Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Havbadvos



ESTABLISHED 1895



Ike Disturbed
About Europe

LONDON, Jan. 25
GENERAL EISENHOWER will go back to

America ‘somewhat disturbed’ about Europe’s

armament problem, Atlantic Pact sources said
here today.

The Supreme Commander of the Atlantic Pact
forces is particularly concerned about the lack of
standardisation he found in his tour of European
capitals which ended today.

This problem will be priority
m the report he makes to Congress
Committees in Washington.

No Penal In America he will _ meet

William Roger Herod, rewly ap-
M tointed Co-ordinator of Atlantic
AGAINST CHINA

Pact Production and press on
the need for more rapid arms
production,
Eisenhower left Orly Field for
Heykjavik, Icelandic capital this
morning. -
LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 25. The General drove from _ his
Britain’s Sir Gladwyn Jebb said | } ctel to the airfield along a road
that no penal measures should be flanked by police.
taken against China whose inten- ie
tions should be further probed.
The Indian delegate, Sir Bene-
gal Rau, told the Political Com-
mittee it was difficult to conduct
negotiations with the Peking Gov-!
ernment across thousands of miles
The quickest way therefore to deal



Lieutenant General Alfred
Gruenther his Chief of Staff, ac-
companied him,

The General seemed in good
form as he shook hands with high
ranking French officials.



; Eisenhower, smiling broadly

with the Korean problem would ade state ‘ -orrespond

oe | made no statement to correspond-

be to hold a preliminary round bits. “who. ceatiaineted.<4uat he
table conference nts who anticipatec _ the

Sir Benegal ‘ade h ‘ ont | 2 uld disclose something about

nega’ made the statement tye selection of the site for his



in the Committee to-day on the ;
z ; : -) | permanent headquarters.

pesursbiteri Sf debate on an Arab-| *"Gince its establishment, Supreme
sian proposal to a seven-power





onfe 7 ey | Headquarters Allied Powers o
Far Easterd’ probes. ee ates Europe (S.H.A.P-E..) has oc-
—Reuter,| ¢upied — temporarily the 200
room hotel Astoria on the Champs
Elysees,



Observers believed that for his
permanent headquarters General
Eisenhower will return to his old
headquarters at Versailles.

—Reuter,

B.G. To Grant Tax
Concessions

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan. 23.
The Legislative Council will
shortly discuss a Bill which seeks
to confer power on the George-
town Town Council to exempt fhe
owners of certain properties in
Georgetown from liability to pay

!
—
\
|

Copper Talks May
Prove Successful



rates and taxes for a SANTIAGO, Chile. Jan, 25. _
period. Talks between Chilean Presi-

In view of the prevailing} dent Gonzalez and highest
housing shortage it is felt] executives of American copper

should
erect

that some encouragement
be offered to

visiting
succesful!

companies now
are nearing a

mining

people to Chile

new buildings and repair| conclusion according to authorita-
or replace existing ones. The] tive sources.
Bill will apply to any building] Jt js reliably reported. that <

used as a dwelling house, but not

Ai ; agreement will be signed next
to buildings used totaliy or in part eturtay between the Chilean
or the purposes of any trade or} Government ard the Anaconda

a Bi en consisting of eopper mining company, establish-
seams to be fet eparatelye | fnu new tans aie, pro
; ildi a ¥|eedures, and reforming :
June 1, 1950—--December 31, 1950, | °f Chilean copper.





— Reuter,



———————



Smallest Soldier France Will Support

LONDON. f
British under-secretary of War U
Michael Stewart had the greatest
surprise of his life when inspect-
ing the Rawlinson Barracks, Den- A 1
bury, Devonshire, spokesman said to-night
He met Corporal Frank Vin-] France would in principle vote in
cent, who is only 4 feet 25 inches) the U.N.O. Political Committee
tall, and is the smallest man in| for the whole American resolution

y



Resolution

PARIS, Jan. 2
French Foreign i




ee











the British Army. condemning Communist China as
“How did you manage to get] an aggressor.
in’? asked Stewart, Questioned whether France

“I told them what a good cook; would vote or abstain on the para-
I was,” replied Corpora! Vincent.| graph relating to sanctions if

Vincent weighs less than 98) clause by clause vote were taken
pounds and takes size one in} the spokesman said: “One cannot
boots. " § here. A lot depends on the

At Denbury camp he is a mem-| circumstances in which the voting
ber of a cookhouse team about! takes place and how the resolu-
whom a major commented; “In|tions are presented.
a long military career I have
never known better



—Reuter.







Commands Ail

WN a Ss -
Nylons For Cop French Forces
DERBY, England, Pe
Nylon stockings are to be sup~ ) PARIS, Jan, —
plied to the policewomen of Der. General Alphonse Juin, who

, has been widely mentioned for a
possible High Command post in

y . ,
j , at r thy-
This was decided by the Derby aeaen win
shire Municipal Council upon the | the Atlantic : B
suggestion of Alderman J. Var-| appointed Inspector General of
ley who told the Council that;the French armed forces with
nylons would “give the police-| authority over the army, the navy
women a bit of respect.” and the air force.

—LN

TWO TYPES



G: —Reuter.







,
MR. JOHN GODDARD, West Indies Cricket Captain left yesterday
morning for St. Lucia to attend a cricket tournament in St. L
between the Windward and Leéy d island He is a
observer for the West Indies Cricket Board, He will be aw
week. He was accompanied by Mr, Teddy Jeons, Manager of the
Barbados Dairies,



3 an







uy one



\





ie

Chinese Hunt |
For Serap Iron

HONG KONG, January 25

Chinese interests in Hong Kong
are scouring the ports of the
world for secondhand ships which
they are breaking up to sell either
és scrap iron, or reprocessed stee!
to Chinese Communists according
to usually reliable sources.

At the same time, these intérests
are

reported to be ==

large quantities of scrap iron
wbroad for delivery to China,

China’s demand is said to be so

keen that dealers are paying fabu-
lous prices almost equivalent to
the cost of new ships,
hulks bareiy able to float.

Purchases

for old
have been
are under negotiations in such
widespread places as France,
India and New Zealand according
to these sources.,

made or

One informant said Chinese
crews were being flown from
Hong Kong to many parts of the
world by chartered
pick up these ships.

But the Chinese lacked agircra‘t
out all

ar



aircraft to

to carry these
promptly.

Annual trade figures just pub-
lished reflect an enormous increase
in. Hong Kong’s exports of iron
and steel, The Value of these ex-
ports rose from $37,700,900 in 1949
to $124,000,000 last year.

Official sources said most second
hand ships were breken up by
Chinese companies in Hong Kong
where a certain amount of re-
processing was also dene,

Some of this scrap or re-pro-
cessed steel was devoted to Hong
Jiong’s own need but these sources
estimated that af least 75 per.
cent was re-exported to China,

—Keuter.

missions



Down

LONDON.
3ritish stillbirths and infant
mortality rates in 1950 were the
lowest ever recorded.

Figures by the Registrar-Gen-
eral’s Office said that the stillbirth
rate was 22.6 per 1,000 births.
Previous lowest was 22.7 in 1949

Infant mortality e fell to 29.8
per 1,000 live births—the first time
it has been below 30.

A Health Ministry official com-
mented:

“In less than.10 years we have








halved the death .rate among
babies. In 1941 the rate’was 60
per 1,000 births. A remarkable

achievement.”
—ILNS.,



SACKED

PRAGUE
Maria Svermova, A
retary General of the C
Communist party and a member
of Parliament has been relieved
of her duties as a member of the
party’s Central Committee, it was
reported here today by usually re-
liable sources.
She is the widow of Jan Sver-
mova, Communist deputy killed
by Germans during the Slovak

Jon, 25.
ant Sec-

hoslovalr










uprising in 1944 and later pro-
claimed a national hero
—Reuter.
Full House
VIENNA.
The Czech trade unicn paper
Prace reported that
werkers attended the )
week’: iowing of the Russian



film “Fall of Berlin” in Prague
Accerding to Vienna’s Socialist
Party press service, there was a
geod reason for the turnout:
When labourers opened their
Wage envelopes they found inside
10 tickets to the film. The price
cf the tickets had been deducted
from their wages. —(I.N.S.)



PARIS POLICE HOLD
3,267 COMMUNISTS

PARIS, January 25.









Police here said totiay 7
Cor nist demonstrators re
| de for an identity check-
up atte ve ter lay’s 4 ille : off”
demcnstratior against General
Bi hower.

A ere le ed betore 1
| le arrested f, r

r resist
. ortly be



BELIEVE IT OR NO®

eT. s

THIS IS BRIDGETOWN. Picture taken is Fairchild Street yesterday.



300,000! ta Cyrus would be contrary to the the perils of atomic attack
second] real view of the constituency and | 11% radio stations last night in the





FRIDAY, JANUARY 26,

1s



hdl

—See Story below,

Boom InScrapIron

YESTERDAY scrap irop packed Fairchild Street for
about 40 yards, The heap was composed of broken and
worn pieces*of factory machinery, motor car and lorry
engines, axles, tyreless wheels, pieces of chassis, old chains,
pots, stoves, and other pieges of iron.

-_—_— a Mr. Victor Chase has bought
the iron and he intends shipping

Shell Tanks At, fi ie earliest opportunity either
Coolidge Field

Kingdom.
Lighters will carry the scrap
(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, January 25.

fron off to a steamship which wiil
discharge its load at Trinidad, The
scrap iron will then be tranship-

sae: ranks tisiiacntea bol ped from Trinidad to one of the
dé awe ie anne Ent : ome sya {three countries.
asys ago at. Engineers ees Mr. Chase told the Advocate

Coolidge Field, under the direction
of Major David Hurst, This morn-
ing, activities ceased abruptly
due to a legal point in the lease
concerning which the Shell Com-

yesterday that the scrap iron trade
is a boom. to many people who
have accumulated old ironware
over a period of time,

The serap iton is resmelted for



pany is awaiting clarification by Juse in making ironware.
the Colonial Office.



Attlee Gets
Details From

( LONDON, popuary 25,
a

“rime Minieter Attlee § Te-
ceived from India details of a
fresh communication from the

Peking Government on Korea an
official spokesman said to-day.

Usuaily well informed quarters
believed the dispateh indicated a
development fn Chinese policy
towards easing conditions in which
a Korean cease fire could be
brought about.

Observers here thought the new
nove would make Britain increas-








ingly anxious to postpone any
vole on the American resolution
branding China as an aggressor

It was considered that British
policy would require further min
isterial decision in the light of
Nis move and.also of the decision
ff Arab and Asian countries in

the United Nations to press for a
seven power conference on Korea,

Observers believed the new
Chinese move would modify the
Cninese position by

1, Dropping the condition that
any conference must be held in
China.

2. Not rigidly insisting on the
isé circumstances of China’s
idinission to the United Nations

3, Admitting the interest of
fcreign powers in a settlement in
Korea,

BRIG. FE. MOUNT off to St.
Lucia yesterday to observe t
the progress of the rebuilding 7
of Castries.

Vibart Wight Off
The Council

(From Oar Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., Jan, 25
Chief Justice Sir Newnham

Worley today declared the election





—Reuter,

| BEVINIMPROVED
|

LONDON, Jan, 25.
Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin,
ill with pneumonia, was “some-










of Claude Vibart Wight, C.B.E.,| what improved”, Herbert Morri-
as Councillor for Ward 8. George. | 80n, Government feader in the
as ard 3, | rg ee ae Z sadtia.
tcwn Town Council, void, and | House sf ( pe rg
rdered the return to be set aside; Ment today, e was replying |

md a new election to be held. a question by Opposition Leader

The decision followed a petition Winston Churchill who asked for
by defeated candidate (ten votes) | information about the health of
Barrister Sam Cyrus, asking the} the Foreign Secretary “for whose
Supreme Court to declare. the eecovery we are all so much con-
Supreme } 2 y
nominations of candidates Wight, cerned.

and Dr. Cheddi Jagan not in order avin's Alexande



doctor, Sir





as the returning officer had not â„¢ i, said. oe ; Visiting pet
received written consents from | patient __ this afternoon era
Wight and Jagan, who were absent| Slight improvement in Bevin’s

from the colony at the time of condition is maintained

hemination, as ordered by Or- —Reuter.
dinance.
The petitioner also asked the}

court to decree that he be declared |‘ PL AN FOR SURVIVAL’”’







duly elected. The court reasoned
ine error was made by the return NEW YORK, Jan. 25.
ing officer and to award the seat New Yorkers were alertec

over
there would be therefore no real
election at all.

The petiticner was
four-fifths of taxed costs

Lord Lyle Shares
Out Prosperity

LONDON,

first of a broadcast series called
\“Plan for Survival,” aimed at re-
awarded jeryiting civil defence. workers,
—Retter.



Jan. 25

on the shilling Silvertown Service
















Lord Lyle of Westbourne, who|rhares than they recei 1 under
recemily created a Prosperity | the 1949 Segregation Sche The
Fund for Tate and Lyle employ-| dividend is 100 per cent. again, bu
ees today shared cut some of the)is paid on capital increased
Company’s prosperity to his share- | §y per cent. bonus on last Se

| holder says the Evening Stan-| tember
dard City Editor Ex A trading profit of Tate and]
| By announcing Lyle was £3,387,780 agair
jdend of 22 per ce | £3,030,633, Employees get £117
| he dividend ot -|780 from the Prosperity Func
dinary share up and tl axman takes £1,227
| cent t the ir red with £3 ,083, S
holder ae £5 500



Peking Govt. during the debate.



T’dad Pass
Budget For
$52,000,000

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan, 24
Trinidad’s new
legislature after a four days
debate on the colony's T

Tuesday passed it en bloe with
ony

Opposition leader, Tubal
Uriah Burs Butiey abstaining,
In an 18 hours debate during

Which all
members
words of

but three of
spoke some
pertinent and
nent comment, members talked
aon a wide variety of subject
including natienalisation of oil
and sugar industries, wisdom an
ethics, higher or lower taxatii
on business, the need for incre;
ed expenditure on education and
Social services and health
Most of the comments
more with political
and revelations of the eccnomic
Standards Of various industries
little with the actual budget items,
while much time was
personal abuse and invective,

The budget

the 26
70,000
impert:-



dealt
philosopiiy

which Butler des-
cribed as “anti-social,” provides

bumper estimated expenditure
of $52,000,589 and an estimated
revenue of $52,055,050. It allocat
ed for social services $15,000,000
or thirty per cent. of the total to
education over $8,000,000

The biggest budget in Trini-
dad's history it also took the
longest debate, the previous year’s
debate lasting only one day. The
budget debate opened on Tues-
day morning,
| The only people
speak were three
the Executive,

who did not
members of
Acting Colonial
Secretary, Joseph O’Connor, At-
torney General Joseph Perez,
and nominated member Lennox
Hanne
All five elected Ministers spoke
cP),





Avalanches
Threaten Alps
ANIMALS DYING

VIENNA, January 25.

The danger of fresh avalanches
in the Austrian Alps increased to-
day as temperatures rose again in
some parts

Flocds also threatened parts of
Salzburg province where ava
lanches dammed valleys,

Thousands of wild animals un-
able to get to their grazing grounds
were reported to be dying from
starvation,

Tens of thousands of Tyrclean:
were still cut off in more remote
valleys, Witnesses said they saw
Wallack House, well known shelte:
lor mountaineers on Gross Gl



lock



ner Mountain Carinthia »
ind carried away like a $s
beat on a flood.”

More great avalanches overhung
lonely vaileys of the align Alps
today threatening rescue teams.

The r and rumble of sliding
snow v last heard on Tuesday
right when an avalanche erashed
iiito Fundres Valley southeast of
the Brenner Pass, The bodies of
four people killed by snow were
found yesterday.






Other avalancnes struek Badia
Valley further south but there was
no news of any victims or damage

Troops were struggling througt
with food and medical supplies
to places cut off for days,

The avalanche death toll in
Italy is now put unofficially at 34,

—Reuter,



N. Guinea Voleatio

Explodes Again

MELBOURNE, Jan, 25
Mount Lamingion voleano in
New Guinea exploded again
early to-day according te
reports received by Percy Spend-
er, Australian Foreign Minister.

the Government







constitution

million
dollar a week budget for 1951 on

spent inj

UNITED NATIONS

off Inchon, west coast Korean

tons of shells on to the
dian and other

British Commonwea













TOKYO, Jan. 25
Naval units tonight stood
ort, crashing
— Cana-
th warships

city and doc

were taking part in the operation but there were
| no details of any supporting ground action.
| Inchon, held by Communists since the United
: Nations forces fell back there at the beginning of

January, was the port

at which General

MacArthur threw in his vast sea-borne invasion
force on September 9 last year to split and crush

the original North Korean offensive.



ON THE |
¢ spor |

| LONDON

|! Ogler Ward, prominent |
London surgeon, described a
novel cure for lumbago in

the British Medical Journal.
He said |

“IT was troubled by an at-
tack of lumbago during an

|

operation, so I hooked my |
fingers over the top of a door |
and hung there until my |

- Spine had readjusted itself." |
| —INS. |
he ‘



Did Red China
Accept Proposals?

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan, 25
India’s Chief United Nat!ons
delegate Sir Benegal Rau was
expected to announce to the Gen-
eral Assembly's Political Com-
mittee to-day that Communist
China had accepted the idea of
a seven nation “exploratory’
conference on Korea,
The Committee has before it a
resolution by a group of 12 Aslan

and Arab nations proposing such
a conference

Under this proposal
and venue of the conference
would be left to the discretion
of the General Ags ‘mbly, Presi-
dent Nasrullah Entezam’ of Per-
sia.

the date

Latest development ta thé tense
diplomatic situation eame in a
note explaining Peking’s position.
It was handed to the Indian Am-
bassador in the capital, Furthe:
details of the Peking note were
being kept secret until their in-
troduction in the Political Com-
mittee,

But

usually well

pointing to

intormed
reports fror
® no man’s land at the
front which had been probed by
United Nations forces to a
siderable depth said they expect-
ed Chinese Communists might uy
to create a “lull in the fighting”
in Korea, —Reuter,

sources

Koreéa of

cole

-_-—————





It lies 18 miles west of Seoul,
the Communist-occupied South
Korean capital. United Nations
forces evacuated the port on Jan-
uary 4. South of the City, United
Nations armoured land patrols
probed to-day up to 25 miles into
deserted no man’s land between
two forces without encounteriag
Communist resistance,

Ronald Batchelor, Reuter’s war
correspondent with the United
Nations Eighth Army said that
Communist. forces which had
been withdrawn along the entire
western and central ffonts> con-
tinued to show little or no in-
clination to resist United-Nations
patrols. During the past 24 hours
these patrols pushed Between 10
miles and 25 miles into Com-'
munist territory.

An Eighth Army communique
to-night said that extensive pa-—
trolling continued over the whole

front but enemy contact was
negligible.
A battle between a United

Nations division and a large force
of North Koreans is said to have
raged this afternoon in Yongwol
area. It said there had been no
contact between United Nations
patrols and Communist forces
north of Yongwol this morning.
Reports from the front had said
earlier that the United + Nations
livision was “decimating” a large
North Korean foree surrounded
yesterday southwest of. Yongwol
which is 30 miles southeast of
Wonju. Wonju is now occupied
by United Nations troops after
changing hands several times,

—Reuter.



DULLES 1S.IN JAPAN

TOKYO, Jan. 25,
John Foster Dulles, America’s
Republican Foreign Policy Advis-
er, was met by General Mac

Arthur when he flew into Tokyo
tonight

He is to have talks aimed at the
conclusion of the Japanese peace
—Reuter.

treaty by October,
ey

TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT







“FLOATING CORPSE”
FIVE ACQUITTED

BOYSTE SINGH

and David Bruce were acq
of Appeal this morning as
trial took a dramatic turn,

Henriques Dies
in Jamaica

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGS‘YVON, Jan. 25
Hon'bie ©, K, Hen iques

the leading members of the

Jamaica's Government died trom

a heart attack to-day, He Was for

one ot



: nicknamed
defendants James Durant, E

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAQIN, Jan. 25.
“Rajah” and. four co-
Idon Coggins, Augustus James
uitted by the Criminal Court

the “floating corpse” murder

The accused men were condemn-
e€d to die last December for the
murder of Philbert Peyson, a roti
seller off Bayshore, four miles from
Port-of-Spain harbour on April 14
last year. The first trial lasted 26
days when the jury failed to agree
but at the retrial which lasted
one day longer, the men were all
sentenced to death,

Handing down pages of written

two decades Jamaica’s leading} judgment this morning before a
industrialist, business man, econo- court packed with lawyers, press-
mist and financier’ and was con-| men and hundreds of spectators
nected with most of the agricul-| the Appeal Court comprised of

tural and industrial developments
in the island,

He was Chairman of more than
12 companies most of which he
organised including the island’s
telephone and other utilities and
was Director of many others

Henriques was an origina) and
continuous member of the Jamai-



Lonergan, can Executive Council under the
Secretary said in Canberra that] 1944 Constitution and was busy
the volcano showed signs of ac up to a few hours before death in
ivity last night but he could not] the Executive Council preparing
confirm that there had been the estimates of expenditure of
major explosion. the island

Mount Lamington voleano be He was regarded politically as
gan erupting last Thursda lay- ultra conservative and was chief

ting waste a farge part of the|*Upperter of the Government’s side
surrounding ea and killing} in the Executive Council, He

ever 3,000 people.—Reuter.



New Gas Mask

LONDON







British government scientist
have devised a jlian ga
mask for use the late

.| types of poison and radio-
active dust
| It now being tested by the
| British Home Office authorities i
| competitior With an Americ
gasmask to decide which shouk
be ma oduced for the Brit
4) pub
I Home Office i I
1} side the general
ed defence
£ simple prec
he «
IN:



companied the Hon'ble W. A
Bustamante to Britain in July 1949
as a member of the Jarnaica Gov
ernment Su Delegation

BACK TO WORK





(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jan. 25
| Work resumed at Worthy Park
Estate to-day following a settle-
ment of the second strike on al-
tleged victimisation as the Labour
|A visor got Sugar Manufacturers
jand T.U.C. to agree to submit the
: spute to arbitration
| Arrangements have now been
made to convene meeting be-
tween Bustamante’s Union, T.U.C
n an attempt to set
ite in the sugar indus-
> minimum of disloca-

tion

t the present



which|C. T. W.

Sir Cecil Furness Smith, Mr. Jus-
tice Mortimer Duke and Mr. W.H.
Irwin declared at one stage that
“never before have we experi-
enced a more slender foundation
for conviction upon a capital
charge.”

Evidence Tainted

Of Rahamut Ali alias “Loomat;:
tar witness for the Crown, the
Court declared that his general
haracter left much to be desired
ind that his evidence was “tainted
throughout by inconsistencies,
prefabrications and failure of
memory when confronted by awk-
ward decisions and we have no
hesitation in’ regarding him as a
thorougnly unreliable witness.”

The Cgurt criticiseq the evi-
dence of the police complainant
Sub-Inspector Bleasdell as inac
urate and declared that the trial
Judge S, E. Gomes had not direct-
od the jurors to the point of mis-
direction.

The accused men all wept bit-
terly when the Superintendent
broke the news of the decision in

their death cells Pandemonium
reigned outside the Royal gaol
when the accused walked Out

Singh declaring “justice must be
done in this country”. Mr, R. C
Archibald, K.C., Mr. Leo Lyder,
Mr. S. B. Dolsingh, Mr. S. Ameer-
ali and Mr. J. E. Castillo were
| defence counsel, while Mr.
Worrell, Acting Solicitor
; General prosecuted

———————_—_——_—$—$————
Del a





— _ Te _— ea ee ee ee ee ee ee a a Oe ee a ee ee ae ee ee ae





; r. JANUARY 26, 195)
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY,
, = SS
——
‘ 1 Mf )
® @ With Bovell & Skeete oi I " +. ‘ ;
a. tnd tars.” Lice, Wonnint .bD.U. Radio | \} AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only) i
i si iniGes, “NiMe eintes . | . - MATINEES : TODAY and TOMORROW AT 5 P.M 1
* and family who have beea Judy Garland s te oo SUNDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
holidaying in Barbados with rela- ¢ CECIL B. DE MILLE'sS - - - -
tives for the past few weeks rc- P m r r Mighty Spectacle ::: “CLEOPATRA” Be al )
turned to Grenada yesteruay ro am € Own Story Starring Claudette COLBERT :o Warren. WILLIAM Henry WILCOXON
y 7S F afte ; y f J and a Cast o ousands
PANAMA FAMILY areracen. ey 1. A cic Lock out for Judy Gar- A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
Webster is in charge of Boveli FRIDAY, January 26, 1951. land’ 2 eae
and Skeete’s Office in Grenada and’s own story begii MONDAY and TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
Appointed 7.00 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. News| on Sunday, Page 3 om- MATINEE a ee TRUE LOVE”
Analysis; 7.45 a.m. From the Editorials; | tinuing daily on Page 2. Paramount Presents = = = 2 VYN DOUGLAS
ISS GWENDOLINE DENNY. 7.25 am. Programme Parade; 7.30 a.m If you are among the mil- Starring PHYLLIS CALVERT :o: MEL
has been appointed Inspector Freedom Under the Law; 7.50 a.m. Inter- | licns ef movie fans the world WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
~ " lude; 8.00 a.m. Music from Australia Day; " MATINEE: WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.
of Domestic Subjects working UN= 2945 am Good Films and Bad Films over who have been spouse Ray MILLAND 0: Florence MARLY
der the Education Department 9.00 ~.m. The News; 9.10 a.m. Home News and puzzled by Judy Gar in “SEALED VERDICT” :
Miss Denny who has been acting: #0 Britain; 9.15 arm. Close Down; 11.15 land’s suicide attempt, you A PARAMOUNT PICTURE 4

ine |-m, Programme Parade; 11.30 am. Lis-
in that post since April 1949, WAS geners’ Choice: 11.45 a.m. World Affairs

for many years an Assistant Mis- 12.00 toon) The News, 3 we News
_ fhe 5 , fnal 12.15 pam. Close wn;
tress at the Westbury Girls aemCOl, f mar Hallo Austratins 448 Pan tight Or-
She now succeeds Miss Ivy Al-Yghectrai Music; 5.06 p.m. Composer of
leyne, Organiser of, the House@- ahe Week: 5.15 p.m. Let's Make Music:

will not miss a word of her
own frank human life story.



PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

GIRLS RUSH



craft Centre 60 p.m. Merchant Navy Newsletter; TODAY 2.30 & 8.20 P.M, and CONTINUING DAILY — 445 & 8.30 P.M.
2 s 615 p * Se aan ae ager: 6.35 LONDON. There'll be Laughter to the Rafters !
p.m ntevlude; 645 p.m ogramme * cS .
No Need To Ask Parade; 700 pm. The News, 740 pm | Over 5,000 girls have applied






HERE will be a film about News Analysis; 7145 p.m. West Indian DANNY KAYE in

* i; ‘ Inary; 1.45 pam. Think en These Things:
cricket included in the film 8.00 p.m. Radio Neweree]; 8.19 pm. Eng-

i{. | lish Magazine; 845 p.m. Composer of the

clayey arti sponsored by the Brit Week; $.00 p.m. World Affairs; 9.15 p.m.
ish Council at Scout Headquar- y7)\5\c’ for Australia Day; 10.00 p.m. The
ters, Beckles Road, tonight at News; 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials;
8 o’clock. Need I ask if there will 10-15 p.m. Communism in Practice; 10.30

for jobs as air hostesses with Brit-
ain’s nationalized airlines although
the pay is only about $20 a week.

Only 90 girls a year are ap-
pointed to the job of air hostess |
but those who make the grade

“THE INSPECTOR GENERAL”

Color by Technicolor

“SPECIAL MAT. TODAY — 4.45 P.M.
“FREDDIE STEPS OUT” (By Request)
Freddie STEWART and The TEENAGERS

a ee
parreiiiciemeencinet

Tim Holt in - - -
“STAGECOACH KID’ ‘&

SATURDAY: 9,30 a.m, & 1.30 p.m.
| “NEVADA” with











-> and :-
rr us p.m. SPA Orchestra; 1045 p,m. The| get free nylons, uniforms, hand- Tom KEENE in “DYNAMITE CANYON” Robert Mitchum, Ann Jeffries
be a “ turn out of scouts to Debate eee 11.00 p.m. Music for bags, hats and shirts. '
see the filnt. Australia Day. —LN:S.
CROSSWORD

TODAY TO SUNDAY — 5
RKO RADIO'S DOUBLE THRILLER ! !

&

Joan EVANS

and 8.30 P.M.



7]

Rupert and the Sketch
fn La a! a i] { Mi

cit,
jes

or

ee eG

ida




Samuel Golwyn's
“ROSEANNA McCOY”
Farley GRANGER —

George O'BRIEN in
“MARSHAL OF MESA CITY”

Bes
|







mi
ry
‘IH
|
1






MIDNITE SHOW —
Tim Holt (in Both)

SATURDAY 27TH — RKO Radio
Zane Grey's - - - =





il!
NYY &

“INDIAN AGENT" “THUNDER MOUNTAIN ™

PLAZA Theatre=OI/STIN (DIAL 8404)











GARETT Y—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

Today — Saturday & Sunday 8.30 p.m. : Mat. Sunday 5 p.m.



- station platform. A train is standing out, you've no business in there,’ 1. The heedicss priest falled to WARNER'S Big Special Double ! !
‘ there and is signalled to go. Someof he calls. ‘We must go back to Match this man’s tiara, (9)
DR. (MAJ.) DEAN KLEVAN, back in uniform, accompanied by his wife and their two children the doors are open, but at first there Mrs. Pig this minute |‘? But Rosalie Pais, Ole belunes wo one. ¢4) fas Ingrid BERGMAN Dick FORAN (The Singing
left yesterday by B.W.I.A. for Puerto Rico en route to Panama where Dr, Klevan will be Ho, SBM of Rosalie. °° 1 must find doesn't move. " These seat cushions 10, ‘an dancing girl. (4) Joseph COTTON Cowboy) 2
stationed at the U.S. Army B er,” he thinks, as he moves for- feel nice,’ she says calmly. I i2 itors of the earth. (4) Sey owboy) in
; 5. iy Base. yin to look gne the earings, can’t run any more. J think I'll re BT nat ~ a
A most at once he finds her, and he rest here!" Beg hea nee. “UNDER CAPRICORN” GUNS OF THE PE -
. ; So dart : . (4) cos
7 GEN: SIR OTTO LUND, Destination Panama Grenada Arrivals tT: ¥ou heed part ‘only. to make tt
| ~ o.U., i. — ne t4) 4, Joined. (
sioner in- Chief, St. John Ambu- .R. (Maj.) & MRS. DEAN ge BARBARA LANG whove 19. They are joined when spliced. (4) /
Jance Bvtigade, accompanied by KLEVAN and their two G nee own an estate in SHOP a Qrseo, sol Ashe io ae Ory
: A ’ : N 8 y renada arrived yesterday morn- ia. Left-overs. 23 yal,
the Countess of Brecknock, Lady children left yesterday morning ; y. 8 24. Hangman’s rope periJaps. (4-3)
Superintendent in Chief, St. for Puerto Rico by B.W.LA. Dr. ing by B.W.I.A. from Grenada to) JANETTA DRESS

John Ambulance Brigade (Over- Klevan will

spend a month’s holiday in Bar-











Rupert peeps anxiously on to the

beckons her urgently. ** Here, come



















Across



Down





EMPIRE








ROYAL



leave Puerto Rico ‘hados. She is a quek at tha Ocout UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAW'’S, Lower Broad St. 1. Overwhelm with success, (5)
sci : Benen eul « ¥ . . a tee ados. g a an 2. Buffoon. (4
padee pi ae ‘iapiier ak tbe Da tn , oo Dawe eat "View Hotel. J ived in ti f Weddin ro { 3. Biblical Giant and father of To-day 2.30 and 8.30 and Last Two Shows‘ To-day
ona two dey visit 2 ane § thos ae ee, res Arriving on the same plane was SS eS Se 4 Sappites Eric a list. (9) Continuing 4.30 and 8.30
Lady Baden Powell, Chief terday to see then of wwe. My. Miss Rita Branch of Grenada who AFTERNOON & COCKTAIL DRESSES B,. Hoe Gen ATanOnER toe rar: (a4) oie a
Citi dite World, who’ war tn \ see them off were, Mr. is here for a few days holiday, Also a few LONDON MODEL EVENING GOWNS 6. City with a novel chess piece. (¥) 20th Century-Fox Presents : 1 i Sia
e , who was in- and Mrs, Al Nyren, Mr. and Mrs. staying at the Worthing Guest COTTON FROCKS & BEACH WEAR 8. Out of burst hosepipe. (5) Columbia Big Double
transit through Barbados last Lisle Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Jean House ne is English Pure Wool Twin Sets of Matching 9. SR i
van oe. 5s A Me a Iverson, Mr. and Mrs. Don Clair- ? SWEATER & CARDIGAN 13. Weight carries poy cores x TLL GET BY Richard DIX in
ill. x ao" ‘ r } : 1 j le. ”
offieigi visit on February 3rd. Rolfe, Mrs, Av de K Frampton Here -For a Day READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty’s of London. Me Gy, Srey See Animale Uo
She-will be here for ten days. and Dr. Allan Gardiner. Râ„¢., E. A. PITT, Supt. Min- HOURS: Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30 Solution of yesterday's puzzle... Across: Colce by Technicolor rv} SECRET OF
-€.D.C. Representative Taking over Dr. Klevan’s prac- - s aeiee of the Methodist Church SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30 3, Haphasaras G.. ia, Teigy 5: Beanie: Starring : :
RIG. ERIC MOUNT, - tice here is Dr, Gardiner who in Kingstown, St. Vincent arrived] eee See i. Bee ast 5 meee :
presentative of Colghidt By — from Ottawa just over 2 from St. Vincent yesterday morn- a eT HOIGAN THE WHISTLER
" . 5 ; week ago. Dr. Gardiner graduat- ing by B.G. Airways intransit to r
im , x . ~ e j
ets ee Mr visit ed a arid ne in the age Trinidad. He left later the sam2 GENERAL MILARITY Takes Over ae rasta AND
yeste ; “= or years. e expects is afternoon for Trinidad to see his: inui + ag
to by Sin a ho i wife and family to arrive in sister who is ill, Rev. Pitt was at TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing and 4 U
i ; arbados on February ; one time stationed in Barbados i:) ILY at 4.45 an 5 -m. .
progress of the rebuilding of Batbad Fet 3rd ime tioned in dos i DAIL 5 and 8.30 p Dennis DAY THUNDERHOOF
Castries. Brig. Mount is station- P the parish of St. Philip.
ed ‘in Trinidad. : Cricket Plane LA’ Never such singin’ dancin’ Danny Kaye-pers/ with Robert PRESTON
Intransit To Antigua RAVING -on the saiie‘blane we et Ae 4 2 ROXY and William BISHOP
. MARGARET MANNING JL vocterday for St a , nite ||P
arrived from St Vincent Skipper John Goddard, was ane Ve, Who is B.W.1.A.’s agent in ||] 4 DAN NEY’: A
yesterday by B.G, Airways ic other cricketer, Norman Mar- Martinique left yesterday fo , ‘ To-day Last Two Shows OLYMPIC
em a few days in Barbados shall, Norman ‘is the Assistant oe a. anes Bacay ; ; 4.30 and 8.15
staying at Cacrabank. She is in- Manager of the Singer Sewing One week's holiday in Barbados.
transit to Antigua where she will Machine Co., here and he has H@ was staying at the Hastings See Us for the

join her husband Judge Manning, gone to St. Lucia for about one
who is at present there, Judge week,

Messing is a Puisne ouees, in a Incidentally the Air Hostess on

Hotel.

Max was in Barbados about fiv?
years ago, when he came over tc
learn Englishy’ He* now speaks



following :-—

20th Century-Fox Double:

John PAYNE
and

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.15

' M-G-M Smashing Double
. the "plane on which they were ; peebebel DIRECTED BY ins PEANUT BUTTER ( Alice FAYE in
eile travelling was Yvette Gomez, English fluently. - wi TER SLEZAK - cttitintali’e JERRY WALD HENRY KOSTER @ jana ;
Trinidad Senior Judge wife of Gerry Gomez, Trinidad WALTE pus ent erated Sits Wises ¢deocians daienostone Bots, SALTED PEANUTS Van JOHNSON and

R. JUSTICE KENNETH and WI. Cricketer,
VINCENT-BROWNE, Senior

Medico From Tennéass2e
and Mrs.

Dp".

Hearn Bradley





Lyrics and Musee by The Assocute Producer SYLVIA FINE © Muncalditrection ond incitenta Scere By Joteiny Green

PLAZA — BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310)









Packages DATES

“WEEK-END IN

Phillis THAXTER in

ek Tins KRAFT CHEESE & ‘

Jape te Trinidad arrived on Continuing W.I. Tour . : aennaree are oe MACARONI HAVANA” “ THIRTY
rity est Indian Airway’s een here for one week staying 5 ‘

morning plane from ‘Trinidad JP)jR. ERIC PRIDIE, Chief Medi- at the Marine Hotel, left yester-||}] WATCH FORTHE STORY OF SEABISCUIT” Bots. KRAFT

yesterday. Here for about six cal Officer at the Colonial day by B.W.I.A. for St, Lucia = MAYONNAISE aR, SECONDS

weeks’ holiday he is spending Office who arrived from Brazil From there they will visit Mar-| e090 9000-0 O00O999GOPOFOFF FO SP 9PPD DEEP GPPPPPPOPIOE, 21» Tins HAMS

the’ first two weeks at. Powell via Trinidad on Wednesday af- tinique, and St, Thomas before} a ee :

Spring Hotel, after which he will ternoon,
be moving over to the
Royal for the remainder

c left yesterday for An-
Hotel tigua by B.W.1.A. continuing his

of his tour









returning to the U.S.

Arts Officer









SPEIGHTSTOWN

PLACE

T.H E AUT RE

TIME 8.30

Tins RABBIT
Tins GUAVAS



“ SOMEWHERE

OVER TOKYO”




























of the Caribbean, accom-
stay. He hopes to be here for panied by Dr. J. W. Harkness, R. JOHN HARRISON, the FRIDAY To SUNDAY S FRIDAY To SUNDAY Tins SWEET CORN TON’S IN THE AND
the races and before returning Medical Adviser to C.D. and W. , British Council’s Arts Offi- (13's sONDaa WADA Beene” iss “AmaROADES ie? eONORA” 1% Tins C & E MORTO!
to Trinidad he expects to tour Dr. Pridie ends his tour in ‘cer in the Caribbean left for Ono aed PEARL BARLEY NIGHT ” “ THE ARNELO
some of the other W.I, islands Jamaica-and will then be return- Antigua yesterday morning by Starring ROY ROGERS Starring Allan “ROCKY” Lane
including Jamaica. ing to England, B.W.LA. on a short visit. % osae sabia ances Oo a a ai dae AFFAIR ”
; CE & C Ltd Starring :
Ce a “GABBY” and that Horse that's Patrons this is the Double you IN u Orcs ‘+
W en : , t ‘ John HODIAK Starring John HODIAK,
BY THE AY more than a Horse--TRIGGER, long Wanted. Go to it ! 6, 4, 8 & 9 Roebuck Stree”. and Geoeen MURPHY and
‘ SLO GOOFS FSOSOSS Dial 2236 and Nancy GUILD Francis GIFFORD
WRITER—and what more
offensive term can I em-
ploy ?—-appears to think that the
bee 4 ne people had for animals
efore the dawn of this enlight- pam
ened age was to torture them. TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 ASALINTERNATIONAL presents N
I my ca to him two per- UNIVE
fect poems about animals, written ’ ny /; ’ f
about 400 years ago by Joachim AND CONTINUING DAILY BUD >
= Bear His epitaphs for his s
og Peloton and his cat Beland are ' re Q 7 x
full of humour, and you can recog- At Mat. & Night Shows — to Thursday / % %
= in = descriptions of the ani- % 4) $
mals at play, your own favourite 7 % : %
Y a. ~Y Y ~ ‘ $
dog and fat THE BIG MUSICAL af OU 14% 0 ° N
Private. Enterprise . F eetur @e@ F er st SX
— yy %
F a Hollywood v-edding I read sailed % » %
that ‘220 police watched June ee OREIGN LEGION ERLLRRLL 8 >
a une SORRY SS a
over the hundreds of bejewelled R . LUNDIGAN . . OT BRON x
guests,” The problem for the de- ~ Gloria “i
tectivés on one such occasion was $





to distinguish between the guests
and «the jewel-thieves, since
everybody was loaded with costly
ornaments, There usually comes
a moment when the jewels begin
to change hands in dark corners,
as at @ wedding in London, when
a man was heard to say angrily to
a friend: “I switched necklaces,
and now you've gone and pinched
my sHam one from her.” “That's
all right,” replied his friend, “I'll
substitute it for the one that huge
woman over there is wearing.”
But at that moment there was a
scuffig, and someone else got the
huge-woman’s trinket.



wn PATRICIA MEDINA . water sLezaK DouGLAss DUMBRILE

Screenplay by JOHN GRANT MARTIN RAGAWAY and LEONARD STERN
Directed by CHARLES LAMONT*Produced by ROBERT ARTHUR

NTI ST) sates
RPC eee oO
ODS PTFLEI ROO



De HAVEN -



er





GOOOeOPPPPST SISTA SSOP PSE. SEDOCPOCSCES OD PLOCE PL ODDPP POSS
Opening TODAY to TUESDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. : ro a a
% oot x oe LRA PTT ee
Their NEWEST and FUNNIEST f. by Far ! Megs
Sia Een. e g y a
Bue ~ Think of the

OOS
i
45





Exira—Gene KRUPA the Drummer Man and
His Orchestra Plus
British and American News Reels

When you plan Buying a
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ontY $4.70 rEacn

ae
THE HARHADOS CO-OPERATIVE
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Herdware and Ironmongery Department Telephone No. 2039

GUARANTEE’ — BEAUTY

— FOOD SPACE with the
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|
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FRIDAY,

—

JANUARY 26,

1951





Colonial Troops
Are Being Recruited

LONDON.

Official British sources disclosed
today that recruitment of colonial
troops is being speeded up under
a master plan that could bring
more than 500,000 men into action
im the event of war.

The colonial force would in-
clude a large number of the
dreaded Gurkhas, small but fero-
cious warriors from Nepal whose
kukri knives and stealthy ways
pread terror through Japanese
ranks in World War IT,

A British wefence Ministry
pokesman ‘said that the ctrrent
troop target is for a total of

69,200 colonials by April,

But more important than the
number of men in, uniform, the
spokesman added, is the fact that
a military nucleus is now in exist-
ence which could be expanded
“very rapidly” if war comes,

The two main pools from which
these troops could be drawn are
in East Africa and West Africa.

Before the: start of World IT,
East Africa had 11,000 fighting
men, drawn from Kenya, Rho-
desia, Uganda, Tanganyika and
3ritish Somaliland and centered
in Nairobi, capital of Kenya. Dur-
ing the war, the number was in-
ereased to 223,000,

West Africa—Siérra Leone,
Nigeria, Gold Coast and Gambia
-had 8,000. That was increased
to 150,000 before the war ended.
Nepal provided more than
50,000 Gurkhas in World War II
and 10,500 are fighting in the war
against terrorists in Malaya now.
Other colonials come from
Malaya itself, where native troops
are being inereased from four

“Sorry, George, no

-



Flying-boats
Have Had It!

battalions to six; Jamaica and
Cyprus, Com

British officers concede that the oxut aiciee bre
African troops “need a lot of ‘to. aibay

IF the Government abandons
work on the giant Saunders-Roe
S.R. 45 Princess flying-boat, which
seems likely, this type of aircraft
may be dead for ever. :

The flying-boat—and its cousin
the float-plane—have had_forty-
cdd years of adventure through
the efforts of the three great Brit-
ish flying-boat firms — Super-
marine, Saunders-Roe, and, above
all, Short Brothers.

I believe »ne flying-boat IS
dying, but dyitg hard. Never
since the Britisn cavalry replaced
horses with tanks has a contro-
versy sparked such high feeling.

What is the argument all about?

Chief flying-boat protagonist is
Sir Arthur Gouge, designer of the
Short series and now chief de-
signer for Saunders-Roe. He de-
signed the huge Princess.

Gouge argues that in all forms
of transport—road, rail, and sea—
the largest unit has always proved
the most efficient unless restricted
by factors outside the vehicle. For
example, the size of roads, the
bearing-capacity of rails, and the
size of port facilities are restric-
tive.

handiing” and are best used for
service work. 3ut the Defence
Ministry spokesman explained :

“In any future war they would
be used as the circumstances de-
manded.”

British policy now is that col-
onial troops should be used to
build up the defences of their own
countries. However, as in the
last war the British High Com-
mand would be free to move them
to any theatre where they coul.)
be used,

During World War II, the Afri-
eans fought in Italian East
Africa and Burma.

Ghost House
For Sale

LONDON.

The most haunted estate in all
Britain is up for sale. Asking
price is $11,200; nothing extra for
the ghosts,

Nearly 12 years ago Borley
Rectory, Essex, reputedly the
most haunted house in the coun-
try, burned down, But sightseers
und psychic researchers claimed



The flying-boat can theoretical-
ly be immensely larger than the
land plane because it is not re-

t stri size and

that the fire had not succeeded in freneih. os

exorcising the ghosts. Next, he argues that a land-

ciatias' last five years poet-| plane needs an under-carriage,
? 211s

James Turner and his
wife have lived in the adjoining
stables, which have been convert-
ed into a house with three recep-
tion and three bedrooms,

which adds weight.

Sir Arthur’s opponents say:—

First, the use of rocket-assist-
ance for take-off and _ efficient
braking systems have made exist-
ing runways usable by aireraft as
big as we are ever likely to need.

Second, they say, the weather
restricts flying-boats to sheltered
marine bases.

Turner, who categorically states
he has seen no ghosts—not even
the “Blue Nun” who allegedly
z0ams the churchyard in flowing
rebes—has how decided to sell out
end move to the nearby village ot
Belchamp Walter.

In addition to the converted
liouse there are seven acres of
garden, a mushroom farm and an
erchard containing about 600
apple trees, and, of course, the
ruins of a rectory.

Turner said his only reason for
ieaving is that his health. will not
allow him to look after the estate,

Third. the installation of ade-
quate blind-approach systems at
marine bases is difficult.

Fourth, water does not abound
everywhere. London is 70 miles
from the nearest suitable stretch.
Most world capitals are even fur-
ther.

Fifth, undercarriages pay their
way; they fit snugly into a stream-
lined hull.

A boat-shape can never be a





—IN.S. perfect air-shape. The problem
is how to get our perfect air-
shape off the earth’s surface,

NO SIXTH
SENSE

By WALLACE S. HULLETT
LONDON.
A Ministry of Labour working
committee has issued a _ report
shattering the idea that the blind
have a mysterious sixth sense,

The committee included two
blind men — Arthur E, Wilson of
the Ministry of Labour, and
Thomas H. Smith, general secre-
tary of the National League of the
Blind.

The report said:

swiftly through the air,.and safely
down again.

Look ahead, not back. In a few
years’ time our aircraft will close-
ly resemble the V.2 rocket, with
vertical take-off, and a sit-down
landing on its jets. Almost like a
jet plane with a hover-plane iaud-
ing gear,

L.E.S,












BRAZIL, ITALY SIGN
AVIATION PACT

ROME, Jan. 25.
An, Aviation agreement between
Italy and Brazil was signed at the
Italian Foreign Ministry today.
Intended to facilitate air traffic
between Italy and South America,
the Pact was signed by Italian
Foreign Minister Count Carlos
Sforza and the Brazilian Ambas-
sador.—Reuter,

“Tt is not true that the memory
of the blind is inherently superior
nor the senses of hearing, touch,
taste, and smell are inherently
more aeute, than in seeing per-
sons.”

The report admitted that blind
persons, because of their affliction,
made ,better nse of their senses
than those with sight:



“It is true that becouse of the
impossibility of obtaining mental
impressions from seeing, senses
are used as far as possible to fill
the gaps and may thus improve
with use.

“The fact is the blind make bet- ~~



tér and different use of their mem- BD M)
cry and remaining senses, we
“The idea that blind persons are gv
nearly’ all musical geniuses has
been long in dying. But blind
children cultivate their hearing
more intensely than sighted chil- Your hair will be
dren and this helps them in the
acquisition of musical gooey handsomer by far
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water” because they lack “the art) the difference!

of relaxation.”

His letter etaimed that nothing
women ever do is done “for the
mere pleasure of doing it, without
ulterior motive.” He predicted:

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of sailing a boat around a pond,
or cohecting butterflies: if ever
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Private Sheffield, inthe Army since 1908, wants to stay

Soldier Has Not Had

Leave For 21 Years

ONE of the oldest serving sel-
diers in the British Army is
60-year-old Private Frederick
Sheffield, 2/4th Queen’s Royal
Regiment. He has completed 42
years’ service, and has not been
away on leave for the last 21
years.

He hopes to serve for a total
of 50 years, he told me, then add-

ed: “If I can I will do 60.”
“Chuck” Sheffield — as he
is known to his friends, was

wounded at Mons in October 1914.
Lives In Cabin

Now he is comfortably installed,
with a radio set, in a small cabin
at the back of the barracks library
at Guildford.

He looks after the library and
the billidrds room adjoining it,
and in his spare time is general
handyman about the barracks.
Once a week he goes on parade—
a saluting parade.

He has eight good-conduct
stripes on his left forearm.

“Chuck” last went on leave in
1929, His mother was then living
at Ash, about eight miles away.
“Then she died,” he said, “and I

have not troubled about leave
since.



PTE. FREDERICK SHEFPELD
Saluting parade ohce a week.

‘Not Worth It’

Ws ; . cicceiaciaeetalimees
are wt a eee if you have

arents and a home to go to, or

if you are married, but otherwise THE LAST CENT

it is not worth while. LONDON.
“You have to find

: your own
digs, your own fares, your own
f — everything. If you are a
bachelor, like me, you might just
as well stay in barracks.

A man fined $2.80 for stealing
a bottle of milk could only. pro-
duce $2.79.

The magistrates waited until he
had finally emptied all pockets
and then demanded he bring the
other cent to the court within

“IT have a day off and go to
Brighton or some such place occa-
sionally, but that is all.”

“Chuck” enlisted in 1908, ana Seven days, :
has seen service in Gibraltar, Ber-~ Said the magistrates: “It was a
muda, South Africa, France, Bel- Mean theft.”
gium, Palestine, India and Egypt.

\ ;

ra —I.N.S.

B.G. To Fly Meat
To Trinidad

(From Our Own Correspondent).
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 23

Supplies of meat may soon be
rushed here by, plane from British
Guiana, to ease the present short-
age. This was what members of
the Hotel Association were told
on Monday when they interviewed
Mr. A. A. Douglas, acting Control-
ler of Imports and Exports. The
delegation agreed to pay the in-
creased pricé which they werc¢
warned the meat would cost.

Mr. Douglas had informed the
delegation that in order ,to ease
the situation, the Board would try
to get supplies of meat from Brit-
ish Guiana by plane. He also
warned them that the price would
be higher than at present,

The quantity which the Control
Board will try to get from British
Guiana will be only to ease the
position until the arrival of a
shipment from Australia around
the middle of February.





in the mirror.

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B.G. Means To
Grow Citrus
In Big Way

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan, 21
The Director of Agriculture said
to-day that the Department is tak-
ing care of orders for 20,000 citrus
plants which are being distributed
to local farmers,



The floods of 1949 had played
havoc with earlier attempts at de-
velopment but the Department
was well on the way to establish-
ing q plentiful growth, not only of
citrus, but other fruits like avo-
eado pears, sapodillas, ete., which
have a high market value,

With the new plans for de-
velopment of the industry, the
Department has abandoned the

Food Production Nursery which,
for the past three years has been
supplying the public with vege-
table seedlings.

The Nursery was started to en-
courage people to grow and main-
tain their own vegetable home
gardens and also to give the neces-
Sary advice to owners how to run
their gardens.

Hundreds of people from the
city and country took advantage
of the Nursery service which re-
eeived a $10,000 maintenance
grant from Government,

oe

9 ae -
“Samson” Fined $5

(From, Our Own. Correspondent),

““PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 2!

“Samson” in the person of
Arnold Davis, of Belmont, was on
Monday convicted by Mr. Fabien
J, Camacho in the Courts on a
charge of obstructing the free
passage of the street,

Mr. Camacho ordered Davis to
pay a fine of $5 or 14 days im-
prisonment.

Davis explained that he worked
for a film company and was im-
personating “Samson” of the pie-
ture “Samson and Delilah.”





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pred

PAGE THREE



F.A.O. Talks
Opened
(From Our Own Correspondent).
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 23

The Conference of the Food and
Agricultural Organisation of the
United Nations which opened at
the Caribbean Commission, Kent
House on Monday morning, might
be a historical occasion pdiating
to a very fruitful tine of future
development.

This statement was made by Dr.
H. Belshaw, Director of Rural
Welfare Division of F.A.O. when
he opened the conference in the
presence of g number of delegates
in the Caribbean area, Thirty
four delegates for Metropolitan
countries and Territorial Govern-
ments as well as Dominion Repub-
lic and F.A.O., attended the meet-
ing.

Domestic Science

The possibility of training West
Indian women to be specialist
teachers of domestic science in the
Caribbean area is now being in-
vestigated by ‘he Colonial De-
velopment and Welfare Organisa-
tion

Miss Dora Ibberson, Social Wel-
fare Adviser to Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Organisation
who is attending the F.A.O, con-
ference said that she was discuss-
ing the matter with various
authorities in this region,

Miss Ibbersen added; “It seems
anomalous to me that at this stage
of development, the West Indies
should have to send overseas for
qualified teachers of so basic a
subject as homemaking.”

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B.G. May Send2-Man
Team To Argentina

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan. 23.

British Guiana may send a two-
man team to the Pan American
Games at Buenos Aires—Keevil
Daly champion weight-lifter who
is a world class lifter and Clement
Cummings, the colony’s best mid-
dle-distance runner.

The B.G. Olyrhpics Committee
decided not to send a team to
Buehos Aires, but rather, concen-
trate on getting together a team
for Helsinki in 1952. However,
the A.A.A. have applied to the
Olympics Committee to approve
of Daly and Cummings represent-
ing the Colony, The cost of send-
ing the two has been guaranteed
by prominent sportsmen.



AFRICAN

-




' BOOKER’S

¢

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= AD hime

Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Phyllis Mark, Swedish Training
Ship “Sunbéam", Sch. Marion Belle
Wolfe, Sch. Mary M. Lewis, Sch, Zoileen,
Sch. Emmanuel C, Gordon, Sch. Triumph-
ant Star, Sch. Burma D., M.V. Sedgefield,
Sch. Belqueen, Sch. Enterprise S., Sch.
Molly N. Jones, Sch. Lucille M. Smith,
Yacht Juanita, and Sch, United Pilgrim 5

ARRIVALS

M.V. La Perle, 40 tons nett, Capt, ft
Claude, frem Martinique f

M.V. Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt. Par-
sons, from St. Lucia.

ara



In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

\

Cable and Wireléss (W.T) Ltd. advise }
that they can now communieate with the {
following ships through their Barbados |
Coast Station: '

‘

S.S. Alcoa Polaris, 8.8. Bonaire, 9.8.
Jutahy, %5, Jamaica Producer, s.s. Lady
Rodney, s,s. Larentian Forest, 5.8, Bayano,
ss. Carona, #8. Regina, 9.8. Beechhill,
ss. Amakura, 5.8, Empress of Scotland,
s.8.Willemstad, s@, Silverwainut, . 8%
Enoil, 9.8. Arndale, 8.8. Vesuvio, s,s. City

of Oxford, 5.8, Nieuw Amsterdam, &.5.
Uruguay, ss. Britannic, 8.4, Inyperial
Toronto, s.s. Colombie, s.4, Paula, 5.8,

Lago Azul, s.s. Hersilia,

Rates Of Exchange

January 25, 1951
CANADA
Cheques on

Bankers
Demand

Drafts
Sight Drafts
Cable
Currency
Coupons
Silver

637/10â„¢ pr.

61 7/10%

61.55% pr.
614/10 % pr

pr.

68 1/10
62 2/10°

pr.
pr. 60 2/108 pr.

