antry, St. Michael, was yesterday of Jamaica, bee prineipa: ere pavilion is 20 feet by 12 feet ana EVERY West Indian school. s¢ven months, presented a peace petrated annually in the island.
fined 30/~ in 14 days with an producing colony of the West j)., committee is formed by the P©Y Should know how a combus. ful enough scene today: with: rag. 27; Brewster lett ‘the ‘colony on
alternative of one month’s im- Indies. , e ) Sunday night for South America

. ; : 4 : »jg tenants of Deacons ‘ soe j10n engine or a radio works. ged childre aying i ;
prisonment when the City Police | Dr. Page #9 that She SPovels > after i wee sibetadtchecwe This view was expressed by. Dr. and wennen. Ratan nce
Magistrate Mr. C, L, Walwyn that pebiithed’ on the taoet ails By the end of November last C&Pildeo, We: Indian " phy- ways watching Allied troops and
found him guilty of working a 18 established as the most satis ny ember “last sicist, lecturer in University Col. transports move through to the completed six weeks in the West

where he will continue his six
month study tour. He has already







ney . > anan: ne » Vvear ; Uses g 2e: 0,

donkey in a lame condition, Ee an tense —- I rat ae pes Rony been the lege, London, when addressing a north, Indian Islands and found in most

The donkey was attached to a ah ll eeuatsin is vere suscepti- Bay Estate and cceiatiinieus tor two-day conference in London of But ‘southward the winding of the English occupied regions
bread cart. Although Weekes bie to Panama disease wiih the the removal of others were ia West Indian students, He discuss. stretch of road between Osan and that there was a picture ef pros—
was manning the cart he is not yesuit that the banana production progress, “ed the importance of science in Suwon was a grim sight with perity against a low standard of
the owner of the donkey. It is in Jamatoa has suffered severely. The removal of houses ta the the national development of the corpses of men and women litter. living.
owned by one Alleyne. There are however hoping to Pine wii] have ta Sais ai aS . West Indies and said vocational ing the rice paddies, bata acetic rns iti

Before imposing sentence the breed at the LC.T.A. a banana fave unin sonatas i re and technical training should be Many men's bodies clad in civil- °
Magistrate said, “These are cases which is just as good as gros district . a EARS stepped-up, in order to promote ian dlothes were shod with brand Pays Tribute To \
that I take very serious, Un- michel, but which is immune to This ‘hwivaiation die ae encustelal development in the is. new Ameriean tornbat beets

vaS £iven at jands, :



fortunately. the owner was not the disease. the Housing Board yesterday a t Cee, emPossible to tell whether Lady Baden-Powell

driving the cart. I might have With regard to sugar the object














7 is ; i ‘e the ej. after the clerk read a letter fr, » was str aig : jese were refugees or disguised
imposed a heavier fine.” is not only to improve the effi- the Actina e reads letter sroxn ue ae strongly supported by Communist infiltrators killed as (From “Our Own Correspondent) '
be 5 i ha —e ciency of sugar manufacture, but “cung Financial Secretary, tie students during the Confer. ,.o™ . ms ORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. 26 }
His Honour called Alleyne and : ; rNeque : 7 ; ; ; ? : they attempted to walk through PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan, 26. }
se : Ss43 ¢ to find commercial uses for sugar juesting progress reports to Once diseussions. The opinion was ji beret & 7m” . ae ee
asked him about the condition of 2 . the end aaa : ies : Allied lines, Sir. Hubert Rance, Governor, :
cane by-products, such as sugar Me end of November 1950 on ©Xpressed that in formulating an ; j ; urse sa S=
the enimal. Alleyne’s excuse was came eae inGeasse.. and “in. the woke included in the saniat overall plan for the West Tadies North of Osan now nothing more paid tribute to thé World Chief
that “he preferred to work the sadition to that, to develop tha Estimates 1950—51 which are Plimary consideration should be nies giant heap of ashes and Guide on Wednesday. He said: ’ j
ae peneuane vane a + 2 manufacture of other. useful sub- ar led by the Board, given to the problems relatingite jo posclnog village sepcored to nite a br any Pera yriae that for the quick and sure
stable it would bite at the foot stances from cane sugar itself. erection of houses at both technological and economic de- -., 2° coy Scores of tiny or- has been paid to any Lady I have relief from H. n é
and make the injury worse, Dr. Page said that on March 17, Pine and Bay Estate. ie “ velopments. mnie @e~ phans, playing happily and un. known in my career ‘before,” 5 Th me and Chest Colds, Bronchitis, Coughs, Catarrh,,
HE SHAMROCK OREDIT 1C.7.A. will be having the official commenced. ‘The houses now 2o2 Ot entiedly among heaps of twist- The occasion was a function given pre Throat, Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sciatica, Be
UNION, with headquarters at opening of the two new laborator- ing built will contain two bed After reports of various com- eco nee Of CI troops. in honour ef the Chief Guide at Neuritis, Neuralgia, Toothache, Muscular Pains ;
St. Patricks, Jemmott's Lane con- ies and the celebration of the 25th rooms each. missions on Social Problems ‘in ny six-year-old girl clad the Boy Scouts Headquarters, and Strains, Bruises Scratches, Insect Bites
tinues to render pioneer service anniversary of the granting of the ~ Phe Acting Financial Secretary the West Indies, Agriculture, }" quien pantaloons, skipped Port-of-Spain. ond ether Ach 4 P ; :
in this field in the colony. Not Royal.Charler to the Crown: wrote to tell the Board that 1% “Tansport, Economic “bevelep” happily neat a couple of bodies It was attended by the Goy- other Aches and Pains, there is nothing
enough ig known of co-operatives uxcellency the Governor-in. Ment, Education, etc, had been ae heee want guiged. ke ee ya Chief Scout of the Colony, better than Thermogene Medicated Rub.,
in Barbados and the meeting now t ° » Executive Committee has released Vresented, general discussion (,; meee om Giscar ady Rance, Chie? Guide, the Hon So healing! Soothing! Relieving!
: for eas as ased Ponte : signal wire. — , ‘ &: + Relieving! Try it — you
being held in Trinidad sponsored Local Livestock the unexpended balance of funds Cred around problems of over- a Wier eNet. W. L. Savary, Speaker of the will say it is a real aoa ! « Y y
by the Caribbean Commission will e r 1 i voted for the ereetion of houses, population, federation and indus- ies Legislative Council, His Grace, 8
do’ much to focus attention on the Of High Slant are Will Not Interfere trialisation. the Archbishop of Port-of-Spain,

e ° :
subject, Next Tuesday the Sham- ; ; The Boz if aes : Z A Dr. Finbar Ryan, His Lordship the
rock Union will hold its Annual —Colonial Adviser wth io aoe one ee Bh Sev Sentences Footed thas = elion Against Bishop of Trinidad, the Rt, "het ;
eting when aetivities will be ' “ople ; Ree ate a * creasing productivity is the solu- . J. D, Wilson, Hon, y Josep)
Sete ‘and trash plans laid. Touring the Caribbean area People at the Bay and Pine hous- tion to over-population in the China Delayed Minister die Sithiousicn slater :

looking into all problems connect- '%g schemes. The Board came to West Indies, On the political is- Services, Hon. Albert Gomes




T. LUKE'S CHURCH, Christ ng in jonnect- mg schem ;
a at hes sits harvest ed with live stock production and is decision when two women sues, it was felt that in order to @ From Page 1. inter : . eee
Dea ee oe eee development is Dr. R. J. Simmons, wanted furniture disputes settled. build up a democratic West Indies, Pression of being in a conciliatory Gapuenett Saree wey S08 MEDICATED" RUB
under Capt. C. .E. Raison, ©;B-B., Adviser to the Secretary * he women were of the flood federation should be proceeded ™ood. . , Hamel-Smith, Mayor of Port_of a
w BE will play there at 4. pm of State for the Colonies. area and along with their reputed with, They regarded it as an .| Most responsible diplomats were Spain, the Isle ' 4 “SA ° ates In Jars and Tit
19 ~2).5 aS Before taking up his present ap- husbands had been given furni- economic necessity, inclined to think that the Peking =P“: Cen coe cone sc ‘
SS ee pointment, Dr. Simmons was for ture. The dispute in each case Government would not take too sioner, Major R. J. Morrison, Mrs. A
Bates son ° ene seers in ~ Seon al Ses was about who was the owner of The conference, which was hela St'@ng_an exception to condemna- Gilbert, Colony Guide Commis- — 7 é
Britain Can Provide See oe At sory ommine tie le at the furniture, at Hans Crescent, the new regi. Hoe Provided that there was: a sioner and Mrs.. Murray, Assistant —— 7 — er
Veterinary Servicesin Uganda 4 The Board received a letter from “°Mtial centre for students, demon. veasonable chance of their ob-| Bland Commissionér, ~ ’ ” iss a a





Tas subsequently Director in Nigeria. the Act eR ot ee. oe i, -eieeted. tie anuiaty ; tainin atisfacti "
i eee res Priday (by ing Financial Secretary jn *'Â¥ated the anxiety of the West t 8 satisfaction for some oi ; ae eas
More Ships nw pees Nene on ee * connection with revotes for Draft 1%dian students to help solve the their principal demands, ‘w “a ; > t
a eileen | aS pNP RL a Maye Estimates 1951—52 €apital, problems Which confront _ their Far Eastern experts also poiit- NS PINRORXND iz TOOTH PAS
G. Donald, Chairman of Rownson, . Dr. Simmons told the Advocate _ The General Manager, Flectric me islands, ed out that a complete victory of 3 ' . eo

Drew & Clydesdale, Ltd., sup- yesterday that he has visited Company, told the Board that the They look forward to the es- Chinese arms in Korea would in

" ad +43 Sain oe ‘rinidad ¢ estimated cost for installing gy tablishment of their , t Many respects | é ]
for better ser- British Guiana, and Trinidad and ; _ to stalling M € o Cir oWn West ; pects be a hollow one J
nae eee will be leaving here on Monday lights for sections at the Bay Indian Students’ Centre in Lon. They believed that Peking wat I it 1B ie is
vRonen for Dominica after which he will Estate would be $2,400. He in- don. The new President, Mr, l€ss concerned with conquering ' . f A ae a





























Causing Hardship " t Visit the rest of the islands, fin- formed the Board that the Com- Rawle Farley, told me that when Korea than with obtaining For-
Says Mr, Barton: “The present joning up with Jamaica. pany would undertake to stand this Centre is ready for use the MOsa and United Nations member.
lack of passenger shipping be- “hy.” has already inspected the half of that sum. work of the Union would be Ship.
tween this country and the British stock at the Agricultural Stations The Secretary was given in- greatly facilitated, /
West Indies is causing hardship jy Barbados and has also seen a structions to interview the mana- Complete breakdown in the
and financial loss to West Indians, selection of stock kept by the per, During the past year, it is re- Peace negotiations at this stage,

hitting the tourist trade and put- sugar estates. He was impressed Mr. F. C. Hutson, M.Inst.M.B, ported, the prestige o{ the Union these _ experts thought, would
iting difficulties in the way of py the excellent condition of the M.L.C., was welcomed by the has been greatly enhanced, Cam. leave China with a war devastated
commercial development ., . What stock on the whole. eats Chairman of the Housing Board, bridge University invited repre- Country on her hands, and the
is suspected is that the British He said however, dag would Mr. G, H. Adams, when he at- rentatives of the Union to dis. Prospect of a long drawn-out con-
Government is content to let con- be as well to remember that al- (0) Gaq’ the Board yesterday for cuss some of the problems of the flict with the United Nations.



; ose re ad high ; ‘ . ; ' Thi ‘ A
nections between the,UK and the thousth. hese ere Me eet 2 e the first time as a_representative West Indies. The Union also main- This week's diplomatic man-
Eastern group of the BWI be ane What might be termed ‘high Of the Legislative Council, tains friendly relations with the C@uvring with proposals and
catered for by foreign lines and Mr. H. A. Tudor’and Mr. E, D, West African Students’ Union, Dr, Counter proposals from all sides

: 4 slass conditions, the peasant far- N rl =
as nerrnredy, tO Jace tip to any Eaton tee other hand could not Mottley, M.C,P., two last yeat T. O. Elias, a West African lee. have thus left many delegates here For white teeth, use the PEROXIDE

substantial contribution to ensure ! i andar representatives of the St, Michael turer at London University, re- With a greater optimism = aan
“nr a afford such a high standard of I es e St. iversity, re Pp . ‘ ‘ ri aa acle: ery
that British citizens can get to management, and Thetelate should Vestry on the Board were reap~ vently addressed the Union on tooth paste—use Macleans every day.
British Colonies on British ships.” }6 content with a lower grade and pointed by the Vestry as their some historical aspects of Africa,
Outlook Disheartening therefore hardier animal. representatives again this year,

There was a growing body of
opinion which believed that if’ the
: * : a8 , A Committee was appointed to - United Nations refused any “ap-
Says Mr, Palmer: “Our experi- ~ He considers that it is possible make recommendations about 79 r peasement,” Peking would realise
ence is that shipping accommoda- that an increased percentage of playing fields and other open J cans Plan Tour Of that it could not impose its terms
tion available to the Eastern Zebu blood might give this re- Spaces at the Bay Estate. The and would actept “honourable

Caribbean, while covering existing quired hardiness. The chief prob- Committee is: Hon. F. C. Hutson, T’dad For Carnival peace terms,











staff movements, does not provide = ee oe a Dee 4 M.Inst., M.E., MLC. E, D. —Reuter.
for (1) new staff (2) business deiknee Geconiechad food. He Mottley, M C.P., Mr. John (From Our Own Correspondent)

people or (3) round-trippers ... derstands that these matters are Beckles, M.B.E., T. E. Went,

If it were not forthe six-weekly aie aoe tea ates s the attention of M.B.E,, Colonial Engincer, Miss KINGSTON, Jam., Jan. ° ° 1°
sailings of the Golfito and the the Ausinucal Desartrenk. Betty Arne, Social Welfare Officer _ Leading travel agents in Jamaica First Indian Film
four-weekly services of the He thought it necessary to reit- and Mr. T, O, Lashley, Secretary have planned a Carnival Week

Booker line from Liverpool to crate the old warning that “one of the Board. ° yee

ac of Trinidad for On Local Sereen

Complete-all—expense
; are offered to take in all the
Carnival attractions from Febru-

Demerarag we should be in @ cannot get more out of a cow than This Committee will also visit
‘worse fix than We are. As it is, one puts in”, a thing which few and report on the question of im-
the outlook is very disheartening small farmers ever appreciate proving the open area above the



Local film history will be made
at the Royal Theatre next Thurs-





indeed, and there seems to be no fully Bay Mansion ary 1 to February 6, the asphalt day evening when a pi i
i , y. . 3 § nthe an ft Dine “Salter a) en a pict with
immediate prospect of improve- In Barbados, as in the rest of Re Ua pr send City tour of Port-of-Spain, dialogue int the Radian Wainer
ment.” ;| the Caribbean, the standard of M 2100 cs fey san per formances, dances will be shown. Name of the pic-
Fortnightly Service “pnanagement of the smaller farmer yp wag inadvertently stated in Friday's oP di, ade attractions, ture is Bodhai—Two Brothers—
: is, on the whole, deplorably low {seve that the motor car M-1200 was in- nidag-Jamaican footballer and the show begins at 4.45 p.m.

Says Mr. Donald: “What right and the man who wishes to make volved in an 35 sy gk ey ype age lg te Ba, it pag MeLean So ncustiig the "The pierce is baged on @ romantic
) a profit out of his cow or out of his 9. Michael about 12.05 p.m. on Thurs tour on ehalf of the travel agents story, with a background of exotic
then deny them proper transport herd, must learn the necessity for ““Phe number of the car in the accident sil dd ae Re a oriental music and scenery. It
facilities? Surely the first duty of a steady improvement in the ae was wi 0 Srey a eiintt winedon, neighbour ihavemeater, 7s ~ has already been shown in India
the Ministry of Transport Is to en- , © al management of farm stock. St. George and driven by EI Simpson, = and Trinidad among ather —
sure direct and regular mail, pas-
—— and cargo services to every .
colony. he merchant venturers TO
regarded transport costs and THE KEY
trade as one; later, when trans-
port was segregated, a profit was |
expected from both. A country
can well afford a loss on transport,
provided it makes up the loss by
trade, The proposal made by me
for the scheduled and regular use
of 25. per cent of the British re-
frigerated ships regularly passing
through the Panama Canal, if
adopted, would supply the ships
now. TIT advocate this step as an
interim arrangement pending the
building of special refrigerated
ships to provide a fortnightly
rvice to both the Eastern and
Western Caribbean C

have we to own these Colonies and







The sooner you take Phensic the

you'll feel better, for Phensic’s quickigake
action will bring relief, lift away pain-caused
fatigue, and remove Weariness in a matter of
minutes. Phensic neither harms the heart,
nor upsets the stomach. Be prepared for
pain — keep a supply of Phensic handy.

Phensic

Cc.
for quick, safe relief
FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,





CANE JUICE
OR MAUBY

Cane juice is ba
ane juic iS becoming a fave
©urite drink with labx

'





| 7 on the
Wharf side. Yesterda man help-
ed by an assis een work-

ing hard pri



ing di the cane, the
juice of which { ping into

a bucket at the bx f the cart.

ee ae ee MI Wel" ~ ESSO STANDARD







waiting his turn to get a tot of
cane juice With a bit ( ice in it. ’ $ DS
TES ott Saratent Saale R. M. JONES & CO. LTD, — ‘Agents OIL NERVE PAINS ’ NEURALGIA, FLU, COL & CHILLS.




noticed, j
——— err eines * rameter tenement mini vssnilnicdiaRSOSIIS.





SUNDAY,
HENRY







JANUARY 28,

1951

ITHINK THAT TZIG-TZAG
FLY DID BITE ME! WHAT 7
Ow 7

RAFTON, DID YOU
NEER SAID
BLE MAN”?

—~ G
HEAR WHAT THE ENGI
ROU!

I'M SICK AND TIRED
OF THE NEIGHBOSS
CALLING ON US
JUST BECAUSE WE
HAVE A TELEVISION

Na na ci iti

IN THE BANKS
VAULT.

alabincer

tt



DON'T WORRY-
'M GONNA

| PUT A STOP TO

THEM COMIN!
IN I

THEY ALL
STAY HOME
AN! SIT IN
FRONT OF

THE
TELEVISION!

[Sav GOOD-BYE TO ALL
FRIENDS...-THAT'S ALL!

HE'S JUST A RAILROAD POLICE-
MAN. | KNOW ABOUT HIM
READY FOR HIM. | KNOW JUST WHERE] | THERE FOR ME. I'M GOING AFTER

AND I'M

gy TO FIND HIM/
ak

I HOPE THIS PROP
I HAD MADE WILL
FIT RIGHT OVER
THE ANTENNA~

LOOT TO THE HIDEOUT AND WAIT
THAT’ TROUBLE MAN”!











wow! I ALMOST

| FORGOT-I MUST
) GIT HOME / THAT
WESTERN GOES
ON IN FIFTEEN
MINLITES //



JUST AN
INTERESTED
PRIVATE PARTY.










I HAVEN'T




HE PUT MY GUN IN HiS COAT
POCKET #ILL GET IN ONE QUICK
PUNCH* THEN SHOOT HIM i





THERE !S NO CURE FOR THE TZIG-TZAG
FLY |! YOU HAVE ONLY -
A FEW DAYS

|| De b , &

p! |} 2 Lay
S '
Ce ae gi LET'S CALL ON ||

ft | THE ZEKLEYS-
) o —~ | THEY GOT ONE! ||
PL eet A
: See ape - {
\ fc y
5
\ 1



a rn

iY Wenaye

Wd DID THE RUSTLERS NaS
| A MINUTE GIT THE HERD OVER | > II Oo

“T] To rose! THE BORDER AT —/ | NOT fa

' MIDNIGHT ? J SHUT

SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN











BY CARL ANDERSON





















{ a
|
|
| BRANDRAM-HENDERSON PAINTS



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Sunflex distemper in all shades;
also Beaver Brand paints, a full
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All classes of Insurance transacted, including —

FIRE, MOTOR, WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION,
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AND GOLFERS’.

For information and rates, apply to

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—aAGENTs

A. BARNES & CO., LTD.





oe elie? 3

BY FRANK STRI

(T'S THE"TROUBLE MAN’ QUESTIONING THE
TELEGRAPH OPERATOR, JUST AS |
THOUGHT! phen





B. E.N.
AIR COMPRESSORS

IN STOCK
Ft./Min Portable
Ft./Min Stationary
Ft./Min Stationary
Ft./Min Stationary

Cu.
Cu.
Cu.
Cu.









|





| yveT/
oni UuPy/

hoe

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED

Tweedside Road St. Michael
Phone 4629 & 4371








OOOO MAOH LEE EE pt otetet tot, ytstet, PLEA ELLE EE SAT TTE eer
% awit 7 — a 3
BY ALEX RAYMOND x iy $
fs % # 46 in y 4 me) »
. i 8
$ g
3 %
% %
- x
~ %
3 %
x $
‘ 2
% $
% x
s 2
= 3
- ~
x =
¢ x
» x
.
>
.
me , 2 . A z m
oe ene oe wha ” ert ~
e $
‘ ; ALE :
JOE TRIES HIS QUICK PUNCH = =~ FOR AK x
BUT THE PHANTOMS IRON HAND x
MOVES LIKE LIGHTNING ( Pe a K
a x

g “Mianzanilla” ‘
§ ST. JAMES S

% . S
x (Next to Colony Club) g
g 140’ Beach Frontage :
% Perfect Bathing g
1% ONLY NEW HOUSE FOR SALE ON THIS, COAST =
| % ALL MAIN SERVICES 8
3 View by Appointment Only—TELE: 9172 >
1g PRICE with ONE ACRE €16,500 with 2} ACRES £18,500 FREEHOLD <
36000e00e: (AEP QAP APOLLO EAI ALL LLLP OMA LLL LALLA LLCO OOOO OOOO neee





te.

PAGE TWELVE



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508



DIED
CRAWFORD MAREA. Her funeral
will leave her late residence Lower
Gili’s Road at 4.30 o'clock this evening
for the Westbury Cemetery. Friends are
invited

Lawrence Crawford, Wilfred Worrell.
28.1.51—1n

THANKS
EDOGHILL The Edghill family beg
Through this medium to return thanks
to all those kind friends who sent
wreaths, letters of condolence, or in
any way expressed their sympathy in

our recent bereavement
28.1.51.—1n.
POLLARD—The undermentioned grate-

fully acknowledge with deepest appre-
tiation the many and various expres-
sions of sympathy tendered them in the
loss of their mother Mary Eliza L. Pol-
Jard, Jate of Codrington Hill, St. Mi-
chael
Hesketh Pollard, Muriel Pollard.
28.1.51.—In
The Gibson family beg to return thanks
te those who attended the funeral of
their devoted mother and grandmother,
Ethel Gibson, sent cards, wreaths, letters

or in any other way sympathised with
them.
28,1,51---1n.



IN MEMORIAM
EDGHILA—In constant memory of our
beloved father JOSEPH McDONALD
EDGHILL. Who was called to eternal
rest one year ago.
“We cannot Lord Thy purpose see
But all is well, what is done by thee,”
Whitfield & Mildred Edghill = grand-
children 1.61.—1n,
GREENIDGE In loving memory of

our dear mother ELVIRA GREENIDGE
who was called to rest on the 23rd of



Januany 1950,

How often we tread the path

That lends us to her grave,

Where lies the one we love so well,

But whom we could not save.

At night when all is silent

And sleep forsakes our eyes,

Our thoughts are on the lonely grave,

Where our dear mother lies.

Ever to be remembered by Mr. Sey-
mour Greenidge (son), Mrs. Edith Lovell,
Mrs. Marie Trotman (U.S.A.), Mrs.
liene Jackman, Mrs. Ruth Willoughby.
(daughters;, and her fifteen grand child-
ren, 28.1.51—1n.



FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR — Hillman 10° H. P, ii in n good work-
ing Order. Apply to B. A Belgrave,
Belgrave's Garage, Hindsbury Rd Phone
5253. 28.1,51—I1n.

CAR — Ford 1948 six cylinder De
Luxe Sedan, low mileage and in good
mechanical condition, Chas. Mc Ernear-
ney & Co., Ltd. 24.1.51—4n

CAR — X 86. Dodge 5 Passenger in
A 1 condition and licensed till June.

















Contact Leon Alleyne at Fort Royal
Garage about sale of car. Mrs, A. M,
Arthur, Yorkshire.

26,1.51—3n,

CAR — Ford 10 h.p. in good working
order.. Apply Miss L, Clarke, “Ivy
Lodge", The Ivy. Dial 2575,

26.1.51—3n,

CAR—Citroen 15 H.P, 1950 model in
excellent — condition, Owner _ leaving
island. Apply: B'dos Agencies Ltd.
Dial 4908, Evelyn. 21,1,51—Tn









CAR — One 5 passenger Sedan Terro-
plane recently overhauled and in perfect
working order price $400, Ring 91-24,
Lighthouse, St, Lucy. 27,1.51—T7n,
—_——————

2 Morris Cowley Pick-ups, 1 Morris
Cowley Van and 1 10 h.p. Utilivan. Used
only 8 weeks with less than 2500 miles.







At considerable reduction. A chance

not to be missed. FORT ROYAL
GARAGE LTD. Telephone 4604.

20.1.51—4n

enemies

PICK-UP — One Second hand Fotd

V-8 Pick-up in A. 1 condition. Just

overhaul, (Past inspection) 2 days ago,

New Tyres. C, Bannister, Station Hill,

St. James. 26,1.51—4n.



ELECTRICAL

—<<<—$

RADIO—One (1) Eddystone model $.504
Radio in excellent condition. No reason-
able offer refused. For further par-
teulars phone 8641, before 9.00 a.m. and
after 4.00 p.m. 21.1,51—4n.

—_——
RADIOS — Several New Pilot Radios,
Battery and Electric at Special reduced
prices at Ralph Beard’s Show Rooms,
Hardwood Alley, Phone 4683,
26,.1.51—3n.
REFRIGERATOR — 6 cub, ft, Ameri-
can Gibson 3 years guarantee, left in
Ralph Beara’s Show Rooms, Hardwood
Alley. 26.1,51—5n.

LIVEs10CK

COW — One registered Guernsey cow
by Mt. Hope Vigour An Exhibition Ist.
Prize Winner She gave (32) Pints Milk
with 2nd Calf To calve 26th January,
1951. Apply to V. W. Clarke, Ivy
Lodge, Ivy Road, St. M. 26.1.51—3n.

CALF — One (1) Graded Guernsey
heifer calf, ten days old. (Sire) of
Mother Mount Hope Vigar. A, Williams,
Rose Cottage, St. George.

27.1.51—2n.





POULTRY

—_—
POULTRY — Fowls, ducks sna tur-
keys. Tel. 3904. 1,51—-2n,

7 MECHANICAL

FS
DIESEL ENGINE — 7 horse power
vertical, shop soiled, never been used
$700.00. For inspection call at Ralph

Beard’s show room Hardwood Alley,
27.1.51—3n,
—_————
ENGINE — assisted cycles complete
Price $155.00 including Bicycle at Ralph
Beard's Show Room, Hardwood Alley.



Phone 4683. 26,1,51—3n.
MACHINE—One 11) Spray Painting
Machine. In Good condition. Price $25.00.
Phone 4910. STANWAY STORE, Lucas
st 28.1.51.—1n,
MISCELLANEOUS
ANTI ofS — Of every a
gem. ina, old Jewels. fine

San et en tique shop

3 c. @

adjoining Royal Yacht Club:
3.9,00—t.2.n,



AGRICULTURAL FORKS — A small

Dial 4222
(or 4843 Branch Store) G. W. Hutehingon

Guantity available. $4.70 each,

» Co. Ltd. 26.1.51—4n,
BARBED WIRE — 650 feet of used

Pi oo in 5 lengths. Good condition. Tel.
70

sv.

BALL POINT PENS — Colours “Rea
and Green — Excellent value 3/- cost,
You must get one — Knight's Drug
Stores — 27.1,51—2n,
BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in

White, Green, Primrose with matching

units to complete colour suites, Top

grade, A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.
26.1.51—t.£.n.

CIGARETTES Ardath
20's. Now 33 cts. 333 — 20's Now 33 cts.
usually 37 cts. All in good condition ~
Too. many in stock — Knight's Drug
Stores. 27.1,51—2n,



-WtehjGerms

~ Killed in 7 Minutes
























FOR RENT
HOUSES







ALEXANDER, Worthing, from the
Maret Apply Mrs. Marion Gibbs,
Guerite, Hastings. Dial 4568.

281.51

Ist
“La



~2n.

“ANNBURY” — House with shop at-



tached. Three bedrooms. Electric light
and water, Black Rock, near Wavell
Avenue. Apply W. A. Bibby, River
Road

28.1.51,—I1n,
aap apitigipeniatinpaeee
CHADEN, — Marine Gardens ‘consis-

ting of 3 bedrooms all with running
water, reception rooms and all modern
conveniences. For appointment Ne =

24.1,51—5n.

ESPERANZA—Fully furnished,
modern conveniences. On St.
Sea Coast. Phone 91-33.



with
James

10.1,51—8n.

FURNI6HED HOUSE —In Hastings.
On Sea-side, Full particulars Telephone
3904. 28.1.51—1n.



FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast. Furnish-

3 bedrooms, Water-mill = suppiy,
Lighting Plant. Double carport, 2 servant
rooms. From Februany Ist. Dial 4476.









" FLAT—At Sea View, Upper v
oprosite Bay Mansion also Basement.
Apply on premises. 21.1,51—t.f.n.

TRINITY COTTAGE—St. James Coast.
Fully furnished containing 3 bedrooms,
also a telephone. Available for months of
February to May and August to Decem-
ber 1951. Phone 2959. 21,1.51—-2n

NEWHAVEN, Crane Coast. Furnished;
4 bedrooms, Water-mili supply, Lighting
Plant, Double Garage, servant rooms,







For April. Dial 4476. 28.1.51,—t.f.n.
WYNDAL, ~— Three bedroom house
with every convenience, on Rockley

main road. Garage, two servant rooms,
servant's toilet and bath. For reat un-
furnished, or for sale. Available from
March ist. Dial 4476, 26.1.01—t.f.n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

“£25° -. -d. easily earned by obtaining

order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi-
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making







opportunity. Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
England.”

25.1.51—18n

NOTICE
THE PARISH OF ST, ANDREW

Tenders are invited for a loan of
£1,000 at a rate of interest not to ex-
ceed 4% per Annum under the St. An-
drew Parish Church Loan Act. And
will be received by the undersigned up
to February 3rd 1951.

Signed C. A, SKINNER,
Vestry Clerk,
St. Andrew,
24,1.51—6n.

OLD HARRISONIAN SOCIETY
There will be an open day at Harri-
son College for ail old boys on Wednes-
day February 7th.

Old Boys’ Cricket match 12,30
Tea 3.15 to 4.15

Cocktails 5.30 to 7 p.m.

All Old Harrisonians who will

attending are asked to notify
retaty by February 2nd. Subscription

$1.00,
8. O. C. GITTENS,
Hon. Secretary,
23.1,51-—-2n.



be
the sec-



NOTICE
PARISH OF CHRIST

Sealed Tenders, (marked on_ the
envelope “Tender for Loan"), will be
received at my office up to 3.00 p.m, on
Monday 29th January, 1951, for the loan
of £1,950 to the parish, at a rate of
interest not exceeding 4%, to be repaid
in fifteen equal instalments of £13)
each ae in the month of

WOOD GODDARD,
Clerk of the Vestry,
Christ Church.
18,1, 51—5n.

CHURCH



For Sale—Cont'd



MISCELLANEOUS

CUPS & SAUCERS — Breakfast size
(large). Cups and Saucers at 58 cents,
Tea Cups and Saucers at 35 cents. G.
W. Hutchinson & Co. Ltd.







Cc) HANG GERS—Wooden Clothes
han from 8 cents each up. Also col-
ul Plastic Ladies’ Hangers at 43
cents each. G. W, HUTCHINSON &
Co, Ltd. 26.1.51—4n.
CARD CASE. One Lady's Silver Card
Case. Wm. D. Richards & Son, Me

Gregor Street. 28.1.51.—1n,
-

DIVING MASKS — 10/- each obtain-
able in the Toy Dept, at Cave Shepherd
& Co, Ltd. 28,1,51—t.f.n.

Paterna hchreetinresoehersnieienimsiesigntintapsteaethasees
DIAMOND RING — Solitaire diamond
in claw setting at an attractive price.
Wm, ‘D. Richards & Son, Me Gregor St.
-1.51—2n

DIVING GOGGLES — Get one of these
and see the wonders of the sea
Knight's Drug Stores, 27,1.51—2n,

LADIES SPORT COATS — For coo!
evenings. Fawn, beige, wine and black







i



23,1.51—6n,

PLASTIC Parasols, Raincoats, Shower
caps, Aprons, Table Cloths, Babies’ Pan-
ties. Modern Dress Shoppe.

23.1.51—6n

RIBBONS, Feathers, Flowers,
Buttons, Laces & Edges in a large vari-
ety at reasonable prices, Modern Dress
Shoppe. 23.1,51—6n,

PIANO—Upright made by John Brins-
mead & Sons (makers for Royalty) in
excellent condition at Ralph Beard's Show
Room, Hardwood Alley, Chee or: 2

i —3n.

SKIRTS, BLOUSES, SHORTS, — In 9
large variety. §3.98 ‘to saaeat Moderr.
Dress Shoppe. 23.1.51-—6n,

—

CELLAR-—Silver Salt Cellar, One pa pair
silver salt cellars shell pattern, Wm, D.
Richards & Son., Mc Gregor ba “

— 51 gauge, Fine Nylon

a







Stockings. $2.14 Ladies and children
Ankle Socks, 36 to 48 cents, ern
Dress Shoppe. 1.51—6n.



SWEET BISCUITS.—A fresh shipment
in Presentation Tins by Crawford.
Oblong Assorted Cream, Oblong Club
Cheese Straws, Square Club
Cabinet Cream’ Crackers, Special “Ufil-
lit’ Round, Almond Shortbread, Fam: ay
Drums Sweet Assorted, Jollity Assort
Assorted Cream, Also a variety of Flav-
ours in ‘2 lb. Packages.JOHN D. TAY-
LOR & SONS LTD., Roebuck Street.

28.1.51.—2n,





Available at Imperial
(over Bata Shoe Store,
Lower Broad Street) Sunshades, Bino-
culars, Barometers, Microscopes, Hand-
readers, and all Optical requisits, Phone
4075. 24.1,51—t.f.n.



WATER PUMP — 4% inch_ suction
20,000 galls. an hour complete with shaft-

Annual General

MAY UNITE

DAMASCUS, Jan. 27,

The Syrian Government has
realised the text of the resolu-
tion submitted to the Arab

League Political Committee call-
ing for seven members of the
League to unite in one solid bloc.
The resolution strongly urged
in the first place that the Arab
League be replaced by the
United Arab State.
Alternatively it suggested fed-
eration which would make the
countries one sovereign power,
but leave them independent in
their internal affairs, or confed-
eration which would be a per-
manent union of the countries for
common external purposes.
—Reuter

Weymouth Club

MEMBERS are hereby reminded of the
Meeting to be held at

the Hurd Memorial, James Street on
Monday Night 29th January, 1951, at
7.30 p.m. 28.1.51.—1n



notify their Customers



























































Removal Notice

ROGERS BARBER SALOON Beg to
that they will
be moving upstairs J. N. Goddards &
fons Building (Next Door) as from
the 28th January 1951.

24.1.51—5n,

PURLIC SALES
___ AUCTION

TUESDAY, 30th ‘at 12 neon
BION LODGE, Barbarees Hill. Garage
13 ft x 18 ft. covered with Aluminum
Sheets. Good Wallaba Posts uprights also
SERVANT'S ROOM 12 ft. x 8 ft. partly
covered with G, I. Terms Cash, To be
removed, Dial 2947, R. Archer McKenzie
Auctioneer, 26.1 S1—4n,







at AL-

Under The Sterling Hammer

By kind permission I will sell on Tues-



Way 30th, at the Avillon Sports Club,
Orange Street, Speightstown, 1 piano (by
Storey & Clarke}, 1 Radio, 1 Gramo-

phone, Singer Hand Machine, Gents and

Ladies Bicycles, Tables, Chairs, Larders,
Coal Stove, Couch, and many other iiem
of interest. Sale 12.30. Terms CASH

VAN ROLAND EDWARDS,
Auctioneer
28.1.51.—2n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON Tuesday 30th by order of Dr. Kle-
van, we will sell his Furniture
“Brigade House” Garrison

which includes

Dining Table, Upright Chairs, China
Cebinet, Ornament Tables, Electric
Floor Lamps, Very nice Bridge Table
and 4 Arm Chairs with Rush Seats,
Plant Stands all in Mahogany: Very
Good Poker Table, Piano by Ackerman
Lowe, Pye Radio; Singer Treadie Ma-
chine (new) Glass and China, Fruit
Salad and Wine Sets, Breakfast Service,
6 Very Comfortable Uphold. Arm Chairs
Cedar and Pine Book Shelves, Carpet
(new), Mission Clock; Single Mahog.
Bedsteads, Vono Springs and Mattress
es; Cedar and Mahog: Linen Presses,
Sewing Tables; Cradle, Children's Pres
es, High Chair, Baby's Basinette, Very
Good Pram and Go-Cart: 2 good Gas
Rangers with 2 Hot Plates each (Ameri-
can) Electric Roaster, Dormever Mix
Master with meat Grinder and Juicer;
Elec, Hot Plate and Irons. all in per-
fect condition; 10 gal. Demijohn (Ele
trified) Kitchen Tables, Kitchen Uten-
sile, Garden Tools, Lady's Bicycle,
Lawn Mower, Galy. Tubs and Buckets
Swing and many other items.

Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms Cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,













Auctioneers.
27.1.51—2n.

REAL ESTATE
BUNGALOW Newly constructed
concrete Bungalow at Enterprise Road,
Christ Church. Modern new furniture
Phone 3535, _ 28,1.51.—3n.

FOR KENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din-
ing room, Breakfast room. and Kitchen-
ette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
Toilet and Bath, DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone,
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas Dial 2221. 21,1.51,—6n.

THEN C ME AND U
SEE BARGAINS AT YOUR
BECK! Imagine a Bungalow Type in
Belleville, 3 Spacious Bedrooms with
Basins, Excellent Condition, Well Laid
Out, Going for Under £1,900; A

Bedroom (2 Large, one with Basin)
at Thornbury Hill, Very Good Condi-
tion, Modern Convesiences, Spacious
Yard enclosed with Stone, Vacant,
Going for under £900; A & Bedroom
Cottage by Lower Bank Hall Main Ra.,
Modern Conveniences, oe Yard,
Going for Under £1,200;
room Stonewall Bungalow not far from
Rockley, Modern Conveniences, Going

Stonewall) Near City, Good Location

Residence (Stonewall),
Going for Under £2,500 and £3,000.
Is IT YOUR DESIRE — YES — A
CINCH? — A Furnished Unique and
Artistic Super De Luxe Seaside Stone-

Very Busy Area,

wall Bungalow, Almost New, Wide
Sandy Beach, Fine Bathing, ~Trees,
Exclusive Area at St. J ames, over

Ye Acre, Going Indeed Reasonable,
Building Sites — Seaside and Elsewhere.
Re-Sale Values Assured. Mortgages
Arranged. I am He!
Auctioneer and Yes How Wise it is tc
let Me Sell Your Household, Furniture,
Etc,, at Auction. Finger 3111. D. F.
de Abreu for Nearly Anything in Rea)
Estate, If I CAN'T, WHO WILL?
Kindly Call at Olive Bough, Hastings?
er â„¢

CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS
We will set up for sale by Public
Competition at our Office James Street,
on Friday 2nd February 1951, at 2 p.m.
CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS
situate in St. Lucy and containing by
estimation 82 acres 3 roods 23 perches
of which about 48 acres are arabie.
The acreage is made up as follows:
25% acres ist crop canes ready for
reaping.
14 acres young canes,
34 acres sour grass.
® acres 23 perches in preparation,
roads, yards etc
Inspection on application to Mr.
Ormond Knight on the premises.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.





HOUSE SPOTS — 80 ft. x 100 ft. at
Amity Lodge, Christ Church, 5 minutes
walk Golf Club, Water, well laid out
roads, electricity, Apply Norman Alleyne
Dial #164, 24.1.51—3n,



3 bedrooms, two
baths. Overlooking’ Sea, own private
bathing beach. Good Yacht Anchora
Phone 91-50. 16.11,50—t.





LAND-—Six acres one rood and twenty-
five perches of land at Sea View, St
Philip, including two acres of pasture
Apply : Mrs. Marion Holder, Drakes, nr
Grand View, St. Philip. 28.1.61,—1n.

WESTCLIFFE — Navy Gardens, stand-
ing on eleven thousand square feet of
land. Built of Stone, Three bedrooms
and all modern conveniences. Also large
play room 30 by 14 feet. For particu-
lars and appointment, Phone Winston
Johnson at 4311, 26.1.51—6n.

MARSHVILLE Bank Hall main road
standing on 5,445 square feet of land.







Dwelling house comprises closed ver-
andah, drawing and dining rooms,
three bedrooms, breakfast room toilet

A New 2 Bed- | ~~~

for Under £1,700; A Two-Storey (Part | Erglish Schoolteacher.

A Trained | and the *

18.1.51—6n, |Panies whether

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





U.S. Assume
New Slogan

WASHINGTON

A new slogan—‘“strength fa
the free worid—from the United
States of America’—will in fu-
ture appear on American financed

Jan, 27



shipments to, Burope and south-
east Asia.

It will replace the previous
slogan: “For European recovery

supplied by “the United States of
America”

William C. Foster, Administra-

tor of E.C.A., announcing this
to-day, said the Marshall Plan
coneept of self-help and mutual

aid would be carried, forward in
the new programme for the con-
tinued building up of the eco-
nomic strength of free nations to
help them defend themselves
against aggression from without
and from within.
—Reuter

DETERMINATION
WELLINGTON,

Because none of her family
would teach her to drive a car @
sixty-four-year-—old woman of
Mount Albert, Auckland, went te
the chief instructor of the Auck-
Jand Aero Club and asked for a
trial lesson. She got it and will
go hack for more,

NOT QUITE



NEW YORK,
The fattest man in Americ.
measured 6ft. 8in., around the

middle and was 5ft. 8in., tall, But
he just missed his lifelong ambition

to weigh 50 stone. He died this
week and his weight was only
48-stone,

FEUD
LISBON,

Two tribes of gypsies engaged
in a blood fued cleared the streets
and stopped all traffic for tweive
hours in the town of Olhao, The
Police finally broke up the fights
raging all over the town, which
had caused cinemas, theatres and
restaurants to close down, The
feud started fifty years ago wnen
a boy from one tribe slapped the
face of a girl from the other,

SENTENCE

MILAN,

Three ex-Partisans, accused of
killing 16 handcuffed Italians near
Modena in May, 1945; today heard
the State Prosecutor accuse them
of machine-gunning the victims
without giving them time to make
the sign of the Cross. He asked for
30 years’ imprisonment for each,





WANTED

HELP
SUB AGENT WANTED, Resident
Bridgetown, well connected with com-
meree, to seli accredited British goods
on commission, State age, experience,

references, Post box 532, Trinidad.
26.1.51-—3n,





Vacancies ex in Design Department
of a West Indian Petroleum Refinery
for Trained Draughtsmen, capable of
design and detail work on civil, mechani-
cal, and chemical engineering projects.
Applicants must have the British
Higher National Certificate or its U.S. or
Canadian equivalent and should be
prepared to give proof of technical abil-
ity by interview or examination.

Applications, giving full details and
experience, accompanied by a _ recent
passport photograph, should be address-
ed to Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd., P.O.











Box 103, Bridgetown. 23.1.51—6n.
WE BUY FOR CASH — Clocks, watches
and musical boxes in any condition.

Write, call or dial 4429.GORRINGES An-
tique shop, Upper Bay Street.
25,1.51—7n.

__
WE BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and



Silver jewellery, coins, dentures, ete.
write, call or Dial 4429, GORRINGES
Antique shop, adjoining Royal Yacht
Club. 25.1.51—Tn.

2 ieersiceericantenenarasteesiesipheanshithineasnytaanieresamhanetaaareei

GORRINGES undertake expert watch
and clock repairs, cl ing and resto-
ration of oil paintings, valuations for in-
surance and probate, GORRINGES,
upper Bay St. 25.1.51—7n.





SPANISH AND ENGLISH STUDENTS
PRIVATELY COACHED by fully qualitied
Spanish speaking

students taught English by quick and

and Condition, Suitable also as aj easy method. Preparatory and School
Guest House, Large Yard, Going for] Certificate standard, Backward students
Under £1,900; Three City Business &| speciality, Commercial courses also,

including Commercial English, Spanish
and Commercial Geography. General
office routine given. "Phone Mrs. Good-
ing 4932, after 5 for appointment.
17.1.51-—4n



Spanish Tuition

New Spanish Classes Regular Spanish
‘Advanced Commercial Course”
will be commencing from the First of
February,

All those interested; please be good
enough to contact Mrs, Maria Carlotta
Gonsalves, “Santa Clara”, St. Lawrence
Gap, before the above date, for Regis-
tration, — Phone; 8495,

25.1,51—6n

INCOME TAX NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that
Income Tax returns are required
from every married man whose
income is $1,200.00 per annum or
over, from every other person
whose income is $720.00 per
annum or over and from com-
incorporated or
unincorporated, societies, persons
engaged in any trade or pro-
fession, and owners of land or
property whether a taxable in-

come has accrued during the past
year or not.



Forms or Return may be ob-
tained from the Income Tax De-
partment AFTER THE 1ST DAY
OF JANUARY, 1951, and the
forms duly filled in must be
delivered to me on or before the
votewine respective dates:

Returns of persons whose
books were closed on the

e $list day of December, 1950,
on or before the 3ist day
of March, 1951.

2. Returns of persons whose
principal place of business
is not situate in the island
on or before the 30th of
June, 1951.

3. Returns of all other persons,





SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, -1951





















GOVERNMENT NOTICES WRONG Atrossexs, | “A WISE...
. cart ae ADVERTISE
APPOINTMENT OF ASSISTANT EAR, NOSE AND THROAT jan Antwerp diamond p er, e
SURGEON. sentenced to two years |
. labour on charges of theft, visite
GESRAAL: HOSPITAL. - her husband in prison for the fit
Applications are invited for the part-time appointment of Assis-| time, she slipped a revolver un FAITH HE \ | ING
tant Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeon, General Hospital, which will be-|the grille separating them. L }
come vacant on Ist February, 1951. the gun, the husband forced the

he “SELF-HELP & THRIFT”
a fact. Just so is it a fact that
Friendly Society of 47 Swan St.,

The salary attached to the appointment is $240 per annum and
this Officer is permitted to make charges for the above-mentioned
ervices rendered to paying patients in the Hospital.

Further information regarding the appointment may be obtained
rem the Director of Medical Services, to whom applications should
be forwarded by 3lst January, 1951.
¢ 28.1.50—2n

PART ONE ORDERS

nearest guard to unlock the doors.
As he backed out of them it
the street, he walked int
arms of two warders report
duty. Both hus
were arrested.



—

=| takes no Levies nor Assessments
fron Ss members; gives better
; i and Bigger Bonus; takes
all the family as members from





5 years old; allows Loans to
member carries on a Savings
rtment; and pays anybody
(member or not).for making new
embers





at the rate of Sixty

Lieut.-Col. J. CONNELL, O.B.E., E.D., Conte: (basi ehehpnkio- day.
Cammandine, -
The Barbados Regiment. 2 LY-HELP & THRIFT”
Issue No, 4 26 Jan. 51.







(Over
1. PARADES

All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thursday

1 Feb, 51

HQ Coy will carry out specialists training. The open range is also allotted to

HQ Coy under arrangements to be made by the O.C.

’ Coy will do Mortar Training—2” Mortar Lesson 1.—Description and main-

t nce of mortar. N.C.Os will ensure that they know this lesson by Thursday.
“B" Coy will do L.M.G. Training—L.M.G, Lesson 2.—magazine filling, loading,
unloading, sight setting. Instructors will read this lesson in preparation for
Thursday.
Band
Band practic: parades
Thursday 1 Feb. 51

VOLUNTARY NIGHT
Â¥ There will be a voluntary parade for WOs & NCOs at 1700 hours on Tuesday
20 Jan. 51. The object of this parade being to assist WOs & NCO instructors in
the lessons they are going to carry out the following Thursday. WOs and NCOs
should make every effort to attend if possible.
2. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
Orderly Officer —- Lieut. P. L. C. Peterkin
Orderly Serjeant — 407 L/S Quintyne, L. G,
Next for Duty
Orderly Officer —
Orderly Serjeant

Open Everyday — See Hand-Bills

{ 27.1.51—2n.

he
SOCIETY, 47 Swan St.
Bata's Shoe Store)






























will be held on Monday 29, Wednesday 21 Jan. and

acid indigestion ?
headache too?

check both at once...
here’s what to do!

5 PEB, St

2/Lt. C. G. Peterkin
~ 409 L/S Reid, N. E,

M. L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
8.

-O.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.

BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

NOTICE

Officers’ Reading File will be kept in the Officers’ Mess.
scheduled for Tuesday 30 Jan. 51 is cancelled.

PART Ti ORDERS

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
26TH JANUARY, 1951

In future the
he shoot Q
oe a When unbalanced eating, over-
work or worry cause Acid Indi-
SERIAL No. 4.
SHEET No, 1.

FOR SALE

gestion, Headache...take pleasant-
'



tasting Alka-Seltzer right ay!





































Pe ae : 2 ape a “ROCK DUNDO'—Cave Hill. A
1. STRENGTH DECREASE — Resignations Combining alkaline gngredicnts | seetitalited Heat eepamentive
422 Pte. Kirton, FE. “A’* Coy. for neutralizing excess gastric | ® of some 32 acres in a very
464 Gibbs, N Ha, Permitted to resign from the Regiment idi with an analgesic for ovely position 2 miles from City
9 larke, V. 1 A ef, 26 Jan. 51 aerery 8 | ‘The house worthy of special
399 Clarke, 4 "A - w . 2 . 51, . z -n-Seltver ¢ 5 he house is vorthy of spe
7 Barrow, E. R Ps soothing pains, Alka Seltzer mag notice and possesses great charm,
ickly to relieve both discom- | its geheral condition is excellent
Dismissals quickly ¢ es ‘ } .
310 Pte. Carrington, D. HQ Coy. forts. | eng there is spacious accommoda-
432 , Cozier, R. A “A” ” .
348 Sealy, E. A. . Dismissed for non-attendance at par- os ot axative—re- | iio lca” urahita
413". Scott, Dac. "© ades from the Regiment w.e.f. 26 Jan. Alka-Seltzer is not a laxative—re CASABLANCA” — Maxwell's
229 Lewis, G. * 61, peated use won't hurt you. Take Com a Aantal Broperty: pe
6 e ; . . Vay body inest pre-war work~
as Bourne, E. L. = it at the first sign of ae and | manship. and well planned with
1 TRANSFERS — Reserve ain half an hour later, if symp- 2 reception, 5 large bedrooms, ver-
416 Pte, Walker, H. A. HQ Coy. ag ; andah, kitchen, pantry, sarage,
314 Green, V is Transferred to Reserve strength w.e.f. toms should persist. MioneROOInE: ator che lana decane
337. Hinds, C. MeN. ” 26 Jan, 51. proximately 2 acres with flower
M. L, D, SKEWES-COX, Major, Drop one or two tablets of Alka- and vegetable gardens, productive
S.O.L.F. & Adjutant, i ater. Watch orchard and coconut grove.
Seltzer into a glass of wat

The Barbados Regiment. acre of walled garden may be sold

separately as building site.

it sparkle into a refreshing solu-
tion — then drink it. Keep a sup-



















: ‘ a-Seltze “BETMAR” Navy Gardens.
handy — always! everite roof, detached garage an
‘ _ y rvant'’s quarters, on over 14,000
q. ft. of land, There are 2 large
reception rooms, 2 verandahs, 5
MONTREAL AUSTRALIA, NEW Alka-Seltzer helps bedrooms, 2 bathrooms etc. Suit-
. J ’







able for conversion into two semi-
detached houses at little cost.

ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)



The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for



et _














“BON ACCUIL" — Pine Hill,

M.S. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to St. Lueia, Grenada, and Aruba, and | Large well built residence in
sail Adelaide January 17th, Melbourne Passengers only for St. Vincent, part of this select area. .
January 2ist, Brisbane February ‘7th, Sailing on Wednesday 31st inst, Accommodation comprises large
Ree eee 15th, Arriving at Bar- respptlon Peon aie serene
jados : 51. ag study, 3 large bedrooms, 4 i.
This Saat ates space for Hard The M.V. “Caribbee” will Nee rarer ages, and outbuildings, Pleasant
Frozen and General cargo accept Cargo and Passengers for esr ty iat lawns and gardens with tennis
Cargo accepted on through il f Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, eon sabicac nan a tars : court. Grounds approx. 414 aeres,

ing with ppeare ch) Meat Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of Offered at attractive figure.
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad departure to be notified.



for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
and Leeward Islands,









“CRANE VILLA"—Modern stone




















































































































- 1 4 i . built 2-storey property with “ap-
Fog, furrner, Particulars apply: — DWE, BCHOOMED OWN BENWEE Gl EST HOUSE prox: 3% acres bounded by Crane
FU thee Bee cQ. LTD., ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc. ? Hotel driveway. Converted in 2
B.W.1. Telephone: 4047 MRS, JEMMOTT. ‘TEL. 9196 Eeentent Torta arate
DA pose Se sae LTD., icebbiieas dia. Saat with good sea bathing. Offers in-
ADO! CANAD eccommernds, Righ vited,
B.W.1, = Pe elle: Sooking
Opt eta eee oem ne “THE OLIVES" — Upper Colly-
more Rock. This large mod-
er bungalow with approx, 1 acre
n a io eams ships of lawns, kitchen garden ne ry
chard. Large lounge, gallery,
SOUTHBOUND bedroor fitted kitchen, garage
Soils _ Sails ‘Sails Arrives FOR = = |-ete Centrally located.
Montreal Holifax Boston Barbados Barbados
Tae RODNEY” ; 17 Jan. 19 Jan. 29th Jan. 29th Jan. WELDING “DEANE HOLLOW” zSt. Luey. |My
“LAD NELSO’ on 1 Feb. 3 Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb Pleasant country home of stone
“CAN, CHALLENGER” - 15 Fev. _ 25 Feb, 25 Feb. BATTERY CHARGING hingle containing 3
“LADY RODNEY” Uae. 3 Mar. 5 Mar. 14 Mar, 15 Mar. living an ne rooms,
“LADY NELSON” pei i. ‘ fr. ervar > quarters, 2
“CAN, CHALLENGER" Pr a A eRe OS MOTOR REPAIRS and storerooms, 244. acres
“LAD ” ae ’ ‘ ertile land and an option for a
'Y RODNEY 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 27 Apr 27 Apr Seo . a further 2% acres. Offers consid-
NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives ges
Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax GORDON BOLDEN “SILVERTON” Cheapside.
ommodious 2-s stone S
“LADY RODNEY” 10 Feb. 12 Feb. 21 Feb, 22 Teb. ~ nading in ror es
a NELSON” 25 Feb, 27 Feb. 8 Mar. Mar - | ed wit E ae
“LADY RODNEY" 27 Mar. 28 Mar. 6 Apr. 7Apr. | — BARBADOS GARAGE | Beepibin a bedsociie es cation
ae ELSON, js fe Ne ane: e abt. - ze Ape 130 Roebuck St, ::: Dial 3671 | hen, 2 bathrooms ete Central-
LAD NEY" y ay. ay. _ ay. ly situated and suitable for con-
version into flats or boarding
N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted with cold storage cham. house.
bers. Passenger Fares and freight 1ates on application to :~— PESSOSSOSSS:.
_ % TOWER GARAGE—St. Matthias
% | Gap. An almost new property
GARDINER TIN 24 For D % suitable for a large
AUS & CO. LTD. — Agents. |% BARBADOS 3
5,
>
pete alae INVESTMENTS %

11,000 sq, ft, Contains living room,
verandah 2 sides,
kitchen and pantry.




3 bedrooms,

Consult - - - Offers. will




















3 be considered,
A. M. WEBB, % “BRANDONS"—St, Michael. A
Stockbroker é mellowed old stone property on

the coast with good boat anchor-












> age about 1 mile from town, with

33 Broad St. (Over ~ Sv2_acres of enclosed grounds, the

: -major part planted with produc-

Phoenix Pharmacy) | tive coconut and fruit trees. There

8 | are 3 reception, 4 bedrooms, gal-

—: Phone 4796 :— ¢ | jeries, 2 garages etc. _ Suitable

% either for continued use as a pri-

$605965¢ D665 3 OOO OO OOSOE# vate residence, a club or .board-







ing house,








HOTEL—Old established hotel
property on coast is now available

45 a going concern at a low figure,
Pull

Good
people,




HAvE YOU GOT A

COLD or COUGH

IF SO TRY

BROWNE'S
CERTAIN COUGH
CURE




information on application.

opportunity energetic

for











BUILDING LAND — Nearly 2
acres of land on edge of escarp-
ment near the Club Morgan, Ideal
position for good class property.









Col ASTLAND —
acres of excellent building
with sea frontage which may
old in half acre lots

St. James. 3



Janda
be
if required.



RENTALS
















The Unique Remedy for Coughs, Tn Chancery — “Inch Marlow.
Colds, Bronchitis, Sore Throat, Modern furnished bungalow,
Hoarseness, Bronchial Asthma, Flores"—Kont. Unfurnished,








Whooping Csugh, Diseate of the
Chest and Lungs, etc., ete.

C. CARLTON BROWNE
Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813





REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

| PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640






5 variety of pur-
poses other than a garage,

“LILA COTTAGE” — Britton
Cross Road. Timber Bungalow on



GERM LUBRICATING OILS

ARE BEST BY TEST
DON’T ONLY OIL IT — GERM IT,

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

appearance—all outstanding”
Say Motorists and Tyre Suppliers alike.

The tread rubber is ye Wider, flatter ireaa

! tougher, more shock- area
resisting than ever for tare seein ne
before, wears more woe.
The im roved -
Weather Treadee
with its new Stop-
Notches for quicker,

Gasoline Station * vrafalgar Street.

%& Handsome buttressed
sidewalls provide pro-
tection from kerb

safer stops — resists damage, and make
Bid awash Ky than you've ever THERE Is NO DOUBT ABOUT re

INSIST ON GOODYEAR TUBES

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM












BY GOODYEAR
“Stamina, strength and V4OV 2M)
LAVA











in, d $250.00 in Ralph Beard’s| 4nd bath, Government water and elec- on or before the 31st Jan- . £38 .
® Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny seams ee ae Datennd "ATES tricity installed. This property will be ibe S6at Ou can Tiust (With The Distinctive Flavour)
and pores wliere germs hide and cause ter- " 27.1,51—gn, | Offered for sale to public competition aes * ] 4
rible Itching, Cracking, Eezema, Peeling, at our office James Street, on Friday F. A, C, CLAIRMONTE, is quite a Fav ite in the Island
Burnin €ne, Ringworm, Peoriasts, | WATCHES — Just received Ladies| 204 February, 1951 a 2 p.m itions | Commissioner of Income Tax eee are eee
Blackhe: Pimples, Foot Itch and other | (arteen) Gents (fifteen) and Waterproof| For further particulars and conditions ‘ De: ; ~ Its quality is Unique
blemishes. Ordinary treatme: ia Slee only | Centre Seconds. Advance Store, James + sale apply to Hutchinson & Banfield, ¥ and eath Duties. .
temporary relief because they do not kill | ¢ 4 ’ 151 james Street. heme Note: —Any Hers: failing THE L N ° * ,
the germ cause. The new discovery, Nixo- | St a7.1.0i—2n. 17.1, 51—6m Ar i ae ae ailing | to GB.1-50.6 ONG-LIFE;HARDEST.W E “k RING TYRE Try It For Yourself.
: ia @ ante = iain make his return within A

derm kills the germs in 7 minutes and is WHEAT in its complete and most ap- ene : ;
guaranteed to give you a soft, clear, attrac- | oiling. form Freth crunchy flakes}, AT TOP ROCK—Delightful residenc the que date will be liable Blenders:
tive, smooth skin in one week, or money which delight the palate. For all ages | having 3 Bedrooms, large Lounge, sepa to a fine not exceeding ers:
back on ate san au pac’ rh Get |VIGRO is 100% food and it is always oT ene oe R fut aaah ee £100 and not less than £2 , 7

ar Pe ixoderm from _your ¢ nemist si a a natn hag, ath, moderr n uilt £ i less s 2 ~ 4
serene eaicsandves | ena, Getczomrymectany tam, Ainge | 204 cat an ne an and. will "be prosecuted THE CITY GARAGE JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

move the real Jon ’ Co y. M. Ford, Empire | on nearb aif an P © 4 St s sfactory 2a+
pixed Cause Of SKIN | Pharisees, Hnatlesoirs Donor Dintcion | neareat offer, | Yor Vic : oe a en se NR Roebuck St. Dial 4335
Bin | Feoniies tble, 1/9 ior :—C. B. PHILLIPS, 8 High Street, | A. Beard, Hardwood Als Phone } ic ae TRADING CO. LTD
ete 1 98.1.81,—in, | 4689, 26.1,.51—6n. | i 6.1.51--8n : Fes Live i





SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 1951



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

e
Caribbean
: .
Commissioners
To Confer 2 am. Holy Communion. 9 a.m. Choral
Bucharist and Address, 11 a.m. Matins

THE first Caribbean Scout Com- 224 Sermon. ¢ p.m. Children’s Service
missioners’ Conference, under the 220 non "ica @ Pu Pvensone ond
Chairmanship of Mr, John Durey, eee:
po se Commissioner for British ST. ee am. Com-
uiana 2 teed munion, 30 a.m. Procession, Solemi
fi , will be held at Trinidad Mass and Sermon—S.8. Chi-iren. 0
rom Wednesday next, 3lst Jan— p.m. Evensong and Sermon ¢nd Parish
eee 2nq February. a gag rege FE sgs Stret, Chelsea
F ar. , * toad., Beckles . Preacher: Canon

D.C. of Py . < Springer, Moore. 7 p.m. Solemn Evensong. Sermon
eg eee ce oe and Procession, Preacher; Canon Barlee.
nas been represen
Barbados. METHODIST

CHURCH SERVICES

ANGLICAN
ST. LEONARDS CHUROH HARVEST
PESTIVAL SUNDAY

Holy






P. Bruce.

B. Crosby,

am, Mr, A.

BE. J.

ane Fl—-11 a.m. and 7 p.m, Rev. B.
rosby.
CANADIAN DALKEITH—11 am. Mr
COMMISSIONER'S * BELMONTCS sim, Rev,
7 pm. Mr. J. W. Lovell.
VISIT sare DISTRICT—9
. . Hill. 7 p.m. Supply.
anne J. L. McGregor, Canadian “‘pRovipeNce—11 am. Rev.
ravelling Commissioner, who is Griffin, 7 p.m. Miss E. Bryan,
at present on a tour of the West , VAUXHALI—9 a.m. Rev. E. J. Griffin.
Indies, is due to arrive in Barba- 7 ae Mr. dos on 11th February and will be McCullough. 7 pan. Rev. H.C. Payne.
remaining until 17th. ; oath eee a.m, Mrs, Morris.
During his stay in the island, * }itipw iat 9 90
fe * WHITE HALL—9.30 a.m, Mr. G. Hayer
arrangements will be made for 7 p.m, Rev. R, McCullough. | ane

him to see troops in action, and bs as ae ce a.m, Rev. H. C,
rt . ayne, p.m. r. J. Layne
on Friday 16th, be will give a “yoLFTOWN—8.30 a.m, Rev. F. Law

talk to Scouters at Scout Head-
quarters at 4.30 p.m. Uniform
must be worn on this occasion.

renee, 7 p.m. Mr. V. B. St. John,
BANK HALL—9.30 a.m. Miss G. Oxley.
7 p.m, Mr. S. Phillips.
SPEIGHTSTOWN—11 a.m. Rev. F. Law~
rence, 7 p.m, Rev. F. Lawrence.

WOOD BADGE SELAH—I1 a.m. Mr. B, E, Barnett.
7 p.m, M.

Wood Badge (Cub & Scout) _ BETHESDA—11 a.m, Mr, N. Blackman.
Part I Studies (Theorectical) 7?" ?â„¢-



THE SALVATION ARMY
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL — 11 aun
Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m. Company Meet
ing. 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Conducted
who by Major L. Rawlins (R),
have had at least six months’ prac- aoe nant sere ay
. . SS eeting. p.m, ompany Meeting.
tical experience with a troop of 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher; Sr
pack are eligible to take Part I. Major Gibbs.
There is also opportunity for deaetny ater oe weit ese en
eeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting. 7 p.m.
Scouters to take Part II (In Camp) Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr. Captain
under the supervision of Mr. J. L. Bishop.
McGregor, Canadian Travelling seesine one ete a Holiness
od eeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting. 7 p.m
Commissioner. : 7 Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Lieutenant
This camp will be held in Tri- Reid.

nidad from 3rd until 11th March gaye CORNER —i1 5.1m. Holiness

. 3 pm. Company Meeting. 7 p.m.

firs one ee cost will be around ae Meeting. Preacher: Lieutenant

. ore.

All Scouters who have reached PIP, CORNIN-11 ant. Hotiness, Meet-

their 2ist year, have been war- if. 2 Pm. Company Meeting 7pm

Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr. Majo

ranted for at least three years, and Hollingsworth. be ee di

have attended a Preliminary | SEA VIEW—l11 am. Holiness Meeting

Course are eligible to attend, and fh "Kin? Preasher, Liculenant Gib:

a deposit of ten dollars must be pons. ‘
made with each application.

BADGERS’ CORNER

1950-51 have been received, and
can be had on application to Scout
H.Q., Beckles Road.

All warranted Scouters





MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK STREET. Harvest Festival.

9 am, Rev. A. C. Pilgrim. 3.30 p.m.
Cantata, Rev, D. C. Moore. 7 p.m. Rev.

During the past month or so We D. C, Moore,
GRACE HILL—11 a.m, Mr. O. Lewis.

have been able to publish very lit-

: 7 p.m. Mr. W. Swire.
tle of our activities, but neverthe- ° FurnecK—11 a.m. Rev. A. C. Pilgrim
less, there has been a great ad-— (Holy SOS CR SY s 7 p.m. Mr. U. Reid.

i in MONTGOMERY—7 p.m. Mr. Phillips.
vance in numbers as well as in 3iQoSnt—7 p.m. My, FG. Smith.
proficiency. i DUNSCOMBE—9 a.m. Mr. G. Francis.

In the youngest = of the 7 p.m. Mr. D. Culpepper,
Movement—Wolf Cubs—there has

ta ; CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
been a rapid increase in numbers, First Church of Christ, Scientist,
for apart from over 200 enrolled - Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street
its undays: 11 a.m. an p.m. ednes-

cubs, there are over 100 recruit days: 8 p.m. A Service which include
awaiting enrolment. Testimonies of Christian Science Healing

At present we are out of stock Subject of Lesson-Sermon: TRUTH,

Sunday, January 28th.

of Tenderpad Badges, but we hope y Seals 408:3A.

‘ Golden Text: T will
aoe will soon be re- praise thee, O Lord among the people:
lieved, a

. for thy mercy is great above the
WELCOME CORNER

heavens: and thy truth reacheth unto
the clouds,

We welcome these Tenderfoots:
and wish them good Scouting.

W. Cummins, E. Griffith,
Richardson (1st Sea Scouts), L.
Jones, E. Smith, W. Moore (Cathe-
dral).

Congratulations to the 1
who have gained the following





French Culture

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON.
Five hundred books were pre-
Scouts sented to the Modern Languages
Department of the University

College of the West Indies by

nee Class: L, Quintyne, T. France at a function held in the
Carter (ist Sea Scouts). Theatre of the University last
Class: R. Smith, A. week. At the same time the

Smith, A, Ward, G. Husbands, J. function marked the formation of
Barker, G. Pilgrim, R. Headley a local branch of Alliance Fran-

. Skinn Ist Sea Scouts). ?aise.
ee bisnnee, S. Pilgrim, Attended by professors of the
(Bethel) K. Laurence (Gill's University College, French or
Memorial). O. Springer, R. John- French-speaking citizens of

Kingston and arts students of the
University College, the function
amper: O. Springer, R. John— was divided in two parts, the first
an P Walton Ast Sea Scouts). presided over by Dr. T. Ww. J.
Despatch Rider: C. Walkes Taylor, C.B.E., Principal of the
(Gill’s Memorial), A. Seale, (St. University College and __ the
' Patrick’s), N. Smith, N. Clarke, second half by Mr. Arthur Hen-
L. Quintyne (1st Sea Scouts). ariks, prominent Kingston bus!-
Rescuer: N. Smith, N. Clarke, nessman, and University trustee.
G. Rudder (1st Sea Scouts). On behalf of the French
Venturer: N. Smith, N. Clarke, Government, Mr. Wellesley
G. Rudder (1st Sea Scouts), H. Bourke, Jnr., French Consular
Lewis (Bethel). Agent in Kingston, handed over

son, A. Smith, A. Ward, P. Wal-
ton, R. Headley (ist Sea Scouts).

aman’s: N. Smith (ist Sea 500 French books to Professor
shout), : M. Sandmann, head of the Modern
Bushman’s Thong: H. Lewis Languages Department. Professor
(Bethel), Sandmann said that he had

started negotiations for the gift

when M. Jean Bailloux, Director

of the Relations Culturelles ——

Sea Scouts) and ed Edinburgh University shortly

ee tants chamnel). after his appointment to the
Application has been made to University College in Jamaica.

1.H.qQ. for these Badge Certificates During the function Mr. Bourke

read a letter from M. Jacques
Island Offers Its

Hearty Congratulations to these
Scouts who have qualified for the
King’s Scout Badge:



Leguebe French Consul in Port-
of-Spain, Trinidad, regretting
that he could not be present as
originally planed. Mr. Bourke

Pirate Gold
also read, then handed to Dr.

te . Taylor, a letter meres the
. a - 7 .

A Touri Ba good wishes of the orbonne
8 st uf University of Paris for the Wel-

fare of the College. ;
The formation of Alliance
Francaise resulted in Mr. Arthur
Hendriks, being elected President,
Mr. Wellesley Bourke, Jnr. Ist.
Vice President, Dr. Taylor, 2nd.

NEW YORK.
Britain’s palm-clad Robinson
Crusoe islands, dotted about the
western side of the Atlantic, are
engaged in an all-out battle among
themselves for the American

i id
holiday-maker’s dollar. Vice aera eee 7.
Tiny British possessions, ignored mann, cretary; . ,
f nturies, are having their Paris, assistant Secretary; and
faces lifted their tropic beaches Mrs. E. C. Skempton, headmis.-
photographed, their climates and tress of Wolmer’s Girls’ School,
scenic beauties extolled as never ‘Treasurer.
before. See en
War scares in other parts of the . ‘i ' oes
world have brought an unexpected Harbou r 0. 2"
boom to the West Indies. But i
are up against a new factor, as the
aeroplane makes it possible for In Carlisle Bay
holiday-makers to go ever farther Swedish Training Ship "Sunbeam",
afc Seana Mahaney he sods
' They have competition now BR EAS eee ecine &, Sch
from South Africa and Australia Molly None, seh, huieilie M.. Smith.
— r the American Yacht Juanita and Sch. United Pilgrim
yeh going efter © ARRIVALS m ”
holiday-maker ae big way. Sch. Lady Noeleen, 41 tons net, Capt.
Bermuda has already lost her “Sy "Omi Chal aa
S.S. Canadian allenger, 3,92 ons
commanding lead in the island net, Capt. Clarke, from Trinidad.
popularity stakes among American eee
sunsseekers. Top favourite new is In Touch With Barbados
Jamaica, In 1950 Jamaica drew Coastal Statio:
66,268 U.S. visitors, against Ber- Cable and Wireless ne oa: advise
—_* 61,863. that er aren corner a
e British Government have the, following s ps tl rough their Bar-
released £3,000,000 rr of < cAweroen 83, Forneeo: oe
blo¢ked U.S. funds in London to Cabe~Georgia. S.S- Quadriga, SS. Tad)
enable private enterprise to build Repney. £0. Pate oe wicolecs, 8.8,
a new “tourist city” near Kingston, Neocardia, 8.5. Runa, SS. Alcoa Roam-
Jamaica. er, S.S. Esso France, S.S. Silver Walnut,





* 3 S.S. Beech Hill, S3.S. Defender, S.S. Rio
The little-known Jamaican Jachal, 5.5. Bonaire, S.S. Bayano, S.S
dependency of the Cayman Path Finder, S.S. Empress of §




Islands is also being promoted as
a new holiday paradise.
It has some of the world’s best

saaepepalanceanepiapepeiieaaenarmmmmaatestiniemiiaidpsatamt
in the sandy beaches. Several he
already made minor hauls
silver and gold coins.

sport, fishing, wonderful bathing, “ Nassau, Bahamas, long a mil-
and a new thrill for the jaded jjgnagire’s resort, is n¢ ’
holiday-maker, — hunting fot the middle-income grout

buried treasure supposedly left by A newcomer the




pirates.
Tourists may hire a mine detec-
tor to see if they ean, find metal



31 hours

York. =—L.E





B. B.C. Radio

Programmes

Hereditary
Disease



















SUNDAY, January, 28 1951

6.30 a.m. Week End Sports Report; A Milw bs CHICAGO.
6.45 a.m. Sandy MacPherson at the ilwaukee physician reports
Theatre Organ; 7.60 a.m. The News; that hemophilia, a lack of. clot-
Fron the Baniannalyss: 7.15 a.m. ting in the blood, is net the mys-
gramme Parade; aglish Maga. terious and uncommon disease
Rine; 8.0 2.m. all Fo ons 9.00 mest people believe it to be.
from Britain: 9.15 a.m. Close Down; _ Ene disease which came to
11.15 28, Progr ne Perade; 11.20 public attention through its prev-
a nterlude; am. Sund: - i i i
vice; 12 noon News; i210" en alence in certain royal families
News Analysis; m. Close Down; Of Europe is both hereditary and
413° p.m. Musie 2 ine; 4.30 p.m. congenital
Sunday Half Ho stoners *
Cree, os Mon? Bee WOeuncet "ge But the physician, Dr. Armand
chestrs: € 45 pm. Programme Parade; J. Quick of Marquette University

7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m

News School of Medicine, reported in

7.15 p.m. Caribbean Voices; the current



The body of Christ: #40 issue of the journal
: » Newsreel; 15 p.m. Sunday of the American Medical Associa-
Service 8.45 p.m Composer of the tion:
Week: -9.00 p.m The half Century; “a ee
10.00 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From “In a surprisingly large number

the Editoriols; 10.15 p.m. The Cathedral ili itiv ilv

Organs: 10.30 p.m. London Forum. 11-00 history previous evidence ~~
r ybert Casedesus. 3 >

Ot eee ae disease) is obtainable.”





MONDAY, January 29, 1951,

2.30 a.m. BIW Cotton band Show; He cited Queen Victoria of
7.00 am The News: 7.10 am. News Ano. England as an example of a
iy ~ es > a aon ee s; 7.25 carrier—the disease is transmitted
é “ogramm ‘arade 3 a.m
Panily Plight, 1.45 a.m. Singing is so tO male children through women
Food a Thing: 8.00 a.m. Let’s make in much the same manner as
Music; £.45 a.m, The debate Continues: ¢ : wi “enti
9.00 an The News; 9.10 a.m, Home colourblindness ‘with an entize-
pews from Britain: 9.15 a.m. Close ly negative” family history.
en 11.15 a.m Proucanany ene Dr, Quick said a new test is
11,30 a.m. Listeners Choice; 5 a.m " * i " «
Commonwealth Survey; 12.00 noon proving valuable to the doctors
The News: 1210 pm. News Ana- by warning them of the exist-
lysis; 12.15 p.m. Close Down: 4.45 ja ded
E.m. Composer of the Week; 4.15 p.m ence of hemophilia, He ad

that the condition can be treated





Ray Martin end his Orchestra; 56.00 p.m.
Composer of the Week; 5.15 p.m. The just as well by a family doctor as
story Teller; 5.35 ym. Interlude; 5,45

by a specialist.

p.m. Piano P me; 6 00 p.m. Nights at ,, -
the Opera; 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade; The Milwaukee expert said
700 pt ‘Tr New 7.10 p.m News h 1 dic ft
7.0 " 1e News; mn, ° g

Analysis; 7.15 p.m. Our Mutual Friend; that abnormal ble ng ® =
+45 pin. Family Flight; 8.00 p.m. Radio tooth extraction or a minor

Newsreel: 6.15 p.m. Commonwealth operation is sometimes the first

7; 8.38 p.m. Singing is so Good a gj S1iss ceed
ye 45 p.m. Composer of the @m of hemophilia.—I.N.S
ek; 9.00 p.m. BEC Symphony Or-







chestra; 10.00 p.m. The News; 10.10
p.m. From the Editorials; 10.15 p.m,
Ray's a Laugh 1¢.45 p.m. Science Re- N J t M.
view; 11.00 p.m. How to Woo
"BOSTON ew € a y
WRUL 15.299 Mc WRUW 11.75 Mc
WRUW 17.75 Me v
Wate eNom Break Record
6.30—9.00 ...... 18. 18 Me. i
4.15—6.00 . Ul ul a Me F S T :
6007.15 . ; ) 9.58 Me. " ¥
6.60—7/15 6.195 Me. or owe 1
7 9 9. 58 Mc,
7 6.195 Me. ALL records for the east-west
Atlantic air crossing are expected
— to be broken soon by Britain’s



first jet bomber. : zy
F SI} . The aeroplane, an English Elec-
trie Canberra, is likely to fly from
or s 1ortwave England to the United States
e when negotiations, now going on,
Listeners are completed for Canberras to be
i! built in America as well as in
‘ a four British factories,
Talk in “Science Review” It is also.to be produced in
The talks given from time to Australia.
time in the BBC’s General Over- Range and performance de-
seas Service under the title ‘Are tails of the Canberra, which is
You Receiving Me?’ in which the fitted with two powerful Rolls-
problems of short-wave listening Royce Avon jet motors, are still
is discussed have given much use- on the secret list.
ful advice to listeners in all parts But the bomber has a fighter-
of the world, One of these talks like speed, and United States air
cr discussions will be given in force officers who saw Wing Com-
‘Science Review’ in the coming Mander R, P. Beaumont fly the
week, A listener, Mr. A. E. Canberra at the Farnborough Air
Wilkins of Bombay’ was recently Sree ase year were greatly
in England on leave and he went ressed. :
to Broadcasting House to discuss _ Jf the var ys have et
problems of short-wave listening yet been vere wd an “ ee ibe
vith F. C, McLean, Head of the cluded satistactorty -. am ;
nsf i : * me ; Canberra is put into production
BBC's Engineering Projects Group. jn the United States, then it will
They discussed wavelengths and pe used by the USAF in prefer-
frequencies, the best kinds of ence to some American designs.
aerials to use, and the problems —L.E.S.
of interference. Their conversa-



tion was recorded and this re- fi :

cord i tne presen. on Monty’s Car May

oir coer 29th. January, at Be Retired
Inspector French Serial THE car used by Field-marshal

i A : Lerd Montgomery may soon cease
A new serial_ begins in the to be No. 1 transport of the Brit-
BBC’s General Overseas Servic@ jsh Army.
in the coming week. This is a jt has earned the title by carry-
radio dramatization of one of the jng five field-marshals and two
most exciting of Freeman Wills generals the equivalent of nine
Crofts Inspector French stories, times round the world in the past
‘Sir John Magill’s Last Journey.’ 12 years. The car may be retir-
The book has been adapted by ed,

Patrick Riddell who is well known The car was first used by
as a radio writer; his dramatisa- _ General Sir Walter Kirke in
tion of “The Count of Monte 1939. :

Cristo” was broadeast in the It passed in succession to Field- |
BBC’s Home and Overseas Ser- marshals Lord Ironside, Lord}

translated into several Gort, and Sir John Dill, General
European languages. Broadcasts Sir Bernard Paget and Field
of this story will be given in marshal Lord Alanbrooke,
eight episodes at 8.15 p.m., on —
Thursdays beginning on the Ist
February.

vices and



British Export
Horses Shine

LAST year there were at least
600 individual British-bred win-
ners in foreign countries, Ireland
excepted.

West Indies Programmes

_ While the news is not definite
it is hoped that ‘Caribbean
Voices” on Sunday 28th inst will
feature the first part of ‘Henri
Christophe’ the verse play by the
young St. Lucian poet, Derek
aleott. ‘Caribbean Voices’ is on .
the air every Sunday at 7.15 p.m. ,, They are ue re 4
and consists of verse and prose ae _~ B itish a revi-
by West Indian writers. Contri- eee eet and 5 eres abeaed
butions to this programme which This is z positive army, of which
are always. welcome should be I have Web record ee
sent to the BBC, Box 408, King- al bject to animals
ston, Jamaica, B.W.I. Next Wed- Fo Brkt Tay Av oyre. OO it is
nesday, 31st ‘inst, sees the final en tae oa thei
broadcast in the current discus- ¢i-es, An example is Noor
sion series ‘Can We Do It?’ in “ Noor, one of the best horses
which John Figueroa has been exported from this country in
interviewing three individuals on recent years,.was shipped to the
the question of what ordinary {S.A, ‘after he had raced here;
eerie Wada tae’ proedoan, eenaes age Vales on
cL} = world’s ils i: ast, made headlines.
like all West Indies programmes His achievements, in terms of
from London is at 7.15 p.m, figures, are recorded in the statis-
. ' ‘ tical abstract issued by the Thor-
The Week's Music oughbred Breeders’ Association
Included in the musical broad- he oe ee aera gta
casts from London in the coming ,
week are the following worthy ;
ef special mention: Robert Case- 15 eee ve.
dus, one of the most Gistingaisned nient example, not because it
ef contemporar ianists will y
play comnposltiness of Ravel and pot By ® peg _ caine toe
Debussy, in the interpretation of of my investigation was to trace
whose works he is considered by some of the other winners and to
some critics to be unsurpassed. ghow where they all won.

His half-hour programme will
begin at 5.15 p.m. on Wednes- Admiral’s Walk was a good
sire but never in the top flight.

day, 31ist.inst. The BBC North-
ern Orchestra conducted by Louig ‘Ten of his stock won between
them 29 races in foreign coun-

Cohen, will present a concert on

Sunday, 28th, inst. at 6.00 p.m. tries in 1950. E
As conductor of the Harrogate The countries were India,
Municipal Orchestra he helped to Malaya, Ceylon, Venezuela,
build a reputation for the best France, the South Caribbean.
light music under the most pleas- oo ~ as eer ‘ dollars,
ant* conditions ig z ti rancs an slivares.

ant’ conditions at thig attractive a ittle-20-year-old

Yorkshire spa on the fines of the , Montrose, ‘
eontinental spas and Viennese horse, standing in Ireland at £26,
beer gardens. The concert in- had 23 winners of 38 races last
cludes. work by Haydn, Jarnfelt Year, including the two principal
and Smetana races in South Africa, and others

Â¥ in Malaya, India, Venezuela and



Norway,
BLOWING ONE’S BUGLE Casanova, better known, per-
haps, in this country, had 13
VIENNA, winners abroad, including one
Whenever fire broke out in the distinguished winner in Sweden.
Burgenland village of Neustift, This was Amigo, who won

an

18-year-old farm labourer’s job nothing less than the Stockholms-
f storapris and Kapplogningssalls-








vas to blow the fire bugle. Afte
> : 2 rie!
bugie had called people t kapets-storapris! ' ~
: Colombo, Colorado Kid, Coup
elp € uish large fires for g ; i
ge ae here aes he de Lyon, Diplomat, Fairhave:
7 . eae "0 Furrokh Siyar, His Highne
came ‘sus Khan Bahadur, Legend of France
oure ‘ - Montrose, Pay U nd William of |
Valence are o few more sir
‘ the with multiple winners abroad.
2b lef —L.E 8.





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CORPORATION LIMITED.

NOTICE

et

Due to the large increase in the price of
Fuel Oil the Company are now forced to
advance the present Surcharge from 20% to
27%.



The new Surcharge will take effect on all
bills rendered for the month of February and
onwards,

V. SMITH,

General Manager.

Yours faithfully,

THE BARBADOS ELECTRIC SUPPLY
CORPORATION, LTD.















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Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements In :~

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PAGE FOURTEEN





POSTHUMOUS AWARD



THE U.S. ARMY’S BRONZE STAR MEDAL is pinned on Mrs. Susie Cooper, who accepts the honour on

behalf of her son, the late Corporal Wade E. Rutledge, killed in action in Korea.

Cpl. Rutledge, who

was a member of the famous 25th Infantry Division; fired into the advancing enemy, allowing many of
his comrades to withdraw to safety. Major R. B. Woodruff, lst Army Deputy Chief, performs the cere-

mony.—Express.







Moyra Blair Wins Again

Tornadoes

Sail Well

By Our Yachting Correspondent

JACK WILKINSON’S

Moyra Biair scored another

victory in the “B” Class at the Second Regatta yeterday to

repeat its performance in the First Regatta.

The boat,

which is skippered by Tom Wilkinson, started from scratch
with Okapi but gave War Cloud two minutes.

At the completion of the second
round it had a good lead and kept
this throughout In this round
Fantasy broke down and dropped
out.

Tornado K 29, Cyclone which is
owned by Messrs. Jason Jones,
gave an excellent performance.
Unlike the previous Saturday, it
sailed perfectly well in the steady
breeze and calm. seas yesterday.
Skipper Michael Mayers, with his
crew of Ian Gale and another,
brought it in fourth in the “Cc”
Class after giving » few minutes
tovsuch boats as Magwin, Peggy
Nan, and Scamp.

Ten boats started in the “B”
Class. Circe did not race. Wizard,
which was given ten minutes fom
MoYra Blair kept her lead up to
the end of the first round, Ranger
was second and Moyra Blair, who
had by now covered some ground
was third. Although Gypsy and
Mischief started together at the
end of this round Gipsy was about
three minutes ahead of Mischief.

At the end of the second round

Moyra Blair had the lead. She
was followed closeiy by Okapi
who was out to give battle,

Wizard had now dropped to third
nosition while War Cloud crept
into fourth place, a few seconds
ahead of Ranger, the fifth boat.

In the final

lap it was all
Moyra Blair.

She kept the lead
on Okapi and’ was “given the
gun”. In the third place was
Lester Toppin’s Gipsy, skippered
by Watchie Burke, and fourth
Jack Badley’s War Cloud,

A little bird told me yesterday
that Hammond Burke, who at the
beginning of the season said. “I
am resting this year,” is sailing
as one of the crew of the Moyra
Blair. This meant that Burkes
were in the first three “B” boats
yesterday. 4

Cyclone by her performance
yesterday, showed that Tornadoes
are made out of good stuff.
Maurice Leach also gave a fairly
good performance in his Tornado
Comet but Ivan Perkins’ Edril
was sailing backward and _ for-
ward as if skipper Noel Emptage
had forgotten:the course. At one
time the Edril went ahead and
left one of its crew who fell
everboard, in the water.

Apart from the Tornadoes eight
other boats started in the “C”
and Centreboard Class. Two new
beats Missbehave and Madness
didnot race.

Honcurs went to the Lightning
Scamp which came in a few
seconds ahead Peggy Nan, Third
was Colin Bellamy’s Magwin
which closely defeated Tornado
Cyelone. At the end of the first
round the boats were in the sam@
position.

Five “D” Class boats started
but Van Thorndyke dropped-out
mid-way in the secgna round.
This left Olive Blossom, Buc-
caneer, Peter Pat, and Imp sail-
ing.

Vectivey Johnson's Imp came
first followed by Winston Has-





ie

EYES UNDER

WATER ! THERE'S Sq
CHLORINE IN
THIS POOW!!

ITTLE TODINE'S. THEME SONG ALL
LAST SUMMER WAS “ WITH MY
“ EYES WIDE OPEN I’M SWIMMIN’....”

Baggott skippered. In third place
was the new boat Buccaneer.
_David Payne’s Mohawk must be
given a big hand. It carried off
honours in the Intermediate Class
after sailing two well timed
rounds. ‘

In this Class nine boats started,
Midway in the first round Arthur
Evelyn's Dawn dropped out. At
the end of this round Mohawk had
a good lead. Its nearest rival was
Eagle which was many seconds,
behind.

Throughout the second reund
Mohawk kept the lead and came
in first. Len Hoad managed to
edge the Reen into second posi-
tion, Eagle was third, beating
Coronetta by many seconds.

The Third Regatta will be sailed
next Saturday, February 3 and
the Fourth on the following Satur-
day, February 10. This had to he
done because of Intercolonial
Cricket on the last two Saturdays
in February and Horse Racing on
the first two Saturdays in March,
After this period the regattas may
take place. as before, every other
Saturday.

The results were as follows:

“B" Class: 1. Moyra Blair. 2
Okapi. 3, Gipsy.

“C” Class: 1. Scamp. 2. Peggy
Nan. 3. Magwin.

Intermediate: 1. Mohawk. 2,
Reen, 3. Eagle.

“D” Class: Imp. 2. Olive Blos-

som, 3. Buccaneer,



MeMahon Scores 61
In Leeward
Tournament

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST, LUCIA, January 27.

In bright weather but with a
heavy out field, Leeward batted
defensively until the Gore-Kirnon
sixth. wicket partnership. Me
Mahon was brilliant in parts;
Livingstone and Kirnon the lefl-
hander batted well, Of _ the
Windward speedsters Mason,
Crick, Drysdale and Pemberton,
-he former three bowled steadily,
Asgill, Griffith and Thomas slow/
medium also bowled well, Faulty
fielding and poor catching affected
the averages. Six catches went
abegging. There was a good at-
tendance:

The Scores
Claxton ¢ Mason, b Asgill gee
Eddy b Crick 5
Livingstone c wkpr. Soso b Mason 25
McMabon b Drysdale . -. 61

Wilkin I.b.w. Drysdale... Pe
Kirnon not out .. ‘ -. 3
Gore ¢ Phillips b Griffith .. 4s 0 3T
Davis run out ,.., inate 9
Matthew not out , ‘ 2

Extras A 5

Total (for 7 wkts.)

Fall of wickets:

1—ll, 2—4l,
4—111,

5—113, 6—158, 7—179,
Crick 1 for 26; Mason 1 for 31; Drys-

date 2 for 24; Pemberton 0 for 5; Asgill
1 for 46; Thomas 0 for 18; Griffith 1 for

28,
—Reuter,








bbe WHEN PAPA AND MAMA TAKE
HHER FOR AN EYE CHECKUP.WoOW!

SHE WON'T EVEN. WINK |!



“Wind Tuniel”
May Speed Up
Space Travel

OTTAWA, January 27.

Rocketship space travel may be
brought closer by experiments
being carried out in the National
Research Council’s laboratories
here, according to a scientist en-
gaged on the work.

A new kind of “wind tunnel”
has been built at the -cost of
$250,000 which will show how ob-
jects behave at speeds of 3,125
miles per hour.

Instead of having propellers to
create wind speed the new wind-
producer uses a vacuum.

It is simply a, 10-yard sphere
niade of thick steel in which a
vacuum is created by powerful
pumps,

When the valves are opened, the
cutside air rushes in at seven times
the speed of sound.

This shrieking, howling current
lasts only 15 seconds, but could
be made to last longer by building
a bigger globe, engineers
explained,

Models fixed in the path of this
short lived blast of air show the
same variations in performance
as experienced by jet air-craft
and supersonic missiles,

The Council's scientists said
that it was only through such
data that man would eventually
be able to design an aircraft
space-ship or a rocket capable of
attaining about 3 miles per sec-
ond “breakaway” velocity needed
to penetrate the earth’s atmos-

pheric envelope and get into the

free space where friction would
be negligible.—Reuter, biake

‘FLU RAGES IN
HONG KONG

HONG KONG, January 27.

Thousands of people here have
been stricken with influenza, be-
iieved to be the same type as that
now sweeping Europe,

The Government Medical OMicer
said he had never known such
a widespread outbreak in the
colony, but added that the epi-
demic is mild and no deaths have
been reported. —(C.P.)

’ °

New Eastern Resolution

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 27

The 12 Asian and Arab nations
whose present resolution before
the Political Committee has been
criticised by some United Nations
delegates as too general, will put
another revision before the Com-
mittee on Monday.

