc




TUESDAY, JANUARY

*
ov,

1951



Dogs And Whistling Are! Lady Savage

Banned In The Market i

PEOPLE who go into the Public Market below the wharf |
to buy meat cannot whistle nor can dogs walk about the

market yard or slaughterh

board in the market says so,

yesterday about noon, you

Opens
| YWCA,



THE Y.W.C.A. movement in
Barbados was revived when Lady

An order painted on a . mote
but if you were in the market , 3°V88e officially opened the new
Â¥ e |Y.W.C.A. Headquarters at Pin-

would have heard the shrill; ¢oiq Street yesterday evening. It

ouse,

whistle of a man as he sat relaxed on the market wall. You | is situated
f s only a few yards aw
would have seen, too, a well fed dog strolling about the {from the Y.M.C.A. hoe

yard.

Y.W.C.A. OPENED

Wie the ADVOCATE visited
the Y.W.C.A. Headquarters
at Pinfold Street ‘at midday yes-
terday a number cf ladies were
making preparations for the!
cpening function later in the day.

indows were being cleaned,
the front room decorated with
flowers and the surroundings
looked “spick and span”, Mrs.
D. H. L. Ward, Secretary of the
Y.W.C.A., was supervising the
work.

The Y.W.C.A, has very little
yard and no playing field. At the
beginning only tea will be served
Members can start enlisting from
today. They have only to get a
iorm from Headquarters.

There are three spacious rooms
on the second floor. Two will be
used by boarders while the other
goes to the person in charge. The
kitchen is in a very sanitary con-
aition and equipped with an oil
stove,

Some of the furniture is old
fashioned, but this adds to the
beautiful surroundings.

N ACCIDENT occurred at
Queen’s Park on Sunday
night while the Church cf God
meeting was taking place. It was
however only slight.. The front
wheel of a bicycle, owned by
Jsmes Beckles of Richmond Gap,
St. Michael, was damaged, Also
involved was motor car E, 175,

HARLES BROWNE of Ban-

4 croft Land, Carrington Village,
fell from a bus at Arthur Hill cn
Saturday night and was injured.
He was treated at the Hospital and
sent home.

Browne was a passenger on the
bus. He was getting off when the
incident occurred. The bus _ is
owned by the My Lord’s Hill Bus
Company and was being — driver.
by Benjamin Agard of Britton:
Hill, St, Michael.

N ACCIDENT occurred at the
junction of Rickett and Tra-
falgar Streets cn Sunday morning
between a motor car owned and
driven by Ashten Gibbs of “Croy-
don”, Hastings and a motor cycle.

The rider of the motor cycle
was injured. He was taken to the
General Hospital where he was
tweated and discharged.

*PHE TAILORS DIVISION at

their general meeting at the
Union Headquarters elected Mr.
G. Bascombe President, Mr. L.
Austin Vice President and = Mr.
T. Ishmael Secretary .

General members of the Com-
mittee appointed were Messrs. H.
C, Clarke, S. Carew, E. Padmore,
LE. Carrington and C.. Robinson



E EVERTON CLUB held its
Annual General Meeting on

Sunday last and the following
were elected:— Messrs C. A.
Nourse, President, R. Culpepper,
Vice President, S. Williams, Trea-
surer, L, Jones and K, Harding,
Trustees, F. L. Walcott, Hony.
Secretary, with Messrs N. Gill, G.
Blades, -D. Olton, and R. Leslie as
members of the Committee of
Management.

Ist Division Football Captain—
E. Reece.

2nd Division Football Cagtain—
C. Archer,

3rd Division Football Captain—
R. Leslie.

Ist Division Table Tennis Cap-
tain—N, Gill.

2nd Division Table Tennis Cap-
tain—R. Leslie.

B.A.F.A. Council
tive:—F. L. Walcott,

T.T.A. Council Representative:
N. Gill.

Association of Cultural Societies
Representatives:—F. L. Walcott
and S. Williams.

Representa-



Whole Day Service

It seems unrealistic for anyona
jto be on the spot where a divine
service is to be held, eight hours
before the start, but that is what
happened at the shed in Queen’s
Park yesterday.

The service began at 7.15 p.m.
but from 11 a.m, the lame, deaf,
dumb and blind were trudging in,
supported by some friend or
relative.

Soon the preacher’s platform
and the tront benches as well,
began to fill up with these seekers
after healing. The wait was a
long one but their patience was
admirable.

It was the last day but one
that Rev. James B. Reesor who
had been instrumental in healing
scores of people through faith in
God, was to he heard in the Park
preaching and asking God to
heal the afflicted.

These people being aware of the
difficulty of gaining entry to the
building in the afternoon, were
taking no chances. As the hours
went by more and more people
‘turned up and when 4 o'clock in
the afternoon the building was
almest filled. Singing
and continued until the





















Any woman will be able to join,
The building in» whieh the|regardless of her standing in life
butchers sell their meat is about|or her particular religious denom-
60 yards long by 25 yaras wide,;ination. Already many have ex-
Butchers rent stalls tne price of} Pressed their wish to become
which vary according to the size. }|members.
Some stalls are $15 a month, some| Lady Savage arrived
$10 and others $5. panied by His Excellency the
The stalls were only built six|Governcr and Major Denis
years ago, but the slaughter-| Vaughan. After she clipped the
house is the sane old slaughter-|ribbon the Association was bless-
house for many years ago. One|/ed by Dean Mandeville.
of the oldest butchers of the M
market, ‘Fitzgerald Springer who] ., rs. A. A. Gibbons, President
has been killing animals there|° te ¥.W.C.A., after weicom-
now’ for 25 years, tolq the ing His Excellency and Laay
Advocate that the siaughter house | °#V@8* thanked Lady Savage tor
was there before he was born, 51| P¢tforming the opening ceremony.
years ago. The slaughterhouse | +2¢y Were also,very pleased w
which is about the same size as al] | ¥¢lcome Mrs. Frederick Koss,
the stalls, is.an old wooden and] Who is a member of the Nationai
galvanise building. Board of the Y.W.C?A, ot
it--is always kept clean and] Canada,
hanging about it can be seen the| She said that Barbados had a
pieces of rope which are used to| ¥.W.C.A. before 1910 which was
fasten the animals ang the hooks| Started by Miss Edith Triming-
to which the meat is attached. | ham, but unfortunately it was
There is always a smell of blood| closed in 1921.

and the buzz .of flies about the
. n é
ieatinh.. OG aitiny Iles yesteeelinr In June last year a letter ap-
ie : peared in the Auvucate asking ivr
much business was not _ being sumeone to torm a ¥.W.c.A
oe E pred en “a rt Knowing wnat good work 1s qoue
ay é pu ” by an institution of this kind aii

kept busy
busy. ‘ the world over, and wnat a uselui
It is a regular thing to hear f rs
é 8 § piace it nils in any community,

in the market, a woman com- “i

plaining about too much fat being cat ee a pis 10a eee

on the meat she is offered. The} ‘78! she would help if a Com-

reply the butcher always gives is pays He oe nes join ner
ha in ie r in starting a Y.W.C.A.

that he did not make the meat Tne foudwites jedies dre.

and he also bousht the fat. Frank Bishop, Vice Fresident, .wirs,

Meat From Australia Deighton Ward, Secretary, Mrs.
Twenty-five years ago most of P. A. Clarke, Treasurer, .wirs,
the meat that used to be sold at|Fred Goddard, Mrs, H. A. Talme,
the market came from local oxen|Mrs. A. W. Scott, Mrs. Donaia
and the remainder from Vene-| Wiles, Mrs. Herbert Greaves, Miss
zuela. ‘Those were in the days| Edna Fields, Miss Jean Wilkinson,
when oxen were used to a large/Miss E. Bourne, Miss A. Bourne,
extent on plantations. Meat from|Miss Betty Arne, Mrs. S. Taylox
Venezuela stopped coming to Bar-|and Mrs, D. Woode, kindly ofter—
bados 17 years ago, Springer said. |ed their assistance and a Commit-
Most meat now come from Aus-|tee was formed. Rev. Derek
tralia. Woode has kindly consented to be
In the days when oxen used to]their Chaplain
be brought to the market, some
would often escape and injure ain
people. Then, pork used to be 12
cents a pound.

accom-

She said that to date they had
hand $1,570.45. This had
been given by subscribers, (nov

The butchers all think that the |©P/y in Barbados) some anony-
market should be removed to a}â„¢ously. To these they were
residential area, grateful. Mrs. Herbert Greaves

Behind the meat market there is} With helpers ran a most success-
a shed alongside the beach and|ful Cake Sale making $142.33
small boats are hauled up there.|Mrs. A. W. Scott held a very suc-
The shed is shady and fishermen | cessful fair and donated $473.56,
usually sit around there to mend j part of fhe proceeds.
their nets. They were also grateful to the

A rule of the fish market which ; 4 :
is abowe this shed is titat one Ladies Canadian Clyb for. their

, ati }
must not throw cane peelings) 8¢nerous donation and to al
about it. Since the crop ‘ean sant others who had helped in any way
ed, however, and lorries bring} They had to thank too Mr. H. O.

sugar to the bond house near the|Emtage for renting them _ the
market, the men who work-on the } building at a nominal rate, With-
lorries bring along cane with]out a house they could not have
them and after ‘a fill of cane juice, | made a start.

the market is léft full of peelings. '
After getting the house they

then had some difficulty in getting
a Matron, but this was finally
overcome and Miss Rogers ha:
been appointed.

She said that Captain Herber
Williams, Secretary of the

Discussed At
Y.M.C.A., had been a tower ol

rf
L.A.O. Conference strength and to him they were

SEVERAL topics were discussed} most grateful. They had helc
and important recommendations their meetings at the Y.M.C.A
agreed on at the Food and Agri-/and the Y.M.C.A. Committee had
culture Organisation Conference] allowed Captain Williams to tend
held in Trinidad, with respect to}them furniture which at present
the development of co-operatives; they were not able to provide.
in the Caribbean area, Mr. C. A. She thanked Mrs. Ward, their
E, Beckles told the Advocate] Secretary, for all her help and
yesterday. hard work so willingly given and

Mr. Beckles who is Senior} also the Committee.

Peasant Agricultural _ Instructor “It is going to cost us quite ¢
at the Department of Science and|jarge sum each month to run
Agriculture, was the Barbados} this institution involving as_ it
representative at the conference. does rent, light, water rates

The conference — a technical| tajanhone, staff and running ex-
cne on co-operatives in br eg se penses,. ahd without help thir
bean was sponsored joint y thet ee nab a :

r.A.o. oe the United "Nations cannot be done”, she said.

and the Caribbean Commission. Lady Savage, after thanking
It took place at ‘Kent House”,} Mrs. Gibbons, said, “It is not
Maraval, the Headquarters of the necessary for me to explain the
Commission, and lasted from Jan- purpose and objects of the
uary 22 to January 27. Y.W.C.A. The need for such a



Co-operatives

There were forty people takin&| fellowship of service is ever
part, including delegates anc! present and ever increasing, ana
observers, said Mr, Beckles.| preat credit is due to Mrs. Pearl

There were representatives fToM) Cipbons and her Committee for
the Dominican Republic, France, the work they have done in re-

. ‘ t
Oe et ine United aiaton ne establishing this organisation,
C . Ss o

“I hope that the principles of
It was arranged mainly to pro- t D
vide for an exchange of informa- sees ce ae ‘
tion and experience on co-opera- :
tive problems and developments] @ great extent on the goodwill ana
throughout the Caribbean, This| #ssistance of the general public
was done with a view, he said,| I, therefore, appeal to you all for
to providing guidance to the ter- your support. :
ritories represented, and obtain- ‘And so today, it has been an
ing advice on how, as part otf honour to open this Y.W.C.A
their normal activities, -F.A.O.| Headquarters, which I trust will
and the Caribbean Commission] grow in the years ahead to a full
could be of service in the develop-| scale branch of the international

mentrof co-operatives inythe area:) organisation, and provide facilities

for the social intellectual welfare
Comprehensive Report of young women irrespective of
To accomplish this purpose the|raee, colour and creed, with a
conference made.a detailed study] dominant spiritual background of
of a very comprehensive “report! christian faith and practice. 1
on “Co-cperatives in the Carib-] wish the Association every suc-
bean”, prepared by Dr. D, Bros] pegs.”
sard of F.A.O. Mrs. Frank Bishop, who moved
An intensive programme W@5), vote of thanks, said that she

started | arranged and provision was made hoped Lady Savage would visit
long- for two sessions daily. Topics were

the Association in the future, On

looked-for-preacher put in his aiscussed under the — general behalf of the Committee she con-
appearance. | Heads: “Co-operatives in he gratulated His Excellency and
By this time there were a5/ separate territories”, Main obsta- Lady Savage.

usual, crowds around the building,
and the service went on.

Those who waited were
jrewarded for their
for Rev. Reesor again preached

well

and healed. ‘sig
fied their intention to be christians

patience }| tion.”

Many people signi- | «Primary

cles and problems”, “Requirements

for the development of co-opera-| _ Among those present were: Sir

George and Lady Seel. Mr. ant

” ctinch nies a a.
tives,” and “Technical cc-oper Mrs R. N Turner, Mr. J. W. 3.

jects dealt with included} Chenery, Mr. and Mrs. H. A

ot marge ona wEnetlit soci-| Vaughan, Mr. H. A, Talma, Mr

eties,” “Marketing”, “Consumers|O. T. Allder, Mr. F. Miller, Mr

and there was a general rejoicing. | nd supply,” “Fisheries,” “Health,| A. Nyren, Mr. D. A. Wiles, Mr
ane

The Advocate learnt yesterday | +}Housing,” “Sehool Co-operatives,” | and Mrs. Glindon Reed, Mr.

that over 2,000 people had
declared their intention to be fol-

“Apex or central banks based on} Mrs. F. J. Ross. Mrs. HW. A. Cuke
primary thrift and credit soci-}Mr, John Beckles, Miss Norah

lowers of Christ, at these services | ¢ties.* “Co-operative unions and| Burton, Rev. and Mrs. Tudor, Mr
‘which have been going on iM} federations,” “The lack of trained] onq Mrs. F. C. Goddard, Mr

the Park.

PORT: ENQUIRY MEETING

The Port Enquiry Committee
held its third meeting yesterday
and discussed with representa-
tives of Messrs. DaCosta & Co.
Ltd., and Messrs. S. P. Musson,
Son & Co. Ltd. certain points
arising out of the memoranda
submitted by these firms.

The next meeting of the Com-
mittee will be held on Monday
next at the Labour
when the Committee will meet
representatives of certain firms to
discuss the regrouping cf cranes
on the waterfront,



Department |

and|H. A. Tudor. Colonel and Mrs

personnel for co-operatives
A. Gib-

co-operative services,” “Require-;R. T. Michelin. Dr. A

ments in respect to promotion andj pons, Cant. H. H. Williams, Mr
registration of co-operative | pudlev Wiles, Madame Ifill and
sceieties,” “Training of officers of} Mrs. Olga Symmonds

sccieties, and Government per-





sennel.””

ence. the fine arrangements made
by the Caribbean Commission for
the conduct of the meeting

Pleasurable Experience
Mr. Beckles said that. despite!

and










the heavy nature of the _ _PFO-! the convenience of tha represen-
gramme and the con iderable tatives. and above all, he said. the
amount of work involved, the] ,,,onificent heln given the mect
experiénce was most stir atin fling by Dt. H. Belsh Nirector |
j end pleasurable. He spoke } hly | of Rural Welfare Divisi

f the general attitude of cc-oper | The report of. the e



tion and enthusiz

oi -whe- took part



pl

1a : ea be presented t
in-the conter-+

governments in d



BARBADOS

ADVOCATE
CHATTING



}
|
|
|
'

|

|



LADY SAVAGE (right) is seen chatting with Mrs. Pearl Gibbons, |
President of the Y.W.C.A., in the verandah of the Y.W.C.A.











*

Miss M. J. Bowman
MARY JULIA BOWMAN was born in Jersey, Channel
Islands, where her family had for generations owned a
house in Beaumont with a magnificent view overlooking
the harbour of St. Helier, the capital of Jersey, During the:
early part of her life, she was educated in Germany; after-|
wards, in 1894, on being awarded a Founder's Scholarship!
in Modern Languages, she entered the Royal Holloway
College, University of London. She subsequently proceeded
to Oxtord and gained Honours in English at that University.



At the bexinning of the pre-} pare for a London degree
sent century Miss Bowman ac- With the object of providing an
cepted a post as Assistant Mistress| Opportunity for Queen‘s College
‘6 teach Modern Languages—| girls to benefit from a veut |
French and German—at Queen’s} Waining in the United Kingdom,
College, Barbados. Although her}she tried her utmost to increase
first acquaintance with Queen's] the Scholarship Fund started by
College was comparatively short,! Miss Noble for the same purpose
her pupils, colleagues and friends}It was during Mi: Bowman’s
remember her then as a beautiful] term of office that a Commercial
and dignified young woman who] Class waS begun in 1928 at
won their affection and respect. | Queen’s Coiiege, thus enabling the
She also showed that she already | pupils to be trained for the Lon-
possessed the qualities of charac-}don Chamber cf Commerce
ter and personality suited to one| Examination. The Library too
who was later to fill with distinc-] vas renovated and new books
‘ion a position of influence and of] Were Hdded. She realised the im-
the highest responsibility in this] portance of Science on the cur-
islands riculum of a scnool and with the

Between the years of her first] help of her friend Miss Skues did





and second appointments at]. great deal to raise the standard
Queen’s College, Miss Bowman] of the Science teaching and to
held teaching posts in various} improve the laboratory and equip
parts of the world. She returned| ment at the school, Her interest
to the island in 1926 as Headmis-}in Art prompted her to obtain
tress of Queen’s College. Barba-| more pictures, statues, and models
los was indeed fortunate to regain| of animals for the Art Studio
he s@rvices of a woman who dis-| Music too had its place in Miss

Powman's plans for Queen's Col-
‘nd devotion to her work as Miss | iege, for in 1928 a new piano was
Bowman did. While each former] purchased for the use of the
headmistress of Queen’s College} school. Her Speech Days, which
had played her part in the devel-|tock place annually, are worthy
opment of the school into the lead-| of mention, not only because they
ing girls’ school in the island, to] revealed a h+gh standard of sing-
Miss Bowman must be accorded] ing and dramatics but also because
the chief credit for this achieve-|they were so fully appreciated by
meat. She had certain principles parents and children alike. Miss
ynd she was not afraid to abide] Bowman herself assisted in the
by them. production of the plays, especially
the French plays, With advice and
encouragement when necessary

played such a keen sense’ of duty

Possessed of the pioneer spirit,
she made it her mission here to
further educational opportunities
for girls, especially for those who
showed promise intellectually
Some of these pupil: of the senior
classes were granted the privi-
lege of studying in the quiet
atmosphere of Miss Bowman's
nouse, often with her text books
it their disposal. By allowing
them to act on the staff as “stu-
dent mistresses”, Miss Bowman
encouragéd them not only to ac

Externally also the school reaped
the fruits of a culture which origi-
vated from an innate love of beau
ty and had been fostered by wide
ivavel. The swamp was filled in,
new playing fields were acquired,
tennis lawns were established, and
numerous flowering trees and
shrubs were planted

Under the auspices of Miss Bow
man, the Old Girls’ Association
tock on a new lease of life and



quire experience in teaching but} her “At Homes” were always a
also to serve their old school.| Scurce of delight to all who at-
Later, when the External Inter-| tended them. In most of her plans

for the welfare of the school Miss
Bowman was staunchly supported
Sy the old girls who gave her
willing and ready co-operation.

mediate Examination of London
University in Arts was introduced
locally, “student mistresses” as
well as pupils were able to pre-

CLARKE’S “BLOOD MIXTURE” +7












Cleanse the system from blood
impurities ; many sufferers from
rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago,
neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and
minor skin ailments, can derive great
benefit from this well-known medicine.

In LIQUID or TABLET FORM




Just in Case

Doing HMome-Baking

ou're
gy





TURBAN DATES ..... eh per pkt. 30c.

SPRINGBOK TABLE RAISINS Peta set. ot Oe
% MIXED FRUIT for Cakes Js Ratna tg args >All,
% CURRANTS for Cakes y inne 39c. X|
% SULTANAS for Cakes BL, Se a ele

CRAWFORDS CREAM CRACKERS per tin $1.37
% MELTIS NEW BERRY FRUITS $1.32 & 75e. &
§§ PALM TOFFEES per tin 67e. & 46c. }|
& CARNIVAL Asst, BISCUITS per tin $1.24 |
4 +
: g
* ~y %
$ STANSFELD SCOTT & Co.. Ltd. %
103660600605006 9660600656 0000 000000 HOD O4O,

ja resident of Watk'ns Alley, was
j charged with the larceny of a vest

ae ee

PAGE FIVE

Deep Water |\auuuse eRe anes
Harbour FRESH SUPPLY OF %

ee .; "PURINA HEN CHOW



chant, told the Advocate yesterday

| dee win a Deep Water Harbour 2 (SCRATCH GRAIN)
} Mr ‘eldman had just. returned
“ES Sly | gall. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—Distributore

the deep water harbour facilitieg



he had found in Jamaica and a a w@ @ B au Bw a | ww B B a @ B
othe. countries included in the VOSS FF99 999998595 OO a a ee a a
cruise : ‘
He said that Jamaica looked
: — r
very progressive He described EWIOY A

the whole trip as a wonderful one.