£9 5/10 % pe

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{OP e OSSD OO eyo Oe LOOPY PLL, .
* %
* THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK &
‘ °
% x
% WITH A VIEW to assisting the Secretaries of Societies, Clubs, x
x - and Associations to make the compilation of information in %
% THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as <
% possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities; $
% religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports, *
% rddio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed %
% below filled in and sent in as soon as possible to: $
: THE EDITOR, § |
g THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951, x ‘
% C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street. = —s
FORM $

Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Ete, o.com & %

FOR URN EEE CREE ANE R EERE E EEE RR ER! BAEHURETE ESSERE EEEEIEEEE RESET TEASERS

President or Chairman...............00008

PO ONE AERA EEO EERE TRAE ERSTE FEET REE ERE EERE ER EEE RESTO OEE AH ERED

LSC SOGSSPO SPP PPP POPS GO POSS

activities :
OC

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Council or Committee Members.........

TROCBUPOR .6.....sccsessesssvessosssesesseses DOCPOLOPY...ssssssccsesesesssssesnssssssuseaees nihabde

Short historical account of the origin, functions and current

4

‘ . . *y
OCCOOTOST VOVSOOOUS OS FOSS SO WISE

GaP

wwaas

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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

wor! Notes On Agriculture





SUGAR WORKERS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 195i









: eneaeeraed The old plant can ‘ D. V. SCOTT TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
+ —— he old plant cane crop, particu- apaw 7 en Ap :
larly in the coastal areas, began. viBy. 5C, C.. SKEETE oe & CO. LTD. at THE COLONNADE
. Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown. to show signs of ripening during (Director of Agriculture) Coconuts 398
: the last fortnight of the month; One hundred and eighty-two i ge gaara acura
good growth and have a green and {he cabbage white buitertly and Cnamental plants of different) (By Our Industrial Correspondent) Usually Now
é 4 the army worm in sweet potatoes. . 5P¢¢ ae s '
3 Friday, January 26, vigorous appearance. There is I dd 425 casuarina . . P
“ os 7 still every evidence of a record Pessant Livesteck. As a result tree were diiribated oe YESTERDAY the Barbados Sugar Feder- Tins BROOKS PEACHES ........-.--- = _
. crop being harvested ef the rains which continued well - ‘ 5 FLAKES 37 34
2 The “supplying” of the newly *t0 December, the supply of 9. — ae of| ation began negotiations with the Barbados Pkgs. QUAKER CORN is.
3 J ee ee ee etanie a cea ome ro ity ok sweet potato fields jhas been ex-} Workers’ Union as to the price to be paid||/ Bottles ALLSOPP’S BEER we 26 a
NJ U erm . = j i gs 2 ‘ .
. C0-OPERATIVES \edeiieanncen: Seta animal feed also was in free sup- tensive in ert ee eek de-| to sugar workers during this year’s crop. Pkgs. CORN FLAKES.......00...-0000000000 29
® —— ~ - . ply. ; ; sats ‘ ;
a number of fields had practically ” reduce yieldg considerably. It The negotiations are taking ce just one
‘ to be replanted. This unsatisfac- Extension Work. The Peasant ) oO oiso bee! 8 pla

THE. presence of the local Senior Peas-
ants Agricultural Instructor at a conference
of Co-operative Officers in Trinidad serves
to wali attention to the unsatisfactory
method adopted in this island for handling
a most important aspect of our economic

life.

There is today no Co-Operative Officer
in this-island and after a series of elabor-
ate preparations the whole Co-operative
scheme appears to have been abandoned.

The act passed by the Legislature under
which co-operative societies were to be
registered has not been proclaimed as was
laid down in the provisions of that act and
to this date not one such society has been

registered,

An ever growing population with im-
proved standards of living demands an
economy.
economy can only come with increased
production and increased production is not
to be gained through obsolete methods, It
is OM agriculture that the economy of this
island. depends and co-operatives seem to
be one of the vital answers to the prob-

improvement in our

lems of the peasantry.

If these facts are admitted then it is im-
perative that something be done not only
to set up the machinery for establishing
co-operatives but to gear it for success.

‘A few years ago Mr. J. M. Cave was
from British Honduras
seconded for duty with the Department of

brought

Science and Agriculture. He

Efigiand and trained specially for the
work, For reasons which have not been
divulged to the general public Mr. Cave
has returned to his post in British Hon-

dtiras, and as no one has been

act, it would appear that the seheme has

been abandoned.

Ina community where prosperity de-
pendson agriculture and where there are
nearly 20,000 peasant holders unable to
purchase the necessary modern machinery
and other equipment to increase the pro-
duction of their holdings it should not be
difficult to convince any one of the impera-
tive necessity for co-operative societies. It
should be even less difficult to convince the
Government that it is its primary duty to
foster the co-operative movement and so
ensure an improved economy for the

people who contribute to it.





“No Beach” Fish

tory germination was largely due
to the heavy rainfall which ob-
tained during the month of No-
vember.

Food Crops. Several fields of
early yams and eddoes weie har-
vested during the moath ard
yields were generally good, The
market supply of ground provis-
ions was satisfactory.

Cotten Inspections. Inspection
for wild cotton was continued in
the parish of St. Michael for the
first part of the month and 60
trees were found in Mayers Land,
Ivy Village, My Lord’s Hill and
Fairfield. These inspertions have
now been discontinued.

The reaping of the cotton crop
was commenced in full and
although the weather conditions
were not very favourable in
November, some good yields are
being obtained. There was a lit-
tle boll shedding at the beginning
of the month. The reaping of the
cotton variety trials was begun
during the month,

ever, continued to be in short
supply and were very expensive,
cabbages and tomatoes being sold
in St. Michael at 40—44c, per Ib.
Sugar Cane. Of the crop soon to
be reaped, both plant and ratoon
canes are in good condition and
give promise of satisfactory yields.
Germination of the young cane
crop has been for the most part
disappointing. A good deal of
supplying will have to be done.
Cotten. The advent of drier
weather towards the end of De-
cember was favourable for the
picking of cotton. Harvesting was
in progress during the month and
some good yields have been re-

Agricultural Instructors visited
510 peasant holdings and 16
school gardens.

An important aspect of the
work of the extension service was
the stall organised by the Depart-
ment at the Agricultural and In-
dustrial Exhibition held on 6th
and 7th, The stall was designed
to demonstrate scientific methods
of producing green v-getables in
the vegetable garden as weil
as under a system of pot and
culture. Considerable interest
was evinced in this section of
the exhibition, and the Peasant
Instructors who supervised the
stall during the two days were
able to teach some valuable les-
sons and pass on useful informa-

tion.

Irrigation. Under the provisions
of the Colonial Development and
Welfare Scheme, work was start-
ed during the’ month on the instal-
lation of a 12’ windmill unit on a
peasant holding-in St. Philip.
Other small holders were given
assistance with galvanized pipe
for the improvement of existing
units.

Crop Husbandry. Following the
initial setbacks caused by heavy
rains, cotton picking was resumed
during the month at The Home,
Sayes Court and Jerusalem. Indi-
cations are that fairly satisfactory
yields will be obtained at all these
stations. At Haggatts, the only
other Station at which cotton was
grown, harvesting had not begun
up to the end of December,

Livestock. The total number of
livestock at the six Stations at the
end of the month was 122. These
included stud animals, cattle,
goats, sheep, pigs and equines.
Four hundred and eighty-five
gallons of milk were produced.
Twenty-one head of stock were
sold, including 17 young pigs for
rearing.

tion can be
reduced by properly timed and
applied sprayings with lead arsen-
ate and that ,this same spraying
will greatly reduce or control in-
festation by scarabee and thrips.

Control of Root Borer.
was made with laboratory experi-
ments, and with thg present les-
sening in the amount of rainfali,
it should be possible to carry out
the remaining field experiments
early in January, 1951. Equip-
ment for further field experiments
has been ordered.

Intreauction of Parasites and
Predators. Three consignments
of Leionota were received from
Trinidad and liberated in cane
fields and one large consignment
of Apanteles was received from
Canada for control of cabbage
worm. One field recovery was
made of Rodolia a _ predator
which controls cottony cushion
sealc. As this predator was in-
troduced several years ago its
occasional overy shows that it
is still maintaining itself.

Control of Wood Ants. Three
inspections were carried out on
Gevernment property and three
on private properties during the
month.

Chemical

Soils. Preliminary investiga-
tion into the effect of addition of
Sulphate of Ammonia to black
coral soils high in free calcium
carbonate was commenced. The
object was to determine whether
there was any loss of nitrogen
from the fertilizer in the form of
volatile ammonia.

Six Codrington and three Dur-
ants soil samples were examined
chemically, the former in conjunc-
tion with fertility
Codrington.

The work on the analysis of
samples of soils taken from areas

ee a month after the Sugar Producers’ Association
were informed on December 23 that’ the
British Ministry of Food would purchase the
1951 West Indian sugar crop at a price of
£32. 17s. 6d., c.if., an increase of 47/6 per
ton on the price paid for the 1950 crop.
Taking into consideration the Christmas
and New Year festivities and the variety of
calculations and discussions that have to take
place before a decision can be made as to
the price to be paid to some 21,000 agricul-
tural labourers and some 5,000 factory work-
ers, the period of a month is no undue period
for the Sugar Federation to decide what pro-
portion of thé increased price for this year’s
sugar crop can be passed on to the worker.

The cable received by the Barbados Sugar
Association on December 23,
merely announced the price that the U.K.
Government was prepared to pay ci-f., for
the 1951 West Indian sugar crop. The next
step was an offer made to the Barbados Sugar
Producers’ Association by the London sugar
brokers who quoted an f.o.b. price offer.

This offer had then to be submitted by the
Sugar Producers’ Association to its Financial
Adviser who had to investigate a whole series
of figures to make sure that the broker’s
offer was correct.

At the same time agreement had to be
problems at| Made on the shipping charges. An important
point to be checked at this stage (and again
a whole series of mathematical calculations

Producers’

ported,
was sent to

groundnuts
month fell short
papaws, guavas,

appointed to | month,

Groundnuts. Owing to the
heavy rains which fell during the jng the month.
growing season,
reaped during the

Tree Crops. Limited supplies of

coconuts were on sale during the

the yield of follows: —bulls
of expectations.

limes

Three hundred and - fifty-eight

similarly sampled approximately : :
20: years og had to be made) is the degree of difference

is now complete.

Sugar Cane.

Russia’s Slaves

Figures of total exchangedble pot-
stud services were paid for dur- assium, total and water soluble
These were as phosphate and organic carbon are
147, bucks © 97, availabie.
rams 39 and boars 75.

Economic Tree Propagation and are being laid out.
Distribution. Forty-five lime and
green. eighty-five orange trees were bud-
ded during the month. Fruit trees
delivered from Codrington were trial.

Pests and Diseases. The princi- as follows:—
pal pests claiming the attention of
the Peasant Agricultural Exten-
sion staff during December were

for the 3 x 3 x 3 factorial potash
trial have been selected, and four
sites for the 4 x 3 x 2
Owing to the size of the
trial oon. one of the treat-

Orange 8, Grapefrui: 23, Lime ments has en omitted at two]; .
12, Lemon, 7, Sugar Apple 2, Pom- centres in order to permit the increased during the year,
ela 6, Breadfruit 7, Guava 18, trial to fit into the area available.

Manurial trials
Three sites

N.P.K.

between the net price increase to be received
by the factory and the increase if any over
previous years.

A most important calculation which in-
volves detailed scrutiny of thousands of
figures is that which decides how much costs
of supplies, equipment and machinery have

It is only after all these intricate calcula-
tions have been made that it is possible for
the Sugar Federation to decide what pro-
portion of the increased price per ton of

WASHINGTON.

In Paris last week, after a six
weeks’ trial which focussed the
attention of all France and mos:
of Europe, the Soviet government
was convicted of practising mass
slavery on a scale without prece-
dent in history.

This is the meaning of the ver-_

cict which a French Court unter
presiding Judge Colomies render-
ed in favour of the plaintiff, David
Rousset, in his suit for libel
against the communist magazine
“Lettres Francaises” and its edi-
tors, Claude Morgan and Pierre
Daix.

David Rousset learned about

20th century slavery the hard

By JAMES BURNHAM

A Paris Court on Jan. 12 ruled against
# French Communist Weekly and its
editors for libeling David Rousret, French
writer who has charged Russia with
maintaining huge slave labour camps

In the following articlés written ex-
clusively for International News Service,
dames Burnham, American Professor and
Author, analyzes the results.of .the
farmmotrs Parts trigti«) ~*~ oF -

Long a student of’ -raditdl " politics,
Burnham is the author of “THE STRUG-
GLE FOR THE WORLD,” which created
a stir when published in 1947.

tres Francaises” answered Rous-
set’s appeal by calling him a liar,
renegade, fascist, pervert — in
short, the usual list that commu-
nists apply to determined oppo-

- other. e@

communists over to the Gestapo,} sugar paid by the Ministry of Food for the

which put her for the rest of the

war inig.the Nasi camp at Ree Barbados sugar crop can be passed on to the
Barbados sugar workers.

The fact that the British West Indian Sugar
Producers in their bargaining with the United
Kingdom asked for a price which would allow
for a ten per cent increase to sugar workers
does not mean that the mere announcement
of the price to be paid for the West Indian
sugar crop allows the Barbados Sugar Feder-
ation to announce a 10% increase in wages to
the sugar workers. Every figure has to. be

vensbrueck.

Captain Joseph Czapski told of
his stay at the Soviet camp oi
Starobielsk, and how he was
transferred a few days before his
fellow officers there and in two
s — fifteen thousand
in all‘ ‘were massacred by the
NKVD in the Katyn Forest. It was
Czapski who had later en, as aide
to the Polish General Anders.
visited hundreds of Soviet slave
comps in vain search for the
missing fifteen thousand.

Valentino Gonzales, the Repub-

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THE general public are justified in their | way. During the war, the Gestapo ents. Rousset brought suit for ae thal Weeue "ai Cammpornot checked first. As soon as the figures are
j i i ; kept him for four years behind libel against the magazine and its . : . availabl egotiati i
complaints against the action of fishermen | ‘spt Ulm ified barbed wire of editors It is this suit which has (the peasant), told how, after] ® e negoti hones begin between the BLUE, TAN, MUSTARD AND GREY
who’ refuse to sell fish to anyone on the | its most barbarous concentration just ended with the complete a Republican eee. Be eee Barbados Workers’ Union and the Sugar
hes unle: R camp — Buchenwald. After the vindication of Rousset. re) Sa cee © | Federation of Bar i
beache: ss they are hawkers SAD eutet rote two books — ‘The communists assembled ‘a land among the supposed com- Barbados which represents the ALSO
about the “Concentrationary Uni- battery of their most brilliant des, who throughout the Civil] employers and factory owners. These nego-

The schedule published by the Control
Authority lays it down that fish sold on
the beach must be sold at a cheaper price

than that sold elsewhere.

Fishermen have now adopted the atti-
tude whereby they sell on the beach only
to their womenfolk who then retail the fish

on the street.

It is annoying to housewives who either
send their servants or go themselves to the
beach in order to secure fish at an early
hour to find that after hours of waiting the

fish are not available to them.

In the past the complaint was that the
‘fish were hidden when people went to the
beaches and were taken away in trays and
later sold at blackmarket prices. In some
instances housewives contributed to this
by paying the scheduled price and then giv-
ing the seller a “tip” for bringing therm the

Peasant Agriculture
ood Crops. Suppties of early
yams, sweet potatoes and guinea
corn were available during the
month. (.reen vegetables, how-

verse.” These becaice rapidly
known throughout Europe, _ es-
pecially by the hundreds of thou-
sands of others who had also
served their time in the Nazi slave
gangs.

For a while, the communists
were quite friendly to Rousset
end his books. They hadn't caught
cn to the fact that Rousset object-
ed to Moscow-made slavery just
as much as to the Berlin brand.

Then, in November, 1949, Rous-
set addressed a public appéal to
the ex-inmates of Nazi concen.
tration camps. Rousset declared
that those who had suffered under
the Gestapo had the duty of un-
covering the truth, all of the truth,
about all concentration and slave-
labour camps, wherever located
and by whoever run,

The appeal noted the charge
that there are slave camips within
tne Soviet Union, and that Soviet
law permits a man to be sent to
a camp without any judicial pro-
cess. It called for an International
Commission of Enquiry to ex-
amine these charges, and to ¢s-
tablish their truth or falsity.

lawyers. Just as in the commu-
nist trials that have became fa-
miliar in this country, every
legalistic trick was used to con-
fuse and block the court proceed-
ing. The communists were deter-
mined to stop at nothing in order
to prevent the truth from becom-
ing known.

But Rousset and his attorneys
triumphed over the legal tricks,
and drove home the evidence,
point by point. They procured for
the court those articles of the
Soviet code which permit an
M.V.D. official to send a man to
slave camp without any hearing
or a court action. They proved
the existence and character of the
camps by documents, maps, orders
and administrative regulations.

Then, before the astonished
court, there appeared a remark-
able series of witnesses —- witness-
es to tell from their own terrible
experience the truth about the
Slave camps of Stalin.

Margarete Buber, wife of the
former chief of the German Com.
munist Party, told how in 1937
the NKVD (now the MVD) had

War, had called him. friend and
ally and hero. He teld also what
had happened to him in the father-
land — told of the prison cells
the closed and icy freight cars
the slave-work in the death
camps.

Small and gentle Jerczy Gliks-
man explained how he had been
thrown into prison in 1940, in
Soviet-occupied Eastern Poland,
gud then sent to fell great trees
in the twelve-foot open snow far
in the monstrous Soviet north.

Eleanor Lipper gave, in her
soft and shy voice,, the story of
her years in Kolyma — dread
Kolyma, the MVD empire in
vorth-eastern Siberia where gold
is mined at seventy degrees be-
low zero, where no one is ex-
cused from work unless he has
more than 103 degrees of fever,
and where the annual mortality
of the slave-labourers ranges from
thirty to fifty per cent.

Confronted with the absolute
sincerity of such witnesses to the
truth, the ‘communist defense
could only shout and obstruct

tiations opened yestérday.

It has been suggested that Barbados has
lagged behind Trinidad in announcing the
prices to be paid to sugar workers. The com-
parison is not apt: because in Trinidad sugar
producers ship their own sugar direct through
their own agents, whereas in Barbados the
sugar is sold to local merchants at factory
tests and weights and the merchants then
resell to the broker, any loss in test and
weight being borne by the merchant.

The time taken to reach final decisions as to
workers’ wages in Barbados must therefore
be longer than in Trinidad.

Since it has now been made clear that in
all negotiations with the Ministry of Food as
to the price to be paid for West Indian sugar,
wage increases to workers are always taken
into consideration by the British West Indies

IMITATION CAMEL’S

HAIR

Suitable for - - - -

TRAVELLING COATS.



DACOSTA & CO,, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPT.



via

fish. Nowadays even with the advanced
price under the new schedule it is difficult
for them to purchase fish and the phrase
“ex-beach” in the control list is an insult

: ; This week, with the trial conclud. | Sugar Association, there ought to be no dela
The answer of the ccmmunists first shipped her to the desolace 64 the International Commission 8 o delay

was the same that they gave to concentration camp at Karagan- ¢{ Enauiry continues formal hear-= in the settlement of this year’s wage increases
every attempt oa ce Ge. tn Tate, * a cue aoe ings in Belgium, Slavery, as al- | to be paid to agricultural workers and an
truth: A storm of abuse, lies, slan- to Hitler under the Stalin-Hitler ways, defends itself with lies, | early Nate

cer, vilification. Pact, the NKVD had turned her white truth sides with freedom. rly announcement can be expected soon

For Your



od

to the housewife.

‘The communist magazine “Let-

and a hundred other German ex-



Our Readers Say:

Farewell Sermon

To the Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—I should like to make a
few comments on Bishop Hughes’
farewell sermon.
»-I am surprised at his scathing
criticism in public of the clergy,
which, if justifiable, would have
been more effective if administer-
ed to each individual in private.

ass public condemnation can
only diminish the respect due to
their calling from their congrega-
tions,

Bishop Hughes deplored the
lack of interest and leadership
among the leaders of the Church
~—both Clergy and Laity. Who
dre these leaders? Of the clergy,
surely the Bishop himself. Of
the —the members of the

lature, some of whom are
even Church members?

The Bishop complains that in
. political matters the
a h is half asleep, and lays the
) for this squarely on the
x an Church Act. Now as
this Act does not affect the Laity,
Who” @ré mostly ignorant of its
contents, we may logically assume
that..the Bishop when referring
te the Church was referring speci-
fleatly to the Clergy
Bishep implies that the

Charch is doing nothing towards

the improvement of education ih
this Island. Surely the Church
to-day is allowed little say in
these matters, except through the
mouth of the Bishop, who is on
the Governing Bodies of the
schools. What has he done? In
any case, the function of the
Church in this matter is to ensure
that the educational system is
based on broad Christian princi-
ples, leaving details of organisa-
tion and teaching to the trained
experts to whom we pay large
salaries. “ :

Again, the Bishop asks, what is
the Church doing about the social
and political stirring of the people.
Thank God, the Church in Barba-
dos has no political power. The
only Church dignitary who has
ever been entrusted with a voice

in politics is Bishop Hughes him- tl

self. What has he done with it?

The truth seems te pe that the
Bishop had many social aad
political schemes which may bave
been very admirable, but instead
of infusing religion into politics
he has sought to introduce politics
into religion, This was not the
way that Christ dealt with the
political problems of His day. liv-
ing as He did under a totalitarian
tvranny. He taught that the
Kingdom of God must be within
the individual, and must spread

like leaven through the mass—not
imposed arbitrarily from
above.

However, the Bishop convicts us
all—both Clergy and Laity—of
selfishness and lack of true Chris-
tianity, and in spite of the harsh-
ness of his words we would do
well to profit by them, It is in-
teresting’ im’ this connection to
quote from the words of the late
William Temple, the great social-
ist Archbishop, on the difference
in emphasis between the work of
the Clergy and that of the Laity,
the orders who together form the
Church, He writes; —''The Priest's
work is religion ..... he stands
for the things of God before the
Laity—religion is his daily work
. . « » The Laity stand for the
things of God before the world
« . .% . they seek the help that
a. religious specialist can give
hem. . The layman finds
in religion the strength for doi
in a Chfistian spirit work whi
unbelievers also do.”

In conclusion, may I add a fur-
ther quotation from Archbishop
Temple for the benefit of Bishop
Hughes, and also for his detrac-
tors? “We so easily assume that
what seems to us good must be
the will of God. We make our
plans for the work of God, ard
ask Him to prosper them. But
they may be seriously infected
with our prejudice, ignorance and.

—LNS.

and may already have been made.

nesses

short-sightedness. We can neyer
see in advance that the way to
final success lies through immedi-
ate failure; yet God may know
that this is so.”

A LAY MEMBER OF THE CHURCH.

Disendowment

The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—It is unfortunate that the
Hon, Mr. Cuke's letter should be
published after the Bishop has
left the island, thus giving him no
opportunity of replying.

After all His Lordship’s serm,
was delivered eleven dame Si =

FAIRPLAY.
BL. Cricket Tour

To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—In’ “The Cricketer”,
Oe eas 1950-51, it is
8 that after meetings of R
Board of Control and the Regist
County Cricket Committee t
Lord’s on November 15, the follow..
ing money grants were made.

I quote:—"“As a result of the
Test matches against West Indies
the “counties on whose grounds
matches were played will each
receive” “£4,442, the other first
class counties. £1,493, each, minor
county” “£257 and the two unhi-+
versities £1,493 between them.”

We here are ail pleased to heat Barbados hotels.. Americans love 25th’ January, 1951,

that such financial success as that
achieved by our West Indies team
has enabled this generous distr-
bution of moneys for the upkeep
of the game in England but we
would be very interested to learn
how much of the funds we
brought home has been allotted
to us for the amelioration of the
good old game in Barbados.
Yours truly.
CE

Americans And Barbailos

The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—I cannot get out of my
mind how our old beloved island
is passing up their r
A bunch of good fellows named
me in Barbados “Speed boat
Doorly” and they so write me.

“Planes have made the West
Indies the year round playgrounds
of the world”. That is the slogan
I am selling. I remember Ber-
muda in the late 1800's people
here used to say “Bermuda is too
hot in the summer, too cold in
the winter.” To-day ii is the
largest all year round island resort
in the world.

You can get Barbados to wake
up and build some modern hotels
on their beaches or near, as
Jamaica, St. Thomas, Grenada and
others are doing. I hate to say
what a lot of Americans call

Barbados, they spend money, they
love Steamship travel when they
have time. They are fed up with
their own high priced artificial
resorts, they are lovers of travel,
they are worth going after.

I say, now is the time to look
ahead for Barbados in a big way.
Ex-President Hoover was quoted
some years ago as saying “We
bought some poor-houses” re St.
Thomas and St. Croix. Is he right

to-day? _
GEORGE DOORLY.
209 Newark Avenue, '
Bloomfield, N.J.,
U.S.A.

January 19, 1951.
The “Refuge ss

The Editor, The Advocate,
I have a little refuge,
It's only ten by eight
But when I'm tired on evenings,
I make for it quite straight.

It's been a shelter for me
In days of sun and rain;
And even when floods threaten-

I've fled to it again,

But now I’m sorely worried

Pah scadts es
“Advocate”

ye pi COLLECTORS COM-

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FRIDAY,

50 Acres Of
Canes Burnt

HE LARGEST cane fire so far
4 this year Broke out at Small
Ridge Plantation, St,
Wednesday night and destroyed
163 acres of second crop ripe
canes. lney are the property of
G. S. Evelyn and were insured.
A NOTHER large cane fire on
’ Wednesday night at Fairy
Valley Plantation, Christ Church,
destroyed 94 acres of first crop
wipe. canes belonging to E, L.
Ward of the same plantation.

This fire extended to Tyme
Bottcm and burnt 10% acres of
ast, second and third crop ripe

anes belonging to ten peasants.
A THIRD FIRE broke out at

Yorkshire Plantation, Christ
Church and burnt 11 acres of first
crop ripe canes and one and a-half
acres of second crop ripe canes.
They are the property of -A; M.
Arthur of the same plantation,
Ss" STEPHEN'S CHURCH will

be nolding its Harvest on
Sunday, January 23. In addition
to the Matins and Low Mass at
7 80-a.m, there will be pracession
and Salemn Mass at 9 a.m,

In the afterncon a_ Sacred
Centata will be sung by the choir
and the programme will end witb
Solemn Evensong procession and
‘Te Deum at 7-p.m,.

TEVES broke and entered an

unoccupied house at Queen
Street, St. Michael and stole a
quantity of galvanise and lumber
valued at $49.12. The ‘incident
was reported by Charles Barton of
the same address,
NEVENTY-YEAR-OLD Bertha
ad Sobers of St. Matthias Gap,
Christ Church, died suddenly at
her home early yesterday morning.
Her body was removed to the
Public Mortuary where an autopsy
was performed.
Â¥T AWN TENNIS is played four

times a week ut the Princéss
Alice Playing field. So far this is
the only sport that is organised.
Only one tennis court is in use,
but the other two are expected to
be completed shortly.

A large part of the breakwater
around the field has been buili
and some cf the old one repaired
The evergreen trees are not yet
planted,



Lady Savage Visits.
Ch. Ch. BabyLeague

Lady Savage visited the Christ
Church Baby League yesterday
and wrote in the Visitors Book
that the League is doing excellent
‘work,

Lady Savage was accompanied
by Miss Betty Arne, Social Wel-
fare Officer. She talked to some
of the mothers who were at the
League and asked many questions
about its working,

She was shown around by
Madam Ifill, President, Mrs. Fred
Goddard and Mrs. E. Sampson,
Vice President:



“RODNEY” DUE
MONDAY.

The Lady Rodney, which was
scheduled to arrive at. Barbados
on Sunday, will now be calling
on Monday, Messrs Gardiner Aus—
tin & Co, Ltd., - informed the
Advocate yesterday,

She is coming from Canada via
the British Northern Islands and
will be leaving Barbados the
same night for British Guiana
via St. Vineent, Grenada and
Trinidad. Passengers are asked
to keep in touch with her agerts.

CINEMA SHOWS ON
SCOKER LINE SHIPS

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan, 21
Passengers travelling between
Georgetown and Liverpool in the
Bocker Line Vessels Amakura and
Arakaka now have the benefit of
cinema shows during the yoyage.
These vessels have had sound
projectors installed, and full-
length feature films will be put
en board each voyage for the
entertainment of passengers.



m,

Firemen, Bandsmen Will
Welcome Club Willow

JUDGING from its castle-like appearance, “Club Wil-
low” which the Government plans to buy to accommodate
the Police Band and the Fire Brigade will perhaps be more
suitable for that purpose than for the club and dancing

house which it has been for

Containing about 20 rooms, it
is a building in which a new resi-
dent would really have to learn
his way about — a rambling house
literally, It is said that the family
who lived in it originally was a
family of just two people.
Willoy stands on two
of land.



acres



After the original owners sold |

the property, it was used as a
rather exclusive club, Clubs in
Barbados are notoriously short-
lived, and it was not Jong before
“Club Willow” became just an-
other of the local temples dedi-
cated to the god of daencing.;
Dances were held there up to last
Christmas,

In a short time from now, if
the Legislative Council concurs in
the Resolution to grant Govern-
ment the funds to purchase the
property,

Thomas on}

‘| bers who. remain

ceases. a Savings Department has

Philip 3.

“Club}



| cramped

its walls will echo with opportunity

JANUARY 26, 1951

i
ie

THE PICTURE SHOWS THE TOYS laid out at yesterday's Auction Sale for bidders to get a good

fhesicis and value them.



137 FRIENDLY
SOCIETIES

One hundred and thirty seven
Friendly Societies in the island
provide certain benefits that at-
tract a membership of well over
half the population.

The majority of the people are
drawn from the poor working
classes. These for the most part
join to ensure that at Christmas
time they will be in rece'pt of a
bonus—a portion of the money
they contribute during the year.

Another important reason is
that in the event of their death
or any of their dependents’,
there would be some money to
help tide over expenses. This
applies as well to cases in which
a member may become ill,

Until recently these were pro-
bably the most important in-
ducements.-In recent times, how-/
ever, the most modern of the so- |
cieties have increased the bene-
fits to such an extent, that thou
sands of the poor and middle



BARBADOS sciatica OTE EAS

Sh ke AA | SALE



One Can

Battleships, Oatflakes
And Bath Sponges

AT AN AUCTION SALE

AUCTION SALES are
of Barbados in which only

However, those who do, know their business.



Flying Fish
Catches Have
Been Small

During this month there have

classes alike join year after year.| been very small catches of flying

Probably one of the most at-
tractive of the benefits is the
provision of scholarships at sec-
ondary schools. Th@se are com-
peted for yearly by the sons and
daughters of the members. Not
only are the fees and books pro-
vided, but in some cases help is
given in the supply of lunch,

Then there is the benefit of 2
long-term bonus paid to mem-
in the» society
for twenty years or more.

Some Societies even have an
Accident Fund where a few cents
paid by a member besides his
weekly contribution, make some
provision for him in case he be-
comes the victim of an accident

Loans are made to members at
some of the societies, it is under-
stood, and at least in one or two

been established for the use of
members. The latest addition at
one of these societies is the set
up of a store where members are
allowed to take advantage of the
hire-purchase. system operating
without any extra charges on the

articles. ion
Some of the societies have
branches in the country districts

and the numbers of these socie-
ties are considerable,

The grades rise
cents weekly to four

St. Michael with 54
has by far the largest
St. Peter comes next with 18.
The remaining order follows:
St. Lucy 12, St. John 10, St.
James 9, St. Andrew 8, Christ
Church and St, George 7 each,
St. Joseph 5, St. Thomas 4, St.

from eight
shillings.

societies
number.

the last few years.

There are two outbuildings
which once served as stables, and
the land on which the property
stands is full of grass weeds and
vines. Thereabouts a tennis court
once graced the property.

A tennis court will no doubt
grace it again, for as soon as the
Band and the Firemen move in
there will be provision for games
and other forms of relaxation, As
Colonel Michelin, Commissione:
of Police, told the Advocate yes-
terday, the purchase of the place
would be of great benefit to these
two branches of the Police Force,
both of whom now occupy
quarters.

An Ideal Spot

A Fireman spends most of his
time in barracks waiting for
something to happen, Spending
it in a cramped space with no
for a really good

music again — the music of the} game except one of cards or table
Police Band going through their | tennis can be boring, Then, when

daily practice,

The revving up the alarm of fire is raised and the

of the Fire Br igade’s engine and|engine swings out from its pres-
the clanging of its bells will also|ent quarters, it swings into roads
be heard as the firemen get off toj that are always busy with traffic,

fight a fire somewhere in Barba-
dos,

Needs Repairs

At this moment the rooms are
deserted and gloomy and badly in
need of the renovation which, if
the Government buys the place,
will be done by the Public Works
Department. One of the remind-
ers of the family occupants is an
iron safe let into the wall of one
of the rooms, A reminder of the
dancing house days is the bar. In
it is a blue price board on which
is printed in white letters the
price of rum, beer, pork chops
and the rest of them.

Some of the walls are built of
rubble stone and are still in good
condition, but there are rooms
where laths and plaster were used
and these walls are crumbling

at least during the day,

But if “Club Willow” is used as
quarters, Col. Michelin said, the
engine will swing out from the
back entrance which is on King
Street, and unimpeded by heavy
traffic, can get off to a really fast
start.

Where the Band is concerned,
they now have to practise in a
small room where Capt. Raison
cannot hear the sound of each in-
strument well,

finish their practising by 10.00
a.m. or else they will disturb the

| Courts.

There will be plenty of room for |
practice at “Club Willow”, and as
\time goes on, Colonel Michelin
thinks it will be possible for them

to put on concerts there. The|
Band will then be really “at
home” to the public,

















fish, Up to Monday only 1,275
pounds of flying fish have passed
through the Public Market. At
the other fishing centres the re-'
turns are also small.

In the month of December
20,674 pounds of flying fish came
into the market and many more
thousands of pounds at other cen-
tres. This is a brilliant catch for
that month considering that in De-
cember 1949 only 1,983 pounds
were recorded.

It would appear as though the
December catches are good every
other year. In December 1946 the
catch was good. Over 14,000
pounds passed through the market.
December 1947 saw a little over
2,000 while the next December was
over 10,000,

“Unless we have currents com-
ing towards us we cannot find fly-
ing fish. That was the position a
week or two ago when very little
fish were being caught,” Mr. D. W.
Wiles, Fisheries Officer, told the
Advocate yesterday.

He said that at present the cur-
rents would appear to be coming
towards the island as some flying
fish have been seen within the last
two days. It has however been
extremely difficult to catch many
due to high winds that prevailed.

Hindered by Wind |

“We have had a_ persistently
calm period for ten days from
January 3 to January 13”, he said,
“and what wind was blowing
came from the north west while
the position of the flying fish dur-
ing that period was in the south
and south western area of the
island. This meant that the fish-
ing boats could go for the fish but
could not return within reasonable
hours, coupled with tremendous
difficulties.”

He said that after this period of
calm the wind has been persistent-
ly high and is again hampering
fishing boats from bringing in
large catches. He however thinks
that the catches in December were
brilliant

“When you get a good Decem-
ber followed by a poor January
you are not badly off. May is
usually the best month for flying





month, It was extremely old and
the centre bone very large. It was
the largest grouper on record since
the fish market has been func-
tioning. A 100 pound porpoise was
also caught.

The total amount of fish record-
ed in the market in December is
29,543 pounds. Of this 20,674
pounds were flying fish, 1,438
pounds dolphin, 837 pounds king
tish, 1,999 pounds bili fish, 2,157
shark, 2,024 pounds albacore, 56

| pounds of bonito, 63 pounds bar-

And they have to}

‘

racudas, a grouper and a porpoise.
The total for January up to the
22nd is: 1,275 pounds of flying fish,
1,208 pounds dolphin, 632 pounds
king fish, 289 pounds bill fish,
1,849 pounds shark, 1,428 pounds
aibacore, and 40 pounds of tabois.
During this period large quanti-
ties of lion shark were caught.

Bookers Will Train
B.G. Boys As Sugar
Technologists

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan. 21

Bookers Sugar Estates Limited
propose to offer a limited number
ef scholarships to enable boys
educated in British Guiana to
qualify as Sugar Technologists at
the Imperial College of Tropical
Agricuiture in Trinidad’ with a
view to their employment on the
staff of the sugar estates adminis-
tered by the Company.

The minimum qualifications re-
quired of candidates are the
| School Certificate (or equivalent)
with credits in physics, chemistry
and mathematics, or in general
science and mathematics

Candidates will be selected by a
panel appointed by the, Directors

f the Corpany.



ee

fish catches,
A grouper weighing 195 pounds 2M a "ers
was brought into the market last| have been instructed to visit and



Buy Toy

a part of the community life
a small percentage take part.

Yesterday the Advocate visited
the Auction Mart of Mr. Vincent
Griffith at Shepherd Street, where
a sale was in progress, There
were only a dozen people present
but several dozens of racing cars,
toy battleships, fire engines and
stuffed animals changed hands
and only a nod of the head meant
that a bidder was willing to pay
a sixpence or a dollar more than
the figure offered

The variety is amazing. From
selling a dozen iron pots and at
the same time extolling their
virtue, the auctioneer suddenly
switched to two dozen boxes of
jig-saw puzzles and was equally
fluent.

Jig Saw Puzzles

It was a far cry from jig-saw
puzzles to bath sponges but four
dozen of them went next.

A few dozen bicycle rims came
“out of the box” next and without
a breather the auctioneer sold a
dozen boxes of oatflakes.

One could not be too surprised
now at the appearance of some
cases of Lighthouse matches but
they were scarcely prepared for
a series of Christmas decorations
to be put up next.

Tins of potato chips and jam,
excellently foiled by a set of books
on mechanics were all snapped
up,

Yes, it is interesting to see that
almost all the articles, regardless
of their variety have ‘their back-
ers and those willing to bid them
up to the limit after a series of |
lightning calculations, and aban-
don them just as suddenly if the
calculations prove the figure un-
economic,





B.G. Health Officers
Check For ’Flu

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Jan, 21

In view of the influenza epi-
demic now raging in Britain the
Public Health Department at
Georgetown has taken special
precautions to prevent any spread
to the Colony.

All incoming passengers by air
or sea are subject to scrutiny and
if any of them report being ill,
they are given a leaflet which out-
lines the measures to be taken to
prevent the spread of the disease.
They are also advised to go to bed
and call = doctor.

All csyict Sanitary Officers
ascertain the state of attendance
at schools in their districts, and
if this is found to be below aver-
age, to investigate further, If
influenza is the cause of absentec-
ism, they are instructed to report
immediately their findings to their
Health Officer and advise the
parents of the affected children to
put them to bed immediately and
call the doctor.

All School Nurses, Health Visit-
ors and district subsidized League
Midwives have received similar
instructions and all registered
medical practitioners have already
been alerted,



OOO

Sweet
Biscuits

YOUR OWN

DELIGHTS
JUST ARRIVED

JACOB'S CARNIVAL ASST.
” AFTE RNOON

s,
-
°G0O606066666660606060666606

LLCS SCD OHO









Has Heard The Beat
Of The African Drum

IN THE ALMOST BARE front room of his home up}
Sayes Court, Christ Church, 75-year-old Charles FE. Daisley,
a round loud man who has fought in Africa and has heard |
the African drums, told the Advocate yesterday of the |
days when he used to buy four eggs for a cent in Africa |

and three six-by-four-by-one-inch thick biscuits for a cent |

in Barbados.

Seventy-five and
enough for

looking hale |
manys more years,
Daisley first left Barbados in 1893

soldier of the West India/



outside world.

He came from the hills of St.
Thomas and went to school at|
Sharon’s mixed school. In those
days there was not any age limit
and Daisley remembers a young
man and woman who were at
school in his day and who married
shortly after they left.

The fact that Daisley helped
teach at Sharcn makes him more
indignant when as he says, his
present neighbours do not believe
he can read and write. Daisley |
calls himself Charles E, Daisley |
whenever he is referring to him-}
self. Before he first left Barbados
about 1898, a labourer used to
— for 20 cents a day and what |
used to support him, his wife and
and Mr. lehildven, Pp

a man killed a pig, he gave a pound
jue each of his nearest neighbours
and salted the remainder to put
, by. Then too, milk used to be
| given away. People walked from
, the country to town in those days
and if could drive to a

Inspectors
Reappointed

Six cane weighing Inspectors
who were appointed in 1945 to
Supervise the weighing of sugar

canes at factories throughout the!
island, have again been appointed!
this year. They will be supervis
ing at 35 factories and will work
under the Labour Department a |





the first six months of the year
These men are Mr. F. A. Good-
ridge, Mr. R. Nelson; Mr. R. A | .
Vaughan, Mr, C. Vere Walker
Mr. J. McD. Heath,
M. A. Wilkinson,
Their chief function is to make
Sure that cane weighers
always weighing and
the weights accurately.
Cane weighing Inspectors have
no ro — time for starting to
work, but their business can vary oy C
trcm early in the morning. saiy ee 0 Caner On.
around seven o'clock until late io ones &
the evening. Each man has to
use his discretion as to the time} , After four years service in
he goes to his work, Africa, Daisley went to Bermuda
This is the seventh season that) for 11 months, still as a soldier,
these men have been engaged in then stayed three years in Jamaic a
this type of work. They know jand finally returned to Africa.
their job and their presence does | His has been a real soldier's life,
From fierce battles
through woodlands where they
saw lions and then back to the
joy of the barracks,
The rank to which Daisley
climbed was Warrant Officer. But
through it al' he carried a charmed

But in those days when |
|

are
recording





a man

Saw Ostrich Eggs

he was
man of means,

a lot in maintaining the confidence| he Said,
ef peasants and sugar workers,

Inspectors Interchanged

In_ addition to the allotted
number of factories a cane weigh-.
ing Inspector has to visit, there life. He was never wounded, nor
is a regular weekly interchange was he ever attacked by animals
cf inspectors when each man gocs or snakes although he saw many of
to a district other than his own
so that each cane weigher in the
island sees each of the six inspec-}
tors yY

Cane weighing Inspectors have
to be alert for anything which
might affect the accuracy of the
scale beam or the weighing of
the canes.

Although it is not their job to
see that the machine itself 18
correct, yet, if they have reason
to believe that any particular
machine is not weighing correct-
ly, it is their duty to report the
matter to the Labour Commission-
er who weuld immediately bring
it to the attention of the proper
authorities.

The chief method of checking
is the recalling of loads of cane
that had been weighed in their
absence and re-weighing them.

Jas a
Cane Weighing| Regiment He was young then and })i
| filled with a desire to see the

them. He has seen ostrich eggs,
but was afraid to eat them be-
cause they were “so big.”

It was in the army band that
he learned the theory of music,
the subject on which he would
talk to you non-stop for days. If
you want to hear about the four
years he worked on the Lagos
Government Railways in Nigeria,
you would have to lead him away
trom his musical topic,

Hags Live In Papaw

Ask him about African witch
doctors and Daisley will tell you
he never got in touch with any of
them, but he knew of hags. If you
allowed a squint to escape you
when Daisley begins his hag-dis-
cussion, he will tell you he is an
old enough man to know he should
not tell nancy stories, and will
assure you that hags are people
who can live in a papaw.

Daisley never saw the Egyptian
pyramids and such famous places,
but he wil] still tell you about
them as he heard it from soldiers
who slept beside him. He is proud
of having slept, near men who
actually saw such places.

Daisley’s view is that to really
become skilled in musie, one
should not marry and he would
tell you of a young man he used
fo teach who got married and
took a down turn. When you hear
jhim thlking so, you would neces-



Demerara Electric
Company Workers
Get 10% Increase

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Jan, 21
The Demerara Electric Company
Limited, and the Man-Power Citi-
zens’ Association announced yes- |

,. sarily hum and say, so you are
terday the signing of a new agree 75 ang never married. Then he
meee giving whe. oa tk: ta ; would come out with the flooring
employees" an additions. | news that he was married twice
cent. cost of living bonus retro- 1Both. of Daisley's wives may be
spective to September, 1950. 24 living. He married the second
agreement followed months

|| time after he had not seen or
iheard of the first wife after 22
years.

And after many years in Africa
Daisley returned to Barbados t«

long-drawn-out negotiations Wihich
at several stages were on the!
verge of a complete break-down,

The cost-of-living bonus agreed



T

upon brings the total to 20 per
cent, bonus, with a sliding scale
arrangement by which should the
Cost of Living Index show any
increase or decrease the bonus
would be adjusted accordingly.

It is estimated that the new
concessions will mean an addi-
tional $15,000 to $20,000 per an-
rum for wages, while the mini-
n.um wage, including bonus, now
rises to $2.20 per day.

TRADE FAIR OPENED

(From Our Own Correspondent)

POR'T-OF-SPAIN.
The Governor, Sir Hubert
Rance, formally declared open the
first “Trade fair” in Trinidad of
British goods and British caravans
on Monday,

Sir Hubert, who was accom-
panied by his A.D.C,. was met on
his arrival by Mr A, S. Jenkinson,
British caravan salesman, and
Major Carruthers, who in conjunec-
tion with the West Indies Buyers’
are responsible for the exhibition,



Lord Selsdon, a Director of
Raven Caravans Ltd., said that
the exhibition was an experiment
to bring more British. goods and
larger exhibitions in the future.

PSP LLLP,

work with the Waterworks De-
partment as a sub store-keeper
He likes life in Africa better than
he likes it in Barbados Ten
years ago he resigned and moves
from the city into the country tc
lead a quiet life,



NEW CATHOLIC
CHURCH BLESSED

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPALN,
Catholics from various parts ot
the island turned out in thousands
to witness the ceremonial blessing
of the new $200,000 San Fernando
Catholic Church by His Grare the
Archbishop of Port-of-Spain, the

Most Rey. Dr. Finbar Ryan on
Sunday. The ceremony which
drew one of the largest crowds
ever seen on Harris Promenade,
was attended by legislators, Bor-
ough Councillors, high ranking
Government officials, and people

of a!! walks of life.

Dedicated to Our Lady of Per-
petual Help, the new church which
is one of the beautiful buildings
in the town, replaces the structure
which was demolished in
after serving for a little over
years,

Students of St. Joseph’s Con-
vent High School and of Presenta-
tion College turned out in their
uniforms.

100

1948,)



” ASST. CREAMS .. ” AT
” APRICOT & CREAM RINGS ” Al
” SWEET ASST. bode cheat

” MARIE

CREAM CRACKERS ...

TEA.

STANSFELD scorr & Co., Ltd.

CRAWFORD’S PUFF CREAMS .
” KENT CREAMS





Heartbreaker 51 Gauge,

15 denier. Pair $2.58
Camay 54 Gauge,
15 denier, Pair $2.75







PAGE FIVE

See ee em

forms suony or
FRESH SUPPLY OF

" SPURINA HEN CHOW § “

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

at JASON JONES & CO., LTD.--Distributors .
SREB CED ReUe eee
















| TO-DAY’S
SPECIALS!

vei ee



2 PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN
wa KNIGHTS LTD.

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED
A SHIPMENT OF

AGRICULTURAL
FORKS

GOOD QUALITY — FULLY STRAPPED.
$4.70

The quantity for disposal is small

ONLY EACH.

and. future supplies are uncertain.



SEND US YOUR ORDERS
WITHOUT DELAY.

HARRISON'S

SOCCCCC CI

HARDWARE _ DEPT.
TEL. 2364.

LAL APPELLEE













CT evety

occasion
at a ns,

on Sale at the
leading Stores









~ «= and
Camay

Stockings

Full Fashioned and mad2 of DUPONT Nylon

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID.

10, 11,

nareeeeasomntai init teeta lial





12 & 13 Broad Street







PAGE

HENRY

SIX





BY CARL ANDERSON

aa

pENTisr

RING
BELL

AND
WALIC IN



MICKEY MOUSE






OU SEE, ... HEY, PUT )
DOWN THAT BOTTLE !

RUN FOR YOUR
" LIFE! THAT'S
THE DREAD
TZiG-TZAG FLY!



‘ ® DON

&

|
| es
j@

b

rae
BSE





: os er





( OH, BLONDES--/ pos
BY ALL MEANS, . WHY THE PAUSE?
BLONDES . ) ( WAS THERE ANY
be a

el Pe, 2




THE LONE RANGER







mo TON TO iy | YOUR PLAN WORKED! 7ive GOT THE [ WHEN YOU'VE LOCKED UP THESE CROOKS IN JAIL, MARSHAL, WEILL ROUND UP THE
ME ( MARSHAL “THESE. THREE ARE JEWELER! REST OF THE GANG! =
url : a | P| PROVED chooks \| eS TIED UP] h—
Xi amy CROOK! JH | ON THE
| soe \ =e ree ha Li BACKTRAIL!
2 ae? Ney f | p
ea ||
me Gif -| |
Loe Re
Lo ol
| 4 A ee ae |
if iz {7a RB \ ee)
es me as 8
' COM |
1% ik ; wax) j
Â¥ 2 el
| i y —_—_— '.

Fhe et

____f GO ON TO TOWN WITH
| THOSE-CREOKS: ILL BRING THEIR

si HIYO, SILVER,
AWAY /

TO THINK MR. PECK THE
JEWELER WAS BEHIND ALL THE
wy CRIME HERE!
Gc 0 Z
aw * we,
‘ih Pe,
ar ie 53 on MONA 2
C0 |
ar Pion
ix ex
bee A]
rl ( . \

UP OUR TOWN! 3
or ZG

BEGINNING
MONDAY:



BY GEORGE MC.MANUS
— bse ;

cee eee









r- Pn i a a
{ THIS TELEVISION ) | | JS. COME BACK HERE” >)

| SET 1S GONNA |





f
| : ALL. RIGH T- MAGGIE
BE A GREAT | 5 YOU'RE GOING ? YOU | M2 sth SO1nt"
|] HELP To we | wae ( GREAT B16 6 . ) | tO Ta SPORE TD
NOw FOR _/ ec Sie: GROWN GOOD-FOR 3
| BINT YS H f = {sj j ‘
—— Wn a ae

.

w

‘ I WANT THE BiG
BAG YOU HAVE...
=> STRAPS...

I WANT A
TOUPEE!






a

PAIR OF é
CUTTING PLIERS, ///
PLEASE... /f//



DW

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

MILE AHEAD OVERHILL*RED
BARN«WAITING-WITH PLANE +
FOR ME + I'M THE PILOTe~




STAY, FELLA! NO MORE BAD 2-
MANNERS! WHERE ARE THEY ?




ee HMM+YOURE THE PILOT’ THEY CANT
WHERE
ae, ARE THE THREE KILLER?




ALITTLE TIME FOR



BF) iio viDNaprED ILLTELL YOU ANYTHING + BUT YOu TO

oe DIANA PALMER? / Keer ae TALKS
' eis ae OFF ME! > _
RY — =



it 1 DONT KNOW.
Me



















LEAVE WITHOUT YOU. THAT GIVES US

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ROBINSON'S

‘PATENT’ BARLEY

. ~~ makes milk more digestible for baby -
avn

‘PATENT’ GROATS
. Makes weaning a happy time for baby—
ately and mother

Ae DA



————————

ATTENTION !!





MILD

See us for - - -
BRC FABRIC

EXPANDED METAL
- TEMPERED HARD BOARD
OIL STOVES & OVENS
Phone Phone

aoe TL, HERBERT Ltd. “‘2x7°

10 & 11 Roebuck St., & Magazine Lane.

a

DIAL 4528



Tos good looks tell you they’re just right.
‘You know, too, when you look at the price .
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated



a is a Two-tone Brogue. Tied to every pair is

=\, = the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign

| rad \ #/| Glad” which means ‘just right’! Look for it in
\| | , leading stores in Barbados.

JOHN WHITE

means made just.right













The Advocate Co: Ltd’, will publish a Year Book of Barbados
in 1951,

; The Year Book will contain three parts:—

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know about
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover,

(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,

— butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
etc.

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Director of the Barbados Advocate will be respon-

* sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisa-
tions immediately or not later than April 15th 1951.

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

2 Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951.
Advertisers are asked to get in touch with

Mr, Trevor Gale,
Advertising Director,
Barbados Advocate,
84 Broad Street.

_ This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)





FRIDAY,



YEAR BOOK 1951 |

JANUARY 1951

26



FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :~

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from 14 in. upwards

STEEL ,

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes

FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Li.
WHITE PARK ROAD, ST. MICHAEL

- Gums Bleed!





Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth 6 io
Teeth mean that you have py fa ame.
‘Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad ¢ ees
that will sooner or later cause your —
to fall out and may also cause Rheumsa as 4
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sore eon ;
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron sind
guarantee. Amosan must make 7
mouth well and save your teeth ror
money back on return of empty, poet:
Get Amosan from your chemls)

a today. The guar-
osan antee protects
you. ¥ Rec

for ‘Pyorrhea—Trench. Mouth




COUGH LOZENGES
Ratatat rete 9



Many women are subject to weak,
aching back. Often the kidneys are
to blame, for your kidneys, along
with the liver, must filter out im-
purities from the bloodstream.

So if you feel tired, worn-out, head-
achy—with the nagging pain of an
aching back—look to both your kid-
neys and liver. That's why Cana-
dians haye been relying on Dr.
Chase’s Kidney-Liver Pills for over
half a century.

Give your system a chance to
work properly. ‘Try Dr. Chase's
Kidney-Liver Pills today. The name
“Dr. Chase” is your assurance. 3

Dr. Chase's

KIDNEY-LIVER PILL?



with an







“Ye

YOU GET



ie. Where dependabili-
ve (ty.is.vital—you had
"better use EXIDE Bat-
teries. When you buy
-) am EXIDE * you get
“® extrapowertohandle ~
the} roughest ’crank-
a ing job... extra rug-

_ gedness'for hard

. service inall climates
3 and low mainte! ©~)
‘nance cost. Whenit’s ,
lan | EXIDEnyAYOU
Start!

oS DEPENDABLE BATTERIES
| FOR 61 YEARS!

ke

‘
t

«
a

CITY GARAGE TRADING co, ETD



_ with grass cutter.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 1











The shock was great the blow severe

We never thought his death was near
ly those who love can tell

pain of parting without farewell.



The Bullen family, Emerald Villa,
Cheapside. 25.1.51—I1n.
ELDER—In loving memory of Miss

Elouise Elder Who departed this life
on 23rd January, 1948.
“Where the Mourners Weeping
Sheds the Secret tear
God His watch is keeping
Though none else be near.

May Elder, Noel Elde 26.1.51—1n.

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR = X 86. Dodge 5 Passenger in
A 1 condition ‘and licensed till June.
Contact Leon Alleyne at Fort Royal
Garage about sale of car. Mrs, A. M.
Arthur, Yorkshire.













26.1.51—3n,

CAR — Ford 10 h.p. in good working
order.. Apply Miss L. Clarke, “Ivy
Lodge”, The Ivy. Dial 2575,

'

26.1.51—3n.





CAR — Ford 1948 six cylinder De
Luxe Sedan, low mileage and in good
mechanical condition. Chas. Mc Ernear-



ney & Co., Ltd. 24.1.51—49

CAR—Citroen. 15 H.P. 1950 model in
excellent condition, Owner leaving
island. Apply: B'dos Agencies Ltd.
Dial 4808, Evelyn. 21.1,51—Tn

ee
CAR—Buick 8. 1939 Model, inspection
invited. Willems, Rosamund, Worthing.
20.1.50—6n.

ENGINE — assisted cycles complete.
Price $155.00 including Bicycle at Ralph
Beard's Show Room, Hardwood Alley.
Phone 4683. 26.1.51—3n,





PICK-UP One Second hand Ford
V-8 Pick-up in A. 1 condition. Just
overhaul. (Past inspection) 2 days ago.
New Tyres. C. Bannister, Station Hill.
St. James, 26.1.51—4n.

TRACTOR—One (1) McCormick Deer-
ing Farmall H. wheel tractor, complete
In excellent condi-
_ tion, very little used. COLE & CO,,
LTD. 20.1.51—7n

ELECTRICAL

RS
FRIGIDAIRE—One (1) American Frigid,
aire 7 cub, ft. complete with lock.
Apply D. L. Emtage c/o R. Hunte
& Co., Ltd, 4611, .1.51—t.f.n.,

———
RADIOS — Several New Pilot Radios.
Battery and Electric at Special reduced
prices at Ralph Beard’s Show Rooms,
Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.
26.1.51—3n.

cecsipsinioniapinpcintiacenatingiiceenceitionigitlipeinetretenet
REFRIGERATOR — 8 cub. ft. Ameri-
can Gibson 3 years guarantee, left in
Ralph Beara’s Show Rooms, Hardwood
Alley. . 26.1.51—5n.