According to usually reliable
scurces, the new revised resolu-
tion will attempt to incorporate
some of the Canadian suggestions
made during the. general debate














SUNDAY ADVOCATE

13 Killed In
Plane Crash !

ROME, Jan. 27.

Thirteen people were killed and
four injured when an Italian four
engined airliner crashed to-day at
Tarquinia 55 miles northwest of
Rome.

Airplane offices said all passen- y
gers were non-Italians. r

Four of the crew of five were |
among the dead,

Eye witnesses said the plane
was struck by lightning as it lost {J
height in a heavy rainstorm to
approach Rome airport.

There was a blinding flash and
the machine crashed near the
main railway line to Rome,

Among the dead was a four
months’ old baby girl.

Airline officiais announced that
seven British subjects were among
‘he dead and another was lying
injured at Tarquinia hospital.

A four months’ old child killed
in the crash was the daughter of
an American couple.

The parents now in Tarquinia
hespital suffering from severe
shock and bruises have not yet
been told that their child is dead.

The second pilot also killed in
the crash, was to have been mar-
ried tomorrow it was reported.

He was the only Italian crew
man who was a’ bachelor.

The company told Reuter to-
night that the disaster was a
“major tragedy for us.”

The airliner’s Commander was
the best pilot in the Company’s
employ, it was added.——-Reuter.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 1951





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| Boxed In Freedom

MARSEILLES, Jan, 27.

A stowaway who lived for 10
days in the darkness of a wooden
case arrived here to-day from
Sofia aboard an Italian steamer
claiming he had “chosen free-
dom”.

The man who gave his name as
Cristof said he had himself nail-
ed inthe crate in Sofia, The
crate was stamped automobile,
Betas —Reuter




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ACCIDENT

Roy Pryme yesterday became
unconscious for a short while after
he was involved in an accident
with the car M—911 when riding
the bicycle X—528 at the bottoin
of Bishop Court Hill. The car i
owned and was being driven by
Edward Evelyn of Colloden Road

Pryme was taken to the Genera}
Hospital, treated and discharged
The car brakes were tested and
found to be in working condition,

P.C.§. MAFFEL & C0. LTD.

“Top Scorers in Tailoring”

and Panellings













COMFORT.
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C. B. RICE & CO.

BOLTON LANE











THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
(Local and Visiting Mem-
bers only)

FEBRUARY










——————

SOME MENU
SUGGESTIONS

with BREAKFAST — i

For Pancakes and Waffles
CHOCOMEL—a Chocolated Flavoured Drink

with DINNER |

|
| MEAT APPLE SAUCE—in tins
|
|
|

SATURDAY,
3rd, 9 p.m.

Music by HARRY BANNIS-
ter and his Orchestra.
Admissien to Ballroom 2/-

28.1.51—I1n.








ROYAL BARBADOS
YACHT CLUB

FLANNEL DANCE

On SATURDAY, 3rd FEB-
RUARY, 1951.

(For Members and their friends)
In honour of the Captain,
Officers and Cadets of
H.M.S, “Devonshire.”
Dancing 8.00 p.m. to 12,00

Midnight
ADMISSION

| By order of,
The Committee of Management,

T. BRUCE LEWIS,
Manager & Secretary,
Members introducing their {

!

PICKLES DUTCH SOUR-SWEET SPICED GHERKINS

* DESSERT BROWN & POLSON’S CORN FLOUR



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friends must enter their names fs
in the Visitor's Register or give ‘

ALLEYNE, ARTHUR & CO., LTD. 4
ihe necretary. “eerun “YOUR GROCERS”

———



























and will make a definite provision aca — ——S—S—SSSS=S= ae
for a Korean cease-fire. ec uy — S 9SO99OF oo 920908
sete! BOXING o FUL
! -
The Weather |; at the Talking about RADIOS! . }
TODAY YANKEE STADIUM
Sus ao Se a.m, | Brittons Hill ; ' VALUES
Sun Se a ‘ dom, i | e
ny a. — Tuesday ~~ Feb. 13th a o wrong FOR A [EN
iting: > 2 ao
High Water: 742 am., 7.48 | KID RALPH PP can tg
pan. (163 Ibs.) You
YESTERDAY vs.
Rainfall (Godringtox) nil | KID F RANCIS if if A
Tg see eat to Keser. | (162 Ibs. if you specify Pag
‘Temperature (Min.) 75.0°F _






Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
E.N.E., (11 a.m.) E.N.E.

Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour

Baremeter (9 a.m.) 30.002,
(11 a.m.) 29.997

e By Jimmy Hatlo







Al KZ
betes
yuats! 7 !

Il

Zz



|



In return match for the
Light-Heavy weight
Championship | of
BARBADOS

10 Rounds

FERGUSSON





Semi-Final :
SAM KING (130 Ibs.)
vs.

HAL WILLIAMS
(131 lbs.)



PYJAMAS

Included in our huge Stock of these are - - -

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SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS and PYJAMAS
Preliminary In GREY, WHITE, TAN and BLUE

VICTOR LOVELL

Sizes: 144 to 17 @ $7.90 each
(122 Ibs.)

t PYJAMAS

In GREY, CREAM and BLUE
Size: 40 and 42 @ $15.64 per pair

PULLOVERS



vs.
BELFIELD KID
(125 Ibs.)

6 Rounds

They are designed to give satisfaction.





’ e
Ring Side $2.00 a ; In WHITE and COLOURS
Balcony ... $1.50 (All Sizes)
Cage $1.00 THF CENTRAL EMPORIUM Prices from $4.00 to $8.93
Arena ‘nae eL.00
Bleachers .............. 48

Obtainable at - - -

'N. E. WILSON & Co.

The Swan Street Ultra Modern Store with the Broad Street
. Goods at the Swan Street Prices

4200 ni:

Winner of the champion-
ship will receive a Belt
presented by

Da COSTA & CO., LTD,

(Central Foundry Lid.—Proprietors.)

Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets

Phone



31, Swan Street

DIAL 3676

+

- , »
be gt CORES SES PDO OT IESG OOOO GOT SLM OOOO



antry, St. Michael, was yesterday of Jamaica, bee prineipa: ere pavilion is 20 feet by 12 feet ana EVERY West Indian school. s¢ven months, presented a peace petrated annually in the island.
fined 30/~ in 14 days with an producing colony of the West j)., committee is formed by the P©Y Should know how a combus. ful enough scene today: with: rag. 27; Brewster lett ‘the ‘colony on
alternative of one month’s im- Indies. , e ) Sunday night for South America

. ; : 4 : »jg tenants of Deacons ‘ soe j10n engine or a radio works. ged childre aying i ;
prisonment when the City Police | Dr. Page #9 that She SPovels > after i wee sibetadtchecwe This view was expressed by. Dr. and wennen. Ratan nce
Magistrate Mr. C, L, Walwyn that pebiithed’ on the taoet ails By the end of November last C&Pildeo, We: Indian " phy- ways watching Allied troops and
found him guilty of working a 18 established as the most satis ny ember “last sicist, lecturer in University Col. transports move through to the completed six weeks in the West

where he will continue his six
month study tour. He has already







ney . > anan: ne » Vvear ; Uses g 2e: 0,

donkey in a lame condition, Ee an tense —- I rat ae pes Rony been the lege, London, when addressing a north, Indian Islands and found in most

The donkey was attached to a ah ll eeuatsin is vere suscepti- Bay Estate and cceiatiinieus tor two-day conference in London of But ‘southward the winding of the English occupied regions
bread cart. Although Weekes bie to Panama disease wiih the the removal of others were ia West Indian students, He discuss. stretch of road between Osan and that there was a picture ef pros—
was manning the cart he is not yesuit that the banana production progress, “ed the importance of science in Suwon was a grim sight with perity against a low standard of
the owner of the donkey. It is in Jamatoa has suffered severely. The removal of houses ta the the national development of the corpses of men and women litter. living.
owned by one Alleyne. There are however hoping to Pine wii] have ta Sais ai aS . West Indies and said vocational ing the rice paddies, bata acetic rns iti

Before imposing sentence the breed at the LC.T.A. a banana fave unin sonatas i re and technical training should be Many men's bodies clad in civil- °
Magistrate said, “These are cases which is just as good as gros district . a EARS stepped-up, in order to promote ian dlothes were shod with brand Pays Tribute To \
that I take very serious, Un- michel, but which is immune to This ‘hwivaiation die ae encustelal development in the is. new Ameriean tornbat beets

vaS £iven at jands, :



fortunately. the owner was not the disease. the Housing Board yesterday a t Cee, emPossible to tell whether Lady Baden-Powell

driving the cart. I might have With regard to sugar the object














7 is ; i ‘e the ej. after the clerk read a letter fr, » was str aig : jese were refugees or disguised
imposed a heavier fine.” is not only to improve the effi- the Actina e reads letter sroxn ue ae strongly supported by Communist infiltrators killed as (From “Our Own Correspondent) '
be 5 i ha —e ciency of sugar manufacture, but “cung Financial Secretary, tie students during the Confer. ,.o™ . ms ORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. 26 }
His Honour called Alleyne and : ; rNeque : 7 ; ; ; ? : they attempted to walk through PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan, 26. }
se : Ss43 ¢ to find commercial uses for sugar juesting progress reports to Once diseussions. The opinion was ji beret & 7m” . ae ee
asked him about the condition of 2 . the end aaa : ies : Allied lines, Sir. Hubert Rance, Governor, :
cane by-products, such as sugar Me end of November 1950 on ©Xpressed that in formulating an ; j ; urse sa S=
the enimal. Alleyne’s excuse was came eae inGeasse.. and “in. the woke included in the saniat overall plan for the West Tadies North of Osan now nothing more paid tribute to thé World Chief
that “he preferred to work the sadition to that, to develop tha Estimates 1950—51 which are Plimary consideration should be nies giant heap of ashes and Guide on Wednesday. He said: ’ j
ae peneuane vane a + 2 manufacture of other. useful sub- ar led by the Board, given to the problems relatingite jo posclnog village sepcored to nite a br any Pera yriae that for the quick and sure
stable it would bite at the foot stances from cane sugar itself. erection of houses at both technological and economic de- -., 2° coy Scores of tiny or- has been paid to any Lady I have relief from H. n é
and make the injury worse, Dr. Page said that on March 17, Pine and Bay Estate. ie “ velopments. mnie @e~ phans, playing happily and un. known in my career ‘before,” 5 Th me and Chest Colds, Bronchitis, Coughs, Catarrh,,
HE SHAMROCK OREDIT 1C.7.A. will be having the official commenced. ‘The houses now 2o2 Ot entiedly among heaps of twist- The occasion was a function given pre Throat, Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sciatica, Be
UNION, with headquarters at opening of the two new laborator- ing built will contain two bed After reports of various com- eco nee Of CI troops. in honour ef the Chief Guide at Neuritis, Neuralgia, Toothache, Muscular Pains ;
St. Patricks, Jemmott's Lane con- ies and the celebration of the 25th rooms each. missions on Social Problems ‘in ny six-year-old girl clad the Boy Scouts Headquarters, and Strains, Bruises Scratches, Insect Bites
tinues to render pioneer service anniversary of the granting of the ~ Phe Acting Financial Secretary the West Indies, Agriculture, }" quien pantaloons, skipped Port-of-Spain. ond ether Ach 4 P ; :
in this field in the colony. Not Royal.Charler to the Crown: wrote to tell the Board that 1% “Tansport, Economic “bevelep” happily neat a couple of bodies It was attended by the Goy- other Aches and Pains, there is nothing
enough ig known of co-operatives uxcellency the Governor-in. Ment, Education, etc, had been ae heee want guiged. ke ee ya Chief Scout of the Colony, better than Thermogene Medicated Rub.,
in Barbados and the meeting now t ° » Executive Committee has released Vresented, general discussion (,; meee om Giscar ady Rance, Chie? Guide, the Hon So healing! Soothing! Relieving!
: for eas as ased Ponte : signal wire. — , ‘ &: + Relieving! Try it — you
being held in Trinidad sponsored Local Livestock the unexpended balance of funds Cred around problems of over- a Wier eNet. W. L. Savary, Speaker of the will say it is a real aoa ! « Y y
by the Caribbean Commission will e r 1 i voted for the ereetion of houses, population, federation and indus- ies Legislative Council, His Grace, 8
do’ much to focus attention on the Of High Slant are Will Not Interfere trialisation. the Archbishop of Port-of-Spain,

e ° :
subject, Next Tuesday the Sham- ; ; The Boz if aes : Z A Dr. Finbar Ryan, His Lordship the
rock Union will hold its Annual —Colonial Adviser wth io aoe one ee Bh Sev Sentences Footed thas = elion Against Bishop of Trinidad, the Rt, "het ;
eting when aetivities will be ' “ople ; Ree ate a * creasing productivity is the solu- . J. D, Wilson, Hon, y Josep)
Sete ‘and trash plans laid. Touring the Caribbean area People at the Bay and Pine hous- tion to over-population in the China Delayed Minister die Sithiousicn slater :

looking into all problems connect- '%g schemes. The Board came to West Indies, On the political is- Services, Hon. Albert Gomes




T. LUKE'S CHURCH, Christ ng in jonnect- mg schem ;
a at hes sits harvest ed with live stock production and is decision when two women sues, it was felt that in order to @ From Page 1. inter : . eee
Dea ee oe eee development is Dr. R. J. Simmons, wanted furniture disputes settled. build up a democratic West Indies, Pression of being in a conciliatory Gapuenett Saree wey S08 MEDICATED" RUB
under Capt. C. .E. Raison, ©;B-B., Adviser to the Secretary * he women were of the flood federation should be proceeded ™ood. . , Hamel-Smith, Mayor of Port_of a
w BE will play there at 4. pm of State for the Colonies. area and along with their reputed with, They regarded it as an .| Most responsible diplomats were Spain, the Isle ' 4 “SA ° ates In Jars and Tit
19 ~2).5 aS Before taking up his present ap- husbands had been given furni- economic necessity, inclined to think that the Peking =P“: Cen coe cone sc ‘
SS ee pointment, Dr. Simmons was for ture. The dispute in each case Government would not take too sioner, Major R. J. Morrison, Mrs. A
Bates son ° ene seers in ~ Seon al Ses was about who was the owner of The conference, which was hela St'@ng_an exception to condemna- Gilbert, Colony Guide Commis- — 7 é
Britain Can Provide See oe At sory ommine tie le at the furniture, at Hans Crescent, the new regi. Hoe Provided that there was: a sioner and Mrs.. Murray, Assistant —— 7 — er
Veterinary Servicesin Uganda 4 The Board received a letter from “°Mtial centre for students, demon. veasonable chance of their ob-| Bland Commissionér, ~ ’ ” iss a a





Tas subsequently Director in Nigeria. the Act eR ot ee. oe i, -eieeted. tie anuiaty ; tainin atisfacti "
i eee res Priday (by ing Financial Secretary jn *'Â¥ated the anxiety of the West t 8 satisfaction for some oi ; ae eas
More Ships nw pees Nene on ee * connection with revotes for Draft 1%dian students to help solve the their principal demands, ‘w “a ; > t
a eileen | aS pNP RL a Maye Estimates 1951—52 €apital, problems Which confront _ their Far Eastern experts also poiit- NS PINRORXND iz TOOTH PAS
G. Donald, Chairman of Rownson, . Dr. Simmons told the Advocate _ The General Manager, Flectric me islands, ed out that a complete victory of 3 ' . eo

Drew & Clydesdale, Ltd., sup- yesterday that he has visited Company, told the Board that the They look forward to the es- Chinese arms in Korea would in

" ad +43 Sain oe ‘rinidad ¢ estimated cost for installing gy tablishment of their , t Many respects | é ]
for better ser- British Guiana, and Trinidad and ; _ to stalling M € o Cir oWn West ; pects be a hollow one J
nae eee will be leaving here on Monday lights for sections at the Bay Indian Students’ Centre in Lon. They believed that Peking wat I it 1B ie is
vRonen for Dominica after which he will Estate would be $2,400. He in- don. The new President, Mr, l€ss concerned with conquering ' . f A ae a





























Causing Hardship " t Visit the rest of the islands, fin- formed the Board that the Com- Rawle Farley, told me that when Korea than with obtaining For-
Says Mr, Barton: “The present joning up with Jamaica. pany would undertake to stand this Centre is ready for use the MOsa and United Nations member.
lack of passenger shipping be- “hy.” has already inspected the half of that sum. work of the Union would be Ship.
tween this country and the British stock at the Agricultural Stations The Secretary was given in- greatly facilitated, /
West Indies is causing hardship jy Barbados and has also seen a structions to interview the mana- Complete breakdown in the
and financial loss to West Indians, selection of stock kept by the per, During the past year, it is re- Peace negotiations at this stage,

hitting the tourist trade and put- sugar estates. He was impressed Mr. F. C. Hutson, M.Inst.M.B, ported, the prestige o{ the Union these _ experts thought, would
iting difficulties in the way of py the excellent condition of the M.L.C., was welcomed by the has been greatly enhanced, Cam. leave China with a war devastated
commercial development ., . What stock on the whole. eats Chairman of the Housing Board, bridge University invited repre- Country on her hands, and the
is suspected is that the British He said however, dag would Mr. G, H. Adams, when he at- rentatives of the Union to dis. Prospect of a long drawn-out con-
Government is content to let con- be as well to remember that al- (0) Gaq’ the Board yesterday for cuss some of the problems of the flict with the United Nations.



; ose re ad high ; ‘ . ; ' Thi ‘ A
nections between the,UK and the thousth. hese ere Me eet 2 e the first time as a_representative West Indies. The Union also main- This week's diplomatic man-
Eastern group of the BWI be ane What might be termed ‘high Of the Legislative Council, tains friendly relations with the C@uvring with proposals and
catered for by foreign lines and Mr. H. A. Tudor’and Mr. E, D, West African Students’ Union, Dr, Counter proposals from all sides

: 4 slass conditions, the peasant far- N rl =
as nerrnredy, tO Jace tip to any Eaton tee other hand could not Mottley, M.C,P., two last yeat T. O. Elias, a West African lee. have thus left many delegates here For white teeth, use the PEROXIDE

substantial contribution to ensure ! i andar representatives of the St, Michael turer at London University, re- With a greater optimism = aan
“nr a afford such a high standard of I es e St. iversity, re Pp . ‘ ‘ ri aa acle: ery
that British citizens can get to management, and Thetelate should Vestry on the Board were reap~ vently addressed the Union on tooth paste—use Macleans every day.
British Colonies on British ships.” }6 content with a lower grade and pointed by the Vestry as their some historical aspects of Africa,
Outlook Disheartening therefore hardier animal. representatives again this year,

There was a growing body of
opinion which believed that if’ the
: * : a8 , A Committee was appointed to - United Nations refused any “ap-
Says Mr, Palmer: “Our experi- ~ He considers that it is possible make recommendations about 79 r peasement,” Peking would realise
ence is that shipping accommoda- that an increased percentage of playing fields and other open J cans Plan Tour Of that it could not impose its terms
tion available to the Eastern Zebu blood might give this re- Spaces at the Bay Estate. The and would actept “honourable

Caribbean, while covering existing quired hardiness. The chief prob- Committee is: Hon. F. C. Hutson, T’dad For Carnival peace terms,











staff movements, does not provide = ee oe a Dee 4 M.Inst., M.E., MLC. E, D. —Reuter.
for (1) new staff (2) business deiknee Geconiechad food. He Mottley, M C.P., Mr. John (From Our Own Correspondent)

people or (3) round-trippers ... derstands that these matters are Beckles, M.B.E., T. E. Went,

If it were not forthe six-weekly aie aoe tea ates s the attention of M.B.E,, Colonial Engincer, Miss KINGSTON, Jam., Jan. ° ° 1°
sailings of the Golfito and the the Ausinucal Desartrenk. Betty Arne, Social Welfare Officer _ Leading travel agents in Jamaica First Indian Film
four-weekly services of the He thought it necessary to reit- and Mr. T, O, Lashley, Secretary have planned a Carnival Week

Booker line from Liverpool to crate the old warning that “one of the Board. ° yee

ac of Trinidad for On Local Sereen

Complete-all—expense
; are offered to take in all the
Carnival attractions from Febru-

Demerarag we should be in @ cannot get more out of a cow than This Committee will also visit
‘worse fix than We are. As it is, one puts in”, a thing which few and report on the question of im-
the outlook is very disheartening small farmers ever appreciate proving the open area above the



Local film history will be made
at the Royal Theatre next Thurs-





indeed, and there seems to be no fully Bay Mansion ary 1 to February 6, the asphalt day evening when a pi i
i , y. . 3 § nthe an ft Dine “Salter a) en a pict with
immediate prospect of improve- In Barbados, as in the rest of Re Ua pr send City tour of Port-of-Spain, dialogue int the Radian Wainer
ment.” ;| the Caribbean, the standard of M 2100 cs fey san per formances, dances will be shown. Name of the pic-
Fortnightly Service “pnanagement of the smaller farmer yp wag inadvertently stated in Friday's oP di, ade attractions, ture is Bodhai—Two Brothers—
: is, on the whole, deplorably low {seve that the motor car M-1200 was in- nidag-Jamaican footballer and the show begins at 4.45 p.m.

Says Mr. Donald: “What right and the man who wishes to make volved in an 35 sy gk ey ype age lg te Ba, it pag MeLean So ncustiig the "The pierce is baged on @ romantic
) a profit out of his cow or out of his 9. Michael about 12.05 p.m. on Thurs tour on ehalf of the travel agents story, with a background of exotic
then deny them proper transport herd, must learn the necessity for ““Phe number of the car in the accident sil dd ae Re a oriental music and scenery. It
facilities? Surely the first duty of a steady improvement in the ae was wi 0 Srey a eiintt winedon, neighbour ihavemeater, 7s ~ has already been shown in India
the Ministry of Transport Is to en- , © al management of farm stock. St. George and driven by EI Simpson, = and Trinidad among ather —
sure direct and regular mail, pas-
—— and cargo services to every .
colony. he merchant venturers TO
regarded transport costs and THE KEY
trade as one; later, when trans-
port was segregated, a profit was |
expected from both. A country
can well afford a loss on transport,
provided it makes up the loss by
trade, The proposal made by me
for the scheduled and regular use
of 25. per cent of the British re-
frigerated ships regularly passing
through the Panama Canal, if
adopted, would supply the ships
now. TIT advocate this step as an
interim arrangement pending the
building of special refrigerated
ships to provide a fortnightly
rvice to both the Eastern and
Western Caribbean C

have we to own these Colonies and







The sooner you take Phensic the

you'll feel better, for Phensic’s quickigake
action will bring relief, lift away pain-caused
fatigue, and remove Weariness in a matter of
minutes. Phensic neither harms the heart,
nor upsets the stomach. Be prepared for
pain — keep a supply of Phensic handy.

Phensic

Cc.
for quick, safe relief
FROM HEADACHES, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,





CANE JUICE
OR MAUBY

Cane juice is ba
ane juic iS becoming a fave
©urite drink with labx

'





| 7 on the
Wharf side. Yesterda man help-
ed by an assis een work-

ing hard pri



ing di the cane, the
juice of which { ping into

a bucket at the bx f the cart.

ee ae ee MI Wel" ~ ESSO STANDARD







waiting his turn to get a tot of
cane juice With a bit ( ice in it. ’ $ DS
TES ott Saratent Saale R. M. JONES & CO. LTD, — ‘Agents OIL NERVE PAINS ’ NEURALGIA, FLU, COL & CHILLS.




noticed, j
——— err eines * rameter tenement mini vssnilnicdiaRSOSIIS.


SUNDAY,
HENRY







JANUARY 28,

1951

ITHINK THAT TZIG-TZAG
FLY DID BITE ME! WHAT 7
Ow 7

RAFTON, DID YOU
NEER SAID
BLE MAN”?

—~ G
HEAR WHAT THE ENGI
ROU!

I'M SICK AND TIRED
OF THE NEIGHBOSS
CALLING ON US
JUST BECAUSE WE
HAVE A TELEVISION

Na na ci iti

IN THE BANKS
VAULT.

alabincer

tt



DON'T WORRY-
'M GONNA

| PUT A STOP TO

THEM COMIN!
IN I

THEY ALL
STAY HOME
AN! SIT IN
FRONT OF

THE
TELEVISION!

[Sav GOOD-BYE TO ALL
FRIENDS...-THAT'S ALL!

HE'S JUST A RAILROAD POLICE-
MAN. | KNOW ABOUT HIM
READY FOR HIM. | KNOW JUST WHERE] | THERE FOR ME. I'M GOING AFTER

AND I'M

gy TO FIND HIM/
ak

I HOPE THIS PROP
I HAD MADE WILL
FIT RIGHT OVER
THE ANTENNA~

LOOT TO THE HIDEOUT AND WAIT
THAT’ TROUBLE MAN”!











wow! I ALMOST

| FORGOT-I MUST
) GIT HOME / THAT
WESTERN GOES
ON IN FIFTEEN
MINLITES //



JUST AN
INTERESTED
PRIVATE PARTY.










I HAVEN'T




HE PUT MY GUN IN HiS COAT
POCKET #ILL GET IN ONE QUICK
PUNCH* THEN SHOOT HIM i





THERE !S NO CURE FOR THE TZIG-TZAG
FLY |! YOU HAVE ONLY -
A FEW DAYS

|| De b , &

p! |} 2 Lay
S '
Ce ae gi LET'S CALL ON ||

ft | THE ZEKLEYS-
) o —~ | THEY GOT ONE! ||
PL eet A
: See ape - {
\ fc y
5
\ 1



a rn

iY Wenaye

Wd DID THE RUSTLERS NaS
| A MINUTE GIT THE HERD OVER | > II Oo

“T] To rose! THE BORDER AT —/ | NOT fa

' MIDNIGHT ? J SHUT

SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN











BY CARL ANDERSON





















{ a
|
|
| BRANDRAM-HENDERSON PAINTS



Perma Exterior Forest Green, and
Sunflex distemper in all shades;
also Beaver Brand paints, a full
range, Holl-ex top grade enamels
and China-Lac enamels and Marine
White: we have them all for you!

All classes of Insurance transacted, including —

FIRE, MOTOR, WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION,
PERSONAL ACCIDENT, TRAVELLERS’ BAGGAGE,
MONEY, GLASS, LOSS OF PROFITS, MARINE,
AND GOLFERS’.

For information and rates, apply to

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—aAGENTs

A. BARNES & CO., LTD.





oe elie? 3

BY FRANK STRI

(T'S THE"TROUBLE MAN’ QUESTIONING THE
TELEGRAPH OPERATOR, JUST AS |
THOUGHT! phen





B. E.N.
AIR COMPRESSORS

IN STOCK
Ft./Min Portable
Ft./Min Stationary
Ft./Min Stationary
Ft./Min Stationary

Cu.
Cu.
Cu.
Cu.









|





| yveT/
oni UuPy/

hoe

ELECTRIC SALES & SERVICE LIMITED

Tweedside Road St. Michael
Phone 4629 & 4371








OOOO MAOH LEE EE pt otetet tot, ytstet, PLEA ELLE EE SAT TTE eer
% awit 7 — a 3
BY ALEX RAYMOND x iy $
fs % # 46 in y 4 me) »
. i 8
$ g
3 %
% %
- x
~ %
3 %
x $
‘ 2
% $
% x
s 2
= 3
- ~
x =
¢ x
» x
.
>
.
me , 2 . A z m
oe ene oe wha ” ert ~
e $
‘ ; ALE :
JOE TRIES HIS QUICK PUNCH = =~ FOR AK x
BUT THE PHANTOMS IRON HAND x
MOVES LIKE LIGHTNING ( Pe a K
a x

g “Mianzanilla” ‘
§ ST. JAMES S

% . S
x (Next to Colony Club) g
g 140’ Beach Frontage :
% Perfect Bathing g
1% ONLY NEW HOUSE FOR SALE ON THIS, COAST =
| % ALL MAIN SERVICES 8
3 View by Appointment Only—TELE: 9172 >
1g PRICE with ONE ACRE €16,500 with 2} ACRES £18,500 FREEHOLD <
36000e00e: (AEP QAP APOLLO EAI ALL LLLP OMA LLL LALLA LLCO OOOO OOOO neee


te.

PAGE TWELVE



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508



DIED
CRAWFORD MAREA. Her funeral
will leave her late residence Lower
Gili’s Road at 4.30 o'clock this evening
for the Westbury Cemetery. Friends are
invited

Lawrence Crawford, Wilfred Worrell.
28.1.51—1n

THANKS
EDOGHILL The Edghill family beg
Through this medium to return thanks
to all those kind friends who sent
wreaths, letters of condolence, or in
any way expressed their sympathy in

our recent bereavement
28.1.51.—1n.
POLLARD—The undermentioned grate-

fully acknowledge with deepest appre-
tiation the many and various expres-
sions of sympathy tendered them in the
loss of their mother Mary Eliza L. Pol-
Jard, Jate of Codrington Hill, St. Mi-
chael
Hesketh Pollard, Muriel Pollard.
28.1.51.—In
The Gibson family beg to return thanks
te those who attended the funeral of
their devoted mother and grandmother,
Ethel Gibson, sent cards, wreaths, letters

or in any other way sympathised with
them.
28,1,51---1n.



IN MEMORIAM
EDGHILA—In constant memory of our
beloved father JOSEPH McDONALD
EDGHILL. Who was called to eternal
rest one year ago.
“We cannot Lord Thy purpose see
But all is well, what is done by thee,”
Whitfield & Mildred Edghill = grand-
children 1.61.—1n,
GREENIDGE In loving memory of

our dear mother ELVIRA GREENIDGE
who was called to rest on the 23rd of



Januany 1950,

How often we tread the path

That lends us to her grave,

Where lies the one we love so well,

But whom we could not save.

At night when all is silent

And sleep forsakes our eyes,

Our thoughts are on the lonely grave,

Where our dear mother lies.

Ever to be remembered by Mr. Sey-
mour Greenidge (son), Mrs. Edith Lovell,
Mrs. Marie Trotman (U.S.A.), Mrs.
liene Jackman, Mrs. Ruth Willoughby.
(daughters;, and her fifteen grand child-
ren, 28.1.51—1n.



FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR — Hillman 10° H. P, ii in n good work-
ing Order. Apply to B. A Belgrave,
Belgrave's Garage, Hindsbury Rd Phone
5253. 28.1,51—I1n.

CAR — Ford 1948 six cylinder De
Luxe Sedan, low mileage and in good
mechanical condition, Chas. Mc Ernear-
ney & Co., Ltd. 24.1.51—4n

CAR — X 86. Dodge 5 Passenger in
A 1 condition and licensed till June.

















Contact Leon Alleyne at Fort Royal
Garage about sale of car. Mrs, A. M,
Arthur, Yorkshire.

26,1.51—3n,

CAR — Ford 10 h.p. in good working
order.. Apply Miss L, Clarke, “Ivy
Lodge", The Ivy. Dial 2575,

26.1.51—3n,

CAR—Citroen 15 H.P, 1950 model in
excellent — condition, Owner _ leaving
island. Apply: B'dos Agencies Ltd.
Dial 4908, Evelyn. 21,1,51—Tn









CAR — One 5 passenger Sedan Terro-
plane recently overhauled and in perfect
working order price $400, Ring 91-24,
Lighthouse, St, Lucy. 27,1.51—T7n,
—_——————

2 Morris Cowley Pick-ups, 1 Morris
Cowley Van and 1 10 h.p. Utilivan. Used
only 8 weeks with less than 2500 miles.







At considerable reduction. A chance

not to be missed. FORT ROYAL
GARAGE LTD. Telephone 4604.

20.1.51—4n

enemies

PICK-UP — One Second hand Fotd

V-8 Pick-up in A. 1 condition. Just

overhaul, (Past inspection) 2 days ago,

New Tyres. C, Bannister, Station Hill,

St. James. 26,1.51—4n.



ELECTRICAL

—<<<—$

RADIO—One (1) Eddystone model $.504
Radio in excellent condition. No reason-
able offer refused. For further par-
teulars phone 8641, before 9.00 a.m. and
after 4.00 p.m. 21.1,51—4n.

—_——
RADIOS — Several New Pilot Radios,
Battery and Electric at Special reduced
prices at Ralph Beard’s Show Rooms,
Hardwood Alley, Phone 4683,
26,.1.51—3n.
REFRIGERATOR — 6 cub, ft, Ameri-
can Gibson 3 years guarantee, left in
Ralph Beara’s Show Rooms, Hardwood
Alley. 26.1,51—5n.

LIVEs10CK

COW — One registered Guernsey cow
by Mt. Hope Vigour An Exhibition Ist.
Prize Winner She gave (32) Pints Milk
with 2nd Calf To calve 26th January,
1951. Apply to V. W. Clarke, Ivy
Lodge, Ivy Road, St. M. 26.1.51—3n.

CALF — One (1) Graded Guernsey
heifer calf, ten days old. (Sire) of
Mother Mount Hope Vigar. A, Williams,
Rose Cottage, St. George.

27.1.51—2n.





POULTRY

—_—
POULTRY — Fowls, ducks sna tur-
keys. Tel. 3904. 1,51—-2n,

7 MECHANICAL

FS
DIESEL ENGINE — 7 horse power
vertical, shop soiled, never been used
$700.00. For inspection call at Ralph

Beard’s show room Hardwood Alley,
27.1.51—3n,
—_————
ENGINE — assisted cycles complete
Price $155.00 including Bicycle at Ralph
Beard's Show Room, Hardwood Alley.



Phone 4683. 26,1,51—3n.
MACHINE—One 11) Spray Painting
Machine. In Good condition. Price $25.00.
Phone 4910. STANWAY STORE, Lucas
st 28.1.51.—1n,
MISCELLANEOUS
ANTI ofS — Of every a
gem. ina, old Jewels. fine

San et en tique shop

3 c. @

adjoining Royal Yacht Club:
3.9,00—t.2.n,



AGRICULTURAL FORKS — A small

Dial 4222
(or 4843 Branch Store) G. W. Hutehingon

Guantity available. $4.70 each,

» Co. Ltd. 26.1.51—4n,
BARBED WIRE — 650 feet of used

Pi oo in 5 lengths. Good condition. Tel.
70

sv.

BALL POINT PENS — Colours “Rea
and Green — Excellent value 3/- cost,
You must get one — Knight's Drug
Stores — 27.1,51—2n,
BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in

White, Green, Primrose with matching

units to complete colour suites, Top

grade, A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.
26.1.51—t.£.n.

CIGARETTES Ardath
20's. Now 33 cts. 333 — 20's Now 33 cts.
usually 37 cts. All in good condition ~
Too. many in stock — Knight's Drug
Stores. 27.1,51—2n,



-WtehjGerms

~ Killed in 7 Minutes
























FOR RENT
HOUSES







ALEXANDER, Worthing, from the
Maret Apply Mrs. Marion Gibbs,
Guerite, Hastings. Dial 4568.

281.51

Ist
“La



~2n.

“ANNBURY” — House with shop at-



tached. Three bedrooms. Electric light
and water, Black Rock, near Wavell
Avenue. Apply W. A. Bibby, River
Road

28.1.51,—I1n,
aap apitigipeniatinpaeee
CHADEN, — Marine Gardens ‘consis-

ting of 3 bedrooms all with running
water, reception rooms and all modern
conveniences. For appointment Ne =

24.1,51—5n.

ESPERANZA—Fully furnished,
modern conveniences. On St.
Sea Coast. Phone 91-33.



with
James

10.1,51—8n.

FURNI6HED HOUSE —In Hastings.
On Sea-side, Full particulars Telephone
3904. 28.1.51—1n.



FARAWAY, St. Philip Coast. Furnish-

3 bedrooms, Water-mill = suppiy,
Lighting Plant. Double carport, 2 servant
rooms. From Februany Ist. Dial 4476.









" FLAT—At Sea View, Upper v
oprosite Bay Mansion also Basement.
Apply on premises. 21.1,51—t.f.n.

TRINITY COTTAGE—St. James Coast.
Fully furnished containing 3 bedrooms,
also a telephone. Available for months of
February to May and August to Decem-
ber 1951. Phone 2959. 21,1.51—-2n

NEWHAVEN, Crane Coast. Furnished;
4 bedrooms, Water-mili supply, Lighting
Plant, Double Garage, servant rooms,







For April. Dial 4476. 28.1.51,—t.f.n.
WYNDAL, ~— Three bedroom house
with every convenience, on Rockley

main road. Garage, two servant rooms,
servant's toilet and bath. For reat un-
furnished, or for sale. Available from
March ist. Dial 4476, 26.1.01—t.f.n.

PUBLIC NOTICES

“£25° -. -d. easily earned by obtaining

order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi-
ence necessary. Write today for
beautiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making







opportunity. Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
England.”

25.1.51—18n

NOTICE
THE PARISH OF ST, ANDREW

Tenders are invited for a loan of
£1,000 at a rate of interest not to ex-
ceed 4% per Annum under the St. An-
drew Parish Church Loan Act. And
will be received by the undersigned up
to February 3rd 1951.

Signed C. A, SKINNER,
Vestry Clerk,
St. Andrew,
24,1.51—6n.

OLD HARRISONIAN SOCIETY
There will be an open day at Harri-
son College for ail old boys on Wednes-
day February 7th.

Old Boys’ Cricket match 12,30
Tea 3.15 to 4.15

Cocktails 5.30 to 7 p.m.

All Old Harrisonians who will

attending are asked to notify
retaty by February 2nd. Subscription

$1.00,
8. O. C. GITTENS,
Hon. Secretary,
23.1,51-—-2n.



be
the sec-



NOTICE
PARISH OF CHRIST

Sealed Tenders, (marked on_ the
envelope “Tender for Loan"), will be
received at my office up to 3.00 p.m, on
Monday 29th January, 1951, for the loan
of £1,950 to the parish, at a rate of
interest not exceeding 4%, to be repaid
in fifteen equal instalments of £13)
each ae in the month of

WOOD GODDARD,
Clerk of the Vestry,
Christ Church.
18,1, 51—5n.

CHURCH



For Sale—Cont'd



MISCELLANEOUS

CUPS & SAUCERS — Breakfast size
(large). Cups and Saucers at 58 cents,
Tea Cups and Saucers at 35 cents. G.
W. Hutchinson & Co. Ltd.







Cc) HANG GERS—Wooden Clothes
han from 8 cents each up. Also col-
ul Plastic Ladies’ Hangers at 43
cents each. G. W, HUTCHINSON &
Co, Ltd. 26.1.51—4n.
CARD CASE. One Lady's Silver Card
Case. Wm. D. Richards & Son, Me

Gregor Street. 28.1.51.—1n,
-

DIVING MASKS — 10/- each obtain-
able in the Toy Dept, at Cave Shepherd
& Co, Ltd. 28,1,51—t.f.n.

Paterna hchreetinresoehersnieienimsiesigntintapsteaethasees
DIAMOND RING — Solitaire diamond
in claw setting at an attractive price.
Wm, ‘D. Richards & Son, Me Gregor St.
-1.51—2n

DIVING GOGGLES — Get one of these
and see the wonders of the sea
Knight's Drug Stores, 27,1.51—2n,

LADIES SPORT COATS — For coo!
evenings. Fawn, beige, wine and black







i



23,1.51—6n,

PLASTIC Parasols, Raincoats, Shower
caps, Aprons, Table Cloths, Babies’ Pan-
ties. Modern Dress Shoppe.

23.1.51—6n

RIBBONS, Feathers, Flowers,
Buttons, Laces & Edges in a large vari-
ety at reasonable prices, Modern Dress
Shoppe. 23.1,51—6n,

PIANO—Upright made by John Brins-
mead & Sons (makers for Royalty) in
excellent condition at Ralph Beard's Show
Room, Hardwood Alley, Chee or: 2

i —3n.

SKIRTS, BLOUSES, SHORTS, — In 9
large variety. §3.98 ‘to saaeat Moderr.
Dress Shoppe. 23.1.51-—6n,

—

CELLAR-—Silver Salt Cellar, One pa pair
silver salt cellars shell pattern, Wm, D.
Richards & Son., Mc Gregor ba “

— 51 gauge, Fine Nylon

a







Stockings. $2.14 Ladies and children
Ankle Socks, 36 to 48 cents, ern
Dress Shoppe. 1.51—6n.



SWEET BISCUITS.—A fresh shipment
in Presentation Tins by Crawford.
Oblong Assorted Cream, Oblong Club
Cheese Straws, Square Club
Cabinet Cream’ Crackers, Special “Ufil-
lit’ Round, Almond Shortbread, Fam: ay
Drums Sweet Assorted, Jollity Assort
Assorted Cream, Also a variety of Flav-
ours in ‘2 lb. Packages.JOHN D. TAY-
LOR & SONS LTD., Roebuck Street.

28.1.51.—2n,





Available at Imperial
(over Bata Shoe Store,
Lower Broad Street) Sunshades, Bino-
culars, Barometers, Microscopes, Hand-
readers, and all Optical requisits, Phone
4075. 24.1,51—t.f.n.



WATER PUMP — 4% inch_ suction
20,000 galls. an hour complete with shaft-

Annual General

MAY UNITE

DAMASCUS, Jan. 27,

The Syrian Government has
realised the text of the resolu-
tion submitted to the Arab

League Political Committee call-
ing for seven members of the
League to unite in one solid bloc.
The resolution strongly urged
in the first place that the Arab
League be replaced by the
United Arab State.
Alternatively it suggested fed-
eration which would make the
countries one sovereign power,
but leave them independent in
their internal affairs, or confed-
eration which would be a per-
manent union of the countries for
common external purposes.
—Reuter

Weymouth Club

MEMBERS are hereby reminded of the
Meeting to be held at

the Hurd Memorial, James Street on
Monday Night 29th January, 1951, at
7.30 p.m. 28.1.51.—1n



notify their Customers



























































Removal Notice

ROGERS BARBER SALOON Beg to
that they will
be moving upstairs J. N. Goddards &
fons Building (Next Door) as from
the 28th January 1951.

24.1.51—5n,

PURLIC SALES
___ AUCTION

TUESDAY, 30th ‘at 12 neon
BION LODGE, Barbarees Hill. Garage
13 ft x 18 ft. covered with Aluminum
Sheets. Good Wallaba Posts uprights also
SERVANT'S ROOM 12 ft. x 8 ft. partly
covered with G, I. Terms Cash, To be
removed, Dial 2947, R. Archer McKenzie
Auctioneer, 26.1 S1—4n,







at AL-

Under The Sterling Hammer

By kind permission I will sell on Tues-



Way 30th, at the Avillon Sports Club,
Orange Street, Speightstown, 1 piano (by
Storey & Clarke}, 1 Radio, 1 Gramo-

phone, Singer Hand Machine, Gents and

Ladies Bicycles, Tables, Chairs, Larders,
Coal Stove, Couch, and many other iiem
of interest. Sale 12.30. Terms CASH

VAN ROLAND EDWARDS,
Auctioneer
28.1.51.—2n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON Tuesday 30th by order of Dr. Kle-
van, we will sell his Furniture
“Brigade House” Garrison

which includes

Dining Table, Upright Chairs, China
Cebinet, Ornament Tables, Electric
Floor Lamps, Very nice Bridge Table
and 4 Arm Chairs with Rush Seats,
Plant Stands all in Mahogany: Very
Good Poker Table, Piano by Ackerman
Lowe, Pye Radio; Singer Treadie Ma-
chine (new) Glass and China, Fruit
Salad and Wine Sets, Breakfast Service,
6 Very Comfortable Uphold. Arm Chairs
Cedar and Pine Book Shelves, Carpet
(new), Mission Clock; Single Mahog.
Bedsteads, Vono Springs and Mattress
es; Cedar and Mahog: Linen Presses,
Sewing Tables; Cradle, Children's Pres
es, High Chair, Baby's Basinette, Very
Good Pram and Go-Cart: 2 good Gas
Rangers with 2 Hot Plates each (Ameri-
can) Electric Roaster, Dormever Mix
Master with meat Grinder and Juicer;
Elec, Hot Plate and Irons. all in per-
fect condition; 10 gal. Demijohn (Ele
trified) Kitchen Tables, Kitchen Uten-
sile, Garden Tools, Lady's Bicycle,
Lawn Mower, Galy. Tubs and Buckets
Swing and many other items.

Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms Cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,













Auctioneers.
27.1.51—2n.

REAL ESTATE
BUNGALOW Newly constructed
concrete Bungalow at Enterprise Road,
Christ Church. Modern new furniture
Phone 3535, _ 28,1.51.—3n.

FOR KENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din-
ing room, Breakfast room. and Kitchen-
ette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
Toilet and Bath, DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone,
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas Dial 2221. 21,1.51,—6n.

THEN C ME AND U
SEE BARGAINS AT YOUR
BECK! Imagine a Bungalow Type in
Belleville, 3 Spacious Bedrooms with
Basins, Excellent Condition, Well Laid
Out, Going for Under £1,900; A

Bedroom (2 Large, one with Basin)
at Thornbury Hill, Very Good Condi-
tion, Modern Convesiences, Spacious
Yard enclosed with Stone, Vacant,
Going for under £900; A & Bedroom
Cottage by Lower Bank Hall Main Ra.,
Modern Conveniences, oe Yard,
Going for Under £1,200;
room Stonewall Bungalow not far from
Rockley, Modern Conveniences, Going

Stonewall) Near City, Good Location

Residence (Stonewall),
Going for Under £2,500 and £3,000.
Is IT YOUR DESIRE — YES — A
CINCH? — A Furnished Unique and
Artistic Super De Luxe Seaside Stone-

Very Busy Area,

wall Bungalow, Almost New, Wide
Sandy Beach, Fine Bathing, ~Trees,
Exclusive Area at St. J ames, over

Ye Acre, Going Indeed Reasonable,
Building Sites — Seaside and Elsewhere.
Re-Sale Values Assured. Mortgages
Arranged. I am He!
Auctioneer and Yes How Wise it is tc
let Me Sell Your Household, Furniture,
Etc,, at Auction. Finger 3111. D. F.
de Abreu for Nearly Anything in Rea)
Estate, If I CAN'T, WHO WILL?
Kindly Call at Olive Bough, Hastings?
er â„¢

CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS
We will set up for sale by Public
Competition at our Office James Street,
on Friday 2nd February 1951, at 2 p.m.
CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS
situate in St. Lucy and containing by
estimation 82 acres 3 roods 23 perches
of which about 48 acres are arabie.
The acreage is made up as follows:
25% acres ist crop canes ready for
reaping.
14 acres young canes,
34 acres sour grass.
® acres 23 perches in preparation,
roads, yards etc
Inspection on application to Mr.
Ormond Knight on the premises.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.





HOUSE SPOTS — 80 ft. x 100 ft. at
Amity Lodge, Christ Church, 5 minutes
walk Golf Club, Water, well laid out
roads, electricity, Apply Norman Alleyne
Dial #164, 24.1.51—3n,



3 bedrooms, two
baths. Overlooking’ Sea, own private
bathing beach. Good Yacht Anchora
Phone 91-50. 16.11,50—t.





LAND-—Six acres one rood and twenty-
five perches of land at Sea View, St
Philip, including two acres of pasture
Apply : Mrs. Marion Holder, Drakes, nr
Grand View, St. Philip. 28.1.61,—1n.

WESTCLIFFE — Navy Gardens, stand-
ing on eleven thousand square feet of
land. Built of Stone, Three bedrooms
and all modern conveniences. Also large
play room 30 by 14 feet. For particu-
lars and appointment, Phone Winston
Johnson at 4311, 26.1.51—6n.

MARSHVILLE Bank Hall main road
standing on 5,445 square feet of land.







Dwelling house comprises closed ver-
andah, drawing and dining rooms,
three bedrooms, breakfast room toilet

A New 2 Bed- | ~~~

for Under £1,700; A Two-Storey (Part | Erglish Schoolteacher.

A Trained | and the *

18.1.51—6n, |Panies whether

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





U.S. Assume
New Slogan

WASHINGTON

A new slogan—‘“strength fa
the free worid—from the United
States of America’—will in fu-
ture appear on American financed

Jan, 27



shipments to, Burope and south-
east Asia.

It will replace the previous
slogan: “For European recovery

supplied by “the United States of
America”

William C. Foster, Administra-

tor of E.C.A., announcing this
to-day, said the Marshall Plan
coneept of self-help and mutual

aid would be carried, forward in
the new programme for the con-
tinued building up of the eco-
nomic strength of free nations to
help them defend themselves
against aggression from without
and from within.
—Reuter

DETERMINATION
WELLINGTON,

Because none of her family
would teach her to drive a car @
sixty-four-year-—old woman of
Mount Albert, Auckland, went te
the chief instructor of the Auck-
Jand Aero Club and asked for a
trial lesson. She got it and will
go hack for more,

NOT QUITE



NEW YORK,
The fattest man in Americ.
measured 6ft. 8in., around the

middle and was 5ft. 8in., tall, But
he just missed his lifelong ambition

to weigh 50 stone. He died this
week and his weight was only
48-stone,

FEUD
LISBON,

Two tribes of gypsies engaged
in a blood fued cleared the streets
and stopped all traffic for tweive
hours in the town of Olhao, The
Police finally broke up the fights
raging all over the town, which
had caused cinemas, theatres and
restaurants to close down, The
feud started fifty years ago wnen
a boy from one tribe slapped the
face of a girl from the other,

SENTENCE

MILAN,

Three ex-Partisans, accused of
killing 16 handcuffed Italians near
Modena in May, 1945; today heard
the State Prosecutor accuse them
of machine-gunning the victims
without giving them time to make
the sign of the Cross. He asked for
30 years’ imprisonment for each,





WANTED

HELP
SUB AGENT WANTED, Resident
Bridgetown, well connected with com-
meree, to seli accredited British goods
on commission, State age, experience,

references, Post box 532, Trinidad.
26.1.51-—3n,





Vacancies ex in Design Department
of a West Indian Petroleum Refinery
for Trained Draughtsmen, capable of
design and detail work on civil, mechani-
cal, and chemical engineering projects.
Applicants must have the British
Higher National Certificate or its U.S. or
Canadian equivalent and should be
prepared to give proof of technical abil-
ity by interview or examination.

Applications, giving full details and
experience, accompanied by a _ recent
passport photograph, should be address-
ed to Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd., P.O.











Box 103, Bridgetown. 23.1.51—6n.
WE BUY FOR CASH — Clocks, watches
and musical boxes in any condition.

Write, call or dial 4429.GORRINGES An-
tique shop, Upper Bay Street.
25,1.51—7n.

__
WE BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and



Silver jewellery, coins, dentures, ete.
write, call or Dial 4429, GORRINGES
Antique shop, adjoining Royal Yacht
Club. 25.1.51—Tn.

2 ieersiceericantenenarasteesiesipheanshithineasnytaanieresamhanetaaareei

GORRINGES undertake expert watch
and clock repairs, cl ing and resto-
ration of oil paintings, valuations for in-
surance and probate, GORRINGES,
upper Bay St. 25.1.51—7n.





SPANISH AND ENGLISH STUDENTS
PRIVATELY COACHED by fully qualitied
Spanish speaking

students taught English by quick and

and Condition, Suitable also as aj easy method. Preparatory and School
Guest House, Large Yard, Going for] Certificate standard, Backward students
Under £1,900; Three City Business &| speciality, Commercial courses also,

including Commercial English, Spanish
and Commercial Geography. General
office routine given. "Phone Mrs. Good-
ing 4932, after 5 for appointment.
17.1.51-—4n



Spanish Tuition

New Spanish Classes Regular Spanish
‘Advanced Commercial Course”
will be commencing from the First of
February,

All those interested; please be good
enough to contact Mrs, Maria Carlotta
Gonsalves, “Santa Clara”, St. Lawrence
Gap, before the above date, for Regis-
tration, — Phone; 8495,

25.1,51—6n

INCOME TAX NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that
Income Tax returns are required
from every married man whose
income is $1,200.00 per annum or
over, from every other person
whose income is $720.00 per
annum or over and from com-
incorporated or
unincorporated, societies, persons
engaged in any trade or pro-
fession, and owners of land or
property whether a taxable in-

come has accrued during the past
year or not.



Forms or Return may be ob-
tained from the Income Tax De-
partment AFTER THE 1ST DAY
OF JANUARY, 1951, and the
forms duly filled in must be
delivered to me on or before the
votewine respective dates:

Returns of persons whose
books were closed on the

e $list day of December, 1950,
on or before the 3ist day
of March, 1951.

2. Returns of persons whose
principal place of business
is not situate in the island
on or before the 30th of
June, 1951.

3. Returns of all other persons,





SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, -1951





















GOVERNMENT NOTICES WRONG Atrossexs, | “A WISE...
. cart ae ADVERTISE
APPOINTMENT OF ASSISTANT EAR, NOSE AND THROAT jan Antwerp diamond p er, e
SURGEON. sentenced to two years |
. labour on charges of theft, visite
GESRAAL: HOSPITAL. - her husband in prison for the fit
Applications are invited for the part-time appointment of Assis-| time, she slipped a revolver un FAITH HE \ | ING
tant Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeon, General Hospital, which will be-|the grille separating them. L }
come vacant on Ist February, 1951. the gun, the husband forced the

he “SELF-HELP & THRIFT”
a fact. Just so is it a fact that
Friendly Society of 47 Swan St.,

The salary attached to the appointment is $240 per annum and
this Officer is permitted to make charges for the above-mentioned
ervices rendered to paying patients in the Hospital.

Further information regarding the appointment may be obtained
rem the Director of Medical Services, to whom applications should
be forwarded by 3lst January, 1951.
¢ 28.1.50—2n

PART ONE ORDERS

nearest guard to unlock the doors.
As he backed out of them it
the street, he walked int
arms of two warders report
duty. Both hus
were arrested.



—

=| takes no Levies nor Assessments
fron Ss members; gives better
; i and Bigger Bonus; takes
all the family as members from





5 years old; allows Loans to
member carries on a Savings
rtment; and pays anybody
(member or not).for making new
embers





at the rate of Sixty

Lieut.-Col. J. CONNELL, O.B.E., E.D., Conte: (basi ehehpnkio- day.
Cammandine, -
The Barbados Regiment. 2 LY-HELP & THRIFT”
Issue No, 4 26 Jan. 51.







(Over
1. PARADES

All ranks will parade at Regimental Headquarters at 1700 hours on Thursday

1 Feb, 51

HQ Coy will carry out specialists training. The open range is also allotted to

HQ Coy under arrangements to be made by the O.C.

’ Coy will do Mortar Training—2” Mortar Lesson 1.—Description and main-

t nce of mortar. N.C.Os will ensure that they know this lesson by Thursday.
“B" Coy will do L.M.G. Training—L.M.G, Lesson 2.—magazine filling, loading,
unloading, sight setting. Instructors will read this lesson in preparation for
Thursday.
Band
Band practic: parades
Thursday 1 Feb. 51

VOLUNTARY NIGHT
Â¥ There will be a voluntary parade for WOs & NCOs at 1700 hours on Tuesday
20 Jan. 51. The object of this parade being to assist WOs & NCO instructors in
the lessons they are going to carry out the following Thursday. WOs and NCOs
should make every effort to attend if possible.
2. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
Orderly Officer —- Lieut. P. L. C. Peterkin
Orderly Serjeant — 407 L/S Quintyne, L. G,
Next for Duty
Orderly Officer —
Orderly Serjeant

Open Everyday — See Hand-Bills

{ 27.1.51—2n.

he
SOCIETY, 47 Swan St.
Bata's Shoe Store)






























will be held on Monday 29, Wednesday 21 Jan. and

acid indigestion ?
headache too?

check both at once...
here’s what to do!

5 PEB, St

2/Lt. C. G. Peterkin
~ 409 L/S Reid, N. E,

M. L, D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
8.

-O.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.

BLADON

A.F.S., F.V.A.
Formerly Dixon & Bladon

NOTICE

Officers’ Reading File will be kept in the Officers’ Mess.
scheduled for Tuesday 30 Jan. 51 is cancelled.

PART Ti ORDERS

THE BARBADOS REGIMENT
26TH JANUARY, 1951

In future the
he shoot Q
oe a When unbalanced eating, over-
work or worry cause Acid Indi-
SERIAL No. 4.
SHEET No, 1.

FOR SALE

gestion, Headache...take pleasant-
'



tasting Alka-Seltzer right ay!





































Pe ae : 2 ape a “ROCK DUNDO'—Cave Hill. A
1. STRENGTH DECREASE — Resignations Combining alkaline gngredicnts | seetitalited Heat eepamentive
422 Pte. Kirton, FE. “A’* Coy. for neutralizing excess gastric | ® of some 32 acres in a very
464 Gibbs, N Ha, Permitted to resign from the Regiment idi with an analgesic for ovely position 2 miles from City
9 larke, V. 1 A ef, 26 Jan. 51 aerery 8 | ‘The house worthy of special
399 Clarke, 4 "A - w . 2 . 51, . z -n-Seltver ¢ 5 he house is vorthy of spe
7 Barrow, E. R Ps soothing pains, Alka Seltzer mag notice and possesses great charm,
ickly to relieve both discom- | its geheral condition is excellent
Dismissals quickly ¢ es ‘ } .
310 Pte. Carrington, D. HQ Coy. forts. | eng there is spacious accommoda-
432 , Cozier, R. A “A” ” .
348 Sealy, E. A. . Dismissed for non-attendance at par- os ot axative—re- | iio lca” urahita
413". Scott, Dac. "© ades from the Regiment w.e.f. 26 Jan. Alka-Seltzer is not a laxative—re CASABLANCA” — Maxwell's
229 Lewis, G. * 61, peated use won't hurt you. Take Com a Aantal Broperty: pe
6 e ; . . Vay body inest pre-war work~
as Bourne, E. L. = it at the first sign of ae and | manship. and well planned with
1 TRANSFERS — Reserve ain half an hour later, if symp- 2 reception, 5 large bedrooms, ver-
416 Pte, Walker, H. A. HQ Coy. ag ; andah, kitchen, pantry, sarage,
314 Green, V is Transferred to Reserve strength w.e.f. toms should persist. MioneROOInE: ator che lana decane
337. Hinds, C. MeN. ” 26 Jan, 51. proximately 2 acres with flower
M. L, D, SKEWES-COX, Major, Drop one or two tablets of Alka- and vegetable gardens, productive
S.O.L.F. & Adjutant, i ater. Watch orchard and coconut grove.
Seltzer into a glass of wat

The Barbados Regiment. acre of walled garden may be sold

separately as building site.

it sparkle into a refreshing solu-
tion — then drink it. Keep a sup-



















: ‘ a-Seltze “BETMAR” Navy Gardens.
handy — always! everite roof, detached garage an
‘ _ y rvant'’s quarters, on over 14,000
q. ft. of land, There are 2 large
reception rooms, 2 verandahs, 5
MONTREAL AUSTRALIA, NEW Alka-Seltzer helps bedrooms, 2 bathrooms etc. Suit-
. J ’







able for conversion into two semi-
detached houses at little cost.

ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)



The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will
accept Cargo and Passengers for



et _














“BON ACCUIL" — Pine Hill,

M.S. “TONGARIRO” is scheduled to St. Lueia, Grenada, and Aruba, and | Large well built residence in
sail Adelaide January 17th, Melbourne Passengers only for St. Vincent, part of this select area. .
January 2ist, Brisbane February ‘7th, Sailing on Wednesday 31st inst, Accommodation comprises large
Ree eee 15th, Arriving at Bar- respptlon Peon aie serene
jados : 51. ag study, 3 large bedrooms, 4 i.
This Saat ates space for Hard The M.V. “Caribbee” will Nee rarer ages, and outbuildings, Pleasant
Frozen and General cargo accept Cargo and Passengers for esr ty iat lawns and gardens with tennis
Cargo accepted on through il f Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, eon sabicac nan a tars : court. Grounds approx. 414 aeres,

ing with ppeare ch) Meat Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of Offered at attractive figure.
Lading with transhipment at Trinidad departure to be notified.



for British Guiana, Barbados, Windward
and Leeward Islands,









“CRANE VILLA"—Modern stone




















































































































- 1 4 i . built 2-storey property with “ap-
Fog, furrner, Particulars apply: — DWE, BCHOOMED OWN BENWEE Gl EST HOUSE prox: 3% acres bounded by Crane
FU thee Bee cQ. LTD., ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc. ? Hotel driveway. Converted in 2
B.W.1. Telephone: 4047 MRS, JEMMOTT. ‘TEL. 9196 Eeentent Torta arate
DA pose Se sae LTD., icebbiieas dia. Saat with good sea bathing. Offers in-
ADO! CANAD eccommernds, Righ vited,
B.W.1, = Pe elle: Sooking
Opt eta eee oem ne “THE OLIVES" — Upper Colly-
more Rock. This large mod-
er bungalow with approx, 1 acre
n a io eams ships of lawns, kitchen garden ne ry
chard. Large lounge, gallery,
SOUTHBOUND bedroor fitted kitchen, garage
Soils _ Sails ‘Sails Arrives FOR = = |-ete Centrally located.
Montreal Holifax Boston Barbados Barbados
Tae RODNEY” ; 17 Jan. 19 Jan. 29th Jan. 29th Jan. WELDING “DEANE HOLLOW” zSt. Luey. |My
“LAD NELSO’ on 1 Feb. 3 Feb. 12 Feb. 13 Feb Pleasant country home of stone
“CAN, CHALLENGER” - 15 Fev. _ 25 Feb, 25 Feb. BATTERY CHARGING hingle containing 3
“LADY RODNEY” Uae. 3 Mar. 5 Mar. 14 Mar, 15 Mar. living an ne rooms,
“LADY NELSON” pei i. ‘ fr. ervar > quarters, 2
“CAN, CHALLENGER" Pr a A eRe OS MOTOR REPAIRS and storerooms, 244. acres
“LAD ” ae ’ ‘ ertile land and an option for a
'Y RODNEY 16 Apr. 18 Apr. 27 Apr 27 Apr Seo . a further 2% acres. Offers consid-
NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives ges
Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax GORDON BOLDEN “SILVERTON” Cheapside.
ommodious 2-s stone S
“LADY RODNEY” 10 Feb. 12 Feb. 21 Feb, 22 Teb. ~ nading in ror es
a NELSON” 25 Feb, 27 Feb. 8 Mar. Mar - | ed wit E ae
“LADY RODNEY" 27 Mar. 28 Mar. 6 Apr. 7Apr. | — BARBADOS GARAGE | Beepibin a bedsociie es cation
ae ELSON, js fe Ne ane: e abt. - ze Ape 130 Roebuck St, ::: Dial 3671 | hen, 2 bathrooms ete Central-
LAD NEY" y ay. ay. _ ay. ly situated and suitable for con-
version into flats or boarding
N.B.—Subject to change without notice. All vessels fitted with cold storage cham. house.
bers. Passenger Fares and freight 1ates on application to :~— PESSOSSOSSS:.
_ % TOWER GARAGE—St. Matthias
% | Gap. An almost new property
GARDINER TIN 24 For D % suitable for a large
AUS & CO. LTD. — Agents. |% BARBADOS 3
5,
>
pete alae INVESTMENTS %

11,000 sq, ft, Contains living room,
verandah 2 sides,
kitchen and pantry.




3 bedrooms,

Consult - - - Offers. will




















3 be considered,
A. M. WEBB, % “BRANDONS"—St, Michael. A
Stockbroker é mellowed old stone property on

the coast with good boat anchor-












> age about 1 mile from town, with

33 Broad St. (Over ~ Sv2_acres of enclosed grounds, the

: -major part planted with produc-

Phoenix Pharmacy) | tive coconut and fruit trees. There

8 | are 3 reception, 4 bedrooms, gal-

—: Phone 4796 :— ¢ | jeries, 2 garages etc. _ Suitable

% either for continued use as a pri-

$605965¢ D665 3 OOO OO OOSOE# vate residence, a club or .board-







ing house,








HOTEL—Old established hotel
property on coast is now available

45 a going concern at a low figure,
Pull

Good
people,




HAvE YOU GOT A

COLD or COUGH

IF SO TRY

BROWNE'S
CERTAIN COUGH
CURE




information on application.

opportunity energetic

for











BUILDING LAND — Nearly 2
acres of land on edge of escarp-
ment near the Club Morgan, Ideal
position for good class property.









Col ASTLAND —
acres of excellent building
with sea frontage which may
old in half acre lots

St. James. 3



Janda
be
if required.



RENTALS
















The Unique Remedy for Coughs, Tn Chancery — “Inch Marlow.
Colds, Bronchitis, Sore Throat, Modern furnished bungalow,
Hoarseness, Bronchial Asthma, Flores"—Kont. Unfurnished,








Whooping Csugh, Diseate of the
Chest and Lungs, etc., ete.

C. CARLTON BROWNE
Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813





REAL ESTATE AGENT
AUCTIONEER

| PLANTATIONS BUILDING
Phone 4640






5 variety of pur-
poses other than a garage,

“LILA COTTAGE” — Britton
Cross Road. Timber Bungalow on



GERM LUBRICATING OILS

ARE BEST BY TEST
DON’T ONLY OIL IT — GERM IT,

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

appearance—all outstanding”
Say Motorists and Tyre Suppliers alike.

The tread rubber is ye Wider, flatter ireaa

! tougher, more shock- area
resisting than ever for tare seein ne
before, wears more woe.
The im roved -
Weather Treadee
with its new Stop-
Notches for quicker,

Gasoline Station * vrafalgar Street.

%& Handsome buttressed
sidewalls provide pro-
tection from kerb

safer stops — resists damage, and make
Bid awash Ky than you've ever THERE Is NO DOUBT ABOUT re

INSIST ON GOODYEAR TUBES

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM












BY GOODYEAR
“Stamina, strength and V4OV 2M)
LAVA











in, d $250.00 in Ralph Beard’s| 4nd bath, Government water and elec- on or before the 31st Jan- . £38 .
® Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny seams ee ae Datennd "ATES tricity installed. This property will be ibe S6at Ou can Tiust (With The Distinctive Flavour)
and pores wliere germs hide and cause ter- " 27.1,51—gn, | Offered for sale to public competition aes * ] 4
rible Itching, Cracking, Eezema, Peeling, at our office James Street, on Friday F. A, C, CLAIRMONTE, is quite a Fav ite in the Island
Burnin €ne, Ringworm, Peoriasts, | WATCHES — Just received Ladies| 204 February, 1951 a 2 p.m itions | Commissioner of Income Tax eee are eee
Blackhe: Pimples, Foot Itch and other | (arteen) Gents (fifteen) and Waterproof| For further particulars and conditions ‘ De: ; ~ Its quality is Unique
blemishes. Ordinary treatme: ia Slee only | Centre Seconds. Advance Store, James + sale apply to Hutchinson & Banfield, ¥ and eath Duties. .
temporary relief because they do not kill | ¢ 4 ’ 151 james Street. heme Note: —Any Hers: failing THE L N ° * ,
the germ cause. The new discovery, Nixo- | St a7.1.0i—2n. 17.1, 51—6m Ar i ae ae ailing | to GB.1-50.6 ONG-LIFE;HARDEST.W E “k RING TYRE Try It For Yourself.
: ia @ ante = iain make his return within A

derm kills the germs in 7 minutes and is WHEAT in its complete and most ap- ene : ;
guaranteed to give you a soft, clear, attrac- | oiling. form Freth crunchy flakes}, AT TOP ROCK—Delightful residenc the que date will be liable Blenders:
tive, smooth skin in one week, or money which delight the palate. For all ages | having 3 Bedrooms, large Lounge, sepa to a fine not exceeding ers:
back on ate san au pac’ rh Get |VIGRO is 100% food and it is always oT ene oe R fut aaah ee £100 and not less than £2 , 7

ar Pe ixoderm from _your ¢ nemist si a a natn hag, ath, moderr n uilt £ i less s 2 ~ 4
serene eaicsandves | ena, Getczomrymectany tam, Ainge | 204 cat an ne an and. will "be prosecuted THE CITY GARAGE JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

move the real Jon ’ Co y. M. Ford, Empire | on nearb aif an P © 4 St s sfactory 2a+
pixed Cause Of SKIN | Pharisees, Hnatlesoirs Donor Dintcion | neareat offer, | Yor Vic : oe a en se NR Roebuck St. Dial 4335
Bin | Feoniies tble, 1/9 ior :—C. B. PHILLIPS, 8 High Street, | A. Beard, Hardwood Als Phone } ic ae TRADING CO. LTD
ete 1 98.1.81,—in, | 4689, 26.1,.51—6n. | i 6.1.51--8n : Fes Live i


SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 1951



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

e
Caribbean
: .
Commissioners
To Confer 2 am. Holy Communion. 9 a.m. Choral
Bucharist and Address, 11 a.m. Matins

THE first Caribbean Scout Com- 224 Sermon. ¢ p.m. Children’s Service
missioners’ Conference, under the 220 non "ica @ Pu Pvensone ond
Chairmanship of Mr, John Durey, eee:
po se Commissioner for British ST. ee am. Com-
uiana 2 teed munion, 30 a.m. Procession, Solemi
fi , will be held at Trinidad Mass and Sermon—S.8. Chi-iren. 0
rom Wednesday next, 3lst Jan— p.m. Evensong and Sermon ¢nd Parish
eee 2nq February. a gag rege FE sgs Stret, Chelsea
F ar. , * toad., Beckles . Preacher: Canon

D.C. of Py . < Springer, Moore. 7 p.m. Solemn Evensong. Sermon
eg eee ce oe and Procession, Preacher; Canon Barlee.
nas been represen
Barbados. METHODIST

CHURCH SERVICES

ANGLICAN
ST. LEONARDS CHUROH HARVEST
PESTIVAL SUNDAY

Holy






P. Bruce.

B. Crosby,

am, Mr, A.

BE. J.

ane Fl—-11 a.m. and 7 p.m, Rev. B.
rosby.
CANADIAN DALKEITH—11 am. Mr
COMMISSIONER'S * BELMONTCS sim, Rev,
7 pm. Mr. J. W. Lovell.
VISIT sare DISTRICT—9
. . Hill. 7 p.m. Supply.
anne J. L. McGregor, Canadian “‘pRovipeNce—11 am. Rev.
ravelling Commissioner, who is Griffin, 7 p.m. Miss E. Bryan,
at present on a tour of the West , VAUXHALI—9 a.m. Rev. E. J. Griffin.
Indies, is due to arrive in Barba- 7 ae Mr. dos on 11th February and will be McCullough. 7 pan. Rev. H.C. Payne.
remaining until 17th. ; oath eee a.m, Mrs, Morris.
During his stay in the island, * }itipw iat 9 90
fe * WHITE HALL—9.30 a.m, Mr. G. Hayer
arrangements will be made for 7 p.m, Rev. R, McCullough. | ane

him to see troops in action, and bs as ae ce a.m, Rev. H. C,
rt . ayne, p.m. r. J. Layne
on Friday 16th, be will give a “yoLFTOWN—8.30 a.m, Rev. F. Law

talk to Scouters at Scout Head-
quarters at 4.30 p.m. Uniform
must be worn on this occasion.

renee, 7 p.m. Mr. V. B. St. John,
BANK HALL—9.30 a.m. Miss G. Oxley.
7 p.m, Mr. S. Phillips.
SPEIGHTSTOWN—11 a.m. Rev. F. Law~
rence, 7 p.m, Rev. F. Lawrence.

WOOD BADGE SELAH—I1 a.m. Mr. B, E, Barnett.
7 p.m, M.

Wood Badge (Cub & Scout) _ BETHESDA—11 a.m, Mr, N. Blackman.
Part I Studies (Theorectical) 7?" ?â„¢-



THE SALVATION ARMY
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL — 11 aun
Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m. Company Meet
ing. 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Conducted
who by Major L. Rawlins (R),
have had at least six months’ prac- aoe nant sere ay
. . SS eeting. p.m, ompany Meeting.
tical experience with a troop of 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher; Sr
pack are eligible to take Part I. Major Gibbs.
There is also opportunity for deaetny ater oe weit ese en
eeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting. 7 p.m.
Scouters to take Part II (In Camp) Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr. Captain
under the supervision of Mr. J. L. Bishop.
McGregor, Canadian Travelling seesine one ete a Holiness
od eeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting. 7 p.m
Commissioner. : 7 Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Lieutenant
This camp will be held in Tri- Reid.

nidad from 3rd until 11th March gaye CORNER —i1 5.1m. Holiness

. 3 pm. Company Meeting. 7 p.m.

firs one ee cost will be around ae Meeting. Preacher: Lieutenant

. ore.

All Scouters who have reached PIP, CORNIN-11 ant. Hotiness, Meet-

their 2ist year, have been war- if. 2 Pm. Company Meeting 7pm

Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr. Majo

ranted for at least three years, and Hollingsworth. be ee di

have attended a Preliminary | SEA VIEW—l11 am. Holiness Meeting

Course are eligible to attend, and fh "Kin? Preasher, Liculenant Gib:

a deposit of ten dollars must be pons. ‘
made with each application.

BADGERS’ CORNER

1950-51 have been received, and
can be had on application to Scout
H.Q., Beckles Road.

All warranted Scouters





MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK STREET. Harvest Festival.

9 am, Rev. A. C. Pilgrim. 3.30 p.m.
Cantata, Rev, D. C. Moore. 7 p.m. Rev.

During the past month or so We D. C, Moore,
GRACE HILL—11 a.m, Mr. O. Lewis.

have been able to publish very lit-

: 7 p.m. Mr. W. Swire.
tle of our activities, but neverthe- ° FurnecK—11 a.m. Rev. A. C. Pilgrim
less, there has been a great ad-— (Holy SOS CR SY s 7 p.m. Mr. U. Reid.

i in MONTGOMERY—7 p.m. Mr. Phillips.
vance in numbers as well as in 3iQoSnt—7 p.m. My, FG. Smith.
proficiency. i DUNSCOMBE—9 a.m. Mr. G. Francis.

In the youngest = of the 7 p.m. Mr. D. Culpepper,
Movement—Wolf Cubs—there has

ta ; CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
been a rapid increase in numbers, First Church of Christ, Scientist,
for apart from over 200 enrolled - Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street
its undays: 11 a.m. an p.m. ednes-

cubs, there are over 100 recruit days: 8 p.m. A Service which include
awaiting enrolment. Testimonies of Christian Science Healing

At present we are out of stock Subject of Lesson-Sermon: TRUTH,

Sunday, January 28th.

of Tenderpad Badges, but we hope y Seals 408:3A.

‘ Golden Text: T will
aoe will soon be re- praise thee, O Lord among the people:
lieved, a

. for thy mercy is great above the
WELCOME CORNER

heavens: and thy truth reacheth unto
the clouds,

We welcome these Tenderfoots:
and wish them good Scouting.

W. Cummins, E. Griffith,
Richardson (1st Sea Scouts), L.
Jones, E. Smith, W. Moore (Cathe-
dral).

Congratulations to the 1
who have gained the following





French Culture

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON.
Five hundred books were pre-
Scouts sented to the Modern Languages
Department of the University

College of the West Indies by

nee Class: L, Quintyne, T. France at a function held in the
Carter (ist Sea Scouts). Theatre of the University last
Class: R. Smith, A. week. At the same time the

Smith, A, Ward, G. Husbands, J. function marked the formation of
Barker, G. Pilgrim, R. Headley a local branch of Alliance Fran-

. Skinn Ist Sea Scouts). ?aise.
ee bisnnee, S. Pilgrim, Attended by professors of the
(Bethel) K. Laurence (Gill's University College, French or
Memorial). O. Springer, R. John- French-speaking citizens of

Kingston and arts students of the
University College, the function
amper: O. Springer, R. John— was divided in two parts, the first
an P Walton Ast Sea Scouts). presided over by Dr. T. Ww. J.
Despatch Rider: C. Walkes Taylor, C.B.E., Principal of the
(Gill’s Memorial), A. Seale, (St. University College and __ the
' Patrick’s), N. Smith, N. Clarke, second half by Mr. Arthur Hen-
L. Quintyne (1st Sea Scouts). ariks, prominent Kingston bus!-
Rescuer: N. Smith, N. Clarke, nessman, and University trustee.
G. Rudder (1st Sea Scouts). On behalf of the French
Venturer: N. Smith, N. Clarke, Government, Mr. Wellesley
G. Rudder (1st Sea Scouts), H. Bourke, Jnr., French Consular
Lewis (Bethel). Agent in Kingston, handed over

son, A. Smith, A. Ward, P. Wal-
ton, R. Headley (ist Sea Scouts).

aman’s: N. Smith (ist Sea 500 French books to Professor
shout), : M. Sandmann, head of the Modern
Bushman’s Thong: H. Lewis Languages Department. Professor
(Bethel), Sandmann said that he had

started negotiations for the gift

when M. Jean Bailloux, Director

of the Relations Culturelles ——

Sea Scouts) and ed Edinburgh University shortly

ee tants chamnel). after his appointment to the
Application has been made to University College in Jamaica.

1.H.qQ. for these Badge Certificates During the function Mr. Bourke

read a letter from M. Jacques
Island Offers Its

Hearty Congratulations to these
Scouts who have qualified for the
King’s Scout Badge:



Leguebe French Consul in Port-
of-Spain, Trinidad, regretting
that he could not be present as
originally planed. Mr. Bourke

Pirate Gold
also read, then handed to Dr.

te . Taylor, a letter meres the
. a - 7 .

A Touri Ba good wishes of the orbonne
8 st uf University of Paris for the Wel-

fare of the College. ;
The formation of Alliance
Francaise resulted in Mr. Arthur
Hendriks, being elected President,
Mr. Wellesley Bourke, Jnr. Ist.
Vice President, Dr. Taylor, 2nd.

NEW YORK.
Britain’s palm-clad Robinson
Crusoe islands, dotted about the
western side of the Atlantic, are
engaged in an all-out battle among
themselves for the American

i id
holiday-maker’s dollar. Vice aera eee 7.
Tiny British possessions, ignored mann, cretary; . ,
f nturies, are having their Paris, assistant Secretary; and
faces lifted their tropic beaches Mrs. E. C. Skempton, headmis.-
photographed, their climates and tress of Wolmer’s Girls’ School,
scenic beauties extolled as never ‘Treasurer.
before. See en
War scares in other parts of the . ‘i ' oes
world have brought an unexpected Harbou r 0. 2"
boom to the West Indies. But i
are up against a new factor, as the
aeroplane makes it possible for In Carlisle Bay
holiday-makers to go ever farther Swedish Training Ship "Sunbeam",
afc Seana Mahaney he sods
' They have competition now BR EAS eee ecine &, Sch
from South Africa and Australia Molly None, seh, huieilie M.. Smith.
— r the American Yacht Juanita and Sch. United Pilgrim
yeh going efter © ARRIVALS m ”
holiday-maker ae big way. Sch. Lady Noeleen, 41 tons net, Capt.
Bermuda has already lost her “Sy "Omi Chal aa
S.S. Canadian allenger, 3,92 ons
commanding lead in the island net, Capt. Clarke, from Trinidad.
popularity stakes among American eee
sunsseekers. Top favourite new is In Touch With Barbados
Jamaica, In 1950 Jamaica drew Coastal Statio:
66,268 U.S. visitors, against Ber- Cable and Wireless ne oa: advise
—_* 61,863. that er aren corner a
e British Government have the, following s ps tl rough their Bar-
released £3,000,000 rr of < cAweroen 83, Forneeo: oe
blo¢ked U.S. funds in London to Cabe~Georgia. S.S- Quadriga, SS. Tad)
enable private enterprise to build Repney. £0. Pate oe wicolecs, 8.8,
a new “tourist city” near Kingston, Neocardia, 8.5. Runa, SS. Alcoa Roam-
Jamaica. er, S.S. Esso France, S.S. Silver Walnut,





* 3 S.S. Beech Hill, S3.S. Defender, S.S. Rio
The little-known Jamaican Jachal, 5.5. Bonaire, S.S. Bayano, S.S
dependency of the Cayman Path Finder, S.S. Empress of §




Islands is also being promoted as
a new holiday paradise.
It has some of the world’s best

saaepepalanceanepiapepeiieaaenarmmmmaatestiniemiiaidpsatamt
in the sandy beaches. Several he
already made minor hauls
silver and gold coins.

sport, fishing, wonderful bathing, “ Nassau, Bahamas, long a mil-
and a new thrill for the jaded jjgnagire’s resort, is n¢ ’
holiday-maker, — hunting fot the middle-income grout

buried treasure supposedly left by A newcomer the




pirates.
Tourists may hire a mine detec-
tor to see if they ean, find metal



31 hours

York. =—L.E





B. B.C. Radio

Programmes

Hereditary
Disease



















SUNDAY, January, 28 1951

6.30 a.m. Week End Sports Report; A Milw bs CHICAGO.
6.45 a.m. Sandy MacPherson at the ilwaukee physician reports
Theatre Organ; 7.60 a.m. The News; that hemophilia, a lack of. clot-
Fron the Baniannalyss: 7.15 a.m. ting in the blood, is net the mys-
gramme Parade; aglish Maga. terious and uncommon disease
Rine; 8.0 2.m. all Fo ons 9.00 mest people believe it to be.
from Britain: 9.15 a.m. Close Down; _ Ene disease which came to
11.15 28, Progr ne Perade; 11.20 public attention through its prev-
a nterlude; am. Sund: - i i i
vice; 12 noon News; i210" en alence in certain royal families
News Analysis; m. Close Down; Of Europe is both hereditary and
413° p.m. Musie 2 ine; 4.30 p.m. congenital
Sunday Half Ho stoners *
Cree, os Mon? Bee WOeuncet "ge But the physician, Dr. Armand
chestrs: € 45 pm. Programme Parade; J. Quick of Marquette University

7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m

News School of Medicine, reported in

7.15 p.m. Caribbean Voices; the current



The body of Christ: #40 issue of the journal
: » Newsreel; 15 p.m. Sunday of the American Medical Associa-
Service 8.45 p.m Composer of the tion:
Week: -9.00 p.m The half Century; “a ee
10.00 p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. From “In a surprisingly large number

the Editoriols; 10.15 p.m. The Cathedral ili itiv ilv

Organs: 10.30 p.m. London Forum. 11-00 history previous evidence ~~
r ybert Casedesus. 3 >

Ot eee ae disease) is obtainable.”





MONDAY, January 29, 1951,

2.30 a.m. BIW Cotton band Show; He cited Queen Victoria of
7.00 am The News: 7.10 am. News Ano. England as an example of a
iy ~ es > a aon ee s; 7.25 carrier—the disease is transmitted
é “ogramm ‘arade 3 a.m
Panily Plight, 1.45 a.m. Singing is so tO male children through women
Food a Thing: 8.00 a.m. Let’s make in much the same manner as
Music; £.45 a.m, The debate Continues: ¢ : wi “enti
9.00 an The News; 9.10 a.m, Home colourblindness ‘with an entize-
pews from Britain: 9.15 a.m. Close ly negative” family history.
en 11.15 a.m Proucanany ene Dr, Quick said a new test is
11,30 a.m. Listeners Choice; 5 a.m " * i " «
Commonwealth Survey; 12.00 noon proving valuable to the doctors
The News: 1210 pm. News Ana- by warning them of the exist-
lysis; 12.15 p.m. Close Down: 4.45 ja ded
E.m. Composer of the Week; 4.15 p.m ence of hemophilia, He ad

that the condition can be treated





Ray Martin end his Orchestra; 56.00 p.m.
Composer of the Week; 5.15 p.m. The just as well by a family doctor as
story Teller; 5.35 ym. Interlude; 5,45

by a specialist.

p.m. Piano P me; 6 00 p.m. Nights at ,, -
the Opera; 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade; The Milwaukee expert said
700 pt ‘Tr New 7.10 p.m News h 1 dic ft
7.0 " 1e News; mn, ° g

Analysis; 7.15 p.m. Our Mutual Friend; that abnormal ble ng ® =
+45 pin. Family Flight; 8.00 p.m. Radio tooth extraction or a minor

Newsreel: 6.15 p.m. Commonwealth operation is sometimes the first

7; 8.38 p.m. Singing is so Good a gj S1iss ceed
ye 45 p.m. Composer of the @m of hemophilia.—I.N.S
ek; 9.00 p.m. BEC Symphony Or-







chestra; 10.00 p.m. The News; 10.10
p.m. From the Editorials; 10.15 p.m,
Ray's a Laugh 1¢.45 p.m. Science Re- N J t M.
view; 11.00 p.m. How to Woo
"BOSTON ew € a y
WRUL 15.299 Mc WRUW 11.75 Mc
WRUW 17.75 Me v
Wate eNom Break Record
6.30—9.00 ...... 18. 18 Me. i
4.15—6.00 . Ul ul a Me F S T :
6007.15 . ; ) 9.58 Me. " ¥
6.60—7/15 6.195 Me. or owe 1
7 9 9. 58 Mc,
7 6.195 Me. ALL records for the east-west
Atlantic air crossing are expected
— to be broken soon by Britain’s



first jet bomber. : zy
F SI} . The aeroplane, an English Elec-
trie Canberra, is likely to fly from
or s 1ortwave England to the United States
e when negotiations, now going on,
Listeners are completed for Canberras to be
i! built in America as well as in
‘ a four British factories,
Talk in “Science Review” It is also.to be produced in
The talks given from time to Australia.
time in the BBC’s General Over- Range and performance de-
seas Service under the title ‘Are tails of the Canberra, which is
You Receiving Me?’ in which the fitted with two powerful Rolls-
problems of short-wave listening Royce Avon jet motors, are still
is discussed have given much use- on the secret list.
ful advice to listeners in all parts But the bomber has a fighter-
of the world, One of these talks like speed, and United States air
cr discussions will be given in force officers who saw Wing Com-
‘Science Review’ in the coming Mander R, P. Beaumont fly the
week, A listener, Mr. A. E. Canberra at the Farnborough Air
Wilkins of Bombay’ was recently Sree ase year were greatly
in England on leave and he went ressed. :
to Broadcasting House to discuss _ Jf the var ys have et
problems of short-wave listening yet been vere wd an “ ee ibe
vith F. C, McLean, Head of the cluded satistactorty -. am ;
nsf i : * me ; Canberra is put into production
BBC's Engineering Projects Group. jn the United States, then it will
They discussed wavelengths and pe used by the USAF in prefer-
frequencies, the best kinds of ence to some American designs.
aerials to use, and the problems —L.E.S.
of interference. Their conversa-



tion was recorded and this re- fi :

cord i tne presen. on Monty’s Car May

oir coer 29th. January, at Be Retired
Inspector French Serial THE car used by Field-marshal

i A : Lerd Montgomery may soon cease
A new serial_ begins in the to be No. 1 transport of the Brit-
BBC’s General Overseas Servic@ jsh Army.
in the coming week. This is a jt has earned the title by carry-
radio dramatization of one of the jng five field-marshals and two
most exciting of Freeman Wills generals the equivalent of nine
Crofts Inspector French stories, times round the world in the past
‘Sir John Magill’s Last Journey.’ 12 years. The car may be retir-
The book has been adapted by ed,

Patrick Riddell who is well known The car was first used by
as a radio writer; his dramatisa- _ General Sir Walter Kirke in
tion of “The Count of Monte 1939. :

Cristo” was broadeast in the It passed in succession to Field- |
BBC’s Home and Overseas Ser- marshals Lord Ironside, Lord}

translated into several Gort, and Sir John Dill, General
European languages. Broadcasts Sir Bernard Paget and Field
of this story will be given in marshal Lord Alanbrooke,
eight episodes at 8.15 p.m., on —
Thursdays beginning on the Ist
February.

vices and



British Export
Horses Shine

LAST year there were at least
600 individual British-bred win-
ners in foreign countries, Ireland
excepted.

West Indies Programmes

_ While the news is not definite
it is hoped that ‘Caribbean
Voices” on Sunday 28th inst will
feature the first part of ‘Henri
Christophe’ the verse play by the
young St. Lucian poet, Derek
aleott. ‘Caribbean Voices’ is on .
the air every Sunday at 7.15 p.m. ,, They are ue re 4
and consists of verse and prose ae _~ B itish a revi-
by West Indian writers. Contri- eee eet and 5 eres abeaed
butions to this programme which This is z positive army, of which
are always. welcome should be I have Web record ee
sent to the BBC, Box 408, King- al bject to animals
ston, Jamaica, B.W.I. Next Wed- Fo Brkt Tay Av oyre. OO it is
nesday, 31st ‘inst, sees the final en tae oa thei
broadcast in the current discus- ¢i-es, An example is Noor
sion series ‘Can We Do It?’ in “ Noor, one of the best horses
which John Figueroa has been exported from this country in
interviewing three individuals on recent years,.was shipped to the
the question of what ordinary {S.A, ‘after he had raced here;
eerie Wada tae’ proedoan, eenaes age Vales on
cL} = world’s ils i: ast, made headlines.
like all West Indies programmes His achievements, in terms of
from London is at 7.15 p.m, figures, are recorded in the statis-
. ' ‘ tical abstract issued by the Thor-
The Week's Music oughbred Breeders’ Association
Included in the musical broad- he oe ee aera gta
casts from London in the coming ,
week are the following worthy ;
ef special mention: Robert Case- 15 eee ve.
dus, one of the most Gistingaisned nient example, not because it
ef contemporar ianists will y
play comnposltiness of Ravel and pot By ® peg _ caine toe
Debussy, in the interpretation of of my investigation was to trace
whose works he is considered by some of the other winners and to
some critics to be unsurpassed. ghow where they all won.

His half-hour programme will
begin at 5.15 p.m. on Wednes- Admiral’s Walk was a good
sire but never in the top flight.

day, 31ist.inst. The BBC North-
ern Orchestra conducted by Louig ‘Ten of his stock won between
them 29 races in foreign coun-

Cohen, will present a concert on

Sunday, 28th, inst. at 6.00 p.m. tries in 1950. E
As conductor of the Harrogate The countries were India,
Municipal Orchestra he helped to Malaya, Ceylon, Venezuela,
build a reputation for the best France, the South Caribbean.
light music under the most pleas- oo ~ as eer ‘ dollars,
ant* conditions ig z ti rancs an slivares.

ant’ conditions at thig attractive a ittle-20-year-old

Yorkshire spa on the fines of the , Montrose, ‘
eontinental spas and Viennese horse, standing in Ireland at £26,
beer gardens. The concert in- had 23 winners of 38 races last
cludes. work by Haydn, Jarnfelt Year, including the two principal
and Smetana races in South Africa, and others

Â¥ in Malaya, India, Venezuela and



Norway,
BLOWING ONE’S BUGLE Casanova, better known, per-
haps, in this country, had 13
VIENNA, winners abroad, including one
Whenever fire broke out in the distinguished winner in Sweden.
Burgenland village of Neustift, This was Amigo, who won

an

18-year-old farm labourer’s job nothing less than the Stockholms-
f storapris and Kapplogningssalls-








vas to blow the fire bugle. Afte
> : 2 rie!
bugie had called people t kapets-storapris! ' ~
: Colombo, Colorado Kid, Coup
elp € uish large fires for g ; i
ge ae here aes he de Lyon, Diplomat, Fairhave:
7 . eae "0 Furrokh Siyar, His Highne
came ‘sus Khan Bahadur, Legend of France
oure ‘ - Montrose, Pay U nd William of |
Valence are o few more sir
‘ the with multiple winners abroad.
2b lef —L.E 8.





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CORPORATION LIMITED.

NOTICE

et

Due to the large increase in the price of
Fuel Oil the Company are now forced to
advance the present Surcharge from 20% to
27%.



The new Surcharge will take effect on all
bills rendered for the month of February and
onwards,

V. SMITH,

General Manager.

Yours faithfully,

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CORPORATION, LTD.















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PAGE FOURTEEN





POSTHUMOUS AWARD



THE U.S. ARMY’S BRONZE STAR MEDAL is pinned on Mrs. Susie Cooper, who accepts the honour on

behalf of her son, the late Corporal Wade E. Rutledge, killed in action in Korea.

Cpl. Rutledge, who

was a member of the famous 25th Infantry Division; fired into the advancing enemy, allowing many of
his comrades to withdraw to safety. Major R. B. Woodruff, lst Army Deputy Chief, performs the cere-

mony.—Express.







Moyra Blair Wins Again

Tornadoes

Sail Well

By Our Yachting Correspondent

JACK WILKINSON’S

Moyra Biair scored another

victory in the “B” Class at the Second Regatta yeterday to

repeat its performance in the First Regatta.

The boat,

which is skippered by Tom Wilkinson, started from scratch
with Okapi but gave War Cloud two minutes.

At the completion of the second
round it had a good lead and kept
this throughout In this round
Fantasy broke down and dropped
out.

Tornado K 29, Cyclone which is
owned by Messrs. Jason Jones,
gave an excellent performance.
Unlike the previous Saturday, it
sailed perfectly well in the steady
breeze and calm. seas yesterday.
Skipper Michael Mayers, with his
crew of Ian Gale and another,
brought it in fourth in the “Cc”
Class after giving » few minutes
tovsuch boats as Magwin, Peggy
Nan, and Scamp.