Also returning to Barbados on
the Coembie yesterday was Mr
L. Spira another City merchant.
He too, wefit on a ten-day cruise
and was enthused over the beau-

wr
GOOD SMOKE G
WHILE You \- KZ. f
ties cf Caracas.
M Pe? |

* CAN AN /
>. Kreindler who; =
travelled to Curacao on holiday x ‘ \ }
by B2W.I1.A. returned on the % ‘, /
He said that | & \

44
SLEEP APSE *







bent pear ge 3 days on ¢ TU RKISH and
EGYPTIAN

the ship, he had enjoyed every ‘
moment of the voyage back home. } ¢

15/- For Indecent
Language



a

65 PPOODOL EL GEESE EEL

&
.
% CIGARETTES
x ABDULLA CIGARETTES No. 11 — 50's ...... ec e055 $1.61
rue webs ae x » ” Dt: 208 ii ak . 68
i SAR-OL eotta | \ * a ie OBA 3
Jemmott of Hawkins Gap, West-|% ig ee Pitted, ge 29 <4 x
bury Road, was yesterday fined < Ks c No, 14 =, 30'8.... -66 x
15s. in 28 days with an alternative | \ ” ” No. 16 —°50’s ... $1.45 *
of one month’s imprisonment when $ ” Py No. 16 — 20's CUR oses 60 6
City Pol'ce Magistrate Mr. H. A. ; *
Talma found her guilty of using | & .
indecent language on Baxter’s|? x
Road on Sunday. xg *
For causing an obstruction on x s

Busbey Alley
parking a donkey drawn cart,
33-year-old Nathaniel Evelyn, a
hawker of Hall’s Road, St. Michael,
was yesterday fined 10s. in 14 days
with an alternative of 14 days’ im-

4,

on Saturday by

<4, 34,
POEL PALL A LLL LIEK Oe.



SPECIFY

“EVERITE”

ASBESTOS-CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

“TURNALL” —

ASBESTOS E





pr.sonment by Mr. H. A. Talma.
A case against Gilbert Burnett,
alias “Browne,” a _ 16-year-old

lighter boy, was dismissed without
prejudice by Mr. Talma, Burnett,

shirt belonging to Shurland Cox.



LT TTT

Perhaps the goal cf Miss Bow-
man’s ambitions for Queen's Col-
lege was her sincere desire to see
the school removed to more spa-
cious and suitable surroundings at
Erdiston This desire she was
never fortunate enough to see ful-




gli The memory of Miss Bowman’s
unremitting zeal and devoted ser-
vice to Queen's College for a pe-
riod of over eleven ‘years and to
the cause of education in this
island. Her sometimes apparently
sustere exterior concealed a sensi-
tive and sympathetic nature which
made her exceedingly considerate
and understanding of the special
problems and needs of her pupils,
With her passing Barbados has
lost a true friend, a loyal servant
and an excellent
The vineerity of her regard for
Queen's College and her attach-
ment to Barbados may be appro-
priately expressed in the words
that she herself used in her fare-
well speeches to the school and to
the Old Girls’ Association;-—
all to be true to
Queen's College. Uphold her hon-
sur and her interests in every
way. It is the oldest girls’ school
in Barbados and it is in your hands
te maintain it as the best girls’
school in Barbados, I pray and
trust it may always remain so, .
I have always looked on Barbados
anywhere




Headmistress.

st









“I beg you



CODCOD ESOS PREOOO GOS DOM

HARRISON’ S- 22000 st.

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED
A SHIPMENT OF

| AGRICULTURAL |

more like home than

Ise in the world,'—D.A.G.C,



























ORIENTAL

GooDs

From INDIA, CHINA,
EGYPT !
Silk, Curios, Brasswere,
Jewels, Linens, Ivory, Teak-
wood, Sandals, French Per-
'| fumes, Barbados Scarves in

diled and it remained the one bit-
ter disappointment of her work in
Barbados.

It is only fitting that the people
ef Barbados should always cher-

|| Pure Silk, Ete., Ete, Ete,
The Souvenir Headquarters } KS
| THANE Hros.
KASHMERE

Pr. Wm. Henry 8t.—Dial 5466

GOOD QUALITY — FULLY STRAPPED.
ONLY $4.70 rEacu.

§ The quantity for dispdsal is small
and future supplies are uncertain.

i The
EAVESTAFF

' The small modern Piano

For a piano of limited
dimensions the “Eavestaft”
reveals a volume of quality
| of tone out of all propor-
tions to its size, convenient
deferred terms available.
Inspection Cordially Invited

JUST CALL—4563

CECIL JEMMOTT

33 Broad St.
Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy
20.1.'51

SEND US YOUR ORDERS
WITHOUT DELAY.



HARDWARE _ DEPT.
TEL. 2364,



aS yeaneven —PPLECEPOOE SOO COCPOOOK%F










a fresh stock of old favourites

Dr. Scholl’s
FAMOUS

Foot Remedies |

Arch Supports, Foot Easers, Zino Pads for Bunions





and other items Foot Powder.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID.

,10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

and Callouses. Foo! Balm.

for the promotion





of comfort of the

foot,





{
1951

BARBADOS TUESDAY, JANUARY 30,



ADVOCATE

BY CARL ANDERSON



and Heart

bleeding the first day, ends sore

and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron clad
. Amosan must make your

mouth well and save your teeth or

money back on return of empty pack-

age. Get Amosan from your chemist

t

ay. e guar-
antee protects
you.
for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth





"Dear, it's time you knew.

POSSIBLY

THE TRIGE )
UST ONE! E

THAT MAY
SAVE YOU FROM THE BITE OF THE
TZIG=TZAG FLY LIVES THERE... BUT
NO ONE WOULD DARE TAKE YOU :

WAIT A MINUTE!

fe
TRADING ¢
GSTABLISNMENT

00D |
oF



as <= Wise Morners advise their ~

daughters fo take Paradol, and
thus save needless suffering due to
periodic pains. Scientifically com-
pounded from 4 ingredients, Paradol
helps relieve pain quickly—with no
disagreeable after-effects. Excellent
for headaches, too. The name “Dr,
Chase’ is your assurance,

aN:

TEA.

“ye oo00d tea |
.










a\-4 WOMEN
ARE ALL
» ALIKE

STANDS

SUPREME





Deliveries can be arranged in
the U.K. for the popular - -

VAUXHALL CARS

Full details will be gladly given on application to - - - -

ROBERT THOM LTD.

Whitepark (COURTESY GARAGE)

| U.K. ?
|
|








THE LONE RANGER

ALOT OF ROB NEE UO BEEN

_ [LIKE A WELL ORGANIED GANG? LOOKS
hb =

TELL MEALL YOU
KNOW ABOUT

Dial 4616

MM News OF ANOTHER ROBBERY IS
] L COMIN’ THROUGH RIGHT Now!

{iii 4 i]

1)

7 Hi

|||











The Advocate Co Ltd:, will publish a Year Book of Barbados

1
n
rn
ry
a
i.
a
F in 1951.



an...
BRINGING UP FATHER

BY GEORGE MC.MANUS The Year Book will contain three parts:—

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know about
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover.

* #") THINK THOSE
RUSTLERS WILL GIT
THAT HERD OVER TH’

| BORDER BY MIDNIGHT ?

AND NOW LISTEN AND
LOOK TOMOR
WILL. THE RUS6ETLERS
GET THE HERD OVER
( THE BORDER BY
MIDNIGHT ?

emergence
IT WAS RADIO STATION
“K-N-+G-THEY SAID BY
NOT BEING HOME YOU
LOGE THE GRAND PRIZE
OF A POTATO PEELE
AND TEN DOLLARS /

(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,
soap, butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
etc.

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Director of the Barbados Advocate will be respon-
sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisa-
tions immediately or not later than April 15th 1951.

Year Book, ’
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951.
Advertisers are asked to get in touch with

Mr, Trevor Gale,
Advertising Manager,
Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

_ This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)

I ONE one
‘AN OLD AND TRUSTED
EMPLOYEE...WILFREO CUTTLE!

Oe

HOW DO | LOOK, DEVIL? LIKE A PILOT,
READY TO FLY AGANG OF KILLERS
| TOTHEIR HIDDEN THREE

MILLION DOLLARS? * :
Pama YES, \}\.
ORM) OR NO, >|"
nt OR MAYBE.



DR. CHASE'S
PARADOL

rams Quick Relief from Pain ===

FR
which makes
* GOD’S WAY OF
SALVATIO!
PLAIN”
Please write
Samuel Roberts,

Book and Tract Service, %
30, Central Avenue, Ban- ¢%
gor N, Ireland.” ¥,

offers
CLIPPER *
CV-240

SERVICE

between

SAN JUAN
ST. THOMAS
ST. -CROIX
GUADELOUPE
MARTINIQUE
ST. JOHNS

ST. LUCIA ~~
PORT OF SPAIN
*

The Clipper CV-240 is
acknowledged to be the
most advanced type airplane
of its kind. Its extra large
picture windows, wide aisles”
and its 40 roomy, recline-to-
your-comfort seats, assure
passengers the utmost in
comfort and luxury in flight. |

By providing this most mod-
ern, fost, dependable Clipper
on this route, PAA is cons
tributing to the advancement
ofthe rapidly growing touris?
area in the islands between
Puerto Rico and Trinidad.

For full information ond
reservations, consult your
wavelagentor =

G *T.M. Reg.

PAN AMERICAN
Horto AIRWAYS



DaCOSTA & Co., Lid.
Broad St.

for one % $ ©
Gospel ¥
TUESDAY, JANUARY 30,

CLASSIFIED ADS.





1951







today










PUBLIC SALES
tanaennaseneeseencntreseensensems
AUCTION












































TAKE NOTICE

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

TAKE NOTICE
PIN-UP





QUIX



















ROYAL NETHERLANDS.

PAGE SEVEN



take NoTicE | SHXPPING NOTI































sin ee S32 noon at AL- That PIN-UP COLD prFmevanl STEA
rbarees Hill. . PERM-WAVF 4 MS Co. ‘
DIED FeR RENT 12 % x 38 &. covered wir Ahm Linat Josern WATSON & song| LIMITED a Company incorporated weder Jie 7c es. HIP « The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will
£DWARDS — EDWARD OWEN Hi Sheets. Good Wallaba Posts uprights - &_ Company incorporated | ‘"¢ English Companies Act, Manufactur- > Sailing from Amsterdam. Dover and accept Cargo and Passengets for
funeral will leat 5 is Terms Cash. To be removed ai we? under the English Com anié ers, whose trade or business address is Madeira—s.s, “Cottica™ 2nd, ard, 9th St. Lutia, Grenada, and Aruba, and
“Hentstead” ee mee HOUSES R. Archer McKenzie, Aucioneeke MAT. | Manufacturers, whose trade or busince 5@-61, Park Reval Road, London, N.W. 10, PAINT February, 1951. M.S. “Bonaire” 9th, Passengers only for St. Vincent,
o'clock this afternoon for St. Suen 26.1.51—4n, hall Ross eee Soap Works, White- a} cau es ee TAS te Ree iis Msoiline t ke ee ees eee
. . - eeneeneeentnneeeeniintomenren eos d, Leeds, c rade mork in P: a s ard’s Church, 30,1,51—1n. ae GARDIE — Worthing. Drawing Und for the registration oft teane wpptied in respect of ataleeieias i oe 5 ms, “Helena” 13th. igh, ‘Febroary: 1951, Th v “Cari ” i
—— 1. dining rooms, 3 bedrooms with run- r The Sterling Hammer ‘art “A” of Register in re: t "| the hair, sachets for use in waving the ms. “Willemstad” 9th, 15th, February obtet ena oO ie cenan ees ad
ning water. Available February Ist sy «ind permission I will selon Tues- |C°@MON soapy. detergents, oy ©! | hair, toilet preparations, hair lotions 1951, m.s. “Oranjestad” 9th, Sth Mareh Se ae tee =
PAYNE_We the undersigned beg through | 2! 28 O.L.81—Sn, | gay" 3th, tthe Avillon: Sports Chas, | Ballshing, “Scouring “sna rashes: | Nt” fagteners "and Rasy supports, and 151 canes Stl ea
this medi — range Street, Speightstown, ia » | Perations of all ki a entitled to register the same Sailing to Trinidad, Paramaribo and abe ‘
a, seen to thank all those Sta-"ide residence ae Clarks). 1 Radio, ? Gremnee = to register Se mnie eee ee ater one wpa from the 30th day Georgetown—m.s, “Bonaire” 37th Janu- departure to be notified.
any way condoled with us in oar recent}and cutlery optional bs Snes Pees r Hand Machine, Gents and {7m the 30th day of January tanr Pe ree tame Some person. shall THE Sty 1961; ms. “Cottica” 20th, February SCHOONE WN
loss occasioned by the death of Kenneth | onward. For particulars ant eae aTy Goal Staves Conct e ey ote aes time ght eereon ahah in the mean- ie to ae ate wemet’ er ppitttion COLOR COMPANY Una # | Gduing to Teiedad Poon < a ee
£ . ave in AY oO ion a “at ot r Lo Trinidad, La uiara, C a-
Rudora (mother), Alfred (father), Marion a ee pete sali 10.1.51—t-t.n. }0F re kee 30. Terms CASH. at my office of Cepouttion of eich a bs of such registration, The trade mark can | P©MY registered under the aes * te cao ete—m.s. “Oranjestad” ist February ERS ASSOCIAMIOM, Ine.
(sister), Ivan, Aean (brothers). © SANDY GREST—Cattlewash 1 LAND ARDS, tration. The trade mark can be oan aes be teen on application at my office tario, a Province of the Dominion of | 1951. 4 Telephone: 4047
30.1.51—1n, | March, June. October Se ae Feb.. mine application at my office. Dated this 29th day of January, 1951,] Canada, whose trade or business address Sailing to Plymouth, Antwerp, Amster-
cates in atone tea vem 1951. trie Dated this 29th day of January, 1951 H. WILLIAMS, is 2-20 Morse Street, Toronto 8 Onta, | 4&m-—m.s, “Oranjestad” 23rd Mareh 1951.
MEMO: : » a Peak. UNDER : . Registrar of Trade Marks. | 7, Canada, has applied for the regis- 8S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD., =
DaCOsTA—In RIAM soesialiapne sites SO THE SILVER Registrar of Trade Marks 30.1 $1--3n,| Wetion of a trade mark in Part “A” of Agents
ever tender memony of r “ Register in respect of enamels, paints.
our darling TWO ROOMS—At Vesper Cot, Pinfold 30.1.$1—3n. . paints,
1 ae younger son Patrick, Lt. | crest Aas Sie Ane nfo HAMMER Se ee senienneeucieee cee” varnishes and laequers, and will
st Ansio op January’ oem 18st, Ore, ‘si—in.|, Mrs. S. H. Street’ TAKE NOTICE one marathi alee, eee >
oie uary 30th 1944. RIP. he. Wika: s Sale will TAKE NOTI ene month from the 30th day of 0.
ever sorrowing Father and Mother. AGE—8t d, ednesday 7th February at January 1951 unless some person shall eo
30.1.51—In. lames Coast. Bloomsbury, St, Thomas ° in the meantime give notice in dupli-
BRAN : cate to me at my office of iti r
ee loving anne, of my KER, So & CO. such registration. The trade mark can Inc.
adopted . Dorot ristina a uc ionee: " be seen on application at my office,
of Buckingham Road, Bank Hall, who . 21,1,51—2n. 30 Dated this 29th day of January 1951 NE
fell asleep in Jesus, 29th Jan 1 Se ern eS 30.1,51—1n : W YORK SERVICE
“Her smiles ‘still iin juary 1949. UPSTAIRS PREMISES—At No. 6 Swan . _. H. WILLIAMS, SS. “Essi” saile ith January arrives Barbados 4th February
be Street. Cool and airy—very spacious. REAL ESTATE pany. $ — ant SS. “Byfjord” sails Ind February — —,, ae 14th “as
Saviour" . Dentists, Solicitors Siiindean in : ni _ — -— tase
Lost Rot, fereotten by Ste, To approved tenants. ‘Apply. im- Whee a Bungalow at Redman> hie eee NEW
uise Newto: therine 5 diately THANI BROS. Phone 3466. s je, St. iomas, conta. 5 SE ANS Y
nee, Qeoree Blackman eels 30.1,.51—1n acne Aeeing room we ee aewine. That HENRY HEIDE INCORPORAT LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE} 4 stesmer satis roth Ree m ore 2na
SA. .151—1n. | +» On perches of | . | ED, a Corporation organized un he “ ” ist February — St
Cita isneiiie tag eee WENDAL, — Three bedroom house. ween te Rec same may Raa Gn State ‘ad See York 4 an The application of Marie E. Yearwood | n-___s_«_. ary 15th
FORDE—In lov with every convenience, on man on premises, Ho on 5 | United Si holder of Liquor License No, 975 of 1951
ing memory of our dear Rockley House 25 ft. by 14 x 10 ed States of America, whose trade or CANADIAN SERV
father George Ford who died January | ain road. Garage, two servant rooms, | COMtaining 2 bedrooms, drawinu reow | business address is No. 313 Hudson Street, granted to ‘Her ih. respect of bottom u UND ’ ani
9th 1943 and our darling mother who| S¢tvant’s toilet and bath. For reat un-| Ste» sitliated at Westmoreland, St J City and State of New York, United floor of 2 two storey wall butiding in| OUTHBO
died January $tth 1948, ; furnished, or for sale. Available from| ie same is put” together” oe Sane Season 6t-donarica, has applied fon ths Church Village, St, Michael for permis-
Deep in our hearts lies a picture March Ist. Dial 4476, 2€.1.61—t.f.n, | Suitable for club or meeting Geer registration of a trade mark in Part “A” tard aed Genie. chee ain den ere Halifax seoccae
Pate, pewcious than silver or gold ——_— ecae aney ° — by getting permission | Of Register in respect of candies of all attached at Engle Halil, St, Michael, “ALCOA PILGRIM” Gab January 26th, February ah
s that of our dathng parents PUBRLI Sor tery rathwaite on premises, |*inds, candied nut products, namely. Dated this 29th day of January 1951. “ALCOA PENNANT” ys Pebruary 9th February 20th
Whose memories will never grow old Cc NOTICES Fitts Vv’ 8 of sale apply: Gilbert Millar, | Chocolate covered nuts, chocalate roast- To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq ss. “ALCOA POLARIS" vrs Pebruary 23r. March 6th s
Looking back with tenderness s Village, St. James. 90.1.51—1n, }€4 almonds, chocolate and icing, and Police Magistrate, Dtst, “A” deeuat teiadianal
oon eae tare a a ———L — The undersigned will offer f 1 atehee Sena eran Noe vane ae ae eee : ;
i had them “ ae 7 vill offer for sale by | one mon from the lay Applicant. These vesseis have limited passenger .
Timethy leave the rest with God. £25: -: -3- ty monies by obtaining Bah seep ttition st their office, No, 17,]¢f January 1951 unless some person (N.B.—This application will be con- Y ; poe
a Y (son), Rhodg, .Ivie, Ruth tréoa ante oh pri = Christmas Cards of Februany’ 1a ursday the &th day | Shall in the meantime give notice That J. & E. ATKINSON LIMITED 4| ‘idered at a Licensing Court to be held
(daughters). 30,1,51—in, iriends. No previous experi-| house called’ St ® Pm. the dwelling- | duplicate to me at my office of opposi- | Company incorpoarted under the Eng-| *\ Police Court, Dist. “A” on ‘Thursday

HARPER—In lov: memory
father Archibald Harper

‘ a i Old Bond Street, London, W.L, Engl. EB. A. MeLEOD, | __
the 28th January 1960.,, © - f. | r in; marvellous money making | 2t The Garrison, containing 2 verandahs. Dated this 29th day of January, 195). |} has applied F wintratt gland Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”,
Erno and Patsy Harper (daughters), g ity. Jones, Williams & Co., oa rooms, 2 bedrooms, toilet, bath, H. WILLIAMS, trade a hen “AP eee S 90.1.50—1n :
oa ivan, Archia, Thomas and David England Victoria Works, Preston, ans ee nTee servants rooms and Registrar of Trade Marks. | respect of perfumes, toilet preparations, $$9S99699000595995990095
sons), .1.51—1n., ™ . 51—3n. 5 ‘
25,1.51—18n The sale may be made with or wits 30 1.51—3n. | essential olls, cosmetics, hair lotions,

JORDAN—In loving memory of our dear

ory of our dear beautiful free sample Book
who died on | [armest a







to Britain's
ind foremost Publishers; highest | With 7.444



THE BOWER
Square feet of land | situate

out the furniture.

tion of such registration.
mark can be seen on application at my
office.



The trade the 8th day of February 1951 at 11 o'clock

lish Companies Act, Manufacturers, | (yy,

| Whose trade or business address is 24.




dentifrices and soaps, and will be en-



! , we ——— | titled to register the same aft N 0 i] « E

Va : i 8 after one A

See on soa * Sen vege cae NOTICE Inspection by eppate eg even: with EE ae ight wot Say. Of . Janus ' s
The i was great, the blow severe tie present tenant, Mrs. Adams. WANTED SRE Theahrtie etre ng et Spall. in are

We never thought that death was near
Only those who loved him can tell
The pain of parting without farewell.
Ever to be remembered by—
Gertrude — Jordan (daughter-in-law)
Doreen, Ruby, Syrena, Marjorie (grand-



THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW
Tenders are invited for a loan of
£1,000 at a rate of interest not to ex-
ceed 4% per Annum under the St. An-
drew Parish Church Loan Act. And
will be received by the undersigned up





Further particulars from
COTTLE, CATFOPD & Co.
. 30.1.51—9n,

FOR KENT, SALE OR LEASE
BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-





a ee









the meantime give notice in duplicate to
me at my office of opposition of such
registration, The trade mark can be
seen On application at my office.
Dated this 29th day of January, 1951
H. WYLLIAMS,



GIRLS’ FRIENDLY SOCIETY

ANNUAL SALE







ROBERT THOM LTD.-—-New York and Gulf Service.
Apply: DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Canadian Service.