CS 4
REFRIGERATOR — One General Elec-
tric American Refrigerator 5 c.f. in
perfect order. A gift at the price. Call
C. Pierrepointe at 4910 or 3601,
25.1.51—2n.

LIVES LOCK

———

COW — One registered Guernsey cow
by Mt. Hope Vigour An Exhibition Ist.
Prize Winner She gave (32) Pints Milk
with 2nd Calf To calve 26th January,





K.
20.

1951. Apply to V. W. Clarke, Ivy
Lodge, Ivy Road, St. M. 26.1.51—3n.
MECHANICAL



eaten east deol

BICYCLE—One 3-speed Gent's Groen
Raleigh Bicycle standard almost new for
sale. Apply to F, O, Pounder, jeweller,
Roebuck Street 26.1.51—2n,

FURNITURE
cent te Ragen eae tantre —
FURNITURE—Ralph Beard offers the
following:— New Mahogany furniture:
Dining Chairs $18.00 per pr. Tub Chairs
$36.00 per pr., Cocktail tables $10.00. Tea
trolleys $15.00, Streamlined Morris chairs
$35.00 each; Vanities $95.00 each also
unpainted rush chairs; rockers and
stools not forgetting a large assortment
of good second hand furniture. Call at
Ralph Beard’s furnishing showrooms,
Hardwood Alley. Open 8 am. to 4
p.m. daily. Close Saturday noon.
PHONE 4683. 18,1.51—6n



POULTRY

anne Tenn
POULTRY — Fowls, ducks and_ tur-
keys. Tel, 3904, 26.1,51—2n.

MISCELLANEOUS

———_

AGRICULTURAL FORKS — A small
cvantity available. $4.70 each. Dial 4222
(or 4843 Branch Store) G. W. Hutchinson

& Co, Ltd, 26,1.51—4n.
——————
BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in

White, Green, Primrose with matching

units to complete colour suites. Top

grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.
26.1.51—t.f.n.

EE
BOTTLES—30 empty 3 Ib Horlicks Bot-
tles Price 2/- each Phoenix Pharmacy,
26.1.51—2n.

-
_-——<—<
CUPS & SAUCERS — Breakfast size
(large!. Cups and Saucers at 58 cents.
Tea Cups and Saucers at 35 cents. G.
W. Hutchinson & Co, Ltd.

26.1.51—4n,



CLOTHES HANGERS—Wooden Clothes
hangers from 8 cents each up. Also col-~
ourful Plastic Ladies’ Hangers at 43
cents each, G. W. HUTCHINSON &
Co. Ltd, 26.1.51—4n.

LADIES SPORT COATS — For _ cool
evenings. Fawn, beige, wine and black
in assorted sizes. $28.50. Modern Dress
Shoppe. 23.1,.51—6n.

——_—_—
PLASTIC Parasols, Raincoats, Shower
caps, Aprons, Table Cloths, Babies’ Pan-

ties. Modern Dress Shoppe.
23,1.51—6n.

RIBBONS, Feathers, Flowers, zipps,
Buttons, Laces & Edges in a large vari-
ety at reasonable prices. Modern Dress
Shoppe. 23.1.51—6n,





_——
PIANO—Upright made by John Brins-
mead & Sons (makers for Royalty) in
excellent condition at Ralph Beard’s Show

Room, Hardwood Alley, Phone 4683.
26.1.51—3n.

—_—————

SKIRTS, BLOUSES, SHORTS, — In a
Jarge variety. $3,98 to . $4.80. Moderr.
Dress Shoppe. 22.1.51--6n.

—$

STOCKINGS — 51 gauge. Fine Nylon
Stockings. $2.14 Ladies and children
Ankle Socks. 36 to 48 ‘cents. Modern
Dress Shoppe. 23.1.51—6n.

——$<—$$ $$$ $—$_—_—$_$_$_
‘SAPPER SWALLOW” Collapsible Sail-



ing Boat 11 ft. 6 ins by 4 ft. New com-
plete with sail, oars ete. Specially
treated canvas to suit Tropics. Also
two fourteen foot oars. Apply Young,

Gas Coy. 24.1, 51—3n.



_———_—$

We have just received a nice assort-
ment of Bath Sponges, at reasonable
prices, KNIGHT'S LTD. 26.1.51—2n

PERSONAL,





The public are hereby notified that I
sm no longer responsible for my wife
Anita Humphrey (nee Greaves) or any
debt or debts contracted by her having
fciled to be under my care and protection
from the 11th day of December 1960.

PHILIP ALISTAIR HUMPHREY,
C/o CS.M.
Curacao, N.W.1.



Removal Notice

CLASSIFIED ADS.



TELEPHONE 2508
1
DIED F@R RENT
BOWMAN—On lith imst at Jersey,
Channel Island, Miss MARY JULIA
BOWMAN formerly Head-mistress of HOUSES
Queen's College, Barbados. — }
CHADEN, — Marine Gardens consis-|
IN MEMORIAM ting of 3 bedrooms all with running
water, reception rooms and all modern
BULLEN—In loving memory of our | C°"Veniences. For appointment dial 2899.
dear Willie who departed this life on %4.1.51—Sn.
Jan. 28th 1960. ————— —
“LASCELLES” — Worthings, Ch. Ch.

























951







consisting of Drawing and dining rooms.

3 Bedrooms all with running water,

for further particulars phone 2824.
25.1.51—3n.

TRINITY COTTAGE—St. James Coast.
Fully furnished containing 3 bezirooms,
also a telephone. Available for months of
February to May and August to Decem-
ber 1951. Phone 2859. 21.1.51—2n

—_{—$_——————————

WYNDAL, — Three bedroom house
with every convenience, on Rockley
main road. Garage, two servant rooms,
servant's toilet and bath. For rent un-
furnished, or for sale. Available from
March Ist. Dial 4476. 26.1.51—t.f.n.

—_

PUBLIC SALES

AUCTION
Under The Diamond Hammer

By instructions received from the In-
surance Co,, I will sell on the spot at
Bank Hall x Road on Friday the 26th
of January, beginning at 1 o'clock, One
double-roofed shop. To be removed from
spot. D'Arcy. A. Scott, Auctioncer.

23,1.51—4n.











TUBSDAY, 30th at 12 noon at AL-
BION LODGE, Barbarees Hill. Garage
13 ft x 18 ft. covered with Aluminum
Sheets. Good Wallaba Posts uprights also
SERVANT’S ROOM 12 ft. x 8 ft. partly
covered with G. I. Terms Cash. To be
removed. Dial 2947, R. Archer McKenzie
Auctioneer, 26.1.51—4n.

REAL ESTATE

—— —

WESTCLIFFE — Navy Gardens, stand-
ing on eleven thousand square feet of
Jand, Built of Stone, Three bedrooms
and all modern conveniences. Also large
play room 30 by 14 feet. For particu-
Jars and appointment, Phone Winston
Johnson at 4311. 26.1.51—6n.

SPRINGHAM—The dwelling house at
Springham, White Park Road. Building
to be removed. Apply D. V. Scott &
Co. Ltd. 12.1.51—t.f.n.



























































FOR SALE OR LEASE
PROPERTY — No. 67 Roebuck Street.
Cardinal Bowen, Station Hill, St.
Michael. Dial 3901. 24.1.51—3n.

CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS
We will set up for sale by Public
Competition at our Office James Street,
on Friday 2nd February 1951, at 2 p.m.
CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS
situate in St. Lucy and containing by
estimation 82 acres 3 roods 23 perches
of which about 48 acre; are arabie.
The acreage is made up as follows:
25% acres ist crop canes ready fcr
reaping.
14 acres young canes.
34 acres sour grass.
9 acres 23 perches in preparation,
roads, yards etc,
Inspection on application to Mr.
Ormond Knight on the premises.
YEARWSOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.
18,1,.51—6n.





FOR RENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din
ing reom, Breakfast room and Kitchen~-
ette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
‘Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone.
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St, Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1,51.—6n.

PROPERTIES — Delightful residence
having 3 Bedrooms, large Lounge, Sepa-
rate Dining Room, 2 fully Tiled Toilets
and Bath, modern Kitchen, built in 2
Car Garege 2 Servants Quarters, standing
on nearby half an act Price £4,500
nearest offer. For viewing apply Ralph
A. Beard, Hardwood Aley or Phone
4683.

PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

PICKWICK CRICKET CLUB

Members are kindly asked to collect
their gear as the pavilion and grounds
have been handed over io the Barbados
Cricket Association, The Club will not
hold themselves responsible for any loss
of gear if not collected immediately,

H. D. KIDNEY,
Hon, Secretary.
21,1.51—6n







NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PHILIP

Sealed Tenders for replacing the ceiling
of the St. Philip’s Parish Churech—
marked on the envelope Tender for
Church ceiling—will be received by the
alae not later than 27th January

1.

Plans and Specifications can be seen
at my Office on any Office day.

Successful Contractor must be preparec
to complete this job to the satisfaction
of, the Building Committee,

(Sed.) P. S. W. SCOTT,
Clerk to the Vestry,
St. Philip.
20.1.51—7n







“£25: -. -d. easily earned by obtaining
order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi-
ence necessany. Write today for
beeutiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making
opportunity, Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
England.”

25.1.51—18n



NOTICE
THE PARISH OF ST, ANDREW

Tenders are invited for a loan of
£1,000 at a rate of interest not to ex-
ceed 4% per Annum under the St. An-
drew Parish Church Loan Act. And
will be received by the undersigned up
to February 3rd 1951.

Signed C. A. SKINNER
Vestry Clerk,
St. Andrew.
24.1.51—6n.

Notice of Change of Name

I CLAIRMONTE NATHANIEL CLARK
heretofore called and known by _ the
name of CLAIRMONTE NATHANIEL
BLACKETT at present of 970 Tinton|
Avenue, Bronx, in the City and State
ot New York in the United States of
America Esquire and formerly of the
Island of Barbados British West Indies
hereby give public Notice that on the
28th. day of April 1950 I formally and
absolutely renounced, relinquished and
abandoned the use of my said surname
of “Blackett” and then assumed and
adopted and determined thenceforth on
all occasions whatsoever to use and
subscribe the name of Clairmonte
Nathaniel Clark instead of the said name
of Clairmonte Nathaniel Blackett.

AND I give further notice that by a
deed-poll dated the 28th. day of April
1850 duly executed and attested in ine
British Consulate General Office of New
York in the United States of America
and recorded in the Registration Office
of the Island of Barbados on the 18th.
day of May 1950 in Volume 685 of Deeds
at Page #4 I formally and abrolutely
renounced and abandoned the said sur-
name of “Blackett” and declared that
I had assumed and adopted and = in-
tended thenceforth upon all occasions
whatsoever to use and subscribe the
name of Clairmonte Nathaniel Clark in-
stead of Clairmonte Nathaniel Blackett
and so as to be at all times thereafter
called, known and described by the name
of Clairmonte Nathaniel Clark exclu-
sively.

Dated this 24th day of January 1951.

Clairmonte Nathaniel Clark,

Late Clairmonte Nathaniel Blackett.

26.1.51—2n























WANTED

HELP



Junior



SALESMAN
Apply by letter
P. O. Box 228.

Salesman
Bradshaw & Co.,
24.1.51—3n

to

SUB AGENT. WANTED, —
Bridgetown, well connected
merce, to sell accredited
on commission. State

Resident
with com-



MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED TO RENT
FURNISHED HOUSE Situated be-
tween Maxwell's and Rockley.
Coast preferred. (For) not
Phone 3541.



Sea
less than
three months.
24.1.51—3n.



WE BUY FOR CASH — Clocks, watches
and musical boxes in any condition.
Write, call or dial 4429.GORKRINGES An-
tique shop, Upper Bay Street,

25.1.51—Tn

—_————

WE BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and
Silver
write, call or
Antique shop,
Club.

jewellery, coins, dentures, etc.
Dial 4429. GORRINGES
adjoining Royal Yacht

25.1.51—Tn.



GORRINGES undertake expert watch
and clock repairs, cleaning and resto-
ration of oil paintings, valuations for in-
surance and probate, GORRINGES,
upper Bay St. 25,1.51—T7n.

MAGAZINES Second hand maga-
zines and comics in good condition.
STANWAY STORE, Dial 4910, Lucas St.

25,1.51—2n.







MULE — One (1) small mule, suitable



for store work. Must be sound. (Mare or
Gelding}. Apply S. B. Warren, Pitcher
Ltd. 26.1.51—2n

Connell & Co.,



Vacancies exist in Design Department
of a West Indian Petroleum Refinery
for Trained Draughtsmen, capable of
design and detail work on civil, mechani-
cal, and chemical engineering projects.
Applicants must have the British
Higher National Certificate or its U.S. or
Canadian equivalent and should be
prepared to give proof of technical abil-
ity by interview or examination.

Applications, giving full details and
experience, accompanied by a recent
passport photograph, should be address-
ed to Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd, P.O.
Box 103, Bridgetown. 23.1.51—6n.

INFORMATION which will lead to
the whereabouts of Miss GRACE COLE
who has been missing from her home
in George Street, Belleville. since Mon-
day, 22nd January, believed dressed in





her night clothes. Deseription: White,
brown hair, dark brown eyes; heigiist
just under 5 ft. age: in forties. Please

communicate any information to 2650 or
2767, or to the nearest Police Station.
f



Spanish Tuition

New Spanish Classes Regular Spanish
and the “Advanced Commercial Course’*
will be commencing from the First of
February.

All those interested; please be good
enough to contact Mrs. Maria Carlotta
Gonsalves, “Santa Clara", St Lawrence
Gap, before the above date, for Regis-
tration, — Phone: 8495,



25.1,51—6n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Mortimer Callender



and Eldica McCollin of Hillaby, St.
Thomas for permission to sell Spirits,
Malt Liquors, &c., at a boarded and
galvanized shop at Strong Hope. St,
Thomas,

Dated this 24th day of January 1951.

To:—J. R. EDWARDS, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “D",
Sed. G. WARD,
for Applicants.
N.B.—This application will be consi-
dered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “D' on Wed-
nesday the 7th day of February 1951 at
11 o'clock, a.m.
J. R, EDWARDS,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “D".

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Livingstone Lewis
of Spooners Hill, St. Michael for per-
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &¢e.,
at a board and shingle shop with shed-
pohayettached Ah. Spogners Hill, St.
Ic .

Dated this 25th day of January 1951,
To:—E,:A, McLEOD, Esq,,

Police Magistrate, Dist.
Sed, L.



“An,
LEWIS,
Applicant.
be consi-
to be held
on Monday
1951 at 21

N.B.—This application will
dered at a Licensing Court
at Police Court, District “A”
the 5th day of February
o'clock, a.m.

FE.
Police Magistrate, Dist.

A, MeLEOD,
CA".









——————————— =

Pay a visit each day

Round The Town

with G. A. Service
whilst you sleep I

help work

Daily Advocate

to on your







‘TO-DAY'S NEWS

wvyast 100 expens:ve iwovels
selling off at
2 for $1.00
The space is needed for new
stock, Select your Book Bargain
now.
We have just opened SHEET

PLASTIC in different colours for
Lamp Shades.

AT
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and

|
FLASH |
HARDWARE

For





: BARBADOS
INVESTMENTS
Consult - - -

A. M. WEBB,
Stockbroker

33 Broad St. (Over
Phoenix Pharmacy)

—: Phone 4796 :—





Barbados Amateur
Boxing Association

All amateur boxers are
asked to report to the Asso-

ciation’s Head-quarters
Modern High School on
Friday, 26th January at
5 p.m. to arrange for

eliminations in preparation
for West Indian Champion-
ships to be held in Trinidad
aor 24th, and 25th March,
1951.

Local title-hol!ders must
be prepared to defend their
titles during the month of
February or early March.

N.B. — All professionals
who have engaged in no
contest during the past three
years may revert to their
amateur status on applica-
tion to this Association and
investigation of their claims.

L. A. LYNCH,
Hon. Sec. B.A.B.A.

|



ROGERS BARBER SALOON Eeg to

notify their Customers that they will

be moving upstairs J. N. Goddards & BE WISE. ‘ee

fons Building ‘Next Door) as from

the 29th January 1951. 7)
ain! e+ « ADVERTISE
A







—————— —



British goods
age, experience,

references, Post box 532, Trinidad.
26.1.51-—3n



Luopeseccocecssecseeesee:

24.1.51—Sh. i

—————

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



” _| Hydrogen Bomb

Is A Myth

Atom Commission Chairman

NEW YORK, Jan. 25.
NO SUCH WEAPON as the hydrogen bomb now ex-
ists, according to David E. Lilienthal, former Chairman of
the United States Atomic Energy Commission.

“Whether there ever will be, is plague efforts to strengthen and
only a remote possibility,” hey;balance America’s military des
wrote in an article in Collier's; fences.
magazine, He urged that America’s imme-

He said he referred to the bomb j diate programme for peace should
only to illustrate how damgerously | be built on a programme of pro-
fay the country had drifted prior! ductiveness.
to Korea in its reliance ‘“‘uwpon one.
and only one means of protecting
this country, and the furthering
of the peace of the world.”

“The ignition of hydrogen and
weapons based upon that ignition
is only a remote possibility,” he
said. “It is a possibility that may
well grow more remote rather
than less.”

Earlier this month, noted sci-
ence writer William Laurance, in
a book predicted that the United
States would test the hydrogen
bomb this year at Eniwetok in
the Pacific.

He said that the issue, war or
no war, was not a United States
decision alone.

It was possible that Russian

precipitate a vast war,

“They may believe that now is
the time to unleash the chaos and
terror that their dogma teaches is
necessary for their revolutionary
ends,” he added.

“It may be therefore that there
is nothing to adjust, no conces-
sions, no compromises that would
change their pre-determined
ecurse.”

War with Russia would be ter-
rible, | bloody, costly and heart-
breaking, but if we must, we can
and will fight.”—Reuter.

Lilienthal’s article concerned it-
self primarily with the question:
“Can the atom bomb beat Com-
munism?”

He said that dropping atom
bombs on Russia would not defeat
the Soviet Union.

“It would gravely _ terribly
wound Russia, but not defeat her,”
he wrote.

“Nor would it alone prevent the
Red Arfny from overrunnming and
occupying Europe, even if atom
bombs were used in anticipation
of such an attack—the “preventive
war.”



ACCIDENT

Floretta Hinds, a six year old
schoolgirl from Arthur Hill while
on her way home from school
about 12.05 p.m. yesterday was
involved in an accident with the
motor car M-1200 along Tweed-—
side Road, St. Michael.

Mr. Lilienthal maintained that She was taken to the General
the magic formula for victory, Hospital where she was treated
“dropping an A-bomb,”’ couldand discharged.

—————EE—————————

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORT

Temporary Employment for Road Supervisors.

Applications are invited for temporary employment as Road
Supervisors in the Department of Highways and Transport.

2. Successful applicants will be paid a forty-four (44) hour
weekly wage, based on the Government Rates of Pay of 30c.—38c. an
hour for Supervisors employed in the “Unestablished Staff” of the
department, and fixed according to experience and general suitability
and merit. ' ;

3. Candidates must be able to read and write English, to keep
correctly the Labour and Distribution Rolls, to set out, carry out and
measure up road work and perform any other duties in connection
with road work as may be required of them by the Director.

4. Candidates must at all times be prepared to promptly carry
out the work of the department in accordance with such instructions
as may be from time to time given them by the Executive Engineer
or other Officers of the department on his behalf.

5. Candidates should submit evidence to show that they have
some knowledge of road construction and repair work and have
actually been in charge of labour and material employed on road
work for which they were directly responsible.

6. Successful candidates will be required to be on the job in
time to start work each day at 7 a.m. and must not leave the job
until after‘ work has stopped each day.

7. Successful candidates will be paid where necessary a bicycle
travelling allowance of 3c. per mile for every mile after the fourth
mile travelled each day to the job.

8. Applications, which should be made on forms obtainable from
the Colonial Secretary's Office should be addressed to the Director
of Highways and Transport, and will be accepted up to 4 p.m, on
Wednesday, 3lst January 1951.



20.1.51—3n.

—s Givestone

—— -



=

——————



ey
——$__—_—



and Chinese leaders wanted to] Committee's

acelin sg ineeeene pain epeacen ta



B.B.C. |

LONDON.

The Beveridge Committee,
whose report to Parliament will
shape the British Broadcasting}
Ccrporation’s new charter for the
next five years, was appointed by
Lord President of the Privy Coun-
cil Herbert Morrison and Post-
master General Ness Edwards.

The report coneernedthe future
of scund and television broadcast-
ing in Britain and
confirmed the B.B.C. monopoly of
the air.

The control of radio passed ‘to
the British Broadcasting Corpora-
tion on January 1, 1927, It took
over, by Royal Charter, from the
privately-owned British Broad-~
casting Company.



A new charter was gtanted for
ten years, im 1937, and another for
five years in 1947. The Beveridge
findings will dictate
the terms of the 1952 charter.

Seven governors, responsible to

the Government, are in control.
The ‘chairman, Lord Simon of
Wythenshawe, is paid $8,400 a

year: the Vice-Chairman, Marshal
of the Royal Air Force, Lord
Tedder, receives $2,800 a year; the
remaining five governors each
receive $1,680 a year.

Executive responsibility is in-
vested in a director-general, at
present Sir William Haley, who is
chosen by the goverpors.

The corporation has no capital.
Its revenue comes from licenses
and publications and a Govern-
ment grant for the Overseas and
European services. Latest license
figures showed there were 11,837,-
050 sound listeners at $2.80 each
and 423,550 registered television
licenses at $5.60 each,—IN.S.



Canes Burnt

SIXTEEN and a half acres of
sugar canes belonging to Mr. G., E.
Evelyn and = growing on Small
Ridge Plantation, Christ Chureh
were destroyed by fire which
started about 7 p.m. on Wednes-
day.

Police and residents living in
the area tried to fight the flames
but could mot save the canes as
the fire had gone too far into the
field,



° .
Wife’s Duties
LONDON,

Judge John Blagden told his
Westminster, London, court that
no wife had the right to let a room
to a practising violinist. 2

The judge dismissed an action
for possession by landlord Mark
Berson who claimed that his ten-
ant, Deane Rais, had violated their
agreement by letting a room,

Rais claimed that his wife had
let the room to a violinist for
practice work during his absence.

Judge Blagden said he refused
to “visit the sins of a wife on her
husbands” and gave this advice to
wives,

They could, he said, act for their
husbands in certain ways, such as
sending for the plumber if the
boiler burst, or invite women
friends in for a cup of tea without
getting permission.

But they could not do such
things as letting rooms to vio-
linists,

—LN.S.



|

|

|

TYRES «1 TUBE
AVAILABLE IN ALL SIZES |

USE THE TYRES CHAMPIONS USE |
Charles Mc Enearmey & Co,, Lid. |

TO



— AND —



Dial 4616



OF INTEREST
ALL PLANTERS

°

EAGLE SIX (6) TONS TRAILERS Equipped with Brakes
(These Trailers are very Ruggedly Constructed)

BOTH these are NOW TO HAND and on DISPLAY at our SHOWROOM
YOUR INSPECTION CORDIALLY INVITED

COURTESY GARAGE

WHITE PARK ROAD





THE PERFECT COMBINATION
TO MEET YOUR
TRANSPORT PROBLEMS

MASSEY-HARRIS 42 b-b.v. 8 cyl. DIESEL TRACTORS

(Steel Wheels also available for Ploughing)



in substance |

SSS!

PAGE SEVEN



REFUSE LORRIES
TOO EXPENSIVE

When the two modern refuse
collectors for the Scavenging De-
partment of St. Michael arrive,
they will not add to the number
of collectors the Department now
has. They will replace two of the
present nine lorries whose main-
tenance has been found too ex-
pensive. :

It is expected that the remaining
seven lorries will be replaced by
| the modern type of collector from
time to time, the Advocate was
informed at the Department ves-
terday. The two new collectors,
however will greatly. contribute to
the sanitary arrangements or the

bringing about of a cleaner
Bridgetown.

The Department has a staff of
nearly 100 scavengers whose work
it is to keep the City clean. Of
these 33 are sweepers and 15 oper-
ate a similar number of push carts.
These latter help in taking up the
refuse off the streets and clean
the tunnels. Eight man four water
carts for flushing the streets and
gutters and 6 clean the drains. ,

When the refuse is collected it
is taken to areas where it is tsed
for reclaiming purposes. The De-
partment is on the job every day

of the week.



MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)

MS. “TONGARTRO" is scheduled to
sail Adelaide January lith, Melbourne
January 2ist, beisbane February 7th,
Sydney February 15th, Arriving at Bar-

bados 22nd arch, 1951















NOTICES





The M.V. “DAERWOOD" will
accept Cargo and Posvengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba, and
Pastengers only for St. Vincent,
Sailing on Wednesday 31st inst,
“Caribbee” — will

The M.V,



This vessel has ample space for Hard accept Cargo and Passengers for
Frozen, and neral , cargo. Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Caro ac od on through Bills of Nevis and St, Kitts Date of
Lading with shipment at Trinidad departure to be notified.
for British Gu . Barbados, Windward ‘
and Leeward Islands ae
For further particulars apply B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN
FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD.,
jane ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc.
BWI ‘Telephone: 4047
DA COSTA & CO, LTD,
BARBADOS,

BW. — —_———
Canadian National Steamships
SOUTHBOUND

Sails Sails Satle Arrives Sails
Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
“LADY RODNEY” _ 17 Jan. 19 Jan. 28 Jan. 29 Jan.
“LADY NELSON” _ 1 Feb 3 Feb. 12 Feb 13 Feb.
“CAN, CHALLENGER" _ 15 Fev. _ 25 Feb. 25 Feb.
“LADY RODNEY" — 3 Mar. § Mar. 14 Mar. 15 Mar,
“LADY NELSON” -— 19 Mor, 21 Mar. 30 Mar, 31 Mar.
“CAN. CHALLENGER” - 2 Apr _ 12 Apr. 12 Apr,
“LADY RODNEY” — 16 Apr. 18 Apr 27 Apr 27 Apr
NORTHBOUND Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax

“LADY RODNEY” 10 Feb. 12 Feb, 21 Feb, 22 Feb. —

“LADY NELSON” 25 Feb, 27 Feb 8 Mar. 9 Mar _

“LADY RODNEY" 27 Mar, 28 Mar, 6 Apr. 7 Apr. —
“LADY NELSON" 12 Apr. 14 Apr, 23 Apr. _ 24 Apr.
“LADY RODNEY” 10 May. 12 May, 21 May. _ 22 May.

N.B,.—Subject to change without notice.
bers. Passenger Fares and freight

All vesels fitted with cold storage cham.
1ates on application te :—



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,



8.S. COLOMBIE

1951,
§.S. COLOMBIE

1951,
8.8. GASCOGNE

1951,
8.8. GASCOGNE

Lucia, Marti
Pitre & Ba
February 170

—==

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_







PAGE EIGHT

Roy Marshall Hits

111 In Second Trial
Keith Walcott Scores 50

' ROY MARSHALL, West Indian opening batsman,
went on a run getting spree when he scored 111 retired—
which included 17 fours and one six—for John Goddard's
XI who scored 258 runs in their first innings in reply to
Clyde Walcott’s XI total of 177 when play ended yesterday,
the second day in the second cricket Trial Match at Ken-
sington Oval.
‘jens me pen 2 paces - or
nutes an i ‘ours giving
eng chance at 81 His tate Attn Ne ee or
= Sore aae oa for ore Atkinson for four runs, Atkinson’s
shaw, the Police pacer when ne figures at this stage were five
raised him overhead for six runs. °V€rS, one maiden, 12 runs and
Bradshaw's nine overs, one maid-

Keith Walcott going at number en, 28 runs one wicket, that of
three scored a quick 50 which Taylor. Walcott again on drove
included eight fours. the third ball of Atkinson’s sixth

Bowling for Clyde Walcott’s XI over for four runs.

Bradshaw took three wickets for

62 runs in 19 overs five of which _ When the score had reached 64

were maidens, E, Atkinson took Skipper. Walcott brought on H.

two for 42 and W. Greenidge one King to bowl to Marshall who was

for 36. 23. King’s first ball was dis-
. p patched to the boundary for four

When play began — yesterday runs. Walcott also hit a four in the
A. M. Taylor who was not out third ball to make him 24 and the
nine and Roy Marshall not out total 74.

40 continued the first innings for

fonm Goddard’s XI. C. Bradshaw Another change was made and
sent down the first over to Tay- Barker came on in place of Atkin-
lor. "The first ball Taylor moved son. His first and only over of the
across the wicket and watched day yielded eight runs. Green-
the ball go through to wicket idge sent down his first over to
keeper Walcott. Marshall who hit a four in the
fifth ball. Marshall now 48 reach-
ed his fifty by hitting King for
four runs. The scoreboard read

; A a 112—1—-17. Marshall now began
oe ee anes thee to really hit out and King’s fourth
to Taylor and the last ball of over yielded 13 runs, two fours and
this over Taylor took a single. & single by Marshall and one four
At this stage a slight drizzic by Keith Wétcott.
began. to fall. K. Bower relieved Greenidge

a shaw’'s sec- and his first over of the day cost
I HS Oe Tea hook- him 6 runs. Keith Walcott reached
ed for four runs. The second his fifty with a four off Atkinson,
ball he took a single. Marshall but on reaching his fifty he too
also took a single in the fifth ball. tried to be breezy and just after
Atkinson's second over of the day he was bowled by Atkinson.
ri g a
yemee ere fens Somes tee tne Proverbs joined Marshall who
score was now 30, Marshall 12, was 59 and was off the mark with
Taylor 16. Atkinson now began to 4 brace. Marshall when 81 was
look steady and in his third over dropped by Cave at deep fine leg
of the day sent down a maiden off Bradshaw. The score was
over. Bradshaw continued to 164, 47 runs ahead of Clyde Wal-
bowl but did not seem to oskc> a cott’s score.

i ort
os ee Shee Pravior had | Marshall still continued to pun-
timed properly he would have got ish the bowling and got his cen-
a six for each shot as these balls eee ere eres fo

; Pete 7 i rer, roverbs .
were pitched too short. ae area.

Nevertheless when ‘Taylor’s Bradshaw sent down the last
score had reached 17 in trying to over — his 13th — before lunch
force q good length ball he was and at lunchtime his analysis was
struck on the pads and given out 013, M1, R55, W1. and the score







The second ball was of the same
type But the last ball, an in-
swinger, Taylor took a_ single.

leg before by Umpire Spellos. 190.
Keith” ‘Walcott es nae After lunch, Marshall, retired
off with q sharp single £r9™M With 111 and Wood joined

Bradshaw. Proverbs, Bowen sent down the
: first ball to ood who took a

Marshall hit his first four of singte. When = score was 204,
the day off Atkinscn’s fourth wood was bowled by Greenidge.
over. This was the third ball funte then followed and was
pitched well up and Marshall of the mark with a single from
executed a lovely full-blooded 4 well timed drive. Proverbs now
drive placed away from H, King. 18 began to bat patiently and was

Walcott cut the first ball from dropped by Skipper Clyde Wale
Bradshaw’s fifth over of the day who had taken off the gloves an
for four and Marshall took a was fielding at silly mid on, brace in the third. The score- cver after Proverbs was run cut.
board now read 48—1—17. Branker joined Hunte. Wer
the new ball was brought out —
the score 236 — Branker took a
single in the second ball of the
tenth over. Hunte went down and





_—

Pe ree













in trying to drive a ball from
THE TWO-CARD Atkinson, he gave Smith, now
CONVENTION keeping wickets, a lovely catch.

E. Hoad followed and at eight was
nicely caught by C, Walcott at
second slip off Bradshaw.

by M. Harrison-Gray

rus convention is used in
some American schools.
If a player, in certain circum-

Btarices, leaves Eamselt with Williams joined Branker who

was 13, Bradshaw got much life
out of the new ball and bowled
Branker with what looked like an
inswinging yorker,



ext
two extra
‘anastas,
Naturally this only wor!
advan’ wi
nership holds the
favourable position.
ease two cards would
m y be a bad numbe:
leave yourself with.
one or three would be more
normal if you were trying to
go out. For erie e, gy
and your Paper have al. \y
melded as follows:
Canasta of Sevens

Mut¥ins followed after Branker
and the innings closed when Mul-
lins, in attempting a short run,
was run out. Skipper Goddard
and Millington were absent.

The match continues on Satur-
day.

CLYDE WALCOTT'S XI—Ist Innings 177
JOHN GODDARD'S XI—ist Innings

K 10 9 6656 Q s

K 10 9 6 56 Q Taylor 1b.w., b Bradshaw way
K 10 Joker 6 5 Marshall retired iiss capentaee
K 10 265 Walcott b E. Atkinson .......... 50
2 10 26 Proverbs run out ieee ee Tae

Wood b W. Greenidge . ai 6
Hunte c (w.k, Smith) b E, Atkin-
son 3

You_hold in your hand 3
K, Q, 9, 9, 6. 2, 2.
Whatever you draw, you can
of course meid everything and
go out. But in order to make

Brancker b Bradshaw ... 2: ae
Hoad e C. Walcott b Bradshaw &%
Williams not out ..............-. 2
Mullins run out .....

. ddard absent We ery eres
. Millington absent ni

















us
warning your partner of the

mane ADDARD>

sition He then melds all Extras eners

e can and makes up any

possible Canastas. At you TROUE eh esate oe

next turn you will go out, : ay Tae ae
lacing your wild cards to the

st advantage.

But if your side is in a bad
may have to
ible cards in

BOWLING ANALYSIS

°
=
7

order to help your parther to C. Bradshaw ........ 19 5 62 3
gO out, and you may be left C. Barker .......... 4 0 20 0
with two only. In such a E. Atkinson cose, MG 3 42 2
case the two-card convention H. King 66a A Se a |
has no meaning. W. Greenidge ... 1 2 36 1
Sy powers, . a3 1 87 0

Lond OOO cree ie ie 0

lon. Bepress Service. C. Waleott .......... ‘4 ® 0



The ll Do It Every ‘Lime









SX

SOs

2 a
THANK TO

LT. JOHN KELSEY, TR. AISN, [1 fi
UNIV.OF MINNESOTA,

MIN!





WHAT A WONDERFUL. * d
Bdovicion mis (MATA weNPERREL a NOW HE'S ( HE'S TEETHING!
HE'LL. MAKE »sLOOK MARRIED AND
HOW HE LOVES HAS ONE OF
CHILDREN »+-= HIS OWN»

Crick Gets Four
Whkts. In St. Lucia

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. LUCIA, Jan. 25.
Crick and Ellick opened the
bowling today, Crick being more
successful, at-
tacking, swing-
ing both ways.
Ellick, medium
off-break bowl-
er was steady
throughout.






Batting honours
went to Living-
‘stone and Mc-
Mahon, Living-
stone proved
the hero for the
Leewards. St.

best. St. Lucia
returned to the
crease losing
wickets cheaply
to Anthonyson’s
swings. Auguste
batted well for the Leewards.,
Scores:
ST. LUCIA—Ist Innings cede . 1065
LEEWARD'S 1ST INNINGS

c.0'RB. CRICK

MeMahon b Ellick . rr

Claxton l.b.w. b Crick hoes » B
Livingston not out . bade ee
Witkin Lb.w. b Asgill Pr +. 1S
Eddy c Ishrnael b Griffith ..... vi 2
Gore ¢ (w.k.) b Crick . 5
Thompson c St. Helen b Crick . 0
Mathews e¢ Phillip b Crick 2
Anthonyson b Ellick és 1
Lavis Lb.w. b Auguste : . 6
Extras « +. , 6
Total .... 152

Fall of wiekets:

& for 107, 9 for 110,
BOWLING ANALYSI6
°o. M.

w.
Crick. ....: . . 6 3 44 4
Etlick *% 19 =610 26 2

ST. LUCIA 2ZND INNINGS

Paul ¢ (w.k.) b Anthomyson .. - 2
Augier ¢ Gore b Anthonyson , 4
Auguste not out . : s006 9
Phillip stpd. b Eddy . jee
Griffith run out ‘ s 'S
Deterville not out wees 2

Total (for 4 wkts.) «. 23

Fall of wickets: 1 for 4, 2 for 9, 3 for

10, 4 for 21,



Belleville Tenniis
Tournament

The results of matches played

yesterday are as follows:—
MEN'S DOUBLES

J. D. Trimmingham and J. L.
St. Hill beat W. V. Hunte and V.
Hutson 6—1, 6—1.

P. G. Patterson and G. H. Man-
ning beat V. Roach and P. Roach
6—2, 6—3.

LADIES’ DOUBLES

Miss G. Pilgrim and Mrs. O.
Skinner beat Miss E. Worme and
Mrs. D. Worme 7—5, 6—4

To-day’s Matches
LADIES’ DOUBLES (FINALS)

Miss D. Wood and Mrs. R. Ban-
croft vs. Miss G. Pilgrim and Mrs.
A. Skinner,

MIXED DOUBLES

Miss L. Branch and Mr. W.
Crichlow vs. Mrs. A. Gibbons and
Mr. A. Skinner.

Miss M. King and Mr. J. L. St.

Hill vs. Mrs. N. Warren and Mr,

A. Jemmott.

—_—_

Cricket And
Baseball

LONDON.



More than 500 basebail clubs
are now in operation and prepar-
ing for a boom season in Britain
where cricket is the national game,

competitions .
are to be held during the summer] \s
and are expected to attract thou-

League and cup

sands of spectators,

The leading team in Britain is
They de-

the ‘Hornsey Req Sox.
feated several visiting Americar
Navy teams last season.

Other teams in the London area

are;

Albany Pirates, Briggs Brigands,
Pirates, Ruislip
USAAF, Surrey Tigers and Essex

Eltham Dodgers,

—LN.S.

Cubs.

Standard TTT

THIS RULE SAVES TIME
By M. Harrison-Gray

JN the rules on Canasta
drawn up by Crockford’s
Club, there is a law that
allows @ game to start at
1000 points to each side,
This has the effect of
shortening the game. and
does away with part of the
whe en ek Stage — Le.,
when both sides require 60
points only for the first meld.
It must be appreciated that
this is not the same thing as
making the game one of
points only, In the latter case,
Bast etek ar eae Ree
vulnerabilit:
(between 0-1500) in full, at
the same time cutting out a
Portion of the last stage when
ae a required for the initial
This rule is a very good on
for a club, where a Semper
may be waiting to enter the
game, or for the last game of
& session, when the players
Dee tees sure whether
me for“
more nave. ti for “ just one
greement on this local
oa dent ode at
ac
features of the wen hia













































London Bkpress Service.

y Jimmy Hatlo

’ i BUT, DEAR»





1 for 0, 2 for 47, 3 for
53, 4 for 79, 5 for 86, 6 for 97, 7 for 9,








BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Sports Officers MIAMI TOPS
Elected WITHOUT

At the Annual, General Meeting
Pre-season forecasts that



of the Rangers Spotts Club held
on Sunday last at “Retreat”, Pas-
sage Road, the following officerg
were elected for the year 1951—52.
R. O. Culpepper (President);
. E. Squires (Vice-President):
L. G. Slocombe (Hony. Secretary);
B, Scott (Hony. Treasurer);
J. L. Blackett, S. Grant (Trus<
tees); and Messrs S. White, C. F.
Reece, H. Jones, other members LONDON.
of the Committee Just to show that Britain is
Cricket Captains: “A” team: §, still “tops” in soccer, the Football
Grant (Capt.); R. O. Culpepper Association will invite a F.LF.A.
(Vice-Capt.); “B” team: L. G. team—which could mean the rest
Slocombe (Capt.); T. Hinds (Vice- of the world — to play agairist
Capt.) _} » British stars in 1953, to mark the
Football: Capt. E. Cox, Association’s 50th anniversary.
A British team may tour South
America that year.



Britain Is Still Tops





Tennis Champion ee a
Art Larsen, Fama EXHIBITION GOLF
tennis champion, is providing LONDON.

plenty of ammunition for his
Australian critics, according to
reports received in London from
Adelaide.

Accusing Larsen of “court an-

Mildred (Babe) Zaharias, the
American golf professional, is
scheduled to take part in exhibi-
tion matches in Britain during the

tics’ the critics declared that SUmmer, |
during the recent South Austra. According to Fred Corcoran,
lian singles championship, hq £lf promoter, the first six in a

demanded that a press photog- tournament being held in the
rapher should leave the side of United States next June are com-
the court because of the click of ing to Europe on tour. It is likely
the camera shutter which might that among the winners will be
disturb him and cause him to lose Patty Berg, Betty Jamieson, the

a point. Bauer sisters and Peggy Kirk.
Larsen also demanded that But whether she is successful or
program sellers, newsboys

and not the “Babe” is to play here.
ice-cream vendors should be si- s
lenced, and that ball-boys must
be made to bounce the balls
back to him on his backhand at
a particular height. —LN.S.



—

Fell Off Horse

Livingston Walcott a 24-year-
old groom of My Lord’s Hill, St.
Michael was treated at the Gener-
al Hospital and discharged after
he fell from the race horse Wilmar
while exercising it at the Belle
tween Mr. K. Greenidge’s XI and Soy meaaniog. Wane aes gee

Y.M.P.C. will be played at ,.; la. of
Beckles Road on Saturday at L peony °° his yight, forearm from
p.m



K. Greenidge’s XI Will Play
Y.M.P.C. On Saturday

A friendly cricket match be-



Fell Off Bench

After falling off a bench at St
Leonard’s Boys’ School yesterday
about 10.15 am. Ronald Reid a
12-year-old schoolboy of Peter—
kin’s Road, St. Michael, was treat-
ed and discharged at the General
Hospital for a fractured left fore-
arm.

YOUR...

The teams are:—

K. Greenidge (Capt.), A. Me-
Kenzie, S. McKenzie, H. Andrews,
C. Watts, C. Gaskin, A. Kinch, J.

_Parris, D. Gooding, P. Clarke and
H. Cox.

B. Porter (Capt.), C. McKenzie,
R. Peterkin, E. Branker, G.
Archer, D. Archer, H. Ingram,
A. Ingram, F. Austin, H. Mat-
thews and I. Burke,

BRUSH... UP...
4



SMILE...






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THE SEASON
GAMBLING

MIAMI.
Miami would fizzle as a vaca-

cationland without wide-open gambling to stir up interest
fell flat te-day as America’s winter playground settled
down to its best season in years.

More out-of-towners are dip-
ping into their pocketbooks tc
eat, drink and be warm in Miam
than ever before in the area’:
history. For merriment, they are
getting the same plush, silver-
lined stuff they always did, witt
one exception.

The click of the croupier’s stick

and the metallic spinning of
roulette wheels are sounds they

cannot hear anymore.

Months ago, when the “squeeze”
first went om organized, illegal
gambling in the area, gambling
interests predicted a sudden
death to the gold coast’s annual
tourist boom. They bitterly fore-

cast that without gambling,
Miami would fold up.
But Dan Sullivan and the

greater Miami Crime Commission
which he heads thought differ-
ently. The Crime Commission
and local newspapers put on the
heat. aroused the public, and,
with ammunition suppli#i by the
Kefauver Senate Crime Commit-
tee, forced the gamblers to close
down.

Some illegal bookies continue
to operate, but a vigorous cam-
paign by Sheriff Tom Kelly is
making it hard on them. -

The lack of big-time gambling
apparently makes no difference
to Mr. and Mrs. Tourist.

Fred Davant, executive secre-
tary of the Greater Miami Hotel
Association, pointed out that
there are more places for tourists
to stay this winter than ever be-
fore. And, he added:

“We have plenty of visitors
here to fill them. In spite of the
predicted drop in tourist trade
all indications point to the con-
clusion that there are more visit-
ors than ever before.”

Even apartment houses, which
as a rule get only tourists who
plan to stay most of the season,
report practically no vacancies.

Street traffic is heavy day and
night and, surprisingly, a large
number of the big cars which
are “just down for the winter”
bear California licence aes

“At least, John, were
saving our fuel.”


























What's on Today

Exhibition of Oil paintings
and pencil sketches by
Mrs, Fela De Kuh at “The
Pavilion—9.00 a.m.

Advecate’s Photo Exhibition
at Barbados Museum —
10.00 a.m.

R,. J. Me Leod’s Exhibition
of Oil Paintings at the
Barbados Museum—10.00

a.m.

Court of Ordinary—1i1 a.m.

Sale of Double roofed shop
at Bank Hall Cross Road
(D'Arcy Scott Auctioneer)
1,00 p.m,

Belleville Tennis Club Tour-
nament—4,15 p.m,

Celebration of the Annivers-
ary of the Founding of
the Republic of India at
Combermere School under
the patronage of His Hon-
eur Mr. J. W. B_ Chen-
ery. Mr. G. H. Adams,
M.C.P., and Mr W. A.
Crawford, M.C.P., are to
be among the speakers—
4.45 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives show
at Kingsland Pasture, Ch.
Ch.—7,30 a.m,

CINEMAS

AQUATIC CLUB; “Cleopatra”—
8.30 p.m.

PLAZA (Bridgetown): “The In-
spector General’ — 8.30 p.m.

PLAZA (Oistin): “Roseanna
McCony” and ‘Marshal of
Mesa City” — 5 & 8.30 p.m.

GAIETY (St. James): “Under
Capricorn” and “Guns of the
Pecos" — 8.30 p.m,

ROYAL: “Secret of the Whistler”
and “Thunderhoot" — 4.30 &

8.30 ae,

OLYMPIC: “Thirty Seconds Over
Tokyo” and “The Arnels
Affair’ — 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

ROXY: “Weekend in Havana”
and “Somewhere in the Night”

—130 & 8.15 pom,

The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rices: 6.12 a.m,
Sun Sets: 5.58 p.m.
.Moon (Last Quarter) Janu-
ary 30
Lighting: 6.30 p.m
High Water: 6.37

p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
Total for Month to Yester-

day: 1.81 ins.
Tempetature (Max.) 82.5°F
Temperature (Min.) 76.0°F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E,

(3 p.m,) N.E. by E.
Wind Velocity: 15 miles per

a.m., 6.18

Barometer (9 am.) 29.952,
(3 p.m.) 29.862

THERE WILL BE...

DANCING
TOMORROW NIGHT

CASUARINA CLUB

Cc. BERTIE HAYWARD’S
ORCHESTRA
ADMISSION ::: 6c.
DINNERS FROM 7 P.M.





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1951

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26,

“axarive

N addition to the regular size, this new,
smaller pack of Andrews Liver Salt has been
introduced to enable you to try the World’s most
popular saline for a very small outlay !
A glass of effervescing Andrews, costing only a
few pence, cleans the mouth, settles the stomach,
tones up the liver, and finally clears the bowels.
Also at any time of the day one teaspoonful in
a glass of cold water makes a cooling, refreshing
drink. You can be sure of Inner Cleanliness
with Andrews.















Tune in to
Barhades
} every Tuesday at
17.30p.m. The
Andrews “Buggy
Ride” Programme
provides real
entertainment.



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Full Text

PAGE 1

rKIII.W JANUARY 26. 1951 BAABADOS ADVOCATK r\(.i until Colonial Troops Are Being Rei-riiiU'cl LONDON. Official British source* disclosed today thai iniuitmt'iil of colonial bein that could bung in 500.000 men into action rant of .jr. Tt i %  ulonial force would Include a larite number of the dreaded Gurkhas, small but feroN< pal M hoM* Kukri knives and stealthy ways spread terror through Japanese i**.uII. Man Oolenrr spokesman MU tint Hn %  ..I I-., %  U9JO0 (-ulumaK by April. But more important HUM BM number ol men in uniform, the n added, i the (act that %  mllitai aow In ex 1stenco which could be expanded "very rapidly" tt war comes. The I wo main pools it um •Mch UlOM IrOOM COUld be drawn arc I %  %  \\. UM atari "t Woilrl II. i iiiKio BdtaUoi I .n from Kenya, IthoUganda, Tanganyika and i centered I ti if Kanjra, Dta ing the war. the numb-' h> to 223.000. W. Africa—Siena IOIU>. Gold Coi and OaniWi had 1,000. That m LncroaiH .ii ended. Nepal provided, more than I >n WbrU War II and 10.500 are lighting In lha anU in Malaya now Other colonials come from Malaya itself, where native troops Bra being increased from fou is to six; Jamaica and Cvpru*. i iiiitrers concede thnt the • Mad a lot of and Bra be:-* aorvica work nut the DafMce Mln.strv apOfccaflMII explained : "In any future war they would < nciimstances demandci." British policy now is that colonial troops should be used to build un thfl defences o! their own countries Rowovar, as in the last war the British High Command would be free to move Ihem to any theatre where ihey coul I I DunnWorld War II. the Africans fought In Italian East Africa and Burma. —INS "Sorry George no more sloe! shoe* How about filling em up far pat slippers 7 Flying-boats Have Had It! Ghost House For Sola LONDON. The most haunted estate in all U up for sale Aaking price is $11,200; nothing extra for the gh Nearly 12 years ago Borley Essex, reputedly the most haunted house in the country, burned down. But .sightseers UM psychic researcher* claimed i ..IT the lire had not succeeded In exorcising the .... For the last five years poetTurner and his iiv have lived in the adjoining : tablet-, which have been convertd into a house with throe r a ca lion and three bedrooms. Turner, who categorically state* %  en HO ghests—not even Me "Blue Nun" who allegedly loams the churchyard in flowing robe*—has now decided to sell out e to the nearby village o' Belchamp Walter. In addition lo the converted '.toute there are reven acres of .i mushroom farm and an nl. an I containing about 600 aople troea, and. ol course, the i uins of a lulory. Turnei aid hi < onlv n i mi li.i •OOViOg II that his health Will hoi How l,un lo look ufti-i II -INS. BT Wlng-f'ommander PAl'L RICHET. D.FC. IF the Government abandons ork on the giant Saunders-Roe S.R. 4.1 Princess tlying-boat. which seems likely, this type of aircraft nv be dead for ever. The ilying-boat—and Its cousin the float-plane—have hod fortyodd years Ol adventure through the efforts of the three great British flying-hnnt firms — Supermarine. Saunders-Roe, and. above all, Short Brothers. I believe .Tie flying-boat IS dying, but dy<:.g hard. Never Since the BrlUan cavalry replaced horses with tanks has n controversy sparked such high feeling. What is the argument all about'' Chief flying-boat protagonist is Sir Arthur Gouge, designer of the • ues and now chief deMi;ncr for Saunderk-Roe. He designed the huge Princess. Gouge argues that in all forms of transport—road, rail, and sen— the largest unit has always proved the most efficient unless restricted by factors outside the vehicle For example, the sire of roads, the .t parity of rails, and the size of port facilities are restrictive. The flying-boat Mfi theoretically be immensely larger than th land plane because it is nof restricted by runway sire and strength. Next, he argues that a landplsne needs an under-earn age, wUch addi weight. Sir Arthur's opponentFirs r. the use of rneket-assist ance for take-off and efficient braking systems have made existing runways usable b> aircraft as big as we arc ever likely to need. Second, they say, the weather I'ylng-boats to sheltered marine bases. Private Sheffield, in the Army since 1908, wants to stay Soldier Has Not Had Leave For 21 Years ONE of the oldest serving soldiers in the British Armv is 80-year-old Private Prod Sheffield. 2/4th Queen's Royal Regiment. He has completed 42 years' service, and has not been away on leave for the last 21 years He hopes to serve for a total of 50 years, he told me, then added "If I ran 1 will do CO." "Chuck" Sheffield — as ho is known to his friends, was wounded at Mons in October 1914. Lives In Cabin Now he is comfortably n with a radio set. in n small cabin at the back of the barracks library at Cmldford. He looks after the lihrary and the billiords room adjoining it. and In his spare time is general handyman about the barracks Once a week he goes on parade?— a saluting parade. He has eight good-condur' stripes on his left forearm. "Chuck" lnst went on leave in 1920. His mother was then living at Ash. about eight miles away "Then she died." he said, "and I have not troubled about leave since. 'Not Worih It' "Leave is all right If you have >nrents and a home to go to. or f you pro married, but QU II is not worth white. You have to find your own digs, your own fares, your food — everything. If you are a B.G. Means To Crow Citrus In Big Way iFrvrri Chir Own CorrespondM! > CEOKC.ETOWN. Jan. 21 Th* Dtnctoi ol Afrteuttun said to-day that the Department is takIng care %  % %  i.ooo citrus plants which arc being aatrtrlbtltod to local farmers. The flood! of 1MB had played havoc with earlier attempts at development but the hi was well on the way to establishing B plentiful growth, not only of like %\ cedo pears, sapodillas, etc wh have a high market value. Wit'i th.BOW plans for de. kal i nl ol the industry, the I %  t his abandoned the FnmeMic Krlenre Tlie possibility of training Wc % %  Indian women lo be specialist Of domestic science in the Corlbaant) area is now being i by h t Ootonka) Do%  .. lopm nl .' %  'i w> II iro Organ th. n Mlsa Dora Ibbenon. Social Weiraro Advlacr to Colonial it.veinpment and Welfare Organis it inn who Is attending the FAO. conference said Hint vhc WOa diseussin u the mutter with various uthorltiea m Ihla region. t.l.' It seems anomalous to me that nl I i>f developinenl. the West Indies should have to send ovr qualified teachers of so bosic i subject as homemaking" Q" s& bev* i*tf! NO SIXTH SENSE B> WALLACE 8. HI'LLCTT LfJNDON. A Minisfry of Labour working committee has issued a report hattenn:' that the blind have a n r % tarlou Ixtft unite., included twfl Mind men — Arthur F. Wilson of Ol Laliui. an! n Smith, general secreUi. ol UM NaUonal U The report said: %  %  .• that the inomiiry . [ hearing, toucr nail are Inherently l tt, thnn In seeing perT 1 e report at'itlttci tl > %  of their nfTlietion. %  tHor use of their senses thru th.^e with sight: I' is true that because of the iiv of obtaining mental rrom seeing, tenses I aa far as possible to fill the gaps and mav thus improve with use. The fact is the blind make better and different U0S of their mentrrv and remaining sense*. ea that blind persons a re naariy an nwaMal geniuses hn l>een long in dying. But blind children cultivate their hearlnmore intensely thon sighted children and this helps them in the arqmsitmn of musical skill." —I.N.S Third the installation of ade.nd-approach systems laoa Is difflcult. Fourth, water does not abound everywhere London is 70 miles from the nearest suitable stretch. Id capital! are even further. Fiflh. undercarriages pay tliei way; the lined hull. A boat-shape cm never !* %  pafffotl air-shape. The problem Is how to fvX our perfect rhape off the earth's surface. swiftly through UM an. and gafftj down again. I^iok ahead, not back. In I few rs' tlrr i mu alrerafl will closely resemble ahe V.2 i-ocket, with a veTtu-.ii t;iice-olf. and a sit-down andliig on its icts. Alnw >t like a let plane with a hover-plane lauding; g rt ar. r r s. THE LAST CENT LONDON. B.G.May Send 2-Mun Team To Argentina irmn Our Own Cttrrewoivl'"'• OEOROaTTOWN, Jan. 23. British Uuiana may send a twoman team to the Pan American Games at Buenos Aires—Keevil Daly champion welglil-liller Who U World elans lifter and (lenient Cummings. the ooiony'l best midtnnce runner. I"he l^n. Olympics Committee decided not to send a team to Buenos Aires, but rather, concentrate on gettlni; together a team for Helsinki In 19M. ll owoVfr, the A.A.A have applied to the Olympics Committee to approve of Daly and Oummings representing the Colony. The cost of -en.lInir the two has b*en guarnnleed by prominent sportsmen. Harbour Log la Carlisle Bar NOURISHING... STIMULATING INVIGORATING... REFRESHING... SATISFYING • C l. SUBS ( CO. ITn lUlDntTOWN. .• .. un NO MORE GREY HAIR AFRICAN MIXTURE Colourt ths Hilr lmtar.il r h H sfctotiiislT whst l protenerl of It: A GENUINE HAIR COLOURING Aro.loOie m 4 fiondy KM BOOKER'S (Barbados) DRUG STORES LTD. BROAD STREET. BRIDGETOWN Mimifanurid b r E. fLOUTIIR ITO. %•• %  "" •>'. Mlddi..... Inc FLEUR0IL BRIUISNTINE Main Ihf hair loft and glouf Soldlnisiix End. I ALL OVIR THE WORLD A man fin bottle ol bachelor, like me, you might just duce $2 IV as well Ma.? In barracks. "I have n day off, and go to Brighton or some such place occasionally, but that is all." "Chuck" enlisted in 19(18, nnri has seen service in Gibraltar, Bormuda. South Africa, nm glum. Palestine, India ;md Egvui a uid nils i>">The magistrates waltetl until he bad linnlly emptied all pockets ind then detnand'.l he I %  I other cent to the court within seven days. Said the magistrates: "It m u mean theft." 'Samson' Fined S-*> SPAIN, Jan 23 mson" in tho paroan of \ I,, II,, %  EMtmoat, was on BCondaj coovlctad bj Mr Fabien i the < ourtg .m %  charge of obstructing the free .,! Hie street. Mr Can % % %  I darod Davis fo pay a fine of S5 or 14 days imprisonment Davis explained that he worked for a film company and was Inv peraonatlni "8nm .n" of the pie %  I,-... hlp Bui *..., Scl. M-il"ii n *' S.Il Me M Le %  S.1I /-illr'., ith. r art n n, i %  i. \. Burma l> M V tf,i'f.lt% K utM, sh l*i ,n. M ImllK 1 I M In. ;i'Ml "*(!. Unill IMl In. S ARKIVAI.S M V La Pil. • lo %  sMi Cupl. 1. In ti M.>rl.nM|>H> M V 1 ., Joy. M too* %  1 Ii %  '. %  PrIn Touch With EUrbadoi CoasUl Sutlon Cablr >t.d Wl(.l ,* I H B&AZIL, ITALY SIGN AVIATION PACT KOMK. J.in M. An Aviation a g Toa m ani batwoao Italy god BraaU aw signed at the lUlian Kurvign Ministry today. n tended to facilitate air traftii Italy and South America the Pact was turned by Italian Foreign Minister Count Carl. Sforza and the Brazilian Amou %  ador.—Keuter. WOMEN I^NDON Lovelock tuiu tl if the Dally Craahie f), are doomed forever to the rule of. 'he.-.e-< or wood and drawers ofl water" bocauao ihey lack 'the ar: of relaxation." His letter etaimed that nothir,c wtmen ever do Is dor mere pleasure of doing it. without ulterior motive." He predicted: %  f •ailing a b-vl around a pond. e.r collecting butterfl.es. if ever %  i pun to ional football—from that day they will rule •he workaV —• K.8. Your hair will handsomer by far when you treat it tt Vaseline* Hair Tonicl Just use a few drops a day... then sea the difference I Buy a bottle today! Vaseiineffi fiVUMmto. Aft To Fly Meal To Trinidad m Our Own Urr> |x,nit>(i. I'onr-oi-SPAIN. Jan ^a Suiiplles of meal may soon be rushed here by plane from British Guiana, to ease the present atiortage. Thi was what mambari of the Motel Association WOW told on Monday when they mteivicwed Mr. A. A. Douglas, acting Controller of Imports and Bxporl I dek>i.atimi agreed to pay th,. InIICD Miey w erI warned the meat would cost Mr. DOUKIJbud Informed Ui< deleciticn thai In ordei to aaaa the situation, the Board would try to get supplies uf moat Hum British Guiana by plane He .1 warned thorn that the price WOQtd be higher than at present. The quantity which UM I Board will try to get ta Guiana will be only to ea>,> Ih4 poslUon until t h e arrival o shipment from Australia nround the middle of Febnmry. [Good mornings henin with Gillette The Basques who reside in the High Pyrenees Now shave o*J their beards with the greatest of ! You also should share the improvement thev've made By using Hie wonderful Blue (nlleltc Blade Mi.irpcsl ever made, Blue OflJatia Modal im abo tha mo.t aconotnicaJ baoai m tba) uui so long. Vitiir.illy they arc ilin.cn bv the Matftaal BaWJ Ow c\*f> I <>iinti) in the uorld. Blue Gillette Blades i.iMirtn ga4 Wn BARBADOS YEAR BOOK LOOK YOUR BEST WITH A VIEW lo aBllinq tho Secrelarlea ol Societies. CMUM. %  and Anocialioiu lo make tho compilation oi information in THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as ay and complete as possible, all organisations embracing all lorms ol activities; religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports. radio, agricultural, stc. are asked to have the lorm printed below lilled in and sent in as soon as possible lo : EDITOR. THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951. C o Advocate Co. Ltd.. 34 Broad Slreet. FORM Title ol Society. Club, Organisation, Etc.. President or Chairman. Council or Committee Members Treasurer Secretary Short historical account ol the origin, functions and current activities: •I \