Ten boats started in the “B”
Class. Circe did not race. Wizard,
which was given ten minutes fom
MoYra Blair kept her lead up to
the end of the first round, Ranger
was second and Moyra Blair, who
had by now covered some ground
was third. Although Gypsy and
Mischief started together at the
end of this round Gipsy was about
three minutes ahead of Mischief.

At the end of the second round

Moyra Blair had the lead. She
was followed closeiy by Okapi
who was out to give battle,

Wizard had now dropped to third
nosition while War Cloud crept
into fourth place, a few seconds
ahead of Ranger, the fifth boat.

In the final

lap it was all
Moyra Blair.

She kept the lead
on Okapi and’ was “given the
gun”. In the third place was
Lester Toppin’s Gipsy, skippered
by Watchie Burke, and fourth
Jack Badley’s War Cloud,

A little bird told me yesterday
that Hammond Burke, who at the
beginning of the season said. “I
am resting this year,” is sailing
as one of the crew of the Moyra
Blair. This meant that Burkes
were in the first three “B” boats
yesterday. 4

Cyclone by her performance
yesterday, showed that Tornadoes
are made out of good stuff.
Maurice Leach also gave a fairly
good performance in his Tornado
Comet but Ivan Perkins’ Edril
was sailing backward and _ for-
ward as if skipper Noel Emptage
had forgotten:the course. At one
time the Edril went ahead and
left one of its crew who fell
everboard, in the water.

Apart from the Tornadoes eight
other boats started in the “C”
and Centreboard Class. Two new
beats Missbehave and Madness
didnot race.

Honcurs went to the Lightning
Scamp which came in a few
seconds ahead Peggy Nan, Third
was Colin Bellamy’s Magwin
which closely defeated Tornado
Cyelone. At the end of the first
round the boats were in the sam@
position.

Five “D” Class boats started
but Van Thorndyke dropped-out
mid-way in the secgna round.
This left Olive Blossom, Buc-
caneer, Peter Pat, and Imp sail-
ing.

Vectivey Johnson's Imp came
first followed by Winston Has-





ie

EYES UNDER

WATER ! THERE'S Sq
CHLORINE IN
THIS POOW!!

ITTLE TODINE'S. THEME SONG ALL
LAST SUMMER WAS “ WITH MY
“ EYES WIDE OPEN I’M SWIMMIN’....”

Baggott skippered. In third place
was the new boat Buccaneer.
_David Payne’s Mohawk must be
given a big hand. It carried off
honours in the Intermediate Class
after sailing two well timed
rounds. ‘

In this Class nine boats started,
Midway in the first round Arthur
Evelyn's Dawn dropped out. At
the end of this round Mohawk had
a good lead. Its nearest rival was
Eagle which was many seconds,
behind.

Throughout the second reund
Mohawk kept the lead and came
in first. Len Hoad managed to
edge the Reen into second posi-
tion, Eagle was third, beating
Coronetta by many seconds.

The Third Regatta will be sailed
next Saturday, February 3 and
the Fourth on the following Satur-
day, February 10. This had to he
done because of Intercolonial
Cricket on the last two Saturdays
in February and Horse Racing on
the first two Saturdays in March,
After this period the regattas may
take place. as before, every other
Saturday.

The results were as follows:

“B" Class: 1. Moyra Blair. 2
Okapi. 3, Gipsy.

“C” Class: 1. Scamp. 2. Peggy
Nan. 3. Magwin.

Intermediate: 1. Mohawk. 2,
Reen, 3. Eagle.

“D” Class: Imp. 2. Olive Blos-

som, 3. Buccaneer,



MeMahon Scores 61
In Leeward
Tournament

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST, LUCIA, January 27.

In bright weather but with a
heavy out field, Leeward batted
defensively until the Gore-Kirnon
sixth. wicket partnership. Me
Mahon was brilliant in parts;
Livingstone and Kirnon the lefl-
hander batted well, Of _ the
Windward speedsters Mason,
Crick, Drysdale and Pemberton,
-he former three bowled steadily,
Asgill, Griffith and Thomas slow/
medium also bowled well, Faulty
fielding and poor catching affected
the averages. Six catches went
abegging. There was a good at-
tendance:

The Scores
Claxton ¢ Mason, b Asgill gee
Eddy b Crick 5
Livingstone c wkpr. Soso b Mason 25
McMabon b Drysdale . -. 61

Wilkin I.b.w. Drysdale... Pe
Kirnon not out .. ‘ -. 3
Gore ¢ Phillips b Griffith .. 4s 0 3T
Davis run out ,.., inate 9
Matthew not out , ‘ 2

Extras A 5

Total (for 7 wkts.)

Fall of wickets:

1—ll, 2—4l,
4—111,

5—113, 6—158, 7—179,
Crick 1 for 26; Mason 1 for 31; Drys-

date 2 for 24; Pemberton 0 for 5; Asgill
1 for 46; Thomas 0 for 18; Griffith 1 for

28,
—Reuter,








bbe WHEN PAPA AND MAMA TAKE
HHER FOR AN EYE CHECKUP.WoOW!

SHE WON'T EVEN. WINK |!



“Wind Tuniel”
May Speed Up
Space Travel

OTTAWA, January 27.

Rocketship space travel may be
brought closer by experiments
being carried out in the National
Research Council’s laboratories
here, according to a scientist en-
gaged on the work.

A new kind of “wind tunnel”
has been built at the -cost of
$250,000 which will show how ob-
jects behave at speeds of 3,125
miles per hour.

Instead of having propellers to
create wind speed the new wind-
producer uses a vacuum.

It is simply a, 10-yard sphere
niade of thick steel in which a
vacuum is created by powerful
pumps,

When the valves are opened, the
cutside air rushes in at seven times
the speed of sound.

This shrieking, howling current
lasts only 15 seconds, but could
be made to last longer by building
a bigger globe, engineers
explained,

Models fixed in the path of this
short lived blast of air show the
same variations in performance
as experienced by jet air-craft
and supersonic missiles,

The Council's scientists said
that it was only through such
data that man would eventually
be able to design an aircraft
space-ship or a rocket capable of
attaining about 3 miles per sec-
ond “breakaway” velocity needed
to penetrate the earth’s atmos-

pheric envelope and get into the

free space where friction would
be negligible.—Reuter, biake

‘FLU RAGES IN
HONG KONG

HONG KONG, January 27.

Thousands of people here have
been stricken with influenza, be-
iieved to be the same type as that
now sweeping Europe,

The Government Medical OMicer
said he had never known such
a widespread outbreak in the
colony, but added that the epi-
demic is mild and no deaths have
been reported. —(C.P.)

’ °

New Eastern Resolution

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 27

The 12 Asian and Arab nations
whose present resolution before
the Political Committee has been
criticised by some United Nations
delegates as too general, will put
another revision before the Com-
mittee on Monday.

According to usually reliable
scurces, the new revised resolu-
tion will attempt to incorporate
some of the Canadian suggestions
made during the. general debate














SUNDAY ADVOCATE

13 Killed In
Plane Crash !

ROME, Jan. 27.

Thirteen people were killed and
four injured when an Italian four
engined airliner crashed to-day at
Tarquinia 55 miles northwest of
Rome.

Airplane offices said all passen- y
gers were non-Italians. r

Four of the crew of five were |
among the dead,

Eye witnesses said the plane
was struck by lightning as it lost {J
height in a heavy rainstorm to
approach Rome airport.

There was a blinding flash and
the machine crashed near the
main railway line to Rome,

Among the dead was a four
months’ old baby girl.

Airline officiais announced that
seven British subjects were among
‘he dead and another was lying
injured at Tarquinia hospital.

A four months’ old child killed
in the crash was the daughter of
an American couple.

The parents now in Tarquinia
hespital suffering from severe
shock and bruises have not yet
been told that their child is dead.

The second pilot also killed in
the crash, was to have been mar-
ried tomorrow it was reported.

He was the only Italian crew
man who was a’ bachelor.

The company told Reuter to-
night that the disaster was a
“major tragedy for us.”

The airliner’s Commander was
the best pilot in the Company’s
employ, it was added.——-Reuter.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 1951





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| Boxed In Freedom

MARSEILLES, Jan, 27.

A stowaway who lived for 10
days in the darkness of a wooden
case arrived here to-day from
Sofia aboard an Italian steamer
claiming he had “chosen free-
dom”.

The man who gave his name as
Cristof said he had himself nail-
ed inthe crate in Sofia, The
crate was stamped automobile,
Betas —Reuter




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ACCIDENT

Roy Pryme yesterday became
unconscious for a short while after
he was involved in an accident
with the car M—911 when riding
the bicycle X—528 at the bottoin
of Bishop Court Hill. The car i
owned and was being driven by
Edward Evelyn of Colloden Road

Pryme was taken to the Genera}
Hospital, treated and discharged
The car brakes were tested and
found to be in working condition,

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BOLTON LANE











THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
(Local and Visiting Mem-
bers only)

FEBRUARY










——————

SOME MENU
SUGGESTIONS

with BREAKFAST — i

For Pancakes and Waffles
CHOCOMEL—a Chocolated Flavoured Drink

with DINNER |

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|
|
|

SATURDAY,
3rd, 9 p.m.

Music by HARRY BANNIS-
ter and his Orchestra.
Admissien to Ballroom 2/-

28.1.51—I1n.








ROYAL BARBADOS
YACHT CLUB

FLANNEL DANCE

On SATURDAY, 3rd FEB-
RUARY, 1951.

(For Members and their friends)
In honour of the Captain,
Officers and Cadets of
H.M.S, “Devonshire.”
Dancing 8.00 p.m. to 12,00

Midnight
ADMISSION

| By order of,
The Committee of Management,

T. BRUCE LEWIS,
Manager & Secretary,
Members introducing their {

!

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* DESSERT BROWN & POLSON’S CORN FLOUR



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and will make a definite provision aca — ——S—S—SSSS=S= ae
for a Korean cease-fire. ec uy — S 9SO99OF oo 920908
sete! BOXING o FUL
! -
The Weather |; at the Talking about RADIOS! . }
TODAY YANKEE STADIUM
Sus ao Se a.m, | Brittons Hill ; ' VALUES
Sun Se a ‘ dom, i | e
ny a. — Tuesday ~~ Feb. 13th a o wrong FOR A [EN
iting: > 2 ao
High Water: 742 am., 7.48 | KID RALPH PP can tg
pan. (163 Ibs.) You
YESTERDAY vs.
Rainfall (Godringtox) nil | KID F RANCIS if if A
Tg see eat to Keser. | (162 Ibs. if you specify Pag
‘Temperature (Min.) 75.0°F _






Wind Direction (9 a.m.)
E.N.E., (11 a.m.) E.N.E.

Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour

Baremeter (9 a.m.) 30.002,
(11 a.m.) 29.997

e By Jimmy Hatlo







Al KZ
betes
yuats! 7 !

Il

Zz



|



In return match for the
Light-Heavy weight
Championship | of
BARBADOS

10 Rounds

FERGUSSON





Semi-Final :
SAM KING (130 Ibs.)
vs.

HAL WILLIAMS
(131 lbs.)



PYJAMAS

Included in our huge Stock of these are - - -

A

8 Rounds SHIRTS
SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS and PYJAMAS
Preliminary In GREY, WHITE, TAN and BLUE

VICTOR LOVELL

Sizes: 144 to 17 @ $7.90 each
(122 Ibs.)

t PYJAMAS

In GREY, CREAM and BLUE
Size: 40 and 42 @ $15.64 per pair

PULLOVERS



vs.
BELFIELD KID
(125 Ibs.)

6 Rounds

They are designed to give satisfaction.





’ e
Ring Side $2.00 a ; In WHITE and COLOURS
Balcony ... $1.50 (All Sizes)
Cage $1.00 THF CENTRAL EMPORIUM Prices from $4.00 to $8.93
Arena ‘nae eL.00
Bleachers .............. 48

Obtainable at - - -

'N. E. WILSON & Co.

The Swan Street Ultra Modern Store with the Broad Street
. Goods at the Swan Street Prices

4200 ni:

Winner of the champion-
ship will receive a Belt
presented by

Da COSTA & CO., LTD,

(Central Foundry Lid.—Proprietors.)

Corner of Broad & Tudor Streets

Phone



31, Swan Street

DIAL 3676

+

- , »
be gt CORES SES PDO OT IESG OOOO GOT SLM OOOO




PAGE 1

PAGJ FOI RTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 28. 1M1 rosifiniois AYYAIIO THE U H ARMY 8 BRONZE STAR MEDAL i pinned on Mr*. Bul Cooper, who accapt* the honour on behalf of htr von. the UU Cwporal Wad* E Rutlcdge, killed in action in Korea. Cpl. RuUedge. who IU a member of the famon* S6th Infantry Division, flred Into the advancing enemy. allowing many of hi', roiniade.-. to withdraw to tvafety. Major R. B WoodruR, lt Army Deputy Chief, perform* the ceremony -Express. Moyra Blair Wins Again Tornadoes Sail Well By Our Yachting Correspondent "V\ i i if I Tuin." l "< Mohawk must be producer uses a vacuum. ( -it given a big hand. It carried off It is simply %  to-yurd sphere TonMdo K 29 < yrlene which is i,0J 'u r?i * 'he Intermediate Class made of thick steel in which a owned by Messrs Jason Jones a er **"<"* x *'<> wo" timed vacuum la created b> powerful performance! ,ount •"'.'Si"* ... ,„.. -_ _,, h saded perfectly well in the steady Midway In the first round Arthur lhc sUCft | 0 f SOU nd uS^^Su&J22J?£& £**£ P?*" ,,ro M**' "ft AI Trui shrieking, howling current Skipper Muh.el Mayers, with his the end „f this round Mahawk had i asU only IS seconds, but could le and another. a good lead Its nearest rival was be made lo last longer by building Kagle which wal many secondB bigger globe, engineer.-. *>*£* %  explained. Throughout the second round Model) fixed in the path t,t this Mohawk kwpt the lend and came ?hort lived blast of air show the KMt> started in the, IV "I Br *.l -V"" H " d manaIed ,0 *•"< variations In MfftN claw ra^riM ?-! ww IL •* %  ,hr R ~" m ' ,econd P 0 1 !" experienced by jet atr-crafl S „ Ti> < W '^' t,on E ** le wa %  ** boating and supersonic missl! wMeh was given ten minute* ffhm CorwnetU by manv seermds. The Council's scientists said Marra niair kept her lead up to lhat it was onlv through 'he end of the first round. Ranger The Third Regatta will be salted rt lta thol miin would eventuoll) wae second and Moyra Blab-, who * Saturday, February 3 and ^ a0 | e .,, ,|,. M( ; n ; ,„ aircraf. had by now covered some ground ,hc Fourth on the following Batui, .,;,„.hip or a rocket capable of was thir.l Although Cjp-y and ii>.v. February 10 This had to lie ail „ mmg ab out 3 miles per secMtarhfef itarted together at the £" ,l 1>CCflUSC ln, ^ olonlal ond breakaway" velocity needed "*•>' 1^ nenetrate the earth's atmosnto tho where friction broughl it in fourth In the C" Class alt' ew minutes 1" such iwvats as Magwin, TecfT Via. and Scamp. 13 Killed In l*lane Crash ROME. Jan. 27 Thirteen people were killed and four injured when an Italian four • B fj w d airUnwt crashed to-day at Tarqulnia 55 miles northwest of Rome Airplane offices aaid all passengers were non-Italians Four of the crew of five were uniting Ihe dead. .'Hesse* said the planewas struck by lightning as it loat height in a heavy rainstorm to %  i rport. There wa* a blindniR flash and the machine crashed near the main railwuy line to Home. Among the dead was a four "Id baby girl. Airline officials announced that •reel iintish subjects weie inwofj and another was lying injured at Tarquinia hospital A four months' old child killed in the mall wa% the daughter of on American couple Tho pertnta now in Tarqulnin hospital sufferms from severa •hock and bruise* have not yet been told that their child is dead. The second pilot also killed in the crash, was to have been mnrlied tomorrow it was reported. He was the only Italian crew nan who was a bachelor The comp.mv told Renter tonight tliat the disaster ffM I "major tragedy for us The airliner's Commander was the best (Hot in the Company': employ, it was added Reater. Boxed lit Freedom MARSEILLES. Jan. 27 A stowaway who lived for 10 owned and was being driven b> Edward Evelyn of Collodcn Road Prvmc was taken to the Oenarftl Hospital, treated and dixhargecl I.rakes were tested and found to be in working condition. done because .nd.Ml.U round Gipsy was about £rtcket' "'^J"A^-"^.JW" tc penetrate the ... zrj£n&*e offl Ear "^^ x ss ez22z M ou( to give battle. The rat Whrard had now .hopped to third oosilion while War Cloud crept "B" Class: I. M. into fourth plare. g few seconds Okapi. 3 Gipsy ahead of Ranger, the fifth boat. "C" Class: 1. Scamp. 2. Pegg; i results were as follows: oyra Blair 3 Magwm Intermediate: Mohawk In the Hi Moyra Rlalr She kept lhc lead o„*" %  Of) Okapi and was given the ^ CU? lino 2 Olive I sun". In the th.rd place was EO n7 3 BKraneJr LaaAar ToppUl'l Gipsy, skippered l >>• Watchle Burke, and fourth Jack Badlcv' War (loud A hide bird thai Hammond beglnninc of the season said am resting this year/' Is sailing ns one of the crew of the Meyrs Blair. This meant that Burkewete in ihe first three "B" boats yesterday. War Cloud. ** * l c* fi S !' J I toid me yesieni^ \\ 'Malion Seores 61 ft2r, I Buike. who at the ,M JQ lit LeewaWt] Tournament Cyclone uv her performance ycMerday, showed that Tornadoes are made out of good aluff. Maurice Ix>ach also gave i f.mU -ood i>erfo!mnnce in his Tornado l^aarl but Ivan PerkinsEdrll was sailing backward and for%  FLU RAGES Ihl HONG KONG HONG KONG. January 27. Thousands of people here hii/< been stricken wilh iiilluenza, be ileved to be the nms) type a** that now sweeping EUrttM TinQovwfMnanl Medical,O.Heer .sold he had never know ; widespread outbreok m th lony. but ndded that U l mild and no daatha bin ported. — (C P 1 New Eastern Resolution LAKE SUCCESS, j Tlie 12 Asian and Arab nations artwgl pusent resolution before tiie Pouucal CommMt** has been eiittotted by some United KattOM U tOO genend. will put uthei rovlalon before the ComParasols In plain colours of Navy. Brown. Black, Oreen, and Red made of cotton with straight handles Each UM Mude ut Kayon In fanry (Heck designs assorted colour S5 65—$5.87 Sun Shades With honked handles with cream top* ..ml ereen lump; specially for glare ond hot Mill. See us for • BRC FABRIC EXPANDED METAL TEMPERED HARD BOARD OIL STOVES A OVENS o T. HERBERT Ltd. ^ 10 & II Roebuck St.. & Magazine Lane. Kuril sii ;< CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. Ill, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET DANCE %  AT — TIIK BARBADOS AQCATIC (l.l'B (Lcical and Vblllna Mem ten only) — ON — SATCRDW. FEBRCARV 3rd. p m Mnvlc by HARRY BANNISter and hU Orehealra. Adin'*h'n to Ballroom ?/28.1 51 in. PHONE 42S7 FOR . SURINAM PLYWOOD Treated to resW Termites. W thick in sheets Is V" thirk in sheets S' X '' First class quality, ideal for Flush Doors, Cupboards, and Panellings of all kinds. Can be Polished, Varnished or Painted. STANDARD HARDBOARD W thick in sheets V X 6', 8', UV 3/16" thick in sheets 4' X " GET READY FOR THE 11111 Hi I TOURNAMENT Let us fit you now with a FINE TROPICAL SUIT BLAZER AND FLANNEL PANTS • P.C.S. MAFFFJ & CO. LTD. ST. LUCIA. January 27. In bright weather but with heavy out M& Leeward batted mittee on Monday. itl.-nblvely until the Gore-Kirnon Aeeordlnu to usually relinbl< sixth wicket partnership. Me sturces. the new revised Malion was brilliant in parts; tlon will iiManipt to InOOiporata Livingstone and KM mm the loftacme of the Canadian suggestions < u .. '"""der batted well. Of the made during the general debate '-Ick. Drysdale and Pembortcn. for a Korean cease-li— lime ihe Edrll went ahi left one if it* crew win tverbnard, in the water i former three bowled steadily. Assill. Griffith nd Thomaa slow/ medium also bowled well. Faulty Apart from the Tornadoes eight fielding and poor catching affected other he-it. started in the "C" DM araiaasa. Six catches wen' ntrehoard Class Two new aoegging. There was a good albt-ats Mlsaheha\e and Madness tendance: did not race. Honcm-s went to the Lightning The Scor.'s seemp which wmc in a few cltxlon c MmMtn b A-llI „ .^eeond!i ahead Peggy Nan Third eddy %  > ench I was Colin Ilelluniy's Magwin Uvijaatotia c *pr ... alawm defeated Tornado SfS*?7b D rv"i' Caala a w At the end of ihe riivi K round the boats were in the FBIIH O C pniilip* b cnfrtih poaltkn Fne r' Class boats started but Van Thcrndyke dropped out midway In the *ecf-nu round. This left Olive Bloaaom. Bae• anrer. Peter l'., 11 and Imp Mil* Geoffrey Johnson's Imp c.nne tlrst followed by Winston Ha *n Street Prleea 31. Swan Street — < j6 Wft w-.v/.'/////. 1 .'//. C'<.. t >tta >ow l DIAL 31



PAGE 1

PAGE TWO SUNDAY AI)\H III' SUNDAY. JIMARVall Qahib galling B RIGADIER ERIC MOtTNT. j • ntative of Colonial II. whoM 1 n Trinidad, was i>it passenger through .TUt !. '• I'M IMMTI Si I.Ui .J Trinidad UriR-idiT Mount was Barbados for a few days last ACT QUICKLY.'! THEY'RE MOVING FAST!! A Small Shipment of AGRICULTURAL FORKS O.M.V $4.70 tuum lill tlMill MIOS I O-OI'I II Al IVI COTTON FACTORY LTD. il dwarf and Iroiimongei %  Department Telephi flsatrtu and dMiabititi' fom&iwd Wm. FOGARTY Ltd. THAT'S THE STANDARD SET BY EVERY TEMCO ELECTRIC CLOCK C. D. and W. Movement* M ISS DORA IBBERSON. Social Welfare Adviser to CD. and W who was in Trinidad on a ihort visit, returned yesterday omlac b9 W T A. by the same 'plane was r A. de K. Frampton, Agriculial Adviser to CD. and W. Mr. James Nicol. Educational dviser to C D and W.. left for Grenada yesterday by B.W.I A. Canadian Breweries M R AND MRS. C O DALTON cf Tcronio. after spending ayi in Trinidad. Utfvi 0 here yesterday to spend two weeks %  Hotel. Mr. Dalton i with Canadian Breweries In Toronto. Manufacturer! Ag ?nt M R. AMD MRS. C. B. STFVF-NSON came in on the, TC A rli'iht yesterday morning to spend three weeks in Barbados. Thev are slaying at the Windsor Hotel. This is their first visit here. Mr. Sievensnn is a Manufacturer-' Agent, and proprietor of Stevenson Millinery Agency in r,.i"iito. Arrivals From Toronto M R 0, E. SCUDAMORE, a Produce Broker of Toronto. accompanied by his wife, arrived by TC.A. yesterday morning to ,.• wi-cks at the Marine lintel. %  Also from Toronto amvlngyts• nta] Win sir. and Mrs. Ernergfl 1 Bummtn. They were accompanied by Miss Ann WalterThev are here for one month, ,,t the Marine Hotel. Mr Summers it owner of Erner%  on K Summers Company Umhad. Importers and Manufacturer* if Toronto. Advertising and the Y.W.C. A. C iARIB had an interesting chat •,,'.. %  .,(!, ML and %  nek .1. Ross while they MN at Seawell. Mr. and Mis. ..ii the TC.A. (light from Canada. Here for about three months Ih*3 ..ie staying at Edgewater Hotel. Bathsheba. Mr. Ross now retired was OM turn Chairman of Fuller :>nfl Smith and Koss, an ... oiRanisalion in New Yoik. Mi It. i %  a member i f the Nat patchwork bedspread which was made by the children of Ue Haynes Memorial School, will purchase a second-hand typewriter Sffikfl Will be used to tea.h the children to type. The bedspread was won by Mrs. E. C. Haynes. Intransit W ISS THEODORA LOlWENCO who arrived from Canada last Saturday by T.C A. to see her mother who is at present in Barbados, left for Trinidad In the middle of last week Yesterday morning she was an Intransit passenger through Barbados by TC.A returning to Canada. Ilei sisters Mollv and Mi Fi in> were at Seawell to meet her during the short tim the plant wain. Here for Eft Week* VfRS. H. R. BAIN accompanied i~* by Miss Ella Rogers, arrived from Canada yesterday by T.C.A.. to spend six weeks' holiday in Barbados, staying with Mr. and Mrs. Robert Van den Bergh at 'Beach House." Glitter Bay, St. J..IT'..". Mrs. Rain's husband is President of National Life [naUMJ pany and President of Bain, Newling and Company, in Toronto Mid goes in for breeding horses In a big way. He is tin.utih tr. send a Canadian bred horse to England to take part in the Grand National. That was in IMS. lie may come down to Barbados on a short visit while his wife is here. PF.GttY JOHNSON rhattlni wilh her Dad visits the Polo Club for the (Irsl lime. Peggy arrived by the "Colombia after two year* school in England. Mtcndrd Trinidad Meeting R KV. BRNEBT GHIFKIN Supt. of the Methodist Church no was in Trinidad for a few days intending the Inler-Distrlct Stationing Committee of the Methodi Trmidad yesterday morning by B.W.I A. Grenada Holiday M R. & MBfi QBOROI SHARP were among the passengers Who 1' '*' lor Cicuada yesterday by B.W.I.A. They will lie away for one week. ParsenRer Supt B.W.I. A. M H. RAY LEGGE. Passenger Supt. of B.W.I.A i arrived en B.W.I.A/s morning flight ft l '.erday. He is slaying al the Ocean teL Mr. Legge returnto Trinidad tomorrow. M "TI.UK M IIH III s OX" BIT -TKMCO' BiKEfS C.OOI* llill ox snow AT Tin: (diiMii STORE Re-opening AFTER STOCK-TAKING MONDAY, 29TH JANUARY Many CLEARANCE BARGAINS in every Department. Ol ipecial interest to Men Is the arrival of: MERCERISED WHITE DRILL 28 inches wide at $1.43 per yard Il' the DRILL so many men hav# been waiting lor. Please Enquire Early al: Wm. FOGARTY Ltd. LUni JU.IE MICIIEMN A keen Tolo f.n. frrU lh.it smaller Polo halu and fthorter sticks should be made if -hr L, I.I (oln the ladles' learn. Her brother Andrew happll> agrees; with this point ol view. Busy Visit M R. NORMAN MANLEY. wnn ainvqd In London on the 2U| January will have other tasks to l>erform apart from pleading in the Privy Council. The League of Coloured Peoples are arranging a reception for him at the Chelsea Centre of the West African Students' Union, on February 1st But members of the West Indian Students' Union here feel that Manlej-'s special ]ob U to present the West indies to London. A number of public meetings in London nre being arranged, by WISU at which Mr. Manley will talk about the political, economic and social problems of to* West binge. Pilot and Navigator D R. VERNON MARQUEZ and Mr. Douglas Moore arrived at Seawell at 9 a.m. yesterday in OM of the Trinidad LJghl Aaropiano Club'* Auster aircraft. VPTAR. They left Trinidad at 9 a m. on Friday for Grenada. Leaving Grenada for Barbados they i ncountered ram and bad visibility. They changed course for St. Lucia. Poor visibility groundeel them there overnight. They left Si Lucia at 7.30 am. yesterday for Barbados. Weather was ngnin hary. They were Just about to return to St. Lucia when thev sighted the northwest coast of Barbados at about 8.40 a.m. Mr. Moore if. the pilot and Dr. Marquot the navigator. These two v ere in Barbados in November, erhen they flew up in the same aircraft they arrived in yesterday Dr Vernon Marquez told Carlo that funds from the Light Aerop'anc Club's raffle now being sjld In Trinidad will help promoW a tlr rally which he hope* will come off sometime this year. Aircraft Clubs from all parts ot ihe world will be invited to attend to Like part. They were met at Seawell by Mr Charles AJlmon. the American photographer who is in Barbados taking pictures for the National Geographic Magazine and the Barbados Publicity Committee. Shonly after they arrived Mr. Moore who met Mr. Allmon last j cm* in Trinidad took Mr. Allmon up for a fly. The aircraft was seen flying OVOr Barbados again yesterday afternoon, and U expected to go up this morning for another flight. The Auster Is due to return to Trinidad via St. Vincent earlv this afternoon. Holidaying With Relatives M ISS HONOR INCE who spent several weeks in Barbados holidaying with relatives returned to Canada yesterday morning by T.C A. GLOBE TOMTF. S.30 lo TUESDAY Bud ABBOTT and Lou COSTELLO in: THE FOREIGN LEGION Extra: BRITISH NKWSREE1, %  •: .'•'-^'.^'.'.'.'.',',V,-.'.*.'^'*'.'.'.','.'.-.'.',','.',-.v^'.-.-.'.-.','.-,','.-.'.'.-, BALLROOM DANCING CFNFRAL and tcwclalited daasea Weekly CUMM or MIVATE I lit. -ii || rrqunrd. WRITE Mr*. MARGOT LAJTAN Pique* Villa, K>nt. trr. Ch. or phona OlS bMwoon S •. and S urn. an-, mofnina •• crp* Sundar. %  • fttHi INFANT'S SHOES by Clark I in | RED, WHITE, TAN %  from i $3 0 9 |t YOUR SHOE STObE Children's 'Comfort' Shoes %  A broaJ filling flexible, all-leather lace-up shoe B of exceptional qualify for price UH s'.-io, 4" n't-ri...560 %  j "TRUFORM" Sandals 7V-8-i from 4.33 Evans and Dii 4606 Whitfields OM 4220 1 1



PAGE 1

SUNDAY. JAM WRY M. 15I MS DAY ADVOCATE PACK N1NF. JKE/V Lead Slimming : Craze By EILEEN ASCROFT when it was the heifht of rved, has there been such a NOT since tr. : fashion to look ,:rcraie for %  Umn.ir 11 Current slim-lined fashions with tinv waisU have started women watching their weighing machines. %  But It li the IITII who arc most keen on dieting," sayi Jane Gonlnn. author "f one of the bet recent books on the art of losing weight quickly. R e t—o the gives for sudden masculine enthusiasm Is that men before the war uoir the chief meat-eaten. A the meat ration has diminishes '.hey have tended lo eat mar* Bf..rrh. ;m.1 waistline have increase. Slim and dark, a qualified nurse and now an .niniinistr.iliviHospital woriMT, Jane Gordon is the wife of writci Ch;itU-s GreaveHer only parsmial diet problems have been how t.. put on weight latches First -^^v-rfs^*-.b*. Unlike expert Nest;i Pain, she .yj and on o1 ,h busiest women in Another expert who holds this lhp w ^ rtd „ womBn aoctor vlaw la Elisabeth Arden While it is impoaaible n. generalise about Her pr c lce is ln „ resj( | ontul SThK?^. -L ^IfeL. nLote l,oraI !" ,th P"tonts include P gives the perfect figure many nationaUll ^ i deluding Far Last diplomats' wives who have V.em tmihio* (.oaiai frei rfxr. 0*V* *:ol "ill dnoppeci fam 'l.i ulilitf 'SHffei br I9i2. 4ut IS ifM #• 'runf CMl o* *"• • oo' lit bvri '*'i li"'"* •". Ihrttto'e rtoi BWH D" • taihf ovtfili • timm§i lfte ho-t Iheir own tfcftft /**(•. i>inlt> (h*r go -rf' ***• eo-t n,ur.s arc d?.' through i their > %  >'nipt on., i Interpreter. Why Mothers' Boys Die Young... Barristers, civil servant*, artists. ij" hosMsses, students, saleswomen and musicians feature BY CHAPMAN PINCHER A four.year-old boy Kith "Nervei women and musicians feature w .-; / ,7 i.'_u every day on her crowded diary J, ur "P on his head, a burn on hi but it is the housewives who are !"'"• %  { %  ?", " "i" ..".T'J^l her special Interests Perhaps be'"" mnu,h 'V" "'. %  H?"*,'* iTifJ cause she doc, her own ^oo','" £f ^S lo el 0>ln • "•'""• lnii,shopping and most of her "-""hy li.e. housework, she can understand so A "'T us d"""/" !" 1 M**'"''*" well the extra strain that women "*• *P '^.* J cbc, m '' c 1 "*•"" face these days. published today. ie request for a T" 0 **• mosl •" c ,l "" u t ,? ....... brine many women to my serious accidents—which n k ''' surgery." she says. -Nine time, m oro J ln * r <•" *<•' *"\f' out of ten it is a mental problem J i g. g "" one so %  ""causing the trouble, and very oftoddled by his mother that ne ten housing." never has a chance to become accident-conscious. Listening, giving o word of ndTh* "f^JSl ?'„ ""'" vice, even practical assistance bv Dietrich, of Beverly Hills, urges way of a call to the housing aumothers lo ensure thil their thorities or the home-help organl. youngsters oxperienuplcnly ol sation. can sometime, do more nasty knocks, even II it means than any tonic to avoid illness staging them drllbenstely. and breakdown. So convinced is this young woman of the necessity of maintaining the old personal relationship of doctor anil patient that the has limited the number of her patients. 1 InIII-II ill II IUI-II ill if /iHzali' in hi-rf ui/iiin IIAICIlVOIfillS l/6 d ANDREWS LIVER SALT ##*{' ,i.J maddening itch of %  .<-.! : ihy people seem to have been In/uriated by the tint DARTWORDS that the Advocate" today reveata the tl..-r For new eomera, thla la a eroaaword with oat clues You have to arraage the wordh o thai they lead \--.> tally from f.ARTER to GLORY Tho seven rules which govern the relationship between aby word and the word thai precedes are:— A word may be an anagram of the word that pr* I IT may be a synonym of tlm word that precedes it. IT may be achieved by adding one letter to, subtractinc BOB letter from, or changing one letter in 'the preceding word. IT may be associated wttb the previous word In a saying, simile, metaphor, or association of ideas. IT may form with the preceding word the name uf a wellknown person or place In fact or ilction, IT may be associated wild the preceding word in tho title or action of a book, play, or ottPaT composition. NONE of the foregoing rules may be used more than twice cotuecuUvely, and only on t-e used to govern on nshlp. A topical succession of wordi might be Mengist llorsa Hon., rode Cote Not* : i-nes-Jones-Davey-Lomp —L t S • SidHtian on MoodCROSSWORD | i| 'F: f ' I 1 i 1 L_ J 1 i ln|*" r r \ i r* 1 %  ?) 1. hJlilnttici' iH %  > (I) irch mat H A. GRAY. 13 Be then Street. Ormand S.E.I4. Melliourne, Victoria. Austral! exchanging stamps. Michael Merrlck. No. 20 St. %  TaggflB Stieet. San Fernanda. THntdaSd Age 15. hobbies MDSCtklfl %  tamps, reading and going to the cinema. Anfhony Gonsalves H—14 Norton Street, Wortmanville. Geometown. British Guiana. Age It. .|.., it roaa t-\. 1 I'.iiiiKm. Hie noatrlls, a hah. in ii i pi t .!•.• •list motiry i.( ll lu art %  poltill. iige irom oot*. i4i Is interested in *> P<"Jnd in ri boiled shirts. deep penruaiing. li-i' polaotuma ptaia kwUm ibt akin tu.d uni. Wl> clemiup • ih* moil Ik* au aoras. CET A BOTTLK TODAY. Obuioabla from all Chcm l n a. D. Prescription ASTHMA MUCUS Dissolved First Day .i-ii. nap >our dii-.t oian % % %  %  %  •ouah ihi ttlaoks. The *rr firm ii tig inurut. U .Il.a->lv-i1 lnJofll..n>i Jul Ilkptennaal. tul<>,• MKNI'Aro lahlrla nl meili anil >• rnllrely fre* tf>m Aaihmtt aad lima. that H ta giiaranlretl to nH,> >u 'in'. •Kay i>rl our ments in his hand. LET EM CRY Charles Cochran's partner. 1-ady Vivian. This is her ., Dr. Dietrich condemns the wellmeaning mother who tries to give 100 per centprotection to her children This saves them from .u .. c injury while they remain at home. Linen cupboards in the U.S.A. b u rxDOSPS (hom to terrible I job since leaving school. aro nl|rilly coIour(>d Navy gig tlftks as s ^ a5 i hcy RO i 0 B chool. % %  irst was In the export depart%  h fC,,t nre smart with white nwnt of a Piccadilly store. Then im ln "^ lfl,e, , ( uddU 0n h s C ca ^f y Excessive mother-sympathy ond iHt summer she went to help Lady --triped. with matching piUow PO7lBO Bt 0n ,„ xhv form of sweets. %  den sister-in-law of Mr. Anthony CMes special favours, or cuddling should %  den. as an assistant at her prlr 0 hion eccentricities from be avoided, however dilUcuh this Kte school in Kensington. America include man-made nylon may be. %  Blue-eyed, with honey-blonde a U J/^!i;ng m a\ hP a Sut an i?43 Wa (u; "Split llpt. blistered fingers. ft.fr. ^^^ h Vivmn uaually model. J w orn 8 ulldcr loose suit Jack* !" V* 'ractures and gory laceraKy and evening clothes suitable e „ and a new material made t'na must be accepted a, normal %  r girls of her own age or in the from „,„,_ w hi c h resembles wool wear and tei.r. he write--. late teens. Her measurements: and 3 a nathcma to moths. Bit Bin, in shoes; waist 22in; hips rain i bust 33in, WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED —LES —L.E.S The doctor believes, of course. that parents should provide full protection against serious dangers. London Express Service the only pen wilh the litn'% newt about the worM'i mml fnmot rr,| There ta a NEW Pailer "51", liner Dun ever before. And it ii the only pen with ihc remark. ahk near AcnvmrlrhInk Sy.Lm ... the rre.itcM e\er deviled' %  The Acro-mcirKInk Syitem it a h..l! new. tattDOBl nietlio-l of drawing in.Moiinf. MfaguaiJmg and iclcitma ink. lo give iha mint ulufaclory pen r*'l""naiKe cvar known. Sar llu* fine pen . admne ill dun grace . Cinerttixc >U tilky writing ... for younclf. of aa t gifl. here it perfecnon maJa Dnaxl %  hi* pen atoll* it doignvd foi i.n)tfj.;.ii> ui* vnth Parker Supcrchruma — iha aupci bnlliam, lupfipeinianent drfwnuag ink. -u)o'Ucti moat utanted p&tv Prices: Wilh I,.lied Ould Cap 2I05. Wllh Lustraloy Cap IH.IJ Dlslrlbulors for Uarbados: A. S. Brydcn & Sons (Barbados) Ltd. 'K&tttmarttH FLIT Altfctiticontairts O.D.T. FLaT IS AN (Csg) PRODUCT s > Like J happy memory, the haunting fragrance of Mttcham Lavender bring* the English countryside to Barbados Originally made by Potter & Moore in their Mitcham Distillery two hundred years ago. Mitcham Lavender has ever line* been dedicated to Beauty the World over. H.I.TCHVM lAVillDYr. BOUNC'NG A PIN tells us about pinking LAVENDER WATFft TAIXUM rOWOlll TOrtET SOAP SHAVING SOAP BaiLLlANIINE saOZEN BAlLLIANTlNE AFTERSHAVt lOTION Obtainable ut BOOKERS DRUC STORED Our scientists protest that this is a slanderousmiifepresenlation of a serious lest lo safeguard the Anti-Knock qualities of 1< I (11 s 1, What really happens is tha! regular tests are madj in a special engine, ihc compression of which can be progressively increased until the fuel is made lo knock. A "Bouncing I'm" resting on a diaphragm in Ihc cylinder head measures ihc inlcnsiiy of Knock electrically, thereby enabling us lo datdnniM and control ihc Anti-Knock qualities of the sample. This ia only one of many tesn which safeguard the quality and performance of RliOLNT petrol. .KaMlfcW I Sterling Quality DISTRIBUTORS:— DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. AND JAMES A. LYNCH & CO., LTD. ;



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u U.N. DELAY ACTION AGAINST CHINA Britain Can Provide More Ships For W.I.Now (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON. Jan. 19 "T^HE impression is gaining ground in the British West Indies today ihat the U.K. Government is not merely failing to act on the recommendation* of the Commonwealth Shipping Committees and many pre\ious reports hut is indifferent to the situation". This is an extract from %  lull length review i>f the "precarious A-Hornh Tested In Las Vegas WASHINGTON. Jan 27 The Atomic Energy Commission said today that "one of the periodic tests'* of atomic explosions Ml held today at the Air Force limiting range near LAS Vega*. Nevada. Vesterday the Governor of Nevada, Charles Russel. disclosed that there was an explosion on Wednesday night at the Atomic Fnepiy Commission's new testing grounds In his State. He said he could not give any details for security reasons but that he was authorised to say the tes>t was primarily to check communications and other facilities. The Commission last night described the test as a complete success and said full-scale tests would begin on a regular basis within two weeks. Results of these future tests would be neither audible nor visible except under certain weather conditions. People in Las Vegas saw and felt today's explosion. It was believed to bo the second testing detonation on the deseil base. "It really lit up the sky like a big sunburst." one resident said. Hundreds of people saw and heard the blast. Many of them were Southern Callfornlans in the town with the usual weekend tourist.*.—Rruter Banana Exports Fell Last Year KJNUaToN. Jan. M. Jamaica's banana exports derlln. ed by over 750,000 stems in I5t to reach its lowest export prodi tion since the island's output turned to the 5.000.000 mark 1940. In 1949 total banana purchases mad* by the Banana Purchases Board amounted to 6,736.12 stems; of this amount 6.330.133 stems were shipped. Purchi in 1950 fell to 8.042.108 sterns and RhJomaatfl were just under 5,300, 000 stems. The decline In last year's total production is attributed in soin quarters to the windstorm whk hit the island towards the end ot lost year, but while this is responsible to some small extent for tl: deficit, the figures indicate thai the main reason was a shortfall In Qroa Michel production, due Hie ravagaa of Panama Disease. Kremlin Must Not Misjudge America WASHINGTON, Jan. 27. President Truman said here that It was "vitally Important that the leaders of Communist imperialism do not misjudge this nation as did Hitler and the Kaiser," in the last two world wars. Truman sent this message to the annual Roosevelt Day dinner last night, sponsored by the Americans for democratic action. The President said: The Kremlin should understand Ihat contrary to Its own propaganaa this country Is not weak and divided. We are not in a state of moral and economic decay," "We know very well what Stalinist domination would mean. We know how difficult It Is for people under Moscow domination to break away."—Reuter. ond inadequate" shipping services between Britain and the Caribbean, contained in the recent issue of the British Export Gazette. It lists five main requirements, which adequate shipping service? should be able to provide for: (1) "Movements of official and commercial staff between the U.K. and the British Caribbean. (2) Journeys of merchants and others concerned with fostering U.K.-Caribbean trade. (3) Tourist traffic, which is pctentially much greater than at present. (4) Shipments of West Indian produce—not only what is immediately offering, but what could be economically grown if refrigerated transport were guaranteed (5) Export' of t'.K. manufactured goods, which again might well expand under the stimulus of improved shipP'ng". Shirking Responsibilities In not taking steps to see that <' %  % %  rvices are provided, the British Government is not facing up to its responsibilities, it continue Twice, recently, questlonn the House of Commons have been "fobbed off" with the answer that "no practical plan" has been submitted for implementing recommendations in the Commonwealth Shipping report. But as Lord Lucas announced in the House of Lords last month, plans been submitted for improving services between the two areas. The Colonial Office declared that they are not "'practical'*. The Garotte says It Is agreed there Is no likelihood of a regula' ITrltish passenger service to the Eastern Caribbean without some form of Government assistance. A direct subsidy to Caribbean services might seem invidious to ether owners operating elsewhere but this objection could be met by invlUng tenders. Alternatively the building of ships for the West Indies rui might be assisted either by outright grants or by special credits on a mutual risk-sharing basis. In addition It would have to b< iscertained how far the West Indies themselves would be prepared to contribute and in what %  ways they might assist a British shipping line by such items n* l>ort charge concessions, etc Attention should also be paid when studying the economies IN? question to the heavy tonnages which have to be brought frorr the Caribbean area to Britain ir chnrtered vessels. Any saving Ir, this respect might be regarded .. a contribution tj a subsidy. Stop Gap In the meantime while though s being given to these propoui'i the Gazette suggests as a s.opgap measure to relieve immedi-le ngestion, consideration should be given to the possibility of in Slicing Australasian ships passui| through the Panama Canal to oa more regularly at ports in the Eastern Caribbean. It is hard to believe that the? difficulties are insurmountable when so much is at stake" it add: "The time has come for business Interests in Britain and the British Caribbean to unite their voices I) Insisting that the present attitude of drift, complacency and evasion come to an end." Appended to the Gaiette'* article are three letters from Mr. A. E. V. Barton, West India Committee Secretary, Mr. E. Palmer. Director of Bookers' Shipping and Trading Co, Ltd., and Mr. Percy if on page 16 l*OI.O I'lll/I DAY THE PHOTO AT THE TOP shows a rhnkks in progress during the Presentation Match played by members of the Barbados Polo Club at the Osrrlson yesterday. THE PHOTO AT THE LEir pictures Mr. Colin Dtane receiving the Advocate Challenge Cup from Mrs. H A. Arthur. ^ "* AT THE RIOHT. the Camer-tnan caught Mr A. J. Hsnschell waiving tka T. di> LIBIA Ohallmga Clip W ill Help To Defend Peace Of The World LONDON. Jan. 27. Diplomatic relations between India and the People's Republic of China will "help to defend the peace of Asia and of the world/' Tiie reklng Peopte'a daily said loday. according to a new China (Communist) news agency message received In London. Commenting on the first anniversary of the Republic of India the paper wrote: "Diplomatic relations between the Itepubhe of India and the Peoples Republic of na which jhave been established on the basis of equality, nutual benefit, and mutual re:pect for territorial and sovereign rights, will not only help further consolidate and develop the friendship which already eiists between the peoples of these two countries, hut will also help to defend the lasting peace of Asia and the whole world."—ReuWr. Diplomats Faced With Very Difficult Task By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE. _____ WASHINGTON. Jan. 27. THE present rift in Anglo-American Far Eastern policies lias presented British officials here with one of their most arduous diplomatic talks since ihe second world war. — — %  i %  .. There h_* been no Bin-nipt I" 'iiSKuise ihe divergence of llrit' %  h and American atMtudai tcsyards the Communist regime In Ike Returns Home NEW YORK. Jan. 27. General Elsenhower landed today at Sewart air force base near here at ihe end of his 21 day military fact finding tour of F.ur >pe. The General will spend the next four days at West Point, United States military academy. He will leave on Weds* Washington to report on how In found Western Europe's defences —Reulrr ox TIII: • SPOT II (NOON. C. W. Brown of Deal. Kent county, sent the following letter about his family 1 meagre meat ration to the editor of the Sunday Express: "Our piece of mutton was flavourless and tough. So we gave it t> the cat. She '.in"i %  iiit. n;ivt u up. and went out. "In about ten minutes she returned with a large, ful mouse, which she laid at nv (sag, "Waa she sorry for ua?" —1 N. g. TOOK DRUGS Manner helm Gets Worse LAUSANNE. January 27. The condition of Field Marshal ^^ Mannerheim in hospital here after an Intestinal operation deteriorated again tonight. His doctors at the Cantonal Hospital expressed grave fears for his life. —Reuter. Polic French and i, after a day The police tlteie 10 opm burning larni 20 di %  pa PARIS. Jon. 27. charged, tiie "I yt \ aid llthor, Henry De Monfr-id wife with drug taking aid on their hOBBa Paddy and Robbie and Bob tr y to make rain with contraptions like this y f] fit---. CF—; (From JOHN REDFERN) KONGWA. %  THE OVERSEAS FOOD CORPORATION, which failed with groundnuts, has started trying to produce rain. lcdl< le each <:..i ... • .. ... m meet* aim In the rainy season now on there are maddening dry gaps at critical operational limes. Mr. George Raby. tall, general manager of the whole works was in Army expert on projectiles during the war. He sot down and figured a few Ideas himself, including "Hnb>'s 3pe> la!." topic charcoal burner that look. Uka I drainpipe with an aircraft rudder attached. This is for rain precipitation by using Africa's strong vertical currents to "seed'' high clouds with silver iodide from chare ers With a battery of burners about _3 worth o! elver tment. Special '.,11 With chemicals released hy burners nnIhe gr"ound"_r"b_!^TSing'The^TrTclouds loons exploded at great heights, the corporation is trying area of 200 square mie*. to tip over the cloudswhere they will do moat good. __._._• Children s Balloons The job. completely hush-hush bock end of a truck with old The squad use cfa _L_rt l r !" t, .i. ta _*' n *J? onp bv y____ Um h l akp c > lindPr; trnm loons 8s per thousand) for thei 3F£_LTn £* d S p,,rtm nt called lonifS for the ga wn wind lwlI aild fa Special Projects^ R bv „ Special from African observers In the ,-i. .1 !" r _!__ ul *_ vr : b oriv *ln distribution has been a Government's weather service min SUIK ^ _tt i! h A rn **" r P r <*'" f"n the startThey have done more than 3(1 Roh' ttaSJ TS* "^ Bl ^ although the old vug denied this ex, there ha. SSrtw-T. H?;th^i3_w_£ ' *""*> it always I-.-,, ram at the appointed irSSSi J -H i ^".f" con l her more lh -" two EEage -hev -rlnca at the word traptions made from throw-out Useful moisture clouds -'ill sail rainmakers "We don't n across from the east and swill their We precipitate it war.They make hydrogen in the bush stun near the Mgomba Range 50 ed," says Kenny, with a — I.JI_ntgenci^v^nwdc__ruro \t.a n^'-'.t^ir. %  rheygi. ,-„.'. %  .. \ laid that they found i pipes, ma oplutns. 300 grammes of grammes of opium 9 grammes of )u for opium pi(>RriiU-r ChJ President Truman and Piime Minlstti Attlea actnowkadMd the dlflerenci aftei their n'lifercnc. 1 hep in December. S. than, it has been nurdo Indraattngly ilear that both lead. • backed in their differing 'Of opinions by majoritie governments and legislatures. Public opinion in both countries vould make It impossible to per anode the United States Government to recognise the Communist regime In China or to persuade the Bntis'i Government to withdraw Its recognition of that regime. British ond American attitudes to those problems and Ihe proposals for their solution are equally bound to be complicated a>y divergent attitudes towards Communi-: Chil Witlun UMaa hmitatioiui, the Isritish Ambassador Oliver Franks and his slaff here have baan ink S opportunity both formf -end informally to present Britain's case. They have aimed at removing misunderstandings, at \ the divergence of issues from i itecessarlly holding up )0 Anglo-American policy, and i tion at preventing any n una>i>t_titling or questioning of lirltain's motives. —Keuler 286 Rebels Killed SAIGON. Jan 27. French forces in the Northern Indo-C'hina battle area of Tonking arrled dut two "compleiely suc%  essful" clearing operations yesterday, a communique announced here to-night. The communique said that 2G6 Vielminh insunrrnu were killed n Cochin, China. Reuter Mystery Weapon SAN ri.'AWlSC'O Jan 27 The 10.000 ion aircnll carrier Independence badly damaged in experimental atom bomb explosions at Bikini In 1046 his been %  at to l>e sunk by a mystery weapon SOIK" time next month Only American naval expeits will watch hti %  —Renter U.S. Delegate Complains S. Koreans Strike Back At Inchon TOKYO. Jan. 87 %  ouih Knrean le.ipl tuck Ini '' R Ban war picture to-.ia >ap hit. kill and run r.ild on Communut-heUI Inchon, port for Seoul. South (tori according to a report here lat to-night. The raid listed four hour; Heavy Unite.) States naval guns -Cntbwdstd the .irea lor the second day 1111111111,'. The report said the Korea killed 40 Communists and then left without suffering any casual Armoured elements of the 8th Army which captured Buwon yc'erday pushed more than six milenorth to-day Chinese troo|. were reported to have fallen back towards the Han Hlver skirting tlv %  southern outskirts of Seiml This drive up the west coast of Korci along the main mad to Seoul had met by house to relain u foutlmld in the town and In the hillsto the north god -f-gg Machine gunnen nnd siupe were smoked out of buildings ; the Chinese withdrew. Jet plan., and other fighters attacked with napalm (jellied petrol) bombs. Withdrew Fuither east still, a United Nations battalion was forced to withdraw and regroup four miles north-west of Ichon hut later Ihry were reported to hove taken an unidentified small village there. For the third successive dty United Nation* patrols adv.iiut.l unopposed north of Wouju on tlv right wing of the Seoul front K' u.i more Ihiin 3.000 Communists were rejiorted mi log near in-ongihang 12 miles norlh of the mining town Y"iigjol. Admiral Arthur W Radfrnd. United States 1'acitlc Fleet Coin i bare ta-4ay "i tiunk e can stay in Korea". On .i blMperiodical visit to Jupun he said everyone he had talked to here had been "very optimistic about the Korean o|>erattofM". Renter Their Daily Bread WASHINGTON, Jan. 27 Turk! h brooM aftac a bayonet (harge with the United Nations' forces In K< rca. sent this messago to the supp.y depot "Enemy -lt.ii k..l. send us more bread." This request was reveeled at the Pratt Conference to-day by Colonel Cary flutchlnson. the American supply officer, who was If) Kama earlier this month Hq said that the United States Army food cxperti had pi i %  eial kind of bread for the Turku. It MM heavy breal end contained wheat flours and olive oil.—Beater. Bevin Improved LONDON. Jan 27. The Hriti.h Foreign Ministe F-rnest lk-vin. ill with pneumonl had another "restless night." hU personal do. tor sir Al ax a n de McCall, said this morning. Bevin was yesterday stated \< have shown slight improvi-meor. A Foreign Office spokesman son later today that Bevin "continues to Improve and Is slightly bettei —Reuter Spanish Representative? LONDON, January 27. The British Foreign Office would mther confirm nor deny the report appearing in the British Press i>day, that Britain has replied unfavourably to Spain's request for rcredilaUon of Fernando Caililla V. MjiKin. Spain's new ambassador i London The newspaper report suggested t'at Castilla's record service In %  i .• Divls -I in I!-. %  Ug AK_; SUCCESS. Jan 27 Poland to-night told the United Nations she would support the 12 nation AM.OI rafOtuttoa -g-UQI for an "exploratory" conference with I'ekuiK. Kut7. Suchy, I'olnh delegate announcae Im. when to-day' debate on Korea opened before the POUtl tal i-.uiumtteo. Poland will give her support he K;Miisin the Spanish town of Marios, he fell to the at re. t below, seriously injuring him —and his wife who happened % %  fce passing at that moment. %  %  It! Inbelling the Peking regime an aggressor. ;' The Canadian proposal made lnfomially yesterday for a seven power conference corvditlonal on a cessation of fighting to be arranged by the delegates at the start of their meeting. 3. The Israeli Plan for nv afflrmatlon by the Gener.d Assembly of the Five point "Conunissal Plan." 4. Proposal by 12 Asian and Arab nation* for a Seven Power Conference which would obtain from Communist China clarification C_ the terms of a ceasefire. Aggressor Charge Earlier in the day Michael Fry reported that the United Nntion.< Ceneral Assembly hi carry n.xt week expected strung majority to bran Communist China as on aggressor Korea while leaving the door open to further peace got i-lions. The American resolution now her.u-e tinPolitical Committee labels the' Peking Government an iggressor, demands the withdrawal of Chinese troopfrom Korsw and asked the Assembly to aft in motion the machinery of poa%  Ible economic and other aencTo dale 25 countries hsxr expressed their support for the random nation of Communist China. Seven,] delegations Including Ihe British said that they were l" ivour "I condemnation. Another resolution before the Polltical Committee iponsored by the 12 Arab and Asian nations asked for the convening immediately of xplorator>'" confexenee to le and elucidate tome doubtful aspects of the Peking (loveitimcnt's attitude a TELL TIIE ADVOCATE THE NEWS RING Mil DAY OR NIGHT i plan received lukewarm suppoi t gmong the members largely on the grounds that it tiki not make any provision for a ceasefire before beginning any negotiations. A new (actor introduced into Ihs (liM-uflMons here, was the apparent lull in the lighting in Korea which the Indian delegates thought might be "significant I They emphasised that the I Peking Government while not | formally acceding to a ceasefire might be trying to give the 1mI a On page 10. PRINTERS REFUSE TO JOIN IN BOYCOTT 1WENOS AlltKS. Jan. 27. In an eleventh hour effort to prevent La Prenaa being distributed for the second day running. boycotters last night picketed the punters as they attempted '" enter the printing shop. Earlier >e,terday evening the printer! hart ueridM to rlr-oljey the Peronlata Union orders to join Ihe newspaper vendors' hoycolt in ympath> Rruter STRIKE AVERTED Ian 27 A dis|... ken Union and copper mining rompar.M' Rhodesia which throat* : %  lei from the com%  vaa nnnounced here today the revised offer were no*, dlscio-ed. IviACARTHUR TALKS ON JAPAN WITH DULLES TOKYO, Jan. 27 John Foiti-r Dulles. President : envoy, charged with sounding out Japan %  Treaty, had a tW04MMir talk with General MacArthur to> %  -• %  (sorted to ha. li complete agreement ith the Supreme i"om inn rider on :1| issueTreaty" A spokesman said the discussion had been "vei Pact Of Friemlship NEW DELHI. Jan 27. India and Indonesia have concluded negotiations for a treaty of friendship and the treaty will come into force nhortly, it waa learned here to-day. Under the treaty which confirms a recent trade agreement, %  it.ts will be appointed nnd both countries are pledged to assist each other's In and agricultural progress. —Reuter DIAL STALIN NEW YORK. Three College students triad t recently. Tluv p ask him wheth-r thev should volunteer at on< %  to be conscripted, I —1.11, THROUGHOUT THE YEARS. 1W r.i.vr 4 lit II lit* WITH A in QUALITY and PERFORMANCE III l IS ll'ffl MO IH It Mill till l.V.v VHOOSE RALEIGH THE. A L L -STEEL. aiC V.C L E A Cave Shepherd & Co.. Ltd. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street Distributors %  J



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PAGE EIGHT M'MiAY ADV(H'\TE SUNDAY, JANVARY 1151 D. H. Lawrence FROM i60 -FRENCH-SCHOOL* PAINTINGS SIR GERALD KELLV CHOSES THE Kv XOH.M.W MMIOIVIV (stilish novelist and poet, D, H. Lawrence, died in lu. leaving behind htm *ucl\ peat novels as Sons ud Lavrii and sut-h controversial U LMIV ChaUerle* Later. Mr believed nimh in i Id as h found it lo %  %  %  %  i i ins i.re .ofent effort to ttnd hi good through the medim-i ol l.teutuf*: The age of much material pro.hich preceded the nr-l world vtfar of 1914 — 18 produced writers many who 4 the nri!flni!itttion and pty, while lakinR for granted i aim*. But gradually ihere befc-in to eppr. r a number of men who denied that material progress I.KI. piogros at all. The of these In England wi, D. II. Lawraac* Law. icncc believed that western civilisation ni In decay becau.se Man nnd *h\x\ himself off from his true sources of vitality. During the nineteen-twentic* he bi-camc the centre of one storm after anCthar, aod when he died In 1930 at the age of forty-four, imrr appealed .i great amount of reRUnlaoRtse and criticism, which began to create a Lawrence legend, i „,$, rl Lawrence wai born in 1885 In the COiUery vu%  %  i •' %  %  xl in ihe English Midland}. His father was a miner rough and ready, and rather coaise: hi! mother wa delicate and cultured As the bo> grew I developed an intense sympathy between turn and his mother. ;which was to influence him Uiroughout his life and to prov.de the'jubjert of several of his books In Eastwood, Lawrence came to know the life of industry ond also the countryside, which at hand. and the contra* t between the two cut him to the quick. II* studied, pa, attended Nottingham University, and thin became a teacher in a London .•chool His poems and his Ant (wo novel* received mm but It was not until the third. So' sad Lovers, that it was realised that n new force had rt/en In (lctlon; by this time his mother was dead, and he had left teaching, married and gone te, live m Germany, from whe-iee he had to return at the beginning of the 1914—18 war. Son* and I .evert is partly autobiographical, it tells of the •motional hold of %  mother over her of the struggle between hei and Miriam, the ulrl he loves In setting and structure it is not unlike t)i C work of one of the "realist" novelist*, Wells or Rentier!, but il WM <|iiil<> new in its deep understanding <>f personal relationships, and in thr vividMtr with which it records sens*? .mi rg %  looa and expert! Beta This intensity, hanging over the prose like air heavy with elecIB be felt in the opuitinr. ) • • riu Ralnhaw "The Brongwens had lived for gjensntksH IB the Marsh Parm. in the meadows wbero the Erewash twisted sluggishly through alder tree*, separating Deibyshlr* from Nottingham| They | came and went without fenr of necessity. working hard because of the life that -was in them, not for want o/.the money. Neither were thrv UirtftkH Ttw* WvM aware pf Uie last h;ilf|>eiinv. and instinct made them Ml waste "he peeling of their apple, lor it would help to feed the cattle Bui heaven and earth '-nlng nmuml them, ami how should this cease? They fait the rush of sao in spring, ihev knew 'he wave which cannot halt, hut every year Ihrowf I aM to begetting, and. Tilling ba'V. leave* the young-horn on the earth. They knew the intercourse hctwee.i heavena-id earth, sunshine drawn into the breast and howels. MM rain sucked up in the day-time, nakeooess tnat comes under the wind u. autuinr. the birds' nasts no longer %  | lieir | lttf and inter-relation* wed feeltr.it the pulse and body ol | ihat opened to their furrow for the gram. mnA became smooth and supple after their pJouguig, and clun B to thenfeet wltra u weight ihai pulled like desire . This paragraph reveal* much ol the mature Lawrence. The prose has great beauty—though it is overcharged with words and meaning—and the violence of the imagery is inescapable. Man is %  een not so much in relation to society as to the created world, to tn* sot), plants, animals and seasons And the air is heavy with %  ex, becauae sex was for Lawrence the central experience bv !" lc *\ man <"" ld regain his blood consciousness." As his work went on he became preoccupied with sex, examining QM type of sexual experience, after another, seeking for the purely nstaral relationship. i>*twecn man and woman, that which was not controlled by the mental will. More and more he began to distrust the rational part of the mind, and lo turn to the irrational, the "subconscious." Hi nui: ma a clearing In a dark forest, and he waited for the "Dark Gods" to come and take possession of him. More and more, new. he began to be attracted TO A, f, ir //,,, Exhibition iteetf— the non-mental existence of ani* mal* and plants — Folded m like a dark thought For which the language ir lost Tuscan cypresses. ONE HE'D LIKE TO PRINT' rjmnahn nftji'T-T"*"** 1 '"fjsij-^ r^r.tcomfortsbl.weyeiasteeliitT^W itrewajl stretch wah v*y s*>n mevsmant Thay moukj rVmly W awkward plaoti and tvtabla you to carry on whatit tha wound haati. Variety of wai %  every pr>. AGENTS: GENERAL AGENCY CO. Elastoplast FIRST AID DRESSINGS II IS AS THOUGH BROOKLYN DODGERS HAD INVADED LORDS Is there a great secret?" After the 1914-18 war Lawrence wanted to escape from the industrial society of England. He went first to Italy, living among the Italian peasants, but he Ml European civilisation hanging und him like a second-hand overcoat, and soon he left for Australia Australia produced the BOVal Kangaroo, but did not satisfy him. and he sailed across ;he Pacific to Mexico. From this Mexican experience, we gel many essays, poem*, some of his finest wi f irt stories, and The Plumed .Serpent. In the lost mentioned story. Kate, a cultural European, goes to Mexico, meets two men and goes with them to an Indian village where she is initialed into a sort ol rellglous-polilienl movement which la to rettore the old Mexican gods. There ii much beauty m the native ritual and thants. but there is also squalor and brutality, and Kate Is both lascinuted and disgusted. tn the novel Kate steels herselt and stays. Lawrence did nol stay, but returned to Europe. Bv ow the tuberculosis which had troubled him for years was in an advanced stage, and he was a very sick man when he wrote fell Ifjal novai. Lady rhatteriev'Lever. Throughout his life ho had ti ied to live according to his own doctrine, bin by now he must. have realised that for him tlulife of the intellect, of the spirit, could never be subordinated to that of the senses; his physique, let alone his genius, made that impossible. But in Lady Chatteiley he made a last desperate attempt to solve his problem bv allegory'The scene is Derbyshire, and Lady Chatter ley. whose husband la paralysed (symbolically as well as literally) from the waist down, turns to her Kamekeeper for a nthaj child she wants. The book is -i long, lyrical account of their iovemaking. written w|th the greatest detail and frankness, but to the sympathetic reader its offect is neither erotic nor shocking, but profoundly saddenint*. Soon afterwards Lnwrrm c iticii al Vence. In Southern France. By OSRLRT LANCASTER To most of the Royal Academy's regular patrons the sudden appearance at Surlington House of trie paintings of the modern French school will doubtless prove as shocking as would the unherahtod invasion of Lord's by the Brooklyn Dodgers to the older members of the MC C. Those walls where year after year have hung "Spring Sunshine at St. Ives" and A Highland Winter" are now given over to the menacing abstractions of Kandinsky and Mondnan. And in place of Sir Alfred's gleaming horseflesh are the mechanical streamlined nudes by Lgejaj To ihe rest of the world, however the shock is likely to be less. In the 20 years which have passed since these works first horrified our parents, their influence has been profound Not Just In the realm of painting but in everyday life Today hardly a hoarding or a magazine would look quite the way it does had the early Cubists never existed. The bisected guitars and fragments of newspaper headlines which once seemed so chic and unexpected when encountered in the paintings of Gris and Braque are now the commonplaces of the commercial textile designer. And the ferocious brilliance of the colour contrasts that once dazzled and appalled is now even occasionally mimicked with a notable lack of success, by the more daring Academicians themselves.. But it is not easy to estimate the real value of any school of painting at second-hand. It was largely to overcome thU difficultv that Sir Cerald Kelly decided to add five rooms of French Moderns to the already extraordinarily mixed l>ag of pictures which have gone to make up the Winter Exhibition in: • inately, quantity rather than quality appears to have been ihe g ling principle of selection. And it is no more true of modern than of any other that the large* the picture Ihe better, and f jr third-rate canvases of any one painter do not equal one liist-iateT*ere are two masterpieces by Braque and a wonderful Rousseaur Hamlet however Is not the fame when the Prince of Danifi rh has vanished behind the Iron Curtain. Picasso's withdrawal en ideological Krounds leaves a gap which no one else can All. Off Their Game Maybe Sir Gerald Kelly hoped thai the students who are the public he is eager to reach would be inspired by seeing the actual works of the great men whom they have hitherto worshipped from afar. Or, as seems not altogether improbable, he anticipated a sharp disillusionment. In either case he is likely to be disappointed. For with the exception of Braque, Matisse, and Miro. the big men are almost all off their game. Far too many of the second, and even the third, eleven have been given a place in the team. Many of the paintings are no better and no worse than the' average at the Royal Academy. but baseball is not quite the same as cricket and the M.C.C. may be, forgiven if they can't recognise; the second-rote when they see It. i —L.E.S. Hair getting thin ? Picture yourself in ten years! Raldnes) is hound to overtake you unless you do something toslop falling hair sow. And you can do something to slop it. Hair falls out because it is starved out. • %  .tarved of the natural foods on which it lives. Silvikrin makes up the deficiency—gets your hair growing and thriving again. Use ftre Silvikrin in severe cases of dandrulT and thinning hair. As a daily dressing use Silvikrin Hair Tonic Lotion or. for dry heads, the new Silvikrin Hair Tonic Lotion with Oil. Silvikrin DOCS GROW HAIR 0 From all thtmltli. hatrdrrittri ami Hour SIlVIKftIN LAIORAFODIC! I'D 10ND0N • NWfO > ENGLAND BICYCLEIn trying to assess his work */• muft consider it as a whole. Lawrence never really found B literary form which suited him his novels are mostly too long, and lack variety; his verse has not the precision and conciseness which belongs to poetry of the first rank. Yet it is obvioui the* both novels and poems are works ol genius, and so, too, are those books like A rantaala of the l ni'iiiM ion. mid Apoealypae, m which out of a mixture of psycho. analysis, ancient symbols and a private cosmogony, he tries to create a myth through which he con formulate his beliefs. His most satisfactory work Is probably in the short stories, in the best of which he Is more economical than usual, and his rrose burns with a bright loveliness as fresh as gorse: the biasphemous hut beautiful Man Who Died, the enchanting Man Who Leved Islands, and the hypnotic Weman \w Rode Away. Whatever his faults (and they were, 1 believe, proportionate to his genius) he added a new vitality to fiction and a new beauty to prose, and he made thousandaware of their almost-lost communion with the wcrld of nuture. NEW LOOK FOR A BEST-SELLER l'. %  JON HOPE $> The men who print the Authorised version of ihe Biblo in England are combining reaoureag to present it in a new manner. In ihe Reader's Bible, as It will be called, traditional doublecolumn page form will give way to normal book format. Between them Eyre and Spottiswoode, Cambridge University Press and Oxford University Press plan lo make the new edition available by May. It will he 1.938 pages Cosl; 30s. The Bible is still the biggest selling book of all. Every ittf 3.1X10.000 copies are produced in U.K. But supply lags far behind gaanaan. W. A Collins, whose llrm print the Bible In Scotland, reports"Though enormous quantities of Bibles were sent to the United State |.,M ye ;il il i( Americans cannot get them fast enough." ** How fares the publishing business? Publisher Arthur Barker, who has just returned to his business after two years' illnc. has been having a look M t the position. This is his verdict; The supply of paper and binding boards is rapidly beeomin* serious. No prospect of it ge'tlng better in the next two years. But from the publisher's point of view this may be a blessin, 1 in disguise. Reduced supplies wi'l mean that in a year eg raw tl-ere .will I* a real shortage of new books—and that in turn will rresn a demand for some books *r TRINIDAD, with carnival about twelve .lay* off. the City hotels and guesis houses andally refusing person.' who are requesting accommodation, especially visitors from Venezuela, arid the other neighbouring ii i aoriajt One hotel manager said that he has been receiving cables and letters every day requesting reservations. n e pointed out that his hotel has been booked up about two weeks .ago. This, he added, Is the big-est influx t,f visitors for quite a long time. 'In the luture. publishers might not be able to spare enough of their supplies to manufacture huge quantities of these best%  ••lli'i-. Instead they will have to i :cnri them more equitably over Inedr llat. This may hit some authors—hut will Improve the general state of the whole trade." 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Blue Gillette Bljdcs are altu the most cconomkal because they last * ,on 8Naturally they are HI M>l s -f^ -0> "XM 1^^^^ vnosen by the smartest men of *v_x* every country in the world. Blue Gillette Blades COOL AND FRESH. ...THANKS TO MAT ROIL RlleeoMM wulllad Miluajl -it!i Matrnil Odbonnd Wntor I'.int. Ibaa PM tiow OMI aod tma Ihi moaM leak. Ani how thin.-w bantv <'..< %  hi Mutr..ii M oUbawd lo ntaln H aaahabli and daiaUe Than are uonthan twonty itnghtM ihadai to ol r naa, aaaa aMaf a tint, smooth laaia. Mjtr.nl ivary panto apply, and you'll U-|l..wt nt Ir "ifj.ri.>d to and how far it goes. Agantt 1MB B B V BERGER PAINTS GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD., BRIDGETOWN '




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Sl-NIMY, J 1*31 si ADA Y AUVOCATK l'\CI JUDY GARLAND'S STORY This Is Judy GtrlM personal story of her tUna but n I happy childhi" her eventl including the tragic moment when :<>(| she no lor., of movie fans have wondered about the ei old stars reeea %  break with her studl T1SU in her spectacular cawir. Why dirt Judy attain) What civ.' • .md psychological COnflleta upset her during her gl from (itvet.de stardom and i dealre to grow up ana swrlously as an Now. for the first tune. Judy has told her full, (rank and human *ory. It begins herewith in (he first of six articles condensed from the current issue of Cosmopolitan Magazine. Start JuoV* gripping, intimate story now and continue it daily in the Adveeate. R* Jf|>V GARLAND As told to MICHAfcl. Ulll-RY Ui-inb.jifd u>In u manorial Nnn . BBM) It I %  Orious ron I wonted it that Way. sty mother in a strong-nun-' %  %  Duung those vaudt-vilt" 1 OOUntlaal wlngji waiting for our i :. I d lit hear nthI • U things like, "you go on oul there or I'll hn-ak your hea i %  and II Nobody Jl M GARLAND ever talked to me like Ulat or % %  in any way. 1 drove n.v-ietf— but It WM my own Ma> i irll compelled to do II. I don't entirely know. It wasn't to lo-te myself completely in my work the way some people can—but so much of acting was the only reliaUf thin* he only place where I felt like a useful person, when people Bald, "fine, you did a good 10b. Come again." and everybody needs to hear thoso things. When I was aboul ol went back to see Grand Rapids, Minna la, whan I am bom. I %  liicious little town, full ol trees and porches and people BOW tO live in simple anoa wM i 1 think I would h.tve liked to ;'i W up there, currying my ichcolbooks In a strap and DVrlng %  n th 4 milkman's son. rank 11 wonderful man with %  fiery tem%  of humour, and an unfjalfted but beautiful voice. i. %  I fthel Milne, when he was singing in a Wisconttro where she was lh^ ured Vaudeville togetli1 k and Virginia Leo. out hern singcif baby was coming, and Ugbf the mi.vulka> ;.ti.IP, (.rand Rapids, and thev tcitled do\N n Ui i two-etore) white %  a garden behind It, By the Unit i i lint ik WM seven and Jinny was live. My parent-: were hoping for a a> at end uf enl. 3 COOKEHY CORNER When buying fi'h I I thnt ataa ln& merHum-slzed fl*h generally have the rlnest flavsmr. l>o not l>e afraid of trvlng the las* USttaj tvpes of fish and you will enjoy 'he slightly osalgMaf Bavour ami texture, they can be used U> make unusual and attractive dlska The liiiv tasty fish of which I #n going to gr. this week — ruh, Chin .. dishes have ong flavour nnd are therefore n i eeptable to the Wertirn palate. Fish Head Smi|> Several small fish heads. A few drops of sherry. 1 or of oil A few dropa of en* I grated yams. A few spring onions. A few pieces of fresh or dried Method: Wash the fish heads. remove the gill-: god drops of sherry: put in two quarts Watar with the ginger, a few spring onions and an or. of oil. Simmer for one hour, then arid %  few drops of vmegar nnn n %  iuirter pound of grated yam. Roil for another ten minutes until the yams are tender and the soup becomes a creamy colour, it is then ready for serving. Steamed Finn 1 lb of small filleted fish. 1 o/ of onion. 1 lb. of tinned mush KHirtlA drop of vinegar. 1 tablespoon fill of dilute*! Bovril. 1 oi. of fat. 3fi'ihod; Cut the mushrooms nnd onions into slices x Ui the Bovril. W.ish the Bab and place it In a basin with the white side up. Cover it with the Other ingredients, put the contents of the bnsln in a steamer and .steam for 15 minutes. Season with a diop of vinegar, pepper and salt before serving. Gardening Hints For Amateurs The Raarden In January Gladiolma — Week 4 AN article on Gladiolus has already appeared la this paper, but. it January is the month when Hulbs generally OBBM to e island, perhaps a refresher ay be'of interest to some gardenAs soon as the Bulbs i January or February they should %  i a in an open sunny poslPreparatinn of The Bed To prepare the bed. fork it deeply, turning 1:1 some well rotted i:i i.ianure. Gladioli like a rich bed. eut. they dislike fresh animal manure. If the soil is it all hesvv or cloggy, mix in a good supply of fine charcoal to lighten It up. Plant tne Bulbs about thn-< inches deep m the ground, and about eight inches apart, pressing them in very firmly. As sown u* ihe> iprtnd, showing a few leavegive Mm an application of manure, and. UV useful ii V ftt (garden vegetable manure) ii; do f"i nila. Keep the plants well watered at ;iii Hiram Whan 'he plants hove rea ch ed full growth, periodic applied;.ms of manure will give good remits. One of our Garden Books, advises a weik solution of liquid Sheep Manure for this, but G. V answer just as well To ensure straight well shaped gg of feu plants is adVtawt In putting in the stakes, however, great care must be exercised to see that the Bulb. pierced and Injured. Bulbs planted In January should be flowering by April. After the flowering period) RH fultage id the Gladi' down, and it R then that the Bulbs should be taken up. and stored in loose dry earth until the following January, when they OM be ro-planled. This Is the recognised treatment, hut one successful grower of Gladiolus always leaves her Bulbs in tne ground, and up thev Oonw the following January at the appointed time Other gardeners may like to *ry out this method far then %  Gladioli ui by planting Hv small Comtl which generally form around the mother Bulb. But th'; I i.ike maiu yean to mature am with the imported Bulbiitably pi iced, and so easy to get. rorth the trouble. it,, a kaiger supjiv of llnwers. it is n gooo plan to plant the Bulbs in batch — > paving tliein a week or two apart. MI making sure of a continuous gunply f flowers, over a longer rick tlu* flower-spikes for the house when the Hist two bloom have opened, they will last well. with the blooms opening gradually all up the stalk. Have you a gardening question you would like amwered or any narden information of Interest to nther gardeners you could pass on? Have you a surplus of seeds or cuttings to exchange' 1 Please write to "Gardiner" c 0 The Advocate and watch thli column. At The* f in. in. %  The Inspector General BASED on Nikolai Gogol'*, ?rcr\ satirizing bureaucracy. THE INSPECTOR GENERi-L. shov IgRtown, is an excellent \-ehicle for the inimitable of Danny Kave. Probably the best young comedian in theentertainment world today, Mr. Kuve ,s given full scope for his abilities. Among other things, he dances. *eti thoroughly entangled) and. unknowingly, set-, fire to his han ^he direction is good, the set. tags, enhanced by Te, i i" outstanding, and though the n down in certain spots, I i. good enlertammeii' farce and slapv. BJ with en meu.jik-. ILL GET BY I'LL GET BY. a pleosan cal comedy in Techi i Theatn resiles, produces amating facial i aliithcnc5. gets mixed up with a group of tumblers, and signs— with three Danny Kaye faces—a uujrtet with himself, one of the rlcverest bits of entertainment 1 All of this is per funned at a speed that leaves you gasping This probably explains the lulls which occur m the piclure when Mr. Kaye Is either not present, or not so noticeably %  ettve Theet same lulls also • the cxtraordin.ii > .ihilIty of Mr. Kaye uhen he gets hold of a realty funny situation, The ntttni of the turn is the mvthical town of Brodnry in the ftainng Jui.,Havei. Will Frt-nrh Empire, .hiring the NapolbuiKligan ami Cllwu .ir It..era. As a mambodied Tpth Wlula WHUam Uindigan are comically pompous and Elsa l ok •*'**r the more serious bust Larjchester, .is the ma) Dve-nwaina. Attractivt In km with Mr. Kaye, duet ami BOBM, plus %  hoping he will take her to Pan itn. by June Haw, ai gnd Itudapcst. Miss Latuheslei | Han Dalk b nzati'ins are always memTie settings are attractive u %  lid her tetr-a-tete wil"i vo„ will pi ml., i the "inspector", which ends with ..f the tunes. het i etUeoata over, her head, I lelightful. Walter Slezak. as the -ghow man is excellent and Barbara Hates the little kitchen maid, who Iries to save the "inspector's" life Is most ati . %  m.ill pjit. THE FOREIGN LEGION Bud Abbolt ami I :uplaying at the Clot" I IN THE FOHKICN UXilON. In this nim. Amarlca'a comedy kin*** as they are calleti, have tl' One or tho features of the musi. „ )ind |j m0i Starting out an wTtwUlnj DnV S ll I cal score If the • lever burlesqii" Of OW tune, which accompany nmie^V'Thev"..^, tf^nsel i My THEGAMBOL? {prf** boy. and I understand they tried i i htiie prenatal influence i ) i leiunir to me as Frank, but I don't think they were deeplydisappointed when they had to | slightly to Frances Contrary tr what some peoph* seem to think, I wasn't a tomboy! I had %  !* %  < vitniity, but I never took it out In athletics, and to this day 1 hate exercise of tnid kind. 1 plav tennis a Uttle, Mil that's all. and we don't own a .swimming pool. ilfLSIlAV;—Judy's start as i singer; why ihe get* "the rocky feeling.") t.fcJrf!i wmlp ehamploh. Runn vioim (ytth which ha „! nn( Ilf Itu locnI ShC | khSi „, _____^ , _. re duped into joining Hie l-*'i and from that point onanything go-. AnMmpI then esemitlful slave gills In a market, without know ing they had bid for them: getting themselves well ami tmlj the deiert. which produces the most amailng mirages; <>emg captured by the Sheikh, and lurnbaf hi. camp Rrto m upe" " I'nallv blowing up a I> Patricia Medina, a nev. onv of the ftTOtlp p| iiuit supply the neceawry feminine appeal, but I don't think she was entirely at case will gajRy type I 1 realize that Abbolt and C'ostello arc supposed to le ldosplltllngly funny — but sides have remained ml" \ %  •' %  %  there's probably %  pnithl with my sense of humour Any .'..iy. If you an OIM Of their millions of fans, you won't want to mills this film, wlii'li I in a year. —jC UJf POND'S PtfND'S COLB CREAM to cleanse and soften your skin. I-0ND-* VANIHINC CBEAM to protect your skin by day and to hold your powder matt. dmtr &t,*i-'Bs^ly "EduJb* I'OSDS I ACE PBLR: clinging, perfumed, 5ceintifically blended, for a glamorouily matt complexion. £?&.C. ELECTRIC 'j2efsUc/e/aiiob Pfl>Sa- I.IPIICK smooths so easily onto your lips; the rich vibrant colour stays on and on and on. Here is a range of beauty products used) by lovely society women everywhere. Simple and Inexpensive, they arr all you need to keep you looking :> %  lovely, feeling your very best at all times. You will find them at all the best beauty counters. III I'll III llll II F Viul with %  rval liUUUbl* SMcuUUoa. Iiahi. Minni and rnl* wW*4 l h..KU U hvinia wldi aucfe |r..Oa Hrrwtr-* OHS lUauaa hat* inci*ud etuince* ol %  dru.ii and PMa Booklet NUatTl irii.. iinpi. mo 4 Csttl SUM*. Loadon. W.I. '-f 1 '—* —ill** ry^Ram N eW!jMPROVED ^m ODEX*^* O Binishei parspiralion odour /x_^g/i-^ O l*"* 5 b0, 5 M| d '" n, BRaTw\ i 's KBa-"^j / AVOID OFFENDING-USE ODEX yie FAMILY Food Dr/nk CADBURY'S %  i or" . %  .• %  What do you know about ENO? DO YOU KNOW .IUI ENO will r.licvc irtcnia, and lassirude, Irobrii you up racnially and SCt H a ictrrthing, iiwitoraling puk-rac-up? DO YOU KNOW than dash of liNO in a rumhlerful of walcr will iclieve a sick IieadaLhc,or liven I.ncss, and overcome ilrC"hmvInc^\"whnJi lull-iwi unwise cjting or drinking ? •VoW in bottles for lasting fr^ahnttn Eno s Fruit Salt' 7*< wotJi %  (•*' %  ami "P-mt !*Ji~ m The refrigcraiin;? unit of the G.E.C refrigerator is en nnelr made lhat it is hcrmciically sealed after manufacture and never needs serricing. This refn^rral'ir will Hand up :o any extreme of climate — and it's lovely lo look at, too I Solid chromium plitad hand!* Intorpornlnf corcaaisd totsTftr THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. BRIDGETOWN. BARBADOS urmsomic mt UMUM. ur.ciuc co. uo, a INOAHO IJSlR I olourful -p' i • i 1 I .I..I i. n n bi i I \ ; in. \|. I II In Trini.1 .. iSODM lbut| you should %  vow linii-ii \v. i Indian for iHHikinKS kBNIVAL TRI^ BWIA BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LOWER BROAD STREET. BRiDGLTOWN