CANADIAN SERVICE

From Montreal, Halifax,

N.S., St. John, NLRB,

To Barbados, Trinidad, Demerara, B.G.

———
LOADING DATES










Expected
nr es Registrar of Trade Marks. (under the distinguished pat ake }
SS | Pe alta. a, exconenn, | 2 Ton, Braskias’ ‘soca so8 habe: | ARE ™REEN GRD, DRRSEMAKERS | Goi sean |B oF Mie Excelleney “the. Govwrner | Maucax | st. ann | “rtgeetown
we LA, * - | Wee > pply: roadway ess OP. | ~ ' and Lady Savage he yorest"
Boy peg Venger | Saher bears *ynsing water in sah, mista | will be Open'Be Led) Ravage on BYP Sz afateeret” | sah gun. | 260m gan.] aan wep
moe ae ee 24.1 51—6n. and. Kiiehenette s whaeee a 0m} SECRETARY for ROCKLEY GOLF TAKE NOTICE SATURDAY 28TH APRIL Sere +1 20h Feb. ! agra rep. | rat” Maris
. . is Toilet an .» Salary $100.00 r month to_ ,
Ever to be remembered by— ° " ety Speones Light and Telephone. | yether with free rans: in flat over Full particulars later UK. SERVICE
John’ Leslie (husband) and children: Caribbean Bottlin SP Maneger of Bagatelle Plantation, |Ciub House, containing two. bedrooms, | N
.1.51—1n. 0. h mas Dial 2221, 21.1,51.—6n. | living room, is, alee Police Band in attendarice, LOADING Expetea
Pa popper ~ —__.. | free light, Water and taxes. Knowled, Arrival Dat
SFALY—In loving memory of my dear Limited cave oft ROACHES PLANTATIONS ! of Goif an advantage. ge $$$$$$559569O6$6565SS0L oi tibapala’ hash ie
beloved daughter. Bvangeline Nadella ic e a set up for sale by Public Apply by letter only, forwarding re- FOS SOOSSOY 88. “Oak Hine © 25th + Jan,
Sealy who was laid to rest on 2th ‘ompetition at our Office James Street, ) ferences, to—The Secretary, Golf Club NAL Eee eecamer
Jaaiacy 160), Sasnpuinel noes on Friday 2nd February 1951, at 2 p.m. | Rockley 20.1.51—1.f.n. NOTICE M'pook Ginsgow “~ “tnd March
In tears we saw her sinking NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN|CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS ‘ ” t Z
And watch her fade away in pursuance of Section 183 of the situate in St. Luey and containing by eae -LANTATIONS LIMITED—4 it:
God know how much we missed her Compani Act 191 estimation 82 acres 3 ‘roods 23 perches US onnbenron , gents
As it dawns four years to-day panies Ac 0 that a gen-}of which about 48 acres are arabie. The general public is hereby

We often stand beside her grave

eral meeting of the abovenamed

acreage is made up as follows:



warned against contracting any

Phone 4703














a
WE BUY FOR CASH — Clocks, watches

with ‘hearts still ead and sore company will be held at the office and musical boxes in any condition.

Ard think we hear those loving] of Messrs. Bovell & Skeete, Lucas





25% acres Ist crop canes ready for

debt or debts with any person
reaping.

or persons on production of the

14 acres youn; es, Write, call or dial 4429.GORRINGES An- piot and other documents for land

Not dead just gone to rest Street, Bridgetown, _on Monday, 34 acres aes. grass. tique shop, Upper Bay Street. 24 FLOWERS owned by me at Sealy Hall, Mer-
Anice. (mother), George (father) and the fifth day of March, 1951, at 9 acres 23 perches in preparation, 25.1.51—Tn. EAU DE ricks, St, Philip, as I have not
f:mily. 30.1.51—1n. 2.30 o’clock in the afternoon for roads, yards etc COLOGNE authorised such business transac-

—_—_—_—__
WE BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and






Inspection on application to Mr. tions, The plot for the above



the purpose of having an account



























































































; Ormond Knight on the mises. Silver jewellery, coins, dentures, etc. Jand was lost during the month PAO OELDLA OOS, .
OMOEE — [Rec inwaien the windhg'ap'tng| | THANNSOD TRG Set a he Atle acer tone Menta a 1 eae oe
UTOMOTIVE = ; . JULIA HOWARD, le
been conducted 181 én, | Club. 25.1.51—Tn. : aly Hal NX .
CAR—Morris 8, 1948 Model in good] of the cepely aed or Git nee That J, & E. ATKINSON LIMITED, a Merricks, St; Philip NOTICE +
condition. Phone 4255. 30.1,51—I1n. * A The undersigned will offer for b GORRINGES undertake expert watch |COmpany incorporated under the Eng- i, : 4
of hearing any explanation that] pupie competition at thelr office, Ne 17,| 2nd clock repairs, cleaning and resto- | lish Companies Act, — Manufacturers, x x
AC pentition ghd taenoed tt sane, Rated tir doth ae TC: HGH Rtreet. Bridgetown, ‘vn. Thursday | Sotion Of Olt Painting value ee ete | old Bond Wired tongen WL, mre: COS GOGO4 Ss. S. « ISL ANDS rl >
Contact Leon Alleyne at Fort Royall! 195), ee Caen dwabinguouce Sout ran meri Rte ete upper Bay St. ; 25.1.51—Tn. | land, has applied for the registration of =—w_—oeeéee_ Os] ee . * IDE x
Garage about sale of car. Mrs. A. M. J. W. McKINSTRY RICHELIEU a tarde mark in Part “A” of Register " 7 r Me ’ \
we 26.1.51—2n Tn STaquidator, | 18 Silent order and zecentiy renovated, | oo are cageyyy | sions ermenunt ous, commer, hie to: RURNISH TO-DAY S18 saitine ¢ ae %
A * * n venue, ville, with 9,859 ae . > a ¥ > "
2 eee 30.1.51—In | square feet of "Iand. Drawing, ‘aining | APOEwS SEBEC DNS | sons dentition noebe. tnd, will be a eka ste 19S-—ncceptiog raise eet ae, oF shout 16th February %
plana recentin ovighailled and. in.pertast NOTICE se etnan tenn, eenace Bette heres arity Spanish Classes Reguiar Spanish | month from dhe qth day ot, January, THE POPULAR WAY . epling passengers“ Bare 77 and Cargo, y
7 order $400. 91-24, and t . . e@ “Advance: ommercial Course” unless some person sha! n eo % E
mae. tie asnron® wert, of Inspection by appointment only. Dial} Wt be commencing from the First of | meantime give notice in duplicate to m2 POPULAR Mahogany, Cedin > ROBERT THOM LIMITED, %
‘ Pr HUNT 2210, February. at my office of opposition of such reg, and other Vanities, Wardrobe » igs %,
(Deceased) COTTLE, CATFORD & CO All those interested; please be good | istration, The trade mark can be seen Bet'steads, Dresser-robes, Cradles, (Agents) Ny
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that al! . me enough to contact Mrs, Maria Carlotta | on application at my office. + Bed, Bedsteads, Springs, Laths s
BICYCLE—One Gents 4 Speed Blue] persons having any debt or claim upon Solicitors. | Gonsalves, “Santa Clara”, St. Lawrence | Dated this 29th day of January, 1951 ; i \ Teleph 4228, -
Raleigh in perfect condition, for further] or a! the estate of Ashton 21.1.51—On. | Gap, before the above date, for Regis« ‘a? WILLIAMS, mepernyy deen, MOteai Eat ‘ oon : x
teadaeee ct ath saat sn Hoptal’ ta oun oF aor ae ao WESTCLIFFE — Navy Gardens, stand-| **@tlon, — Phone; 8495, Registrar of Trade Marks, DINING, Kitchen, Cocktail a ft OPM: LALLA PLLA ALL ALLE Mat het ?
eran’ —— "| and “Isiand of "Barbados who died in | img on eleven thousand square ‘feet of $3.1.61-—€n 0:1 81-0.) }) Radio, “Sewing and other fancy ee
GINE — pow this Island on the 29th da f and. Built of Stone, Three bedrooms re nal na, :
vote utee pet a Toner ee cane 1948, are hereby required id ae and all modern conveniences. Also large Kitehen Cabinets, i ae PASSAGES T
waar’ For inspection call, at Ralph | particulars of their claim duly | Play room 30 by 14 feet. For particu- NOTI ES Waggons, warders, Tea Trolleys oO EUROPE
Y wood Alley. attested, to me undersigned, in| lars and appointment, Phone Winston OVERNMENT Cc z ine | we
ep a oe rnd care of Messrs. Hutchi: & Banfield,| Johnson at 4311 26.1.51—6n. DRAWING ROOM HITS in Cont A 7
a ea Solicitors, James eet, Bridgetown, - — - T T ona ake eae ese tunes ‘ ee eee Fagpenins nani ag iphea, for sall- {
> amd pholstere 5 5
salom papers: the py BON enh fachine tee eo APPOINTMENT OF ASSISTANT EAR, NOSE AND THROA SR a eeidtes wuacteGourtes; ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
AGRICULTURAL FORKS — (A. small [to distribute the assets of the estate| rate Dining Room, 2 fully Tiled Toilets SURGEON, Settees with low and high backs Rotterdam,
quantity available. $4.70 each. 4222

(or 4843 Branch Store) G, W. Hutchinson
& Co. Ltd. 26.1.51—4n,

CEREALS — Shredded Wheat,
Plakes, All Bran, Oatflakes in Pack and
Loose Barley 16c. per Ib. Linseed 40c
per Ib. W. M. FORD. Dial 3489, 35 Roe-







among the parties entitled thereto,
having regard to the debts and claims
only of which I shall then have
notice and that I




of whose debt or claim I shall not | 468s.

have had notice at the time of such

uaa on nearby
shall not be liable} nearest offer.
Corn | for assets so distributed to amy person| A,

and Bath, modern Kitchen, built in 4
Car Garege 2 Servants ()uarters, standing
half an rere, Price £4,500
Beard, Hardwood Alicy or Phone
26.1.51—6n.



Applications are invited for the part-time appointment of Assis-
For viewing apply Ralph | tant Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeon, General Hospital, which will be-
} come vacant on Ist February, 1951.

The salary attached to the appointment is $240 per annum and



GENERAL HOSPITAL.







MORRIS CUSHIONS, $4.50 up,
DESKS, with Flat or Sloping
top, and Folding leaf with pigeon
holes, $8 up—Bookcases, Book-
racks, Strong Office Chairs



Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. |

We invite you to inspect our assortment of:—

Oe this Offi i itted t k h for the abo ti d ene e aT CEILING FY ’ ‘Fie
buck St. 20.1.51—2n.] AND all indebted to th is cer is permitted to make charges for the above-mentione ihe Ee 'TTINGS, ‘ ‘
uck Bp I cic ie? age PERSONAL SAVING PRICES a ACKET and DESK LAMPS

BULL RINGS—Estate owners nahe



accounts without delay.









services rendered to paying patients in the Hospital.



sure your bulls, ate. secure hy using Further information regarding the appointment may be obtained e Just Opened.
od “strong Bi . We have dif- blic are hereby warned :
Sete uses. Phoeule ‘Phinrmhscy, executrix of the Will of | giving credit ‘to my wile ALBERTHA | 70M the Director of Medical Services, t¢°whom applications should L. S. WILSON

30.1.51—2n.



—————$$S$—$_—_—$
BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in

White, Green, Primrose with matching

units to complete colour suites. Top

grade. 4 BARNES & Co., Ltd

t

SN
CUPS & SAUCERS — Breakfast size
Qarge). Cups and Saucers at 58 cents.

OFFICIAL NOTICE

26,1.51—t.f.n. | BA’



Ashton Winthrop Hunt, deceased.



SMALL (nee Hinds) as I do not hold

9.12.50—4n. | myself responsible for her or anyone else

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT
OF APPEAL










contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed

by me.
Signed OLIVER SMALL,
Hillaby, St. Andrew.
30.1.51—2n.





be forwarded by 31st January, 1951.



[0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH



28.1.50-—2n Trafalgar Street — Dial 4069















Proprietors—Cnr.

NTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

of Broad and Tudor Sts,









(Equitable Jurisdiction) : ‘ {
The public are hereby warned against ( SUPPLY
. BLACKMAN—
Tea Cups and Saucers at, 35 cents, G, | JOSEPH GOSLIN WAneintit | giving credit to my wife RUBY GOD- OViEt 100 expessrve iwovels |: THE B ARB ADOS ELECTRI THIS ITs od. iF {
W. Hutchinson & Co. 26.1.51—4n. DARD (nee Gaskin) 7 I do not Hd selling off at
Lem t ursu: myself responsible for her or anyone else 2 f 1,00 ;
LOTHES HANGERS—Wooden Clothes inthe anaes erties ws ites dee contracting any debt or debts in my name The space id sloded for new
< â„¢ ts each up. Also col-\ day of November 1950, I give notice to| Uriess by a written order signed by me. stock, Select your Book Bargain 4
ourtul Plastic. Ladies" ers_at all persons having any estate, right o: Signed pptaopiy oe now. : i j
cents each, G. W,. ON &l interest in or any lien or incumbrance Zackman's, wh Michael We have just opened SHEET |@'
Co. Ltd 26,1.51—4n. | effecting all that certain piece or parcel St. Michael. PLASTIC in different colours for
ean of land situate at Dr. Gill’s land in the 50,1.81--ain, ‘

ee rwereal
DIVING MASKS — 10/- each obtain-
able in the Toy Dept. at Cave Shepherd

h, LAA, 28.1,51—t.f.n. | fourteen perches putt and bounding| The Annual General Meeting will be

So — ———— — URS Vegetable Tomato, on lands of H. Wutkle ore, L, Miller and | held at the Caspegrel aren ee ay and eae
z 80 vee *}on lands of Clayton Glascow on lands| Tuesday, 6th February, at 7, m,
oxtail, cream of Mushroom, chicken} o¢ Colleton Plantation on a Poot te Pe ARE T ;
soup, Tomato Ketchup and Tomato Puree. | piantation and on a ri ae mae way HARD'
W. M. FORD, Dial 3489, 35 Roebuck St. | however else the cake Dulko ET a ee = sic
St = | et oe gee ees INCOME TAX = ”
of their c! with

LT
HAMS—Cooked Hams 7 Ib. to 9 Ib. 2%
tins, 1 Ib, tins $1 38 each. Bacon $1.17



























parish of Saint John comtaining by ad-
measurement one acre one rood and

witnesses,
documents and vouchers, to be examined








—
BARBADOS CHORAL SOCIETY
















Lamp Shades.

T
JOHNSON’S ey



FAITH HEALING







v7
per Ib. W. M. Ford, 35 Roebuck Street. ‘ : ; YoU ee
oe ott 9 premece,, 18 > heteby, given, thahiee oe ea a Due to the large increase in the price of
DES—Protect your a ea House, Income Tax returns are required acs hein & * 38 el Oil the Company are now forced to
onan a by. ing, shades, re, ave, fut ny of Saniusry: ts a ram a8) 2 Pee: Se ee ee eee i the piers § Susctiares from 20% to
openad a’ nice asso 4 1—2n. may ran come .00 per annum or Friendly Society of 47 Swan St., Po
— ba the nature and Priority lover, from every other person takes no Levies nor Assessments 27%. RO y Al
WEET BISCUITS —A Cont ie ford meee Hors, the whose income is $720.00 per from its members; gives better d
in Presentation eal blong , ree, an annum or over and from com- Benefits and Bigger Bonus; takes ‘ ffect ll
Crea See effect on a
pan Ae ene Square Chub ay: Nota property.. claim on or against the | Danies whether incorporated or||| all the family as members trom wine aoe et be Febru ary and
Cabinet Cream Crackers, Special ee Claimants are also notified that they | unincorporated, societi2s, persons} |} years old; allows Loans to |}, Mi TENGETER 10)
Drums Sweet Assorted, Jollity b reich wong gy Moons ye tek Be Wednes engaged in any trade or pro- members; carries on a Savings |]! onwards.
Assorted, Cream, Also a variety of Fev" |io'5 ee ait eT ce thelr said claims|fession, and owners of land or||} Department; and pays anybody V. SMITH,
oe eee a wil) be ranked.

" Street.
LOR & SONS ETD, 28.1.51.—2n.









Given under my hand this 23rd day of | come has accrued during the past

property whether a taxable in-

(member or not) for making new
members at the rate of Sixty

General Manager.




r ear or not. Cents (G6e,) each, any day.
TINNED FRUIT — Pears, Peaches, Lv. GILKES, ¥' , 5
Grapes, Apricots, Truss nocbuc poet | “ie of Appest.| Forms or Return may be ob-||] The “SELF-HELP & TaRiFT” ||) Yours faithtully, Announces
a , 30.1.51—2n. 28.11.50—3n. | tained from the Income Tax De- SOCIETY, 47 Swan St. (Over














TONS rE oes mace
PA!

Saturda: . Finder
‘0 Mr. A ‘ey, Lynch,

‘iubres

‘When headache, fatigue and upse
stomach ruin your morning, you ce.

OFFICIAL SALE

aedegaes
Pees,

&
r

}















Miller and on lands of Clayton
lands of Colleton Plantation
Pool Plantation and on a

partment AFTER THE 1ST DAY
OF JANUARY, 1951, and the
forms duly filled in must be
delivered to me on or before the
following respective dates:

1. Returns of persons whi
pooks were closed on e
3ist day of December, 1950.
on or before the 31st day
of March, 1951.
westined Gite of, honpaee
prin Pp of business
is not situate in the island
on or before the 30th of
June, 1951.

Returns of all other persons,
on or before the 3ist Jon-
uary 1951.
F. A, C. CLAIRMONTE,
Commissioner of Income Tax
and Death Duties.













Bata’s Shoe Store)
Open Everyday — See Hand-Bills |





THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION, LTD.










As from lst February our

business will be removed to
No. 12 HIGH STREET

To matk the event we will

open attractive new stocks
and will be delighted to

Rpe
28

a
e
i




Note:—Any person failing to
make his return within
the due date will be liable
to-a fine not exceeding
£100 and not less than £2! @

“save the day” with ,

‘Take it on arising,

later in the day. Keep a supply o:
quick acting Alka-Seltze



r however else the same
bound, and if not then sold
will be s€t up for sale
succeeding Friday between the
until the same is sold for a
than £250.



'y





a
H
3

friends




welcome our old
in the new premises.

:
:

:
:



5
i

eS
E
=}
=
|
a
——
i
=
2

Dated ay of November 1950. | ahd will be prosecuted ‘
. V. GILKES, | less a satisfactory rea- %
Ag. Cletk of the Assistant Court | a le ; }

son is given



28.11.50—29. 6.4.61—8n





of onan |




PAGE

EIGHT



Ten-Wicket Victory

For M.C.C.

Cricketers

Over Combined Tasmanian XI

iy

Peter Ditton

LONDON, Jan. 23:

Centuries by Denis Compton (his fourth of the tour) and

Cyril Washbrook (his first)

together with some fine spin

bow ling by Erie Hollies who captured four wickets for seven

runs were the feature of the

MCC's ten wicket victory over

a Combined Tasmanian XI at Launceston, Tasmania.

Another interesting point about
this match was that Alec Bedser
twice more captured Morris's
wicket cheaply, being the sixth
time in nine innings that he. nas
claimed this great left-hander as
his victim

Ih the absence of F. R. Brown,
taking a well carned rest after his
great performance in the Third
Test, Compton captained his side
and again lost the tess The
Tasmanian XI strengthened by the

inclusion of main-land players
Morris, Noblet, Hole and D
Courcey, batted first and scored

289 on the first day

For this total they were mainly

indebted to the young right
hander Hole who compiled his
maiden century in first elass
cricket It was a chanceless
affair, occupying ten minutes
short of three hours with seven
fours including some lovely

specimens of square cut

At one stage, at the tea inter+sl,
it seemed the M.C,C..might dis-
miss their opponents for a much
smaller total than they eventually

obtained Five wickets were
down for 178 runs but after the
tea interval the bowling was
collared and the remaining five
added another 114 runs
Previously Bedser had wiven
the M.C.C, a fine start by
capturing; Morris’s wicket with
only 17 rung on the board. It was

Morris’s 29th birthday, incidental
ly, and Bedser's “present” was in
the nature of an outswinger which
left-hander Morris touched to
Compton in the slips,

Apart from Hole the best
Tasmanian batting came from the
captain Laver who hit left-hander
Berry ior six fours in two overs
and altogether had ten fours in
his 59 obtained in just over 50
minutes,

On the second day the M.C.C
catablished a first innings lead of
93 and Compton. and Washbrook
both hits bundreds, Compton. com-
pleting his thousand rung for the
tour -when he reached 112. They
took part ir a whirlwind partner

ship which realised 200 in just
under two hours
Compton was the dominating

partner and after Sheppard, Dewes
and Close had all been dismissed
cheaply he took corfimand. Usitg
his feet to all the bowlers and
showing no trace of the injury
to his kriee he raced to 50 in 54
minutes and then hit a full toss
trom Shelton over the’ on-side
boundary for the first six of the
day.