PAGE 1

FSIDAV uamtn x. mi BARBADOS ADVOCATE 50 Acres Of Canes Burnt T BI \KI;..ST cine Are sofa* tlua ye** troke oui at Small 1'idge Plantation. St. Thomas on Wednesday night and destroyed 18 s acre* or second crop ripe >i i Thty artthe property of Q s Kviiyn ami W erc insured. A NOTIIM lai Wednesday night at Fairy Valley Plantation. Chrikt Churt-n t 3J acres of first crop %  M belonging to E. L the iamr plantation. Tnis fire extended to Tyme %  lirst, second and third crop ripe "nglng to ten peasants. \ nn FIRE broke out at hut Plantation. Christ Church and hiirnt 1) acies of first crop ripe canes and or.e and a-half MOOd crop ripe HMI They are the property of A. M Aithui of the same plantation. S T. STFrilFNS (111 lit II will Idllkf its Harvest on Sunday, January 23lit additio n Jo the Matins ar.d Lew Mass ;it 7 80 a m (here will bo procession and Solemn Mass at 9 a.m. In the afternoon %  Sacred %  .ill be -unit by the choir iltd the programme will QIH! with Solemn Evensong procession and To ivum at 7 p.m. -f'linVF** broke and entered an 1 unoccupied house at Queen Street, Bi Michael and stole D quantity of galvanise and lumber valued at $40.12. The incident was reported by Charles Barton of .he H>me address. S KVFMVVKAR-OLD Fertha Sobers of St. Matthias Gap, Christ Church, died suddenly at her home early yesterday morning. Her body was removed to the >*ublic Mortuary where an autopsy WM perfoiir.nl I AWN TENNIS U played four time* a week at the Princess Alice Playing Held. So far this Is | \port that is organised Only one tennis court Is In use. but the other two are expected to lM completed, shortly. A large part of the breakwater •round the field has been bulk and some cf the old one repaired Tha evergreen trees are not yet planted. Lady Savage Visits Ch. Ch. BabyLeaguo L-ady Savage visited the Christ Church Baby League yesterday i>nrt wrote In the Visitors Book that the League is doing excellent work Lady Savage wan accompanied bj lib Batty Amp Social Weirate Officer, She talked to some ot the mothers who were at the T aagllf BBd asked many questions ibnut its working. She was shown around by Madam lfill. Pre*ident. Mrs. Fred i and Mrs. E. Sampson. Vice President; "RODNEY" DUE MONDAY The Lady Rodney, which was BChaduled to arrive at Barbados on Sunday, will now be calling Oil Monday. Messrs Gardiner Austin A; Co. Ltd. Informed the Ad vacate yc-Vnl.iy. She is coming from Canada Vll the British Horthern l-lands and will be leaving Barbados the si.me night for British Guiarw via St Vincent. Grenada and Trinidad. Passenger* are asked to keep In touch with her agents CINEMA SHOWS ON CZOKER LINE SHIPS KAGE FIVE Has Heard The Beat Of The African Drums IN THE ALMOST BARE front r-xim of rm hoCM up Saves Court. Christ Church. 75-war-nld Chai fa a round loud man who has fought In Africa and hai hewrd thtAfrican drums, told the Adxocatc i f '!.* days when he used tc buy four egnjg fur u cvni in rVfrt) i and three six-by-four-by-one-inch thick biscuits i< in Barbados. THE PKTl'RE SHOWS TIIF TOYS laid out at | lat>k and value Uiem sterday's Auction Sale for bidders to get a gasd I...in Oai Ovn I •nxBonttnli (IKUHOETOWN. Jan. 21 Passengers travelling between Georgetown and Liverpool in the Bocker Line Vessels Amakurs and Arakaka HOW have the benefit of inecna siwws during the voyage. These Weirtl have had sound projectors installed, and full length feature films will be pu' en board each voyage for the St. Joseph talnment of passengers. Philip 3. 137 FRIENDLY SOCIETIES One hundred and thirty seven friendly Bocietioa in the island provide certain benefits that attroet a membership of well over half the population. The majority of the people are drawn from the poor working classes These for the most par: ran to ensure feat at Christmas time they will be in rece'pt of r bonus—a portion of the mono thai contribute during; U %  Another Important reason is that in the event of their death any of their dependents'. tbeie A. lU ld be some money to help tide over expen applies as well to cases in which member may become ill. Until recently these were probably the most Important ducements. In recent times. h—ever, the most modern of the so-' c.eties have increased the benefits to SUCtl an extent, that thou eandl of the poor and middle classes alike join year after year. Probably one of the most atof tinbenefits Is the provision of scholarships at secondary schools. These are competed for yearly by the daughters of the members. No". only are the fees and books provided, but in sonic cases help U given In the supply of lunch. Then there hi the benefit of long-term bonus paid to members whu remain in UM for twenty years or more. Some Societies even have an Accident Fund where a few cents paid by u member besides his weekly contribution, make tome provision for him in case he betbe vii tun of an an-idr-nt Leans are made to members at some of the societies, it II understood, and at least m one OC tefC cases a Savings Department has been established for the use of members. The latest addition at one of these societies is the set up of a store where men allowed to take advantage of the hire-purchase system operating without any extra charge00 It* articles. Someof the societies have :.n,. h. 111 the count" and the numbers of these societies are considerable. The grades rise from eight cents weekly to four %  hillings. One Can Buy Toy Battleships, Oatflakes And Bath Sponges AT AN AUCTION SALE AUCTION SALES are a part of the community life of Barbados in which only i small percentage take part However, those who do. know their business. Flying Fish Catches Have Been Small st Micimei with M eoeJetiei has by far the largest number, 5 pel next with 1H The remaining order follows: St. Lucv 12. St. John 10. St. James 9. St. Andrew 8. Christ Church and St. George 7 each, St. Thomas 4, St. Cane Weighing Inspectors Reappointed Six cane weighing Inspector wno were appointed in 1945 | supervise the weighing of mg*r aa throughout the %  Hand, have again been appointed eel They will be supervisiies. .m.i will w.-ii CrTf2' e ..b abour .P t ,>arU ?' nl ,,r i *heneee he "rit six months ur the year tt ir. Befon i \iuchan. Mr. C. Vere Walk-r Mr J. McD Heath, and Mi M A Wilkinson. The:r chief function is to make sure ttiat cane weighers art • Iw*ys weighing and recordiiv SSlrf^SJ n l f c 1 moi 7 , m C,' ,i "> l considered a man of neW aiouml seven ocloek until late nil v ,.„. gCSSlk v..* the evenlnf Each man has !..[ ,, hl "* lr 11 %  "•* use his discretion as to the time Af,, r 1% nu r vears service in ., |0 hl work Afn.... Delete] auoi to %  • \ This Is the seventh season that fur '"onlhs. still as a soldier. these men have been enahfed In >h etayed three years in Jamafce a Of WOrt Tnev RAO* • J'.t finally returned to Africa their job and their presence does • """ been a reel soldiers life, %  lot in malitteJnlni the conftdea 5* %  J* 1 >r ?" B *2? al 1 *" f i^asants and sugar workers. I through woodlands where the] In-pi i do Inlerthnnued Seventy live and looku enough for many more years. DeUkty am left Barbadoi In i8w:i as a soldier of the West India : He was young then and ftlled with a desire to see the. cutside HI ila He came from the hills of St Thcmas and wem to school ar Sharon's mixed school In those %  re was not any age limn %  ley remember* a young man and woman wh-> teen M school in I is day and who married .hortly after they left. Tiie fact that Dalsley helped .i,(i „i stu.i, n %  -. (kea him mora ii dignant when as he says, his • ighbours do not behave ne can read and urrite %  iills himself Charles I (Settle? referring to httn* llrsl led HarbudoM htbouiei ueed i" work for 20 eenta a da> and that ueed ii> support him, hu wife and children, iiut In %  a man killed a pig. he gave a pound oaeh of hia nearest neighbours! and sailed the remainder to pui by. Then too. milk used lo be IVople walked fi FRESH SUPPLY Or :PURINA HEN CHOW %  (SCRATCH GRAIN) "rl. JASON JONES & CO., LTD.--Du&ibuior. Firemen, Bandsmen W ill Welcome Club Willow JUDGING from its castle-like appoarance. "Club Willow" which the Government plan-t to buy to accommndatt the Police Band and the Fire Brigade will perhaps be more suitable for that purpose than for the club and dancing boMN which it has been for the last few years. Containing about 20 room. it Un| in which a new nattily have to learn In anu abOUl — a rambling house literally it n mid that the lamily who lived HI it originally nu n family if just two people. "Chin WlUuw" riandl on two acr*s i ( land. Aftci the original owners sold the property, i t was used as a rather exclunvc club. Clubs in Barbados are notoriously shortItved. and it aa not long before Cluh Willow" iiecame just another Of the local temples dediIhe god of dxneing. Dances were held there up to last Chrllte In a short time from now. if the lx-sislative Council concurs in the Resolution to grant Government the hinds to purchase the it property, its walls will echo with •pportunity musk again — the music of the Pui ice Band Roing through their dully practice. The revving UP Of the Fire Brigades engine and the clanging of it bell There .-ire two Dlttbultdintt which once erved aa tables, and the land on which the property stand'; is full ot vines. 1 %  •' '• j ,1IS r^ 1 oace graced the pfoseity. A tennis CMirl will grace it again, for as soon as the Band and the Firemen move there will be provision for games and other forms of relaxation. As Colonel Miihelm. Comrmssionci of Police, told the Advo-ate yesterday, the purchase of the placewould be of great benefit to these two branches of the Police Force. both of whom now ocsrupy cramped quarters. An Ideal Spot A Fireman spends nwel Of his lime in barracks waiting for something to happen. Spending iped space with no for a really good game except one of cards or table tennis can be boring. Then, when the alarm of lire is raised and the engine swings out from its present quarters. It swings into roads During this month there have been very small catches of living fish. Up to Monday only 1,275 pounds of living fish have passed through the Public Market. At i Ashing cenlres the reare also small, the month of December 20.674 pounds of flying fish came into the market and many more "f (XIUTIIIS at othei pen* trr: Tinis a brilliant catch for that month considering that In December 194H only 1,983 pounds ere recorded. It would appear as though the December catches are good every other year. In December 1946 the catch was good. Over 14.000 K unds passed through the market, cember 194" saw a little over 2,000 while the next December was over 10.000. "Unless we have eurrenta coming towards us we cannot find Hying Bah. That waj the position a week or two ago when very little fish were being caught." Mr. D, W. wUee, PlsberUH OfBcer, told the Advocate yesterday. Hi laid that at present the currents would appear to be coming towarda the Island as some flying llsh have l>ccn seen within the last two days. It has how | extremely difficult to catch many due lo hieh wind. that prevailed Hindered by Wind "Wc have had a icalm period for ten days from January 3 to January 13". he said, "and what wind was blowing came from the north west while thposition of the flying flefa during: that period was In the south and south western area of the island. This meant that the fishing boats could go for the fish but could not return within reasonable hours, coupled with tremendous difficulties" He said that after this period of 1m the wind has been persistently high and is again hampering fishing boats from bringing in large catches. He however thinks that the catches In Decent] i brilliant. 'When you k'.'l B g'>d December followed by a poor January' you are not badly oft. May Is usually the best month for flying fish catches. A grouper weighing 195 pounds was brought into the market last It was extremely old and the centre bone very large. It the largest "rouper on record since mertcM hea been functioning, A ioo pound porpotaa ena light. Tiie total amount of Dl ed in the market In December is 29.543 pounds Of this 20.674 iKnuids were flying tish. 1.438 pound' dolphin, 831 pounds king nsh. 1.VH9 pounds bill fish. 2,157 shark. 2,024 pounds albacore. 58 pounds of bonlto, 63 pounds barracudas, a grouper and J I—M-H 1 he total for January up to the find let 1.275 pounds of flying fish. 1,208 pounds dolphin, 032 pounds king fish, 289 pounds bill fish. 1.849 pounds shark. 1.428 pounds albacore, and 40 pounds of tabois During this peiiod large quantities of lion shark were caught. Tealeidaj the Advocate visited the Auction Mart of Mr. Vincent Clrtfnth at Shepherd Street, where a sale was in progress. There were only a do/en people present but several dozens ,>f racing car), r.) "7 toy battleships, fire engines and £,, stuffed animals changed hand:. and only a nod of the head meant that a bidder was willing to pay a sixpence or a dollar more lhan the figure offered The variety is amanng. From selling a dozen iron pots and at the same time extolling then virtue, the auctioneer suddcnlv %  witched le two dosen boxes ol jig-saw puzzles fluent Jig Saw Pur/les lions and then hack to the joy of the barracks. The rank to which Daisley In addition to the allotted rhmWM was Warrant Ofllcer Hut number of factories a cane weigntht.nigh it al' he carried a charmed ing Inspector has to visit, there life. He vas m-vt r arou %  is a regular weekly inter, hanp was he ever attacked by animals n.ilU 1 ccome skilled in IIIIIM. MM • hould not marry and he erOUld li II you of a young man he ni-u \o teach who g,>t marrted and took a down turn. When you hear him talking so. you would necessarily hum and say. s< TO-DAY'S SPECIALS! PINEAPPLE IMIOKMV SODA FOUNTAIN HMt.lHS LTD. HARRISONS ;; BROAD ST. WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SHIPMENT OF AGRICULTURAL FORKS GOOD OIIAIJTY FULLY STRAPPED. OXI.V S 1.70 KAMI. The quantity for disposal is small and future supplies are uncertain. M Ml IS Ol It *MIIH US UIIIIOI I' DELAY. be heard"eaTtbd llremen get off to i that are always busy with traffic, light a lire somewhere in Darbaat least during the day d.. Needs Repairs At this moment the rooms are Hid badly in i.i.i 1.1 the renovation which, if the Oeveinunenf buys the place, will lie done by Ihe Public Works Depar tm e n t One of the reminders of the family occupants is an iron safe let into the wall of one of the roorm. A reminder of the dancing house days is the bar In it Is a blue price board on which is printed in white letterthe price il rum, beer, poik chops dnd the re*t of them. Some of the walls HI I rubble stone and are tidl m good (uiiditii.ii, but there are rooms tha and plaster were u-*H and these walls arc crumbling. But If Club Willow" |s used aquarters. Col. Mlchelm Mid, the engine will nMnj out from the back entrance which It on King Street, and unimpeded b) bMV) traffic, can get off to a really fast start. Where the Band is concerned. they now have to practise in a small loom where Cspt. Raiton cannot hear the sound of each instrument well. And they have to finish their practising by 10.00 a m. or else they w ill disturb the Oourt There will be plenty of room for practice al Club Willow", and tln.e goes on. Colonel Michelin %  to put 01 Bawl '"ill then be ically "at home" to the public. B.G. Health Officers Check For Flu y are given a leaflet which i lines the measures to IKtakei prevent the spread of lh> They are also advised lo go to bed and call a doctor All Cxrarwt Sanitary Off! have been Instructed lo visit and ascertain the state of attend at schools in their districts, and if tins is found tc ibelow uge. to investigate lurthei influenza Is the cause if abs lantt ti"'v an inatructed immediately Iheir Undings lo their Health Ofllcer and advise i li. parents or the affected aUMren to put them to bed immediately a,id call the doctor. All School Nurse. Health Visitors and district subsidized League Mid wives have received similar instructions and all registered mediral practitioners bam been alerted. GEORGETOWN. Jan. 21 The liemerara Electric Company Limited, and the Manpower Citizens' Association announced yesU>rda> Ihe signing of a new agre..;,. ftnd ncvcr mflrrk (1 Thcn men giving the emp-uiy; wouUi come rtll .„„ Ult „,„„>,.emplOyen an additional it per h ""'."" %  t a^-£L5 0n iel r i %  Oth of DalsleyeneeNve to September, ieso. The h Hp mj irlrtl Ult ^^^^ I HARRISONS %  ; ,, „, h ,i living lie rnaiiicn n BgmneM followed months of, ( h h d Ui.g-d...wn-aut negotiations which h fl u — several stages were on the m oi veig' "f a complete break-down The cost -of-llving bmus agreed upon brings the total to 2<> per tent, bonus, with a sliding scale %  rrangement by which should the Cost <.f Living Index show any IncreOM or decrease the bonus would be adjusted accordingly. It u estimated that the new concessions A-IU mean an additional Si5.i>oo to $20,000 per an rum for rfas.es. while the minin um wane, including bonus, now rites to $2.20 per day. .i-.ii Ami after many years In Africa Daisley returned to Barbados U i-ork with the Wacerwotij partment as a sub slore-keeper He like* life in Africa ! %  "< i thai he likes it In Barbados Ten years ago he resigned awl mover n the city into the counliy U lead a eulet life. TRADE M/ft OPENED ittam Oui tfteaesat] HARDWARE DEPI TEL 2364 ;V^^V.^^^^^^'.'--AW.V,'^W^^^^^W^'.'.^^'A PORT-OF-SI'AIN. The Governor, Sir Hubert Ranie. formally declared open th* Bret "Trade fair" in Trinidad *>' Britten Hoods and British carnvoni on Monday. sir Hubert, eri pained \.\ In A in' m-1 ins arrival iy Mr A. s. Jenklneon, British caravan salesman, and Major Carruthers. who in conjunction with the West Indies Buyers* ere responsible for the exhibition. l.ord Selsdon. a Director ol Raven Caravans Ltd., said that the exhibition was an experiment to bring more British goods and larger exhibitions in the future. ',v>',v ( .*^>',',*^-,'.'--^v,',',','^;',*,^vNEW CATHOLIC CHURCH BLESSED urnea %  n CWtmpaegsali l'')lt'l-y His Gra<-e the Archbishop of Porl-of-Spaln the Most Kev. Or Flnhar Ryeo ou Sunday The ceremony which drew one of UM on Iferrfa promi j %  led b) jegfa lab iv i ough CtHincillora, high Govenimer.l offlcul., and feople or a 1 walks of life. Dedicated t<* Our Led) I Pet petual Help, the new chill Is one of the beautiful buildings In the town, replaces the structure which was demolished in 1948, alter serving for a little over IOC years. Students of St Joseph's Convent High School and of I ta< tlon College Uurned out uniforms. Bookers Will Train B.G. Boys As Sugar Technologists Don (.M..MOI <;Fonr,rrrowN Sugar Estates Limited i offer a limited number Of scholarships to enable boys educated m Brltteh G meUf> Bi Sugar Technologists at the Imperial College Of Tropical Agriculture in Trinidad with a view to their employment on the stall of the sugar estates administered ty the Company. The minimum qualifications required of candidates School Certificate (or equivalent) with credits in physics, i and mathematics, or In general science and mat letee will be aetei i panel appointed by the.Directors %  A the Company. Sweet Biscuits YOUR OWN DELIGHTS JUST ARRIVED i l: IB I .il'I. pirr CHUMS „ KKNT CKEAMS ASST. rMM „ AI-KIKIT ON \M KINGS SUf.ET ASST. MAKII (RLAM CRACKERS JACOB'S CARNIVAL ASST AUTKNOON If: A tot evety occasion Sale at the leadlntt .itoteS on if SIWSII M.lt SCOTT A Co.. I ol. ,K'W/.K-/,W.'.'.-.V//,-,''.'.-.'.W.-. f it §na if Stock in g* full Fashioned and nad; 0/ CUPQNT Nylon Gauge, n-2.7.; CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Slrctl



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PAGE FIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FR1DAV. JANUARY M. Il Roy Marshall Hits 111 In Second Trial Keith Walcott Scores 50 ROY MARSHALL. West Indian openinfi batsman. went on a run getting spree when he scored III retiredwhich included 17 fours and one six—for John CJoddard's XI who scored 25)1 runs in their first innings in reply to Clyde Walcott's XI total of 177 when play ended yesterday, the >econd day in the second cricket Trial Matrh at Kensington Oval. Marshall scored hi* hundred ir — %  ~ — ~ N minutes and hit 16 four. giving WaIcol! n up h e fifty on the tin* by back driving a ball from Crick Gels Four Wlcts. In St Lucia Sports Officers Elected At the Annual General Merlin*. of the Hungers Sports Club held on Sunda> List .it "mlrnt Pas' sago Road. the following; offlcem tProm Our Own Cormveudrr.tST. LUCIA. Jan. 38. i <-ned the bowling today, Crick being mort '.^L'T^Llni' weclerted for the year"lar-l-Jr nho\h w.vV R Culpepner (President.; t,f "IMZL C E Squire* (Vice-president): SKS l Sloc-ombc (lion,. Secretary); S C. B Scott (Hony Treasurer); ihout J U B>*ck#ll. S. Grant ne chance at 81. His .nle ratting and driving 1 wag a lesson for tyr L and he was most rough an 81 shaw. the Police pacer when railed him overhead lor six n MIAMI TOPS THE SEASON WITHOUT GAMBLING MIAMI. Pre-season forecasts that Miami would fizzle as a vacacationland without wide-open gambling to stir up interest fell flat tc-day as America's winter playground settled down to its best season in years. %  %  % %  More out-of-towners are dipBritain IS Still TopS .-t'danK anef'be LONDON. that Britain Atkinson for four run*. Atki \ figures at this stage were five overs, one maiden. 12 runs and Brodshaw's nine over*, one mai'lKeith Walcott going at numlx; en, 28 runs one wicket, that ol three scored a quick 50 wh.cn Taylor. Walcott again on drove included right fours. the third ball of Atkinson's sixth Bowline for Clyoa Walootfi XI over lor four runs. Bradahaw took three wukets tar 62 runs In 19 • vcrs live of which %  %  > •wer. maidens E. Atkinson look Skipper Walcott.brought on H *JS two for 42 and W. Greenidge o" Km 8 to bow lo Marshall who was ,,.,„ „ for an 23. King's first ball was disThotni—r. cm than ever before in the history. For merriment, they an Just to show that Britain is trtl j n the rame plush, sllvertopa" in soccer, the Football lined rtun ntf v always did. wiU Culpepper Association will invite a F.IF-A. crw exception. stoneproved (Vice-Capt. j; "B" team: L C. team—which could mean the rest The clirk of the croupier's stick the hero for the siocombe (Capt.); T. Hinds (Viceof tho world — to play again"*! ana ; the metallic spinning ol apt.) _k British stars in 1953. to mark the roulette wheels are sounds they Football: Capt. E. Cox. Association's 50th anniversary. A British team may tour South 1 America that year, TJU. Leeward*. Lucia's fielding apt t h • [best. St. Lucia turned to the crease losing .ickeis cheaply to Ant hony son's wings. August? I o a e UKK batted well for the Leewards. sT I UCIA la) Inning* . l_fS£WAIM)H un MrMihon b Kill. M rikilnn Ibh b Cnt-k When the score had reached (! %  > : A.lll b OrlflUh ..... OKK Helen b Crk-a %  Tennis Champion LONDON. Art Larsen. American singles tennis champion. Is providing i .ci.tv of ammunition for his Australian critics, according ,• reports received in London from Affcssida. EXHIBITION GOLF LONDON. Mildred (Babe) Zaharias. the ,, American golf professional. 1st scheduled to take part in exhibicannot hear anymore. Months ago. when the squeeze" first went or. organized, illegal gambling In the area, gambling interests predicted a sudden death to the gold coast's annual %  tourist boom. They bitterly forecast that without gambling. Miami would fold up. Bui Dan Sullivan and the Miami Crime Commission which he heads thought differently. The Crime Commission i matches in Britain during the nn(( 1OCB1 newspapers put on th heat, aroused the pub'lc. and, n.pli/i Aiilhon)*on b KlIM-k also htt a tour in the l-vti lto w b Au€lrt u. t him 24 and thri...i*. MM When play began yesterday runs. Walcott A. M. Taylor who ttj not out thir Accusing Larsen of 'court antics" the critics declared that um — --.-.-,-._ during the recent South Austra. According to Fred Corcoran. wit|l ammun ition supph/l by the lian singles ehampionship. ^ Klf promoter, the first six in a Kefauver Senate Crime Commitdemanded that a pre tme<*l the gamblers to close raphcr should I. or United Slates next June arc comdown the court because ol the click of '* to Europe on tour. It is likely Snmc Illegal bookies continue the camera shutter which might ihat among the wu.ners will bo to operate but a vigorous camdisturb him and cause him lo km Patty Berg, Betty Jamieson. the pa ign by Sheriff Tom Kelly e point. Bauer sisters and Peggy Kirk. making it hard on them. Larsen also demanded that But whether she is successful or The lack of big-time %  i ircgram seller*\ newsboys and not the "Babe" Is to play here an vendors should be si—IN H. lenccd. and that ball-boys must be made lo bounce the balls bach to him on his backhand at mm prtic U i.rh.iht-iN.. Fell Off Horse Uvlngston Walcott a 24-yearbllng apparenUy makes no difference to Mr. and Mrs. Tourist Fred Davant, executive score lary of the Greater Miami Hotel Association, pointed out tha' there are more places for tourist|o slay this v. inter than ever before. And, he added: sitorIhU over Taylor look .rnklr. I ggj^ ^^^ rjJ1 ^^, ,„ 10. At trus began to fall. took slight I (or *. 3 lor YM.P.C. On Saturday K. Bower relieved Greenidgo %  emA.*. h>dl frf n^tUhkw'4 secand his first over of tho slay cost I£^J*&1£T$S:&? '""**""; rsissss rt for lour rum. Thr Mxd his ""v with a (our CfMUM ball h. .00k .. .injle Marriin I bu. on rM 'ov M cr"Th:i Proverb, Joined. M-h.!, i\n* was The teams arc:— K Oreenidge (Capt.). A Mc. Ken/ie, S McKenfle, H. Andrew. results of matches played c. Watts, C Gaskm. A. Kmch. J. Parris, D, Gooding, P. Claike and H. COT. B, Porter (Capt.). C. McKenzie, R. Peterkin, E. Branker. G Archer. D. Archer, II. Inerair. A. Ingram. F. Austin. H. Maithews and I. Burke. folio* MEN'S IMU'BLKM J. D. Trimiriingham and J. I. Hill beat W V. Hunle und V rredicted drop in tourist tradi all Indications point to the conclusion that there are more visitors than ever before." Even apartment house-, whirr as a rule get only lounsis plan to stay most of the season, report practically no vacancies. Street traffic Is heavy dav and night and. surprisingly, a largt rumber of the big cars which are "lust down for the winterAfter falling off a bench at St ^^ California licence plate il Hospital und discharged after he fell from the race horse Wilmar while exercising It at (he Belle I'l.intatinn about 9.45 a.m. yesterday morning. Walcott got a law bruises on his right forearm from the fall. Fell Off Bench ... llulson e;—1. 6—1. w "'P. G. Patterson and O. H. Manning brat V. Roach and P. Roach a. units nuinns Marshall still continued to pun,.,„„., „„, „,.,„ SSwTSvprrlv he w..ul,l have eot h the howl.nit and got his ceiiM|! K ru rlm ,„„ Mrl force struck on the pads and leg before by Umpire Spellos. Keith Walcott followed and was off with a sharp single I r o m Bradshaw. was and a. iuncn.ini* m.. *...>.,...•. ^-' ,._,., v •,, oll t 013, Ml. R55. Wl. and the score A r Sk ni r Mrs. . Wormc 7 To-day's Matche. I Mill IHIII.IIS (FINALS) Miss D Wood and Mrs R Ri G I'ilgrii d Mi' M ixiii DOI mum Mi' 1. Branch and Mr. Crlchlow vs. Mrs. A. Gibbons After lunch. Marshall retired m with 111 and Wood joined Proverbs. Bowen sent down Ihc Mr A gpW** first ball to Wood who look a ?' single. When Hie score was 2M. Wood was bowled by Ores Hunte then followed and Marshall hit his first foi the day off Atkinscn's fourth over. This was the third ball pitched well up nnd Marshall nn e tho mark with ;i mule IrOOl executed a lovely full-blooded a WI .H tuned drive. Proverbs no-.v dr.v-placed away from 11. King. ia began to bat patiently and *.. Walcott cut the first ball from dropped by Skipper Clyde Wole ,;t Rradshsw's fifth over of the day who had taken off the gloves an I for four and Marshall loan a was fielding at silly mid on. An brace in the third. The %  score. vir after Proverbs was run cut. Branker Joined Hunte. \V< .n Mill vs. Mr A. Jcmmott Bad Mr. J. L. St. Warren and Mr. Cricket And Iktsebatl board i cad 48—1—17. tandard Canasta THE TWO-CARD CONVENTION by M. Harrison-Gray 'JMUH .-tmMiUon u w*a in signal U. Ins paruier u> meld all pu^Mbl* earOa. so that b hlmstrir CJ with oni Uatia-Vai NBlumll* this titit* wnrks so Misn u f i wnen uia pan> IIOT nip n ui da lh* n*ors l.vnui.liln po-Hlon for ID Una caos two cards would normally te PI had namOrr lo leuv mur-^tr wlin ftliber normal It ym stw* tiylng W go uut POT extmpl* vni %  .nn your partner Hm ainatd* meliled %  >Ttulrow.i : Canasta ol Serena i.'fr a a Wtinlrvrr V.'U drnw. jrnu eufl of ix,tii iv uin" ever(ll>Uitt >ed axi on. Bui in ordfr to rusk* the masiinum numlwr uf c.ins-uu vou sftouia maid ail hui ih i*,. wild earda. ibos warning your psrinsr of MM position Ha tdrn meina Ul lie ean and mskaa up an* pos-mile caiinot-vs At four net turn you win to out. pucir.ii it.iir wild card) lo Us best ndvnntaae Bui II y^ur aidla tn a Dad position i-ou may tiafa to meld all possible cards In order lo help your paruwr W ao out, and rua may be ivit witn two only In aucli a ca-o the two-card convention lias no me-tntr.a I-ONDON More than 500 baseball club* ore now in operation and preparfor a boom season In Britain tho new ball was brought oul — where cricket is the national garni the score 236 — Branker took J League and cup competitions single In the second ball of flu are lo be held during the summer tenth over. Hunte went down an.1 „nd are expected to attract thouin trying to drive a ball from sands of spectators. Atkinson, he gave Smith, nov T[l( |,.jding learn In Britain keeping wickets, a lovely catch. Ine Hornscy Re,i Sox, Thev hoit run, was run out. Skipper GoddaiJ and Millington were absent. The match continues on SatHrdoy. • i mi MMinn XI—id lnal.it i:: JOBS t.t.nii \ ini \ti.i i,.:,.., A Tavlnr It.w. b Btad-haw H K. M.nhall round III K Wak-oll b K Atklntian . M USAAF. Sur.-cy Tigers und ban Cubs. —I.N.S. Wood b W. Oiernldalluntr c iwk. Sinillo b Standard Canasta THIS RULE SAVES TIME By M. Harriion-Cray IN the rules on Co not to drawn mi by Crwklord"s Club, there Is a, law iluu sik>ws a game to start at looo points to each side This iias the etTect, u | shortening I hi* game and does away with part ot (tie leavlnteresung stage — l.e~ 11 /Idc-s rcqu K Riamkri K l loud r J William. C Mu HUM run ant .i Osama abatn %  F Millington abaenl Bradohaw l Walrall h SMadUtaw I OUl ..., J BOW LI NO ANAI.VS.lt l*innii MtMaa. Cll-OI'lllarirMi W.leott pota boil onlv lor the flrM meld, ii must bf apprrctaird that this i. not tinsame thing %  iiuiLtitR Ih. game unn of *QW ix.iia. only In tde lattrrcaa*. y..ii would b. maintaining the liny the sani* time portion of the In full Tills rule foe a club. required lor (tie mitini %  i %  I soodc my PSSS or (or the in-t etimn o| %  %  •• !" n. wnen Uie player* are not quilt, nurv wtieil.er tntiy nT time (or luat one more iramr Agreenirtit on this local rule %  llpw-s for the time laeiur %  U (HU il-':-v ".T>K irom the it PHONE 42S7 FUR . SURINAM PLYWOOD Tr.-.iinl lo resist Termilrs. Ii." thick in shteti 4' X * W thick in sheets 3' X '' First class quality, ideal for Flush Doors, Cupboards, and Panellings or all kinds. Can be Polished. Varnished or Painted. STANDARD HARDBOARD V thick in sheets 4' X •', , 1"' 3/16" thick in sheets f xr WILKINSON & HAYNES Co., Ltd. GET READY fMMVsMsMV-904 ^sfrlHih'^V^tevsft tiis^vS{. • THE lilt KIT TOURNAMENT Let us fit you now with a FINE TROPICAL SUIT BLAZER AND FLANNEL PANTS • P.f.S. MAFFH & CO. LTD. Top S-SnM in Tailoriofl" Wlaas>sp^sagsq0B90l "At least, John. trerTs taring our fuel." W hats on Today Exhibition of OH paintings and pencil sketches by Mrs. rrla De Kuft at 'The Pavilion— S.ea m Advccaie's Photo Exhibition at n .i i..ui..-. Museum — I0a ., m R. J Me I '"d\ Exhibition al OH Paintings at the Barbados Muaeum—10.UO avaa. .in! t.l llriliuir'. —11 a-m Sale ot Doable roofed shoo at Bank Hall (rosa Koad (D'Arey Scott Auctioneer 100 p.m Belleville Tennis flub Tournaments—4.1a p m. Celebration of the Anniverary of the Foondlng of the Republic of India at Cembermere School under Hi,patronage ol Ills Honour Mr. J. W. B Chenery Mr. G. H Adams. M C P., and Mr W A Crawlord. M C P are tobe among the speakers— II.. P Ml M -lullllnema gives show at KlngslatMl Pasture. Ch. fh.—7.30 a m CINEMAS AQ1 ATII I l.l'B; CI|i.Ua'— ri.\tA tMassatsni Th i-pe,!.., n.nftalBW SB. TL\t* lOi.imi%  %  •wmii* Sftf.-f•" S teisaal r M..4 n. —SB s*. .• OAtfTT IBB, nme.i -('a.*r ROVM *SMM at me WStMl.t* % %  s Tkona*tk.tsif" — i.sa a sat %  m oi.VMrtt''Taint -r-M-.i. o.r T.iy.sag tht Atsaai aoxr ti.. The. Weather TODAY Sun Rhes: 1? a.m. sun MM 5 51 pm Moon (Last Quarter) I %  ni ary St Lighting: 63 p.m lllg* Water: til a.m. 6 IB VFKTERPAY Rainfall (Cadrington) nil I.l-l fur Month to ester day: I Bl Ins Temperatsre (Mas.) 873'F Trmperalure (Mln.l 1.T Wind Direction (9 am.l E. (S iin > N* F by E. Wind Velocity: 15 miles per hour Barometer (fl am.) 29*53. It t m ) Ml THERE WIIX BE . DANCING TOMORROW Mt.lll at (ASIARINA CLUB C. RF.RTIE HAYWARD*S ORCHESTRA -ION ge DINNERS FROM 7 p \l Reaer. allooa S4 002. TM I 1 Tune in In K | :• %  -ii. r\ In--dav al to p.m. Tart 1 1 idrevva "Buggv IR le"l'rngranure r< 1 ...i.lc* riml iilciiainmenl. I N addition to the regular gtavj this new, smaller pack of Andrews Liver Salt has been introduced to enable you to try the World's roost popular saline for a very small ouday A glass of effervescing Andrews, MSggfj only a Jen pence, cleans the mouth, settles the stomach, tones up the liver, and finally clean the bowels. Al>o at any time of the day one teaspoonful in a glass of cold water makes a cooling, refreshing drink. You can be sure of Inner CUanlim:s with Andrews. Circular Mercerised Knitted Fabric in while, blue, pink, green, 34" wide Per yarcL 7oy Rayon Taffeta in all the popular shades, A Silmyra Fabric. 36" wide Per yard 84^ Suede Corduroy In Candy stripes 36 w Ofi,/ Per yard HOiZ CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., ltd. 10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET COMFORT. STYLE. DURABILITY. THESE ARE WHAT YOU SHOULD DEMAND OF GOOD CLOTHES. THESE ARE WHAT YOU GET IN CLOTHES MADE BY C. B. RICE & CO. OF BOLTON LANE


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PAGI: TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY IWTARY 20. IM1 Ccuub Calling PANAMA FA.Ull/Y ^_ "il 9 wmfm&km^ *"3c* %  J kiw' Jti fv3 P ^o ^•^ —" i it 1 -^K' -j^J^H HL ii. 1.11 NX. i DB. IMA I I DEAN KLEV AN. bark In uniform, ...... mi... n i.-il b> Wl .r.ir.il .. by BWI A for Puerto Rlro rn rout* lo Panan suUoned .1 Ihe |L| Army Hue. nil wife and th.lr two rhlldrrn where Dr. Klevan will be Destination Panama L T CEN. SIR OTTO LUND. K.C.U.. D SO Commis. In Cl....f. SI. John AmburvR (Maj ) a MRS DEAN lance Brigade, accompanied by X> KLEVAN and ih.If u.. Ihe Counlea. of Brecknock. Lady children lefl vc.lerdey morn'nf .Sllpeiinltaide.i: in Chief. SI for l-nerto Hico by B W I A llr. John Ambuh.nce Brigade (OverKlevan will leave Puerto Rico MM) n due to arrive in Bai.shortly for I'.n.ima to lervr In bade* oil Srairlay. rebruary 4th the U.S. Arn.y Base trier.".',"* %  "' vl "t. Among thoae at Seawell rwLaely Hauen Powell. Chef |„day In ee the n off v the World, who was inand Mrs. Al Nvrni. Mr. and His transit through Barbados las". Lisle Smith. Mr. and Mrs Jean \seeK on ru r way to Trm'dad lver*on. Mr and Mr< Don Clalrwm sum to Barbados on her monte. Mr and Mrs Bernard 3" rt,l ... v ?" "" F b u r y 3rd Holfe. Mia. A de K. Frampton. £ il Sf £." ,or "" d ) • ni %  % %  Allan Gardiner C.D.C. Representative Taking over Dr Klcvan's pracB HIO ERIC MOUNT, a Re,icc hcrc ir Dr Gardiner who pmentative of Colonial De"rived from Ottawa jtun over • velgpment Corporation who wa, !" •& "J^, 0 "*?" fj""'In Barbados on a four day visit 5 '"'*" ""' X M m "" Ar "> left yerorday momln, for St ,or l0 >'"' "" P~>' "Is !.! by BWI A to otaeVo the 5"! nd '•"?">• to ""'" %  '" l.iogress of the rebuilding of Barbados on February 3rd. Castries. Brig Mount Is station„ . „. • J In Trin.dad Cricket Plane Intransit To Antigua PNfajasM %  *' %  i i :>t ih. Law, had*, in a.m. Mmic IPOITI %  1 am Oonal PlWni and B->* Film. %  •X t Th* Nr>. til .. n> llama Nw. I • 1* a.m. Clam Down: II IS :.|4II to n> I.I.• %  Cbot: II U World AlUin % %  **>• The N. MIO am Naw •TSS^iSl; -SBsflaa She „ow nucceeds Mi im B n r iipir oi leyne. Oritanioer of. the .louseih. w*^ MI pm ii-. hUha Mu-ir irifl ("en!re ••* P %  % %  U'rrlianl K*y S> • IS p~ riMdotn Under Ihe !-•*: S o Nee.l To A*k im ,„ TK, ... f% a... T HERR will be a Mm about ** *"" J^'" J^*" 1 ti I' i" Think % %  Thvae Thlnli cricket Included in the Hun irpm Kad>a Neorreei. B •, >,. proKramme sponsored bv the Brit "W' %  "' fi"' PM 1 f *** ish Council at Scout Headquar* 1 ** f *~ A ^u.iu'ri* ISM ;Jm. TS s. Heckles Road. toiiiKht at Haw*; ww aja rraai in* suntonau. .•clock. Need I ask if there wl ll. .s >JJi c. !" -^ !" 'I.S^: '?£ II OB pm. kluikc for ee Ihe fllnf Atitlralla Day. Rupert and the Sketch Book-19 Grenada Arrivals M ISS BARBARA .LANG who< parents own an estate a. Granada arrived yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. Irom Grenada ID spend a month's holiday in Barhados. She Is a auest at the Ocear. Vi-w Hotel, Atnvlnij on the same plane wa* Miss Rita Branch of Grenada who Is henfor a few day.* holiday, staying at the Worthing Gut*l House. Here For a Day R EV E A PTTT. Supt Minister of the Methodist Churci in Kingstown. St Vincent arnvee from St. Vincent yesterday morning by B.G. Airways intransit h Trinidad. He left later Ihe sam: afternoon for Trinidad to see hi' sister who is ill. Rev. Pitt WM J one time stationed in Barbados I. ihe parish of St. Philip. M.iilini-iue by B.W.I.A., afti rne week's holiday in Barbado_. I staying at the Mastint'Hotel. Max was In Barbados about flv. yearn ago, when he came over u English. He now speak KIIK1'*.I llui'iilly. %  aJ-. .-^^S S a^ ^ -^— mdai b) BO. Airways -other crtel KarF?22 a r ^ y in Barbados shall Norman is the Assistant "*** %  MCacrabani Sba U >"Manager of th Sltim i transit to AnUgua where she will Machine Co. here and he has ; join her husband Judge Manning, gone to St l.ucia for about one who Is at present there, •tudfa week. Manning is a Puisne Judge in S". incidentally ihe An Hostess on the "plane on which thi ) Yntic fJoine/. vtneem. nfv -f C.IIV Gomes, Trinidad nl W.I. Cricketer. Continuing W.I. Tour Trinidiil Senior Judge M R. JUSTICE KENNETH VlNCENT-IlRnWNE, Senior Judfip m Trinidad arrivad on British West Indian Airway's morning plane from Trinidad >> %  Enic PHIOIE, cim-f Hi %  < % %  yesterday Here for about six i-' cal Onicer at the Colonial weeks' hoi diy he is spending Ofllce who arrived from Brazil the first two weeks nl_ Powell via Trinidad on Wednesday afSpring Hotel, after which he will ternoon. lefl leatsillaj for Anhe moving over to the Hotel tlgua by B.W.I.A. continuing his Royal for tin remainder of hi., tour e.-fect poems about animals, written about 400 years ago b) On BaUay. His epitaphs for his dog I'cloton and his cat Belaud are full of humour, and you can recognise, in his descriptions of the animals at play, your own favourite dog and cat. PrivuU' F.nU'rprhv O F a Hollywood \ eddlng I read that "220 police watchad over the hundreds of bejewelled The problem fi tcctlvas on one sucn occasion was lo distinguish between the guests and the jewel-thieves, since i-very body was loaded with costly "injinents. There usually comes mocf)Qltt when the jewels begin to ,'honge hands in dark c orner a, as nt a wedding in London, when %  man was heard to say angrily to .1 Frtebd: "1 "itched necklaces. ami now you've gone and pinched my sham one from her Th.it s all righi." replied hla friend. I'll substitute It for the one that huge woman over there n wearing." Bui a\ that moment there was a cuiTto, and someone else got the 1 iige woman's trinket. EMPIRE THEATRE TO. 11 •j.:to A §.90 rlAD CONTINUING DM I.) Al Mnl. & Nighl Shows lo Thursday THI: UHi MVSHAL T R E TIM£ 8 30 IKIDAV T.. SUNDAY Hi Ml. till ^ ,.t SOSOS \ %  Sunns Allan HOCKV Une SPEIGHTSTOWN PLACE THE fill DAY To SUNDAY 11 — 1 nan MV \i'\ -Kii %  tatffag ROY Ttoomia Yir Sin'ms r.ib..v. GABBY' and that Hor- IKat'i more Uian a llo.n GLOBE Opening TODAY to TUESDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. A S T O R 1 Ft t-UM HlR'ftfllUMl ing,lOSD J'IBH DstKtM bl CHafclS 1W 11 Pr-teM tf mm AKINUR Judy Garland*^ Own Story Uoli out for Judy Garland's own story W.iii""". MI Sunday, Page 3 sad con imuln; dally on Page 2. If yea are asnoac the mil liens of movie fans the world •ver who have been ahoi-aed and poisled bs Jud\ Gar land'.. auleMe alli-ntpt. ><>u will not ml" a Hiirii *f her own fninh human life story. AQI'ATM'CXI II saatia'i* CUOFATBA" Siarrlna CULJ.U CO LB (1ST o Wsuian WILUAM %  a-S a >l a< TIUBaaaSi A PABAUOIWT PU-IUItE BBt| WILCOXON MATINC Paranaaat I-.. — -u ... SUrnna PHYLLIS CALVg DAY AT 1 F M t OWN Ilir LOVE" MBLVYN DOUDLAS GIRLS RUSH bONQOM. Over 5.000 girls have applied for Jobs as air hostesses with Urn's nationalized airlines .illhouBh the pay is only about $20 a week Only eo .rU a rear are appointed to the job of air hostess but those who make the grade get free nylons, uniforms, handbags, hats and shirts. —I.N.S. CROSSWORD / %  b ^TTRF ;• /J | T ," 7f~ z 1: -ji.. PLAZA Theatre— Bridgetown (DIAL 2310) DAMNV KA*£ in THE INSPECTOR GENERAL" • by Technicolor pCOAL MAT TODAY 4 *t I' M Kciioir inr* oi T stars, <*i ieed part ^niy to : •. 3 • % % % %  i <*> 17. Yo she It. <-d. i4i npllccd. ill IS. The are Joined £ Often, etc.: pni*lac d> Lef.-urer-. ill -JS Loyal. l M. Haumnins rope penfipa. (4-3) llonn .llanu. 4 fcupp.io. Erie a lias, S. Nw gvt u chai.ee tor her. (3-4) Ltr. a novel ciieaa piece. >vi it hoaeplpa. .i a Out of i 11. Dear Leu became educated. (71 i*. weiaht ciirmna, rsi I 17. W.-va wretr tried with sn npu'-o. 14) It, An urn, |g| aa'illon of la asn jars pau:e Aera-, l luwiiim, t. 2V. i 1 Be.!; 8, pro%  "on: 1_. U.-.rff.. %  lI.A/..\ Thenirc— 0/ST/iV (DIAL 8404) •INDIAN AGENT" & THUNDER MOUNTAIN" I..XIi: I V— (THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES Tod.j — Saturday Siinda) 8.30 p m : Mai. Sands, 5pm WAHNERS Bis Special Double I I Ingrid BERGMAN Joseph COTTON UNDER CAPRICORN" & See Us for the following:— Tins PEANI'T BITTER Bata. SALTED PF.ANI/TS Parkas*. DATES Tin. KRAFT CHEESE MACARONI Bot. KRAFT MAYONNAISE I & 31b Tin* HAMS Tina RABBIT Tins GCAVAK Tins SWEET CORN lib Tins C \ I MORTON S PEARL BARLEY INCE&Co.,Ltd. i.. 7 A '• Roebuck Stree*. Dial 2236 EsHPIRE To-day 2 30 and 8 30 and Cantlnulne 20th Century-Fox Present*: ILL GET BY Colrr by Technleolor Starring: June HAVER William LUNDIGAN with Gloria DcHAVEN and Dennis DAY BOXY Tn-dav Last Two Know. 4.M and 8 1'. 2'Uh C.ntury-Fo\ Doublr : John PAYNE and Allot. TAYE in "WEEK-END IN HAVANA" AND SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT" Starring John HOD1AK and and Nancy GUILD Dick FORAN (Th, Singing Cowboy) In GUNS OF THE PECOS ROYAL Lass Two Shows To-dav I .10 and 8 30 Columbia Big Double Richard DIX in "SECRET OF THE WHISTLER AND THUNDERHOOF' wllh Robert PRESTON anil William BISHOP OLYMPIC !.;•! Two Show* To-day 430 and S.15 M-G-M Smashing Double Van JOHNSON and Phillis TIIAXTER in .. THIRTY SECONDS OVER TOKYO" AND "THE ARNELO AFFAIR" Starring John HODIAK, George MURPHY and Francis GirFORJ) .a* S fi NAMRIT" Tobralco and LYSTAV newly opened at Evans and Whitfields I TOBRALCO A TOOTAL FABRIC i. VISITORS & COLLECTORS art invited to cat! and Inspect our fine Range of ROlAL DOULTON CHINA FIGURES a TlECORATIVL FLORAL CHINA BASKET Extra—Gene KRUPA Ihe Drummer Man and His Orchestra Plus British and American News Reels ; M ^\ ACT QUICKLY!! THEY'RE MOVING FAST!! A Small Shipment of AGRICULTURAL FORKS OM.V S 1.70 IAII Till: IIMillAllOS I O-Ol-I II \l I\ I KUIO\ I'A 4 TO in LTD. IIr.~d*are and Ironmongerv llepurtment Telephonr No. 2#S9 ^ af When you plan Buying a I:I i I:M;I li.vi'tn: all these essential beauties should bo considered:QUALITY GUARANTEE — BEAUTY — FOOD SPACE with the New ENGLISH ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR ALL THESE FEATURES ARE EMBODIED S~ ,h* m on ttinpla„ *t 1111. 1'OMtXESt STOKE I \lllll a-^^y.-,-,-.-.V.---.-.--VMSSSMV*





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PACE SIX BAUUDOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JAMARY M, l5l HENRY CARL ANDERSON B MINOULL AMD WALK IM o MOUSE WALT DISNEY J .SOME V / _ I 3 KAN *. %  %  •vou SEC : ... KEV PUT DOWN THAT BOTTL-B ! L. -S I ^-AS TMB Da6At> TZ3-T2AS PuVI ^T -4 BLONDIE MAKE J / OH BLONDFSBv ALL %  BLONOCS ip^ •v BY CHIC YOUNG *?E ANV PCUBT? S3 THE LONE RANGER %  IS TtElR DOS' BY FRA NK STRIKER *"T> VTA* VC LOCKED UP Um CROOKS IN JA.L MARSHAL, WILL ROUND UPT-lE ) it W THE GfcN&' — -* TH '.K MB PECK THf fc JCWELEA WAS BEHIND AUTHC CRIME HERE'l" BRINGING FATHER BY GEORGE MC.MANUS I COul *AC MCCV '' WMCBL oo you TmwK ROSAl %  ". OVIS c> weak. H.'hlng hock. Often the fcprlnfV" "" lu lilnmr, for your kidney*, %  ilotif ilh th liver, muM fillet out impurilkio from Ihe U.-Wr'.m. Ho if you foel tlwd. worn-wit, Imad•chv -with the nji(|inf pain of an nr-hini htti-klook to eolA war kmm-rt jnd liver. Thiil* -ky Cnn.. tliHiHi havo b.-en relyinr on Ur. ChRRp* Kitlnrv-Uver I'llh for o* balfacenlury. f]ive your avatem •• ctiani-o to wnrk properly. Try Dr. ('ha*'> KkliRry-liverPiUllodav. Tin-namo "Dr. Chase" )> yuur wuniw. 1 Dr. Chase's KIDNEY-LIVER PILL? with an BATTERY YOU Gf r DEPENDABLE PERFORMANCE Where dependability" is'vital—vou had better UMFXIDE Betleries.Whenyoubuy an FXIDE • you gei extra power to handle che ti>ui;lu-'i 'cranking job...extra ruggednesiUor hatd ecrvke m all climates ..-. and low mainte-J nance cost. When it's an l\l[)L'.:.-',VOI) Start! DIPENDABU IATTEHIE5 FOtel YEARS! OARAQS TRAOrN : fc Tr