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•*-* •'"%  1l-JltmilS IUJJ ^IIWI.WW W, _._ %  *•% %  y -*. -_g_l. i.. U.N. DELAY ACTION AGAINST CHINA Britain Can Provide More Ships For W.I.Now (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON, Jan. 19 "'TMIE impression is gaining ground in the British West Indies today that the U.K. Government is not merely failing to act on the recommend IIMHI of the Commonwealth Shipping Committees and many previous reports but is indifferent to the situation". — Thig is an extract from a full A-Bomb Tested In Las Vegas WASHINGTON, Jan. 27 The Atomic Energy Commission laid today that "one of the perlodic tests" of atomic explosions v-as held today at the Air Force bombing range near Las Vegas. Nevada. Yesterday t h e Governor of Nevada. Charles Russel, disclosed that there was an explosion on Wednesday night al the Atomic Energy Commission's new testing grounds in his State. He said he could not give any details for security reasons but that he was authorised to say the lest was primarily to check communication!: aud other facilities The Commission last night described the teat as a complete success and said full-scale tests would begin on a regular basis within two weeks. Result* of These future tests would be neither audible nor vi'ible except under certain weather conditions. People in Las Vegas saw and felt today's explosion. It was believed to be the second testing detonation ou the deseit base. "11 really lit up the sky like a big sunburst." one resident said. Hundreds of people saw-and heard the blast. Many of them were Southern Californians in the town with the usual weekend tourists.—Rruter. Banana Exports Fell Last Year KINGSTON. Jan. 14. Jamaica's banana exports declined by over 750,000 stems in 19.M tu reach its lowest export prod tion since the island's output turned to the 5.000.000 mark 1846. In 1949 total banana purchases made by the Banana Pu eho-rs Board amounted to 6.736.12 stems; of this amount 6,530,133 stems were shipped. Purchase in 1950 fell to 6.0*2.108 sterns nnd shipments were just under 5,300.000 items-. The decline In last year's total production is attributed in BOOM quarters to the windstorm whki hit the island towards the end u last year, but while this Is respon &ible to some small extent for tin deficit, the figures indicate thai the main reason was a shortfall in Grcs Michel production, due the ravages of Panama DiseaKremlin Must Not Misjudge America WASHINGTON, Jan. 27. president Truman said here that it was "vitally important that th leaders of Communist imperialism do not misjudge this nation as did Hitler and the Kaiser." in the last two world war* Truman sent this message to the annual Roosevelt Day dinner leaf night, sponsored by the Americans for democratic action. The President said: The Kremlin should understand that contrary to its own propaganaa this country is not weak and divided. We are not in a state of moral and economic decay." "We know very ell what Stalinist domination would mean. We know how difficult It Is for people under Moscow domination to break away."—Reuler. igth review of the • %  precarlouand inadequate" shipping services between Britain and the Caribbean, contained in the recent issue of the British Export Gazette. It lists five main requirements. which adequate shipping services should be able to provide for (1) "Movements of official and commercial staff between the U.K. and the British Caribbean. (2) Journeys of merchants and others concerned with fostering U.K.-Caribbean trade. (3) Tourist traffic, which is potentially much greater than at present (4| Shipments of West Indian produce—not only what is Immediately offering, but what could be economically grown If refrigerated transport were guaranteed. (5) Exports of U.K. manufactured goods, which again might well expand under the stimulus of improved shipping". Shirking Responsibilities In not taking steps to see that these services are provided, the British Government is not faring up to its responsibilities, it continues. Twice, recently, questioners in the House of Commons have been "fobbed off" with the answer that "no practical plan" has been submitted for implementing recommendations In the Commonwealth Shipping report. But as Lord Lucas announced In the House of l^ords last month, plans have been submitted for improving rvices between the two areas. The Colonial Office declared that they are not "practical". The Gazette says it Is agreed there is no likelihood of a reguiai llrltlsh passenger service to th* Eastern Canbuean without some form of Government assistance. A direct subsidy to Caribbean services might seem invidious to ether owners operating elsewhere bill this objection could be met by inviting tenders. Alternatively the building of ships for the West Indies run might be assisted either by outright grants or by special credits on a mutual risk-sharing basis. In addition it would have to b< iscertHined how far the West Indies themselves would be prepared to contribute and in wnat ways they might assist a British shipping line by such items m j>ort charge concessions, etc. Attention should also be paid when studying the economies U IK" question to the heavy tonnages which have to be brought fn the Caribbean area to Britain in chnrtered vessels. Any saving it: this respect might be regarded CJ a contril utlon tj a subsidy. US. Delegate Complains THE PHOTO AT THE TOP shews s chukkt in progress dnnng tin Presentation Match played 0T numbers of the Barbados Polo Club at the Qnrrlson yesterday. THE PHOTO AT THE LEFT picture* Mr. Colin Deane receiving the Advocate CoalUtim Ooa fr* !" Mrs. H. A. Artanr. ^ ^ m AT THE RIGHT, tlio Cameraman ctliglit Mr A. J. Hanschell receiving tat Y. da LIMA Challenge Otip. Stop Gap In the meantime while thought is being given to these propoias the Gazette suggests as a >:o|>gap measure to relieve immediate congestion, consideration should given to the possibility of inducing Australasian ships passing through the Panama Canal to car more regularly at ports in the Eastern Caribbean. "It is hard to believe that the^: difficulties are insurmountjul; when so much is at stake" it adds. "The time has come for business Interests in Britain and the British Caribbean to unite their voices In insisting that the present atlitud of drift, complacency and evasion come to an end." Appended to the Gazette'! article are three letters fiom Mr. A. E. V. Barton, West India Committee Secretary, Mr. E. Palmer. Director of Bookers* Shipping and Trading Co., Ltd., and Mr. Percy aj on page 10 Will Help To Defend Peace Of The World LONDON, Jan. 27. j Diplomatic relations between India and the People's Republic of China will "help to defend the peace of Asia and of the world.' Tiie Peking People's daily said today, according to a new China (Communist) news agency message received in London. Commenting on the first anniversary of the Republic of India the paper wrote: "Diplomatic relations between the Republic of India and the Peoples Republic of Chins which have been established on the basis of equality, mutual benefit, and mutual respect for territorial and sovereign rights, will not only help to further consolidate and develop the friendship which alrendy exists between the peoples of these two countries, but will also help to defend the lasting peace of Asia and the whole world."—Renter Ike Returns Home NEW YORK. Jan. 27. General Eisenhower landed today at Sewart air force base near here at the end of his 21 day military fact finding tour of Europe. The General will spend the next four days at West Point, United States military academy. He will leave on Wednesday for Washington to report on how hefound Western Europe's defences. —ReuUv Diplomat* Faced With Very Difficult Task By PAUL SCOTT RANKING. WASHINGTON, Jan. 27. THE present rift in AnglD-Amr-ru m Far Eastern policies has presented British officials here with one of iheir most arduous diplomatic tasks since the second world war. %  There ha* been no attempt to [disguise the divergence of itritil'h and American attitudes %  he Communist regime in o\ mi: • SPOT LONDON' C. W. Brown of Deal. Keni ciuntv. pent the follow mu letter about bis family's meagre meat ration to the adgtOf 'if the Sunday Express: "Our piece of mutton was flavourless and lough. So we gave It to the cat. She tried u bit, gave it up, and went out. "In about ten minutes she returned with a large, fat mouse, which she laid at my feet. "Was she sorry for us?" —I. N. S. S. Koreans Strike Back At Inchon TOKYO. Jan. II Bouth Korean* BsBfM hack in the Korean war picture to-d wiih a snap hit, kill and run r.i on Communist-held Inchon, port for Seoul. South Korean caplUI according to a rep..it here lat" to-night The rnlil lasted four hou Heavy United States naval guns bombarded the area for the second day running. The report said the Korean killed 40 Communists and then left without suffering any cnsualnV Armoured elements of the 8H1 Army which captured Suwon yesterday pushed mure than six 'lorth to-day Chinese troops •" %  ported to have fallen back towards the Han River skirting the outhi-rn outskirts of Seoul. HUB drive, up the west coast of Kon rbng the main road I Sv ..' > .K, el ',nly light rcilstanc ' b dU lint hitter llKlilinic had raged farther east H 01 III 1 ti |ad to advance bvvond battered Kumyangjangm Two Chinese reuimeitls fought ferociously house by house to retain a foothold In the town and Ir the hiltx-to the north and west Maohlne Runners and sniper wore smoked out of buildings. A: the Chines*withdrew. Jet plane. and other fighters atlncked With napalm (jellied petrol) bombs. Withdrew Fuither east still, a United N.iUons battalion was forced to withdraw and rasstm p four miles north-west of Ichon hut Inter lOt) Wra reported to have taker an unidentified small village there. For the third successive day United Nations patrols advanced unopposed north of Wimju on Ir* right wing of the Seoul fund. in Bant Kcraa nrara than 3,000 Communists were ic|>orte %  -i] old French author. Henry De Honfratd and his wife With '.run taking 1 after a raid on their bOBBc Mannerheim Gets Worse l&jtfgJtt&JS" LAUSANNE, January 27. hurtling lamps. 300 %  The condition of Field Marshal oph"' 1 2W grammes of opium dross, 9 grammes of hei-m.. ai Mannerheim. In hospital here alter an intestinal operation dolcrior. eted again tonight. His doctors at the Cantonal Hospital expressed grave fears for his life. —Renter. Paddy and Robbie and Bob tr y to make rain with contraptions tike this In the rainy season now on there jire maddening dry gaps at Critical operational times. Mr. George Raby, tall, general manager of the whole works was an Army expert on projectiles during the war. He sjt down ana llgured a few Ideas himself. Including "Rnby's Special," j simple charcoal burner that looks !ik*> u drainpipe with an aircraft rudder attached. This is for rain precipitat-nn by using Africa's strong vertical currents to "ae*d" high clouds with silver iodide from charcoal burner.; With a battery of btSmafl 286 Rebels Killed SAIGON, Jan. 27. French forces in the Northern Indo-China batlle area of Tonkin* carried out two "completely successful" clearing operations yesterday, a communique announced hento-night. Tlu1 nimunique said that 2C6 Vietminh insurgents wenkilled in Cochin. China. Reuler (From JOHN RF.DFERN) KONGWA. THE OVERSEAS FOOD CORPORATION, which failusing about ts worth of silver ed with groundnuts, has started trying to produce rain. rd, <' *<* treatment special W,.h chcmjc.1. released by burners -m the ground or b.1PXZ^&^l^'lZ'il, loons exploded at great heights, the corporation Is trying arm of 200 iqwri tit tip over the clouds-wherr thev will do most good. Children's Balloons The job. completely hush-ho*h hack end of a truck with ol.l Th,. ^yg,! IIH ,hi|rlren'i bairn rlaimiiiK. I being done by %  vacuum brake cjliralcr Iro.n |„„,„ ,„, p,. r u.ou~i,cl, for lhair ^"7"" **prtlnit called lorries for !he ., wlivd tMUaTKl get „dvice %  S, f !" '"J" Kthy; SpeeUI from African observers in me .. %  .1 ^ '"""*'" as everybody R,i n distribution has lieen n Governmerrfs weather service. 22 £' %  '.Z *2 d ?' .' Ir '*"^ m "l" r uioblem from Ihe start— They have dona more than 30 man. Koobie the Englishman, and (..though the old gang denied ir u now and say % %  • %  i !" ^ ,i SL, Tli wllh iniioualy when I suggested il always been lain at the m wondrou. Heath Hob'jison eonhr „. ,„„„. nan wo >Mr> ,im,* B ut tftev win,, traptions made from throw-out Usefu] moJ „ u „ cloud5 „(„ Mi „ on ., milkl across from the east and .will their We precipitate it where They make hydrogen in the bush stuff near the Mgombn Range 50 edj' says Kenny. wilh a gerier-ajor^rgade Irom U.e rrjlet. beryid the upU-. h spare parts for oplun en %  Prealdant Truman and Prime Ministei Attlaa ae-lMowladMd U i after their cotiferencj hear In Deci'mber. Since then, it has been made igl) i (ear that both lead' month Only American naval expert: ill watch hrr 'death", -Renter Their Daily Btvud WASHINGTON, Jan. J7. Turkish troops after a bayonet (barge with the United Nations' forces In K< reu, sent this messagx to the supplJ dapo* attacked, send ua more bread." This request was revealed at the Press Conference to-doy by Colonel Cary HutCAlnson, lha A mi in .HI supply officer, who was Korea earlier this month Hi id that the United Slate% Army food experts had produced a speejaj kind of braad for the Turks. It was bsaivj bra I ;*nd contained wheat Hours and olive oil-Renter. Bevin Improvei LONDON, An tl. The Britlah ForeiRn Ernest Bevin. ill with pneumom ^ad another "restless night." h personal doctor Sir Alexander McCall, said this morning. Bavin ms yesterday stated to have shown slight improveme A Foreign Office spokesman i later to-day that Bevin "continues to improve and Is slightly better." —s>uter Spanish Representative ? IX.NDON, January 27. The llrili-.li F"i< icither confirm nor deny the reI iil ap p ea ri ng in the British Press ; .day, th.it Britain has rapllad un.'.ivourably to Spain's request for ..nish representative in Britain —Rruter LAKE SUCCESS. Jan. 27 THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY'S POLITICAL Committee adjourned again today without reaching a decision after a week of debates on methods of achieving peace in Korea. The chief American delegate Warren Austin today continued his efforts to get the Committee to brand Communist China an aggressor and appoint a Committee to consider "collective measures" against her. "It is the view uf ihe United States Government and people that the United Nations have already delayed too Mmtag the aRxressor." Austin declared. "We are conscientiously opposed to any further United Nations action which avoids ihe central issue The Committee had four main proposals before k: 1. The United States Resolution labelling the Peking regime an aggressor. The Canadian proposal made informally yesterday for a seven power conference conditional on a re la tion of fighting to be arranged by the delegates at the start of their meeting. I. The Israeli plan for reitmrmatton by the Oenerd Assembly of the rive Petal "Commissal Plan." i. Proposal by 12 Asian and Arab nations for a Seven Power Conference which would obtain from Communist Chins clartneation c: the terms of a ceasefire. Aggressor Charge Don't Condemn Red Chinese URGES POLAND I-AKE SUCCKSS. Jan. 27 Poland to-night totd the United Nnlions she* would support 12 nation Aalaa resolution calling for an "exploratory" cenfennea. with Pacing Katz Suchy, Polish delegate anloiincef. ihk when tn~day' B debut % n Korea opened before the Polili al Coounlrtaa Poland will give her support he said after certain minor amendments proposed bj the Soviet Union. The Polish delegate said N v.'i nt international ncgotin tions has there been a case when negotiations have been preceded with condemnation of one power. not been a case where condemnation was followed by negotiations.he declare,!. Joosto, South, Afri. delegate, announced his country'j sii|ipor: for the American rosoluHon condemning Communist China. Al ihe same lime he hoped Hut on..th:it u.i. .lone, the United Nation* would exhaust the possibilltles of peaceful ncgollntion lie foro stalling to fnlinuhil.. nil. 1 Jnoste dii lined"We ennnot see hew the iuceptaitcc of the tTnUsd States resolution cun UOBS the dOOf lo paaeeCai negotiiiiions w. art staling formally in the resolutioi merely what is known to all thi world and what has repeatedly been staled by responsible people — Iteutei COINCIDENCE MADRID, Win n Antonio Espcjo w epairing the roof of a threeutotev huiise in the Spanish town f M-if.s. he fell to the sire, i %  ioiisly injuring htmtei —and hi* wife who happened t> be passing ut that moment. —I. KB TrXI. IB ADVOC'ATR TIIK NEWS RINfl till DAY OR NIGHT Earlier in the day Michael Fry reported that Uie United N.tti.Mis Ccneral Assembly Is carry next week expected by strung majority to brand pMnmuniSt China as on aggressor Koie.i while leaving Ihe door OMn to further peace I'gutiatlons. The American resolution now bgfor* Hie Political Coromlttce labels tho" Peking Covernment an aggressor, demands the withdraw, al of Chinese troops from Kore*i and asked the Assembly to set in motion the machinery of po*> slbJc pconomlc and other uinCle 7^ eofintries haxe c>rI tressed Iheir support for the condemnation of Communist China Severn) delegations Including the BrIUsh said that they were I* ivuur of condemnation Another resolution before the Political Committee sponsored by the 12 Arab and Asian nations asked for Ihe convening immediately of n exploratory" conference to xamine and clueidute tome doubtful aspects of the Peking Government's attitude. This plan received lukewarm support among the members largsl> on the grounds that 11 did not make any provision for a ceasefire before beginning any negotiations. A new factor introduced into the dlkcusirtotts here, was the apparent lull in the fighting in Korea which the Indian delegates thought might be "significant." They emphasised that the Peking Government while not formally acceding to a ceasefire might be trying lo give the im On page It. Don't IBM RUSS1AS NIW EMPIRE. Begins TUESDAY. Order your copy early. PRINTERS REFUSE TO JOIN IN BOYCOTT BUENOS AMIES. Jan 27. In an eleventh hour effort t l meant L* Preoae. being distributed for the second dav Miinnitg. boycotters last night pickded the printers as they attempted to enter the printing shop. Earlier yesterday evening the printers had decided to disobey the IN-ronista Union orders to join the newspaper vendors* boycolt in sympathy —leuler -Lt. STRIKE AVERTED JOHANNESBURG. Jan 27 A dispute between tiie African mining companies m Rhodes!(i which tl rs ended last Light ; < i rrom the ompaniei. it was announced here today. The terms of the revised offer M disclosed. -Reawr IWACARTHUR TALKS ON JAPAN WITH DULLES TOKYO. Jan. 27 John Foster I special Snvoj. ling out Jap^r on a Peace Treaty, had %  I lalfe with General Mac-Arthur to%  ported to have 'found himself in complete agreement i'.h tinB under on ill Issues of the Japan Treutv • man said the discussion fruitful." Pact Of Irientlship NEW DELHI. Jan 27. India and Indonesia have coneluded negotiations for a treaty of friendship and the treaty will c

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PACE FOIR SISDAY ADVOCATE BVNDAT, JANUARY 2K. 15I ^TALEr^scotT 18 C Waleott Scores Fine Century Kensington Wickets Are Grave}* rd* Hits 128 As SeCOINl Thifd Trial ^ 0 ' Trophies 1950 WAS INDECISIVE September Song And Footmark Were The Best BY O. S. COPPlH I fiml m>elf in the unarculnmsa position Itns wwk et bavin* to offer congratulations to II IndieCrirket Board of Control for their deeision to lentl John Godslard. Welt Indies Crleket Captain in India and Enland to St Lucia %  n ol at a aeries of Tests l-i n d ns>' Sklulx'r C.tKl.lar'd, I am Informed on relmlile .01isioned tv lot* for erkket talent In the pagoi of m potenYial West indies player and if one Is discovered he will be asked tot ike part in some sort of Trial James, preferably here. TWs is a sound decision on the part of the Board and for the 1J fou ft niorlty. iscomn Trial Game Ends .Teams Named The third trial game in preC. WAl.tOTTS XI I77& for 6 wkf.) 232 i attori fo. J. (
    DAKI>*S XI 23K kj' tournament opens at un Thursday nexCLYDE WALC0IT, Weal Imliun Test bat and wicketff^ 1 ""* *?-£* keeper, (cored 128 run. not out In the Moond inning* for his XI yatterday, the* last day in the second cricket trial mutch. tig in at pumber flee he hit———— tn in, !-. %  and baited %  i foUI on. Sal Presented Thr Deane Bros., who for the pant several yean have l*en sucoaaahd In tarrying ol almon rtaa < ITcred for amateur horwmanshlp. crowned their achievementwhen they won Ijoth Hi*' Advocate Challenge Cup A BY BOOKIE T HE month of January Is. usually the time when sports writer* indulge in reviews of the past year and to-day I will lake my turn with racing. I admit that most of us get il oft our chests earlier In the month i>.il as the rtcing season ends in the first week in January it is usually review* at the Christmas meeting *•* five w, 3i .1. Sunday 4th and conclude* !^''i" Ih( n/arner Bolloti Chal' I :. rhur-.uy 8th. | cn( ,p Cup ) n tha Polo Tourna OOKINCT back at the Racing Year 1950 it seems fair enough to The teams will be: mi nU lus i t .,,ded Three teams Xa describe it as a good one all round. On the financial side J. D. G-igard'a XI — J. D. toolt .^E in thls t,. u rnament: Col. there was prosperity both here and in Trinidad while in British GuiGoddard (C-.pL) G. Wood. R. Michelm'imm, the Hurricanes, ana things were apparently no worse than they were before. BarbaA. M. Taylor, E. Atyj Victor Weekes' Team the dos in particular saw an unprecedented sale of sweepstake tickets and I i> Bradati K Brankcydonaa and the Deane Bros. — E. Millington, C. Proverbs. W Xon .. low the first prize in August reached the hitherto unbelievable heights of forty-four thousand dollars. Neither Trinidad nor Jamaica c.,.. i I'lllllIIIX em ii day. D Atk.i until .5 45 p.m. And now, back to the home scene. The Second Trial game ha barn completed and it (a time that we took a look at the poaalW MM that ahauM rapnsaent lUrbadw. against Trinidad next moi U. I must s..v :.t the outset th,.t I think the vectors are farnl ill *. most dimcult task There are only a few players' *hose claim to Inclusion are undeniable but there is a weallh of mediocre player, from whom they will be forced to chooae. Their onlv salvation will lie in the course that lh<> mUS only do just^ to the candidates for mclus.on bntanatira that when they haw sclecte.1 the team that justice will appear to haw bean UNFRIENDLY WICKETS 4 the beat howling figure .3T, „ It was slow scoring forced runs; fa *J| tut ton ol I Hi-: InjUnga win, li .I. r -I %  aeood innings foi In their ,ot plied with 258. ihe I il-im-n to a large rJagjH i ni n P"^"^'> <>' "ie iiti.-k ptw thalnhey score,! 177 to t0I15C hPnt and m ^ wn|fn Fnmr l ra Umpfl worried the tourists. When the sides met in October, the M.C.C. won to regi-ti only success against a state team far on the tour. Cricket Coach Warns W .1. "Get Some fast! Bowlers" i PMl Play When play was resumed yesterday C. Atkins and C Smith open Mil I IfI ISMM.4 wirkat that was wathtar-aoit c aheiuri fa l-l-iaiei taking turn. The first ball wan •ww-ppotd c N<*I b TCBM bowlci by Mulllns to Atkins. 5iJ ,p ^„ c r b* 1 ^^ %  %  % %  Its easy wickets but no Atkins watched the ball go thrutuh BMwn • iikuri b Nobin The trials \„ Wood and took u single in the cio— ib. b WCSLMII P FHSONM.l.Y I think that the wickets prepared during the Trial ^ he second inning* for i ly."r.,, tts&tttt^isvsr&fiSTiA n bowim. „i,H,h... so on a Bap Hank •*" %  ""' %  ;' """ slips .. nd jeep line leg bowl. M k Tne y v U .n.iht% l roha r bS^ niKTmore run. but they would have to second over of the day He sent nghTJor then*? aSfcirn them against bowkr. who at least had a immhlmMb^^am over to JM Ch n With the 1 wTption of "Brickie" Lucas and Keith Walcolt the i„ Mulllns' fourth ball of the *""* neldinit ha been a long way below what we associate with In*'>' 10 third over Atkins had a narrow nSl standards There have been occasionally hnghl spots of fielding t ., r;((M whpn h( f lde(| tmt niBh Nnblet but a KOOfi ihfi Muitanes, One thing lhat was noticeable in racing in both Barbados and ther. w wlnnm^the Y 1^ Lima Trinidad was also Ihe need for new tracks. This was due to the inning the Y. De Lima ^^^ Ilumbcrs of lmponed horses and Creoles and it E tfe to H.V l ,n M n,.^ .., fine sav that at no time In the past has the influx of new blood to the :, ttteBLSJ&fr Kanian^iT. SSJgS J^ii^S .it t d*n e „ i.rc and limb, both of horse and rider, and the few n accident., which look place in 1950 will be multiplied as ihe years go bv W ITH respect,lo the actual racing I can remember few years when there have been such changes in fortune in nearly every class. Here I must ask to be excused from any discussion on racing In Bfi. because of so little first hand information from that colony to go by. Starting, therefore, with the Barbados March meeting, here we saw .... the flrt Parltados Gidneas. As I pointed out two weeks ago in a WUItami en tha other Edghill ,| iscUM j qn on the classics there were many of the most promising canwas taking the place of Colin d |j rtP$ absent for the race. Nevertheless we saw Ihe Hon. J. D. Deane both of whose horses were Chandler's tiny filly Watercress in good form and in addiUon to taking lame. the first Guineas she won two other race, lo end up the meeting The Col. Mlchelin learn won unbeaten. 1 Among the loeallv bred three-year-olds the filly Bowmanston F< Rowing is the personnel of the aigo showed splendid form in her first race. She broke the F class .unadllen played this season:— record for 54 furlongs and in so doing defeated a field of older horses Senior?. with ridiculous ease. %  K „ r (...„_, r The March meeting also saw the first Jamaica Derby winner to .„, %  In B.ub.id." fi nmnj a ve.i :! not the first foi ..II UBML (I %  %  a of the %  Match. In the Presentation %  i. thraa ol tha winning teams, and Mark Edghill on 0M %  Ida. and Col. Michelui. John Marsh, Victor Wvakaj and Elliott b Noblrl "rl.hi b Wllno.1 I r>.UI. b NabWI %  r. l( r.lra. '10 WsbT. | noMII. 1 nidei :. %  (Capt) M m. im s||rr whpIher Saraband ever raced here). This was Mr. Taw Marsh. TawlU's tall bay gelding Blue Streak. Unfortunately he did not ,,' .in 1, strike his best form and the laurels of the meeting in the top claw divided between Beacon BrUht and Gun Site. The latter. and Englnnd nilPt J* e,T .'"" J rounder said. I'I.I(MM thraa C'llone D A V Weekes (Capt ) J^ E. P. ^ aii'l or. the Englnnd side Bed^r Williams and E. A. B Deane particular established a reputation for himself as one of the best sons Read "EntiliOi Cricketers in Harhiidns— .16 yer.rs w-" hy Inn 1. ..-• in tomorrow's "Evening Advocate". Hailey look the majority arickata." Mercer, who coached suga arns for the Sug f:clurers' As-^ciation ol '"' • %  1 tha*. during hi I 0 he had it-. number of "naturals" and yen prov bs worthy candidates for not only 1 1 Hie Jamaica gMa btil also the West Indies. "I Mieve". Mr. Mercer said." lhat there II I ureai possibility of .1 sugar Batata baam rialUng %  arbadoi aftar tha crop season. Arthur Bonltta will no doubt skipper the team and wh it may be the beginning of an Twriudoe*: Colin Deane (Capt I 0 j Q.T C. by ling twice. • A TI li [>ee Deane, Keith Deane nnd 71^ furlongs with top weight 1 Daana. Juniors Criolles: A J. II. Hanschell (capt.) O. H. Johnson. J. W. Chandler and Andrew Arthur. 1 nine and another time over T Union Park 11 was another three-year-old creole melight. who held the At this meeting Dr. N. Bain's gelding Wavecrest. the first son of the sire Coat-of-Arms ever to prove of any consequence, dished out three consecutive defeats to his contemporaries to become %  firm favourite for the Trinidad Trial Stakes. This marked Wavecrest's first appearance since the previous August and It certainly appeared that a bright future was in .tore for him. •COX and II. K. Melville. Beacon Bright also displayed good form at Union Park but was If conditions are suitable n few rather unlucky to lose the first A class race due to his unfamtliarity more Saturday afternoon chukw (t n the track. However he managed one first while The Gauntlet ill be played. Rifle Results and Pharlite accounted for the other two A claw races, the latter also winning a B class race. It was at Union also that the first record forecast for the year was paid when the aged gelding Brown Boy got up in the last stride to win from the Jamaican mare Miniature. Not since 1946 had Brown Boy won a race. The forecast pay out was $5,533.48. M the beginning of an Tha uaual 8j*ay *< !" 2 \\TtTH the T.T.C. June meeting came outstanding performances o> £SXL"m ?%AZ**S^2b£? Wseptember Song. Blue Streak. Orly and Bow Bells. Al] for struggle to fiea place on the Ihejarlnd being gusty. aide Finally Ml rear beuaved England 1 South A/| said that bowled by Marshall while making a defensive stroke. __ -vent in and the first ball Hoad was brought on In place of | ha t he took from Mnrshull struck —...._—_ Mulhns and his first ball of his him on the pads but a loud appeal f^^-m W nl IILH. *g.... NO COMPROMISE *irst 0r Smith pulled again to wo. not uphekl H^didnotsV.v l ttlU tletUTllfl llOIIIC 1 CANNOT AGBEE with any compromise lo.selcct.Toylor to open the square leg boundary for four UmK wiIh skipper Waleott and at ,,-__ 0ur ,,_,, cttmiii#ti with Marshall and send Hunte lower in the batting order. runs. „!„,. H „ vc : i oad h| R third a KINGSTON Jan 14 Although It would ^^^SS^J^Jf^S^y^lS^S, '" the fourth ball Smith edged *"V P Taylor caught him A team of touring football plavyel I think that Ihcy would do better to play one of these tn ea* h lroverbs Greenldge went in and was off „.„ scl.oolb.os returned to Jamaic match .f they are undecided H to who should ^company Hoy MarJ !" n "J DU Vf £ with a brace and Waleott was 49. ,., | oek assured that shall lo the middle to open tho innings. M 111 on coiil tie I wl m Al lhls *** Walcoti l^ga,, tg u.e, hod done a gnod job as amAtkinson 1 would play a. one of the opening bwrtarg.^ J !" |** wta T^ 1 wna?Ationa P^verise the bowling but when basiadors;_ during their .s*en-doy oft of The following are the he best scores returned :— M. A. Tucker 100 M. G. Tucker 100 s Woatherhaad 98 O. Martin 98 F. Tempro 97 l Chaie ne R. Marshall 9fi H. Websler 92 Is quicker off the pitch in the opening overs than pace" bowling candidates and he'Tson'lnflnlVely better'batsman than h^k^singk^ ^ West ,. I \.-ivone was looking for a good visit to the French-cultu .! %  %  .enl down a partnership with Greenldge and Indian republic. any of them. t% "" "" ,'" ""?". "'' ',,'* himself. Greenldge was out l< They were students of the St. The other place for o pace bowler would seem to rest between m*iWcnin h* thirdover When Brankpr f;cor C e's College who left Jamaica Bradshaw and Mullina. Bradshaw cannot complain for having bei the score had reached ..3 Smith K ( ^ Waleott when on January1% play thraa matches tuSrss b o> rrfiffn g s-s;r 5rr" over. Smith mod LAwnTeniiifl Results The results of yesterday's sets a the Belleville Tennis the day afforded the most generous chance to qualify but I cannot truthfully gay that Mullins has received equally indulgent treatment. H.iiti. making o two-way his ccnturv with a four of* Journal "^d army plana Branker and when plav wns ende plaied nt (hair disjHisul by the Eric Atkinson followci and was Waleott was undefeated with IS ":'.'/"' Government. off with n single from Hoad. In hitting 18 fours and Bowen D'. Millington's fiHh ove r Atkins out five. was beginning to look shaky and at Six wi U 1 tW KaJth Waleott at silly mid runs. off an easy calch. Hoad figures ,, TD h „ IO ii. xi RgsH six overs, two maidens. 17 INNINGS THE ONLY FAST BOWLER i WILL stand or fall by my suited opinion that Carl Mullins U the only real pace bowling candidate In Barbados today. 1 have alreadv written lhat Atkinson gets more pace off the pitch in the early overs but Mullins is the only pace bowler who is fast lor AN ENTIRE DAY. Denis Atkinson I would select at once. He has not been successful in the trials but he has given the best all round performance wicket this season with bat and ball tor Wanderers the champions In the !" ns First Division competition. Cave went in and Millington He has had International experience as^n member of the West ,,„„.„,,, „„, ,.,,, having taken .1 Indie-; Mm in India. He is young, energetic and really keen. Wu wjck#?| had Atkinson in check 'would be really rich in talent if we could afford to ignore these M ,n „.,.,„„•.. n lsl wicket came £ •*"!'" %  ,apd %  "' w b ^,,^4 qualities in selecting a Barbados team today. wnen h( orcc d Atklruun to give t Auumen e^av atarssaii'1'. Norman Morshall has carved a place hi himself as the most jicRm Man nBl | ,.,,,,, when the atHtlnaiea curate medium fast bowling machine we have produced in years. ^—^ W]K fl2 Sk | pprr u/alcolt = TTs. xi 3sn INNINC* The vialton won one match and drew two. While DO tour the n for 25J team also took port in track athletics and won several aWnti The schoolboys were occompanted by the Itev Fr. Welch of (he CoUaga, who said that he had lieon unpraaaad with the speed ;"" %  A ". N. Skinner. ml drlva of the Haitian St. Men s Doubles tbaUeri and througtl 31 H L TOpptn and D. lawless gkaige'.* pla>-ed a more construeva. E. P. Tavlor and Dr. C. G. live 1.11m-, only tha brilliance nt Manning. Sounders, t ! %  visitors' gjoaOnapar, rt-avad oil dafaal 1 B. Mar>hall _... ...... „... ....-, follow.d and a/u otTwiih n single. | ££ !" *?£.£ViiMd I'J I II \ I WAIXOTT W OreMkleic WUII-m. I WOULD coriainly relieve Civile Walcolt from the strain of wicket At 92 Mullms was brought on nr.nk.-r keeping especially In view of the fact that he might not be called again lo bowl and the second ball K upon to perform this role on the Australian tour and also in view of in his first over Ol his second the fact Ihul he might not always be available to Barbados in the spell Waleott cover drove hard f n r Intercolonial commitments and so one should be trained Gerald Wood is in 0 section without competition and he picks himself if the selectors are at oil mindful of the above facts. Roy Marshall. Everton Weekes and Clyde WaUolt are the batting certainties. EITOI Millington has picked himself nnd so my twelve would be -Goddard (Capt I. Hunte or Taylor. Roy Marshall. Weekes Waleott, Eric Atkinson. Denis Atkinson. Norman Marshall. G !" ' Wood. Errol Muhngton, Carl Mulllns. Hood. Blanker, or Bowen, if they icach Intercolonial standard by next match or else dispense alow spinner altogether, rely upon ihe fast and nicdii play Keith Waleott as a forceful batsman and exfour runs, and Cavi At lunch Walcolt 23 rjmra itUI together. Rilian T....1 IBM !*"* I M eekea Hils 48 In Second Teal After Lunch ,._ i_o ? a, BOW I.INT. ANAI.YHI8 After lunch Williams in brought on agoln in place ol BranMu)l ..„ kcr to bowl to Walcolt. The last WU ball of this over Waleott pulled to ^| a '" w ; bowling and the bmindnrv for four runs. Cave Brankt f Hent field. who was batting patiently when kl.rU.atl ..... Hiam Our Own ( >rri->Ba. C.RENADA. Jan -f. Empire after Grenada in the second Colony Match for :.8. Holder taking fl fur 19 In 14 overs and Alleyne 4 for 23 in 1:1,1 i loaad with 92 for 4: Jonea 4 Taylor 0. Mi Grant 27 not out. Weekes DMU. by those who criticise her as one who cannot run in mud will, ever convince me that she was not as versatile as Ligan in this respec*. T HE Barbados August meeting sow further triumph for Watercress, who won the Derby with ridiculous ease from a poor field wnile It will forever be remembered as the "meeting of records". No less than eight records were broken in the course of three days' racing and chief among these was the one set up by the great mare Elizabaflban when she ran the nln? furlongs and 14 ;..irds In 1.531. *t IS a record which I expect to sec standing for a long while. AT ARIMA it wns Ocean Pearl. Mr. William Scott's classic filly. %  who dumbfounded tho critics, myself among them, by winning twice in A class and once In B. Previously it was felt thai Ocean Gibbons Pearl was only a sprinter and at that one of no great consequence. However at Arima she not only outran Blue Streak over six furlongs but allowed him tq_lead in the early stages (his favourite lype of race), of o 7'TJ furiong event and then overtook him in the closing lurlongs in a most decisive manner. About this filly too was sad news to be subsequently chronicled when a few days before the Christmas meeting sne bowed a tendon, and was reported retired for good. The Arima meeting might also be noted for the repercussions caused after it had passed into history. Chief among these 1 would mention the dispensing by the Trinidad Turf Club with the services of Mr. O. P. Bennett as starter. I. for one, have never seen a better in. 26. ttarter than Mr. Bennett and I have been going lo racing now for 25 Footmark, sweep winner at the years, for at least 15 of which my criUcol faculties have been reasonChristmas Race Meeting of the ably developed. The other aftermath of note of the Arima meeting Trinidad Turf Club, is being offerwas the so-called "Glmeruck Dinner" held in honour of the dinner ed for sale. The price asked is cf the Arima Derby Trial Stakes. The first of its kind in the West understood to be $8,160. Indies It will not long be forgotten for the speeches made thereat. Footmark's proposed trip to AS I do not propose to discuss the Christmas meeting I end with Miami B*l been cancelled, but it .fVthe Barbados November fixture, and that in brief only. The is not known whether the horse mest significant event I can think of in connection with this was the "Hi T ;ice at ihe Union Park Race victory of Cross Roads in the two-year-old Trumpeter Cup. Few %  ting ai I two-year-olds have ever scored such a surprising and devastating win M Watson of Jamaica at one and the same time. Others of note at the November meeting Yes 1950 cerlootmark For Sale time. i 8 not out. CHECK YOUR FACTORY SUPPLIES and Phone tmrtti for tk following DUNI.0P TRANSMISSION BELTING SH" X" Plj DUNLOP RUBBEK INSERTION V." 1-1' DICK'S PACKINGS all Type. BELT FASTENERS BELT DRESSING FLAKE GRAPHITE STENCIL INK COTTON WASTE BASS BROOMS STEEL WIRE BRUSHES EMERY li SANDPAPER FILES All Type. TAPS DIES HACKSAWS & HACKSAW BLADES ENGINEER'S HAMMERS — OPEN END & BOX SPANNERS TAPER A STRAIGHT SHANK HIGH SPEED DRILI.S J-lbj l-lb.. 11-lb. lj-lb.. 2<4-lb.. 3-lb. STILLSON TYPE WRENCHES R'. 10", 14", 18". 24". 38" CHAIN PIPE WRENCHES V—4" ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAT BlillT T coicaTi erress soumnc svistnci THAT BKUSHIN6 Tinil RISMT MTU UTMW WITII COLGATE DENTAL CREAM HELPS STOP TOOTH DECAY! H.lp Ytar Children knU TMtk Dwoyl Insist that your children •ilu : %  >'<• bru-li llieii teeth right alter meals frith C 1aaleDent-.l.'i.um TMQ il lora Colgate*! delicious doiii'lc-minty flavour, so it's easy ti> get l.n*m to UN earn* tl> Tha . % %  %  affarttva >v >it known tu help ra Exkaattiva Restore* ly Eminent Dantol Aatbaritias Pravot Haw Using CaJpolt's Helps Stan Taath Datoy Mere It Starts! 2 years' research at 5 Rreat.sUniversities—case histories of hundreds of people who used Colgjata I trii-.il Cream right after eating —shows the Colgate way helpsprevent new cavities, greatly reduce tooth decay! / AlWAYS U 1 'COlGAnVS TO ClUM YOUR IHATH WHIlt YOU ClfAN YOUR TtlTH—AMD HUP STOP TOOTH WCAYI PHOSFERINE for more ^^r' confidence 1 If lack of confidence worries you and v.>u feel tired and depressed through overwork remember how I very useful PHOSFERINE has been J to others in a umilar state. PHOSFERINE may be Juit what you need to put back strength and energy. PHOSFERINE toon revives the appetite and, in so doing, ft revives keenness for work, for enterprise. PHOSFERINE helps to build up staying power—gives you reserve of patience and good* will when you need the m most. Try this grand ionic today. la liquid or tablet form, a Tablet* nf PHOSFERINE equal lo drops, THE GREATEST OF AIL TONICS for Dsnrs M ls a Dtbiln r h Up i i m, fliiiliiauia,and ofWI



    PAGE 1

    SUNDAY. JANUARY 2, ]|5I -I M"VY ADVOTATi: i'AClK THIItll.l.s Caribbean Commissiom i .• To Confer CHURCH SERVICES -I irONAUl. KI1I.H llHHI rtirtv ti .< VII M B.B.C. Radio Programmes ShichariM ma AMif 11 -~hUuiu THE ant Caribbean Scout Comr "" 1 *"" 1 l > %  "> Chijrn mm tup missioned Conference, under Ihe S^LS.'* Vic* a "" = "' r ^ n "* """ ?£ %  -. Chairmanship of Mr. John Durev. Colony Commissioner for British ** PAinLt-fJ _aat. Mai* Guiana, will be held at Trinidad ^ from Wednesday next. Jlst Janpm ax*.*,,,* !" d uary to Friday 2nd February-. p n ataaBtan. iknr Mr. Charles R C. Springer. D.C. of the South Western LA. La* been appointed to represent Barbados CANADIAN COMMISSIONER'S VISIT l'.i M am. PmrMun.su Ma., and Jnnun .p| P '.%  r.*t. a>ci.m n#ad. rt.-chrr c.i*-. Vn IOIHereditary Disease CHICAGO m report 1 that hemophilia, a lack of ting in the blood. %  %  lrD bniaii • 13 I P-..r.i %  %  l,Mc. 11.3 -nd PrncfiiKin. PtMrMr: Ca MFTPOPIIT nrnin.--u i n-vr KFvrn— II %  m. ad %  a v.i-. T i It Hill 7 PStOVIt air. J W Cwwbv. It. DIsTWCT • Mr. J. L McGregor. Canadian "sjgvwiM i ". r J Travelling Commissioner, who is Gnffln Ipi *l at present on a tour of the West VALXIIAII. M ft I J OrUto Indies. is due to arrive in Barba' $&£ fijM"ifR, V dos on 11 Ih February and will be MeCuUaoBti -p.. R.V II remaining until 17lh. J*" !" "*;.-** Dunn* his stay in the Island. T nrrangements will bo made for him to see troops in action, and on Friday 16lh. be will give a talk to Scouters at Seoul Headquarters at 4.30 pm. Uniterm must be worn on this occasion ii* and uncommon disease I.. i i .-.'I,.m .• to be. Ihe dbcssM whK-h came to H.radv. ii M public attention through its ptfv iM p*?> •"alence in certain royal fan-ilie* An.i££ ii of Europe i* both heredlUry aa*d m cmiivnital But the physician. Dr. Armand i r 11 Mirquett* U School of Medicine, reported it %  of the journal %  n m the American Medical A'SOCiaIfrVK*. • l pm f-npour ol ifcr |0n lumber fjunll) id or the disease) is obtainable uw p %  T' <•u> is p m frt* "In a surprisingly large Th* CMhariiBi c f hemophiliac* no positl m ror.u" %  • %  a, is5i. Irntrl HALL mo arc. M p ' %  K afcCuUsugh. Hi •*: \: n.v 11 c. Uin 7 Din Mr. J Law I %  '. %  • • M a n> 1 I MHI BSSM %  WOOD BADGE HOUTOWN-S as am Rev. renea. T i> %  *. HANK iiAix—eaa , MI G O*>. r pm Mr. 8 PhillipSPFKMITKTOWNII a.m Hw Ft*" rsHFS T pm. rlev r l_.-i r -..nrniis%nA--ii m M, N iHHtain Pro*.at TMT *\I.VATIO\ ABMV BRUKirrOWN CK-MTKAI. II Ii" Ilollncoi Merlin* 3pm CaS. ir* I p.m Sjlvauon W-I. T1 I. Condt"-!"" Wood Badge (Cub & Scout I Part I Studies iTheoreviicali lSSO-'rl have been received, and can be had on application to Scout H.Q.. Beckles Road. Alt warranted Scouters who bv uiwr u Rawiini have had it least six months' pracJ^H^SfS t C^ tical experience with a troop oi 7 pm Mw y,, fiislai r pack are eligible to lake Part I. Major GIM. There is also opportunity for .*" J '"' H Tl 'TT N ~ n ",,' „ Scouters to take Part II (In Camp) ^.i',*., .M^.ma?TTOiafta7V.pi.i. under the supervision of Mr. J. L. Bithop McGregor. Canadian Ttavelllnu riircKESi KAIJ Commissioner. KKK i This camp will be held in TriRrid. nldad from 3rd until 11th March WAMONII imsn II am KetesM 1951. and the cost will be around SSS^^S^SSTi fifleen dollars. All Scouters who have reached !" i t ?*! t !" ^* m J !" l^S !" their 21st year, have been war^ y ^ m u ^!^"\%  ranted for at least three ve.irs. and Hoiiinrtwnrin. have attended a Preliminary SKA VIFW-II mxu """"T Course are eligible to attend, and l|#n M^,;','^. p, tBCh „ ; i.^„!,. a deposit of ten dollars mutt be • made with each application. II.* cttad Queen Victoria ol England as an example %  %  >— UM ditease in Iran • %  %  children through women much the same manner as CtmtuuaM ,-oiourblindness—with an cntirepUv-r" family l>r Quick said a new aaM irue N*^. ui* pm Nr*- Anaby warning them of the ncW ct.^ Own; 441 cncG Q f hemophilia. He i.dde-l J.^.,;,-;.' ;., ..',;...''.'.' %  ,; ''.; %  ttt UM condiU *n b trasrtM kl'p.m. Th# lust as well by a family doctor •' %  ::>__'' %  by a specialist. iniato. The Milwaukee expert said Maws t hat abnormal bleeding aft' v aw isBT— %  —— -i.i. m P i Nn,iwl n pm. Oomm c-., MM %  m BBC Sym plumy Ot) p in The News; 10 la ii m FY-TII ...eh IC 44 p m view; II c> p m How to w. r Opr: %  %  i<. %  i i a as P m F 'fiadio tooth extraction or a minor Deration i* sometimes the first Mfn ol hemophilia.—l.N-S INGTHI n :; M. %  3a e 00 %  %  %  I oo • '5 IS M* %  I ft M He. f II M. | ]\ M. New Jet May Break Record For U.S. Trip RADGKRS* COBNB MOBMVIAN noEBUCK sTnrrrr n S om. Krv. A. C PlWrH CaBtSts. Rev. D. C. Moore During the past month or so we D C. MWI.. have been able to publish very litf ^^ r ^f^^\ tie of our activities, but neverthert'LHiCK-Ji am Mt*. A. C. piiirif less, there has been a great adnioiy OOTM v.„ r in number, H U .. In jSrTOgmjr-^..^proficiency. DUNSCOMBSV-B am. Mr. o. rrairfh In the voungest section or the 7 pni Mr. n. Cuipavt*'. Movement-Wolf Cubs-there ha-. sjBgwSS ,.„.,, been a rapid increase in number*. r rtt 0llll „ .,, for opart from over 700 enroll. 1 R'iition. Upper nav it cubs, there are over 100 recru.ts • t 9^ l Z%j& 1 J& OWaitinK enrolment. Te>llmanie< ol Cftriwian fclenc* II*. At present we ore nut of 'took aubi-ci < % ( Latjsjn-swi of Tenderpad Badges, but we hope *•£*. J %  L iav. Mr. o. Lewis. A1J. records lor th. 1 Atlantic HI a"" I bj Brll ilfl %  riiber. %  plane, an F.ngluh Elet" r to fly from 1U1M %  % %  when iMiaajllwllima. BtrW going 01.. are comitleted for Canberra* to bt IniiU in America ns well as in „ tour British factories. Talk in "Science I C WW n i~ alao i-> bt produead m The tall "i time to Auftrailaihe BBC's General OveiMange and performance de^* Service under Ihe title 'Are tails o' the Canberra, which i F t Ol a. —^ The aeroplane, an Ci or Shortwave g^ Listeners lined with two powerful HollsRoyce Avon jet motors, 111 M}l| on the se> ntl But the bomber has a light thlf situation will lieved. be reTef Plm 10.34 WELCOME CORNER *" ekda._ [ O Lord among lh P pc.ple ihy mercy la great above ih^ ,nd my intlh n — lwir u'o .'.e" in which Ihe Uatanlm s |tvs3n much useful advice t< listeners in all parts -Id. One ol these talks like speed, and tnited Slau-i „, force oftlcers who saw Wing, 'Science Review' In the coming mand .\ rtcfliar, Mr. A. B. \. %  ently %  in. French Culture II I'. Beaumont il) the berin .it the Faniboiough Air Bhow last year were greatly %  i Ihe went ln, P ,ff u ^ la kSi whlrh havc nol , d ,SC V S yet been Anal y satttod. are conproblem." of sbort-wav* latanlng %  d Mt lfactor „ y and the with F. C. MeL*an. Head of the c anDW ra is pul into production ...ineeiing 1'rojects Qroup. kll lr ,e United BUtaa, then It '" They discussed wavelengths and be used by the USAF in prefi lieii.11 -ncic*. the best kinds of t nce to some American designs. aerials to ue, god iba pratalanM 'r ( of interference. Thenconversa^_^^^.^_IKI |hl We welcome these Tenderfoots: and wish them good Scouting. W. Cummins, E. Grimth. T. Richardson (1st Sea Scouts). I.. Jones, E. Smith, W. Moore (Cathedral). ia„..a. ^ni'e>i irTihe"Modem Langua: • ;. oiderl and this re&ET8SU s* 2SS ggU 2 ,;, Monty's Car May S,Alm^*-^*Stt^ m % !" '"•"' Retirpd ^v&G^^&S&iLt """ s ul 1 aaoaw. BatkT. G. Pilgrim. R. Hracllcy u local branch or Allunic rimA ,„.,,. „,.;,, |^. fil „ ln hl u [H No ,,.„,,„„ „f n nnrf SWinner (1*1 Sea Scoulsl. 3ls . ... BBC's !. %  Scrv-tco lsn Army. AlhlclcR Skinner S. PIlRTlm. AlWvUd by proteoor. of IM n ,„^ cam m* week. Trm Is a „ h a earned the lillo b> (ru.ihnllK liurcncc IOI1V. Unlvenlly collee. Fremi, i ilhalton ..( one ..r the ,„, five lield-mar!hal • \Sniej-i-iH O Snrinier. R. John. French-speakina cillien d mMt txclUn| ot Freeman Will, (rnrrali Ihe euuiv..!. • %  !" i 4mllh A Ward P WfllKingalon and arts sludonla of me (; lo(t I, BJH round Ihe worli .„'c'ii„L,ile' ii.i sra'ScouUl. Unlvenlty Collenc, Ihe Inaction -si,John Ma|UTi Lafl Journn.' 12 yean. The car may or .. T=.J.' O conn^ll Johnw, divided In fo ,,ar. the Hr The hnok %  I %  %  ed. ., ,,5 p wi 1 S tol-l. prwided over by lr. T. W J. Hurt The car flr;t uj* taJl Rld' C. Wolkes Taylor. C.B.E.. Principal „l I' b lurttor.ener.l S.r Walter Klrke o'urrfaSSr;A. SOO^IS, ilnive.^ ".gj.^nd ^ ^ i? ,ed in ,ucceion to F ,,n : Five hundred books were prei 0M .-! £ cV" C N Smith. R Ci.rke. ,~econd h'alr by M? Am ."_.'' .. c._ o .*. ..Hfc. nrnniltient KlhU5tOn DUEI B OW Btl marshal*. laircl i :i pOVV and Si F i llroadcails Sir Bernard tory eluht ovliiod! i"rviintvti. (tut Sea Scoulsl. orlkn. promlnonl Kind.'., i M N "miih N Clarke, nessman. and Onlwrmlt, iiu.tee. vice. C Htidder'datSc. Scout.). On behalf o( the Venturer' N. Smith. N. Claikc. Government. Mr. We C. Rudder (1st Sea Scout,). H. Bourke J^ Jrench ;;•"'••;;. Tm .,„ „,„„„,„„ „,.. "SUSf*. Smilh I... sea .Tr^TS., V £ Thonrt H. W fi„r^"^XM^ ^ F "" (Bethel) Ironside, John Dill. O* l %  t and F 111 be given i> marshal I-ord Alanbrouke. B.18 pm. Sandmann said that he bad Whilethe news is %  uI- r n nor a iiilation< to Ihese started negotiations for the gift it Is hop i thai Caribbean ScoSf who XvJ quiiuird for the when M J. Ba.ilou,. UMt. Voices" 28th in British Export Horses Shine VM.I sicnu' nadRP Of me Reunions lunureii N Sm. !" 'Kt Se, Scout.) and ed Edinburnh Univer.,t, W i^rt. (Betheli %  •'" "" appointment H '.^'i,., „.. Men made to University College .n Jan 'I. inst will lhm we „ „, | C „„ of the Relation, C'ulturelles vi-!• I pert 0. Ib'uri ,' ]lvldua BriUsh-breil winhortly ChrtBophtf tk< n % %  pUj by the „",'„'„",,,„„„ countrie., Ireland liertk JJlT.-iid has been made to University College in Jamaica Walnut Caiibbcan T „ aro „„,,„ K p.,.i. from Aopbra .on has hero ma > function Mr. Bourke the a:, every Sunday at 15 p.m. • bjch ha „ ,„.„ ,,,-,.,1 I H.Q. for these Badge Certmcate, uu ~^ '.'-\-'T .."' : '!',""rT *''" Ml "" a^'^kt.sr'aWs.S agwr • %  a V -BlXa ..mT^.ec, to animal. /s/arnri Offers Its Pirate Gold As Tourist Bait ny subiect to %  xi-nrted from tills country that "he could not be present originally planed. Mr. Bou re'", ""'• S, e.o'reiln'j S • "2 ""-, """' 55"5"aS5f "^0 under Taylor, a letter eitpresslnc tn. DltMdr „„ ,„ h( current discus,.„, A c-iirnplg i, Nuor. good w..hes of the Sorbonne ^ w> ,„ ,,. ,. IJ> !" w )h< ^ „ orM< 1,'niverMty of Paris for tne wetw h| rn John Figueroa has been CX ported from this OOUntry r. fare of the College interviewing Ihree individuals on nct M vcars was shipped to the The formation of Alliance „ 1P quMlon ot what ordinary u S A. after he had raced here. %  .. j K k!Vi ha Franraisc resulted in Mr. Arthur ^cn nnd ifana rainhlk victories In Ihe United SMtv S l,€ J.u^r Ire endriks. bemg elected PreMlen. ^ ft. BrOadeaat, m>de h „,dh weatern side of the AUan.ic. are v/elle*lev R'-urke. Jr-i programmes H U tcnlevamanU, m terms of engaged In an all -out battle amongaar. pj^^^ Dr Taylor, 2nd | imil i^.nrjim Is at 7.15 p.m. ilguxes. are recorded in the stallsBritain's pali Crusoe inland: NEW YORKi-clad Robinson themselves for the "American Vic. Preside,,, Vice President. holiday-maker's dollar 'ISSrfTtTi Tiny BrilUh po*.on S igtiored marm, ^^^^^ aml for centuries, are haying then n r.s. a ^on. faces lifted, the.r tropic beaches Mrs. E SolStrrt Olrtf' School, photographed, their climates and ^ fi ?' WOlm 5 U scenic beauties extolled as never Treasurer. War scares in other parts of the world have brought an unexpected boom to the West Indies. But they are up acainat a new factor, as tne .lereplane makes it possible for holiday-makers to go ever farther afield. They have competition now from South Africa and Australia .voii* s —keth going after the American Yacht holiday-maker in n big way. The WeeVN Mttaic Bermuda has ..heady lost her commanding lead in the island poeulart'v -Like-, among American •un-aeekers. Top favourite now i^ Jamaica. In 1950 Jamaica drew 66 MS U.S. visitors, against Ber, mudo' l.aa. The British Government have j£ released £3.000.000 worth Of i i,loCkM US. fund in London to ^ enable private enterprise to oulld n Np \., Harbour Lag In Carlisle Bay S*dh Trainin* ahip %  I Wh Marv M ll. rh Bi.manu-1 I Ci<,r*r.. Srli Burma D. M.V SaaeatW'". •Ich B*lQUM". Stri Tiiti-iT ,, |rh I %  AFRIVAI* Sch. Lflrty NoaUen. 41 looa net, CaptNoal. frit" l> kdlan Ch..iw-ns"'. *ssS Mi* i.rt. dpi Clsffke. rom T:n.iaati tical abstruet issued by the Thi oughbred Breeders' Aflaodatson and mav be found under the name Included in the musical broadot hlf ,},,_ Nasrullah. casts iron. I-ondon in the coming weak ai .ng worthy Successful Kmigrant i.f speci.il mention: Robert CaseMoor Is taken only as a convedus. one of the m tad n i ( nl example, not because II of cor: anlsta will.happens that he was a partlrularly Doa ol Raval -' % %  successful emigrant. The purpose Debussy. In the interpretation of ot m v jnvestlfation was idered by some 0 ( the other winnerand to some crttl -rpasaed. 8now W heie thev all won His h.ilf-hour programme will i 15 p m. on Wenine^day. Slat BBC Northi by Loui Cohen, will praaent a concert on 2fth. Inst. at fl.OO p.m. Ktor of the HiirroK^U Admiral's Walk was a good sire but never In the ftp flight Ten of his stock won between ihem 20 races in foreign countries In 1050 The countries were India. Venezuela, In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station %  -•; r. new "tourist city" near Kingston, tit Jamaica. The uttie-known Jamaican dependency of the Cayman Islands is also being promoted as a new holiday paradise. It has some of the 1RH sport, fishing, wonderful bathing. %  IM %  new thrill far I holiday-maker. — hunting for buried treasure supposedly Ian by pirates. Tourist* may hire a rr and Wlrala Mas U. ilnartr.aa %  t. US %  I elude* work b] and Smetana. In the sandy beach'' Severn! have already made minor hauls of silver and gold is now the middle-income group. tor to see J they caiL find in.' .—i '. mini . ...x ...... ^..^ — Munlcipol hel,M-l lr Malays, Ceylo llAtmu '> won J. n !" %  *" %  lillle-2n.year-oW nfelt >r. including Ihe two principr.1 races in South Africa, and other* in Malaya. India. Venezuela and Norway. Casanova, bettri known, perhaps, in this country, had 13 VIENNA. Winners abrond, including one . bed winner in S iilutaaTf tSL ;|< Am,fn > wh0 wun and Kapplogningssall'k apets-storapr Is! •>. Colorado Kid. Cnt.|> : >. -r His High BahSMiur, legend of Franc BLOWING ONI BUGI I %  -.-.. %  .. to blow U* %  large llrea for if for the aixtii l ma BUS j and William ..re only a few %  %  [ love u, ,in multiple winners abroad. K -* E



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    NOW .IWI'IRY 2K. US! SIM) XV ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE H.C.C. Beat I a-niania By .Vide Margin nun Our Own (-orraipondtrir. LONDON, January 17. Defeating a Tnsmanian XI by wicket* the M.C.C 'team b*tI the performance of Waller mund's 1948-47 lean: DM. The prwei "* won three matches fo of them first class fixtures, .lories were scored fcst South Australia al Adeland anaintt a Colts XI at victory followed the n of their Adelaide success. i get 188 for victors ML just %  tVO hour* thev did so with untiles anil nine wickets to bahly the most encouraging j was the return to form nil Compton who In scoring ut in the MCC'a second igx set up something of a record by hitting six succesfours to finish the match, as against Tasmania four C that Compton ended a ad run with Hammond's Afterwards he went from to success. (. Brown decided not lo visit inla In view of his previous strain in the Third Test as a result the MCC were >y Compton. who. following fashion, lost the toss. horns team batted first and close of play had establishem selves in a strong position, sconnp IS-2 runs they captwo MCC wickets for only is, twelve of which were helton was the most successthe home, batsmen, eight of fell to the MCC pace bowl. arr and Bedser. MCC included Eric Bed%  in brother of Alec, who his in Australia on business. ^me in because of the injurothcr players. Whcr. hi bowling off spinners the nhabitants could not at first stand why "Alec" Bedser hanged his action Ttiev found out when they saw •ins together a* the players •ft the field. pi on decided to entrust the lg of the MCC innings to and Sheppard, the two Cambridge batsmen who I against the West Indies Miner. But the gamble did unc off and each was out scoring only two runs, i o kketi were claimed bv -silway clerk Keith Dollerv it cost and the following B ; he nddeds£v.ms lo hi% are the first run appeared his name in the scorebook. despite Ihe loss of another wicket, the MCC establlshisl innings leads of 42 due to One aggressive batting itapton. Washbrook, in the al position of No. 6, and ledser. The two latter were ned in a line forcing partwhleh added HJ in 81 before Bedser. attempting M bit, mi well eaugnt on ta boundary. light caused the Tasmaninn Innings to lie curtailed at we of the second day but foUVwfof morning Rodwell. und Reid all hit strongly and ire was taken along to 221'. time It looked as if it would even larger proportions but new hall spell by Warr and %  with the total at 20G t about o late collapse, tlv x wickets falling for over RIVAL TEST : Rugby's Qualification Rule Needs Tightening Up By PETER DITTON LONDON, January 19. THE selection of Rittson-Thomas to take the place of England's captain, John Kendall-Carpenter, in the Rugby International al Swansea last week only re-emphasised the absurdity of the qualification rule. Rlttson-Thomas was born In Is residing in this country — and Cardiff. Wales, of Cardiff parents. Is %  good player. Vet because he has played for Last year for Instance. England TWord University and resided in cidled upon South African. MmKngland lie was claimed for Englay Hofmeyer and New Zealandland's International XV er, Ian Hotting and m previous •esuons since the war they have There is surely nothing more made similar use of Dominion ridiculous than this qualification P | < >* < rs SE e 'T SS? ?£££d h '5£; Tc^VTrr H"S £££! the En B ll!h selector, chce RIUx V -"K* "omc Keller who "nThson-Thoma because in spile of. I Welsh birthplace he ni really .?„„?, aJ5!S En.h.hm.,, and „ n. their •' %  "*' f %  "1 season had played vhlle | embei team. How silly it all is! If. for instance, in the near future there cf the Australian touring policy only to play Englishmen, that would be some sort. of on excuse. But by their actions over the past couple of years the Ens.should he prrhap* half lisli Selectors have shown that lthodes scholars at Oxford Unistiey are not concerned with a versity. all good enough to gain a player's nationality as long as hi* place In England's team, then pre. 23 In seven overs. Bedser taking four for 11 in 3. overs. Previously Rodwell. another hard bluing batsman, had delighted the home crowd by hitting three mighty sixes off Hollies, two of Ihem off successive balls, the recond of which went clean out of the ground. The MCC were left to i!ct 18A rung for Victory IB I13 minutes and Compton's answer to this challenge was to send in quickscoring Simpson to partner Sheppard. They added 06 in half-an-hour and then Simpson was caught Compton and Sheppard put on .mother 50 in 24 minutes and the MCC were well ahead of the clock. Sheppard reorhed his 50 In an hour und then had Hie unusual and lucky experience of being missed off successive balls, at mid-on and deep mid-off. By this time, however, it WH obvious that such u miss would make little difference to the result and Compton after reaching his 50 in 37 minutes finished the match by taking six successive fours off Laver. the Tasmanlan captain. umably Ihcy will be included, regardless of the fact that til** eome from anywhere except England. Of course, the side will still be labelled "England" but what degree of comfort could the, honest English support's' gain if such a side was to win the Inter* nations? Championship and perhaps even the Triple Crown It would he English in name only for* behind the wicket after scoring 43. nearly half ihe players would be from the Dominions. And yet that is exactly what could happen as a result of the present loose ruling on qualification. In soccer, such a position would be hardly likely to arise Bar Mr, if any, of the Dominion or Colonial visitors to this country are good enough even to gel into %  league side—always providing, of course, they have the tun.u> spare for the extra training which wculd be necessary. Fixed Kulins Soccer has none of this haphazard selection of players for International matches. A player c*.n only be chosen to represent the country of his birth. Occasionally this brings odd etonscquinces .-I* in the case of Walley Barnes of Arsenal who is the present Welsh Captain Barnes IK 10 per cent. English but he happened to be born on the Welsh side of the border und so is not eligible, for England. But at least with such a hard •ltd tag! ruling, players and sciMtori know where they stand. It can be certain that an International team Is composed of players who at least have some connection with the country which "caps' them. This hard and fast ruling is for the good of the game. It ensures! that players with proper qualifications have an opportunity to play for their country. It's Up To Those Club Cricketers By JOIIV MACADAM you want to know what Is wrong with English cricket—aid J*enonaUy, we donl think there Is all that much wrong with it you only have to go along and meet the English cricketers as we c id, over the week-end. Nmw, there are the county sideg *-ha produce the players for U TtW teams, and then there are all the club sides who producet l-ayer* who graduate into the sides. Any tadling-off you may notice nai sides is reflected right dtn* u to these club sides, and that i* 'v her* you must start to look for :he trouble. This all came about as we talked at dinner with members and %  a of FVl.terhnic Cricket tiuo. an organisation that bag Infl in the Cluh OnKtl e *moe 1B73. and knowle-lgenble officer* of that body will tell you that the young player* are simply not coming alone J the fact that the club i* turning out some hundred player* cxery week-end. The matter was put *ry i— rlnetly by A. J Spong. chaltniar or the Club Conference and of the H> Linslnw club. wh,. s.iid quite • My that club cricket **u the backbone of the game toda* and that it always would be. Tlie major point he made W* that 'he gume would still go Oil if so-called first-class cricket dis• : The same could not be %  aid of the game so far as firstclass cricket was concerned If club cricket were to disappear. So the motivating force appears to b* club cricket, and what art we going: to do about it through the agency of such clubs a) Polytechnic? Already, we have gone Into the business of proper pitches and •A ic-kets for the young idea practise on. nnd certainly there seems to be something lacking on that score There appears to be something else. We heard only yesterday the story of an Australian cricket executive who was told In hi hotel that n strange sight was l be seen at first-light almost arty morning at the practice nets ol Sydney ground. He happened to wnke one mor>*Intj before dawn and, unable t<> %  Wp again, ho decided to test the sti.f v out. He got along to the. %  round and there, sure enough, al the nets—time, 5 a.m..—were tw< Ml bowling at each other. They were putting everything they had into II; unrelaxing, unrelenting, completely wrapped u, in what they were doing. The? were around the age of 14 Nantes? Lindwall and Morris. Mjybe there is something that lacking In the younusteii here. —L E . H is • in ti g ruling which fai minted rugby enthusiasts are no saying should be operative in Hi., eountry. Particularly in the case of E igland It would ensure that homiborn players wenout of the International side by Rhodes Scholars and other players with qualifications for other countries. a a JAN. 28 NO 156 The Topic of Last Week >• — . rM Ml %  ni-* titr II.T .. r Club Willow ajutrklN nlllk-Ui Allhmifh H oil kind PVIt Ihp A iieuel boy* It.. •uih ir i Bse si ei •iKHllrlo I I-.t ore it nasewn* -lul. .<-lh..,,t Ml,. *ut Ooverrunem hale. r.U.i. F..r .,.r>ining U tlona -Air Mell" II you awn %  liaunlea •eUre r*pi*ii "ewt-fAe > lu.t H* it .Ull* DIM oblMI Anfl IKr Oo.ftn.twnl mmy OK" An Mp-l.r-riale parkini %  %  %  Bui Joe and Robert. memor% K* lime like a food rMck Abo.il eiiht adlee I>o pralrrl Ihe prutx-d ewnei Skwh 4 pulle. will be wUe, When a Are's en Ihe hm Htil Wednesday m(hl *t Oueen'a Pal We u* Ihe la Ith-hew 1114 man Ann ihe people who attended Were llkr Ihe n>(*l mid A ouii sl whe knew no belle. Slatl the merlin* lo det< 1 Then .he aald lo Joe and Hebrrt If I telr. I n I eel b.' I een wear my ballet in a < I ran dieaa In ihorU end lace 1 min! keep m/ iweet lip. pmt>led Or I rnual dtep-otil-the race" Fol >-ou nee we modern dinxrla t.n 1 Mtord 10 -.m 1. ,1 n> Thai would ..ni my deat frand-ntolri She reuld wall; I IIMI.I eel l>> Thl. new ae awe rail, tot sUenour And we sin. mm! ilaniounre If e fail In iel llnnf* %  %  tay-pul' We een'l catch Joe A Rebetl'a eti And of roura* when we are btoken Thai L Jnat Ihe lime lo mend We will tee Ihe beloved p..lot And ercepl lalUi-healing then sponsored by JAR BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of JAR RUM BARBADOS TURF CLUB Official Programme--Spring Meeting, 1951. s.vrrmiAY :iri Furlongs 5 Overl—H/C B 4 Lowtr —H/C G 4 Lpwer —H/C D 4 Lower —H/C C 4 Lower —H/C A 4 Lower —H/C 5H Furlona* 3K 7V4 74 6(J 614 1V4 n s l.ioo 1305 tins t to 700 235 115 40 700 900 600 800 BOO Lea 235 300 200 20.'. 205 335 115 150 100 135 136 163 tl.710.00 1,090.00 1,090.00 1.405.00 940.00 1,245.00 1.250.00 1.560 00 827.00 14 00 27.00 38.00 27.00 21.00 27.00 30.00 21.00 21.00 27.00 18.00 24.00 24.00 >o on CUM BRFFIIERS PREMIUM* 1ST 2ND 3RD 4TH TOTAL 860 00 830 00 115.00 $105.00 100.00 "5.00 50.mi 825.00 250.00 100.00 80.00 50.00 80 00 90.00 60.00 40.00 25.00 40 00 43.00 25.00 10.00 12 50 20 00 22 50 175.00 140.00 87.90 140 00 137.50 8100.00 8!0 00 825.00 Play safe! Br>*lcrcem your hair. DaiulrulT on your collar f loose hair on your comb—liicse arc Janger signals thai point the need for Brylcrecm's d.'ublt btntjil: [l 1 D.y-I*itg imh... (l) Luting h.'r h..llh. Manage with Brylcreem stimulates the scalp, ( encourages natural hair growth, wards off OandrulV. Its pure emulsified oils put life into Dry Hair and impart a splendid gloss. Don't take any chances, Brylcreem your hair — most men dol e Vi This following amendments and additions have been mad*to tho Oflielul Classification tor Iht Spiitlfl MrrtiiiK. 1951. 1 111. Nllllll Ml Landsciipi' luis liepn |>rom K. H. BH I G. D, BYNOF,. Third IhiH-Salnrdan lOth Mnrrti. Ift.1l 1.00 1.40 2 20 3 00 3.40 4 20 HASTINGS HANDICAP MARCH HANDICAP .. ST. ANNS' HANDICAP Wm. BOWR1NG MEMO. Ht'AP NEW YKAR HANDICAP CREOLE HANDICAP .. g 5.00 DRILL HALL HANDICAP II 5.40 DALKEITK HANDICAP C 4 Lower —H/C SV4 Furlongs 8 800 3265 3135 9 30 31.250.00 824.00 B 4 Lower —H/C 900 300 150 88 1.405.00 27.00 G 4 Lower H/C 7's 600 200 100 40 040.00 18.00 D 4 Lower —H'C • 800 263 135 49 1.245.00 24.00 C 4 Lower —H/C 800 365 118 30 1.250.00 24.00 r 4 Lower <3 y.o.) —H/C 7(4 700 235 115 40 1,090,00 11.00 f 4 Lower (4 y.o. 4 Overl-H'C I 700 335 115 40 1.090.00 21.00 A t Lower —H C 7*4 a 1,000 335 165 60 1,560.00 10.00 811.410.00 1.230.00 rotol Breeders' Premiums 332.640.00 Entries k> close on Thursday 15th February, 1951 at 3 p.m. at the Office of the Turf Club. i this Propramme may be obtained at the Office of the Turf Club, Synagogue Lane. O. A. LEWIS, SecreUry. ADVOCATE CO., LTD. COMMERCIAL PRINTING DEPARTMENT To our Clients and the General Public Owing to increased, coils of Raw Materials, lc. Paper. Ink. Metal. Zine. and the Ugh cost of Production, we are therefor* compelled tu Increase the Prices of Commercial Jobs as from January. 1ML



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    SUNDAY, JANUARY 28. l*5t SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACK I.I.I \ I N HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY SAV GOOP-Z^B TO A-_ ^-'_? M5\W...TKT3 A --S2S S >-0 C-SE =OST- OCwi' ON M TUB WORLD I *P ONI tM* TO COME WTO ONTYT4 R.AC6 ANY MO*?E~ eoooT o= TE-SMSO-! fcjtrrf—: ^z wow' I o*. : .., GT i


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    II PAOI RN Charged \\ illi College Chiej Demanding Here For 556,000 Discussions M M.\Y \DVOt % %  %  %  .%.\ .IKH SI M>AY. JAKVAKY 2*. ItSl •tod DPI IIAROl.lt PAGE. IMnclj ippin, *if the i i.iture is op 1 discuss With Sir ( MTVkW and various matters of common interest affecting the Wrst Indies a* uholc. H< .irnvcd on Prtdav by II W.I A. from Trinidad arcomrll MM) Will I" P OLIO (**>.?W •• ncw *W tLSrzrssj^ss? s r zsstJSs**'' n h !" ,s SSS, y """ nd ""~ "" %  *"> building, had bran "SSL t bulll f und., from Fybrarr, who w riding hii Ovclnpmi ml pad Wl tar* in EngDtcyclc, was Involvi-d in an arland and would br used kirgeiy wlUl the motor car O-M. (or rMcarrh work on to. owned and driven bv Edmund anas and sugar. Wallon of Parra Hill. St. Joseph. He .aid thai the object of Ini.it the junction of Roebuck. Hindsproving the economic position of bury and Tweedaide Roadi. Both ,hc cocoa ir.du.lrv. not vehicle, were damaged Trinidad, but of Grenada, wa. to Elkanah White, who WM riding P' ovl < 1 . information thai would on the bar of the Vvilr was also '" u !" ln lhc development of Husiamant. M U \ Go ToBr. Guiana Soon The w .%  1 i %  and Hif H Agrlrultn'. Hritlsh Guiana within |hi next few Mr. Barrant. who recentK pttft a visit to the main.*.... colony on a rice study mission, has rece from British Guiana that pl.n. -re being made to welcome ttW Jamaica Ministers. 11 sit KIM 1 MOKMN'C ihf. r lag aircraft parked akmt.ide ear* *e.iwe.i i.etenh-d striking ...ntrasi. The big —an Auster airrraft t ,„.„., „, u,, | (y shouhl know (,, :u ii ii ti : >choolii combusnidlo w-irks titan o B t u.., rmiiiatmn KINGSTON. Jam.. Jan. After a week obser\i: %  gi vifiajgajgi In %  noted Anthropologist ai> git from Grccic. h;i< found lh;i* the people In the rural areas o! the Colony do not live In harmon> with each other. Out of ever) three houses hv \ found that iicighbour^ Sl'WON J n 27 " W*Klra| terms with MM Suwon, seemingly little touched anotn r ; 1 Thii Sf U 0 he •* tod by the lighting that has red wa w f" rC!l P onsi > lp tor the great i II fuur limos in theTast l* %  n, •;"-• ' criminal act. per Bv tVARKKN WIIITt: breed a banana which Panama disc: • Michael, was yesterday t.f Jamaica, the principal The lined 30/in 14 days with an productnv colony of the W.-i alternative of on* rnoqtti'l ImI' "nd by Uie i tut when the Citv Poliqf Or Pag< said thai Hat troubk %  Bo' "'K 1 for South Am i, 1 ""'"' %  ,* W W ^ r **l>"-ssi-" lU COOtUUM Ihe end of Now, IndlU ph.. i, wat.h.n 8 Allied troops and "V*"* sludv ,our "ehasul.ee 1>Utn Panama disease wt.h the ihe ;il >rth. Bill %  .'i..—ion wa, give,, ., | "• k *"" ptxd on i the I.'.>.,. oiaunine Ihe curl he ., not „.,„„ h .„ „„. hi „„,., V M{ ,, U the owner of Ihe donkey. It I. ,„ J„„„| M hM suffered wen i owned hj one Alleyne. rhere are however hoping to Before imposing sentence the breed at the I ("I* A Irate .aid, These .,..cases which is just :is i;,>.l a', gro. rii _, that 1 lake very serious. |,n mlrhcl. but which is immune Io L.ttely Ihr oivnei was not the disease. oiiving the cart I miilhl IUV With regard to sugar the obie.1 ',: lmpo.ie,| g he.iviei f.ne" not oulv to improve the .Hi• I prrted bv Hi. Honour called All.-.wio ,and cleneyol sugar manufoi tun-, hut "" '* %  "" financial Sacrcla, Confer a-ked him about lhc " nd enmmen. pcogrcra r. ; % % %  %  ' %  . . IDso ,.„ cxp i-iiiulloiina .V ,h.t he "iV;" 1 1 "' %  • I addition to Ih.t I .. %  I.„, • ., I. imates IMO-ji u i of olhcr useful sub%  oi II, Boartt given lo lhc prol ,.','''""•" "' ""i 1 "" %  Im'h the *li • %  •' MI and economic T HE SHAMROCK Cr.O!T C T i, "w,,,^ haViug „'.'.' V'.^L "' !^ ItNlON. w.th hcadouarters al ananlnn of Ihe iwo now l.ho.nl., .'.!".'". ."' n ""~ " I'-... n two bedAv cr i*e|Kirts of various com. pictim' ol pros. dard ol Indian I winding ' ltlc English occupied importance ,.f gdana. I.on.1 *velopn,e,,t of the carpaa, of men and women lilte, s.nd vocalional |,, K th nee paddla.. Many men', hodles clad In civiln — . — •awarg -h,.d ith bran-i rtiya Irilnttf Jo dWiaa. si,etch of r,d betwatn'Oagn and <*' f nova, o, hot-c, to th. SS." SHH* ^^7 £ rpS. o'Jme^ aS"w^ l.jiiV K^ """"' II < animal because if he lefl it in the n;",„Vfactun uabla It would bile .V the fool WMM ag fi-om cane sugar HM-lf. !" ? "Llt^iliilK."'"^-.,>r Pat* >ala that oi March 17. •Ill MIAMIUM-K f'ftr.DIT I C.T A. will !• having Ihe olf., ial ,., UNION, with hoadauarten al ppenlng of the; two new labprator. ,,,g built should bu .;, Dnd ifl, | the 2Mb innlvei aiy ol ii" RrniiUiui of the R. viol a .i %  %  U %  %  % %  St. Patrick:. jemrnoU'i I ii'iidi r iiiopeer service in this IK Id HI Mil colony Not ,,i rn-oi-eratives In PoilmHH on < in* MOMUM now %  it in i'i Lad %  ; Ibbeon OuiiimitioBn will do much Mubjcct. Next Tueodoy rock Union will bold ''" ABBUOI Meeting when Ottivtttol will be .taiulfresholansla.il Tourtruj the Corl llKFS f-ilt'RCH. Chrurt looklni Into oil problccns tMioneci ed with In. . ii.prricnl ii 1 )i 'l! .f Si C.B.E., Advi:-'i in tin Bccreutr] Ttta wonon wera of the of Stale for the Culonie .'..ni! with their reputed Betore taking up Mo pr „.,.„ tul|| JJJ^ ore. The dispute in ,..,, |, .a* alvout win. wi the owoei Q\ Ibe furniture The Boau I |>llllltlllfllt. I>T i i'i the Colonial s. i vice In Africa and was Dn < %  i., r ol Sen i. M in If] %  In Nigoria. pMblenu |i. 1 ill navalon. ItiOn, el... had (>een %  Of i.vei. UOpUlalloo, federation .,nd industrial isat mi i. The Conference OMldad that in1 won to ovhr-|KputotkM ,„ ln( " %  In. !,.-. <),, the imliiical is. *•* felt that in order to build up ; di n N i Wi |tifJte. il.wd lusjfraMon ihouW be "iv They rogorded H K necessity. eombot boots. l ^r?rS^rif2SS. La, 'y Hativn-Powell ( maaunlat infiltrators killed as < r m %  -pnimssjian '"*?' •MPmpted to walk through POUT-UK SPAIN 1 t line.. sir Hubert B N'irib of Osan now nothing more l ,a l tribute to the v/orl I PM) heap of ashes and Guide on Wednesday. He aoM; A to "I do not think any an — J orhas, been paid lo any Uidv 1 nave playing happily and unknown in my carer. ncernodly among heaps of twislThe occasion was a function given Hurtles nf Communist troops, in honour u| th.<-.I.-I Guido at One t.ny s.x-yoor-old girl clad Ihe Boy Si-ouU Head namaloons, skipped Port of-Spnin. i %  occupied by neons p| Un Pha-uuilted h ; i il> i.< Her rope w, i ,e.—Kealer, .a II ilrnth held W. I ^ i.c-i-l.ii.ve Council. Hi* Grace, the Archbishop of I'ort-of-Spaln. Or. Finbar Ryan. Hi, Lordship Ihe Ilishop of Triindad. the lit. Rev J. p. Wpaon, H Minister for Ecu. Services, Hoc All., it domes, pretolon of being m aWncUiotorv ??' ni9ler r r Labour. Indu mood. eonciuaiori Commerce. Councillor Raymond Moresix,n,ibtediploraaIgwerco a IPl ^'V 1 ; M > '" ,,r : "mimed u, think that the PoE,S SpJU "' l hr ^ ,:,,l • s "" Cornmis.ovemment u-oukl not take too Action Against China Delayed • From Page 1. " S lack of panenger .hipping be' |,'i" „?, ,| r l.dTto. D eeled lag .',"'', %  """'-'^ '" "* ""•,< %  for IM lh. t-ccn !hl"eounlry and Ihe Br.ll.l. JS %  -. .', , Slal... Th •-.""" """ %%  8nl Pnualai nardaalp f n B-,rbn iand ha. a,., 'ei-ii a -J2E ''; v w ? lv n '"'•" %  '"' %  ' %  ' and financial loss io wS.i India,,,. Lel'flon S ".' ,ew u,e ,„„,!,Cnmplele breakdown In ll, hilling Ihe louri.l Irade and putsu ga, e.n.l... Ht wa Im|ire..eil „ r „ „.. , „_ ',",,, .• ,." •'"' ncgolialioni al ihl, alagc ling dIOculUM in Ihe way of o> u,e ncaUanl ...IHIII.OI, ,.f Ihe ., ,'/ ' IS.I i the prallaa ol Ihe limn ""e experu ihoulhl. wcul. .ommeieialdevelopmenl.. What .l.-k nn Ihe u l„.le I'I, h,,,',.' '^ tnhaWod. Cam l """'Cln,,:. wilh a war devaKale, 1. .uapacUd U lhat Ihe Brili.h II. .aid however, lhal n wi.ulil >,,.,''."?' "" l d !" Prorounlr >' " her hand., and 11K GovcnTiment ,. conlenl in lei ran. ba %  well l„ ramambai lhal all' %  ,la "; s when he Jtirnil ilive, of the Union lo du. Prospeet of a long drawn-out connection, batwaan Iha "K and tho though tnm pura Wfad and high '"""' ,"" > "" yeaterdoy fur am >on on, ,•„. OWt with the Uniled Nations. Eastern group .if li,.BWI I %  ''••!'< %  n !• kept as I. shown, un""> "••> [> M a rcprrsei %  .. I;, Union al.„ ntahr week's diplomatic man. In what might I* tarmed louli "* %  l^gUlaUvo CouncIL oauvMn| wiih propoaalg las. condilion., the peasant far,. !" ;_}}• Q; J u d r "."d Mr -. E D ; 2 ^luilenu' Union, lh. e-Hinlcr proposal, from all sioner. Major R. J Moi rt Gilberl. Colony atrijlo Commb] .loner and Mis. Murray. A \ : Island Commlsslonar, Write Direct or Airmail lor Fatherly AaVke ft— THE STEPPING STONES TO SUCCESS Don't hesitate aaout your future Goforward. confident that The Bennett College will tee you through to a >ound position m any carter you choose. The Bennett College method! arc individual. There's afriendly, personal touch that encourages quick protreis and makes Tor early efficiency. CHOOSE YOUR CAREER ,. a..!arm •MO-. <• %  *!.<> ta>*.iU C*M ei-a-fc.ll* SM *-iI "gt—winf *ii,.id VttnM't ,-.*.„ T.Kf ruat., and -Direct Mail to DEPT. IllTHE BENNETT COLLEGE LTD. SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND that for the quick and sure relieF from Head and Cheu Cold*. Bronchitis. Coughi. Catarrh. Sore Throat. Rheumatism. Lumbago. Sciatica, Neuritis, Neuralgia. Toothache, Mutcular Palm and Strains-. Brunei. Scratches. Insect Bites, and other Aches and Pains, there is nothing better than Thermogene Medicated Rub., So healing! Soothing! Relieving! Try It— you \ will say it is a real blessing! THERMOGENE MEDICATED RUB MACLEANS S>IUB3a TOOTH PAST^ keeos I I l|U< att^l healthy Eroup catered tn by toruian lines and is not ready to face LIB real aspects of Africa. 1 first time as ot UnUsUtettvi Mr H. A. Turlor end Mi mcr OH tho other haiiil could not Mottley. M.C.P., two last year T. (). CUaa, %  West Afrieiin'lac afTord Mich a high standard nf represenUtlvea of the St. Mich^c! turot ol Loodon I'm.. ... i.k SL inanoBeinent. aim lhi'n-1.-re should Vestry on th,ll-..u.l wenrMS.inilv orldreoood the "" British Colonies on Briiiih ships. )w ron i cnt „„(, ,, lowei irraric and iwinUxl by the Vestry ns their aotno htfftoi Outlook Disheartening thcrrforr hurdler animal. HpfMontattvsM m,Mui Uiia year. | Mr. Palmer: -Our experiHe considers that it is possible m^TeVVI.mu-uH^H^?^^,!? .. that shipping accommodathat m Increooid pomonlaajo o( ^'" "" I,|L IVJIIIC PI,,,, '|\w,„ / af t.on available to the BoMom Zebu blood rnigbt Svi tins ,. ,> ''\' J US I IUI1 I 4>||r t M Caribbean, while covering existing quired hardiness Th-mi.1 l." .;' 11 ,'! t 'I*' I J r< ^ . mart movements, does not pmv.de \m would appear to be I %l ' ;" "'*'. ,. """ %  h %  ,u ' 1 euce terms. —Reuter. I HI" II i III.II1IHI .llg'H II'"!". II' . ; undmland. lhal IhMa mail.[""'." %  > %  < %  E. Wenl. X, ilWady ataagglng Kha allenUon ol > l 1 colonial Kngincrr. Miss KINGSTON. Jam., Jan. Jf the AarMuRural Deaarlinenl "• "\ Aflie, Social WeUara Off m [ajadlnitraval afanti Hi' Inoalhl .: %  %  r.u;i'i*d lo lallr In all tka ihe ope, area ibove me '•''"I 1 '.' 1 S2ff Uoo '. ,n >> "obru,„ ,1f' ,,,,. I)a.v Man %  "' I" 'ebruary , ||,o asphall „''',,' itytoui %  • ..i s,,.„„. "•' If It were not lor Hi.'.-...,.!.!. sailing, of the i;llit and four-weekly services of thi SSI E**w ^ '" %  tmoaHmat mow cut of a cow than XI .?\ We S A n '* %  " ^ ,u, • '""• ,hll, i tne outlook is v.ry disheartening small farmers aver approeiaU indeed, and there seems to be no fully. immediate prospect of improveIn Barbados, as in the rest of 1'iwii tho Caribbean, the standard of Forlniuhtlv Scr\ ire management of the omaller farmer Is. on the hoie, deplorably low Mr. Donald: "Whol light ; %  '"' '"^ m;i w ho wishes t" inaN have we to own these Colonies and %  pr m oul * his oow or ou, "' Ml %  By them proper transport n rtl hatlOl learn the m.. foctlrtlooT Surely the rli-st duty i f %  cad 3 f itnprovement in the gOBFirst Indian Film On Local Screen M 21 nil i i u i'ii> stall '-..,. %  n....i. the Ministry of Transport 1* to enI regular mail, pa*w-nger niul i ;n,,i -ivm>. t„ V er\ eolony. The merchant venturer %  ^Carded transport coaU and trade as one: later, when trOD*. port was segregate,!, u profit was Txperted from both. A country ford a lo*s on traniDort [I makes up the loSbv ,'"''' %  ""' i""; %  -J arrangement .iid,nu th, building nf jpocia 1 Fhips rritt reied fbrtalsjhtii %  CANEJUICI OK MAURY { %  r.v• 1 • iir. hard grinding the Juice of whi a buek. %  Then an ourers around the ran waiting his Ul lee with a bit i Meanwhile a close by with mouby noticed. iit-lpII workno, tb ling lulu tee ca\1 %  ice in il. standing oral management • lake,. %  and other populai ottm Triiiirid-Jain.n. MMCOlni HeLoan is conducting the Iravel agents and he ,,,.„. ••"••' Ot Iho <-..nl..(eaii goodh nelghfc I-ood dim history will be made _l Thoatrc next Thursday evening when a picture with dialogue In the Indian language "ill be shown. Name of the uict-ne Ifiodliui Two Brothers— and the show logins at 4.45 p.m. Hie picture is baaed on a romantic HI a baekgruuud of exotic music and scenery. dy been shown m I ml cntal id. Trinidad among ot£oi [dawaa hire teeth, u.c the PEROJCmH pjstc use Maclcaao ever.day. R. M. JONES & CO. LTD. A fl ei ESSO STANDARD OIL When PAIN strikes remember Phensic! The sooner you take Phensic, the sooner you 11 feel better, for Phcnsic's quick, safe action will briny relief, lift awav pain-caused fatigue, and remove weariness in a matter of minutes. Phensic ncuher harms the heart, nor upsets the stomach. Be prepared for pain keep a supply of Phensic handy. Phensic tor quick, safe relief NERVE PAINS, NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS & CHILLS



    PAGE 1

    M NDA1 MNUAIY U. IMI Hrirfurlnnn \r.rr Mrrps-I SISDAY ADMK Ml: I'M. I -l\l\ l. IA> GALE / FOUND A FLOURISHING KNITTING MILL IN AN EX-STABLE I IIIIIM. is YOI n PRESCRIPTIONS | WE IUSPEXSE i.XHEEIELY .,.,.1 AUIHATELV \ Central Stabm kirg1 ,ir> Uiil.linti Whlcfa I % %  >( hurM-s and carnage*, the home of the West Irdian Knittuuc Mills, a new and %  :M operation In March last year, and with MM *taff divided Into Ihivrahtftj k all day and all night. ing plant. I It the Cotton Factory, a Lit further down the road There ". %  raw cotton fram Carurn. Only the Marie Gallant*? variety is usad, l Ml It Is i tl I quarter ItOQ used by the knitting n.illtome from Carriarou. New machinery is now being In tolled i.uming department, and *.ken ii is in operation It will bo 1-ossible to use even more West Indian cotton. Ai w. knitting mill* I foun* 1 tries — fmni England. Ameruo. ('arrlarou and Inrlin tl cot^ OOOtaJtM suM* and must It by a rewinding It was latarcfriini; to Ml\ . ball of yam and see it gradually turned Bio a "Wastkntt" shirt. ID tie knitting department, wrier* all the machinery is American. I |W ingenious machines km'ting vests, shirts, panties and the like Striped rhirt-. I oiscnv not dyed after the> ure made, hat are knitted, from balls of while The material cornea out of the knitting machine In the form of long, tubular "piece goods", which .-re then taken to a gigantic washing machine Tliev are then bleached or dyed, as the case may i .weed on to the dryer large steel cabinet heated to boiling point and co-itmns ., number of fans After drying, the piece goods are %  • paused through I llowed the mater,.l upthe cutting department men and girls were cutting out shiru with electric cut fcr> using cardboard patterns as u mnde The pieces wenthen ho the sewing room and MWmbled. In this room there are %  tiler if ,;irK u-ing elcciri. •ewflnt; •aatttaasaa, and each bar own particular Job to nly other knittin* mill in DM West Indies Is. a protective tariff 0) K ^htiiiurc.*' per dozen garments has been set up. The West India Knitting MilK which employ 129 people, only two of whom are not Barbadian, lias made remarkable progress in fne short time that it has tieen In tion. But. most remarkable of all. Is the Managing Aaron Karb. He has oiil> been in the knitting husinei r | year, for ten years before th.t tawas in lumber In British Oman* He now works from seven in Ihe morning i.. t w e lv e-thirty at night! J The Cosmopolitan Pharmacy *.-.-.•-•.-.•.--•--,',', *.',--'V','-*,*,*-'-*-'-'.-.'-'.-,V^ .:, FRESH SUPPLY or :PURINA HEN CHOW %  (SCRATCH GRAIN) !H. JASON JONES & CO., LTD. -Distributor. Steady projrom A wise mother Ins baby decide about the milk for bottle feeds. Lob of energy, steady gains, contented days, peaceful nights — these tell her what she most wants to know — baby ia doing splendidly on Ostermilk. important additions ire made: Iron to enrich the blood sugar to modify die food for tiny digestions — Vitamin I) IO help build strong bones and iceih. Osicrmilk is made by Glaxo Laboratories Ltd., who. since 1908, hsve been pioneers in the dcvelopi:.-:it of the best possible foods fw babies. Why can mother pin her faith so nrulr on Ostermilk Because, where feeding is difficult or impossible it la the perfect substitute for mother's milk. Ostrmilk Is finest grade cow's milk, dried under tha roost hygienic coodirkos. Tha protein, great hodybnilaaa. Is made easily digest ibis by aha soDav drytag process. And OSTERMILK 1$ right For your fi oe copy of illustrated Baby Book—Phone 4675 ; %  '-^'-',^^*,',*,^^-,^*,^^vo^*#^%'*^.v•>^v>^.^v^^.'*o^^^'-*.v>'#**'***^ i HARRISON'S BROAD ST. COTTINO BOOM showing cutters operating, aiitoma tic cutting m.tchlnes Mr. Lewis, cutter at riant, will cut approximately 200 dosen garmentin 3 honr of type -taown. Cat garments are then tied in bundle* and pas-rd to sewing room. SEWING ROOM showing irwing operators at work. Each operator perform* one operation and garment U then paued along until Anally rrrspleted. Luke Visits Jamaica (Tr*M o on r*rr*>e> £1,000. KINGSTON, JamatCS jan 14. The Jamaica Chamber of CoiBlnai'ia might abandon thvr proposal u> tinance. will) rricnt niaiantoaa. %  ESO.IHHrlass housing scbeaM HI of Kingston. Tachnical laabtlllv 1 %  plan n type of house at a flgur' tailed for by the scheme Is said to be rcponsible tor thi* %  %  '.ent. It is tmpossib'e. tha tachnlca raporlad to the Chamber to build a satisfactory type of twobedroom cottage in the city a' l.\DY BADSN-POWSU TO VISIT JAMAICA %  KINGSTON, Jamaica, Jan. 14 Lady Baden Powell. h> I I dta* Movement throughout the world, is to visit Jamaira In March on a fortnight's stay. An ..II Iflai la planned bj 1 • .< -1 nui'ii" In honour ol her visit While here. Lad] I'owill will give BOVaral lectuic* throughout the islann. "IN SICKNESS ANf) IV HEALTH WE ARE ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE With a range of drug xtorrs m this City arc specially stocked with the highest quality Drugs—you can bring us your doctor's prescriptions with the confidence that only the best drugs will be dispensed by a highly qualified staff. From our wide experience we can also suggest a tonic to keep you fit and fine. KNIGHTS DRUG STORES FOR QUALITY DRUGS "i o**-er derm to* lha promotion of comfort of f>e foe". a fresh stock of ottt favourites Dr. Scholl's nuois Foot Remedies *rch Support 1, Foci fawtrj, Zino Pads lor D-jnonf ard Callouses Foo Balm fcol Powder CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, II, 12 & 13 Broad Slrccl SEA VIEW HOUSE IIASTl.t*->. HAKBAlMtS EXCELLENT CUISINE FI'IJ.Y SUM Kl l ll\lt RATE4: f5.M per Dai A upward* ilmlualve) Aaalj Mrs W S. HOWEI.ItO-DAVS NEWS FLASH I0ft n^i-V.V-.V%W^V^ FINE FOODS YOUB IVMIIA ^.'. ^^1, WILL r.-wouK vi&j&Sjrty I* DUTCH TABU APPLES per ft £ ( DUTCH PCRUITIIN BEEB ptr botllf A .. yn 1 . %  <• > !:l( 1 %  BKOTH i i tin S Ml LTIS n RKI8H OELIOHT ;. boa ;ARMALADE | I I U Kl %  %  1 ONION ti I I %  tin I I 1 I IIK-^ A CABR i.-: pet lit mm a ,HEI DANISH TINNED II.'. 1 U 4 00 I II M .65 1 17 PI • I 1 10 81 I. 10 .72 SPECIAL HEINZ & AYLMERS 15 vm FOODS ny |HI I111 510^ |MT IZ. I .vnvvfHw. sioriA 10. im •



    PAGE 1

    4 PAGE SIX ^WWSj0_AO\t)rE M NOW AliMK \TI Sl'NDAV JAMABYM. Sunday. January 28, If5l Alll HMMKS DISQUIETING rumours abound tftat British West Indian Airways is intend!ng a policy of retrenchment No official statement has been made but it has been made known that the Managing Director of British West Indian Airways whose headquarters are in Trinidad is being transferred and certain reductions in flights have already been made. Amontr these reductions in flights is one between Barbados and Caracas. Since December the weekly flights between Barbados and Caracas have been cut from three to two. The rumours about British West Indian Airways serve to bring into the limelight the whole air policy affecting Barbados. It is common knowledge that Barbados being a British possession in the legal sense cf the word is tied by international conventions entered into by the Britisn Government affecting air transport. This is not only common knowledge; it is commonBut what is not reasonable nor common knowledge is the fact that Barbados has been in the past and still is to-day a pawn in any international bargaining that the British Government can or may be making with foreign Governments. The case of Pan American Airways and Barbados deserves especial study in this connection. Pan American Airways have wanted to come to Barbados for the past twenty years. About three years ago the American Civil Air Authorities gave specific approval for Pan American Airways to call at Barbados. but the State Department in Washington is not prepared to bargain with the United Kingdom Government for permission for Pan American to enter Barbados on the baeia of the British Government getting concessions to enter American airports which would overweigh the concession to enter Barbados Pan American Airways do not want to enter Barbados on such terms, but they are willing to come here, and it has been stated by one of their representatives that the Company is prepared to spend one quarter of a million dollars in advertising Barbados throughout the United States, as soon as it gets permission to come in here. While PanAmerican Airways do not want to carry "cabotage" passengers between the British territories in the area, it is worth recording that they do by special agreement with the French Government carry "cabotage" passengers between Martinique and Guadeloupe now. It is worth recording because if at any future period Barbados should suffer as a result of retrenchment by British West Indian Airways, there is no doubt that Barbados could .follow the example of Martinique and Guadeloupe and request the British Government to grant Pan American Airways similar "cabotage" rights which would allow them to fly passengers between Barbados and other British Caribbean territories served by Pan American. To-day those territories already include Trinidad. Jamaica, Antigua, St. Lucia and British Guiana. Barbados suffered during the last World War because KLM were not permitted to fly to Barbados and in consequence hundreds of Dutch people who could not get Lack to Holland spent their holidays in Jamaica instead of Barbados and the Barbadian exchequer was correspondingly lower as a result. Even to-day when Dutch people can revisit Holland the possibilities of enticing our Dutch neighbours from Aruba. Curacao and Surinam to come to Barbados cannot be explored because of the "no (ntry" sign shutting out KLM. When it is realised that the British Government subsidises the expensive Caribbean Commission in the interests of international co-operation in the Caribbean it is surprising that no attention is being paid to the obvious and only way of producing that co-operation-communications. It is a subject for congratulation that the British territories in the Caribbean do not adopt this stupid policy with regard to steamship communication, otherwise dependence on British methods of passenger transportation would leave us only the Golflto and the schooners and even Ashing boats would have to be pressed into service. In 1940 a British steamship company, the Furness Line, recommenced passenger service between New York and the United States West Indian possessions, the Virgin Islands. It is indeed strange thai at a time when the British West Indian possessions are clamouring for British p^nt tiy gers. such ships cannot only be spared to carry American passengers betw
Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text






ESTABLISHED 1895



U.N. DELAY ACTI



Britain Can Provide
More Ships For W.I.Now

(From Our Own

‘“

Correspondent)
LONDON, Jan. 19

HE impression is gaining ground in the British West

Indies today that the U.K. Government is not merely
failing to act on the recommendations of the Common-

wealt

Shipping Committees and many previous reports

but is indifferent to the situation”.