The partnership became worth
100 in 55 minutes, Washbrook
having scored only seven of the
last 50,

Comptor reached his individual



NE es TR ATS)

By M. Harrison-Gray 5
Dealer: North, 5
Game alt, . 4
N. 4
ajiKn2 *) $
PI
She)
é §

a’o b otis ”
/ 6 Q
rears FUMES? |
¢ @ 10752 ena ;
oe Qe #J105 (
s. (

5 @Q43
2 ROS $
5 eatiu 2
’ #AADTS é
Tiiis hand from @ sin-tab'e 4

. Individual contest brought a
« food result to four pairs who
» played the Two No-Trump
? Yesponse as _ non- forcing
> North opened One Diamond,
but with a minimum = 12-
point hand he automatically
¢ passed Soutin’s bid of Two

¢ No-Trumps
; West led @ 5. Basi’s @ 10
losing to Sonth's @& Q. After
the lamonds

en 1 @& A. & K ond
¢ South playec / an
gn third Club won by Enst
S "The defence took three tricks

in Spades, but West then had

aww

~~

to lead Hearts and South)
made & tricks <
Ata fifth table South's ¢

> two No-Trumps was forcing.
¢ So North had to bid Three

The last South player tem. >
porised with Two Clubs. ¢
‘ ralsed w Three Clubs by }
North. and again South's :
final call of Three No-
i Trumps was easily defeated ;

London krpress Service.





See

y, i Se

a

44! AND S0,CUB SCOUTS
AND PARENTS =“IT GIVES
ME GREAT PLEASURE TU
INTRODUCE BUFFALO BILL'S
FORMER SCOUT, CHIEF WILD
ARROW, WHO WILL TALK
To YoU ABOUT THE









They'll Do It Every Time
oe:

century in. 88. minutes and = in-
cluded argong his more profitable
strokes wete eleven 4's and one
6

After the tea interva) Cormpton
was lucky not to be caught in the
slips off fast bowler Noblet but
the etcape did not benefit him
much. For as soon as the partner
ship became worth 200 (Wash
brook 59) he tried to hit across
off-spinner Dollery and w
caught at cover

as

After: Compton’s dismissal
Washbrook continued sedately to
his hundred including 58 singles
and seyen 4's made in just over
three hours. Parkhouse after a
shaky ‘start batted fluently for his
44 and W4s out “having a dip” at
whet in any case would ‘have
been thé last ball of the day

Batting the third day after the
M.C.C. declaration at their over
night total the Combined XI found
themselves caught on a_ pitch
taking spin

Bedser. repeated his first innings
performance by getting Morris's
wicket cheaply—this time caught
in the gully by Warr. Afterwarils
Hellies. struck a length and the
Australian batsmen found him
virtually unplayable. Once again
hey showed how extremely inept
they dre at making strokes when
the ball is turning. Even their
efforts to go down the wicket and
put the bowler off a length failed
to work and Evans collected two
victims behind the stumps as the
result of such attempts

A heavy thunderstorm after
lunch caused a temporary hola~up
when the M.C.C. were two runs
behing ‘arid the last Tasmanian
pair Were ‘at the wicket, When
the rain stopped however, nine
balls were sufficient to end the
innings and the M.C,.C, in the
presence of Close and Evans hit
off the necessary rung for victory
from ten balls.



What's on Today

Fela De, Kuh’s Exhibition ot
ol paintings and penci)
sketches at ‘“The Pavilion”,
Hastings— 10.00 a.m.

| Advocate’s «noto Exuibition
at Barbaods Museum —

10.00 a.m.

K. J. MacLeod’s exhibition |
of Oil Paintings at Barba. |
| dos Museum—10.00 am. |
Meeting Legislative Council |
—2.00 p.m,

The Council

|
|
\

| will consider |
supplementary resolutions
in the sums of $64,806, $43,.
509, $32,400 and $69,680.
Amoag other things, these
resolutions will provide’
the funds to meet the costs |
of the destruction of worn!
currency notes, the devel.)
erment of the water re.
sources by drilling inves.
tigations with drilling rigs,
runway lighting at Sea.)
well Airpert and altera-_
tions to and equipment for
sclence laboratories
Harrison College.



at

| Bills to suspend the provi-|
| sloms of the Representa.
| tion of the People Act,
provide for the winding
| Up and dissolution of the,
| Barbados Mutual Aid and
| Assersment Assurance So.
| ¢lety are set down for con-
sideration by the Council.
The House of Assembly)
meets at-—3,00 p.m. |
The House is due to resume)
Committee on the Bill to
provide for the regulation

| of Public Utilities.
| Belleville Tennis Tourna-
ment—4,15 p.m, |
Mobile Cinema gives show
at St. Mark’s School Pas. |
ture, St, Philip—7.30 p.m |

CINEMAS |
Empire, PH Get By" 4.45 & 8.30)
Aquatic Cinb, “My Own

True)
Love" 8.00 |
| Plaza (Bridgetown) “The Inspec
tor General’ 146 & 8.20 |
| Pinga (Oistin) “Border G-Man” & |
| “Painted Desert’ 5 & 8.0 |
| Galety (St, James) “Amazing Dr. |
Cliitterheuse” and “George |
Washington Slept Here’ —8.30 |
445 & 8.20,
4 Seoret of St. Ives’*
‘ond HO RG
West Dave






















*
en.

POOR BUFFALO
BILL «I. OROVE



THE CHIEF OVER IN THE FIR! gf OIG UP THESE
HERE-+-HE& GOT BibT ike AE ODD CHARACTERS ©

ON
HIGHWAY 29 ++
I'VE HEARD
HIM BEFORE
HiS"UGH" HAS
A BROOKLYN
ACCENT +5

“J

O

Kl



HOW DID HE GET
THE CHIEF TITLE 2
HE MUST'VE BEEN







Ra 'TEARING Dow A

=)





HAVE A

BARBADOS
DRINK

ADVOCATE



MEMBERS of the Polo Club take turns in being barman in the

recently erected pavilion, and there

are always comfortable seats for

those who do not care for perpendicular drinking.

SET THE PACE |
AND EXAMPLE

iy Willy

BILLY WRIGHT, the brillian
closes the SOCCER SCHOO!
pers on the way to make the



Wright

t Wolves and England capteif,
, with advice to aspiring skip-
job a success. Says the modest

Wright, hero of 37 internationals: You can never stop learn-

ing about the game.

HELLO classmates. Yes, 1 was
the quiet young fellow at the back.
Neyer miss a soccer lesson, You
can never stop learning about the
game, which, I suppose, is one of
its fascinations.



Watch the youngsters in the
playground, the youths in the
parks, or the young chaps who

kick a small ball around during
the dinner break, You never know
when you might spot something to

make you just that little extra
efficient.
And to those enthusiasts who

have to play on cinder pitches I
say: Do not worry about this spoil-

heap of a ground.in my Shropshire
hometown of Ironbridge

It helped rather than hindered
You had to be smart
the ball, and a few cuts and
bruises speed up the lessons of
balance and that vital art of keep-
ing your feet,

Encourage Them

AS CAPTAIN, I try to encourage
the new boys to think football as
well as just getting their
and feet into action.

But that is only one of the many
jobs of being captain, And whether
you are leader of Much-Kicking-
in-the-Marsh or, as I have had the
privilege to be, captain of England,
the duties the
same,

YOU MUST set the pace and the
example to your team. Be the first
out at training, and follow training
instructions keenly and = with
enthusiasm,

MAKE A POINT of seeing that
your playing gear is clean and in
good order. A badly tied boot, a
weak lace, an irritating hole in
your stocking are small things tha!
ean switch the result of a game.

MAKE SURE you know who '!s
going to take penalty kicks, and
when the back or half-back wilt
take free kicks. Small points, but
they all aid smooth team work.

Spot The Weakness

DURING THE GAME your job
is to set the pace for your side,
spot the weakness and strength of
the opposition and try to plan your

to control

heads

are pretty much



The Weather |

TO.DAY

Sun Rises: 6.15 a.m,
Sun Sets: 5.59 p.m.
Moon (Last Quarter): Janu-
30
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Water: 9.02 a.m., 9.57
p.m.

_——— a ee





ae RR By Jimmy Hatlo |









i WHERE DOES
THAT CUB-MASTER



THE LAST GUY WHO
SHOWED THE KIDS
HOW TO TIE KNOTS

pee §=COULDN'T TIE

HIS NECKTIEs

es)









FOR-FREE GUEST
SPEAKER THEY'LL Do | |
IT EVERY TIME +. |

mH

ing your Soccer future. I served my
football apprenticeship on an as

campaign accordingly

If you have a new player try to
give him every encouragement, Let
him have a feel of the ball early
in the game and try to keen him
in action as much as possible. He
gets confidence and soon Yoses the
empty feeling you get in your first
big game



wJchnstone 2

Football Results

LONDON, January 2
F A. CUP FOURTH ROUND
Arver torthampten Town 2
Biacke 2, Stockport Count Bristol
City 14 Hove 0. Derb?



Cour rmingham City 3 Exeter
City 1 I Hull City 2, Kother-
ham Unitec Luton Town 1, Bristol

Manchester United 4, Leeds

FIRST DIVIBION



Charttor Athietic 1, Liverpool 4%

7 D DIVIssQN
Bu ter ty 0 Doncaster
thwers J, Swanses town 0. Queen's Park

Trngers 4, Brentiord 1}

SOCTTISH CU? FIRST ROUND
Aberdeen 6, Inverness Caledonian 1
Albion Rovers 1, Stenhousernuir 1. Alloa
Athletic 2, Hearts 4. Brechin City 3,
Perwiek Rangers 2. Dumbarton 6, Saint
Dunfermline Athietic J
Cvde: 2.
* "SCOTTISH CUP FIRST ROUND

Morton 2, Cowdenbeath 2. Partick
Thistle 1, Raith Rovers 1 Peterhead 6,
Motherwell 4. Queen's Park 3, Abroath
1) Rangers 2, Queen Of The South 0
Stirling Albion 3. Ayr United 2. Saint
Mirren 1. Hibernian 1, Third Lanark 5,
Forfar Athietic 2.

THIRD DIVISION

Southern Bournemouth 2, Swindon Town
1 Colchester United 1, Aldershot 0
Crystal Palace 1, Nottingham Forest 6.

Reading 3, Port Vale 0. Walsall 2, Ipswich
Town 0. Watford 1. Plymouth Argyle 1
FRIENDLY MATCHES
Purnley |, Blackburne Rovers 1. Car-
diff City 2, Tottenham Hotepur 3. Cov-
entry City 2, Portemouth 2. Everton 3,
Nott's County 2. Leicester City 1, Shef-
field Wednesday 06
Barnsley 1

field 1:

Middlesbrough 2,
Southend Uniied 1, Chester-

—Reuter

I make a rule uf ucv=r shouting
criticism to a player, It rattles the
clayer and can upset the whole
side.

When yeu ge*4 the chance move
cver to the player and suggest a
change in his tactics. If he sue-
ceeds, then is the time to raise
your voice and cal! across your
encouragement.

OFF THE FIELD it is the duty
of the captain to know as much as
possible about his players. Domes-
tic reasons may affect a player.
and a tactful werd may help to
overcome the difficulty.

YOU MUST, when away from
the ground, set the example of
behaviour, I don’t mean being a
spc l-sport, because | realise that a
bunch of fit, healthy lads are not
going to do themselves much good
just moping around.

And make sure the new boy is
not neglected.

In my book, “Captain of Eng-
Jand,” I stress that I shall never
forget the kindness of England
captain Joe Mercer in my first in-
ternational.

He made a point of being help-
ful and friendly, and before the
team trotted out he found time to
come over and say: “Don't forget
I am here to help you. Now, best
of luck and a grand game to you,”
1 shall never forget how I warmed
to such encouragement,

So remember the new chaps and
give them every help. The points
of training and tactics have been
excellently covered in the Soccer
School classes. I suggest you save

the series and study them again |

and again,
—L.E.S.



/i=TH ROUND SOCCER

LONDON, Jan. 29
Draw for the fifth round of: tie
Football Association Cup, to be
played on February 10. was mad¢
here today as fellows: Wolver-
hag_pton Wanderers v. Hudders-
field Town, Exeter or Chels€a v
Fulham, Sunderland v. Norwich,
Blackpool! v. Sheffield United or
Mansfield, Manchester United v
Arsenal, Stoke City v. Newcastle
United, Birmingham City v. Bristos

City, er Rovers v. Hull City
Replays are to be held on o1

before the following Thursday

vane was inspired by fruit and

MORE ABOUT TACTICS

By M. Harrison-Geoy
y 7HEN both sides require
120 forwthe tnt meld,
it is often @ gbod policy to
keep as many pairs of smal}
cards as oe wible ous
hand, providing you
least one Yokes ika a hand
which contains either the
correct count or very ciose
vo_it.

The opponents, who may
well be strugglig to attain
the count, are ‘more tikely to
discard a smal! card than, say,
an Ace or a King. For

instance, your hand ts:
K. K, @, J, » B.

. K 6. 5, 4.
er, Joker.
15 ou can of course meld 120
at any moment, but should
refrain from doing so, as you
should play to take the dis-
card pile with ¢ither a King
or a Nine. When you draw
from the stock and have to
diseard, you should throw
the Queen and the Knave
(unless you draw a matching
one) before your small cards;
for if you draw from the stock
a Four, 4 Five or a Six, you
stan a better chance of
having one of these thrown to
you than if you kept a pair of
eens.

ba the other hand, if
instead of the two Jokers
our hand contained two
wo’s, you would be forced to
keep your high cards in order
to build up the hand to the

requisite count,



London Express Service.

—_~







YACHT CLUB

FLANNEL DANCE

On SATURDAY, 3rd FEB-
RUARY, 1951.
(Por Members and their friends)

In honour of the Captain,
Officers and Cadets of
H.M.S, “Devonshire.”

Dancing 8.00 r.m. to 12,00
Midnight

ADMISSION 3/-

' By order of,
The Committee of Management,

T. BRUCE LEWIS,
Manager & Secretany,
N.B.—Members introducing their
fiiends must enter their names
in the Visitor's Register or give
them a letter of introduction to

the Secretary.









A FRESH ARRIVAL OF SMILES

Here she
Happiness—Cow & Gate, the most famous of all

Infants’ Foods.

comes



with her cargo of Health and

And what a relief! For there is

everything that Baby needs in atin of Cow & Gate
to build firm flesh, strong bones, sound teeth, and to
give that cheerful smile of abounding health and

vitality. Yes! Welcome once again Cow & Gate,

“ COW
MILK2FOOD

%

‘ Chev will be what you want them to be on Cow & Gate”

g& © 7»



J.B. LESLIE & CO. LTD.—Agents



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THEM OFF

BK I



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The Vitamin Loaf







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ROYAL BARBADOS











Yes, mothers, your good health and \
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sitamins. Sostart taking Scott's



TUESDAY, JANUARY 30,

The secret of a happy
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straight handles
Each

assorted colour

1951

HEALTH!






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Gh ENERGY FOOD TONIC

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Made of Rayon in fancy check designs,
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Broad Street, and ALPHA PHARMACY, Hastings.

me
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—_ ss”