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rAGfc FOUR %  ASBADOS ADVOCATE FKIDAV JAJ.TABV M. 1KI rURMDOS AinOMTE rrtataS k| Ik. *<>INU Cm. LU BtM II %  ...•.*•' %  Friday. January 26. 1951 CO-OPERATIVES THE presence of the local Senior Peasants Agricultural Instructor at a conference of Co-operative Officer 1 in Trinidad serves to rail attention to the unsatisfactory method adopted in ihis island for handling a most important aspect of our economic Ufa There is today no Co-Operative Officer in this island and after a series of elaborate preparations the whole Co-operative scheme appears to have been abandoned. The PCI passed by the Legislature under which co-operative societies were to be registered has not been proclaimed as was laid down in the provisions of that act and to this date not one such society has been registered. An ever growing population with improved standards of living demands an improvement in our economy. That economy can only come with increased production and increased production is not to be gained through obsolete methods. It Id on agriculture that the economy of this island depends and co-operatives seem to be one of the vital answers to the problems of the peasantry. If these facts are admitted then it is imperative that something be done not only to set up the machinery for establishing co-operatives but to gear it for success. A few yean ago Mr. J. M. Cave was brought from British Honduras and seconded for duty with the Department of Science and Agriculture. He was sent to Kfl^land and trained specially for the work. For reasons which have not been divulged to the general public Mr. Cave has returned to his post in British Honduras, and as no one has been appointed to act, it would appear thai the scheme has been abandoned. In a community where prosperity depends on agriculture and where there are nearly 20.000 peasant holders unable to purchase the necessary modern machinery and other equipment to increase the production of their holdings it should not be hfficult to convince any one of the imperative necessity for co-operative societies El should be even less difficult to convince the Government that it is its primary duty to foster the? co-operative movement and so ensure an improved economy for the people who contribute to it •\o Beach" Fish THE genera! public are justified in their complaint-; against the action of lishermen who refuse to sell (ish to anyone on the beaches unless they are hawkers. The schedule published by the Control Authority lays it down that fish sold on the beach must be sold at a cheaper price than that sold elsewhere. Fishermen have now adopted the attitude whereby they sell on the beach only to their womenfolk who then retail the bsti on the street. It is annoying to housewives who either send their servants or go themselves to the beach in order 10 secure (ish at an early hour to And that after hours of waiting the fish are not available to them. In the past the complaint was that the fish were hidden when people went to the beaches and were taken away in trays and later sold at blackmarket prices. In some instances housewives contributed to this by paying the scheduled price and then giving the seller a "lip" for bringing them the fish. Nowadays even with the advanced price under the new schedule it is difficult for them to purchase fish and the phrase "ex-beach" in the control list is an insult to the housewiie. Notes On x\gri*iiUiire Papaw 7. Cold. r. Apple 12. Total Coconuts I One hundred eightv-two different ild plant cane i-e coaital area*, began Ay C. C SKEETE to how signs of npeaing during ,..... .1 a a-.i the la.i fortnight of o.e momh. good .owlh and haie a green and n ootatoM pec'e> were distributed vigorous appearance There 1. ria.a.1 1 ,„2 n Vi imn '" addiuoa. 2..M casuanna ""} !" Z, 0 • """ a of^Stir^^onSnued: wiu "~ er, dl* ri bj.ed c.p briM; harvested Dumber ,,.,. upp |y „, KntamokHSical Tn ' ,hr ""'>' green fodaVTin the majOTity of "••* < !" t Defoliation of pUnted crop was carried out ourXZ Kl "a. good Xlanced """ Potato M* "a. been ex2 '^T£u\J?*i'Z£T21 • %  ''-' ""> • '•"" •"!SSZ '" ; was vary irregular, in some araaa a number ot fields had practically follaUon has been proved The Peasant "*"• > l ,d < ""^l"* 61 /. to be replanted This unsatisfacA !" "" n "•"„ '"* *77J?I2 has also bee V ov 1 ,Mt defohalory irrnimation was largely due #J £Z?L fSStST ,nH l2 * n ** A^ ""> s. .K.-,,, ,.,f.n --h^K „.-_ 5|C peasant holding* and 16 „. 1M _j w u !" **.iv nm#ri and to the heavj rainfall which ob'h^ 11 ?!^.-, tamed .during the month of No"*}** f m ^ > 7Jt n wirk of the %  ember Food Crass. Several fields of early yimi and eddors vested during the n .weld-, were generally good. The " %  market supply of ground provis%  tons was satisfactory CiHia %  n i tn applied sprayings with lead arsenM ale and that .this same spraying service was reduced hv pray thai im u.i: psssbf retta*e i !" the stall organised by the DepartSgsSSSsTBJ WarasW S'thri'pV ir.ent at Ihe Agricultural and InConrro* V — "rial Exhibition held on 6ih for wild cotton was continued In the parish of St Michael for the first part of ihe month and 80 tress were found in Mayers Land, Ivy Village. .My Lord* Hill and Fairfleld These inspernons have now been discontinued. The reaping of the cotton cop was commenced in full and although the weather -onditions were not very favourable In November, some food yields are Borer. Progress __ —ide with i.ilioralury esperiThe stall was designed ments. and with th pn to demonstrate scientific methods scning in the amount i Inspection * producing green vegetables in tt should be possible to Wab. ar>ssssssss#asl A rt... the vegetable garden as well Hie remaining ueld experiments .is under a system of pot and early in January. 1951. Eqiflpculture Considerable interest ment for further field experiments was evinced ki this section of ha been ordered the exhibition, and the Peasant saaUeasaKtleei of Parasite* and Instructors who supervised the PrasTatats. Three consignments stall during the two day* were of Leioeote were received from able to teach some valuable lesTrinidad and liberated in cane sens and sasi on useful informafields and on.large consignment of Apantrie* was received from for the Sugar hederatton to decide wnai proIrrlgallsn. Under the provisions Canada for control of cabbage of the Colonial Development and worm. One field recovery was k was utartmad ** Rododa a predator WAGES 1951 (B> thir Industrial t'orrespondrnl 1 BBOAY ihf Barbados Sugar Fleration began negotiations with the Barbados Union as to Ihe price to be paid tc sugar workers during this year's crop. The negotiations are taking place just one month after the Sugar Producers' Association were informed on December 23 that the Britiah Ministry of Food would purchase thf 1951 West Indian sugar crop at a price of CH l?i 6d., c if, an increase of 47/6 per ton on the price paid for the 1950 crop. Taking into consideration ihe Christmas and New Year festivities and the variety of calculations and discussions that have to take place before a decision can be made as to the price to be paid to some 21.000 agricultural labourers and some 5,000 factory workers, the period of a month is no undue period D. V. SCOTT & CO., LTD. TO-DAVS SPECIALS at THE COLONNADE Usually Tins BROOKS PEACHES 5 PkKs. QUAKER CORN FLAKES 3' Bottles. ALLSOPP'S BEER 2 Pkgs. CORN FLAKES Now 55 31 2U 2 w--.•.-------.-.-.-.-----.---.----'-'-'-'•'•'-•-'-''-'-We Have ... bein, obtained There was a litJ'i;"'„*„: !" Th !" iT ins "ui: hh control, cot.on, tie boll shedding at the belinnin, r?..^ !" , .'.'. n ^ !" "!!',,"£ '1. A. this predator w„ ,n of the month The reapina of the tion of a cotton variety trial, wa. beiun K""'. "**' %  " '" s during the month. .ndm.ll unit -. troduced frvp ,„ yMrf ag0 „ Other small holders were given ^Mm£SS!SiSu* "*' assistance with gal vanned pipe ^J^ j ^^ j^ Thw Peasant Agriculture for the improvement of existing lnspectlons „,,. carried out on l-aad Craps. Supplies of early uniu -j, verumt-nt pi o pf tj and three yams, tweet potatoes and guinea Crap Ha-bandry Following the on private properUes during the corn were available during the initial setbacks caused by heavy month. month I ccn vegetables, howrains, cotton picking was resumed ever, continued to be in short during the month at The Home, hemicul supply and were very expensive, Sayes Court and Jerusalem. IndiSails. Prehmii caboagas and tomatoes being sold cations are t,hat fairly satisfactory lion Into the effect ot addition of in St. Michael at 40—44c per lb. vields will be obtained a* all these Sulphate of Ammonia to black ftagar Cane Of ih 2^ #Z£SafiE3^in^5^ €4l*w. Trw advenl of drier goa,,. ,Heep pigs and equine, ^a Witt (ertiUty problems at weather towards the end of DeFour hundred and eighty-five Codilngton cember was favourable for the nUnns of mdk we produced Th(> orK on the ana lvsis of picking of cotton. Harvesting was Twenty-one head of stock ware sample* of soils taken from areas in progress during the month and joitj, including 17 joung pigs for similarly sampled approximately some good yields have been rerearing. 20 years a,^ Is now complete. pOrtM ... Three hundred and fifty -eight Figures of tot il <-xchangcdlc pot( %  rMUisuiuls. Owing to the nu $ .jprvtees were paid for durassium. tsoluble heav> rams which fell during the ina ne month. These were as phosphate an I rganlc carbon are growing season, the yield of follows:—bulls 147. bucks 97, available, groundnuts reaped during the rams 39 and boars 75. Sugar CamMam trial trial' month fell short of expectaUons. Ecaawmlc Tree Prapagatisai and are i i.-ing la. I out Three sites Tree Crvaa, Limited supplies of Dtrsttlawtsa*Forty-nve lime and for the 3 x 3 x 3 factorial potash papaws. guavas. lime* and green eighty-five orange trees were budtrial have been .elected, and four coconuts were on sale during the ded during Ihe month. Fruit trees sites for the 4 x 3 x 2 N P K month ared from Codrington were trial Owttf lo UM r*u and Disease*. The pnncijs follows:— %  Of the ir<-;.tpal pest* claiming the attention of Orange 8. Grapefruit 23, Ume ments has been omitted at two the Peasant Agricultural Extcn1_\ l^i'.t.:,. '.. Sugar Apple 2. Pom.-entxes in order b) erniil the sion SUIT during December were ela 6. Brradfruii 7. Guava 18, trial to fit Into the area available WASHINGTON In Paris last week, after a nx weeks' trial which focussed ttsl attention of all France and mos. the Soviet goverr.men" was convicted of practicing mDi :. a scale without prece> aent in history. This u the meaning of the verdict which n Frrnrh Court under .; Judge Colamies render.l in favour of the plaintiff, David Rousset. in his suit for libel against the communist magazine "TallKI Francaises" and its ed llnssia's Slaves By JAMES BURNHAM A P.-. ''. Ill %  r-rnrh for,!, i .1 ".t | .'Umg .• %  in tommunistg over to the Gestapo, which put her for the rest of ihe on J.n i) ruled aa.mt war into the Nazi camp at Raiunirt WMI. ,.i it. vensbmeck. BM*Jtogsd^hTnsa ' ld iniit, hua> saws i-bo.tr campi his stav M I tamp ol starobielsk, and how he Nora servtM. transntrred o lew days before his fellow officer' there and in two -olhe* OJ'SSJ* — flft*n lh..i*an*i 'In nil'— were massacred by the !" l woSa>" : "•>" *• *"'S" m "" .in .hr,. MbltsksM Czaprkt who had later Bit, a. aide to the I ncral Amiers tri^ Fr:mc:ilses" answercil Ron:visited hundred, of Soviet li.r*. Claude Morgan and Pierre ret', appeal by callinit Mm a liar, c^mps in vain se-atrh for Uaix. 'rregade. fascist, pervert — in missing fifteen thousand. David Rousset learned about short, the usual list that commu— 20th century slavery the hard msu apply to determined oppo Valentino Gonialc., the Repubway. During[the war/the Ge.t.po i,nt>. Rouuet brought suit f. ^an'.er.eral known ,n the Spank-pt him for four year, behind libel against the magailne and its 1 h .. Cl "" "" *? ,_P t* mpe l'? f,c electrified barbed wire o. .oitors. 11 is this sun which ha> .U-e pent). told how. after most barbarou. concentration Just ended with the complete if**"*" !" GALVANISE DOWN PIPES WATER HEADS RIDGE CAPS BARBED WIRE MESH WIRE r, W. IV LASHING WIRE 16, U, 12 and 10 Gauge „ „ WOVE WIRE — 24" and .>6" „ CHAIN '•", 3-16", U". 4V 5-16" IV defeat, he had tamp — Buchcnwald. After the vindication of Rousset ...,i. It., it wTote two books The communists assembled a tibiut the Concentrationary Unlbattery ot their most brilliant verse" These bccai.'e rapidly lawyers. Just as In the commu. known throughout Europe, eiu.t trials that have becarie faI ially by the hundreds of thoumili.r m liu, .uim>. evcr> n *J^_ P T,, 1 ,, onds "of other, who had also legalistic trick was used to ccnserved their time in the Nail slave fuse and bkek the court proeeedi.jngs. *"CThe commun. I For a while, the communists mined to stop at nothing in order were quila friendly lo Rousel to prevent the truth from becomi.id his bocks. They hadn't caught in* k < n to the fact that Rousset objectBut Rousset and h ed lo Mojcow-made slavery just triumphed over the '"gal tricks, a. much as to the Berlin brand, and drove home the evidence, Then, in November. 1949. Rousi.cint by point. They procured for set addressed a public appeal lo the court ihosc articles of ihe me ex-inmates of Nazi concenScviei olc whufi permit an -.ration camps Ri usset declared MV.D oandal to send a man to that those who had suffered under ihe Gestapo had the duty of un covering tne truth, all of the truth, t.ie existeno and character of the _ about all concentration and slavecamps by documents, maps, orders „ m i n( d labour camps, wherever located and administrative regulations Uken rdufsj in the So\-iet rath land among the supposed comrades, who throughout the Civil War. had < ailed him friend and illy and hero. He told also what to him lib Ihe father. %  ells Und — ti<: of II ad ;md icy freight the slave-work in the death camps. Small and gentle Jerczy Cliksman axplatDM how he had been attorneys """own int prison in 1*40. in Soviet-of i upied Eastern Poland. %  tM. then sent to fell great trees in tht* twelve-foot open snow far irtoe monstrous Soviet north. Eleanor I.ipper gave, in her ,.oft and * thirty lo lifty per cent a camp without any Judicial proSlave camps of Stalin. Confronted with the absolute • called for an International Margarete Buber. wife of ^Ihe „ lnc( rl v rf uth Ul tne>ses lo ihe Commission of Enquiry to exformer chief of ihe German Com iry-jh^ |, lC eommunisl defense .-.mine these charges, and to esmunul I"nrt>. tUi bo In •• %  % %  r j,, ,„.| V S hnut and obstruct tabluh thtir truth or falsity. IM week, with the trial condud Tlie answer of the c mmmlgti i.nt tfri] Nd It nterl it nal Commission was the same that they gave lo concentration ramp at Karayan ( Enuuiry cmtiue formal hearevery attempt to discover Ihe da. In 1940. as o friendly gesture ,„(., „, Belgium. Slavery, as alirulh A storm Of abuse, lies, slanto Hitler under the Slalin-Hitler w i>Si defends itself with lies icr, vilification. PMt, tt'.NKVI) bad turned bar \. lule irulh sides wllh fre?dom The communist magazine "Letand a hundred olher German ex—l.N S portion of the increased price for this year's sugar crop can be passed on to the worker. The cable received by the Barbados Sugar Producers' Association on December 23. merely announced the price that the U.K. 1 Go-eminent was prepared to pay c.i.f.. for the 1951 West Indian sugar ctop. The next itfj was an offer made to the Barbados Suga>Producers' Association by the London sugar btsfcan who quoted an f.o.b. price offer. This offer had then to be submitted by the •ducers' Association to its Financial Adviser who had to investigate a whole .series of figures to make sure that the broker's offer w..> correct. At the same time agreement had to be made on the shipping charges. An important point to be checked at this stage (and again a whole series of mathematical calculations liad to be made) is the degree of difference between the net price increase to be received by the factory and the increase if any over previous years. A most important calculation which involves detailed scrutiny of thousands of figures is that which decides how much costs of supplies, equipment and machinery have increased during the year. It is only after all these intricate calculations have been made that it Li possible for the Sugar Federation to decide what proportion of the increased price per ton of sugar paid by the Ministry of Food for the Barbados sugar crop can be passed on to the Barbados sugar workers. The fact that the British West Indian Sugar Producers in their bargr.mini; with the United Kingdom asked for a price which would allow for a ten per cent increase to sugar workers does not mean that the mere announcement of the price to be paid for the West Indian sugar crop allows the Barbados Sugar Federation to announce a 10'* IMP the sugar workers. Every figure has to be checked first. As soon as the figures are available negotiations begin between the Barbados Workers' Union and the Sugar Federation of Barbados which represents the employers and factory owners. These negotiations opened yesterday. It ha$ been suggested that Barbados has] lagged behind Trinidad in announcing the prices to be paid to sugar workers. The comparison is not apt: because in Trinidad sugar producers ship their own sugar direct through their own agents, whereas in Barbados the sugar is sold to local merchants at factory tests and weights and the mi rchants then resell to the broker, any loss in U-s' and weight being borne by the merchant. The time taken to reach final decisions as to workers' wages in Barbados must therefore be longer than in Trinidad. Since it has now been made clear that in all negotiations with the Ministry of Food as to the price to be paid for West Indian sugar. wage increases !o workers are always taken into consideration by the British West Indies Sugar Association, there ought to be no delay in the settlement of this year's wage increases lo be paid to agricultural workers and an early announcement can be expected soon and may already have been made. WILKINSON & HAYN.ES Co^ Ui. Successors To C.S. PITCHER & CO. Phonei — 4472, 4117, SCOTLAND'S BEST MS SCOTTISH CREAM BLEXDED SCOTCH WHiSKY A Favourite at all The Leading Clubs Aik for SCOTTISH CREAM WHISKY at Your Grocer LADIES ... Our lleaderM Say: like leaven th: be Imposed /nreirc/f Svrman the improvement of educaUon ih •tv*. '"""" hll i t f and san>l> the Church To %  Editor. The Advocate JfrJUff^JmnB the" %  th S1R.-I Mould like to make a ^K !" .*""!; ,S, ,h J^*?. ^ ~lnsh. fw comment', on Bishop Hughei farewell sermon. I am surprised at his scathing criticism in public of the clergy. which, if jgi Unable 1 would have heen more •(!. %  ir, ed to each Individual in private Mass public rondemn.itn r. ..> only dfcunith '> % %  <• respect due to tht'ii calling from Ihel lions. Bishop Hughes iteplorad congrega^Qim. moulh of the Bishop, Uta Governing: Bodies of the schools What has he done" In any case, the function of the Church in this matta thai the educational system ihnsed on broad Christian principles, leaving details of organisntion and teachlni !•> tin 1 iralntd experts to whom we pay large .ugh the mats—not short-sightedness We can never thai such financial success a* th;.: Barbados, they spend monev, they arbitrarily from see in advance that Ihe way to ;-hieved by our West Indies tenlove Steamship travel when they final success lies through immodlhas enabled thl < Thev are fed up wllh _, %  •• '"'lure: yet God ma> know bulion of moneys lor the upke^n their own high priced artificial ever, ihe Bishop convicts u that this Is so. ,-amc in England but %  rrsorls. they are lovers of travel, t Irrgy and UjJ' - A LAY MEMBER or 7n rimnrii. would be vcrv interested to lcun they arc worth going after, much of the funds we I Bay. now is me lime in look brought home has been alloUed. hcn £ for Barbados in a big way, ty. and in aptU' <>f llic harshness of his wordi wa would do well to prom by thorn. It is InTJic Edtfor terestlng in this cenMCtloa t<> SIR —It .. uniacuauKc iri S jole from the words of the late Hon V i .... 'illiam Temple. Ihe groat socialpoblishe.l ;.ftrr the Bishop las 1st Ai. htiishop, on the difTcrencc left the Island, thus giving him no in emphasis between Ihe work of opportunity o( rel the Clerfy and that of ihe Laily. to us for the amelioration of th CELT. the orders who toavlhrP form the Church. He writes: -'The Priest's work is religion ..... he stands After all His lordship's sen. i-as delivered eleven days ago FAIRPLAY H./. CHclrrt Tour .__ the Again, the Bishop aski, what L „ lack of Interest and leadership the Church doing about the social f"r the things of God before UM among Ihe leaden of the Church and political itimni <>f HIP people. Laily—reUglon is hi* dally wi.rk —both Clergy ami Laity. Wh. Thank Cod, the Church in Barba. • 'The Leitj stand for Ihe are these leaders? Of ihe clcrgv. .lus has nn IMII ideal power The things of God before the world -. -.-. ^_ surely ihe Bishop himself. Of only Church dignitary who has . %  they seek the help that '%,,* i„ V religious specialist can give vv ;'"^ !'* l ," c %  *' | Legislature, some of whom arc in polilics is Bishop Hughe, him'hem T he layman finds "J,?V,. A .. ,,I,U .' U ' %  M-Sl. * „ not even Church mvmliers? selL What has he done wh il? In religion the strength for doing f***f J • ,f "' ""-elings of Itae in a ChflsUan spirit w„ r k which S 1 *" 11 of Control and the AdvlsJT, The Bishop complains that In The truth seems Uoe thai tie unbelievers also do." County Cricket Committee a! J! social and political matters the Bishop had many social aad Lord's on November 15. the i Church is half asleep, and lays the political schemes which may have ln conclusion, may I add i furing money giants were made J! blame for this squarely on the been very adJnlrahle, bul Instead tiier quotation from Archbishop . Anglican Church Act. Now as of infusing religion into politics Temple tot tha benefll ol Blahep _* Quote:— As a result of the lius Act -! -.<. •< not affect the Laily, he has sought to Introduce poUUci Hughes, and also I against west Indies" who are mostly ignorant of its into religion. This was not ihe tors? "Wr so easily assume th.ii M on whose grounds contenU. we may logically asI dealt with tl lo us good must be rnatcli. thatthe Bishop when legaeil i litlcal problemi of His day. livthe will of God. %  *42. ihe othci %  arch wee refer. H* did under %  totautarlan plans for the work t class The Edifor. The Adforafe Silt. I cannot gel out of my mind how our old beloved Island is Dassing up iheir great chance A bunch of good fellows named me in Barbados ''Speed boat Doorty" arid they so write me. nea.lv tv. Ihe Clergy that the C r->thing towards ExPresident Hoover some years ago as saying' "W Umghl some poor-hou-tThomasandSt Croix. Is he rial to-day? GFOItr.K DOORLY. 209 Newark Aveniah Blonmlield. N.J U.S.A. January 19. 1951. The "Rpfugr" TJic Editor. Tlie Advocate. 1 have a btlle refuge. It's only ten by eight Hut when I'm und 00 I I make for il quite straight Its been a shelter for me In days of sun and rain; And even when floods threatened. I've fled to it again. But now I'm sorely worried I'll have lo start a-strumming For I read In this morning's "Advocate'' taught that the ask Him to u But od mual !> % %  within thev may be seriously infected individual, and must spread with our prejudice, Ignorance and to pi Kingdom Of God mul be within they may be seriously infected vcnsiifc-s £1.493 belwi a/hat a lot of" Amen. „tV nuosrn'..' j BL TlionuuL Grenada I CUT and the la arP doing, l II I I (.1 1 Ol I.KIOKS (IIM INC. We here are all pleased lo hour Barbados hotels. Americans love 25lh' January, 1951. When the Evenings are Chilly you wilt need a Coat Slop in To-day at DACOSTA'S Where you will find all Wool Materials in Ihe following colours:— BLUE, TAN, MUSTARD AND GREY ALSO IMITATION CAMEL'S HAIR Suitable for I, For Your Afternoon Tea Party Choose your favourite brand Red Ross Choyce Tips Knfca Nectar Kardonah Upton Hornlmsos Blue X Tea lreail. Uullrr iliitl .lams J. . Brosd Anchor ButUr BotiUiwsll's Jams %  alaaae M..t rmh Bpreado Carr's Assorted BlsculU Oarr's Olngar Nut Pau Cake Syrup %  llrsd Ham SPECIALS MYNAH TEA—S6c per j Idrls Kola Tonic— 1.00 par Bottle Lnncheon Choase 11.21 ea. RELISH L PIOBXF.S Oacumber Balad A I. Sauce Pan Yan Braaston HP liurt K.p (air ( %  <'!• CARROTS CABBAGE BEANS GOMPDAHIPS BBuvm



PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1895 Ike Disturbed About Europe _, LONDON, Jan. 26 GENERAL EISENHOWER will go back to America 'somewhat disturbed' about Europe's armament problem, Atlantic Pact sources said here today. The Supreme Commander of the Atlantic Pact forces is particularly concerned about the lack of standardisation he found in his tour of European capitals which ended today. This problem win i>c priority lakea lo Congrc* •on. In America h will meet William Rotf i" C erdlnator of Atlantic Pact p... prase '"i the need foi more rapid arms production. rer left Oriv rMd I % %  • rtcykjavik, Icelandic capital thi< The General drove from his f h a Nag! Hanked by police. No Penal Measures 4Utf$T CHINA LAKE auocau Britain's Sir Gladwvn Jebb said thai no penal inejsun-. should be taken against China whose intentions should be further probed. The Indian delegate, Si, Bern gal Rau. told the Political Comnattes it wan difficult to conduct negotiations with the Peking Government across Uft The quickest Bray therefore tn deal %  vith the Korean DTOM be to hold a prcUminarv rouii'i table conference. Sir Benegal made the statement in the Conu'iittetto-day on the resumption df debate on an ArabAsinn proposal to a Mti HOlimM on Korea ;md other Far Eastern pr< i —Reuler. Lieutenant General Alfrc' his Chief of Staff, Bc1 him. The General seemed In good form as he shook hands with high .-unking French offWhtlB. 1 er. smiling broadly n.ade no Maternal Bllt ivho -utii'ipatcd that he would disclose something about %  ; t'ii-l*iuarters. esfaelaahmenl Headquarters Allied Powci a H.A.p.t,) aupled temporarily the 200 room hold Abtoria on tin I /AC To (r rail I TtlX ''' v r believed that tor hi • %  men' head(,;i. Concessions The Legislative Council will shortly discuss a lull which totkl to confer power on the Georgetown Town Council to exempt the owners of certain properties In Georgetown from llabUli rates and taxes for %  limited period. in view of the housing shortage It is felt : iat sonic encouragement should be offered to people t who told the Council that nylcns would "give the policewomen a bit of reapi —l.N.S France Will Support U.S. Resolution PARIS A French Foreign spokesman aid l< night Uini I I ... %  > %  %  condemning Coma l :. i %  Franca would vote or al< I gi.iph i l.-.'ru: .lauso vote were taken the spokesman said: "Oi • :iy line A lot neper circumstances in which the voting tea and how the resolu"' preaaaaad —Reuler Comma mis A il French Forces PARIS General Alphonse Jum. who has been widely mentioned for a High Command post in the Atlantic aaneaee was today appointed Inspector General of h arntad fort authority the navy and the air force. —Iteuler. 11I1S IS BRIDGETOWN. Picture taken Is FalrclilUI Street yeaaareay. —Set Story bcioir. Chinese Hunt Boom in Scrap iron TWO TYPES -y— %  Wi \JA' 1 Vi, ££• 5% aT*4 B^BBrtar^BBBBBa r Sear WI~ JOHN OODDARD. Wast Indies Cricket Captain Itft TMUnUr morning for Ht. Lncia ta ttend a crirkrt r. I.nela between the Windward and Leeward lalaad n i observer for the Wait Indlit Cricket Board He w.:i be aa waek. He wa. accoaipanled by Mr. 1t46y Jeoas. Mtnsger U Barbados Dairies, For Sera j) Iron : KONG, Jan %  the ports of the dhand ship^ which braaksaag up te is scrap i Daaaad steel able sources. Al the same Time, these interests are reported so be purchasinn i •.broad lor delivery to China. China's deinami keen that ping fabu'he cost of new ships, for old hi Iks barely able to float. M have bee'i made or re under negotiations in such i i India and New Zealand according One informant said Chinese %  an being II i Hone Kong to many part.of ou vi rid by ch.irtcic.i aircraft !i nips. But the Chinese lacked aircraTt : %  : promptly. Annual trade flguraj Llabad reftect an anormoti i .of iron ..nil u •'( The value "I %  i % %  '7.700.000 m 1P4D to $1^4.000.000 b Ofllcial BOUTOBa said most second n up b) %  nl of re, Some of this ceased steel was A KorR'-: own need but tlu M 73 per. I %  %  re-exported t<—Keutcr. iFtom Our Own I mdMll ANTIQU \. ... The [niUllaUOQ Of BheU bull) days ago al 1 Coolldge Field, under the dlrei Uo Da\ Id )h.' i ing. aclivities dot i" .i legal ] %  .. %  ... %  %  .. %  l-ony Is .i Hie Colonial Office. Down LOM v mortality rates in 1950 Figures by the Regi.-'i ernl's OtTlee said that the stillbirth par I.UOO births. 7 in 1949 i pi %  1,000 "'i below 30. A Health Mini I merited: %  i we have halved the death rate among baWen. In 1941 tl i per 1.000 births. A rtmarkahle achievement." -I.VS SACKED PRACJUE, Jan. 25 Maria Svarmora, Aaai l Communist party and a membci bean relieved of her iron will then be | -.. %  of the intries. %  sterday thai the %  crap iron trude lo many people who %  nulatod old ironware %  !%  i in makine Ironv BRIfi K. MOt'NT ofT 1,. *l l.uev|i-id.ij lo observe II.r prorresa of the rebuilding of f'afttrh-4. Vlbarl 1 igfat Off The Cooncil Attlee Gets 'tails From Peking Govl. 1 UNDO*) %  MlnbMei Attli (ram India details ( p i irnunlcal Aclal i|iokesmi. n . ChH in which n ceaic Ore could be %  %  : the new %  %  %  Ba an aggressor. i it British in the inn* oi .inu also ol thi %  %  I'hi modify the Meld in %  f China** i thi 3. Admitting the ,i> U lelgn powers In a % %  lUSSnilll In Korea. —Reuler. Tiled las8 Budget Far 852.00(1.000 PORT-OF-SPAIN". Jn. 24 rrlnkiad i new ronnituUnn a four da : dollar a week budget for 1931 m yasaed il en t. leader, Tulul I safntna:. In Jn m hours debute during but three of the 2d Mime 70J0C %  i.ilisation of oil i. ttloa and anal %  ervicea and hi ii. ore with potii %  %  %  penl it. personal abuse ai The budget which Ii .: 1 nllm-.il %  or thirty psi cent of the '"tai to i ear fs.oOO.ooo HI Tnniistory it nlso b Icngesi debute, the previous vaar's debate lasting only .me day 11 %  budget < %  day morn ny .. 'Ikl Not mi mbori ol ihr laecutlva, Acting I i Joseph Peres. I .I'llllnX H abate GKOHOfcrOWH, B.U %  Si i Newnnan ,. %  of Claud it i: Ward :t. George tewn Town Council, void, urdered II %  tt Lklatai WigStt, and Dr. Choddi Jagan not In order • oaVar had not %  %  Jagan. who wen %  i, as ordered by Ordinance. Utlonor also asked thcourt lode d eelared Ihe returnrd tlio seat tloti I*a ?Secrelary "foi %  boM %  .ill so much coadocior. Sir A i. ft ihng hn%  n that ''Ihght improvement in Itevir maintained" — Reuler. 'PLAN FOR SURVIVAL' NEW YOltK. .Ian. 2JNew v PARIS POLICE HOLD 3.267 COMMUNISTS PARIS. January 25. ban *jid tod %  •released before 1 am.. %  will appear shor*. —Iteuler laCyftH Irory to the iha penis of atomic Bttl icnl view i ( f the II radio stations last night in ih> uld be therefore no real.Arvl of a broedflSJ %  %  %  election at all. aimed at repetitioner was awarded ( cruiting civil defence workeri (aur-flfth| of %  .xed ctu —Ketiter Lord Lyle Shares Out Prosperity LONDON. Jan 2S. .ire, who % %  Fund for Tate BBN %  hared cut ^ • m lo hia share" "i Mitn%  i final divt%  %  i %  Iders also get more U.N. Naty oegin Attack On Inchon AtHtlanchcti Th rea tee A //• AtilMALS DYING viKNXA. Januarj I the Aii i %  %  ad part Balxburg pravli mad v.iiii -. %  ble toge* ring from %  valleys. V, %  Wallack Hi mi mountaineers mi <.* • %  Boa] mi J lu.itd." lonely vaUf illan Alp* I %  %  %  snow WW rtlght when an avaland iha Brem %  lour people killed by sn .>. angra Other avaluncnes struck Badia %  r %  were struggling througr With ii < <\ and medlcsl | i ul iff for davs. i Italy Is nt —Reuler TOKYO. Jan. 25 %  JNITED NATIONS Naval units tonight stood off Inchon, west coast Korean port, crashing tons of shells on to the city and dockyards. Cana dian and other British Commonwealth warships were taking part in the operation but there were no details of any supporting ground action. Inchon, held by Communists since the United Nations forces fell back there at the beginning of January, was the port at which General Douglas MacArthur threw in his vast seaborne invasion force on September 9 last year to split and crush the original North Korean offensive. o.\ THI: • SPOT LONDON. Ward, pra Londo %  11 iba i .1 nova! uo rot lomimgo 'n lotirnal. %  bled by an at'i .g an I hool Oneara over the lop of .1 dom and hung there until mv 1 I.'.KIMI-ICI rWIf • —IMS. DU Kd China loeepl PrnprtawliT I.AKI 1 United Nat'om Bsoegal Itau was expected to announce to the Gen9F *> ASS.-' ;...,j ( %  „.„. nuaee lo-day thai ( < idea of 1 11 loratory' %  %  1 efora it a resolution b 1 group of 11 As'au %  1 ihe dale 1 would be len to ihe 1 '""' % %  %  1 %  My, Prcsi1 of PerN. (riiimaVolcano Explodes Again Jan. 25 %  %  '"< ngain early i" 1 img v 1 1 spend* %  iiiin foreign Minister. 1^ nerg.ii 1.• vernmenl I %  ci nflrm that then inajei implosion. atningten voli dav |y%  1 and killinn %  HUeaar. iJ'teat di ihe wnw cama m a ONI 1 i in.fnd v capital Kuuii. Ha % %  1 I Peking note w'. expei-t1 %  hahtlng" 11. Korea —Krut.r It lies 18 mile west of Seoul. tie Comrnuui-d-octupied BcSJth Ki.rean rapital L'nlte,! Nation-) forces evacuated the iiri on Jan ut rr South of the city. United Nations armoured land patrols pmhed to-day up to 25 miles into denned 110 man's land belweei two forces Without encmiiilcri.i:' Communist rsaisUnce, ItonaM Batchelor. Rcu %  Rftth the United I -stitti Annv aald Iha' C'ummuni.si Eoreaa which had In-en Withdrawn along Ihe entire 1 ral fronts con* Unued to show little or no incllnstlon la rostat United Nations BtrOll Outing the pant 24 hount between II) Dd 2.'. miles Into Communist territory. An Bgjltl) Army communique l-nlght s.ud that extensive pa'rolling continued over the whets front hut enemv contact was MgUglblC A battle between a United Nations division and a large fore* of North Koreans n agld to have raged this afternoon in Yongwol area. It said there had been no contact between United Nation; patrols and Communist force-. north of Yongwol this morning. It-port* from the front had said earlier thai the United Nations M "diii ma ting" a large North Korean forro surrounded psterday southwest of Yongwol ID miles southeast of Wnniu Wonju Is now occupied by unltad Nations troops after changing hands several times, — %  eater. DULLES IS IN JAPAiH TOKYO. Jan 25 John Foster Dulles, America's Republican Foreign Policy AdViaer, was met by General Mai Aiihui when he Hew into Tgkjro tonight iava talks .mncd at the Conclusion <>( the Japanese peace treaty by Octobei. —Reuler. TEIX TllE \n\ M \ l 1 TIIF NEWS RING sin HAY OK NIGHT FLOATING CORPSE" FIVE ACQUITTED (From Our Oun Correspondent) TORT-UF-SfAtN. %  rharc< Iha the SMB S< i/aln. btit la paid on BO per cent. bofUia on A trading pt-.' C3.0lf)IOS. Employees get £117,%  taxman takes 1 with Ci.Oll.OM ( 17 7.500 agaln-P 1519.750. New Cos Mask ajoveriiiheiil havi devised n new civilian gas mafk fin dust. i' 1 %  ,, . : %  %  trial i|.*i4>iil KIN< : Estate to-day following a settle %  lie Labour M It dispute to arlulralion. %  tween Hustamante's Unli m atlempl to sct%  try With the mil *'ii which ii mostly under wi>y at the present The accused men were condemn. SU to die last Deremlcr log th. murder of Philbert Person rot. eher off Bayahore, foui %  1 -f Spain harbour no April u last year The first trial lasted 26 the Jury failed to agree but at the jc-tnal which lane I *>e day longer, the men wire all sentenced to death. Handing down page* of written judgment this morning before court packed with ln*yers. pressnr'ii and hundreds of spectators he Apiieal Court cont'> Sn Cecu rurneai Smitii. Mr j|,*tlie Mortimer I)utcand Mr W H in declared at one stage that %  (ore have we experienced a more "lender foundjtlo't ftr conviction upon .. charge Rtaaleaaaa TaaastOcI Of Rahamut All alias •'Loomat; roam, tho clared 1 t h Ii ft much to iSid | . Uuroughoui h\ Inconal 1 prefabi itaOn ..nd failure of • nave 110 1 th.<-Tougniy unr.llaWe Tin Court iiticu(d the evidence of tire police complainant Sub-Inapeetoi itieasdcti urate and declared thai the laial Judne s E. Comes had not ed the Jurors to the rioint ol nuiB^reoJlsBBL The accused men all wept bitterly when the Superinlande.it broke Iha news of the.dechttan Hi their death cells Pandemonium reigned outside the Royal gad ut.cn tbs Bceassed walked out. Singh declaring "Justice must In 1 %  try" Mr It C 1 K.C. Mr Leo Lyder, Hi S H Datatngh, Mr S. Ameerall an I Mr .1 I Castillo were Rjnsel, white Mr. c T W Worrel!. Arimg Solicitor General, prosecuted


$







Havbadvos



ESTABLISHED 1895



Ike Disturbed
About Europe

LONDON, Jan. 25
GENERAL EISENHOWER will go back to

America ‘somewhat disturbed’ about Europe’s

armament problem, Atlantic Pact sources said
here today.

The Supreme Commander of the Atlantic Pact
forces is particularly concerned about the lack of
standardisation he found in his tour of European
capitals which ended today.

This problem will be priority
m the report he makes to Congress
Committees in Washington.

No Penal In America he will _ meet

William Roger Herod, rewly ap-
M tointed Co-ordinator of Atlantic
AGAINST CHINA

Pact Production and press on
the need for more rapid arms
production,
Eisenhower left Orly Field for
Heykjavik, Icelandic capital this
morning. -
LAKE SUCCESS, Jan. 25. The General drove from _ his
Britain’s Sir Gladwyn Jebb said | } ctel to the airfield along a road
that no penal measures should be flanked by police.
taken against China whose inten- ie
tions should be further probed.
The Indian delegate, Sir Bene-
gal Rau, told the Political Com-
mittee it was difficult to conduct
negotiations with the Peking Gov-!
ernment across thousands of miles
The quickest way therefore to deal



Lieutenant General Alfred
Gruenther his Chief of Staff, ac-
companied him,

The General seemed in good
form as he shook hands with high
ranking French officials.



; Eisenhower, smiling broadly

with the Korean problem would ade state ‘ -orrespond

oe | made no statement to correspond-

be to hold a preliminary round bits. “who. ceatiaineted.<4uat he
table conference nts who anticipatec _ the

Sir Benegal ‘ade h ‘ ont | 2 uld disclose something about

nega’ made the statement tye selection of the site for his



in the Committee to-day on the ;
z ; : -) | permanent headquarters.

pesursbiteri Sf debate on an Arab-| *"Gince its establishment, Supreme
sian proposal to a seven-power





onfe 7 ey | Headquarters Allied Powers o
Far Easterd’ probes. ee ates Europe (S.H.A.P-E..) has oc-
—Reuter,| ¢upied — temporarily the 200
room hotel Astoria on the Champs
Elysees,



Observers believed that for his
permanent headquarters General
Eisenhower will return to his old
headquarters at Versailles.

—Reuter,

B.G. To Grant Tax
Concessions

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan. 23.
The Legislative Council will
shortly discuss a Bill which seeks
to confer power on the George-
town Town Council to exempt fhe
owners of certain properties in
Georgetown from liability to pay

!
—
\
|

Copper Talks May
Prove Successful



rates and taxes for a SANTIAGO, Chile. Jan, 25. _
period. Talks between Chilean Presi-

In view of the prevailing} dent Gonzalez and highest
housing shortage it is felt] executives of American copper

should
erect

that some encouragement
be offered to

visiting
succesful!

companies now
are nearing a

mining

people to Chile

new buildings and repair| conclusion according to authorita-
or replace existing ones. The] tive sources.
Bill will apply to any building] Jt js reliably reported. that <

used as a dwelling house, but not

Ai ; agreement will be signed next
to buildings used totaliy or in part eturtay between the Chilean
or the purposes of any trade or} Government ard the Anaconda

a Bi en consisting of eopper mining company, establish-
seams to be fet eparatelye | fnu new tans aie, pro
; ildi a ¥|eedures, and reforming :
June 1, 1950—--December 31, 1950, | °f Chilean copper.





— Reuter,



———————



Smallest Soldier France Will Support

LONDON. f
British under-secretary of War U
Michael Stewart had the greatest
surprise of his life when inspect-
ing the Rawlinson Barracks, Den- A 1
bury, Devonshire, spokesman said to-night
He met Corporal Frank Vin-] France would in principle vote in
cent, who is only 4 feet 25 inches) the U.N.O. Political Committee
tall, and is the smallest man in| for the whole American resolution

y



Resolution

PARIS, Jan. 2
French Foreign i




ee











the British Army. condemning Communist China as
“How did you manage to get] an aggressor.
in’? asked Stewart, Questioned whether France

“I told them what a good cook; would vote or abstain on the para-
I was,” replied Corpora! Vincent.| graph relating to sanctions if

Vincent weighs less than 98) clause by clause vote were taken
pounds and takes size one in} the spokesman said: “One cannot
boots. " § here. A lot depends on the

At Denbury camp he is a mem-| circumstances in which the voting
ber of a cookhouse team about! takes place and how the resolu-
whom a major commented; “In|tions are presented.
a long military career I have
never known better



—Reuter.







Commands Ail

WN a Ss -
Nylons For Cop French Forces
DERBY, England, Pe
Nylon stockings are to be sup~ ) PARIS, Jan, —
plied to the policewomen of Der. General Alphonse Juin, who

, has been widely mentioned for a
possible High Command post in

y . ,
j , at r thy-
This was decided by the Derby aeaen win
shire Municipal Council upon the | the Atlantic : B
suggestion of Alderman J. Var-| appointed Inspector General of
ley who told the Council that;the French armed forces with
nylons would “give the police-| authority over the army, the navy
women a bit of respect.” and the air force.

—LN

TWO TYPES



G: —Reuter.







,
MR. JOHN GODDARD, West Indies Cricket Captain left yesterday
morning for St. Lucia to attend a cricket tournament in St. L
between the Windward and Leéy d island He is a
observer for the West Indies Cricket Board, He will be aw
week. He was accompanied by Mr, Teddy Jeons, Manager of the
Barbados Dairies,



3 an







uy one



\





ie

Chinese Hunt |
For Serap Iron

HONG KONG, January 25

Chinese interests in Hong Kong
are scouring the ports of the
world for secondhand ships which
they are breaking up to sell either
és scrap iron, or reprocessed stee!
to Chinese Communists according
to usually reliable sources.

At the same time, these intérests
are

reported to be ==

large quantities of scrap iron
wbroad for delivery to China,

China’s demand is said to be so

keen that dealers are paying fabu-
lous prices almost equivalent to
the cost of new ships,
hulks bareiy able to float.

Purchases

for old
have been
are under negotiations in such
widespread places as France,
India and New Zealand according
to these sources.,

made or

One informant said Chinese
crews were being flown from
Hong Kong to many parts of the
world by chartered
pick up these ships.

But the Chinese lacked agircra‘t
out all

ar



aircraft to

to carry these
promptly.

Annual trade figures just pub-
lished reflect an enormous increase
in. Hong Kong’s exports of iron
and steel, The Value of these ex-
ports rose from $37,700,900 in 1949
to $124,000,000 last year.

Official sources said most second
hand ships were breken up by
Chinese companies in Hong Kong
where a certain amount of re-
processing was also dene,

Some of this scrap or re-pro-
cessed steel was devoted to Hong
Jiong’s own need but these sources
estimated that af least 75 per.
cent was re-exported to China,

—Keuter.

missions



Down

LONDON.
3ritish stillbirths and infant
mortality rates in 1950 were the
lowest ever recorded.

Figures by the Registrar-Gen-
eral’s Office said that the stillbirth
rate was 22.6 per 1,000 births.
Previous lowest was 22.7 in 1949

Infant mortality e fell to 29.8
per 1,000 live births—the first time
it has been below 30.

A Health Ministry official com-
mented:

“In less than.10 years we have








halved the death .rate among
babies. In 1941 the rate’was 60
per 1,000 births. A remarkable

achievement.”
—ILNS.,



SACKED

PRAGUE
Maria Svermova, A
retary General of the C
Communist party and a member
of Parliament has been relieved
of her duties as a member of the
party’s Central Committee, it was
reported here today by usually re-
liable sources.
She is the widow of Jan Sver-
mova, Communist deputy killed
by Germans during the Slovak

Jon, 25.
ant Sec-

hoslovalr










uprising in 1944 and later pro-
claimed a national hero
—Reuter.
Full House
VIENNA.
The Czech trade unicn paper
Prace reported that
werkers attended the )
week’: iowing of the Russian



film “Fall of Berlin” in Prague
Accerding to Vienna’s Socialist
Party press service, there was a
geod reason for the turnout:
When labourers opened their
Wage envelopes they found inside
10 tickets to the film. The price
cf the tickets had been deducted
from their wages. —(I.N.S.)



PARIS POLICE HOLD
3,267 COMMUNISTS

PARIS, January 25.









Police here said totiay 7
Cor nist demonstrators re
| de for an identity check-
up atte ve ter lay’s 4 ille : off”
demcnstratior against General
Bi hower.

A ere le ed betore 1
| le arrested f, r

r resist
. ortly be



BELIEVE IT OR NO®

eT. s

THIS IS BRIDGETOWN. Picture taken is Fairchild Street yesterday.



300,000! ta Cyrus would be contrary to the the perils of atomic attack
second] real view of the constituency and | 11% radio stations last night in the





FRIDAY, JANUARY 26,

1s



hdl

—See Story below,

Boom InScrapIron

YESTERDAY scrap irop packed Fairchild Street for
about 40 yards, The heap was composed of broken and
worn pieces*of factory machinery, motor car and lorry
engines, axles, tyreless wheels, pieces of chassis, old chains,
pots, stoves, and other pieges of iron.

-_—_— a Mr. Victor Chase has bought
the iron and he intends shipping

Shell Tanks At, fi ie earliest opportunity either
Coolidge Field

Kingdom.
Lighters will carry the scrap
(From Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, January 25.

fron off to a steamship which wiil
discharge its load at Trinidad, The
scrap iron will then be tranship-

sae: ranks tisiiacntea bol ped from Trinidad to one of the
dé awe ie anne Ent : ome sya {three countries.
asys ago at. Engineers ees Mr. Chase told the Advocate

Coolidge Field, under the direction
of Major David Hurst, This morn-
ing, activities ceased abruptly
due to a legal point in the lease
concerning which the Shell Com-

yesterday that the scrap iron trade
is a boom. to many people who
have accumulated old ironware
over a period of time,

The serap iton is resmelted for



pany is awaiting clarification by Juse in making ironware.
the Colonial Office.



Attlee Gets
Details From

( LONDON, popuary 25,
a

“rime Minieter Attlee § Te-
ceived from India details of a
fresh communication from the

Peking Government on Korea an
official spokesman said to-day.

Usuaily well informed quarters
believed the dispateh indicated a
development fn Chinese policy
towards easing conditions in which
a Korean cease fire could be
brought about.

Observers here thought the new
nove would make Britain increas-








ingly anxious to postpone any
vole on the American resolution
branding China as an aggressor

It was considered that British
policy would require further min
isterial decision in the light of
Nis move and.also of the decision
ff Arab and Asian countries in

the United Nations to press for a
seven power conference on Korea,

Observers believed the new
Chinese move would modify the
Cninese position by

1, Dropping the condition that
any conference must be held in
China.

2. Not rigidly insisting on the
isé circumstances of China’s
idinission to the United Nations

3, Admitting the interest of
fcreign powers in a settlement in
Korea,

BRIG. FE. MOUNT off to St.
Lucia yesterday to observe t
the progress of the rebuilding 7
of Castries.

Vibart Wight Off
The Council

(From Oar Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., Jan, 25
Chief Justice Sir Newnham

Worley today declared the election





—Reuter,

| BEVINIMPROVED
|

LONDON, Jan, 25.
Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin,
ill with pneumonia, was “some-










of Claude Vibart Wight, C.B.E.,| what improved”, Herbert Morri-
as Councillor for Ward 8. George. | 80n, Government feader in the
as ard 3, | rg ee ae Z sadtia.
tcwn Town Council, void, and | House sf ( pe rg
rdered the return to be set aside; Ment today, e was replying |

md a new election to be held. a question by Opposition Leader

The decision followed a petition Winston Churchill who asked for
by defeated candidate (ten votes) | information about the health of
Barrister Sam Cyrus, asking the} the Foreign Secretary “for whose
Supreme Court to declare. the eecovery we are all so much con-
Supreme } 2 y
nominations of candidates Wight, cerned.

and Dr. Cheddi Jagan not in order avin's Alexande



doctor, Sir





as the returning officer had not â„¢ i, said. oe ; Visiting pet
received written consents from | patient __ this afternoon era
Wight and Jagan, who were absent| Slight improvement in Bevin’s

from the colony at the time of condition is maintained

hemination, as ordered by Or- —Reuter.
dinance.
The petitioner also asked the}

court to decree that he be declared |‘ PL AN FOR SURVIVAL’”’







duly elected. The court reasoned
ine error was made by the return NEW YORK, Jan. 25.
ing officer and to award the seat New Yorkers were alertec

over
there would be therefore no real
election at all.

The petiticner was
four-fifths of taxed costs

Lord Lyle Shares
Out Prosperity

LONDON,

first of a broadcast series called
\“Plan for Survival,” aimed at re-
awarded jeryiting civil defence. workers,
—Retter.



Jan. 25

on the shilling Silvertown Service
















Lord Lyle of Westbourne, who|rhares than they recei 1 under
recemily created a Prosperity | the 1949 Segregation Sche The
Fund for Tate and Lyle employ-| dividend is 100 per cent. again, bu
ees today shared cut some of the)is paid on capital increased
Company’s prosperity to his share- | §y per cent. bonus on last Se

| holder says the Evening Stan-| tember
dard City Editor Ex A trading profit of Tate and]
| By announcing Lyle was £3,387,780 agair
jdend of 22 per ce | £3,030,633, Employees get £117
| he dividend ot -|780 from the Prosperity Func
dinary share up and tl axman takes £1,227
| cent t the ir red with £3 ,083, S
holder ae £5 500



Peking Govt. during the debate.



T’dad Pass
Budget For
$52,000,000

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan, 24
Trinidad’s new
legislature after a four days
debate on the colony's T

Tuesday passed it en bloe with
ony

Opposition leader, Tubal
Uriah Burs Butiey abstaining,
In an 18 hours debate during

Which all
members
words of

but three of
spoke some
pertinent and
nent comment, members talked
aon a wide variety of subject
including natienalisation of oil
and sugar industries, wisdom an
ethics, higher or lower taxatii
on business, the need for incre;
ed expenditure on education and
Social services and health
Most of the comments
more with political
and revelations of the eccnomic
Standards Of various industries
little with the actual budget items,
while much time was
personal abuse and invective,

The budget

the 26
70,000
impert:-



dealt
philosopiiy

which Butler des-
cribed as “anti-social,” provides

bumper estimated expenditure
of $52,000,589 and an estimated
revenue of $52,055,050. It allocat
ed for social services $15,000,000
or thirty per cent. of the total to
education over $8,000,000

The biggest budget in Trini-
dad's history it also took the
longest debate, the previous year’s
debate lasting only one day. The
budget debate opened on Tues-
day morning,
| The only people
speak were three
the Executive,

who did not
members of
Acting Colonial
Secretary, Joseph O’Connor, At-
torney General Joseph Perez,
and nominated member Lennox
Hanne
All five elected Ministers spoke
cP),





Avalanches
Threaten Alps
ANIMALS DYING

VIENNA, January 25.

The danger of fresh avalanches
in the Austrian Alps increased to-
day as temperatures rose again in
some parts

Flocds also threatened parts of
Salzburg province where ava
lanches dammed valleys,

Thousands of wild animals un-
able to get to their grazing grounds
were reported to be dying from
starvation,

Tens of thousands of Tyrclean:
were still cut off in more remote
valleys, Witnesses said they saw
Wallack House, well known shelte:
lor mountaineers on Gross Gl



lock



ner Mountain Carinthia »
ind carried away like a $s
beat on a flood.”

More great avalanches overhung
lonely vaileys of the align Alps
today threatening rescue teams.

The r and rumble of sliding
snow v last heard on Tuesday
right when an avalanche erashed
iiito Fundres Valley southeast of
the Brenner Pass, The bodies of
four people killed by snow were
found yesterday.






Other avalancnes struek Badia
Valley further south but there was
no news of any victims or damage

Troops were struggling througt
with food and medical supplies
to places cut off for days,

The avalanche death toll in
Italy is now put unofficially at 34,

—Reuter,



N. Guinea Voleatio

Explodes Again

MELBOURNE, Jan, 25
Mount Lamingion voleano in
New Guinea exploded again
early to-day according te
reports received by Percy Spend-
er, Australian Foreign Minister.

the Government







constitution

million
dollar a week budget for 1951 on

spent inj

UNITED NATIONS

off Inchon, west coast Korean

tons of shells on to the
dian and other

British Commonwea













TOKYO, Jan. 25
Naval units tonight stood
ort, crashing
— Cana-
th warships

city and doc

were taking part in the operation but there were
| no details of any supporting ground action.
| Inchon, held by Communists since the United
: Nations forces fell back there at the beginning of

January, was the port

at which General

MacArthur threw in his vast sea-borne invasion
force on September 9 last year to split and crush

the original North Korean offensive.



ON THE |
¢ spor |

| LONDON

|! Ogler Ward, prominent |
London surgeon, described a
novel cure for lumbago in

the British Medical Journal.
He said |

“IT was troubled by an at-
tack of lumbago during an

|

operation, so I hooked my |
fingers over the top of a door |
and hung there until my |

- Spine had readjusted itself." |
| —INS. |
he ‘



Did Red China
Accept Proposals?

LAKE SUCCESS, Jan, 25
India’s Chief United Nat!ons
delegate Sir Benegal Rau was
expected to announce to the Gen-
eral Assembly's Political Com-
mittee to-day that Communist
China had accepted the idea of
a seven nation “exploratory’
conference on Korea,
The Committee has before it a
resolution by a group of 12 Aslan

and Arab nations proposing such
a conference

Under this proposal
and venue of the conference
would be left to the discretion
of the General Ags ‘mbly, Presi-
dent Nasrullah Entezam’ of Per-
sia.

the date

Latest development ta thé tense
diplomatic situation eame in a
note explaining Peking’s position.
It was handed to the Indian Am-
bassador in the capital, Furthe:
details of the Peking note were
being kept secret until their in-
troduction in the Political Com-
mittee,

But

usually well

pointing to

intormed
reports fror
® no man’s land at the
front which had been probed by
United Nations forces to a
siderable depth said they expect-
ed Chinese Communists might uy
to create a “lull in the fighting”
in Korea, —Reuter,

sources

Koreéa of

cole

-_-—————





It lies 18 miles west of Seoul,
the Communist-occupied South
Korean capital. United Nations
forces evacuated the port on Jan-
uary 4. South of the City, United
Nations armoured land patrols
probed to-day up to 25 miles into
deserted no man’s land between
two forces without encounteriag
Communist resistance,

Ronald Batchelor, Reuter’s war
correspondent with the United
Nations Eighth Army said that
Communist. forces which had
been withdrawn along the entire
western and central ffonts> con-
tinued to show little or no in-
clination to resist United-Nations
patrols. During the past 24 hours
these patrols pushed Between 10
miles and 25 miles into Com-'
munist territory.

An Eighth Army communique
to-night said that extensive pa-—
trolling continued over the whole

front but enemy contact was
negligible.
A battle between a United

Nations division and a large force
of North Koreans is said to have
raged this afternoon in Yongwol
area. It said there had been no
contact between United Nations
patrols and Communist forces
north of Yongwol this morning.
Reports from the front had said
earlier that the United + Nations
livision was “decimating” a large
North Korean foree surrounded
yesterday southwest of. Yongwol
which is 30 miles southeast of
Wonju. Wonju is now occupied
by United Nations troops after
changing hands several times,

—Reuter.