A-Bomb Tested
In Las Vegas

WASHINGTON, Jan. 27

The Atomic Energy Commission
said today that “one of the peri-
odig tests” of atomic explosions
was held today at the Air Force
bombing range near Las Vegas,
Nevada,

Yesterday the Governor of
Nevada, Charles Russel, disclosed
that there was an explosion on
Wednesday night at the Atomic
Energy Commission’s new testing
grounds in his State.

He said he could not give any
details for security reasons but
that he was authorised to say the
test was primarily to check com-
munications and other facilities.

The Commission last night
deseribed the test as a complete
success and said full-scale tests
would begin on a regular basis
within two weeks. Results of
these future tests would be neither
audible nor visible except under
certain weather conditions.

People in Las Vegas saw and
felt today’s explosion,

It was believed to be the second
testing detonation on the desert
base.

“Tt really lit up the sky like a
big. sunburst,” one resident. said.

Hundreds of. people saw - and
heard the blast. Many of them
were Southern Californians in the
town with the usual week-end
tourists —Reuter,



Banana Exports
Fell Last Year

(Prom Our Own Correspondent)
..»» KINGSTON, Jan, 14...

Jamaica’s banana exports declin.
ed by over 750,000 stems in 195U
to, reach its lowest export produc-
tion since the island’s output re-
turned to the 5,000,000 mark in
1946. In 1949 total banana pur-
chases made by the Banana Pur-
chases Board amounted to 6,736,12
stems; of this amount 6,530,183
stemms. were shipped. Purchases
in 1950 fell to 6,042,168 stems and
shipments were just under 5,300,-
000 stems,

The decline in last year’s total
production is attributed in some
quarters to the windstorm which
hit the island towards the end oi
last year, but while this is respoti-
sible to some small extent for the
deficit, the figures indicate that
the main reason was a shortfall in
Gres Michel production, due tc
the ravages of Panama Disease.



Kremlin Must Not
Misjudge America

WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.

President Truman said here
that it was “vitally important
that the leaders of Communist
imperialism do not misjudge
this nation as did Hitler and the
Kaiser,” in the last two world
wars. ‘

‘Truman sent this message to
the annual Roosevelt Day dinner
last night, sponsored by the
Americans for democratic action,
The President said:

The Kremlin should under-
stand that contrary to its .own
propaganda this country is not
‘weak and divided, We are not
im a state of moral and economic
decay,” ~~

“We know very well whst
Stalinist domination would mean.
We know how difficult it is for
people under Moscow domination
to break away.”—Reuter.



This is an extract from a full
length review of the “precarious
and inadequate” shipping services
between Britain and the Carib-
bean, contained in the recent isste
of the British Export Gazette.

It lists five main requirements,
which adequate shipping services
should be able to provide for:

(1) “Movements of official and
commercial staff between
the U.K. and the British
Caribbean. ,
Journeys of merchants and
others concerned with fos-
tering U.K. -Caribbean
trade,

Tourist traffic, which is
petentially much _ greater
than at present.
Shipments of West Indian
produce—not only what is
immediately offering, but
what could be economically
grown if refrigerated trans-
port were guaranteed.

rts of U.K. manufac-
tured goods, which again
might well expand under the
stimulus of improved ship-
ping”.

Shirking Responsibilities

In not taking steps to see that
these services are provided, the
British Government is not facing
up to its responsibilities, it con-
tinues. Twice, recently, question-
ers in the House of Commons have
been “fobbed off” with the answer
that ‘‘no practical plan” has been
submitted for implementing re-
commendations in the Common-
wealth Shipping report. But as
Lord Lucas announced in_ the
House of Lords last month, plans
have been submitted for improving
services between the two areas.
The Colonial Office declared that
they are not’ “practical”.

The Gazette says it is agreed
there is no likelihood of a regular
Eritish passenger service to the
Eastern Caribbean without some
form of Government assistance. A
direct subsidy to Caribbean ser-
vices might seem invidious to
other owners operating elsewhere
but this objection could be met by
inviting tenders.

Alternatively the building of
ships for the West Indies run
might be assisted either by out-
right grants or by special credits
on a mutual risk-sharing basis.

In addition it would have to be
ascertained how far the West
Indies themselves would be pre-
pared to contribute and in what
ways they might assist a British
shipping line by such items as
port charge concessions, etc. ;

Attention should also be paid
when studying the ezonomies cut
the question to the heavy tonnages
which have to be brought from
the Caribbean area to Britain in
chartered vessels, Any saving in
this respect might be regarded a+
a contrikution to a subsidy.

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

Stop Gap

In the meantime while thought
is being given to these proposa!s
the Gazette suggests as a stop-
gap measure to relieve immediate
congestion, consideration should
be given to the possibility of in-
cucing Australasian ships passing
through the Panama Canal to cal!
more regularly at ports in the
Eastern Caribbean.

“It is hard to believe that thes
difficulties are insurmountable
~wvhen so much is at stake” it adds.
“The time has come for business
interests in Britain and the British
Caribbean to unite their voices in
insisting that the present attitude
of drift, complacency and evasion
come to an end.”

Appended to the Gazette's
article are three letters from Mr.
A. E. V. Barton, West India Com-
mittee Secretary, Mr. E. Palmer,
Director of Bookers’ Shipping and
Trading Co., Ltd., and Mr. Percy

@ on page 10



”

THE PHOTO AT THE TOP shows a chukka in progress during the Presentation Match



a ee

POLO PRIZE

undap

BARBA

i





members of the Barbados Polo Club at the Garrison yesterday.

THE PHOTO AT THE LEFT pictures Mr. Colin Deane receivi

Mrs, H. A. Arthur,

Seger
“ JAN ARY 28, 1951

N AGAINS

¢



played by

ng the Advocate Challenge Cup from

AT THE RIGHT, the Cameraman caught Mr. A. J. Hanschell recelving the ¥. & Lima Ghallenge Oup,
Diplomats: Faced With
Very Difficult Task

By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE.



WillHelp To Defend
Peace Of The World

LONDON, Jan. 27.

Diplomatic relations between
India and the People’s Republic
of China will “help to defend the
peace of Asia and of the world,”
The Peking People’s daily said
today, according to a new China
(Communist) news agency mes-
sage received in London, |

Commenting on the first anni-'
versary of the Republic of India
the paper wrote: “Diplomatic re-
lations between the Republic of
India and the Peoples Republic of
China which {have been estab-
lished on the basis of equality,
mutual benefit, and mutual re-
spect for territorial and sover-
eign rights, will not only help
to further consolidate and de-
velop the friendship which al-
ready exists between the peoples
of these two countries, but will
also help to defend the lasting
peace of Asia and the whole
world.”—Reuter, |



Ike Returns Home |

NEW YORK, Jan. 27.

General Eisenhower landed to-
day at Sewart air force base near
here at the end of his 21 day mili- ;
tary fact finding tour of Eur pe.
The General will spend the next
four days at West Point, United
States military academy,

He will leave on Wednesday for
Washington to report on how he
found Western Europe's defences.

—Reutes.



Mannerheim Gets Worse

LAUSANNE, January 27.
The condition of Field’ Marshal
Mannerheim in hospital here after



WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.

THE present rift in Anglo-American Far Eastern policies
has presented British officials here with one of their most
arduous diplomatic tasks since thé second world war.



ON THE
°* SPOT

LONDON,

C. W. Brown of Dealj Kent
county, sent the following
letter about his family's
meagre meat ration to the
editor of the Sunday Ex-
press:

“Our piece of mutton was
flavourless and tough. So~
we gave it to the cat. She
tried a bit, gave it up, and
went out,

“In about ten minutes she
returned with a large, fat
mouse, which she laid at my
feet.

“Was she sorry for us?”

N. 8.



TOOK DRUGS

PARIS, Jan, 27,

Police charged the 71 year old
French author, Henry De Monfreid
and his wife with drug taking
after a raid on their home yester-
day.

The police said that they found
there 19 opium pipes, nine opium-
burning lamps, 300 grammes of
opium, 290 grammes of opium
dross, 9 grammes of heroin, and

an intestinal operation deterior-|*Pa'e parts for opium pipes.

ated again tonight.

His doctors at the Cantonal
Hospital expressed grave fears for
his life.

—Reuter,

Paddy and Robbie and Bob
try to make rain
with contraptions



like this

(From JOHN REDFERN)

KONGWA.

' THE OVERSEAS FOOD CORPORATION, which fail-

ed with groundnuts, has s
With chemicals released by

tarted trying to produee rain.
burners ‘on the ground or bal-

loons exploded at great heights, the corporation is trying
to tip over the ¢louds- where they’ will do most good.

The job, completely hush-hush
in planning, is being done by a

uad from the department called
“Special. Projects,”

“The rainmakers” as everybody
calls them, are Paddy the Irish-
man, Robbie the Englishman; and
Bob the Scot. They work with
wondrous ._Heath, Robinson ‘con-
traptions. made from throw-out
stuff

They make hydrogen ir > bust

with a generator Rade from, the

the

old
from

atruck with
cylinders

back end of
vacuum brake
lorries for the gas.
Raby’s Special
Rain distribution has
major problem from
although the old gang denied this
strenuously when I suggested it
here more than two -year
Useful mc

from the east

been a
the start—




Ago



> clo



acro
¢



st near tf

beyond the agricultural units



mM,



In the rainy season now on there
are maddening dry gaps at critical
operational times.

Mr. George Raby, tall, general
manager of the whole works was
an Army expert on projectiles
during the: war. He sat down and
figured a few ideas himself, in-
cluding “Raby’s Special,” a simple
charcoal burner that looks like a
drainpipe with an aircraft rudder
attached,

This is for rain precipitation by
using Africa’s strong vertical cur-
rents to “seed”
silver iodide from charcoal burn-
ers. ‘With a battery of burners
using about £5 worth of silver
icdide each — treatment.
projects aim to control the rainfall
providing there are clouds, in an
area of 200 squaré. miles,

Children’s Balloons

The squad use children’s bal-
loons (8s. per thdusand) for their
own wind tests and get advice



from African observers in the
Government’s weather service

They have done more than 30

experiments now and say there has

always been rain at the appointed

time. But they wince e word

| rainmake “We don’t make rair



Special | will watch her

—Reuter

286 Rebels Killed

SAIGON, Jan, 27.

French forces in the Northern
Indo-China battle area of Tonking
carried dut two “completely suc-
cessful” clearing operations yes-
terday, a communique announced
here to-night.

The communique said that 286
Vietminh insurgents, were killed
in Cochin, China.



—Reuter

Mystery Weapon

SAN FRANCISCO. Jan. 27
The 10,000 ton aircraft carrier
Independence badly damaged in
experimental atom: bomb . explo-
sions at Bikini in 1946 has been



high clouds with|towed to sea to be sunk by a mys-

tery weapon
month .
Only

some time next

American naval. experts
“death”,
—Reuter



STRIKE AVERTED

JOHANNESBURG, Jan. 27



A dispute between the African
Mine Workers Union and copper
mining companies in Northern
Rhodesia which threatened to lead
to.a strike 20,000 miners ended




last night, w
ed a revised offer from the com-
as a ced here te

pani it wa nnour

—Reuter



en the Union accept~

There -has been no attempt to

'disguise the divergence of Brit-
lich

and American: . attitudes
towards the Communist regime in
‘China,

President Truman and Prime
differences after their conference

here in December.

Since then, it has been made
increasingly clear that both: lead-
ers\ are backed in their differing
fof opinions by majorities in their
governments and legislatures,

Public opinion in both countries
would make it impossible to per-
Suade the United States Govern-
ment to recognise the Communist
regime in China or to. persuade
the British Government to with-
| Soar its recognition of that
regime,

British and American attitudes
to those problems and the pro-
posals for their solution are
equally bound to be complicated

= Attlee acknowledged the

by divergent, attitudes towards
Communist China,
Within these limitations, the

British Ambassador Oliver Franks
and his staff here have been tak-
img every opportunity both form-
atly -and informally to present
Britain’s case,

They have aimed at removing
misunderstandings, at preventing
the divergence of issues from un

necessarily holding up joint
Anglo-American policy, and ac-
tion at preventing any mis-

understanding or questioning of
Britain’s motives. —Reuter

Spanish Representative ?

LONDON, January 27,

The British Foreign Office would
neither confirm nor deny the re-
port appearing in the British Press
today, that Britain has replied un-
favourably to Spain’s request for
acereditation of Fernando Castilla
Y. Maigin, Spain’s new ambassador
in London.

The newspaper report suggested
ihat Castilla’s record service in
the Spanish Blye Division in Rus-
tia (he received the Iron Cross
from the Germans) makes him





unsuitable as the Spanish. repre-
—Reuter.

sentative in Britain,







Don’t Miss RUSSIA'S
NEW EMPIRE. Begins
TUESDAY. Order your
copy early.

|MACARTHUR TALKS ON
| JAPAN WITH DULLES

TOKYO,,Jan, 27
John, Foster Dulles, President
Truman's special envoy, charged

;v ith sounding out Japanese views
on a Peace Treaty, had a two-hour
talk with General MacArthur to.
cay

He is reported to have “found

himself in complete agreement

ith the Supreme Commander on

] sues of the Japanese Peace
re

i

i 4 —Reuter: |

S. Koreans
Strike Back

At Inchon

TOKYO, Jan, 27

South Koreans leapt back into
the Korean war picture to-day
with a snap hit, kill and run raid
on unist-held Inchon, port
for Seoul, South Korean capital,
according to a report here late
to-night.

The raid lasted four ‘hours
Heavy United States naval guns’
bombarded the area for the second
day running,

The report said the Koreans
killed 40 Communists and then
left without suffering any casual-
ties,

Armoured elements of the 8th
Army which captured Suwon yes-
Yerday pushed more than six miles
north to-day. Chinese troops were
reported to have fallen back to-
wards the Han River skirting the
southern outskirts of Seoul,

This drive up the west coast of
Korea along the main road to,
Seoul had met only light resistance
so far to-day, But bitter fighting
had raged farther east as United
Nations troops tried to advance
beyond battered Kumyangjangni.

Two Chinese regiments fought
ferociously house by house to re-
tain a foothold in the town and in
the hills~to the north and west.

Machine gunners and_ snipers
were smoked out of buildings. As
the Chinese withdrew, Jet planes
and other fighters attacked with
napalm (jellied petrol) bombs.

Withdrew

Further east still, a United Na-
tions battalion was forced to with-
draw and regroup four miles
north-west of Ichon but later
they were reported to have taken

an unidentified small village
there,
For the third successive day

United Nations patrols advanced
unopposed north of Wonju on the
right wing of the Seoul front.

In East Korea more than 3,000
Communists were reported mass~
ing near Pyongchang 12 miles
a of the mining town Yong-
jol,

Admiral Arthur W. Radford,
United States Pacific Fleet Com-
mander said here to-day “I think
we’can stay in Korea”, ,

On a brief periodical visit to
Japan he said everyone he had
talked to here had been “very
optimistic about the Korean op-
erations”.

Reuter



Their Daily Bread

WASHINGTON, Jan, 27.
Turkish troops after a bayonet
charge with the United Nations’
forces in Kcrea, sent this message
to the supply depot: “Enemy
attacked, send us more bread.’’
This request was revealed at
the Press Conference to-day by
Colonel Cary Hutchinson, the
American supply officer, who was
in Korea earlier this month. He
said that the United States Army
food experts had produced a spe-
cial kind of bread for the Turks.
It was heavy bread end con-
tained wheat flours and olive
oil,—Reuter,



Bevin Improves

LONDON, Jan, 27.
The British Foreign Minister,
Ernest Bevin, ill with pneumonias,
had another “restless night,” his
personal doctor Sir Alexander

McCall, said this morning,

Bevin was yesterday stated to
have shown slight improvement,
A Foreign Office spokesman said
later to-day that Bevin “continues
to improve and is slightly better.”

~—Reuter,



PRINTERS REFUSE TO
JOIN IN BOYCOTT.

BUENOS AIRES, Jan, 27.

In an eleventh hour effort to
prevent La Prensa being distribu-
ted for the second day running,
boycotters last night picketed
the printers as they attempted to
enter the printing shop.

Earlier . yesterday evening the
printers had decided to disobey
the Peronista Union orders to
join the newspaper vendors’ boy-
cott in sympathy.—Reuter.



Pact Of Friendship

NEW DELHI, Jan. 27.
India and Indonesia have con-
Cluded negotiations for a treaty
of friendship and the treaty will
come into force shortly, it was
learned here to-day,
Under the treaty
firms a recent trade agreement,
trade agents will be appointed
and both countries are pledged
to assist each other’s industria)

and agricultural progress.
—Reuter.

which con-

DIAL STALIN

NEW YORK,

College students tried t
recently. The}
whether t

Three

telephone

Stalin

ree \ a
ed to ask him Ley

i voluntes t once or wai
-—L.E.S




to brand Communist

appoint a Committee to consider “collective
measures’’ against her.

“It is the view of the United States Government and
people that the United Nations have already delayed too
long in naming the aggressor,” Austin declared.

“We are conscientiously opposed to any further United
Nations action which avoids the central issue.”

Don’t Condemn
Red Chinese
URGES POLAND

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan, 27
Poland to-night told the United
Nations she would support the
12 nation Asian resolution calling
for an “exploratory” conference
with Peking.

Katz Suchy, Polish delegate an-
nounced this when to—day’s debate
on Korea opened before the Politi-
cal Committee, Poland will give
her support he said after certain

minor amendments proposed by
the Soviet Union,

The Polish delegate said:
“Never in international negotia-

tions has there been a case when
negotiations have been preceded
with condemnation of one power,
There has not been a case where
condemnation was followed by
negotiations,” he declared,
Gehard Jooste, South African
delegate, announced his country’s
suppor? for the American regolu-

tion condemning Communist
China,

At the same time he hoped that
once that was done, the United
Nations would exhaust the possi-
bilities of peaceful negotiation be-
fore starting’ to formulate addi-
tional measures, ’

Jooste declared: “We cannot see
how the acceptance of the United
States resolution can close the door
to peaceful negotiations. We are
stating formally in the resolution
merely what is known to all the
world and what has repeatedly
been stated by responsible people.”

—Reuter

COINCIDENCE

MADRID,
When Antonio Espejo was
repairing the roof of a_ three-

storey house in the Spanish town
of Martos, he

CHINA

U.S. Delegate Complains

LAKE sv

‘THE GENERAL ASSEMBL
Committee adjourned again to-day without
reaching a decision after a. week of debates
methods of achieving peace in Korea, ,
The chief American delegate Warren AtiStin
today continued his efforts to get the Committee




fell to the strect}not ,
below, seriously injuring himseif|ceasefire before

PRICE: SIX CENTS

ESS, Jan. 27
8 ‘POLITICAL

on

China an r and

The ‘Committee hag four main
propoSals before it:
1, The United States Resolution
labelling the Peking regime an
aggressor,
The Canadian proposal made
informally yesterday for @
seven power conference con-
ditional on a ‘cessation of
fighting to be arranged by the
delegates at the start of their
meeting. bom
3. The Israeli Plan for re
affirmation by the General
Assembly of the Five Poin’
“Commissal Plan.” ,
4. Proposal by 12 \Asian an@
Arab nations .for a -Seven
Power Conference which
would obtain from Commu.
nist China clarification éf the
terms of a ceasefire, .

Aggressor Charge

Earlier in the day Michael
Fry reported that the United
Nations General Assembly is
early next week expected b:
a strong majority to bran
Communist China as an aggressot
in Korea while leaving the
door open to further peace
negotiations,

The American resolution now
before the. Political _Committee
labels the Peking Governm an
aggressor, demands the withdraw.
al of Chinese troops from Koréa
and asked the ‘Assembly to. ‘set
in motion the machinery of pos
sible. economic and other. saht-

“To date 25 countries haxe 39
pressed their peer! for
condemnation, st ommunist Chi-
na. Several delegations wee
the British said that they were i
favour of condemnation.
Another resolution before the Po-
litical Committee sponsored by the
12 Arab and Asian nations asked
for the convening immediately of
an “exploratory” confererite to
examine and elueidate some
doubtful aspects of the Peking
Government's attitude,

This plan received lukewarm
support among “the members
largely on the grounds that it did
make any provision for a
beginning any

—and his wife. who happened to| negotiations,

be passing at that moment.
—LES.





TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT



\ the

|Peking Government



A new factor introduced into the
discussions here, was the apparent
lull in the fighting in Korea which
Indian delegates thought
might be “significant.”

They emphasised that the

while not

formally acceding to a cef$efire
might be trying to give the im«
@ On page 10.



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(From Our Own

$ impression is gainin;

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failin;
wealt
but is indi

A-Bomb Tested
In Las Vegas

WASHINGTON, Jan. 27
The Atomic Energy Commission
said today that “one of the peri-
odig tests” of atomic explosions
was held today at the Air Force
bombing range near Las Vegas,
Nevada,
Yesterday the Governor of
Nevada, Charles Russel, disclosed
that there was an explosion on
‘Wednesday night at the Atomic
Energy Commission’s new testing
grounds in his State.
He said he could not give any
details for security reasons but
that he was authorised to say the
test was primarily to check com-
munications and other facilities.

The Commission last night
deseribed the test as a complete
success and said full-scale tests
would begin on a regular basis
within. two weeks. Results of
these future tests would be neither
audible nor visible except under
certain weather conditions.
People in Las Vegas saw and
felt teday’s explosion.

It was believed to be the second
testing detonation on the desert
base.

“It really lit up the sky like a
big. sunburst,” one resident said.
Hundreds of. people saw -and
heard the blast. Many of them
were Southern Californians in the
town with the usual week-end
tourists.—Reuter,





Banana Exports
Fell Last Year

(Prom Our Own Correspondent)

... KINGSTON, Jan, 14..
Jamaica's banana
ed by over 750,000 stems in 195U
to. reach its. lowest export produc-
tion since the island’s output re-
turned to the 5,000,000 mark in
1946. In 1949 total banana pur-
chases made by the Banana Pur-
chases Board amounted to 6,736,12
stems; of this amount 6,530,133
stems. were shipped, Purchases
in 1950 fell to 6,042,168 stems and
shipments were just under 5,300,-
000 stems,

The decline in last year’s total
production is attributed in some
quarters to the windstorm which
hit the island towards the end of
last year, but while this is respoli-
sible to some small extent for thc
deficit, the figures indicate that
the main reason was a shortfall in
Gres Michel production, due tc
the ravages of Panama Disease.

Kremlin Must Not
Misjudge America

WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.

President Truman said here
that it was “vitally important
that the leaders of Communist
imperialism do not misjudge
this nation as did Hitler and the
Kaiser,” in the last-two world
wars. 4

Truman sent this message to
the annual Roosevelt Day dinner
last night, sponsored by the
Americans for democratic action.
The President said:

The Kremlin should under-
stand that contrary to its .own
propaganda this country is not
weak and divided, We are not
in a state of moral and economic
decay,”

“We know very well what
Stalinist domination would mean.
We know how difficult it is for
people under Moscow domination
to break away.”’—Reuter.



lik




1

With chemicals released by

to tip over the Clouds. wher

The job, completely hush-hush
in planning, is being done by a
squad from the department called
“Special. Projects.”

“The rainmakers” as everybody
calls them, are Paddy the Irish-
man, Robbie the Englishman; and
Bob the Scot. They work with
wondrous

Heath Robinson con-
traptions made from throw-out
stuff.

They



ydrogen in the bust

pnergtor. ngade from. the



declin.}¢,



Britain Can Provide
More Ships For W.I.Now

Correspondent)
LONDON, Jan. 19
g ground in the British West

.K. Government is not merely
to act on the recommendations of the Common-
Shipping Committees and many previous reports
erent to the situation”.

This is an extract from a full
length review of the “precarious
and inadequate” shipping services
between Britain and the Carib-
bean, contained in the recent issue
of the British Export Gazette,

It lists five main requirements,
which adequate shipping services
should be able to provide for:

(1) “Movements of official and
commercial staff between
the U.K. and the British
Caribbean. ’
Journeys of merchants and
others concerned with fos-

(2)

tering U.K. -Caribbean
trade. :
(3) Tourist traffic, which is

petentially much _— greater
than at present.
Shipments of West Indian
produce—not only what is
immediately offering, but
what could be economically
grown if refrigerated trans-
Pp were guaranteed.
Xports of U.K. manufac-
tured goods, which again
might well expand under the
stimulus of improved ship-
ping”.

Shirking Responsibilities

In not taking steps to see that
these services are provided, the
British Government is not facing
up to its responsibilities, it con-
tinues. Twice, recently, question-
ers in the House of Commons have
been “fobbed off” with the answer
that “no practical plan” has been
submitted for implementing re-
commendations in the Common-
wealth Shipping report. But as
Lord Lucas announced in the
House of Lords last month, plans
have been submitted for improving
services between the two areas.
The Colonial Office declared that
they are not’ “practical”.

The Gazette says it is agreed
there is no likelihood of a regular
British passenger service to the
Eastern Caribbean without some
‘orm of Government assistance. A
direct subsidy to Caribbean ser-
vices might seem invidious to
other owners operating elsewhere
but this objection could be met by
inviting tenders.

Alternatively the building of
ships for the West Indies run
might be assisted either by out-
right grants or by special credits
on a mutual risk-sharing basis,

In addition it would have to be
ascertained how far the West
Indies themselves would be pre-
pared to contribute and in what
ways they might assist a British
shipping line by such items as
port charge concessions, etc. :

Attention should also be paid
when studying the ezonomies ut
the question to the heavy tonnages
which have to be brought from
the Caribbean area to Britain in
chartered vessels, Any saving in
this respeet might be regarded es
a contribution to a subsidy.

Stop Gap

In the meantime while thought
is being given to these proposa!s
the Gazette suggests as a siop-
gap measure to relieve immediate
congestion, consideration should
be given to the possibility of in-
cucing Australasian ships passing
through the Panama Canal to call
more regularly at ports in the
Eastern Caribbean.

“It is hard to believe that thes:
difficulties are insurmountable
avhen so much is at stake”’ it adds.
“The time has come for business
interests in Britain and the British
Caribbean to unite their voices in
insisting that the present attitude
of drift, complacency and evasion
come to an end.”

Appended to the Gazette's
article are three letters from Mr.
A. E. V. Barton, West India Com-
mittee Secretary, Mr. E. Palmer,
Director of Bookers’ Shipping and
Trading Co., Ltd., and Mr. Percy

@ on page 10

(4)

(5)





FERN)

KONGWA.
ON, which fail-

burners ‘on the ground or bal-

loons exploded at great heights, the corporation is trying

e they’ will do most good.

back end of
vacuum brake
lorries for the gas.
Raby’s Special

Rain distribution has been <
major problem from the start—
although the old gang denied this
strenuously when I suggested it
here more than two years ago

Useful moisture cloud Ss
ross from the east and ill th

T » Mgomba

old
from

atruck with
cylinders




ac











’

THE PHOTO AT THE TOP shows a chukka in progress during the

meeaperensryeneeersianterimeecenteeeticags| teahestihis imental ae tian Someta

POLO PRIZE DAY

members of the Barbados Polo Club at the Garrison yesterday.

THE PHOTO AT THE LEFT pictures Mr.

Mrs, H. A. Arthur.

AT THE RIGHT, tho Cameraman cauglit Mr. A. J, Hanschell recetving the ¥, de Lima Challenge Oup.
Faced With
Very Difficult Task

By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE,



Will Help To Defend
Peace Of The World

LONDON, Jan. 27.

Diplomatic relations between
India and the People’s Republic
of China will “help to defend the
peace of Asia and of the world,’
The Peking People’s daily said
today, according to a new China
(Communist) news agency mes-
sage received in London,

versary of the Republic of India
the paper wrote: “Diplomatic re-
lations between the Republic of
India and the Peoples Republic of
China which {have been estab-
lished on the basis of equality,
mutual benefit, and mutual re-
spect for territorial and sover-
eign rights, will not only help
to further consolidate and de-
velop the friendship which al-
ready exists between the peoples
of these two countries, but will
also help to defend the lasting
peace of Asia and the whole
world.”—Reuter,



Ike Returns Home

NEW YORK, Jan. 27.
General Eisenhower landed to-
day at Sewart air force base near

here at the end of his 21 day mili- -

tary fact finding tour of Europe.
The General will spend the next
four days at West Point, United
States military academy.

He will leave on Wednesday for
Washington to report on how he
found Western Europe’s defences.

—Reutes’. |



Mannerheim Gets Worse

LAUSANNE, January 27.

The condition of Field’ Marshal
Mannerheim in hospital here after
an intestinal .operation deterior-
ated again tonight.

His doctors at the Cantonal
Hospital expressed grave fears for
his life.

—Reuter.

Paddy and Robbie and Bob —
try to make rain
with contraptions
e this

(From JOHN RED

THE OVERSEAS FOOD CORPORATI
ed with groundnuts, has started trying to produee rain.

In the rainy season now on there
are maddening dry gaps at critical
operational times.

Mr. George Raby, tall, general
manager of the whole works was
an Army expert on _ projectiles
during the: war. He sat down and
figured a few ideas himself, in-
eluding “Raby’s Special,” a simple
charcoal burner that looks like a
drainpipe with an aircraft rudder
attached.

This is for rain precipitation by
using Africa’s: strong vertical cur-
rents to “seed” high clouds with
silver iodide from charcoal burn-
ers. ‘With a battery of burners
using about £5 worth of silver
iodide each treatment. Special
projects aim to control the rainfall
providing there are clouds, in an
area of 200 squaré miles,

Children’s Balloons

The squad use children’s bat-
loons (8s. per thdusand) for their
own wind tests and get advice
from African observers in the
Government’s weather service

They have done more than 30
experiments now and say there has
always been rain at the appointed
time, But they wince at ord
rainmake “We don't ake rair

We prec where it nt

the





—LES.

|

Commenting on the first eani-'

Diplomats:

THE present rift in Anglo-American Far Eastern policies
has presented British officials here with one of their most
arduous diplomatic tasks since the second world war,



ON THE
° SPOT

LONDON.

C. W. Brown of Deal) Kent
county, sent the following
letter about his. family’s

meagre meat ration to the
editor of the Sunday Ex-
press:

“Our piece of mutton was
flavourless and tough. So
we gave it to the cat. She

| tried a bit, gave it up, and
went out,

“In about ten minutes she
returned with a large, fat

! mouse, which she laid at my
feet.

“Was she sorry for us?”

—I_ N. 8.



TOOK DRUGS

PARIS, Jan, 27.
Police charged the 71 year old
French author, Henry De Monfreid
and his wife with drug taking
after a raid on their home yester-
day.



The police said that they found
| burni 19 opium pipes, nine opium-
opium, 290 grammes of opium
dross, 9 grammes of heroin, and
spare parts for opium pipes.
Reuter
SAIGON, Jan. 27.
French forces in the Northern
Indo-China battle area of Tonking
carried dut two “completely suc-
terday, a communique announced
here to-night.
The communique said that 286
Vietminh insurgents. were killed

burning lamps, 300 grammes of
286 Rebels Killed
cessful” clearing operations yes-
in Cochin, China,

—Reuter



Mystery Weapon

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan, 27
The 10,000 ton aircraft carrier
Independence badly damaged in
experimental atom: bomb . explo-
sions at Bikini in 1946 has been
towed to sea to be sunk by a mys-

tery weapon some time next
month.
Only American naval. experts

will watch her “death”,
—~Reuter



STRIKE AVERTED

JOHANNESBURG, Jan, 27
A dispute between the African
Mine Workers Union and copper

mining companies in Northern
Rhodesia which threatened to lead
tc.a strike by 20,000 miners ended
last night, when the Union accept~
ed a revised offer from the com-
; panic it was announced here to-
~Reuter

ee
BARBADOS, JAS#ARY 28, 1951

AGAINST CHINA

U.S. Delegate Complains

Colin Deane receiving the Advocate Challenge Cup from







S. Koreans
Strike Back

At Inchon

TOKYO, Jan. 27

South Koreans leapt back into
the Korean war picture to-day
with a snap hit, kill and run raid
on Communist-held Inchon, port
for Seoul, South Korean capital,
according to a report here late
to-night.

The raid lasted four ‘hours
Heavy United States naval guns
bombarded the area for the second
day running.

The report said the Koreans
killed 40 Communists and then
left without suffering any casual-
ties.

Armoured elements of the 8th
Army’ which captured Suwon yes-
Yerday pushed more than six miles
north to-day. Chinese troops were
reported to have fallen back to-
wards the Han River skirting the
southern outskirts of Seoul.

This drive up the west coast of
Korea along the main road to,
Seoul had met unly light resistance
so far to-day. But bitter fighting
had raged farther east as United
Nations troops tried to advance
beyond battered Kumyangjangni.

Two Chinese regiments fought
ferociously house by house to re-
tain a foothold in the town and in
the hills-to the north and west.

Machine gunners and_ snipers
were smoked out of buildings. As
the Chinese withdrew, Jet planes
and other fighters attacked with
napalm (jellied petrol) bombs.

Withdrew

Further east still, a United Na-
tions battalion was forced to with-
draw and regroup four miles
north-west of Ichon but later
they were reported to have taken
an unidentified small village
there,

For the third successive day
United Nations patrols advanced
unopposed north of Wonju on the
right wing of the Seoul front.

In East Kevea more than 3,000
Communists were reported mass-
ing near Pyongchang 12 miles
ee of the mining town Yong-
jol.

Admiral Arthur W. Radford,
United States Pacific Fleet Com-
mander said here to-day “I think
we'can stay in Korea”, ’

On a brief periodical visit to
Japan he said everyone he had
talked to here had been “very
optimistic about the Korean op-
erations”,

Presentation Match played by

WASHINGTON, Jan, 27.

There -has been no attempt to




















PRICE: SIX CENTS

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 27
‘THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY’S ‘POLITICAL
Committee adjourned again to-day without
reaching a decision after a week of debates on
methods of achieving peace in Korea, aed
The chief American delegate Warren AtiStin
today continued his efforts to get the Committee
to brand Communist China an aggressor and
appoint a Committee to consider “eollective
measures’’ against her.

“Tt is the view of the United States Government and
people that the United Nations have already delayed too
long in naming the aggressor,” Austin declared.

“We are conscientiously opposed to any further United
Nations action which avoids the central issue.”

~— —————==== ‘The Committee hag four main
proposals before it:
1. The United States Resolution
labelling the Peking regime an
aggressor,
The Canadian proposal made
informally yesterday for a
seven power conference con-
ditional on a cessation of
fighting to be arranged by the
delegates at the start of their
meeting. ;
The Israeli Plan for re«
affirmation by the General
Assembly of the Five Poin
“Commissal Plan.” :

Don’t Condemn
Red Chinese
URGES POLAND

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 27
Poland to-night told the United
Nations she would support the
12 nation Asian resolution calling
for an “exploratory” conference
with Peking.
Katz Suchy, Polish delegate an-




' 4. Proposal by 12 i ané
nounced this when to-day’s debate ‘Arb sai ton a cmavahs
on Korea opened before the Politi Power Conference which
cal Committee

Poland will give
her support he said after certain
minor amendments proposed by
the Soviet Union,

The Polish delegate said:
“Never in international negotia-
tions has there been a case when
negotiations have been preceded
with condemnation of one power.
There has not been a case where
condemnation was followed by
negotiations,” he declared,

Gehard Jooste, South African
delegate, announced his country’s
suppor? for the American regolu-

tion condemning Communist
China.

would obtain from Commu-
nist China clarification ¢f the
terms of a ceasefire,

Aggressor Charge

Earlier in the day Michael
Fry reported that the United
Nations General Assembly is
early next week expected b:
a strong majority to bran
Communist China as an aggressor
in Korea while leaving the
door open to further ‘peace

negotiations,

The American resolution now
before the, Political Committee
labels the Peking Governm an
aggressor, demands the withdraw.
al of Chinese troops from Korea
and asked the ‘Assembly to. ‘set
in motion the machinery of pos-
sible, pconomic. and other. saft-

r “To date 25 countries haxe ¢x-
pressed their support the
condemnation, of Communist Chi-
na. Several delegations includ
the British said that they were i
favour of condemnation.
Another resolption before the Po-
litical Committee sponsored by the
12 Arab and Asian nations asked
for the convening immediately of
an “exploratory’’ conference to
examine and. elueidate some

At the same time he hoped that
once that was done, the United
Nations would exhaust the possi-
bilities of peaceful negotiation be-
fore starting to formulate addi-
tional measures, :

Jooste declared: “We cannot see
how the acceptance of the United
States resolution can close the door
to peaceful negotiations, We are
stating formally in the resolution
merely what is known to all the
world and what has repeatedly
been stated by responsible people,”

—Reuter

COINCIDENCE

‘ ; spects of the Pekin

'disguise the divergence of Brit- —Reuter eather Ri ; .

lich and American | attitudes MADRID,

towards the Communist regime in When Antonio Espejo was| This plan received are

China, We . repairing the roof of a three- |Support among “the members
President Truman «and ‘Prime Their Daily Bread storey house in the Spanish town| largely on the grounds that it did

Minister Attlee acknowledged the of Martos, he fell to the strect}not make any provision for a

differences after their coriference
hege in December.

since then, it has been made
increasingly clear that both lead-
ers| are backed in their differing
fof opinions by majorities in their

WASHINGTON, Jan, 27.
Turkish troops after a bayonet
charge with the United Nations’
forces in Kerea, sent this message
to the supply depot: “Enemy

attacked, send us more bread,”

vernments and legislatures. This request was revealed at
Public opinion in both countries | the Press Conference to-day by
would make it impossible to per-|Colonel Cary Hutchinson, the

Suade the United States Govern-
ment to recognise the Communist
regime in. China or to persuade
the British Government to with-
draw its recognition of that
regime,

British and American
to those problems and the pro-
posals for their solution are
equally bound. to be complicated
by divergent attitudes towards
Communist China.

Within these limitations, the
British Ambassador Oliver Franks
and his staff here have been tak-
mg every opportunity both form-
atly -und informally to present
Britain’s case,

They have aimed at removing
misunderstandings, at preventing
the divergence of issues from un
necessarily holding up joint
Anglo-American policy, and ac-
tion at preventing any mis-
understanding or questioning of
Britain’s motives, —Reuter

Spanish Representative ?

LONDON, January 27.

The British Foreign Office wouid
neither confirm nor deny the re-
port appearing in the British Press
| today, that Britain has replied un-
favourably to Spain’s request for
accreditation of Fernando Castilla
Y. Maigin, Spain’s new ambassador
in London. enter the printing shop.

The newspaper report suggested} Earlier yesterday evening the
that Castilla’s record service in’ printers had’ decided to disobey
the Spanish Blue Division in Rus-| {he Peronista Union orders to

sia (he received the Iron Cross | join the newspaper vendors’ boy-
from the Germans) makes him | eott in sympathy,—Reuter,

\Pact Of Friendship

NEW DELHI, Jan. 27.
India and Indonesia have con-
cluded negotiations for a treaty
of friendship and the treaty will

American supply officer, who was
in Korea earlier this month. He
said that the United States Army
food experts had produced a spe-
cial kind of bread for the Turks,

It was heavy bread end con-
tained wheat flours and olive
oil,—Reuter,

attitudes

Bevin Improves

LONDON, Jan, 27.
The British Foreign Minister,
Ernest Bevin, ill with pneumonia,
had another “restless night,” his
personal doctor Sir Alexander

McCall, said this morning.

Bevin was yesterday stated to
have shown slight improvement,
A Foreign Office spokesman said
later to-day that Bevin “continues
to improve and is slightly better.”
—Reuter,





PRINTERS REFUSE TO
JOIN IN. BOYCOTT.

BUENOS AIRES, Jan, 27,
In an eleventh hour effort to
prevent La Prensa being distribu-
ted for the second day running,
boycotters last night picketed
the printers as they attempted to



unsuitable as the Spanish repre-
sentative in Britain.



—Reuter








Don’t Miss RUSSIA’S
NEW EMPIRE. Begins
TUESDAY. Order your
copy early.





come into force shortly, it was
learned here to-day. ,
1 a Under the treaty which con-
MACARTHL R TALKS ON firms a recent trade agreement,
JAPAN WITH DULLES | trade agents will be ane
. ‘ and ) : tries are pledgec
TOKYO,, Jan, 27 nd both countri are re
John Foster Dulles, President to eater — Bhan. = eiduateis)
Truman's special envoy, charged and agricultura apes iret P
| with sounding out Japanese views ——meuter.
on a Peace Treaty, had a two-hour cumemseneneenianenes
talk with General MacArthur to- ;
cay DI |
He is reported to have “found Al STAL N
himself in complete agreement NEW YORK,
ith the Supreme Commander on Three College students tried t I
#ll issues of the Japanese Peace telephone Stalin recently, They,
Treaty.’ wanted to ask him whether the
KE I ij i ) tec it once or if
i 4 —Reuter —LE.S

‘

below, seriously injuring himself | ceasefire
—and his wife. who happened to| negotiations,
be passing at that moment,

before beginning any

A new factor intreduced-into the





—LES discussions here, was the apparent
" - \Jull in the fighting in Korea which
ithe — Indian delegates thought
might be “significant.”
TELL don fag They emphasised that the
RING 3113 | Peking Government while not

formally acceding to a cefi$efire
might be trying to give the im«
@ On page 10.

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PAGE TWO



JANETTA DRESS SHOP

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Phone 2684

READY MADE DRESSES of all types
WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Local Handicraft
EVENING MITTENS—in Pastel Shades and Biack

READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty’s of London.













445 & 8.30 p.m
The Comedy

TODAY and Continuing Daily
KAYE-O from Warner Bros

Danny kAYEin “The Inspector General”

Color by eet
Also; The Color Carton: “KIT FO Cc
And Latest Wostt D NEWS (By WARNER- PATHE NEWS)

MATINEE THURS. | My



1.30 p.m MAT: PRIDAY 4.45 PM.

“THE Gt , “BELOW THE DEADLINE
i ee, ee with Warren Douglas and
DYNAMITE CANYON” “LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT”











, th Tor ‘eene * >
HOURS: Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30 el ee ne
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30
2 a Teena PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)
RCS OD POS SOO F FOTO OOO FOO OOS PESOS CS CSCC COCO COPTO S Last 2 Shows TODAY 6 & 8.30 p.m. (RKO Radio}
SPEIGH 1 sto WwW N % Samuel Gelwyn's & George O'BRIEN in
. ~ “ROSEANNA MeCOY” “MARSHAL OF MESA CITY”
p » Farley GR R — Joan EVANS
PLACE T H E A T R E_ TIME 8.30 ~ ; ; eiceeas
2 MONDAY and TUESDAY 6 & 6.30 p.m. (RKO Double)
Last show Tonight S Monday and Tuesd + George O'Brien (in both)
(1) — “UNDER NEVADA SKIES T Q) “CALL OF THE YUKON “ BORDER G-MAN” & “PAINTED DESERT ”
Starr ROY ROGERS 2 RAZIL
+ i esate me ee % MIDNITE SAT. FEBRUARY 3rd (2, Featu
= . oO M al o “DEATH VALLEY RANGERS” “DYNAMITE CANYON’ .
@) “RENEGADES of SONORA” ae ae , = =<
R This Republic double is ful 2
Alien “Rocky” LAYNE etertainment 3
4
ISSSSSSES POSSE OOOO OOOO OOOO





AQUATIC cLUn CENEMA (MenbersOrly) |
TONIGHT at 8.30
Cecil B. De MILLE’S
Mighty Spectacle “CLEOPATRA”

Starring:

Claudette COLBERT Warren WILLIAM Henry WILCOXON

and a Cast of Thousands
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE

MONDAY and TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30

MATINEE: TUESDAY at 5 p.m

Paramount presents:

Starring: Phyllis CALVERT

a

EMPIRE

Today 445 & 8.45 p.m.

“MY OWN TRUE LOVE”

— Melvyn DOUGLAS

GATETWY—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TODAY 5 &

&

Last 2 Shows 8.30 p.m. (Warner's Double)

“ UNDER CAFRICORN 7
Ingrid BERGM
Joseph COTTON.

GUNS OF THE PECOS”
Dick FORAN (The Singing

Cowboy)

aa
—



MONDAY & TUESDAY 8.30 p.m, (Warner's Double)
“AMAZING DR. CLITTERHOUSE” & “GEO, WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE”
*. G. Robinson, Hun Bogart Jack Benny



phrey





(Only) ]
Bi

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

———aan9D9@D@nDn9D@DD9D9@B93Hoo————————_—___—XX_—_S +
| PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

RIGADIER ERIC, MOUNT, a
representative of Colonial
Development Corporation, whose
headquarters is in Trinidad, wag
‘an intransit passenger through
3arbados yesterday from St, Lucia
Trinidad. Brigadier Mount was
in Barbados for a few days last
week.

H\¢: D. and W. Movements







EMPIRE THEATRE



ROYAL

Today—Last Two

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30

Shows

4.30 & 830 p.m,

Monday to Thursday

4.45

20th Cen

& 8.30 p.m,

tury

Fox Presents
“PLL GET
BY 9°

Color by Technicolor

Starring June HAVER

William LUNDIGAN
With Gloria De HAVEN

and Dennis DAY



ROXY

Today to Tuesday
4.30 & 815 p.m.

Columbia Double Attraction

Robert Louis Stevenson's
Adventure

“THE SECRET
OF
ST. IVE:

With Richard NEY,
Vanessa BROWN
and Henry, DANIELL

Johnny WEISSMULLER

as Jungle Jim in...

“CAPTIVE
GIRL ”

with Buster CRABBE
and Anita LHOEST



Beauty and Reliability (Combined







And



M-G-M Smashing Double
Bud ABBOT

and Continuing to Thursday

and

Lou COSTELLO in...

“LOST IN A
HARE:
AND

** TARZAN
AND THE
APE MAN”

Starring

Johnny WEISSMULLER
and Maureen O’SULLAVAN

Monday & Tuesday
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.

“Killer Me Coy”

*RMose Marie”

OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows Today
445 & 8.30 p.m.

FIRST INSTALMENT

Universal Serial...



MATINEE & NIGHT SHOWS DAILY,

William

- LUNDIGAN

June

Ed
Cat

¢ pCHNIC *OLOR



ACT QUICKLY !!
THEY'RE
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A Small Shipment of

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Monday & ‘Tuesday

4.45 & 8.15 p.m.

AND





“TIME MARCHES ON™
TEMCO® KEEPS

BUT
GO00nD TIME

ON
THE

FINAL INSTALMENT |
Universal Serial . . , |

John Mack BROWN
and George SHELLEY in

“WILD WEST
DAYS”

with Lynn GILBERT
and Frank YAGONELLI

THAT'S THE
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AGRICULTURAL FORKS
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AFTER

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Announcing Our - « +

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STOCK-TAKING
MONDAY, 29TH JANUARY

Many CLEARANCE BARGAINS

in every Department.



ISS DORA IBBERSON, Social

Welfare Adviser to C.D. and
W., who was in Trinidad on a
short visit, returned yesterday
morning by B.W.1 rae,

oo ing by the same ’plane was
Mr. A. de K. Frampton, Agricul-
tural haan to C.D. and W.

Mr. James Nicol, Educational
Adviser to C.D. and W., left for
Grenada yesterday by B.W.I.A.

Canadian Breweries

| R. AND MRS. C. O. DALTON

of Tcronto, after spending

three days in Trinidad, arrived

here yesterday to spend two weeks

at the Windsor Hotel. Mr, Dalton

is with Canadian Breweries in
Toronto.

Manvfacturers Agent

M* AND MRS. C, B. STEV-
ENSON came in on the
'T.C.A. flight yesterday morning to
ao three weeks in Barbados.

hey are staying at the Windsor
Hotel. This their first visit
meee

15

Stevenson is a Manufactur-

rs’ aenet and proprietor of Stev-

pe Millinery Agency in
Toronto,

Arrivals From Toronto

R. G. E. SCUDAMORE, a

Produce Broker of Toronto,
accompanied by his wife, arrived
by T.C.A. yesterday morning to
spend three weeks at the Marine
Hotel,

Also from Toronto arriving yes-
terday were Mr. and Mrs. Emer-

on EB. Summers. They were ac-
companied by Miss Ann Walters.
They are here for one month,
staying at the Marine Hotel.

Mr. Summers is owner of Emer-
son E. Summers Company Lim-
ited, Importers and Manufacturers
in Toronto.

Advertising and the
Y.W.C. A.

ARIB had an interesting chat
yesterday with Mr. and

Mrs. Frederick J, Ross while they
were at Seawell. Mr. and Mrs.
Ross came on the T.C.A. flight

from Canada,

Here for about three months
they are staying at Edgewater
Hotel, Bathsheba, Mr. Ross now
retired was one time Chairman of
Fuller and Smith and Ross, an
advertising organisation in New
York

Mrs. Ross is a member of the
National Board of the Y.W.C.A,

Chairman in Canada of Mrs, Win-
ston Churchill's Fund for British

Service Women, This branch was

asked to raise $100,000 dollars.
Mrs, Ross told Carib that they
raised over $140,000 before the

Fund was closed,

Their home is in Toronto, where
Mr. Ross was born. Before com-
ing to Barbados they spent a few
days in Bermuda,

Here Last Year

R. AND MRS. W, C. WELLS
who were here last year
arrived yesterday morning by
T.C.A. to spend a holiday in
Barbados, Mr. Wells is_ the
founder of Wells Construction

Co., Ltd., General Contractors,
Their home is in Victoria, Brit-
ish Colombia, They have two
sons who are both in the business.

Short Visit
M*: BASIL WEATHERHEAD,
Representative of Messrs.
J. W. Potter & Co., Ltd., left for
Grenada yesterday by B.W.I.A.
He will be away for one week,



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SUNDAY,

Carb Calling

Same ’Plane

RS. K. E, DOWD and her

daughter Barbara arrived

from Montreal yesterday by

T.C.A. to spend three weeks at
the Hastings Hotel.

Arriving on the same plane

were Mrs, Maude Macdonald and
Mrs. Christie McLeod who are also
down for three weeks. They are
from Toronto and are staying at
the Marine Hotel,

Supreme Powers

R. EDWARD J. MACKER-
ETH, President and Gen-
eral Manager of Supreme Powers
Suppliés Ltd., in Toronto, accom-
panied by Mrs, Mackereth arrived
from Canada yesterday morning
to spend a week in Barbados,
staying at the Marine Hotel.

Back From St. Lucia
R. PETER POTTER who was

on holiday in St. Lucia,
Staying with his parents Mr, and
Mrs. Freddie Futter, returned

yesterday by B.W.I.A.
with Barclays Bank

Peter is
here,
Bedspread Buys A
Typewriter

ROCEEDS from the raffle of a
patchwork bedspread which

was made by the children of the
Haynes Memorial School, will
purchase a second-hand typewriter
which will be used to teach the
children to type. The bedspread
was won by Mrs, E. C. Haynes.

Intransit

ISS THEODORA LOUREN-
CO who arrived from Can-

ada last Saturday by T.C.A. to
see her mother who is at present
in Barbados, left for Trinidad in
the middle of last week. Yester-
day morning she was an intransit
passenger through Barbados by
T.C.A, returning to Canada. Her
sisters Molly and Mrs. Franco
were at Seawell to meet her dur-
ing the short time the plane was

in,
‘ix Weeks

S. H. R. BAIN accompanied

by Miss Ella Rogers, arrived
from Canada yesterday by T.C.A.,
to spend six weeks’ holiday in
Barbados, staying with Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Van den Bergh at
“Beach House,” Glitter Bay, St.
James,

Mrs, Bain’s husband is President
of National Life Insurance Com-
pany and President of Bain, New-
ling and Company, in Toronto and
gees in for breeding horses in a
big way. He is the only Canadian
to send a Canadian bred horse to
England to take part in the Grand
National. That was in 1938. He
may come down to Barbadcs on a

Here for

short visit while his wife is here,
of Canada and during the war 7

of view.

% TONITE 8.30

Bud ABBOTT and

Extra:

PSOE OV SOOO

a INFANT’S

e SHOES
by
Clark

mw RED, oni TAN

from

i ee



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GLOBE.

** THE FOREIGN LEGION ”
BRITISH NEWSREEL

SEESOSES



1951

JANUARY 28,

PEGGY JOHNSON chatting with her Dad visits the Polo Club for

the first time.
school in England,

Attended Trinidad Meeting
EV. ERNEST GRIFFIN Supt.

of the Methodist Church who
was in Trinidad for a few days
attending the Inter-District Sta-
tioning Committee of the Method-
ist Church, returned from Trinidad
yesterday morning by B.W.I.A.

Grenada Holiday
R. & MRS. GEORGE SHARP
were among the passengers

who left for Grenada yesterday

by B.W.I.A. They will be away

for one week.

Passenger Supt. B.W.IA.
RAY LEGGE, Passenger

M* Supt. of B.W.1.A, stationed
in Trinidad arrived on B.W.1.A.’s
morning flight from Trinidad yes-
terday. He is staying at the Ocean
View Hotel. Mr. Legge returns
to Trinidad tomorrow,



LITTLE JULIE ‘MICHELIN, a keen Polo fan, feels that smaller
Polo hats and shorter sticks should be made if she is to join the
ladies’ team, Her brother Andrew happily agrees with this point

POF

to TUESDAY
Lou COSTELLO in:

Â¥,
POMEL SSS

SOOSOO



Peggy arrived by the “Colombie” after two years

Busy Visit

R. NORMAN MANLEY, who

arrived in London on the 213t
January will have other tasks tw
perform apart from pleading in
the Privy Council. The League of
Coloured Peoples are arranging
a reception for him at the Chel-
sea Centre of the West African
Students’ Union, on February 1st
But members of the West Indian
Students’ Union here feel that
Manley’s special job is to present
the West Indies to London A
number of public meetings in
London are being arranged by
WISU at which Mr, Manley will
talk about the political, economic
and social problems~of the West
InGies.

Pilot and Navigator

R. VERNON MARQUEZ and
Mr. Douglas Moore arrived
at Seawell at 9 a.m. yesterday in
one of the Trinidad Light Aero-
plane Club's Auster aircraft, VP-
TAR. They left Trinidad at 9
a.m. on Friday for Grenada. Leav-
ing Grenada for Barbados they
encountered rain and bad visi-
bility. They changed course for
St. Lucia, Poor visibility ground-
ed them there overnight, They
left St. Lucia at 7.30 a.m. yester-
cay for Barbados. Weather was
again hazy. They were just about
to return to St. Lucia when they
sighted the northwest coast of
Barbados at about 8.40 a.m, Mr.
Moore is the pilot and Dr. Mar-
avez the navigator. These two
were in Barbados in November,
when they flew up in the same
aireraft they arrived in yesterday.
Dr. Vernon Marquez told Carib
that funds from the Light Aero-
plane Club’s raffle now being sold
jn Trinidad will help promote a
gigantie air rally which, he hopes
will come off sometime this year.
Aircraft Clubs from all parts ot
the world will be invited to attend
to take part.

They were met at Seawell by
Mr. Charlies Allmon, the American
photographer who is in Barbados
taking pictures for the National
Geographic Magazine and the
Barbados Publicity Committee.
Shorily after they arrived Mr,
Moore who met Mr. Allmon las
year in Trinidad took Mr, Allmon
up for a fly.

The aircraft was seen flying
over Barbados again yesterday
afternoon, and is expected to go
up this morning for another
flight .

The Auster is due to return to
Trinidad via St. Vincent early
this afternoon.

Holidaying With Relatives

M's HONOR INCE who spent
several weeks in Barbados
holidaying with relatives return-

ed to ‘on yesterday morning
by T.C.A,

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cept Sundays

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 23,



1951

JUDY GARLAND'S STORY

This is Judy Garland’s own,
personal story of her life, from
her exciting but not entirely
happy childhood days through
her eventful career in Hollywood,
including the tragic moment when
she decided she no longer wanted
to live.

Miilions of movie fans have
wondered about the enigma of
Judy Garland—and the 28-year-
aid star’s recent emotional up-
heavals that resulted in a final
break with her studio and a
crisis in her spectacular career.

Why did Judy attempt suicide?
What emotional strains and psy-

chological conflicts upset her du- |

ring her struggle ta emerge from
juvenile stardom and her ardent
desire to grow up and be taken
seriously as an adult?

Now, for the first time, Judy
has told her full, frank and human
story. It begins herewith in the
first of six articles condensed
from the current issue of Cosmo-
politan Magazine. Start Judy's
gripping, intimate story now and
continue it daily in the Advocate.

By JUDY GARLAND

As told to MICHAEL DRURY
(Distributed by International News
Service, permission of Cosmopolitan
Magazine).

All my life I have tried to do
whatever was expected of me, and
now sometimes I think that isn’t
very smart. Sooner or later some-
thing inside of you kicks.

It has taken me a long time to
find that out, because I am a
bern trouper. My father used to
say, “it won't make any difference
what Judy does for a living, she’ll
tear the house down getting there,”
and he Was right. I would have
trouped in a shoe factory,

As it happened, T got into a
business where trouping counts.
One snowy Christmas eve before
I’ was three years old, I began
singing and dancing on the stage
in a little town in Minnesota. I
poured my heart into five Straight
choruses of “Jingle Bells,” and I
would have kept it up all night if
dad hadn't carried me off, kick-
ing and yelling like an Indian,

I don’t know whether I actual-
ly remember that or whether I’ve
heard people talk about it so much
that it seems as if L remember,
but I do know this: I took one
look at all those people, laugh-
ing and applauding, and I fee}
hopelessly in love with audiences
After twenty-five years, I stil}
love them, and it has been a
serious romance.

I wanted it that way. My mother
is a strong-minded woman, but
she was never a “Stage Mamma.”
During those vaudeville years, my
sisters and I while standing in
countless wings waiting for our
cues, used to hear other mothers
threatening their children, saying
things like, “you go on out there
or Ill break your head,” and it
made us kind of sick. Nobody



JUDY GARLAND
talked to me like that or

ever
forced’ me in any way. I drove
myseltf—but it was my own doing.

Why I felt compelled to do it,
I don’t entirely know, It wasn’t
to forget my trouples—I’ve never
been able to lose myself complete-
ly in my work the way some peo-
ple can—but so much of the time
acting was the only reliable thing
I knew, the only place where I
felt like a useful person, where
people said, “fine, you did a good
job. Come again,’ and every-
body needs to hear those things.

When I was about fifteen, i
went back to see Grand Rapids,
Minnesota, where I was born. I
found a gracious little town, full
of trees and porches and people
who know how to live in simple
goodness,

I think I would have liked to
grow up there, carrying my
schoolbooks in a strap and having
a crush on the milkman’s son,

My father, Frank Gumm, was a
wonderful man with a fiery tem-
per, a great sense of humour, and
an untrained but beautiful voice,
He met, my mother, Ethel Milne,
when he was singing in a Wiscon-
sin theatre where she was the
pianist.

They toured Vaudeville togeth-
er as “Jack and Virginia Lee,
sweet southern singers,” until
their first baby was coming, and
then dad bought the movie the-
atre in Grand Rapids, and they
settled down in a two-storey white
frame house with a garden behind
it,

By the time I came along, Suzy
was seven and Jinny was five.
My parents were hoping for a

@ at end of col. 3

COOKERY CORNER

When buying fish remember
that size is not everything, me-
dium-sized fish generally have the
finést flaveur. Do not be afraid of
trying the less usual types of fish
and you will enjoy the slightly
different flavour and texture, they
can be used to make unusual and
attractive dishes.

_The Chinese have many very
tasty fish dishes, two of which I

m7. going to give you
this week —- the fish
héad soup and steamed

sh, Chinese s t y le.

hese two dishes have
no strong flavour and
are therefore more ac-
ceptable to the West-
ern palate,

Fish Head Soup

Several small fish
heads,

A few drops of
sherry.

1 02, of oil.

A few drops of vinegar.

d-lb. of grated yams.

A few spring onions.

A few pieces of fresh or dried
ginger.

Method: Wash the fish heads,
remove the gills and add a few
drops of sherry; put in two quarts
of cold water with the ginger, a
few spring onions and an oz.



of oil.

Simmer for one hour, then add
a few drops of vinegar and a
quarter pound of grated yam. Boil
for another ten minutes until the
yams are tender and the soup be-
comes a creamy colour. It is then
ready for serving. u

Steamed Fish

1 Ib of small filleted fish,

1 oz. of onion.

4 lb. of tinned mush
rooms,

A drop of vinegar.

1 tablespoonful of
diluted Bovril.

1 oz. of fat.

Method: Cutthe
mushrooms and
onions into slices

and mix in the Bovril.
Wash the fish and place
it in a basin with the
white side up. Cover
it with the other in-
gredients, put the con-
tents of the basin in a
steamer and steam for 15 min-
utes. Season with a drop of vine-
gar, pepper and salt before serv-

Gian”

For Amateurs

The Garden In
January
Gladiolus — Week 4

AN article on Gladiolus has al-
ready appeared in this paper, but,
as January is the month when
Gladiolus Bulbs generally come to
the island, perhaps a_ refresher
may be of interest to some garden-
ers.

As soon as the Bulbs arrive, in
January or February they should
be planted in an open oer posi-
ticn at onec.

Preparation of The Bed

To prepare the bed, fork it deep-
ly, turning in some well rotted pen
manure. Gladioli like a rich bed,
but, they dislike fresh anima)
manure. If the soil is at all heavy
or cloggy, mix in a good supply of
fine charcoal to lighten it up.

Plant the Bulbs about three
inches deep in the ground, and
about eight inches apart, pressing
them >in very firmly.

As soon as they spring, showing
a few leaves, give them an appli-
cation of manure, and, the useful
G. V. M. (garden vegetable man-
ure) will do for this.

Keep the plants well watered at
all times.

When the plants have reached
full growth, periodic applications
of manure will give good results,
One of our Garden Books, advises
a weak solution of liquid Sheep
Manure for this, but G. V. M. will
answer just as well.

To ensure straight well shaped
flower spikes, neat staking of the
plants is advised. In putting in the
stakes, however, great care must
be exercised to see that the Bulbs
are not pierced and injured.

Bulbs planted in January should
be flowering by April.

After the flowering period, the
foliage of the Gladiolus dies
down, and it is then that the

Bulbs should be taken up, and
stored in loose dry earth until the
following January, when they can
be re-planted,

This is the recognised treatment,
but one successful grower of Glad-
iolus always leaves her Bulbs in
the ground, and up they come
the following January at the ap-
pointed time.

Other gardeners may like to try
out this method for themselves.

Gladiolus stock may be increas-
cd by planting the small Corms
which generally form around the
mother Bulb. But these Corms
take many years to mature and,
with the imported Bulbs so reas-
enably priced, and so easy to get,
this is hardly worth the trouble.

To ensure a longer supply of
Gladiolus flowers, it is a good plan
io plant the Bulbs in batches,
spacing them a week or two apart,
so making sure of a continuous
supply of flowers, over a longer
period.

Pick the flower-spikes for the
house when the first two blooms
have opened, they will last well,
with the blooms opening gradu-
ally all up the stalk.

Have you a gardening question
you would like answered or any
garden information of interest to
other gardeners you could pass
on?

Have you a surplus of seeds oF
cuttings to exchange?

Please write to “Gardener”
c/o The Advocate and watch this
column,





-~

boy, and I understand they tried
to wield a little prenatal influence
by referring to me as Frank, but
I don’t think they were deeply
disappointed when they had to
revise it slightly to Frances.

Contrary te what some people
seem to think, I wasn’t a tomboy.
I had great vitality, but I never
took it out in athletics, and to
this day I hate exercise of that
kind, I play tennis a little, but
that’s all, and we don’t own a
swimming pool.

(TUESDAY:—Judy’s start as 4
singer; why she gets “the rocky
feeling.”)

-
|
|

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Here is a range of beauty products used by lovely society women every-

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Simple and inexpensive, they are all you need to keep you looking
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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

(ardening Hlints At The Cinema

The

Inspector General

GR,

BASED on Nikolai Gogol’s,

far
THE INSPECTOR GENERAL,
is an excellent «vehicle for the inimitable

Bridgetown,

ce, satirizing bureaucracy,
showing at the Plaza}

talents of Danny Kaye. Probably the best young comedian

in the entertainment world
scope for his abilities.

Among othér things, he dances,
wrestles, produces amazing facial
calisthenics, gets mixed up with a
group of tumblers, and signs—
with three Danny Kaye faces—a
quartet with himself, one of the
cleverest bits of entertainment I
have seen. All of this is perform-
ed at a speed that leaves you
gasping. This probably explains
the lulls which oecur in the pic-
ture when Mr. Kaye is either not
present, or not so _ noticeably
active. These same lulls _ also
emphasize the extraordinary abil-
ity of Mr. Kaye when he gets
hold of a really funny situation,

The setting of the film is the
mythical town of Brodney in the
French Empire, during the Napols
eonic era, As a_ disembodied
head, Danny Kaye is part of the
show, as well as the idiot assistant,
of an itinerant medicine man.
Parting company with his erst-
while employer, he is mistaken
for the Inspector General, who is
fearfully awaited by corrupt pub-
lic officials, and who travels under
a wide variety of disguises, to un-
cover corruption in the Empire.
For a time, his masquerade is
successful, until the medicine man
arrives on the scene, followed by
the real Inspector, who promptly
signs a death warrant for the im-
poster. Nothing daunted, as he
cannot read or write, Mr. Kaye
destroys the document and pro-
ceeds to inform the mayor and
council, who are the worst offen-
ders, of the corruption in their
town. As you can guess, every-
thing turns out for the best and
there is a victorious ending for
nearly everybody concerned, but
not without one or two close
shaves for Mr. Kaye.

The supporting cast includes
Gene Lockhart and Alan Hale as
officials of Brodney, both of whom
are comically pompous and Elsa
Lanchester, as the mayor's wife,
who falls in love with Mr. Kaye,
hoping he will take her to Paris
and Budapest, Miss Lanchester's
characterizations are always mem-
orable, and her téte-a-téte with
the “inspector”, which ends with
her petticoats over. her head, is
delightful. Walter Slezak, as the
medicine-show man is excellent
and Barbara Bates, the little
kitchen maid, who tries to save
the “inspector's” life is most at-
tractive in a small part.

One of the features of the musi-
cal seore is the clever burlesque
of gypsy tunes which accompany
Mr. Kaye during a notable eating
seene and later when he sings,
plays a violin (with whieh » he





BUY ANY TICKETS
FA. DRAW, GEORGE 3



today, Mr. Kaye is given full

gets thoroughly entangled) and,
unknowingiy, sets fire to his hair.

The direction is good, the set-
tings, enhanced by Technicolor,
are outstanding, and though the |{
film slows down in certain spots,
it is good entertainment, featur-
ing satire, farce and slapstick cor-
edy with cne of the finest present
day comedians.

I'LL GET BY

I'LL GET BY, a pleasant musi-
eal comedy in Technicolor, is
playing at the Empire Theatre.
Starring June Haver, William
Lundigan and Gloria @e Haven,
With guest appearances by Jeanne
Crain, Victor Mature, Dan Dailey
and Harry James, it is the story
of two unsuccessful song writers,
who start a small publishing busi-
ness in order to bring their own
songs before the public. Down
tea their last dime, they enlist the
aid of a professional sister-team,
through which they not only find
success, but romance as well, All
this takes place during the years;
1931—1944, and the film is studded
with song hits of those years, For
those of you who are lovers of
popular music well played, Harry
James and his orchestra are heard
in several numbers, and there’s
no denying the fact that it is one
of the finest dance bands you
can hear and trumpeter James is
second to none,

June Haver and Gloria de
Haven are a charming contrast to
each other as the sister-team, and
their dancing and singing are
pleasing and enjoyable. Dennig
Day, of radio fame, and Thelma
Ritter supply the touches of light
comedy, while William Lundigan
looks after the more serious busi-
ness of love-making. Attractive
duets and solos, plus a surprise
cance routine by June Haver and
Dan Dailey round out this film
The settingS ‘are attractive and
vou will probably remember most
of the tunes,

THE FOREIGN LEGION

Bud Abbott and Lou Costello
are playing at the Globe Theatre
IN THE FOREIGN LEGION. In
this film, America’s comedy kings,
as they are called, have themselves
a tind time,

Starting out as wrestling pro-
moters, they find themselves in
Algiers in hot pursuit of an erst-
while champion. Running foul
of one of the local Sheikhs, they
are duped into joining the Legion

and from that point on—anything | >

goes. Amongst their escapades is
the purchase of six beautiful slave
girls in a market, without know.-
ing they had bid for them; getting
themselves well and truly lost in
the desert, which produces the
most amazing mirages; being
captured by the Sheikh, and turn—
ing his camp into an uproar and
finally blowing up a Legion fort.
Patricia Medina, a newcomer, is
one of the group of slave girls
that supply the necessary feminine
appeal, but I don’t think she was
entirely at ease with our heroes’
zany type of slapstick,

IT realize that Abbott and
Costello are supposed to be side-
splittingly funny — but so far, my
sides have remained intact and
there’s probably something wrong
with my sense of humour. Any-
way, if you are one of their
millions of fans, you won't want to
miss this film, which is their first
in a year.



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PAGE THREE





MEWS UAPROVED
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DO YOU KNOW
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SURELY one of the most

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Trinidad’s Carnival, and it
is even bigger and better
To go there



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Carnival for 1961 in Trini-
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should
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PAGE FOUR

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



JOHN GODDARD IS

TALENT SCOUT
Kensington Wickets Are Graveyards

BY O. S. COPPIN

I find myself in the unaccustomed position this
week of having to offer congratulations to the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control for their decision
to send John Goddard, West Indies Cricket Captain
in India and England to St. Lucia as an observer
at a series of Tests between the Windward and Lee-

A
V Yee ward Islands, , : ;
bed Skipper Goddard, I am informed on reliable au-

ity. is commissioned te look for cricket talent in the person of any
Sehatial West Indies player and if one is discovered he will be asked
to take part in some sort of Trial games, preferably here.

This is a sound decision on the part of the Board and for the
benefit of those Barbadians who still call these islands by the in-
triguing name of “down-along”, I must recall that Mr. C. A, Ollivierre
and R. C. Ollivierre who represented the West Indies in England, both
hailed from St. Vincent. ;

‘As amatter of fact C. A. Olliverre also qualified
for Derbyshire

'
WEEKES MIGHT HAVE HELPED :
PYAHE Empire team is at present playing in Grenada and it would
have been in the interests of West Indies Cricket if the Board
had briefed Everton Weekes, a member of the Empire touring team,
to perform a similar duty. There could scarcely be any question that
he is as qualified as John Goddard is, to assess the possibilities of any
promising bowler.
And now, back to the
been completed and it is time t

3!

and turned out

home scene. The Second Trial game has
hat we took a look at the possible
team that should represent Barbados against Trinidad next month.

I must say at the outset that I think the selectors are faced with
a most difficult task. There are only a few players whose claims
to inclusion are undeniable but there is a wealth of mediocre players
{rom whom they will be forced to choose.

Their only ‘salvation will lie in the course that they must not
only do justice to the candidates for inclusion but ensure that when
they have selected the team that justice will appear to have been

done.
UNFRIENDLY WICKETS ; 5
ERSONALLY I think that the wickets prepared during the Trial
games at Kensington have been the most unfriendly ones on
which bowlers could hope to bowl.
NOTORIOUS :
ENSINGTON is already notorious for its easy wickets but no
effort seems to have been made to get any life into it. The trials
up to the present have been in favour of batsmen all the time and
naturally some flattering scores have been returned. I would pay any -
thing to see some of the batsmen who have returned good scores, do
so on a fiery Bank Hall wicket or a Wanderers wicket that I used
to know up to four or five years ago.
They might probably make more r
fight for them and earn them against
nance to get them out. .
- With the exception of “Brickie’ Lucas and Keith Walcott the
fielding has been a long way below what we associate with Intercolo-
nial standards, There have been occasionally bright spots of fielding
but a good general standard has not obtained throughout the games.
Certain prejudices and certain fantastic yardsticks are brought
jnto play whenever a Barbados team is selected. We who live in these
Gays are even better off since it is not now being selected by telephone.

THE “ALLAMBYS” HELP ;

SELECTION COMMITTEE is supposed to sit to all intents and
A purposes but it is a strange coincidence that those with the
backing of the “Allambys” stand a better chance of getting in than
anyone else. ,

I am giving my impressions of those whom I think should repre-
sent the colony and if I am wrong I want to warn my readers that
i am picking my probables purely on merit and am not being guided
ry any extraneous prejudices. ee

In the first place I think that the selectors should make up their
minds whether or no they are going to select Hunte to open the innings
with Roy Marshall or whether they are going to choose Charlie Taylor
for the job. ?

These players have been before their eyes this season, Charlie
Taylor the more so, because he is a Barbados Cricket Association
player, Hunte has also had his showing.

NO COMPROMISE

CANNOT AGREE with any compromise to_select;Taylor to open

with Marshall and send Hunte lower in the batting order.

Although it would be an awkward way of handling the matter
‘yet I think that they would do better to play one of these in each
match if they are undecided as to who should accompany Roy Mar-
shall to the middle to open the innings,

Eric Atkinson I would play as one of the opening bowlers. He
is quicker off the pitch in the opening overs than any of the other
pace bowling candidates and he is an infinitely better batsman than
any of them.

The other place for a pace bowler would seem to rest between
Bradshaw and Mullins. Bradshaw cannot complain for having been
afforded the most generous chance to qualify but I cannot truthfully
say that Mullins has received equally indulgent treatment.

THE ONLY FAST BOWLER ;

WILL stand or fall by my stated opinion that Carl Mullins 1s

the only real pace bowling candidate in Barbados today, I have

already written that Atkinson gets more pace off the pitch in the
early overs but Mullins is the only pace bowler who is fast for AN
ENTIRE DAY.
; Denis Atkinson I would select at once. He has not been suc-
cessful in the trials but he has given the best all round performance
this season with bat and ball for Wanderers the champions in the
First Division competition.

He has had International experience as a member of the West
Indies team in India. He is young, energetic and really keen. We
twould be really rich in talent if we could afford to ignore these
qualities in selecting a Barbados team today.

Norman Marshall has carved a place for himself as the most ac~
curate medium fast bowling machine we have produced in years,

RELIEVE WALCOTT
I WOULD certainly relieve Clyde Walcott from the strain of wicket
keeping especially in view of the fact that he might not be called
upon to perform this role on the Australian tour and also in view of
the fact that he might not always be available to Barbados in the
Intercolonial commitments and so one should be trained.
Gerald Wood is in a section without competition and he picks him-
self if the selectors are at all mindful of the above facts, F
Roy Marshall, Everton Weekes and Clyde Walcott are the batting
certainties. Errol Millington has picked himself and so my twelve
would be — Goddard (Capt.), Hunte or Taylor, Roy Marshall, Weekes,
Walcott, Eric Atkinson, Denis Atkinson, Norman Marshall, Gerald
Wood, Errol Miilington, Carl Mullins, Hoad, Branker, or Bowen, if they
reach Intercolonial standard by next match or else dispense With a
slow spinner altogether, rely upon the fast and medium bowling and
play Keith Walcott as a forceful batsman and excellent field.

uns but they would have to
bowlers who at least had a








C. Walcott Scores Fine Century :

Hits 128 As Second
Trial Game Ends

C. WALCOTT’S XL... 177& for 6 wkts.) 252
J. GODDARD'S XI . 258.

CLYDE WALCOTT, West Indian Test bat and wicket-
keeper, scored 128 runs not out in the second innings for
his XI_yesterday, the last day in the second cricket trial
match,

Going in at number five he hit-———
18 fours in his 128 and batted in
his usual attractive style and only
gave one chance when he was 33
off Mullins,



M.C.C. All Out
For 211

ADELAIDE, Jan. 27.

Marylebone Cricket Club tour-
ists to-day scored 211 all out on
the first day of their four days re-
turn match here against South
Australia.
_ Throughout the day good field-
ing reduced scoring opportunities
and Dave Sheppard was top-
scorer with 33.

Jeff Noblet with five wickets for
56 had the best bowling figures
It was slow scoring forced on the
batsmen to a large degree by the
fceuracy of the attack plus the in-

In the bowling department the
spinners proved to be the most
successful. E. Hoaq intercolonial
player of Pickwick bowled well to
capture three wickets for 34, Mil-
lington, Marshall and Branker got
one each,

Carl Mullins the Police pacer
bowled steadily in the early part
of the play.

Clyde Walcott’s XI at the end
of play yesterday had scored 252
runs in their second innings for
the loss of six wickets. In their

first innings they scored 177 to tense heat ¢ ; ;

ag : . y s at and flies “
which John Goddard’s XI re- times worried the Meat car
plied with 258. we

When the sides met in October
the M.C.C. won to register their
only success against a state team

so far on the tour,
Seores:—

Play

When play was resumed yester-
day C, Atkins and C, Smith open-

ed the second innings for Clyde M.C.C. FIRST INNINGS

Hutton

A . . as . b, Noblet..... 5 18
Walcott’s XI on a wickat that waS Washbrook c. Michael b, Noblet.. 32
taking turn. The first ball was Sheppard c. Noblet b. Wilson "3
bowled by Mullins to Atkins. Simpson c. Michael, b, McLean 25
: t Me Intyre b, Wilson - 0
Atkins watched the ball go through Brown c, Michael b, Nobiet 2
to Wood and took qa single in the Ciges l.b.w. b. McLean . 4
. oe " attersall b. Noblet . l4
fourth ball. Mullins first over wright b. Wilson... 29
conceded one run. Statham c. Duldig b. Noblet 18
é ‘ ; Hollies not out . ‘ 5
Williams bowling with three Extras 110 legbyes, 1 noball, 1 wide) 12
slips and deep fine leg bowled the P
second over of the day. He sent mae
down his first ball of the over to Fall of wickets: 1—21; 2—72; 3—108
Atkins who hit a brace. a 5—120; 6—132; 7—145; 8—165
In Mullins’ fourth ball of the °~** BOWLING
third over Atkins had a narrow oO M R W
escape when he glided one high Noblet .......--...++ Ree
. : : Bowley Oa a
and Marshall at fine leg tried to sinart 5 1 13 «(OO
make a catch, FUGA =p Sones 4 2 6 0
WENO | das ubces sees 20 8 29 3
Smith hit his first four of the McLean ..... 4678, OR" 8

day off Williams. This was the
first ball of Williams’ third over.
Both batsmen were now getting
well over the ball.

Mullins fourth over conceded 11
runs, After Mullins fourth over
Millington was brought on to bowl
to Smith, Smith was 19. The
second ball of Millington’s first
over Smith pulled for a single and
Atkins played out the remainder
of the over. The score was now
41.

Read “English Crick-
eters in Barbados—i6

years ago” by Ian Gale
in tomorrow's “Evening
Advocate”.





15 was bowled by Marshall while
he was making a defensive stroke.
Lucas went in and the first ball
that he took from Marshall struck
him on the pads but a loud appeal
was not upheld. He did not stay
long with Skipper Walcott and at
nine gave Hoad his third wickel
when Taylor caught him,

Greenidge went in and was off
with a brace and Walcott was 49.
At this stage Walcott began to
pulverise the bowling but when
everyone was looking for a good
partnership with Greenidge and
himself, Greenidge was out to
Branker,

K. Bowen joined Walcott when
the score was 200. Walcott reached
his century with a four off
Branker and when play was ende.|
Walcott was undefeated with 128
hitting 18 fours and Bowen not
out five.

Six wickets-were down for 252
runs.

Bowling Change

Hoad was brought on in place of
Mullins and his first ball of his
first over Smith pulled again to
the square leg boundary for four
runs,

In the fourth ball Smith edged
through the slips but Proverbs
was too far to make a catch of it.
Millington continued to bowl and
the fifty went up when Atkins
took a single off of one of his
deliveries. Millington sent down a
maiden in his third over, When
the score had reached 63 Smith
was nicely stumped by Wood off
Hoad’s fourth ball of his fiftn
over. Smith made 35,

Eric Atkinson followed and was
off with a single from Hoad. In
Millington’s fifth over Atkins
was beginning to look shaky and at
33 gave Keith Walcott at silly mid
off an easy catch. Hoad figures
were six overs, two maidens, 17
runs, two wickets.

CLYDE WALCOTT’S XI

FIRST
INNINGS isdgievial

17

JOHN GODDARD'S XI FIRST
Cave went in and Millington INNINGB ¥e..-+-. Meters screen
although not yet having taken a
wicket had Atkinson in check,
Millington’s first wicket came

when he forced Atkinson to give

CLYDE WALCOTT’S XI 2ND INNINGS

é
35

33

C. Smith (stpd wkp.) Wood b. Hoad
C. Atkins c. Walcott b. Hoad,...

&. Atkinson c. R, Marshall b.
Roy Marshall a catch ‘when the — Millington ........-. Wivcter ae
: i ‘ 15
score -was 82. Skipper Walcott s Save bi, b. Maree seas eet tan Y 2
followed and was off with a single, \° tuieee Ane Dh IAME css c seis;
W. Greenidge c. Williams b.
At 92 Mullins was brought on — Branker OTS A seren dee he ett 12
again to bowl and the second ball K. Bowen not. out f

in his first over of his second Extras ..

spell Walcott cover drove hard for



Total (for 6 Wkts.) ..



four runs. At lunch Walcott 23 .
and Caye 9 were still together, Fall of ‘Wickets: 1--63, 22, 3-83,
4--132, 5—152, 6—200.
After Lune BOWLING ANALYSIS

After lunch Williams was oir 4
brought on again in place of Bran- wutiins ............55 is ee es 20
ker to bowl to Walcott. The last Williams . NW Tee 0
ball of this over Walcott pulled to Millington 7. - ee 3
the boundary for four runs, Cave Branker |........- $3 ae ee
who was batting patiently when Marshall . aia 20 ae

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game in pre-
forthcoming
opens
Thursday next
lasts for four
om Saturday
and cencludes

Third Tr

Teams Name

The third trial
paration for the
cricket tournament
Kensington on
February 1, and
days. It continues
3rd, Sunday 4th
on Thursday 8th.

The teams will be:

J. D, Goddard’s XI — J. D.
Goddard (Capt.) G. Wood, R.
Marshall, A. M. Taylor, E, At-
kinson, D. Bradshaw, K. Brank-
er, E, Millington, C. Proverbs, W.
Greenidge, C, Atkins, K. Bowen.

K. Walcott’s XI — K. Walcott

at

(Capt.), C. Smith, C. Hunte, N.
Marshall, C. Mullins, J. Williams,
E. L. G. Hoad, Jnr., H.. King,
N. S.° Lucas, D. Atkinson, E.
Cave, C. Alleyne,

Play continues until 5.45 p.m.
@ach day.

Cricket Coach
Warns W.1.

“Get Some Fast Bowlers”

(From Our Own Correspondent)



KINGSTON, Jan. 14.
Jack Mercer, cricket coach
who left the island last week

after his third coaching season in
Jamaica, sounded a word of
warning in connection with the
forthcomihg West Indies tour of
Australia,

“Get some fast bowlers”, the
old Glamorgan and England all-
rounder said. “The first three
Tests were won by fast bowlers
and on the England side Bedser
and Bailey took the majority of
wickets,”

Mercer, who coached sugar

* estate teams for the Sugar Manu-

facturers’ Association of Jamaica
this season, said that during his
stay here he had discovered a
number .of “naturals’ and in a
year or two, providing they im-
prove as they should, they will

be worthy candidates for not only
a place in the Jamaica side but
also the West Indies.

“I believe’, Mr. Mercer said,”
\hat there is a great possibility
of a Sugar Estate team visiting
Barbados after the crop season.
Arthur Bonitto will no doubt
skipper the team and who knows
it may be the beginning of an
Intercolonial Sugar Estates Tour-

nament. What a splendid thing
for cricket and imagine the
struggle to get a place on the
side.”

Finally Mercer said that he

believed England would beat the
South Africans,



Team Returns Home

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jan. 14.
_ A team of touring football play-
ing schoolboys returned to Jamaica
from Haiti last week assured that
they had done a good job as am-
bassadors during their seven-day
visit to the French-culture West
Indian republic.
They were students of the St.
George’s College who left Jamaica
on January 3*to play three matches

in Haiti, making a _ two-way
journey by special army plane
placed at their disposal by the

Haitian Government,

The visitors won one match and
drew two. While on tour the
team also took part in track
athletics and won several events.

The schoolboys were accom-
panied by the Rey. Fr. Welch of
the College, who said that he had
heen impressed with the speed
‘wid drive of the Haitian St.
Louis footballers and through St
George's played a more construc-
tive game, only the brilliance of
Teddy Saunders, the visitors’
goalkeeper, staved off defeat.



Weekes Hits 48
In Second Test

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, Jan, 27

Empire after dismissing
Grenada in the second Colony
Match for 58, Holder taking 6
for 19 in 14 overs and Alleyne

4 for 23 in 13, the Visitors closed
with 92 for 4: Jones 4, Taylor 0,

Grant 27 not out, Weekes 48
l.b.w., Robinson 0, Symmonds
8 not out.



Polo Trophies
Presented

The Deane Bros., who for the
past several years have been suc-
cessful in carrying off almost
every prize offered for amateur
horsemanship, crowned their
achievements when they won
both the Advocate Challenge Cup
and the Warner Bolton Chal-
lenge Cup in the Polo Tourna-
ment jyst ended. Three teams
took part in this tournament: Col.
Michelin’s team, the Hurricanes,
Mr. Victor Weekes’ Team, the
Cyclones and the Deane Bros.
Team, the Tornadoes.

â„¢ the Junior Fixtures, the
Criollos defeated the Mustangs,
thereby winning the Y. De Lima
Challenge Cup.

Yesterday afternoon, in fine
weather and in the presence ot
a crowd of enthusiasts, Mrs. H.

A, Afthur wife of the founder of
the Club, presented the trophies
after some of the personnel of the
various teams had played a Pres;
entation Match.

Playing in the Presentation
Match were three of the winning
teams, and Mark. Edghill on one
side, and Col. Michelin, John
Marsh, Victor Weekes and Elliott
Williams on the other. Edghill
was taking the place of Colin
Deane both of whose horses were
lame,

The
7—4,

Fellowing is the personnel of the
teams which played this season:—

Seniors

Hurricanes: K. D. G., Frost, Col.
R. T. Michelin (Capt.), M. M.
Parker and J. C. Marsh.

Cyelones: M. D. Edghill,
D. A. V. Weekes (Capt.) J. E. P.
Williams and E. A. B. Deane.

Tornadoes: Colin Deane (Capt.)
Lee Deane, Keith Deane and
Vere Deane.

Juniors

A. J. H. Hanschell
(capt.) O. H. Johnson, J. W.
Chandler and Andrew Arthur.

Mustangs: G. S. Emtage, P.
D. Maynard (Capt.) M. L. D.
Skewes-Cox and H, K, Melville.

If conditions are suitable a few
more Saturday afternoon chuk-
kas will be played.

Col. Michelin. team won

Criollos;



Rifle Results

The usual Saturday afternoon
practice of the Small Bore Rifle
Club took place yesterday.

Conditions were not too good,
the wind being gusty.



The following are the eight
best scores returned :—
MAL DMCROP 2 tba C hoe 100
MEY Sai RUMOR ei wees 100
S. Weatherhead 98
A RS oa sd ks 98
By DOING. 5 ies re hig cians 97
DiiOhasesii'e, 8 96
R. Marshall ............ 96
Fae WOUROE bees ki rcue 92
Lawn Tennis Results

The results of yesterday’s sets
played in the Belleville Tennis
Tournament are:

Men’s Doubles

J. A. Trimmingham and J. L.
St. Hill beat J. H. C. Edghill
and S. H. Edghill 7—5, 6—0.
TO-MORROW’S FIXTURES

Mixed Doubles Handicap

Miss M. King and J. L. M.
Hill vs. Mr. A. Warren and
A. F. Jemmott.

Miss L. Branch and W. A.
Crichlow vs. Mrs. A, A. Gibbons
and A, O. N. Skinner.

Men’s Doubles

H. L. Toppin and D, Lawless
vs. E. P. Taylor and Dr. C. G.
Manning.



Footmark For Sale

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 26.

Footmark, sweep winner at the
Christmas Race Meeting of the
Trinidaq Turf Club, is being offer-
ed for sale. The price asked is
understood to be $8,160.

Footmark’s proposed trip to
Miami has been cancelled, but it
is not known whether the horse
will race at the Union Park Race
Meeting at Easter.

Mr. F, M. Watson of Jamaica
is the owner, while Mr, Leo Wil-
liams is the local trainer.



If lack of confidence worries you





SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 1951

1950 WAS INDECISIVE
September Song And Footmark
Were The Best
BY BOOKIE

HE nth of January is usually the time when
sports writers indulge in reviews of the past
year and to-day I will take my turn with racing.
I admit that most of us get it off our chests ear-
lier in the month but as the recing season ends in
the first week in January it is usually reviews of
the Christmas meeting which take up our time and
space for a week or two afterwards.
OOKING back at the Racing Year 1950 it seems fair enough to
describe it as a good one all round. On the financial side
there was prosperity both here and in Trinidad while in British Gui-
ana things were apparently no worse than they were before. Barba-
dos in particular saw an unprecedented sale of sweepstake tickets and
the first prize in August reached the hitherto unbelievable heights
of forty-four thousand dollars. Neither Trinidad nor Jamaica can
boast of such a prize ever being paid out in their sweepstakes.
One thing that was noticeable in racing in both Barbados and
Trinidad was also the need for new tracks. This was due to the
increased numbers of imported horses and creoles and it is safe to
say that at no time in the past has the influx of new blood to the
race track been as large or as fast. It therefore seems as if the
tracks at the Arima and Garrison Savannahs will, by force of circum-
stances, have to be abandoned at some future date whether the
authorities like it or not. Otherwise overcrowcing will continue to
be a danger to life and limb, both of horse and rider, and the few
accidents which took place in 1950 will be muitiplied as the years

go by.
win respect to the actual pesiog can remember few years when

there have been such changes in fortune in nearly every class.
Here I must ask to be excused from any discussion on racing in B.G.
because of so little first hand information from that colony to go by.
Starting, therefore, with the Barbados March meeting, here we saw
the first Barbados Guineas. As I pointed out two weeks ago in a
discussion on the classics there were many of the most promising can-
didates absent for the race. Nevertheless we saw the Hon. J. D.
Chandler’s tiny filly Watercress in good form and in addition to taking
the first Guineas she won two other races to end up the meeting
unbeaten.

Among the locally bred three-year-olds the filly Bowmanston
also showed splendid form in her first race. She broke the F class
record for 54 furlongs and in so doing defeated a field of older horses
with ridiculous ease.

The March meeting also saw the first Jamaica Derby winner to
race in Barbados for many a year, if not the first for all time, (I am
not sure whether Saraband ever raced here). This was Mr. Tass
Tawill’s tall bay gelding Blue Streak. Unfortunately he did not
strike his best form and the laurels of the meeting in the top class
were divided between Beacon Bright and Gun Site. The latter, in
particular established a reputation for himself as one of the best sons
of O.T.C. by winning twice, once over nine and another time over
714 furlongs with top weight.



T Union Park it was another three-year-old creole who held the
d limelight. At this meeting Dr. N. Bain’s gelding Wavecrest, the
first son of the sire Coat-of-Arms ever to prove of any consequence,
dished out three consecutive defeats to his contemporaries to become
a firm favourite for the Trinidad Trial Stakes. This marked Wave-
crest’s first appearance since the previous August and it certainly
appeared that a bright future was in store for him.

Beacon Bright also displayed good form at Union Park but was
rather unlucky to lose the first A class race due to his unfamiliarity
with the track. However he managed one first while The Gauntlet
and Pharlite accounted for the other two A class races, the latter
also winning a B class race.

It was at Union also that the first record forecast for the year
was paid when the aged gelding Brown Boy got up in the last stride
to win from the Jamaican mare Miniature. Not since 1946 had Brown
Boy won a race. The forecast pay out was $5,533.48.

ITH the T.T.C, June meeting came outstanding performances by

September Song, Blue Streak, Orly and Bow Bells. All four
had their fling in different spheres, September Song indeed proved
himself to be a horse of untsual class as far as sprinting was icon-
cerned and I doubt if we have ever seen better in the South Caribbean
at any time. His last win with 136 lbs., in the thickest mud was one
of the most impressive feats of weight-carrying that I have seen in
many a year. Consequently when a few weeks after the June meeting
we learned of his death due to a twisted intestine one could not help
feeling that racing in 1950 had suffered a great loss. Along with
Footmark, who subsequently figured so prominently in the Soutn
Caribbean, I place September Song on equal merits as “horse of the
year,

By winning the Trial Stakes Mr. Cyril Barnard’s Bow Bells
proved that she had lost none of her two-year-old speed but due to
1ack of first class opposition it remained doubtful whether she was
the best of the bunch. Nevertheless Bow Bells also proved that she
was a filly with great possibilities as well as plenty of courage by
winning with 136 lbs., on a slippery slushy track which only a few
hours before had been inspected by the authorities to decide whether
the day’s racing should begin or be postponed. No amount of argu-
ment by those who criticise her as one who cannot run in mud will
ever convince me that she was not as versatile as Ligan in this respect,

HE Barbados August meeting saw further triumph for Water-

cress, Who won the Derby with ridiculous ease from a poor field
while it will forever be remembered as the “meeting of records’.
No less than eight records were broken in the course of three days’ rac-
ing and chief among these was the one set up by the great mare Eliza-
bethan when she ran the nine furlongs and 14 yards in 1.53%. It is
a record which I expect to see standing for a long while.