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TENNIS AND OTHER SPORTS

New Shipment of PUMPS in Brown and White



8 We have New Stocks of”:

Sizes: 6—11

price: $1.60



Unitex Insulating Wallboard

TERMITE-PROOF, 34 ins. thick

4 ft. wide by 8ft. 9 ft; 10 ft; 12 ft. long

Standard Hardboard

1¢ ins. thick; 4 ft. x 6ft; 8 ft. 10, ft,

3/16 ins, thick 4 ft. x

Tileboard

Cream, White and G

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FILES



PAGE 1

TUESDAY. JANUARY 30. 1921 HVRBAIMI\I)V and others *5. The stalls were only built six years ago. but the slaughterhouse is the same old slaughterhouse lor many years ago. One of the oldenl butchers of the market. Y %  Lngsw who i n killing animals there now' for 23 years, told the Advocate that the slaughter house was there before he was born. SI years ago. The slaughterhouse which is ,iix>ut the same size as all the stalls, is .an old wooden and galvanise building. It -is always kept clean and hanging about it can be seen Ihe pieces of rope which are used to fasten the animals and he hooks lo which the IM There is always u smell of blood and the bUSS of. Hies about the market On a day like yesterday much business was not being done. It is on Saturdays and that ihe butchers are kept busy. t is .1 regular thing to heir in the market, a woman rom-| plaining about too much lat being on the meat she is offered. Thr reply ihe butcher always gives ii that he did not make and he al; bought the fat. old Y.W.C.A. OPENED \17HEN the ADVOCATE visited "the Y.W.C A. Headquarters %  t rmfold Slreel al midday yesterday a number cf ladies were Making preparations for UK' opening function later in Ihe dav. Windows were being cleaned. Ihe front room decorated with newer* and the surroundings looked "spick and span". Mn P, "• L Ward, Secretary of the VW.C.A was supervising the work. The Y.W.C.A. has very liul : ard and no playing field. At ihe beginning only lea will be served Members can start enlisting from today. They have only to get a lorm from Headquarters. There are three spacious rooms on the second floor. Two will l>e used by boarders while the other goes to the person in charge. The kitchen Is In a very sanitary condition and equipped with an oil stove. Some of the furniture fashioned, but this adds beautiful surroundings. A N ACCIDENT occurred Queen's Park on Sund right while the Church f Qod meeting was taking place. It was however only slight. The front wheel cf a bicycle, owned by J;.mes Bockles of Richmond Cap. St Michael, was damaged. Alt involved wus motor car E. 175. C 'li xiii i BROWNE of Baii1 crofi Land. Cnrrington Village fell from a bus at Arthur Hill OS Saturday night and was injured He was treated at the Hospital ard sent home. Browne was a passenger on the tus. H c was getting otT when tl,< incident occurred. The bus is owned by the My Lord's Hill BuCompany and was being driver. by Benjamin Agard of Lrltloh* Hill. St. Michael. A N ACCIDENT occurred at the Junction of Rickett and Trafalgar Streets < n Sunday morning between a motor ear owned ami driven by Aslit. ti Glbbs of "Croydon". Hastings and a motor cycle The rider of the motor cycle was injured. He was taken to thr General Hospital where he Wal :.*cated and discharged. 'pilE TAILORS DIVISION at their genernl meeting at the Union Headquarters elected Mr G. Bascrmbe President, Mr. L Austin Vice President and Mr T. Ishmael Secretary. General members of the Commitlee appointed were Messrs. II C. Clarke. S. Carew, E. Padmore E. Carrlnglon and C. tobUuon 'X*HE i vi i! in\ (ill. held its %  *Annual General Meeting or. Sunday last and the following were elected:— Messrs C. A. Nourse, President. R. Culpeppcr Vice President. S. Williams. Trca .urer, L. Jones and K. Harding. Trustees, F. L. Walcott. Hony. Secretary, with Messrs N. Gill. G Blades. D. Olton, and R. Leslie as members of the Committee of Management. 1st Division Football Captain— E Reece. 2nd Division Football Ccstaln-C. Archer. 3rd Division Football Captain R Leslie. 1st Division Table Tennis Captain—N. Gill. 2nd Division Table Tennis Caplain—R. Leslie. B.A.F.A. Council Representative:— F. L, Walcott. T.T.A. Council Representative: N GDI. Association of Cultural Societies Representatives:—F. L. Walcott and S. Williams. Meal From Australia Twenty-five years ago most oi That used to be sold at the market came from local oxen and the remainder from Venezuela. Those were in the days when oxen m used to n large extent on plantations. Meat from Venezuela stopped coming to Barbados 17 years ago. Springer said. Most meat now come from AusIn the days when oxen used to be brought to UM market, some would often i' c.ipe and Injure people. Then, ponl USBd to be 12 cnts a pound. The butchers all think that the hould be removed to a .1 area Behind the meat market there is shed alongside th.beach and mil boats jre hauled up there. The ghed kl lhadjj Ud fishermen usiiallv sit around there to nu-nd their nets. A rule of the fish market which Is aboxte :hls shed b] I must not throw cane peelings about it. Smr cane iuice. the market is left full of p*v*H rifts. Whole Day Service It seems unrealistic for anyono l0 be on the spot where a divim teivicc Is to be held, eight hours belore the start, but that is whal happened at the shed in Queen's [•ark yesterday. The service began at 7.15 p.m. but irom 11 a.m. Ihe lame, deaf. dumb and blind were trudging in. supported by some friend or relative. Soon the preacher's platform and the iront benches as well, began to fill up with these seeker* after healing. The watt was a long one but their patience was admirable. It was the last day but one that Rev. James B. Rcesor who had been instrumental in healing scores of people through faith in God. was to he heard in the Park y reaching and asking God (o heal the afflicted. These people being aware of the difficulty of gaining entry lo the building in the afternoon, were tnklnt no chances. As the hours went by more and more people turned up and when 4 o'clock in the afternoon the building was almcst filled. Singing started Co-opera ii vest Discussed At V.A.O. Conference SEVERAL topics were discussed r.nd important recommer.dat n ni ( their meetings at the Y.M.CA Opens Y.W.C.A. THE Y.W.C.A. movement in Barbados was revived when Ladv Savage flflfctaltj Y.W.C.A. Headquarters al Pin yesterday evening. It only a few yards away from the V \t c A Any woman will be able to }otn, regardless of her standing in life oi her particular religious denomination. Already nianv have expressed their wish to become members. Lady Savage arrived accompanied by His Excellency the Governor and Major Denis Vaughan. After she clipped the ribbon the Association was blessed by Dean Mandeville Mrs. A. A. Gibbons, Presided, 0' the Y.W.C.A., alter weicoin jng ills Excellency and Laay Savage, thanked Lauy -S.tvnge lui performing tne opening ceremony. ihey were also.very picueo Ui welcome Mrs. Frederick Boss, who is a member of the National Board of the Y.W.C.A. oi Canada. She said that Barbados had a t .C A. before 1810 which was Marled by Mis* Edith Trnnmnham. but unfortunately it was closed in 1921. In June last year a letter appeared, in tne Auvuraw %  i H i Ma ap n e to lorm a f.W.^.A. Knowing sraal g.^d WUIK is ov.ic by an institution oi tnis kind aw tne world over, ami wnat a maaui place it mis in any coinmuuuj, %  M nptaN 10 the letter wyuig that sue would help if a Committee of laoies would Join ner in starling a Y.W.C A. i % %  • hltMwliai bKtm — Mrs Frank bishop. Vice i-rcsiucnt, n Deighton Ward, Secretary-, Mr... P. A. Clarko, Treasurer, a Fred Goddard, Mm. H A. Tall Mrs. A. W. Scott, airs. Donaio Wiles, Mrs. Herbert QnavSS, MtM Edna Fields. Miss Jean WiiKinson. Miss E Bourne. Miss A li<>iinii\ Miss Hetty Arne. Mrs. S. lavloi and Mr D. Woode, kindly offered their assistance and a Committee was formed. Rev IH-n-k Woode has kindly consented to be their Ch;. She sain thai lo date thev had In hand $1,570 45. This hao been given by subscribers, (noi nly in Barbados) some an.mynously. To these they were graleful Mrs. Herbert (htm with helpers ran a most %  UeeeSBful Cake Sale making $142.33 Mrs. AW Scott held ft 'TCI cessful fair and donated $473.56. part of (fie proceeds. They were also graleful to Ihe Ladles Canadian Club for their generous donation and to all oihers who had helped in any way They had to thank too Mr. II. O Emtage for renting Diem th. bttUdlM at a nominal rate. With out a house they could not hav< made a stai t After getting the house the> then had some difficulty m gettini Matron, but this was flnallj OTCKOfM and Miss Rogers ha: been appointed. She said that Captain Herber Williams. Secretary of th* V.M.C.A., had been a tower Oi ngth and lo him they were most grateful. They had hel Di>f>p Water Harbour Urged Mr G O. I d Ihe AaHncatr I irom a % %  l IsSnMn, and spoke highly u facilities! hc had found m Jamaica and > i m the I thai Jamaica looked : I affuJ one A i returning to Baibados on l i f omhl. yesterdaj was Mr I i %  and was enthured over the beauI >iacas. H J C Ki.mdler who to Curacao on holiday I B W.1.A returned on the Calaaaeti Mtarday IU said that >u;h he spent only 3 days on he 1 i i I the voyage back home agreed on at ihe Food and AgrlCUltUra OrgjBlllntlotl C'-nfeience held in Trinidad, %  rttb respeci to the develojnient of co-operniives in Ihe Caribbean area. Mr. C. A. E. Beclclos told the Advocate . -lei'l..Mi BeekhM who is Senior Peasant Agricultuial h j.t Ihe Department of Science and Agitculture. was the Barbados representative at the conference The conference — a technical cne on cooperative*. In the Caribsponsored jointly by tne F.A.O. of the Unitc this time ihere were I I usual, crowds around the building. and the service went on. Those who waited were well rewarded for their patience lot Roe Reosor again preyed and healed. Many people Minified their intention lo be Christians and there was a general rejoicinfc. Thr Advocate learnt yesterday that over 2,000 people had. declared their Intention to be followers of Christ, at these servurwhich have been going on m the Park PORT ENQUIRY MEETING The Port Enquiry Committee held its third meeting yesterday and discussed whh represent.tlves of Messrs. DaCosla & Co Ltd., and Meters. S. P. Musson. Sen It Co Ltd. certain point* arising out of the menaorand submitted by these lU The next meeting of Ihe Commlttee will be herd on Mondav nexi al the I-abour Depart: wlier the Committee *f ilatives of certain firms lo discuss the regtouping on the waterfront. iscd under "the general .'. %  %  •eparate leititories". 'Main obstacles and problems". ReipMireinents far the development of eo-operatives." and "Technical c %  -operation." Subjects dealt with included radit ssciUarkattnaf. "QmmHutn ;.nd supply." Fi'.l ," "Hi. '5MHIC.1 Co-iii "Apex or central bank* based on prlmai > thrill and credit socl r :ons and lederati-n'." -The lark i personnel f"i co-operaUvea and co-operatiVe aatvi respect to promotion and Ion of eo-opaTatlve I ..ud Government |K>rnd Ihe Y M C A. Committee had allowed Captain Williams to lend them furniture which at preocnl they were not ahlc to provide She thanked Mrs. Ward, tl ah Seereiary. for all her help and hard work so willingly given am 1 also the Committee. "It is going lo cost us quite i large sum each month to rur this institution involving gg i' :loes rent, light, water rates telephone, staff and running ev pensrs. and without help thi* -annol be done", she said. Lady Sava&e, after ttianktni Mrs. Gibbons, said, "It Is not necessary for mc to explain th purpose and objects of the Y.W C A. The need for such a fellowship of service is ever present and ever increasing, ano great credit Is due to Mrs. Pearl Gibbons and her Committee for the work they have done in re establishing this organisation. 'I hope that ihe principles of self-help will be adopted, but U is clear that we shall d epen d a great extent on the goodwill ana assistance of the general public I. therefore, appeal lo you all for your support. And so today, it has been an honour to open this Y.W.C.A Headquarters, which I trust will grow In the years ahead to a full le branch of the international organisation, and provide facilities for the nodal intellectual welfare of young women Irrespective of race, colour and creed, with i dominant spiritual background o' %  hristlan faith and practice. I wish the Association every sue(( % % %  Mrs Frank Bishop, who move" vote of thanks, said that she hoped I*dy Savage would visit the Association In the future. On behalf of the Committee she congratulated Hm Excellency am' Lady Savage. Among those present wereS.George and Lady Seel. Mr am Mrs. R. N. Turner. Mr J W. n Chenery, Mr and Mrs. H A Vauchan. Mr H A. Tilmi. Mr O. T. Allder. Mr F Miller. Mr A Nvren, Mr t) A Wiles. Mr ond Mrs. Gliudon Read, Mr an Ml r 1 Boss. Mrs TI A o.k. Mr. Joh'i Heckle-;. V Burton. Rev and Mrs. T..d... M-nd Mr* F C Goddard. Mi H A T'irfcr Colonel and Mrs R T Mtchelin. Dr A A C.ih hor Can! H H. WHli-m-. M Dudlev Wiles. Madnnw Ifill and Mrs Olga Svmmonds Pleasurable Kxperieiire Mr Be %  despite the heavy nature cf the l>ro%  amount of work inv< i kc highly f crar.es lien and enthusiasm displayed bv %• look pan In th . Prarl Oibbons, rreuctent of the Y.W.C.A., iu tao verandh of th tOO v books Ihe Im portantc ol Science on Uia eui rieulum nil % %  tab learning and to inpi' vi t 1 %  i .n /.rt promptetl her : %  %  i animali tor ihe An siund davotl i k as Miss BN wm.-n did. whde sech rormai ag lii i. c^uern's Cnllega had played her part m the aeVl lopment of Ihe school into the leadig gtrta* school lo ihe island, lo liss Bowman must I** accorded the chief credit for the achieve Matt, She Ud i oi I prlnetpita >nd she wn* not afraid to alndu Possessed of the p l enaai apnit, ha mada M bai RIU Ion here to i Uicatir n.'-.l upportunitie'. lor RirK, especially for those who howed promise Intelai Some of lhe*e pupil' of tl ilasses were granted the piiviludjina %  lt ''' vast .'tmosphei. llowman's loUfcO. often with her texl bOOki • I their disposal. By allowing Ihem to act on the staff as "student n 'tresses", Miss Bowman encouraged them nol only to ac 'iniri' i gparlanca in teaching but lso to serve their old school. Latefi Kfhen lbs Eatatual Intermediate Bauunlnattbn ^r laaBdan | in Arts was introduced %  .iiiy. "atudant nlatra %  well ;is pupils were able to preCLARKE'S "BLOOD MIXTURE Cleanse the system from blood Impurities ; many sufferers from rheumatic aches and pains, lumbago, neuritis, pimples, boils, sores and minor skin ailments, can derive great benefit from this well-known medicine. fa LIQUID or TABLET fOttM *SSSSS,'0'**&,*,','.'S**SSS.%' l 'S,' f %*f**S*MSS**SSSS>i'SS*S>; • I II si lit 1 list' t;int'i'ithn'iu/ iloiti.'-lltil.nn, 15*For fadeceift LftaVgiiige FORTY VKAR-Ol.l) LJJDSSI Jemmolt < f ll.iwkin* i. bury Road, was > eater da) One< ith .HI alternattvi npi i' ameni a hai Irate Hi H A Talma found her guilty of using Hasten %  in obstruction nt Batui has bj donkey drawn ea i i Nathaniel tvi lyn, %  nU days ailh an altarnatlva of u days' imril b] Ml H A Talma A CBJMagainst alias -Browne," ( Hi % %  %  i without >> Mi Tiiin. Burnetl i Wath ra Alley, wai Ith Ihe i 'i " of a veal Oglng ; %  • Bhul % %  I I %  Man's ambitions Im Qoet ire to see %  she was %  enough ii us tut < one bil. %  ibibnenl <>t hec "i K In llnrhndns. Ins people lid I Miss Ilowman', unremitting Keel and >i< Ice ti Quaen Collegs fi! and to Clrla* As-socialiun N-g you all lo bitrue lo Queen's College. Uphold her hon%  i. lest, in every way It is Ihe oldest girls' school %  II il us the best girls' ,.|. I |.i i> and trust II may always remain so. . Ii aked on llarbadoa mere Ilka home ihau anywhere world."—O A o.c. OIIII\TAI. C^ Oa ali From INDIA, CHINA, l.t.YI'T Silk. Curies. Ilrasswr.-e, Jrwela. Linen*. Ivory. TrakHi*wd. Sandalh. l-'reiirh I'erhinir-. IliibadnB Scarves In fure Hllk. Ele.. Etc. Etc ii II AM "llrcM.' h \-ii'ii ,: %  l'r %  > ll'nri %  -UUI UM ( FRESH SUPPLY OF : PURINA HEN CHOW %  (SCRATCH GRAIN) f H. JASON JONES & CO.. LTP.-ni.f.Brtm %  3VSJBJV .1 f II IIILK '*• V. j,— *'v W^\' TURKISH and \ i^ EGYPTIAN 7f CIGARETTES ***V AHI'CI.l.A CIOABCTTM NO. II ?IQ', ... No. 11 — 20 s No. IS — 40's Na II — 20's .... ... No. 18 — SO | I — 2ils / $1 61 SI.62 II .60 KNIGHTS DRUG STORES J SPECIFY EVERITE" ASBESTOS-CEMENT CORRUGATED SHEETS AND TUH1VALL ASBESTOS WOOD. v ^/rtMMW^^tWVAMWMWMW*HWV'* HARRISON'S -BROAD ST. UM FAVFSTAFF Ihe small modern Piano I 1 04 hm.!ed dimes %  reveals ;i ml u as out of all propof i n nk i 1 adsSlly Invite** row nuiii i im 11(11. JF.MM0T1 33 Broad SI rpKUin. Phoenix I'harmary WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SHIPMENT OF AGRICULTURAL FORKS GOOD QUALITYFULLY STRAPPED. ONLY S 1.70 BAcm The quantity for disposal is small and future supplies are uncertain. sivn is voin omii us VMIIIOI i II:I.,\V. HARRISON'S '"'T^r Tl KBAS DA 11 ^ %  TIM.I'.I,, TABLE al~is-. MIVI n n:i IT lor Cakso < I'RRAMS r,.r < aki-K -I l I WAS for Cakn ( R IWFORD1 HI \M i K V( Kl Us Ml LTIS M,\\ BKKR1 I l ll s PALM TOFFEEfl < \ M\ \L At. BISI ( Ii prr pfcL .10c .. .. G2c. r. 3r. sac. s*r tin SI 37 tl 32 75c. aer tin C7e. A s>. p-r tin SI 24 s/ivsn/w SI OTT A Co.. 1.1.1. | a fresh slock of old favourite* Dr. Scholl's FAHOUS Foot Remedies Arch SuppeiiL Fool Eaters, Zino Pad* (or Bunions ard Callouwi Foot Balm Fool Powder CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Slreel