DULLES 1S.IN JAPAN

TOKYO, Jan. 25,
John Foster Dulles, America’s
Republican Foreign Policy Advis-
er, was met by General Mac

Arthur when he flew into Tokyo
tonight

He is to have talks aimed at the
conclusion of the Japanese peace
—Reuter.

treaty by October,
ey

TELL THE ADVOCATE
THE NEWS
RING 3113

DAY OR NIGHT







“FLOATING CORPSE”
FIVE ACQUITTED

BOYSTE SINGH

and David Bruce were acq
of Appeal this morning as
trial took a dramatic turn,

Henriques Dies
in Jamaica

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGS‘YVON, Jan. 25
Hon'bie ©, K, Hen iques

the leading members of the

Jamaica's Government died trom

a heart attack to-day, He Was for

one ot



: nicknamed
defendants James Durant, E

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAQIN, Jan. 25.
“Rajah” and. four co-
Idon Coggins, Augustus James
uitted by the Criminal Court

the “floating corpse” murder

The accused men were condemn-
e€d to die last December for the
murder of Philbert Peyson, a roti
seller off Bayshore, four miles from
Port-of-Spain harbour on April 14
last year. The first trial lasted 26
days when the jury failed to agree
but at the retrial which lasted
one day longer, the men were all
sentenced to death,

Handing down pages of written

two decades Jamaica’s leading} judgment this morning before a
industrialist, business man, econo- court packed with lawyers, press-
mist and financier’ and was con-| men and hundreds of spectators
nected with most of the agricul-| the Appeal Court comprised of

tural and industrial developments
in the island,

He was Chairman of more than
12 companies most of which he
organised including the island’s
telephone and other utilities and
was Director of many others

Henriques was an origina) and
continuous member of the Jamai-



Lonergan, can Executive Council under the
Secretary said in Canberra that] 1944 Constitution and was busy
the volcano showed signs of ac up to a few hours before death in
ivity last night but he could not] the Executive Council preparing
confirm that there had been the estimates of expenditure of
major explosion. the island

Mount Lamington voleano be He was regarded politically as
gan erupting last Thursda lay- ultra conservative and was chief

ting waste a farge part of the|*Upperter of the Government’s side
surrounding ea and killing} in the Executive Council, He

ever 3,000 people.—Reuter.



New Gas Mask

LONDON







British government scientist
have devised a jlian ga
mask for use the late

.| types of poison and radio-
active dust
| It now being tested by the
| British Home Office authorities i
| competitior With an Americ
gasmask to decide which shouk
be ma oduced for the Brit
4) pub
I Home Office i I
1} side the general
ed defence
£ simple prec
he «
IN:



companied the Hon'ble W. A
Bustamante to Britain in July 1949
as a member of the Jarnaica Gov
ernment Su Delegation

BACK TO WORK





(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jan. 25
| Work resumed at Worthy Park
Estate to-day following a settle-
ment of the second strike on al-
tleged victimisation as the Labour
|A visor got Sugar Manufacturers
jand T.U.C. to agree to submit the
: spute to arbitration
| Arrangements have now been
made to convene meeting be-
tween Bustamante’s Union, T.U.C
n an attempt to set
ite in the sugar indus-
> minimum of disloca-

tion

t the present



which|C. T. W.

Sir Cecil Furness Smith, Mr. Jus-
tice Mortimer Duke and Mr. W.H.
Irwin declared at one stage that
“never before have we experi-
enced a more slender foundation
for conviction upon a capital
charge.”

Evidence Tainted

Of Rahamut Ali alias “Loomat;:
tar witness for the Crown, the
Court declared that his general
haracter left much to be desired
ind that his evidence was “tainted
throughout by inconsistencies,
prefabrications and failure of
memory when confronted by awk-
ward decisions and we have no
hesitation in’ regarding him as a
thorougnly unreliable witness.”

The Cgurt criticiseq the evi-
dence of the police complainant
Sub-Inspector Bleasdell as inac
urate and declared that the trial
Judge S, E. Gomes had not direct-
od the jurors to the point of mis-
direction.

The accused men all wept bit-
terly when the Superintendent
broke the news of the decision in

their death cells Pandemonium
reigned outside the Royal gaol
when the accused walked Out

Singh declaring “justice must be
done in this country”. Mr, R. C
Archibald, K.C., Mr. Leo Lyder,
Mr. S. B. Dolsingh, Mr. S. Ameer-
ali and Mr. J. E. Castillo were
| defence counsel, while Mr.
Worrell, Acting Solicitor
; General prosecuted

———————_—_——_—$—$————
Del a


— _ Te _— ea ee ee ee ee ee ee a a Oe ee a ee ee ae ee ee ae





; r. JANUARY 26, 195)
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY,
, = SS
——
‘ 1 Mf )
® @ With Bovell & Skeete oi I " +. ‘ ;
a. tnd tars.” Lice, Wonnint .bD.U. Radio | \} AQUATIC CLUB CINEMA (Members Only) i
i si iniGes, “NiMe eintes . | . - MATINEES : TODAY and TOMORROW AT 5 P.M 1
* and family who have beea Judy Garland s te oo SUNDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
holidaying in Barbados with rela- ¢ CECIL B. DE MILLE'sS - - - -
tives for the past few weeks rc- P m r r Mighty Spectacle ::: “CLEOPATRA” Be al )
turned to Grenada yesteruay ro am € Own Story Starring Claudette COLBERT :o Warren. WILLIAM Henry WILCOXON
y 7S F afte ; y f J and a Cast o ousands
PANAMA FAMILY areracen. ey 1. A cic Lock out for Judy Gar- A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
Webster is in charge of Boveli FRIDAY, January 26, 1951. land’ 2 eae
and Skeete’s Office in Grenada and’s own story begii MONDAY and TUESDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
Appointed 7.00 a.m. The News; 7.10 a.m. News| on Sunday, Page 3 om- MATINEE a ee TRUE LOVE”
Analysis; 7.45 a.m. From the Editorials; | tinuing daily on Page 2. Paramount Presents = = = 2 VYN DOUGLAS
ISS GWENDOLINE DENNY. 7.25 am. Programme Parade; 7.30 a.m If you are among the mil- Starring PHYLLIS CALVERT :o: MEL
has been appointed Inspector Freedom Under the Law; 7.50 a.m. Inter- | licns ef movie fans the world WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY NIGHT AT 8.30
~ " lude; 8.00 a.m. Music from Australia Day; " MATINEE: WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.
of Domestic Subjects working UN= 2945 am Good Films and Bad Films over who have been spouse Ray MILLAND 0: Florence MARLY
der the Education Department 9.00 ~.m. The News; 9.10 a.m. Home News and puzzled by Judy Gar in “SEALED VERDICT” :
Miss Denny who has been acting: #0 Britain; 9.15 arm. Close Down; 11.15 land’s suicide attempt, you A PARAMOUNT PICTURE 4

ine |-m, Programme Parade; 11.30 am. Lis-
in that post since April 1949, WAS geners’ Choice: 11.45 a.m. World Affairs

for many years an Assistant Mis- 12.00 toon) The News, 3 we News
_ fhe 5 , fnal 12.15 pam. Close wn;
tress at the Westbury Girls aemCOl, f mar Hallo Austratins 448 Pan tight Or-
She now succeeds Miss Ivy Al-Yghectrai Music; 5.06 p.m. Composer of
leyne, Organiser of, the House@- ahe Week: 5.15 p.m. Let's Make Music:

will not miss a word of her
own frank human life story.



PLAZA Theatre—Bridgetown (DIAL 2310)

GIRLS RUSH



craft Centre 60 p.m. Merchant Navy Newsletter; TODAY 2.30 & 8.20 P.M, and CONTINUING DAILY — 445 & 8.30 P.M.
2 s 615 p * Se aan ae ager: 6.35 LONDON. There'll be Laughter to the Rafters !
p.m ntevlude; 645 p.m ogramme * cS .
No Need To Ask Parade; 700 pm. The News, 740 pm | Over 5,000 girls have applied






HERE will be a film about News Analysis; 7145 p.m. West Indian DANNY KAYE in

* i; ‘ Inary; 1.45 pam. Think en These Things:
cricket included in the film 8.00 p.m. Radio Neweree]; 8.19 pm. Eng-

i{. | lish Magazine; 845 p.m. Composer of the

clayey arti sponsored by the Brit Week; $.00 p.m. World Affairs; 9.15 p.m.
ish Council at Scout Headquar- y7)\5\c’ for Australia Day; 10.00 p.m. The
ters, Beckles Road, tonight at News; 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials;
8 o’clock. Need I ask if there will 10-15 p.m. Communism in Practice; 10.30

for jobs as air hostesses with Brit-
ain’s nationalized airlines although
the pay is only about $20 a week.

Only 90 girls a year are ap-
pointed to the job of air hostess |
but those who make the grade

“THE INSPECTOR GENERAL”

Color by Technicolor

“SPECIAL MAT. TODAY — 4.45 P.M.
“FREDDIE STEPS OUT” (By Request)
Freddie STEWART and The TEENAGERS

a ee
parreiiiciemeencinet

Tim Holt in - - -
“STAGECOACH KID’ ‘&

SATURDAY: 9,30 a.m, & 1.30 p.m.
| “NEVADA” with











-> and :-
rr us p.m. SPA Orchestra; 1045 p,m. The| get free nylons, uniforms, hand- Tom KEENE in “DYNAMITE CANYON” Robert Mitchum, Ann Jeffries
be a “ turn out of scouts to Debate eee 11.00 p.m. Music for bags, hats and shirts. '
see the filnt. Australia Day. —LN:S.
CROSSWORD

TODAY TO SUNDAY — 5
RKO RADIO'S DOUBLE THRILLER ! !

&

Joan EVANS

and 8.30 P.M.



7]

Rupert and the Sketch
fn La a! a i] { Mi

cit,
jes

or

ee eG

ida




Samuel Golwyn's
“ROSEANNA McCOY”
Farley GRANGER —

George O'BRIEN in
“MARSHAL OF MESA CITY”

Bes
|







mi
ry
‘IH
|
1






MIDNITE SHOW —
Tim Holt (in Both)

SATURDAY 27TH — RKO Radio
Zane Grey's - - - =





il!
NYY &

“INDIAN AGENT" “THUNDER MOUNTAIN ™

PLAZA Theatre=OI/STIN (DIAL 8404)











GARETT Y—(THE GARDEN) ST. JAMES

Today — Saturday & Sunday 8.30 p.m. : Mat. Sunday 5 p.m.



- station platform. A train is standing out, you've no business in there,’ 1. The heedicss priest falled to WARNER'S Big Special Double ! !
‘ there and is signalled to go. Someof he calls. ‘We must go back to Match this man’s tiara, (9)
DR. (MAJ.) DEAN KLEVAN, back in uniform, accompanied by his wife and their two children the doors are open, but at first there Mrs. Pig this minute |‘? But Rosalie Pais, Ole belunes wo one. ¢4) fas Ingrid BERGMAN Dick FORAN (The Singing
left yesterday by B.W.I.A. for Puerto Rico en route to Panama where Dr, Klevan will be Ho, SBM of Rosalie. °° 1 must find doesn't move. " These seat cushions 10, ‘an dancing girl. (4) Joseph COTTON Cowboy) 2
stationed at the U.S. Army B er,” he thinks, as he moves for- feel nice,’ she says calmly. I i2 itors of the earth. (4) Sey owboy) in
; 5. iy Base. yin to look gne the earings, can’t run any more. J think I'll re BT nat ~ a
A most at once he finds her, and he rest here!" Beg hea nee. “UNDER CAPRICORN” GUNS OF THE PE -
. ; So dart : . (4) cos
7 GEN: SIR OTTO LUND, Destination Panama Grenada Arrivals tT: ¥ou heed part ‘only. to make tt
| ~ o.U., i. — ne t4) 4, Joined. (
sioner in- Chief, St. John Ambu- .R. (Maj.) & MRS. DEAN ge BARBARA LANG whove 19. They are joined when spliced. (4) /
Jance Bvtigade, accompanied by KLEVAN and their two G nee own an estate in SHOP a Qrseo, sol Ashe io ae Ory
: A ’ : N 8 y renada arrived yesterday morn- ia. Left-overs. 23 yal,
the Countess of Brecknock, Lady children left yesterday morning ; y. 8 24. Hangman’s rope periJaps. (4-3)
Superintendent in Chief, St. for Puerto Rico by B.W.LA. Dr. ing by B.W.I.A. from Grenada to) JANETTA DRESS

John Ambulance Brigade (Over- Klevan will

spend a month’s holiday in Bar-











Rupert peeps anxiously on to the

beckons her urgently. ** Here, come



















Across



Down





EMPIRE








ROYAL



leave Puerto Rico ‘hados. She is a quek at tha Ocout UPSTAIRS OVER NEWSAW'’S, Lower Broad St. 1. Overwhelm with success, (5)
sci : Benen eul « ¥ . . a tee ados. g a an 2. Buffoon. (4
padee pi ae ‘iapiier ak tbe Da tn , oo Dawe eat "View Hotel. J ived in ti f Weddin ro { 3. Biblical Giant and father of To-day 2.30 and 8.30 and Last Two Shows‘ To-day
ona two dey visit 2 ane § thos ae ee, res Arriving on the same plane was SS eS Se 4 Sappites Eric a list. (9) Continuing 4.30 and 8.30
Lady Baden Powell, Chief terday to see then of wwe. My. Miss Rita Branch of Grenada who AFTERNOON & COCKTAIL DRESSES B,. Hoe Gen ATanOnER toe rar: (a4) oie a
Citi dite World, who’ war tn \ see them off were, Mr. is here for a few days holiday, Also a few LONDON MODEL EVENING GOWNS 6. City with a novel chess piece. (¥) 20th Century-Fox Presents : 1 i Sia
e , who was in- and Mrs, Al Nyren, Mr. and Mrs. staying at the Worthing Guest COTTON FROCKS & BEACH WEAR 8. Out of burst hosepipe. (5) Columbia Big Double
transit through Barbados last Lisle Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Jean House ne is English Pure Wool Twin Sets of Matching 9. SR i
van oe. 5s A Me a Iverson, Mr. and Mrs. Don Clair- ? SWEATER & CARDIGAN 13. Weight carries poy cores x TLL GET BY Richard DIX in
ill. x ao" ‘ r } : 1 j le. ”
offieigi visit on February 3rd. Rolfe, Mrs, Av de K Frampton Here -For a Day READY-MADE DRESSES in materials by Liberty’s of London. Me Gy, Srey See Animale Uo
She-will be here for ten days. and Dr. Allan Gardiner. Râ„¢., E. A. PITT, Supt. Min- HOURS: Mondays to FRIDAYS 8.30 to 3.30 Solution of yesterday's puzzle... Across: Colce by Technicolor rv} SECRET OF
-€.D.C. Representative Taking over Dr. Klevan’s prac- - s aeiee of the Methodist Church SATURDAYS 8.30 to 11.30 3, Haphasaras G.. ia, Teigy 5: Beanie: Starring : :
RIG. ERIC MOUNT, - tice here is Dr, Gardiner who in Kingstown, St. Vincent arrived] eee See i. Bee ast 5 meee :
presentative of Colghidt By — from Ottawa just over 2 from St. Vincent yesterday morn- a eT HOIGAN THE WHISTLER
" . 5 ; week ago. Dr. Gardiner graduat- ing by B.G. Airways intransit to r
im , x . ~ e j
ets ee Mr visit ed a arid ne in the age Trinidad. He left later the sam2 GENERAL MILARITY Takes Over ae rasta AND
yeste ; “= or years. e expects is afternoon for Trinidad to see his: inui + ag
to by Sin a ho i wife and family to arrive in sister who is ill, Rev. Pitt was at TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing and 4 U
i ; arbados on February ; one time stationed in Barbados i:) ILY at 4.45 an 5 -m. .
progress of the rebuilding of Batbad Fet 3rd ime tioned in dos i DAIL 5 and 8.30 p Dennis DAY THUNDERHOOF
Castries. Brig. Mount is station- P the parish of St. Philip.
ed ‘in Trinidad. : Cricket Plane LA’ Never such singin’ dancin’ Danny Kaye-pers/ with Robert PRESTON
Intransit To Antigua RAVING -on the saiie‘blane we et Ae 4 2 ROXY and William BISHOP
. MARGARET MANNING JL vocterday for St a , nite ||P
arrived from St Vincent Skipper John Goddard, was ane Ve, Who is B.W.1.A.’s agent in ||] 4 DAN NEY’: A
yesterday by B.G, Airways ic other cricketer, Norman Mar- Martinique left yesterday fo , ‘ To-day Last Two Shows OLYMPIC
em a few days in Barbados shall, Norman ‘is the Assistant oe a. anes Bacay ; ; 4.30 and 8.15
staying at Cacrabank. She is in- Manager of the Singer Sewing One week's holiday in Barbados.
transit to Antigua where she will Machine Co., here and he has H@ was staying at the Hastings See Us for the

join her husband Judge Manning, gone to St. Lucia for about one
who is at present there, Judge week,

Messing is a Puisne ouees, in a Incidentally the Air Hostess on

Hotel.

Max was in Barbados about fiv?
years ago, when he came over tc
learn Englishy’ He* now speaks



following :-—

20th Century-Fox Double:

John PAYNE
and

Last Two Shows To-day
4.30 and 8.15

' M-G-M Smashing Double
. the "plane on which they were ; peebebel DIRECTED BY ins PEANUT BUTTER ( Alice FAYE in
eile travelling was Yvette Gomez, English fluently. - wi TER SLEZAK - cttitintali’e JERRY WALD HENRY KOSTER @ jana ;
Trinidad Senior Judge wife of Gerry Gomez, Trinidad WALTE pus ent erated Sits Wises ¢deocians daienostone Bots, SALTED PEANUTS Van JOHNSON and

R. JUSTICE KENNETH and WI. Cricketer,
VINCENT-BROWNE, Senior

Medico From Tennéass2e
and Mrs.

Dp".

Hearn Bradley





Lyrics and Musee by The Assocute Producer SYLVIA FINE © Muncalditrection ond incitenta Scere By Joteiny Green

PLAZA — BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310)









Packages DATES

“WEEK-END IN

Phillis THAXTER in

ek Tins KRAFT CHEESE & ‘

Jape te Trinidad arrived on Continuing W.I. Tour . : aennaree are oe MACARONI HAVANA” “ THIRTY
rity est Indian Airway’s een here for one week staying 5 ‘

morning plane from ‘Trinidad JP)jR. ERIC PRIDIE, Chief Medi- at the Marine Hotel, left yester-||}] WATCH FORTHE STORY OF SEABISCUIT” Bots. KRAFT

yesterday. Here for about six cal Officer at the Colonial day by B.W.I.A. for St, Lucia = MAYONNAISE aR, SECONDS

weeks’ holiday he is spending Office who arrived from Brazil From there they will visit Mar-| e090 9000-0 O00O999GOPOFOFF FO SP 9PPD DEEP GPPPPPPOPIOE, 21» Tins HAMS

the’ first two weeks at. Powell via Trinidad on Wednesday af- tinique, and St, Thomas before} a ee :

Spring Hotel, after which he will ternoon,
be moving over to the
Royal for the remainder

c left yesterday for An-
Hotel tigua by B.W.1.A. continuing his

of his tour









returning to the U.S.

Arts Officer









SPEIGHTSTOWN

PLACE

T.H E AUT RE

TIME 8.30

Tins RABBIT
Tins GUAVAS



“ SOMEWHERE

OVER TOKYO”




























of the Caribbean, accom-
stay. He hopes to be here for panied by Dr. J. W. Harkness, R. JOHN HARRISON, the FRIDAY To SUNDAY S FRIDAY To SUNDAY Tins SWEET CORN TON’S IN THE AND
the races and before returning Medical Adviser to C.D. and W. , British Council’s Arts Offi- (13's sONDaa WADA Beene” iss “AmaROADES ie? eONORA” 1% Tins C & E MORTO!
to Trinidad he expects to tour Dr. Pridie ends his tour in ‘cer in the Caribbean left for Ono aed PEARL BARLEY NIGHT ” “ THE ARNELO
some of the other W.I, islands Jamaica-and will then be return- Antigua yesterday morning by Starring ROY ROGERS Starring Allan “ROCKY” Lane
including Jamaica. ing to England, B.W.LA. on a short visit. % osae sabia ances Oo a a ai dae AFFAIR ”
; CE & C Ltd Starring :
Ce a “GABBY” and that Horse that's Patrons this is the Double you IN u Orcs ‘+
W en : , t ‘ John HODIAK Starring John HODIAK,
BY THE AY more than a Horse--TRIGGER, long Wanted. Go to it ! 6, 4, 8 & 9 Roebuck Stree”. and Geoeen MURPHY and
‘ SLO GOOFS FSOSOSS Dial 2236 and Nancy GUILD Francis GIFFORD
WRITER—and what more
offensive term can I em-
ploy ?—-appears to think that the
bee 4 ne people had for animals
efore the dawn of this enlight- pam
ened age was to torture them. TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 ASALINTERNATIONAL presents N
I my ca to him two per- UNIVE
fect poems about animals, written ’ ny /; ’ f
about 400 years ago by Joachim AND CONTINUING DAILY BUD >
= Bear His epitaphs for his s
og Peloton and his cat Beland are ' re Q 7 x
full of humour, and you can recog- At Mat. & Night Shows — to Thursday / % %
= in = descriptions of the ani- % 4) $
mals at play, your own favourite 7 % : %
Y a. ~Y Y ~ ‘ $
dog and fat THE BIG MUSICAL af OU 14% 0 ° N
Private. Enterprise . F eetur @e@ F er st SX
— yy %
F a Hollywood v-edding I read sailed % » %
that ‘220 police watched June ee OREIGN LEGION ERLLRRLL 8 >
a une SORRY SS a
over the hundreds of bejewelled R . LUNDIGAN . . OT BRON x
guests,” The problem for the de- ~ Gloria “i
tectivés on one such occasion was $





to distinguish between the guests
and «the jewel-thieves, since
everybody was loaded with costly
ornaments, There usually comes
a moment when the jewels begin
to change hands in dark corners,
as at @ wedding in London, when
a man was heard to say angrily to
a friend: “I switched necklaces,
and now you've gone and pinched
my sHam one from her.” “That's
all right,” replied his friend, “I'll
substitute it for the one that huge
woman over there is wearing.”
But at that moment there was a
scuffig, and someone else got the
huge-woman’s trinket.



wn PATRICIA MEDINA . water sLezaK DouGLAss DUMBRILE

Screenplay by JOHN GRANT MARTIN RAGAWAY and LEONARD STERN
Directed by CHARLES LAMONT*Produced by ROBERT ARTHUR

NTI ST) sates
RPC eee oO
ODS PTFLEI ROO



De HAVEN -



er





GOOOeOPPPPST SISTA SSOP PSE. SEDOCPOCSCES OD PLOCE PL ODDPP POSS
Opening TODAY to TUESDAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. : ro a a
% oot x oe LRA PTT ee
Their NEWEST and FUNNIEST f. by Far ! Megs
Sia Een. e g y a
Bue ~ Think of the

OOS
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45





Exira—Gene KRUPA the Drummer Man and
His Orchestra Plus
British and American News Reels

When you plan Buying a
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ae
THE HARHADOS CO-OPERATIVE
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Herdware and Ironmongery Department Telephone No. 2039

GUARANTEE’ — BEAUTY

— FOOD SPACE with the
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FRIDAY,

—

JANUARY 26,

1951





Colonial Troops
Are Being Recruited

LONDON.

Official British sources disclosed
today that recruitment of colonial
troops is being speeded up under
a master plan that could bring
more than 500,000 men into action
im the event of war.

The colonial force would in-
clude a large number of the
dreaded Gurkhas, small but fero-
cious warriors from Nepal whose
kukri knives and stealthy ways
pread terror through Japanese
ranks in World War IT,

A British wefence Ministry
pokesman ‘said that the ctrrent
troop target is for a total of

69,200 colonials by April,

But more important than the
number of men in, uniform, the
spokesman added, is the fact that
a military nucleus is now in exist-
ence which could be expanded
“very rapidly” if war comes,

The two main pools from which
these troops could be drawn are
in East Africa and West Africa.

Before the: start of World IT,
East Africa had 11,000 fighting
men, drawn from Kenya, Rho-
desia, Uganda, Tanganyika and
3ritish Somaliland and centered
in Nairobi, capital of Kenya. Dur-
ing the war, the number was in-
ereased to 223,000,

West Africa—Siérra Leone,
Nigeria, Gold Coast and Gambia
-had 8,000. That was increased
to 150,000 before the war ended.
Nepal provided more than
50,000 Gurkhas in World War II
and 10,500 are fighting in the war
against terrorists in Malaya now.
Other colonials come from
Malaya itself, where native troops
are being inereased from four

“Sorry, George, no

-



Flying-boats
Have Had It!

battalions to six; Jamaica and
Cyprus, Com

British officers concede that the oxut aiciee bre
African troops “need a lot of ‘to. aibay

IF the Government abandons
work on the giant Saunders-Roe
S.R. 45 Princess flying-boat, which
seems likely, this type of aircraft
may be dead for ever. :

The flying-boat—and its cousin
the float-plane—have had_forty-
cdd years of adventure through
the efforts of the three great Brit-
ish flying-boat firms — Super-
marine, Saunders-Roe, and, above
all, Short Brothers.

I believe »ne flying-boat IS
dying, but dyitg hard. Never
since the Britisn cavalry replaced
horses with tanks has a contro-
versy sparked such high feeling.

What is the argument all about?

Chief flying-boat protagonist is
Sir Arthur Gouge, designer of the
Short series and now chief de-
signer for Saunders-Roe. He de-
signed the huge Princess.

Gouge argues that in all forms
of transport—road, rail, and sea—
the largest unit has always proved
the most efficient unless restricted
by factors outside the vehicle. For
example, the size of roads, the
bearing-capacity of rails, and the
size of port facilities are restric-
tive.

handiing” and are best used for
service work. 3ut the Defence
Ministry spokesman explained :

“In any future war they would
be used as the circumstances de-
manded.”

British policy now is that col-
onial troops should be used to
build up the defences of their own
countries. However, as in the
last war the British High Com-
mand would be free to move them
to any theatre where they coul.)
be used,

During World War II, the Afri-
eans fought in Italian East
Africa and Burma.

Ghost House
For Sale

LONDON.

The most haunted estate in all
Britain is up for sale. Asking
price is $11,200; nothing extra for
the ghosts,

Nearly 12 years ago Borley
Rectory, Essex, reputedly the
most haunted house in the coun-
try, burned down, But sightseers
und psychic researchers claimed



The flying-boat can theoretical-
ly be immensely larger than the
land plane because it is not re-

t stri size and

that the fire had not succeeded in freneih. os

exorcising the ghosts. Next, he argues that a land-

ciatias' last five years poet-| plane needs an under-carriage,
? 211s

James Turner and his
wife have lived in the adjoining
stables, which have been convert-
ed into a house with three recep-
tion and three bedrooms,

which adds weight.

Sir Arthur’s opponents say:—

First, the use of rocket-assist-
ance for take-off and _ efficient
braking systems have made exist-
ing runways usable by aireraft as
big as we are ever likely to need.

Second, they say, the weather
restricts flying-boats to sheltered
marine bases.

Turner, who categorically states
he has seen no ghosts—not even
the “Blue Nun” who allegedly
z0ams the churchyard in flowing
rebes—has how decided to sell out
end move to the nearby village ot
Belchamp Walter.

In addition to the converted
liouse there are seven acres of
garden, a mushroom farm and an
erchard containing about 600
apple trees, and, of course, the
ruins of a rectory.

Turner said his only reason for
ieaving is that his health. will not
allow him to look after the estate,

Third. the installation of ade-
quate blind-approach systems at
marine bases is difficult.

Fourth, water does not abound
everywhere. London is 70 miles
from the nearest suitable stretch.
Most world capitals are even fur-
ther.

Fifth, undercarriages pay their
way; they fit snugly into a stream-
lined hull.

A boat-shape can never be a





—IN.S. perfect air-shape. The problem
is how to get our perfect air-
shape off the earth’s surface,

NO SIXTH
SENSE

By WALLACE S. HULLETT
LONDON.
A Ministry of Labour working
committee has issued a _ report
shattering the idea that the blind
have a mysterious sixth sense,

The committee included two
blind men — Arthur E, Wilson of
the Ministry of Labour, and
Thomas H. Smith, general secre-
tary of the National League of the
Blind.

The report said:

swiftly through the air,.and safely
down again.

Look ahead, not back. In a few
years’ time our aircraft will close-
ly resemble the V.2 rocket, with
vertical take-off, and a sit-down
landing on its jets. Almost like a
jet plane with a hover-plane iaud-
ing gear,

L.E.S,












BRAZIL, ITALY SIGN
AVIATION PACT

ROME, Jan. 25.
An, Aviation agreement between
Italy and Brazil was signed at the
Italian Foreign Ministry today.
Intended to facilitate air traffic
between Italy and South America,
the Pact was signed by Italian
Foreign Minister Count Carlos
Sforza and the Brazilian Ambas-
sador.—Reuter,

“Tt is not true that the memory
of the blind is inherently superior
nor the senses of hearing, touch,
taste, and smell are inherently
more aeute, than in seeing per-
sons.”

The report admitted that blind
persons, because of their affliction,
made ,better nse of their senses
than those with sight:



“It is true that becouse of the
impossibility of obtaining mental
impressions from seeing, senses
are used as far as possible to fill
the gaps and may thus improve
with use.

“The fact is the blind make bet- ~~



tér and different use of their mem- BD M)
cry and remaining senses, we
“The idea that blind persons are gv
nearly’ all musical geniuses has
been long in dying. But blind
children cultivate their hearing
more intensely than sighted chil- Your hair will be
dren and this helps them in the
acquisition of musical gooey handsomer by far
—LN.S.
when you treat it te
WOMEN ‘Vaseline’ Hair Tonic,
LONDON.
Bisset Lovelock iid. the editor Just use a few drops
ef the Daily Graphie fhat womén
are doomed forever to-the role of a day. «+ then see
“hewers of wood and drawers of
water” because they lack “the art) the difference!

of relaxation.”

His letter etaimed that nothing
women ever do is done “for the
mere pleasure of doing it, without
ulterior motive.” He predicted:

“Tf ever they discover the joy
of sailing a boat around a pond,
or cohecting butterflies: if ever
80,000" of them ¢an be prevailed
upon to watch professional foot-
ball—from that day they will rule
the world?’ —+bN.S,

Buy a bottle today!

Vaseline:

TRADE MARK
VASI_LINE is the aed trade mark
of the Chrsebrough Mig. Co., Coms'd




















BARBADOS

’ ee



eS

How about fitiing ‘em up with a mice

>>> at mS

more stee! shoes.



—s





Private Sheffield, inthe Army since 1908, wants to stay

Soldier Has Not Had

Leave For 21 Years

ONE of the oldest serving sel-
diers in the British Army is
60-year-old Private Frederick
Sheffield, 2/4th Queen’s Royal
Regiment. He has completed 42
years’ service, and has not been
away on leave for the last 21
years.

He hopes to serve for a total
of 50 years, he told me, then add-

ed: “If I can I will do 60.”
“Chuck” Sheffield — as he
is known to his friends, was

wounded at Mons in October 1914.
Lives In Cabin

Now he is comfortably installed,
with a radio set, in a small cabin
at the back of the barracks library
at Guildford.

He looks after the library and
the billidrds room adjoining it,
and in his spare time is general
handyman about the barracks.
Once a week he goes on parade—
a saluting parade.

He has eight good-conduct
stripes on his left forearm.

“Chuck” last went on leave in
1929, His mother was then living
at Ash, about eight miles away.
“Then she died,” he said, “and I

have not troubled about leave
since.



PTE. FREDERICK SHEFPELD
Saluting parade ohce a week.

‘Not Worth It’

Ws ; . cicceiaciaeetalimees
are wt a eee if you have

arents and a home to go to, or

if you are married, but otherwise THE LAST CENT

it is not worth while. LONDON.
“You have to find

: your own
digs, your own fares, your own
f — everything. If you are a
bachelor, like me, you might just
as well stay in barracks.

A man fined $2.80 for stealing
a bottle of milk could only. pro-
duce $2.79.

The magistrates waited until he
had finally emptied all pockets
and then demanded he bring the
other cent to the court within

“IT have a day off and go to
Brighton or some such place occa-
sionally, but that is all.”

“Chuck” enlisted in 1908, ana Seven days, :
has seen service in Gibraltar, Ber-~ Said the magistrates: “It was a
muda, South Africa, France, Bel- Mean theft.”
gium, Palestine, India and Egypt.

\ ;

ra —I.N.S.

B.G. To Fly Meat
To Trinidad

(From Our Own Correspondent).
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 23

Supplies of meat may soon be
rushed here by, plane from British
Guiana, to ease the present short-
age. This was what members of
the Hotel Association were told
on Monday when they interviewed
Mr. A. A. Douglas, acting Control-
ler of Imports and Exports. The
delegation agreed to pay the in-
creased pricé which they werc¢
warned the meat would cost.

Mr. Douglas had informed the
delegation that in order ,to ease
the situation, the Board would try
to get supplies of meat from Brit-
ish Guiana by plane. He also
warned them that the price would
be higher than at present,

The quantity which the Control
Board will try to get from British
Guiana will be only to ease the
position until the arrival of a
shipment from Australia around
the middle of February.





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B.G. Means To
Grow Citrus
In Big Way

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan, 21
The Director of Agriculture said
to-day that the Department is tak-
ing care of orders for 20,000 citrus
plants which are being distributed
to local farmers,



The floods of 1949 had played
havoc with earlier attempts at de-
velopment but the Department
was well on the way to establish-
ing q plentiful growth, not only of
citrus, but other fruits like avo-
eado pears, sapodillas, ete., which
have a high market value,

With the new plans for de-
velopment of the industry, the
Department has abandoned the

Food Production Nursery which,
for the past three years has been
supplying the public with vege-
table seedlings.

The Nursery was started to en-
courage people to grow and main-
tain their own vegetable home
gardens and also to give the neces-
Sary advice to owners how to run
their gardens.

Hundreds of people from the
city and country took advantage
of the Nursery service which re-
eeived a $10,000 maintenance
grant from Government,

oe

9 ae -
“Samson” Fined $5

(From, Our Own. Correspondent),

““PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 2!

“Samson” in the person of
Arnold Davis, of Belmont, was on
Monday convicted by Mr. Fabien
J, Camacho in the Courts on a
charge of obstructing the free
passage of the street,

Mr. Camacho ordered Davis to
pay a fine of $5 or 14 days im-
prisonment.

Davis explained that he worked
for a film company and was im-
personating “Samson” of the pie-
ture “Samson and Delilah.”





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PAGE THREE



F.A.O. Talks
Opened
(From Our Own Correspondent).
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 23

The Conference of the Food and
Agricultural Organisation of the
United Nations which opened at
the Caribbean Commission, Kent
House on Monday morning, might
be a historical occasion pdiating
to a very fruitful tine of future
development.

This statement was made by Dr.
H. Belshaw, Director of Rural
Welfare Division of F.A.O. when
he opened the conference in the
presence of g number of delegates
in the Caribbean area, Thirty
four delegates for Metropolitan
countries and Territorial Govern-
ments as well as Dominion Repub-
lic and F.A.O., attended the meet-
ing.

Domestic Science

The possibility of training West
Indian women to be specialist
teachers of domestic science in the
Caribbean area is now being in-
vestigated by ‘he Colonial De-
velopment and Welfare Organisa-
tion

Miss Dora Ibberson, Social Wel-
fare Adviser to Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare Organisation
who is attending the F.A.O, con-
ference said that she was discuss-
ing the matter with various
authorities in this region,

Miss Ibbersen added; “It seems
anomalous to me that at this stage
of development, the West Indies
should have to send overseas for
qualified teachers of so basic a
subject as homemaking.”

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B.G. May Send2-Man
Team To Argentina

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan. 23.

British Guiana may send a two-
man team to the Pan American
Games at Buenos Aires—Keevil
Daly champion weight-lifter who
is a world class lifter and Clement
Cummings, the colony’s best mid-
dle-distance runner.

The B.G. Olyrhpics Committee
decided not to send a team to
Buehos Aires, but rather, concen-
trate on getting together a team
for Helsinki in 1952. However,
the A.A.A. have applied to the
Olympics Committee to approve
of Daly and Cummings represent-
ing the Colony, The cost of send-
ing the two has been guaranteed
by prominent sportsmen.



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Sch. Belqueen, Sch. Enterprise S., Sch.
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Coastal Station

\

Cable and Wireléss (W.T) Ltd. advise }
that they can now communieate with the {
following ships through their Barbados |
Coast Station: '

‘

S.S. Alcoa Polaris, 8.8. Bonaire, 9.8.
Jutahy, %5, Jamaica Producer, s.s. Lady
Rodney, s,s. Larentian Forest, 5.8, Bayano,
ss. Carona, #8. Regina, 9.8. Beechhill,
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of Oxford, 5.8, Nieuw Amsterdam, &.5.
Uruguay, ss. Britannic, 8.4, Inyperial
Toronto, s.s. Colombie, s.4, Paula, 5.8,

Lago Azul, s.s. Hersilia,

Rates Of Exchange

January 25, 1951
CANADA
Cheques on

Bankers
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Drafts
Sight Drafts
Cable
Currency
Coupons
Silver

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% x
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x - and Associations to make the compilation of information in %
% THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951 as easy and complete as <
% possible, all organisations embracing all forms of activities; $
% religious, commercial, cultural, educational, health, sports, *
% rddio, agricultural, etc., are asked to have the form printed %
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: THE EDITOR, § |
g THE BARBADOS YEAR BOOK 1951, x ‘
% C/o Advocate Co. Ltd., 34 Broad Street. = —s
FORM $

Title of Society, Club, Organisation, Ete, o.com & %

FOR URN EEE CREE ANE R EERE E EEE RR ER! BAEHURETE ESSERE EEEEIEEEE RESET TEASERS

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Short historical account of the origin, functions and current

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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

wor! Notes On Agriculture





SUGAR WORKERS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 195i









: eneaeeraed The old plant can ‘ D. V. SCOTT TO-DAY’S SPECIALS
+ —— he old plant cane crop, particu- apaw 7 en Ap :
larly in the coastal areas, began. viBy. 5C, C.. SKEETE oe & CO. LTD. at THE COLONNADE
. Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown. to show signs of ripening during (Director of Agriculture) Coconuts 398
: the last fortnight of the month; One hundred and eighty-two i ge gaara acura
good growth and have a green and {he cabbage white buitertly and Cnamental plants of different) (By Our Industrial Correspondent) Usually Now
é 4 the army worm in sweet potatoes. . 5P¢¢ ae s '
3 Friday, January 26, vigorous appearance. There is I dd 425 casuarina . . P
“ os 7 still every evidence of a record Pessant Livesteck. As a result tree were diiribated oe YESTERDAY the Barbados Sugar Feder- Tins BROOKS PEACHES ........-.--- = _
. crop being harvested ef the rains which continued well - ‘ 5 FLAKES 37 34
2 The “supplying” of the newly *t0 December, the supply of 9. — ae of| ation began negotiations with the Barbados Pkgs. QUAKER CORN is.
3 J ee ee ee etanie a cea ome ro ity ok sweet potato fields jhas been ex-} Workers’ Union as to the price to be paid||/ Bottles ALLSOPP’S BEER we 26 a
NJ U erm . = j i gs 2 ‘ .
. C0-OPERATIVES \edeiieanncen: Seta animal feed also was in free sup- tensive in ert ee eek de-| to sugar workers during this year’s crop. Pkgs. CORN FLAKES.......00...-0000000000 29
® —— ~ - . ply. ; ; sats ‘ ;
a number of fields had practically ” reduce yieldg considerably. It The negotiations are taking ce just one
‘ to be replanted. This unsatisfac- Extension Work. The Peasant ) oO oiso bee! 8 pla

THE. presence of the local Senior Peas-
ants Agricultural Instructor at a conference
of Co-operative Officers in Trinidad serves
to wali attention to the unsatisfactory
method adopted in this island for handling
a most important aspect of our economic

life.

There is today no Co-Operative Officer
in this-island and after a series of elabor-
ate preparations the whole Co-operative
scheme appears to have been abandoned.

The act passed by the Legislature under
which co-operative societies were to be
registered has not been proclaimed as was
laid down in the provisions of that act and
to this date not one such society has been

registered,

An ever growing population with im-
proved standards of living demands an
economy.
economy can only come with increased
production and increased production is not
to be gained through obsolete methods, It
is OM agriculture that the economy of this
island. depends and co-operatives seem to
be one of the vital answers to the prob-

improvement in our

lems of the peasantry.

If these facts are admitted then it is im-
perative that something be done not only
to set up the machinery for establishing
co-operatives but to gear it for success.

‘A few years ago Mr. J. M. Cave was
from British Honduras
seconded for duty with the Department of

brought

Science and Agriculture. He

Efigiand and trained specially for the
work, For reasons which have not been
divulged to the general public Mr. Cave
has returned to his post in British Hon-

dtiras, and as no one has been

act, it would appear that the seheme has

been abandoned.

Ina community where prosperity de-
pendson agriculture and where there are
nearly 20,000 peasant holders unable to
purchase the necessary modern machinery
and other equipment to increase the pro-
duction of their holdings it should not be
difficult to convince any one of the impera-
tive necessity for co-operative societies. It
should be even less difficult to convince the
Government that it is its primary duty to
foster the co-operative movement and so
ensure an improved economy for the

people who contribute to it.





“No Beach” Fish

tory germination was largely due
to the heavy rainfall which ob-
tained during the month of No-
vember.

Food Crops. Several fields of
early yams and eddoes weie har-
vested during the moath ard
yields were generally good, The
market supply of ground provis-
ions was satisfactory.

Cotten Inspections. Inspection
for wild cotton was continued in
the parish of St. Michael for the
first part of the month and 60
trees were found in Mayers Land,
Ivy Village, My Lord’s Hill and
Fairfield. These inspertions have
now been discontinued.

The reaping of the cotton crop
was commenced in full and
although the weather conditions
were not very favourable in
November, some good yields are
being obtained. There was a lit-
tle boll shedding at the beginning
of the month. The reaping of the
cotton variety trials was begun
during the month,

ever, continued to be in short
supply and were very expensive,
cabbages and tomatoes being sold
in St. Michael at 40—44c, per Ib.
Sugar Cane. Of the crop soon to
be reaped, both plant and ratoon
canes are in good condition and
give promise of satisfactory yields.
Germination of the young cane
crop has been for the most part
disappointing. A good deal of
supplying will have to be done.
Cotten. The advent of drier
weather towards the end of De-
cember was favourable for the
picking of cotton. Harvesting was
in progress during the month and
some good yields have been re-

Agricultural Instructors visited
510 peasant holdings and 16
school gardens.

An important aspect of the
work of the extension service was
the stall organised by the Depart-
ment at the Agricultural and In-
dustrial Exhibition held on 6th
and 7th, The stall was designed
to demonstrate scientific methods
of producing green v-getables in
the vegetable garden as weil
as under a system of pot and
culture. Considerable interest
was evinced in this section of
the exhibition, and the Peasant
Instructors who supervised the
stall during the two days were
able to teach some valuable les-
sons and pass on useful informa-

tion.

Irrigation. Under the provisions
of the Colonial Development and
Welfare Scheme, work was start-
ed during the’ month on the instal-
lation of a 12’ windmill unit on a
peasant holding-in St. Philip.
Other small holders were given
assistance with galvanized pipe
for the improvement of existing
units.

Crop Husbandry. Following the
initial setbacks caused by heavy
rains, cotton picking was resumed
during the month at The Home,
Sayes Court and Jerusalem. Indi-
cations are that fairly satisfactory
yields will be obtained at all these
stations. At Haggatts, the only
other Station at which cotton was
grown, harvesting had not begun
up to the end of December,

Livestock. The total number of
livestock at the six Stations at the
end of the month was 122. These
included stud animals, cattle,
goats, sheep, pigs and equines.
Four hundred and eighty-five
gallons of milk were produced.
Twenty-one head of stock were
sold, including 17 young pigs for
rearing.

tion can be
reduced by properly timed and
applied sprayings with lead arsen-
ate and that ,this same spraying
will greatly reduce or control in-
festation by scarabee and thrips.

Control of Root Borer.
was made with laboratory experi-
ments, and with thg present les-
sening in the amount of rainfali,
it should be possible to carry out
the remaining field experiments
early in January, 1951. Equip-
ment for further field experiments
has been ordered.

Intreauction of Parasites and
Predators. Three consignments
of Leionota were received from
Trinidad and liberated in cane
fields and one large consignment
of Apanteles was received from
Canada for control of cabbage
worm. One field recovery was
made of Rodolia a _ predator
which controls cottony cushion
sealc. As this predator was in-
troduced several years ago its
occasional overy shows that it
is still maintaining itself.

Control of Wood Ants. Three
inspections were carried out on
Gevernment property and three
on private properties during the
month.

Chemical

Soils. Preliminary investiga-
tion into the effect of addition of
Sulphate of Ammonia to black
coral soils high in free calcium
carbonate was commenced. The
object was to determine whether
there was any loss of nitrogen
from the fertilizer in the form of
volatile ammonia.

Six Codrington and three Dur-
ants soil samples were examined
chemically, the former in conjunc-
tion with fertility
Codrington.

The work on the analysis of
samples of soils taken from areas

ee a month after the Sugar Producers’ Association
were informed on December 23 that’ the
British Ministry of Food would purchase the
1951 West Indian sugar crop at a price of
£32. 17s. 6d., c.if., an increase of 47/6 per
ton on the price paid for the 1950 crop.
Taking into consideration the Christmas
and New Year festivities and the variety of
calculations and discussions that have to take
place before a decision can be made as to
the price to be paid to some 21,000 agricul-
tural labourers and some 5,000 factory work-
ers, the period of a month is no undue period
for the Sugar Federation to decide what pro-
portion of thé increased price for this year’s
sugar crop can be passed on to the worker.

The cable received by the Barbados Sugar
Association on December 23,
merely announced the price that the U.K.
Government was prepared to pay ci-f., for
the 1951 West Indian sugar crop. The next
step was an offer made to the Barbados Sugar
Producers’ Association by the London sugar
brokers who quoted an f.o.b. price offer.

This offer had then to be submitted by the
Sugar Producers’ Association to its Financial
Adviser who had to investigate a whole series
of figures to make sure that the broker’s
offer was correct.

At the same time agreement had to be
problems at| Made on the shipping charges. An important
point to be checked at this stage (and again
a whole series of mathematical calculations

Producers’

ported,
was sent to

groundnuts
month fell short
papaws, guavas,

appointed to | month,

Groundnuts. Owing to the
heavy rains which fell during the jng the month.
growing season,
reaped during the

Tree Crops. Limited supplies of

coconuts were on sale during the

the yield of follows: —bulls
of expectations.

limes

Three hundred and - fifty-eight

similarly sampled approximately : :
20: years og had to be made) is the degree of difference

is now complete.

Sugar Cane.

Russia’s Slaves

Figures of total exchangedble pot-
stud services were paid for dur- assium, total and water soluble
These were as phosphate and organic carbon are
147, bucks © 97, availabie.
rams 39 and boars 75.

Economic Tree Propagation and are being laid out.
Distribution. Forty-five lime and
green. eighty-five orange trees were bud-
ded during the month. Fruit trees
delivered from Codrington were trial.

Pests and Diseases. The princi- as follows:—
pal pests claiming the attention of
the Peasant Agricultural Exten-
sion staff during December were

for the 3 x 3 x 3 factorial potash
trial have been selected, and four
sites for the 4 x 3 x 2
Owing to the size of the
trial oon. one of the treat-

Orange 8, Grapefrui: 23, Lime ments has en omitted at two]; .
12, Lemon, 7, Sugar Apple 2, Pom- centres in order to permit the increased during the year,
ela 6, Breadfruit 7, Guava 18, trial to fit into the area available.

Manurial trials
Three sites

N.P.K.

between the net price increase to be received
by the factory and the increase if any over
previous years.

A most important calculation which in-
volves detailed scrutiny of thousands of
figures is that which decides how much costs
of supplies, equipment and machinery have

It is only after all these intricate calcula-
tions have been made that it is possible for
the Sugar Federation to decide what pro-
portion of the increased price per ton of

WASHINGTON.

In Paris last week, after a six
weeks’ trial which focussed the
attention of all France and mos:
of Europe, the Soviet government
was convicted of practising mass
slavery on a scale without prece-
dent in history.

This is the meaning of the ver-_

cict which a French Court unter
presiding Judge Colomies render-
ed in favour of the plaintiff, David
Rousset, in his suit for libel
against the communist magazine
“Lettres Francaises” and its edi-
tors, Claude Morgan and Pierre
Daix.

David Rousset learned about

20th century slavery the hard

By JAMES BURNHAM

A Paris Court on Jan. 12 ruled against
# French Communist Weekly and its
editors for libeling David Rousret, French
writer who has charged Russia with
maintaining huge slave labour camps

In the following articlés written ex-
clusively for International News Service,
dames Burnham, American Professor and
Author, analyzes the results.of .the
farmmotrs Parts trigti«) ~*~ oF -

Long a student of’ -raditdl " politics,
Burnham is the author of “THE STRUG-
GLE FOR THE WORLD,” which created
a stir when published in 1947.

tres Francaises” answered Rous-
set’s appeal by calling him a liar,
renegade, fascist, pervert — in
short, the usual list that commu-
nists apply to determined oppo-

- other. e@

communists over to the Gestapo,} sugar paid by the Ministry of Food for the

which put her for the rest of the

war inig.the Nasi camp at Ree Barbados sugar crop can be passed on to the
Barbados sugar workers.

The fact that the British West Indian Sugar
Producers in their bargaining with the United
Kingdom asked for a price which would allow
for a ten per cent increase to sugar workers
does not mean that the mere announcement
of the price to be paid for the West Indian
sugar crop allows the Barbados Sugar Feder-
ation to announce a 10% increase in wages to
the sugar workers. Every figure has to. be

vensbrueck.

Captain Joseph Czapski told of
his stay at the Soviet camp oi
Starobielsk, and how he was
transferred a few days before his
fellow officers there and in two
s — fifteen thousand
in all‘ ‘were massacred by the
NKVD in the Katyn Forest. It was
Czapski who had later en, as aide
to the Polish General Anders.
visited hundreds of Soviet slave
comps in vain search for the
missing fifteen thousand.

Valentino Gonzales, the Repub-

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THE general public are justified in their | way. During the war, the Gestapo ents. Rousset brought suit for ae thal Weeue "ai Cammpornot checked first. As soon as the figures are
j i i ; kept him for four years behind libel against the magazine and its . : . availabl egotiati i
complaints against the action of fishermen | ‘spt Ulm ified barbed wire of editors It is this suit which has (the peasant), told how, after] ® e negoti hones begin between the BLUE, TAN, MUSTARD AND GREY
who’ refuse to sell fish to anyone on the | its most barbarous concentration just ended with the complete a Republican eee. Be eee Barbados Workers’ Union and the Sugar
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beache: ss they are hawkers SAD eutet rote two books — ‘The communists assembled ‘a land among the supposed com- Barbados which represents the ALSO
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The schedule published by the Control
Authority lays it down that fish sold on
the beach must be sold at a cheaper price

than that sold elsewhere.

Fishermen have now adopted the atti-
tude whereby they sell on the beach only
to their womenfolk who then retail the fish

on the street.

It is annoying to housewives who either
send their servants or go themselves to the
beach in order to secure fish at an early
hour to find that after hours of waiting the

fish are not available to them.

In the past the complaint was that the
‘fish were hidden when people went to the
beaches and were taken away in trays and
later sold at blackmarket prices. In some
instances housewives contributed to this
by paying the scheduled price and then giv-
ing the seller a “tip” for bringing therm the

Peasant Agriculture
ood Crops. Suppties of early
yams, sweet potatoes and guinea
corn were available during the
month. (.reen vegetables, how-

verse.” These becaice rapidly
known throughout Europe, _ es-
pecially by the hundreds of thou-
sands of others who had also
served their time in the Nazi slave
gangs.

For a while, the communists
were quite friendly to Rousset
end his books. They hadn't caught
cn to the fact that Rousset object-
ed to Moscow-made slavery just
as much as to the Berlin brand.

Then, in November, 1949, Rous-
set addressed a public appéal to
the ex-inmates of Nazi concen.
tration camps. Rousset declared
that those who had suffered under
the Gestapo had the duty of un-
covering the truth, all of the truth,
about all concentration and slave-
labour camps, wherever located
and by whoever run,

The appeal noted the charge
that there are slave camips within
tne Soviet Union, and that Soviet
law permits a man to be sent to
a camp without any judicial pro-
cess. It called for an International
Commission of Enquiry to ex-
amine these charges, and to ¢s-
tablish their truth or falsity.

lawyers. Just as in the commu-
nist trials that have became fa-
miliar in this country, every
legalistic trick was used to con-
fuse and block the court proceed-
ing. The communists were deter-
mined to stop at nothing in order
to prevent the truth from becom-
ing known.

But Rousset and his attorneys
triumphed over the legal tricks,
and drove home the evidence,
point by point. They procured for
the court those articles of the
Soviet code which permit an
M.V.D. official to send a man to
slave camp without any hearing
or a court action. They proved
the existence and character of the
camps by documents, maps, orders
and administrative regulations.

Then, before the astonished
court, there appeared a remark-
able series of witnesses —- witness-
es to tell from their own terrible
experience the truth about the
Slave camps of Stalin.

Margarete Buber, wife of the
former chief of the German Com.
munist Party, told how in 1937
the NKVD (now the MVD) had

War, had called him. friend and
ally and hero. He teld also what
had happened to him in the father-
land — told of the prison cells
the closed and icy freight cars
the slave-work in the death
camps.

Small and gentle Jerczy Gliks-
man explained how he had been
thrown into prison in 1940, in
Soviet-occupied Eastern Poland,
gud then sent to fell great trees
in the twelve-foot open snow far
in the monstrous Soviet north.

Eleanor Lipper gave, in her
soft and shy voice,, the story of
her years in Kolyma — dread
Kolyma, the MVD empire in
vorth-eastern Siberia where gold
is mined at seventy degrees be-
low zero, where no one is ex-
cused from work unless he has
more than 103 degrees of fever,
and where the annual mortality
of the slave-labourers ranges from
thirty to fifty per cent.

Confronted with the absolute
sincerity of such witnesses to the
truth, the ‘communist defense
could only shout and obstruct

tiations opened yestérday.

It has been suggested that Barbados has
lagged behind Trinidad in announcing the
prices to be paid to sugar workers. The com-
parison is not apt: because in Trinidad sugar
producers ship their own sugar direct through
their own agents, whereas in Barbados the
sugar is sold to local merchants at factory
tests and weights and the merchants then
resell to the broker, any loss in test and
weight being borne by the merchant.

The time taken to reach final decisions as to
workers’ wages in Barbados must therefore
be longer than in Trinidad.

Since it has now been made clear that in
all negotiations with the Ministry of Food as
to the price to be paid for West Indian sugar,
wage increases to workers are always taken
into consideration by the British West Indies

IMITATION CAMEL’S

HAIR

Suitable for - - - -

TRAVELLING COATS.



DACOSTA & CO,, LTD.

DRY GOODS DEPT.



via

fish. Nowadays even with the advanced
price under the new schedule it is difficult
for them to purchase fish and the phrase
“ex-beach” in the control list is an insult

: ; This week, with the trial conclud. | Sugar Association, there ought to be no dela
The answer of the ccmmunists first shipped her to the desolace 64 the International Commission 8 o delay

was the same that they gave to concentration camp at Karagan- ¢{ Enauiry continues formal hear-= in the settlement of this year’s wage increases
every attempt oa ce Ge. tn Tate, * a cue aoe ings in Belgium, Slavery, as al- | to be paid to agricultural workers and an
truth: A storm of abuse, lies, slan- to Hitler under the Stalin-Hitler ways, defends itself with lies, | early Nate

cer, vilification. Pact, the NKVD had turned her white truth sides with freedom. rly announcement can be expected soon

For Your



od

to the housewife.

‘The communist magazine “Let-

and a hundred other German ex-



Our Readers Say:

Farewell Sermon

To the Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—I should like to make a
few comments on Bishop Hughes’
farewell sermon.
»-I am surprised at his scathing
criticism in public of the clergy,
which, if justifiable, would have
been more effective if administer-
ed to each individual in private.

ass public condemnation can
only diminish the respect due to
their calling from their congrega-
tions,

Bishop Hughes deplored the
lack of interest and leadership
among the leaders of the Church
~—both Clergy and Laity. Who
dre these leaders? Of the clergy,
surely the Bishop himself. Of
the —the members of the

lature, some of whom are
even Church members?