‘T ARIMA it was Ocean Pearl, Mr. William Scott’s classic filly,

who dumbfounded the critics, myself among them, by winning
twice in A class and once in B. Previously it was felt that Ocean
Pearl was only a sprinter and at that one of no great consequence.
However at Arima she not only outran Blue Streak over six furlongs
but allowed him to lead in the early stages (his favourite type of
race), of a 7%% furlong event and then overtook him in the closing
turlongs in a most decisive manner. About this filly too was sad
news to be subsequently chronicled when a few days before the
See meeting she bowed a tendon, and was reported retired for
good,

The Arima meeting might also be noted for the repercussions
caused after it had pred into history. Chief among these I would
mention the dispensing by the Trinidad Turf Club with the services
of Mr. O. P, Bennett as starter. I, for one, have never seen a better
starter than Mr. Bennett and I have been going to racing now for 25
years, for at least 15 of which my critical faculties have been reason-
ably developed. The other aftermath of note of the Arima meeting
was the so-called “Gimerack Dinner” held in honour of the winner
of the Arima Derby Trial Stakes. The first of its kind in the West
Indies it will not long be forgotten for the speeches made thereat.
AS I do not propose to discuss the Christmas meeting I end with

the Barbados November fixture, and that in brief only, The
most significant event I can think of in connection with this was the
victory of Cross Roads in the two-year-old Trumpeter Cup. Few
two-year-olds have ever scored such a surprising and devastating win
at one and the same time. Others of note at the November meeting

cake started on their return to championship form. Yes 1950 cer-
tainly had its ups and downs. .








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WWNDAY, JANUARY 238,

1951



V.C.C. Beat
*
ns
Tasmania By
Wide Margin
e Our Own Lorrespondént).
LONDON, January 17.
Defeating a Tasmanian XI by
’ wickets the M.C.C.team bet-
the performance of Walter
mond's 1946-47 team which
two games. The present MCC
fh have now won three matches
vo of them first class fixtures.
victories were scored

bat
st South Australia at Adel-
and against a Colts XI at












is MCC victory followed the
rn of their Adelaide success.
© get 188 for victory in just
© two hours they did so with
inutes and nine wickets to

bably the most encouraging
of all was the return to form
nis Compton who in scoring
jot out in the MCC's second
gs set up something of a
record by hitting six succes-
fours to finish the match.
was against Tasmania four
ago that Compton ended a
r bad run with Hammond's
Afterwards he went from
Iss to success.
. Brown decided not to visit
ania in view of his previous
strain in the Third Test
as a result the MCC were
y Compton, who, following
fashion, lost the toss.

home team batted first and
close of play had establish-
mselves in a strong position.
scoring 192 runs they cap-
two MCC wickets for only
s, twelve of which were

helton was the most success-
the home, batsmen, eight of
fell to the MCC pace bowl-
arr and Bedser.
-@ MCC. ineluded Erie Bed-
vin brother of Alec, who has
.in Australia on business.
‘ame in because of the injur-
other players. When he
bowling off spinners the
nhabitants could not at first
stand why “Alec” Bedser
hanged his action. They
sfound out when they saw
Wis together as the players
{ off the field.

pton decided to entrust the
ng of the MCC innings to
s and Sheppard, the two
Cambridge batsmen who
‘against the West Indies
mmer. But the gamble did
me off and each was out
coring only two runs.
eir wickets were claimed by
railway clerk Keith Dollery
it’ cost and the following
ng he addedyEvans to his
fore the first run appeared
t his name in the scorebook,
despite the loss of another
_ wicket, the MCC establish-
irst innings leads of 42 due
- fy. to fine aggressive batting
mpton, Washbrook, in the
al position of No. 6, and
edser, The two latter were
ned in a fine forcing part-
p which added 82 in 81
s before Bedser, attempting
Ossal hit, was well caught on

boundary.

light caused the Tasmanian

innings to be curtailed at
ose of the second day but
following morning Rodwell,
and Reid all hit strongly and
re was taken along to 229.
time it looked as if it would
even larger proportions but



RIVAL

SUNDAY

TEST CAPTAINS



FRED BROWN (left) of England and L. Hassett of Australia admire the trophy presented to Hassett on

behalf of the Jubilee Sports Committee.

Hassett received the trophy on behalf of the Australian Test

team who won the Jubilee (third) Test Match at Sydney. Miniatures of the Trophy were also presented
to all members of both teams, the managers, scorers and umpires.





Rugby’s Qualification Rule Needs
Tightening Up

By PETER DITTON

LONDON, January 19.

THE selection of Rittson-Thomas to take the place of Eng-
land’s captain, John Kendall-Carpenter, in the Rugby In-

ternational at Swansea last

week only re-emphasised the

absurdity of the qualification rule.

Rittson~Thomas was born in
Cardiff, Wales, of Cardiff parents.
Yet because he has played for
Sxford University and resided in
£ngland he was claimed for Eng-
tand’s International XV

There is surely nothing more
ridiculous than this qualification

tule which enables Selectors to
pick a man regardless of his birth-
place. If it could be claimed that
the English selectors chose Ritt-
son-Thomas because in spite of
his Welsh birthplace he was really
an Englishman and it was their
policy only to play Englishmen,
that would be some sort, of an
excuse, But by their actions over
the past couple of years the Eng-
lish Selectors have shown that
they are not concerned with a
player’s nationality as long as he



23 in seven overs, Bedser taking
four for 11 in 3.6 overs.

Previously Rodwell, another
hard hitting batsman, had delight-
ed the home crowd by hitting three
mighty sixes off Hollies, two of
them off successive balls, the
second of which went clean out
of the ground,

The MCC were left to get 188
runs for victory in 113 minutes
and Compton’s answer to this
challenge was to send in quick-



is residing in this country — and
is a good player.

Last year for instance, England
called upon South African, Mur-
ray Hofmeyer and New Zealand-
er, Ian Botting and in previous
seasons since the war they have
made similar use of Dominfon
players.

Neither are the Scottish Select-
ors free from blame. Two seasons
ago they appointed Doug Keller
as Captain of their International
XV—-the same Keller who in the
previous season had played
against Scotland while a member
of the Australian touring team.

How silly it all is! If, for in-
stance, in the near future there
should be perhaps half a dozen
Rhodes scholars at Oxford Uni-
versity, all good enough to gain a
place in England’s team, then pre-







and then Simpson was caught

Compton and Sheppard put on
another 50 in 24 minutes and the
MCC were well ahead of the clock.
Sheppard reached his 50 in an hour
and then had the unusual an
lucky experience of being missed
off successive balls, at mid-on and
deep mid-off.

By this time, however, it was
obvious that such a miss would
make little difference to the result
and Compton after reaching his 50



. —Express



sumably they will be included,
regardless of the fact that they;
eome from anywhere except
England. Of course, the side will
still be labelled “England” but
what degree of comfort could the
honest English supporter gain if
such a side was to win the Intere
nationa! Championship and per-
haps even the Triple Crown. It
‘would be English in name only fon
behind the wicket after scoring 43.
nearly half the players would be
from the Dominions. And yet
that is exactly what could hap-
pen as a result of the present loose
ruling on qualification.

In soccer, such a position would
be hardly likely to arise for few,
if any, of the Dominion or Colo.
nial visitors to this country are
good enough even to get into a
league side—always providing, of
course, they have the time to
spare for the extra training which
would be necessary,

Fixed Ruling

Soccer has none of this hap-
hazard selection of players for
International matches, A player
can only be chosen to represent
the country of his birth. Occa.
sionally this brings odd conse.
quences as in the case of Walley
Barnes of Arsenal who is the pres-
ent Welsh Captain. Barnes is 100
per cent, English but he happened
to be born on the Welsh side of
the border and so is not eligible
for England.

But at least with such a hard
and fast ruling, players and se.

q lectors know where they stand,

It can be certain that an Inter.
national team is composed of play-
ers who at least have some con-
nection with the country which
“caps’ them,

This hard and fast ruling is for
the good of the game. It ensures)





It’s Up To
Those Club
Cricketers

By JOHN MACADAM
IF you want to know what is
wrong with English cricket—and,
personally, we don’t think there



‘is all that much wrong with it—

you anly have to alo and
meet the English etiteehere te we
did-over the week-end,
Now, there are the county sides
who. produce the players for the
Test teams, and then there are all
the club sides who produce the
players who graduate into the
county sides,
_ Any falling-off you may notice
in national sides is reflected right
down to these club sides, and that
is where you must start to look
for the trouble,

This all came about as we talked
at dinner
































Club, an organisation that has
been going in the Club Cricket
Cenference since 1873, and know-
ledgeable officers of that body wil!
tell you that the young players
are simply not coming along
despite the fact that the club is
turning out some hundred players
every week-end.

», The matter was put very suc-
cinctly by A. J. Spong, chairman
of the Club Conference and of the
Hounslow club, who said quite
categorically that club cricket was
the backbone of the game today,
and that it always would be.

The major point he made was
that the game would still go on
if so-called first-class cricket dis-
appeared. The same could not be
said of the game so far as first-
class cricket was concerned if club
cricket were to disappear,

So the motivating force appears
to be club cricket, and what are
we going to do about it through
the agency of such clubs as
Polytechnic?

Already, we have gone into the
business of proper pitches and
wickets for idea to
practise on,
seems to be something lacking on
that score.

There appears to be something
else. We heard only yesterday the
story of an Australian cricket
executive who was told in his
hotel that a strange sight was to
be seen at first-light almost any
morning at the practice nets of
Sydney ground,

He happened to wake one more-
ing before dawn and, unable to
sleep again, he decided to test the
story out. He got along to the
ground and there, sure enough, al
the nets—time, 5 a.m.,—were two
kids bowling at each other,

They were putting everything
they had into it; unrelaxing, un-
relenting, completely wrapped up
in what they were doing. They
were around the age of 14
Names? Lindwall and Morris.

Maybe there is something of
that lacking in the youngsters
here, ‘ Omer

—L.ES.

-_—

It is such a ruling which fair-
minded rugby enthusiasts are now
saying should be operative in thig
country, Particularly in the case
of England it would ensure that
home-born players were not kept
out of the International side by



JAN. 28 -- NO. 156

The Topic

of
Last Week



Well very little fireworks
Were seen on Tuesday last
When a new site for our Firemen
At Club Willow quickly passed
. . .

Some of our dear politicians
Although our Treasury's flush
By all kinds of rare taxations
Felt the matter shouldn't be rushed
° . .

As usual boys it happens
At every white-elephant sale
Our Government hates relaxing
For everything is done “Air Mail”
‘ . .

If you own a haunted palace
Especially “‘out-the-way”
Just say it suits some object
And the Government says “O.K.”,
* . .

For boys good land in Bridgetown
Bought-out with undue haste
Now serves this only purpose
An up-to-date parking place
. ‘ .

But Joe and Robert's memory
Keep time like a good clock
About eight years and ten months
A Brigade should be at Top Rock
; *

‘Twas 4 man of revered memory
Who felt this crying need
Of_a Fire Brigade in Christ Chureh
But politicians don't take heed,
. . *

Snee then a brand new village
With some bungalows galore
Have been built with tons of money
From the ceiling to the floor
. ; .

Navy Gardens is a new place
Top Rock a paradise
Do protect the property owners
Such a policy will be wise,
. * .

We suppose you'll wait till doomsday
To decide to foot this bill
Or erect a fire station
When a fire’s on the hill
. ‘ ‘

But Wednesday night at Queen's Park
We saw the faith-healing man
And the people who attended
Were like the crystal sand
® * .

A young girl who knew no better
Start the meeting to decry

Then she said to Joe and Robert
If I join “I can't get by"
° * .

T can wear my ballerinas
f can dress in shorts and lace
I must keep my sweet lips painted
Or I must “drop-out-the race"
. ° *

For you see we modern damsels
Can't afford to walk-but fly
That would suit my dear grand-mother
She could wait; "I must get by”
* . .

This new age sure calls for glamour
And we girls must glamourize
If we fail to get things “stay-put”
We can't catch Joe & Robert's eyes,
° . .
And of course when we are broken
That is just the time to mend

We will see the beloved pastor
And accept “faith-healing” then
. . .

sponsored by
J&R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED, BREAD
























new ball spell by Warr and y
with the total at 206 scoring Simpson to partner Shep- in 37 minutes finished the match that players with proper qualifi. Rhodes Scholars and other play- and the blenders of
t about a late collapse, the pard, by taking six successive fours off cations have an opportunity to ers with qualifications for other
wickets falling for over They added 68 in half-an-hour Laver, the Tasmanian captain. play for their country. countries, aaa! J&R RUM
4
BARBADOS TURF CLUB
e e e e
Official Programme—Spring Meeting, 1951.
pe SATURDAY 3rd. THURSDAY Sth, SATURDAY 10th MARCH. 1951
Bing * x
i First Day-Saturday 3rd March. 19351
CLASS DISTANCE 1sT 2ND 3RD 4TH TOTAL ENTRY CREOLE BREEDERS PREMIUMS
NAME OF RACE IST 2ND 3RD 4TH TOTAL
1.00 MAIDEN STAKES ae os ++ |C & C2 (Maidens) —
W/A 5% Furlongs $ 900 $300 $150 $ 50 $1,400.00 $27.00
1.40 CHELSEA STAKES .. oe +» |F & F2 (Only)—
W/A 5% ” 800 265 135 40 1,240.00 24.00 $60.00 $30.00 $15.00 $105.00
«4 2.20 B’DOS GUINEAS STAKES & CUP .. | Nominated Me 900 300 200 100 1,500.00 27.00 100.00 75.00 560.00 $25.00 250.00
$ 3.00 B.T.C. STAKES .. | .. .- +- {A & Lower—W/A 9 ” 1,100 365 185 60 1,710.00 33.00 100,00 50,00 25.00 175.00
3.40 SPRING STAKES o- +. ++ |C & Lower—W/A 7% Fo 900 300 150 50 1,400.00 27.00 80.00 40.00 20.00 140.00
; 4.20 H.B. CREOLE STAKES .- «- 1G & Lower—W/A 5% ” 700 235 115 40 1,090.00 21.00 50.00 25.00 12.50 87.50
oF 5.00 CASTLE GRANT STAKES .. ++]D & Lower—W/A 1M% + 900 300 150 45 1,395.00 27.00 80.00 40.00 20.00 140.00
. 5.40 GARRISON STAKES .. o- +» 1B & Lower—W/A 5% ” 1,000 335 165 55 1,555.00 30.00 90.00 45,00 22.50 157.50
a
> Second Day-Thursday Gth March, 1951
1.00 DAW ‘ITH STAKES .. es ».|A & Lower—W/A 5% Furlongs $ 1,100 $365 $185 $ 60 $1,710.00 $33.00 $100/00 $50.00 $25.00 $175.00
{, - 1.40 BRIDGETOWN HANDICAP .. .. |F& Lower (3 y.0.)
Hs —H/C 5% ” 700 235 115 40 1,090.00 21.00 $1,230.00
2.20 CHELSEA HANDICAP os. .. |F & Lower (4 y.o. & rey
4 Over)—H/C 1% ” 700 235 115 40 1,090.00 21.00
# 3.00 GARRISON HANDICAP o +. |B & Lower —H/C 1% 900 300 150 55 1,405.00 27,00
4 3.40 H.B. CREOLE HANDICAP .. ++|G & Lower —H/C Sey 600 200 100 40 940.00 ,' 18.00
% 4.20 CASTLE GRANT HANDICAP ++] D & Lower —H/C 5ie » 800 265 135 45 1,245.00 24.00
* 5.00 SPRING ‘HANDICAP ,. +. +. |C & Lower —H/C % ” 800 265 135 50 1,250.00 24.00
% 5.40 B,T.C,. HANDICAP ee o- «+ |A & Lower —H/C 9 ” 1,000 335 165 60 1,560.00 30.00
=
;
% ’ «
i Third Day-Saturday 10th March. 1951
3
1.00 HASTINGS HANDICAP o «. | C & Lower —H/C 5% Furlongs $ 800 $265 $135 $ 50 $1,250.00 $24,00
1.40 MARCH HANDICAP ., o «. |B & Lower —H/C 9 ” 900 300 150 55 1,405 00 27.00
2.20 ST, ANNS’ HANDICAP éy +. |G & Lower —H/C 1% i 600 200 100 40 940.00 18.00
3.00° Wm. BOWRING MEMO. H'CAP.,. |D & Lower —H/C 9 ” 800 265 135 45 1,245.00 24.00
3.40 NEW YEAR HANDICAP sa +. |C & Lower —H/C 9 o 800 265 135 50 1,250.00 24.00
4.20 CREOLE HANDICAP .. .._ ...|F & Lower (3 y.o.)
. : Fi —H/C 1% » 700 235 115 40 1,090.00 21.00
5.00 DRILL HALL HANDICAP .. -. | F'& Lower (4 y.0. &
: Over)—H/C 9 ” 700 235 115 40 1,090.00 21.00
5.40 DALKEITH HANDICAP oe ye {A & Lower —H/C | 7% ,, 1,000 335 165 60 1,560.00 30.00
%
; F Total Stakes .. «. © se +s $81,410.00
- : Total Breeders’ Premiums .. oe 1,230.00
< 7a
$32,640.00





‘Entries to close on Thursday 15th February, 1951



Topies of this Programme may be obtained at the Office of the Turf Club, Synagogue Lane.





at 3 pm. at the Office of the Turf Club.

G. A, LEWIS,
Secretary.



PAGE FIVE





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BARBADOS TURE CLUB

ne nee

The following amendments and additions have
been made to the Official Classification for the Spring
Meeting, 1951.

Amendments:—

| Landscape has been promoted from C.1. to B.2.

i Nan Tudor ,, a sj we CR to Bid:
Best Wishes ,, ” as es PT, BO Sey
Cross Roads ,, “ > tp: Bake Ou mae
Cross Bow ,, Pe Ps inp es Whe

Additions:—
F.2.—Little Dear

{ G.1.—Jewel

G.2.—Frivolity

Classifiers:—

T. N, PEIRCE,
L,-Be Re Gibb;
+ D, BYNOE,.





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COMMERCIAL PRINTING
DEPARTMENT





To our Clients and the General Public



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increase the Prices of Commercial Jobs as from

January, 1951, at









PAGE SIX



Sunday, January 28, 1951

AIR BLOCKS

DISQUIETING rumours abound that
British West Indian Airways is intending
.2 policy of retrenchment. No official state-
ment has been made but it has been made
known that the Managing Director of
British West Indian Airways whose head-
quarters are in Trinidad is being trans-
ferred and certain reductions in flights
have already been made.

Among these reductions in flights is one
between Barbados and Caracas. Since
December the weekly flights between Bar-
bados and Caracas have been cut from
three to two.

The rumours about British West Indian
Airways serve to bring into the limelight
the whole air policy affecting Barbados.

It is common knowledge that Barbados

being a British possession in the legal sense
of the word is tied by international conven-
tions entered into by the British Govern-
ment affecting air transport. This is not
only common knowledge; it is common-
sense.
But what is not reasonable nor common
knowledge is the fact that Barbados has
been in the past and still is to-day a pawn
in any international bargaining that the
British Government can or may be making
with foreign Governments.

The case of Pan American Airways and
Barbados deserves especial study in this
connection.

Pan American Airways have wanted to
come to Barbados for the past twenty years.
About three years ago the American Civil
Air Authorities gave specific approval for
Pan American Airways to call at Barbados,
but the State Department in Washington
is not-prepared to bargain with the’United
Kingdom Government for permission for
Pan-American to enter Barbados on the
basis of the British Government getting
concessions to» enter American airports
which would overweigh the concession to
enter Barbados.
| Pan American Airways do not want to
enter Barbados on such terms, but they are
willing to come here, and it has been stated
by one of their representatives that the
Company is prepared to spend one quarter
of a million dollars in advertising Barbados
throughout the United States, as soon as it
gets permission to come in here.

While Pan. American. Airways do: not
want to carry “cabotage” passengers be-
tween the British territories in the area,
it is worth recording that they do by spe-
cial agreement with the French Govern-
ment carry “cabotage” passengers between
Martinique and Guadeloupe now. It is
worth recording because if at any future
period Barbados should suffer as a result
of retrenchment by British West Indian
Airways, there is no doubt that Barbados
could follow the example of Martinique
and Guadeloupe and request the British
Government to grant Pan American Air-
ways similar “cabotage” rights which
would allow them to fly passengers
between Barbados and other British Carib-
bean territories served by Pan American.
‘To-day~-those territories already include
Trinidad, Jamaica, Antigua, St. Lucia and
British Guiana.

| Barbados suffered during the last World
War because KLM were not permitted to
fly to Barbados and in conséquence hun-
dreds of Dutch people who could not get
back to Holland spent their holidays in
Jamaica instead of Barbados and the Bar-
badian. exchequer was correspondingly
Jower as a result.

| Even to-day when Dutch people can re-
visit Holland the possibilities of enticing
our Dutch neighbours from Aruba, Cura-
cao and Surinam to come to Barbados can-
not be explored because of the “no entry”
sign shutting out KLM.

When it is realised that the British Gov-
ernment subsidises the expensive Carib-
bean Commission in the interests of inter-

“national co-operation in the Caribbean it
is surprising that no attention is being paid
to the obvious and only way of producing
that co-operation—communications,

It is.a subject for congratulation that the
British territories in the Caribbean do not
adopt this stupid policy with regard to
Steamship communication, otherwise de-
pendence on British methods of passenger
transportation would leave us only the
Gelfito and the schooners and even fishing
boats would have to be pressed into ser-
(vice.
| In 1949 a British steamship eompany, the
Furness Line, recommenced passenger ser-
vice between New York and the United
States West Indian possessions, the Virgin
Islands. It is indeed strange that at a
time when the British West Indian posses-
sions are clamouring for British -passen-
gers, such ships cannot only be spared to
carry American passengers between their
own térritories, but that international bar-
gaining prevents Barbados from adding to
its sources of revenue by granting Pan
American Airways landing rights at Sea-
well,



z

Nor are the instances of Pan American
and KLM isolated instances. A look at
the airlines serving the Caribbean area, as |
listed in the Year Book of the West Indies |
and Countries of the Caribbean 1950, will |
come as a shock to many residents of
Barbados.

There is no shortage of air communica- |
tions in the Caribbean area. But there is |
a great lack of air Co-operation between
the nationals whose air lines serve the
area.

GAMES

THE Caribbean is slowly but surely
taking its rightful place in sport. Last
year the West Indies Cricket Team showed
clearly that the standard of cricket in the
West Indies is not below that of England,
South Africa or New Zealand. This year
the West Indies enter the lists against
Australia who is now the champion coun-
try.

It is to the credit of the cricket authori-
ties in the West Indies that they have
realized, before it is too late, that the pop-
ulation of the territories in the Caribbean
is remarkably small and that no possible
talent in the area must be overlooked if a
team from the Caribbean is to be fully rep-
resentative of these territories.

Here in Barbados the authorities are
seeking talent in fields once ignored, and
members of League clubs have been in-
vited to take part in trial games in prepar-
ation for the Intercolonial matches next
month. And the West Indies Board of
Control last week sent an observer, in the
person of Mr. John Goddard, to watch the
play in the Leeward vs. Windward Islands.
Tournament in the hope that the Leewards
and Windwards may be able to supply
talent for a West Indies Team.

It must not be forgotten that fifty years
ago St. Vincent was able to provide two
outstanding players to West Indies Teams
touring England and it would be surpris-
ing if, after this lapse of time during which
the game has become even more popular
in the neighbouring colonies, the Leewards
and Windwards were unable to aid the
West Indies by providing some outstanding
players for inclusion in a touring team.

The West Indies are making headway
in golf, a game that is at last becoming
popular in Barbados. Golf has the special
charm possessed by billiards. It is a game
that can be played alone with the player
trying to beat the best for the course or
for an individual hole.
| To-day a strong team of golfers leaves
this island to try conclusions with a Trini-
dad team. ;

The West Indies are now trying to build
up the standard of Lawn Tennis in these
colonies. It is indeed surprising that, while
the people of the Caribbean have shown
a phenomenal aptitude for cricket, the
standard of Lawn Tennis has remained
woefully below that of any country which
takes part in international tournaments.
And the reason why Barbados, although
leading the way in cricket, is at the bottom
of the ladder on the tennis court is no
doubt due to the fact that tennis in this
island has been played for so many years
within segregated cliques.

In Jamaica, Trinidad and British Guiana
the standard of Association Football is
reasonably high but football in Barbados,
played as it is in the wrong season of the
year, has not improved in forty years.

Nor does Barbados show any signs of
keenness in attempting to produce out-
standing athletes for track and cycling
events.

This island has however, built up a
Water Polo team that would hold its own
in county tournaments in England. But
in Water Polo, swimming and diving, Bar-
bados is not yet taking full advantage of
the ideal conditions provided by nature.

If the youth of Barbados would only
show the same keenness in other games
as they do in cricket and would practice
assiduously then there is no doubt that this
island would be represented in other
games by teams as pre-eminent as the
island’s cricket teams.



LIGHT PURSE

_ TO-MORROW Barbades gets its first

Young Women’s Christian Association, Its
counterpart working in the interest of
young men in this island has been recog-
nised as an institution worthy of public
support and it is to be hoped that the same

, Success will now attend the new venture.

It is proposed to conduct a canteen and

_ to accept eight girl boarders who will pay

low rates for rooms. The Association
begins its heroic task with a light purse.

The funds which here been generously
donated by Barbadians are $1,645 and run-
ning expenses will be $100 per month, This
shows that the present financial resources
of the Association can only support its
activities for a period of twelve months. It
is hoped that the Vestry will support the
institution with a parochial grant and of
course the Government pledged as it is
to improve the standards of women will
want to help.

Already there have peen applications
from 50 young women for membership.
Any institution which tends to strengthen
the moral stamina of women in this island
deserves the greatest public support,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



. THEY DO IT AGAIN AND AGAIN



Sitting On The Fenee|

A Government White-paper
has announced that £36,500,-
000 advanced for the ground-
=a scheme has been written
off,

“It's the taxpayer’s money
(your money) which has been
poured into the arid soil of
Africa.”"—Leading article.

MIGHT have bought a little
house
The cottage of my dreams
But money saved to pay for it
Has paid for groundnut schemes.
I might have had a holiday
In Paris or Capri
If money -earned had not been

spent
On nuts I'll never see.

I might have botight a motor-car
With shining wheels and wings

A sailing yacht, a radio,
And lots of lovely things.

I might have bought a dairy farm
With everything complete

If money earned had not been

spent
On nuts I'll never eat.

If they should
scheme
To spend my hard-earned pelf
I'll get into the Government
And run the scheme myself;
Oh, then I'll have my motor-car
With shining wheels and wings,
My little house, my dairy farm,
And lots of lovely things.
How To Avoid Flu
ELOW, Dr. Gubbins, famous
Fleet-street quack, answers

start. another

\j}some questions on how to avoid

influenza. “

Question: In view of the short-
age of meat, what sort of food
should I eat-to build up body re-
sistance?

Answer: Sturgeon, sole, chicken,
turkey, pheasant, partridge, quail,
lobster, crab, caviar, pate de fois
gras. If these are unobtainable,
eat all the fat you can. Get up
early and devour the family ration
of bacon, butter, margarine, and
eggs before your wife and children
are awake. Remember, this is a
tough age and a tough country.
It’s you or the family, big boy.

Q: How can mother, the linch-
pin of the family, avoid flu? And
the children?

A: As they also need body-
building fat, leave them the ration
of lard. If they complain,~ tell
them about the Eskimos who eat
candle grease and never get flu.

Q: Will early morning exercises
help?



By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

A: You will get all the early
morning exercise you need creep-
ing down the stairs while your
family is asleep, tip-toeing

ough the kitchen and picking
iff the larder.

Q: What about hardening the
body against infection?

This is a good idea so far
as your wife and family are con-
cerned. Tell thern to “enjoy the
winter” by keeping out in the
fresh air all day, except on Sun-

, when your dinner must be
cocked. This is your only chance
of-eating most of the flu-resisting
meat ration Moreover, if your
family is out all day while you
are in your warm office, you will
be saving fuel and aVoiding the
worry of the high cost of home
heating. Worry lowers body re-
sistance and leaves it unguarded
against infection.

Q: Are vitamin pills any good?

A; Not for you. All the vita-
S necessary to bodily health
will be found in the family rations
you are eating, and a good lunch
in the City six times a week. If
you think your family need them
your doctor will provide prescrip-
tions for nothing.

: -Are inoculations worth
while?
A: They were worth while to
me when I could charge for them.
Under the National Health Service
they are no good to anybody, un-
less you, want to a free. experi-
meteor your ites ae

Q: Suppose, after all precau-i
tions, I get flu?

A: Stay in bed and. make as
much fuss as possible. And don’t
worry about feeling too ill to make
that early morning trip to the
larder. A heavy diet when you
are sick only makes you worse.

Q: Suppose my wife gets flu?
A: Move into the nearest hotel.

Make Believe World
SCIENTIST (bless ’em all)
has discovered a way of turn-
ing cheap drinks into vintage
wines, and new wines into old, by
sound waves.
So it won’t be long now before
old eggs, by a reverse process, are

tugned into new laid eggs, ewe |

FF

DON’T HELP THE® REDS



Stop All This, Hate Talk

“The Communist dynamism
thrives on hatred and for that
very reason is proving much
more effective in destruction than
in achievement. We must recog-
nise the need for constant re-
form because all human institu-
tions tend to decay and corrup-
tion, but no man should be a
reformer without first showing
he values the society in which

the reforms he seeks are to be
fitted, and that he understands
how difficult it has been to

achieve even a_ society riddled
with defects, so hard is sustained
public spiritedness for men.”

These two sentences culled
from my weekly newspaper
seem to sum up all that is wrong
in Barbados to-day.

In recent years this island has
been invaded by numbers of
newcomers who have lost no time
in pointing out our faults.

Faults we have and faults in
plenty but to come in for a
basinful of contempt all we
need to be is local Barbadians,

There is a tot of Irish in the
loca! Barbadian and most of this
contempt finds an outlet in much
the same way as the storm water
finds its way to the sea. Even-
tually our despisers settle among
us and join the party or they go
away nursing their resentment
or hatred.

This is alright as far as it goes,
but recently we poor Barbadians
have been treated to exhibitions
of hate and ill temper which
eannot be passed over in silence

We have had to put up with
two insults. Firstly, the Central
Office of information, His Majes-
ty’s State supported bureau for

telling the British people the
truth, has listed Barbadians as
“mostly Africans.’ Secondly tne
recent Bishop of Barbados has
been promising brimstone and
fire because the ‘whites” have
no social conscience, Now the

two things don’t mix. Either we

Says GEORGE HUNTE

are mostly Africans or we must
be a considerable body of whites
to merit the smiting of an ec-
clesiastical dignitary.

The truth is that we are all Bar-
badians and far less concerned
with our racial origin than these
well meaning but misinformed
newcomers from the United King-
dom try to make out.

“The Communist dynamism
thrives on hatred” and hatred is
the last thing that one would ex-
pect to be fostered by newcomers
to Barbados who profess to be well
disposed towards the people
among whom they live if only
for a short time.

Of all the foul lies that I have
had to deny most in recent years
is the lie that seeks to depict Bar-
bados as an island overrun by de-
generate white people with a root-
ed hatred or neglect of peoples
who are not white.

Your local white Barbadian is
perhaps the most tolerant of all the
white skinned people in the worid
to-day. There is no colour bar in
Barbados; to-day as there is in
Bermuda, the Southern States of
America or in South Africa, All
of us white and black have equal
opportunities in all the profes-
sions and our government is black.
Yet this almost unique fact is so

“twisted out of its true context that

a picture is still built up, by those.
in authority and in high places, of
a society in which ov exists no
social conscience and the age-old
ery of colour is kept valiantly alive
by those who profess to act from
motives of Christian charity and
in the interests of the community.

Instead of an awed admiration
of the patience and long suffering
of thousands of local Barbadians
white and many coloured who
suffer in silence the bungling and
fumbling of Bushe rule, we are
treated publicly to the tirades of
those in high places and privatety
to the shrill eomplaints of those



‘slowbut progressive way.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 1951

eee SSS SSS
TO-DAY’S SPECIALS









D. V. SCOTT
& CO., LTD. at THE COLONNADE
LS
Usually Now

Tins BROOKS PEACHES .........-00- 59 .
Pkgs. QUAKER CORN FLAKES ........ 37 o
Bottles ALLSOPP’S BEER ............. 26 a
Pkgs. CORN FLAKES..........0..00000 29





We Have...

at.






ISE DOWN PIPES
pte WATER HEADS
a RIDGE CAPS

BARBED a
W
MESH a”, Wy", 1%”, 1%”
i $ aes . LASHING WIRE
16, 14, 12 and 10 Gauge

WOVE W3RE — 24” and 36”
CHAIN %”, 3-16”, 14”, & 5-16”












WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd.




> , Successors To
C.S: PITCHER & CO.
mutton into prime canes
ae fizzy lemonade PI ee 4472, 4687,


























In the future world of make be-
lieve nothing will be real. Few
of us but scientists and adminis-
trators will know what we're eat-
ing, drinking, or even doing.

“INTERNATIONAL”



When alchemists have made
banquets out of firewood and fine
clothes out of waste paper, the
hypnotist will come into his own.
He will be engaged by a vote-
catching Government during by-
elections to persuade some home-
less, flat-footed drudge in a fish
queue that she is a lucky woman
with a good income and a town
house in a fashionable London
square. \

All the period furniture will be
imaginary, tou. When the drudge
looks in the nurror, the hypnotist
will persuade her she is young
and beautiful. Her lovely figure
will be clothed in the latest daring
evening model even though she is
as naked as the king in the fairy
tale.

ONE OF THE GREATEST NAMES
IN THE PAINT INDUSTRY.

As Agents of International Paints, Ltd., we can
offer you a wide range of the famous “International
brands, namely :—

RED ROOFING PAINTS

“Danboline” Anti-corrosive Paint (for galvanized
iron).

“Propeller” Ready mixed Oil Paint (for wooden
shingle, asbestos cement, and alumini-

* » * um). ,

Switch on the imaginary lights,
madam. Your imaginary guests
are arriving.

WALL PAINTS

“Propeller” Dry Distemper (for exterior walls).

They are all handsome, distin-
guished looking men in faultless
evening dress. The buffet table is
laid with horse meat turned into
prime roast beef, a lump of stale
cod turned into a smoked salmon;
a heel of mouldy cheese has be-
come a ripe Stilton.

“Lagomatt” Flat Oil Paint (for interior walls).

PAINTS FOR EXTERIOR AND _ INTERIOR

WOOD WORK AND METAL WORK

Hand round the glasses of
paraffin which sound waves have
turned into cocktails. Listen to
your imaginary witty remarks and
their imaginary witty replies,

“Lagoline undercoating and “Lagoline” Enamel.

PAINT FOR FURNITURE AND GENERAL th

Are you sure? Maybe it’s dish
water after all. Maybe your guests
are real after all.

| HOUSEHOLD PURPOSES ‘

' ane onde the re spark-
ing dish water (now champagney : ‘ ‘
ai ach the eae Ree thick “International” Quick Drying Enamel.
faces as they take the first sip... .

Yes, they do look a bit surprised, ALUMINIUM PAINT
irs" they? Are ie sure your a
sound Wav machi h eel :
model} wetked preseris? “Danboline-Silverette” Aluminium Paint.

And heavens, no wonder they
look surprised. And embarrassed,
too. '

\ “Bituguard” Black Bituminous Paint.
MOLASSES TANK. PAINT

Maybe... why, maybe, madam,
you’re naked after all.
LES. “International” Molasses Tank Paint (for the in-
terior of molasses storage tanks).

YACHT PAINTS & VARNISHES

BITUMINOUS PAINT






| For underwater surfaces, topsides, boot toppings,
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who criticise our fathers,
brothers and our sisters. t

Our cup of long suffering is long
since full.

our
_

DA COSTA -& CO., LTD. - Acer




We pay our taxes, we put up
with inefficiency and we co-oper-
ate to the largest stretch of our
human elastic. For what end? So
that Mr. Grantley Adams can avail
himself of the freely offered micro-
phone of the British Broadcasting
Corporation to tell the English lis~
teners that he would rather deal
with English people than with lo-
cal white Barbadians. The white
planter is blamed for every thing
by the Lord Bishop of Barbados
while Mr. Grantley Adams pub-
licly praises him at a dinner at
the Hastings Hotel.

And so the mad unhappy whirl
of invective goes on, while we who
strive our best to preach toler-
ance, the practise of Christian hu-
mility and love are Iabelled by
hysterical voices, reactionaries and
worse names besides.

Meanwhile the taxpayer con-
tinues to pay for the children of
mothers, some of whom can count
the fathers of their children on all
the five fingers of one hand,

Men and women who save
money and buy houses: thousands
of white people who live at stand-
ards of life far lower than that of
many not so white are included
in this general stream of abuse. It
is so easy to preach hatred, so
hard to seta better example. But
those who preach hatred, cannot
pretend to reform because “no
man should be a reformer without
first showing he values the society
in which the reforms he seeks are
to be fitted, and that he under-
stands how difficult it has been
to achieve even a society riddled
with defects, so hard is sustained
public-spiritedness for men.”

Goddard's
GOLD BRAID
RUM |
Svcs cecal

Those of us who show our ap-
preciation of Barbadian society by
living here know best how to value
those who come, who get a)

eam,

and who go away and leave us to
go on loving one another in our







CNR ge





;
|



SUNDAY, JANUARY 28.



1951

Bridgetown Never Sleeps=3

SUNDAY ADVO¢



MILL IN AN EX-STABLE

Opposite the Central’ Station

th ; irge a 7

‘ — . .: my 4 esd a whi - the - using cotton from . coun- The dryer is a large steel cabinet and their job is to trim off bits of y

Row it ik the homes . the west tries — from England, America, which is heated to boiling point thread, etc., which would spoil the * 66669960°"%
Toatiain Knitting Mille, the est Carriacou and India. The Indian and contains a number of fans. look of the garments. The goods gee oane

a new and,
vigorous industry for this island.
The Knitting Mills started opera

tion in March last year, and w ith
the staff divided into three shifts,



the knitting mills found

cotta. contains seeds and other
impurities, and must be cleaned
by a rewinding process.

It was interesting to follow a
ball ef yarn and sée it gradually

be, and passed on to the dryer

After drying, the piece goods are
prpened by being passed through
rohers

I then followed the materia] up-

The trimmers then take over

are then sorted to see that they.
are all up to standard, and the
ones that pass the test are taken
to a pressing room. After being
pressed they are folded by hand

ATE

iy

/ FOUND A FLOURISHING KNITTING



FAN GALE

- ‘ er
ON



oo



they work all day and all night. turned into a “Westknit” shirt. In stairs to the cutting department.-and then packed for dispatch.
I first visited ; the knitting department, whera There men and girls were cut- : ’ bt
Visited the spinning plant, all. the machinery.is American, I titg out shirts with electric cut- , About 15 per cent. of the West-
which js at the Cotton Factory,.a saw ingenious machines knitting fers, using cardboard patterns as ‘Mit garments are sold in Barba
bit fur her Gown the road There. vests, shirts, panties and the like .a guide. The pieces were then 9S, and the rest is exported all
I saw the raw cotton.from Car- Striped shirts, I discovered, are taken into the sewing room and OVer the West Indies — except
Facou being spun into yarn. Only not dyed after they are made, but assembled. In this room there are Jamaica. In Jamaica, where the
the Marie Gallante variety is used, are knitted. from balls of white a large number of girls using elec- ODly other knitting mill in the |
und it is estimated that a quarter and coloured thread. tric sewing machines, and each West Indies is, a protective tarifT
of the cotton used by the knitting one has her own particular job to Of Six shillings per dozen gar-

mills come from Carriacou. New
machinery now being installed
in the peers department, and
when it is in operation it will be
possible to use even more West
Indian cotton,

ments has been set up.

The West India Knitting Mills,
which employ 129 people, only
two of whom are not Barbadian,
inas made remarkable progress in
me short time that it has been in
operation, But, most remarkable
of all, is the Managing Director,
Aaron Karb, He has only been
in the knitting business fora
year, for ten years before that
Was in lumber in British Guia
He now works from seven in the
morning to twelve-thirty at night!

The material comes out of tha do
knitting machine in the form of dc
long, tubular “piece goods”, which
are then taken to a gigantic wash- With panties, of course, elastic
ing machine. They are then must be put in, and this is done
bleached or dyed, as the case may by a special machine,

Some put on the sleeves, some
the hemming, some put on but-
tons and others sew on the collars.



ENITTING MACHINES showing spools of yarn on the floor being |
knitted and automatically rolled into bolts of cloth.



DRYING MACHINE — Automatic steam dryer for bolts of cloth which are Washed and chemically pro-
cessed. Dries approximately 500 yds. of goods in from 30 to 44 minutes.





!
|
|



FPPPSSODSOF GOGO OGIO FOGSIGO

Mr. Lewis, cutter at right, will
Cut garments are then tied in bundles

CUTTING ROOM showing cutters operating automatic cutting machines.
cut approximately 200 dozen garments in 14-hour of type shown,

aud ‘pusked: to sewiig rods. SEWING ROOM showing sewing operators at work.

is then passed along’ until finally completed.

Each operator performs one operation and garment































































by the voll: drying process.

v= OSTERMILK....

For your free copy of illustrated Baby Book—Phone 4675

progross
tells yee

45666504
PPPS POPES OOO

€ - 4 ¢*
PROPOOOSOO LECCE PSOOTSOS,

PAGE SEVEN



4434

*

BRING US YOUR

PRESCRIPTIONS

tNSE
ACCEL

WE DISP

and

The Cosmopolitan Pharmacy

A wise mother lets baby decide about
the milk for bottle feeds. Lots of energy, steady
gains, contented days, peaceful nights — these tell her what she most
wants to know — baby is doing splendidly on Ostermilk.

Why can mother pin her faith so
firmly on Ostermilk ? Because, where
breast feeding is difficult or impossible
it is the perfect substitute for mother’s
milk. Osterzailk is finest grade cow's
milk, dried mnder the most hygienic
condithons,. The protein, great body-

fs made casily digestible
And

OF,

PSDP E CLEP PP EEOOCE LOE,

HARRISON’S-sroa0 sr.

HAVE JUST RECEIVED
A SHIPMENT OF

AGRICULTURAL |
FORKS

GOOD QUALITY — FULLY STRAPPED.
ONLY $4.7@ §Eacn.

The quantity for disposal is small



WE

and: future supplies are uncertain.



SEND

WITHOUT













(RATELY

LOO OCB COO BOLO BBCSO

SRR SR EER SERRE S
FRESH SUPPLY OF

US YOUR ORDERS

CAREFULLY

an a ds

{PURINA HEN CHOW §&

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

my JASON JONES & CO., LTD.—-Distributors
CEEt ttt tte





important additions are made: Lron
to enrich the blood ~. sugar to modify
the food for tiny digestions — Vitamin
D to help build strong bones and
teeth. Ostermilk is made by Glaxo
Laboratories Ltd,, who, since 1908,
have been pioneers in the develop-
ment of the best possible foods for
babies.



*

%



DELAY.







ODDO SSSS CCS SOSS





‘ : cwrnd present for under £1,300 and the s
Luke } isits Canadians Honour Spent 9 Hungry and Waterless Days Jamaica Gives Up Chamber's requirements were that |%
a cottage of this type to be econu- | X% ’ HARDWARE _ DEPT.
ica Jamaica’ s Maroons (From Our Own Correspondent) — of how they ran out of food on the Cottages At £1,300 mical should be possible — tor } TEL. 2364
amaic ron ou our coring sn, PORTIOMSMPAIM, dun sh 0000 Sey sod oc of wales B00, : Be
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Jan. 14 Nine “erdless” days and nights fourth; of phandoning shia’ ‘and (From Our Own Correspondent)
(From Our Own Correspondert) Jamaica's RMarvoons that ledend at sea, without food and water foundering—all of them in the last eran $56:5:6966656050905941004000964690060000008 CSREES
7 : oa ’ aa 2 " Aa 7 , ; : >, . NGSTC . Jame “ge al i
KINGSTON,- ary -tribe of: “freemen” living. in - rn da part of Rt ae ordeal ea ae nat a a? r- 7 te 8 thot i LADY BA DEN-POWELL LPO COLELLO ESOC SLLPL LOOPED
Step! uke, *ho tax-free compounds in the hills © 44 seamen who left Tobago en Gees, ang, Se ae St sir % ¥
jucbeded aces : Sel. as of the island, were honoured last 4 two-day fishing trip at the end of two weeks’ detention in jail i oe It danke OOtn a cron TO VISIT JAMAICA : E —“ x
© . : ’ . el ee cet 0G ay . oY afar ; “i se 4 )roposa € ance, w yovern.
Assistant’ Under-. Secretary of week by a party of Canadians led BS | pecernbar: , Six of the men there before being released on sions cuddaaetean a £80,000 middle ~ (From Our Own Correspondent) % FF j N 4 54 D = %
State for the Colonies, and Mr. by the Hon. Paul Martin, Canada’s &'ived in Trinidad by air from Tuesday. They reached Trinidad class housing scheme in the city i" as -f ‘ %
Henry °T.. Bourdillon, Chief Minister of Health and Welfare. Venezuela on Wednesday after- without a cent among them. Thos: of Kingston “Technical inability to Sete arn SED % %
Finance: Secretary at the Colonia! - ; _ hoon, «The others are expected. who have arrived are Dudley plan a ‘type of. house at a figure Lady Baden—Powell, head of the ® , a x
Ofitee, vartived. in| Jamaica “test At a. function which -will be Wood, 47 of Scarborough, Tobago called foe by the scheme is. said Girl Guides’ Movement throughout | % Y OUR I AMILY %
Saturday for a 10-day official’given wide -publicity’in the — An account of long rainless days John Edwards cf Scarborough the is. a ba seponsible for. this the world, is to visit Jamaica in | Q ~
visit : Dominion through the “Montreal of thirst and hunger as their 15- cook; Henzel Albert 38, of Duncan a oe: ad Barat uy * March on a fortnight’s stay. KS a ' x
"They. are at King’s House and Star,” the Canadian Minister pre- ton vessel drifted with the ocean Street, Port-of-Spain 16; Edgar “°° 0P™eP* An all-Island Rally is planned | WILL FAVOUR %
will hold discussions with local sented Colonel Rowe the Maroon currents alter the engine had Garraway, 25, mate; of California; It is impossible, the technica! by local guides in honour of her |Â¥ : x
Government officials on major chief of Accompong with a silver failed on their second day out was Bernard Jarvis, 38 of 6th Street, adviser teported to the Chamber, visit. While here, Lady Baden S $
matters of finance and develop- medal inscribed ‘to Colonel Rowe given by the men. Barataria and John Steward, 47 to build a satisfactory type of two- Powell will give several lectures | ¥ s
ment in Jamaica, from Canadian Admirers. They told of drifting for 13 days, of Scarborough, bedroom cettage in the city at throughout the island. DUTCH TABLE APPLES~-per tb $ .30- &
= ———<— % DUTCH PERLSTEIN BEER—per bottle 1g S
i a CINTA | i DET CASE... 4.00 ¥
= LAs aassssascsseamesanaamssaraamansamaeaneeen momeoeeemenennmee, ; wwe’ > r 7
‘i 4 Bis RICO CONCENTRATED CHICKEN BROTH—per tin ©1114 ¥
a? : ’ ag 2 | ix MELTIS TURKISH DELIGHT—pe Bete ~-9e |
‘; “IN SC Ss SEA VIEW % ROBERTSON'S GINGER MARMALADE per bottle 35
IN SICKNES = Ik CRAWPORD'S CREAM CRACKERS—per tin 137 >
1 1 il & HEINZ COCKTAIL ONIONS—per jar 1a &
x . + yh o [ % FRENCH USHROOMS—per tin 4 ©
ND IN HEALTH a fresh stock of old favourites GUEST HOUSE Bere Ryo yaa rat
HASTIvus, BARBADOS ¢ H. & P. SALAD STICKS—per tin 1.10 ¢
he nuciee wy cans x ROMARY'S PARMASTICKS—per tin slg
eS 5 } E ULE? SUES E | CARR'S ¢ S9ESE CRISPS oo tir bs os 1.10 ‘
WE ARE ALWAYS | FULLY STOCKED BAR [f/% prinkinG STRAWS—por box of 500. ims
e ! iS SeRVIFE i T. cho | RATES: $5.00 per Day & | % DANISH TINNED HAMS—All Sizes, g
x AT YOUR | upw: s x 3
(Inclusive .
ine FAMOUS | Apply— | eee SFP EAT ;
With a range of drug stores inthis City are specially Mrs. W. 8S. HOWELL | , 2 . $
stocked with the highest quality Drugs—youcan bring t t nee a EE 2
us your doctor's prescriptions with the confidence that S - > asd $
only the best drugs will be dispensed by a highly quali- 00 eme les — — ~ — % HEINZ & %
fied staff. From our wide experience we can also § ; ; >
suggest a tonic to keep ‘you fit and fine. Arch Supports, Foot fasers, Zino Pads for Bunions [0-DAY’S NEWS FLASH % AYLMERS %
‘ &
and otker items ‘ % > 1 . ‘ x
and Callouses Foo! Balm. Foot Powder. | ape tei Li $s BABY FOODS
KNIGHT'S ville narerae — elteae S s
P , 2 for $1.00 1% . %,
of comfort of the The space is needed for 1% Bb? per tin $
t “lect your Dook Bargai Mo .
T foot : ° q 4
Ta ¥ ‘ ‘ ereen aE qe »
DRUG STORES ; x irene, Sut openea, suree | DO? per doz
hade | >
| Ping shaden IS S
SSM RR A VE ORY RARE * =—_
: 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street JOHNSON’S STATIONERY §| } igh eh gi at, 9 x
FOR UALITY DRUGS ee eee ee ae v1 : %
“ae G and |} STAVSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.
i) eae HARDWARE 1g s
© 56363633666 OOOO hee.









SSS ne Re eee eae Seas eee ae _—

$2

LLL LLG LLLP SL LFF FF FFF SSS FFF FFF FFF FSF SP

COCSSSS SSS



PAGE EIGHT



D: H. Lawrence

Hy

The British novelist and
poet, D, H. Lawrence, died in
1930, leaving behind him such
great novels as Sons and
Lovers and such controversial
enes as Lady Chatterley’s
Lover. He believed much in
the world as he found jt to
be wrong, and spent his life
in a vigteht effort to find his
g0od threugh the medium of
literatufé;

The age of much material pro«
gress which preceded the first
world War of 1914—18 produced
among its writers many who



criticised the organisation and
tramework of society, while
taking for granted its general

aims. But gradually there be-
gan to appear a number of men
who denied that material progress
was, in fact, progress at all. The
most prophetic of these in Eng-
land was D. H. Lawrence. Law-
rence believed that western civili-
sation was in decay because Man
had shut himself off from his
true sources of vitality. During
the nineteen-twenties he became
the centre of one storm after an-
cther, aNd when he died in 1930
at the age of forty-four, there
appeared a great amount of re-
miniseence and Criticism, which
began to create a Lawrence leg-
end. : ) aka

David- Herbert Lawrence was
born in -1885 in the colliery vil-
lage of Eastwood in the English
Midland§. His father was a miner,
rough and ready, and rather
coarse; his mother was delicate
and cultured. As the boy grew
up there developed an intense
sympathy between him and his
mother, -which was to influence
him throughout his life and to pro-
vide the. subject of several of his
books.

in Eastwood, Lawrence came to
know the life of industry and also
that of the countryside, which
there is eVérywhere close at hand,
and the contrast between the two
cut him tothe quick. He studied,
won scholarships, attended Not-
tingham University, and then be-
came a teacher in a London
school. His poems and his first
two novels received much praise,
but it was not until the third,
Som and Lovers, that it was
realised that a new force had
risen in fiction; by this time his
mother was dead, and he had
left teaching, married and gone
to live in Germany, from whence
he had to return at the begin-
ning of the 1914—18 war.

Sons and Lovers is partly au-
tobiographical. It tells of the emo-
ticnal hold..of a mother over her
son, and ofthe struggle between
her and Miriam, the girl he loves,
In setting and structure it is not
unlike the work of one of the
“realist” novelists, Wells or Ben-
nett, but it was quite new in its
deep understanding of personal
relationships, and in the vivid-
ness with which it records sense
impressions and experiences,

This intensity, hanging over the
prose like air heavy with elec-
tricitv, can be felt in the opening
to his next novel, The Rainbow.

“The Brangwens had lived
for generations in the Marsh
Farm, in. the meadows. where
the EreWash twisted sluggishly
through ‘alder trees, separating
Derbyshire from Nottingham
shire [They] came and
went without fear of necessity,
working hard because of the
life that-was in them, not for
want of,.the money. Neither
were they thriftless..They were
aware of the. last halfpenny,
and instinct made them not
waste the peeling of their ap-
ple, for it would help to feed
the cattle. But heaven and earth
was teeming around them, and
how should this cease? They
felt the rush of sap in spring,
they knew the wave which can-
not halt, but every year throws
forward the seed to begetting,
and, falling back, leaves the
young-born on the earth. They
knew the intercourse between
heavens and earth, sunshine
drawn into the breast and bow-

+ wey

2 2




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NICHOLSON

els, the rain sucked up
day-time, nakedness that comes
under the wind in autumn.
Showing the birds’ nests no
longer. worth hiding. Their life
4nd inter-relations were such;
feeling the pulse and body ot
the svil, that opened
furrow for the grain, and be-
came smooth and supple after
their ploughing, and clung te
their feet with a weight that
pulled like desire .. °°
This paragraph reveals much of
the mature Lawrence, The prose
has great beauty—though it is
overcharged with words and
meaning—and the violence of the
imagery is inescapable. Man is
seen not so much in relation to
Society as to the createq world,
to the soil, plants, animals and
seasons. And the air is heavy with
Sex, because sex was for Law-
rence the central experience by
which man could regain his
“blood consciousness.” Ag his
work went on he became pre-
occupied with sex, examining one
type of sexual experience. after
another, seeking for the purely
natural relationship between man
and woman, that which was not
controlled by the mental will,
More and more he began to dis-
trust the rational part of the
mind, and to turn to the irration-
al, the “subconscious,” His mind,
he sald, was a clearing in a dark
forest, and he waited for the
“Dark Gods” to come and take
possession of him, More and more,
now, he began to be attracted to
the non-mental existence of ani-
thals and plants:

“Folded in like a dark thought
For which thé language is lost
Tuscan cypresses,

Is there a great secret?”

After the 1914-18 war Law-
rence wanted to escape from the
industrial society of England. He
went first to Italy, living among
the Italian peasants, but he felt
Europeiin civilisation hanging
round him like a second-hand
overcoat, and soon he left for
Australia. Australia produced the
novel Kangaroo, but did not
satisfy him, and he sailed across
the Pacific to Mexico. From this
Mexican experience we get many
essays, poems, some of his finest
snort stories, and The Plumed
Serpent.

In the last mentioned story,
Kate, a cultural European, goes to
Mexico, meets two men and goes
with them to an Indian village
where she is initiated into a sort
or religious-political movement
which is to restore the old
Mexican gods. There is much
beauty in the native ritual and
chants, but there is also squalor
and brutality, and Kate is both
fascinated and disgusted,

in the novel Kate steels herselt
and stays. Lawrence did not
stay, but returned to Europe. By
ow the tuberculosis which had
troubled him for years was in
aun advanced stage, and he was a
very sick man when he wrote
kis last novel, Lady Chatterley’s
Lover. Throughout his life he
had tried to’live according to his
own doctrine, but by now he must
-have realised that for him the life
of the intellect, of the spirit,
could never be subordinated to
that of the senses; his physique.
let alone his genius, made that,
impossible, But in Lady Chat-
terley he made a last desperate
attempt to solve his problem by
allegory. The scene is Derby-
shire, and Lady Chatterley, whose
husband is paralysed (symboli-
cally as well as literally) from
the waist down, turns to her
gamekeeper for a father for the
child she wants. The book is a
jong, lyrical account of their
lovemaking, written with the
greatest detail and frankness, but
to the sympathetic reader its
effect is neither erotic nor shock-
ing, but profoundly saddening.
Soon afterwards Lawrence died
at Vence, in Southern France.








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SUNDAY

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ADVOCATE

oe





FROM 160 ‘PRENCH-SCHOOL’ PAINTINGS. SIR GERALD KELLY CHOSES THE |
ONE HE'D ‘LIKE 10 PRINT

If 1S AS THOUGH BROOKLYN DODGERS HAD INVADED LORD'S

By OSBERT LANCASTER
To most of the Royal Academy’s
regular patrons the sudden ap-
pearance at Burlington House of
the paintings of the modern
French school will doubtless prove
as shocking as would the unher-
alded invasion of Lord’s by the
Brooklyn Dodgers to the older
members of the MC.C.

Those walls where year after
year have hung “Spring Sunshine
at St. Ives” and A Highland
Winter” are now given over to
the menacing abstractidns of Kan-
dinsky and Mondrian.

And in place of Sir Alfred's
gleaming horsefiesh are the
mechanical streamlined nudes by
Leger,

To the rest of the world, how-
ever the shock is likely to be less.
In the 20 years which have passed
since these works first horrified
our parents, their influence has
been profound. Not just in the

In trying to assess his work we
must consider it as a whole.
Lawrence never really found a
literary form which suited him:
his novels are mostly too long,
and lack variety; his verse has
not the precision and conciseness
which belongs to poetry of the
first rank. Yet it is obvious that
both novels and poems are works
of genius, and so, too, are those
books like A Fantasia of the
Unconscious and Apocalypse, in
which out of a mixture of psycho-
analysis, ancient symbols and a
private cosmogony, he tries to
create a myth through which he
can formulate his beliefs,

His most satisfactory work is
probably in the short stories, in
the best of which he is more
economical than usual, and _ his
Prose burns with a bright love.
liness as fresh as gorse: the blas-

hemous but beautiful Man Who

fed, the enchanting Man Who
Loved Islands,.and the hypnotic
Woman Who Rode Away, What-
ever his faults (and they were,
I believe, proportionate to his
genius) he added a new vitality
to fiction and a new beauty to
prose, and he made thousands
aware of their almost-lost com-
munion with the world of nature,







realm of painting but in everyday
life,
Today hardly a hoarding or a

magazine would look quite the
way it does had the early Cubists
never existed,

The bisected. guitars and frag-
ments of newspaper headlines
which once seemed so chic and
unexpected when encountered in
the paintings of Gris and Braque
are now the commonplaces of the
commercial textile designer.

And the ferocious brilliance of
the colour contrasts that once
dazzled and appalled is now even
occasionally mimicked with a
notable lack of success, by the
more daring Academicians them-
selves,

But it is not easy to estimate
the real value of any school of
painting at second-hand, It was
largely to overcome this difficulty
that Sir Gerald Kelly decided to
add five rooms of French Moderns



NEW LOOK

to the already extraordinarily
mixed bag of pictures which have
gone to make up the Winter Ex-
hibition,

Unfortunately, quantity rather
than quality appears to have been
the guiding principle of selection.
And it is no more true of modern
painting than of any other that
the larger the picture the better,
and four third-rate canvases of
any one painter do not equal one
first-rate.

are two masterpieces by
Braqué and a wonderful Rous-
seaus” Hamlet however is not
the same when the Prince of
Denmark has vanished behind
the Iron Curtain. Picasso’s with-
drawal on idealogical yrounds
leaves a gap which no one ‘else
ean fill

.

Off Their Game

Maybe Sir Gerald Kelly hoped
that ithe students who are the

FOR





A BEST-SELLER

By JON HOPE

@ The men who print the
Authorised version of the Bible
in England are combining re-
sources to present it in a new
manner,

in the Reader’s Bible, as it
will be called, traditional double~
column page form will give way
to normal book format. Between
them. Eyre and Spottiswoode,
Cambridge University Press and
Oxford University Press pian to
make the new edition available
by May. It will be 1,938 pages.
Cost: 30s,

The Bible is still the biggest
selling book of all. Every year
3,000,000 copies are produced in
U.K. But supply lags far behind
demand.

W. A. Collins, whose firm print
the Bible in, Scotland, reports:
“Though enormous quantities of



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Bibles ‘were sent to the United
States. last year, the Americans
cannot get them fast enough;

@ How fares the publishing
business? Publisher Arthur Bar-
ker, who has just returned to his
business after two years’ illness,
has been having a look at the
position, This is his verdict:

“The _ supply of paper. and
binding boards is rapidly becom-
ing serious. No prospect of it
getting better in the next two
years. But from the publisher's
point-of view, this may be a bless—
ing in disguise, Reduced supplies
will mean that in a year or two
there ,will be a real shortage of
new books—and that in turn will
mean a demand for some books
that cannot be sold at the
moment. Lately, too, there has
been a tendency for publishers to
conceatrate attention on best-
sellers,







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Shell is proud to have played a leading part for fifty years in the

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4

public he is eager to reach would
be inspired by seeing the actual
works of the great men whom

they have hitherto - worshipped
from afar. Or, as seems not
altogether improbable, he anti-

cipated a sharp disillusionment.
In either case he is likely to be
disappointed.

For with the exception of
Braque, Matisse, and Miro, the
big men are almost all off their
game.

Far too many of the second,
and even the third, eleven have
been given a place in the team,

Many of the paintings are no
better and no worse than the
average at the Royal Academy,
but baseball is not quite the same
as cricket and the M.C.C. may be
forgiven if they can’t recognise
the second-rate when they see it.

«LES. |



(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
TRINIDAD,
With carnival about twelve days
off, the City hotels and guests
houses are daily refusing persons
who are) requesting accommoda-
tion, especially Visitors from Vene-

zuela, and the other neighbouring
territoriés,

One hotel manager said that he
has been receiving cables and
letters every day requesting re-
servations, He pointed out that
his hotel has been booked up
about two weeks ,ago. This, he
added, is the biggest influx of
visitors for quite a long time.



“In the future, publishers might
not be able to spare enough of
their supplies to manufacture
huge quantities of these best-
sellers. Instead they will have to
spread them more equitably over
their list. This may hit some
authors—but will improve the
general state of the whole trade.”
World Copyright Reserved
k aia L.E.S.



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Sf. .







UARY 28,






























ning.

ordon, author of one of

gives for sudden
mthusiasm is that men
| war were the chief
As the meat ration
led they have tended
arch, and waistlines
lark, a qualified nurse
administrative hos-
, Jane Gordon is the
r Charles Greaves.
Wsonal diet problems
to put on weight.

First

Nesta Pain, she

in dehydrating fat
liquids. But she

‘ other slimming
iVocating Yoghourt as
od for the person who
} weight, without ac-
ggard, starved look,


























portant than losing
sing inches,” Miss
‘me. “I ‘think a tape
bathroom is more
a weighing

ert who holds this
beth Arden. While
ble to generalise about
ight, she says a waist
ent 10in. smaller than

1951

EN Lead
Slimming
Craze

EILEEN ASCROFT

e 1920s, when it was the»height of
half-starved, has there been such a

m-lined fashions with tiny waists have
watching their weighing machines.
mén who are most keen on dieting,”

art of losing weight quickly.

the world. .



the best recent

pees ‘

Manv fashion houses fear that
pure wool will disappear from

the utility ranges by 1952,
to the ever-rising cost

wool. Best buys this spring
therefore, wool utility
weather outfits.

coat.

eee eee eae eee

their fortunes, tend to have an
even bigger contrast between waist
and hip measurement. Here are
the measurements of one of Lon-
don’s top models, Shelagh Wilson:
bust 34in., hips 35in., waist 23in.,
height 5ft. 9}in.

Other Women’s Lives

SHE is brunette, blue-eyed at-
tractive, fortyish, nameless (be-
cause of professional etiquette)
and one of the busiest women in
+ a woman doctor.

Her practice is in a residential
West London area and her Na-
tional Health patients include
many nationalities, including Far
East diplomats’ wives who have
to describe their symptoms
through an interpreter,

_Barristers, civil servants, artists,
aa hostesses, students, sales-
women and musicians feature
every day on her crowded diary

tn summer they
have their own short jackets;
in winter they go under a heavy









but it is the housewives who are
her special interests. Perhaps be-
cause she does her own cook-
ing,+ shopping and most of her
housework, she can understand so
well the extra strain that women














































LANCE MODEL

5 SALLY ANN VIVIAN, a

her of Princess Margaret’s
‘of friends and one of the
debutantes of 1949, has
a fashion model, She
as a free-lance, has her
on the books of a Mayfair
yy, and receives around
forgan hour’s modelling.

‘2

enty-year-old Miss Vivian is
only daughter of Lord Vivian,
* Charles Cochran’s partner,
| Lady Vivian. This is her
d job since leaving school.













t was in the export depart-
lent ofa Piccadilly store. Then
summer she went to help Lady
iden, sister-in-law of Mr. Anthony
len, as an assistant at her pri-
ate school in Kensington.

" Blue-eyed, with honey-blonde

r, Miss Vivian usually models
ay and evening clothes suitable
or girls of her own age or in the
te teens. Her measurements:
. 8in, in shoes; waist 22in; hips
6in.; bust 33in.

—LES.

:



face these days,

“Nerves or the request for a
tonic bring many women to my
eurgery,” she says. “Nine times
cut of ten it is a mental problem
causing the trouble, and very of—
ten housing.”

_Listening, giving a word of ad-
vice, even practical assistance by
way of a call to the housing au-
thorities or the home-help organi.
sation, can sometimes do more
than any tonie to avoid illness
and breakdown. So convinced is
this young woman of the neces-
sity of maintaining the old per-
sonal relationship of. doctor and
patient that she has limited the
number of her patients.

So Lonely

“Most frustrating problem for a
modern doctor is the man or wo-
man on their own,” she tells me.
“No one to cook and care for
them or even let the doctor in,
and not the interest or ingenuity
tq produce nourishing meals on
one person’s rations. Perhaps they
are not sick enough for a hospital
bed and the local home-helps are
over-taxed.”

Apart from being on call 24 hours
a day taking two surgeries most
days in the week, private calls
and clinic work, the woman doc-
‘tor has to face the lack of that
all-important person, the doctor’s
wife, to take telephone calls, re-
ceive patients and do much of the
paper work.

There is little time left for a
personal life. A little reading, an
occasional visit tothe theatre -or
friends, and two short holidays a
year motoring in England are the
only times she can forget her
busy, harassed, fascinating life.

In Colour

Linen cupboards in the U.S.A.
are highly coloured. Navy blue
sheets are

striped, with matching pillow
cases.
Fashion eccentricities

accident-conscious,

nasty knocks, even if it means
staging them deliberately.

smart with white
initials; latest additions are candy-





due
raw
are,
oll-



Why Mothers’

Boys Die
Young...

BY CHAPMAN PINCHER

A four-year-old boy with a
bump on his head, a burn on his
fnger, a bandage on his knee, and
his mouth full of mustard is well
on the way to enjoying a healthy,
lengthy life.

A famous child-health specialist
says so in a sober medical report
published today.

The child most susceptible to

serious accidents—which now kill

more youngsters than any single
disease—is the one so molly-
coddled by his mother that he
never has a chance to become

The specialist, Dr. Harry
Dietrich, of Beverly Hills, urges
mothers to ensure that their
youngsters experience plenty of

STAGE KNOCKS

The critical time for completing
this education is between the ages
of one and five. After that it
may be too late. Dr. Dietrich
gives mothers these .tips:—

LEAVE a jar >=
of hot mustard or ton
a bottle of vine-
gar were the
children are
bound to find it.
One taste will He
convince them \
more memorably than a score of
“naughty boy” commands that
some things are best left alone.





LET him play with a mechani-
cal egg-whisk. A chipped finger
nail or a grazed knuckle is a
small price to pay for learning re-
spect for machinery.

ALLOW the child to fall out of
chairs—being careful to see first

that he has no dangerous imple-
ments in his hand,

LET “EM CRY

Dr. Dietrich condemns the well-

meaning mother who tries to give
100 per cent, protection to her
This saves them from

children,
injury while they remain at home,
but it exposes them to terrible

risks as soon as they go to school.

Excessive mother-sympathy and














SUNDAY

The new maddening pussle is



ADVOCATE

meee

here again

DARTWORDS



O many people seem to have
been infuriated by the first
DARTWORDS that the ‘Advocate’
today repeats the dose. For new-
comers, this is a crossword with-
out clues. You have to arrange
the words so that they lead logi-
cally from GARTER to GLORY.
The seven rules which govern the
relationship between ahy word
and the word that precedes are:—

1
2

A word may be an anagram
of the word that precedes it.
IT may be a synonym of the
word that precedes it.

IT may be achieved by adding
one letter to, subtracting one
letter from, or changing one
letter inthe preceding word.
IT may be associated with
the previous word in a saying,
simile, metaphor, or associa-
tion of ideas.

ww

a

IT may form with the preced-
ing word the name of a well-
known person or place in
fact or fiction.

IT may be associated with
the preceding word in
title or action of a book, play,
or other composition.

NONE of the foregoing rules

co)

the



Pen Pals

R. A. GRAY, 13 Bethell Street,
Ormand. S.E.14. Melbourne, Vic-
toria, Australia. Is interested in
exchanging stamps.

Michael Merrick, No. 20 St.
Joseph Street, San Fernanda, TTin-
idad. Age 15, hobbies collecting
stamps, reading and going to the
cinema.

Anthony Gonsalves 14—14 Nors
ton Street, Wortmanville, George-
town, British Guiana. Age 16,
likes boxing, stamp collecting and
exchanging newspapers.



Birthday Greetings

Happy birthday to Erin Jones
and Peggy Dean who celebrate
their birthdays this week,

Rupert tugs at the strap
stiff, and before he can fet the
window down the train has cleared
the station and is slipping through
the countryside,
without getting any reply.

@ we are in a fix,” says dismally.
** Nobody knows we're here.



consolation in the form of sweets,
special favours, or cuddling should

from be avoided, however difficult this

America include man-made nylon may be.

fur coats, mothproof and wash-
able selling at about £43: fur

vests, worn under loose suit jack-
ets,
from corn, which resembles woo
and is anathema to moths.

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED

and a new material made

“Split lips,

The doctor believes, of ©ourse,
that parents should provide full

protection against serious dangers.

London Express Service

ELIT IS AN PRODUCT

blistered fingers,
simple fractures and gory lacera-
tions must be accepted as normal

] Wear and tear,” he writes, 4















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ANDREWS

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The egeay and madd itch of
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@ Solution on Monday,



CROSSWORD



Across

(anag.)
Eminence, (
Part of the

Nice cart, (8)

, what mig?

{

te

1.
7. 8)
8 church
appear rose red. 7
.1, Partitions the nostrils, (5)
+2. Fish, (3)
13. Emphasise what money
a little account, (6)
7. That's the — to get a polish, (3)
(4)
(3)

is

1

19.
20.
21.

2

It's a change from oats,
Found in ali boiled shirts.
Gravel under foot; sounds like

it. (6)

Graduate to two directions, how

low! (4) 23. Give way, (4)
Down

Tell with the rat near,

Rate love as a lift. (8)

Heinously wicked, (9)

A rawhide thong. (4)

Made up by a senile tec, (9

Quite
reverse.

Welsh orpplen ?

(
Sounds an expensive animal. (4)
Congealed (3
Bird that is
thing. (5)
Sounds as though the Colonel is

ed.
(4)

©

(7)

)
the

3)
liable to lift any-

@ FSe epserr

a

ie, (3)
In which sable may be pear
(), 18, Tie.



y's puzzle,—Across:
Cineraria

Solution of vesterda
1, Repertory; 5, Eleph
10, ni

Omit; 11, Outer; 15, Nitrogen; 14,
Romero: 15, Alert; 17, Verse; 18, Caught
Down: Reconcile; 2, Eliminate:
Pen: 4 Yuarling, 6, Petrol; 8 Room: 9,
Auger; 12, Enough: 14, Rave; 16, Ere.

Book--2

Se

haven"t got any tickets, and we
don't know where the train's going,
and it’s all your fault! What on
earth made you run away from
Constable Growler like that ? Don't
you like him?" Rosalie doesn’t
answer. By this time she is
thoroughly frightened, and only
begins to ery loudly. . {

————— LT

“ Beauty, you lifted

up my sleeping eyes, 6
And filled my heart

with longing with a look.’’

JOHN MASEFIELD

a,
U breath f

Like a happy memory, the haunting

fragrance of Mitcham Lavender brings
the English countryside to Barbados
t Originally made by Potter & Moore

in their Mitcham Distillery two hun-
dred years ago, Mitcham Lavender
has ever since been dedicated to
Beauty the World over. ‘

STORES

DRUG







ASTHMA MUCUS

Dissolved First Day

Choking, gasping, wheering
Asthma and Bronchitis poison
your system, sap your energy, ruin
your health and weaken your heart,
In 3 minutes MENDACO—the pre-
scription of a famous doctor—cireus
lates through the blood, quickly curb-
ing the attacks. The very first day the
strangling mucus tis dissolved, thus
iving free, easy breathing and rest-
ul sleep. No dopes, no smokes, no
injections, Just take pleasant, taste-
less MENDACO tablets at meals and
Ne entirely free from Asthma and
Bronchitis in next to no time, even
though you may have suffered for
years, MENDACO ita 80 successful
that it is guaranteed to give you free,
easy breathing in 24 hours and te
tompletely stop your Asthma in 8 days
vr money back on return of empty

ckage. Get MENDACO from your

ho=at. The guarantee protects you,



cee
Pay a visit each day
with G. A. Service
You will find G. A. Service the
most popular assistunt to Doctors,
Nurses, Didticians, and Cooks.

At the General Hospital
24 HOURS PER DAY SERVICE
for cooking and Sterilising



STIFF NECK,

RHEUMATISM,
PAINS IN_ THE
JOINTS

You can get speedy re-
lief by rubbing in

SACROOL

This great
Pain-Killer on Sale at

Knights Drug Stores











PAGE NINE



“Soaping’dulls hair_
Halo glorifies it!














Halo—Nota scoop,
not a cream—
connot leave
dulling film!

Halo quickly
removes dandruff
from hair and
scalp!

Halo gives
fragrant lather
evenin
hardest water!

Halo leaves













hoir soft, easy
Made with a to manage,

new patented ingredient sparkling with
hiohliahts?

HALO REVEALS THE HIDDEN
BEAUTY OF YOUR HAIR!

NEW Features the only pen
ons BP with the
BEAUTY é
mle

COW a

Here's news about the world’s most famots pen!
There is a NEW Parker “51”, finer than ever
before. And it is the only pen with the remark«

NM sf able new Acro-metric Ink System... the
hi , greatest ever devised! ‘

MAM Mg ae The Aero-metric Ink System is a wholly new,

She scientific method of drawing in, storing, safeguard:

ing and releasing ink, to give the most satisfactory
pen performance ever known.

See this fine pen . . . admire its slim grace. . .
experience its silky writing . . . for yourself, or as @
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This pen alone is designed for satisfa-tory use
with Parker Superchrome—the super-brilliant,
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@ NEW FOTO-FILL FILLER

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@ NEW PLI-GLASS RESERVOIR
@ NEW VISIBLE INK SUPPLY

and 4 other great advances

-wolus most wanted pen

Prices: With Lustraloy Cap $19.77

|

With nolled Gold Cap $24,05,
Distributors for Barbados:

A. S. Bryden & Sons (Barbados) Ltd.
P.O, Box 403





Bridgetown.
csontetinnninsantitalaiagis isicabantiasteanienensanpretiniapinaheiniphpabininitl
e




tells us
about pinking

Our scieniists protest that this is a slanderous misrepresentation
of a serious test to safeguard the Anti-Knock qualities of
REGENT. What really happens is that regular tests are made
in a special engine, the compression of which can be progress-
ively increased until the fuel is made to knock. A “Bouncing
Pin’’ resting on a diaphragm in the cylinder head measures
the intensity of Knock electrically, thereby enabling us to
determine and control the Anti-Knock qualities of the sample.
This is only one of many tests which safeguard the quality and
performance of REGENT petrol.

REGENT

PETROL
Sterling Quality =,



DISTRIBUTORS :—

DA

COSTA & CO., LTD.

AND

JAMES A. LYNCH & CO., LTD.









Charged With College Chief maUTT AND, SEF8 Bustamanite May Go|
$6.000 Discussions

KINGSTON, Jam., Jan. |
OLICE CONSTABLES a:

Write Direct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice —Free

THE STEPPING STONES
TO SUCCESS........

-/ Don’t hesitate about your future ! Go forward,
b confident that The Bennett College will see
you. through to a sound position in any career
you choose, The Bennett College methods

are individual. There's @ friendly,



PAGE TEN SET Ky ,
SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 1951
reniennteepnenplligsartinsiettenass te













Leader, has now accepted t!
invitation of several B.G., labour
leaders, it is reported he ©, for
himself and the Honourable
I. W. A, Barrant, Minister fox




d DR. HAROLD PAGE, Principal
in, of the Imperial College of Tropi-

, cal Agriculture is now in Barba-
discuss with Sir George
d members of his staff,







Bustamante, Jamaica’s Lab
alias “Barracuda,” at the Garr

on Friday night and brought him do¢




The Honourable WwW A
16-year-old Wilfred |






to the Central Police Station wees elas deenien Sei Agriculture, Lands and Commerce personal touch that encour-

Toppin, a resident of Bay Land, ovisory services aul. eaanrdae to visit British Guiana within th: ages quick progress: and
appeared before the City Police matters of common interest af- - makes” for early
Magistrate Mr. C. L. Walwyn fecting the West Indies as a whole. Mr. Barrant, who recently paid efficiency.
yesterday morning, charged with He _ arrived on Friday by a visit to the mainiand





colony on a_e rice’ study
mission, has received information
from British Guiana that plans
are being made to weleome the
Jamaica Ministers,

demanding $6,000 with menaces p W.I.A. from Trinidad accom-
from Mr. A. W. Birch of the panied by his wife and will be
Progressive ‘Bus Company, He here for one week as a guest of
Was remanded Sir George and Lady Seel.

A charge of loitering, which Dr. Page told the Advocate
was formerly brought against yesterday that they had just com-
Toppin, was withdrawn by the pleted two big buildings at the



beast. *
YOUR CAREER


















ice. 1.C.T.A. There are, a new bio- . NI
event , , . logical laboratory which costs Villagers Do Not Accountancy Exame. an Conteris Shae Haga ond
TANLEY FYBRACE of Good- < Aviation ‘Engineering and Commercial Art Quantity Surveying
re ore ioe about $350,000 and a new sugar ad : Draughtsmanship, All Radio Service Engineering
land, St. Michael, was treated ®% . F ae ee Wireless 8 Ps lo $
. : esearch laboratory which costs a non ic hveamien Branches Radio (Short Wave)
at the General Hospital for in- * Pe wnat a YOeY , ree : ive n armo Book-keeping — Dey Secretarial Examinations
ar saga on oad “S08 ~ about $150,000. YESTERDAY MORNING these two aircraft parked alongside each other on the parking apron at ae fork of We ao Ceslecte of Mereicinas Shorthand (Pitman’s
juries on Friday night and de- Both these buildings had been Seawell presented a striking contrast. The bi DC y . (From Our Own Correspondent) Caapeeery ana Taleary Engineers Surveying °
‘tained. : built with central funds from Se me oe é St. g one—a -4, T.C.A. aireraft, the small one KINGSTON, Jam., Jan. Chemistry Mathematics Seeman of Bendioreite
_Fybrace, who was riding his Development and Welfare in Eng- —an Auster aircraft belonging to the Light Aeroplane Club of Trinidad. After a week observing the life chu somien Mining, All Subjects “(city @.Guilds)
bicycle, was involved in an ac- land and would be used largely : - onsen ne led by the average villager in Engineering, All Branches Novel Writing Television
cident with the motor car O-38, for research work on cocoa, ban- Trinidad, Mr. James W. Brewster, on ee Police. Special Course yaleohony =




next few weeks,

If your requirements are not licted cbove, write us for free advice
Direct Mail to DEPT. 188 7
THE BENNETT COLLEGE LTD.