PAGE 1

PACK HHK BARBADOS ADVOCATK TUESDAY. JANUARY 3*. IMI BARBADOS ADV(MIT, r1-—— —*— 1 .i Pi 1.1*4 hi lh. MI.NU (• 114. kfH4 St.. Iillltuii iMMhy, January 30, lfSl MARKET .AUDI \\ THERE is a current saying hi this island that every available cultivable square foot of land is under crops of one kir.d or another. Close examination to-day will prove that this is no longer true. < It may have been true that the cultivation of plantations was more intensive with regard to Barbados' size than that in other West Indian islands because most of the 65.000 arable acres were under crops. But during the y.-ars there has been a system of fragmentation and this has led to small lots going uncultivated. The necessity for more intensive and extensive cultivation of the total area is indicated by the international situation It should be apparent to everyone that greater effort should be made to utilise the small plots now covered in grcss or useless plants in order to supply more vegetables. Careful invvstii;;itinn will show that thousands of dollars worth of garden vegetables are imported from St. Lucia. Dominica, St. Vincent and other places. This amount would, if produced locally, supplement the earnings of the small land holder and at the same time would tend to raise the nutritional standard, by affording a more balanced diet. During the last war. the planters did a fine job in supplying home grown food to an extent almost unbelievable. The peasant holder can now fill the breach by utilising every available stitch of land in his possession. In Barbados there are very few areas where water is not available for garden purposes by means of shallow wells. And there is the added advantage of getting assistance from the Government through the Peasants Loan Bank. Here it is possible to get equipment for irrigating plots of land of any size. The equipment is available at half the price to land owners and in order that this job might be done properly the Government recently appointed an irrigation officer attached to the Department of Agriculture. All this information is already known end it is for those who are in possession of land to make use of the services offered. It is however necessary to appeal tothosa who can to get on with market gardening. These small plots when counted together add up to a sizeable area. They can be made to produce more vegetables and benefit the owners and the entire community at the same time. On Will. The Clock DURING the years of the last war local clocks were put forward one hour. After the practice had been tried two years, objection was made and it was abandoned. The advantage of working in the early hours when the heat of the sun does not make such inroads 0.1 one's energy is a real advantage and there is the increase in the hours available for recreation, it does not interfere with the length of the day's work and keeps the worker in better health if there is opportunity for games of one kind or another. In the past the objections to putting the clock forward were mainly personal and it would be worth while to hear what other objections can now be registered against what seems to be a desirable practice. SHU I Mill SIIOHI Al.l A SHORTAGE of sheet steel poses a serious obstacle to Britain's industrial recovery. First effects are expected to fall on the automotive industry with plants working shorter schedules. Some plants will work a four-day week while others will work throe weeks a month. Output may be reduced by about 15 to 20 percent according to spokesmen for the Society of Motor Manufacturers. Although the automobile industry will be the first and h-irdest hit. other light industry, especially radio and television, are expected to feel the pinch. Reasons for the cut are that the British Government has switched supplies of steel to the rearmament programme, and the United States is not exporting such large quantities because of the American stockpiling project. Heavy demand for foreign scrap metal has further aggravated the raw-materials Mortage, British imports of German scrap have been cut from 2,000,000 to 1,000,000 a year. Industrialists also fear that Britain's steel industry wtych faces nationalization on February 15 will be forced to slash output in the next few months because of the present coal crisis. 'These sources claim there are two reasons for this: 1 A cut ir. iron ore imports because of a million tons of shipping being diverted to import coal. 2. United coke supplies for making pig iron. Britain's steel industry has revealed its output during 1950 totalled lii.29.'f,000 tons —a record—INS Russia's New Einpirc-1 The Festival TNTIL the IaU> 1930 I ihc Soviet KJ itate could not be called an empire AtwortMK. In iu internal By DAVID J DALLIS Tri hundreds of pljin-clfrthe* „. .... :r n •"" v officer*, and all %  affair, ii hn,i n „ SuZZlli !" fn* hafl > leave the land o( kinds of adviaen" Would Stay OH TSi^JSSr£JSS5&S. SI* mfld el MlelllU Th •* rt i-".-nn.U'ly m both Hungary and element* -t future driven, since stretched as far* 1MB, Mil. and especially | £" !" .!E ft* IhiS !" 1.5 \. "'"PPW*%  '" %  < In thsouth new empire of the East and Its ft R UM j a n troops had bM k>opula the Italian rebellion. MoacMs has withdrawn K considerably. The n army only from the smallest march on Europe was and least impatiial .->.ali-lli HulaariR and North Korea. The leaden, have had to develop methtk^"toY" U £^ti > V!J!!lu~i~ Xrr ,cna i ar * military oecu'* n 4*.?'£l,Tj£fSi-.. - .w-... .h "** n 0 "' would have been Indeed, experience is demon „£, *.* *E'J""£?E SLftL*£' f. ul 'o*n like the I'ohsh uprising, "trnting that the two new tech HlSS ZS$&X%%£~*~ K^'^tdS of the mternational uuiauon. betaken to asm ?£* E !" Other imperial structure---those lhc other satellite* These SMS*But the principle of non-annexof Germany. Japan, Italy. Britain. urM mcanI a rev?rsion ,„ ne oi(| ntion must . %  maintained, partly ways of armed occupation. because of considerations of propaganda, partly because annexFrance, and the Netherlands BSsBSSSmttnfj at an earlier stage in Its history the Soviet stnle Polnnd. where anti-Soviet atinii tmplfes" "permanent Itself had been a powerful force trends seemed to be particularly tlemcnt v ith the VfsM ;"n(l Stalin In fostering this anti-Imperial strong, was the first nation to feel sees a settlement as a calamity sentiment; it had been Instruthe effects of the organic transGlobal stability would mean the mental in destroying empires and formation of Soviet Imperialism, "stabilization of ...pit.il.sm" and had conducted a drive against ImBefore 1*17, the greater part of tba strengthening of anti-Compcrlallsm more powerful than that Poland belonged to ihtold emmunist tendencies. Stalin's Comof any other government Antipire and was governed bv a Rusmtinism therefore blocks the road imperialism remained a powerful sian governor-general, a number to the stability of h.s o.vn empiro as a price that mu>i be mild for blocking world stability Stalin acquired a sphere in Korea but has not |M>rmltted normal relations with Soil'! Kill, served him only as an initial state lor a further expansion. He is master of the con:, but blocks the road to a pasct with Japan. He holds Eastern Germany but refutes '" keep of the Canaan Waal In an ,' lanahs <>' Mrtscsful pn HctsotM his press and his v serve everywhere and i> Utdlsputatals :-'. n i %  crises, catastrophes, rebellions, :uid decay. •THAT'S FONNv. l flUviK' IHOX-VU'V C.SMa^r Mf.No IX WA-i THE NAMt Of A SCHOOL QOV V' weapon io its arsenal of propaganda. Now. when events took a new turn and impei, opened up. Stalin's renime could not simply resume the drive interrupted in 1817. It could not us* the old ways of Russian expansion It had to find a way to reconcile taking advantage of its Imperial opportunities with its own antiImperial protestations and the anti-imperial sen\mcnt of the rer! el the world. The aim of traditional imperialism was frank; the extension of the realm of the state. Its ultimate goal was the greatness of the imperial structure, and Its personification was the majestic figure of the king, t*ar. or emperor That ictory leads to the acquisition of new area* was axiomatic; annexation of foreign lands was the obvious, undisputed right of the victor But nothing of this kind was possible In a Russia that had made a creed of antl-impcri.ilimn. tha| had won adh. % % %  over the world for its "struggle against 'imperialist exploitation.' that had avocated liberation *,. colonies and freedom for all na% %  a Russian officialdom; a Rusonly be assisting Hitler." M; tiara from oppression by the levla••> army was stationed there. i.,t V inov told Harry Hopkins in thans of the political oceans, that A '' r ,h c !" rebellion in \UHI>March of the same year that his had tried to teach the world a f'* v,a Vl*, 1 K 1 Kovcrnmcnt subgovernment "would like to see moral lesson bv renouncing lm)•"• Poland to a series of new Germany dismembered At the pertal Russian privileges abroad, measures which resembled those Teheran Conference, when Presiparticularly in Persia and China. ' lhe prcrevolutionary period. dent RoOStveH and Prime Minivter Consequently, when the drive to ,_ N -,..,._ Kl „ .Q-Q e fl ,i„ •, Churchill proposed certain measthe east south, and west which h '" £ JES. r ,: K'S/i Urss for keeping Germany weak in had nrumatcd Huss, ; ,n conquerors f^Sl^ 1 i^^ < S2^r v "K Ute Xutur*, St,l,n appeared to of R How the Communisi necessity for non-nnnexatio:: Mtl in the wa> %  if enu'iic-buildillK U dr., illustrated in Germany. A rniijire-buildcr, StaJln has stood fur the dr ; sgiy since 194S. but as a Corrmunist he must man unity Molntgv told the Czechoslovak President Benes in 1943. "Germany must be divide,(. , but at present we must not reveal provincial governors, our intentions because we would through the became eviippointed to i Polnnd' Al. ""' Julu -"'. Stalin appeared U dffc££i ,-. !" *" d n measures proposed fo wiiKUfcii me el-limn*.-iKT*mr evi.i:,..,.,*, ln . ,^ J h; c > ,. %  "i(ara Oil mcas dont a| ain at lhc end ot World ^u, .5 "—J^iSS" !i T "" ub )u atlon nnd torlhe .on. Worll.lhcnr.cpantimn.mwn, EZSflELXEPSS! J 1 ."" <>1 "' Germany as inadequate, different from .he old. *"'< ^i !" " *&*?&£ %  He appeared to have no 'faith In ovtky made Poland's Minthe posslhllily of the reform of ihe There were ..mdnmenlnl differlater of Defenje and member of German oeoote" Al Yaln -AW ence. in .cope and technique. The lhc Sten Council, the huhrit aev membe.menl' was dlicuued 5t .ope of Imperial amblllon, Inernln, body In Poland, which has ^nSh bV Chu^hil] RoSSieS creased enormously Old Russia wide powers In proclaiming laws and Slal ; n a w n • bv ,.', had always aimed al limited obard making appropriations. He ,,„,.„,., minislcts Uen Moln-ov tf uw D .'! n a r '" T V H !Si %  r" %  •'';;'"" i'TI "V' h ? Ce '""" SX^ST^SrSkShSi slice of Poland. ;, region in China Committee of Poland s Communn( w >..„ ma(1 JThii! ,,.. c,_, The new goal wa. ihe encompassM parly rUnlled Workers Par,„T u ,^Ro,velt mewh ,"l mcnl of ihe enlirc globe. Old 1>"I and was immediately, al„"s i^a l,u"was lin : flv nrem?ed Russia wa. thus easier lo sallsfy. ihough al nrsl „,„,f,i..ll>. Includ!"„„"„. X' ,'* „'"i S^miS aruT peace wilh her easier .0 ed In Ihe Polish Politburo Among '^.IT ?h irchl'luim !" ^' achieve than w„h her succe^r. the eleven members of this bod, ^'Z"\^Ho""," ^SUc' n The changes In technique were he ha. obviously l^en wielding ,„,, mon „,,„„, stnlif, ref,,"oH v F r onr su P' cn, e Per. w >lve ln H( 1 „„, lpd „„, ,„ l]v JJ an immediate decision but also on inclusion of •dismemberment equally [evolutionary. F, thing, traditional cmplrc-ouilding _, . was earned oul by armies sla" Ev ,en before Rokossoysky Uoned in the conquered and anpmntment almost all lhc laadblg nexed areas. The builders planned lo whaTwe";'."!! Unflh^lCmns^have KK Ataou.'dx'hTmdJed high^f'^ £ <' ,, ranking Soviet mililary men beIncluded dlsmembermenl „f c;, ,[ actual commanders in the man >' • j 1 requisite for future Polish army. Simultaneously B9* and ecqrily The nubOf Britain Colonial Disappointment In I I'slirul Programme By K. B. TIMOTHY LONDON. In May this year, crowds will (lock to the South Bank of the Thames in London lo see the latest scientific marvels, lo see the Dome of Discovery, lo hear magnificent music in a great Concert Hall. All this—and more—they can see and hear this summer at lhc Festival nf Britain. The best brains of the country are cumbmim; in this effort to tell the story of to-day. Away from the crowds on the South Bonk, there will be olher special exhibitions lo attend—in Museums. Centres and Institutes.— Thtre in a quieter way. Britain's treasures will be on display to the world. They will not be restricted to British exhibits. The British Museum, for example, will feature Colonial exhibits in its 'Festival' display Benin (Nigeria.) will lw represented by specimens from ihe collection of bronzes and ivories in the museum. Wood carving of the llbe. Yoruba and Hausa peoples will be shown The art of applying gold leaf to wood carving, almost exclusive to Ashanti (Gold Coast) will be revealed. Ancient Jamaica will be represented by a wooden idol discovered in a cave in Carpenter's mountain in 1792. Arawak GUVingt from the West Indies, chiefly Trinidad, will be shown. Traditional crafts of the Commonwealth will be demonstrated m such examples as that from ihe British Solomon Islands and in Ihe bark cloth beaters from Uganda and Kenya (East Africa). Bui is this really a "Festival of Britain.?" The programme might make one wonder. From May to June, two hundred ?nd fifty musical events will take place in London. Let us look at the list of Orchestral Concerts. During the first week of the 'Festival', we find, Arturo Toscanini. an Italian, conducts three concerts at the Royal Festival Hall. A conductor. Eduard Van Beinum. will conduct the London Philharmonic Orchestra; Rafael Kubelik. a Czech, will conduct the Philharmonic Orchestra and an Austrian. Rudolf Schwarz. will conduct Ihe Bournemouth Municipal Orchestra Foreign arlists are prominent, loo, in ihe field of visual atts. Sculptors like Karen Jonzen, E. Paolozzi and Uli Nimpsch hove been commissioned by the Arts Council of Great Britain to prepare sculptures for the Festival. And at Battersea Park. Indonesian ballet I l'rt*f'" "? f 01 '": •'"" hart !*•'" po^edThiofll b?"n^. S "Sl l dancm wi display their terpsichorean skill. nTSl-emen'!,' "£2^JZ!~Slgr£ XSR S^ WU *- ">< the idea of The "Festival of '•Britain" is to depict the British way of life How much ei before' When. In 1815, a great war ended for Russia, there were ruples against territorial acbeen, In theory, the Communist substitute for occupation by armed forces and Ihev h-ive hoen nrouMlv 1'olisn army. simultaneously ;:~r" ""** •-"<" % %  -insMUOreurdtWfag auswrtor to ?h?^ib.,. '" h lh announcement of Rokosj!"^ communique on Ihe Yalta le" * ur. nTtr, menu of iST "OVsky's appolnlmenl all Polish Conference did not mention disKSJKS. ln "" um lU ' """ Communl.l leaders suspected ot membe.ment 01 Germany only The other ercal innovation in opposing close lies with lhc Soviet ^ au r J. 1 was "" <" %  < mention lechn'quc "a."5,e ,. %  ? mn". Z > %  '""•" ere purged from the govof m, fhl ^ Soviet governmenl lo refrain from e.nmenl and the arm,. Ihe firs " but Ihe declslpn lo dismemofflclally incorporallng Ihe lerrl"Jn, JJeni being the potential "" JS '" ••>"' lories ot Us satclliles inlo Russia T '" of Poland—Wladyslaw GomY el onlv three month, after tl,,. It has maintained the Hclion of ull>. general Secretary of the v„„ a conference Slalui now n their sovereignly and has denied !" fh <-"pn."' ?> ""Ing po.,U„n of Eastern G any Intention of exploiting Ihem %  " " 'be war. „, d ,„ pu|j||c 1Ul cm enl which The new administrative arwas ">"""> to his speeches in had heen rangemenl thus became very siml' u '" y he Soviet Union does lar to ihe old Imperial one. Ihough ,n to '"' Io dismember (Instill preferred lo observe n, 1 *K' ~.Klay we are repeatedly w principle of non-lncortol, t ,hal tlic Soviet government Is qulsiVloSs">"iVr'AiexVnder"h;.dly poratlon of satellite. The eleva"JSSSS^^",'!,', !" "? """,' needed Ihe present-dav excuses of !" "' Marshal Rokossovsky CSJ?,!. rep *?'' d ov •security' or "anti-cordon sanitherefore had lo be presented as 2 !" f. ."• m k n impreaalon; laire' when he annexed Ihe whole "" exception, a unique act of repeated o f t e n enough II of Finland lhc greater part of Purely personal nature; Poland's Becomes an indisputable tacl. • Poland, and" Hessarjbla. Similarlv President Bierul had "requested" Actually lhc Soviet programme Russia's programme in 1014-lfj lhe hoviet government "if posssince 1943 has l>een a campaign openly and unabashedly aimed at lb, e" to place the matshal "at lhe lor lhe dlsmemoirmcnt of Gerthe creation, aflcr victorv, of a disposal of Poland"—and the many. Russian sphere in Europe IneorSoviet government "In view of the poraling. In one wa) o, anolher, friendly relation." between lhe %  "' hen "he war ended, the Poland. Creehoslovakla. Serbia two nations agreed lo comply The j' 0 """ ' ";" %  ' Oermany reHungary. Rumania, and part of K !" mll" did not proclaim iu per',',.;.'?„ f nol mean an end of lhe uprising.. purged. Ihere were no legal means expansionist drreoi lo the leader Today Ihc Russian orbit in Enprovided for a Russian emissary lo f lv rl(l Communism. Eaat Her. rope actually includes the lerrlsucceed him as dictator of Poland. , lriJ u1 1 serve as ;, nrldcehcad tnrlcs envisioned by the Isarist So even this partial adherence ">r ;i m ovr mm Western C.ennany. planners of 1914-16 as part of the to the new techniques of empire*; , r, n r lo lhe wesl. lhe large Russian Empire; yet Stalin must buildinK has significant shortcomr**S "I ''encli ( omniutusm was prelend lo be antl-annexallonist lugs from lhe Soviet polnl of view. 7W "f nayvaws nanea, tha proud To relinquish Poland to Use Petal and mug act as if h,_ satclliles lo maintain real mastis oul of II prudence, in our present violentRussia's i ey anti-Imperialist world no other Germany course has seemed possible, even government lo Ihe Kremlin fifth coli Poland Is ""l 1 "" in llalv stood at alThe limitations of tradis main road to the Wesl. to ,V empire-building no longer MI and bevnnd. „n, ll„-i.,i. ,"'" ••" s ' lm ItaMfm Iha out. ,...„. ..ment which Intends to '" "f '" vast and exciting onaraM ,n lhc West must control P ln for lhe ncw,o,lof rope hinges on his dominance over „f the ifUfuTlslll. ."."' ")". empire-bulldint A.coidmBly. at Pol.„:,l. :„.,! tat would risk a war r,„„ ~ At" r era. f world Ihe end of lhe war. Soviet Hoops rather than restore Polish HideSf"?LiS" k "LvSSf """" n0 w.ic nisi withdrawn from Yugopendencc. As a mailer ot fuel, :,',!..'""; handiwork, a book flavin, and Yugoslav leaders were Stalln.lhi-Kmpcrur exercises more "'''-on earlv In Ike first Woil-I left l long ns occupallon forces rcmai'i 1 iheones nci' International ., lhe Yugosl.lvs were excluded fi, .re based on he Soviet family, and soon alt negotiationn a world sltuatlor.lr-,!*,^ ?, and ratactd al(eatl u ..•-„ ..... i __., to-day. the participation of foreign artisU andl musicians in the festival proorammc is understandable and leKitimate. In the dayto-day life of Britain, it is not uncommon for a distinguished foreigner to conduct say, lhe London Philharmonic or any other famous orchestra. But Colonials in London are expressing some disappointment that no Colonial has yet been commissioned to take part in one or other of the celebration activities. The Rev. R. W. Sorensen, UP., Mr. Fcnner Brockway, M.P.. and Fabian Colonial Bureau are approaching the Lord President of the Council, Mr. Herbert Morrison M P with a suggestion that since foreign artists are taking part in the Festival of Britain, i. seems only right and fair that British Colonials should also be invited to play their part. Colonials are asking why their kinsmen like Fein Sowande. from Nigeria, regarded as one of the distinguished organists in England; Rudolph Dunbar. from British Guiana, who has conducted famous orchestras in London, Berlin, Paris and Hollywood, and Ronald Moody from Jamaica, who has achieved fame as a sculptor, have not been oimmissioned for the Festival. The Press Officer of the body responsible f-r the arts side of the Festival, the Art Council, tells me thai the Council empanelled small groups of distinguished persons under various headings such as poetry, sculpture, music etc. Fach group had a chairman at its head who was also a member of the Arts Council. Names of musicians, etc were proposed by members of the groups for approval or rejection. But a different method was adopted in commissioning the conductors of orchestras. The orchestras were empowered by the Arts Council to choose their own conductors. Is it too late to include one cf these men in the Festival programme ? I hope not itaifrsabai' QmmUflcmUoiu "S"V. "••• Md,„,-„,c. •,„,,.'.r ,i .'v5f. ;"> rt ""' P~f j" your columns, dealt with Electricians' QualiflcaSoviet economic and military rejected attractive ofters. that has ceased to cxlsl. Which must have caught the eves I hope"that this'"tier be nSsal,T ,ul V con L' h r e"' F-. ,, „ hjdl Is %  f" • *• awsweai saw. 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Appeiiain/i lliftlkfii*!* JrXXllsD CHICKKN JF.L1.IED TURKEY ANCHOVIES MACKERAI, PILCHARDS CHEESE PRUNES DATES PIGS COCKTAIL SAUSAGES ASPARAGUS fWhole; ASI'AHAGUS (Tips, EGGS MARSH MALLOWS DINNER MINTS FRESH FRUIT 1 VEGETABLES Make your own Ice Cream with the rich Australian BUTTER MILK POWDER Price 61c. per un or KRAFT'S ICE CREAM MIX —51b Tin S4.I2 STEAK , KIDNEY PUDtaC. per Tin FRUIT PUDDING—48c. per Tin tlNEWIff& BEERS and CnTTsTl GOLD BRAID Rl*M TOP NOTCH RUM SANDEMANS SHERRY RHINE \. BRISTOL CREAM SHERRY DRY SUCK VIENE CURE riCAHKTTIS Embassy Cigarettes in tin* of 25 at 48c. per Un Churchman Cm of 25 at 50c p-:



PAGE 1

TUESDAY. JANTJABY 3. l*St BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACI Jamaican Sculptor — Joins The "Seven Dials iFYofn Our Own Corravpondrn.' LONDON. Jamaican-born RonaW Moody li lhe> only Colonial member of in* "Seven Dials Group", a newly-formed painiers" and sculptor* rlub in London. The membership of the club . limited to seven—five painters and two sculptors. nd Ihe idea of It belongs to painter Archibald Ziegler. What does Seven Dials" maan' "It can mean so many things," says Moody The cl-ib aims to hold two exhibitions a year In London The first is OfaM from 8lh—17th January at the Galen* Apolllnaire. The cxhiU' elude six sculptures—the work of Moody. Ronald Moody is a silent and sensitive artist, whn speaks with great modesty .-.bout his work London newspapers have recently carried favourable comment on hiability as a sculptor, lie it now recognised as one of the few accomplished coloured sculptors. The Ministry of Works have recently bought a woodcarving o' a male figure completed by Moody in his Paris studio just before the German invasion. It is to be placed in the library of the new Colonial office when that Is built—on the site of the old Westminster Hospital. The figure Is in palisander— a darkish wood with violet, red, and yellow light* in it Moody tells me he did not have a model for the statue. "It CUM entirely from my imagination: it is svmbolic of many thines." When I called at his Knightsbridge studio this week, he was busy on a sculpture which he hopes to include in a protected one-man exhibition in 1952. His success may be attributed 1 partly to his self-imposed rule: ''Whenever I feel tired I stop work, and take n rest That wav. he feels, he produces nothing less than his best. WEST l\ll\\ MIIJTOH A !\ew School Geometry With Trigonometry FINE VARIED A FINE of £3 in 14 days with an alternative ol two tinnthV iii prlsorunent. which was Impost* Police Magistrate Mr C L Walwyn on Daphne Jones a Br ANDREW O. J CAMACHO. %  Tenantry. St. George B A iLuast I was yesterday varied by Tht u Mr. CAMACHO naa taught al Honours Mr G L. Taylor .,iu\ Mr St. Stanislaus' College, b.U ana %  A > Vaugflan. Judgn of tht 1* now learning as Mathematics Assistant Court of Appeal. Slv Master at St Mary's Collesjs. must pay t2 In 14 days or underg Trinidad "* month's imprisonment. He is also Mathematics Tutor Daphne Jones was charged wit: to Ihe Board of Industrial Trainunlawfully and nialirlnusly ing and the Extra-Mural Dun wounding her husband Ulrick (in Trinidad) of the University ^ onf% ' Brighton, St. George, on College of the West Indies his nose with a bottle I ScplcinWith tfaa publication of volume ber -J 4 I 950 ,' II. it is possible to review the Th* husband in his wKtenca book as a who.c. I have already J" ,d al '*-*" 1 p r, S2 l£? reviewed volume 1 tApn, J gj ^e^a^T-jarr *•£££ il^Un.^L^ P ,ovldcs (r ? n ami oe—> to move hi-, furniture ex client oeometry course. The ta _,, tjonai. *l I ground for a school eertilcate ,n !" ,."^1 th. wlgStW of the new general certificate nad lntM ,ion of going back being thoroughly covered wlth h ,. r .y,,. slrm k hllll wUb The book i.s neatly laid out itoUir ()ll hl nmc an ,i he Ml with essentials clearly picked out When he was getting up from tn' in dark punt. Plenty of space g, r ,ind she struck him with tW makes it easy to read. When „ tlinc [„ his buck and than i l formal theorems ore started, ea.h a* g ta given a separate page Diagram* He was ti*eated by Pi K< %  > are bold and clearly marked. m>d alterwards spent 14 days in There is a wealth cf worked exthe General Hospital. His no*'" amples. in fact in volume II a bled for four days. whole chapter is devoted to ml*Cameron Franklvr. ol cellaneovis worked examples. The St Plu\l|.\ who was in the vtdnAl book should be particularly useful al the time of the Incident, corto anyone studying on his own roboraled this story He said tna. and stso a s a revision course he was at Ulrick Jone* Volumn II consists of three the time of the incident. Jones had parts. Part 4 deal* with tho called him for some frui t. -Irclc. part 5 with ratio ami pro— Harbour Log John Roebuck, BACK TO WOBK — Moody entering hi* itlldlo. Passenger Facilities 33 Religions More Important J^g/^g To Spend $2,307,732 On Development Than Cargo SUNBEAMLEAVES LONDON, Jan 29. Improvements in passenger facilities between Britain and the ' : I. hi %  i:%  i-.-..l'.'.i.il .. %  present than additional cargo In Barbados % From fage 1 was photographed, watching in. ship leaving him behind in exile. *\f 1 orfo_ Mtx Jute, the Director, said country were "'he had taken shots of the harnrr ;^ when viewed in relation to the [*" %  * %  " .?. a r. b d .^: traduced too fast He thought yesterday a lovely day for HI portion ami part G with triKuuom •try. I have only one criticism to make of the Geometry sr<-*mn. The author introduces equiangular trianiiles and uses them for a %  ,, couple of chapters before calling c . them similar triangles. TIM '. %  author has been very thorough S~l'|i and waited to introduce similar pugi triangles as u special case of similar figures. Though this is u !" u undoubtedly u gain as far as those as students who are going to con•" %  '•" tlnue the subject are concerned, Ll £'j I doubt whether it just .Acs tho oast <• delay. '• I am not quite so happy as far ?"* as the triurnomctry section is con'£.'•, Mildred Waiur*. si I feel the subject is inr-i>i n.-n.is from M.nmiqi becoming . g=^"JJg£ra In Carlitle Bay Moll) N J,.M * t.UCMI*> M laSSta a..* S*h WMIM AKHIVAIJf l..,.:...-i H lona **, Cpl B, lima Aruba vU SH LBM 1 -1 -lnrv. JOt torn nl LcBlaivr, t'Ofl' lUHU* vfel %  C(H—I. Irom MiHlnHiuH K T. PalhUntlvi. *. from i WSjHgd leach some Schemes which grata ^ Largest services. These are the views of ' ol the counto. taken as an Mi A F V Barton Seeretarv index of the people's goodness, iw niming as *ix *iemsnips trigonometry to fairly voung boys. scgi^ of the Wt India cSSml5c7and Barbados would have to be put *cal steel band. u nl be improved by being broke:, up Office, and there are About 5.1S p.m. the filming into imal RecI(on quite a few that are not registered, par'y were taking their last shot | W9S particularly glad to see a Those registered are the >• B r hado. They_ took a launch (ha pi„ on 3 dimensions. o neces1,. iFYom Our Own Conn pax tdrii. PORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan 26 The Government propo (pending this year some S2.307.Association and are cxpresVed denorn..., number of development today in correspondence to the Regi.ti-r. lready in proManchester Guardian. allocation 1 Their letters follow rubllcat DFfAtmmKH %  tafe-g Bhlp "gmJ Cap! lVir.litv.iirt. Ml %  .M aWlor, 6rreissra! tht fttu remmttttf roV I |w B 1 .'' % %  %  v it t Oisr 0/ V siosf : "i mail "1 tht lr*J tkm+tr pwm m i~4 rtodui m tit vital themtd itiif mrniuJ^mn-J m a vtsi (fair, mJ aim rritnra* P','JMI.'I.I Btm m Skfrid n I;J., ],MR*'%  ••' %  • wm '' % % %  M of sfS q sfas El ws^avsfr. fa Wnws^iss AffhrJ nttntt hxaw hit hMy, ana* aW iraW ,-A.wiirf tvar %  si'y tme 0J SJURf /' %  m ."ni'ii 'i..'" ...'p .V'.'.. '. ;,•> %  .', i. : ; !-''!'I MtgAsfftSa n,*tojhli ic4th in i;n. f" fcas* fcw ssasj A i'oVfy. 'Kr.t i Mrsssfl "**V %  "'* tasVs?, Un hil enJuring ..'JI* Ifjmt "Ht on the (hwU %  sV ttmtttt" pfwra stfAMU l\-rtgrute Ftf|K k I JtmmJijtrmtplmriivid. Trad*Hark oj / I sNtglgasl In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station which I Sun vay in sary and yet so often neglected in textbooks. In this connection, page 2M several quaMJons .-iw t. 11.1 "^'llliu. r !" •-* a > n might be enlisted to Salvat.on Army. All of the above, making his usual rounds from m rff„V th a ,, .real circle mute *-'" %  • ^w.""". Th! u ManAo^^ brln t aboul w* ""provement-. with the exception of the Roman cabin to cabin and making his way L? ml^t llii %  *• Tobago a sum of_$280,600 hi reMl Balton ooinU gul ,h at no cthnlic and the Moravian, have from ooe end r the HJTI, .„ IK* W n< *. fl"lred and indeed _it b^ir.-P-ur 11. .. CrlsM buildings the St. quiied and under the ..,. %  % %  •• 1 %  „•.. %  •*.,. 1.1.^1 ...v. ^mtmmw^m, %  • %  -iiuii. 1:1. mil !.i (tic ii..(. it* (.in,,„ iSl failure on the part ol present branches all over the Uland. other between the loja of his 218 will THSenT^n !" d, wSfi '"H*" !" "* responsible for the The Roman Catholic parish Swede compa.uom who were too tVL^ ,,\r r, ,, rO 11 15 while preien t complaints which have to rhurch IS In Jemmotts Lane, and busv to notice him fc *Se?il Xosei %  TCqUirCd So "cluswely with lack of pas.here is a chape, at the Urs'ufine rJanR DaSin a Swedish Jour^^^tiTui rimX ha. Vff^-5K lcr """ •" i-^P""1 scnger accommodation whereby Convent. Collymore Rock and annn hst, is with the crew of the 1 do "*' fn 1 Mr Cnm rnn %  """'•" *"*"' with few exceptions British subother in St. John. 8ui bei jocls are unable to travel to and The ~ from the British colonies of the has a targe iouowing ana many nt :„ inalttau nni. ".Luioh' eastern Caribbean in British ships. placcs of worlh ip. There is also SOm doUllh He adds, "the problem will rejie Church of God, the Evangellmain until the British Governc i Church of God. and the United SAME OFFENCE THE Jndles of the AssisU.il Court of Appeal Mr. G. L. Taylo cr in St. John. su.bum. Apart from UIIB no '?"••"" '"" '"" '" %  he P.lrlm Holmes. Church omu dopc ,„*„„ Sw^^'pape?. • much T"r OUFBEE a lane lollowmi and man, h „ is m ^, lm! smu •dounh-Vi^ E c VEBZZ would be an excellent exercise to .miMm. ,, nisaY aj AW-... IVI., find the distance both wavs. • %  S|atjS^,Tr7* No book ran ; or rltrh Cl „ B< ,, npo.i.. .. Aewort* %  euUMrn COUMIIVK %  %  Ikilacn. t . !" !" . -...*•*. A' 1 *""' <*" %  iii!" done an encellent )ob nnd Is to bo som slating the filming party. MAIL NOTICES •md Mr H Vm ihi !" .A|, U "Jn until the British Governcl Chureh of God. nnd the United ___ S5-S.IS&3S S^e-form^a^S ^T'^"^^^ THANKS B.W.I.A. RATES OF EXCHANGE I. • not be convicted twice for tin „ Methodist renven nd !" *oncilcs itself to the possibility Episcopal Church, familiarly BRITISH West Indian Airwayi Mur!c GSVC liS^bSn ,h tnc !" bs,dy m ^ hove to ** kno *" ^ initials "A.M.E.", Ltd.. have received a letter from lined 10 aftn thev h I been substantial. the Church of the New Testament, the Governor of Barbados thankU"nStedI bv sit Julian Ilcnrv fo" Mr Mar > ln ."'" COrne L S 1 tC_ ,ne r !" Ba P ,isl ,he *•&**. *e Ing the Company on behalf of tnc SaSa duSEbadce M the c'our,m,ndcr '"his letter that the Comuhel Baptist. St. Therexa First Government of that Island for the vuStSi cMuher "? L venr monwealth Shipping Committee Baptist, the National Baptist and efficient service they maintained Pohre MaxStrate Mr E A ,n 9^"'ound freight services h Northern Baptist Convention, during the construction of the new MeLellT aiSfsaautmSv fined IK. lit from lnc Vnited Kinadom to the The Episcopal Orthodox runway at Seawell Airport, and SicavS 10 T! foSnd them ?*"* West Indies to be adequate, church wnich was once repreparticularly when the pilot; had y dhv of' \sslultme md bcSh / bul rw nnwnd 1 government Mn ted only by St. McGinfe.Vs only 4.00C feel of ninway on Si vi PeterkVn The offence-for ac,l0n ll1 r 8 rd to additional pasCathedral in Country Road now which to land their aircraft. ^Kiini'MS']^tJ^^JSx n ^ m VK ^^ says : "Since has about two other chapels. Its The communication from the mtued at the simc UirTe as llic then, cargo services have not dimdestiny is presided over by ArchGovernment of Barbados went 0.1 Surbance inlshed in relation to the volume of bishop Jack. to say: "A spec.l measure of Mr Adams who defended tl.c ,ramc ' ** <-;'ined. On the conPentecostal praiso is due to your airmen, who those whose throughtheir skill and sense of word "Penlepatient duty brought their planes costal", there is the United I'enteto safe landings, and so upheld the costal Assembly of God, the Penhigh reputation for safety wU th destinatecoatai Assembly of Canada, the characterises your service," Barbados expressed tho hope thai B.W.I.A., would be abl< World. make full use in the future of th* country's larsji azportl to the -yh, Christian MUsion Is animproved facilities at Seawell, West indies ll routed by foreign olhfr rc ||g. 0 n with a large folshipping lowing. Then there is also the PROMOTED J." T*l?? nt T .11 s-T S2E Ch rcn oi ,he Nazarene and the Mr ,. L fSSt, Control Officer g-gy %  ?-* %  "SSS!?^' Nazareth Holiness Also scatter„ Seawell. has been appointed f.iurdlsn expresaed asjreemen. ^ over he i s i nnd are p i, ce s of Assistant Manager and Control with the point* raised but cntiwo „ hip of the Gospel Hall Reofficer of the Airport with effect C S R Ll hr ""US'* frw uenl t an ligion and the United Christian !rom February I. 1851. Brethren CANADA •fla/lfr", pr. Ch-(i... M li'i"' II S'IS'1 pr. Demand Drain SI.SS'. pt Niahl Di.d, SI MO", pr Cabia Currartrv aoi/is', pr. Couponm MS-If-, pr illvar iba by th* M V Daarwnxl hill %  >• cloaad al Iht 0*i.rul Po.t OtrW %  • uridar;Fitrl mall at II noon. f>lMrrd i" all al I pm. Ordinary mall al )M p.m oat %  >• Slal Januar. ISSI UaiU lor nnilah (Mi-n. h* alhf "kit r>ai>r W Smith will r Hoard al Ur Uenaral Fnal Orrk- at undt-r Prel mall al II .>.•.> %  Hasitti-.r-. itall %  I p m Ordinary inall al ISO pm c-i Ihr 1UI Januar* ISSI traffic lo be carried. On the con' nary several cargo vessels are p. SKK s^^^rol^^ited -2= the same offence. The Polhe hi Kin „ donl „, lhllu (Xri,,^^. rar won n eaae auilnal m !" b, d o.. British Cuiana) Peterkin eould not then bring one NOU,'" '',, :., !" "i li no, 1^; "r s b5 "*"'" "'•"<"J Brl ,'p^o.t.vr.iu;& %  *=.s Notice of appeal nad not ne**n n h companies and only P-I.-.V-IBI A^#mhlv of the ven by Munel Greaves, and u t neg|lR|b e ^ -nti|y of ^ Wntecostal Asse m bl y ol the given Police Magistrate s decision against her remained in force. flees To The West BERLIN. Jan. 29 Walter Oelkers, President of the East German Railway Administration at Halle. Saxony has lied '<' shipment of goods tic ..v ; "Of course there are ,,, cargo services but transhipment is West Germany, the antl-Commutoo frrquMll | y reoU ired at Trininist Information Bureau reported . . % %  Tiiliggi liulml dad, and better services—includ nter-Island services^—will nist here to-day. He had been cised by East German Socialist eertainly be needed f West InUnity Party of which he was a mnn economy is In develop member, the Bureau said. -Renter, healthily You can't see the difference...! NEW! Her old blouse looks new — because it's always washed in LUX Your clothes List so much longer when you wash them regularly in Lux. Gentle Lux flakes keep them looking new, make colours stay gay and bright! So give your pretty clothes longer life with regular Lux care. Keeps all dainty clothes like NEW The Seventh Day Advenlists are ship a stone's throw from tin going from strength to strength. Roman Catholic Church. The Watch Tower Society which Other churches not so well claims not to be a religion, and known are St. Maria O.S. the which hits out at the Roman Antioeh Church, S.P. Religious Catholic faith more than at any Science and Mt. Sinai Holy other, has its chief place of worChurch. 1 Your Backache may bs> du to sluggish Kidnty Action TIFB IS NOT so good when you srs troubled wttb backskhc, rheumatic psiai. stiff, setting muscles sod HHiiii, lumbigo or common urinary disorders due to ajiigoiih kidney acuoa. Why put up wiih pain sod discomfort when you might get happy relief by taking Doan's Backafhs K .tlnrv Pills. They mmutai* sod clsanse tvlusaiah kidoryi and > help tnem So rid the blood ofeaoMi uric acid aod otbes topuribc* which othtnrlM Dugbt collect In the frseem sod cause distreu. Dosa 1 Pius have helped thousands | let then, help you. HAW A CENTURY 0/ mum at rsJiMsV* mbmtms da* to t/mtmttm kiJnrr action, u SM SMaai ruotd 0/ Doam'i 1'iUi. OtMiful mam amd oman of oil ogtt uu and rttommand thu tfaamnt ur,tii and urinary uniu*crw ta thaw Jrtamma SS-gUcSfS. aUsii A Wide Range ol really High Quality ELECTRICAL WISING ACCESSORIES at Reasonable Price* Included in the TENBY RANGE ARE WIRING CLIPS CEILING ROSES .JUNCTION BOXES for Rubber and Lead Covered Cable and a wide variety of • SWITCHES SOCKJST-OTJTLETS BELL PUSHES, ETC. Write for Details and Export Term*. SO-BOUJKEft LTD 19—21. Warstone Lane, Birmingham, England. CHECK YOUR FACTORY SUPPLIES and Pmon* mmrly for thm Inllou-ina DUNLOP TRANSMISSION BELTINO IV." X PI DUNLOP RUBBER INSERTION W' %  -'•' DICKS PACKINGS aU Trpaa BELT rASTENERS BELT DRESSINO •T.AKE GKAPHITE STENCIL INK COTTON WASTE BASS BROOMS STEEL WIRE BRUSHES EMERY a SANDPAPER FILES All Type, TAPS a DIES HACKSAWS a HACKSAW BLADES ENGINEERS HAMMERS — OPEN END a BOX SPANNERS . TAPER a STRAIGHT SHANK HIGH SPEED DRILLS 1-lb., l-lb, ll-lb. It-lb.. JVt-lb., 3-lb ST1LLSON TYPE WRENCHES 8\ 10", 14", 18", 2", Jo" CHAIN PIPE WRENCHES V—*" ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAT arnurr DIAL a— ill B.r. IIX CTLINDEB onuuo inn EX-WALL NFW .. AU mm. CAB COMFOBT CAPBTT CAB irifins. ran tpnaa* • .rwd. Toush carry rannl loaal *> •aim ol* ifea i mtt^tj I The New 5 ton ££ MORRIS-GOMNERClAt FORT HOYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 FASTER SERVICE TO BY B.O.A.C. CONSTELLATION IN CONJUNCTION WITH B.W.IA. teealar Bae4Mrd Bsnsss) t No tips or axtrsa for fomfort Btljoas Connlr.es on all sis continent* Baoaas that raw journeys are too far, nuti tai-a too lone. that r?fle-ts II O.A.r's 31 ysarold tradition of HpesJb.rd iervlee and eiperiencs. OIT TKBKK lOOMEtt 1T4T THREE W)lfaBE I rross BarbaJos to Ktant'tn hy il.W.l.A. Loo3on Flying Time i lln. 1 Pay 1 J Mi. nights Weakly iUtura Fsro • .11' ii 1.277 Z" Also Boiular aps-dblrd Marrloss tr> Saxopo sad South AJnartca B.O.AC. TAKES GOOD Q\RE OF *OU Book Ihroiiofi yftr local B.O.A.C. Appointed Agrnt toho makes no rhartre for cr. in forma' ton or boofcbv •'Spetdbird-' In all FLY* BO AC ,ix ssssssawam BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LIMITED Lo.r Broad *f* En.la.aaw* rhaoa i&afl



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%  IUP I II. Ill HARBAIMill'llil Ml I I -I. W. JASLARV an. lil Ten-Wicket Victory Far M.C.C. Cricketers QMT C$mbim*d TuHinan.utn XI II* IM.r Oil!-.n LONDON. Jan 23. %  this first) together with -imc fine spin H IJIMB who captured fourwM k feature ol Ike MCC'i t-n wicket victoi • Combined Taaniamian XI .it LaurwesMi, Tasmania. errsiifis point about eanlurs ID M minutes anet in 'hi* m,.^ ; n-d araonf hi, more proflt*bft1 'woee %  MOmi'l Sll v*rr *l*^rn ..it' icfcri rfceapl*. ,< in| the uiih 8. 'iiin£> mat MAVIS \ III! I Mi irieat leC Alur trc |M inter. I <-jght in rlipa off faat %  -ol i*ririr much For a* soon at Boa parm lr.ru. %  Ul| hit v:r %  %  ' %  "'.r r ft aVowi Uklns a well earned rest afl became wortn 200 (Wash l0 > brook M, be tr^ct ID hi: sera i.nd itK-ii! lost the im-. The '' %  f* DoUary and w* T B—M B ia u XI 'trrnuthenan b lh. ciUiht t wft al di^mli.. h m %  ,,., %  %  •tin .., %  %  >., tm n k %  • %  ,n a |1 h "" "* ana sevan tfl ma*tt> just OV For ihi iglal they MM mainlv "> r * hours. Parhh^,, i'-. itarl salt" nlly for li ho compuad iia '• -"'' a ""' 'a*vu d*#* H century Oral elaas wn <" i" *•> oaaa would hi"a 114 i the M c.c i unr nan eapturJnii \t.,,,--. i ket with only 17 run* i rt i the t.:ir<] It w:: MH oirlhri.i>. ineiili-nial Kf, uad BadMr*! 'present" was in iho noun i ielt-haniM'i Mrri, i... •ii in the -inn Apart hit., IT. u the nest Tasmanian liattliiit "••• hrom IBM taptakr. Laver who hit lelt-hanier i dx four* in two ovan •md altonether had !<"n fours in f.U S9 obiaiiie'i II, (i..-i nvi M inuiuun. %  acond n.*> the M C C -utiliaht-d a nnt inntnt> lend of "3 anrt CompUm and Wahbiuo>. ii'?i'. tt^nptofi compleling hi* ihouaand rurm f'/i U> lour when he re.tie,| 11? The;, took pan II .rtner IN in jiul undn two hmira Compton wai t 1 1 i^ruter R nd afwi Sheppsrd, l)r**and Cloa* ha i all bt i..miwd cheapiy i,, •..., < f in>nand Unfnj nil feet to nil ih. bowtari -n1 %  hi wi'i; no T-i' nf the injury lo hU knuhiraced 10 M in SI minute HHI n i trMn Bholt n c.-< i tha on iio> Imiiodai The i 100 m 5.'i minutes. Waslibrotik havlna acorad i .,r the %  %  .'.(• ComptoM n kdual Ballinii the 'hlrrl day after t M <" '" declaration %  if. night total ttw Comblaad xi found ibamaalvai oiofht on puca lakln*pln F.eilarr roiwated his fimt nnlnfi j#rformaiicc by letting Morrlt'i A-trkel eheaply—thla time faujjhl ID the gully by Wan Afb HflliM aaruek u lenth and th<^ batsman found him virtually unplayable <>; i. %  hOWM h0 fxlremi'ly Inapt ihry are .it MWIKII'K strokes whei the hall i* lurnliiK Fven theii i iforti to go down tha a > I.ul Ihe howl.i i.rf a length faile.i to wort and Evani coOactod iwo victims bohln i Iba reiult of such attl A heavy ir underslotm nftei -ld the last Taamaman pali '('fr a) the wleket Whr,, •tupped howavai Innlhull RvsultH %  r A CVF rOURTH St-LSD -OriWi u a—ii Tw. ,—.. i BuaftaM %  %  %  %  B • • I. BrnpH.-, >na Ma I -^O I. I.. MB UMtad • Lulie Tn I HJ iraaaao DSStal %  rrr.lfk I'-....' %  I e %  IfSfUl n I I' p nasn; /irTH ftOUND S are \ be heltf on oi before the followirf Ti. vane wu inspired by fruit ,.nd .oma barman in tha ilwny* comfortahle neata for drinking. SET THE PACE AND EXAMPLE II* Hill* Wrtyti KLLV WRIGHT. Uw bi Ulitnt Wolv< i and EnftUnd ci.ptair closes the SOCCER SCHOOL with advice to aspirinn skipi. the wjiy tci make the job a success. Says the modest Wright, hern nf 37 intern;ition;ils YOU can never atop learning %  bOUt the i!rJ.: %  * %  I was cant| iluudjr. bail* were •niffiiieni t<, and iha the Min-'i ,r iMi, : fallow at tha bock II w I > no* pli i innings and ihc M C.C, in the Nan ml laaaon. couragainamt iM of Close nnd Kvan^ hit can DCVr atop learning ubnut the him havi a reel of tna ball oarly • ii | necessary run* for victory ** n, c > *hleh. 1 suppose, it. ona o* In the game and try lo keep W Irom ten balls JJUJMJBX.riJLL %  y M. Hatriton-Cray ; i Dr.lrr NSftk. s (iimr al!. < N *• 1 %  .1 H MKM tat 941 . • A f 11 a> K 1* 1 f H V U U ft 11 &f i : *. • h i • U : ^ aft J Ift 3 5 • 01 : k ft A if J | A A S I t • ...md from a i :ndi> dual mi M i>.ought J I ((Hi iwayed uiTao No-Trump i is*t>iiu' u t not • i i I i in %  I .: im i %  Ito.n' .md lie autoniaUrSl v I ptviced Kt:.'jih I. 'l or Tu i i a. a> io i n :;. i i i led •> s. r.i *0 'hDiamond* vi il A \ A K and % %  a Ciiib won bw Enn j The Ori, ,-. • r.k. ( inHpaUMil We(hen had s %  i i li % %  i %  -. i'ii .).* M ; At a Hi two No-Trum-ta uai foirinf I la i lud to bid 1 i player tern) with TYo_ Cluht laWed io Tliree Clubs by rjorlli and aialn Boutii's J Taial rail ot Three NoJ %  J'riiti I I %  What's on Today; re*, lie Huh Kxhlbltluu M oil painting* and penell; %  ketehes at The Pavilion Hi im,. 10 00 am. Advoratr • noto l.xmOlUon I at Barbaodt Museum — 10 aft an R J MaeLeod's eahlbltlon •f Ol! Palnllnis at Rarhn daa Muaeiun—lt.10 a.m Meeting Legislative Council —? ao p in Ihr Council will ransldei MipplemenUry resolutions, In Uie sum* of set mm. Ml I SW, (17,400 and SOft.ftBO IrniM; other Ihmcv the.i ii-luu..i will provide'' Ihe funds In meet Ihe rosU c.f Ihe destrurtlon ol worn 1 currency note*, the cVvet ; mrnt nf Ihr water resources by drllllnc inves llialloiu. Milh drilling rig*, runway llahtlni at Heswell Alrperl and altera lions I., and equipment foe > .. i.-r:. la bora lories,' al I Harrison College, mils to -usuenrt the provl • Innof Ihe IUIIM % %  ( ni i tlan ol Ihe People Act. provide for the winding up ami dissolution of tht liMh.Mi.iMutual Aid and A**e • ment Ainiiranee So-' etel are set down for eon aideratlon by the Couneil i | The ll ... of Asemhlt merls at 3 00 p.m The House b due la leaume Cimmiltee on the Hill to provide for the regulation i Of l'ubllc l I'lili.. Hrllevllle Tennis Tourna im-n i—1.13 p m Mi bile Cinema lives show at HI Mark s School Paa I lore. HI Philip 7 3a p m Its fastni %  If %  hara !| pUktgroui outha in parks, in tinyouni chap* %  kick a amall ball aroui the dinner break, Ynu novi when you mmht make you Just thai llttl aflkftaot And lo those enthusiasts who have to play cm cinder pitches 1 %  ay: Do not \M ir> ^l..ut thla -poil mi VOID Boecat future i football ftpjNranUcaahip on an -<^> heap nf .i ground in in.v I hometfi\Mi if lismbridga It helped rather than hindered you had io ba amort l the ball, and ;i feubruises a|eed n|> the lessons i>l bulance anil that vit.il 01 MIR mm (i I | Knrniirane Thrm AS CAPTAIN. I try lo Ihe new bojl to think football as .list gell'lnu Uv .owl f.-*-t into action Hut lh.it s ciil.one %  >! the many jobs of being captain. And whethei you are leader nf Vuh-K I In-lhe-Marsh or, as I ha< i PfivUaaa t.i b i apialn of England. •ho dutla* pr*tt} same. VOU MUST srl the pace and the exanipii'to youi taiun 1 ining. umi follow training ona keanl) and with cnthu'-i.' MAKK A POINT ol seetnj tin. your playing near li ell I good oroai Ah weak hue. an IrrlUtll .inn ptopMaMara small things that can switch ihr result nf a game. MAKK BURI yOU know who l going lo take |H-nnlty I whan lha bock or balf-bAch will take fiee kicks Small DOlata. l>ut [he) .,n gld smooth leant work Spl The Weakness DsTRfNO TliK OAMK %  I Uv i -'' tot rout pot Hi,. %  bajngth of i •i|>|i>ition and try lo plai action aa much an possible. He the set* confidence and soon Ibsas the tna tmptj laetlni %  • %  %  K"t in your firsv vho bl game I % %  %  • %  1 <• ~r" Won I. An i t-rn—n I Inuo lanwia p, I %  ,.r.!*w.i*.Tn." lad I. AfcUftol n Ci"UI Palvt I Niltinaham rraal a B>a.ii^ 3. fan Vala a Wataall J. I M H Tnw" 0 WaUoeA I. flimouia Ai|>h I -WIINDI.Y MATCHBS %  i.-.nw RWvan | car%  I I 1 % % % %  '*i I i %  %  I Climtrf a -InUi nil f .noutinR ..ttles the %  eaa uphM tha ithcla 1 .reu ge*. the chance move Uayer and suggest g te In h tactics If he tha ti voice and call Mrment. <>F THE FIELD it of the captain to ki possible about his players. Domestic reasons mav affect a player, and a tOCtftll IVCrd mny help lo a Die difficulty. YOU MUST, when BWS) from d -et Ihff • K.imple of Lour I don': ape l-sport, because I realise lhat n bunch of tit. health) had going to do thamaalvai much aeod Just moping around And make sure the new toy Is not neglected. In mv book, "Captain of England." I stress that I shall never forsjH the kindness of England captain Joe Mercer in my first Internal Hi .nude a point of being helpful and friendly, and before the team trolled out he found time to come over and say: "Don't forajat I am here to help fOD. Now. best of luck and a grand game t I 'hull never forget how I warmed lo such encouragement "inber the new chaps and fjva them every help The po'nts nf training and tactics have been excellently covered In Ihe Soccer I Sehool classes. I suggest you save! and study them again Standard; Canasta MORE AMUT TACTICS i, M ahyiiiiaCssy 'MBN hmr, >idas raqulf* IW foe •• IMUS. %  !• is ^n/, a aL-i t .r~p a> wiaitf puira o. %  .aro as pos.iiiis in ouj • mm .oiitaii riiaei iae correct count oi ears e*Hm well M i!ruaal.. U* SWalo the coant anmore use), i'> ".:r £."£"', "K.srt!, loaoafHSi vour iiuwi i* I K Ti j a a a. s. • J, 1San*of.uur.m.UliaO .1 am nMNtw-ii but snould rlrin Irom o.t.a ao as you ihould pil '" is' lr ,# oucarcl pile with eiUwr a Kins ra a Nine Whan you disw from the stocs and Ir — dlarsrtl >oU >tltiuld me (f*rn and 'ht %  *• lunlma rou di* a mairtilnil one i brtore •oui small "ea. tor it rou draw noni IM iw "tai.d "s oatier having' tou lha On Uia other hand. If instead of tht two Joan* ..ur hand nmUlned two Two's, rou w"uld br lontolo t'our hiih CMIO* in urfl*r uld up tha band to tna roullte a sis. rou The secret of o happy family isGOQD HEALTH! Yes. mothers, your good health and riaM of y"o' .hiidren. If you • tomciimes truss and yui children art noi robust, perhaps you jnd ywur uussilv seed more A at I> .nimins Sostan lakingMDaTI Fmulsion everyday Soon you will see a wonderful difference in ih. way you sod your < hil dre'n look, aci and feel" Sera i f**b>* si aeavpa ^SCOTTS EMULSION HIGH ENERGY FOOD TONIC Parasols In plnin colours of Nvy. Brown. Black. Green, and Red made nf cotton with FtraiHht handles Fh w33 A FRESH ARRIVALOF SMILES CIN MAH bassi •! Si —1 •• a a • l"V*— a aa** Sit O %  a era nan tnsaataiai Ul 1,'Rtl.l Man" i ....... 1 .1 \-..n>. in %  llllr.buar a a 4 -U — rt M..hOill.. -1 -i H... i u a ass lo.,. "Tfc. .i 1 •! si I.*." 4 Taallx lltfl' S.11 in --i. -ana wsaj Baa"— The Weather TO l4t Sun Rlaaa: li IS a m. Sun Srl.: 5 .Ml p m. Mmn (La*l Quarltr): J.nu ary no l.llhlini: 130 p m. IInl. Water: %  .1 %  BU 9 n 1 IK .11 Do It Every Time Hallo YMERE r*x.s 1 WAT cua-MASTER as UP -ruese THE LAS' GUV V^O SUO1.Z0 THE K>35 MCW ID Ti K-vOTS COULCNT T£ N;C