The Bishop complains that in
. political matters the
a h is half asleep, and lays the
) for this squarely on the
x an Church Act. Now as
this Act does not affect the Laity,
Who” @ré mostly ignorant of its
contents, we may logically assume
that..the Bishop when referring
te the Church was referring speci-
fleatly to the Clergy
Bishep implies that the

Charch is doing nothing towards

the improvement of education ih
this Island. Surely the Church
to-day is allowed little say in
these matters, except through the
mouth of the Bishop, who is on
the Governing Bodies of the
schools. What has he done? In
any case, the function of the
Church in this matter is to ensure
that the educational system is
based on broad Christian princi-
ples, leaving details of organisa-
tion and teaching to the trained
experts to whom we pay large
salaries. “ :

Again, the Bishop asks, what is
the Church doing about the social
and political stirring of the people.
Thank God, the Church in Barba-
dos has no political power. The
only Church dignitary who has
ever been entrusted with a voice

in politics is Bishop Hughes him- tl

self. What has he done with it?

The truth seems te pe that the
Bishop had many social aad
political schemes which may bave
been very admirable, but instead
of infusing religion into politics
he has sought to introduce politics
into religion, This was not the
way that Christ dealt with the
political problems of His day. liv-
ing as He did under a totalitarian
tvranny. He taught that the
Kingdom of God must be within
the individual, and must spread

like leaven through the mass—not
imposed arbitrarily from
above.

However, the Bishop convicts us
all—both Clergy and Laity—of
selfishness and lack of true Chris-
tianity, and in spite of the harsh-
ness of his words we would do
well to profit by them, It is in-
teresting’ im’ this connection to
quote from the words of the late
William Temple, the great social-
ist Archbishop, on the difference
in emphasis between the work of
the Clergy and that of the Laity,
the orders who together form the
Church, He writes; —''The Priest's
work is religion ..... he stands
for the things of God before the
Laity—religion is his daily work
. . « » The Laity stand for the
things of God before the world
« . .% . they seek the help that
a. religious specialist can give
hem. . The layman finds
in religion the strength for doi
in a Chfistian spirit work whi
unbelievers also do.”

In conclusion, may I add a fur-
ther quotation from Archbishop
Temple for the benefit of Bishop
Hughes, and also for his detrac-
tors? “We so easily assume that
what seems to us good must be
the will of God. We make our
plans for the work of God, ard
ask Him to prosper them. But
they may be seriously infected
with our prejudice, ignorance and.

—LNS.

and may already have been made.

nesses

short-sightedness. We can neyer
see in advance that the way to
final success lies through immedi-
ate failure; yet God may know
that this is so.”

A LAY MEMBER OF THE CHURCH.

Disendowment

The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—It is unfortunate that the
Hon, Mr. Cuke's letter should be
published after the Bishop has
left the island, thus giving him no
opportunity of replying.

After all His Lordship’s serm,
was delivered eleven dame Si =

FAIRPLAY.
BL. Cricket Tour

To The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—In’ “The Cricketer”,
Oe eas 1950-51, it is
8 that after meetings of R
Board of Control and the Regist
County Cricket Committee t
Lord’s on November 15, the follow..
ing money grants were made.

I quote:—"“As a result of the
Test matches against West Indies
the “counties on whose grounds
matches were played will each
receive” “£4,442, the other first
class counties. £1,493, each, minor
county” “£257 and the two unhi-+
versities £1,493 between them.”

We here are ail pleased to heat Barbados hotels.. Americans love 25th’ January, 1951,

that such financial success as that
achieved by our West Indies team
has enabled this generous distr-
bution of moneys for the upkeep
of the game in England but we
would be very interested to learn
how much of the funds we
brought home has been allotted
to us for the amelioration of the
good old game in Barbados.
Yours truly.
CE

Americans And Barbailos

The Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—I cannot get out of my
mind how our old beloved island
is passing up their r
A bunch of good fellows named
me in Barbados “Speed boat
Doorly” and they so write me.

“Planes have made the West
Indies the year round playgrounds
of the world”. That is the slogan
I am selling. I remember Ber-
muda in the late 1800's people
here used to say “Bermuda is too
hot in the summer, too cold in
the winter.” To-day ii is the
largest all year round island resort
in the world.

You can get Barbados to wake
up and build some modern hotels
on their beaches or near, as
Jamaica, St. Thomas, Grenada and
others are doing. I hate to say
what a lot of Americans call

Barbados, they spend money, they
love Steamship travel when they
have time. They are fed up with
their own high priced artificial
resorts, they are lovers of travel,
they are worth going after.

I say, now is the time to look
ahead for Barbados in a big way.
Ex-President Hoover was quoted
some years ago as saying “We
bought some poor-houses” re St.
Thomas and St. Croix. Is he right

to-day? _
GEORGE DOORLY.
209 Newark Avenue, '
Bloomfield, N.J.,
U.S.A.

January 19, 1951.
The “Refuge ss

The Editor, The Advocate,
I have a little refuge,
It's only ten by eight
But when I'm tired on evenings,
I make for it quite straight.

It's been a shelter for me
In days of sun and rain;
And even when floods threaten-

I've fled to it again,

But now I’m sorely worried

Pah scadts es
“Advocate”

ye pi COLLECTORS COM-

ye REFUGEE

Afternoon
Tea Party

Choose your
favourite brand

Red Rose
Choyce Tips



read, Hutter
and Jams

ic
Meat & Fish Spreads
Carr's Assorted Biscuits

Pan Cake Syrup
Sliced Ham





SPECIAL

MYNAH TEA—S5c. per ¢
Idris Kola Tonic—
1,00 per Bottle

i Luncheon Cheese $1.21 ea.
RELISH & PICKLES

Cucumber Salad

A.T, Sauce

Pan Yan

Branston

HELP. Sauce

Kep



Greens

CARROTS
CABBAGE

BEANS

GODDARDS - pevwe.
FRIDAY,

50 Acres Of
Canes Burnt

HE LARGEST cane fire so far
4 this year Broke out at Small
Ridge Plantation, St,
Wednesday night and destroyed
163 acres of second crop ripe
canes. lney are the property of
G. S. Evelyn and were insured.
A NOTHER large cane fire on
’ Wednesday night at Fairy
Valley Plantation, Christ Church,
destroyed 94 acres of first crop
wipe. canes belonging to E, L.
Ward of the same plantation.

This fire extended to Tyme
Bottcm and burnt 10% acres of
ast, second and third crop ripe

anes belonging to ten peasants.
A THIRD FIRE broke out at

Yorkshire Plantation, Christ
Church and burnt 11 acres of first
crop ripe canes and one and a-half
acres of second crop ripe canes.
They are the property of -A; M.
Arthur of the same plantation,
Ss" STEPHEN'S CHURCH will

be nolding its Harvest on
Sunday, January 23. In addition
to the Matins and Low Mass at
7 80-a.m, there will be pracession
and Salemn Mass at 9 a.m,

In the afterncon a_ Sacred
Centata will be sung by the choir
and the programme will end witb
Solemn Evensong procession and
‘Te Deum at 7-p.m,.

TEVES broke and entered an

unoccupied house at Queen
Street, St. Michael and stole a
quantity of galvanise and lumber
valued at $49.12. The ‘incident
was reported by Charles Barton of
the same address,
NEVENTY-YEAR-OLD Bertha
ad Sobers of St. Matthias Gap,
Christ Church, died suddenly at
her home early yesterday morning.
Her body was removed to the
Public Mortuary where an autopsy
was performed.
Â¥T AWN TENNIS is played four

times a week ut the Princéss
Alice Playing field. So far this is
the only sport that is organised.
Only one tennis court is in use,
but the other two are expected to
be completed shortly.

A large part of the breakwater
around the field has been buili
and some cf the old one repaired
The evergreen trees are not yet
planted,



Lady Savage Visits.
Ch. Ch. BabyLeague

Lady Savage visited the Christ
Church Baby League yesterday
and wrote in the Visitors Book
that the League is doing excellent
‘work,

Lady Savage was accompanied
by Miss Betty Arne, Social Wel-
fare Officer. She talked to some
of the mothers who were at the
League and asked many questions
about its working,

She was shown around by
Madam Ifill, President, Mrs. Fred
Goddard and Mrs. E. Sampson,
Vice President:



“RODNEY” DUE
MONDAY.

The Lady Rodney, which was
scheduled to arrive at. Barbados
on Sunday, will now be calling
on Monday, Messrs Gardiner Aus—
tin & Co, Ltd., - informed the
Advocate yesterday,

She is coming from Canada via
the British Northern Islands and
will be leaving Barbados the
same night for British Guiana
via St. Vineent, Grenada and
Trinidad. Passengers are asked
to keep in touch with her agerts.

CINEMA SHOWS ON
SCOKER LINE SHIPS

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan, 21
Passengers travelling between
Georgetown and Liverpool in the
Bocker Line Vessels Amakura and
Arakaka now have the benefit of
cinema shows during the yoyage.
These vessels have had sound
projectors installed, and full-
length feature films will be put
en board each voyage for the
entertainment of passengers.



m,

Firemen, Bandsmen Will
Welcome Club Willow

JUDGING from its castle-like appearance, “Club Wil-
low” which the Government plans to buy to accommodate
the Police Band and the Fire Brigade will perhaps be more
suitable for that purpose than for the club and dancing

house which it has been for

Containing about 20 rooms, it
is a building in which a new resi-
dent would really have to learn
his way about — a rambling house
literally, It is said that the family
who lived in it originally was a
family of just two people.
Willoy stands on two
of land.



acres



After the original owners sold |

the property, it was used as a
rather exclusive club, Clubs in
Barbados are notoriously short-
lived, and it was not Jong before
“Club Willow” became just an-
other of the local temples dedi-
cated to the god of daencing.;
Dances were held there up to last
Christmas,

In a short time from now, if
the Legislative Council concurs in
the Resolution to grant Govern-
ment the funds to purchase the
property,

Thomas on}

‘| bers who. remain

ceases. a Savings Department has

Philip 3.

“Club}



| cramped

its walls will echo with opportunity

JANUARY 26, 1951

i
ie

THE PICTURE SHOWS THE TOYS laid out at yesterday's Auction Sale for bidders to get a good

fhesicis and value them.



137 FRIENDLY
SOCIETIES

One hundred and thirty seven
Friendly Societies in the island
provide certain benefits that at-
tract a membership of well over
half the population.

The majority of the people are
drawn from the poor working
classes. These for the most part
join to ensure that at Christmas
time they will be in rece'pt of a
bonus—a portion of the money
they contribute during the year.

Another important reason is
that in the event of their death
or any of their dependents’,
there would be some money to
help tide over expenses. This
applies as well to cases in which
a member may become ill,

Until recently these were pro-
bably the most important in-
ducements.-In recent times, how-/
ever, the most modern of the so- |
cieties have increased the bene-
fits to such an extent, that thou
sands of the poor and middle



BARBADOS sciatica OTE EAS

Sh ke AA | SALE



One Can

Battleships, Oatflakes
And Bath Sponges

AT AN AUCTION SALE

AUCTION SALES are
of Barbados in which only

However, those who do, know their business.



Flying Fish
Catches Have
Been Small

During this month there have

classes alike join year after year.| been very small catches of flying

Probably one of the most at-
tractive of the benefits is the
provision of scholarships at sec-
ondary schools. Th@se are com-
peted for yearly by the sons and
daughters of the members. Not
only are the fees and books pro-
vided, but in some cases help is
given in the supply of lunch,

Then there is the benefit of 2
long-term bonus paid to mem-
in the» society
for twenty years or more.

Some Societies even have an
Accident Fund where a few cents
paid by a member besides his
weekly contribution, make some
provision for him in case he be-
comes the victim of an accident

Loans are made to members at
some of the societies, it is under-
stood, and at least in one or two

been established for the use of
members. The latest addition at
one of these societies is the set
up of a store where members are
allowed to take advantage of the
hire-purchase. system operating
without any extra charges on the

articles. ion
Some of the societies have
branches in the country districts

and the numbers of these socie-
ties are considerable,

The grades rise
cents weekly to four

St. Michael with 54
has by far the largest
St. Peter comes next with 18.
The remaining order follows:
St. Lucy 12, St. John 10, St.
James 9, St. Andrew 8, Christ
Church and St, George 7 each,
St. Joseph 5, St. Thomas 4, St.

from eight
shillings.

societies
number.

the last few years.

There are two outbuildings
which once served as stables, and
the land on which the property
stands is full of grass weeds and
vines. Thereabouts a tennis court
once graced the property.

A tennis court will no doubt
grace it again, for as soon as the
Band and the Firemen move in
there will be provision for games
and other forms of relaxation, As
Colonel Michelin, Commissione:
of Police, told the Advocate yes-
terday, the purchase of the place
would be of great benefit to these
two branches of the Police Force,
both of whom now occupy
quarters.

An Ideal Spot

A Fireman spends most of his
time in barracks waiting for
something to happen, Spending
it in a cramped space with no
for a really good

music again — the music of the} game except one of cards or table
Police Band going through their | tennis can be boring, Then, when

daily practice,

The revving up the alarm of fire is raised and the

of the Fire Br igade’s engine and|engine swings out from its pres-
the clanging of its bells will also|ent quarters, it swings into roads
be heard as the firemen get off toj that are always busy with traffic,

fight a fire somewhere in Barba-
dos,

Needs Repairs

At this moment the rooms are
deserted and gloomy and badly in
need of the renovation which, if
the Government buys the place,
will be done by the Public Works
Department. One of the remind-
ers of the family occupants is an
iron safe let into the wall of one
of the rooms, A reminder of the
dancing house days is the bar. In
it is a blue price board on which
is printed in white letters the
price of rum, beer, pork chops
and the rest of them.

Some of the walls are built of
rubble stone and are still in good
condition, but there are rooms
where laths and plaster were used
and these walls are crumbling

at least during the day,

But if “Club Willow” is used as
quarters, Col. Michelin said, the
engine will swing out from the
back entrance which is on King
Street, and unimpeded by heavy
traffic, can get off to a really fast
start.

Where the Band is concerned,
they now have to practise in a
small room where Capt. Raison
cannot hear the sound of each in-
strument well,

finish their practising by 10.00
a.m. or else they will disturb the

| Courts.

There will be plenty of room for |
practice at “Club Willow”, and as
\time goes on, Colonel Michelin
thinks it will be possible for them

to put on concerts there. The|
Band will then be really “at
home” to the public,

















fish, Up to Monday only 1,275
pounds of flying fish have passed
through the Public Market. At
the other fishing centres the re-'
turns are also small.

In the month of December
20,674 pounds of flying fish came
into the market and many more
thousands of pounds at other cen-
tres. This is a brilliant catch for
that month considering that in De-
cember 1949 only 1,983 pounds
were recorded.

It would appear as though the
December catches are good every
other year. In December 1946 the
catch was good. Over 14,000
pounds passed through the market.
December 1947 saw a little over
2,000 while the next December was
over 10,000,

“Unless we have currents com-
ing towards us we cannot find fly-
ing fish. That was the position a
week or two ago when very little
fish were being caught,” Mr. D. W.
Wiles, Fisheries Officer, told the
Advocate yesterday.

He said that at present the cur-
rents would appear to be coming
towards the island as some flying
fish have been seen within the last
two days. It has however been
extremely difficult to catch many
due to high winds that prevailed.

Hindered by Wind |

“We have had a_ persistently
calm period for ten days from
January 3 to January 13”, he said,
“and what wind was blowing
came from the north west while
the position of the flying fish dur-
ing that period was in the south
and south western area of the
island. This meant that the fish-
ing boats could go for the fish but
could not return within reasonable
hours, coupled with tremendous
difficulties.”

He said that after this period of
calm the wind has been persistent-
ly high and is again hampering
fishing boats from bringing in
large catches. He however thinks
that the catches in December were
brilliant

“When you get a good Decem-
ber followed by a poor January
you are not badly off. May is
usually the best month for flying





month, It was extremely old and
the centre bone very large. It was
the largest grouper on record since
the fish market has been func-
tioning. A 100 pound porpoise was
also caught.

The total amount of fish record-
ed in the market in December is
29,543 pounds. Of this 20,674
pounds were flying fish, 1,438
pounds dolphin, 837 pounds king
tish, 1,999 pounds bili fish, 2,157
shark, 2,024 pounds albacore, 56

| pounds of bonito, 63 pounds bar-

And they have to}

‘

racudas, a grouper and a porpoise.
The total for January up to the
22nd is: 1,275 pounds of flying fish,
1,208 pounds dolphin, 632 pounds
king fish, 289 pounds bill fish,
1,849 pounds shark, 1,428 pounds
aibacore, and 40 pounds of tabois.
During this period large quanti-
ties of lion shark were caught.

Bookers Will Train
B.G. Boys As Sugar
Technologists

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Jan. 21

Bookers Sugar Estates Limited
propose to offer a limited number
ef scholarships to enable boys
educated in British Guiana to
qualify as Sugar Technologists at
the Imperial College of Tropical
Agricuiture in Trinidad’ with a
view to their employment on the
staff of the sugar estates adminis-
tered by the Company.

The minimum qualifications re-
quired of candidates are the
| School Certificate (or equivalent)
with credits in physics, chemistry
and mathematics, or in general
science and mathematics

Candidates will be selected by a
panel appointed by the, Directors

f the Corpany.



ee

fish catches,
A grouper weighing 195 pounds 2M a "ers
was brought into the market last| have been instructed to visit and



Buy Toy

a part of the community life
a small percentage take part.

Yesterday the Advocate visited
the Auction Mart of Mr. Vincent
Griffith at Shepherd Street, where
a sale was in progress, There
were only a dozen people present
but several dozens of racing cars,
toy battleships, fire engines and
stuffed animals changed hands
and only a nod of the head meant
that a bidder was willing to pay
a sixpence or a dollar more than
the figure offered

The variety is amazing. From
selling a dozen iron pots and at
the same time extolling their
virtue, the auctioneer suddenly
switched to two dozen boxes of
jig-saw puzzles and was equally
fluent.

Jig Saw Puzzles

It was a far cry from jig-saw
puzzles to bath sponges but four
dozen of them went next.

A few dozen bicycle rims came
“out of the box” next and without
a breather the auctioneer sold a
dozen boxes of oatflakes.

One could not be too surprised
now at the appearance of some
cases of Lighthouse matches but
they were scarcely prepared for
a series of Christmas decorations
to be put up next.

Tins of potato chips and jam,
excellently foiled by a set of books
on mechanics were all snapped
up,

Yes, it is interesting to see that
almost all the articles, regardless
of their variety have ‘their back-
ers and those willing to bid them
up to the limit after a series of |
lightning calculations, and aban-
don them just as suddenly if the
calculations prove the figure un-
economic,





B.G. Health Officers
Check For ’Flu

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Jan, 21

In view of the influenza epi-
demic now raging in Britain the
Public Health Department at
Georgetown has taken special
precautions to prevent any spread
to the Colony.

All incoming passengers by air
or sea are subject to scrutiny and
if any of them report being ill,
they are given a leaflet which out-
lines the measures to be taken to
prevent the spread of the disease.
They are also advised to go to bed
and call = doctor.

All csyict Sanitary Officers
ascertain the state of attendance
at schools in their districts, and
if this is found to be below aver-
age, to investigate further, If
influenza is the cause of absentec-
ism, they are instructed to report
immediately their findings to their
Health Officer and advise the
parents of the affected children to
put them to bed immediately and
call the doctor.

All School Nurses, Health Visit-
ors and district subsidized League
Midwives have received similar
instructions and all registered
medical practitioners have already
been alerted,



OOO

Sweet
Biscuits

YOUR OWN

DELIGHTS
JUST ARRIVED

JACOB'S CARNIVAL ASST.
” AFTE RNOON

s,
-
°G0O606066666660606060666606

LLCS SCD OHO









Has Heard The Beat
Of The African Drum

IN THE ALMOST BARE front room of his home up}
Sayes Court, Christ Church, 75-year-old Charles FE. Daisley,
a round loud man who has fought in Africa and has heard |
the African drums, told the Advocate yesterday of the |
days when he used to buy four eggs for a cent in Africa |

and three six-by-four-by-one-inch thick biscuits for a cent |

in Barbados.

Seventy-five and
enough for

looking hale |
manys more years,
Daisley first left Barbados in 1893

soldier of the West India/



outside world.

He came from the hills of St.
Thomas and went to school at|
Sharon’s mixed school. In those
days there was not any age limit
and Daisley remembers a young
man and woman who were at
school in his day and who married
shortly after they left.

The fact that Daisley helped
teach at Sharcn makes him more
indignant when as he says, his
present neighbours do not believe
he can read and write. Daisley |
calls himself Charles E, Daisley |
whenever he is referring to him-}
self. Before he first left Barbados
about 1898, a labourer used to
— for 20 cents a day and what |
used to support him, his wife and
and Mr. lehildven, Pp

a man killed a pig, he gave a pound
jue each of his nearest neighbours
and salted the remainder to put
, by. Then too, milk used to be
| given away. People walked from
, the country to town in those days
and if could drive to a

Inspectors
Reappointed

Six cane weighing Inspectors
who were appointed in 1945 to
Supervise the weighing of sugar

canes at factories throughout the!
island, have again been appointed!
this year. They will be supervis
ing at 35 factories and will work
under the Labour Department a |





the first six months of the year
These men are Mr. F. A. Good-
ridge, Mr. R. Nelson; Mr. R. A | .
Vaughan, Mr, C. Vere Walker
Mr. J. McD. Heath,
M. A. Wilkinson,
Their chief function is to make
Sure that cane weighers
always weighing and
the weights accurately.
Cane weighing Inspectors have
no ro — time for starting to
work, but their business can vary oy C
trcm early in the morning. saiy ee 0 Caner On.
around seven o'clock until late io ones &
the evening. Each man has to
use his discretion as to the time} , After four years service in
he goes to his work, Africa, Daisley went to Bermuda
This is the seventh season that) for 11 months, still as a soldier,
these men have been engaged in then stayed three years in Jamaic a
this type of work. They know jand finally returned to Africa.
their job and their presence does | His has been a real soldier's life,
From fierce battles
through woodlands where they
saw lions and then back to the
joy of the barracks,
The rank to which Daisley
climbed was Warrant Officer. But
through it al' he carried a charmed

But in those days when |
|

are
recording





a man

Saw Ostrich Eggs

he was
man of means,

a lot in maintaining the confidence| he Said,
ef peasants and sugar workers,

Inspectors Interchanged

In_ addition to the allotted
number of factories a cane weigh-.
ing Inspector has to visit, there life. He was never wounded, nor
is a regular weekly interchange was he ever attacked by animals
cf inspectors when each man gocs or snakes although he saw many of
to a district other than his own
so that each cane weigher in the
island sees each of the six inspec-}
tors yY

Cane weighing Inspectors have
to be alert for anything which
might affect the accuracy of the
scale beam or the weighing of
the canes.

Although it is not their job to
see that the machine itself 18
correct, yet, if they have reason
to believe that any particular
machine is not weighing correct-
ly, it is their duty to report the
matter to the Labour Commission-
er who weuld immediately bring
it to the attention of the proper
authorities.

The chief method of checking
is the recalling of loads of cane
that had been weighed in their
absence and re-weighing them.

Jas a
Cane Weighing| Regiment He was young then and })i
| filled with a desire to see the

them. He has seen ostrich eggs,
but was afraid to eat them be-
cause they were “so big.”

It was in the army band that
he learned the theory of music,
the subject on which he would
talk to you non-stop for days. If
you want to hear about the four
years he worked on the Lagos
Government Railways in Nigeria,
you would have to lead him away
trom his musical topic,

Hags Live In Papaw

Ask him about African witch
doctors and Daisley will tell you
he never got in touch with any of
them, but he knew of hags. If you
allowed a squint to escape you
when Daisley begins his hag-dis-
cussion, he will tell you he is an
old enough man to know he should
not tell nancy stories, and will
assure you that hags are people
who can live in a papaw.

Daisley never saw the Egyptian
pyramids and such famous places,
but he wil] still tell you about
them as he heard it from soldiers
who slept beside him. He is proud
of having slept, near men who
actually saw such places.

Daisley’s view is that to really
become skilled in musie, one
should not marry and he would
tell you of a young man he used
fo teach who got married and
took a down turn. When you hear
jhim thlking so, you would neces-



Demerara Electric
Company Workers
Get 10% Increase

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Jan, 21
The Demerara Electric Company
Limited, and the Man-Power Citi-
zens’ Association announced yes- |

,. sarily hum and say, so you are
terday the signing of a new agree 75 ang never married. Then he
meee giving whe. oa tk: ta ; would come out with the flooring
employees" an additions. | news that he was married twice
cent. cost of living bonus retro- 1Both. of Daisley's wives may be
spective to September, 1950. 24 living. He married the second
agreement followed months

|| time after he had not seen or
iheard of the first wife after 22
years.

And after many years in Africa
Daisley returned to Barbados t«

long-drawn-out negotiations Wihich
at several stages were on the!
verge of a complete break-down,

The cost-of-living bonus agreed



T

upon brings the total to 20 per
cent, bonus, with a sliding scale
arrangement by which should the
Cost of Living Index show any
increase or decrease the bonus
would be adjusted accordingly.

It is estimated that the new
concessions will mean an addi-
tional $15,000 to $20,000 per an-
rum for wages, while the mini-
n.um wage, including bonus, now
rises to $2.20 per day.

TRADE FAIR OPENED

(From Our Own Correspondent)

POR'T-OF-SPAIN.
The Governor, Sir Hubert
Rance, formally declared open the
first “Trade fair” in Trinidad of
British goods and British caravans
on Monday,

Sir Hubert, who was accom-
panied by his A.D.C,. was met on
his arrival by Mr A, S. Jenkinson,
British caravan salesman, and
Major Carruthers, who in conjunec-
tion with the West Indies Buyers’
are responsible for the exhibition,



Lord Selsdon, a Director of
Raven Caravans Ltd., said that
the exhibition was an experiment
to bring more British. goods and
larger exhibitions in the future.

PSP LLLP,

work with the Waterworks De-
partment as a sub store-keeper
He likes life in Africa better than
he likes it in Barbados Ten
years ago he resigned and moves
from the city into the country tc
lead a quiet life,



NEW CATHOLIC
CHURCH BLESSED

(From Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPALN,
Catholics from various parts ot
the island turned out in thousands
to witness the ceremonial blessing
of the new $200,000 San Fernando
Catholic Church by His Grare the
Archbishop of Port-of-Spain, the

Most Rey. Dr. Finbar Ryan on
Sunday. The ceremony which
drew one of the largest crowds
ever seen on Harris Promenade,
was attended by legislators, Bor-
ough Councillors, high ranking
Government officials, and people

of a!! walks of life.

Dedicated to Our Lady of Per-
petual Help, the new church which
is one of the beautiful buildings
in the town, replaces the structure
which was demolished in
after serving for a little over
years,

Students of St. Joseph’s Con-
vent High School and of Presenta-
tion College turned out in their
uniforms.

100

1948,)



” ASST. CREAMS .. ” AT
” APRICOT & CREAM RINGS ” Al
” SWEET ASST. bode cheat

” MARIE

CREAM CRACKERS ...

TEA.

STANSFELD scorr & Co., Ltd.

CRAWFORD’S PUFF CREAMS .
” KENT CREAMS





Heartbreaker 51 Gauge,

15 denier. Pair $2.58
Camay 54 Gauge,
15 denier, Pair $2.75







PAGE FIVE

See ee em

forms suony or
FRESH SUPPLY OF

" SPURINA HEN CHOW § “

(SCRATCH GRAIN)

at JASON JONES & CO., LTD.--Distributors .
SREB CED ReUe eee
















| TO-DAY’S
SPECIALS!

vei ee



2 PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN
wa KNIGHTS LTD.

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED
A SHIPMENT OF

AGRICULTURAL
FORKS

GOOD QUALITY — FULLY STRAPPED.
$4.70

The quantity for disposal is small

ONLY EACH.

and. future supplies are uncertain.



SEND US YOUR ORDERS
WITHOUT DELAY.

HARRISON'S

SOCCCCC CI

HARDWARE _ DEPT.
TEL. 2364.

LAL APPELLEE













CT evety

occasion
at a ns,

on Sale at the
leading Stores









~ «= and
Camay

Stockings

Full Fashioned and mad2 of DUPONT Nylon

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LID.

10, 11,

nareeeeasomntai init teeta lial





12 & 13 Broad Street




PAGE

HENRY

SIX





BY CARL ANDERSON

aa

pENTisr

RING
BELL

AND
WALIC IN



MICKEY MOUSE






OU SEE, ... HEY, PUT )
DOWN THAT BOTTLE !

RUN FOR YOUR
" LIFE! THAT'S
THE DREAD
TZiG-TZAG FLY!



‘ ® DON

&

|
| es
j@

b

rae
BSE





: os er





( OH, BLONDES--/ pos
BY ALL MEANS, . WHY THE PAUSE?
BLONDES . ) ( WAS THERE ANY
be a

el Pe, 2




THE LONE RANGER







mo TON TO iy | YOUR PLAN WORKED! 7ive GOT THE [ WHEN YOU'VE LOCKED UP THESE CROOKS IN JAIL, MARSHAL, WEILL ROUND UP THE
ME ( MARSHAL “THESE. THREE ARE JEWELER! REST OF THE GANG! =
url : a | P| PROVED chooks \| eS TIED UP] h—
Xi amy CROOK! JH | ON THE
| soe \ =e ree ha Li BACKTRAIL!
2 ae? Ney f | p
ea ||
me Gif -| |
Loe Re
Lo ol
| 4 A ee ae |
if iz {7a RB \ ee)
es me as 8
' COM |
1% ik ; wax) j
Â¥ 2 el
| i y —_—_— '.

Fhe et

____f GO ON TO TOWN WITH
| THOSE-CREOKS: ILL BRING THEIR

si HIYO, SILVER,
AWAY /

TO THINK MR. PECK THE
JEWELER WAS BEHIND ALL THE
wy CRIME HERE!
Gc 0 Z
aw * we,
‘ih Pe,
ar ie 53 on MONA 2
C0 |
ar Pion
ix ex
bee A]
rl ( . \

UP OUR TOWN! 3
or ZG

BEGINNING
MONDAY:



BY GEORGE MC.MANUS
— bse ;

cee eee









r- Pn i a a
{ THIS TELEVISION ) | | JS. COME BACK HERE” >)

| SET 1S GONNA |





f
| : ALL. RIGH T- MAGGIE
BE A GREAT | 5 YOU'RE GOING ? YOU | M2 sth SO1nt"
|] HELP To we | wae ( GREAT B16 6 . ) | tO Ta SPORE TD
NOw FOR _/ ec Sie: GROWN GOOD-FOR 3
| BINT YS H f = {sj j ‘
—— Wn a ae

.

w

‘ I WANT THE BiG
BAG YOU HAVE...
=> STRAPS...

I WANT A
TOUPEE!






a

PAIR OF é
CUTTING PLIERS, ///
PLEASE... /f//



DW

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

MILE AHEAD OVERHILL*RED
BARN«WAITING-WITH PLANE +
FOR ME + I'M THE PILOTe~




STAY, FELLA! NO MORE BAD 2-
MANNERS! WHERE ARE THEY ?




ee HMM+YOURE THE PILOT’ THEY CANT
WHERE
ae, ARE THE THREE KILLER?




ALITTLE TIME FOR



BF) iio viDNaprED ILLTELL YOU ANYTHING + BUT YOu TO

oe DIANA PALMER? / Keer ae TALKS
' eis ae OFF ME! > _
RY — =



it 1 DONT KNOW.
Me



















LEAVE WITHOUT YOU. THAT GIVES US

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ROBINSON'S

‘PATENT’ BARLEY

. ~~ makes milk more digestible for baby -
avn

‘PATENT’ GROATS
. Makes weaning a happy time for baby—
ately and mother

Ae DA



————————

ATTENTION !!





MILD

See us for - - -
BRC FABRIC

EXPANDED METAL
- TEMPERED HARD BOARD
OIL STOVES & OVENS
Phone Phone

aoe TL, HERBERT Ltd. “‘2x7°

10 & 11 Roebuck St., & Magazine Lane.

a

DIAL 4528



Tos good looks tell you they’re just right.
‘You know, too, when you look at the price .
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated



a is a Two-tone Brogue. Tied to every pair is

=\, = the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign

| rad \ #/| Glad” which means ‘just right’! Look for it in
\| | , leading stores in Barbados.

JOHN WHITE

means made just.right













The Advocate Co: Ltd’, will publish a Year Book of Barbados
in 1951,

; The Year Book will contain three parts:—

(1) Handbook giving detailed statistics and information on
a wide variety of subjects e.g., agriculture, finance,
industries, trade, communications, tourism, hotels, sport,
art, literature and all the things we want to know about
Barbados but have until now not been able to find
under one cover,

(2) Special supplement on Barbados’ industries: e.g. sugar,

— butter, lard, ice, gas, tobacco, electricity, hotels
etc.

(3) A Who's Who of Barbadians you should know about

A local committee comprising among others Hon. V. C. Gale
M.L.C., Managing Director of the Advocate Co. Ltd., Vice
President of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce, Mr. George
Hunte, Assistant Editor of the Barbados Advocate, Mr. Neville
Connell Director of the Barbados Museum and Mr. Trevor Gale,
Advertising Director of the Barbados Advocate will be respon-

* sible for the publication.

The compilers of the Year Book want to make sure that the
Year Book is representative of all aspects of life in Barbados
and it is taking this opportunity to invite secretaries of Societies,
Clubs, Institutions, and business, social and other organisations
of all kinds to send particulars about their respective organisa-
tions immediately or not later than April 15th 1951.

Year Book,
C/o Editor, Barbados Advocate,
34 Broad Street.

2 Names and addresses of all those to be considered for
inclusion in Who's Who will also be welcomed.

Advertisements close April 30th 1951.
Advertisers are asked to get in touch with

Mr, Trevor Gale,
Advertising Director,
Barbados Advocate,
84 Broad Street.

_ This is one publication that no advertiser can afford to
ignore because no one interested in Barbados can afford to be
without the Year Book of Barbados 1951.

(AN ADVOCATE PUBLICATION)





FRIDAY,



YEAR BOOK 1951 |

JANUARY 1951

26



FACTORY MANAGERS

Take this opportunity of obtaining your requirements in :~

GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE
Ranging from 14 in. upwards

STEEL ,

Flats, Rounds, Squares in all Sizes
BOLTS & NUTS—All Sizes

FILTER CLOTH—White Cotton Twill
At PRICES that cannot be repeated.



The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Li.
WHITE PARK ROAD, ST. MICHAEL

- Gums Bleed!





Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth 6 io
Teeth mean that you have py fa ame.
‘Trench Mouth or perhaps some bad ¢ ees
that will sooner or later cause your —
to fall out and may also cause Rheumsa as 4
and Heart Trouble. Amosan stops gum
bleeding the first day, ends sore eon ;
and quickly tightens the teeth. Iron sind
guarantee. Amosan must make 7
mouth well and save your teeth ror
money back on return of empty, poet:
Get Amosan from your chemls)

a today. The guar-
osan antee protects
you. ¥ Rec

for ‘Pyorrhea—Trench. Mouth




COUGH LOZENGES
Ratatat rete 9



Many women are subject to weak,
aching back. Often the kidneys are
to blame, for your kidneys, along
with the liver, must filter out im-
purities from the bloodstream.

So if you feel tired, worn-out, head-
achy—with the nagging pain of an
aching back—look to both your kid-
neys and liver. That's why Cana-
dians haye been relying on Dr.
Chase’s Kidney-Liver Pills for over
half a century.

Give your system a chance to
work properly. ‘Try Dr. Chase's
Kidney-Liver Pills today. The name
“Dr. Chase” is your assurance. 3

Dr. Chase's

KIDNEY-LIVER PILL?



with an







“Ye

YOU GET



ie. Where dependabili-
ve (ty.is.vital—you had
"better use EXIDE Bat-
teries. When you buy
-) am EXIDE * you get
“® extrapowertohandle ~
the} roughest ’crank-
a ing job... extra rug-

_ gedness'for hard

. service inall climates
3 and low mainte! ©~)
‘nance cost. Whenit’s ,
lan | EXIDEnyAYOU
Start!

oS DEPENDABLE BATTERIES
| FOR 61 YEARS!

ke

‘
t

«
a

CITY GARAGE TRADING co, ETD
_ with grass cutter.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 1











The shock was great the blow severe

We never thought his death was near
ly those who love can tell

pain of parting without farewell.



The Bullen family, Emerald Villa,
Cheapside. 25.1.51—I1n.
ELDER—In loving memory of Miss

Elouise Elder Who departed this life
on 23rd January, 1948.
“Where the Mourners Weeping
Sheds the Secret tear
God His watch is keeping
Though none else be near.

May Elder, Noel Elde 26.1.51—1n.

FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR = X 86. Dodge 5 Passenger in
A 1 condition ‘and licensed till June.
Contact Leon Alleyne at Fort Royal
Garage about sale of car. Mrs, A. M.
Arthur, Yorkshire.













26.1.51—3n,

CAR — Ford 10 h.p. in good working
order.. Apply Miss L. Clarke, “Ivy
Lodge”, The Ivy. Dial 2575,

'

26.1.51—3n.





CAR — Ford 1948 six cylinder De
Luxe Sedan, low mileage and in good
mechanical condition. Chas. Mc Ernear-



ney & Co., Ltd. 24.1.51—49

CAR—Citroen. 15 H.P. 1950 model in
excellent condition, Owner leaving
island. Apply: B'dos Agencies Ltd.
Dial 4808, Evelyn. 21.1,51—Tn

ee
CAR—Buick 8. 1939 Model, inspection
invited. Willems, Rosamund, Worthing.
20.1.50—6n.

ENGINE — assisted cycles complete.
Price $155.00 including Bicycle at Ralph
Beard's Show Room, Hardwood Alley.
Phone 4683. 26.1.51—3n,





PICK-UP One Second hand Ford
V-8 Pick-up in A. 1 condition. Just
overhaul. (Past inspection) 2 days ago.
New Tyres. C. Bannister, Station Hill.
St. James, 26.1.51—4n.

TRACTOR—One (1) McCormick Deer-
ing Farmall H. wheel tractor, complete
In excellent condi-
_ tion, very little used. COLE & CO,,
LTD. 20.1.51—7n

ELECTRICAL

RS
FRIGIDAIRE—One (1) American Frigid,
aire 7 cub, ft. complete with lock.
Apply D. L. Emtage c/o R. Hunte
& Co., Ltd, 4611, .1.51—t.f.n.,

———
RADIOS — Several New Pilot Radios.
Battery and Electric at Special reduced
prices at Ralph Beard’s Show Rooms,
Hardwood Alley. Phone 4683.
26.1.51—3n.

cecsipsinioniapinpcintiacenatingiiceenceitionigitlipeinetretenet
REFRIGERATOR — 8 cub. ft. Ameri-
can Gibson 3 years guarantee, left in
Ralph Beara’s Show Rooms, Hardwood
Alley. . 26.1.51—5n.

CS 4
REFRIGERATOR — One General Elec-
tric American Refrigerator 5 c.f. in
perfect order. A gift at the price. Call
C. Pierrepointe at 4910 or 3601,
25.1.51—2n.

LIVES LOCK

———

COW — One registered Guernsey cow
by Mt. Hope Vigour An Exhibition Ist.
Prize Winner She gave (32) Pints Milk
with 2nd Calf To calve 26th January,





K.
20.

1951. Apply to V. W. Clarke, Ivy
Lodge, Ivy Road, St. M. 26.1.51—3n.
MECHANICAL



eaten east deol

BICYCLE—One 3-speed Gent's Groen
Raleigh Bicycle standard almost new for
sale. Apply to F, O, Pounder, jeweller,
Roebuck Street 26.1.51—2n,

FURNITURE
cent te Ragen eae tantre —
FURNITURE—Ralph Beard offers the
following:— New Mahogany furniture:
Dining Chairs $18.00 per pr. Tub Chairs
$36.00 per pr., Cocktail tables $10.00. Tea
trolleys $15.00, Streamlined Morris chairs
$35.00 each; Vanities $95.00 each also
unpainted rush chairs; rockers and
stools not forgetting a large assortment
of good second hand furniture. Call at
Ralph Beard’s furnishing showrooms,
Hardwood Alley. Open 8 am. to 4
p.m. daily. Close Saturday noon.
PHONE 4683. 18,1.51—6n



POULTRY

anne Tenn
POULTRY — Fowls, ducks and_ tur-
keys. Tel, 3904, 26.1,51—2n.

MISCELLANEOUS

———_

AGRICULTURAL FORKS — A small
cvantity available. $4.70 each. Dial 4222
(or 4843 Branch Store) G. W. Hutchinson

& Co, Ltd, 26,1.51—4n.
——————
BATHS — In Porcelain Enamel, in

White, Green, Primrose with matching

units to complete colour suites. Top

grade. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.
26.1.51—t.f.n.

EE
BOTTLES—30 empty 3 Ib Horlicks Bot-
tles Price 2/- each Phoenix Pharmacy,
26.1.51—2n.

-
_-——<—<
CUPS & SAUCERS — Breakfast size
(large!. Cups and Saucers at 58 cents.
Tea Cups and Saucers at 35 cents. G.
W. Hutchinson & Co, Ltd.

26.1.51—4n,



CLOTHES HANGERS—Wooden Clothes
hangers from 8 cents each up. Also col-~
ourful Plastic Ladies’ Hangers at 43
cents each, G. W. HUTCHINSON &
Co. Ltd, 26.1.51—4n.

LADIES SPORT COATS — For _ cool
evenings. Fawn, beige, wine and black
in assorted sizes. $28.50. Modern Dress
Shoppe. 23.1,.51—6n.

——_—_—
PLASTIC Parasols, Raincoats, Shower
caps, Aprons, Table Cloths, Babies’ Pan-

ties. Modern Dress Shoppe.
23,1.51—6n.

RIBBONS, Feathers, Flowers, zipps,
Buttons, Laces & Edges in a large vari-
ety at reasonable prices. Modern Dress
Shoppe. 23.1.51—6n,





_——
PIANO—Upright made by John Brins-
mead & Sons (makers for Royalty) in
excellent condition at Ralph Beard’s Show

Room, Hardwood Alley, Phone 4683.
26.1.51—3n.

—_—————

SKIRTS, BLOUSES, SHORTS, — In a
Jarge variety. $3,98 to . $4.80. Moderr.
Dress Shoppe. 22.1.51--6n.

—$

STOCKINGS — 51 gauge. Fine Nylon
Stockings. $2.14 Ladies and children
Ankle Socks. 36 to 48 ‘cents. Modern
Dress Shoppe. 23.1.51—6n.

——$<—$$ $$$ $—$_—_—$_$_$_
‘SAPPER SWALLOW” Collapsible Sail-



ing Boat 11 ft. 6 ins by 4 ft. New com-
plete with sail, oars ete. Specially
treated canvas to suit Tropics. Also
two fourteen foot oars. Apply Young,

Gas Coy. 24.1, 51—3n.



_———_—$

We have just received a nice assort-
ment of Bath Sponges, at reasonable
prices, KNIGHT'S LTD. 26.1.51—2n

PERSONAL,





The public are hereby notified that I
sm no longer responsible for my wife
Anita Humphrey (nee Greaves) or any
debt or debts contracted by her having
fciled to be under my care and protection
from the 11th day of December 1960.

PHILIP ALISTAIR HUMPHREY,
C/o CS.M.
Curacao, N.W.1.



Removal Notice

CLASSIFIED ADS.



TELEPHONE 2508
1
DIED F@R RENT
BOWMAN—On lith imst at Jersey,
Channel Island, Miss MARY JULIA
BOWMAN formerly Head-mistress of HOUSES
Queen's College, Barbados. — }
CHADEN, — Marine Gardens consis-|
IN MEMORIAM ting of 3 bedrooms all with running
water, reception rooms and all modern
BULLEN—In loving memory of our | C°"Veniences. For appointment dial 2899.
dear Willie who departed this life on %4.1.51—Sn.
Jan. 28th 1960. ————— —
“LASCELLES” — Worthings, Ch. Ch.

























951







consisting of Drawing and dining rooms.

3 Bedrooms all with running water,

for further particulars phone 2824.
25.1.51—3n.

TRINITY COTTAGE—St. James Coast.
Fully furnished containing 3 bezirooms,
also a telephone. Available for months of
February to May and August to Decem-
ber 1951. Phone 2859. 21.1.51—2n

—_{—$_——————————

WYNDAL, — Three bedroom house
with every convenience, on Rockley
main road. Garage, two servant rooms,
servant's toilet and bath. For rent un-
furnished, or for sale. Available from
March Ist. Dial 4476. 26.1.51—t.f.n.

—_

PUBLIC SALES

AUCTION
Under The Diamond Hammer

By instructions received from the In-
surance Co,, I will sell on the spot at
Bank Hall x Road on Friday the 26th
of January, beginning at 1 o'clock, One
double-roofed shop. To be removed from
spot. D'Arcy. A. Scott, Auctioncer.

23,1.51—4n.











TUBSDAY, 30th at 12 noon at AL-
BION LODGE, Barbarees Hill. Garage
13 ft x 18 ft. covered with Aluminum
Sheets. Good Wallaba Posts uprights also
SERVANT’S ROOM 12 ft. x 8 ft. partly
covered with G. I. Terms Cash. To be
removed. Dial 2947, R. Archer McKenzie
Auctioneer, 26.1.51—4n.

REAL ESTATE

—— —

WESTCLIFFE — Navy Gardens, stand-
ing on eleven thousand square feet of
Jand, Built of Stone, Three bedrooms
and all modern conveniences. Also large
play room 30 by 14 feet. For particu-
Jars and appointment, Phone Winston
Johnson at 4311. 26.1.51—6n.

SPRINGHAM—The dwelling house at
Springham, White Park Road. Building
to be removed. Apply D. V. Scott &
Co. Ltd. 12.1.51—t.f.n.



























































FOR SALE OR LEASE
PROPERTY — No. 67 Roebuck Street.
Cardinal Bowen, Station Hill, St.
Michael. Dial 3901. 24.1.51—3n.

CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS
We will set up for sale by Public
Competition at our Office James Street,
on Friday 2nd February 1951, at 2 p.m.
CAVE & ROACHES PLANTATIONS
situate in St. Lucy and containing by
estimation 82 acres 3 roods 23 perches
of which about 48 acre; are arabie.
The acreage is made up as follows:
25% acres ist crop canes ready fcr
reaping.
14 acres young canes.
34 acres sour grass.
9 acres 23 perches in preparation,
roads, yards etc,
Inspection on application to Mr.
Ormond Knight on the premises.
YEARWSOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors.
18,1,.51—6n.





FOR RENT, SALE OR LEASE

BAGATELLE HOUSE, St. Thomas Up-
stairs Closed Gallery, Drawing and Din
ing reom, Breakfast room and Kitchen~-
ette 3 bedrooms running water in each,
‘Toilet and Bath. DOWNSTAIRS Closed
Gallery, Living-room, Breakfast room
and Kitchenette, 2 Bedrooms Toilet and
Bath, Electric Light and Telephone.
Apply Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St, Thomas Dial 2221. 21.1,51.—6n.

PROPERTIES — Delightful residence
having 3 Bedrooms, large Lounge, Sepa-
rate Dining Room, 2 fully Tiled Toilets
and Bath, modern Kitchen, built in 2
Car Garege 2 Servants Quarters, standing
on nearby half an act Price £4,500
nearest offer. For viewing apply Ralph
A. Beard, Hardwood Aley or Phone
4683.

PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

PICKWICK CRICKET CLUB

Members are kindly asked to collect
their gear as the pavilion and grounds
have been handed over io the Barbados
Cricket Association, The Club will not
hold themselves responsible for any loss
of gear if not collected immediately,

H. D. KIDNEY,
Hon, Secretary.
21,1.51—6n







NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PHILIP

Sealed Tenders for replacing the ceiling
of the St. Philip’s Parish Churech—
marked on the envelope Tender for
Church ceiling—will be received by the
alae not later than 27th January

1.

Plans and Specifications can be seen
at my Office on any Office day.

Successful Contractor must be preparec
to complete this job to the satisfaction
of, the Building Committee,

(Sed.) P. S. W. SCOTT,
Clerk to the Vestry,
St. Philip.
20.1.51—7n







“£25: -. -d. easily earned by obtaining
order for private Christmas Cards
from your friends. No previous experi-
ence necessany. Write today for
beeutiful free sample Book to Britain's
largest and foremost Publishers; highest
commission; marvellous money making
opportunity, Jones, Williams & Co.,
Dept. 9 Victoria Works, Preston,
England.”

25.1.51—18n



NOTICE
THE PARISH OF ST, ANDREW

Tenders are invited for a loan of
£1,000 at a rate of interest not to ex-
ceed 4% per Annum under the St. An-
drew Parish Church Loan Act. And
will be received by the undersigned up
to February 3rd 1951.

Signed C. A. SKINNER
Vestry Clerk,
St. Andrew.
24.1.51—6n.

Notice of Change of Name

I CLAIRMONTE NATHANIEL CLARK
heretofore called and known by _ the
name of CLAIRMONTE NATHANIEL
BLACKETT at present of 970 Tinton|
Avenue, Bronx, in the City and State
ot New York in the United States of
America Esquire and formerly of the
Island of Barbados British West Indies
hereby give public Notice that on the
28th. day of April 1950 I formally and
absolutely renounced, relinquished and
abandoned the use of my said surname
of “Blackett” and then assumed and
adopted and determined thenceforth on
all occasions whatsoever to use and
subscribe the name of Clairmonte
Nathaniel Clark instead of the said name
of Clairmonte Nathaniel Blackett.

AND I give further notice that by a
deed-poll dated the 28th. day of April
1850 duly executed and attested in ine
British Consulate General Office of New
York in the United States of America
and recorded in the Registration Office
of the Island of Barbados on the 18th.
day of May 1950 in Volume 685 of Deeds
at Page #4 I formally and abrolutely
renounced and abandoned the said sur-
name of “Blackett” and declared that
I had assumed and adopted and = in-
tended thenceforth upon all occasions
whatsoever to use and subscribe the
name of Clairmonte Nathaniel Clark in-
stead of Clairmonte Nathaniel Blackett
and so as to be at all times thereafter
called, known and described by the name
of Clairmonte Nathaniel Clark exclu-
sively.

Dated this 24th day of January 1951.

Clairmonte Nathaniel Clark,

Late Clairmonte Nathaniel Blackett.

26.1.51—2n























WANTED

HELP



Junior



SALESMAN
Apply by letter
P. O. Box 228.

Salesman
Bradshaw & Co.,
24.1.51—3n

to

SUB AGENT. WANTED, —
Bridgetown, well connected
merce, to sell accredited
on commission. State

Resident
with com-



MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED TO RENT
FURNISHED HOUSE Situated be-
tween Maxwell's and Rockley.
Coast preferred. (For) not
Phone 3541.



Sea
less than
three months.
24.1.51—3n.



WE BUY FOR CASH — Clocks, watches
and musical boxes in any condition.
Write, call or dial 4429.GORKRINGES An-
tique shop, Upper Bay Street,

25.1.51—Tn

—_————

WE BUY FOR CASH — Old Gold and
Silver
write, call or
Antique shop,
Club.

jewellery, coins, dentures, etc.
Dial 4429. GORRINGES
adjoining Royal Yacht

25.1.51—Tn.



GORRINGES undertake expert watch
and clock repairs, cleaning and resto-
ration of oil paintings, valuations for in-
surance and probate, GORRINGES,
upper Bay St. 25,1.51—T7n.

MAGAZINES Second hand maga-
zines and comics in good condition.
STANWAY STORE, Dial 4910, Lucas St.

25,1.51—2n.







MULE — One (1) small mule, suitable



for store work. Must be sound. (Mare or
Gelding}. Apply S. B. Warren, Pitcher
Ltd. 26.1.51—2n

Connell & Co.,



Vacancies exist in Design Department
of a West Indian Petroleum Refinery
for Trained Draughtsmen, capable of
design and detail work on civil, mechani-
cal, and chemical engineering projects.
Applicants must have the British
Higher National Certificate or its U.S. or
Canadian equivalent and should be
prepared to give proof of technical abil-
ity by interview or examination.

Applications, giving full details and
experience, accompanied by a recent
passport photograph, should be address-
ed to Messrs. Da Costa & Co. Ltd, P.O.
Box 103, Bridgetown. 23.1.51—6n.

INFORMATION which will lead to
the whereabouts of Miss GRACE COLE
who has been missing from her home
in George Street, Belleville. since Mon-
day, 22nd January, believed dressed in





her night clothes. Deseription: White,
brown hair, dark brown eyes; heigiist
just under 5 ft. age: in forties. Please

communicate any information to 2650 or
2767, or to the nearest Police Station.
f



Spanish Tuition

New Spanish Classes Regular Spanish
and the “Advanced Commercial Course’*
will be commencing from the First of
February.

All those interested; please be good
enough to contact Mrs. Maria Carlotta
Gonsalves, “Santa Clara", St Lawrence
Gap, before the above date, for Regis-
tration, — Phone: 8495,



25.1,51—6n

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Mortimer Callender



and Eldica McCollin of Hillaby, St.
Thomas for permission to sell Spirits,
Malt Liquors, &c., at a boarded and
galvanized shop at Strong Hope. St,
Thomas,

Dated this 24th day of January 1951.

To:—J. R. EDWARDS, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist, “D",
Sed. G. WARD,
for Applicants.
N.B.—This application will be consi-
dered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “D' on Wed-
nesday the 7th day of February 1951 at
11 o'clock, a.m.
J. R, EDWARDS,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “D".

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Livingstone Lewis
of Spooners Hill, St. Michael for per-
mission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &¢e.,
at a board and shingle shop with shed-
pohayettached Ah. Spogners Hill, St.
Ic .

Dated this 25th day of January 1951,
To:—E,:A, McLEOD, Esq,,

Police Magistrate, Dist.
Sed, L.



“An,
LEWIS,
Applicant.
be consi-
to be held
on Monday
1951 at 21

N.B.—This application will
dered at a Licensing Court
at Police Court, District “A”
the 5th day of February
o'clock, a.m.

FE.
Police Magistrate, Dist.

A, MeLEOD,
CA".









——————————— =

Pay a visit each day

Round The Town

with G. A. Service
whilst you sleep I

help work

Daily Advocate

to on your







‘TO-DAY'S NEWS

wvyast 100 expens:ve iwovels
selling off at
2 for $1.00
The space is needed for new
stock, Select your Book Bargain
now.
We have just opened SHEET

PLASTIC in different colours for
Lamp Shades.

AT
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and

|
FLASH |
HARDWARE

For





: BARBADOS
INVESTMENTS
Consult - - -

A. M. WEBB,
Stockbroker

33 Broad St. (Over
Phoenix Pharmacy)

—: Phone 4796 :—





Barbados Amateur
Boxing Association

All amateur boxers are
asked to report to the Asso-

ciation’s Head-quarters
Modern High School on
Friday, 26th January at
5 p.m. to arrange for

eliminations in preparation
for West Indian Champion-
ships to be held in Trinidad
aor 24th, and 25th March,
1951.

Local title-hol!ders must
be prepared to defend their
titles during the month of
February or early March.

N.B. — All professionals
who have engaged in no
contest during the past three
years may revert to their
amateur status on applica-
tion to this Association and
investigation of their claims.

L. A. LYNCH,
Hon. Sec. B.A.B.A.

|



ROGERS BARBER SALOON Eeg to

notify their Customers that they will

be moving upstairs J. N. Goddards & BE WISE. ‘ee

fons Building ‘Next Door) as from

the 29th January 1951. 7)
ain! e+ « ADVERTISE
A







—————— —



British goods
age, experience,

references, Post box 532, Trinidad.
26.1.51-—3n



Luopeseccocecssecseeesee:

24.1.51—Sh. i

—————

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



” _| Hydrogen Bomb

Is A Myth

Atom Commission Chairman

NEW YORK, Jan. 25.
NO SUCH WEAPON as the hydrogen bomb now ex-
ists, according to David E. Lilienthal, former Chairman of
the United States Atomic Energy Commission.

“Whether there ever will be, is plague efforts to strengthen and
only a remote possibility,” hey;balance America’s military des
wrote in an article in Collier's; fences.
magazine, He urged that America’s imme-

He said he referred to the bomb j diate programme for peace should
only to illustrate how damgerously | be built on a programme of pro-
fay the country had drifted prior! ductiveness.
to Korea in its reliance ‘“‘uwpon one.
and only one means of protecting
this country, and the furthering
of the peace of the world.”