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND






i j 2 ‘Ne :
owned and driven by Edmund anas-and sugar. W llH dO ; ¢ W I B noted Anthropologist and Sociolo-
Walton of Parris Hill, St. Joseph, He said that the object of im- 1 an ver Ive oe oys ay mong gist from Greece, has found that
the people in the rural areas of

at the junction of Roebuck, Hinds~ eres the ean mpnitions of * * . tt
bury and Tweedside Roads, Both the cocoa industry, not only of Pl F Id i hn l K. . D c d the Colony do not live in harmony
By na thg ee Grefiada, ea aying 1e ec 1ca oréan ea with each other, Out of every



vehicles were damaged. provide information that would
Elkanah White, who was riding : e three houses he visited, he said, he

on the bar of the ’cycle was also be used in the development of The members of the Housing Edueat By WARREN WHITE found that neighbours were not

ie . . cocoa growing. Board will formally hand over 10n

injured: He was treated at the “The banana work is primarily on Friday evehine ot © che’ SUWON, Jan. 27

Hospital and discharged. to kreed a banana which is im- ¢he THY ete ae oe aa ale



oh speaking terms with one
; "i pha ; ; another. ‘This sityation, he added
newly erected pavilion at By E. B. TIMOTHY Suwon, seemingly little touched was well a for the great

w EVENTEEN-YEAR-OLD Darcey mune to Panama disease. That : ;

S co ; coe ge Seen ew re Deacons Playing Field to the by the fighting that has raged x » eriminal ‘ad ai
S Weekes _of Waterford Ten- work is primarily for the aaa Playing Field Committee. The
Full Text

PAGE 1

I'M.I IHI I \ I M M>AY AllVOI ATI V JWIAUV 2P. 1S31 CLASSIFIED ADS. TELEPHONE 2MB I>lrl> lOS.WtllF.il ltd %  '. %  ) %  !• ..d at 4 30 o flock for ihe • %  THANKS %  K-'ui tl'-IM the luneial of IN Mr; MO li IAM rH MKVI HOUSES i ai -an. tarned Three bedroom' Electro light .,-.! MW, %  !* %  !" iMf Wavcll Apo' 1 W A Hibbv. River Road M 1)1 -in CMAMN I1n of 1 bedroom* all w rr. reception rooma and IfnMMM Foe BBpOklUm (llldfl.. K.HI'autAN7.AFully lui lodern rtiti\fnip^fM 4 lM CM. Phono 01-33. nxMin) MOUSE -In H*ain.-< m Sea •>* Pull particulars Telepho.it 114 Ml 51 In JQ.la.ol 1 Mm I fc Mildred rail., um > hf< Thai i. .. Bui what A it *Mh all Wh.i read Ihe path .la.gne: .low so Wei i. .iieni. %  -ely gray, wtiwr ii" Mr Say ii, Mm. Edith Lovel iU.B-A huh Wiiinurhb. i "•" grand childMill—In Kill V % IJK AUTOMOTIVE CAR — Hi lima. l) <-•: Liu Hi* mileage and In good tMmm Chi*. Me ErnoBr34.1*1-4.1 CAR X H Dodge S I',-..,.-, A I condition and Hceivsed till Jui Cagilact Leon Alley ne al Ton Ho.sl Oarage aliout • %  ol car Mr*. A M Arthur. Yorkshire M.l*l~*tt m good >>mi Clarke. Ml 31—In CAR rord 10 h.n nrdn. Apply Ml*. Imi.. The I-DIB CAR—Clt—en 11 e.eellrul condllii i-lard Apply: Dial 400ft Br**FA low model In Owner leaving Ailrncle* Lid II I 11 'i FARAWAY. Si Philip Owal FurnuhI 1 brdmimi, Water-mill aupplv. lahtmg Plant. Double terport. 1 servant -m*. From Fobruaa1*4. Dial 4470 Mltl-TFM. FLAT-Al Sea View. Upper nev Rmt oproitte Bay Mansion a In Basement Appl> on prrml-e. JllilII %  TRINITY COTTAOt—nt Jalnfi COM Fully furnished containing 5 bedroon alto a telephone. Available (o( month, i f.i,,,,..!. M MM ad *•* %  .-I %  i* ber 1*51 Phone MM. 11 .LSI—I NfcWHAVXN bed roorif. . Plant Double For April Dial %  all UgMaM WYNDAL, Thr. nih aver. eoi..en lied room h MM, on ftorkle? re servant n-irn _lh. For ra.u unral*. Available from ll HI II MJIIILS £25 -. -d. ea.ll. e.n 1.1 pfl tl,ll| I >ri • .gland." :: %  i M iBn MAY UNITE DAMASCL'S Thr SM.HI (1. VI mmriil ha %  liMd the toxl of llM tion nubtnittcd to the Ai.ib Lgue Political (ummiiuv tng for MRPSB member* of the I-eague to unne m one tolid bloc. The lesolutlon ittangly urged M place that Ltagur be replaced by the United A !" i> StaterUtart attwl fHiMaUon which Rpoufi make the %  i power, but IIJV. them iiidrpenrlent m iinal affaln, or confederation which would be a pcrinion of the cow common external i>Lirpo*x-s IteMtr.Weymouth Club MFMUIHs ... heniii rnUndgal ol :i>* Aauiual Orn*ral Mr< th* II, .id Mrmnr.ai MMMa> Night nth Jam... PMl 31 In. Removal Notice ROGERS BARREH SAIaTON Beg rn.llf. it.| r Cu.lomn. thai th.-v he moving npitali* J N Goddaidi Fntu Building iN*t Doon a. from th* Kin Januat, 1SJI. M 1 l|-n IM III M S\l I S AUCTION TUESDAY, mn at 12 nao. ( AtWON I.ODOE. Ilarhar-v. Hill Oaf**? II n II (I rovwrd wmi A ShjBt. flood Wallaha Po.1. upright, al-o SERVANTS ROOM II It x B fj gettB mvnred with O. I. Trtn.i Ca-t, T,• Inremoved Dial mtl. R A.cl.rr McKenil* Ai.rtwi.eer. rill In I illli'I "Hi;' 'il'-ilimi 11 i I.; i R^ klr lh. wt : I s,.., Slatey A* Clarke-. I It* i ,,,*,,phone Sinarr Hand Machine;. c**d. -. per Annum under Ihe Si drew Parl.rt Churrh Loan Ael. And Will ra* received b/ ihe underalgned UP lo fehruarv lid IM1 Signed C. A SKINNTH. V.-lry Ctork. Si. Andrew Ml 31 •" ON Tueadav JOUl by order .,( Ir K' %  '" """ will Mil In. Furmiurc "Brigada Houar" aarrlaon which Include* Dining Table. Upright Chair*. Chin*. Cablnel. Omanwnt Table*. Flert-ic Floor Lamp*. Vary nice Bridge Tabl. and Art,, Chair, .ilh I' I lam niand* all In Mahof al Vtr Oood Poker Table. PUno by Ack e. P%e Radio, linger Treadu U.S. Assume \ru Slogan FnW O TON. Jan 2T j A new slogan—-slrcngih for the free world—from U State* of America"— AIII in future appear on American financed 1 %  oat Asia. Ii i* ill gligan' %  % %  i C. Foster, Ad tor <*f E.CJ\.. annoiii: to-day, finid the Marshall Plan Of self-help and mutual "led forward in I njsnmma f"r the continued building up ..; Uie BCOnotnlc itn nations to help llietn defend themselves ogainrt aggTessioii hum without and from wjihtn. rteuler DETERMINATION WKLUNtlTON. Beinuse none of haji etl her to drhR Did woman of klberl, A kland, went to I instructor of the Auckland Aero Club and ;isked for ^ trial lesson. She got it and will if more NOT QIJ1TB NFW YORK. The falteat m.in in AJMlte i flft. Hm uround the fl Bin tall Bui InJLI^I d.iined his lifelm.i to weigh fit stone He dltd UUl week and his 48-stone. Mil) LISBON, Twr. nines of gypsies engain'H rj lUrd fleered ihe streets and stopped nil ti:d!ic Tor twvive hours m the town of Olh.io The Police imniiv brain up %  (.r 'he town, wiiiui had caused dim restauiiints to close down. The .mo wher a boy from one tribe slapped thi ace of a girl from the other. GOVERNMENT NOTICES APPOINTMENT OF AMIBTANT EAR NOSE AMD THEOAT %  UOEON. GENERAL HOSPITAL Apbi^' %  r the part-time nppoinUnent of Assistant Ear, Nose nd Throat Surgeon. General Hospital, which will beeorne vacant on 1st February, 1851. The *.a)arv attached to the appointment is t240 per annum and th! Officer Is permitted lo make charges for the above-mentioned i to paying potientin the Hospital. regarding the appointment may be obtained am should i.,nuary, 1951. 28 1.50—2n One 3 pa-iei an T'i % % %  riBuled and Iri prrle:' Ice MOD. Hi,.* M-M Ef. 3T I 31-In I Morn* Cowln Pick-up*. I Mortl. Coley Van and I 10 h|> L't I UM I hfc I wMfea with le*. tlutu 3300 mile. AI %  •natderable reduction A chance no! lo be ml.M-il FORT ROYAL liAKACE LTD. Telephone 4304. M.I.SI—Ii Pit K 1 10t r.,r. Vd Pick-u ,1.11,.' j..t overhaul %  wat %  Mwg i 1 day ..%  New Tyre. i II %  ..!.. Stai. %  um m laoasi X 1 31 *n ELECTRICAL RADIO -On. Hi L4dvtMn* modal IMi RBdH> In e.callenl condition. Ko raa*on.blrfer letiiaed For further parilfuiar* phone Mil before S.00 am. *nC alter 4 00 pm HIM In RADIOS Several New Pllol Radio.. Baiurv and t'.ectnc at Special reduced pflce* al Ralph Beard. Show Room.. Mardwood Alio Phono 46*j M.I.S1—Jn. 1 UrntaEBATOR H cub. It. American Cibaun 3 year* guarantee, lefl in Ralph Be.ia Stum Koomi, llaidnood UVEaioCK Cow _One .eguiered Guarnaey by Ml II.pe Vlgi.nr An Exhibition %  -r She gave %  > Pint, Mils with and Calf To talvo Mlh January. IMI Apply lo V. W. CUirge. Ivl Lodge Ivy Rood, BL M. Ml SI -In. CALF On. •!, Oraded Guerni'' Itglfer call, len dot old al Harrison College for ail old boy. on Wedne. lav Fewruarv Ith Old Ho I Cricket molrh 13)0 Tea 3.1B to 4 13 CocklaiU IS to 7 pm. All Old Harrieonlan* who Will be tlendlng are B.ked to notifv the *rreUrry bv Peluuary 2nd. HubxriplKin 100 S O. C. aiTTENS. Hon. Secretary ni.Sl-3n NOTICE PABISH OF CHRIST illliiul Sealed Tender*. i marked on -iivrb.pe "Tender for Loan i. will be received al mv office up U. 3 00 pm on Monday SMh January, IMI. for the loan f EI.SM lo the pai-i-h. at a i-tr of mterr.t nut eicaedmg 4 .. lo be repaid Rfteen ogual inaUtmanIB nf -J h eommanclng in tha month ol October 1'WOOO OODDARD. Clerk of the Veilrr. Chrlit Church lOlBI 3n For Sale— Cont'd MISCELLANEOUS CUP at SAUCERS — Brook!**! laigev Cup* and Saucer* at M n Tea Cup* and Saucer, at 33 rent.. Hutchknaon a* Co. Ltd i l—TIIKS HANGERS-Wooden angor. Iiom I cent* each up A urful pia.tnLadle>' Hanger, wit* oach a. W. HttTcHIN! 5 Ud. M ... .1 PM Salad and v. . ,., |BMM Very comlortable Uphold Arm Charr* Cedar and Pine IV,. Mlulon Clock. Si. ir I. l,l,,, Bedrtead. Vonn Spring* al i •a; Cedar and Mairaaj: Lhw awing Table*. Cradle. Chi.,1 I. High Chair. Bab> BaatrMtU Vert ood Prarn ^nd (lu-Cart: 1 good Ogi Ranger, nnh 3 Hot Plate* each .Amer' rani FJectrlr Roailar, Dormever M Mailer with meal Orinder and Juicer E'er. Hoi Plate and Iron*, al) In per dHMm: 10 gal Demi" Kilchen Table*. KHchen Uti PART ONE ORDERS ELL, DBI Command i it'. i..I ad. lasgRM •larad. al Regimental Headquarlen I TOO hour* > allotted to IIU Co. will carrv ,.,it .peclBli.ta Irainlng The open rai HQ Coy under aiian-emcnt. to be made by the DA A" C>y mil do Mortar Training 1Mortar Laoaun I — Description and mainCO* *ill rn.,.ie that that know thi. lex.in bv Thur*da>. rj will do L.M.O. Tiainlna I. M G Loaaon E—moKannr r.llm.. l..adina. ... will read thi* ktouin In preparation lo* |i n.rf Hand proctif parade, will be held on Monday 3P. Wednoaday 31 Jan. and T.uradav 1 F-h SI \ Ol I Mill Ml.MI II be a voluntary parade f.>r WO. a NCO* at ITOO hour, on Tueoday 30 Jan :t The nbleci of thi. parod< bd la BMM WO* & NCO in*truclor* in the hMoon. they .. I %  I i I thi fallowing Thur*da> WO* and NCO* i %  PHI II 1 il II IN \M. OR'ilKI V *l Sir ANT FOR UFtK rNOINO .MF 3| I % %  Orderly s%  I lafl QuiaMyBa, L C. s-.i fur Daly Orderlv Officer I'LL C. C Pelerkin Orderly Sarieanl — M I_'R Held. N E. M I n SKFWFS COX. Maim Ii AdJUi Hal ii. M Banal NOTICE Roodlng POa will be kept In the Offlc i Tw*day 30 Jan. SI H FART It Mini;. WHOM. J %  genlencetl labour on I her husbund in the grille aassn th* iun. the luisbond forced the ,, m As he DaV tha street, he %  Bf. WtSF.. . . tin i JIT isi: FAITH HEALIM. i i i mt r a Tunny I* a Shot. Juit an 1% %  a fact that -..-.*> of 41 Rwan St. tako* no Levira nor Aaaaaarnent* i memberttl all UM laaaUr a* nraiwr. fr.a* I. allow* Loam lo %  nember.; earrkra on a Saving* and paw aaybodr i -iiaking new iFi?rt-.ber* ai tho Bat ('• %  la ' WANTED Qarwai Mo. I BE| n, Tub* and Iln. •wing and many ..the. ,!•,,,. Sale 11 JO o'clock. Term. Co*h BRANKPK. TROTMAN CO., \lll ln.n-.i 11 XT WANTED. II. IdM radMad muiu. good* on commiislon. Stale age. evpeiience %  ; ,' SI I M3n. %  BAC KSTATE IH'NOALOW 1 Ml 1 CARD CASE On. Lady'* Caw W.., n Richard* Ureaor Sired. DIVING MAMKS — 10/each obtalnJihle in the Toy Depl. at Cave Shepherd Cd. Ltd. Ml SI tin IHAMOMi ilVli S.,]M,!r. ill.irioi.-: In claw netting at an attractive BTICJ Wm. D. Richard* At Son. Mc Gregor Hi ft I 01—In I'M -I t vetttcol. 17*. i* rw it...--. %  -' .. ENOSNi 7 hora* •arWfl i. ued R..lph KNOINE — aiaUtcd l|dllj i Pie stsa.oo including Hicrrle tMarda Show Room. Hardwoe* l't... 4' M MACHINE One~Ui Spray ; MochinIn Oood ... I STANWAV sTiiKF MISCELLANEOUS ANTlgLD* OJass, CMni. anaMkB e^c "at adJolnlDg Itoy Of every BMM| %  wiiiU oa a Sthrer tarly booka. Mape. AutoFiotrlnge. Ant.qu. Shop %  Yacht Club. ilkvtla l Dial 4333 !l %  thln.i.n M I II -an. ntanii) WIRE no fret of vend wire In > length*. Good condition. Tl *"• %  rr in-*. RAM. roiNF PINS Coknii and lerern — Etcellent value 1 ite — Knight-i Store* n 1 81—i BATHS In Pnn-elaln Enamel. White. Orwan, Prlmroa. ,th matchlnf umu to compl.tr colo.ir .uilra, Top grade A BARNES a. Co.. Ltd. MI.SI—Lf, i-p". Apron.. Table Cloth*. Ba e* Modern Dreea Shoppe. POR HINT. SALS OR I.EASS BAOATELLE HOU8E. St Thomoi DpHalr. Cloeed Gallery. Drawing and Din irg room. Breakfiet room and Kit. 1 • ett* 3 bedroom* running water in ecn Tollel and Lath DOWNSTAIRS (!,...• Oallary, Uvlng-room. Br<-akfaal room *nd Kitchenette. 1 Bedroom* Toilet and Belli. Electric Ughi and Applv Me iager of Bugatclle Plant illon St Thome* Dial MIL 3l.LSI.-0n C THKM THSM C ME AND U WILL SEE BARGAIN'S AT YOt'R BECK1 lanigine a Hum; .low Type In Belleville. 3 Spaclou* Bedroom, wiin Be •in*. Eacellenl Condilinn. Well L.n.l Out. Going lor Under E 1.000; A 1 01 Thornburv Hill. Very Good Coiutillon. Modern ConveSMtncea, Spaclou* Yard encloaed with Alone. Vacant. Going lor under EOOO: A 3 Bedroom Collage by Lower Bank Hall Main Rd Modern Convenience*. Suarloua Yard. Oolng foUnder EIJOO. A New J Bedroom gtoi.ewall Bungalow not far from Roc a ley. Modern Convenience*, Oolng for Under E 1.700. A Two-Rtorey ipjrt wwaUi Near City. Oood LOCBII.II and Condition. Suitable also a* a Gue.t Hou.e. Large Yard, Oolng RM Under ELwOO: Three City Bu*tne*a A Reudenrr iSUmewalli. Very R U NJ Aiea. Going lor Under EJ.SOO and E3.0O0 IS IT YOUR DtZUttE YH A CINCH? — A FurnUhed Unique and ArlUU.Super De Luxe Sea.ide Stonewell Bungalow. AlmoM New. Wide Sandy Beach. Fin. Bathing. Tiro -•clualve Area al St Jame*. over %  Acte. Going Indeed Reasonable Uiildlng Site* Soaaldc and Elsewhere le-Sale Value* Asiuied Mnrtg-ife. irranged. I sm Hel — A Trained Lurtloneer and Ye* How Wl*e It u iM Me SeU Your Hounehnld. FiirnituTc. :ir al Auction. Finger 3111. D F e Abieu for Nearly Anything In Re.>> .taie. II I CAN'T. WHO Will Mndly Call al Olive Bough. Haytbii..' I>c*ign Department .( %  Weal Indian Pi I lor Trained Draughtsmen, rapabie ol design and detail work on rWB. rhecb.."!1 irmlc.il engineering peoleci.. AppUcania must have the Bnti n rial Certificate 01 its I's or Canadian equivalent and should be epared to give proof of technical obllrrVstej or examination A m>lk alums, giving lull d-'..il* and experience, acoumpanled bv a recant >ort photograph, should be a ddraao Mesar. De Cuala It Co I.ld. PO 103. Bridgetown 33 LSI n. Feathers, Flower*, ti e. At Edge* In a large < mable prsre*. Modern l: PIANO— Upnght made by John Brln.rnd a) Son* iiiutkrm for RoyaltM In .-rile1 condition at eUlpli Beard*. Shov. Room. Hard.ood Alley. Phone 4083 niil-Jri. SKIRTS. BLOUnnR. SHORTS. — tn %  largo variety. |in 1.1 04SO Moderr Dress Shoppe 13 1 SI -dn CE3JAR—Silver Salt Cellar. One p illvrr saH cellars shell pattern Wm. tlchard. ft Son Mc Oregor Street fTMIRTOCKINOa ai gauge. Fine Nylo Sto.kir.lII 14 Ladles and children Ankle Sock* M to M cent. Modern Dreea Shoppe. tlMl-On SWEET BISCUITS.—A freeh hlpmen in Presentation Tin* by Crawlord Oblong Assorted Cream. Obbiog Clul Cheese Straw.. Square Club Cheese. Cabinet Cream Cracker.. Special "Uflllit" Ri-iwl. Alnwnd Shortbread. Family Drums Sweet Assorted. Jollity Assorted Assorted Cream Abo a variety of Flavoure in ', lb Package. -JOHN D TAYLOR A SONS LTD Roebuck Street. TEA SERVkE Tlifee plec Wcob Pn.we P1..UIn good r. Wm. D. RuRai-ds A Son, OITICAI. Available al Imperial pttcal Co: low Beta Shoe Store, ower Broad Street. Sunshade*, llmo-..( %  Barometers. Mirronopri. Handrader.. at>d all Oartlcal leqni.ils J"hon PIS Mill—tin WATER PIMP *•, Inch BU 30 000 galls an hour complete with *hafili.g and bed S2M 00 In Ralph Beard' *h-.w room. Hafdwood Alley. u \ 11 III asMrt ft . alway %  t tour package from Alle>> A Medford A Co M Ford. F..ipir, PHILLIPS. • High Street. t Ml*l-lfi AVE no 1. 111 I'l.VM %IIUS Compenilon al our OfBce James Street Frldav 3nd February 1031. al ) p.m CAVE A ROACHES PLANTATIi>.\> Uluale In SI Luc* and ron'.Unlng h> The acreage 1* made up as folio-*. %  Uj acre* 1st crop canaa ready loi leaping 14 acre* young cane*. %  acres 33 perches in prrparatiiui rood), yarda etc In.pe.tion on application to Hi Ormnrid Knight on the prenik*-. YEARWOOD A BOYCE, Wttk Han IE 111—On Hoi'SE SPOTS — SO ft. aAmlty Lndg*, Christ Church. walk doll Club Water, wel n>ad*. electrlcitv Apply Norm IHal 11M 100 It. ON THE SEA at Garden, SI. Jat Modem Bungalow, a lik ai balha. Overlooki-ig Sea, owp prlv. rlagwlag beach. Oood Yachl Anehorsie Phone ll-M !!!. II" LAND S,. acie e i. eve perches ol land ai Saa I'm Philip, in.lud L'lew. 81 %  %  Philip Ml SI-in. WEHTCUrTE Navy Garden-, .tin Ing on eleven thousand square feet < land Built ol Stone. Three hedrooii and all modern convenient.-AIBI Ian play room M br 14 fret 1 Lars and appointment. Pi MARSHVnil.E standing on > %  Dwelling hou*e andeh. drawn,, three bedroom • and baih. Oove trMSn % % %  .t.,...t adterad for *ak st our ofrlra J, End February. I0SI for further particular* and condition. Of aale apply to Hutchinaon A Banfi.ld. Jame* Street 17 1 51 Bank Hall main toad I square Ie*l of land. comprir** cloeed ****• end dining room* lneakfxt room lolle ni'n-nt water and elec This (Top.I me. Street, on Friday AT TilP ROCK lh liet'.'i having 3 Redrmirnlaige I.-unge. sepa r-le Il,i.ir.i 1: lucd TOtlOtt and B-th. mod.-,, CJ neareat offer For A. award, Hard*ool Ami oP 40W. Mill MISCELLANEOUS CASH — Clock*, watrhet e* in any BOflSIUoa .il 41.r.ukRIM.F* Aner Bay Slrrel .'<\V. Tn MS Bt POR CASH Old Gold a 111 11 %  I.UMKINt. iiltqvic .hop. ad|olnlrg Rovil Yacht lub. as 1 H -7n Ons undertake evpert watch nd clork irpair*. rleanlng and realoulloii of oil painting*, valuation. BM • urance and probate, GOKRIM.i S ,pne. Bay SI. 3S.I.BI—7n. .-. FWTV \Ti:i V COACHED by fullanaSSswag Engliah Schoolteacher. Spanish -peakli idenu laughl English by quick ai iv method. Preparalory and School rliflcale standard Backward atudei apeclBlltv. Commercial rout r* il Including Commercial English. Span nd Commercial Oeography Oene %  ffice routine given. 'Prone Mr*Ooodliig 4033. alter a lor appoint 17 I I4i %  .• P. ann.nl Tiamlerred to Reserve slrengih H Jan. 51. M. L. D SKEW ES COX. Major, S.O.LP. Adlutant. The aBibadoa jlglilint SHIPPING NOTICES acid indigestion? Machetoo? check both at once... here's what to do! When unbal-i work, ur OnMnT) OHKM U3>d Indigevtion. Mcada.hv. .cat. 1 ng Alka-Scli/.i riggtl Combining SaataJstBt bag* for neuirahriiiK 1 %  acidity with an analgc-u hn tiiiiy. pwlat, Alkj-Scli/cr acts anlau) n rotnr** /" %  /> di 1. M-heduIrd %  ie February 71 MONTKBAL, AI'STRACIA. NKW ZEALAND LINK, I.IMITI I> .MANE UKti M s "TONGARIho tall AdelatdiJ| Rydiu-v Februai bad.Z3nd March. HM. ample 'pace lor Hard Friiren and General cargo. Cargo accepted on tlifwiflB.U• %  %  — — 3 Mar. %  Mar. — 10 Mar. 31 Mar. — S Apr — — 11 Apr. 10 Apr. NORTIIIKIl ND Barbadoi Spanish luilian Now Spanlah Claseea Regular Sp. nd Ihe -Advanced CV (III be commencing (,. ebrgery. All thoss tntereded. pleaa. be ei->ugh to contact Mis. V salve.. "Santa Clara". St I.1-1 INCOME TAX NOTICE Notice Is hereby given that 1:H'.IIII* T-.\ 1, •:;ii. tgaj ,, (1Ll „,,| from every married man whose income in (1.200.00 per annum or OVnr, Eflna every other person whose income Is 5720.00 per annum or over aod from compaDlea whether incorporated or unincorporated, societies, personj engaged In any trade or profeuion. and owners of land or property whether a taxable Inome has accrued during the pail year or not. Forms o; Return may be obtained Irnin Ihe Income Tax Depntnwni AFTEH ~x\\r. IST DAY OF JANUARY. IBS I. and th* forms duly filled In must be delivered to me on or before the f-'Ilowinj; respective dates: 1. Returns of persons whose books were closed on the31-t day of December. 1950. on or before the 31st day of March. 1051. 2. Returns of persons whose principal place of businessis not situate in the Island on or before the 30th ol June. 1151. 3. Returns of all other persons, on or before the 31st January 1951. F. A. 0. CLAIRMONTE. Com mis* inner „f Income Tax and Death Duties. Note:—Any person filling m make his re: the due date will be liable to a tine not exceeding riOO and not legg than £i %  ctory rea%  6 1*1—tn LADY RODNKY" 1 LADY NELSON" 1 l-ADY RODNCY" "I-ADY NELSON • "l-ADY RODNEY" 31 Feb. it Mar. • Apr. El Apr. — 34 Apr 11 May. — 33 May. N II —SubjectJo change without notice. All vea-eU Riled with co m ,iorage chambers. Passenger Fares and freight istea on appllcaUon to :— 10 Feb. 33 Feu. IT Mai. 13 Apr GARDINER AUSTIN ONE-0-ONE -work* like ." n! Stamina, strength and appearance-all outstanding" — say Motof/iu and Tyre Suppliers alike. The irc*J rubber rougher, more ihock re luting man improved AIIWesther Tread— oith it 1 new .St..-. Kotchet lor mucker, aalcr nou_ n ev-fty dlrrciun WiJ ihrougaoui die tyre' 1 loagcr Idc ssMHOaV IMSIIT ON GOODrTjUt TVBtt 70u can hutt GOODYEAR THE CIT\ r GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD.








ESTABLISHED 1895



U.N. DELAY ACTI



Britain Can Provide
More Ships For W.I.Now

(From Our Own

‘“

Correspondent)
LONDON, Jan. 19

HE impression is gaining ground in the British West

Indies today that the U.K. Government is not merely
failing to act on the recommendations of the Common-

wealt

Shipping Committees and many previous reports

but is indifferent to the situation”.

A-Bomb Tested
In Las Vegas

WASHINGTON, Jan. 27

The Atomic Energy Commission
said today that “one of the peri-
odig tests” of atomic explosions
was held today at the Air Force
bombing range near Las Vegas,
Nevada,

Yesterday the Governor of
Nevada, Charles Russel, disclosed
that there was an explosion on
Wednesday night at the Atomic
Energy Commission’s new testing
grounds in his State.

He said he could not give any
details for security reasons but
that he was authorised to say the
test was primarily to check com-
munications and other facilities.

The Commission last night
deseribed the test as a complete
success and said full-scale tests
would begin on a regular basis
within two weeks. Results of
these future tests would be neither
audible nor visible except under
certain weather conditions.

People in Las Vegas saw and
felt today’s explosion,

It was believed to be the second
testing detonation on the desert
base.

“Tt really lit up the sky like a
big. sunburst,” one resident. said.

Hundreds of. people saw - and
heard the blast. Many of them
were Southern Californians in the
town with the usual week-end
tourists —Reuter,



Banana Exports
Fell Last Year

(Prom Our Own Correspondent)
..»» KINGSTON, Jan, 14...

Jamaica’s banana exports declin.
ed by over 750,000 stems in 195U
to, reach its lowest export produc-
tion since the island’s output re-
turned to the 5,000,000 mark in
1946. In 1949 total banana pur-
chases made by the Banana Pur-
chases Board amounted to 6,736,12
stems; of this amount 6,530,183
stemms. were shipped. Purchases
in 1950 fell to 6,042,168 stems and
shipments were just under 5,300,-
000 stems,

The decline in last year’s total
production is attributed in some
quarters to the windstorm which
hit the island towards the end oi
last year, but while this is respoti-
sible to some small extent for the
deficit, the figures indicate that
the main reason was a shortfall in
Gres Michel production, due tc
the ravages of Panama Disease.



Kremlin Must Not
Misjudge America

WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.

President Truman said here
that it was “vitally important
that the leaders of Communist
imperialism do not misjudge
this nation as did Hitler and the
Kaiser,” in the last two world
wars. ‘

‘Truman sent this message to
the annual Roosevelt Day dinner
last night, sponsored by the
Americans for democratic action,
The President said:

The Kremlin should under-
stand that contrary to its .own
propaganda this country is not
‘weak and divided, We are not
im a state of moral and economic
decay,” ~~

“We know very well whst
Stalinist domination would mean.
We know how difficult it is for
people under Moscow domination
to break away.”—Reuter.



This is an extract from a full
length review of the “precarious
and inadequate” shipping services
between Britain and the Carib-
bean, contained in the recent isste
of the British Export Gazette.

It lists five main requirements,
which adequate shipping services
should be able to provide for:

(1) “Movements of official and
commercial staff between
the U.K. and the British
Caribbean. ,
Journeys of merchants and
others concerned with fos-
tering U.K. -Caribbean
trade,

Tourist traffic, which is
petentially much _ greater
than at present.
Shipments of West Indian
produce—not only what is
immediately offering, but
what could be economically
grown if refrigerated trans-
port were guaranteed.

rts of U.K. manufac-
tured goods, which again
might well expand under the
stimulus of improved ship-
ping”.

Shirking Responsibilities

In not taking steps to see that
these services are provided, the
British Government is not facing
up to its responsibilities, it con-
tinues. Twice, recently, question-
ers in the House of Commons have
been “fobbed off” with the answer
that ‘‘no practical plan” has been
submitted for implementing re-
commendations in the Common-
wealth Shipping report. But as
Lord Lucas announced in_ the
House of Lords last month, plans
have been submitted for improving
services between the two areas.
The Colonial Office declared that
they are not’ “practical”.

The Gazette says it is agreed
there is no likelihood of a regular
Eritish passenger service to the
Eastern Caribbean without some
form of Government assistance. A
direct subsidy to Caribbean ser-
vices might seem invidious to
other owners operating elsewhere
but this objection could be met by
inviting tenders.

Alternatively the building of
ships for the West Indies run
might be assisted either by out-
right grants or by special credits
on a mutual risk-sharing basis.

In addition it would have to be
ascertained how far the West
Indies themselves would be pre-
pared to contribute and in what
ways they might assist a British
shipping line by such items as
port charge concessions, etc. ;

Attention should also be paid
when studying the ezonomies cut
the question to the heavy tonnages
which have to be brought from
the Caribbean area to Britain in
chartered vessels, Any saving in
this respect might be regarded a+
a contrikution to a subsidy.

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

Stop Gap

In the meantime while thought
is being given to these proposa!s
the Gazette suggests as a stop-
gap measure to relieve immediate
congestion, consideration should
be given to the possibility of in-
cucing Australasian ships passing
through the Panama Canal to cal!
more regularly at ports in the
Eastern Caribbean.

“It is hard to believe that thes
difficulties are insurmountable
~wvhen so much is at stake” it adds.
“The time has come for business
interests in Britain and the British
Caribbean to unite their voices in
insisting that the present attitude
of drift, complacency and evasion
come to an end.”

Appended to the Gazette's
article are three letters from Mr.
A. E. V. Barton, West India Com-
mittee Secretary, Mr. E. Palmer,
Director of Bookers’ Shipping and
Trading Co., Ltd., and Mr. Percy

@ on page 10



”

THE PHOTO AT THE TOP shows a chukka in progress during the Presentation Match



a ee

POLO PRIZE

undap

BARBA

i





members of the Barbados Polo Club at the Garrison yesterday.

THE PHOTO AT THE LEFT pictures Mr. Colin Deane receivi

Mrs, H. A. Arthur,

Seger
“ JAN ARY 28, 1951

N AGAINS

¢



played by

ng the Advocate Challenge Cup from

AT THE RIGHT, the Cameraman caught Mr. A. J. Hanschell recelving the ¥. & Lima Ghallenge Oup,
Diplomats: Faced With
Very Difficult Task

By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE.



WillHelp To Defend
Peace Of The World

LONDON, Jan. 27.

Diplomatic relations between
India and the People’s Republic
of China will “help to defend the
peace of Asia and of the world,”
The Peking People’s daily said
today, according to a new China
(Communist) news agency mes-
sage received in London, |

Commenting on the first anni-'
versary of the Republic of India
the paper wrote: “Diplomatic re-
lations between the Republic of
India and the Peoples Republic of
China which {have been estab-
lished on the basis of equality,
mutual benefit, and mutual re-
spect for territorial and sover-
eign rights, will not only help
to further consolidate and de-
velop the friendship which al-
ready exists between the peoples
of these two countries, but will
also help to defend the lasting
peace of Asia and the whole
world.”—Reuter, |



Ike Returns Home |

NEW YORK, Jan. 27.

General Eisenhower landed to-
day at Sewart air force base near
here at the end of his 21 day mili- ;
tary fact finding tour of Eur pe.
The General will spend the next
four days at West Point, United
States military academy,

He will leave on Wednesday for
Washington to report on how he
found Western Europe's defences.

—Reutes.



Mannerheim Gets Worse

LAUSANNE, January 27.
The condition of Field’ Marshal
Mannerheim in hospital here after



WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.

THE present rift in Anglo-American Far Eastern policies
has presented British officials here with one of their most
arduous diplomatic tasks since thé second world war.



ON THE
°* SPOT

LONDON,

C. W. Brown of Dealj Kent
county, sent the following
letter about his family's
meagre meat ration to the
editor of the Sunday Ex-
press:

“Our piece of mutton was
flavourless and tough. So~
we gave it to the cat. She
tried a bit, gave it up, and
went out,

“In about ten minutes she
returned with a large, fat
mouse, which she laid at my
feet.

“Was she sorry for us?”

N. 8.



TOOK DRUGS

PARIS, Jan, 27,

Police charged the 71 year old
French author, Henry De Monfreid
and his wife with drug taking
after a raid on their home yester-
day.

The police said that they found
there 19 opium pipes, nine opium-
burning lamps, 300 grammes of
opium, 290 grammes of opium
dross, 9 grammes of heroin, and

an intestinal operation deterior-|*Pa'e parts for opium pipes.

ated again tonight.

His doctors at the Cantonal
Hospital expressed grave fears for
his life.

—Reuter,

Paddy and Robbie and Bob
try to make rain
with contraptions



like this

(From JOHN REDFERN)

KONGWA.

' THE OVERSEAS FOOD CORPORATION, which fail-

ed with groundnuts, has s
With chemicals released by

tarted trying to produee rain.
burners ‘on the ground or bal-

loons exploded at great heights, the corporation is trying
to tip over the ¢louds- where they’ will do most good.

The job, completely hush-hush
in planning, is being done by a

uad from the department called
“Special. Projects,”

“The rainmakers” as everybody
calls them, are Paddy the Irish-
man, Robbie the Englishman; and
Bob the Scot. They work with
wondrous ._Heath, Robinson ‘con-
traptions. made from throw-out
stuff

They make hydrogen ir > bust

with a generator Rade from, the

the

old
from

atruck with
cylinders

back end of
vacuum brake
lorries for the gas.
Raby’s Special
Rain distribution has
major problem from
although the old gang denied this
strenuously when I suggested it
here more than two -year
Useful mc

from the east

been a
the start—




Ago



> clo



acro
¢



st near tf

beyond the agricultural units



mM,



In the rainy season now on there
are maddening dry gaps at critical
operational times.

Mr. George Raby, tall, general
manager of the whole works was
an Army expert on projectiles
during the: war. He sat down and
figured a few ideas himself, in-
cluding “Raby’s Special,” a simple
charcoal burner that looks like a
drainpipe with an aircraft rudder
attached,

This is for rain precipitation by
using Africa’s strong vertical cur-
rents to “seed”
silver iodide from charcoal burn-
ers. ‘With a battery of burners
using about £5 worth of silver
icdide each — treatment.
projects aim to control the rainfall
providing there are clouds, in an
area of 200 squaré. miles,

Children’s Balloons

The squad use children’s bal-
loons (8s. per thdusand) for their
own wind tests and get advice



from African observers in the
Government’s weather service

They have done more than 30

experiments now and say there has

always been rain at the appointed

time. But they wince e word

| rainmake “We don’t make rair



Special | will watch her

—Reuter

286 Rebels Killed

SAIGON, Jan, 27.

French forces in the Northern
Indo-China battle area of Tonking
carried dut two “completely suc-
cessful” clearing operations yes-
terday, a communique announced
here to-night.

The communique said that 286
Vietminh insurgents, were killed
in Cochin, China.



—Reuter

Mystery Weapon

SAN FRANCISCO. Jan. 27
The 10,000 ton aircraft carrier
Independence badly damaged in
experimental atom: bomb . explo-
sions at Bikini in 1946 has been



high clouds with|towed to sea to be sunk by a mys-

tery weapon
month .
Only

some time next

American naval. experts
“death”,
—Reuter



STRIKE AVERTED

JOHANNESBURG, Jan. 27



A dispute between the African
Mine Workers Union and copper
mining companies in Northern
Rhodesia which threatened to lead
to.a strike 20,000 miners ended




last night, w
ed a revised offer from the com-
as a ced here te

pani it wa nnour

—Reuter



en the Union accept~

There -has been no attempt to

'disguise the divergence of Brit-
lich

and American: . attitudes
towards the Communist regime in
‘China,

President Truman and Prime
differences after their conference

here in December.

Since then, it has been made
increasingly clear that both: lead-
ers\ are backed in their differing
fof opinions by majorities in their
governments and legislatures,

Public opinion in both countries
would make it impossible to per-
Suade the United States Govern-
ment to recognise the Communist
regime in China or to. persuade
the British Government to with-
| Soar its recognition of that
regime,

British and American attitudes
to those problems and the pro-
posals for their solution are
equally bound to be complicated

= Attlee acknowledged the

by divergent, attitudes towards
Communist China,
Within these limitations, the

British Ambassador Oliver Franks
and his staff here have been tak-
img every opportunity both form-
atly -and informally to present
Britain’s case,

They have aimed at removing
misunderstandings, at preventing
the divergence of issues from un

necessarily holding up joint
Anglo-American policy, and ac-
tion at preventing any mis-

understanding or questioning of
Britain’s motives. —Reuter

Spanish Representative ?

LONDON, January 27,

The British Foreign Office would
neither confirm nor deny the re-
port appearing in the British Press
today, that Britain has replied un-
favourably to Spain’s request for
acereditation of Fernando Castilla
Y. Maigin, Spain’s new ambassador
in London.

The newspaper report suggested
ihat Castilla’s record service in
the Spanish Blye Division in Rus-
tia (he received the Iron Cross
from the Germans) makes him





unsuitable as the Spanish. repre-
—Reuter.

sentative in Britain,







Don’t Miss RUSSIA'S
NEW EMPIRE. Begins
TUESDAY. Order your
copy early.

|MACARTHUR TALKS ON
| JAPAN WITH DULLES

TOKYO,,Jan, 27
John, Foster Dulles, President
Truman's special envoy, charged

;v ith sounding out Japanese views
on a Peace Treaty, had a two-hour
talk with General MacArthur to.
cay

He is reported to have “found

himself in complete agreement

ith the Supreme Commander on

] sues of the Japanese Peace
re

i

i 4 —Reuter: |

S. Koreans
Strike Back

At Inchon

TOKYO, Jan, 27

South Koreans leapt back into
the Korean war picture to-day
with a snap hit, kill and run raid
on unist-held Inchon, port
for Seoul, South Korean capital,
according to a report here late
to-night.

The raid lasted four ‘hours
Heavy United States naval guns’
bombarded the area for the second
day running,

The report said the Koreans
killed 40 Communists and then
left without suffering any casual-
ties,

Armoured elements of the 8th
Army which captured Suwon yes-
Yerday pushed more than six miles
north to-day. Chinese troops were
reported to have fallen back to-
wards the Han River skirting the
southern outskirts of Seoul,

This drive up the west coast of
Korea along the main road to,
Seoul had met only light resistance
so far to-day, But bitter fighting
had raged farther east as United
Nations troops tried to advance
beyond battered Kumyangjangni.

Two Chinese regiments fought
ferociously house by house to re-
tain a foothold in the town and in
the hills~to the north and west.

Machine gunners and_ snipers
were smoked out of buildings. As
the Chinese withdrew, Jet planes
and other fighters attacked with
napalm (jellied petrol) bombs.

Withdrew

Further east still, a United Na-
tions battalion was forced to with-
draw and regroup four miles
north-west of Ichon but later
they were reported to have taken

an unidentified small village
there,
For the third successive day

United Nations patrols advanced
unopposed north of Wonju on the
right wing of the Seoul front.

In East Korea more than 3,000
Communists were reported mass~
ing near Pyongchang 12 miles
a of the mining town Yong-
jol,

Admiral Arthur W. Radford,
United States Pacific Fleet Com-
mander said here to-day “I think
we’can stay in Korea”, ,

On a brief periodical visit to
Japan he said everyone he had
talked to here had been “very
optimistic about the Korean op-
erations”.

Reuter



Their Daily Bread

WASHINGTON, Jan, 27.
Turkish troops after a bayonet
charge with the United Nations’
forces in Kcrea, sent this message
to the supply depot: “Enemy
attacked, send us more bread.’’
This request was revealed at
the Press Conference to-day by
Colonel Cary Hutchinson, the
American supply officer, who was
in Korea earlier this month. He
said that the United States Army
food experts had produced a spe-
cial kind of bread for the Turks.
It was heavy bread end con-
tained wheat flours and olive
oil,—Reuter,



Bevin Improves

LONDON, Jan, 27.
The British Foreign Minister,
Ernest Bevin, ill with pneumonias,
had another “restless night,” his
personal doctor Sir Alexander

McCall, said this morning,

Bevin was yesterday stated to
have shown slight improvement,
A Foreign Office spokesman said
later to-day that Bevin “continues
to improve and is slightly better.”

~—Reuter,



PRINTERS REFUSE TO
JOIN IN BOYCOTT.

BUENOS AIRES, Jan, 27.

In an eleventh hour effort to
prevent La Prensa being distribu-
ted for the second day running,
boycotters last night picketed
the printers as they attempted to
enter the printing shop.

Earlier . yesterday evening the
printers had decided to disobey
the Peronista Union orders to
join the newspaper vendors’ boy-
cott in sympathy.—Reuter.



Pact Of Friendship

NEW DELHI, Jan. 27.
India and Indonesia have con-
Cluded negotiations for a treaty
of friendship and the treaty will
come into force shortly, it was
learned here to-day,
Under the treaty
firms a recent trade agreement,
trade agents will be appointed
and both countries are pledged
to assist each other’s industria)

and agricultural progress.
—Reuter.

which con-

DIAL STALIN

NEW YORK,

College students tried t
recently. The}
whether t

Three

telephone

Stalin

ree \ a
ed to ask him Ley

i voluntes t once or wai
-—L.E.S




to brand Communist

appoint a Committee to consider “collective
measures’’ against her.

“It is the view of the United States Government and
people that the United Nations have already delayed too
long in naming the aggressor,” Austin declared.

“We are conscientiously opposed to any further United
Nations action which avoids the central issue.”

Don’t Condemn
Red Chinese
URGES POLAND

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan, 27
Poland to-night told the United
Nations she would support the
12 nation Asian resolution calling
for an “exploratory” conference
with Peking.

Katz Suchy, Polish delegate an-
nounced this when to—day’s debate
on Korea opened before the Politi-
cal Committee, Poland will give
her support he said after certain

minor amendments proposed by
the Soviet Union,

The Polish delegate said:
“Never in international negotia-

tions has there been a case when
negotiations have been preceded
with condemnation of one power,
There has not been a case where
condemnation was followed by
negotiations,” he declared,
Gehard Jooste, South African
delegate, announced his country’s
suppor? for the American regolu-

tion condemning Communist
China,

At the same time he hoped that
once that was done, the United
Nations would exhaust the possi-
bilities of peaceful negotiation be-
fore starting’ to formulate addi-
tional measures, ’

Jooste declared: “We cannot see
how the acceptance of the United
States resolution can close the door
to peaceful negotiations. We are
stating formally in the resolution
merely what is known to all the
world and what has repeatedly
been stated by responsible people.”

—Reuter

COINCIDENCE

MADRID,
When Antonio Espejo was
repairing the roof of a_ three-

storey house in the Spanish town
of Martos, he

CHINA

U.S. Delegate Complains

LAKE sv

‘THE GENERAL ASSEMBL
Committee adjourned again to-day without
reaching a decision after a. week of debates
methods of achieving peace in Korea, ,
The chief American delegate Warren AtiStin
today continued his efforts to get the Committee




fell to the strect}not ,
below, seriously injuring himseif|ceasefire before

PRICE: SIX CENTS

ESS, Jan. 27
8 ‘POLITICAL

on

China an r and

The ‘Committee hag four main
propoSals before it:
1, The United States Resolution
labelling the Peking regime an
aggressor,
The Canadian proposal made
informally yesterday for @
seven power conference con-
ditional on a ‘cessation of
fighting to be arranged by the
delegates at the start of their
meeting. bom
3. The Israeli Plan for re
affirmation by the General
Assembly of the Five Poin’
“Commissal Plan.” ,
4. Proposal by 12 \Asian an@
Arab nations .for a -Seven
Power Conference which
would obtain from Commu.
nist China clarification éf the
terms of a ceasefire, .

Aggressor Charge

Earlier in the day Michael
Fry reported that the United
Nations General Assembly is
early next week expected b:
a strong majority to bran
Communist China as an aggressot
in Korea while leaving the
door open to further peace
negotiations,

The American resolution now
before the. Political _Committee
labels the Peking Governm an
aggressor, demands the withdraw.
al of Chinese troops from Koréa
and asked the ‘Assembly to. ‘set
in motion the machinery of pos
sible. economic and other. saht-

“To date 25 countries haxe 39
pressed their peer! for
condemnation, st ommunist Chi-
na. Several delegations wee
the British said that they were i
favour of condemnation.
Another resolution before the Po-
litical Committee sponsored by the
12 Arab and Asian nations asked
for the convening immediately of
an “exploratory” confererite to
examine and elueidate some
doubtful aspects of the Peking
Government's attitude,

This plan received lukewarm
support among “the members
largely on the grounds that it did
make any provision for a
beginning any

—and his wife. who happened to| negotiations,

be passing at that moment.
—LES.





TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT



\ the

|Peking Government



A new factor introduced into the
discussions here, was the apparent
lull in the fighting in Korea which
Indian delegates thought
might be “significant.”

They emphasised that the

while not

formally acceding to a cef$efire
might be trying to give the im«
@ On page 10.



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$ impression is gainin;

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failin;
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but is indi

A-Bomb Tested
In Las Vegas

WASHINGTON, Jan. 27
The Atomic Energy Commission
said today that “one of the peri-
odig tests” of atomic explosions
was held today at the Air Force
bombing range near Las Vegas,
Nevada,
Yesterday the Governor of
Nevada, Charles Russel, disclosed
that there was an explosion on
‘Wednesday night at the Atomic
Energy Commission’s new testing
grounds in his State.
He said he could not give any
details for security reasons but
that he was authorised to say the
test was primarily to check com-
munications and other facilities.

The Commission last night
deseribed the test as a complete
success and said full-scale tests
would begin on a regular basis
within. two weeks. Results of
these future tests would be neither
audible nor visible except under
certain weather conditions.
People in Las Vegas saw and
felt teday’s explosion.

It was believed to be the second
testing detonation on the desert
base.

“It really lit up the sky like a
big. sunburst,” one resident said.
Hundreds of. people saw -and
heard the blast. Many of them
were Southern Californians in the
town with the usual week-end
tourists.—Reuter,





Banana Exports
Fell Last Year

(Prom Our Own Correspondent)

... KINGSTON, Jan, 14..
Jamaica's banana
ed by over 750,000 stems in 195U
to. reach its. lowest export produc-
tion since the island’s output re-
turned to the 5,000,000 mark in
1946. In 1949 total banana pur-
chases made by the Banana Pur-
chases Board amounted to 6,736,12
stems; of this amount 6,530,133
stems. were shipped, Purchases
in 1950 fell to 6,042,168 stems and
shipments were just under 5,300,-
000 stems,

The decline in last year’s total
production is attributed in some
quarters to the windstorm which
hit the island towards the end of
last year, but while this is respoli-
sible to some small extent for thc
deficit, the figures indicate that
the main reason was a shortfall in
Gres Michel production, due tc
the ravages of Panama Disease.

Kremlin Must Not
Misjudge America

WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.

President Truman said here
that it was “vitally important
that the leaders of Communist
imperialism do not misjudge
this nation as did Hitler and the
Kaiser,” in the last-two world
wars. 4

Truman sent this message to
the annual Roosevelt Day dinner
last night, sponsored by the
Americans for democratic action.
The President said:

The Kremlin should under-
stand that contrary to its .own
propaganda this country is not
weak and divided, We are not
in a state of moral and economic
decay,”

“We know very well what
Stalinist domination would mean.
We know how difficult it is for
people under Moscow domination
to break away.”’—Reuter.



lik




1

With chemicals released by

to tip over the Clouds. wher

The job, completely hush-hush
in planning, is being done by a
squad from the department called
“Special. Projects.”

“The rainmakers” as everybody
calls them, are Paddy the Irish-
man, Robbie the Englishman; and
Bob the Scot. They work with
wondrous

Heath Robinson con-
traptions made from throw-out
stuff.

They



ydrogen in the bust

pnergtor. ngade from. the



declin.}¢,



Britain Can Provide
More Ships For W.I.Now

Correspondent)
LONDON, Jan. 19
g ground in the British West

.K. Government is not merely
to act on the recommendations of the Common-
Shipping Committees and many previous reports
erent to the situation”.

This is an extract from a full
length review of the “precarious
and inadequate” shipping services
between Britain and the Carib-
bean, contained in the recent issue
of the British Export Gazette,

It lists five main requirements,
which adequate shipping services
should be able to provide for:

(1) “Movements of official and
commercial staff between
the U.K. and the British
Caribbean. ’
Journeys of merchants and
others concerned with fos-

(2)

tering U.K. -Caribbean
trade. :
(3) Tourist traffic, which is

petentially much _— greater
than at present.
Shipments of West Indian
produce—not only what is
immediately offering, but
what could be economically
grown if refrigerated trans-
Pp were guaranteed.
Xports of U.K. manufac-
tured goods, which again
might well expand under the
stimulus of improved ship-
ping”.

Shirking Responsibilities

In not taking steps to see that
these services are provided, the
British Government is not facing
up to its responsibilities, it con-
tinues. Twice, recently, question-
ers in the House of Commons have
been “fobbed off” with the answer
that “no practical plan” has been
submitted for implementing re-
commendations in the Common-
wealth Shipping report. But as
Lord Lucas announced in the
House of Lords last month, plans
have been submitted for improving
services between the two areas.
The Colonial Office declared that
they are not’ “practical”.

The Gazette says it is agreed
there is no likelihood of a regular
British passenger service to the
Eastern Caribbean without some
‘orm of Government assistance. A
direct subsidy to Caribbean ser-
vices might seem invidious to
other owners operating elsewhere
but this objection could be met by
inviting tenders.

Alternatively the building of
ships for the West Indies run
might be assisted either by out-
right grants or by special credits
on a mutual risk-sharing basis,

In addition it would have to be
ascertained how far the West
Indies themselves would be pre-
pared to contribute and in what
ways they might assist a British
shipping line by such items as
port charge concessions, etc. :

Attention should also be paid
when studying the ezonomies ut
the question to the heavy tonnages
which have to be brought from
the Caribbean area to Britain in
chartered vessels, Any saving in
this respeet might be regarded es
a contribution to a subsidy.

Stop Gap

In the meantime while thought
is being given to these proposa!s
the Gazette suggests as a siop-
gap measure to relieve immediate
congestion, consideration should
be given to the possibility of in-
cucing Australasian ships passing
through the Panama Canal to call
more regularly at ports in the
Eastern Caribbean.

“It is hard to believe that thes:
difficulties are insurmountable
avhen so much is at stake”’ it adds.
“The time has come for business
interests in Britain and the British
Caribbean to unite their voices in
insisting that the present attitude
of drift, complacency and evasion
come to an end.”

Appended to the Gazette's
article are three letters from Mr.
A. E. V. Barton, West India Com-
mittee Secretary, Mr. E. Palmer,
Director of Bookers’ Shipping and
Trading Co., Ltd., and Mr. Percy

@ on page 10

(4)

(5)





FERN)

KONGWA.
ON, which fail-

burners ‘on the ground or bal-

loons exploded at great heights, the corporation is trying

e they’ will do most good.

back end of
vacuum brake
lorries for the gas.
Raby’s Special

Rain distribution has been <
major problem from the start—
although the old gang denied this
strenuously when I suggested it
here more than two years ago

Useful moisture cloud Ss
ross from the east and ill th

T » Mgomba

old
from

atruck with
cylinders




ac











’

THE PHOTO AT THE TOP shows a chukka in progress during the

meeaperensryeneeersianterimeecenteeeticags| teahestihis imental ae tian Someta

POLO PRIZE DAY

members of the Barbados Polo Club at the Garrison yesterday.

THE PHOTO AT THE LEFT pictures Mr.

Mrs, H. A. Arthur.

AT THE RIGHT, tho Cameraman cauglit Mr. A. J, Hanschell recetving the ¥, de Lima Challenge Oup.
Faced With
Very Difficult Task

By PAUL SCOTT RANKINE,



Will Help To Defend
Peace Of The World

LONDON, Jan. 27.

Diplomatic relations between
India and the People’s Republic
of China will “help to defend the
peace of Asia and of the world,’
The Peking People’s daily said
today, according to a new China
(Communist) news agency mes-
sage received in London,

versary of the Republic of India
the paper wrote: “Diplomatic re-
lations between the Republic of
India and the Peoples Republic of
China which {have been estab-
lished on the basis of equality,
mutual benefit, and mutual re-
spect for territorial and sover-
eign rights, will not only help
to further consolidate and de-
velop the friendship which al-
ready exists between the peoples
of these two countries, but will
also help to defend the lasting
peace of Asia and the whole
world.”—Reuter,



Ike Returns Home

NEW YORK, Jan. 27.
General Eisenhower landed to-
day at Sewart air force base near

here at the end of his 21 day mili- -

tary fact finding tour of Europe.
The General will spend the next
four days at West Point, United
States military academy.

He will leave on Wednesday for
Washington to report on how he
found Western Europe’s defences.

—Reutes’. |



Mannerheim Gets Worse

LAUSANNE, January 27.

The condition of Field’ Marshal
Mannerheim in hospital here after
an intestinal .operation deterior-
ated again tonight.

His doctors at the Cantonal
Hospital expressed grave fears for
his life.

—Reuter.

Paddy and Robbie and Bob —
try to make rain
with contraptions
e this

(From JOHN RED

THE OVERSEAS FOOD CORPORATI
ed with groundnuts, has started trying to produee rain.

In the rainy season now on there
are maddening dry gaps at critical
operational times.

Mr. George Raby, tall, general
manager of the whole works was
an Army expert on _ projectiles
during the: war. He sat down and
figured a few ideas himself, in-
eluding “Raby’s Special,” a simple
charcoal burner that looks like a
drainpipe with an aircraft rudder
attached.

This is for rain precipitation by
using Africa’s: strong vertical cur-
rents to “seed” high clouds with
silver iodide from charcoal burn-
ers. ‘With a battery of burners
using about £5 worth of silver
iodide each treatment. Special
projects aim to control the rainfall
providing there are clouds, in an
area of 200 squaré miles,

Children’s Balloons

The squad use children’s bat-
loons (8s. per thdusand) for their
own wind tests and get advice
from African observers in the
Government’s weather service

They have done more than 30
experiments now and say there has
always been rain at the appointed
time, But they wince at ord
rainmake “We don't ake rair

We prec where it nt

the





—LES.

|

Commenting on the first eani-'

Diplomats:

THE present rift in Anglo-American Far Eastern policies
has presented British officials here with one of their most
arduous diplomatic tasks since the second world war,



ON THE
° SPOT

LONDON.

C. W. Brown of Deal) Kent
county, sent the following
letter about his. family’s

meagre meat ration to the
editor of the Sunday Ex-
press:

“Our piece of mutton was
flavourless and tough. So
we gave it to the cat. She

| tried a bit, gave it up, and
went out,

“In about ten minutes she
returned with a large, fat

! mouse, which she laid at my
feet.

“Was she sorry for us?”

—I_ N. 8.



TOOK DRUGS

PARIS, Jan, 27.
Police charged the 71 year old
French author, Henry De Monfreid
and his wife with drug taking
after a raid on their home yester-
day.



The police said that they found
| burni 19 opium pipes, nine opium-
opium, 290 grammes of opium
dross, 9 grammes of heroin, and
spare parts for opium pipes.
Reuter
SAIGON, Jan. 27.
French forces in the Northern
Indo-China battle area of Tonking
carried dut two “completely suc-
terday, a communique announced
here to-night.
The communique said that 286
Vietminh insurgents. were killed

burning lamps, 300 grammes of
286 Rebels Killed
cessful” clearing operations yes-
in Cochin, China,

—Reuter



Mystery Weapon

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan, 27
The 10,000 ton aircraft carrier
Independence badly damaged in
experimental atom: bomb . explo-
sions at Bikini in 1946 has been
towed to sea to be sunk by a mys-

tery weapon some time next
month.
Only American naval. experts

will watch her “death”,
—~Reuter



STRIKE AVERTED

JOHANNESBURG, Jan, 27
A dispute between the African
Mine Workers Union and copper

mining companies in Northern
Rhodesia which threatened to lead
tc.a strike by 20,000 miners ended
last night, when the Union accept~
ed a revised offer from the com-
; panic it was announced here to-
~Reuter

ee
BARBADOS, JAS#ARY 28, 1951

AGAINST CHINA

U.S. Delegate Complains

Colin Deane receiving the Advocate Challenge Cup from







S. Koreans
Strike Back

At Inchon

TOKYO, Jan. 27

South Koreans leapt back into
the Korean war picture to-day
with a snap hit, kill and run raid
on Communist-held Inchon, port
for Seoul, South Korean capital,
according to a report here late
to-night.

The raid lasted four ‘hours
Heavy United States naval guns
bombarded the area for the second
day running.

The report said the Koreans
killed 40 Communists and then
left without suffering any casual-
ties.

Armoured elements of the 8th
Army’ which captured Suwon yes-
Yerday pushed more than six miles
north to-day. Chinese troops were
reported to have fallen back to-
wards the Han River skirting the
southern outskirts of Seoul.

This drive up the west coast of
Korea along the main road to,
Seoul had met unly light resistance
so far to-day. But bitter fighting
had raged farther east as United
Nations troops tried to advance
beyond battered Kumyangjangni.

Two Chinese regiments fought
ferociously house by house to re-
tain a foothold in the town and in
the hills-to the north and west.

Machine gunners and_ snipers
were smoked out of buildings. As
the Chinese withdrew, Jet planes
and other fighters attacked with
napalm (jellied petrol) bombs.

Withdrew

Further east still, a United Na-
tions battalion was forced to with-
draw and regroup four miles
north-west of Ichon but later
they were reported to have taken
an unidentified small village
there,

For the third successive day
United Nations patrols advanced
unopposed north of Wonju on the
right wing of the Seoul front.

In East Kevea more than 3,000
Communists were reported mass-
ing near Pyongchang 12 miles
ee of the mining town Yong-
jol.

Admiral Arthur W. Radford,
United States Pacific Fleet Com-
mander said here to-day “I think
we'can stay in Korea”, ’

On a brief periodical visit to
Japan he said everyone he had
talked to here had been “very
optimistic about the Korean op-
erations”,

Presentation Match played by

WASHINGTON, Jan, 27.

There -has been no attempt to




















PRICE: SIX CENTS

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 27
‘THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY’S ‘POLITICAL
Committee adjourned again to-day without
reaching a decision after a week of debates on
methods of achieving peace in Korea, aed
The chief American delegate Warren AtiStin
today continued his efforts to get the Committee
to brand Communist China an aggressor and
appoint a Committee to consider “eollective
measures’’ against her.

“Tt is the view of the United States Government and
people that the United Nations have already delayed too
long in naming the aggressor,” Austin declared.

“We are conscientiously opposed to any further United
Nations action which avoids the central issue.”

~— —————==== ‘The Committee hag four main
proposals before it:
1. The United States Resolution
labelling the Peking regime an
aggressor,
The Canadian proposal made
informally yesterday for a
seven power conference con-
ditional on a cessation of
fighting to be arranged by the
delegates at the start of their
meeting. ;
The Israeli Plan for re«
affirmation by the General
Assembly of the Five Poin
“Commissal Plan.” :

Don’t Condemn
Red Chinese
URGES POLAND

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 27
Poland to-night told the United
Nations she would support the
12 nation Asian resolution calling
for an “exploratory” conference
with Peking.
Katz Suchy, Polish delegate an-




' 4. Proposal by 12 i ané
nounced this when to-day’s debate ‘Arb sai ton a cmavahs
on Korea opened before the Politi Power Conference which
cal Committee

Poland will give
her support he said after certain
minor amendments proposed by
the Soviet Union,

The Polish delegate said:
“Never in international negotia-
tions has there been a case when
negotiations have been preceded
with condemnation of one power.
There has not been a case where
condemnation was followed by
negotiations,” he declared,

Gehard Jooste, South African
delegate, announced his country’s
suppor? for the American regolu-

tion condemning Communist
China.

would obtain from Commu-
nist China clarification ¢f the
terms of a ceasefire,

Aggressor Charge

Earlier in the day Michael
Fry reported that the United
Nations General Assembly is
early next week expected b:
a strong majority to bran
Communist China as an aggressor
in Korea while leaving the
door open to further ‘peace

negotiations,

The American resolution now
before the, Political Committee
labels the Peking Governm an
aggressor, demands the withdraw.
al of Chinese troops from Korea
and asked the ‘Assembly to. ‘set
in motion the machinery of pos-
sible, pconomic. and other. saft-

r “To date 25 countries haxe ¢x-
pressed their support the
condemnation, of Communist Chi-
na. Several delegations includ
the British said that they were i
favour of condemnation.
Another resolption before the Po-
litical Committee sponsored by the
12 Arab and Asian nations asked
for the convening immediately of
an “exploratory’’ conference to
examine and. elueidate some

At the same time he hoped that
once that was done, the United
Nations would exhaust the possi-
bilities of peaceful negotiation be-
fore starting to formulate addi-
tional measures, :

Jooste declared: “We cannot see
how the acceptance of the United
States resolution can close the door
to peaceful negotiations, We are
stating formally in the resolution
merely what is known to all the
world and what has repeatedly
been stated by responsible people,”

—Reuter

COINCIDENCE

‘ ; spects of the Pekin

'disguise the divergence of Brit- —Reuter eather Ri ; .

lich and American | attitudes MADRID,

towards the Communist regime in When Antonio Espejo was| This plan received are

China, We . repairing the roof of a three- |Support among “the members
President Truman «and ‘Prime Their Daily Bread storey house in the Spanish town| largely on the grounds that it did

Minister Attlee acknowledged the of Martos, he fell to the strect}not make any provision for a

differences after their coriference
hege in December.

since then, it has been made
increasingly clear that both lead-
ers| are backed in their differing
fof opinions by majorities in their

WASHINGTON, Jan, 27.
Turkish troops after a bayonet
charge with the United Nations’
forces in Kerea, sent this message
to the supply depot: “Enemy

attacked, send us more bread,”

vernments and legislatures. This request was revealed at
Public opinion in both countries | the Press Conference to-day by
would make it impossible to per-|Colonel Cary Hutchinson, the

Suade the United States Govern-
ment to recognise the Communist
regime in. China or to persuade
the British Government to with-
draw its recognition of that
regime,

British and American
to those problems and the pro-
posals for their solution are
equally bound. to be complicated
by divergent attitudes towards
Communist China.

Within these limitations, the
British Ambassador Oliver Franks
and his staff here have been tak-
mg every opportunity both form-
atly -und informally to present
Britain’s case,

They have aimed at removing
misunderstandings, at preventing
the divergence of issues from un
necessarily holding up joint
Anglo-American policy, and ac-
tion at preventing any mis-
understanding or questioning of
Britain’s motives, —Reuter

Spanish Representative ?

LONDON, January 27.

The British Foreign Office wouid
neither confirm nor deny the re-
port appearing in the British Press
| today, that Britain has replied un-
favourably to Spain’s request for
accreditation of Fernando Castilla
Y. Maigin, Spain’s new ambassador
in London. enter the printing shop.

The newspaper report suggested} Earlier yesterday evening the
that Castilla’s record service in’ printers had’ decided to disobey
the Spanish Blue Division in Rus-| {he Peronista Union orders to

sia (he received the Iron Cross | join the newspaper vendors’ boy-
from the Germans) makes him | eott in sympathy,—Reuter,

\Pact Of Friendship

NEW DELHI, Jan. 27.
India and Indonesia have con-
cluded negotiations for a treaty
of friendship and the treaty will

American supply officer, who was
in Korea earlier this month. He
said that the United States Army
food experts had produced a spe-
cial kind of bread for the Turks,

It was heavy bread end con-
tained wheat flours and olive
oil,—Reuter,

attitudes

Bevin Improves

LONDON, Jan, 27.
The British Foreign Minister,
Ernest Bevin, ill with pneumonia,
had another “restless night,” his
personal doctor Sir Alexander

McCall, said this morning.

Bevin was yesterday stated to
have shown slight improvement,
A Foreign Office spokesman said
later to-day that Bevin “continues
to improve and is slightly better.”
—Reuter,





PRINTERS REFUSE TO
JOIN IN. BOYCOTT.

BUENOS AIRES, Jan, 27,
In an eleventh hour effort to
prevent La Prensa being distribu-
ted for the second day running,
boycotters last night picketed
the printers as they attempted to



unsuitable as the Spanish repre-
sentative in Britain.



—Reuter








Don’t Miss RUSSIA’S
NEW EMPIRE. Begins
TUESDAY. Order your
copy early.





come into force shortly, it was
learned here to-day. ,
1 a Under the treaty which con-
MACARTHL R TALKS ON firms a recent trade agreement,
JAPAN WITH DULLES | trade agents will be ane
. ‘ and ) : tries are pledgec
TOKYO,, Jan, 27 nd both countri are re
John Foster Dulles, President to eater — Bhan. = eiduateis)
Truman's special envoy, charged and agricultura apes iret P
| with sounding out Japanese views ——meuter.
on a Peace Treaty, had a two-hour cumemseneneenianenes
talk with General MacArthur to- ;
cay DI |
He is reported to have “found Al STAL N
himself in complete agreement NEW YORK,
ith the Supreme Commander on Three College students tried t I
#ll issues of the Japanese Peace telephone Stalin recently, They,
Treaty.’ wanted to ask him whether the
KE I ij i ) tec it once or if
i 4 —Reuter —LE.S

‘

below, seriously injuring himself | ceasefire
—and his wife. who happened to| negotiations,
be passing at that moment,

before beginning any

A new factor intreduced-into the





—LES discussions here, was the apparent
" - \Jull in the fighting in Korea which
ithe — Indian delegates thought
might be “significant.”
TELL don fag They emphasised that the
RING 3113 | Peking Government while not

formally acceding to a cefi$efire
might be trying to give the im«
@ On page 10.

DAY OR NIGHT



THROUGHOUT
THE YEARS...
YOU CAN'T

CATCH UP

win A





‘RALEIGH

TWE ALL-STGSL BICYCLE



in QUALITY

and

PERFORMANCE

THAT'S WHY MORE
BARBADIANS CHOOSE

RALEIGH

ae ee

Cave Shepherd & Co. Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
Distributors




PAGE TWO



JANETTA DRESS SHOP

UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAM'’S, Lower Broad St.

Phone 2684

READY MADE DRESSES of all types
WOLLEN TWIN SETS—Local Handicraft
EVENING MITTENS—in Pastel Shades and Biack

READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty’s of London.













445 & 8.30 p.m
The Comedy

TODAY and Continuing Daily
KAYE-O from Warner Bros

Danny kAYEin “The Inspector General”

Color by eet
Also; The Color Carton: “KIT FO Cc
And Latest Wostt D NEWS (By WARNER- PATHE NEWS)

MATINEE THURS. | My



1.30 p.m MAT: PRIDAY 4.45 PM.

“THE Gt , “BELOW THE DEADLINE
i ee, ee with Warren Douglas and
DYNAMITE CANYON” “LAW COMES TO GUNSIGHT”











, th Tor ‘eene * >
HOURS: Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30 el ee ne
SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30
2 a Teena PLAZA Theatre=O/STIN (DIAL 8404)
RCS OD POS SOO F FOTO OOO FOO OOS PESOS CS CSCC COCO COPTO S Last 2 Shows TODAY 6 & 8.30 p.m. (RKO Radio}
SPEIGH 1 sto WwW N % Samuel Gelwyn's & George O'BRIEN in
. ~ “ROSEANNA MeCOY” “MARSHAL OF MESA CITY”
p » Farley GR R — Joan EVANS
PLACE T H E A T R E_ TIME 8.30 ~ ; ; eiceeas
2 MONDAY and TUESDAY 6 & 6.30 p.m. (RKO Double)
Last show Tonight S Monday and Tuesd + George O'Brien (in both)
(1) — “UNDER NEVADA SKIES T Q) “CALL OF THE YUKON “ BORDER G-MAN” & “PAINTED DESERT ”
Starr ROY ROGERS 2 RAZIL
+ i esate me ee % MIDNITE SAT. FEBRUARY 3rd (2, Featu
= . oO M al o “DEATH VALLEY RANGERS” “DYNAMITE CANYON’ .
@) “RENEGADES of SONORA” ae ae , = =<
R This Republic double is ful 2
Alien “Rocky” LAYNE etertainment 3
4
ISSSSSSES POSSE OOOO OOOO OOOO





AQUATIC cLUn CENEMA (MenbersOrly) |
TONIGHT at 8.30
Cecil B. De MILLE’S
Mighty Spectacle “CLEOPATRA”

Starring:

Claudette COLBERT Warren WILLIAM Henry WILCOXON

and a Cast of Thousands
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE

MONDAY and TUESDAY NIGHT at 8.30

MATINEE: TUESDAY at 5 p.m

Paramount presents:

Starring: Phyllis CALVERT

a

EMPIRE

Today 445 & 8.45 p.m.

“MY OWN TRUE LOVE”

— Melvyn DOUGLAS

GATETWY—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

TODAY 5 &

&

Last 2 Shows 8.30 p.m. (Warner's Double)

“ UNDER CAFRICORN 7
Ingrid BERGM
Joseph COTTON.

GUNS OF THE PECOS”
Dick FORAN (The Singing

Cowboy)

aa
—



MONDAY & TUESDAY 8.30 p.m, (Warner's Double)
“AMAZING DR. CLITTERHOUSE” & “GEO, WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE”
*. G. Robinson, Hun Bogart Jack Benny



phrey





(Only) ]
Bi

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

———aan9D9@D@nDn9D@DD9D9@B93Hoo————————_—___—XX_—_S +
| PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

RIGADIER ERIC, MOUNT, a
representative of Colonial
Development Corporation, whose
headquarters is in Trinidad, wag
‘an intransit passenger through
3arbados yesterday from St, Lucia
Trinidad. Brigadier Mount was
in Barbados for a few days last
week.

H\¢: D. and W. Movements







EMPIRE THEATRE



ROYAL

Today—Last Two

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30

Shows

4.30 & 830 p.m,

Monday to Thursday

4.45

20th Cen

& 8.30 p.m,

tury

Fox Presents
“PLL GET
BY 9°

Color by Technicolor

Starring June HAVER

William LUNDIGAN
With Gloria De HAVEN

and Dennis DAY



ROXY

Today to Tuesday
4.30 & 815 p.m.

Columbia Double Attraction

Robert Louis Stevenson's
Adventure

“THE SECRET
OF
ST. IVE:

With Richard NEY,
Vanessa BROWN
and Henry, DANIELL

Johnny WEISSMULLER

as Jungle Jim in...

“CAPTIVE
GIRL ”

with Buster CRABBE
and Anita LHOEST



Beauty and Reliability (Combined







And



M-G-M Smashing Double
Bud ABBOT

and Continuing to Thursday

and

Lou COSTELLO in...

“LOST IN A
HARE:
AND

** TARZAN
AND THE
APE MAN”

Starring

Johnny WEISSMULLER
and Maureen O’SULLAVAN

Monday & Tuesday
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.

“Killer Me Coy”

*RMose Marie”

OLYMPIC

Last Two Shows Today
445 & 8.30 p.m.

FIRST INSTALMENT

Universal Serial...



MATINEE & NIGHT SHOWS DAILY,

William

- LUNDIGAN

June

Ed
Cat

¢ pCHNIC *OLOR



ACT QUICKLY !!
THEY'RE
MOVING FAST !!

A Small Shipment of

——————



Monday & ‘Tuesday

4.45 & 8.15 p.m.

AND





“TIME MARCHES ON™
TEMCO® KEEPS

BUT
GO00nD TIME

ON
THE

FINAL INSTALMENT |
Universal Serial . . , |

John Mack BROWN
and George SHELLEY in

“WILD WEST
DAYS”

with Lynn GILBERT
and Frank YAGONELLI

THAT'S THE
SET BY EVERY

TEMCO

ELECTRIC CLOCK

snow
CORNER STORE

AGRICULTURAL FORKS
$4.70 §Facn

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

Hardware and Ironmongery Department Telephone No. 2039

ONLY







NS



\,



STANDARD

AFTER

Of special interest to Men is the arrival of :

MERCERISED
WHITE

28 inches wide at $1.43 per yard



aT



Wm. FOGARTY Ltd.

Announcing Our - « +

Re-opening

STOCK-TAKING
MONDAY, 29TH JANUARY

Many CLEARANCE BARGAINS

in every Department.



ISS DORA IBBERSON, Social

Welfare Adviser to C.D. and
W., who was in Trinidad on a
short visit, returned yesterday
morning by B.W.1 rae,

oo ing by the same ’plane was
Mr. A. de K. Frampton, Agricul-
tural haan to C.D. and W.

Mr. James Nicol, Educational
Adviser to C.D. and W., left for
Grenada yesterday by B.W.I.A.

Canadian Breweries

| R. AND MRS. C. O. DALTON

of Tcronto, after spending

three days in Trinidad, arrived

here yesterday to spend two weeks

at the Windsor Hotel. Mr, Dalton

is with Canadian Breweries in
Toronto.

Manvfacturers Agent

M* AND MRS. C, B. STEV-
ENSON came in on the
'T.C.A. flight yesterday morning to
ao three weeks in Barbados.

hey are staying at the Windsor
Hotel. This their first visit
meee

15

Stevenson is a Manufactur-

rs’ aenet and proprietor of Stev-

pe Millinery Agency in
Toronto,

Arrivals From Toronto

R. G. E. SCUDAMORE, a

Produce Broker of Toronto,
accompanied by his wife, arrived
by T.C.A. yesterday morning to
spend three weeks at the Marine
Hotel,

Also from Toronto arriving yes-
terday were Mr. and Mrs. Emer-

on EB. Summers. They were ac-
companied by Miss Ann Walters.
They are here for one month,
staying at the Marine Hotel.

Mr. Summers is owner of Emer-
son E. Summers Company Lim-
ited, Importers and Manufacturers
in Toronto.

Advertising and the
Y.W.C. A.

ARIB had an interesting chat
yesterday with Mr. and

Mrs. Frederick J, Ross while they
were at Seawell. Mr. and Mrs.
Ross came on the T.C.A. flight

from Canada,

Here for about three months
they are staying at Edgewater
Hotel, Bathsheba, Mr. Ross now
retired was one time Chairman of
Fuller and Smith and Ross, an
advertising organisation in New
York

Mrs. Ross is a member of the
National Board of the Y.W.C.A,

Chairman in Canada of Mrs, Win-
ston Churchill's Fund for British

Service Women, This branch was

asked to raise $100,000 dollars.
Mrs, Ross told Carib that they
raised over $140,000 before the

Fund was closed,

Their home is in Toronto, where
Mr. Ross was born. Before com-
ing to Barbados they spent a few
days in Bermuda,

Here Last Year

R. AND MRS. W, C. WELLS
who were here last year
arrived yesterday morning by
T.C.A. to spend a holiday in
Barbados, Mr. Wells is_ the
founder of Wells Construction

Co., Ltd., General Contractors,
Their home is in Victoria, Brit-
ish Colombia, They have two
sons who are both in the business.

Short Visit
M*: BASIL WEATHERHEAD,
Representative of Messrs.
J. W. Potter & Co., Ltd., left for
Grenada yesterday by B.W.I.A.
He will be away for one week,



DRILL

It’s the DRILL so many men have

been waiting for.

Please Enquire Early at :

| Wm. FOGARTY Ltd.



SUNDAY,

Carb Calling

Same ’Plane

RS. K. E, DOWD and her

daughter Barbara arrived

from Montreal yesterday by

T.C.A. to spend three weeks at
the Hastings Hotel.

Arriving on the same plane

were Mrs, Maude Macdonald and
Mrs. Christie McLeod who are also
down for three weeks. They are
from Toronto and are staying at
the Marine Hotel,

Supreme Powers

R. EDWARD J. MACKER-
ETH, President and Gen-
eral Manager of Supreme Powers
Suppliés Ltd., in Toronto, accom-
panied by Mrs, Mackereth arrived
from Canada yesterday morning
to spend a week in Barbados,
staying at the Marine Hotel.

Back From St. Lucia
R. PETER POTTER who was

on holiday in St. Lucia,
Staying with his parents Mr, and
Mrs. Freddie Futter, returned

yesterday by B.W.I.A.
with Barclays Bank

Peter is
here,
Bedspread Buys A
Typewriter

ROCEEDS from the raffle of a
patchwork bedspread which

was made by the children of the
Haynes Memorial School, will
purchase a second-hand typewriter
which will be used to teach the
children to type. The bedspread
was won by Mrs, E. C. Haynes.

Intransit

ISS THEODORA LOUREN-
CO who arrived from Can-

ada last Saturday by T.C.A. to
see her mother who is at present
in Barbados, left for Trinidad in
the middle of last week. Yester-
day morning she was an intransit
passenger through Barbados by
T.C.A, returning to Canada. Her
sisters Molly and Mrs. Franco
were at Seawell to meet her dur-
ing the short time the plane was

in,
‘ix Weeks

S. H. R. BAIN accompanied

by Miss Ella Rogers, arrived
from Canada yesterday by T.C.A.,
to spend six weeks’ holiday in
Barbados, staying with Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Van den Bergh at
“Beach House,” Glitter Bay, St.
James,

Mrs, Bain’s husband is President
of National Life Insurance Com-
pany and President of Bain, New-
ling and Company, in Toronto and
gees in for breeding horses in a
big way. He is the only Canadian
to send a Canadian bred horse to
England to take part in the Grand
National. That was in 1938. He
may come down to Barbadcs on a

Here for

short visit while his wife is here,
of Canada and during the war 7

of view.

% TONITE 8.30

Bud ABBOTT and

Extra:

PSOE OV SOOO

a INFANT’S

e SHOES
by
Clark

mw RED, oni TAN

from

i ee



4, POSS999SSSS G96 9SSS SOS S 9999 OO6

GLOBE.

** THE FOREIGN LEGION ”
BRITISH NEWSREEL

SEESOSES



1951

JANUARY 28,

PEGGY JOHNSON chatting with her Dad visits the Polo Club for

the first time.
school in England,

Attended Trinidad Meeting
EV. ERNEST GRIFFIN Supt.

of the Methodist Church who
was in Trinidad for a few days
attending the Inter-District Sta-
tioning Committee of the Method-
ist Church, returned from Trinidad
yesterday morning by B.W.I.A.

Grenada Holiday
R. & MRS. GEORGE SHARP
were among the passengers

who left for Grenada yesterday

by B.W.I.A. They will be away

for one week.

Passenger Supt. B.W.IA.
RAY LEGGE, Passenger

M* Supt. of B.W.1.A, stationed
in Trinidad arrived on B.W.1.A.’s
morning flight from Trinidad yes-
terday. He is staying at the Ocean
View Hotel. Mr. Legge returns
to Trinidad tomorrow,



LITTLE JULIE ‘MICHELIN, a keen Polo fan, feels that smaller
Polo hats and shorter sticks should be made if she is to join the
ladies’ team, Her brother Andrew happily agrees with this point

POF

to TUESDAY
Lou COSTELLO in:

Â¥,
POMEL SSS

SOOSOO



Peggy arrived by the “Colombie” after two years

Busy Visit

R. NORMAN MANLEY, who

arrived in London on the 213t
January will have other tasks tw
perform apart from pleading in
the Privy Council. The League of
Coloured Peoples are arranging
a reception for him at the Chel-
sea Centre of the West African
Students’ Union, on February 1st
But members of the West Indian
Students’ Union here feel that
Manley’s special job is to present
the West Indies to London A
number of public meetings in
London are being arranged by
WISU at which Mr, Manley will
talk about the political, economic
and social problems~of the West
InGies.

Pilot and Navigator

R. VERNON MARQUEZ and
Mr. Douglas Moore arrived
at Seawell at 9 a.m. yesterday in
one of the Trinidad Light Aero-
plane Club's Auster aircraft, VP-
TAR. They left Trinidad at 9
a.m. on Friday for Grenada. Leav-
ing Grenada for Barbados they
encountered rain and bad visi-
bility. They changed course for
St. Lucia, Poor visibility ground-
ed them there overnight, They
left St. Lucia at 7.30 a.m. yester-
cay for Barbados. Weather was
again hazy. They were just about
to return to St. Lucia when they
sighted the northwest coast of
Barbados at about 8.40 a.m, Mr.
Moore is the pilot and Dr. Mar-
avez the navigator. These two
were in Barbados in November,
when they flew up in the same
aireraft they arrived in yesterday.
Dr. Vernon Marquez told Carib
that funds from the Light Aero-
plane Club’s raffle now being sold
jn Trinidad will help promote a
gigantie air rally which, he hopes
will come off sometime this year.
Aircraft Clubs from all parts ot
the world will be invited to attend
to take part.

They were met at Seawell by
Mr. Charlies Allmon, the American
photographer who is in Barbados
taking pictures for the National
Geographic Magazine and the
Barbados Publicity Committee.
Shorily after they arrived Mr,
Moore who met Mr. Allmon las
year in Trinidad took Mr, Allmon
up for a fly.

The aircraft was seen flying
over Barbados again yesterday
afternoon, and is expected to go
up this morning for another
flight .

The Auster is due to return to
Trinidad via St. Vincent early
this afternoon.

Holidaying With Relatives

M's HONOR INCE who spent
several weeks in Barbados
holidaying with relatives return-

ed to ‘on yesterday morning
by T.C.A,

BALLROOM DANCING

CENERAL and Specialized
dances Weekly classes or PRI-
VATE tuition if required.

WRITE Mrs. MARGOT LAFFAN
Piques Villa,

Kent, Ch. Ch.
or phone 4315 between 8 a.m.
and 9.30 am, any morning ex
cept Sundays

sae
BEEREBE SBE ERE BER RB BRB eee ese

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A broad-fitting flexible, all-leather lace-up shoe

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. Evans and Dial 4606
| ee t

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“TRUFORM” Sandals 7’s—2's









SUNDAY, JANUARY 23,



1951

JUDY GARLAND'S STORY

This is Judy Garland’s own,
personal story of her life, from
her exciting but not entirely
happy childhood days through
her eventful career in Hollywood,
including the tragic moment when
she decided she no longer wanted
to live.

Miilions of movie fans have
wondered about the enigma of
Judy Garland—and the 28-year-
aid star’s recent emotional up-
heavals that resulted in a final
break with her studio and a
crisis in her spectacular career.

Why did Judy attempt suicide?
What emotional strains and psy-

chological conflicts upset her du- |

ring her struggle ta emerge from
juvenile stardom and her ardent
desire to grow up and be taken
seriously as an adult?

Now, for the first time, Judy
has told her full, frank and human
story. It begins herewith in the
first of six articles condensed
from the current issue of Cosmo-
politan Magazine. Start Judy's
gripping, intimate story now and
continue it daily in the Advocate.

By JUDY GARLAND

As told to MICHAEL DRURY
(Distributed by International News
Service, permission of Cosmopolitan
Magazine).

All my life I have tried to do
whatever was expected of me, and
now sometimes I think that isn’t
very smart. Sooner or later some-
thing inside of you kicks.

It has taken me a long time to
find that out, because I am a
bern trouper. My father used to
say, “it won't make any difference
what Judy does for a living, she’ll
tear the house down getting there,”
and he Was right. I would have
trouped in a shoe factory,

As it happened, T got into a
business where trouping counts.
One snowy Christmas eve before
I’ was three years old, I began
singing and dancing on the stage
in a little town in Minnesota. I
poured my heart into five Straight
choruses of “Jingle Bells,” and I
would have kept it up all night if
dad hadn't carried me off, kick-
ing and yelling like an Indian,

I don’t know whether I actual-
ly remember that or whether I’ve
heard people talk about it so much
that it seems as if L remember,
but I do know this: I took one
look at all those people, laugh-
ing and applauding, and I fee}
hopelessly in love with audiences
After twenty-five years, I stil}
love them, and it has been a
serious romance.

I wanted it that way. My mother
is a strong-minded woman, but
she was never a “Stage Mamma.”
During those vaudeville years, my
sisters and I while standing in
countless wings waiting for our
cues, used to hear other mothers
threatening their children, saying
things like, “you go on out there
or Ill break your head,” and it
made us kind of sick. Nobody



JUDY GARLAND
talked to me like that or

ever
forced’ me in any way. I drove
myseltf—but it was my own doing.

Why I felt compelled to do it,
I don’t entirely know, It wasn’t
to forget my trouples—I’ve never
been able to lose myself complete-
ly in my work the way some peo-
ple can—but so much of the time
acting was the only reliable thing
I knew, the only place where I
felt like a useful person, where
people said, “fine, you did a good
job. Come again,’ and every-
body needs to hear those things.

When I was about fifteen, i
went back to see Grand Rapids,
Minnesota, where I was born. I
found a gracious little town, full
of trees and porches and people
who know how to live in simple
goodness,

I think I would have liked to
grow up there, carrying my
schoolbooks in a strap and having
a crush on the milkman’s son,

My father, Frank Gumm, was a
wonderful man with a fiery tem-
per, a great sense of humour, and
an untrained but beautiful voice,
He met, my mother, Ethel Milne,
when he was singing in a Wiscon-
sin theatre where she was the
pianist.

They toured Vaudeville togeth-
er as “Jack and Virginia Lee,
sweet southern singers,” until
their first baby was coming, and
then dad bought the movie the-
atre in Grand Rapids, and they
settled down in a two-storey white
frame house with a garden behind
it,

By the time I came along, Suzy
was seven and Jinny was five.
My parents were hoping for a

@ at end of col. 3

COOKERY CORNER

When buying fish remember
that size is not everything, me-
dium-sized fish generally have the
finést flaveur. Do not be afraid of
trying the less usual types of fish
and you will enjoy the slightly
different flavour and texture, they
can be used to make unusual and
attractive dishes.

_The Chinese have many very
tasty fish dishes, two of which I

m7. going to give you
this week —- the fish
héad soup and steamed

sh, Chinese s t y le.

hese two dishes have
no strong flavour and
are therefore more ac-
ceptable to the West-
ern palate,

Fish Head Soup

Several small fish
heads,

A few drops of
sherry.

1 02, of oil.

A few drops of vinegar.

d-lb. of grated yams.

A few spring onions.

A few pieces of fresh or dried
ginger.

Method: Wash the fish heads,
remove the gills and add a few
drops of sherry; put in two quarts
of cold water with the ginger, a
few spring onions and an oz.



of oil.

Simmer for one hour, then add
a few drops of vinegar and a
quarter pound of grated yam. Boil
for another ten minutes until the
yams are tender and the soup be-
comes a creamy colour. It is then
ready for serving. u

Steamed Fish

1 Ib of small filleted fish,

1 oz. of onion.

4 lb. of tinned mush
rooms,

A drop of vinegar.

1 tablespoonful of
diluted Bovril.

1 oz. of fat.

Method: Cutthe
mushrooms and
onions into slices

and mix in the Bovril.
Wash the fish and place
it in a basin with the
white side up. Cover
it with the other in-
gredients, put the con-
tents of the basin in a
steamer and steam for 15 min-
utes. Season with a drop of vine-
gar, pepper and salt before serv-

Gian”

For Amateurs

The Garden In
January
Gladiolus — Week 4

AN article on Gladiolus has al-
ready appeared in this paper, but,
as January is the month when
Gladiolus Bulbs generally come to
the island, perhaps a_ refresher
may be of interest to some garden-
ers.

As soon as the Bulbs arrive, in
January or February they should
be planted in an open oer posi-
ticn at onec.

Preparation of The Bed

To prepare the bed, fork it deep-
ly, turning in some well rotted pen
manure. Gladioli like a rich bed,
but, they dislike fresh anima)
manure. If the soil is at all heavy
or cloggy, mix in a good supply of
fine charcoal to lighten it up.

Plant the Bulbs about three
inches deep in the ground, and
about eight inches apart, pressing
them >in very firmly.

As soon as they spring, showing
a few leaves, give them an appli-
cation of manure, and, the useful
G. V. M. (garden vegetable man-
ure) will do for this.

Keep the plants well watered at
all times.

When the plants have reached
full growth, periodic applications
of manure will give good results,
One of our Garden Books, advises
a weak solution of liquid Sheep
Manure for this, but G. V. M. will
answer just as well.

To ensure straight well shaped
flower spikes, neat staking of the
plants is advised. In putting in the
stakes, however, great care must
be exercised to see that the Bulbs
are not pierced and injured.

Bulbs planted in January should
be flowering by April.

After the flowering period, the
foliage of the Gladiolus dies
down, and it is then that the

Bulbs should be taken up, and
stored in loose dry earth until the
following January, when they can
be re-planted,

This is the recognised treatment,
but one successful grower of Glad-
iolus always leaves her Bulbs in
the ground, and up they come
the following January at the ap-
pointed time.

Other gardeners may like to try
out this method for themselves.

Gladiolus stock may be increas-
cd by planting the small Corms
which generally form around the
mother Bulb. But these Corms
take many years to mature and,
with the imported Bulbs so reas-
enably priced, and so easy to get,
this is hardly worth the trouble.

To ensure a longer supply of
Gladiolus flowers, it is a good plan
io plant the Bulbs in batches,
spacing them a week or two apart,
so making sure of a continuous
supply of flowers, over a longer
period.

Pick the flower-spikes for the
house when the first two blooms
have opened, they will last well,
with the blooms opening gradu-
ally all up the stalk.

Have you a gardening question
you would like answered or any
garden information of interest to
other gardeners you could pass
on?

Have you a surplus of seeds oF
cuttings to exchange?

Please write to “Gardener”
c/o The Advocate and watch this
column,





-~

boy, and I understand they tried
to wield a little prenatal influence
by referring to me as Frank, but
I don’t think they were deeply
disappointed when they had to
revise it slightly to Frances.

Contrary te what some people
seem to think, I wasn’t a tomboy.
I had great vitality, but I never
took it out in athletics, and to
this day I hate exercise of that
kind, I play tennis a little, but
that’s all, and we don’t own a
swimming pool.

(TUESDAY:—Judy’s start as 4
singer; why she gets “the rocky
feeling.”)

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

(ardening Hlints At The Cinema

The

Inspector General

GR,

BASED on Nikolai Gogol’s,

far
THE INSPECTOR GENERAL,
is an excellent «vehicle for the inimitable

Bridgetown,

ce, satirizing bureaucracy,
showing at the Plaza}

talents of Danny Kaye. Probably the best young comedian

in the entertainment world
scope for his abilities.

Among othér things, he dances,
wrestles, produces amazing facial
calisthenics, gets mixed up with a
group of tumblers, and signs—
with three Danny Kaye faces—a
quartet with himself, one of the
cleverest bits of entertainment I
have seen. All of this is perform-
ed at a speed that leaves you
gasping. This probably explains
the lulls which oecur in the pic-
ture when Mr. Kaye is either not
present, or not so _ noticeably
active. These same lulls _ also
emphasize the extraordinary abil-
ity of Mr. Kaye when he gets
hold of a really funny situation,

The setting of the film is the
mythical town of Brodney in the
French Empire, during the Napols
eonic era, As a_ disembodied
head, Danny Kaye is part of the
show, as well as the idiot assistant,
of an itinerant medicine man.
Parting company with his erst-
while employer, he is mistaken
for the Inspector General, who is
fearfully awaited by corrupt pub-
lic officials, and who travels under
a wide variety of disguises, to un-
cover corruption in the Empire.
For a time, his masquerade is
successful, until the medicine man
arrives on the scene, followed by
the real Inspector, who promptly
signs a death warrant for the im-
poster. Nothing daunted, as he
cannot read or write, Mr. Kaye
destroys the document and pro-
ceeds to inform the mayor and
council, who are the worst offen-
ders, of the corruption in their
town. As you can guess, every-
thing turns out for the best and
there is a victorious ending for
nearly everybody concerned, but
not without one or two close
shaves for Mr. Kaye.

The supporting cast includes
Gene Lockhart and Alan Hale as
officials of Brodney, both of whom
are comically pompous and Elsa
Lanchester, as the mayor's wife,
who falls in love with Mr. Kaye,
hoping he will take her to Paris
and Budapest, Miss Lanchester's
characterizations are always mem-
orable, and her téte-a-téte with
the “inspector”, which ends with
her petticoats over. her head, is
delightful. Walter Slezak, as the
medicine-show man is excellent
and Barbara Bates, the little
kitchen maid, who tries to save
the “inspector's” life is most at-
tractive in a small part.

One of the features of the musi-
cal seore is the clever burlesque
of gypsy tunes which accompany
Mr. Kaye during a notable eating
seene and later when he sings,
plays a violin (with whieh » he





BUY ANY TICKETS
FA. DRAW, GEORGE 3



today, Mr. Kaye is given full

gets thoroughly entangled) and,
unknowingiy, sets fire to his hair.

The direction is good, the set-
tings, enhanced by Technicolor,
are outstanding, and though the |{
film slows down in certain spots,
it is good entertainment, featur-
ing satire, farce and slapstick cor-
edy with cne of the finest present
day comedians.

I'LL GET BY

I'LL GET BY, a pleasant musi-
eal comedy in Technicolor, is
playing at the Empire Theatre.
Starring June Haver, William
Lundigan and Gloria @e Haven,
With guest appearances by Jeanne
Crain, Victor Mature, Dan Dailey
and Harry James, it is the story
of two unsuccessful song writers,
who start a small publishing busi-
ness in order to bring their own
songs before the public. Down
tea their last dime, they enlist the
aid of a professional sister-team,
through which they not only find
success, but romance as well, All
this takes place during the years;
1931—1944, and the film is studded
with song hits of those years, For
those of you who are lovers of
popular music well played, Harry
James and his orchestra are heard
in several numbers, and there’s
no denying the fact that it is one
of the finest dance bands you
can hear and trumpeter James is
second to none,

June Haver and Gloria de
Haven are a charming contrast to
each other as the sister-team, and
their dancing and singing are
pleasing and enjoyable. Dennig
Day, of radio fame, and Thelma
Ritter supply the touches of light
comedy, while William Lundigan
looks after the more serious busi-
ness of love-making. Attractive
duets and solos, plus a surprise
cance routine by June Haver and
Dan Dailey round out this film
The settingS ‘are attractive and
vou will probably remember most
of the tunes,

THE FOREIGN LEGION

Bud Abbott and Lou Costello
are playing at the Globe Theatre
IN THE FOREIGN LEGION. In
this film, America’s comedy kings,
as they are called, have themselves
a tind time,

Starting out as wrestling pro-
moters, they find themselves in
Algiers in hot pursuit of an erst-
while champion. Running foul
of one of the local Sheikhs, they
are duped into joining the Legion

and from that point on—anything | >

goes. Amongst their escapades is
the purchase of six beautiful slave
girls in a market, without know.-
ing they had bid for them; getting
themselves well and truly lost in
the desert, which produces the
most amazing mirages; being
captured by the Sheikh, and turn—
ing his camp into an uproar and
finally blowing up a Legion fort.
Patricia Medina, a newcomer, is
one of the group of slave girls
that supply the necessary feminine
appeal, but I don’t think she was
entirely at ease with our heroes’
zany type of slapstick,

IT realize that Abbott and
Costello are supposed to be side-
splittingly funny — but so far, my
sides have remained intact and
there’s probably something wrong
with my sense of humour. Any-
way, if you are one of their
millions of fans, you won't want to
miss this film, which is their first
in a year.



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PAGE FOUR

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



JOHN GODDARD IS

TALENT SCOUT
Kensington Wickets Are Graveyards

BY O. S. COPPIN

I find myself in the unaccustomed position this
week of having to offer congratulations to the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control for their decision
to send John Goddard, West Indies Cricket Captain
in India and England to St. Lucia as an observer
at a series of Tests between the Windward and Lee-

A
V Yee ward Islands, , : ;
bed Skipper Goddard, I am informed on reliable au-

ity. is commissioned te look for cricket talent in the person of any
Sehatial West Indies player and if one is discovered he will be asked
to take part in some sort of Trial games, preferably here.

This is a sound decision on the part of the Board and for the
benefit of those Barbadians who still call these islands by the in-
triguing name of “down-along”, I must recall that Mr. C. A, Ollivierre
and R. C. Ollivierre who represented the West Indies in England, both
hailed from St. Vincent. ;

‘As amatter of fact C. A. Olliverre also qualified
for Derbyshire

'
WEEKES MIGHT HAVE HELPED :
PYAHE Empire team is at present playing in Grenada and it would
have been in the interests of West Indies Cricket if the Board
had briefed Everton Weekes, a member of the Empire touring team,
to perform a similar duty. There could scarcely be any question that
he is as qualified as John Goddard is, to assess the possibilities of any
promising bowler.
And now, back to the
been completed and it is time t

3!

and turned out

home scene. The Second Trial game has
hat we took a look at the possible
team that should represent Barbados against Trinidad next month.

I must say at the outset that I think the selectors are faced with
a most difficult task. There are only a few players whose claims
to inclusion are undeniable but there is a wealth of mediocre players
{rom whom they will be forced to choose.

Their only ‘salvation will lie in the course that they must not
only do justice to the candidates for inclusion but ensure that when
they have selected the team that justice will appear to have been

done.
UNFRIENDLY WICKETS ; 5
ERSONALLY I think that the wickets prepared during the Trial
games at Kensington have been the most unfriendly ones on
which bowlers could hope to bowl.
NOTORIOUS :
ENSINGTON is already notorious for its easy wickets but no
effort seems to have been made to get any life into it. The trials
up to the present have been in favour of batsmen all the time and
naturally some flattering scores have been returned. I would pay any -
thing to see some of the batsmen who have returned good scores, do
so on a fiery Bank Hall wicket or a Wanderers wicket that I used
to know up to four or five years ago.
They might probably make more r
fight for them and earn them against
nance to get them out. .
- With the exception of “Brickie’ Lucas and Keith Walcott the
fielding has been a long way below what we associate with Intercolo-
nial standards, There have been occasionally bright spots of fielding
but a good general standard has not obtained throughout the games.
Certain prejudices and certain fantastic yardsticks are brought
jnto play whenever a Barbados team is selected. We who live in these
Gays are even better off since it is not now being selected by telephone.

THE “ALLAMBYS” HELP ;

SELECTION COMMITTEE is supposed to sit to all intents and
A purposes but it is a strange coincidence that those with the
backing of the “Allambys” stand a better chance of getting in than
anyone else. ,

I am giving my impressions of those whom I think should repre-
sent the colony and if I am wrong I want to warn my readers that
i am picking my probables purely on merit and am not being guided
ry any extraneous prejudices. ee

In the first place I think that the selectors should make up their
minds whether or no they are going to select Hunte to open the innings
with Roy Marshall or whether they are going to choose Charlie Taylor
for the job. ?

These players have been before their eyes this season, Charlie
Taylor the more so, because he is a Barbados Cricket Association
player, Hunte has also had his showing.

NO COMPROMISE

CANNOT AGREE with any compromise to_select;Taylor to open

with Marshall and send Hunte lower in the batting order.

Although it would be an awkward way of handling the matter
‘yet I think that they would do better to play one of these in each
match if they are undecided as to who should accompany Roy Mar-
shall to the middle to open the innings,

Eric Atkinson I would play as one of the opening bowlers. He
is quicker off the pitch in the opening overs than any of the other
pace bowling candidates and he is an infinitely better batsman than
any of them.

The other place for a pace bowler would seem to rest between
Bradshaw and Mullins. Bradshaw cannot complain for having been
afforded the most generous chance to qualify but I cannot truthfully
say that Mullins has received equally indulgent treatment.

THE ONLY FAST BOWLER ;

WILL stand or fall by my stated opinion that Carl Mullins 1s

the only real pace bowling candidate in Barbados today, I have

already written that Atkinson gets more pace off the pitch in the
early overs but Mullins is the only pace bowler who is fast for AN
ENTIRE DAY.
; Denis Atkinson I would select at once. He has not been suc-
cessful in the trials but he has given the best all round performance
this season with bat and ball for Wanderers the champions in the
First Division competition.

He has had International experience as a member of the West
Indies team in India. He is young, energetic and really keen. We
twould be really rich in talent if we could afford to ignore these
qualities in selecting a Barbados team today.

Norman Marshall has carved a place for himself as the most ac~
curate medium fast bowling machine we have produced in years,

RELIEVE WALCOTT
I WOULD certainly relieve Clyde Walcott from the strain of wicket
keeping especially in view of the fact that he might not be called
upon to perform this role on the Australian tour and also in view of
the fact that he might not always be available to Barbados in the
Intercolonial commitments and so one should be trained.
Gerald Wood is in a section without competition and he picks him-
self if the selectors are at all mindful of the above facts, F
Roy Marshall, Everton Weekes and Clyde Walcott are the batting
certainties. Errol Millington has picked himself and so my twelve
would be — Goddard (Capt.), Hunte or Taylor, Roy Marshall, Weekes,
Walcott, Eric Atkinson, Denis Atkinson, Norman Marshall, Gerald
Wood, Errol Miilington, Carl Mullins, Hoad, Branker, or Bowen, if they
reach Intercolonial standard by next match or else dispense With a
slow spinner altogether, rely upon the fast and medium bowling and
play Keith Walcott as a forceful batsman and excellent field.

uns but they would have to
bowlers who at least had a








C. Walcott Scores Fine Century :

Hits 128 As Second
Trial Game Ends

C. WALCOTT’S XL... 177& for 6 wkts.) 252
J. GODDARD'S XI . 258.

CLYDE WALCOTT, West Indian Test bat and wicket-
keeper, scored 128 runs not out in the second innings for
his XI_yesterday, the last day in the second cricket trial
match,

Going in at number five he hit-———
18 fours in his 128 and batted in
his usual attractive style and only
gave one chance when he was 33
off Mullins,



M.C.C. All Out
For 211

ADELAIDE, Jan. 27.

Marylebone Cricket Club tour-
ists to-day scored 211 all out on
the first day of their four days re-
turn match here against South
Australia.
_ Throughout the day good field-
ing reduced scoring opportunities
and Dave Sheppard was top-
scorer with 33.