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PAGfc TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATI Tlf.SDW JAM\RY :i. ISM CaJub Calling Judy Garlands Story Hv .Inif* I..II I.UMI TOIMI %  f'h M R. GRIMM PROVENCE. Trade Commissioner from the French Rnibassy in Caracas, rrraed by the CsUatHr yesterday afternoon (cr about Mx day*' hy the (•!•> %  hie aerempanied by their two children and are staying it lb* Hotel Royal Mr Fredricksnn is employed with Compama Rieijo. on irngalion company. He s^tid that that company II also engaged in the construction of highway* He e f.„ one week, while will be remaining for month* Intransit R EV. AND MRS DAVE MITCHELL. Rev James S. Boulton. Rev Norman W Harrlson. Rev. F. Mural. Rev Vivian Commissiong. Sister Marjorie Watson. Mr. George Marshall arrived from Trinidad yesterday morning bv B.W.l.A to Join the laul) Rodney which left last night for St. Vincent. They have gone to attend (he Annual Methodist Synod held (his year in St. Vincent. Short Viiit M AJ Operations Engineer of Shel Leaseholds Distributing Co Ltd home who waa in Antigua on a shoi* visit arrived here on Sunday fternoon by B W.I.A He is are staying al the Marine Hotel here fur about two days and 1 ) %  about six As Told To Michael Drury i cumr >jn U-ri'm—llr lettrr En Route To Nevis M RS. MILLARY MALONEY of Nevis who was spending a I adored my father, and he had otaj mm I n1 good. Why don't holiday with her ion .rnu daughtera special kind of love for me, He you change it?" id-law. Mr and Mrs. Roy Maioney lived to knew that I had signc i left for Antigua yesterday mornrontrnet with Metro • Goldwyn 'he. >ailie tog by HWl.A., inlranalt to St. Mayer, but not long enough to* fe _,--— *-H W e <-ll .mrselvea KltU and Nevis ace any of my picture.. "I** ?!" ..J„IT W7 ,^ J *" 'nend of his. Leaves on Ihursday Being the dau-nters of show %  l,d ' !" i :np mother as Mis Garland launched into "Jingle Bells dad -nd the top of my voice. After thai, then got a call for a season's work there were three Glun %  • %  knew named %  stead of two H "S ,n c JjlKC Talioc. Wc N Muaic Lesion. .bout going. I NOBODY ever taught i uw thinf*. lam I .-I MitMr. IU am l*t\n ti.%  am HM New*, t IS a.m Marnr M> tiofii nmain. Sit an. II*B Dm* > IS am PTociamma Pa(a4r, II.SS am Liiimn* CtioM*. II** am. mtpmn Irvm Il'ltaln. II im TW Nw II IS P %  >ia. HIS pm. Cto Dwwn. IS pm Uuw fram Un4 H--1 IS • S pjn. PeSi*nry ol UTS Mc ..n Virflh UU n< pm Coi n pOMr •( IM — VIS p.m *IM. Magasine. SSS > I'IHHIIIIIII r-ta4r. S p m N Iterr*e*. — I U p i F-iu*r al SIS Kl, WavaMikfth )I3> n. <• IIS P i" • IBS He wav.la.ia.Ui SO am, S S P %  Profrarmsa Ft*". T IS p in W* Indian Oiici Sighi. !.• nr.,1—m. 1S — S pm 'SS Me aa*eBrm ol 31 IS %  ,.-s pm im Mr wwiisaa n i "' SSm. S P-m. RaUlu S'*""l IU ( m Mi inr Onmaionaealth 1*1 pn. C l un B -arr of th* w#e* • p % % %  Kapoii lro,r. Bnlam. S 13 pjn. IUJ Martin an-1 nOrrnailia. 1" p.m. The News, ISIS ii, rrom IM Bdrtarwila. IS IS o m Kirn .nal <*•. !• pm Genlns rw4' %  or IH FeMlval of Britain. II P" BB1 Stcllttn Oiea#H d^. ,„d t,o h^£v m G^d. SCned %  "•* "Pjhejr _ "% %  •' home on S.iurd., b,B.W 1 A. M retroleum bngincer _ You could rithrr do ll R nd MRS. OEOFFREV T.C.A. Reservation Dept. couidm. n %  .. •< simple u I. I'riE-SMITH arrived from VfISS DORIS TIDY who "ork thai. Bui to-dly 11 somettmos Venezuela yeslerdav im Trinidad i"* m Tf A "s Reaervallon Dedves me the rocky feelinc thai 1 by B W.I.A. to *pend a holiday pertinent in Toronto, arrived from don't know what I'm dome. I'm in Barbados Mr Lucic-Snuth Bermuda on Saturday morrunf by a*"*** u "' how I've done '.ill I u a Petroleum Engineer with the T C.A to spend about live dav* *** ,h nnal picture*— and 1 do Sorony Vacuum OH Co. in Vene. in Barbados. She ll 5tayin at tho ee "I'm '"• %  Seeln, your with an audience glad • dad, and had discovered .he opposite "ex. But Bonea al*' tttok the job. It %  .-" ntful. and I H ith mom Lnvtoi Uk %  inch was H k.-d i< I W had got milei down the moun%  out .i velp— "" •."'" i | bathos wttn routines, and ,,, ft „_ K,HB. I sewed their oa i %  tsying at the Aqustic Club. With Singer Sewing Co. M R. AND MRS. VICTOR WARD, who had been holidaying In Barbados returned tu Trinidad on Sunday by B.W.l.A. Mr. Ward is uith the Singer Sewing Machine Co in Trinidad. Off to England M RS STEPHANIE WARD. snf of Dr. Louis Ward. P M O Christ Church, and their younger sen Robert were among the po-xscngers leaving for Englard yesterday by the C'olomble She will be spending four montns „ In llday with relatives in England. t ~,uD /. Left for Dominican Republic L EAVING for Cludad Trujillo Dominican Republic yentardny mormng bv B.W I A were Mr. and Mrs. Mike Foster POHtteal rihd their three children, Michael ,, n To Form Bolivarian Society M R Jt'LIO ARANGO. Consul With Koyal Bank faetion vou get tn the onh %  i '"* m,r l to od up and said #--_ p .. .v awn •a.m % % %  >•*ai . ". .."^ ..^^r*— .^ IJ ..!_.. — !.••!_ —!% % %  U our headgear in it. We •* %  go back. Sanii 'Din Us' I ran laJ room to get the box Bone* and some %  %  %  around a table Bones asked me .inds. 1 told him mj mother was wgdtUal wtttl the Ding, and anyhow, there %  rent any musicians. One of he £ .lOSS WORD F M 4 %  i %  .IP a i | ''I DSl i i p %  >uld play .ouid I like? i my little piano. What & t way of trying to Panama i n Trinidad and T^f R AND MRS V. MARTIN l0 tell whether you've "sent" just Mr. Albert Pierre. Secretary .,( i.*aV arrived from Grenada over >ourelf or whether you've le: ihe the Bolivarian S cifty in Trinidad the week-end to spend a couple audience in on it arrived ywtcrd.iv bv B.W.I.A.. "1 weeks' holiday with friends In 17. dad sold the theatre i m •> what was requested of me. I from Trinidad on a short visit here-. Mr. Martin is with the Royal Grand Rapids. Minnesota) ant % %  %  twy. Can re guest. „ lhc Aqu.U^Bank of Canada In British Guiana h^ .ygsg tot**** m ch,ef ur pje of aheir vuit u For Po.t Gradu.U Courae - < lh Mo >" •>* %  ;; SlAa, "buV y i &i. urian Society in |-|RHAROLD rORDE. IMS We lived there for nine year,. Mid hen I got bach to 'he car. *-** Birbados Scholar who is now and I wasn't happy any of that 1 cjught a scolding for taking so l Uaoie. or i^ T (.'i.uiiii music. () < %  \ HcftndinsvUn (•) 11 M.> M anotliar arlrl. (S) 13 a arsM •now* up o)a-(sanionso •veapooa ; l ,,J ** %  it Lew BroWn, the song g for fhO gyqfll.** * _M"^, #W u Eaeeutive „,-• he will Hart P l^^^^nd^^ l CoiumbU Pictures, called up badoa werc_Mr. and Mrs Harold take a post graduate course in Theatre They are slaying L\ Medicine' Hotel. Mr Stauble ii Joseph Here for Two Months Zk \f RS SEBASTIAN '. wlfe Sebaatiani. the Stauble of San Fernando. Mrs Stauble is the former dare Faffa They were married in Trinidad on Sunday. Touring W.I. M R. PETER BELBIN. Edu:aMaxwells'. tlonal Manager of Thomas Nelson, of Edinburgh. Publlshe.f arrived here on Sundav afternoon by B.W.l.A. from Jamaica. He is louring ihe Wc;t Im:. | [ %  %  for about live days he is a guest at the Ocean View Hotel For Trinidad Holiday M RS. H. A. BOVELL of "Hill old Cherry, daughter or former Crest". Britton's Hill, left Jamaican Governor, Sir John on Sunday by B W.I.A. for TrinlHuggins and Lady Huggin^ Miller, dud 10 spend six weeks' holiday Cherry is a student at the Royal with her sister-in-law. Academy of Dramatic Art. I think he and mom were as happy as moat couples, but she ,f was part of an era that was hard Town on women. .^ jf and asked my mother to bring 1 to the studio He'd been Bonetj> table with Harry AksT. N'oi Impressed Coun.lllor of Dernerara is to BarM a familv we were ne^-r badoa for two monthsholiday.; bu[ M H vaudcvl „ e afl wc ?. h u .?. ueJt al Manitow-on-Sea, were frequently broke. There was always a manager Vbo ., — couldn't pay us, or a downviRht Among the Debutantes cheat who wouldn't, but m.thrr A MONG debutantes in England never wrote home to dad fm who will be visumg dressmoney, akers in the next few weeks to some people there, but nobody I'd Lew Brown told agent named Al Rosen about and Al towed me all over California. I think I bad an audition at or ItudlO, but ivcrvoiie kept saying. "She isn't any age Shi i-n 1 .. child wonder, and she isn't grown up." weeks, mother tried whal was owed 1 to shut up and stay healthy %  By a process of eliinmttJon •>< arrived at Metro where Jack RobhM bins agreed to hear me and got he-alih, '""" H "W '" OOfOe in. toV healthy W|1C1( h( v ljI(1 ^ ked It was In Chicago, too. at .he "Who > Mr. Mayer?" I guess ihey Oriental Theatre, that We were "< ^f lv 'lropj*d their i c eth billed on the marquee as 'The N , bo ? y "*. a word but he G|um SMmn ., Wp pro^^j IO eouldnt have been mad beci the master of ceremonies. whne l '}* cc ' lil "' r my mother D„ fl---L^ B _L_name was George Jessel, and he Pfoneii rne JU M hool and said • • • • By oeaencomoer ^m bluntly that Gumm waao'i "• t, %  "• ' pm me on the pay roll irchlna to a nice war, (g) aUIT*S sehooioor* room (or e*rruuaa at (0* atari. )•) I'neruned possvaaloD *a pictured lo Dana or Natnaa. iMl mmnli. i> In UiU j-ou are at nocnt. (W| 1*. purely flcutlou*. >4i rive diderenl pain* in w0* bone Uie*ae. ib> To a Mnall advertisement rou'd naae u nymph. tn last. Ift' 17. Kotau <4) 1 get to* auig. %  *, It • [11 my fi (4) _Naarf>K._7, Aiu.nA ^ AQtIATIt' CLtJB UXEMii (Members Onh/J MATINKf TODAY BT at SJS %  sMUil DouSlai "MY OWN TR1 I I Ofl I ilrfU ll.-r.1-.MATIM. WBOMEatDAV I H wansnainAV AT :i.d. riiManr* MarK In -SKAIJID VERDICTarttli ftaatarleh Cl*fl*ea] J-fc Hi A Paranxhinl Pie*— I'LAZA Thealre— Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) cr.*, KAY. ,n "The Inspector Qeneral" aasfl Hie Calat Carla* -air IOB (Af ••< l.i-.i MOILS \rH •I VI •! II i MMI I '•al Wallnev Th.ir..u> I TBS ni'lLTT" Don Ca-lle "BTNAMlTr CAMOV MAT FPIDAV II'. Pa* -OfllK SllnS TBl DFADUKFa,ltri W.iiren DouBla* and i \H i our* TO ciwnSf PLAZA Theatre— O/ST/A/ (DIAL 8404) Uun S Show. TODAY > a. • JO p m. -BKO Bartto. Georav 0 b -RORDFR Ci-MAN" a. "PAINTED nrSKRT" WB1NFADAV A THURSDAY I A a 30 p m iBKO Badwi TLane Ora> "WANDERER OF THE WASTELAND" as "BROTHERS IN THE SADDLE' Jam* u., i ii.. "DYNAMITE CANYON" tAIETY— (THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES \MS\ Show Tonitc 8.30 (Warner's Double) Ed O. Robinson Ar Humphrey Bogart •AMAZING DR. ( LITTEItllOl'SE" A "CEO WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE" Jack Ilerry WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 8 30 p m (Warner's Double) "LARCENY INC." "WINGS FOR THE EAGLE" Ed G. Booiuson & Jane Wymon. Dennis Morgan. Ann Sheridan GLOBE | TODAY 5 and 8.30 LAST SHOWS ABBOTT .an.I COSTELLO In TUK FOR*:IV \ MCGMOX vj TOMORROW and THURSDAY 4.30 and 8 P. ;! THE WHOLE -l RIAL J -FLAMENm FttOXTIEtt" Johnsiy MACK BROWN & y i • f "" %  —> —— — % %  O I 1 HEJ VVAl .... a.aaoy ownconii-w M i d b i un r UNDERSTAND that the ease took the girl, and left the ele* of the old Bailor who pninted phant. with ;. note suving, 'Dear ugn n buvei's ear wax sinned *...~" % % %  % % %  Vbo, e .^ h nni"r hi ,,^ k<,, ;r l ^ %  „^ '-> Sj ^ :!&.JSU%MUX bum> i i *" n Kf^6Laa4l ria S iSfAlSa! w uld 1 \ Cl MoDPl h ve ,ms volubl >' to "orse in a corner. A *n _Councll. the Wlberwick an mal. but we can g.-l m •Ithdealer WhON hal was blown off ung Devclout It. Please see to Its food and by a hard-breathing bit of bloodRegional build some kind of a -shelter for stoek turned and punched a colleague on the jaw The hut was ll .^_ i HI;.. retrieved in momentary darkness Hows by comifrtijiht and placed on the head of a T u . .. woman who had just been kicked HE holding of a bloodstock by her purch sale by candlelight was probably an attempt to ac|l "glamour" Civic Dormitory Pla. >menl Board. :l eolth Bureau, and the "Local It." Decorations Committee will shortly come before Mr. Justice Cocke„t a ,ion. infracbon ^goSge K'"^^"*^ 'tSS T^' mlsapplication, and malinterpre!" ?—^* !" ?. -?*. ">lMy Vof/i/n/r lo ilo wilh mr IMSTninUTION plead rora lation The defence may jusliflciitlor rul prnerts and iwpulo. The intervention Mrs. Hound, who supplied the B Unt through the ag^ncv of a T. rarfogut, is likely t 0 complicate (he ease. The accused has so far confined his remarks to a half-dozen rautical oaths of considerable crudity. • 'Ao wouftj harv thought it? T HE tale of the two elephants who sat down In n Birmingham street reminded me of what nappanad at Pinner recently. An Indian student In love with a Pinner girl brought her an elephant as a token of his admiration. He* father, an ironmonger, round the benst standing in his gufden. When he questioned his MJghter,, she hung her head and blushed. The student was reqimted to remove the elephant But when he next called Ihe girl aald, "Dad reruses to let me have the elephant." So the student A ccount says that when the canfrom Portugal, to policewomen, .**• 80 **. out matcnrs *•* "to give them self-respect." is a struck. There must have been a devilish good Idea. But, for the good deal of fumbling. I hear that n-iment. I forget why. Rupert and the Sketch Book-22 r length drift her eyei. *nd when .h* :-am Mop. in* gti* oui and .l"d wilh Ruptrt. '-joking bewildered al the crowd, iroond ih-m. •' I t ( 3 n'i know wnn*. gomR iO h4pp*T lo ii. or how we're going ro ge; bifk." uy\ iSe l.ttle bnr. Ltt'l in *nd uk |IM >~n•All .h.Hhenr-de So INFANT'S SHOES by Clark In RED, WHITE, TAM from Children's 'Comfort' Shoes A bfoedfirhng flexible, akV'eahSer tace-up shoe o[ exceptional qualify for price '-.o. 47 ir—r*......56o $3 09 In YOUR SHOE STORE from 433 Evans and Whitfields T "TRUFORM" Sandals r,-r. Dial 4606 Dial 4220