“The ignition of hydrogen and
weapons based upon that ignition
is only a remote possibility,” he
said. “It is a possibility that may
well grow more remote rather
than less.”

Earlier this month, noted sci-
ence writer William Laurance, in
a book predicted that the United
States would test the hydrogen
bomb this year at Eniwetok in
the Pacific.

He said that the issue, war or
no war, was not a United States
decision alone.

It was possible that Russian

precipitate a vast war,

“They may believe that now is
the time to unleash the chaos and
terror that their dogma teaches is
necessary for their revolutionary
ends,” he added.

“It may be therefore that there
is nothing to adjust, no conces-
sions, no compromises that would
change their pre-determined
ecurse.”

War with Russia would be ter-
rible, | bloody, costly and heart-
breaking, but if we must, we can
and will fight.”—Reuter.

Lilienthal’s article concerned it-
self primarily with the question:
“Can the atom bomb beat Com-
munism?”

He said that dropping atom
bombs on Russia would not defeat
the Soviet Union.

“It would gravely _ terribly
wound Russia, but not defeat her,”
he wrote.

“Nor would it alone prevent the
Red Arfny from overrunnming and
occupying Europe, even if atom
bombs were used in anticipation
of such an attack—the “preventive
war.”



ACCIDENT

Floretta Hinds, a six year old
schoolgirl from Arthur Hill while
on her way home from school
about 12.05 p.m. yesterday was
involved in an accident with the
motor car M-1200 along Tweed-—
side Road, St. Michael.

Mr. Lilienthal maintained that She was taken to the General
the magic formula for victory, Hospital where she was treated
“dropping an A-bomb,”’ couldand discharged.

—————EE—————————

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORT

Temporary Employment for Road Supervisors.

Applications are invited for temporary employment as Road
Supervisors in the Department of Highways and Transport.

2. Successful applicants will be paid a forty-four (44) hour
weekly wage, based on the Government Rates of Pay of 30c.—38c. an
hour for Supervisors employed in the “Unestablished Staff” of the
department, and fixed according to experience and general suitability
and merit. ' ;

3. Candidates must be able to read and write English, to keep
correctly the Labour and Distribution Rolls, to set out, carry out and
measure up road work and perform any other duties in connection
with road work as may be required of them by the Director.

4. Candidates must at all times be prepared to promptly carry
out the work of the department in accordance with such instructions
as may be from time to time given them by the Executive Engineer
or other Officers of the department on his behalf.

5. Candidates should submit evidence to show that they have
some knowledge of road construction and repair work and have
actually been in charge of labour and material employed on road
work for which they were directly responsible.

6. Successful candidates will be required to be on the job in
time to start work each day at 7 a.m. and must not leave the job
until after‘ work has stopped each day.

7. Successful candidates will be paid where necessary a bicycle
travelling allowance of 3c. per mile for every mile after the fourth
mile travelled each day to the job.

8. Applications, which should be made on forms obtainable from
the Colonial Secretary's Office should be addressed to the Director
of Highways and Transport, and will be accepted up to 4 p.m, on
Wednesday, 3lst January 1951.



20.1.51—3n.

—s Givestone

—— -



=

——————



ey
——$__—_—



and Chinese leaders wanted to] Committee's

acelin sg ineeeene pain epeacen ta



B.B.C. |

LONDON.

The Beveridge Committee,
whose report to Parliament will
shape the British Broadcasting}
Ccrporation’s new charter for the
next five years, was appointed by
Lord President of the Privy Coun-
cil Herbert Morrison and Post-
master General Ness Edwards.

The report coneernedthe future
of scund and television broadcast-
ing in Britain and
confirmed the B.B.C. monopoly of
the air.

The control of radio passed ‘to
the British Broadcasting Corpora-
tion on January 1, 1927, It took
over, by Royal Charter, from the
privately-owned British Broad-~
casting Company.



A new charter was gtanted for
ten years, im 1937, and another for
five years in 1947. The Beveridge
findings will dictate
the terms of the 1952 charter.

Seven governors, responsible to

the Government, are in control.
The ‘chairman, Lord Simon of
Wythenshawe, is paid $8,400 a

year: the Vice-Chairman, Marshal
of the Royal Air Force, Lord
Tedder, receives $2,800 a year; the
remaining five governors each
receive $1,680 a year.

Executive responsibility is in-
vested in a director-general, at
present Sir William Haley, who is
chosen by the goverpors.

The corporation has no capital.
Its revenue comes from licenses
and publications and a Govern-
ment grant for the Overseas and
European services. Latest license
figures showed there were 11,837,-
050 sound listeners at $2.80 each
and 423,550 registered television
licenses at $5.60 each,—IN.S.



Canes Burnt

SIXTEEN and a half acres of
sugar canes belonging to Mr. G., E.
Evelyn and = growing on Small
Ridge Plantation, Christ Chureh
were destroyed by fire which
started about 7 p.m. on Wednes-
day.

Police and residents living in
the area tried to fight the flames
but could mot save the canes as
the fire had gone too far into the
field,



° .
Wife’s Duties
LONDON,

Judge John Blagden told his
Westminster, London, court that
no wife had the right to let a room
to a practising violinist. 2

The judge dismissed an action
for possession by landlord Mark
Berson who claimed that his ten-
ant, Deane Rais, had violated their
agreement by letting a room,

Rais claimed that his wife had
let the room to a violinist for
practice work during his absence.

Judge Blagden said he refused
to “visit the sins of a wife on her
husbands” and gave this advice to
wives,

They could, he said, act for their
husbands in certain ways, such as
sending for the plumber if the
boiler burst, or invite women
friends in for a cup of tea without
getting permission.

But they could not do such
things as letting rooms to vio-
linists,

—LN.S.



|

|

|

TYRES «1 TUBE
AVAILABLE IN ALL SIZES |

USE THE TYRES CHAMPIONS USE |
Charles Mc Enearmey & Co,, Lid. |

TO



— AND —



Dial 4616



OF INTEREST
ALL PLANTERS

°

EAGLE SIX (6) TONS TRAILERS Equipped with Brakes
(These Trailers are very Ruggedly Constructed)

BOTH these are NOW TO HAND and on DISPLAY at our SHOWROOM
YOUR INSPECTION CORDIALLY INVITED

COURTESY GARAGE

WHITE PARK ROAD





THE PERFECT COMBINATION
TO MEET YOUR
TRANSPORT PROBLEMS

MASSEY-HARRIS 42 b-b.v. 8 cyl. DIESEL TRACTORS

(Steel Wheels also available for Ploughing)



in substance |

SSS!

PAGE SEVEN



REFUSE LORRIES
TOO EXPENSIVE

When the two modern refuse
collectors for the Scavenging De-
partment of St. Michael arrive,
they will not add to the number
of collectors the Department now
has. They will replace two of the
present nine lorries whose main-
tenance has been found too ex-
pensive. :

It is expected that the remaining
seven lorries will be replaced by
| the modern type of collector from
time to time, the Advocate was
informed at the Department ves-
terday. The two new collectors,
however will greatly. contribute to
the sanitary arrangements or the

bringing about of a cleaner
Bridgetown.

The Department has a staff of
nearly 100 scavengers whose work
it is to keep the City clean. Of
these 33 are sweepers and 15 oper-
ate a similar number of push carts.
These latter help in taking up the
refuse off the streets and clean
the tunnels. Eight man four water
carts for flushing the streets and
gutters and 6 clean the drains. ,

When the refuse is collected it
is taken to areas where it is tsed
for reclaiming purposes. The De-
partment is on the job every day

of the week.



MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N.Z, LINE)

MS. “TONGARTRO" is scheduled to
sail Adelaide January lith, Melbourne
January 2ist, beisbane February 7th,
Sydney February 15th, Arriving at Bar-

bados 22nd arch, 1951















NOTICES





The M.V. “DAERWOOD" will
accept Cargo and Posvengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba, and
Pastengers only for St. Vincent,
Sailing on Wednesday 31st inst,
“Caribbee” — will

The M.V,



This vessel has ample space for Hard accept Cargo and Passengers for
Frozen, and neral , cargo. Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Caro ac od on through Bills of Nevis and St, Kitts Date of
Lading with shipment at Trinidad departure to be notified.
for British Gu . Barbados, Windward ‘
and Leeward Islands ae
For further particulars apply B.W.I, SCHOONER OWN
FURNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD.,
jane ERS ASSOCIATION, Inc.
BWI ‘Telephone: 4047
DA COSTA & CO, LTD,
BARBADOS,

BW. — —_———
Canadian National Steamships
SOUTHBOUND

Sails Sails Satle Arrives Sails
Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
“LADY RODNEY” _ 17 Jan. 19 Jan. 28 Jan. 29 Jan.
“LADY NELSON” _ 1 Feb 3 Feb. 12 Feb 13 Feb.
“CAN, CHALLENGER" _ 15 Fev. _ 25 Feb. 25 Feb.
“LADY RODNEY" — 3 Mar. § Mar. 14 Mar. 15 Mar,
“LADY NELSON” -— 19 Mor, 21 Mar. 30 Mar, 31 Mar.
“CAN. CHALLENGER” - 2 Apr _ 12 Apr. 12 Apr,
“LADY RODNEY” — 16 Apr. 18 Apr 27 Apr 27 Apr
NORTHBOUND Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St.John Halifax

“LADY RODNEY” 10 Feb. 12 Feb, 21 Feb, 22 Feb. —

“LADY NELSON” 25 Feb, 27 Feb 8 Mar. 9 Mar _

“LADY RODNEY" 27 Mar, 28 Mar, 6 Apr. 7 Apr. —
“LADY NELSON" 12 Apr. 14 Apr, 23 Apr. _ 24 Apr.
“LADY RODNEY” 10 May. 12 May, 21 May. _ 22 May.

N.B,.—Subject to change without notice.
bers. Passenger Fares and freight

All vesels fitted with cold storage cham.
1ates on application te :—



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,



8.S. COLOMBIE

1951,
§.S. COLOMBIE

1951,
8.8. GASCOGNE

1951,
8.8. GASCOGNE

Lucia, Marti
Pitre & Ba
February 170

—==

PASSAGES

Contact Antilles Products, Limi













CHE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQUE
(French Line)



Sailing to Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao,
Cartagena and Jamaica on January 18th.

Sailing to Plymouth and Le Havre via Mar-
tinique and Guadeloupe on January 29th.

Sailing to Grenada, Trinidad, British Gui-
ana and French Guiana on F

Sailing to Plymouth and Le Havre via St.

R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.-Agents.

oe

LTD. mer Agents.



ebruary 8th,

nique, Guadaloupe (Pointe a
eee and Antigua on
h, 1951,



TO EUROPE

ted, Roseau, Dominiau, for sail-

ing to Europe. The usual ports of call are Dublin, London, or
Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children.



Just received - - =



STEAMCOOKERS

KETTLES

A

FISH FRYERS
' @ $7.28 each

GRILL FRYERS

@ $6.10 each

FRYING PANS

@

SAUCEPANS
(2%, 4, 7 & 12 pt.)

For the

GERM LUBRICATIN

ARE BEST BY TEST

(8 & 12 pt.) @ $9.63 & $13.44 each respectively

Y




OILS

DON'T ONLY OIL It — GERM IT,
CENTRAL

Gasoline Station

FOUNDRY LTD.

Trafalgar Street.





Wm. FOGARTY Ltd.

+

PYRAMID ALUMINUM WARE

For HOTPLATE COOKING

(7 & 9 pt.) @ $21.34 & $25.95 each respectively

$3.53 & $5.10 each

@ $3.86, $5.10, $6.10. 5:
& $8.82 each respectively

Joys of

PERFECT COOKING
Get PYRAMID ALUMINIUM WARE

—at—







ai

_




PAGE EIGHT

Roy Marshall Hits

111 In Second Trial
Keith Walcott Scores 50

' ROY MARSHALL, West Indian opening batsman,
went on a run getting spree when he scored 111 retired—
which included 17 fours and one six—for John Goddard's
XI who scored 258 runs in their first innings in reply to
Clyde Walcott’s XI total of 177 when play ended yesterday,
the second day in the second cricket Trial Match at Ken-
sington Oval.
‘jens me pen 2 paces - or
nutes an i ‘ours giving
eng chance at 81 His tate Attn Ne ee or
= Sore aae oa for ore Atkinson for four runs, Atkinson’s
shaw, the Police pacer when ne figures at this stage were five
raised him overhead for six runs. °V€rS, one maiden, 12 runs and
Bradshaw's nine overs, one maid-

Keith Walcott going at number en, 28 runs one wicket, that of
three scored a quick 50 which Taylor. Walcott again on drove
included eight fours. the third ball of Atkinson’s sixth

Bowling for Clyde Walcott’s XI over for four runs.

Bradshaw took three wickets for

62 runs in 19 overs five of which _ When the score had reached 64

were maidens, E, Atkinson took Skipper. Walcott brought on H.

two for 42 and W. Greenidge one King to bowl to Marshall who was

for 36. 23. King’s first ball was dis-
. p patched to the boundary for four

When play began — yesterday runs. Walcott also hit a four in the
A. M. Taylor who was not out third ball to make him 24 and the
nine and Roy Marshall not out total 74.

40 continued the first innings for

fonm Goddard’s XI. C. Bradshaw Another change was made and
sent down the first over to Tay- Barker came on in place of Atkin-
lor. "The first ball Taylor moved son. His first and only over of the
across the wicket and watched day yielded eight runs. Green-
the ball go through to wicket idge sent down his first over to
keeper Walcott. Marshall who hit a four in the
fifth ball. Marshall now 48 reach-
ed his fifty by hitting King for
four runs. The scoreboard read

; A a 112—1—-17. Marshall now began
oe ee anes thee to really hit out and King’s fourth
to Taylor and the last ball of over yielded 13 runs, two fours and
this over Taylor took a single. & single by Marshall and one four
At this stage a slight drizzic by Keith Wétcott.
began. to fall. K. Bower relieved Greenidge

a shaw’'s sec- and his first over of the day cost
I HS Oe Tea hook- him 6 runs. Keith Walcott reached
ed for four runs. The second his fifty with a four off Atkinson,
ball he took a single. Marshall but on reaching his fifty he too
also took a single in the fifth ball. tried to be breezy and just after
Atkinson's second over of the day he was bowled by Atkinson.
ri g a
yemee ere fens Somes tee tne Proverbs joined Marshall who
score was now 30, Marshall 12, was 59 and was off the mark with
Taylor 16. Atkinson now began to 4 brace. Marshall when 81 was
look steady and in his third over dropped by Cave at deep fine leg
of the day sent down a maiden off Bradshaw. The score was
over. Bradshaw continued to 164, 47 runs ahead of Clyde Wal-
bowl but did not seem to oskc> a cott’s score.

i ort
os ee Shee Pravior had | Marshall still continued to pun-
timed properly he would have got ish the bowling and got his cen-
a six for each shot as these balls eee ere eres fo

; Pete 7 i rer, roverbs .
were pitched too short. ae area.

Nevertheless when ‘Taylor’s Bradshaw sent down the last
score had reached 17 in trying to over — his 13th — before lunch
force q good length ball he was and at lunchtime his analysis was
struck on the pads and given out 013, M1, R55, W1. and the score







The second ball was of the same
type But the last ball, an in-
swinger, Taylor took a_ single.

leg before by Umpire Spellos. 190.
Keith” ‘Walcott es nae After lunch, Marshall, retired
off with q sharp single £r9™M With 111 and Wood joined

Bradshaw. Proverbs, Bowen sent down the
: first ball to ood who took a

Marshall hit his first four of singte. When = score was 204,
the day off Atkinscn’s fourth wood was bowled by Greenidge.
over. This was the third ball funte then followed and was
pitched well up and Marshall of the mark with a single from
executed a lovely full-blooded 4 well timed drive. Proverbs now
drive placed away from H, King. 18 began to bat patiently and was

Walcott cut the first ball from dropped by Skipper Clyde Wale
Bradshaw’s fifth over of the day who had taken off the gloves an
for four and Marshall took a was fielding at silly mid on, brace in the third. The score- cver after Proverbs was run cut.
board now read 48—1—17. Branker joined Hunte. Wer
the new ball was brought out —
the score 236 — Branker took a
single in the second ball of the
tenth over. Hunte went down and





_—

Pe ree













in trying to drive a ball from
THE TWO-CARD Atkinson, he gave Smith, now
CONVENTION keeping wickets, a lovely catch.

E. Hoad followed and at eight was
nicely caught by C, Walcott at
second slip off Bradshaw.

by M. Harrison-Gray

rus convention is used in
some American schools.
If a player, in certain circum-

Btarices, leaves Eamselt with Williams joined Branker who

was 13, Bradshaw got much life
out of the new ball and bowled
Branker with what looked like an
inswinging yorker,



ext
two extra
‘anastas,
Naturally this only wor!
advan’ wi
nership holds the
favourable position.
ease two cards would
m y be a bad numbe:
leave yourself with.
one or three would be more
normal if you were trying to
go out. For erie e, gy
and your Paper have al. \y
melded as follows:
Canasta of Sevens

Mut¥ins followed after Branker
and the innings closed when Mul-
lins, in attempting a short run,
was run out. Skipper Goddard
and Millington were absent.

The match continues on Satur-
day.

CLYDE WALCOTT'S XI—Ist Innings 177
JOHN GODDARD'S XI—ist Innings

K 10 9 6656 Q s

K 10 9 6 56 Q Taylor 1b.w., b Bradshaw way
K 10 Joker 6 5 Marshall retired iiss capentaee
K 10 265 Walcott b E. Atkinson .......... 50
2 10 26 Proverbs run out ieee ee Tae

Wood b W. Greenidge . ai 6
Hunte c (w.k, Smith) b E, Atkin-
son 3

You_hold in your hand 3
K, Q, 9, 9, 6. 2, 2.
Whatever you draw, you can
of course meid everything and
go out. But in order to make

Brancker b Bradshaw ... 2: ae
Hoad e C. Walcott b Bradshaw &%
Williams not out ..............-. 2
Mullins run out .....

. ddard absent We ery eres
. Millington absent ni

















us
warning your partner of the

mane ADDARD>

sition He then melds all Extras eners

e can and makes up any

possible Canastas. At you TROUE eh esate oe

next turn you will go out, : ay Tae ae
lacing your wild cards to the

st advantage.

But if your side is in a bad
may have to
ible cards in

BOWLING ANALYSIS

°
=
7

order to help your parther to C. Bradshaw ........ 19 5 62 3
gO out, and you may be left C. Barker .......... 4 0 20 0
with two only. In such a E. Atkinson cose, MG 3 42 2
case the two-card convention H. King 66a A Se a |
has no meaning. W. Greenidge ... 1 2 36 1
Sy powers, . a3 1 87 0

Lond OOO cree ie ie 0

lon. Bepress Service. C. Waleott .......... ‘4 ® 0



The ll Do It Every ‘Lime









SX

SOs

2 a
THANK TO

LT. JOHN KELSEY, TR. AISN, [1 fi
UNIV.OF MINNESOTA,

MIN!





WHAT A WONDERFUL. * d
Bdovicion mis (MATA weNPERREL a NOW HE'S ( HE'S TEETHING!
HE'LL. MAKE »sLOOK MARRIED AND
HOW HE LOVES HAS ONE OF
CHILDREN »+-= HIS OWN»

Crick Gets Four
Whkts. In St. Lucia

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. LUCIA, Jan. 25.
Crick and Ellick opened the
bowling today, Crick being more
successful, at-
tacking, swing-
ing both ways.
Ellick, medium
off-break bowl-
er was steady
throughout.






Batting honours
went to Living-
‘stone and Mc-
Mahon, Living-
stone proved
the hero for the
Leewards. St.

best. St. Lucia
returned to the
crease losing
wickets cheaply
to Anthonyson’s
swings. Auguste
batted well for the Leewards.,
Scores:
ST. LUCIA—Ist Innings cede . 1065
LEEWARD'S 1ST INNINGS

c.0'RB. CRICK

MeMahon b Ellick . rr

Claxton l.b.w. b Crick hoes » B
Livingston not out . bade ee
Witkin Lb.w. b Asgill Pr +. 1S
Eddy c Ishrnael b Griffith ..... vi 2
Gore ¢ (w.k.) b Crick . 5
Thompson c St. Helen b Crick . 0
Mathews e¢ Phillip b Crick 2
Anthonyson b Ellick és 1
Lavis Lb.w. b Auguste : . 6
Extras « +. , 6
Total .... 152

Fall of wiekets:

& for 107, 9 for 110,
BOWLING ANALYSI6
°o. M.

w.
Crick. ....: . . 6 3 44 4
Etlick *% 19 =610 26 2

ST. LUCIA 2ZND INNINGS

Paul ¢ (w.k.) b Anthomyson .. - 2
Augier ¢ Gore b Anthonyson , 4
Auguste not out . : s006 9
Phillip stpd. b Eddy . jee
Griffith run out ‘ s 'S
Deterville not out wees 2

Total (for 4 wkts.) «. 23

Fall of wickets: 1 for 4, 2 for 9, 3 for

10, 4 for 21,



Belleville Tenniis
Tournament

The results of matches played

yesterday are as follows:—
MEN'S DOUBLES

J. D. Trimmingham and J. L.
St. Hill beat W. V. Hunte and V.
Hutson 6—1, 6—1.

P. G. Patterson and G. H. Man-
ning beat V. Roach and P. Roach
6—2, 6—3.

LADIES’ DOUBLES

Miss G. Pilgrim and Mrs. O.
Skinner beat Miss E. Worme and
Mrs. D. Worme 7—5, 6—4

To-day’s Matches
LADIES’ DOUBLES (FINALS)

Miss D. Wood and Mrs. R. Ban-
croft vs. Miss G. Pilgrim and Mrs.
A. Skinner,

MIXED DOUBLES

Miss L. Branch and Mr. W.
Crichlow vs. Mrs. A. Gibbons and
Mr. A. Skinner.

Miss M. King and Mr. J. L. St.

Hill vs. Mrs. N. Warren and Mr,

A. Jemmott.

—_—_

Cricket And
Baseball

LONDON.



More than 500 basebail clubs
are now in operation and prepar-
ing for a boom season in Britain
where cricket is the national game,

competitions .
are to be held during the summer] \s
and are expected to attract thou-

League and cup

sands of spectators,

The leading team in Britain is
They de-

the ‘Hornsey Req Sox.
feated several visiting Americar
Navy teams last season.

Other teams in the London area

are;

Albany Pirates, Briggs Brigands,
Pirates, Ruislip
USAAF, Surrey Tigers and Essex

Eltham Dodgers,

—LN.S.

Cubs.

Standard TTT

THIS RULE SAVES TIME
By M. Harrison-Gray

JN the rules on Canasta
drawn up by Crockford’s
Club, there is a law that
allows @ game to start at
1000 points to each side,
This has the effect of
shortening the game. and
does away with part of the
whe en ek Stage — Le.,
when both sides require 60
points only for the first meld.
It must be appreciated that
this is not the same thing as
making the game one of
points only, In the latter case,
Bast etek ar eae Ree
vulnerabilit:
(between 0-1500) in full, at
the same time cutting out a
Portion of the last stage when
ae a required for the initial
This rule is a very good on
for a club, where a Semper
may be waiting to enter the
game, or for the last game of
& session, when the players
Dee tees sure whether
me for“
more nave. ti for “ just one
greement on this local
oa dent ode at
ac
features of the wen hia













































London Bkpress Service.

y Jimmy Hatlo

’ i BUT, DEAR»





1 for 0, 2 for 47, 3 for
53, 4 for 79, 5 for 86, 6 for 97, 7 for 9,








BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Sports Officers MIAMI TOPS
Elected WITHOUT

At the Annual, General Meeting
Pre-season forecasts that



of the Rangers Spotts Club held
on Sunday last at “Retreat”, Pas-
sage Road, the following officerg
were elected for the year 1951—52.
R. O. Culpepper (President);
. E. Squires (Vice-President):
L. G. Slocombe (Hony. Secretary);
B, Scott (Hony. Treasurer);
J. L. Blackett, S. Grant (Trus<
tees); and Messrs S. White, C. F.
Reece, H. Jones, other members LONDON.
of the Committee Just to show that Britain is
Cricket Captains: “A” team: §, still “tops” in soccer, the Football
Grant (Capt.); R. O. Culpepper Association will invite a F.LF.A.
(Vice-Capt.); “B” team: L. G. team—which could mean the rest
Slocombe (Capt.); T. Hinds (Vice- of the world — to play agairist
Capt.) _} » British stars in 1953, to mark the
Football: Capt. E. Cox, Association’s 50th anniversary.
A British team may tour South
America that year.



Britain Is Still Tops





Tennis Champion ee a
Art Larsen, Fama EXHIBITION GOLF
tennis champion, is providing LONDON.

plenty of ammunition for his
Australian critics, according to
reports received in London from
Adelaide.

Accusing Larsen of “court an-

Mildred (Babe) Zaharias, the
American golf professional, is
scheduled to take part in exhibi-
tion matches in Britain during the

tics’ the critics declared that SUmmer, |
during the recent South Austra. According to Fred Corcoran,
lian singles championship, hq £lf promoter, the first six in a

demanded that a press photog- tournament being held in the
rapher should leave the side of United States next June are com-
the court because of the click of ing to Europe on tour. It is likely
the camera shutter which might that among the winners will be
disturb him and cause him to lose Patty Berg, Betty Jamieson, the

a point. Bauer sisters and Peggy Kirk.
Larsen also demanded that But whether she is successful or
program sellers, newsboys

and not the “Babe” is to play here.
ice-cream vendors should be si- s
lenced, and that ball-boys must
be made to bounce the balls
back to him on his backhand at
a particular height. —LN.S.



—

Fell Off Horse

Livingston Walcott a 24-year-
old groom of My Lord’s Hill, St.
Michael was treated at the Gener-
al Hospital and discharged after
he fell from the race horse Wilmar
while exercising it at the Belle
tween Mr. K. Greenidge’s XI and Soy meaaniog. Wane aes gee

Y.M.P.C. will be played at ,.; la. of
Beckles Road on Saturday at L peony °° his yight, forearm from
p.m



K. Greenidge’s XI Will Play
Y.M.P.C. On Saturday

A friendly cricket match be-



Fell Off Bench

After falling off a bench at St
Leonard’s Boys’ School yesterday
about 10.15 am. Ronald Reid a
12-year-old schoolboy of Peter—
kin’s Road, St. Michael, was treat-
ed and discharged at the General
Hospital for a fractured left fore-
arm.

YOUR...

The teams are:—

K. Greenidge (Capt.), A. Me-
Kenzie, S. McKenzie, H. Andrews,
C. Watts, C. Gaskin, A. Kinch, J.

_Parris, D. Gooding, P. Clarke and
H. Cox.

B. Porter (Capt.), C. McKenzie,
R. Peterkin, E. Branker, G.
Archer, D. Archer, H. Ingram,
A. Ingram, F. Austin, H. Mat-
thews and I. Burke,

BRUSH... UP...
4



SMILE...






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THE SEASON
GAMBLING

MIAMI.
Miami would fizzle as a vaca-

cationland without wide-open gambling to stir up interest
fell flat te-day as America’s winter playground settled
down to its best season in years.

More out-of-towners are dip-
ping into their pocketbooks tc
eat, drink and be warm in Miam
than ever before in the area’:
history. For merriment, they are
getting the same plush, silver-
lined stuff they always did, witt
one exception.

The click of the croupier’s stick

and the metallic spinning of
roulette wheels are sounds they

cannot hear anymore.

Months ago, when the “squeeze”
first went om organized, illegal
gambling in the area, gambling
interests predicted a sudden
death to the gold coast’s annual
tourist boom. They bitterly fore-

cast that without gambling,
Miami would fold up.
But Dan Sullivan and the

greater Miami Crime Commission
which he heads thought differ-
ently. The Crime Commission
and local newspapers put on the
heat. aroused the public, and,
with ammunition suppli#i by the
Kefauver Senate Crime Commit-
tee, forced the gamblers to close
down.

Some illegal bookies continue
to operate, but a vigorous cam-
paign by Sheriff Tom Kelly is
making it hard on them. -

The lack of big-time gambling
apparently makes no difference
to Mr. and Mrs. Tourist.

Fred Davant, executive secre-
tary of the Greater Miami Hotel
Association, pointed out that
there are more places for tourists
to stay this winter than ever be-
fore. And, he added:

“We have plenty of visitors
here to fill them. In spite of the
predicted drop in tourist trade
all indications point to the con-
clusion that there are more visit-
ors than ever before.”

Even apartment houses, which
as a rule get only tourists who
plan to stay most of the season,
report practically no vacancies.

Street traffic is heavy day and
night and, surprisingly, a large
number of the big cars which
are “just down for the winter”
bear California licence aes

“At least, John, were
saving our fuel.”


























What's on Today

Exhibition of Oil paintings
and pencil sketches by
Mrs, Fela De Kuh at “The
Pavilion—9.00 a.m.

Advecate’s Photo Exhibition
at Barbados Museum —
10.00 a.m.

R,. J. Me Leod’s Exhibition
of Oil Paintings at the
Barbados Museum—10.00

a.m.

Court of Ordinary—1i1 a.m.

Sale of Double roofed shop
at Bank Hall Cross Road
(D'Arcy Scott Auctioneer)
1,00 p.m,

Belleville Tennis Club Tour-
nament—4,15 p.m,

Celebration of the Annivers-
ary of the Founding of
the Republic of India at
Combermere School under
the patronage of His Hon-
eur Mr. J. W. B_ Chen-
ery. Mr. G. H. Adams,
M.C.P., and Mr W. A.
Crawford, M.C.P., are to
be among the speakers—
4.45 p.m.

Mobile Cinema gives show
at Kingsland Pasture, Ch.
Ch.—7,30 a.m,

CINEMAS

AQUATIC CLUB; “Cleopatra”—
8.30 p.m.

PLAZA (Bridgetown): “The In-
spector General’ — 8.30 p.m.

PLAZA (Oistin): “Roseanna
McCony” and ‘Marshal of
Mesa City” — 5 & 8.30 p.m.

GAIETY (St. James): “Under
Capricorn” and “Guns of the
Pecos" — 8.30 p.m,

ROYAL: “Secret of the Whistler”
and “Thunderhoot" — 4.30 &

8.30 ae,

OLYMPIC: “Thirty Seconds Over
Tokyo” and “The Arnels
Affair’ — 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.

ROXY: “Weekend in Havana”
and “Somewhere in the Night”

—130 & 8.15 pom,

The Weather

TODAY
Sun Rices: 6.12 a.m,
Sun Sets: 5.58 p.m.
.Moon (Last Quarter) Janu-
ary 30
Lighting: 6.30 p.m
High Water: 6.37

p.m.

YESTERDAY
Rainfall (Codrington) nil
Total for Month to Yester-

day: 1.81 ins.
Tempetature (Max.) 82.5°F
Temperature (Min.) 76.0°F
Wind Direction (9 a.m.) E,

(3 p.m,) N.E. by E.
Wind Velocity: 15 miles per

a.m., 6.18

Barometer (9 am.) 29.952,
(3 p.m.) 29.862

THERE WILL BE...

DANCING
TOMORROW NIGHT

CASUARINA CLUB

Cc. BERTIE HAYWARD’S
ORCHESTRA
ADMISSION ::: 6c.
DINNERS FROM 7 P.M.





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1951

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26,

“axarive

N addition to the regular size, this new,
smaller pack of Andrews Liver Salt has been
introduced to enable you to try the World’s most
popular saline for a very small outlay !
A glass of effervescing Andrews, costing only a
few pence, cleans the mouth, settles the stomach,
tones up the liver, and finally clears the bowels.
Also at any time of the day one teaspoonful in
a glass of cold water makes a cooling, refreshing
drink. You can be sure of Inner Cleanliness
with Andrews.















Tune in to
Barhades
} every Tuesday at
17.30p.m. The
Andrews “Buggy
Ride” Programme
provides real
entertainment.



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PAGE 1

FRIDAY, JANIZARY 26, ISil BARBADOS ADVOCATE I'M.I CLASSIFIED ADS. WAXTED TCLOHONE 2 SOt DIED N)M!-On lllh inn . J*i C'hmnri ImUnd. MuMARY JfliA BOWMAN formnli HrUiiiUm of wn %  CMIff. BartuOoi IN MF.MORIAM THa *Hart wa* great tha Mow Mirrr W* MWr thougUi h.a tMath u naar Only thoaa ho lova ran tall Ttw pain of parting without farTwell TW Bullm familv Emerald Villa. Ch*-ap*. Dodge ft pin|ft in A I rendition and llrenaad till June Contact Leon AI torn* at fort Royal Oar*!* about tale of or. Mra. A. M. Arthur. Y-Mhihlre *.lM-*i. CAR Feed IS hp In food worfcln* order Apply Mm L. Clarke. "a*| Lodge'. The l. Dm JST9 BMsl-ln. CAR Kr.rd IftU alx rTllnfler Dt UOM Sedan, low mlleaasa and In amori rnechanafal condition. Chu. Mr Krneariiey 4t Co.. I-id. Ml.Sl—*> CAR—Citroen 15 K.P. 1M0 model m ricrllrrit condition. Owner leaving i-;.iinl Apply: B'doi Agenda* Lid. Dial **0 IWI II 1.51-Tn R4GLVE — aaauted rrtie* compWM Price IIUOO including Bicycle at Ralpl Heard'! Show Room. Hardwood Alley r....-.**i MI.91-3P PICK-UP One Second hand Ford V-i Plek-up In A 1 condlUon. iu* overhaul iPart In.pectloni 1 day* ago New Tyre. C. Banniaiar. SUtion Hill V J.m. Mll-*n TRACTOR—On* Hi McCorralck DeerIr.g Farmall H wheel tractor, complete with r>.iM culler. In excellent eondlI lion, very lltile uaid. COW. co. LTD. %  I W •' ElaKCTRICAI. •HH.IDAIRE—On* Hi Amei-ran Frlg-d. all* 1 cub. ft. complete with lock. Apply P L. Emtaff c o K. R Hunt* Co.. Ltd. tan 10.151—K i IIA11IOS Sevet-l New Pilot fladm.. Battery and Clectilc at Special reduced pi ice* at Ralph Heard'* Show Room.. Hardwood Alley. Jmon* SS>. XI Sl-Bn. KU'HKiCKATOR S cub ft. Amerl:-..i, Gibeun 3 year* guarantee, left m Ralph Beam Pint* Milk with Jnd Calf To calve auth MSMarj IBM Apply to V. W. Clarke. Ivv Uadff*. Ivy Poad. St M atl*l- MECHANICAL HirVCLX -Una S-apeed Oar.t'a HaVrrltt liicvcie iland.ril nlinmt rw %  Auply to F. O. Pounder, icw.llei Roehuck Sl.eet .l SI-*' FURNITURE FUR.NITUHE-Ralph Heard followingNew Mehogarv Dining Chair. SUM per pr. Tub Chair. •MOO per pr CockUII table* HOW. Tea trolley* (15.00. Streamlined Morrf** (3*00 aaeh. VanllK. SUM aa iinpalnlrd rtiah rhalra; rocker* and • tool* not forgetting a large aiaorlmenl Of good tecond hand furniture Call at Halph Beard's furnUhlnc aho" Hardwood Alley. Open > a pm dally. Cloa* Salurda PHONE 46*3. H 1 51 rom KE.\I I. — Marine Garden* (oniUng of S bedroe^i all wM water, reception room* and all modern KM..-,. F.'i Ifaal I I data MM M1SI—So %  %  U P. O. Bent at. SCB AGENT WANTTD. rU.-ier,* S.n-T ..i iaw a. Co. M.ISl-3*>. %  aaen Slate age, "...I bo* US. TrKidad MISCEU.ANEOIS LAataiA" %  Worthina*. Ch Ch MaadM %  *] H Bnwtaal %  %  %  g*alsg NOW S Badroom* all with lunning water, for further particular* phone MM M I il-Sn TRINITY COTTAG*— St JimH CoaM Fully furnUhed conUlnlug 1 ballroom'. %  aw a telephone. Available for month* ol February to May and Auaru.l to Dtcen— 1*51 Phone MM. II lil-1M.1.U WVNDAL. — Three bedroom houte with every convenience, on RoekU^ in road Garage, two anvant room-. van! toilet and bath For rent mim*hed. or for aae. AvaiUble tram March lt Dial 44rB Mill—Hn. PUBLIC SALES AUCTION BaMaW TIM IhlRlOnH HaWaMT By in-tructlon. received from the Insurance Co. I lll eell on Ihe (pot a 1 Bank Hall x Road on Friday the Mtl of Jar;.ii\. brgmiing at I o'clock. On< double •roofed .hop To be removed frori %  pot. D'Atcy. A. Scott. Auctioneer. S3 I SI—an TintnAV. 30th at IS noon at Al.WON loin;*. Ikilwtti Hi ShoeU Ootid Wullaba Po.t* upright, a 1 1 SERVANT'S ROOM 13 fl X %  ft. parti* 'led with O 1 Term* Caah To be removed IH.il 7T H Archer McKennr Auctioneer. Mi51-i> l Oil V ma i A*M (Tel. watche-t and n-.Ualcal t"m- Write, call or dial 44Ot.ltl^i i • ttque .nor. Up par Bay Street. 15 I M Tn Wr. %  y FOR ('AMI Old Gold *n.1 %  '" |awUae) caM, denture*, etc errte. call ..r Dt-I ** OOflUaOIOI %  Antkaua shop, adjoining Roval Yacht Club. tJUl-Tn GOKRINGEat undeitake expert aalch -id .luck irp.nr*. cleaning and rettomtion ol oil palntinc aurane* and prob..'. OOBBDIOBB .pper Bay St. Mlal-Tn.j Hydrogen Bomb Is A Myth Atom Commis&lon Chairman NEW YORK. Jan. 25. NO SUCH WEAPON at Ihe hydrogen bomb BOW •* %  i ts. according to David E. LiUenth*.., former Chan 11 the United States Atomic Entrgy Comn MAGAZINES Second hand magazine* and roml.-i In good eonditMn. STANWAY STOHE. Dial t!0 1 %  .. M mil f. %  H MMI rh Mva) N RNHNJ ilun >-* Geldmg. Apply 9. B. Warren. Pitch, r Conr.rll A 1 1 %  I M 1 II -T.i BEAT ESTATE WrsTCI.II'FK Oarden*. Handof Stone. Thiee bedroom* and all modern convenience. Alao large play room M b/ 14 feet. For partlcuind appointment. Phone Wlnita't Johnson at 4311 M 1.51-dn SPHJNOHAM—The duelling hou*e at Springham. White Park Road Butldlm be removed. Applf D. V. Scott Lid. I2:.51-tfn Michael. Dial CAVB A l.im in i-t \M MI..SWa will art up far aala by Public Competition at our Office Janie* Street. on Friday Ind February 1MI. at t p.m. CAVB V ROACHES P1A5TTAT1UNS Ituale tn SI. Lucy and cooUlnlng by •(llmatton 13 acre. 3 rood* 33 percht* of which about 4* acre are arable. The acreage It made up aa follow*: BVj acre* Itl crop cane* icady ftreaping. 14 arrea young eanea. M acre* aour graaa. S acre* 13 pert he* In preparation. roada, yard* etc Inipectlon on application to Mr. Onnoiid Knight on aiicie-> eaut In I> HTI Department Of a Weil Indian Petroleum Refine. • lor Trained Draughuman. capahlg oi de*ln and detail work on civil, mechanical, and chemical < i Appllcail. mn.t have the Billn Higher National CertlneaU M II* U* % %  Canadian eq.nv.ilent and . \TION hicl. il| lead to Ihe •nereabout* f Mi-. ORACB COLIC ith ha* been mi — tng from her home In George Street. Belleville, ilm-e Monday 13nd Januarv. brliord dreeted n-. her night chttbaa DewrlptlonWMte. ]uat undei 5 li aa> In foitie.' Please ItMJ nearex Fttltea Stalion. Sptinitih I niI ion New hpaniih Claaae* RaCUiai Spaniari and Ihe 'Advanced Commrielal Court*' Will be commencing from Ihe Flrrt of February. AH tho.e Intereited: plaaaa be good er.oi.gh lo mill..cl Mi. M.o. Conialve* "Santa Clar %  St IjiaTenco Gap. before the above date, for Heglatrallon. — Phone: B40S. Mill-n FOR RENT, BALE OR LEASB BAGATFJ.1X HOUSE. Si. Thorn*. Up•taii. Clo*ed Ualliry. Drawing and Din irg room. Breakfaet room and Kltchenclt. 3 bedroom* running water in e.itn. Toilet and Halh. DOWNSTAIHS Clo*rC Gallery. UvlnS-room. Breahfatt roorr. :.nd Kitchenette. I Bedroom. Toilet and Bnth. Electric laght and Telephone. APPlv Ma-ager of Hugateile I'U* i .tio.i St. Thomaa Dial 1331. II 1.51 —ftn PROPFJT1ES Delightful rt'lng 3 Bedroom*, large Lounge, bvpa ^te Dlnl.< Room. 1 fully Tllr.i T,.\|.r.d Bath, i 'ar Oj'fgc 1 hervanl. tjiatler*. %  fnaatn. %  nea.i tmU •• %  %  Prtr* Mi m ieare.1 nrTer. For viewing apply Halpi A. Beard. Ilarduou.l Ai.tv .>Phon. 4ej B I 51--3., POULTRY MISCELLANEOUS AGRICULTURAL FORKS t.vantltv available $4 TO each Dial 43H tat 4*43 Branch Sloiei O W Hutchinfcin A co Lid. ":'_ BATHS — In Porcelain Bnamal. in While. Green. Prfhffoa* with matching unit* lo complete colour *ult*e. Top grade A BAHMEH A Co.. Ltd. BOTTLES-3* rmplv 3 lb llorlicka Bot HePure I • each Phoenix ."haimacv M | M—In CCPS A SAUCERS — Br-.kla-l %  largei Cupe and Saucer* *l 5S ce Tea Cup*rut Saucer, at 3i centW Hutchlnaon ar Co. Ltd ri.mit.s iiAM.ms u...'. ( .'i % % % %  ,. hanger, from %  cent. earl, up AUo coliinrdil Plaitic Ladle*' llanaer. at *3 tSSr ..V' a W. HUTCHWSO*I* 0 Mil 30 1 5l-dn ""LADIES SPORT COATS PM iSSJ rvenlr.ga. Tawn. beige, wine and UUck MI a-oned .lae.. (MM. Modern Drew Shoppe H.I-M-4B. 1'IASTIC Psnoata, Raincoatt. Shower cap*. Apron*. Table Cloth*. Babl**' Paitie* Modern Drew Shoppe %  1 II — RlllHONS. Fealher.. Flo*c. Ilpp' Button*, Lace* a> Edge* In large variety at tea*onabl* price*. Modern Die*. PIANO—Uptight made by Jor mead Borta imakera for Ro 1 -xceilent condition al Ralph Beai ftoum. Hardwood Alley. Phone LIQUOR LICENSh NOTICE The ..p|.l.ti.,n of Mortimer Calender and EJdica Mcdulin of Hillaby. St. Thoma* for permMalon to *cll Spirit*. Walt Laquoi.. Ac al a boarded and galvantred *hop at Strong Hope St Thorns*. Dated tin. Itlh da< of Jaiuiarv lll TO—J. R. EDWAIt:: Police M*. %  • Sid. C WARD. NB-Tlii. application will he con-l(lired at a Licenamg Court to be held at Police Court, Dutrirt "D" on Wed • neiday the Tih day of FVbtuary 1H1 al J li tOW/kMM, LIQUOR LICENSE NOT1CK The opp.. i lime Lcwla of SpooneiKin. Bf Mlchaal for parn iflon to %  • %  II Spiriti, Man I.Minor*, gcc. |e it-.i. with *hedp^'l 1 **" 0 '** ***>"" "" %  s 'Daied thi. rth da uf Jai uaiy IftSt. "Whether there ever will be. 1* only %  remote pomibilit" noj i wrote in Sn article in Collier'* niiMtBZiiic. He ssirl he rererrtM In the bomb only lo illustrate how (<:<>.far the eountr> had drifted prior le Korea in its reliance "upon ont ind only on* means of proleciuiK tun t-minti'v. .mtl the furthering of Ihtpence of the world." I 'ntion of hydrogen and v.rapons baaed upon that jjpM'i"— il only n retimle MdMltty." tM wild. "Il is a possibility that mav well crow more remoto ralher than Ism" Earlier this month, noted sei•DM writer William Laurance. in book predfeied thul Ihe United rauld test Ihe hydroceii bemb this year nt Eniwetolt in the I'jcillc. Lilientiial's article eonccrr.i\i it self primonlv with the Question Tan the atom bomb bent Com: %  nil 111"" 1UHid that dropping aiom bombs on Russia would nut defeat the Soviet Union. It would gravely terriblv IPOUnd Itujsia, but not d> %  : %  he wrote. Nor would it alone prevent the Red Army from overrunninn and occupying Europe, wen if atom bombs were used In anticipation cf such an altack—the "preventive tr. Ulienthal maintained that the maiiir formula for victory, 'dropping an A-bomb," could rla*Tue efforts to atrengthen and DaUMdJ America's military defence*. He urged that America's Imme:rjmmc for peace **BVMIad btbuilt on a progranune uf pro ductiveness. Hi -aid that the usue. war or iv mr, was not a United Static division alone. It was possible that Russian il Chines.Igkfjdtri wonteti to pr*.; '.i!c i I.,-; Htr, "They may believe that now i< the lime to unleash the chaos and terror tltat their dogma teaches H necessary for their revolutionary M'lv" he added. "Il may be Uu'ivfuro that there la nothing to adjust, no concession*, no compromises lhat would change their pre-deterniniiii War with Russia would tie ter nbie. hinody, costly and rtsati breakinii, but if we must, w* MB nnd will fight."—Itruler ACCIDENT Floretta Hinds, a six schoolgirl from Arthur Hill SfhaM on her way home from school about 1205 p.m. yesterday was LBS iv.-.t in an accident with the molor ear M-1200 along Tweedside Road. St. Michael. She was taken |0 the Onci.il Hospital where she was treated and discharged. GOVERNMENT NOTICE B*B*C LONlMiN Ttie F.everidgo Commitlee. ment will shape the British Broadcasting Mr for the next the year.. j, |H) L-ard President of the V> I HoctiSOB U master ( % %  Mwaxds. Tini.iv.i I ci nerrned the future of sound Mtd lelevtstoti broadcast Ing in Rritain and in subsUnce B.C. monopoly of %  irol of rniiio passed tn I CorporB%  : ..r. by Royal Charter, from the] %  A new charter was granted IB* ten years, nt 1937. mw %  in IHI; 1'h. I ll dictate dkartr, Seven icvenmre. r*a> I control ThC tlM.mi;,!' L K iwo, l I $.s00 a vearIhe VlCO-1 ftl of the Royal \ %  I..M<-. latwd >.'.R00 a year; the i-em:.ininii live governors each no., .. %  .,! %  %  pn .. „ t Bli \\. lb i i HTA %  dBBBBB bj tinv f The ( iiri>oration has no capital Hs icvcmit* fMBMBl frOM In'''!-'' and publications and a Government grant fa iho >" Kurop.Mii sorvurs Lab liUUi.s MIwed tlu-re were 11.837.050 sound listeners al nnd 429.550 reel tie* i N ll |> ;i) •-' %  'I s s REFUSE LORRIES TOO EXPENSIVE the two modei partment of St I no) add le the number [Vpartment now h*.s They trill replaie two of the present nine lorilM whoat maintin.line hi DBBJI ('.nul '.mi .-xponsivi* It is expected that the remainmc • i laced by the modt'i lime to time. Ihe stdi-oeaie was Informed At the Depart-: %  !: rdaj r however will gMBtl) 0 utiibule t<> the sanitary arrangemei:' cleaner bringirx about of %  BBBBBK*" has a staff ol nearly 100 scavengers whose work it is to ke. p tha City clean. Of these M are sweepers and 15 operate a similar nun.i i These latter help in taking up the tefuse of! the streets Bfl tl,c tunnels Eight man four water cartg for flushing the streets nnd %  the draana Whan ihe refuse is coll' is laken to areas where it i' used for reclaiming purposesThe !> %  partaMfll is mi the Job every day i Mk. DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AND TRANSPORT Temporary Employment for Road Supervisors. Applications are Invited for temporary employment as Ro Supervisors In the Department of Highways and Transport. 2. Successful applicant, will be paid a forty-four t4s) hour ockly wage, based on the Covernmem Rates of Pay of SOc—Sftc. an hour for Supervisor! employed in the "Unestablished Staff" of the department, and fixed according to exiericnce and general suitability and merit. • 3. Candidates must be ible to rcid and write English, to keep correctly the Labour and Distribution Kolls, to let out. carry out aud measure up road work and perform My other duties in connection with road work as may be required of them by Ihe Director. 4. Candidates must at all times be prepared to promptly carryout the work of the department In accordance with such instructions as may be from time lo time given than by the Executive Engineer or other Officers of the department on Ins behalf. 5. Candidates should submit evidence lo show that they have some knowledge of road construction and repair work and LtnVt actually been in charge of labour and material employed on road work for which they were directly re i-onslblc. 6. Successful candidates will be lequlred to lie on the Job in time to start work each day at 7 a.m. and must not leave the Job until :ifter-work has stopped each day. 7. Sureearful eatididkates will be paid where necessary a bicycle Unveiling allowance of 3c. per mile for every mile after the fourth ile travelled each day to Ihe Job. 8. Applications, which should be made on forms obtainable from the Colonial Secretary's Office should be addressed lo the Director of Hinhwnyi and Transport, and will be accepted up to 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 31st Januarys IBM. ZO.1.51—3n. Canes Birrnt SIXTEEN ind a half acres of oea belonging to Mr. G. E. ud grow log %  i KUIKIPlantation, Christ Church hy fire which out 7 p-ni. on Wednesroliee and resident HVbl| In •i icl iii flKhl the flames but could not i-avt* the canes as the) BK had gone too far Into me SHIPPING NOTICES MIIMRItl. \ISTK\I.1A NEW ZEALAND MM!. LIMITED iMANZ IJNl> %  BQAB Q IO .i.luled to %  1 %  % %  -t Bar%  d..< nd atarrh, 1901 %  pn. veaeel **amp* *P*. > 10 -I '-irgu. Canto "C.-ri'iril un inrotagai lull. M %  MM TnuKtid %  %  I-land* rVRNK*kS wmiv K •>• TBBraMDi ItW I I i.TO, BAB \>>' The M V. "DAKBW I aecefl CarfO and Pa*ener> lor Bt la-la. Grenada, ai i Paat'iger* only tea St Vlwent. %  ,.: .,. BrgaBMsan Hat ma Te M V. "Carll*.*" %riU Ma** Carga ;nil Paa—ngen U.c M' i Net ii and St Kt"* D'a ot departure to bt notiSed H.W.I. 8CHOOSr.ll OTTNEKS ASSOCIATION. Inc. Telephone: ion Canadian National Steamships -ii: llliini SII 1-*DY BODNCT" "LADY NBLBON" "CAN CIIAUJX.NOEH" "1>DV HUDNEY" "I^DY Nr-iaroy" •CAM CllAl.IXNtir.HLADY HOUNIY S.lle Salla :-.- llallfa> 1? Jan I 1'.'. is r.1 M.r IS M*r a Ape IS Apr lit Arrlvee Salla an Barbadoa B.rt> -1 Jan IS Jan M J i in. is rab il I M Teb Mar 14 M.r Mar. Mai. II Apr 1 Apr n Apr IS Mar 11 Mai. 11 Api. 2? Apr soiiiiinin M. -I-AOY RODSIV" IAOV NiiauN* I.V'IY li 1-UlY NKI-SON" 1-%0Y RODNEY" Baibado* Bartoadea IS Fa* 11 l-eo art r.i I Mai BS Mar II Apr 1 Apr ID Mar 11 Ma.. >tlce. All vearl* law 7i ra GARDINER AUSTIN a. CO. LTD. Aient*. SKIRTS. HLOUn*. HO*T. — %  %  I>rc*a Shoppe S. I • %  •-**• STOCK INO SI aug' Fine Njloi rtocklngv V 14 Lndie* and chUdrari A-SU Sock*. M t cent. Modarn Pre*. Shoppa. •BAPPtR SWALLOW" Coll*piole SatlIng Bolt 11 It • l" by 4 B. *w complelc *.th sail, oar* etc. Bpecullr t-caied canvai to *ull Tropic*. Alao !. loutleer, foot oara. Apply Yo-mg. Ca. Coy. %  • I We hava lt Mcelved nice a*oHmcnl o| Bath Sponge*, al reaaonaei* price* KNIOlfT'S LTD. S*l"— PERSONAL The public are hereby notified that I im no longer re.pon.ible for n Ai.iia H.imphre> mee Oreaveai .l.bl nr debt, extracted bi her having f. lied tn be under my care and protection (rom Ihe llth dav Ol Deeamber ISM nirwr Ai.isTAni ML'MPIU'CY. Co CB-M. Removal Notite POGEBS BAPBER SALOON Beg lo Cmion-.er* that lhav will r>moving i.patairs J N Goddatd* •i. Building -Ntvt Doeti aa from the Bth Jaruatv 1SS1. 34 1 Tl-ln |XJS1M)N Judge John lUnatil.il told Ins VWslrtiinsli i"' 1 "'"' ,i UM riyht to let a room liiaiat, The Juda-tdi-miM^<-d Ell iicUott fur possession lv h.ndlord Mark hi'raon who CUIBMH* thai hll i"i.-. 11 %  i; uroarneni i %  • IdUni %  • roorn Rail claimed llml nil •Hfa had h>i Uuj room to ;• vloUi ork durniR Juditc lll.ir.'lo to %  •visit ih<* MII"I * wiiian net husbands" and gdVal thi ild. he said. Mt f"i lAafa husbands In eerlain ways, such as -.endini: for the plumber ir the iMiUer hurst, or Inviti' wmnrii Mendi in i' of laa*. WaOia I'rllillk pei' But ihey cmld not do such llni,t _i HJ 4IK. 4.1 I!. IllV\SAlLAVIIIIH\S USE PASSAGES TO EUROPE Contact Antilles Product!, Limited, Roseau, Domlnla., for sailing to Europe. The usual port! of roll arc Dublin, London, or Rotterdam. Single fare £70; usual reductions for children. Charles McEneamey & Co., Ltd. PYRAMID ALUMINIUM WARE Notice of Change( Nanir l CLAIBMONTE NATHANIFICt**B> harctofora ralKd and known. Us ON Of I I.WHMuNTt NATMA.N11" UUACKETT at raraaant of SIS Tmiot Avenue. BI>TIX. in trie Cilv nr of New York la Ihe L'nimi S itTlca Eaqulre and furmtrl' BriliHh We*t Indie jgjfcj gi.e public Notice lhat on IBlh da> o( April IBM I formalu ib*ohilel> renouncad. relinouialied iMndgnad the uat if Clairmonle Nathaniel blatkell AND I give further net** lhat by ileed-i-iil dated tha U. da> laso duly aiecuted and aite*te Brltlah Con*ulate Oaneral OflUVork in the United and fecorded in trie Regittiatlo" OftCl Of tha Island of Darbado* on the lltn day of Ma' laSO in Volume aSS Of Daed at Baga ** I formally MM nmouncad and abandoned the -al -,.• name of 'BUikett" and darUrad I bad aaaumed and adopted and landad iherceforlh upon aU oeteeie whalaoava-r to uaa and .ubaetlba name of Clalrmoiie Nathanial Clam ftead of Clalrmonta Nathaniel Blacke and *o at* lo be at all ti-i.e* then" ralttd. known and deacrtbed by the of Claumonla Nathaniel Clark *ciuOated thi* Mth day ol January 1B. Nathaniel Clark. U.te CUlrmonta Nathank-: I III WMSE. .. . lOI / ItllSI All amateur boxers are asked to report to the (Association's Heiid-quarters Mo'• wn. TKACTOBS (Sltcl Whrrb aim availiblc for PlMgB***) — AND — EAGLE SIX ,6 TONS TRAILKRS F.i|uipprd wilh Brakes (Thwr Trailer, are very Hii.:;. each SAUCEPANS (2',, 4, 7* 12 pi.)'.i s:i.s.ss.io. $f,.IO. Sc 88.82 each respectively For the Joys ol PERFECT COOKING 0*4 I'YltAMII) Al-l'MISIL'M WAKE Wm. FOGARTY Ltd.