Jeff Noblet with five wickets for
56 had the best bowling figures
It was slow scoring forced on the
batsmen to a large degree by the
fceuracy of the attack plus the in-

In the bowling department the
spinners proved to be the most
successful. E. Hoaq intercolonial
player of Pickwick bowled well to
capture three wickets for 34, Mil-
lington, Marshall and Branker got
one each,

Carl Mullins the Police pacer
bowled steadily in the early part
of the play.

Clyde Walcott’s XI at the end
of play yesterday had scored 252
runs in their second innings for
the loss of six wickets. In their

first innings they scored 177 to tense heat ¢ ; ;

ag : . y s at and flies “
which John Goddard’s XI re- times worried the Meat car
plied with 258. we

When the sides met in October
the M.C.C. won to register their
only success against a state team

so far on the tour,
Seores:—

Play

When play was resumed yester-
day C, Atkins and C, Smith open-

ed the second innings for Clyde M.C.C. FIRST INNINGS

Hutton

A . . as . b, Noblet..... 5 18
Walcott’s XI on a wickat that waS Washbrook c. Michael b, Noblet.. 32
taking turn. The first ball was Sheppard c. Noblet b. Wilson "3
bowled by Mullins to Atkins. Simpson c. Michael, b, McLean 25
: t Me Intyre b, Wilson - 0
Atkins watched the ball go through Brown c, Michael b, Nobiet 2
to Wood and took qa single in the Ciges l.b.w. b. McLean . 4
. oe " attersall b. Noblet . l4
fourth ball. Mullins first over wright b. Wilson... 29
conceded one run. Statham c. Duldig b. Noblet 18
é ‘ ; Hollies not out . ‘ 5
Williams bowling with three Extras 110 legbyes, 1 noball, 1 wide) 12
slips and deep fine leg bowled the P
second over of the day. He sent mae
down his first ball of the over to Fall of wickets: 1—21; 2—72; 3—108
Atkins who hit a brace. a 5—120; 6—132; 7—145; 8—165
In Mullins’ fourth ball of the °~** BOWLING
third over Atkins had a narrow oO M R W
escape when he glided one high Noblet .......--...++ Ree
. : : Bowley Oa a
and Marshall at fine leg tried to sinart 5 1 13 «(OO
make a catch, FUGA =p Sones 4 2 6 0
WENO | das ubces sees 20 8 29 3
Smith hit his first four of the McLean ..... 4678, OR" 8

day off Williams. This was the
first ball of Williams’ third over.
Both batsmen were now getting
well over the ball.

Mullins fourth over conceded 11
runs, After Mullins fourth over
Millington was brought on to bowl
to Smith, Smith was 19. The
second ball of Millington’s first
over Smith pulled for a single and
Atkins played out the remainder
of the over. The score was now
41.

Read “English Crick-
eters in Barbados—i6

years ago” by Ian Gale
in tomorrow's “Evening
Advocate”.





15 was bowled by Marshall while
he was making a defensive stroke.
Lucas went in and the first ball
that he took from Marshall struck
him on the pads but a loud appeal
was not upheld. He did not stay
long with Skipper Walcott and at
nine gave Hoad his third wickel
when Taylor caught him,

Greenidge went in and was off
with a brace and Walcott was 49.
At this stage Walcott began to
pulverise the bowling but when
everyone was looking for a good
partnership with Greenidge and
himself, Greenidge was out to
Branker,

K. Bowen joined Walcott when
the score was 200. Walcott reached
his century with a four off
Branker and when play was ende.|
Walcott was undefeated with 128
hitting 18 fours and Bowen not
out five.

Six wickets-were down for 252
runs.

Bowling Change

Hoad was brought on in place of
Mullins and his first ball of his
first over Smith pulled again to
the square leg boundary for four
runs,

In the fourth ball Smith edged
through the slips but Proverbs
was too far to make a catch of it.
Millington continued to bowl and
the fifty went up when Atkins
took a single off of one of his
deliveries. Millington sent down a
maiden in his third over, When
the score had reached 63 Smith
was nicely stumped by Wood off
Hoad’s fourth ball of his fiftn
over. Smith made 35,

Eric Atkinson followed and was
off with a single from Hoad. In
Millington’s fifth over Atkins
was beginning to look shaky and at
33 gave Keith Walcott at silly mid
off an easy catch. Hoad figures
were six overs, two maidens, 17
runs, two wickets.

CLYDE WALCOTT’S XI

FIRST
INNINGS isdgievial

17

JOHN GODDARD'S XI FIRST
Cave went in and Millington INNINGB ¥e..-+-. Meters screen
although not yet having taken a
wicket had Atkinson in check,
Millington’s first wicket came

when he forced Atkinson to give

CLYDE WALCOTT’S XI 2ND INNINGS

é
35

33

C. Smith (stpd wkp.) Wood b. Hoad
C. Atkins c. Walcott b. Hoad,...

&. Atkinson c. R, Marshall b.
Roy Marshall a catch ‘when the — Millington ........-. Wivcter ae
: i ‘ 15
score -was 82. Skipper Walcott s Save bi, b. Maree seas eet tan Y 2
followed and was off with a single, \° tuieee Ane Dh IAME css c seis;
W. Greenidge c. Williams b.
At 92 Mullins was brought on — Branker OTS A seren dee he ett 12
again to bowl and the second ball K. Bowen not. out f

in his first over of his second Extras ..

spell Walcott cover drove hard for



Total (for 6 Wkts.) ..



four runs. At lunch Walcott 23 .
and Caye 9 were still together, Fall of ‘Wickets: 1--63, 22, 3-83,
4--132, 5—152, 6—200.
After Lune BOWLING ANALYSIS

After lunch Williams was oir 4
brought on again in place of Bran- wutiins ............55 is ee es 20
ker to bowl to Walcott. The last Williams . NW Tee 0
ball of this over Walcott pulled to Millington 7. - ee 3
the boundary for four runs, Cave Branker |........- $3 ae ee
who was batting patiently when Marshall . aia 20 ae

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game in pre-
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opens
Thursday next
lasts for four
om Saturday
and cencludes

Third Tr

Teams Name

The third trial
paration for the
cricket tournament
Kensington on
February 1, and
days. It continues
3rd, Sunday 4th
on Thursday 8th.

The teams will be:

J. D, Goddard’s XI — J. D.
Goddard (Capt.) G. Wood, R.
Marshall, A. M. Taylor, E, At-
kinson, D. Bradshaw, K. Brank-
er, E, Millington, C. Proverbs, W.
Greenidge, C, Atkins, K. Bowen.

K. Walcott’s XI — K. Walcott

at

(Capt.), C. Smith, C. Hunte, N.
Marshall, C. Mullins, J. Williams,
E. L. G. Hoad, Jnr., H.. King,
N. S.° Lucas, D. Atkinson, E.
Cave, C. Alleyne,

Play continues until 5.45 p.m.
@ach day.

Cricket Coach
Warns W.1.

“Get Some Fast Bowlers”

(From Our Own Correspondent)



KINGSTON, Jan. 14.
Jack Mercer, cricket coach
who left the island last week

after his third coaching season in
Jamaica, sounded a word of
warning in connection with the
forthcomihg West Indies tour of
Australia,

“Get some fast bowlers”, the
old Glamorgan and England all-
rounder said. “The first three
Tests were won by fast bowlers
and on the England side Bedser
and Bailey took the majority of
wickets,”

Mercer, who coached sugar

* estate teams for the Sugar Manu-

facturers’ Association of Jamaica
this season, said that during his
stay here he had discovered a
number .of “naturals’ and in a
year or two, providing they im-
prove as they should, they will

be worthy candidates for not only
a place in the Jamaica side but
also the West Indies.

“I believe’, Mr. Mercer said,”
\hat there is a great possibility
of a Sugar Estate team visiting
Barbados after the crop season.
Arthur Bonitto will no doubt
skipper the team and who knows
it may be the beginning of an
Intercolonial Sugar Estates Tour-

nament. What a splendid thing
for cricket and imagine the
struggle to get a place on the
side.”

Finally Mercer said that he

believed England would beat the
South Africans,



Team Returns Home

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jan. 14.
_ A team of touring football play-
ing schoolboys returned to Jamaica
from Haiti last week assured that
they had done a good job as am-
bassadors during their seven-day
visit to the French-culture West
Indian republic.
They were students of the St.
George’s College who left Jamaica
on January 3*to play three matches

in Haiti, making a _ two-way
journey by special army plane
placed at their disposal by the

Haitian Government,

The visitors won one match and
drew two. While on tour the
team also took part in track
athletics and won several events.

The schoolboys were accom-
panied by the Rey. Fr. Welch of
the College, who said that he had
heen impressed with the speed
‘wid drive of the Haitian St.
Louis footballers and through St
George's played a more construc-
tive game, only the brilliance of
Teddy Saunders, the visitors’
goalkeeper, staved off defeat.



Weekes Hits 48
In Second Test

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, Jan, 27

Empire after dismissing
Grenada in the second Colony
Match for 58, Holder taking 6
for 19 in 14 overs and Alleyne

4 for 23 in 13, the Visitors closed
with 92 for 4: Jones 4, Taylor 0,

Grant 27 not out, Weekes 48
l.b.w., Robinson 0, Symmonds
8 not out.



Polo Trophies
Presented

The Deane Bros., who for the
past several years have been suc-
cessful in carrying off almost
every prize offered for amateur
horsemanship, crowned their
achievements when they won
both the Advocate Challenge Cup
and the Warner Bolton Chal-
lenge Cup in the Polo Tourna-
ment jyst ended. Three teams
took part in this tournament: Col.
Michelin’s team, the Hurricanes,
Mr. Victor Weekes’ Team, the
Cyclones and the Deane Bros.
Team, the Tornadoes.

â„¢ the Junior Fixtures, the
Criollos defeated the Mustangs,
thereby winning the Y. De Lima
Challenge Cup.

Yesterday afternoon, in fine
weather and in the presence ot
a crowd of enthusiasts, Mrs. H.

A, Afthur wife of the founder of
the Club, presented the trophies
after some of the personnel of the
various teams had played a Pres;
entation Match.

Playing in the Presentation
Match were three of the winning
teams, and Mark. Edghill on one
side, and Col. Michelin, John
Marsh, Victor Weekes and Elliott
Williams on the other. Edghill
was taking the place of Colin
Deane both of whose horses were
lame,

The
7—4,

Fellowing is the personnel of the
teams which played this season:—

Seniors

Hurricanes: K. D. G., Frost, Col.
R. T. Michelin (Capt.), M. M.
Parker and J. C. Marsh.

Cyelones: M. D. Edghill,
D. A. V. Weekes (Capt.) J. E. P.
Williams and E. A. B. Deane.

Tornadoes: Colin Deane (Capt.)
Lee Deane, Keith Deane and
Vere Deane.

Juniors

A. J. H. Hanschell
(capt.) O. H. Johnson, J. W.
Chandler and Andrew Arthur.

Mustangs: G. S. Emtage, P.
D. Maynard (Capt.) M. L. D.
Skewes-Cox and H, K, Melville.

If conditions are suitable a few
more Saturday afternoon chuk-
kas will be played.

Col. Michelin. team won

Criollos;



Rifle Results

The usual Saturday afternoon
practice of the Small Bore Rifle
Club took place yesterday.

Conditions were not too good,
the wind being gusty.



The following are the eight
best scores returned :—
MAL DMCROP 2 tba C hoe 100
MEY Sai RUMOR ei wees 100
S. Weatherhead 98
A RS oa sd ks 98
By DOING. 5 ies re hig cians 97
DiiOhasesii'e, 8 96
R. Marshall ............ 96
Fae WOUROE bees ki rcue 92
Lawn Tennis Results

The results of yesterday’s sets
played in the Belleville Tennis
Tournament are:

Men’s Doubles

J. A. Trimmingham and J. L.
St. Hill beat J. H. C. Edghill
and S. H. Edghill 7—5, 6—0.
TO-MORROW’S FIXTURES

Mixed Doubles Handicap

Miss M. King and J. L. M.
Hill vs. Mr. A. Warren and
A. F. Jemmott.

Miss L. Branch and W. A.
Crichlow vs. Mrs. A, A. Gibbons
and A, O. N. Skinner.

Men’s Doubles

H. L. Toppin and D, Lawless
vs. E. P. Taylor and Dr. C. G.
Manning.



Footmark For Sale

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 26.

Footmark, sweep winner at the
Christmas Race Meeting of the
Trinidaq Turf Club, is being offer-
ed for sale. The price asked is
understood to be $8,160.

Footmark’s proposed trip to
Miami has been cancelled, but it
is not known whether the horse
will race at the Union Park Race
Meeting at Easter.

Mr. F, M. Watson of Jamaica
is the owner, while Mr, Leo Wil-
liams is the local trainer.



If lack of confidence worries you





SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 1951

1950 WAS INDECISIVE
September Song And Footmark
Were The Best
BY BOOKIE

HE nth of January is usually the time when
sports writers indulge in reviews of the past
year and to-day I will take my turn with racing.
I admit that most of us get it off our chests ear-
lier in the month but as the recing season ends in
the first week in January it is usually reviews of
the Christmas meeting which take up our time and
space for a week or two afterwards.
OOKING back at the Racing Year 1950 it seems fair enough to
describe it as a good one all round. On the financial side
there was prosperity both here and in Trinidad while in British Gui-
ana things were apparently no worse than they were before. Barba-
dos in particular saw an unprecedented sale of sweepstake tickets and
the first prize in August reached the hitherto unbelievable heights
of forty-four thousand dollars. Neither Trinidad nor Jamaica can
boast of such a prize ever being paid out in their sweepstakes.
One thing that was noticeable in racing in both Barbados and
Trinidad was also the need for new tracks. This was due to the
increased numbers of imported horses and creoles and it is safe to
say that at no time in the past has the influx of new blood to the
race track been as large or as fast. It therefore seems as if the
tracks at the Arima and Garrison Savannahs will, by force of circum-
stances, have to be abandoned at some future date whether the
authorities like it or not. Otherwise overcrowcing will continue to
be a danger to life and limb, both of horse and rider, and the few
accidents which took place in 1950 will be muitiplied as the years

go by.
win respect to the actual pesiog can remember few years when

there have been such changes in fortune in nearly every class.
Here I must ask to be excused from any discussion on racing in B.G.
because of so little first hand information from that colony to go by.
Starting, therefore, with the Barbados March meeting, here we saw
the first Barbados Guineas. As I pointed out two weeks ago in a
discussion on the classics there were many of the most promising can-
didates absent for the race. Nevertheless we saw the Hon. J. D.
Chandler’s tiny filly Watercress in good form and in addition to taking
the first Guineas she won two other races to end up the meeting
unbeaten.

Among the locally bred three-year-olds the filly Bowmanston
also showed splendid form in her first race. She broke the F class
record for 54 furlongs and in so doing defeated a field of older horses
with ridiculous ease.

The March meeting also saw the first Jamaica Derby winner to
race in Barbados for many a year, if not the first for all time, (I am
not sure whether Saraband ever raced here). This was Mr. Tass
Tawill’s tall bay gelding Blue Streak. Unfortunately he did not
strike his best form and the laurels of the meeting in the top class
were divided between Beacon Bright and Gun Site. The latter, in
particular established a reputation for himself as one of the best sons
of O.T.C. by winning twice, once over nine and another time over
714 furlongs with top weight.



T Union Park it was another three-year-old creole who held the
d limelight. At this meeting Dr. N. Bain’s gelding Wavecrest, the
first son of the sire Coat-of-Arms ever to prove of any consequence,
dished out three consecutive defeats to his contemporaries to become
a firm favourite for the Trinidad Trial Stakes. This marked Wave-
crest’s first appearance since the previous August and it certainly
appeared that a bright future was in store for him.

Beacon Bright also displayed good form at Union Park but was
rather unlucky to lose the first A class race due to his unfamiliarity
with the track. However he managed one first while The Gauntlet
and Pharlite accounted for the other two A class races, the latter
also winning a B class race.

It was at Union also that the first record forecast for the year
was paid when the aged gelding Brown Boy got up in the last stride
to win from the Jamaican mare Miniature. Not since 1946 had Brown
Boy won a race. The forecast pay out was $5,533.48.

ITH the T.T.C, June meeting came outstanding performances by

September Song, Blue Streak, Orly and Bow Bells. All four
had their fling in different spheres, September Song indeed proved
himself to be a horse of untsual class as far as sprinting was icon-
cerned and I doubt if we have ever seen better in the South Caribbean
at any time. His last win with 136 lbs., in the thickest mud was one
of the most impressive feats of weight-carrying that I have seen in
many a year. Consequently when a few weeks after the June meeting
we learned of his death due to a twisted intestine one could not help
feeling that racing in 1950 had suffered a great loss. Along with
Footmark, who subsequently figured so prominently in the Soutn
Caribbean, I place September Song on equal merits as “horse of the
year,

By winning the Trial Stakes Mr. Cyril Barnard’s Bow Bells
proved that she had lost none of her two-year-old speed but due to
1ack of first class opposition it remained doubtful whether she was
the best of the bunch. Nevertheless Bow Bells also proved that she
was a filly with great possibilities as well as plenty of courage by
winning with 136 lbs., on a slippery slushy track which only a few
hours before had been inspected by the authorities to decide whether
the day’s racing should begin or be postponed. No amount of argu-
ment by those who criticise her as one who cannot run in mud will
ever convince me that she was not as versatile as Ligan in this respect,

HE Barbados August meeting saw further triumph for Water-

cress, Who won the Derby with ridiculous ease from a poor field
while it will forever be remembered as the “meeting of records’.
No less than eight records were broken in the course of three days’ rac-
ing and chief among these was the one set up by the great mare Eliza-
bethan when she ran the nine furlongs and 14 yards in 1.53%. It is
a record which I expect to see standing for a long while.

‘T ARIMA it was Ocean Pearl, Mr. William Scott’s classic filly,

who dumbfounded the critics, myself among them, by winning
twice in A class and once in B. Previously it was felt that Ocean
Pearl was only a sprinter and at that one of no great consequence.
However at Arima she not only outran Blue Streak over six furlongs
but allowed him to lead in the early stages (his favourite type of
race), of a 7%% furlong event and then overtook him in the closing
turlongs in a most decisive manner. About this filly too was sad
news to be subsequently chronicled when a few days before the
See meeting she bowed a tendon, and was reported retired for
good,

The Arima meeting might also be noted for the repercussions
caused after it had pred into history. Chief among these I would
mention the dispensing by the Trinidad Turf Club with the services
of Mr. O. P, Bennett as starter. I, for one, have never seen a better
starter than Mr. Bennett and I have been going to racing now for 25
years, for at least 15 of which my critical faculties have been reason-
ably developed. The other aftermath of note of the Arima meeting
was the so-called “Gimerack Dinner” held in honour of the winner
of the Arima Derby Trial Stakes. The first of its kind in the West
Indies it will not long be forgotten for the speeches made thereat.
AS I do not propose to discuss the Christmas meeting I end with

the Barbados November fixture, and that in brief only, The
most significant event I can think of in connection with this was the
victory of Cross Roads in the two-year-old Trumpeter Cup. Few
two-year-olds have ever scored such a surprising and devastating win
at one and the same time. Others of note at the November meeting

cake started on their return to championship form. Yes 1950 cer-
tainly had its ups and downs. .








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WWNDAY, JANUARY 238,

1951



V.C.C. Beat
*
ns
Tasmania By
Wide Margin
e Our Own Lorrespondént).
LONDON, January 17.
Defeating a Tasmanian XI by
’ wickets the M.C.C.team bet-
the performance of Walter
mond's 1946-47 team which
two games. The present MCC
fh have now won three matches
vo of them first class fixtures.
victories were scored

bat
st South Australia at Adel-
and against a Colts XI at












is MCC victory followed the
rn of their Adelaide success.
© get 188 for victory in just
© two hours they did so with
inutes and nine wickets to

bably the most encouraging
of all was the return to form
nis Compton who in scoring
jot out in the MCC's second
gs set up something of a
record by hitting six succes-
fours to finish the match.
was against Tasmania four
ago that Compton ended a
r bad run with Hammond's
Afterwards he went from
Iss to success.
. Brown decided not to visit
ania in view of his previous
strain in the Third Test
as a result the MCC were
y Compton, who, following
fashion, lost the toss.

home team batted first and
close of play had establish-
mselves in a strong position.
scoring 192 runs they cap-
two MCC wickets for only
s, twelve of which were

helton was the most success-
the home, batsmen, eight of
fell to the MCC pace bowl-
arr and Bedser.
-@ MCC. ineluded Erie Bed-
vin brother of Alec, who has
.in Australia on business.
‘ame in because of the injur-
other players. When he
bowling off spinners the
nhabitants could not at first
stand why “Alec” Bedser
hanged his action. They
sfound out when they saw
Wis together as the players
{ off the field.

pton decided to entrust the
ng of the MCC innings to
s and Sheppard, the two
Cambridge batsmen who
‘against the West Indies
mmer. But the gamble did
me off and each was out
coring only two runs.
eir wickets were claimed by
railway clerk Keith Dollery
it’ cost and the following
ng he addedyEvans to his
fore the first run appeared
t his name in the scorebook,
despite the loss of another
_ wicket, the MCC establish-
irst innings leads of 42 due
- fy. to fine aggressive batting
mpton, Washbrook, in the
al position of No. 6, and
edser, The two latter were
ned in a fine forcing part-
p which added 82 in 81
s before Bedser, attempting
Ossal hit, was well caught on

boundary.

light caused the Tasmanian

innings to be curtailed at
ose of the second day but
following morning Rodwell,
and Reid all hit strongly and
re was taken along to 229.
time it looked as if it would
even larger proportions but



RIVAL

SUNDAY

TEST CAPTAINS



FRED BROWN (left) of England and L. Hassett of Australia admire the trophy presented to Hassett on

behalf of the Jubilee Sports Committee.

Hassett received the trophy on behalf of the Australian Test

team who won the Jubilee (third) Test Match at Sydney. Miniatures of the Trophy were also presented
to all members of both teams, the managers, scorers and umpires.





Rugby’s Qualification Rule Needs
Tightening Up

By PETER DITTON

LONDON, January 19.

THE selection of Rittson-Thomas to take the place of Eng-
land’s captain, John Kendall-Carpenter, in the Rugby In-

ternational at Swansea last

week only re-emphasised the

absurdity of the qualification rule.

Rittson~Thomas was born in
Cardiff, Wales, of Cardiff parents.
Yet because he has played for
Sxford University and resided in
£ngland he was claimed for Eng-
tand’s International XV

There is surely nothing more
ridiculous than this qualification

tule which enables Selectors to
pick a man regardless of his birth-
place. If it could be claimed that
the English selectors chose Ritt-
son-Thomas because in spite of
his Welsh birthplace he was really
an Englishman and it was their
policy only to play Englishmen,
that would be some sort, of an
excuse, But by their actions over
the past couple of years the Eng-
lish Selectors have shown that
they are not concerned with a
player’s nationality as long as he



23 in seven overs, Bedser taking
four for 11 in 3.6 overs.

Previously Rodwell, another
hard hitting batsman, had delight-
ed the home crowd by hitting three
mighty sixes off Hollies, two of
them off successive balls, the
second of which went clean out
of the ground,

The MCC were left to get 188
runs for victory in 113 minutes
and Compton’s answer to this
challenge was to send in quick-



is residing in this country — and
is a good player.

Last year for instance, England
called upon South African, Mur-
ray Hofmeyer and New Zealand-
er, Ian Botting and in previous
seasons since the war they have
made similar use of Dominfon
players.

Neither are the Scottish Select-
ors free from blame. Two seasons
ago they appointed Doug Keller
as Captain of their International
XV—-the same Keller who in the
previous season had played
against Scotland while a member
of the Australian touring team.

How silly it all is! If, for in-
stance, in the near future there
should be perhaps half a dozen
Rhodes scholars at Oxford Uni-
versity, all good enough to gain a
place in England’s team, then pre-







and then Simpson was caught

Compton and Sheppard put on
another 50 in 24 minutes and the
MCC were well ahead of the clock.
Sheppard reached his 50 in an hour
and then had the unusual an
lucky experience of being missed
off successive balls, at mid-on and
deep mid-off.

By this time, however, it was
obvious that such a miss would
make little difference to the result
and Compton after reaching his 50



. —Express



sumably they will be included,
regardless of the fact that they;
eome from anywhere except
England. Of course, the side will
still be labelled “England” but
what degree of comfort could the
honest English supporter gain if
such a side was to win the Intere
nationa! Championship and per-
haps even the Triple Crown. It
‘would be English in name only fon
behind the wicket after scoring 43.
nearly half the players would be
from the Dominions. And yet
that is exactly what could hap-
pen as a result of the present loose
ruling on qualification.

In soccer, such a position would
be hardly likely to arise for few,
if any, of the Dominion or Colo.
nial visitors to this country are
good enough even to get into a
league side—always providing, of
course, they have the time to
spare for the extra training which
would be necessary,

Fixed Ruling

Soccer has none of this hap-
hazard selection of players for
International matches, A player
can only be chosen to represent
the country of his birth. Occa.
sionally this brings odd conse.
quences as in the case of Walley
Barnes of Arsenal who is the pres-
ent Welsh Captain. Barnes is 100
per cent, English but he happened
to be born on the Welsh side of
the border and so is not eligible
for England.

But at least with such a hard
and fast ruling, players and se.

q lectors know where they stand,

It can be certain that an Inter.
national team is composed of play-
ers who at least have some con-
nection with the country which
“caps’ them,

This hard and fast ruling is for
the good of the game. It ensures)





It’s Up To
Those Club
Cricketers

By JOHN MACADAM
IF you want to know what is
wrong with English cricket—and,
personally, we don’t think there



‘is all that much wrong with it—

you anly have to alo and
meet the English etiteehere te we
did-over the week-end,
Now, there are the county sides
who. produce the players for the
Test teams, and then there are all
the club sides who produce the
players who graduate into the
county sides,
_ Any falling-off you may notice
in national sides is reflected right
down to these club sides, and that
is where you must start to look
for the trouble,

This all came about as we talked
at dinner
































Club, an organisation that has
been going in the Club Cricket
Cenference since 1873, and know-
ledgeable officers of that body wil!
tell you that the young players
are simply not coming along
despite the fact that the club is
turning out some hundred players
every week-end.

», The matter was put very suc-
cinctly by A. J. Spong, chairman
of the Club Conference and of the
Hounslow club, who said quite
categorically that club cricket was
the backbone of the game today,
and that it always would be.

The major point he made was
that the game would still go on
if so-called first-class cricket dis-
appeared. The same could not be
said of the game so far as first-
class cricket was concerned if club
cricket were to disappear,

So the motivating force appears
to be club cricket, and what are
we going to do about it through
the agency of such clubs as
Polytechnic?

Already, we have gone into the
business of proper pitches and
wickets for idea to
practise on,
seems to be something lacking on
that score.

There appears to be something
else. We heard only yesterday the
story of an Australian cricket
executive who was told in his
hotel that a strange sight was to
be seen at first-light almost any
morning at the practice nets of
Sydney ground,

He happened to wake one more-
ing before dawn and, unable to
sleep again, he decided to test the
story out. He got along to the
ground and there, sure enough, al
the nets—time, 5 a.m.,—were two
kids bowling at each other,

They were putting everything
they had into it; unrelaxing, un-
relenting, completely wrapped up
in what they were doing. They
were around the age of 14
Names? Lindwall and Morris.

Maybe there is something of
that lacking in the youngsters
here, ‘ Omer

—L.ES.

-_—

It is such a ruling which fair-
minded rugby enthusiasts are now
saying should be operative in thig
country, Particularly in the case
of England it would ensure that
home-born players were not kept
out of the International side by



JAN. 28 -- NO. 156

The Topic

of
Last Week



Well very little fireworks
Were seen on Tuesday last
When a new site for our Firemen
At Club Willow quickly passed
. . .

Some of our dear politicians
Although our Treasury's flush
By all kinds of rare taxations
Felt the matter shouldn't be rushed
° . .

As usual boys it happens
At every white-elephant sale
Our Government hates relaxing
For everything is done “Air Mail”
‘ . .

If you own a haunted palace
Especially “‘out-the-way”
Just say it suits some object
And the Government says “O.K.”,
* . .

For boys good land in Bridgetown
Bought-out with undue haste
Now serves this only purpose
An up-to-date parking place
. ‘ .

But Joe and Robert's memory
Keep time like a good clock
About eight years and ten months
A Brigade should be at Top Rock
; *

‘Twas 4 man of revered memory
Who felt this crying need
Of_a Fire Brigade in Christ Chureh
But politicians don't take heed,
. . *

Snee then a brand new village
With some bungalows galore
Have been built with tons of money
From the ceiling to the floor
. ; .

Navy Gardens is a new place
Top Rock a paradise
Do protect the property owners
Such a policy will be wise,
. * .

We suppose you'll wait till doomsday
To decide to foot this bill
Or erect a fire station
When a fire’s on the hill
. ‘ ‘

But Wednesday night at Queen's Park
We saw the faith-healing man
And the people who attended
Were like the crystal sand
® * .

A young girl who knew no better
Start the meeting to decry

Then she said to Joe and Robert
If I join “I can't get by"
° * .

T can wear my ballerinas
f can dress in shorts and lace
I must keep my sweet lips painted
Or I must “drop-out-the race"
. ° *

For you see we modern damsels
Can't afford to walk-but fly
That would suit my dear grand-mother
She could wait; "I must get by”
* . .

This new age sure calls for glamour
And we girls must glamourize
If we fail to get things “stay-put”
We can't catch Joe & Robert's eyes,
° . .
And of course when we are broken
That is just the time to mend

We will see the beloved pastor
And accept “faith-healing” then
. . .

sponsored by
J&R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED, BREAD
























new ball spell by Warr and y
with the total at 206 scoring Simpson to partner Shep- in 37 minutes finished the match that players with proper qualifi. Rhodes Scholars and other play- and the blenders of
t about a late collapse, the pard, by taking six successive fours off cations have an opportunity to ers with qualifications for other
wickets falling for over They added 68 in half-an-hour Laver, the Tasmanian captain. play for their country. countries, aaa! J&R RUM
4
BARBADOS TURF CLUB
e e e e
Official Programme—Spring Meeting, 1951.
pe SATURDAY 3rd. THURSDAY Sth, SATURDAY 10th MARCH. 1951
Bing * x
i First Day-Saturday 3rd March. 19351
CLASS DISTANCE 1sT 2ND 3RD 4TH TOTAL ENTRY CREOLE BREEDERS PREMIUMS
NAME OF RACE IST 2ND 3RD 4TH TOTAL
1.00 MAIDEN STAKES ae os ++ |C & C2 (Maidens) —
W/A 5% Furlongs $ 900 $300 $150 $ 50 $1,400.00 $27.00
1.40 CHELSEA STAKES .. oe +» |F & F2 (Only)—
W/A 5% ” 800 265 135 40 1,240.00 24.00 $60.00 $30.00 $15.00 $105.00
«4 2.20 B’DOS GUINEAS STAKES & CUP .. | Nominated Me 900 300 200 100 1,500.00 27.00 100.00 75.00 560.00 $25.00 250.00
$ 3.00 B.T.C. STAKES .. | .. .- +- {A & Lower—W/A 9 ” 1,100 365 185 60 1,710.00 33.00 100,00 50,00 25.00 175.00
3.40 SPRING STAKES o- +. ++ |C & Lower—W/A 7% Fo 900 300 150 50 1,400.00 27.00 80.00 40.00 20.00 140.00
; 4.20 H.B. CREOLE STAKES .- «- 1G & Lower—W/A 5% ” 700 235 115 40 1,090.00 21.00 50.00 25.00 12.50 87.50
oF 5.00 CASTLE GRANT STAKES .. ++]D & Lower—W/A 1M% + 900 300 150 45 1,395.00 27.00 80.00 40.00 20.00 140.00
. 5.40 GARRISON STAKES .. o- +» 1B & Lower—W/A 5% ” 1,000 335 165 55 1,555.00 30.00 90.00 45,00 22.50 157.50
a
> Second Day-Thursday Gth March, 1951
1.00 DAW ‘ITH STAKES .. es ».|A & Lower—W/A 5% Furlongs $ 1,100 $365 $185 $ 60 $1,710.00 $33.00 $100/00 $50.00 $25.00 $175.00
{, - 1.40 BRIDGETOWN HANDICAP .. .. |F& Lower (3 y.0.)
Hs —H/C 5% ” 700 235 115 40 1,090.00 21.00 $1,230.00
2.20 CHELSEA HANDICAP os. .. |F & Lower (4 y.o. & rey
4 Over)—H/C 1% ” 700 235 115 40 1,090.00 21.00
# 3.00 GARRISON HANDICAP o +. |B & Lower —H/C 1% 900 300 150 55 1,405.00 27,00
4 3.40 H.B. CREOLE HANDICAP .. ++|G & Lower —H/C Sey 600 200 100 40 940.00 ,' 18.00
% 4.20 CASTLE GRANT HANDICAP ++] D & Lower —H/C 5ie » 800 265 135 45 1,245.00 24.00
* 5.00 SPRING ‘HANDICAP ,. +. +. |C & Lower —H/C % ” 800 265 135 50 1,250.00 24.00
% 5.40 B,T.C,. HANDICAP ee o- «+ |A & Lower —H/C 9 ” 1,000 335 165 60 1,560.00 30.00
=
;
% ’ «
i Third Day-Saturday 10th March. 1951
3
1.00 HASTINGS HANDICAP o «. | C & Lower —H/C 5% Furlongs $ 800 $265 $135 $ 50 $1,250.00 $24,00
1.40 MARCH HANDICAP ., o «. |B & Lower —H/C 9 ” 900 300 150 55 1,405 00 27.00
2.20 ST, ANNS’ HANDICAP éy +. |G & Lower —H/C 1% i 600 200 100 40 940.00 18.00
3.00° Wm. BOWRING MEMO. H'CAP.,. |D & Lower —H/C 9 ” 800 265 135 45 1,245.00 24.00
3.40 NEW YEAR HANDICAP sa +. |C & Lower —H/C 9 o 800 265 135 50 1,250.00 24.00
4.20 CREOLE HANDICAP .. .._ ...|F & Lower (3 y.o.)
. : Fi —H/C 1% » 700 235 115 40 1,090.00 21.00
5.00 DRILL HALL HANDICAP .. -. | F'& Lower (4 y.0. &
: Over)—H/C 9 ” 700 235 115 40 1,090.00 21.00
5.40 DALKEITH HANDICAP oe ye {A & Lower —H/C | 7% ,, 1,000 335 165 60 1,560.00 30.00
%
; F Total Stakes .. «. © se +s $81,410.00
- : Total Breeders’ Premiums .. oe 1,230.00
< 7a
$32,640.00





‘Entries to close on Thursday 15th February, 1951



Topies of this Programme may be obtained at the Office of the Turf Club, Synagogue Lane.





at 3 pm. at the Office of the Turf Club.

G. A, LEWIS,
Secretary.



PAGE FIVE





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BARBADOS TURE CLUB

ne nee

The following amendments and additions have
been made to the Official Classification for the Spring
Meeting, 1951.

Amendments:—

| Landscape has been promoted from C.1. to B.2.

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Best Wishes ,, ” as es PT, BO Sey
Cross Roads ,, “ > tp: Bake Ou mae
Cross Bow ,, Pe Ps inp es Whe

Additions:—
F.2.—Little Dear

{ G.1.—Jewel

G.2.—Frivolity

Classifiers:—

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PAGE SIX



Sunday, January 28, 1951

AIR BLOCKS

DISQUIETING rumours abound that
British West Indian Airways is intending
.2 policy of retrenchment. No official state-
ment has been made but it has been made
known that the Managing Director of
British West Indian Airways whose head-
quarters are in Trinidad is being trans-
ferred and certain reductions in flights
have already been made.

Among these reductions in flights is one
between Barbados and Caracas. Since
December the weekly flights between Bar-
bados and Caracas have been cut from
three to two.

The rumours about British West Indian
Airways serve to bring into the limelight
the whole air policy affecting Barbados.

It is common knowledge that Barbados

being a British possession in the legal sense
of the word is tied by international conven-
tions entered into by the British Govern-
ment affecting air transport. This is not
only common knowledge; it is common-
sense.
But what is not reasonable nor common
knowledge is the fact that Barbados has
been in the past and still is to-day a pawn
in any international bargaining that the
British Government can or may be making
with foreign Governments.

The case of Pan American Airways and
Barbados deserves especial study in this
connection.

Pan American Airways have wanted to
come to Barbados for the past twenty years.
About three years ago the American Civil
Air Authorities gave specific approval for
Pan American Airways to call at Barbados,
but the State Department in Washington
is not-prepared to bargain with the’United
Kingdom Government for permission for
Pan-American to enter Barbados on the
basis of the British Government getting
concessions to» enter American airports
which would overweigh the concession to
enter Barbados.
| Pan American Airways do not want to
enter Barbados on such terms, but they are
willing to come here, and it has been stated
by one of their representatives that the
Company is prepared to spend one quarter
of a million dollars in advertising Barbados
throughout the United States, as soon as it
gets permission to come in here.

While Pan. American. Airways do: not
want to carry “cabotage” passengers be-
tween the British territories in the area,
it is worth recording that they do by spe-
cial agreement with the French Govern-
ment carry “cabotage” passengers between
Martinique and Guadeloupe now. It is
worth recording because if at any future
period Barbados should suffer as a result
of retrenchment by British West Indian
Airways, there is no doubt that Barbados
could follow the example of Martinique
and Guadeloupe and request the British
Government to grant Pan American Air-
ways similar “cabotage” rights which
would allow them to fly passengers
between Barbados and other British Carib-
bean territories served by Pan American.
‘To-day~-those territories already include
Trinidad, Jamaica, Antigua, St. Lucia and
British Guiana.

| Barbados suffered during the last World
War because KLM were not permitted to
fly to Barbados and in conséquence hun-
dreds of Dutch people who could not get
back to Holland spent their holidays in
Jamaica instead of Barbados and the Bar-
badian. exchequer was correspondingly
Jower as a result.

| Even to-day when Dutch people can re-
visit Holland the possibilities of enticing
our Dutch neighbours from Aruba, Cura-
cao and Surinam to come to Barbados can-
not be explored because of the “no entry”
sign shutting out KLM.

When it is realised that the British Gov-
ernment subsidises the expensive Carib-
bean Commission in the interests of inter-

“national co-operation in the Caribbean it
is surprising that no attention is being paid
to the obvious and only way of producing
that co-operation—communications,

It is.a subject for congratulation that the
British territories in the Caribbean do not
adopt this stupid policy with regard to
Steamship communication, otherwise de-
pendence on British methods of passenger
transportation would leave us only the
Gelfito and the schooners and even fishing
boats would have to be pressed into ser-
(vice.
| In 1949 a British steamship eompany, the
Furness Line, recommenced passenger ser-
vice between New York and the United
States West Indian possessions, the Virgin
Islands. It is indeed strange that at a
time when the British West Indian posses-
sions are clamouring for British -passen-
gers, such ships cannot only be spared to
carry American passengers between their
own térritories, but that international bar-
gaining prevents Barbados from adding to
its sources of revenue by granting Pan
American Airways landing rights at Sea-
well,



z

Nor are the instances of Pan American
and KLM isolated instances. A look at
the airlines serving the Caribbean area, as |
listed in the Year Book of the West Indies |
and Countries of the Caribbean 1950, will |
come as a shock to many residents of
Barbados.

There is no shortage of air communica- |
tions in the Caribbean area. But there is |
a great lack of air Co-operation between
the nationals whose air lines serve the
area.

GAMES

THE Caribbean is slowly but surely
taking its rightful place in sport. Last
year the West Indies Cricket Team showed
clearly that the standard of cricket in the
West Indies is not below that of England,
South Africa or New Zealand. This year
the West Indies enter the lists against
Australia who is now the champion coun-
try.

It is to the credit of the cricket authori-
ties in the West Indies that they have
realized, before it is too late, that the pop-
ulation of the territories in the Caribbean
is remarkably small and that no possible
talent in the area must be overlooked if a
team from the Caribbean is to be fully rep-
resentative of these territories.

Here in Barbados the authorities are
seeking talent in fields once ignored, and
members of League clubs have been in-
vited to take part in trial games in prepar-
ation for the Intercolonial matches next
month. And the West Indies Board of
Control last week sent an observer, in the
person of Mr. John Goddard, to watch the
play in the Leeward vs. Windward Islands.
Tournament in the hope that the Leewards
and Windwards may be able to supply
talent for a West Indies Team.

It must not be forgotten that fifty years
ago St. Vincent was able to provide two
outstanding players to West Indies Teams
touring England and it would be surpris-
ing if, after this lapse of time during which
the game has become even more popular
in the neighbouring colonies, the Leewards
and Windwards were unable to aid the
West Indies by providing some outstanding
players for inclusion in a touring team.

The West Indies are making headway
in golf, a game that is at last becoming
popular in Barbados. Golf has the special
charm possessed by billiards. It is a game
that can be played alone with the player
trying to beat the best for the course or
for an individual hole.
| To-day a strong team of golfers leaves
this island to try conclusions with a Trini-
dad team. ;

The West Indies are now trying to build
up the standard of Lawn Tennis in these
colonies. It is indeed surprising that, while
the people of the Caribbean have shown
a phenomenal aptitude for cricket, the
standard of Lawn Tennis has remained
woefully below that of any country which
takes part in international tournaments.
And the reason why Barbados, although
leading the way in cricket, is at the bottom
of the ladder on the tennis court is no
doubt due to the fact that tennis in this
island has been played for so many years
within segregated cliques.

In Jamaica, Trinidad and British Guiana
the standard of Association Football is
reasonably high but football in Barbados,
played as it is in the wrong season of the
year, has not improved in forty years.

Nor does Barbados show any signs of
keenness in attempting to produce out-
standing athletes for track and cycling
events.

This island has however, built up a
Water Polo team that would hold its own
in county tournaments in England. But
in Water Polo, swimming and diving, Bar-
bados is not yet taking full advantage of
the ideal conditions provided by nature.

If the youth of Barbados would only
show the same keenness in other games
as they do in cricket and would practice
assiduously then there is no doubt that this
island would be represented in other
games by teams as pre-eminent as the
island’s cricket teams.



LIGHT PURSE

_ TO-MORROW Barbades gets its first

Young Women’s Christian Association, Its
counterpart working in the interest of
young men in this island has been recog-
nised as an institution worthy of public
support and it is to be hoped that the same

, Success will now attend the new venture.

It is proposed to conduct a canteen and

_ to accept eight girl boarders who will pay

low rates for rooms. The Association
begins its heroic task with a light purse.

The funds which here been generously
donated by Barbadians are $1,645 and run-
ning expenses will be $100 per month, This
shows that the present financial resources
of the Association can only support its
activities for a period of twelve months. It
is hoped that the Vestry will support the
institution with a parochial grant and of
course the Government pledged as it is
to improve the standards of women will
want to help.

Already there have peen applications
from 50 young women for membership.
Any institution which tends to strengthen
the moral stamina of women in this island
deserves the greatest public support,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



. THEY DO IT AGAIN AND AGAIN



Sitting On The Fenee|

A Government White-paper
has announced that £36,500,-
000 advanced for the ground-
=a scheme has been written
off,

“It's the taxpayer’s money
(your money) which has been
poured into the arid soil of
Africa.”"—Leading article.

MIGHT have bought a little
house
The cottage of my dreams
But money saved to pay for it
Has paid for groundnut schemes.
I might have had a holiday
In Paris or Capri
If money -earned had not been

spent
On nuts I'll never see.

I might have botight a motor-car
With shining wheels and wings

A sailing yacht, a radio,
And lots of lovely things.

I might have bought a dairy farm
With everything complete

If money earned had not been

spent
On nuts I'll never eat.

If they should
scheme
To spend my hard-earned pelf
I'll get into the Government
And run the scheme myself;
Oh, then I'll have my motor-car
With shining wheels and wings,
My little house, my dairy farm,
And lots of lovely things.
How To Avoid Flu
ELOW, Dr. Gubbins, famous
Fleet-street quack, answers

start. another

\j}some questions on how to avoid

influenza. “

Question: In view of the short-
age of meat, what sort of food
should I eat-to build up body re-
sistance?

Answer: Sturgeon, sole, chicken,
turkey, pheasant, partridge, quail,
lobster, crab, caviar, pate de fois
gras. If these are unobtainable,
eat all the fat you can. Get up
early and devour the family ration
of bacon, butter, margarine, and
eggs before your wife and children
are awake. Remember, this is a
tough age and a tough country.
It’s you or the family, big boy.

Q: How can mother, the linch-
pin of the family, avoid flu? And
the children?

A: As they also need body-
building fat, leave them the ration
of lard. If they complain,~ tell
them about the Eskimos who eat
candle grease and never get flu.

Q: Will early morning exercises
help?



By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

A: You will get all the early
morning exercise you need creep-
ing down the stairs while your
family is asleep, tip-toeing

ough the kitchen and picking
iff the larder.

Q: What about hardening the
body against infection?

This is a good idea so far
as your wife and family are con-
cerned. Tell thern to “enjoy the
winter” by keeping out in the
fresh air all day, except on Sun-

, when your dinner must be
cocked. This is your only chance
of-eating most of the flu-resisting
meat ration Moreover, if your
family is out all day while you
are in your warm office, you will
be saving fuel and aVoiding the
worry of the high cost of home
heating. Worry lowers body re-
sistance and leaves it unguarded
against infection.

Q: Are vitamin pills any good?

A; Not for you. All the vita-
S necessary to bodily health
will be found in the family rations
you are eating, and a good lunch
in the City six times a week. If
you think your family need them
your doctor will provide prescrip-
tions for nothing.

: -Are inoculations worth
while?
A: They were worth while to
me when I could charge for them.
Under the National Health Service
they are no good to anybody, un-
less you, want to a free. experi-
meteor your ites ae

Q: Suppose, after all precau-i
tions, I get flu?

A: Stay in bed and. make as
much fuss as possible. And don’t
worry about feeling too ill to make
that early morning trip to the
larder. A heavy diet when you
are sick only makes you worse.

Q: Suppose my wife gets flu?
A: Move into the nearest hotel.

Make Believe World
SCIENTIST (bless ’em all)
has discovered a way of turn-
ing cheap drinks into vintage
wines, and new wines into old, by
sound waves.
So it won’t be long now before
old eggs, by a reverse process, are

tugned into new laid eggs, ewe |

FF

DON’T HELP THE® REDS



Stop All This, Hate Talk

“The Communist dynamism
thrives on hatred and for that
very reason is proving much
more effective in destruction than
in achievement. We must recog-
nise the need for constant re-
form because all human institu-
tions tend to decay and corrup-
tion, but no man should be a
reformer without first showing
he values the society in which

the reforms he seeks are to be
fitted, and that he understands
how difficult it has been to

achieve even a_ society riddled
with defects, so hard is sustained
public spiritedness for men.”

These two sentences culled
from my weekly newspaper
seem to sum up all that is wrong
in Barbados to-day.

In recent years this island has
been invaded by numbers of
newcomers who have lost no time
in pointing out our faults.

Faults we have and faults in
plenty but to come in for a
basinful of contempt all we
need to be is local Barbadians,

There is a tot of Irish in the
loca! Barbadian and most of this
contempt finds an outlet in much
the same way as the storm water
finds its way to the sea. Even-
tually our despisers settle among
us and join the party or they go
away nursing their resentment
or hatred.

This is alright as far as it goes,
but recently we poor Barbadians
have been treated to exhibitions
of hate and ill temper which
eannot be passed over in silence

We have had to put up with
two insults. Firstly, the Central
Office of information, His Majes-
ty’s State supported bureau for

telling the British people the
truth, has listed Barbadians as
“mostly Africans.’ Secondly tne
recent Bishop of Barbados has
been promising brimstone and
fire because the ‘whites” have
no social conscience, Now the

two things don’t mix. Either we

Says GEORGE HUNTE

are mostly Africans or we must
be a considerable body of whites
to merit the smiting of an ec-
clesiastical dignitary.

The truth is that we are all Bar-
badians and far less concerned
with our racial origin than these
well meaning but misinformed
newcomers from the United King-
dom try to make out.

“The Communist dynamism
thrives on hatred” and hatred is
the last thing that one would ex-
pect to be fostered by newcomers
to Barbados who profess to be well
disposed towards the people
among whom they live if only
for a short time.

Of all the foul lies that I have
had to deny most in recent years
is the lie that seeks to depict Bar-
bados as an island overrun by de-
generate white people with a root-
ed hatred or neglect of peoples
who are not white.

Your local white Barbadian is
perhaps the most tolerant of all the
white skinned people in the worid
to-day. There is no colour bar in
Barbados; to-day as there is in
Bermuda, the Southern States of
America or in South Africa, All
of us white and black have equal
opportunities in all the profes-
sions and our government is black.
Yet this almost unique fact is so

“twisted out of its true context that

a picture is still built up, by those.
in authority and in high places, of
a society in which ov exists no
social conscience and the age-old
ery of colour is kept valiantly alive
by those who profess to act from
motives of Christian charity and
in the interests of the community.

Instead of an awed admiration
of the patience and long suffering
of thousands of local Barbadians
white and many coloured who
suffer in silence the bungling and
fumbling of Bushe rule, we are
treated publicly to the tirades of
those in high places and privatety
to the shrill eomplaints of those



‘slowbut progressive way.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 1951

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_

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We pay our taxes, we put up
with inefficiency and we co-oper-
ate to the largest stretch of our
human elastic. For what end? So
that Mr. Grantley Adams can avail
himself of the freely offered micro-
phone of the British Broadcasting
Corporation to tell the English lis~
teners that he would rather deal
with English people than with lo-
cal white Barbadians. The white
planter is blamed for every thing
by the Lord Bishop of Barbados
while Mr. Grantley Adams pub-
licly praises him at a dinner at
the Hastings Hotel.

And so the mad unhappy whirl
of invective goes on, while we who
strive our best to preach toler-
ance, the practise of Christian hu-
mility and love are Iabelled by
hysterical voices, reactionaries and
worse names besides.

Meanwhile the taxpayer con-
tinues to pay for the children of
mothers, some of whom can count
the fathers of their children on all
the five fingers of one hand,

Men and women who save
money and buy houses: thousands
of white people who live at stand-
ards of life far lower than that of
many not so white are included
in this general stream of abuse. It
is so easy to preach hatred, so
hard to seta better example. But
those who preach hatred, cannot
pretend to reform because “no
man should be a reformer without
first showing he values the society
in which the reforms he seeks are
to be fitted, and that he under-
stands how difficult it has been
to achieve even a society riddled
with defects, so hard is sustained
public-spiritedness for men.”

Goddard's
GOLD BRAID
RUM |
Svcs cecal

Those of us who show our ap-
preciation of Barbadian society by
living here know best how to value
those who come, who get a)

eam,

and who go away and leave us to
go on loving one another in our




CNR ge





;
|



SUNDAY, JANUARY 28.



1951

Bridgetown Never Sleeps=3

SUNDAY ADVO¢



MILL IN AN EX-STABLE

Opposite the Central’ Station

th ; irge a 7

‘ — . .: my 4 esd a whi - the - using cotton from . coun- The dryer is a large steel cabinet and their job is to trim off bits of y

Row it ik the homes . the west tries — from England, America, which is heated to boiling point thread, etc., which would spoil the * 66669960°"%
Toatiain Knitting Mille, the est Carriacou and India. The Indian and contains a number of fans. look of the garments. The goods gee oane

a new and,
vigorous industry for this island.
The Knitting Mills started opera

tion in March last year, and w ith
the staff divided into three shifts,



the knitting mills found

cotta. contains seeds and other
impurities, and must be cleaned
by a rewinding process.

It was interesting to follow a
ball ef yarn and sée it gradually

be, and passed on to the dryer

After drying, the piece goods are
prpened by being passed through
rohers

I then followed the materia] up-

The trimmers then take over

are then sorted to see that they.
are all up to standard, and the
ones that pass the test are taken
to a pressing room. After being
pressed they are folded by hand

ATE

iy

/ FOUND A FLOURISHING KNITTING



FAN GALE

- ‘ er
ON



oo



they work all day and all night. turned into a “Westknit” shirt. In stairs to the cutting department.-and then packed for dispatch.
I first visited ; the knitting department, whera There men and girls were cut- : ’ bt
Visited the spinning plant, all. the machinery.is American, I titg out shirts with electric cut- , About 15 per cent. of the West-
which js at the Cotton Factory,.a saw ingenious machines knitting fers, using cardboard patterns as ‘Mit garments are sold in Barba
bit fur her Gown the road There. vests, shirts, panties and the like .a guide. The pieces were then 9S, and the rest is exported all
I saw the raw cotton.from Car- Striped shirts, I discovered, are taken into the sewing room and OVer the West Indies — except
Facou being spun into yarn. Only not dyed after they are made, but assembled. In this room there are Jamaica. In Jamaica, where the
the Marie Gallante variety is used, are knitted. from balls of white a large number of girls using elec- ODly other knitting mill in the |
und it is estimated that a quarter and coloured thread. tric sewing machines, and each West Indies is, a protective tarifT
of the cotton used by the knitting one has her own particular job to Of Six shillings per dozen gar-

mills come from Carriacou. New
machinery now being installed
in the peers department, and
when it is in operation it will be
possible to use even more West
Indian cotton,

ments has been set up.

The West India Knitting Mills,
which employ 129 people, only
two of whom are not Barbadian,
inas made remarkable progress in
me short time that it has been in
operation, But, most remarkable
of all, is the Managing Director,
Aaron Karb, He has only been
in the knitting business fora
year, for ten years before that
Was in lumber in British Guia
He now works from seven in the
morning to twelve-thirty at night!

The material comes out of tha do
knitting machine in the form of dc
long, tubular “piece goods”, which
are then taken to a gigantic wash- With panties, of course, elastic
ing machine. They are then must be put in, and this is done
bleached or dyed, as the case may by a special machine,

Some put on the sleeves, some
the hemming, some put on but-
tons and others sew on the collars.



ENITTING MACHINES showing spools of yarn on the floor being |
knitted and automatically rolled into bolts of cloth.



DRYING MACHINE — Automatic steam dryer for bolts of cloth which are Washed and chemically pro-
cessed. Dries approximately 500 yds. of goods in from 30 to 44 minutes.





!
|
|



FPPPSSODSOF GOGO OGIO FOGSIGO

Mr. Lewis, cutter at right, will
Cut garments are then tied in bundles

CUTTING ROOM showing cutters operating automatic cutting machines.
cut approximately 200 dozen garments in 14-hour of type shown,

aud ‘pusked: to sewiig rods. SEWING ROOM showing sewing operators at work.

is then passed along’ until finally completed.

Each operator performs one operation and garment































































by the voll: drying process.

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ODDO SSSS CCS SOSS





‘ : cwrnd present for under £1,300 and the s
Luke } isits Canadians Honour Spent 9 Hungry and Waterless Days Jamaica Gives Up Chamber's requirements were that |%
a cottage of this type to be econu- | X% ’ HARDWARE _ DEPT.
ica Jamaica’ s Maroons (From Our Own Correspondent) — of how they ran out of food on the Cottages At £1,300 mical should be possible — tor } TEL. 2364
amaic ron ou our coring sn, PORTIOMSMPAIM, dun sh 0000 Sey sod oc of wales B00, : Be
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Jan. 14 Nine “erdless” days and nights fourth; of phandoning shia’ ‘and (From Our Own Correspondent)
(From Our Own Correspondert) Jamaica's RMarvoons that ledend at sea, without food and water foundering—all of them in the last eran $56:5:6966656050905941004000964690060000008 CSREES
7 : oa ’ aa 2 " Aa 7 , ; : >, . NGSTC . Jame “ge al i
KINGSTON,- ary -tribe of: “freemen” living. in - rn da part of Rt ae ordeal ea ae nat a a? r- 7 te 8 thot i LADY BA DEN-POWELL LPO COLELLO ESOC SLLPL LOOPED
Step! uke, *ho tax-free compounds in the hills © 44 seamen who left Tobago en Gees, ang, Se ae St sir % ¥
jucbeded aces : Sel. as of the island, were honoured last 4 two-day fishing trip at the end of two weeks’ detention in jail i oe It danke OOtn a cron TO VISIT JAMAICA : E —“ x
© . : ’ . el ee cet 0G ay . oY afar ; “i se 4 )roposa € ance, w yovern.
Assistant’ Under-. Secretary of week by a party of Canadians led BS | pecernbar: , Six of the men there before being released on sions cuddaaetean a £80,000 middle ~ (From Our Own Correspondent) % FF j N 4 54 D = %
State for the Colonies, and Mr. by the Hon. Paul Martin, Canada’s &'ived in Trinidad by air from Tuesday. They reached Trinidad class housing scheme in the city i" as -f ‘ %
Henry °T.. Bourdillon, Chief Minister of Health and Welfare. Venezuela on Wednesday after- without a cent among them. Thos: of Kingston “Technical inability to Sete arn SED % %
Finance: Secretary at the Colonia! - ; _ hoon, «The others are expected. who have arrived are Dudley plan a ‘type of. house at a figure Lady Baden—Powell, head of the ® , a x
Ofitee, vartived. in| Jamaica “test At a. function which -will be Wood, 47 of Scarborough, Tobago called foe by the scheme is. said Girl Guides’ Movement throughout | % Y OUR I AMILY %
Saturday for a 10-day official’given wide -publicity’in the — An account of long rainless days John Edwards cf Scarborough the is. a ba seponsible for. this the world, is to visit Jamaica in | Q ~
visit : Dominion through the “Montreal of thirst and hunger as their 15- cook; Henzel Albert 38, of Duncan a oe: ad Barat uy * March on a fortnight’s stay. KS a ' x
"They. are at King’s House and Star,” the Canadian Minister pre- ton vessel drifted with the ocean Street, Port-of-Spain 16; Edgar “°° 0P™eP* An all-Island Rally is planned | WILL FAVOUR %
will hold discussions with local sented Colonel Rowe the Maroon currents alter the engine had Garraway, 25, mate; of California; It is impossible, the technica! by local guides in honour of her |Â¥ : x
Government officials on major chief of Accompong with a silver failed on their second day out was Bernard Jarvis, 38 of 6th Street, adviser teported to the Chamber, visit. While here, Lady Baden S $
matters of finance and develop- medal inscribed ‘to Colonel Rowe given by the men. Barataria and John Steward, 47 to build a satisfactory type of two- Powell will give several lectures | ¥ s
ment in Jamaica, from Canadian Admirers. They told of drifting for 13 days, of Scarborough, bedroom cettage in the city at throughout the island. DUTCH TABLE APPLES~-per tb $ .30- &
= ———<— % DUTCH PERLSTEIN BEER—per bottle 1g S
i a CINTA | i DET CASE... 4.00 ¥
= LAs aassssascsseamesanaamssaraamansamaeaneeen momeoeeemenennmee, ; wwe’ > r 7
‘i 4 Bis RICO CONCENTRATED CHICKEN BROTH—per tin ©1114 ¥
a? : ’ ag 2 | ix MELTIS TURKISH DELIGHT—pe Bete ~-9e |
‘; “IN SC Ss SEA VIEW % ROBERTSON'S GINGER MARMALADE per bottle 35
IN SICKNES = Ik CRAWPORD'S CREAM CRACKERS—per tin 137 >
1 1 il & HEINZ COCKTAIL ONIONS—per jar 1a &
x . + yh o [ % FRENCH USHROOMS—per tin 4 ©
ND IN HEALTH a fresh stock of old favourites GUEST HOUSE Bere Ryo yaa rat
HASTIvus, BARBADOS ¢ H. & P. SALAD STICKS—per tin 1.10 ¢
he nuciee wy cans x ROMARY'S PARMASTICKS—per tin slg
eS 5 } E ULE? SUES E | CARR'S ¢ S9ESE CRISPS oo tir bs os 1.10 ‘
WE ARE ALWAYS | FULLY STOCKED BAR [f/% prinkinG STRAWS—por box of 500. ims
e ! iS SeRVIFE i T. cho | RATES: $5.00 per Day & | % DANISH TINNED HAMS—All Sizes, g
x AT YOUR | upw: s x 3
(Inclusive .
ine FAMOUS | Apply— | eee SFP EAT ;
With a range of drug stores inthis City are specially Mrs. W. 8S. HOWELL | , 2 . $
stocked with the highest quality Drugs—youcan bring t t nee a EE 2
us your doctor's prescriptions with the confidence that S - > asd $
only the best drugs will be dispensed by a highly quali- 00 eme les — — ~ — % HEINZ & %
fied staff. From our wide experience we can also § ; ; >
suggest a tonic to keep ‘you fit and fine. Arch Supports, Foot fasers, Zino Pads for Bunions [0-DAY’S NEWS FLASH % AYLMERS %
‘ &
and otker items ‘ % > 1 . ‘ x
and Callouses Foo! Balm. Foot Powder. | ape tei Li $s BABY FOODS
KNIGHT'S ville narerae — elteae S s
P , 2 for $1.00 1% . %,
of comfort of the The space is needed for 1% Bb? per tin $
t “lect your Dook Bargai Mo .
T foot : ° q 4
Ta ¥ ‘ ‘ ereen aE qe »
DRUG STORES ; x irene, Sut openea, suree | DO? per doz
hade | >
| Ping shaden IS S
SSM RR A VE ORY RARE * =—_
: 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street JOHNSON’S STATIONERY §| } igh eh gi at, 9 x
FOR UALITY DRUGS ee eee ee ae v1 : %
“ae G and |} STAVSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.
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COCSSSS SSS
PAGE EIGHT



D: H. Lawrence

Hy

The British novelist and
poet, D, H. Lawrence, died in
1930, leaving behind him such
great novels as Sons and
Lovers and such controversial
enes as Lady Chatterley’s
Lover. He believed much in
the world as he found jt to
be wrong, and spent his life
in a vigteht effort to find his
g0od threugh the medium of
literatufé;

The age of much material pro«
gress which preceded the first
world War of 1914—18 produced
among its writers many who



criticised the organisation and
tramework of society, while
taking for granted its general

aims. But gradually there be-
gan to appear a number of men
who denied that material progress
was, in fact, progress at all. The
most prophetic of these in Eng-
land was D. H. Lawrence. Law-
rence believed that western civili-
sation was in decay because Man
had shut himself off from his
true sources of vitality. During
the nineteen-twenties he became
the centre of one storm after an-
cther, aNd when he died in 1930
at the age of forty-four, there
appeared a great amount of re-
miniseence and Criticism, which
began to create a Lawrence leg-
end. : ) aka

David- Herbert Lawrence was
born in -1885 in the colliery vil-
lage of Eastwood in the English
Midland§. His father was a miner,
rough and ready, and rather
coarse; his mother was delicate
and cultured. As the boy grew
up there developed an intense
sympathy between him and his
mother, -which was to influence
him throughout his life and to pro-
vide the. subject of several of his
books.

in Eastwood, Lawrence came to
know the life of industry and also
that of the countryside, which
there is eVérywhere close at hand,
and the contrast between the two
cut him tothe quick. He studied,
won scholarships, attended Not-
tingham University, and then be-
came a teacher in a London
school. His poems and his first
two novels received much praise,
but it was not until the third,
Som and Lovers, that it was
realised that a new force had
risen in fiction; by this time his
mother was dead, and he had
left teaching, married and gone
to live in Germany, from whence
he had to return at the begin-
ning of the 1914—18 war.

Sons and Lovers is partly au-
tobiographical. It tells of the emo-
ticnal hold..of a mother over her
son, and ofthe struggle between
her and Miriam, the girl he loves,
In setting and structure it is not
unlike the work of one of the
“realist” novelists, Wells or Ben-
nett, but it was quite new in its
deep understanding of personal
relationships, and in the vivid-
ness with which it records sense
impressions and experiences,

This intensity, hanging over the
prose like air heavy with elec-
tricitv, can be felt in the opening
to his next novel, The Rainbow.

“The Brangwens had lived
for generations in the Marsh
Farm, in. the meadows. where
the EreWash twisted sluggishly
through ‘alder trees, separating
Derbyshire from Nottingham
shire [They] came and
went without fear of necessity,
working hard because of the
life that-was in them, not for
want of,.the money. Neither
were they thriftless..They were
aware of the. last halfpenny,
and instinct made them not
waste the peeling of their ap-
ple, for it would help to feed
the cattle. But heaven and earth
was teeming around them, and
how should this cease? They
felt the rush of sap in spring,
they knew the wave which can-
not halt, but every year throws
forward the seed to begetting,
and, falling back, leaves the
young-born on the earth. They
knew the intercourse between
heavens and earth, sunshine
drawn into the breast and bow-

+ wey

2 2




Good mornings begin with Gillette :

The Basques who reside

in the High Pyrenees
Now shave off their beards

with the greatest of ease ;
You also should share the rs
improvement they’ve made

. By using the wonderful

Blue Gillette Blade



Blue Gillet

TRADE ENQUIRIGS TO: T. G

NORMAN



LL_OVER THE WORLD

Sharpest ever made, Blue
Gillette Blades are also the most
economical because they last

so long. Naturally they are

chosen by the smartest men of

NICHOLSON

els, the rain sucked up
day-time, nakedness that comes
under the wind in autumn.
Showing the birds’ nests no
longer. worth hiding. Their life
4nd inter-relations were such;
feeling the pulse and body ot
the svil, that opened
furrow for the grain, and be-
came smooth and supple after
their ploughing, and clung te
their feet with a weight that
pulled like desire .. °°
This paragraph reveals much of
the mature Lawrence, The prose
has great beauty—though it is
overcharged with words and
meaning—and the violence of the
imagery is inescapable. Man is
seen not so much in relation to
Society as to the createq world,
to the soil, plants, animals and
seasons. And the air is heavy with
Sex, because sex was for Law-
rence the central experience by
which man could regain his
“blood consciousness.” Ag his
work went on he became pre-
occupied with sex, examining one
type of sexual experience. after
another, seeking for the purely
natural relationship between man
and woman, that which was not
controlled by the mental will,
More and more he began to dis-
trust the rational part of the
mind, and to turn to the irration-
al, the “subconscious,” His mind,
he sald, was a clearing in a dark
forest, and he waited for the
“Dark Gods” to come and take
possession of him, More and more,
now, he began to be attracted to
the non-mental existence of ani-
thals and plants:

“Folded in like a dark thought
For which thé language is lost
Tuscan cypresses,

Is there a great secret?”

After the 1914-18 war Law-
rence wanted to escape from the
industrial society of England. He
went first to Italy, living among
the Italian peasants, but he felt
Europeiin civilisation hanging
round him like a second-hand
overcoat, and soon he left for
Australia. Australia produced the
novel Kangaroo, but did not
satisfy him, and he sailed across
the Pacific to Mexico. From this
Mexican experience we get many
essays, poems, some of his finest
snort stories, and The Plumed
Serpent.

In the last mentioned story,
Kate, a cultural European, goes to
Mexico, meets two men and goes
with them to an Indian village
where she is initiated into a sort
or religious-political movement
which is to restore the old
Mexican gods. There is much
beauty in the native ritual and
chants, but there is also squalor
and brutality, and Kate is both
fascinated and disgusted,

in the novel Kate steels herselt
and stays. Lawrence did not
stay, but returned to Europe. By
ow the tuberculosis which had
troubled him for years was in
aun advanced stage, and he was a
very sick man when he wrote
kis last novel, Lady Chatterley’s
Lover. Throughout his life he
had tried to’live according to his
own doctrine, but by now he must
-have realised that for him the life
of the intellect, of the spirit,
could never be subordinated to
that of the senses; his physique.
let alone his genius, made that,
impossible, But in Lady Chat-
terley he made a last desperate
attempt to solve his problem by
allegory. The scene is Derby-
shire, and Lady Chatterley, whose
husband is paralysed (symboli-
cally as well as literally) from
the waist down, turns to her
gamekeeper for a father for the
child she wants. The book is a
jong, lyrical account of their
lovemaking, written with the
greatest detail and frankness, but
to the sympathetic reader its
effect is neither erotic nor shock-
ing, but profoundly saddening.
Soon afterwards Lawrence died
at Vence, in Southern France.








7“

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as ee?
1 tes
“Yee

> ey

every country in the world.

te Blades

EODES GRANT LIMITED

to their



in the

As

SUNDAY

for the Exhibition itself—

ADVOCATE

oe





FROM 160 ‘PRENCH-SCHOOL’ PAINTINGS. SIR GERALD KELLY CHOSES THE |
ONE HE'D ‘LIKE 10 PRINT

If 1S AS THOUGH BROOKLYN DODGERS HAD INVADED LORD'S

By OSBERT LANCASTER
To most of the Royal Academy’s
regular patrons the sudden ap-
pearance at Burlington House of
the paintings of the modern
French school will doubtless prove
as shocking as would the unher-
alded invasion of Lord’s by the
Brooklyn Dodgers to the older
members of the MC.C.

Those walls where year after
year have hung “Spring Sunshine
at St. Ives” and A Highland
Winter” are now given over to
the menacing abstractidns of Kan-
dinsky and Mondrian.

And in place of Sir Alfred's
gleaming horsefiesh are the
mechanical streamlined nudes by
Leger,

To the rest of the world, how-
ever the shock is likely to be less.
In the 20 years which have passed
since these works first horrified
our parents, their influence has
been profound. Not just in the

In trying to assess his work we
must consider it as a whole.
Lawrence never really found a
literary form which suited him:
his novels are mostly too long,
and lack variety; his verse has
not the precision and conciseness
which belongs to poetry of the
first rank. Yet it is obvious that
both novels and poems are works
of genius, and so, too, are those
books like A Fantasia of the
Unconscious and Apocalypse, in
which out of a mixture of psycho-
analysis, ancient symbols and a
private cosmogony, he tries to
create a myth through which he
can formulate his beliefs,

His most satisfactory work is
probably in the short stories, in
the best of which he is more
economical than usual, and _ his
Prose burns with a bright love.
liness as fresh as gorse: the blas-

hemous but beautiful Man Who

fed, the enchanting Man Who
Loved Islands,.and the hypnotic
Woman Who Rode Away, What-
ever his faults (and they were,
I believe, proportionate to his
genius) he added a new vitality
to fiction and a new beauty to
prose, and he made thousands
aware of their almost-lost com-
munion with the world of nature,







realm of painting but in everyday
life,
Today hardly a hoarding or a

magazine would look quite the
way it does had the early Cubists
never existed,

The bisected. guitars and frag-
ments of newspaper headlines
which once seemed so chic and
unexpected when encountered in
the paintings of Gris and Braque
are now the commonplaces of the
commercial textile designer.

And the ferocious brilliance of
the colour contrasts that once
dazzled and appalled is now even
occasionally mimicked with a
notable lack of success, by the
more daring Academicians them-
selves,

But it is not easy to estimate
the real value of any school of
painting at second-hand, It was
largely to overcome this difficulty
that Sir Gerald Kelly decided to
add five rooms of French Moderns



NEW LOOK

to the already extraordinarily
mixed bag of pictures which have
gone to make up the Winter Ex-
hibition,

Unfortunately, quantity rather
than quality appears to have been
the guiding principle of selection.
And it is no more true of modern
painting than of any other that
the larger the picture the better,
and four third-rate canvases of
any one painter do not equal one
first-rate.

are two masterpieces by
Braqué and a wonderful Rous-
seaus” Hamlet however is not
the same when the Prince of
Denmark has vanished behind
the Iron Curtain. Picasso’s with-
drawal on idealogical yrounds
leaves a gap which no one ‘else
ean fill

.

Off Their Game

Maybe Sir Gerald Kelly hoped
that ithe students who are the

FOR





A BEST-SELLER

By JON HOPE

@ The men who print the
Authorised version of the Bible
in England are combining re-
sources to present it in a new
manner,

in the Reader’s Bible, as it
will be called, traditional double~
column page form will give way
to normal book format. Between
them. Eyre and Spottiswoode,
Cambridge University Press and
Oxford University Press pian to
make the new edition available
by May. It will be 1,938 pages.
Cost: 30s,

The Bible is still the biggest
selling book of all. Every year
3,000,000 copies are produced in
U.K. But supply lags far behind
demand.

W. A. Collins, whose firm print
the Bible in, Scotland, reports:
“Though enormous quantities of



COOL AND FRESH...

a,

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GALL MI

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MADE

Matroil is very

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BY
BERGER PAINTS





Agents

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD.,
BRIDGETOWN |

ce eeeenmmeiien emanate



UBN 1

Bibles ‘were sent to the United
States. last year, the Americans
cannot get them fast enough;

@ How fares the publishing
business? Publisher Arthur Bar-
ker, who has just returned to his
business after two years’ illness,
has been having a look at the
position, This is his verdict:

“The _ supply of paper. and
binding boards is rapidly becom-
ing serious. No prospect of it
getting better in the next two
years. But from the publisher's
point-of view, this may be a bless—
ing in disguise, Reduced supplies
will mean that in a year or two
there ,will be a real shortage of
new books—and that in turn will
mean a demand for some books
that cannot be sold at the
moment. Lately, too, there has
been a tendency for publishers to
conceatrate attention on best-
sellers,







¢

Shell is proud to have played a leading part for fifty years in the

» progress and development of internal combustion engines on land, on

4

public he is eager to reach would
be inspired by seeing the actual
works of the great men whom

they have hitherto - worshipped
from afar. Or, as seems not
altogether improbable, he anti-

cipated a sharp disillusionment.
In either case he is likely to be
disappointed.

For with the exception of
Braque, Matisse, and Miro, the
big men are almost all off their
game.

Far too many of the second,
and even the third, eleven have
been given a place in the team,

Many of the paintings are no
better and no worse than the
average at the Royal Academy,
but baseball is not quite the same
as cricket and the M.C.C. may be
forgiven if they can’t recognise
the second-rate when they see it.

«LES. |



(Barbados Advocate Correspondent)
TRINIDAD,
With carnival about twelve days
off, the City hotels and guests
houses are daily refusing persons
who are) requesting accommoda-
tion, especially Visitors from Vene-

zuela, and the other neighbouring
territoriés,

One hotel manager said that he
has been receiving cables and
letters every day requesting re-
servations, He pointed out that
his hotel has been booked up
about two weeks ,ago. This, he
added, is the biggest influx of
visitors for quite a long time.



“In the future, publishers might
not be able to spare enough of
their supplies to manufacture
huge quantities of these best-
sellers. Instead they will have to
spread them more equitably over
their list. This may hit some
authors—but will improve the
general state of the whole trade.”
World Copyright Reserved
k aia L.E.S.



SUNDAY, JANUARYâ„¢ 28, + 1951

ihe
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gea and in the air. Shell research has had much to do with thé

Perfecting of the modern jet engine. For the Comet today, for the

horseless carriage of yesterday, it has been ‘true to say

t=



you can he sure of |:



pose
Sf. .




UARY 28,






























ning.

ordon, author of one of

gives for sudden
mthusiasm is that men
| war were the chief
As the meat ration
led they have tended
arch, and waistlines
lark, a qualified nurse
administrative hos-
, Jane Gordon is the
r Charles Greaves.
Wsonal diet problems
to put on weight.

First

Nesta Pain, she

in dehydrating fat
liquids. But she

‘ other slimming
iVocating Yoghourt as
od for the person who
} weight, without ac-
ggard, starved look,


























portant than losing
sing inches,” Miss
‘me. “I ‘think a tape
bathroom is more
a weighing

ert who holds this
beth Arden. While
ble to generalise about
ight, she says a waist
ent 10in. smaller than

1951

EN Lead
Slimming
Craze

EILEEN ASCROFT

e 1920s, when it was the»height of
half-starved, has there been such a

m-lined fashions with tiny waists have
watching their weighing machines.
mén who are most keen on dieting,”

art of losing weight quickly.

the world. .



the best recent

pees ‘

Manv fashion houses fear that
pure wool will disappear from

the utility ranges by 1952,
to the ever-rising cost

wool. Best buys this spring
therefore, wool utility
weather outfits.

coat.

eee eee eae eee

their fortunes, tend to have an
even bigger contrast between waist
and hip measurement. Here are
the measurements of one of Lon-
don’s top models, Shelagh Wilson:
bust 34in., hips 35in., waist 23in.,
height 5ft. 9}in.

Other Women’s Lives

SHE is brunette, blue-eyed at-
tractive, fortyish, nameless (be-
cause of professional etiquette)
and one of the busiest women in
+ a woman doctor.

Her practice is in a residential
West London area and her Na-
tional Health patients include
many nationalities, including Far
East diplomats’ wives who have
to describe their symptoms
through an interpreter,

_Barristers, civil servants, artists,
aa hostesses, students, sales-
women and musicians feature
every day on her crowded diary

tn summer they
have their own short jackets;
in winter they go under a heavy









but it is the housewives who are
her special interests. Perhaps be-
cause she does her own cook-
ing,+ shopping and most of her
housework, she can understand so
well the extra strain that women














































LANCE MODEL

5 SALLY ANN VIVIAN, a

her of Princess Margaret’s
‘of friends and one of the
debutantes of 1949, has
a fashion model, She
as a free-lance, has her
on the books of a Mayfair
yy, and receives around
forgan hour’s modelling.

‘2

enty-year-old Miss Vivian is
only daughter of Lord Vivian,
* Charles Cochran’s partner,
| Lady Vivian. This is her
d job since leaving school.













t was in the export depart-
lent ofa Piccadilly store. Then
summer she went to help Lady
iden, sister-in-law of Mr. Anthony
len, as an assistant at her pri-
ate school in Kensington.

" Blue-eyed, with honey-blonde

r, Miss Vivian usually models
ay and evening clothes suitable
or girls of her own age or in the
te teens. Her measurements:
. 8in, in shoes; waist 22in; hips
6in.; bust 33in.

—LES.

:



face these days,

“Nerves or the request for a
tonic bring many women to my
eurgery,” she says. “Nine times
cut of ten it is a mental problem
causing the trouble, and very of—
ten housing.”

_Listening, giving a word of ad-
vice, even practical assistance by
way of a call to the housing au-
thorities or the home-help organi.
sation, can sometimes do more
than any tonie to avoid illness
and breakdown. So convinced is
this young woman of the neces-
sity of maintaining the old per-
sonal relationship of. doctor and
patient that she has limited the
number of her patients.

So Lonely

“Most frustrating problem for a
modern doctor is the man or wo-
man on their own,” she tells me.
“No one to cook and care for
them or even let the doctor in,
and not the interest or ingenuity
tq produce nourishing meals on
one person’s rations. Perhaps they
are not sick enough for a hospital
bed and the local home-helps are
over-taxed.”

Apart from being on call 24 hours
a day taking two surgeries most
days in the week, private calls
and clinic work, the woman doc-
‘tor has to face the lack of that
all-important person, the doctor’s
wife, to take telephone calls, re-
ceive patients and do much of the
paper work.

There is little time left for a
personal life. A little reading, an
occasional visit tothe theatre -or
friends, and two short holidays a
year motoring in England are the
only times she can forget her
busy, harassed, fascinating life.

In Colour

Linen cupboards in the U.S.A.
are highly coloured. Navy blue
sheets are

striped, with matching pillow
cases.
Fashion eccentricities

accident-conscious,

nasty knocks, even if it means
staging them deliberately.

smart with white
initials; latest additions are candy-





due
raw
are,
oll-



Why Mothers’

Boys Die
Young...

BY CHAPMAN PINCHER

A four-year-old boy with a
bump on his head, a burn on his
fnger, a bandage on his knee, and
his mouth full of mustard is well
on the way to enjoying a healthy,
lengthy life.

A famous child-health specialist
says so in a sober medical report
published today.

The child most susceptible to

serious accidents—which now kill

more youngsters than any single
disease—is the one so molly-
coddled by his mother that he
never has a chance to become

The specialist, Dr. Harry
Dietrich, of Beverly Hills, urges
mothers to ensure that their
youngsters experience plenty of

STAGE KNOCKS

The critical time for completing
this education is between the ages
of one and five. After that it
may be too late. Dr. Dietrich
gives mothers these .tips:—

LEAVE a jar >=
of hot mustard or ton
a bottle of vine-
gar were the
children are
bound to find it.
One taste will He
convince them \
more memorably than a score of
“naughty boy” commands that
some things are best left alone.





LET him play with a mechani-
cal egg-whisk. A chipped finger
nail or a grazed knuckle is a
small price to pay for learning re-
spect for machinery.

ALLOW the child to fall out of
chairs—being careful to see first

that he has no dangerous imple-
ments in his hand,

LET “EM CRY

Dr. Dietrich condemns the well-

meaning mother who tries to give
100 per cent, protection to her
This saves them from

children,
injury while they remain at home,
but it exposes them to terrible

risks as soon as they go to school.

Excessive mother-sympathy and














SUNDAY

The new maddening pussle is



ADVOCATE

meee

here again

DARTWORDS



O many people seem to have
been infuriated by the first
DARTWORDS that the ‘Advocate’
today repeats the dose. For new-
comers, this is a crossword with-
out clues. You have to arrange
the words so that they lead logi-
cally from GARTER to GLORY.
The seven rules which govern the
relationship between ahy word
and the word that precedes are:—

1
2

A word may be an anagram
of the word that precedes it.
IT may be a synonym of the
word that precedes it.

IT may be achieved by adding
one letter to, subtracting one
letter from, or changing one
letter inthe preceding word.
IT may be associated with
the previous word in a saying,
simile, metaphor, or associa-
tion of ideas.

ww

a

IT may form with the preced-
ing word the name of a well-
known person or place in
fact or fiction.

IT may be associated with
the preceding word in
title or action of a book, play,
or other composition.

NONE of the foregoing rules

co)

the



Pen Pals

R. A. GRAY, 13 Bethell Street,
Ormand. S.E.14. Melbourne, Vic-
toria, Australia. Is interested in
exchanging stamps.

Michael Merrick, No. 20 St.
Joseph Street, San Fernanda, TTin-
idad. Age 15, hobbies collecting
stamps, reading and going to the
cinema.

Anthony Gonsalves 14—14 Nors
ton Street, Wortmanville, George-
town, British Guiana. Age 16,
likes boxing, stamp collecting and
exchanging newspapers.



Birthday Greetings

Happy birthday to Erin Jones
and Peggy Dean who celebrate
their birthdays this week,

Rupert tugs at the strap
stiff, and before he can fet the
window down the train has cleared
the station and is slipping through
the countryside,
without getting any reply.

@ we are in a fix,” says dismally.
** Nobody knows we're here.



consolation in the form of sweets,
special favours, or cuddling should

from be avoided, however difficult this

America include man-made nylon may be.

fur coats, mothproof and wash-
able selling at about £43: fur

vests, worn under loose suit jack-
ets,
from corn, which resembles woo
and is anathema to moths.

WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED

and a new material made

“Split lips,

The doctor believes, of ©ourse,
that parents should provide full

protection against serious dangers.

London Express Service

ELIT IS AN PRODUCT

blistered fingers,
simple fractures and gory lacera-
tions must be accepted as normal

] Wear and tear,” he writes, 4















ee
OUI

EB

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TALCUM POWDER
TOILET SOAP
SHAVING SOAP
BRILLIANTINE
FROZEN BRILLIANTINE
AFTER-SHAVE LOTION

Obtainable



It is

He calls for help
** Now

e
4LL RIGHTS RESERVED

ee ne
AVERDER

at BOOKERS

Seow disappeace



(erranet

ANDREWS

LIVER SALT





The egeay and madd itch of
ulcers and eczema arte ended at the
first touch of D.D.D. Prescri —
dee etra' liquid ler
may be used more than twice atenunen vn below the skin and
consecutively, and only one| quickly clears up even the most obstin-
-may be used to govern one] ate sores. GET A BOTTLE TODAY,
* relationship, Obtainable from all
A typical succession of words Sele Distributes t
might be: Hengist — Horsa - Horse #6. Armeress
Morse Code - Cote - Note Bridgetown.

Tone — Tones-Jones-Davey-Lamp.
.E.S.

@ Solution on Monday,



CROSSWORD



Across

(anag.)
Eminence, (
Part of the

Nice cart, (8)

, what mig?

{

te

1.
7. 8)
8 church
appear rose red. 7
.1, Partitions the nostrils, (5)
+2. Fish, (3)
13. Emphasise what money
a little account, (6)
7. That's the — to get a polish, (3)
(4)
(3)

is

1

19.
20.
21.

2

It's a change from oats,
Found in ali boiled shirts.
Gravel under foot; sounds like

it. (6)

Graduate to two directions, how

low! (4) 23. Give way, (4)
Down

Tell with the rat near,

Rate love as a lift. (8)

Heinously wicked, (9)

A rawhide thong. (4)

Made up by a senile tec, (9

Quite
reverse.

Welsh orpplen ?

(
Sounds an expensive animal. (4)
Congealed (3
Bird that is
thing. (5)
Sounds as though the Colonel is

ed.
(4)

©

(7)

)
the

3)
liable to lift any-

@ FSe epserr

a

ie, (3)
In which sable may be pear
(), 18, Tie.



y's puzzle,—Across:
Cineraria

Solution of vesterda
1, Repertory; 5, Eleph
10, ni

Omit; 11, Outer; 15, Nitrogen; 14,
Romero: 15, Alert; 17, Verse; 18, Caught
Down: Reconcile; 2, Eliminate:
Pen: 4 Yuarling, 6, Petrol; 8 Room: 9,
Auger; 12, Enough: 14, Rave; 16, Ere.

Book--2

Se

haven"t got any tickets, and we
don't know where the train's going,
and it’s all your fault! What on
earth made you run away from
Constable Growler like that ? Don't
you like him?" Rosalie doesn’t
answer. By this time she is
thoroughly frightened, and only
begins to ery loudly. . {

————— LT

“ Beauty, you lifted

up my sleeping eyes, 6
And filled my heart

with longing with a look.’’

JOHN MASEFIELD

a,
U breath f

Like a happy memory, the haunting

fragrance of Mitcham Lavender brings
the English countryside to Barbados
t Originally made by Potter & Moore

in their Mitcham Distillery two hun-
dred years ago, Mitcham Lavender
has ever since been dedicated to
Beauty the World over. ‘

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with G. A. Service
You will find G. A. Service the
most popular assistunt to Doctors,
Nurses, Didticians, and Cooks.

At the General Hospital
24 HOURS PER DAY SERVICE
for cooking and Sterilising



STIFF NECK,

RHEUMATISM,
PAINS IN_ THE
JOINTS

You can get speedy re-
lief by rubbing in

SACROOL

This great
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Knights Drug Stores











PAGE NINE



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|

With nolled Gold Cap $24,05,
Distributors for Barbados:

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P.O, Box 403





Bridgetown.
csontetinnninsantitalaiagis isicabantiasteanienensanpretiniapinaheiniphpabininitl
e




tells us
about pinking

Our scieniists protest that this is a slanderous misrepresentation
of a serious test to safeguard the Anti-Knock qualities of
REGENT. What really happens is that regular tests are made
in a special engine, the compression of which can be progress-
ively increased until the fuel is made to knock. A “Bouncing
Pin’’ resting on a diaphragm in the cylinder head measures
the intensity of Knock electrically, thereby enabling us to
determine and control the Anti-Knock qualities of the sample.
This is only one of many tests which safeguard the quality and
performance of REGENT petrol.

REGENT

PETROL
Sterling Quality =,



DISTRIBUTORS :—

DA

COSTA & CO., LTD.

AND

JAMES A. LYNCH & CO., LTD.






Charged With College Chief maUTT AND, SEF8 Bustamanite May Go|
$6.000 Discussions

KINGSTON, Jam., Jan. |
OLICE CONSTABLES a:

Write Direct or Airmail for Fatherly Advice —Free

THE STEPPING STONES
TO SUCCESS........

-/ Don’t hesitate about your future ! Go forward,
b confident that The Bennett College will see
you. through to a sound position in any career
you choose, The Bennett College methods

are individual. There's @ friendly,



PAGE TEN SET Ky ,
SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 1951
reniennteepnenplligsartinsiettenass te













Leader, has now accepted t!
invitation of several B.G., labour
leaders, it is reported he ©, for
himself and the Honourable
I. W. A, Barrant, Minister fox




d DR. HAROLD PAGE, Principal
in, of the Imperial College of Tropi-

, cal Agriculture is now in Barba-
discuss with Sir George
d members of his staff,







Bustamante, Jamaica’s Lab
alias “Barracuda,” at the Garr

on Friday night and brought him do¢




The Honourable WwW A
16-year-old Wilfred |






to the Central Police Station wees elas deenien Sei Agriculture, Lands and Commerce personal touch that encour-

Toppin, a resident of Bay Land, ovisory services aul. eaanrdae to visit British Guiana within th: ages quick progress: and
appeared before the City Police matters of common interest af- - makes” for early
Magistrate Mr. C. L. Walwyn fecting the West Indies as a whole. Mr. Barrant, who recently paid efficiency.
yesterday morning, charged with He _ arrived on Friday by a visit to the mainiand





colony on a_e rice’ study
mission, has received information
from British Guiana that plans
are being made to weleome the
Jamaica Ministers,

demanding $6,000 with menaces p W.I.A. from Trinidad accom-
from Mr. A. W. Birch of the panied by his wife and will be
Progressive ‘Bus Company, He here for one week as a guest of
Was remanded Sir George and Lady Seel.

A charge of loitering, which Dr. Page told the Advocate
was formerly brought against yesterday that they had just com-
Toppin, was withdrawn by the pleted two big buildings at the



beast. *
YOUR CAREER


















ice. 1.C.T.A. There are, a new bio- . NI
event , , . logical laboratory which costs Villagers Do Not Accountancy Exame. an Conteris Shae Haga ond
TANLEY FYBRACE of Good- < Aviation ‘Engineering and Commercial Art Quantity Surveying
re ore ioe about $350,000 and a new sugar ad : Draughtsmanship, All Radio Service Engineering
land, St. Michael, was treated ®% . F ae ee Wireless 8 Ps lo $
. : esearch laboratory which costs a non ic hveamien Branches Radio (Short Wave)
at the General Hospital for in- * Pe wnat a YOeY , ree : ive n armo Book-keeping — Dey Secretarial Examinations
ar saga on oad “S08 ~ about $150,000. YESTERDAY MORNING these two aircraft parked alongside each other on the parking apron at ae fork of We ao Ceslecte of Mereicinas Shorthand (Pitman’s
juries on Friday night and de- Both these buildings had been Seawell presented a striking contrast. The bi DC y . (From Our Own Correspondent) Caapeeery ana Taleary Engineers Surveying °
‘tained. : built with central funds from Se me oe é St. g one—a -4, T.C.A. aireraft, the small one KINGSTON, Jam., Jan. Chemistry Mathematics Seeman of Bendioreite
_Fybrace, who was riding his Development and Welfare in Eng- —an Auster aircraft belonging to the Light Aeroplane Club of Trinidad. After a week observing the life chu somien Mining, All Subjects “(city @.Guilds)
bicycle, was involved in an ac- land and would be used largely : - onsen ne led by the average villager in Engineering, All Branches Novel Writing Television
cident with the motor car O-38, for research work on cocoa, ban- Trinidad, Mr. James W. Brewster, on ee Police. Special Course yaleohony =




next few weeks,

If your requirements are not licted cbove, write us for free advice
Direct Mail to DEPT. 188 7
THE BENNETT COLLEGE LTD.

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND






i j 2 ‘Ne :
owned and driven by Edmund anas-and sugar. W llH dO ; ¢ W I B noted Anthropologist and Sociolo-
Walton of Parris Hill, St. Joseph, He said that the object of im- 1 an ver Ive oe oys ay mong gist from Greece, has found that
the people in the rural areas of

at the junction of Roebuck, Hinds~ eres the ean mpnitions of * * . tt
bury and Tweedside Roads, Both the cocoa industry, not only of Pl F Id i hn l K. . D c d the Colony do not live in harmony
By na thg ee Grefiada, ea aying 1e ec 1ca oréan ea with each other, Out of every



vehicles were damaged. provide information that would
Elkanah White, who was riding : e three houses he visited, he said, he

on the bar of the ’cycle was also be used in the development of The members of the Housing Edueat By WARREN WHITE found that neighbours were not

ie . . cocoa growing. Board will formally hand over 10n

injured: He was treated at the “The banana work is primarily on Friday evehine ot © che’ SUWON, Jan. 27

Hospital and discharged. to kreed a banana which is im- ¢he THY ete ae oe aa ale



oh speaking terms with one
; "i pha ; ; another. ‘This sityation, he added
newly erected pavilion at By E. B. TIMOTHY Suwon, seemingly little touched was well a for the great

w EVENTEEN-YEAR-OLD Darcey mune to Panama disease. That : ;

S co ; coe ge Seen ew re Deacons Playing Field to the by the fighting that has raged x » eriminal ‘ad ai
S Weekes _of Waterford Ten- work is primarily for the aaa Playing Field Committee. The